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AccompE 



ATWOODftCD 



DOCUMENTS. 



Vol. I. 



No. 1 —Report of Secretary of State. 

2 — Secretary of State, as Insurance OommiBsioner- 

3 — State Treasurer. 

4 — School and University Land Commissioners. 

5 — Superintendent of Public Instruction- 
s' — Regents of State University. 

Vol. II. 

No. 6— Report of Trustees of Hospital for the Insane. 

7— Northern Hospital for the Insane. 

8 — . Institution for the Blind. 

9-. Institute for the Deaf and Dumb. 

1(V— Soldiers* Orphans' Home. 

11 — State Prison Commissioner. 

12 — Managers of Industrial School for Boys, 
la— State Board of Charities and Reform. 
14^ Commissioner of Immigration. 

15 — Adjutant General. j 



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I 
\ 

1 

4 



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DOCUMENT No. 6. 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORl 



OFTBK 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



Wisconsin State Hospital for t 

Insane, 



For tfu Fiscal Year f.nding September 30, 1873. 



I 



MADISON, WIS. : 

ATWOOD ft CULYER, FRmTKKS AND STEBS0TTPSR8. 

1872. 



1 



TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS. 



\' 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



F. J. BiiAiB, Milwaukee. 
Wm. R Tatlob, Cottage Grove. 
SiMBOir Mills, Madison. 
David Atwood, Madison. 
E. W. Young, Prairie du Sac. 



Term expires April 1, 1878. 

" 1, 1874. 
« " " 1, 1875. 

" " " 1. 1876. 

". " " 1, 1877. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 
DAVID ATWOOD, 

FBESEDENT. 

WM. R. TAYLOR, 

VICB-FBBSIDBHT. 

SIMEON MILLS, 

TRBASUREB. 

S. D. HASTINGS, 

SECBBTABT. 



AUDITIKa OOHHITTBE. 



E. W. YOUNG, Chairman. 
P. J. BLAIR, WM. R TAYLOR 



RESIDENT OFFICERS OF THE HOSPITAL. 



A. 8. McDILL, M. D., 

6UFBBIirrEl!n>BNT. 

R. M. WIGGINTON, M. D., 

FIB8T AB8ISTAI7T PHY8ICIA1T. 

D. R. BOYNTON, M. D., 

SECOBD ASSISTANT PHYSICIAN. 



MRS. M. C. HALLIDAY, 

KATBON. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency, C. C. Washbubn, 

Governor of the State of Wisconsin: 

The thirteenth annual report of the Trustees of the Wiscon- 
sin State Hospital for the Insane, is herewith submitted. 

The number of patients at the commencement of the year was 
three hundred and fifty-five ; the number admitted during the 
year, one hundred and sixty-six, making a total of five hundred 
and twenty-one under treatment during the year. The number 
discharged, including those who have died, was one hundred and 
forty-eight, leaving in the hospital on the 30th day of Septem- 
ber, 1872, three hundred and seventy-three. 

The daily average number in the hospital during the year 
was three hundred and sixty-five. 

For further particulars as to the movements of the hospital 
population, the results of the treatment, and for hospital statistics 
of all kinds, we would respectfully refer to the report of the 
Superintendent, herewith presented, and its accompanying 
tables. 

The importance of enlarged accommodations for the insane, 
was discussed at considerable length in our report of 1870, and 
again briefly alluded to in our report of 1871. We are more 
than ever convinced of the correctness of the views then pre- 
sented, and we would earnestly call the attention of the legisla- 
ture and the people to the facts and suggestionss contained in 
the accompanying report of the Superintendent on this subject. 

We regard the views presented by the Superintendent as 
sound, and as worthy of the most careful consideration of those 



6 

upon whom rests the responsibilty of caring for the unfortu- 
nate insane of the state. 

On the 8th of August last, the laundry, with*all its machinery 
was destroyed by fire, the fire also destroying the wooden building 
attached to the coal house adjoining the boiler house, used for 
storing coal, with seventy-five tons of coal, that were in it at 
the time, and also seriously damaging the boilers and the con- 
necting steam-pipes. 

The exigencies of the case demanded immediate action in 
order to keep the hospital running, and to provide for the repair 
of the boilers and renewal of of the steam pipes, before the ap- 
proach of cold weather, as without this there would be no way 
to save the inmates of the hospital from suffering. 

The trustees were called together when it was decided to pro- 
ceed at once to rebuild and enlarge the laundry, repair the 
boilers and connecting steam pipes, rebuild the coal house, to 
erect a new smoke stack, and to purchase new machinery for the 
laundry, and Messrs. Simeon Mills and David Atwood were ap- 
pointed a committee to superintend the erection and repair of 
the buildings, and in connection with Dr. McDill, to purchase 
new machinery for the laundry. 

At a recent meeting of the Trustees, the Building Committee 
reported as follows : 

" That in pursuance of authority given by the Trustees for 
that purpose, your committee commenced the work of repairing 
and rebuilding the engine-house and laundry, by repairing so 
much thereof as was found practicable, and rebuilding anew 
and enlarging such parts thereof as could not be repaired. The 
greater part of the repairing was of such nature and in such 
condition that to let it by contract was not regarded advisable. 

" The work has, therefore, much of it, been done by the pur- 
chase of materials and the employment of mechanics and labor- 
ers to do the work by the day. 

^' The walls of the east boiler room and coal house were dam- 
aged beyond repair, and the rebuilding of the same on the 
enlarged plan, prepared by Mr. Klerke and adopted by the 



Board at its special meeting, has been let by contract to the 
lowest bidders. The carpenter and joiner work, including ma- 
terials, was awarded to Mr. H. N. Moulton, at the sum of two 
thousand nine hundred and fifty dollars ; and the mason work, 
for the building and smoke stack, including materials, except 
iron, and not including plastering, was let to Mr. James Liv* 
sey, for the sum of seven thousand and ninety-five dollars. 

" Notwithstanding some unavoidable delays have occurred in 
the delivery of materials, the work is in such state of advance- 
ment, we think, as to insure its completion by the last of 
November. The Superintendent, with the approval of your 
committee, has purchased machinery and fixtures for the laun- 
dry, which are now being put in place as fast as practicable. 

'' Immediately after the fire occurred in August last, the esti- 
mated loss which it was supposed the institution sustained was 
about ten thousand dollars. By reason of the worn condition 
of much of the machinery, the actual loss may not have ex- 
ceeded that amount; yet, while the cost of r-epairs and re-con- 
struction of the building — enlarged and improved as it has 
been — and the replacing of the washing apparatus and ma- 
chinery with the newest and most approved patterns now in 
use, will necessarily much exceed the estimated loss, your com- 
mittee believe that the money thus laid out has been judiciously 
expended, and that a thorough investigation of the whole 
expenditure will show, that the work done and the machinery 
purchased was of such obvious necessity as to command the 
hearty approval of the legislature and the people of the state. 

" Respectfully submitted, 

" Simeon Mills, 
" David Atwood, 

" Building Committee.^^ 

The size of the old building that has been repaired is sixty 
feet by thirty-eight, and the addition built to it is seventy feet 
by forty-eight. 

In the basement of the old building, there is the engine 
room, the fan room, and a room for the use of the blacksmith 
and engineer in repairing machinery and iron work. 



8 

In the basement of the new building, is the boiler room, now 
of convenient size and well arranged — something that has been 
very much needed for a long time. 

Adjoining the boiler room is a new coal house, sixty-four feet 
by thirty, and in the angle east of the boiler house is the new 
smoke stack which is one hundred and fifteen high above the 
top of the boilers. 

The basement rooms are on a level with the ground on the 
lower side of the building, and the rooms above are on a level 
with the ground on the upper side, the building being located 
on a side hill. 

On the upper floor in the old building is the wash room, the 
drying room and a soap room, and on the upper floor in the new 
building is the ironing room, a room for heating the sad irons, 
and a dressing for the women who work in the laundry. 

The machinery in the laundry is of the newest and most ap- 
proved patterns, and we are satisfied that when it is completed 
we shall have one of the most convenient and best arranged 
laundries in the country. 

The entire cost of the repairs on the old building, the erect- 
ing of the new building, the new coal house and smoke stack, 
and the new machinery in the laundry, will be about $24,000; 
we cannot give the exact figures as some of the plastering and 
other work is still incomplete, but it cannot vary but a few dol- 
lars from the amount stated. 

Some valuable improvements have been made during the past 
year. 

The wooden floors in the bath rooms and water closets in the 
old female wards have been removed, and replaced with marble 
tiling; the new barn has been completed; the wards and center 
building have been repainted; the airing court for the women 
has been much enlarged; a permanent road seven hundred feet 
in length has been built, connecting the main land with the 
island in the lake ; a sidewalk to the depot of the Northwestern 
Railroad has been put down, a distance of about three-fourths 
of a mile; over two miles of post and board fence have been 
built, and the new main steam pipe in its place. 



9 

There is pressing necessity for some few improvements during 
the coming year, among which we willname, 

First. A suitable building for a carpenter and work shop. 
The only place that has ever been used for this purpose is a 
room in the basement of the center building. In these days of 
fires, prudence would dictate the speedy removal of the com- 
bustible and inflammable material, which always accumulates in 
such a place. To erect a suitabla building for this purpose, the 
sum of twenty-five hundred dollars will be required. 

Second, A supply of hose is needed, and proper connections 
made with the large pumps, so that in the case of fire, the 
means for putting it out would be at hand in an effective shape. 
An appropriation of one thousand dollars would be needed for 
this object. 

Third. The recent fire has developed the necessity of a 
greater supply of water. Although the supply has been suffi- 
cient for the ordinary use of the institution, it accumulates so 
slowly in the large well, that in case of an emergency like a 
fire, the supply would be very soon exhausted, and great loss 
might result as a consequence. 

The supply may be increased by a direct communication with 
the lake or by enlarging and deepening the well. 

To accomplish this object, an appropriation of $2,000 would 
be required. 

The amount needed for the support of the hospital, for the 
ensuing year, will be as follows: 

For the support of patients, including current 
expenses, clothing for patients, and ordinary 
repairs, as set forth in detail in Superintend- 
ent's report, to January 1, 1874 $80,000 00 

Add for three months, to April 1st — in accord- 
ance with the recommendation of the State 
Board of Charities and Reform, so that the 
annual appropriations for all the state institu- 
tions may cover the same period of time, and 
80 that the new appropriation may be availa- 
ble by the time the old one is exhausted 20,000 00 

♦100,000 00 



10 

For repairs on laundry and boiler rooms, and 

additions thereto, including new coal house 

and smoke stack 24,000 00 

For carpenter and work shop 2, 500 00 

For hose and connections ' 1, 000 00 

For increasing supply of water 2,000 00 

♦120,500 00 
To meet this expenditure, there will be received 
the amount charged to counties, for mainten- 
ance of patients, clothing, etc |29,552 90 

Amount that will be received from friends of 
patients for maintenance and clothing, esti- 
mated at 3,500 00 

33,052 90 

Leaving tlie amount for which an appropria- 
tion will be needed from the State Treasury $96. 447 10 

The appropriation made last year for the erection of an ice 
house is still unexpended. Owing to the great demand for 
labor in the repair and enlargement of the laundry and boiler 
house, it was found difficult to get the work on the ice house 
done. Of the appropriation for the purchase of live stock, but 
a small part has been used. The unused portion of this appro- 
priation and the amount appropriated for the ice house, have 
been temporarily used to meet payments on the laundry that 
could not be deferred. When the appropriation for the repair 
and enlargement of the laundry and boiler house is received 
from the State Treasury, the money will be in hand to build the 
ice house and complete the purchase of live stock. 

We would again respectfully urge the importance of an en- 
largement of the Hospital by the addition of two wings, one at 
each end of the building. 

We ask this. 

Fir at. Because there is need of the additional room to 
accommodate the hundreds of insane who are now in the jails 
and poor-houses of the State, suffering for the want of suitable 
accommodations aed proper care, and others who are with their 
friends, who have the same claim upon the State as have those 
who are already provided for. 

Second, Because, to put on the two wings asked for, will be 
but to complete the building according to the original design 



11 

and furnish opportunity for more extensive claBsifioation of the 
patients, something that is very much needed to secure the suc- 
cess of the institution in the restoration of the patients. 

Third, Because, when completed, with the two new wings 
it will have no more wings, and no more extended means of 
classification than will be had at the new hospital at Oshkosh, 
when that is completed. 

The necessity of this enlargement has been felt and acknowl- 
edged for several years. The legislative visiting committee in 
their report to the legislature in 1871, strongly urged the im- 
portance of the proposed enlargement, and recommended an 
appropriation of ninety thousand dollars for its accomplishment. 
The legislative visiting committee of 1872, in their report to 
the legislature, say, '' We believe the ultimate plan of our hos- 
pital accommodations should embrace the two additional wings 
asked for this hospital, and the full completion of the Oshkosh 
Hospital according to the plan of that structure." 

A minority of the committee were in favor of recommending 
an appropriation at that time for the erection of the two wings, 
but the majority chose to make no recommendation, but to 
leave the matter to the judgment of the legislature. 

The necessity of the enlargement seems to be admitted on all 
hands: the only question is, when shall it be done? 

We are aware that the finances of the state will not admit of 
its being done during the coming year, but we would respect- 
fully urge the passage of a law at the approaching session of 
the legislature, authorizing the erection of the two wings asked 
for, the money to be raised in the tax of 1873, or if necessary, 
one-half of the amount in 1873 and the balance in 1874. 

We cannot close our report, without calling attention to a 
matter so appropriately alluded to by the Superintendent in his 
report, viz: the death of Dr. Edward G. Marshall, who until the 
20th of March last, the day of his death, occupied the place of 
first assistant physician of the hospital. 

Dr. Marshall was a man who was respected and beloved by all 
who knew him. He was especially adapted and qualified for 
the work in which he was engaged. He loved his profession 



12 

and was especially devoted to that branch of it to which his 
attention had been given during the last five or six years of his 
life. The manner of his intercourse with those around him was 
such as to secure the esteem and confidence of not only the 
employes of the hospital but in an especial manner that of the 
patients. In his death the institution met with a great loss, a 
loss that has been felt, not only by every trustee, officer and 
employe, but by nearly every patient in the hospital. 

In the report of the Superintendent, we receive the not un- 
expected notice of his resignation, to take effect in the month of 
February. He leaves us to take his seat in the 4:3d Congress, 
as the representative of the eighth congressional district. He 
will enter upon new and important duties, but not more ardu- 
ous or responsible than those he leaves. Gladly would we have 
retained him with us, but as he has chosen this new sphere of 
labor, we can ask nothing better for him than that his labors 
may be as satisfactory and successful there as they have been 
here. His loss from the hospital will be deeply regretted by all 
connected with the institution. 

The post of first assistant physician is now filled by Dr. R. 
M. Wigginton, who for three years occupied the place of sec- 
ond assistant. He left the hospital some time since to engage 
in private practice, but on the death of Dr. Marshall he was 
invited to take the place of first assistant, and his acceptance of 
the invitation was a source of gratification to all concerned. 

The post of second assistant physician has been acceptably 
filled since April last by Dr. D. R. Boughton, of Northfield, 
Michigan. 

The other resident officers of the hospital remain as they were 
at the date of our last report, and we take pleasure in express- 
ing our confidence in the faithful manner in which all are dis- 
charging their respective duties. 

Respectfully submitted on behalf of the Trustees. 

Madison, October, 1872. 

DAVID ATWOOD, 

PresidenC. 
Sam'l D. Hastinqs, 

Secretary. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Wisconsin State Hospital for the Insane: 
Gentlemen : — In compliance with the law governing the 
Hospital, the following report of its operations during the past 
year is respectfully submitted for your consideration : 





Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Number of patients at the commencement of the 
vear 


173 
92 


182 
74 


355 


Admitted durinir the vear 


148 






Whole number treated 


265 

83 


256 
65 


512 


Discharfired and have died 


148 






Remaining Sept. 30, 1872 


182 


191 


373 







Daily average number in the hospital 365 



Of the one hundred and forty-eight discharged, there were : 



Recovered. . 
Improved . . 
Unimproved 
Died 



Males. 



34 
19 
19 
11 



Fem. 



26 

7 

18 
14 



83 



65 



lotal. 



60 
26 
37 
25 



148 



Of the twenty-six discharged improved, most of them could 
be comfortably cared for at their homes; and some of them 
undoubtedly would have recovreed had their residence in the 



14 

hospital been prolonged. Those discharged as unimproved were 
mostly chronic cases of many years' duration, whom we were 
compelled to return to the county authorities, to be cared for, 
that room might be obtained in the hospital for the treatment 
of recent and more hopeful cases. 

Death occurred in eight cases, from exhaustion, the result of 
long continued maniacal excitement. In six, from paralysis — 
five males and one female; in five, from consumption — ^all fe- 
males; and in one case each, from exhaustion from acute mania, 
enteritis, epilepsy, dropsy, disease of the heart, and one from 
suicide. 

Of those admitted during the year, one hundred and thirty- 
two were admitted for the first time to a hospital. Six had been 
inmates of other hospitals, and twenty-eight were re-admissions 
of patients who had, in previous years, been discharged from 
this hospital. Of these, twenty-three were received for the sec- 
ond time, two for the third, one for the fifth, one for the sixth, 
and one for the eleventh time — ^this was a case of oinomania. 
Thirteen had previously recovered. 

As usual, a large proportion of those admitted were broken 
down in general health ; one-third of them were cases of chronic 
insanity, that promised little hope of being benefitted by treat- 
ment; three were parietics; two were subjects of epileptic 
seizures. A number were suffering from tubercular disease of 
the lungs, three of whom were in the advanced stage. Seven 
of those admitted died within the year; three were brought in 
a condition of extreme exhaustion, and died within a week after 
their admission. For more precise information regarding the 
operations of the hospital during the year, as well as from its 
organization, you are respectfully referred to the tables annexed 
to this report. 

During the year just passed, the customary succession of 
events incident to a hospital for the insane, have been witnessed 
here. And although furnishing but little, if anything to be 
ohronicled, worthy of special mention. Still I may venture to 
believe the rightful purposes for which this institution was ere* 
ated, have been pursued with a fair measure of success. If we 



15 

have a right to think that the means of restoration within our 
control, which has been taught us by the progress of knowledge 
and the experience of years, hare been faithfully used; that as 
much of comfort has been obtained for our patients, and as 
much discomfort avoided as was possible under existing circum- 
stances, then may we not be dissatisfied with the result of our 
labors for the year. 

In my previous reports I have urged the necessity, for more 
extended provisions by the State, for the care of the insane, and 
for the completion of this hospital according to its original plan, 
by the erection of two wings for the use of patients and an ad- 
dition to the centre building for an enlarged kitchen and rooms 
for the use of the employes not engaged in the care of patients; 
and the experience of the past year has added strength to the 
belief heretofore expressed. Nor will the completion of that 
part of the new hospital at Oshkosh, now under contract, meet 
the requirements of this most unfortunate of the dependent 
classes. The report of the State Board of Charities and Re- 
forms for 1871, show that there was on the 1st of December, 
1871, two hundred and thirty-one insane persons in the poor- 
houses and jails of the State; since then, thirty-six patients have 
been sent from this hospital to swell that niunber, and there is 
now on file seventy-six applications made within the past year 
for admission into this hospital for patients who could not be 
admitted for want of room. Besides this, the number now in 
this hospital is much greater than can be safely maintained 
without greatly imperilling the health and comfort of the patients 
as well as those engaged in their immediate care. 

Various sources of atmospheric contamination exist in every 
hospital. In almost every ward will be found some who are the 
subjects of offensive physical disease, and the natural propen- 
sity of the insane to habits of uncleanliness, even under the 
most watchful supervision, manifests itself in ways innumerable. 
To this may be added the physiological fact that the persons o^ 
many of the insane, when in a state of high excitement, exhale 
an effluvium at once pungent, penetrating and almost ineradica- 
ble. It is also a well established fact that the more depraved 



^ 16 

and noxious the air becomes, the less movable it is. The air of 
a hospital, even were it not deprived of its vitalizing properties 
by being breatheil over and over again, these sources of contam- 
ination would be sufficient in a short time to render it unfit for 
healthful respiration. The deplorable consequences of this state 
of existence are but too apparent to the observant physician, 
not so much in its immediate results as in the slow constitu- 
tional deterioration of all who are for a long period subject to 
its contaminating influences. The vital energies are gradually 
impaired, the step loses its elasticity, the cheek its fresh tints, 
the eye its expression, and the whole countenance bears witness 
to the physical lassitude that has taken the place of all the nat- 
ural forces of the individual. But it is chiefly in certain latent 
consequences, that are not usually revealed to the eye, that the 
insiduous poison of a vitiated atmosphere manifests its opera- 
tion. The system becomes imperceptibly disarmed of that con- 
servative force by which the inroads of disease are averted. 
Mild forms of disease assume a malignant character, or readily 
pass inUy the typhoid state, trivial wounds, or mere abrasions of 
the skin become erysipelatous, abscesses form without apparent 
cause, which are slow in maturing and healing. The vital func- 
tions are imperfectly performed, the nutrition of the system is 
impaired, and that poverty of the constitutional forces which the 
physicians term the " cachectic state," sooner or later prostrates 
the healthiest system when for a long period it is subjected to 
the inhalations of the subtle miasms of an over-crowded hos- 
pital. 

This unfortunate condition incident to an over-crowded hos- 
pital, i/fas in some measure experienced by us during the past 
year. In the months of January, February and March, erysip- 
elas, though of a mild type, but evidently the result of this 
vitiated condition of the atmosphere in the wards, caused by 
over-crowding, prevailed among our patients, having had during 
those months about twenty cases, only one of which proved 
fatal. The most of the cases recovered rapidly, under a tonic 
and invigorating medication, conjoined with a liberal, nutricious 



17 

diet, when removed from the vitiated atmosphere of the wards 
and placed in airy and well-ventilated apartments. 

As the rigors of our climate, during the winter months, com- 
pel us to keep our patients within doors most of this period. 
And to obviate, as far as possible, a recurrence of the condition 
which existed last winter, I have deemed it my duty to request 
the removal of a number of patients having a residence in those 
counties which have an excess above their quota in the hospital. 
In most instances this request has been promptly complied with. 
Some have protested against the removal of patients to their 
counties, saying they have no possible way to care for them, 
and others have paid no attention to the request. 

Unless otherwise directed by your Board, I shall deem it my 
duty to insist on the removal of such patients as are not likely 
to be benefitted by hospital treatment, from those counties 
which now have a greater number in the hospital than they are 
entitled to have maintained here. However much I may regret 
the necessity which impels me to return any one of the patients 
now under my charge to the poor-house or the common jail, for 
custodial care. But a due regard for the health and com- 
fort of those who shall remain, especially those whom are 
deemed curable, or likely to be benefitted by treatment in this 
hospital — as well as for those who are engaged in their imme- 
diate care — ^require that we should not permit this over-crowded 
condition to continue. When we remember the fact that a hos- 
pital for the insane, is to a large body of its inmates a place of 
absolute confinement, notwithstanding many may be engaged 
as laborers in the fields, or as as assistants in the domestic 
affairs of the institution, and under favorable circumstance, a 
large majority may be participants in walks and rides, it never- 
theless holds true, that taking our patients as an entire body, 
seven-eights of the time spent at the institution, — nights of 
course being included in the calculation, — is spent in its wards, 
and behind a lock and key. Hence, it may be gravely ques- 
tioned, whether those who are entrusted with the responsibility 
of caring for and protecting the inmates of an institution of this 
kind, as well as those charged with the duty of making provis- 
a— Wis. Hos. Doc. 6.) 



18 

ions for their care, are not truly criminal, when under the pre- 
text of doing good, they impose restraints and conditions on a 
helpless and unfortunate class, without at the same time care- 
fully providing all the conditions requisite for a healthful physi- 
cal existence. This question must be met in all its important 
bearings, by those who are charged with the duty of providing 
institutions for the care and treatment of the insane. And 
costly and expensive as such provisions may appear, they are 
simply what humanity demands of the representatives of the 
people of this great and growing state in which we live. 

The emberassi^ents incident to an over crowded hospital has 
been so frequently experienced by those engaged in the care 
and treatment of the insane, that it led the Association of Med- 
ical Superintendents of American Institutions for the Insane at 
their meeting in May last in this city, to unanimously adopt the 
following resolutions: 

'^ Mesolvedy That this Association regards the custom of ad- 
mitting a greater nnmber of patients than the building can 
properly accommedate, which is now becoming so common in 
Hospitals for the Insane in nearly every section of the country, 
as an evil of great magnitude, productive of extraordinary dan- 
gers, subversive of the good order, perfect dicipline and greatest 
usefulness of these institutions and of the best interests of the 
Insane. 

^^Hesolvedj That this Association having repeatedly affirmed 
its well -matured convictions of the humanity, expediency and 
economy of every state makeing ample provision for all its Insane, 
regards it as an important means of affecting this object, that 
these Institutions should be kept in the highest state of ef- 
ficiency, and the difference in the condition of patients treated 
in them and those kept in alms houses, jails or even private 
houses, be thus most clearly demonstrated. 

" Iiesolv9dj That while fully recognizing the great suffering 
and serious loss that must result to individuals by their exclu- 
sion from hospitals, when laboring under an attack of insanity, 
this association fully believes that the greatest good will result 



19 

to the largest number, and at the earliest day, by the adoption 
of the course now indicated. 

^' Hesolvedy That the boards of management of the di£Ferent 
hospitals on this continent, be urged most earnestly, to adopt 
such measures as will effectually prevent more patients being 
admitted into their respective institutions than in the opinions 
of their superintendents can be treated with the greatest 
efficiency, and without impairing the wellfare of their fellow 
sufferers." 

The only proper remedy for such a condition is increased 
accommodations by the State for the treatment and care of the 
insane; and to this subject your earnest and thoughtful consid- 
eration is invited. 

On the morning of the 8th of August, a fire was discovered 
in the wooden building, adjoining the boiler house, used for 
storing coal. When first discovered, not only the building but 
the whole pile of coal, containing about seventy-five tons, was 
enveloped in the flames. The fire rapidly extended to the 
engine house and laundry, destroying the upper portion of 
these buildings and the entire laundry machinery. 

The work of re-construction and procuring new machinery, 
to replace what was destroyed by the fire, being under the. 
direction of a building committee of your board, whose report 
will furnish a detailed statement of the work now being done. 

For the fiscal year ending September 30, 1872, bills have 
been audited for which orders have been drawn on the treasury 
for the current expenses, and for such other purposes as were 
contemplated by the legislature in their last appropriation for 
the use of the hospital, together with such expenditures for 
repairs of damages by the fire as have been audited, amounting 
to $105,975 78. 

Os this amount there was expended for the current expenses 
of the hospital, including ordinary repairs to the build- 
ings and heating apparatus, bedding, furniture and cloth- 
ing for patients, the sum of $86,770 66 

Completion of new bam 2,3M 88 

Lumber for side-walks, airing courts, and fencing for new 
farm 2,015 16 

Boad to island . , 802 22 



20 

Furniture for centre building 1,50000 

Oils, paints and painting 2,764 46 

New steam pipe 2,430 20 

Tileing bath-rooms and water closets 73o 20 

Live stock 359 CO 

New carriage 550 00 

W. J. 8mith, houses 200 00 

Jas. Ready, 15 acres land 1 ,500 00 

Mrs. Lyon, 10 aeresof land 1 ,000 00 

M. King, 10 acres of land 1,006 60 

New laundry and repairs of damages caused by fire 2,477 10 

1105,975 78 



A classified detailed statement of expenditures for all purpo- 
ses will be found annexed to this report. 

I have received during the year : 

For maintenance of patients $2, 873 65 

For clothing furnished, etc 1,034 81 

For hides, pelts, etc 1,041 91 

For sundries 519 64 

Total , $5,470 01 

"Which has been paid to the treasurer. 

Under the provision of chap. 176, general laws of 1872,1 have 
charged to the several counties and certified to the Secretary of 
State as therein provided, for the year ending Sept. 30, 1872: 

For maintenance of patients |24, 814 87 

For clothing furnished patients 4,644 63 

For patients' expenses home 93 00 

Total $29,552 90 

For the year ending Sopt<jml:)er 30th, 1873, for the ordinary 
current expenses and repairs, the following sums will be needed: 

Subsistence $24,000 00 

Salaries ana wages 23,000 cO 

Fuel 10,000 00 

Farm and barn expenses 2,500 00 

Drugs, medicines and liquors 1,500 00 

Lights and oil 1,200 00 

Amusements and enterUiiniiieu's 500 00 

Papers, periodicals, static »n«rv und postage 600 00 

Bedding and furniture 5,000 00 

Clothing for patients 6,000 00 

Repairs to building and hcatiu^r ,ii>purMtus 5,000 00 

Trustees and Visiting Coninuui •• rxjx uses 700 00 

$80,000 00 



21 

To meet this expenditure for the next fiscal year, there will be 
collected for amount charged to counties $29, 552 90 

Estimated amount will be received from patients for maintain- 
anceand clothing 8,600 00 

Appropriation for 46,947 10 

$80,000 00 



This amount is exclusive of such sums as may be needed for 
permanent improvements or new structures, as may be recom- 
mended by your board. Among the most pressing wants of 
the institution is the erection of a suitable building for a car- 
penter and general work shop. Ever since the erection of the 
hospital the carpenter and general repair shops, with all their 
accumulation of combustible and inflammable materials, have 
been in the basement of the centre building; ordinary prudence 
would indicate an early removal. For the erection of a suitable 
building for this purpose, a sum of two thousand and five hun- 
dred dollars will be required. 

I would also recommend that a quantity of hose be procured, 
and such connections made with the large pumps as will insure 
their efficient use in case of fire. For this purpose the sum of 
fifteen hundred dollars will be required. 

During the past two years the supply of water, though suffi- 
cient for the ordinary use of the institution; but it accumulates 
so slowly in the large well that in case of fire, requiring the use 
of a large quantity of water in a short time, the supply would 
be quickly exhausted, and some measures should be taken to 
increase the supply, either from the lake, or by deepening and 
enlarging the well. 

During the year just closed we have had nearly the entire 
part of the building occupied by patients repainted, and such 
other repairs made as were necessary for the preservation of the 
building. In the old female wards the wooden floors in the 
bath rooms and water closets have been removed and replaced 
by marble tiling, which is supported on brick arches. A side- 
walk to the depot of the Northwestern Railroad has been put 
down, a distance of about three-fourths of a mile. Over two 
miles of post and board fence have been built. A permanen 



22 

road, seven hundred feet in length, has been built across that 
portion of the' lake intervening between the main land and the 
island. 

Other works of improvement have been steadily carried on 
during the year. Such as clearing on the new farm, taking out 
stumps, stones, etc., on the old farm. The principal part of 
this work, as well as the work on the farm and garden, has been 
done by patients. 

The product of the farm and garden, although not so abun- 
dant as in previous years, on account of the long continued 
drouth of the past summer, are still sufficient to well repay the 
labor bestowed on their cultivation, and furnish our household 
with a supply of necessary articles which would be difficult to 
procure from any other source. Besides this, it has furni3hed 
useful employment for a large class of patients that would else 
have gone unemployed. 



23 

The farmer has furnished me with the subjoined list of the 
productions of the farm and garden, with the cost of conduct- 
ing them. 



462 

1,420 

1,280 

125 

50 

40 

500 

1,082 

75 

1,564 

275 

80 

40 

85 

200 

25 

10 

75 

50 

500 

1 

8,000 

500 

64 

5 

25 

17, 010 

7,260 

881 



busb. 
busb. 
busb. 
tons, 
tons, 
tons, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
bush, 
lbs., 
ton., 
heads 
heads 

falls, 
bis. 
bush, 
lbs., 
lbs., 
lbs.. 



29,289 qts.. 
52 head. 



Wheat 

Oats 

Com 

Tame Hay 

Straw 

Com stalks . . 

Potatoes. 

Carrots 

Early Turnips 

Flat Turnips 

Beets 

Parsnips 

Beans 

Sweet Corn 

Tomatoes 

Green Beans 

Green Peas 

Onions 

Apples 

Grapes 

Pie plant 

Cabbage 

Cauliflower 

Maple Sugar 

Vinegar 

Strawberries 

Pork (live weight) 

Stock Hogs 

Veal 

Asparagus, Lettuce, Cucumbers, Cur- 

rants, etc 

Milk 

Cattle pastured 



Total 



$1 80 

25 

85 

10 00 

400 

400 

45 

85 

40 

80 

80 

40 

850 

40 



1 
1 
1 
1 



00 

00 

00 

50 

45 

10 

40 

5 

8 

1 00 

10 00 

4 80 

400 

8 00 

8 



5 
14 00 



Cost of feeding cows 

manual labor 

team labor (|1 per day) 

feedine teams 

board ror manual labor < 

seeds of all kinds 

blacksmithing 

tools, implements and repairs. 



$868 80 
646 89 
415 50 
468 60 
864 00 
199 14 
89 70 
218 46 



$562 60 

855 00 

420 60 

1,250 00 

200 00 

160 00 

225 00 

861 20 

80 00 

469 20 

82 60 

82 00 

140 00 

84 00 

200 00 

25 00 

10 00 

112 50 

22 60 

50 00 

40 00 

150 00 

40 00 

64 00 

60 00 

120 00 

680 40 

216 00 

80 48 

200 00 

1,464 00 

728 00 



$8,554 80 



$8,271 09 
$5,288 71 



The Matron reports the following list of articles made in the 
house daring the year, in addition to the mending and repairing 
for the whole house: 

Dresses 284 

Skirts 58 

Night gowns 60 

Chemises 79 

Women^s drawers 88 

Men's drawers 188 

Men's cotton flannel shirts 165 

Hickory shirts 180 

Bosom shirts 2 

Bed spreads 48 

Aprons 10 

Sheets 519 

Pillowslips 605 

Tablecloths 49 

Carpets 6 

Horse blankets 4 

Holders 12 

Mittens, pairs 43 

Mittens with buckles, pairs 9 

Straw ticks 195 

Pillows 73 

Roller towels 166 

Hand towels 188 

Dish towels 602 

Table napkins 120 

Camesoles 8 

Pants and waists 2 

Suspenders 326 

Handkerchiefs 144 

Sun bonnets 87 

No. of pieces 4,250 



The publishers of the following papers will accept thanks for 
gratuitous copies furnished the hospital. Their arrival was 
always anxiously looked for by patients from the^locality where 
they were published : 

Green Bay Advocate. 
Fond du Lao Commonwealth. 
Waupun Leader. 
Brandon Times. 
Watertown Democrat. 
Watertown Republican. 
Jefferson Banner. 
Sheboygan Times. 



/ 

Richland County Bepublican. 

La Crosse Republican and Leader. 

Chippewa Herald. 

Portage Register. 

Janesville Gazette. 

Beloit Free Press. 

Racine Journal. 

Racine Advocate. 

Burlington Standard. 

Monroe Sentinel. 

Kenosha Telegraph. 

Grant County Herald. 

Dodgeville Chronicle. 

Waukesha Plaindealer. 

Waukesha Freeman. 

Journal of Education. 

Maine State Press. 

Since our last report, death for the first time, has invaded the 
circle of our associates. On the 20th of March, 1872, Dr. 
Edward G. Marshall, First Assistant Physician in this hospital, 
was removed by death. The two years previous to his death, 
he had been one of the resident officers of this hospital, where 
he labored with a zeal and fidelity exceeded by no one, in the 
discharge of the arduous duties of that position. 

Dr. Marshall was ardently devoted to his profession, and with 
high professional attainments, though quiet and unpretending, 
he was possessed in no small degree witn that energy and 
force of will which alone will enable a man to accomplish great 
restdts. Called away in the prime of a vigorous manhood, 
when he had but just fully commenced a life of great usefulness 
and rich in promise, there is something inexpressibly sad in his 
removal. 

Dr. R. M. Wiggington, who for near three years had accept- 
ably filled the office of Second Assistant Physician, left the ser- 
vices of the hospital in December last, to engage in private 
practice, returned to the hospital on the first of May last, to fill 



26 

the place of First Assistant Physician, made vacant by the 
death of Dr. Marshall. 

On the first of January last, Dr. W. R. Page of Chicago, was 
appointed to the place of Second Assistant Physician, but left 
the services of the hospital 'in April, to resume his former 
business, and D. R. Boughton, M. D., of Northfield, Mich- 
igan, was appointed Second Assistant Physician, which he con- 
tinues to fill acceptably. As required by your by-laws, I hereby 
nominate Dr. R. M. Wiggington for the office of First Assist- 
ant Physician, and Dr. D. R. Boughton for the office of Second 
Assistant Physician, and respectfully ask a confirmation and 
approval of their respective nominations. 

It is now nearly four and one-half years, since with hesitancy 
and distsust of my ability to satisfactorily discharge the respon- 
sibilities pertaining thereto, I assumed the duties of superin- 
tendent of this hospital. The exact measure of success thus 
far obtained under my administration, is not for me to esti- 
mate. But I trust it may not be deemed improper to recount, 
in part, what has been accomplished, and the changes which 
have occurred during this period. 

Since we have taken charge of the hospital, two hundred 
acres of valuable land have been purchased, all of which has 
been fenced, and over one-half of it has been cleared of every 
obstruction which would interfere with a high degree of culti- 
vation. A large and commodious farm barn, and other outbuild- 
ings have been erected, and the quantity of stock on the farm 
has been doubled; one and one-quarter miles of sidewalk has 
been put down, for the use of the . institution, the first ever 
built for the accommodation of patients. Trees have been 
planted, and a system of making roads and drives, and other 
improvements of the grounds, have been projected, which, with 
the great natural beauty of the place, when completed, will 
make the hospital grounds one of the most picturesque spots in 
all the land. 

Two large airing-courts have been enclosed and sodded, thus 
enabling every class of our patients to spend the greater part 
of the day, in pleasant weather, outside the buildings, without 



27 

being subjected to the stare and gaze of the idle and curious. 
A wide brick pavement, with cut stone curbing, has been put 
down around tne centre building, and a front entrance with 
iron steps leading thereto has been made for each wing. 

The re-construction of the boiler house and laundry buidings, 
now commenced, when compleated, will be commodious, con- 
venient and well adapted for the purposes designed. 

Inside the building we have covered the entire basement, 
with the exception of a part of one section, with a heavy coat- 
ing of hydraulic cement, and thus effectually preventing rats 
from burrowing under the walls. 

A bakery and the conveniences appertaining thereunto, have 
been added, and additional improvements and conveniences 
have been introduced into the kitchen. 

The chapel has been tastfully frescoed and provided with 
new seats. A stereoscopticon, with a large assortment of views, 
have been procured, furnishing a never failing source of enter- 
tainment for our patients. 

The number of books in our library has been more than dou- 
bled, and pictures have been obtained, framed and hung on 
the walls of the wards occupied by the patients. 

Small conservatories, protected by wire screens, have been 
placed in six of the wards. Additional furniture has been pro- 
cured, and the means for the amusement and entertainment of 
the patients have been extended, and such improvements and 
conveniences have been added from year to year as were calcu- 
lated more effectually to promote the objects of the institution. 
Acting on the belief that if it is proper to have a hospital at all, 
the reason is equally strong that it should be a good one, well 
fitted for its intended purposes, keeping up to the improve- 
ments of the day and steadily extending its means of useful- 
ness. 

In this spirit I have always acted, being steadily governed by 
a system of rigid economy. We have sometimes doubted 
whether the idea of cheapness, may not' in some departments have 
been too strictly adhered to, we allude more particularly to the 
straw beds, the wooden seats, and uncomfortabte surroundings 



28 

in the furniture and furnishing of the patients wards. But 
whatever would contribute to the health and comfort of the 
patients, in the liberal supply of healthful, nutricious and invig- 
orating diet, or in the way of moral influences to their recovery> 
by furnishing them with pleasant surroundings, giving them oc- 
cupation and amusement, and especially securing for them 
humane, capable and intelligent attendants, cheapness is very 
far from being economy. 

The great importance of having in every hospital for the 
insane an efficient corps of experienced and properly qualified 
attendants, is hardly anywhere thoroughly understood, nor the 
real value of the duties performed by them, adequately appre- 
ciated outside of a hospital. 

The traits of character and high standard of qualifications 
desirable in an attendant are not always possessed by those who 
are willing to engage in this service. Neither will liberal 
wages alone secure the qualifications desirable in attendants 
upon the insane, but when persons are once found who have 
clearly manifested all the conscientiousness, fidelity, tact and 
real ability that are desirable in an attendant, no want of a 
reasonable amount of compensation should ever be permitted 
to allow them to leave this for any more profitable calling, as 
such persons might reasonably be expected to do. 

When I assumed the duties of Superintendent, the hospital 
contained two hundred and two patients. At the close of the 
present fiscal year, it numbers three hundred and seventy-three. 
During the time I have been in charge, seven hundred and 
eighty-four cases have been admitted to the benefits of the in- 
stitution, and six hundred and fourteen have been discharged 
therefrom; two hundred and forty-eight of whom were dis- 
charged as recovered, and were restored to their friends and 
usefulness in society. Whether all have recovered,- who under 
a reasonable degree of intelligent management and skillful 
treatment would have recovered, — whether the incurable have 
been relieved of their sufferings and rendered as comfortable as 
it was possible to make them, it is not for me to say. 

In regard to the peculiar difficulties under which the head o 



29 

an institution of this kind has always to contend, of which the 
community at large know little or nothing about; in dealing 
with the innumerable forms of mental disease and the often no 
less baseless fancies of unreasonable friends, of every degree of 
intelligence, from the higher as well as the lower walks in life. 
Some swayed by passion or prejudice, others expecting what no 
mortal can give, and determined not to be satisfied with any 
attainable result. It would be strange, indeed, if we have suc- 
ceeded in satisfying everybody with whom, as patients or friends, 
we have had to deal in the discharge of our duties as Superin- 
tendent. 

Acting with human agencies, imperfections are always to be 
anticipated, and when it is considered that the immediate care 
and management of patients is accomplished through delegated 
help; and those who have charge of the insane, while endeavor- 
ing to secure the best assistance within their reach, must often 
be disappointed, and compelled to make frequent changes in 
order to insure the best results in the working of the institu- 
tion. You, with the opportunities afforded by your office, in 
frequently visiting the wards, and in some measure becoming 
familiar with the patients under different phases of disease, has 
enabled you to learn something of the spirit which pervades the 
general management of the institution; in the inculcation of 
that spirit of gentleness and kindness, and the thorough recogni- 
tion of that great law of humanity which should govern in all 
hospital management of the insane; and judge to what extent 
the failings and shortcomings of employees should be visited 
upon the head of the institution. 

The proper internal organization of hospitals for the insane, 
is now well understood. Efficient, conscientious resident offi- 
cers must always be the first great reliance. No matter what 
else may be done, it will be found that placing the right persons 
in these official positions, and giving them a proper support in 
the performance of their duties, will be essential to the success 
and usefulness of such institutions. 

For outside supervision a board of trustees selected for 
their high character as citizens, and general fitness for 



30 

their duties, is the proper body for this purpose. Having 
no pecuniary interest in the institution in any way, ren- 
dered familiar with its workings by frequent visits, and actuated 
by the higesfc motives to promote its usefulness and the interest 
of its patients, they form the strongest guarantee that all pos- 
sible good will be effected, and no wrong be tolerated. Regular 
visits at short intervals from such a board are infinitely more 
thorough and efficient, and their supervision more reliable and 
intelligent than any public commission, without special qualifi- 
cations for their duties, visiting at long intervals, and probably 
selected for political rather than humanitarian reasons, could be. 
And I trust it may not be considered improper for me here to 
suggest that nothing will serve to insure the future prosperity 
of this institution, more than the strict maintainance of a vigilant 
supervision over all its affairs by the trustees. No overweening 
confidence in the capacity of the resident oflBcers should justify 
them in relaxing this, the most important part of their official 
duties. If an institution is well conducted, it is worth an effort 
to keep assured of that fact, and if it is not, no long time should 
be permitted to elapse before the obstacles to its success are re- 
moved. 

In conclusion I will avail myself of this occasion to give the 
notice the rules governing the hospital require, of my intention 
to resign the office I now hold in this institution. This I now 
desire to do at the end of four months from this date, or as soon 
thereafter as it may be convenient for my successor to enter 
upon his duties. 

When I accepted this trust from your hands, I expected it 
would be only temporary in its duration, and with hesitancy d 

and distrust, I entered upon its duties as an untried experiment. 
What measure of success has attended my ministrations, is not 
for me to estimate. If I have failed to meet the requirements 
of the situation, it cannot be attributed to any want of sym- 
pathy or cooperation on your part, or any unwarranted inter- 
ference with my administrative duties, for in all things pertain- 
ing thereto I have been permitted to act according to my 
judgment, always aided and encouraged by your approbation 



31 

and support. That I may have erred sometimes, I do not doubt, 
and while I would avoid no responsibilty that properly belongs 
to me, I only claim the indulgence that is always accorded by a 
generous public to an honest purpose, and a diligent endeavor 
to fulfill it. 

That indulgence, if I mistake not, has invariably been ex- 
tended to me, — ^with a degree of cheerfulness which I should be 
proud to believe to have been fully warranted — not only by you, 
but also by the various official committees of the legislature and 
other bodies charged with the duty of examining into and re- 
porting on the financial and economical administration of this 
trust. The encouragement thus afforded has stimulated the en- 
deavor to merit the approval so generously extended, and has 
amply consoled me, under the misconstructions and harsh judg- 
ments to which the superintendent of an institution of this kind 
is not unfrequently subjected. 

Among the pleasing recollections of my life, none will be 
cherished with more heartfelt satisfaction than the remembrance 
of the uninterrupted harmony of the relations which have ex- 
isted between us, not only during my superintendency, but also 
during the many years previously thereto, when I was associat- 
ed with you as a member of the board of trustees, in the man- 
agement of this hospital. And in dissolving my official connec- 
tion with the institution, permit me to assure you I shall ever 
feel a deep interest in the allotted work of this, the greatest of 
our public charities. Trusting in my successor you may find an 
abler head and stronger hands, under whose ministrations a 
higher degree of usefulness may be attained in succeeding 
years. A. S. McDILL, 

Superintendent, 

Madison, September 30, 1872. 



TABLES ACCOMPANYING SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



TahU No. 1. 



MOVEMENT OP THE POPULATION. 



Patients in hospital September 80th, 1871 

Admitted during the year 

Whole number treated 

Discharged recovered 

Discharged improved 

'"Discharged unimproved 

Died 

Whole number discharged 

Remaining September 30th, 1872 

Daily average under treatment 

* 



Hale. 



173 
92 

265 
84 
19 
19 
11 
88 

182 

178 



Female. 



182 
74 

256 
26 
7 
18 
14 
65 

191 

189 



Total. 



855 

166 

521 

60 

26 

37 

25 

148 

873 

365 



Table No. 2. 



ADMISSIONS AND DISCHARGES FROM THE BEGINNING OP 

THE HOSPITAL. 



Admitted 

Discharged recovered . . 
Discharged improved . . 
Discharged unimproved 
Died 



Males. 


FemaleB. 


858 


795 


280 


255 


178 


129 


111 


125 


112 


90 



Total. 



1,658 
585 
307 
286 
202 



/ 



33 



Table No. 3. 
NUMBER AT EACH AGE IN THE TEAR. 





WHEN ADHTTTBD. 


WHEN ATTACKED. 


AQE. 


Male. 


Fem. 


Total. 


Male. 


Fem. 


Ototol. 


Tjesfl than 15 veaw .....*..- 1 « 


1 
8 
29 
15 
23 
12 
4 


28 

18 

10 

8 

5 


1 

13 
57 
33 
33 
20 

9 


2 

12 
26 
15 
23 
11 
3 


2 
5 

28 

19 

10 

6 

4 


4 


Between 15 and 20 


17 


Between 20 and 30 


54 


Between 30 and 40 


34 


Between 40 and 50 


33 


Between 50 and 60 


17 


Over 60 


7 


TTnkno'WTi 


















Total 


92 


74 

• 


166 


92 


74 


166 







Table No. 4. 
NUMBER AT EACH AGE PROM BEGINNING OP HOSPITAL. 





WHEN ADMirrED. 


WHEN ATTACKED. 


AGE. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Less than 15 years 

Between 15 and 20 

Between 20 and 30 

Between 30 and 40 

Between 40 and 50 

Between 50 and 60 

Over 60 


6 

37 

281 

196 

192 

82 

60 

4 


7 

41 

258 

221 

146 

78 

40 

4 


13 
78 
539 
417 
338 
160 
100 
8 


14 

64 

253 

173 

163 

68 

27 

96 


14 

64 

261 

206 

122 

52 

24 

52 


28 
128 
514 
379 
285 
120 

51 


Unknown 


148 






Total 


858 


795 


1,653 


858 


795 


1,653 



3— Wis. Hob. 



(Doc 6.) 



34 



Table No. 5. 
NATIVITY OF PATIENTS ADMITTED. 



Nativity. 



Germany 

Ireland 

England 

Norway 

Wales 

Scotland 

Canada 

Nova Scotia . . . . 

Switzerland 

Denmark 

Cuba 

Bohemia 

New Brunswick. 

France 

Bavaria 

Holland 

Poland 

Sweden 

Isle of Man 

Bel^um 

On Ocean 

Unknown 

New York 

Pennsylvania . . . 

Ohio 

Wisconsin 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts... 

Connecticut 

Bhode Island . . . 

New Jersey 

Maryland 

Indiana 

Michigan 

Illinois 

North Carolina . 
South Carolina. . 

Missouri 

Virginia 

Kentucky 

Tennessee ...... 

Total 



Within 
the Tear. 



25 
24 

7 

10 
1 
3 
5 
1 
1 
2 



3 



3 



6 



26 
7 
2 

19 
5 
3 
4 
1 
2 



1 
1 



1 
1 
2 



166 



From the 
Begiim'g. 



308 

207 

82 

89 

23 

22 

38 

8 

17 

12 

2 

19 

5 

4 

9 

1 

6 

11 

2 

1 

2 

82 

288 

47 

47 

97 

34 

32 

49 

29 

30 

2 

7 

2 

11 

4 

11 

2 

1 

3 

3 

3 

1 

1,653 



35 



Table Ko. 6. 
RESIDENCE 0? PATIENTS ADMITTED. 



Besidence. 


Whole No. 
Admitted. 


Renmin- 
ing. 


Adams 


8 


4 


Ashland 




Barron .^ 






Bayfield 






Brown 


24 

10 

8 

12 

8 

8 

69 

19 

156 

71 

4 

1 

6 

11 

88 

61 

85 

19 

50 

8 

65 

20 

81 

8 

27 

86 

85 

8 

11 

188 

10 

18 

19 

20 

8 

7 

4 

15 

52 

15 

89 

18 

42 

8 

82 


7 


Buffalo .' 


8 


Burnett 


2 


Calumet 


1 


Chippewa 


3 


Clark 


1 


Columbia 


11 


Crawford 


S 


Dane 


26 


Dodflre 


14 


Door 


8 


Douglas 


1 


Dunn 




Eau Claire 


4 


Poud du Lac 


12 




16 


Green 


7 




5 


Iowa 


9 




6 


Jefferson 


11 




4 


Kenosha 


6 




2 


La Crosse 


7 




8 


Manitowoc 


9 




8 


Marquette 


6 




82 


Monroe 


4 




8 


Outasramie 


4 




6 


PeDin 


1 




1 


Polk 


8 




5 


Racine 


8 




8 


Rock 


18 




2 


Sauk 


10 




2 


Sheboygan 


14 



36 



Table No. 6. — Hesidence of Patients Admitted — continued. 



Residence. 



Trempoaleaii 

Vernon 

Walworth . . 
Washington 
Waukesha . . 
Waupaca . . . 
Waushara.. . 
Winnebago . 

Wood 

State at large 

Total . . . 



Whole No. 
Admitted. 



12 
13 
69 
30 
64 
18 

8 
45 

4 
24 



1,653 



Remain- 
ing. 



4 
4 
9 
9 

10 
5 
1 

13 
4 
8 



373 



Table No. 7. 
CIVIL CONDITION OF THOSE ADMITTED. 





IN THR YKAR. 


FROM THK BBQINNING. 




Male. 


Female 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Sinfi:le 


48 

37 

5 


19 
58 


67 

90 

5 

8 

1 


429 

868 

22 

"'"i" 

38 


203 
511 

"65" 
3 

13 


632 


Married 


879 


W idowers 


22 


Widows 


65 


Divorced 


1 


4 


Unknown 


51 






1 




Total 


92 


74 


166 


858 


795 


1,653 





37 



Table No. 8. 

DURATION OP INSANITY BEFORE ENTRANCE OF THOSE 

ADMITTED. 





IN THE YEAK. 


FROM TUJfi BBGmNING. 


. 


Male. 


Female 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


Less than 3 months 

Between 8 and 6 months.. 
Between 6 and 12 months. . 
Between 1 and 2 years. . . . 
Between 2 and 3 years. . . . 

Between 3 and 5 years 

Between 5 and 10 years 

Between 10 and 20 years 

Between 20 and 30 vears .... 


46 
10 . 

5 
15 

8 

5 

1 

1 


26 

14 
8 
9 
4 
7 
5 
1 


72 
24 
13 
24 
12 
12 
6 
2 


255 
93 

107 
78 
49 
48 
38 
17 
5 


200 

129 

117 

79 

44 

52 

48 

19 

5 

2 

100 


465 

222 

224 

157 

93 

100 

86 

36 

10 


Over 30 years 








2 


Unknown 


1 




1 


168 


268 






Total 


92 


74 


166 


858 


795 


1,653 





Table No, 9. 

RECOVERED OF THOSE ATTACKED AT THE SEVERAL AGES 

FROM THE BEGINNING. 



AoE WHBN At- 


NO. ADMin'KD. 


NO.RECOVEKED. 


PER CT. RECOVERED. 


tacked. 


M. 

7 

41 

278 

196 

192 

81 

46 

13 

4 


F. 

9 

41 

258 

222 

146 

76 

24 

15 

4 


Total. 


M. 

2 
21 
97 
68 
46 
24 
20 
1 
2 


F. 

4 

20 

90 

62 

44 

17 

9 

5 

3 


Total. 

6 

41 

187 

130 

90 

41 

29 

6 

5 


M. 


F. 


Total. 


Less than 15 ys 
Bet. 15 & 20 " 
Bet. 20 & 80" 
Bet. 30 & 40" 
Bet. 40 & 50 " 
Bet. 50 & 60" 
Bet. 60 & 70* 

Over 70 

Unknown... 


16 

82 

536 

418 

338 

157 

70 

28 

8 


28.57 
51.22 
34.85 
34.69 
23.69 
29.63 
43.48 
7.70 
50.00 


44.44 
48.78 
34.88 
27.90 
30.13 
23.37 
37.50 
33.38 
75.00 


37.50 
50.00 
34.88 
81,10 
29.58 
26.11 
41.43 
21.43 
62.50 


TotAl 


858 


795 


1,653 


281 


254 


535 


32.75 


82.07 


32.36 



38 



Table Ifo. 10. 

RECOVERED AFTER VARIOUS DURATIONS OF DISEASE BE- 
FORE TREATMENT, FROM THE BEGINNING. 





NO. 


ADMITTED. 


NO. RECOVERED. 


PER CT. RECOVERED. 


DURATIOSOJ'DlS- 














EASE BEFOSS 

Admission. 




















M. 

255 


P. 

200 


Total. 


M. 
132 


F. 


ToUl. 


M. 


P. 


Total. 


Less than 8 m*s 


455 


101 


233 


51.76 


55.00 


53.38 


Bet. 3 & 6 " 


93 


129 


222 


48 


50 


98 


41.16 


38.75 


39.95 


Bet. 6 &12 " 


107 


117 


224 


27 


36 


63 


25.23 


57a69 


31.46 


Bet. 1& 2y8 


78 


79 


157 


10 


15 


25 


12.71 


18.98 


15.84 


Bet. 2& 3'* 


49 


44 


93 


9 


9 


18 


20.00 


24.54 


22.27 


Bet. 3& 5" 


48 


52 


100 


5 


10 


15 


14.16 


19.23 


16.68 


Bet. 5&10" 


38 


48 


86 


2 


3 


5 


5.26 


6.25 


5.75 


Bet. 10 & 20 " 


17 


19 


36 


1 


1 


2 


5.88 


5.26 


5.75 


Bet. 20 & 30" 


5 


5 

2 

100 


10 
2 

268 














Over 30 














Unknown. . . . 


168 


47 


29 


76 


27.97 


29.00 


28.48 


Total 


858 


795 


1,653 


281 


254 


536 


32.75 


82.07 


82.86 



39 



TaAle No. 11. 

DURATION OF TREATMENT OF THOSE RECOVERED FROM 

THE BEGINNING. 



Ddbatiok. 



Less than 8 months 

Between 8 and 6 months. 
Between 6 and Id months. 
Between 1 and 2 years . . 
Between 2 and 8 years . . 
Between 8 and 5 years . . 
Between 6 and 10 yeass . . 
Between 10 and 20 years . . 
Between 20 and 80 years . . 

Over 80 years , 

Unknown 



Total. 



NXTHBEB RBCOYERKD. 



Average duration of treatment. 



Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


90 


60 


140 


87 


87 


174 


71 


76 


147 


24 


26 


50 


6 


10 


16 


2 


5 


7 


1 




1 



281 



7-81 mos. 



254 



842 mos. 



585 



7-86 mos. 



40 



Table No. 12. 

WHOLE DURATION OP DISEASE OF THOSE RECOVERED 

FROM THE BEGINNING. 



DUBATIOV. 



Lefts Uian 8 months 

Between 8 and 6 months. 
Between 6 and 12 months. 
Between 1 and 2 years. . . 
Between 2 and 8 years. . . 
Between 8 and 5 year6. . 
Between 6 and 10 years . . 
Between 10 and 20 years. . . 
Between 20 and 80 years. . . 

Over 80 years 

Unknown 



Total. 



Average duration of disease. 



NUMBER RBCOVEBSD. 



Male. 



80 

48 

80 

46 

18 

8 

6 

1 

1 



49 



281 



12.47 mofl. 



Female. 



11 

42 

80 

49 

19 

14 

7 

1 

1 



80 



254 



Total. 



16^ mos. 



41 

90 

180 

95 

82 

82 

12 

2 

2 



79 



j5;85 



14.45 mos 



41 



Table No. 13. 

NUMBER OP DEATHS FROM THE BEGINNING AND THE 

CAUSES. 



I^ATTRVA 


IN THE YEAR. 


FROM BEGINNING. 




M. 


P. 


Total. 


M. 


P. 


Total. 


Phthisis Pulmonalis 




6 

8 
1 


6 

8 

4 


9 

28 

12 

2 

4 
1 
9 
2 


28 

20 
6 

1 

8 

2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
8 
1 
2 
1 

"5 ■ 
1 

1 


87 


Exhaustion from Chronic 
Mania. 




48 


Exhaustion from Acute Mania. 
Senile Exhaustion ; 


8 


18 
8 


Exhaustion of feeble or worn 
out cases 








7 


Purpura 








1 


Epilepsy 


1 




1 


14 


Typho Mania ..,,... 


4 


Gastritis 








1 


Bonv Tumor of Brain 










1 


General Paralysis 


5 


i" 


6 


22 
2 


23 


Marasmus 


6 


Puerperal Mania 




i 


1 


Dvsenterv 




1 


1 


5 
2 
8 


8 


Apoplexy 




8 


Suicide 




1 


1 


5 


Cerebro Spinal Meninifitis. . • • 




1 


Dropsy 


1 


1 


1 


1 


■M^ M. •t^^tJJ •..•...........■.•■••. 

Chlorosis 


5 


Gastro Enteric Fever 




1 


2 
2 
1 
4 

1 
2 
1 

1 
1 


8 


Valvular D isease of Heart 

Phleinnonous Erysipelas 


1 


1 


2 
1 


Orfiranic Disease of Brain 








6 


Peritonitis 




1 


1 


2 


Chronic DiarrhoBa 




2 


Inanition 








2 


Cystitis 






1 


Cvnanche Malimia 








1 












Total 


11 


14 


25 


112 


90 


202 







42 



Table No. 14. 
AGES AT DEATH. 





Ik 


thieTbaik. 


Fbox thx BBoimixiro. 


AOES. 

ft 


Male. 


Female 


Total. 


Male. 


Female 


Total. 


Less than 15 years 


» 


1 










Between 15 and 20 years 








1 
25 
25 
20 

21 

12 

6 


"24" 
22 
14 
16 

9 

4 


1 


Between 20 and 80 yeais 

Between 30 and 40 years 

Between 40 and 50 years 

Between 50 and 60 years 

Between 60 and 70 years 


1 
2 
5 
2 


5 
8 

1 
4 

1 


6 
5 
6 
6 

1 
1 


49 
47 
84 
87 
21 


Over 70 years 


1 


10 






Total 


11 


14 


25 


112 


90 


202 







Table No. 15. 
RATIO OF DEATHS FROM THE BEGINNING. 



Pkb Crar. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


Of all admitted 


18.05 


11.82 


12.18 


t 





Table No. 16. 
REMAINING AT THE END OF THE TEARr-PROSPECT. 



Curable 

Incurable 

Total 



Male. 



44 
188 



182 



Female. 



89 

152 



191 



Total. 



88 
290 



878 



43 



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44 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES 

F<yr the Tear Ending Septmber 80, )873. 



Articles. 



Amusbments. 



Set croquet 

Cards 

Corn poppers 

Checkers 

Dramas 

Drum heads 

Cue tips 

Excursion — steamboat . . 

Fire works 

Fishing tackle 

Music 

Masques 

Paper — ^gilt and tissue . . 

Row boat 

Stereoscopticon views. . . 
Tuning piano and organ 

Violin repairs 

Skate straps 



Butter 



Bbddxkg. 



Feathers 

Toilet quilts 

Sheeting 

Ticking 

Batting 

White curled hair 

Blankets 

Blankets 



Qaantity. 



Bboohs and Brushes. 



Brooms 

Whisks 

Scrub brushes . . 
Feather dusters. 
Wall brushes . . . 
Counter brushes 

Sponges 

Mop handles . . . 



BLACKBMITHINa 



25,550 fts 



41Jfi)S 

171 

1,4261 yd 

1,450 yd 

12 fbs 

150 lbs 

50 pr 

1, 094t Rs 




4Jdo 



Price. 



Amonnt. 



$9 00 

16 80 

1 50 

1 00 

1 45 

7 00 

8 00 
11 00 
45 08 

2 50 
135 00 

1 45 
5 64 
20 00 
214 55 
5 00 
7 40 
4 75 



152 H, 088 ^ 



$88 60 
821 90 
419 98 
212 00 
8 00 
101 55 
225 00 
1,088 06 



1128 75 



4 
28 



00 
19 



18 50 
10 80 
1 00 
47 16 
15 40 

$184 55 



Total. 



$492 12 
i4i638'28 



2,850 04 



248 80 
i84'55 



45 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures — continued. 



Article. 



Babn Expenses. 



Robes 

Duster 

Horse blankets 

Livery 

String bells 

Horse medicine 

Axle grease 

Board of horses in town 

Lanterns 

Hay , 

Bags 

Rope 

Whips 

Curry combs 

Cards 

Ring 

Strap yoke 

Halter straps 

Pole straps 

Thimble skein 

Shaft 

Plow bolts 

Mower repaired 

Wagon repaired 



OHEE8E 



Crackers 
Coffee. . 
Clothino. 



Crockery, Etc. 



Tableware 

Slop Jar 

Ewers 

Basins 

Chambers '. 

Bed pans 

Lanterns 

Lanterns, globes. . 

Chimneys 

Smoke bells 

Jugs 

Vegetable dishes. 

Urns , 

Stand for urn 



Quantity. 



2 

1 
4 



2}doz, 
6 



30 
29 lbs. 

2 

2 

8 



2 
1 



1, 996^ lbs. 
2,809^ lbs. 
4,806 lbs. 



1 
18 

6 
84 doz 

6 

1} doz 

2|doz 

2 doz 

8 

1 d oz 

9 setts 

2 

1 



Price. 



.14 
.28} 



Amonnt. 



^ XrX 

2 

16 

23 

10 

8 

6 

16 

8 

27 

8 

6 

4 



1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
4 
7 
4 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
75 
40 
75 
75 
10 
00 
96 
10 
50 
57 
60 
00 
42 
50 
75 
00 
08 
40 
65 



$279 87 



$186 00 



$1,014 97 



$7,285 51 



$204 88 

5 00 
10 25 

4 50 
182 50 

6 75 
17 40 
11 

2 
2 



50 
50 
25 



10 00 

45 00 

14 00 

1 50 



Total. 



$208 28 
279*37 
186*66 



1,014 97 
7,28551 



46 



Detailed* Statemdnt of Expenditures — continued. 



ArticleB. 



Crockery, ete.— continued. 



Cutlery — 

Ivory Ejiives 

Knives and forks. 
Tea spoons, iron , 

Carvers 

Butter knixes 

Steel 



Tea spoons, plated. . . 

Forks, plated 

Butter Knives, plated 

Castors, plated 

Engraving 



Dbuos, etc. 



Drugs and medicine 

Office bottles labeled 

Marble Tile and Weights 

Corks 

Labels 



EOGB 

Elopers, returned . 

Exchange 

Flour. 



Wheat 

Buckwheat 
Graham . . . 



Fuel. 

Indiana coal, at Chicago. . 

Briar Hill coal. . . .do 

Wilmington coal . .do 

Btraitsvule coal, at Madison, 

Freight and hauling 

Rent of coal yard 

Charcoal , 

Wood 



Fruit. 



Green- 
Apples 
Currants... 
Cherries . . . 
Cranberries. 



quantity. 



2 dz 
15 dz 

Hgr 
6 pr 

3 ... 
2 ... 



Price. 



12 dz 

9 dz 

4 dz 

2 dz 



2 
1000 



8^ dz 



6964^ dz . 



bis. 
5^ bis, 
13i bis, 



87Atns. 
803i tns. 
210| tns. 

40^ViiS. 



Amount. 



121 00 

35 00 

11 75 

13 00 

2 10 

1 60 

89 09 
48 00 

8 60 

9 00 
15 00 



1816 49 
84 62 
22 25 

1 80 

2 06 



I 11} 



169 bu.. 
444f cd.. 



286| bis. 
8f bu.. 

^ bu.. 

8ibu.. 



5 674 

7 12 

6 00 



5 28 
5 07 
4 00 
8 32 



28 
8 81 



2 69 



1799 45 



1112 40 



177 66 



%Z, 856 86 
37 49 
78 75 



$197 98 

4,078 83 

842 00 

411 82 

8,792 35 

80 00 

48 12 

1,695 75 



1686 04 

11 10 

12 85 
85 60 



Total. 



$666 53 



927 22 
799*45 

112 -io 

77 66 



3,473 10 



11,096 30 



47 
Detailed Statement of J^o^endfiYt^r^— continued. 



Abtxclxs. 



Fruit — Green^on — 

Grapes 

Lemons 

Oranges 

Plums 

Raspberries 

Stristwberries 

Confectionery, etc. . 
Peaches 



Dried — 

Apples 

Currants, Eng 

Citron 

Figs 

Prunes 

Peaches 

Raisins 



Fbeioht ajxd Express 



FuRNrruKB ajsd Housb Fuknishing. 



Bird cages 

Book case 

Bedsteads, oak 

Carpet, Brussels 

Carpet, tap., ingrain 

Carpet, matting 

Carpet, rug 

Chairs, dining : 

Chairs, cane seat 

Chairs, cane seat 

Chairs, reception uphol . . . . 
Chairs, Boston rockers .... 
Chairs, walnut rockers .... 

Chairs, oak rockers 

Chamber set, walnut 

Cribs 

Curtains 

Flower stand and jars 

Framing;* 

Lounge cover 

Mirrors, French plate glass 

Mirrors, small 

Repairs and upholstery. . . . 

Sink 

Spittoons 

Towelline 

Rubber blankets 

Tables, walnut 

Tables, marble top, large . . 
Tables, marble top, small. . 



Quantity. 



dOO lbs. 



3ibu. . 
ifbu".! 



1,845 lbs. 

255 lbs. 

8 lbs. 

2 bxs. 

691 lbs. 

172 lbs. 

10 bxs. 



AmouLt. Total 



4 

1 

34 

62 

287 

5^ 

4 
1 
8 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 

10 
6 



yds. 
yds 
yds. 

• « • • 

doz. 
doz. 

• • • ft 

doz. 
doz. 



1 
23 



1 

4 
,1851 



doz. 
yds. 



2 
2 
1 



$22 94 

54 20 

12 98 

6 

4 



75 
29 



12 58 
14 78 
78 40 



150 70 

25 96 

5 

2 



20 
21 



68 05 
20 64 
48 15 



558 86 



14 00 
25 00 

285 00 

188 80 

858 71 

6 19 

4 50 

50 00 

85 00 

19 68 

90 00 

27 00 

16 00 

6 00 

119 00 

120 00 
21 00 
24 95 

2 40 

8 50 

45 00 

19 90 

251 05 

15 10 
102 00 
178 76 

62 50 
15 75 
76 00 
10 50 



1896 86 



310 91 
558*86 



48 
Detailed Statement of ^^€n(]?t^r^-~contmued. 



ABnCLBB. 



Furniture — con. 



Table legs 

Tablecloth.... 
Table linen — 
Table napkins. 
Wire guard — 



Kitchen- 
Broiler 

Tin 'dishes 

Hen fmit cans 

Coffee pots 

Teapots 

Kitchen tables — 
Sausage cutter... 

Gem irons 

Coal hods 

Wooden bowls . . 
Mincing knives.. 
Steak pounders.. 

Bread knives 

Milk strainers . . . 

Ladles 

Baskets 

Crocks 

Firkins 

Dripping pans. .. 

Iron spoons 

Sieves 

Rat trap 

Brick 

Repairing kettles. 
Tinware 



Fresh, 



Fish. 



Saltr- 
Mackerel . 
White fish 
Cod 



Fabm Expenses. 

Seed wheat 

Qarden seeds 

Implements — 

Scrapers 

Wheelbarrows 

Pitchforks 

Hay forks 

Garden rakes 

Hay rakes 



Quantity. 



6 .... 

624J ydV 

11 doz 

1 .... 



13 

13 

3 



3 . 
3 . 
3 . 
3 . 

3 . 

4 . 
3 . 

34 . 



10 
3 



4,964 lbs 



33 hfbl 

m'O • • • • 

403 lbs. 



80 bu 



3 
3 
3 
4 
8 
1 



doz, 



Price. 



■ V • • • • 



7 71 
5 00^ 
06J 



Amoant. 



$3 

3 

196 

35 
113 



90 
75 
98 
00 
04 



$3 

77 

36 

5 

9 

16 

5 

8 

3 

3 



36 
34 
33 
18 
1 
1 



3 
113 



00 
93 
00 
10 
00 
87 
00 
00 
00 
45 
70 
60 
00 
60 
40 
60 
13 
13 
83 
48 
10 
75 
00 
68 
03 



$388 71 



$176 
115 

37 



50 
25 
14 



fl03 
96 

14 

30 

3 

3 

8 



96 

18 

00 
00 
00 
00 
90 
40 



Total. 



$3,478 46 



397 86 



388 71 



318 89 



49 
Detailed Statement of JSxpenditures — continued. 



Articles. 



Farm i7iep«7i»0«— continued. 



Implements — 

Steeel scoops 

Shovels 

Spades 

Hoes 

Cultiyator 

Cultivator shovels 

Axes, helves and bit. . 

Livery 

Repairing implements 

Hot bed sash 

Sap pan.. 



Use of mower 

Repairing mower. 

Use of horse 

Threshing 

Paris green 

Hay 

Labor— extra .... 



Gas Fixtubes 



Glass. 



Imfbovements. 



New bam 

Fencing 

Lumber 

New Road 

New carriage 

Painting 

New steam pipe . . . 

New laundry 

Bath rooms — tiling 
Repairs from fire. . 
Moving building . . 



Quantity 



2 doz 
i doz 
i doz 

1 doz 

1 

2 



Price. 



e^ lbs 
4i tons 



60 boxes 



Imfroyino GBOUiffDe. 



LiBRART. 



Light. 



Gasoline . 
Kersosene 
Lard oil.. 
Candles . . 



4,526 gals 
143igals 
48|galB 
80 lbs 



10 28 
26} 
90 
18 



Amonnt. 



(88 85 

840 

9 00 

800 

400 

8 00 

8 40 

12 60 

26 70 

12 00 

25 00 

28 00 
2 25 
80 00 
64 41 
24 20 
16 00 
60 87 



1868 68 



$267 41 



$2,854 88 
644 80 

1 .479 08 
802 22 
560 00 

2,164 41 

2.480 20 
2,456 84 

786 20 
112 86 
202 26 



$70 00 



$77 06 



$1 ,052 79 
88 61 
48 66 
10 40 



Total. 



$598 02 



$858 68 
$257*41 



$18,882 24 



$70 00 
$77 06 



$1,146 26 



4— WiB. Hob. 



(Doc 6.) 



50 



Detailed Statement of Expenditures — continued. 



rArtlclea. 



Nails, Etc. 
Locks, bolts and screws. 

LiQUOB. 



Brandy . . . . 
Whisky . . . 

Wine 

Cider 

Wine, sour. 
Beer 



Lime, Saitb, Cement. 



Lime . 
8and . . 
Cement 



Lead, Iron, Zinc, Etc. 



Lead 

Iron 

Zinc, solder, etc. 

Meal 



Meat. 



Beef, on foot. 
Beef, dressed. 
Beef, dried... 

Ham , 

Mutton 

Tongues 

Veal. 



Miscellaneous. 



Blacking 

Bath brick 

Bird seed 

Clothes baskets . . 

Clothes pins 

Cutting ice 

Dustpans 

Hospital seal 

Matches 

Pails 

Plants, flowering. 
Restraints ....... 

Bash cord 

Scales < 



Quantity. 



Price. 



26} gls. %2 51 
232} gls. 2 14 



96} gls. 
85 gls. 



2 91 
25 



If doz 18 00 



26 bu. 



19 bis, 



200 lbs. 



17,772 lbs. 



168,677 lbs. 

1,823 lbs. 

8} lbs. 

171 lbs. 

3,912 lbs. 

1 doz 

2 



15 doz 



1 doz 



2 cas 
24 doz 



Amount. 



$281 14 



$252 50 

498 98 

280 84 

21 20 

31 50 

25 00 



$10 40 

2 10 

59 35 



$25 00 
11 67 
25 01 



09} $1,327 68 



25 
13^ 
04 
74 
4 00 



$6,733 40 
116 62 
88 
22 66 
177 31 
8 88 
8 00 



$17 88 
3 50 
2 97 
7 40 

1 15 
28 50 

2 25 

5 75 
13 65 
69 00 
12 60 

110 00 

6 40 
900 



Total. 



$281 14 



1, 109 62 



71 85 



61 68 



1,327 68 



$7,067 75 



61 



Detailed Statement <f Magpenditurea — continued. 





Quantity. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Total. 


Mi$eeUaM0U9'-<ion, 
Trunk , . r 






$3 50 
1 68 
1 35 
408 

44 06 

7 50 

75 




TPl^gTMIUfl .,...« r .,.,..- t .. T . 








Tacks and hammer 








Twine 








Taxes 








Trustees Liverv 








Wicks 


8 doz. 








2 doz. 
2 doz. 




$351 97 


NonoKS. 
Brushes, hair 


300 

2 00 
32 30 

6 09 
13 40 

3 50 
2 70 

25 60 
24 87 


Brushes, shavinir 






Combs 






pins and 'N^e^dlep. , - r t 








Razors and StroDs 


12 






Scissors 


6 






Shoestrinsrs 








Thread '. 








Toilet SoaD 














113 55 


Newspafers akd Periodicals 


327 62 








327 62 


Otbtbbs. 
nATifl 


136 55 

11 80 

3 60 


Cove 








Sardines 










l,251Jfbu.. 
4,284 lbs . 


80^ 


151 95 


Oats 


378 21 




""378'2i 


Poultry 


377 03 




377 08 


P(MTAOB Ain> Box Rekt 


260 84 








260 84 


Patients Expenses Home . . . 


197 96 








197 94 


Paints and On^ 


593 62 
6 43 




128 lbs. 








2,381 lbs . 


09K 

1 


600 05 


Rice 


229 88 




229 88 


Repairs. 
Boilers and heatinsr aDoaratus . 


1,472 31 








1,661 29 



62 



Detailed StatemerU cf Expenditures — continued. 



Rkfaiss. 

General— 
Vegetable Steamers. 

Ck>pper steamers 

Ck>yersfor steamers. 

Percolators 

Tin Steamers 

Tin boilers 

Stock boilers 

Lareepans 

Milk cans 

Tin 



To roof 

To building 

To carriages and harness. 

To omnibus 

Heatcart(new 



SuoAB, Whitb. 



Ck>ffee A . 
Crushed . . 
Pulverized 
Brown . . . . 



Small Grocebibs akd Spicb. 



Allspice 

Almonds 

Baking powder 

Bees wax 

Cassia 

Cloves . . . 

Can. Citron 

Candy for Christmas Eve 

Farina 

(Gelatine 

Ginger 

Indigo 

Mustard 

Maccarroni 

Nutmeg 

Orange peel 

Pearl barley 

Pickles 

Pepper 

Salt 

Starch, clear 

Starch, corn 

Sage 

Tapioca 



(^lUAtlty. 



8 
8 
8 
8 

4 
4 
1 
8 
2 



Price. 



976 ft. 

212 lb. 

240 %. 

10,000 ft. 



8 ft. 

201 ft. 

4 ft 



20 ft. 
2 ft. 



10 doz 

43 doz. 

110 ft.. 

5{ ft.. 

52 ft.. 

49 ft.. 

25 ft.. 



225 ft. 



183 ft. 

44 bis 

1,064 ft. 

240 ft. 

9 ft. 

2 ft. 



Amoimt. 



• • • • • 



13K 
11-10 



185 50 
82 00 
18 60 
18 00 
18 00 
16 00 
24 00 
22 60 
6 20 
14 05 



1227 80 

135 00 

48 20 



1,217 67 
28 09 
83 00 

1,114 67 



$5 65 

4 80 
83 45 

1 60 

10 07 
7 50 
1 60 

16 17 
18 77 

11 80 
28 52 

12 75 
28 94 

5 30 
32 00 



33 
25 



2 

11 

14 40 

57 75 

100 45 

71 54 

27 00 

6 35 

50 



Total. 



1847 75 
269 90 
624 81 



406 60 



2,393 88 



569 49 



58 



Deiuiled Statetnent qf ^apenJi^rea— oontinued. 



Aanoias. 



SALABIB8, Officers. 
Stbtjf 



Soap. 



Laundry 

Concentated lye 



Stock . 
Straw. 



Statiokert and Ink. 



Indelible ink 

Stationery and writing fluid. 



Tea 



Tools and IxpuEiasNTS 



Tobacco 



TRAYBLiNa Expenses 



YlNEOAR 



Ybgetables. 



Beans 

Potatoes 

Green groceries 



Wages. 



Attendants, male. . 
Attendants, female , 

Butcher 

Baker 

Ck)achman 

Cook 

Assistant cooks. . . . 

Carpenter 

Chambermaids . . . . 

Chaplain 

Engrmeer 

Assistant engineer. 

Fireman 

Farmer 



Quantity. 



Prioe. 



834 gal. 



4,176 lbs . 
65 box. 



70 tons. 



1,548 lbs.. 



668ilbs.. 



857i gals . 



aOibus. 
1,288 bus. 



$5,556 46 



.69i 



18 44 



.75 



.55i 



.m 



Mi 



17 
16 
1 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Amoiuit. 



$225 80 



$275 58 
884 85 



$859 00 



$241 12 



$26 50 

201 89 



$1,144 91 



$168 62 



$870 85 



$284 29 



$78 61 



$81 84 

810 25 

70 55 



TMaL 



$4,296 07 
2,584 40 
882 50 
455 00 
800 00 
400 00 
796 14 
888 87 
240 00 
806 00 
900 00 
480 00 
210 00 
600 00 



$5,556 46 



225 80 



610 48 



859 00 

241*12 



818 89 



1,144 91 
' i68'62 



870 86 
28429 
" 78*61 



912 15 



54 



Detailed Statement qf ^a;pefM7i^r«9— continued. 



Articles. 



TFa^««— continued. 



Gardner . 

Laborers and teamsters. 

Launderer 

Laundreses 

Night watch, female . . 

Night watch, male 

Porter 

Supenrisor 

Sui>enisore8s 

Waiters 



Qa'nty. 



Orders drawn by Trustees . 
Total of orders drawn. 



1 
5 
1 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 



Amonnt. 



1800 00 
1,289 91 
420 00 
988 48 
168 00 
800 00 
800 00 
860 00 
284 00 
240 00 



TotaL 



117,884 87 
4,947 21 



1105,976 78 



REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF VISITING COMMITTEE. 



Madison, Oct. 14, 1872. 

To the Trustees of the Wisconsin Hospital for the Insane: 

Gbntlemeit: — The monthly visiting committee for the last 
six months have the honor to report that, as may be seen by 
reference to their recorded visits, they have uniformly found 
the hospital in a creditable condition; answering as they be- 
lieve the full expectation of the trustees and the public. The 
chairman desires for himself to say that he thinks there is need 
of more employment, both physical and mental,. If it is desi- 
rable to save the body, is it less so the mind? If the body will 
rot from disease, so will the mind. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN FAVILL, 
Chairman of the Monthly Visiting Committee. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees qf the Wisconsin State Hospital for the 
Insane: 

The underaignedy Treasurer, respectfully presents this, his 
annual report, for the fiscal year ending October 1, 1872. 

At the commencement of the year there was a balance in the 
treasiizyof 98,118 85 

I have received during the year, from the State Treasurer, 
the sum of 108,096 87 

And from Dr. A. 8. McDlll, Superintendent 5,470 01 

Making a total of 1111,084 78 

I have paid out upon orders drawn by the Secretary, the 
sum of 106,085 80 

Leaving a balance in the treasury of $5,598 93 

At the close of the year. 

I herewith submit a detailed statement of the receipts and 
disbursements. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SIMEON MILLS, 
Madison, October 1, 1872. Treasurer. 



AUDITING COMMIHEE'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Wisconsin State Hospital for the Insane: 

GENTLSifSK: — The auditing committee have made a careful 
examinatioB of the financial records, books and vouchers of the 
Secretary, Treasurer and Steward, corering the hospital expen- 
ditures from Sept. 30, 1870, to Sept. 30, 1872, reviewing the ex- 
tensions and footings of bills and accounts, and with the excep- 
tion of some clerical errors <m the part of those presenting bills 
against the hospital, we find the accounts are accurately kept, 
the money appropriated for the use of the institution all fully 
accounted for by the proper vouchers, and that the amount of 
money in the hands of the of the treasurer at the latter date 
above mentioned, was $5,598 93. 

The committee take pleasure in commending the accuracy 
and neatness of the books and papers of the book-keeper. Miss 
McDill, not having detected the slightest error of any kind in 
all her records, and we sincerely regret that she is so soon to 
leave her office. 

E. W. YOUNG, 
W. R. TAYLOR, 

F. J. BLAIR, 
Auditing Committee. 

Madisobt, Nov. 27, 1872. 



SECRETARY'S FINANCIAL REPORT. 



To the TrtMtees of the Wisconsin State Hospital for the In- 
sane: 

Gentlemen: — The Secretary would make the following state- 
ment of the finances, as shown by his books for the year end- 
ing September 30th, 1872: 



On the first day of October, 1871, the books of the 
Secretary showed a balance in the hands of the 

Treasurer of 

At that date there were outstanding orders that had 
been drawn on the Treasurer ana credited to him, 
not presented for payment, as follows : 

No. 860, September 29th, 1870, Mr. Ryan 

No. 818, February 7th, 1871, Mary Hoben. . . . 

Number and date unknown 

Amounting in the aggregate to 

Which, added to the balance as shown above, makes 
the actual balance in the hands of the Treasurer, 
October 1st, 1871 



1871. 
Oct. 2 

1872. 
Feb. 27 
Mchl2 
April 2 
May 14 
July 1 
July 16 
July 80 
Sept 80 




The Treasurer has received as follows : 
From the State Treasuer 



From 
From 
From 
From 
From 
From 
From 
From 



the State Treasurer 

the State Treasurer 

the State Treasurer 

the State Treasurer ., 

the State Treasurer 

A. S. McDill, superintendent. 
A. S. McDlll, superintendent. 
A. S. McDill, superintendent. 



Orders have been drawn on the Treasurer during the year 
amounting to 



Which amount deducted from the receipts of the year, leaves 
a balance in the hands of the Treasurer October Ist, 
1871, of 



12,945 62 



172 78 



$8, 118 85 



120,000 00 

18,446 37 

15,850 00 

26,860 00 

9,100 00 

17,860 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

8, 470 00 



$111,512 00 



1106,975 78 



<6,686 22 



59 



Secretary's Financial Report — continued. 



There are outstanding orders which have been credited to 
the Treasurer not presented for payment, as follows : 

No. 8«0, September 2»th, 1870 »87 44 

Number and date unknown 25 27 

Amounting to 

Which added to the balance as shown by the boolu of the 
Secretary ($5,586.52) makes the actual balance in the hands 
of the Treasurer at this date 



$62 71 
$5,598 98 



Herewith is presented a statement of the number and amount 
of all orders drawn on upon the Treasurer during the past year 
with the names of the persons and the purposes for which they, 
were drawn. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SAMUEL D. HASTINGS, 

Secretary. 
Madison, October Ist, 1872. 



60 



LIST OF WARRANTS 
Itiusdfcr ihs Tear ending September 80, 1873. 



Date. 



19 
L9 
L9 
L9 
19 
19 
9 
9 
9 



187 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Oct. 81 
Nov. 1 
Not. 4 
Nov. 4 
Nov. 6 



To whom and for what iBsned. 



8. Mills, for advanced payment on land 

Wm. R. Taylor, expenses as trustee 

F. J. Blair, expenses as anditinj^ committee 

£. W. Toung, expenses as auditing committee. 
Dr. A. J. Wfufd, expenses as ch'm^n vis^g com. . 

A. KentEler, Uverv 

S. D. Hastings, salary as secretary 

C. SeiberlinjF, retummg elopers 

W. J. Park & Co., binding books 

I. Dorman, straw 

Steward, for current expenses 

W. A. Oppel, fruit 

W. J. & jf. Ellsworth, groceries 

L. P. Goodchap, eggs, butter, etc 

J. Pierce, exchange in horses 

J. Lester, beef 

Thos. Lynch, beef 

Field, iJeiter & Co., dry goods 

H. M. Wilmarth & Bro., gas fixtures 

Steward, for current expenses 

H. Berthelet & Co., sewer pipes 

H. Sherman, beef 

Chi. & N. W. Railway Co., freight on coal 

Wm. Woodard, beef 

Asa Brink, beef 

Jas. Sherman, carpenter 

Wm. Peckham & Sons, flour 

L. O'Keiffe, butter 

A. Gill, moving buildings 

Chi. & N. W. Railway Co., freight on coal. . . . 

A. S. McDill, Supt 

E. G. Marshall, M. D. asst physician 

R. M. Wiggenton, M. D., asst. physician 

Narrie McDill, book keeper 

M. C. Halliday, matron 

A. M. Warren, farmer 

W. J. Smith, carpenter 

Wm. Bird, launaerer 

J. Doyle, engineer 

M. Doyle, fireman 

E. O. Eng, baker 

P. O'Malley, beef 

Alex. Findlay, groceries and butter 

Pollard & Nelson, painting 

Thos. Holden, beef and apples 

Wm. Woodard, beef and apples 

M. Johnson, beef 

Steward, current expenses 



No. 


Amount. 


1 


$202 60 


2 


80 00 


8 


20 00 


4 


11 00 


5 


22 00 


6 


10 00 


7 


50 00 


8 


40 00 


9 


42 80 


10 


40 68 


11 


1,000 00 


13 


87 85 


18 


67 26 


14 


40 05 


15 


100 00 


16 


81 75 


17 


88 25 


18 


495 40 


19 


129 25 


20 


1,000 00 


21 


121 00 


22 


55 00 


28 


1,090 00 


24 


77 84 


25 


102 87 


26 


40 00 


27 


475 00 


28 


48 80 


29 


200 00 


80 


2,024 00 


81 


500 00 


82 


88 88 


88 


88 88 


84 


50 00 


85 


66 66 


86 


50 00 


87 


75 00 


88 


85 00 


89 


75 00 


40 


50 00 


41 


40 00 


42 


82 80 


43 


975 77 


44 


188 12 


45 


47 10 


46 


42 28 


47 


40 12 


48 


1,000 00 



61 



List (f Warrant lestted — contintied. 




1871. 
Nov. 6 
Nov. 8 
Nov. 8 
Nov. 9 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 11 
Nov. 11 
Nov. 11 
Nov. 13 
Nov. 14 
Nov. 14 
Nov. 14 
Nov. 15 
Nov. 15 
Nov. 16 
Nov. 16 
Nov. 15 
Nov. 17 
Nov. 17 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 17 
Nov. 17 
Nov. 25 
Nov. 28 
Nov. 30 
Nov. 80 
Nov. 80 
Nov. 30 
Nov. 80 
Nov. 30 
Nov. 80 
Nov. 30 
Nov. 30 
Nov. 30 
Dec. 2 
Dec. 2 
Dec. 8 
Dec. 8 
Dec. 12 
Dec. 18 
Dec. 15 
Dec. 19 
Dec. 80 
Dec. 80 
Dec. 80 
Dec. 80 
Dec. 80 
Dec. 30 
Dec. 80 
Dec, 30 



F. Menzedoch, hauling coal 

D. O'Mally, butter 

Wm. Jones, mason work 

M. O'Mally, beef 

Delaplain & Burdick, cows, etc 

James W. Queen & Co., slides, etc 

Steward, current expenses 

J. H. Carpenter, 15 acres of land 

Hiram Bacon, carpenter 

M. C. Halliday, matron 

P. O'Mally, apples 

Madison Manufacturing Co., castings 

Bobbins & Thornton, meal 

W. J. & F. Ellsworth, groceries 

P. Dufl^r, butter 

B. Veerhusen, stone and apples 

S. Raymond, beef and oats 

H. Fnnge, beef 

M. Roth, beef 

B. Verhusen, beef 

(}eo. Green, apples 

Chi. & N. W. R. R Co., freight 

W. E. €k>odman, gas fixtures 

Wm. Larkin, beef. 

Rhodes & Co., coal 

Wm. Woodard, beef and hide 

William Jones, mason work 

E. G. Marshall, assistant physician 

R. M. Wigginton, assistant physician 

Narrie NcDill, clerk 

A. Warren, farmer 

W. J. Smith, carpenter 

Wm. Bird, Launaerer 

John Doyle, fireman 

M. Doyle, engineer 

E. O.Eng, baker 

Steward, current expenses 

Ezra Sonres, carpenter work 

Hiram Bacon, carpenter work 

Steward, current expenses 

John Davis & Co., pipes, etc 

Wm. Wilson, horse power 

R. Lynch, Mason work 

P. L. Carman, feed steamer 

Chi. & N. W. R. R. Co., freight 

Steward, current expenses 

Jacob Burgay, butter 

Conklin & Gray, oats and cement 

R. Harney & CJo., hardware, etc 

John W. Eviston, repair on boler, etc 

Morton <& Wakely, brick 

Riley & Thompson, livery 

E. W. Young, exp. as trustee and visitin com. 



48 $8088 

50 61 80 

51 817 98 

52 38 48 
58 22400 

54 206 30 

55 1,000 00 

56 1,500 00 

57 58 50 

58 138 32 

59 45 00 

60 45 95 

61 55 00 

62 62 59 

63 45 10 

64 99 30 

65 45 28 

66 6042 

67 226 50 

68 36 07 

69 837 50 

70 178 75 

71 66 65 

72 48 80 
78 4,078 38 

74 57 78 

75 64 81 

76 83 88 

77 83 88 

78 5000 

79 50 00 

80 75 00 

81 35 00 

82 50 00 
88 75 00 

84 4000 

85 1,000 00 

86 121 50 

87 59 62 

88 1,000 00 

89 460 82 

90 75 00 

91 105 47 

92 200 00 
98 112 40 

94 1,000 00 

95 166 82 

96 47 05 

97 4002 

98 301 94 

99 4800 

100 6 00 

101 15 10 



62 



List of Warrants 7a«ue(f— continued. 




1873 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 18 
Jan. 18 
Jan. 28 
Jan. 28 
Jan. 28 
Jan. 23 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 81 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 81 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 31 
Jan. 81 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 19 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 



F. J. Blair, expenses as trustee 

S. D. Hastings, three month's salary, Secretary 
Hartford Steam Boiler Ins Co., ins. on boiler. 

Wm. Graves, butter 

Payroll for December 

8. Williams, lime 

A. M. Burke, gasoline 

Curwin, Stoddart & Co., blankets and sheet'ng 

E. P. Henikee & Co., robe.s 

Eugene Hughes, wood 

Thos. Re^an, gas fixtures 

Doe & Miller, lumber 

Bicker Crombie & Co., groceries 

H. Friend and Bros., clothing 

Sexton Bros. & Co., dry goods 

Green & Button, drugs and medicines 

J. N. Morton, medicine bottles 

H. L. Eisen & Co., shirts, etc 

Booth & Heineman, hats and caps 

Vroman, Frank & Co., hardware 

Bobbins & Thornton, flour and meal 

Madison Woolen Mills, blankets 

J. B. ShannoQ, locks and keys 

Northwestern Manufacturing Co., steamers . . . 

John N, Jones, hardware 

Atkins, Steele & White, boots and shoes 

W. A. Oppel, oysters, etc 

Hiram Bacon, meal 

W. J. & F. Ellsworth, groceries 

A. M. Burke, gasoline 

Pay-roll for January 

J. C. Johnson, beei. 

Atwood & Culver, printing 

M. Roth, beef 

Chicago & N. W. Railway, freight 

Wm. Wilson, beef 

H. P. Bacon, meai 

Wm. Woodard, ten acres of land 

J. C. Schette, balance on ten acres of land 

Wm. Woodard, wood 

Madison Manuf. Co., casting. . .■ 

Wolcott, Smith & Co., gasolme 

Jones & Sumner, hardware 

Thomas Casey, straw 

N. W. Furniture Co., cribs 

B. Yeerhusen, wood 

John A. Doyle, wood 

Vroman, Frank & Co., hardware 

Dunning & Sumner, drugs and medicines. . . . 

S. Elauber & Co., dry goods 

Bobbins'^ Thornton, flour and meal 

C. H. Arnold, beef, etc 

Pollard & Nelson, painting, etc 



102 121 60 

108 60 00 

104 112 60 

105 66 36 

106 1 ,692 81 

107 93 10 

108 178 68 

109 367 48 

110 44 00 

111 46 00 

112 188 63 

113 294 69 

114 1,772 59 

115 1,295 75 

116 636 89 

117 607 36 

118 84 62 

119 94 00 

120 118 88 

121 486 98 

122 471 87 

123 769 88 

124 80 00 
126 136 60 

126 72 78 

127 595 23 

128 187 63 

129 69 86 

130 487 98 

181 190 48 

182 2,009 96 
188 922 62 
184 823 75 

135 864 99 

136 98 74 
187 69 65 

138 127 58 

139 1,000 00 

140 804 00 

141 514 75 

142 64 79 

143 55 82 

144 58 90 

145 60 82 

146 120 00 

147 128 00 
149 689 00 

149 178 52 

150 688 47 
150 618 32 
152 774 13 
163 268 00 
154 860 42 



63 



Xfiet qf Warrants laeued — continued. 




1872 
Mar. 9 
Mar. 9 
Mar. 9 
Mar. 9 
Mar. 80 
Mar. ao 
Mar. 30 
Mai. HO 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Apr. 4 
Apr. 4 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 

Apr. 80 

Apr. 80 

May 6 

May 6 

May 6 



8 
6 
6 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 



Pay roll for February 

Lyman Bacon, meal 

Geo. Mock, beef 

John Paton, beef. 

J. B. Pradt, chaplain 

R. P. Hay, beef 

John Larch, butter and egsn 

John Davis & Co., ^as ana water fixtures .... 
Chicago and Wilmington Coal Company, coal 

Bunker & Yroman, lumber 

R. L. Qarlick, crockery 

Blair & Persons, crockery 

Field, Leiter & Co., dry goods 

Allen & Mackey, carpets 

Chicago and Kortwestem Ry. Co., freight .... 

P. Downey, beef 

J. E. Fisher, flimiture 

E. M. Cooper, beef 

Ricker, Ober & Co., groceries 

Green & Button, drugs and medicines 

Chicago and Northwestern Ry Co., freight . . . 

U. D. Mihills & Co., posts 

Robbins & Thornton, flour and meal 

Pay roll for March 

John Howe, seed wheat 

Pollard & Nelson, painting 

John Larch, butter and eggs 

J. L. Schuman, marble tile 



Chicago and Northwestern Ry. Co., freight. . . 

L. J. Farwell, rent of farm 

S. Mills,abstract of title and recording of deeds 
Riley & Thompson, livery 

A. ^entzler, livery 

M. H. Irish, entertainment of State Board of 

Charities of Illinois 
Riley & Thompson, livery, Dr .Marshall's funU 

D. Fitch, casket and fun. exp do 

8. D. Hastings, three months salary as Sec^* • 

E. W. Young, expenses as Trustee 

N.W.Tel.Co.,tel. Dr. Marshall's sick, and death 

Riley & Thompstm, livery 

W. K. Taylor, expenses as Trustee 
W. J. Smith, two small houses. . . . 

Kellogg & Harris, potatoes 

M. Zwicky, soap 

John Black, liquors 

McFetridge, Burchard A Co-, blankets 

Chicago and Wilmington Coal Company, coal 

Steward, current expenses 

Evans, Stlllman & Co., wire work 

Samuel W. Pack, beef 

Alex. Findlav, groceries 

D. B. Lyon, lumber 



juyc 
l,Le 



Field, Leiter & Co., dry goods, 



155 11,962 56 

156 208 25 

157 814 25 

158 105 75 

159 150 00 

160 I 42 00 

161 60 78 

162 95 87 
168 416 00 

164 800 08 

165 70 40 

166 184 87 

167 129 53 

168 166 87 

169 268 20 

170 49 28 

171 910 05 

172 44 61 
178 1,205 94 

174 506 51 

175 224 05 

176 68 15 

177 875 81 

178 1,921 51 

179 79 84 

180 278 92 

181 60 28 

182 866 20 
188 50 88 

184 300 75 

185 83 85 

186 6 00 

187 8 00 

188 26 87 

189 80 00 

190 188 00 

191 60 00 

192 7 35 

193 50 14 

194 4 00 

195 16 00 

196 200 00 

197 232 32 

198 117 00 

199 384 03 

200 268 18 

201 426 00 

202 1,00000 
208 112 04 
804 60 69 

205 397 52 

206 206 08 

207 1,077 91 



64 



List of WarranU Issued— oontimxed. 




7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



1872. 
May 6 
May 6 
May 6 
May 6 
May 6 
May 7 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 20 
May 26 
May 25 
May 81 
May 81 
May 81 
June 4 
June 4 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 6 
June 17 
June 17 
June 17 
June 17 
June 17 
June 17 
June 17 
June 26 
June 26 
June 28 
June 28 
June 28 
Sune28 
July 2 
July 2 
July 2 
July 2 
July 2 
July 2 
July 2 



Ricker, Crombie & Co., groceries 

Bobbins & Thornton, flour and meal 

R L. Garlick, crockery, etc 

Geo. P. Taylor, boots and shoes 

Chicago and N. W. Railway Co., freight 

Madison Manufacturing Co., circular saw, etc. 

Pollard & Nelson, painting 

Steward, current expenses 

W. A. Oppel, oysters, lemons, etc 

Ole Leviston, heef 

Pay roll for April 

J. Jameson, beef 

H. J. Spauldlng, beef : 

R. Caldwell, potatoes 

John Larch, eggs and butter 

R. Lynch, mason work 

Mary Hoben, butter 

T. £. Bird, carria^ and repairs 

L. Stowe, beef and cheese 

D. Robertson, beef 

J. H. D. Baker, seed 

Conklin & Gray, cement, etc 

John McMurren, beef 

Chicago and N. W. Railway Co., wood 

Clark & Mills, drugs, etc 

Pollard & Nelson, patnting 

Robbins & Thornton, flour and meal 

Steward, current expenses 

S. Klauber & Co., dry goods 

A, Pindlay, groceries 

Pay roll for May 

J. Keady, potati.>es, etc 

Sorenson & Frederickson, cabinet work 

Chicago and N. W. Railwaw Co., freight , 

R. L. Garlick, crockery 

M. Joachim & Co., hardware 

Blair & Persons, table ware, etc 

Thos. O'Malley, beef 

John Larch, butter and eggs 

Jas. E. Fisher, chairs 

Eenley (& Jenkins, gasoline 

J. H. Weed & Co., lumber 

Field, Leiter & Co., hair and shades 

Bunker <& Vroman, lumber 

D. Robinson, oats 

Vroman, Frank & Co., hardware 

Pollard & Nelson, painting 

Robbins & Thornton, flour and meal 

W. J. & F. Ellsworth, groceries 

R Caldwell, beef 

John N. Jones, hardware 

Chicago and N. W. Railway Co., freight 

A. Findlay, groceries 



208 


1856 52 


209 


864 78 


210 


158 58 


211 


212 50 


212 


116 21 


218 


71 40 


214 


885 12 


215 


1,000 00 


216 


44 55 


217 


89 68 


218 


2,035 74 


219 


109 70 


220 


42 46 


221 


58 94 


222 


42 55 


228 


283 50 


224 


45 82 


225 


648 19 


226 


184 12 


227 


263 05 


228 


53 86 


229 


91 85 


280 


110 00 


281 


265 00 


282 


87 71 


233 


480 86 


284 


377 60 


235 


1,000 00 


286 


165 68 


237 


287 29 


238 


1,945 27 


239 


67 16 


240 


45 58 


241 


182 57 


242 


105 15 


248 


410 85 


244 


50 28 


245 


106 45 


248 


104 88 


247 


125 18 


248 


191 80 


249 


539 20 


250 


122 55 


251 


501 24 


252 


48 91 


258 


410 11 


259 


146 05 


255 


408 87 


256 


155 15 


257 


212 61 


258 


81 58 


259 


68 00 


260 


218 87 



65 



ItisC of Warrants Issued— continued. 



Date. 

1872 
July 2 
July 2 
July 2 
July 2 
July 2 
July 12 
J^ly 12 
July 12 
July 12 
July 12 
July 12 
July 12 
July 12 
July 12 
July 31 
July 31 
July 31 
July 31 
July 31 
July 31 
July 31 
July 81 
July 81 
July 31 
July 31 
Aug. 1 
Aug. 2 
Aug. 2 
Aug. 2 
Aug. 2 
Aug. 2 
Aug. 2 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 9 
Aug. 
Aug. 12 
Aug. 13 
Aug. 15 
Aug. 16 
Aug. 22 
Aug. 24 
Aug. 34 
Aug. 10 
Aug. 24 
Aug. 24 
Aug. 29 
Sept. 2 
Sept. 2 
Sept. 2 
Sept. 2 



To whom and on what accoont imid. 




Clark & Mills, drugs, etc 

Thos. Regau, gas fixtures 

Pay roll lor June 

Steward's current expenses 

W. A. Oppel, fruit, etc 

C. H. Arnold, mutton 

John Larch, butter and eggs 

D. Robertson, beef 

C. A. Belden, plated ware, etc 

P. R. Tierney, flour 

Chicago and Northwestern Railway Co., freight 
Wm. Woodard, beef, etc 

D. 0»Mally, beef 

James Baxter, beef 

F. Barnes, steamboat expenses for Supts. Ins. . 

B. Jefferson, coaches do 

Wm. Dunn, omnibusses do 

M. M. Dorn & Co., livery do 

A. Kentzler, livery do 

Riley & Thompson, livery do 

E. W. Young, trustee and member of com 

S. D. Hastings, 3 months salary as secretary . . 
Richard Clement, artificial leg for patient 

E. W. Youne, per diem as member of com . . . 
Wm. R. TaWor, exp. as trustee and mem. com 

Robbins & Thornton, flour and meal 

M. Friend, coats, pants, etc 

M. Joackim & Co., hardware 

Ricker, Crombie & Co., groceries 

Curwan, Stoddert & Co, boots, etc 

A. Findley, paints, etc 

Chas. E. Morgan, dry goods 

Dunnmg & Sumner, drugs, etc 

A. F. Waltzidger, fire works, etc 

John B. Wiser, repairs on carriage 

S. Klauber & Co., dry goods 

L. O'Keife, beef 

Pay roll for July 

A. Collidge, mutton 

P. Downey, beef 

John S. Fisher, restraints 

D. O'Mally, beef 

Wm. Woodard, beef 

G. W. Baxter, beef 

John Davis & Co, gas fixtures, etc 

Steward's current expenses 

F. A. Stoltze, shoes etc 

Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Co., freight 

Field, Leiter & Co., drj' goods 

Patrick Roach, beef 

A. Findley, groceries ' 

Vroman, Frank & Co., hardware 

Robbins & Thornton, flour and feed 



261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
266 
267 
268 
269 
270 
271 
272 
273 
274 
275 
276 
277 
278 
279 
280 
281 
282 
288 
284 
285 
286 
287 
288 
289 
290 
291 
292 
293 
294 
395 
296 
297 
298 
299 
300 
301 
302 
303 
304 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
810 
311 
312 
813 



Amount. 



$75 65 

75 95 
1,923 48 
1,000 00 

72 18 

56 10 

57 00 
127 07 
124 50 

71 79 

62 74 

110 76 

162 00 

112 40 

8 00 

15 00 
18 00 

16 00 
66 00 
53 00 
37 60 
50 00 

76 45 

9 00 
28 50 

199 50 

207 00 

91 30 

1,053 88 

262 50 
78 44 
56 65 
99 56 
47 81 

135 00 

58 11 
78 64 

2,028 01 

61 57 

94 10 

110 00 

158 00 

135 00 

169 60 

249 06 

1,000 00 

43 40 

139 18 

440 39 

68 00 

126 26 

155 23 

394 51 



5 — Wis. Hos. 



(Doc. 6.) 



66 



List of Warrants Issued — continued. 



Date. 



To whom and for what i}>jtued. 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 



1872. 
Sept. 2 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 10 
Sept. 10 
Sept. 11 
Sept. 11 
Sept. 11 
Sept. 11 
Sept. 11 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 12 
Sept. 14 
Sept. 14 
Sept. 14 
Sept. 20 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept 30 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept, 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept, 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 30 
Sepi. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 



Clark & Mills, druirs and groceries 

W. J. & F. Ellsworth, whisky, etc 

Wm. Miller, threshing *. 

J. P. Bacon, l^eef 

Chicago and N. W. R. R. Co., freight 

P. Keifer, beef 

Pay roll for August 

J. H. Welch, beef 

Smith, Roundy «fe Co., groceries 

H. Friend & Bro., clothing 

H. L. Eison & Co., shirts 

R. Haney & Co., hardware 

Green & Button, drugs, etc 

M. H. Wheeler, beef 

David Robinson, beef 

John Davis & Co., pipe 

P. Keifer, beef 

John B. Wiser, hand cart and repairing 

Chicago and N. W. R. R. Co., freight 

Kenly & Jenkins, gasoline 

George F. Taylor, boots and shoes 

Chicago and N, W, R, R. Co., freight 

W. A. Oppel, fruit and oysters 

John N. Jones, hardware 

Blair & Persons, crockery, etc 

Duff & Campbell, window glass 

R. Haney & Co., truck castors 

B. Kohner, clothing 

Crane Bro. Manuf. Co., flues and pipe 

H. L. Eison & Co., shirts 

Pay roll for September 

Vroman, Frank & Co., hardware 

Thomas Welch, beef 

Pat. Roach, beef 

R L. Garlick, crockery 

Robbins & Thornton, flour and meal 

Dunning & Sumner, dru^s, etc 

Clark & Mills, drugs, paints, etc 

Madison Manufacturing Co., castings, etc . . 

A. Findlav, coffee 

James E. Fisher, furniture 

A. S. McDill, M. D., sundry expenses 

E. W. Keyes, stamped envelopes 

John Davis & Co., steam pipe, etc 

Waldron, Niblock & Co., hardware 

M. Joachim & Co., hardware 

Conklin & Gray, coal, salt and cement 

Rev. J. B. Praat, chaplain si-rvices 



No. 



314 
315 

:mo 

317 
318 
319 
330 
321 
322 
323 
324 
325 
326 
327 
328 
329 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
335 
336 
337 
338 
339 
340 
341 
342 
343 
344 
345 
346 
347 
348 
349 
350 
351 
352 
353 
354 
355 
356 
357 
358 
359 
300 
361 



Amount. 



f 



1136 30 

73 80 

04 98 

98 00 

10« 75 

42 50 

2,020 01 

163 60 

381 20 

1,210 00 

154 00 

37 85 

142 00 

122 00 
77 52 

1,779 67 

95 00 

42 20 

153 99 

241 01 

223 70 

195 18 

52 35 

235 78 

66 65 

268 11 

42 00 

271 89 

194 75 

111 75 

2,256 88 

136 02 

123 87 
36 00 
33 65 

868 89 

2« 95 

105 60 

270 33 

40 38 

29 75 

72 15 

51 10 

1,271 14 

197 93 

156 13 

548 17 

132 00 

$105,975 78 



DOCUMENT No. 7. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BUILDING COMMISSIONERS 



OP THE 



Nortfiern Hospital for the Insane, 

OP THE 

STATE OF WISCONSIN, 
For the year ending September 30, 187^. 



Office of Building Commissioners 

OF THE NOBTHERK HOSPITAL FOR THE InSANE, 

Os^KOSH, October 1, 1872. 

To his Excellency, C. C. Washbitrn, 

Governor of Wisconsin: 

Honored Sir: — ^With pleasure we 'comply with the require- 
ment of law in submitting this Second Annual Report of Build- 
ing Commissioners of the Northern Hospital for the Insane. 

It is deemed unnecessary to repeat entirely the former report, 
but taking a few figures therefrom as a basis, the progress of 
the past year will be succinctly reviewed, and a few suggestions 
considered important for the interests of the Institution pre- 
sented. 



126,000 00 



2 

. Appbopbiations have been made as follows, viz: 

1870. 

For locating and securing site and commencing the build- 
ing 1125,00000 

1871. 

For completing north winff $44,000 00 

For sewerage, air ducts ana water 8,000 00 

For kitchen, laundry and engine house 48 ,500 00 

For heating, laundry and culinary apparatus. 25,500 00 

1872. 

For central tuilding f{91,800 00 

For lighting, fixtures and furniture 31 ,500 00 

For bams, tencos and roads, etc 6,700 00 

For purchase of land 2,000 00 

182,000 00 

Total appropriations $383,000 00 



Contracts have been awarded as follows, viz: 

1871. 

Feb. 2. For construction of six north wings, Messrs. Rey- 
nolds & Fellenz '. $146,581 80 

Aug. 16. Messrs. Reynolds & Fellenz, kitchen, laundry and 

engine house 47,565 00 

Aug. 16. Sewerage and air ducts, Messrs. Reynolds & Fel- 
lenz 6,993 00 

1872. 

May 7. Central building, Messrs. Fish, Stephens & Co. . . 72,445 00 
May 15. Heating, laundry and culinary apparatus, Messrs. 

Jno. Davis & Co., including central building. 33 ,000 00 

June 24. Two bams, L. G. Alger 8,300 00 

July 3. Bam foundation walls, Messrs. Fish & Stephens. 400 00 

July 26. Gas works, I. H. Walker 6,600 00 

Total $316,884 80 

Of the $125,000 appropriated in 1870 $2,976 96 

was paid to the locating commissioners, and for the site, 

337.66 acres 10,000 00 

$12,976 96 

(In addition to which the city of Oshkosh paid for the land about $16,000.) 

Leaving only $112,023.04 to the credit of the building commissioners. 

The cost of plans and architect's superintendence is in addi- 
tion to contract price, being five per cent, thereon. All ex- 
penses of commissioners are in addition also. 



3 

Estimates have been made and approved as follows, viz: 

On north wings $148,076 87 

15 per cent, retained, 121,461.53. 
Kitchen, laundry and engine house 41 ,107 47 

15 per cent, retained, 16,179.62. 

Sewerage and air ducts, in flill ^ 6,998 00 

Central building 87,770 85 

15 per cent, retained, $5,665.63. 
Heating, laundry and culinary apparatus 31 ,280 65 

15 per cent, retained, $4,692.10. 

Two bams, in full 8,800 00 

Foundations for bams, in full 400 00 

Carpenter and mason work pertaining to heating and laun- 
dry apparatus, but not included in Jno. Davis & Co.^s 
contract 1,706 05 

15 per cent, retained, $255.91. 

On account of artesian well 100 00 

To architect and superintendent. ) iq mx at 

Wholeamount paid, $12,563.55. . J ia,uio »4 

The contract for gas works stipulated for completion and 
satisfactory test of the gas supply before any payment. Con- 
tract was made with Mr. Allen to drill a six inch artesian bore 
to a depth of 150 feet at $5 per foot, and %% 50 per foot ad- 
ditional for the portion above the rock requiring wrought 
iron tube. The depth of 110 feet has been reached, 65 feet 
through hard lime rock, water rising in the tube within 8 feet 
of the surface. 

Since September 1, 1871, to October 1, 1872, the aggregate per- 
sonal expenses of Building Commissioners are $2,859 05 

Paid for surveying boundary lines ^ 10 25 

Paid for surveying building and bam lines j[i 00 

Stationery and postage $8 50, telegrams $8 80 11 80 

Legfkl advice respectmg contracts and estimates 80 00 

Livery bills $28, notices protecting trees $1 24 00 

Blank book $2 40, blank proposals $5 740 

Advertising for bids on rear buildings 98 00 

Advertising central building and heating, etc 186 60 

$8,179 10 

Miscellaneous items reported in 1871 $1 ,117 44 

Commissioners* expenses reported in 1871 1 ,691 73 

$2,809 17 

The farming land proper upon the premises was in very poor 
condition at the time the state came into possession; the only 
pastures being wood lots, no meadow lands, and all the fences 



and buildings in most dilapidated condition, consequently but 
slim showing could be expected in the agricultural department. 
With proper management, however, in due time the place will 
doubtless afford good returns for labor, and is capable of becom- 
ing a desirable and profitable farm; though, of course^ other 
and more important considerations prompted the selection of 
the site, which, for the purposes desired, is proving admirable 
in its various adaptations. 

It seemed for the interests of the state to " let " the arable 
land upon " shares " till such time as the hospital required the 
use of it, retaining such control of the premises as would fully 
protect the property of the state. The season of 1871 proved 
quite unfavorable in this section for cereals, owing to the ex- 
treme wet of l-he seeding time, and subsequent early hot 
weather. The returns to the state consisted of — 

225>i bushels of wheat, sold at |1.12 1253 78 

56 bushels of oats (reserved for seed.) 

88J^ bushels of shelled corn, sold at 40 cents 35 40 

Small amounts of wild hay, unripe buckwheat, wheat straw 
unthreshed, potatoes and some pasturage items, were turned 
over to the farmer in payment for services in watching the tim- 
ber, sand, gravel, etc., on the state land — ^upon which certain 
of the public seemed quite inclined to depredate — and making 
some fence about the grounds not otherwise paid for. 

The season of 1872 proved too extremely hot and dry for the 
best results; however the returns are an improvement upon last 
year, viz: 

Wheat, 1Q0}4 bushels, good q[uality, on hand. 

Oats, 340 bushels, gooa quality, on hand. 

Beans, 6 bushels, on hand. 

Potatoes, 12 bushels on hand. 

Hay, 16 tons, clover and timothy (estimated), on hand. 

}^ of about 5 acres of com, not husked, on hand. 

}4 of about 2 acres of buckwheat, not threshed, on hand. 

Bills pasturing collected $24 00 

Bills pasturing yet due 105 00 

$129 00 



5 

Paid for seed wlieat(3»^ share) |52 50 

Seed oats crop of 1871. 

OUier seed furnished by farmer. 
Paid farmer for labor about hospit^il grounds, fencing, cleaning 

off brush and building approach to grain bam 20 90 

Land plaster for clover field 10 00 

Damage paid for trespass by stock pastured on stiitc land 7 00 

^90 40 

The .dilapidated condition of fences, together with the contin- 
ual throwing down'about the hospital buildings, entailed great 
labor upon the farmer and much annoyance to the commission- 
ers, rendering the pasturage much less available than if other- 
wise. Two miles of good substantial board fence is an impera- 
tive necessity upon the place at once, in order to secure the 
products of the land and keep in safety the stock upon the 
farm. 

The north wings will probably be completed about the first 
of November, ready for furnishing, and arc in many respects 
creditable to architect and builders. 

The • rear buildings, comprising kitchens, bakery, laundry, 
amusement room and dormitories, also engine and boiler house, 
and fan room, are well advanced, giving promise of completion 
on or before the first of December next. 

The central building has been somewhat delayed on account 
of difficulties encountered by the contractors in obtaining cut 
stone; but the contractors manifest commendable energy in the 
prosecution of the work, and hope to get it safely inclosed 
during the month of November. Their contract requires them 
to finish the job by the first of January next. 

The heating works are nearly ready for testing, waiting only 
for the builders to get out of the way. The job seems to be a 
fine one, and gives, promise of gratifying success. 

Th^gas works are so far advanced as to afford assurance of 
early completion, and will undoubtedly be ready for the trial 
test before the buildings are completed. 

The water supply is still involved in doubt, yet it is hoped a 
flowing well may soon reward our exertions, and prove a benefi- 
cent boon to the Institution. The water question must needs 
be solved before opening the Hospital for patients. 



6 

The fitting up of the grounds about the Hospital, as contem- 
plated this season, has been prevented by delay in completing 
the buildings and removing the rubbish. Some of the necessary 
underdraining will be done yet this fall, and, perhaps, some 
work upon the road ways. 

In the way of furnishing the buildings much time and thought 
have been expended, and some necessary travel. Contracts have 
been made for the woolen blankets with Messrs. Burchard, Mc 
Fetridge & Co. of Beaver Dam; for the hair mattresses, with 
Messrs. A. T. Stewart & Co. of New York. Other contracts are 
pending and will be executed at an early day. 

No reason presents why the Hospital should not be rendered 
available for its intended use by the first of January next, pro- 
vided prompt legislatiye action is taken upon appropriations 
required for operating expenses. 

It is upon careful and mature deliberation recommended, that 
the final completion of the hospital be secured as soon as possi- 
ble, by the" erection of the south wiijgs — designed for the use of 
the male patients— during the year 1873. Among many reasons 
for this, the suggestion of a few will suffice: Economy will be 
secured thereby, as all the appliances for bmlding, belonging 
to two separate sets of contractors are now upon the grounds, 
including expensive railroad switch tracks, docks for unloading 
sail and steam vessjls, tramways, derricks and other hoisting 
machinery, besides wagons, teams, tools, temporary wells and 
buildings incident to, and necessary for the handling of such a 
job; also the disbanding and regathering of suitable artisans and 
laborers is an item of some weight. 

It is estimated by competent parties that a saving would be 
effected to the state of at least $20,000 by a continuous prosecu- 
tion of the work, as against a suspension of it for a year or 
more. The unavoidable annoyance and inconvenience to the 
inmates and managers of such an institution beyond almost any 
other, by the intrusion of an army of strange workmen with the 
din of labor, is well worth consideration. The necessary delay 
in fitting up the grounds about the hospital, or the worse de- 
struction of them if fitted up, is an important item. Last, though 



7 

not least, is the consideration of the fact that the interests of 
the unfortunate class to be cared for and cured, urgently demand 
a speedy completion of the whole structure; which fact might be 
forcibly enlarged upon to the extent of pages; but the readiness 
of our people to assist the unfortunate renders it unnecessary. 

Some further expenditures upon farm and grounds are indis- 
pensable, as for stock of horses, cows, swine, poultry, etc.; also 
sundry vehicles, implements and machinery, drainage, road 
making, fencing and outbuildings. 

The water supply, including necessary reservoirs, will more 
than exhaust the balance of the specific appropriation made for 
that purpose in connection with sewerage and air ducts. Its 
paramount importance forbids delay or the withholding of any 
necessary expenditure. 

Attention is respectfully called again to the portion of our 
last yearns report pertaining to the additional twenty acres of 
land contiguous to the hospital grounds upon the north, for the 
purchase of which $2,000 were judiciously appropriated by the 
last legislature. The commissioners have labored faithfully to 
effect the purchase of the desired strip of land, but their efforts 
have been unavailing; the owner asks $200 per acre for a piece 
of wild land without improvement, situate about five miles from 
the city, while well-tilled farms, with fine buildings and good 
fences, immediately adjoining, and even within the city limits, 
can be bought for $100 per acre. Therefore it is recommended 
that immediate steps be taken by the proper authorities to con- 
demn the land for state purposes, and thus pay its real value. 

The estimated amounts required suitably to carry out the 
foregoing recommendations, are as follows, viz: 

For south wings |161 ,000 00 

For heating south wings, including boilers 18,500 00 

For furnishing for 200 additional patients 12 ,000 00 

For improvement of grounds, garden and orchard, farm 

stock, implements, etc., and vehicles for hospital 8,000 00 

For gas fixtures, air duct, water supply pipes and sewerage. 7,850 00 

For operating expenses of hospital for one year 48,000 00 

ToUl 1255,350 00 



8 

For further partieulars and itemized statements we refer to 
the more carefully prepared report of the architect and super- 
intendent, Col. S. V. Shipman, whose experience in the prepara- 
tion of plans and supervision of their execution fit him for the 
responsible position occupied. His share in the work is duly- 
appreciated and acknowledged by the commissioners. 

Realizing the importance of preparing the hospital for use as 
soon as may be, and haying some idea of the preparatory labor 
requisite by those duly authorized under the law, we most re- 
spectfully suggest the early appointment of the Board of 
Trustees, upon whom also will devolve the unfinished task which 
it has been the earnest desire and watchful care of the present 
Board faithfully to perform, regardless of any personal incon- 
veniences or annoyances, (of which there have been not a few) 
if only the interests of the state might be subserved; the re- 
sults we speak not of, save to express the belief that they are 
worthy of all the cost, and hope for their endurance long after 
those who have labored to secure them shall be forgotten! 

Thanking yoti, kind sir, for the ever hearty interest and cor- 
dial co-operation manifested in behalf of this most beneficent 
work, this, our second annual report, is 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. M. DANTFORTH, 
D. W. MAXON, 
A. M. SKEELS, 

Building Commissioners, 
OsHKOSii, October 1, 1872. 



REPORT OF ARCHITECT AND SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Building Commissioners of the Northern 
Wisconsin Hospital for the Insane. 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to submit "this second an- 
nual report of the progress made in the construction of the 
new Hospital building, and its surroundings, together with 
^ such suggestions as appear to me proper to be made ^t this 
time, in regard to the future. 

Since the last annual report, the north wings have been 
fully enclosed, the plastering completed, the joiners' work, 
plumbing, gas piping, painting and glazing, and steam heating, 
are in such a state of forwardness, that there now appears to be 
a reasonable assurance that before the end of October, this por- 
tion of the main edifice will be fully completed and ready for 
occupancy. 

The walls of the rear building, which contains the kitchen, 
store rooms, laundry, boilers, engine, and apartments for domes- 
tics and employes, have been completed, the slate roof put on, 
and the plastering has so far advanced as to warrant the belief 
that this portion of the work will be completed before the close 
of the month of November. 

It is due to the Contractor to say, serious difiBculties have 
been encountered in obtaining a supply of brick suitable for 
the exterior walls of the building, by reason of the extraordi- 
nary demand for this commodity, created by the burning and re- 
building of Chicago; nearly all of last years' stock having been 
absorbed by that market, during last fall and winter, at greatly 

2— Nob. Hos. (Doc. 7.) 



10 

advanced rates; in consequence of which a limited supply 
only was obtained until after new brick had been manufactured. 
For this reason, principally, the walls were not completed until 
much later in the season than was contemplated at the end of 
last year. 

The subterranean air ducts have been completed, and the 
large and substantial brick sewer from the building to the lake 
shore has been laid, on a grade of not less than one foot fall m 
every hundred feet in length, which leaves no foundation for 
doubts on the subject of having perfect and reliable drainage 
for the institution. The laying of sewer pipe for surface drain- 
age has also been provided for, and will, without doubt, be com- 
pleted before the middle of November. The underground con- 
duits for cohveying the rain water from the roofs into the large 
cisterns are also being put down. 

The construction of the central building and connections, 
authorized by the Legislature of last winter, was commenced 
immediately after the passage of the law, and has, under the 
contract of Messrs. Fish, Stephens, Sorrensen & Co., been carried 
forward with commendable energy and success, until the walls 
have been raised to the window sills of the third story, and no 
g^od reason is known why this portion of the main Hospital 
building shall not be roofed in and fully enclosed before the 
middle of November. 

The heating, ventilating, laundry and culinary apparatus, 
which is being put in under the contract of Messrs. John Davis 
& Co., is rapidly approaching completion, and steam will be let 
into the coils, for testing the same, within a short time. 

All rooms in the Hospital building will be warmed by indi- 
rect radiation, with the addition of coils for direct radiation 
in all bathrooms, where a higher temperature is at times requi- 
site. Pure and fresh air, forced into chambers containing coils 
of steam pipe, by the fan, is warmed, and conducted by flues 
directly into the rooms and corriders, controlled by valve regis- 
ters. The system of ventilation adopted and carried out, is a 
combination of the exhaust and forcing principles. In the or- 
dinary working of the apparatus, as arranged, every inmate of 



11 

the Hospital will be supplied with six hundred cubic feet of 
fresh air every hour, day and night, which quantity may be in- 
creased or decreased as the Medical Superintendent may 
direct. 

The gas works adopted by the Board of Commissioners are 
warranted by the Contractor to supply the whole institution 
with fixed gas, of twenty candle-power, manufactured from pe- 
troleum. Of the merits of this particular method of manufac- 
turing gas, I cannot speak; but it is hoped the assurances given 
by the Contractor will be verified. 

There being no springs or running streams upon the Hospi- 
tal farm, or near enough to be made available for supplying 
water for the institution, various plans were discussed for ob- 
taining the requisite supply; and, in view of the fact that a 
large number of artesian wells in the city of Oshkosh and vicin- 
ity were furnishing large quantities of pure soft water, it was 
deemed economical and for the best interests of the State that 
this method of obtaining water should be tried before resorting 
to the more expensive plan of pumping it from Lake Winne- 
bago. A favorable contract was therefore entered into with 
Henry Allen, he being the lowest bidder, for sinking an artesian 
well of six inch bore, convenient to the engine room, in which 
are- located the pumps for forcing water to the iron tanks in the 
attic of the Hospital buildings. 

The tubing was driven to the rock, a distance of thirty-six 
feet from the surface of the ground. The boring has necessa- 
rily progressed slowly, on account of the extreme hardness of 
the rock. At first, water stood in the tubing within fourteen 
feet of the surface, but on reaching the stratum of sand rock, 
at the depth of one hundred ten feet from the surface, the water 
rose four feet higher; and, while no adequate test has been 
made, for want of steam power, a considerable quantity of water 
may be relied on from this bore, if used as a pumping well, in 
case a flowing well be not secured by going a reasonable 
depth. The depth of one hundred and eleven feet has now 
been reached, and the indications seem to be favorable for a 
flowing well. Should this not prove a success after going a 



12 

« 

reasonable depth, then resort should be had to pumping from the 
lake, by which means an undoubted supply may be obtained. 

The north wings and the rear buildings are now so nearly 
completed that it is entirely safe to say the Hospital may be 
opened for the reception of patients on the first day of January 
next. Should the central building, which is designed specially 
for the officers and visitors, not be fully in readiness by 
that time, temporary accommodations for them will be found 
in wing " F " immediately adjoining. No reason is known why 
the furniture, bedding, table ware, etc., may not be in readiness 
to allow the opening at the time named. 

The estimates for work done by Contractors to the close of the 
fiscal year (Sept. 30) 1872 are as follows: — 

North win^s (Messrs. Reynolds & Fellens) $143,076 87 

Rear buildme ^Messrs. Reynolds & Fellens) 41 ,197 47 

Sewerage ana air ducts (Messrs. Reynolds & Fellens), final . 6,993 00 

Central building (Messrs. Fish, Stephens, Sorrensen & Co.) 37,770 85 
Heating, ventilating and culinary apparatus (Messrs. John 

Davis & Co.) 31,280 65 

Mason and carpenter work connected with heating, etc., 

(Messrs. Reynolds & Fellens) 1 ,706 05 

Artesian well, payments on acct 00 001 

On the estimates for sewerage and air ducts, and for the arte- 
sian well, the amount stated is the amount paid. On all other 
estimates eighty-five per cent has been paid in cash by the State 
Treasurer. 

To complete the remaining portion of the Hospital building, 
according to the plans and specifications, so as to present to the 
people of the State a finished and complete institution, second 
to none in the country in point of completeness in construc- 
tion, convenience in arrangement, efficiency and economy in its 
operation, will require further appropriations, as follows: — 

For constructing the south wings $161 ,000 00 

For heating and plumbing, including additional boilers and 

tanks 18,500 00 

Air ducts, rain water pipes, and sewerage for south wings . . 5,400 00 

Two reservours for ram water 1 ,600 00 

Gas fixtures for south wings 850 00 

Total $187,350 00 



13 

For forniture, bedding and table ware for 200 additional pa- 
tients at $60.00 each $12 , 000 00 

For current expenses, including salaries, etc.. for the treat- 
ment of 200 patients, for one jeai, at $20.00 per month . . 48 ,000 00 

For horses, carriages, farm stock, improvements on farm, or- 
chard, ornamental shade trees, etc 8,000 00 



If an appropriation be asked for current expenses from the 
opening to the time when the Legislature ordinarily makes ap- 
propriations, it should be for the time commencing January 1st, 
1872, to March 31st, 1874, fifteen months, for two hundred pa- 
tients, at $20 per month, $60,000. 

At the commencement there will be some extraordinary ex- 
penses, and while the average number of patients will not be 
two hundred for every month, the appropriation asked will be 
required. 

Should the Legislature make an appropriation early in the 
session, the south wings may be completed by the first of April, 
1874, and it would seem that there could be but one opinion 
among men accustomed to think on the subject, that enlightened 
economy would suggest the completion of the whole building 
at the earliest practicable time, both as regards economy in con- 
struction and the increased usefulness of the institution. This 
policy cannot be too strongly presented and urged for the con- 
sideration of the Legislature. 

The immediate and pressing necessity for increased accom- 
modations for the unfortunate insane in our State must be ap- 
parent to every observing man and woman in the State. And 
while Wisconsin has done nobly in providing for the treatment 
of this peculiarly unfortunate class of her citizens, the rapid in- 
crease of this terrible malady calls for continued eflfort on the 
part of the authorities, in order to meet the demands upon their 
enlightened philanthropy. 

The work so far accomplished has been well done, and is 
creditable to the skill and integrity of the Contractors; while it 
must prove to the Legislature and all who examine it, that this 
important public interest has been entrusted to intelligent, hon- 
est and faithful public servants. 

That the Legislature and the people at large may understand 



14 

fully what has been done, as well as what remains to be done, I 
respectfully recommend that a perspective view and ground 
plans of the buildings, on a scale adapted to the same, be pub- 
lished with the annual report of the Board of Building Com- 
missioners. 

The constant and efficient superintendence of the work by my 
assistant, Mr. William "Waters, architect, has' contributed large- 
ly to the excellent character of the work accomplished, and 
should prove to the Board, as it has to me, his fitness and in- 
tegrity. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. V. SHIPMAN, 
Architect and Superintendent. 
October 1, 1872. 



DOCUMENT No. 8. 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



Wisconsin Institution for the Education 

of the Blind, 



For the Fiscal Year ending October, 1S72. 



Located at Janesville, Wis. 



MADISON, WIS. : 

ATWOOD & CULVKB, PRINTERS AND STERE0TTPER8. 

1872. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Terms expire April 3, 1873. 
WM. H, TRIPP. A. A. JACKSON. 

Term expires April 3, 1874. 
PLINY NORCROSS. 

Terms expire April 3, 1875. 
J. D. REXFORD. J. B. WHITING, M. D. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

A. A.. JACKSON, 
President, 

J. D. REXFORD, 
Treasv/rer. 

J. B. WHITING, M.D., 
Secretary, 



RESIDENT OFFICERS OF INSTITUTION. 



SUPEBIVTByDENT. 

THOMAS H. LITTLE, M. A. 



TEACHEBS. 

Miss S. A. WATSON, Miss H. A. DAGGETT, 

Miss C. L. BALDWIISr. 

TEACHEBS OF aiUSIC. 

MAURICE D. JONES, Miss FRANCES L. COLVIN. 



FOBEXAN OF SHOP. 

JAMES STEPHEN. 

MATBON. 

3Ir8. MARIA H. AVHITING. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency, C. C. Washburn, 

Governor of Wisconsin: 

We have the honor to present the following as the 23rd an- 
nual report of the Wisconsin Institution for the Education of 
the Blind. It is accompanied not only by the usual reports of 
the Secretary and Treasurer of the Board and of the Superin- 
tendent of the Institution, but also by a detailed statement, re- 
quired by act of the last Legislature to be presented, in the 
form prescribed by the State Board of Charities and Reforms. 

The Institution is in a prosperous condition, and has during 
the year conferred its benefits upon a larger number of persons 
than in any previous year. 

The arrangements in progress at the date of our last report 
for lighting the house with gas have been completed, at a cost 
within the appropriation made for the purpose. The special 
appropriation of $1,400 for the purpose of purchasing an adja- 
cent lot of ground has been expended in accordance with the 
terms of the act appropriating the money. 

The following is a summary of the financial operations of the 
year: — 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance in treasury at last report : 

Balance of appropriation for appa- 

ratus 1465 00 

Balance of appropriation for lighting 1 ,848 34 , 

Balance of appropriation for current 

expenses 4,054 09 

$6,367 43 

Appropriation for 1872 : 

For current expenses $21,000 00 

For purchase of land 1 ,400 00 

22,40000 



Receipts from work department, etc 1 ,034 65 

$29,802 08 



8 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

For Amusements 32 31 ... 

Apparatus and means of instruction 663 94 

Clothing * 170 71 

Dru^s and medicines and medical attendance . . 103 59 

Puef '3,191 60 

House furnishing 649 15 

Lights (exclusive of fixtures) 385 21 

Manufacturing expenses 667 10 

Miscellaneous purposes (including $1,400 for 

land) 3,974 85 

Repairs 1 ,152 27 

Permanent improvements 1 ,460 87 

Subsistence 4,543 03 

Salaries and wages .... 6 ,214 96 

123,218 59 



Balance on hand $6,5 83 49 

To find the true " current " expense for the year we must de- 
duct the amount of , the following special expenditures: — 

For land 11,400 00 

Lighting with gas 1 ,205 05 

Apparatus 179 00 

Superintendent's working fund 50 00 

$2,834 05 



This shows the expenditures for ordinary purposes to have 
been $20,384.53. 

The following sums are needed to carry on the Institution for 
the year ending January 31, 1874: — 

For Subsistence $5 ,488 00 

Salaries 4,925 00 

Wages 2,000 00 

Fuel 3,200 00 

Lights 500 00 

Repairs 1 ,0!)3 00 

House furnishing 903 00 

Means of instruction 532 00 

Expenses of barn and stable 550 00 

Miscellaneous purposes 1 ,309 00 

$20,500 00 

In common with others connected with the various State in- 
stitutions, we think it desirable to make a change in the time 
of l^eginning the year for which the annual appropriations are 
made. To effect this, we propose that the next Legislature pro- 



vide for carrying on the Institution through the months of Feb- 
ruary and March, 1874, in order that subsequent appropriations 
may be made for years beginning on the first of April. For 
this purpose the sum of $3,500 will be needed. 

The Institution is greatly in need of a suitable building for 
the accommodation of its horses and carriages, cows and swine. 
Want of space has hitherto compelled the use of buildings not 
only in every way unfit, but so located as in case of fire to im- 
peril other buildings of the Institution. The last Legislature 
authorized the purchase of the lot adjoining that on which the 
Institution stands, with a view to erecting the necessary build- 
ing thereon. Such a structure as is needed will cost, according 
to the architect's estimates, about $5,000. As there are always 
some contingent expenses in connection with building, and as 
architects' estimates usually fall below the real cost, we increase 
the estimate a little, and ask that $5,500 may be appropriated 
for this purpose. 

When the grounds of the Institution were fenced, a mistake 
was made by which a small piece of land belonging to Dr. R. S. 
Maloney was enclosed. Most of this lies directly between the 
house and the street. To regain possession of his property, Dr. 
Maloney has commenced legal proceedings. He offers, how- 
ever, to convey it to the Institution upon receiving payment at 
the rate of $200 per acre. There is a little more than an acre 
of this land. We recommend that $250 be appropriated to en- 
able us to buy it. 

In conclusion, being aware that in the faithful and efficient 
administration of our trust, are concerned not only the welfare 
of the blind, but also the honor of the State, we invite the care- 
ful attention of your Excellency and of the Legislature to our 
proceedings; and, believing that those who have been placed 
under our charge are receiving very great benefits from the In- 
stitution, we earnestly commend its interests to the continued 
support of the people of Wisconsin, and to the Great Being 
who has made the people able and willing to relieve mis- 
fortune. A. A. JACKSON, President. 
. J. B. Whiting, Secretary. 
Janesvillb, October, 1872. 



STATEMENT OF THE EXPENDITURES 



Of the Wisconsin Institution for the Education of the Blind ^ 
from October Kth 1871, to October 16^A, 1872, detailed accord- 
ing to form of " Exhibit 6^," prescribed by the State Board 
of Charities ajid Reform, 



Articles. 



Amusements 



APPARATUS AND MEANS OP INSTRTTCTlON. 



Books in raised print 

liaised maps 

Instruments, books, etc., for musical department 

Books and periodicals 

Apparatus for \\Titing 

Miscellaneous apparatus 



N. B. $179.00 of above from special fund. 



CLOTHING. 



Boots and shoes and repairing, 

Boys' garments , 

Girls' garments 



DRUGS A!ID MEDICINES. 



Medicines, etc 
Doctors' bills . 



FUEL. 



Coal — Anthracite, 9 t^)ns 1,450 pounds, $10 per ton. . 

Coal— Anthracite, 220 tons, $10 50 per ton 

"VVood — maple, 60 cords, $7 65 per cord 

\\''ood — 2(1 growth oak, etc., 33)^ cords, $6 per cord 
Wood— other kinds , 



Amomit. 



$.32 31 



$119 93 

46 00 

418 23 

46 20 

27 45 

6 13 



$063 94 



$09 80 
88 20 
12 71 


$170 71 


$27 09 
76 50 


$103 50 


$155 60 

2,310 00 

459 00 

201 00 

66 00 


$8,191 60 



11 



Statement of JExpenditures — continued. 



Articles. 



House Furnishing 



Candles. . 
Gasoline . 
Kerosene 
Tapers. . . 



LIGHT. 



Liqixms. — ^Noae. 



MANUFACTURING. 



Materials used in shop 

N. B. — This has been repaid to the Inst, by 
Mr. Stephens. 

Tools and fixtures for shop , 

Wire for girls* work 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Advertising 

Barn and stable expenses, including feed, etc., 

for animals, and repairs on vehicles, etc. 

Grounds and fencing 

Hotel bill for legislative committee 

Insurance 

Land, (special appropriation) 

Laundry expenses, including steamer, soap, 

starch, etc 

Labor 

Livery for legislative committee 

Postage 

Printing 

Stationery 

Telegraphing ... - 

Trustees' expenses — None. 
Tobacco^None. 

Unclassified expenses 

" Working fund" of Superintendent 



PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS. 

Lighting with gas, (special appropriation). . 

On heating apparatus 

On cistern 

On plumbing 

On rail to west steps 



Quiuitlty. 



40 lbs 

1,737 gal.... 
49K gal ... . 



Amoont* 



$640 15 



$8 00 

861 06 

15 35 

80 



$385 21 



1629 68 



20 26 
17 16 


m^ 10 


$8 50 


528 44 

343 41 

50 00 

425 00 

1,400 00 


282 02 
202 12 
45 00 
86 96 
98 80 
35 56 
4 55 


414 49 
50 00 


$3, 974 85 


$1,205 05 

181 63 

72 42 

55 20 

6 67 


$1 ,469 87 



12 



/Statement of JSospenditures — continued. 



Articles. 



REPAIRS. 



On heating apparatus 

Carpenter work 

Painting, papering and glazing 

Mason work 

Hardware 

Unclassified items 



Quantity. 



SUBSISTENCE. 



Amoant 



1557 57 

291 78 

84 14 

138 75 

34 73 

45 30 



11,152 27 



Articles. 



Bread 

Butter 

Cheese 

Crackers 

Coffee, Rio (ground), 

Cider 

Eggs... 

Fish, cod 

Fish, fresh 



FLOUR AND MEAL. 



Flour 

Graham flour . . . 
Buckwheat flour 

Com meal 

Prepared wheat . 



FRUIT. 



Apples, green 
Apples, dried 

Berries 

Cherries 

Citron 

Cocoanut .... 
Cranberries . 



Quantitj. 


Amoant. 


14,477 lbs 


496 62 


2,883 lbs 


549 82 


192 lbs 


29 16 


649 lbs 


62 04 


419 lbs. .. 


98 97 


7 gal 

788 doz 


2 15 


114 57 


600 lbs 


42 25 


55 lbs 


6 53 


6,800 lbs. ... 


200 40 


275 lbs 


8 57 


150 lbs 


6 80 


1,100 lbs 


14 05 




3 85 


196 bush... 


108 15 


98 lbs 


11 88 


419 qts 


50 66 


9 9-16 bu 


23 15 


4 lbs 


2 10 


13 J^ lbs 


4 46 


1 bbl.... 


9 03 



13 
Statement of Expenditures — Subsistence — continued. 



Articles. 



Currants 

Currants, dried. 

Grapes 

Lemons 

Melons 

Peaches , 

Pleaches, dried . . 
Peaches, canned. 
Plums, (wild)... 

Prunes 

Raisins 



Fruit — con. 



Freight on groceries not specified 

Honey 

Ice 

Lard ; < 



MEATS. 



Beef, fresh . . . 

Beef, salt 

Beef, dried . . . 

Hams 

Lamb 

Mutton 

Mutton, dried 
Pork, fresh. . . 

Tongues 

Veal 



Milk and cream. 
Molasses 



Chickens .. 
Turkeys.. ., 

Rice 

Salt, coarse. 
Salt, fine... 



POULTRY. 



Quantity. 



lOJi bush.. 

19 lbs . , . 

47 lbs . . . 

14 doz . . 

6 

19J^ boxes. 
51 lbs . . . 

2 doz . . 

9 V bush . 
224 lbs .. 

8 bxs . . 



10 lbs... 



1,015 lbs... 



14,030 lbs. 

191 lbs. 

61 lbs. 

5051^ lbs. 

363 lbs. 

96 lbs. 

11 lbs. 

183 lbs, 

13 ... 



415 lbs. 



SMALL OROCERIES AND SPlCEd. 



Allspice 

Carb. soda . . . 
Cinnamon . . . 

Cloves 

Com starch . . 
Cream Tartar. 

Extracts 

(Gelatine 

Ginger 



473^ gals.. 



383>^ lbs... 
332 lbs... 
250 lbs... 

1 bbl... 

2% bbl... 



6 lbs.. 

20 lbs.. 

13 lbs.. 

11}^ lbs.. 

20 lbs. . 

81 lbs.. 

2 pts .. 

ioji'ibs!! 



Amonnt. 



$13 50 



2 
3 



62 

78 

38 

98 

19 85 



4 

7 
11 



59 
00 
57 



24 94 
10 15 

6 84 

1 80 

63 25 

84 02 



1,034 18 
6 68 
7,68 
55 05 
34 70 
6 12 
1 00 
9 10 
4 71 

36 60 

14 28 

37 82 



24 75 
44 58 
23 00 
2 75 
10 95 



1 80 

1 70 
9 10 
8 10 

2 80 
15 55 

200 
80 

3 80 



14 



Statement of Expenditures — Subsistence — continued. 



AfinoLBS. 



Small Groc^rteSj etc. — con. 



Mace 

Mustard. 
Nutmegs 
Pepper . . 



Sugar, A. . 
Sugar, C. . 

SjTup 

Tea, black 



Vinegar 



VEGETABLES. 



Asparagus 

Beans 

Cabbages 

Celerj' , 

Cucumbers, pickled, 

Green Corn 

Green Peas 

Onions 

Parsnips 

Pieplant 

Peppers 

Potatoes 

Pumpkins 

Squashes 

Sweet Potatoes 

Turnips 



Yeast 

Total cost of Subsistence 



Quantity. 



Mlb. 



M lb. 
14)4 lbs. 



1,702 

1,751 

02 

185 

133 



lbs. 
lbs. 
gal. 
lbs. 
gal. 



3J^ bush . . 



6 doz. . . . 
511>^ bush . . 

2 

271 

1 bbl . . . . 
20 bush... 



Amount. 



8 3-5 bush. > 

200 

3 



fO 40 

5 46 

31 

5 05 

212 89 
211 08 

53 03 
130 68 

29 00 



30 

16 78 

8 00 

2 70 

3 00 

1 81 

2 03 
1 50 
8 03 

75 

1 80 

331 00 

10 

18 85 

4 50 
7.80 

20 



$4,543 03 



15 



Statement of Expenditures — continued. 



SALARIES AND WAGES. 



Names. 



Thomas H. Little . . . 
S. Augusta WaUon. . 
Helen A. Daggett. . . 
Clara L. Baldwin . . . 
Maurice D. Jones. . . 
Flora F.Winslow... 

James Stephen 

George Schorl) 

Mrs. M.H. Whiting. 

J. K. Wilson 

John Snider 

John Cavanagh 

Jolui Cavanagh 

Ellen Hanson 

Susan Anderson .... 

Sophie Svenson 

Marj' L. Jerdee 

Ann Peterson 

Ann Peterson 

Ann Peterson 

Carrie Nelson 

Carrie Nelson 

Carrie Nelson 

Jane Reseland 

Jane Reseland 

Belle Femereite 

Belle Femereite 

Jane Brown 

Jane Brown 

Ann Oleson 

Emma Oleson 

Alb'tinaFredericks'n 
Alb'tinaFredericks'n 
Alb'tinaPredericks'u 
Betsy Hanson ...... 

Betsy Hanson 

Kate Sennett 



Occnpatlon. 



Time em- 
ployed. 



Rate per 
month. 



Superintendent 

Teacher 

do 

do 

Teacher of Music: . 

Teacher of H'dicr't 
Assistant in teach'g! 

Matron ; 

Janitor | 

Laborer 



Year . . . . 
Session . . 
. . .do .. . 
.. .do .. . 
. . .do . . . 
^% Mo.. 
9 Mo.. 
Session. . 

Year 

, . . .do . . . 



$168 33 
30 00 
30 00 
30 00 
50 00 
15 00 

30 00 
7 50 

31 25 
41 67 

1 2i3.30Moi 18 00 



■ Uw • • • • • ■ • 



do 

Seamstress 

do 

Cook * 

Chambermaid 

do 

Laundress 

Cleaning house 

Laundress I 

do : 

Cleaning house ; 

Dining room girl . .' 

Cleaning house 1 

Dining room girl . . j 

Cleaning house 

General work 

do 
Kitchen girl 
Laundress 
General w^ork 

do 

Cleaning house 

Kitchen girl 

Cleaning 

Laundress 



Total of salaries and wages 



4 Mo I 

6 9-30 Mo 
52 2-7Wk, 
, . . .do ... 
50 4.7Wk! 
21 2.7Wk| 
22Wks..| 
24 4-7Wki 

5 5-7 ^Vk! 
8 6-7 Wkl 
31 l-7Wk! 
1 2.1 Wk 
42 2-7Wk' 
3 Wk...l 
40 4-7Wk! 
1 2-7 Wk' 

6 5-7 Wk 

5 3-7 Wk 
8 5-7 Wk 
18 5-7 Wk 
23 3.7Wk 

6 1-7 Wk 

7 1-7 Wk 
27 2.7Wk 
1 2-7 Wk 
2 14.26MO 



16 00 

18 00 

3 00 

3 00 



3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 



00 
50 
50 
75 
00 
75 
25 
00 
50 
00 
2 25 
8 00 
2 00 
2 25 
25 
75 
25 
50 
00 

2 25 

3 00 
12 00 



2 
2 
2 
2 
3 



Amount. 



$1,900 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

500 00 

121 88 

270 00 

75 00 

375 00 

500 00 

31 80 

64 00 

113 22 

156 85 

156 85 

151 71 

53 22 

55 00 

67 57 

17 14 

24 36 



^ 



07 

3 a5 

105 71 
9 00 
91 29 
3 85 
13 57 
12 50 
19 61 
51 46 

50 91 
15 36 
21 42 

51 39 
3 85 

30 46 

16,214 96 



SUPERINTENDENTS REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Wisco?isin Institution for the Educa- 
iton of the Blind: 

I respectfully submit the following as the report due from 
your Superintendent at this time: 

During the year eighteen pupils have been . admitted, and 
thirteen have left, of whom two left to remove from the State. 
The entire number in attendance has been seventy -six, of whom 
forty-three were males and thirty-three females. The largest 
number in attendance in any previous year is sixty-nine. The 
number thus far enrolled for the present term of school is fifty- 
seven. 

Classes were taught during the term ending in June last in 
Reading, Spelling, Arithmetic, Geography, Grammar, Rhetoric 
and the History of the United States. The classes for the pres- 
ent term are in Reading, Spelling, Writing, Arithmetic, Geo- 
graphy, Rhetoric and Physiology, In most of these studies 
there are several classes. The literary department necessarily 
receives the greatest amount of labor, because in it are gained 
both the knowledge required for taking creditable position in 
the world and the mental discipline so necessary to success in 
any special pursuit. "Without the increased intellectual power 
resulting from this training, the blind broom-maker stands a 
poor chance in the competition of trade; and without this power 
and the culture acquired in the study of science and literature, 
the blind musician is painfully liable to be regarded with con- 
temptuous pity in the society to which his artistic skill intro- 
duces him, and is in danger of being left to find companionship 
among associates of low tastes and bad habits. 



17 

In the work department, broom-making has been taught to 
twentj-five. Two of these were adults that were admitted 
expressly to learn the trade. Seating of cane chairs has been 
introduced and taught to a few. More will be done with this 
branch hereafter. 

The plan of placing the work department, so far as its pecun- 
iary results are concerned, entirely in the hands of its foreman, 
has proved so far satisfactory as to encourage its continuance. 
The boys have never made so good progress in broom making as 
since this plan was adopted. 

To the work department I attach great importance. Most of 
our male pupils must depend upon their own industry for their 
living. If it were not necessary for them to do so, they would 
no doubt be happier when industriously and usefully employed, 
than under any other circumstances. It would be very poor 
policy for the State to attempt to cultivate their minds, and 
leave their hands untrained. If the community had to support 
any one in idleness, (that could support himself) it might as 
well be done without previous expenditure of large sums upon 
intellectual culture. 

It is gratifying to hear from time to time that former pupils 
of the institution are putting the skill acquired in our shop to 
good use, and securing profitable employment thereby. 

In the musical department there have been two choirs, a class 
of fourteen in harmony, and an orchestra of fourteen instru- 
ments. Eighteen pupils have had private instruction in voice 
culture. Thirty-eight have had lessons on the piano, five on the 
cabinet organ, nine on the violin, and nine on other instru- 
ments. The attractiveness of music itself, and the probability 
that those who become skillful in it may obtain good positions 
as music teachers or organists, excite among the pupils a strong 
desire to devote themselves to it. Their parents are apt, also, 
to mistake a love of music for musical talent, and to cherish ex- 
pectations of their children's success which are not well founded, 
and can never be realized. Our practice is to give all an oppor- 
tunity to develop what musical talent they possess, but not to 
allow them to neglect the literary or work departments. We 
a— Bund. (Doc. 8.) 



18 

aim, also, to make pupils who reach a certain degree of pro- 
gress as thoroughly acquainted with the science of music as 
possible, in order that when they undertake to teach, they may 
be not only equal but superior, in this respect, to the majority 
of seeing teachers with whom they will come in competition. 
It is to be regretted that they have but few opportunities of 
hearing first-class musicians. Better privileges in this respect 
would both improve their taste and enable them to form more 
correct judgments of their own abilities and attainments. 

There have been no regular school exercises on Saturdays, but 
a part of the forenoon has usually been occupied either with a 
musical rehearsal or with the examination of some class selected 
by lot. An hour in the evening is devoted to reading to the 
school, which is divided into two classes for the purpose. By 
this means they are made acquainted with the literature of the 
language, and acquire a taste for good reading. 

Training in light gymnastics has been given to about half of 
the school. This gives physical exercise which some are back- 
ward in taking. It also aids greatly in correcting awkwardness 
in giving ease and gracefulness to position and motions, and in 
developing the muscular system — matters to which many par- 
ents of blind children do not seem to have given much atten- 
tion, and to which it is not easy to induce all blind persons to 
attach sufficient importance. 

This may be a proper j)lace to refer to the great amount of 
incidental labor that comes upon the officers of the house in 
endeavoring, by personal influence and repeated instruction, to 
form in the pupils good personal habits and manners, and to 
give them an acquaintance with the conventional proprieties of 
life. On account of their inability to perceive how cultured 
persons behave under various circumstances, things which with 
others are largely matters of unconscious imitation, are to the 
blind matters of laborious acquisition; and while some are 
solicitous to conform to the customs of good society, and ready 
to comply with suggestions ujoon any points of decorum, others 
are negligent of appearance, careless of manners and seem to 
think it strange that one way of doing a thing should be con- 



19 

sidered more correct or becoming than another. That there are 
among our pupils any uncouth motions of head, face, hands or 
body is an occasion of constant and great regret; that there are 
no more is due partly to highly creditable exertion made by 
many of them to improve, and partly to incessant care and kind- 
ness on the part of teachers and others who have them in charge 
from day to day. 

The officers are the same as last year, except that Miss Fran- 
ces L. Colvin has succeeded to the place that Miss F. F. Wins- 
low had held in the musical department for two years. Miss 
Winslow was a skilful teacher and leaves us to carry out plans 
of her own. 

Mention should be made of the fact that two pupils, George 
Schorb and Minnie Donahue, have given useful assistance in 
teaching — ^the former in the literary department, and the latter 

in the musical. 

Except that the mumps went through the school last winter, its^ 
health has been as good as is to be expected in the class of per- 
sons with whom we have to deal. There has often been some 
person ailing and but seldom any person very sick. Our salu- 
brious location, regular hours, good diet, attention to cleanli- 
ness and exercise, the care of the matron and the skill of our 
physician, under divine favor, have combined to secure this re- 
sult. 

It is natural to suppose that the efforts made by the State to 
improve the condition of blind youth would be hailed by their 
parents with delight, and that they would hasten to avail them- 
selves of the privileges offered. Experience, however, (not of 
this Institution only, but of all,) proves that it is necessary to 
make constant and varied exertions to search out those who 
should be in school, and to gather them in. Some parents set 
too little value upon education in general, and some think it 
useless to hope for good results from educating a ' blind child ; 
some are too careless of their children's interests, and some so 
careful of their safety and comfort that they are reluctant to 
entrust them to the care of strangers ; some are uninformed as 
to the existence of the Institution, and many are misinformed 



20 

as to its terms, operations and advantages. To overcome some 
of these hindrances, I have, during the past summer, employed 
Geoige Schorb, an intelligent pupil of the Institution, to travel 
in various parts of the State, visiting the parents of blind chil- 
dren, whose residences were known to me, searching for others, 
and disseminating information as to the work of the Institu- 
tion. His own ability to do such work, affords parents sufficient 
proof of the capacity of the blind for becoming useful citizens, 
and of the power of the Institution to benefit those who are 
placed in it. I feel satisfied that this experiment was a profit- 
able one. 

In further prosecution of the same class of work, I have 
availed myself of the means afforded by the report of the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, which shows that 
the school district clerks found last year in their various locali- 
ties one hundred and fifty-two children ^^ incapacitated for in- 
struction from defect of vision." Through the kindness of the 
Superintendent I have had access to the returns and been fur- 
nished with a list of town clerks. I have entered into corres- 
pondence with these officers, and find that, in some instances, 
errors have occurred by which such children have been reported 
in places where they cannot be found; but on the other hand, I 
know of others who seem to have been overlooked, so that the 
number is probably not far from correct. I desire here to ac- 
knowledge the kindness with which many of the clerks have 
sought information, by which the work of the institution has 
been promoted. Some children have already entered school as 
a result of this information, and others will undoubtedly do so 
in the course of time. 

Nearly a yearns experience in the use of the Gas Generator 
bought of Judd & Co., has proved it to be an excellent arrang- 
ment for lighting the buildings. It only needs to be wound up 
and supplied with gasoline once in two or three days, to keep 
us fully supplied with a clear, strong and steady light. The la- 
bor of keeping it in operation is less than that of attending to the 
lamps formerly in use; the light is better and far more abund- 
ant; and we are entirely relieved from the feeling of danger 



21 

connected with the use of kerosene. I see no reason why the 
apparatus should not continue to give as good satisfaction for 
years. 

The thanks of the institution are due to S. S. Merrill, of the 
Milwaukee and St. Paul railway, for facilities afforded for hunt- 
ing up blind children along the line of that road; also to him 
and other gentlemen connected with the railroads of the state, 
for the transportation of needy pupils to and from their homes. 

Thanks are also to be rendered to the publishers, for copies 
of the papers named below: 

Weekly State Journal, Madison. 

Crescent, Appleton. 

Advocate. Green Bay. 

State Gazette, Green Bay. 

Standard, Burlington. 

Banner, Black River Falls. 

Chief, Fort Atkinson. 

Recorder, Janesville. 

Times, Janesville. 

Picayune, Janesville. 

Sentinel, Monroe. 

Union, Kenosha. 

Commonwealth, Fond du Lac. 

Northwestern Christian Advocate, Chicago. 

Advocate, Atlanta, Georgia. 

Amateur, Philadelphia. 

Official Gazette (Patent Office), Washington, D. C. 

Thanks are likewise due to Mrs. Marion Leavitt, Janesville, 
for four volumes of Waverly Novels; to C. H. Heimstreet, 
Janesville, for seeds, and to Smith & Bostwick, Janesville, for a 
package of trimmings. 

THOS. H. LITTLE, 

Superintendent. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Wisconsin Institution for the 
Education of the Blind: 

Gentlemen: — Herewith I submit a statement of my receipts 
and disbursements on account of the institution you have in 
charge, since the date of my last annual report. 

Respectfully Yours, 

J. D. REXFORD, 

Treasurer, 
Dated October 30th, 1872. 



23 






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SECRETARY'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees qf the Wisconsin Institution for the 
Education of the Blind: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith present you a statement in detail of 
the orders drawn on your Treasurer from Oct. 30th, 1871, to 
Oct. 12th, 1872, inclusive. 

^ Very respectfully, I have the honor to be, 

J. B. WHITING, 

Secretary. 
Janesville, Oct. 16, 1872. 



25 



LIST OF ORDERS. 



Bate. 



No. 



1871 




Oct 80 


158 


Oct 80 


154 


Oct. 80 


155 


Oct 80 


156 


Oct 80 


157 


Oct 80 


158 


Oct 80 


169 


Oct 80 


160 


Oct 80 


161 


Oct 80 


162 


Oct 80 


163 


Oct 80 


164 


Oct 80 


165 


Oct 80 


166 


Oct 80 


167 


Oct 80 


168 


Oct 80 


169 


Oct. 80 


170 


Oct 80 


171 


Oct 80 


172 


Oct 81 


173 


Oct 81 


174 


Oct 81 


175 


Oct 81 


176 


Oct 81 


177 


Nov. 14 


178 


Nov. 14 


179 


Nov. 14 


180 


Nov. 14 


181 


Nov. 14 


182 


Nov. 14 


183 


Nov. 14 


1B4 


Nov. 14 


185 


Nov. 14 


186 


Nov. 14 


187 


Nov. 14 


188 


Nov. 14 


189 


Nov. 14 


190 


Nov. 14 


191 


Dec. 18 


192 


Dec. 13 


193 


Dec. 18 


194 


Dec. 18 


195 


Dec. 18 


196 


Dec. 18 


197 


Dec. 13 


198 


Dec. 13 


199 


Dec. 18 


200 


Dec. 18 


201 



[To whom and for what iasaed. 



James Sntherland, wall paper, etc. . . 

T. Judd & Oo„ gasoline 

Wm. B. Wait, apparatus for writing. 

Mike Dawson, meat 

Adam Wilson, blacksmithing 

W. H. Douglass, broom corn 

James McCrea, oats 

H. Gilliland, squashes 

J. B. Carle, potatoes 

L. Sennett, butter and eggs 

James Stephen, salary 

Fuller & Fuller, cream tartar 

J. R. Holmes, beef 

T. H. Little, current expenses 

T. H. Little, salaiy 

T. H. Littlejj)ay roll 

Miss S. A. Watson, salary 

Miss H. A. Dagffett, salary, 
ild^' 



Miss 0. L. Baldwin, salary 

M. D. JoneSjSalary 

Mrs. M. H. Whiting, salary 

G. A. Libbey, steam work , 

Davis A Bro., groceries 

N. H.Clark, beef. 

T. Judd & Co., on gas contract 

J. R. Holmes, beef , 

Mike Dawson, mutton , 

Graham A Clark, flour and meal. 

(Cancelled) 

Pat Sennett, labor , 

Jackman, Ross & Co., feed , 

Anderson, Harvey & Co., repairs, etc. 

T. H. Little, pay roll 

T. H. Little, " working ftmd " 

T. Judd & Co., work and material 

H. M. Hart, insurance 

Hammond & Lawrence, insurance. . . 

O. J. Dearborn, insurance 

F. F. Stevens, insurance , 

Blav & James, masonry 

J. U. Haynor, hay 

Grannis & Farwell, groceries 

James Stephen, salary 

James Stephen, maps 

Graham & Clark, flour and meal 

W. G. Wheelock, crockery 

F. Z. Sherwood, drugs 

G. R. Curtis, drugs 

W. J. Doolittle, hardware, etc 



Amonnt « 



$26 48 
74 62 
21 60 

6 98 
27 10 
82 04 
10 00 
10 00 

289 45 

7 65 
80 00 

450 
69 69 
67 65 

816 67 

156 92 
60 00 
60 00 
60 00 
60 00 
60 00 

181 63 
41 22 
21 15 

850 00 

25 29 

6 49 

47 25 



80 00 

18 60 

253 00 

169 92 

50 00 

200 28 

60 00 

100 00 

225 00 

60 00 

22 49 

42 10 

164 64 

80 00 

16 00 

13 87 

11 68 

12 86 
15 17 
87 81 



26 



List of Orders — continued. 



Date. 


No. 


1-871 


Dec. 


13 


202 


Dec. 


13 


208 


Dec. 


13 


204 


Dec. 


13 


205 


Dec. 


13 


200 


Dec. 


13 


207 


Dec. 


13 


208 


Dec. 


13 


209 


Dec. 


13 


210 


Dec. 


13 


211 


Dec. 


13 


212 


Dec. 


13 


213 


Dec. 


13 


214 


Dec. 


13 


215 


Dec. 


13 


216 


Dec. 


13 


217 


Dec. 


13 


218 


Dec. 


13 


219 


Dec. 


13 


220 


Dec. 


13 


221 


Dec. 


13 


222 


Dec. 


13 


223 


Dec. 


18 


224 


Dec. 


13 


225 


Dec. 


13 


226 


1872 




Jan. 


3 


227 


Jan. 


8 


228 


Jan. 


3 


220 


Jan. 


3 


230 


Jan. 


3 


231 


Jan. 


3 


232 


Jan. 


3 


283 


Jan. 


3 


234 


Jan. 


3 


235 


Jan. 


3 


236 


Jan. 


3 


237 


Jan. 


3 


288 


Jan. 


3 


289 


Jan. 


3 


240 


Jan. 


3 


241 


Jan. 


8 


242 


Jan. 


3 


243 


Jan. 


3 


244 


Jan. 


8 


245 


Jan. 


3 


246 


Jan. 


8 


247 


Jan. 


8 


248 


Jan. 


8 


249 


Jan. 


8 


2^>0 


Jan. 


3 


251 


Jan. 


8 


252 



To whom and for what isaned. 



John H. Boulter, turkeys 

Mike Dawson, meat 

Pat Scnnctt, labor 

Wm. B. Baines, butter 

J. R. Holmes, beef 

Thos. Madden, beef and labor 

Walter Little, wood 

Hiram Brown, iron barrel 

Atwood & Culver, printing 

Root & Cady, musical instrument 

W. & J. Gr. Flint, spices 

Wheelock & Comstock, vegetables 

F. C. Welles, broom brush 

F. P. Schicker, bread 

Ashcraft & Wingate, furniture 

W. H. Churchman, proceedings Convention . . 

Miss H. A. Daggett, on salary 

Miss C. L. Baldw^in. . .do 

Miss 8. A. Watson. . . .do. 

Mrs. M. H. Whiting . .do 

M. D. Jones do 

T. H. Little do 

T. H. Little, pay roll 

T. H. Little, current expenses 

Cronk, Haviland & Antisdel, st'r for laundry. 



J. R. Holmes, beef 

W. T. Vankirk, groceries 

J. H. Burk, beef 

F. P. Schicker, bread 

W. Baines, filling ice house 

W. G. Wheelock, crockery 

M. Zwicky, soap 

N. H. Clark, beef 

8. N. Loomer, apples 

G. W. Hersee, tuning pianos 

R. G. Parmly, oats 

J. R. Holmes, beef 

N. W. Furniture Co., broom handles 

Geo. W. Prentice & Co., broom wire 

Thos. Madden, labor, oats and poultry 

Harris Mfg. Co., iron work 

Graham & Clark, flour 

Gazette Printing Co., daily, and job work 

Root & Cady, musical goods 

flavnor. Bliss & Co., robe, whip, bells 

Mike Dawson, beef 

Mike Dawson, beef 

J. A. Denniston, fruit, eggs, etc 

Frank Stnmk <fc Co., livery for leg. comm'tee . 
Royal Wood, livery for legislative commHee. . 
Myers House, bill for same committee 



Amount; 



17 70 
12 42 

29 00 
28 20 
95 46 
38 80 

201 00 

18 00 
63 00 
32 50 

7 80 

84 20 

254 94 

91 06 

30 50 

27 55 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 

48 75 
75 00 

158 88 

169 20 

81 45 

95 75 

32 50 

239 34 

21 92 

49 00 
58 00 
15 83 

28 00 
24 81 

21 00 

10 00 
27 52 
32 55 
24 00 

14 62 
18 50 

11 83 
17 25 

15 50 
5 51 

17 00 

12 20 
7 84 
9 80 

23 00 

22 00 

50 00 



2' 



List of Orders — continued. 




3 
8 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



1872 
Jan. 3 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb, 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Mar. 6 
Mar. G 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 6 
Mar. G 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 6 
Mar. G 
Mar. 
Mar. G 
Mar. C 
Mar. G 
Mar. G 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 
Mar. G 
Mar. G 
April 3 
April 3 
April 3 
April 8 
April 3 
April 3 
April 3 
April 3 



253 

254 

255 

25G 

257 

258 

259 

260 

261 

262 

263 

264 

265 

266 

267 

268 

269 

270 

271 

272 

273 

274 

275 

276 

277 

278 

279 

280 

281 

282 

283 

284 

285 

286 

287 

288 

2«9 

290 

291 

292 

293 

294 

295 

296 

297 

298 

299 

300 

301 

302 

303 

304 

305 



To whom and for what Issued. 



Forest City Varnisb and Oil Co 

Geo. Schorb, for teaching 

Tlios. H. Little, current expenses 

S. B. Austin, «broom brush 

Eldred & Otis, milk 

Graham & Clark, flour and uicul 

Wm. George, beef 

Carle Bros., groceries 

Wm. Steele, lard 

W. G. Wlieelock, crockery 

Smith <& Bostwick, dry goods 

T. H. Little, pay-roll 

G. A. Libby, repairs on steam and gas works 

James Steiihen, making maps 

Flora F. Winslow, salary 

S. A. Watson, do 

M. D. Jones do 

C. L. Baldwin do 

James Stephen . . . .do 

Helen A. Daggett. . .do * 

Wm. J. Doolittle, hardware 

Kothman & Winkley, harness repairs 

J. R. Holmes, beef. 

Hodge & Buchholz, carriage repairs 

T. H. Little, current expenses 

Janesville Postofflcc, stamps and envelopes. . 

J. A. Tice, photographs of building 

Wheeler & Lake, groceries 

Moseley & Bro., organ 

Field, Leiter & Co., dry goods 

Lawrence & Atwood, piping 

W. G. Wheclock, crockery 

J. R. Holmes, beef 

F. P. Schicker, bread 

Root & Cady, musical good.s 

W. B. Baines, hay 

Grannis & Farwell, sugar 

W. & J. G. Flint, coffee 

N. B. Kneass, Jr., books in raised letters .... 

M. H . Whiting, salary, 

James Stephen, salary 

Jackman, Koss & Co., feed and meal 

T. H. Little, salary 

T. H. Little, pay-roll 

T. H. Little, current expenses 

Field, Leiter & Co., cocoa matting 

N. W. Furniture Co., broom handles, etc 

G. W. Prentice, broom wire 

James Stephen, salary 

G. A. Libbey, tools and materials for rep's. . . 

Harris Manufg Co., grates 

C. H. Vorhes, painting carriage 

Root & Cady, drum 



Amount. 



$91 41 
20 00 
77 10 
75 50 

13 28 

37 25 
16 60 

261 24 

44 67 

4 75 

35 42 

173 65 
72 98 
26 00 
46 88 
75 00 

125 00 
75 00 
60 00 
75 00 
28 11 
9 15 

41 95 
77 52 

49 08 
33 80 
18 00 

38 38 
100 00 

83 74 

65 50 

6 00 

77 51 

104 50 

39 39 
20 00 
59 81 

50 40 

42 70 
93 75 
30 00 
22 51 

475 00 

170 05 

65 54 

48 02 

33 80 

14 91 
30 00 
32 11 

121 72 

15 00 
8 00 



28 



JLxailqf Orders — continued. 




1872. 
April 8 
April 8 
Aprils 
April 8 
April 3 
April 8 
April 8 
April 8 
April 8 
April 8 
April 8 
April 8 
April 8 
April 8 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

May 

June 5 

June 5 

June 5 

June 5 

June 5 

June 5 

June 5 

June 5 

June 5 

June 5 

June 5 



806 
807 
808 
809 
810 
311 
812 
813 
814 
315 
816 
317 
318 
310 
320 
321 
322 
328 
824 
326 
326 
327 
328 
329 
330 
831 
382 
833 
384 
335 
386 
837 
838 
339 
340 
841 
842 
843 
844 
845 
846 
347 
348 
340 
360 
861 
362 
353 
864 
366 
366 
357 



Mass. Inst for Blind, printing 

Thos. H. Little, current expenses 

E. J. Owen, hay 

J. R. Holmes, beef 

Simon Antisdel, beef. 

Eldred & Wheeler, groceries 

Pat. Sennett, labor 

T. H. Little, pay roll for February 

C. L. Martin, doctoring horse 

W. T. Vanlcirk, groceries 

J. B. Whitine, medical services 

Forest City varnish and Oil Co 

J. B. Wliitinj^, salary as secretary of board. . . . 

L. P. Frost, in payment of land 

Hogoboom & Wood, coal 

James Sutherland, books and stationery 

Adam Wilson, blacksmithing 

W. J. Doolittle, hardware 

L. Gould & Co., broom handles 

T. M. Lynch, beef 

Bigelow & Co., beef 

Simon Antisdel, butter and eges 

Wm. M. Steele, hams, lard and soap 

Eldred & Wheeler, ^oceries 

Geo. W. Hersee, tuning and repairs 

Root & Cadv, musical goods 

Shearer & Dowling, mason work 

E. Rathram, work on boilers 

Graham & Clark, feed 

W. G. Wheelock, crockery ., 

F. P. Schicker, bread .' 

Miss Flora F. Winslow, salary 

M. D. Jones... salary 

James Stephen . .do 

Helen A. Da^gettdo 

Clara L. Balawin.do 

S. A. Watson. .. .do 

George Schorb . .do 

T. H. Little, current expenses 

T. H. Little, pay roll 

F. H. Judd, balance on ic^s machine 

Moseley & Bro., musical goods 

W. G. Wheelock. crockery 

Fifield Bros., fencing 

James Stephen, music boards 

Carle Bros., groceries 

8. Antisdel, butter 

Colling & Bro., fixtures for shop and bookcase. 

Johnson, Dann & Co., flour and meal 

Eldred & Wheeler, ^rroceries 

Geo. W. Prentice, wire 

C. A. Brace, soap 



Amonnt. 


$85 10 


182 69 


12 80 


38 95 


18 03 


137 67 


26 25 


162 80 


21 00 


88 59 


74 50 


94 21 


100 00 


1,400 00 


156 60 


12 49 


9 95 


38 60 


9 25 


21 06 


96 17 


57 31 


70 34 


21 02 


10 00 


18 95 


8 88 


6 70 


17 50 


8 17 


118 08 


87 50 


126 00 


80 00 


75 00 


75 00 


75 00 


80 00 


88 93 


174 83 


561 00 


33 89 


10 00 


73 53 


26 00 


216 87 


67 94 


10 73 


55 69 


113 66 


59 06 


15 00 



29 



List of Orders — continued. 



Bate. 




1873 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
June 5 
July 

July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 20 
July 20 
July 20 
July 20 
July 20 
July 20 
July 20 
July 20 
Sept. 9 
Sept. 9 
Sept. 9 
Sept. 9 
Sept. 9 
Sept 9 
Sept. 9 
Sept. 9 
Sept 9 
Sept 9 
Sept 9 
Sept 9 



858 
859 
360 
861 
862 
368 
864 
865 
866 
867 
868 
869 
370 
371 
372 
373 
374 
375 
876 
877 
878 
879 
880 
881 
882 
888 
884 
385 
386 
387 
388 
389 
390 
891 
392 
893 
894 
395 
896 
397 
398 
899 
400 
401 
402 
403 
404 
405 
406 
407 
408 
409 
410 



To whom aod for what Isened. 



Waterbury Brass Company, wire 

George J. Kellogg, trees 

J. M. Hodge, oats 

Massachusetts Asylum for Blind, books 

P. Palmer, Butter 

Root & Caldy, musical goods 

T. H. Little, current expenses 

T.H. Little, pay roll 

T. H. Little, salary 

James Stephen, salary 

S. A. Watson, salary 

H. A. Daffgett,-6alaxy 

C. L. Baldwin, salary 

P. P. Winslow, salary 

M. D. Jones, salary , , 

George Schorb, salary 

M. BL Whiting, salary 

P. P. Schicker, bread 

P. P. Schicker, bread 

Hogoboom & Co., wood 

Eldred and Wheeler, groceries 

Adam Wilson, blacksmithing 

W. J. Doolittle, hardware. .^ 

Fifield Bros., fencing 

Doty manufacturing Co., wood 

Geo. R Curtis, drugs and oil 

H. Johnson, flour and feed 

Geo. Scarcliff, meat 

Jas. Stephen, salary 

T. H. Little, pay roll for May 

T. H. Little, current expenses 

T. H. Little, pay roll for June 

T. H. Little, salary 

A. J. Roberts, drugs, etc 

G. A. Libbjr, material and repairs 

P. M.Wilkinson & Co., repairing steam works 

Swan, Watkins & Co., fire brick . 

T. H. Little, current expenses 

H. 8. Hogoboom & Co., coal 

Mrs. M. H. Whiting, salary 

Anderson, Harvey & Co., carpenter work . . . 

James Sutherland, stationery 

N. Griswold, repairs on boiler 

Pield, Leiter & Co., bed spreads 

Eldred & Wheeler, groceries 

Ashcraft & Wingate, furniture 

Thomas Madden, labor 

H. Johnson & Co., corn meal and feed 

Smith & Bostwick, carpets, etc 

Jas. Shearer, mason work and material 

T. H. Little, salary 

M. H. Whiting, salary 

T. H. Little, current expenses 



Amount 



$14 26 

19 50 
86 75 
31 50 

5 75 

7 21 

153 41 

171 17 

475 00 

30 00 

75 00 

75 00 

75 00 

37 50 
125 00 

25 00 
98 75 
56 98 
33 71 
511 00 
95 12 
9 45 

7 00 
40 50 
14 00 

20 57 

8 60 
167 10 

30 00 
174 84 
198 90 
176 11 
158 33 

8 82 

17 48 
290 85 

22 50 
90 72 
2,310 00 
62 50 
65 81 

18 86 
12 75 
51 09 

16 80 
157 70 

17 17 

38 20 
116 00 
160 60 
316 67 

31 25 
118 77 



30 



List of Orders — continued. 



Dale. 



1872. 
Sept. 9 
Oct. 2 
Oct. 2 
Oct. 2 
Oct. 2 
Oct 2 
Oct. 2 
Oct. 2 
Oct. 2 
Oct. 2 
Oct. 2 
Oct 2 
Oct 2 
Oct 2 
Oct 2 
Oct 
Oct 
Oct 2 
Oct 2 
Oct 
Oct 
Oct 12 
Oct 12 
Oct 12 
Oct 12 
Oct 12 



2 
2 



2 
2 




411 

412 

413 

414 

415 

416 

417 

418 

419 

420 

421 

422 

428 

424 

425 

426 

427 

428 

429 

480 

431 

432 

488 

434 

435 

486 



To T^hom and for what issacd. 



T. H. Little, payroll 

M. Conant & Co., groceries .* 

T. H. Little, pay roll 

Root & Cady, music and goods 

Moseley & Brother, musical books 

Rogers & Hutchinson, painting and glazing . . 

George Schorb, traveling 

Janesville post office, stamped envelops 

Anderson <& Harvey, repairs 

Hodge & Buchholz, carriage repairs 

Gazette Co., paper and printing 

W. & J. G. Flint, coflf^e 

G. A. Libbey, steam fitting and plumbing 

H. Johnson & Co., flour 

Eldred <fe Wheeler, groceries 

W. G. Wheelock, crockery 

Carle Brothers, groceries 

W. T. Vankirk, groceries 

F. P. Bchicker, bread 

Ford & Clark, flour 

T. H. Little, current expenses 

J. R. Holmes, beef 

Eldred & Wheeler, groceries 

Georj^ Scarelift', meat 

H. Gillilaod, squashes 

L. Sennett, butter 

Total 



Amoant. 


1148 39 


129 31 


129 51 


35 08 


27 33 


61 77 


52 60 


34 00 


59 53 


30 50 


15 00 


44 00 


70 79 


48 70 


29 95 


8 37 


95 86 


94 06 


41 44 


3 50 


100 24 


46 55 


143 89 


210 22 


8 00 


20 50 



$23,218 59 



CATALOGUE OF PUPILS. 



Name. 
Mary O. Donahue, 
Louis E. K. Klatte, - 
John Cowley, 
George Schorb, 
Lucy A. Little, - 
Charles Evans, 
Sidelia Kelley, 
Jacob E. Lewison, 
Matilda L. AUcott, 
Charles Hartle, 
Philip Wentzel, - 
Wilhelmina Mesenburg, 
Julia Gorham, 
Nathaniel W. Farnsworth, 
Barbara P. Fontaine, 
Hege Knutson, 
James Brennan, - 
Mary Hrobsky, 
John H. Cummings, 
Kate Page, 
AUie M. Brown, - 
Sophronia Johnson, - 
William Harvey, - 
Adam Zepp, - 
Emma Henderson, 
Elizabeth Noonan, 
Orrin G. Rice, 



Bendence. 
Crawford county. 
Milwaukee county. 
Dodge county. 
Racine county. 
Rock county. 
Walworth county. 
Dodge county. 
Dane county. 
Milwaukee county. 
Portage county. 
Milwaukee county. 
Dodge county. 
Shawano county. 
Columbia county. 
Brown county. 
Dane county. 
Grant county. 
Dodge county. 
Rock county. 
Jefferson county. 
Walworth county. 
Jefferson county. • 
Rock county. 
Washington county. 
Rock county. 
Rock county. 
Outagamie county. 



32 



Catalogue of PupiU 

Name. 
Frederick Tranton, - 
John T. White, - 
Frederick Parker, 
Ira M. GriflSn, 
William Bautz, 
Wilhelmina Lloyd, 
Jennie Cummings, 
Joseph Vandervest, 
Catharine Sullivan, - 
Charles W. Thomas, 
Levi G. McColloch, - 
Edwin Bates, 
Hugh J. Pierce, 
Frank Finsterbach, 
Amanda McClosky, - 
Margaret Fohey, - 
Charles Krakopsky, - 
Willard Close, - 
Elizabeth Fletcher, - 
John Lavell, 
Edward B. Speer, 
George Steumpiig, 
Arvilla Bush, - - . 

Thirza L. Vanderzee, 
Jda Green, 
Jonas Hedburg, - 
Caroline Hedburg, 
Selby Rich, 
William Charmer, 
Conrad Miller, 
Joseph F. Wigmore, - 
Theodore Dressen, 
Amanda E. Davey, - 
Orrin M. Dodds, 
Margaret Lapine, 



— continued. 

Residence. 
Marathon county. 
Columbia county. 
Rock county. 
Dodge county. 
Milwaukee county. 
Dodge county. 
Rock county. 
Brown county. 
Rock county. 
Milwaukee county. 
Crawford county. 
Jefferson county. 
La Crosse county. 
Pierce county. 
Crawford county. 
Waukesha county. 
Racine county. 
Waupaca county. 
Monroe county. 
Marquette county. 
Dane county. 
Columbia county. 
Green Lake county. 
Vernon county. 
Calumet county. 
Pierce county. 
Pierce county. 
Dodge county. 
Milwaukee county. 
Crawford county. 
Milwaukee county. 
Washington county. 
Green Lake county. 
Portage county. 
Fond du Lac county. 



38 



Catalogue qf 

Name, 
Josephine Lapine, 
Caroline Highland, • 
Edward Davis, 
Henry Hill, - 
Julia Patch, 
Lodema Sturdevant, - 
Andrew J. Sturdevant, 
Sarah Murphy, 
Primus Wright, - 
Charles E. Flick, 
Honora Dorsy, 
William D. Otes, 
Augusta Zimmerman, 
Cora A. Briggs, 



Pwpt'fo— continued. 

lUiidenee. 
Fond du Lac county. 
Rock county. 
Waushara county. 
Milwaukee county. 
Ozaukee county. 
Monroe county. 
Monroe county. 
Rock county. 
Iowa county. 
Dane county. 
Rock county. 
Dane county. . 
Jefferson county. 
Outagamie county. 



8 — Blind. 



(Doc. 8.) 



ADMISSIOlsT OF PUPILS. 



Any person wishing to make application for the admission of 
a pupil into the Institution, must address the Superintendent, 
giving definite and truthful answers to the following questions, 
viz: 

1st. What are the names and post office address of the parents 
or guardians of the person for whom application is made: 

2d. Are such parents or guardians legal residents of the State 
of Wisconsin? 

3d. What is the name and age of the person for whom ap- 
plication is made? 

4th. At what age did he or she become blind, and from what 
cause? 

5th. Is he or she of sound mind and susceptible of intellectual 
culture? 

6th. Is he or she free from bodily deformity and all infectious 
diseases? 

7th. What are his or her personal habits and moral character? 

Upon receipt of such application by the Superintendent, 
the applicant will be notified as to whether or not the person in 
question will be admitted; and no one must be sent to the Insti- 
tution until such notification shall have been received. 

No person of imbecile or unsound mind, or of confirmed im- 
moral character, will be knowingly received into the Institution ; 
And in case any person shall, after a fair trial, prove incompe- 
tent for useful instruction, or disobedient to the wholesome reg- 
ulations of the Institution, such pupil will be thereupon dis- 
4charged. 

All are expected to come provided with an adequate supply 






85 

of good, comfortable clothing, which must be replenished from 
time to time, as it becomes necessary. 

The stock of clothing should embrace suitable articles for 
both summer and winter, and a sufficient number of each 
kind to admit of the necessary changes for washing and re- 
pairing. 

All the clothing must be sent in good condition, not only upon 
the first entrance of the pupil, but also at each subsequent re- 
turn from home after the vacation. 

Each article should also be distinctly marked with the own- 
er's name or initials, in order to prevent confusion or loss. 

There is no charge for tuition, or for board; but a small sum 
should be deposited with the Superintendent for occasional ex- 
penses. 

It is important that new pupils should enter upon their term 
of instruction at the commencement of a session ; and it is ex- 
pected of all others that they will be present at the opening of 
the school, and remain until it closes, on the last day of the ses* 
sion, unless prevented from doing so by sickness or other emer- 
gency. It is also expected that timely arrangements will be 
made for the departure of every pupil from the IjdlKitution with- 
in a few days after the close of each session. 

All letters to the pupils should be addressed to the care of the 
Institution, in order to insure their prompt reception. 

From ten to fourteen is the most favorable age for entering 
the Institution, provided the pupils have judicious care and 
training at home prior to that age. But as this is not always 
the case, and as there are many who lose their sight after that 
age; or, having lost it earlier, do not find an opportunity of go- 
ing to school at the proper time, the regulations of the Institu- 
tion allow the admission of all proper subjects who are not un- 
der eight or above twenty-one years of age. 

It must be borne in mind, however, by the friends of blind 
children, that though they have the privilege of sending them 
to the Institution at a later period than the one mentioned as the 
best, yet it is of the highest importance that they should be sent 
within said period; for as they grow older their neglected pow- 



36. 

ers lose their susceptibility for cultivation, rendering the train- 
ing more and more difficult, until they become wholly incapaci- 
tated for receiving such an education as will fit them for a life 
of usefulness, independence and happiness. It is not uncom- 
mon to witness results of this kind, arising out of the morbid 
tenderness with which a blind child is frequently regarded by 
his friends, rendering them unwilling to trust him, at the proper 
age, to the care of strangers, lest some harm should befall him. 
Indeed every year's experience serves to indicate more clearly 
the lamentable prevalence of this unjust neglect; as there are 
constantly applying for admission into the several Institutions 
of the country, those whose melancholy lot it is to lead a life of 
hopeless ignorance and dependence, but who might, with proper 
training in early youth, have become happy and useful members 
of society, maintaining themselves comfortably and respect- 
ably. 

The term of instruction is not limited to any definite number 
of years, but is determined in each individual case by the ac- 
quirements of the pupil and consequent fitness for graduating. 
The length of each one's term will of course depend upon his 
aptness to learn, and the extent of the course to be pursued. 

The session of the Institution commences on the second 
Wednesday of September in each year, and closes on the next 
to the last Wednesday of June following; leaving a vacation 
of more than two months, during which time the pupils have 
an opportunity of visiting their homes and replenishing their 
clothing. 

Parents of blind children are cordially invited to visit the In- 
stitution, that they may decide from their own observations 
whether it is best to send them here. 

All persons are requested to send the names and addresses of 
blind children of their acquaintance to the Superintendent. 

T. H. LITTLE, 
Institution /or the Blind^ 

Janesville, Wis. 



37 



Valuable information in regard to a kindred Institution is 
contained in the following. 

NOTE. 

The Wisconsin Institution fob the Education op the 
Deaf and Dumb, located at Delavan, Walworth Co., is free to 
the deaf and dumb of the State, and will receive those who are 
too deaf to be taught in the common schools. Pupils are ad- 
mitted between the ages of ten and twenty-five. The term be- 
gins on the first Wednesday of September. 

For further information address the principal of the Institu- 
tion for the Deaf and Dumb, Delavan, Wis. 



• 



DOCUMENT No. 9. 



/ TWENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OP THE 



Wisconsin Institute for the Education 
of the Deaf and Dumb, 



For the Fiscal Tear ending October isf^ 1871- 



Located at Delavan, Wis.. 



/ 
MADISON, WIS. : 

ATWOOD ft CULTEB, PRINTERS A3S(D 8TERB0TTPER8. 

1872. 



To His Excellency, C. C. Washbubn, 

Governor of the State of Wiscoiiain: 

I have the honor of presenting you herewith the Twenty- 
First Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Wisconsin 
Institute for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb. 

C. D. LONG, 

Secretary of the 

Board of Trustees. 
Delavan, Nov. 18, 1872. 



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BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Term JExpireg April, 1878. 

A. L. Chapin, - - Beloit, • - Bock Comity. 

H. S. Blood, - Appleton, - - Outagamie County. 

Term JSxpires April, 1874. 
A. H. Babnes, • • Delavan, • . Walworth County. 

Term JSxpires April, 1875. 
HoLus Lathah. '• - Elkhom, - Walworth County, 

James Abam, - • Delavan, - - Walworth County. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

A. n. BARNES, 
President. 

C. D. LONG, 
Secretarif. 

A. D. THOMAS- 
Treaturer. 



Executive Comkittee. 
H. LATHAM, J. ARAM, A. H. BARNES. 



OFFICERS. 



FRLNCIPAL. 

GEO. L. WEED, Jr., M. A. 

nffSTSUCTOBS. 

L. Eddy, M. A. G. F. Schilling, M. A. 

Z. G. McCoy, E. F. Valbntinb, M. A. 

H. Phillips. C. L. Williams. 

Emily Eddy. Maby Johnsok. 

Philip Englbhabdt. 

MATBON. 

Mrs. LuTHEBA J. Hill. 

physician. 
D. B. Deyendobp, M. D. 

MASTEB OF CABDVET^BHOP. 

Emanuel Young. 

MASTEB OF SHOE SHOP. 

Chables H. Rideout. 

CLEBK. 
A. J. WOODBUBY. 

ENOIKEEB. 
D. T. GiFPOBD. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency, C. C. Washbubn, 

Governor of Wisconsin: 

The members of the Board of Trustees of the Wisconsin 
Institute for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, respectfully 
submit their twenty-first annual report for the year ending Sep- 
tember 30, 1872: 

For such changes as have transpired among the officers of the 
school, we refer you to the accompanying report of the Prin- 
pal. 

The amount appropriated for current expenses for the year 
ending March 1, 1872, was thirty*seven thousand nine hundred 
and forty-nine dollars ($37,949), which, with the amount on hand 
October 1, 1871, (as per report of 1871), and the amount re- 
ceived during the year, from miscellaneous sources, amount to 
the sum of fifty-twa thousand seven hundred and eleven dollars 
and ninety-four cents ($62,711.94.) 

The amount actually expended from September 30, 1871, to 
September 30, 1872, is thirty-four thousand one hundred and 
seventy-four dollars and thirty-four cents ($34,174.34.) 

The estimated expenses from September 30, 1872, to March 
1, 1873 (not including salaries for January and February, 1873), 
are eleven thousand eight hundred and forty*one dollars ($11,- 
841.) 

Salaries for January and February, 1873, two thousand four 
hundred dollars ($2,400), making for actual expenses for the year 
ending September 30, 1872, and the estimated expenses from 
September 30, 1872, to March 1, 1873, forty-eight thousand four 
hundred and fifteen dollars and thirty-seven cents ($48,415.37), 



8 

leaving a balance on hand, March 1, 1873, of four thousand two 
hundred and ninety-six dollars and fiftj-seven cents ($4,296.57). 

In explanation of the fact that we have not, during the year 
just closed, used the amount appropriated for current expenses, 
we would say that we have been able to purchase meats and 
most kinds of farm products on more favorable terms than at 
any former period within many years, and probably cheaper 
than we can reasonably hope in the future. 

We have been fortunate in the purchase of coal. By our 
contract, the coal for the institution is delivered on the track at 
Delavan at $9.75 per ton, being but a trifle in excess of the price 
now at Chicago, Racine and Milwaukee. 

We think that we are safe in saying that the amount unex- 
pended March Ist, 1873, of the last appropriation, will be suffi- 
cient to pay the current expenses of the Institution to April 
1st, 1873. 

Our estimates, therefore, are for the year ending April Ist, 
1874. 

For current expenses, for the year commencing April 1st, 
1873, we aric for an appropriation of thirty-eight thoasand three 
himdred and eighty-nine dollars ($38,389). 

Iti the estimates presented, we have endeavored to give to 
the subject that careful consideration which a prudent business 
man would give to his own individual afiairs. 

In our last report we called attention to the fact that the 
present building was inadequate to the wants of the institution, 
and that additional accommodations were necessary. We were 
not able to mature our plans and procure estimates to be made 
in time to submit the same to the last legislature. During the 
past season we have agreed upon a plan, and procured careful 
estimates to be made by E. T. Mix, architect, for the erection 
of a wing, or additional building, which it is believed will fur- 
nish sufficient room for the accommodation (with our present 
accommodations) of a school of from two hundred and seventy- 
five to three hundred pupils. 

The estimate of the architect for this addition is thirty-five 
thousand dollars ($35,000), the erection of which will require 



9 

two years. The appropriation should be about equally divided, 
so as two have one half each year. The erection of this addi- 
tion should be commenced at the earliest possible moment. Our 
dormitories are crowded and insufficient to meet our present 
wants. We have no proper accommodation for children when 
sick. 

Our kitchen answered well till we had a school of about one 
hundred. It is now entirely insufficient. We have not suffi- 
cient accommodations for laundry purposes. Our dining room 
is full to overflowing. 

In order to get through the last year the library room was di- 
vided into school and sleeping rooms by temporary partitions to 
meet immediate and pressing necessities. 

The following is the itemized estimates [of current expenses 
for the jear commencing April 1, 1873: 

Atua^ements and Means of Instruction f400 

Clothing and Expenses for Indigent Pupils 1, 000 

Drugs and Medicines 100 

Farm, Bam and Stock 800 

Fuel •. 8,500 

House Furnishing .- . 2, IMK) 

Lijjhts 500 

Miscellaneous 1, 550 

Repairs 1,600 

Permanent Improvements * - " : 700 

Subsistence 9, 824 

Salaries and Wages 16, 156 

$88,889 



In conclusion, the Board of Trustees are most happy to say, 
that under the efficient and watchful care of the Principal, 
the Institution, is pressing forward in its career of usefulnesflii 
promising^ with the necessary means, the accomplishment of 
the great design of the institution. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. D. LONG, 

Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL 



To the Board of Trustees of the Wisconsin Institute for t/ie 
Deaf and Dumb: 

Gentlemen: Since the last report, this Institute, the super- 
vision of whose interests is committed to you, has completed 
the twentieth year of its history. Its original number of pupils 
has multiplied nearly nineteen fold ; and it enters upon its sec- 
ond score of years as upon an advanced stage, full of promise 
and hope. 

The organization and establishment of an institution of this 
kind involves labors abundant and time protracted. Some men 
must labor and other men enter into their labors before the full 
measure of success is realized, or the institute is prepared to 
accomplish its grandest results. Therefore, while we rejoice in 
present prosperity, we may justly remember those who have laid 
the foundation on which we build. 

CHANGES. 

Since the last report, two changes have occurred in the do- 
mestic department. Miss Boyce, who had acted as Assistant 
Matron, and subseqilently. Miss Cornell, who had held the posi- 
tion of Matron, have left ; the one to assume domestic duties 
in a new home, and the other to accept a position in the Ohio 
Institution for the Deaf and Dumb. 

In the intellectual department, the corps of instructors remains 
the same as last year, with the addition of Mr. Philip Engle- 
hardt, who is temporarily employed to take charge of an extra 
class, made necessary by the prospect of more new pupils than 
should be comprised in one class, and by the impracticability of 



11 

classifying the present school into eight divisions. Mr. Engle- 
hardt is a graduate of the Instisute, who, after completing his 
course here, pursued advanced studies at the Naticmal Deaf 
Mute College in Washington. 

ATTENDANCE. 

The attendance of pupils has been larger than ever before, 
though not quite as large as was anticipated, owing to some 
having been detained at home on account of their own sickness 
or that of friends; to some having been refused full admission, 
after it became evident that they were not proper subjects; to 
some not being sent at the proper time, and to some not having 
come for causes unknown. As seen in the tabular statement, 
appended to the accompanying list of pupils, the whole number 
connected with the school during the year is one hundred and 
sixty-four, of whom one hundred and forty-four were in attend- 
ance on the first of the present month. 

It is evident that the present rate of increase cannot long be 
continued without enlarged accommodations; our present not 
being sufficient for the number that should now be in attend- 
ance. 

INPBOVEMENTS. 

Within the past year the domestic department has been 
greatly improved. The dormitories have received special atten- 
tion. They have been to a great extent renovated. Much of 
the furniture had been in use many years — some of it since the 
commencement of the school — and, though rickety, had been 
compelled to do constant service. The bedding had been in 
use longer than was desirable. Our dormitories now present 
a cheerful and comfortable appearance, and are in a condition 
which contributes much to the health of so large a family. 

The addition of a cistern is of special value. Other changes 
have contributed to comfort, health, convenience and attract- 
iveness, which combine to secure the best results. 



12 



WINTKB VACATION. 



It has been the custom for several years to suspend school 
exercises during the holidays. This vacation is nominally a 
week or ten days, but practically a longer time. There are sev- 
eral objections to its continuance. The difficulty of travel at 
that season of the year, especially for deaf mute children, ex- 
posed to inconveniences, if not dangers, from which they are 
free in summer travel, will be readily understood. So fully are 
these felt by the parents of pupils that, for several years, not 
more than one-third of them have improved the opportunity of 
seeing their children at that time. Also, as might be expected 
one-third of those who do go home, do not retun\ in proper 
time; so that classes are interrupted in their studies, and the 
school is not restored to its ordinary condition for two or three 
weeks from the time its exercises were suspended. Oftentimes 
sickness follows the return of those who do go home, occasioned 
by indulgences to which they have been tempted in holiday fes- 
tivities. In addition to all this, the care of one hundred chil- 
dren and youth, out of school, is a serious burden, without any 
compensating advantage. The ditkiinution of pupils for so short 
a time does not materially diminish the expense of the house- 
hold, as the establishment must be kept up in most respects as 
if the number were complete; whereas if this vacation were 
added to the summer vacation, there would be the saving of a 
considerable amount. In view of these considerations, and oth- 
ers which are minor, yet important, it seems proper to discon- 
tinue the winter vacation. 

THE INSTITUTE A SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF. 

Hon. Samuel Fallows, Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
has in his last report, recognized this Institute as one of the ed- 
ucational interests of the state. The position here assigned 
it is proper, inasmuch as it is a school, for the instruction of a 
particular class; not an asylum merely, whose inmates are to be 
regarded chiefly as objects of charity. 

Tuition is furnished, as in any public school, by the state. 



13 ' 

The limited number of children and youth who are proper sub- 
jects for instruction here, and their distance from each other, 
make it necessary to collect them at one point, which involves 
domestic as well as school accommodations. Some require aid 
beyond this; so the Institute has a benevolent character which 
entitles it as such to sympathy and support. But its main fea- 
ture is defined in its name — " The Wisconsin Institute for the 
Education of the Deaf and Dumb." The propriety of recog- 
nizing the distinction between its educational and charitable 
aims, is apparent from the fact that it has been necessay to re- 
ject several applications by parents who had the latter idea 
chiefly or only in view, while their children could not properly 
be admitted for intellectual training. 

Another misapprehension of the design of the school is illus- 
trated by the claim made in some instances, that the Institute 
is " for the Deaf," and " for the Dumb," instead of the " Deaf 
and Dumb." A moment's thought will satisfy any intelligent 
mind, that our method of instruction is necessarily based upon 
deafness^ and that the chid who has its hearing can learn faster 
anywhere else than hce. Our medium of instruction is the 
sign language, which is a substitute for written and spoken 
language; it is used under pecular disadvantages, and because 
there is no other method of reaching the uneducated deaf. 
Could we only gain access to the ear, we would gladly speak 
the word instead of make the sign. Where this can be done, 
there is no propriety in employing an unnecssary and less 
practicable substitute. It might save ambiguity in the minds 
of some if our school were named. The Institute for the Deaf. 

THE SCHOOL PERIOD. 

There seems to exist a misapprehension of the length of time 
to which pupils are entitled. The following action of the Board 
of Trustees is a definite^ expression, which is introduced here 
that it may attract the attention of parents and guardians : 

1. " The regular course of study in this Institute shall occupy 
five years, to which all pupils shall be entitled, provided their 
progress in study or general training shall justify their reten- 



14 

tion during that period ; and the Principal, with the approval of 
the Board, may require the removal, at any time, of any pupils 
whose progress is not such as to warrant their continuance. It 
is moreover understood that parents or guardians will allow 
their children to remain during five years, unless their stay is 
shortened by removal or Providential circumstances." 

2. ^^ When five years of improvement give promise that more 
time would be of special advantage to the pupil, an additional 
period may be allowed." 

It should be noticed that five years is the term allowed an 
ordinary pupil; and if any, on account of superior ability, or 
diligence, or attainment, secure additional time, none should 
feel that injustice or partiality has limited the opportunities of 
those discharged at the end of the only period for which obliga- 
tion has been assumed by the Institute. It is hoped and ex- 
pected that within that time such an education can be secured 
as will be of great value. While we would gladly extend the 
period for all, we are not justified in so doing beyond the limits 
indicated. It should also be remarked that this recent action of 
the Board is chiefly a re-statement of a former regulation, 
which, in the course of years, had become erroneously con- 
strued, until some who were entitled to only the minimum 
period, felt that they could justly claim the maximum. 

SOCIAL LIFE OF THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

At home deaf mutes are isolated. However much the kind- 
est of parents and friends may contribute to their comfort and 
happiness, many wants are unsupplied. The deaf mute ever pre- 
serves, and is conscious of preserving, a separateness from his 
fellow-men. If he has never had hearing, this consciousness is 
not as distinct and oppressive as it is when a blessing has been 
lost. He wanders among men, but does not seem to be of them. 
Some of the charms of social life are, his, but not all of them. . 
It is not strange therefore if the Institute life is one of special 
enjoyment. The very affliction which robs home of some of its 
joys, is a bond of interest and sympathy and pleasure, which is 
found nowhere else. To the question sometimes asked — ^^ Are 



15 

they not sad?*' — we can in reply give assurance of joyousness 
in school life, that is far removed frc»n that sadness -which we are 
so ready to associate with permanent deafness. They forget 
however what we constantly remember — that these days of so- 
cial life among themselves are very brief; and that, after all we 
can do to fit them for the society whence they came^ and of 
which they will be more completly than before their educationi 
a part, then will follow a period, ending only with life, during 
which certain wants of [their nature must remain unsatisfied. 
Such facts suggest the duty — we might ratheri say the priv- 
ilege—of surrounding them while in school, with every influ- 
ence that may properly contribute to their social enjoyment. 

INFORMATION AND CO-OPERATION NEEDED. 

In the last report it was suggested that special effort is de- 
manded to make known our Institute, and to secure the attend- 
ance of all of those who should receive its benefits. While the 
number of pupils has been gradually increasing for several years, 
the pro{>ortion of increase to the number of deaf mutes in the 
state, who should be received, is far too small. It is certain 
that we cannot depend on parents of deaf mutes to take the in- 
itiative in the education of their children. Of thirty-six appli- 
cations, formal and informal, received within the past year, not 
more than one-third of them were by the parents of the candi- 
dates for admiBsion. Intelligent neighbors have done quite as 
much as they. Could some of them see the results of compara- 
tively little effort on their part — ^the improvement of the child- 
ren they have been instrumental in sending here — ^they would 
feel amply rewarded. Much has been done by correspondence, 
and this means will be diligently employed. Personal visitation 
may secure what mere correspondence cannot. But many fam- 
ilies with deaf-mute members are distant from the centers of 
intelligence. Census returns have proved only a partial aid in 
discovering them. Parents are often reluctant fo trust their 
unfortunate children to strangers; and, saddest of all, some are 
willing that their own sons and daughters should grovr up to 
manhood and womanhood in the darkness of an ignorance al- 



16 

most total, rather than to be deprived of their manual Jabor. 
Some are ignorant of the improvement to which the deaf are 
susceptible. 

Such considerations and others combine to illustrate the dif- 
ficulty of securing a full attendance, and the necessity of the 
co-operation of legislators, teachers, clergymen, editors, educa- 
tional and benevolent committees and boards, and of intelligent 
citizens generally. 

OFFICIAL VISITS. 

From the nature of the case it is difficult to estimate the 
work entrusted to our care. Questions such as these: What 
should be expected? What are the best methods to be em- 
ployed? Have proper results been secured? are not easily 
answered. There are diflSculties involved which none can fully 
know without contact with the work itself, or even an experi- 
ence in it. It is not strange if sometimes it is overrated; some- 
times underrated. 

In reviewing the events of the year, we recall with special 
satisfaction the jttst and kind manner in which examinations of 
the Institute have been conducted by those appointed to do so; 
and the appreciation they have manifested of whatever has 
been attempted by those to whom its interests have been directly 
committed. The visits of the legislative committees, and of the 
State Board of Charities and Reform, and of the Governor of 
the state, and of others, have proved an encouragement to offi- 
cers and pupils. The endeavor, on such occasions, has been to 
present ordinary methods and results — the everyday life of the 
Institute — rather than exceptional possibilities or well prepared 
exhibitions. 

COXCLUSIOX. 

I have the pleasure of reporting to you the apparent co-oper- 
ation of those associated with me in the management of our 
large familjUs and in whatever pertains to their intellectual pro- 
gress or training in household duties. Constant supervision 
and instraction, patient forbearance, guarded deportment, a 



17 

lively sympathy, a studied adaptation to a peculiar work, union 
in purpose and action — these are conditions on which the best 
results depend, and there is a constant endeavor to secure 
them. 

Recognizing the entire work here as a trust, committed by 
you and the State, conscious continually of the responsibility of 
one who undertakes its immediate supervision, and wishing to 
be guided by your united wisdom, and that which is better than 
all human, this record is 

Respectfully submitted. 

GEO. L. WEED, Jr., 

Dblavan, October 29, 1872. 

2— D. A D. (Doc. 9.) 



18 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. 

The following papers have been sent to the Institute gratu- 
itously, for which editors and proprietors will please accept 
thanks : 

Wisconsin State Journal. 

Janesville Gazette. 

Burlington Standard. 

Racine Advocate. 

Beloit Free Press. 

Chicago Post. 

Northwestern Christian Advocate. 

Delavan Republican. 

Badger State Banner. 

Fond du Lac Commonwealth. 

Jefferson Republican, (Arkansas.) 

Whitewater Register. 

Deaf Mutes' Gazette. 

Mutes' Chronicle. 

Deaf Mutes' Home Circle. 

Deaf Mutes' Advance. 

Deaf Mute Pelican. 

Silent World. 

Mexico Independent. 

La Crosse Republioan and Leader. 

Special favors have been granted on the following railroads : 

The Western Union. 

The Milwaukee and St, Paul. 

The Chicago and Northwestern, 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Wisconsin Institution for the 
Deaf and Dumb: 

• 

Gentlembn — In respect to the health of the pupils in the 
Institution during the year just closed, I can only say that they 
have suffered but little from sickness. 

There has been no prevailing disease, and only one case of a 
grave character, which was typhoid fever of three weeks' dura- 
in, a nd so severe as to seriously endanger the life of the pa- 
tient. I am pleased to be able to state that the boy has fully 
recovered and is able to pursue his studies. 

There have been but few accidents, all of which were slight, 
and required but little surgical treatment. 

I have taken the precaution to vacinate and re-vacinate every 
pupil and nearly every person in the Institution annually, and 
the result has been to impress us with the confidence that all 
were protected from that loathsome disease, small-pox, which 
has raged so fearfully in the surrounding cities for the last two 
or three years. 

Although the rooms and dormitories are well ventilated and 
kept, they are too small to afford convenience and comfort 
requisite for the number of pupils occupying them; and I would 
respectfully call your attention again to the propriety of having 
more room, which would insure good health, and in case of an 
epidemic or a disease of a contagious character, would admit of 
the pupils being separated, as circumstances might require, so 
as to prevent its extension. 

All appear cheerful and happy, and at all times respectful; 
and while in discharge of my duties I am always impressed 



20 

with the idea that I am in the midst of a large and well disci- 
plined family. 

It affords me pleasure to state that a particular regard to the 
general health and welfare of the pupils, has characterized the 
action of the Principal, Teachers, Matron and attendants of this 
Institution, as well as of this Board. 

D. B. DEVENDORF, M. D., 

Physician in charge. 
Dblavan, Oct. 15, 1872. 

I 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Trustees of the Wisconsin Insti- 
tute for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb: 

Gbntlsmsn : — The following is an exhibit of all moneys re- 
ceived and paid out by me since my last report: 



187X 
Oct. 1. 

1873 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 



Dr. 



To amount on hand. 



To amomit received from State Treasurer 

To amount from Principal, as receipts from shops 
and miscellaneous sources 



$2,606 42 

39,893 75 

724 52 



Cn. 



$43,224 69 



By payment of orders from No. 481 to 1,018 ;$34,174 37 



Balance on hand 

Amount in hands of State Treasurer 



$9,050 32 
9,487 25 



$18,587 57 



Dated Oct. 1, 1872. 

Yours reepectfuUy, 

A. D. THOMAS, 
Treasurer of 2>. and D. Inst. 



22 



LIST OF ORDERS PAID 

Dusing the year ending September 30, 1872. 



Bats. 

1871 
Oct. 13 
Oct. 13 
Oct. 15 
Oct. 15 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 23 
Oct. 24 
Oct. 27 
Oct. 27 
Oct. 27 
Oct. 27 
Oct. 28 



Not. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



1 
1 
1 



Nov. 1 



1 
1 
1 
2 
2 



2 
2 
2 
2 



Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 4 
Nov. 4 
Nov. 7 
Nov. 8 
Nov. 8 
Nov. 8 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 10 
Nov. 13 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 28 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 20 
Nov. 21 
Nov. 21 



No. 



481 
482 
483 
484 
485 
486 
487 
488 
489 
490 
491 
492 

493 
494 
495 
496 
497 
498 
499 
500 
501 
502 
504 
504 
505 
506 
507 
508 
509 
510 
511 
512 
513 
514 
515 
510 
517 
518 
519 
520 
521 
522 
523 
524 




526 
527 



H* Fleming, butter 

J. B. Smith, butter 

F. Williams, squash, beets, etc 

O. 8. Paul, butter 

C. B- Morehouse, cranberries 

E. F. Garney, butter 

E. F. Gamsey, butter 

Isabel Johnson, wages 

G. F. Schilling, cabbages 

D. B. Barnes, wood 

E. F. Garnsey, butter and eggs 

G. F. Flanders, butter 

Total for October 

A. L. Chapin, expenses as trustee 

C. D. Long, expenses as trustee 

C. D. Long, salary as secretary 

A. H. Barnes, expenses as trustee . . . 
HoUis Latham, expenses as trustee. . 

H. L. Blood, expenses as trustee 

C. H. Ridout, salary 

Whitney & Lowe, meat for October. 

Coburn & McKee, hardw^are 

A. J. Woodbury, clerk's cash account 

M. J. White, freight for October 

H. B. Morgan, butter 

C. Cahill, crab apples 

A. D. Seaman <& Co., office table 

Edward A. Fay, American Annals. . . 

T. H. Little, brooms 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

Pat Wier, cabbage 

Chas. T. Smith, potatoes 

Morris Fleming, labor 

M. Mulville, postage stamps 

T. Thomas, bcdsteods 

J. M. Kull, apples 

Lyon & Bro., butter 

John Alcott, beets 

C. B. Jones butter 

James A. Dudley, painting 

J. B. Lippincott, books ana papers . . 

Lyon & Bro. butter 

G. F. Flanders, butter 

Henrj' Fleming, butter 

Ra.«(well Burt, soft soap 

Phelps & Utter, flour and feed 

E. E. Boyce, salary 

J. B. Smith, butter 



Amount. Monthtytot 



16 20 


24 70 


12 68 


6 80 


13 33 


12 98 


8 64 


9 75 


3 36 


49 37 


17 30 


25 23 


12 70 


49 75 


50 00 


42 75 


79 20 


28 00 


25 00 


217 89 


32 79 


79 60 


24 30 


29 67 


3 75 


17 00 


45 00 


5 00 


193 73 


5 70 


219 13 


12 25 


9 99 


16 00 


133 14 


51 81 


9 00 


4 40 


15 00 


9 50 


72 21 


21 86 


23 10 


25 50 


351 62 


35 87 


27 17 



$190 34 



23 



Ifist of Orders Paid — continued. 



r 



ate. 



1871 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 23 
Nov. 26 
Nov. 26 
Nov. 29 
Nov. 80 

Dec. 1 
Dec. 5 
Dec. 6 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
8 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 11 
Dec. 16 
Dec. 18 
Dec. 19 
Dec. 19 
Dec. 20 
Dee. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 20 



No. 



628 
629 
680 
631 
632 
638 

634 
686 
686 

687 
688 
639 
640 
641 
642 
643 
644 
646 
646 
647 
648 
649 
660 
661 
662 
663 
664 
666 
666 
667 
668 
669 
660 
661 
662 
663 
664 
666 
666 
567 
668 
669 
670 
671 
572 
678 
574 
576 
676 
677 



To whom and for what paid. 



E. C. Stone, to settle account 

A. J. Woodbury, acc't with pupils. . . 

John Allott, vegetables 

M. W. Chapman, butter 

C. B. Jones, butter 

Bcribner & Co., Scribner's Monthly . . 

Total paid in November 

Hammersley & Co., books 

D. G. Foster, beans 

Geo. L. Weed, Jr., for John L. Shorey, 

books etc 

M. J. White, freight for Nov 

A. J. Woodbury, clerk's cash acc't. . . 

John Allott, meat for Nov 

J. B. Bossi, stone for sewer 

D. L. Shader, papers, etc 

J. H. Camp, drugs and sundries . . . . 

Atwater & Co., casting 

J. B. Smith, butter 

O. B. Burt, vegetables 

G. Pflster, leather 

Judd & Co., gasoline 

Hoffman, Billings & Co., sVm flt'gs, etc 

Goldsmith & Co., carpets 

Blair & Persons, crockery and cutVy . 

Green & Button, brushes 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

A. D. Seaman & Co., furniture 

G. F. Flanders, butter 

Fleming H. Revel, papers 

S. Brainard, straw 

Jane Bibbins, chickens and butter. . . 

Dennis Cronin, cabbages 

Field, Leiter & Co., drjr goods 

George L. Weed, Jr., salary 

Leveus Eddy do 

C. If. Williams do 

G. F. Schilling do 

E. G. Valentine do 

Emily Eddy do 

Mary Johnson do 

Z. G. McCoy do 

Hiram Phillips do 

A. J. Woodbury do 

A. J. Cornell do 

L. J.Hill do 

E. Young do 

D. T. Gifford do 

C. H. Rideout do 

Maurice Fleming, Wages 

R. W.Harris do 

Lois E. Nedry do 



Amount. 



MonthlT tot. 



138 26 

64 50 

8 50 

27 23 

400 

6 00 



7 12 

11 32 

10 67 
20 77 
69 94 

226 64 

9 00 

7 86 

24 71 

12 05 
31 24 
14 10 

159 71 
9 26 

213 61 
68 44 
53 88 
16 00 

86 84 
103 50 

12 49 
2 25 
4 50 
4 10 

11 00 
172 81 
375 00 
387 50 
262 50 
262 50 
200 00 
150 00 

87 50 
225 00 
225 00 
126 00 
100 00 

75 00 
225 00 
285 65 
187 50 
100 00 
72 66 
28 60 



$2,126 86 



24 



List of Orders paid — continued. 



Pate. 



2 
2 
2 



1878 
Dec. 2 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 2 
Ded. 2 
Dec. 2 
Dec. 23 
Dec. 23 
Dec. 23 
Dec. 20 
Dec. 21 
Dec. 27 



5 
2 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
8 



1872 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 10 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 15 
Jan. 15 
Jan. 22 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 25 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 81 



Feb, 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 



No. 



587 
579 
580. 
581 
582 
583 
583 
585 
586 
588 
589 
590 
591 



591 
598 
594 
594 
595 
596 
597 
598 
599 
600 
601 
602 
603 
604 
605 
606 
607 
608 
609 
610 
611 
612 
613 
614 
615 
616 
617 
618 
619 
620 

621 
622 
623 
624 
625 
626 



To whom and for wbat paid. 



A. M. Faulkner wages. 

Julia McCarty do. . . 

Annie Lee do . . . 

Kate Culien do. .. 

Kate Cline do... 

Maggie Delaney do. . , 

Maggie Hageman do. . . 

Jbhana Sampson do. . . 

Mattie Olesen do. . . 

Carrie Peterson do. . . 

Maurice Fleming, cabbages . . 

Wiiliam Holmes, wood 

D. B. Devendorf, salary 

Total paid for December. . . 



W. B. Moffat, masonwork and mater'l. 

Julia McCarty, house cleaning 

H. W. Wood, honey 

M. Mulville, postage and stamps 

R. M. Williams, painting cutter 

Michael McCarty, cow 

Whitnay and Lowe, meat for Dec. . . . 

William Holmes, wood , 

Timothy Duggan, labor 

E. F. Gumsev, eggs 

G.W.Bushnell, carriages for Vis'g com 
A. Schultz, harness repairs and robes. 
K. N. Hollister, flavoring ext's, ctcs. . 

W. Isham, hardware 

J. H. Goodrich, groceries 

J. J. Watson & Co., lumber 

Field, Leiter & Co., dry goods 

Atwood & Culver, printing reports. . . 

F. C. Varnish Co., gasoline 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

H. M. Wilmarth & Bro., gas chimne}^ 
Geo. L. Weed, Jr., expenses 

C. D. Long, salary as secretary 

M. J. White, R. ft. freight, Dec 

D. A. Hall, butter and eggs 

E. W. Phelps, groceries 

West & Co., books, stationery, etc 

D. B. Devendorf, medicine 

D. B. Barnes, wood 

D. A. Stevens, brooms 

Total paid in January 

Atwater & Co., feed 

H. Latham, vinegar 

E. L. Shader^papers 

W. M. & E. Wells, dry goods 

R. H. James, groceries 

Whitney & Lowe, meat for January. . 



Amount. 



Total. 



$45 50 
89 00 
89 00 
89 00 
86 00 
32 60 
82 50 
82 50 
22 50 

82 50 
8 00 

75 00 

83 60 



20 80 

7 00 
20 97 
19 18 
10 00 
40 00 

286 77 

60 00 

9 87 

8 05 

5 00 
59 85 

6 85 
87 27 

73 65 

74 65 
12 00 
30 00 
72 35 

192 38 
18 00 

8 50 
25 00 
27 90 
27 56 
47 70 
16 21 
10 00 
80 00 

8 00 



10 82 

800 

7 10 

70 57 

84 81 

170 97 



$5,048 96 



11,294 96 



26 



List of Orders Paid — continued. 



Date. 


No. 


1872. 


Feb. 7 


627 


Feb. 7 


628 


Feb. 8 


629 


Feb. 8 


680 


Feb. 8 


681 


Feb. 8 


682 


Feb. 10 


683 


Feb. 14 


684 


Feb. 14 


685 


Feb. 15 


686 


Feb. 15 


687 


Feb. 16 


688 


Feb. 17 


689 


Feb. 20 


640 


Feb. 20 


641 


Feb. 29 


642 



To whom and for what paid. 



Mar. 1 
Mar. 2 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 6 
Mar. 7 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 8 
Mar. 14 
Mar. 20 
Mar. 20 
Mar. 25 
Mar. 25 
Mar. 26 

April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 



648 
644 
645 
646 
647 
648 
649 
650 
651 
652 
658 
654 
655 
656 
657 
658 
659 
660 
661 
662 
668 
664 

665 
666 
667 
668 
669 
670 
671 
672 
678 
674 
675 
676 



M. J. White, railroad freight for Jan. 

A. J. Woodbury, cash account 

G. Pfister, leather and findings 

G. Eberle & Co., hard soap 

American Tract Society, books 

Hoffman, Billings & Co.,8t*m watfit. 
M. Melville, P. M., stamps and env. . 

C. S. Babcock, straw 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

John M. Eull, dried apples 

M. J. White, railroad freight 

J. C. Burt, soft soap 

F. Wheeler, butter and eggs 

T. Duggan, labor 

I. L. Feet, slates 

Phelps & Utter, flour and feed 

Totalpaid in February 

Geo. L. Weed, Jr., for indigent pupils 

M. J. White, railroad freight 

Lois Nedry, wages 

Geo. L. Weed, Jr., expenses 

John Allott, meat for February 

J. J. Watson & Co., one door 

J. W. Patterson, dry goods 

Strow & Donahue, cleaning cistern . . 

G. Pfister, leather and findings 

Forest City Varnish Co., gasoline 

Hoffman, Billings & Co., steam fitt'gs 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

Glen Wood, books 

R. H. Post, books 

A. H. Andrews & Co., maps and globe. 

Field, Leiter & Co., dry goods 

S. C. Grigffs & Co., books and statin*y 

L. Barnes, butter 

G. H. Briggs, drugs, paints, oils, etc. . 

C. D. Long, salary as secretary 

P. M. Latimer, butter 

Order not used. 

Totalpaid in March . , 

Geo. L. Weed, Jr., salary 

E. G. Valentine do 

L. Eddy do 

C. L. Williams do 

H.Phillips do 

G. P. Schilling do 

Z. G. McCoy do 

Mary Johnson do 

E. Eddjr do 

A. J. Woodbury. . . .do 

E. Younc. do 

D. T. GiSbrd do 



Amount. 



$12 17 
81 70 

178 81 

50 40 

5 32 

46 79 

81 28 

5 00 

297 98 
29 80 
21 60 
20 00 
25 61 
4 50 
88 00 

482 89 



187 20 

6 47 

27 00 

12 45 

191 85 

3 75 
11 63 
15 00 
44 12 
76 18 
18 56 
54 59 
14 06 

6 12 
22 58 
78 12 
48 88 

8 72 
89 60 
25 00 
85 58 



875 00 
200 00 
887 50 
262 50 
225 00 
262 50 
225 00 
87 50 
150 00 
125 00 
225 00 
250 00 



Monthly tot. 



$1,682 52 



921,85 



26 



lAat of Orders Paid — con. 



Date. 



1872 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 1 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 4 
April 5 
April 5 
April 5 
April 6 
April 8 
April 8 
Aprl 11 
Aprl23 
Aprl 23 
Aprl 24 



May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 




678 
679 
680 
681 
682 
683 
684 
685 
686 
687 
688 
689 
690 
691 
692 
693 
694 
695 
696 
697 
698 
690 
700 
702 
702 
703 
704 
705 
706 
707 
708 
709 
710 
711 
712 
713 
714 
715 
716 
717 
718 



To whom and for what paid. 



2 


719 


2 


720 


2 


721 


2 


722 


2 


723 


8 


724 


8 


725 


3 


726 


8 


727 


8 


728 


8 


729 



Amount. 



A. J. Cornell, salary 

Luthera Hill, salary 

M. J. Flemming wages 

R. W. Harris do.. 

A. M. Faulkner do. . 

Julia McCarty do.. 

Annie Lee do. . 

Kate Cullen do. . 

Kate Kline do. . 

Maggie Delaney do. . 

Johanna Sampson. . . .do. . 

Mattie Oleson do. . 

Carrie Peterson do. . 

Maggie Hagcman ... .do. . 
Lois Nedry do.. 

D. B. Devendorf , salary . . . 
C. H. Rideout, wages foi wife sewingi 

E. W. Phelps, groceries 

W. Isham, hardware and repairing. . 

E. M. Sharpe & Bro., groceries 

P. Grassie & Co., groceries 



1100 
75 
100 
60 
45 
45 
89 
89 
89 
82 
82 
82 
82 
32 

4 
31 

6 
26 
68 
52 

"Whitney, Lowe & t)o., meat for March| 195 

J. M. Smith, blacksmithing 

A. J. Woodbury, cash account 

M. Mulville, postage and postage stps 
Hatch, Hoi brook & Co., cherry lum .'. 

G. Pfister, leather and findings 

West & Co., books and stationary 

Not used 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

Carrie Peterson, wages 

A Smith, butter and eggs 

M. J. White, railroad freight 

J. C. Burt, soap 

M. E. H. Payne, sewing machine, etc. 

Harper Bro., papers 

C. B. Jones, butter, eggs and apples. . 
I. L. Pect, expenses on iraporta goods 

M. J. AVhite, railroad freight 

P. E. Jones, butter 

Total paid in April 

Hoffman, Billings &Co.,diffr. in pmp 

G. Eberle & Co., hard soap 

John Allott, meat for April 

Walton & Francisco, blacksmithing 
Geo. L. Weed, jr., for indigent pupils 

T. Duggan, wages 

H. M. Wilmarth & Bro., gas fixtures. 
H. M. Wilmarth & Bro., gas fixtures. 
West & Co., books and stationery. . . , 
Blair & Persons, glass ware, etc. . . . 
Ball & Goodrich^ groceries 



223 
12 



00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
50 
00 
00 
00 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
25 
00 
30 
50 
68 
75 
21 
30 
15 
19 
00 
86 
70 



Monthly tot 




14,735 92 



27 



List of Orders Paid — continued. 



Date. 

1872. 
May 2 
May 4 
May 7 
May 9 
May 11 
May 16 
May 18 
May 22 
May 25 



No. 



1 
4 
5 
5 
5 
6 
5 
5 
5 
5 



June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 5 
June 5 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June Q 
June Q 
June 8 
June 11 
Junell 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 13 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 
June 13 
June 18 
June 13 
June 18 
June 18 
June 18 



780 
781 
782 
788 
734 
735 
736 
737 
738 

739 
740 
741 
742 
748 
744 
745 
746 
747 
748 
749 
750 
751 
752 
758 
754 
755 
756 
757 
758 
759 
760 
761 
762 
768 
764 
765 
766 
767 
768 
769 
770 
771 
772 
773 
774 
775 
776 
777 
778 
779 
780 
781 



To whom and /or what paid. 



Amount. 



Strickland & Co., stationery, etc 

L. Barnes, butter 

C. E. Ferow, soft soap 

C. B. Jones, butter and eggs 

R. W. Harris, wages : 

E. Stowell, straw 

Thomas Sullivan, digging out ditch. . 

Arthur Bowers, butter 

Dennis Cronin, plowing garden 

Total paid in May 

C. B. Jones, butter and eggs 

Remain Calkins, apples 

J. C. Burt, soap 

Amos Phelps, flour and feed 

Order not used. 

Atwater & Co., castings for school d'sks 
Whitney, Lowe & Co., meat for May. . 

Geo. L. Weed, Jr.. expenses . .». 

A. E. Hale, boiler insurance 

D. B. Barnes, drugs, paints, oils, etc . 

D. L. Shader, papers, etc 

H. M. Norris, sink pattern 

H. J. Ross & Co., lumber 

J. H. Goodrich, groceries 

M. J. White, R. R. freight 

A, J. Woodbury, clerk's cash account 

M. J. White, express charges 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

Blair & Persons, crockery and glassw. 
A. D. Seaman & Co., moulding, etc. . 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

John Jearmark, brooms 

A. Vandyke, printing 

A. Bowers, butter 

D. B. Devendorf, . . .salary 

Geo. L. Weed, Jr.,. . . .do 

E. G. Valentine do 

C. L. Williams, dd 

L. Eddy, do 

Hiram Phillips, do 

G. F. Schilling do 

Z. G. McCoy do 

E.Eddv do 

Mary Johnson, do 

A. J. Woodbuiy, do 

E. Youfagj do 

D. T. GiSbrd, do 

C. H. Rideont, do 

A. J. Cornell, do 

L. J. Hill, do 

A. M. Faulkner, wages 

Julia McCarty do 

Annie Lee do 



<d6 25 

440 

9 37 

10 07 

24 00 

4 00 

15 53 

4 62 
8 50 

17 34 

5 40 
24 00 

352 50 

67 30 

198 52 

10 00 

56 25 

47 62 

8 55 
10 50 

48 61 
40 53 

6 27 

9 49 
6 20 

158 78 

133 35 

4 90 

49 70 

6 37 

7 00 

8 16 
31 25 

375 00 
200 00 
262 50 
387 50 
225 00 
262 50 
225 00 
150 00 
87 50 
125 00 
225 00 
250 00 
137 50 
100 00 
75 00 
45 50 

38 50 

39 00 



Monthly tot 



$887 79 



28 



Xfiat of Orders Paid — continued. 



Date. 




1872 
June 13 
June 13 
June 13 
June 13 
June 13 
June 13 
June 13 
June 13 
June 13 
June 13 
June 14 
June 10 
June 20 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 



July 
July 
July 
Juy 
July 
July 
July 

July 
July 
July 
July 

July 

July 
July 
July 

J«y 

Juy 
Juy 
July 
July 
July 
July 
J'uly 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
Juy 
July 
July 



Aug. 8 



782 
783 
784 
785 
786 
787 
788 
789 
790 
791 
792 
793 
794 
795 
796 
797 



1 


798 


3 


799 


8 


800 


3 


801 


3 


802 


3 


802 


3 


804 


8 


805 


3 


806 


3 


807 


3 


808 


3 


809 


3 


810 


3 


811 


9 


812 


11 


813 


12 


814 


13 


815 


13 


816 


13 


817 


15 


818 


16 


819 


16 


820 


17 


821 


18 


822 


19 


823 


20 


824 


22 


825 


22 


826 


27 


827 


27 


828 


27 


829 


80 


830 


8 


881 


8 


882 



To whom and for what paid. 



Amount. 



Kate Cullen, wages 

Kate Kline do 

Maggie Delaney . . .do 

Joanna Sampson. . .do 

Maggie Hageman. .do 

Lizzie Hageman. . . .do 

Mattie Oleson do 

Lois Nednr do 

Maurice Flemming.do.' 

L. Barnes, butter 

H. L. Blood, expenses as trustee. . . . 

Buckser & Hart, re-cutting files 

Ed. Madden, drawing brick 

C. B. Jones, butter 

Ed. Madden, drawing brick 

M. O. Wright, whitewashing 

Total paid in June 

H.W. Randolph, cherries and strawb's. 

Tim. Duggan, wages 

M. Gleason, wagjss 

John Allott, meat for June 

G. L. Weed. Jr., indig't pupils R. R. fare. 
H. Albro, boiled cider, vinegar, etc . . 
E. W. Phelps, groceries 

D. L. Shader, papers 

M. J. White, R. K. freight 

G. H. Brings, drugs ana sundries .... 

Goodrich Bros., diy goods 

H. B. Dunham & Co., varnish, etc ... 
Geo. L. Weed, indigent pupils' cloth'g 

R. W. Harris, wages 

M. A. Hall, cherries 

Ira Mereness. .do 

Ira Mereness . .do 

M. O.Wright, whitew'g and painting. 

Dennis Quinn, wages 

Mattie Oleson 

M. J. White, R. R. freight 

M. A. Hall, cherries 

T. Duggan, labor 

Ira Mereness, cherries 

Peter McCarty, wa^es 

E. L. Harris, cherries 

M. Gleason, wages 

A. Van Dyke, printine circulars 

Ed. Madden, drawing orick . 

Louis Goltz, wages ' 

Kate Kline ao 

Lizzie Hageman .do 

John Reader, stramberrles 

Total paid in July 

Dennis Doyle, wages 

Ed. Madden, drawing brick 



$39 00 

89 00 

82 60 

27 00 

32 50 

80 00 

32 50 

32 00 

100 00 

26 69 

45 00 

10 16 

4 60 

3 84 

7 50 

25 00 



$9 55 

9 00 

19 12 

182 87 

87 80 

86 40 

44 96 

6 05 

11 95 
81 22 

4 40 
19 98 
83 27 
16 00 

1 84 
3 20 

3 50 
54 87 
22 50/1 

2 50 
15 75 

4 00 
80 50 

6 00 
28 12 

2 00 

7 00 

5 00 
15 00 
21 00 

12 00 
10 00 

3 60 



»15 75 
1 50 



Monthly tot. 



Hs 956 28 



710 45 



29 



Ifiat of Orders Paid — continued. 



Date. 

1873. 
Aug. 5 
Aug. 5 
Aug. 5 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 7 
Aug. 9 
Aug. 13 
Aug. 12 
Aug. 12 
Aug. 14 
Aug. 17 
Aug. 17 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 26 
Aug. 27 
Aug. 28 
Aug. 80 
Aug. 81 
Aug. 81 

Sep. 8 
Sep. 8 




888 
884 
885 
886 
887 
888 
889 
840 
841 
842 
858 
844 
845 
846 
847 
848 
849 
856 
851 
852 
858 
854 
855 
856 
857 
858 
859 
860 
861 
862 
868 
264 
865 
866 
867 
868 
869 
870 
871 
872 
878 
874 
875 
876 
877 
878 
879 
880 
881 

882 
888 



To whom and for what paid. 



B. S. Bangs, raaspberries 

M. Mulvifle, envelopes, postage, etc. . 
E. M. Irish, raspberries 

A. H. Barnes, hauling sand 

Qeo. Burpee, brick 

Atwater & Co., iron sink, etc 

M. J. White, R. R. freight 

M. J. White, express charges 

Chas. Perry, mason work 

Geo. Gk)ve, mason work 

D. Gove, mason work 

B. W. Moffat, whitewashing, etc 

Terry Clark, wages, labor on cistern . 
Dennis Quin, wages, labor on cistern 
Luscombe & Pierce, lumber 

A. J. Woodbury, clerks* cash acc*t. . . 
Whitn^, Lowe & Co., meat for July. 

H. H. Williams, clocks, etc 

Amos Phelps, ffour and feed 

Hoffman, Billings & Co., steam flings 
H. J. Ross & Co., lumber, lime, etc . . 

Matthew Bros., chairs 

H. M. Wilmarth & Bro., gas tapers . . 

W. M. & E. Wells, dry goods 

T. A. Chapman & Co., ary goods 

E. M. Sharpe & Bro., groceries 

C. A. Buttles, Hardware 

Stark Bros, matting 

H. B. Pearson, fire brick and clay 

J. H. Camp, drugs and sundries 

Smith, Roundy & Co., groceries 

W. Isham, hardware, etc 

F. C. Varnish Co., gasoline 

M. Gleason. wages, labor on cistern . 
E. A. Fay, American Annals 

B. S. Bangs, apples 

C. H. Johnson, eggs 

D. T. Gifford, currants, etc 

R. W. Harris, wages 

Jennie Faulkner, wages 

Henry sage, peaches 

Order not used 

Perry Flint, cleaning wells 

M. Gleason, wages 

Wm. Holmes, Cucumbers 

James Brabazon, straw 

E. Stowell, oats 

James Brabazon, straw 

C. P. Soper, potatoes 

Total paia in August 

A. S. Spooner, straw 

M. J. White, R R. freight 



Amount. 



Monthly Tot. 



$41 10 

80 78 

6 50 

15 75 
189 90 

26 50 
5 05 
5 81 

16 50 
28 18 
52 93 
23 12 
22 00 

18 50 
244 40 

19 89 

57 46 

27 50 

88 90 

89 82 
67 85 
42 50 

8 00 

58 50 

90 90 
14 86 

9 90 
85 10 
19 50 
10 50 

146 78 

125 72 

88 27 

40 75 

45 00 

1 50 

2 45 
2 80 

26 98 
8 22 
2 50 




91,826 02 



30 



List of Orders Paid — continued. 



6 

7 
7 
7 
7 
9 
9 
9 



9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 



Date. 

1872 
Sept 4 
Sept. 
Sept 
Sept. 
Sept 
Sept. 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept. 9 
Sept 9 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 
Sept 10 
Sept. 10 
Sept 11 
Sept 12 
Sept 13 
Sept 14 
Sept. 14 
Sept 14 
Sept 14 
Sept 14 
Sept 18 
Sept 18 
Sept 18 
Sept 19 
Sept 19 
Sept 20 
Sept 23 
Sept. 25 
Sept. 26 
Sept. 26 
Sept 27 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 




884 
885 
886 
887 
888 
889 
890 
891 
892 
893 
894 
895 
896 
897 
898 
899 
900 
901 
902 
903 
904 
905 
906 
907 
908 
909 
910 
911 
912 
913 
914 
915 
916 
917 
918 
919 
920 
921 
922 
923 
924 
925 
926 
927 
928 
929 
930 
931 
932 
933 
934 
935 
986 



To whom and for what paid. 



W. B. MoflFat, mason work, etc 

Swan, Watkins & Co., coal 

Jansen, McClurg& Co., school books 

G. O. Pay, school books 

J. M. Kull, apples 

Louis Gk>ltz, wages 

E. M. Sharpe & Bro., stone ware 

John Allott, meat for August 

R. H. James, groceries 

H. M. Wilmarth & Co., gas fixtures. . 

C. E. Perry, mason work, etc 

Smith, Roundy & Co., groceries 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

Fiald, Leiter & Co., dry goods 

N. W. Furniture Co., bedsteads 

T. A. Chapman & Co., diy goods 

M. Fleming, currants, milk and com 

Geo. Watkms, bath tub 

Whitney, Lowe & Co., butter 

C. P. Calkins, apples 

P. C. Williams, Butter 

J. W. Randolph, grapes 

C. B. Jones, butter 

H. Hevn & Co. dry goods 

C. P. Soper, potatoes 

J. C. Burt, soft soap 

Munsel & Fuller, dray age 

E. Starin, squashes and pumpkins . . . 

Wm. Hatton, butter 

J.W.Randolph, grapes and wat^rmePs 
Jansen, McClurg & Co., school books 

James Hennesy, wood 

Chas. C. Brown, onions 

8. Thomas, butter 

A. J. Cornell, salary as matron 

J. W. Randolph, grapes 

W. C. Van Velzer, pumpkins 

8. N. Loomer, apples and grapes .... 
Geo. L. Weed, jr.. salary Principal . . 
E. G. Valentine, salary as teacher . . 

C. L. Williams do 

L. Eddy do 

G. F. Schilling do 

Z. G. McCoy do 

H. Phillips do 

P. 8. Englehardt do 

E. Eddy do 

Mary Johnson do 

Mrs. L. J. Hill, salary as matron .... 

A. J. Woodbury, salary as clerk 

E. Toung. salary as master cab. shop. 

D. T. Gifford, salary as engineer I 

C. H. Rideont, sal. master shoe shop.' 



Amount. JMonthlyTot. 



$5 00 


500 00 


11 56 


13 33 


7 50 


9 50 


4 12 


62 16 


87 72 


9 73 


6 87 


31 16 


189 67 


154 50 


243 75 


48 93 


7 70 


20 00 


6 80 


3 90 


15 77 


2 61 


6 86 


8 10 


18 00 


80 00 


4 00 


1 26 


11 16 


2 75 


21 42 


70 00 


15 00 


83 95 


67 00 


2 77 


6 00 


18 50 


375 00 


208 33 


270 83 


320 83 


270 as 


225 00 


225 00 


25 00 


150 00 


87 50 


83 33 


133 50 


225 00 


250 00 


187 50 



31 



List of Orders Paid — continued. 



Date. 

1872 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sopt. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept 80 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 80 
Sept. 80 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 80 
Sept 80 
Sept 30 



No. 



937 

988 

989 

940 

941 

942 

948 

944 

945 

946 

947 

948 

949 

950 

951 

952 

958 

954 

955 

956 

957 

958 

959 

960 

961 

962 

963 

984 

965 

966 

967 

968 

969 

970 

971 

972 

973 

974 

975 

976 

977 

978 

979 

980 

981 

982 

988 

984 

985 

986 

987 

988 

989 



To whom and for what paid. 



Amoant. 



I 



Monthly tot. 



D. B. Devendorf, sal. as Physician . . 
Maurice Fleming, wages genU work. 
Mrs. A. Faulkner, wages as cook. . . . 

Julia Delaney , wages as cook 

Maggie Delaney, wages din. r'm girl 
Joanna Sampson, wages ass't cook. . 

Annie Lee, wages as baker 

Kate Cullen, wages head laundress. . 
Maggie Hageman, wages laundress. . 
Lizzie Hageman, wages laundress. . . 
Tildie Hetterman, wages laundress. . 
Mattie Oleson, wages seamstress. . . . 
Anna Dyreson, wages cleaning girl . 
Geo. McKee, wages ass't engineer . . 
Hattie Kideout, wages general work 

C. T. Spooner, squashes 

Honora McCarty, wages house cPg. . 

Charles Wilbur, patatoes 

L. Hollister, butter 

M. Mulville, P. M, postage and st'ps. 

Henry Fleming, butter 

Dennis Cronin, squashes and labor. . 
A. H. Andrews & Co., books 

D. Martin, squashes 

A. H. Barnes, potatoes 

C. D. Long, butter 

J. M. KuU, apples 

Geo. L. Weed, jr., trav. expenses .... 

J. W. Patterson, dry goods 

G. H. Briggs, paints, oils, etc 

Buckley & Hall, hardware 

R. H. James, groceries 

M. J. White R. R. freight 

J. H. Goodrich, groceries 

E. W. Phelps, groceries 

Whitney, Lowe & Co., meat for Sept. 

Wm. Hatton, cabbage and eggs 

W. M. & E. Wells, dry goods 

T. J. Smith, hardware 

A. Schults & Bro., harness and rep'rs 

Utter & Caldwell, groceries 

A. J. Woodbury, clerks* cash acc't. . 
M. J. White, express and telegr*ing. . 

G. Eberle & Co., hard soap 

T. A. Chapman & Co., dry goods. . . . 

A. P. Morgan, school books 

George Crosby, library books 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries 

Drake Bros., sponges, etc 

Sutton & Scott, library books 

Drake Bros., gasoline 

Ball & Goodrich, groceries • . 

I. G. Ferris, leather 



$38 38 

100 00 

45 50 

20 00 
87 50 
10 00 
24 00 
14 00 
80 00 

21 84 
21 84 

17 15 

18 57 
23 85 
20 00 

2 26 
2 00 

8 75 
14 80' 
17 19 

5 40 

9 70 
9 00 



8 
4 
8 



21 
50 
61 



19 56 
19 15 

10 09 
105 82 

82 95 

92 67 

16 99 

39 33 

87 17 

208 13 

8 25 

103 08 

58 18 

48 65 

7 48 

2 72 

11 70 
50 40 

19 00 
22 88 

20 40 
45 87 

4 10 
16 80 
28 67 
80 90 
68 85 I 



32 



Xfist of Orders Paid — continued. 



Date. 

1873 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 

Sept 30 

Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 

Sept 30 
Sept. 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 80 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 

Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 
Sept 30 



No. 



990 
991 
992 
993 
994 

• 

995 

996 

997 

998 

999 

1000 

1001 

1002 

1003 

1004 

1005 

1006 
1007 
1008 
1009 
1010 
1011 

1012 
1013 
1014 
1015 
1016 
1017 
1018 



To whom and for what Paid. 



Amount 



Hoffman Blllings&Co., steam fittings 
Robert Clark & Co., library books. . 

West & Co., school books 

J. R. Keep, school books 

Am. Tract Society, school books and 

papers 

P. and y. Leather Co., leather and 

findings 

C. A. Battles, hardware 

James O'Neil, hay 

R. Cobum, cow and calf 

Henry Fleming, batter 

J. F. McKee, cow 

M. J. White, potatoes 

L. Barnes, butter and potatoes 

A. H. Barnes, potatoes 

Wm. Morgan, potatoes 

Mansell £ Faller, brick and team 

work 

David Vroman, beets and cabbage . 
West & Co., blank books, etc 

D. L. Shader, books, papers, etc. . . . 

J. F. Birchard, furniture 

Smith, Roundy <& Co., groceries 

Walton & Francisco, olacksmith^s 

repairs 

Susan Sharpe,hat8 for indigent girls 

Swan Watkins & Co., coal 

Munsel & Fuller, hauling coal. . . . 
Sexton Bro. & Co., dry goods 

E. P. Gifford, squash 

K. N. Hollister, drugs and sundries 
C. D. Long, cheese 

Total paid in September 



Total paid during the year. 



64 

7 

20 
18 



01 
96 
75 
00 



16 51 



133 
25 
62 
50 

2 

40 

125 

33 

9 
15 

5 

16 

18 

100 

863 

17 

2 

1987 

75 

85 

8 

12 

36 



50 
97 
40 
00 
30 
00 
22 
95 
60 
00 

50 
27 
40 
55 
00 
40 

IS 
90 

50 
00 

48 
14 
86 
88 



Monthly tot 



$9,842 92 



$34,174 87 



SUMMARY OF THE EXPENDITURES 

Of the Wisconsin Institute/or the Education of the Deaf and 
Dumb^foT the year ending September 30, 1872. 

For Means of instruction $454 33 

Clothing 817 60 

Drugs and medicines 104 06 

Farm expenses 401 07 

Fuel 2,836 87 

House furnishing 2, 109 06 

Livestock 180 00 

Lights (exclusive of fixtures 264 25 

Liquors .' 7 23 

Manufacturing expenses 1, 000 27 

Miscellaneous purposes 1,739 77 

Repairs 1 , 701 21 

Permanent improvements .... 691 35 

Subsistence 7, 617 14 

Salaries and wages 14,720 19 

$34, 174 37 



3— D. & D. (Doc 9. 



31 



Detailed Statement op Expenses of the Wisconsin Institute 
for Deaf ayid Dumh^ for the Year ending September dOth^ 
1872. 



Articles . 



American Annals 

Books — school 

Books — library 

Bell for school room 

Camp's Outline Maps 

Composition books 

Class books 

Engravings 

Mucilage 

Magazines and Papers 

Map of Wisconsin 

News and illustrated papers 

Picture cards 

Small globe 

Slate pencils 

Slates 



CLOTHING. 



Combs 

Coats 

Caps 

Corset , 

Fine combs 

Hose — cotton 

Hose — ^Woolen 

Hats for girls 

Gloves , 

Linen cuffs 

Linen coats 

Making dresses 

Neckties 

Paper collars 

Pantaloons 

Ribbon.... 

Shoes 

Socks for boys 

Scarfs — woolen 

Shirts 

Suspenders 

Straw hats 

"Vests •.< 

Total for clothing. 



MEANS OF INSTRUCTION. 




set . . . 
dozen 



1 
1 
4 

16 at 60c . 
3 bottles. 



8 dozen 
1 

5 ffross. 

6 dozen 



pairs 
pairs 



Amount. 



9 

13 

7 

1 

10 

42 pairs 

12 pairs 

3 

2 

2 

2 

4 

4 

137 boxes 
20 pairs 

1 yard. 

4 pairs 
18 pairs 

5 

14 

12 pairs 

• 1 

16 



$90 00 

183 34 

110 73 

65 

21 00 

6 00 

2 25 
9 60 

75 
27 42 

70 
88 85 

3 05 
1 58 
1 75 
6 65 



12 10 

90 64 

10 00 

75 



2 
7 
4 
3 



10 
94 
25 
65 

3 50 
40 

2]50 



4 
1 



33 
20 



9 69 

96 25 

13 

10 50 

4 20 
6 25 

23 50 

5 47 
35 

27 90 



ToUl. 



$454 32 



317 60 



35 



Detailed Statement of JSapenses^-contimied. 



Articles. 



DRT708 Aim MEDICINES. 

Tincture arnica 

Castor oil 

Carbolate of lime 

Bromo chloralum 

Glycerine 

Glycerine court plaster 

Iodide potassium 

Morphine 

Micellaneous drugs 

Painkiller 

Quinine pills 

Beidlitz powders 

Syrup, sarsaparilla 

y accinnating material 

Total for drugs andmed^s 

FARM EXPENSES. 

Feed— 

Corn and oat meal 

Bran..' 

Oats 

Pumpkins 

Hay 



Qaflatlty. 



7 qts 
IJiqts 



2 
6 
2 
1 



t 

ft.... 
ft.... 
yards 
oz ... 



Price. 



8 D 



2 pints . 

9^ doz . . 

8 boxes. 

12 



oz 



5,307 ft 

10,184 ft 

100 bush . 

8 loads. 

10-846-1000 tons. 



Irwplementa — 

Curry combs 

Con/baskets 

Fork — ^hay 

Fork— Spading 

Fork — ^manure 

Horse brushes 

Ironing wheelbarrows 
Spodes and shoyels . . . 
Scythe Stones 



Miscellaneous — 

Buffalo robes 

Cebbage plants 

Digging aitch 

Garaen seeds 

Harness repairs 

Horse blankets 

Horse shoeing 

Loads Straw 

Single harness 

Plowing garden 

Rope 

Repairs to buggy ,wag.etc. 

Upholstering seats 

Whips 

Painting cutter 



8 
2 
1 
4 
2 
2 
7 
5 
2 



Total for farm expenses 



2 

400 

17>^ yards 



13 
1 



14 ft... 



3 
1 



(55 05 

78 14 

25 00 

6 00 

62 40 



1 05 

1 60 
75 

5 75 

2 18 
1 50 

20 50 

6 60 
80 



$86 00 

1 00 

15 58 

4 10 

14 85 

600 

10 40 

29 50 

85 00 

8 50 

8 52 

87 25 

19 50 

8 65 

10 00 



Amount. 



$7 00 



1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
1 
2 



50 
50 
50 
90 
75 
20 
90 



62 70 
2 00 
8 51 
840 
1 20 

10 00 



$221 59 



40 18 



Total. 



$104 06 







































229 80 




'"♦49107 



36 



Detailed Suuement qf ^apenset^-oaaliaaed. 



Artide. 


QoAiitlty. 


Price. 


Amount. 


Total. 


FUEL. 
Wood 


68^ cords. 




$824 87 
3,612 50 




Coal 


250 tons. . 






Total for fuel 






2,886 87 


HOUSB FUBKISHIKG. 

Fwmiture and Carpets — 

Bed fastenings 

Caroet loun&re 


8 doz . . 

1 

1 
86 yards. 
98 22^6 yds 


14 05 
13 00 

5 50 
35 10 

118 11 

2 16 

2 25 

8 11 

80 00 

259 75 

25 08 

6 50 
19 50 

5 50 

27 00 
90 00 
42 50 

28 00 








Cane seat chairs 






Cocoa mattinfiT 






Infirain caroets 






Makin? ud caroet 






Oil cloth ruflr 


1 

7J^ yards. 

79 y.\v.\ 

47 

1 doz . . 
8 doz . . 

2 

2 

1 

5 

5 

42 yards. 

51 yards. 

47-12doz.. 

461>^yds 

6 pkgs . 






Oil cloth carpet 

Oval tete 










Panel bedsteads 












Stools 


.. ...... 




Wooden chairs 






Wilson ruffs 






Walnut table 






Walnut desk 






Walnut chairs 






Walnut parlor chairs . . . . 






$722 11 




Dry Goods- 
All wool merino 


$31 50 
25 02 

4 40 

76 14 
in AR 




All wool flannel 






Alnaca braid 






Brown crash 






Barbour^s linen thread. . . 






Blue demins 


99M yards. 1 SO ik 






Buttons, needles, etc 




80 58 
37 04 
80 85 

24 00 

25 08 
24 94 
18 00 

5 48 

16 40 

8 80 

96 

75 

7 55 

112 50 

18 00 

58 19 

420 

689 






Bleached sheeting, 9-4. . . 
Bleached sheeting, 4-4. . . 

Bed spreads, white 

Coat^s thread 


773^ yards. 

2825i yards. 

6 

298-12doz.. 
125 10-16 lbs. 

5 doz . . 
54^ yards. 

188' yards. 

41 Ji yards. 
16 balls . 

8 yards. 
41}^ yards. 

V . . ... 

6 doz . . 
2801^ yards. 

42 balls . 
2 doz . . 


















Cotton battinsT 






Cotton hose 






Cambric 






Calico 






Canton flannel 






Candle wickin&r 






Drilling : 

Gingham 

Hair mattrasses 














Huck towels 






Huck towelinfiT 






KnittiniT cotton 






Linen tape 





87 



Detailed StcUement of JEixpense^ — continued. 



Aitide. 



House Fumi8hinff'-<ion, 
Dry Ooo€U— con. 

Mosquitobar 

Merino vests 

Napkins 

Lawn 

Kansook sheeting, 4-4 .. . 
Patterns, worst and canv. 

Poplin 

Sewing silk 

Ticking 

Table cloth linen 

Table spreads 

Unbleached heavy sheet'g 
Woolen yam 



MUeeUaneauB — 

Brooms 

Brush brooms 

Barrel covers 

Bath bricks 

Butter bowl and ladle 

Carpet tacks 

Crockery ware 

Counter brushes 

Clothes baskets 

Clothes pins 

Clothes lines 

Curtain cord 

Coarse combs 

Clocks 

Feathers 

Fly paper 

Florence sewing machine. 

Hair brushes 

Gas chimnies 

Indelible ink 

Lamp chimnies 

Lamp wicks 

Lanterns 

Mop sticks 

Mason glass fruit jar, 3 qt. 

Matches 

Repairs to kitchen tinware 
Rubber hand, table knives 
Rosewood table cloth .... 

Straw for beds 

Shoe laces 

Shears 

Scouring soap 

Spittons 

Scouring powder 



Quantity. 



6 yards. . . . 
10 
6 

241i£ 



Price. 



dozen . . . 
yards.... 



20 
12 
44Ji 

2 

837.2 

3 



yards 

spools . . . 
yards.... 
yards. . . . 



yards. . . . 
pounds . . 



10 1142 dozen 

3 dozen . . . 
1 dozen . . . 

4 

1 



6 packages 



6 
17 
61 
14 
76 
6 
2 
25 



dozen .. 
dozen .. 



yards... 
dozen .. 



pounds 



10 85 
10 00 
18 50 

1 78 
42 48 

8 10 

440 

80 

18 85 

80 05 

250 
48 93 

3 61 



$28 
5 



5 3-12 dozen. 
12 dozen . . . 
11 bottles... 

4J^ dozen . . . 

1 dozen . . . 

8 

8 

9^ dozen . . . 

8 gross • . . . 



1 
5 

2 
2 
2 

80 
4 
1 



dozen . . . 
pieces .. 
loads ... 
gross . . . . 
pairs .... 

CaKcB. . . . 



pound... 



182 

28 

14 

8 

4 

2 

10 

15 

20 

88 

24 

12 

3 

5 

3 

1 

29 
7 
9 
5 
22 
5 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 



87 
18 
75 
50 
65 
48 
30 
45 
65 
20 
25 
50 
50 
50 
00 
65 
70 
75 
00 
75 
30 
18 
75 
95 
58 
65 
01 
50 
00 
00 
26 
50 
23 
25 
20 



Amonnt. 



$786 32 



1 



Total. 



38 



Detailed Statement of ^scpen^e^— continued. 



Article. 



Quantity. 



House Fumiihing— con. 

Miscellaneous— con. 

Sponges 

Scrub brushes 

Tea spoons 

Toilet soap 

Toilet brushes 

Umbrella 

Woooden pails 

Wash tubs 

Wash boards 

Total for house fum*g. 



LITE STOCK. 

Cows , 

Total for live stock. 



LIGHTS. 

Candles , 

Gasoline 

Gas tapers 

Head light oil 

Total for lights. 



LIQUORS. 

Alcohol 

Bourbon whisky 

Port wine 

Total for liquors (med.) 



MANUFACTURING. 

Cabinet 87u>p — 

Asphaltum 

Balls twine 

Brads 

Bitts 

Boiled oil 

Bureau knobs 

Cut nails 

Chisels 

Chisel handles 

Common glue 

Cherry lumber 

Escutcheons 

Furniture varnish .... 

Gimlets 

Hand ax 

Key hole saw 

Miscellaneous articles 

Oak lumber 

Plane irons 



2J^lbs.. 
2j| doz. 
3 doz. 
n% doz. 
2 doz. 

1 

2^ doz. 

6 . -. 

7 



80 lbs.... 

1821 gals... 

6 boxes. 

84 gals... 



3;gqts 
2>^qts 
1 qt. 



8 
2 
4 
5 
2 
5 

22 
8 

12 

15 
1 

18 
5 
8 
1 
1 



gals. 



lbs. 



fals. 
oz. 
lbs.. 



lbs 

M feet.. 

doz 

gals 



PrtM. 



12 05 

6 40 

16 84 

11 50 

2 05 

2 00 

88 

75 

78 



7 
5 
1 



8 60 
20 
60 
75 
80 
75 
48 
75 
00 
00 



1 
2 



1 
2 
1 
5 



8 



50 00 

2 40 

10 00 

88 

1 50 
60 

540 

2 16 
8 60 



Amoant. 


Total. 


































$600 63 






$2,100 06 


180 00 


180 00 


15 60 
218 90 

8 00 

16 75 








254 25 


8 58 
250 
1 15 


AVTK ISH3 






7 23 




1 mnj 






























































• 













39 



Detailed Statement of Expenses — continued. 



Article. 


Qaandty. 


Price. 


Amonnt. 


ToUl. 


Manufactwn7hg—-coix. 

Cabinet Shop— con. 
Picture nails 


12 


63 






Screws 


lb gross 


10 46 






Saw handle 


45 

1 65 

2 73 
67 30 

1 75 
45 

480 

3 30 

2 00 
1 60 
5 58 






Sand paper 


...i. ........... 






Saw nles 


18 






School desk castings 

Steel square 

Sash brush 


673 pounds.. 
1 










2 






Shellac 


IJ^ gallons .. 
16 


_ 




Small locks 






Turpentine 


2 gallons .. 






Varnish brush 






Walnut moulding 


139}^ feet 

90 V^ pounds . . 
30 






1198 07 




8?ioe Shop — 
American calf 


115 29 
16 62 

6 90 

7 75 
1 32 
4 50 
4 50 
3 50 

232 95 

3 50 

4 50 
60 

27 79 
50 
13 18 
50 50 
18 00 

5 40 
273 40 

1 25 

2 25 

8 00 




Bark lininfirs 






Barbours thread 


6 pounds . . 

7 






Colored lininfirs 






DrillingTor lining 

Dressing 

Iron ratchets 


7 yards ... 
1 doz. qts.. 
6 














Ink 


1 doz. qts.. 
2663^ pounds.. 

1 doz 

10 






Hemlock kip 






Hammers 






Lasts 






Edfire plane 


1 






French calf 


15 7-16 pounds 






Nippers 






Nails, awls, etc 








Oak kip 


50>^ pounds. . 
6 






Pebble goat skins 

Split leather 

Sole leather 






12 pounds . . 
2583^ pounds .. 
12 










Shoe knives 






Toe stretcher 


1 


■ 




IlDDer leather 


82 fact 








$802 20 




Total for manufacturing 

MIBCEIiT.ANEOUS FUKP08ES. 

Blank books 




»1,000 27 


25 ouires .. . 




$9 07 

12 15 

1 13 

1 50 

2 50 
'26 26 

10 08 


Butter tubs 


15 


• 




Borax of commerce 


3 pounds. . 






Black ink 


3 Quarts . . . 






Clothes marker and type. . . 

Castile soap 

Composition books 








170 pounds. . 






8 doz 







40 



Detailed Statement qf Expenses — continued. 



ArticleB. 



MisceUaneour Purposes — con. 



Cedar pencils 

Crayons 

Commercial note paper 

Common envelopes 

Cigars for legislative committee . . 

Barrels for apples 

Express charges 

Expenses getting servants 

Freight, boxing and cartage 

Faber pencils 

Glass ink stands 

Hard soap 

Hair cutting for indigent pupils . . 

Insurance on boilers 

Liquid blueing 

Livery hire for visiting committee 

Legal cap paper 

Letter paper 

Money from treasurer for pupils . . 

Mail bag 

Mucilage 

Masons blacking 

Opodeldoc soap 

Order book 

Postage and stamps 

Peanuts for Thanksgiving 

Printing reports 

Principal's traveling expenses .... 

Printed letter heads 

Pens 

Pass books 

Printed cards 

I^inted circulars 

Paper fasteners 

Paper cutter 

Rope 

R. R. fare indigent pupuls 

Receipt book 

Salary of secretary of board 

Soft soap 

Balance due E. C. Stone on old acct 

Stone ware 

Sal soda 

Silver gloss starch 

Stamped envelopes 

Stamped wrappers 

Soap making 

Soda ash 

Telegraphing 

Teeth extracted indigent pupils . . . 
Shoe brushes 



Quantity 



3 

1 
4 
2 
2 
33 



gross., 
box .. . 
reams . 
thous'd 
boxes . 
barrels. 



% CTOSS.. 

% dozen.. 
2,190 pounds 



Amount. 



5 gallons 



% ream . . 
1 ream . . 



1 
9 
1 

12 
1 



bottles, 
gross. . 
pounds 



H 50 

1 25 
7 CO 
5 00 

10 00 
16 50 
78 66 
16 85 
328 70 

2 55 
75 

154 20 
2 15 
66 25 
3 
6 
6 



2 
500 



bushels 



\% reams . 
4 gross. . 
2W dozen . 

1,000 

500 

2 boxes . 

1 

6 pounds 



31 7-32 bbls. 



90 

188 

828 

1,000 

100 



gallons 
pounds 
pounds 



6 pounds 



6 dozen . 



60 
00 
13 



3 00 

64 50 

85 

1 80 

8 40 

2 64 
7 00 

88 13 

5 50 

30 00 

60 10 

9 75 
2 40 
2 05 



7 
6 



00 
00 
60 
50 

1 50 
45 16 

5 00 
75 00 

124 87 
38 25 
12 47 

6 27 

33 91 

34 20 

2 13 
6 00 

54 
23 25 

50 
18 00 



Total. 



41 



Detailed Statanent qf ^^«n«M— continued. 



Articles. 


Quantity. 


Price. 




Total. 


Miseellaneous— continued, 

• 

Tablet-slate 


1 




10 85 

257 75 

200 

8 00 




Trustees* expenses 








Writingfluid 

Wooden ink stands 


8 ats 






2 doz 






Total for mifloellR'orifl mir 






n,789 75 

« 


BEPAIB8, OBDIKABT. 

Axes 


........ ... ... 

8 


18 00 
6 50 

1 40 

6 50 

2 50 

7 00 
16 00 

800 

80 

9 15 

1 50 

75 

60 

8 82 
1 25 
1 88 

12 76 
28 25 
14 00 
18 50 
11 20 
600 
250 
18 75 
11 70 

1 50 
865 

2 25 
450 

81 07 

6 40 

7 20 
450 
5 62 
1 50 

8 50 
60 

18 50 




Albata tea spoons 

Butts for doors 


6^ doz .... 

7 prs 

12 










Bakincr pans 






Coal hods 


2 






Coflee mill 


1 






Cut nails. 


284 lbs 

2 






Coal SCOOPS 






Candle sticks 


8 

1 






Clothes wriger, No. 1 

Five srallon can 






1 






jBiFfir beater 


1 






Fire shovels 


2 

46 lbs 

2 






Flat irons. 6 






Grid irons 






TTfiinfner ....... . , . 


1 






Lanterns....... *..x... 


11 






Lead pipe 








Laree dish nans 


8 






Laundrv stove 


1 






Mortise door locks 


18 






Meat boiler 


1 






Molasses eate 


1 






Milk pans 


3 doz 

IJi doz 

3 






Platea door knobs 






Rat trans. 






Screws 


10 ,gros 

8 






Sutrar scoops 






81oD nails 


4 






Small hardware 


Sundries 

2 doz 

1 






Thermometers 






Tin bath tub 






Tin water carriers 


2 






Tin pails, 12 at 


6 






Window fasteners 


12 






Wardrobe hooks 


1 gross.... 
6 lbs 

2 






Wrought nails 






Water cooler 










1824 60 





42 
Detailed Statement of Expenses — continued. 



ArticleB. 



BepairSy Ordinarj^ — con. 

Limey Mason Worky etc. — 

Lime 

Cement 

Stucco 

Hair 

Labor 



Lumber — 
Common lumber 

Clear do . . 

Flooring 

Lath 

Posts 

Panel door 



Quantity. 



26 1-6 bbls 

10 bbls.... 
2 bush.... 

11 lbs 

48 days . . . 



Miscellaneous — 

Brick 

Building paper 

Cleaning cisterns 

Cleaning wells 

Climax churn 

Fire brick 

Fire clay 

Gas fixtures 

Hauling brick 

Hauling sand 

Labor, digging cistems,etc 

Putty 

Repair water pipe 

f utter and tinware 
oiler and st. pipes 

bathtubs 

sewing machine, 
clocks 



stoves 

Re-cutting old files.. , 

Stone for sawer 

Sperm oil 

Sink pattern ... ^ ... . 
Team work, grading. 

Window glass. .* 

Wall paper 

Wall paper border. . . 



4375 feet 

252 feet 

414 feet 

375 feet 

22 .... 

1 .... 



21 6-10 M 
17 lbs.... 

5 

2 

1 

250 

1 bbl.... 



20 loads. 
18 loads. 
51 days.. 
41 lbs... 



1 
1 
1 



gal 



Painting and Whitevoashing- 

Boiledoil 

Furniture Tarnish 

French Zinc 

Japan Dryer 

Labor 

Miscellaneous paints . . 



1% days. .. . 
187>^ feet 

16 rolls 

17 yards . . . . 



8 gals. 
2 gals. 
25 lbs. 



Jigal.. 

4834 ^ftys- 



Piloo. 



$40 40 

27 00 

8 00 

1 10 

127 73 



$97 31 

8 82 

13 04 

3 00 

4 51 
3 75 



194 
1 

15 
6 
8 

15 
4 

20 

29 

15 

85 
3 
4 

64 
272 
2 
2 
7 
5 

10 
9 
3 

10 
6 

21 
4 
1 



90 
19 
00 
25 
00 
00 
50 
70 
70 
75 
25 
58 
50 
38 
23 
00 
00 
50 
15 
16 
00 
50 
50 
75 
68 
00 
70 



$8 80 

8 00 

4 50 

1 00 

120 99 

10 22 



Amount. 



$199 23 



130 43 



Total. 



824 87 



43 



Detailed Statement of Expenses — continued. 



Articles. 



Repairs^ ordinarif — con. 

Painting^ etc— con. 

Turpentine 

Paris white,for whitewa'g 
Wliite glue, for whitewa*g 

Whitewash brush 

White lead 

Total for repairs (ord'y) 

PEBMAHrSKT IMFBOYEMEITTS 



Bath tub, cast-iron 

Bath tub, rubber 

Cast iron sink 

Difference in pumps 

Drop gas burners 

Lumber for new front fence 
Posts for new front fence. . 
Rubber hose, 2 inch. ...... 

Water gauge for boiler — 

School room slates 

Total for permanent imp's 

SUBSISTENCE. 

Fruits — 

Apples, green 

Apples, dried 

Apples, Siberian crab. . . 

Cranberries 

Currants 

Currants, dried 

Cherries 

Citron 

Goose berries 

Gnspes 

Lemons 

Melons 

Prunes 

Peaches 

Peaches, halves, dried . . 
Peaches pared, dried . . . 
Peaches canned, quarts . 

Raspberries 

Raisins 

Strawberries 

Tomatoes 



Quantity. 



. 6M 

165 

19 

1 

250 



gallons, 
pounds, 
pounds. 



pounds. 



1 
1 
1 



10 

4900 

120 

45 

1 

40 



feet 



feet 



a023< 
691 
5 

84)^ 
282 

84 

318 

10 

8 

218 

9 

87 

175 

27 

210 

50 

2 

482 

6 

49 



bushels. . 
pounds. . 
bushels. . 
quarts . . . 
quarts. . . 
pounds. . 
quarts.. . 
pounds. . 
pounds. . 

Sounds. . 
ozen . . . 



pounds. . 
baskets., 
pounds. . 

Sounds. . 
ozen . . . 
quarts... 
boxes . . . 
quarts... 
bushel .. 



Price. 



«6 85 

12 15 

13 82 
1 50 

84 25 



201 85 
69 38 

3 75 
13 83 

11 60 
8 65 

26 64 

5 80 

64 

12 68 

4 70 

4 75 
17 28 
24 95 
19 75 
11 00 

5 00 
48 20 
19 15 

8 25 
50 



Amoant. 



$222 08 



$28 00 
20 00 
22 40 
75 00 
86 00 

218 00 
26 40 

178 55 

9 00 

88 00 



Total, 



$1,701 21 



691 35 



44 



Detailed Statement qf ^S6pen«e«— continued. 



Article. 



8ubg%$tene6 — con. 

Flour and Meal — 

Flour, Family 

Flour, Qraham 

Flour, Buckwheat . . . 
Meal, sifted 

OTOcer%e% — 

Allspice 

Butter 

Baking Powder 

Boiled Cider 

Crackers, Picnic 

Graham . . . 

Sweet 

Cofiee, Roasted Rio. . 

O.G.Java. ... 

Cinnamon 

Cloves 

Cheese 

Com starch 

Cocoanut, dessicated. 

Eggs 

Extracts, Lemon 

Vanilla. . . . 

Ginger 

Honey 

Hops 

Hominy 

Lard 

Molasses 

Mustard 

Milk 

Popcorn 

Pickles, cucumber. . . 

PeoDer 

Pickled Radish .".!"..'! 
Preserved Pumpkin . 

Rice 

Sugar, Pulverized . . . 

Granulated . . . 

Coffee C 

Brown 

Maple 

Syrup 

Sage 

Salt, coarse 

fine 

Sago 

Saleratus 

Tea, Japan 

Green 

Tapioca 



Quantity. 



158 bbls . . . . 

.8 bbls . . . . 

5 bbls . . . . 
1,650 lbs 

6 lbs 

5,856 lbs 

102 lbs 

82 gals . . . 

470 lbs 

79 lbs 

70 lbs 

1313 lbs 

60 lbs 

29M lbs 

J^lb 

334% lbs 

80 lbs 

8 lbs ... . 

1366 doz 

6 doz 

4 doz 

20 lbs 

122 2-16 lbs . . . 

lOM lbs 

250 lbs 

853 lbs 

192Kgal 

20 lbs 

10 qts 

5 bush . . . 
2770 

10 lbs 

3 p'k'gs . . 
2 lbs 

850 lbs 

263 lbs 

1701 lbs 

1792 lbs 

4869 lbs 

37 1146 lbs . . 

138 gal 

2 lbs 

1 bbl 

IM bbl 

5 lbs 

66 lbs 

96 lbs 

4 lbs 

5 lbs 



Pric«. 



983 75 
45 63 
85 00 
22 16 



Amount. 



80 

1064 37 

43 83 

24 00 

29 69 

8 34 

8 18 

327 93 

19 25 

17 50 

55 

42 42 

8 60 

1 25 

179 58 

6 00 

4 35 

5 60 
23 62 

6 55 

7 50 
81 23 

106 84 

5 80 

50 

5 00 
11 00 

3 10 
65 
40 

34 90 

35 65 
220 44 
215 00 
480 83 

8 08 
128 20 

1 15 

2 75 

4 95 
50 

6 86 
96 10 

5 80 
48 



1 ,086 54 



Total. 



45 



Detailed Statements of JEospenses — continued. 



Sub8i8tenee— con . 



Groeeries-'-coji — 
Vinegar — cider 
Yeast cakes 



Vegetables — 

Beans 

Beets 

Cabbages 

Green com, sweet. 

Onions 

Potatoes 

Potatoes, sweet. .. 

Bquasli 

Turnips 



Meats — 

Beef, fresh 

Beef, salt , 

Beef, dried 

Beef, tongues 

Beef shanks 

Pish, cod 

Pish, mackerel 

Pish, whiteflsh, salt . 
Pish, whiteflsh, fresh . 

Pish, Halibut 

Pish, oysters 

Ham 

Ice 

Mutton 

Pork, fresh 

Pork, salt 

Sausage 

Veal 



Poultry — 
Chicken 
Ducks .' . 
Turkey . 



Qoantity. 



87 gals . 
8 pkgs 



14 bush 

42}i bush 

623 heads . 

13 dz e'rs 
IIU bush 

718 bush 

10 lbs . . 

8,008 lbs.. 

14 bush 



14,5663^ lbs... 

5,887 lbs... 

1095i lbs... 

19 



8 



Total for subsistence. 



49 

48 lbs... 

69 lbs... 
100 lbs... 
547 lbs . . . 

18 9-16 lbs.. 

85 cans. . 

471 lbs... 

,230 lbs... 

251>^ lbs... 

60 lbs... 
748J^ lbs... 
849 lbs... 
471 lbs... 



lbs 



Price. 



17 90 
80 



$21 58 

21 25 

50 52 

1 20 

17 50 

I486 25 

50 

24 00 

6 60 



Amonat. 



3,296 72 



Total. 



787 

11 

4553^ lbs. 



1806 42 

888 76 

18 84 

4 75 

11 65 

4 60 

8 81 

8 45 

45 11 

2 24 

18 50 

47 11 

41 15 

20 12 

6 46 

68 86 

88 81 

87 72 



64 85 

1 75 

49 22 



$579 40 



$12020 86 



$115 82 



$7617 14 



46 



Detailed Statement of JSapenses — continued. 



SALARIES. 



Names. 



Geo. L. Weed, Jr. . 
E. G. Valentine . . . 

*L. Eddy 

♦C.L.Williams... 
♦Geo. F. Schilling. 

♦Z.G. McCoy 

♦H. Phillips 

P. 8. Englehardt. . 

E. Eddy 

Mollie Johnson . . . 
Alice J. Cornell. . . 
Luthera J. Hill . . . 

E. E. Boyce 

♦D. B. Devendorf . 
A. J. Woodbury . . 

♦E. Young 

♦C. H. Rideout . . . 
♦D. T. Gifford . . . . 
♦C. D. Long 



Occapation. 



Principal . 
InstruLtor 
do .. 



do 

do 

do 

, do 

, do 

do 

do 

Matron 

do 

do 

Physician .... 

Clerk 

Foreman C. 8 
Foreman 8. 8 

Engineer 

8ec. B'dofTr 



Time employed. 



WAGES. 



M. Fleming 

L. Goltz 

R. W. Harris 

Geo. McKee 

A. M. Faulkner. . . 
Julia McCarty. . . . 
Julia De Lancy... 
Joanna 8ampson. . 
Jennie Faulkner. . 

Annie Lee 

Maggie Delaney . . 

Kate Cullen 

Maggie Hageman. 

Mattie Oleson 

Carrie Peterson... 
Libbie Hageman. . 
Tildie Hetterman . 
Isabel Johnson . . . 

Kate Kline 

Anna Dyreson 

Eva Kline 

Kate Clary 

Lois Nedry 

Mattie Oleson . . . . 
H. O- Rideout 



All work 

do 

Fireman 

do 

Cook 

Assistant cook. 

, do 

, do 

, do 

Baker 

Din'gro'm girl 
Laundress .... 

do 

, do 

, do 

do 

do 

do 

House cleaner. 

do 

do 

do 

Seamstress 

, do 

do 



1 year . . . , 
...do ..., 
...do .... 
...do .... 
...do .... 
..do .... 
...do .... 
1-12 year.. 
1 year . . . . 
...do .... 
11-12 year. 

1 year 

2-12 year.. 

1 year 

...do .... 
...do .... 
...do .... 
...do .... 
1-2 year... 



Months 
employed. 
12 ... 

21-30 

949^0. 

11-5 
52... 
37... 

5 5-7 
404-5 

3 2-7 
47... 
52... 
43 3-7 
52... 
36... 
27 6-7 
23... 

7 2-7 

36-7 
42... 

7 4-7 

4... 

2... 
305-7 

5 5-7 

85-7 



Batepr 

month. 

$33 33 

15 00 

20 00 

20 00 

3 50 

3 32 

3 50 



2 
2 



50 
60 
3 00 

2 60 

3 00 
2e2H 

2 50 
50 
69 



2 
2 



3 00 



2 
3 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 



50 
00 
50 
00 
50 
00 
00 



8 00 



Amoant. 



1,500 

808 

1,333 

1,058 

1,058 

900 

900 

25 

600 

350 

367 

308 

35 

129 

508 

900 

575 

985 

25 



00 
33 
33 
33 
33 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
33 
37 
33 
50 
00 
00 
55 
00 



$400 

80 

199 

23 

182 

123 

20 

102 

8 

141 

135 

131 

136 

90 

69 

61 

21 

9 

126 

18 

12 

5 

92 
17 
26 



00 
50 
59 
85 
00 
00 
00 
00 
22 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
62 
84 
84 
75 
00 
57 
00 
00 
00 
15 
00 



Total. 



112,367 40 



$1,528 49 



* Kot realdent in the Institute. 



47 



Detailed Statement Expenses — Salaries — continued. 



Names. 



"Women 
Men . . . 
Men . . 



Occapation. 



House cleaning 
Mis. work .... 
Job work . . . 



Total for current expenses 



Time Emplotxd. 



Days. 



10 

79 9-10. . 



Rate 
per day. 



$1 00 
1 50 



Amount. 



«10 00 

119 86 

40 50 



Total. 



$170 36 



184,174 87 



48 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE CABINET SHOP 

For the year ending October 1, 1872. 



To Expenses for lumber and other materials. 

Salary of foreman 

Stock on hand Oct 1, 1871 



By Work done for institute 

Book accounts 

Cash sale 

Manufactured goods on hand. 

Stock and material on hand . . 

Balance 



Dr. 



$108 07 
900 00 
238 17 



25 99 



$1,362 23 



Cr. 



$999 06 

13 50 

50 

130 75 

218 42 



11362 23 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE SHOE SHOP 

For the year ending October 1, 1872. 



To Expenses — ^leather, tools, etc , 

Salary of master 

Fuel 

Stock on hand Oct 1, 1871. . 



By Cash sales 

Cash from pupils 

Amount charged indigent pupils. 

Amount charged institute 

Book accounts 

Boots and shoes on hand 

Leather and findings on hand . . . 

New tools , 

Balance 



Dr. 



1802 20 

550 00 

20 00 

305 00 



$1,677 20 



Cr. 



$248 30 

264 66 

262 14 

16 62 

161 75 

375 40 

235 75 

97 35 

15 23 

$1, 677 20 



CATALOGUE OF PUPILS 

In schdol within ths year ending October Ist^ 1872. 



MALES. 



NameB. 



Barker, Sidney R. . . . 
Bamhart, Charles]. . . 
Beers, LskFayette G. . 

Blair, John W 

BoBckmann, Ernest J. 
Briffgs, Urbin A . . . , 
Bushell, Louis H. . . 

Bellman, John 

Birk, Qustav 

Blonde, Miker 

Buchman, William . 



Callahan, Patrick. 
Chambers, James . 
Conery, Phillip J . 

Cork, Hugh 

Cullen, James F . . 
Cullen, William G 

Ceke, Fred E 

♦Clawson, Frank . . 



Day, William 

Deubel, Edmund 

Dill, Johan 

Donegan, Edward S. 
Drinkwine, Elick . . , 




Englert, Leonard. . . 
Ernst, Edwin;H. K. 



Felton, John 

Field, JBemt . . . . 
Field, Sievart S. 
Foy, Thomas . . . 



Ganger, Carl 

German, Fred E . 
Goold, Alfred W < 

4— D. & D. 



Poysippl 

Wautoma 

Janesville 

Boscobel 

Milwaukee . . . .. 

Lowell 

Azatalan 

Jefferson 

Glen Haven 

New Franken . . . 
Hortonville 

Pleasant Prairie . 
Garden Valley . . . 

Fall River 

Mazomanie 

Janesville 

Black River Falls 
Brookfield Centre 
Brodhead 

Mineral Point . . . 

Watertown 

Manitowoc 

Janesville 

Fond du Lac 

New Franken . . . 
Oshkosh 

Dayton 

Raceine 

Racine. ... 

West Point 

Cooperstown — 

Harris 

Racine 



County. 



Waushara. 

Waushara. 

Rock. 

Grant. 

Milwaukee. 

Dodge. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Grant. 

Brown. 

Outagamie. 

Kenosha. 

Jackson. 

Columbia. 

Dane. 

Rock. 

Jackson. 

Waukesha. 

Green. 

Iowa. 
Jefferson. 
Manitowoc. 
Rock. 
Fond du Lac. 

Brown. 
Winnebago. 

Richland. 
Racine. 
Racine. 
Dane. 

Manitowoc. 

Marquette. 

Racine. 

(Doc 9. 



50 



Catalogue of Pupils — Males — continued. 



Name. 




Goltz, Louis 

€k)ry, Dennis 

Grosenick, Heinrich 

Gunderson, Gander M 

♦Hadley, Rufus 

♦HarloflF, John F. M 

Harrison, Hergie 

Hebberd, Perry G 

Hecker, Louis 

Henry, Albert 

Henry, Charles 

Hines, John 

Hoskins, John H 

*Hutson, Frank 

Jearmark, John 

Jceckell, Geo. 8 

Johnson, John 

Jones, Selh B 

Kaigea, Frederick 

Klug, August 

Larson, Lars M 

Lynch, James 

Matthias, Emil G W 

Meeland, Knud E 

Miller, William 

Minert, Garet 

Moon, Simpson 8 

Murphy, Joseph 

♦O'Brien, James 

O'Connell, Dennis 

O'Connell, Patrick H 

O'Neal, Patrick 

Poh, Henry 

Prochnow, Bemhard F. M . 

Rassel, John 

Beed, Harry 

Riggs, Austin W 

Ripiinser, Herman 

Ruthenord, James A 

Ryan, Michael 

Ryan, Michael 

Sampson^Erick L 

Shatfer, William I 

Smith, Allen 

♦Sparks, Theodore 



Watertown . . 

Magnolia 

Watertown . . 
Waterford . . . 

Palmyra 

Milwaukee . . 
Manitowoc . . 
Hamilton ... 

Mayville 

West Point. . 

Palmyra 

Sturgeon Bay 

Linden 

Janesville . . . 

La Fayette . . 
Lake Mills . . 
Coon Valley . 
Montello .... 

Burlington . . 
Reeseville . . . 

Jefferson .... 
Millford 

Bloomfleld . . 
Columbus . . . 

Depere 

Albany 

Ironton ... . 
Janesyille . . . 

Deerfleld 

Westfield .... 
Westfield.... 
Reedsville ... 

Manitowoc . . 
Panyesville. . 

Decada 

Menasha 

East Delavan 
Manitowoc . . 
Lake Mills . . 

Delavan 

Portage City. 

Harvey 

Downsville . . 

Ajhf ord 

Glen Beulah 



Jefferson. 
Rock. 
Jefferson. 
Racine. 

Jefferson. 

Milwaukee. 

Manitowoc. 

La Crosse. 

Dodge. 

Columbia. 

Jefferson. 

Door. 

Iowa. 

Rock. 

Walworth. 
Jefferson. 
Vernon. 
Marquette. 

Racine. 
Dodge. 

Vernon. 
Jefferson. 

Waushara. 

Columbia. 

Brown. 

Green. 

Sauk. 

Rock. 

Dane. 
Marquette. 
Mar(}uette. 
Manitowoc. 

Manitowoc. 
Milwaukee. 

Sheboygan. 

Winnebago 

Walworth. 

Manitowoc. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Walworth. 

Dane. 
Dunn. 

Fond du Lac. 
Sheboygan. 



51 



Cotaloffue of Pupils — ^Jfa/e^— oontinued. 



l^ame. 


Town. 


County. 


Scott Charles W 


Brothertown 


Calumet 


*8D6iicer. David 


Bell Center 


Crawford. 


Titzlaff. Auflrnst C 


Depere 


Brown. 


Toller, Gteoree 


Porter 


Rock. 


♦Trembor, John 


Mineral Poin t 


Iowa. 


Tschudy, Pridolin F 

Tschudv, Joshua 


New Glarus 


Green. 


New Glarus 


Green. 


♦Tyler, Edwin E 


Aztalan ............... 


Jefferson. 


Urban, William 


Union Centre 


Juneau. 


♦Weller, Pred 


SheboYiran 


Sheboyiran. 


White, Arthur 8 


Sun Prairie 


Dane. 


White, William F 


Mazomanie 


Dane. 


White, James 


Mazomanle 


Dane. 


Worden, Gteo. F 


Oshkosh 


Winnebago. 







52 



Catalogue of Pupils — continued. 



FEMALES. 



Name. 




Anderson, Stina C 

Andrews, Dora E 

Atkins, Alma M 

Bailey, Linda 

Bartholomew, Anna M 

Bates, Emma J 

Bandow, Wilhelmina 

Bartlett, Chloe H 

Behling, Johanna 

Bishop, Ada J 

Blair, Olivia J 

Bues, Sophia W 

Bunker, Carrie M 

Blonde, Anna 

*Calkins, Josephine 

Carroll, Margaret 

Christie, Maggie A 

*Coke,EllaL 

Conery, Honora 

Cutler, Carrie E 

Daly, Joanna 

Downey, Marv L 

Drake, Isabella J 

♦Duell, Medora 

Dyreson, Anna 

Eberle, Emilie 

Eberhart, Mary A 

Englehardt, Philomene 

♦Gibson, Eva J 

Grant, Wilmet U 

Gratz, Kate 

GuUickson, Ragnill 

Hahn, Elizabeth 

Hulse, Katy 

Bunnell, Alda P 

Button, Maggie 

Johnson, Mary C 

Lafler, Mary A 

*Lynn, Karah A 

McEee, Mary A 

Mcbler, Esther H 



Basswood 

Eeshena 

Wrightstown 

Trimbelle 

Lodi 

Adell 

Stevens Point. . . . 
Chippewa Falls. . 

Milwaukee 

Union 

Boscobel 

Milwaukee 

Troy Centre 

New Franken. . . . 

Jefferson 

Erfurt 

Homers Corner . . 
Brookfield Centre 

Pall River 

Premont 

Holland 

Milwaukee 

La Crosse 

North Lamartine. 
McParland 

Watertown 

Necedah 

Milwaukee 

Elkhom 

Sullivan 

Racine 

Winneconne 

Oak Creek 

Weyauwega 

Argyle 

Janesville 

OraOak 

Wyocena 

Portage City 

Cedarburg : 

Rockton 



Richland. 
Shawano. 
Brown. 

Pierce. 

Columbia. 

Sheboygan. 

Portage. 

Chippewa. 

Milwaukee. 

Rock. 

Grant. 

Milwaukee. 

Walworth. 

Brown. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Waushara. 

Waukesha. 

Columbia. 

Waupaca. 

Brown. 
Milwaukee. 
La Crosse. 
Pond du Lac. 
Dane. 

Jefferson. 

Juneau. 

Milwaukee. 

Walworth. 
Jefferson. 
Racine. 
Winnebago. 

Milwaukee. 
Waupaca. 
La Payette. 
Rock. 

Grant. 

Columbia. 
Columbia. 

Ozaukee. 
Vernon. 



53 



Catalogue of Pupils — Females — continued. 



Name. 




♦Minert, Statira 

Minert, Frances 

MolBter, Annette W. . 
Morse, Pmella J 

♦Oleson, Ingleborg. . 

Oleson, Tomena 

Overton, Ella 

Phillips, Evangeline 

♦Provot, Harriet 

Peterson, Carrie C. . . 

Quade, Bertha W.... 

♦Rapp, Wllhelmina . 
Riplinger, Elizabeth. 
Rutherford, Ada M.. 
Rutherford, Agnes E 
Rodford, Eneretta E. 

Schwarz, Charlotte.. 
Seefeldt, Emma. . , . . 
Slatteay, Barbaia. . . . 

Smith, Ella 

Smith, Jennie O 

♦Smith, Phebe A . . . . 
Stillwell,MaryP.... 

Tenney, Helen 

Wells, Mary A 

Wells, Theresa 

White, Mary J 

White, Elizabeth.... 
Wichtner, Augusta . . 
Wilhelmi, Mary 

Zimmer, Mary 



Albany 

Albany • 

Merton 

Waupaca 

Mount Vernon 

Viroqua 

Wilmot 

Eau Galle 

Calamus 

Raymond 

Naugart 

Milwaukee 

Manitowoc 

Lake Mills 

Lake Mills 

Menominee 

Watertown 

Milwaukee 

Stiles 

Green Bay 

Wautoma 

Belleville 

Mazomanie 

Riehland Centre . . 

Eau Galle 

Eau Galle 

Sun Prairie 

Mazomanie 

Milwaukee 

Racine 

Stevens Point 



County. 



Green. 
Green. 
Waukesha. 
Waupaca. 

Dane. 

Vernon. 

Kenosha. 

Dunn. 

Dodge. 

Racine. 

Marathon. 

Milwaukee. 
Manitowoc. 
Jefferson. . 
JelSerson. 
Waukesha. 

Jefferson. 

Milwaukee. 

Oconto. 

Brown. 

Waushara. 

Dane. 

Dane. 

Richland. 

Dunn. 

Dunn. 

Dane. 

Dane. 

Milwaukee. 

Racine. 

Portage. 



RECAPITULATION. 





Boys. 


Girls. 


Tot 


Whole number in attendance within the vear 


92 
10 


72 
10 


164 


♦Left within the year 


20 






Number present October 1, 1872 


82 


62 


144 







ADMISSION OF PUPttS. 



The Wisconsin Institute for the Education of the Deaf and 
Dumb is located at Delavan, Walworth county, on the Western 
Union Railroad. 

It is a school for the education of the children and youth of 
the State who, on account of deafness^ connot be instructed in 
the common schools. 

The f proper age for admission is twelve years; application 
should not be made for any child under ten. The regular course 
of instruction occupies five years. It is understood that parents 
and guardians will allow their children to remain during that 
period unless their stay is shortened by removal or Providential 
circumstances. The only time in the year for admission is the 
beginning of the term, on the first Wednesday of September. 
The term closes in June. There is no winter vacation. 

No person of imbecile or unsound mind will knowingly be 
admitted; and such, if received, will be discharged on discov- 
ery that they cannot be instructed by means of the method here 
employed. 

All applicants must be free from immoralities of conduct, and 
from offensive or contagious diseases. 

There is no charge for children of the State for board or tui- 
tion, but their friends are expected to pay traveling and inci- 
dental expenses; and to supply clothing, a sufl&cient supply of 
which should be furnished at the beginning of the school year, 
or be sent by express as needed. Ordinary mending is done at 
the Institute, but the making of garments is no part of its 
work. Every garment should be distinctly marked with the 
owner's name. A sum of money, not less thai^ five dollars 



65 

should be deposited with the Principal at the beginning of the 
school year, for incidental expenses. 

All letters respecting fipplicants or pupils should be addressed 
to the Principal, to whom money should be sent by draft or 
Postoffice order. 

All letters and express packages for pupils should be marked, 
'^ Institute for the Deaf and Dumb." Express matter should 
be prepaid. 

Any person knowing of deaf mute children or youth, not in 
school, may confer a great blessing on them by sending their 
names, and the address of their parents, to the Principal of the 
Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, Dalavan, Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin Institute/or the Education of the Deaf and Dumb 

Delavan^ Walworth County. 

FORM OF APPLICATION. 

1. Full name of deaf mute. 

2. Date of birth. 

3. Place of birth. 

4. Names of parents. 

Father. 
Mother. 

5. Residence of parents. 

Town. 

County. 

Postoffice. 

Nearest Railroad Station. 

6. Occupation of father or mother. 

7. Nationality of parents. 

8. Was the child bom deaf ? 

Or, What was the cause of deafness? 
At what age? 

9. Is deafness total, or partial? 

10. What is the general health? 

11. Is there any imbecility or idiocy? 



56 

12. Has it had the small pox? 

Mumps? 
Measles? 
Whooping cough? • 

13. Are any of the family connections deaf ? 

14. Were the parents related before marriage? 

15. Names of all the children in the order of age. 
Signature of parent or other person making application. 
Postoffice address. 

This form when filled and signed should be sent to 

GEORGE L. W'rEED, Jr., 
Principal Institution for Deaf and Dumb, 

Delavan, Walworth Co., 

Wisconsin. 

NOTE. 

The State supports also an Institution for the Education of 
the Blind. Persons who cannot see enough to attend the com- 
mon schools, and who are of suitable age and capacity to re- 
ceive instruction, are entitled to admission. No charge is made 
for education of children of citizens of the State. 

For further information address the Superintendent of the 
Institution for the Education of the Blind, Janesville, Rock 
county. Wis. 



DOCUMENT No. lo. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



OF THK 



SOLDIERS' ORPHANS' HOME 



OF THS 



STATE OF WISCONSIN, 



For the Fiscal Tear ending September 30, 1872. 



TRUSTEES OF THE HOME. 



Gen. HENRY HABNDEN, - - Madison. 
Gen. JAMES BINTLIFP, - - . Janesville. 

Col. C. K. PIER, - - . . Pond du Lac. 
Col. W. J. KIIRSHAW, - - - MtLWAUKEE. 

Dr. A. J. WARD, - - - . Madison. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 



JAMES BINTLIPF, 

PRESIDENT. 

A. J. WARD, 

VICE PHESIDEKT. 

C. K. PEER, 

BECRETABT. 

HENRY BJSTZ, 

TREASURER. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS. 



R. W. BURTON, 
8DFEiinnrBin>BKT. 

Mrs, E. W. BURTON, 

ICATROK. 

A. J. WARD, 

PHYSICIAN. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To His Excellency, C. C. Washbuen, 

Governor of Wisconsin: 

The act of the Legislature approved March 31, 1866, ^^ to 
provide a Home for the orphans of Wisconsin soldiers,^* requires 
that the Board of Trustees at ^^ their annual meeting shall 
make a full report to the Governor, of all their proceedings 
connected with the Home." In pursuance thereof we herewith 
present this, our seventh annual report. 

The finances of this institution are in better condition than 
they have ever been before. The following list shows the num- 
ber of children, inmates of the Home each year, at date of 
Trustees* report, and the appropriation by the Legislature for 
that yearns expenses. 



Year. 



1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1878 



Number of Children. 



266 

252 

228 

228 

215 (estimated) 



Appropriation. 



145,000 
40,000 
40,000 
80,000 
20,000 



It has been the constant aim of the Board to provide well 
for the children, and at the same time not to expend a dollar 
unnecessarily. The hearty co-operation and good judgment of 
the Superintendent and Matron of the Home warrant us, we 
believe, in asking from the legislature for the ensuing year an 
appropriation twenty thousand dollars less in amount than 
they gave us two years ago, and ten thousand less than one year 



ago—the number of children during those three years being 
very nearly the same. Among other assurances, that we may 
safely do this, is the fact that the current expenses of the Home, 
including pay and labor account, from March 1, 1872, to Octo- 
ber 1, 1872, were nearly thirty-five hundred dollars less than for 
the corresponding period the year previous. For a detailed 
statement of the financial transactions during the past year, we 
respectfully refer to the Superintendent's and Treasurer's reports 
herewith presented. 

The schools connected with the Home arc in an exceedingly 
prosperous condition, the present corps of teachers entering 
heartily into their labors, and exhibiting a proficiency in their 
respective departments beyond our most sanguine expectations. 
The pupils at the Normal Schools from the Home pursuant to 
chapter 49, laws of 1870, are now ten in number, of whom nine 
are at Whitewater and one at Platteville. The former, by res- 
olution adopted by the trustees, are placed under the special 
care of Gen. James BintliflF, Vice President of the Board, and 
your attention is called to his full report accompanying this 
paper. The one at Platteville, the Board placed in charge of 
Hon. J. H. Rountree, who kindly accepted the trust, and reports 
her doing well. 

Chapter 149, laws of 1872, passed to secure for the orphans all 
the benefits to which they are entitled under the U. S. pension 
and bounty acts, and to provide them suitable homes and guar- 
dianship upon leaving our institution, and generally to protect 
their interests outside of the Home, specified certain duties to 
be performed by the trustees. The Board, by resolution, em- 
powered and directed its secretary. Col. C. K. Pier, to take all 
necessary steps to carry out the objects of the law. His pro- 
ceedings under such authority are detailed in his report to the 
board, hereto annexed, and to which your attention is called. 
He expects by the next meeting to have completed the greater 
part of these duties, and which, by reason of limited time, he 
was unable to do at the date of this report. 

We regret to report that Mendel Blakesley, the young man 
from the Home, who was appointed last year a cadet at the 



5 

Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., failed to pass the required 
examination at the end of the academic year. We may in 
justice add that the course of study was so severe that at the 
annual examination, out of a class of sixty-three, only twenty- 
one came fully up to the required standard. The balance of 
the fund deposited at the Academy, amounting to $113.47, has 
been repaid into the State treasury. 

We have received during the year, two thousand dollars, left 
as a bequest to the Home, by Caroline E. Smith, deceased, late 
of Chicago, Illinois, and the same has been paid into the treas- 
ury. The Ward bequest is still in our hands, a portion of the 
accumulated interest only having been expended, as follows : 

To W. P. Towers, for benefit of Frank Blakesley ?25 00 

To W. P. Towers, for Christmas presents for orplians 195 80 

To C. K. Pier, sec'y, for expenses of Mary De Lapp 100 00 

To R. W. Burton, for benefit:of Prank Bla*kesley 75 00 

In addition to the above expenditures, after a full considera- 
tion of the subject, and in view of the constantly increasing 
demand for telegraphic operators, we have directed the organi- 
zation of a class in telegraphy at the Home, to be composed of 
those girls and boys whose natural abilities seem best adapted 
to and promise successful mastery of the art. We have con- 
tracted with C. E. Bross, of Madison, to furnish suitable instru- 
ments, and connect the Home by telegraph wires to the main 
lines of the Western Union Telegraph Company. He is also to 
give the class suitable instruction so long as the Board desire. 
We are to pay him, in addition to the actual cost of the instru- 
ments furnished, at the rate of five hundred dollars per year. 
These expenses we propose to pay from the Ward fund. Reports 
of all moneys drawn from this fund, not already made, will be 
given in detail from time to time. 

The sanitary condition of the Home is remarkably good. To 
the constant, unremitting care of the Home Physician, in a 
very great measure, may be attributed the uniform freedom 
from diseases and epidemics, which have this year been so prev- 
alent. His report will be found, following this. 

Among the many improvements effected during the past sea- 



6 

son, in the management of the Home, none is more marked, or 
has been (productive of more beneficial results, than the few 
acres styled " the farm," rented by Mr. Burton, the super- 
intendent, and cultivated by the boys of the Home. The capaci- 
ty of the workshop has also been increased, and a larger 
number of the boys given employment during hours not occu- 
pied in the school room. The girls, also, have been formed into 
sewing classes, and already are becoming proficient in cutting 
and making their own wearing apparel. A course in the kitch- 
en and cooking department of the Home is also established, by 
which the older girls are required to master the details of 
household duties. 

True economy, doubtless, requires the thorough painting of 
the buildings of the Home, outside and inside, and there are 
other similar repairs for the preservation of the real estate 
needed. We recommend an appropriation of two thousand 
dollars for that purpose. January 24, 1872, the late Superin- 
dent and Matron tendered their resignations to the Board, which 
were promptly accepted; and R. W. Burton and his wife, Mrs. 
Emma Burton, were thereupon selected Superintendent and 
Matron. They entered upon their duties March 1st, following. 
The change has been productive of most wonderful benefits to 
the Hpme and its inmates thus far. We have confidence that the 
many improvements already made are indicative of a determi- 
nation, on the part of those two officials, to continue in making 
changes for the betteri so long as improvement is exhibited. 

It is now over seven years since the war closed. It is reason- 
able to presume the great majority of soldiers' orphans in the 
state, who desire to do so,- have already been admitted to the 
benefits of the Home, and that in the future, comparatively few 
applications will be made. In a few years, at the most, so far 
as^the Home is concerned, the state will have completed its 
noble charity towards its precious wards. 

Since the organization of this institution, nearly seven hun- 
dred little ones — soldiers' orphans — all fatherless, many mother- 
less as well, have sought and found care and culture beneath the 
hospitable roof of the Wisconsin Soldiers' Orphans' Home. But 



for the patriotic liberality of our Legislatures, many of these 
children would have been reared in ignorance and destitution, 
some of them in the purlieus of vice and crime. 

We hold it to be the duty of the government to so educate all 
its children as that in after years they shall be fully qualified to 
intelligently perform their highest duties as citizens. How much 
stronger are the claims of these children upon us, whose fathers 
sacrificed their lives to maintain the honor of the State. 

In signing the above report, I do so as President of the Board 
of Trustees, by a majority of whom it was adopted. While as- 
senting in the main to it, there are portions from which I dissent, 
and have deemed it proper to express my views in a separate 

report. 

HENRY HABNDEN, 

Presidene. 

0. K. PiKB, 

Secretary, 



HEMY HAMDEN'S DISSENTING REPORT. 



To His Excellency^ Govkrxob Washburn: 

Entertaining views in some respects different from some of 
the trustees of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home, and these views 
having been presented to the Board, and not fully meeting with 
the approval of the majority, the full board not being present, 
however, and still deeming them of importance to the welfare 
of our soldiers' orphans, I respectfully present the same for 
your Excellency's consideration, asking that they may be pub- 
lished in connection with the annual report of the trustees of 
said institution. 

The Soldiers' Orphans' Home, having nearly completed the 
seventh year of its existence, it may be well now to pause and 
inquire what has been accomplished by this noble charity. 
From the commencement up to the present time, there have been 
received into the Home over six hundred children, clothed, fed, 
and schooled at a cost to the State of two hundred and ninety- 
one thousand and one hundred dollars, besides about fourteen 
thousand dollars received from private charity. Some of these 
children remained in the Home but a short time, while others 
have been inmates over six years. All coming within the scope 
of the law, who made application, have been received, so that 
now it is confidently believed, all who stand in need, or whose 
friends desire it, have been received. At first, some of these 
children came from alms houses, and some from the abodes of 
want, while the great majority were entered by their mothers, 
who desired that their children might have the benefit of a bet- 
ter education than their own localities afforded. At the close of 
the war, many mothers found themselves widows with large fam* 



ilies of children, and at that time without pensions, which, in 
most instances, have since been obtained, the Orphans' Home 
then supplied the want so greatly felt by them. 

Now the question arises, is the Home doing for the orphans 
all the State ought to do for them, or is it doing the best that 
can be done for them? We reply, that, in our opinion, it is not. 
In the first place, we think the location of the Home was not 
well chosen for a permanent institution, however well it may 
have answered for the time being; but it was found already 
started by private charity, with many soldiers' orphans gathered 
in, and there seemed then no alternative but for the State to 
adopt it just as it was. Situated on a part of a block of ground 
in the city of Madison, hedged in on one side by the lake, and 
on all other sides by streets, there was no room for expansion, 
consequently no industrial pursuits could be inaugurated, for 
neither building nor grounds admitted of any, excepting, that 
the boys and girls did the chores, and a few boys were employed 
in assisting the shoemaker; this was well as far as it went, but 
it was very little among so many. With no land adjacent for 
cultivation, nothing left for the children to do, but eat, drink, 
play and go to school; no wonder that it was at times hard to 
keep the larger boys and girls under proper restraint, much less 
to prevent them from acquiring fixed habits of idleness. At 
first, these evils were but little felt, the children, many of them 
being small, and the larger ones remaining for a short time only; 
but as years rolled on, the one great want of the institution be- 
came more and more apparent. 

Children have been yearly sent out from the Home at fifteen 
or sixteen years of age, with some book learning, it is true, but 
as ignorant of the way to meet the stern duties of life, as they 
were the day they entered. This we feel should not be so. We 
believe the Home should have been located at some accessible 
point; it should have had at least forty acres of land — one 
hundred would have been better. It should have been provided 
with workshops, so that the labor of the children could have 
been utilized; not that their labor, in dollars and cents, would 
have been much to the state, but the habits of industry formed 



10 

'would have been much to the children. Furthermore, all expe- 
rience has shown that it is better for their morals to educate 
children in families, than to bring together large numbers of 
both sexes under one roof. If the Home had been located on a 
farm, with several family buildings, with work shops of different 
kinds, similar to the location and arrangements of the Indus- 
trial School for Boys, at Waukesha, it would have obviated 
many of the difficulties under which the institution has labored, 
and rendered it far more beneficial to the children who have 
been its inmates. 

But, after all, no public institution, however costly it may be, 
or well located, or managed, can compare with the home where 
mother is. We believe the State cannot now do any better for 
these, its wards, than to provide them, as speedily as possible, 
with homes in families, where they can be well cared for, and 
taught such occupations and habits of industry as will enable 
them to earn their own bread, by and by. 

From a somewhat intimate personal acquaintance with these 
children, we are led to think that many of them at least, have 
imbibed what we consider to be wrong views of life. They 
have been taught to think that to be professional men and ladies 
is what they ought to aim at ; that to be lawyers, doctors, clerks 
and school teachers, is the mark toward which they should press. 
We admit the professions are honorable, and all well enough 
for those who have talents and the means to fit themselves for 
such, but it is a well known fact that, in our country, the pro- 
fessions are crowded, and while skilled labor is at all times in 
demand, and commands its own price, the professions which are 
generally termed genteel are, except to the favored few, yield- 
ing but a slim support, and are quite often but another name for 
beggary. We confess to having a preference for a system of 
training which will make these children in love with the occu- 
pation of farmers and mechanics, rather than to the one which 
teaches that only the professions are honorable. 

These orphans are not as a class likely to have much capital 
to start with in life, and it is therefore all the more important 
that they should early learn to rely upon themselves. But the 



11 

question now is, what plan can be suggested which will meet 
the requirements of the case? We will present a plan which 
occurs to us; it may not be the best, as it certainly is not the 
only one, but it is this: let the legislature appropriate a sum of 
money, say fifty dollars per child, to be paid annually to all 
mothers having children now in the Home, who choose to take 
their children home and provide for them, an exception to be 
made in the cases of such mothers as are manifestly unsuited to 
have charge of their children. When the child has no mother 
living, or, if living, is unfit, or does not choose to take her chil- 
dren, then let some relative have the opportunity to receive the. 
orphan into his family, with the same aid which would have 
been given to the mother. 

j r If this does not take all the children, as it probably will not, 
tl^n let the remainder be provided for in other families, or put 
to trades. Let this be done under a State agent, whose duty it 
should be to maintain a strict watch over the children provided 
for under this proposed act, during their minority. This aid 
would not be required affcer the child became fifteen years of 
age, but in exceptional cases. 

We believe some plan like this would be far better for the 
children than to keep them in the institution, the cost to the 
State being much less than the present system. The only extra 
cost would be the expense of the State agent. The saving 
would be, the expense of the large number of employes, which 
under the present system are found to be necessary. We be- 
lieve one-half of the cost of supporting the soldiers' orphans 
could be saved, to the positive benefit of the children. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY HARNDEN. 
Madison, September .30, 1872. 



REPORT 

CONCERNING THE PUPILS FROM THE HOME AT THE NOR- 
MAL INSTITUTION AT WHITEWATER. 



In chapter 49, General Laws of 1870, and chapter 124, Gen- 
eral Laws of 1871, the Legislature authorized the Board of 
Trustees of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home to send to one of the 
State Normal Schools such pupils from the Home, not exceeding 
six in number in any one year, as should pass a satisfactory exam- 
ination, and appropriated a sum of money not to exceed two 
hundred dollars per annum for each pupil, to pay the expenses 
to be thereby incurred. Said act also provided that you should 
report to the Governor, and annually file with the Secretary of 
State, vouchers for said expenditures. At your meeting in June, 
1870, after a personal examination of the pupils, recommended 
by the Superintendent of the Home and of the report of the As- 
sistant State Superintendent of Public Instruction, you selected 
Mary E. Skinner, Lottie Robinson, Watson Hitchcock, Theresa 
Place, Kate Stalker and Alice Friselle as the pupils for that 
year, and designated the Normal School at Whitewater, as the 
place to which they should be sent. You also authorized Hon. 
N. M. Little John of Whitewater, who was then the President of 
your Board to take the charge and oversight of these pupils, and 
to disburse the funds appropriated for their benefit. 

At the commencement of the school year in September, they 
were accordingly sent to Whitewater, but upon examination, 
some of them were found to be below the standard of attainments, 
necessary to enable them to enter upon the regular course, and 
were therefore detained in the academic department during the 
year. Our judgment however was clear, from the verbal re- 
ports received from N. M. Littlejohn, that as a whole, the class 



13 

had made such satisfactory progress in their studies, as to amply 
justify the generosity of the legislature in affording them this 
opportunity. At the close of the year, N. M. Littlejohn filed 
his vouchers for the disbursements made, with the Secretary of 
State. At your meeting in June, 1871, N. M. Littlejohn hav- 
ing left the Board, the undersigned was empowered to draw and 
disburse the appropriation in accordance with the provisions of 
of the law authorizing it, and to represent the Board with the 
students from the Home, at Whitewater. You also selected 
Emma Ballenger, Nellie Hogoboom, Mary Marcum, George Mar- 
shall, Sumner Gifford and William Welch, as the class for that 
year, and directed me to apply for their admission also at 
Whitewater. At the commencement of the school year they 
were admitted, but the same difficulty of too low a standard of 
scholarship to enable them all to enter upon the regular course, 
as with the class of 1870, was experienced. In February last, 
Mary Marcum and Theresa Place were sent to their homes, in 
consequence of an indisposition on their part, to submit to the 
discipline of the school. But one of these girls is now teach- 
ing in one of our public schools, and is succeeding well. Some 
of the other pupils have made very satisfactory advancement; 
all have done reasonably well in their studies during the year. 
During the vacation, those of the pupils who have homes, are 
permitted to visit their friends; those who have no homes, or none 
within the state, return to the Home at Madison. 

The following is a copy of the report made by me to the Sec- 
retary of State at the close of the fiscal year: 

Janesville, Auggust 28, 1872. 

" Hon. Ll. Breese, Secretary of State, 

"Madison, Wis.: 

" In pursuance of law, and in behalf and by authority of the 
Board of Trustees of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home, at Madison, 
Wis., I have drawn from the state treasury during the past year, 
twenty-four hundred dollars, to be expended for the support of 
pupils from the Home, whose names are hereto annexed, sent 



14 

to the Normal Institute, at Whitewater, at the commencement 
of school year, September, 1871. Names of the pupils are as 
follows, yiz: Watson Hitchcock, George Marshall, Sumner Gif- 
ford, William Welch, Mary Skinner, Alice Friselle, Kate Stal- 
ker, Theresa Place, Lottie Robinson, Nellie Hogoboom, Emma 
Ballenger, Mary Marcum. I enclose herewith vouchers number 
one (1) to thirty-six (36) inclusive, for expenditures on said ac- 
count, making in the aggregate the sum of $2,139.94, and leav- 
ing in my hands a balance of $260.06. 

« JAMES BINTLIFF, Vice President, 
" Board Trustees Soldiers' Orphans' Home.*' 

There can be no doubt that in making this provision, whereby 
a few of the orphans of Wisconsin heroes may obtain an honora- 
ble profession, the legislature correctly represented the sen- 
timent of the people of this state. The people are willing to 
take these children by the hand and aid them to prepare to en- 
gage in the stern duties of life, and, in our judgment, in no other 
way can this be more effectually done than in affording them 
these educational opportunities. 

JAMES BINTLIFF. 



SEORETARTS REPORT. 



Fond du Lac, Wis., September 30, 1872. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Soldiers^ Orphans* Home: 

Pursuant to the resolution of the Board, directing me, as 
Secretary, to take such steps as were necessary, to carry out 
the provisions of chapter 147, laws of 1872, 1 respectfully sub- 
mit the following report of my proceedings: 

There were at the time of the passage of said act, 231 orphans 
at the '^ Home,'' and there have since been admitted 31, making 
a total of 262. Of these, 141 are boys and 121 girls. Their ages 
may be classed as follows: 

Under, five years, one. Over five and under seven, five. 
Over seven and under ten, forty. Over ten and under four- 
teen, one hundred and seventy. Over fourteen years, thirty- 
nine. Unknown ages, seven. 

As soon as practicable,^after being authorized, I addressed to 
the parent or guardian of each child a letter, setting forth in 
brief the main features and objects of the law, my position 

under the resolution of the Board, and asking for all informa- 

• 

tion within their knowledge pertinent to the purposes and end 
sought. Each letter was accompanied by a uniform set of 
interrogatories, the answers to which would give the facts 
desired, or indicate the channel through which they might 
be obtained ; and with every letter was enclosed a properly 
addressed, stamped envelop for reply. This led to a corres- 
pondence of more or less magnitude with mother^, and guar- 
dians, with relatives and friends of the orphans, and with vari- 
ous county judges throughout the state. 

Very much of this has not yet been brought to a close. I 
have opened a record where, under each orphan's name is noted 
such facts appertaining to him or her as are from time to time 



16 

developed by my investigations, with reference to source of 
information. 

All material correspondence is carefully numbered, filed and 
preserved. For a detailed statement of each individual case, 
the facts elicited and progress made therein, I respectfully refer 
the Board to that'^record. 

You will notice, among other things, that of the 262 orphans, 
184 have mothers living, and 78 have neither father nor mother. 
Fifty-eight mothers have re-married since their children entered 
the Home. Twelve have removed from the State. Of the 262 
orphans, I find 51 (and there are doubtless more) who have 
guardians regularly appointed by the probate judges of their 
respective counties. Of these guardians, 39 are drawing pen- 
sions for their wards. Seventy-three of the mothers are drawing 
the two dollars additional pension for each child, while 29 have 
as yet received no pension certificate. 

In several instances no application has been been made to the 
government, and in others the claims are still pending. There 
seems to be a general desire expressed, as well by county judges 
as others, to require guardians to insure the faithful perform- 
ance of their trusts by sufficient bonds, and when requested, the 
former have ordered guardians to file additional bonds. As a 
rule, the latter have not been prompt in making their reports to 
county judges. This to a certain extent has been remedied. I 
expect to have the record completed by the time of your semi- 
annual meeting in April. For many reasons it has been im- 
practicable to do so for the present session. 

It is a matter of gratification to know that the management 
of the Home, in all its departments, the instruction, discipline 
and care, bestowed upon the children there, meet the hearty ap- 
proval and commendation of nearly every mother and guardian 
who has a child in that institution. 

Expressions of this nature, and likewise of heartfelt gratitude 

to the State, for providing such a Home, reach me from every 

part of the commonwealth. 

C. K. PIER, 

Secretary Board of Trustees S, O, S, 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



STATE OF WISCONSIN, 

Tjreasurer's Office, 

Madison, Oct. 8th, 1872. 

To the Board of Trustees of the Soldiers* Orphans* Home of 
the State of Wisconsin: 

Gentlemen: Herewith I hand you my annual report as 
Treasurer of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home of this State, for the 
fiscal year ending on the 30th day of September, 1872. 

Very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

HENRY BiETZ, 

State Treasurer, 

2— Orph. Hohe. Poo. 10.) 



18 



Treasurer's Report — continued. 



1873 
Feb. 29 
Apr. 2 
Apr. 24 

June 1 
Aug. 8 

Sept. 12 



KECEIPTB. 



1871 
Oct. 5 

Oct. 7 
Dec. 2 
Dec. 28 
1872 
Jan. 20 
Jan. 26 

Feb. 20 
Mar. 1 
Mar. 29 

Apr. 2 
Apr. 24 

May 4 
June 1 
July 6 
Aug. 8 



Aug. 22 
Sept. 11 



Balance on hand Oct. 1, 1871 

Received of W. P. Towers, Superintend- 
ent, unexpended balance 

Received of State Treasurer, to apply on 
appropriation for the year 1872 

Received of State Treasurer, amount ap- 
propriated for soldiers' orphans in 
normal schools 

Received of State Treasurer, to apply on 
appropriation for the year 1872 

Received of State Treasurer, for support 
of pupils in normal'schools, as per war- 
rant of Secretary of State, dated Aug. 
2, 1872 (No. 2,467) 

Received of Gen. Henry Harnden, Trus- 
tee of " Home," being amount refund 
ed by Naval Academy at Annapolis, 

in case of M. Blakesley 

Total receipts 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Paid James Bintliff, expenses 

C. K. Pier, expenses 

W. P. Towers, Sunt., current exp's 

do do do... . 

do do do... . 

do do do .... 

James Bintliff, expenses 

C. K. Pier, expenses 

W. P. Towers, Supt, current exp's 
R. W. Burton, Supt., current exp's 
Henry Harnden, stationery and 

postage stamps for " Home '* 

R. W. Burton, Supt., current exp's 
James Bintliff, for soldiers' orphans 

in normal schools 

R, W. Burton, Supt., current exp's 
do do do . . . 

John H. Rountree, to defray exp'es 
of Mary Barrett at Platteville 

NormarSchool 

R. W. Burton, Supt., current exp's 
do do do 



$16,668 05 

675 70 

7,500 00 



1,200 00 
7,500 00 



1,200 00 



113 47 



111 80 

17 00 

3,000 00 

3,000 00 

8,000 00 

3,000 00 

19 75 

61 10 

3,000 00 

2,244 60 

25 00 
3,000 00 

1,200 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 
2,500 00 



200 00 
1,000 00 
1,500 00 



Total disbursements 

Balance in fund Sept. 30, 1872 



'182,768 75 
2, 088 47 



$34,857 22 



134,857 22 



19 



Treasurer^B Heport — continued. 

WARD FUND OP THE SOLDIERS' ORPHANS' HOME. 

As stated in my last annual report, I have received of Henry 
Hamden, one of the trustees of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home, 
the following securities, viz: 



1871 
Dec. 12 

1872 
Jan. 17 



July 15 



1871 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 80 

1872 
Hay 4 

May 27 
Aug. 29 



5 6-20 U. S. coupon Vds, of |1 ,000 each 
10 5 per cent, bonds of the city of Mil- 
waukee, of $1, 000 each 

2 6 per cent, bonds of the city of Alba- 
ny, of 11,000 each 

2 7 per cent, first mortgage bonds of 
the Ohio & Miss. R. R. Co.. of |1,000 
each 

4 5 per cent, bonds of the city of Pitts- 
burg, of f 1 , 000 each 

Currency 



15,000 00 

10,000 00 

2,000 00 

2,000 00 

4,000 00 
554 97 



These securities remain the same as be 
fore, except that the said Ohio & Miss 
issippi Railway bonds have since been 
redeemed at par, in currency, and the 
avails, (|2, 000) deposited by me in the 
savings department of the State Bank, 
at M^ison, drawing 6 per cent, inter- 
est per annum, both prmcipal and in- 
terest payable to the treasurer of the 
Soldiers' Orphans' Home. 

The receipts into said funds ince my last 
annual report,have been as follows, viz : 

November, 1871 interest on U. S. 5-20 
bonds 

January, 1872, interest on Ohio and Miss. 
Railway bonds, less $1 .75 tax 

January, 1872,interest on the bonds of the 
city of Pittsburg 

December, 1871, int. on Mil. city bonds. . 

July 1872 interest on U. S- 5-20 bonds. . . 



niSBUnSEMEKTS. 

W. P. Towers, Sup't (for F. Blakesley). . 
W. P. Towers, for Christmas tree for 

"Home," 

C. K. Pier, expenses incurred in provid 

in^ suitable homes for orphans 

R. W. Burton, superintendent 

R. W. Burton (for F. Blakesley) 



Total disbursements 

Balance in fund, Sept. 30, 1872: 

Bonds $21,000 00 

In bank on interest 2,000 00 

Currency in hands of Treas'r 912 62 



$105 19 

68 25 

100 00 
250 00 
170 00 



$25 00 

195 89 

100 00 
50 00 
25 00 



$895 89 



$28,554 97 



$753 44 



$23,912 52 



$24, 808 41 



$24,808 41 



^ 



Treasurer's JReport — continued. 



" SMITH FUND " OF HOME. 



1872 BKCBIFTS. 

Jan. 6 Received of C. K. Pier, Secretary of the 
Board of Trastees of the "Home," 
(being portion of a bequest of Caroline 
E. Smith 

June 15 Received of C. K. Pier, Secretary of the 
Board of Trustees of the '-Home,'* 
(being balance of said Smith legacy). . . 

Sept. 80 Three months' interest on |1,000.00, in 
bank, at 6 per cent 

Balance in fund Sept. 90, 1872 : 
In State Bank on interest 
Currency in hands of Treasurer 



$1,000 00 



1,000 00 
15 00 



11,000 00 
1,015 00 



12,015 00 



12,015 00 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the Soldiers^ Orphans^ Home : 

Gentlemen: I have the honor herewith to transmit my annual 
report of the diseases incident to the inmates of the Soldiers' 
Orphans' Home, during the past year. 

No deaths have occurred. One case of cerebro spinal menin- 
getis resulted in loss of hearing. 

The sanitary regulations are uniformly satisfactory, for which 
much credit is due to the superintendent and matron, as well as 
for their kind interest in the moral and mental training of the 
children. 

Abscesses 3 

Burns d 

Carbuncles 4 

Catarrh (nasal) 4 

Cerebro spinal meningetis • 5 

Croup 8 

Diarrhoea 18 

Erysipelas 2 

Frozen feet ^ 8 

Gastric fever 10 

Intermittent fever 15 

Malarial fever 20 

Measles 2 

Mumps 8 

Necrosis femur 1 

Necrosis tibia 1 

Opthalmia 15 

Otitis 8 

Pneumonia 3 

Pleuritis*. 2 

Poison by ivy 2 

Rheumatism 4 

Scro fill a 1 

Synovitis 1 

Tonsllitis 44 

Ulcer of the cornea. 1 

Ulcer of the leg 2 

Vertigo 1 

179 



22 

There was one case of fracture of the fore-arm, and one dis- 
location of the wrist. 

Respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

A. J. WARD, M. D. 



SUPERINTENDENT TOWERS' REPORT. 



ITo the Truateea of the Soldiers* Orphans* Home of Wisconsin: 

GsNTLBMEN — I respectfully present the following as the re- 
port of the Home, for the five months of the present fiscal year) 
ending March 1, 1872: 

dumber of children belonging to the Home at the date of last report 214 
ITumber admitted since then 21 

Total 285 

Kumber discharged in the past five months 19 

210 
Applications on file, accepted 1 

Total belonging to the Home, March 1, 1873 217 

The name and history of each child received since October 1, 
1871, is as follows: 

AxiCE M. Majob, aged 12, daughter of Thomas P. Major, 29th 
Regt., died at New Orleans. Entered Oct. 7th, by mother 
Douglas, Marquette Co., Wis. 

Willis E. Majob, aged 10 years; as above. 

Oblando a. Colman, aged 13 years, son of Jordan Colman, 36th 
Wis., died at Salisbury, N. C. Entered by mother, Nov. 
6th; Rubicon, Dodge Co., Wis. 

Alios A. Colman, aged 12 years; as above. 

Maby a. Colman, aged 9 years; as above. 

Ed. Killiston, aged 11 years, son of Geoi^e Killiston, 35th 
Wis., died at Neosho, Wis. Entered by mother, Nov. 5th; 
Rubicon, Wis. 



24 

Hannah Randle, aged 10 years, daughter of John Handle, 
25th Wis., died at Andersonville. Entered by mother, 
Nov. 15th; Wilton, Monroe Co., Wis. 

John A. Parker, aged 10 years, son of Levi M. Parker, 12th 
Wis.; died at Pulaski. Entered by mother, Nov. 22; Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Wm. E. Parejbb, aged 8 years; as above. 

James S. Slater, aged 12 years, son of Wm. Slater, 1st cav- 
alry, died at Andersonville. Entered by mother; Oregon, 
Wis., Dec. 6. 

Ellen M. Slater, aged 9 years; as above. 

Emha Weeks, aged 12 years, daughter of Geo. H. Weeks, 76th 
Reg., N. Y., died at Alexandria. Entered by mother, S. F. 
Davis, Dec. 11; Madison, Wis. 

Alex. Fontaine, aged — years, son of Antonie Fontaine, 11th 
Wis., died at Montgomery, Ala. Entered by Xavier Mar- 
tin; Green Bay, Dec. 12. 

Emma Buck, aged 5 years, daughter of M. D. L. Buck, 5th Wis., 
mother dead; father left the State in a partially insane con- 
dition; reported to have died in Iowa one year ago. En- 
tered by J. B. Hasbrouck, Grand Rapids, Wis., Dec. 20. 

John G. Wood, aged 12 years, son of John G. Wood, 36th Wis., 
died at Madison, Wis. Mother dead. Entered by Cornelia 
Bowen; Ithica, Richland Co., Wis., Jan. 1, 1872. 

Roland Hill, aged 12 years, son of Erasmus W. Hill, 29th 
Wis., died at Watertown, Wis. Entered by mother; Wa- 
tertown, Jan. 12, 1872. 

John H. Nimmo, aged 12 years, son of Richard Nimmo, 29th 
Wis., died at Memphis. Entered by mother; Christiana, 
Dane Co., Wis., Jan. 18. 

Jenny D. Nimmo, aged 10 years; as above. 

Catharine Ann Ellis, aged 13 years, daughter of Richard 
Ellis, 25th Wis., died at Chattanooga. Entered by mother; 
Lima, Pepin Co., Wis., Feb. 5. 



25 

Judith Ellis, aged 10 years; as above. 

RosANNA TouNABD, aged 13 years, daughter of Joseph Tpun- 
ard, 12th Wis., died -on hospital steamer. Mother dead. 
Entered by Alex. Guesneir; Green Bay, Feb. 12. 

The total amount of receipts during the past five months, in- 
cluding the balance on hand at the date of last report, was 
$16,841 90; the disbursements for that time were $16,165 20, 
leaving a balance in my hands of $675 70, whieh I have paid 
over to Hon. Henry Bsetz, Treasurer of the " Home," taking 
his receipt for the same. 

I have expended of the amount appropriated by you from the 
" Ward Legacy," the sum of $195 89, in procuring Christmas 
presents for the children, and $25 for the benefit of Frank 
Blakesley, the boy employed in the Railroad machine shops in 
Milwaukee, vouchers for both of which expenditures are on file. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. P. TOWERS. 



26 



DETAILED FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Soldiers'* Orphans* Some: 

Gentlemen: — The following is a detailed statement of the re- 
ceipts aud expenditures of the Home, from October 1, 1871, to 
February 29, 1872, inclusive. 



1871 
Oct 1 
Oct. 9 
Nov. 29 
Dec. 26 

1872 
Jan. 20 
Feb. 20 



Balance on hand . . 
Cash of Treasurer. 

..do do ... 

..do do... 



..do 
..do 



.do 
.do 



Total amount received 



$1,841 90 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 
8,000 00 

3,000 00 
3.000 00 



116,841 90 



I have paid on account of expenses from October 1, 1871, to 
February 29, 1872, inclusive, the following sums, vouchers for 
which are on file with the State Treasurer, duplicates at the 
Home. 



Date. 


No. 


1871 




Oct. 


2 


1 


Oct. 


3 


2 


Oct. 


3 


3 


Oct. 


3 


4 


Oct. 


8 


5 


Oct. 


3 


6 


Oct. 


5 


7 


Oct. 


6 


8 


Oct 


5 


9 


Oct 


5 


10 


Oct 





11 


Oct 


6 


12 


Oct 


6 


13 


Oct 


6 


14 


Oct 


7 


15 


Oct 


7 


16 


Oct 


9 


17 


Oct 


10 


18 


Oct 


11 


19 



To whom and for what paid. 



Chas. Burse, potatoes 

S. H. Cowles, bread . 

H. Wildhagen, grapes, etc , 

Fred. Hausmire, potatoes 

J. Conlon, butter 

Bray & Pierson, carpenter work. . 

To] ford & Nichols, meat 

E. W. Keyes, postage stamps 

W. P. Towers, expenses 

R. L. Garlick, crockery 

Dunning & Sumner, groceries, etc 

J. E. Moseley, books, etc 

Mrs. Oleson, butter 

Mr. Whiting, turnips 

Aug. Dohn, potatoes 

Jacob Esser, shoemaking 

H. P. Hall, milk 

D. L. Babcock, writing 

Gas Company, gas for September. 



Amount. 


110 21 


227 14 


8 18 


10 23 


2 72 


116 37 


146 93 


15 00 


30 50 


25 75 


162 19 


110 07 


1 61 


5 30 


7 40 


48 75 


189 31 


27 60 


48 15 



27 



Detailed Financial Statement — Expenditure8'--coni\xi\x^^. 




1871 
Oct. 12 
Oct. 14 
Oct. 14 
'Oct. 14 
Oct. 18 
Oct. 17 
Oct. 17 
Oct 18 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 19 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 23 
Oct. 23 
Oct. 24 
Oct. 27 
Oct. 28 
Oct. 30 
Oct. 30 
Oct. 30 
Oct. 30 
Oct.- 31 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 2 
Not. 2 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 2 
Nov. 3 
Nov. 3 
Nov. 3 
Nov. 3 
Nov. 4 
Nov. 6 
Nov. 8 
Nov. 8 



Bunker & Vroman, lumber 

Mr. Whiting, squash 

Auff. Lempp, services 

C. Askew, biacksmitliing 

W. H. Hamden, butter and eggs 

Mrs. Shroeder, sewing 

W. W. Miner, butter 

Mrs. Clark, chickens 

R. L. Newton, apples 

M. Halstead, sewing machines 

Huntley & Wootton, provisions , 

Cook Bros., leather and findings 

Thos. Killian, potatoes 

W. J. & F. Ellsworth, groceries 

Peter Anderson, cabbage 

Mr. Sweeney, potatoes 

J. Conlin, butter 

Samuel Arthur, potatoes 

J. R. Hiestand, onions 

Thos. Killian, potatoes 

Mil. & St. P. R. R., freight \.,, 

Mrs. Devine, services , 

R. Entwhistle, apples 

R. L. Newton, Apples 

A. J. Ward, salary 

S. Klaubcr & Co., dry goods 

S. Klauber & Co., diy goods 

E. W. Keyes, box rent and postage ... 
A. B. Devoe, expenses of Ed. Devoe.. 
8. H. Cowles, bread 

D. L. Babcock, window fasteners 

H.P.Hall, milk 

Jas. Finnev, butter 

Tolford &*^NichoIs, meat 

Conklin & Gray, coal 

Pay roll for October 

Mrs. Coufhlin, potatoes 

Jacob Esscr, shoemaking 

D. L. Babcock, writing 

Mrs. Adulof, eggs 

J. H. D. Baker, groceries 

W. A. Oppell, vegetables 

Gas Co., gas for October 

Ira Mass, apples 

G. W. P. Whiting, turnips 

Moseley & Bro.. stationery and books 



1360 61 


6 23 


13 00 


6 80 


10 07 


82 00 


25 84 


2 81 


23 25 


65 00 


37 18 


150 03 


16 25 


7 13 


2 68 


15 00 


1 17 


50 


17 50 


8 37 


4 13 


6 00 


15 00 


18 90 


33 33 


16 55 


59 11 


3 95 


20 00 


278 58 


3 60 


209 79 


23 79 


167 78 


510 73 


632 33 


3 50 


65 00 


68 75 


8 00 


20 35 


49 12 


76 50 


14 70 


840 


37 92 


16 87 



28 



Detailed Financial Statement — Expenditures — continued. 



Date. 



1871. 




Nov. 10 


67 


Nov. 10 


68 


Nov. 12 


69 


Nov. 14 


70 


Nov. 14 


71 


Nov. 14 


72 


Nov. 14 


73 


Nov. 14 


74 


Nov. 17 


75 


Nov. 21 


76 


Nov. 24 


77 


Nov. 28 


78 


Nov. 28 


79 


Nov. 28 


80 


Nov. 28 


81 


Dec. 2 


82 


Dec. 2 


83 


Dec. 4 


84 


Dec. 4 


85 


Dec. 4 


86 


Dec. 5 


87 


Dec. 7 


88 


Dec. 9 


89 


Dec. 9 


90 


Dec. 11 


91 


Dec. 11 


92 


Dec. 11 


93 


Dec. 13 


94 


Dec. 13 


95 


Dec. 15 


90 


Dec. 20 


97 


Dec. 21 


98 


Dec. 26 


99 


Dec. 26 


100 


Dec. 26 


101 


Dec. 26 


102 


Dec. 26 


103 


1872. 




Jan. 8 


104 


Jan. 3 


ia5 


Jan. 8 


106 


Jan. 8 


107 


Jan. 3 


108 


Jan. 8 


109 


Jan. 3 


110 


Jan. 3 


111 


Jan. 3 


112 


Jan. 8 


113 


Jan. 4 


114 


Jan. 4 


115 


Jan. 4 


110 


Jan. 4 


117 


Jan. 5 


118 



No. 



To wbom and for what paid. 



Geo. F. Tavlor, shoes, etc 

Dunning & Sumner, groceries, etc 

A. Culver, lard and hams 

Mrs. Clark, butter 

Express Company, freight 

W. P. Towers, expenses 

Geo. Lee, pickles and butter 

Geo. Whiting, turnips 

Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad Co., freight . . 
Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad Co.,freight . . 

I. French, straw 

Pay roll for November 

Charles Oshlut, turkeys and chickens 

Dr. A. J. Ward, salary for November 

Mr. Curtin, turkeys 

E. W. Keyes, stamps 

Tolford & Nichols, meat 

Moseley & Bro., piano and books 

H.P.Hall, milk 

Jacob Esser, shoemaking 

S. H. Cbwlcs, bread 

Peter Anderson, tallow, etc 

Gas Company, gas for November 

Madison Woolen Mills, cloth 

Dunning & Sumner, groceries, etc 

W. G. Benedict, groceries, etc 

Rice & Friedman, dry goods 

J. Schweincm, ice 

J. B. Bowen, straw 

Chas. Hawks, sewing machine supplies 

Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad Co., freight . . 

John Wood, straw 

W. H. Harndcn, beans 

Payroll for December 

E. W. Keyes, stamps 

8. E. Pearson, carpenter work 

Mrs. Welch, sewing 

Main & Spooner, insurance 

M. J. Vincent, butter 

A. J. Ward, sal airy for December 

H. P. Hall, milk 

S. H. Cowles, bread 

Mrs. Adolf, oil and tallow 

W. P. Thompson, skate straps, etc 

Jacob Esser, shoemaking 

Tolford & Nichols, meat 

J. H. D. Baker, apples and groceries 

Thos. Regan, gas and water fitting 

W. P. Towers, expenses 

W. P. Towers, expenses 

Express and telegraph 

Gas Company, gas for December 



Amoant. 


1275 50 


91 61 


8 30 


1 76 


2 20 


13 65 


14 25 


7 80 


3 54 


1 12 


16 00 


669 33 


9 80 


33 33 


10 08 


15 00 


155 21 


390 95 


207 03 


62 50 


289 37 


4 87 


90 45 


489 18 


73 80 


72 12 


52 50 


30 00 


16 00 


12 46 


1 17 


12 00 


17 62 


603 33 


6 00 


34 37 


4 .W 


175 00 


5 60 


33 33 


180 84 


262 70 


9 30 


18 85 


01 25 


105 23 


86 40 


36 33 


4 50 


6 82 


2 20 



112 50 



29 
Detailed Financial /Statement — Expenditures — continued. 




6 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 



1872 
Jan. 5 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 10 
Jan. 10 
Jan. 10 
Jan. 10 
Jan. 12 
Jan. 17 
Jan. 19 
Jan. 20 
Jan. 22 
Jan. 23 
Jan. 23 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 29 
Jon. 80 
Jan. 80 
Jan. 80 
Jan. 30 
Jan. 81 



1 
1 



3 
3 



5 
5 

5 



Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 2 
Feb. 2 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 8 
Feb. 3 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 6 
Feb. 7 
Feb. 10 
Feb. 13 
Feb. 14 
Feb. 14 
Feb. 17 
Feb. 17 
Feb. 17 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 20 
Feb. 22 
Feb. 22 
Feb. 22 



119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 



Mrs. Tubbs, sewing 

Wm. Eavanaugh, wood 

H. P. Allen, hauling wood 

Jf. P. Jones, piciure 

S. Klauber & Co., dry goods 

S. Klauber & Co., dry goods 

Peter Anderson, watching wood 

Hill & Vaughan, cement 

A. F. Waltzinger, candy 

Moseley & Bro., books etc 

Vroman, Frank <fe Co., furnace etc . . 

N. J. Moody, dentistry 

William Kavanaugh, wood 

H. P. Allen, hauling wood 

R. Jones, potatoes 

Wm. Kavanaugh, wood 

J. Flynn, butter 

H. Grove, vinegar 

H. Perry, butter 

H. P. Allen, hauling wood 

B. Kohner, cutting suits 

George F. Taylor, shoes 

Pay roll and labor 

Mil. «fc St. P. R. R., freight on wood. 
D. Memhard, fruit 

D. L. Babcock, writing 

8. H. Cowles, bread 

Mary Bevitt, teaching 

Gas Company, gas 

Estate J. T. Wilson, drugs 

E. A. Jones, medicines 

Mrs. Doylan, labor 

W. J. & F. Ellsworth, groceries. . . . 
W. Hcitkamp, blacksmithing 

E. W. Keyes, postage stamps 

Isaac Klauber, groceries 

Tolford & Nichols, meat 

H.P.Hall, milk 

Express Company 

Moseley & Bro., stationery, etc 

Jas. E. Fisher, furniture and repairs 

F. Hanson, flour 

H. P. Allen, sawing wood 

Dunning & Sumner, groceries, etc. . . 

Adam mrth, painting 

H. Kleuter, oats and teed 

Bobbins & Thornton, flour, et<: 

W. A. Oppell, provisions, etc 

J. K. Fuller, doctoring horse 

Wm. Kavanaugh, wood 

Bunker & Vroman, lumber 

Ricker, Crombie & Co., groceries . . . 
State Industrial School, brooms .... 



$5 00 

808 00 

33 60 

3 00 
118 71 

17 50 
<l 00 

4 50 

3 20 
24 40 

378 73 
80 00 

827 25 
35 70 
11 50 

865 75 

4 84 
9 08 
9 97 

89 90 

89 00 

54 45 

744 41 

168 00 

2 50 

11 25 

275 52 

13 00 

110 70 

7 28 

20 25 

1 50 

69 22 

6 60 
9 00 

7 60 
185 66 
204 01 

1 55 
28 85 

40 80 
13 00 
43 00 
42 85 

1 25 

18 90 
129 85 

97 43 

200 

816 25 

61 28 
200 84 

41 90 



30 



Detailed Financial Statement — Expenditures— QoniinM^d, 




1872 
Jan. 22 
Jan. 22 
Jan. 23 
Jan. 23 
Jan. 23 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 24 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 
Jan. 26 



172 

173 

174 

175 

176 

177 

178 

179 

180 

181 

182 

183 

184 

185 

186 

187 

188 

189 

190 

191 

192 

193 

194 

195 

196 

197 

198 

199 

200 

201 

202 

203 

204 

205 

206 



To whom and for what paid. 



Seifert & Lawton, views of " Home," . 

G. W. Hersce, tuning pianos 

H. P. Allen, hauling wood 

John Reiner, straw 

F. Hanse i, flour and meal 

Ed. Morden, repairing pumps 

Cook Bro's, leather, etc 

Dunning & Sumner, groceries, etc 

B. W. Suckow, binding books 

Geo. F. Taylor, shoes, etc 

W. J. Park & Co., books 

Vroman, Frank & Co., hardware 

Pardee & Bro., drugs 

H. Klueter, feed 

TV. J. & F. Ellsworth, groceries 

Atwood & Culver, paper and printing. 

Chas. Askew, blacksmithing 

Madison Woolen Mills, yarn, etc 

Bamsdalc & Hegan, horseshoing 

Huntley & Wootton, groceries 

J. H. D. Baker, groceries 

Moseley & Bro., books and stationery. 

Mrs. Flynn, eggs 

M. Halstead, machine attachments. . . 

8. E. Pearson, carpenter work 

W. Veerhusen, confectioner}' 

S. Klauber <& Co., dry goods 

Pay roll and labor for February 

Mrs. Adolph, eggs . , 

M."^* St. P. U. Km hauling wood 

W. A. Oppcl, provisions , 

W. P. Towers, cash paid for butter. . . 
W. P. Towers, cash paid for stamps . . 

D. L. Babcock, w^riting 

Henry Boctz, treasurer, cash bal. ret'd . , 



AmoDDt. 



$8 15 

6 00 

34 50 

4 00 
26 52 

5 00 
108 95 
132 14 

3 50 
14 80 

1 20 
10 92 

3 35 

2 50 

20 12 
44 00 

3 00 

21 75 

4 50 
24 08 
13 50 
26 54 

1 75 

1 85 
3 75 

2 15 
169 84 
752 76 

5 72 
550 50 

10 23 

6 84 
1 00 

11 25 
675 70 

$16,841 90 



SUPERINTENDENT BURTON'S REPORT. 



To the Tniateea of the Soldiers^ Orphans^ Home of Wis.: 

Gentlemen: Allow me to present to you the following report 
of the institution from March 1 to Sept. 30, 1872, inclusive: 

Number of children in the Home, March 1, 1872 217 

Since admitted 33 

Total 250 

Number discharged 35 

Total number belonging to the Home, Sept. 30, 1872 215 

The following is the name and history of each child received 
since March 1st: 

James Bartholomew, aged 12 years, son of Abram Bartholo- 
Ynew, 33d regiment, died at Moscow, Tenn. Entered by 
mother; March 11, 1872, Windsor, Wis. 

Albert A. Bartholomew, aged 11 years; as above. 

John Mathews, aged 8 years, son of Baptist Mathews, 4th cav- 
alry, died at Morgansa, La. Entered by mother, April 3, 
1872; Tunnel City, Wis. 

Frank Perry, aged 12 years, son of Alfred W. Perry, 8th ar- 
tillery, died at Camp Utley, Racine. Entered by mother, 
April 4, 1872; Wausau, Wis. 

Emma Ramsey, aged 9 years, daughter of Thomas M. Ramsey, 
42d Regt., died at Cairo, 111. Widow supports herself by 
sewing. Entered by mother, April 10, 1872; Pleasant 
Prairie, Wis. 

Nellie Ramsey, aged 7 years; as above. 



32 

Oliver Pulver, aged 12 years, son of John N. Pulver, 43d Regt., 
died at Madison, Ind. Widow dependent upon her own 
exertions. Entered by mother, May 1, 1872; Springville, 

Wis. 

Blanche Pulver, aged 8 years; as above. 

Casper Penhallow, aged 10 years, son of Reuben Penhallow, 

35th regiment, died at Morganza, La. Entered by Col. 

C. K. Pier, May 8th, 1872, Fond du Lac. 

Laura Penhallow, aged 8 years; as above. 

Emmet Duvall, aged 12 years, son of Truman Duvall, 2d Cav- 
alry, died at Spring Green, Wis. Widow supports herself 
by her labor. Entered by A. C. Daley, May 13th, 1872, 
Madison. 

Eunice Duvall, aged 10 years; as above. 

Frank Hatfield, aged 11 years, son of Silas Hatfield, 7th regi 
ment. died at Chester, Pa. Widow poor and out of health. 
Entered by mother, May, 17th, 1872; Marshall, Wis. 

Elsie Welton, aged 9 years, child of Moses S. Welton, 1st 
Cavalry, died at Andersonville, Ga. Entered by mother, 
July 24th, 1872; Omro, Wis. 

Martha Welton, aged 8 years; as above. 

Robert Moore, aged 10 years, son of Jeremiah Moore, 33d 
regiment, died at Avoca. Widow supports herself by sew- 
ing. Re-entered by mother. May 1, 1872; Sextonville, Wis. 

Henry Fields, aged 13 years, son of Stephen Fields, 18th regi- 
ment, died at Macon, Ga. Re-entered by mother, May 10, 
1872; Baraboo, Wis. 

Sarah Sheeks, aged 14 years, daughter of W. N. Sheeks, 6th 
regiment, killed in battle. Re-entered by Henry Harnden, 
June, 1872. 

Wm. Hoey, aged 12 years, son of Geo. F. Hoey, 37th regiment, 
died at Danville Hospital. Entered by mother, Aug. 8th; 
Beloit, Wis. 

Cena Layton, aged 12 years, daughter of John Layton, 31st 



33 

regiment. Entered by mother, Mary E. Lajrton ; Monro e, 
Wis., August 30, 1872. 

Eliza Latton, aged 10 years; as above. 

Phebe Kellisok, aged 8 years, daughter of Geo. Kellison, 35th 
Inf. regiment, died at Neosho, Wis. Entered by mother, 
Roena Kellison; Neosho, August 5, 1872. 

Luna Hicks, aged 9 years, daughter of Geo. E. Hicks, 7th bat- 
tery, died at Ashippun. Entered by mother, Lucinda 
Hicks; Ashippun, Wis., August 31, 1872. 

Marshall Hatfield, aged 13 years, son of Silas Hatfield, 7th 
regiment, Co. B, died at Chester, Pa. Entered by mother, 
Sarah Hatfield; Medina, Wis., August 31, 1872. 

Leroy Hayes, aged 11 years, son of S. H. Hayes, Co. H, 36th 
Regt., died at Salisbury, N. C. Entered by mother, Ra- 
chael Hayes; Clayton, Wis., September 2, 1872. 

Mabia Close, aged 11 years, daughter of John Close, Co. F., 
8th Regt., died at Perryville, Ky. Entered by mother, 
Catharine Close; Utica, Wis., September 3, 1872. 

Fanny Knoble, aged 9 years, daughter of Casper Knoble, Co. 
B, 31st Regt., died in New York Hospital. Entered by 
mother; Mt. Sterling, Wis., September 4, 1872. 

Willie Randall, aged 11 years, son of Reuben Randall, Co. 
H, 36th Regt., died at Salisbury, N. C. Entered by moth- 
er, Clestea Randall; Yankeetown, September 2, 1872. 

Cabrie Ellis, aged 9 years, daughter of Richard Ellis, 25th 
Regt., died at Chattanooga. Entered by mother, Martha 
Harmer; Lima, Wis., August 30, 1872. 

Leonabd Doty, aged 13 years^ son of George Doty, 2d Wis- 
consin cavalry; died at Madison. Entered by his aunt, 
Jennie Hamilton; Darlington, September 1, 1872. 

Clabence Shaw, aged 13 years, son of William F. Shaw, 25th 
regiment, Co. D; died at Memphis, Tenn. Entered by 
mother, Louisa J. Shaw, September 14, 1872; Adrian Wis.. 

Wm. H. Shaw, aged 10 years, as above. 

8— Orph. Home. (Doc. 10.) 



34 

Hugo Muimih, aged 8 years, son of Albert Munim; died at 
Whitewater, Wis. Entered by mother, September 24, 
1S72; Whitewater. 

The children that have been furnished with homes since 
March Ist are 

Mary J. Legget, with Mr. Nesbits, Clinton Junction. 

Wm. Conant, with D. N. Holly, Esq., Merton. 

Sarah Sheeks, with uncle, J. Lutes, Pardeeville. 

Willie Smith, with P. Sawyer, Oconomowoc. 

Belle Smith, with P. Sawyer, Oconomowoc. 

Jane E. Faith, with Mr. Vosley, Beloit. 

Arthur Burt, with F. Leland, Esq., Elkhorn. 

Maggie McFadden with Mr. Spence, Baraboo. 

In every instance mentioned, all parties up to this time ex- 
press satisfaction. 

Several worthy applications to adopt children are now on file. 

Believing family influence to be the most potent for the prop- 
er development of the child, we earnestly recommend that great- 
er effort be made to secure suitable homes for children, particu- 
larly those who are soon to leave us unattended by natural pro- 
tectors, and in many cases devoid of friends that are able to care 
for them. 

Such effort we believe will greatly enhance the welfare of the 
children, and thereby more completely secure the object of your 
earnest endeavors. 



36 



STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, 

From March Ut, 1872, to October Ut, 1872, detailed according to form pre- 
scribed by State Board of Charities and Rrform, 



Articles. 



Dbugs akd Mbdicikes 
ahu8ehekt6 



Clothing. 

Boys' Hats , 

Girls' Hats 

Tailoring (for Normal scholars), 



Sheeting 
Checks . 
Tweed . . 



Dry Goods. 



Dress goods and triftimings. 
Muslin 



Alpaca 

Curtains 

Flannel ..^.< 

Carpets and matting. 

Buttons 

Hose 

Linen thread 

Combs 

Round combs 

Crash , 

Table linen 

Needles 

Thimbles 

Dress braid 

Black ribbon 

Cottonade 

Drilling , 

Paper collars , 

Spool thread 



Shoes and findings. 
Leather and findings. 
Leather and findings . 
Blacking 



Shoe Shop. 



Books asd STATiomsKT. 



Coal 

Sawing wood. 
Gas 



Fuel akd Liohtb. 



Quantity. 



1,524 yds... 
580 yds. . . . 
211 yds 



54 yds. . . . 
139 yds 



82 yds 

116 yds. . . . 

78 cro 

26 doz.... 

23 lbs 

34 doz 

8 doz. . . . 

181 yds 

138 yds 

63 papers. 
I gro 

12 doz 

166 yds 

207 yds 

53 yds.... 

50 boxes . 

37 doz 



18 tons . . 
879 cords. 



Amount. 



$73 53 
65 18 



117 01 
15 04 
62 20 



225 27 
180 36 
221 55 
116 88 

10 80 
44 87 

4 00 
12 50 

147 06 

20 42 
53 30 
80 70 

21 95 

11 20 
42 36 
65 49 

7 62 
2 25 

8 75 
15 55 
63 47 

9 89 

5 00 
25 00 



164 55 
194 08 
146 02 

3 75 

268 02 



174 00 
162 97 
811 80 



36 



Statement of Expenditures — continued. 



Articlxs. 



Stablb. 



Hay 

Oats 

Bran 

Harness repaired. 
Harness oil 



MlBCELLAJBfBOUB. 



Express and freight . 

Confectionery 

Notarial Commission, 

Postage stamps 

Box rent 

Labor 

Straw 

Dishes 



Laondry expenses 
Boat 



Quanticy. 



1 ton... 

44 bu... 

310 lbs... 



2 gal.. . 



for pupils. 



Brooms, brushes, etc 

Printing 

Travelinff expenses 

Furniture 

Sunday school papers. . . 

Flags 

Barbering 

Matches 

Unclassified expenditures 



REPAms. 



Painting and glazing. 

Sand T. 

Lumber 

Mason work 

Stone 

Hardware 

Labor 

Piano tuning 

Lightning rods 

Plumbing 

Window blinds 

Kalsomining 



SUBSISTENCB. 



Bread... 
Crackers. 
Cake . . . 
Meal ... 
Flour. . . 



lease. 



1 crd, 



40,534 lbs. 

285 lbs. 

110 lbs. 

500 lbs. 
6,200 lbs. 



Amount. 



$6 65 
14 31 

2 90 
1 70 

3 00 



50 06 


4 18 


2 00 


34 34 


7 05 


5 00 


82 75 


17 55 


9 36 


45 00 


39 35 


25 00 


34 95 


131 30 


87 25 


27 37 


24 30 


5 00 


4 70 


202 88 



254 45 

1 00 

32 63 

83 74 

7 00 
168 02 

25 60 

8 00 
47 50 
38 78 

218 28 
65 88 



1,298 05 

25 00 

41 80 

6 72 

214 75 



37 



Statement of Expenditures — continued. 



Abticlbs. 



Subsistence-— continued. 



Rice 

Milk 

Butter 

Eggs 

Cheese 

Oat meal . . . . 

Salt 

Vinegar 

Soap 

Sugar 

Sugar, maple 
Coffee, Rio. . 
Coffee, Java . 
Tea 



Bmall Gfroc&ries — 

Com starch 

Baking powder . 
Cocoanut (des). . 
Cinnamon...... 

Cream of Tartar, 

Ginger 

Nuts 

Fruit (canned) . . 

Extracts 

Maccaroni 

Tapioca 

Nutmegs 

Allspice 



Fruits 

Lemons 

Raisins 

Apples 

Currants (dried) 
Currants (green) 

Citron 

Oranges 

Apples (dried).. 
Peaches (dried). 
Strawberries . . . 
Raspberries . . . . 
Blackberries . . . 

Peaches 

Fruits (mixed).. 



VegetabUi — 
Cabbages . . . 

Beets 

Lettuce 

Horseradish 
Tomips .... 



Qnantity. 



228,lbs. . . 

22,264 qts... 

1,564 lbs... 

1,869 doz... 

113 lbs. . . 

1 bbl . . 

2bbls.. 

09 gals. . 

1,045 lbs... 

2,920 lbs... 

62 lbs... 

448 lbs. . . 

57 lbs. . . 

166 lbs. . . 



40 lbs. . 

148 lbs. . 

12 lbs. . 

8 lbs. . 

lib .. 
10 lbs.. 
86 lbs. . 
17 doz . 

2 qts . 
26 lbs. . 
50 lbs. . 

5 lbs. . 
10 lbs. . 



8 doz . . 



9 bbls . 
80 lbs. . . 
22 qts . . 

2 lbs. . . 

9 doz . . 

379 lbs. . . 

828 lbs. . . 

51 qts . . 

51 qts . . 

24qts .. 

2 boxes 



12 doz . . 
2 bush. 



Auonnt. 



$20 60 

1,266 94 

288 75 

146 40 

17 34 
7 00 
5 20 

29 86 

62 70 

828 11 

18 91 
105 55 

17 50 
127 45 



4 40 
57 54 

408 

1 95 
65 

8 50 

15 89 

43 10 

400 

8 00 

5 00 

6 00 

2 60 



4 80 
18 25 
27 80 

3 01 



1 

1 

4 

41 



48 
80 
90 
80 



42 78 
7 85 
6 57 



4 
2 



08 
00 



29 bush.. 



24 99 



10 70 
1 00 
6 10 
8 20 
440 



38 



Statement qf Expenditures — continued. 



Articles. 



Subsistence — con. 



Parsnips 

Asparagus 

Potatoes . . ; . . 



MeaJti — 

Beef 

Mutton 

Veal 

Pork, salt 

Ham 

Lamb 

Beef tongues. 

Lard 

Chickens 

Turkeys 

Tallow 



Fiihr- 
Mackerel . 
Fish, salt . 
Fish, fresh 



Plants . . . 
Seeds ... 
Rent. .... 
Teaming 
Baskets . 



Fabm Expenses. 



QoAntlty. 



3 bu... 



106 bu... 



7,028 

1,864 

993 

1,227 

878 

74 

110 

324 

164 

126 

50 



lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 
lbs. 



1 kit . . 
381 lbs. . 
232 lbs. . 



Amount. 



12 70 

63 

110 60 



699 15 
186 40 

99 80 
111 13 

44 44 
7 85 

14 60 
32 40 
19 54 

15 69 
3 50 



400 
25 65 
20 22 



16 85 

10 06 

90 00 

8 00 

2 90 



39 



Statement of JEsq>enditures — continued. 



SALARIES AND WAGES. 



Names. 



Robert W. Burton.... 
Emma W. Burton. . . . 

Dr. A. J. Ward 

Alma Cardelle 

Laura Hamden 

Maggie Mclntyre .... 
Kittie Huntington. . . . 

Jennie Terry 

Ella Bradley 

Helen Sturtevant 

Maggie Conklin 

Lavinia Thornton .... 

Lydia Green 

Charlotte Post 

Fannie Morgan 

Emma Ramsey 

Mrs. Storms 

Olive Noll 

Amerilla Crane 

Martha Gloyer 

Hannah Doyle 

Annie Willson 

Mrs. Patterson 

Charlotte Post 

Marion Strogan 

Margaret Buckley. . . . 

Mary Ward 

Marion Strogan 

Bridg'tO'Shaughnessy 

Maggie Hogan 

Mary Miligan 

Delia Miligan 

Maggie Curtain 

Johanna Crowley 

Lena Oleson 

Kate Ho^an 

Annie E^elley 

Maria Lee 

Mary Kelly 

Maggie Nary 

Mary Daly 

Maggie Howard 



Occapation. 



Superintendent 

Matron 

Physician 

Teacher 

...do 



...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

Housekeeper. 

...do 

Seamstress .. 
...do 



...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

Nurse 

...do 

...do 

Dormitory .... 

;;!do v,y.\[y.\ 

. . .do 

Cook 

...do 

...do 

do . 

...do 

Laundress 

...do 

...do 

Ironer 

...do 

...do 

...do 

General work.. 



Tolena Oleson do 



John Walters . . . . 
Peter Anderson . , 
Thomas Swenson. 
Jacob Esser 



Engineer 
Carpenter . 
Watchman 
Shoemaker 



Time em- 
ployed. 



Rate per 



7 mos. 
7 mos. 
7 mos. 
2} mos. 

4 mos. 

5 mos. 

4 mos. 

5 mos. 
24 mos 

I mos. 
I mos. 

1 mo. 
5 mos. 

2 mos. 
64 mos. 
3i mos. 
l| mos. 
5 mos. 
6^nK)8. 
l| mos. 
7 mos. 
7 mos. 
2| mos. 
2| mos. 
1 mo.. 
1 mo.. 
7 mos. 
5 mos. 
1} mos. 
7 mos. 
IHmos 
2^ mos. 
5 mos. 



2| mos. 
2 mos. 

6 mos. 
5 mos. 
2 mos. 

7 mos. 
4 mo.. 

l| mos. 
7 mos. 
7 mos. 
7 mos. 
7 mos. 
7 mos. 

7^A dyfl' 



1100 00 
83 33 
33 83 
80 00 
30 00 
80 00 
30 00 
30 00 
80 00 
30 00 
30 00 
30 00 
22 00 
22 00 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
16 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
10 00 
40 00 
40 00 
85 00 
♦2 50 



Amount. 



1700 00 
233 31 
233 31 

79 00 
120 00 
150 00 
120 00 
150 00 

71 00 
10 00 
20 00 

80 00 
110 00 

44 00 

102 25 

57 50 

22 50 

80 00 

102 25 

22 75 

112 00 

112 00 

46 00 

34 00 

16 00 

12 00 

84 00 

60 00 

14 00 

84 00 

20 80 

29 84 

60 00 

33 36 

24 00 

60 00 

60 00 

24 00 

84 00 

6 05 

14 00 

84 00 

70 00 

280 00 

280 00 

245 00 

421 75 



•Per day. 



40 

So brief has been the period of our connection with the 
" Home," that we are inclined to allow the length of this report 
to correspond, preferring rather, that the appearance of the 
institution and of its inmates should proclaim the merits or de- 
merits of its present management. 

Though the time has been short, it has been filled with hon- 
est endeavor to place the " Home " upon a basis equal to that of 
other charitable institutions of like character in the State. 

It affords us great pleasure to state that the health of the 
children during the seven months, generally speaking, has been 
very good. 

Through the summer, weeks passed without an inmate of the 
sick room. In the spring time, however, there were several 
cases of " Cerebro Spinal Meningitis," none of which, we are 
happy to 'say, proved fatal, and in but one instance were the 
faculties of the patient at all impaired by this dreadful disease. 
That no more serious consequences resulted from its presence 
among so many, is largely due to the indefatigable attention 
and skillful treatment of our physician, Dr. A. J. Ward. 

We would reverently acknowledge a kind Providence in 
averting a calamity that threatened so much disaster among the 
children. 

At present, the schools are in a condition far more satisfactory 
than when we took charge of the " Home." By a careful selec- 
tion of teachers, and a watchful superintendency, we hope to 
place our schools upon an equality with any public schools of 
similar grade in the state. By its energy and deep interest, 
the present corps of teachers promises good things in this direc- 
tion. Our four schools correspond to first and second primary, 
intermediate and grammar departments. 
/ Our present teachers are: 

Miss Ella Bradley, of grammar department. 
Miss Maggie Mclntyre, of intermediate department. 
Miss Maggie Gonklin, of first primary. 
Miss Lavinia Thornton, of second primary. 

The text books used are as last reported. 



41 

Miss Jennie Terry is our music teacher. In her department 
there are sixteen pupils. Aside from her class duties, much of 
her time is occupied with vocal exercises in the schools. 

Some of our children show particular talent for music, and are 
making corresponding progress in the art. 

It is pleasing, and at the same time a matter of great en- 
couragement to us in our work, to realize that the moral tone of 
the children is daily becoming healthier. 

That the standard of morality among them may continually 
advance, is our constant and great care; and to this end, we 
strive to improve every opportunity to impart a wholesome 
lesson. 

Our Sunday School continues under the efficient care of Hon. 
LI. Breese, as its superintendent, who, with his associates, is 
ever faithful to his charge. 

With these kind Christian teachers, our Sunday School ser- 
vice is no mere pastime; but an opportunity for heart- felt Chris- 
tian work. Neither sunshine nor storm deters them from their 
labor of love. They can be adequately rewarded by Him alone 
in whose service they so cheerfully engage. 

To the deep interest, on the part of Superintendent and 
teachers, in the welfare of the children, is wholly due the life 
of our Sunday School, to which we look with great interest for 
the moral growth and Christian character of our little com- 
munity. 

Of Christ's soldiers in this field of usefulness, the following 
are the names of veterans: — ^Hon. D. Worthington, D. H. Tul- 
lis, E. Thompson, Mr. Cowles, J. H. D. Baker, B. E. Hutchin- 
son, Mrs. S. F. Dean, Miss E. Pierce, Miss E. A Burdick, Miss 
S. E. Nichols, Miss S. Prescott, Miss M. E. Snell, Mrs. H. F. 
Hayward. 

To many other friends we are deeply indebted for their kind 
sympathies and words of encouragement. 

The children are evidently happy in their home. In every 
respect we endeavor to treat them as we would have our own 
dealt with, striving to throw about them, as far as possible, such 
influences as naturally cluster about the family fireside. 



42 

The older boys have cheerfully cultivated a garden of five or 
aix acres, this season, and all have reaped the wholesome reward 
of industry in the matter of fresh vegetables for the children's 
table. 

In respect to clothing, we aspire to neatness and cleanliness ; 
but even these simple demands are very difficult to secure, par- 
ticularly among the small children. The improved appearance 
of the girls in this respect, is wholly attributable to their own 
efforts. They have been encouraged to sew, by the promise of 
better and more tastily arranged clothing, if made by their own 
hands. Industrial habits, personal neatness, and a greater de- 
gree of refinement are among the wholesome fruits of such a 
course. 

To enhance the comfort of the children, and render the library 
more accessible for them, we have removed the library to what 
was formerly built for a sewing room, and the room vacated by 
such removal has become the sewing room. With a view to the 
same end, such books as are commonly read by boys, have been 
placed in the old office, which has been, with slight expense, 
fitted for a boys' reading room. Here, too, all the papers re- 
ceived by the Home are on file for the perusal of all. We trust 
that this arrangement will increase the love for reading and pro- 
duce a greater degree of general intelligence. 

The play rooms have been rendered more cheerful and com- 
fortable by the admission of more light, and the arranging of 
stationary seats. By this agreeable change, with better warm- 
ing facilities, these old dungeon-like rooms have become places 
of no small attraction. 

The highest class of the first school was duly examined at the 
close of last term by Rev. J. B. Pradt, Assistant State Superin- 
tendent, for admission to Normal School. In this examination, 
72 in a scale of 100 was the standard of scholarship reached by 
the class. Subsequently it was determined by you to retain 
these children in the " Home" another year. The wisdom of 
such a course becomes daily more apparent. While their schol- 
arship is fair, their youthfulness is objectionable to their enter- 
ing Normal school. The presence of the class in our schools 



43 

another year will aid in securing a better scholarship, and also 
better fit the members of the class to receive the full benefit of 
a course of normal training. 

In accordance with your instructions, we have liberally fur- 
nished the children at Whitewater with clothing, and in so doing 
have consulted their tastes, and endeavored to gratify their 
wishes. These scholars, I am happy to say, are acquitting them- 
selves creditably. For their future progress and ultimate suc- 
cess, we shall watch with deep interest; for our greatest reward 
of labor in the Home, is to behold the prosperity of any that 
may have in any degree been under our charge. The time we 
trust is not distant, when the Home will receive to positions of 
honor and responsibilty, those whom it has sent forth to be fur- 
nished with such knowledge and understanding, as shall fit them 
to become faithful and efficient laborers in the broad field of 
Education. 

How shall we employ the boys? is a question that is constantly 
forced upon us. In our attempt to answer it, we increased the 
force of boys in the shoe shop to eight. The cultivation of the 
garden, already referred to, has been of great service in this 
respect. We have also encouraged the boys to work for far- 
mers in the vicinity, and in several cases have secured places 
for them. Many of them spent their entire vacation at work, 
and have earned, in the aggregate, $150. In matters of repairs 
and improvements, we have endeavored to employ the boys 
wherever they could be of any service. Notwithstanding this, 
we urge the necessity of providing means for more tangible 
employment. 

To employ the girls is a matter of less difficulty. In the sev- 
eral departments of the " Home," there is a great variety of 
housework for ready and willing hands. Besides this, needle- 
work occupies the girls much of the time. 



44 

The division of labor among the boys is approximately shown 
by the following: 

Number employed^in shoe shop 8 

garden 6 

stable 2 

playroom 3 

office 1 

library 2 

children's kitchen 3 

family kitchen 1 

dormitory 3 

as monitors 6 

wood carriers 10 

with engineer 1 

carpenter 2 

47 



All participate in general work. The boys have carried and 
piled 440 cords of wood, and split and stored in wood shed one- 
fourth of that amount. 

The division of work in girls' department is as follows: 

Number employed in sewing room 2 

dormitories 11 

children's dining room 12 

family dining room 2 

family kitchen 8 

school house 9 

play room 2 

library 2 

wash room 1 

ironing room 2 

private rooms 9 

55 

All that are able, share the general house cleaning. 

We will simply call attention to items of repairs most worthy 
of mention. 

The chimney in the large dormitory, so long an eye-sore and 
cause of alarm, has given place to one of better material and 
larger capacity. 

The top of the other in the same dormitory has been rebuilt, 
making both safe and substantial structures. 

In the school building, the walls of the chapel, music-rooms, 
halls and stairway leading to them, have been carefully repaired 



45 

and kalsomined; the wood work has been painted, the furniture 
renovated. 

Every window throughout the building has been furnished 
with inside blinds. 

These matters conduce very much to the comfort and con- 
venience of the children in school, and render the chapel in 
appearance worthy of the institution. 

With an appropriation much less than last year's, we find our 
expenses, in matters of repairs for the corresponding time, 
largely in the excess. As compared with the same period, 
the pay-roll has been materially reduced. The receipts are 
$16,306.14 ; of this $1,005.99 has been expended to discharge 
former indebtedness ; $970.00 on account of repairs and im- 
provements, and $13,531.06 on account of current expenses, 
leaving on hand, $799.09. Average monthly expenses, including 
all expenditures, $2,215.29. 

We respectfully recommend that suitable provision be made 
for thoroughly painting the " Home,'' another season, as a mat- 
ter of economy and neatness. 

Our gardening enterprise, in consequence of drouth, has not 
succeeded as well as we had hoped ; yet the value of the pro- 
ducts, at a very low estimate, will more than cover expenses. 
In a disciplinary sense, it has been a profitable affair. In the 
matter of garden, much more can be done another year. 

The following figures show the amount of work done in shoe 
shop since March 1st : 

Number of pairs of shoes manufactured 164 

Number of pairs of shoe uppers fitted 40 

Number of pairs of half soles 862 

Number of pairs of shoes patched 240 

A low estimated value of the work done in the shop is $650. 

We now have to buy very little ready-made work. With ad- 
ditional shop room, we could quite meet the demands, without 
increasing our pay roll. 



46 

The work in the sewing room since March 1st, consists of 
girls' clothing, as 

Best dresses made 187 

Common dresses made 50 

Night dresses made 84 

Common aprons 100 

Best aprons made by girls 90 

Under suits of two pieces each 236 

Hats trimmed 00 

Of boys' clothing, as 

Shirts made 108 

Woolen coats made 1^ 

Cotton coats made 76 

Woolen pants made 188 

Cotton pants made 76 

Suspenders ^ 150 

In reference to the class in telegraphy, we have carried out 
your instructions, by fitting up an office in the attic of the main 
building, where are six instruments. The room is readily 
reached by both back and front stairs, is easily warmed by 
stove, well lighted and retired. The Home line is connected 
with the main line at the city office, where is located our effi- 
cient instructor, 0. E. Bross. The present class consists of 
twelve pupils, selected from the older boys that are likely to be 
the first to leave the Home. The teacher reports his pupils as 
apt, and progressing finely. 

Hon. Albert D. Wood, of Vallejo, California, will please ac- 
cept our sincerely hearty thanks for his donation of the beauti- 
ful chromo, representing one of the beatitudes, presented to the 
children by Hon. Samuel D. Hastings. 

Park & Co. also share our thanks for framing the same. 
The editors of the following papers will please accept our 
grateful acknowledgements for their many and oft-repeated 
favors. Our State papers are ever welcome guests of the Home: 

The Janesville Gazette. 

The Fond du Lac Commonwealth. 

Wisconsin State Journal. 

The Janesville Times. 

The Rock County Recorder. 



47 



The Kenosha Union. 
The Racine Journal. 
The Waukesha Freeman. 
The Berlin Courant. 
Badger State Banner. 
The Western Farmer. 
The Soldiers' Record. 
The University Press. 
The State Gazette. 
The Burlington Standard. 
The Weekly Rescue. 
The Liberal Press. 

■ 

The gentlemanly managers and conductors of the Milwaukee 
and St. Paul, and the Chicago and Northwestern Railways, are 
deserving of our warmest thanks for their many kind attentions 
bestowed upon the children journeying to and from their homes. 

We have but partially expended the last two hundred dollars 
of the appropriation made by the legislature for library pur- 
poses, and approved March 15, 1870. 

The account stands thus: 



Jan. 8 



June 9 
June 12 
June 20 



RECEIPTS. 

Received of State Treasurer 

EXFKJNDITUBES. 

Paid West & Co., librarv books 

Paid W. Huntington, " Uncivilized Races" . 
Paid H. R Thompson, ''Bible Commentary*' 

Total 

Cash on hand 



(200 00 



140 34 
6 00 
2 00 



$48 24 
151 76 



1200 00 



As soon as our room is in order, we shall spend the the bal- 
ance, which will very greatly add to the attractions of the read- 
ing room. 



48 



WAJa> BEQUXST. 



Of 80 much of this fund as was entrusted to us, the following 
is the account. Vouchers and receipts for disbursements are on 
file in this office : 



May 27 

Aug. 29 



May 28 



RECEIPTS. 



Received of State Treasurer. 
Received of State Treasurer, 



Total 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Paid Frank Blakesley, cash 

Paid Woolen Mills, suit of clothes. . 
Paid Frank Blakesley, pair of shirts 
Paid Frank Blakesley, cash 



$50 00 
25 00 



175 00 



120 00 

28 00 

1 50 

10 00 




159 50 
15 50 



"When we consider the amount and variety of work to be ac- 
complished to secure the grand object for which the institution 
was founded, viz: to prepare these fatherless children in mind, 
morals and manners, to become good citizens; and also reflect 
upon the shortness of time for its accomplishment, our courage 
almost fails us. But with your united support, with the faith- 
ful co-operation of our associates, we are fully convinced that 
greater and better results can be obtained in the future of the 
" Home " than has crowned its past. 

Up to this time we have succeeded in doing all office work. 
Although the new system of accounts, recently introduced, 
renders the work somewhat burdensome, yet we are inclined 
to continue free of the care of a clerk. 

In conclusion, permit me to say that a realizing sense of the 
great importance of the work in hand, daily increases upon us. 
Parental responsibility multiplied a thousand times, can scarcely 
equal it. If ever there was a work for hands, head and heart, 
it is here. 



4d 

And now, gentlemen, allow us to thank you most heartily for 
the confidence you have reposed in us, and for the substantial 
xnannef in which you have sustained us in our arduous, though 
in very many respects, pleasant labors. You have proven your- 
selves in every respect worthy of the high trust committed to 
your care. 

As a token of our appreciation of you as officers of the 
Home, you will ever find us persevering in our endeavors to se- 
cure the greatest good to the greatest number of those most 
deeply concerned. 

While we are permitted to work together in a cause so hu- 
mane, let us invoke the blessing of Him who has always proved 
himself a friend to the needy and a father to the fatherlesij. 

Sincerely yours, 

R. W. BURTON, 

iSuperintendent. 

4— Orph. Home. ^ (Doc. 10.) 



50 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT- 

The receipts and expenditures of the Home, from March 1, to 
September 30, 1872, inclusive, correspond with the following 
statement : 



1872 
Mar. 1 
Mar. 30 
Apr. 2 
May 4 
June 1 
June 11 
July 6 
July 20 
Aug.92 
Sept. 11 



Sept. 30 



RECEIPTS. 

From State Treasurer 

Sale of rags < 

State Treasurer 

State Treasurer , 

State Treasurer 

Cancellation of fire insurance policy 

State Treasurer 

Sale of horse power , 

State Treasurer 

State Treasurer 

Total amount received < 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

To orders paid : Kos. 1 to 226 inclusive 

Cash on hand 



12,244 60 
5 00 

8,000 00 
3,000 00 
3,000 00 

19 04 
2,500 00 

87 50 
1,000 00 
1,500 00 



$16,306 14 



$15,507 05 
799 09 



$16,806 14 



LIST OF VOUCHERS. 

The following sums have been paid on account of indebted- 
ness, incurred previous to March 1. Vouchers filed with the 
State Treasurer ; duplicates in this office. 



Date. 


No. 


1872 




Mar. 4 


1 


Mar. 4 


2 


Mar. 4 


3 


Mar. 4 


4 


Mar. 9 


5 


Mar. 11 


6 


Mar. 11 


7 


Mar. 14 


8 


Mar. 14 


9 


Mar. 14 


10 


Mar. 14 


11 


Mar. 14 


12 



To whom and for what paid. 



Tolford & Nichols, meat 

S. H. Cowles, bread 

H. P. Hall, milk 

H. P. Allen, sawing wood 

Robbins ft Memhara, painting 

Gas Company, gas ^ .'. 

Am. Merchants' Union Ex. Co., freight. 

Davenport & Co., sand 

A. F. Waltzinger, candy 

E. A. Jones, medicine 

Sorenson & Frederickson, lumber 

E. Sharp & Son, plastering 



Amount. 



$182 75 

274 06 

245 98 

162 97 

25 50 

98 10 

1 85 

1 00 
4 18 
640 

2 20 
1 60 



Total I $1,005 99 



61 



Xist of Vouchers — continued. 

On account of expenses of the Home from March 1, to Sep- 
tember 30, 1872, have paid the following sums, for which vouch- 
ers are on file with the State Treasurer, duplicated in this 
office. 



Date. 



1873 
Mar. 12 
Mar. 16 
Mar. 18 
Mar. 21 
Mar. 21 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Mar. 80 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 11 
Apr. 11 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 26 
Apr. 27 
Apr. 27 
Apr. 27 
Apr. 27 
Apr. 27 
Apr. 29 
Apr. 80 
M!ay 1 
May 2 
May 2 
May 2 



1 
2 
2 
3 
8 
8 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
8 
8 
9 



No. 



18 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
28 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
80 
81 
82 
88 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
40 
41 
42 
48 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 



To whom and for what ]>aid. 



F. Hanson, flour and meal 

Geo. R. Cook, silve-ware 

Hon. LI. Breese, notarial commission. 

E. W. Key«8, postage stamps 

E. W. Keyes, P. O. rent 

Am. Merchants Union Ex. Co., fi'eight, 

Mrs. Green, extra service 

Pay roll for March 

H. P. Hall, milk 

Tinware 

Gas Company, gas 

..do do 

C. C. Bobbins, painting 

M. Zwickey, soap 

8. H. Cowles, bread, etc 

Geo. F. Taylor, 'shoes, etc 

Bunker & vroman, lumber 

8. Thuringer^ butter and eggs 

Tolford & Nichols, meat 

J. H. D. Baker, sugar and eggs 

W. H. Hamden, butter and eggs 

8. Klauber & Co., dry goods 

Geo. Heitenback, stone and teaming . . 
Moseley & Bro., books and stationery. 

Jno. N. Jones, hardware 

Crist Commier, ham and eggs 

8. C. Marks, work 

Cook Brothers, leather and findings. . 

Bobbins & Thornton, flour 

Anna Adolf, eggs 

Dunning & Sumner, glass, etc 

Huntley & Wootton, groceries 

H. C. Wilson, horse radish 

E. A. Jones, medicines 

G. W. Hersee, tunine pianos 

Conklin & Gray, coal and salt 

Mil. & St. Paul B. B. freight 

R. W. Burton, sundries 

Seifert & Lawton, printing 

Am. M. U. Ex. Co., freight 

Madison Woolen Mills, cloth 

B. W. Burton, travelling expenses . . . 

Mil. & St Paul, B. R freight 

A. Findlay, sugar 

Pay roll for April 

H.P. Hall,mfik 

J . B. Treat, butter 

Gas Company, gas 

..do do 



Amonctt. 



6 22 


20 80 


200 


15 00 


8 20 


2 25 


5 00 


748 66 


241 78 


5 00 


5 55 


68 80 


10 50 


61 20 


261 74 


164 55 


80 43 


20 68 


218 29 


84 09 


15 52 


128 50 


7 00 


29 88 


21 04 


18 80 


750 


73 20 


82 50 


4 62 


27 66 


140 42 


8 20 


7 15 


400 


153 20 


2 50 


8 60 


11 00 


2 65 


221 55 


28 95 


15 99 


60 88 


758 66 


187 77 


10 00 


48 06 


285 



52 



List qf Vouchers — continued. 




1872. 
May 8 
May " 
May 
May 

May 

May 
May 



3 

4 
4 
4 
6 
6 
7 



May 6 
May 7 
May 8 
May 8 
May 8 
May 9 
May 11 
May 11 
May 18 
May 14 
May 14 
May 16 
May 16 
May 16 
May 22 
May 23 
May 25 
May 28 
May 29 
May 31 
May 81 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 8 
June 3 
June 3 
June 4 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 
June 5 
June 6 
June 6 
June 6 
June 7 
June 7 
June 8 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



4 
4 
4 
6 
5 
5 



62 Regburn, Hunter & Co., lightning rods 

63 Anna Adolf, eggs 

64 Jas. Finney, potatoes 

65 Bradford & Marean, dry goods 

66 Smith, Roundy & Co., groceries 

67 Gunther & Hansen, hats 

68 8. Thuringer, eggs 

69 Tolford & Nichols, meat 

70 D. J. Bailey, brooms * 

71 S. H. Cowles, bread 

72 Madison City Mills, flour 

73 Jerome Blitz, amusement 

74 G. W. B. Whiting, ham and eggs 

75 S. Klauber & Co., dry goods 

76 Huntley & Wootton, groceries 

77 Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad, freight 

78 Cook Bros., leather and findings 

79 J. L. Davidson, butter 

80 I West & Co., school books, etc 

81 ; Tlios. Regan, plumbing 

82 j Gunther & Hansen, straw hats 

83 ' Gunther & Hansen, straw hats 

84 C. Nelson, butter 

85 J. L. Davidson, butter 

86 1 S. Arthur, potatoes and eggs 

87 Henry Switz, drayape 

88 E. W: Keyes, P. O, drawer 

89 Pay roll for May 

90 Am. Mer. Union Express Co., freight 

91 ' G. A. Patterson, boat 

92 Chas. Hawkes, tailoring 

93 ' H. H. Rand, quarter's rent for land 

94 ' R. L. Garlick, crockery 

95 I Sorenson & Frederickson, blinds for school h'se 

96 M. E. Emerson, potatoes . . . .• 

97 ' 8. H. Cowles, bread 

98 ' Gas Company, gas 

99 I Gas Company, gas 

100 Tolford & Nichols, meat 

101 Clark & Mills, medicine 

102 Geo. Walbiesler, plowing 

103 J. Tollotson, oat straw ; 

104 S. Thuringer, eggs 

105 A. Peterson, butter 

106 C. Nelson, butter 

107 Madison City Mills, flour 

108 Dunning & Sumner, paints, etc 

109 H. P. Hall, milk 

110 A. T. Twing, Sunday School papers 

111 Geo. Reitenback, work 

112 Thos. Davenport, brick laying 

113 8. Klauber & Co., dry goods 



H7 50 



4 07 


7 80 


831 82 


516 88 


90 01 


82 26 


161 79 


6 00 


220 67 


82 60 


85 00 


• 1 96 


843 78 


105 48 


3 15 


120 83 


2 76 


198 14 


38 78 


21 00 


14 29 


5 90 


4 77 


7 10 


2 00 


3 85 


781 16 


6 22 


45 00 


84 60 


25 00 


2 85 


218 28 


11 70 


264 65 


35 25 


300 


217 02 


37 88 


8 50 


11 75 


21 60 


8 12 


488 


74 60 


62 30 


160 65 


9 37 


6 60 


82 24 


128 69 



53 

Idst of FimcAer«— continued. 



Dale. 

' 1872. 
June 10 
June 10 
June 10 
June 18 
June 13 
June 18 
June 18 
June 14 
June 17 
June 19 
June 22 
June 22 
June 22 
June 25 
June 25 
June 25 
June 25 
June 25 
June 25 
June 25 
June 26 
June 28 
June 29 
June 29 
June 29 




1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
8 
8 
8 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 



July 
yuly 

5Sg 

July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 10 
July 10 
July 11 
July 12 
July 12 
July 13 
July 18 
July 15 
Jvly 15 
July 18 
July 18 

July 18 



114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
128 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
180 
181 
182 
188 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
140 
141 
142 
148 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
158 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 

168 



To whom and for what paid. 



J. L. Ackley, painting 

Thomas^ Swensen, fish 

Stevens & Son, floTrers 

C. Barte, cabbage plants 

W. J. & F. Ellsworth, cheese, etc 

J. D. Davidson, butter 

S. Johnson, brooms 

J. Voffel, boat rollers 

A. F. Waltzinger, bats and balls 

Conklin & Gray, coal 

E. W. Key es, postage stamps 

Geo. Whiting, but&r 

S. S. Rockwood, entertainment 

M. E. Emerson, butter 

Huntley & Wootton, CTOceries 

Vroman & Frank, hardware 

Geo. R. Cook, silver ware 

J. E, Fisher, ftimiture 

C. Nelson, butter 

J. L. Ackley, painting 

R. W. Burton, childrens' railroad fare, etc 

Pay roll for June 

H. E. Emerson, butter 

U. 8. Express Co., freight 

R. W. Burton, cleaning and repairs 

H. P. Hall, milk and vegetables 

Tolford & Nichols, meat 

S. H. De Parcq, whitewashing 

Gas Company, gas 

Gas Company, gas 

G. W. B. Whiting, butter 

J. L. Ackley, painting 

S. H. Cowles, bread 

John N. Jones, hardware 

Cook Bros., leather and findings 

8. Klauber & Co., dry goods 

8. Thuringer, eggs 

Moseley & Brottier, books and stationery 

Anna Adolf, eggs 

H. H. Rand, 2d and 8d quarters rent of land. . . . 

J. H. D. Baker, garden seeds 

J. E. Williams, garden plants 

E. W. Keyes, P. O. box rent and postage 

Chas. Hawks, tailoring v 

C. Barte, cabbage plants 

W. H. Hamden, berries and vegetables 

Dunning & Sumner, paints, brushes, etc 

M. E. Emerson, butter 

R. W. Burton, childrens' railroad fare, extra la- 

bor, etc 

G. F. Taylor, shoes, etc 



Amoimt. 



$86 00 

1 20 

2 00 
690 
7 55 

11 88 

12 00 
2 00 

7 83 
26 00 

6 00 

1 00 

15 00 

6 28 
58 00 

25 75 

4 18 
87 25 

8 57 
84 88 
79 15 

719 91 
8 01 

2 56 
8 10 

171 72 
206 40 

7 50 
23 25 

2 85 

1 00 

6 88 

180 81 

66 80 

86 22 

89 78 

21 60 

26 95 

5 76 
50 00 
281^ 

8 45 
4 34 

11 60 
1 25 

16 54 
62 26 

8 67 

66 95 
59JB0 



54 



Iii9t of FbwcAer*— continued. 



Date. 


No. 


1872 




July 81 


164 


July 81 


166 


July 81 


166 


Aug. 1 


167 


Aug. 1 


168 


Aug. 1 


169 


Aug. 1 


170 


Aug. 1 


171 


Aug. 1 


172 


Aug. 2 


178 


Aug. 2 


174 


Aug. 8 


175 


Aug. 8 


176 


Aug. 5 


177 


Aug. 5 


178 


Aug. 7 


179 


Aug. 7 


180 


Aug. 15 


181 


Aug. 15 


182 


Aug. 15 


188 


Aug. 15 


184 


Aug. 17 


185 


Aug. 26 


186 


Aug. 29 


187 


Aug. 20 


188 


Aug. 80 


189 


Aug. 80 


190 


Aug. 80 


191 


Bept 2 


192 


Sept. 8 


198 


Sept. 8 


194 


Sept 8 


195 


Sept. 4 


196 


Sept. 5 


197 


Sept. 5 


198 


Sept. 6 


199 


Sept 7 


200 


Sept 7 


201 


Bept 7 


202 


Sept 7 


208 


Bept 7 


204 


Sept 7 


205 


Sept 7 


206 


Sept 10 


207 


Sept 10 


^ 


Sept 18 


209 


Sept 18 


210 


Sept 18 


211 


Sept 18 


212 


Sept 18 


218 


Sept 18 


214 


Sept 18 


215 


Bept 16 


216 



To whom and for what paid. 



U. S. Express Co., freight 

Pay roll for July 

Heim & Schulkamp, lime 

H. P. Hall, milk 

S. Thuringer, eggs 

A. Conrao, whips, etc 

R. Nichols, meat 

Gas Co., gas . . 

. . . .do 

S.' Sharp & Son, repairs 

Dunning & Sumner, butter 

S. H. Cowles, bread 

Bobbins & Thornton, flour 

Geo. Wabbiser, teaming 

C. Nelson, butter 

D. Memhard, vegetables 

. . . .do . . . .do 

A. A. Pardee, whitewash brush 

Huntley & Wootton, groceries 

S. EHauber, dry goods 

W. J. & P. Ellsworth, tea 

Anna Adolf, eggs 

H. C. Wilson, apples 

R W. Burton, K. R. fare for children 

U. 8. Ex. Co., express charges 

Pay roll for August 

M. Sweney, apples 

Mil. &, St P. R. R., freight 

B. H. Cowles, bread 

R. Nichols, meat 

Gas. Co., gas 

.... do 

Park & Co., stationery, etc 

Jas. Finney, butter and chickens 

R. EntwisUe, apples 

M. E. Emerson, butter 

E. W. Keyes, postage 

G. W. Gilman, baskets 

Tho. Swensen, barbering 

H. P. Hall, milk 

Clark & Mills, medicines 

Elauber & Adler, dry goods 

Huntley & Wootton, groceries 

Smith, *Roundy& Co.... do 

Atwood & Culver, printing 

Geo. Eelbfleash, grapes 

D. McDonald, butter, etc 

J. N. Steams, 8. 8. papers 

J. S. Webster, liquid slating 

W. A. Oppel, vegetables 

A. P. Waltzinger, flaffs, etc 

Anna Adolf, eggs and oil 

M. Sweney, butter and apples 



AmoDiit 



■ " 

$1 00 


698 66 


1 20 


189 22 


10 80 


1 70 


119 47 


15 15 


1 50 


61 63 


27 51 


71 24 


71 75 


3 00 


8 96 


18 06 


28 77 


4 25 


57 86 


81 50 


26 15 


2 60 


18 25 


15 75 


60 


531 46 


5 25 


3 55 


79 04 


130 68 


16 05 


1 50 


7 75 


10 17 


5 18 


8 50 


9 00 


90 


5 00 


151 86 


19 75 


81 95 


169 60 


liB 22 


14 00 


7 02 


12 67 


18 00 


5 00 


20 66 


88 70 


7 25 


14 21 



55 



X/ist qf Vouchers. — continued. 



D&te. 

1872. 
Sep. 17 
Sep. 17 
Sep. 21 
Sep. 21 
Sep. 21 
Sep. 27 
Sep. 27 
Sep. 28 
Sep. 80 
Sep. 80 



No. 



217 
218 
219 
220 
221 
222 



224 
226 
226 



To whom and Ibr wliat paid. 



H. Whitfield, em 

H. H. Rand, lanS rent 

A. Halverson, onions 

S. Arthur, eggs 

Stone & Kreuz, straw hats 

Jas. Finney, butter and chickens . . . 

Mrs. Flvnn, potatoes 

G. W. Hersee, tuning pianos 

Payroll for SeptemlSsr 

R. W. Burton, sundries 

Total 

Add amount of former indebtedness 

Total 



Amount. 



10 85 

15 00 

7 88 

2 91 

7 00 
13 80 

8 75 
400 

780 18 
12 40 



$14,501 06 
1,006 99 



116,607 65 



LAWS RELATING TO THE HOME. 



CHAPTER 121. . 

Section 1. Section one of chapter forty-nine of the general 
laws of 1870, entitled " an act to provide for a course of instruc- 
tion in the state normal schools for certain pupils of the Soldiers* 
Orphans' Home,'' is hereby amended by adding thereto, as fol- 
lows: ^^providedy that if the president of such normal school shall 
designate annually a number (not exceeding three) of such pupils 
who have been in attendance upon school two years, as manifest- 
ing unusual excellence in scholarship, and peculiar talent and 
qualifications for teaching, the board of trustees of the Soldiers' 
Orphans' Home may continue such pupils in such normal school 
until they have finished the course of instruction at such school. 

CHAPTER 149. 

Section 1. All children who are now or may hereafter be- 
come inmates of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home, shall become the 
wards of the state. 

Sbotion 2. The board of trustees of the Soldiers' Orphans' 
Home shall, by virtue of their office as trustees, be the legal 
guardians of all children of the home who now have no legal 
guardian, and said board are authorized to receive all previous 
back pay and bounties due or to become due to any child that 
is now or may hereafter become an inmate of the home, and 
shall invest the same upon good security, and hold it in trust for 
the child or children to whom such money belongs. And such 
trustees shall also from time to time, by and with the consent 
of the governor, bind any child that is an inmate of the home, 
for such time and for such purpose as such trustees shall deem 



n 

proper and shall appear to be for the best interest of the child 
or children so bound respectively: provided^ that in case any 
child, an inmate of said home, shall have a parent living, the 
consent of the parent shall be first obtained, unless such parent 
be insane or otherwise unfit to have the cdre, control and custody 
of such child. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of said board of trustees to 
ascertain the condition and circumstances of all the children 
who now are or may hereafter become inmates of the home, 
with a view, if deemed necessary for the best interests of such 
children or any number of them, of providing them with suit- 
able places, wHere they may be provided with the advantages 
of a good home, and taught some trade or occupation, the bet- 
ter to fit them for the duties of life; and said board shall keep 
and exercise a close supervision over the interests of any and 
every child during its minority, who may by virtue of this a€t 
be bound out, to the end that the terms of the conpact may be 
faithfully carried out and the interests of the child properly 
cared for; and said board is hereby authorized to institute in- 
quiries, visit the child or in any way by them deemed proper, 
ascertain that this is done; and in case of neglect or unjust 
treatment, they may remove any child and institute or cause to 
be instituted, such legal proceedings as may be necessary to 
recover damages, secure relief for any ill treatment received by 
any such child so bound out, against the person in whose charge 
such child has been placed. 

Section 4. The said board of trustees are hereby authorized, 
by and with the consent of the governor, to receive into the 
Soldiers' Orphans' Home, the orphan child or children of any 
soldier who served in the union armv in the late rebellion, which 
child or children are now residents of this state, under the 
same terms and regulations now in force relative to the admis- 
sion of orphans of soldiers who enlisted from this state, and any 
such child or children, when so admitted, shall be entitled to all 
the advantages and benefits of the home in common with the 
other inmates: provided^ however^ that no such child shall be 

5 — Orph. Homb. (Doc. 10.) 



«8 

Bcbnitted to the home when such admissioii would exclude the 
orphan child of a Wisconsin soldier. 

Sectiok 5. The board of trustees shall receive no compen- 
sation for their services, but all expenses necessarily incurred 
by them in the performance of their duties, shall be paid out of 
the state treasury on the warrant of the secretary of state. 

Section 6. There is hereby appropriated out of any money 
in the general fund not otherwise appropriated, a sum sufficient 
to carry out the provisions of this act. 

Section 7. Chapter 147 of the general laws of 1871, enti- 
tled ^^ an act to secure a proper guardianship of children in the 
Soldiers' Orphans' Home, and for other purposes," is hereby 
repealed, together with all other acts or parts of acts which con- 
flict with the provisions of this act. 

Section 8. This act shall take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage and publication. 



DOCUMENT No. ii. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



STATE PRISON COMMISSIONER 

OF THE 

STATE OF WISCONSIN 

For the Fiscal Tear ending September 30, 1872. 



Office of State Prison Commissioner, 

Waupun, Wis., Sept. 30, 1872. 

To His Excellency, C. C. Washburn, 

Governor of Wisconsin: 

Sir: — I have the honor to submit herewith my third annual 
report as Commissioner of the Wisconsin State Prison. 

There were present in the institution on the 30th of Septem- 
ber, 1871, one hundred and ninety-one (191) convicts. Total 
number present at this date, one hundred and eighty-six (186). 
Total number received during the year, ninety- four (94). Num- 
ber discharged, one hundred (100). Daily average, two hundred 
and seven-eighths (200 J). Of those discharged, fifty-eight (58) 
were on reduction of time ; on Governor's pardon to restore to 
citizenship, twenty (20) ; on Governor's pardon before expi- 
ration of sentence, thirteen (13) ; on President's pardon, two 
(2) ; on expiration of sentence, two (2) ; order of Supreme 
Court, one (1) ; escapes, two (2) ; deaths, two (2). 

In the prosecution of the usual and necessary business of the 



prison, and under full sanction of law, convicts are employed 
outside the walls for the purpose of loading and unloading cars, 
moving and piling lumber, etc.; none being so employed except 
such as in the judgment of the officers can be safely trusted, and 
having always an officer in charge. 

Among those so employed were Charles Myres and David 
High, the two prisoners who escaped, the former convicted of 
the crime of burglary at the Crawford county circuit court, 
November 29, 1870, and sentenced for a term of two years, and 
the latter convicted of the crime of maiming at the Grant 
county circuit court, Md,rch 22, 1872, and sentenced for a term 
of one year. Both escaped at the same time, about 8 oVlock 
on the morning of June 17th, by jumping from the wagon when 
on their way to Chester station, at a point about one and a half 
miles from the prison. There were with them, in the same 
wagon several other convicts, and all in charge of Mr. W. H. 
Shipman, a faithful and competent officer. No blame is properly 
chargeable to Mr. Shipman. On the contrary, great credit is 
due him for the coolness and judgment displayed in controlling 
the other men under his charge, and bringing them safely back 
to prison. 

Immediately upon the return of Mr. Shipman the alarm was 
given, and officers and citizens commenced a thorough search, 
which was continued through that day and the following night, 
but without avail. The thick foliage on the trees and bushes, 
and the nearly full grown grass and grain afforded a perfect 
cover both day and night, and conspired to render our search 
fruitless. On account of the short time remaining of their sen- 
tence, I deemed it best not to oifer a reward for their recapture, 
preferring, in this instance, to rely upon such means as the cir- 
culating of descriptive hand-bills, etc., among sheriffs in this 
and adjoining States. Notwithstanding our efforts to recapture 
them they are still at large. 

One other attempt to escape came near being successful, in 
fact was successful in the matter of getting away, to- wit: Jo- 
seph Edwards, employed as chore boy in office, scaled the wall 
on Sunday afternoon, and was absent until the following Thurs- 



day, when he was recaptured by the Sheriff of Dodge county, 
and is now here. In this case, I offered a reward of one hun- 
dred dollars, and paid the same to said Sheriff upon his delivery 
to me. 

With these exceptions, the conduct of the prisoners has been 
generally good. Cases of refractory conduct have been rare, 
and of a trifling character. Solitary confinement and the dark 
cell are the only means employed in punishing for disobedience, 
and I am happy to state these are not frequently necessary. £!x- 
perience confirms me in the opinion heretofore expressed, that 
it is much easier to maintain good order and discipline under 
the rule of kindness than by the use of harsh measures. Kind- 
ness and obedience will ever be found marching hand in hand^ 
in the prison as well as the family circle. Men are not essen- 
tially changed, the moment they are cast into prison. Putting- 
on the prison garb does not necessarily shut out humanity. 
Though fallen, they are yet men, and, so far as possible, should 
be treated as men. The question of prison discipline and the 
treatment of criminals before and after conviction has been very 
widely and ably discussed, both in this country and in Europe, 
during the last few years, but I have seen nothing in the pub- 
lished reports of any convention or penal institution wherein 
this subject has been stated more sensibly and clearly than in 
the report of the inspectors of the Western State Penitentiary 
of Pennsylvania, dated Dec. 31, 1871. They say: 

" It can be no longer doubted that the treatment and control 
of our criminal classes of various grades has become a vital 
question with our whole country. What shall be done with 
our convicts? is no longer merely a local question, agitating the 
magistrates and legislators of great cities. He who now passes 
by and shows a disposition to let ' crime cause and crime cure ' 
take their chances, does not do his whole duty as a citizen or a 
guardian of the true interests of society and humanity. It will 
not help the want of interest to talk and complain that the dan- 
gerous class is growing in number, daring and successful effort. 
It will not accomplish the end to say that the condition and sur- 
roundings of the criminal should be made more punitive and 



oppressive. Our penal code is severe enough. It is not the 
severity and rigor of a crime sentence, but the certainty of it 
that sways the deterrent sceptre. It is not to make the penal- 
ties more onerous and degrading that future legislation can do 
its most noble work. 

^' If there was more discrimination in drawing the indict- 
ments for the minor grades of criminal offenses; if there was 
some method of securing an earnest and careful inquiry into 
the circumstances before the case and the culprit are set before 
the court, and if, besides this, there was granted some room for 
judicial discretion under the light of all the circumstances, in- 
stead of arbitrarily fixing a maximum and minimum limit by 
which they are to be controlled, we have always thought that 
much higher benefits could be made to accrue. The same degree 
of guilt cannot attach to every man who is arraigned and con- 
victed, even though the act be the same or similar. There are 
external and internal conditions which may lessen or increase 
the moral turpitude very materially." 

I have in my mind a case that tends in some measure to illus- 
trate this idea, and parties are now serving sentence in this 
prison. Three persons were arrested for passing counterfeit 
money, all for the first offense, and the amount alleged to have 
been passed was one ten dollar bill. The case was chiefly man- 
aged on the part of the prosecution by the detective who made 
the arrest, and who seemed to be more solicitous to gain a rep- 
utation as a successful detective, rather than that exact justice 
should be done. 

One of the three, (and I believe the most guilty) was induced 
to make certain admissions, to be used in the trial as testimony 
against his comrades. That done, the detective could very 
plausibly advise the other two to plead guilty, and if they did 
so plead, the judge would probably give them the lightest sen- 
tence known to the law for such offenses. They concluded to 
act upon the advice, plead guilty, and received a sentence at 
the hands of the judge of seven years each, while the third one 
stood trial and was acquitted. 

Another prisoner received a one year sentence by the same 



court that had sentenced him two or three time before^ and 
when discharged a few days ago, it was for the fifth time from 
this prison. 

It would seem a wiser course to graduate the sentence some- 
what by the number of crimes committed, as well as by the 
magnitude of the offense for which the person may be on trial. 
It not unfrequently happens that subsequent events disclose 
that parties convicted of crime are more guilty or less guilty 
than appeared upon the trial. I am not aware that any pro- 
vision of law exists in any of the states for the shortening of a 
crime sentence except by pardon, or for lengthening^ it except 
by a new trial. 

The indeterminate sentence is suggested as a remedy for the 
many evils growing out of the present system, and is thought 
by many wise and philanthrophic men to be the only true sys- 
tem for governing and punishing the criminal classes. I think 
it is the opinion of almost every person in charge of any of our 
penal institutions, that some system might be devised whereby 
more equal justice could be meted out to those unfortunate per- 
sons who make up the population of our prisons. 

Passing from this subject to matters more directly connected 
with the institution under my charge, I have to say, that in good 
order, discipline and obedience, no prison in the country excels 
the Wisconsin state prison. The prisoners very soon learn, after 
coming here, that good conduct will invariably secure to them 
mild and humane treatment; hence a cheerful obedience to all 
the rules of the institution is secured and maintained. The 
absence of that downcast, dogged, dissatisfied look, so noticea- 
ble to all strangers visiting here, may be attributed mainly, if 
not wholly, to that cause. 

The legislature, at its last session, appropriated the sum of 
five hundred dollars, to be expended during the current year in 
the purchase of books for a prison library, with an annual ap- 
propriation of one hundred dollars thereafter. This is the first 
appropriation of any importance that has ever been made to the 
state prison for the purpose of establishing a library. Although 
long delayed, yet it is one step in the right direction, and c 



not fail in its good results to those intended to be benefited 
by it, and I can assure you will be appreciated by all. 

In pursuance of the action of the legislature, and deeming 
myself instructed by such action, I early in June directed the 
prison clerk, Capt. L. D. Hinkley, to correspond with a number 
of publishing houses, east and west, requesting a catalogue of 
publications, and the price at which they would furnish books. 
This correspondence drew responses from a large number of 
publishing houses, accompanied with catalogue and price list, 
and gave us a large and varied list from which to make our selec- 
tions, as well as to make favorable terms in the purchase. On 
account of the time necessarily consumed by the correspondence, 
and the delay on the part of publishers in furnishing books after 
selections had been made and the order given, only a part of 
the purchase has yet been received. I confidently expect the 
order to be filled in the next thirty days, and the entire list 
ready for inspection by the next legislative committee. 

The prison chapel which has so long been allowed to remain 
in an unfinished and dilapidated condition, is now fully com- 
pleted and furnished, and is in all respects well suited to the 
purpose for which it is intended. It is suggestive to the minds 
of the convicts that the State, in its dealings with them, has in 
view their present as well as their future welfare, and furnishes 
another and a strong incentive to good conduct. 

The State Board of Charities and Reform, in their annual re- 
port of last year, dwell somewhat at length upon the affairs and 
management of the state prison, and many things are therein 
suggested that seem to demand more than a passing notice on 
this occasion, and are well worthy of a careful consideration by 
the legislature. 

They regard the present manner of governing and managing 
the state prison as radically wrong, and recommend a change of 
the system now in force, in language as follows: '^ In view of 
the facts and considerations presented us, we would recommend 
an entire change in the system of government of the state 
prison, so that the system shall be virtually the same as that in 
other state institutions; the appointment of a board of trustees, 



managers or inspectors by the Governor, whose term of office, 
powers and duties shall be substantially the same as those of 
the trustees and managers of other public institutions.'' 

The reasons for their conclusions are given at length, and I 
will not recite them here, but would respectfully refer you to 
the report above noticed, on pages 158 to 166 inclusive. 

A similar recommendation was made by the visiting commit- 
tee of the legislature at its last session. A bill was introduced 
in the last general assembly, embodying substantially the views 
of the board of charities and the legislative committee, and 
intended to effect the change recommended, but for some cause, 
was not considered except in committee. It seems to be appar- 
ent that the conclusions arrived at by the board of charities on 
this subject are being very generally accepted by the people of 
the state, and that some change will sooner or later be adopted* 
A change that will give more permanency to the management of 
the institution, with the appointing power entirely uninfluenced 
by political or local considerations, selecting appointees from 
among the best business classes with direct reference for the 
position, would doubtless be beneficial in its tendencies, at 
least would be more satisfactory to the people, than the system 
now in force. Such a change would have my hearty approval. 

On the other hand, a change that would leave the inspectors 
or managers subject to removal at the pleasure of the appoint* 
ing power for political or local reasons, or to be appointed to fill 
some political gap, could not be otherwise than disastrous to the 
welfare of the institution and to the interests of the state. 

It is charged by the Board of Charities and Reform, in the 
report referred to, that I have exceeded the authority given by 
law, in employing a greater number of officers than the law con- 
templates or allows, and in paying, in several instances, more 
wages than is authorized by law. My attention was called to 
this matter some time in December last, by a letter from Hon. 
S. D. Hastings, secretary of said board, to which I answered by 
letter dated December 26, 1871, which letter appears in said re- 
port, on page 163, and to which I respectfully refer. 

The maximum of wages fixed by statute to certain employes 



8 

is, and for a long time has been, too low to secure competent 
help. The Commissioner has therefore found it absolutely ne- 
cessary for a number of years to pay certain mechanics and the 
prison clerk somewhat in excess of the wages established by 
law. This fact has been explained to the visiting committee 
each year, and by them sanctioned and approved. Hence I did 
not deem it important to call the attention of the legislature to the 
matter in any former report. I am now paying in excess of the 
amount fixed by statute, to the prison clerk, two hundred dollars 
per annum, making his salary twelve hundred, instead of one thou- 
sand dollars per year. To S. W. Cross, master mechanic; to E. D. 
Bent, superintendent in paint shop, and to G. J. Heiderman, over- 
seer and keeper in north room of chair shop, I am now paying each 
fifty cents per day more than the maximum fixed by law, making 
the wages of the two former three dollars, and of the latter two 
dollars and fifty cents per day. With one exception, and that 
for a short t\me only, these constitute the cases in which I have 
not followed the strict letter of the law in this regard during the 
past year. Permit me to state in this connection that I had no 
motive except to promote the best interests of the state, and of 
this institution, and I would respectfully ask that my acts may 
be sanctioned by the legislature about to assemble, and that 
such legislation be had as will authorize a continuance of the 
practice in such cases as in the opinion of the commissioner may 
be deemed absolutely necessary. 

In regard to the number of men employed as officers, I can 
only repeat what I said in my communication to the Board of 
Charities above referred to. I can readily imagine that to those 
who are entirely unused to prison discipline, it may seem un- 
necessary to employ so large and expensive a force to govern 
and manage two hundred prisoners. To keep them constantly 
in their cells, it would not be necessary. But Vhen it is remem- 
bered that by the terms of their sentence, as well as by every 
consideration of humanity, these men are to be employed at 
some kind of labor, as well as confined and guarded, I think the 
mystery will be satisfactorily explained. The expense per cap- 
ita for officers^ wages in keeping and guarding prisoners, will 



9 

necessarily be increased or diminished in the same proportion 
as the prison population increases or diminishes in numbers. 
The cost per capita of the prison population in this prison for 
officers' wages, including commissioner's salary, is about one 
hundred and eighteen dollars to each prisoner. The total cost 
would be but little less if the number of prisoners was but one- 
third the present average, and it would be but little more if the 
prison population was increased three fold. 

The financial result of the business for the current year has 
not fully met my expectations. The total gain in the cabinet 
and chair shop is 118,685.43, and in the other shops, |6,379.77; 
value of labor done upon building extension and in repairs, 
$2,302.26. 

The principal source from which revenue is derived is from 
the cabinet and chair shop. The small net gain from this depart- 
ment may be accounted for in part by the fact that a loss of 
$2,500 was sustained on account of damaged work that was 
thrown back upon my hands, for which there was no remedy, 
and which is properly chargeable to the business of the previous 
year. Another cause was a deficiency of stock suitable for 
some parts of the work; and the want of sufficient facilities for 
drying after stock was obtained, served materially to lessen our 
sales during the first six months of the current year. 

With a full stock of all kinds of lumber on hand, and with the 
increased facilities for drying furnished by the completion of the 
shop building, no such deficiency will be likely to occur during the 
coming year. I think it a safe estimate to fix the net earnings 
for the ensuing year at $25,000. The indebtedness for the cur- 
rent year is $20,733.72, and is accounted for by the increase of 
stock on hand above the inventory of last year, the cost of fin- 
ishing shop building and repairs above the estimates in my last 
annual report, and by the loss above referred to. 

Upon assuming the duties of this position, in January, 1870, 
the question of disposing of the manufactured goods to the best 
advantage, and at the same time not create an unhealthy com- 
petition with other manufacturers of the state, early engaged 
my attention. 



10 

Great complaint had been made prior to that time, by manu- 
facturers and dealers, that the state prison commissioner, being 
engaged in the same, or a similar kind of business, and employ- 
ing a traveling agent upon the same territory with them, was 
disastrous to their business, and forced upon them a competi- 
tion that the manufacturers of other commodities did not have 
to contend with. With a view to making some arrangement 
whereby the product of the prison might be disposed of without 
prejudice to others, I was, some time in February, 1870, invited 
to meet at the city of Watertown, several gentlemen who were 
largely engaged in the manufacture of chairs and furniture, at 
different points in this state, and whose interests were said to 
be unfavorably affected by the competition referred to. At this 
meeting, the subject was fully discussed in all its bearings, and 
I determined, if possible, to find a market outside of the state. 
This I soon after succeeded in doing, and since that time nearly 
all the chairs made in the prison shops have been shipped to 
Messrs. Abemathy Bros., Leavenworth, Elansas. 

The arrangement was somewhat an experiment with them as 
well as myself, and to induce these parties to take hold of it, 
extra inducements had to be offered. I am still satisfied the 
arrangement was a good one, and, although the price obtained 
for the goods has been below the average price obtained by 
other manufacturers, yet it has furnished a steady market for 
our entire product, and prompt payment for the same without 
any trouble or expense for selling or collecting. 

It is now no longer an experiment, it having been fully demon- 
strated, that the goods can all be sold in the market selected, 
and by the parties now handling them, and I confidently expect 
to realize an advance of ten per cent, on the present price, after 
the first of January next. 

With the exception of the iron doors in the partition walls 
and steam pipe for heating, the prison shop is now fully com- 
pleted and ready for occupation. In point of convenience and 
durability, it is not surpassed by any similar structure in the 
northwest. 

The necessary repairs upon the roofs of the prison buildings 



11 

proper have been quite extensive, and will, I think, protect and 
preserve them for two or three years to come, but the time is 
not very distant when nearly all the roofs of the older buildings 
will need new covering and some other repairs. 

The amount necessarily expended in completing the shop 
building and for general repairs exceeds the estimate in my 
last report in the sum of $3,104.06, and by that sum is in excess 
of the appropriation made for that purpose. The amount neces- 
sary to be appropriated for current expenses, officers' wages and 
necessary repairs for the coming year will be $25,000.00. The 
financial and statistical tables herewith presented are complete, 
and give a full and accurate history of the affairs of the prison 
in detail. These tables have been prepared with great care and 
labor by the Prison Clerk, Capt. L. D. Hinkley, and I trust will 
be carefully perused and considered by all who feel an interest 
in the history and welfare of this institution. 

I take pleasure in referring you to the accompanying report 
of the prison chaplain, Rev. Henry Drew. He has been con- 
stantly at his post of duty, and has had great influence for good 
upon the minds of all those who have been placed especially 
under his charge. I ask for it a careful perusal. 

I desire also to call attention to the report of the prison phy- 
sician. Dr. H. L. Butterfield, and especially to that part relating 
to the insane convicts here. Most of these cases are probably 
incurable, while some, with suitable treatment, could doubtless 
be materially benefited, if not permanently cured. 

The female department is in charge of Mrs. Martha Cliff, who 
is discharging her duties to my entire satisfation. The number 
of inmates in this department is seven. 

To the deputy warden, Hon. B. H. Bettis, and to the prison 
clerk, Capt. L. D. Hinkley, my most sincere thanks are due for 
the faithfulness, efficiency and energy displayed in the perform- 
ance of their varied and arduous duties. 

A similar acknowledgement is also due to the subordinate 
officers and guards as connected with me. All have performed 
their respective duties with an apparent desire to promote the 



12 

hannonious working of the official machinery of the institution, 
and the interests of the state. 

In conclusioif, I tender my sincere thanks to the citizens of 
Waupun and vicinity for the promptness with which they have 
responded to every call for assistance to re-capture escaped 
convicts. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

GEO. F. WHEELER, 

State Prison Commisioner. 



FINANCIAL AND STATISTICAL TABLES. 



Part First. 

FINANCIAL— 

« A."— ACCOUNTS. 

" B."— INVENTORY. 

Part Second. 

POPULATION STATISTICS. 



FINANCIAL. 



CASH ACCOUNT. 



BECBIFT8. 

Balance from 1871 

From State Treasurer 

United States for board of convicts 

Chair and Cabinet shop 

Shoe shop 

Tailor shop 

Blacksmith shop 

Stone shop 

Yard 

Visitors 

Outstanding accounts of 1869 

Outstanding accounts of 1870 

Outstanding accounts of 1871 

Interest 

Convicts on Deposit 

Loan 

Sundries 



DISBUBSEMENTS. 

Current Expenses — 

Subsistence » 

Hardware, stoves, kitchen and cell-room uten 

sils and furniture 

Tobacco 

Lights 

Wood 

Clothing and tailor's shop stock 

Merchandise, bedding, etc 

Newspapers, printing, etc 

Hospital stores 

Postage and telegraphing 

Revenue stimps 

Traveling expenses 

Mileage 

Forage 

Sundries 

Machinery and tools 

Stock, blacksmith shop 

Stock, shoe shop 

Stock, chair shop 

Teaming for stone shop 

Building account 



$150 00 

68. 093 47 

1,601 28 

40,670 81 

406 25 

144 15 

148 27 

2,571 00 

199 49 

480 75 

92 75 

824 20 

5,389 55 

17 18 

275 50 

1,700 00 

286 12 



$12, 637 88 

452 57 

250 74 

390 29 

3,385 79 

2,303 25 

295 60 

367 55 

143 04 

233 99 

23 05 

113 60 

394 25 

824 78 

61 60 

2,098 55 

466 20 

265 50 

26,082 44 

9 36 

10,904 38 



$113,446 17 



15 
CorSh Account — continued. 



Current Expenses-— continued. 

Indebtedness for 1871 

Loan 

Interest 

Discharged convicts 

Convicts' deposit 

Officers services 

Arresting escaped convicts. ....... 

Exchange 

Lawj'er*s collection fee 

Burial lot 

Cash on hand 



124,528 e9 

1,700 00 

964 54 

475 00 

805 23 

28,458 05 

112 00 

15 05 

25 00 

100 00 

68 20 



1118,446 17 



16 



« A."— ACCOUNTS. 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF PURCHASES, PAYMENTS 

AND INDEBTEDNESS. 

SUBSISTENCE. 



^eef 

Butter 

Beans 

Beets 

Chickens 

Cabbages 

Cranberries 

Eggs 

Flour 

..do 

..do 

. .do. .graham, etc.. . 



Ginger 

Groceries (miscell's) 

Hops 

Indigo , 

Mutton , 

Mustard , 

Matclies 

Onions 

Potatoes 

Pork 

Pork 

Peas, split 

Pepper 

Rice 

Rice 

Syrup 

Salt 

Sugar 

Soap 

Starch 

Teas 

Turnips , 

Vinegar 

Yeast cake 

Board, sick convicts 

in hospital 

Freight 

Cartasres and pkgs. 
Sundries 



08,960 lbs. 

5,050 lbs. 

111} bu. 

4 bu. 

103i lbs. 

208 

2 gts. 

10 cfoz 

440 bis. 

44 bis. 

01 bis. 

1,002 lbs. 



44 lbs. 



16 80 to 17 00 
14 to 20 
1 00 to 2 25 

35 

00 



15 
5 73 
5 72 

4 72 



36i. 



$2,840 30 
251 68 
420 52 
42 32 



101|lbs. 

1 lb. 
320 lbs. 

2 lbs. 
30 bxs 

21 bu. 
1,311 bu. 

182 lbs. 

16 bis. 

706 lbs. 

103 lbs., 

87 lbs.) 

1,167 lbs. 

801 gls. 

22 bis. 
22 lbs. 
58 lbs. 
4li lbs. 

170 lbs.! 

10 bu.l 

830^ fr\S. 
10^ doz 

130w.8d. 



25 to 



50 



05 



86 



40 



35 to 

1 00 ... 
48 ... 
00 ... 

15 50 ... 
04 ... 
24 to 

12 

00^ 

55 to 62i 

2 25 to 3 00 

IH 

07i 

12ito 15 

7(H 

50 

15 to 10 



2*2 



2 00 



Amounts paid per cash account 

Settled by sales from shops and yard 
Balance unpaid 



16,608 29 

017 55 

200 43 

1 40 

17 41 

10 40 

20 

1 50 



3,072 82 
16 05 
44 71 
55 22 
2 00 
16 45 

1 30 
10 75 
21 00 

624 72 
16 34 

248 00 

28 24 

26 20 

4 44 

110 72 

480 44 
58 85 

2 53 

4 85 

5 63 
136 85 

5 00 
61 06 
12 80 

278 86 

340 04 

18 62 

4 80 



M3,556 87 



^2,637 88 
153 10 
765 80 



17 
" A." — Statement of Pu rchasesj Payments^ etc. — con. 



HARDWARE, STOVES, KITCHEN AND CELL-ROOM TOOLS, 

UTENSILS, ETC. 



Axes 

Ash pails 

Broom 

Broom brushes 

Baskets 

Brushes, W. W 

. .do. . . .scrub 

. .do. . . .horse 

. .do. . . .shayiug 

..do.... dust 

..do.... clothes 

Butter tubs 

Boxes 

Bath brick 

Basins 

Cups 

Copper boiler 

..do... heater 

. .do. . .washbasins . . . . 
. .do. . .water traps . . . . 

Combs 

Carpet sweeper 

Coffee mill 

Coffee pots 

Chain 

Curry combs 

Cake tins 

Corks, clothes pins, etc 

Dish pans 

Drip pans.... 

Dusters 

Egg beater 

Eyelets 

Filter 

Faucets 

Hoes 

Hone 

J115 

Knives and forks 

..do do 

Kerosene tank 

. .do cans 

Kettle 

Kettle ears 

Key blank 

Lanterns 

Lantern globes 

Lamps 

Lamp chandelier 

Lamp trimmer 

Ladle 



Molasses gates 
Manure fork. . 



M . • • . 

4 .... 

28 doz. 

2idoz. 

8 .... 

o . • • . 

15 ... 

6 . . . . 
10 .... 

1 .... 

1 .... 

o . . . . 

6 . • . . 

2 .... 
74 . . . . 

201 .... 
8 .... 
1 .... 
3 
8 
5 
1 
1 
2 

8 
18 



II 12Kc.... 



2 00 to 2 25 



3 20 



1 15 



75 
50 



doz. 



doz. 



lbs, 



4 
2 
8 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
4 
2 



1 25 to 1 88 



box 



doz 



2 

1 
152 
1 



8 ... 
8 ... 
6 ... 
2 ligU 



8 
1 



2 00 



12 25 
5 45 

58 50 



5 

4 



75 
70 



25 65 

7 
5 
1 



20 

75 

40 

75 

50 

6 00 

8 00 

23 

18 50 



41 97 


82 50 


900 


20 40 


8 75 


688 


4 60 


1 25 


1 25 


1 85 


205 


1 55 


8 62 


9 50 


85 


6 90 


1 00 


250 


1 25 


87 


1 65 


8 50 


25 


10 06 


1 10 


8 00 


1 00 


1 00 


5 82 


25 


840 


95 


6 57 


6 00 


50 


75 


6 05 


1 25 



2— St. Peis. 



(Doc 11.) 



18 



" A.'. — Statement qf JPur chases^ Pyments^ €^c.— continued. 
Hardmare^ Stoveg and {Tifwitfl*— continaed. 



Mop sticks 

Pails 

Pails, tin 

Pans fdust) 

Pans, iron 

Padlock 

Rope 

Bope, sash 

Bazors 

Repairing tin ware. 

Bakes 



J 



4 .... 

4)ti doz 

4 . . . • 

1 .... 

2 .... 
1 .... 

22 
4 
8 



lbs. 
lbs. 



Bepairing stove drums (cell room) 

Stoves, (Dictator) 

Stoves, (sheet iron) 

Stove zinc and board 

Stove pipe 

Stove pipe 

Stove pipe and elbows 

Stove blacking 

Stove and pipe 

Scythes and snaths 

Scythe stone 

Spectacles 

Spectacles, goggles 

Shears 

Shovel 

Shovel scoop 

Spade 

Spade fork 

Spittoons 

Sprinklers 

Selves 

Spoons . . . . 

Spring balance ; 

Steel yard 

Strainer 

Slop pail and tub 

Snaps, (harness) 

Tea pots 

Tunnels'. ,,.', 

Thimbles 

Wringers (clothes) 

Wire cloth 

Wire 

Water pots 

Water pots repairs 



Amount paid per cash account. 

Settled by sale from shop 

Balance unpaid 



1 
1 



1 

1. 

3 

65 

31 



lbs. 
lbs. 



3 

1 
2 



doz 



pair 
pair 
pair 



30 

1 
1 

1 ... 

1 ... 

1 ... 

3 ... 

3 ... 

3 ... 
5}^ doz 

1 !!! 

1 ... 



II 15 



80 



90 
25 



2 25 



2 
2 
1 
2 



doz 



71^ lbs. 
2 ... 



11 00 

12 85 
460 

45 
650 

20 
660 
250 
3 50 
3 95 



1 15 
15 80 
15 00 
10 00 

5 17 



5 
2 



61 

77 

98 

4 59 

39 75 

450 

10 

19 50 

1 50 

65 

1 75 

1 75 

1 75 

1 50 

1 80 

2 50 



1 05 


540 


300 


65 


75 


3 50 


200 


2 95 


38 


70 


17 75 



86 

94 

6 00 

35 



1587 17 



1452 57 

22 50 

112 10 



19 
"A." — Seatement of Purchases^ PaymerUs^ etc, — continued. 



TOBACCO. 



Plug. 
Snuff. 



Amount paid per cash account 

Settled by sales 

Balance unpaid 



l,2d4Mlb8 
1 & 
9;^&s 




1 00 



f715 97 

50 

25 



1725 72 



¥250 74 
474*98 



LIGHTS. 



Wicks . . . 
Chimneys 
Burners . . 
Kerosene. 
. . • do . 
. .. .do .. . 
. . . .do . . . 
....do ... 



Lamps 



t 



8 

25 

7 

47 

61J 

476 

478 

475J 



eross 
aoz . 
doz . 
gals, 
gals, 
gals, 
gals, 
gals. 



fl 



Amount paid per cash account. 
Balance unpaid 



80 
23 
22 



116 45 
18 45 
109 48 
105 16 
102 24 



|6 0e 
81 70 
11 ^ 



861 78: 
5 5& 



1406 47 



1890 2» 
16 IS 



WOOD. 



Maple . . . . 

Oak 

Basswood 
Mixed.... 



804^T<^ds. 
406 cds. 
102^ cds. 
tm% cdfl. 



|4 85to5 00 

8 92 

2 68 

8 82 



Amount paid per cash account 

Settled by sales from shops and yard. 
Balance unpaid 






11,828 17 

1,594 14 

270 41 

864 07 



18,556 79 



18,885 79 

111 04 

59 96 



20 
" A." — Statement of Purchases^ Payments^ €^c.— continued. 



CLOTHING AND STOCK FOR TAILOR SHOP. 



Batting (cotton) . . . . 

Buckles 

Battons 

Beeswax 

Cloths, gray 

Cloths, Scotch cass 
Cloths, striped cass 
Cloths, cassimere . , 

Canyas 

Cambric 

Coat lining 

Crayons 



Denims 

Flannel 

Hickory 

Hats 

Hats, straw 

Haircloth 

Needles 

Oil (machine) 

Sheep skins (mittens). . 

Sheeting 

Socks 

Sewing silk 

Silesia 

Satteen 

Ticking 

Tape 

Thread, cotton 

Thread, linen 

Thread, linen 

Twist 

Underclothes — 
Drawers and wrappers 
Drawers and wrappers 

Velvet collars 

Waterproof 

Wiggans 

Wadding 

Yarn, woolen 

Yarn, woolen 

Yam, woolen 

Sundries 



67 lbs... 

3 gross . 

52J^ gross . 



,4971^ 
193 jsf 

137 



20 



;^ 



yards. 

yards . 

yards, 

yards 

yards 

yards, 

yards. 



25K 



162 yards. 

105 J^ yards. 

684>^ yards. 

5y^2 dozen. 

2 dozen. 

3 yards . 



4885^ 

108 J^ 
2 

95M 
9 
1084 

2 

4 



dozen 
yards, 
dozen, 
spools, 
yards, 
yards . 
yards . 
balls . 
dozen, 
dozen, 
lbs... 
spools. 



1 20 
1 25 
1 50 
1 33 



30 



20 to 25 
29 

17 to 21 
9 03 
2 60 



6 50to7 00 

14 to 16 

1 75to2 00 



17 to 20 



30 



14 dozen. 
4t}^ dozen. 

3 

5 yards . 

49 yards . 
10 sheets. 

50 lbs . . . 
50 lbs . . . 
50 lbs . . . 



70 to 80 
7j to 87 



8 00 
8 76 
1 00 



16 to 20 

05 

1 05 

1 15 

1 10 



Amount paid, per cash account 

Settled by sides from shops and yard 
Balance unpaid 



117 32 
2 65 

10 47 
1 05 

1,796 70 

241 56 

37 87 

184 17 

1 22 
21 

6 00 
50 

37 10 
30 65 

135 98 
48 90 

5 00 

2 32 
12 57 

1 55 
24 25 
72 41 
41 24 

6 15 
20 17 

1 20 

28 73 

40 

79 28 

11 18 
4 15 
4 80 

112 00 

38 00 

3 00 
6 30 
8 20 

50 
52 50 
57 50 
55 00 
47 29 



$3,247 94 



12. 303 26 
477 61 
467 08 



21 
"A" — Statement of Purchases^ Payments^ etc, — continued. 



MERCHANDISE. 



Blankets 

Blankets 

Bed spreads 

Binding 

Crash, (towel ing) , 

Counterpanes ... 

Flannel , 



{ 



Gloves 



Gingham 

Hooks and eyes 

Muslin 

.Prints 

Poplin 

Rubbers 

Sheeting , 

Scarfs 

Ticking 

Cartages and sundries. 



6i prs white, 60| lbs. 

75 prs gray, 484^ lbs. 

6 



844 yds. 

1 at.. 

1 at.. 

7 yds. 

8 prs. 
11 prs. 

4iyds. 



10 yds. 

20 yds. 

5 yds. 

8 prs. 

818 prs. 

5 

494 yds. 



Amount paid per cash account 

Settled by sales from shops and yard. 
Balance unpaid 



II 25. 
1 20. 
8 75. 



l4tol8i 

5 75 

8 75 

1 85 

2 00 

50 

18 



16. 



9itol4t 
16 to 80 



110 94 

581 40 

28 50 

70 

59 77 

9 50 

9 46 

11 68 

77 

12 

80 

50 

80 

3 40 

44 74 

2 10 

119 66 

18 66 



1 
2 



$900 85 



$295 60 

6 52 

598 28 



NEWSPAPERS, PRINTING, ETC. 



Newspapers , 

Printing and advertising 

Printing views of prison 

Binding for library 

Paper 

Slate pencils 

Geography 

Ink 

Stamp ribbon 

Amount paid per cash account 
Balance unpaid 



$98 00 

220 60 

38 00 

14 30 

5 15 

1 50 

1 50 

80 

1 00 



$870 75 



$867 55 
8 20 



22 
"A.*' — Statement qf Purchases^ Payments^ etc. — continued. 



HOSPITAL ACCOUNT. 



Drugs and medicines 

Other hospital supplies 

Total 

Amount paid per cash account 
Balance unpaia 



1165 69 
16 59 



1182 28 



1143 04 
89 24 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Postage and telegraphing 
Revenue stamps 



Trayeling expenses — 

To Cincinnati, Ohio 

To Fond du Lac, Wisconsin 
To Madison, Wisconsin . . . 

To Tiffin, Ohio 

To Milwaukee, Wisconsin . , 
To Portage, Wisconsin ...... 



150 00 

1 00 

12 25 

81 50 

6 75 

12 10 



Commissioner's credits — ^mileage and expenses 

Teaming 

Library , 



Teaming settled by sales. 
Library balance unpaid. , 



Total Am'tB. 



$233 99 
28 05 



AmHPikld. 



$283 99 
24 05 



1394 25 
500 00 
284 45 



1118 60 



$394 25 



$500 00 
284 45 



23 

"A." — Statement qf Purchases^ PaymentSy etc. — continued. 



FORAGE. 



Bran 


1,000 pounds. 
1,880 pounds. 

723 bushels 
2,580 pounds. 
12^ton8.... 
^}i tons 

043 bushels 
13 weeks . . 


$0 08 ... 
01 ... 

41 vW... 


$8 00 
18 80 




Bran 






$21 80 
801 55 


Com 




Feed 


Oik... 




29 20 


Hay 


WA^g ... 

6 00 ... 

7 12}^... 

82 to 87}^. 


75 55 
240 42 




•*^*"j ............. 

Hay 




**'v 


815 07 
824 52 


Oats 




Pasturing one cow 
Straw 




7 80 


8 loads . . . 




1 59 

2 50 




Straw 


14 loads . . . 








1 dftv tAam xrnrlc . 




47 75 
8 00 


A Threshinir oats . . . 














$1,051 09 


Amount paid per c 

flfitt.lftd hv flftlftfl froi 


ash account .^. 


$824 78 


m flhnna sltxA vard . . 




• 


114 82 


Bl|||^n^*r6 unpaid .....*. .T«.,t..tT..tt.rr--tT--Tt-Ttr--t«rT-' 


111 49 







NOTE. 



Of the above amount there was sold to 
CfOmmissioner 

Straw used for bedding, ten loads at $2.50 



Balance fed to stock on account of state 
as below 



Com for hops, 728 bushels 

Ground feed for hogs, 2,580 pounds 
Hay, oats, etc., for horses and cow. . 



$250 00 
25 00 



$275 00 



$801 55 

29 20 

445 84 



$776 09 



$776 09 



24 

"A." — Statement of Pur chases^ Payments^ etc. — continued. 



CURRENT EXPENSE SUNDRIES. 



Ammunition 

Clock repairs 

Combs 

Crockery — ewer, basin, etc 

castor, tumblers, etc< 

bowl 

plates, tea cups, etc . 

Eyelets 

Harness rep 

Harness oil 

Pails 

Repairing revolvers 

Seeds 

Seed potatoes 

Spectacles, etc 



Amount paid per cash account. 



2 doz 



2 doz 



$2 15 
2 30 
2 00 
8 00 

1 75 
50 

2 58 
2 50 
7 19 
1 40 

6 28 
5 50 

15 92 

7 50 
1 08 



$61 60 



161 60 



25 



" A." — Statement of Purchases^ Payments^ etc, — continued. 

MACHINERY, TOOLS, ETC. 



Belting, rubber A% inch 

..do 1% inch 

Leather 4 inch 

. .do. . double. 3)^ inch 

. .do 3 inch 

..do 2 inch 

Bitts, machine % inch 

..do ^ inch 

. .do % inch 

Small 



Brad awls 

Belt hooks , 

Babbitt metal 

Crimp machine, shoe 

Clamps 

Copper 

Crucibles 

Chisels, soc. firmers 

Emery wheels, 9y4x%4. 

do 9%x9i. 

do lOJ^xJl. 

do lOJix^. 

do 10}|x%. 



26 ft. 

50 ft. 

50 ft. 

476 ft. 

68 ft. 

J^doz 

1 doz 

2 doz 
74 doz 



10 pap 
88A lbs. 



2 

12U lbs. 
6 



sett 



Files, assorted 

Grindstones 

Grinding machine. . . 
Glue kettles, copper. 

do 

do 



Gouges 

Hostt , 

Hand axe , 

Hammers , 

Hollow auger 

Knives 

Shoe 

Lathe, 18>^ inch. 

.. .do.. .10^ inch. 

...do... 18^ inch, 

...do... 11^ inch. 



Lace leather, for belts 

Mandrils, stretcher machine 

Needles 

Oil stones, Ouichita 

do 

Oil cans 

Oil tanks 

Oil gate 

Oilers 

. . . .do 

Planer knives 



lbs. 



1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 

221 
288 
1 
8 
1 
1 



6 

10 ft. 
1 
8 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



l}i lbs. 
50 lbs. 

2 
1 
2 

1 sett 



10 42 
12 
46 

80 

24 



1 50 
75 



8 75 



4 11 
4 00 



8 00 



51 



10 00 



1 85) 
1 20^ 



15 00 



38)^ 



(6 93 
8 12 
28 00 
40 00 
151 01 
16 82 



flO 00 

9 24 

21 00 

19 73 



$7 50 
5 15 

8 22 

9 80 
5 65 



9 00 

85 

1 00 



141 62 
43 59 
41 84 
25 03 



$240 88 



59 97 
53 
14 86 
13 55 
26 00 

8 00 

9 18 

6 45 

7 50 



36 82 

62 08 

5 86 

15 00 



10 35 
2 50 
5 10 



1 
4 
1 
1 



50 
10 
25 
10 
25 



151 58 

36 35 

20 00 

10 

61 85 

6 70 
80 00 

75 
. 50 
800 

7 00 



26 

" A." — Statement of Purchcises^ Payments^ etc, — con. 

Machinery^ Tools, «fc.— contintied. 



Pamp column 

Pump (iron) 

Pomp (tin) 

Pnmp (force) 

Pulley 

Paintmill 

Pipe vise 

Pipe^taps and dies, |, i, f , 1, 1} li, 2. . 
Pipe stocks 



Less discount 

Pipe wrenches 

Pipe cutters (Standwood) 

Packing lead 

Packing rubber 

Packing soapstone 

Pipe and valves 

Planes 

Plane irons 

Putty knives 

Re^aiTS — 

Boiler 

New cross head for engine 

Hammering saws 

Pump, bail 

Of iron pump 

Of mach'y per bill Filer & Stowell. 

. . . .do. do . .P. D. Whitney 

. . . .do do . .M. J. Althouse 

do do ..W. Oliver 

Rules, (2 feet) 24 

Saws (circular)' 30 inch 

Saws (circular) 80 inch 

Saws (circular) 18 inch 

Saws, web 

Shoe tools, awls 

Shoe tools, knives 

Shoe tools, counter-float 

Shoe tools, heel shave 

Shaper 

Sewmg machine 

Shaves 

Spoke shave 

Screw (bench) 

Strainer (paint) 

Tape lines 

Varnish cup 

Peg wheel 

Freights 



IMdoz. 
1 .... 
1 .... 
1 .... 
1 .... 



7 50 



S^lbs . 
.375^1b8 . 
2 



1 



8 



lbs 



5 

4 

10 



12« 
56 
80 
40 



1 .... 

1 .... 
1 .... 
8>idoz. 



1 
1 
5 
1 
1 



2 



3 40 



80 and 75 



15 00 
40 60 
17 25 



$72 85 
3 40 



1 



14 80 

15 75 



} 



150 00 

55 00 

250 

112 50 

25 

23 50 



69 45 

17 00 
32 78 

4 06 
21 21 

5 00 
25 

86 10 



5 
2 
2 



88 
20 
83 



56 00 
»4 97 

5 35 

1 50 

11 00 
464 34 

92 71 
140 40 

6 78 

12 70 

30 55 

5 00 
28 95 

2 75 
90 

2 25 

85 

325 00 

70 00 

6 70 
75 

1 50 
50 

1 55 

25 

35 

12 05 



Amount paid per cash account 

Settled by sales from shops and yard. 
Balance unpaid 



2,709 82 



$2,098 55 

' 116 60 

404 77 



■as 



aai 



27 



" A." — Statement of Purchases^ Paymenta^ etc, — continued. 



STOCK FOR BLACKSMITH SHOP. 



Axles, (iron) 

Axles, clips 

Bolts and nuts 

Borax 

Bolster plates 

Buggy circle 

Coal (bituminous) 

Cbarcoal 

Copper 

Iron 

Nails, (horse shoe. 

Riyets 

Steel 

Steel, springs 

Sleigh shoes 

Skeins, (wagons). . < 

Washers 

Whippletree hooks. 
Horseshoeing 



m sett 



875 

lbs . . 
5 

1 

5)^ tons. 

30 bu . . 

2)4 lbs . . 

4,311M lbs . . 

2031 lbs . . 

low lbs . . 

451}^ lbs . . 

71 ij lbs . . 

8 setts. 

8 setts. 

1 lb... 

8 setts. 



49 Ji 
75 



■ J. 



18 00 
20 



74 
81 
26 
20@25 
22 
8 25 
$4to5 00 



Amount paid per cash account 
Balance unpaid 



Ill 
2 



76 
24 



15 52 
445 

8 75 
2 50 

71 60 

6 00 

1 26 

819 18 

9 16 
5 40 

112 68 

16 68 
9 75 

14 00 
80 
65 
75 



1 
8 



1610 45 



466 20 
144 26 



STOCK FOR STONE SHOP. 
Teaming, $250 00 

Amount paid per cash account 9 86 

Settled by sales from shops and yard 240 64 



28 
" A *' — Statement of Purchases^ Payments^ etc. — continued. 



STOCK FOR SHOE SHOP. 



Awls 

Bristles 

Boots 

Eyelets 

Lasts 

Leather, Sole, oak 

Sole 

Upper 

French kip . . , 

American kip . 

French calf . . . 

American calf. 

American calf. 

Morocco 

Russet calf.... 

Roans 

Linings 

Pink and bark. 

(Lace) 

Measure straps 

Nails 

Nails, shoe 

Oil.; 

Oil, neatsfoot 

Over shoes 

Pegs ^ 

Rasps 

Shoes 

Silk 

Thread 

Thread 

Tacks (lasting) 

Wax 



Webbing. 
Sundries 



4,^ gross 
H gross 

1 pair . 

4 bxs . . 

6 pair . 
106 J^ lbs . . 
8853i lbs . . 

312 ft 

16Ji lbs . . 
87M lbs . . 
41)? lbs . . 
ri% lbs . . 
83^ lbs . . 

%% doz. . 

1 doz.. 

IK doz. . 
11 

1 

2 

2 
14 
48 



doz. 



pap. 
lbs . 

IJ^gal.. 
10 

5 
54 

2 

1 

1 

8 
26 

1 



gal., 
pair 
qts . 



pair . 
spool . 
fbs .. 
balls, 
gross 



33 to 
25 to 
1 
1 



50 
44 
34 
26 
60 
001 



2 20to 2 30 
1 35 
1 30 



Amount paid per cash account 

Settled by sales from shops and yard, 
Balance unpaid , 



11 
2 00 
1 35 



•I 



45 



15 10 

2 50 

3 50 
85 

3 00 

48 86 

296 14 

79 98 

26 00 
87 83 
92 71 
23 62 

108 39 

27 50 

28 50 
19 00 

8 50 

8 75 

5 50 

20 

1 35 
5 28 

2 50 
13 50 
11 50 

3 08 
90 
50 
35 
05 

3 70 

25 

1 36 

1 25 

28 68 



2 
1 
4 



1955 68 

265 50 

9 50 

680 68 



-_ — tea 



29 

" A," — Statement of Purchases^ Payments^ etc, — continued. 



STOCK FOR CHAIR AND CABINET SHOP. 



Lumber — 

Bolts — ^maplc and elm. . . 

Plank do 

Basswood 

Butternut 

Oak 

Cherry 

Black walnut 

Pine 

Paints, oils, varnish, etc — 

Asphaltum 

Alcohol 

Benzine 

Benzine 

Brushes — paint 

...do varnish 

. . .do sash 

. . .do camel hair 

. . .do striping pencils 

...do various 

Chrome yellow . . 

Chamois skins... 

Dutch metal 

Glue 

Japan (turp) 

Japan (benzine) . 

Lampblack 

. . .do 

Lead (white) 

Lead (red) 

Logwood 

Ochre (yellow) . . 

Oil—lard 

Oil — fine en 

Oil — linsee 

Puttjr 

Pamice stone... . 

Prussian blue 

Paris green 

Paint (oak) 

Pyrol igneous acid 

Rose pink 

Sponges 

Spts. turpentine.. 

Varnish— No. 1, furniture 

...do do 

. . .do flowing 

. . .do do 

...do shellac .... .. . 

. . .do shellac, im. . . . 

...do union 

...do barrels 



^ 



me 




504,828 

640,080 

6,720 

8,117 

615 

14. 817 

83,620 



c's 
eet 
feet 
feet 
feet 
feet 
feet 
feet 



55 gals 
23^gals 
285^gals 
l,427)igals 
5 doz 
5^doz 
25^ doz 



$4 00to 18 00.. 

14 87 

1194 

2240 

12 31 

15 26 

45 00 

11 02J^ 



1 10 



25 ... 

18 ... 

18 00 to 18 25. 

12 00 to 22 50. 

225 



( 



25 lbs 
8 

10 pks 

6,115 lbs 

642 gals 

1,065 gals 

657 lbs 

8 lbs 

1,400 lbs 

30 lbs 

772 lbs 

4,090 lbs 
222i^gals 

402 gals 

470 gals 
654Mlbs 

27 lbs 



1 bbl 
1,702 lbs 



671Ji^gals 

1,020 gals 

04 gals 

144 gals 

1 gal 

45J^gals 

25 gals 

25 gals 



83 .. 

75 .. 
2 00 

10 to 
1 15A .. 

75 to 
OJi .. 

m}4 .. 

13 00 .. 
16 

2Kto 
5 .. 
80 to 
60 to 
02 to 

^% .. 
16M .. 



83. 



85. 



3. 



00. 
00. 
05. 



14Ji 



68 to 
1 25 

1 30 

2 75 



1 05. 



8 75 
1 40 
1 00 



$4,016 08 

7. 528 62 

7,650 47 

151 12 

88 37 

80 
666 77 
401 01 

60 50 
6 25 

328 35 

80 25 

80 85 

6 63 

6 37 

5 67 
10 77 

8 24 

6 00 

20 00 
1,540 08 

744 07 

823 66 

62 41 

1 13 
182 00 

483 

21 88 
251 77 
102 68 
280 08 
437 80 

30 47 

445 

8 40 

3 30 

37 

14 50 

246 47 

32 47 

521 35 

1,286 25 

122 20 

806 00 

8 38 

170 63 

35 00 

25 00 

65 00 



/ 



30 



"A." — Statement of Purchases^ Payments^ 6<c.— continued. 

Stock Chair 5A<jf>— continued. 



Paints, etc.— continued. 

YennilUon, Eng. an d A . . 
....do Chinese 

Whiting 

. . . .do 

Whiting 

Wood filling 

Yellow — brandon 

Gane and cane work — 

Cane — ^rattan 

Cane work at Ind. 8ch*l . . . 
Upholstery — 

binding— mattrass 

Buttons 

Cambric 

Carpet 

Carpet — ^Brussels 

Enameled 

Gimp 

Hair— curled 

Hair 

Hair cloth 

Moss 

Nails — ^porcelain heads 

Plush 

Reps 

Spring 

Sheeting 

Sheeting 

Ticking 

Tow 

Velveteen 

Webbing 

Webbing, four inch 

Chair Hardware — 

Brads and clout nails 

Butts 

Bolts— flush 

Casters 

Emery 

Emery stone 

Escutcheons 

Hat-tree pans 

Locks — various 

Nails 

Nails 

Nails — shoe 

Screws 

Tacks 

Wire cloth 

Sundries — 

Bedsteads 

Cutages and packages. . . . 

Chalk 



18 lbs 



^K 



3 



688 lbs 
40 lbs 
2 qts .. 
4 gals . . 
,000 tt>s... 



8,050 m 



t^ 



N 75 . 

2%. 



57 less dis. 



5 gross. 
4 gross. 

46 yards. 

7 yards . 
82 yards. 
86 yards . 

4 gross. 

445 lbs... 

10 yards . 

25 yards . 
255 &s... 

2 m 

6^yards . 

120 yards . 

600 fi>s.. 

7d3i^yards . 

73}»|yards . 

115)|yards . 

712 tt>s... 

14 yards . 

26 pieces 

6 pieces 



159 paps 
176 pairs 
2{ doz . 
128 setts. 



gross. 



6 
12 
49} doz . . 

7 kegs . 

68 fts... 

14 tt>s. . . 

439 gross. 

17X3oz . . 

4 yards 



20 



1 
1 



2 

1 



25 to 40... 

10 

33 

40 

40i 

31 

50 to 65... 

95 

25 

1^ 






g 27 

1 25 to 2 60.. 
12 tol2Ji .. 

10 \ 

4 to 4>i.. 



80 to 85. . ? 
2 00 f 



8 25 



$8 88 

2 51 
17 20 

1 60 

1 00 

19 00 

75 00 

1,G70 53 
1,160 20 

7 12 
1 30 
4 60 

84 25 

14 70 
21 25 

277 26 

60 75 

38 88 

3 00 
21 25 

239 00 
74 00 

15 77 

28 80 
30 90 
19 54 

33 10 



16 77 

22 40 

8 71 

36 30 

20 

1 40 

3 60 



00 
75 



7 

121 

44 75 

5 85 

2 07 

409 41 

15 28 

8 25 

65 00 

72 88 

80 



31 



"A** — Statement of Purchases^ Payments^ etc, — continued. 

Stock Chair >9A<>p— continued. 



Sundries--con. 
Diamond — glazier's. . . 

Glass 

Drop handles 

Lumber for wagons. . . 

Marble tops 

Mirror plates 

Needles — upholsterer's 
Pencils— caipenter*8 . . 

Paper pattern 

Paper (wrapping) 

Rosin 

Sand paper, 7 rolls 

Sand paper 

Sand 

Sand moulding 

Screw eyes, etc 

Twine 

Reftinded on ftir. ret'd. 

Freight 

Teaming 



98 lights, 
1 doz . . 



26 



8 gross, 

1 roll . 

1,884 lbs..., 

78i lbs. . . . 

850 yds... 

87i rms. . . 

1,226 lbs.... 



1,572^ lbs... 



»11A 

8 to 15 
5 50 to 6 75 
4 85 to 4 75 

4 



22 



Amount paid per cash account 

Settled by sales from shops and yard. 
Balance unpaid 



17 00 

84 13 

8 00 

82 91 

254 46 

92 50 

87 

17 19 

18 20 
156 28 

10 67 

45 00 

889 99 

49 04 

1 

1 

348 82 

10 00 

4.434 08 

1,489 86 



25 
95 



HO, 788 95 






126, 082 44 
440 54 
14,260 97 



32 

" A." — StatemoU of Purchases^ Payments^ €tc, — coi^inued. 



BUILDING ACCOUNT. 



Blinds 

Blinds (chapel) 

Bolts (chain) 

Blasting powder 

Brimstone 

Copper 

Furnishing — 

Clocks 

Carpets, matron*s room. . . . 

Carpets, chapel 

Carpet, pulpit stair 

Curtains and fixtures 

Oil cloth and binding. . . . 

Mosquito net 

Willow chairs, etc., from In 
dustrial school 

Glass 

Glass 

Hinges 

Hair (plastering 

Iron roof, complete 

Iron chimney 

Knobs 

Lime 

Lime • 

Lime (water) 

Lead (white) 

Lumber — 

Clear 

Timber 

Joist and scantling 

Ceiling (matched and bead) 

Flooring 

Boards 

Fencing 

Lath '. 

Locks 

Lat«:hes 

Lead 

Mason's lines 

Nails 

Nails 

Putty 

Services — 

Superintendent, season of 
'71, 129 days, and part of 
y'r covered by this report 

One officer and mechanic. . 

Steam pipe and fittings. . . . 



8 setts 
4 setts 
3 

25}4 lbs. 

46 lbs. 

23 lbs. 



25% yds 

25 yds. 

3>^ yds. 



6J4 yds 
24 yds 



34 

243 

19pr5 

30 



boxs 
Its. 
lbs 
lbs 



2 

25;^^ bus. 

353 bus. 

2 b'ls 

1,250 lbs 



3,354 

1,864 

18,283 

28,550 

200 

35,537 

200 



feet, 
feet, 
feet, 
feet, 
feet, 
feet, 
feet. 



2 
9 



2 

38 

54 

189 



kegs 

lbs 

lbs 



214 
1,357 



days 
feet. 



9 60 I 

7 12Jif 
50 



10 
55 



1 25 
76 



6 00 to 6 30 



86 to 40 

30 

2 50 

13 to 14 

35 00to45 00 
15 26 



26 60 

25 00 

12 00tol6 00 

17 00 



50 



65 
50 



40 

5 25 to 6 75 

07 

06 



6 00 
2 60 
valves etc. 



} 



/ 



$104 60 

1 60 
9 00 
456 

12 65 

22 00 
37 15 
81 25 

2 60 
6 04 



4 
3 



40 
60 



41 00 

180 60 

37 84 

10 90 

1 80 

6,990 73 

10 00 

25 

116 15 

5 00 
166 76 

117 42 
28 46 

293 70 
756 68 

5 00 
639 68 

3 40 

1 

1 

4 



243 
3 



02 
15 
60 
40 
80 
16 
78 



13 34 



645 00 
535 00 
303 34 



u 



"A." — /Statement of Purchases, Pa^ment^^ etc. — continued. 



INDEBTEDNESS OF 1871. 



Indebtedness of 1871, per last report. 

Unreported indebtedness 

Total 



Paid per cash account , 

Settled by sales from shops and yardj. 
Balance unpaid 



Loan 

Interest 

Discharged convicts. 
Convicts on deposit . 

Exchange 

Attorney's fee 

Burial lot 



124,589 47 
714 56 



Total Amoant 



11,700 00 



$25,804 03 



124,523 69 
474 23 
306 11 



Am^tPftid. 




11,700 00 
964 54 
475 00 
305 23 
15 05 
25 00 
100 00 



35 



" A.'' — Accounts — continued. 



OFFICERS' SERVICES. 



Commissioner . 
Deputy; warden 

Physician 

Chaplain ...... 

Usher 



Chaplain, Catholic 

do due last year. 



Clerk 

Master mechanic 
Master painter. . . 

do 

do 



Mechanic and keeper 

• •• a...... UO •*•..». 

do 



Turnkey 
. . .do . . . 



Yard master 

Mechanic and keeper stone sh'p 
do do.. .. 



do caVt sh*p 

do do 



Keeper paint shop 

do 

...'.... .do 



Keeper saw room 

turning room . . . 
blacksmith shop. 

shoe shop 

kitchen 



gate 

2 office guards 

2 cell-room guards. 

4 wall guards 

Matron 



866 days. 



867 
87 
26 

253 



days, 
days, 
eays. 
days. 



859 days. 

24^ days. 

108>| days, 



6 
860 

851 

8 

858 



days, 
days. 

days, 
days, 
days. 



180 days. 
286 days. 



56 
29 

281 

866 
866 
866 
866 
866 
866 
732 
732 
1,8783^ 
52f 



days, 
days, 
days. 



days . . . 
days. .. 
days. . . 
duys. .. 
days. . . 
days. .. 
days. . . 
days. . . 
days... 
weeks . 



18 00 



550 00 
450 00 



1200 00 
125 00 



$8 00 
2 00 
2 50 
8 00 



2 50 
2 00 
2 50 



2 00 
2 50 



2 50 
2 00 
2 50 



2 00 
2 50 



2 00 
2 25 
2 50 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 



00 
00 
CO 
00 
00 
00 
00 
2 00 
2 00 
8 50 



11,200 00 

1,098 00 

400 00 



1,000 00 



325 00 
1,200 00 
1,071 00 



998 00 
897 50 



820 00 



912 OO 
877 50 



911 00 
850*66 



879 75 

782 00 

732 00 

732 00 

732 00 

782 00 

732 00 

1,464 00 

1,464 00 

2,746 50 

446 80 

$28,458 05 



Amount paid per cash account 



3G 
" A." — Accounts— continued. 



ARRESTING ESCAPED CONVICTS. 



Jno. Moore, expenses 

H. S. Benjamin, .do 

H. Bertram, reward 

F. S. Keach, livery , 

Amount paid per cash account 



|5 00 

1 00 

100 00 

6 00 

$112 00 

fll2 00 



38 
**A"— -4ccownto^-coiitinued. 



STATEMENT OF THE BUSINESS 
Transacted by ihe Several Shops during the year ending Sept, 30, 1872 



CHAIR SHOP. 



Received from sales 


f 40, 670 31 

1 ,487 89 

8,144 88 

1,254 25 

44,844 16 




Indebtedness settled bv sales 




Outstandincr accounts for work sold 


, •••.■•.•.•. 


Work done for the prison 




Stock and finished work on hand 






191,400 49 




f31,931 11 

26, 082 44 

440 54 

14,260 97 

18,685 43 


Stock on hand Oct. 1, 1871 




Paid for stock 




Paid for stock in work 




Indebtedness for stock 




Earnings 






f91,400 49 







SHOE SHOP. 



Received from sales 

Indebtedness settled by sales 

Outstanding accounts far work sold 

Work done for the prison 

Stock on hand 

Stock on hand Oct. 1, 1871 . ../..'.. 

Paid for stock 

Paid for stock in work 

Indebtedness for stock 

Earnings 



$406 25 

35 13 

15 67 

1, 126 71 

767 43 




12,351 19 



4^2,351 19 



39 
" A." — Accounts — Statement of business — continued. 



TAILOR SHOP. 



Keceived from sales 

Indebtedness settled by sales 

Outstanding accounts^ for work sold 

Work done for the prison 

Stock on hand 

Stock on hand October 1, 1871 

Paid for stock 

Paid for stock in work 

Indebtedness for stock 

Earnings 



fl44 15 


86 85 


50 


8,754 78* 


2,409 19 


$986 61 


2,805 25 


477 61 


467 08 


2,108 92 





^,845 47 



$6,845 47 



BLACKSMITH SHOP. 



Keceived firom sales 

Indebtedness settled by sales 

Outstanding accounts for work sold 

Work done for the prison 

Stock on hand 



Stock on hand October 1, 1871 

Paid for stock 

Paid for stock in work 

Indebtedness for stock 

Earnings 



$143 27 

13 85 

1 90 

1, 563 77 

184 25 



$247 80 
466 20 



144 25 
1,048 79 



$1,907 04 



$1,907 04 



40 
" A." — Accounts — Statement of Business — continued. 



STONE SHOP. 



Received from sales 

Indebtedness settled by sales 

Outstanding accounts for work sold. . . . 
Work for the prison other than building 

Paid for teaming 

Settled for teaming by sales , 

Making and repairing tools 

Earnings 



$2,671 00 

12 08 

624 65 

17 00 


19 86 

240 64 

473:35 

2,502 28 





$3,225 63 



13,225 63 



41 



" A." — AccaunU — continued. 



STATEMENT OF THE PRODUCTS 

€f the Prison garden and farm lot for tJie year ending September ZOy 1872. 



125 bush . 

30 bush . 

25 bush . 
800 head . 

75 

42 

47 

54 

728 bush . 

2,580 lbs... 

218 days. . 

10 days. . 

80 

50 



Potatoes 

Turnips 

Green com 

Cabbage 

Squashes 

Hogs killed, weight 18,255 S> 

Hogs on hand 

Pigs on hand 



Seeds 

Com for hogs 

Qround feed for hogs 

Labor 

Labor of team 

Hogs on hand Oct. 1, 1871 . . 

Pigs do 

Balance 



$0 50 
50 



5 
5 

7 75 
15 00 

200 



II 00 
8 00 

20 00 
8 00 



162 50 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 

8 75 

1,027 26 

705 00 

106 00 



$7 50 
801 55 

29 20 
218 00 

80 00 
600 00 
150 00 
620 26 



$1,951 51 



$1,951 51 



Note.— The Prison lot coatainB abont twelve acres outside the walls, the mosto 
which is occupied as pastnre for hos^s. 



42 
" A." — Accounts — continued. 



STATEMENT OF VALUE OF MATERIAL AND LABOR 

Expended during the year ending September 30, 1872, in com- 
pleting the Prison Workshop^ in finishing the Chapel^ and 
in sundry repairs and improvements. 

SHOP COMPLETION. 



Stone work — 
Fine pointed surface top-course under 

roof ,. 

Rough wallS) backing 

Rough walls, pipe ditches 



Flagging in cut-off room 
ja fo 



Bed for planer and cut stone for engine 
room 

Bed for planer, rough stone 

Labor, excayating, etc., not included 

above 

Plastering — 

Three coats on 

Dry house (cement) 

Iron roof- 
Completion, cornice, gutters, conduct- 
ors, etc 

Wood work — 

Flooring, two-inch 

Flooring, one-inch 

Partitions, first and second stories, two- 
inch 

Partitions, first and second stories, one- 
inch •. 

Studdinff, 14 feet, 2x8 

Ceiling Joists 

Ceiling boards 

Sash, 74 windows 

Hash, 4 windows 

Privy doors 

Square doors 

Heavy arch top doors 

Stair cases, two, 500 feet each, $10, 
labor 110 

Labor, not included above. 

Glazing and painting sash — 

Glass 

Putty 

Zinc points 

White lead 

Oil 

Japan 

Labor 



410 ft. 

820 ft.. 

930 ft.. 

1,600 ft.. 

41«ft.. 
1 c'd 



1,477 yd 
125 y'd 



15,500 ft.. 

27,000 ft. 

1,400 ft.. 

1,400 ft. 

800 ft.. 

6,850 ft.. 

20,050 ft.. 

12 It. 

12 It. 

4 ... 

o . • « 

6 ... 



34 bxs 

283 lbs 

60 lbs 

1 qt. 



$0 30 
12 
12 
30 

60 



35 
50 



16 00 

15 00 

16 00 

26 50 
16 00 
16 00 
26 50 
32 
32 
2 50 
400 
10 00 

20 00 



1 
1 



5@5 50 
06 



13 00 
1 05 
1 15 



1123 00 

98 40 

111 60 

450 00 

26 30 
400 

55 50 

515 95 
62 50 



7,252 43 

248 00 
405 00 

22 40 

37 10 

12 80 

109 60 

690 33 

97 68 

5 28 

10 00 

80 00 

60 00 

40 00 

185 00 

180 50 

16 98 

50 

7 80 

2 62 

80 

18 75 



48 



*' A." — Accounts — Value of Material and Labor — continued. 



Painting- 
White lead 

Oil 

Turpentine 

Labor * 

Steam Pipe — 
Bill of pipe, 1,357 feet, with valves, fit 

tings, etc 

Labor 

Services of superintendent for season of 
1871, a part of the time being included 
in this report 

Officers' wages 

Nails, 88 kegs, $5.25@6.75 

Locks and latches 

Hinges 

Teaming * 

Freights 



850 lbs 
22 ffls 



§ 



Ol'i 



gis 



10 d's 



129 d's 
184 d's 



22 prs 



113 00 
1 05 
80 
1 25 



1 50 



5 00 
2 50 



1110 50 

23 10 

640 

48 75 



803 34 
15 00 



645 00 

460 00 

243 16 

5 65 

11 80 
350 00 

78 23 



$13, 183 25 



44 
" A." — Accounts — Value of buildings — continued. 



CHAPEL FINISHING. 



Plastering 

Inside blinds 

Inside blinds 

Chaplain^s platform 

Keeper^s platforms 

Brackets for window arches . . . 

Brass bntts for blinds 

Labor hanging blinds, etc 

Painting — 

Oil 

Turpentine 

Varnish (Lamar) 

Horicon paint 

Brandon yellow 

White lead 

White zinc in varnish 

Putty 

Labor 

Fixtures and furniture — 

Chaplain's table, cushion, etc 

Settees (iron frame) 

Carpet lor platform 

Carpet for platform steps. ... 

Office chairs 

Dining and bow back chairs. 

Labor puttinfj^ in fixtures .... 

Offlcers^services 

Officers' services 



829 yds 

8 sets 
4 sets 



5 

28 
86 



p'r 



20 gls 
14 gls 

20 lbs 
60 lbs 
275 lbs 
20 lbs 
25 lbs 
62id's 



30 
9 50 

7 12i J 



3 00 

1 00 

15 



1 05 

80 



42 

25 y's 
3iy's 
2 

18 



19 
80 



d's 
d's 



05 
05 
14 00 
45 
06 
1 00 



7 
1 



50 
25 
75 
1 00 



2 00 
2 50 



i 



$248 70 
104 50 

10 00 
15 00 
28 00 
12 90 
35 00 

21 00 

11 20 

12 00 
1 00 

8 00 
38 50 

9 00 
1 50 

62 50 

55 00 

315 00 

81 25 

2 

2 



50 
00 



15 00 
25 00 
38 00 
75 00 

$1,172 55 



4:i 

" A." — AccounCs — Value of Buildings — continued. 



HOG PEN. 



Timber and scantling 

Plank for floor 

Common boards 

Kails 

Labor 

Officer's services. . ... . 



1,200 ft. 
1,008 ft. 
1,000 ft. 
65 lbs. 



5 days 



$16 00 

14 00 

15 00 
07 



2 50 



119 20 

14 12 

15 00 
4 55 

85 25 
12 50 



$100 62 



SUNDRY REPAIRS. 



Bepairs on Main Building — 
Roof, repairs, Tin 

Solder 

Nails 

Labor 

Convict labor 

Glass, putty and lab., rep. windows. 

Partition in swing room 

Setting glass and rep. in chapel. . . . 

Door for chapel 

Making frames for mosquito nets. . 



Bepairs in Kitchen — 

Iron pump repairs 

Repairing refrigerator 

Making aish-rack and cupboard 
Sundry small repairs 



Bepaira of Cell-room — 
Roof— Tin 

Solder 

Labor 

Convict labor 

Sash cord 

Repairing windows 

Repairing ceiling and roof 

Making 2 doors, and sundry rep. 
Making 3 ash tables 



Bepairs at Female Pri$on — 
Roof— Tin 

Solder 

Conductors, 

Labor 

Convict labor 

Painting, glazing, etc 

Wall paper 



1,093 8hts.$0 20 



65} lbs. 
28 lbs. 
86 d'ys. 
30 d'ys. 



50 



4 
1 



00 
25 



68 8hU. 

7 lbs. 

19 hrs. 



17J lbs. 



175 shts. 
27 lbs. 



96 hrs. 

15 d'ys. 

9 d'ys. 

17 rls. 



$0 20 
50 
40 



40 



10 16 
50 



40 



$218 60 


82 63 


2 89 


143 80 


4 87 50 


15 68 


15 00 


4 50 


4 75 


10 00 


$23 40 


800 


27 50 


3 50 


$12 60 


3 50 


7 60 


200 


6 83 


16 00 


13 50 


14 25 


25 00 


$27 98 


13 50 


11 45 


88 40 


22 60 


42 00 


5 24 



$484 85 



57 40 



101 28 



161 07 



46 



" A." — Accounts — JRepairs— continued. 



Repairs in Barn — 

JBuilding stalls 

Putting on ridge-boards and repairing roof 
Sundry repairs 



R^irs and Improvements in Shops — 

mtten door in engine room 

Kidge-boards and repairing roof, blacksmith shop 

Repairing windows, blacksmith shop 

Putting in cistern pipes 

Repairing steam boxes 

Making patterns 

Repairing chair racks 

New track 

Planking ditches 



Miscellaneous — 

Making new bucket platform, 1,632 feet lumber 

Fitting up cellar 

Repairing hot house 

Frames in front yard, lumber, making and painting. 

Fence repairs — 

Posts, 61, at 13c 

Boards, 1,608 feet, at $14 to $16 

Nails, 20 lbs., at 7c 

Labor 



Total repairs, etc. 



$10 00 
250 
8 60 



14 00 

8 00 

25 

6 25 

5 50 

6 00 
5 50 
3 92 
8 98 



$80 00 

200 

800 

15 50 



$7 98 

25 05 

1 40 

8 00 



$16 00 



38 40 



50 50 



42 38 



$951 88 



SUMMARY. 

Shop completion $13,183 25 

Chapel completion 1 ,172 55 

Hog house 100 62 

Sundry repairs and improvements 951 88 



$15,408 30 



47 
" A." — Accounts'— continued. 



STATEMENT OF OUTSTANDING ACCOUNTS. 



$1,566 37 

786 40 

7,764 41 



Outstanding accounts of 1869, per last 

report . , 
Outstanding accounts of 1870, per last 

report 
Outstanding accounts of 1871, per last 

report 

Total 

Received cash from outstanding ac 

counts of 1869 

Received payment in merchandise 

Deductions 

Total accounts of 1869 settled 

Received cash from outstanding ac 

counts of 1870 

Received payment in merchandise 

Deductions 

Total accounts of 1870 settled 

Received cash from outstanding ac 

counts of 1871 

Received payment In merchandise 

Deductions 

Merchandise returned 

Total accounts of 1871 settled 

Total accounts settled 

Accounts of 1869 still outstanding $1 ,373 00 



192 75 
38 68 
61 94 


$824 20 
68 58 
17 16 



$5,389 55 

242 55 

1 ,493 52 

85 00 



Accounts of 1870 still outstanding, 
Accounts of 1871 still outstanding, 

Balance outstanding , 

Outstanding accounts of 1872 . . . . , 



Total accounts outstanding Sep- 
tember 30, 1872 



325 46 
553 79 



$193 37 



409 94 



7,210 62 



$10,066 18^ 



7,813 93. 



2,252 25 
3,961 81 



$6,214 06 



48 
" A." — Accounts — continued. 



Table showing the whole number of days spent in prison^ the 
number of days lost time^ and the number of days given to 
productive ami unproductive labor. 



Whole Number of Days— 
Males 


71, 893 
1,426 








Females 








Total 






73,319 


Lost Time^ 
Sundays 


10,445 

403 

268} 

87} 

2,367 

2,768 

1,663 






Solitary per sentence 








Solitary for punishment 








Dark cell for punishment 








Sick or disabled 








Insane or idiotic 








Old ace 








Total lost time -. 


8,002 






Indispensdble Labor but not directly pro- 
ductive of Income — 
ShippinfiT clerk 


814 

814 
1,831 
2,859} 
3,033 

821 
2, 953} 

517} 
54 
1,107 

1,500} 
1,121 
871 






Hospital steward 

Tier tenders, barber and office boy. 
iLitchen men 












1 




Stable men and teamsters 








Wash house men 








Chore men, shops and female prison. 
Garden and farm labor 














Filling ice house 

Cuttinc wood 














Blacksmiths, tailors and shoemakers 
^ time 








Menders 








General repairs and excayating .... 
Total 








17,297 






Aff jrrGffate unTiroductive lalior 




35,299 




Productive Labor— 

Cliair and cabinet shop 


35,059 
2,713 

248 






Stone shoD 








Shoe, tailor and blacksmith shop, } 
time 








Total productiye labor 

Total time 


38,020 










73,319 













49 



"B."— INVENTORY OF PRISON PROPERTY, 

8eptmber 80, 1872. 



STOCK IN CABINET AND CHAIR SHOPS. 



2 



Chamber set, blackwaliiat 

Secretary do 

Wardrobes.: do 

Secretary .do , 

Side-board do , 

Side-board, butternut 

Tete-a-Tetes, blackwalnut 

Bureau, marble top, blackwalnut, with glass 

. .do do do 

. .do do 

. .do butternut 

..do. do 

..do do 

. . do pine 

. .do. . dressing, marble top, blackwalnut, unf' d. 
Bedstead, blackwalnut 

. . .do. . . .butternut 

. . .do do 

.. .do .do • 

. . .do do... 

Washstand bureaus, cherry 

Washstand, blackwalnut, marble top 

. . . .do do do 

. . . .do butternuts 

. . . .do do 

Wash sink, blackwalnut 

do butternut 

Towel racks, blackwalnut. 

Rocker, hair cloth, large 

Toilet stand, butternut, with j|;la88 

do do do 

Quartette stand, butternut 

Light stands, blackw^dnut, marble top 

do cherry 

do do 

do butternut. 

What-not, enclosed, cherry 

. . . .do do. • • •• 

Hat rack, blackwalnut 

Table, butternut 



>85 00 



40 00 



80 00 



7 60 



8 00 



8 00 



16 00 



12 00 



2 90 



$280 00 
186 00 
70 00 
100 00 
40 00 
46 00 
80 00 
60 00 
60 00 
20 00 
26 00 
16 00 
12 00 
10 00 
80 00 
66 00 
86 00 
16 00 
^ 14 00 
12 00 
80 00 
20 00 
14 00 
10 00 

6 00 
16 00 
12 00 

6 00 
18 00 
20 00 
82 00 

1 76 
86 00 

600 

8 00 

6 00 
10 00 

6 00 

16 oa 

6 OO 



4--ST. Pbi8. 



(Doc. 11.) 



50 



" B." — Inventory — Cabinet and Chair /SAofw— continued. 



1 

1 

1 
13 

2 

8 

4 

1 

1 

9 
18 

9 

1 

5 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

5 

4 

8 

2 

6 

8 

1 

2 

4 

2 

1 

9 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

150 

125 

100 

250 

40 

811 

10 

29 

6J 
1 

8 
19 

8 
22 

6 

25 

105 

16 

46i 



Cylinder desk, black walnut 

Office desk, black walnut 

Office desk, butternut 

Upholstered chair frames, black walnut. 

Lounge frames, black walnut 

Lounge frames, unfinished, basswood . . . 

Camp chairs 

Camp chair 

Croquet set 

Brackets, black walnut 

What-not shelves 

Rustic frames, assorted sizes 

Lot carvings 

Set extension table slides, patent 

Lumber wagon 

Lumber wagon 

Lumber wagon 

Set truck wheels 

Marble bureau tops 

Marble centre table tops, oval 

Marble wash-stand tops 

Marble wash-stand backs, large 

Marble wash-stand backs, small 

Marble bureau desk tops 

Marble shelves, with brackets 

Mirror plate 

Mirror plates 

Mirror plates 

Mirror plates 

Mirror frame, black walnut, large 

Mirror frames, blackwalnut, unfinished . 
Lot miscellaneous lumber, assorted sizes 

Lot turned stock 

Lot veneer 

Set wagon felloes 

Set wagon spokes 

Set bob sleigh runners 

Pounds curled hair 

Pounds moss 

Pounds tow 

Pounds springs 

Yards red rep 

Yards green rep 

Yards green rep 

Yards green rep 

Yards striped rep 

Yard tan rep 

Yards plush 

Yards green damask 

Yards ribbed delaine 

Yards 24-inch hair cloth 

Yards 88.lnch hair cloth 

Yards enameled cloth 

Yards burlaps 

Yards carpet 

Yards cambric 



$5 50 
8 00 

4 00 

5 00 



3 00 
2*66 



7 00 
6 50 
5 00 
4 50 
3 00 

3 50 

4 50 



4 50 
3 00 
2 50 



2 50 



63 
13 
05 

12i 
2 50 
2 10 
75 
50 
25 



1 
1 
2 



3 50 
90 
35 
65 
50 
35 
15 
40 
15 



1 
2 



$60 00 
80 00 
30 00 
71 60 
16 00 

12 00 
20 00 

3 00 

8 00 
27 00 

6 00 

18 00 

200 00 

13 00 

80 00 
70 00 

65 00 
16 00 

14 00 
82 50 

20 00 
13 50 

6 00 

21 00 
13 50 

15 00 

9 00 
12 00 

5 00 
10 00 

22 50 
200 00 
115 00 

15 00 
3 50 

2 50 

3 00 
94 50 

16 25 
5 00 

81 26 
100 00 

66 15 

17 50 
43 50 
15 

1 



19 

85 



10 50 
17 10 

1 05 
87 53 
16 26 

8 75 
15 75 
22 40 

6 97 



51 



" B." — Inventory — Cabinet and Chair Shops — continued. 



40 
83 
41 
89 
23 

5i 
15 

1 

9 

3 
10 

3J 

9 

6 

50 
25 

1 
60 

5 

75 

100 

80 

8 

1 
38« 

l^ 
3i 

H 

2i 

H 
i 

8i 
2i 
Oi 

24J 
4 

i 
1651 
1 
61 

n 

6 
15 



?! 



94 

67 

llo 

371 

326 

403 

919 

548 

1,126 

2,483 

1,519 



Yards sheeting 

Yards sheeting 

Yards ticking 

Yards ticking 

Pieces webbing, cotton 

Pieces webbing, hemp 

Pounds twine 

Ponnd yarn. . 

Pounds cotton batting 

Gross gimp 

Gross buttons 

Set desk legs, maple 

Set table legs, maple and cherry 

Cast iron hat tree pans 

Sets casters, assorted 

Dozen brass drawer locks 

Dozen bureau drop handles 

Dozen hinges, assorted 

Dozen locks, assorted 

Papers brads, assorted 

Papers tacks, assorted 

Gross screws, assorted 

Upholsters* needles 

Book of designs 

Dozen cane seat ehairs 

. .do. .cane seat chairs in white 

. .do. .cane seat Boston rockers 

. .do. .cane seat Boston rockers in white 

. .do . .cane seat brace-arm rockers 

. .do. .cane seat misses rockers 

. .do. .cane seat misses rockers in white. ..... 

. .do. .wood Boston rockers 

. .do. .wood Boston rockers in white 

. .do. .wood sewing rockers 

. .do. .wood sewing rockers in white 

. .do. .wood misses rockers 

. .do. .wood misses rockers in white 

. .do. .wood childs rockers 

. .do. .wood seat chairs, assorted 

Set extra finished chairs, 1 office chair, 2 rockers 

Dozen wood seat chairs, in white 

. .do. .office chairs 

. .do. .office chairs, in white 

. .do. .childs chairs ; 

. .do. .stools 

Cane Boston rocker backs, caned 

Cane nurse rocker backs, caned 

Cane misses rocker backs, caned 

Cane Boston rocker seats, caned 

Cane Boston rocker seats, uncaned 

Cane nurse rocker seats, caned 

Cane nurse rocker seats, uncaned 

Cane misses rocker seats, caned 

Cane chair seats, caned 

Cane chair seats, uncaned 

Cane chair and rocker fronts 




$0 15 
11 
30 
16 
80 
2 00 
40 



8 00 
6 00 

24 00 
22 00 
16 50 
12 00 
10 00 
15 00 
12 00 
12 00 
10 00 

9 00 



7 
7 
4 



00 
00 
50 



3 00 

10 00 

8 00 



5 
3 



00 
75 
62i 
50 
40 
50 
15 
40 
12 
30 
30 
10 
5 



$6 00 

3 63 
12 30 
14 24 
18 40 

11 00 
6 00 
1 10 

1 44 
18 00 

5 00 

2 28 

4 50 

3 30 

27 50 
62 50 

8 00 
48 00 

8 75 

9 37 
10 00 

100 00 

1 60 
3 00 

310 67 
98 00 
78 00 
25 67 
41 25 
16 00 

5 00 
125 00 

30 00 
76 00 
248 83 
36 00 
46 67 

2 34 
746 25 

12 50 
183 00 

28 33 
48 00 
75 83 

6 25 
58 75 
33 50 
44 00 

185 50 
48 90 
161 20 
110 28 
164 40 
337 80 
248 30 
75 95 



52 

" B." — Inventory — Cabinet and Chair Shop9 — continued. 



275 

1,575 

525 

8,163 

1,672 

560 

216 

18,505 

620 

265 

5,408 

56,800 

19,600 

5,150 

1,530 

8mrnry 
,i>UU 

8.800 
4.130 
6,175 
2,100 
115,850 
62, 810 
42,250 
5,930 
85,565 
44,988 
9,700 
14,000 
81.925 
1,895 
27,000 
126, 800 
167,960 
2,510 
23,200 
69,950 
26,000 
482,000 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
11 
1 
8 
800 
12 
16 
25 
2 
1 
1 
1 
885 
80 



Cane chair, half Grecian fronts 

Ribs for cane rockers 

Scroll arms for cane rockers. . . 
Wood seats per hundred. . 



.do, 
do 
.do. 
.do. 
do, 



.do 
. . . .do 
. . . .do 
. . . .do 
. . . .do 

Pillars do. 

..do do. 

..do .do. 

. .do do. 

Arms do. 

Bows do. 

. .do do. 

Rockers do. 



..do 
. .do 
Legs. 
..do 
..do 
. .do , 



.do, 
.do 
do. 
.do. 
.do. 
do. 



Backs do 

. .do do 

. .do do 

..do do 

..do do 

Stubs do 

Scrolls and risers. . . .do 

Spindles do 

..do do 

. .do do 

Stretchers do 

. .do do 

..do do 

. .do do 

Feet stretchers do 

Lot dowels 

Lot wedge lumber 

Lot assorted cut lumber 

Lot croquet stock 

Lot assorted chair stock 

Dozen machine bits, assorted . 

Lot assorted flies 

Casks nails 

Pounds sand 

. .do. . .sheet lead 

. .do. . .antimony 

. .do., .washers 

Gross belt hooks 

Lot string leather 

Lot packing 

Lot steam pipe fittings 

Gals, varnish— No. 1 furniture. 
do 2 flowing . 



10 04 
01 
06 

11 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 



5 
4 
4 
4 
1 
1 



00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
00 



2 00 
7 00 
6 50 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 



4 
8 
2 
1 
1 



90 
60 
50 
50 
26 
86 
70 
60 
60 
50 
60 
50 
36 
50 
76 
60 
86 
00 
60 
50 
40 
85 



12 00 



6 50 
06 
16 
25 
121 

1 00 



1 25 

2 75 



$11 00 


16 76 


26 25 


847 98 


188 76 


38 60 


12 96 


725 25 


24 80 


10 60 


216 32 


844 50 


196 00 


108 00 


107 10 


510 00 


133 00 


103 25 


154 37 


31 50 


1,448 12 


529 63 


295 75 


266 85 


1,244 77 


1,124 70 


48 60 


210 00 


111 78 


6 98 


202 50 


787 80 


587 82 


25 10 


189 20 


849 75 


100 00 


1,512 00 


10 00 


15 00 


35 00 


10 00 


96 00 


182 00 


165 00 


19 50 


15 00 


1 80 


400 


8 18 


200 


2 00 


25 00 


50 00 


481 25 


82 60 



53 
" B.'' — Inventory — Cabinet a^id Chair Shops — continued. 



00 

25 

10 

15 

8 

120 

126i 

90 

7 

2 

86 

115 

48 

40 

\' 

1 
130 
2,292 
853 
600 
1,500 
728 
200 
260 
200 
450 

3 

5 

75 

190 

68 

600 

175 

2 

8 

1 

1 

4 

1 
• 1 

i 

i 

1 




Gallons yamish, Shallac 

. .do . . .Tarnish. . . .do imitatipn^, 

. .do . . .yamish, black 

..do . ..oil finish 

. .do . . .wood filling 

. .do . . .oil, boiled linseed 

. .do . . .oil, fine engine. 

. .do . ..oil, lard 

. .do . . .oil, neats-foot 

..do . ..oil, castor 

. .do . . .oil, benzole, Japan. 

. .do . . .oil, benzine 

. . do . . .asphaltum 

. .do . . .turpentine 

. .do . . .Valentine^s Japan gold size. .. 

. .do ... alcohol 

Barrel pyroligneous acid 

Pounds glue 

. .do . . .glue 

. .do . ..glue 

. .do . . .Uoricon paint 

. .do ... Brandon yellow 

. .do . . .yellow ochre 

. .do . . .logwood 

. .do . . .rosepink 

. .do . . .Venetian red 

. .do . ..whiting 

. .do . . .pure French zinc 

. .do . . .raw sienna 

. .do . . .burnt umber 

. .do . . .lamp black 

. .do . . .gold bronze 

. .do . . .wrapping paper 

. .do . . .twine 

. .do . . .sponge 

Packages Dutch metal 

Lot mixed paints, etc 

Dozen yamish brushes 

Dozen yarnish brushes 

Dozen paint brushes 

Dozen paint brushes 

Dozen painters dusters 

Dozen sash tools 

Dozen marking brushes 

Box striping brushes .... 

Gross carpenters pencils 

Gross carpenters pencils 

M cane 

Reams sand paper 

Rolls sand paper 

Pounds oil slips 

Ponnds copper 

Pounds copper wire 

Pieces blister steel 

Whip saws 

Split pins 



$8 
1 

2 
4 



1 
2 



75 
45 
65 
65 
75 
95 
63 
88 
35 
00 
75 
18 
10 
68 
00 



2 
2 



35 
26 
16J 

4 

13 

8i 

4 
45 

9 

8 
10 
00 
11 
28 
00 
90 



16 25 



6 00 
2 25 
1 50 



7 00 

9 00 

55 

^4 50 

600 

1 20 

55 

75 

50 

25 

00 



1 
1 
1 






$75 00 


36 35 


6 50 


39 75 


14 25 


114 00 


79 70 


79 20 


9 45 


400 


64 50 


20 70 


52 80 


27 20 


6 00 


n 00 


15 00 


45 50 


595 92 


58 24 


21 00 


37 50 


29 12 


5 00 


33 80 


7 00 


18 00 


1 36 


45 


6 00 


19 00 


476 00 


66 00 


40 25 


4 00 


8 70 


35 00 


32 50 


65 00 


13 50 


12 00 


3 00 


94 


75 


2 80 


5 25 


2 25 


742 50 


247 60 


18 00 


68 60 


12 65 


4 50 


800 


2 50 


4 00 



54 



^^ BJ*^ — Inventorj/ — Cabinet and Chair Shops— continued. 



12,000 

45,000 

1,000 

10,800 

453,000 

585,500 

6,000 

800 

2,500 

1,500 

3,700 

5,204 



Feet black walnut lumber , 

Feet butternut lumber 

Feet cherry lumber 

Feet oak lumber 

Feet maple and elm lumber 

Feet basswood lumber 

Feet mixed lumber 

Feet pine ceiling lumber, matched & beaded 

Feet pine boards — common 

Feet pine boards for boxes 

Feet pine joists 

Feet pine joists 

.Total 



$75 00 
25 00 



20 00 
20 00 
15 00 
15 00 
26 50 

14 00 
13 00 
17 00 

15 00 



$900 00 

1,125 00 

25 00 

216 00 

9,060 00 

8,782 50 

90 00 

21 20 

35 00 

19 50 

62 90 

78 06 



$44,844 16 



WOOD. 



220 

40 

5 



Cords, four feet — ^hard 

Cords, four feet — soft 

Cords, stove length — mixed 

Total 




$1,045 00 

120 00 

30 00 

$1,195 00 



STONE. 



4,340 

2,640 

220 

200 

150 

60 

66 

40 

32 

70 

60 

55 



Feet 8 inch rough stone 

Feet fla^ering — in rough 

Feet 12 inch boulders for bases 

Feet drilled for sockets 

Feet arch stone — axed 

Feet bushed stone 

Feet moulded steps 

Feet cut bases 

Feet window sills 

Rough sockets 

Rough sockets 

Cor& rough wall stone 

Total 



$0 20 


$868 00 


08 


211 20 


20 


44 00 


15 


30 00 


40 


60 00 


60 


36 00 


1 00 


66 00 


60 


24 00 


60 


19 20 


1 00 


70 00 


75 


45 00 


4 25 


233 75 



$1,707 15 



55 
" B." — Inventory — continued. 



BLACKSMITH SHOP. 



750 

185 

1 

1 



Pounds American iron 

Pounds steel 

Set wagon tires 

Tons old iron, bolts, etc., average value. 
Ton hard coal 



Total. 



10 07 
25 



50 00 



$52 50 
88 75 
10 00 
75 00 
18 00 



$184 25 



SHOE SHOP. 



118 
16 
1 
1 
1 
4 

8 



208^ 

58i 

4 

28 

148 

1 

A 
lA 

41 
38 
18 

f 



Pairs brogans 

Pairs shoes 

Pair shoes, canvas 

Pair boots, sewed 

Pair boots 

Pair boots, (old stock, out of proportion), 



Pairs ladies bootees. 



Pair slippers 

Stock in process of manufacture. 

Pounds sole leather 

Pounds American kip 

Pounds French kip , 

Pounds French calf 

Feet upper leather , 

Lace leather skin 

Dozen russet calf skins 

Dozen cochineal skins 

Dozen boot morocco 

Dozen roans 

Dozen pink skins 

Roll boot webbing 

Pounds shoe thread 

Pounds iron shoe nails 

Pounds zinc points 

Bushels pegs 

Lot wax 



Total. 



18 00 
8 ({0 



1 



8 00 
4 50 
8 50 
1 00 



84 
90 

1 60 

2 20 
26 



80 00 
10 00 



14 00 
9 50 



1 75 
10 
20 

1 50 



$854 00 

56 00 

2 50 

9 50 

6 80 

12 00 



\ 



9 00 

1 50 
18 25 
70 81 
48 15 

6 40 
61 60 
88 48 

2 75 
20 00 



7 
4 



60 
26 



15 17 

8 95 

65 

7 87 

8 80 
8 60 
8 75 

80 

$767 48 



56 



" B." — ^Thv^n^ory— continued. 



TAILOR SHOP. 



l,020i 
8 
114} 
54} 
77} 
89 
40 
5 
8 
1 
95 
10 
5 

98 

10 

1 

3 

14 

1 

9 

9 

16 

16 

7 

88 

48 

48 

2 

8 

58 
22 
10 



Yards gray cadet 

. .do. . cassimere 

..do. .hickory 

. .do. .drilling 

. .do. .silesia 

..do..wiggan 

. .do. .canvasa 

. .do. .sheeting 

. .do. .blue denim ■ 

Lot binding 

Dozen spools assorted thread 

Pounds woolen yam 

Pounds linen thread 

Gross assorted buttons 

Gross shirt buttons 

Box crayons 

Dozen bottles sewing machine oil 

Dozen cotton hose 

Gk)ing out shirts 

Linen duster 

Going out coats 

Going out coats 

Gk)ing out vests 

Pairs goin^ out pants 

Going out hats 

Prison coats 

Prison vests 

Pairs prison pants 

Pairs prison overalls 

Prison caps 

Prison shirts 

Aprons 

Pairs mittens 



II 20 

1 80 

21 

20 

16 
20 
14 
24 



fl 



1 
1 
1 



80 
10 
00 
00 
10 



1 25 

2 00 
2 00 



10 00 



7 
4 



00 

00 

6 00 

80 

6 00 

2 50 

00 

25 

00 

25 

50 

50 



5 

1 
1 
1 



,224 60 

8 90 

24 05 

899 

15 60 

6 24 

800 

70 

1 92 

75 

76 00 



11 
5 



00 
00 



28 00 

1 00 

40 

1 04 
400 

28 00 

200 

90 00 

63 00 

64 00 
96 00 

560 
198 99 
107 50 
240 00 

2 50 
800 

72 50 

11 00 

5 00 



Total 



$2,409 19 



57 



" B." — Inventoty — oontinued. 



MERCHANDISE. 



67 Tarda ticking 

62 Yards ticking , 

288 Tarda toweling , 

27 Bedticka, new 

18 Sheets, new , 

} Roll pattern paper , 

6 Dozen brooms , 

2 Dozen brush brooms 

154 Pounds tobacco 

2^ Dozen lamp chimnies, assorted sizes. . . . 

7 Gross kerosene wicks, assorted sizes. . . , 
2} Dozen sun hinge burners, assorted sizes. 

1 Dozen Alladdin. burners 

1 Pound beeswax 

1 Lot alum 

1 Lot chalk 

1 Dozen store polish .^ 

8 Pounds soap; Castile 

56 Pounds soap, German 

250 Pounds soap, prison manufacture 

880 Gallons soft soap 

6 Buckets, new — large 

75 Buckets, new— small ■ 

60 Barrels 

8 Pickling tubs 

1 Barrel lime 

1 Lot common brick < 

65 Firebrick 

288 Gallons carbon oil 



I 



80 
16 
20 
00 

76 



2 
1 



00 
60 
67 

1 00 
80 

800 



80 

8 

4 

l^ 
60 
76 
60 
00 



9 
25 



«20 10 

8 82 
67 60 
64 00 

9 75 
6 00 

12 00 

800 

87 78 

260 

6 60 

800 

200 

80 

60 

60 

1 76 

90 

448 

10 00 

110 00 

9 00 

56 25 

86 00 

6 00 



1 
2 
6 



60 
00 

85 



72 00 



Total. 



$598 18 



58 



" B.'* — Inventory— -contijmed. 



PROVISIONS AND FORAGE. 



10 

2 

156 

45 

43 

25 

150 

80 

50 

850 

400 

100 

50 

200 

180 

110 

8 

50 

8i 



Barrels flour , 

. . .do . . salt , 

Gallons syrup 

do. .vim^gar 

Pounds tea 

. . .do. .ground ginger. . . , 

, . . do. .rice , 

— do. .pepper , 

,.. .do. .split peas 

. . . .do. .beef, per hundred. 

. . . .do. .pork. . . .do 

— do.. butter , 

, . . .do. .tallow 

, . . .do. .grease 

Loaves bread 

Bushels potatoes 

. . . .do. .beans 

. . . .do. .corn 

Tons hay 

Ton bran 



Total 



$5 73 
2 25 
56 
19 
60 
30 
09 
25 
04 

6 60 

7 75 
15 
10 
06 
12} 
60 

2 00 

50 

6 00 

20 00 



157 30 
450 

86 80 
8 55 

25 80 
7 50 

13 50 



7 
2 



50 
00 



23 10 
31 00 

15 00 
5 00 

12 00 

16 25 
66 00 
16 00 
25 00 
21 00 
10 00 



1453 80 



LIVE STOCK. 



1 Span horses 

1 Cow 

47 Hogs 

54 Pigs 



Total 



$15 00 
2 00 



$400 00 

40 00 

705 00 

108 00 

$1,253 00 



59 
" B." — ^Jnwen^ory— continued. 

MACHINERY, TOOLS AND APPURTENANCES. 



CABINET AND CHAIR SHOPS. 



.do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do., 
.do.. 



2 



1 Engine and boiler, including belt, complete |5 

810 Feet line shaft, pulleys and hangers r 4 

20 I Dozen glass oilers 

1 Cold water pump, with fixtures, complete 

1 Iron pump column 

1 Small iron pump 

1 Elevator and fixtures complete 

Steam pipe for heating shops 

2 Steam boxes 

8 Glue-heaters 

8 Water-tanks 

1 Eng. lathe tools, counter shaft pulleys, hang, and belting 

2 Quage do do 

Guage do do. .. . 

Bailev do do 

Hand do do. . . . 

Hand lathe beds do do 

Planer do do.... 

Planer do do 

Shaper do do.... 

Shaper do do. . . . 

Stretcher machine ^ . . .do do. . . . 

Gain-cutter do do 

Post rounder do do. . . 

Seat jointer do do 

Upright cylinder machine do do 

Wood seat hollowing do do 

Slat turning machine do do 

Tenoning arbor do do 

Seat-notching machine do do 

Boring machines do do. . . . 

Boring machine (iron leg hld^r) do do 

Boring machine do do. . . , 

Tenoning machine do do 

Tenoning machine do do 

Seat framer and dowel machine do do. . . . 

Morticer do do. . . . 

Morticer do do. . . . 

Rocker arm cutter do do. . . . 

Rocker seat maker do do 

Chuck machine do do . . . 

Bent rim machine do do . . . 

Back planer not set up 

Surface plaier do 

Band saw, counter shaft, pulley hangers and belting . 
Saw table frame arbor do do. . . . 



,470 76 

,698 80 

428 00 

278 81 

50 00 

15 00 
105 78 

,042 00 

55 00 

223 48 

150 00 

627 60 

,873 84 
297 25 
118 50 
855 40 

16 00 
648 25 
528 50 
860 00 
231 86 
227 48 
171 70 
122 50 
189 80 
227 
151 
287 40 

84 50 
282 25 
830 00 
155 00 

70 22 
863 75 
195 00 
888 91 
195 87 
182 69 
182 08 
210 00 
145 81 

185 40 
90 00 

160 00 
621 88 
816 58 
271 68 
264 00 
252 00 
242 86 

186 00 



10 
90 



60 



" B." — JnventoTf/ — Machinery^ e^c— <sontinued. 
Cabinet and Chair iSA^ipt— con. 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 

13 
3 
1 
2 



1 

45 

26 

88 

1 

1 

160 

1 

156 

60 

185 

25 

4 

800 

5 

21 

50 

2 

8 

800 

20 

200 



Saw table, counter shaft, pulley, hangers and belting 

....do do do. ... 

. . . .do do do. .. . 

Wabble saw table, frame arbor, do ... . 

Pillar splitting saw table do. . . . 

Saw table for ripping long material do. . . . 

Scroll saw do 

. . . .do do, . . . 

.... do do. .. . 

Cut-off saw, frame arbor do. . . . 

. . . .do do. . . . 

... .do do. .. . 

. . . .do do. .. . 

Wood circular saw with frame and arbor 

Saw frames, with arbors 

Em. wheel ^ind. machine, 6 wheels do. . . . 

Saw gummmg emery wheel do 

Sand wheel do 

....do do.... 

Grind stone do 

. . . .do 

.... do 

Sand belts with fixtures 

Clamping machine with fixtures 

Chuck an>ors and pulleys 

Chuck machine ft*ame 

Iron'chucks 

Brass chucks 

Lot chuck knives 

Cutter heads for stretcher machines 

Pipe and valves for cistern , 

Pipe tools, vice, tap wrenches, cutters, etc 

Lot clamps for putting up seats 

Belt shifters 

Gnuee lathe patterns 

Set shaper knives , 

Lot new saws 

Lot old saws 

Feet rubber hose with nozzles 

Drive belt for counter line shaft 

Feet new belting, various dimensions 

Feet old belting, various dimensions 

Chair forms 

Chair clamps and standards 

Clamps 

Bendmg forms 

Bending stands 

Bendinff irons 

Pillar forms 

Set iron bending handles 

Bending levers 

Bending frames 

Frames for holding bending work 

Seat clamps 



$55 00 



25 00 



2 50 
5 00 



10 00 



1 00 
1 00 
3 00 



3 50 
8 00 

13 00 

1 25 

4 50 
50 
10 

3 50 

2 00 
25 

250 
8 



$183 83 
182 28 
180 80 

163 58 

164 67 
136 20 
246 08 
245 87 
175 00 
199 50 
182 75 
180 75 
130 50 

75 00 

165 00 
112 20 
150 58 
130 17 
102 00 
159 50 

46 58 
46 50 
50 00 

25 00 
30 00 

5 00 
32 50 
15 00 

8 00 
20 00 
78 42 
114 84 
50 75 
45 00 

26 GO 
114 00 

65 00 

120 00 

101 45 

98 72 

62 34 

10 80 

437 50 

75 00 

52 00 

375 00 

22 50 

10 50 

5 00 
7 00 

6 00 
75 00 
50 00 

600 



61 



" B." — JkverUory — Machinery^ e^c.-— continued. 
OMnet and Chair ShojH^on. 



460 

42 

8 

6 



1 
1 

17 

28 
7 
8 
7 
1 
8 
2 
1 

28 

20 

25 
1 

19 
7 
1 
1 
1 

12 
4 
5 
1 
4 
4 

14 
1 
8 
1 

10 
8 
6 

25 
8 
1 
2 

14 



6 
4 
5 
2 
2 
1 



50 
25 
00 
50 
50 



Iron staples 

Thumb screw clamps 

Sets le^ forms for boring seats 

Table lorms for boring seats 

Forms for morticing machine 

. . . .do. . . . boring do 

. . . .do. . . . grooving . . . .do. 

. . . .do. . . . npright shaper. . .' 

. . . .do. . . . horizontal shaper « 

Clamp screw 

Bendme screw 

Seat-making patterns 

Chair-back patterns 

Chair^haping patterns 

Back-bormg patterns 

Digger patterns 

Tuning frame 

Dumping barrows 

Grindstones 

Iron vise 

Work benches 

Paint brushes 

Wood vises 

Set rope and tackles 

Hand barrows , 

Boxes for shipping cane work 

Mammoth paint mill 

. . .do. . . . . . .do.... old 

Hand paint mill 

Stationary racks 

Cupboards 

. . .do 

Cupboard I 

Tool chests 2 50 



^ 08 

65 

8 00 

2 50 



8 00 



20 00 
8 00 
2 00 



2 
1 



00 
50 



8 00 
20 00 
10 00 



Pike poles 

Hook ladders 

Step ladder 

Pair wooden horses . . . 

Pair scales 

Paint tubs , 

Paintboxes 

Sprinklers > 

Glue pots 

Lanterns 

Oil filter tank 

.Oil tanks 

Varnish dishes 

Dripping pans 

Scoops ana funnels. . . . 

Tin cans, with faucets. 

. . . .do do 

. . . .do do 

. .. .do do 

. . . .do do 



50 
75 



50 



8 
1 
1 
1 



50 
00 
75 
60 
60 



15 00 
65 
75 
20 
00 
50 
50 
50 





4 
2 
2 



118 50 
28 10 
24 00 
16 00 
16 00 
15 00 

5 00 
15 00 

9 00 
10 00 
12 00 

8 50 

6 76 

7 00 

4 00 

8 60 
400 

100 00 

6 00 

18 20 

660 00 
60 00 
50 00 

8 00 
88 00 
10 50 
26 00 

6 00 

7 00 

86 00 
80 00 
50 00 

2 60 
10 00 
200 
24 60 
1 60 
400 
6 00 

5 00 

9 00 
10 50 

87 60 
4 50 
1 50 

80 00 
9 10 

16 00 
1 20 

86 00 

22 50 

6 00 
400 
1 60 



62 



8 

6 

42 

8 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

7 

1 

46 

4 

1 

2 

2 

6 

14 

10 

15 

4 

4 

8 

1 

2 

6 

25 

43 

7 

1 

4 

3 

5 

42 

9 

1 

1 

1 

40 

2 

1 

60 

26 

42 

1 

1 

3 

1 

20 

37 

3 

20 
9 



" B." — Invefitort/ — Machinery^ c^c— continued. 
Cabinet and Ghair /^^pa— continued. 



Tin cans 

. . .do 

. . .do 

Copper cans , 

Painted half-barrel, 

Chest drawers 

Bureau 

Desk 

Clock 

Tables 

Chairs , 

Chair 



Pails 

Pokers, large 

Wash tub 

Sinks, with fixtures. 

Stands 

Buckets 

Brooms 



Cups 

Curtains 

Stools 

Stoves and pipes 

Tool boxes 

Lot assorted files 

Set carving tools , 

Dozen machine bits, assorted .... 
Braces and 25 dozen assorted bits, 

Wrenches, various kinds 

Axes 

Hatchet , 

Crooked Adzes 

Scoop shovels, iron 

do wood 

Screw drivers, assorted sizes 

Gimlets 

Copper hammer 

Machine hammer 

Riveting hammer , 

Nail hammers 

Nail drawers 

Spoke shave 

do , 

Drawshaves , 

Hand saws 

Cross-cut saw 

18-inch circular saw 

Dozen scroll saws 

Steel square, standard , 

Steel squares 

Tri-squares , 

Rimmers 

Pairs dividers 

Pairs calipers 



%\ 00 
65 
20 

80 



00 
75 



25 
50 



600 
50 

1 00 
20 
15 
25 
25 

5 00 



12 00 
3 75 
1 75 

1 50 



2 50 

2 25 

1 25 

60 

20 



1 25 
40 



40 

1 25 

2 25 



4 00 



2 25 

1 50 
75 

1 00 
80^ 



$8 00 
3 25 
8 40 
6 40 

2 00 
8 00 



7 
5 
2 



00 
00 
50 



12 00 
5 25 
2 50 

11 50 



00 
50 



2 
1 
12 00 

1 00 
6 00 

2 80 
1 50 

3 75 
1 00 

20 00 

5 50 
200 00 

50 00 
72 00 

93 75 
75 25 
10 50 

1 10 
10 00 

6 75 

6 25 

21 00 

1 80 
5 00 

2 00 
75 

50 00 
80 

3 75 
24 00 
32 50 

94 50 
5 00 
5 00 

12 00 

4 00 
45 00 
55 50 

2 25 
20 00 

7 20 



63 



" B." — Inventory — Machinery^ etc, — continued. 
Cabinet and Chair 8?iop9-~coji, 



2 

10 

1 

108 

28 

80 

80 

2 

1 

1 

6 

2 

4 

10 

18 

2 

3 

1 

7 

2 

100 

40 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

10 

2 

10 

1 

15 
1 
8 
1 
1 
1 

9 



Pair pincers 

Set firmer chisels 

Set turniDg chisels .... 

Assorted chisels , 

Oil stones , 

Guages, assorted 

Planes, assorted 

Plane irons 

Lot hand screws , 

Lot iron thumb-screws 

Iron hand-screws 

Counter sinks 

Augurs 

Pincers 

Awls 

Key-sets 

Saw sets 

Band set 

pairs gas pipe tongs . . . , 
Pairs blacksmith tongs. 

Scrapers 

Wood mallets 

Spirit levels 

Spirit level 

Steel 



Straight edge, 16 ft 

Heading knife 

Knives 

Putty knives 

Pairs shears 

Upholsters needles 

Flat iron 

Varnish and paint brushes, 
Badger hair flowing brush. 

Blendes 

Cart 



Wheel house 

Rimming bench 

Extra counter shaft pulleys, etc. 
Fire annihilators 



^ 90 
6 00 



1 
1 
1 



Total. 



50 
00 
50 
75 
65 



60 
25 
25 
30 
15 
75 
50 



75 
50 
20 
15 
00 



20 
45 
90 
15 



1 25 



1 25 



8 00 



$1 80 
60 00 

11 00 
54 00 
28 00 
45 00 

140 00 

1 30 
150 00 

80 00 

8 60 

50 

5 00 

8 00 

2 70 
1 50 

7 50 

12 50 

5 25 

1 00 
20 00 

6 00 

8 00 

2 00 
75 
50 
00 
80 
50 
80 
50 
75 

18 75 

1 00 
8 75 

20 00 

2 50 
1 00 

117 50 
72 00 

$84,551 59 



2 

1 

4 
1 

1 



64 



" B.** — Inventory — Machinery^ e^c— continued. 



STONE SHOP. 



1 Crane, with fixtures, new. 

9 Chum drills 

1 Blasting drill 

1 Iron bar 

4 Iron bard 

8 Iron bars 

8 Sledge hammers , 

7 Stone hammers 

45 Mash hammers 

7 Bush hammers 

d Bush hammers 

8 Picks 

25 Mallet chisels , 

14 Stone axes . . . . 

11 Pitching tools , 

5 Hand drills , 

21 Scratchers 

2 Bush chisels 

1 Shovel 

2 Heating irons 

25 Feathers and wedges 

68 Chisels 

67 Points 

11 Bankers 

16 Squares 

25 Straight edges 

1 Grindstone 

1 Car 

3 Waterpails 

1 Stove and pipe 



12 50 



8 00 

1 50 

2 00 
1 50 
1 50 
8 00 



5 
1 

2 
1 



00 
50 
50 
00 
50 
75 
10 
75 



25 



40 
50 
75 
25 
5 



$160 00 

22 50 

6 

7 



00 
00 



20 



12 00 

12 00 

6 00 

10 60 

67 50 

21 00 

10 00 

4 60 

12 50 

28 00 

16 50 

8 75 

2 10 

1 50 

1 00 

60 

1 75 

27 20 

83 50 

8 25 

4O0 

1 25 

500 

10 00 

eo 

10 00 



Total 



$405 40 



r— 



65 

" B." — Inventory — Machinery^ e^.-— oontinuecL 



BLACKSMITH SHOP. 



1 


Puncb mftchine. ,...,. , , 




$100 00 


1 


Drill machine 




8 00 


5 


Anvtlft - ^ . - . , T - \, , , 


$12 00 
800 
600 


00 00 


8 


Blacksmith bellows 


2^ 00 


8 


Vises 


18 00 


1 


Swedire block 


20 00 


8 


Screw-plates and tans. 




5 00 


2 


Monkey wrenches 


76 
26 

12 

300 
75 
50 
60 


1 60 


61 


Pairs tongs 


12 75 


28 


Piipche**r , , T , 


8 86 


9 


FraiTw punches. ... 


27 00 


82 


Heading tools , 


24 00 


29 


Swedges 


14 60 




Cold chisels 


2 00 




Screw driver 


60 




Punch-blocks 

Buttress tool 


26 


75 

75 




Bit stocks 


26' 


50 




Press drill 


1 60 








2 60 




Hammers . , t . , 


1 00 

1 60 


4 00 




Sled&re-hammers 


3 00 




Pair shears 


8 00 








60 00 




Desk 




1 50 




Cupboard 




400 




.... do •• 




1 00 




Case of drawers 




1 00 




Total 








$898 61 











6— St. Peis. 



(Doc. 11.) 



y" 



I 



66 



" B." — Inventory — Machinery y 6^c— continued. 



SHOE SHOP/ 






1 Crimping machine and box. 
1 Pegfloat 

Dozen shoe knives 

Dozen shoe knives 

Dozen skivers 

Dozen French soap stones. . 

Dozen collices 

Dozen flower wheels 

Dozen seamsets 

Dozen seat wheels 

Dozen tack-cutters 

Dozen ppjr-p.nttftrB 

Dozen weTt knives 

Dozen strip awls 

4^ Benches, with kit 

28 Pairs lasts 

1 Offlcechair 

4 Spittoons 

Washing utensils 

1 Stove and pipe 

1 Cutting board 



Total. 



$1 25 
2 00 



4 80 
8 25 
8 60 
2 40 

50 
00 
00 
40 
40 

5 00 
30 



7 
5 
5 
2 
2 



12i 



928 40 

8 00 

98 

1 00 
250 



1 

7 



20 

81 

60 

40 

62 

1 25 

88 

20 

40 

20 00 

8 40 

1 00 

50 

20 

00 

00 



1 
5 
1 



185 89 



67 



" B," — Inventory/ — Machinery^ etc, — continued. 



TAILOR SHOP. 



1 Sewing machine — ^new . . . 

1 sewing machine— old .... 

1 Knitting machine 

1 Pairs shears 

3 Pair shears 

2 Blacknnt press boards. . . . 

4 Common press boards 

1 Stove and pipe 

3 Chairs 

2 Benches 

1 Backet, baisin and broom 



Total, 



$0 75 
75 
35 



25 

15 



$75 00 

20 00 

45 00 

12 00 

2 25 

1 50 

1 00 

5 00 

50 

80 

75 



$168 80 



SOAP HOUSE. 



1 Fnmace and kettle. 

1 Wringer 

2 Tubs 

8 Tubs 

8 Washboards 

4 Pails 

5 Sets candle moulds 

2 Clothes racks 

1 Soap pump 



Total. 



$2 00 
25 
80 
25 
60 
1 50 



$8 00 

10 00 

400 

75 

00 

1 00 

800 

800 

1 25 

$81 90 



68 



** B." — Inventary^-'-Qontimi^ 
TOOLS AND CHATTELS IN BARN AND YARD. 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
4 
2 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
4 
1 

10 
1 
1 
500 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
8 
2 
12 
2 
14 



Double carriage 

Open buggy 

Furniture wagon 

Double wagon, new 

Cutter 

Double harness 

Single harness 

Sets of trucks 

Set of bobs, new 

....do do 

. . . .do do. . not ironed. . . . 

... .do 

. . . .do 

Hay rack, new 

. . . .do. . . .old 

Chair racks 

Wood racks 

Pairs of blankets 

Pair of fly blankets 

Harness cupboard 

Grain box 

Hay knife 

Sets whiffletrees 

Neck yokes 

Halters 

Lanterns 

Set curry tools 

Harrow , . . . 

Ploughs 

Shovel-plough 

Stone-boat 

Rakes 

Pitchforks 

Dung-forks 

Chains 

Auger 

Pails 

Lot cooper tools 

Lot garaen tools 

Feet cable chain 

Derrick gearings, with castings. 

Force pump 

Hand-car, with shafting 

Hand-sled, large 

Bucket rack on wheels, large. . . 

Lumber do do . . 

Razor grinding machine 

Hand truck 

Hand barrows 

Wheelbarrows 

.... do 

.... do 

.... do with water barrel. 

Wooden horses, large 



(16 00 



40 00 



15 00 



5 00 
2 00 

6 00 



8 
2 



00 
00 
75 
60 



5 00 



25 

50 

80 

2 00 



25 



15 00 



4 

^ 1 



50 
00 
00 
50 
00 
50 



$150 00 
00 00 
60 00 
80 00 
20 00 
26 00 
20 00 
45 00 
45 00 
80 00 
20 00 
80 00 
80 00 
10 00 

500 
10 00 

400 

24 00 
250 

12 00 
10 00 

1 50 
12 00 

800 

1 50 
600 
8 00 

5 00 
10 00 

800 
00 
50 
00 
60 
800 
75 

2 50 
50 00 

25 00 
150 00 

45 00 
15 00 
25 00 
10 00 
25 00 
20 00 
10 00 

6 00 

7 50 
18 00 

8 00 
18 00 

600 
2100 



1 
1 



** B." — Inffmtory — Tools and Chattels — oontintidd. 



1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

12 
4 
9 
6 

12 
5 

18 
1 
8 

20 
1 
8 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 
4 
1 
1 
8 
6 



Wood rack, hand use. 

Step ladders 

Sand screen 

Spirit level 

Wood measure , 

Dozen brick trowels. , 

Bucksaws 

Picks 

Shovels 

Axes 



Hoes 

Hods 

Benches • < 

Stove and pipe, north cell room 

Stoves, old , 

Feet lead pipe 

Stove in gate house , 

Chairs do 

Desk do 

Wood box. .do 



Lamp 

Stoves on wall 

do 

do 

High chairs on wall . . . . 

Buckets on wall 

Iron pump in front yard. 
Gurden tool box, new . . . 

Snow shovels, new 

Saw bucks, new 



Total. 



$1 25 



1 00 
1 00 
80 
75 
25 
25 
1 00 



8 00 
40 



50 



7 00 



1 75 

75 



50 
50 



18 00 

5 00 
2 50 
2 00 
2 50 

6 00 
12 00 



4 
7 
4 



00 
20 
50 



8 00 
1 25 
18 00 
25 00 
900 
800 



4 
1 



00 
50 
8 00 
200 
1 50 
14 00 
250 
1 50 
700 
8 00 
55 00 
1 75 
1 50 
8 00 

1,481 55 



70 
" B." — Inventory — JFumiture and CAoMe/^— continued. 

OFFICE. 

1 Safe. 

1 Cocoa matting carpet 

1 Clock regulator. 

1 Secretary and book-case, old. 

1 Bureau with cupboard, old. 

1 Lounge, old. 

1 Stamp. 

1 Copy press. 

1 Coi)y press stand. 

1 Writing table. 

1 Water cooler. 

2 Light stands. 
6 Office chairs. 

1 Office turning chair. 

2 Spittoons. 

1 Mail basket. 

1 Pail. 

1 Piece oil cloth. 

1 Piece zinc. 

8 Lamps. 

1 Hall lamp. 

GUARD ROOM. 

1 Stove, pipe and zinc. 
1 Wardix)be. 

1 Clock regulator. 

2 Writing desks, old. 
1 Writing table, old. 
1 Pigeonhole. 

1 Settee. 
1 Office stool. 
1 Stand. 
1 Lamp. 

1 Wash sink. 
10 Office chairs. 

2 Cane-seat chairs. 
2 Pails. 



71 
" B." — Inventory — Furniture and Chattels — continued. 

COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE. 

1 Desk. 

1 Desk and book-case, old. 
1 Cupboard and book-cas6, old. 
1 Wardrobe, new. 

1 Office-turning chair. 

2 Cane-seat chairs. 
1 Quartette stand. 
1 Carpet 

1 Wash sink. 

1 Bowl and pitcher. . 

1 Looking-glass. 

1 Stoye and pipe. 

1 Spittoon. 

1 Lamp. 

COMMISSIONER'S APARTMENTS. 

FABLOR. ^ 

1 Carpet 

8 Sets curtains and fixtures. 

2 Sofas, old. 
1 Hat-rack. 

1 Marble-top centre table. 

1 Marble-top table, old. 

2 Hair cloth rockers. 

1 Hair cloth easy-chair. 

1 Easy chair. 

8 Wiflow chairs. 

6 Hair cloth chairs. 

6 Hair cloth chairs, old. 

1 Common bureau, old. 

1 Whatnot, old. 

1 Light-stand, old. * ' ; L 

1 Chandalier, old. 

1 Stove and pipe, old. 

1 Lamp, old. "' ...J ' 



72 

^^B.^^^Invent&ry— Furniture and ChaUeh—Qontiajied. 
Oommi$$iaMr*9 .^fMirtfiMn^— continued. 



8ITTIKG-B00K. 

1 Carpet, old. 
1 Extension table. 
1 Black walnut center table. 
1 Lounge, new. 
1 Book case. 
1 Work stand. 
1 Side-board. 
1 Looking-glass. 
1 Clock. 
1 Lamp. 
10 Cane-seat chairs. 

1 Cane-seat Bostoii|rocker. 

2 Cane-seat sewin^ockers. 
1 Camp chair. 

1 Light stand. 

1 Common table, old. 

1 RefHgerator, new. 

BED-BOOM. 

1 Bedstead. 

1 Spring bed and mattrass. 

1 Bureau. 

1 Wash sink. 

1 Towel rack. 

1 Light stand. 

1 Carpet— old. 

1 Lamp. 



BEI>-BO0VC. 



Bedstead. 
Wardrobe. 
Spring mattrass. 
Bureau, old. 
Carpet, new. 
Lamp. 
Wash sink. 
Towel rack. 






.1 .j« 



78 
" B.'' — IwiseTUGry — Fumitfurt and Chattels — oontinued. 



COMMITTEE ROOM. 



Carpet. 

Sofa. 

Stoye and pipe. 

Center-table. 

Oyal-table. 

Hair-cloth rocker, larse. 

Hair-cloth rocker, small. 

Hair-cloth chairs, old. 

Cane-seat rocker, old. 

Cane-seat chair, old. 

Bedstead. 

Lamp. 

Spring-bed and mattrass. 

Hair mattrass. 

Wash-sink bureau. 

Carpet in bedroom. 

Looking-glass, small. 



COOK'S APABTHENT. 



1 Lounge. 

1 Bureau, with glass. 

1 Carpet, old. 

1 Wardrobe, old. 

1 Light stand, new. 

1 Stove and pipe. 

1 Blackwalnut bedstead, new. 

1 Spring mattrass. 

4 Cane-seat chairB, old. 

1 Cane-seat rocker, old, large. 

1 Cane-seat rocker, old, small. 

1 Wash-sink. 

1 Lamp. 



n 

"B." — Inventory — FumiPure and CAa^^fo— oonti»ued. 

DEPUTY WARDEN»8 APARTMENT. 

1 Carpet 

2 Carpets, old. 
1 Lounge, old. 
1 Sofa. 

1 What-not 

1 Centre-table, old. 

2 Black walnut bureaus, new. 
1 Black walnut bureau, old. 

1 Black walnut what-not, old. 

1 Black walnut wardrobe. 

1 Butternut wardrobe. 
26 Cane-seat chairs. 

4 Cane-seat rockers. 

1 Black walnut bedstead. 

1 Bedstead, good. 

4 Bedsteads, common. 

1 Wardrobe, old. 
12 Curtains. 

1 Spring bed. 

1 Black walnut wash stand bureau, new. 

1 Butternut wash stand bureau, new. 

2 Wash stand bureaus, old. 
2 Wash-sinks. 

2 Wash bowls and pitchers. 
2 Sewing stands. 
1 Light stand. 

1 Common six leg table, old. 
1 Common four leg table, old. 
1 Looking glass, old. 
1 Clock. 
1 Befrigerator. 

16 Musquito frames— 1 for door, 14 for windows. 
4 Lamps. , „ 

1 Cooking stove and pipe with new copper boiler. 
1 Stove and pipe. 
1 Stove and pipe, small. 



76 
"B." — Inventory — Furniture and CJiaUeh — continued. 

MATRON'S APARTMENT. 

1 Lennge, old. 
1 Bureau, new. 
1 Bureau, old. 
1 Carpet, new. 
8 Curtains. 

5 Cane seat chairs, old. 

1 Cane^eat rocker, old, large. 

1 Cane-seat rocker, old, small. 

1 Looking.fflass. 

1 Stove and pipe with new zinc board. 

1 Bedstead, new. 

1 Spring bed and mattrass, new. 

1 Bed-quilt, new. 
4 Blankets. 

8 Sheets. 

2 Pillow ticks. 

2 Pair pillow slips. 

6 Towels. 

1 Wash-stand, new. 
1 Wash-stand, old. 
1 Wash-bowl. 
1 Lamp. 

OFFICERS' APARTMENTS. 

THIRD FLOOR. 

11 Bedsteads, old. 

1 Carpet. 

1 Carpet, old. 
26 Cane-seat chairs. 

8 Cane-seat chairs, new. 

1 Office chair. 

2 Wood-seat rockers. 
8 Cane-seat rockers. 

1 Cane-seat rocker, new. 
4 Common chairs, old. 
4 Looking-glasses. 
8 Lamps. 

1 Center table, new. 

2 Center tables, old. 

2 Common tables, old. 

1 Wash-stand bureau, new. 

2 Wash-stand bureaus, old. 
4 Bureaus, old. 

6 Wash stands, old. 

4 Light stands, old. 

1 Lounge, old. 

1 Wardrobe, old. 

6 Bowls and pitchers, old. 

4 Stoyes and pipes. 



76 
» B.^^^^lM}entofy'^Fumiture and ChatUh'—ooaiinu^d. 

SECOND FIiOOR 

2 Bureaus, old. 

1 Table, old. 

1 Wash stand, old. 

4 Common chairs, old. 

6 Cane seat chairs, new. 
1 Cane seat rocker,^new. 
8 Bedsteads, old. 

1 Looking glass, old. 

2 Lamps. 

2 Stoves and pipes, old. 

1 Ironing bou^ and stand, new. 

FIRST FLOOR. 

1 Bureau, old. 
1 Wash stand, old. 
1 Wardrobe, old. 
1 Centre table, old. 

8 Cane chairs, old. 

1 Stove and pipe, old. 

1 Wood box, old. 

2 Wood rockers, old. 

BEDDING. 

1 Tow mattrass, old. 
1 Cotton mattrass, old. 
12 Straw ticks, old. 

7 Pillows, old. 
6 Pillows, new. 
6 Spreads. 

9 Quilts. 
21 Towels. 

12 Blankets, new. 
86 Blankets, old. 
80 Pillow slips. 
86 Sheets. 

CHAPEL. 

1 Organ, cabinet. 
1 Organ stool. 

1 Chaplain's table with bible cushion, etc., new. 
42 Iron frame settees, new. 

2 Office chairs, new. 

18 Bow back chairs, new. 

1 Table and book case, old. 

2 Stoves with pipe. 

1 Carpet for platform. 



r? 

FEMALE DEPARTMENT. 

1 Cooking stove and pipe. 

1 Kettle, new. 

1 Copper boiler, new. 

1 Copper boiler, old. 

1 Zinc board, new. 

1 Stove and pipe. 
16 Stands, old. 
U Chairs, old. 

5 Pine-tables, old. 

6 Flat-irons. 

5 Pails. 

4 Wash-tables, old. 
1 Wash-table, new. 
1 Clothes wringer, laree. 
1 Clothes wringer, medium. 
1 Washing machine. 
Small assortment tin-dishes, plates, cups and saucers, knives 
and forks. 

6 Nightbnckets. 
10 Straw ticks. 
21 Sheets. 

16 Pillow slips and ticks. 

15 Blankets. 

50 Towels. 

14 Blue denim dresses, new. 

7 Blue denim dresses, old. 

8 Bonnets, in use. 

8 Under-shirts, in use. 
28 Under garments, in use. 
14 Pair hose, in use. 

7 Pair shoes, in use. 

7 Pair slippers, in use. 



78 
" B.*'— /nv^^ofy— -F«m<^r6 and Chattels— coniiim^d. 

HOSPITAL. 

1 Lot of medicinee and containers. 

6 Bedsteads, old. 

1 Spring mattrass. 
1 Tow mattrass. 
1 Stove and pipe. 
1 Capboard, large, old. 

1 Cupboard, smul, old. 
4 Cane seat chairs. 

2 Office chairs. f 
2 Wood rockers. 

1 Table. 

1 Wash sink, old. 

1 Wash basin, old. 

2 Stands, old. 
2 Pails, old. 

12 Tin cups, new. 
8 Tin cups, old. 
2 Lamps. 

1 Woodbox, old. 

2 Night buckets. 
1 Night stool. 

1 Ash pail, old. 

1 Lot cups and Baucers,''old. 

1 Lot knives and forks, old. 

1 Tea kettle. 

1 Stew keUle. 

1 Copper boiler, old. 

4 Bea spreads. ' 
15 Blankets, new. 

7 Ticks. 

8 Sheets. 
6 Pillows. 

1 Dozen pillow slips. 

COMMISSIONER'S KITCHEN. 

1 Sink, large. 

1 Sink, smfil. 

1 Cupboard, old. 

8 Tables, old. 

1 Stand, old. 

1 Looking glass, old. 

1 Washing machine. 

2 Stools. 

8 Benches, old. 

2 Clothes bars, old. 

1 Cane seat sewing rocker, old. .^ 

8 Dozen towels, small. 

1 Set Fairbanks' scales, small. 

1 Dish rack. 

5 Trays. 



79 
"B." — Inventory — Furniture and Chatteh — continued. 

OFFICERS' DINING ROOM. 

4 Dining tables, old. 
1 Common table, old. 
1 Cupboard, old. 

1 Milk safe, old. 
86 Common chairs, old. 
1 Sink. 
8 Curtains. 
1 Knife box. 
1 Stove and pipe. 
1 Large lamp. 

PRISONERS' KITCHEN. 

KOBTH BOOM. 

1 Stoye with cauldron kettle. 
1 Meat block with bench, old. 

1 Hash block, old. 

5 Tubs, old. 
10 PaUs, old. 

2 Benches, old. 
2 Chairs, old. 

1 Spice mill, old. 
1 Wash bowl. 
1 Moj). 
8 Strainers. 
1 Cleaver, large. 
1 Cleaver, small. 

6 Butcher knives. 
1 Meat saw. 

1 Steel. 

1 Iron spoon, large. 

2 Tin dippers, laree. 
1 Tin dipper, smtul. 
5 Tin pans, small. 

8 Tin pans, large. 

8 Iron forks. 

1 Ash pail. 

1 Scraper. 

1 Hammer. 

1 Shovel and poker. 

1 Broom and dost pan. 

1 Meat chopping machine. 

8 Trays. 



80 
*^B,^^—InveTUary— Furniture and ChattelB—contmaed, 

PRISONERS' KITCHEN. 

80T7TH BOOM. 

1 Cupboard for bread, old. 

1 Cupboard for spices, old. 

2 CoflEee boilers, large, old. 
2 Coffee boilers, new. 

1 Coffee pot, old. 
8 Pails. 
288 Tin dishes. 
1 Iron kettle, old. 
4 Tables, old. 
1 Office chair. 
1 Water boiler, old. 

1 Force pump. 

2 Looking-glasses. 

1 Iron scraper. 

2 Bread baskets, old. 
1 Bread knife. 

4 Tin pans. 

1 Small iron spade. 

8 Sets knives and forks. 

1 Oil can. 

1 Wash sink, old. 

4 Benches, old. 

1 Writing desk, old. 

1 Clock. 

1 Bread trough, new. 



BAKER'S ROOM. 



1 Flour box. 
1 Trough. 
8 Yeast tubs. 

1 Water pail. 

2 CuUenaers. 
20 Baking pans. 

1 Hammer. 

1 Wooden shovel. 



HALL AND CELLAR. 



1 Set Fairbanks' scales. 

1 Meat rack and bench. 

1 Swill box. 

1 Potato boiler, old. 

1 Refrigerator, new. 

8 Baskets. 

1 Dish rack. 

1 Wood box. 

2 Benches. 

1 Carving board. 



81 
" B." — Inventory — Furniture and C%a^^e^a— continued. 

ARMORY. 

9 Springfield rifles, breach loaders. 
6 Springfield rifles, old. 
13 Harper's Ferry muskets, old. 
6 Heavey revolvers, old. 

1 Smith «& Wesson's revolver, old. 

2 Colt's revolvers^ old. 
4 Pocket revolvers, old. 
2 Allen's revolvers, old. 

SCHOOL BOOKS. 

A small assorment of primary instruction books, of a value not 
exceeding fifty dollars. 

« 

CELL ROOM. 

4 Stoves and pipes with drums. 

1 Boiler. 

1 Desk. 

1 Desk, very old. 

1 Sink. 

2 Ladders. 

1 Pike-pole. 

2 Chairs, large, old. 
1 Bell.* 

1 Tin oil can, large. 

1 Tin oil can, smSl. 

2 Lamp-fillers. 
2 Dummies, old. 

2 Tables, large, new. 

2 Tables, large, old. 

1 Zinc top lamp table, new. 

1 Lot of razors, etc. 

1 Cupboard for clothes, large. 

1 Cupboard for books, old. 

1 Ash-bucket. 

4 Wood boxes. 

1 Sprinkling can. 
6 Water cans. 

2 Fire shovels. 
2 Pokers. 

100 Water pails. 

190 Sets knives, forks and spoons. 
15 Large Lamjps. 

6— St. Pbib. (Doc. 11.) 



82 

" B." — Inventory — Furniture and Chattels — continued. 

CeU Boom— con. 

200 Cell lamps, small. 
220 Drinking cups. 
220 Tin wash basins. 
210 Night buckets. 
176 Comraon chairs, old. 
102 Benches, old. 

22 Stands, old. 

16 8tools, old. 
1 Barber^s box, new. 
195 Wooden spittoons. 

174 Blankets, new. 
158 Blankets, medium. 

188 Blankets, nearly worthless. 

386 Sheets. 

210 Ticks. 

210 Pillows. 

203 Towels, small. 

14 Towels, large. 
170 Undershirts. 

150 Undershirts, nearly worthless. 
150 Pairs of drawers. 

134 Pairs of drawers, nearly worthless. 
200 Overshirte. 

190 Overshirts, nearly worthless. 

190 Pairs of woolen socks. 

160 Pairs of woolen socks, nearly worthless. 

285 Pairs of cotton socks. 

75 Pairs of cotton socks, nearly worthless. 
183 Coats. 

78 Coats, nearly worthless. 
130 Pairs of pants. 

87 Pairs of pants, nearly worthless. 

135 Vests. 

60 Vests, nearly worthless. 
200 Caps. 

15 Pairs of overalls. 
10 Overall shirts. 

15 Pairs of boots. 

175 Pairs of shoes. 



83 
" B." — Inventory — continued. 

SUMMARY 

Showing the amount of Personal Property in and about the 

Prison, Sept. 30, 1872. 

Stock in chair and cabinet shop 944, 844 16 

Shoeshop 767 48 

Tailor shop 2,409 19 

Blacksmith shop 184 25 

Stone shop 1,707 15 

Tools, machinery, etc., in chair and cabinet shop 84, 551 59 

Shoeshop ^ 85 39 

Tailor shop 168 80 

Blacksmith shop 898 61 

Stoneshop 495 40 

Soap house 81 90 

Bam and yard .... 1,481 56 

Miscellaneous merchandise 598 18 

Proyisions and forage 458 80 

Wood 1,195 00 

Live stock 1,258 00 

Furniture, etc., in various apartments 7,000 00 

Ou tstanding accounts 6 , 214 06 

1108, 828 96 



■^r* 



84 



POPULATION STATISTICS. 



TABLE 1. 
AMOUNT OP CLOTHING FURNISHED. 

October, 1871 1663 75 

November, . . .do 417 60 

December, ... do 608 00 

January, 1872 470 00 

February, ... .do 614 50 

March, do 892 25 

April, do 496 75 

May, do 875 00 

June, do 845 00 

July, do 492 00 

August, do 880 60 

September, . . .do 511 25 

Total 15,611 50 

The aboYC table includes 100 going-out suits for discharged prisoners. 





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Tablb 4. — JReceipts — continued. 

RECAPITULATION. 

COUNTIES FROM WHERE RECEIVED. 

Brown 6 

Chippewa 1 

Columbia 8 

Crawford 1 

Dane 6 

Dodge 2 

Dunn 1 

Eau Claire 1 

Fond du Lac 1 

Grant 8 

Green 1 

Jackson 8 

Jefferson ; 8 

Juneau 6 

£enosha 8 

La Crosse 7 

La Fayette 1 

Manitowoc 1 

Marquette 1 

Milwaukee 2 

Monroe .> 6 

Oconto 1 

Outagamie 1 

OzauKee 2 

Pierce 2 

Portage 1 

Racine 1 

Richland 1 

Rock 8 

Sauk 1 

Shawano 1 

St. Croix 2 

Vernon 4 

Walworth 8 

Waukesha 2 

Waupaca 1 

Winnebago 6 

Total 05 



HABITS. 

Temperate 88 

Moderate 89 

Intemperate 28 

Total 05 



96 
Table 4. — Iieceipts^Iiecapitul<Utonr--contimied. 

CRIMES. 

Arson 3 

Accessory before the fact to the crime of rape 1 

Aidinff prisoners to escape 1 

Assault with intent to kill 8 

Assault with intent to rape 2 

Assault with intent to steal 1 

Burglary 6 

Burglary and larceny 4 

Burglary with arms 1 

Burning hay stack 1 

Grand larceny 3 

Horse-stealing 7 

Incest 1 

Keeping house of ill-fame 4 

Larceny 87 

Manslaughter, 2d degree 1 

Manslaughter, 3d degree 1 

Mayhem 1 

Murder 2 

Obtaining money under false pretenses 4 

Passing counterfeit money 4 

Polygamy 1 

Rape 1 

Total _95 

CONJUGAL RELATIONS. 

Married 33 

Single 54 

Widowers 6 

Widows 1 

Divorced 1 

Total 95 



NATIVITY. 

Native 53 

Foreign 42 

Total 95 



SEX. 

Males 90 

Females 5 

ToUd 95 



97 
Table 4 — Receipts — ^jBecapt^w/a^»on— continued. 

TERMS OF SENTENCE. 

During life 2 

18 years 1 

12 years 2 

11 years 1 

10 years 2 

8 years 1 

7 years 2 

6 years 8 

4i years 1 

4 years 6 

8 years 5 

r2i years 3 

* 2 years 15 

1 year 10 months and 10 days 1 

1 J years 2 

15 months 1 

1 year 27 

9 months 4 

8 months 4 

6 months 8 

Total 95 



PLACE OF BIRTH. 

Bohemia 1 

Canada 5 

Connecticut 1 

Denmark 1 

England 5 

Germany 11 

Hungary 1 

Illinois 4 

Indiana 2 

Ireland 7 

Kentucky 2 

Massachusetts ... 4 

New Hampshire 2 

New York 12 

Norway 8 

Ohio 8 

Pennsjlyania 7 

Prussia 4 

Scotland 8 

Switzerland 1 

Virginia 8 

Vermont 1 

Wisconsin 7 

Total 95 



7— St. Phis. (Doc. 11.) 



98 
Table 4. — JReceipts — SecapitulaHan — continued. 

JIELIGIOUB ITSTRUCTION. 

Adyentist 1 

Baptist S 

Catholic 38 

Christian 8 

Congregational 2 

Episcopal 4 

Pree-will Baptist 1 

Jew 8 

Lutheran 18 

Methodist 37 

None 6 

Presbyterian 8 

United Brethren 1 

Uniyersalist 1 

Total 05 

EDUCATIONAL RELATIONS. 

Read and write English 69 

Read and write English and German 6 

Read and write English, German and French 1 

Read and write German 12 

Read and write Norwegian 8 

Read and write Bohemian 1 

Read but not write 7 

Neither 6 

Total 05 



AGES. 

From 12 to 20 15 

From 20 to 80 46 

From 80 to 40 19 

From 40 to 60 10 

From 50 to 60 8 

From 60 to 70 

From 70 to 80 2 

Total 95 



COLOR. 

White 91 

Indian 2 

Black 1 

Mulatto 1 

Total 95 



99 
Table 4. — Jteceipts — Hecapitulation-^-^ontimxed. 

OCCUPATIONS. 

Artist 1 

Bank clerk 1 

Barber 1 

Bar-keeper , 1 

Blacksmith . . . • 6 

Brewer 1 

Bricklayer 2 

Bruahmaker 1 

Cabinet maker 1 

Carpenter 2 

Clerk 1 

Carriage maker 1 

Chair maker 1 

Circus performer ^ 1 

Cook 1 

Distiller 1 

Farmer 21 

Gas pipe maker 1 

Harness maker 1 

Hotel keeper 2 

Hoase keeper 8 

Indian Chief 1 

Laborer 10 

Lumberman; 4 

Machinist. . ! 1 

Merchant 1 

Moulder 1 

Painter 8 

Pedlar 1 

Produce dealer 1 

Publisher 1 

Real estate dealer 1 

Sailor I 2 

Sawyer 2 

Sewing machine agent 1 

Shoemaker 8 

Showman 1 

Stage driver 1 

Saloon keeper 1 

Stone cutter 4 

Tailor 1 

Teamster 1 

Washwoman 1 

Woolen mill operative 1 

Total 95 



100 



TABLE 5. 



PRISONERS DISCHARGED FROM OCT. 1, 1871 to OCT. 1, 1872. 
*Their pardons simply restore tbem to citizenship. 



No. 



1450 
1559 
1557 
1586 
1558 
1560 
1556 
1201 
1393 
1564 
1316 
1573 
1551 
1582 
1482 
1485 
1608 
1585 
1415 
1414 

1496 
1598 
1219 
1176 
1596 
1587 
1502 
1583 
1431 
1590 
1555 
1591 
1544 
1606 
1588 
1507 
1620 
1621 

289 
1508 
1513 

997 
1254 



NAine. 



William Lewis 

Martin Peterson 

J. Wm. Wilson 

Henry Peterson 

John'ferown 

John Hunt 

Charles Johnson. . . . 

Francis Cohn 

Aaron Winters 

William Dennis.... 

E. F. Barton 

Merritt Bates 

Thomas Ladds 

William Johnson. . . 

S. H. Phelps 

Geo. W. Duncan... 

John Lynch 

Morris Hodges 

Patrick Monyhan . 
Humphrey Monyhan 

George Henderson, . 

C. W. McRea 

William Bassett. . . . 

Jay Holloway 

Duane Crotsenberg. 
Michael Higgins... 

Owen Cain 

Henry Brown 

Jacob. Wilson 

Albert C. Kenniston . 

John Lynch 

William Lattimer. . . 
Michael Laviviere. . 
Thomas Powell... 

George Jarvis 

John E. Shelby. . . . 
Herman Mayer .... 
William Mayer .... 
Francis H. Stevens. 

George Elliott 

Marion Robinson. . . 

Prudent LeMay 

Patrick Kelly 



Connty where 
from. 



Vernon 

Dane 

.. do 

Dunn 

Dane 

. . .do 

La Crosse . . . 
Milwaukee . . 
Walworth . . . 
Milwaukee . 

Dane 

Waupaca . . . 
Outagamie . 

Green 

Dodge 

Racine 

Eau Claire . 

Racine 

Pierce 

. .do 



Monroe 

Pierce 

Winnebago 
Milwaukee . . 

Rock 

Dunn 

Dane 

Green 

Monroe 

...do 

La Crosse . . . 

Monroe 

Brown 

La Crosse. .. . 
Chippewa . . . 
La Crosse. . . . 
Winnebago. . 

do 

Waukesha... 
Walworth . . . 

Vernon 

Pierce 

Sheboygan . . 



How Discharged. 



Commutation 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Governor's pardon, 

Commutation 

do 

, do , 

, do , 

do 

do 

Governor's pardon. 

Commutation 

do 

Governor's pardon . 

do 

do 



When 
DiBchM. 



Commutation 

Death 

Governor's pardon. 

Commutation 

Governor's pardon. 

do 

do 

Commutation 

Death 

Governor's pardon. 

do 

Commutation 

Governor's pardon. 

Commutation 

do 

do 

do 

.. ..do 

Governor's pardon. 

Commutation 

do 

Governor's pardon. 
do 



1871. 
Oct 10 
Oct 12 
Oct 12 
Oct 17 
Oct 18 
Oct 18 
Oct 24 

*Oct 25 

Oct 26 

Oct 30 

Oct 30 

Oct 31 

Nov. 2 

Nov. 11 

Nov.29* 

Dec. 21 

Dec. 23 

Dec. 23 

Dec.29* 

Dec.29* 

1872. 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 5 

♦Jan. 9 
Jan. 16 

♦Jan. 19 

♦Jan. 30 

♦Jan. 31 
Feb. 1 
Feb. 7 

♦Feb. 9 
Feb. 9 
Feb. 10 
Feb. 10 
Feb. 12 
Feb. 19 
Feb. 22 
Feb. 24 
Feb. 24 
Mar. 4 
Mar. 15 
Mar. 18 
Mar. 22 

♦Mar. 27 



101 
Table 6 — Prisoners Discharged during the year — continued. 



ITo. 



1241 
1568 
1647 
1662 
1686 
1619 
1263 
1576 
1898 
1597 
1848 
1563 
1410 
1615 
1278 
1486 
1036 
1372 
1609 
1283 
1682 
1549 
1554 
1618 
1612 
1611 
1613 
1614 
1667 
1610 
1537 
1467 
1584 
1540 
1522 
1646 
1536 
1468 
1678 
1677 
1628 
1541 
1625 
1310 
1566 
1631 
1675 
1570 
1571 
1635 
1481 
1553 




William Lake 

Jacob Miller 

Wilhelm Fislier . . . 

Harry Smith 

James ^gan 

Carl J. Christoplison 
Sylvester Lattin .... 
John Cooper, Jr . . . . 

Henry Miller 

William Butterfield. 

Ross Conklin 

William O'Donnell. 

Hugo Kroscher 

John Kellv 

Adolph Blume 

Eugene M. Easting. 

Malcolm Wells 

John McCannon 

Andrew Barhyadt. . . 

Abram Hall 

David Hlffh 

Charles Meyers 

George Eeltenbach . 

James Rowan 

George Brown 

Richard A. Stewart. 
William Henderson . 

Joseph Ready 

John Ingrame 

Geo. H. Dennis 

James Johnson 

Henry Parks 

Dennis Lon^ 

Peter L. Mifier 

John Copp 

John Dedrick 

John W. Bambrough 
Robert Buckland. . . 
John S. Tillotson. . , 
Nathaniel S.Outman 

Charles Jones 

Warren Flint 

William Cross 

Andrew Bauldauf . * 

Peter Reise 

James Buttlcr 

August Degan 

Hans Peter Peterson 
Christ'n Rasmuessen 
Henry Reckerts.... 

Orlando Casler 

Selden Bo wen 



Connty where 
from. 



How DiBcharged. 



When dis- 
charged. 



Adams 

La Fayette . . 
St. Croix .... 


Commutation 

do 


do 


Rock 


do 


Columbia . . . 


do 


Milwaukee . . 


do 


Waukesha.. . 


do 


Waukesha... 
Milwaukee . . 
Columbia . . . 
Milwaukee . . 

Rock 

Rock 

La Crosse . . . 
Milwaukee . . 
Racine 


Governor's pardon. 

President's pardon. 

Commutation 

Governor's pardon. 

Commutation 

Governor's pardon. 

Commutation 

do 

do ........... 


Waukesha. . . 
Columbia . . . 


Governor's pardon. 
do 


Columbia . . . 

Dane 

Grant 

Crawford. . . . 


Commutation 

President's pardon. 
Escaped. 


La Crosse . . . 
Milwaukee . . 
La Crosse . . . 
La Crosse . . . 


Governor's pardon. 
Order Suprm. Court 

Commutation 

do 


Eau Claire .. 
La Crosse . . . 


Governor's pardon. 
do 


Richland .... 


do 


Monroe 

Iowa 

Rock 


Commutation 

Governor's pardon. 
do ..:. 


Racino 

Fond du Lac. 

Jefferson 

Dunn 

Iowa 

La Fayette . . 
Columbia . . . 


Commutation 

Governor's pardon. 

Commutation 

Governor's pardon. 

Commutation 

do 


do 


Columbia . . . 


do 


Brown 

Fohd du Lac 
Grant 


Governor's pardon. 

Commutation 

do 


Milwaukee . . 
Waukesha.. . 
Vernon 


Governor's pardon. 

Commutation 

do 


Ozaukee .... 
Columbia . . . 
Columbia . . . 


Expiration 

Commutation 

do 


Outagamie . . 
Dodge 


Governor's pardon. 
do 


La (S*osse . . . 


Commutation 



Mar. 8 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 1 
Apr. 11 
Apr. 11 
Apr. 18 
Apr. 15 
Apr. 22 
Apr, 27 

♦Apr. 80 
MTay 2 
May 11 
May 16 
May 17 
May 20 
May 20 

♦May 30 
June 3 
June 10 
June 17 
June 17 
June 19 
June 19 
June 20 
June 20 



1 
1 
3 
8 
9 
9 



♦July 

♦July 

♦July 
July 

♦July 

♦July 
July 10 

♦July 15 
July 23 

♦July 24 
July 24 
July 31 
Aug. 4 
Aug. 4 

♦Aug. 5 
Aug. 8 
Aug. 14 

♦Aug. 16 
Sep. 2 
Sep. 2 
Sep. 
Sep. 10 
Sep. 10 

♦Sep. 10 
Sep. 18 
Sep. 14 



102 
Tablb 5. — Pri$<mer$ Dueharged during year — continnecL 



No. 


Name. 


Ooontj when 
from. 


How dlfchirgod. 


When dis- 
charged. 


1548 
1426 
1562 
1572 
1624 


William Hinson. . . . 
Andrew H. Adams. . 

John Fraser 

Arthur Lee 

Chas. B. Dayenport. 


Crawford.... 
Milwaukee . . 
Outagamie . . 
Ck)lumbia . . . 
Grant 


Commutation 

QoYernor*8 pardon 

Commutation 

....do ••.. 

Expiration. ........ 


Sept 16 
Sept 22 
Sept 28 
Sept 26 
Sept 28 



RECAPITULATION. 

Commutation (including 20 pardoned to restore citizenship) 78 

Goremor's pardon 13 

President's pardon 2 

Death 2 

Escaped 2 

Expiration 2 

Order Supreme Court 1 



Total. 



100 



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117 
Table 6. — Prison Population Exhibit — continued. 

RECAPITULATION. 

COLOR 

White 181 

Black : 2 

Indian ^ 4 

Total 187 

NATIVITY. 

Native 108 

Foreign ^ ; . 79 

Total 187 



SEX. 

Males 180 

Females 7 

Total 187 



HABITS. 

Moderate 89 

Temperate 65 

Intemperate 48 

Total 187 



CONJUGAL RELATIONS. 

Single ; 110. 

Married 57 

Widower 16 

Widow 8 

Divorced 1 

Total 187 

Average population — ... .200} 



118 



TABLE 7. 



LIFE MEMBERS IN PRISON OCTOBER 1, 1873. 



No. 



115 

822 

891 

460 

586 

644 

776 

825 

828 

831 

844 

852 

872 

980 

944 

955 

978 

1039 

1057 

1190 

1210 

1818 

1314 

1831 

1332 

1844 

1442 

1452 

1499 

1518 

1519 

1538 

1602 

1606 

1638 

1700 



Name. 



Crime. 



Ck>aiity when 
Convicted. 



Fred'k Schultz. 
Edward Walsh. 
Patrick Bennett 
H. Schoonover. . 
Patrick Crook. . 
Jos. Eichinger. . 

Jas. Croak 

Jno. Vande Wal 
Joshua Wilson. 

D. S. Shearer . . 
W.T.Ward.... 
John Pennings. 
Ferd. Peglan.. . 
Jacob Clear. . . . 
G. Brundstetter. 

Jas. Walters 

Geo. Wilson.... 
C. H. Harney . . 
Nicholas Knorr 
Jas. B. Carter. . . 
Jos. Deleglise. . 
A. J. Howard.. . 
Elias H. Reid.. 
Henry Bulman. 
Samuel Babb... 
Pat. McDonald. 
Fred. Williams 
Robert N. West. 
Samuel Watson 
M. Burcsch .... 
John Hogan . . . 
Wm. P. Duvall. 

E. Zimmerman. 
John Schroeder 
*NicholasLillis. 
Henry C. Rice. . 



Murder 
. . . do . . . 
. . . do . . . 
. . .do. . . 
. . .do. . . 
. . .do. . . 
. . .do.. . 
. ..do. . . 
. . .do. . . 
. . .do. . . 
. . .do.. . 
. . .do.. . 

• • ■ Vft v/ • * « 

. . .do. . . 
. . .do.. . 
...do... 
. ..do. . . 
. ..do.. . 
. . .do.. . 
. . .do. . . 

Rape . . 

Murder 
. . .do. . . 
. . .do.. . 
. . .do. . . 
. . .do.. . 
. . .do. . . 
. . .do. . . 
. . .do . . . 
. . .do . . . 
. . . do . . « 
. . .do. . . 
. . . do . . . 
. . . do . . . 
. . . do . . . 
. . . do . . . 



Dodge . . . 
Waushara. . 
Milwaukee. 
St. Croix.. . 

Dodge 

Manitowoc. 

Dane , 

Brown . . . 
Outagamie 
Milwaukee. 
Waushara . 

Brown 

Manitowoc. 
La Crosse 
Sheboygan 

Grant 

Milwaukee. 

Grant 

Dodge .... 
La Crosse . 
Shawano.. . 
Milwaukee. 
. . . .do .... 
FondduLac 
Jefferson. . 

Dodffe 

FondduLac 

Rock 

Racine 

Manitowoc. 

. . . .do 

Walworth.. 
Green Lake 
Milwaukee. 
Oconto . . . 
Columbia. 



When sentenced. 



Oct. 17, 1854 
Oct. 9, ia57 
Apr. 28, 1858 
Nov.22, 1858 
Apr. 6,1860 
Nov. 1, 1860 
Nov.14, 1863 
Junel2, 1863 
Junel7, 1863 
July 10, 1863 
Oct. 3,1862 
Oct. 12, 1863 
Dec. 23, 1863 
May 8,1865 
June 9, 1865 
Sept.28, 1865 
Oct 27, 1865 
Mar. 23, 1866 
Mar. 16, 1867 
June 7, 1867 
Aug.lO, 1867 
May 9,1868 
May 9,1868 
Sept.l8, 18G8 
Sept.28, 1868 
Oct. 15, 1868 
Nov.15, 1869 
Nov.26, 1869 
Apr. 9,1870 
July 23, 1870 
July 23, 1870 
Oct. 22, 1870 
Junel6, 1871 
July 5,1871 
Nov. 4, 1871 
June 8, 1871 



Oocnpfttion. 



Blacksmith 

Laborer. 

Laborer. 

Farmer. 

Ham. m^kr. 

Fanner. 

Laborer. 

Blacksmith 

None. 

Gambler. 

Bricklayer 

Blacksmith 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Carpenter. 

Shoemaker. 

Laborer. 

Physician. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Fisherman 

Fireman. 

Carpenter. 

Bricklayer 

Farmer. 

Farmer. 

Clergyman. 

Housek'pr. 

Farmer. 

Blacksmith 

Farmer. 



Native 15 



119 



TABLE 7. 



LIFE MEMBERS IN PRISON OCTOBER 1, 1873. 



Nativity. 



Prussia 

Ireland 

Ireland 

Pennsylvania .. . 

Ireland 

Germany 

Ireland 

Holland 

New York 

New York 

Missouri 

Holland 

Germany 

Indiana 

Germany 

Pennsylvania . . . 

New York 

Kentucky 

Germany 

Maine 

Switzerland 

Wisconsin 

Nova Scotia 

New York 

England 

Ireland 



Habits. 



CoDjngal 
lielatlons. 



Moderate ... 

Intemperate. 

...do 

Temperate.. 

Moderate .. . 

...do 

...do 

Intemperate. 

Moderate ... 

. . .do 

Temperate. . 

.. .do 

Moderate . . . 

Intemperate. 

Temperate. . 

Moderate . . . 

...do 

Temperate . . 

Moderate . . . 

Temperate . . 

Moderate ... 

...do 

Temperate. . 

Intemperate. 

Moderate .. . 

...do 

Georgia do 

Ohio , Temperate. . 

Ireland Moderate .. . 

Bohemia do 

Ireland . . .do 

Pennsylvan i a . . . Temperate . . 

Germany 

Germany 

Ireland 

New Hampshire. 



do 

Moderate .. . 
Intemperate. 
Moderate ... 



Married . 
Widower 
. . . .do . . . 
Married . 
Widower 
Married . 
Single . . . 

Married . 

Single.. . 

Married . 
....do ... 
. . . do . . . 
. . . .do . . . 
Widower. 

Married . 

Single... 

Married . 
Widower. 

Single. . . 

! '. .* .'do '. '. '. 

. . . .do . . . 

Widower. 

....do ... 

Married . 

— do . . . 

Single... 

Widower. 

...do ... 

Married . 

Widower. 

Widow. . 

Widower. 

Married . 

, .. .do .. . 



Color. 



Ac:e. 



BcligioDB Instrac- 
tion. 



White. 

. . do . . 

. .do . . 

. . do . . 

. . do . . 

. . do . . 

..do . . 

..do .. 

Indian. 

White. 
. . .do . . 
. ..do .. 
...do .. 
. ..do . . 
. . .do . . 
. . .do . . 
. ..do .. 
. ..do . . 
. . .do . . 
. ..do .. 
...do .. 
. ..do . . 
...do .. 
... .do . . 
. . . do . . 
. . .do . . 

Black . 

White . 
. . .do . 
. . .do . . 
. . .do . . 
. . . do . . 
. ..do . . 
. . .do . . 
. . .do . . 
. . . do . . 



50 

45 

41 

38 

70 

43 

44 

24 

35 

82 

25 

26 

51 

24 

28 

45 

27 

50 

50 

24 

20 

21 

24 

52 

39 

54 

22 

34 

CO 

65 

55 

46 

42 

41 

33 

72 



Lutheran. 

Catholic. 

Catholic. 

Methodist. 

Catholic. 

Catholic. 

Catholic. 

Catholic. 

Presbyterian. 

Baptist. 

Christian. 

Catholic. 

Presbyterian. 

None. 

Catholic. 

Quaker. 

Catholic. 

Christian. 

Lutheran. 

Methodist. 

Catholic. 

Methodist. 

Baptist. 

Methodist. 

Methodist. 

Catholic. 

Methodist. 

Congregational. 

Presbyterian. 

Lutheran. 

Catholic. 

Methodist. 

Lutheran. 

Lutheran. 

Catholic. 

Christian. 



Foreign 21 



120 
Table 7. — Life Members — continued. 



RECAPITULATION. 



NATIVITY. 

Ireland 8 

Germany 6 

New York 4 

Pennsylvania 8 

Holland 2 

Prussia 

Bohemia 

Eneland 

Switzerland 

Nova Scotia 

New Hampshire 

Missouri 

Indiana 

Kentucky 

Maine 

Georgia 

Ohio 

Wisconsin 



Total 



36 



COUNTIES WHERE FROM. 



Milwaukee 6 

Dod^e 4 

Manitowoc 4 

Waushara 2 

Brown. ... * 2 

La Crosse 2 

Grant 2 

Fond du Lac 2 

Dane 

Racine 

Oconto 

St. Croix 

Outagamie 

Sheboygan 

Shawano 

Rock 

Jefferson- 

Walworth 

Green Lake 

Columbia 



Total 86 



SEX. 



Male . . . 
Female. 



85 

1 



Total 36 



121 
Table 7. — Life Members — Recapitulation — continued, 

RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION. 

Catholic 13 

Methodist 7 

Lutheran 6 

Baptist 2 

Presb^rian 3 

Christian , 8 

ConCTegational 1 

Qaaler 1 

None • 1 

Total _JI6 

CONJUGAL RELATIONS. 

Married 15 

Single 9 

Widower 11 

Widow 1 

Total 36 

AGES. 

From 20 to 30 11 

30 to 40 6 

40 to 50 8 

50 to 60 7 

60 to 70 2 

70 to 80 2 

Total 36 

HABITS. 

Moderate 20 

Temperate 10 

Intemperate 6 

Total 36 

COLOR. 

White \ 34 

Black 1 

Indian 1 

Total 36 



m 



TABLE 8. 



EXHIBIT OP UNITED STATES PRISONERS. 



PBI80IT POPTTLATION. 



Name. 


Connty where 
Convicted. 


When Sentenced. 


Term, 


Crime. 


Gfaas. E. Douglas . 
Wm. McPherson . 
George Thompson 
Hen^ Hopkins . . 
Ed. C. Griswold . . 


^Milwaukee. 

.... do 

. . . .do 

Dane 

.... do ..... 


Sept 22, 1869 
Sept 22, 1869 
Feb. 9,1870 
Feb. 28, 1871 
June 28, 1871 
Mar. 14, 1872 
June 25, 1872 


7 years 
7 years 
6 years 
5 years 
5 years 
5 years 
10 years 


Pass. ct. money. 
Pass, ct money. 
Pass, ct money. 
Pass, ct money. 
Pass, ct money. 
Pass, ct money. 
Pass, ct money. 


Geo. A. Thrall.... 
N.B. Latta 


. . .do 

. . . .do 







DISCHARGED. 



Name. 


Ho\«. 


When. 


Jav Hollowav 


Commutation 


Jan. 16,1872. 
Apr. 22,1872. 
June 10, 1872. 


Henry Miller 


President's pardon 

President's pardon 


Abram Hall 





Amount received from the United States for support of above 
mentioned prisoners $1 ,601 26 



123 



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124 
Table 9 — Showing number and how discharged — continued. 



RECAPITULATION. 



Per cent. 



Commutation 

Expiration 

Governor's pardon 

President's pardon 

Death 

Suicide 

Escaped 

Order supreme court 

Order secretary war 

Writ of habeas corpus 

Kemoved to insane asylum 

Kemoved to State Industrial School 

Total 




126 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 

Showing the various characteristics and relations of prisoners 
received since the organization of the Prison — said statistics 
dating back to the reception of each prisoner. 

COUNTIES WHERE SENTENCED. ' 

Adams 6 

Brown 85 

Buffalo 3 

Calumet 2 

Chippewa 6 

Clark 2 

Columbia 59 

Crawford 21 

Dane 108 

Dodge 60 

Douglas 1 

Dunn 5 

Eau Claire 14 

Fond du Lac 43 

Grant 56 

Green 12 

Green Lake 7 

Iowa 21 

Jackson 13 

Jefferson ^ 52 

Juneau 17 

Kenosha 26 

Kewaunee 1 

La Crosse 71 

LaFayette 14 

Manitowoc 18 

Marathon 2 

Marquette 12 

Milwaukee 551 

Monroe 23 

Oconto 5 

Outagamie 14 

Ozaukee 3 

Pepin 4 

Pierce 8 

Polk 3 

Portage 8 

Racine 70 

Richland 7 

Rock 117 

Sauk 16 

Shawano 3 

Sheboygan 14 

St. Croix 11 



126 

Statistical Tables — Counties where Sentenced'—conimued. 

Trempealeau 3 

Vemon 20 

Walworth 47 

Washington ... % 8 

Waakesha : 40 

Waupaca 9 

Waushara 6 

Winnebago 29 

Wood 2 

Total 1,718 



NATIVITY. 



AHERICA17B. 



Alabama 3 

Arkansas 3 

Connecticut 14 

Florida 2 

Georgia 3 

Illinois 32 

Indiana 14 

Iowa 4 

Kentucky 15 

Louisiana 4 

Maine I, 19 

Mar}'land 3 

Massachusetts 33 

Michigan 21 

Mississippi 2 

Missouri 13 

New Hampshire 12 

New Jersey' 8 

New York 382 

North Carolina 6 

Ohio 99 

Pennsylvania 82 

Rhode Island 1 

South Carolina 3 

Tennessee 3 

Texas , 1 

Vermont 88 

Virginia 21 

Wisconsin 82 

Total 923 



127 



Statistical Tables — Nativity — contiuued. 



FOREIGN. 

Atlantic Ocean 2 

Belgium 2 

Bohemia 11 

Canada 78 

Denmark 11 

England 67 

France 7 

Germany and Prussia 293 

Holland 11 

Hungary 8 

Isle of Man ; 2 

Ireland 229 

Jamaica ' 1 

Mexico ~ , . . 2 

New Foundland 1 

Norway 28 

Nova Scotia 6 

Sandwich Islands 1 

Scotland 15 

Sweeden / 6 

Switzerland 12 

Wales 7 

Total 795 





RECAPITULATION. 








Total. 


Per cent. 


American 


923 
795 


53.72 


Foreiim 


46.28 








A^sresrate 


1,718 


100.00 







128 
Statistical Tables — continued. 

AGES. 

Under 12 years 3 

From 12 to 20 340 

From 20 to 80 753 

From 30 to 40 367 

From 40 to 50 156 

From 50 to 60 74 

From 60 to 70 18 

From 70 to 80 7 

Total 1,718 



COLOR. 

White 1,661 

Black . 46 

Indian 6 

Mulatto 5 

Total 1,718 



SEX. 

Males 1,620 

Females 98 

Total 1,718 



129 
Statistical Tables — continued. 

CRIMES. 

Accessory before the fact to the crime of rape 1 

Adultery 11 

Aiding prisoners to escape 1 

Altering and forging U. o. treasury notes 3 

Arson 53 

Assault with intent to kill 70 

do maim 3 

do rape 32 

do steal 10 

Bigamy 3 

Breaking church 1 

Burglary 220 

Burglary and larceny 15 

Burglary with arms ; 5 

Burning hay-stack 1 

Claiming and opening letters 3 

Counterfeiting 49 

Desertion 1 

Embezzlement 20 

Forgery 30 

Fraud... 1 

Illegal voting 1 

Incest 10 

Keeping house of ill-fame 21 

Larceny of different grades 883 

Manslaughter, Ist degree .... 15 

do 2d . .do 16 

do 8d..do 27 

..do 4th. .do 10 

Mayhem.' 2 

Murder, 1st degree 68 

Murder, 2d degree 6 

Murder, 3d degree 3 

Obtaining money under false pretenses 13 

Passing forged order 1 

Perjury 6 

Placing obstructions on railroad track 4 

Poison mg wells 1 

Polygamy 14 

Prisofi breaking 5 

Rape 29 

Receiving stolen goods 5 

Robbery 45 

Seduction , 2 

Sodomy 4 



Total 1,71 8 

PERCENT. 

Crimes against person 20.37 

Crimes against property 79.63 

Total 100.00 

9— 8t. Pmb. (Doc. 11.) 



130 
Statiatical Tables — continued. 

SENTENCES. 

Daring life 71 

^ years 1 

15 years 2 

14 years 2 

13 years 4 

12 years 14 

11 years ^ 1 

10 years and 6 months 1 

10 years 33 

9 years and 6 months 1 

9 years 2 

8 years 11 

7 years and 5 days 1 

7 years 26 

6 years and 6 montlis 1 

years 9 

5 years and 6 months 1 

5 years 67 

4 years and 6 months 1 

4 years 60 

3 years and 6 months 4 

3 years and 1 day 1 

3 years 141 

2 years and 11 montlis 1 

2 years, 6 montlis and 10 days 1 

3 years and 6 months 27 

2 years and 4 months 1 

2 years and 3 months 5 

2 years and 10 days 1 

2 years and 5 days 3 

2 years and 3 days 3 

2 years and 1 day 2 

3 years 374 

year and 11 months 1 

year, 10 months and 10 days 1 

year, 10 months and 5 days 1 

year and 10 months 2 

year andO months 3 

year and 8 months 3 

year, 6 months and 5 dnys 1 

year and 6 months 68 

year and 5 months 3 

year and 4 months 5 

year and 3 months 10 

year and 2 months 1 

year, 1 month and 7 days 1 

year and 1 montli 1 

year and 10 days 6 

year and 3 days 2 

year and 1 day 8 

year 572 

months 8 

9 months 17 



131 
Statistical Tables — continued. 

Sentsnees — continued . 

8 years and 1 day 2 

8 years 18 

6 years and 8 days 2 

6 years and one day 2 

6 years IIG 

Total 1 ,718 

Aggregate amount of sentencesi exclusiye of life. 
Average sentences, exclusiye of life. 

OCCUPATIONS. 

Agent 1 

Artist 8 

Baker 18 

Bank clerk 2 

Barber 13 

Barkeeper 8 

Basket-maker • 1 

Blacksmith 51 

Boatman 1 

Boiler-maker 1 

Bookbinder 8 

Book-keeper 10 

Boot and shoe fitter 2 

Box-maker 1 

Brakeman 1 

Brewer 8 

Bricklayer .■ 5 

Brickmaker 1 

Brushmakcr 4 

Butcher 17 

Cabin boy 1 

Cabinet-maker 18 

Carpenter 76 

Oarriage-maker • 1 

Chair-maker 2 

Cigar-maker 9 

Circus performer 1 

Clergyman 4 

Clerk 29 

Clock-maker 2 

Clothier 2 

Confectioner 1 

Cook 22 

Cooper 18 

Coppersmith 1 

Dance performer 1 

Daguerrean artist 2 

Daguerrean case-maker 1 

Dentist 1 

Detective 1 

Distiller 2 



132 

Statistical 7ad/e«— continued. 

Oeeupatians — continued. 

Draftsman 1 

Drayman 8 

Dressmaker 4 

Druffgist 1 

En^eer. 10 

Farmer 480 

Finisher 4 

Fireman 6 

Fisherman.' 6 

Gambl er 1 

Gardener 4 

Gas-fitter 1 

Gas pipe maker 1 

Glove maker 1 

Goldsmith 1 

Gunsmith 2 

Hackdiiver 1 

Harness maker 16 

Horse farrier 1 

Horse shoer 1 

Hostler 8 

Housekeeper 45 

Indian chief 1 

Jeweler 5 

Laborer 290 

Land agent 1 

Lawyer 4 

Livery stable keeper 1 

Lock maker 1 

Lumberman 26 

Machinist..... 15 

Manufacturer of musical instruments 1 

Mattrass maker 1 

Mason 15 

Merchant 4 

Miller 10 

Milliner 2 

Millwright 1 

Miner 6 

Moulder 5 

Newsboy 4 

None 28 

Painter 88 

Paper folder 1 

Paper maker 1 

Pedlar , 8 

Physician 18 

Photographer 1 

Plasterer 1 

Porter 8 

Printer 10 

Produce dealer 1 

Publisher 2 

Raftsman 6 

Raihroader 8 



133 
Statistical TaJ/e«— continued. 



Occupations— contiimed. 

Railroad contractor 1 

Bailroad overseer 1 

Heal estate dealers 2 

River boatman 5 

River pilot 1 

Sailor 91 

Saloon keeper 4 

Sash and blind maker 1 

StLwyer 3 

School teacher 1 

Seamstress 12 

Servant 81 

Sewing machine agent 1 

Shingle maker 1 

Ship carpenter 6 

Shoe maker 49 

Showman 4 

Silk manufacturer 1 

Silversmith 8 

Slater 2 

Soap maker 1 

Soldier 10 

Stage driver 5 

Steamboatman 1 

Stonecutter 16 

Stone mason 8 

Store keeper 5 

Tanner 1 

Tailor 14 

Tailoress 1 1 

Tavern keeper G 

Teacher 1 

Teamster 28 

Telegraph operator 1 

Ticket agent 1 

Tinsmith 4 

Tool-maker 1 

Traveling agent 1 

Turner 1 

Tjrpeist 1 

upholsterer 1 

Vagrant • 1 

Wagon maker 6 

Wash woman 2 

Watch maker 2 

Weaver 

Well dagger 1 

Wheat buyer 1 

Wheel-wTight 1 

Woolen mul operative 1 

Total 1,718 



lU 



STATE OF WISCONSIN, Dodge County, ss. 

George F. Wheeler, State Prison Commissioner, being duly 
sworn, says, that the contents of the foregoing report by him 
subscribed, are just and true, according to the best of his knowl- 
edge and belief. 

GEO. F. WHEELER, 

State Prison Commissioner. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 30th^day of Septem- 
ber, 1872. 

L. D. HINKLEY, 

^otar^lPublic. 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



It has been the established policy of our worthy Commis- 
sioner, Hon. G. F. Wheeler, to execute the sentence of the law 
upon the unfortunate victims of crime committed to his charge, 
in the the spirit of kindness, commiseration and pity. Daily 
observation and years of experience, and his long official con- 
nection with this institution as State Prison Commissioner, have 
all conspired to lead him, not only to embrace the theory, but 
• to adopt the law of kindness as the rule in the administration 
of prison discipline. 

He has demonstrated the correctness of the theory that while 
a severe mode of discipline may coerce an unwilling submission 
to the rules and regulations of prison life, it never tends to the 
reformation of the prisoner, but, on the contrary, it has a uni- 
form tendency to keep alive the fires of hate and revenge — 
ready at the first favorable opportunity to break from all re- 
straint with uncontrollable fury, and sometimes with most de- 
plorable consequences. It is to this mild and humane policy of 
our prison discipline that I am mostly indebted for what success 
has attended my department of this institution. 

In regard to the moral and religious department of the prison, 
it gives me great pleasure to report this department of the insti- 
tution in as prosperous and healthy condition as at any time 
since my official connection with it. Notwithstanding, we were 
deprived of the use of the chapel for many weeks during the 
summer, and compelled to worship in a room temporalily fitted 
up for our accommodation, yet the prospect of a speedy return 
to better quarters, inspired us with courage to prosecute our 
work with unabated zeal and uniform cheerfulness. 



136 

" After many days " we returned to the chapel, and found all 
the old familiar andj dilapidated furniture had been removed, 
and new and beautiful fixtures gave us a friendly greeting. 
The organ pealed forth sweet strains of lofty music, again, as if 
newly inspired with the spirit of the ancient bards, and every 
heart responded with increased emotions of thanksgiving and 
praise. These pleasant surroundings, attended by strains of 
beautiful music echoing the praise of God, in lofty hymn and 
song, loaded with the inspiring sentiments of Christian joy and 
hope, must lift up the sad heart of the despairing convict, re- 
kindle the fires of expiring aspiration, melt the soul into 
penitence, and send it burning with Christian devotion to the 
throne of the Eternal. 

We have public religious services in the chapel every Sabbath 
morning at 10^ o'clock. This meeting is attended by all the 
convicts, both male and female. This service is also attended 
by many outside people who are also permitted to attend all our 
public meetings. Many Christian people are frequently seen 
mingling in our devotions. Their presence and sympathy 
cheers us on and strengthens our hands in the great work com- 
mitted to our trust. Their presence not only does us good, but 
steals over this unfortunate congregation with the effect of the 
distant, but approaching friendly sail, to the eye of the ship- 
wrecked mariner. It softens the hardest heart, as it brings to 
his mind his once happy, but now desolate home and loved ones, 
and better days once enjoyed by all, but from some, now passed 
away forever. 

The chapel itself deserves notice in this report, and I am 
happy to say that it is a convenient and beautiful room, the walls 
replastered and finished in the most durable"', manner; the 
trimmings are beautiful and the seats comfortable. The 
platform, pedestals and singing seats, covered with beautiful 
carpet and a new desk, which for beauty of design and complete- 
ness of workmanship, is not surpassed by anything of the kind 
in this part of the state. 

In our morning service, we are governed by the same order 
which is observed in outside congregations. We are greatly 



137 

indebted to those of our friends from the outside, who com- 
pose a large proportion of our choir, and who by their excellent 
music contribute greatly to the interest of our services. 

I must not forget Mr. West, a convict for life, in this institu- 
tion, who is also a member of our choir, and whose superior 
qualifications both as a singer and as a musician have won for 
him the respect of all. 

All who have attended our religious services will, I have no 
doubt, agree with me, that a more attentive and interested con- 
gregation can no where be found. During my ministry of more 
than six years in this prison, I have never seen an indication of 
impious levity, or an instance of apparent contempt for reli- 
gious ordinances. They listen with deep and earnest attention, 
and often with deep emotion. I am convinced that there is a 
greater amount of deep conscious feeling on religious subjects in 
this than in congregations in general, and judging from what is, 
injother congregations, deemed satisfactory evidence, I have no 
doubt that genuine conversions are frequent. Incentives to 
deception are found here, but no giusater than on the outside. 
I organized the prison church some time in February, 1868, with 
a membership of six or eight persons. During that year the 
class increased so rapidly, that before the year closed I was 
compelled to make two classes, and meet them on alternate 
Sabaths, and have continued so to do since that time. 

Our social meetings are held in the chapel, at from 3^ to 4^ 
o'clock Sabbath evening. To these meetings none are admitted 
but such as profess a saving faith in Christ, or who are striving 
for the hope of the gospel — "By breaking off their sins by 
righteousness, and their iniquities by turning to the Lord." 

These meetings are mostly conducted by the convicts them- 
selves. All are permitted to contribute to the interest of the 
meeting by speaking, singing, and prayer. And they make 
them truly interesting, and sometimes greatly affecting. Never 
will these seasons be forgotten — ^at least, not by me. To see 
scores of rough men, men unaccustomed to weep, subdued and 
humbled in view of their sinful condition, and pleading in deep 



138 

agony for mercy and pardon, is truly affecting. This, more than 
anything, illustrates the saying, " This man receiveth sinners." 

Since the organization of the prison church, there have been 
admitted to membership and received the rights of christian 
fellowship, 158 persons. During the same time, there have been 
honorably discharged from our communion, 84 members. Of 
these, I am happy to say that not one, so far as I can ascertain, has 
ever been returned to this or any other prison ; but, on the con- 
trary, I know of many who are occupying places of trust and 
profit, and enjoy the confidence of the community where they 
are now doing an honorable business. They are now building 
up and industriously laboring to redeem, by honest industry, 
what they lost by a reckless life. They are also working in the 
Sabbath schools and churches with which they have connected 
themselves, and have won the confidence of the Christian people 
among whom they live. 

Since my last report, I have received into society, 22 persons, 
and in the same time have discharged 18, which leaves a present 
membership of 34 in good standing. Some, like too many out- 
side, " fall out by the way ;" and some — ^yea, many — ^give good 
evidence of genuine piety, by uniform Christian deportment. 
"By their fruits ye shall know them." But why should we 
doubt? Has the gospel lost its power to save bad men, in or 
out of prison? Before we admit this conclusion, let us ask. 
Prayer was the last that fell upon the ear of the dying Saviour. 
Faintly He heard the accents of prayer for pardon and salvation 
from the lips of a dying malefactor ; and Jesus lingered in the 
pang of His crucifixion and the more terrible agony of His soul 
made an offering for sin,' that He might save a repentant convict. 

The prison school was instituted under authority of law in the 
year 1867,and has been in constant and successful operation since 
that time. Prison schools and the education of convicts in our 
penal institutions are no longer experiments with uncertain 
results. The utility of educating the ignorant in our prison 
population is becoming more and more convincing every year, 
and I believe it is soon to become one of the prominent agencies 
in prison reform. Its good results are not*alone realized by 



139 

the prisoners themselves, but every part of the institution is 
correspondingly benefited by it. In the same proportion as 
the minds of these men are educated and enlightened, and they 
are made to feel the inspiration of new and more elevating 
thoTights and ideas, and wider and loftier views of manhood 
open to the mind, self-respect returns to the soul, and good 
order and better discipline are secured. It is truly remarkable 
that for the whole term of five years that this school has been in 
operation, with a membership of from 40 to 70 scholars, not one 
solitary breach of order has occurred; but all have behaved 
with propriety. There are taught in our prison school, all the 
common branches of education, such as reading writing, spell- 
ing, arithmetic, both mental and written, geography and gram- 
mar. The school is classed as follows: One class in primer; 
one second reader; the remainder in third reader; one class in 
geography and grammar; all study arithmetic, and all practice 
writing. 

There have been admitted to the school since its organization, 
268 scholars. There have been admitted since my last report, 
35. I have discharged in the same time, 38, leaving at this time 
a membership of 42. The school was never doing better than 
at the present time. 

Since our return to the chapel, greater interest is manifested 
in all the classes and studies of the school. I cannot leave this 
subject without expressing and acknowledging my indebtedness 
to those from among the convicts who have, as teachers, ren- 
dered me great assistance in the prosecution of my work. These 
teachers exhibit great interest in this new enterprise, and seem 
anxious to elevate their more unfortunate associates to that 
plane where ignorance shall no longer be an incentive to vice. 

I am permitted, for the first time since my official connection 
with this institution, to report the existence of a prison library, 
a blessing not in disguise, but a blessing long delayed. Though 
every convict is supplied with a bible — and I am pleased to 
know that they are generally read by them — ^yet there is a 
longing for general reading, and mental gratification, which 
only a variety of reading can furnish. The authorities have or- 



140 

dered made a new and beautifully finished case for the recep- 
tion and accommodation of this new and valuable library, and I 
anticipate great pleasure in making my first distribution from 
this fine selection of books, which will be as soon as possible. 
For the aggregate cost of the library, I respectfully refer you 
to the Commissioner's report. 

The library consists of 451 volumes, carefully selected, and 
embracing a wide field of general reading and information. 
Included in this collection of books, are many valuable and 
choice works from the pen of the most eminent writers in this 
and other countries, upon the subjects of religion, history, 
biography, literature and science. Truly, the good people of 
"Wisconsin do not forget even those who forget themselves. 

All these benevolent and humane provisions for the comfort 
and welfare of our prison population are, in my opinion, greater 
preventives of crime, in the future of these convicts, than the 
sentence that confines them here. 

The mildness of our prison discipline; the sabbath with its 
rest and teachings ; then, the school with its chances of obtain- 
ing an education; the library, rich with books suited to the 
wants of all, selected with care from all parts of the country 
and world — truths of interest and of vast importance shine 
from every page. If convicts come here ignorant, they are 
urged, and encouraged, and assisted to learn to read and write. 
They have constantly pressed upon their attention the import- 
ance of improvement, and encouraged to reform, and hope for a 
brighter future. 

I cannot in justice close this report without expressing my 
.sincere thanks to our worthy Commissioner and his subordinate 
officers for their uniform kindness and cheerful cooperation, 
without which I could have accomplished nothing with credit 
to myself or with profit to those for whose welfare I labor. 

Respectfully submitted. 

HENRY DREW, 

Chaplain. 



PHYSICIAFS REPORT. 



I present the following as my annual report of the medical 
department of Wisconsin State Prison, for the year ending- 
September 30, 1872. 

The number of prisoners during the year has been two hun- 
dred and eighty. The average number, about two hundred. 
But two deaths have occurred since the last report, Charles 
McCray, aged 33 years, who was in feeble health on admission, 
suffering from rheumatism and scrofulous disease of the lungs, 
died January 5th of pulmonary consumption. The other, Jacob 
Wilson, aged 81 years^ subject to attacks of asthma, contracted 
a severe cold, which induced congestion of the lungs, of which 
disease he died February 7th. 

The health of the prisoners has been as good as in any similar 
institution in the country. No epidemic disease has prevailed. 
The vigilance of the officers in charge has been particularly^ 
active in averting disease, by requiring personal cleanliness,, 
disinfecting the cells frequently, and causing the food to be well 
cooked, and of a wholesome character, and clothing to be warm 
and comfortable. 

I think education is one of the principal effects, in reformings 
the unfortunate; it has a tendency to inspire new thoughts, in- 
duce higher aims for self respect and personal improvement, and 
contributes very much to contentment and discipline of prison 
life. 

All aid has been rendered the prisoners, that could be under 
the circumstances, to improve their condition, both moral and 
spiritual. They have been furnished with books and papers, and 



142 

have had the advice and teachings of the able Chaplain, in moral 
and religious instruction. We hope and trust, that the influ- 
ence of this instruction will lead them with a true and honest 
purpose, to better lives, for future usefulness and honest indus- 
try. That such men are better prepared to go forth into the 
world, there can be no question. 

I wish to call especial attention to the subject of insanity, 
which seems to be fearfully on the increase, not only in com- 
munity at large, but in our penal institutions. It is reasonable 
to suppose that the normal conditions of the minds and dispo- 
sitions of men are differently constituted. Persons under the ex- 
citement of passion often lose themselves, and perform acts, 
and give utterance to language which in calmer moments they 
would not allow themselves. If these passionate excitements 
are not restrained, they gain more and more power to subdue 
the will while the resolution grows weaker, and gradually the 
subjection of the will to excited feelings, increases, and the 
derangement is continued, until the disorder is fixed, and the 
mind becomes insane. 

The increase of insanity is undoubtedly owing a great deal to 
the high and varied developments of the emotions. Says a late 
writer, "all the circumstances conspire to intensify the feelings; 
pride, ambition, fear, grief, domestic trouble, speculation, re- 
verse of fortune, intoxication, political excitement, all have a 
tendency to intensify the emotions, and worse than all, our edu- 
cation, instead of being a system of self-control and systematic 
course of discipline, is conducted in the same spirit of 
excitement." 

I think it will be admitted, that a fruitful source of insanity 
in our penal institutions, may be incident to the degradation of 
a public trial, the remorse of the crime itself, and the disgrace 
brought upon relations and friends. Propensities of character 
which have been kept under restraint by reason or external cir- 
cumstances, may by, and often are developed by confinement. 

Moral or emotional insanity, as a distinct disease, is now well 
known by our medical men, and it often introduces the unfor- 
tunate individual to confinement in our jails and prisons, where. 



143 

sooner or later, intellectual disturbances take place, which only 
were required to have been developed in society at large. The 
possibility is that the disease may have existed at the time, and, 
perhaps, sugge sted the perpetration of the crime itself. 

Moral insanity is not a disease which begins and ends, except in 
rare instances in the same act of outrage and crime. ^^ The act may 
come like an avalanche which has been preparing under the accu- 
mulating snow of years." A person may go through life, main- 
taining an even contest with the hereditary gift of an insane tem- 
perament, circumstances are favorable, and the will keeps watch 
and ward to prevent any public display of emotion. But a 
crisis comes, when the will stops or is overpowered by some ex- 
citing cause, and the fair fabric of a life goes down in ruins. 
Still the disease was there before, and remains there after 
the downfall, ingrained into the most intimate texture of the 
brain. 

Those who have paid any attention to the predisposing causes 
of insanity, cannot fail to have observed the influence of neg- 
lected moral training in early youth. The neglect of moral 
indisciple gives to the passions and emotions an undue ascend- 
ancy, and allows violent tempers to be formed, on which the 
exciting causes of mental derangement have a much greater 
influence than on persons whose feelings and desires act under 
the guidance of an enlightened moral culture. It has been 
found by investigation that the great mass of criminals is com- 
posed of persons whose childhood and youth were spent in the 
uncontrolled exercise of their vicious instincts. 

Humanity, as well as law, is alike interested in the convict. 
Unless insanity is to be made a universal door of escape for 
criminals, and unless community is to be called upon to chron- 
cle many a disastrous stroke in social life, the definition and de- 
cision of insanity must be left with those who have made it a 
study, and are familiar with it from daily practice. 

This subject is certainly deserving the earnest study and 
careful attention of the reformer, the philanthropist and the 
jurist, as illustrating the connexion of insanity and crime. 



144 

I wish to call your attention to a tabular statement of the in- 
sane at present in confinement in the prison. 

In concluding this report, I cannot refrain from speaking of 
the Commissioner and Deputy Warden, who have at all times 
given great attention to the improvement and reformation of 
the prisoners under their charge, by the law of kindness and 
humanity, to inspire a sense of self respect, which will have a 
beneficial effect after they leave the prison walls. 

To the officers of the institution, I consider myself under 
many obligations. 

H. L. BUTTERFIELD, M.D., 

Prison Physician, 



145 



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DOCUMENT No. 12. 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OP THE 

WISCONSIN 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 

For the year ending October lo, 1872. 



MANAGERS. 

• Ttrm% expire on t?ie 8(2 of April, 1878. 
WM. BLAIR, Waukesha, EDWARD O'NEILL, Milwaukee. 

Term expires on the Zd of Aprils 1874. 
CHARLES R. GIBBS, Whitewater. 

Terms expire on the M of Aprils 1875. 
ANDREW E. ELMORE, Green Bay, 
SAMUEL A. HANDLES, Waukesha. 

Regular Meetings of the Board held on the second Wednesday in Jan- 
uary, April, July and October- 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

EDWARD O'NEILL President. 

WM. BLAIR Vice President. 

ANDREW E. ELMORE Treasurer- 

CHARLE8 R. GIBBS Secretary. 



OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL: 

A. D. HENDRICKSON Stjterintendent. 

Mrs. O. D. HENDRICKSON Matron. 



The Wisconsin Industrial Scliool for Boys, is situated about three- 
fourths of a mile west of the railroad depot, in the village of "Waukesha, 
the county-seat of Waukesha county, Wisconsin. It was organized as a 
House of Refuge, and opened in 1860. The name was afterwards changed 
to State Reform School, and again to Wisconiin Industrial School for 
Boys, its present title. The buildings are located on the southern bank 
of Fox river, in view of the trains as they pass to and from Milwaukee 
and Madison, presenting an attractive front to the traveling public, and 
furnishing the best evidence of the parental care of the State authorities 
for the juvenile delinquents within our borders. 



MANAGERS' REPORT. 



To his Excellency C. C. Washburn, 

Governor of the State of Wisconsin: 

The Board of Managers of the Wisconsin Industrial School 
for Boys have the honor to present this, their annual report^ for 
the year ending October lOth, 1872 : 

The number in school at the beginning of the year was — 

Boys^ 237 ...^ 

Girls a .... 

Total 239 

Number received during the year — boys 107 

Escaped last year, returned do 

Returned from out on ti(;ket do. 1 

Whole number in school during year ', 34T 



Whole number in school since July, 1860 886^ 

Returned to parents on ticket , 85 

Out to place on ticket — 

Boys 21 

Girls 2 

Total 23 

Escaped 10 

Term of commitment expired 

Fully and honorably discharged 

Deaths 1 

Number in school October Ist, 1872 278 

ToUl 347 



EXPENDITURES. 



Our expenditures for the year have amounted 
to the sum of 

Which has been expnded on the following ac- 
counts : 

For amusements and means of instruction . . . 

Clothing 

Medical services, drugs and medicines 

Farm expenses 

Fuel ; 




House furnishing 

Live stock 

Lights (exclusive of fixtures) 

Postage, insurance^freight, livery, telegrams,etc. 

Manufacturing expenses 

Micellaneous purposes 

Bepairs 

Permanent improvements 

Subsistence 

.Salaries and wages 

Farm implements 

Managers 

Total 



$1,235 05 

8,266 35 

214 65 

833 66 

2,571 40 

1,245 06 

600 00 

125 45 

556 02 

1,864 29 

639 52 

1,694 42 

1,644 54 

8,759 68 

10,819 04 

81 28 

388 30 



$36,538 71 



$36,538 71 



In reviewing the history of the Industrial School for the past 
year, the subject of the unusual and unexpected increase in the 
number of inmates first presents itself. We certainly expected 
an increase, but not such as we have realized, or we should have 
asked for means to provide for their accommodation. It 
is difficult to convey to any one unfamiliar with institutions like 
this, a clear idea of the consequences growing out of this influx 
upon us. In order to make room for the newly committed boys, 
we had no alternative but to send away many wko ought to have 
been retained. Those sent away were selected from among the 
boys farthest advanced in reformation of character and in ability 
to aid in their own maintenance, but after all, the necessities 
of our condition furnished the reason for removing them, 
rather than any fitness in themselves to justify it. Of course, 
they were among our older and larger boys. Sending them 
away lessens the working power of the school in all its depart- 
ments. Average of age, deportment, tone of manners, the 
general physique of the school — all are lowered, and visitors 
are at once struck with the thought that a school which has been 



in existence so long ought to exhibit stronger marks of improve* 
ment than we can with the new and young recruits to which we 
are reduced by reason of having made no provision for our 
changed condition. 

This is to be regretted, but it is not the worst view of the mat- 
ter ; the boys sent from here to make room for new comers, are 
exposed to the danger of losing the good we have been able to 
impart to them, and relapsing into the condition from which we 
have only partially rescued them. Experience teaches that a 
second attempt to reform such boys is like that of the physician 
to relieve a patient from a second attack of disease more diffi- 
cult than the first, and much less likely to succeed. The send- 
ing away boys only partially reformed, without stability of 
character, or the power to resist temptation, or their natural 
propensities to do wroug, is calculated to weaken and destroy 
the confidence of the community in this and kindred institu- 
tions, a consideration entitled to some weight in a government 
of the people. 

There is another fact worth mentioning, when we come to 
consider the productive value of the labor of these boys. Those 
in the school at the date of our last report, averaged a little be- 
low fourteen years of age ; those committed since average 
twelve and one-fourth years of age ; as their numbers increase, 
their ages decrease. Our rooms are generally so crowded as to 
hinder or seriously embarrass all attempts to preserve order, or 
enforce such rules as are necessary for the government of any 
class of boys. Our family sitting-rooms and our assembly-room 
have come to resemble a crowded camp, rather than a place 
where one is expected to learn good manners or morals. 

Any one who has attempted to control nearly three hundred 
boys in a room intended only for less than two-thirds of that 
number, can appreciate the difficulty; and when it is remem- 
bered that this is to be repeated seven days in the week for 
fifty-two weeks in the year, it will not be regarded as an over- 
statement. Boys who have been trained in the rowdyism of the 
crowded assemblies in the theatres, concert-rooms or political 
gatherings of our cities and larger towns, are often sent here; 



6 

they find it difficult to abstain from the amusements to which 
they have been accustomed when the chances are presented so 
often and so temptingly. The average boy of the school is very 
willing to follow in the footsteps of those educated in the city. 
When it is remembered that our ranks are recruited from those of 
the ungoverned boys of the whole State, that they are sent here 
because they cannot be properly disciplined elsewhere, it would 
seem entirely reasonable to expect that sufficient means, room 
and facilities should be furnished to accomplish, if possible, the 
purposes of their commitment. In our last report we congratu- 
lated ourselves and the State authorities that we hoped to be 
able to get through the year without the erection of any new 
buildings. We are sure now that we erred; we ought to have 
erected two family buildings, and an addition to the main build- 
ing, giving us room to retain those we had, and providing for 
those since committed to us. 

This would have saved to the boys sent away the advantages 
of the school, and to the boys since brought here the salutary 
influence of those sent away, and this is by no means small or 
contemptible. It would have enabled the Superintendent and 
those in charge to have, to some extent, disarmed criticism and 
kept up the standard of reformation in the school. We are able 
to report another year of health among the inmates. Only one 
death has occurred, and that of a colored boy who had been for 
a long time suffering with a disease of the lungs brought with 
him from the South, when he followed our army " home from the 
war." We call attention to the fact that our medical bills are 
so small when the number of inmates is so large, of such a class 
and crowded into such close quarters. We attribute the con- 
tinued good health of the boys to the attention that is paid to 
their habits of personal neatness, frequent, regular and thorough 
bathing, to careful and judicious nursing, in all those numerous 
attacks of sickness to which boys are subject, and to a plain, 
palatable and plentiful diet. The visitors record shows a large 
increase during the year; thousands instead of hundreds have 
been here to see and judge, approve or disapprove. We are glad 
to see the interest of the public increase as our numbers in- 
crease; it will result in good to all concerned. 



7 

For particulars in reference to the productions of the farm, 
garden, shops, etc., reference is made to the reports of the su- 
perintendent and his assistants, presented herewith. 

The results may be regarded as satisfactory upon the whole, 
when the reduced condition of the labor power in the sohool, 
and the severe drouth of the season are remembered. With the 
exception of roots, the crops are fair — the condition in which 
they are saved cannot well be improved. All the live stock be- 
longing to the institution are in good condition. The product- 
ive power of the land is increasing every year by the liberal use 
of manure, produced on the farm and purchased in the neighbor- 
hood. The supply of vegetables for the daily use of the in- 
mates is made as abundant as we are able to make it, and adds 
to the comfort and health of the boys, while furnishing health- 
ful employment for quite a number. We refer again to the 
matter of cane seating, a branch of industry only recently in- 
troduced here. We regard it as highly now as when we alluded 
to it in our former report. It furnishes for many of our boys 
the only means within our reach or knowledge to keep them 
from idleness much of the time. 

We have no causes for discouragement except those growing 
out of our crowded condition. We have been compelled to 
part with some boys we would recall. We could have pre- 
sented to visitors a very diflFerent exhibit if we could have 
retained them. As it is, some of them are within, some beyond 
our reach. We have looked into the matter of building, have pre- 
pared sketches and estimates, and arrived at the conclusion that 
we can erect two family buildings of the character needed, and 
an addition to the main building, affording school, assembly, 
lodging rooms, office, etc., etc., and furnish the same, with the 
sum of forty thousand dollars, in addition to the sum of three 
thousand dollars, now in the treasurer's hands. 

We estimate our current expenses for the year 1873 at $42,000 00 

From which deduct amount due from counties, with amount 
estimated to be on hand at close of the year 8,500 00 

Which will leave for the year |33, 500 00 



8 

Add for three months, to April 1st, 1874 10,500 00 

Total 144.000 00 

To which add for building purposes 40,000 00 

Amount to be appropriated $84,000 00 

We have in accounts due and in manufactured wares for sale 
about three thousand dollars, which will be needed for permanent 
improvements, and for heating and lighting the new buildings. 
For the information of committing officers and all othors in- 
terested, we republish the law regulating the admission of in- 
mates. 

EDWARD O'NEILL, 
WM. BLAIR, 
S. A. RANDLES, 
ANDREW E. ELMORE, 
CHAS. R. GIBBS, 

3Ia7iager8. 
Waukesha, October 10th, 1872. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



Wisconsin Industrial School for Boys, 

Waukesha, October 10, 1872. 

The Treasurer would report that there was (as will be seen 
by his report for 1871,) applicable to the current expen- 

ses of this year $8,781 85 

Appropriated in 1872 83,460 00 

Amount received from counties 6,056 00 

Received from Superintendent 2, 167 10 

Total 160,454 95 

Expenses, first auarter |7,495 81 

Expenses secona quarter 9, 668 34 

Expenses third quarter 8, 472 80 

Expenses fourth quarter 10, 802 45 

Subtract 136,538 70 



Which leaves balance of $13,916 25 



Of the building appropriation of 16, 000 00 

There has been expended, as per vouchers 12, 809 59 

Leaving $3,190 4 1 

Applicable to new building account 

ANDREW E. ELMORE, 

Treasxirer, 



SUPERINTENDENrS REPORT. 



Wiscoxsix Industrial School for Boys, 

Waukesha, Oct. 10, 1872. 

To the Board of Managers', 

Gentlemen: The whole number of inmates in this Institution 
since it was opened in July, 1860, to Sept. 30, 1872, is 886. Of 
this number 73 were girls and 813 boys. 

The successive annual reports show that in 

1861, the number of inmates was 39 

55 



1862. . . . 


. . . .do. . . . ■ 


. .do 


1863.... 


. . . .do. . . . . 


.. .do 


18G4. . . . 


. .. do 


. . .do 


1865. . . . 


. . . .do 


.. do 


1866. . . . 


. . . .do. ... 


. . .do 


1867. . . . 


. . . .do 


. . .do 


1868. . . . 


. . . .do 


. . .do 


1869. . . . 


. . . .do 


. . .do 


1870. . . . 


. . . .do 


. . .do 


1871.... 


. . . .do 


. . .do 


1872. . . . 


. . . .do 


. . .do 



72 

137 
155 
134 
155 
163 
176 
206 
239 
278 



It will be seen from the above that our increase this year has 
been greater than in any one year of the last seven years, not- 
withstanding the continued efforts to discharge every inmate 
whose case would justify the board in so doing. 



11 



Tabus No. 1 



Shows the population. 



Boys. 



Number in school October 1, 1871. . . 
Number committed during the year. 
Number returned from out <5n ticket 



Total. 



Number returned to parents or guardian on ticket of leave , 

Number out to place on ticket of leave 

Number escaped 

Number of deaths , 

Number on record at this date 



Total. 



287 

107 

1 



845 



35 

21 

10 

1 

278 



345 



Girls 



Tot. 



239 

107 
1 



347 



35 
23 

10 

1 

278 



847 



Smallest number at any time during year. 

Largest do do 

Average do do 



289 
284 
252 



Table No. 2 
Shows the number committed each month. 

October, 1871 6 

November, 1871 6 

December, 1871 2 

January, 1872 7 

February, 1872 10 

March, 1872 10 

April, 1872 7 

May, 1872 10 

June, 1872 9 

July, 1872 12 

August, 1872 17 

September, 1872 11 

Total 107 



12 

Table No. 3 
Shows the courts by which they were committed. 



Previoas 


Past 


Total. 


years. 


year. 




28 


28 


56 


186 


65 


251 


20 


12 


32 


5 


2 


7 


1 


....•,... 


1 


240 

■ 


107 


347 



Municipal 

Justice 

Police 

Circuit 

* Entered voluntarily (see report '71) 

Total 



Tablb No. 4 
Shows the offenses for which they were committed. 



Vagrancy 

Larceny 

Incorrigibility 

Burglary 

Arson 

8toning railroad cars. 
Rape 



Total 



Previous 
years. 



51 
101 

83 
4 
1 



240 



Past 

years. 



16 
41 
47 



2 
1 



107 



Total. 



67 
142 
130 
4 
1 
2 
1 



847 



*In this and subsequent tables the colnmns headed **]>ast year^* include only those 
committed during the year ending with this date. Columns headed " previous years *^ 
include all except past year. 



13 

Table No. 5. 
Shows the ages of inmates at j;he date of this report: 



Six 

Seven .... 
Eight . . . . 

Nine 

Ten 

Eleven . . . 
Twelve. . . 
Thirteen . 
Fourteen . 
Fifteen... 
Sixteen. . . 
Seventeen 
Eighteen . 
Nineteen . 
Twenty... 



PreviouB 
Yean. 



2 

2 

13 

25 

34 

25 

64 

88 

20 

10 

5 

2 



240 



ySJ. Total. 



1 

2 

7 

1 

9 

10 

26 

17 

17 

17 



107 



1 

1 

2 

9 

11 

23 

51 

51 

42 

81 

38 

20 

10 

5 

2 



347 



Hecapitulation, 

Yeara. 

Average age of previous years 14.5 

Average age of past year J 12.25 

Total 13.88 



14 



Table No. 6 
Shows the counties from which they were committed. 



Manitowoc . . 

Jefferson 

Iowa 

Bank 

Rock 

Kenosha .... 
Milwaukee . . 
Walworth . . . 
Fond da Lac 
Sheboygan . . 
Green Lake . 

Dodee 

Waukesha. . . 

Racine 

Winnebago.. 

Dane 

Columbli . . . 

Brown 

Crawford .... 
Outagamie . . 
Washington . 

Monroe 

Green 

La Favette . . 
Marathon . . . 

Oconto 

Grant 

Calumet 

La Crosse . . . 
Waupaca.... 

Dunn 

Jackson 

Waushara . . . 
Marquette . . . 

Juneau 

Trempealeau 
St. Croix . . . . 



qo 



I I^«^rtoot Part Tear.! TotoL 
1 Yean. 

I • t 




15 



Table No. 7. 

The amount charged each county for those committed for va- 
grancy, incorrigibility, or vicious conduct, is as follows : 

Milwaukee county $866 60 

Racine do 806 50 

Manitowoc ... .do d65 00 

Walworth do 89 00 

Dane do 246 00 

OreenSake ...do 166 60 

Iowa do 104 00 

Kenosha do .* 214 00 

"Waukesha do 849 00 

Crawford do 840 00 

Washington . . .do. 41 00 

Outagamie . . . .do 5 60 

Jefferson do 856 60 

Sheboygan do 248 00 

Columbia do 172 00 

La Fayette do 62 00 

Winnebago do 750 60 

Marquette do 29 00 

Fond du Lac . .do 842 50 

Dodge do 828 00 

Brown do 239 00 

Green do 110 00 

Rock do 510 60 

Sauk do 384 60 

Juneau do j 17 50 

Grant do 161 50 

Waushara do 8 00 

Trempealeau . . do -. 82 00 

St. Croix do 27 00 

Calumet do 104 00 

La Crosse do 108 00 

Marathon do 52 00 

Monroe do 141 50 

Oconto do 52 00 

17,165 00 



16 

Table No. 8 
Shows the birth places of the inmates. 

Wi8Con8in 206 

New York 24 

Illinois 12 

Pennsylvania 1 

Michigan 6 

Iowa 3 

Massachusetts 4 

Mississippi 1 

Ohio 2 

Vermont 1 

Alabama 2 

Minnesota 5 

Louisiana 1 

New Jersey 1 

North Carolina 1 

Tennessee 1 

Connecticut 1 

Maine 2 

New Hampshire 1 

Rhode Island 1 

California 1 

Maryland 1 

Indiana 1 

England 3 

Ireland » .^ 1 

France .' 1 

Germany 16 

Denmark 1 

Prussia 1 

Norway 3 

Canada 6 

Unknown 36 

Total 347 

JRecapitu lation. 

Number bom in America 279 

Number torn in foreign countries 82 

Number place of birth^unknown 36 

Total; 347 



17 

Table No. 9 

Shows the nationality of parents: 

American 89 

Irish 59 

German 69 

English 43 

Colored 14 

French 9 

Scotch ;5 

Norwegian 7 

Welsh 3 

Hollander 2 

Canadian 1 

Bohomian G 

Danish 2 

Prussian 2 

Italian ^ 1 

Polish 2 

Unknown 35 

Total 847 

SOCIAL AND DOMESTIC SELATI027S. 

It is not to be concealed that many, probably a majority of 
the inmates of our school have had their early training under 
circumstances unfavorable to good habits and good morals. The 
following statement of facts relating to the past history of our 
wayward and unfortunate boys, may aid in the better under- 
standing of their condition when they were placed under our 
care. 

Fifty-six of the 347 inmates have neither father or mother 
living; 145 have no fathers living, and 113 no mothers; 49 have 
step-fathers, and 44 step-mothers. Only 144 of the whole num- 
ber have both parents living, and of these, the parents of 26 are 
separated, several are insane and several are intemperate. As 
a special and noteworthy fact, I may name the following: Four 
of our inmates have parents, both living — ^but separated, and 
each married again to other parties. 

Many additional circumstances of a similar character could 
be given, but these are sufficient to show how home ties are 
broken, family relations dissolved, and the restraining influences 
lost that bind the son to the father and mother and sisters at 
home. 

2— Ind. ScHJ (Doc. 12.) 



18 

What may be expected of a boy of the best native talent and 
disposition, when thrown into society, or rather out of society, 
with no home, no parental aid and no legacy but that of a dis- 
sipated or disgraced parentage. 

, Is it a matter of surprise that boys thus situated, should be- 
come reckless, profane and untruthful? That, surrounded with 
bad examples and wicked associations, suffering with cold and 
hunger, left homeless and friendless, they should lose self-re- 
spect, become lawless and commit crime? 

While it is true that some possess native propensities to evil, 
it is also true that a large majority are disposed to evil more 
from bad examples and want of control, than from any deprav- 
ity in them\not common to youth. Hence we labor in hope, not 
feeling that we are warring against nature, but in harmony with 
nature, believing that if we can succeed and ^' train up a child 
in the way he should go, when he is old, ho will not depart from 
it.'' It is a matter of great encouragement that so large a per- 
centage of the youth discharged from this school are doing well, 
and promising to repay the State by becoming good citizens. 



19 



GENERAL MANAGEMENT. 

The history of the inmates, previous to their connection "with 
our institution, is set forth in the foregoing tables; the disposi- 
tion made of them, and the general management of the insti- 
tution remains to be considered. 

This may be included principally under the three divisions of 
Homes, Employment and Education. "We are required to re- 
ceive all the male vagrant, incorrigible and criminal youth of 
the State, between the ages of eight and sixteen years, that the 
courts see fit to send to us. We are expected to do for these 
boys what their parents, guardians and teachers have heretofore 
partially or totally failed to do, namely, to develop their man- 
hood. We are expected to direct and bring forth, by healthy 
growth, all the faculties of body, mind and soul which they 
possess. 

To accomplish this, we know of no better plan than to imitate 
the model of a good family government, where friendship, order 
and cleanliness abound, in a good society where industry, intel- 
ligence and a high-toned moral sentiment prevail. Physical 
comforts are first in the order of nature, and first to receive 
attention ; hence we look first to what we denominate our 

HOME DBPABTMENT. 

No influence known to civilized society is so powerful for 

good, in forming the character of the young, as that of home. 

No home is perfect without father, mother and children. Our 

homes are but approximations to perfect homes; hence the 

* nearer we approach to this, the more hopeful is our success. 

The completion of our new family building, in November last, 
enabled us to organize our sixth home. This building is an 
improvement over any of the former, in several particulars, 
among which I will mention ventilation, increased capacity of 
the dormitory, the elevation of the basement story, the stone 
stair cases, and the finish of the work. In common with the 
other family buildings, it has its general sitting-room, dining- 



20 

hall, dormitory and bath-room, and also separate apartments for 
the accommodation of the family officers. All the family or home 
buildings are surrounded with ample play-yards and necessary 
out-buildings; and it is a pleasure to be able to add, they are all 
in good condition. 

Each home is supervised by a nian who, as the father or elder 
brother, looks after the comfort, conduct and health of his boys. 
His duties require him to be in the building or in the yard, night 
or day, when his boys are there. 

The internal arrangement of the home is managed by a wo- 
man. She is expected to care for the inmates' wearing apparel 
and extend to the boys of her family such attention as a good 
mother should to her own children. 

At date of this report, / 

Family One numbers 48 and is in charge of J. W. Babcock. 
Family Two do. . 51 do R. F. Farrington. 



Family Three . .do . . 48 do. . . . 

Family Four . . .do. .44 do 

Family Five . . .do. . 49 do. . . . 

Family Six do. . 88 do 



...H. W. Cole. 
. . .A. J. Cole. 
. . .J. Korn, Jr. 
.. .B. B. Monroe. 



These buildings were intended to accommodate each thirty- 
six boys. The health, comfort and reformatory success of the 
school is, in my opinion, much retarded by the present over- 
crowded state of the homes. 

BMPLOTMEXT. 

Every inmate is provided with a business suited to his capac- 
ity and strength. He is assigned a place and a time for the 
performance of his duties. We anticipate permanently good 
results only in connection with industrious habits. Honest, 
productive labor is ordained of God to restore the fallen. Here 
faith and works unite. In the exercise of this we pray and 

hope for success. 

Division of Time, 

Eight hours of each day in winter and nine in summer, a^e 
devoted to [school and work. During the winter, the time 
devoted to school is four hours, and to work four hours. In 
summer the school time is four hours per day, and the work 
five. Each half day, except Saturday afternoon and Sunday, 



21 

has its work session and school session, with a recess interven- 
ing. Saturday afternoon of each week is devoted to recreation, 
writing letters, receiving visits of friends, and other miscella- 
neous duties. 

The small boys' work time is one hour less per day than the 
above. 

In silfaimer, inmates rise at 5.30 

And retire at 8.00 

In winter, they rise at 6.00 

And retire at 7.90 

From the above it will be observed that eight or nine hours 
of the twenty- four are devoted to active employment, about the 
same to sleep, and six or seven to meals, reading, devotional ex- 
ercises and recreation. 

During the hot weather in July and August, for a few weeks, 
the school books are laid aside, and we call it a vacatloi. This 
is an oecasion of joy to most of the boys, but of increased weari- 
ness and care to all others in the institution. A few boys, em- 
ployed as teamster and farmer boys, are kept out of school to 
work the entire day, during the season when work is pressing. 

Table No. 10 
Shows the division of labor. 

Number employed in Shoe shop 10 

Tailor shop 12 

Willow shop 20 

Cane shop 80 

Broom shop 9. ' 

Knitting class 25 

Laundry 10 

Family kitchen 2 

Boys' kitchen 7 

Dining rooms 6 

Dormitories 6 

Bath and play rooms 6 

School rooms and library 2 

Store 1 

With carpenter 1 

With painter 1 

In charge of teams and stock 6 

On farm 20 

In garden 14 

• In carrying wood and doing errands 3 

As monitors and chore boy 8 

Doing general work 8 

252 



22 

The above division varies with seasons and circumstances. A 
large portion of the knitting class, chore and general work 
boys, are too small to do other work, or for other causes, are in- 
efficient in any position. The broom shop boys are employed in 
cultivating broomcom, and doing other farm work, during the 
fanning season. The farm boys, in winter, saw the wood, clean 
the paths, gather ice, and do miscellaneous work. 

In assigning employment to boys, special reference is had to 
their health, strength and fitness for the work, and as far as is 
consistent, the boy's wishes and the wishes of friends, are con- 
sulted. 

A large percentage of boys' labor may be denominated non- 
productive, such as the work done in the bakery, laundry, kitchen, 
etc. The farm and garden, and some of the shops, pay ex- 
penses, and, perhaps, do a little more ; still, if the rent, fuel, 
lights and tools were all charged up to each of these, as in ordi- 
nary business establishments, I doubt whether any considerable 
pecuniary profit would be realized. In fact, so far as product- 
ive labor is concerned, I am of the opinion that the amount paid 
to officers and employes, if judiciously expended for help, 
would secure the accomplishment of more work producing in- 
come than is now accomplished. I hope not to be misunder- 
stood. I do not in this complain of any lack or deficiency in 
the employes or the inmates. The cause which leads to this 
apparently contradictory statement, exists, not in the capacity, 
efficiency or faithfulness of the parties interested, but in the 
existing nature and condition of things, and in the objects 
which our institution seeks to accomplish. To explain : 

First, it is to be remembered that one-half of the available 
portion of each day is devoted to school, and it is not our pur- 
pose to exhaust the energy of the boy with labor, and send him 
to school to restore the waste. We send him to the school 
room fresh and vigorous. 

Again, we estimate that one-fourth of the inmates are too 
young or, for other causes, are unfit to engage in any kind of 
remunerative labor. They are employed for their individual 
good, and it is best that they should feel that their labor is pro- 



23 

ductive. A third consideration, which, though less appreciable 
by the uninitiated, but none the less potent in its bearing, is 
the shiftless and idle life of inmates previous to their connec- 
tion with the school. They are unskilled in handiwork, and as 
in case of apprentices generally, the time spent in teaching 
them quite offsets their labor. In cases, not a few, either inten- 
tionally or in consequence of confirmed careless habits, they 
break tools, destroy stock, do imperfect work and thus waste as 
much as they earn. 

What farmer, mechanic or housekeeper, who has depended 
even on adult labor, has not experienced similar results? How 
much more should we who depend upon boys untrained, and 
often reckless and destructive? Of course this applies mainly 
to inmates during the first period of their connection with the 
school. But just here we are reminded of another fact, bearing 
directly on this point. When an inmate reaches that condition 
which enables him to become profitable to the institution, he is 
generally correct in his deportment, and is deemed worthy of 
discharge. He leaves us, and his place is filled with another 
unskilled, and for the time unprofitable recruit. This is not 
said in a spirit of complaint — far from it; neither should it be 
regarded as a discouraging feature of our work, as it would be 
if moneyed gains were the first object to be attained. The mo- 
tives prompting this statement of facts is, first, to meet the oft- 
repeated inquiries concerning the institution becoming self-sup- 
porting; and second, to show that we are aiming to make men 
and citizens, rather than money and merchandize. 



24 
Shoe Shop. 

Table No. 11 
Shows work done in the Shoe Shop. 



■ 


Made. 


ICended. 


Footed. 


FUtcd. 


"NTiimher nairs of Broflrans 


510 

64 

100 


1,918 
46 






Boots 


88 

"si" 


260 


Bootees 


83 


Susnenders 


253 


SliPDers 


5 


"142" 
52 




Mittens 




Miscellaneous , . 















Tailor Shop, 

Table No. 12 
Shows the work done in the Tailor Shop. 



Number pairs Woolen Pants 

Woolen Jackets . . . 

Cashmerette Jackets 

Overalls 

Blouses 

Caps 

Aprons 

Sackcoats 

Miscellaneous 



Vended. 



3,499 

1,422 

50 



50 
104 



27 



The products of both the Shoe and Tailor Shops are princi- 
pally consumed in the institution. 

The success of both these shops has this year been fnlly equal 
to that of any previous year. Not only has more work been 
done for both home consumption and outside parties, but the 
quality of the work is improved, and what is quite as satisfac- 
tory, is the better progress of the boys in a knowledge of the 
trade. 

The products of the "Willow, Broom and Cane Shops, unlike 



25 

those of the Shoe and Tailor Shops, are principally for outside 
parties. 

Table No. 13 
Shows the work done in the Willow Shop. 

Number of Reticules 522 

Common market baskets 827 

Clothes baskets 286 

Potato baskets 128 

Round dinner baskets 187 

Koife and spoon baskets 27 

Fruit or sewing baskets 197 

Bouquet baskets 157 

Sewmg stands 55 

Footstools 57 

Larfe cradles 4 

Doll cradles 5 

Chairs with rockers 50 

Chairs without rockers 16 

High chairs. ^ 10 

Clothes hampers 6 

Children's chairs, all kinds. ... : 83 

Chairs repaired 16 

Baskets repaired 10 



Table No. 14 
Shows the work done in Broom Shop. 

No, 12 Brooms, dozens 139kf 

No. 10 do 118 

No. 8 do 80 

No, Broom Brushes, dozens 5 



Table No. 15 
Shows the work done in the Cane Shop. 

Number of Seats caned 11,411 

Number of Backs caned 2,159 

Number of Chairs re-caned 45 



The results of the Willow Shop are in advance of past years. 
We labor under embarrassment from two causes. First, the 
removal of boys from the school so soon after they attain suffi* 
lent skill to do good worlc; secondly, lack of facilities for mar- 
keting the wares. The first is probably without remedy; the 
latter should reeeive attention. 



26 

The Broom Shop is kept running about five months of the 
year, commencing in November. 

The Cane Shop employs by far the largest number of boys, 
and two overseers, as we have now two shops. The success has 
been reasonably satisfactory, accomplishing all that we antici- 
pated. The most serious drawback this year, has been a lack 
of work during the summer vacation, when we most needed the 
means of employment. 

The Knitting Class 

Still exists, although the more efficient have been transferred 
to the cane shop, and other places of business. The class con- 
sists of the smallest and least efficient boys. The reaults have 
been as follows : 

Kumber pairs of Socks knit 187 

footed 26 

Suspenders knit 19 

repaired 86 

These boys are furnished other employment a portion of the 
time, sorting husks for mattrasses, pulling weeds from the corn 
potatoes, raking the grove, etc., thus giving a variety of employ- 
ment and open-air exercise. 

In-Door Work, 

A large portion of the work in the kitchens, dormitories, din- 
ing-rooms, bakery, laundry, etc., is done by the inmates. A 
force of about thirty bojrs is employed to carry on the various 
branches of household duties. 

Bakery and Boys'* Kitchen. 

The baking for the whole institution and all cooking to sup- 
ply the inmates' dining-halls are done in this department by one 
woman and seven boys. A table showing the number loaves or 
cords of bread, bushels of vegetables, barrels of soup, stacks of 
buck- wheat cakes, cards of ginger bread, plates of pumpkin pies, 
etc., cooked and baked during the year, would no doubt afford 
amusement to many, and quite possibly be regarded by some aa 
incredible. But the consideration that nearly two barrels of 



27 

four are baked daily, and that a vegetable or soup dinner can- 
not be prepared in a three-quarter barrel kettle, may help to 
disaipate the doubt. The quality of the cooking could be best 
tested by witnessing the daily exhibition of the dining rooms. 

Laundry. 

Table No. 16 

Shows the work done in the Laundry. 

Number of towels washed and ironed 7,247 

Pillow cases do 18, 740 

Sheets do 13,880 

Shirts do 12,489 

Aprons do 1,049 

Table-cloths do 283 

Jackets do « 487 

Overalls do 508 

Bed-spreads do 444 

Bed-ticks do 612 

bankets do 812 

Dresses do 304 

Drawers do 602 

Pants do 650 

Handkerchiefs do 6, 612 

Napkins do *. 488 

Linen coats do 52 

Nightdresses do 256 

Chemise do 559 

Stockings do 6,570 

White skirts do 884 

Collars and cuffs. . .do. 866 

Window curtains . .do 90 

Caps do 100 

Woolen scarfs do 260 

Vests do 40 

Neck-ties do 88 



28 



Tabus No. 17 
Shows the work done in the sewing department. 



Kumber of Shirts 

Sheets 

Pillow cases 

Pillow ticks 

Bed spreads 

Comfortables 

. Pocket handkerehiels, 

Mattrasses 

Towels , 

Blankets 

Blowses '. 

Tables clothes 

Miscellaneous 

Socks 



Msde. 



154 

288 
53 
13 
69 

250 
43 

147 

40 

16 

6 

10 



Mended. 



4,240 



178 
3,885 



This work is performed by the female employes, principally 
those in charge of Family Buildings under the supervision of 
the matron. 

Fartn. 

With satisfaction I again bear testimony to the success of 
our farming operations. Though not largely renumerative, it 
pays expenses, is yearly improving in value, and affords the best 
means of developing the health, muscle, and industrious habits 
of our boys, of any branch of business in which we are engaged. 
In addition to our own farm, we have this year rented 33 1-5 
acres adjoining for which we have paid $166.00. 

We estimate the vaiue of the crops from this at $416.00. 
This is included in the following list of products. 



29 



Table No. 18 
Shows'the products of the Farm. 



Articles. 



Wheat 



Oats. 



Corn 



Beans 

Potatoes 

Broom com 

Hay 

Ihimpkins. . 
Pop-corn . . 
Clover seed. 



Acrei. 



24 



20 



50 



1^ 

9 
60 



S^ 



Prodncod. 



393 buslii^ls... 
30 tons straw 



Less threshing 

758 bushels... 
20 tons straw 



Less threshmg 

1,175 bushels... 
50 tons stalks 



75 bushels. 

500 bushels. 

2 tons. ... 

50 tons 

30 loads... 
25 buahels. 
tfbushels. 
Less threshing 



At 


Amount. 


ToUl. 


11 18 
800 


1463 74 
90 00 






1563 74 
19 65 


158409 


25 

400 


9189 50 
80 00 




1269 50 

22 74 


124676 

1541*66 
150 00 


33i 
3 00 


1391 60 
150 00 


2 00 




50 
70 00 


••••• ••• 


250 00 
140 00 


10 00 
1 00 




500 00 
30 00 


50 




12 50 


5 00 


"*38'75' 
7 75 


"si 66 



In addition to the above, allowance should be made for pas- 
turage, growth of stock, pork and beef slaughtered, milk and 
eggs produced. But as no accurate data are at hand bj which 
an estimate can be made of their value over and above the cost 
of the feed, which constitutes a part of the fkrm products esti- 
mated above, I am compelled to omit these in this years' ac- 
counts. The products of the farm and garden, except green 
hides, elsewhere accounted for, are all consumed in the insti- 
tution. 



30 

I/ive Stock. 

The stock belonging [to the St«te consists of horses, cattle 
and hogs. 

^ H0RBE8. 

Two doable teamsi in ^ood condition 4 

One double team, in middling condition 2 

Single hone, inferior 1 

Single horse, young and good 1 

Single horse, dray, old 1 

Total number of horses 9 

One horse died in the spring. 

CATTLE. 

MilchCowB 13 

Dry Cows 4 

Three year olds 3 

Two year olds 6 

Yearlings 5 

Calves 9 

Stock 1 

Total number of cattle 40 

One cow has died, and five calves have been slaughtered. 

HOGS. 

Fattening 52 

Breeding 7 

Stock 1 

Store, (including shotce) 42 

Total number of hogs 102 

Garden. 

The land under the charge of the gardener includes not only 

the vegetable garden, but the orchard, nursery and ground on 
which the osier willows grow — in all, about twenty acres. 



31 



/Table No. 19 
Shows the prodaots of the Garden. 



YBOKTABLB8. 



Beets 

Carrots 

Turnips 

Parsnips 

Vegetable Oysters 

Onions 

Tomatoes 

Cucumbers 

Peas, (green) 

Beans, (green) 

Cucumbers, pickled 

Cabbage heads 

Bquash, Hubbard 

Beans 

Garden Seeds, (yarieties) 

Pie-plant, asparagus and lettuce, 

(say)..--. 



FRTTITB. 



Gooseberries 
Strawberries 

Currants 

Raspberries . 
Apples 



275 

280 

650 

100 

10 

8 

75 

8 

120 

40 

8 

800 

8,200 

8 



bus., 
bus., 
bus. . 
bus., 
bus. . 
bus., 
bus., 
bus., 
bus., 
bus., 
bbls. 

• • • • • 

lbs., 
bus.. 



Willow reeds. 



Total of products 



1 bus.. 
4 bus.. 
10 bus. . 
8 bus . . 
6 bus.. 

8 tons . 



40 

40 
80 
60 
00 
50 
40 
50 
60 
80 
75 
5 

n 

00 



4 
1 
4 



00 
75 
00 
50 



80 00 



$110 00 

112 00 
195 00 



00 

10 00 
400 

80 00 
12 00 
72 00 
12 00 

11 25 
40 00 
48 00 

6 00 
10 00 

15 00 



12 00 

16 00 

17 50 
82 00 

8 00 



1747 25 



70 50 
90 00 



$907 75 



The nursery has received but few additions to its number of 
shrubs, but the growth has been very satisfactory. We now 
have over 4,000 trees and shrubs growing, about one-half of 
which are of sufficient size to transplant. 

The drouth and the bugs damaged both the quantity and 
quality of our root crops. The full value of the garden cannot 
be all expressed in its cash value. A supply of fresh vegetables 
on hand, v^hen needed, is inestimable to a family of the size and 
character of ours. 

The work done on both the farm and garden has been wel 
done. The tillage is deep and thorough and the soil kept free! 
of weeds. About 600 loads of manure have been distributed on 
the farm and garden this year. 



32 

Miscellaneous Work. 

Work of nameless character is being accomplished in some 
parts of our institution. The carpenter, in addition to the con- 
stant repairs on buildings, fences, implements and tools, has 
built a picket fence in front, with gates suited to both the front 
and business entrances, a half mile of portable fence on the new 
addition to the farm, repaired and greatly improved some out- 
buildings, built wood house to No. 4 — a house for dry earth, also 
a bleach house. This last supplies a lack long felt in conduct- 
ing the willow and broom shops. 

Considerable labor has also been expended in the grove. 
The lawn has been extended and greatly improved, and the 
older portion heavily top-dressed. The drives and walks have 
also been improved and extended. To accomplish this and grade 
around buildings and yards, some 275 or 300 loads of gravel have 
been used. On the public roads leading to the village, we have 
expended over two hundred dollars in gratuitous work. 

On the whole, in reviewing our industrial pursuits of the year, 
we have reason to be satisfied with our eiForts, and gratified with 
the results. 

EDUCATION. 

Ordinarily a large portion of a child's early education is ob- 
tained at home, more than we are wont to give credit for. The 
majority of boys sent to us are of the class whose home educa- 
tion has been neglected. They have been educated in the streets 
and saloons, consequently a large portion of our work consists 
in helping them to unlearn what they have learned amiss. Their 
persons, their manners and their morals, are special objects de- 
manding attention ; with us, the family, the work-shop and the 
assembly-room are places of instruction as well as the school- 
room. 

Our institution is known as a school. It is such most emphat- ' 
ically. In the work department even more attention is directed 
towards teaching a boy how to do things, than to secure any 
other one result. By such means we aim to develop, draw out 
and discipline his faculties, and thus fit him for a good citizen. 



33 

School, 

Our school department is a school proper, and as such we 
are sparing no pains to make it equal to any in the Stat^ 
The common branches of English education are taught. Special 
attention is given to reading, writing and the art of computa- 
tion. At present our school consists of five departments; the 
time is near at hand when a sixth must be added. The school 
is now graded as closely as our circumstances will admit. The 
whole is under the supervision of a principal whose duty it is to 
classify the school, examine and promote those who are qualified, 
and look to the general interests of the departments. 

For further particulars relative to the school, I beg leave to 
refer you to the teacher's report, hereto appended. 

The work of a teacher in our school is an arduous work ; a 
work that requires rare ability to secure success. Not only is 
aptness to teach a requisite, but a high order of disciplinary 
power is demanded. Success is attained only while the interest 
of the pupil is kept up. 

The teacher's patience, skill and perseverance are taxed to 
their utmost — ^such teachers are not too numerous. We count 
ourselves fortunate that we have some of this description. And 
it is a pleasure to be able to say, that notwithstanding the diffi- 
culties attending the management of a school composed of such 
a mass of uncultivated minds, the general progress is commenda- 
ble, and in some cases quite remarkable. 

While we do not attempt to teach higher mathematics, natu- 
ral science or the classics as they are taught in the high schools, 
we do teach physiology, history, analysis of the constitution, and 
by familiar lectures and general oral exercises, acquaint our pu- 
pils with many of the leading facts of astronomy, geology, zool- 
ogy, and similar subjects. This method of oral instruction is 
admirably adopted to the class of youth with which we have to 
do. They listen with earnestness to the living teacher when the 
same thought on the printed page would elicit little or no atten- 
tion. This method of instruction is employed not only in the 
school but in the 

3— Iin>. 8cH. (Doc. 12.) 



34 

ABsembly Boom. 

Here we gather at the close of each day, pupils, teachers and 
all connected with the Institution. To some extent, we review 
the day's proceedings, calling attention to the defects and 
awarding commendation for that which is honorable and praise- 
worthy. The occurrences of the day, any matter of general 
interest found in the journals of the times, whatever may fur- 
nish a theme of useful information is here presented. These 
exercises are conducted by the teacher, the superintendent, or 
others, frequently by some visitor who may chance to favor us 
with his presence. H^re, also, vocal music is cultivated. All 
are requested to join in the songs. Aided by a leading voice 
and the instrument, a large portion of our boys acquire much 
practical knowledge of vocal music. 

An hour of each Sabbath morning is spent in the assembly 
room, in reading and studying. A service is conducted at half 
past ten o'clock. Sunday School at half past two. All assem- 
ble again in the evening, and listen to select reading or a brief 
lecture. These exercises are adapted to the capacity of chil- 
dren, and generally prove seasons of interest to most in the 
assembly. In other words, briefly, we assemble four times on 
Sunday, spending in all about five hours of the day in exer- 
cises calculated, as we believe, to make us all wiser, better and 
happier. 

Library, 

One hundred and forty volumes have been added this year, 
making in all about 840 volumes — some of them are too much 
worn for circulation. The following rules govern the circula- 
tion of the library, which are appended to each volume : 

Bulb 1. — The Library will be open for delivery and return of books 
each Satarday. 

Rule 2. — ^Each inmate and employ^ shall be entitled to draw one book 
and only one. ^ ^ 

RuLX 8. — Ko book shall be retained longer than one week. 

RuLB 4.— Every person shall be responsible for the loss or injury of a 
book drawn by him. 

RuLB 5. — ^Each man in charge of a family is expected to keep a record 
of the Library books sent to his family each week, and see that Uiey are 
cared for and returned ' 

By order of the Superintendent 



35 

From 150 to 200 volumes are drawn weekly; many of the boys 
read these books with marked interest. 
Added to the above, the following 

Periodicals • 
are so distributed that all can have opportunity to read them« 

Arthur's Home 2 

Wood's Household 8 

The Nursery 8 

Phrenological Journal 1 

Little Corporal 5 

Schoolday Visitor ^ 8 

Childerns' Homes 8 

Sunday School Scholar 6 

Our Younff Folks 1 

Merry's Musenm 1 

Rural New Yorker 8 

Hearth and Home 1 

Sunday School Advocate 16 

Child at Home 16 

Child's World 10 

Scientific American 1 

Sand. 

In my last report I said ^^ a new set of instruments is needed.'^ 
These were received in April. Thanks to the Legislature, the 
Governor, and all who favored this " extra " for our pleasure 
and profit. The band suffers as much, perhaps more, from the 
frequent changes than any other portion of the institution. At 
present it consists of sixteen members; is instructed by Prof. 
Thomas Williams, who meets them once each week. Consider- 
ing the age and opportunities afforded, our band is making cred- 
itable advancement, and we regard it as an ornament to our in- 
stitution. 

With such appliances as those above mentioned, we are striv- 
ing to draw out the latent faculties, store the mind with knowl- 
edge, and so direct the impulses of these young sons of Wis- 
consin, that when they go forth as citizens they may find a wel- 
come in any good society, and by lives of uprightness repay 
the State many fold for the expense of their educat:^on. 



36 

MORAL TSAININ6. 

Home and home comforts are indispensable. Employment 
furnishing a basis for future livelihood, is also indispensable. 
Without education human beings are little more than a higher 
order of animals. Still, indispensable as are all of these, no one 
or all of them combined, will perfect reformatory work. There 
is a higher object to be attained — a character to be formed — a 
manhood to be established. Unless this higher manhood is 
matured, the eflfort is a failure — the tree will have trunk, 
branches, leaves, but no fruit. The means of accomplishing this 
result we denominate moral training. While all our efforts are 
designed, ultimately, to reaqh this object, direct and special 
means are also needful. 

To this end we endeavor to call to our aid all the facilities we 
are able to command, and draw upon every chord that vibrates 
in the being of him whose character we are seeking to form. 
We aim so to shape all the moral forces within our control that 
every good impulse of the young mind and heart shall be called 
into requisition. Hence, we appeal to his honor, his manhood 
and his conscience ; to his interest, his comfort, his hopes and 
his fears ; to his love of self, of his friends and his country. 
We endeavor to stimulate him to well doing by encouragements, 
by privileges, by hope of reward, of usefulness and honorable 
position in society, and by a sense of duty to himself, his fel- 
lows and his Maker. We seek to restrain his tendencies to 
wrong, by loss of privileges, by discomforts, resulting directly 
from his own acts, and by a consciousness of the ultimate con- 
sequences of wrong doing; thus enforcing upon him a sense of 
the great truth taught by nature and revelation, that the way of 
the trangressor is hard. 

To secure these results in a practical way, constant atttention 
must be given to all he does and all he neglects to do. His at- 
tention to his studies, his success at work, his character for 
fairness and honor on the play ground, his care for his clothes, 
his books and his tools must all be subjects of merit or demerit. 
To bring all this into a tangible form, each boy is placed in a grade 



37 

indicative of his standing. All his misdoings worthy of record 
are written'out and his grade is written up on the first and mid- 
dle of each month. This system of grading in our school is the 
fulcrum on which our disciplinary forces act. The grade-book 
is our " book of remembrance written." To this we refer the 
Board of Managers and the boy's friends to learn his present 
standing and the steps by which he has attained it. We refer 
to the grade-book to know who are worthy of positions of trust 
or entitled to special privileges, as well as who are deserving of 
ticket of leave or entitled to final discharge. The boy enters 
the school in the fourth grade, below this are fifth, sixth and 
seventh grades, which are grades of punishment; above this are 
the third, second and first grades, and " the grade of honor." In 
honor, a boy may rise any number of degrees corresponding 
to his number of grade times, showing a clear record. It is 
seldom that a boy wholly disregards his standing as shown in 
the grade-book. When he does, solitary confinement for a lim- 
ited time and " thorough work " are the means usually employed. 
Corporal punishment is not totally ignored, however much we 
desire to dispense with its use. In the use of these appliances 
it is our great pleasure to see the majority of our numerous 
charges, improving, some slowly to be sure, others rapidly, but 
nearly all surely. 

CONCLUSION. 

A review of the year on the whole affords a comfortable de? 
gree of satisfaction. 

It has been a year of much care, anxiety and some discour- 
agements, but I trust not destitute of good results. 

The general health of the employes and inmates have been 
good. Only one deiath has occurred among our inmates. This 
was Bennie Newson, a colored boy. Bennie was a quiet boy, 
and one who had many friends and no enemies. His disease 
was consumption. His health was poor when he came to us, 
about two years and five months previous to his death. ' He 
rode out the day before he died, and was able to walk to and 
from the carriage. A few cases of fever, late in the fall of '71, 



38 

and a few more in September of this year, constitute all the 
additional cases of sickness worthy of note. 

With pleasure, I again acknowledge the kindness of the many 
friends who by words and deeds have encouraged ns in our 
work. I doubt not my associates and pupils all join me in ex- 
pressing especial thanks to all the faithful and devoted Sunday 
school teachers who have so efficiently aided us in our Sabbath 
labor. 

To my associates and co-laborers who with patience and 
fidelity have devoted their time and energies to this benevolent 
and Christian work, I desire to express my warmest thanks. My 
earnest prayer is, that profiting by the experience of the past, 
and receiving the continued guidance of Him, .without whose 
blessing all humane effort is vain, our future may be crowned 
with even greater success than the past. 

To you, gentlemen, with grateful acknowledgements of your 
continued kindness, forbearance and counsel, I submit this, my 
seventh annual report. 

A. D. HENDRICKSON, 
SuperifUendent. 



TEACHERS' REPORT. 



/ 



Number of pupils under instruction at the commencement of the 

year 239 

Number that have been received 108 

Whole number under instruction 347 

YThole number left during the year. 69 

Present attendance 278 



FIRST PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. • 

"Whole number in attendance '. 66 

Whole number in Primer, A class 13 

Primer, B class 8 

First Reader. 20 

Second Reader, A class 11 

Second Reader, B class 14 

Total 66 

Whole number in Primary Arithmetic, A class 15 

Primary Arithmetic, B class 17 

Total 32 

Whole number in Primary Oeography, A class 6 

Primary Geography, B class 10 

Total... _ie> 

Whole number in oral spelling 66 

« 

Whole numberthat can write letters and words 87 

Whole number that cannot write letters and words 29 

Total 66 



• 



40 



SECOND PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

TAUOHT BT MISS M. L. MEADEB. 

Whole number in attendance 68 

Whole number in Second Reader, A class 9 

B class 22 

Third Reader, A class 18 

Bclass 14 

Total 68 

Whole number in Geography, A class ; 28 

B class 18 

C class 12 

Total 58 

Whole number in Intellectual Arithmetic 15 

J 

Whole number in Oral Spelling e 68 



Whole number can write letters and words 51 

print on slate 7 

cannot write 5 

Total 68 



41 



FIRST INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT. 

TAUOHT BT MIB8 B. CAMPION. 

"Whole number in attendance 43 

Whole number in Third Reader, A class 10 

Third Reader, B class 13 

Third Reader, C class 20 

Total 48 

X 

Whole number in Written Arithmetic 6 

Whole number in Intellectual Arithmetic, A class 16 

Intellectual Arithmetic, B class 20 

Primary Arithmetic 7 

Total 43 

Whole number in (Geography, A class ', 17 

Geography, B class 22 

Total 89 

Whole number in Spelling (orally) 43 

Whole number who can write letters and words 48 

During a portion of the year this department has had general 
exercise in Gymnastics, Arithmetic, and similar exercises, each 
alternate Saturday. 



42 



SECOND INTERMEDIATir DEPARTMENT. 

TAUGHT BT H. W. OOLB. 

Whole number in attendance 42 

Whole number in 4th Reader, A Class ^ 13 

4th Reader, B Class 15 

8d Reader 14 

Total 42 

Whole number in Written Arithmetic, A Class 14 

Written Arithmetic, B Oass 20 

Total 84 

Whole number in Intellectual Arithmetic, A Class 18 

Intellectual Arithmetic, B Class 15 

Intellectual Arithmetic, C Class 14 

Total 42 

Whole number in Geography, A Class 12 

(Geography, B Class 14 

(Geography, C Class 16 

Totol _^ 

Whole number in Spelling, (orally) 42 

Whole number who can write letters and words 42 



43 

SENIOR DEPARTMENT. 

TAUGHT BT J. W. BABOOCX. 

Wbole number in attendance ?. 64 

Whole number in Fourth Reader, A Class 25 

Fourth Reader, B Class 16 

Fifth Reader 28 

Total 64 

Whole number in Practical Arithmetic, nPrimaiy) A Class 10 

Practical Arithmetic, (Primary) B Class 11 

Practical Arithmetic, (Higher) A Class 20 

Practical Arithmetic, (Higher) B Class 12 

Practical Arithmetic, (Higher) C Class 11 

Total __64 

Whole number in Intellectual Arithmetic, A Class 18 

Intellectual Arithmetic, B Class 26 

Intellectual Arithmetic, C Class 20* 

Total ; 64 

Whole number in Geography, A Class 20 

Geography, B Class 80 

Geography, C Class 14 

Total 64 

Whole number in Grammar, (Harvey's) 80 

Whole number in History, (Swlnton's) 24 

Whole number in Spelling 64 

Whole number in Writing 64 

Declamation and general exercises in arithmetic, civil govern- 
ment, writing and singing, every Saturday, daring morning 
session. 

The foregoing report shows the general condition of those at- 
tending the schools during the year. The classes have all made 
yery good progress; in some the advancement has been quite 



44 

marked. The almost daUy introduction of new Bcholara, who 
have been accustomed to little or no parental discipline, with 
aversion to study, whose homes have been the street, and com- 
panions the low and vicious, makes the advancement in knowl- 
edge necessarily slow. 

The teacher, before any advancement can be made, has to 
arouse a desire for learning; in most cases this has been done, 
and, ss a result, a general interest in study has grown up. 

A comparison with other years' statistics will, I think, prove 
favorable to the present condition. Results come slowly. 

In conclusion, permit me to tender you my thanks for forbear- 
ance toward my faults, as also for kindness and counsel; and, 
to my associate teachers, for industry and fidelity in their duties. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. W. BABCOCK, 
Principal Teacher. 



AN ACT 

TO PROVIDE FOR THE GOVERNMENT AND MANAGEMENT 

OP THE STATE REFORM SCHOOL. 



Section 1. The State Reform School at Waukesha shall be 
the place of confinement and instruction of all male children 
between the ages of eight and sixteen years, who shall be legal- 
ly committed to the State Reform School as vagrants, or on the 
conviction of any criminal offense, or for incorrigible or vicious 
conduct, by any court having competent authority to make said 
commitment. 

Section 2. The managers of the State Reform School are 
hereby clothed with the sole authority to discharge any child or 
children from said reform school, who have heretofore been or 
may hereafter be legally committed thereto; and such power 
shall rest solely with said board of managers, and they shall 
have power to return any child to the court, justice or other 
authorities ordering or directing said child to be committed, 
when in the judgment of said managers they may deem said 
child an improper subject for their care and management, or who 
shall be found incorrigible, or whose continuance in the school 
they may deem prejudicial to the management and discipline 
thereof, or who in their judgment ought to be removed from the 
school from any cause; and in such case said court, police jus- 
tice or other authority shall have power, and are hereby requir- 
ed, to proceed as they might have done, had they not ordered 
the commitment to such school. 

Section 3. The superintendent of the State Reform School 
shall charge to each of the several counties in this State, in a 
book provided by him for that purpose, the sum of one dollar 



46 

(11.00) per week, for the care and mamtenance of each person 
remaining in said State Reform School, who was committed 
thereto as a vagrant, or by reason of incorrigible or vicious con- 
duct, or who may thereafter be received into said state reform 
school, committed for vagrancy or incorrigible or vicious con- 
duct, from each of such counties respectively: provided, that the 
cost of the original commitment of all persons to said state reform 
school shall be chargeable to the county irom which the person 
committed to said school is sent: and provided further , that 
it shall be the duty of the superintendent of said state reform 
school to procure the arrest and return of any person escaping 
therefrom; and it shall also be the duty of any justice of the 
peace, marshal or constable, upon information of such escape, to 
arrest and return any such fugitive, as above mentioned. . 

SBcnriON 4. The superintendent of the State Reform School 
shall keep an accurate account of the amount due from each 
county for the support of persons therefrom, and shall annually, 
on or before the tenth day of October in each year, report to 
the secretary of state the amount which may then be due 
from each county for the year ending on the first 
day of October preceding, which report shall state the 
name or each person for whom such account is rendered, the 
number of weeks which such person has been in said school 
during said year, and the amount charged for each of said per- 
sons respectively; and such report shall be verified by the oath 
of said superintendent as to its correctness. The secretary of 
state shall add the amount due from any county in this state for 
the support of such persons to the state tax apportioned to said 
county, and such amount shall be collected and paid into the 
state treasury for the use of the State jReform School. j 

SKcnosr 6. The board of managers shall consist of five 
members, who shall be appointed by the governor and hold their 
offices for three years;, said board shall be divided into three 
classes, and so divided that the term of one class shall expire 
each year, on the first Tuesday of March, and shall receive for 
their compensation two dollars and fifty cents (12.60) per day 
for every day actually employed, and ten (10) cents per mile for 



47 

every mile aoto&llj traveled, and shall verify their account by 
their oath or affirmation. 

SscmoK 6. Such managers shall have the power to make 
rules, regulations, ordinances and by-laws for the government, 
discipline and management of the State Reform School, and the 
inmates thereof, as to them may seem just and proper: provided^ 
that such rules and by-laws shall be in accordance with the con- 
stitution of this state and the constitution of the United States: 
and they shall have power to place the children committed to 
their care, during the minority of said children, at such employ- 
ment, and cause them to be instructed in such branches of use- 
ful knowledge as shall be suited to their years and capacities; 
and they shall have power in their discretion to bind out said 
children, with their consent or the consent of their parents or 
guardians, if they have any, as apprentices or servants during 
their minority, to such persons, and at such places, to learn such 
proper trades and employments, as to their judgments will be 
most for their reformation and amendment, and the future bene- 
fit of such children: provided^ that the religious opinions of the 
inmates shall not be interfered with. 

Sbotion' 7. The said managers shall appoint a superintendent 
of said state reform school, and such officers as they may deem 
necessary for the interest of the institution, with a view to the 
accomplishment of the object of its establishment and economy 
pf its management; and the said managers shall make a detailed 
report to the governor of the performance of their duty, on or 
before the tenth day of October in each year, which report shall 
contain a statement of the number of persons in the school at 
the commencement of the year, together with all such facts and 
statements as they may deem necessary to communicate; which 
report shall be laid before the legislature by the governor. 

Section 8. The courts and several magistrates in any county 
in this state may in their discretion, sentence to the State Reform 
School any such male who may be convicted before them as a 
vagrant, or of any petit larceny or misdemeanor; and the several 
courts may, in their discretion, send to said State Reform School 
any such male who may be convicted before them of any offense 



48 

which, under the existing laws, would be puniflhable by im- 
prisonment in the state prison : provided^ in all cases, the term 
of commitment shall not be less than to the age of twenty-one 
years. 

Section 9. The managers of the State Reform School shall 
have power, in their discretion, to restore any person duly com- 
mitted to said school, to the care of his parents or guardian, 
before the expiration of their minority, if in their judgment 
it would be most for the future benefit and advantage of such 
persons. 

Section 10. The courts and several magistrates in any county 
in the state, shall also have the power to commit to the State 
Reform School any male child, under the ages specified in sec- 
tion one of this act, upon complaints and due proof made to said 
court or magistrate by the parent or guardian of such child, 
that by reason of incorrigible or vicious conduct, such child is 
beyond the control and power of such parent or guardian, and 
that a due regard for the morals andy future welfare of such 
child manifestly requires that he should be committed to the 
guardianship of the managers of the State Reform School. 

Section 11. The managers of the State Reform School are 
hereby aathorized and directed to procure suitable places for the 
females under their charge, and in their discretion to dispose of 
them as in their judgment, will be for their best interests and 
the interest of the state. 

Section 12. All acts or parts of acts inconsistent with the 
provisions of this act, are hereby repealed, and this act shall take 
effect and be in force from and after its passage. 

Approved March 15, 1870. 



It will be seen by an examination of the act, that every inmate 
must be committed by a court or magistrate. Frequent appli- 
cation is made for the admission of children, by their friends, on 
the ground of incorrigibility, with the hope that the restrain- 
ing influences of the school may save them from actual crime. 
The tenth section of this act was framed with express reference 



49 

to such cases, and it is believed to be the most important one in 
the whole chapter. Such cases when cQmmitted, should at once 
be taken to the school without being imprisoned, as is sometimes 
done, in the county jail for several days with matured and 
hardened criminals. In some cases more vicious examples are 
there seen, and more corrupt influences experienced, than during 
their whole previous life. 

Objection has been made to the term of commitment, which 
in every instance must be during the minority of the inmate. 
This is regarded by many as the period of actual confinement 
in the school, while it is designed only to give the board of 
managers such control over the inmate as to secure his complete 
and thorough reformation. Provision is made for the discharge 
of every one, when, in the opinion of the board, it would be 
safe and proper to do so. 

There is another reason why the term of commitment should 
be as it is. There are many children who have no parents or 
guardians, and who, if discharged on the expiration of a sentence 
of one or two years, would have no one to provide for them, and 
if good homes should not be secured at the time of their dis- 
charge, which cannot always be done, they would be thrown upon 
society, homeless and friendless, and be compelled frequently 
to resume those vicious habits from which they may have been 
only partially reformed. It is impossible to determine the 
length of time necessary to reform any one case at the time of 
commitment. It must be left discretionary with those in the 
immediate charge of the school. Experience has shown that in 
a majority of cases, the average time is about two years, while 
some require a much longer period before they are fitted for 
places of trust and responsibility. 

— IND. ScH. (Doc. 12.) 



LIST OF BILLS PAID 

Since the date of last Report. 



Date. 



No. 



1872 




Jany. 10 


1 


. . . .do. . . . 


2 


• • ■ • (XO • • • • 


3 


■ • • • vll/ • ■ • • 


4 


do. .. . 


5 


■ • • • vLw • • • • 


6 


• • • • vLU • • • • 


7 


• ■ • • QO • • • • 1 


8 


• ■ « • Vivr • • • ■ 


9 


• • • • UO • • • ■ 


10 


• • • • UU • • • • 


11 


• ■ ■ • Clvl ■ • • • 


12 


• ■ • • UU • • • • 


13 


■ ■ • ■ VaU • • • ■ 


14 


• • ■ • \Xw • • ■ • 


15 


• • • • U V • ■ • ■ 


16 


• • a • UU • • • • 


17 


■ • • ■ UU • • • • 


18 


• • • • ^lU ■ ■ • 


19 


■ • • • UU • ■ • ■ 


20 


• • ■ • UU • « • ■ 


21 


• • • • UU ■ • • ■ 


22 


• • • • vlU • • • • 


23 


. . . do . . . . 


24 


.... v&l^ .... 


25 


■ « a • VIU ... * 


26 


• . • . vl.\/ .... 


27 


.... Ul^ # . • • 


28 


I • . • vl V • • • • 


29 


. . • • Uly .... 


30 


.... U V .... 


31 


• « • • UO • . • . 


32 


.... Uv .... 


38 


.... u(J . . • . 


84 


• . . • UO «... 


35 


• • • aUO • • • 


36 


.... UO . * • • 


37 


.... UO .... 


88 


a • • a UO • • • • 


80 


« a a a UO a ■ a a 


40 


a a ■ ■ UO a . • a 


41 


• * a a UO • ■ • ■ 


42 


a • • a UU a a a . 


43 


a a a a UO a a a • 


44 


• a a a UO a a a a 


45 


a a a a UO a a a a 


45 


• a a aQOa a a a 


47 



To whom and on what account paid. 



Jas. Bonnell, dry goods 

Sexton, Bros. & Co, dry goods 

C. Stein & Bro., dry gooas 

Waukesha County Manuf. Co. wool goods . . 

Stark Brothers, furnishings 

John Gasper, furniture 

West & Co., books and stationery 

A. H. Andrews & Co., working cards 

O. Culver, harness repairs 

H. II. Hunkins, leather and findings 

G. Pfister, leather and findings 

Wa Frankfurth, willow shop 

Wm. Miller & Co., rockers 

Berry Bro., oils, etc 

G. Wa Swift, dyes 

Aa F. Lemke, broom findings 

N. Burroughs, hardware, etc 

J. Nazro & Co., hardware, etc 

Peterman, Steady & Co., hardware, etc 

R. C. Beg^s, tin ware 

Julius Reise, tin ware 

A. Loeffelholz, locks 

Wm. Blair, blacksmithing 

M. Fallon, horse shoeing 

E. Detmiller 

Blair & Persons, glassware 

C. A. Buttles, repairs 

R. A. Waite, spoons 

W, G. Benedict, groceries 

Beach & Hause, groceries 

Ricker, Cronbie & Co., groceaies 

Weaver, Kirk i& Co., groceries 

J. M. White, drugs, etc 

Oa Tichenor, apples, etc 

0. Tichenor, potatoes 

G. Mevis, lard kegs 

Johnson & Thyng, soap 

Ja Wa Thomas, salt 

A. Waite, meat 

C. Famham^meat 

Ja Donahue, meat 

J. Moore, chickens 

Ca Esther, saufiages 

J. W. Thomas, pork 

Oa Tichenor, butter and lard 

Pa Ma Schwartz, butter and lard 



Amoaut. 



47 ) P. Ma Schwrrtz, butter and lard and apples a . 



1223 41 

170 77 

117 93 

43 80 

94 06 

10 20 
142 27 

4 00 

19 00 

41 62 

186 62 

36 91 
6 50 

98 12 

14 74 
40 40 

132 30 

11 45 
23 66 

37 93 
4 52 

18 00 
56 94 
18 55 
40 50 
8 12 
18 23 
16 40 

358 24 
29 70 
90 08 

251 35 
35 48 
58 73 
46 00 
2 50 
21 00 
27 20 

214 88 
89 63 
56 98 

15 76 
488 

11 24 

100 82 

18 85 

18 58 



51 



J^ut of JBilh Paid — continued. 




1872 
Jan'ry 

. do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. . do . 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

..do. 

. .do. 
April 

..do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 

. .do. 



10 48 W. Nickereon, butter and lard 

49 J. C. Love do 

50 R. N. McCumber do 

51 A. Smith do 

52 H. P. Price, corn 

58 G. Lawrence, seed wheat 

54 G. H. Vincent, wheat and grinding 

55 Kimball & Howe, flour 

56 8. Beard, wood 

57 M. Stark. . .do 

58 J. E. Potter & Co., carbon oil 

59 Pay Roll, officers 

60 J. Vreeland, cnrpenter 

61 M. S. Hartwell & Co., planing and sawing. . . 

62 C. A. Hendrickson, labor 

63 C. Wardrobe, mason work 

64 C. Jentsch do 

65 R. 8. Gregory, painting 

66 R. N. Kimball, cement 

67 8. Richardson & Co., lumber 

68 G. P. Pfefler, willow^ and evergreens 

69 Winchester & Partridge, iron posts 

70 Atwood & Culver, printing 

71 W. Reiners. bob sleighs 

72 Cole & Caine, cranberries '. 

73 D. W. Reid & Co., robes 

74 J. Graham, sheriff 

75 Dr. J. Smith, medicine and service 

76 E. Holbrook, Legislative Comnyttce 

77 ^tna Insurance Co. premium 

78 O. Z. Olin, P. M., postage 

79 U. 8. Express Co., express 

80 Mil. & St. P. R. R. Co., freight 

81 Superintendent, sundry bills paid 

82 M. Schuyler, escapes 

83 C. Cork, groceries 

84 D. Stewart, lard 

85 J. Cork, turkeys 

86 R. L. Gove, robe 

87 R. Haney & Co., hardware 

10 88 J. Bonnell, dry goods 

89 Rice & Fredman, dry goods 

90 C. Stein do 

91 Sexton Bro & Co. . .do 

92 Perkins & Co woolen goods 

93 Waukesha County Manfg Co. . . .do 

94 West <&; Co., books and stationery 

95 Ivison & Co do 

96 State Prison, fiirniture 

97 M. Palz, do 

98 C. A. Buttles, sundries 

99 N. Brick, chair 

100 Blair & Persons, crockery and hardware. . . . 



$38 25 
75 00 
90 19 
22 38 
24 08 

28 32 
463 69 

22 40 
115 43 
57 75 
36 00 
2,611 42 
89 00 
71 30 
48 70 

34 05 
27 00 
16 00 

11 00 
27 77 

14 00 
10 00 

7 00 

35 00 
13 75 

15 00 
10 00 

12 50 

16 00 
75 00 

21 26 

22 45 

29 48 
117 23 

4 10 
83 26 



5 

11 



00 
00 



11 00 
34 35 

145 10 

7 22 

38 74 

137 68 

269 36 
43 70 

157 03 
25 25 
79 30 

15 87 
22 60 

16 00 
198 71 



52 



List of Bills Paid — continued. 




1872. 

April 10 101 Hoffman, Billings & Co., hardware 

. .do 102 Jno. Nazro, hardwace 

..do 103 J. N. Blair, hardware 

. .do 104 J. Hardy, cutlery 

..do 105 N. Burroughs, hardware 

. .do 106 M. H. Howil, pork and eggs < 

. .do 107 Johnson & Thyngs, soap 

. .do 108 W. G. Benedict, groceries 

. . do 109 Bicker, Crombie & Co, groceries 

. . do 110 C. Cork, groceries 

. .do. . . . Ill Beach & Hawes, groceries 

..do.... 112 C. Wardrobe, apples 

. .do 118 H. YanBuren, oried apples 

. .do. . . . 114 F. Mc Naughton, apples and eggs 

..do 115 P. Regan, potatoes and eggs 

..do 116 A. S. Hair, potatoes and eggs 

. .do 117 J. H. Phillips, potatoes ana eggs 

..do 118 P. M. Schuartz, potatoes and eggs 

. .do 119 M. Buchner, potatoes and eggs 

. .do 120 O. Tichenor, potatoes, eggs and butter . . 

. .do 121 E. Wood, beans,'etc 

. .do 122 J. A. Patten & Co., oil 

..do.... 123 G. W. Swift, oil, etc 

..do.... 124 C. Jackson, drugs, etc 

..do 125 J. M. White, drugs, etc 

..do 126 J. Donahue, meat , 

..do 127 H. W. Colver, meat 

..do 128 Saml. Hadfleld, beef 

. .do 129 C. A. Wadsworth, beef cattle , 

..do 130 C. A. Wadsworth, beef 

. .do 131 J. A. Hibbard, beef and veal 

. .do. . . . 132 N. Nichols, beef 

..do.... 133 Pratt i& Marshall, flour 

. .do 134 G. fi. Vincent, wheat meal and grinding. 

..do 135 M. R. Crane, hay 

..do 136 E. E. Hodgson, straw 

..do 137 H. Vanburen,. . .wood 

..do 138 J. VanBuren, do 

..do 139 M.Shark, do 

..do 140 J.Sharp, do 

..do 141 H. Munck, do 

. .do. ... 142 Eli Welsh, do 

..do 143 T. Seyncss, do 

..do 144 J. H. Phillips, .. .do 

..do 145 Andred Snyder, . .do 

. .do 146 C. Plattz, do 

..do 147 A. R. Clefton, do 

. .do. . . . 148 M. Howie, hauling wood 

. .do. . . . 149 A. C. Nickel, do 

. .do. ... 150 J. Hille do 

..do 151 C. Winderman,...do 

..do 153 S. Richardson, lumber 

, .do. . . .1 153 C. A. Browson,. . .do 



167 17 

14 82 
69 42 

15 75 
92 64 
15 82 

108 67 

85 43 

256 67 

34 21 
3 25 

20 00 

8 80 

9 40 
10 64 

24 25 

15 80 

25 40 
24 66 

102 98 
24 70 

16 65 
39 52 

7 73 

19 93 
89 00 
61 59 

35 16 
156 30 

85 84 
50 20 
82 96 

20 95 
944 85 

38 00 

20 00 
108 00 
127 87 

79 87 
148 50 
110 46 
121 00 
324 50 
197 50 

72 00 
121 00 
166 41 
119 81 

72 00 
216 38 

48 94 

12 50 
135 72 



68 



Jdst qf Bills Paid— continued. 




1872 
April 10 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. . do . . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. . do . . 

. . do . . 
July 10. 

. .do. . 

. . do . . 

. . do . . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. . do . . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. . do . . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. . do . . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. . do . . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. .do. . 

. . do . . 

. . do . . 

• .do. . 



154 

155 

156 

157 

158 

159 

160 

161 

162 

168 

164 

165 

166 

167 

168 

169 

170 

171 

172 

173 

174 

175 

176 

177 

178 

179 

180 

181 

182 

183 

184 

186 

186 

187 

188 

189 

190 

191 

192 

192i 

193 

194 

195 

196 

197 

198 

199 

200 

201 

202 

208 

204 

205 



A. F. Lemke, broom findings 

Wright, Dunton Ss Co., broom corn.. 

L. Schnell, willow and rattan 

W. Frankforth, hardware and willow find'ga 

Q. Pfister, leather and findings 

H. H Hunkins, leather and midings 

M. Barber, sleigh 

J. W. Park, harrow 

B. Fox, cow 

William Sanger, repairs 

A. Atkins, hunting escapes 

H. W. McNair, hunting escapes 

8. Barber, livery 

T. Spence, insurance 

William D. Holbrock, dentistry 

O. Culver, repairing harness 

Q. W. Booker, teamster 

George Watson, teaming and general work. 
J. C. Barnes, painting 

C. Wardrobe, mason work 

J. Vreeland, carpenter 

Pay-roll of officers 

United States Express Company, express. . . 

Sundry bills paid by Superintendent 

P. M. Dingham, escapes 

Milwaukee and St. Paul R. R Co., freights . 

Sexton Bros & Co., dry goods 

C. Stein & Co., dry edods 

Price <& Freedman, dry goods 

Field, Leiter & Co., dry goods 

F. W. Ambler, straw hats 

McFetridge, Burchard <& Co., woolen eoods 
Wau. Manufacturing Co., woolen gooos. . . . 

West & Co., books and stationery 

Milwaukee Sentinel Printing Co., binding . 

G. Pfister, leather and findings 

J. Malligan, leather work 

T. Edwards, butter and eggs 

E. S. Purple, butter and eggs 

H. H. Blair, butter and eggs 

Blair & Persons, glassware, etc 

J. M. White, druge, etc 

G. W. Swift, drugs, etc 

J. Sharp, maple sugar 

Beach & Hawes, groceries 

Smiih, Roundy & Co., groceries 

C. Cook, groceries 

W. G. Benedict, groceries, etc 

W. G. Benedict, groceries, etc 

N. Burroughs, hardware 

J. Rcise, hardware 

C. A. Buttles, hardware 

Peterman, Stredy & Co., hardware 



124 

74 

109 

82 

289 

274 

15 

25 

50 

5 

8 

82 

17 

8 

4 

7 

15 

81 

82 

9 

175 

2,752 

11 

185 

25 

41 

289 

79 

7 

247 

56 

1,247 

188 

103 

15 

286 

6 

95 

7 

108 

21 

15 

61 

9 

47 

245 

81 

102 

90 

86 

11 

8 

4 



92 

44 
40 
98 
98 
00 
00 
00 
00 
50 
00 
80 
25 
00 
75 
15 
00 
25 
00 
50 
50 
68 
78 
44 
00 
28 
04 
17 
46 
96 
50 
76 
76 
88 
00 
77 
90 
68 
76 
28 
68 
88 
89 
68 
11 
26 
47 
61 
77 
91 
80 
00 
21 



64: 



JList of Bills Paid — continued. 



Date. 


No. 


1872 


July 10 


206 


• • ■ ■ ^X\/ • ■ • • 


207 


• • • • Ul^ • • • • 


208 


• ■ • • \*>^ • ■ • • 


209 


• • • • uu • ■ • • 


210 


• • • • UCr • ■ • • 


211 


• • • • uu • • ■ • 


212 


• • • • ^Lw • • • • 


213 


• • • • U V « • • • 


214 


. . . .do. . . . 


215 


. . . .do . . . 


216 


.... UO . • . • 


217 


. . . .do. . . . 


218 


. . .do. .. . 


219 


. • • • UO . . • « 


220 


. . . .do. . . . 


221 


. . . .do. . . . 


222 


. . . .do. . . . 


223 


do ... . 


224 


do . . . 


225 


. .. .do. . . . 


226 


do — 


227 


— do. . . . 


228 


. .. .do. . . . 


229 


— do 


230 


. .. .do. .. . 


231 


.... do ... . 


232 


. . . .do. .. . 


233 


do. . . . 


234 


— do. . . . 


235 


do. .. . 


236 


. .. .do. . .. 


237 


. .. .do. .. . 


238 


. . . .do. .. . 


239 


.. . .do. . . . 


240 


. . . .do. . . . 


241 


. .. .do. .. . 


242 


. . . .do. . . . 


243 


. . . do. . . . 


244 


.... do ... . 


245 


. .. .do. .. . 


246 


. .. .do. .. . 


247 


.... \X\J . « . . 


248 


.... do ... . 


249 


. . . .do. .. . 


260 


. . . .do. . . . 


251 


. . . .do. . . . 


252 


. . . .do. . . . 


253 


. . . .do. . . . 


254 


• • • • Uw • • • • 


255 


■ • • • UCj • • • ■ 


256 


October 9 


257 


.... QO .... 


258 



To whom and on what account paid. 



R. Haney & €k)., hardware 

W. FranKforth, hardware 

Hofiman, Billings & Co., iron pipe, etc . . 

G. Esterly, post caps 

H. Brown, iron pipes, etc 

W. F. Whitney, mower sickle 

W. Blair, blacksmithing, etc 

S. Richardson, lumber 

R A. Kimball, lumber, etc 

Q. H. Vincient, grinding, etc 

J. W. Thomas, salt, cement, etc 

A. Smith, wheat 

D. Evans, beef 

A. Waite, meat 

J. Weise, willows 

W. Pomeroy .do 

J. "Wallace . . .do 

J. H. Reigart.do 

C. Sperry . . . .do 

H. 8. Pomeroy, willows 

A. F. Lemke, broom findings 

H. & G. 8. Graves, broom corn seed 



Wieht, Dunton & Co., broom com seed. . 
J. Co 



/oon, Jr., wood 

J. Cummins, wood 

J. 8toltz, eom 

F. 81awson, manure 

A. C. Nickel, beans 

Pflster & Vogel, rolling machine 

Greenman, McGraw & Day, trees 

F. D. Falkner, photographs 

Meinicke & Co., foot balls 

J. Gasper, coffin 

W. Smith, straw 

C. Sheppard & Co., wheelbarrow 

M. Buchner, potatoes 

J. Porter do 

A. C. Nickel, .do 

J. C. Patten & Co., oil 

Berry Bros., turpentine 

J. C. Barnes, painting 

J. Vreeland, carpenter 

Pay Roll, officers 

O. "McDougal, labor 

W. Thomson, labor 

Sundry bills paid by Superintendent 

O. Z. Olin, P. M., postage 

U. S. Express Co., express 

W. U. R. R. Co., freight 

National Lightning Hod Company, rods . 
Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R. Co., freight . 

Sexton Bros. & Co., dry goods 

C. Stein & Co., diy goods 



Amoimt. 



117 80 

60 24 

68 96 

9 20 

117 76 
7 00 

124 02 
45 82 
81 09 
97 76 
19 45 

39 00 

6 64 
202 78 

400 
10 00 
15 81 
85 00 
23 83 
44 20 

18 59 
3 00 

2 60 

10 00 

40 23 
180 00 

5 00 
, 88 00 

19 25 

7 50 
22 00 
12 00 

11 00 

15 00 
11 18 

20 67 

3 85 
50 40 
17 18 

21 40 
36 25 
99 15 

3,028 95 

6 66 
6 66 

167 16 

16 35 
15 75 
62 92 

112 60 
30 77 

101 61 
58 18 



55 



List of Bills Pa»^— continued. 



Bate. 


No. 


1872 




October 9 


259 


• • • • UO • > • • 


260 


.... do ... . 


261 


• » ■ • UO • • * • 


262 


• a • • UO • ■ » ■ 


268 


. . . .do. . . . 


264 


• • • • U V • • • • 


265 


• • • • Ul/ ■ • • • 


266 


• • • • U V • • • • 


267 


i • • • U V • « • ■ 


268 


. . . .do . . . 


269 


.... uo ■ . . • 


270 


.... uo .... 


271 


.... Uvl .... 


272 


.... uo .... 


278 


.... QO .... 


274 


■ . ■ . U\J .... 


275 


.... Uvf . . • . 


276 


... «U.\I .... 


277 


.... ULI .... 


278 


. . > . (lO .... 


279 


.... uo . . . • 


280 


.... uo .... 


281 


.... uo .... 


282 


.... uu .... 


288 


.... Ul/ .... 


284 


.... \XO .... 


285 


. • • .uo .... 


286 


• . . » uo .... 


287 


. . • . uo .... 


288 


.... uo .... 


289 


.... uo .... 


290 


.... uo .... 


291 


.... uo .... 


292 


.... uo .... 


298 


a . . . vLO .... 


294 


• . • . uo .... 


295 


.... uo .... 


296 


.... uo .... 


297 


.... uo .... 


298 


.... uo .... 


299 


.... uo .... 


800 


.... uo . . . . 


801 


.... uo . . . . 


202 


.... uo . . . . 


808 


.... uo . . . • 


804 


.... uo . . . . 


805 


.... uo . . . . 


806 


.... uo • . . . 


807 


... .do. . .^ 


808 


.... uo . • . . 


809 


.... uo . . . . 


810 


. ■ • . uo . . . . 


811 



To whom and on what aocoant paid. 



Rice & Friedman, buttons 

Stark & Bros., carpets, etc 

Perkins Bros. & Lawton, woolen goods . . . 
Waukesha Manufacturing Co., woolen goods 
Pfister Royal Leather Company, leather, etc. 

H. H. Hunkins do 

J. Puri)le & Bros do 

W. Blair, blacksmithing, etc 

R. Haney & Co., hardware 

Wm. Frankfurth do 

N. Burrouffh do 

Eendrick & Gasper, hardward and awls. . . . 

HoJSman, Billings & Co., awls 

C. A. Buttles, awls 

Blair <& Persons, glassware 

O. Tichner, pork, etc 

J. M. White, drugs and groceries 

Beach & Hawes, groceries 

C. Cook, p'oceries 

G. W. Swift, lead, ramish, etc 

W. G. Benedict, groceries 

Ricker, Crombie & Co., groceries 

A. Waite, meat 

D. Eyvns, beef 

P. M. Swartz, pork 

D. Stewart, pork and lard 

Keppe & Howell, meat 

G. H. Vincent, wheat, meal and grinding. . . 

C. S. Smith, wheat 

John Bovd, wheat 

R. W. Kimball, meal, oats and flour 

H. A. Blair, butter 

Thomas Edwards, butter and chickens 

A. C. Nickel, butter 

D. Eelley, beans and potatoes 

J. Schultz, com 

S. Richardson, lumber, etc 

Mayhew Bros., lumber, etc 

8. Richardson, coal 

W. H. Gross, broom handles 

A. F. Lemke, broom wire 

John E. Houston, wind mill 

J. H. Osbom, willows 

E. B. Winship, pump 

H. Berthelet & Co., drain tile 

C. C. McGovem, threshing 

B. Howard, sinking wells 

John Gasper, bedstead 

Matthew Bros., rockers 

T. Haynes, water lime, etc 

J. W. Thomas, cement and salt 

J. C. Mitchen, pie 

Star Lightning iu>d Company, rods 



Amount. 



$8 00 


142 07 


155 98 


28 25 


312 40 


14 14 


25 81 


75 88 


7 62 


20 07 


89 86 


80 


12 72 


15 05 


5 00 


85 47 


19 18 


5 72 


89 60 


44 88 


60 90 


584 06 


865 21 


19 18 


17 84 


12 58 


ICf 75 


829 15 


860 15 


288 80 


98 45 


149 80 


62 58 


6 88 


18 60 


11 25 


88 65 


44 88 


818 75 


5 67 


400 


100 00 


26 62 


10 00 


12 80 


48 89 


8 50 


8 00 


28 76 


6 80 


10 90 


15 00 


48 90 



56 



IabI of BilU Paicf— continued. 



Date. 

1873" 
October 9 
. . . .do . . , 

• • ■ ■ U.O ■ • • • 

• • • • ^A^ ■ • • • 

» r • •Uv« ■ • • 

• • • • U^ • • a • 

• • • • vLl/ • • • • 

• • • • uo * • ■ 

• • • * vLlJ « • • 

• « • « uO ■ • • 

• • • • UO • • • 

• • • ■ vIO • « • 

• • • • UO • • • 

• • • • UU • • • • 

• • ■ • uu • • • • 

••••do.... 

• . . • U V • . • • 

• . • • uo • ■ • . 

... U V ... a 

.... uo • . . . 
... .uu. ... 

.... UU « . . • 

.... uo . • . • 

.... U V .... 

• • • ■ uo «... 
* » » f uo . . • • 

. . . .do . . 

• • « aVIU* • • ■ 

• • • • UU • • • • 

• • • aUU* • • • 

• ■ • ■ UU • • • • 

> • • • vLU • • • • 

• » • • uo • « • • 

• • • « uo • • • • 

» • • • uo • • • • 




312 

318 

314 

315 

316 

317 

318 

319 

320 

321 

322 

323 

324 

425 

326 

327 

328 

329 

330 

331 

332 

333 

334 

335 

336 

337 

338 

339 

340 

341 

342 

343 

344 

345 

346 



W. Rhodes, returning escayes 

C. L. Brown, returning escapes 

H. N. Hempstead, drum heiMs 

A. J. Weist, cooper work 

West & Co., paper, postage, etc 

E. Enos, P. M., postage 

J. Smith, medicine and attendance 

PsY roll, employes 

J. Vreeland, carpenter 

J. 0. Barnes, painter 

United States Express Company, express. . 
Northwestern Railroad Company, freight . 
Milwaukee and St. Paul R. R. do., freight. 

Sundry bills paid by superintendent 

N. Walton, rent of land 

H. B. Clark, hogs, etc 

Hadfleld & Wilkins, stone and lime 

P. G. Williams, butter 

J. Vose, Horse 

T. Williams, musical instructor 

State prison, office desk 

P. W. Tratt, span of horses 

J. Mulligan, harness 

Hall & Quimby, musical instruments 

Winchester & Partridge, wagon, etc 

Mayhew Bros., fencing 

H. M. Sherwood, school furniture 

J. D. McLean, stone 

Jameson, McCleary & Co., books 

Jameson, McCleary & Co., books 

Wm. Blair, manager 

Edward O'Neill, manager 

Chas. R. Gibbs, secretary and manager 

Andrew E. Elmore, manager 

E- Hurlbutt; manager 



95 00 

8 00 

12 00 

8 50 
33 07 

27 47 

56 50 

2,977 29 

154 50 

21 25 

6 45 

3 57 

13 16 
104 30 
166 00 

56 36 
49 50 

9 22 
85 00 

127 60 

125 00 

400 00 

42 00 

505 00 

75 40 

75 08 

169 33 

130 00 

61 42 

83 25 

10 00 

26 00 

194 00 

142 00 

15 85 

$86,538 70 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THB 



STATE BOARD 



OP 



CHARITIES AND REFORM, 



OF THB 



STATE OF WISCONSIN. 



Presented to the Governor, December, i8y^. 



MADIBON, WIS.: 

ATWOOD * CULYBB, PBINTSB8 AKD 8TBBBOTTPBB8. 

1878. 



STATE BOARD 

OF 

CHARITIES AND REFORM. 



Wm. C. Allen Racine Tenn expires April 1, 1878. 

HiBAM H. Giles Madison Term expires April 1, 1874. 

AmmKW E. Elmore Green Bay Term expires April 1, 1875. 

Mart E. B. Ltndb Milwaukee .... Term expires April 1, 1876. 

WiLLARD Merrill Janesrille Term expires April 1, 1877. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 



HIRAM H. GILES, 

FREBIDBirr. 

WILLIAM C. ALLEN, 

VICB PRESIDENT. 

SAMUEL D. HASTINGS, 

8ECRETART. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT. 



To His Excellency, 0. C. Washburn, 

Oovemor of the State of Wisconsin: 

Herewith we hand you the second annual report of the State 
Board of Charities and Reform. 
The report is arranged under the following general heads: 

^I. — Laws, etc., Dbpikino the Powbbs and Duties of the 
Board, with Extracts from the Record of their 
Proceedings. 
II. — Poor Houses. 
III. — Jails. 

rV. — Milwaukee Charitable Institutions. 
V. — State Charitable and Correctional Institutions. 
VI. — Statistics. 
VII. — Miscellaneous. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. C. ALLEN, 
H. H. GILES, 
ANDREW E. ELMORE, 
MARY E. B. LYNDE, 
WILLARD MERRILL, 
Samuel D. EUstings, 

JSecretarr/. 



1. 



LAWS, Etc., 

DEFINING THE POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE BOAi&>, 

WITH 

EXTRACTS FROM THE RECORD OF THEIR PROCEEDINGS. 



Chapter ld6— General Laws, 1871. 
AN ACT TO ORGANIZE A STATE BOARD OP CHARITIES AND 



REFORM. 



/ 



[Ae amended by Chapter 187, General Lawe, 1878. ] 

The people of the State of Wisconsin^ represented in Senate 

and Assembly^ do enact as follows: 

Section 1. To the end that the administration of public char- 
ity and correction may be conducted upon sound principles of 
economy, justice and humanity,, and that the relations between 
the state and its dependent and criminal classes may become 
better understood, there is hereby created a State Board of 
Charities and Reform. 

MEMBSFS OF THE BOARD. 

Section 2. The said board shall consist of five members, who 
shall be appointed by the governor and shall hold their offices 
for the tenn of five years and until their successors are appointed 
and qualified, except that at the first appointment the term of 
one member shall be fixed for one year, of another for two years, 
of another for three years, of another for four years, and of the 



6 

other for five years. When any vacancy shall occur in the board 
by resignation, death or otherwise, the governor shall appoint a 
new member to serve the residue of the unexpired term. 

KESTINGS. 

Section 3. The board shall meet in the ofBce of the secre- 
tary of state within sixty days after their appointment, to or- 
ganize and to transact such other business as may be necessary 
to carry into effect the provisions of this act. They shall after- 
ward meet in October, on or before the 15th day, and in January, 
on or before the 10th day, in each year; and they may hold such 
other meetings as they may decide upon. 

SECRETARY. 

Section 4. The board shall appoint a qualified elector as sec- 
retary, whose duty it shall be to keep the books and records of 
the board, to prepare such papers, to make such visits and to 
engage in such researches and investigations as may be required 
of him by the board. He shall hold his office for three years, 
unless sooner discharged by the board. 

STATE charitable AND CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

Section 6. It shall be the duty of the board to investigate 
and supervise the whole system of the charitable and correc- 
tional institutions supported by the state or receiving aid from 
the state treasury, by personal visits to such, making themselves 
familiar with all matters necessary to be understood in judging 
of their usefulness and of the honesty and economy of their 
management; and it shall be their duty to recommend such 
changes and additional provisions as they may deem necessary 
for their greater economy and efficiency. 

POOR HOUSES. 

Section 6. It shall be the further duty of the board to com- 
mence and to conduct a course of investigation into the con- 
dition of poor houses in the state, personally visiting and in- 



specting them from time to time, ascertaining how many persons 
of each sex are therein maintained, at what cost, and under 
what circumstances, as to health, comfort and good morals; how 
many insane persons are therein confined, and whether such 
arrangements are made for their care as humanity demands; 
also how many idiotic persons are therein supported; also how 
many poor children the said poor houses contain, and what pro- 
vision is made for their suitable care and education. They shall 
also collect statistics as to the number of the poor who are sup- 
ported or relieved by towns or otherwise at the public expense, 
outside of poor houses, the cost at which such support or relief 
is furnished, and any other important facts therewith connected. 
They shall also inquire to what extent the provisions of the law 
in regard to binding out poor children are complied with; and 
in general, they shall seek to collect such facts as may throw 
light upon the adequacy and efficiency of existing provisions 
for the support and relief of the poor, and any causes operating 
to increase or diminish the amount of pauperism in the state, or 
to pla6e the burden of relieving it where it does not properly 
belong. 

JAILS, BTO. 

Section 7. It shall be the further duty of the board to com- 
mence and conduct a course of investigation in regard to jails, 
city prisons, houses of correction and other places in the state 
in which persons convicted or suspected of crime, or any insane 
persons are confined, ascertaining by visit or otherwise, their 
sanitary condition, their arrangement for the separation of hard- 
ened criminals from juvenile offenders and from persons sus- 
pected of crime or detained as witnesses; also, whether any 
useful employment is furnished for prisoners, whether the insane 
are treated with due regard for humanity, and what efforts are 
put forth for the reformation of criminals; and in general, they 
shall endeavor to ascertain for the information of the legisla- 
ture, *any important facts or considerations bearing upon the 
best treatment of criminals and the diminution of crime. 



POWEB8 OF THX BOARD. 

SscnoK 8. The board shall have fall power at all times to 
ook into and examine the condition of the institutions and es- 
tablishments referred to in this act, to inquire into and examine 
their methods of treatment, instruction, government and man- 
agement of their inmates, the official conduct of trustees, man- 
agers, directors, superintendents, and other officers and em- 
ployes of the same, the condition of the buildings, grounds and 
other property connected therewith, and into all other matters 
petaining to their usefulness and good management; and for 
these purposes they shall have free access to all parts of the 
grounds and buildings, and to all books and papers of said in- 
stitutions and establishments; and all persons now or hereafter 
connected with the same are hereby directed and required to 
give, either verbally or in writing, as the board may direct, such 
information, and to afford such facilities for inspection as the 
board may require. 

REPORT. 

Section 9. (As amended by chapter 137, general laws 1872.) 
On or before the fifteenth day of December, in each year, the 
board shall present to the Governor a report of their proceedings 
and of their expenses under this act. Said report shall contain 
a concise statement of the condition of each of the charitable 
and correctional institutions supported by the state, or receiving 
aid from the state treasury, together with their opinion of the 
appropriation proper to be made, for each, for the following 
year. It shall also embody the results of their investigation 
during the year in regard to the support of the poor, and the 
treatment of criminals, and shall also contain any information, 
suggestions, or recommendations which they may choose to 
present upon the matters by this act assigned to their super- 
vision and examination. Three thousand (3,000) copies of this 
report shall be printed by the state printer, in the same manner 
as those of state officers are printed, for the use of the board 
and of the legislature. 



KOT TO BB INTEBBCrrXD IN COITTBACTS, ETC. 

Section 10. All members of the board and the secretary of 
the board are hereby prohibited from being intesrested, directly 
or indirectly, in any contract or arrangement for building, Repair- 
ing, furnishing, or providing any supplies of either of the insti- 
tutions placed under their supervision. 

compensations, etc. 

Section 11. (As amended by chapter 137, general laws 
1872.) The members of the board shall receive no compensa- 
tion for the services rendered under this act. Upon filing with 
the secretary of state sworn statements of the ampunt of the 
expenses actually and necessarily incurred by them in carrying 
out the other provisions of this act, they shall have the amount 
of said expenses refunded to them from the state treasury ; and 
the secretary of state is hereby authorized and required to draw 
his warrant upon the state treasury for the amount of expenses 
so incurred and proven. The secretary of the board shall re- 
ceive for all services rendered by him under this act, fifteen hun- 
dred dollars per annum, payable upon the warrant of the board, 
quarterly, from the state treasury. His actual and necessary 
expenses incurred in performing his duties shall be refunded in 
the same manner as those of the members of the board. And 
there is hereby appropriated out of any money in the treasury, 
not otherwise appropriated, a sum sufficient to comply with the 
provisions of this act. The board shall be supplied with all 
necessary stationery, blanks, printing, postage stamps, stamped 
envelops for their own use and for the use of their secretary, 
in the same manner in which state officers are now supplied with 
these articles. And there is hereby appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury, not otherwise appropriated, a sum suf- 
ficient to comply with the provisions of this act. 



10 

Chapter 66, O&Mral Lawi^ 1872. 

AN ACT TO PROVIDE FOR A UNIFORM SYSTEM OF KEEPING 
THE BOOKS AND ACCOUNTS OF THE STATE CHARITABUS 
AND PENAL INSTITUTIONS. 

The people of the state of Wisconsin represented in senate and otsanNjr, 
do enact as follows : 

TO BB PEEPABBD BY STATE BOABD OF CHABITIBS. ^ 

Sbction 1. The State Board of Charities and Reform are 
hereby authorized and directed, to prepare a system or plan for 
keeping the books and accounts of the state charitable 4«.nd penal 
institutions, to be as near uniform as can be adapted to the 
wants and necessities of the different institutions. 

TO BB APPROVED BY GOVBRNOB. 

Section 2. Upon the completion of such system or plan, it 
shall be submitted to the governor, and when approved by him, 
shall be adopted by all the state charitable and penal institutions. 

ANNUAL reports TO CONTAIN DETAILED STATEMENTS OP EX- 
PENDITURES. 

Section 3. Hereafter the annual reports of the state char- 
itable and penal institutions, shall contain a detailed statement 
of their expenditures for the year, prepared in such form as shall 
be prescribed by the state board of charities and reform. 

Section. 4. This act shall take effect and be in force from and 
after its passage. 

Joint Resolution No. 19, Senate^ 1873. 

NATIVITY, ETC., OF INMATES OP CHARITABLE AND PENAL 

INSTITLTIONS. 

Besolved by the Senate^ the Assembly concurring^ That the 
State Board of Charities and Reform be instructed to investi- 
gate and ascertain the number of foreign bom citizens who are 
now inmates of our charitable and penal institutions, including 
county jails and poor-houses, and what number of those who are 
Buch inmates that have been in similar institutions in the coun- 
tries from which they came, so far as practicable, and to report 
as fully as they are able to do in their next annual report. 



16^ 



# 



11 

MEETING OF THE BOARD 

AT MADISON. 

Januajry 20, 1872. — The Board met at their office in Madison 
and adjourned until the 22d. On that day they again assembled, 
and after transmitting the business before them, adjourned. 



HOSPITAL FOB THE INSANB AT SLGIN, ILL. 

FsBBUABY 20, 1872. — ^An invitation to meet the Governor and 
Legislature of Illinois, at the opening of the new Hospital for 
the Insane at Elgin, in that State, was accepted. The exercises 
of the occasion were of an interesting character. The hospital 
at Elgin is built on a plan very similar to that of the Northern 
Hospital at Oshkosh, the building at Oshkosh being a little the 
largest. The three wings on the north and the rear building 
for kitchen, chapel and heating purposes, were completed. The 
building in its present shape, is calculated to accommodate one 
hundred and fifty patients. 



Fbbbuaby 7, 1872. — The Wisconsin State Hospital for the 
Ihsane and the Soldiers' Orphans' Home, were this day visited in 
company with the State Commissioners of Public Charities of 
the State of Illinois. 



Fbbbuaby 8, 1872. — The Milwaukee County House of Cor- 
rection at Milwaukee and the Industrial School for Boys at 
Waukesha, were this day visited in company with the State 
'^' Commissioners of Public Charities of the State of Illinois. 



Fbbbuaby 9, 1972. — The institution for the education of the 
Deaf and Dumb, Delevan, and the institution for the education 
of the Blind at Janesville, were this day visited in company with 
the State Commissioneis of Public Charities of the State of 
Illinois. 



12 

MESTING AT MILWAUKSK. 

April 8, 1872. — A meeting of the Board was held this day 
at the Plankintou House, Milwaukee. 

The Secretary was instructed to forward copies of the joint 
resolution of the legislature, No. 19, to the commissioner of the 
State Prison, and to the superintendent of the Wisconsin State 
Hospital for the Insane, requesting them to keep such records of 
the nativity and previous history of the inmates of the institutions 
under their charge as would enable them to furnish to this 
board the information sought for by the Legislature. 

The secretary laid before the Board a copy of the law of last 
winter — chapter 66, laws of 1872 — relative to the preparation 
by this Board of a uniform system for keeping the books and 
accounts of the state charitable and penal institutions, where- 
upon the following action was had: 

Voted — ^That the matter of getting up a uniform system for 
keeping the books and accounts of the state charitable and 
penal institutions, be referred to the secretary, with instruc- 
tions to invite a conference of the superintendents of these in- 
stitutions, so as to have the benefit of their views aiid sugges- 
tions, and if possible to agree upon a system that will be satis- 
factory to all, and that he report to this Board as soon as prac- 
ticable; also, that in his conference with the superintendentd of 
the state institutions, he endeavor to secure an understanding 
with them by which the estimates they present in their annual 
reports, for the expenses of the succeeding year, shall all be 
made to cover the same period of time. 



April 9, 1872. The « Home of the Friendless," at Milwau- 
kee, and the Industrial School for Boys, at Waukesha, were this 
day visited. 

April 10, 1872. The institution for the instruction of the 
Deaf and Dumb, at Delavan, and the institution for the educa- 
tion of the Blind at Janesvillei werejthis day visited. 



13 

Apbil 18, 1872. The Wisconsin State Hospital for the In- 
sane, near Madison, was this day visited. 



Apbil 22, 1872. The board this day visited Milwaukee and 
examined the plans for the new jail then in process of erection 
in that city. 

After a careful examination of the plans and the grounds, a 
communication, of which the following is a copy, was addressed 
to the 

COMMITTEE OP THE BOABD OF SUPEBVI60RS OF MILWAUKEE 

COUNTY, ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

. ^'Gentlemen: The State Board 6f Charities and Reform are 
charged with the duty of examining into the condition of the 
county jails of the state, the treatment of their inmates, their 
sanitary condition, etc., and in the discharge of this duty, they 
recently made an examination of the plans of the new jail now 
building in the city of Milwaukee, by authority of your county 
board of supervisors, and as we judge under your supervision, 
' as the committee on public buildings. 

" In our investigations thus far, as you will see set forth in 
our first annual report, a copy of which we forward to you by 
to-day's mail, we have found much to commend in the public in- 
stitutions of your county, and we are satisfied that it is the de- 
sire of your people to do all in their power for the welfare of 
the criminal and dependent classes in your midst. 

^^ From an examination of the plans of your new jail, we are 
satisfied that you have avoided many of the most glaring de- 
fects of the majority of the jails of the state. We judge you 
have made provision for good drainage; for a separation of the 
di£Perent classes of inmates, and your system for ventilation 
seems to be well devised, and we doubt not will work in a most 
satisfactory manner. There is one very important matter, how- 
ever, which seems to have been entirely overlooked, and that is 
bathing accommodations for the inmates of the jail. In the 



14 

erection of your house of correction, you have shown your ap- 
preciation of the importance of this matter, and we trust you 
will not allow your new jail to be completed without providing 
ample bathing accommodations. In conyersation with your ar- 
chitect, Mr. Mygatt, he expressed the opinion that there would 
be no difficulty in putting in a bath room on each floor, without 
interfering at all with the general plan, and with comparative 
little expense. 

" The completion of your contemplated water works will fur- 
nish an abundant supply of water. 

" In the report of our board, you will notice our views of the 
hardship and injustice of treating a man simply detained as a 
witness as though he was a convicted criminal. There is room 
in the second story of your new jail that could be set apart for 
the use of this class of persons, when there are such in the 
building. 

^' By dividing the room so as to make a sleeping apartment in 
one end, comfortable accommodations for day and night could 
be secured. 

" We trust these suggestions will receive your favorable con- 
sideration. 

'^ On behalf of the state board of charities and reform, we 

are, 

" Very respectfully, 

" Your ob*t servants, 

"H. H. GILES, 

President of the Board. 

Sam'l D. Hastings, Secretary. 



Apbil 23, 1872. The state prison, at Waupun, was visited 
this day. 



Apbil 25, 1872. The La Crosse county jail and the La Crosse 
city lock-up were this day visited. 



Mat 6, 1872. — In response to the invitation of the Secretary, 
issued by direction of the Board, 



15 



A MXBTIKa OF THE BUPBBIKTBKDBKTS OF THB OHABITABLB Ain> 

PBNAL iirsrrnjnoKB 

Was held at the office of the Board in Madison, for the pur- 
pose of considering the question of a uniform system for keep- 
ing the books and accounts of the yarious institutions. 

The institutions were represented as follows: 
The Wisconsin State Hospital for the Insane, by Dr. A. S. 

McDill, Superintendent. 
The Institution for the Education of the Blind, by T. H. Little, 

Superintendent. 
The Institution for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, by 

Geo. L. Weed, jr.. Principal. 
The Industrial School for Boys, by A. D. Hendrickson, Super- 
intendent. 

The State Prison, by Capt. L. D. Hinckley, Clerk of the Prison. 

Plans for keeping a record of the daily population of the 
various institutions, for classifying and analyzing their expen- 
ditures, forms for making reports, etc., were examined and dis- 
cussed and conclusions reached that seemed to be satisfactory 
to all. 



May 14, 1872. — In response to an invitation from the Board 
of State Commissioners of Public Charities of the State of 
Illinois, a conference of the State Boards of that and the 
adjoining States was held at the Sherman House, Chicago. 

The following is the official record of the proceedings furn- 
ished by the Secretary: 

COKFBBSlfCE OF STATE BOARDS AT CHICAGO. 

At the request of the Illinois State Board of Public Charities, 
the Wisconsin State Board of Charities and Reform and the 
Michigan State Board for the Supervision of Charitable, Penal 
and Reformatory Institutions met with the aforesaid Illinois 
Board at the Sherman House, in the city of Chicago, on Tues- 
day, the 14th day of May, 1872, for the purpose of mutual con- 



16 

fereuce and consultation, and for the more especial considera- 
tion of the manner of punishing criminals by confining them 
for a period of time in county jails. 

There were present from the state of Illinois, Elmer Baldwin, 
President; Selden M. Church, of Rockford; J. B. Lawson, of 
Chesterfield, and Rev. F. H. Wines, of Springfield, Secretary. 
From the state of "Wisconsin, H. H. Giles, of Madison, Presi- 
dent; Wm. C. Allen, of Racine; Mrs. Mary E. B. Lynde, of 
Milwaukee; Willard Merrill, of Janesville, and Samuel D. Has- 
tings, of Madison, Secretary. From the state of Michigan, 
William B. Williams, of Allegan, and Charles M. Croswell, of 
Adrian, Secretary. 

The meeting organized by selecting Judge W. C. Allen to 
preside over its deliberations, and Charles M. Croswell for Sec- 
retary. 

On motion of Judge Williams of Michigan, the secretaries of 
the several boards represented in the conference were considered 
and declared members of the convention, and entitled to all the 
rights and privileges thereof. 

Judge Baldwin, of Illinois, moved that a committee of four be 
appointed to report a programme of subjects for the considera- 
tion of the conference. 

This motion prevailed, and the chairman appointed as such 
committee, Elmer Baldwin, Rev. F. H. Wines, Samnel D. Hast- 
ings and CM. Croswell, 

The conference then took a recess until 2^ o'clock, P. M. 

On the re-assembling of the convention, the committee. ap- 
pointed to draft programme of subjects for discussion, through 
its chairman, reported the following, which was unanimously 
adopted. 

First, — The object of imprisonment. (1) The protection of 
society ; {%) The reformation of the criminal; (3) The preven- 
tion of crime. 

Second, — ^The result of the examination of jails in these three 
states. How far is thie object sought attained under the present 
system. 



17 

Third.— Whtit would be the effect of a substitution of com- 
pulsory labor for compulsory idleness? 

Fourth. — Is compulsory labor in county jails practicable? 

Fifth. — Intermediate prisons. (1.) The economic question; 
comparative cost of construction; comparative cost of mainten- 
ance. (2.) Their reformatory effect. (3.) Their deterent effect. 

Sixth. — Obstacles to be overcome. 

Seventh. — Is it desirable to make an immediate effort to secure 
their establishment? 

Eighth. — Points with regard to which more detailed and accu- 
rate information is needed. 

Ninth. — Details of plan. 

The several subjects presented for consideration were then 
discussed, all the members taking part therein, and after due 
deliberation a committee consisting of Rev. F. H. Wines, Sam- 
uel D. Hastings and Charles M. Crosswell, was appointed to 
to embody in writing the views of the conference upon the sev- 
e^al subjects considered and discussed. 

This committee in due time reported the following declara- 
tien, which was, without dissent, adopted as representing the 
views of each and every member of the conference. 

DSCLABATIOK. 

The object of the imprisonment of criminals is conceded by 
all, to be two-fold — the protection of society and the criminal 
himself. The protection of society is effected in part by the 
segregation of the offender, and in part by the deterrent influ- 
ence of punishment upon others who are tempted to commit 
crime. 

A minute and careful examination of the jails of Illinois 
Wisconsin and Michigan, by kindred commissions specially 
appointed for this purpose, reveals the fact that as proper places 
of punishment, they fail to accomplish the object of their crea- 
tion. They are for the most part, defective in a sanitary point 
a— C. & R (Doc. 13.) 



18 

of view; many of them are insecure; they are frequently so 
constructed as to compel the promiscuous association of the 
young and the old, the guilty and the innocent, the hardened 
villain and the [novice in crime, and in some cases even the 
sexes. In none of them is there provision for the employment 
of the imprisoned inmates; and there are few in which any 
attempt is made either at their moral or intellectual culture. 
In the aggregate, they cost large sums of money for their con- 
struction, and are a great annual expense to the community, 
without adequate return for this expenditure. 

The finest and most costly of them all, however superior in 
architectural construction, exerts as little reformatory eflFect as 
the poorest. Their condemnation may be pronounced in a single 
sentence: They are an absurd attempt to cure crime, the off- 
spring of idleness, by making idleness compulsory. The fail- 
ure of the jails is due, not to the character of the officers who 
have charge of them, but to this radical defect in the jail sys- 
them itself, which originated in the primitive condition of our 
national history, 'snd was then the only thing possible. It has 
been blindly copied and extended with the growth of the coun- 
try, in consequence of the difficulty of effecting any change 
after the investment of so much money. We are satisfied that 
for enforced idleness the state should substitue enforced labor. 
We are also satisfied that no remunerative system of labor can 
be introduced into county jails on account of the very limited 
number of persons in each. The only remedy for the evils of 
the present system consists in the substitution of houses of cor- 
rection in their stead. The county jails should be remodeled, 
and simply used as houses of detention. One or two prisons 
in each state of a character intermediate between the jail and 
the penitentiary, might be so organized and conducted as to 
diminish the cost of crime, and to diminish its amount. The 
cost of original construction would be diminished by the substi- 
tution of a single capacious edifice for fifty or sixty smaller 
ones. The cost of maintainance of criminals would be dimin- 
ished by the aggregate amount of their earnings, while enforced 
labor would benefit the prisoner himself, and exert an increased 



19 

deterrent influence upon the criminal class at large. The mod- 
em facilities for transportation of criminals by rail remove, to a 
great extent, the objection arising from distance. 

We believe that the time has come for an earnest effort to 
call public attention to this subject, and to prepare the way for 
a great public reform. In this effort we invoke the aid of 
philanthropists, believing that no one, who has seen what we 
have seen, can fail to adopt the conclusions which have been 
enforced upon our mind. 

The meeting then adjourned until Wednesday morning, at 9 
o^clock A. M. 

The conference re-assembled at 9 o'clock on the morning of 

Wednesday, the 15th day of May, at the Sherman House, and 

proceeded in company with Commissioner Harris, of the Cook's 

county board, and Dr. C. B. Miller, superintendent of public 

charities of the city of Chicago, to visit the Chicago house of 

correction. The members of the conference were most kindly 

received, and courteously conducted and shown through every 

department of this institution by Superintendent Felton, and, 

after thoroughly inspecting the same and expressing themselves 

as greatly pleased with it, and with the management thereof, 

and their visit thereto, returned to the city when the meeting 

adjourned without day. 

C. M. Croswell, Secretary, 



Meeting op the Board at Chicago. 

May 14th, 1872.— While in attendance upon the conference 
of State Board of Public Charities, at Chicago, a meeting of 
the board was held at the Sherman House. 

The Secretary reported the result of his conference with the 
superintendents of the State charitable and penal institutions, 
relative to the adoption of a uniform system for keeping the 
books and accounts of the different institutions. 

The system that had been prepared was laid before the board 
and after considerable time was spent in examining its details, 



20 



the final disposition of the matter was postponed to an adjourned 
meeting, to be held at the call of the Secretary. 



Junk 8th, 1872. — The Sauk county jail, at Baraboo, was this 
day visited. 

June 9th, 1872. — The Dane county poor house was this day 
visited. 



June 11th, 1872. — The Dane county poor house was again 
visited, at the invitation of and in company with the county 
superintendents of the poor. 



MEETING AT DELAVAN. 

June 13, 1872. A meeting of the board was held at the In- 
stitution of the Deaf and Dumb at Delavan. 

They examined the building and grounds, and witnessed the 
closing exercises of the school previous to the summer vacation. 
The board adjournnd to meet at Waukesha on the following 
day. 



MEETING AT WAUKESHA. 



June 14, 1872. Pursuant to adjournment the board met at 
the Industrial School for Boys at "Waukesha. 

The board resumed the consideration of the plan which had 
been prepared in consultation with the Superintendents of the 
State charitable and penal institutions, for a uniform system for 
keeping the books and accounts of the State institutions, and, 
after a careful examination and consideration of the plan, it 
was, on motion, approved and adopted, and the Secretary was 
instructed to submit it to the Governor for his approval. 

The plan was subsequently submitted to the Governor, and 
approved by him, and is as follows: 



21 



SYSTEM FOR KEEPING THE BOOKS AND ACCOUNTS OP THE CHAR- 
ITABLE AND PENAL INSTITUTIONS OP THE STATE OP WIS- 
CONSIN. 

In accordance with the provisions of chapter 66 of the gen- 
eral laws of 1872, the State Board of Charities and Reform have 
prepared the following system or Dlan for keeping the books 
and accounts of the state penal and charitable institution sub- 
ject to such changes and additions, from time to time, by the 
Board, as experience and observation may show to be necessary. 

First. A record of the population of all the state charitable 
and penal institutions shall be kept substantially in the manner 
and form set forth in exhibit marked " A." 

A report of the population of these institutions, to be made 
to the State Board of Charities and Reform, quarterly, in sub- 
stantially the manner and form set forth in exhibit marked "B." 

Second, The analysis of the expenditures, and the detailed 
statement thereof, required by section 3 of chapter Q^ of the 
general laws of 1872, to be made in connection with the annual 
reports of the state institutions, shall be substantially in the 
form shown in exhibit marked " C." 

Third, Exhibit " D " is recommended as a suitable form of 
arrangement for keeping the record of the analyzed expendi- 
tures of the different institutions. 

Fourth. All purchases for current expenses, ordinary repairs, 
and for all other purposes where the appropriation for the same 
is made in advance of the expenditure, and the funds are in 
hand, should be made so as to secure the usual cash discounts; 
and open accounts should be paid in full at the close of each 
month, when there are funds in hand to do so. 

Fifth. A summary of the expenditures of each State institu- 
tion shall be reported to the State Board of Charities and Re- 
form, quarterly, on blanks to be furnished by said Board, which 
blanks shall be in the form set forth in exhibit marked '* E." 

Sixth. In those institutions where farming and gardening op- 
erations are carried on, the accounts shall be so kept as to show, 



22 

as near as practicable, the cost of carrying on the farm and gar- 
den, and a report shall be made showing the quantity and value 
of the productions of the farm and garden, estimating the value 
at the average market price, and also showing the cost of^ the 
milk produced, and of the cattle, swine or poultry, raised or fat- 
tened for the use of the institution, with the quantity and value 
of the same, that they may be estimated in making up the cost 
of subsistence of the inmates of the institution. 

Seventh. In those institutions where manufacturing operations 
are carried on, the accounts shall be so kept as to show the cost 
and results of each separate branch of manufacture, and an ex- 
act account shall be kept of the quantity and value of all man- 
ufactured articles used in the institution where manufactured. 

Eighth, Every institution should have some one to act as a 
storekeeper, whose duty it shall be to receive and examine all 
articles purchased for the institution, and to deliver the same 
to the persons into whose hands they should go, making a 
proper record thereof, or taking an appropriate receipt for the 
same. 

Ninth, The estimates for the current expenses of the differ- 
ent State institutions should be made so as to embrace the year 

from April to April. 

H. H. GILES, President, 
Sam'l D. Hastings, Secretary, 

Approved: 

C. C. WASHBURN. 

(The various " exhibits " referred to are omitted as they would 
not be of general interest, and from their shape it would be 
difficult to get them into the form of this report.) 

The secretary was instructed to have printed a sufficient 
number of copies of the foregoing system for keeping the 
books and accounts of the state institutions with accompanying 
" exhibits " to supply the institutions. 

The secretary laid before the board copies of circulars which 
he had prepared for town clerks, overseers of poor-houses, su- 
perintendents of the poor, and also forms for registers for jails 



23 

and poor-houses, which on motion were referred to the presi- 
dent and secretary with authority to perfect the same and have 
the necessary number printed. 

The board were informed that the managers of the Industrial 
School for Boys had agreed to grant to Mr. Hendrickson, the 
superintendent of the institution, leave of absence to attend the 
sessions of the international penitentiary congress, to be held 
in the city of London, England, commencing on the third day 
of July next, whereupon it was on motion of Mr. Elmore, 

Votedj That the secretary, on behalf of this board, request 
Gov. Washburn to give Mr. Hendrickson a commission to rep- 
resent the state of Wisconsin in the international penitentiary 
congress, to be held at London on the 3d of July, 1872. 

The request was promptly and cheerfully responded to by 
Gov. Washburn, and Mr. Hendrickson attended the sessions of 
the congress at London. 



JiTNB 14, 1872. — The Walworth county poor-house, at Geneva, 
and the Walworth county jail, at Elkhorn, were this day visited. 



MEBTING AT MILWAUKSB. 

Jttly 1, 1872. — The Board met at the Plankinton House, Mil" 
waukee, on the evening of Monday, July 1, and on the follow- 
ing day^visited the following institutions, to which appropriatio ns 
had been made by the legislature at its last session, viz: 

Milwaukee Hospital, 

St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum, 

St. Mary's Hospital, 

Milwaukee Orphan Association, 

Home of the Friendless, 

St. Rosa's Orphan Asylum, 

St. Amelianus* Orphan Asylum, 

Milwaukee Seaman's Friend Society. 



July 3, 1872. — ^The Board visited the Milwaukee county- 
house, at Wauwatosa. 



24 
July 9, 1872. — The Green county jail was visited this day. 



MEETING AT MADISON. 



July 22, 1872. — A meeting of the Board was held at their 
office in Madison, Monday evening, July 22. 



July 23, 1872. — The Wisconsin State Hospital for the Insane 
and the Dane County Poor-house were visited. 



July 24, 1872. — The Soldiers' Orphans' Home was visited. 



MEETING AT MILWAUKEE. 



August 5, 1872. — A meeting of the Board was held at the 
Plankinton House, Milwaukee, on Monday evening, August 5, 
1872, and on the following day they visited the Milwaukee 
County House of Correction and the new county jail. 



August 7, 1872. — The Sheboygan county jail and the Fond 
du Lac county jail and poor-house were this day visited. 



August 8, 1872. — The Winnebago county poor-house at Osh- 
kosh, and the Jefferson county poor-house at Jefferson, were 
this day visited. 



August 15, 1872. — The Kenosha county jail, the Kenosha 
city poor-house, at Kenosha, the Racine county poor-house at 
Torkville and the Racine county jail at Racine were visited this 
day. 



August 16, 1872. — The Waukesha county poor-house, at 



25 

Yemon, the Waukesha county jail, at Waukesha, and the Indus- 
trial school for boys at Waukesha were this day visited. 



August 21, 1872. — The Grant county jail, and the Grant 
county poor-house, at Lancaster were this day visited. 



August 22,1872. — The La Fayette county jail, and poor-house 
were this day visited. 



August 23, 1872. — The Iowa county poor-house at Linden, 
was this day visited. 



August 27, 1872. — The Columbia county jail at Portage, was 
this day visited. 



August 28, 1872. — The Columbia county poor-house at Wyo- 
cena, and the JeflFerson county jail at Jefferson, were this day 
visited. 



Septembeb 26, 1872. — The Dodge county jail, and poor-house 
at Juneau, were this day visited. 



September 27, 1872. — The Rock county poor-house at Johns- 
town, was this day visited. 



OcTOBEE 1, 1872. — The La Crosse county jail and the La 
Crosse county lock-up were this day visited. 



October 2, 1872. — The Vernon county poor-house, and jail at 
Viroqua were this day visited. 



26 

OcTOBiDB 11, 1878. — The Brown county jaU at Green Bay, and 
the Brown county poor-houBe at Preble, were this day visited. 



ANNUAL MBBTING AT MADISON. 

OcTOBEB 17, 1872. — ^The annual meeting of the Board was 
held at their office, in Madison, on Thursday evening, October 
17, 1872. 

On motion, it was voted to postpone the election of officers of 
the Board, until a meeting to be held at Janesville on Friday, 
October 25, 1872. 

On motion, it was voted that Mrs. Lynde be requested to pre- 
pare a paper for the next annual report in relation to the estab- 
lishment of an industrial school for girls. 



OcTOBKB 15, 1872. — The Board visited t\e Wisconsin State 
Hospital for the Insane, and Soldiers' Orphans' Home. 



OcrroBEB 10, 1872. — The Board visited the Dane county jail. 



OcroBBB 24, 1872. — The Green county poor house, at Mount 
Pleasant, was visited this day. 



MEETING AT JANESVILLE. 

The adjourned annual meeting of the Board was held at the 
institution for the instruction of the Blind, at Janesville, on 
Friday, October 25, 1872. 

The annual election of officers of the Board took place, which 
resulted as follows: 

HiBAM H. Giles, President. 
"William C. Allen, Vice President. 

While together, the Board examined the building and grounds 



27 

of the institution for the education of the Blind, and witnessed 
the regular exercises of different classes in arithmetic, geogra- 
phy and music. 



MEETING AT WAUPTJK. 



The Board met at Waupun on the evening of October 31, 
1872. 

On the following day they examined the cells, the chapel, the 
kitchen, the workshops and the grounds of the Prison. 



MBETING AT WAUKESHA. 



The Board met at the Industrial School for Boys, at "Wauke- 
sha, on the evening of November 14, 1872. 



MBBTING AT DELAYAN. 

The Board met at the institution for the education of the 
Deaf -and Dumb, at Delavan, on the morning of the 15th of No- 
vember, 1872. and while there examined the grounds and build- 
ings, and witnessed the regular exercises of the different classes 



MEETING AT OSHKOSH. 

The Board met at Oshkosh on the mopning of Friday, Decem- 
ber 20, 1872. On the following day, in company with the 
Legislative Visiting Committee, they visited the Northern Hos- 
pital for the Insane, and examined the building, barns, gas- 
house, heating apparatus, etc. 



EXPENSES OF THE BOARD. 



In the annual report of the Secretary of State for the year 
1871, he reports the amount audited for expenses of the Board, 
including salary of the Secretary, at $554.20. 



28 

The report of the Board being made up at a later date, they 
reported the amount of their expenses $1,171.65. 

The Secretary of State, in his report for the year 1872, re- 
ports the amount audited during the fiscal year, for expenses of 
the Board, $2,400.30. 

The items in detail of $1,171.65 of this amount were given by 
the Board in their report of last year. 

The amount reported by the Secretary of State as audited by 
him for expenses of the Board during the two years ending 
September 30, 1872, is $2,954.50. 

Deducting the amount for which the items were given in de- 
tail by the Board in their last report, $1,171.65, it leaves the 
sum of $1,782.85, the items of which we give below. 

Hereafter we will report the expenses of the Board for the 
fiscal year, so that the aggregate amount will agree with the 
amount audited by the Secretary of State during the same pe- 
riod. 

BXPENSBS OF THS BOARD. 



1871. 
Nov. 11 

Dec. 11 

Dec. 29 

1872. 
Jan. 2 
Jan. 80 
Feb. 8 
Feb. 12 
M'ch 9 
M*ch 9 
M'ch25 
Apl. 8 
June 14 

June 14 

June 9 
June 9 
July 8 



Cash paid for 150 8c. postage stamps 

do 50 Ic. postage stamps 

... .do telegram to Mrs. Lyndc and to legislative 

visiting committee 

... .do telegram to Mr. Merrill^ to State Prison 

Commissioner and to Mr. Giles 



Cash paid for postage stamps 

. . . .do do 

. . . .do do 

. . . .do do 

... .do do 

Cash paid for telegram ft'om Waukesha to Delavan.. . 

do expressage on reports sent to other States. 

... .do telegram from Waukesha to Delavan... . 

... .do telegram f^om Delavan to Messrs. Giles 

and Merrill 

....do livery from Delavan to Walworth Co. 

poor house and jail 

. . . .do livery to Dane Co. poor house 

. . . .do bindmg pamphlets 

... .do teams tovisit Milwaukee charitable insti- 
tutions and Milwaukee county house . . 



H 50 
50 

1 40 

8 90 

6 25 
16 00 

1 00 
15 00 

2 50 
80 

4 25 
80 

1 20 

4 00 
6 00 

5 75 

20 00 

m 85 



29 



EXPENSES OF SBCBETABY. 



1872 
Sept. 30 

1872 
April 1 

1871 
Oct. 6 

Not. 23 

Dec. 18 

1872 
Feb. 3 

Feb. 8 

April 8 

May 14 

Apr. 22 
Apr. 23 

Apr. 27 

June 8 

July 3 



Cash paid salary to date , 



Cash paid salary as agent of Soldiers* Or- 
phans' Home to date of repeal of law. 

Cash paid expenses of attending meeting 
at Janesville 

Cash paid expenses of visit to Monroe Co. 
jail and La Crosse lock-up 

Cash paid expenses of attending meeting 
at Delavan 



Cash paid expenses of visit to Elgin, 111., 
at opening of hospital for insane 

Cash paid expense of visit to Milwaukee 
house of correction 

Cash paid expense of meeting at Milwau- 
kee and visit to institutions at Wauke 
sha, Delavan and Janesville 

Cash paid expense of meeting of board at 
at Chicago 

Cash paid expense of meeting at Milw'k. 

Cashpaid expense of visit to state prison, 
Waupun 

Cash paid expense of visit to La Crosse 
lock-up and jail.. : 

Cash paid expense of visit to Sauk county 
jail 

Cash paid expense of meeting at Milw'k 



11,350 00 



290 00 



II 25 

I 

4 25 

2 50 

3 25 

2 50 

10 25 

50 

3 50 

1 25 

3 50 

1 25 
600 



11,640 00 



49 00 



f 1> 689 00 



BECAPITULATION. 

Expense of the board, as a whole $93 85 

Salary of secretary 1,640 00 

Expenses of secretary 49 00 

$1,782 85 



The members of the board have not yet rendered their bills 
for their traveling expenses during the past year. The bills will 
not probably exceed in the aggregate $200, if they do $175. 

The board have occasion to express their renewed obligations 
for courtesies received from the managers of the Chicago and 
Northwestern, the Milwaukee and St. Paul, the "Western Union 
and the West Wisconsin railway companies. 



II. 



POOR-HOUSES 



The previous report of the Board oontained a description of 
the size and value of the poor-house farms, and of the value of 
the buildings and personal property connected with them, and 
much other general information that it will not be necessary to 
repeat in this report. 

A large majority of the counties are still without poor-houses; 
in one or two instances, farming out their poor to the lowest 
bidder, in another instance hiring them kept in the poor-house 
of a neighboring county, but in most cases, where there are no 
county poor-houses the poor are provided for under the town 
system. 

One county, Clark, during the past year, has given up the 
county system, leased their county farm, and returned to the 
town system. 

Sauk county has voted to adopt the county system, and has 
authorized the purchase of a farm and the erection of a poor- 
house. 

ADAMS COUNTY POOR-HOUSE. 

At the session of the board of supervisors of Adams county, 
held in November, 1871, it was voted to adopt the county sys- 
tem of supporting the poor, and a farm was procured in the town 
of Jackson, and placed in charge of Mr. R. B. Rose. 

We have failed to get any response to our communication to 
Mr. Rose, and hence are unable to give any information in rela- 
tion to the population of this poor-houae. 



31 

The fact of its existence did not come to the knowledge of 
the Board until late in November, of the present year, 

BBOWN COUNTY POOR-HOUSE 

Is still in charge of Mr. Wm. Rowbotham, as overseer. 

No particular change here since our last report. The house 
and grounds are kept clean and in good order. The building is 
very old and but poorly adapted to the purpose for which it is 
used. 

We are pleased to learn that the county supervisors contem- 
plate the erection of a new and appropriate building. The farm 
is very pleasantly located, and when a proper building is erected 
the place will compare favorably with any in the state. 

COLUMBIA COUNTY POOR-HOUSK. 

The impressions made by the visit to this poor-house last year 
were very favorable; in fact, all things considered, we pro- 
nounced it the ''most homelike and comfortable'' in its appear- 
ance of any similar institution in the state, and we are happy 
in being able to say, that the visit made during the present 
year has fully confirmed our first impressions of the appearance 
and management of this poor-house. 

The visit this year was made in company with H. W. Roblier, 
Esq., one of the county superintendents of the poor. It was 
made early in the morning, before breakfast, in many respects 
a very unfavorable time to have the place appear to advantage, 
as all housekeepers can well understand, and yet every thing 
appeared neat and clean and in good order. 

The beds and bedding were in good condition and the linen 
remarkably clean, considering that the following day was the 
time for the weekly change. 

The arrangements for the care of the insane are the best 
found in any poor-house in the state, and the cells &nd wards 
were in perfect order. The building is so constructed, that the 
insane can be divided into four distinct classes, each class hav- 
ing a separate apartment into which their cells open, and each 
apartment having a separate yard to which the inmates have 



32 

free access where they can have the air when the weather is 
suitable. 

The arrangement for the separation of the sexes, is complete 
and equal to any thing of the kind in any poor-house in the 
State. The privies are also separate. 

The grounds around the house are pleasant, with a good num- 
ber of shade trees in the front yard. 

The inmates took their breakfast, during the visit. The din- 
ing room was pleasant and comfortable, and there was a good 
wholesome meal on the table served up in good shape. 

Everything in and about the house, and in the appearance of 
the inmates indicated that they were comfortable and that they 
were kindly cared for. 

There is every reason to believe that Mr. Roblier, the super- 
intendent, who spends several hours every day at the poor-house, 
and Mr. Hill the overseer, and his wife are doing their full duty 
to those under their charge, and the liberal and enlightened 
policy pursued by the authorities of this county in the care of 
their unfortunate poor, is worthy of great commendation. 

DANS COUNTY POOR-HOUSK. 

There is little to be said in relation to this poor-house in ad- 
dition to what was said in our former report. Some excellent 
improvements have been made since our first visit. The accom- 
modations for the insane females have been improved by the 
construction of a veranda where they can spend a part of their 
time in the open air in pleasant weather. 

At a recent meeting of the county board of supervisors, an ap- 
propriation was made for the erection of a new building for a 
wash-house, in which they propose to have accommodations for 
bathing, and in the upper story will be rooms for insane males ^ 

The suggestions made by this Board Trom time to time for 
the improvement of the poor-house, have been kindly re- 
ceived by the overseer, the superintendent and the county board, 
and we have full confidence that the improvements already in 
progress, will be continued until Dane county will be behind no 
county in the state, in the extent and completeness of its accom- 
modations for the care of her poor. 



33 

Under the excellent management of Mr. Titus, the overseer, 
and his wife, the house and grounds are always neat and in good 
order, and the inmates seem to be as comfortable as their circum- 
stances will admit of. 

DODGE COUNTY POOB-HOUSE. 

The system in force in this county for the care of the poor 
is somewhat different from that of any other county in the State. 
Instead of a board of county superintendents of the poor, the 
whole matter is in charge of one man, Mr. A. B. Hitchcock, who 
resides at the poor-house and has the personal charge of it as 
overseer. Each town bears the entire expense of the support 
of its own poor, as much so as though there was no county poor- 
house. They can provide for them in their own homes in their 
own towns, or they can send them to the poor-house. The ac- 
tual cost of keeping the paupers at the poor-house, per capita, 
is ascertained, and this is the price the towns are required to 
pay for all they send there. If they can provide for a pauper 
at home at less cost than at the poor-house, he need not be sent 
there. The result is that those received from the towns are 
generally old, feeble or helpless, so that they can render little 
or no aid in the way of labor. A county pauper, that is, one 
who has not resided long enough in a town to acquire a legal 
residence, can secure aid out of the poor-house to the amount 
of ten dollars only, on the order of Mr. Hitchcock, the county 
superintendent. 

A large proportion of the inmates of the poor-house are al- 
ways county paupers. Of the 63 inmates on the day the house 
was visited, 44 were county paupers and 19 town paupers. Out- 
agamic county having no county poor-house, has an arrange- 
ment with Mr. Hitchcock by which paupers from that county 
are taken care of. Since the visit of last year, great improve- 
ments have been made. 

An addition has been made to the main building 30 feet by 60, 

two stories high, with a connection 16 feet by 20. When completed 

it will be one of the most extensive and best arranged buildings 

of the kind in the State, capable of accommodating about one 

8— C. & R. )Doc. 13.) 



34 

hundred inmates. The arrangement for the separation of the 
sexes is complete. Two new priries have been built, located in 
different parts of the grounds, one for each sex. A division 
fence is to be erected so that the sexes will have separate yards. 
There are four cisterns, one with a capacity of five hundred bar- 
rels, and the other three with an aggregate capacity of five hun- 
dred barrels, making a total capacity of one thousand barrels. 
There is also a good well on the place. Bathing accomodations 
are much needed. There is room in the new building where 
they can be arranged, and there will always be an abundant 
supply of water. Attention is called to this matter with the 
assurance that the officers of a county that has made such ex- 
cellent and abundant provision for the care of its poor will 
not allow so pressing a want as this to be long unsupplied. 

The bam, cow-stables, pig-pen, and the out-buildings gener- 
ally, were in excellent order. Mr. Hitchcock^s long experience in 
the position he holds has well qualified him for the discharge of 
its important duties, and he is evidently the right man in the 
right place. 

The grounds in the front of the building are tastefully laid 
out, and are inclosed with a good, substantial, yet quite ornamen- 
tal fence. Hedges and trees have been set out during the past 
year, that in a few years will add much to the beauty of the 
place. 

Too much praise cannot be awarded to the Supervisors of 
Dodge county for the enlightened and liberal views they have 
shown in the provisions they have made for the care of the poor 
in their midst, and in what they have already done we have the 
assurance that in the future, nothing will be left undone that they 
can be satisfied an enlightened humanity demands should be 
done. The building for the insane is in about the same condi- 
tion in which it was found at our previous visit. We are pleas- 
ed to state that arrangements have been made for two large 
yards or airing courts for the insane, one for each sex. The con- 
dition of the insane in this building is sad to contemplate. They 
are chiefly of the most difficult class to manage, violent and filthy 
and disposed to destroy their clothing, and there is no poor- 



35 

house in the State that has proper facilities for taking care of 
this class of the Insane. 

It is hoped that the opening of the new hospital for the Insane 
at Oshkoshj will aiford the opportunity for the removal of the 
most of these cases. • 

The county employs a physician by the year to look after the 
welfare of the inmates of the poor-house and jail. Dr. Barber 
has held this position for about twelve years, and owing, doubt- 
less, to his watchful care, no epidemic has ever visited the poor- 
house. The doctor seems to be as deeply interested in the 
welfare of the inmates of the house as though they were all 
members of his own family; and he is constantly on the watch 
to administer to their comfort and well-being. 

FOND DU LAC COUNTY POOR-HOUSE. 

No improvements, and, in fact, no changes of any kind have 
been made in this poor-house during the past year. 

What was said of it in our last report would hardly need to 
be changed, to describe its condition when visited on the 7th 
day of August last. 

The great trouble here is the presence of a class of violent 
and filthy insane, that are not, and cannot be properly cared for 
in such a place. 

GBANT COUNTY POOR-HOUSE. 

No particular change has taken place in this poor-house since 
our last report. It is still in charge of Mr. Halbert, as over- 
seer, who receives two dollars per week for taking care of the 
paupers, for which he boards and clothes them, and pays doctor 
bills and funeral expenses, furnishes the house entirely, and 
owns all the personal property in and about the house. 

Mr. Halbert has been in charge of the poor-house about ten 
years, and the system seems to have worked well in his hands ; 
at all events, we heard no complaints from any one, and we were 
informed that the county authorities were well satisfied with his 
administration. Mr. Halbert talks of leaving at the close of 
the present year. Should he do so, we would strongly recom- 



36 

mend to the county authorities a change in their system. 
While it may have worked satisfactorily in the hands of Mr. 
Halbert, we regard it as a vicious system in itself, and the 
sooner it is laid aside, the better will it be for all concerned. 
The county board should take the place under their immediate 
charge, appoint some one to run it for the county, fix up the 
buildings so that there can be a complete separation of the sexes 
at night, build two privies in different parts of the grounds, 
make two large yards for the use of the insane, one for each 
sex, get a supply of more appropriate furniture, new beds and 
bedding, build a new barn, provide bathing accommodations, 
and make sundry other improvements for the comfort of the 
inmates of the place. But whether they change the system or 
not, we trust there will be no hesitation in making the improve- 
ments we have suggested, as they are imperatively demanded 
if Grant county would keep up with her sister counties in pro- 
viding for the wants of the poor in her midst. 

GREEX COUNTY POOR-IIOUSE. 

But little change has been made in this poor-house except 
that the lack of proper drainage spoken of in our last report 
has been remedied by the construction of a drain leading to the 
piggery. 

The present arrangement of the building is bad. In ap- 
proaching the house a person has to pass through the barn-yard 
and the wood-yard. The barn and especially the piggery are 
too near the house. There is really no front yard to the poor- 
house proper, and with the preseiit arrangement of the barn and 
out-buildings it is almost, if not quite an impossibility to keep 
things neat and inviting around the house. The location of the 
house away from the public highway is good, and in the event 
a proper arrangement of the barn and out-buildings could be 
made, the place would appear as comfortable and attractive as 
any in the State. We could see no reason to doubt that Mr. 
Bennett, the overseer is doing all he can, but with his unfavor- 
able surroundings, it is hardly possible to make the place ap- 
pear neat and clean. We were pleased to learn that the super- 



37 

visors are aT^ake to the fact that the out-buildings are badly 
located and that they are contemplating their removal to more 
favorable situations. The house itself is far from being what it 
should be. The basement is damp and the cells in which some 
of the insane are confined at night and sometimes during the 
day, must be unhealthy. The plastering has fallen off in many 
places, and the house needs a general overhauling. 

The evils spoken of in our former report growing out of the 
mixing up and promiscuous association of sane with the insane 
still exists, and if any thing are worse than they were a year 
ago. 

The promiscuous association of the sane with the insane, is a 
great wrong to both parties, and should not be allowed one mo- 
ment longer than is absolutely necessary. This evil exists in 
many of the poor-houses of the state, but in no place is it more 
marked than in the Green county poor-house. It is hoped that 
the completion of the new hospital at Oshkosh and the enlarg- 
ment of the hospital at Madison, will furnish sufficient room to 
accommodate all now in poor-houses, who are proper subjects for 
hospital care and treatment. The privy arrangements at this poor- 
house are very objectionable, there being but one building, with 
two apartments for the whole house, both reached by a narrow 
walk, raised some four or five feet from the main building. 
There should be two privies located in diflferent parts of the 
grounds, and in the re-arrangment of the house, bathing accom- 
modations should be provided. 

IOWA COUNTY POOR-HOTJSE. 

Some improvements have been made during the past year. A 
room has been prepared for bathing purposes, and arrangements 
made for heating water. A large cistern has been built, which 
will furnish a good supply of water for washing and bathing. 

Mr. W. F. Rewey is still in charge of the place as overseer 
but since the previous visit of the Board, he has buried his wife. 
He is doing his best for the comfort and well-being of those un- 
der his charge, but everywhere could be seen evidence of the 
loss of his excellent wife. She performed a very important part 



38 

in the care of the house and its inmates, and it will not be easy 
to make her place good. 

JEFFEBSON COUNTY POOR-HOUSE. 

This place was found to be in a most excellent condition; the 
improvements made since the previous visit of the Board, being 
most marked and gratifying. 

The suggestions made by this 'Board to the overseer for the 
improvement of the condition of the insane, all seem to have 
been carefully followed. The apartment for the insane was neat 
and clean and free from all bad odors. 

It would seem impossible for any one to keep such a class of 
persons in such a building, in better condition than they were 
found, under the system of treatment necessarily pursued. 

Everything about the house and out-buildings was in excel- 
lent order, and we feel assured that Mr. Foster, the overseer, is 
a most valuable man in the place he now occupies. 

An addition to the building, something very much needed, is 
in process of erection, and when completed, the grounds around 
the house should be improved. 

There should be a new fence in front; shade trees should be 
set out, and a flower garden made. A little expense in these di- 
rections, will add much to the appearance and comfort of the 
place. 

KENOSHA CITY POOR-IIOUSE 

Is still in charge of Mrs. Colby, and is still in the favorable 
condition spoken of in our previous report. 

L4l FAYETTE COUNTY POOR-HOUSE. 

But little can be said of this place in addition to what was 
said in our previous report. 

Captain Osborn is still in charge as overseer. The buildings 
and grounds around the house are in most excellent order. The 
house is as clean and neat as possible. The beds and bedding 
are good and comfortable, and in good order. 

The arrangement of the privies, all under one roof, is bad; 
there should be two of them, one for each sex, located in differ- 



39 

ent parts of the grounds. The house is defective, in that it is 
not properly arranged for a separation of the sexes at night. It 
is so large, and the number of inmates so few that no difficulty is 
experienced on this account now, but should the house ever be 
filled to its utmost capacity, or nearly so, great trouble and 
annoyance would result. 

MARATHON COUNTY POOR-HOUSE. 

No change to note in this poor-house. 

MILWAUKJCE COUNTY POOR-HOUSE. 

This institution was not found in as good a condition as it 
was when first visited last year. It contained, at the time of 
the visit, forty- eight insane persons, nineteen males and twenty- 
nine females; and other inmates as follows: thirty-two males 
and twelve females; fourteen children, eight boys and six girls. 
Ten of the children attend a school in the house, taught by Miss 
Fitzgerald. 

The beds in the male department were in a very unsatisfac- 
tory condition. There was a great deficiency of straw in the 
ticks; the bedding was soiled, and the bedsteads overrun with 
vermin. There was a lack of neatness around the buildings. 
The privy in the yard for the insane was in the worst possible 
shape, emitting a foul odor. 

The privies for the sane inmates were in a bad condition. 
Those for the males and females were together, in quite a pxiblic 
place, and all without doors. One or two of them had loose 
boards that could be set up in place of doors, but sufficient only 
partially to cover the open space. 

The hospital was neat and clean, and the inmates appeared to 
be well cared for. 

There was, however, a bad smell all over the house, and in 
some parts of it, especially on the female side, it was almost in- 
tolerable. It was enough to create sickness, and it is difficult 
to understand how invalids can recover in such an atmosphere. 
The Superintendent said that this state of things had existed 
for a long time; that it arose from a defect in the construction 



40 

of the building, or in the arrangements for ventilation or heat- 
ing, the foul air from the privy getting into the flues and com- 
ing into the building through the heat registers. 

This is something for which Mr. Kcrin is not responsible, and 
its existence is a matter of great regret and annoyance to him. 

3IONROB COUNTY POOR-HOUSE. 

This poor-house has been but recently established, at the 
date of our last report, being but partially organized. When 
visited this year it was found in charge of William H. Goode. 
There were thirteen inmates; seven men, five women and one 
child. One man was insane, one idiotic, and two were cripples, 
and three of the women were insane. Mr. Goode took charge 
of the farm in May last, paying the county $300 per annum 
rent, and receiving from the county three dollars per week for 
the insane, and two dollars and a quarter for the sane. If any 
are sick, the county agrees to pay a reasonable amount in addi- 
tion for their care, A part of the paupers were kept in the 
house in which Mr. Goode lived, and the balance in an old log 
house across the road. Last summer, several paupers who were 
sick were kept in the barn loft. In the main building, one room 
up stairs had four beds in it; three beds occupied each by a 
man, and the fourth by a man and his wife. The buildings are 
old, and in winter must be very cold. The log house needs re- 
pairs very badly. The roof was very open. The whole prem- 
ises were untidy and neglected. Mr. Goode readily admitted 
that the premises were not in a suitable condition, but claimed 
to be doing the best he could with the material furnished by 
the county board. The county board ought to furnish better 
buildings, and then require Mr. Goode to keep the whole prem- 
ises much cleaner than they were found. 

We think the system adopted by the County Board an unwise 
and unsafe one. We think it would be far better to employ a 
man to run the place for the county, and then hold him to a 
strict accountability. 

Let the overseer be so situated that he shall have no motive 
other than to do the best in his power for the county, and for 
the unfortunates placed in his charge. 



41 

OZAUKEE COUNTY. 

^ The poor of this county are still kept by Mr, John U. Keller, 
at Saukville. He has a contract with the Board of Supervisors 
by which he takes care of the poor of the county in his own 
house, boarding and clothing them for the sum of $900 for the 
year. 

We are of the opinion expressed in our previous report, that 
this is a very unwise system and ought to be abandoned. 

PIERCE COUNTY POOR-HOUSE 

Is situated at Ellsworth. It was not opened until December 
12, 1871. The entire number of inmates during the year was 
thirteen, and the average number five. 

The number in the house on the first day of December, 1872, 
was three, two male and one female. 

The expense of the poor-house during the year was $1,000. 
The paupers are boarded by the week, the house is furnished 
by the county, and the keeper receives two dollars and fifty 
cents per week for boarding each inmate. The county pur- 
chases all clothing necessary for paupers, and the keeper has the 
use of the farm. The farm contains two hundred acres, of 
which thirty acres are under cultivation. 

We regret the county has adopted the system of boarding 
its paupers in this way, as we regard it as a plan that is much 
more liable to abuse than that of having the house and farm run 
by the county, as is the case in most of the poor-houses of the 
state. 

RACINE COUNTY POOR-HOUSE. 

The remarks made in the previous report of the Board in re- 
lation to the situation of this house, when visited in 1871, will 
^ apply to the situation when last visited. 

The insane man, then described as being in an out-building 
in a cage or pen, on a heap of straw, in a nude state, was still 
in the same condition. 

The basement was still damp, and in a wet time the floor cov- 
ered with water, and the drainage still defective. 



42 

An addition is now being made to the building, and when 
this is completed, the facilities for taking care of the inmates 
of the house will be greatly increased. 

It is the intention of the county authorities to go right on and 
construct a drain that will correct the trouble with the base- 
ment floors and also to remove the standing water and slops 
from the yard. There appears to be a disposition on the part 
of the county authorities to correct the defects in the building, 
and to make the place all that is needed for the accommodation 
and comfort of its inmates. 

We are still of the opinion, as expressed in our last year's re- 
port, that the best policy of the county would have been to have 
sold the farm and purchased one more favorably located, and 
erected a house expressly for the purpose, but as the improve- 
ments now in progress show a design to retain the present place, 
we would urge the setting out of shade trees, and the laying out of 
a flower garden with the view of giving the place a more attrac' 
tive and home-like appearance. 

It is hoped that among the contemplated changes, there will 
be a partition in the house, so as to make a complete separation 
between the sleeping apartments of the sexes, and the building 
of two privies in different parts of the grounds, in place of 
the double one now in existence. 

Mr. Shepard, the overseer, and his excellent wife, seem to be 
unwearied in the discharge of their duties and in their efforts to 
promote the welfare of those in their charge, but Mr. Shepard 
has more to do than any one man can properly attend to, and 
the county authorities ought to provide him with help in the 
conduct of the farm or else increase his compensation so that he 
can hire help on his own account. 

There is much that ought to be done around the house and 
grounds to beautify and improve the place, that Mr. Shepard 
would gladly do if he had the time or help to do it. 

ROCK COUNTY POOR-HOUSE. 

Great improvements have been made in this poor-house since 
our visits of last year. 



43 

Every thing in and around the house was found neat and in 
good order. 

Two new privies have been built since the house was last vis-^ 
ited, one for each sex. They are located in different yards, and 
the yards are separated by a good substantial fence. The room 
which was so severely commented upon in the previous report of 
the Board, has been completely renovated and painted, and now 
appears clean, comfortable and ventilated. 

The building for the use of the insane was in excellent order. 
The cells were clean, and the air was pure. One man only was- 
confined in the building; two were in the yard attached to the 
building. The dark rooms in the main building, spoken of in 
our previous report, are still without light, but an arrangement 
has been made by which the ventilation has been very much im- 
proved. 

From the examination made of the house and grounds, we 
are satisfied that Mr. Pickett, the overseer, is doing all in his* 
power for the welfare of those in his charge; that in the build- 
ing of the new privies, in the improved ventilation, in the com- 
plete renovation of the room occupied by the old men, in the 
neatness and cleanliness of the yards and out-buildings, we find 
the evidence that every effort has been made to promote the 
comfort and well-being of the inmates of the house. 

We notice that many of the old wooden bedsteads have been 
removed and replaced with single iron bedsteads. 

For a large number of the inmates of our poor-houses, espe- 
cially the old men and women, we regard the single bed as a 
necessity, and we would recommend its use in all cases where 
practicable. We have seen nothing we regard as better adapted 
for the purpose, than the iron bedstead they are introducing in 
this poor-house. 

We would again respectfully call the attention of the county 
authorities to the importance of the introduction of light into 
the dark rooms already spoken of, and also to the great need of 
providing suitable accommodations for bathing. 



44 

ST. CEOIX COUNTY POOB-HOUSE 

Is situated in the town of Kinnikinnick, on a farm of two 
hundred acres. The house was opened for the reception of in- 
mates January 1, 1871. 

The whole number of paupers during the year 1872 was 
eleven, and the average number was eight. 

The number in the house on the first day of December, 1872, 
was eight, six males and two females. 

Of the inmates of the house, three are insane and one idiotic. 

The overseer receives a salary of $550, for the services of 
himself and wife. 

VERNON COUNTY POOE-HOUSE. 

The house has been painted since our last report, and a few 
other slight repairs made. The privies are in the worst possi- 
ble condition, but assurances are given that two new ones should 
be speedily built, one for each sex, located in different parts of 
the grounds. The hog yard is still too near the house. More 
shade trees should be set out. A new fence is needed in front 
of the house. There should be more cistern room, and arrange- 
ments for bathing accommodations should be made. The small, 
unsightly out-buildings about the house should be removed, and 
the place cleaned up. The house is very much crowded, and 
should be enlarged at once. 

Among the inmates of the house are ten idiots, some of them 
of the most helpless class. There are no suitable accommoda- 
tions for these helpless creatures. 

The farm is a good one and the location of the house is excel- 
lent, and there is no reason why this may not be made one of 
the best poor-houses in the State. 

We have the assurance that the county authorities have pom- 
menced a work of reform in their legislation in relation to the 
poor-house at their last session, and that they intend to keep on 
until they have "a place worthy of the large and prosperous 
county they represent. 



45 



WALWORTH COUNTY POOB-UOCSE. 

The condition in which this establishment was found wa s 
highly satisfactory. Everything in and around the house was 
neat and in good order. The beds and bedding appeared to be 
clean and comfortable, and the whole place had a cheerful, and 
homelike aspeot. The inmates all appeared as if they were well 
cared for. The arrangements for the separation of the sexes are 
complete. There are separate privies and although at some lit- 
tle distance apart there should be a fence between them. The sug 
gestion was made to the superintendents of the poor, two of whom 
were present at the time of the visit, and assurances were given 
that a fence should soon be put up. Bathing arrangements 
have been introduced since the last report. The overseer in 
speaking of it says, '^ we have a bath tub and we find it to 
be a fine thing, and I think every institution of this kind should 
have one, and I hardly know how we got along without one as 
we did.'' 

The buildings are not quite large enough for the accommoda- 
tion of the poor of the county, nor are the original buildings 
that were on the farm at the time it was purchased, well adapted 
to the purposes for which they are now used, but such as they 
have are used to the best advantage, and kept in excellent con- 
dition. The place is still in charge of the Hon. Thos. W. Hill 
and his wife. Mr. Hill is one of the county superintendents of 
the poor, and one of the leading citizens of the county. 

The inmates of the poor-house, as well as the people of the 
county generally, are favored in having such persons in charge 
of the place. Upwards of twenty, about one-half of the whole 
number of the inmates of the poor-house, are either insane or 
idiotic. This makes the task of the overseer and his wife a 
very difficult one. 

The farm and grounds around the house were in excellent 
order, and the crops were good. The suggestions made by the 
Board at their visit last year, have been carefully followed. 
The whole establishment is a credit to the county. 



46 



WASHINGTON COUNTY POOB-HOUSE 

Contained thirty-three inmates on the first day of December, 
1872, twenty-five males and eight females. 

Of this number, five were children under ten years of age; 
twenty-two over fifty; twenty over sixty; sixteen over seventy, 
and seven over eighty years of age. 

Three of the inmates are insane. 

The entire expense of the house during the past year was 
$3,000. The overseer receives a salary of $300, and an allow- 
ance of $136 for extra help. 

WAUKESHA COUNTY POOB-HOUSB. 

This place seemed to be in excellent condition, much better 
than when visited a year ago. The drainage had been much 
improved; there was a gate at the entrance to the front yard, 
and there was a general appearance of neatness and order in 
and around the house. 

So far ^as what depends upon the overseer, Hon. George C. 
Pratt, is concerned, we saw but little, if anything, to criticise, 
but there is much for the county authorities to do. The stone 
building for the insane and for the male inmates of the house 
is still in the condition described in the previous report of the 
Board. It should be fixed before winter, or it will be very un- 
comfortable during the cold weather. The great want of the 
place is more room, which should be provided with as little delay 
as possible. There are five persons compelled to occupy apart- 
ments in the cellar, a blind man and his insane wife and a wo- 
man partially insane and her three children. The place con- 
tains quite a number of old men from sixty to ninety odd years 
of age. These feeble old men are compelled to sleep two in a 
bed, on small bedsteads and in small rooms. Some of them 
were sick, and the room-mates of the sick ones were compelled 
to sleep in the barn during the warm weather. 

An additional privy for the women should be built in another 
part of the grounds. There should be two large yards for the 
insane. One woman has to be confined in her room, and in an- 
other room a man has to be chained. 



47 

No one has been met with in the State who seems to under- 
stand more fully the wants of the poor, or to appreciate more 
fully their condition than does Mrs. Pratt, the worthy wife of the 
overseer. 

From those in the house, who are unable to go out to work, 
she gets all the aid they are able to render. 

The old and feeble, who have no other hope than to end their 
days in the poor-house, she endeavors to reconcile to their lot. 
She appeals to their better nature, and tries to excite their self- 
respect. She tells them that the fact that they are poor, is no 
reason why they should not still be ladies and gentlemen. She 
tells them to regard the place where they are as their home, and 
to try and make it homelike — so far as they are able to beautify 
it, to set out trees and plants, to cultivate flowers, and to do all 
they can to make the place comfortable and pleasant. 

Before her husband took charge of the place she had an idea 
that the inmates were a very unpleasant class of persons to get 
alohg with; that they were rough, selfish, ungrateful, always dis- 
satisfied and complaining; hard to please and hard to manage; 
but she said she had found it altogether otherwise, that she had 
had no trouble with them; that they were easily managed; that 
what she did for them, always seemed to be just what they 
wanted, and that ihey always seemed thankful for what was 
done. She seemed surprised to find things so different from 
what she had imagined before she came there. 

An hour spent in her company, listening to her remarks in 
relation to the way in which the poor ought to be treated, and 
in noticing her manner of intercourse with the inmates of the 
house, was sufficient to solve the mystery. The whole secret is 
in her kind feelings towards the unfortunates under her charge, 
manifested in all her actions, — in all that she says and does. 

She is kind and loving, and this begets kindness and love in 
those under her charge. 

An hour spent with Mrs. Pratt has thrown more light upon 
the difficult questions as to what should be done for the poor 
and how they should be treated, than has months of study and 
investigation in visiting the poor-houses of our own State, and 



48 

reading of their condition in other States. Provide them with 
comfortable quarters, good wholesome food, and place them in 
charge of women like Mrs. Pratt, and but little, if anything 
more, could be asked. 

%VlNNEBAGO COUNTY POOB-HOUSE. 

But little change has been made in this poor-house since last 
year. The rooms, the beds and bedding, were found clean and 
in good order. There is, however, a lack of neatness around the 
house and grounds. Heaps of dirt and rubbish might be re- 
moved without at all injuring the appearance of things. 

The arrangements for the separation of the sexes at night, are 
very imperfect, and should be made more complete. 

POOB-HOUSES— GENERAL BEMABKS. 

The improvement in the condition of some of the poor- 
houses and their inmates is marked and satisfactory, while in 
other cases things have gone along in the old beaten track with 
no attempt at improvement. On the whole, the Board feel 
greatly encouraged at what has been accomplished. 

Their suggestions for changes and improvements, so far as 
they are informed, have been kindly received by Overseers of 
Poor Houses, County Superintendents of the Poor, and by 
County Boards of Supervisors, and in many instances they have 
been fully and promptly carried out. 

In some counties, the officers charged with the care of the 
poor-house have taken hold of the matter of the improvement 
of their poor-houses, and the improvement of the condition of 
their inmates, in such a manly and determined spirit, as shows 
that they will go on until all is done that can reasonably be 
asked. 

Without repeating what we said on these points, we would 
respectfully call attention to the suggestions found on pages 
88 to 98 inclusive, of our previous report, in relation to the 
importance of cleanliness in our poor-houses; of the necessity 
of providing good, wholesome food for the inmates, comfort- 
able beds, an abundance of fresh air and pure water; of the 



49 

advantage of having vegetable and flower gardens, of setting 
out trees and shrubbery, of the importance of a proper classifi- 
cation of the inmates, and the great disadvantages and evils 
growing out of the necessity of keeping the insane in poor- 
houses. Another year's experience and observation have con- 
firmed us in the correctness of the views then expressed, and 
we would respectfully, but earnestly, urge their careful consid- 
eration by the people of the State generally, as well as by those 
especially charged with the care of the poor and the insane. 



4--C. & R. )Doc 18.) 



in. 

JAILS. 



Our previous report contained a description of the size and 
arrangement of all the jails in the state, the materials of which 
they were constructed, and in most cases the date of their erec-, 
tion. None of this information will be repeated in this report. 

The jails of the state generally are in about the same condi- 
tion as they were a year ago. In some instances they were 
found somewhat cleaner and the beds and bedding in better 
order, and in two or three cases they were found in a worse 
state than they were when first visited. As a general rule, no 
real improvement can be made. The great difficulty is with the 
system upon which our jails are built and managed. It is not 
susceptible of any great improvement; what is needed is an en- 
tire and radical change. This change is something that must be 
brought about. There is no evading it. It is only a matter of 
time. The whole jail system is a disgrace to the civilization of 
the nineteenth century, and cannot much longer resist the en- 
lightening and reforming influences of the age in which we live. 
There can be no difference of opinion in relation to this matter 
among those who will examine into it. The subject is under 
discussion all over the civilized world, and everywhere the same 
conclusion is reached, and that is, that the system is radically 
wrong, and that an entire change is needed. 

The defects of the system were discussed at some length in 
our previous report, to which we would respectfully call atten- 
tion. We would also call attention to the " Dsclasation " of 
the conference of the State Boards of Illinois, Michigan and 
Wisconsin, on the subject, which will be found on page 17 of this 
report. 



51 

At the present time, we shall mention only those jails where 
some change for the better or worse has been found, or where 
abuses existed that have not been removed. 

BKOWN COUNTY JAIL. 

This jail was not found in as good a condition as it was last 
year. It contained at the time of our visit some ten or a dozen 
inmates, among whom were three insane, or partially demented. 
Two of this latter class were without clothing save a shirt. It 
was quite a cold day in October, and their situation must have 
been very uncomfortable. There was a good fire in the stove at 
the time of the visit, but when the small stock of wood in the 
ward was exhausted, as it was liable to be, the inmates must 
have suffered from cold, as one of the windows was entirely 
without glass. The cells and jail generally were anything but 
clean. There were really no beds, the iron bedsteads having 
nothing on them but two or three soiled blankets. The inmates 
complained that they did not have clothes enough to protect 
them from the cold, and that their cells were filled with vermin. 
There is no privy in the building, or any to which they can have 
access, except when there is some one present to unlock the 
doors and let them out in the yard. The inmates were using the 
floor of an empty cell, filling the whole place with a foul odor. 
The cells occupied by the two insane or idiotic men who were 
without clothes, were without beds, with nothing to cover their 
nakedness and protect them from the cold but two or three dirty 
blankets. The female apartment contained one woman. She 
appeared to be comfortably situated. The defective arrange- 
ment between the male and female apartments, by which the 
men and women can see and converse with each other, spoken of 
in our previous report, has not been remedied. There is a very 
unfavorable contrast between the condition of this jail now and 
when last visited. 

COLUMBIA COUNTY JAIL. 

This jail has been altered and very much improved since vis- 
ited last year. The cells are now all lined with iron. There is 



52 

a good yard connected with the jail, but if it was two or three 
times as large it would be much better. The jail was clean and 
in good order. 

CKAWPOED COUKTY JAIL 

Was in about the same condition as when previously visited. 
There were three inmates at the time of the visit, Sept. 12, 1872; 
one had been in since March under indictment for manslaughter 
(abortion); another had been confined since June under an in- 
dictment for polygamy, and the third was an insane man. 

PANB OOUNTY JAIL. 

This jail was found in a much better condition than when vis- 
ited last year. The beds and bedding were in better order, and 
there was no reason to doubt that the jailer was doing all in his 
power for the comfort of the prisoners. 

The jail, however, is a very defective one. It is badly venti- 
lated; the cells are so constructed as to furnish harbors for ver- 
min; there is no privy accessible to the inmates unless the jailer 
is at hand to unlock the door into the yard; there is a small 
yard around the jail, but it is not available to the prisoners for 
exercise; there is no place for the detention of witnesses or for 
women except the ordinary cells for the prisoners; there are no 
arrangements for bathing, and the general construction of the 
jail is such as to render it very unsafe for the jailer to enter when 
the jail is occupied by desperate characters, as is frequently the 
case. The county ought to have the jail entirely reconstructed, 
or what would be much better, they should build a new one at 
the capital, that may be a model for all the other counties of the 
State. 

DOPGB COUNTT JAIL 

Waa found clean and in good order. 

POirn DU JiAC COUNTY JAIL. 

No special change to notice in this jail since our last visit. 



53 



GRANT COUNTY JAIL. 



A new jail has been built in this county during the past year, 
and it is without question, one of the best in the State. It is 
built very much after the style of the Green county jail, which 
was fully described in our previous report, although it is claimed 
that it has several improvements over that one. So far as the 
matter of the security of the inmates is concerned, this jail seems 
to be very complete. 

The prisoners will be completely enclosed in iron, with no 
chance to get through without detection. The cells are in the 
centre of the building, with no chance to get to the outer walls, 
without working through strong iron guards. The jailer can 
enter the building and go all through it without coming in con- 
tact with any of the inmates,|and it is so constructed that if he is 
on his guard, he can never be taken unawares by a prisoner and 
injured. 

The jail contains twelve cells, five by seven feet, and so 
arranged as to accommodate two in each cell in case of necessity. 
Great attention has been paid to ventilation and the i.i.proec'o:! 
is that the system apdoted will prove successful. The jail is 
abundantly supplied with water for washing purposes, and it is 
hoped arrangements will be made for bathing. The supply of 
water will be sufficient, and there is a good place for locating a 
bath tub. 

There is a separate apartment for the women, entirely away 
from the apartment for the men. 

This jail seems to have one defect, in that there is no com- 
fortable place for the inmates to occupy when out of their cells. 
The cells open into a narrow corridor or passage way in the cen- 
ter of the building, and away from the windows. To be out on 
this corridor would be better than to be in the cells, yet to keep 
the person confined there is a greater hardship than really seems 
necessary. 

GREEN COUNTY JAIL. 

This jail was found in the same neat and wholesome condition 
as at our visit last year, and nothing need be said except to 
warmly commend its management. 



54 

JEFFBSSON COUNTY JAIL. . 

This is a very old building, and is a totally unfit place in 
which to keep human beings confined. 

The apartment for women had three inmates. One insane 
woman was locked in a cell. The cell was in a most filthy con- 
dition. It was dark and gloomy, and the stench through the 
barred doors was almost intolerable. This woman's condition 
was about as wretched as can well be conceived of. There are 
no conveniencies for taking care of her where she is, and she 
ought to be in a hospital for the insane or a poor-house. We 
made inquiry to see if she could not be removed, either to the 
hospital for the insane or to the county poor-house, and learned 
that both places were already filled to overflowingi 

The women's apartment in the jail was in a dirty, filthy con- 
dition. The privies on both sides of the building were in bad 
order, located inside of the building, with no way of escape for 
the stench and foul air. The place in its present condition is a 
disgrace to the county. 

KENOSHA COUNTY JAIL. 

We had occasion to speak very strongly of the condition of 
this jail in our previous report. 

We found things in and about the jail, when visited this 
year, in about the same condition as they were in when previ- 
ously visited. We could see no particular ground for finding 
fault with the sheriff ; he is without doubt doing the best he 
can, with his unfavorable surroundings. There is no adequate 
remedy for the manifold evils connected with this jail short of 
the erection of a new and appropriate building. 

LA-CROSSE COUNTY JAIL. 

The condition of this jail when visited in April was any thing 
but satisfactory. It is badly constructed, with no proper venti- 
lation; the lower tier of cells damp and exceedingly uncom- 
fortable and unhealthy; no bathing facilities and no yard. The 
privy was in the worst possible condition. The accumulations 



55 

of the entire winter were in a close room in one comer of the 
jail, with no ventilation, no way in which the air could get to 
it and yet under the same roof and in the comer of thero om 
in which all the prisoners were confined. Bad places have been 
found before, but nothing that would compare with this in its 
disgusting filth and sickening odor. 

It is no wonder that the prisoners make attempts to get out. 
If they saw any show for success they would be fools not to 
make a trial. 

At a subsequent visit made to the jail in October, we found 
the privy, spoken of above, had been removed, and a new one 
built with a vault on the outside of the wall, with a door open- 
ing into the jail. There was still an offensive smell from the 
privy when the door was opened, which seemed to vitiate the 
atmosphere of the entire jail. The trouble is with the con- 
struction of the jail, and not with the sheriff or jailer. 

LA CBOSSE CITY LOCK-UP. 

This place was very severely criticised in our previous report, 
and was spoken of as the worst place in the State in which hu- 
man beings were confined, and we regret to be obliged to say 
that but little improvement has been made during the past year. 

In the month of April the lock-up was visited in company 
with the mayor of the city, one of the members of the city 
council, a member of the committee, having the oversight of 
city public buildings, and the chief of police. The place was 
without inmates at the time of the visit. The official gen- 
tlemen admitted the glaring aspects of the lock-up as a place 
in which to confine human beings, and attention having been 
called to it in our last report, it is a source of surprise and re- 
gret that this lock-up has not been abandoned and a suitable 
place provided. 

At a subsequent visit made in the month of October, we found 
that an opening had been made on the inside of the lock- 
up into a cellar, where there was a window which communicated 
with the outside world, which has considerably improved the ven- 
tilation. Yet after all, it is the same dark, damp, underground 



56 

hole, deacribed in our report of last year, and should be aban- 
doned at the earliest moment practicable. 

M3XWAUKEB COUNTY JAIL. 

In the month of April, the board visited Milwaukee, and ex- 
amined the plans for the new county jail then in process of 
erection. It is located on Broadway, adjoining the city police 
station. It is to contain 18 cells, 8 by 5 feet, and S^ feet high. 
There are five different rooms or corridors in which the prison- 
ers can be kept during the day, thus affording a good opportu- 
nity for classification. 

The arrangements for drainage appear to be good, and the 
ventilation excellent. The plan is what is known as downward 
ventilation. There are two 12-inch ventilators in each cell con- 
necting with the bottom of a shaft, which extends twenty feet 
above the top of the building. Each cell has a stool connect- 
ing with the main drain or sewer. The doors are iron bars^ 
crossed so as to admit the air freely. 

The cells are constructed of iron, brick and stone, no wood 
being used. 

At a subsequent visit made in the month of August, when the 
jail was nearly ready for occupancy, the board were pleased to 
find that, in accordance with the suggestions made to the build- 
ing committee of the county supervisors in a written communi- 
cation from this board, arrangements had been made by which 
the inmates of the jail will be furnished with facilities for 
bathing. 

The completion of the jail confirms the favorable opinion of 
the structure formed by the board from an examination of the 
plans in the hands of the architect, but we regret that in conse- 
quence of the limited amount of land upon which the building 
has been erected, there are not more and better accommodations 
for women and detained witnesses. 



67 

« 

MILWAITKBE COUNTT HOUSB OF COBRECTTION. 

This institution was visited twice during the past year. The 
favorable opinion expressed in our previous report as to the 
value and importance of this institution has been fully con- 
firmed by subsequent visits. We are fully satisfied that it is a 
move in the right direction, and that Milwaukee county has 
done much towards the solution of the vexed question as to 
what is to be done with our common jails. 

At the time of the visit of the Board, in August, 1872, the 
institution contained 74 inmates belogning to the House of Cor- 
rection proper, and three persons, under the charge of the sher- 
iff of Milwaukee county, awaiting trial; one on a charge of 
murder, and two on a charge of burglary. 

The number of persons in confinement, Oct. 1, 1871, was 68 

Committed since 579 



Total 647 

Discharged since 575 

Bemaining in confinement, Oct 1, 1872 72 

Average number per day ^ 

Male prisoners 514 

Female prisoners 65 

679 



Native bom 177 

Foreign bom 402 

579 

The ages of the persons were as follows: 

18 years old 4 

14 do 5 

16 . . . .do 5 

17 ... do 11 

18 do . 16 

19 ....do 20 

From 20 to 30 years old 207 

From 80 to 40 years old 166 

From 40 to 50 years old 97 

From 50 to 60 years old 88 

60 years old 8 

62 do 4 

66 do 4 

66 ....do 1 

69 do 1 

70 do 8 

Total 679 



58 

» 

The expenditures were as follows: 

For erocercies and proyisions |5,029 63 

Tight and soap 118 42 

forage 828 62 

fuel 897 00 

clothing and bedding 928 57 

repairs 225 72 

improvements 685 00 

postage, stationery, etc., etc 246 40 

salaries 5, 954 00 

$14,358 86 

^' In the total of $14,353.36, are included the expenses incurred 
in boarding two jail-guards, and an average number of four jail" 
prisoners per day from September 30, 1871, to August 12, 1872» 
when they were removed to the new jail of the county of Mil- 
waukee." 

In a recent communication from the Hon. Daniel Kennedy, 
the inspector, he says: " During the year, from September 30th, 
1871, to October 1st, 1872, this institution has not drawn for 
one cent on the county, and when the Board of Supervisors 
levied the taxes last fall, for the year coming, they, did not find 
it necessary to make any appropriation for this institution." 

When the institution was visited in the month of August, we 
noticed three boys, from 12 to 15 years of age, and we observe 
from the report of the Inspector, that during the past year nine 
persons have been inmates of the institution under 15 years of 
age. These lads appear very much out of place, surrounded by 
such a company of old and hardened offenders. The Industrial 
School for Boys, at Waukesha, would be a far more appropriate 
place for lads of this age. 

While the institution seems to be well managed, so far as its 
sanitary and industrial interests are concerned, there is evidently 
a great defect in the fact that nothing is done for the education 
and reformation of the inmates. There should be some regular 
system of instruction organized, by which a portion of time, 
each day, shall be devoted to the education and moral training 
of the prisoners. 



69 



MONBOB COUNTY JAIL. 



This jail was in about the same condition as it was last jear. 
At the time of the visit it contained eight persons, seven men 
and one woman. Two of the men were insane. A woman had 
just been arrested and brought to the jail, charged with an at- 
tempt to kill and commit arson. She was lying upon the floor, 
very drunk, and was a sad sight. 

BACIKE COUNTY JAIL., 

This building is old and in many respects very defective. It 
appears, however, to be kept in most excellent order. The 
cells were remarkably clean, having recently been whitewashed, 
and the whole place was free from unpleasant odors. . The im- 
pression made by the visit was, that the sheriff and his deputy 
were taking excellent care of the jail and its inmates. 

It is hoped that the county will soon provide a more suitable 
building. 

SAUK COUNTY JAIL, 

This jail was visited for the first time in June last 

It contained at the time of the visit five inmates. One was 
an insane woman who had been in the jail some three or four 
years. She has been an inmate of the hospital for the insane, 
near Madison. The most of the time she is quiet and inoffens- 
ive, but occasionally is violent and dangerous. 

One insane man, quiet and inoffensive, and does considerable 
work. He was sawing wood at the time of the visit. 

Another insane man, who at times is dangerous. Both of 
these men have been in the hospital for the insane. 

One man was soon to go out, having been sentenced for 
ninety days for stealing. It is the fourth time he has been in 
the jail. He was in before for vagrancy and drunkenness. 

The other inmate was awaiting his trial on a charge of mur- 
der. He had been in jail since April, and was to be tried in 
September. Although this jail is open to much criticism it is 
much better than many of the jails of the State. The cells are 



60 . 

large, and when occupied by but one person, are much better 
than the cells in most of the jails. 

Considerable attempt has been made to secure good ventila- 
tion, but it is thought with indifferent success. The air of the 
jail was quite impure and offensive. A frequent and abundant 
use of water, frequent whitewashing and a free use of disin- 
fectants, would greatly improve the air and the general appear- 
ance of the jail. 

SHEBOYGAN OOXTirTY JAIL. 

This jail was visited for the first time in the month of August 
last. 

The jail is located under the court house, above ground, and 
on the satne level as the Sheriff's appartments; his appartments 
occupying the centre, and one side of the building and the jail 
the other side. The jail contained one idiot, three insane men 
and one insane woman. There are also six male prisoners and 
one female. 

The two females occupy two cells, in one of the wards of the 
jail, and the males, sane and insane occupy the other ward. The 
women are allowed considerable liberty, both of them doing 
more or less work in the Sheriff^s ifamily. 

The prisoners seemed to be well taken care of and it is doubt- 
ful if they would run away if the doors were unlocked and they 
were requested to remain; that is, the sane ones. 

There is a fair sized yard connected with the jail in which the 
insane men spend the most of their time when the weather is 
suitable. Some of the insane men are troublesome at times, one 
man stays in his bed in his cell all the time; another destroys his 
clothes: another is occasionally violent and liable to injure any 
one who comes near him. 

The presence of these men in the ward with the sane prison- 
ers is very unpleasant and annoying, and there is but little 
doubt that as a consequence of this annoyance the insane men, 
are often abused and ill-treated. 

One of the prisoners was remarking that he had considerable 
care of one of the insane men, and that he often found it neces- 



61 

sary to punish him, speaking of the fact as a practice that wa 
all right, and the idea that there was anything wrong in his fre- 
quent '' strapping " of the poor unfortunate, had probably never 
entered his mind. 

The situation of things in this jail furnishes another illustra- 
tion of the great wrong of keeping insane persons in places of 
this kind. 

YEBNON COUNTY JAIL. 

This jail has been enlarged by the addition of two iron cells, 
since last year. The jail as a whole, is a very defective affair. 
The prisoners must be kept confined in their cells all the time, 
or else they must be entirely at liberty. There is no place out- 
side of the cells, where they can be kept any more securely than 
they would be in an ordinary wooden house. 

The cells are designed to have small stoves in them in cold 
weather. There are two small openings in the doors, and a 
small opening in the rear ; these openings being the only means 
for lighting and ventilation. 

There was but one inmate in the jail at the time of the visit, 
and he was awaiting trial on a charge of horse stealing. He had 
been in confinement one month, and two months more would 
elapse before he could have his trial. 

WALWORTH COUNTY JAIL. 

This jail was about in the same condition in which it was 
when visited last year. The sheriff seems to take good care of 
the jail and its inmates. 

The building is old and not adapted to the purpose for which 
it is used, and should be replaced by a new one. 

WAUKESHA COUNTY JAIL. 

This jail is old and insecure, two prisoners having made their 
escape a day or two previous to our visit. 

It appears to be well kept, everything clean and in good order, 
and the prisoners well cared for. 



62 



WINNSBAGO OOUNTY JATL. 



There were fifty-eight persons confined in this jail dunng the 
year 1871. The average time the prisoners were in jail was 
twenty-eight days. Among the number is one insane man. No 
special change to note in the condition of this jail. 



IV. 



Milwaukee Charitable Institutions. 



At the last session of the Legislature, an appropriation of 
one thousand dollars was mad^ to each of the following-named 
institutions located in Milwaukee: 

St. Mary's Hospital. 

Milwaukee Hospital. 

St. Rose's Orphan Asylum. 

St. Joseph's Orphan Asylum. 

Milwaukee Orphan Asylum. 

Home for the Friendless. 

Wisconsin Seaman's Friend Society. 

St. Ameliana's Orphan Asylum. 
By reason of the acceptance of these appropriations, these in- 
stitutions were brought under the supervision of this Board in 
the same manner and to the same extent as are the state chari- 
table and penal institutions. 

Appropriations have been made by the state to these and 
other charitable institutions in Milwaukee and elsewhere since 
these organizations, as follows: 

TO ST. MABY's hospital, MILWAUKEE. 

In 1862 $3,000 

1868 8,000 

1864 1,250 

1865 500 

1866 500 

1867 1,500 

1868 4,100 

1869 500 

1872 1,000 

f 15, 850 



64 



TO MILWAUKEE HOSPITAL. 

In 1865 1500 

1866 600 

1867 4,000 

1868 1,000 

1869 600 

1872 1,000 



7,600 



TO HILWATTKBE ORPHAN ABTLUH. 

In 1866 '. $500 

1867 600 

1868 600 

1869 600 

1872 1,000 



TO ST. Joseph's orphan asylt^c, Milwaukee. 

In 1867 $600 

1868 600 

1869 600 

1872 1,000 



8,000 



2,600 



TO ST. rose's orphan ASYLUM, MILWAUKEE. 

In 1866 1600 

1867 600 

1868 600 

1869 600 

1872 1,000 



18,000 



TO ST. AMELIANUS' ORPHAN ASYLUM, MILWAUKEE CO. 

In 1866 1500 

1867 600 

1868 600 

1872 1,000 

2,600 

TO WISCONSIN seaman's FRIEND SOCIETY, MILWAUKEE. 

Inl869 $1,000 

1372 1,000 

$8,000 

TO HOME FOR THE FRIENDLESS, MILWAUKEE. 

Inl868 $8,000 

1869 600 

1872 1,000 

$4,600 



65 

TO ST. MABT^B ABTLVM, BLM GROTS, WAUKBBHA CO. 

In 1867....: 1500 

1868 1,500 

1869... 600 

$3,500 

TO ST. ABMIDIUS' ASYLUM, SOUTH POINT, IflLWAUKEE. 

In 1868 500 

TO ST. claba's ACADSMY, GBANT CO. 
In I860 600 



H8,850 



There has always been 

A WIDE DIFFERENOB OF OPINION 

among the people of the state, as to the propriety of these appro- 
priations, and whenever the question has been before the Legisla- 
ture there has always been an excited and protracted discussion 
resulting, sometimes in favor of the appropriations, and again 
in opposition to them. 

In order that the Legislature may have as many facts as possi- 
ble before them, in relation to the character and objects of these 
institutions, to aid in the decision of this question when it again 
comes up, we present in this report — 

FiBST, The act of incorporation of all the institutions to which 
appropriations were made last year. An examination of these 
acts will show the objects and the corporate power of the insti- 
tutions. 

Second, A paper prepared by some one connected with each 
of the institutions containing information on the following 
points: 

(a) When was the institution organized? 
(J) Who was it established by? 
(c) How is it governed? 

5— C. & R. (Doc. 13.) 



66 

(d) To whom, and how often wre reports made? 

(e) Who are its officers? 

(/) DescripticHi of the property owned hj the institntion^ 
its location^ quality of hmd, and yalae, with and withoat the 
buildings. 

(g) In what name is the title to the property? 

(A) Is it all paid for? 

(i) If any encumbrance on the property; amount, to whom 
payable, and when due. 

(J) State the special object of the institution, giving statistics 
and facts showing its value, and the good it has accomplished. 

Third. A statement of the receipts and expenditures during 
the past year, in all cases where we have been able to procure 
them, with some figures showing the economy with, which the 
institutions have been managed. 

The more we have looked into the history and work of these 
institutions, the more deeply have we been impressed with 

THEIR VALUE AXD IMPORTANCE. 

Each one seems to be performing a work peculiar to itself, 
and a work which, if left unperformed, would leave exposed to 
want and suffering a large number of persons. 

These institutions have been established and are now con* 
trolled by men and women of high standing in the community, 
many of them distinguished as christians and philanthropists, 
and we have had abundant evidence to satisfy us that they are 
managed with a high degree of skill, prudence and economy. 

They are not only an honor and a credit to the city within 
whose boun'ls they are mostly located, but they are institutions 
of which the whole state may well be proud. 

During the comparatively few years of the existence of these 
institutions, upwards of 

TEX THOUSAND PERSONS 

have been sheltered beneath their hospitable roofs, and been the 
recipients of the blessings they have been established to confer. 



67 

Five of these institutions have been planned and established, 
and are now governed by women, and if there are any persons 
in the community who doubt the ability of women to plan, 
establish and successfully conduct institutions of the kind, they 
can have all their doubts removed by making an examination 
into the history and workings of these. 



68 



Q 
55 



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69 
Statistics of Milwaukee Charitable Institutions — continued. 



Kamb or 
Ihbtxtutzon. 


Amount of 
money recM 
from State 
Treasury. 


Cash on hand 
at commence- 
ment of year. 


Amount re- 
ceived dur- 
ing the year. 


Am*t nald 
for Buoaist- 
ence. 


St. Mary^s Ho^ital. . . 
*St. Rosa's Orphan As 
*St. Joseph's. . .do. . . . 

Milwaukee do. . . . 

St Amelianus .do ... . 
Home for Friendless. . 
f Milwaukee Hospital, 
n^amen's Bethel Homfi 


115,850 00 
8,000 00 
2,500 00 
8,000 00 
2,500 00 
4,500 00 
7,500 00 
2,000 00 


$116 27 


$7,866 14 


$3. 181 07 


2,547 46 

9,100 00 

780 57 

191 59 


12,854 11 
9,226 39 
7,149 15 
8,470 16 


4,618 05 

2,884 89 

2,986 89 

007 74 


15 00 


6,480 25 




t-. - .Ml.. .. 





* The financial accounts of these two asylums are kept as one. 
t No financial report this year. 



Statistics of Milwaukee Charitable Iiistitutioiu — continued. 



Kaxkof 

iKBTrrUTIOW. 



St Mary's Hospital 

St Rose's Orphan Asylum ) 
St Joseph's Orphan. do. . ) 
Milwaukee Orphan Asylum 
St Amelianus Orphan, .do. 
Home of the Friendless. . . . 

Seaman's Bethel Home 

^Milwaukee Hospital 



AiinU paid 

for current 

expenses for 

1873. 



(6,506 88 

10,709 88 

6,287 28 
6,108 89 
1, 970 85 
4,561 38 



AmH paid 
on Indebt- 
edness. 



1700 00 
8,051 00 



1,300 00 
1,988 92 



Am't paid 

for all other 

purposes. 



1567 68 



5,000 00 

160 00 

62 65 



Cash on 

hand at 

close of 

the year. 



(209 35 

1, 141 19 

6,989 11 

1,651 88 

828 25 



*Xo financial report of this institution for the year 1873. 



SlatUtics <f Milvsaukee Charitable ItiatitutiOTU — continued. 



Ni«B or LormmcN. 


III 


i 


Hi 


1 




1195 S8 
79 17 
105 71 

78 35 


13 60 
1 50 

aoe 

1 60 


$1711 83 
85 07 
117 68 
83 48 




St. Rosa's Ornban Asvlum 1 

SL JomdU'b Orphan Asylum ....} 

Milwaukee Orphan Asylum 

8t AmeIiaQU3' Orphan Asylum 


1 64 
336 

1 78 

































SlalUtlcs of Milwaukee Charitable Inttitutiona — continued. 



N*« or mnrnrrtan. 


f 

III! 


1 


1 

III! 


1 




»e6 37 
33 67 
38 04 
87 65 


n 27 

84 
73 
78 


*85 07 
36 90 
4-j 00 
44 50 




Bt. Rosa'a Orphan Asylum . . . . j 
81, Joseph's Orphan Asylum . . 7 
Milwaukee Orphan Asylum 


70 
86 
85 
































• Acconnta not kepi to tl 
t No Hdbd^UI report for 


ItthMllleiu 


.c«beglTs 


'• 





Btatiatxct tf Milwaukee Charitable JtuHluCiofu — continued. 



«"— ■"■™>—- 


IS 

II 


11 




1 


1 

e 

1 


f 


i 
1 

5* 


1 

1 

S 




su 

174 
84 
97 






269 
4 

16 

11 


45 

no 

68 

66 








8t Rosa's Orphan Asylum. . ) 
8L Joseph's OrphsnAsytam f 
Milwaukee Orplian Asjlum . . 
SLAmelisnus' Orphan Aaylum 


163 
66 
91 


23 
18 



131 
58 
67 


41 
18 
23 


13 

18 
16 






















































1 



73 



I.— ST. MARY'S HOSPITAL. 

This institution is under the control of certain sisters of 
charity who were made a body corporate by the legislature of 
1859. Chapter 79, of the private and local laws of that year ia 
as follows: 

" AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE SISTERS OP CHARITY OP 
ST. JOSEFH^S, OP THE CITY OP MILWAUKEE. 

NAMES OF COBPOBATOBS AKD COBPOBATE POWEBS. 

" Section 1. — That Mary Vincent Mc Intee, Frances Agnes 
Hanley, Mary George Sebold, Ariana Buckley, and Monica 
Ryter, and their sucdessors, appointed in accordance with the 
rules and regulations of the sisters of charity of Saint Joseph's, 
of the city of Milwaukee, whose mother house J^is in Emmets- 
burg, in the county of Frederick, State of Maryland, be and are 
hereby constituted and established a body corporate and politic 
with perpetual succession, by the name'and style of ^' the sisters- 
of charity of Saint Joseph's, of the city of Milwaukee," and by 
that name shall be competent to contract and be contracted 
with in all matters relative to the objects of their association, 
shall have a common seal, the device of which they may form 
and change at their pleasure ; shall be capable of sueing and 
being sued ; of pleading and being impleaded ; of answering 
and being answered unto in all of the courts in this state or the 
United States, with full power and authority to acquire, possess^ 
hold, use and enjoy by gift, grant, devise, purchase, or other- 
wise, real estate and personal property, and shall have power 
to sell, convey, mortgage, and dispose of the same in any man- 
ner the said corporators or their successors appointed as afore- 
said, shall deem best for the interest of the corporation, and the 
furtherance of the charitable and educational purposes, for 
which this corporation is created. 



73 

POWSB TO KAKB BT- LAWS, ETC. 

^' SscTiOK 2. The said corporators and their successors, shall 
have full power and authority to make, ordain, establish and 
put into execution, such by-laws, rules and regulations as 
they may deem proper for the conduct and government of the 
hospitals, schools, asylums and other establishments under their 
care and control, and the efficient government of their own 
board, and the officers appointed thereby, such by-la^rs not 
being contrary to the laws and constitutions of this state or the 
United States. 

OBJECT OF THE COBPORATION. 

^^ Section 3. The object of this corporation, is to afford a 
greater opportunity and more security to the corporators and 
their successors for the establishment of hospitals, schools, 
asylums and other institutions for the relief and education and 
care of the poor, the needy, the destitute, the orphan, and the 
ignorant, and to this end no property of any kind whatever, 
shall be held or acquired, or conveyed otherwise than for the 
furtherance of the object for which this corporation is insti- 
tuted. 

" Section 4. It is hereby declared, that in the judgment of 
the legislature of this state, the objects of the foregoing act 
cannot be attained under the general laws. 

•' Section 5. This act to take effect and be in force from and 
after its passage. 

'* Approved March 11, 1859." 

The following paper, prepared by Sister Mary Vincent, Supe- 
rioress of this institution, will be read with great interest: 



cc 



ST. MABY'S hospital, MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



" The establishment of an hospital in the city of Milwaukee, 
was first undertaken by the Sisters of Charity in the summer of 
the year 1848. That scourge of nations, Asiatic cholera, then 
raged in the city and vicinity, and in order to take care of the 
most fosaken, a small frame building which then stood at the 



74 

comer of Jackson and Oneida streets, was fitted up for the pur- 
pose of a temporary hospital. Sister Felicita Dellone, a mem- 
ber of the community of the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's, 
Emmettsburg, Maryland, was the one who commenced that 
charitable work, with no means or resources than those contrib- 
uted by a few kind friends. But her trust in Divine Providence 
was unbounded, and her success proves that her heart was filled 
with benevolence and charity, and that such a one will not fail 
to accomplish wonders, when the object in view is the relief of 
God's suffering representatives. The little hospital was named 

* St. John's Infirmary.' During the prevalence of the terrible 
disease, daily, nay hourly, were the calls made on her and her 
three companions energies and zeal. 

* " After the subsidence of the cholera, the little infirmary still 
continued open to all who asked admission, and two years after, 
in the September of 1850, a vessel of Swedish and Norwegian 
emigrants, all attacked by typhus fever, landed in Milwaukee. 
The condition of ihese poor sufferers was most appalling, and as 
many as the capacity of St. John's Infirmary could accommodate 
were received and therein cared for; the others were taken care 
of by the Sisters in the old government buildings at the request 
of the Mayor. 

" During the same year (1850), application was made for the 
reception into the little infirmary of the . 

" jSick and Disabled Seamen 

'^ Of the port of Milwaukee. After^ the extirpation of the 
typhus fever, an agreement was made, or rather a contract 
signed between the Treasury Department at Washington and the 
Sisters of Charity, since which time (except one short interval), 
they have continued to form part of the patients under the Sis- 
ters' care. 

'^ In the month of January, 1857, a petition was presented to 
the common council of the city of Milwaukee by sundry citizens 
asking a donation by the city of Milwaukee to the Sisters of 
Charity of three acres of land out of the " poor-house property,'* 
situated in the First Ward of the city, for the purpose of an hos- 



76 

pitaL It was referred to a select committee, who reported to 
the common council recommending a donation of the said land. 
The Mayor and Clerk of the city were then authorized to exe- 
\ cute a warranty deed, donating the three acres to the Sisters, 
their heirs and assigns forever, for an hospital; revertable, how- 
ever to the city, should the land at any time be used otherwise 
than for an hospital. The deed bears date the tenth day of 
January, 1857, and was recorded February 4, 1857, in vol. 56 of 
deeds, pages 105 and lOG. A. Bade, register. The) land is de- 
scribed as follows: Beginning at the south east comer of the 
south east quarter of the south west quarter of section number 
fifteen (15), in town seven (7) north, of range twenty-two (32) 
east, and running thence north on the quarter section line two 
hundredand eighty- four twenty-five and one hundredths (284j^) ; 
thence west on a line parallel with the south line of said section 
fifteen to the east line of Fourth avenue, thence south thirty- 
four degrees west along said east line to the section line be- 
tween sections fifteen (15) and twenty-two (22), thence east along 
said line five hundred and fifty-eight and forty-nine one hun- 
dredths (558 -i^), to the place of beginning, containing three 
acres, more or less. 
^' Immediately the Sisters set to work to 

" Commence a JBuilding 

^' On the land donated. It would be almost incredible were 
the hardships enumerated that they endured in endeavoring to 
> raise funds for the work; but God blessed the widow's mite as 
much as the offerings of the more opulent, and the building was 
at length ready for the reception of patients, though far from 
being completed or furnished; hence, almost ever since its oc- 
cupancy the Sisters have been endeavoring to add to the com- 
forts and conveniences it should afi^ord. 

" In the year 1859, the sisters were established a body corpo- 
rate, under the name and title of 



76 

" * The Sisters of Charity of St. Josephs of the City of Mil- 

vsaukee^ 

"The act is dated March 11, 1859, and in 1860 another piece 
of ground containing seven-tenths of an acre which joined the 
three acres was donated and added to the hospital grounds. 
This donation was also made by the common council; the deed ' 
bears date December 28, 18G0, and was recorded March 26, 1861, 
in vol. 71 of Deeds, pages 363, 4 and 5, Chas. Fessel, Register. 
To complete the grounds in 1864, a second lot adjoining the 
three acres on the other side, containing one and forty- two one- 
hundredths (l^^j^) acres, was donated by the common council; 
this deed bears date August 6, 1864, and was recorded August 
22, 1864, in vol. 84 of Deeds, on pages 595, 6 and 7, F. Bag- 
geler. Register. 

" St. Mary^s Hospital 

" is governed solely by the corporation of ' the Sisters of 
Charity of St. Joseph's of the City of Milwaukee,' whose mother 
house is St. Joseph's Academy, Emmettsburg, Frederick county, 
Maryland. Sister Mary Vincent McEntee, present superioress 
of the hospital, is President of the board; Sister Monica Ryder, 
Treasurer; Sister Simeon Quinn, Secretary; Sister Euphemia 
Blekinsop and Sister Camilla O'Keefe, members. Meetings 
are held annually in the business office of the hospital^ on the 
first Monday of September, when any vacancies that may have 
occurred during the year are filled and officers are elected. 

" The following are the 

" By-Laws of the Corporation 

" Of ' The Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's of the city of 
Milwaukee': 

" Article 1. All members of this corporation must be regu- 
lar members of the society of Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's 
whose mother house is now in Emmettsburg, Maryland. 

" Article 2. Should any member of the Board cease to be a 
member of the above-named society of the Sisters of Charity of 
St. Joseph's, she shall thereby forfeit the membership of the 



77 

Board, and all rights acquired in virtue of the act incorporating 
' the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's of the city of Milwau- 
kee.' 

^'Abticxb 3. All the establishments that are now or may 
hereafter be in charge of this corporation shall in every respect 
be conducted according to the constitution and rules of the 
above named society of the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's, 
Emmettsburg, Maryland. 

^^ Abticle 4. No immovable property can be alienated, mort- 
gaged or otherwise disposed of, except with the consent of all 
the members of the Board. 

" Article 5. The officers of this corporation shall be a Presi- 
dent, a Treasurer and a Secretary, to be elected annually on the 
first Monday in September. 

"Article 6. Any vacancy occurring, by death or otherwise, 
may be filled at the annual or any special meeting to be called 
by the President or by the majority of the members of the 
Board. 

"Article 7. Two-thirds of the members' shall constitute a 
quorum. 

"Article 8. None of these by-laws can be abridged or altered 
without the consent of all the members of the Board. 

" Signed by " Mart Vixcent McEntee, 

" Frances Agnes Hanly, 

" Mary George Sebold, 

"Arianna Btjckly, 

" Monica Ryder. 
" Sept. 5 1869. 

" The St. Mary's Hospital 

" Is mainly supported by the pay patients. It has also derived 
much asssistance from public generosity. All classes in the 
city and vicinity as well as all denominations have been very 
generous, and the liberal appropriations made by the state of 
Wisconsin at different times, amounting in the aggregate to the 
sum of fifteen thousand three hundred and fifty dollars 
($15,350), added material aid and comfort to the suffering in- 
mates of the said hospital. 



78 

^' The institution is solely governed and conducted by the 
corporation of the sisters of charity. Statistics are made out 
annually and sent to the principal Superior of the Sisters of 
charity at St. Joseph's Academy, Emmettsburg, Maryland. 

" The Hospital^ Building 

" Is 82 feet in length, 53 feet width in center, 48 feet width 
of wings, 47 feet highth of wings, and 53 feet highth of center- 
There are six large wards, three of which are 30 by 30 feet ; the 
other three are 18 by 14 feet. Ten rooms for private patients, 
besides ample room for the Sisters and domestics, parlors and 
office. 

" The Pharmacy 

^^ Is a small room fitted up for the purpose and presided over 
by one of the Sisters who compounds all the medicines prescrib- 
ed by the Doctors and Surgeons. The chapel occupies the center 
on the second story, but no obligation is enforced on the pa- 
tients to attend service therein ; however those wishing to do 
so are permitted. Bathing and closet facilities are provided and 
supplied with water by the five large cisterns on the grounds 
and which are never exhausted ; the water is conveyed from 
them to a tank near the roof by a force pump. The base- 
ment contains the kitchen, dining room, store rooms and boiler 
room ; the entire house is heated by steam and is comfortable 
in the most severe weather. 

" On the premises are stables for one horse and four cows, 
carriage and wagon house, ice house, and hen house. A large 
room used at present for a laundry over which arc two rooms in 
which those aiFected with contagious diseases are taken care of, 
so as not to endanger the patients in the main building. There 
are no incumbrances on the property, but there are some debts 
yet on the building for improvements, heating, etc., with a bal * 
ance due for flour and fuel, of last year, amountiag altogether 
to $1800. 



79 
"7%e special object of the Institution 

^^Is to afford relief and suitable care to all classes and denomi- 
nations, regardless of country or color, to all condition of suffer- 
ers, mental as well as physical, according to the rules of th^ 
society of the Sisters of Charity, to fulfil the signification of the 
name ^ Sisters of Charity,' and to carry out the intentions of the 
founder of the society. 

" The value of the buildings we don't know, but up to the 
present time the cost of erection and improvements amounts to 
thirty thousand dollars. 

" We can give no estimate of the value" of the property to 
the Sisters ; it is of no value except for the use of an hospital ; 
neither can we form an estimate of the good effected by the 
institution since its foundation ; that is left to the Recording 
Angel ; but the number of patients admitted into the hospital 
up to the first of December, 1872, is 3,581. 
" Very respectfully, 

" Sister MARY VINCENT, 

" Superioress.^^ 

The following extracts from correspondence between the Sec- 
retary of the board and Sister Mary Vincent, will explain itself: 

EXTRACT FROM A LETTER OF TUE SECRETARY, 

Dated Dec. 10, 1872, to Sister Mary Vincent: 

'' In presenting a statement of the origin, management and 
objects of the Milwaukee charitable institutions, we wish to 
have it as complete as possible, and so that all reasonable inqui- 
ries of members of the legislature, and others interested in the 
institutions, can be answered. In the paper which you so kindly 
prepared and sent to me, you allude to one or two matters in 
relation to which I am quite sure more information will be desired 
You refer to a contract you have with the Treasury Department 
at Washington, to take care of sick and disabled seamen in the 
port of Milwaukee. Will you have the kindness to furnish us 
with a copy of the contract, or so much of it as will show the 



80 

terms upon which you receive this class of persons and the 
compensatiom you receive therefor? 



it 



Article 3 of the By-Lawe 



*^ Of your corporation provides that ^ all establishments that are 
now or may hereafter be in charge of the corporation shall in 
every respect, be conducted according to the constitution and 
rules of the above named society of the Sisters of Charity of 
Emmettsburg, Md.' 

^^ Can you furnish us with a copy of the constitutions and 
rules here referred to? 

^ ^^ Can you inform us how many members there are of the cor- 
poration of ' Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's, Milwaukee?* 

" How many members are there in your ' Board?' Article 6 
of your by-laws refers to the filling of vacancies — will you have 
the kindness to inform us how these vacancies are filled? * * 

^^ There is great curiosity to learn how it is that the Mil- 
waukee charitable institutions are run so much more economi- 
cally than are our State institutions, and we want to get all the 
light on the subject we can.'' 



EXTRACT FROM THK REPLY OP SISTER MART VINCENT, 



Dated December 14, 1872: 

^^ We are all willing to give your Board, as well as the legis- 
lature, all the information regarding our institution in otir 
power. 

"First, then, the contract with the Treasury Department, 
Washington, for the care of the sick and disabled seamen of 
the port of Milwaukee, a copy of which you requested sent to 
you — I am sorry we are unable to give it, as it has been mts- 
laid or lost. The compensation received for that class of pa- 
tients varied since that first contract; then it was as low as $2.00 
per week, afterwards |2.50; during the war as high as $5.00, 
and at the present time we receive but $3.99 per week for each 
seaman and $12.00 for interment, in case of death. We are 
required to receive all who present themselves furnished with a 



81 

permit from the Collector of Customs, except contagious dis- 
eases; those we are not obliged to provide for ^ within the walls 
of the hospital,* but we take care of them apart. 

^^2 he Constitution and Rules 

" Of the Society of the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's, 
Emmettsburg, Md., do not belong to the public, but this insti- 
tution ( St. Mary*s Hospital ) does, and those desirous', of ascer- 
taining how it IS conducted are willingly admitted and can see 
for themselves. 

" The corporation of ' the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph's, 
of the city of Milwaukee," is composed of five members. All 
vacancies are filled by vote. ♦ ♦ ♦ 

" In conclusion, I can only say if there is more economy prac- 
ticed in our institutions than in those of the state it is entirely 
owing to the fact that no mercenary motive could ever induce 
us to embrace and continue the life of a Sister of Charity, and 
consequently that which is confided to us we consider as held 
in trust for the benefit of th5 poor— one five cents worth care- 
lessly wasted or destroyed would be a matter ef grave self- 
reproach, none of it being ours. 

"Again I beg you will excuse my delay, and kindly overlook 
any mistakes in this hurriedly written paper. 

"Very respectfully, 

« Sister MARY VINCENT, 

" JSuperioress" 

6 C. &R. (Doc. 18.) 



82 



THB BKCEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Of the Hospital for the year ending December 1, 1872, were 
as follows: 



BECEIFT8. 

Cash on hand December 1, 1871 ..... 

Received from pay patients '. 

. .do ... .from the State of Wisconsin. 

. .do . . . from U. S. for seamen 

. .do . . . .from donations 



EXPENDITURES. 



Paid 
..do 
. .do 
. .do 
. .do 
..do 
..do 
..do 
..do 
..do 

..do 
..do 
..do 
..do 
. .do 
..do 
. .do 
. .do 
..do 
..do 
. .do 
..do 



for 



• »• 



groceries 

.fresh beef and mutton 

.ft^sh pork 

.potatoes, early vegetables and apples, 
.flour XXX family and Berchey best. . 

.medicine 

.wine 

coal, small cggy Brier Hill 

.wood — mtple , 

.kerosene oil, sperm candles and lamp 

wick 

.forage for one horse and four cows . . 

.wages to domestics 

.blankets, sheeting and toweling 

.clothing 

•furniture 

.hair and straw for mattrasses 

.surgical apparatus and splints 

.hardware, dishes, etc 

.postage and stationery 

.debt on building, without interest . . . 

.for painting and whitewashing 

.flooring hall and two ,wards for first 

story 



Cash on hand December 1, 1872. 



$116 27 

4, 363 41 

1,000 00 

2,335 73 

167 00 



$1,141 57 

1,229 42 

32 00 

199 77 

809 60 

291 64 

58 67 

682 92 

50 00 

89 75 

888 69 

800 00 

447 82 

821 88 

182 60 

»9 25 

80 00 

69 78 

30 00 

700 00 

839 46 

228 22 



$7,773 06 
209 35 



17,982 41 



$7,982 41 



THE HOSPITAL IS IX DEBT AS FOLLCAVS: 

Due on labor and steam fixtures $1 ,000 

Due for flour 206 

Due for wood 100 

Due for coal 200 

Due for furniture 192 

Due for medicine <9 

$1,777 



83 

THE WHOLE NUMBER OP PATIENTS 

In. the hospital during the past year was, 314; of whom 269, 
were foreign bom and 45 native. 

Of this number 242 were pay patients from whom was received 
the sum of $6,699 14. 

The remaining 72 were charity patients, from whom nothing 
was received during the past year. Sixteen of these have been 
in the hospital twelve months or longer, seven of whom help 
in the laundry, kitchen, and other departments of domestic work. 
The average time the other 56 charity patients were in the 
house, was 23 days, or a trifle over three weeks each. The res- 
idence of the 72 charity patients as near as we can make it out 
from the report made is as follows: 

Milwaukee 58 

Unknown 6 

Michigan 5 

Massachusetts 1 

Missouri 1 

Canada 1 

Waukesha county 2 

Kacine county 1 

Washington county 1 

Dodge county 1 

Of the charity patients, 38 were foreign and 18 native born, 
and the birth-place of the remaining 16, not reported. 

The total expenditures for current expenses, last year, were 
$6,505.38, being $193.76 less than the amount received from pay 
patients. 

The records of the hospital have not been kept so that the 
daily average of the population can be accurately stated, but as 
near as it can be ascertained the daily average of patients was 
37, and the daily average number subsisted in the house, inclu- 
ding officers and employes, was 48. 

THE AMOUNT PAID FOR SUBSISTEN»CE 

During the year, including say $268.69 paid for feed for four 
cows,, is $3,181.07. 



84 

This would make the cost per capita on the daily average num- 
ber subsisted in the house (48), $66.27 per annum, or $1.27 per 
week, and the cost of subsistence per capita on the daily aver- 
age number of patients (37), $85.99 per annum, or $1.65 per 
week. 

The cost per capita on the daily average population of the 
hospital, of the entire running expenses of the institution 
($6,505.38), was $135.53, or $2.60 per week; and the cost per 
capita on the daily average number of patients was $175.82 per 
annum, or $3.38 per week. 

The Board visited this institution on the second day of July. 
Our visit was entirely unannounced and unexpected. The 
building is beautifully situated in the midst of a five-acre lot 
on the banks of lake Michigan; is large and commodious, and 
well adapted to the purpose for which it has been erected. The 
buildings and the improvements around them have cost about 
thirty thousand dollars, ($30,000), and we know of no place in 
the state where there is more to show for an equal outlay of 
money than there is here. The institution is entirely under the 
control of women — Sisters of Charity. They hold the title to 
the property; they secured the means to erect the buildings; 
they decided upon the plans, and superintended the work, and 
they can now show one of the best arranged buildings for the 
purpose for which it was designed that can be shown in the 
state. 

The hospital is in the immediate charge of sister Mary Vin- 
cent, as Superioress, a woman who is thoroughly devoted to the 
work to which she has consecrated her life, and one who is in 
every way eminently qualified for the responsible and important 
position she holds. 

After a careful inspection of the house in all its parts wc find 
it difficult to suggest any changes that would be improvements 
in the appearance or arrangement of the building or its different 
departments. 



85 



II.— MILWAUKEE HOSPITAL. 

Chapter 396 of the General Laws of 1864 is as follows: 

" AN ACT IN RELATION TO THE MILWAUKEE HOSPITftX. 

" WHEREA.S, The Rev. W. A. Passavant, by the aid of sundry 
charitable persons, has established a hospital known as the 
* Milwaukee Hospital,' in the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 
order that the suffering -and sick might be cared for and re- 
lieved in a becoming and charitable manner, without distinction 
ef creed, country or color, and has placed the same under the 
more immediate supervision and control of ' the institution of 
Protestant Deaconesses,' an association duly incorporated by 
the legislature of Pennsylvania, and authorized to establish and 
conduct hospitals and other institutions of mercy in the United 
States — it is enacted: 

" The people of the state of Wiscofuin^ represented in senate 
and assembly^ do enact asfolloxos: 

CORPORATE POWERS. 

" Section 1. That the Rev. W. A. Passavant is hereby au- 
thorized and empowered to assign, convey and transfer to the 
aforesaid corporation all property, real, personal and mixed 
which may be hereafter held by him in trust for the purposes 
of said hospital, subject to the same trusts and considerations 
upon which he may hold the same; and that any other person 
or persons now holding or who may hereafter hold any goods, 
chattels or property, real, personal or mixed, in trust for the 
use of the aforesaid hospital, are hereby authorized to convey, 
assign and transfer the same to the aforementioned ^ institution 
of Protestant Deaconesses,' subject to the trusts and conditions, 
under which it is or may be held by such person or persons. 



86 

BOABD OF YISITOBS. 

" Section 2. That in order more perfectly to secure and per- 
petuate the charitable and impartial character of this hospital, 
Alexander Mitchell, Eliphalet Cramer, John H. Vandyke, John 
Henry Inbusch, Greenleaf D. Norris, John Nazro, Lester Sex- 
ton, Joseph T. Bradford, Charles Eisfeldt, Gideon P. Hewitt, 
Frederick Kuetemeyer, Sr., John Tomsen, Charles F. Illsley, 
and W. M. Sinclair, and their successors, appointed as hereafter 
provided, shall constitute a board of visitors, who shall meet 
annually on the third Monday in January, to examine and re- 
port for publication the condition and management of the Mil- 
waukee hospital aforesaid; for which pi^rpose they shall have free 
access to all the buildings, apartments and grounds belonging 
thereto, and the inspection of all books, papers, and accounts 
relating to the management thereof. And it shall be their spe- 
cial duty to investigate, and in their annual report set forth, 
any discrimination which may at any time hereafter be made in 
favor of the sick of one creed, color or country over another in 
the granting permits, or the care of the sick, to the end that 
any such abuse may be speedily corrected. All vacancies in said 
' board of visitors ' shall be filled by the votes of a majority of 
the patrons of the hospital hereinafter mentioned, at a meeting 
"convened for the purpose, on the call of the surviving members 
of the board, or in default of such election, by the board of 
visitors at their next annual meeting. 

EKPOBTS TO BE MADE. 

" Section 3. The director of the hospital, together with the 
physicians and treasurer, all of whom are appointed by the 
aforementioned ' institution of Protestant Deaconeses,' shall 
present an annual report of their respective departments of the 
hospital to the board of visitors, which, if so ordered by them, 
shall be published in pamphlet form. 

LIFE PATRONS. 

" Section 4. That any contributor who has already, or who 
shall hereafter subscribe the sum of one thousand dollars at a 



87 

single benefaction, or who has subscribed a less sum, and shall 
increase the same to one thousand dollars, on payment of the 
same into the treasury, shall be entitled to become a patron 
for life, and shall have the right to nominate and send in, gra- 
tuitously, one patient at all times during the year; provided 
that the person so nominated shall be of the condition and fall 
within and comply with the rules that may be established for 
the goyernment of the hospital. And the same privileges and 
rights shall be conferred on any person or corporation paying 
one hundred dollars annually, for the period of fifteen years, 
and the same privileges and right to the free beds of the hospi- 
tal shall be conferred on any church or religious society which 
shall take an annual collection for the benefit of the hospital, 
amounting to the sum of seventy-five dollars annually, 

EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 

^^ Section 5. The buildings, grounds and such real estate be- 
longing to the Milwaukee hospital, as shall be used by it for 
the humane purposes of the institution, shall be exempted from 
taxation. 

" Section 6. The inclosed site and lands of this institution, 
devoted to hospital purposes, shall in no wise be affected by 
changes which may be made in existing roads, or by the laying 
out of new streets, without the written consent of the -board of 
visitors, which consent shall be obtained at an annual or a 
special meeting on the call of one-third of the members of the 
board. 

" Section 7. No gift or grant made to the ' Milwaukee hos- 
pital,^ by legacy or subscription, shall be lost to the institution 
because of a misnomer, in the will or agreement ; provided the 
purpose of the testator or donor was clearly to appropriate the 
amount specified to the charitable purposes of this institution. 

"Approved April 4, 1864." 

The following paper in relation to this institution has been 
kindly furnished by the Rev. Dr. W. A. Passavant, of Pitts- 
burg, Penn.r 



88 

*^ THS MILWAUKEB HOSPITAL 

" Was founded by the Rev. Dr. W. A. Passavant, of Pittsburg- 
Pa., at the instance of a number of pastors and citizens of Mil- 
waukee, who had long been familiar with his labors among the 
sick of that city. In the absence of any means tc purchase 
property for the institution, it became necessary for him to be- 
come personally responsible for the whole sum involved in the 
original purchase of the ten acres and the present edifice, cost- 
ing $12,000 cash. In order to give the institution the benefit of 
experienced nurses it was placed by him under the care of 
an association of Christian women, known as 

" * The Institution of Protestant Deaconesses^ 

" Who are chartered by t|ie legislature of Pennsylvania, and are 
occupied solely in the work of caring for the sick and support- 
ing and educating the fatherless in various parts of the United 
States. 

" The Object of the Hospital, 

" As stated in its charter granted by the legislature of Wis- 
consin, in the month of April, 1864, is that ' the suffering and 
sick might be cared for and relieved in a becoming and christian 
manner, without distinction of creed, country or color; ' and for 
the carrying out of this purpose more eflBciently, the more im- 
mediate supervision ^nd control of the hospital is placed under 
the ' Institution of Protestant Deaconesses ' aforesaid. At the 
same time, * in order more perfectly to secure and perpetuate 
the charitable and impartial character of this hospital, Hon. 
Alexander Mitchell, Eliphalet Cramer, John H. Van Dyke, John 
H. Inbusch, G. D. Norris, John Nazro, Lester Sexton, J. T. 
Bradford, Charles Eisfeldt, G. P. Hewett, F. Kuetermeyer, Sr., 
John Thompson, Charles F. lUsley and Wm. M. Sinclair, and 
their successors, shall constitute a ^ board of visitors,' who shall 
meet annually on the third Monday in January, to examine and 
report, for publication, the condition and management of the 
Milwaukee Hospital; for which purpose they shall have free 



\ 



89 

access to all the buildings and grounds belonging thereto, and 
the inspection of all books, papers and accounts relating to the 
management thereof. And it shall be their special duty to in- 
vestigate, and, in their annual report, set forth any discrimina- 
tion which may at any time hereafter be made in favor of the 
ilk of one creed, color or country, over another in the granting 
of permits or the care of the sick, to the end that such abuse 
may be speedily corrected.' 'All vacancies in the board of 
visitors shall be filled by a vote of a majority of the ' patrons ' 
of the hospital. * Patrons' are those who have already sub- 
scribed the sum of one thousand dollars at a single benefaction, 
or have contributed this amount at various times. 
^ '^ The hospital went into practical operation on the 2d of Au- 
gust, 1863, and since that time its labors among the sick and 
suffering have never been intermitted a single hour. 

" Upwards of Two Thousand Patients 

" Have been received, of whom more than two-thirds have 
been charity cases. Less than one-third of all who have been 
received have been able to pay in whole or in part the small 
sum of five dollars pei* week which is charged in the general 
wards. 

" Of the whole number received, nearly 400, or one-fifth of 
the whole number, have been small pox cases — this institution 
being the only place in or near the city where provision is made 
for this unhappy class of sufferers. In the repeated visitations 
of small pox with which Milwaukee has been afflicted, this hos- 
pital has been a public blessing to the sick from all parts* of the 
state, and all classes of the community have gratefully acknowl- 
edged its valuable services. 

" In addition to the ten acres originally purchased, a second 
purchase of several acres was subsequently made by Dr. Passa- 
vant, to still further increase the grounds of the institution and 
prevent unsuitable establishments in too close proximity to the 
hospital. 



90 
" The Total Cost 

^^ Of both purchases was seventeen thousand dollars, on which 
there is yet a debt of about three thousand dollars. This is the 
only remaining debt on the hospital property and buildings — 
the subscriptions of the citizens of Milwaukee, from time to time, 
having paid off the original purchase money of $12,000, and the 
sale of some lots outside of the new extension of State street 
having paid off the remainder, with the above exception. 

" The institution depends for its support wholly on the 

" Free-will Offerings of the Charitable^ 

" And on the income which is received from those patients 
who are able to pay in whole or in part. The legislature of the 
state have on several occasions, in view of the benefits to citi- 
zens from all parts of the state, voted appropriations of from five 
hundred to one thousand dollars. This aid was never solicited 
by the hospital, but was gratefully appreciated, and was as 
timely as it was important in the early years of its struggle for 
life. On another occasion, when the institution was involved in 
a heavy expense of five thousand dollars by the repeal of a sec* 
tion of its charter and the extension of State street through its 
grounds, the legislature kindly saved the institution from the 
embarrassment which would have otherwise followed. 

'^ The edifice used as 

" The Main Hospital Suilding^ 

'' Was a private residence, and is not well adapted for hospi* 
tal purposes. With the wards in the separate building, forty- 
five to fifty sick can be accommodated. It is hoped, however, 
ere long to have a suitable edifice erected, with all the advan- 
tages of a more perfect construction. The ample grounds, the 
healthy location and the beautiful view of the present location 
invite the benevolent to such an outlay for the care of the suf- 
fering and the sick in their community. 

" The services of the Director and Physidam 
" Are gratuitous, and of the deaconesses likewise, so the con- 



91 

sequence is that the institution is conducted not only in a very 
economical manner, but at a cost i^hich is scarcely credible for 
so large a family. In this respect the ample grounds and gar- 
dens which furnish fresh vegetables and an abundant supply of 
milk for the sick, are of great advantage as well as economy. 

" The title of the property is in the " Institution of Protes- 
tant Deaconesses, of Alleghany county, Penn." but they hold it 
simply for the uses of a hospital forever, in the city of Milwau^ 
kee, subject to the same trusts by which it was held by Dr. 
Passavant, the founder. 

"« There is no mortgage on the property, but the director has 
borrowed the sum yet due on the property, nearly three thous- 
and dollars. It is past due and has been for two years 

" Pittsburg, Dec. 3, 1872." 

The officers and all connected with the management of the 
institution have been 

PBOMPT TO RESPOND 

To our requests for information; but owing to the fact that 
their annual financial report is not made up until sometime in 
the month of January, we are unable to present such facts in re- 
lation to the operations of the hospital during the year 1872, as 
we have in relation to the other Milwaukee institutions, but that 
we may have some light in relation to the income and expend- 
itures of this hospital we give the statistics for the previous 
year. 



92 



BECEIPTS AND £XPENDITUH£S. 



For the year 1871. 



BECEIPTS. 



From donations of individuals, churches, etc. . 
From boarding and nursing pay patients 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for house expenses, flour, meat, groceries 

etc 

Fuel and lights 

Medicines 

Furniture and fixtures 

Improvements and repairs 

Wages of male nurses. 

Wages of domestics 

Labor on grounds and gardens 

Insurance and taxes .* 

Stable expenses 

Interest on balance due on property.. . 

Printing rules and acknowledgments. 

' Miscellaneous expences 



Paid on deficiency of previous year.. . 



12,868 90 
1, 597 80 



II ,089 90 
268 00 

91 29 
150 43 
240 43 
879 94 
289 00 
262 68 
216 50 

79 94 
257 60 

50 00 
119 66 




$4,466 70 



«4|466 70 



THE DUMBER OP PATIENTS 

in the hospital from January 1, 1871, to January 1, 1872, was 
152. Their ages were as follows: 

Between 5 and 10 7 

10 and 20 28 

20 and 80 75 

80 and 40 25 

40 and 60 10 

50 and 60 7 

CO and 70 4 

70 and 80 1 



152 



93 

THEIR NATIVITY 



'WBs as follows: 



United States 41 

German States 81 

Ireland 18 

Norway 11 

8 weden 8 

Kussia 1 

Bohemia 1 

Canada 1 



152 

THEIR RELIGION 



as follows: 



Protestant 105 

Roman Catholic 44 

Jews 8 



103 



Married 87 .... 

Single 115 

152 



White 151 

Colored 1 



152 



Discharged cured 103 

Discharged much improved 10 

Discharged somewhat improved 6 

Discharged not improved 4 

Died 16 

In hospital January 1 , 1872 18 



152 



Of the whole number of cases, one-third (52), were cases of 
small-pox. Deaths from small-pox were 12; typhoid fever, 1; 
pneumonia, 1; general dropsy, 1; general decay or old age, 1. 
It is but just to say that the cases of death from small-pox were 
of small-pox in the worst form of the confluent form, or of per- 
sons who had never been vaccinated, and that many of them 
died in a few days after admission. 



94 



THE NUMBER OF PATIEXTS 



Received into the hospital from January 1 to December 1, 
1872, was 147. 

Their nativity was as follows: 



:i 



Enfirland 6 ... 



Germany 79 .... 

Wales 1 .... 

Ireland 10 

Norway 12 

Sweden 4 .... 

Canada 3 .... 

United States 32 

147 



Married 30 .... 

Single 117 

137 



Protestants 103 

Roman Catholics 42 .... 

Jews 2 .... 

147 



In a communication received from Dr. J. K. Bartlett, the 
physician of the hospital, dated November 2nd, 1872, he says: ' 

" When the small pox broke out ^last summer, the Board of 
Health, on behalf of the city made an arrangement with the 
hospital to receive and take care of all small pox cases which 
they should send, they agreeing to pay one dollar per day for 
such patients. These were lodged and cared for in a building 
erected for this purpose some years ago, at a distance from the 
main hospital. You will find from the report that there has 
been forty- four cases of this kind sent by the city during the six 
months, for the care of which the hospital has received in city 
orders something over $800. We have also admitted in the 
usual way seven small pox patients who paid for themselves ; 
from these we have received $139. Since the first of July to 
the present time there have been no small pox cases paid for by 
the city, and only five cases in the month of July that paid for 
themselves. I make this explanation to show that the receipts 
for this six months would be no criterion whereby to estimate 



95 

the ordinary amount received from patients by the institution ; 
as a general thing those admitted do not and are not able to pay 
anything. You will observe that only thirty-five dollars was 
received during the six months from others than small pox 
patients, who indeed were more than half of all received. 
From the first of July to the present time we have received 
forty-six patients, of whom only five were small pox cases, as 
stated above." 

We are sorry that our report has to be closed before ^^ can 
have the precise figures of this institution for the past year, 
but the facts given in relation to the operations of the hospital 
during the year, and the full figures of the previous year, will 
serve to satisfy any one that a very large amount of good is ac- 
complished with the outlay of but a comparativly small sum of 
money. 

During the year 1871, one hundred and fifty-two patients were 
treated for periods ranging from a single week to three and four 
months, and yet the average cost for each one was a trifle less 
than twenty-three dollars. The services of the Rev. Dr. W. A. 
Passavant, the director and treasurer of the hospital, of Dr. J. 
K. Bartlett the physician, and of two of the female nurses, are 
given gratuitously, and for their faithful self-denying labors they 
are entitled to the thanks not only of those who are specially 
benefited by them, but of all who can appreciate such works of 
love and charity. 

This institution by reason of the ample and excellent provis- 
ion it hasanade for the care and treatment of small-pox patients 
must be one of great value and importance to the city of Mil- 
waukee, and the people of the city will but consult their own 
interests in seeing that the institution is liberally sustained. 



96 



III— HOME FOR THE FRIENDLESS, MILWAUKEE. 

This institution was chartered by a special act of the Legisla- 
ture, approved March 6th, 1868. 

The charter will be found in chapter 431 of the local laws of 
that year, and is as follows : 

" AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE MILWAUKEE HOME FOR 

THE FRIENDLE88. 

" The people of the State of WiacoAsin^ represented in Senate 
and Assembly^ do enact as follows : 

NAMES OF CORPORATOBS AND POWERS. 

"Section 1, Mrs. Charles A. Keeler, Mrs. G. P. Hewitt, 
Mrs. John Nazro, Miss M. Blanchard, Mrs. C. D. Bigelow, Mrs. 
J. H. Rogers, Mrs. N. Storrs, Mrs. J. Downer, Mrs. S. D. Arnold, 
Mrs. Chas. Bigelow, Mrs. H. Chase, Mrs. A. Green, Mrs. G. F. 
Austin, Mrs. W. F. Garlick, Mrs. I. Sercomb, Mrs. J. B. Judson, 
Mrs. J. H. Tweedy, Mrs. H. H. Button, Mrs. T. H. Judd, Mrs. 
I. C. Coleman, Mrs. E. R. Persons, Mrs. T. Gwynne, Mrs. J. G. 
Inbusch, Mrs. M. Jewett, Mrs. J. Plankinton, Mrs. J.C. Spencer, 
Mrs. Delafield, Mrs. A. H. Gardner, Mrs. G. Miner, and their 
associates, are hereby constituted a body corporate and politic, 
by the name and style of the " Milwaukee Home for the 
Friendless," and by that name shall have perpetual succession, 
and shall have power to contract and be contracted with, to sue 
and be sued, to plead and be impleaded, and to do and perform 
all such acts and things as are and may become necessary for 
the furtherance and advancement of the purposes of said incor- 
poration, as fully and completely as a natural person might or 
could do. 



97 

OBJECTS AND PURPOSES OF OOBPOBATION. 

" Section 2. The objects and purposes of said corporation 
shall be the relieving, aiding, and providing homes for friendless 
and indigent women and children. 

MEMBEBSHIP. 

" Section 3. Any person may become an annual member of 
said corporation who shall pay to the treasurer thereof the sum 
of one dollar annually, and any person may become a life mem- 
ber of said corporation, who has paid to the treasurer thereof 
the sum of thirty dollars or more at one time. 

OFFICBBS. 

" Section 4. The officers of this corporation shall be a Presi- 
dent, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Board of Man- 
agers, of not less than twelve, the number to be determined by 
the members of said corporation from time to time. The Pres- 
ident, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Board of Man- 
agers shall be elected annually by the members of said corpora- 
tion, on the first Tuesday of October each year ; all of said 
officers shall hold their respective offices for one year, and until 
their successors are elected. In case of any vacancy in any of 
said offices, by death, resignation, or otherwise, the Board of 
Managers shall have power to fill such vacancy till the next annual 
election. The regular meeting of the officers and Managers of 
this corporation shall be on the first Tuesday of October each 
year. The President, Secretary, and Treasurer of this corpora- 
tion shall be ex officio^ President, Secretary, and Treasurer of 
the Board of Managers, and shall be associated with said Board 
in matters of business pertaining to said corporation. It shall 
require at least seven of said Board of Managers to constitute a 
quorum. 

CAN HOLD BEAL ESTATE. 

" Section 6. The said corporation may receive, take, hold, 

either by gift, purchase, devise, bequest, or otherwise, any real 

or personal estate, for the use and for the advancement of the 

purposes of said corporation, whether the same' be purchased 
T'-C. & R. (Docl8.) 



98 

given, devised, bequeathed or conreyed directly to said corpora- 
ration. No real estate to which said corporation shall acquire 
title, shall be alienated or leased for a longer term than two 
years at one time, except by a majority vote of the Managers at 
an annual meeting, or at a special meeting to be called for the 
purpose, to be specified in the notice of said meeting. 

MANAGERS CAN APPOINT OFFICERS, ETC. 

" Section 6. The Board of Managers may at any time ap- 
point such subordinate officers, agents and committees, as they 
may deem necessary, the more efficiently to carry out the objects 
of said corporation; and they may take and enforce such by-lawFj 
rules, and regulations, as they may deem necessary for the elec- 
tion and government of officers and members of said corpora- 
tion, and to govern the admission of applicants to the ' Home of 
the Friendless;' also for the government, discipline and disposal 
of those that may be received as inmates, and for the conducting 
and managing the general business of said corporation. 

LEGAL GUARDIANS OF CIIILDREN. 

"SEcrriON 7. The board of managers of said corporation 
shall be the legal guardians of all children that by the provis- 
ions of this act shall be surrendered to the said corporation, and 
they may, in their discretion, indenture such children to an hon- 
orable trade or employment; but in all cases provisions shall be 
made in the indenture by which such children are bound to ser- 
vice, for securing an education proper and fitting for the condi- 
tion and circumstances in life of such children. 

MOTHER LEGAL GUARDIAN. 

" Section 8. In the case of the death or legal incapacity of 
a father, or in case of his abandoning or neglecting to provide 
for his children, the mother shall be considered their legal guar- 
dian for the purpose of making surrender of them to the charge 
and custody of this corporation, and in all cases when the per- 
son or persons legally authorized to act as the guardian or guar- 



99 

dians of any child are not^ known, the mayor of the city may, in 
his discretion, surrender such child to said corporation. 

CHILDRBK MAT BE SURRENDERED TO THE HOME. 

" Section 9. In case it shall be shown to any judge of a 
court of record, or to the mayor or to any justice of the peace 
within the city of Milwaukee, that the father of any child is 
dead or has abandoned his family, is imprisoned for crime, and 
the mother of such child is an habitual drunkard, or is in prison 
for crime, or is an inmate of a house of ill-fame, or if the 
mother of such child is dead, imprisoned for crime, or has 
abandoned her family, and t^e father of such child is an habit- 
ual drunkard and an unsuitable person to have the care of such 
child, or that the parents of any child have abandoned or neg- 
lected to provide for it, then said judge, mayor or justice may, 
if he thinks the welfare of the child requires it, surrender such 
child to said corporation. 

"Section 10. Whenever complaint be made to a judge of any 
court of record, or to the mayor, or to any justice of the peace 
of the city of Milwaukee, that any girl under the age of four- 
teen years or any boy under the age of twelve years is aband- 
oned by or is sustaining relations to its parents or guardians 
mentioned or contemplated in section nine of this act, it shall 
be the duty of such judge, mayor or justice to issue a warrant 
for the arrest of such child and its parents ( if any it may have 
in Milwaukee), and if, on testimony satisfactory to said judge, 
mayor or justice, it shall appear that such child has no parents 
or is abandoned by its parents or guardians contemplated in sec- 
tion nine of this act, the said mayor, judge or justice may, if he 
believes the best interests of the child require it, surrender such 
child to the care of said corporation. 

construction by courts. 

"Section 11. Upon the hearing of any habeas corpus for 
the custody of any child, and it appears that such child has been 
surrendered to said " Home for the Friendless " under the pro- 
visions of said act of incorporation, by an officer authorized un- 



100 

der said act to make a surrender of such child to said *^ Home 
for the Friendless," such surrender shall be taken by all courts 
of justice as conclusive that such child was legally and prop- 
erly surrendered to said " Home for the Friendless,'* and that 
said " Home for the Friendless " was entitled to the custody and 
guardianship of said child under the provisions of said act. 

MEETIX08, BTC. 

'^ Section 12. Should there from any cause fail to be an annual 
meeting or annual election, the president, or any three of the 
board of managers, may call a special meeting, by giving two 
days' notice of the same in any one of the Milwaukee papers, 
at which meeting they can proceed to elect a president, vice- 
president, secretary, treasurer and board of managers. 

OFFICERS. 

" Section 13. Mrs. Charles A. Keeler shall be the first pres- 
ident; Mrs. G. P. Hewitt the first vice-president; Miss M. 
Blanchard the first secretary; Mrs. J. Nazro the first treasurer; 
and Mrs. C. D. Bigelow, Mrs. J. H. Rogers, Mrs. N. Storrs, Mrs. 
J. Downer, Mrs. S. D. Arnold, Mrs. C. Bigelow, Mrs. C. Chase, 
Mrs. A. Green, Mrs. G. F. Austin, Mrs. W. F. Gorlick, Mrs. I. 
Sercomb, Mrs. J. B. Judson, Mrs. J. H. Tweedy, Mrs. H. H. 
Button, Mrs. T. H. Judd, Mrs. I. C. Coleman, Mrs. E. R. Per- 
sons, Mrs. T. Gwynne, Mrs. J. G. Inbusch, Mrs. Jewett, Mrs. J. 
Plankinton, Mrs. J. C. Spencer, Mrs. Delafield, Mrs. H. A. Gard- 
ner and Mrs. G. Miner, shall constitute the first board of mana- 
gers by virtue of this act, and shall hold their offices until the 
first Tuesday in October, 1868, and until their successors are 
elected. 

" Section- 14. This act shall take eflFect and be in force from 
and after its passage." 

Approved March 6, 1868." 

The following 



101 



HISTOBIC BK£TCH 



Of this institution) from the pen of Miss M. Blanchard, sec- 
retary joro. tem.^f will give a clear view of its history and work: 

'^ The Milwaukee Home for the Friendless was established in 
the fall of 1867 by a number of ladies who organized them- 
selves into an association for that purpose. Their first formal 
meeting was held October 2, 1867, at which time they adopted 
a constitution, appointed their officers, and created a fund by 
each lady pledging herself to raise at least thirty dollars by out- 
side subscriptions besides pubscribing herself an annual sum of 
not less than one dollar. The annual payment of one dollar 
constituted one a member of the association. 

/' The Officers of this Institution 

" Are a president, vice president, secretary, treasurer, a board 
of managers of not less than twelve ladies, and a board of 
councilors of not less than six gentlemen. 

" The board of managers, including officers and ex-officio mem- 
bers, meet the first Monday of each month to report and pro- 
vide for the needs of the institution. The first week in Octo- 
ber of each year a public meeting of the association is held, 
when full reports of the year are given by the secretary, treas- 
urer and the matron of the institution; officers are appointed 
and the general interest and progress of the institution are 
freely discussed. 

" The present officers are 

"Mrs. Chas. A. Keeler, President. 
•* Mrs. Jason Downer, Vice President. 
" Mrs. "Wm. L. Dana, Secretary. 
" Mrs. John Nazro, Treasurer. 

" A Board of Managers consisting of thirty members, and a 

" Board of Councilors^ 

^^ Consisting of seven gentlemen, Messrs. John Plankinton, 



102 

Levi Kellogg, E. R. Persons, John W. Gary, John R. Goodrich' 
Chas. A. Keeler and T. H. Judd. 

" The first building occupied by the institution was a small 
frame house, No. 346 Cass street, but it was soon found insuffi- 
cient for the needs of the home, and the following year the 
building now occupied by the institution was purchased for 
eight thousand dollars, five thousand being the amount of first 
payment, the balance remaining in mortgage on the property. 

"The Home for the Friendless was incorporated March 6, 
1868, the state Legislature at the same time granting an appro- 
priation of $3,000 towards the building fund. 

*' The institution has been supported entirely by subscriptions 
and donations, including the above mentioned appropriation of 
the state legislature in 1868 — five hundred dollars in 1869, and 
of one thousand dollars in 1872. 

" Through the prompt and energetic efforts of a 

• 

*'*'Financial Agent 

" Appointed by the Board of Managers, the final payment of 
the mortgage was greatly hastened, and the corporation, in the 
name of the ^ Milwaukee Home for the Friendless,' now holds 
clear and undisputed title to the property now occupied by the 
institution. 

" Tliis Property 

" Consists of one lot 60 feet by 120, situated in the third ward 
of the city of Milwaukee, on the east side of Van Buren street, 
between Wisconsin and Michigan streets, and a double framed 
wooden building two and a half stories high, standing on said 
lot. This is the only property owned by the corporation and 
is valued the same as when purchased, eight thousand dollars. 

" The object of this Ifistitution 

" Is distinctly^indicated by its name a " Home for the Friend- 
less.'' It is to give to destitute and homeless women and child- 
ren, without regard to sect or nationality, the temporary protec- 
tion and comforts of a home, to provide for their immediate 



103 

wants, and help them to secure employment and more perma- 
nent homes. 

^^It has in the five years of its existence given such help to 
1,055 women and children. 

" This class of unfortunates. 

" Is made up of widows; deserted wives; children deserted by 
their parents; travelers, often times foreigner s, unable to speak 
our language, whose means have been exhausted — ^perchance 
have been robbed or deceived in their journeyings; sewing girls 
and house-servants from the country, seeking homes and em- 
ployment in the city. 

" It would be 

" Hardly possible to over estimate 

^^ The value of such an institution in so large and central a 
city of the west, though it will be readily seen when once con- 
sidered that the large proportion of the recipients of this charity 
are not of this city but from the country, from inland towns and 
other lands, thus proving its worth as a state institution. 

^^ This fact should be better known or more fully realized that 
more frequent donations might follow from the country, and 
auxilliary societies might be formed in other adjoining cities. 

" The necessity of this institution 

" Was long felt in this city, as was caressed by the Chief of 
Police to the ladies in consultation with him prior to organiza- 
tion — it was strange that Milwaukee, with her many charities, 
did not realize so apparent a need, seeing, as he dtid, in the 
execution of his official duties so many instances of lone women 
and young girls, who, through loss, neglect or desertion, were 
found penniless ip our streets, with no doot open to them save 
that of the police station; and this same sentiment is often 
expressed by different members of the police in now conducting 
such to the home. 

" One can easily give statistics 
" To prove the worth or work of an institution, as in this 



104 

instance it can be said, the Home for the Friendless has giyen 
refuge to over one thousand unfortunates — a refuge "where the 
hungry, destitute and weary have found food, clothing and rest; 
but in this giving temporary shelter and subsistence there has 
been gained by these poor sufferers strength, encouragement 
and energy of purpose for future work in life; and who can 
estimate the worth and work of those thousand human lives in 
their ifuture homes; who can tell what suffering, sorrow, crime 
and misery this timely aid has averted; or who can doubt that 
for humanity there has been gained the labor and simpathy of 
many grateful hearts. 

" Though much has been done by the Home for the Friend- 
less in the work for which it was incorporated, the experience 
of each year, and we might say each day, point to 

"J[ Yet Ghreater Wor/Cy 

^ the accomplishment of which is debarred by limited means. A 
lying-in-hospital and an industrial school seem almost indis- 
pensable in connection with the institution, and the public, from 
time to time, have cried out against it because no hospital pro- 
vision was made for the sick at the Home; but none realize the 
great deficiency more than the friends and workers of the insti- 
tution, who are ever looking forward most hopefully to the time 
when more adquate resources will allow them to greatly extend 
the present field of their labors. 

« MYRA BLANCHARD, 

^^ Secret art/ pro tem^ 



105 



BEC£IPTS AND JfiXPEKDITlTRBB 



From Octeber 1, 1871, to October 1, 1872, are as follows: 



RECEIPTS. 



Cash on hand October 1, 1871 * 

From collections by financial agent 

subscriptions and donations 

jurors fees 

board of inmates 

Thanksgiving offering, Milwaukee 

do Geneva 

do Holland Church,Wau 

kesha 

balance Grand Ducal party fund 

BanitaiT Relief ftind 

State or Wisconsin 



EXFEKDITUBES. 

Subtiitence — 
Groceries and vegetables. 

Meats and fish 

Ice 



Help — 

Matron 

Servants and cooks 



Coal and wood 

Ga» and oil 

Stamps, stationery and printing 

Hardware, dry goods and house keeping 

articles 

Bepairs and labor on premises 

Insurance 

Carriage hire 

Charity and assistance to inmates 



»481 70 

120 64 

5 40 



^16 69 
189 12 



Total for current expenses. . . 
Paid for interest on mortage loan. 

Paid C A. Keeler's loan 

Paid mortgage 

Cash on hand October 1, 1872 . . . 



$62 65 

800 00 

1,000 00 

828 25 



V 

1191 59 

1,485 00 

523 60 

6 00 

170 12 

21 50 

10 00 

4 00 

49 94 

200 00 

1.000 00 



$607 74 



605 81 

242 35 

16 94 

63 35 

189 85 
54 92 
22 50 
12 75 

156 14 



$3,661 75 



$1,970 85 



1,690 90 



$3,661 76 



Donations of flour, potatoes, apples, poultry, sugar-cured ham, 
etc., were received during the year 6f the value in cash of about 
fifty dollars. 

Two hundred and forty-six persons were received into the 
Home during the past year ; of this number seventy were 



/ 



m 



106 



widows and deserted wives, ninety-one sewing girls and ser- 
vants, and sixty-seven children. Of the whole number received 
one hundred and twenty-nine were Catholics, and one hundred 
and seventeen Protestants. Two children have been given for 
adoption ; three ^families assisted to begin house-keeping ; and 
twenty-five passes obtained for needy travelers. 

TOB WOBK OP THIS INSTITUTION 

Is peculiar ; perhaps we cannot give a better idea of it than 
to give a few extracts from a record of the inmates for the past 
six months, furnished by the matron : 
" Mes. M. — 64 years old, a widow — stopped on her way to 

Waukesha. 
" Mrs. G. — ^A deserted wife, 25 years old, with an infant six 

months old — ^sent her to her mother at Rock Island. 
** Miss R. — Homeless, friendless, and lame — ^kept her five days. 
*^ Mrs. M. — ^and child 3 years old, has a home while being treated 

for her eyes, by Dr. Bartlett. 
^^Mbs. S. — 61 years of age, with two grandchildren, 3 and 5 

years of age — from Portage — remains two days when she 

takes a house in the city. 
" Two CHILDREN — 16 mouths and 5 years old — ^father and mother 

drunk. 
" Girl — 10 years old — ^picked up by the police— orphan. 
** M. G. — 14 years old, with infant — ^mother and child sick — not 
married — ^sent them to hospital. 
" H. D. — ^Woman 33 years old, looking for work — sent her to a 

place. 
" M. B. — 15 years old. Brought in by a city missionary — staid 

until a place was found. 
" B. W. — 18 years old — sick — sent her to the hospital. 
" Mrs. B. — 26 years old — widow, with four children, going to a 

brother in Minnesota. 
** Mrs. B. — 36 years old — a deserted wife with one child. 
" Mrs. F. — and two small children — ^a deserted wife, from Chi- 
cago — wanted help to go to housekeeping — sent them back 

to Chicago. 



107 

" R. T. — 19 years old — a servant girl, needing rest. 

" Mrs. C. — ^With three children with her — her husband at the 

hospital. 
" E. AND M. — 18 and 20 years of age — ^girls from the country 

looking for work — found it for them. 
^' S. G. — ^Wanted a place as a servant — found a place for her. 
** Mrs. A. — ^A widow waiting for funds from her friends at the 

East, BO t^hat she could return to them. 
" E. O.— 29 years of age— overworked — ^homeless and friendless. 
" Mrs. O. M. — 64 years of age — just from Ireland, going to her 

sons at Eau Claire — got off by mistake at the station — 

brought to the Home by a gentleman. 
'' Chables M. — 12 years old — found in the streets late at night 

and brought to the Home — ^in a few days found that he was 

a runaway. 
" M. — 24 years old, with child 16 months — wanted a place, and 

one was found for them. 
^ Mrs* W. and four children. — From Grand Rapids, Michigan, a 

widow, on her way to Iowa. Her purse was stolen on the 

boat. Mr. Beck, Chief of Police, sent her to the Home to 

stay until a pass could be gotten for them. 
^' Mbs. T. — ^Wandered from her home, partially insane. 
^^ Mbs. B. — 55 years old; a widow, sick. Sent to the Passavant 

Hospital. ^ 

" Mbs. M. — A widow, with four children; sent her to a place. 
"W. B. — 10 years old. Father dead. Mother sick with four 

children. 
" E. H. — 22 years old. Received at the request of Dr. Thomp- 
son. Will go to the lying-in-hospital in Januaiy. 
^' Mbs. K. and daughter 9 years. — Driven out of doors by a 

drunken husband. 
^^ M. G. — 15 years of age; an orphan looking for work. 
*^Mbs. J. — 30 years of age; a widow wanting work; a worthy 

person. 
^' Mbs. S. — Came to the city to meet her husband, but did not 

find him. 
" Maby. — 16 years old; foolish; sent her to her parents living 

six miles from the city. 



108 

*' During the months of October and November ten servant girls 
were received and provided with places." 

We regret that the records of the institution have not been, 
kept BO that we can know the daily average number of persons 
subsisted in the home during the year, so that we could get at 
the cost per capita to compare with other institutions. 

From a list of the names, age, residence, birth-place, etc., of 
some 125 of those who were inmates of the home from the first 
of April to the middle of October, we learn that about one-half 
of the number were residents of Milwaukee, that about two- 
thirds were foreign bom or of foreign parentage; that the time 
which different persons remained in the home was from a single 
meal or a single night's lodging to one, two and, in some cases, 
three months, and the ages are all the way from the infant of a 
few weeks to the aged woman of 64 years. 

MORE THAK A THOUSAND 

Women and children have been the recipients of its blessings 
during the few years of its existence; many of those persons 
have been homeless, friendless and destitute, and the aid re- 
ceived from the institution has in many cases saved life, in other 
cases saved young girls from a life of shame and infamy, and in 
hundreds of other cases has conferred benefits far too great to 
be estimated in dollars and cents. 

When we consider 

THE BLESSINGS CONFERRED 

upon the the two hundred and forty-six persons who were re- 
ceived into the Home during the past year, and reflect upon 
what might have been the fate of scores of them had it not been 
for this institution, and then remember that it has all been ac- 
complished with an outlay for current expenses of less than two 
thousand dollars, we cannot but regard it as one of the noblest 
charities of our state; an institution of which Milwaukee may 
well be proud, and one that reflects the highest honor upon the 
kind hearted ladies who organized and have thus lar sustained it 
The " Home " was visited by the board on the second day of 



109 

July, and everything in and around it was found in a moet sat- 
isfactory condition. The matron seems well qualified for the 
important duties devolving upon her, and the economy with 
which the affairs of the Home are managed, speaks volumes in 
praise of the care, prudence and business tact of the excellent 
women who have the institution in charge. 



IV.— ST. ROSA'S AND ST. JOSEPH'S ORPHAN ASY- 
LUMS, 

These two institutions are under the control of one organiza- 
tion, and under the immediate supervison of one and the same 
individual — Sister Camilla. 

They are incorporated in accordance with the provisions of a 
general law passed in 1850, entitled ^^ an act to provide for the 
incorporation of orphan asylums," approved February 1, 1850. 

THB CBBTIFICATK OP INCOBPOBATION 

Filed in the office of the Secretary of State, is as follows: 

" We, the undersigned, re^dents of the county of Milwaukee, 
in the state of Wisconsin, do hereby certify that, being desirous 
of forming a corporation for the purpose of establishing and 
maintaining an asylum for the support and education of orphans, 
do hereby associate ourselves together as a corporation under an 
act entitled * an act to provide for the incoporation or orphan 
asylums,' approved February 1, A. D. 1850, under the name of 
" The St. Rosa's Orphan Society,' for the purposes contemplated 
in said act, and for the support and education of orphan girls in 
the city and county of Milwaukee, in said state. 

'^ The said asylum shall be established and located in the said 
city of Milwaukee, in the county of Milwaukee aforesaid; the 
number of officers in said corporation shall be for the first year 



110 

seven, to wit: Five Directors, a Secretary and a Treasurer, and 
the number and names of the officers who shall hold the said 
offices for the first year as aforesaid shall be as follows, to wit: 
Five Directors, viz.: The Right Reverend John Martin Henni, 
the Reverend Patrick Bradley, Doct. Jesse S. Hewitt, John Fur- 
long and Joshua Hathaway, of whom the said Right Reverend 
John M. Henni shall be President, and one Treasurer and Sec- 
retary, to wit: Joshua Hathaway, who shall fill both offices last 
aforesaid, which said officers shall manage the concerns of the 
said corporation for the said first year. 

" t John M. Henni, Bp. of Mil. 
" J. S. Hewitt, 
"John Furlong, 
"Patrick Bradley, 
"Joshua Hathaway. 
" In presence of John L. Doran, Thomas Hutton." 

" State of Wisconsin — Milwaukee County^ ss. 

" Be it remembered that on the 31st day of October, A. D. 
1850, personally came and appeared before the undersigned, a 
justice of the peace, John M. Henni, J. S. Hewitt, John Fur- 
long, Patrick Bradley and Joshua Hathaway, to me known to 
be the persons who executed the above instrument, and ac- 
knowledged to have executed the same for the uses and pur- 
poses therein mentioned. 

" John L. Doran, 

" Justice of the JPeacc.^^ 

The foregoing certificate of incorporation was recorded in the 
office of the Register of Milwaukee county, December 3, 1850, 
and filed in the office of the Secretary of state, December 6, 
1850. 

The following statement in relation to 

ST. Rosa's female orphan asylum. 

Has been kindly furnished by Sister Camilla, the person in 
charge of the institution: 



Ill 

" Object of the Tftstitution* 

" The support of destitute female orphan children, chiefly and 
principally of the Catholic Fai^h, and residing in the city and 
Diocese of Milwaukee; but real objects of charity of other denom- 
inations or more distant places, are never refused the shelter of 
the asylum. We may add that since the erection of St. Joseph's 
Asylum, only girls between the ages of six and sixteen years are 
received at St. Rosa's. 

" When Established ? 
" May 9, 1848. 

" £y Whom Established f 

" By Right Reverend J. M. Henni, Catholic Bishop of Mil- 
waukee, assisted by the Catholic population of the city and dio- 
cese of Milwaukee. 

^^ How Governed? 

^^ The financial administration is in the hands of the Trustees. 
The domestic affairs are directed by the Sisters of Charity. 

" IToio Supported ? 

^' Chiefly by the contributions of the English speaking Catho- 
lics of Milwaukee. Donations are sometimes received from 
other sources, but excepting the appropriations received at in- 
tervals from the state and county, they have never aided mate- 
rially in the support of the institution. The^ earnings of the 
children is a small item, they amount on an average to $50 per 
month. Compensations are received for a few of the children, 
but the largest sum received for any one child is one dollar per 
week. According to the annual report for the year 1871, the 
moneys received by donations, children's salaries, their earn- 
ings, and other sources, amounted to $1,680.90. 

" To Whom Accountable. 

" The Treasurer, who is one of the trustees, and the Sister in 
charge each makes a report once a year to the Board of Trus- 
tees, at the time specified by the board. 



J 



112 
" Names of Officers. 

" Board of Trustees. — Right Rev. J. M. Henni, Rev. S. 
Lalumiere, Matt. Keenan, Dr. Jas. Johnson, Edward O'Neill 
and John Dahlman. Of these gentlemen, the Right Rev. Bishop 
is President of the Board, John Dahlman, Treasurer, and Jas, 
Johnson, M. D., Secretary. 

" Sister Camilla, the Sister of Charity in charge. 

" Incorporation, 

^' The institution was chartered according to the laws of the 
State of Wisconsin, on the 6th of December, 1850, and went 
into operation (as a corporate body) February 13, 1851. 

" Location of Property. 

^'The building known as St. Rosa's Asylum, Milwaukee, 
occupies a lot of ground on Jackson street, adjoining the Roman 
Catholic Cathedral, having a front of forty feet on Jackson street, 
and extending back to Van Buren street, a depth of two hundred 
and forty feet. This ground is the property of the Right Rev. 
J. M. Henni, who grants the use of it to the asylum. There is 
no incumbrance upon it. In May of 1869, the treasurer, in 
behalf of the trustees, purchased for the use of the asylum, the 
lot on Jackson street, adjoining the asylum, and owned formerly 
by Hon. J. J. Talmadge. This ground has a front of seventy 
feet on Jackson street, by a depth of one hundred and twenty 
feet. This property was purchased at a cost of $8,000, five 
thousand of which still remains due, together with interest at 
8^ per cent. 

^'The value of the ground is estimated at $7,000, and the 
building, a two-story brick building, and a one-story frame 
cottage, at $14,000. 

^ " Incumbrances. 

" There is a mortgage of $5,000, with interest at 8J per cent., 
payable May 1st 1874, on the property of Hon. J. J. Talmadge, 
purchased as above stated. This mortgage is held by Joseph 



113 

Paige of Milwaukee. The title of the property is in the hands 
of the trustees." 

•* Particular Good Accompiished by the Institution. 

. '^ The particular good aimed at in this Asylum is set forth in 
the * object of the institution.' Those charged with the con- 
duct of it, make it a conscientious duty to provide suitably for 
the children entrusted to their care, and to give them such 
training as will make of them useful members of society. Ac- 
cording to the register of the Asylum from its commencement 
to the present date, 743 children have been received under its 
roof. Many of these have been supported from infancy until 
they were able to earn honest livelihoods for themselves. Child- 
ren are not given from the Asylum to any one who may desire 
to take them. We must have every guarantee that the home 
offered is a suitable one before we give a child. We consider 
it better that the Asylum should support the child somewhat 
longer, than she should become a disgrace to society from a want 
of kindness. 

" For any further information concerning our institution, we 
would respectfully refer you to our communicatioh, published in 
the report of the joint committee made in Senate January 17, 
1872, page 19. 

" Hoping I may have given satisfactory answers to your ques- 
tions, I have the honor to be 

" Yours most respectfully, 

" Sister CAMILLA, in charge:' 

The following statement in relation to 

ST. Joseph's female obphan asylum, Milwaukee. ' . 

Is also from the pen of Sister Camilla, the Sister in charge: 

" Object of the Institution. 

^' The support and maintenance of destitute female orphan 
children. This house is designed especially for the younger 
children between the age of 2 and 10 years. 

8— C. & R (Doc. 13.) 



" When Established, 



** September 21, 1860. On that day and date the city of 
Milwaukee donated to the Sisters of Charity in Milwaukee a 
lot of land containing 3 ^qV^ acres, situated at the north point 
of Milwaukee bay, for the purpose of building an asylum 
thereon, as it was represented to the common council of the 
same city of Milwaukee that the building known as St. Rosa's 
asylum had become too small for the increasing number of 
orphans, and there was neither ground nor means sufficient to 
enlarge the building. As soon as possible after the donation of 
the ground, the Sisters of Charity, by their own labors and ex- 
ertions, and with the assistance of generous benefactors in and 
aroTind the city^f Milwaukee, erected thereon a two-story brick 
building at an expense of about $7,000, which has ever since 
been used as an orphan asylum. Since that time the Sisters of 
Charity have continued to cultivate and improve the ground as 
far as their means would allow, and, at the present time, St. 
Joseph's asylum, besides its usefulness as a charitable institu- 
tion is considered as an ornsement to that part of the city where 
it is situated. It has not, as yet, been possible, however, to en- 
large the original building, which, being small, can only accom- 
modate a limited number of orphans. 

^^ How Governed ? 

" Three sisters of charity manage the domestic affairs of this 
institution, but they are subject to and directed by the Sister of 
Charity in charge of St. Rosa's Asylum, Milwaukee. 

Hoio Sujyported ? 

*' The two asylums, St. Rosa's and St. Joseph's, are supported 
from one common fund, which is in the hands of the treasurer, 
Mr. John Dahlman, of the Board of Trustees of St. Rosa's 
Asylum. 

" To Whom Accountable ? 

" As the support is derived from the same source, and the 
common fund in the hands of the same treasurer, the expenses 



115 

of the two asylums are included in one report, which is made 
annually to the Board of Trustees of St. Rosa^s Asylum. 

" Title and Incumbrances ? 

" The Deed of this property is in the hands of the sisters of 
charity to whom it was given by the city of Milwaukee. There 
is no incumbrance upon the property. 

^^ Value of Property. 

^' The estimated value of the ground and improvements is ten 
thousand dollars. 

I 

" The Particular Good Accomplished by the Institution. 

> 

" The particular good done by this institution consists in its 

having given shelter to as many children at any one time as its 

size would allow, and this for a longer or shorter period as their 

necessities required. Numbers of these children came from the 

lowest depths of poverty and misery, and on their admittance 

would inspire only disgust tp those who were not animated by 

christian charity. We are happy, however, to devote our 

existence to bettering the condition of the poor orphans, doing 

all in our power to cure their evils of body and mind, and 

training them in such a manner that they may hereafter become 

useful members of society. 

" Sister CAMILLA." 



116 
The following is a copy of the 



ANNUAL BEPOBT 



Of the receipts and expenditures and the present condition of 
St. Bosa^s Asylum, from. December, 1871, to December, 1872, by 
John Dahlman, treasurer: 



RECEIPTS. 

Balance on hand from 1871 

Chistmas collection at the Cathedral and St. 

Gairs Church 

Easter collection at the Cathedral and-StGalPs 

Church 

Donation from state of Wisconsin 

do H. B. Pearson 

do Milwaukee coun^ 

do,. . Alexandria, 111., Relief Society 

Donations in small sums, from yarious persons 

Pension of Mary A. Eagan. 

Cash from parents and guardians 

Cash from children's work 

Monthly dues from members of association. . . 

Cash from rafSe of vestment \ 

Net proceeds of pic-nic 

do fair 

Bequest of Nathan Engleman 

... .do Thos. Dooley, of Cedarburg 



EXPENDITURES. 

Flour and feed, ($400 worth of flour on hand). 

Groceries 

Meat 

Potatoes, vegetables, fruit, butter, etc 

Dry goods 

Shoes 

Hardware and crockery 

Drugs and medicines 

Furniture, bedsteads, bedding, etc 

Fuel, (about $400 due from previous year). . . . 
Building wood-house and carpenter work at St. 

Joseph^s Asylum 

Two cows, $72 ; shoeing horse $28 

Gas and lamp oil 

Repairing, etc 

Insurance 

Hired man's wages at $15 per month 

Sundries 



Total expenditures 
Balance on hand 



$9,547 46 

379 92 

271 61 
2,000 00 

25 00 
400 00 
100 00 
125 00 

21 07 
550 00 
650 00 
534 55 

72 00 

1,047 51 

0,027 45 

100 00 

50 00 



$1,608 56 

1,774 13 

1,264 52 

654 62 

1,478 58 

868 68 

4i»6 30 

101 75 

259 75 

1,258 00 

200 00 
100 00 
100 00 
123 39 
40 00 
180 00 
290 55 



$10,709 38 
4, 192 19 



^$14,901 57 



$14,901 57 



117 



The following statement showing 

THE SITUATION OF THE CLAIMS 

Against the property purchased of J. J. Talmadge, has been 
furnished by Sister Camilla: 

"/S^^ Ilo8a*8 Orphan Asylum in account with A, Dahlman 
<b Co. 



1870 
Apr. 20 
Kov. 8 

1871 
May 8 
Nov. 8 

1872 
May 8 
Nov. 8 



To cash advanced for J. J. Talmadge property 
To six month's interest on Paige's mortgage . . 



To six do. 

To six do 



do. 
do. 



To six do do, 

To six do do. 



.do. 
.do. 

.do. 
.do. 



Less amount paid as per resolution passed December 10) 1870. 



Less amount paid as per resolution passed December 12, 1872. 



18,051 00 
200 00 

200 00 
200 00 

200 00 

200 00 



14,05100 
$2,000 00 



$2,051 00 



$2,051 00 



^* In a meeting of the Board of Trustees held December Idth, 
1872, it was resolved to pay from the $4,192,19, remaining in the 
treasury of St. Rosa's Asylum the balance of $2,Q51,00 due A. 
Dahlman & Co., on the J. J. Talmadge property; also to pay 
$1,000 from the same source to Joseph Paige, on the bond and 
mortgage of $5,000 he holds against the same property which 
now belongs to St. Rosa's Asylum. Therefore the balance now 
remaining in the treasury is $1,141,19. 

^^ Joseph Paige, still holds a mortgage of $4,000 against the 
institution." 

THE NUMBER OF IKMATES 

In the two Asylums December 8th 1871, was, including Sisters and em- 
ployes f 182 

Children admitted since 54 

186 
Discharged, 42, Died, 2 45 

Leaving number of inmates December 8th 1872 141 

Of this number ten are Sisters, and two employes 12 

Leaving the number of children December 8th 1872 129 



118 



Fifty of whom are in St. Joseph's Asylum, and seventy-nine, 
in St. Rosa^s. 

The whole number of children in the Asylums during the year 
was 174. 

THS BISTH-PLACB OF THS PABBKTS 

Was as follows: 

Ireland 130 

(Jermany 

Holland 

Bohemia 

France 

Scotland 

England 



13 
1 
8 
2 
2 



United States 



152 

22 



The children were mostly bom in the United States, although 
the larger proportion of them were of foreign parentage. Two 
wei^e bom in Ireland, one in England and one in Canada. 

One hundred and forty -seven were bom in Wisconsin (one 
hundred and thirteen in Milwaukee city and county), and the 
remaining twenty-three in ten different states of the Union. 



THE RESIDEKCE OF THE CHILDBBX 

When received into the Asylum, was as follows: 

Milwaukee county 121 

Columbia do 1 

Crawford do 2 

Dane do 4 

Dodffc do 2 

Fond du Lac .do 5 

Iowa do 1 

Jefferson do 1 

Marathon do 1 

Outagamie . . .do 3 

Rock do; 5 

Sheboygan. . . .do 2 

Walworth . . . .do 4 

Waukesha do ♦ 4 

Washington . . do 6 

Illinois 6 

Michigan 2 

Missouri d 

Rhode Island 1 

Massachusetts 1 

174 



119 
Of the children in the two Asylums last year, there were 

Whole orphans 86 .... 

Half orphans 88 .... 

174 



THE AGES OF THE CHILDREN 



In the two ftsylums last year, were as follows: 



20 years... 

19 years... 
18 years. . . 

17 years... 
16 years... 
15 years... 
14 years . . 

18 years... 
12 years . . . 
11 years. .. 
10 years... 

9 years. . . 
8 years. . . 

7 years. . . 
6 years... 
6 years... 
4 years. . . 

8 years. .. 

20 months. 
18 months. 
10 months. 



In St. 



1 

1 

1 

8 

7 

7 

13 

20 

14 

15 

10 

18 

7 

8 

2 



In St. 
Joseph*!. 



1 



Total. 



117 



1 
5 
2 
2 
2 
3 
6 
7 
4 
9 
5 
6 
2 
1 
1 
1 



1 



57 



1 

1 

1 

8 

7 

8 

18 

22 

16 

17 

IS 

19 

14 

7 

11 

5 

6 

2 

1 

1 

1 



174 



The average age, leaving out of the calculation the three 
children under two years, is lOf years. 

The daily average number of children in the two asylums as 
near as we can make it out was 125, and the daily average num- 
ber subsisted in the asylum, including Sisters, children and em- 
ployees, was 137. 

The total expenditures of the two asylums during the past 
year was $10,709.38; a cost per capita^ on the whole number 
subsisted, of $78.17 per year, or $1.50 per week. 

The cost per capita on children, was $85.67 per year, or $1.C4 
per week. 



120 
The cost of subsistence for the year was as follows: 

Flour and feed 11,608.56, less $400 worth of flour on hand. . . $1,208 56 
Groceries 11,774.18, less 288.78 for candles, &c., included in 

this amount 1,485 85 

Meat 1,264 62 

Potatoes, Tegetables, ft-uit, timtter, &c., 654 62 

Making a total of $4,613 05 

• 

The cost per capita for subsistence for the children was 
$36.90 per year, or 70 cents per week; and the cost per capita 
on the whcde number subsisted, was $33.67 per year, or 64 cents 
per week. 

The following extract from a commmunication received from 
Sister Camilla, will throw further light upon the 

GOYERNMEXT AND MANAGEHEKT 

Of the asylums. 

" As to Whom the Trustees Heport, 

" There is in the city of Milwaukee a society named the Or- 
phans' Association, the members of which contribute four dol- 
lars a year for the support of the asylum. A special meeting 
of this association is called yearly on the 8th of December, and 
in their presence the annual report of the asylum is read. It is 
at this meeting, and from the members of the society, that the 
annual election of trustees is made. ♦ ♦ ♦ 

" JFor the care of the Orphans 

" There are employed ten Sisters of Charity, whose food and 
clothing are supplied by the institution; these expenses are in- 
cluded in the Treasurer's report; the Sisters receive no other 
remuneration. There is a hired man employed at St. Joseph's 
asylum for the care of the cows, to saw wood, etc.; he receives 
$15 a month and his board. There is also an aged man at St. 
Rosa's asylum, who does work around the house, but for the last 
six years he has given his services to the asylum for nothing; 
he is, however, supported and clothed by the institution. You 



121 

will see from the report, the expenees of the institution for the 
last year. They are of course much more than would be neces- 
sary to support the same number of persons in one house large 
enough to accommodate them. * * * As for dona- 
tions of provisions, with the exception of the Christmas dinner 
of fowl, which is always given by the gentlemen who supply the 
institution with meat, they are seldom received. This^ is easily 
accounted for by the fact that our asylums are almost entirely 
dependent for their^ support, and can only Count their friends 
among the poorer class of people. These are called upon four 
times a year for cash contributions; they always answer willing- 
ly and generously as the report shows, and could scarcely be 
expected to do more. It must also be remembered that a great 
deal of the money made at the annual pic-nio and fair arises 
from the sale of refreshments, and these are all donated. The 
same also must be said of the articles sold or raffled at the fair; 
they are all the donations, principally of the merchants of Mil- 
waukee. 

" The Economy Practiced • 

^' In the asylums does not consist in stinting the inmates either 
in food or clothing; all are comfortably clothed, lodged atud fed; 
and this costs money, but we try to take good care of what is 
given to «s, and put all to the best advantage. Our children 
make and mend their own clothing; they bake, wash, do the 
cooking and housework under the supervision of the Sisters. As 
a general thing they acquire habits of neatness and order. The 
greater number give satisfaction to those who employ them 
when old enough to leave the asylum, reflect credit -on their 
childhood's home, and are a reward, even in this world, to the 
charitable who cared for them in the hour of need." 

THB TWO ASYLUMS WERE VISITED 

By the board on the second day of July. The children appeared 
to be in good health, happy and contented; they were com- 
fortably clad, and everything in and around the building was 
neat and in good order. Sister Camilla, the sister in charge 



122 

of the two asylums, is a woman admirably qualified for the im- 
portant and responsible post she fills. On every side can be 
seen the evidence of the skill, prudence and fidelity with which 
she discharges her duties. And we regard her as exceedingly 
fortunate in the selection of the Sisters she has to aid her in the 
care of the children. The noble charity to which they have 
consecrated their lives, seems to have stamped its impress upon 
their countenances and manners, and it is not strange that the 
helpless orphans confided to their care, are 'drawn to them as to 
a mother. Their self-denying labors will surely receive their 
reward, if not in this world, in that where no deed of love or 
charity is ever forgotten. 



I 

t 



V— ST. AMELIANUS' ORPHAN ASYLUM. 

This institution is located about four miles south of the city 
of Milwaukee, near the St. Francis Catholic College. 
. It is incorporated in accordance with the provisions of a gen- 
eral law passed in 1850, entitled " an act to provide for the in- 
corporation of orphan asylums," approved February 1st, 1850, 
of which the following is a copy : 

(Chapter 60, General Laws of 18S0.) 

•*AN ACT TO PROVIDE FOR THE INCORPORATION OP 

ORPHAN ASYLUMS. 

*' The people of the state of Wiiconsin repreitfUed in eenate and aaemblp^ 
do enact as follows: 

CERTIFICATB TO BE MADE. 

" Section 1. Any five or more persons m any county of this 
state, desirous of forming a corporation for the purpose of es- 
tablishing and maintaining an asylum for the support and edu* 
cation of orphans, may make, sign and acknowledge before 



123 

some officer authorized to take the ackowledgment of deeds, a 
certificate in writing, in which shall be stated the name of such 
corporation, the number of officers and their names, who shall 
manage the concerns of said corporation for the first year, and 
the name of the city, village or town and county, in which such 
asylum is to be established. 

CERTIFICATE TO BE FILED. 

^^ Section 2. Such certificate shall be filed in the office of 
the register of deeds of the county to which such asylum shall 
be established, and a duplicate thereof shall be filed in the office 
of the secretary of state. 

POWERS OF corporation. 

" Section 3. The corporation so established shall be invested 
with and entitled to all the powers and privileges, and be sub- 
ject to all the liabilities prescribed in chapter fifty- four of the 
Revised Statutes, entitled ' general provisions relating to cor 
porations, so far as the same may be applicable.* 

CAN receive donations, ETC. 

" Section 4. It shall be lawful for such corporation to re- 
ceive donations and bequests and to apply the same for the pur- 
poses aforesaid, and the proper authorities of any town, village, 
city or county are hereby authorized to make such appropria- 
tions, for the benefit of said institution, as they sh{i,ll from time 
to time deem right and proper. 

NO political or religious test. 

" Section 6. No political or religious test shall ever be re- 
quired as a qualification for office or for admission to the bene- 
fits of the asylum. 

can hold real estate. 

" Section 6. Said corporation shall have power to hold real 
estate as provided by law, and may sell and convey the same 



^ 



124 

whenever they may deem it proper, and as provided in cases of 
other corporations. 

"Approved February 1, 1850." 

THB CEBTIPICATB OF INCORPORATION 

" Filed in the office of the Secretary of State, December 6, 
1850, is as follows: 

" We, the undersigned residents of the county of Milwaukee, 
in the State of Wisconsin, do hereby certify that being desirous 
of forming a corporation for the purpose of establishing and 
maintaining an asylum for the support and education of or- 
phans, do hereby associate ourselves together as a corporation, 
under an act, entitled *an ,act to provide for the incorporation 
of orphan asylums, approved February 1, 1850, under the name 
of the ' St. Amelianus' Orphati Society,' for the purposes contem- 
plated in said act, and for the support and education of orphan 
boys in the city and county of Milwaukee, in said state. 

^' The said Asylum shall be established and located in the said 
city of Milwaukee, in the county of Milwaukee aforesaid, the 
number of officers in said corporation shall be, for the first year, 
seven, to-wit: Five Directors, a Secretary and Treasurer, and 
the number and names of the officers for the first year, as afore- 
said, shall be as follows, to-wit: Five Directors are: The Right 
Revered John Martin Henni, the Reverend Doctor Joseph Sals- 
man, Reverend Ignatius Ives, Joshua Hathaway and Augustus 
Greulich, of whom the said Right Reverend John M. Henni shall 
be President, and one Secretary and Treasurer, Joshua Hatha- 
way, who shall fill both offices last aforesaid, which said officers 
shall manage the concerns of said corporation for the said first 

year. 

" JonK M. Hknni, pp. of Wis. 

^^ Joseph Salbhak. 

" J. M. Ives. 

" Joshua Hathaway. 

" Augustus Greulich. 

** In presence of John L. Doran Thomas Hutton." 



125 

"State of Wisico^si^— Milwaukee County. 

" Be it remembered that on the 3l8t day of October, A. D. 
1850, personally came and appefired before the undersigned, a 
justice of the peace, John M. Henni, Joseph Salsman, I. M. 
Ives, Joshua Hathaway and Augustus Greulich, to me known to 
be the persons who executed the above instrument, and 
acknowledged to have executed the same for the uses and pur- 
poses therein mentioned. 

" John L. Dorak, 

" Justice of the Peace. 
" Filed December 6, 1850." 

The following paper furnished by the Rev. Chr. Wapelhorst, 
one of the Directors of the institution, cointains the 

INFORMATION 

Asked for by the Board. 

" The Asylum is Governed 

" By the following Board of Directors: 

"Rt. Rev. J. M. Henni, President. 
" B. A. Westhoff, Secretary. 
" Aug. Greulich, Treasurer. 

^^'Memhers of the Board — Messrs. Jos. Phillips, Stephen Hoff, 
John Hass, Werner Timborn, and Rev. Chr/ Wapelhorst. 

^' The immediate charge of this institution, as far as the paid 
labor and the making of clothes for the orphans, is entrusted to 
the care of twelve Franciscan Sisters. 

" The asylum being adjacent to the Seminary of St. .Francis, 

" Able and JEJfficient Male Teachers 

" Are procured, who instruct the boys not only in the elemen- 
tary branches of an English, but also in those of a German edu- 
cation. 

^' The time daily employed for instruction and study is six 
hours. As regards [the location and the object of the asylum, 
we wouldjsimply say that it is located' some four miles south of 



126 



the city of Milwaukee — the property owned being some three 
acres of land, valued at five hundred dollars, and a building 
partly of brick and partly of wood, valued at eight thousand 
dollars — ^the title of which is invested in the name of the incor- 
porators and their successors. We may also remark that there 
is annually rented some five acres of land, three of which are 
cultivated and the other two serve as a pasture. 

" The Special Object 

^^ Is to take care of and instruct the Catholic orphan boys of 
the state. Half orphans are admitted when the Board of Direc- 
iors deem their condition to be almost equal to that of a whole 



one. 



?> 



tc 



We shall now subjoin the list of 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



For the year 1872. 

I ■ 



it 



RECEIPTS. 



Balance on hand, December, 1871. 

Cash for half orphans 

per Rev. , (will, 



from State. . 

Milwaukee county 
collections in the Catholic churches 
of Milwaukee 

Society 

and donations from different parties, per 
books of the asylum 



ti 



EXPENDITURES. 



Sisters and teachers 

Coal. 3 tons, 112.50 

Wood, 60 cords, at f4.50 to |7.50. . 
Flour, 80 barrels, at 5^6.50 to |3.00 

Butcher's bill 

Shoes and dry goods 

Groceries 

Interest on loan 

Repairs on building 

lient for land and pasture ^ 

To produce, etc., as per donation . 
Cash on hand, December, 1872 . . . 



1730 57 

407 85 

100 00 

1,000 00 

200 00 

1,939 m 
659 50 

2,841 94 



1650 

37 

452 

552 

661 

1,300 

684 

160 

560 

167 

1.038 

1,651 



00 
50 
50 
50 
91 
00 
05 
00 
00 
00 
43 
83 



17,879 73 



♦7,879*73 



127 



THB WHOLE NUMBER OP CIIILDREX 



in the institution during the year was 97. 



THE BIRTH PLACE OP PARENTS WAS AS FOLLOWS! 

Ireland 47 

Germany 18 

Poland 9 

Prussia 5 

Bavaria ' 5 

France 3 

Scotland. 2 

Italy 1 

United States 4 o 

Not given 2 

97 



THE BIRTH PLACE OF CHILDREN 

Was as follows: 

Milwaukee county 52 

Ozaukee county 5 

Dane county 7 

'VYaukesha county 2 

Fond du Lac county 6 

Rock connty 6 

Racine county 

Dodge county 

Washington county 

Poland 

Germany • * • * 

Italy 

Bavaria 

Ireland 

Michigan 

Not Given 



A 



97 



THE RESIDENCE OF CHILDREN 



Was as follows: 

Milwaukee county 57 

Ozaukee do 6 

Dane do 7 

Waukesha do 3 

Dodee do 1 

Fona du Lac do 2 

La Crosse do 1 

Rock do :.. * 6 

Racine do 1 

Not given 15 



97 



128 



THE NUMBEB OF CHILDBEN 

In the Asylum at the commencement of the year, was 65 

Admitted during the year 88 

»8 
Discharged and died 62 

Remaining at the end of the year 66 

As near as we can make it out from the papers in our posses- 
sion, the average number in the Asylum during the year was 
sixty-six. 

Sixty-eight of the boys are half orphans, and twenty-nine 
whole. 

THE AGES 

Were as follows: 

19 years i 2 

14 do 5 

13 do 2 

12 do 10 

11 do 14 

10 do 14 

9 do ^ 9 

8 do 7 

7 do 8 

6 do 5 

6 do • 5 

4 do : : 3 

3 do , 5 

2 do 1 

1' do 4 

10 months 1 

9 do 3 

4 do... , 1 

97 

Average age, 7^ years. — 

" During the existence of this asylum at least 400 children 
have been admitted, of whom twelve have died, and the balance, 
with the exception of the sixty-six now in the asylum, have been 
bound out to loarn jtnfd'es." 

The officers of the asylum say, " As far as we know all of 
Ijieift have become good and law-abiding citizens. Some of 
those who are now maintained in the asylum are children of 
fathers who have lost their lives in the cause of their country 
by enlisting and serving in the late war against the rebellion." 



129 
The total cost for 

CUBBBNT SXPBNSES 

Last year, was $6,103.89, and for subsistence $2,936.89, which 
will amount to $44.50 per year, per capita^ on the Average num- 
ber of boys for subsistence, or 85 cents per week. The cost 
per capita for the entire current expenses would be $92.48 per 
year, or $1.78 per week. 

The cost per capita^ on the entire number subsisted in the 
house, adding the twelve Sisters to the sixty-six boys, would 
be, for subsistence, $37.65 per year, or 72 cents per week, and for 
the entire current expenses $78.25 per year, or $1.50 per week. 

This institution 

WAS VISITED BT THB BOABD 

On the second day of July, 1872. The asylum contained at 
that time 79 boys, from sixteen months to sixteen years of age. 

There was a lack of neatness in and around the building, and 
the children and the school room appeared to be neglected. The 
privies were in very bad order, and there was an offensive smell 
that was perceptible on the back side of the building in some 
of the rooms and dormitdries. 

The location is pleasant, and if the buildings and grounds are ' 
properly taken ckre of ought to be a healthy spot. . 

Notwithstanding these criticisms we regard the asylum as a 
most valuable institution, one that has done and is doing much 
good, and as entitled to the liberal support of the people. 

0— C. & R. (Doc. 13.) 



130 



VI.— MILWAUKEE ORPHAN ASYLUM. 

The act of incorporation of this institution can be found in 
chapter 152 of the laws of 1852, and is as follows: 

"AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE MILWAUKEE ORPHAN 

ASYLUM. 

" The people of the State of Wisconsin y represented in Sen- 
ate and Assembly y do enact as follows: 

% 

WHO MAT BB MEMBERS, ETC. 

Section 1. All such persons of the female sex as now are or 
hereafter shall become annual subscribers to the amount of not 
less than fifty cents per annum, to the said association, ishall be 
and are hereby constituted a body (Corporate and politic in fact 
and in name, by the name of " The Milwaukee Orphan^s Asy- 
lum," and by that name shall have perpetual succession, and be 
in law capable of suing and being sued, defending and being 
defended in all courts and places, and in all manner of actions and 
causes whatsoever, and may have a common seal and change the 
same at their pleasure; and shall by that name and style be ca- 
pable in law of purchasing, holding and conveying any estate, 
real or personal, for the use of the said corporation: Provided j 
That such estate shall never be applied to any other purpose 
than those for which this corporation is formed. 

trustees, how elected, etc. 

" Section 2. The estate and concerns of the said corpora- 
tion shall be managed, directed and disposed of by a board of 
trustees, to be composed of a first and second directress, treas- 
urer, secretary and twenty -four managers, to be elected by a 
plurality of ballots of the members resident in the city of Mil- 
waukee, being annual subscribers as aforesaid, and present at 
such election, yearly, on the first Tuesday of December, at such 
place in said city, and at such time in the day, as the board of 
trustees may from time to time by ordinance or otherwise ap-. 
point, and of which public notice shall be given; and if any va- 



131 

cancy shall be occasioned by the death, resignation, removal or 
otherwise, of any one of the said board, the same shall be filled 
for the remainder of the year by such person or persons, being 
annual subscribers as aforesaid, as the board of trustees for the 
time being, or a majority of them, shall appoint; and until the 
election on the first Tuesday in December, A. D. 1852, the board 
of trustees shall be as fellows, to wit: Mrs. G. P. Hewitt, first 
directress; Mrs. B. McVickar, second directress; Mrs. M. B. 
Taylor, secretary; Mrs. Alexander Mitchell, treasurer; and Mrs. 
Thomas P. Williams, Mrs. Elisha Eldred, Mrs. E. La Due, Mrs. 
"Wm. P. Lynde, Mrs. Wm. H. Byron, Mrs. G. Bonnell, Mrs. H. 
P. Peck, Mrs. Joseph Gary, Mrs. Edward D. Holton, Mrs. P. C. 
Hale, Mrs. James H. Rogers, Mrs. John]Hustis, Mrs. S. Grant, 
Mrs. A. F. Clark, Mrs. A. D. Smith, Mrs. Daniel Wells, Mrs. J. 
P. Greves, Mrs. L. Kennedy, Mrs. H. Bosworth, Mrs. Wm. P. 
Young Mrs. C. Arnold, Mrs. O. H. Waldo, Mrs. McDougall and 
Mrs. M. W. Clark, managers; and that a majority of said board 
shall be requisite to transact business, and in case of the non- 
attendance of the said first or second directress, the members 
present may appoint a directress pro tempore. 

ANNUAL ELECTION. 

" Section 3. If the annual election shall not be made on the 
stated day, the said corporation shall not thereby be dissolved, 
but the members of the said board shall continue in office until 
a new election, which shall be made at such time and place, and 
after such notice, as the said board shall prescribe ; and in case 
an equality of votes shall be given for any one or more persons, 
as a member of the said board of trustees, the said board shall 
determine which of said persons shall be considered as elected, 
and which determination shall make it lawful for such person to 
act as a member of said board. 

REPOFT TO be HADE. 

" Section 4. The said board shall, at least at every yearly 
meeting, exhibit to the members of the said corporation an ex- 
act account of the receipts and disbursements of the preceding 
year. 



132 



CAN MAKB BT-LAWS, ETC. 

" Section 5. The said board may from time to time, make 
by-laws, ordinances, and resolutions relative to the management 
and disposition of the estate and concerns of the said corpora- 
tion, and the regulation of the persons exercising the offices 
aforesaid, not contrary to law, and may appoint such other 
officers, agents, and servants, as they deem necessary to trans- 
act the business of the said corporation, and designate their 
duties ; and shall have power to bind out by indenture such 
children as are or may be placed in said asylum, and who have 
neither parents or guardians, or whose parents or guardians are 
unknown or absent from the state. 

LIABILITY OF HUSBANDS OF MEMBERS OB OFFICERS. 

" Section 6. The husband of any married woman, who is or 
may be a member or officer of the said corporation, shall not be 
liable to the said corporation for any loss occasioned by the ne- 
glect or misfeasance of his wife; but if he shall have received any 
money from his wife belonging to the said corporation, or the 
same shall have been applied to his use, he shall be accountable 
therefor; or if the husband's goods shall be attached, or if he 
shall have become insolvent, such money, if received after the 
passage of this act, shall be paid by the trustees or assigns in 
preference to all other debts. 

CHARTER PERPETUAL. 

" Section 7. This charter shall be perpetual: Provided 
always^ That if the said corporation shall apply their, or any 
part of their funds to any other purpose than those contem- 
plated by this act, and shall thereof be convicted in due course 
of law, then the said corporation shall cease and determine, and 
the estate, real and personal thereof, shall be forfeited to and 
vested in the people of the state: And provided further^ That 
nothing in this act contained shall be construed to prevent the 
legislature at any time, in their discretion, from altering or re- 
pealing this act 



133 

^' Section 8. This act shall be and is hereby declaried a pub- 
lic act, and the same shall be construed in^ all courts and plac^ 
benignly and favorably for every humane, charitable and lau- 
dable purpose therein contained. 

" Approved March 24, 1852." 

The following 

HISTORIC SKETCH 

Of this institution is from the pen of the secretary of the 
association, Mrs. Wm. P. Lynde. 

^ 

" Origin of the Society. 

^' This asylum was the out-growth of the Ladies Benevolent 
Society of Milwaukee, the need of an asylum being made ap- 
parent by the fact that orphan children were left in care of the 
society whose parents had been dependent upon its charity dy- 
ing and leaving their young families with no other support. 

'^ On the 4th of January, 1850, the ladies met pursuant to a 
call previously issued through the public journals, at the house 
of Mrs. S. B. Grant, and organized an association to be called 
the ^^ Milwaukee Orphan Asylum," adopted a constitution which 
was presented by a committee, previously appointed by the 
benevolent society, and elected officers, which consisted of a 1st, 
2nd, and 3rd directress secretary, and treasurer, and twenty-four 
managers, which board has since been increased by adding 
twelve more managers and a corresponding secretary. 

" Says a former report, so promptly and energetically did this 
original board enter upon their work, that at the expiration of 
a month, a house was rented and a matron engaged, and nine 
children gathered into the asylum. 

^' Through the public prints donations of furniture, bedding, 
clothing, cooking utensils, provisions, any and everything that 
goes to make up a comfortable home or supply a family were 
solicited, the managers alternating with each other in staying at 
the house and receiving whatever was sent. 



134 

" The Mouse loas Mostly Furnished 

" In this manner by the citizens of Milwaukee, and for means 
to provide for the family, they were dependent upon voluntary 
subscriptions from ladies of fifty cents and from gentlemen of 
five dollars, sums exceeding these being very rare exceptions, 
and oftener falling below them. Yet -so successful were they 
that the report at the close of the year shows twenty-three (23) 
children had been received and maintained and a small balance 
remained in the treasury. The next year the board were much 
encouraged by the generous donation of a city lot on Marshall 
street, valued at one thousand dollars, by Mrs. Wm. P. Young. 
During the succeeding year, a building was commenced, and so 
much of it as was needed completed ready for occupancy in 
June, 1853, and the asylum moved into it. 

" This Building was JErected 

" At a cost of something over $4,500, the whole amount for 
which was obtained by subscriptions circulated in Milwaukee, 
f he association was incorporated by act of the legislature in 
, the year 1852. The property is deemed vested in the officers 
^nd managers, by virtue of their office. Meetings of the Board 
are held on the first Tuesday of each month, the annual 
meeting occurs on the first Tuesday of Nov,ember, at which 
time the reports of the Secretary, Treasurer and Matron are 
presented. There is a board of counselors of three gentlemen, 
and an auditor. 

" The Board at Present 

" Consists of 

" Mrs. Clarence Shepard, 1st Directress. ^ 

" Mrs. S. S. Sherman, 2d Directress. 

" Mrs. R. D. Jennings, 3d Directress^ 

" Mrs. John H. Van Dyke, Treasurer. 

" Mrs. Wm. P. Lynde, Secretary. 

" Mrs. Daniel Newhall, Corresponding Secretary. 



136 

" Board of Caunselers. 

« John H, Van Dyke. ^ 

« A. Finch. 

" J. D. Inbusch. 

" Auditor. 

" S. S. Sherman. . 

Until the past two years the asylum had depended mainly 
upon the proceeds of 

An Annual Festival^ 

Or Fancy Fair, for its support, but in June, 1870, the Board 
at a quarterly meeting resolved to dispense with the usual festi-: 
yal, and each- manager desired to raise one hundred dollars 
($100) by direct subscription, the subscription of five dollars 
per year from gentlemen, having been long abandoned. The 
institution derives its principal support at the present time from 
this source. During the whole period of its existence (twenty- 
three years), it has received from the state in appropriations 
from the legislature, three thou3and dollars, a few hundred from 
the board of supervisors of Milwaukee, occasionally a donation 
of a small sum from some committee, an unexpended balance 
from a public collection fund, a few legacies, the largest on@ $250 
from Miss Davis, who was matron of the asylum for about nine 
years, devoted to its interests with remarkable unselfishness, and 
in dying bequeathed the above named sum, to be invested and 
the interest devoted to the purchase of Christmas gifts for the 
children. Mrs. C. Arnold, one of the founders of the asylum, 
bequeathed for the same purpose one hundred dollars. But the 
entire amount of legacies received do not exceed, if they reach, 
one thousand dollars. Thirty-three dollars have been received 
from the relations of an orphan boy, resident in Scotland, who 
had been several years an inmate of the asylum, and whose 
relatives were informed of his existence and death in the ser- 
vice of the United States, as a volunteer soldier, from the 
records of the asylum. 



136 

*' The Asylum building 

*^ On Marshall street was froiQ time to time enlarged, and out- 
buildings added until nearly the entire lot was covered and the 
premises too crowded for comfort or health, when in the spring 
of 1869, the residence of Wallace Pratt, Esq., on Division street 
and the lake shore, containing over four city lots and a conve- 
nien house, was purchased at auction by the association for 
$16,300 — cash payment of $11,731.01 being made at the time of 
purchase — a mortgage of $3,000, at eight per cent, being suf- 
fered to remain a lien upon the property. The property on 
Marshall street remained unsold until the following year when 
a sale was effected for $6,000, and the mortgage upon the 
Asylum on Division street paid off. No debt remains or has 
any other ever been contracted. In 1860, by rtjite of the com- 
mon council, a tract of land belonging to the city, lying near 
the lake shore adjoining St. Mary's Hospital, was given to three 
of the charitable institutions of Milwaukee, of which the Mil- 
waukee (Protestant) Orphan Asylum received four and three- 
quarters acres ; with the exception of fencing no improvements 
have been made upon the property, but it is contemplated that 
the Asylum will be removed there when the horse railway and 
other city improvements 'shall render it expedient. This land 
was given subject to the condition that it shall be occupied for 
an Orphan Asylum within two years. This time has been twice 
extended and is now continued until 1882. 

" Since the organization 

^^ Of this institution 628 children have been inmates, it is 
perhaps just to average for as many as four or five years each. 

^^ The average number for the past year, has been fifty-four 
(54); average age, 7^. The employes are^a matron, assistant 
matron, house-keeper, cook, nurse and two girls. 

^' One teacher h employed who lives outside and school is con- 
tinued from nine to twelve and from two to half past four, as in 
the public schools, and modeled upon the same system, but no 
portion of the school funds is received from the state or city. 



137 



" A shop for cane seating' chairs 

^^ Has been fitted up during "the past year and a woman em- 
ployed^t<y teach the trade. Over thirty of the children have 
worked at it and fifteen have learned the trade. 

" The domestic arrangements 

'' And regulations correspond as nearly as possible to ordinary 
family households only on a larger scale. The children assist in 
the general housework} the girls take care of their own rooms, 
sweep, dust, assist in washing dishes, cooking, washing, and any 
work suitable for their age. The boys clean the walks, bring in 
wood, water, coal, and all that are old enough work in the cane 
shop. 

" The Hours qf Work, Study and Play^ 

^^ Are so arranged that each child has four hours study, three of 
work, and freedom to play the remaining hours of the day. The 
girls arc taught sewing, mending, and both boys and jirls, knit- 
ting and darning stockings. 

" Children are received from any part of the state upon satis- 
factorily attested proof of destitute orphanage, and character 
suitable for a charitable institution. Application is sometimes 
received for children of such criminal tendency as render them 
unfit residents in a family of ordinarily innocent children. 
These cases are a perplexity, and sometimes real sorrow to the 
committee on receiving children, and in several instances they 
have received young girls of this sort because there was no other 
refuge oflfered where they could be suitably cared for. If the 
surviving parent or natural guardian of any children are able to 
pay something towards their support it is expected of them and 
perhaps more half than full orphans are received and kept until 
the parent can resume the support or care of their offspring. 
A few months or it may be years of aid so rendered have in 
numerous instances enabled parents to retrieve the losses of mis- 
fortune and resume the care and maintenance of their children. 
Many a widow's heart has been cheered and her hands strength- 



138 

ened, many a father's courage sustained and his motherless 
family kept together by the temporary shelter our asylum has 
, provided for their orphaned little ones. 

^' Entire orphans are in many oases 

*' Provided with Homes 

*' Where they are adopted as children of the family, the com- 
mittee making every suitable inquiry into the character and 
ability of the guardians, and maintaining a correspondence with 
tkem until they reach an age to'care for themselves. Commit- 
tees are appointed^from the Board of Managers to perform the 
several duties of providing for the wants of the familiy, such as 
purchasing supplies, receiving and putting out children, super- 
vising the school, etc., an executive committee for the transac- 
tion of business requiring unexpected and immediate attention, 
and such other not defined in the duties of other officers or com- 
mittees. 

" The entire 

" Board is divided into Committees 

" Of three, who, with one officer are required to visit the asy- 
lum, spending two afternoons each week, for one month, attend 
to the weekly supplies, assist in sewing and making up the 
clothing and bedding, and watch over the health, comfort and 
moral training of the children. 

" It is endeavoured to have every religious denomination of 
the city represented in the Board of Managers, and no sectarian 
or denominational influence is permitted in the teaching of the 
children. They attend the church of which the matron may be 
a member, and such Sunday schdol as may be deemed for any 
given time advisable. 

" It is the design and hope, as it has always been the en- 
deavor of the board of managers of this asylum, while rescuing 
from want and ignorance, to prevent from leading lives of crime 
and to rear for society out of these unfortunates committed to 
their care, worthy and useful citizens. 

« Mrs. WM. P. LYNDE, 

*• Secretary. 



139 

" Address Milwaukee Orphan Asylum, 350 Division street, 
Milwaukee/' 

THE NUMBER OF CHILDREN 

In the asylum at the commencement of the year 59 

Beceived during the year 25 

Making a total of 84 

Discharged during the year 84 

Leaving in the asylum at the close of the year 50 

THE BIRTH PLACE OF PARENTS 

Is as follows: 

England , 16 

Scotland .< 6 

Wales 4 

Ireland , 8 

Germany 25 

Norway and Sweden 7 

United States • 18 

Unknown , 5 

84 



THE RESIDENCE OF THE CHILDREN 

Was as follows: 

Milwaukee county 58 

Outagamie. . . .do 2 

Waushara do 1 

Rock do 1 

Walworth do 1 

Crawford do 1 

Racine do 1 

Dane do 2 

Dodee do : 1 

Fond du Lac . .do 8 

Illinois 3 

Massachusetts 2 

Unknown 7 

New York 1 



THE BIRTH PLACE OF THE CHILDREN 

Was as follows: 

Milwaukee 86 

Other places in Wisconsin 17 

Other places in United States 15 

Europe 11 

Canada. . / 4 

Unknown 1 

84 



140 



THS A6X8 OF THE CHILDBKN 

Were as follows: 

15 . .years 1 

14 do '. 1 

18 do 1 

12 do G 

11 do 8 

10 do 9 

9 do 9 

8 do 8 

7 do 8 

6 do 8 

5 do 9 

4 do 6 

8 do 4 

2 do 2 

2 infants ^ 



Average age, 7^. 

THE BECEIFTS AND EXPENDITURES 

*' For the past year were as follows: 



84 



RBCBIFTS. 

Cash on hand at the commencement of the year 

From board of children 

From pledged subscriptions 

Annual subscriptions and collections 

Donations 

Thanksgiving offerings from churches 

State of Wisconsin 

Milwaukee county 

Steamboat excursion 

Bequests , 

Jury fees. .^ 

Belief i\ind of Alexandria, 111 

Children's work, cane seating 

Interests on deposits, bonds and stock 



EXPEKDrrUBES. 

Cash for matron's salary 

Housekeeper's salary 

Teacher's salary 

For fuel, lights, clothing provisions and serv'ts 

For Milwaukee Iron Ck>mpany's bonds 

In bank 

On hand 



19,100 27 

749 20 

4,485 75 

636 91 

188 12 

856 85 

tOOO 00 

200 00 

251 70 

485 71 

8 00 

100 00 

86 82 

686 76 



(879 00 

215 00 

285 00 

5,408 28 

5,000 00 

6. 298 21 

690 90 



$18,226 89 



$18,226 89 



- * 



141 

The amount paid for current expenses was $6,237,28 which 
will b^ a cost per capita (53) of $117,68 for each orphan for the 
year, or $2.26 per week. 

The cost per capita for current expenses, for all who were 
subsisted in the house, (59) would be $105,71 per year, or $2.03 
per week. 

The cost of subsistence for the year was $2,384,39 which will 
be the cost per capita for each orphan of $45 per year, or 86cts. 
per week, and for each person subsisted in the house, $38.04 per 
year or 73cts. per week. 

This is a most 

ADMIRABLY MANAGEB INSTITUTION, 

And we are sure, it is accomplishing a large amount of good, 
and it is justly entitled to the sympathy and support of the peo- 
ple, and we rejoice to know that during the past year, contribu- 
tions ranging from 25 cents to two hundred dollars, have been 
received from more than one thousand inhabitants of the city 
of Milwaukee. 

The ]arge number of persons who contribute to its support 
gives evidence of the strong hold it has upon the confidence of 
the people of the city. 

The Asylum was visited by the Board on the second day of 
July last. It has a very pleasant location at the head of Davi- 
son street on Lake Michigan. It contained fifty-two inmates at 
the time of the visit. Every thing in and around the house, was 
neat and clean, and in perfect order, reflecting the greatest credit 
upon all connected with its management. 

It is gratifying to know that it is in a prosperous condition finan- 
cially, having good accomodations, all paid for, with money at 
interest or in stocks and bonds, and a handsome balance of cash 
in their treasury. 

The excellent women who have built up and are now sustain- 
ing this institution, are doing a noble work and they are doing 
it well. 



142 



VII.— SEAMAN'S BETHEL HOME, MILWAUKEE. 

This institution is under the charge of a society incorporated 
by the legislature of 1868. 

Chapter 160 of the private and local laws of that year, is as 
follows: 

"AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE WISCONSIN SEAMAN'S 

FRIENDS' SOCIETY. 

" TTie People of the State of Wisconsin^ repreaented in Senate 
and Assembly^ do enact as follmes: 

KAHKS OF CORPOBATORS, POWERS, BTC. 

" Section 1. That J. A. Dutcher, J. B. Bradford, J. B. Jud- 
son, H, R. Bond, Joshua Stark, T. T. Howard, D. A. Olin, U. 
Bachelor, W. S. Candee, G. B. Davidson and E. C. Kirtland 
and such other persons as may hereafter become associated with 
them, shall be and are hereby incorporated a body politic by 
the name of the ^ Wisconsin Seaman^s Friend Society,' and by 
that name shall have perpetual succession and power and 
authority to contract and be contracted with, to sue and be sued, 
and all common law powers of a corporation necessary or con- 
venient to the accomplishment of the objects of such cor- 
poration. 

MAT HOLD REAL ESTATE. 

^^ Section 2. The corporation hereby created may acquire by 
purchase, gift, devise or otherwise, and may hold, transfer, 
mortgage, and convey real estate and personal property, to be 
held and used for the purpose of furnishing aid and relief to 
sailors and the establishment of a sailors' home, with religious 
privileges and all things appertaining thereto, and said property, 
real and personal, shall be exempt from taxation. ~ 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Section 3. The affairs of the society shall be conducted by 



C4 



143 

a board of eleven directors, a majority of ^hom ghall constitute 
a quonini, and their duties and manner of election, shall be 
prescribed by the by-laws of said society. 

CAN MAKB BY-LAWS. 

" Section 4. The said society shall have power to make from 
time to time such by-laws, rules and regulations as shall be 
judged expedient and proper, for the election of officers, pre- 
scribing the duties and functions of tbe same, for the appointing 
of the times and places of meetings, filling vacancies in office, 
and for the proper management of the affairs of said society, so 
as to best accomplish the general objects of the same. 

SHAIXBSMAIN A BBNEYOLENT AND BELIGIOUB SOCIBTT. 

^' Section 5. This corporation shall always remain a benevo- 
lent and religious society, and no portion of the property or 
funds shall ever be used for the benefit of the incorporators, di- 
rectors or members thereof. 

" Section 6. It is hereby declared that in the judgment of 
the legislature, the objects of this corporation cannot be ob- 
tained by or under general laws. 

" Section 7. This act shall take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage, and is hereby declared to be a public act. 

" Approved February 29, 1868." 

The following communication from the officers of the society 
will give interesting facts relative to the 

history, etc., op the sailors^ bethel home. 

"Milwaukee, November 27, 1872. 

" Hon. S. D. Hastings: 

Secretary of the State Board of Charities and Jtrform: 

" Dear Sir: — ^Yours of the 25th inst., asking for a statement 
and history of the Sailors^ Bethel Home, was duly received, and we 
are glad of the opportunity of laying before' you a short state- 
ment of our work among a class ot men who had for years been 



144 

« 

entirely neglected in this port, without any one to look after or 
care for them, and left entirely in the hands of those whose only 
purpose was to strip them of their hard earned wages and kick 
them into the streets to be sent to the House of Correction or 
other penal institutions. For the purpose of benefiting this 
.class of our felllow beings, there was a society formed in the 
winter of 1867, and application made to the legislature for an act 
of incorporation, which act was passed ^' A bill to incorporate 
the Wisconsin Seamans' Friend Society," approved by the Gov- 
ernor Febauary 29, 1868. 
" In carrying on this work it, of course, was necessary 

" To Establish a Home^ 

*' And the Board of Directors purchased a piece of property 
which was built for and used as a hotel, it being situated near 
the river, and well located for a home. It was bought at a very 
low price — $5,760 — and about $2,000 ^expended in repairs. For 
the purpose of paying, the individual members of the Board 
solicited subscriptions among our citizens, and raised nearly 
$4,000. A mortgage was executed upon the property of $3,500, 
at 8 per cent, interest, (this incumbrance remains unpaid) ; there 
is also a floating debt of about $3,000. 

" The Objects of the Society 

"Are to provide a place where the sailor may find a home 
witjiout being obliged to go to the numberless dens of infamy 
and houses of death; to throw around him moral influences; to 
encourage him in saving his'earnings, in fact, to make him feel 
that there is some one who cares for his welfare and would do 
him good. In this we have been measureably successful, and 
our Bethel Home is increasing in favor in spite of the determ- 
ined efforts of the saloon-keepers, who surround us on every 
hand, and who do everything in their power to keep sailors 
away from our influence. We had in our home last year over 
1,300; the year between 1,000 and 1,100. Many that came 
were intemperate and went out reformed. We charge the same 
price for board that the whisky houses charge, which does not 



145 

remunerate us, and would not them without their profits on their 
liquor, combined with their stealings. Many come to us 

" Sick and Poor, 

" And are carod for. Shipwrecked sailors come, and we take 
care of them till they leave for their homes or ship again. 

^^Anstoers to Interrogatories. 

"When was the institution established? Fall of 1868. 
" Who was it established by? Wisconsin Seaman's Friend 
Society. 

" H«w is it governed? Board of 11 Directors. 

" How is it supported? Earnings and contributions. 

"To whom and how often do you report? To the society, at 
the annual meeting in the month of December. Five dollar 
contribution makes a member of the society. 

" Give names of officers. 

"J. A. Dutcher, President. 
" W. S. Candee, Secretary and Treasurer. 
" A. Scofield, Superintendent and Chaplain. 
" Mrs. Elliott, Matron. 

"Is the institution incorporated? Yes. 

"Date of incorporation? Approved February 29, 1868. 

"Location of property? Corner of Milwaukee and Erie 
streets. 

" Quantity of land? 70 feet front, 160 feet deep. 

" Description of building? Three story brick building, cov- 
ering full width of lot, containing 36 sleeping rooms, 2 sitting 
rooms, 1 reading room, 1 dining room and a chapel on the first 
floor, opening on the street, that will seat a hundred. 

" Value of the property? With building, full $10,000; with- 
out the building, $3,000; furniture, $2,000. Railroad changes 
and improvements have increased the value of the property. 

" In what name is the title? The Wisconsin Seaman's Friend 

Society. 

10— C. & R. (Doc. 13.) 



146 



^^ Is it all paid for? It is not. 

^' If any incumbrance, state amount and to whom due and 
when payable. Mortgage, $3,500, to the Northwestern Life 
Ins. Co., due Nov. 1, 1873. Floating indebtedness, to sundry 
persons, $3,000. 

" Respectfully submitted, 

" J. A. DUTCHER, President 
" A. ScopiKLD, Superintendent and Chaplain, 

From the 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



Of this institution, it appears that the 



From the 



REPORT OF THE CHAPLAIN. 



Balance in the treasury, Jan. 1, 1872. was 




$15 00 


Receipts at the Home for board and lodging 
durinfiT the year 




8,300 00 
3,180 25 


Collections and donations during tlie year, in- 
cludinfiT $1,000 from the State 






$4,561 83 
1,933 92 


The expenditures haye been as follows : 

For current exoenses 


$6,495 25 


Paid on indebtedness 






$6,495 25 


■ 


sss 


The amount paid for salaries and help is as 
follows : 

SuDcrintendent 




Matron 




Resular and extra heln 






$1,306 00 







Made to the annual meeiing of the society it appears that one 
thousand and eleven persons were entertained during the past 
year. 

Twenty of these were shipwrecked sailors or others entirely 
destitute, the entertainment of whom was an act of charity. 
The average time this latter class were entertained was five days. 
During the last six months, or since the Rev. A. Scofield Has had 



147 

the management of the place as superintendent and chaplain, 
the reports show the Home, under his admirable management, 
to have been self sustaining. 

The Home was visited by the board during the summer, and 
every thing was found in a satisfactory condition. 

THE INSTITUTION IS A MOST EXCELLENT ONE. 

To provide the seamen with a home .where all their wants can 
be supplied at a reasonable price, and where they will be under 
good influences while in port, and saved from the depredations 
of the land sharks who are ever on the watch to rob and ruin 
them, is a work which should secure the support and counte- 
nance of every good man and woman in the commimity. There 
IS no institution in the city more worthy of the countenance 
and support of its merchants and business men than the asso- 
ciation that has established and is now sustaining the Seaman^s 
Bethel Home. 



V. 



State Charitable and Correctional Insti- 



tutions. 



The following table will show the cost of these institutions 
from their organization to the present time: 



Nahi or Ihstitution. 



State Prison 

Institution for the Blind . . 
Institution for the Deaf and 

Dumb 

Wisconsin State Hospital 

for the Insane 

Industrial School for Boys . 
Soldiers* Orphans* Home. . . 
JN'orthern Hospital for the 

Insane 



Amoant prevlona 
to 1972. 



$856,691 54 
425,847 91 

899,989 00 

997,962 26 
882,900 50 
274,907 13 

251,000 00 



18,589,298 84 



Amoant appro- 
ated in 1872. 



$58, 993 47 
22,400 00 

37, 949 00 

*100,656 87 
*39. 506 00 
t32,400 00 

132,000 00 



$428,904 84 



Total. 



$915,685 01 
448,247 91 

487,988 00 

1,098,618 68 
422,406 50 
807,307 18 

388,000 00 



$4,013,208 18 



*Inclnding amount collected from counties. 

tlnclnding amoant appropriated for orplians in Normal Schools. 

THE APPBOPRIATIONS 

Hade to the State Charitable and Correctional Institutions 

in 1871, amounted to $480,856 17 

And in 1872 to 423,904 84 

$904,261 01 



Making a total in two years of nine hundred and four thou- 
sand two hundred and sixty-one dollars and one cent — well on to 
A million of dollars. 



149 

The state charitable and correctional institutions have be- 
come one of 

THE HOST IMPORTANT IlTrBSBSIB 

Of the state, and the entire people are deeply interested in 
their management pecuniarly and otherwise. 

The establishment of these institutions, the erection and fur- 
nishing of ^he buildings necessary for their accommodation, and 
the yearly cost of their support, involves the expenditure of 
large sums of money, and the welfare of the hundreds of unfor- 
tunate beings who are the inmates of these various institutions, 
is something that touches tender cords in the hearts of thou- 
sands of the citizens of the state. 

The relations of this Board to these institutions are of an 
exceedingly delicate, yet important character, and while we 
have endeavored to be faithful in the discharge of our duties, 
we have aimed to be courteous in our intercourse with all with 
whom we^have hud official relations, and to be candid and char- 
itable in all our judgments. 

We find in the fifth annual report of the Board of State 
Commissioners of Public Charities of the state of New York, 
presented to the legislature of that state in April last, some 
views that we think will be equally applicable to our own state, 
and hencp shall make a brief quotation therefrom. 

^ THS INTENTION OF THE LEGISLATURE, 

*^ As imj^lied in the act creating the Board of Charities, was 
of a two fold character, viz: first, to bring under a supervisory 
and extra official inspection all the charitable and correctional 
institutions of the state; and, secondly to exercise a vigilant 
« oversight of the manner in which the public funds appropriated 
to charitable uses are expended. Under this aspect of its du- 
ties, the Board of Public Charities is constituted the 

^ XOBAL STB OF THE STATE, 

^' And its adviser in relation to the management of all its ele- 
emosynary institutions. 



150 

" From these duties, and the necessarily large sphere of inves- 
tigation which they unfold, it will be perceived that, in order to 
discharge them faithfully, every department, however high or 
however humble, of every institution having a state foundation, 
becomes not only a proper, but a required field of observation 
for the criticism of the Board. Nor should it be assumed, by 
either the superintendents or managers of state institutions, be- 
cause inquiries are set on foot by the Board, whether in habitual 
or in new directions, that such inquiries carry with them neces- 
sarily any imputation of o£Scial mismanagement. 

" All public institutions are but so many trusts created by the 

* 

state for the benefit of its citizens, and its civtl government 
is under moral obligation to the people to watch, through 
official eyes, the details of execution with which such trusts 
are charged, 

" Mindful of the responsibilities thus devolving upon it, the 
Board has endeavored to discharge them in a faithlul manner, 
and always within the legitimate scope of its powers." 

In a further examination of the fifth annual report of the board 
of charities of the state of New York, we find some suggestions 
touching 

DIETARIES IS PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS, 

That strike us as exceeeingly valuable and important, and as 
applicable to the institutions of our state as to those of New 
York. ' 

We shall o£Per no apology for presenting these suggestions 
here, as we feel sure they will commend themselves to all who 
give them the least consideration: 

^^ It may be said of all our state institutions that their dieta- 
ries are, in general^ good, both as to quantity as well as quality 
of food. But this by no means implies that they are beyond 
the possibility of improvement. It is with the hope, therefore, 
of throwing out suggestions calculated to lead to experiment, 
rather than from any desire to animadvert captiously [upon an 



151 

old established system, that we venture to offer a few ideas up- 
on this subject. And, inasmuch as it is made the duty of the 
board to inquire into the management of all state institutions, 
it will be perceived that this subjer-.t comes legitimately 
within the purview of its statutory obligations. The difficul- 
ties in the way of arranging any dietary for a public institution 
upon a physiological basis, arise from two sources, viz: first, 
economy, and second, taste — economy, to meet the criticism of 
the public mind, and taste, to meet the demands of the inmates. 
So far as economy is concerned, it is a wise measure in itself, 
eveiy where, but in no field of application is it so likely to go 
amiss as in that of food. In fact, all investigations into this 
subject concur in shoeing that the majority of the working pop- 
ulation are, as a whole, underfed. The truth of* the observation 
may be found in the general character of the diseases presented 
by this class, and the underlying foundation of insufficient food, 
upon which so many of these diseases rest. Poverty may, pos- 
sibly be the first essential cause of limitation in quantity; but 
ignorance in the selection of food, militating, as it does against 
judicious variety, may in the end do as much harm as the mere 
incapacity to procure it in sufficient amount. Then, so far as 
taste is to be consulted, the duty of those having charge of pub- 
lic institutions is one of elevation ,^and not of simple acquiescence 
in the taste of their inmates, which tastes often are opposed to 
health*and should not, therefore, be indulged. 

" Let it be remembered, at the outset, that filling men is not 
necessarily, y66C?t«^ them. The appropriateness of food, as 
such, depends upon, not quantify alone, but also upon quality 
and variety^ and there is no escape from this law, consistent 
with health. Redundancy of inferior art cles of food does not 
compensate for either absence or paucity of nutritive constitu- 
ents. This is the 

" Grave Error^ 

" So commonly committed by the laboring population, who, 
from further ignorance in this respect apply the term " rich " to 
food, from metaphorical analogy to the prices asked for such 



152 

articles, whereas, in fact many of the most costly substances are 
in a nutritive point of view, of inferior value to cheaper ones. 
The sole physiological basis of value in food rests upon the 
presence and quantity of some proximate organic element. 
Wherever this is found in a form acceptable to digestion, the 
article is nutritious, whatever its price. 

" The dietaries of our public institutions are evidently intended 
to meet, in conjunction with economy, the habitual tastes of 
iheir inmates. 

^^ Those inmates are mostly from the laboring population. Can- 
not something be done, through the instrumentality of the in- 
Si^itutions in which they are placed, to 

" Mtform their Tastes^ 

" By supplying them with a larger range of dietary, and at the 
same time, not proportionably enhancing the cost of their sup- 
port ? In the list of articles which we have appended below, 
will it be said, for example, that farmers will not eat oatmeal 
because horses eat the whole grain ? On the same principle 
they should not eat corn meal. Again, in relation to Graham or 
unbolted wheat flour, there is 

" An Ignorant Prejudice 

^' Against it among the laboring class, who think only the 
finest and whitest wheat flour edible, when, in fact, the whole 
agricultural population of continental Europe and all its armies 
are almost exclusively fed on unbolted flour, not only wheat, but 
often of other grains, and no one^ certainly will question the 
healthy state of these populations. 

" We think, therefore, that the experiment, considering its 
inexpensive character, is worth trying, in all state institutions, 
of adding to their already established dietaries, some new 
articles, and thus educating, within the limits of a still present 
economy, those tastes for variety in food, which tend so largely 
to maintain heaith. There can be no doubt, as all physicians 
know, that the restricted diet of our agricultural population is 
at the foundation of most of those constitutional degenerations 



153 

which open the door to consumption, insanity, and a nameless 
host of diseases, whose seeds whether inherited, or self-produced, 
find a ready soil for development in all underfed people. 

" The persistent use of salted meats, whose most valuable 
constituents are abstracted by brine in proportion to the length 
of their immersion, and the omission to use vegetables in suf5- 
cient amount and variety, are the fruitful sources, of 

" Glandular Degeneration 

" And diathetic diseases in our laboring population. In re- 
lation to vegetable, it may be said that, in general, the starch 
^oup is used to excess, and not sufficiently counterbalanced by 
the cruciferoits leguminous and compositae families. 

" The carrot, parsnip, beet, tomato, cauliflower, salsify, let- 
tuce, cresses, leeks, onions, are not as generally used as they 
should be, when compared with the potato, rice, Indian meal, 
buckwheat, turnip and cabbage, even the last two being often 
in winter, inexcusably absent. And as to the acid fruits, they 
play but a small part in the general dietary among the laboring 
classes, although it is every day evident, in the cravings for 
them exhibited by dyspeptics, that they are among the most 
useful of substances in the chemistry of digestion. The rega* 
lation of food according to seasonal necessities is another of 
those problems not wisely considered in social life, which, if it 
were, would prevent many of those miscalled bilious disorders. 

^' Without desiring to do more than suggest, as was stated at 
the outset of these remarks, 

" The Possibility of Improving 

• 

" Our public dietaries, we venture to name a few articles 
which might be introduced into them. These articles aro nutri- 
tious, relatively inexpensive and easily obtained. The following 
list comprises the leading ones: 

^^ First, Oatmeal, in the form of stir-about or hasty-pudding, 
three mornings in the week, from Ootpber to April. This is, 
perhaps, the most nutritious and heat producing of all the 
cereals, and, by itself, is quite competent, when taken with 



154 

milk, to make a sufficient breakfast for a laboring man. Most 
of the laboring people of Scotland have no other. 

*' Second. Graham flour, made into bread, without sweeten- 
ing, and served daily at breakfast throughout the year. The 
presence of the phosphates in the unbolted wheat flour consti- 
tutes its great value as a nerve nourisher. 

" Third. Rye flour made into bread and served twice a 
week, from November to April. 

" Fourth. Fresh fish, once a week at least, the year round. 

" Fifth. Cheese, three times a week, the year round. 

^ Sixth. Chocolate twice a week, at breakfast or supper, 
from December to March. 

^^ Seventh. Milk, as an article of drink, separate from tea 
and coffee admixture, at supper daily. 

^' We assume that true coffee and tea are daily given in all 
our public institutions, and certainly, so far as the former' is 
concerned, it is one which, physiologically considered, subserves 
some of the highest purposes in the human economy, being not 
only a digestive stimulator, but also a tissue saver. Tea corres- 
ponds to it in many particulars, but in a far inferior degree. An 
army might endure a forced march upon a ration of coffee and 
biscuit alone, but it could not on tea, whatever its quality or 
strength. 

^^ All the above enumerated articles should be used to dimin- 
ish the quantity of certain substances now consumed in excess, 
such as molasses, salted meats, pork, fine wheat flour buckwheat 
and com meal, and in a nutritive point of view they are more 
than an offset.'' 

The suggestions here presented are matters which will attract 
the attention of every house-keeper in the state, and they must 
be of special interest to those who have immediate charge of 
our state charitable and correctional institutions. We regard 
it as quite 

WITHIN THE SAKGB OF POSSIBILITY 

to say the leasts that careful experiments in our state institu- 



156 

tions based upon these suggestions, may result not only in the 
improvement of the health of the inmates but in a reduction in 
the cost of subsistence. 

In the following pages will be found as required by law, a 
statement of the condition of each of the state charitable and 
correctional institutions, together with the opinion of the Board 
as to the appropriations proper to be made to each for the fol- 
lowing year, with such suggestions and recommendations, as we 
have felt it our duty to make. ' 



/ 

L— WISCONSIN INSTITUTION FOR THB EDUCATION 

OF THE BLIND. 

The entire number of pupils in the institution during the past 
year, was seventy-six, of whom forty-three were males and 
thirty-three females. The number in attendance in 1871 was 
sixty-eight; the average attendance fifty-one, and the average 
attendance last year fifty-seven. 

Although the average number of pupils was seven more in 1872 
than in 1871, the current expenses of the institution were con- 
siderably less. 

Current expenses in 1871 |21 ,168 94 

Current expenses in 1873 20,884 68 

♦779 41 



The cost of subsistence in 1871, was |5,591 89 

The cost of subsistence in 1872, was 4,548 08 

11,048 86 



t 



A decrease in the year 1872 of over one thousand dollars on 
the item of subsistence. 

A comparison between the quantity and cost of some of the 
leading articles of / 



156 



StrBSISTBNOE ANB CONSUMPTION 



in 1871 and 1872 may not be uninteresting: 



1871 
1872 

1871 

1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 

1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 



Bread and bread stuffs '. 

. . .do do 



Batter 
. . .do . 



Eggs. 
. . . .do 



Coffee 
. . . .do . 



Tea.. 
. . .do 



Sugar. 
. . .do . 



Beef, mutton, pork, etc 



do. 



Z 



Beef (included above) ..... . . 



Poultry 
. . .do . . 



Fish. 
. ^ . .do 



Fruit 
. . . .do 



Fuel . . 
. . . .do i 



Light 
> . . .do 



3,486 lbs. 

2.883 lbs. 

l,114idoz. 

788 doz. 

605 lbs. 

419 lbs 

166 lbs. 

185 lbs. 

4,200 lbs. 

8,453 lbs. 



14,925 lbs. 
15,854 lbs. 

11,871 lbs. 
14,282 Ids. 

299^ lbs. 
665 J lbs. 

625 lbs. 
655 lbs. 



2W/\j 
19 + 

16* 

14} f 

20 
23.6 + 

90 
70 + 



10 + 

7.3+ 

18 
10.4+ 

'3'A + 



1668 75 
790 83 

716 87 
549 32 

173 10 

114 57 

123 60 
98 97 

149 43 
130 68 

632 78 
423 98 

1,477 16 
1, 191 06 

1,200 13 
1,048 49 

40 76 
69 28 

40 40 

48 78 

818 84 
308 28 

3,440 27 
3, 191 60 

$78 41 
385 21 



In 1871, the institution was lighted with kerosene oil, in 1872 
with gas manufactured on the premises. 

The quantity and quality of the light in 1872, taken in connec- 
tion with its greater safety, would fully warrant the difference 
in cost. 



167 
The amount paid for salaries and wa^es 

In 1871 was $5,586 60 

In 1872 was 6,214 96 

An increase if 1872 of 628 86 

Tlie average cost per pupil for current expenses 

In 1871 was 414 97 

In 1872 was 857 62 

A saving on each one of 57 85 



The average cost per week for 



• 



1871 was 7 98 

1872 was 6 88 

Or a saving on each one per week of 1 10 

The average cost per pupil for subsistence 

1871 was ' 109 68 

1872 was 79 70 

A saving on each one of 29 93 

The average cost per week for 

1871 was 2 10 

1872 was 1 58 

A saving on each per week of 57 

The whole number of persons subsisted in the house, includ- 
ing ofiScers, employes and pupils, was 77, and the average cost 
of the subsistence of each one was $59 per year, or |1.13 per 
i^eek. 

BECEIPTS. 

The balance in the treasury- of the institution at ^the com- 
mencement of the fiscal year was $6 ,367 43 

Appropriation for current expenses of 1872 21, 000 00 

Appropriation for purchase of land 1, 400 00 

Receipts from work department, etc 1 ,034 65 

129. 802 08 
The disbursements for all purposes during the year have been 23 , 218 59 

Leaving a balance on hand of 16,583 49 



168 

DI8BUBSEMENX8. 

The disbursements, as classified in the report of the trustees, 
were for the following purposes: 

For amusements $82 31 

Apparatus and means of instruction 663 94 

Clothing 170 71 

Drugs and medicines, and medical attendance 103 59 

Fuel 3,191 60 

House furnishing 649 15 

Light (exclusive of fixtures) \ , 885 21 

Miscellaneous purposes (including |1,400 for land) 8,974 85 

Manufacturing expenses ^. . 667 10 

Repairs 1,152 27 

Permanent improvements 1 ,469 87 

Bubslstence 4,548 03 

Salaries and wages 6,214 96 

$28,218 69 



Deducting the amount of the following special expenditures 
will leave as properly chargeable to "current expenses/' 
$20,384.63. 

For land $1,400 00 

Lighting with gas 1,205 05 

Apparatus 179 00 

Superintendent's working fund 50 00 

$2,834 05 



ESTIMATES FOR 1878. 

The estimate of the trustees for current expenses to January 
31, 1874, is as follows: 

t'or Subsistence $5,488 00 

Salaries 4,925 00 

Wages 2,000 00 

Fuel 8,20000 

Lights 500 00 

Repairs 1,098 00 

House-furnishing 908 00 

Means of instruction 582 00 

Expense of bam and stable 650 00 

Miscellaneous purposes 1, 809 00 



db 



$20,500 OCi 

From an examination of this estimate of the trustees, we are 
satisfied that it has been carefully made, and that the amount 



159 

asked for is as small a sum as can reasonably be expected to 
pay the current expenses of the institution to the first of 
February, 1874. 

This board were of the opinion; all things considered, that it 
would be best to mak^ the appropriations for the current ex- 
penses of all the state charitable and penal institutions, to 
cover 'the period ending on the first day of April, 1874, but 
after consulting with the legislature visiting committee, and 
learning that they had decided that a more appropriate time 
would be the first of February, and that they would report 
appropriation bills accordingly; we have concluded to recom- 
mend appropriations for the same period. 

In the report the trustees say, " When the grounds of the in- 
stitution were fenced, a mistake was made by which a small 
piece of ground belonging to. Dr. R. S. Malony, was enclosed. 
Most of this lies directly between the house and the street. To 
regain possession of his property. Dr. Malony has commenced 
legal proceedings. 

He offers, however, to convey it to the institution upon re- 
ceiving payment at the rate of $200 per acre. There is little 
more than an acre of land.'^ 

They ask an appropriation of $250, to enable them to pur- 
chase this land of Dr. Malony, and thus save the expense and 
annoyance of legal proceedings, and we would recommend an 
appropriation accordingly, and also an appropriation of $20,500 
for current expenses from February 1, 1873, to February 1, 1874. 

The trustees, in their report, ask for an appropriation of 
$5,500 for the purpose of building a bam. Since the printing 
of the report they have notified the board that, at a subsequent 
meeting held for the purpose of considering the matter, they 
had decided to withdraw the request for the appropriation. 

THIS INSTITUTION WAS VISITED 

By one or more representatives of the board four times 
during the year, and at each visit everything in and around the 
building was found in a most satisfactory condition. 

The pupils were visited while engaged in their regular class 



160 

exercises. The teachers appeared to be well qualified for their 
positions, and the pupils were evidently making rs^Ad progress 
in their studies. 

Mr. Little, the able and experienced superintendent, is un- 
wearied in the discharge of his laborious and responsible duties, 
and with the aid of those he has called around him, we feel 
assured the institution is accomplishing the good work for which 
it was organized. 



n.— WISCONSIN INSTITUTION FOR THE EDUCATION 

OF THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

The whole number of pupils in attendance upon this institu- 
tion during the past year was 164; the number in attendance at 
the close of the year October 1, 1872, was 144, 80 boys and 57 
girls, and the average number in attendance during the year 
was 137. 

EPPENDITURES IN 1871, 

The amount expended for current expenses during the fiscal 
year ending October Ist, 1871, was as follows, as classified in the 
report of the trustees for that year: 

Provisons and groceries |5 ,910 90 

Meat 2,535 67 

Building and repairing. 1 ,255 32 

Balaies 11,221 83 

Wages 1,979 84 

Dry goods 1 , 576 83 

Cabinet shop 287 18 

Shoe shop 874 13 

Fuel and light ; 3,813 92 

Farm, barn and stock 696 50 

Steam fixtures 867 54 

Pupils 663 20 

Books 528 60 

Furniture and hardware 1 ,164 97 

Insurance and trustees expenses. ,, 1 ,923 38 

Freight, drugs and miscellaneons 428 96 

$85,780 77 



161 

EXPENDITURES IN 1872. 

The amount expended for current expenses for the year 1872, 
as reported by the trustees, is as follows: 

For Means of instruction |454 82 

Clothing 817 60 

Drugs and Medicines 104 06 

Farm expenses 491 07 

Fuel 2,886 87 

House furnishing 2 , 109 06 

Livestock 130 00 

Lights (exclusive of fixtures 2M 25 

Liquors 7 28 

Manufacturing expenses 1, 000 27 

Miscellaneous purposes 1 ,789 77 

Repairs 1,701 21 

Permanent improvements 691 85 

Subsistence 7,617 14 

Salaries and wages 14,720 19 

»34,174 87 
APPROPRIATION FOR 1872. 

The amount appropriated by the last legislature for current 
expenses, was $37,949.00; the amount expended was but 
$34,174.37, a decrease of $3,774.63. 

The trustees were authorized by chapter 123, of the general 
laws of 1872, to expend the sum of $1,500 in the purchase often 
acres of land, about eighty lods distant from the institute build- 
ing, provided the amount could properly be saved from the sum 
appropriated for current expenses. 

The purchase has not been made, and we think the trustees 
acted wisely in not making it. 

The current expenses of the institution were $1,556.40 less in 
1872 than in 1871, although the average nember of pupils in at- 
tendance in 1872 was ten more than in 1871. 

8UBSISTBNCB. 

The cost of subsistence in 1871 was 18,446 57 

And in 1872 it was 7,617 14 



The average cost of subsistence for each pupil for the year 
1871 was $66.51, or $1.27 per week. 

11— C. & R. (Doc. 13.) 



162 

The average cost for the year 1872, was $55.60, or $1.07 per 
week; g 

The average cost of the entire 

CUBRENT EPPENSE 

For each pupil for the year 1871, was $281.34, or $5.41 per 
week; for the year 1872, it was $249.44, or $4.80 per week. 

We present a statement of the quantity and cost of some of 
the- leading articles of subsistence purchased in 1871 and 1872. 

COMPARISON BETWEEN 1871 AND 1872, 

In 1871 the amount and cost of breadstu£Fs was as follows: 

210 bbls. flour, average cost $5.50 |1,155 OO 

12W cwt buckwheat flour 2.50 81 25 

20 cwt. Qraham flour 2.25 45 OO 

2,000 lbs. com meal 1.50 per cwt 80 UO 

1 ,000 lbs. crackeiB Ocents 00 00 

♦1,821 25 

In 1872, the amount and cost was as follows: 

158 bbls. flour (6.28 $M8 75 

5 bbls. buckwheat r. 7.00 85 00 

8 bbls. Graham flour 45 63 

1,650 lbs. corn meal 22 16 

619 lbs. crackers 46 28 

11,182 75 



Forty barrels of flour were purchased in 1872, and not in- 
cluded in the above statement, as the person from whom it was 
purchased failed to present his bill before the accounts for the 
year were made up. This would make the cost of breadstuff's 
about the same for both years. A quantity of potatoes, costing 
about the same as the forty barrels of flour, were paid for in 
1872, which will not be consumed until 1873, which will make 
the amount paid for subsistence during the year substan- 
tially correct. 

In 1872 the aggregate cost of meat was $438.16 less than in 
1871, although an average of ten persons more were fed in 1872 
than in 1871. 



168 



The amount and cost of •osio of the 
during the two years is as follows: 



leading articles used 



1871 

1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 

1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 

1871 
1873 



17,064 lb. 
14,566}^ lb. 

4,500 lb. 
5, 887 lb. 

1,000 lb. 
351^1^ lb. 



500 
60 

499 
471 



lb. 
lb, 

lb. 
lb. 



1,000 lb. 
849 lb. 



309 lb. 
748^ lb 



781 
1,308 



lb. 
lb 



4,800 lb. 
5, 856 lb. 



1,560 dz. 

1,866 dz. 

8,065 lb. 

8,163 lb. 



350 tons 
350 tons 

80 cd. 
68;gcd. 



Fresh beef, 
...do 



Salt beef. 
. . .do. . . . 



Mutton 
. . . do . 



Fresh pork 
...do 



Veal.. 
. . . .do. 



Sausage 
. . .do?. . 



Salt pork 
— do. . . . 



Salt fish, halibuts white fish. . 
Fish, dr. beef, ham, oysters, ice. 



Poultry, 
...do... 



Butter 
. . . .do. 



Eggs 



Sugar 



Trustees, and insurance. 
— do do 



Coal . 
. . . .do. 

Wood 
....do. 



Salaries and wages. 
...do do ... 



♦ 09.7+ 
08.97 

07 
06.39 

10 
08 

10 
09.1 

10 
08 

13.5 
11 + 

08!l6 + 



10.5 
09.6+ 

33 
19.8 + 

13.5 
13.1 + 

13.7 + 
11.7+ 



10 85 .... 
10 05 

5 00 

470+... 



11,658 40 
1,806 43 

815 00 

888 76 

100 00 
30 13 

50 00 
5 46 

49 90 

37 73 

135 00 
88 81 

36 13 
68 86 

184 50 
310 31 

76 75 
115 83 

946 00 
1,064 87 

195 00 
179 58 

1,037 00 
959 45 

1,935 88 

889 00 

3,713 50 
3,513 50 

400 00 
834 37 

13,301 67 
14, 730 19 



164 



8TA.TBMXNT OF FIKAKCB8. 

The balance in the hands of the treasurer of the institute on 
the first day of October, 1871* was |2,606 42 

Amount in tne State Treasury of the previous yearns appropri- 
ation since paid over 11, 432 00 

Beceived from the State Treasurer on account of the appropri- 
ation of 1872 28,461 75 

Received from the Principal of the Institute, receipts trom the 
shops and other sources 724 52 

$48,224 69 
The amount disbursed for all purposes during the year was. . . 84,174 37 

Leaving in the hands of the treasurer, October 1, 1872 $9,050 33 

ESTIMATES FOR 1878. 

The estimate of the trustees for current expenses to April 1, 
1874, is as follows: 

Amusements and means of instruction $400 00 

Clothing and expenses of indigent pupils 1 ,000 00 

Drugs and medicines 100 00 

Farm , barn and stock 800 00 

Fuel 8,500 00 

House furnishing 2,250 00 

Lights 500 00 

Miscellaneous 1 ,550 00 

Repairs 1,600 00 

Permanent improvements 700 00 

Subsistence 9 , 8$^4 00 

Salaries and wages 16, 155 00 

$38, 879 00 

We notice that in the above estimate the amount asked for 
the following purposes, is in excess of the amount expended last 
year, as follows: 



Fuel 

Light 

^Subsistence 

Salaries and wages 



Cost for 1872. 



$2,886 87 

254 25 

7,617 14 

14,720 19 



Asked for 
1873. 



$8,500 

500 

9,824 

16,155 



Excess. 



$663 13 

245 75 

2,206 86 

1.434 81 



The amount paid for salaries and wages in 1872 was $1,518.52 
in excess of what was paid in 1871. 



^ 165 

The reasons assigned for asking this excess are as follows: 

Fuel. — The contract last year was a more favorable one than 
they have any reason to expect next year. More wood will be 
needed next year than was lised last year. The building has not 
been fully heated. y 

lAghtB. — The cost of gasoline is nearly double what was for- 
merly paid for it, and it is thought the additional cost for lights 
will be quite what is asked for. 

Subsistence. — Calculation is made for an increase of at least 
fifteen pupils, and some allowance is also made for fluctuation in 
prices. 

Salaries. — ^The peculiarities of the work of this institution 
and the necessity of training the teachers and the keeping of 
them after they ar^ trained, compels a scale of prices^ without 
which, instructors of a certain kind, could not be secured or 
retained, and without which the institute could not accomplish 
its work. The maximum of this scale is not reached until the 
fifth year. 

The most of the instructors board themselves which makes 
the salaries higher than they would otherwise be. 

An increase was made ki the salaries last year and another 
increase must be made this year. 

All but one of the teachers will reach his maximum of salary 
next year, so that this large increase will not occur again, unless 
the Institute becomes enlarged to a number greater than 160 
pupils. 

October 1st, 1872, there was in the hunds of the treasurer of 
the institute f9,050 82 

And in the state treasury, of the appropriation of last winter 
undrawn 9,487 25 

Making a total of ^18,687 67 

This amount will be sufficient to pay the expenses of the in- 
stitute to the first of April, 1873. 

In case the legislature conclude to provide for the expenses 
of the state institutions to the first of April, 1874, we would 



reoommend the appropriation asked for, |88,379, but in the 
event the conclusion is to appropriate only to the first day of 
February, 1874, then the amount seeded will be one-sixth less 
or $31,982 50, which we think will be sufficient for current ex- 
penses from April 1st, 1873 to February 1st, 1874. 

The trustees ask for an appropriation of $35,000 for an[enlarge- 
ment of the building. 

We are aware that there are inconveniences growing out of 
the limited size of the kitchen, laundry and dining room, bat 
they are far less than the inconvencies from similar causes in 
some of the other state institutions. 

From a careful examination of the dormitories we are satis- 
fied that from fifteen to twenty more children can be accommo- 
dated without any very serious inconvenience, and without 
crowding to anything like the extent the boys at the industrial 
school of Wauhesha are now and have been for some time past 
crowded. 

If the funds of the state were in a condition to admit of it, we 
would recommend an appropriation with a view to an enlarge- 
ment of the building, believing that by the time it could be 
completed, there would be need for it, but we seriously ques- 
tion whether an enlargement of the size contemplated, provid- 
ing accommodation for double the number of pupils now in the 
institute, will be needed for several years to come. 

We would recommend that the trustees have prepared a plan 
for the proposed enlargement, with estimates of the cost, and 
that they submit the same to the governor. 

This institution was visited four times during the year, by one 
or more representatives of the board. 

At each visit everything was found in a most satisfactory con- 
dition. 

The board were present at 

THB CLOSING EXEBCldSd OF THE SCHOOL 

On the 13th of June, 1872. These exercises were of an ex- 
ceedingly interesting character. The first class examined was 
that of Miss Johnson. The childrvft entered the school in the 



167 

month of September, 1871, and hence had received but ten nustnths 
instruotion. The progress they had made in this short time-was 
most gratifying. 

The penmanship of the children was excellent when it is con- 
sidered that they knew nothing of the formation of letters 
before entering the institution. 

One of the boys was told to write on the black-board 

WHAT HE HAD LEARNED ABOUT GOD. 

He promptly wrote, in a plain and distinct hand, as follows: 

*' God made animals. 
God is very ^od. 
God is merciful to sinners. 
God wishes ns to do good. 
God will forrive us if we pray to him. 
We must be humble and patient. 
We must be kind and pleasant. 
God will love us if we do right" 

THE NEXT CLASS BXAMIKED, 

Was that of Prof. Schilling. This class had been in the in- 
stitution twenty months. One of the boys was told to select 
some subject and write about it on the black-board. He se- 
lected "The Goat," and wrote as follows: 

** I write about the goat. 
A goat walks on the ground. 
He goes to the looking glass. 
He fights a rooster. 
The rooster bite his nose. 
He hooks at the rooster. 
The rooster flies away." 

The boy continued his essay at some length in which he gave 
an account of a contest a goat once had with a looking glass the 
goat taking the reflection in the glass to be another goat. 

Another boy drew on the black-board from memory, a very 
fair map of the New England states; and another drew a map 
of the middle states. Others gave the names of the mountains, 
lakes, rivers, and chief cities of the different states embraced in 
the maps. Another did a difficult sum in arithmetic, and 



168 

another wrote a description on the black-board of a piotore that 
was handed to him. 

About forty children entered the school in September, 1870 
Among the number were two that were thought to be almost 
idiotic. These two were examined, and showed that thej had 
made considerable progress. They wrote on the black-board 
answers to questions that were asked them. Thej also wrote 
down figures and added them together. The examination of 
Miss Eddy's 

CLASS IN ABTICITLATION 

Was witnessed with the deepest interest by the large audi- 
ence who were present. The class was addressed by the teach- 
er in her natural voice and told to do various things. She 
was understood and her requests complied with. They all read 
in an audible voice sentences that were written on the black- 
board. They were given the name of a person in the audience. 
He was pointed out to them and they were told to describe him 
which was done something as follows: 

" Mr. A, is a large man. 
His hair is brown. 
His coat is black. 
He is good. 
He is very pretty. 
He smiles. 
His hands are clean. 
His shoes are black. 
His stockings are white. 
He is writing on a paper." 

THB CLASS LAST EXAMINED 

Was that of Professor Valentine's. One of the girls recited 
some poetry in sign language. It was well done. The class 
answered questions showing an excellent knowledge of the 
constitution of the United States, and the constitution of the 
state of Wisconsin. They also answered questions showing a 
good knowledge of book-keeping. 



169 

THB BEY. DB. CHAPIN, 

One of the trustees, gave an account in sign language of 
something that occurred in a recent visit he had made to the naval 
school at Annappolis. After watching him until he was through, 
two of the pupils wrote the whole account on the black-board, 
showing that they had good memories and an excellent command 
of language. 

The favorable impressions of this institution, made by our 
visits of the previous year, have been more than confirmed by 
subsequent visits. Although it is unpleasant to sec so many 
children and youth deprived of the power of speech and hear- 
ing, yet there is so much that is pleasant and cheerful, and inspir- 
ing — so much that is suggestive of comfort and happiness, so 
much that gives evidence of the good work that is being done 
here, that our visits are always pleasant, and we leave the insti- 
tution strongly impressed with the feeling that it is in the charge 
of those who appreciate the work in which they are engaged, 
and whose great aim is to benefit those under their charge. 

Mr. Weed, the principal, has now been in charge of the insti- 
tution nearly two years, and we should not do justice to our 
own feelings should we fail to express our high appreciation of 
the admirable manner in which he is discharging his duties. 
We regard the trustees as exceedingly fortunate in securing his 
services, and we trust his connection with the institution will 
long continue. 



III.— WISCONSIN STATE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE- 

• 

This institution was visited four times during the past year by 
the Board, or some representative thereof, and at each visit 
evidcmce of the watchful care of the officers, and of the genera 
prosperity of the institution was seen on every hand. ^ 

The following table, taken from the report of the superin- 
tendent will show the important facts in relation to the 



170 



POPULATIOIT OF THE HOBPirAL 



During the past year: 



Patients in hospital, September 90, 1871. 

Admitted during the year 

Whole number treated 

Discharged recovered , 

Discharged improved 

Discharged unimproved 

Died , 

Whole number discharged 

Remaining September 80, 1872 

Daily average under treatment 



Male. 


Female. 


173 


182 


93 


73 


265 


256 


84 


26 


19 


7 


19 


18 


11 
83 


14 
65 


182 


191 


178 


189 



ToUI. 



355 

166 

521 

60 

26 

87 

25 

148 

373 

365 



The following table will show the whole number of patients 
each year, the average number at the end of each year, and the 
annual expense of each patient and the expense per week for 
each year the hospital has been in operation: 



'ViEAn 


Whole 


AveraKe 


No. at end 




nam1»er. 


nomber. 


of year. 


1860 


45 


7 


41 


1861 


147 


90 


103 


1862 


192 


117 


131 


1863 


254 


162 


188 


1864 


800 


187 


170 


1865 


257 


179 


177 


1866 


272 


181 


180 


1867 


294 


185 


180 • 


1868 


855 


203 


246 


1869 


455 


810 


864 


1870 


532 


362 


860 


1871 


524 


859 


855 


1872 


521 


365 


873 



Cnrrent expenses 
each year. 



$8,875 89 
21,602 18 
22,038 49 
81,716 86 
85,311 12 
47,309 78 
40,495 60 
44,118 87 
46,818 00 
71,820 08 
80,518 37 
76,890 61 
86,770 56 



$606,785 91 



Anneal ex- 
pense per 
patient. 



$240 08 
196 90 
195 75 
188 88 
264 30 
228 73 
286 28 
230 62 
280 06 
223 66 
214 18 
237 78 



Bxpense 
per week 
per pa^nt 



$4 61 
8 79 
8 75 
8 68 
08 
30 
50 
43 
42 
30 
12 
57 



5 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 



171 



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172 

Of the 373 patients in the hospital at the close of the fiscal 
year, 270 were regarded as incurable^ 138 males and 152 fe- 
males; and but 83 curable, 44 males, and 39 females. 

The amount expended for current expenses during the past 
year, including ordinary repairs to the building and heating ap- 
paratus, bedding, furniture and clothing for patients, was 
$86,770.56. 

The average number of patients was 365, and the average 
number of persons subsisted in the house, exclusive of visitors^ 
was 448. 

This latter number is made up in this way: 

Patients 365 

Officers and employes 75 

Not employed 4 

Carpenters, painters, masons, plasterers and boiler makers, amount- 
ing to 4 persons 4 

THE ENTIBE EXPENDITURES 

For the year, as classified by the superintendent, were as fol- 
lows: 

For amusements and means of instruction |7 ,235 51 

Clothing 7,235 61 

Drugs and medicines 927 22 

Farm expenses 2,805 36 

Fuel 11.091 80 

House furnishing 6,371 81 

Live stock 356 00 

Lights (exclusive of fixtures) 1 ,145 25 

Liquors 1,109 60 

Miscellaneous purposes 4,272 85 

Repairs— ordinary 8,692 35 

Repairs extraordinary and new furniture 4,814 46 

Permanent improyements and real estate 10 ,021 86 

Subsistence 24,741 04 

Salary and wages 22,890 63 

|ia5,975 78 



173 



The expenditures for 



SUBSISTENCE 



During^ the past year were as follows: 

For Meat |7,067 75 

Flour 8,473 10 

Butter 4,088 28 

Sugar 2,893 88 

Meat 1,207 27 

Tea 1,144 91 

Coffee 1,014 97 

Egffs 799 46 

Pish and oyters 769 55 

Vegetables 91 2 16 

Small groceries and spices 569 49 

Poultry 877 03 

Cheese 279 37 

Rice 229 88 

Syrup 225 80 

Crackers 186 00 

Vinegar 73 61 

$24,741 94 



The following is 



A COMPABISON 



Between the quantity and cost of some of the leading articles 
used in the hospital in 1871 and 1872: 



1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 



676 bbls. 
691! l3bls. 

2,967 lbs... 
2,809ilbs.. 



8,675 lbs... 
l,996ilbs.. 



162,170 lbs... 
168,677 lbs... 



18, 877 J lbs.. 
26,550 lbs... 



6.838doz.. 



4,883 lbs.. 
4,806 lbs.. 



1,894 lbs.. 
1,648 lbs.. 



Pamily flour, in bulk. 
. . . .do 



Crackers 
...do... 



Cheese 
...do.. 



Beef, on foot 
...do 



Butter 
...do. 



Eggi 



s . 
o. 



Coffee 
...do. 



Tea 



$4 
5 



.do 



90 
67i 

06i 
06i 

18 

14 

04i 
03x^0 

17 
15J 

11 

19 
28} 

87 
75 



12,846 55 
8,856 86 

174 88 
186 00 

509 60 
279 87 

6,864 66 
6,788 40 

8,210 47 
4,038 28 

765 55 
799 46 

866 63 
1* 014 07 

1 ,395 79 
1,144 91 



174 
Comparative 7a&/e— continued. 



1871' 
1872 



1871 
1873 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 



1872 



1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 

1872 



1871 
1872 



18, 868 lbs.. 
10,808 lbs.. 

10,000 lbs.. 

9,740 lbs.. 

212 lbs.. 

240 lbs.. 

8,245 lbs.. 
4.284 lbs.. 



4,622 lbs.. 
2,881 lbs.. 



65 gals. 

129 gals. 

21 gals. 

91} gals- 



26} gals 

2824 gals. 

96} gals. 

85 gals. 

l}doz. 



457} lbs.. 
668} lbs.. 



Brown sngar. 
White. ..do.. 



Brown., do. 
CJoffee. ..do. 
Crashed, do. 
Pulver'd do 



Poultry. 
. . .do. . , 



Rice . 
. . .do, 



Fish and oysters 
. . .do . . . do. . . . 



Drugs and medicines. 
. . .do. . . . do 



Alcohol 

Bourbon whisky. 
Cabinet whisky . 

Wine...* 

Ale and beer . . . . 



Brandy . . . 
Whisky. . . 

Wine 

Cider 

Sour wine 
Beer 



Tobacco 
...do... 



Salaries and wages 
. . .do. . . . do 



Trustees and visiting 
committees' ezp's 

Trustees and visiting 
committees' exp's 



Light. 
...do, 



11 
18 



11,665 29 
1,455 27 



iVM 



2 15 
8 82 
6 00 
4 42 



9 
2 
2 



61| 



91 
25 
18 00 



61 
55| 



,114 67 

1,217 67 

28 09 

88 00 



$118 70 

428 50 

126 00 

402 11 

55 00 



$252 50 

498 98 

280 84 

21 20 

81 50 

25 00 



8,020 66 



2,893 88 
319 80 
377 08 

421 83 
229 88 

1,031 88 
759 65 

776 17 
927 22 



1,130 31 



1,110 02 
283 47 
870 85 

21,973 62 
22,890 88 



1,138 15 

418 05 

1,801 88 
1,145 26 



In the report of the Superintendent will be found a detailed 
statement of all expenditures audited by him. 
The following is a 



176 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITUBES 

audited by the Board of Trustees, and not included in the re- 
port of the Superintendent, except in the aggregate: 

For trustees and visiting committee expenses $418 05 

85 acres of land 8,506 60 

Livery for use of trustees visting commi^ 84 00 

Insurance and inspection of steam boiled. 113 50 

Rent of Farwell place 800 75 

Abstracts of title and recording deeds. : . . 88 85 

Expenses attending Dr. Marshall's death and fVineral as 
follows : 

Casket and funeral expenses $188 00 

Telegraphing 60 14 

Livery 80 00 

268 14 

Expense of entertaining commissioners of public chari- 
ties of 111., (hotel bill) 26 87 

Expenses of entertaining association of superintendents 
of the insane, as follows: 

Steamboat excursion on lake.. 8 00 

Omnibusses and coaches 83 00 : . . . 

Livery 185 00 

176 00 

For artificial leg for patient whose leg was broken in the 

hospitol 76 45 

14,947 21 



176 



The following table, furnished by the Superintendent in his 
annual report, will show the 

PBODUCTIOXS OF THB FABM AND GABBEN, 

And their value, with the cost: 



462 bush. 

1,420 bush. 

1,280 bush. 

126 tons. 

60 tons. 

40 tons. 

600 bush. 

1,032 bush. 

76 bush. 

1,664 bush. 

276 bush. 

80 bush. 

40 bush. 

86 bush. 

200 bush. 

26 bush. 

10 bush. 

76 bnsh. 

60 bush. 

600 lbs . . 

1 ton. . 

8,000 heads 

600 heads 

64 galls. 

6 bbls. 

26 bush. 

17,010 lbs.. 

7,260 !bs.. 

881 lbs . . 



29,289 qts. . 
62 head. 



Wheat " .. 

Oats 

Com 

Tame Hay 

Straw 

Com Btakls 

Potatoes 

Carrots 

Early Turnips 

Flat Turnips 

Beets 

Parsnips 

Beans 

Sweet Corn 

Tomatoes 

Green Beans 

Green Peas ■ 

Onions 

Apples 

Grapes 

Pie plant 

Cabbage 

Cauliflower 

Maple Sugar 

Vinegar 

Strawberries 

Pork (live weight) 

Stock Hogs 

Veal 

Asparagus, Lettuce, Cucumbers, Cur 

rants, etc 

Milk 

Cattle pastured 



Total 



11 80 
26 
36 

10 00 



4 
4 



00 

00 

46 

86 

40 

80 

80 

40 

8 60 

40 

00 

00 

00 

60 

46 

10 

40 

6 

8 

1 00 

10 00 

4 80 

4 00 

8 00 

8 



1 
1 
1 
1 



6 
14 00 



Cost of feeding cows 

manucl labor 

team labor (|1 per day) 

feeding teams 

board for manual labor 

seeds of all kinds . 

blacksmithing 

tools, implements and repairs. 



$808 80 
646 89 
416 60 
468 60 
864 00 
199 14 
89 70 
218 46 



$662 60 

866 00 

420 60 

1,260 00 

200 00 

160 00 

226 00 

861 20 

80 00 

469 20 

82 60 

82 00 

140 00 

84 00 

200 00 

26 00 

10 00 

112 60 

22 60 

60 00 

40 00 

160 00 

40 00 

64 00 

60 00 

120 00 

680 UO 

216 00 

80 48 

200 00 

1,464 00 

728 00 



$8,664 80 



$3,271 09 
$6,288 71 



177 

The jearly , cost per capita for current expenses for the past 

year, on the average number of patients was $287 73 

or $4.67 per week. 
The yearly cost per capita for current expenses on the whole 

number connected with the hospital was 198 68 

or $8.72 per week. 
The yearly cost per aipita for subsistence for the past year on 

the average number of patients was 67 78+ 

or $1.80+ per week. 
The yearly cost per capita for subsistence on the whole number 

subsisted, was 55 22— 

or $1.06+ per week. 



THE ESTIMATE FOR CURRENT EXPENSES 

For the year ending January 1, 1874, is as follows: 

Subsistence $24,000 00 

Salaries and wages 23,000 00 

Fuel 10,000 00 

Farm and bam expenses 2, 500 00 

Drugs, medicines and liquors 1,500 00 

Light and oil 1,200 00 

Amusements and entertainments 500 00 

Papers, periodicals, stationery and postage 600 00 

Bedding and furniture 6, 000 00 

Clothing for patients 6,000 00 

Repairs for building and heating apparatus 5 ,000 00 

Trustees and visiting committee expenses 700 00 

$80,000 00 

ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS 

Are needed for the following purposes: 

For repairs on laundry, and boiler rooms and additions 
thereto, including new coal house and smoke stacli;, in 

consequence of Are *. . . . $25,875 00 

(When the trustees made the estimate for the above, as set 
forth in their report, the bills were not all in, add their 
estimate was below the cost.) 

For carpenter and work shop 2,500 00 

For hose and connections 1, 500 00 

For increasing supply of water 2,000 00 

$111,875 00 
To meet these expenditures there will be received 
the amount charged to counties,for maintenance 

of patients, clothing, etc $29, 552 00 

Amount that will be received from friends of pa- 
tients for maintenance and clothing, estimated at 8 ,500 00 

83,052 90 



$78, 822 10 



12— C. & R (Doc.18.) 



178 

hemwing the amoant necessarjr to be appropruUed firom the StaUS 
Treasury to pay the corrent expenses of the hospital and for 
other purposes as abore set forth to January 1, 1^4 178,822 10 

Or if the appropriation should be made to cover the expensea 
to February 1, 1874, one- twelfth of the amount required for 
current ezpen<K.s, to wit, $6,666.66 should be added, making 
the amount of the appropriation needed 85 ,4 88 76 

The trustees ask for an appropriation payable one half in 
1873 and the balance in 1874, for the purpose of erecting two 
wings, one on the east end of the present building, and the 
other on the west end« 

We are of the opinion that it will not be long before it will be 
the duty of the state to provide for the enlargement asked for, 
but in view of the embarrassed condition of the state finances, 
and of the fact that the opening of the Northern Hospital will 
furnish accommodations for all or nearly all of the insane in the 
state who are proper subjects for hospital treatment, as shown 
by the statistics gathered from towns and counties, published in 
this report, we cannot recommend any action in this direction at 
the present session of the Legislature. 

In the report of the trustees they say, ^' on the 8th of Au- 
gust last, the laundry, with all its machinery, was 

" DBSTBOTED BY FI&E, 

" The fire also destroying the wooden building attached to 
the coal house adjoining the boiler house, used for storing coal, 
with seventy- ffve tons of coal that were in it at the time, and 
also seriously damaging the boilers and the connecting steam 
pipes. 

^^ The exigencies of the case 

^^ DEMANDED IMMEDIATE ACTION 

"In order to keep the hospital running, and to provide for the 
repair of the boilers and renewal of steam pipes, before the ap- 
proach of cold weather, as without this there would be no way 
to save the inmates of the hospital from suffering." 

The trustees were immediately called together, and they de- 
cided to proceed at once to rebuild and repair. 



179 

Although as a general rule, the trustees of our state institu- 
tions should not erect buildings, or incur any extraordinary ex- 
pense, without the express authority of law, we are of the opin- 
ion that this was a special emergency which fully justified the 
course taken by the trustees, and we doubt not will be sanc- 
tioned by the legislature 

The trustees in their report, in speaking of Dr. McDill, say, 
" In the report of the superintendent, we received the not un- 
expected notice of his 

BBSIGKATION, 

" To take effect in the month of February. He leaves us to take 
his seat in the 43d congress, as the representative of the eighth 
congressional district. He will enter upon new and important 
duties, but not more arduous or responsible than those he leaves. 
Gladly would we have retained him with us, but as he has cho- 
sen this new sphere of labor, we can ask nothing better for him 
than that his labors may be as satisfactory and successful there 
as they have been here. His loss from the hospital will be 
deeply regretted by all connected with the institution." 

We can cordially unite with the trustees in their kind ex- 
pressions in relation to Dr. McDill, and in their regret in losing 
him from the hospital, and our earnest desire is that success and 
prosperity may attend him in his new sphere of labor. 

While visiting the hospital at different times, and inquiring 
into its management, we have been impressed with the convic- 
tion that the superintendent had 

TOO MUCH PSBSONAL LABOR 

To perform, in connection with the purchasing of supplies, 
the settling of accounts, and other outside matters. The chief 
executive officer of so large an establishment, embracing a pop- 
ulation of almost four hundred and fifty persons, more than 
three hundred and fifty of whom are invalids, should not have 
his time and personal attention occupied with the details of 
business that can be attend. d to by a person whose services are 
of far less value. 



180 

The superiDtendent, while he should hav^e the oversight and 
control of everything, should be so situated that he can give 
his best thoughts and his chief attention to the care of the hun- 
dreds who are in the hospital, with the hope that through its 
remedial agencies they may be restored to health of body 
and mind. 

We notice that not only the organic act, but the by-laws of 
the hospital, provide for the employment of a steward, and we 
trust that simultaneously with the election of the superin- 
tendent to suceed Dr. McDill, a competent steward will be em- 
ployed, who will relieve the new superintendent of much 
of the outside labor that has been so well performed by 
Dr. McDill. 

There is another matter to which the attention of the Board 
has been called while passing through the wards of the hospital 
from time to time, and that is the character of the attendants. 
From our want of experience in the management of hospitals 
for the insane, we should have felt some hesitation in express- 
ing our views in relation to this matter, had we known or even 
supposed that they would not coincide with the views of those 
whose long experience and observation render them specially 
.qualified to form a correct judgment. 

We find in the last report of the hospital that Dr. McDill has 
given expression to views on this subject, entirely in harmony 
with our own, and we take pleasure in quoting them: 

"the gbbat importance 

^' Of having in every hospital for the insane an efficient corps 
of experienced and properly qualified attendants, is hardly any- 
where thoroughly understood, nor the value of the duties per- 
formed by them, adequately appreciated outside of a hospital. 

^' The traits of character and high standard of qualifications 
desirable in an attendant are not always possessed by those who 
are willing to engage in this service. Neither will liberal 
wages alone secure the qualifications desirable in an attend- 
ant upon the insane, but when persons are once found who 



181 

have clearly manifested all the conscientiousneBS, fidelity, tact 
and real ability that are desirable in an attendant, no want of a 
reasonable amount of compensation should ever be permitted 
to allow them to leave this for any more profitable calling, as 
such persons might reasonably be expected to do." 

We are satisfied that Dr. McDill has here called attention to 
one of the most important matters connected with the manage- 
ment of hospitals for the insane and one which cannot be too 
soon or too carefully considered by those interested in the 
control of this class of institutions. 

DB« W. H. BOCKWBLL, 

Superintendent of the Vermont asylum for the insane, in his 
report for 1866, says: 

'^ The importance of a proper corps of attendants cannot be 
too greatly appreciated. The comfort and welfare of the 
patients are greatly affected by the character of those under 
whom they are immediately placed. If the attendants are of a 
benevolent and obliging disposition, industrious in their habits, 
mild, yet decisive in their manners, and possessing a favorable 
and pleasant tact to perform their several duties, they will greatly 
relieve the labors of the physician and promote the recovery of 
the patients. Those who are mild, amiable and courteous, will 
impart the same feelings to those around them; while those who 
are nervous and irritable will create a gloomy and unpleasant 
atmosphere to all with whom they come in contact." 

DB. WM. H. PBINCB, 

Former superintendent of the state lunatic asylum at North- 
ampton, Massachusetts, in his report of 1858, in speaking of at- 
tendants, says: 

** Placed in constant contact with their patients and having 
unrestricted intercourse with them, their influence is powerful for 
good or evil, and the success of a hospital as a curative institu- 



182 

tion, is, to a considerable extent, dependent on their fidelity and 
natural adaptation to the performance of the peculiar duties of 
the office. The mere performance of prescribed duties in the 
wards, however promptly and well done, cannot be considered 
as by any means fully satisfying the demands of the position * 
There must be an active, sympathizing interest felt in thei^ un- 
fortunate charge; a desire to promote the cure of the patients 
committed to their care, by constant watchfulness over their 
conduct, and their intercourse with one another, over their 
amusements and their daily habits, and a determination to make 
their comfort and well-being the object of paramount import- 
ance. There is constantly some patient to be soothed, or con- 
soled, or amused or constrained, and unless attended to at the 
proper time and in a judicious manner, an opportunity for mak- 
ing a favorable impression upon the disease is perhaps lost 
through a momentary neglect, or an improper manner." 

DB. KIRKBRIDE, 

Of the Pennsylvania hospital for the insane, says: ^^ Good at- 
tendants cannot fail to be of great service in a ward while those 
without the requisite qualifications may essentially diminish the 
enjoyments of patients, and instead of advancing, may actually 
retard the recovery of those under their care. Good intentions 
are not enough to make good attendants, or good companions 
for the insane; attention is to be paid to many small matters; per- 
sonal appearance, manner, dress, are not to be neglected, and 
what can only be described as iact is indispensable. Not only 
must they feel sym|>athy, but they must be able to show that 
they really do feel it. It does little to satisfy insane persons to 
be told that all around them sympathize with them in their afflic- 
tions, when they see no evidence of it manifested. A look, a 
word, a gesture, the simple tone of the voice itself, when pa- 
tients are highly excitable, often decides whether an individual 
shall be calm or the reverse, but indirectly whether a whol© 
ward, for some time afterwards, is to be a scene of noise and 
confusion, or of quiet and correct deportment.'* 



183 

We are satisfied there is nothing of more importance to a hos- 
pital for the insane, nothing upon which its real prosperity and 
success depend more than the 

CHABACTBB AND QUALIFICATIONS OF THE ATTENDANTS, — 

Those who are constantly, daily and hourly, in immediate con- 
tact with the patients. If we haye a class of men and women 
who are experienced, who are kind, humane, gentle, intelligent, — 
whose hearts are in the work, and who really desire to benefit 
those under their charge, their influence must be most happy, 
and cannot fail to give power and efficiency to the remedial 
measures adopted by the Superintendent for the restoration of 
the reason of the patients; while, on the other hand, if the at- 
tendants are too young and inexperienced, ignorant, cruel, in- 
temperate, brutal and vicious in their habits generally, with no 
real interest in the welfare of those under their charge, caring 
only to pass away their time and draw their pay, their influence 
must be most unhappy, and will tend powerfully to counteract 
the good which might otherwise be accomplished. 

But it may be objected, that such attendants as we speak of 

CANNOT BE PROCUKED 

For the wages that are now paid; we are well aware of this 
fact, as we know that those possessing the requisite qualifica- 
tions of mind and heart for good attendants, can always procure 
better pay in other and pleasanter fields of labor. 

There is always a demand for persons possessing such traits of 
character as are needed here, in other pursuits of life, and we 
cannot procure them unless we pay the market value of the ser- 
vices they are prepared to render. 

The settlement of this question should not turn upon the 
matter of cost. Other important questions in relation to the 
care and management of the insane are not settled in this way. 
The questions should be, What is right? What is best? What 
will best secure the great end for which the'institution has been 
established? A superintendent is not hired because his services 



184 

can be had for a small sum; there are certain important duties 
to be performed, and we look around for the man who is best 
able to perform them, and then we secure him, and pay what his 
services are worth in the market. If we wish to build a barn, 
or a laundry, or any addition to the hospital, we want the work 
done in the best possible manner, and we employ men to do it 
who understand their business, and who can and will do it well, 
and then we pay them the full value of the work done. If an 
engineer, or a carpenter, or a farmer is to be employed, care is 
taken to find one who fully understands his business, one who 
will do, and do well, just the work we want done, and then we 
don't hesitate to pay the value of the service rendered. 

Why should not this matter of the selection and compensation 
of attendants be looked upon and settled in the same way? The 
main object of the establishment of our hospitals for the insane is 
the restoration of the reason of those who are unfortunately de- 
prived of it. To secure this result, nothing is more important than 
to have the right kind of attendants; the class of attendants needed 
cannot be secured for the compensation now paid — what then 
shall be done? Shall we secure them in the same way we secure 
other things we need, by paying their value, or shall we con- 
tinue on in the way we have thus far gone, rendering the good 
results of the vast outlay of money in building our great hos- 
pitals, and in their support, far less than they otherwise would be? 
. We would commend this matter to all interested in the man- 
agement of these institutions, to the legislature, and to the 
people generally, believing it to be one of the greatest import- 
ance and with the full conviction that whenever it is carefully 
considered the proper action will be taken. 

There are scattered through the land persons who are natu- 
rally adapted to the care of the insane, who are patient and en- 
during, who have hearts that deeply sympathize with the unfor- 
tunate and the suffering, and who long to be in positions where 
they can administer to the wants and relieve the necessities of 
such. Those who have the charge of our hospitals for the in- 
sane should be constantly on the lookout for such persons, and 



185 

when fouod their services should be secured and a sufficient 
compensation paid to secure their continuing in the service. 

Experience in the care of the insane is of great value, and 
hence, when it is found that a person has been employed who is 
really adapted to the place, proper inducements should be held 
out to him to remain permanently, and as one mean to secure 
this result, we would suggest that a fair compensation be fixed 
for new and inexperienced attendants, to be increased yearly, 
where the individual is found to be adapted to the service, until 
it reaches a maximum equal to the compensation paid for ser- 
vices of equal value in other fields of labor. Let this course be 
entered upon at once and followed up until there is at least one 
first-class attendant in each of the wards in the hospital. 



IV.— INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 



THE KUMBBB OF INMATES 

Of this institution at the beginning of the year, October 1, 1871, was 289 
Received during the year 108 

Making the whole number in school during the year 847 

Whole number in school since July, 1860 886 

Returned to parents on ticket 86 

Out to place on ticket {, 28 

Escaped 10 

Deaths 1 

Number in school October 1, 1872 278 

847 



Smallest number a^ any time during the year 280 

Largest do 284 

Ay er age do 252 

The average age of those committed in previous years 14.6 

The average age of those committed the past year 12.26 

Total 18.88 



186 

THB NATIONALITY OP THE PARENTS 

Of the boys in the school during the past year, is as follows: 

AmerlcftD 89 

Foreign 228 

Unknown 35 

847 

THE BIRTH PLACE OF THE CAILBREN 

American 279 

Foreign countries 82 

Birth place unknown 86 

Total 347 



'• Forty-six of the inmates have neither father or mother liv- 
ing; one hundred aud forty-five have no father living, and one 
hundred and thirteen no mothers; forty-nine have step-fathers 
and foriy-four step-mothers. Only 144 of the whole number 
have both parents living, and of these, the parents of twenty- 
six are seperated, several are insane and several are intemperate 
Four of the inmates have parents; both living but separated, 
and each married again to other parties.'' 

The average number of boys in the school during the year, 
was 252, which would make the average cost per capita for the 
year, $145, or $2.71 per week — 12 cents per week less than the 
cost of the previous year. 

The cost of subsistence, $34.76 per capita for the year, or 67 
cents per week — 8 cents per week in excess of what it was dur- 
ing the previous year. 

THE RECEIPTS 

For the past year were as follows: 

On hand at the commencement of the year $8,781 85 

Appropriation in 1872 88,460 00 

Amount received from counties 6,056 00 

Amount received from superintendent 2,167 10 

150,454 95 
Sxpenditures as above 86,668 70 

On hand October 1,31872 fl8,916 25 



187 

There was also received building fund appropriation $16,000 00 

Expenses for building purposes 12,809 59 

On hand October 1, 1872 $3,190 41 



A COHPABISON. 

The following is a comparison betweeen the quantity and 
prices of several leading articles purchased in 1871 and 1872: 



1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 



1871 
1872 



1871 
1882 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 



7,366 lbs... Beef. 
9,968 lbs do. 

1,361 lbs... 
1,118 lbs... Pork 



Salt fish. 



8, 183 lbs... 
4,048 lbs... 



526 lbs... 
288 lbs... 

3,240 lbs... 
1,662 lbs... 
2,000 lbs... 



1,244 gals. 

181 gals. 

1,052 gals. 



167 J lbs.. 
100 lbs... 

87 tons. 
36f tons 

284 cords. 
144 cords. 

173 cords. 
321J cd's. 



1,823 bus. 
1,928 bus. 



Butter, 
.do... 



Coffeee. 
..do.... 



I coflfee A., I brown.. 

mite 

Brown 



Syrup. 
. .do... 
..do... 



Tea. 
. .do. 



Coal at Milwauke. 
..do do 



Wood, delivered 

. . do not delivered . . . 

..do.... oak and soft.. .. 
. .do maple and hick. 



t 



21 
21 



22 

24f 

IBA 
12 

lOf 



64A 

78 

51i 



$1 16 

8 63 

9 30 

5 10 
3 19 

2 77 



Wheat, includ'g grind 

ing and delivery 

Wheat 



1 28} 
1 26 



$199 32 
216 15 



131 83 
542 09 



1,096 54 
456 47 



478 56 
1,748 09 



$698 22 
746 95 

132 76 
99 40 

678 27 
854 95 

117 38 
69 04 

413 83 



415 47 
797 98 



673 92 

194 93 
110 70 

319 50 
313 75 



1,552 01 



2,226 66 



2,842 66 
2,430 61 



188 

THS CITBREirr EXPENSES 

Of the institution as given in the report of the trustees for the 
year 1872, were as follows: 

For amasements and means of instruction $1 ,235 05 

Clothing 8, 266 35 

Medical services, drugs, medicens 214 65 

Farm expenses 333 06 

Fuel 2.571 40 

House furnishing 1 ,245 06 

Live stock 600 00 

Lights (exclusive of fixtures) 125 45 

Postage, insurance, freight, livery, telegrams, etc., 556 OS 

Manufacturing expenses 1, 864 29 

Miscellaneous purposes 639 52 

Repairs 1,694^ 

Permanent improvements 1 ,644 54 

Subsistencef. 8,759 68 

Salaries and wages - 10,819 04 

Farm implements 81 28 

Managers 288 30 



Total $86,538 71 



189 



The following is a statement of the 



FARM PBODUCrrS 



Consumed for subsistence by the Industrial School for Boys, 
from October 1, 1871, to October 1, 1872. 



Articles. 



Pork 
Beef. 



Winter Squash 

Chicken 

Wheat 

Potatoes 

Beans 

Beets 

Onions 

Carrots 

Turnips 

Parsnips 

Salsify 

Green Peas 

Green Beans 

Green sweet corn ears 

Cucumbers 

Gooseberries 

Strawberries 

Raspberries 

Currants 

Apples 

Cabbages 

^^■:::::::::::::::: 

Veal 



Qaantlty. 



.doz. 
.gals 



6,500 

1,500 

3,000 

100 

267 

260 

24 

75 

8 

20 

85 

10 

15 

100 

20 

50 

10 

1 

4 

8 

10 

6 

850 

150 

3,672 

650 



Price. 



$4 40 



50 

^^ 

15 
50 
75 
85 
75 
40 
80 
60 
00 
50 
40 
85 
75 



4 
4 
1 



00 
00 
75 
50 
4 

10 



Amoant. 



1286 00 

112 50 

45 00 

8 00 

307 05 

180 00 

42 00 

26 25 

6 00 

8 00 

10 60 

6 00 

15 00 
50 00 

8 00 
17 50 

7 50 
200 

16 00 
82 00 

17 50 

8 00 
14 00 

18 75 
868 20 

48 75 

$1,604 50 



190 



The following is a 



LIST OF THE OPPICKKS 



And employes of the Industrial School for Boys, with statement 
of the time they were employed and the amount of salary and 
wages paid to each one: 



Names. 



A. D. Hendrickson. . 
Mrs.O.D.Hend'k8on . 
Miss M.L.Uend^kson. 

Cyrus Alsdorf 

J. H. Goodearle. . . . 

Wm.H. Bleep 

J. W. Babcock 

liina Clark 

Geo. F. Anderson . . . 

Esther Campion 

Miss M. L. Header . . 
H. W.Cole 

At B. X OQU 

Anna Williams 

Jennie Williams . . . 

Anna Jones 

Anna Jones 

Mary Palz 

Barah Morton 

Mr8.R. F. Farrington. 
Mrs. A.McNaughton. 
Mrs. Kate Partridge . 
Mrs. M. A. Towsley. 
Mrs. Julia Sperry .. . 
Mrs. Elinor Jones. . . 
Mrs. Ellen Godfrey.. 

Julia Hurd 

MuT Williams 

B. F. Farrington 

J. M. Shearer 

B. B. Monroe 

Jacob Eorn, Jr 

Robert Eensie '. 

J.B.Day 

H. E. Anderson 

George Coombs 

J. H. Whitcher 

John Enieht 

Richard F. Jones — 

A. J. Cole 

Ellis Purple 



Occapation. 



Superintendent 

Matron 

Clerk and librarian 

Ov'r m'h de't& bandleader. 

. . . do . . . do store kee'r.. 

OutBide overseer 

Prin. teacher & ov*r No. 1 . 
Int. teach'r Ist and 2d dp'ts. 

. . . .do . . do do 

.. do 

Prin. t'ch»r 2d d't, and K.C. 
. ...do...lstd't,&o*rNo.3. 

. . . .do. . .Ist .. .do 

Care Ko. 1 and seamstress. 

, . . .do do. . . . 

Cook 

Cook 

Care No. 2 and seamstress. 

. . . .do do. . . . 

Care No. 3 do... . 

Care No. 4 do. . . . 

> . . . UO ....a. ..«■. vLKJ .... 

Care No. 5 and prin. s*m's. 
Care No. 6 and seamstress. 

Laundress 

GenU work and seamstress. 

Cook and baker 

Ov'r No. 2 and cane seater. 
Ov'er No. 4 and carpenter. 
O'vr No. 6 and shoemaker. 
0*vr No. 5 and gardener. . 

Tailor and picket duty 

Cane seater 

. .. .do 

Farmer 

Teamster 

... do 

....do 

General work 

do 



Time emplojed 



1 year 
...do... 
...do ... 

7 mos. 
8} mos. 
1 year, 

. . .do ... 

6| mos. 

5Amos. 

4 month 

1 year 

8 mos. 

4 mos. 
3| weeks 

18^ weeks 
28 weeks 
24 weeks 

28 w^eks 
49| weeks 

2^ weeks 
1 year.. 

29 f weeks 
8 weeks 
1 year. 

....do... 
... do ... 
. . . .do .. . 
....do ... 
. . . .do .. . 

5 mos. 
1 year. 

. ...do . . 
do . . 

8 mos. 

1 month 

1 year, 
i year. 

1} mos. 

6 mos. 
2( mos. 
8 days 



Amount. 



«1,850 00 
400 00 
300 00 
495 83 

239 90 
490 00 
600 00 
162 50 
210 94 

10 00 

260 00 

291 66 

133 33 

10 60 

65 50 

96 90 

81 10 

112 00 

148 50 

7 50 

156 00 

89 15 

24 00 

182 00 

166 00 

195 00 

150 50 

240 00 
480 00 
192 44 
500 00 
400 00 
400 00 
119 99 

40 00 
400 00 
172 00 

61 10 
180 00 

77 76 
9 00 



191 



liiat of Employes — Salaries and Wages — continued. 



Names. 



Roger Jones 

SamE. Orvis 

Isaac Hadfield 

N. Weitcn 

Q«o. M. Booher 

"Wm. Thompson. . . . 

Orin McDougal 

Henry Good water.. 

George Watson 

Albert Hastings. . . . 
0. A. Hendrickson . 

Benj. Howard 

John Vreeland 

J. C. Barnes 

Ohas. Wardrobe. . . . 
C. Jeutsch 



Occupation. 



Care live stock and farmer 

Night watch 

do 

Willow worker 

Teamster 

... do 

...do 

...do 

... do 

Broom maker 

Labor 

Labor, sinking well 
Carpenter 
Painter 
Mason work 
do 



Of this amount, there is classified as 
" Permanent improvements" 
Repairs ordinary 



Leaving, as per annual report 



Time 
Employed. 



1 year. . . 
853 nights. 
14 nights. 
1 year... 
6}fmonths 
5 months 
5^ months 
\\ months 
2^ months 
4| months 
63} days . 



Amonnt. 




1360 00 
440 00 

17 60 
582 50 

72 07 
24 08 

26 66 

18 76 
81 25 

160 10 

48 70 

8 50 

518 06 
89 50 
43 55 

27 00 



112,160 21 



1,881 17 
no, 819 04 



THE MAKAGEBS ESTIMATE 

that it will require three thousand and five hundred dollars per 
month for cusrent expenses for the ensuing year. 

For thirteen months, from January 1, 1873, to February 1, 1874, 
the period for which the legislative visiting committeeh^ve 
decided to introduce appropriation bills, will amount to $45,500 00 

Deduct amount due from counties 8,500 00 

Which will leave .$37,000 00 

To be provided for by appropriation, and we recommend that 
an appropriation be made accordingly. 
The managers ask for 



AK APPBOPBIATIOK 



• I • 

Of forty thousand dollars for the purpose of enlarging the 
main building, and erecting two more family buildings. 



192 

The institution is now crowded to overflowing, and we are 
satisfied that every inch of the room asked for will be needed 
as soon as the buildings can be completed. We have carefully 
examined into the situation and wants of the institution, and 
we are convinced that it is very much crippled in its operations 
and its power for good greatly lessened by reason of the lack of 
room, and we are strongly in favor of providing the necessary 
means to furnish the enlarged accommodations asked for, at the 
earliest moment the finances of the state will permit. We fully 
endorse the necessity of what is asked for, and trust the Legis- 
lature will make as liberal provision for building as the situa- 
tion of the treasury will warrant, whicn we trust will be enough 
at least to erect one new building, and enlarge the main build- 
ing, say $24,000, which with the balance now on hand belong- 
ing to the building fund will make $27,190. 

The Industrial School for Boys has been visited by one or 
more representatives of the Board six times during the past 
year, and each subsequent visit has served to impress us more 
and more with the importance and usefulness of the institution. 

The small number of persons 

IN CONFINEMENT FOR CRIMES 

In Wisconsin, is often the subject of remark, not only in our 
own State, but in other parts of the country. 

The average number of prisoners in the State Prison during the past 

year, was but 201 

The average number in the county jails, exclusive of the insane, was 106 
The average aumber in the Milwaukee House of Correction was 68 

875 



Making a total of 375, in a population of at least twelve 
hundred thousand. 

Various reasons have been assigned for^the fact that the num- 
ber is so small in comparison with the number in confinement in 
the most of the other States of the Union, but we are inclined 
to think that one of the most important of the influences in the 
production of the result alluded to is that of the Industrial 



193 

School for Boys. Since its organization it has had eight hundred 
and eighty-eight inmates, two hundred and seventy-eight of 
whom were in the school at the close of the last fiscal year, leav- 
ing some six hundred who have gone forth from the institutions. 
Under the infiuence of the training of the school, a large num- 
ber have gone out reformed, and with habits and inclinations 
that will aid them in becoming useful members of society. 

It is impossible to tell how many of these boys would have 
grown up in idleness and crime until they found a home in the 
county jail or the state prison, had it not been for the influence 
of this institution; but it is by no means a violent presumption 
to presume that such would have been the fate of a large num- 
ber of them. 

It is a matter of regret that there are in the community so 
many boys that need the restraints of an institution of this kind; 
but here they are, and there is a future before them, and that 
is, either to be brought under the influence of this institution 
and trained in a way that large numbers will become useful 
citizens, or, left without its influence and grow up in idleness 
and crime until they become subjects for the state prison. 

Tne Industrial School for Boys is, to a great extent, shutting 
off the supply of inmates for the state prison, and the true 
policy of the state is to enlarge its borders until it has capacity 
for all in the state who are proper subjects of its restraints. The 
boys can be trained here while they are young, and a large 
number of them prepared for usefulness as good citizens, or 
they can be left until they graduate in crime, and then the state 
can provide for them behind her prison walls. Can there be a 
question as to which is the wisest course to pursue? 

We desire to bear our testimony to the faithful and devoted 
manner in which Mr. Hendrickson, the superintendent, is dis- 
charging his laborious and responsible duties. We know of no 
position in the state more trying to a man's physical and mental 
energies than that occupied by Mr. Hendrickson. He has charge 
of a prison, and yet it is not a prison — the inmates are all pri- 
soners, and yet there are no high walls, no cells, no locks and 
keys to confine them. They are held by constant unwearied 
18— C. & R. (Doc.18.) 



194 

watchfulness. The mind is on a continuous strain. There is no 
rest or relaxation except when the great household are quiet in 
slumber, nor hardly any even then, so heavy is the burden upon 
the mind of the superintendent. 

We have but one complaint to make againt Mr. Hendrickson, 
and that is, that he works too hard — he performs too much 
physical and mental labor, — he will wear himself out before his 
work is accomplished. 

"We would urge upon the Managers of the school the import- 
ance of providing Mr. Hendrickson with such assistance as will 
relieve him from a very considerable portion of his physical and 
mental labor, believing that in so doing they will be subserving 
the best interests of the institution. 



v.— SOLDIERS' ORPHANS' HOME. 

The number of children in the home October 1, 1871, was ^1* 

Number admitted to March 1, 1872 22 . • • • 

Number admitted from March 1 to October 1, 1872 33 . . • 

50 



Number discharged to March 1, 1872 19 • • • • 

N^umber discharged from March 1 to October 1, 1872 35 . ••• 

— 54 

Number belonging to the home September 30, 1872 J}? 

The amount expended last year was as follows: 

By W. P. Towers, from October 1, 1871, to March 1, 1872. . . $16,166 20 

By R. W. Burton, from March 1, 1872, to October 1, 1872.. . . 14,501 W 

By R W. Burton for purchases made by W. P. Towers pre- ^^ ^ 

vious to March 1, 1872 ^'^15 

For trustees' expenses ^ ^ 

For stationery and postage stamps for home, purchased by ^^ ^ 

H.Harnden 25 W 

$31,797 40 
For expense of Mary Barrett at Normal School, Platteville. . 200 00 

$81,997 jW 
.Spdcial appropriation for children in Normal School 1,200 00 

$83,197^ 



195 



A DETAILED STATEMENT OP THE BXFENDITUBES, 

Of the Home for the seven months, from March Ist to Oct. Ist, 
1872, under the superintendency of R. W. Burton, will be found 
in the published report of the institution made to the Governor: 
The following is a detailed statement of the expenditures for 
the five months from Oct. 1st, 1371, to March 1st, 1872, under 
the superintendency of Mr. Towers: 



Abtxclbs. 



AMUSEMENT AlfTD MEAK8 OF INSTBTTCTIOIT. 

Castinett 

Tamborine 

Photographs 

Periodicals 

Harper 

Journal 

Music 

School registers 

School books and slates 

Ink 



Drawing books . 

Copybooks 

Slate Pencils . . . 
Piano and cover 
Lead pencils. ... 
Tuning piano... 
Bookbmding . . . 



CLOTHIITG. 



Girls* clothing. . . 
Boys' clothing. . . 
Making clothmg. 
Caps and gloves . 
Boots and shoes . 



Bbuos and Medicinbs. 



HOUSE FUBKISHING. 

Crockery and batter jars 

KiTCHBK Utensils— 

Tin ware 

Bath brick 

Scrub brushes 

FUBNITURE — 

Two spring beds 

Mattrass 

Bepairing furniture 



Quantity. 



1. 
1. 
5. 
20. 
1. 
2. 



9 

4 

20doz... 
10 boxes. 



2doz, 



Price. 



$0 15 



60 



4doz, 



Amount. 



(0 75 

80 

75 

8 05 

4 00 

20 00 

70 

2 25 

208 78 

8 25 

1 40 
27 00 

2 18 
358 75 

1 00 
6 00 
8 50 



1644 06 



1665 89 

287 25 

80 50 

6 80 

844 75 



$1 ,874 69 



$78 25 



151 55 

78 07 

2 00 

16 00 

18 00 
12 50 
15 80 

tl87 42 



196 
Detailed Statement — continued. 



Articles. 



MIBCELIiAlTBOnB. 

Bam and stable expenses including feed 

and repairs on harness 

Dentistry 

Furnace and pipes, etc 

Indigo 

Insurance 

Postage and box rent 

Printing 

Stationery 

Sewing machine and supplies 

Unclassified expenses 

Writing 

E. Blakesley, to Washington 

E. Devoe, to New York 

F. Blakesley, to Milwaukee 

W. and A. omalle, to Leavenworth 

L. and L. Fauster, to Portage city 

Supt to Milwaukee 



Qnatity. 



Price. 



Amount. 



2 lbs. 



BEPAIBS. 

Carpenter work 

Painting 

Plumbing 

Blacksmith 

Lumber , 

Hardware . 

Unclassified items 



Wood 

Hauling 

Sawing 

Freight 

Coal 

Watching wood, 



FUEL. 



479 



2 75 



46A% 



Gas 

Candles. 
Oil 



LIGHT. 



MANUFACTUnmO. 

Leather 

Pegs, nails, etc 



89K 
4 gallons 



$80 75 
80 00 
234 13 
3 25 
175 00 
40 95 
44 00 
7 00 
79 81 
192 38 
118 75 
30 50 
20 00 
3 65 
10 00 
2 00 
9 32 

10,000 OO 

154 49 

1 25 

86 33 

13 40 

411 84 
65 52 
24 75 

1707 5 8 

11,317 250 

143 70 

43 00 

718 50 

510 78 

6 00 

$2.789 18 

438 30 

15 80 

9 80 

$463 95 

225 18 
33 90 

$259 08 



197 
Detailed Statement — continued. 



ArticleB. 



8UBBIBTENCE. 



Bread 

Butter 

Cake and crackers. 

Cheese 

Coffee 

Cider 



Eges 

Fish, cod 

Fish, halihut. 
Fish, fresh.... 



Flour and Meal, 



Flour 

Flour, buckwheat 
Corn meal 



Fruit, 



Apples 

Currants 

Grapes 

Peaches 

Prunes 

Dried apples 
Cocoanut . . . 



Freight. 
On groceries not specified 
Milk 



Meats. 



Beef, fresh 

Ham 

Pork, salt. 
Sausage... 

Lard; 

Oysters . . . 



PauUry. 



Chickens 
Turkeys . 



Sundries. 



Baking Powder 
Cassia 



Quantity. 



87,164 pounds. 

l,787f pounds. 

891 pounds. 

161|pounds. 

50 pounds. 

84igallons . 

112 dozen... 

462 pounds. 

SS^pounds. 



4,488 pounds. 

50 pounds. 

1,678 pounds. 



6 pounds. 

78 poimds. 

2 baskets. 



98 pounds. 
1 pound.. 



17,758 quarts. 



7,676|pounds. 

69|pounds . 
919 pounds. 

66 pounds. 
296 pounds. 

86 cans . . . 



68 pounds, 
268 pounds. 



60 pounds. 
4}poundfi. 



Price. 



8Jic 



2a>ic 



Amount. 



II 



,161 86 

206 50 

171 95 

28 66 

11 26 

6 90 

20 85 

87 42 

6 45 

50 



1155 88 

1 88 

80 19 



1178 50 

75 

6 08 

2 50 

61 08 

9 77 

50 



$668 08 
17 11 
118 85 
16 20 
28 18 
47 55 



111 68 
22 82 



180 50 
8 56 



Total. 



11,786 85 



186 95 



259 18 

17 44 
990 98 



890 51 



88 95 



198 
Detailed Statement — continued. 



Article. 



Subsistence — continued. 
Sundries— QontmMed. 



Candy . . 

Keeler 

Nuts 

Pickles . 
Pop-corn 

Soda 

Tallow.. 

Ice 

Salt 

Vinegar. 

Rice 

Sugar. . . 
Tea 



Vegetablee. 



Beans 

Cabbage 

Miscellaneous 

Potatoes 

Onions 

Squash 

Tomatoes 

Turnips 



Total subsistence 



Qoantlty. 



Price. 



1 barrel . 
Ipeck . . 
6 pounds. 
89 ^pounds 



48igallons. 

891 pouncs. 

1,688 pounds. 

41 pounds. 



llfbushels 
67 heads . . 



190}bushels 

85 bushels 

528 pounds. 



71ibushels 



15c 



85c 



Amovnt 



H95 

65 

7 50 

12 00 

25 

75 

6 27 

80 00 

6 65 

7 88 
86 54 

198 49 
84 85 



$17 62 
2 68 
56 88 
92 25 
17 50 
528 
46 89 
21 45 



Total. 



1430 79 



260 06 
»4,806 15 



199 
Detailed Statement--^ continued. 



SALARIES Ain> WAGES, 



Naxib. 



W, p. Towers 

Mary Towers. 

Mrs. Green.. . 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 

M 



8S Crandall 

ss Hamden 

ss Mclntyre 

ss HuDtington . . . . 

ss Terry 

ss Morean 

ss Martin 

Anna Wilson 

Miss Crane 

Miss Doyle 

Mrs. Paterson 

Miss Ward 

Miss Buckley 

Maggie Hogan. 

Mary WHligan. . . . 

Maggie Curtiss 

Mary Oleson 

Lena Oleson 

Mary Hogaa 

Mrs. Dolant 

Mary Riley 

Carrie Hanson 

John Walters 

Peter Anderson 

Thos. Swan son 

Mrs. Straus 

A J. Ward 

Jacob Esser 

Mai'ia Lee 

Maggie Howard 

Mary E. Bevitt 

Mrs. Doylan 

Bridget Pendergrass. 

Stephenson 

Mrs. Hall 



OCCUPATION. 



Superintendent . . . 

Matron 

Housekeeper 

Teacher 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Tailoress 

do 

Dressmaker 

do 

Seamstress 

Nurse 

Dormitory 

Kitchen 

do 

do 

Washer 

. . ■ . .uo. • • • « . . 

do 

Ironer 

Chamber 

do 

Engineer 

Carpenter 

Watch 

Tailoress 

Physician 

Shoemaker 

Washer 

Chamber 

Teacher 

Laundry 

Ironer 

Laborer 

Dressmaker 



Ttme 
Employed. 



5 months . 

5 months . 

5 months. 

5 months. 

5 months. 

5 months. 

5 months. 

5 months. 

5 months. 

8 months. 

5 months. 
4 J months. 

5 months. 

5 months. 
5} months. 

6 months. 
5 months. 
5 months. 
5 months. 
5 months. 
2 months. 
2 months. 
5^ months. 

4 months . 
2 months. 

5 months. 
5 months. 
5 months. 

4 months. 

5 months. 



Rate per 
Month. 



8 months. 

3 months . 

3 weeks.. 

3 days . . . 

1 month . 



4} months. 



$100 
381 
22^ 
80 
30 
80 
80 
80 
16 
10 
16 
16 
16 
16 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
40 
35 



m 



12 

12 



16 



Amonni. 



1500 00 

166 65 

110 00 

150 00 

150 00 

150 00 

150 00 

150 00 

80 00 

48 00 

80 00 

68 00 

80 00 

80 00 

68 00 

60 00 

60 00 

60 00 

60 00 

60 00 

24 00 

24 00 

89 00 

48 00 

24 00 

200 00 

175 00 

170 00 

58 00 

166 65 

315 00 

86 00 

86 00 

18 00 

1 50 

12 00 

21 60 

76 00 

|8»765 40 



200 



The following is 



A COMPABISOK 



Between the quantity and price of some of the leading arti- 
cles purchased in 1871 and 1872: 



1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 

1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 



8,962f lbs. 
8,35U lbs. 

1,147 doz 
1,481 doz 



40,862 qts. . 
40,012 qts. . 



17, 101 Albs.. 
18,704 lbs.. 



2,255i lbs.. 
2,146 lbs.. 



583} lbs.. 
626 lbs. 



Bread, cakes, cra'ks, flour,meal, 
do 



Butter 



..do., 

E^s. 
. .do. . 



Milk. 
..do. 



Beef. 
..do. 



jiSalt Pork 
...do 



Poultry. 
. . . .do. . 



Fish and oysters 
do.. 



1871 5,703 lbs.. 

1872 4,665 lbs.. 



1871 
lo72 



Vejjetables. 
do 



Su^ar 
..do. 



Fruit. 
..do. 



12 
Hi 

5} 
5i 

10 
10 

15 
10 

10 
11 



+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 



+ 
+ 



12 + 
11 + 



$3,703 67 
3,105 28 



17 + 708 11 

13.5+ ! 535 25 



141 70 
186 75 

2,287 22 
2,257 92 

1,710 14 
1,867 18 

343 24 
224 48 

62 72 
69 18 

142 02 
141 79 

722 52 
399 38 

707 05 
535 51 

575 l;^ 
449 74 



THE AMOUNT EXPENDED 

For current expenses during the past year was $31, 797 40 

For subsistence 10.549 10 



The average number of children in the home during the year 
was 208, and the average number subsisted in the house, includ- 
ing officers and employes, was 234. 

The cost per capita for current expenses for the children was 
$152.87 per year, or $2.94 per week; the cost per capita on the 
whole number in the house, $135.88 per year or $2.61 per week. 



201 

The cost per capita for subsistence for the children was $50.71 
per year, or 97 cents per week, and on the whole number sub- 
sisted in the house, $45.08 per year, or 88 cents per week. 

The amount of money at the control of the Home at the close 
of the fiscal year available for current expenses, was as follows: 

In the hands of the Superintendent $799 09 

In the hands of the Treasurer 2, 088 47 

In the state treasury, of last year's appropriation, undrawn. . 16,000 00 



$17,887 56 



The trustees ask for 



AN APPROPRIATION 

Of twenty thousand dollars for the current expenses of the 
next year, and we would recommend an appropriation accord- 
ingly, believing that this amount, with the amount on hand at 
the close of the fiscal year, as stated above, will be sufficient to 
pay the current expenses of the Home until February 1, 1874. 

The trustees also ask for an appropriation of two thousand 
dollars for the purpose of painting the buildings. Satisfied of 
the need of having this done, we would recommend the appro- 
priation asked for. 

This institution 

HAS BEEN VISITED 

Several times during the past year, by different members of 
the Board, and nothing was seen to raise a question as to the 
competency and fidelity of the superintendent and matron. 

It is no secret that there has been discord among the trustees 
and that the influence of this state of things has been felt at 
the Home, interfering more or less with the harmony of its 
internal working. 

Charges have been made in the public prints and elsewhere, 
reflecting upon the official conduct of the superintendent and 
trustees, and in fact upon all in any way connected with the 
management of the institution. 

As this whole matter is to be investigated by a joint commit- 



202 

tee of the legislature, we do not deem it necessary to make any 
further allusion to it, but patiently to abide the result of the 
investigation. 

The question is sometimes asked why these charges have not 
been nvestigated by this Board; the answer is that they have no 
power to make such an investigation as the nature of the charges 
required. 

We have no power to compel the attendance of witnesses; no 
power to examine them under oath, and no power to incur any 
expense in conducting such an investigation. And still further 
in the event, they had been fully empowered to make the inves- 
tigation, we doubt whether it would have been wise to have un- 
dertaken it just on the eve of the meeting of the legislature, the 
body who would ultimately have to pass upon the matter. 

In our report of last year we devoted considerable space to the 
discussion of matters connected with the Home, and the soldiers' 
Orphans' generally.; 

We would respectfully refer the legislature to the views 
there presented, as found upon page 282, and on pages 291 to 
304 inclusive, of the report referred to. The observation and 
experiences of another year have fully confirmed us in the views 
then expressed. 

Some of the views of the Board then presented received the 
endorsement of the legialature in the third section of chapter 
149 of the general laws of 1872, which is as follows: 

" Section 3. It shall be the duty of said board of trustees to 
ascertain the condition and circumstances of all the children 
who now are or may hereafter become inmates of the home, with 
a view, if deemed necessary, for the best interests of such chil- 
dren or any number of them, 'of providing them with suitable 
places, where they may be provided with the advantages of a 
good home, and taught some trade or occupation, the better to 
fit them for the duties of life; and said board shall keep and ex- 
ercise a close supervision over the interests of any and every 
child during its minority, who may by virtue of this act be 
bound out, to the end that the terms of the compact may be 



203 

faithfully carried oat and the interests of the ohild properly 
cared for; and said board is hereby authorized to institute 
inquiries, visit the child, or in any way by them deemed 
proper, ascertain that this is done; and in case of neglect or 
unjust treatment, they may remove any child and institute or 
cause to be instituted, such legal j^oceedings as may be neces- 
sary to recover damages, secure relief for any ill treatment re- 
ceived by any such child so bound out, against the person in 
whose charge such child has been placed." 

The trusteesin their last report, in speaking of this law, say: 

" The board, by resolution, empowered and directed its secre- 
tary. Col. C. K. Pier, to take all necessary steps to carry out the 
objects of the law. His proceedings, under such authority, are 
detailed in his report to the board, hereto annexed, and to which 
your attention is called. He expects, by the next meeting, to 
have completed the greater part of these duties, aud which, by 
reason of limited time, he was unable to do at the date of this 
report." 

We give the following extract from the 

BEPOBT OF COL. PIEB, 

Of his action, under the authority of the board, in carrying 
out the provisions of the law referred to: 

^ There were, at the time of the passage of said act, 231, or- 
phans at the ^ Home,' and there have since been admitted 31, 
making a total of 262. Of these 141 are boys and 121 girb. 
Their ages may be classed as follows: 

^' Under five years, one. Over five and under seven, five. 
Over seven and under ten, forty. Over ten and under fourteeOi 
one hundred and seventy. Over fourteen years, thirty-nine* 
Unknown ages, seven. 

^^ As soon as practicable, after being authorized, I addressed 
to the parent or guardiaa of each child a letter, setting forth in 
brief the maiq features and objects of the law^ my position 



204 

under the resolution of the board, and askinfr for all informa- 
tion within their knowledge pertinent to the purposes and end 
sought. Each letter was accompanied by a uniform set of in- 
terrogatories, the answers to which would give the facts desired, 
or indicate the channel through which they might be obtained; 
and with every letter was enclosed a properly addressed, stamped 
envelope for reply. This led to a correspondence of more or 
less magnitude with mothers and guardians, with relatives and 
friends of the orphans, aud with various county judges through- 
out the state. 

" Very much of this has not yet been brought to a close. I 
have opened a record where, under each orphan^« name is noted 
such facts appertaining to him or her as are from time to time 
developed by my investigations, with reference to source of in- 
formation. 

" All material correspondence is carefully numbered, filed and 
preserved. For a detailed statement of each individual case, 
the facts elicited and progress made therein, I respectfully refer 
the board to that record. 

" You will notice, among other things, that of the 262 orphans, 
184 have mothers living, and 78 have neither father or mother. 
Fifty-eight mothers have re-married since their children entered 
the Home. Twelve have removed from the state. Of the 262 
orphans, I find 61 (and there are doubtless more) who have 
guardians regularly appoined by the probate judges of their 
respective counties. Of these guardians, 39 are drawing pen- 
tions for their wards. Seventy-three of the mothers are drawing 
the two dollars additional pension for each child, while 29 have 
as yet received no pension certificate. 

*^ In several instances no application has been made to the 
government, and in others the claims are still pending. There 
seems to be a general desire expressed, as well by county judges 
as others, to xequire guardians to insure the faithful perform- 
ance of their trusts by sufficient bonds, and when requested, tbe 
former have ordered guardians to file additional bonds. Asa 
fUle, the latter have not been prompt in making their reports to 
county judges. This to a certain extent has been remedied. I 



206 

expect to have the record completed by the time of your semi- 
annual meeting in April. For many reasons it has been im- 
practicable to do so foi the present session.'' 

We rejoice at what has been done in this direction, and trust 
that the trustees will continue the good work they have under- 
taken, until the situation of the orphans is thoroughly understood 
and their rights and interests fully secured and guarded. 

In our previous report we called special attention to the great 

IMPORTANCE OF BEGULAB EMPLOYMENT 

For the children, that they might be trained in habits of indus- 
try, and thus prepared for the stern duties of life that must con- 
front them on leaving the Home. We are pleased to notice the 
efforts which have been made during the past year in harmony 
with our suggestiohs. 

In the report of the superintendnt, he says: 

" The older boys have cheerfully cultivated a garden of five or 
six acres this season, and all have reaped the wholesome reward 
of industry in the matter of fresh vegetables for the childrens' 
table." In another part of his report he says: " How shall we 
employ the boys? is a question that is constantly forced upon 
us. In our attempt to answer it, we increased the force of boys 
in the shoe shop to eight. The cultivation of the garden, 
already referred to, has been of great service in this respect. 
We have also encouraged the boys to work for farmers in the 
vicinity, and, in several cases, have secured places for them. 
Many of these spent their entire vacation at work, and have 
earned, in the aggregate, $150. In matters of repairs and im- 
provements, we have endeavored to employ the boys wherever 
they could be of any service. Notwithstanding this, we urge 
the necessity of providing means for more tangible employment. 
To employ the girls is a matter of less difficulty. In the several 
departments of the * Home ' there is a great variety of house- 
work for ready and willing hands. Besides this, needlework 
occupies the girls much of the time. 



206 

" The division of labor among the boys is approximately shown 
by the following: 

Nmnber employed in shoe shop 8 

garden 6 

stable 2 

playroom 3 

oiBce 1 

library 2 

children's kitchen 3 

family kitchen 1 

dormitory 3 

as monitors 6 

wood carriers 10 

with engineer 1 

carpenter 2 

47 

**' All participate in general work* The boys have carried and 
piled 440 cords of wood, and split and stored in woodshed one- 
fourth of that amount. 

^^ The division of work in girls^ department is as follows: 

** Number employed in sewing room 2 

dormitories 11 

children's dining room 12 

family dining room 2 

family kitchen 8 

school house 9 

play room 2 

library 2 

wash room 1 

ironing room 2 

private rooms 9 

55 

^^ All that are able share the general house cleaning. 

'' Our gardening enterprise, in consequence of drouth, has not 
succeeded as well as we had hoped ; yet the value of the pro- 
ducts, at a very low estimate, will more than cover expenses. 
In a disciplinary sense, it has been a profitable affair. In the 
matter of garden, much more can be done another year. 

" The following figures show the amount of work done in 
shoe shop since March 1st. 

Number of pairs of shoes manufactured 164 

Number of pairs of shoe uppers fitted 40 

Number of pairs of half soles 862 

Number of pairs of shoes patched 240 



207 

" A low estimated value of the work done in the shop is $650. 

•* We now have to buy very little ready-made work.With 
additional shop room, we could quite meet the demands without 
increasing our pay roll?" 

If the '^ Home" was to be a permanent institution there could 
not be a question as to the duty of providing means for the 
regular and systematic employment of all the children, especially 
of the older ones, but as it seems to be admitted on all hands, 
that in a few years at most, the necessity for its existence will 
have passed away, we cannot hope for very much to be accom- 
plished in this direction. 

The great questions to which public attention as well as the 
attention of the trustees is now called, are as to the time when, 
and the manner in which the ^^ Home" shall be closed. 

The trustees, in their report, say: 

" It is now over seven years since the war closed. It is reason 
able to presume the great majority of soldiers' orphans in the 
state, who desire to do so, have already been admitted to the 
benefits of the Home, and that in the future, comparatively few 
applications will be made. In a few years, at the most, so far 
as the Home is concerned, the state will have completed its 
noble charity towards its precious wards." 

The former President of the Board, in a separate report, in 
which he expresses some opinions of his own not endorsed by 
the other trustees, advocates the adoption of measures looking 
to a more speedy closing of the institution. We have carefully 
examined this report, and are satisfied there are some things in 
it worthy of the careful consideration of the legislature. We 
think his criticisms on the location of the " Home" are, in the 
main, sound. The difficulties resulting from the want of more 
ample grounds have been felt from the. first, and, as time has 
passed on, they have become more and more evident, and that 
great evils have resulted from the lack of regular and systematic 
employment of the children in past years, no one at all conver- 
sant with the history of the institution and of those who have 
gone forth from its shelter, can for one moment doubt. 



208 

It is further remarked: ^' Furthermore, all experience has 
eihown that it is better for their morals to educate children in 
families, than to bring together large numbers of both sexes 
under one roof." No reference, we judge, is had here to the 
assembling together of large numbers of children simply to re- 
ceive instruction in a day school, but to their residence in a pub- 
lic institution, and in this view we have no doubt he is correct. 
It is still further remarked: *' But after all, no public institution, 
however costly it may be, or well located, or managed, can com- 
pare with the home where mother is. We believe the state can- 
not now do any better for these, its wards, than to provide them, 
as speedily as possible, with homes in families where they can 
be well cared for, and taught such occupations and habits of in- 
dustry as will enable them to earn their own bread, by and by." 

The third section of the law of last winter to which we have 
already alluded, and under the provisions of which the secre- 
tary of the trustees has been actively working during the past 
year, provides as follows: 

" It shall be the duty of said board of trustees to ascertain 
the condition and circumstances of all the chilren who now are 
or may hereafter become inmates of the home, with a view, if 
deemed necessary for the best interests of such children or any 
number of them, of providing them with suitable places, where 
they may be provided with the advantages of a good home, and 
taught some trade or occupation the better to fit them for the 
duties of life," and the section goes to provide for the proper 
supervision of the interests of the children thus provided with 
homes, during their entire minority. 

It would thus appear that provision is already made by law, 
for the accomplishment of the very object proposed in the re- 
port, and the only question for consideration would seem to be, 
how rapidly and to what extent shall these " homes " be pro- 
vided? In reply to these questions, we would say; 

AS BAPIDLT AS THE BIGHT KIND OF HOMIBS CAN BB PBOCUBBD. 

If all in the institution can be provided with such homes in a 
single year, where their condition for the present and prospects 



209 

for the future will be improved, let it be done even though it 
involves the closing of the institution at the end of that period; 
and if, on the other hand, it should require five or even ten 
years to accomplish the result, let the institution remain until 
the best interests of the children can be subserved. 

We notice from an examination of the report of Mr. Burton, 
the superintendent, that since the first of March last, he has 
succeeded in providing homes for eight of the children. 

In speaking of his action in this direction, Mr. Burton says: 

" Believing family influence to be the most potent for the proper 
development of the child, we earnestly recommend that greater 
e£P6rts be made to secure suitable homes for children, particu- 
larly those who are soon to leave us unattended by natural pro- 
tectors, and in many cases devoid of friends that are able to 
care for them. Such efforts we believe will greatly enhance the 
welfare of the children, and thereby more completely secure 
the object of your earnest endeavors." 

We rejoice that the gentleman in charge of the institution 
entertains such sound and practical ideas. 

Near the conclusion of the paper a plan is presented for dis 
posing of a portion of the children in these words: 

" Let the legislature appropriate a sum of money, say, fifty 
dollars per child, to be paid annually to all mothers having 
children now in the Home, who choose to take their children 
home and provide for tbem, an exception to be made in the cases 
of such mothers as are manifestly unsuited to have charge of 
their children. Where the child has no mother living, or, if 
living, is unfit, or does not choose to take her children, then let 
some relative have the opportunity to receive the orphan into 
his family, with the same aid which would have been given to 

the mother." 

« 

We find that 

SUBSTANTIALLY THE SAKB PLAN 

Here presented was embraced in " Senate Bill No. 97," in- 
troduced in the Senate of 1872 by Senator Williams of Rock 
14— C.&R (Doc.18.) 



210 

county, on the 15th day of February of that year. We quote 
four sections of the bill referred to: 

'^ Sbotion 15. It shall be the duty of said trustees, as far as 
possible, to visit the mothers of the children who are now or 
who shall hereafter be inmates of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home; 
and where they shall be satisfied that the mother is a suitable 
person to have the charge of the child, and that with the aid of 
the state she will be able to provide for the wants and comfort 
of the child, and secure for it a common school education, they 
shall be authorized to arrange with the mothers to receive and 
provide for her child or children, and to contract to pay her, on 
behalf the state, a sum not less than $25 nor more than $100 per 
year for each child thus placed in her charge, for a period to be 
agreed upon not to extend beynd the time the child shall arrive 
at the age of fifteen. 

'' Section 16. In the case of children who have no mothers 
living, or where the mothers, if living, are not suitable persons 
to have the charge of their children, the said trustees shall en- 
deavor to find a place with relatives of the children, if they have 
such who are suitable persons, and if not, with other suitable 
persons, and they shall be authorized to make contracts with 
such persons similar in their provisions to those authorized in 
the next preceding section, to be made with the mothers of the 
children. 

" Section 17. In all cases where contracts are made for the 
payment of money to mothers or others for the care of soldiers 
orphans, the money shall be payable to the parties to whom it 
may be due, on the order of the said trustees, drawn on the 
treasurer of the Home, from the money annually appropriated 
for the Soldiers' Orphans' Home. Such payments shall be made 
quarterly, on the first Monday of January, April, July bM 
October. 

" Section 18. The said board of trustees shall include in 
their annual reports to the governor, a full statement of all their 
action under the provisions of this act." 

We are informed that a plan very similar to the one we &i^ 



211 

now considering was laid before the Illinois legislature last win- 
ter, by a committee of that body. 

THB NORMAL CONDITION OF A CHILD 

Is in the family and the mother, especially while the child is 
^ quite young, is the natural and appropriate guardian, protector 

' and instructor. To what extent the mothers of the soldiers' 

' orphans' now in the Home, are the proper persons to have the 

care of their children, we have no means of knowing. 

We are aware that some of the mothers of these children, by 
reason of their characters, situation and surroundings are not 
the proper persons with whom to entrust their children, but we 
can hardly think that this can be the case to any very consider- 
' able extent. 

Where the oaly difficulty in the way, is their poverty, would 
it not be for the best interest of the child to place it in the 
1 charge of its mother, and allow her a sufficient sum to provide 

for its wants, even if the amount should equal the cost of the 
support of the child in the Home? Our impression, however, 
is, that the amount which would be needed, would not exceed 
) two-thirds, if it did one-half of the present cost of the support 

of the children. 

Admitting the obligation of the state as we do, to provide for 
the real wants of these orphan children and to place them in 
circumstances where they can provide for themselves when they 
arrive at a suitable age, we would look at this question solely 
from the standpoint of the best good for the children. If, to 
keep them in the " Home " until they reach the age of 14 or 15, 
or even older, m the best thing the state can do for them, then 
we say, by all means let them remain there; but if, on the other 
hand, it can be made to appear that it would be better for the 
children to be placed, in some instances, in the care of their 
mothers, with reasonable pecuniary assistance from the state, 
and in other instances, to be *^ provided with the advantages of 
a good home, and taught some trade or occupation, the better 
to fit them for the duties of life,'' then let this be adopted as the 
policy to be pursued, and the children be disposed of in thts 



212 

way as rapidly as the right kind of places can be found for them. 
We do not advocate this measure on the ground of economy 
to the state; it should be decided on higher grounds — ^the best 
good of the children — ^but if the highest good of the children 
can be secured at a less cost than is involved in the present sys- 
tem, this certainly presehts no argument why the change should 
not be made. 

It may be objected, that when all are provided for, that can 
be, in the ways suggested, that there will, without doubt, still 
be quite a number remaining in the Home; and that the expense 
of keeping up the institution with a small number will be almost 
as large as with the present number. In reply, we would say, 
that whatever force there may be in this objection, it will apply 
with equal power when the Home is finally to be closed; an 
event which all admit m,«t occur within a few years. We 
would, however, suggest, still further, that when the number of 
children in the Home is reduced, say to one hundred or less, it 

will be an easy matter for the state to contract with some 
of the 

PBBMANEirr OBPHAN ASYLUMS 

Now in existence in Milwaukee and Racine, to take charge 
of those remaining. We rejoice to be able to say that the Mil- 
waukee Orphan Asylum, the St. Rosa's and St. Joseph's Orphan 
Asylums, and the St. Amelianus' Orphan Asylum, at Milwaukee, 
and the Taylor Orphan Asylum at Racine, are institutions where 
the state would be perfectly safe in placing such of the soldiera' 
.oq>hans as they wished to provide for in this way. 

These institutions are admirably managed, and we have no 
hesitation in saying that the children would be as well taken 
care of and made as comfortable in them as where they now 
are, and at no greater cost. These institutions are not only wil- 
ling, but anxious, to open their doors to these children when- 
ever the state shall desire them to do so. Proposals to this ef- 
fective already been received from some of them. 

There is nothing in which the people of the state feel a deeper 
interest than in the welfare of the soldiers' orphans, and the sug- 
'gestions we have made are respectfully, but earnestly commended 
o the consideration of the legislature. 



213 



VI.— STATE PRISON. 



THE NUHBSB OF OONTICT0 IN THE PRISON 

On the 80th of September, 1871, was 191 

Number received during the year 95 

Making a total 286 

The number discharged during the year 100 

Leaving in the Prison, September 80th, 1872 186 



The daily average number during the year was 200} 



THE BBCEIFTS OF THE PBISON 

During the year were as follows: 

Balance from 1871 |150 90 

From state treasurer 58,998 47 

United States for board of convicts 1,60128 

Chair and cabinet shop 40,670 81 

Shoe shop 406 25 

Tailor shop 144 15 

Blacksmith shop 148 27 

Stoneshop 2,571 00 

Yard 199 49 

Visitors 480 75 

Outstanding accounts of 1869 92 75 

1870 82420 

1871 5,889 55 

Interest 17 18 

Convicts on deposit 276 50 

Prom loan 1 , 700 00 

Sundries 286 12 

«118,446 17 



214 

THS DISBUBSEMENTS 

As presented in the report of the Commissioner, were as fol- 
lows: 

CUBRENT EXPE«NSB8. 

Subsistence 112,637 88 

Hardware, stoves, kitchen and cell- room utensils and furni- 
ture 452 57 

Tobacco 250 74 

Lights 890 29 

Wood 8,885 79 

Clothing and tailor's shop stock 2,803 25 

Merchandise, bedding, etc 295 60 

Newspapers, printing, etc 867 55 

Hospital stores 148 04 

Postage and telegraphing 238 99 

Revenue stamps 28 05 

Traveling expenses 118 60 

Mileage 894 25 

Forage 824 78 

Sundries 61 60 

Machinery and tools 2,098 55 

Stock, blacksmith shop 466 20 

Stock, shoe shop 265 50 

Stock, chair shop 26,082 44 

Teaming for stone shop 9 86 

Building account 10 , 904 38 

Indebtedness for 1871 24,528 69 

Loan 1,700 00 

Interest 964 54 

Discharged convicts 475 00 

Convicts* deposit 805 28 

Officers services ^ 28,45305 

Arresting escaped convicts 112 00 

Exchange 16 05 

Lawyer's collection fee 25 00 

Burial lot 100 00 

Cash on hand 6820 



1118,446 17 



The expenses of the year maybe classified as follows: 

Current expenses, including salaries of officers — |50,226 47 

Stock and machinery for the various shops 45, 809 90 

Indebtedness of 1871 25,80408 

Building account 18 , 106 04 

Loan 1,700 00 

Interest 964 54 

Convicts on deposits 805 28 

Burial lot 100 00 

1187,016 21 



215 



The following table will show 

THB ENTIBE BXPENSB8 OF THE PRISON 

During the past year, the amount paid in cash, the amount 
settled by sales, and the amount still unpaid: 



Total Amoant 



10 



Subsistence 

Hardware, stoves, kitch- 
en and cell room uten 
sils, etc , 

Tobacco 

Lights 

Wood , 

Clothing and stock 
tailor's shop 

Merchandise 

Newspapers, printing,etc 

Hospital stores 

Postage and telegrams . . 

Revenue stamps 

Traveling expenses 

Commissioner's credits, 
mileage, etc 

Teaming 

Libaary 

Forage 

Sundries 

Machinery, tools, etc. . . . 

Stock in blacksmith shop 

Stock in stone shop 

Stock in shoe shop 

Stock in chair and cabi- 
net shop 

Buildine account 

Indebtedness of 1871 — 

Loan 

Interest 

Discharged convicts.... 

Convicts on deposits. . . . 

Exchange 

Attorney's fee 

Burial lot 

Officers' services 

Arresting escaped con- 
victs 



118,556 H7 



687 17 

726 73 

406 47 

8,666 79 

8,247 94 
900 36 
870 76 
182 28 
288 99 
23 05 
118 60 

894 26 

600 00 
284 45 

1,051 09 
61 60 

2,709 82 
610 45 
260 00 
965 68 

40. 788 95 

18,106 04 

25,804 08 

1,700 00 

964 64 

476 00 

806 28 

16 05 

25 00 

100 00 

28,468 05 

112 00 



1187, 016 21 



Paid CBSh. 



112,687 88 



462 67 

260 74 

890 29 

8,886 79 

2,808 25 
295 60 
867 55 
143 04 
288 99 
28 05 
118 60 

894 25 



Settled by 
Salee. 



824 78 

61 60 

2,098 55 

466 20 

9 86 

266 50 

96,082 44 

10,904 88 

24, 528 69 

1,700 00 

964 64 

475 00 

806 28 

16 05 

26 00 

100 00 

28,468 05 

112 00 






$118,877 97 



1168 19 



22 50 



111 04 

477 61 
6 52 



500 00 



114 82 



116 60 



240 U 
9 60 

440 64 
287 48 
474 28 



Balance 
Unpaid. 



1765 80 



112 10 

474 98 

59 96 

59 96 

467 06 

698 23 

8 20 

89 24 



234 65 
111 49 



494 77 
144 26 



680 68 

14,260 97 

1,964 28 

806 11 



12,904 62 



$20,788 72 



216 
The following table will show 



THB COST OF BUB8ISTENCB 



During the past year, with quantity and price of each article 
used: 



Beef 

Butter 

Beans 

Beets 

Chickens 

Cabbages 

Cranberries 

Eggs 

Flour 

..do 

..do 

. .do. .graham, etc.. 



Ginger 

Groceries (miscePs) 

Hops 

Indigo 

Mutton 

Mustard 

Matches 

Onions 

Potatoes 

Pork 

Pork 

Peas, split 

Pepper 

Rice 

Rice... 

Syrup 

Salt 

Sugar 

Soap 

Starch 

Teas 

Turnips 

Vinegar 

Teast cake 

Board, sick convicts 

in hospital 

Freight 

Cartages and pkgs. 
Sundries 



98,960 lbs. 

5,050 lbs. 

lllj bu. 

4 bu. 

1931 Ihs. 

208 .... 

2 qts 

10 doz. 

440 bis. 

44 bis. 

91 bis. 

1,902 lbs 



44 lbs. 



191) lbs. 

1 lb 
829 lbs. 

2 lbs 
30 bxs. 

21 bu. 
1,311 bu. 

182 lbs. 

16 bis. 

706 lbs. 

103 lbs. 

37 lbs. 

1,167 lbs. 

801 gis. 

22 bis. 
22 lbs. 
58 lbs. 
4U lbs. 

179 lbs. 

10 bu. 
380} gls. 

10| dz 

139w.3d. 



16 60 to 17 00 

14 to 20 

1 00 to 2 25 

85 

09 



15 
5 73 
5 72 
4 72 



86}. 



25 to 
05.; 



50 




18,849 80 

251 68 

429 52 

42 32 



2 00 



16,698 29 

917 65 

200 43 

1 40 

17 41 

10 40 

20 

1 50 



8,072 82 

16 06 

44 71 

55 23 

2 00 

16 45 

1 30 

10 75 

21 00 

624 72 

16 34 

248 00 

28 24 

26 20 

444 

110 72 

480 44 

58 85 

258 

4 35 
6 63 

136 85 

5 00 
61 06 
12 80 

278 86 

340 94 

18 62 

4 80 



108,556 87 



The items of indigo, matches, soap and starch, amounting in 
the aggregate to $22.73, are not properly chargeable to subsist- 



ence. 



217 



We present below 



▲ COMPABISON 



Between the quantity and cost of a few of the leading articles 
in 1871 and 1872 



1871 
1872 

1871 



1872 



1871 
1872 

1871 



1872 



1871 



1872 



1871 



1872 



1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 

1871 
1872 



97,775 lbs. 
118,960 lbs. 



l^Vbbls 



Beef. 
...do. 



Pork. 



84^bbls ... .do 



16 bbls 
182 lbs. 



Pork. 
...do 



5,457 
5,050 

190 

409 

11,699 

440 

44 

91 

1,902 

925 

643 



1,2341 
1 

n 



lbs. 
lbs. 



bbls 
bbls 
lbs. 

bbls 
bbls 
bbls 
lbs. 

lbs. 
lbs. 



Butter 
. . .do. 



Flour 

. . .do 

Meal,G*m,*c. 



$7 20 @ 7 50 
6 60 to 7 50 



26 40. 
18 00. 



15 50. 
9. 



1371 45 
615 06 



19... 
14 to 



20 



lbs. 
lb., 
lbs. 



8 eds. 

81 cds. 

718t cds. 



304^rCds. 
406 cds. 

cds. 

cds. 



102} 
109} 



Flour 

. . . .do 

. . . do 

Meal, G'm, ac 



Pluf tobacco. 
Snuflf....!!.! 



Plug tobacco. 
Snuff....!!.! 



Maple wood 
Oak wood . . 
Mixed wood. 

Maple wood 
Oak wood . . 
Bass wood.. 
Mixed wood.. 



4 48. 

4 72. 



5 78. 

5 72. 
4 72. 



65.... 
62}... 



52 to 62} 



1 00. 



5 00.. 
4 00.. 
8 02}. 



4 85to5 00 
3 92 

2 63 

3 82 



1248 00 
16 34 



851 20 

1,930 48 

194 37 



$2,349 30 
251 68 
429 52 
42 32 



1601 24 
402 02 

8 88 



1715 97 

50 

9 25 



115 00 

324 00 

2, 174 46 



$1,328 17 

0, 594 14 

270 41 

864 07 



Lights^. 
. . . .do. . 



Officers' services. 
. . . .do 



Stock for chair and cabinet shop 
. . . .do. 



Stock for blacksmith shop. 
. . . .do. 



$7,261 19 
6,698 29 



986 51 



264 84 

1,041 00 

917 55 



2,976 06 



3,072 82 



.•.•....a. 



1,012 14 



725 72 



2,518 46 



3,656 79 

269 62 
406 47 

23, 720 10 
23,453 06 

24,824 96 
40,788 96 

1,027 66 
610 46 



218 



Comparison — contiimed. 



1871 ■ Stock foi shoe shop. 

1872 i do 



1838 18 

955 08 



1871 ' Stock for tailor shop i »11 96 

1873 ! Clothing and stock for tailor shop I 3,247 M 



The following tabl^ will show the 



AYSSAGK PRI80H POPUULTlOir, 



The amount paid for sabsistence, for officers' services, entire 
amount for current expenses, and the amount of cost per capita 
for subsistence, for officers' services, and for current expenses 
for the past seven years: 



18v6 
1807 
1868 
1869 
•1870 
1871 
1872 



At. 
Popn- 
Ution 



128 
194 
208 
186 
189 
202 
201 



I 



Cmrmt 6X- 



136. 813 29 
40.675 76 
50.589 45 
46.341 26 
41 ,954 86 
53,500 72 
50,226 47 



Officers* 

Tioet 



$15,535 06 
15,060 91 
17,970 84 
17.994 18 
13,998 48 
23,720 15 
28,458 06 



Sabsifltence. 



18,266 18 
13,636 14 
18,242 04 
14,769 69 
11,127 20 
15,805 92 
13,534 14 



I 
Pbt c^ta Per Gai»iu:Per cap 
for current, for offlc's.forsvb- 
ezpeoMC.' Berricea. 'siatiioe 

I 



1287 60 
209 66 
249 20 
249 14 
282 52 
264 85 
249 88 



I 



$121 36 
77 62 
88 52 
96 74 
94 25 
117 43 
116 68 



$64 57 
70 28 
89 86 
i9 40 
74 92 
78 24 
67 33 



* These fignres are for the nfne months, fiom Janoftry 1 to October, 1870, bat the per 
capita is flfued for the entire year. 



219 

The following table will show 



THS AKOUNT OF PBBSONAL PBOPSSTY 



In and about the Prison, Sept. 30th^ 1871 and Sept. 30th, 1872. 



Stock in chair and cabinet shop 

Shoe shop 

Tailor shop 

Blacksmith shop 

Stono shop 

Tools, machiney, etc., in chair & cabinet shop. 

Shoe shop 

Tailor shop 

Blacksmith shop 

Stone shop 

Soap house 

Bam and yard 

Miscellaneous merchandize 

Proyisions and forage 

Wood 

Live stock 

Furniture, etc., in various departments 

Outstanding accounts 



Sept. 80, 1871. 


Sept. 80,1978. 


181,981 11 
696 27 


r 

(44,844 16 
767 48 


986 61 
247 80 


2,409 19 
184 25 


2,667 40 

88,868 84 

57 12 


1,707 15 

84,551 59 

85 89 


189 90 


168 80 


898 61 


898 61 


868 55 


495 40 


29 25 


81 90 


1,071 60 
480 21 


1,481 51 
598 18 


816 58 


458 80 


1,902 00 

1,190 00 

6,500 00 

10,066 90 


1,195 00 
1,258 00 
7,000 00 
6,214 06 


192,858 28 


1108,828 96 



Showing an increase in the value of this kind of property in 
1872, of 111,470 73, over the value in 1871. 



220 



The following table will show 



A OOMPABISON OF THB BUSINESS 



Of the different shops during the year 1871 and 1872. 



CABINST AND CHAIB SHOPS. 



Beceived from sales 

Indebtedness settled by sales 

Outstanding accounts for work sold 

Work done for prison 

Stock and work finished and unfinished on hand 

Stock ordered Oct 1, 1870 and Oct 1 1871 .... 

Paid for stock 

Paid for stock in work 

Indebtedness for stock 

Earnings, ( with machinery running 8 months 
in 1871 




115,689 81 

2,281 09 

7,867 84 

1,161 17 

31,981 11 



168,270 02 



118,646 97 

11,718 01 

781 74 

11, 876 20 

20,899 08 



168,270 02 



1879. 



140,670 31 

1,487 89 

8,144 88 

1,254 26 

44,844 16 



$91,400 49 



$81,981 11 

26,082 44 

440 64 

14,260 97 

18,688 48 



191,400 49 



TAILOR SHOP. 



Beceived from sales 

Indebtedness settled by sales 

Work made for prison 

Outstanding account for work sold. 
Stock and work on hand 



Stock on hand Oct 1, 1870, and Oct 1, 1871. . . 

Paid for s toe k 

Indebtedness for stock 

Paid for stock in work 

Earnings 



1871 



$138 99 

67 86 

8,869 86 



986 61 



$6,042 81 



$1,842 88 
766 62 
166 44 



2,788 62 
$6,042 81 



1879 



$144 16 

36 85 

8,764 78 

60 

2,400 19 



$6,846 47 



$986 61 

2,305 26 

467 08 

477 61 

2,108 02 

$6,845 47 



221 
Comparison qf JBiisiness — continued. 



BHOB SHOP. 



Beceived from sales 

Indebtedness settled by sales 

Outstanding account for work sold . 

Work made for prison 

Stock and finished work on liand . . . 




Stock and work on hand October 1, 1870, and 

October 1, 1871 

Paid for stock 

Indebtedness for stock 

Paid for stock in work 

Earnings 



1405 00 

165 62 

88 59 

1,909 85 

696 27 



$8,300 83 




1,692 42 



$8,300 83 



1S7», 



$406 25 

85 18 

15 67 

1,126 71 

767 48 

$2,851 19 



$675 74 

265 50 

680 68 

9 50 

719 78 



$2,851 19 



BLACKSMITH SHOP. 



Received for sales 

Indebtedness settled by sales 

Outside account for work sold 

Work done for prison 

Stock on hand 

Stock on hand October 1, 1870 and October 1, 

1871, ■ •• 

Paid for stock 

Indebtedness for stock 

Earnings 



1871, 



$171 11 

9 09 

5 80 

2, 729 60 

247 80 



$8,162 90 



$186 16 

482 95 

544 60 

1,999 19 



$8,162 90 



1S79. 



$148 27 

13 85 

1 90 

1,563 77 

184 25 

$1,907 04 



$247 80 
466 20 
144 25 

1,048 79 



$1,907 04 



%i2 

CompariBon qf ^tM^ne9«— -continued. 



STONE SHOP. 



Received from sales 

Outstanding accounts for work done 

Indebtedness settled by sales 

Work for prison other than building 

Paid for teaming 

Set led for teaming by sales 

Making and repairing tools 

Earnings 



1871. 



$907 81 
367 45 



11,275 26 



»1,275 26 
$1,275 26 



1879. 



$2,571 00 

624 65 

12 98 

17 00 



8,225 68 

$9 86 

478 85 
2,502 28 

$8,225 63 



The following table will show the amount paid during the 
past year for 

OFFICSBS' SSBYICES. 



Comm^'ssioner . 
iDeputy warden 

Physician 

Chaplain 

UBher 



Chaplain, Catholic 

do due last year. 



Clerk 

Master mechanic. 
Master painter... 

do 

do 



Mechanic and keeper 

do 

do 



Turnkey. 
. . .do. . . . 



Yard master 

Mechanic and keeper stone shop 

do do 



Mechanic and keeper cabinet shop. . 
do do 



Keeper paint shop, 

do 

do 



Keeper saw room 

turning room 

blacksmith shop. 

shoe shop 

kitchen 



gate 
2 office guards, 
2 cell-room j^iards. 
4 wall guar( 
Matron. 



rds. 



866 days . 



867 
87 
26 

258 



859 days 

24^ days 

108>| days 



6 
860 

851 

8 

858 



866 
866 
866 
866 
866 
866 
782 
782 
l,878i^ 
52^ 



days . 
days . 
days . 
days . 



days . 
days . 

days . 
days . 
days . 



180 days . 

286 days . 

56 days . 

29 days . 

281 days . 



days . 
days . 
days . 
days . 
days . 
days . 
days . 
days . 
days . 
weeks 



18 00 



550 00 
450 00 



$200 00 
125 00 



18 00 
2 00 
2 50 
8 00 



2 60 
2 00 
2 50 



2 00 
2 50 



2 50 
2 00 
2 50 



2 00 
2 50 



2 00 
2 25 
2 50 



2 
2 
2 
2 



00 
00 
00 
00 



2 00 



2 

2 



00 
00 
2 00 
2 00 
8 50 



$1,200 00 

1,098 00 

400 00 



1,000 00 



825 00 
1,200 00 
1,271 00 



998 00 
897 50 



820 00 



912 00 

877 50 



911 00 
'850 '66 



879 76 

782 00 

782 00 

782 00 

782 00 

782 00 

782 00 

1,464 00 

1,464 00 

2,746 50 

446 80 

¥28,458 05 



234 

The following is a statement of the 



PBODUCTS OF THJB PRISON QABDSN AND FAKM IX>T 



for the year ending September 30, 1872. 



125 bash.. 

80 bush.. 

25 bush.. 
800 head. . 

75 

42 

47 

54 

728 bush.! 

2,580 tt>s... 

218 days.. 

10 days. . 

80 ...... 

50 



Potatoes 

Turnips 

Green com 

Cabbage 

Squashes 

Hogs killed, weight 18,255 fi> 

Hogs on hand 

Pigs on hand 



Seeds 

Ck)m for hogs 

Ground feed for hogs 

Labor 

Labor for team 

Hogs on hand Oct 1, 1871. 

Pigs do 

JSalance 



fO 50 
50 



5 
5 

7 75 
15 00 

200 



II 00 
8 00 

20 00 
8 00 



162 50 

15 00 

15 00 

15 00 

8 75 

1,027 26 

705 00 

108 00 



17 50 
801 55 

29 20 
218 00 

30 00 
600 00 
150 00 

620 026 



11,951 51 



$1 ,951 51 



" NoTS.—The PriBon lot contains aboat twelve aeree oatside the walla, the most of 
which ia occopled aa paatare for hogs. 



225 



The following table oontains 



YABIOtrS COMPARISONS 



Between the prisoners received in 1870, 1871 and 1872, and 
since the organization of the prison: 



» 


Since 
organi- 
sation. 


1870 
100 

88 
58 

8 

1 


1871 
95 

21 

70 

8 

1 


1872 


Whole number received 


1,718 


95 






CONGUOAL KEIaATIONS. 

Married 




88 


Sinele 




54 


Widowers 




6 


Widow 




1 


Divorced 




1 







98 
2 

68 
82 

25 

67 

8 

89 
9 
1 
1 


94 
1 

65 
80 

84 
84 
27 

91 
1 
2 
1 




SBX- 

Males 


1,620 
98 


90 


Females 


5 






NATIVITY. 

Native bom 


928 
795 


68 


Foreiflrn bom 


42 






HABITS. 

Temperate 




88 


Moderate 




89 


Intemperate 




23 








COLOR. 

White 


1,661 

46 

5 

6 


91 


Black 


1 


Mulatto 


1 


Indian 


2 






AGES. 
Under 12 


8 

840 

758 

867 

156 

74 

18 

7 




Prom 12 to 20 


19 
44 
28 
2 
2 
8 
2 


26 
87 
18 
11 
8 


15 


20 to 80 


46 




19 


40 to 50 


10 


50 to 60 


8 


60 to 70 




70 to 80 


• • « 


2 













15— C. & R 



(Doc.18.) 



226 

Variotcs Comparisons — continued. 



EDUCATIONAL RELATIONS. 



Read and write — 

English 

Norwegian 

Qerman 

Danish 

Qerman and Norwegian 

English and Norwegian 

Swedish 

French 

English and Ckrman 

English, Gkrman and French 

Bohemian 

Read but not write 

Neither read or write 



I S V 



BELIOIOUS IKBTRUCTION. 



Methodist 

Catholic 

Lutheran 

Baptist 

Congregational ist . 

Presbyterian 

Episcopal 

None 

Universalist 

Mormon 

Swedenborgian* • • • 

Adventist 

Christian 

Free Will Baptisi.. 

Jew 

United Brethren. . . 



CRIMES TOR WHICH COHMITTED. 



Assault with intent to kill 

Assault with intent to maim 

Assault with intent to rape 

Assault with intent to steal 

Accessory before the fact — rape. 

Aiding prisoners to escape 

Adultery 

Arson 



Altering and forging United States treasury notes . . . 

Burglary 

Burglary with larceny 

Burglary with arms 

Breaking church ... 

Bigamy 



Since 
Org. 



187018711873 



70 

2 

82 

10 

1 

1 

11 

58 

8 

220 

15 

5 

1 

8 



78 
4 
8 



1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
8 
11 



27 

25 

14 

10 

8 

7 

4 

8 

1 

1 



8 

1 



2 

17 
1 



61 
2 
9 

2 
1 
1 



2 
1 

11 
5 



29 
27 
12 
8 
1 
8 
6 
2 
1 



19 
8 



59 
3 

12 



6 

1 
1 
7 
6 



27 
23 
13 
3 
2 
8 
4 
6 
1 



1 
3 
1 
2 

1 



8 

2 

1 
I 
1 

3 

■ • < 

6 

4 
1 



1 ... 



227 

t 

VartotM Compariaona — continued. 



CRIMES FOR WHICH COMMITTED. 



Burning ha^ stack , 

Counterfeitinjg , 

Claiming ana opening letters 

Concealing and disposing of stolen horse 

Desertion 

Embezzlement 

Forgery 

Fraud 

Grand larceny 

Hors^ stealing , 

Illegal voting 

Incest 

Keeping house of ill-fame 

Larceny , 

Murder, different degrees 

Manslaughter, first degree 

Manslaughter, second degree 

Manslaughter, third degree 

Manslaughter, fourth degree , 

Mayhem 

Obtaining goods or money under false pretences. 

Passing counterfeit money 

Passing forged order 

Poisoning well 

Placing obstructions on railroad track 

Perjury 

Polygamy 

Prison breaking , 

Rape. 



Receiving stolen goods, 

Robbery 

Seduction , 

Sodomy 



TERMS OF SENTENCE. 



During life 

Twenty years 

Fifteen years 

Fourteen years 

Thirteen yeas 

Twelve years 

Eleven years 

Ten years and six months. . 

Ten years 

Nine years and six months. 

Nine years 

Eight years 

Seven years and five days. . . 

Seven years 

Six years and six months. . . 
Six years 



Since 
Org. 



1 

49 

8 



1 
20 
80 

1 



1 

10 
21 
888 
72 
15 
16 
27 
10 

2 
13 



1 
1 
4 
6 

14 
5 

29 
5 
5 
2 
4 



71 
1 
2 
2 
4 

14 
1 
1 

88 
1 
2 

11 
1 

26 
1 
9 



1870 



1871 



1872 



1 

i 



5 



46 
5 



1 
5 
2 



5 

1 



5 

I • I 

1 



8 

i 

7 



88 
8 
1 
1 
2 



2 
2 



1 
2 
2 



8 



• • • • 



1 
2 
1 
1 



8 

7 

"i' 

4 
87 

2 

1 
1 

i 

4 
4 



1 

i 



1 

2 

1 

2 

i 

2 



228 
Yariaus Comparisons— coniinvLed. 



TERMS OF sEKTEifCK— continued. 

Five years and six months 

Five years 

Fo\ir years and six months 

Four years 

Three years and six months 

Three years and one day , 

Three years 

Two years and eleven months 

Two years, six months and ten days. . . . . 

Two years and six months 

Two years and four months 

Two years and three months 

Two years and ten days 

Two years and five days 

Two years and three days 

Two years and one day 

Two years 

One year and eleven months 

One year, ten months and ten days 

One year, ten months and five days 

One year and ten months 

One year and nine months 

One year and eight months 

One year, six months and ^ve days 

One year and six months 

One year and five months 

One year and four months 

One year and three months 

One year and two months 

One year, one month and seven days 

K)ne year and one month 

One year and ten days 

One year and three d.ays 

^ne year and one day 

<One year . . 

TesL months 

Kine months '. 

^ght months and one day 

Eight months 

.•Six iMionths and three days 

Six months and one day 

:Six months 



^A"^** 11870 
Org. 



67 
1 

60 
4 
1 
141 
1 
1 

27 
1 
5 
1 
8 
2 
2 
374 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
1 

68 
2 
5 

10 
1 
1 
1 
6 
2 
8 
572 
3 

17 
2 

18 

2 

2 

116 



4 
1 



12 



1871 



1872 



29 



23 

. • • ' 
2 



11 



6 



10 



2 

15 



2 

1 



8 

24 
1 
2 
1 
1 



6 



8 
1 
5 



...» 
15 



1 



. • •• 

27 



4 



8 



229 

m 

Much surprise and disappointment is felt that the prison is 
not only 

KOT SELF-SUSTAINING, 

But that the annual appropriations fail to meet the current 
and other expenses, and that year after year the legislature is 
asked for appropriations to cover deficiencies. 

The indebtedness at the close of the last fiscal year, Septem- 
ter 30, 1872, was $20,733.72. 

Last year the commissioner asked for an appropriation of 
$64,589.47 to pay the then existing indebtedness, and to meet 
the current expenses of the year; the appropriation made was 
but $58,993.47, being $5,596.00 less than the amount asked 
for. 

If his estimates last year were correctly made it would be 
natural to expect a deficiency of that some at the end of the 
year. 

The estim'ate of the amount needed to complete the buildings 
then in progress was $10,000 ; the commissioner's report shows 
that $13,106.04 was required for building purposes, which would 
make a still further deficiency of $3,106.04. It appears from the 
report that a loss of $2,500 was sustained on account of dam- 
aged work thrown back upon his hands. The report also shows 
an increase in the amount of stock of various kinds on hand, 
above the amount on hand at the commencement of the year, 
of $11,470.73. These several items will more than make up the 
amount of the reported deficiency. 

Deficiency in the appropriation of last year f5, 596 00 

Increase m cost of builmng above estimates 8 , 106 04 

Loss on damaged chairs 2,500 00 

Increase in the amount of stock and other personal property 

on hand at the close of the year 11 ,470 73 

♦22,672 77 



Making a total of $1939,05 more than the amount of the in- 
debtedness. 



230 

The wants of the prison for the next year will be 

To pay indebtedness 1^,733 72 

For current expenses — the same amount as last year 50,326 47 

$70,960 19 
The commissioner estimates the net earnings of the prison for 

next year at 25,000 00 

Leaving to be provided for by^appropriation |45 ,960 19 



And we would recommend an appropriation accordingly. 

We cannot, however, refrain from expressing the hope that at 
the close of the present fiscal year, the commissioner will be able 
not only to report the prison free from debt, but with a balance 
of cash on hand. 

The views expressed in our previous report relative to 

THB IMPORTANCE OF A CHANGS 

In the manner of governing the prison we still entertain, and 
are more and more convinced of their soundness, and as the 
need of such a change has been endorsed by the Governor in 
his recent message to the legislature, by the commissioner in his 
last annual report, by the legislative visiting committees of this 
year and last, and, in fact, by almost everyone who has given 
the matter any attention, we trust the legislature at its present 
session will provide by law for the changes needed. 

The prison has been twice visited during the past year, and 
everything in and about it was found to be in a satisfactory con 
dition. 

THE TREATMENT OF THE PBISONEBS 

Is kind and humane. There is but little occasion to resort to 
punishment. The old-time cruel and severe modes of punish- 
ment, such as whipping, showering, gagging, thumb-screw, etc., 
are entirely dispensed with. The only punishments employed 
are confinement in the dark cell, confinement in their own cells, 
sometimes without their beds, a bread and water diet, and a de- 
p rivation of some luxury, comfort or privilege. 



231 

AMONG THE CHIEF WANTS OF THE PRISON, are 

First. — Suitable bathing accommodations. There is nothing of 
the kind in or around the entire buildings for the use of 
officers or prisoners. 

Second. — Water closets in the building; there are now none 
whatever. 

Third. — More hospital room. 

Fourth. — Suitable accommodations for the insane. 

Fvfth. — A dining room where the prisoners can take their meals 
together. A change from the present mode of feeding the 
prisoners would be likely to have a good eflfect upon the men, 
while it would without doubt, be a great saving of expense in 
the end. 

Sixth. — ^Better ventilation of the cells and of the room into 
which they open. 

In our previous report attention was called to the fact that 
the commissioner had found it necessary to employ more under 
officers or employes, and in some cases to pay higher wages 
than prescribed by law. His reasons for the course he has felt 
called upon to pursue will be found in the previous report of this 
Board, and more fully in his last annual report to the Governor. 

While visiting the prison in October last, we made an exami- 
nation with special reference to gaining light in relation to this 

HATTEB OF EATPLOYBS, 

With the following result: 

One keeper in the lumber room, where the lumber is received and 
cut up for the chair and furniture shops. There are usually . 
from six to eight convicts employed in this room. 

One keeper in the machinery room, in which from fifteen to 

eighteen convicts are employed. 
One keeper in another machinery room, in which from fifteen to 

twenty convicts are employed. 
One overseer who has the charge of the work, and the care of 

the machinery in the three rooms referred to above. 



One kt^per in two large painting roomsy in which from twentr- 

fire to thirty conricts are empIojedL 
One oreriter or foreman who attends to the paints and has 

charge of the work in the two large painting rooms. 
Otu Ke^.j^er in the Cabinet Shop and finishing room, in which 

nine convicts are employed. 
One Keeper in the TaUor and Shoe shop, in which fo«ir conTicts 

are employed. This keepier does the cntdng^ as well as take 

charge of the conricts. 
One Keeper in tiie Stone Shop and in charge of the out-door 

stone cutting, where from eight to fifteen convicts are em- 
ployed* 
One Keeper in the Blacksmith Shop and wash house, where 

eleven convicts are employed* 
One Keeper in charge of the Teams, where from six to fifteen 

convicts are employed* 
One Turnkey^ who has charge of the cell room in the day time, 

with six convicts employed in cleaning, mending, etc. 
Two Keepers^ on duty at night. 
Two Keepers^ who are in the back office, and exchange with the 

night keepers, They are at hand to wait on visitors and to 

go on errands. 
One Keeper^ in charge of the gate. 
Four Guards^ on the walls. 
One Keeper^ a carpenter, who has charge of the repairs, etc. 

"We have described the location and duties of twenty-two 
employes, and in looking over the size, and arrangement of the 
rooms, grounds, shop etc., and considering the nature of their 
duties we could not see, how any one of them could be dispensed 
with, and yet as we understand the present law governing the 
prison, authority is only given to employ sixteen persons to per- 
form the duties now performed by the twenty-two. It requires 
no argument to show that this state of things is all wrong and 
furnishes an additional reason why the mode of governing the 
prison should be changed. The precise number of persons to be 
employed in an institution like the state prison, where the num- 
ber of inmates, and the necessities of the institution are liable 



i 



233 

to frequent changes, should be left, as it is in all the other state 
institutions, to the discretion of the local governing^ power, 
they being held responsible for its exercise, and it should also 
extend to the fixing of the wages to be paid to all employes. If 
this is too large a discretion to entrust to a single individual, 
let it be controled, as in other states institutions by a Board of 
Inspectors or Directors. 
There are a few matters to which we would briefly 

CALL ATTENTION. 

They are of sufficient importance, we think, to be carefully 
considered by the legislature and the people generally. 

First. In view of the condition of most of our county 
jails, and the fact that none of them have any system of labor, 
or any way to employ the time of their inmates, and that the 
result of confinement in them is generally to corrupt and de- 
moralize, rather than to reform, and of the fact that in the state 
prison there is a system of organized labor, that the prison is 
free from the great evils that attach to our jails, and that the 
influences of the prison are reformatory, we believe the judges 
of our courts would be consulting the best good of the state as 
well as of. the criminal, if, in most cases where in sen- 
sentencing a criminal it is at their option to sentence to the 
county jail or to the state prison, they would sentence to the 
prison instead of the jail. 

The attention of the various judges of the state in respectfully 
called to this matter. 

Second, We would suggest a change in the law, so that for 
the second and all subsequent offences, for all crimes where it 
is now optional with the judge to send to the jail or prison, that 
the criminal shall be sent to the prison. 

Third. We would suggest a change in the law increasing the 
length of the confinement after the first offence. 

When at the prison in October, the commissioner called our 
attention to the case of a man who had then recently left the 
prison for the fifth time, the last two sentences having been for 
' one year each. 



2U 



Vn— XOBTHERN HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 



Hide hj the Legislature for this institTitiofi are as follows: 

1870. 

For locating and securing site and commencing the boild- 

ing flSS.OOOOO 

187L 

For completing north wins $44,0W) 00 

For sewerage, air duct£ ana water 8,000 00 

For kitchen, lanndrr and engine house 48,500 00 

£or heating, laondzy and cnlinaiy apparatoa. 25 ,500 00 



126.000 00 



1872. 

For central btiilding. ^91,800 00 

For lighting, ilxtares and fnmitare 31.500 00 

For barns, fences and roada, etc 6,700 00 

For purchaae of land 2,000 00 



132,000 00 



Total appropriations $383,000 00 

From the report of the baildiog commissioners, we learn that 



OOHTBACrS 

have been awarded as follows, viz : 

1871. 

Feb. 2. For construction of six north wings, Messrs. Rey- 
nolds & Fellenz 1146,581 80 

Ang. 16. Messrs. Re3molds A Fellenz, kitchen, laundry and 

engine house 47, 565 00 

Aug. 16. Sewerage and air ducts, Messrs. Reynolds & Fel- 
lenz 6,9»3 00 

1872. 

Hay 7. Central building, Messrs. Fish, Stephens & Co 72, 445 00 

May 16. Heating, laundry and culinary apparatus, Messrs. 

Jno. Davis & Co., including central building. . . 33, 000 00 

Jnn624. Two bams, L. G. Alger 3,300 00 

July 3. Bam foundation walls, Messrs. Fish & Stephens. . 400 00 

July 26. Gas works, I. H. Walker 6,600 00 

Total $316,884 80 



235 

From the report of the Building Commissioners and the re- 
cords of the Secretary of State's office, we find that the 

BXPENDITURBS 

Have been as follows: 

To locating commissioners $2,976 96 

For land 10,000 00 

surveying 84 50 

construction of road, 1871 100 00 

For printing and advertising in 1871 $386 25 

1872 141 60 



rentofofflcein 1871 $25 00 

1872 40 00 



$527 85 



65 00 

legal advice, 1871 25 00 

fencing, roadway, grass and labor, 1871 471 40 

freight on drain pipe, 1872 150 00 

1872 11244 

To building commissioners as follows : 

E. M. Danforth in 1871 $1,517 39 

1872 1,028 95 

$2,541 84 



D. W.Maxon in 1871 $659 12 

1872 77127 

$1,480 89 

A. M. Skeels in 1871 $662 70 

1872 888 85 

11,501 65 



S. V. Shipman, architect, in 1871 $6,518 89 

1872 6,044 66 

Reynolds & Fellenz, contractors on north 

wing in 1871 $87,816 06 

1872 58,765 68 

Reynolds & Fellenz,^on contract for kitchen, 

laundry and engine house in 1871 $7,852 88 

1872 80,852 88 



$5,478 28 
$12 ,563 55 

i46,'68i'74 

*88,'765*26 

"*6,998 '66 

John Davis & Co., on contract for heating, ventilating, etc. 27 , 1S2 55 

Fish, Stephens & Co., on contract for centre building. . . 47, 080 17 

L. G. Alger, on contract for two bams 8,800 00 

Fish & Stephens, on contract for barn foundation 400 00 

Henry Atlen, on contract for artesian well 787 50 

Reynolds & Fellenz, on contract for setting machinery ,etc 8,811 16 

A. T. Stewart & Co., for mattrasses 1,985 28 

Field, Leiter & Co., dry goods 1,309 67 

James Reynolds, laying drain pipe 669 50 

Hill & "Williams, drain pipe 881 16 

$311,586 87 



Reynolds & Fellenz, on contract for sewerage 

in 1871 $4,709 84 

1872 2,283 66 



yy." v,*Vi trr.'-:st of xil »pprr>priA::-.si* mAiie to ;^ Xor. 
U*/^ ll'/*;..u* f5>r u:.-*: Iii.*Ai:^ $383.000 01 

lis/: Mto^r-: ':i;^t^^i v^ J»aiArr 1*:. 1*75 Sll^SM S7 

.413 13 



Learin^r a balance: in the state treasury undimvn at that date, 
Janoaiy 1^ 1'5T3, of ferentj-one thoosaDd four hnndred andtliir- 
teisn dollars and thirteen centa. 

To settle with the Tarioos contractors now at work, on the 
c/mpletion of their contracts, will be required as follow 



K/'j-noIdi A Tf-VAu'^ contract for kitchen, laondrv. and engine 

hffti^, ' 1 r. . . . $8.89 74 

Ti^h, St/'ph'-n** A C'o/ji conlract for c^:nt«rr building 25.414 83 

J. liav'i* it Co/<i contract for heatinz, etc 5,*?07 41 

I, ll> Walker, c^^ntract for gaa woakj» 0.600 00 

f40,7«8 08 

Balance of appropriation for fences and roads, etc $3,000 

Appropriation for purcbaase of lands 2,000 

— 5,000 00 

»5t742 (» 

Deducting the amount, $51,742.02, from the amount in the 
state treasury on the first day of January, 1873, $71,413.13 
will leave a balance of $19,671.11 at the disposal of the trus- 
tees, to pay whatever balance may be due on the contract for 
the arteflian well, whatever may be due or to become due to 
the architect, for the purchase of furniture, and for other legiti- 
mate purposes. 

The trustees ask for appropriations to complete and finish the 
south wing of the hospital. 

The present condition of the finances of the state will pre- 
clude the possibility of ^uch appropriations being made at the 
present time, and even if this difficulty was not in the way^ 
we doubt whether the necessities of the insane now in the 
state demand the immediate completion of these wings. The 
facts gathered by this board, during the past year, in relation 
to the number and condition of the insane in the state not 
now in the hospital, lead us to the conclusion that when the 
northern hospital is filled to its full capacity, all, or nearly aU) 



237 

who really need hospital care and treatment, will be provided 
for. 

They also ask an appropriation of. $48,000 for current ex- 
penses on the supposition that they will have 200 patients to 
provide for for one year, estimating the cost at $20 per month 
for each one. If the hospital could be opened on the first day 
of February, with the whole 200 patients on hand, an appropri- 
ation of the amount asked for, would be sufficient to pay expenses 
until the first day of February, 1874; but the hospital will not 
be in readiness to open at that time, and possibly not for a month 
or six weeks later, and when it is opened, it will without doubt, 
be several weeks before it will be filled. In view of these con- 
siderations we think an appropriation of forty-five thousand dol- 
lars will be sufficient to pay current expenses until February 1, 
1874, and we would recommend an appropriation accordingly. 

An appropriation of eight thousand dollars is also asked for 
improvement of grounds, garden and orchard, and for the pur- 
chase of farm stock, implements, vehicles, etc. We are of the 
opinion that an appropriation of five thousand dollars will answer 
all the absolute needs in this direction, in addition to the use 
that can be be made of the labor of patients, in clearing and im- 
proving the grounds, and in work in the garden and orchard, and 
we would recommend an appropriation accordingly. 

Should the legislature make the appropriations suggested 
above, the means at the control of the hospital from the first 
day of January, 1873, until appropriations can be made by the 
legislature of 1874, will be as as follows: 

For the completion of contracts already let, for the center 

building, for heating, etc., and for gas works $46,742 02 

The purchase of 20 acres of land 2,000 00 

Fences and roads, balance of appropriation of 1872 8,000 00 

Balance of appropriations of previous years, available 
for completion of artesian well, payment of archi- 
tect, purchase of fiuniture, and other legitimate pur- 
poses 19,67111 

Current expenses to Febauary 1, 1874 45,000 00 

Improvement of grounds, garden, orchard, implements, 

vehicles, etc 6 , 000 00 

$121,418 18 



238 

This amount we regard as abundantly safficient to complete 
the building already under way, to provide everything that is 
needed to put the hospital in running order, and to pay current 
expenses until February, 1874. 

The hospital was visited on the 21st of December, 1872. It 
was a very unfavorable time for a close inspection, as the mercu- 
ry was some twenty degrees below zero and the buildings were 
not heated. 

We were, however, very favorably impressed with what we 
did see. We should judge that the work was well done, and 
that the building commissioners and the architect had been 
faithful in the performance of their respective duties, and have 
carefully guarded the interests of the State. 

We found two excellent, commodious and convenient bams, 
that have been erected at an expence of but $3,700, for the two, 
including good stone foundations. If all the work has been as 
well and economically done as this, there will be no ground for 
complaint. 

When the entire building is completed, it will be one of the 
finest and best appointed buildings of the kind in the country* 



Y[. 



STATISTICS. 



We have met with