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I 




GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE 



AND 



ACCOMPANYING DOCUMENTS, 



A. D. 1 ft58. 



ANNUAL MESSAGE 



OF 



ALEXANDER W. RANDALL. 



GOVERNOR OP THE 



STATE OF WISCONSIN. 



DELIVERED JANUARY XO, ISSS. 



■ » i ■ ■ 



MADISON. 

▲TWOOD AJSJ) BUBLBS, 8TATB PBINTIEBS. 

1858« 



:\..L':M'. Mirr.i 



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GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 

ChnMtmenof the Ssnate and Assembly ; 

I am f wqmred. fo 'lay befoife yon/BCr'fer as posariW^i tie 
conditionof the State^ and to make to yoa such sugg^gltion* 
as are deemed important for your consideration. 

iflKAkCBS. ' . 

iTie report of the Secretary of State, containing the estim- 
ates of expenses and revenues for thecprreat y€|ar,.wiUrbf 
laid before you immediately. Tour attteutiQn. will 'be attntdt- 
cklby th^ large amount estimated for the expenditorwof the 
yeai*. The large sum named undef the h€jad9'ttf^**Suiid^y 
:^xp^nses Unknown^'* and'^Dne'IndiridtikV TttiKes* ah'aggi'e- 
gate of over' $130,00(7, and constitufing, whatever b^ the ac* 
tfial aoiouBt when liquidated, what may; be called a floaji^i)^ 
debt) is each as to. require the iattention of the Xi^gialaimre'ito 
(Jevisa meansi by which the incurriog of a deb* to lArge/in 
dimensions, and so uncertain and indefinite in its character 
should be prevented. ' The amounts' for which th^ State h'as 
become jiable from" sources of expenditure which the audit- 
ipg offieer h|» be.en upable to eslma^ fcrr. with aoy- degree 
(rf' exftctneBB, have alwtfya^ borne a large propwtkm to Ae .attn 
total tJif Ae expeases of the 'year, an*'h«iice tliere has in al- 
most every year been reported a deficiency in the income to 
meet the disbursements^ and, thi3,.too^ although some of (he 
officers have estimated yeiy larg^^ums to cover these Inevit- 
able but indefiaiite-^xp^nae^, lU foHowiirg table diqws the 
estimated and aqtual .expenses of each year from AAdinclud- 
iDga8*%and will show as well the iratio of iuordaae of.tfie 
e^^ottditnres of the State, as the verji wide difference in 
AfesI teases between the eetimatee and the re«ifltei ' • » -^ 



."wrw ^-» 






4 

BitiiiuUed hj T. McHogfa, Seeretaiy of State, for ex- 

peD86s of 1849 t46,080 00 

Bttimated rerentieB of Mine year, • . 60,696 00 

Bitimated balance in 'nreaanrj, • • • • $13,715 00 
Reported by T. McHugh, as ezpenies of 1849, • 78,085 73 
Beportedrereniiesof 1849, 58,059 94 

« - 

Actual deficit, $20,025 79 

Eftlimated by T, McHugh, for expenaee of 1850, 48,925 00 

^ Add deficit of 1849, 20,025 79 

Total estimated expenses of 1850, . $68,950 79 

Estimated revenues of 1850, • . * • 108,754 19 

Estimated balance in Treasury, • • . . $39,803 40 
Reported by Wm. A. Barstow, (Sec^ of State) for ex- 
penses of 1850, 62,746 20 

Reported revenues of 1850, 94,200 31 

Estimated arrearages of 1850 to be provided for, • 14,567 61 
Add reported expenses as above, • • . • 62,746 20 



« 



' Charged and reported for 1860, . . $77,303 81 

Estimated expenses of 1851, by Wm. A. Barstow, . 65,266 08 
Add deficit as above, 14,567 61 

•Total $80,193 69 

Estimated revenues for. 1851, .... 98,215 00 

Bitimated balance in Treasury, •^ • » . $18,02131 

Reported expenses for 1851, l^ Wm. A, Barstow, 101,885 98 

«< reoeipU of 1851, 75,990 27 

• 

Actual deficit, $24,895 71 

Estimated expenses for 1852, by Wm. A. Barstow, (in- 
cluding about $38,000 of unpaid salaries, and in- 
debtedness, for which no appropriation had been 

made) r09,283 29 

. Bstlmafced resources for 1852, • • • • 109,550 60 



Estimated deficit^ • • « • • • . 266 81 



5 

Reported receipta of 1851^, by 0. D. Robinson, Sec'y of 

State, 136,105 52 

Reported expenMB of 1852, 186,096 23 

Reported^xoeM of pajmentsy 940 71 

Estimated expenses of 1853, by 0. D. Robinson, 99,275 ^^ 

" re?enaes " *• . • . . . 118,557 65 

Estimated balance in Treasury, . . . 19,292 61 

Reported recelpU of 1853, by C. D. Robinfeon, . 152,296 44 

« expenses, "*••.... 160,407,14 

Reported excess of payments, 8,110 70 

Estimated expenses of 1854, by C. D. Robinson, . 157,210 70 
*** revenues, " " 167,147 74 

Estimated balance in Treasury, .... 9,807 94 
Reported receipts of 1854, by A. T. Gray, Sec'y of State, 191,299 46 
Baported expenses of 1854, . . . . 222,154 12 

Btcess of payments, . . . . . 30,854 66 

Estimated expenses of 1855, (A. T.Gray,) . . .253,059 52 
•* revenues .• „ „ . . . 288,826 91 

Estimated balance in Treasury, .... 36,767 39 

Reported expenses of 1855, (A. T. Gray,) . . 273,067 72 

" revenues •* •* 259,4^ 84 

Excess of payments, ...... 13,646 88 

Estimated expenses of 1856, (A. T. Gray,) . . 274,044 50 
** revenues "".,... 412,476 54 

Estimated balance in Treasury, .... 138,432 04 
The estimaated expenses included about $126,000 of 

debts due from the State, and the deficit above 

stated for 1855.) 

Reported expenses of 1856, by D. W. Jones, Sec'y of 

State 395,855 87 

(This includes $32,258 54, the deficit of Treasurer 

Janssen,) 
Reported receipts of 1856, 388,363 84 



r.6 



Excess of' pajTmwitS) • ... •* . . *!,fi^ 2S 
atitDAteid. expenses of 185.Y, (D. W. Jones,) . 345^,316 01 
(lii^lijuiibg the amount overpaid,, and $62,€O0 '^du« indi*> 

viduals.") 
iSstimated revenues; - - - ' - '-' " 439,79^ 93 



( t 



* • • ' balance in Treasuiy, - - - ' - 94,481 92 
, lieported expenses of 1857. (9 mos.) (inalu4iDg o^'er- 
payment balanced,) -, - - . -, *. ' - 384i690 66 
: ' .Rep<?rt#d receipts of 1857, (9 mos,) - - - 889,934 24 

■ , BaJiwee. in i?reasury, - d^l4M^ 

• These transactiond are fof 9 months, the beginning of the 
feciil ' year having been changed to Oct. Ist. By using the 
q^iarterly Treasury Report of January 24 1858, we make 
up ,the transactions for the full year 1857, as follows : 
Reported expenses for 1857 1442.75^.00 

« receipte' " *« * * 432,793,77 



Excess of payn;)ents - $9,96-2,33 

matedEsti expenses of 1858 (D. W. Jones) 1525,824,25 

*' revenue " " 455,478,59 



Estimated deficit 870,34^.66 

: EC)y the purpose of exhibiting the gradual increase of the 
•expenditures of the State from year to year, the following 
table is prepared from- the above : 

Tear. ExpendltmreSf Decrease. Jnoreue 

184'9 * • $78,085 73 

^860 " 77,313 81 #771 92 

1851 101,885 98 $24,572 17 

1852 . 186,096 23 ■ 34,21(L/25 

1853 160,407 14 24,310 91 

1854 222,154.12 61,746 98 
ISSSt 273,067 72 50,913 60 
1856 395,855 87 122,288 16 
1867 442,756 10 47,400 23 

In the expenditures of 1856 is included the balance found to 
lie due to the State by Ex-Treasurer Janssen, $32,258 "84. 



to two cff^e btoevbfent iMtitiitiottsof tlie^Bfaftfe, attd'fbr tfee 

which as, according to the law of last session, oonipTililif^^fiie 
edifices for those Inst^tvO^oons a^ ^ffffJWS ^® expenses of the 
State in the constmction of the new capitol throufi^h the cor- 
rent financial year, wei;e extraordinary in. their .nature, and 
reUere too Trtsasary irQiA^.UraateQ.tp afijr ]arfgd,j^oxio.l\ ^<^ 

' WitHtai^se exj)lantttfriilg, ;it witl'be seen that/the iricrfea* 
in. the cnrl-eht 'eipeddiWtf'k of the State for *l!he yeai* past has 
b^en but small.' '' '^*' ' ' "' ' ' ' '" * 

jrhe^e9retary of^Statej.'in his est^.opfites pf tho,e^ppfl.^itiu:^ 
ap^reyenn^ of the cnrrei^jb year, pr^sftnfs, ^^o(fjnj,j^xa^pi^qt 
for the tax-payers of the State, especially Jin .«(; ti^^^^f grent 
£naiv>ial dirtvese. 3%i^'oilcar ^Itnaitesi a: deficit «i,tli^'jend 
of tht^ fiaoal y»ar odnoiiBting to the sum; of 4rrQj8iS.6A^ snd as 
nnderthe faei^ of resraroes^ the '^banl ^of tke ^kificienoy df 
Ex-Treas. Janssen is included, a sum which there'. a^tiife" lib 
pi'obability thaty the IVeasitt-y tv$I][ recdVe during ^ho year, 
the estimated deficit must be increased by that amount. 'Tlti- 
der these cfrciiWstanccig, ii Hvflrbe tfte duty of the Le^si'attre, 
in the exerWs6 <tf aiNvTsfe^e^onoEfty, 'proper at alliseafirins, but 
especially s6 iVi 'tMesis 'tlfrrffefe— to ^'xaniinfe'carefafty 4:he e^- 
mates of expenditure, and endeavot if possible with a'due.re- 
gard to rae inte5refe'tB of the 'State, to keep 4h'6 appro^frfations 
witihin k'lbw it^gregate. From isuch exaniin^tion of the 6uV- 
jeotas Iliive beto able to make, It is my o^fn&n that i;hfe 
-eiitpendkiti^ of ^^ Stiife niay be'so re^Ia^ed, wsithout d^trl- 
•mentf t6 knf ^adni^t of th^ pnblic serriee, ihtit -a stato 'tUx 
for the current yeai^ of ^e sMie aim^^nt as thit ot fe»t yekr^ 
$Sdo,Wd^wiil be ampfy HuAcieAt. in expl-esiitig 'tihis dpltf- 
ion, I tove in view tfre probable negotiritic^n of a neW* loan <5f 
f«>,000 lo take tbe pfece of the bohds falMg -due *fe yeak 
If <)6 'teami^fiftlon, hoWeV^er, the sum of $800:000 will not tifc 
Buffi<ri^t %o nieet'flie currient legitiniat^^ expenses of the gov- 



.8 

ernment, and pay the debts of the State, the amcNint nmst be 
increased. The debte of the State mnat be proTided for and 
paid, and their nnneoesBary accumnlation guarded against in 
thefatore. 

TVBLSO INtri'KUCTXOlC. 

Owing to the fact that no provision of law has been made 
requiring the clerks of the County Boards to make their re- 
turns to the State Superintendent in time to allow that officer 
to comply with the law requiring a full Beport from the 
several departments soon aft^ the close of the fiscal year, the 
Report of the Department of Public Instruction is not yet 
prepared. I recommend that the necessary provision of law 
be made, so that this important duty may be attended to here- 
after in due season. The present State Superintendent has 
fbrnished me, from the statistics in his possession, the follow- 
ing facts and figures : 

The whole number of children in the State between the ages 
of 4 and 20, entitled to share in the common fund is 241,647, 
being an increase of 27,761 over the number reported for the 
previous year. 

The number of pupils who have attended the public schools 
is 163,613. 

The number of school districts and parts of districtB report- 
ed is 4378, and the number of school-houses in the State 2945. 
The average amount of monthly wages to male teachers was 
$24.60, and to female teachers $15.16. 

Tlie amount apportioned to the Schools in March, 1857, was 
66 cents to each pupil. The apparent amount to be appor- 
tioned this year is about $230,000, which would be 05 cents 
to each pupil; but in view of the probable delay ^ pay- 
ments to the funds, that average cannot be £urly expected. 
The productive fund of the Department now amounts to 
over three millions of dollars. It is a fund which should be 
sacredly guarded by the officers who have it in charge. The 
Legislature will feel it to be a pleasure as well as a duty to see 
that the necessary laws are passed to cause the greatest good to 
be derived from the distribution of the Fund. The impression 



is very general throughout the State that the duties of the De- 
partment have not hitherto been discharged with proper effi- 
dency, and jour attention is invited to a careful consideration 
of the snbjeot 

BEKBVOLKNT INSTmTTIONS. 

The JEleport of the Trustees of the Institute for the Education 
of the Deaf and Dumb, shows that 57 pupils have enjoyed the 
benefits of that Institution during the past year. The attention 
of the Legislature is invited to the Beport in detail, showing 
the expenditures of the past year, and the amount asked for 
during the present year. There must have been some misun- 
derstanding in the Legislature of last year in regard to the con- 
dition of the buildings of this Institution ; the Act approved 
March 6th making an appropriation of $15,000 '' for the par- 
'pose of putting up and finishing ofif the main or centre build- 
ing," while by the present Report the Trustees ask for the sum 
of $21,500 for the same purpose, before the building can be 
ready for the reception of pupils. In the present financial con- 
dition of the State, it is for you to decide, after a sufficient ex- 
amination of the subject, whether it i? expedient to make such 
appropriation. The Institution appears to be under good man- 
agement, and to be conferring great blessings upon an unfortu- 
nate dass of persons, who deserve our warmest sympathy. — 
The amount asked for the support of the Institation is about 
the same as last year. 

The Report of the Trustees of the Institute for the Blind 
shows that 20 pupils were in attendance during the last session, 
and that the. condition of the buildings is such that a large in- 
crease of pupils inay be soon accommodatrd. No estimates of 
appropriations for the present year are submitted with the Re- 
port, the Trustees leaving that duty to be performed through 
the annual visiting committee of the Legislature. The Report 
speaks very encouragingly of the progress of the pupils in the 
acquisition of various branches of knowledge, and the Institu- 
tion seems to be in a flourishing condition, so &r as its means 
of accommodating pupils will admit 

The first Report of the Commissioners of the State Hospital 
for the Insane, exhibits the progress of that very important un- 



dertaking, down to the 1st of October, 1857. The Oomttiis- 
sioners have adopted the location near Madison, npon which a 
'building for the same purpose was 'formerly eontmenced, and 
have let the contract to responsible parties for.$T8,000 for- a 
building which will accommodate 75 patients, and they expect 
to be able to let the contracts for the various heating, cooking, 
and other apparatus, at a sum which will bring the cost of the 
edifice necessary for that number of patients,' within the aggre- 
gate of $100,000. Their suggestions in relation to building 
operations are commended to your attention. So far as is con- 
sistent with just economy in the expenditures of the State,, this 
and th^ kindred Institutions for the instruption, comfc'rt, well- 
being, and cure of the unfortunate, should be liberally provi- 
ded for, and brought to the highest condition of efficiency as 
soon as is practicable. 

Commissioners were appointed by my predecessor, according 
to law, to locate and provide for the erection^ of a Hojuse of 
Pefuge for juvenile offenders. Their report, containing matter 
of much, interest, and mudh^valuable information upon this 
subject, will be laidbeforeyou. The institution has been located 
in the County of Waukesha, at a yery eligible and convenient 
point for publiQ convenience. The benevolent ^object of insti- 
tutions of the kind commends them strongly to, public patron- 
age. It is to become a reform schooj, to reola'im and save. a 
large class of youth from irretrievable ruin.. TJie system 
adopted is one weljl devised for the pbjects and is ei^titled to 
fiivor. The ^ans adopted ifor the building seem to be admirably 
.calculated for the purpose. The building can bq Qompleted as 
fest as public necessity requires. Eaph part will be . perfect in 
itself to accommodate a limited number. The cbnimissioners 

are able, experienced, and energetic men. a small additional 
^^9lpriiKtion will be necessary to enable the conamissioners 
to carry out the designs of the- Legislature. 

The Heportof the Regents of the TJriiversity exhibits the 
condition of that Institution during and. up to the dose' of the 
last fiscal year. Tlie number of students in attehdanoe during 
the year was 164, of wliom'4l w€**d Ja the former Collegiate 



jidaasMi The 'gradoallj IncisasiBg^pirodndkive ftmd ftmpuntod 
on the 1st of October, to $&L5,9;&8.46, giving- ah annual xnoome 
pf $22,116.74 With, the inoF0aae of the means to be devoted 
Jx^.theeduc^onal departoo^Atf th% variQ^8. x^haim ABpcop^iatt 
^ntl ^ecessaxy tp the establishment of a U^iv.ensfft^ jwhich, &ho)il4 
^b^ar tl^e njime^ ^.distinguished from the .many College scat- 
tered throughout the land, have been and will continue to be 
filled, "the new edifice of the Institution, which is now in pro- 
gress of construction, will add greatly to its facilities for carry- 
ing out the purposes of the munificent grant by Congress, The 
State has accepted the trust, luod the Bepresentatives of the 
people will doubtless feel it to be a pleasure to aid the efforts 
of those who have the more immediate duty of discharging 
that trust. 

The report of the Executive Committee of the State liistor- 
ical Society, Jan, I. 1858, shows. a library of over four thous; 
and volnmes, ajad over four thousand unbound documents q,v4^ 
pamphlets,' together with a large number of uubou^d news- 
paper, files, carefully preserved. The Society hoa a valuable 
collection of about 40 oil paintii)g9, the most, of which are 
^ portraits of Wisconsin Pioneers, and prominent public pxi^X^ 
and some are of persons of national celebrity — (hose of Dr. 
Kane and Dr. Percival being among the additions of the 
naat year. It has besides some curious additions to its cabi- 
net^ rare old ipiaps and several hundred manuscripts. Under 
thQ.patron^e Qf t&e State, the society has issued during the 
paat ye^r itsboet annual volume. Since the organbeation- of 
the Society «ii^ January, J 854, it has niet with unusual sucoess 
— the i%^i;efip9 iof the library alone having (iver^ged ov<er^ne 
Iboos^od rrotomes annually. The year past appears to have 
ezMbited wmuch prosperity as any year preceeding, aod'its 
influenee abfioad is giving, in many respects, inci^eafiaug hoiior 
•and credit to tiie State. ' Itip worthy of the patronage of the 
"Btate, and every reasonable faeility should be furnished by the 
' Cegislatnre for its substantial prosperity. The officers of the 



/ 

13 

Society are entitled to great credit, for their enterprise and 
efficiency, and deserve encouragement. 

Under onr present financial embarraasmentB, it becomes, 
however, a question for your consideration, whether it is pm- 
dent to incur the expense of publishing its volume for the 
year 1868, until the present debts of the State are paid. Hie 
materials for the next volume will not be lost, nor the Society 
injured, by the delay of a single year, in case such delay is 
considered expedient. 

AQEIODtTUBB. 

The statistics presented in the report of the Secretary of 
State, as the result of the inquiries of the assessors under the 
law of the last session, exhibit an interesting view of the 
growth of the State in agricultural, manufacturing and min- 
eral wealth. It is to be regretted that quite a number of the 
counties of the State have made no returns, so that the ag- 
gregates are not as great as they should have been. Among 
the counties thus delinquent were Adams, Bad Ax, La Crosse, 
Marathon, Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Pierce, Portage, Sauk, and 
Waupacca, besides several of the more lately organized coun- 
ties, whose returns would have increased the aggregates 
much. 

So far as returned, the principal items of production in the 
' year 1856, were as follows : 

Barley, 408,875 bushel*. 

Com, 6,100,790 « 

Oats, 6,312,804 " 

Potatoes, 2,318,694 " 

Rye, 220,531 •* 

Wheat, 8,717,756 « 

Butter, • . 6,655,686 pounds 

Wool, 989,806 •* 

Lead, raised, 22,706,700 ** 

The county of Grant not being returned, with its large min- 
eral interest^ the last item gives but an imperfect idea of the 
amount of lead raised in the State. ' ' 



II 

upon the proe^rity of oar agricnltnral {nfcereet depends 
die Bubetantial proeperitj of the State. The State Agricnl- 
taral Society, and the large ntimber of Oonnty Agrionltaral 
Societies already formed, are irorking great changes in pnb^ 
lie opinion, as to the importance of the farming interdbt. 
More adequate provision should be made for thorough educa- 
tion in scientific and practical agriculture. Many states are 
now moving upon this question, and are founding agricultural 
colleges and experimental farms, and are memorializiug Con- 
gress for donations of public lands, to endow and sustain them. 
Michigan, Ohio and New York petition for five hundred thou. 
siand acres each, for themselves, and ask In addition that the 
same amount be granted to each of the agricultural states. 
A bill has been introduced in Congress for an appropriation 
of six millions of acres for this purpose to the di£Eerent states. 
The memorial of the Board of Education of the State of 
Michigan, and of the faculty of the Agricultural College, 
on that subject, is so apt that I quote from it. They repre- 
sent that the course of study in that institution is ^^ insepara- 
bly connected with a system of labor in the institution ; that 
it is its design and policy to afford ample and thorough 
education of the student physically, morally and iutellectual* 
ly ; to ennoble the calling of agrieultare, and teach men to 
increase the productions of the earth." They further repre- 
sent, " that in a country so thoroughly agricultural as the 
United "States, and contemplating the nature of the great 
trust of the public lands with an enlightened and comprehen- 
sive forecast, no more legitimate and no wiser disposition can 
be made of limited portions of them, than for instruction of 
men in multiplying the productions of the earth, and th«fl 
eondudng to their comfMt, prosperity and higher civiKza<* 
tioir:" I recommend that you join in memoriidising Oongruss 
for the grant of lands to the different statee, for the purpose of 
eetablishing in ibis State an Agripnltoral GoUege,up<m a perma- 
aent basis. Our State and County Agricnltaral Societies have 
been wisely established, and their a&iss ably and prodently 



oon<hi^ed» Qt^t credit is due them for the ohango abnetdy 
tdkiog piftee in the eetimatioQ ia which agricultural oconpa^ 
Horn are held. Tilling the soil isaaandeiit ecoapatiiMi; in: 
itself the most honorable of i^iy engaged iaby civilized men. 
Kq honorable man can look upon it with disrespect, and no 
man who despises the occupation of cultivating die soil is fit 
for any of the learned professions, or for the respectable soci- 
ety ot men engaged in agriculture. The highest good to all 
mankind^ depends more, than in any other one avocation, upon 
the wise and successful prosecution of agricultural pursuits. 

r 
1 , 

HIKERAJL INTKBKBTS«- 

• 

A verylargfe class of our oitLoens are engaged in lead imd 
iron mining. The mineral interests of the State may w^ll .be 
Qlassed in importanoe .with its agricultural and conunercissL iiy- 
terests. . JS^ew • developements and discoveries are. constantly 
made in the lead mining regions, which are sources of greats 
weallli to the State as well as to individuals. It is of much 
moment that the State render every facility in its power, by 
legislation, and if found practicable in the present stage of its 
finances, by material aid, to futthdr discoveries as to the 
character of the mineral lands and the position and conditioil' 
of lead ores, at difierent localities aiid varying depths from the 
svifjice of the'Carth. Qudstiom connected with this subject wilt 
b^ brought befoi'eyou by these who represent the mining inter*^ 
eatSi ^^d will foe eiltitled to youi'cdireftti examinatioti. 

BANKING LAW. 

Tlie baxOking.Iiaw of the State is deficient -in many impor* 
taut respects, a^ecting ■ the security of. the bill holder, and 
needs mo^t thorpugh revision and amendment;' The &v^ 
duty of theStateinr authorial]^ iasuee of baak l)apeV| is to 
pcroteat the public, and see that' they suffer no loss. All 
bai^king ili^torj^ shows a teodepoyj in pfiLotiee, ta pei^etusdly 
d&niHiiqkipnifalic'isecicrlty, either by expulsion of 's|>eiei«, which 
bank paper'is'.BUpposed 'te'represetit; or by <h^ depreciation 
of iSiiite'Stoeki^^: deported atl collateral to guaWteea^naf 
itid^tiiptWn: Thefeanking sjht^iA of this State has proved nb 



u 

1 

ei;(Qeplioa to the cQmmQii ruXei Th^, Irapiera of the l^wuu-v 
g|i)i(^tipi^ljt designed 10 gusM*d,^g(MJQ.8l| tbi6,ayil,: bait tjhe.eyi- 
dtoae of rao^rd^ ^owisg th^ prA<H}e<98 w)^icb.hAye grown i^p^. 
condufiii^el^.demoiiBtriitee that tbd originaldedign is a failui<^i 
and that seearitif to bill ]ioMbi^ u^taad .of ^ncreasing^ haal 
cobsta'ntiy dknitiished, mdm>>6ep6dlally with the.baiiik»of TOr « 
cent otighi. Ihe object of tto la^^'reqttiringtbe depoeiteof) 
State oi" tJnited States Stocks, 'With- tiw Bank Coniptrollery at' 
gectirity fbr the issue of bank h6tes, was a plain one. These ' 
stocks were not to be regarded as bank capital, strictly speak- 
ing, but as collateral security, available to the bill holdef* 
only in the emergency that iemy bank might feil to redeenr* 
from its own fiindl Banks were expecteid to conduct theii^' 
businegs upon theSr own capital and' giro security besides,' 
and such was the view held and acte4 upon by the Bank* 
Department until a period quite recent. Dttiing the past 
year, however, an entire change seems, to have, taken jilace* 
ib, the practice of th^ Department in this respect, so that kV 
thi3> time the stocks or collateral deposited, is made to stand* 
for and represent bank caj)ital itself; and very large issues of 
b^ls .have .been credited and put into circulation upon' this.' 
hifjpethews. In, numerous instances, too, the banksithus start-* 
edi with n9 other known <5apital tha^ their. collateral seourity, 
afelo^at^d .in places orat points withput pqpjilatlon, unknown: 
tq the peqpleirof the State or the maps,, inaccessible, and be- 
yond.tihe reRoh;9.f:;hiU-holder8, ©v^iif.when inown; aadnotj 
Uftfz^gu^ntLj^the.biUs appear ftof be signed by fictitious na^iesr 
USs officej:^ by .minors, pi; by peraww pecuniarily irreeponsibje'k, 
A« a.n^Qeaaary ooi^s^qoeMe ix^all sach cas^} biU-hold,e]is canr 
not ^Qfl^ij-ucJ paypaj^pti.or.oa default l>ave theix notes protected,. 
ox dp aj^y.apt tq qbtain ^ha mquej due the^a,^ even Jrpm the 
Sj^q^rity which is ^th^ only jeal ,9ritTOgibl?j Cj^piJtal of sujcli. 
^P^^^ Tt? . ^rfiPf^^ of oujr, bank law evidently neyer eojy 
tQfp^pifit^idjth^^forganijzatiaaqf.a banki^ig.ftasociatian, aud.tjti^^ 
ewippfftn.^ ^iHs l^y.it, witftftut •thjQ.^iestoblidimerit.pf a b^^ 
^WJ?P»?^ WPl^?P<>^ bqsipps^.. aqQfi98iW^.^yjWdinary m§vif 



16 

to the public, open at regular biuiiiess hoars, and with offi- 
cers well known to the oommnnitj in which thej reside ; and 
it was, of consequence, anticipated that persona having such 
bank bills, might present tiiem for payment at anj time, and 
in default of payment haye them protested, so that they 
could secure payment by the established legal method. It 
could never have entered the minds of the framers of the 
law, that bills should go into circulation, directly from the 
Comptroller's office, without ever going into a bank or passing 
over the counter of a bank in the ordii)ary course oi busi- 
ness. I cannot regard such issues in any other light, than as 
a manifest perversion of the spirit and intent of the law ; an 
evasion of its terms, for the purpose of preventing bill-hold- 
ers from obtaining payment* of their dues^ and thus far at 
least, fraudulent in design. Whatever may be said of legiti- 
mate banking as an abstract question, or its benefits as com- 
pared with a currency of coin, this practice has certainly 
rendered it impossible. Ko association^ however desirous, 
can carry on a legitimate and honest business on real capital, 
while such institutions as those alluded to are permitted to 
exbt. The question is narrowed duwn to a single point — 
Honest or Fraudulent Banking. Both cannot long exist at 
the same time, and it is your duty to determine which shall 
prevail, and whether the interests of the people of Wisconsin 
in the premises, shall or shall not be protected. It is my 
earnest wish that the great and gix)wing evil should be speed- 
ily checked and removed, and no proper effort will be spared 
by my Department to accomplish that result. An examina- 
tion as to the manner in which one of that claas of banks was 
started discloses Acts more or less appreciable to all persons, 
and which cannot in justice be withheld here. In the case 
alluded to stocks were issued at the Capital of Missouri, on 
the 18th day of December ult., and were registered by the 
Auditor of that State on the same day. On the S8th of the 
same month they were assigned at St Louis, by the Presi- 
dent of the Pacific Bailroad Company ; and on the 81st of 
l3ie same month were assigned in the Bank ComptroUen' 



17 

Office of tliis Stitei aa. secnritj for t&e issues of- beoik notes. 
On that day the receipts in the Treasovy of all fimcls wer6 a 
little over two thousand dollars, as appears hj the booka in 
the Treasurer's office. After that date no bnsineas was done, 
no money receivM or disbursed^ until ihe fourth day of 
the present month,' when the amonnt of $124^224,28, i?hich 
was ia the Treksury on the Slst Dec, wa9 piaid oyer by the 
retiring Treasurer to the present incumbent of that office, 
and the sum of $19,000 of bank notes, issiled o(n theafcffe- 
said Missouri bonds, and dated in July last, tens apart of the 
fimds so paid over. 

These notes had evidently but just been signed, and it might 
be concluded, psssed directly from ihe Comptroller's to the 
Treasurer's office. The bank was a new one, unheard of before, 
so that the plate must have been engsiged under the order of 
ih(B OomptroUer^ and the bills printed in advance of the issue 
of the stocks by the^tate of Missouri and apparently signed 
before their deposit in the Bank Department ; and the State 
Treasurer must hate taken the currency in exchange for other 
funds in the Treasury, before a doUa^ of it had been put into 
circulation elsewhere. This itistitution is so vaguely located 
as to be wholly inaccessible to the business public, It needs 
but little sagadlty to foresee that if such banking is to be. tole- 
rated, or if the Legislature at this 'session shall fail to provide 
stringent reniedies for the evil„ tixat all legitimate banldng is 
ended for the present, and wide spread financial ruin must 
soon overtake the pebple and the State^ Another fjsict'in this 
connection is well deserving of yoiir attention, and the appliba- 
tion of a proper legislative correotlan. The- funds found: in 
the Treasury by the new incumbent amounted' to the sum of 
$124^4)28, nearly all in bank paper, except $2,457,86, 
which was in gold and silver e6in, notwithstanding the law 
prohibits the reosliving of: any* funds but coin in paymbnt of 
public dues. It is apparent thkt whatever specie might reach 
the Treasury, eonamandiDg as it dees! alai^e piremium, might 

hold out a great temptation' to the Treasiireor'tO' etchange it 
2 



18 

for currency. The effect of exchanging bank paper by any 
bank at the Treaspry must work to the detriment of all insti- 
tutions not similarly allowed the privilege. Li view of the 
many ciroumstanees pointing to operations of this nature, and 
the fact that they directly tend to peril the public interests 
and put In jeopardy the funds of theJ^te, I recommend the 
passage of a law prohibiting, under the severest penalties, the 
State Treasurer from traflScking in, changing, loaning, or in any 
manner, directly or indirectly, using any monies belonging to 
the public on his own account, for any purpose whatsoever. 
I also recommend the passage of a law, making it a high 
crime for the Bank Comptroller, or any officer or person in 
the Bank Department, to act as agent or depositor for any 
person or association, dosigtring to establish any bank, or as 
agent of any State for the sale of any of its stocks or other 
evidences of debt, or to procure to be engraved for, or issue 
to any person or banking association, any registered bills in 
advance of the deposite of stocks as security, or to issue 
such Ijills or notes to any person or bank to be put in circula- 
tion in any other manner tlian through a regular banking 
house located at some well known business point, and con- 
veniently accessible to the business public ; or to receive for 
any service in the organization of, or issuing notes to any 
banking association, or for the sale or transfer of stocks, or 
any other official service, any compensation whatever, beyond 
what is allowed or provided by law. 1 know of no way of 
reaching the evils of this system but by the passage and en- 
. forcement of the most stringent laws, for the protection of the 
public. The following table exhibits the circulation ot regis- 
tered notes, and the character of the stocks upon which they 
were issued, taken from statistics furnished by the Bank Comp; 
troUer, with other information connected with the subject. 

During the pastyear twenty-seven Banking AssociatioDs 

have been oiganized with an aggregate Ci^ital of 12,200,000 

V^ven Banks previously organized have increased 

^pital in the aggregi^te 575,000 



19 

And two Banks hare discontinued business, with an ag- 
gregate ct^ital of 125,000 

The whole number of Banking Associations o rganized 
and doing business on the first Monday of January 
1858, is seventy-five, with an aggregate capital of 5,940,000 

The increase of the Banking capital for the year 1857 

is '^ 2,650,000 

The whole amount of countersigned notes issued and 

delivered to the Banks during the year 1857 is $1,697,863 i 

The whole amount of circulating notes returned to the \ 

* Bank Comptroller's ofiSce for destruction during I 

the year 1857, is 493,342 

The whole amount of countersigned notes issued and 

delivered to the Banks knd outstanding on the first 

Monday of January 1858, is $3,215,488 

Which are secured by the deposit of Public Stocks aud 

Specie in the sum of $3,862,041 

50,000 

50,000 

128,000 

41.000 

76,000 

126,000 

232,000 

341,000 

125,000 

14,000 

14,000 

33,000 ' 

33,500 

20,000 

2,004,000 

261,140 

116,000 

Racine ^ Mississippi Rail Road Bonds 8s 27,000 

Milwaukee <kWatenownR.R. "" 88 50,000 

Specie 119,901 

Total $3,862,041 



As follows : 




TVieconsin 


6s 


li 


'-s 


Indiana 


53 


Michigan 


6s 


Ohio 


63 


Louisiana 


' 68 


Virginia 


6s 


Tennessee 


6s 


North Carolina 


63 


Pennsylvania 


5s 


Kentucky 


5s 


<t 


68 


Georgia 


6s 


M 


7s 


Missouri 


68 


Illinois 


6s 


California 


7s 



20 



The whole amoiini of Bank tax aMeesed during the year 

1857, all of which is paid in except $979 16, is 970,298.02 

The follomng Banks have returned to tlie Comptroller's 
OflSce for destruction, circulating notes, amounting to over 
$5,000 eacli : 



Jftnesville, 

Madison, 

Fond du Lac, 

Milwaukee, 

Racine, 

Walertown, 



Badger State Bank, 

Bank of the Capitol, 

Bank of Fond du Lac, 

Bank of Milwaukee, 

Bank of Racine, 

Bank of Watertown, 

Central Bank of Wisconsin, Janesville, 

Columbia County Bank, Portage Citj, 

Dane County Bank, Madison, 

Farmers^ and Millers' Bank, Milwaukee, 

Globe Bank, «• 

Jefferson County Bank, 

Juneau Bank, 

Eenosba County Bank, 

Marine Bank, 



Merchants' Bank, 
Peoples' Bank, 
Producers' Bank, 
Racine County Bank, 
Rock County Bank, 
Second Ward Bank, 
State Bank, 
State Bank of Wisconsin, 



Watertown, 

Milwaukee, 

Kenosha, 

Milwaukee, 

Madison, 

Milwaukee, 

Janesville, 

Racine, 

Janesville, 

Milwaukee, 

Madison, 

Milwaukee, 



Wisconsin Bank of Madison, 



CIBCULATION OF THE FOLLOWING BANKS. 



Arctic Bank, 
•Chippewa Bank, 
Green Bay Bank, 
Oakwood Bank, 
Lumberman's Bank, 
St. Croix River Bank, 
St. Croix Valley Bank, 
Wisconsin Valley Bank, 



Eagle Point, 
Pepin, Dunn Co., 
Marinette, 
North Pepin, 
Conterelle, 
Brinkerhoff, 
St Croix Falls, 
Millville, 



t6,660 
10,364 

8,052 
88,847 
17,799 

7,005 

6,120 
16,000 
29,240 
24,844 
14,099 
25,000 
14,250 

6,000 

6,000 
11,024 
11,000 

8,998 
24,784 
16,083 
19,048 
29,371 
36,313 

7,600 

$387,401 

$86,008 
60,000 
34,300 
80,000 
290,085 
150,000 
40,905 
33,000 





21 








< 

6TAT£A(ENT OF CONDITIOK OF BANK0. 


• 




Aggregate OspiAl. 


Aggregvte Ciroulatloii. 


Ag. AinH Bpeoie 


July 4, '63, 


$530,000 


1301,748 


$174,986.82 


Jan. 2. '64, 


600,000 


486,121 


182,482,81 


July 2, '54, 


1,250,000 


786,216 


240,909.73 


Jan. 1, '65, 


1,400,000 


740,764 


334,883.74 


July 8, '65, 


1,686,000 


930,320 


368,127.68 


Jan. 1, '66, 


1,810,000 


1,066,165 


531,713.64 


Jan. 6, '61 


2,955,000 


1,702,570 


542^38.81 


January 1858, 


6,940,000 


8,215,488 





Of the total outstanding circulation of the Banks, $3,215,488, 
Missouri has furnished securities to the amount of $Sf,004,- 
000. The facility with which certain stocks are changed into 
currency under our B^nk Department^ must, unless checked 
speedily, put an end to our Bank' System. It is well under- 
stood that $100,000 in money will buy abonat $125,000 of these 
Missouri Stocks at any time. Upon these Stocks from $95,000 
to $100,000 may be issued, to buy as much more Missouri 
Stocks, which in turn, being deposited as security, will draw 
nearly as much more currency, and so on almost indefinitely. 
The Banks being established at inaccessible or unknown points, 
to avoid the payment of specie upon the oirculation, would in- 
duce an unlimited inflation of the currency. The value of 
these Stocks. ultimately may well be questioned. While a few 
operators in Wall street may give them a ficti^ous value as a 
banking basis, il is believed that .were the demand created for 
banking in Illinois and Wisconsin to cease, they would sink at 
once far below the rates at which they are received on deposite 
as security for our bank circulation, and that they are not a safe 
basis, even as collateral security, much less when held and used 
as actual bank capital. 

This system of banking, in the end, must drive out of circu- 
lation all specie and the currency of banks established for le- 
gitimate business purposes. Banks located in business centres, 
where they are liable at any time to be called upon to redeem 
their circulation in specie, cannot compete with those institur 
tions located at inaocess.ble points, and. would be neoiossarily 
compelled to withdraw their circulation entirely. 



22 

In concluding this subject, I would say, that the State should 
have honest banking or none at all. It is a branch of business 
in which the temptation to perversion and evasion, if not to 
fraud, is great under any circumstances. But it is the duty of 
the Legislature to check all infringements upon the plain in- 
tention of the existing law, and to punish with severity every 
violation of its provisions, either in letter or spirit, and especi* 
ally to guard every avenue for the perpetration of fraud upon 
the people. A thorough investigation of the Bank Depart- 
ment, and the manner in which its operations have been con- 
ducted, at an early period o»f the Session, is recommended. 

LEGISLATION. 

Grave charges have been made during the past year, and 
are constantly reiterated, ot corrupt conduct in the Legisla^ 
ture which disposed of the Grants of (and donated to thi& 
State for Kailroad purposes. The charges are that individu- 
als connected with the Milwaukee & La Crosse Kailroad, 
either as offii^rs or otherwise, offered and paid to members of 
the Legislature of 1856, either in money or bonds, or other- 
wise, large bribes to procure a particular disposition of thos0 
grants of land. It is also charged that there was the same 
species of corruption in the disposition of a portion of those 
lands designated as the ITorth Eastern Land Grant. These 
charges are so open and bold, that good citizens have become 
alarmed at the idea of such official misconduct, and the repu- 
tations of the members of that Legislature, and* of the State, 
have materially suffered in consequence. 

K there has been no such corruption and wrongs as those 
indicated, it is due to the honorable men of that Legislature 
that they be cleared of those charges, and that the slanders 
be stopped, If there have been such frauds upon, and corrnp- 
tion in Legislation in this State, public justice demands that 
by exposure and punishment an end should be put to such 
venality. 

The man who would dare to approach a sworn public officer 
with a bribe, to turn him from his honest convictions of duty, 
should be hunted down by the law and severely punished. 



It is due to the people of this State to know whether their 
representatives, can be bought and sold like slaves in the 
market, or like cattle in the shambles. Honest Legislation 
in protecting the rights of all by wholesorpe laws, is the great 
safeguard of the people, and thej have a right to demand 
that at the hands of their reipreeentatives. It is time this 
cjlamor eeaaed,or the guilty parties were exposed and punished. 
The self respect which every Legislative body riiould feel, '■ 
should lead without hesitation to exposure of wrongs and 
crimes. ISo oountenanoe should any longer be given to 
causes of reproach i^i^^^t a high and honorable body of pub* ' 
lie men^ Public morals like private morals are never improv- 1 
ed by winking at delinquencies. Covering up crimes aftelr ^ 
they have been committed, neither operates as a punishment 
to oflfenders or to deter other men from the commission of 
like offences. Legislation should be as pure in motive and 
action as the administration of justice or execution of the law. 
If the law making power is suffered to become corrupt with 
impunity, the administration of the law by Courts of Justice 
will be suffered to become corrupt with like impunity, and 
the rights of the whole people be jeopardized. Justice to the 
Legislature upon which the corruption is charged, jus- 
tice to tlie people of the State who have been outraged, if the 
charges are true, and justice to yourselves, demand that the 
Legislation of this State be purged 6f these charges, if they 
are but charges, and of the offences if offences have been 
committed. I will sustain the Legislature, to the full extent 
of the power of my department, in any investigation upon 
this subject, without any regard to where the Vlow will fall. 
It is a question which concerns the honor of your department. 
I submit flxd whole question to your self respect, your honest., 
convictions of duty^ and your obligations to the law and to , 
the people, as to what your duty is \ipon this subject. 

The manner in which the Rail Boad companies to which 
the grants of land were given by the State, have fulfilled the 
conditions of the taw, will necessarily come before you. A ' 



24- 

strict compHance with the material requirements of the law 
must be ezacted. Stockholders in many of the Bail Boad 
companies of this State, and a large class of the best citisooB 
of the State who have encumbered their farms to aid Bail 
road companies, have suffered great losses and are liable to 
suffer still greater losses, on account of the criminal misman- 
agement and breaches of trust of their agents and offioen. 
As far as possible the Legislature should establish safeguards 
against such wrongs, and pass laws making it a criminal of* 
fence ior any director,officer,agent or servant of anj B. B. Ck>« 
to appropriate, sell^ transfer, or in any numner dispose of any 
funds or securities belonging to any Bail road com|>any, or to 
the stock holders thereof, for any other object than for the 
necessary and legitimate purposes of such road. 

An alteration should be made in many of our criminal 
laws, which in cases of light offences, and particularly with 
youthful offenders, will give the courts a greater discretion 
in imposing punishment 

The law on the subject of gambling needs amending. The 
penalties against this vice operate as invitations to indulge in 
it. At every session of the Legislature, gamblers and black- 
legs throng this city, dogging the footsteps of citizens, enticing 
the young and confirming an evil habit in the old. Severe 
punishment should be imposed upon these professional gam- 
blers, armed with all the paraphernalia of a disgraceful pro- 
fession, to drive them if possible from their pursuits. Officers 
should be compelled to a strict performance of their duties in 
this respeot. I shall take great pleasure in attending to the 
execution of any law that may be made on this subject. 
More stringent legislation is required,to compel public officers 
to the performance of their duties. Bold and wealthy crimi- 
nals are too frequently suffered to escape punishment, for no 
other conceivable reason than the high respect felt by public 
officers, for the dignity and magnitude of the offences com- 
mitted. The value of all criminallaw in the protection of 
persons and property, and in the prevention of crime, is ia 
the certainty of its execution. In this age, more than at any 






/ 



25 

other in the history of the civilized world, crimes are increas- 
ing with astounding rapidity. There is more learning and 
comparatively less wisdom; more professions of virtne and 
comparatively more vice ; more religion and comparatively 
less true Christianity, than the world ever witnessed before. . 
Art and science pay tribute to criminal rapacity, and are 
made auxiliaries to aid in successful violation of the law. 
Unless greater efforts are made to secure punishment for of- 
fences ) if the boldness and frequency of public wrongs ate , 
to secure their impunity, but a little time mqst elapse before 
an aptitude for the commission of crime will become a con-' 
firmed defect in the character of the AAiieriean .people. 

IffiVlSION OP THE LAWS. 

The Commissioners appointed to revise the laws have been 
engaged with great industry upon their duties. The ability 
and character of the gentlemen composing the Oorlimisaion 
inspire confidence that the revision of our laws' will be wise- 
ly and satisfactorily made. I am assured that their report 
will be made to you in an early part of the session. 

LOOiX Ii£QiaLATI02Sr« 

L!y predecessor called the attentiqA of thq Legislature to the 
excessive local legislation which has been indulged in since the . 
organization of the State Government. J must call your at-. 
tention earnestly to the necessity of a reform in this respect — 
jSection L of Article 12 of the Constitution of this State is aa 
follows: 

« 

" Corporations, without banking: poweiB or. privileges, may 
be formed under general laws, but shall not be created by spe- 
cial actj except for municipal purposes, and in cases where, in 
the judgment of the Legislature, the objects of the corporation 

4 « 

cannot be obtained under general laws." 

Nearly all the local legislation of the last ten years, which 
has filled large volumes, and cost the State, in time, spent by 
the Legislature, and in expense of printing, at least one hun- 
dred thousand dollars, might have been entirely dispensed with, 
and all the benefits derived, or ^pected to be derived, might 



26 

have been realized under general laws provided for the pur- 
pose, or from the action of Boards of County Supervisors, or 
by proceedings in court. Economy in public expenditures, in 
this time of financial distress, would be your sufl&cient warrant 
for abandoning this systpm of Legislation, if the Constitution 
did not prohibit it. 

ASSSSSMBNT LAWS. 

, Our assessment laws are fall of imperfections, and the at- 
tention of the Legislature is earnestly invited to the necessity 
of a change in the present system. The law should compel 
the assessors to assess all property liable to be taxed, both 
real and personal, at its actual value. There is now, in towns 
and counties throughout the State, a competition among asses- 
sors in the art of making low assessments, far below the value 
of the property assessed. Each seems to fear that his district . 
will be compelled to bear too great a proportion of the gen- 
eral burthens. By the inequality and want of uniformity of 
the system, great numbers escape the payment of their just 
proportion of the taxes, and great numbers are forced to pay 
too much. The law should insist that every tax payer give 
in to the assessor an accurate statement of the amount, and 
estimated real value of his property. Other defects of a se- 
rious character are found in the detail of our present laws, 
and as the importance of the alteration of the law is very 
great, I commend it your attention at an early day of the 
session, before the pressure of other business shall prevent its 
carefdl and deliberate consideration. 

TREASURY ASTD SCHOOL LAND OFFICfiS. 

The investigations that were made two years ago into the 
condition of our public offices, and into the manner in which 
the business of the several State Departments had been con- 
ducted, disclosed the fact that grave offences had been com- 
mitted, and gross frauds perpetrated by men intrusted with the 
administration of public affairs. Money had been embezzled 
from the public treasury to a large amount ; illegal fees had 
been taken by officers in the School Land Department ; frauds 



27 

had been practiced in the sale of school and nnirersity lands, 
and monej paid oat of the State Treasurjr without appropria- 
tions made bj law authorising the same. No adequate law 
had been passedprovixiingsaitable punishment for such offen- 
ces, although an effort had been made in the legislature to 
do so. To prevent a recurrence of such evils in the future, I 
recommend that laws, be passed, imposing heavy penalties for 
their breach, to prevent any money being paid out of the State 
Treasury, except in pursuance of appropriations ma Je by law; 
to prevent the sale of specie belonging to the State Treasury ; 
and to prevent money changers from controlling or in any 
wise interfering with its deposites ; to prevent frauds in th^ 
sale of School and University Lands, and to confine all per- 
sons having charge of any of the great public interests of the 
State to the discharge of their legitimate duties. The Com- 
mittee to be appointed by the Les^islature to report upon the 
condition of the State offices should be under instructions to 
ascertain and report the expenses of the School and Univer- 
sity Land and Swamp Land Departments for the past year, 
and how these expenses have been paid. Each of those De« 
partments should be made to support itselfi without drawing 
upon the General Fund. 

SAXJfi OF BTATI LAUDS. 

There is no good reason why men who desire these public 
lands for settlement and cultivation should be compelled to 
purchase them at second hand from 8j>eculators. There is no 
necessity for any further haste in the sale and disposition of 
those lands. I recommend that the School and University 
lands hereafter sold, and suchyof the Swamp lands as are sus- 
ceptible of cultivation and improvement, be sold only in quan- 
tities, not to exceed three hundred and twenty acres to any 
one individual, and then only to men who desire to purchase 
them for actual settlement and cultivation ; and that in all 
cases of sales, ten per cent, of the purchase money be required 
to be paid at the time of such sale. 

Tbespassebs on state lands. 
Some efficient means ought to be provided to enable the 
Commissioners to protect the School and Swamp lands from 



28 

trespassers. Although several attemftts have been made bjr 
the Legislature to remedy this evil, no adequate protection 
has been within their reach. Trespasses are constantly com* 
mitted, and some of the lands are constantly losing their val- 
ue on that acdbunt. Some of the agents appointed for tlie 
purpose of guarding them, it is feared, have quietly endured 
the spoiling of the lands^ enjoying, as a reward for their pa- 
tient forbearance, a portion of the fruits of the evil. The is - 
lands in the Mississippi^ belonging to the swamp lands, par- 
ticularly require care and supei vision. 

PUBLIC PBINTINO. 

The Legislature is bound to provide for the speedy publica- 
tion of all statute laws. Under the contract of the public print- 
er, the condition of the acceptance of his bid was to publish 
them within sixty days after the adjournment of the Legisla- 
ture. The laws for several years have not been published as 
early as they should have been, and frequently their publica* 
tion has been delayed until it was time, according to the com- 
mon system of Legislation in the State, to repeal or alter 
them. Serious injuries result from this failure to publish and 
distribute the laws, independent of the general inconvenience 
to courts, attorneys, officers, and business men. Eights are 
seriously affected, and the laws broken, by men who have no 
knowledge and no means of knowledge of what they are. The 
attention of the Legislature has been frequently called to this 
subject, but the public printer, for some reason, has paid no 
regard to it. I recommend that authority be given to the 
Secretary of State to declare th^ contract forfeited hereafter, 
whenever the public printer fails to fulfil his contract, and to 
let the printing to some other •party. 

OOBPOBATIOKS. 

The Legislature is empowered to provide for the organization 
of cities and incorporated villages, and it is made its duty by 
the Constitution to restrict their power of taxation, assessment, 
borrowing money, contracting debts, and loaning their credit, 
so as to prevent abuses in assessments and taxation, and in con* 



^ '^ *»-— — . 



29 • 

traoting debts, by such municipal corporations. Constant com- 
plaints htt made of the excesses of taxation in citite and incor- 
porated villages m this State. In many of our larger cities the 
barthena of taxation have become oppressiife. Too great 
powers are' giveh to Boauds of Trustees of villages, and to the 
Common Councils of cities, in expendiiig public moneys ; apd 
the ease with which, in the eatly stages of indebtedness, money 
can be raised upon city bonds, leads to extravagant expendi- 
tures of the public funds, and, too frequently, for other purpo- 
ses than in payment of necessary expenses or in making improv- 
ments, A limit should be fixed, in every city charter, to taxa- 
tion, and a limit to the er^ation of public debts. The debt of a 
city should never be suffered to reach such an am9unt as to 
bring down its credit more than 6 per cent, below par. The 
faithlessness and extravagance of public offioeiB is becoming 
proverbial, and iii incorporated cities, where a perpetuation of 
power, independent of any political considerations, is made to 
depend upon lavish expenditures of public funds for unauthor- 
ized purposes, and in fulfillment of oppressive and fraudulent 
cotL tracts, it becomes a matter of urgent neioessity that the Leg- 
islature should interpose, and obey the 0J(der of the Constitu- 
tion, by placing a restriction upon the power of borro'Wing 
money, of taxation, of assessment, of contracting debts, and 
loaning credit Your attention is invited to a careful consider- 
ation of this subject. ' ' 

There is another question of serious importance connected 
witix this subject of contracting debts by tnunicipal and other 
corporations. The State is not authorised to contract public 
debts to exceed in the aggregate the amount of one* hundred 
thousand dollars. It iS also expressly prohibited from giving 
or loaning its credit in aid of any individual, association or cor- 
poration, or contracting debts for works of internal improve- 
ments. Yet the Legislature, by a series of acts running through 
a number of years, has conferred upon counties, towns, cities 
and villages, a power to do that which the State has no consti- 
tutional power itself to do. A necessity may frequentiy arise 



30 

where, for some purposes, counties and towns may be justified 
in contracting a limited amount of indebtedness, but in no case 
should they be authorized, and there is no constitutional power 
to authorize them, to create a debt which is likely to become a 
public burthen, or to loan their credit for the benefit of, or in 
aid of, any individual, association, or corporation. There is no 
safety for a public corporation if it falls into the hands of a pri- 
vate one. Towns, and counties, and cities, were never organ- 
ized for the purpose of building canals, railroads, or plank roads, 
or in any manner to speculate in private enterprises. Though 
cities may be authorized to loan their credit, the character of 
the corporation being esteemed in law different from that of a 
town or county, yet it is, in every case, of doubtful expediency 
to loan it to private corporations. When once the system is 
adopted, it is diflScult to limit the extent of the liabilities in 
which they may become involved. There is a uniform history 
of embarrassment, prostration of credit, and burthensome tax- 
ation, to be written of such debts. Counties, towns, cities, and 
villages, like individuals, are i^i best condition when out^of 
debt. JTo deserving private corporation needs such aid. C^ pi- 
tal, everywhere, will seek safe and profitable investment, and 
will be furnished as fast as public necessity demands any given 
improvement at the hands of a private corporation. Private 
corporations are unsafe depositories of public credit. 

If the whole amount of bonds had been issued which have 
been authorized by the Legislature, the sum in the last four 
years alone would have exceeded eleven millions of dollars, as 
the following table will show : 





Counties 


Amount 


OoutDies*] 


Amount 




Sheboygan 


$550,000 


Rock 


$160,000 




Outagamie 


866,000 


"Winnebago 


600,000 




Brown 


10,000 


Racine 


90,000 




Fond du Lac 


2,310,000 


Waukesha 


410,000 




Calumet 


238,000 


Dodge 


845,fi00 


1 


Marathon 


10,000 


Dane 


356.000 


1 


Marquette 


1,126,000 


Washington 


100,000 


1 


Ozaukee 


148,000 


Columbia 


415,000 



Sauk 


175,000 


Waupacca 


183.000 


Portage 


200,000 


Waukfihara 


400,000 



81 

Milwaukee 500,000 

Jefferson 1,260,000 

Waushaar Fond du ) ^qqq 
Lac and Marquette ) ^ 

Walworth 680,000 

Tot 1 (11,48»,000. , 

If the « mount pre^onaly autliorized to bo issued be added 
to this aam, the aggregate would uot be lese than fifteen mil- 
lions of doUars-^a sum sufficient to bankrupt the^State. It 
never oould be paid, and would have led. as a last resort) to 
repudiation and public disgrace. I recommend that every 
act of the Legislature authorlEing towns, . counties and vil- 
' lages to loan their credit to private corporations, where their 
bonds have not. already been issued, be at once repealed, and 
that the cities be restrained from any further loa:;3 of a simi- 
lar character. 

BIVK PER CENTUM. 

The General Government con tindes to withhold from tliis 
State the five per centum of the proceeds of sales of the Gov- 
ernment lands lying in this State. "Whether insufficient ef- 
forts have been made by the agents of the State to obtain the 
amount due, which is at the present time estimated at about 
$300,000, or whether the payment is delayed on account of a 
pretended though unfounded claim against this State; grow- 
ing out of its connexion with the Milwaukee and Rock River 
Canal Grant, or whether it is the settled purpose of the Gov- 
ernment, for causes bejond our control, to withhold the 
amount due the State, cannot with any satisfaction be deter- 
mined. The attention of our Senators and Representatives 
should be called particularly to the failure of the Government 
to do justice by payment of the amount due the State. It 
should be ascertained without delay whether the five per cent- 
um is to be permanently withheld, or whether we are ulti- 
mately to realise any benefit from the claim of the State, and 
if so, how soon. In this time of financial embarrassment, 
^ while the State is engaged in thd erection of necessary and 



52 

expensive public baildlngs, its payment would be a great re- 
lief to the people. 

TOX BITEB IMPBOnnEMENT. 

I hare no definite information npon which to baae any rec- 
ommendation in regard to the Fox and Wisconsin river im- 
provement. It is an enterprise of great importance to the 
northern part of the State, and should be treated justly, with- 
out regard to any local jealousies. No portion of the State 
can prosper too much, and the substantial prosperity of one 
portion should not be looked upon with jealousy by any other. 
It is the business, however, of the Legislature to look after 
the manner in which the work upon it is conducted, and to 
take care that the terms of the grant of land made in its aid 
are fully complied with. The State must protect itself from 
being involved in any liability on account of a misappropri- 
ation of the land granted, or a misapplication of the funds re- 
alized upon a sale of those lands. It would be well to have a 
committee appointed to examine and report to the Legislature, 
whether the terms of the grant have been, so far, complied 
with in prosecuting the Improvement 

MUOTIA AND STATE ARHB. 

More adequate provision should be made for the organiza- 
tion of the militia system of the State. If the proper steps 
are taken and exhibits made, the State will be entitled to re- 
ceive during the present year, arms to the value of twenty- 
four thousand dollars. Some safe and commodious place 
ought to be provided for depositing and preserving them. 
The volunteer companies already organized are an honor to 
themselves and to the State, and are entitled to favorable 
public consideration. 

PACIFIC SAILBOAD. 

The necessity of a*thoroagh&re by wagon or* Railroad^ or 
by both, in our own latitude, to the Pacific, for the conveni- 
ence of trade and navigation, is so apparent that I suggest 
that the Legislature join in the lefforts now being' made/ for 



83 

that purpose, and memorialize Congress on the subject. From 
tlie he*ad of Lake Superior to Puget Sound, the distance in a 
direct line is about fourteen hundred miles, and by the Kail 
Eoad route lately explored by Gov. Stevens about eighteen 
hundred miles. The explorations and surveys of the several 
routes — northern, middle, and southern — have resulted in es- 
tablishing the fact that the northern route possesses advanta- 
ges over all the others yet explored, in these particulars : It 
requires, by connecting with present roads, less railroad to be 
built, to make a complete Railroad communication between 
the Atlantic and Pacific, by several hundred miles. It is 
through a better district of country — one capable of sustain- 
ing an agricultural population nearly the entii*e way. The 
gradients are less and the general altitude much lower. It 
furnishes a greater supply, with more general distribution of 
wood, timber, coal, water, and building stone, anct •facilities 
for supplying workmen and material in the progress of the 
work. Between the navigable waters of the Missouri at Fort 

fienton, and the navigable waters ot the Columbia at the 
mouth of the Peluse river, fifty miles above Fort WuUah-wul- 
lah, the distance is 450 miles. With these and other facilities 
fof furnishing supplies, the work of constructing this Eailroad 
can be simultaneously commenced, and carried forward, at 
Lake Superior, Puget Sound, Fort Benton and Fort .WuUah 
Wullah, thus requiring less time for its completion, than oth- 
er routes, where the work must necessarily be continuous 
from either terminus. The climate too of the northern route 
is better adapted to labor, and a great amount can be per- 
formed in a given length of time by the same force. In a 
commercial point of view this line is the most direct between 
the great shipping ports of Asia and India and the gat recom- 
mercial cities, New York and Liverpool, and for North Amer- 
ican produce it avoids the tropical regions. It is of the great- 
est importance that Congress should make an appropriation 
for a wagon road from Fort Benton to Fort WuUah-WuUah. 
It is believed that $200,000 will be sufficient for this purpose. 



34 

THE SLAVEEY QUESTIOK. 

The subject of slavery, and the powers of the federal gov- 
ernment over the subject of Slavery, are aBsuming at the pres- 
ent time a very grave importance. The question whether a 
man shall own himself, or another man shall own him, is of 
itself, infinite in its importance to the parties interested ; but 
it becomes fearful in its import when the institutions of the 
whole country are likely to be involved in diflSiculty growing 
out of its connexion with that peculiar institution. Great 
controversies have arisen as to the duty of the Federal Gov- 
ernment, and as to the duties of the States themselves, upon 
this subject, and this antagonism of opinion has led to antag- 
onism of action, and is likely to involve the Federal Govern- 
ment and the States in grave confusion. The government of 
no one State lias any right to interfere directly with the do- 
mestic institutions or government of any other State of the 
Union. The jurisdiction of no one State extends in any man- 
ner or for any purpose whatever over the territory of any 
other StatOt Each is sovereign within its own boundaries, 
and entirely independent, except so far as power has been 
delegated to the Federal Government, in express and exact 
terms, under the Constitution of the United States. 

Tlie laws of no Stute reach beyond tlie limits of that State 
and every legislative enactment assuming a jurisdiction be- 
yond a constitutional right, is void, Wisconsin has no right 
to Interfere with the domestic, or any other institution of Vir- 
ginia, nor has Virginia with tliose of Wisconsin. No legisla- 
tive enactment here, and no judgment of our own State 
courts, can interfere to abolish slavery in Kentucky, nor can 
Kentucky establish slavery in Wisconsin. Beyond this, the 
Federal Government, being purely a government of delegated 
powers, established for ppecific jmrposes, cannot abolish slave- 
ry in any State of the Union, nor can it establish slavery in 
any State, or in any of the Territories of the United States ; 
nor has it a right directly or indirectly to advise, countenancej 
or assent to, the establishment of domestic slavery any where 
within its jurisdiction, The Federal Government is entirely 



85 



}p 



one of delegated powers, and the powers delegated are inde, 
peiKlent powers. There is no snch thing as an independent 
power granted by implication. There are certain dependent 
powers, implied, assumed and exercised, as incidents for the 
purpose of giving effect to an independent power delegated. 
The Federal Government, therefore, takes nothing but that 
which the Constitution gives it in express terms, and acquires 
no right or authority to exercise any power not expressly del- 
egated, except BO far as may be necessary to give force and 
effect to one expressly delegated, and then only for the pur- 
pose of carrying out the great objects for which the Govern- 
ment itself was formed. The history of dead nations, written 
upon the record and in their ruins, tells us in terms of solemn 
wwming the danger of departure, by any Government, in the 
exercise of its authority, from the great objects for which all 
good governments should be instituted, and of using legiti- 
mate powers as engines of oppression, and fraud, and wrong. 
Th« theory of our Government is that it was instituted to se- 
cure, among other rights, the rights to life and liberty; and 
that it derives all its just powers from the consent of the gov- 
eilied. The people ordained and established the Federal 
Oonstitutien, in order to " form a more perfect union among the 
independent Btates, establish justice, insure jlomestic tran- 
quility, provide "for the common defence, promote the general 
welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty.^ 

Using the great poweiis delegated to the Federal Govern- 
ment by that Constitution for any other purposes than those 
intended and specified, operates as a direct violation of the 
principles that underlie its foundations; denies practically, 
that the Government was instituted for the purpose of pro- 
teicting and sustaining the rights to life and liberty ; perverts 
the theory that it derives its ju3t powers from the consent of 
the governed. Instead of confirming the strength of a per- 
fect union formed, it weakens its bands, and tends to disunion. 
instead of establishing justice, its tendency is to injustice and 
violence* It' insures domestic confusion and discord, instead 



36 

of traaquiUtj ; breaks down the constitutional walls erected 
for the common defence, opens tlie way for thick-coming dis- 
asters and misfortanes, in the place of promoting the general 
welfare, and shackles the liberty of the people instead of se 
curing its blessings. 

The relation of master and slave is peculiar in 
its character. It does not depend for its existence, 
necessarily, upon local law. It is not a natural condition of 
any distinct race of men. It is rather a relation depending 
upon the exercise of force* It is a relation that existed be- 
foie the present State Constitutions were made,and before there 
was any local legislation on the subject. Law makers and 
constitution makers recognized it as an existing institution, 
and passed no laws creating or assuming to create it. It was 
established without law, and is sustained by law protecting 
the exercise of force without right. This is the character of 
the institution now sought to be forced upon a free Territory 
of the United States. Since A. D. 1820, until within a brief 
period, slavery was prohibited by act of Congress north of 
what was called the Missouri Comproniise line. That act was 
repealed and superseded by the Kansas-Nebraska Act. At 
ihe time of its repeal there was no slavery in Kansas^ in the 
judgment of ihe law. At the time of the passage of the Kan- 
sas-Nebraska Act there was neither slavery nor involuntary ser- 
vvtude in any of the Territories of the United States, under the 
Constitution of the United States, There was no local law au- 
thorizing it, nor any act of Congress. There was neither a 
slave state or a free state having any jurisdiction over them. 
The Constitutiou of the United States never carried slavery 
into any free Territory of the United States, The statesmen 
who made it did not make it for that purpose. The people 
who ordained and established it, did not ordain and establish 
it for that purpose. 

There is in it neither an express or implied power to estab- 
lish slavery anywhere. If there was slavery at that time in 
Kansas or any other Territory of the United States, it was 



87 

without law, aod in direct violation of every principle upon 
which our institutions are based, and in conflict with the de- 
clared objects for which the Constitution itself was adopted. 
Neither in regard to slavery or any other subject, does the 
Constitution do that for which it was not intended or institu- 
ted, or that for which it does not itself declare it was intended 
or instituted. No partnership was formed by the Confeder- 
ated States, at the time the Federal Constitution was adopted, 
for the purpose of creating or sustaining slavery. There was 
no article in the partnership contract declaring slaves to be 
common property, or registering them among the list of ar- 
ticles or chatties universally recognized throughout the civil- 
ized world as common subjects of property. That cannot, by 
any just law, be made property which is not the subject of 
property. Men entitled to life and liberty are not the sub- 
ject o •* property to men entitled to life and liberty. Equals 
are not the subject of property to equals. The Constitution 
of the United States was never intended to establish or sus- 
tain, and does not now sustain, this peculiar relation or insti- 
tution in any Territory of the United States. 

There is another serious aspect to this anti-Republican 
doctrine of slavery under the Constitution. If the right to 
hold slaves existed In Kansas at the time of the passage of 
the Kansas act, under the common Constitution, it existed in , 
Utah and New Mexico and Oregon, and Washington and 
Minnesota Territories. If the right to hold slaves exists 
under the Constitution of the United ftate? independent of 
local law, the Constitution being the Supreme law of the 
land as it expressly declares, then every act prohibiting 
slavery in any of the Territories, the ordinance of 1787, and 
every law and Constitution of every ^ree State, abolishing or 
prohibiting slavery, were and are unconstitutional, aijd the 
right of slaveholders to bring into Wisconsin their slaves and 
to hold them here as such, and to sustain the institution of 
slavery here, now exists, and slare labor, forced upon us, is 
liable to come into competition with the free labor of our 



S8 

citftens. It is a question which rises far above all party con- 
siderations. The free psople of Wisconsin will never consent 
to any such construction of the Federal Constitution. 

We. owe it to ourselves, and to the other jfree States, and to 
the spirit of our institutions, to record our solemn^protesfc 
against it. Wisconsin was born of Virginia when ideas of 
free government, filled tlie minds of her great statesmen, 
and when Liberty was the theme of her Orators. The child 
has not forgotten the early taug ht lessons of the parent. ^^Tliere 
SHALL BE neither slavery Twr ihvolu7iiary servitude in the State of 
Wisconsin otherwise ifian in the punishment of crime whereof 
the party shall have been duly convictedJ*^ 

The right to control, is a necessary incident to the power 
to acquire Territory. Congress has no power to establish 
slavery in the Territories, because it derives no power from 
the ConstUution, and to establish slavery was not one cf the 
purposes for which it waf ordained and established. The 
Federal Government has no right to acquire Territory except 
for purposes consistent with the objects of our institutions. It 
has aright, and it is its duty to prohibit slavery in the Terri- 
tories, because it has power to legislate over the Territories, 
and slavery is the antagonist of that Liberty, to secure the 
blessings of which the Constitution was ordained and estab- 
lished. 

The right of Congress to legislate for the territories has beeft 
conceded by every President, and sanctioned by every ad- 
ministration, from that of Washington down to that of Presi- 
dent Pierce. It has been declared by the adjudication of the 
Supreme Court of the United States. Every organic law, or- 
ganizing a Territorial- Government, passed by Congress, is aa 
act of legislation. The act of Congress, organizing a Terri- 
torial Government in Kansas, holds the same relation to that 
territory that a State Constitution does to the State. Con^ 
gross can confer no power of legislation that it does not itself 
possess, and every act of legislation by Congress establishing 
an organic law is legislation for the territory, and for the peo- 



39 

pie of the 'territory ps legislation over tho territory and over 
the people of the territory^ affecting the rights and privileges 
and institutions of the people of the territory. It is the duty 
of Congres3 to exercise that power of legislation over the ter- 
ritories in order to prevent the aggressions of an enemy to the 
common liberty which th(5 people have, under the Constitu- 
tion, a right to enjoy. To a certain extent, the people have 
'' a right to regulate their own lustitutions in their own way. 
But the people have no right to do wrong. The majority of 
the people have no right to oppress the minority. Constitu- 
tions are adopted and laws made with a view to protect the 
rights of minorities against the excesses of majorities, 
as well AS to protect the rights of the majority Le- 
cause of their intrinsic merits. Under a constitutional gx)v- 
ernment, the power of the people is not unlimited. The peo- 
ple must be bound by the law, or there is the end of civil 
government. Our Government is not a pure democracy, 
where the will of the people necessarily becomes the law. 
Otherwise, if the majority determined upon a Limited Mon- 
archy or absolute Despotism, without regard to constitutional 
safeguards, our Government might be changed to-morrow, 
and all our liberties overthrown. Under our present form of 
government, the people in every organised State, having re- 
gard to the bounds set to their action by the Constitution, 
and having in view the great objects of the Government, have 
a right to ^ay through their legally chosen agents and repre- 
sentatives, by what kind of laws thoir lives and liberty and 
property shall be protected and preserved. 

This applies, not to the rights of the majority or of thef 
minority, but to the rights of the whole people. And when 
the objects of the government are to protect and preserve the 
life and liberty and properly of the whole people, the majority- 
has no authority to so will or so order their rule as to take away 
the rights of the least and humblest individual in the State. Th© 
majority of the people have no right under our constitution, 
or under the Federal constitution, to declare as law that the 



40 

minority shall be slaves ; and the fact that the majority should 
so declare would destroy the only really democratic element in 
the government, and would be a Solemn mockery of every 
idea of Republicanism. It is the business, therefore, of Con- 
gress, wherever it has jurisdiction, to prevent by every consti- 
tutional means, the least attempt to establish an institution or 
a system of laws so opposed to all ideas of free government. 

The repeal of the Missouri Compromise was a great wrong 
done to the Free States, and no benefit to the Slave States. It 
opened the door to every species of fanatacism, and to wild 
excesses, from the criminality of which ai» nge of good deeds 
and good government could bring no atonement, and the 
urgent effort still made to force upon the people of Kansas a 
Constitution to which a vast majority are notoriously opposed, 
against every principle of justice and constitutional obligation, 
is lighting up there the flames of civil war, which may spread 
until the whole country shall become involved. It is not the 
business of Congress to make state constitutions, or to force any 
state into the Union with a constitution odious to its pepple. 
The Constitution gives to Congress a discretionary power over 
the admission of new states. It may admit or it may refuse to 
admit. It is the duty of Congress to prevent the admission of 
any more Slave States into the Union. Slavery has spread far 
enough. It has diffused itself over more territory, and has 
now more powerover the Federal Government than the Fathers 
ever intended or expected. It is the duty of every free State 
to remonstrate against its further extension, and against the 
admission of any more Slave States. Congress has no right to 
interfere with it in the Slave States, but should confine it just 
where it is, with all its' blessings and all its woes,by great walls 
of law, supported by all the powers of the national government 

Article 10 of the Constitution of the United States says : " The 
powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, 
nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States 
respectively, or the people." 

President Madison well said — ^*'The powers delegated by 



41 

the Constitution to the Federal Government are few and de- 
fined. Those which are to remain in tlie State governments 
are numerous and indefinite. The former will be exei'cised 
principally on external objects, as w&r, peace, negotiations, 
and foreign commerce, with which last the power of taxation 
will for the most part be donqected. The powers reserved to 
the several States, will extend to all the objects, which, in the 
ordinary course of afiairs, concern the lives, liberties and 
properties of the people, and the internal order,, improve- 
ment and prosperity of the State." 

The tendency of the action of the Federal Government, 
has been for many years, aided by the Federal' Oourts, 
to centralization, and to an absorption of a large share 
of the sovereignty of the States. It has trespassed upon 
the reserved rights of the States and of the people, assum- 
ing a jurisdiction over them, in the exercise of power never 
delegated. The Federal Government, so far as there is any 
sovereignty under our form of government, is sovereign and 
independent in the exercise of its delegated powera, and the 
the States are sovereign and independent in the exercise of' 
their reversed powers. The safety of the States in the exer- 
cise of those powars in defence of the lives and properties, 
and liberties of the people, demands a firm, deliberate oppo^ 
sition and resistance to any attempt at usurpation or aggres- 
sion by the Federal Government, its Courts, its officers or 
agents, upon the reserved rights of the States or the people. 

The laws of Wisconsin declare "It shall be the duty of 
the Governor, and of all the subordinate officers of the State 
to maintain aifd defend its sovereignty and jurisdiction." 
The deliberate judgment of the highest judicial tribunal of 
the State as to the sovereignty and jurisdiction of the State, 
as to the reserved powers of the State and of the people, and 
as to the rights to liberty and property of its people, is the 
law, and must be sustained. Wisconsin is true to the Consti~ 
tution. The people are loyal to the Constitution and to the 
Union. She will give to the Federal Government all its 
rights, to her sister States all their rights, and will insist upon 
her own* The people will never consent to disunion of the 



42 



States. They will aid in bringing back every State that for- 
gets its loyalty. They will not* consent to specnlate upon 
a contingency in which disunion wonid be justifiable, or even 
excusable, but doing justice and demanding justice, they will 
continue to support the Constitution and the laws. 



THE FEDERAL COURTS. 



During the late financial difiiculty my attention has been 
called to the oppressive character of the TT. S. District Conrts,in 
matters between individuals, growing out of or founded upon 
contracts, which come before them. By construction, no ap- 
peal or writ of error is allowed to the Supreme Court of the 
XJ. S. in any civil case between individuals when the amount 
involved in conrtovrersy is less than two thousand dollars. 
These courts are beyond the reach of the people. Tlieir de- 
cisionsj to a certain extent, are as arbitrary and absolute as a 
determination of the Czar ot Bussia. They have no sympa- 
thy for misfortunes among our citizens, and hundreds of men 
in good pecuniary circumstances, but without present available 
means, may be, and frequently have been ruined, by the speed 
with which judgments are enteied and final process Issued and 
executed. Ko attention is paid to the course of practice of the 
State courts, except so far as it facilitates the commencement 
and prosecution of suitSk I submit to you the propriety of 
asking Congress to pass some law confining the business of 
these courts in cases arising on contract between citizens of 
diflferent States, to those where the amount is over $2,000. 

cbisrcLirsioisr. 

The pecuniary embarrassment and distress of the past few 
months, will work out a great gOod to the country. Business 
of almost every kind had been overdone. The great majori- 
ty of buoiness men were rejoicing in an imaginary, and not 
real, prosperity. Men ripe for wild speculations, found the 
speculations ripe to their hands. Every thing bore a fictitious 
value. Lands, products, manufactured fabrics, all things 
marketable, were valued above a real worth. The currency 
was infiated by over issues of bank notes. States were rich 
in the issue and sale of evidences of their debts. Kailroad 



4S 

directors and agentB, were rich in epecuUtioBS upon what 
the; had plandered from stockholders, and stockholderB in in- 
oorporated companieB were rich in the fiotitlous value of their 
stocks. Sellers were rich in debts due for property sold, and 
buyers were rich in that abundance of credit which enabled 
them to get into debt. Men dealt recklesaly aad lived ex* 
truvagantlj, and forgot their obligations to each other*, and 
higher obligations than those they owed to men.. "^ 

Eeverses camcy as they always will come, following fast 
upon the heels of excess. There is a lesson to be learned 
from these expeiiencoa from which men may. grow wisier and 
letter. The great evil which lies back of all these exhibi- 
tions of successes and reverses, is in the teadenoies of the 
age. The great mass of our people are learning to despise 
labor, forgetting that every dollar acquired by any ether 
means than as a reward for honest industry, or well directed 
skill and enterprise in some honorable avocation or employ- 
ment, is so much loss to some less lucky man. Too many 
are endeavoring to live without labor, and to get money 
without earning it. The people must learn to guard against 
these evils, as they learn to acpount for them, after thoy have 
come. Notwithstanding all that has been suffered, the coun- 
try is substantially rich in real wealth. Wisconsin is rich in 
the abundance of her aprricultural and mineral products ; rich 
in her facilities for the transaction of business ; in public im- 
provements; in public and private charities ; in educational 
institutions ; in the intelligence and practical independence 
of her citizens ; in her religious instituitons ; in an able and 
enlightened public press ; in that large liberty, acknowledged 
by the law, and protected by the wisdom and prudence . and 
independence' of her courts of justice, and in ideas of equal- 
ity which recognize the rights of every man as sacred, with- 
out regard to class, condition, creed or birth place. 

Her commercial interests are as vast in extent, as her re- 
sources are exhaustless. A great carrying highway is on 
her West, and another on her East, and iron roads, binding 



\ 



44 

together her rich growing cities, are traversing all her length 
and breadth. The farms of the people are like gardens, and 
her cities are set, like bright jewels, in the crown of her 
prosperity. Wise legislation, pot for party purposes, but to 
redress grievances, protect rights, and to prevent evils ; an 
honest and fmgal administration of the government, and a 
due regard for the rights of all men, will enhance the enjoy- 
ment of all those blessings. I commend the great interests 
of the State and the people to your care, and to the overrul- 
ing Providence of God. I shall co-operate with you in all 
nsetul and considerate legislation for the public benefit. 

ALEX. W. RANDALL. 
Madison, Jan. 14, 1858. 

Senate returned to the Senate Chamber, and 
Adjourned. 






DOCUMENT B. 



• ' 



/ 



• »■ I 
■ < 4 I j: 



\ ' '.••/ 






.<> J > 



{ .i:l 



,* i 



. • 



1 1 • 



I ' • • 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT. 



STATE OF WISCONSIN, 

SsossTART'a (hrici, 

Madison, 10th October, 18OT; 
To thB Cfovermor ; 

An Act to change' the fiscal year of the State of Wisconsm, 
^ atid to amend an Act relating to Printing, approved April 19, 
' 185B, being chapter 99 of the General Laws^ approved MaifcSi 
' 9, 1857, phyvfd^s tkat ^ the 'fiscal year of this State shall here- 
after commence on the first day of October in each year, and 
close on the thirtieth day of September next succeeding," 

The second section of the same Act requires that ^'at the 
close of each year' aforesaid, all officers required by any law 
of the State to make Annual Reports to the Governor, to be 
communicated by him to the Legislature^ shall, within ten 
days thereafter, complete and deposit the same with the Gov- 
emor." 

Complying with these provisions, I herewith .present the 
'^ Tenth Annual Report" from this office, embracing so much 
of the financial transactions of the .State for the. fiscal year 
closing on the thirtieth day of September ultimo, as was not 
contained in the last Anottal Report from this o^e, embrac- 
ing the period from the lat day of January to the 90th day of 
September, 1857, bolb^ineltinv^ 



Among other requirements by law of the Secretary of Stat^ 
as auditor, the following duties are imposed upon him : 

^ Sec. 1 9. It shall be the duty of the Seeretary of State, as 
auditor : 

I ^ 1. To superintend the fiscal concerns of the State, and to 
manage the same in the manner required by law. 

^ 2. To keep fair, clear, distinct and separate accounts of 
all the revenues, funds and incomes of the State, and also of 
all expenditutes, disbtmsetti^rits a^ in^^^^^tofenf therMf, show- 
ing the particulars of every expenditure, disbursement and 
investment 

" 3. To exhibit tp ^he Legislatr^ne, ^t its apn,ual meeting, a 
■complete statement of the funds of the State, of its revenues, 
and of the pdbtic expendituvesr during the preceding year^ 
wft^ |i detailed estimate of the expenditures to be defrayed 
from the treasury for the ensuing year, specifying therehl each 
^.0bj^ct of ^expenditure, and distinguishing between sueh as are 
/pn>^ided for by permanent or temporary appropriation^,; i^nd 
sueh as are required to be provided for by law,, an4 ahowiag 
jthe. means from which such expenditures are to be fiefiayed^ 



9$ 



i««««*****aM^iM4i^*i 



AUDITOR'S REPORT.. 



«»-. 



Th^ RevQuues, Funds and Incomes of the State^ distinct 
.aoid sepajrate accounts of which are kept in this office^ are ^ 
follows, to wit : 

^ I.— The Genef^ Fwid. 

II.— The Judidary Fund. 
Ill,— The School Fund. 
IV. — The School Fund income. 
Y.— The University FumL ' 
' / TL^The Univirsii}/ Fund lueame. i 

VII. — The Swamp Land Ftind 



5 

VlIL-^7A€ SuffUifi/^Lq^ Fw}si Income. 
IX. — The Deposit Recount. 
' ' Xr^The CapUia Fufid. 
XL— The Drainage F^nS. 

Vhe «dmpl«ls trtawetioiis, thowing the leceipli end te- 
penditures <m aMount of^ and in each of tboM smmal fiiiid%! 
diiHng the last fUiM fiscal qttartiva of the year endmgon Ai' 
36th ultimo, 'will be IimumI haiewith. The eeren^ fhiida am * 
fanned and edcplaiMd aafbHe^WB 9 

Embraces all of the revenues of the State, the avdls of 
which axe applicable tc) the psyWent of die ordinary tapehiMw 
of the State government, and is derived' firom the f<dl6#k^ 



I •• 



sources, to wit: ' . o 

Arrearages due to the late terlrritory ; 
' ' The annual tates levied in each tountf for State porpdees ,' 
' The semi-finnua] tax (Charged ^against' banks, being three^^ 
fi>urtlis of one peir cent on the capital stock thereof; ' ' 

The railroad and plankroad tas, being a sUni equial to one' 
per cbntum of the gross earnings of said roads ; - 

' The duties received from hawkers and peddlers, tdt license ; 
. ' Tde annual tax on electric telegraphs, beiiig tWenty-flV^ 
cents on each mile constructed ; ' ' • • ^^ . t, -• 

And £rom the Judiciary Fund. 

Thisi expenditures from this Fund are authorized by perma^ 
n6nt or temporary appropriations of the Legislature; and 'b^ 
the several acts requiring the Secretary of State to imdit tHi- 



■ ■' • • 



) > 



counts. ' 

At tl^9 d^feeof the lait report from thie office^ thie 

ftm^'lUil been 0verpeid;.'......l....'...::i..:i fTAM 98 

fiKfcieetik«ittielliAr«]MbeenrMeire4,...: $SS»3M 91 

JbMv^fiv^.r*.;.^ .- :.. znjm^ 

*?f?^M-:w -t- V vr — - ^^^y 



» 



• II— TheJudikidry Ftind. 






'^ ^ 5>\^ \ 



This Fund will be explainftd\b5t tofer^ee.|0* th^yfollowing 
provisions of the Statutes df.tbt^S^ta: ^. > * -~.[ 

^Simotf rl7. Oa <^ach<rait in the 0i9Qiiftl'(C<i«it»T||iei|$ a^l 
hfBimikih9PtKXi o£ one doU«r^ which slMUlm.|»ai4'i(o 4^,o\$ik,Y 
a^Aff iiinefnf thfi comtnenceneol; Chorabf, ii/!ttich.taz^^(>))«nr|7]> 
ed^skUl fie |nid kito the tttpimvf <i£.tb4 SfaM^.a^A.^oca^t^; 
separate fund^ to be applied to tbe p9ijfrtiwt o£^6) «|l|ury <ai^t 
the judges ; said sum of one dollar shall be taxed in the bill 
of costs, and recover^ ^ oth*t' tt>sfte ^of suit'* ' {Page 762, 

r...f.S|5jv4-,;T,fee^erJf Q^ jthe, Circuit. Ppvwt Qf,.eaph p9P;?i'!3rr 
4^«^«Mrt^»Wihe,.;fix«t 4ayrof J^quary^i^prii, J.yjy^w^ 
October, or within five days thereafter, in every, yea^i;, pw to 
the treasurer of his county, for the u^e of ^this State, the suit 
tt»»{p^o^ 49i4^^ »e^uire|i by. law to J^e paid by^.t^ie cjerkx)n 
Qi}^yi},sij^jTirhiph,^i»s b ia.tl)ip,PwuU Cpiirt 

of his cou^^Jy, duriog^thie three ;aonths.epdii)igo^. the lasjdj^^ 
of th^. month ipiinediately pigcjBding. ui*^- 

" Sbc. 2. The; cl^f k sbafcU tal^e . duplicate receipts .fr(}px . tii^e 
cQ^y:(tiip(^sureri^i;.the sums so.pa^d, wd Qja or before -^e 
t^ffth, ^.^i Jft»,^aTy. April,.|Fuly . sind October, . in ,e^cl?.^ ypir, 
he shall forward to the Secretary, of State,, at Madisqn,,f)i^ of* 
said receipts, and also a statepti^^ on oatl^^. of tbe^,jQuJiiber of 
9i]jUs.ppq[>iif9iic^d in the Circuit C()u^ of his county^ 4V¥?g 
U)|S| three, months jending.on thj^ la^t day of the ^lonth, ^xir 
.n^edifit^ preceding tlyit 4ate„ ,, , . . , ,j • ,. , .-, 

" Sec. 3. If such statement, together with a receipt qC the 

» ' 

whole sum required by law to be paid to the clerk on the 
/^i^>iC> commenced during the preceding,, gviartei^ istjjE^raot 
be received by-tbe- Secretary of State oa. ffirbofiBfe: ^tin^&oA, 
ihef bPthe month next succeeding th« time when mtch^fltlKi^ 
A^ot' as. above required to be transmitted to him, he' sfikll 
%^^tib notifr the iudee of the Circuit Court within whose 



circuit 9uch clerk resides, of the fkilure to transmit such state* 
menty or receipt, or both, as the &a$e intif l)e. 

.**Sisa 4. Whenever the circuit jtfdge shall be notified 6f 
sdch failure he shall forthwith app6iht a time, not exceeding 
sixty days from the date of the notice ^hereinafter menti(yned, 
and a place within his circuit, when and where- such clerk 
shall appear before him, show cause why he shall not be re- 
moved, fox the reasons to be mentioned . in such notice and 
shall cause notice thereof to be- served -within, ten days upon 
the clerk. If the ' clerk shall not upon such hearing show 
to the satisfaction of the judge that lie has complied with the 
provisioM of thiaact, he shall. be U^ble to.be removed- £rpm 
office^- as provided in section five, of chapter eleven^ of the 
Revised Statutes. 

^S£c. 5. ProceediQgs^nUflM^tJI^&i^ m^jibe of a summary 
nature, and. the testimony shall be taken under such reasona- 
ble regulations as to time and plac^, ki^ iii such inaikner las 
the judge shall prescribe. . 

' " The testimony or affidavit of the clefk may be received' ' 
in respect to the fa^t of his having transmitted si return, but 
an no other point 

'^ " $Eo, is.. Moneys paid to the county treasurer,^ pursuant to 
t|iis fict, shall be pcUd over by him' upon the order of the state 
treasurer, and any such moneys remaliiing in his hands at the ' 
uW when , he is required by law to pay tlie sWte' t^^ t6 the' 
s^te treasurer, shall be paid therewith into' ^lle state trea^uryl'^^ 
f General iMWSylBS'Sy dhap.'56.y'' ' 

*"The Secretary of State hasj in every instance, complied 
with the requirements of the 3^ section* as' afeove, notwith- 
standing which, clerks, in many cases,' continue to neglect' 
their duty", knd" there 14 doubtless considerable*' money still 
remaining in ibeji l[i.ands unreported Judges, also, in most 
inst8iieea*£iil to comply, with. the. pcovision^ of tba 4tb sec- 
tion. An abslrafet i4 balanoes due -from clerku ou sosoiint 
«f aarett<gts, hm kma reported to the Legislature each year. 



8 

for several years past^ but without any action thereon. A 
Wffi statement will be found herewith, marked ^ A*'' 

The amount reported by clerks, on account of this FnmAy. 
is as follows, since the organization of the State, to wit : 

J849,.. -r $IJ^ 00 

1850, ■ U68 00 

1851...... 1,336 <N) 

1859, aoiioe 

latt... Muno , 

. 186A» , 1,363 00 

1856, 1,715 OO' 

1866, 4MfW 

1867, 3;6ISM 



ToUl. |fl«7IS00 



. t 



TIL-^The School Fund. 

The proceeds arising from the sale of school land^, seventy^' 
ftye per cent of tHe nett proceeds of the lands granted by act 
of Congress of the £8th Sej^tember, 1850, and the proceeds of 
the, sale of lands selected in lieu thereof, together with the 
fiye per centum of the nett proceeds of the sale of Govern- 
i^ent kmdSj^ to which the State is entitled, the &ve per cent, 
penalty ^ forfeiture for the non-payment of interest when 
due upon school land certificates and loans from the School 
Fundi and the clear proceeds of all fines collected in the sev- 
ecal counties, for the breach of any of the penal laws of the*' 
State, are set apart to constitute the School Fund,— this Jund 
being subject only to certain eicpenses, for advertising and 
selling lands, and necessary books and blanks for conducting 
l}ie transactions thereia 

This hmdi^Aftba date of tlia last report £rDiatbii<4Bce.h«^ . 

OTeipeid, $iwies 

Receipt!.: 984,816 08 ' 

Didbeneiuiite^ 31U8S)8'- 

, Ome^a^toMkU, aW>W 9$ . .. / 



(. 



ij 



Qyerpajmenti brought d6wii| ...' n9,m 9S 

Traiiafer from Swtmp luid Fund, : Stl,177 64 

Baknceonbttiid, 49.0SS «9 - 

fflTUTTW 911,177 04 

■JL— >»»— 

t • 

Tbe xwmda and bgoks of this office exhibit the following 
to be tfae present condition of the School Fund : 

BtlaiweoiilMuidjwabm, f494Mi6 69 

Amount dae on eerUficatetolnle, ,... 1,737,988 14 

AmonDtdne onloans, 667;993'd0 '* 

Amount duo on jnnonp -kntf ^ecrtii^irtK* (f6iSM6 6t) 

iMtfS per oralis ftrdMlBiiig; J .. 649,969 60 

The principal, or capital of ^fchool- Fund, excepting 
the balance in the t^^eaaary^ is productiye^ drawing interest, at 
the rate of 7 per cent, payable before the 5th day of March^ 
in each year. 

This interest constitutes — ^ 

» 

IV — The School Fund Income. 

Which is auumlly apportioned by the State Superintend* 
ent, to the iiererait towns in the State, for the use of OomBton 
Schools, and drawn from the treasury, through the treaiuicnf 
of th^ proper county. 

On aoMRxni of tiie Ineome of thA School Fund, dnzing 

tl^y^ytlMfeiMW.UtnTra&ro^,.,,... f|56431 17 

Balanee Jannary Igt, 16^0 97 

IMsboraementB during the yeak', fl69,S35 56 

Mnite n«nr on hand, • 10,746 61 

tm,979 14 f 173378 14 

'. ' The psincipal of the School Fund, as above shown, draw* 
IJ^ interest, is a§ follows : 

Al|^<dnaa^4e^ttacste;|...,.«....,4, ,. t9,380iM7 64 

w^j^ptan^onjoana^... 667,993 90 

•Bb 



10 

The i^ t iiUJil Off n tiiis nuD, tor one year, at 7 p^ oenft.« ia ^313397 8S 

To which add Swamp Land Inoome on hand^ ,«.....,... ^,719 51 

Also Sehool Fand Income aa abore, lO,7<i$ 61 

llaiEui^atotalof $346,863 98 

This sum is the amount of School Fund Income subject 
to be appropriated for the support of Common Schools in 
March next, subject to a deduction of 25 per cent of the, in- " 
come of the' gross proceeds arising from the sale of Swamp 
and Overflowed Lands, apportioned by the act approved 7th 
March, (Chap. 98, Qen^fal JUii|r») 1857. It, however^ will be 
increased by interest on loans made, aiid sales of School and 
Swamp Land% previous to the 1st of March. 

t • . y^n^TJIit lMidVfsr$Uy Fund. . . 

' 'This Fund is composed of the nett proceed*^ of the?' sale" 
of CTniversily Lands, and from the '6 per cent penalty, as 
forfeiture for the non-payment of interest when due upon' 
University Land Certificates and loans from the University 
Fund. The transactions in this Fund during the year ending 
on the 30th ultimo, are as follows, to wit : 

Iteceipts daiiAg' the rear, , ,... $€4164 69 

Ohi hand iflibuarjr lat, .......v. Uf895 9Q 

]UibiinenMDt4».... , $15,547 43^ 

Balance, ' 6lJ 01 



(16,160 43 f 16J60 43 

II ■« « « ■ m I t « I > | 



The recordis of the office exhibit the present condf tit>& of 
the University Fund, to be as follows : 

AhxoQtit dne on Certificatea of lale, ^ j« $965>498 SK 

. do Loanar.-- 50,52190 

Balance in Treaaory, 613 01 

' fetal,.. :..,.....,., > Wm64 47 

This Fund, except the amount above stated as being In tho 
treasury, is drawing interest at the rate of 7 pet eent, payaW* 
before the 5th day of March in each year, which interest 
e<mstitutesU- 



1^- 

I; >^ L .Kf .: \^>^irAe* VhlHfU^ii^mid Imiati^ -./ ii -^j • toy 

This IS annually applied, towards defraying the current ex^ 
penses of the State University, and is drawn froni^ the Ststfe" 
treasury by the treasurer of the Wisconsin University. * ' -' 

During the ycftf Ui9,ieoe\ptBon account of tlie In- 
come of the Uoiveni^ Fund, has been, . . . .' . 1 . . 1 1 . ^pO,t$0 85 

Bfla^e f faoarj iBt, 1 l..'-..-lw^.*.*V./' 1,084 20 

T^|himpp6ntB during the year, ... 1 $21,593 53 

QyeipayaieBtBr^ '....!..... 360 3d 






(.: w • 



tai,595 53 $21,595 53 

crT]!ie principal of the UftiY^^fe ^410!^^ 
^tfaH^idg interest, is as follows: .m<>m-:}. '. 1 

.^ftitemi'dse ori CeitfBtal^, $265,432 26 

do ,;iiow,r, .- 50,52120 

^■^ •''fnital ^4a;;*'L^^uU'J u. j^n^.i ;.>>v*-Ju«^>..> ; $3j^i^63.-4& ; 

The in te reai upon* thie biihi> for one year, at 7 per cent» is $22,1 16 74 

Lm ov^g!rpaymenti aAabote, ^ 360 39 

. Loans and'jTiirlber sales will dfdtft)lle^ fncrea^S thi4 Inccihiift* 
to such aii extent^ tliat tne' aitiount to U^ apj^ortidhed In MarcV 
next^will reach the Siini of $^jb66 Ooi' ' ' ' ''■ ' --^'^nr. 

Wl.^-'The Swamp Land FuncL'] : -xu 

This fui;4\WWs|fqn\tJiei9ale. <?df ^Iv? Iw^ds in*'^®^ to the 
•State by an Act of Congress entitled '^ An Act to enable the 
State of Arkansas ali^ other States id Veclaiin the bwamp atod ' 
overflowed' lands Vithfli 'their limits,** 'ap^ViivtA Septetnbet 
feth, 1850; 't^rbm'tfie prdce^fii of*'th'ei^' saWis fef^t'to be 
paid, tRe legitimate expenses incident to their sale, and seV^ 
enty.five per cent of tWb i*sitltt(i,"ari*^ alf bf fli© tt^ej^- ft* 
the selecte^jlad^ (being* lands'seledtecl in lieu b^'i^wamp 
IftiMl, that have been pjeviously sold), form and i^OinstitutQ:^ 
^^■^ the School Fundvaadihe balance i4tf ill* >i^dii0'0f 
«li$ll ftoce^E^. m^ be paid to the county treasurer of the 



IS 

county in whidtikftvsiks in^/haTa.btal inadd^ to be used 
by, the. oroper towns for the reclamation of such lands, jtccor^ 
ing to thej provisions of the, original Act of Congress^ granting 
such lands^ 

' * * * * 

Tlie balance on band of tbia fiind, at tbe date of tbe 

lartreport, irnB '..',' $53JBto8 39 

JEtaeeiptB to SeptBQtb^r dOtb SSMJmS^' 

DiabnnementB...: |IU88 S« 

Balance .;..! MiiaA u' 



■4MM«adk*4 



$376^1 30 876.4 51 80 

Balance brongbt doim 3694364 94 

Bxpenaea paid by Genenl Fand> tnoulBrred , €89 75 

Balance nett receipts .^..l.« 361*118 If^ 

HefttZBcaiiita aa aboTe 361^70 i9 

S<lrenty-i?# per cent, tranafemd to Scbool Fond. 9T2477 64 

Baluce tiwaafeiTed to Dninage Fund 90389 5& 

ta6i^70 49 "m^o^ 

Tfaeiecords of this office exhibit the sum of $SSf§^746 00 
ai^,di^«on,/Qe]^qat^ of sal^ of.^ws^mp lands,, exclusiyc^ of 
the, a^dount due pn la^d^ .selected in lieu thereofl which 
amount is included in School Land du^s, . 

The interest on sales of Swamp Land and Swamp Land 
dues, constitute- * . ; 

Vtlt-^-The Swanip Land Fund McoMe^ 

' a^d fojffns.a .po^piiof th^ School Fun^ Income^ ai^d is sul^ 
|8(Pt,iA.p^ Cp ^ sajne dispositiojn, fh€|, remainder, being ap-' 
pprtioned for thqbene&tpfNoirmal. Schools and AcAdemies^ 
aip.iabov^exBlaip|ed4j , 

9^ t^Jiwb.repcfft th^ bfjan^ on bai^ in, tli^^ 
Siramp (jand Fond Incoine» ifaa •••« 9^^^ 

itel»ipt8..i .....; .....:...........:. 99,709 lo 

DiabtU'JNmenti. ....... ».J~. .•«••.•« %^ ^ 






J '/.I » .»•• .. .1-1 



> •■> • ' . " , « I 



* 9fli(lion n, of chapter 24, of the revised statutes, provides, 
hat if on a re-sale of forfeited school lands, the same shall 
''pWdice'tnbf^'thaft stiffifeifefit to t^ty^ tift Witti -oWlng thfefefor, 
■iititti the interest and costs; 'aiid five^ per beVilt Aivitig^ 6tiike 
amount of purchase money unpaid, the residue, if *^nY,' stlAdl 
be paid over to the former purchaser, or his legal representa- 
tive. In the recent sales of forfeited lands, in 1856, the resi- 
de bt sXttplM^j above' tb« mmouii* «»aiing. to the.Stat^, as 
-specified, was reqaiited to be^paid to -the State Tretauavr at 
Ae tim'^e bf' sale. • * '" « ? . . ' . • {• 

All adcftutit of thifr^l^dbs i^ k^ vith the fitofe Tzms- 
urer, and called the Deposit •Aoeounli '(The 'tianBaotions in 
this fund, dmitig the ye«r/ have been as follows : ; i 

Balapctvi^ii huid Janiiary l8t $3,841 83 

DUbunemeotQ to ^te *,^^^ . , , 629 95 

' Balance now on hand 3^1188 

^Ml 83 2,841 83 



The balance is now aubj«ct to be paid to dtie original pur- 
chaser of the land, or his representative, upon surrender and 
cancellation of the original certificates of sale. 

X.—The Capitol Fund. 

Chapter 26 of the Greneral Laws of 1857 provides for the 
sale of the ten sections of land appropriated by Congress ^^ for 
the completion of public buildings." Said lands have been 
sold during the year, and the proceeds arising therefrom con- 
stitute the present Capitol Fund. 

Tbete lands, in all ten aectionB, (6^0 acree,) sold for an aggregate 
of $12^08 90, of which there has been paid into the State 

Treaanzy the sumo^.... fl2478 35 

Leaving the farther sum dae on aceoant of said fiynd, 130 65 

Of the Bom reoeifod aa abore there haa been diabaraed, 3,333 93 



l4 

LotTing bainaee on hand <»f>«« «.;<••. ''—^-— V-^^' ^M4 

This is to be increaMcL by pay meats, due next year, as aboTe, 130 65 

• ' ■ '■ tt;>74 97 

. . . ' • — 

This QUixi cpf^titoles the .jfte^ent resources of th^ Cajpjljtol 
Lands $ to be ijipK3r^aae|d ||288 ,40 for error m entrjr to 1,]be 
wtopg funicL 

XL — Drainage Fund. 

Twentf-five per oeai of tb0 neu proceeds arising from,jl|ie 
sales of swamp lands, (exclusive of lands . selected in lieu 
theteof,) is set apart, to be used for their reclamation, by the 
towns in which they are situated, according to. the provisions 
of the original act. ef Congress. 

The nett proceeds receiyed on aeoonnt of tbcw sales, vp toaad in- 
clading the 30tb day of September, ultimo, as already shoim, 
are, - - fdSUTO 19 

Deduct 75 per cent, for Scbodl^nnd, .*...«.. 971,177 64 

Balance, -• $90,393 55 

With this sum, apportioned as above explained, a new ac- 
count has been opened, called the Drainage Fund. 



ly 



15 



STATEMENT. 



•**i 



The transactions in the several Funds during the period 
embraced' in this report, are as follows, to wit : 

GENERAL FUND.— FIRST QUARTER. 

RECSIFTS. 



Bad Az CouDty, State tax, 

Brown, ...do 

Buffalo, do 

Calumet,.. do 

Columbia, . . do 

Crawford, do 

Daae, do 

Dodge, do 

Dudu, do 

Fond du Lac, do 

Grant,.. •-. do... 

Green, ^ do - 

Iowa, -.f do.^^ 

Jackson, ^.«.. ..do 

Jefferson, . . » do 

Kewaunee,.... *-do--* •-. 

Kenosha, ^^..do 

La Crosse, do 

LaFayetie, • do „-•-. 

Marquette,, .l.p, do .•.. 

If anitowoc, do ..^ 

Uarathoo, do ' 

Uilwaukee, do 

ilonroe, ..^ do 

Outagamie, do 

Osaukee, . « do 

Pierce, * ^ do 

Portage, ,. do 

Racine, --..^-.- do 

Richland, do 

Hock, .-,, do-.l 

Sauk,.. do 

Shawano,*... . do......... 

Shtboygan,...^^ ..'.do 

Trempealtfau, do . 

Walworth, do 




DiBharsetn'ta. 



f3,800 00 

, 3,608 00 

800 00 

2,824 00 

9,992 00 

8,281 00 

17,996 34 

11,750 00 

680 00 

12,444 00 

12,733 00 

7,023 00 

9,299 31 

1,200 00 

12,186 00 

340 00 

9,964 20 

4,065 00 

8.159 98 
6,660 00 
3,340 92 

339 50 

21,281 26 

1,961 00 

1,860 00 

4,140 00 

1,698 33 

689 00 

18,267 00 

4,130 00 

20,390 00 

7,414 17 

1,546 63 

7.160 00 
900 00 

10,612 00 



14 



O^aneral fund — FtrU Qu^arter — con*ar.'n*d. 



'^^npUT'^^ — do 

^wwhar*, ^--- do 

"V'liii^Jvtifn do 

)l<»r.TM«ir^ iuvok^ 

^:r<r)iJtiiqr«» &a&k af Daorlmg 4 Co. 

>'»fli*rv>ii ''bounty Bttak, - 

P'^fvp!** 4 Baok, 

^ k h ^ra Baak. - - 

?vrBgk^%MA MiUen' Bank, 

i^«ttk of Milwaukee, « -- 

/jttwwvilk City Bank, 

KT^itAiiyafi Bftok, 

Winptm Baakt-^.. 

}4^viuukU\e Baakf 

r>yija^(» <'>>«ftty Bank, 

Wiiie^yn^in Central Railroad Co^ 

<'>reea Bfty. Milwaukee h Chicago &R. Co. 

Milwaukee <k Miflmeippi R,B. Co, 

Mitwaokee A Horicon Railroad Go^ 

Chteagr>, Hu Paol 4 Fond da Ue R.K Co. 

U ^^rr^^Me ^. Milwaakce R. R. Co., 

M^anha ^i: KaokamiA Plank Road C<v. . . 
Mvli v.n, Watertown d( Milwaukee P.R.Co. 

Hh#;b//y)j(«a <(f Food da Lac P. R. Co 

Fojt. A inoebafl^o A I>ack Creek P. R. Co. 

UmU/^woc k Mao« Rapids P. R. Co., 

Ui\wfinki'A k iaoe^ville P. R. Co., 

Wfmf^n i'nifm IVlegraph, 

Wiii^ym<»i» Btftte Telegraph, 

ff*y man k BelUteio, peddler's Ucense,. . . 

M«Ka^A Hall, do 

May^ UffcUffi^^,.^ do 

Carl Mongfos, 

t)MiU\ (hif 

</a. Kickards, 

Hohrnitrti Hotter, 



i 



tr.aiT CO 

lO.ioO ^j 
i2of5 0*} 
2.^2-5 1.3 
«.<M^ CO. 

*7i ^ 

I'?T 
12$ 

i.trrs 

1.466 67 
1«7 50 
205 
141 
137 
575 
12 
2,21t 
6,804 72i 
480 06 
1,104 00' 
3,583 40' 
6 14 
65 
99 
27 
6 
48 
11 
50 



50 
50 
12 

00 



20 

6S 

50' 

00 

01' 

87 



29 
21 
75 
53 
10 
00 
50 



30 00 
40 00 
10 00 
10 00 
40 00 
40 00 
10 00 



288,894 98 



■ »■■*>*■ 



17 



^Mma Fuiti^Ftt^ ^uarUr>-^<omiimuA. 



mM Urii)iMBMVL 



■MMMMlhiMt*' 



I ' 



Btfotlpte. 






X Allen Barber, per ikA l^ator 

& >y.' Barnes^ do J 

8. 0. Bean. II. 1 do..-* 

0. H. Bull...^.i...-ido....... 

fi. O.^ha8e..i...;:.i.do--...-. 

Templle CUrk......i.dt> -.- 

B. P^yx Cook . do-.-. 

M.M. Davis. -- do.^, 

George B. Dexter^..:.. do... 

Xdwm-d Oernon :do.. .... 

B. H. Giles. -.;.--... do^... 
August Qrnf licb. .^..:do... 

Luther Haaeheil. ;. do^., 

L. P Hftrvey-.-iJiiiido--.. 

L. W. Joiner.ii. i.do... 

JF. T. KingRtott...!-.-. .do... 
M. L. KiraWl..i..--.dov.. 

3. C Mills..!. iii.:;:dov.. 
Edwitrd 0'NeHi.^..-.do....-..J. 

ElV^ifd Pier.'.--.. do......:. 

WHIiam T, Pieroe-.-. . i . do~.. . .-. ; 

8. L.'Ros©.:... ...i .^-.do-... .... 

e. L Shol^^....'.i.i.do... 

H.J Shult^i.. .:.-... ..do.., 

P; B. Simp800.il . .;.:do... 

P. H, Smilh. :do..- ...l.. 

James Sutherland-. d«> ..-.-. . . 

B.s.vvi.ii:.... ......do. ..-..:, ...... 

Edw. Wlie«»«r... .do....... • 

IVillmm Wil^oo da...-.' .'_-_-•-. 

An>»tir McArthnr, Ijicntenant Governor . 
V^illiam Henry RriftHiin#*, Chief Cterk..-. 
T. 8. A Den, -per diem Member of Assembly 

John Annun«nn-.-ii-....-.-..tio-,-'. .• 

D. W. Anpin^waH ---.". *.-.-.- ..do. I...- 

Geo. R. Athf-rt-n.. .--..-.-. -do 

Henry W, Barnes.-. do 

M. St BrtriiHt - ^...-.-doir. 

QH. Hrttnm --•.-. .do 

O. M; Birthohrmeir . ,.:j.-.do...- . 

F. KiBartUtt.v...... .:..do.. 



'.l\ 



Jlm-tm-^m,^^—*mm^^^ 



Diabanem'ta 



• 



• f 



1 



$2«6 do 


137 50 


197 00 


187 


^ 


187 60 


137 


^0 


187 60 


005 (k) 


206 00 


280 00 


506 00 


1&2 


60 


187 


60 


27^ 


60 


187 
187 


3; 


137 


60 


205 00 


187^60 


242 


60 


187 


60 


173' 


<Jo 


236 00 


148 


'60 


187- 


60 


,187 


^0 


217*00 


:fe05 


00 


147 


60 


187 80 


4rt) 


CO 


616 


60 


137 


50 


\n 


60 


137 


60 


187 


60 


197 


60 


137 


60 


*187 


60 


137 


60 


76 00 



Sb 



iW 



Ommrtd jPundUJ^j* 4iHartaixr^%ii^Jim'^ 



mpvMwmw^ 






luaflu Burgbs, per diem -member ^ifq^lyj. k. 

. Oeprge Caimcross : do « 

rJames Catton.l ^ <^o •-- 

D. D« Cameron {. do .^^^ 

, "William Cl^appel L do .^ 

Jt. P.^Clark I do 

Theodore Oonkey do ^ 

.£dgar Conklin do ^^.^ 

Hcpiry Converse do ^*-, 

II<M»ewell Coxe * do 

F. CunniDabam do ^ 

B. W. Davidson do 

,lSr. W, Dean * do ^ 

James H. Earnest • do ^ 

I i^libtt Enos, Jr v 4o ^ 

X.J.Evans do....... 

A, W, Emory do 

James Fagan do 

Bobert C. Field do 

X. G.. Fisher do 

£. A. Foot do 

rXdwardN. Foster, do 

Joaohim Gfilicb do 

T.W.Hall do 

C. 8, Hawley do 

George HaWley do 

Herman Hsertel , do 

Paul D. Hajward u do 

Fred. W. Horn :.--.do 

. R. H« Hotobkiss ^^..do 

O. C.Howe ..do - 



*■» 



t-f 



Jasper Humpbrey do 

B. A. Hutchmson..! ...do..^ .. 

George A. Jenkins do... 

John A, Jobnson... do... 

E. Knowlton do 

Jos^bLangwortby...^ do 

James M. Lewis do 

Fred. S. Lovell .do 

P. C. Lulkln :..do 

Bobert P. Main do 



■ . » . 



DisbarMin'li. 



197 fO 

192 fiO 

Q\1 00 

147 40 
137 40 
137 00 
137 00 
187 00 
137 00 
246 36 
137 50 
137 00 
ld7 00 
137 00 
137 00 
137 00 
132 00 
137 00 
137 40 
137 00 
137 00 
102 00 
137 00 
157 00 
137 00 
137 00 
137 00 
192 00 
137 00 
137 50 
137 50 
137 00 
192 00 
137 00 
137 00 
187 00 
137 t^O 
137 00 



19 



Oene^ql Ftin4—Eii''*t Ouor/er— continued. 

PI8BUR8EMEKTS. 



<»■ 



,1 I 



Receipts. 



Z,, P« MasoB, per diem meinber ABsembly, 

O. 2;, Jtaxflpn.... l.-.do ^ * 

W. P. McAllister do 

Andrew McOormick. . . ^ do 

{oseph T. Mills ^.-i-.do 
"real MoBcowit2 4.. ...do 

William M. Morse .do 

Joseph Nelfon 4 do 



f 



I- 



do. 
do 
.do 
.do 
do 
do 
.do 



David Noggle 

J. F. Osterander ; 

B.F, Phillips..-: 

Peter Potter 

J^D. Reymert... 

.James Keyiiolds. 

Harmitti Bobbins. 

Anson BooiL do. 

E/S« Bonals... „ do- 

Pluletus SKwyer do. 

A. Scott Sloan .do. 

X. B« Stevens ;.. do. 

G. W. Stone ...1 do. 

George Strong -.. do. 

Moses M. Strong do. 

John B. Sweat do. 

Thomas Sngden..^. do. 

AUenTaylor. do. 

Jonathan Taylor .• do. 

H« A. Tenney do, 

M. J. Thomas : do 

0. F. Thoftipson .1 do. 

James O. Train ., do 

William H. Tripp do 

James YoOmer : do 

8. W.Voorhies.--...i do 

D.E. Waiter i do 

Solomon Wakeley ^......do 

C. H.Walker do 

Aaron Walters do 

R. B. Wenlworth do 

Abram W^st do 

Joseph White do 



,t- 



DisburBcm'ts. 



•137 
1S7 
137 

'137 
192 
151 

.149 
187 
137 
137 
137 
137 

' 07 
137 
137 
142 
137 
187 
162 
137 
147 
137 
137 
137 
162 
192 
137 
137 
137 
137 
137 
67 
137 
137 
137 
137 
137 
137 
150 
67 
137 



?0 
50 
fW) 
30 
50 
4-0 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

to 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

50 

60 

50 

50 

50 

00 

50 

50 



CO 



Oenerat Fund—FInt Qiiorfer— «onCiniied. 



DISBUBSiMSHTS. 



8. iu White, per diem Vember Anemlly, 

J. R Wilbur, do 

D.Williumf, do 

J.J. Willmnn, do 

Siimiiel D. HastiDgt, do . 

Wjman Spooner, 8petker,.do ^ 

Wm. C.Webb, Chier Clerk,. do 

Uileage aceouBt of 1860, 

do 1857, 

Jamet Armttrong, • 

Le¥i Alden, . — 

Adcmt h WilsoD, . 

J, P. Atwood, 

C. Abalar, 1 

Atwood tf Rablee, ^ 

Robert Aiken, ^, 

L. S. Avery, ., 

David Atwood, ., 

J. N. Akermiin, .• 

William H. Aihur & Co., ^ 

H. C. Aintworlh, ..,. 

Adams <fe AdHm?, 1... ^. 

Chauncey Abbott, 

H. Aikens, 

».l). Hurdick, 

fi. K Batigfl, * 

Bradford lirothers,... 

8. O. Benedict, \ 

A.Briggs , 

Brown & Britt, 

Antoine Karbien, - .. 

Charles Heifer, . 

James S Bnker, '. . 

J. T. Bro#n 

Berliner h Brano, 

B. K. fJHFney, 

R. B. B.ia^Mo, 

J. B. Briiion 

H. HurieF6eld, 

aO-Bu^fa, 



$149 K) 

137 50 

137 50 

137 50 

145 5^0 

275 (iO 

709 00 

188 00 

3,348 40 

375 00 

63 00 

97 ifO 

30 00 

83 00 

6,245 60 

55 QO 

93 50 

275 OO 

1^012 03 

226 75 

4 00 
179 83 
750 00 

5 00 

82 24 
315 00 
557 83 
312 35 

55 00 
2.' 65 

83 .00 
55 00 
50 00 
5.S 00 

1,350 00 
55 00 
10 50 
'25 00 
55 VO 
22 00 



81 



Chnenl f\md— First Qi<ar/€r— continued 

DZSBUBflXMKZrrS* 



8. aJBarlow, 

WalUceW.Boikin;..--,. 
In^ilKam fiauer,..* 

g.P. Bond,.---. 
. Briggs, .-.--.-- .,. 

W. P. Barrongbsi..-.-.. 

3. S, Bangs, 

|. O. Bartlett, 

Andrew Bisbop, 

Coles Bash ford, ..'. ...... 

0. 0. Buck<& Co.,... 

{^barles U. Barton, . 

0,F. Brandt,-.-.- \,. 

0. Batchelder, . . .- J: 

S. L, Barber, . .-. 

John Bart».^. 

Gbarles Blanbaeb, ... 

M.P.Barry,-....-.. 

A. C. Barry, .-.'.--.-... 
g. M. Bootb,..-... -..".— 

H, p. Barron,-.'. ..-- 

William Brooks, ......V. 

A. A. Baker, 

0. H. Brush,.-....-.-.-,; 
VVilliam Beck............ 

G. Barkham, •..".- 

Charles Barcbard, 

tiouis Bostedo, ..: 

Ama«a'Cobb,. •.-.,,. 

H. Crawford, ...:. 

John Child, ........ 

D. H. Chandler, . .... — : 
CalkiDS <fc Proadfit,-.v- ... 
H. Cramer, .....•--•..'.*•. 

l^eter Coyne, — . 

ft L«' Carpenter, ^^..-». 

William E. garter, 

W F. Chipman, 

R Carrington,. ..-.^. 

Cincinnati Type Foundry, 
William U.GoUaday,...*. 



Jteoeipts. 



Ml ' 



f ---- 



T 



i;» 



/ I 






Duboraem'tft 


192 00 


110 00 


110 00 


270 00 


270 00 


220 00 


27 00 


163 75 


* 862 50 


9,1112 50 


282 25 


28 00 


50 00 


l.U 50 


28 00 


75 00 


75 00 


200 00 


550 00 


* 848 85 


10 50 


72 00 


ST 00 


80 00 


500 00 


10 00 


105 00 


M 00 


168 50 


55 00 


86 00 


' 600 00 


27,188 88 


82 50 


220 00 


00 


250 00 


55 00 


WW 


8,200 00 


55 (A 



22 



General 



Qvar/cr— condmied. 



H, CaOiii* 

P. G.CbeTet 

W. D. Chapiii, 

Imdc* Coopar, 

Oaorg^Clftrk, 

Jitmct CainpbelU •-- 

8. 8. GoBOTar, ..' 

Ckftrks Cleme&t, . • 

L-Conscr, 

Charles Colltofly 

Ortamns Cole, 

Jl L. CoUina, 

ap. Cotton, 

Geo. W. Oat*, 

M« M« Cothraiy .......^.. . — .. 

Carpflnter k Law, .«. 

J. if. Cone,.* ^ 

Qto.Vf. Chapman, j ...... 

P%t Carmodj ^ 

Wm.B.CalU. 

Bobert Chandler, « 

Cajkint <fe Proudfit and Atwood & Bnblee, 

Mullen Chamberlun, J... 

Ceniaa* 

Charles Dunn, ^ 

H.C.Drake, .; 

John Pay, J 

Dan'l a Durrie, ^ 

John Duffy, j 

William P. Dewey, ^ 

Samuel Dunn, ^ 

Jamee DolaQ,. ^..1 

Dunning <k Paine, 

L. B.Dodge,'. ; 

D. L. Deyo, i 

J.N. Dart, 4 

J. M. Deering, : 

aimeoQ Deaii, ; 

Iiiman 0. Draper, ^ 

Williami Bt Dennis, * 

B. J. Dennis, '..1.1.. 



1 


us 00 


56 00 


106 00 


26 00 


6 00 


220 00 


160 00 


67 50 ^ 


55 00 


4 00 


500 00 


875 00 


875 00 


375 00 


890 00 


52 80 


8 21^ 


15 00 


125 00 


40 00 


25 00 


6,810 06^ 


86 00 


2,118 00 


105 00 


55 00 


105 OO- 


248 3ff 


815 03 • 


400 00 


15 00 


100 00 


198 16 


89 4i 


220 OC^ 


196 00 


885 50. 


465 00 


250 00 


• 800 00 


500 00 



M 



Omu i a ffkmdhfJPffrat .^^atarfeiMf^cdfttisaNd. 



,».j i 



BUrftftrd DomscUca, 
Pitt Ihiflfyj . J . . • • • • 

Dbnaldson & TrMdwAj^L 

§4 O4 'Ddaoruif -^-j. 

ftlfiETansj j. 

9tr.'F. EtoimuB, . ; 

lAbvidge, SUoonaker 
6httrlM ErdtnaBt 
R R£ggI#stoii, 
Wi &^gnDgar»« 



Eer^-^r- — ~ 



.TTfflg 



t 



A; W. FwT) L • 

J. M^ Flowers, *-..! 

T^nttt & Fonda, I 

WiMiel RtVa, j. 1 

©. W. Fitchi : ^^- 

ffabU Ktsgetaldr i 

flu Fltar, -.: ^ 

C^rii» Festilf, l 

flRiB^ E. Foot, ^ . 

I%cli« & GWl, L — 

Bflward B. ^oreaaiiy^L 

Bi S; N. FiOler, |.....^ 

di T^Flowew, I 

WilBam Fitspairickr 
S*. J; Fleisc^Mry .... 
DvFfetchcr, 

W. H; (Season, k 

Patiiek oainly, -. ^.••*-- 

R W. Oeissid, 

ROcGfll,.. |.^ 

WilBam J. Qibson, ^ 

n. ix« Graj'^».a«»»***»t^— »«.»*v--* 

E.F. Giles,i 

Heod^re GtosskoS;^ ... 

Joseph Gile% ^..^.^ 

Reason & Ifemhssd,*..^-^ — .. 

BtoryGrajw.^... L^ 

Oorarnor's Pontingent ^^^oottnt^ «. 

^♦J ■ ■' - I .... . 



R«eexpti. 



• .••..- -^▲i i ' t 



<trf« 



ibunsmtk 



MWOt 

12a oe 

55 00 
M 00 

100 00 

5fi.OI> 

. ai5, 00 

105 00 
80 00 

274 41^ 
29iH0O 

v>67;:40 

. .2r5i.41» 
'110 00 

i 370 00 
IM 40 
120 «0 
a75 00 

:8oa » 
120 fit 

. 484r.50 
58 00 

•lOi 00 

• ' B7 50 
83 00 
10 50 
'67 60 
50.00 
55 00 

164 ao 

110 .00 

76 00 

Q7 Oi 

4 OV 

10,000 00 



> o 



/I 



84 



OmtM Fwid^f^si 9iMHitf«««-ooBti»B«a. 



J.Gatet, 

Wm« IL Oorsline* 

Cteorge Gale^ . 

Greulich <k Sehoeflkr, 

J. H« Goodrich, 

EdmuDd Qibbs, 

A. D* Gray, 

J.Gilletfc, 

Arthur T. Howe, 

W.A. Hawkins, 

Jflmes Halpin, 



'•«te « ^»«A ««r 



•^ m ^ 



r 



J^; 0. Hopkina, -! -^- 

A. AHuntiogton, ^^ 

Lake Haley, ..• •••«••. 

Hale <& Harris, ... 

Theodore Hayes,. ,. — ^ 

Willbm Habich,. 

J6hD W. Hwt,. 

CariHabich, _ 

ft F. Hopkins, 

Btt Rwr HunV 

H. IL Harris,-.... :^. 

Dianiel Howell, 

A. Heidkamp, «^..... 

D. B. Hoaglu 

D. Hbit, ^ 

Johft Henna^ ,. 

H* Hbho, .....••....• .......^...•^ .-^^ J •»«••«•• . 

A, W. Hovej, .. 

hsatnte for the Bliod, 

do... Deal and Dumb, 

Sdward Ilslej, ««. 

ffoha N. Jones, ^ : 

P; Johnson, . ^ .^ 

fohn James, 

IL K. JoneSf 

D^ W. Jonea, .._ 

B. H. Janssen,... . 

D< N, Johnson, 

K Johnson, 

Paul Juatev, . \^r», 

James H. Knowlton, 



Bseeipts. 



,v^^, 



:w. 



•.»« ...^.fc 



Disbiinm*lB. 



«. 



•4«*« • •, 



• •f< 



It 



tas% » 

160 M 

.1,125 00 

8 00 

003 Oi 

^ MOO 

5 00 

* 259 00 

< Ai 

PIS 

' 820 00 

81.00 
00 OY 

06 00 
^300 00 

100 00 

600 00 

500.00 

i 905 00 

07 00 

10:50 

^35 40 

64 00 

• ^ 7 00 

059 75 

55 00 

8 00 

5^000 00 

fir,300 00 

515 00 

A80t 00 

55 00 

. 55 00 

. 83 00 

. 000. 00 

05 30 

05 00 

105 00 

8 00 

55 00 



85 






Joseph Keyesi .'...*. 
IB. KUttber dt Co.|..', 

|L R. K«6gaD, . . 

Ji.; K. Kellogg, ..... 
Carl Kiekhoeffer,.... 
pbartes Kuehn,.... . 
iehn M. Keep....... 

August Kruer, 

p,^tvi9 King & Co.y.\ 
£. B. Kellogg,.....: 
Oie K. Lawrence, ... 

8. Leyy, .'.--.. 

I4 GjuMse eouoty,... 

^« Lai^derdale, 

W. J. Leisure, .- 

Bebert LiYsej, ..... 

p. O. Long, .\... 

WiUiam Lakin, 

pb lories H. Larrabee, 

Jobs . Leonard, J.J 

y. LtiMorrison, IJ... 

t)ex. (21. McBride,:.. 
Mitcbell,-.-..-.-: 
H» Martin,.JJ. JJJ.. 
JlMuea Mu rdocV, III.'. 
Heiira <fe Riplej, J... 
IL J. Murray, ..J... 
Obarjds Moseley,.!.. 

JSgberl Moaeley, 

O. F. Mandt, 1.. 

Fnuik Hunger, 

j, A. Marklaiid, ... 
IL Martin. 2d...... 

£« McMabon, '. 

4A. HengeR, 

^ipneoii Mills, . 

MAdisoQ Gas C6.',1.J.... 

licBride A Ste?en8, 

f. W. P. Matts, (oemus,) 
^^^r Ifenael,..!.!!.. 
J!7aiU«rD. McIndoe»\.... 
4b 



Reeeipte. 



rr' 



"t- 



.4. 



fr f • 



* m 



'?t' 



DisbnrMiii'to, 



I • 



•810 M 

640 50 

710 24 

45 00 

802 04 

75 OQ 

952 50 

1,033 50 

137 00 

164 76 
2 50 

150 00 
10]|^50 
85i 07 
. 55 00 
126 00 

165 00 

270 00 

SO; 00 

375 00 
100 00 

5ai 00 

200 00 

55 00 

238 Od 

495 00 

70 48 

55 00 

100 00 

it50 00 

126 09 

88 00 

. 188 00 

83 09 

156 66 

300 00 

. 40 00 

l,4;id 51 

.. i 12 
12 00 
$1 AO 



t6 



Oenerei l^unA—Ptnt Qtiorf^r— contflniM. 



nSB U ftSK JIBM IS. 



~ * 



Van) <feOruiia, 

WilGam A. Mean,... 

William Miler, 

Charles H. Kfen, . . . 

John Maih«wB, 

iLy.MaUesDn, 

Edirard Meloy, 

D. K. Noyea^ 

G. Noon, .— 

E. E. Nojes, , 

Ole Nottalfaen, 

J. Oslin, -•--..'-. 

C. T. Orertoa, 

J. R. Potter, 

Andrew Prondfit, 

A. F. Phillips, 

J. H. Prenss, ^.« 

ByroQ Payne, i 

G,W,Parkv, -•-.-: 

A V . Preistch, 

^. T. Palmer, ♦ 

S. Pfinegar,--.: i 

G. VT. Pugh,-.- 4 

John F. Potter, 

Thomas B. Parkinson, .« 
Lorenzo PrMon, 

A. P. Pratt, %..,^ 

Wm, Pyneheon, ♦ 

M PeTton,^ --> 

B. E. Pearsons, 

B. P. Perryj 

James, G. Perciral, ^ 

Jacob Quintbs, w 

E. B. Quinei-, i- 

James Qninii, ;. 

D. Redd, .4 

Harrison Reed, \, 

Wm. C. Rofljers, .... _..». 

D. A. Reed} 

Rood <f? Go^rfch, L 

Abner Ron^, ^ 

Wm. RichaMsoo, . . . i . . 



Receipts. 



DiibatMfDils. 


143^ 2b 


128 42 


157 50 


165 m 


120 00 


82 00 


11 0« 


86 00 


56 00 


6 00 


200 00 


' 220 00 


270 00 


105 00 


7,482 00 


568 00 


5,844 70 


150 00 


55 00 


88 00 


55 00 


165 00 


220 00 


887 60 


4 00 


75 00 


68 90 


36 52 


100 00 


186 25 


18? 50 


1,685 06 


375 00 


850 00 


120 00 


55 00 


887 10 


285 50 


102 06 


82 00 


165 00 


80 00 



lit 






Itead 4r Nevttt, :. 

WilBam RnMe, .. 

Horac0 BuUe^y. ...... 

A.W:iUn<Ull, 

Ai Rogers,-' 

V.W.lloth,. ... 

J'olm Reinery 

State Loan, (mtereat,) . 
Sc^oeffler <k IWendt, . . .^ 
State Prison^ appropriatipni: 

0. M.' S^ley, j.. 

AJn^rew Sexton, ..]-. 

£lla^ Stangeland, ^... 

John Sell, 4.- 

E*W. Sherman, 

S^V.Shipmtti) .- 

W.S. Steyeis, --.:..-. 

J,'^. Smith,-. 

fi; F. Seymottr, .. 



S., G. Stacy, {. 
&1'0. Slossev, 



1 



Bu StahAurJr, *- 

W.H. Seals] .-.-.-.■. -4 

B. J: Putnai, ..-I 

Bk v • Smith, j.......'...4 

S;L.Stottt,L...:.--..i 
1 Skinner, j. | 

St^erens ABbsers, ^ 

Alex. Stilwell, .i 

F. A. Scofield, ] 

AD.Smithj... \ 

Wn^.R Smith, :.-.i 

Slm'bn.Sicklts, I 

B. L. Smitk .'.. 

Sharpstein ^ Lathrop, 

f.^mith, -J 

Uarid Tayldr, ....... . 

H:aThom4s,.- .. 

D: L.Thayer, 

Geo, P, T^oinpson, 

John w . Teihiey, * j 

Ole Torgason, 



Heceipta 



If* 






DiBbnrtem'ta. 



T - 



%'t\ 60 

ih od 

250 00 
375 06 

125; 00 

t 56 

8d 00 

"lfi\t 60 

5,88?' 5^ 

27,56^ 50 

60 00 

67,38 

2,S36 20 

'55 00 
15 00 

12t) 50 
85 00 
50 00 
55 06 

200 00 
. 220 06 

5«l 00 
• ,>l«*Od 

2*5 <yo 

490 40 

72 OQ 

100 Od 

» ^5 

180' W> 

4'0i9 

' • 760 00 

$50 06 

200 00 

26 00 
489 25 
270 25 
287^ }^ 

55 00 

ui 56 

52 50 
418 50 
388 79 



Chsnprol Fund—Firai Qmar i w to a trnwdl 



DUBmtXMXVTiL 



KanMl Ten Eyck, 

P. Tbomas, J. 

S^Tbomai, 1 — 

P. ToiaDd, 1 

6eo.F« Taylor, 

Tibbittf 4 Gordon, .... 

W. F.Terbnne, l... 

Williun Voefniti, 

Byr^n Van fiyke, .l 1.. 

Champion Vaughn,..'.... 

D. 8,ViUam, -...-. :... 

Weed 4 Eberhard, 

B.F. Wilson,--.- 11. -.:.--. 

D. Worthingtoh, -* — '. 

A, Woodward,.. ....1. 

Patrick White, :-...: 1 

WelUtood, Hayes, Hank & Whiting,.. 

William Wipperman,.. 

J.Wagner, 1.1 

J. Wearer, ...l 1.1 

Wni.R. Williams,-. -. ..!-.. 

Wisconsin State Historical Society, 

John D. Welch,..- 

W.W. Woodman,: 1 1 

O. Weiss,....--.-.-. 

a a West, 1 

Thoa, Weigand, — ..—.•..11..... 

Wm.H. Wains,.-.... 1-...1 

Edward, V. Whiton, . . 1 , 

BUle Williams, -.11 .... 

JohnWillans, 1.., 

Waukesha County Agricultural Booieiy,. 

D. F. Walters, . 1 

A. Whittemore & Co.,-.— 

M. Wicks 1 , 

William K. Wilson, 

R.T. Williams, ."..1.1. .1.1-... 

Wm.J- Young,..* l.-ll , 

J, O. Toung ,..■-.'..-. , 



Total 






tlOO 00 

191 50 

105 00 

ion 00 

57 50 

54 SI 
2 00 

55 00 
100 00 

88 75 

77 00 

1,145 05 

87 50 
67 50 

150 00 

100 00 

871 08 

55 00 

55 00 

50 00 

8 00 

4,400 00 

128 00 

55 00 

43 

70 00 

75 00 

200 DO 

500 00 

45 50 

i 50 

100 00 

to 00 

108 50 

276 M 

500 00 

50 00 

83 60 

88 60 

282,044 16 



89 



Second Quarter. 



BXCBirri. 



T 



Adftma Gontity, TFax/ ^.. 

Chippewa, ..^..do — .i 

Clark, do i. 

DovgiftM, do •.....«..•. 

Maoilowee, do....^ ^. 

Ifilwatikee, ..doJ ^;.. 

OeoDlo, -- ..I-do i- i 

Pierce, •- •- -do •..-- - . . - . . 

Polk,..- .: do 

Portoge, -. do -. 

8a«k, ..-.::. ...do :...... 

8i. Groii,- -.--. -do.-*. ..-.--..-.-. 

Waupaea, - - J . do. -,-.:--.-..-. ^ 

Bank of Fi« I-ttbe, ....].-... 

hnftkr of- C6\m m btis, . . - i -. . . -. -.-.-.-. . 

Oakwood Bi»nk,-j 

Cbippew»BAnk, .- .---.., 

Bank of Otibioshj -.^.----. 

Baok of -Walertown, --.-.-.-. .-. .-. . 

Rock Cuunly Bank, .-- 

Dodge Gount!y Bank, . . ^-:.-- . . . 

Racine County Haok, . . ------ . . . 

Bank of Kipon,:.' •---..-, 

BiiDk oY Prairie da Chien,- >.. 

Farm era- and Milfers Bank, .-.-.-..*.. 

Wiilworlh County Bank, ..--.- 

Bank of Racine,', i 

Bnak of Wonroe,*. - -.- 

Bank of the North West,. L' :..:.- 
Bap k of th e • Ch pkal, . . . - .- .--.•.-.-, 

German Hank, . . .» .--.-.•--; •- 

Second Ward Bank,-.. 

Nnrthern Bank, . -•-'. . . - j .: - . - .- 

Winnel a^o County Bank,. ..-. ... 
Exchange Bank ot Darling k Co., 
Jed'erauu Cuuniy Bank, 




f I ' 



Duiboriointli 



M,en 57 
SS6 00 
- 1#«17 60 
1,280 00 
8,3Q4 91 
S,4S0 SO 
< 841 07 

- 1«,«®3 6t 

4«7 SO 

- 4S6 56 
' '300r CO' 

'»^70 0» 

' J 60 

' 1&7 50 

" w^m 

460^001 
876 0<i 

' ' ioi 10 
7«o oa 

- 87^00 
• 875 00 

1^470 17 

187 60 

' 822 91 

•1,876 00 

875 00 

• - S'f5 00 

-187 60 

■' 87^ 00 

875 00 
> ' mi 88 

187 60 

876 00 
187 50 
876 00 
662 60 



•TT 



90 



General 



* ' i 



^j9rif|^(^-'-coQtiiiued 

BXCXIPTS. 



m 


Receipts. 


DisburMm*t8. 


Bank of Milwaukee : ..'1 


1,500 00 
75000 
110 42 

. 187 50 
725 00 
, 3(75 00 
375 00 
187 50 
187 50 
375 00 
375 00 
335 42 
187 50 
450 00 
375 00 
750 00 
371 88 
375 00 
750 Qip 
262 50 
356 t5 
262 50 
743 76 
375 00 
460 00 
375 00 
187 50 
375 00 
187 50 
3000 00 
187 50 
301 03 
187 50 
829 16 
110 00 

50,000 00 




Oommereial Bank, . •-... 




JToreft^ Otty Bank, 




Elkborn Bank, J 




Waukesha County Bank. 




P<ink of Fond dn Tae, J . . 




Merchants Bank* J . 




Hudson City B«il)i,;..^ 

Fox Riyer Sank. 




Columbia CovntT Bft&ki 




State Bank, ; 




Oshkosh Comnieroial Bimk, 




Brown Coulnty Baakf--». 




North Westevn BanL.i 




Dane County Bank,... ^ r— 

City Bank ^ Ktfnotha, * 






Kenosha County Baiikt *......>......... 




City Bank of Bacine, 




Wisconsin Marine k Fiiie Insurance Co, . . 




St Croix RiTer Bunk. 




Tiiin>b4riniin4 Bankim --l...-« 




Green Bay Bank *.--. 




Central Bank of Wisoousin, 


---1 •••-■•• 


Rock River Bank. 1 




Bank of Beloit, 








Waupun Bankf,. - 




Marine Bank«...«l... - 




Bank of Sheboyiraa. . .... 


• 


State Bank of wiseonsjn, 




Bank of Citj of La Crosse, 




Eatanyan Bank, 




Peoples Bank, 




£. K. Hinckley's Bank of Grant County,. 
Hawkers and redlars, 






State Loan, (Bonds of 1857) 




' \ . * 




Total 


$06,129 29 














i» 



•( 



J .'jM-^.i'l 



-— r- 



ReceiptB. Diabunem'tB. 



Jan^^B. Alban, 1 

.Aioerican Bxprdss Gomj^tof. . . . . . 

A.,D. Barry i i. 

MaJil<Mi Bawj ^ 

tjoksBMbford 

•Boyd 4i; iiedyard ; 

/W^tej^ H. Beeley f... 

J.,P,BroifD.. 
, W.Ballou, Jr ^ , 

r.N.BoYe^ V-. :...::. 

^ V X ?P- Biroh^d ^ 

Slumfield I?' Kopp ^ 

* (Jensus \..: ♦ 

g.. Cram.. 4 
eorge W.Cate ,. 

Jtf.j^Cothreii.:. ^ 

' Q. K. Cottpn...: , 

Alex. L. OoUiiiB ;. 

,<^rsamu8 Ok>le 

AmAsa Cokb 

, Calkins &J^roti<tfit- 

Wiyi. M. Dennis 

Lyman C. Draper 

0, E. Druitaer 

Sane County Agrioidtaral Sooiety 
ernard Domsohke 

D. L. Deyp 

tiel S. P 



'.».■ 



Daniel S, ynrrte. 
James R. Doolittle. 
S a. N. Fuller... 

E. J.. Tleiacher 

I'ord & Fairbanks . 
JolmB. Ffiller... 

^or^e Gale 

Ouatavus Grahl.. 
Wi3a.,J. Gibson... 
Wm.R. GotsUne.. 

CvlHabi4h 

B. r. Hopkins.... 
John W.ttunt.... 
puBayBiant 



T- T 



/I 



. till 50 


6 10 


612 75 


200 00 


1,562 50 


634 t4 


2 50 


. 66 66 


8 40 


50 90 


839 00 


33 12 


214 00 


55 00 


375 00 


.376 00 


875 00 


875 00 


500 00 


75 00 


375 45 


500 00 


250 00 


9 50 


100 00 


tf75 00 


50 QO 


237 71 


750 00 


875 00 


825 00 


179 60 


24 00 


875 00 


9 25 


17 pO 


875 00 


300 00 


800 00 


822 15 


187 84 



M 



Oerural l\u%d— Second Quartet— eon&DXiei, 



BISBUBSXlIKirTt. 



Charles Hiiggint 

B. C Hull 

A. Holley - 

IIou8« of Rero'ge apprdprialion . 

InstiiuiioD fur DeiLf aod Dumb 

losliiuiion for Bliod 

David W. Jones 

John N Jones....' 

JeOferson County Agricnltaral Society... 

Chanes Kuehn ' 

I«a Fayette Kellogg * 

John M. Keep I ... 

Charles U. Larrabee 

Joseph Laiidon . .. 

LeUnd & Utter 

L A. Lapham * ' 

Arthur Mc Arthur. ..l.." 

A. Mtnges 

^dward McMahon 

Alfred H. Marsloh... " 

. John P. Jd<M>rel ' 

C. Mfjer, Register oT Deeds 

Egbert Mosely 

>1ilea^e Account (of 1856) ^* » 

WiUiam Nelson .' 

J, H. Pruess..-*- 

H. U pHge : : 

Villiam Kichardsion .' 

Al«^x. VV. ..and'al) 

Ge4»rge D. Rubi-rts ," .1 

Charles Koi-ser.-. ' .' . 

H»'rnce Uublee . i 

A. D, Sniiih ... ........ 

Willinm R. Smith 

C«rl H, Schmidt 

8imoii Sickles , . 

John R. 8whI1ow \'^ 

I)aiiiel M Seavcr 

A. S, S>«riborn '. 1 

j;. C. Snckelt. : 

State Piison appropriation (part of 1856)^ 



Disbaiwata 



tissti 
1 to 

5,000 00 
17,000 00 

2,918 n 

900 tk> 

100 00 
SM) 00 

soo do 

376 00 

375 00 

28 80 

48 

to t^ 

513 88 

800 00 

260 00 

8b 00 

30 OO 

t 00 

83 ifO 

« 00 

50 pO 

$,3ai |2 
405 ia 

12 00 

,87.5 00 

' 28 $0 

505 00 

250 00 

1,810 JO 

850 'OO 

18 50 

2U0 00 

1'50 
2 50 

23 50 

12 bo 
^i^ 00 



33 



Oenerai Fund — Second Quarter — continued. 



DISBURSEMENTS . 

> » ' " ■'■■ 



1 <'Vr ;•- <ll(i 



\ty. 



f:'; ♦'•tr'i ' 

^t^Xioan -...--_„.- .......^.......^... ... . 

CK^rg§(P. Thompson ^ -.^^ 

IJ^illiAimP. Towers-,: 1-/.V—. -^..^— . 

^VilJiwriH-Wallis:.:^ 

iL^<)^**08tet 11 ... - - ..-,^..^,.- - -, 

Willifjift M. Watt. ------.•..,- ......... . -... 

Wa^l^Agton Cbuntj Agrioultjgr^i Societj^ 

'V^Ifineoago --.- do ^..^ j,. 

Ed^aTriV.Whiton-l... -.'./. ,, 

WiJlliwv J- Webster ..,.....,. .^^ . , 

Wf?^4 EberhardiCp...,^.-.^,^,,,,,. 



J» 


c . 


'» , 


. ... 


f J 




V- ' 


V 1 •> 


♦ . 


e.T; 


«'■ 


t:\ 


r;.' 


..'I 


01) 


.H;g 


ou 


Oi.- 



ReceiptB. 






r 



• • •(4 U •' 

« « « « A • 






Disbuzwm'ts, 



'< I 



7/ 

otr' .jflDO DMD 

7 ' 100 /Oii 

')( i5l^0 00^. 



fcK 



101,1110)16^; 



. / 






Third Qiiarier, . 



X 



\f 



.1 



-•— f 



•» O'Ji 

La.Pdtti County,.—^. 



«■ ^p •» ^ ^» ^> f M M^M^ _ 



.--L------ 



St;)€reTi 

Wiapneea 

HetafTjT ObnVtns, oVk-eovrty Wid worth- Oor 

Baok^:' ..I.-.---.- — ,.----.. 

HawWs and Podlars s::^^: --..-. - 

*■■ 

05 . ^ 



> ^ 



#457 63 
164 V« 






J >• 



1,0«7 1b'SjfS,7:\V. 



.<» 



496- 96 

]:,166 £9 

^ 10 00 

1,08V 50 

-50 OOt 



45,819 62 



. If, » 



rr 






1 > .i 



I » 
> 






i)i 



. ... \V .1 .f 



tf / 






. t 



I ) 



5b 



34 

Otneral Fund—T/urd 

DISBITBflSM9KTS. 







ntinaed.. 



T' 'J 



/ 1 1 



.^.l 



Receipts. DiBbanem'tiL 



_ - I 



William P. Brown, ! j *1W 98 

SOoodifiald 4 Koppr .----.--....-. --i -,-... i\ v^« W 

Ifahlon P, Barry, ..J. ....../..{ TOO 00 

iba^Barry, -...i. ....ilL J. ' »«0 00 

CMet Bashford, ..-...-....-.. .i..-r-.--.'.y %W 50 



• « fc''<>' % 



» w »^ * 



D. WjBallou^jr. 

AiuioBL K. BaRill,^ . 

J^bn MlByme^ ... 

B$ke9 it Lawton, . . 

Ai'H.-Blmcroft,.... 

Steph^R. Cottom- 

JUifficfttider L. Collins, ^.w. v^,. 

Amas»-Cobb, 

Ottemitt Coie, 

Calkins & Webb, 

Iff. M. Cotbren, --*-- 

George W. Gate, - 

Census, i. — i *- 

J. C. Cbandler, 

Wm. M. Dennis, rYi-^>T - -h- - 

Lyman C. Draper, 

M. M. Davis, ^ • - 

K. J. Fleischert *--..'., ...-.---- ^- . 

Fncbs <fe 0611, ,, ,- --... 

8. 8. IT. Puller. ^ . -•*,^ ^ ................... . 

fleorge Gale, . *.* .,. .j. - -, - - - . 

Wm . R. Gorsline, . 4 f --.--.- -.-- -.- ■ 

Da Ray Hunt, ^^.^i . .1 — ^*.\.y .^ ^i«. ^*.|^w. 

B. P, Hopkins, ^.^ . ;...-.4- - -J-.- -.- -. 

Carl Habicb, ,**-*i- 

Jobn W. Hunt, ..- „ " 

Charles Huffglna^ .^«.v.^^.{. 

Samuel M. Hunt, L 

Bdfrard tt Holton, lJ..-. :... 

J. L. Hill, 

Inatitutefor the Blind, ..^ 

David W. Jones, 

JobnN. Jones, 

John M. Keep, 

Charles Knenn, 

Andrew Eerzhalls, 



1 



t _ Li 



> i, 



I 



* 



'j'^f^r^*' - » 



» * 



• W+,*»*f- « 4 9 . 



H^t-'tf^ 



\^ 



OOO 00. 


IN 50 


-*80 00 


t W 


50 W) 


375 00 


' 375 00' 


75 00 


500 00 


3,877 24 


375 00 


375 00 


78 50 


10 25 


500 00 


260 00 


100 00 


M85.00J 


%.11S U ' 


*T5 i>0 * ■ 


^U 00 -• 


.375.00 V 


217 48 \ 


300 00 ! 


300.00. 1 


300 00 


325 00 


300 00 


21 50 


2 50 


3,750 00 


300 00 


954 72 


375 00 


350 00 


76 00 



<J(. 



ss 



General Fund — T/drd Quarter — continued. 

DI8BUR8BMENT& 



E. W. Keyes, 

J. Gillett Knapp, 

La Fayette Kellogg, . 
Charles H. Larrabee, 

John Lindner, 

Fred. &. Lovell, 

Madison Gas Co., ... 

A. Menges',' 

Arthur Mc Arthur, .. 
Alfred H. Marston, . . 
Helena Meisgrade, . . . 
Edward 'McMahon, .: 
F.J.Mills, 



Edward McGarry, 

McVean <fe St. George, 

Jacob Quintus, 

Charles Boeser,..:.... 
Horace Rublee, ;...-... 

Ryan <k Co,, - 

Bead <fe Nevitt, 

H. L. <&L. N.Rann,.. 

A, D. Smith, 

Simon Sickles, 

William R. Smith,.... 

B. W. Snckbw, 

Joseph A. 81ee]per, ... 

S. W, Smith, 

Sharpstein <fe Lathrop, 
Sanford & Tapley, i.. 
John Taylor, ...ii... 
David Taylor, — --.. 

S. J, Todd, 

Wm. H. Wallis, 

Edward V. Whiton, .. 

W.B.Walton, 

State Loan, interest,.. 



Beceipts. 



- 



Disbureem'tfl. 


$3,000 00 


. 218 


00 


260 


00 


375 00 


76 


op 


805 


00 


48 


96 


800 00 


625 


00 


♦8 


00 


76 


00 


133 


84 


8 


25 


10,000 


00 


• 2 


65 


166 


25 


506 


25 


250 00 


3 


25 


2 


66 


2 


40 


'760 00 


200 


00 


350 


00 


283 


88 


750 00 


4 


79 


6 


00 


2 


60 


26 


80 


845 


00 


385 


00 


200 00 


666 


66 


I 


60 


1,522 


50 



$43,732 



it' 



36 



SCHOOL FUND. 



First Quarter, 



BECEIPTS. 



. I 

Sales 

Dues 

Loans.. 

PenaUy.. 

Fines 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Frederick W. Auguste. 

J. E. Averill 

A. P. Blakeslee 

AVilHam F. Beavers... 

Bad Ax County 

John Peter Behlmer . . 

Brown County 

Chrtetopher Blanbach. 

John Barth 

Calumet County 

Cover (& Goldsmith . . . 

William E Croft 

Satterlee Clark 

Carpenter <fe Law 

Calkins <&Proudfit 

Columbia County 

Crawford County 

CM. Davis..-. 

J. G. DevHlcourt 

Charles W. Fitch 

Farrar <fe Fonda 

Grant County . i. 

Hull&Merfield....:. 
Thomas S* Hodder . . . 

C. E. Havens 

John Kaiifman 

Carl Kickhaefer 

La Crosse County 



Receipts. 



$2,018 46 

28,583 39 

5,460 02 

805 68 

1,355 10 



138,192 65 



Diftbanem'Is. 



>■ * 



$498 00 


30 00 


78 


05 


9 


OO 


530 37 


70 00 


255 


41 


120 


00 


123 


60 


834. 


39 


4 


00 


22 


65 


602 


50 


7 


00 


1,214 


00 


406 


55 


243 


06 


22 


50 


498 


00 


32 


80 


11 


95 


309 


85 


3 


75 


10 


15 


7 00 


498 


00 


110 


39 


184 


13 



37 



School Fund— First Qui^/er— continued. 



DI8 



NTS. 



Lafayette Countj . . 

Abel B. Manning 

V. A. W. Merrell 

Monroe Comntj... 

Marvin Pierce ---. 

A,F. Pratt 

G. M.L. Park--.._ 

Pierce Conntj 1 

Robinson & Brother 

Samuel Ryan, Jr. <k Co. 

Beed & Nevett -, 

Wolfgang Ruble 

Richland County 

Rock County 

Sharpstein k Lathrop. . 

B, L. Sharpstein 

O. A. Staflford.- 

Joseph A. Sonoterby 

O. M. Seeley 

R. Holyoke 

George W. Brown 

Bank County 

Shawanaw County 

George W. Tenner 

M 



ns 



William C. Tompl 

Iff. J. Thomas -- 

'Edward Thwing -..- 

Weed, Eberhard A Co. .. . -•- - -" 

Walworth County i .' 

Washington County .- •. 

Waukesha County 

Waushara County. - 

Phillip Weiyand.:.-.: 

Toung <fe Gibbs :-- 

Refunded Sohool Fund Salea.. . 
Refunded School Fund Sales • . 
Refunded School Fund Penalty. 
Loans 



Receipts. 



n^' 



•■f r 



i ' 



•%*■ 






DiBbonem'ts. 



806 08 

909 00 

3 75 

190. 92 

93 QO 

31 20 

. 16 Ob 

■ 207 38 

17 50 

90 20 

39 25 

86 67 

.926 23 

245 78 

21 80 
16 00 
23 90 
10 50 
75 00 

22 50 
90 00 

661 99 

l,58i 51 

8 d5 

6 50 

14 00 

104 50 

. 208 S^ 

30 90 

233 75 

29 38 
310 08 
206 86 

30 40 
448 40 

88 28 

414 43 

140,300 00 

154,919 07 



38 



School Fund—ccfniamxeA. 



Second Quarter. 



Sales... 
Dues... 
Losns, . 
Penaltj 
Hoes . . 



Bfini UUSJCMSNTS. 

C. J. Allen. -'1 

L. D. Bryan.. 

A. P. Blakeslee 

George C.Baker :.:.- 

Calkuis&Webb 

John Lockhait 

Haul Ai Grimm .' 

Edgar P. Morehouse 

Edmund R. Otis 

Pierce County *- 

Arthur Plati :.. 

Portage. County* 

William Pawley."- 

St. Croix County. . : ^^-. 

Carl H. Schmidt '. ••• 

Weed, Eberhard & Co. .•...• . . 

Refunded School Fund Account. • 

.Loans ;. ;. 

Befunded -..:-- 



Eeodpts. Disbiinein'ts. 



655 65 

' 5,349 56 

1,052 00 

2,091 85 

160 60 



<9,809 66 



• • • 



• • • • • 



--.••••••• 



••..••«••• 



5 50 
24 50 

6 60 
9 88 

321 70 

37 50 

70 00 

23 00 

33 10 

1,333 57 

.96 00 

436 58 

37 50 

2,095 99 

41 70 

111 00 

367 09 

16,314 00 

105 06 

20,464 27 



■^...^^ 



%\ 



9 



.MmfLFvi^sviimimfA 



^(livimb^Nmfv. 



■ ■■ wJ^Z ^^^^^^ »^^^3 



.r ..'='; ' ia! .ij-jio-j)*'! I 



rrr-h 



Dues. i-^--- 



■5««f^ 



Reeeipts. 



•••#•• 



, a«.49l 08 
9,090 24 



Penalty {...• 



----•• ••• 



piSBURSEMllNTS. 



00 for.4 

44Bh|0n,^ Wise. ,- ^ ^ ^ c ^ u >.-. -^ .--..---,- -. 

Citlldpi & Webb, .,.,_,;., ,.^ 

Oarp«n(«r <fc^ Martw , . , , I,, ^,.-, ,^:., 

©i Sj.Currie,^.,,,,, 



Igillim rH. &lefi|Qn, - , . I-.- -^,.-..^^^^^,.- - 
SMn^ki. qan9§b , . . . . j. -, .-^ — ^^^^^^ ., 
AlidrwnKufzhaJ?., . , , , ..^^_..-,^^,^^^, 
jFltmepi JEl. J^nef ..,,,.., :...., . J. . ,,._.- ...^ 

Sd^Wd Leefi. rT»,,«,.r ;_.j..^-.-;-^ -^-p.^^^. 

H^m^-^aitltb^Q^ . , , * • ♦...»---_- J. - -^,*,.- -j- 

Bte4AJirevi^,,-^,-,-.L-.-„-j..-,,^^,-. 

JtBoii'S^majim. , .. r ,* = . f .-^--.--- - .r -^-^--^ 

SkaqwWn * L^throp^.,. ...-..-,-..,.. ....-_..-, 

9ea«tffrred t9.$9b9Ql Fnn4 Jncow^ ,.-..^, 
iO ^..l: I ^ 

10 (.0.1 ; ! 



•--••••••a 



2,667 82 



•86,718. 77 



..^ 



Disbanem'tii. 



» - ff ai. 



■T^ 



> .0 



' I , J/I>1 ^ 



.... to. A 

.839 1^5 

I %a92 '09 

...»* » 

.7« iQi 

c.-v/iio-'W 

... MoiM 

... aaihai 

;«u« 

a>t2,fA9^iW 

..f«f4i4<bii5Ma5.5^fti 
. . - «.^*« I1»,9J^ « 



40 



vBumtsmnA 



•'j^Mr^^tMa^. 






rqf 



Reoejpts. 



• '; J» ■. : ■ 



• • • • • 



• • I • 



I ' 

Bad' A^ Go^^ij; 
Sruifii. 4 mi 



• • 



«'t« 






t k 



^i\ '»( 



ijv..i H .*t?it. 



Columbia,. i 

Crawford, 

<P4>iid>a^Lac, - 



.-(.«.«. 



$i4i,oee4> 



• - - 



DiflbnTsem'tB. 



<'3ii(I 

. . .effflo J 

2,005 74 

1,026 95 

4,761 90 

1,240 80 



0§fiWrson, ..«.••. ••««■!. .•wwr.'.-k^ -.-.•.<.-. 

KbnoB^a, ..•..«.•*«•. L .•w-wv%.-wi.-w<tawi.>. . 

hk C^rdsse, .^«« .-ww-w-w-w-w-.-. .-.^ . 

Ia Pliyette, f . .-- -^ w . -^^-- .^ 

iiaiiiiawoo, ^ U^ w--^-w--^T-n. . .n. 

•ftirqcfette, L --.-. .^-.^-^ .-. . . . 

Milwaukee, 
Mbiiroe, .. 

Ibcine, 

■Ibok,...,." 

B*uk,....., 

MeM^^an, i 

WaJi#orth, ^MM. .«.«.. .L 
Waibington^ -*-•--. ' 

Waukesha, J 

Watt sfcfar a, --.^••.^...i. .-...-.--.-*-..*-. I 

li^ B/'BeardiUy,- L^-.^^ I. rjKi- nj, i c 

Ratit^WV Ittrdr I ... ... -— -- - - - 






,) 



. .• • .•.i.>.-fc-w-*-fc---w*».-fc .%<fct ■'•"'« **•« iv*'^'i)V4#''P0 







€l^dirg«.KrBaooB, 
H. F. EberU . - . . 



I 



..- ..*nF^(Jotirt 

8xi4<» 






-.«-i*:'iJiOS 



--S.X 



Jn«9Moli0S 

; ij^ j/[|ii< I*ri94 VlOII 






..'-'yaiVi'A 



,'VM« 






290«0<I 

220 07 
200 01 
146 66 



#? 



I 



r^f^f^f :?*"?<? f?**»<^^r/' ^t^fT-i^*vi^Ht4p. 



DI8BUBSXMBNTS. 



l{ 



T :a 



< akU 



i )i0'>-»rfl 



t' 






f 



Charles R. Oleason.. 
16Uitt«i 8. Hohart... 

Hi M. Harris 

WattfJI. Jonea • 

Saoflttl Jones « 

Okfl»te Loreniaa . . . 
OuMiiH. Meyer..... 
Okfllte Huggina.... 
mUiati H. HoU.... 

lebA :Q. MoMjnn 

Aartfitf Plati 

IflmMilosa. 

JblXJSagfflea. 

W^ Aujtkl^ieVL .. 

littsabJ fieemaa 1 

t** MoAtgomerj- Smith. . {. 

JdiA^VillaiiBu i 

Wswhara Ooonty.....] 

Ohatlca G. May^s \ 

biteeeet refunded ^ 



■f 



Reoeipts. |Dul>ar46iii'tt. 






r.A 






Xix.d; 



i*'. 



--* Jl 

•...JUX' 



,1 



.0 



Hj 






$206 66 
t^ HfeO 00 

1-'^' . l24ii0D 
aiMiiiM'/ <■ iif.il. 






:.^ 



pSfecwirf' Qtutrter, 



-[•tSc-^ If fiy. ' t;».r ) 









F»* / . ; ^ fc 1- 



RECSIPTS. 



Beempta 



PMBTOSBMBlft^:^^^^^^'* ^^■"^'^ 



Adams County.. 

Buffalo' ....,.,....'..-. i, 

Iowa ^ V 

MOwaukee 

Oconto ! 1 

^e99jp|Ml«<^^ -»---! 

Iup%o^::::-;:::::; 



D5TH 




BV 



f. 



H^i^ 'H 



■.rrTirrrT*.— in 



•^4 



2,841 02 
126 40 

.»«t2. 
8,005 2! 

6,811 84 
145 80 

, .188.Y 






41^ 



SkhbSi t^und Tnchme^iSecond Qtior/er— continued. 



DISBimsSMXNTS, 



'i\ 



- I r* 



'. I" 



Walter H. Bealej 

Xhomas 0, Boudce * 

Sj; S^ Beardslej 

Cleaife E. Bacon. 

EraakjW, Bird 

Ofairi^BR. Oleaaon 

K; y« Harris..., ......... ...... 

Wilfiam 8, Hobart 

WaKiE. Jonea 

Q, Hi; Johnson * 

Ohoies Lorenzen 

John P. Moore.. ^ 

Qt 4 0. MenJman <k £rQ. 

Jk.D. Bugglts 4. 

James Ross .... 

F. A.8cofield 

J. M. Smith 

Jung^L. Smith 

Jacob Seeman . 

John-MiUails 

HT. WHlltos 

F. T. Zettler 

George BL Goodridge "..: 

George W. Dodge -^...^^-^.^,y 

Refunded 'l...... 



ji 



■ ' ■ I ' 1 1 



PiH— 



Receipts. 



-H 



.L4 



f 1 



4 



i^.wU 



» I 



• a f * 






PiBburaem*ti. 



^*\{ .4 06 

ftOO 01 

' .1i9V 09 

Uu.U'-' .246 2i 
^ 119 6ft 

. 150 06 

6,roo tf6 

100 06 
' 160 06 
000 Ol 
160 06 
. Ut 60 
160 od 

210 00 
150 00 
150 00 
14 00 
21 67 
694 63 



28,580 ai 



d*** 



i« I | i j i«'ii ■» ! 



Third Quartef.,,.,^ 

BECSIFTS. 



• . « k > 



J . 



- 1 




' '; ' nrsBURssMi^Ts. 



$10,^^-46 



L. E. ifeardsjIeT . 
Frank; W. Bird.: 
Oeorg^ E. Bacon* 



n i - ^ t vM 



tf' 



. » I- 



f U 



2M 00 



I » 

43 



School Fund Iffq^ff^^Tpiaf^. ^fi^^r^-HSontinued. 



DISBBftSBMENTS. 



» Mir 



ReceiptB. 



J I 



Uartin Cleaiy 

GaMge W. Dodj^ 

Bmest Doerscblag .... 
Bdward B. Foreman... 
^orgeH.*Goodridg6 .. 
Oharles B. GMason .^..- 

Wm,8.Hobart' 

NcM.Harrb :J. 

Johir^. Hunt...--:--. 

Watt E.Jones 

George H. Johnson 

Daniel N. Johnson.. 

Gharies Lorenzen «. 

%bii P. Moore.^ 

Johki G. MoMynn 

•Mil. ^ Mis. BaUroad Co, 

Jiaihes K. Prondfit..... ^^.. 

Fred< Aug, PlaflF 

J. D. Hugglea — u 

James Boss . » .. 

J; M,' Smith. ---.. ^ 

F. A. Scofield !.. 

Jacob Seeman , 

Aii|t.> L. Smith 

R»F. Sweet --...-.. ..^ 

John Willans 

R T.Williams-...-... 

F-T. Zettler 

Joseph Strasser 

Behinded 

Kewannee countj 

St Croix connty 

Outagamie county 

Waupacoa county . -"- . 



Cr I.'- 



(» 



■ f » 



f.; 






• </ 



b*-. -.--^. 



I 



Di«biinem*t8. 



$41 50 
100 00 
108 17 

23.00 
120' 00 

2^0 6p 

'iW 00 

137 5p 

200 00 

166 66 

93 27 

"103 84 

100 00 

425^00 

■' 77 ^6 

70 00 

121 69 

400 06 

l80 00 

»'lt0 00 

20b 01 

160 00 

80*00 

42 00 

240 00 

166 67 

186 67 

60 00 

393 91 

81 84 

498 96 

1,264 66 

1,166 22 



■7*^ 



J-=- 



■ ' » 



8,806^7 






il(.- 



r-^ 



••-' 



'•1 



44 



I fill 



tJin^BSsiiT rffst^. 



First Quarter. 

. XXCEIPTS. 



-^ « « I 



3al88, .. 
Penally, 



DISBURSEMBNTS. 



JJniyetrBiiy Fund Sales Befunded« . 

.University Fund Dues,.... do , 

Cniversity Fund Penalty . * do 

J. K. Ayerill, 

.Jobn Bannister,.,..., 

Oalkins <fe Proudfit, . . , ^ 

Carpenter <feLaw, 

A. F. Pratt, 

.Bdwurd Thwing, 

M.J. Thomas^ , ^.i.. 

iYoungic Gibfes, ^™ 

Loans, 



Rec6i|it»« 



^p.-^.iM***a 



$830 62 

1,402 ^3 

350 00 

101 55 



•2,185 10 






Second Qtuxrter. 



BSCEIFTS. 



I!)MbiinMiLtt. 



■ 






.•u 



• «».s.^k ».« 



*r 



lai ?oo 

SM 

6 OD 

16^ 00 

.42 00 

10 86 

. 11 46 

5 00 

10 40 

14,010<X) 



15,227 79 



J' 



.IT 



Dues, .. 
Penfdty, 



Total, 



•50 20 
660 00 
481 31 

•1,200 51 



.1' 



45 



Univernty tSind^^Stcond ^fdaritr — continued. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



» ' »»»^ ;V yi* m. 



■ ». ^ ■ •■ 



■ ••♦' 



Arthur Piatt, -.• 

Royal Buckf.... 

Edgar P. Morehouse, ..J 

Thomas RejrftoUliii .---.--. — 

Weed Eberhard & Co., 

Refunded Uniyersity Fuud Account,. 



Total, 



Raoeipts. 



Diabiijvem*ts. 



- - ■- - 



)102 48 
6 00 
4 20 

140 00 
22 00 

• 20 85 



$294 53 



Third Quarter. 



BECEIPTS. 



Sales, ... 
Loans,... 
Penalty,. 



'^r ' 



J.i-J 



#229 01 
800 00 
350 01 



Total, 



$870 02 



DISffU&aSMSNTSt 



Refunded, 



^U..>,. mt. 



.»*».>■■ 



$25 ro* 



UNIVERSITY FUND INCOME. 



First Quarter. 



.^Oi 



JL 



Rflioeifts, 



DISBURSEMEKTS. 



Treaaurer State UniyerBitjri..*.^;- 
. Iklefvst Refunded^ . . , , ^ . . . . 



Total, . 



$18,898 Oa 



4. 



AIO^OSl ^ 
4$ '80 

$1Q,J07»B9 



'. » 



46 



U^iverritji /"ui^^^/ncaive.— cofttiattod. 



Second Quarter. 



RXCSIPTS. 



■ 


RemiptB. 


Dxtbuwrn^te. 


RdceiDU --* ... 


$746 98 

1 




■ 

• 

- DISBT7HSEKSNTS. 

Treasurer State Uni versity. - .... 


2,400 00 


Refunded University Fund Income account 




50 68 






' 1 


2,450 68 



SWAMP LAND FUND. 



First Quarter. 

BXCEIFTS. 



t I 



BAoeipts 



DISB0BSBMENT8. 



D.W. Ballon, Jr.: .. 

Brown & Armstrong 

Blum field & Eopp . . 

Calkins & Proudnt 

Carpenter & Law. 

Wm.E. Croft 

Casey <fe Carney.. .J 

M. Cullaton 

S. H. Donnell 

S.G. Fennimore l 

Carr Huniington ...^«.... 

WiHiam H. Hadley , 

D.-W. Jonetr-.-- 

D. Man6 



192,050 43 



tl9 20 

16 25 

10 80 

324 00 

163 20 

9 26 

16 80 

17 05 
130 00 

60 00 

nua 

80 00 
9 25 



47. 



ri- 



Swamp L9fiff^,S^(gidefKi^t\^^ 



PISBlfSSEiiSllTS. 



Maal <fe Grimm Ara.i'J:.. 

J.-D^Rogglefi «« ^......w^^....* 

S. y ,8111010811. ..-..--^--P 

Ttkomas ». Townseni^. u .- 

Wcodf' £b6Tnsrd » \h}, .. ^ r. . . . ........ 

Welles A Peolp, - ,^^- 

StUsOAp lAAd Bales — amounf refunded .'.*. . 



.i-T ll 



$24 00 

^ oa. 

12 00 
180 00 
192^ M 

.P 25r 

829 17' 



1,580 12 



^.\ -r?; 


■~r::"v :;::■;■ ■:r:v.:.:.. h./o/t t vTrr; 




' Second' Quarhr.' - .' ' * ^^ 

. .vj>i '.'J J •'■ \ 'i ' I ' "i 


» f • r. 


-tRKOEtPTS. . . ,.il •■-'♦»'.•. 7/ 


U» 


. -,..'/ ^ .' 



B^ifAs. 

JdhnX* Byrne:.: 
Btomfi^ld (fe Itopp 
Ci&io^ <fe Prdudfit 
CallinV&WeWbr:: 

El C.;Hu11 .J.-..-.- 

B* E. Bale & Co;: 
H 



DISBURSXmnfTS, 



1: 



■1 



■l 



CK^Ie^ Holt. .-.-.v. 
Hfe^ry.F, Hilgard: 
Dkfi^lV. Jones:.-: 
L^ah^A Utter- 
W^nfer Lewis -•-■-- 
Jacob tjuintns . ."r." 
S<fi]Lb^ & Butts .V-- 
S6^teiid ^ Br<^th€r 
SfMot^'A Tj^ley .-.•..-:. 4::::: 
Jo)^ R, Swalltm ..■:.*.-'::: .1:: 
S. T. ^ipmar. .-.--..". . 4 : '. - : : 
Gdbrge^ W. Tepuey. --■-'-"- .::::; 
m'ed. ;Eberh4rd A-Oo;.*: .::::: 
e!^V. Sfcckett . . . .V- .v... H : : : : : 
Befun^pd Swsmp' Lmt Ad<sotlflt 

U4- C(> 



- ♦♦ -- 



'!• 



152,897.74 

.- ..nijf"' 
(i<. 



»loi 



4 * 



T.t 



9 is, 



I f 



99 20 









9 25; 



.T^T 



^.'t! 



, 9 25., 
-.' -li'65. 

,".:'is 08,, 

' ^' "123 oof' 

. ■?' i6-8«r\ 

'?'Xi!09 06.' 

I .?*oo'. 
;i^ 05 ; 

,18 20w 

■''■' ir'85^ 

•'■ ,13''7«. 






• . — ...••••• 



; 25,0 ;otf., 



6,950 ^5,, 



4S 



t ' li 



mtao^ l^iAf ^i^iA^^-t6Dtiin^ 



Third Quwrler. 



00 



■ -X V 



-1 



- »■ < ■■ * ■ I i I !■ M ■ — 11 ^ 






i 



Ji 



PISBURSEMEKTS. 



1 



♦ - 



T. W. &E. Brown 

Lucien D. Bryan . ^^..^^^^.v.*^..}. 

BliftB, Eberhard & Festoer J 

D. W. Ballon, Jr .u.--_ 

O, 0. Buck<k Co 

George C. Baker 

E.iL Baxter.. ^-i:.»w — -- 

Carpenter & Martin 

CalkiD«<k Webb 



r 



-\ 



^ v.. 



S. H. Carpenter 

William E. Croft ] 

it.Cullaton :.-.. .' 

a. J. Allen <k Co. .l.:..- ......V. } 

Dijnsmore & HotehkiBS :...,.'. . '... ^| 

D. fi.Durrie-.: :.•.■...--.-.....! 

Ed, »'• Foreman ::-.: '.:.'. 

C.W. Fitch ::..:v--.v...- 

Farrar & Fonda :. '. 

The »,Prentz ::.: :...: t 

B.C. Golliday. ..:::-.-,:... :...:..•..{ 
RTL. Gove.. ..:..-:.-.:.:::.:. 1. :..:.! 

Qustavus GraJiL-.-r.- ::,i'.-.:".-.."- t 

Adolph H'eidkainp-:---:.M -...:,.-....•_. I , 

Frank Hyde :..: :::.-:..:.r.:...: j 

JohnP. honghtott.--.-. ■.-:.-:'-::. I:.....,... 

D.W.Jones : : { 

Maul & Grimm --- --l-.l-^ 

Cbarle9 Geo. M&yertf..'..^. .'_ ::.: 

f:j. Mills ::.. :._:.:.- - . 

David McBrid^:.-;.v.v.. .:..::..:... J /S_^J 

M,M.Tomeroy j : :...[ ;... ? 

George W. Parker ::..:.,.:..; ,...; 

Reed* Nevitt .......v." :..:...'..* ,*:...» 

V..W. Rotb. ::v..".: 

Bobinson <b Brolh^r;.. 



- ----- -. 


1 


118 00 


10 00 


1,509 


8S 


34 


25 


90 00 


19 


85 


n o»* 


483 


00 


4o: 


70 


30 00 • 


19 


45 


' 34 45; ' 


29 W 


20 


50 


Z5 50 ; 


ai 00. 


"^ 


«0 


63 60' 


30 40 


. 9i 45 


54 


40 


.27 


.25; 


"..48 


85 


50 


85 


40 


00 


. 117 


00 


62 00 


50 W 


■ .^* 


00 


S4 


00,. 


37 SO . 


28 


80' 


13 


05 


105 00 


95 


40 



49 



Swamp Land Fund — Third Quarter— continued. 



/. P¥9(^¥?^ff^Wfrl 



v: 



.%^v\'.ut5> ^'* '^ 



/<ji-n'i*» j 



Byan <& Co». 
"Bmead, Ro^Ewell & S^ofig. -'. . i" --*.*:. - - : 
oliafpbSeemanii...' 

■ Carl fL Sohmiat ..::.:----.*. //.v. - . . . - 
0$. m^ Smith ..:..:..- . .v. . .. , v. :. .v. . 

f)8^vWip Land Sa!qi9 ETzpenses'.". . . .V. . .. . 
I Qh^pstein A Lathrop. . ." \ -VJ. .".V-V 

jffiiiiianLQ- IiiU«r..;.^.,.— -v::.--.:.— 

o^hpviaa <& Chandler - 

William C^ToinpIuns/. --.--., .- 

A. Whittemore a Co 

John Wtllans vua«^.«.4.uw.i^. 

Befiinded* ^...,... 



ReoeijytB. 



) 



Drobunem'te. 



$92 40 







j M im 



23 40 
38 25 

■^70' 26 
67 50 

504 10 






<»J W i ni iii i V 



ii.ii ^id'i^ .-'I A 



SWAMP LAND FUND INCOME. 




ier. 






. "'i Vi ' ^v. * ^) > c innr«> 




1 1 25 



.' i'V.' ly 



inrr 



SecondTQuarter. 



Beoeipts 

DiabnrMmfliOi. 



ft ( 



~#ea-oo 



■T"»" 



» 1 ■ .1 t ' 



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Beoeipte 

DiaburBementa,. 



'«■«■ " I 



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TT 




•4S 59 



50 



DRPOair AOOODKT. 



Fini (Quarter. 



f* I ■■■ 



Jolni A« Bfoini. 
. 0. Dnuff.: 
WaiuunFowbr 
ffilM Haieltine. 
OkBtftcnaoB.. 
J. IL Sherwood. 




^tm^mm^t^immt^t^^ 



4W 62 



• :. 



Steond (Quarter. 



t> 



jB.H. Smith..... 
John A. Byrne.. 
WUliaa Grunee . 
A. D.Wheeloek. 



• ■ ' I 






M5 27 

84 

34 24 

S8 48 



144 88 






-*--r 



iJL 



'Becdpto .\ jtlOjieO 40 

Disbonementf. 



d 



Third Quarter. 



.Im.td 



BeeMpU. 




t2»38d 98 



DBAINAQK IdCOUNT. 



Third iituarter. 



.J 



Beeeq»it. %^M2.£S 



51 



RROAPITULATION. 



Chneral Fund. 



?lMi Qaartor 
Seoond do... 
Third do... 



Oyerpaid, Jannaiyl, 1857, .. 
Balance, Septembar 80, 1867, 



School Ftmd. 



fhrat Quarter. 
Second do... 
Third do... 



Orerpud, January 1, 1857, ... 
Overpaid, September 80, 1857, 



OTerpayment brought down 

Tranafer from Swamp Land Fund 
Balance, October 1, 1857, 



School Fund Income. 



First Quarter'. 
Second do... 
Third do... 



Receipts. 



Disbfinem'ts, 



288,894 98 

96,129 29 

5,810 09 



889»884 M 



882,944 19 

101,012 05 

48,782 14 



"•••w^ 



889,884 24 



477^688 ;88 
7,002 28 
5,148 48 



889,884 24 



Balwpe, January 1, 1857, ...,. 
Balance, September 80| 1857, . 



88,192 65 

9,309 66 

36,713 77 



84,216 08 
'229,121 95 



818,888 08 



271,177 64 



271,177 64 



141^029 41 

4,713 31 

10,878 45 



156,621 17 
16,850 97 



172,972 14 



154,919 07 

20,464 27 

186,988 04 



812,818 as 
1,021 65 



818,338 03 



229,121 95 
'V2i055*f9 



271,177 64 



125,340 05 
28,580 31 
.8,805 17 



162,225 58 

Voi746"6i 

172,972 14 



62 



SecqpUulation-^con^nei. 



UniverMy Fund, 



first Quarter 
Second do... 
Third do... 



Bftlttnee, Jamiftrj 1, 1857, ... 
Balance, September 80, 1857, 



University Fund Income. 



First Quarter 
Second do., 
do.. 



Balance, January 1» 1857, 

Overpayment, Mptember 80, 1857, 



Swamp Land Fund 



First Quarter 
Second do... 
Third do... 



Balance, January 1, 1857, 

Balance, September 80, 1857, 



Balance, as aboTC, Sept. 80, 

Transferred to General Fund, Oct. 1, 

do School Fund, ". 

do Drainage Fund,. 



it 



Recdipta. 



2,185 10 

1,200 51 

879 Od 



4,264 68 

11,895 80 



16,160 48 



18,898 08 
746 98 
505 84 



20,150 85 

1,084 29 

860 89 



21,595 58 



92,050 '48 

52,897 74 

178,594 81 



828,542 98 
52,908 82 



876,451 80 



862,262 94 



862,262 94 



Disbunem'tik 



15,227 79 

294 58 

25 10 



'15,lr47 42 
"'61801 



16,1M 4S 



19,127 89 

2,450 68 

16 96 



21,595 58 



21,995 58 



1,580 12 
6,950 56 
5,707 69 



14,1^8 86 
'86¥,262 94 



876,451 80 



692 76 

271,177 64 

90,S92 56 



862,262 94 



53 



i?ecaptYtifa/ton— continued. 



xl 



Swamp Land Fund Income. 



nmt Qnurter 
Bttcmd do... 
Tbird do.. 



■t 



i)qpont •Account 



Knt Quarter. 
Seeond do... 



Bilaaee, Jeanarj 1> 1857, 

Balance, September 30, ]f857, 



Capitol Land Fund. 



Seeond Quarter, 
do... 



Balaaoe, September 30, 1857, 



Drainage Fund. 



Third Quarter 

Balance, September SO, 1857, 



RaMiptB. 



116 82 

00 00 

22,645 28 

. N lit I **»♦*— A^o 



Balaaee, Jannarr 1| 1857, ^ i 

Balanee, September 80, 1857, 



22,762 10 
1 S5 



»*«*• 



22,768 85 



^fmm^^m^mmtm^mt 



2,841 88 



Mil 88 



10,100 40 
2,077 85 



12,178 25 



12,178 25 



90,802 55 



90,802 55 



DiBbiinem*^: 



1 

00 08 
42 50 



48 84 

*2iiii7io 51 



22,768 86 



485 62 
144 88 



. 6M f5 
"^2,211 88 



2,841 ^8 



2,383 98 



2,333 98 
9,844 82 



12,178 25 



90,892 55 



90,892 55 



54 



GENERAL BBOAPITULATION. 



General Fund 

MuMd Fund 

SAoelFund LMoaie 

Uttfarenitj Fund 

UAHFttreity Fund Ineome .. 

Swiftmii Laod Fud 

Swamp Land Fund Inoome 

Dtpoiit Aooonnt... 

OafiielLand Fiad 



Total, 



IVaBi Swaaqi Land Fsnd 

To' General Fnnd 

Sobool Fund 

Drainage Fond 

Baianee) Janaaiy 1, 18^7| 

Bldanw^, aeptember %% 1857, 



Rfff»fjp*tL 



I>iabii]sem*li. 



1889,834 24 

84,216 08 

156,621 17 

4,264 68 

20,150 85 

828,542 08 

22,768 10 



12,178 25 



$1,018,570 80 



692 75 
271,177 64 

oa,dn 55 

77,058 53 



•i,452,8«l 77 



1377,688 88 

aiMi5 M 

1611,245 a» 

15,547 4r 

21,595 58 

14,188 86 

48 84 

68» 811 

2,338 98 



$(|06,569 88 



362,262 94 



184,059 51 



•1,452,891 77 



55 



>i 



BALANCES. 



In accordance \r^ IB^^i^if b<tfcl-UMi!A6n of chapter 9 of 
the Revised Statutes, the Secre tary , as Auditor, has examined 
at the end of each financial quarter, the books and vouchers 
dif'the l^^t^/heas^i^; ihi<-m viiiiaff^^'oii'h^dln'iik 9lAte 
f reasuiy 'biel^'l^'gii^-to' t^ii s^efdl'ftnids,' abd'^^ikdH^tKe m*- 
suit of sue*]!! «xa'mlnatfoh' l!&'tli^'0otetttoy,'»p«6ifyita|f ^cUt!«ai' 
larly the amotihf knd 1ElA'd!9r-of'fotfa]k.'';Thi! resUK ^'MOi^- 

hi^elofore beferi's'ho'Oini'' ' . • '' 



a • t i .: 



I"*;'f .1 ly. 





oiiows: ^ , .. 



( 'f : 



fU /.• l) ) 



' .iJl 






^ 



)../ 1 



lliw5V«; »aWi*ML'-. ._:•'.'::.. r.-.J.:.. 

Mftroh 8}1. rGoU and Silrar Coin ... 



. V II' i 



- I • . 1.. 



f 
Second Quarter. 



i '((•( r Bdailte -■ aL i ^ a il - j. l .<^>. ^Uvm 1 4;. 4 



().' . 






»;■- ' ■■ .i {.,A 









itii i.ifi Ji ft* 






.:'i' «•« 



June 86, Gh>I<l and Silyer Con 



m .-,.- 



\ . 



i. 



' I . I 



».*•'--. /;<> 



r-c 



* • . • 



in-' r n 



J 



[Third Quarter. 



in 



^ f .1 if'.[ 



Sept. 30, Wisconsin Gorrenej. 
Sept 30, Gold and SUrel^tJdU 



•>!' 



} 't 



1^ 

r 



• ij< i .r 'o 



■ I.. I ttn.-iy 






•it . •' '//t'Mf 

.* T ' r r "*"''■ ' 



mmr% 



184,059 51 



137,520 00 



184,059 51 



56 



\ . r * 

/- 



.' \ •' .il' 



AjCCJODNT? Al^IDITIjn, 



* 'J. .1, ;,.• .:: '.1. /. •!• ' \V,' "•■•»/' * 



1. 



..49 Act, in fpUUon, t^.^tj^ W^,<>( *« Secrela^ q£ Stat^, 
apBfQFed Q(h Maicbf IS^I^ ^m€^d^ Ifi ^ The ni^th^ tenth and. 
elfivm^9Vi;ty4iYi»f^ Revised 

SMtutef^ ^,h^l^|r'«mei>4^ to rea<i,/Mi follows :, 

^.K.S»o- 0.. To oi^fimine ^(vrt de,terjpip(^ Jjie olijlms pif^all per- 
sons against the State in cases where ppyisiK)^. ^ox the. pay- 

Tj^fgit thi?reof shftjijhaw P^^ PVi'^^pT^}^'^fi^^^ .*?,®^^ 
i^on jtbfi sf^fqp.a ^pt^^^jff tlf^^^pLU^frnt du^ and aUpwed 
thereon, and from what fund the same is to be paid I(e shall 
certify the same to the State Treasurer, specifying the name 
of the person in whose favor such account shall be audited^ 
the amount allowed and from what ^nd the^sahie is payable, 
andhe shalLreport (lo,.the Legislature, annu^Uya . a c^pnfli^ 
K^ of i^it a<^counts so audited and^'tsmlied^ jIVmicM; Thai' 
QOLafiCQunt ishaLbe. so audited, except the same be atily Teri- 
iMn^ dM (Mtth; aflMbvit, or aflkmation of the claimant or 
his agent, together with the certificate of the officer ordering 
or making the claim. ' *^ 

^Sso. 10. Toelit^'in-abook to bakept&it<kii'^uipoaft«{. 
rfjcc^^ dt all accounts audited br %lm 'Und c^tiafi^ hv Wt' 
State- Treasurer, pursuant to the last sub-division of this act, 
Rowing th^ hattie of the claimant, the amount claimed, and 
the amount allowed thereon, certified to the Treasurer, sped* 
fying the fund from which the same is to 1[>e paid'' 
-The foHowing^ accounts have been- audited ant: 'eertified^ll!^ 
^rdance with the foregoing proyi^ioqa! ,' " j foO 'i u". f. 



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89 



EXPENDITURES. 



^^h*^ 



The detailed expenditures on account of all ' and each of 
the several Funds during the period embraced in this reposrty 
as required by the third sub^divisioiirOf eeetion 19, ohapler 9^ 
of the Revised Statutes, has already been exhibited in the 
statements showing the transactions in the several Funda 
The same sub-division reqi^ires the Secretary to exhibit a de- 
tailed estimate of the expenditures to be defrayed from the 
treasury for the ensuing year, specifying therein each object 
of expenditure, and distinguishing between sneh as are pio- 
vided for by permanent or temporary appropriation and such 
aa, are required to be provided for by law^ and showing the 
means from which such expenditures are to be defrayed. 

Liabilities of the State and claims upon the Treasury, of 
which this department has no knowledge, makes it impossible 
for the Secretary to present a correct estimate of them. Such 
' as are provided for by permanent appropriations, together with 
such claims as are known in this office to be outstanding, ate 
herewith submitted : 

ft 

Permanent Jippropriationa. 

'^ SALABISS. 

aoyemor's Office $S,450 00 

Secretary's Offiee 2^00 00 

Treaaurer'B Office 3,400 00 

' Attorney 6eneral*8 Office 1,400 00 

State Superintendent's Office 3,000 00 

Bank Comptroller's Office. 5,400 00 

Librarian. 1,000 00 

Adljutant General : 300 00 

State Historical Society 9,000 00 

State Agricnltoral Society....- 3,000 IM) 

^Sujx&eme Court and Reporter : 7,500 00 

, Oiwuit Court !!•.. .., 16,500 00 

..Superintendent of Public Property....... 1 1,000 00 



I I 



$49,350 00 

- • ( ' ■ 

12b 



90 

LEGISLATURB. 

Per diem of 137 membera.lhnaadkyaitMbaUbd) $19,050 

Mile^^e (esUmftted) „ , 3,000 00 

^Pre^dent »nd Pr^id^nt^ro tern, of the Senate ^ 450 00 

Speaker and Speaker pro tern, of the Assembl j 300 00 

tOlri»kit>f tiMSe^aie sikd*AMefail5l^...;.:'V.... !.:.:..:.::..'.. • '4^000-00 

^iism^i/in ht-4UfcnaioiaifcU»pd(tiiiwiMif. u.«u..««.y.L.» ' 'ifSfOOOm 

'' ' "5aftwo*o 
fif^^g^ofiiiQ,Lf^i^\mX^f^ -,•..' iM^^^^ 

Pipintingiprliegislntive ..p .' ,.,^ 15,000 00 

Stationery for Legislature .' '.,'.. 5,000 00 

^S^imei^fi^OfiM.. *: i...w 1. ..'.'..: ' . 4^100*00 

-l^fl■^A>r04fcM(*:.;».J«^; ^..^.^i »;.... ^.^.i^.* - 'fMOlOO 

fifffx^DffP^ ?iHW9^'^ R^*w-TrvTT -'r -'v <ir.T^,.TT^-^^- iKMwe .00 

L^boieiB I...'. J. ,-..'.. 3,000 00 

Compensation of Claris 3,000 OO 

Bene^dleot lD«titiitiott* and Blate PriMm .^ • ISQUDIOiOO 

ifotp^^watileliHn.-.^J..-^*- .•^-.••'.-..•..^.-^«* il^QQD 00 

,WQod..QfinMdiwKt» -,,.,., ,....,,^„, ,,.♦.. ^500 00 

Sundry Expenaee unknown 95,000 00 

State Loan ' 50,000 00 

OajSitolBiilati^AvcMt... ..^ WMM 

>Plie iBditidAfOa - ^ 405.Wid5 

Total ^... tWAH-f^ 

fifSQurefis.. 
The foregoing liabilities are to be defrayed from the foUow- 
i^ sources : 

.»t|^^ Tax of 1857 .-,,$300,000 00 

,g5aok Tax of 1858 (estimated) , 60,000 00 

.jWfroadTaxofl858 do f ' 15,000 00 

flwakroadTaxof 1858....do ,.,, 200 00 

TwouSuitaof 1858 do .,....,.. 4»000 00 

Tel^irapba 100 QO 

.J^^wkersand Peddlers * '. 1 300 00 

,,AneaT»ge0 due from Banks 1,280 99 

, t/iifwrages due from Ooanties, as per Schedule "B" herewith . . ,. 364 19 23 

,l,AJrl;ean^geB due from Olerks of Oourt» as per Statement herewith, 

] marked "A" d,OlO 3S 

I>eficieDC7 of late State Treasurer JII,318 54 

Amountin Treasury September 30, 1857 5,143 4S 

Total $455,478 S9 



I 

91 

The liabilities on the State X^asury, according to the fore- 
going estimates, is as follows : 

Permanent Appropriations ^49^50 00 

LegiBlatore 99300 00. 

Hiscelknaoiia 447,174 SS 

Total $525,824 35 

Deduct Reaeurces aa above 455^78 59 

"^^^^ 

Should the foregoing estimatea.be correct, it will be se^i 
that the liabilities of the State, at the close of the next fiscal 
ybar, ViH ^jtc^eilihe tetottvee^ M thei Stt«i of >f70;946 9^/ 

<•• ^ ' • • . ..•■,;'.-..." . .i 

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• * 

I' • • . , ' 



ADDITIONAL REPORT. 



The foUowing foatter^ pertaining to due office^ not 
braced in the report of Auditor, are respectfully submitted to 
the Legislature : 

EqufMziUiofu 

The result of the deliberations of the State Board of E^qual- 
ization is hereunto appended, marked 'tC./' the basis being 
nearly the same as that of last year. 

Election Laws, 

The 29th and 30th sections of ^ An act to provide for the 
purity of Election/' approved 7th Mtfrch, 1857, provides as 
follows : 

^ Sec. 29. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of State 1o 
cause this act, and all other laws now in force relating to 
^elections, to be published, together with such instractions and 
forms as may be necessary to secure uniformity and regular- 
ity in the manner of notifying, conducting, and making re- 
turns of elections. 

^ Ssa 30. The State Printer shall immediately publish, in 
pamphlet form, bound in board covers, five thousand copies 
of such laws and instructions, for the use of clerks of super- 
visors, town clerks, and inspectors, and clerks of elections. 
Qn the cover of such pamphlets shall be printed the words-^ 
' Public Property ;' to be delivered by every officer to his sue- 
cesser.' * 



93 

These sections were complied with at an early day, and the 
pamphlet cannot fail to facilitate the purpose for which its' 
publication was intended, and to insure^ in a great degree, 
order, system, and regularity in conducting and making re- 
turns of elections. 

The duties required of the Secretary of State by an act to* 
provide blanks for the use of inspectors and clerks of general 
elections, approTed 2d March, 1857, was also complied with. 

■ 4 

Code qf Procedure. i 

The original edition of an act entitled ^ An act to simplify 
and abridge the practice, pleadings, and proceedings of the' 
courts of this State,*^ approved October OCh, 1856, having be-' 
come entirely exhausted, without supplying the demand for 
their distribution in accordance to law and the special pro- 
visions of section 967 of said act, the Secretary of State 
deemed it advisable to direct the publication of a new and; 
corrected edition of the same, together witfi the subsequenr 
amendments passed by the Legislature ; and at several cleri^* 
cal errors, in copying the original enroled act and amend- • 
ments, had been discovered, the whole Code was carefalljr 
examined, and those mistakes corrected. 

At the suggestion of several Judges of courts of the Sthte 
ajid miembers of the bar, a new index was earefolly pvepaied^ 
much more convenient for refiN!<ence to the various subject* 
than the ^ Table of Pontents '^ published in the'first edition. 
This last edition has met the approval of all who have ex- 
amined it 

• r 

\ 

Statistics. 

^ An act to ascertain the number and other facts respecting 
deaf and^dumb, blind, insane, and idiotic persons in the State 
of Wisconsin,^' approved Sd March, 1857,^ and ^An act to 
aothorize the collection of agricultural, mineral,^and manu* 
ftcturing statistics,^' approved fith March, 1857, requires du« 



I 



> » 



94 

ties of the assessors of the several towns and cities ' in tnis 
State^ which have, this year, heen poorly complied with. ' 

Tabular statements of the result of the collection of these* 
statistics, required by such acts, are ' herewith, presented^ 
marked «D.'» and «E.» 

It will be seen at once^ that the returns are very incon^plete, 
and that they fail to give any reliable information on the' 
fubject of enquiry, or to show, with any degree of correctness, 
the agricultural, mineia], and i^anufiu)turing resources of the 
State. The returns, imperfect as thcfy are, were received at 
this office at a very late day, long after the time required for 
their transmission, in consequence of which, this report is 
somewhat delayed. 

Clerks. 

The act to authorisse the Sectetary of State V> employ and 
{toy derks) fox the actual and neoessary discharge of the du*« 
tiaa of Iu8 office, reqitires him to «^t forth ia his Annual Repmt 
the names of the clerks in whose favor certificates havc^.beefi 
diawn for services, the amount of such certificate, and a atate* 
mbnt of the service rendered, the samo to be verified by tb^ 
affidavit of the Secretary of State* 

AU of the facta so required aie shown in the list of ac- 
cdUDls audited payable from the General Fund, an affidavit 
tf tho correetness of which» marked << F.," is hereto appendeid 

Very respectfully, 

i). W. JONES. 

Stcrttary qf Si ate. 



J 



APPENDIX. 



INDEX TO APPENDIX. 



^ A '^ — ^Abstract of arrearages dae from Clerks of Circuit 
Court 

^ B " — Abstract of Balances due from Counties. 

'< *^ — Statement, Showing the aggregate number of acres of 
landj^ the average valuation per acre of such land, the 
aggregate valuation thereof, the aggregate value of 
village and city lots, the aggregate value of personal 
property, the aggregate valuation of all property in the 
State of Wisconsin, as assessed in the year 1857, and 
the aggregate valuation of all the property as equaliz- 
ed by the State Board of Equalization, together with 
the amount of State Tax charged against each county 
in said State for the year 1857. 

^ D " — Schedule of the Deaf, Dumb, Blind, Insane and Idiotic 
persons. 

^ E '' — ^Agricultural, Farm, Manufacturing and Mineral Sta- 
tistics. 

ti p "—AflWavit of Secretary of Stata" 



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STATEMENT «A.^ 



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Arrearages due from Clerks of Circuit Court 

A. P. Ayers, Clerk Cirenit Court, AdamM Oonoty $2 00 

Wm. C. McMichael do Bad Ax do. 7 00 

Charles Gruoning. .do .Calumei ...do 6 00 

Henry Modlia do do do.. 1 00 

A. W. Delaney do Columbia ..do 86 00 

O. B. Thomas, do Crawford. .do 00 

Samuel Noyes, ...do.... ..Dodge do 127 00 

A. W.Eendall do Grant do 61 00 

H. Phelps do Green do 182 00 

J.Hutchinson — do do do........ 266 00 

Henry F. Pelton do Jefferson. ..do • 188 00 

O. F. Dana do Kenosha.. .do 18 00 

L. B.Nichols do do do 19 00 

RLooney do La Crosse.. do 88 00 

D. W. Kyle do do do 108 00 

D. Devaney do Marquette.. do 29 00 

L.F. Towsley do do do 29 8S 

J. G. Looms do Osaukee....do . 80 00 

8. G. Knight do Racine do 28 00 

A. B. Slaughter. «. do Richland.. .do 6 00 

0. D. Bellville do do .do 8 00 

John S.Wilson do... do .do.. ...... 18 00 



H. Dodge do St. Crou..do 8 00 



too 

^ A ''—continued. 

George Mertins, Cll Cir. Court, Sank Ooiuity tl 00 

JolinBear ...do do ..Jo 00 

A.H. Edwards do Bheboygan.do 18 50 

Wm. H. Pettit do. Walworth..do 100 00 

J.J. Jones do .Wanpaoa...do 63 00 

G. H. GUe-.-^ do Waoshara.Jlo 10 00 

E.B. Baldwin do Winnebago..do 128 00 

Ohas. A. Wisebroad.-.do ..do .do 80 00 

Late Clerks CSreuitConiit.... ,*-...'..-^ 408 00 



ToUl »-.t2,016 



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SCHEDULE "B." 



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Jirrearc^^ due from (kmnties. 

AikmB Oovntj . tip 28^ 

'Bail Ax 8 OO 

Brown L. 37 bo 

'Buffalo : ' 21 00 

Oalumet 8 00 

€Iiipp6wa .- -. S,22Y 60 

Clark w 882 60 

Cbhimbia .,...-.. 124 OO 

"Crawford... 66 00 

Dane : 819 00 

Dodge I 2^ 00 

Door. 927 60 

Dnnn - 1,203 00 

FonddnLao 280 00 

Grant 174 00 

Iowa. 44 00 

Jackson i 426 00 

Jefferson 306 00 

Kewaunee '. 4 M,677 It 

Kenosha '. 100 17 

lift Crosse 28 00 

La Fayette 401 87 

La Pobte i i... 200 00 



102 



* B ''—continued 

Manitowoc - $1,284 88 

Marathon - - 1,877 38 

Marquette - 60 OO 

Milwaukee 4,087 7© 

Monroe 31 00 

Oconto 260 57 

Outagamie 2,881 97 

Osaukee 91 00 

Pierce ^** .....i-^ 707 85 

Polk 2,070 20 

Portage ^.. •«..•« 5,602 74 

Racine 100 00 

St. Croix :.----.'. 3,764 32 

,•,, 50^ 01 

1-..-..- 115 00 

9 99 

70 00 

3a po 

92 40 



Smik, 

Sheboygan 

; Tipipealeau 

^ W^vorth 

, Washington 

W^aukesha 

Waupaca.. 1,944 69 

. W^u^hara 50 00 

. Winnebago* X7l 00 

Wjood 6 00 

' 'Total 1 ^ •36,119 28 

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Schedule of the Deaf and Dumby Blind, Insane and Idiotic 
PersonM in the State. 



Coantlet. 


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16 
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4 
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2 


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AgriduUHa/^ Fm^ M^^Hfociuring and Mifip^ SfaHMcs 
cf the To^ffH 4if Otonia^ C^itajf ^OeMid, Siaii ^ ffU^ 



» * 9 



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OMiSiMdc:.. 



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WhMit 



Ottttk ^d Xl479«r-«i h^n^. ^ . ^ . 

; i|fciigkter«d, . 

Hbgi— on luiod^ .r.*«p.r.,..*.r. 

fllaagitflna* 

EotMitBdMta«i» — ,., 

Bbaep ^dS4i|iDb»(Mm:liio4; .... 

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139 



j.^. 



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... 



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« f» 



Stats of Wicovsiv, \ ^ 
County qf Dancj / ' * 

David W. Jones, Secretary of State of the State of Wiscon- 
sin, being first duly sworn, says: That so much of his annual 
report; as Secretary of State and Auditor, dated October 10th, 
1857, as refers to the clerks employed in Us office is correct 
and true, according to the best of his belief, and that the 
swrices by them performed were necessary. 

D. W. JONES, 
• Secretary qf State, 

Sworn and subscribed to before me this 10th of October, 
1857. 

X. D. RUOGLES. 

Notary PUbUe, Wis. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



lb ike L^laiure qf the Siate qf TFUeanrin : 

In pumiance of law, I herewith respectfally rabmit lo 
ytra my Annual Report, embracing the business transactions 
in t^ office during the past nine months. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

CHARLES KUEHN, 

Siaie Treasurer. 

Sum TkBAsimn's OmcB, Madisoh, Wisoomzv, 
September 80th, 1857. 



• ! • ♦ 









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,Zfff qT IfliritijcriH^ tli^^ the State Treasurer 

dempiion i^themoteM4>fBainihswg^afy^M^vmi^ 
ing Lpno ^thi3 Statii, October 1, 1857. 



t. iUv' 



/«• 



*. .' 



■•» i 



J ' 



NiMi^Qfr BaJ^km. 



M 



I fci'*- 



Aidio Batiks 

BfldgwSUlUii^tik.. 

Bask of B^loilt, 

, J^fplc of t^e Capital, 
Bank of £|au Claire, 



;||fll^ of Uld City of pa Oroaae,. 



Hipk of dolumbus, 



N'amoB of Stocks de- 
potftod , with tiio 
Stdte TieaBurer. 



Hieoonri.^ 6fb,.. 



oi Fod4 <iu ^^>- 



IftttonruL 68,.. 

Tennesaee 60,.. 

Hiflsonri... 68,.. 

Missouri 68,. . 

l^chi^aot 1 6b,. . 

Ii|iiioi6. 60^.. 

lififisonri ..68,.. 

Viigiaia... . ... .68,. . 

Georgia 6b,.. 

tllinois 6b,.. 

LouiBiana:. 68,.. 

Kissourih 68,.. 

TenoeaBoe 6q,.. 

HifiBouri 68,.. 

IzuUana 58,.. 



Bonk of H«X'Ifake, 



'). 



jQapJIr of HnWaukee, 



Aniotiiit; 






•MMUKV, 



17,000 
9,000 



65,000 



37,000 

io,ootf 

15,000 



84,ooa 



Virginia 68,. . 

Missouri 6b,.. 

OaUfonua, 7b». . 

TennesBoe 6b,.. 

Illinois 68,.. 

Ohio..-^. .......68,.. 

l^orth Carolina.. 6b,.. 

gpitody: gsM^ 

WlBCOnBltf .'78,.. 



11,000 



9««i^- 



I t . 



#r(M;Mo 
6M00 

S7,50t 



<> 



39,000 

~ 33,000 

9,000 



15,000 
15,000 
5,000 
2,000 
5,000 
2,000 



9,000 
6,000 
5,000 



■ h 

50,000 

6I1OOO 

'I ■ 



* ' f 



>i 



4kfi^ 



. 1 vut 

20jiia 



6 



LUt i/iSSfieiirt^tM^-coiittiiaed. 



ovBami 



Bnk of MoBttDo^ 
Bmk oC MoDToOy. • 



.iMKvffteKMiiWM 



9wk«r 






l> 



> ^•^^^P^* ^^* 



dti CUi6iif. 



'Bnik of teeuM,. 



BsBkof RI|M»v. 



)4 



Bnk of Sbebojgia, 



Bank of Watertofwn, 



Nanci of Stoeks do- 
ted with tho 
into TiuMUiiir. 



poMt 



niiook €■». 

Miaoori €■,. 




Gooi|(lft ......... oi|. 

Nora Ooiioliiia..6^. 

& OSOfllPOO ■ . . . . .v^i« 

Ohio 6i». 

IndimiiA 5e>. 

Mmoori.... ....oib. 

Minopri €«». 

Illinois 6s». 

North OajToliDa.. 6a,. 

Viiginio 6s». 

Minouri Gip. 

6b.. 



niinoifl 6a,. 

MiMoun ..6ay. 

Indiana 5a,. 

Pennaylfania. ..Si^. 

Tennaasee 6a,. 

Miasoari 6a,. 

North Oarolina.. 6a,. 

North Carolina.. 6a,. 

Michigan 6a,. 

Tenneoee 68,. 

Loniaiaoik 6a,. 

Wiaoonrin 7a,. 

California 7a,. 

Ohio 6a,. 

KentQck^r 6a,. 



BtoawB County Bank, 

Ohippawa Bank, 

CM^Bank of BoaTor Dam, 



Tennanoe 
Yiiginia.. 



.6a,. 
6a,. 



Miaaoori 6a,. 

Viilginia 6a,. 

KiaBOTuri 6a^.c 



aiooo 

15,000 



54NX) 

91,000 

1^.000 



9.000 



5,000 
10,000 



wooo 

10,000 
10,000 

io.000 



tO.000 
SjiNPO 



5i000 
41.000 
10,000 



5,000 

5,000t 
15.000 
5,000 



8,000 
84)00 
9,000 



18,000 

11,000 

10,000 

8,000 

7,000 

10,000 

13,000 

8,000! 



10,000 
17,000 



68,000 
500 



95,000 



■igy^|f9 



55g00i 



SOjDOO 



^kfi^ 



7IM0 
97M0 

«uoo 



7 
lAit If Smiritlu—ctMfnt^ 



9 



f ••V, 



'i:iSi'iit »eciifiiiei^^^iiiinueA. 






1 ■ 



i Jb0 






1 



4J^C^Sj>i;. 



7\- 



{- n 






F«sSiv«r 






t 



t..)< 



ti 



Vi. 



* . • i 

I 



t « 



■*'*X "TWt I*' ■ 



••^" "»•" 



t,- 



.1 



^^B.^«he»l^ 

«ii*p<^^^«*-4 

I '• j ■ 

I • . 









(yr.l/ i 



. I 



, — ~^ 

'Kaipes o^ Stoeln de- 

' po&ted with the 

BtAte treMorer. 



Eentoc^., ...... 6iy. . 

TentieflMe 6i^.. 

Looisiani^ 6ty.. 



• k « ■ • a s I 



LoQifiiana* 68». . 

IUil|(»i|f^«^ 6fly.. 

Vir^Dii* «^.. 

Tenoeo^ 6ir.. 

lufiisour! 6iy.. 

Indian|i^ 5b».. 

Missotin^^ 6iy.. 

Vir^mi^.k 68».. 

LoQidana L . . . . . .6a,. . 

N>fthCifi}olma..6B,*. 
Ouio. ,.»; ......Ga,.. 

Ikijaaoiiri 6b».. 

MiaaoTiri. 6a».. 

Oalifomii.. 78».. 

KUW. <irWater. B. B. 
Bo^dat 8a».. 

MiflBonxi $b».. 

MicUgaA 6a,.. 

Mifleoori.l 68,.. 



H{flaoTiri 6a,.. 

TenDeaaee 6a,.. 

Lotiiatana 6a^. . 

minola *.l 6a,.. 

T^^^ 6a,.. 

UlaBoun^ 6a^.. 

llfaBonri '. ^ 6a, . . 

Cali&niili 7b,.. 

I 

a^o, 6a,.. 

lifttmaaa^ 6a,.. 

l^l^ovii^ I .' ; . .'. -6b,:!: 

It Sj" 

tdnaiia 6a^.. 

OalilbmiB 7i^.. 




AmoonCi 



TVM 



74)00 
5A)00 



11,000 
18,000 



10,000 

14,000 

3,000 



7jm 

18,000 
3,000 
3,000 



35,000 



15,000' 
XOOO** 

96,000 



65,000 



15,000 

rlOifOO 



44,000 
8,000 
ZJOOO 
4,000 



19,000 
^ 6/)00 



30,000 
50,000 



93,000 



S5i000 



r^ ^ 



^fiOO 



10.000 



%^m 



am 



fnjm 



35/m 



48i00» 

^,o66 



904)00 

dSiOoa 
a5i000 

6M0O 
414)00 



XwiP 0^ ASactiriViW^— continueil. 



4- 



\\ • • 'K^Msfl OF Ba^kb. 

I 



(. 



lounbeormii^'s BaiJc. 



•XK- .. 



Marine B 



Ik. 



^>}o;.- 



I 



HflpaatiUBank. 



r ■ ■ 

Mercliaiiti^ h M9o2uu4<^ Pank,. 



%(«raliaiiti| B««iiki . . . . 

«i?Wlf«n^^i^ • 

t 



bakirood|£|i^. 



OaUcoab (Jo^jn^eial Bank. 



0.( 






BaGi»eoii]awWlt. 



:<' 'J' 



I 






*: 'if I 



r^ 



2c 



l^ames of StoclcB de» 
poaiteq with the 
State Ifreasurer. 



Mifisoimv... 
IQiAois.*.. 
Virginia ."•- 

Loi^iaiaiiar - 



Georgia .... 

1 

Mjasonri.L.. 

ininoifl 

California. . . 

teissonri.*... 
Illiooia...*.. 
Lonisianim. . . 
Tenneasee. . . 



Miasonri, 
Indianat. 



HisBonri... 
Loaiaiana. . 

Virginia ... 
Miaspurl*.. 

i 

Hinoiuri.. 



If orth Catolina . .6s, 



Tenneeeee. . 
,deorgia« . . . . 



Miaaoun. 
Virginia. 



Indiana •. 
Miaaourl... 
TenneaM . 



North Caf'olina. . 6b,. . 



Louiaiaiia 
Georgia,,- 
Miasouri. 



LouiaiasB... 
Tennesse^ .. 




• •►♦ 



..68y.. 

.-6b,.. 
..6b,.. 
..6s,.. 

-.68,.- 



78,.. 

I wS, . . 



• . 6s, . . 

-.68,.. 

..7b,.. 



..6b,.' 

..6s,. 
..6b,. 



.6s,. 

>OBf • 

.68,. 
.68,. 



.68,.. 

,.6b,., 

. . 68*. . 



..6b,. 

■ ■08, • 



.6a^.. 

68,.. 



58,. 

68,. 
-.68,. 



.68,.. 

.7b,.. 
,6b,.. 



..68,.. 
..66,.. 

..6b,.. 



Amount, 



^ Total 
Anuraat. 



$ldS,000 

59,000 

31,000 

. 3^000 

9,000 



5,000 
SOiflOO 



5.000 
10,000 



40,000 

Slooo 

2,000 



i 



15,000 



47,000 
5,000 



27,000 



10^ 

13,000 

5,000 



5!b(}0 



15,000 

20,000 

10,000 

5,000 

2,000 1 



15,000 



14,000 



• 7,000' 
13,000 




30,000 



$387,000 
35/)0b 






mm 



S4/>00 

* 

30,000 
58,000 

^4,000 



I. ' ¥. 



71,000 
73,000 



53,0d0 
15,000 



llfiQQ 



10 



^ 



Vamm or Bahxb. 



look BW« Bank... 

« 

Sook (knmtf Bank. 

Bank Oonnty Bank . 
Saeond Wazd Bank 

btateBank 

BtataBaakof 

t 

StOroixRiTerBlkiik 

I 

at Proiz yaU0]r Bank 

WahforthOoimtyBank. 

Wankaaha Oonntx Bank :r 



Namea of Stooka do- 
poaited with the 
Stata Treaanrar. 



.WanpQn Bank 



ViiginU 6«». 

Kantticl^ ...... .6a»* 

.MiBBonn,... ....M|. 

MisBOQti 61,. 

TennoBwe 6b». 

Indiana Sa,. 

IfiflMmri 61,. 

tfisonri 61,. 

TeBn«9M9e 6b,. 

Wiaconain 7m. 

Tennesaee 6ty. 

Miflsonri 6a,. 

Kentacky 6a,. 

Misaonrl, 6«,. 

Illinois. 6m- 

Loniaiana 6a,. 

Virginia 6a,. 

Tennenee 6b,. 

North Oarolina . . 6a, . 

MiBSonri 6b,. 

Virginia 6b,. 

TenneBBoe 68,. 

HiBsouri 68,. 



Wlnftebago Count/ Bank 

If ia, Marina A Fire laa Oompanj 



Oalifomia. 



.7b,. 



MiBBOTiri 6b,. 

Tennenae 68,. 

Virginia 



LontBiana... 

lUinoiB 

GaUfomia. . . 

MlBBonri 

Georgia 

Illinoia 



..6a,. 

> . .Do,. 

. .78,. 

...68,. 

...6a,. 
.6b,. 



Indiana 5m. 

MiBBOuri 6a,. 

Virginia 6b,- 

Wifloongfai 6m- 

Mil.AWai.RifilB*date 



▲mooiit. 



37,000 

5,000 

11,000 



94,000 

134)00 

64)00 



814)00 



164)00 
10,000 



84)00 



314)00 

31,000 

6,000 



103,000 

89,000 

10,500 

13,000 

6,000 

64)00 



65,000 



4,000 
S04)00 
24,000 

5,000 



49,000 

S04)00 

154)00 

5,000 

54)00 

54)00 



15,000 
3,000 
1,000 

104)00 



19,000 
10,000 



80.000 
304)00 
94,000 



TMd 



S9JM 

4SyO0D 
31M0 

864NN) 

60j09i 



65J000 



53,800 



994)00 



«MN)0 
994m 



J TiOOO 



u 



List of Securiiie9 — oontiiraed. 



opBavi 



WiMonrin Bank of Mftdifloti: 



NuM« of Stobkvde- 
positfd with the 
State TresRirer. 



MfeMMui .... .... fie^. 

niinoie 6b,. 

Tennessee *v»*«*nibi 
Indiana' 5i^. 



Total Amount 




TVilal 






$$,14M0O 



> !■*■ 



i*aB.^«B«««W«M«»^pa«pi 



. M 



CtoABiJd KtTft SK, iSfo^ TVeiMf <rer, /o the Ste^e qf Wueonsin^ 
on Oficaunt rf" alltbe Funda^ on the let day qf January^ 
IB57, h^flr^ ihe traneactUm of any iueineaa on that day. 



18S7. 



••• . «. 



T " ' 



«•. «OO.s»<i •• 
....do 

.... QO. .... 4 

.do 



. > . aVHV. ■ . . . . 

...yiio.. . ... 

....do 



do. 



To balaooe chi^ SdMol Fandl Income, 

do IFnivermtyPund.... 

do4 Unir.Fand Ineome,. 

do Swamp'Land Pand, 

do» 8w. Ld F'd Ineome, 

do Depoalie Pnnd, 



By orerpajment fiiem GeneiM Fond, 

do School Fund, 

Balance 



To balance dne the State on alAc<ratat 
of aU the Fnnda on the Ist daj of 
January, A. D. 1857... 



I • « 9 * • « • ' 



Dr. 



f 163S0 97 

11^95 80 

1.084 39 

5S,906 33 

1 25 

Mil 83 



f85.08d46 



$77,058 59 



I . r 



(• • 



•7.(My»98 

1.021 65 

77,058 53 



$85,082 4S 



IS 



.•• 



OENESAL FUND. 



j . First QuwrUtj 1S57- 

CHAmLE^ Kxmsm^ State Tredsurer^ to the State qf fFieeonsit^ 
' 9n account qf the General Fund^ 



* M > *\^\ ' " I I 



18S7. 



■* »> tp"<»i 



....do 



Manh 31 . . . To amonnt raoeiTed from County 

Treagoren on aeeo ^nt of Stele 
Rerenao doriiig the Fint Quar- 
ter of the ^ear 1857, 

Taxes on Suita, 

9lii)e/raA *. 

Plank Road Tax, 

JteulMadlkx w w. 

Peddlers' Licenses, 

Tax OB ¥tie^aph Lines, 



*•"'•< 



k..« 



..••do. 



< t 



.dak 



January 1... 
MareH 31... 

....do 

do 

....do 

do...... 

....do 

do 



\ 



By orerpajtient, (see report) 

Appropriations^ 

Salaries, 

Audited Aooonnts, 

. Oensaa ApfrnxMiataons, «. 

Jntwest on $20,0()0 i$Ute Bonds 

atdper et* 

Interest on $30,000 State Bonds 

at 7 per ct, , 

Ssohange on Draft «n If ew York 



at IK per ct 
Balan 



OS on hiwd^. 



Tobalanqe in the Treasuiy due the 
Qenefal Fund at the end of the 
First Quarter of the year, A« 0. 
1857,...., 



Dr, 



$366,151 89 

1,630 87 

5,3M69 

253 09 

180 OQl 
• 61 9^^ 



$088,394 93 



$4^449.46 



0^. 



a . • • •*•• ... 



$74)09 » 

199^5B90 

11,736 00 

16,119 7f 

1,610 ao 

UI0O9 

55 St 

48443 4i 

IT- 



$988,394 93 






Seepn^ ^uqrte^f, JSW- 



on account qf the Oenaxd Jf^Adt • - > v< n ^' ^'-''n «'<> 



I86J^. 



Apcu !•••• 



,.«.<lo.. .... 

..wdo- ---.•- 

,...do...... 



...?4(r. 

,,,-do- 

....do.-.,:; 



.do.. 



-»— t- 



tTo balance in tke Treasurer, 

Ainoant receired ftiiti Oolin^f 
Treaauren, on accontit of State * 
Rerenixe^ dt^ng ik6 Second 

Quarter of the ^ear 1857i 

, BankTax,!. J:.. 

i Tkzon Suits, ;. 

Peddlera' I/ieesMSy 

• 50 State Bonds, at $l,dOO each,. 



Bj Oenaaa Aupiropriatioim, . 



Appropria^onSp . 



.>w>- 4 -•- 

Audited 'A|9CcnintB; .. 

50- State -Bf nda paid, 

BaUnce^ 



i» 



Dr. 



|48.448_ ^6, 



iS,75^ 64 
S4t^5 

50,oeotoo 



^^1 






r 



"■jr:; 
'PS':: 



$144,577 75 



f 



t*o balance in tVTi'etoGrjrdn^^br 
j Oene^al Faiia at ^e* end of the 
I ' Second Quarter of t^ year, *A. 
D.1857,..'. 



•li '^» 






$43,565 KL . 



9 i^troo 

94,8eSi45 

i6,50t'sa 

5,9^ '81 
50/)00'00 
43,565 70 



;.^ 



144,577 75 



T^ 



14 



OEaiERAL fUNt^-^^ontiiiiied. 



7%ird Quarter, 1857. 

f^^»»^ KvmmMy State Tytatmtr^io ike Biaie ff 
on aeeouni ^iht (General Pmnd, ^ 



1857. 



wy 1,. 

8ipt 30.. 



...do 
....do 
....do 

..,.«do, 
....do 
.— Ido 
...do 
,.^.do, 



Befit, »., 



To 'balanee in tlie TrMrazy, 

▲moQBt reoeiFod from Coiintf 
TreMoren on aocoont of SUte 
RovooQO darinc Um 3d qotftor 
of Um ymr A. D. 1857, 

Taxes on snite, ,. 

B«nk Uses. 

Poddlen' lioonni^ 



By appropmliona» 

AndStod aecoonte, 

OesBOfl ftppropriaiion8». 
BaUneo, 



To baknco in tho GoMnl Pvod oi 
tlie end of tke Uiird quarter of Uio 
yoMT A. D. 1857, 



Dr. 



$43,565 70 



4133 68 
99 00 

1M7 50 
50 00 



48,875 73 



UlSfiS 



dr. 



90.478 80 

10^37 4f 

Ui333 10 

83 7S 

5,143 58 



48^5 79 



> . -j.» 



15 



' ■ .r/. : . 



T- 



SCHOOL fCtND. 



\,. '* 



,♦' ' / 



First Quarter, 1857. 



Obaeum ^.jmBXij State Treaaurer^ to the State qf fFieeonatn, 
an account qf the School Fund, '• ^^ 



1657. 



Xttth . $1^- - To reoeipts dtiiih^ the flret quarter, 

oomTDencing on the Irt day of 

' Jl^l128rT and ending on the 31flt 

dar of March of the year A. B. 

1857, 



«.' \ 



J«niiai7 1,.. 
Maith 91,.. 
.••«do.... 

do 

....do.... 



do. 



iBy amount overpaid,, 
Audited aooountB,. 



Balance, 



By oTerpayment darlag th^ tot 
quarter, 1857, 



Dr. 



#38,199 65 



117,748 07 



$155^40 TU 



Ot. 1 



•^ 



4,619 07 
140,300 1)0 



•155,940 79 



•117,748 in 



Second Quart er, 1857. 

Chabubs Kuebn, iState TVeasurer, to the Slate qf fFisconain, 
on account qf the School Fund, 



18^7 




Jino90. 



»dO«««4«A. 



To receipte during the aecopd quar- 
ter, oommenei^ on thf lat day of 
Ajpril and ending on tlie 39^ day 



April an( 
of «hme« 



1851,. 



April l..^.« By overpaymeatdif^aiigiiiiit^iHirtei 
Jum30i..%.. Audited Acoountc ^. 



Dr. 



,Vi 



• I 



«9;Kt9i66 



Or. 



/ ( 



•r. 



Lbanfl, 



..•.do....«. To Bahince orcrpaid. 



1. 1 



■ 



■r 



a « » ■ %W« » • • 



Bj.iffarMPMfti during A^ fw 
quarter, 1857, 



J f 117.749 jOT, 

r 5,l50[Srf. 

I 15^1400 



138,909 68 



$138^19 34 



Hi 



■*f*" 



ti38^i9 34 



$190,909 86 



16 



SCHOOL FUND— continued. 



■ » '^ 



Third (Quarter 1857. 
Ghablxs EusHNy state TVeaaurerj to the, St ate qf Wisconnny 

■ 

an account qf the School Fund, 

••ft ^ H *>! • '• " ^ ■' . ' 1^ / *■?• » '^■»»' * * ^fc ^ » v ». Mi>» m i > « »*'4 . <*f i >t» * 



1K7 



September 30 



Jnlj 1 

September 30 

do 

do 



...do. 



» • 



• ( 



fo receipts diiring the third quar* 
V 1857, 



ter. 



By amount overpaid, . 
Accounts Atidit6d> 
Loans, ,. ... 

To Bahtnoe, 



Bj amount orerpaid* 



Dr. 



.• . .'vr* . 



$36,713 77 



'r "s^-* 



2^Ml 96 



$965,835 7d 



Or. 



138,406 00 



$265335 7S 



$999^11 95 



SCHOOL FUND INCOME. 



I 4 



; I 



First Quarter^ 1857. 



> < 



Chables Kuehn, State Treasurer y to the State qf Wisconsin^ 
on account of the School Fund Income, 



1857 

•J 



Jttiiiaryl... 
Varch 31... 



To Balance in School Fund Income, 
Receipts during tbe fitettjoirtei^. 



commencing on the Ut day of 
January and endilar tm the 
4My\d MMeh, A. D. 1857, 



!dd: r . ^. . Wy i^pertionrnfl to OommohS^bols 



• • ■ m^*^m ... 
a • • • UV« tf* a . ■ 



•do.. 



AeeoiiDt» Audited, t 
Balaneeji. 



I I 



I 



To Balance on band in the Treasprr 
due School iVMid findMe^.^lvl'.^^ 



■» ^ 



± 



Dr. 



$16,350 97 



Uljm 41 






$157,380 38 



Qr. 



4118303 '54 






157380 98 



.fpioirt» 



I 



'4.*. 



17 



SCHOOL FUND INCOME— continued 

Second Quarter 18S7. 

Chabues EusHir, iS'/o/e TVimAnificr) /o iAe jSVo/e q/* fFtseanrin, 
on cuxi^unt of the School Fund Income. 



1857 



April 1. 
June 90. 






....do.. 



A 



To Balance in the Treaanrj, 

ReoeiptB dnris^ tlie second qmr' 
ter,oommenMng9n the Istdaj 
of April and Qtidinff on the 
30th day of Jnne. 1857, 



By Audited Accounts*. 
Loans* 

Balance on hand. 



Dr. 



$32,040 33 



4,713 31 



M. 



Or. 



.(■ 



.M 



To Balance in the Treasury due the 
School Fund Inqpme, 



t36,753 64 



|8J73 33 



•10396 81 
17,589 Ot^ 

8St8 



#36,tS3 64 



' "^rw * « • « n »• . 



• Third Quarter, 1857. 

Charlss Kusbn, Statt * Treasurer y^toHkt State qf Wisconsin, 
on aeeptint qf tfue ^hpol Fund fyccme^ , . 



1857. 


. . 1 


Dr, 


Or. 


July 1,--.. 
Sept. 30, 


To balance in the Treasnry, ^ . . 

Receipts dnrin^ the XbM. qnar-^ 
ter, commeoi^iog: on the ftcsft 
day of July anoj ending on the 
30th day of Idepteoiiber^ A. D. 
1857, 


f8,173 33 

• 
• 

IP.878 '45 


. • ' 






By audited asco^ntfl^ » 


TsSiS 


W««|M9«*^-«* 


Apportionment to pnhlic schools^ 
Balance, •••« 






1(L746 M 




To baknce in Khe VzeMory ine thik 
School Fond Incoitie. 








$19,051 78 


$19,051 78 


8«pt. 30«.... 


|l(r«746 61 


• , 




' • ■ • • ■ • • 





8c 



.18 



I" ■ « » 



UNIVERSfTY FUND. 



■^ A 



'J/. J 



Charlss Kuehn, iS7ai6 ^eomrfr, to the State qf tf^omin, 
of^ account qfthe Umverrity Fund, 



1857. 



January 1,.. 
March 31,.. 






.'do 



Mandi 31,.. 



To balance due the tTniyeTBity Fund, 
Beoeipte dnrinff the first quarter, 
ending on the 3l8t day of 



March, A. D. 1857, 



By aeconnts Audited, 

Loans, 

pTo .balance oFerpaid,. 



By amount orerpaid during first 
quarter. 1857, 



Dr. 



$11,895 80 



9,185 10 



Or. 



-f" 



1,146 89 



$15,297 79 



14,910 00 



$15,997 79 



$U46 89 



,\ 



Charljbs Kubhn, State Treasurery to the State qf ffl^sconsitij 
on account of the University Fundy 



1857. 



June 30,... 






• • • • UV ■ ■ a I 



-•T-n- 



mti»>^-»—^ rti 



To receipts diaHtig the si^ond gar- 
ter, commenciag on the first dar 

. of April and ending on the 30tA 
day of June, 1857 



By oTerpaytnent during the first 

quarter; 

"Audited acoounts, ••• 

To balance orerpaid, 



Dr. 



$14900 51 



940 91 



To bajance ariirpiiid during fihe 5hid 
quarter, 



$1^1 49 



Or. 



$1,14W99 
994 53 



$i,ai 4a 



$940 91 



19 



J UNIVERSITY 



FUND— cpatinueil. 



/ 



" ▼ 



Third Quarter, 1857. 

Chables Kubhn, State Treasurer, to the State of Wisconsin, 
' on decourit qf the Universifi/ Fund, ^ • 

,^\ \ . : 



1857. 



Sept 30». 



July 1,. 

do.., 

do... 



,'.^^• 



Sept. 30,. 



Dr. 



To receiptB during the 3d quaiter, 
commencing oo Uie let daj oiJuly 
and ending on the 30Ui daj of! 
September, A, D. 1857, - - 



A . 



By oyerpajmenty . . . . . 
Audited acconnts,. 



Balance,, 



To balance due the University Fund, ' $613. Ql 



$879,02 



$879 03 



Or. 



f 340 91 

35 10 

613 01 



$879 03 



UNIVERSITY FUND INCOME. 



First Quarter, 1857. 

Charles Euehn, State Treasurer, to the State qf Wisconsin, 
on account of the Uuivtrsity Fund Income, 



Or, 



1857. 



January 1,. 
Maicli 81,. 



To balance in the Treasury due the 

tTniversity Fund Income, 

Receipts during the first quarter, 
commeneincp on the let day of 
January and ending on the Slst 
day of Bfarch, A. D. 1857, 



,.do. 
..do. 



,..dn.. .... 

,..do...... 



By audited aooounta 

Amount paid Treasurer of the 

^niTersity, 

Balance on hand, 



Dr. 



$1,084 39 



18,898 03 



To balance in the Treasury due the 
Uniyereity Fund Income, 



$19,983 33 



$854 43 



$46 89 

19,081 00 
854' 49 



$19,963 38 



20 



UNIVERSITY FUND INCOME— continued. 



Second Quartery 185X 

Chaales Ettehn, State Treasurer , to the Stute qf Wucondn^ 
on account qf the University Fund Income^ 



1857. 



April 1,. 



....do. 
do. 



•do. 



To balance in the Treasury dne the 

Uniyenity Fund Income, 

Reoeiptfi dartng the 3nd qnaiier, 
commencing on the 1st day of 
April and ending on the 30th 
day of June, A. D. 1857, 

By amount paid Treasurer of the 

tTnirersify, 

Andited accounts, 

To baLnnce overpaid, 



By balance oyerpaid during the 9nd 
57, 



quarter, 185 1 



Dr. 



f854 43 



746 98 



849 27 



$3,450 68 




Or. 



$9400 00 
50 68 



$3450 68 



$849 37 



Third Quarter, 1S57. 

Chaxles KrrsHN, State TVeasurer, to the State qf fFisconsin^ 
on account of the University Fund Income^ 



1857. 



Sept. 30v 



Sfft. 80>. 
.•••do... 



...do. 



To receipt! during the 3rd quarter, 
eemmsDoing on the Ist day of 
July and ending on the dOih day 
of September,!. D. 1857, 



By ore^yment, 

Audited afccounts,. 
To balance, 



By oyerpayment,. 



Dr. 



$505 84 



360 39 



$866 S3 



Or. 



$849 37 
16 96 



$866 33 



$360 39 



n 



SWAMP LAND FUND. 



,JSlwft Quarter^ IS57. 

Charles Euehn^ State Treasurer^ to the State of Wtsooiwinf 
on account qf the Swamp Land Fund, 



!..-■ 



1857 



Juiiiary 1 . . . 
Karcb 31... 



• • • • ^* 



0. 
0. 



...do.. 



To Balance in.TMMiiutTi ^« Bvamp 

LandFqnd^ ..i.... 

Receipts dtiHtig thetrat^foarter, 
commeneftiff OD' Ui6 Istdajof 
Jannaiy and endiDg on the Slst 
daj of tfaroh, A. D. 1«&7, ... 



Bj Audited Aceonnts,., 
Bathinee on hand,. 



To Balance in the Treasury due the 
Swamp Land Fund, 



Dr. 



$88,906 32 



M»a9a4» 



#14<9fie 75 



$143i438 63 



Or 

r 



i! 



' 



fl^ 12 
143,438 63 



$144,9S8 75 



7-7 — 7 : 

Second Quarter^ 1857. 



Chakles Euehn, State Treasurer, to the State of Wisconsin, 
'•' im account <f the S^amp Land Fund, • > > 



» \ « fc< It 



> » ■ » » t 



>m m I >» »■■ 1 « 1 I > 



Mn » n <«»■ ii»»N * \ > » 



1«57 



April 1... 
Jue30.., 






• ■*• aVV .... . . 



To Balance in the Treasury due the 

Swamp Land- Fund, 

Keceipts during the second quar- 
ter, eomuencinff on the Ist day 
of April and ending on the 30th 
day of June, A. D. 1857, 



By Audited Accounts,., 
Balance on hand, , 



To Balance in the Treasury due the 
Swamp Land Fond ^..«, 



Dr. 



f 143,428 63 



52,897 74 



$196,926 37 



$189,375 .82 



Or. 



$6,950 55 
189,375 82 



$196,326 91 



.^Mm^i^ 



■*Makl*>«.*.>.^.4A*v^Mi«**lM.^p^M 



22 



SWAMP LAND FUND— continued 



Third Quarter, 1857. 

Chaalbs Kuehn, State Treasurer^ to the State qf WUcofrntHy 
on aecfmnt qf the Swamp Land Fundy 



18S7 




Dr. 


Or. 


JjOj 1 


To Balaooe in the Treuniy dae the 
SwamD liBnd FnDd. ......... 


$189,375 89 
178^94 81 




September 90 


Receipts dnrinff the third qutf^ 
ter. oommenciDff on the lat dftT 
of July and ending oft the 30ih 
day 01 September. A. D. 1857» 

Bt Avdited Aecounta. »» .• 




. « . -oA- .•-->. 


^707 #• 


- - - - do. ..... 


Balance, 






To Baluloe in the Treaanry due the 
Swamp Land Fand, 






. 


$367,970 63 


$367,970 C9 


• .» • W. •» to 4 • 


$36i,269 94 





SWAMP LAND FUND INCOME. 



First Quarter, 1857. 

Chablss Eubhn, State Treasurer ^ to the State i^ fFisconsiny 
on account rf' the Swamp Land Fund Income, 



1867 



Jannary 1. 
Ifareh 31. 



...do.. 
...do.. 



do. 



To Balance due the Swamp. Land 
Fnnd Income, 

Receipts during the first quarter, 
oommencinff on the 1st day of 
January and ending on the 30th 
day of June, A. D. 1857,.... 



By transfer to School Fand Income, 
Balance on hand, 



To Balance in the Treasury doe the 
Swamp Land Fond Income, 



Dr. 



$1 25 



116 82 



$118 07 



$116 83 



Or. 



fl« 

116 8t 



$118 07 

."fUl. 



» 



SWAMP LAND FUND INCOME— continued. 



«*«***•*> r 



Second Quatiery 1857. 

Chjjujbs KusHiTy State TVeasurery to the State qf fFtseanein, 
on aeoiAkit qf tks Skdou^ iMml JF^snd Iiu^am^ - 






»<» » m»,m i i» H'Hi' , w ^ 'i ^ t nu l m ^ t^k \ % V * ' m ^* ^ *!* !' ' ! M ft 



1857 



Ipril 1 



To BalancA dii« tiie Swamp Land 
Fund Income, *«•»«•.••••.•. 



►•■- 



Br. 



•Uft.89 






".-.-.-J*»>*y*IO#Jli 



I' ' •■ 



■■)'» 



2%frrf QuaHer, 1857. 

f^AaT.t!fl KnxHVy ^to/e Treastarer,to the State qf fFieeonsinp 
on aceotmi qf the Swan^ Land Fund Ineofhe^ ' ^ 



1857 



inly 1 

September 80 



do 

, do. • • . . k 



To Balance in the Treaaoi^ due the 
Swamp Land Pnad Mieome^*. 
Reaeipta during the third qoar- 
Usf, oommenoinff on the lat day 
of JqIt and enaing on the 80tii 
day of September, ▲. D. 1857, 



By Andited 

Balance on hand*. 



.do. .. . . . To Balance in the Treaniry dne the 

• Swamp Land Fund Income, . . .,. 



, Dr. 



|fll«^8» 



33,645 38 



,j«j. 



\ 



'|BMI>76a IQ 



^,719 51 



Or. 





^ f • i •>• • • - - • A 

38,719 51 


t3«363 10l. 


r: rrt} 






'.r—rr^ 



T 






;(■ .*. 'z* 



*i 



>» • 






DEPOSIT ACCOUNT FUND. 
«#» accou n t -qf the Depaait Account Fund, 



• 

1857. 


-^- .M 


Dr. 


Or. 


Janaaiyl/.-.. 


T^ bflUiite dne tli» Depeoit AcMurt 
Fund, 


1. • 
$3,641 63 




KarahSl.... 


Bt audited accounts. .............. 


#465 68 
9,356 91 


....do...... 


« • 


•H 


.;\\''.iv'* -. 


^^} 83 


.#a,84lW, 


MarohSl,... 


4A396SH 





Second Quart er^ 1857. 

CHABLies Eluehn, iS/a/6 TVeo^urer, to the State of fFisconsiriy 
on account qfthe Deposit Account Fundp 



1857. 


f • 


, Dr. 


Or. 


JSAB 1,.... 

• 


To balance due the Deponit Aceomil 
Fund. 


|S,356 SI 




Mk6m,.:.. 


By aEudiM^nQOountB, 


#144 33 
9311 88 




Ba2aTW<) on hand , 






• • * 
To balanee due Deposit Acct. Fund, 






. : 


$8^56 %l 


#9356 91 


Wltnd 9v« . . a a 


$3,911 88 









Third Quarter, 1857. 

Ohablxs Euehn, State Treasurer, to the StcUe qf Wisconainy 
on account qfthe Deposit Account Fund, 



1857. 



Sspt. 30,... 



To balance due Deposit Acct, Fund, 



Dr, 



#9311 88 



Or. 



« 



OAPITOt LAND FUND. 



• • • 



■*""'^— ^-* • 



• ■ • 



» < 



• Second [Qtmfter, 1857. 
on accwni <ifihe\ GapifQlX^x^ fund, 



• f t < I 






■ t 

J. ■ ■ i 



I— 1, 



.^e'30, 



1^1 Id 



> — »>> ^ 



•-»«— p 






To rtedpto dtirinr tli^ 9ii4 <ttar1SBri 

E Wf of 

Apr3 and ending pn tbe.3pt$jd(^ . 



I / 



eommenoing m the Isl 

Apr3 and ending on tbe^---^,— ,^ ,. 

9ii^D^ A..D. |85lr, . .^ .^ 1 ... : . J $10,100 40 1 



Dr. 



Or. 






I ^.1 •,< 






TA»kr ijiuarter, lS*7. 

C9A|UJ» KuEHNi St(ite\Treiiimrerj io'.the State hf,ff%S€onsiitil, 
pn account iifthe Cdp^olLand Fund^ ^ y. 



• t* 



: lfiS7. 



July I, 
SepL 30i. 



..i.do. 
....dOk, 



Sept.' 90,., 



» ■> 



1*0 bali&oe in tKe Treaosur j| «j 

Beceipts darin|p the 3r({ qnkrteK 

' commencins^^on thp Ift dnyof 

. Jnlj and ehding on the 30th 

day of @ept^mber, A. D, 1857,. 



By aoeoants a^dAed/..^. 
. . Balance *ea hand. 



To ba&nce in ttier Treasury doe ihe 
, Cl^itol tiftod FimdL x> 



Dr. 






$10400 {10 iL.;^ 



; » V 



*• * 



9,077 85 



V ■* 



C 



^^ 



.J 



w ' 



$9,333 93 

^,844 98 



} — 



$19,178 95 $19*178 95 



tt 



m 



$9,844 39 I 



■^ « *^^ I 



<i* <*»i 



-« 



4C 



f^ 



tj'' 



^ 

^ 






i< . 



'm\ 



H 



•I: 



t 
t 
• 



:3 

I 

il 






3i 



;• 



!:8 







A '» 






SfiS 



in 




f 










I <N*W^ 



)> 






i\ 



s 



.*i/ 




-••i 






i 



<5 



is 



SS8 

IP 



8S3* 

m 

S f 



- <5 i 



f 

in'- 



*^'Cw 



SsiS 2S8 




^3^^ 




^y^< W^^ 




^tJ'w'w 



vt 




r • I • 
It* 



iii 

> • • 



'9 ^'U'O 



TJ'U*^ 



*0 TJ'O 



o o o o 



•^ T3 '6'w 



tJtJ'U ^'OtJ 



■J I I 
« I • 



■ « • 

( p • 



%s 







iSII 









3-s 
^"3 



il 



IIJ 



n 









•DOCUMENT D. 






.(I TA.'!.ui;](,ii. 



».' 



ANNUAL REPOBT: 



STATE OF .WISCONSIN.. 



OmCB OF THE CoMMISSIOirXBS OF S. U. AND S. LaKDS. 

To the Oavemar : 

Tli4 CommiaBionera for the «ale of School and U»ivei»tf'' 
£afids^ and the landagranted by itt of Congress of the iSA 
September, 1850, commonly known as ^ Swamp Lands/' and 
hating in charge the funds derived and arising therefrom^!, 
i^poctiully submit this their Report.foi so much of the fiaaa-» 
okl year ending with.thfi.SOth.xlay.of September, 1857, aa- 
was iHQt included in the last Annual Report from this offio<v 
dated on the Slst day of December, 1856, which Report emr, 
braced the tra^^^tions of the office for the first quarterof the 
last fiscal year, iae.iidianged. and established by ihe .^ni tof tha> 
Legislature, approved March 9, 1867, being up to the date of 
said Report ^ 

. ThB ieporta<^f tha Secretary of State and State Treasuiei; 
exhibit full and detailed statements of the .receipts iand dia->. 
bursements )On,,a^unt of an^ in the several funds ov/hti 
^hi^.we have supervisioa 



4 

The condition of these funds at the commencement and ai 
die close of the period embraced in this report, is as follows : 

School Fund. 

The capital of this (und, al Uie data of tka last report^ Daeamber 

31st, 1856, was, $3,047303 M 

Since which it haa been inereaaed I,0i3j6» 71 

Oapital, September 30Ui, 1857 $3,090,536 S3 

This sum is cofiatitiited and coaoprised of the following 
items : 

▲mounlin treaaory $42,053 C9 

Dae on certiacatea of adld School Landa 1,737,988 14 

Dae on Loana 667,993 IS 

DaeonSvanrfpLandeertificatei^..,......... $856,746 00 

Leai 95 per cent for drainage 914*186 50 

649,559 50 

y f ] r ■■ 

Total- $3,090,596 5S 

Of this sum there is ptoductire, now bearing interest at soTem 
per cent, the amount due on ' 

SthoolIiSiHl CtrtiScalaa. ^ ..w.. $1.1SIJBS 14 

Swao^ Land OerUficatee, \eaa 95 por eanl. 649>59 5$ 

School.Fond Loana 667,*«93 90 

Total en intereat. $3j048,540 84 

ne intereet on thia aam for one year, IB $913397 8S 

Add Swamp Land income on hand 9^719 SI 

Alao School FimdJiioome oa haad«... 10,746 SI 

Total $^16,863 98 

The receipts daring the period haTe bean $84,916 08 

From Sales $95,165 19 

On OeitiftoataB of talc 4SM3 19 

Loanapfcid.... , 8,709 08 

Forpenaltiea 5^464 85 

fift« -^ 1,860 83 

^' 84316^08 

The diabaraementa hare beea ........ $319,316 38 

Losn» $9M.0t9Oa 

Bnndnm 98^«M 98 

319316 98 



5 

of dkbaiMiMiiii ov«r Modpli f998^l00 St 

1l>v«rpflCdlBiofJaBiuB7,1857 IMl tt 



•■•■ 



Votel OTwiMTinenlil, S«pt 30 1,... fJW^iai gt 



•MUMMA^PWM*^ 



^ I 



HWB Swaaip bad flad 971>177, 64 

JN^BM IB TMM1117 ,^ ^. flSMMH 

'* School Fund Income. 

iMMpli $156^91 M 

ABMMiiitiiitrMsii]7,Deoemb«rSl 16»850 91 

TML .......4..-- 179379 14 

JHribonemenlB 169;935 58 

SeptaO ..„- $10,746 61 

UnkferHijf Fund, 

'QH)ltaI,Deo.31,1856.: $310,887 35 

^mwBtoSept. 30,1357 5^9 19 

Total , 316,566 47 

. • I t < 

This sum is composed of the following items.: 

Amoontdneonceitiflcatesof Mle....: '.. $965,4^ 96 

'iLnnrant due on losni 1 50,521 93 

"litewwry - 613 01 

$316^66 47 

Of this sum, all except the amount stated as being in, the 
•easury (0613 01), is drawing interest at sev«n per cent, as 
.£>llows: 

IKui on oertUlcatei, ^..$965,439 96 

Dm fk-om looM, 50,591 90 

T6ta], l)eariiig intarMt^ $315,953 46 

^tereai for one jear, $29,116 74 

£Mi overpaymentB, ^ 360 39 

total, $^1,756 ta 



I 



— '^ •— ;3: 



TlMroeeiptshaTebMii^ • ««.... w... #4,964 

Yhmi nevMlw, $609 83 

On c«rtific8tii% 2,071 93 

Yromloftn*, 650 00 . 

FMatiM, -^. 939 87 

4.964 63 



ip« ™ 












• I .» 



$IWAY^« 



15.S47 41 



Mll'll ?"! 



of diilmnBiBeiitvoTerTBeeipts,... '..... ^ fflTiSStf^ 



, Balance, September 90/ 



11395 81 



M 



IS tl 






Univerriiy, Fund Income, 



Iklt^uui^, January 1, 



t90450 » 



Total, 

Piabunementa, 



A.-H 



.^v^i. 



^-- , 



$3i;n5 14 

91,S» Si 

I.'* ill .ii. 



^terpauL September 30, 



Swamp Land' Fund. 

Tbe amount of thia fond on hand on the Slat daj of Deoember, 

1836, was, aa appeara from the last report, %39JN)8 

^Increase to September 30th, 3S3»S4S 



Total, #376,451 39 

Diabaxaamenta, , 14,188 36 



Balance, fieptamber 30, ^.,. -f3eS4K9 94 

("Tranafer to Genaral Eand> ^^j ...«.«. .4...... ..;«.. 



Kett proceeds, f361,570«tt 

.^rmmler tft School Fund, 371,17? «4 



Transfer to Drainage Fond, ■ $90393 56 

The sum of $%^QjlAS 00 is due on certificates of sale of 

^ Swamp Lands, exclusive of the amount due on lands selected 

-iix lieu of Swamp Lands, which lands being appropriated 

entirely to the School Fund, the amount due on certificates 

'fot such land is^ included in School Fund dues. 

Swamp Land Fund Ineomt, 



j>The interest receired at sales of Swamp Lands, and ariaing frem 

Hie daea on certificates ol aalea, haa reached the sum of $33,763 t§ 



I 



V 

AuMNini on hand, December 31, 1856« $1 

BMelr«d to September 30, 18ft7, 98,788 10 

...'.- 83,763 31 

Diibiiraemenli, 43 84 



1 ;i M|fcMiii (>i ih d> j Jrtiyt#itiB-8<ta^uaLL^wafci^i4ftm o3^^ H 

The Dqwsii Account. :w,>f!r>l 

Vhif fnad ]|as been eliarged bj tbe payment on eertificatee sur- 

fcnifered: ;;::•.! I •..:.! j. '><Vv^ 

MBno9 onjbaiid, September 80tli^ .';t . ..•. :..*.'.«.. .«•«. 8^811-88 
'•Amp{iitoiilaftid/0W5bmW'3tffe7;:..:':.,,::..^ 




) ' ' 1 ' 1 J k 



Jl- »n 'If ! 



epncictiArorfl^fdftd'lRltli^l^milw'i^ • ';;';| 

ikkM: cl 'land .apptocffiitad 'fti^ . Ooogreu to tbia SJtaU' fb^ tluD .["!..*• va>0 

etimpi^fimi of pabUo bnHaift^fte ^^^ ^ Itf^jof J ii^^^' ^ 

V» iri^clk add' error of enitj kctuw. Fand/. ...... ^ . 1 .\ .... .' . ^^Tlff^^ 

cbiitia'oftiiUfaDd,:....^..;.., ._;,: •..■-;ist5W',% 

Of ilR0MntUt»hasbeettt«dStfUtbBStiteT^^^ . .. 



, -«^8umof... ............. :.....: ti*»»w» . 



▲mftant dna, : *^^ ^ -iWUiiyHl 

DjiJQwemtota, :.,„;.. '833JJW . 

BdUtde in Tieaevrj Sepi 80, .-...<...,. 'o^U SI > 



■••^1^'" 






fcTHWy «i above 18,17885 

lla^aeabore, ....1 ^^^ ^fMrnamstiL. 



.ui 



r 



■ ' ■•- 'J ■ • ■ ■' 

la^tbovrn under the bead of '^Vaai||^ Land FVitid,4he neti-pio- 

eeeda arising irom tEe miwioi Swamp Landanp'to the 30iE 'dMj \ ,^ ^ 

e£ SeptAiber, 1857, wail. J .'.*.. 1361,570 18 

Len 75 per cent, transferred to School Fund, ^.^ ^M77 64 

V/^-: :.'-•-:-,•• •■-v- w.. iW^.^ 

' ' Vhich sWhas'yk'se^ asftfe 'abd* atipmi>taJa% fde'^e^ ' 
^eral' towns in which the land 'is sitilated;'f6r'ltie'^utp8Ji^''df 
'ieclaimihg die Iand8;'^c^ordtng to the 0riglUai''i>Mlrt8t6ii8^df 
Ihe act of C!ongies8, and the laws of this Sitaie' oii'tffe sut>)A(k 



\ ' 



SALES. 



' Ttm Coinmifiioiiasy in oonimiilf viUi 

kftving given proper notieey have held pablie nlet of tend 

Ibllowe: 



ai^ 




OaliiBMt.. 
Oohnnbia. 



]Mf«k. 



JPond da Lm. 

^•temm 

JaMwa ....•« 

Xttwann^e 

LaPointo 

Manitowoo... 
IfarqiiettM... 

OOQSltO 

SleoDte 



Portage. 
PoitaM. 






Sbebojgan. 
WMhiogton 
Waapacft... 
Waupaca... 
Waoahara... 
WiniMbaso. 
Wood.™. 




Saptaml 
Ja^... 

taiilaniliw^*. 3 

Jolj 1 

Jalj -. 3 

Jalj 87 

Jafy 18 

Aagoat I& 

Jnly SS 

July ^ 

8apleaibar....SS 
Jjy 10 



Oatasamia , 



MadJacm. 

MadaaoD. 



Superior.. ..•. 
Fond da Lao. 

WatertovB 

Now LiaboB.. 
Kewaonaa.... 
La Poiirtau...< 
Manitowoc... 

MoDtdlo. 

Oconto , 

Oconto 

▲pplaton...... 

Onakm 

Storena Point. 
8toTei« Point., 
Baiaboo 



Joly 8 

Sopieraber,... 5 

Jaly 15 

Jaly 15 

Jaly 90 

Joly S 

September.... 19 
September^.. 19 
September.... 89 
September,... 12 
September.... 19 

Jaly € 

Jaly... 3 

Septaaiber.... 9 
September.... 9 
September,... 7 

July 31 

September.. . .81 lOnmd Rapida. 



Shawanaw... 
SheboTgao.. 
Weal Knd.. 
WejAowegli. 
Weyaawega. 
Waetom*.... 
Oshkoab..... 



Swampb 
Svi 




Svamp^ 
Swaaoip. 
SwaflBDu 
S^ 





Swamp, 
8^ 



S 



SwaauL 
SaUne. 



Swampw 

•SekMML* 

Swamp. 

Swamp. 

Swamp. 

'-Seleelad.* 

Swamp. 

Swamp. 
Swamp. 



I 



Al all of these sales a laige number of bidders were p 
enty and most of the lands offered elicited considerable com- 
petition and spirited bidding. 1% is believed that the lands 
^brpugbt fair prices^and that the trae interest ot the State and 
,pf the several funds to which these lands belong have been 
tcedl .by such sales. 



I 

f 

I 



Ir 

ii 



I 



Scl^edules of these sales properly classified are herewitii 

presented, showing the several matters of interest connected 

therewith from which it appears that at such sales the whole 

namber of acres sold was 677^S66.49. 

SMmm priM, 077. fSSMSIrSS 

▲moant wia Ibr ^ 1JI)19^454.74 

PriMipiaiMikl 107^784 09 



Prineipal unpaid or dae 904,670 

Intmwipdd , . 33.638 36 



i. 



Statement of School Lands, sold at public sale from, Jan- 
nary 1st, to September 30, 1857. 

Sixteenth Section, 



Obmitie*. 



Bad Ax... 

Brown. 

DoDglaM... 
La^Mnte.. 

Oocmto 

Wanahara.. 

I 

TtftaL... 



130 

40 
18368.75 
13,687.80 
43^30.14 

40 



75461.69 



AppiaisaL 



$154 30 

100 68 

35,505 48 

17,354 31 

69,667 06 

54 76 



113336 39 



SoU&ir. 



f 154 30 

100 681 

36^74 48 

19,247 31 

70344 73 

54 76 



Prin. 



$10 30 

10 68 

3303 48 

3,703 31 

7378 73 
' 5 76 



110376 06 14|017 06 



Unpaid. 



$138 00 

90 00 

33,571 00 

16345 00 

63,466 00 

49 00 



103,859 00 



Int. paid 



$00 33 

00 34 

588 06 

43^93 

3337 30 

00 14 



3348 99 



500,000 ^ere Orant. 



Bnim 

Outagamie. 

Pierce 

St. Oroiz... 

ttitd.... 



400 

80 

480 

440 


651 £3 
114 68 

815 79 
748 34 


651 83 
114 68 
815 79 
748 34 

4 


63 33 
13 68 
83 79 
79 34 


588 00 
103 00 
733 00 
669 00 


1400 

• 


333^93 


3,339 93 


337 93 


3393 00 

* 



1 56 
036 
1 
1 



530 



Selected in Ueth 



Sbawanaw. 
Wanpaoa... 

Total ... 



30,154.71 

3>748^ 



33303^ 



37300 38 
4,686 05 



42386 33 



65 J55 63 
7398 03 



73,153 66 



6,706 63 
761 03 



7,467 C6 



59,049 00 
6337 00 



65,686 00 



133133 
143 57 



1374 73 



aSCAPITULATION. 



16th 
500300 a... 

vaMoieQ. •• 



y Total..., U04M94 



75,18139 

1,400 
3330335 



113326 39 

S339 93 

43386 33 



157J58 65 



116376 06 



3339 93 337 93 



73,153 66 



193,359 65 



14,017 06 



7,467 66 



3L793 65 



102359 00 
2.092 00 

65,686 00 



170337 00 



3348 99 
5 30 

1374 79 



3,438 98 



, n ■»» *■ 



" * n' 



■TT- 



T-r- 



id 



10 



.» 1 



Statement of Capitol^ Saline (University), and Swamp Lands, 
sold at public sale, from January 1st to September dOth, 1857. 



'Oi»tifikfi«i* 


▲eras. 


Apprmiwl 


Sold for. 


Pnii.I»i<L 


VnfMu 


laiLpm 


^tMif)hi!re. 


90O 


$310 56 


$931 80 


$901 15 


$190 69 






Saline Univerrity. 


I^ortagei.... 


. 560 .Sil 1,685 69 1,699 81 178 81 


1,514 «^ 99 Yi 


Hwamp' Lands. 



OonntieB. 



Adams. 

Wown 

Oalamet...»... 

Columbm 

Bbm 

l>oor 

Dodm 

Fond du Lae. . . 

Veff«M0Ki 

JntiMiu. 

K0wiiin66..* .... 

'Manitowoc 

ICanjnette. ..... 

Outaffamie 

On.ukee 

Ooonto 

Poftage..... •*«• 

Sank 

Shawanav...««. 

Sheboygan 

Washington.... 

Waupaea. 

Wanahaia.. 

Winnebago 

Wood. 

Total 



Ko.of 
Acres. 



944555 70 
&.0»6^4 

7389.75 
7,178.94 

7.099.4B 
91,097.49 
8,876155 
4,99045 
10,S00JB9 
97,685.63 
99,919^ 
I7.795.ta 
36,550.01 
30,45954 

640 

115,60628 

40;i58.06 

935984 

41,186.94 

1,444.59 

9,965.01 

49^1.31 

97,177 65 

10,000.39 

43,068j60 



Amount 
•old for. 



$33,951 97 

6.778 49 

13,391 90 

13,561 01 

93,430 80 

98.095(9 

15,137 80 

7,803. 79 

18,811 69 

45,439 33 

39.463 53 

98,147 89 

50.587 19 

41,064 53 

809 00 

146^67 84 

60.990 56 

4,115 00 

56,316 67 

1,919 70 

3,805 98 

66.719 34 

35,648 93 

16.006 ^ 

60,188 97 



Amount of 
Prinoipalpd. 



566.071^3 



818.070 48 



$3,456 97 
1,196 49 
1.443 90 
1,406 01 
9,394 80 
9.877 89 
1,561 80 

806 79 
1.964 69 
4494 33 
4.069 53 
3.119 89 
5,863 19 
4,309 53 

196 00 

14.784 84 

6,3U 56 

431 
5.878 

198 

430 
7.099 34 
3,665 93 
1,681 89 
6,938 97 



00 
67 
70 
98 



85.681 48 



▲mount of 
Int. paid. 



$563 65 


176 30 


367 00 


974 99 


936 97 


817 19 


103 56 


908 98 


404 39 


794 84 


1,177 64 


875 99 


1,019 13 


1,144 99 


93 44 


4.955 58 


1JD60 50 


66 61 


1,083 30 


58 01 


116 17 


1,317 50 


715 36 


440 96* 


1,046 38 



Amount 
dneStiale. 



$99,795 00 



19,179 56 



11.948 
19,155 
91^136, 
95,218 
13,57C 
6J997 
16M7 

404)15 
35,401 



44,794 00 

36,755 00 

676 00 

1S1JB83 00 

54J609 09 

3*684 00 

50,438 00 

1,714 00 

U70 00 

59,697 00 

31383 00 

14,395 00 

53,960 00 



799.989 00 



RSCAPITULATION. 



Capital. 

Scnool. 
.Saline.. 

Swamp. 



Acres, 



900.00 
110.484.94 

560.99 
56^.071.33 



Minimam. 



3l0.!)0 

157.75965 

1,685.62 

^707.5*^. 16 



677,316.49 867339.93 



Sold for. 



$331 80 
199.359 65 

1,699 81 
81^.070 48 



1,019.454 74 



Prin. paid, 



$901 15 

91,799 65 

178 81 

85;681 48 



107,784 09 



Unpaid. 



110 65 

170,637 00 

1. 514 00 

739,389 -00 



904.670 0699,63(106 



9^49898 

. 9979 

19479 56 



\\, . i 



11 

Pre-empHona. 



UtUMr/thdif^ liberal proiridotis of the Acts pfbvi'ding for 
the sate of* flframp Ii«aDds ihtm fans been pre-empledh 173,037 
8d-lC0 acres, from which has been received {^6^5 66. 

The following table/|jt9M'>a'ihit'0f these statements by 



counties : 



I < 



■o 



<' ' •> * 



Ckmn^M. 



■aJL 



£fe:: 



<4' 

.J 



BuffiBllo. 

Oalomet ^...,j^.'\^^ 

Ohippewa , J 

OtAn'mMa ....... . 

Danet 

Dodge 

Vaoti 

'«kdre 



>(■• 



zlaa,..' 



JgoaddnLae.. 

Orant 

fireen 

Juneau'. 

Jackson 

JeffenoQ 



Kenoeha 

La Oroaae 

MaffitoWDd.... 

Karathon 

Marquette ..„. 

Konroe 

ueonto........ 



» 



>«• . .to . ii».r« .«.. ..«s 



.... . ■ ' 






mtagamie ^« 

Oxaakee...^ 
Herte ^ 

p6ik. ..,:., 

portage .'...' - 

Rdck 

B^V 

fifbWanaw -'. 

Slieboyffftii 

Trempeleaa ^....4. 

Walworth 

Wa<^hinfft<lii , 

WkdkeBha 

Waopaea 

Wkuehara 

IfirinelMgp ....'... «. 



IftM. 




i3e 

4.560 so 
6,789.43 

340 

40 

645 

ij?0.36 
3,3^.38 



J,7te;37 
3368.17 
4347J83 

148.10 
80 
3,0H5^I 

719^ 
5,31 140 
3^58.35 

49^j04 
9»074^ 

560 

13.293,^ 

7^10.68 

8,I66J>8 

1332803 

691 J61 

1,803 

88 J. 40 
6.432JB9 

80 

145034 

4,619.89 

1,066.14 

4,349.18 

1,685.08 

534.35 

89936 

18,158.93 

15,633.41 

9,804.n8 

1.083.68 



173,03TS3 



Ajnoaalb. 



I ; 



4,603 96 

758 38 

^,701 14 

8.483 01 

4,335 31 

3U0 00 

50 00 

40U 00 
1,713 95 
4339 39 



'3JBI3 

4,307 

6,059 

185 

899 
6314 
4447 

400 

6,135 

11.345 

7U0 

16,615 

9,138 

lo.ros 

15,65d 

864 

3,353 

1,101 

8,016 

lOO 

1«813 

5.774 

1333 

5,399 

3.106 

655 

1,134 

33.703 

19,538 

18,358 

1353 



97 

74 
80 
IS 
00 

8d 

87 
35 
83 
00 
56 
93 
00 
67 

^ 
13 

39 

37 

79 

75 

43 

00 

18 

89 

74 

15 

39 

39 

46 

88 

67 

03 

36 



IL 



■^- 



^316i;S06 66 



12 





Pre-emptUm qf CapUol Laifkd$. 


, Aera& 


MiBimmm. 


FxiMi|Hilptld. 


«M» 


flMOSM 


fttUMSO 


. . 1 


mBeAPiTin-Aiwii, 


* 



0w 



BWftnm 



178JQS7JI 

6;wo 



179,997.39 



Mialmtuik 



$916,906 « 
19^ 50 



999,419 16 



Pdd. 



$916306 68 
19;l65 80 



99M79 16 



x= 



Private Sniry qf Lamh. 

During the term embraced in this report, there hw beea 
sold lS5fi20.23 acres at private entry. 

AnKrant fold for. $179364 91 

Prindpia pftid • 19,651 tl 

Unpwd iss^ssee 

Iniamt paid 4,695 74 

A complete statement of these entries by classes and 
counties, is as follows : 

School Lands. — Sixteenth Sections. 



OonntiM. 



Olark 

Donr 

BonglAa 

Daim 

Ifoiiroa 

Richland. . . 

Polk 

'Winnebago. 



Aena. 



Total. 



400 
708.18 
1,920 
80 
160 
3^0 
4,849.1 1 
537.88 



8,658.67 



Bold for. 


Priii.pakL 


Unpaid. 


$776 00 


$83 00 


$694 00 


930 61 


103 61 


818 00 


3,436 00 


9,956 OO 


180 00 


105 04 


11 04 


94 00 


370 56 


98 56 


943 00 


46 17 


5 17 


41 00 


6,319 35 


674 35 


5,545 00 


690 06 


73 06 


618 00 


11,463 79 


3,931 79 


8,933 00 



Intpali. 

$96 Of 

48 •• 

8 94 

50$ 

971 

946 

393 91 

39 99 

464 89 



500,000 ^cre Orant. 



Brown... 
Buflhlo... 
JaiftprBon.. 
St Oioiz, 



Total, 



40 

480 

40 

80 


61 31 

740 04 

54 76 

115 10 


6 31 

139 04 

5 76 

13 10 


55 00 
611 00 

49 00 
103 00 


640 


971 31 


154 31' 


817 00 



399 

40 6* 
IM 
414 



■.""^ 



48 94 



? . . 



Oonniiea. 



* 4 « • » • • I 



J ' 



IS 






SiaSepoMt-^PriMtt Entfies* 



* I 



Adams. . . . 
Brown.... 
Oslo met..., 
Oolombis.. 

Dsno , 

Door. 

I>odge 

Jefferson... 

Juneau 

Kewaunee.. 
Oatagamie. 

Oeonto 

Pertagu 

fiank 

Sliawanaw. 

Sliebojgaa..,. 

Winnebago 

lfpod,i 



Ko. of 
Aktcsu 



440 . 

1,130 
885.40 
643.01 
93,610 
74737 
200 
1360 
1331.95 
13309.75 
68364.16 
330 
40 
7,693.81 
1,039.64 

40 
1338.47 
3380 - 



Amount 
sold for. 



$S50 00 

1,100 00 

1,400 00 

1,106 75 

3,310 03 

98361 95 

934 33 

250 00 

1350 00 

1,653 44 

16311 95 

85,688 35 

400 00 

50 00 

9394 OS 

1,399 60 

50 00 

1,660 59 

435p0Q 



Total 19633136 160,549 91 



Principal 
pai(i« 



$55 00 

110 00 
140 00 

111 75 
' 386 03 
9,868 95 

98 33 
35 00 
195 
165 
1,661 
8,640 35 
40 00 
5 OQ 
973 OS t 
139" 60 
506 
168 59 
-485.00 



44 
9b 



16,365 91 



. *y* 



Interest 
paid. 



*■ 



$^ 
24 

36 

31 

101 

716 

93 

6. 

' SO 

34 

486 

3353 

. 6 

1 

m 

35 

84 
36 
76 



69 
50 



r- 



00 
79 
44 
56 
35 
91 
38 
99 
93 
39 
79 
86 
54 
00 
15 
53 



4,113 00 



i 



Amoant 
doe, • .^. 



I < 



$495 00 

990 OOr 

. 13ttOOO 

995 00 

9383 00 

95393 00 

836 00 

335 00 

]>755.0$ 

1,487 00 

143^1 <M^ 

77,048 00 

. 360 00 

45 00 

8f,650O0 

1,170 00 

45 00 

1,493 00 

4365 OQ 



144,384 00 



Capital Lands pre-empted. 



Oonaties. 


No. of Acres. 


App. Valae. 


Am't sold for. 


Principal paid. 


Dane 

Dann 

lanOlaire... 


4*480 

730 

1300 


$9355 30 
1357 80 
1359 50 


$9355 90 
1357 80 
1353 50 


$9355 90 
1357 80 
1,553 50 




6,300 


111365 50 


13,965 50 


13365 50 



UBCAPITUI.ATION. 



School Lands. 





No. of 
Acres. 


Amoant 
sold for. 


Principal 
paid. 


Interest 
paid. 


1 mount 
due. 


0is:teenth Section . . 

500,000 Qrant 

Capital 


8,658.67 

640 
6,3U0 
196311.56 


$1M63 79 

971 91 

19,365 50 

160349 91 


$3,331 79 

154 31 

13,365 50 

16,365 91 


$8,939 00 
817 00 


$464 80 
48 94 


$waBp. 


144384 00 


4,119 00 






15131830 


197,685 41 


35303 41 


169389 00 


5,139 48 



14 

From the forgoing it appears that from the Ist day of JaA* 
nary, 1857^ to the SOCh day of September^^bolh iaclusiye, there 
hfs been sold : 

SehMlLandi Aen* llf,783i>l 

XTDiyenitj Landi (Salioe) do. SeOJHI 

Sw^pip Landt.^ do. 865,6a0ill 

Oq>itelLAndB do. 6.40Q.00 

WUemimberof Aerctaold 199,374 04 



Aipoimt aold for. , f 1^13^11 ai 

ApprMstdormiiuniQfi'valDi). Ii998^79l 90 

Sboidaf iminoaMeof. 145ill9 81 



Anomtaol^lbrMaboTe. fMlMll M- 

ijpifyfl^t of |Nrina|Md iMii4 SS^JPS Ift. 

BalMce dttf^ onaotudi yurfUw ft,0S8 003 $S 



Interest ptid to Januftiy M 1868, »t the data ff Mk. t97;m 0» 



» ■■ ■■ 



' LOANS. 

' A ,cppplete list of the LoanSs made from the;Sch9ol and 
University l^und is herewith presented, from whi<ih it appears 
that the whole number of li^&Qs made, daring| the period, 
eo^n^d in this jceport, is from ; . , 

The Sohool Fand 754 Leans, amountiiig to . . . |964|0M - 

The ITniy^r^ Fund . « . 42 Loans, ,aiff9.\^f iiig tO|. * ^ 1 4,910 

Totalr. '^90 Loans, amounting to.. L (298,982 

* 

There are in the counties, and to the j)erson8, as follows: 



-fr-r 



■> 4 . II 



1857. 



January 6 
January 22 
jMUary 22 
January 30 
FeR-tfy 11 
FelMTU'y 28 
llmrcli 2 
July 27 
August 21 
Au^st 94 
A<iigU6t ' 24 
Bfrpiem. It 
Septem. 12 
Si^m. 23 
Beptelii. 23 
84])teni. 27 
A«ugttet 29 



• I 



Counti^fl and Nihmwl 



Amount 



Adorns CourUj^ 

Robert H. Qraoe, 

William H. Spain 

?riUiam Taylor 

W^ H/Kiogsbury 

Josiab JlarshalL : 

Joseph O. Ohilsen* 

Nicholas Ritter « . 

Oalvin Trayers 

John Lyon 

trOutt vraTin* .......... . 

Henry Beebe, 

Thomas Corwipg 

Mathew Spain. . . ^^ . . « J^ 
Stephen B. Chapman..^ 

James Herman. 

Holtead W^ Carter L 

0; A Fretsfhe.. 



r, 



, ( 



^ JanuMry 29, 

1i ii 



January 26, 
Febra'y 18, 
Jakie 30, 



& a West, (Uniy^rsity)... 



Brown Ca^fnig^ \ 

Jose^ Furtiman . 

Ifalchoer 8chanfir..««.*.iu 
Bit P.iHoyfe *i.i 



#400*00 
^tfO 00 

. 300 00 

600^00 

'400 .OCi 

ado. 00 

800^00 
> 150 00 

aoitiio 

820 00 
200 00 
300 00 

aoo 00 

IM.M 
MOkiOO. 
8l9p<.00 

h — 



Interest. 



» *■ 



Mf^m^w 



$27,354 
10^7 •' 
19i 77 
19>81 . 

24 «a;^ 

11 07. 
l7i4A^ 

7 ta 

7 96 

4 98 
6 29 
6 29 

d>07.. 

5 &l ; 



^" ' I" 



( i gii h«t * i 1 1 1 I ' li 



800 00 



=t 



ii 



dOOiiOO ; 
100/4)0) 

' aeQ^Mt 

'/I • ! 



•iMJft 



P**» i.^i«r^.^4»i<M 



19 87 



aouia.. 



*• 



le 



LoanM — contiiiued. 



1857. 



August 20) 
8epiein« 10» 
Beptem. .19, 
Septem. 24, 



Septem. 29, 



January 29, 
Ifarch 10, 
llarch 10, 
Mtrck> 17, 



March; 
July 
July 
Angnit 

Attgoat 
Saj^m. 



6, 

14, 
81, 

8, 
18, 



JaaiiAi7l4, 
March 8, 
March 9, 
July 16, 
Augufti 16, 
August 15, 
August 20, 
August 28, 



Javua^y 12, 
January 20, 
Jauuary 27, 
January 27, 



Ominitefl and Names. 



Brown Co. — continued. 

4 

Albert C. Robinson 

Paul Fox -. 

Samuel Byan 

Alonio Kimball 



Bad Ax Caunijf. 
8. D. Powers 



I Buffixh County. 

EliasSchumaker... 

William Burt 

John Burt.., ^ 

E. Bishop , 

Edvrard Lees ,,a*^.. 

James M. Pierce. ^«... 

John Ochsner w—.« 

OhrisCina Bohri ...««. 

O.W. Gilbert .--.4- 

IVedirick Binder 



Calumet County* 
linria Mary gold... ;.;.•. 

John Nixon 

Qeorge Baldwin. 

John Arena 

B. A. 4 O. A. Pauleson 

Thomas Higgins 

John Marygold 

0. Q. Btanlon 



Columbia Couniy* 

Paul Kotos..... 

Prattcis Wobd. 

Patriek Oraires 

Joseph MahoB 



Amount 



$600 00 
500 00 
600 00 
800 00 



8,100 00 



600 00 



400 00 
IQO 00 
.100 00 
400 00 
iBQO 00 
.490 00 
800 00 
400 00 
800 00 
100 00 



8,060 00 



. 400 00 


260 00 


MO 00 


4oaoo 


600 00 


600 00 


200 00 


600 00 



8,060 00 



600 00 
800 00 
826 00 
600 00 



Interest 



J12 82 

. 10 76 

9 90 

6 60 



106 86 



8 94 



26 82 

^ 66 

6 66 

&2 07 

22 72 

}6 91 

9 81 

11 17 

8 88 

2 87 



128 06 



■•T^ 



26 98 
14 47 

17 02 
12 90 

18 80 
18 80 

6 18 
12 06 



116 10 



88 88 

19 86 

2rio 

82 46 



J 






1857* 



Januttry 28^ 
Januury 28, 
January 28, 
January SO, 
Febm'y 11, 
Pebru'y 12, 
Pebru'y 12, 
Febm'y 18, 
Febm'y 18, 
Febm'y 24, 
Febm'y 25, 
Febm'y 28^ 
Febm'y 26, 
March 8, 
Ifarch 5, 
Marcb 8, 
March 6, 
March 8, 
March 7, 
March 0, 
March 12, 
March 12, 
March 17, 
March 18, 
March 18, 
March 27, 
March 27, 
March 30, 
June 15, 
Jane 27, 
June 27, 
July 16, 
July 27, 
August 7, 
August 8, 
August 18, 
August 18, 
August 14, 
August 24, 
Septem. 4, 
Septem. 27, 
Beptem. 27, 



Okvqnttts and Vtaam* 



AttOQiiC 



Columbia C(0.-«>Mtilinii€cL 

William S. Hobart,. 

WilUam R. Smith 

William Jones 

Charles Baker ••....« 

Felix Molinden » 

Paul Andrews 

Hans Fossen 

Peter Thompson ,.. 

Ole Oleson 

John Gund..., 

James Watson 

William B. Childs 

John Scott 

Daniel Buchanan 

Ezra H. Sturffiss 

John E . Lloyd 

James Chancillor ,. 

M, M. Dayis 

Eran Edwards 

Margaret Kegan 

Day id T. Emerson 

Franklin T. Brayton 

Ole Seyerhuton 

Patrick Monehen 

James Prentiss, 

J. Montgomery Smith 

Joseph ^aisir 

Cyrus D. Hottenstine 

Benjamin Williams 

Thos. Clancy Ss Thos. Drew, 

John Wolstone 

Mrs Jane Smith 

Thomas Moses 

Daniel F. Newcomb 

H. aHaskill 

William Owen 

John Owen 

H.W. Tenney 

Josiah Arnold 

John Eyans 

William ELHaryey 

G. W. Burlingame 

3d 



$B00 GO 
500 00 
600 00 
800 00 
400 00 
200 00 
150 00 
800 00 
150 00 
400 00 
250 00 
800 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
800 00 
500 00 
200 00 
300 00 
150 00 
500 00 
800 00 
500 00 
400 00 
400 00 
300 00 
500 00 
250 00 
400 00 
200 00 
500 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
200 00 
500 00 



Interest 



$82 3T" 
82 8T» 

82 sr 
19 sr 

24 68 
12 28 

9 21 
18 86 
.9 18 
23 64 
14 72 
17 67 
17 62 
17 86* 
17 25 
17 19 
17 la 
17 86. 
17 13 
28 86 
11 23 
16 84 

8 28 
27 50. 

16 50 
26 63 
21 31 
21 15 

11 36 

17 88 
8 94 

12 90 
5 98 

18 97 

13 97 
8 09 

18 49 
13 40 
12 44 
11 84 
8 58 
8 94 



►.' 



1» 



1817. 



Fobrtt'7 18, 

' Febru'y 1?, 

Febni'j 17, 



QoniitlpB Md Ka 



JAnniTf 97, 
Marcb 6, 



January 2, 
January 3, 
January 3, 
January 6, 
January 5, 
January 6, 
January 6, 
January 6, 
January 0, 
January 18, 
January 13, 
January 13, 
January 15, 
January 20, 
January 24, 
January 27, 
January 29, 
January 31, 
Febru'y 9, 
Febru'y 17, 
Febru'y 21, 
Febru'y 28, 
March 2, 
March 2, 
March 5, 
Fcbru*y 28, 
March 9, 
March 18, 
March ll, 



Columbia Co.-«-«oiltiaV]. 
Cba8« H« Moore. (Unirerahy} 

H, A.T»ney« do.««. 

A. B, Greene do 

Augni t Kiermert. ...do. 

Eran Brans do 



Chaw/ord County. 

Joseph Reed 

Ruel £. Hutchinson 



Attioaai 



Dane County, 

J. Sullivan 

James D Ruggles 

Andrew J Mills 

Herman T. Ploag. . 

James J. Nichols 

F. Memhard 

John' E. Mann 

John D.Welch 

Ebeneser Brigham 

WilliHm Hobbins 

Otto Kerl , 

John Bair 

S. H« Haynes 

ilesry Highan 

William Voight 

I John Eberhard. • . 

Ira Isbam. 

Theo. Herferth 

Joel Rice 

Patrick Roach 

Chancey Luce 

John Dorman 

Patrick Dufley 

August Hertford 

Andrew Patton 

Olirer W. Thornton. . 

John Damp 

F. Anthony Browning. 
John H. blavin 



t500f 00 
40O 00 
250 00 
400 00 
300 00 



lMd5 00 



latenst. 



500 00 
300 00 



800 00 



250 00 
600 00 
300 00 
400 00 
250 00 
400 00 
300 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
250 00 
350 00 
500 00 
300 00 
400 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
300 00 
300 00 
500 00 
350 00 
300 00 
300 00 
200 00 
500 00 



$32 H' 
25 W 

15 SO 
24 iff 

16 IS 



ti m 



924 n 

■' ! ,',ri ' 

32 4^ 
17 19 

49 65 

17 50 
84 71 
20 83 
27 62 

17 2$ 

27 54 
20 65 
20 65 
34 42 
3d 75 
20 76 

33 75 

16 78 
23 16 
32 76 

19 48 
25 78 
32 08 

18 59 
30 22 
30 07 

17 79 
17 42 

28 98 

20 18 
17 7^ 
17 02 
11 23 
27 59 



19 
Zroan^.-— continaed. 



1857. 



May 2, 
May 4, 
May 14, 

Jane 30, 
June 80, 
July 7, 

July 13, 
July 28, 
AugUBt 5, 
August 5, 
August 7, 
August IS, 
August 21, 
AugasW 21, 
August 22, 
August 25, 
June 80, 
July 3, 

August 26, 
August 26, 
Septem. 1, 
Septem. 7, 
Septem. 9, 
Septem. 9, 
Septem. 9, 
Septem. 10, 
Septem. 10, 
Septem. 11, 
Septem, 19, 
Septem. 14, 
Febru*y 16, 



Febru'y 9, 



January 8, 
January 8, 
Jaoufiry 8, 
January 18, 
January 15, 



Ooanties itid Kunes. 



Dane C!p.— ^ntinued 

David Holt 

Isaac D. Sweat 

Joseph Hobbins. . ^ 

James A. Rand. 

Daniel ,K. Butler 

John F« Wessel 

William^H. Earns 

Peter B. Field 

John D. Middleton 

R. B. Foster 

Emilie Olagan • 

William F.Baker 

Benjamin F. Nott 

Charles Hilton 

P. H. Van Bergen 

Margaret Herran 

R, Gyles 

Detinis E. Butler. 

Charles L. Ferls 

Marcus Conner 

Sarah Jane k Robert Hasty « 

Chancey Abbott .. 

Timothy Einney 

Pat. Murphy — 

W. H. Eggleston 

J. B. Britton 

Sikke Callinson 

Mary Ready 

Regents IJDiversity of Wis.. 

Alonxo Chipman 

Samuel Crips 1 



Christ Hoffman.(tTniyersity) 



Hodge CourUj/^ 
Cathrine Bttioger- ^— 

Thomas Doyle •• 

William Blake 

Andrew Siensonn. 

Peter Potter... 



Amoant 



Interest 



$500 
600 
500 
500 
400 
500 
850 
200 

too 

150 
500 
600 
200 
500 
500 
500 
400 
400 
500 
500 
250 
500 
500 
800 
500 
600 
200 
800 
6.000 
800 
400 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



27,900 00 
400 00 



600 00 
800 00 
480 00 
200 00 
600 00 



•28 28 
22.91 
22 06 

17 60 

18 89 

16 8a 

11 49 
6.08^ 
6 67 

4 28 
14 07 
18 49 

6 09 

12 72 
12 68 
12 84 
14 08 
18 89 
12 25 
12 25 

5 88 
11 06 
10 86 

6 52 
10 88 
10 76 

4 81 
6 40 

99 00 
6 28 

26 86 

1,161 9t 
24 79 



84 68 
21 88 
88 82 
18 60 
88 66 



so 



1857. 



January 15 
January 15 
January 15 
January 20, 
January 28 
January 29 
Febru'y 5 
Febm^y 12 
Febru'y 12 
Febru*y 27 
Febru'y 28 
Febru'y 23 
March 3, 
March 7, 
March 7, 
March 7, 
March 7, 
March 7, 
March 7, 
March 17, 
April 23, 
July 27, 
July 27, 
July 27, 
July 81, 
July 31, 
July 31, 
July 81, 
August 1, 
August 8, 
August 13 
August 13 
August 25 
Septem. 18 



January 20, 
Febru'y 7, 
Febru'y 12, 



Oonntiee and Kames. 



Dodge Ca-— continued. 

Patrick Dnrkin -. 

Owen McOann 

James Failey 

Chancer Pickards 

David GoflF. 

Edward Cady. 

Wm. J. Daws 

Nathaniel S. Oowles 

Austm Graves 

Simeon Washburn 

John Durkan 

Richard Chatfield 

Silas H. Coleman 

Edward Ryan 

John Mengel 

S. Frank 

Ludwig Dewitz x 

Frederick Dewits 

Martin Ricks 

Robert J. Norris 

Henry M. Coleman 

Andrew P, Moore.. 

Allan Wales 

David B, Quick 

Stephen Sanbourn 

Henry S.Parks 

Matthew E. Groft 

Geo. Davenport, 

Thomas Hayes 

W. Hooper Shelden 

Daniel Winter 

A. P. R Smith 

James McMahon, jr 

Stephen G. Benedict 



Amoimt. 



Intorwi. 



Jas. Whitcomb, (University) 

Martin Webster, do 

Ira Robinson, do 



$200 00 
200 00 
150 00 
300 00 
250 00 
400 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
200 00 
100 00 
300 00 
500 00 
200 00 
1*0 00 
200 00 
800 00 
300 00 
200 00 
400 00 
500 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
300 00 
300 00 
500 00 
350 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
250 00 
500 00 
500 00 



13,630 00 

$850 00 
500 00 
300 00 

1,150 00 



$18 42 
18 42 
10 07 

10 85 

16 18 
25 82 
31 42 
18 42 
81 70 

11 71 

5 83 

17 79 
28 98 
II 42 

8*57 
11 42 
17 13 

17 18 

11 42 
22 07 
24 00 
15 06 

8 98 
15 06 
8 81 
8 81 
14 68 
10 28 
14 58 
14 45 
13 49 

6 74 

12 34 
10 00 

656 89 

$23 16 
81 18 

18 42 

72 76 



fl 



Loans — continued. 



1857. 



Maroh S, 
May 4, 
oeptem. 2, 



Haroh 2, 
Karoh 18» 
Jane 24, 
Septem. 28, 
Septem. 27, 



January 2, 
January 5, 
January 16, 
January 16, 
Varoh 2, 
March 10, 
July 25, 
August 7, 
Au U8t 7, 
August 4, 
August 7, 
August 10, 
August 11, 
August 26, 
August 27, 
August 27, 
Septem. 10, 
Septem. 10, 



Ooanties and Names. 



Dunn County. 
Samuel W, Shurbum. 

Bli Crane 

L. L. Curtiss «... 



▲moQut. 



Interest. 



Eau Claire County. 

Geo. W. Brown 

Jacob S. Cooke 

Thomas Moses, jr.. . . 

W. H, Darbe 

Ole Thompson 



Fond du Lac County. 

Layis Rupp 

Jacob ana Charles Frey... 

Bufus M. Harwood 

Lyman E. Walker.. 

Geo. Ayrell 

Nicholas Engle 

Joseph H. Hall 

0. W. Barnard 

Edwin Reynolds. 

Wm. To wnsend .. 

James Watson 

Manuel Northrop 

John B. Wilber 

Timothy Brown 

Richard Mathews 

James 0. Riley 

E.P.Hall 

David R. Cowan 



January 28, 
yebru'y 16, 



Wm. Enoking, (University*} 
Pat Madden do 



1800 00 
400 00 
250 00 



960 00 



500 00 
500 00 
450 00 
500 00 
500 00 



2,450 00 



800 00 
500 00 
500 00 
400 00 
800 00 
500 09 
500 00 
500 00 
800 00 
500 00 
300 00 
300 00 
500 00 
800 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 



7,700 00 



500 00 
200 00 

700 00 



»17 86 

18 82 

5 77 

41 45 



29 o8 

27 50 

16 27 

9 52 

8 94 

91 26 



21 00 
34 52 
83 47 
26 77 
17 48 
28 26 
15 25 
14 58 

8 75 
14 85 

8 88 

8 27 
13 68 

7 35 
12 15 
12 15 
10 76 
10 67 

297 84 



82 37 
12 13 

44 50 



22 



• ( 



ZfO^ifM'-H^ntin^ed. 



1857. 



January 2, 
Febtn'j 19, 
Febru'j 28, 
Febru'y 26, 



January 19, 
January 29, 
Febru'y 6, 
March 17, 
March , 17, 
March 17, 
inlj V, 
July 10, 
August 6, 
August 6, 
August 20, 
Beptem. 1 
Beptem. 7, 



January 7, 
January 15, 
January 24, 
January 27, 
January 29, 
Febru'y 10, 
Febru'y 11, 
Febru'y 12, 
Febru'y 12, 
Febru'y 17, 
Febru'y 21, 
Febru'y 21, 
Febru'y 13, 
Febru'y 18, 
Febru'y 27, 
March 4, 
March 4, 
March 6, 
March 7, 



OoaotieB and Karnes. 



Chrant County. 

Peter Clayton. 

Abratn Sharks 

Blias Medley.- 

Thos. a Kirkpatriok.. . 



Gr^^en County* 

Joseph 'Qreyson ^- 

Geo. Yale i 

James Moody... , 

Andrew Johnson ,_. 

Chas. F. Thompson.... .... 

R. 9. Bridges. ---. 

Edward Hale 

M.J. White 

Thomas W.Hall 

Natb'i. Butterfield 

Mary B. Biffelow , 

Alonzo H. Jenninson 

Le^is Eutley 



Amount. 



Iowa County, 

Wm, White 

John T. Jones 

Geo. Priestley 

PatDelaney 

Wm. H. Walace 

John Williams 

Evan R. Pritchard 

Wm. Rayner 

Gideon MessersmiCh.. 

Wm. Shimmons 

Pa\ Smith 

Gideon W. Ashmore... 

John Holliogshead. 

Samuel Zollinger 

David Simpson 

E. A. Freeman 

Henry SohiliDger 

Pat McDonnell 

Osoar L. Levake 



tSOO CO 
870 00 
450 00 
400 00 



liiter«0t. 



1,620 00 




300 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00^ 
400 00 
300 00 
250 00 
300 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
300 00 
250 00 
500 00 
300 00 
820 00 
800 00 



$21 00 
22 22 
ltd (18 
28 %« 



98 46 



19 91 

82. ?7 

18 un 

19 82 
27 ^9 
16 56 
13 51 
10 02 




208 78 



20 60 
20 14 
32 75 
82 46 
25 82 
18 54 
15 40 
18 /42 
31 70 
18 18 
30 07 
no 07 
29 65 

17 79 
14 ^Z 
%S 84 

il »o 

18 38 
17 U 



23 



ii57. 



Oonntief aid Ifi 



liurch 19, 
Match 81, 
March SI, 
•Jvne 29, 
Jaly 6, 
Angast 4, 
AtigQst 5, 
■August 5, 
-August 5, 
August 5, 
-August 13, 
August S8, 
'8e]^tem. 10, 
"Septem. 10, 



January 15, 
Feiru'y 11, 



January 27, 
Fcbni'y 27, 



January Id, 
January 22, 
January 22, 
January 24, 
January 24, 
Febru'y 7, 
Febru'y 7, 
Pebru'y 7, 
Tebru'y 10, 
tebru'y 12, 
Febru'y 12, 
Febru*y 12, 
Febru'y 14, 
Febru'y 12, 
Febru'y 21, 



AmoiBi 



Iowa CAr-^-^fitiiraed. 

'Oeo. Dolphiu - 

Wm. TerrelL 

Joel 0. Squiret 

Tbomaa Parr.. 

Vineent Deswaooieaki. . .» . . 

Harrison Ueyd --. 

0, B. Arnold s.^..--!-. 

Jobn A« Meeker. 

Joseph Lane 

BeDjamin Tkemae 

Robert Wilson 

JobnTerrill 

James D. Triplets J 

Stephen Thoniaa 

Mineral Point JBemkiary 



G. C. Mcg8r8...(UnitfeT8ity.) 
Isaac Minnick do 



Jackson County, 

Daniel R. Wheeler - . 

Wm, S. Price ^--..- 



Jefferson County. 

Joseph Banner 

S- Hayden 

John H. Winterling 

IDaniel Ryan.. «... 

James R. Van Orman 

Wm. Oeiae — 

John McKeon.^ . 

Bernard McKeon 

Joseph Stoppenbach 

J. A Aspinwall 

Homer Wilcox 

Amos Brown 

J. F. Ostrander 

Mary Bartlett 

Thomas Alexander 



$800 00 
000 00 
500 00 
80^ 00 
400 00 
800 00 
800 00 

d60 (A 

800 00 
500 00 
500 o6 
800 00 
SOO 00 
500 00 
5,000 00 



•18,27:0 00 

800 00 
200 00 



lilt 



^ ■ * I M 



500 00 



800 00 

500 00 



1^000 00 



100 00 i 
500 00 
500 00 
800 00 
800 00 
200 00 
250.00 
260 00 
400 00 
300 Oo 
200 00 
500 00 
500 00 
100 00 
100 00 



«tf'18 
^t 40 
36. 85 
26*85 
}4 15 
16 98 
14 85 
^ 12 
U 26 
14 26 
18 68 
18 59 
4,62 
10^6 

« 



W8 97 

20 14 
32 82 



32 46 



32 46 
20 36 



81 "-82 



.■ H I I I ■'>» 



6 75 
3!^ 94 
32 94 
19 65 
19 65 
12 18 
15 59 
15 59 
24 71 
18 42 
12 28 
31 70 
80 51 
6 14 
6 02 



L^qm oonttouad. 



1857, 



.Pebru'y 28, 
Fflbru'y 25, 
Jebni'j 26, 
Febni'j 27, 
March fi, 
llwroh 
JCaroh 
Mwch 
Utrdi 

MBTOh 

iCtreb 
.April 



7, 

10, 
12, 

12, 
29, 

4, 
8, 
8, 

8, 

29, 

1, 
«, 
6, 

«, 
8, 



Odantiea aod.Xfamas. 



JuBe 
July 
Jidy 
J«l7 
Jidy 
Angiut 
Augatt 
August 
August 
August 
August 10, 
August 25, 
Stptem. 11, 
Septem. 29, 
Septem. 29, 
Febraarj 5, 
February 5, 



Febru'y 7, 
Febru'y 14, 
Fabru'y 18, 
Febru'y 19, 



' ^ ■ » 



Jfffer^on Co^— continued. 

Robert Plumbly, 

Winslow Blake 

Wm,D Stack 

Ira W. Bird 

John Falinger..^.. .^. 

J.Kimball 

Daniel Collins 

OuttlebWinde 

Amos Bennett 

Jaoob Jussen. 

Frideriok Hagen 

Samuel C. Bread 

James A. Morris..... 
William Larabee . . . « . 

J. A« Famham* 

T. J.Jones 

ft P.Jones 

D. M, Aspinwall. 

E. W.Skmner 

A. T. Howes 

D. K. Cady 

Roswell Crandell 

Judson Prentiss 

James Kelly 

Robert Cr angle 

John Pumer... 

A. Menges 

JohnStaub 

Francis Geise 

John King 



G. H. P. Cone, (Unirersity). 

Henry C, Meaae. ..do 

Owen McNulty do 

Dean Chase do 



Amouat. 



Imterwt. 



$250 
50Q 
800 
500 
100 
500 
500 
500 
500 
300 
500 
100 
250 
400 
450 
450 
450 
200 
500 
500 
800 
800 
500 
150 
500 
850 
500 
500 
400 
200 



00 
00 
60 
00 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



15,050 00 

500 00 
400 00 
400 00 
500 00 

1,800 00 



114 82 
89 46 
17 62 

29 27 
$ 75 

28 74 
28 5S 
28 86 
28 86 
16 96 
28 07 
5 28 

11 72 
16 07 
15 68 
15 68 
15 68 

5 95 
14 58 
14 16 

8 50 

8 50 
13 68 

4 18 

12 84 

7 47 

8 94 
8 94 

25 09 
12 55 

776 11 

81 18 
25 00 
24 00 

30 08 

110 21 



.♦■ 



25 



1857< 



Febru'y 18, 
: Febni'y 23, 

Karcb 17, 
. Miircli 26, 

April 13, 
. August 5, 

August 10, 
. Septem. 2, 
. Septem. 5, 

Septem. 8, 

Septem. 12, 



Jaauaiy 80, 
Pebru'y 11, 
August 1, 
August 18, 
Septem. 26, 
Septem. 25, 



January 28, 
JaDuary 27, 
Septem. 24, 



Varcb 16, 
llarcb 10, 
Karcb 10, 
May 2, 

June 29, 
August 28, 
Septem. 4, 
Septem. 11, 
'- S^tem. 14, 

< Febru'y 16, 
V jPebru'y 16, 



4d 



Ooanties and Kam^. 



Juneau Catimtif. 

0. P.WUliams 

H.W. Jones 

Tbomas Kelly. ^..«' 

Antbony Dixon ^ 

Micbael Murray. ..^ 

Jobn Elmer.: 

James M. BrintaD..^...... 

Josepb Langwortby 

Samuel W. Pierce ^^. 

Thomas McOoran 

George*H. Dykeman ^ 



Kenosha Countjf. 

Dorcas H. Lyman 

Tbomas Brande 

liatbr opBurgess 

Henry H. Tarbell , 

Samuel B. Scott 

Samuel Hale 



Kewaunee County. 

H.D.Everland 

Matibe w Simon 

Edward Decker 



La Crosse Count}/, 

Wm, C. Rogers 

Alex. Cameron 

D. D. Cameron 

Elisba Wbittlesey 

Theodore Rodolph 

Hannah Campbell 

Solomon Howe 

Jobn A.Binne 

Darid B. Trovers 



JohnMoMillen (University). 
Alex, McMillen do. . .. . . 



Amount. 



«500 
v300 
500 
850 
200 
150 
800 
800 
200 
800 
200 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



8,800 00 



500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
50O 00 
500 00 
500 00 



8,000 00 



150 00 
150 00 
500 00 



800 00 



500 
500 
500 
800 
500 
600 
500 
800 
400 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



4,000 

400 
400 



00 

00 
00 



800 00 



latensfc. 



$S1 61 

17 79 
a7 59 

18 72 
9 98 
4 28 
8 27 

. « 92 
4 50 
6 57 
4 28 



140 46 



82 18 
80 80 
14 58 
18 49 
9 20 
9 20 



109 45 


5 45 

5 87 
9 42 


20 24 



28 65 
28 26 
28 26 
18 94 
17 69 
12 05 
11 84 
6 40 
8 80 



154 89 

84 25 
24 25 



48 50 



26 



t i 



i damm o o n lutned 



1157. 



Jane 19, 
June 29, 
JFebru'y 5, 
Febru'7 10, 
F#bru'y 10, 
Fibru'y 10, 
Fibru'y 17, 
Mtrch 1j 
Mftrch 9, 
-Maroh 17, 
April 29, 
liay 6, 

June 29, 
July 18, 
August 1, 
August 5, 
August 7, 
August 7, 
August 12, 
August 25, 
August 21, 
August 28, 
Auffust 29, 
Septem. 5, 
fieptem. 19, 
Septem. 22, 



Febru'y 21, 



. Febru'y 12, 
Febru'y 18, 
Febru'y 13, 
Febru'y 23, 
Febru'y 23, 
Febru'y 25, 
Fehru'y 28, 
Mftfch 0, 
ICaroh 12, 



OonntieB and Ifaffies. 



La Fayeiie fhuniy. 

Naney Feathers 

Gary Mathers 

Daniel M. Parkinson... .«^. 

Wtlliam G. Armstrong 

Albert Bassett 

Oharles Proetor ' ^. . 

William Burgess 

Josiah Honk ,... 

DaTid Thompson. . . l *. . 

R-Haxtable ._^ 

Albert G. Pinncy.. i . 

Owen Qurgerty 

Mathew Olmstead 

Joseph White .: 

E. W. Jermaa ^--. 

Peter Gray : '. 

James Linehan 

Pat. Mughan 

Oalvin Warner 

Thomas H. Sheldon 

P.M. Held 

William Walker 

James McKinn 

J. P. MoFarland. 

W. C. Garton 

John Graber ^ 

Daniel Collins 



John Dailey- . . (University) . 



Manitowoc County^ 

Nicholas Dittmar. .... 

Thomas Cunningham.... 

N. Schemer 

Lewis Langinfeldt . . .^ 

P. J. Blisch 

F. M. Boucher 

F. Solomon. 

John WiUendorfe 

Augustus Witman 



Amount, 



41500 00 


300 00. 


^00 00' 


.400 00 


500 


00 


400 00 


160 00 


•500 


00 


300 00 


300 


00 


500 


00 


200 


00 


300 


00 


500 


00 


500 00 


600 


00 


500 


00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


500 


00 


500 


00 


200 


00 


600 


00 


800 


00 


600 00 


400 00 


300 


00 



10,650 00 
200 00 



50O 00 
450 00 
300 00 
300 00 i 
500 00 
250 00 
500 00 
BOO 00 
400 00 



Iiitarest. 



$88 47 
Id 91 
82. 27 
22^.09 
80,90 
201 
27 
80')2t 
17 IS 

17 OS 
27 69 

9 87 

18 75 
17,69 
15 99 
14*68 
14*26 

8;88 

« ^8 

15 M 

12 84 

5 09 
12 06 

717 

1) 24 

7 Ot 

6 77 

446 08 
11 94 



3.1 79 
.27 M 
18 ^7 
17 J?9 
29 65 
14 79 
» 17 
17 ^9 
22 46 



27 



Lofff^^-^Qnifwed. 



1«57. 



JCarA 

•Jfiych 

dliroh 

March 

March 

May 

/one 

Jnne 

June 

June 

June 

Jiiae 

Jmie 

July 
July 
July 
July 
August 
August 10, 
August 10, 
August 28, 
Augu8^ 29, 
August 29, 
j^ptem. 2, 
Beptem. 8, 
^eptem, 9, 
fieptem. 21, 
Septem, 21, 
fieptem, 24, 
fi^tem* 29, 
fieptem. 80, 
fieptem. 80« 
January 22, 
January 22, 
January 22, 



18, 
IB, 
18, 
20, 
26, 
26, 
80, 
80, 
26, 
16, 
23, 
26, 
26, 
29, 
80^ 
80, 
80, 

3, 

28,- 

4, 



Conntias and JYaipfii. 



Amouat. 



"rp* " 4 



^ • 



Maniiotpifc Co.— cont'd^ 

Franae Hyne,.,-..,.^ 

Nicholas Wili^^r... 
L. W. Dunbaia-... 

R.E. Glover. , 

Fran Be Runse ..... 

Frederick Jonas* 

Ira P. Smith 

Charles ninntck. 

Leonard BinkBoMB^ 

Byron Markham.j^L^l i 

R. KiDgholtz 

George Gessell 

A. C, Pool 

William Woodosok.:... — . 

Nathaniel Feutou... ..j;. 

George Honell :.. 

Roikert Morse. -;..'i.a-— .*-... 

Thomas G. Fenton. ^.l 

James P. GloYer.-.-- 

W.Jjiscomb ;.-^---- 

SiliiB A. Hubbard 

F. Brocherdfe 

Jotfen Mejen < - 

£!• H. bhev7...-UM««. ...... 

George L Lee 

D. B, Knapp 

W. 8, Jones .- 

Wm. G. Shove 

B. Wagner 

Die Oleson .•-*:. 

Frederick Kalle ^ 

Charles A. Himpenmachei.. 

O.W. Fitch 

Joseph Rankin 

Thomas Windiate... ..••••. 

J, Earnest Leabner. 

Martin Scl mit * 

William Lindt ....j 

Benjamin Jonea ...«« 



\\ 



17,418 00, 



Hj^tam^ 



|200 00^ 


.miM 


500 00 


. 27 ^0 


.400 OQ . 


22 00 


200 00 


, J0«2 


800 00 


16 04 


200 00 


10 60 


500 00 


26 44 


800 00 


15 87 


200 00 


8 86 


17'6 00 


9 60 


500 00 


18 27 


250 00 


8 04 


289 00 


10 84 


100 00 


3 54 


30i> OQ , 


. 10^6 


2501 00 


.8 '«0 


4M; OQ.. 


Lfi^8 


deo 00 


6 94 


800 OQ 


10 48 


100 oa 


8 51 


500 00s 


14 96 


500 oa 


14 85 


500 00' 


18 78 


800 00 


8 27 


400 00 


64 


500 00 


11 96 


500. 00 


U 96 


500 00 


11 58 


500 00 


LO 96 


800 00 


6 52 


MO 00.: 


71 


500 00 


Otl 


250 00 


4/72 


500 00 


a. 94 


500 00 


8^5 


500 00 


8 B5 


150 00 


9 80 


800 00 


19 77 


500 00 


82^5 



688 50 



28 



Locau — continnedL 



1657. 



Febru'y 9, 
Febru'y 18, 
Febru'y 18, 
Febru'y 12, 



Septem. 21, 



January 14, 
January 15, 
January 80, 
Mareh 4, 
March 4, 
Mareh 7, 
March 7, 
Mareh 7, 
March 10, 
March 18, 
April 7, 
May 8, 
May 9, 

June 28, 
June 29, 
July 18, 
July 27, 
August 4, 
August 10, 
August 21, 
August 25, 
August 26, 
August 27, 
Septem, 10, 
Septem. 10, 
Septem. 10, 
Septem. 14, 
August 80, 
August 80, 



Ooantiee and Names. 



ManiiovDoc Co. — cont'd. 
Theodore 8hoTe.(nniTer8i^) 

Charles Palm do 

Sebastine Beese do 

B. Tan TaUcenburg 



Marathon C&wUy. 
Walter D. Mclndoe 



Marquette County* 

Wflliam Paige 

John Tobin, 

Lucy and Michaal Foley. 

James Dunn . 

R. Drew ...-. 

John McGinness 

Esra Wheeler 

Paul D. Hayward 

Christian Meade. 

James E. Chamberline. . 

£. B. Haynes 

P. F.Drury 

H.a Griffin.. -i 

P. McDugalL 

L, Leyaney. 

Warren Salisburg 

Lyman J, Barrows. 

M, J. Hayens 

A. J, Ney. 

B. R. Steyens... 

Isaac F. Meade. 

L. R. Dayis 

W, L. McKensie. 

Benjamin Taylor 

Geoige Barry, 

W.H. Peters 

C. E.Hayens 

J. Abbott and Wife 

0. Babcock 



Amoant. 



#250 00 
300 00 
100 00 
400 00 



1,050 00 



500 00 



400 00 
500 00 
200 00 
160 00 
300 00 
200 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
250 00 
800 00 
500 00 
300 00 
200 00 
500 00 
250 00 
400 00 
500 00 
300 00 
975 00 
500 00 
500 00 
400 00 
200 00 
200 00 
500 00 
500 00 
200 00 
200 00 



Intereit. 



$15 49 

18 08 

6 02 

24 56 



•4 16 



9 61 



26 93 
38 56 

12 87 
8 66 

17 80 
11 42 
28 55 
28 55 
28 26 

13 80 

15 32 
22 72 

13 57 
7 27 

17 69 

7 96 

11 98 

14 35 

8 27 

9 47 

12 34 
12 25 

9 75 
4 31 
4 31 

16 76 
10 38 

4 79 
4 79 



\ 



A 



ZroofM^-^ootinued 



18^7. 



FAn'j 10, 



Febni'7 18, 



January 80, 
Jannary 30, 
January 30, 
Marcb 17, 
Ifarcli 21, 
Maroh 26, 
July 20, 
August 10, 
August 11, 
Septem. 8, 
Septem- }2, 
Septem. 21, 
Septem. 20, 
Septem. 29; 
Septem. 29, 
Septem, 30, 
Septem. 80, 
Septem. 30, 
Septem* 30, 
Septem. 30, 



Febru*y 
\ Febrtfy 
Pebru'y 
Febrn^y 
Pebni*y 
March 
March 
April 
Septem. 



12, 
28, 
26, 

26k 
28/ 

3, 
4, 

SO, 

2, 



Ownnti^ aad IVames. 



Anumni 



Marquetie Co. — coixi'iL 
J. MeNasser 



M. L, Kimball. (UniTersity) 



Milwaukee County. 

8. M. Booth 

M,0. Booth 

Joseph Lathrop 

John 0. Dick 

Andrew Eble 

Peter S. Stevens 

G. M. Fitsgerald 

Pat. 0. Donnell 

Peter Bradley 

John ShoTtell 

Henry Maguan* 

F. C. Pomroy, 

Joseph Walton* 

James O. Bryen. 

F. SchmeUing.. 

Byron Paine 

F. Hennmann. 

Amelia Mallory 

George S, Mallory 

Christina Hoffman 



Febrtfy 20, 



Monroe CourUy. 

G. B. Holden 

William Van Antronp. . 

L. A.Farr 

F, A. Ford 

CO. Miller 

C. Hollister.--- 

David Gittman, 

R. A. Gillett. 

J. D. Dammon . ... 



•500 00 



10,825 00 
200 00 



500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
^600 00 
500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
444 00 
500 00 
600 00 
400 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 



E.Sanford Blake(nniyersity) 



9,644 00 



350 00 
800 00 
200 00 
300 00 
350 00 
400 00 
150 00 
400 00 
480 00 



h 



2,930 00 
500 00 



Interttt 



|d0 90 



448 08 
12 05 



32 18 
82 18 4 

32 18 
27 25 
%1 21 
16 04 
15 73 
13 78 
13 68 
10 96 
10 57 

8 62 

9 18 
8 94 

7 15 

8 85 

8 85 . 
8 85 
8 85 
8 85 



309 85 



18 42 
17 62 
11 75 

17 62 
20 42 
23 15 

8 66 

18 67 
11 07 



147 88 
29 94 






so 



18S7. 



Jvly do, 
July 30^ 
July 80, 
AugaBt 28, 
Septem. 8, 



Uarch i^, 
March 6 
March r 
March 80 
January 2& 
January 80 
August 5 
Augutit 11 
August 28 
Septem. 9 



Febm'y 11, 
March 3, 
Juna 20, 



January 24, 
Febru'y 26, 
Pebru'y 2Y, 
March 8, 
March 4, 
March 0, 
March 17, 
March 17, 
March 17, 
March 17, 
March 18, 
July 9, 

July 27, 
Attg«ai 20| 



WaatimmtAJXuML 



Oconto Couhfy. 

G,R.Hiirt 

R. MoClelaad 

8. A.Turner 

E. Hart.. 

Diantha Famsworth. . 



Oufagamie County, 

A. B. Eyerta 

O. Hancbett 

S. Ryan, jr..— 

P. H. Sniilh 



F- Bronhand; 

J. A. Srotter.- 

John 0. Hozie 

J. W. Oarhart, Jr..--. 
Catharine T. Oilmore. 

E. 0. Qoff. 

John H, Barnes 



Pierce County. 

Caroline Beardsley 

J. J. Foster 

J. S: White 



Ozaukee County. 

Nicholas Watry 

Oustavus Neiderstadt . . 

Alvey Stopper 

Christian WiUiams 

William Kraise 

J. H. Rhen 

William Bozhorn 

Charles Brankenhorn.. 

C. P. W. Burchart. 

Hugo Boch. 

Wm. F. Opiti 

Henry Veisselman..-.. 

John Hoops ,M «, 

Mathias Adams 



,« »• 



AmoQ&i 



1500 00 
600 00 
275 00 
400 00 
300 00 



1,976 00 



400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
600 00 
200 00 
200 00 
600 00 
300 00 
800 00 
800 00 
600 00 



4,000' 00 



600 00 
600 00 
300 00 



1,300 00 



600 00 
600 00 
300 00 
100 00 
600 00, 
600 00 
160 00 
260 00 
300 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
200 00 
600 00 



•17 b6 
17 60 

9 68 
10 40 

6 86 



62 14 



22 9!^ 
22 02 
22 98 
28 66 
10 68 

7 08 
17 60 

8 56 
8 21 
7 2S 

10 86 



167 4S 


80 80 
28 93 
10 62 


70 84 



82 76 
29 36 

17 66 

5 79 
28 84 
28 88 

8 2d 

18 80 
16 66 
27 69 
27 50 
16 69 

6 08 

12 6i^ 



31 



£oa^M>J^-^joiitttiUe& 



isrir^ 



r 



Septeati -^j 

* * 

Febni'j 14, 



Jaiiiivj 19, 
January 27, 
Febru^j 7, 
Febru'y 8, 
Febru'jr 7, 
Fcbru'y 11, 
Febru'j 13, 
FebrnV 2a, 
Febru> 20, 
March 7, 
March 0, 
March 10, 
March, 10, 
fieptcm. Sj 
fiq>ten« 4, 
Sepiem. 5, 
fieptem. 8, 
Septem. 21, 
Angast 29, 
AngiMt 29, 

Jairaaiy dl, 



Janiiary 16^ 
January 16, 
March 8, 
March 17, 
April H 
July 2^ 
Aoguii IS; 
fiepuua. 10^ 



^^ttttte ai^ If anlM. 



Ozaukee Cd.-^-K;orif^A 
Darid Siirr,. -.:....,... 

WUliamHrooback..: 



Denis I>csmoA<L(nnhFeiaity) 

Portage Count]/. 

H. W.Eddy— 

Mre. Clara Northrop 

Sumuel Drake 

Ru<'u8 W. Dalton 

AlfrWBarl... 

Henry Rolch » 

John Phillips 

Joseph Baker.. 

A, &. Crosby. K ...,..•- 

Stilman Ellis 

Heriok Anderson, « 

A. W, Ostrander 

Thomas Baker 

L. Hancbit 

H.W.Mitchell. 

WUliam Walton 

John Casey... .-f . ^- 

James B. Wiggtiiton. 

J. T.Pierce 

N. Hayens ,, 

Elisha Parks. . (UniTersity) 



Saeine County. 

George Wustin. 

John Kemcy 

H.T. Fuller 

Hacheii Anderson . 

Hans C. H^g 

Otis £ Stevens 

John Dearaley •«.. 

M.&Go«a 



Amonni 



tntarest. 



f SOO 00 
500 00 



6,300 00 
800 00 



m^-^ la 



280*00 
dOO 00 
800 00 
160 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
800 00 
100 00 
100 00 
IQO 00 
15P 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
500 00 
200 00 
200 00 



6,800 00 
800 00 



=): 



500 
500 
500 
250 
25a 
500 
500 
500 



00 

00 

00 

00 

00 4 

00 

00 

00 



12 05 
10 »6 

t89 06 
18 81 



1! ■:'[! 



u 



13 89^ 

88 4e 

19 00 
8 69 
81 18 
80 80 
80 61 
29 65 
17 62 



5 
6 
5 



71 
67 
85 



8 48 
11 43 
11 34 
11 24 
10 96 

9 61 
4 69 
4 79 

302 97 

19 28 



■ I *■ 



8,600 00* 



88^7 
88 47 

28 93 
18 80^ 
12 44 
15 06 
18 59; 
10 78. 

161 52 



St 



Zoaiu^cojj^U^d. 



1857. 



Febru'y 18, 
Febru'y 20, 



January 6, 
January 16, 
January 19, 
Marck 18, 
January 81, 
July 3, 



January 80, 
Febru'y 12, 
March 11, 
March 24, 
Augutt 20, 
August 25, 
SeptetoL 8, 



January 27, 



January 14, 
January 6, 
January 8, 
January 20, 
January 20, 
January 22, 
January 26, 
January 23, 
Febru'y 20, 
March 4, 
March 7, 
March 7, 
March 10, 
July 8, 



OountioB and Kame^ 



Racine Co.— coniinuecj. 
0l6 Haargeaon.(UniTer8ity) 
Levi Godfrey.- do 



JRichland C0uniff. 
Gary E^ser 

Henry Collina... 

Cornelius Sweney. --•.. . 

Fred. G. Stevens 

Joel Donahen. 

George W, McLaire 



Bock County, 

James Bradsh aw 

Stephen Scott, Jr 

Edw. and Mich. McKey 

Thomas W. Gibbs 

John J. Spafford 

Williafti Shelton 

Mary S.^Holden 



Shawanatv County, 
Wm. A Turner. (University) 



Sauk County, ^ 

James S. Mosely 

John Heldstal ... 

William Andrews 

Herman Dahlin ^ 

John Philip Lang 

Andrew Andrews « 

Maurice Fitzgerald 

Nicholas Smith 

John Obreoht 

Man ville Barber 

Stephen S. Barlow. 

Andrew Bell 

John Johnson. .« 

John Young 



AnouBi 



250 00 
300 00 



550 00 



300 00 
300 00 
260 00 
800 00 
400 00 
400 00 



1,950 00 



500 00 
400 00 
600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
500 00 
500 00 



8,400 0.0 



400 00 



500 00 
800 00 
350 00 
300 00 
400 00 
200 00 
400 00 
200 00 
200 00 
400 00 
300 00 
200 00 
400 00 
400 00 



Interest. 



15 8a 

17 OS 



33 26 



•j 



20 65 
20 14 
16 59 
16 50 
25 67 
13 89 



113 44 



32 IS 
24 56 
28 17 
13 78 
12 34 
12 34 
id 96' 



«■ 



134 38 



26 98 



33 66 
20 65 

28 96 
19 87 
26 47 
18 18 
26 05 
18 14 
17 9& 

29 22 

17 IS 
11 42 
22 61 

18 51 



33 



/Miaiit--*contiiiued. 



18S7. 



Only 31, 
August 1, 
August 17 
August 22 
August 24 
fieptem., 1 
fieptem. 8 
Septem. 
Septem. 10. 

aptem, 10. 
ptem. 24 
Septem. 29 
Febru'y 20 
January 31 



Febru'y 23, 
iPebru'y 28, 
IPBbru'y 23, 
Febru'y 25, 
Febru'y 26, 
Febru'y 26, 
Febru'y 26, 
Febru'y 26, 
Febru'y 26, 
March 17, 
Maroh 26, 
March 31, 
August 15, 
August 25, 



Febru'y 16, 
Febru'y 17, 



Febru'y 25, 
Febm'y 24, 



Oonnties and li«Aiei. 



Amoont 



Sauk CA.-*--coii(iiilied. 

Alfred T. Leonaini.. 

P. H. Towalee l 

Frederiok Albert 

William L. Newmau..w 

Ebenezer Wat8on« .4.... 

GLW.Schimar ;...- 

D.K* Nores. -•. 

T]^6tbas Kathbum ^w.. 

Oti#Lake -. 

Mtehkiel Brindler 

Wm. Leibecker 

C, S, Chase 

John H. Roik...^^..^ — .. 
Christina Oberchret j^i;.. .- . i 
W. &. Smith i 

Sheboygan Caunif^. 

Thomas Faj^P^^- <-- — 

Joseph Shaffe 

DenniflT Eirdy 

CyntbiaPppe. ..>... .j. 

ajewett 

8, Q.Jewett. 

All€iiCarter«-..4^..... 

Frederick Koggenback. .^*- 

William Steel.- 

Z. P.Mason .««.. 

Cornelia £• Mason*. 

Stephen Wolrerton •• 

Charles ThirtpUa 

Ebenezer 81ocom« ^. 

F. G. Adams 



Henrick Eock.. (ITnivdretty) 
F. J.Kingsbury d»»... 



Trempeleau County^ 

Oeoige Baohelder 

Samuel Hastings... 

5d 



1300 
360 
MO 
900 
500 
4M 
800 
800 
350 
400 
500 
500 
400 

•MO 
300 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



10,360 00 



500 
500 
500 

2oa 

200 
300 
300 
360 
500 
500 
500 
450 
150 
300 
800 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

bo 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



5,500 00 

110 00 
400 00 



610 00 



MO 00 
400 00 



Intereat. 



tlO 18 

10 67 

14 58 

18 11 

18 68 

8 84 

7 *) 

4 88 

7 il 

8 61 
10 76 

9 42 
7 08 

17 88 



445 86 



-b^M 



28^61^ 
28 65 
28 65 
11 75 
11 75 
17 62 
17 62 
17 68 
89 8i 

87 58 
'86 78 

88 78 
a 88 
7 40 



284 10 

6 67 
84 17 


30 84 



11 78 

28r!e4 



S4 



Zooiu^— continue(L 



1857. 



Ooanties and Kamea. 



May 8, 

May 18, 

Beptem. 18, 
August 81, 
August 81, 
August 81, 
August 81, 
August 81, 
August 81, 
August 81, 



January 8, 
Febru'y 18, 
llaroh 10, 
Ifarob 1% 
July 26, 
July 28, 



January 13, 



January 6 
January 20 
Fabru'y 10 
Febru'y 11 
Febru'y 23 
F«bru'y 26 
Febru'y 27 
Febru'y 28 
Marob 4, 
Iffarch 4, 
Ifareb 4, 
Marob 6, 
Marob 6, 
Marob 19, 
Marob 10, 
Marob 26, 
July 24, 



Tren^feleau CSs^— cont'd. 

Jobn and Wm. Niobols 

Qeorge W. Parker 

Oeorve H.Olds 

Cbarles T, Holmes 

William Adams 

Obarles 0. Crauo «... 

JameaD. Olds 

Edward Barnard. ..^ «.. 

J. T. Holmes 

Samuel F. Harris... . 



Walworth County, 

Jeremiab Dutobor 

Henry Warner .. 

Francis B^ber, 

William Leonard — 

Pat. MoLaugblift 

Geo. Walwortb h Ste]>b. Jodes 



A. DiokerBon..(UniT«rsity) 



fFashington County, 

B, A. Dunoan 

H. Kodinbirob. 

P. Gottsleben 

PhaipMoKee. 

Cornelius Enrigbt 

Peter Bayer 

NiobolasMarz 

Niobolss Albert 

Adam Sobarti 

Martin Gurlforyd 

Charles Neussell 

Jobn H. Tolland 

Casper Lever 

George Ramsey 

MicbaelBoban 

TbomasJenner w... 

Louis Dingier 



Amount 



Intorost. 



$400 00 
400 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
1^5 00 
800 00 
160 00 



2,025 00 



20O 00 
800 00 
800 00 
800 00 
800 00 
500 00 



1,000 00 
460 00 



600 00 
600 00 
600 00 
800 00 
600 00 
800 00 
200 00 
600 00 
600 00 
200 00 
800 00 
400 00 
600 00 
600 00 
800 00 
900 00 
MO 00 



118 08 

17 71 

2 00 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
7 



71 
71 
71 
71 
11 
06 



8 68 

106 70 

12 88 
18 88 
16 84 
18 84 

9 15 
14 98 

88 78 
87 68 



84 62 
88 18 
80 90 
18 48 
29 66 
17 67 
11 71 
29 17 
28 84 
11 64 
17 27 
28 04 
27 69 
27 40 
16 44 
10 69 
6 04 



35 

ZoayM.-*-oontiAiied. 



10&7. 



Angiut 28, 
August 28, 
Septem, 8, 



Febru'y 9, 
Febru'y 17, 
Fekra*y 19, 



January 7, 
March 3, 
March 7, 
March 81, 
August 14, 
August 14, 
August 17, 
August 17, 
SeptdU. 8, 
Septem. 29, 
Septem. 29, 



Jamuary 20, 
Febru*y 18, 



January 14, 

January 14, 

April 25, 

April 25, 

June 28, 

June 80, 

July 18, 

July 27, 

July 27, 

July 27, 

August 13 

August 14 

August 14 



Ocnntiefl and Ka: 

Washington Ca— -cont^d. 

Phillip Dhein 

Michael Bodenkirch 

George Reynfuss.. 



H. Backhaus,. . (Uniyersity) 

John Murray do:... 

Mathew Burrs.. ••-. do 



JVaukesha County, 

Frederick Kirch 

Silas Barber 

William Rhoads, 

Cearles F. Hawley . 

Alexander Donnan 

D. A. Owles 

Alex. Taylor. 

A. F.Pratt 

J, M. Lewis 

John W. Thomas. 

Owen Rowland 



Komeo Sprague.(UniTersity) 
William Fuss do 



Waupaca County. 

AlrinPope. — — 

Thomas J. Townsand 

Nelson E. Hyde. 

Ira Millard 

Thomas J. Townsand 

Henry Eetcham. 

Frederick Btriel 

Henry Winton... 

A. L. Fuller 

David Wolcott 

Zebulon Laraplear 

W. S. Carr 

W/C. Oarr 



Ammint. 



$500. 00 
800 00 
MO 00 



7,700 00 

600 00 
150 00 
500 00 



Intereat. 



1,150 00 



500 00 
500 00 
400 00 
480 00 
500 00 
600 00 
800 00 
500 00 
600 00 
500 00 
000 00 



5,180 00 

500 00 
500 00 



1,000 00 



200 00 
500 00 
500 00 
600 00 
400 00 
500 00 
800 00 
250 00 
500 00 
500 00 
800 00 
260 00 
250 00 



$12 06 

7 28 

10 96 



404 62 
80 W 

80 08 



70 09 



84 83 
28 08 
22 84 
25 29 
18 40 
18 40 

7 86 
18 11 
le 96 

8 04 
8 94 



188 

88 
80 


00 

08 
86 


6.) 


43 



18 46 
88 66 
28 81 
28 81 

16 16 

17 60 
9 78 

7 58 
16 06 
15 06 

8 00 
6 69 
6 69 



i:5 



Lo(M0^^Tcositian9du> 



1857. 



Avgiwt 24, 
Angiut 26, 
August 26, 
August 26, 
August 26, 
August 26, 
August 27, 
August 81, 
August 31, 
August 31, 
August 31, 



January 17, 
January 20, 
January 20, 
January 20, 
January 22, 
January 24, 
Febru'y 10, 
Febru'y 18, 
Febru'y 23, 
Febru'y 23, 
Febru*y 25, 
Febru'y 26, 
Febru'y 26, 
Febru'y 26, 
Febru'y 26, 
March 7, 
March 7, 
March 10, 
March 10, 
March 10, 
March 10, 
March 10, 
March 10, 
March 10, 
March 11, 
March 11, 
March 11, 
March 28, 



OonattM and Kj 



Waupaca Ca«— com'd. 

Job G. Dayis 

JohnFordyce 

J.W.Dean 

A. L, Peasley. 

Ira Millard, Jr 

Ach. D. Smith 

E. W. Dexter 

B. L. Brown.. ....•«... .... 

Charles B. Sibley. 

W. B.Hibbard 

Mileo Drentzer 

Waushara County. 

William A. Bugh 

G. M. Gile 

W. a Webb 

L.W. Hall 

Lloyd Ghaflfer 

H. k WoodruflF. 

H.W.Willard 

B. F. Dodson 

Nathaniel Boynten 

Phineas Walker 

A. J. French 

W. D. Baker 

Elliot Reed 

Nathan Baker 

George Aldrich 

Benjamin Ghamberline 

George Hawley ^ 

Job Bound 

D. C. Douglass 

E. M. Pickering 

Nelson P. Wiley 

Thomas H. Wafcer 

R. H. Runcon* 

H. Castor 

W, H. Gamsey 

Nelson O. Smead 

J. M. Hudson..... 

James Horn 

I 



▲mount. 



Intflmt 



•600 00 
300 00 
600 00 
500 00 
500 00 
800 00 
600 00 
200 00 
176 00 
100 00 
200 00 



8,726 00 



300 00 
400 00 
400 00 
200 00 
200 00 
600 00 
300 00 
400 00 
300 00 
300 00 
200 00 
200 00 
600 00 
200 00 
200 00 
800 00 
600 00 
160 00 
160 00 
200 00 
200 00 
400 00 
160 00 
200 00 
100 00 
126 00 
300 00 
^00 00» 



$12 44 
7 86 
12 25 
12 26 
12 26 
7 36 
12 16* 



4 
4 
2 
4 



71 
11 
36 
71 



289 26 

20 02 
26 47 
26 47 

15 22 
13 18 
82 75 
18 64 
24 10 
17 79 
17 79 
11 79 
11 76 
29 36 
11 76 
11 76 
17 13 
28 66 

8 48 
8 48 

11 31 

11 31 

22 61 

8 48 

11 31 

6 63 

7 04 

16 90 

10 oa 



37 



Zoai Mn iic oi rtin m Ai 



mmmi^^* 



IW. 



Mar«b ¥«, 

Muoli 31, 

May 1, 

Maj 9, 

June 28y 

July 2, 

July 3, 

July 3, 

July 29, 

August 6, 
Augmt. 6, 
August . 3, 

August By 

August 10, 
August 26, 
August 28, 
August 26, 
August 28, 
August 28, 
August 27, 
August 27, 
August 27, 
August 27, 
Augu«t 27, 
August 27, 
August ^, 
' Septem. 1, 
Septetn. 7, 
August 29, 
August 29, 
August 29, 
August 29, 
August 29, 
August 29, 
August 29, 
August 29, 
August 29, 
August 29, 
August SI, 
August 31, 
August 3, 



Ck»Qnti08 and Kshmj. 




Sfaoaou&iBd.^ ^...;.. 

If OSes Barrett 

Yemon Erans.... 

Spencer Hawley. 

John A Williams 

F. Hayward 

F. Dewey 

Obarleatipencer 

Matliueir Nutter 

K P. Gott - 

Nauey J* Hasford 

Nathaniel Wolcott 

Charles White , 

Tho9sa4 ConoUy 

M. M. Settle 1 

Betay Jones 

BmmaE. Webb 

CashBgan 

Samuel OoUina. 

KF. Williams 

H.B.Hogg 

Georc^e C. jiabcook 

Martin Beam '. 

Benjamin F. Frisbee 

aw, KimbaU 

Judson Luce 

John Hall, Jr 

John Sexton 

Otis Hall 

Geo. F, Witter j. 

Joseph Witter 

Joseph Ingle, 

J. W. Attenburg 

R. B. Spink 

William Seeley 

Moses S. Brindige.. 

William Terita 

P. H. Andrews 

Mathew P. Cummings 

James F. Willey 

Thomas Furstin 



300 
300 
2pt 
300 
10.0 

2W 
200 

200 

200 

400 

200 

4t)0 

100 

200 

200 

200 

200 

2<K>- 

150 

200 

300 

300 

300 

300 

300 

200 

300 

200 

200 

200 

200 

200 

100 

160 

150 

150 

200 

200 

300 

300 



00 
00 
00 
00 

00, 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00. 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 

00 



16,875 00 



Ma Ml. 

15 81 

14 00 

05 

10 04 

5 24, 

a 94, 

6 94. 



5 

5 



96. 

65;, 



11 32 

6 76 

11 17 

2 75, 



4 
4 
4 



9a 
84 
82 
4 82 
dO?. 
3 64 
86 
29 
29. 
29 
29 
29 
67 



4 

7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
4 



6 68 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
7 



79 
79 
79 
79 
79 
39 
59 
50 
59 
79 
71 
06 



18 08 
730 15 



S8 



Lomu^-^itiM6nn9dL 



1857. 



January 66, 



January 1 6 
January 20 
January 21 
January 26. 
January 26 
January 27 
Mareh 2 
March 5 
March ' 7 
August 25 
August 27 
August 27 



Pebru'y 10, 



Septem. 21, 
August 29, 



OKiAties and KaniSB* 



Waushara 0>,-'-cont'd. 
J. D. Witter... (Uoiverrity) 



^Winnebago Couni^, 

Charles Dattey 

O.W. Washburn 

J. H, Wright 

Robert Crawford 

H. Sittrig 

BliStilson 

W.Taggott 

William Luscher 

Samuel Erstine. 

A. Tustson..-. 

CaWin J. Smith 

H.B.Eldrige 



L. K. Edgerton. (UniTersity) 



Wood County. 

Joseph Wood . 

Levi P. Powers 



Amount. 



tsoo^oo 






500 
600 
600 
800 
600 
600 
500 
300 
500 
500 
400 
800 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



5,300 00 
500 GO 



500 00 
500 00 

1,000 00 



Interefti 



'•t9 ^ 



33 47 
33 08 
33 14 
19 54 
29 36 
29 27 

29 08 
17 26 
28 56 
12 84 

9 71 
7 29 

282 03 

30 90 



9 61 
11 96 

n 67 



T-^ 



I 



39 



RECAPITtlLAl^lON. 
School FuafuL 



Oofmtiec. 



Adftnis 

-Bf>ew»»« 

BadAxL.... 

Buffalo 

Calomel 

Oolambia... 
Crawford.... 
Dano.. 

I>od{g;o..v.... 

Dun. 

BatfOtaire... 
Fond llli Lao. 
GflBltJ. 

Giouia*. 

lon^ 

JaoksM 

ZtWttwotk ■ 

Joaeav 

Eenoodia 

Koifameo*.. 
LaCrMie... 
LaFajette.. 
llanitoiroc .. 
Maratkon... 
MarqiMlta. . . 
Mihratkeo... 

Itouroo 

OooAto 

OutagaiDie.. 

Piaree.. 

Oaaskaa 
PoftagB. . • . . 

Baoine. 

BicUand. . . . 

Bock 

Sauk 



Sbebomau 

Tremp^^ 
Walworth .-. 
WaaUnfftin.. 
Waukesha, 



Ko. ofXiOUML 



17 

'% 
1 

10 
8 

2 

60 

69 

3 

5 

18 

4 

13 

S4 

2 

45 

11 

6 

3 

9 

27 

48 

1 

80 

20 

9 

5 

11 

3 

16 

20 

8 

6 

1 

29 

15 

19 

6 

20 

11 



Amoimt. 



t4,920 00 

SylM 00 

500 00 

3,050 00 

8,060 00 

:)6,575 00 

800 00 

27,900 60 

13,680 00 

950 00 

' 2,450 00 

,7,700 00 

1,520 00 

4,900 00 

18,270 00 

.1,000 00 

15,950 00 

8,300 00 

3,000 00 

800 00 

r4,000 00 

10,650 00 

17,418 00 

I 500 00 

10,825 00 

(9,644 00 

2,980 00 

1,975 90 

4,000 00 

a,300 00 

#,300 00 

#^800 PO 

3,500 00 

1,950 00 

3»4IX) 00 

10,360 00 

5^500 00 

.M25 00 

1,900 00 

7,700 00 

5,180 00 



IjitaiMfc ]|Mff. 



119$ 

106 

8 

128 

115 

808 

49 

1,161 

6M 

. 41 

91 

297 

#3 

208 

•ie 
-• eit 

^75 

•MO 

ID9 

to 

IM 
445 

68e 

9 

448 

809 

147 

62 

167 
70 
289 
802 
161 
118 
184 
445 
284 
106 
88 
404 
188 



1« 

85 

94 

95 

10 

55 

65 

91 

8»^ 

45^ 



841 
4# 
7a 
M 
82 
11 
46. 
45 
84 
89^^ 
08 



«1 
08 
86^ 
88 

14 
42 
^5 

06 
97 
52 
44 
33 
86 
10 
70 
78 
52 
00 



4% 



Scfifiol JPim^f— continued. 



Counties. 



Waushara.. 
THnnebago. 



lfo.of3EifMtaia 



j-t:- 



AdaiMj t. 

06bimbia 

DMie 

Dadg^ 

FoadiliiLac 

loWa.L -. 

Jefibrttm w 

LaCrCMise 

LaFayJBtte 

Maailowoo 

Marquette ^^ 

Monroe 

Otauk^e 

Portage - 

Baeine 

Sbtfwrinaw...^ 

Shebo]figaii...j..w. 

WahrMrtti j 

Waehlittfton..j..;.. 

Waukeena.....' 

Wanskara 

Wlanehago 



Amount. 



24 

69 

12 

S 



754 



$8,725 00 

16,875 00 

5,800 00 

1,000 00 



1284,022 00 



Interest paid. 



|;289 26 

780 15 

282 08 

21 67 



|12,0V4 OS 



Universiijf Fund. 



42 



.) -1 


t800 00 


5 
1 


1,850 00 
400 00 


8 


-1,150 00 


2 


700 00 


2 


500 00 


4 
2 


1,800 00 
800 00 


1 


200 00 


4 
1 


1,050 00 
200 00 


1 


500 00 


1 


800 00 


1 


800 00 


2 


550 00 


1 


' 400 00 


^ 


510 00 


1 


450 op 


8 
2 
1 


1,150 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 


1 


500 00 



$14,910 00 



All of which it respectfully submitted, 



$1»$7 

115 84 

24 76 

44iK> 

8triM 

110 M 

48 '6a 

11 i94 
64 Ifr 

12 06 
>M M 

M 81 
19 25 
M 36 
26 M 
80* '84 
>2tr 98 
70 09 
68:43 
19 86 
80 90 



mmtm 



$926 05 



D. W. JONES, Secretary </ SUtte. 
CHARLES EUEHN, State Treasurer. 
YfUL R. SMITH, Mtomey OmemL 



DOCUMENT E. 



\ 



STATE OF WISCONSIN; 

• Offxcs of Bank CoBrPTROLLSR, 

Madison, January 18, 1858. 
MoN. R D. Campbell, 

lAeut. Oaverhar and President^ the Senate : 

I haye the honor, herewith, to transmit to the Legislatore 
Ike Annual Report of the Baiik Comptroller. 

Very Respectfully, 

J. C. SQUIRES, 

Bank Con^trollet. 



I > 



o> . 



\ I 



* • 



r.' 



* 



r.'r) ; '/JirH'- •. . • . .; 



ANNUAii BEPOUT. 



• ' ,«'! H.'i 



•■'.••' fi^TArSBi 'OF W'iSOONififMff-. 

r 



Bank Comptrollee'js Office. 



The Bank Comptroller, in pursuance of the '^ Act to an- 
tiMis^ iliei Biiilin«88 of ' Bfankingf' and the ^Aci to protUe 
iter fbe caiilhi$iM«'egq^ittM dfthe Bank OomptiroIUr^s Office/' 
hw the bono? t%> stkbtnit ih^^ foltowinjgf Report : 






'l^h«i pa^ry^ay ha» been sigiiaKz^^d ad one of unpreoedehtied 
ibumdal dteaM^; extending throughout the United Stketf aiid 
EWDpe. Ad to the eimseiS^ whidh' led td this revultiibn, IW 
flMir^peisotis^ if ier pro^lfal^e, are^ agreed ; I shall; thei^ofe/not^ 
uvMifake Ae eoltetion of ^th)3 problem. 



' .ViT*.' ••<• 



counting billur, nbties, ariff iMh^t^ e Wdeiitee^ bt 9e^i hymAt^^ 
ing deposits ; by buying and selling gold and silver bullion, 
fiUM^^<ioi#and'^fdl^igti aM itilalhd bilU of eitehaAgft;1)y 
lAfifiibt^H$y^»e^&iil')feallltia^;(«i^h^ Hitm' 



The business ot this department, within a very short period, 
has attained a magnitade and importance second to that of 
no other branch of the State Government Judging of the 
future by the past, the banking system of this State, in ixxQxk- 
ttice and extent, can scarcely be over-estimated. As yet it is 
in its infancy. Whether for good, or evil, it is now so inter- 
woven and intimately connected with, all of the business and 
interests of the State and people, that no radical change could 
be made without serious detriment . 

The leading principle of the general banking law« is the 
ultimate security of the bill holder. All other creditors of 
banks and bankin^dsisociatiDns, stand in the- same relation to 
them, that one individual does to another. They are, volun- 
tary creditors. Bill-holders, on the contrary, are involuntary 
creditors of banks, and are therefore under our system, prop- 
erly preferred to all others. 

■ 

Like other similar laws, the banking law is liable to the 
abuse and perversion, of at least the intentioa and spirit of 
the law. Persons and associations are ever ready to tase ad- 
vantage of every defect Time and experience may suggest 
improvement Yet it is believed, that, human ingenuity has 
seldom devised a banking system with fewer defecta Every 
one, almost, has some theory of his own, which he is pw- 
suaded^ if adopted, would cure all of the evils which, it if 
acknowledged, are found in the operations of the present law. 
But the evils are incident to the system, and I am convinced 
will always be found in connection with, and a part o^ any 
and every system pf banking that may be devised. 

|t was no doubt the intention, in firaming the law, that every 
association, carrying on the business of banking, diould ke^ i 
an o^ce at the place named in their certificate, where their 
circulating notes, could be presented and payment demanded* 



tttfaUegiad thaty in solnMiiiManoM^ buikiftg>a>8oeifti(liifrhaM 
taaan &iSB0d^ and are engagsd in puttings* in ciroulotiony bank 
aoM^lhit have no known place of bnamaaEit^ whera^lfaiiittHalei 
eatt be piesentedand protested in case of n<m-paynimt lif 
immediale pradeoesaor wae of the opijuon^ ^bai he oonld net 
go behind die certifioale^ requiied by se& 19 of the ^ Aet-ee 
aathttiae.die Bunn^te of Banking'' In the conectneet of 
due opinion I Ml constaained to conoittL . 

Sec. 18 audioiizea any munber of persons to associate te 
the purpose ef estaUishing ofltcea of discount, deposils 
€iiculationy subject to the lesfrietion of having not kss 
twen^^fire thousand dollais of capital stock, and net exoeedU 
ing fiye hundred thousand* 



Bee 6 proTides that any association so foimedy shall be 
titled to receive, from the Bank Comptroller, an amount^ 
circulating notes of different denominations, equal to, and noC 
exceedihg tiie amount of public stocks transferred in tnistte 
the Tieasorer of this Stata The CkimptroUer is not to inquise 
whether any such association has its capital stodc paid in^ 
whether they have a banking home, or any specie on handi; 
whether they are men of capacity, integrity, or have die 
means necessary to carry on their business. It is his duty to 
see, that the circuktting notes of any such association are se» 
eoied by the transfer of public stocks, and that such stodm 
ate of sufficient market value to redeem all of the notes tint 
may be, or have been delivoed to them. When this is doas^ 
has not the leading oljgect of the banking law> been aeeoaii- 
pUshed ? 

Sec; 89 requires, diat ^all the circulating notes of baiAs 
and banking aasociations, returned to the GcnaptroUer, riudi 
be destroyed by him, after he shall have nmde a record crfdM 
same, whi^ recotd shaH specify die number of eaoh biH, ka 



8 

istay {teid-by: ivbma it wm coutenrigmdi'' Tor odlnpiy 'wUh < 
IteoBBquiiamimto of tins' seotioiiy^ iwoIveD^^ait etpboBrtD^tiiv 
SMe of ' firdm odB thofunnd doUitib W ilanie thoiuuinA dobto * 
y«f tifinmL «IC U Te^ doulHfiil, :xvlijeth^ 'snlfbenefiit wIumk' 
iii-deriYQd bdm the «ipenditiive^ or awnspibnee with«th»' 
/The notes returned <arbofteii* so ilmiibted'^iattM^ ut^:. 
fMy^impossible to determine^ cAtHei^ their d«fe, uuad^er^ or 
letter. In praotice, this* veeord is^ not < untied u^ion as 'being of 
any Talue by either the bankers or this department The ob- 
JKt of ibe Iaw< is nnqaestionablijr (o guaid agoinM fratlds abd 
fbnduknt, oir fbiged issues of oiroulatiiig* nolea it is beimred' 
Astr ithas can be attained' with si great liaving of labor and okj- 
yense; An^tiCvf da thd boc^, simply stadog the aggiegais; 
amount and number of circulating notes of each denoiEiiiia< > 
lion, is thought to be sufficient The registry is made because 
k ]» requiied .by law*, and nert taeeause of aay Mcessit^' foi^it, 
A any present or piospeotire benefit 



The past year has been one of severe tiiai to banks 
bawlring associations It mlist be gratxfying to the fiieads td 
4n system: to reflect, that widi but few exceptions, the banks' 
of Wisconsin were able to conduct their business without a 
an^penflion of specie payments. No circulating notes hate 
laen returned to this office, protested. The Comptroller has* 
ael been compelled to go into the market to sell securities ttaut 
were daily depmci^iting. Had he be^i obliged to do so at one 
Mbm, there must have been a oonsideraUe loss to the bittt 
Md6r& It is a source of gratificatiobto be able to state^ tlmt 
dieisecurkies of all the banks' and bailkingiaMOeidtioiis, at 
the present price of public stocks, are amply sufficient] to' rOi-i 
ieem all outstanding circulating notes. I believe that the 
%aiiks of Wisoonsin ate in as.> sound and faeallhy^conditioit^as 
Anle of any State in: the Unien« labriJlgu^ abont'.this gt9^ 
i^ing resuk^ muck' (nnediit is due my immediate <piadeMisoti 
lifake pleamiB^ in faBarifigi!wining.!witedin, tetke dagdottyasidr 



9 






. f f 



muU iwp«BlKiOsrxilgco«d&«»^ fhftt t&eiaW of thto Stat^ 
^< AHfthoriidng thd Binittcbs of UtaMneg*' be do amond^ hf 
tfa» I^egifltatme^ th«t no bdtid, oNf)^fiM, nfOrtg^e, ovikdd 
of trasty executed, or issued^' by ntfy Rftilrottd' 06toip&ti% dhull 
hereafter be received by the Comptroller, or State Treasurer, 
fliifioctiiitf for ^irettfattiiig^ no jte. Sueh obli^fatiotis ar^ not 
Midtty oim^^Ud into ^aptfdo, and ' !h is extrbtiKily dotititftil, 
iKnthe#, te eas^ of Itodod tmlBB, wsiiKkAmi amdunt cotild b^ 
scadiml to red^m Ao€tf(mtetmg<«e«@9'8^ tfiekn, in 

ittjroasa 

See. 35 of the g60^ral banlriikg li^jisas follows .' ^ItLxttis^ 
the eorrent mmrk^ valtie^ of nnf ' *p&tikfti ol the st^cilriti^ 
Minsferred by any banking asd6«i)iftiiem.in' di«' State' TreaMtto, 
in trust, as provided in this act, shall at any timd, for this'pe* 
riod of ninety days, be less thati the value at which they 
w«re deposited ; the Comptroller shall nbtify such bank of 
tha depreciation in vulUeof Mch s^euiities, and such bank 
wMiin thirty- days^ after receiving' such notice, shall cause b^ 
cwitiefir of thekindis before specified, or to equal amount of 
Hl^h circulating ndtes tt) be Iransferi^d to the Treasurer of 
diate, in trust/to an akno^nt equal to th<e difference bervreen 
the 'current matkef vialu^ at the ilmri*of notice; and the vtiue* 
tfC'^hich the same were d6posit^,>&c'' 

It will be seen that'th^ QovdpwMiif fe ^oweriess W compeL 
any banking association to depoilt addHional sedisifies ifl/ 
case of the depreciation in value of public stocks transferred 
W^he 9tat6f T^ea^utet, unless the period' of <£fifut months^ Has 
eUpfe^, dttting> ntn^ety days^of wliich; the current mkricet 
^ij(« ^ ikne sedtnittos must 4)0 less tbaft * the^ ' value «t' wiiiebi 
lUly'^w^Mr dej^rtt^' Tlilii' isi nen^taity? w ^id^ dKaYgin 
3e 



10 

liEivor of the . baiiks^ aad uad^r ceilain cizcmnstatieeB, migfat 
operate to the detriment and loss of the lpU*ho}dera I lie- 
spectfuUy suggest that the Comptroller f hould have the power 
to leqiiire additional securities upon thirty days notice^ whoDr 
ever in his opinion, the securities deposited with the State 
Tnevisurery are not sufficietM; to redeem the outstaading cir* 
culation of any banking . a^seciAtion. 

• The question of payment, of taxes seems to be left by th« 
law w:ith a good deal of uncertainty in case of the rddnquish* 
ment of business by bajoJai^ associations. A bank desiront 
of relinquishing business, may do.so, as provided in Sec. 35^ 
but a bank may be two or three years in retiring ninety per 
centum of its circulation. In fact, the Wisconsin Bank after 
nearly, two years effort, has still more than twenty per centum 
of , its circulating notes outstanding; The question arises, 
when do such banking associations rightfully cease to be lia^ 
ble for taxes ? 

Again — ^When a banking association has given the two 
year's notice rexuired by Sec. 36, the Comptroller is directed 
to surrender to such association any securities which he may 
bold for the payment of any unredeemed notes of said asso- 
ciation, thus leaving the bill-holders without any secutiiy 
whatever ; some security should be provided. A bond executed 
by the officers of the banking association, to the Comptroller 
with approved sureties, conditioned that all circulating notea 
of such bank which may be presented within the five years 
next ensuing, shall be redeemed by such association, would, 
perhaps, be sufficient security. 

♦ 

Again — ^Any banking association may withdraw all of its 
secorities deposited with the Treasurer by returning its circo^ 
laling. notes to, or by depositing an equivalent amount o^ 
specie with the CompCcoUer, and still remain a body oorpoiale,, 



9Adk bank of diflcount and dfik>slt Wad it intended tliat 
odvporations beyond the power of the Legislature to destroy, 
should thus be formed? The only restriction imposed by 
law is, as to the amount of capital stock, which die law de- 
clares, shall not be less than |[2 5,000, nor more than 11500,000. 
A bank with a capital of |I500,006, with no circulation, under 
favorable circumstances, in discount^ deposits and exchange, 
could do an immense business, without any securities under 
the control of the State, without specie and without re- 
qpurse upon the stocMioIders beyond the capital invested in 
the concern. I repeat. Was this intended by the act of 1852? 

Large deposits instead of strengthening a bank, as is some- 
times supposed, I believe to be a certain indication of weak- 
ness It is a question yet to be solved, whether any banking 
system ever devised has proved to be of permanent benefit to 
the community at lai^e. I belive that of Wisconsin to be as 
firee from defects as any in existence. No system should 
heedlessly be changed. Permanence is a great element in 
any system of banking. Habit is as potent in the business, 
as in the physical world. 

At the date of the last Annnal Beport of this Office the Aggre* 
gate Capital of the seyeral Bankiog Ajnoeiations doing bnjii- 
iies8,WM , $3,390,000 00 

Daring the past year twenty seven Banks have been organized^ 
with an Aggregate Capital of 94^)0,000 00 

And seren Banks, preTionsly organised, have increased' their 
Oapital in the aggvegate. 575,000 00 

And two Banks have diaoontinned hvaiiMm, with an Aggregate 
Capital of 135^000 Oa 

LeaTiDg ths whole somber of Banking Aasooiations oxgniaed 
and doing bnsinen on the fint Monday of Janiuaj, 1858* at 
M?«nty flTe» with an Aggregate Capital of ^.. 5.940,000 00 

The iner«Me of Oie Banking Capital of the State, for Uhey^ar, 
18B7«ia.l....v^..U ...-i-.<. Jt^GMMmOO 



w 



aj^ C«i|^ital Stpch of each o£ the Banks o^gmizeddiiruigililia 
y/eai: 1Q57 ; 



i i»^^» « ■■ I 



«***< >« 



-(...*- 



talX 



Nim#oC'Baiik« 



"^^•■•^•»" 



Arctic Bank ; „....,,... 

BftDK of Co1uml)Q8 

Bank of Grant Go. (E. R. Hinckly <fc Oo.) 

Bwk <ff MtAteUo :....... 

Bank of Oconto 

Bittik of OslikoA ...... 

B^nk of Prairie du .Ghi^n. ., . 4 ^,^,. . . . 

Batik of Sheboygan 

Oity Bank of Bearer Dam. 

Com ExchaneeBank 



Vffonen Bask...*.. 

Forest City Bank. 

ekbtfBarik 

Qall 4k Broti^ers Bank 

Jntiean Bknk 

Knutekee Bank 

Lumbermans Bank 

IfiniitDuwoo Ooimtr Bkak.*. 
Merchants and Mecnanics Bank 
<lillkk]«h 06knBiercial Bunk. . . . 

Prodncers Bank. 

dink County Bank 

Si. Oroiz Kiver Baak..^.. •••• 

St. Croix Valley Bank 

Wisconsin Bank of Madison . . 
Wisconsin Valley Bank 



Locatidni 



».»»«i^< 



rf !>««. 



..i 



JCfi^le Poiot* ..«...«*. 

Commbns 

JSaiOkiire.. ..;««;.. 

PlatteviUe 

MbnteUo .:..... 

Oconto 

OshWosk 

-Praixie da /Qhieiu 

Sheboygan 

Beayer Dam 

Wanpun 

Htidsion ; !• 4. i « « . ^«^ . J 
Waukesha* ,..,.,.... 

Milwanke«.r........ 

E^u Glaire|,,p^..^... 

Milwaukee 

BlM^RiyerWis*... 

Conterelle 

TwoRivm ^ 

Whitewater. 

Oihkoeh 

Jivnosvillo 

Baraboo.'. 

BiiokerlM^w.... 

St, Croix Falls 

Madison.. .» ...:.... 
MiUville 



< I > » >i 



m » *• 



OapitaL 



f900AX)D00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 
d5,000 0§ 
50,000 00. 
S0,000 00 

50.000 Oa 
25,000 06' 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 

9»,ooaoo 

50,000 00 
100,000 06 

50,000 00 
250,000 00 

50,00000 

300,000 00 

fiOiBOO OOv 
100,000 00 . 

50,060 00- 
100,000 00 

50,000 00 
I5O1OOOOO. 

50,000 00 
100,000^ 00 

50,000 00 



$2,200,004 0(r 



The following Statement will show the names and location 
of the several Banks which have increased their Capital dui 
ing the year 1857 : 



•*^k i m 



■y *f* 



Kame of Bank. 



tl H t III ll|M«»K^ 



k«*% 



Bank of Fox Laka^ ..*.. w. 
Bank of Milwaukee •.., .^^. 

Exchange Bank of Datlfki^ it Co.. 
and Millem Baak..v . . . ^ 



Eatanyan Bank. 



'S 



Stole Bank of Wisbonfthi. 



r^Oonnty Bank...< 



Zioeation. 



Milwaukee*.. ..^, 
Fond du Lac... 
HiltrAiilreA.. '...< 
Ja Crosse. 
Mawatitda 
Waukesha 



•■ •• ■ ^^ 



Amount of 



^p^^^^»-^-« 



$06^000 00 

100,000 QO 
25.000 00 

siofooooo 

25,000 Op 

ll0O,yKH) 00 

50»000 00 



Present 
Oapfttl. 



tSD^OOOOO 

300/)00 00 

75.000 00 

ooaooooo 

50,000 00 
990,000 00 
]00,000 00 



' ' > 'The 'fblloFiitfiig shows th« ^ MmeS' ef the Banks that have 
filed iH'this office during fhe^ year 18S7, a r6linq[uia/hnient trf 
di^if corporate poireis^ abo the date of the first pnbhcation 
df notice, requiring 'tfieifcanntersighed notes to be presented 
at this office for redemption, and when time of redeniption 
expires : 



Name of B«Bk A Locatioti. 

Olobe Bank, MQwaukee. 

Peoples 9ank|.... do 



Capital. 



flOO,000 
35,000 



Date of iBt pnb. 



JiiiTiar7 4,1856., 
JannaiyiylSSS.. 



When time expi'/k 



January 4,lV^Qt 



The "whde amount of cotintien^giied ^tea iasaed and deliYered 
to, the banks, smd ontatanding on the fint Monday of January, 
1858, iin $$,215,488 

W^hieb ai« aeoond by the depoadt ef Public Stooka and 8peoie in 
Uj^eeumof..,,, :.. ..-. W^iOll 01 

Ap i»Uov8 : 

C^i|6i;i»ia State Stocks 7 percent^ f 116,000 00 ^ 

Qaosgia do.--«....da 33,600 M 

Georgia do...,T....do : 20,000 00 

Jllinoia do....e....do .261,140 00 

^udUiia do. ...5... .do 128,500 00 

^entu^ky 4<*.,.-^5 do 14,000 00 , 

Kentneky do.-..6....de 33,000 00 

Lomsiana. do. ...6. ...do... 128,000 00 

Miohigan do....6....do «,000 00 

mmovLTl do. ...6.. ..do 2,004,000 00 

KorthOaroUna,do....6....do 125,000 00 

Ohio. do..-*6....do 76,000 00 

F^n»ylTanU...do...,5....do H,000 00 i 

(PenneaaeeL do... .6.. ..do 341,000 00 

▼irgini^ do....e....do 239,000 00 

WiaconaXn dc-.I^-.-do 50,600 60 

Wiaoonain do....7....do..... 50/)00 00 

Bacine * Mias. R. R. IJonda 8 per cent 27,000 60 

MU.AWat do-...8...dou. 50,000 00 

Specie... 113^1 0^ 

*^ - 9362,041 61 



14 



Statement shewing the amount of the CapUal Stock, the 
amount of countersigned, notes issued to each bank, and out- 
standing, and the. amount of Secunties on deposit to secure 
the redemption of such notes, on tl^e first Monday of Janu- 
ary, 1858 : 



Banlks. 



Aretio Bank 

Badger State Bank 

BankofBeloit 

Bank of the Capitol 

Bank of the Oity of La OrosBe.. 

Bank of Columbus. 

Bank of £au Claire 

Bank of Fond du Lac 

Bask of Fox Lake 

B'k of Grant Co. E.'A.Hinekl7(kCo 

Bank of Milwaukee 

Bank of Mentello. 

Bank of Monroou. .. .... .... .,,. 

BaS of the North West 

Bank of Oconto 

Bank of Oehkosh i 

Bank of Prairie du Chien. 

Bank of Racine 

Bank of Ripon 

Bank of Sheboygan. « 

Bank of Watertown 

Brown Coiintj Bank 

Central Bank of Wisconsin 

Chippewa Bank 

City Bank of Beaver Dam 

City Bank of Kenosha. , 

City Bank of Racine 

Columbia County Bank. 

Commercial Bank. 

Cora Exchange Bank : . 

Dane County Bank 

Dodge County Bank. 

Exchange Bank of Darling <k Co. 

Elkhom Bank.. 

Farmers Bank*, -k...'. 

Farmers <fr Millors Bauk 

Forest City Bank 

Fox River Bank 

German Bank..... 

Green Bay Bank 

Hi^ and Brothers Bank 

Hudson Citjr Bank. 

Janesville City Bank 

Jefferson County Bank 

Juneau Bank 

Kankakee Bank 

Katanvan Bank 

Kenosha County Bank 



Capital Stock. 



$200,000 00 
50.000 00 
60,000 00 
50,000 00 
25,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
^0,000 00 
50,000 00 

300,000 00 
35,000 00 
35,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
25,000 00 
95,000 00 

100,000 00 
25,000 00 

100,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 

100,000 00 
50,000 00> 
50,000 00 

100,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
75,000 00 
25,000 00 
50,000 00 

500,000 00 
50,000 00 
25,000 00 
50.000 00 
35,000 00 
50,000 00 
25,000 00 
25,000 00 
75,000 00 

250,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 



Circulation 
outstanding. 



$86,000 00 
20,832 00 
56>000 00 
30,206 00 

21.997 00 
45,000 00 
36,099 00 
50,000 00 
36,377 OO 
48,488 0§ 
11,000 00 
21300 00 
24,985 00 
50,000 00 
22,097 00 
50,000 00 
49,995 00 
32,600 00 

24.998 00 
92,550 00 
65,372 00 

24.299 00 
34,683 00 
50,000 00 
19,748 00 
61,350 00 
43,600 00 
30,144 00 
36,680 00 
25,652 00 
39.750 00 
26,748 00 
37,413 00 
25,610 00 
27,500 00 
23J79 00 
36]l3 00 
25,000 00 
37.972 00 

34.300 00 
47,300 00 
23,010 00 
22,693 00 
50,000 00 

9,495 00 
19,800 00 
49,995 00 
32,250 00 



Am't of Secir- 
rities deposi'd. 



$130,000 00 
26,786 00 
67,000 00 
37,000 00 
27,500 00 
52,000 00 
36,480 00 
61,000 00 
44,000 00 
60,376 63 
11,000 00 
24,700 00' 
31,000 00 
64,000 00 
27,900 00 
60,000 00 
55,000 00 
40,000 00 
30,000 00 
25,748 ftO 
75,000 00 
27,522 50 
41,000 00 
62,500 00 
25,000 00 
69,000 00 
50,000 00 
34,000 00 
51,000 00 
25,660 00 
44,000 00 
30,000 00 
46,000 00 
31,618 12 
33.*127 13 
25,600 00 
43,000 60 
28,123 50 
46,000 00 
48,283 50 
65,000 00 
25,000 00 
25,562 50 
80.000 00 
10,000 00 
25.000 00 
63,000 00 
44,000 00 



t^ 



Statement' shcrvHiig amount of uaj^ital Stock, &c. — continued. 

■ - • ■ . t 



Banks. 



Lmnbermans Bank 

Hanitouwoc Oounty Bank 

Marine Bank...,. 

Keroaniile Bank 

Merchants Bank '. 

Mercliants <k MedianicB Bank. 

JGrarOiem Bank , 

JJiTorth Western Bank 

Oakwood Bank ...., 

OflhkoBb Commercial Bank« ^ . 

Prodneeirs Bank t , 

Bacine County Bank , 

Rock Oonntj Bank. 

Book Birer Bank 

8a«k Cennty Bank 

Second "Ward Bank 

State Bank. .^ ^ 

State Bank of Wisconain. 

St. Croix River Bank. . J 

St. Croix Valley Bank 

Walworth County Bank 

^ankesha County Bank , 

Waupun Bank 

Winnebago County Bank. . . . . 
Wis. Marine <fe Fire Ins. Co. . 
Wisconsin Bank of Madison. . . 
Wisoonsin Valley Bank 



Banks WifuUng Up» 



Bank of Commerce 

Bank of the West* 

Exchange Bank of WmJ3allACo 

Globe Bank 

Germania Bank 

OshkoshCity Bank 

Peoples Bank , «,... 

Wisconsin Bank 



Capital Stock. 



$300,000 00 

50,000 00 

50^)00 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 

100,000 00 

50.000 00 

60,000 00 

60,000 00 

60,dMOO 

100,000 00 

900,000 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 

35,000 00 

50/)00 00 

500,000 00 

150,000 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 

100,000 00 

95,000 00 

95/)00 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 

50,000 00 



5,940,000 00 



Circulation 
outstanding. 



1299^85 00 
41,598 00 
93,997 00 
47.053 00 
49,776 00 
94,000 00 
37396 00 
60,000 00 
60,000 00 
49,50400 
11,000 00 
64,590 00 
34,990 00 
46,999 00 
94,794 00 
9,909 00 
91,400 00 
99,729 00 
150,000 00 
49,995 00 
49^700 00 
83,579 00 
94,785 00 
93,949 00 
65,372 00 
88,400 00 
33,000 00 



3,185,461 



^ 



$831 00 

894 00 

167 00 

10,900 00 

35 00 

397 00 

11,997 00 

4,876 00 



3,915,488 00. 



Am't of Secu- 
rities deposi'4« 



$33^400 oe 

4^,000 00 
83,000 00 
55^704 80 
53,606 00 
30.000 00 
44,946 60 
74,000 00 
76,000 00 
52,000 00 
14*490 00 
73,000 00 
43,000 00 
50,615 00 
31,000 00 
11.000 00 
)2I,400 00 
31,000 00 

179.300 OQ 
66.000 00 
53,000 00 
09^000 00 
99^60 00 
99,000 00 
74»000 00 

103.900 00 
40,000 00 



333133Q 68 



Sp^e. 

$831 00 

508 33 

133 00 

11,500 00 

35 00 

327 00 

19,000 00 

4.876 00 



330^,041 01 



Time of redemption of the notes of this Bank baring expired, the above 
lount is retained by the Comptroller lor tax unpaid. 



MS 

The ^vhole aiooum of. Coi^iC^jtsigp^ JffGffif^ iff^Uf^^im^ 
delivered to^^the Banks during the year 1857, is |[l,697|863y 
as follows: 

Arctic Bank $86,000 00 

Badger State Bank 3,740 W^ 

Bankof Befoit ,.. : 231 00 

Bank o£ the Capitol .^ 9,870 00 

Bank of Oolambns , 45,000 00 

Baak of Eau CliOre, , 38,994 00 

Bank of Fond'^n Lao 1 8,058 00 

Bank of Fox Lake 12540 HO 

fitnk of Grant G^untj (E, R. Hinckly 4k Oo.) 49»d86 00 

Bank of MonteHo 34,999 00 

Bank of the North Weet 9,068 OO 

Bank of Oconto 92,097 00 

Bank of Oehkoah '., 50,160 00 

Bank of Prairie du Ohien 49,995 QO 

Bank of Racine 390 00 

Bankof Ripon 4,689 00 

Bank of Sheboyi^ , 1 99,550 00 

Bank of Watortown 1,959 OO 

Oential Bank of Wisconsin 6,258 00 

CUtjr Bank of Beaver Dam 19,748 00 

City Bank of Kenosha 364 OO 

City Bank of Racine. 143 00 

Oommercial Bank 36,680 00 

Com Exchange Bank 95,659 00 

Dane County Bank 18^0 00 

E]i»baDg9 Bank of Darling 4fr Co 7,399 00 

ElkhomBank..: 4,193 00 

FarmarsBank 97,500 00 

Farmers and Millers Bank. 4,473 00 

Forest City Bank 37,653 OO 

Fox Rirer Bank 63 00 

German Bank 19,991 00 

Globe Bank. 94,999 00 

Green Bay Bank • 1.000 00 

Hall <k Brothers Bank 47,300 00 

Juneau Bank 23,745 fiO 

KankakeeBank 19,800 00 

Katanyan Bank 1 95,009 00 

Kenosha County Bank 9,950 00 

Lnmhermans Bank 30q,000 00 

Hanitonwoc County Bank 41,598 00 



17 

• 

Marine Bank $4,995 00 

MercantUe Bank 20,961 00 

Merchants Bank ,• 30,700 00 

Merchants A Mechanics Bank.. 34,000 00 

ITorthorn Bank 7,697 00 

OakwoodBank 10 00 

Oshkoeh Commercial Bank 43,504 00 

Prodncers Bank 19,998 00 

Bacine Oonnty Bank- '. 25,300 OO 

Bock Oonntjr Bank 11 00 

Bock Rirer Bank 77 00 

Bank County Bank * 24,794 00 

State Bank 900 00 

St. Croix River Bank 150,000 00 

St Croix Valley Bank 49,995 00 

Waukesha County Bank 34,950 00 

Waupun Bank 2,401 00 

Wisconsin Bank of Madison 96,000 00 

Wisconsin Marine and Fire Insurance Company 15,750 00 

Wisconsin Valley Bank 33,000 00 

11,697,863 Oa 



« 



The whole amount of Circulating Notes returned to the 

Bank Comptroller's Office for destruction/ during the yeai 

1657^ is 433,342, all of which have been registered and des* 
troyedy as follows : 

fiidgtf state Bank $6,660 00 

BttdL of Beloit ,. St^iaO 

Btnkof the Capitol 10,364 00 

Bankof UkeOity.of LaOraaM 8 00 

Bftnk of San Claire 9395 00 

Biak of Fond dn Lac 8,093 00 

Bank of Fox iLake S68 00 

SiBkof Gi»niCoiiDt7(B.&.HfaiddayAOo«). * lyASe 00 

Bank of MHwaukee •• 38,847 00 

BMkof MonteUo 3,699 00 

m 

BmkDf Konroe «..* 7 09 

Bfeak of the Nogr^ We«t 140S4M 

BKidH of OshkoA 169 00 

SmOc of Baeine .-.-..- 17,790 00 

BMkof Ripon 40 00 

Bukk of Watertown 7J005 f 

OeiitalBankaf Wiicoiiaiii M90 00 

C% Bnk of KoMMba 4,669 00 

Se 



18 

City Bank of Racine 9%828 00 

Colambia Conntj Baok 16,000 00 

Dane Cotinty kank 29,240 00 

Exchange Baok of Darling & Co 86 00 

nkbomBank _ 80 00 

Farmers and MiUere Bank 24,84i 00 

Forest City Bank 1 1,000 00 

Fox River Bank 63 00 

(SermanBank 11 00 

Green Bay Bank 1,698 00 

Hndson Citj Bank 390 00 

Janesrille City Bank 1,057 00 

Jefferson County Bank 25,000 00 

JaneanBank 14,250 00 

Katanyan Bank ^ 6 00 

Kenofiba Comity Bank 5,000 00 

Lumbermans Bank 15 00 

Marine Bank 6,000 00 

Mercantile Bank ..., 647 00 

Merchants Bank ; 11,924 00 

Korthem Bank 4,221 00, 

OakwoodBank :..., 10 00 

Producers. Bank _ 8,998 00 

Racine County Bank 24,784 00 

Rock County Bank ISjOBS 00 

Rock Rirer Bank 3,051 00 

Socond Ward Bank 184M6 4§ 

StetQ Bank 89^71 ۥ 

Stale Bank of Wiaconain 86,818 00 

Waukesha County Bank * ^ 1,878 08 

Waopun Bank .,., -.... 16 01 

Wianebago County Bank... ..^ ^ ..*•«« 151^08 

Wiiconsin Bank of Hadi0on 7>66Q 08 

Wisconiift Marine and Fire Inai|ratlc8 Oonpanjr......^*. 87d<l8 

Bunks Winding up. 

B4ii)b of Commerce.. •.•.•..•.•..•.■.•.•.-,•.•..•. ..•-..-■--.'....■. 3,596'06 

Baokof the West ...^^..v.-.v... Ivl^^ 

(KkdMinge Bank-of Wau J. Bell 4k Co,. :. :........ '844 60 

OkiVnAnia Bank.. ..-.v..... ....-.,... ...'i.' ' 88 <MI 

<6l<Ai^Bink .. — -*-. .-.*^ ..>.-.• .^^ .-.-. ^ lijM 80 

OjlhkoshCity Bank.......... ^ ...... ..v.... .-.•.-. 8W 88 

X eopiOs l>an je .... . ..-w-.-w .^ ■.%v . w .-.*.%.. .... . • . . . . .*. .*.'.■. i«..'i.« 1 1,089 ^8 

Wiiooirtin Bank.-. •.%*.% .v ^ *vw% .v .-. .•.-.» -^.* ..^ ."w- . .'..;!• . .: . 6JSli& ^ 

'■'' •'' ' $4d9i34tMoft 



'*!.'' 



19 

The following Statemeat will show the amouut due the 
State for Taxes from each Bank, for the year 1857, all of 
which has been paid, excepting JI979 16. 



Banks. 



Ajrctie Bank 

Badger State Bank 

Bank of Beloit. . 

Bank of the Capitol 

Bank of the Oity of La Oroaae,. 

Bank of Columbna.. 

Bank of Ean Ohure 

Bank of Fond du Lac 

Bank of Fox Lake 

B'k of Grant Oa £.R.Hin6k]j<fcCo 

Bank of Milwankea 

Bank of Mentella...— 

Bank of Monroe 

Bank of the North Wegt 

Bank of Oconto 

Bank of Oahkoeh. 

Bank of Prairie du Ohien« 

Bank of Racine 

Bank of Ripon 

Bank of Sheboygan... 

Bank of Watertown 

Brown County Bank. 

Oeniral Bank of WiBconain 

Chippewa Bank 

Cit J Sank of Beaver Dam 

CKly Bank of Keaoaba 

Oity Bank of Racine 

Oolntnbia Oounty Bnk. 

Commercial Bank «...^ 

Corn Exchange Bank.' 

Dane County Bank 

Dodge County Bank 

Exchange Bank of Darling A Co, 

Elkhom Bank J 

farmers Bank. ^V 

Farmers <b MUlers Bank 

Fm BiTOf Bonk 1..^.^.. 

PoreetCity Bank 

German Bank 

Globe Bank.... ^ 

Qfe«en Bay Bank. :. 

^JI and Brothers Bank «. 

Bui^n City Bank 

Janesyille City Bank««« f..,.^, 
Jefferson County Baiak. . 1 ...'... . 

Juneau Bank w. 

Kankakee Bank : 

KatanTanBafokj..; 

Kenoena County Bank 1 . . 

Inmbeiteani Baitk....- 

Manitouwoc County Bank 



Location. 




Eagle Point 

Janesyille 

Beloit 

Madison 

La Crosse 

Columbus 

EauCUire ... 

Fond du Lac 

Fox Lake.. 

Platteville 

Milwaukee 

Montello, 

Monroe. 

Fonddu Lac 

Oconto 

Oshkosh 

Prairie du Chien. . 

Racine 

Ripon 

Sheboygan 

Watertown 

DePere 

Janesyille 

Pepin, Dunn Co... 

Beayer Dam 

Eenoeha* i 

Racine 

Portage 01^..... 

Racine 

Waupun.. 

Madison 

BeayevDam 

Fond duLac 

Elkhom 

Hudson .,. 

Milwaukee 

QMsnBay 

Waukesha 

Sheboyffan 

Milwaukee 

Mannatte ..«• . .'. . 

EauClaiie 

Hiids6n'0ity..L... 
wSJiesviXle ..4. .... 

Watertown 

Milwaukee 

ttaekklyerPalb. 

La Crosse 

Kenosha. 

Conterelle 

Two Risers.. ...^^ 



$300,000 00 
50.000 00 
60,000 00 
50,000 00 
25,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 

300,000 00 
25,000 00 
25,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,060 00 
25,000 00 
25,000 00 

100,000 00 
25,000 00 

100,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 

100,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 

100,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 
75,000 00 

25,ooaoo 

50,000 00 
.600,000 00 
dfiOOOQO 
56,000 00 
50,060 M 
100,000 00 

50,000 00 

2Siioooe> 

25JD00 00 
75,000 00 

250,000 00 
6i,if00 00. 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 

300,000 00 
50,p00 Off 



Amount 
of TaK. 



$1,108 42 
750 00 
900 00 
750 00 
375 00 
641 66 
206 25 
750 00 
546 88 
704 16 

3,720 86 
126 12 
375 00 
750 00 
112 50 
679 16 
697 91 
750 00 
375 00 
375 00 

1,500 00 
375 00 

1,493 76 
750 00 
297 90 

1^00 00 
750 00 
750 00 

1,500 00 
968 7S 
750 00 
750 06 
928 12 
875 00 
897 91 

5,562 56 
^5 
485 

74^86 
' 850 00 
00 
S6 25 
3t6.Q6 
875 00 
Ui^OD 
1,083 33 
375 00 
676 03 
746 88 
2,418 75 

175 00 



% 



20 



Statement of Taxes due fix)m Banks^ &c. — continued. 



Bankfi. 



Marine Bank 

Mercantile Bank 

Merehanta Bank 

MercfaaBtB <& Mechanics Bank. 

Northern Bank 

Vorth Western Bank 

Oakwood Bank 

Oahkoah Commercial Bank 

Peoples Bank 

Proancen Bank ». 

fiacine County Bank 

Bock Hirer Bank 

Bock Conntj Bank 

Sank County Bank 

Second Ward Bank 

State Bank 

State Bank of WiacoiMui 

Si. Cioiz Rirer Bank 

St. Croix Valley Bank 

Walworth Conniy Bank 

Wankeaha County Bank 

Waupun Bank 

Winnebago County Bank 

Wia» Marine A Fire Ins. Co. . . 
Wisconsin Bank of Madison... 



L<^. 


Capital. 

1 


Milwaukee 

Beaver Dam 

Madison 


$50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50,000 00 


Whitewater 

Howard 


100,000 00 
50,000 00 


Stevens Point 

North Pepin 

Oshkosh. 


60.000 00 
60,000 00 
50,000 00 


Milwaukee... 

Janesville ...". 

Racine 


25,000 00 
100,000 00 
200,000 00 


Beloit 

Janesville 

Baraboo 


50,000 00 
50,000 00 
50.000 00 


Milwaukee 

Madison 


25,000 00 
50,000 00 


Milwaukee 

Brinkerhoff 

St. Croix Falls.... 
De!aTan. 


500,000 00 

150,000 00 

50,000 00 

50,000 00 


Waukesha 

Waupun.... 

Neenah ; 

Milwaukee 

Madison 


100.000 00 

25,000 00 

25,000 00 

100,000 00 

100,000 00 







Amoont 
of 



t 



$750 00 
750 00 
750 00 

579 20 
750 00 
900 00 

900 oa 

710 42 
375 00 
791 6S 

2,979 17 
750 00 
750 00 
337 50 
375 00 
750 00 

6,741 €5 

1,387 50 
325 00 
750 00 

1,475 00 
375 00 
375 00 

1,500 00 
737 50 



$70,29802 



A particular description of the securities deposited by each 
bank^ as well as the personal security of stockholders required 
by sec. 17 of the banking law, will be found in the Appendix 
attached to this report, and marked ^ A'' and ^ B." 

Table marked ^ C/' exhibits the names of stockholders and 
the amount of stock owned by each in the sereral banks of 
the State, as reported to this office on the first Monday of 
January, 185a 

Tables marked ^ D'' and ^ £,'' exhibits the condition of the 
banks as reported to this office on the first Monday of July, 
1857, and the first Monday of January, 1858. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

J. C. SQUIRES, 

Bank Camptrolkt. 



* $187 50 of it »«t pdd. tKotpakl, 



• « 



APPENDIX. 



U A 99 



A 



The Jbllotaing is a Statement in detail qf the Securities held 
for each Banking dissociation^ and the amount qf Circu- 
lation issued and outstanding on the same, on the first 
Monday qf January^ 1858 : 



». 



Arctic Banky Eagle Point, 

lliasouri 6s ♦130,000 00 

$130,000 00 

Circulation, 86,000 00 

Badger State Bank^ Janesville. 

^SBOTtri 68 17,000 00 

Tennessee 68 9,000 00 

Specie 780 00 

.26,780 00 

CSroTiIatioiv 20,832 00 

Bank qf Beloity Beloit. 

Missouri 68 67,000 00 

67,000 00 

Circnlation 56,000 00 

Sank qf the Capitoly Madison* 

Missouri Os 37,000 00 

87,000 00 

Circulation :. 30^206 00 



24 

Bank qf the City of La Crosse^ La Crosse. 

Missouri 68 24,000 00 

Virginia es :. 8,000 00 

Georgia,. Cs 600 00 

27,600 00 

Ciroulation 1 21,997 00, 

Bank qf Columbus, Columbus. 

lionsiana,^ 68 26,000 00 

Illinois 6s 13,000 00 

Missouri 6s 14,000 00 



62,000 00 

Circulation 45,000 00 

Sank of Eau Claire, Eau Claire. 

Michigan ,6s 10,000 00 

Illinois 68 24,480 00 

Missouri 68 2,000 00 



36,480 00 



Circulation 36,099 00 

Bank of Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac, 

Missouri 6s 23,000 00 

Tennessee,-^-,. 6s 29,000 00 ' 

Indiana ^.-6s 9,000 00 



61,000 00 



Circulation: 50,000 00 

I 

Bank qf Fox Lake, Fox Lake. 

Virginia 6s 15,000 00 

,Jtfia80uri -6s 15,000 00 

.California 78 5,000 00 

Tennessee 6s 2,000 00 

Illinois w6s--- ^-.^ 6j000 00 

Ohio 68 2,000 00 

^ • 44,000 00 

Circulation 36,377 00 



25 

Bank qf Grant County, {B, R. Hinekly ^ Co.) PlatteviUe. 

Tennessee, 6s 8,000 0^ 

Ifissonri 68 44,000 00 * 

Louisiana 68 -,.L 8,000 00 

Illinois 68 3,600 00 

Specie 1,776 63 

60,376 63 

Circulation : 4a,4S8 00 

Bank of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, 

North Carolina 68 6,000 00 

Wisconsin 7s 6,000 00 

11,000 00 

Circulation 11,000 00 



• 



Bank of MontellOy Montello. 

Missouri 68 .' 17,000 00 

Illinois 6s 7,700 00 

24,700 00 

Circulation 21,800 00 

Bank of Monroe, Monroe. 

Missouri 6s 21,000 00 

Virginia 6s 6,000 00 

Tennessee 6s 6,000 00 

f 31,000 00 

Circulation 24,986 00 

Bank of the North West, Fond du Lac. 

Missouri 68 30,000 00 

California, 78 ^ ^-. 9,0.00 00 

Tennessee, 68 iO,000 00. 

North Carolina 68 10,000 00 

Georgia. 68— 6,000 00 

64,000 00 

Circulation 60,000 00 

4e 



26 

Sank qf Oconto^ Oconto. 

Missouri 63 20,000 00 

Illinois ...68 7,900 00 

27,900 00 

Circnlatioii 22,097 00 

Bank of Oshkosh, Oshkosh. 

Tennessee^ 6s 12,000 00 

Ohio 68 - 10,000 00 

Indiana 6s 10,000 00 

Missouri 68 28,000 00. 

60,000 00 

Circulation 50,000 00 

^^ ■ 

Bank qf Prairie du Chieuy Prairie du Chien. 

Missouri 68 30,000 00 

Illinois 6s 20,000 00 

North Carolina 6s 5,000 00 

— 65,000 00 

Circulation 49,996 00 

Bank of Badne, Racine. 

Tennesse. 6s 10,000 00 

Missouri 68.... 30,000 00 

40,000 00 

Circulation 32,60f 00 

JSonA qf Bipon, Bipon. 

Missouri 6s 6,000 00 

Indiana 6b i 16,000 00 

PennsylTaniaH-68 6,000 00 

Illinow 68 6,000 00 

80,000 00 

Circulation 24,998 00 



27 

Bank of Sheb&jfgan^ Shebojfgan 

Tennessee. -...6s ..- 8,000 00 

Missonri 6a^ 8,000 00 

North Carolina es 9,000 00 

Specie 748 60 

— 25,748 60 

Circulation .'--. 22,660 00 

Bank qf Watertoum^ Watertown, 

!Nortli Carolina 6s 18,000 00 

Mioliigan 6s 11,000 00 

Tennessee 6s 10,000 00 

Kentucky 6« 3,000 00 

Louisiana 6s 3,000 00 

Wisconsin Ys 7,000 00 

Ohio 68 13,000 00 

California 78 10,000 00 

■ 75,000 ♦O 

Cirtulation 65,372 00 

Brown County Banky De Pere. 

Virginia 68 17,000 00 

Tennessee 68 ^ 10,000 00 

Specie 622 60 

27,622 60 

Circulation 24,399 00 

Central Bank qf Wtsconsiny JanesviHe. 

Virginia 68 7,000 00 

Tennessee/.... 68 4,000 00 

MisjBOuri 68 14,000 00 

Georgia, ..68 8,000 00 

North Carolina 68 7,000 00 

Indiana 68 6,000 00 

41,000 00 

Circulation 34y«83 00 



S6 

Chippewa Bank, Piping Dunn County, 

Missouri 68 62,000 00 

Virginm 68 600 00 

62,500 00 

Circulation 50,000 00 

City Bank of Beaver Dam, Beaver Dam, 

Missouri 68 25,000 00 

26,000 00 

Circulatioii l^M^ 00 

City Bank of Kenosha^ Kenosha. 

Virginia 68 25,000 00 

Kentucky, 68 13,000 00 

Georgia, 68 10,000 00 

Louisiana 68 1,000 00 

Missouri 68 20,000 00 

69,000 00 

Circulation 61,350 00 

City Bank of Racine^ Racine, 

Tennessee 68 13.000 00 

Virginia 68.,... 17,000 00 

Missouri. 6s.--- 20,000 00 

50,000 00 

Circulation 43,600 00 

Columbia County Bank, Portage City: 

Indiana 5s I... 15,000 00 

North Carolina 6s 4,000 00 

Tennessee 68^ 5,000 00 

^sconsm 6s-: 10,000 00 

34,000 00 

Circulation 80,144 00 



99 

CommetckU Sank, Racine. 

PeniiB7lvaiiia..68 9,000 00 

Kentiick7M....58 ^ 14,000 00 

Eentuckj 68 1,000 00 

Baoine & Mississippi R. R. First Mortg- 
age Bonds.. 68 27,000 00 

51,000 00 

Circulation S^ieso 00 

Com Exchange Bank, Waupun* 

Illinois 6s 25,660 00 

25,660 00 

Circulation • 25,652 00 

Dane County Bank^ Madison. 

Tennessee th 10,000 00 

North Carolina 68 25,000 OO 

Georgia. 6s 5,000 00 

Specie 4,000 00 

44)000 00 

Ginmlation : 39,750 00 

D€tdge County Bank, Beqver Bam. 

Tennessee 6s ...^..^ 10,000 00 

Georgia. 6s 8,000 OO 

KorihCarolina«6s 11,000 00 

Louisiana Os 500 00 

Tirpaia •Os 500 00 

nUnois... 6s 5,000 00 

S0,000 00 

Oiroulation ^ ^ 26,748 00 

Exchange Bank qf Darling 4" Co., Fond du Lac* 

TeBuessee 6a 18,000 00 

IGsMnui 6ft 88,000 00 

46,000 00 

Ofredation. ..«. «9^M 00 



• 



" 30 , 

Elkhorn Bank^ JBlkhom. 

Louisiana Gs 6,000 00 

Missouri 68 :..:.. 20,000 00 

' Virginia 6s 6,000 00 

Specie - M18 12 

31,618 12 

Circulation 26,610 00 

Farmers Bank, Hudson. 

Missouri Os 20,000 00 

Ifonisiana 68 13,000 00 

Specie 227 13 

83,227 13 

Circulation 27,600 00 

Farmers fy Millers Bank, Milwaukee. 

Tennessee Os 7,000 00 

Kentucky Os 11,000 00 

Loaiifana.-— fls 6,000 00 

SmcU 1 2,600 00 

^^ »6,600 00 

Circulation. 28,779 00 



I 



Forest City Banky Waukesha. 

Missouri 68..r ---- IMOO 00 

Louisiana 68 18,000 00 

Illinois 68 13,000 00 

42,<M)0 00 

. Oircnlation... 86,653 00 

" • ^ • ' ,' . 

Fox River Banky Oreen Bay. 

Virgini*^^.,^.68.-^ ,.. ,..-- ^^'^^^ ^^ 

Tennessee 6s 1 14,000 00 

Missouri 6s---- -..-. 3,000 00 ' 

98«ff*f^.^r--T"'"-" -■— M22 60 ' ' 

^'^ ^ 28,122 60 

'•-^ ^€*re«laaeE - j- :«M00 bo 



* » 



% 



31 



German Banky Sheboygan, 

Louisiana, 68. 3,000 00 

Missouri 6s 18,000 00 

Tirginia 68 3,000 00 

North Carolina 6s 9,000 00 

Indiana .6s 7,000 00 

Ohio .6s - 6,000 00 

— 46,000 00 

Ciroiilation 37,W2 00 

Cfreen Bay Bank^ MarinetL . 

Missouri.. ----.6s 16,000 00 

California 7s 7,000 00 

Mflwaukee & Wat R. B. 1st Mortgage 

Bonds 8s 26,000 00 

Specie..: : 382 60 

48,282 60 

Circulation 84,800 00 

Hall §• Brothers Bank^ Eau Claire, 

lGsBOuri...i..6s - - -' 65,000 00 

66|690^ 

Circulation--. 47,^0 Od 

^y-. , Hudson City Bank, Hudson, 

MQphigau 6s 16,000 00 

Miisouri 6s 10,000 00 

^ r— 26,000*00 

Circulatiw^.--r--J ------.- .-_- ---f---. . ^SjftlA Oft 

'::' • •■ . ;,. '\ 

Jmamlle City Banky JanesviUtk .. .!/ 

Virginia :i«s::-l .- 19,000 00 '^ ^' 

Missouri '.'.'64^. .'-:----•.----.- 6,000 00 ^ '' • 

Specie 11 — ../l ----..-..--.- 66f 60 r- ':''.'*^ 

^'•> "^ - - 26,662 60 

^^ ^ttircttlatioii. :.;::: :;:::. '.i..:...:.::^^ ''nm oo 



f 



32 

a 

J^erson County Bank, Watertoum. 

California 1% 50,000 00»; 

Missouri 6s '.y 30,000 00 

' 80,000 00 

Circulation 50,000 00 

Juneau Bank, Milwaukee, 

Ohio 68 10,000 00 

10,000 00 

Circulation 9,495 00 

Kankakee Bank, Black River Falls, 

Tennessee.. -.68 25,000 000 

25,000 00 

Circulation 19,800 00 

Katanyan Bank, La Crosse. 

Missouri 68 68,000 (to 

63,000 00 

Circulation. 49,995 00 

Kenosha County Bank, Kenosha. 

Miaaoati 68 14,000 00 

Louisiana. Os 10,000 00 

California Ys 15,000 00 

Ohio 6s 5,000 00 

44,000 00 

Circulation 82,260 00 

Lumbermans Bank, ContereUe. 

Misaouri 68 218,000 00 

Illinois 68 82,400 00 

Virgmia 68 21,000 00 

Tennessee 68 9,000 00 

Louisiana 68 2,000 00 

Michigan Os 5,000 00 

887,400 00 

CSrcnlation 899,986 00 



» 



33 



Mamtouwoc Countj/ Sanky Tufo Sfvers. 

Georgia, 78 ' 20,000 00 

Wiaconsin-.-.es 20,000 00 

Ifissoiiii 68 2,000 00 

42,000 00 

Circulation - 41,6W 00 

Marine Banky Milwaukee, 
MiBBonri 68 23,000 00 

California 78 10,000 00 

88,000 00 

Circulation M,09» 00 

Mercantile Bank, Beaver Dam. 

Mimom 68 40,000 00 

T8Bn«B8e6 6b 2,000 00 

Louisiana 68 8,000 00 

IIlmoi8 68 3,600 00 

Specie 2,104 80 

56,704 80 

Oircnlatton i 47,a«l 00 

Merchants Bank, Madispn. 

lOeeonri. 68 47,000 00 

Lpnieiana. 68 5,000 00 

Specie 1,606 00 

63,606 00 

Circnlation 42,776 00 

Merchants and Mechanics Bank, Whitewater. 
Miseoiiri 6s 15,000 00 

Indiana 5s 16,000 00 

80,000 00 

Circidaaon - 24,000 00 

Northern Bank, Howard, 

Virginia Os 27,000 00 

Ifissonri-.-J-.Os 17,000 00 

Specie 946 00 

44,946 00 

CSrcnIation 87,828 00 

5e 



S4 

North Western Bank, Stevens Point, 

Georgia. 68 5,000 00 

Ifissonri 6s 46,000 00 

BTortli Carolina -.68 10,000 00 

Tennessee 68 13,000 00 

Specie - 1,000 00 

74,000 00 

Circulation 60,090 00 

Oakwood Bank, North Pepin. 

Uissoari 68 70,000 00 

Virginia 68 5,000 00 

Specie 1,000 00 

76,000 00 

Circulation .*. 60,000 00 

» 

Oshkosh Commercial Bank. Oshkosh, 

• 

Indiana.. «. 58 16,000 00 

Ifissonri 68 20,000 00 

Forth Carolina.-68 5,000 00 

Tennessee 68 10,000 00 

Louisiana 68 2,000 00 

59,000 00 

Circulation 42,604 00 

Producers Bank, Janesville. 
Missouri 68 14,000 00 

Specie 420 00 

14,420 00 

Circulation 1 11,000 00 

Racine County Bank, Sacine. 

Louisiana 68 7,000 00 

Tennessee 6s ^.. 18,000 00 

llGssouri 68 20,000 00 

Virginia Os 3,000 00 

Ohio 68 30,000 OO 

78,000 00 

Circulation ^^ 64,590 00 



85 

Sack County . B(mk, Janesville, 

IGssourL 68 24,000 00 

Tennessee 6s 13,000 00 

Indiana. 6s 6,000 00 

48,000 00 

Circuiation 84,920 00 

Bock River Bankj Beloit 

Virginia 6s 7,000 00 

Kentucky 6s 5,000 00 

ICssouri 6s. _ ^ 11,000 00 

Specie 27,616 00 

'50,616 00 

Circulationw 46,999.j00 

Sauk County Bank, Baraboo. 

Missouri 6s - 81,000 00 

31,000 00 

Circulation - - €4,794 00 

Second Ward Bank, Milwaukee. 

Tennessee 6s 10,000 00 

Ifiasouri 68 1,000 00 

11,000 00 

Circulation 9,202 00 

State Bank, Madison. 

Wisconsin 7s 8,000 00 "" 

Specie 13,400 00 

21,400 00 

Circulation 21,400 00 

State Bank of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. 

Tennessee 68. 6,000 00 

Missouri 68 81,000 00 

87,000 00 

Circulation 29,729 00 



S6 

St Croix River Bank, Brinkerhoff. 

Louisiana 6b 10,600 00 

Yirginia Os 13,000 00 

nimois 68 ^ 28,8jOO 00 

North Carolina.. 6s 6,000 00 

Tennessee 68 6,000 00 

Missonri 6s 103,000 00 

Specie 6,000 00 

/ 172,300 00 

Circulation 150,000 00 

St. Croix VcUhy Bank, Si. Croix Falls. 

ItfissoUri 68 66,000 00 

66,000 00 

Circulation *- 49,»96 00 

I 
IVeUworth County Bank, Ddannm. 

Tenneseee 68 20,000 00 

Miesoari 6a 24,009 00 

Virginia 68 4,000 00 

California Vs 5,000 00 

53,000 00 

Circulation 42,700 00 

Wemktsha County Bank, Waukesheu 

Missouri- ---.-68 49,000 00 

Virginia 6s 16,000 00 

Tennessee. 68 20,000 00 

Louisiana 6s 6,000 00 

Illinois .68 5,000 00 

California. .-- J7« -. 5,000 00 ' '' 

W,ood bo 

Circulation 83,672 00 



37 

fFauptm Semky Waupun, 

ICdsouri 68. -j , ^ 16,000 00 

Georgia 68 2,000 00 

Illinois 68 1,000 00 

Indiana 6s 10,000 00 

Specie 1,960 00 

29,060 00 

Circulation 24,785 00- ' 



WitmebagQ Cotmty Banh^ NeenaK 

Mi«8piiri 68 19,000 00 

Virginia 68 10,000 00 



29,000 00 
Circulation :.. 23,942 00 

WUcansin Marine 4' ^»>« Ins. Co., Milwaukee. 

Wisconsin Ys 80,000 00 

Wisconsin 6s iO,000 00 

Ma.*Wat.R.R. Bond8..88 24,000 00 



74,000 00 
Circulation 66,872 00 

Wisconsin Bqnk of Madison. 

MiBaowd 68 68,000 00 

Illinois ...68 10,000 00 

Tennessee 68 6,000 00 

Indiana* 68 20,600 00 

Specie 16,400 00 

108,900 00 

Circulation '. 88,400 OO 

Wisconsin VaUejf Banh^. Milbnllc 

lJi«80ttri..j.--68 86,000 00 

Sp^ie. 5,000 00 

'^ 40,000 00 

Circulation 83,000 «ft 



% 



98 

BAlfKS WIHDIHG UP. . 

Sank of Commercty Milwaukee. 

Specie on hand 881 00 

Cirenlaiion ontstandiDg 831 00 

Bank of the Westj Madison. 

Specie on hand •508 n 

Circulation outstanding 804 00 

• 

Exchange Bank of W. J. Belt ^ Co., Milwaukee. 

Speeieonhand 183 00 

Circulation outstanding 167 00 

Olobe Banky Milwaukee. 

Specie on hand - 11,500 00 

Circulation outstanding 10,900 00 

Peoples Bank, Milwai$kee. 

Speeieonhand ...• 12,000 00 

Circulation outstanding 11,997 00 

Wisconsin JBank, Mineral Point. 

Specie on hand • 4,870 00 

Circulation outstanding 4>870 00 

BROKEN BANES, 

Oermania Bank, Milwaukee. 

Speeieonhand 35 00 

Circulation outstanding 35 00 

Oshkosh City Bank, Oshkosh. 

Speeieonhand 827 00 

Circulation outstanding 327 00 

* Tiioe of redemption luLying expired, the aboTe amount is retained^for tas 
mpi&d. 



TTktf foUouring Statement mil show the names qf the persons 
foho have executed Bonds now on deposit in the Bank 
Comptroller's Office^ {in addition to the State Stocks ds^ 
posited^ to further secure the redemption qf the Counter^ 
signed Notes issued to their respective BankSy as required 
by Section ITy of the Banking Law. 

Arctio Bank, Eagle Point, penalty of bond. |87;600 00 

JTamei of Bonckmen^Myron V. Hall, B. F. Hall, and Philip 
A. HaU. 

Arctic Bank, Eagle Point, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

' VmM$ <ff Borukmen—MjTon V« Hall and B. F. HaU. 

Badger State Bank, JanefiTille, penalty of bond 0,250 00 

Kmmn tf JSimdrnien^Vfm, J, B9II and I. L. X>imock. 

Bank of Beloit, Beloit, penalty of bond 1 2,500 00 

ITamn of Bondunm—Qoorge B. SaDderson, Jolin Hackett, 
and W, F, Qoodhne, 

Bank of Beloit, Beloit, penalty of bond. 8,000 00 

JTamei of Bondamef^^Qeo. B. Sanderson A W. F, Goodhue. 

Bank of the Capitol, Madison, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

. JKhrm of Bondmen— K B. Smith apid J, H. Diokinaon. 

' Bank of City of La Crosse, La Crosse, penalty of bond 0,250 00 

MaunoM cf Bondmm— John M. Levy and Thos. Spenoo. 



40 
Bank of Columbus, Columbus, penalty of bond 912,500 00 

Namet cf JBondtmen — G. C. Barnes, Ei-astas Barnes, Aaron 
Blank, Daniel O. Davis, Wm. L. Lewis, A. G. Cook, 
A. S. Birdsej, G. W. Shephard, Benjamin Campbell, 
Peter Wertz, S. H. Warner and James 0. Barnes. 

Bank of Eau Claire, £au Claire, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

NamM of JSoruhmen — W. H. Gleason and C. If. Selej. 

Bank of Fond du Lac, Fond du Lac, penalty of bond 12,500 00 
Namn of Jiondsmen^A. G. Butler. James £wen, Q. Mc 
Williams, and T. F. Strong. 

Bank of Fox Lake, Fox Lake, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

. J(m6t of JhmUmenr—Johxk W. Davis. Wm. J. Dexter, and 

William E. Smith. 

Baafcof Grttnt €04 E. & HboUey & Co., PlaUeyiil^ 

. penaltjr of bond; I2,M0 00 

Jifmm4^ Bondsmen^lBl.U,,Biticl4&y, £, F. W. Sills, D. 
^ G. Clark, C. H. Spafford, £. R. Wadsworth and E. N. 
. Clark, 

Bod: of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, penalty of bond 12,600 00 

Ifamet of Bondgmm%^0. D, Cooker 0. D. Kash, Rodney 
Sherman, John S. Rockwell, Wm. Nash, R. W. Peake, 
and Joseph Warner. 

Bank of Montello, Mdntello, penalty of b<Mid 6, WO 00 

Jfam§ of Bondmnan — E. B. Kelsey. 

Bank of Monroe, Monroe, penalty of bond. 6,900 00 

fimnm nf Bondsmen — Arabut Ludlow, John A, BinghaiD^ 
Asa Richardson and John W. Stewart 

Bank of tbe North West, Fond du Lac, penalty of bond 12,500 00 
mtMm ^ Bondtmen^BenjtkmiR F. Moore, J. K L^flbitl, 
John SewoU, Sdward Pler^ J. H. Mfurtin, John Bon* 

nifiter and Aug, G. Rnggles.— 2 bonds of 64250 eaoL 

•I * 

Bank of Oconto, Oeonto, penalty of bond. 1 2^M0 ' 00 

JVame* <^ Bondtmen—S, W. Bowren, Geo. Woodruff, Slrui 
Harwood, Francis L. Cagwin, 0. C. Bamei and Bdwib 
Hart. i ' 



4i 
Btak^dt' Oiftlikosh, OsHklMdi, pabtlly of bond 112,600 00/ 

Jfame§ cf JSondtmen^Attaiel W. Kellogg, Jolm ^^txgendd 
and William Kellogg. 

Bank of Pirahrie du Gh'ien, PriM«*da Ckien, pen^ty bond; U,6W W 

ItomM cf Bwkdmufi — Axaaom JSIdred, Edward D, Holton, 

H. H. Gamp and Robert MeDzies. 

* 

BafiV of Baeine, Racine, penalj of bond \tfi¥y'Q^- 

KameM of j^ondtm^ii'— Aug. L. McOrea, Wm. J. Bell Mid * 
Heniy J. Ullmann. 

Bank of Kpon, Ripon, penalty of bond 6|260 00' ' 

K<vm» of j^ofubmm— Richard Oatlin, I^v'd. P. Brodiiray, 
Geo. W. Mitchell, Hiram H. Mead, Thoft B. Robbina, 
Ezra L. ITorthrop and A. M. Skeela. 

Bank of Sheboygan, Sheboygani penalty of bond. .. 6,260 00 

Jfame* of Bondtrnm—AMg, L. McOrea, W. W. King, 0. F. 
Moore, Warren Smith, Van Spe Tonng, Chriatian 
Raab and J. V. Kirkland. 



') 



Bank of Watertown, Watertown, penalty of bond... 12,600 OoT 

NomeM of JBondsmm — A. L, Pritchard, Linns R, Cadj, Ln* 

tfaer A. Oole and Ebeneaser W. Cola -''- ^ 



Bank of Watertown, Watertown, penalty of bond. .. 12,600 00 
KaMes of JSondunen^^A, L, Pritchard, Luther A. Oele, 
Ebeneaer W. Oole, Linns R. Cadj and John Richards. 

Brown Obanty Bank, DePere, penalty of bond .. 7,000 0#^ 

IfmM9 of BondtmsH — Joseph G. Lawton and John O. 
Roorback. ^ 

Oealral Bank of Wibmusin, JanesTille, penalty of bond 6^260 dO 

JKmnm of JSorubmmh^'Wwmn Norton, Wm. H. Tripp, J. 

Bodwell Doe, Wm. A. Lawrence, J. DeWitt Aesfonl, 

Otis W. Norton, Z. P. Bnrdick, J. F. Willard, S. G. 

Williams, F. 8. Eidred, E. A. Foot, Jonathan Cory 

. .and Lyman J. Bnrrowa. 

Omitral Bank of Wisconsini Janesi^ille, penally of bond 0,260 00 

JfamM ^ Bondtmen^Wm. H. Tripp, Warren Norton, J. 
F. Willard,. J. DeWitt Rezford, Otis W. Norton, Jona- 
than Oory, F. S. Eldred, L. Borroirs, Wm. A. Lanrenee 
and Z. P. Bnrdieki 

66 



) 



42 
CSilppewa 6ank» Dunn Oonnfyy pentliy of bond. £0,000 00 

Kamet •f Bondtmsn — Sbeoeser Lathrop and Jamea 0. 
Mann. 

Cily Bank of Bearer Dam, Bearer Dam, pen'ty of bond 12,500 00 

I^annM of Bondtmsn—'D. D. Read, Beoj. Q. BIom^ Oharlia 
Idiller, A. Joj, S. L. Rose and D, 0. JackiOB. 

Citj Bank of Kenosha, Eenoiha, penalty of bomd. . . t5,000 00 

NamB$ of BonduMn^Wenrj B. Towalee, John V. Ajm, 
Samuel Hale and H. W. Hubbard. 

CSfy Bank of Racine^ Racine, penalty of bond 12,600 00 

JTamei of JBondtmtn — Gilbert Eoapp, W. H. Waterman 
and Alexander HcOluif . 

Columbia County Bank, Portage City, penalty ef bond 0,250 00 
MoMM of Bondtmon — Sam. Manhall; Qhaa F. Ilalej' and 

H. S. Haskill. , 

Columbia County Bank, Portage City, penalty of bond 0,260 00 

^ J^amet of Bondtmen—John P. McGregor, Fred. S. Ilslejr, 
Samuel Maranall, Ohaa. F. Ilalej and J. A. Ellia. 

Commercial Bank, Racine, penalty of bond. 20,000 00 

Nanut of Bondtmen—^earj S. Durand and Jacob W. Moore. 

Com Exchange Bank, Waupun, penalty of bond 12,600 00 

Karnes of BondnMn—Wm, Hobkirk and Andrew Poudfit 

Dane County Bank, Madison, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

J/dmes of i^ondfrnen^-JamM Richardion, N. B. Van Q\yk% 
and Timotbj Brown. • 

Dodge County Bank, Bearer Dam, penalty of bond. . 12,500 00. 

I^ca7u$ of Bondanun-'S^ L. Roae, 'W^m, Farrii^on and 
^ Robert V. Bogert . 

Exchange Bank of Darling & Co., Fond du Lac, pen- 
alty of bond 12,000 00 

^Jfame^ of Bondtmen^KejeB A. Darling <fr Thos. S. Wrigbt. 

Blkhorn Bank, Elkhorn, penalty of Jbond 6,600 00 

Miwua of Bondtmm^DfD. Spencer, J. Q. HUIa* and Geo. 
Bulkeloj. 



4$ 

Fmiiwt Bank, Hudson, penaltjof bond. $12,500 00 

JFaoiM of JBondimen^-O^ Hoyt, Alhtn DftWBon^ and Ohm, 
B. Dexter. 

farmers <k Millers Bank, Milwaukee^ penalty of bond 12,500 00 

JTmui of Borukmenr^Edwvrd H. Brodketd, S, H. Alden* 
Anflon Eldred, A. Finch, Jr., and John Loektrood. 

FoMsi City Bank, Waukesha, penalty of bond 12,50(r 00 

ITames of Jionitmon — Sydej A. Bean and H. STevton. 

Fox River Bank, Green Bay, penalty of bond T,000 00 

MauMB of JSontkmon—Jomph Q. Lawton, H. L. If artio, F. 
DeBDoyers and John Day. 

€erman Bank, Sheboygan, penalty of bond 12»500 00 

JVamei of Bondsmen — John Ewing and Jamea H. Head. 

Qlobe Bank, Milwaukee, penalty of bond €v250 00 

JTameB of Bonebmen — A. Finch, Jr., Wm. P. Lynde, C. D. 

Coolce, Anson Eldred, and E. H, Brodhead. ^ 

€bieen Bay Bank, Marinett, penalty of bond 6,250 00 

Mm** <f Bondtmen-^jyasdel WeUa, Jr.« Harrison Lndiog- 
ton, and Nelson Xiudington. 

Qreen Bay Bank, Marinett, penalty of bond. 2,500 00 

MmneM of Bondsmen — Harrison Ludiogton dk Nelson Lnd- 
ington. 

Hall <fe Brothers fiank, Eau Claire, penalty of bond. 12,500 00 

Names of Bondsmen — Mjron T. Hall and B, F, Hall. 

Hudson City Bank, Hudson, penalty of bond, 6,250 00 

Names pf Bondsmen — M, S. Gibson and J, O. Henning. 

Janesville City Banki JanesvOle, penalty of bend 0,260 00 

Names of Bondsmen — Sam. Lightbody and Joa. T. Wright, 

JeCvsw Oounty Bank, Watertown, penalty of bond. IS^f (^0,'OQ^ 

NameS^ of Bondsmen-Charles G. Harger and Qaniel Jonea. 

Juneau Bank, Milwaukee, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

tjWuoMBpi Bondsmen—- Jaaes LndingtoQ, fi,L.Eood# JiB.. . / , 
Gross, Sdwin H« Go<)drich, sad 8. B. Scolt, ^ . 



44 
Efliricdm BBnk, Black Rirer FaUs, paaaltf of bond. 12,50a 00 

Names of BoadHBen*— Alonao W. Mack and Henr^ W. 
Hanrood. 

EantaojAtt Bank, La Crosie, penalty of bond 12^74K> 00 

Names of Bondsmen— Wilson Colwell and Qeo. A. Beek. 
2 bonds, one for $6,350, and ono for $6,500. 

EeaoAa County Bank, Kenosha, penalty of bond... 9,200 00 

Names of Bondsmen— John O. Coleman, George Kimball* 
■ Thomas Wright, Uriah Newman, and John V. Ayer. 

Kenosha County ^Bank, Kenosha, penalty of bond... 2,^0 00 

Names of Bondsmen — John V. Ajer, Wm. Goff, Metcalf 
and Merrill, Clement T. Le Fcvre, Camilla Kimball; 
Uiuah Newman, Harmon MatBh, and Smily Hanh. 

Lumbermans^Bank, Conterelle, penalty of bond 18,750 00 

Noae ef Bondsman — Andrew Prondfik 

Lumbermans Bank, Conterelle, penalty of bond..... 16,800 00 

Name of Bondsman — Andrew Proudfit. 

Lumbermans Bank, ContM«lle» penalty of bond 37,(00 00 * 

Names of Bondsmen — Andrew Proudfit, W. J. Gibson, 
Thomas Falyey, and Chase A. Stevens. 

Manitouwoc County Bank, Two Birers, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

Name of Bondsman — Oharles Knehn. 

■ 

Marine Bank, Milwaukee, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

Names of Bondsmen — Qeo. H. Hazelton, Jacob A. Hoover, 
;in B. MedbuTT; awl Edmund H. Hasleton. 



lleroantile Bank, Bearer Dam, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

Names of Bondsmen — Wm. S. H^nntington, Edw. 0. Hun- 
tington, and P. Huntington. 



M^rehantv Bank, Madison, penalty; of bond 6,2M Ofi 

Names of Bondsmen— 0. T. Plowen, Wm. E. BdUo, and 
H. G. Blias. 

Merchaata Bank, Madisoii, peuiky of bond O^iM 00 

Names of Bondsmen— L. H. Ohuroh aad L. Gr^orf. 



I 



45 

Ifotthali and MeohaniiKrBAiik^ WliiAawaiert poMdljr 

of bond 1%BOO 00 

STames of Bondsmen — Alex. Qraham, Laurence Q. Qriliani» 
Augustas H. Scoville, John S. Partridge. 

Northern Bank, Howard, penaltjr of bond 12,M>0 00 

Names of Bondsmen — Otto Tank, M, L. Martin, and B. 
Oonklin. 

North Western Bank, Steyens Point, penalty of bond 16,000 00 

Kamea of Bondsmen — Alonso Wood and Wm. W, Wood, 

Oakwood Bank, North Pepin, penalty of bond 111,500 00 

Kamea of Bondsmen — ^James O. Mann and £. Lathrop. ' 

Oakvood Bank, North Pepin, penalty of bond t,SOO 00 

Kames of fioodsmen — James 0. Mann and Maiy H. Mann« 
Othkosh Commercial Bank, Osbkosh, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

Names of Bondsmen — Henry Strong and Kelson Fletcher. 

Peoples Bank, Milwaukee, penalty of bond ^.. 5,250 00 

Karnes of Bondsmen — H, Haerte), E. B, Greenleaf, and A. 
W. Greenleaf 

Producers Bank, Janesrille, penalty of bond 25,000 00 

Karnes of Bondsmen — Alexander T. Gray and Edward M. 
Hunter. 

Baoine Connty Bank, Racine, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

Kames of Bondsmen — George 0. Korthrop, L. W. Munroe» 
B. M. Korton, Kickolas D. FratC, H. S. Dtfrsnd, A. B, 
Munroe, John W, Gary, and John Thompson. 

Baeine Connty Bank, Baeine, penalty of bond ...... 1 5fO00 00 

Kames of Bondsmen — Geo. 0. Kortfarop, Kicholas D. Fratt^ 
John W. Gary. John Thompson, 0, W. White, L. W. 
Munroe, K. Pendleton, and A. M. K*Arton. 

Bock County Bank, Janesrille, penalty of bond 12,500 00 

Kames of Bondsmen— John' J. R. Petee, T, Jaekman, J. 
B. Grosby, Andrew Palmer, Jelin L. Kunbdl, and L. 
S. Stone. 



» 



46 
Book Rirer Bank^ Beloit, pentlty of bond #12,600 00 

nTames of Bondsmen — John M, Keep, LucIob O. Fisher* 
and Alfred L. Field. 

Sauk County Bank, Baraboo, penalty of bond 12,600 00 

Kaxnes of Bondsmen — Simeon Mills and Terrill Thomas, 

S«cond|Ward Bank, Milwaukee, penalty of bond 0,200 00 

Names of Bondsmen — Augustus G. Wilmanns, William H. 

Jacobs, and John Bertachj-. 
I 

State Bank, Madison, penalty of bond 12,600 00 

Karnes of Bondsmen — Samuel Marshall and Cha& F. Haley. 

State^Bank^of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, penalty of bond 37,600 00 
Nkmes of Bondsmen — Jas. B. Martin, S. Cramer, Anson 
Eldred, John Catlin, P. W. Badglej, Joshua Hatha- 
waj, John Q. Inbusch, and E. B. Dickerman. 

m 

St. Croix River Bank, BrinkerhoflT, penalty of bond.. 18,760 00 

Name of Bondsman — J. M. Dickinson. 

St. Croix River Bank, Brinkerhoflf, penalty of bond.. 18,750 00 

Karnes of Bondsmen — J' M. Dickinson and J. T. Martin. 

St. Croix Valley Bank, St. Croix Falls, penalty of bond 12,600 OQ 

Karnes of Bondsmen — D. D. Spencer and H. 8. Witibor. 

Walwortb County Bank, Delavan, penalty of bond.. 0,260 00 

Kames of Bondsmen — Wm. 0. Allen, George PasBagei W. 
W, Dinsmore, A. MoClurg, and B« D. White, 



• < I 



Walworth County Bank, Delavan, penalty of bond.. ^6,260 00 
Names of Bondsmen — Wm. 0. Alien and W. W. Dinsmore. 

Waukesha County Bank, Waukesha, penalty of bond 26,000 00 

Karnes of Bondsmen — A. Miner, K. Burroughs, T. Rich- 
mond, H. K. Davis, Wm. White, Silas Richardson, 
Wm. Blair, Sehina Bazney, George Lawrence, Jr., and 
Martin Field. 

Waupun Bank, Waupun, penalty of bond 6,260 00 

Karnes of Bondsmen^Leander B. Hills, Seth S. Hills, and 
Leander Hills. 



47 
Wfamebago Gouty Bank, Neenah^ penalty of boad. . 0,250 00 

Vlunes of Bondsmen — Oharlei Oronkhite and Aaron H. 
Oronkhite. 

Wisconsin Bank of IfadiBon, penalty of bond 25,000 00 

Vames of Bondsmen — Manoah D. Miller, Darias C. Jack- 
son, Hiram Miller, and Noah Lee. 

WiBoonsin Marine and Fire Inauraiice Company, Mil- 
waukee, penalty of bond 25,000 00 

ITames of Bondsmen — Qeorge Smith and Alex. Mitchell. 

Wisconsin Talky Bank, ^Ilrille, penalty of bond... 12,500 00 
Vame of Bondsaian — James Bichardson. 



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DOCUMENT "F. 



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====== 



REPOKT. 



DjEPABTHENT of PubUO iNSTBUOTiaEr. 

lb ihe Zegishiure : 

At this date no reports have been received from Counties 
by this department. It is impossible, therefore, in this com- 
munication, to comply with that requirement of the law which 
makes it the duty of the Superintendent to report in each 
year 

1st. An abstract of all the Common School reports received 
by him from the several clerks of the County Boards of Su- 
.pervisors. 

2tid. A statement of the condition of the Common Schools 
of this State. 

8d. Estimates and accounts of expenditures of the School 
monies. 

These will be given iu a supplemental report at as early a 
day as possible, together with such additional matter relating 
to my office and the Common Schools of the State an I may 
deem expedient to communicate. 

I propose to devote this paper to the presentation of a 
few thoughts on the general subject of Education, and the 
duties and responsibilities of parents in connection therewith. 
"What" said Michilet, " is the first part of politics ? Educa- 
tion. Ihe second? JEducation. And the tliird? Education.'' 
Herein lies the safeguard of our Republican Institution^ the 
highest glory of a People and the hope of a World. I would 



6 

that there was a faller and truer perception of this in the 
minds of the American people. I think it quite clear, and 
the iact is forcing itself upon public attention, that it is too 
much sought by legislation, and by mere legal enactments to 
promote the interests of the country and render permanent 
and secure its free institutions. There is pressing need that 
this great nation change its policy somewhat, in certain direc- 
tions at least, that it devote the millions of treasure all 
along absolutely expended for nought and to the detriment 
of great and vital interests, to the planting of schools through- 
out the land and to furnishing the means of right education 
to its entire population. There would then be fewer evils to 
entrench themselves across the path of its prosperity, — evils 
which lie back of the outward form in which they manifest 

themselves — evils which have their origin primarily in the 
uneducated mind and heart,and against which our weapons 
of war, our many and severe laws, our stem and unpitying 
penalties are powerless indeed. 

It is not to be denied that the present age is greatly distin- 
guished because of its rich and varied discoveries and devel- 
opments in Science and Philosophy, and their practical bear- 
ing on the more important concerns and interests of Life. 
How much of light have they thrown on that which was 
doubtful or hidden. And how lucid and satisfactory has 
been their interpretation of that which was dark and mys- 
terious to the human soul. With reference to th^e how 
much stranger is Truth than Fiction, how infinitely more 
to be prized as the utterance of the great God through the 
medium of his invisible works, sweeping forever away our 
doubts and our scepticism, and saying '^ Be not faithless but 
believing." 

And yet I am impressed to believe that our country is 
comjparatively— I say comparativdjf — as enlightened and in- 
tellectually distinguished as it once was. True it caanotbe 
denied that there is more general intelligence abroad in the 
land, that the| discoveries of the age ^av^ shed light on the 



minds of our people, that the institntioiis of learning have 
greatlj multiplied, and the facilities for obtaining knowledge 
largely increased. But it is denied, and will l)e denied so 
long a§ the evidences of the truth of the denial exist, that 
intelligisncey 8K)un4 And uaefol learning, doe^ not possess the 
relative and compianding influence to whieh it is entitled. 
It does not now a§ it once did, take the lead and hold in 
high and imperious control the interests and destinies of the 
nation. As an evidence of this I point you to a marked re- 
ceding fyom the high ground once occupied — a decent from 
the commanding eminence on which our fathers stood, wit- 
nessed in the dying away of intelligence in the Assemblies 
and Senates of a free nation, the lowering of its public standard 
for merit and trust, the departing of courtesy and decorum 
and of unsullied dignity from legislative halls, the accept- 
ance of other securities than those of intelligence and moral 
worth and of other pledges for fidelity and success in the 
enactment and administration of law. Kow all these are 
prools, clear and fatal marks of wasting instead of advan- 
cing intelligence among the people. Horace Mann uttered 
a great truth when he declared that ^^ We have not only to 
propitiate to our aid a host of good spirits, but we have to ex- 
orcise a host of evil ones. Every aspect of our affairs, pub- 
lic and private, demonstrates that we need ior their successful 
management a vast accession to the common stock of intelli- 
gence and virtue," 

I may mention here as demanding an increase of intel- 
lectual and moral enlightenment the evil tendency of that 

radicalism . which is abroad in the land, and which needs to 

' > ' • 

be under the control of cultivated intellect and moral senti- 

'I . . • , 

ment. I mean now a radicalism that would have no Sab- 
bath, that would annihilate every existing institution — cat'ry 
flame and bloodshed through the State and iTation — ^blot out 
all law, and seek by one sturdy blow to destroy all evil, and 
by one great effort to purify human society, and lift up Hu- 
manity to the proud height of its destined glory. I have said 



that in riglit Education lies the safety of our Repablican insti- 
tationsy the glory of a people and the hope of the world. Bnt 
let it be understood that we may mtdtiply our many facili- 
ties for learning, and add millions of dollars to our already 
large funds for educational purposes, and dot the land from 
one end to the other with School houses, Seminaries, and 
Colleges, and tumish Teachers possessed of the rarest intel- 
lectual accomplishments, and yet not secure for our sons and 
daughters a right education. The great and essential thing 
may still be lacking. We will see this when we consider 
that man has a threefold nature : Physical, Intellectual, and 
Moral, and that the proper and harmonious training, discipline 
and improvement of this threefold nature alone is education. 
Now the business ot education for the most part has proceeded 
upon the supposition that man had only an intellectual na- 
ture, and that in our schools of whatever class, only this 
nature was to be developed and matured. Ifan is exceeding- 
ly proud of his intellect. So much is this the case that many 
a time nothing offends him more than a disparagement of this. 
Not even a detraction from his moral character vnll give him 
that quick offence and kindle that dislike and resentment 
that you may be sure of, to speak meanly of his talents. 
Hany there are who would deem it more of a compliment to 
be called a bad man than a fool. Tell him one of his moral 
deficiencies, yet still he may linger in your company ; convince 
him that you think he is not above half-witted — call him a 
ihick-head and a numbskull — and you may be sure to be 
troubled no longer with his acquaintance. 

I do not say that too much attention has been paid to 
man's intellectual nature, that we have erred when we have 
expended vast sums of money and marshalled hosts of in- 
structors for the purpose of leading up the youthful mind to 
ihe manhood of its understanding. These intellectual pow- 
ers are noble — ^they are something of God — they are God- 
like. But they do not constitute all of the human soul that 
is to live forever. And we do greviously sin against the laws 



9 

of our being when we exalt the intellect and lavish all atten- 
tion upon it at the expense of dwarfing the moral nature, and 
rearing up a race of intelligent worldlings. It is a fact wbich 
will meet with universal admission that no person can be 
more dangerous to community than those who have intellec- 
tual education without moral principle. Let* France testify. 
Experience has there demonstrated that in the departments 
enjoying the highest intellectual cultivation, the greatest 
amount of crime exists. Hence the best minds there, are 
compelled to acknowledge that education in France has pro- 
duced crime! It is a one-sided education — ^rather it is no ed- 
ucation at all — only a mere development of the intellect to 
the neglect of the divinest part of man. 

Along with the intellectual, the moral nature must be de- 
veloped, nurtured and trained in our schools. Man must not 
only become learned in the sciences and in all worldly wisdom 
but learned with respect to that higher and profounder know- 
ledge without which he is uneducated indeed. In this har- 
monious development of all that the human mind is, we have 
insured to us the permanent and progressive well-being, pros- 
perity and happiness of individuals and of a people. 

Mere intellectual knowledge is a power that can be em- 
ployed for evil as well as for good. It needs therefore to be 
under the guidance and control of great moral principles. 
When these principles are wanting, every thing in a country 
is tending to utter disorder and ruin. There is no safety for 
a State or a nation without them. You may have the wisest 
government that can be invented and arm it with all the 
checks upon wrong that can possibly be devised, but if you 
have not at the same time a right system of education, if the 
intellectual nature be careftilly trained and the moral neglect- 
ed and even debased your best laws will be mere nulities,and 
no earthly power can enforce them. Back of the law,back of 
legislation, back of penalties, back of administration, execu- 
tive and judicial authority lies, that which only can give force 
and effect to these and which constitutes the only strong and 



10 

enduring foundation of national power and prosperity. This 
great Eepublic may have its standing army and its powerful 
navy, it may have its fortifications scattered along the whole 
extent of its coast, and its walls of strength bristling with 
cannon at the mouth of every harbor, it may multiply its 
prisons, and dujigeons and scaffolds — ^and smite with its stem 
and vengeful penalties on the outward forms of evil, but these 
are not and cannot constitute its safe defences nor can 
they guard securely its liberties. There are foes against 
which these oppose no barrier whatever, foes more to be 
dreaded than an invading armj — they cannot be filled by 
cannon shot nor thrust through with the glittering bayonet 
Chains cannot bind them, nor dungeon walls confine them, 
nor gibbets strangle them. Intelligence in connection with 
moral virtue alone can smite them down, and establish this 
mighty Union upon the rock of safety forever. 

It is important that I remark in this connection that the 
highest intellectual and moral culture cannot be had without 
the aid of physical training. It is impossible that there should 
be a harmoniously developed soul in an undeveloped or a 
partially developed body, a sound, vigorous healthy mind in 
a detective, sickly, dwarfed and feeble physical organization. 
The outward man then needs to be educated. And it is lor 
want of proper physical education, that our thrifty sires are 
fast being succeeded by a race of puny and imbecile sons 
and daughters. 

That the mind, whatever its nature and powers, acts through 
the medium of organised matter, is a conceded point. The 
body is the tenement,the mind the inhabitant. Here, in this 
its earthly and temporal habitation, the soul thinks, and com- 
munes, and sees, and hears, and speaks, and journeys from 
place. It has palpable contact vith the material world 
through the medium of the senses. It looks through these 
windows, the eyes. The friendly word and the melody of 
song thrill upon it along the auditory nerve. It feels and re- 
turns the brotherly clasp of the hand by the ^ense of touch. 



11 

and breathes the Bioma of flowoni throng the nostrils* It 
wills^rand the various memben of the body, doitsibidding^-*- 
the feet -ruor swifUj on erratsda of mercj, the ha&d gfasps the 
pen and writes down the thoughts that breathe and words 
that bum. Over many ixinctions of Uie body it ezerdsesits 
n^ysterions control. And such is the intimate connection 'ez« 
istmg between the two, that they, either eqoy or soffer to« 
gethen 

We were saying that the mind acts throng the medinm of 
organized matter. We wish now to say, that, to urge it Ibir- 
ward,as istoo frequently done, by long continued and exoitiDg 
labor, without the letet regard to the laws of •onv.physical 
being, is absurd^ and attended by evils, the most manifest and 
appalling. r . . . 

These evils, in their incipient or matured development^ 
may be seen thronging our infEuat and distriot schools, es- 
pecially those of our cities sad larger- villages, in the shap^ 
of shattered c6Dstitati(»is, or of meblal weakness and stupids 
ity, while the nuserable hypochondriacs that are too frequent- 
ly leaving our colleges and higher schools* of .learning, givia 
melanchoUy evidence that even on classic ground aind- in 
academic shades a fidse philosophy exerts its pernicious influ- 
enee and deatmctive power. £very where shall we read .on 
human forma around us, that human, eonstitutioqs have suf- 
fered from the hand of violence— nfttujre's orgmuc iand vital 
laws ontraged, and ruined and enfeebled body becoming that 
tomb of the min4. 

Multiplied and alarming are the evils which haye- originat- 
ed, and do, now originate^ in the gentoal neglect o£ the: sdU 
ence of physiology, upon' which our Bystems of eduiebti«n 
aheuld mainly be based^ By this science we are iostrueted 
in the nature and history of those fuaetions • the harmonious 
action of which gives health and life. It shows us, too,/ what 
are the opetcitions ^f the mind, as exhibited, throiigill this ^- 
i;anited; materiality. The inaportantitruth w}mh it proclauns 
here that all mental phenomena are exhibited in tfoiB life 



13 

tbrongh aa apparatus or organ denominated the brain — die 
throne and seat of the intellectual operations — ought never 
to be lost si^t of, especially by those employed in the work 
of edncation. When this organ, the brain, is in a well de. 
Teloped and healthy condition, the intellectaal manifestations 
will be clear, vigorous and correct. Whenever disease in- 
vades this structure, aberration of mind is the result, its de- 
gree proportioned to the amount and force of disease, and 
may be seen from the slightest eccentricity ^of character to 
the most confirmed and raving madness. 

Imbecility and idiocy depend upon a want of development 
or upon a malformation of the brain, aU going to show that 
the full development and healthy state of this organ is as 
necessary to correct mental manifestatious, as of a healthy 
stomach to active digestion, or of sound lungs to free inspir- 
ation, or of free, strong muscles to vigorous locomotion. — 
Long-continued and over excitement in any of these organs 
tends to derange and weaken their powers* and if the aggres. 
sions continue, their structure is soon implicated, their fdnc- 
tions decline, and death is imposed as a consequence of their 
•oessation. . 

This offers a solution of the fact that pro^acted and severe 
fludy, over- exciting and exhausting to the brain, is attended 
with such pernicious and oft-times fatal consequences. Even 
though the cause to which we have alluded might not destroy 
Mfe, yet it would so weaken and disable the brain, that the 
mind never thereafter would act with freedom or energy. — 
Imbecility^ or even insanity, might be the result, and the in- 
dividual, instead of living long and useftiUy, and making 
bright as he thought to do, some pages of his country's hi»> 
tory, linger throughSa few years of weak and miserable exis- 
tenoe, and then descend into a pyemature grave. And all 
tiii^ fortbe want of proper care and judicious managements 
er that fiappy medium of excitement, which, whfle it arouses 
and strengthens, does not infringe upon tine healthy action <i£ 
iihe brain. 



It 

It will always do to excite Knd qmekon the dnggfeh and 
apathetic to diK^ence and activity ; but look w6ll to those of 
a moxe refined and delicate temperament, whose minds, more 
etherial or cast in a finer mould, respond so qnickly to the 
aligbteBt toueb of emulation or ambitLon. These are liable 
to speedy exhanstion, and have been sacrificed by thoosands. 
In the ardent porsnit of knowledge their days and nights 
have been spent. They would rise early to distinction and 
to fiime. But the golden visions, in whose enchantment they 
moved, soon fitded from view and their snn which arose with 
such resplendent glory, set in it very morning. EirkeWhite 
was a notable example, of whom Lord Byron exclaimed : 

O, what ft noble heart mm here iindoiM^ 
When Sdeoce salMeBtroy^ her ftTOrito •qh. 

He die4 at Oxford in his 21st year, f^ martyr to study. 
Gk)dman, one of the ablest anatomists this country ever pro- 
ducedy died at 32. Wells, an eloquent lectnrer on the same 
subject^ at 30. Bechat, whose ardor in the pursuit of scionoe 
y^ua hardly, ever surpassed, at 32. Lord Byron, ^bout the 
^ame age. Pollock, author of the ^' (huin^ (^. ^Tbne," at 24. To 
this list we may add the accomplished and eloquent Summer- 
field,, whp went firom bis pulpit efforts in utter exhaustion^ and 
the very pressure of whose reputation hurried him firpm dua 
earthly scene of labor. There, too, was Kine, whose glowing 
words held admiring thousands as by enchantment, and who 
wept down amidst the teans and prayers of the church to aa 
eady grave. 

Ho one at all acquainted with the laws of organisation need 
be in doubt as to the cause of these sad and lamentable re*^ 
suljbi|. It was inordinate or excessive ment^ labor. It was 
the frictwn^ so to speak, of the mind upon the body, that 
brought on speedy dissolution. Nature's laws cannot be io- 
fiinged with impunily— H^ilent and tranquilly jthey will con- 
tinue thfdir operations, though w;e heed them not, or suffer 
^d pinch in their violation I One of the most learned Pro* 
fipesors of Europe, as he lay upon his death-bed, to which he 



14 

}iad been brought by tbe inteoaitj of bis applioatioB to crtadj, 
exoloLmed : — ^^ Alas I I baye been leamizig every thing but 
the all and most important one of taking care of myseli" 
Though this knowledge caime too late for him, let ns heed 
the warning, soleqin and inypreaslTe, coming iq> "from the 
tomb of departed genias and worth, and learn to take care of 
•urselves. Especially ought those to heed it who would 
make study the busiliess of life. For what bettor capital can 
we invest than health, or foundatian lay for the suceeflsfol 
pursuit of knowledge, or triumph in the more c(mflicting 
straggles of human life. 

There is.evQry thing in Science interesting and attractiye. 
Knowledge holds in her hands the elements of power. Hon- 
or and fame throw a halo of glory all around her pathway. 
What wonder, then, that her votaries consume themselves by 
the ardor of their investigations f What wonrler that the ex- 
cited efforts of the mind, its aspirations and yearnings, should 
at times shake and shatter the feeble organization through 
which it acts, and bring to a speedy and untimely close the 
trials and struggled of its mighty Ambition ? 

An illustration may be given from the London Quarterly 
ItemetD. Speaking of the Education of Lord Dudley the 
writer observes : "The irritable susceptibility of th^ brain 
Was stimulated at the expense of bodily power and health. 
His foolish teachers took a pride in his precocious progress, 
which they ought to have kept back. They watered the 
forced plant with the blood of life. They encouraged lihe 
violation of Nature's laws, which are not to broken in vain. 
They infriiiged the condition of conjoint moral and physical 
existence. They imjirisoned him in a vicious circle, where 
the overworked brain injurlad the stoniach, Which reached to 
the injury of the brain. They watched' the slightest devia- 
tions from the rules of logic, and neglected those of dietetics, 
to which the former are a farce. ITiey taught him no exer- 
cises but those of Latiu j and gave him a gradus instead of a 
cricket-bat, and his mmd became too keen for its mortal coib 



15 

and the foundation was laid for ill-health, moral "weakness, 
irresolution, lowness of spirits,and all the Protean miseries of 
nervous disorders by which his after life was haunted.^ 

The present age is pre-eminently one of excitement and 
mental activity. Every thing must go by steam, or with 
telegraphic despatch. The fluctuations of business — the giant 
speculations by which fortunes are gained or lost in a day — 
the unbounded desire for wealth which is turning the world 
upside down in search of gold — the frauds of trade and lying 
arts of gain, — ^all keep in constant agitation hosts of men. 
Our political contests, also, which are open to all, and which 
in times of peculiar interest, or (luring our presidential cam- 
paigns, wax violent and exciting in the extreme, arraying 
section against section, and man against his neighbor, — all 
are calculated to stir, and do stir the passions to their utmost 
depths. Oonsider, b'kewise, our social condition. What 
rivalry, what jostling for supremacy, what envies and 
jealousies spread abroad their influences in every 
conimunity, destroying health and happiness, and en- 
trenching themselves across the path of all true prosperity. 
And these great evils must increase more and more, until the 
principles of physiology are better understood and applied — 
until Education shall be so reformed that the laws of the Crea- 
tor as adapted to self-regulation and protection shall be the 
first great lesson taught — ^until mental cultivation and bodily 
integrity and power shall be its great object, aim and end. 

The principles which I have thus far sought to establish 
and explain, are more particularly applicable to the periods 
of childhood and youth. This brings us to the subject of 
early education, — a subject oi universal interest, but which 
in general is little understood. 

The opinion is almost as prevalent and common as it is 
wrong and pernicious, that the intellectual powers of children 
should at once be called into active and laborious exercise, 

■ 

and that the early spring-time of our being is the golden period 
of education. Precocity of mind is so pleasing to most parents 



46 

that it ia aa object of especial desire, and whenever obeerved 
it is urged forward bj all the motives which themselves and 
teachers can inspire. Books are written for the express pur- 
pose of supplying additional stimulus. Biographical notices 
are often presented in our Sunday, and other schools, of early 
prodigies of learning, whose intellectual and moral powers 
were precociously developed, and who peacefully died in the 
very morning of their being. These are held up to the minds 
of children as examples worthy of imitation, and calculated 
greatly to benefit the rising generation. 

I never look upon such works but with deep regret, that 
the subjects of them should have been sacrificed to a cruel 
ignorance of the most intelligible laws of our physical exist- 
ence. They should be held up as beacons of terrible warning, 
to deter others from following in their misguided footsteps, 
and sinking like them into a premature grave. 

It is my firm conviction, founded upon much reflection and 
observation, that this almost imiversal desire for early mental 
development and acquisition, has done more to prejudice the 
true interests of education, than all other causes combined. It 
in fact strikes at the very root and source of these interests as 
a philosophical view of the subject will clearly show. 

The brain, the organ of the mind, in early childhood is 
soft and delicate. The relative size of its different portions 
constantly varies during several of the first years of life, and 
it is not till about the seventh year that all its parts are fully 
formed. It grows more rapidly than any other organ, and 
more blood is sent to it in proportion to its size than to any 
other. "We have a reason for this The predominating sys- 
tem of childhood and youth is the nervous, which is earliest 
developed. The organs at this period are chiefly devoted to 
nutrition and growth, and the brain is required to direct its 
undivided influence to their support. These facts demonstrate 
how prejudicial strong excitement must be to the young,, es- 
pecially when we add their proneness to affections of the ner- 
vous system. Inflammation and dropsy of^the brain are fire- 



17 

qaent, while convalsions are among their most common difl- 
orders. There are also some diseases which have a direct 
tendency to develop unduly the brain, resulting in precocity 
of mind and general feebleness. Mental excitement or early 
study have the same effect, concentrating the nervous power 
in the brain, and leaving the other organs to fall into conse- 
quent decay. Here we may see why such havoc is frequerit- 
ly made in young constitutions. Dr. Brigham, who gave 
much study and attention to this subject, speaks as follows : 
'^ Dangerous forms of scrofulous diseases among children have 
frequently fallen under my observation, for which I could not 
account in any other way than by supposing that the brain 
had been excited at the expense of other parts of the system, 
and at a time of life, when nature is endeavoring to perfect 
all the organs of the body ; and after the disease commenced 
I have seen with grief the influence of the same cause in re- 
tarding or preventing recovery. The chance of the recovery 
of such precocious children, is in my opinion, small, when at- 
tacked by disease, while those less gifted easily recover." In 
the light of these facts we see why such numbers fall victims 
to a false system of education — this urging the too early and 
undue development of the mind, till the health is seriously 
undermined, or premature death induced. 

In the early morning of life the system has enough to do to 
develop and properly sustain itself, and education should be 
mainly devoted to the wants and physical growth of the child, 
and the moulding of the habits and moral disposition. In 
this way health would be encouraged, and the foundation of 
a final successful education amply and strongly laid. We 
call the attention of parents and teachers to these important 
considerations. Too long has the physical training of child- 
ren, the development of bodily strength and power, been ne- 
glected, while every means has been eagerly sought and ap- 
plied to call into activity the intellect alone. Tbia k wrontg 
and ruihons. By wise culture and discipline to secure a 

etrongi vigorous, healib}^ body, — ^this should be the first great 
2bb 



18 

object. There will be enough in the works of nature to engage 
the attention and employ the mincL The excitement and 
stimulus of books and school-drill and discipline are not need- 
ed for young children. They are worse than useless, — ^they 
are positively injurious. There are fields, gardens, groves 
and pleasure grounds, where, breathing a pure air, so lavishly 
poured out around them, they might amuse themselves by 
cropping flowers, pursuing butter-flies, listening to bird-songs, 
singing themselves, laughing, shouting, looking at curious in- 
sects, stones, or other natural objects. Familiar lectures -on 
some or all of the natural sciences, — always witli specimens 
for their Ulnstration, — and these lectures anterior to their 
learning to read, might be given to great advantage. While, 
at the same time, habits that are forming their manners and 
moral dispositions, kind and benevolent feelings, firmness and 
cheerfulness under trial and unavoidable suffering, should be 
daily cultivated as among the great duties of early instruction. 
It is to book learning, jper sey at this tender age, that we do 
most seriously and persistingly object. It is abomioable and 
the extreme of cruelty, this confining young children in 
school rooms, — ^and siu^ school rooms I — ^for six hours each 
day, where their limbs are doomed to inactivity, and their 
poor backs ache, — causing them to breathe impure air, while 
au ocean of fresh and invigorating atmosphere forty miles 
deep is all around them — ^and crowding upon their memories 
words apd sentences of which they cannot know the meaning, 
and which would be of no possible use to them if they could. 
For them this whole process of what is termed education, has 
QPt the least possible interest, but is rather abhorent and 
disgustmg-. The school room is looked upon as a prison — 
which too often it literally is— and of course is heartily detest- 
ed. Their nativcf feelings which ar^e acute, and which delight in 
that knowledge which nature addresses to the senses, f^re blunt- 
ed) ftnd oea«e their beneficial operations. The result of their 
soboplgoing 13 a deep, confirmed ^apathyi from which many 
Qf them never; osn be amsakeaed.; qr if partly arotis94) their 



19 

minds, weakened and prejudiced by their false training, will 
never again act with force or freedom. 

Our District School* exhibit too many exam][>le8 of this 
deplorable condition. The school houses are at fault Teachers 
are at fault Parents are at fault The whole educational 
process is at &ult. And the result is seen in the shattered 
constitution, the ruined health, the enfeebled mind, the per- 
verted moral sense, the nervoite ezcitabilif^, of blasted or 
abused childhood. The common discipline of the schoolroom 
too, is at fault The whip and the spur, the torture and the 
shame, making bad infinitely worse, arousing into fearful ac- 
tivity propensities, (fear, hatred and revenge,) which should 
slumber or be repressed, — ^all this is wrong and pernicious. 
Instruction falls powerless upon the subject of such a disci- 
pline, and they grow up with habits of inattention and in- 
difference, the curse and bane of their whole after exis- 
tence. 

How different and more auspicious would have been the 
result, had they entered school at a proper age, with firm and 
healthy bodies, brains, lungs, stomachs, and moving powers, 
and had knowledge been imparted to them adapted to their 
several capacities, calculated to quicken and enlarge their 
native powers, and enlist at length the Ml and well directed 
efforts of the mind. Their progress in science and in all es- 
sential practical knowledge, eminently fitting them for the 
active employments of life, would have been rapid, and there 
would have been a necessity for repressing the ardor of pur. 
suit, rather than of exciting and compelling, as is now almost 
universally done. 

Is there a practical teacher of any considerable experience 
who hears me, who has not frequently observed the extreme 
difficulty of imparting just and clear views of a science to one 
who commenced its study before he could distinctly compre- 
hend its principles. It is often much easier to ii^tmct those 
of a mature age, and within a comparatively brief space of 
time, in any branch of learning, than those who began the 



20 

Btadj too early, and continued it for yeans. The former 
possess real knowledge, the latter only the memory of rules 
and precepts, the jnst nature and application of which they 
will not understand. We see then the folly and absurdity of 
endeavoring to impose the sciences, in their exact and tech- 
nical forms, upon the minds of young children. Theirs is 
not the age suited to this kind of improvement ; and all at- 
tempts to force abstruse and difficult knowledge upon them, 
are in violation of the laws of nature and betray an ignorance 
of the philosophy of mind. 

Again it may remarked, that those who exhibit precocity 
of mind while very young, do not in after life meet public 
expectation, or manifest more than ordinary talent — ^frequent- 
ly they fall far below this standard. They grow up to be 
swayed by the judgment of those who were once considered 
as vastly their inferiors; and to do homage before those 
intellects, once dull and stupid compared with their own, but 
whose slow yet healthy development has made them mighty 
and majestic. 

On the other hand, look at some of the great minds that 
have left their impress ir.delibly upon the records of the 
world, and we shall find that in early life they were not dis- 
tinguished for the force or brilliancy of their intellectual pow- 
ers. The boyhood of Sir Isaac Newton gave little or no pro- 
mise of the bright and glorious future before him. Dr. Adam 
Olark, a man of profound learning, was only distinguished at 
seven years of age for rolling large stones. Patrick Henry, 
the most powerful and brilliant orator of his time, was in 
early life a byword for dullness, and the first time he appear- 
ed in court, his father, then judge, turned his face from him. 
Chancellor Kent, one of the first legal minds of this country 
says, that his boyhood days werechiefly spent in roaming 
over the fields, fishing, sailing, swimming, riding, and play- 
ing ball, and that he was but superficially learned when he 
entered college, and did not begin to study till he was 24 
years of age. Schiller, the great German poet and distinguish- 



21 

ed schollar was noted, when a boy, for strolling about the 
fields, and one day was found during a severe thunder storm 
in a tree, trying to find where the thunder came from I — 
These instances might be multiplied to almost any extent, 
showing conclusively, that greatness of mind does not depend 
upon the early development of its powers. 

It was well said by the distinguished Spurzheim, that 'HJie 
mind ought never to be cultivated at the expense of the body, 
and physical education ought to precede that of the intellect, 
and then proceed simultaneously with it, without cultivating 
one faculty to the neglect of others, ior health is the base, 
and study the ornament of education.^' 

I will bring these remarks to a close by submitting a few 
thoughts on the subject of parental duty and responsibility, 
as connected with the education of the rising generation. 

The parent being the natural guardian and protector of his 
children, is entrusted with their proper culture and training, 
nature and nature's Ood have charged him with this duty.*— 
Somehow and somewhere his children will be educated, if 
not under salutary home influences and the watchful eye of 
the parent, it will be under the influences of the street^ tod 
amidst evil associates. They will be trained in vice or vir- 
tue. Their souls will slumber in darkness under the cloud of 
of ignorance, or rejoice and expand in the genial sunlight of 
acquired knowledge. In a greater or less degree they will 
become degraded, lawless, vile and detested ; or refined, in- 
telligent, useful and honored. The position they shall hold 
in either scale will depend upon the kind and measure of ed- 
ucation they receive. In proportion to the influence and 
ability he possesses, the parent is responsible if they receive 
other than a right education — ^an education that shall make 
them true men and women, and qualify them for a faithful 
and ef&cient discharge of life's great duties* 

As the parent cannot, for many obvious reasons, superin- 
tend or conduct in person the education of his children, so he 
is obliged, in the discharge of his parental duty, to employ a 



23 

Bubstitate, and to entrnst this edncation to others. The per- 
son thus chosen stands in loco parentis^ and is to do the work 
of the parent. He is to aid in the de^relopment and training 
of young immortal minds. The elements of a life that shall 
nerer have an end are given him in charge — a life to which 
the event of death is no abridgment, and across whose eternal 
and npward pathway the grave throws no barrier ; and npon 
him shall it depend, in no inferior degree — ^npon his labors, 
his words, his deportment, his examples, aU that he is, and aU 
AcU Tie doesy what shall be the character of that life — ^what 
the measnre of its progress — ^what the fhlDess and ^lorv of 
ite reward! 

It is the business of the teacher, as of the parent whose 
snbstitnte he is, to edncate — ^physically, intellectually, mor- 
ally. In this, dien, the harmonious development of all that 
human being is — ^lies the teacher's great work. He is to bring 
out that which is within, and train it to the vigor, comeliness, 
and perfect stature of manhood and womanhood. 

Quite too often the process of education has proceeded up- 
on the supposition — ^not that there was something within to 
be brought up by careful nurture and discipline — ^but that 
there was a vacancy, an emptiness, to be filled. To pour in, 
to fill up, and not to develop from within outwardly, was the 
work oi the teacher. It was a sort of cramming process — a 
something not unlike sausage stuffing. Here was the material 
all dished up and seasoned to the liking, and down it must 
go. And when this fiUing-up process was completed, the in- 
dividual was said to have finished his education. The capaci- 
ty was exhausted, and the teacher, consequently, had nothing 
more to do. 

I hardly need say, that this formal and mechanical instruc- 
tion is all false and wrong. This is not to educate, and all 
knowledge thus obtained is mere parrot knowledge. The 
child's own thoughts must be set agoing — his intellect 
called into action — his enthusiasm enkindled. He must be 
made to feel his own individuality as a rational and responsi- 



23 

ble agent. It is not our minds, but their minds, i^Iiich must 
form the characters of our pupils. And the whole process (A, 
education — ^what is it ? I^ot to implant our thoughts, or tile 
thoughts of any man, in the mind of the child ; but with them, 
or by the aid of them^ to stir up his own mind to tiie forma- 
tion of his own ideas and character. 

We learn from this that the work of the teacher requires 
for its faithful and successful performance, the most carefod 
and thorougn preparation. It will not do any longer to set 
apart and consecrate to this work by laying hands on skulls 
that cannot teach and will not learn. The time has pretty 
much gone by when those who could do nothing else were 
thought fit to teach a common school. It will no longer be 
tolerated, tliat a man wha is unqualified to take proper care 
of a horse or an ox, shall be entrusted with the deyelopment 
and training of the immortal minds of our children. He who 
eomes to the solemn office of instmctiDg a human soul that 
shall never die, ought himself to be trained and disciplined. 
He ought to feel that he is CDgaged in no common business, 
but in that which demands and should absorb the best powers 
of the mind and heart. 

In the importance of the work of the teacher, requiring as 
this work does, for its successful accomplishment, the most 
thorough and careful preparation, we see what is the weight 
of responsibility resting upon the parent, and what is the 
measure of his obligation. And he has not acted up intelli^ 
gently to the degree of his responsibility, nor discharged the 
lull measure of this obligation, when he has entrusted the care 
and training of his children, for the time being, to one who 
can simply ^'keep school," and who is willing to keep it, in 
the absence of more lucrative employment, for meagre wages. 
We would not entrust the custody and cultivation 0/ omf 
farms to a person who had little or no knowledge of farm' la* 
bor, and of the requisites for successAil management and til* 
lage. If we did, I venture our now rich and productive 
farms would yield only poor crops and small retturns. But 



34 

we would not do this. We would require of the one so en- 
trusted a pretty thorough acquaintance with the principles of 
agricultural science and their practical application — ^in other 
words we would demand that he should be a pretty good 
farmer ; that he should understand his business by under- 
standing the nature, quality and capacity of different soils, 
their adaptation to the various crops to be grown, and how 
they should be prepared with reference to the most abundant 
yield. For the services of such an one we would be willing 
to pay liberally, and feel that we were the gainers by the 
doing. 

So if we were to employ a man to take care of our horses 
and cattle, or a female to preside over our dairies, we would 
see to it that they possessed the requisite knowledge and ex- 
perience for their business, and could be safely trusted in 
their several departments of laboi-. 

But are lands, and horses, and cattle, of more worth than 
the immortal minds of our children } And is the growth of 
grain, and rich, bountiful harvests, of more imortance than 
the careful culture of those minds, and the planting in them 
of all right and good principles ? And shall we require ex- 
tensive knowledge, and practical skill, and experience, and 
faithfaluf ss on the part of him who superintends the cultiva- 
tion of our farms, and not require equal preparation on the 
part of the individual who takes our place in the education 
of our sons and daughters ? This is the question for us, as 
parents, to answer and decide. And on our answer shall it 
depend whether land shall be more cared for and better im- 
proved than mind, and whether horses and cattle shall be re- 
garded of more worth than in;imortal souls. 

Whatever may be thought or said of the responsibilities of 
teachers, with respect of weight and extent, it is true after all 
that the main responsibility in the matter of education — a re- 
sponsibility higher, deeper, broader, wheightier, than that of 
a^ others — ^rests upon parents, and they cannot throw it off. 
Qpd has pl%ced it there, and there it will remain. It can 



2ft 

neither be shirked nor evaded. Whatever the means em- 
ployed, or the agencies that operate in the work of education, 
and whatever the results produced, the work, as I have said, 
is that of the parent. The school house is such an one as he 
builds, the books are such as he furnishes, the rules and regu- 
lations are such as he approves, the teacher is his agent or 
substitute, and the resmlts produced by them are all combin- 
ed, whether good or bad, favorable or injurious, are to be 
placed to the praise or blame of the parent. 

It is a noble employment to train a young and rising gen- 
eration for stations of usefulness and honor — to lead youth- 
ful minds to the pure fountains of knowledge — to present to 
yet unpolluted lips the living waters of truth and goodness. 
To deck the outward person of the child — ^to possess him 
^ ith worldly advantages — ^to bequeath to him an inheritance 
of broad lands, and silver and gold — is all idle and vain, 
compared with moulding and beautifying the mind, impart- 
ing to it high moral excellencies, and filling it throughout 
with the principles and hopes of a true christian life. This 
material body is less than nothing when placed in contrast 
with the inhabitant which occupies and animates it. It is the 
embodied soul that is above all price. Possessed as he is of 
this thinking, reasoning mind — of a soul that desires and 
struggles and battles amidst the materiality and corruption 
with which it is surrounded, and that is endowed with capa- 
cities for the teachings of God and the knowledge that takes 
in the universe — ^we may make the child all that is good and 
great ; we may so mould his very nature as that when he has 
become a man he shall reflect honor on his teacher, a glory on 
humanity, and be in consequence of his correct principles, 
moral deportment, and pure, devoted life, a blessing to soci- 
ety, and the benefactor of his race. 

Fathers and Mothers ! will you labor for so desirable a re- 
sult as this { Will you see to it that your school shall help 
to accomplish so noble an end in the education of your chil- 
dren? Then, when you shall have done with the duties of 



96 

this life and have paaeed away, you wHl leave behind yon 
those qualified to fill your places, to wield with safety to 
themselves and their posterity the sovereignty with which the 
constitution of their country invests them, and to bear upon 
their shoulders and jealously guard the sacred ark of that 
country's liberties. 

In this connection I may very properly reiterate my views 
with regard to the necessity of increased qualification for 
teachers, and the duty of the State with reference thereto. 
I said in my last annual report, that there is needed a far 
larger supply than we have of thoroughly trained and com- 
petent instructors for our public schools. And the question 
was raised. How shall this demand be met and supplied t 

Teachers' Institutes may assist in the work of qualifying 
men and women for the duties of the school-room, and are 
deserving of aid and encouragement from the State; but 
proper and thorough instruction in the theory and practice 
of the teacher's profession, can only be furnished by the 
NoKifAL School. 

I regard the action of the last legislature on this subject, 
in part at least, as premature and ill-advised ; and the entire 
plan as impracticable, and destined of course to fail. With- 
out wishing to disparage in the smallest degree the claims of 
our colleges and academies, or to call in question their useful- 
ness, I unhesitatingly assert that it is utterly impossible for 
them to iumish the normal instruction required, even though 
the entire income of the School Fund were to be distributed 
among them. The experiment has been fairly and faithfully 
tried, and failed most signally and disastrously, as shown by 
Mr. Mann's statement, copied into my last report, ITew York 
expended $301,716.00 upon her academies to enable them, 
if possible, to supply the deficiency of well-qualified teachers ; 
and yet with all this aid in th^ establishment and maintain- 
anee of Teachers' Deparments, they failed in accomplishing 
the object sought It would be worse than useless, therefore, 
to repeat the experiment in Wisconsin. We can hardly 



27 

afford to be taught, by the same sad experience, the insnffi- 
ciencj of a like scheme. We may save time, money, and 
the vexation and shame consequent upon defeat, by proceed- 
ing at once to the establishment of a State Kormal School on 
a wise and liberal basis. Kever shall we need snch an insti- 
tution more than we do at the present time. I again respect- 
fully urge this subject upon the attention of the legislature, 
and shall hope for its favorable action in relation thereto. 

I again take pleasure in presenting the people of Wisconsin 
with the list of text-books recommended by this department 
two years since. It will be found unchanged, for the reason 
that no books have been found to excel those named, in point 
of general merit. 
Sanders' Speller, Analyzer and Definer. 
" Pictorial Primer. 
" New First Eeader. 
« 2nd « 

« 3rd « 

" 4th " 

" 6th « 

" Young Ladies' Eeader. 
" Elocutionary Chart. 
Thompson's Table Book. 

" Mental Arithmetic. 

^^ Slate and Black-board Exercises. 

" Arithmetical Analysis. 
" Revised Practical Arithmetic. 
Higher Arithmetic. 
Cornell's Primary Geography. 
" Intermediate " 
" High School Geography and Atlas. 
Ricord's Primary Gramma. 
Clark's New English Grammar. 
"Welch's Analysis of the English Sentence. 
McElligott's Young Analyzer. 
^' Analytical Manual. 



28 

QaackenboBs' Ist Leesons in Oomposition. 

^^ Advanced Course of Composition and Bhetoric. 

Fayson & Danton's System of Penmanship. 
Parker's Juvenile Philosophy. 
" Ist Lessons in " 
" Compendium of " 
Wright's Analytical Orthography. 
Korthend's Dictation Exercises. 
Brookfield's Composition. 
Word Builder. 

Willard's Small History of United States. 
" Large " " 

" Universal BKstory. 
'^ Historical Guide. 
Davies' Elements of Algebra. 
'* Geometry. 
" Legendres Gteometry, 
" Bourdon's Algebra. 
" Surveying. 
•* Descriptive Geometry. 
" Calculus. 

^^ Dictionary of Mathematics. 
Youman's Class Book of Chemistry. 
« Atlas « 

« Chart « 

Hitchcock's Geology. 
Coe's Drawing Cards, 10 parts. 
Otis' Drawing Book of Animals, 5 parts. 

'^ Easy Lessons in Landscapes, 6 parts. 
Warings' Elements of Agriculture. 
Green's Primary Botany. 

" Class Book of Botany. 
Fulton & Eastman's Double Entry Book -Seeping. 
F. & E.'s Blanks for Double Entry Book-Keeping. 
Cutter's Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene. 
« Ist Book of « « 



29 

Mrs. Gutter's Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene. 

Webster's Unabridged Dictionary. 
« High School « 

Mitchells Outline Maps. 

Pelton's " « 

The leading books on this list, I am happy in saying, have 
been widely approved and adopted by the schools of the 
State. Much has been accomplished on the behalf of uni- 
formity, but it is highly important that more should yet be 
done, and it would be of great advantage to our schools, if 
even those who honestly believe other books to be somewhat 
better, would yeild their judgment to the opinion of the many, 
and allow our schools to enjoy that uniformity in books that 
is not only important to poor and rich in an economical point, 
but especially important to that class of teachers of which we 
have so many, who are just beginning their own education as 
educators, and to whom uniform books will offer advantages 
as great as that uniformity offers to parents and pupils. I 
again call attention to the importance of providing for addi- 
tional branches of study in our public schools. I sa?d in our 
last report that we need ior the attainment of the highest 
object of the district school, that the course of instruction 
therein should be more thoroughly practical in iis character, fit- 
ting those who go out from such, so far as may be, for the 
callings and employments of active life. To this end I should 
be pleased to see added to the list of studies which the law 
specifies as essential to be taught in our common schools, that 
of natural history, embracing at least the elements of bot- 
any, chemistry, zoology and geology. Agriculture might, 
with great propriety, be added to this list. 

I will add here, that studies ought be pursued in our 
schools embracing the obligations and privileges of citizen- 
ship. Hundreds and thousands there are who go out from 
our common schools to take part in the management of our 
political institutions — ^to wield a portion of the sovereign 
power of this Union, with no other preparation for the enjoy- 



30 

ment of repablican rights and the discharge of republican 
duties, than those schools famish thetn. Is it not of the 
highest importance, therefore, that in those schools should be 
imparted a knowledge of political economj — a knowledge of 
the constitution and laws of the State and of the United 
States? " To be ushered into life without this knowledge, is 
to embark on the ocean ignorant of navigation, and at the 
risk every moment of making shipwreck." 

Nor must the study of anatomy and physiology be over, 
looked. This too should have its place on the list of studies 
required to be pursued in our common schools. The impor- 
tance of these sciences canoot well be over-estimated. Could 
our children be taught to know something of the laws and 
principles which govern their physical nature, and by which 
it should'be regulated, it would be of incalculable service to 
them. 

There are other topics I desire to present and discuss, but 
will defer a consideration of them until I shall make addi- 
tional report 

A. OONSTANTINE BARET, 
State Supt Pub. Instruction, 



DOCUMENT G. 



t . 



1 i 



1- f • ■ 'I 

, . ■ 1 * *1 



If iriysKsiTT OF WiscoNsiir, 
Madisov, October 1, 1857. 
To His Excbixenct^ Colxs Bashvou), 

m 

Governor qf the State qf Wiseonmn : 

As directed^y law, I transmit to you, herewith, the Report 
•f the Regents of the University, for the year ending this day, 
and have the honor to be. 

Most respectfully. 

Your obedient Servant, 
J. H. LATHROP, 

President o^ the BomuL 



en 



, . • ^ r.- 



', I 



. ' • W r 






tl .- . 



t. 



.h • 



t • 












f I' 



r • . I 



• 1 • 



Sl^- , '., . ' . .•.!.< .• ,'•' • .. . • •» 



r ^ . 



• ■ '». . .... J 






o ■■ 



wwijnis' JiiafDsi. 



' ' V^^lie Vkherdty wbnUt this llidr Tenth Anriuat' Itqtort : 

In the last report of the Board, the history of the Institutiom 

••'I.I • ' I ' • 

' was bronght down to the 21st of Pecember,, 1856, Iji ac- 

cordance with the sjtatute of last winter, changing the tenni- 

^ hatfon of the fiscal year, this Report will cover the flr9t tl^ee 

/ ^uajcters of the year 1857^ ending on the jhist oay of 

October, which will, hereafter, be the date of. the Annual 

Reports of the Board to the Legislature. 

The endowment of the Umversity of Wisconsm has been 

r 

* d^BtiTM, wholly, firoqi the j;>roceeds of the sales of lands 
.granted l^ CoQgiess, fojc the support «fi a aemimiry. of leam- 
ing of the highest grade. Like grants have been .ina49 to 
' eMh of the new S4ale8,,as the complemmt K» the endowment 
^ oi the common schools by grant of the 16tfa' section in each 
' township. The obvious intent of Congress has been to inau- 
gurate a system of puUic instruitiott throughout the new 
V Stales which shall offer every d^ree of intelleetual oulture to 
K the young mind of the community ; and which, if wisely 
administeied, wiD constitute an infj>ortant element in the 
) advancement and conservation of American civilizatioa. 
These university grants have been variously admintsleied by 
> tli^ several States which have besn ledpienti of the bounty 
'^eJF^CongreeK Of Ae aggregate amount of property, produc- 



6 

tire and unproductive, derived from this commaii 30uroe, die 
shaie of the Univeisity of Wisconsin will not be behind ibmt 
of the most fortunate of this class of Institutions. 

This result has been reached by a vigilant and pains-taking 
administration of the bounty ; guarding it alike, against the 
greed of the speculator, the local interest of the settler, and 
the cupidity of fancied rival educational institutions. At the 
incipient ominizationi of the University, its whole endowmoit, 
then present inid p^efir{iectiv^, - C(k»i9lrag in the appraised 
value of the University _land grant, did not much exteed 
$lSOfiOO. On this slender foundation the superstructure was 
.(BK^iMnepc^ :i3)^,ciin^t,espenaies irf Ab .>UlM]dknil)r ^Jtave 

> intiervaL been very greatly enlarged. 

The resources of the Institution on the 1st gay of Febni- 
ary, 1857, niay be stated, as follows : 

1^ lfoii«7S prodnctiyelj inyestedat Tper 99ntperaanam»..«.^,.«^^aO$J37l 
% Appnuaed and estimated Valiie of lands nsflola, (nnprod^ctiye) 25,000 

'* 3. MildtBgii fSfMadditJil^ftHitpri^^, (nnprodnciitv)....'^.. iSjOOif St 

• ^i I '.'■'" f) 

' ^ Total prep^itf of the UniTersiiy. prodnctiye and onprodactive,. $416^1 Ot 

ri. .1 «?;<>'»nd,«;^o^of domjto^ djC^jflttoj^te,^,... ,jM^f9f.i* 

. . The PfTOiue of tHe> Utth^rdity; fdr'the year- iSIrT, eonsklB : 

• *i:>iW*eintei^onfdi[idittt«sted,..J.l../.l.;J...:../../A.:^ ^31,401 OS 

iiU, S^im49^fniAiMdmtita'tpi!f&i^ti,t4^ t-' Ut»7S 

..^ ,lt«?^ipt»,Jrow.o^e^f«Tirpi^-.^.,......^^ .. ,l»I.W 

4Balan<5eintreai^ : ^4!¥.'« 

V , Tbe itfmi.efi-disbiiiaraiei^ haMibpeli'as'.fsHfws^^^ t 

f * liJiAnisiotiiiidifatbliieiB^.J. ..v.V. .«. J... |9M M 

, ;|. ^al|tfie9offfij©nlfer,,{t^,^iW»^-v.--.^v .4»;.:;^- #«l;Oi 

.3 Salaries of Swretaiy,Tr<^^ - , 

quarters)....^........ j , 1,021 16 

'» ■4/llii>wifrijrfl«nrf!br'Llbra3r^,Appahitt3iB;'C^^^^^ '^oAb 00 

.. (t^R«p^|of jioi|w^ijjrJbi^d|fipiM ' 4flli« 

■ T|.Im^e«eiit«dj|,ww^ , j^,* 



7 



\ 



8. fitting' aad Atfnialiing public Moms for Libnoy, tTabinet^ 

Lertnw^Ac,, ^..j ....:..:... '^ tt 

il^ Miaceikneoxuiy ...!. .....^ 17S'67 

The residue of the income, after de&Ayiog tl^e /o^Qiewe^^ of 
jhe last ^i^arter of the year, will be strictly Qj^Iied in. ^Pfiy- 
meat so &x forth, of the cost of the central edifice npv in 
procesis of coiistmction. . . , ^ . 
^^^ .An act waajpassed by th^ last Legisktnre mfibJUpg the 
. Board of Regents tomorrow jS40^000 from, the priiwipaliof.the 
tlniTersity Tund. for the construction of the naain edifiee of 
the University^ to contain all^the,pi^blic rooms required, iA.an 
institution of learning; of the first class. After much con^- 
tation^ the Boarc^ adopted a plan for the edifice^ of the IV>manr 
JOpric style of architectjure^ combining beauty of outline "with 
rConvenience. of inte^rnai arrangemeijit The drawings were 
furnished by William Tinsley, Esq.^ of Indianapolis, an archi- 
tect of experience and distinction. 

The edifice will contain a chapel ; a lecture room for each 
department, with study anne:y:ed for the use of the Professor; 
apartments for library, apparatus, cabinet and for collections 
ifi natural skcience, and in ail . , : , • 

Contracts have been executed for the erection of the build- 

■ • • ■ ' ' ' 

ing, at a' cost of thirty-six thousand five hundred and fiiity 
dollars, exclusive of excavation and services of superintendent 
The fitting up . and, furnishing of the several aj^rtments in 
prep^ation for their uses^ will absorb the balance of th,e buijd- 
ing fund, and trench, somewhat, on the annual income of the 
Instituition. . , ^ , 

On opening the departments of instruction in the edifiofi^ a 
new f ra will be inaugi|Urated in the history of the Univeiii^ity, 
to which its antecedent operations have been prop^ly intro- 
ductory. The Board are quite unwilling to defer the occupa- 
tion of the building beyond the opening of the collegiate year 
in September, 1858 ; and they will not be compelled to do so^ 



I' 



if the building fund become available as rapidly as tfaA oon- 
atniction of the work can be safely urged on. •. 
. At the time of the paernge of the law, aadioriziiig the 
Board to borrow 040,000 from di^ principal of the TTniTennty 
Fund, for the erection of this edifice, the proceeds of the 
antecedent sales of ITniversity lands had been mainly inrested, 
and the subsequent sales, up to the first day of October, the 
' date of this Report, have not been large. The Board have 
been able, however, to make such arrangements, as to jostify 
the commencement of the substructure, and the prosecutioft 
of the work through the autumn of the present year, 1857. 
' After providing for the current expenditures of the Institution, 
all the surplus income will be strictly devoted to the prosecu- 
idon of the work, till completed and ftirnished. 

As at present advised, the Board are of opinion, that the 
receipts, into the State Treasury, of the principal of the Uni- 
versity Fund will not exceed ten thousand dollars, during the 
coming year. The whole proceeds of the sales of the residue 
of the University lands, will not exceed twenty-five thonsand 
dollars ; and of this sotn but ten per cent will be paid into 
the treasury, according to the requirements of law; and 
it is not to be presumed that, under the monetary pressure 
which is likely to prevail for the coming year, any consider* 
able amount will be derived to this fund fi-om. voluntary 
payments by settlers, or by non-resident purchasers. 

In consideration of these facts, the Board would pray for 
such additional legislation, as will enable them to prosecute 
with vigor, and to an early completion, a work of undoubted 
interest to the cause of education in the State. A power to 
borrow from any funds, subject to loan, in the hands of the 
Commissioners of School and University Lands, would con- 
stitute the relief desired by the Board, in case of any deficien- 
cy in the treasury of moneys belonging to the principal of 
the University Fund. 

No change has been made in the departments of instruction 



9 

^^ iheif^ei^inQWf in full opf»|ion axe; f 

,L Of Ethi^, Ciril, PoUty^ an4 PoUtipfii Giteiif^ny* ; ^ 
^- . 3/ Of Menial Philosophy, I^giCy Rhetoru^ ^and Eiffigjifalk 

... ', .Literatuia . . 

,^ ^ Of MaUiematica and Natpml Philo^^pfiy. 
, j^ ,4. Of Chemjatry and Najyoi^^ Hislpry. 
5. Of Ancient Laj^age*^ and Litecatme.; 
t. Of Modem Languages and Literature. 
. 7. Of the. A|t of Teaphing. , .. ,. r / 

8. Of Agriciftltural Science* , 

Two aditional departments weie (qeaited ^y 9r4iDaM9b at 
the January meeting of the Board, to wit : •, 
^. 9. Of Theomtic and Practical. Engineering, 
^^, ,. 10. Of Physics. and Astionon^y. 

: , The limited accommodations^ peered l^y ibft hnil^Angft. a1- 
.. ^eady erected/and the necessity of devotang^all suiplw in- 
come xq the construction of the main edifice of .the UniTersity, 
have compelled the Board to defer, for thia and the coming 
. yqar, the election of Professors to these two fb ws of ipstruc- 
lion ; after which, it is beli^ved, no further course of d^y 
will exist' • 

The exte|[ision of the scope of Univeicaity inatructioia so as 
to embrace the philosophy of the Mechanic a^ts, the Mensu- 
tile College, Civil Architecture and other arts, of Design, will, 
ait the proper time, receive the attention of the Board 

The opening of thja University Schools of I«aw, and M^i- 
..i(ine, has been al^o deferred by the Board, till after the . fac- 
tion of the main edifice. 

In the further development of the University, the Board 

aie aware that- the period is not distant, when the cause of 

.education in Wisconsin, will require, and the means of the 

' Institution will justify, a further division of inat^ctional labor. 

, In all wdl appointed Universities, the department of Ancient 

, Layguagw, for vzample^ has its tMiu aad its Qreek Pi o< i a »w i » 

8g 



10 

'aiid^to many/ a ihMyii (M^tki L&n^ages ^d^jfA&Tktfiie. 
The English Department, bis its'Pr6fedsor6flMi^rT%11db^ 
phy aM!Lo^, antftCs'WbfbddOi^'^f Rh^t6l%<^mcln^g iAIocq. 

' tiMt ^ arid '^Cohitibiriiion. ^he ' Mathematical Bepaitmbnt is 
sepaiated from its appendages of Natural Phflosbphy and 
Astronomy. ''hie'Natnral SdenceD^arttoenthas ib Profea* 
sor of Chemistry, tuid otie itr hbre in thebrandhe^ il^N'ataral 
History, and the'^pliekdofM of tttese ^dences to A^cttltiual 
and the Arts. ' 

This perfection of appointmerit ^Il*be gi^ousAIy kj^pitoach- 
ed by the University of Wiscoili^n, aiididff be fblly 'realized 

' idtorMb^ f«icotetf i^all'hdhfe bc^eh reli'^T^tl ftom the btttden of 
building and furnishing 'the necesisary edncational ^trattm^, 
and have disdhterged 'flie ^Hbt incuMid by this hea^ outlay. 
The suggestion has be^ inaide iti 'JitcivioTis. re^cirtSy '%at in 
•ca«WP flii r«*4M 6f thiXfeMogical-Siinrey of ^he Stat^ the 
UHft^twty'ihottJd be •Charged xvith the duty of'm'akhig ftie 
necessaiy chemical analyses and assiays. A reasonable sip- 

■ TpfK^ation io xhA Vnivctsity for this service, wotilfl mtlble 
llie Board 'fey ytt^ide the Department of dheih!stry and Nattfral 

' 'Histehry, attd io bpiin a t)etmanent trdrking I^aboratoty Itit l!he 
benefit of the agricultural interest of the State, as xrell ^'for 
tlkfe «tote hnmedfate uatesi of the Survey. The Board have 

'^h6^ sdtiiifi^, that ata anrangetoeht of this* character wdttld 
tfe nb less siiMceable aftd «conomitH to the State, fhaii citAi- 
itable id ftfe TJhitieri*ty. In case bf k reVifeion arid tiioiilfi- 
•^fifdon df thte fe^Asting law 'for llhfe (ieolbgical Sur^y df the 
•«tate,*thi^'yieW'bf the subjfect 'is re^ptttfiilTy^commi^iiaed'to 
the consideration of the legislature. 

^ ♦he devrioptiient of the Normal Dfepartment of thi Wi- 

^ vertKy, And its "prkcAcBl contieitloh with the public stftbol 

' «yst(Bm; is an objett of higfr ^AAcational interest, \^11 voittiy 
bf the attetftibn 6f the tegislatttre: As a ' dfepartmient of 
-«he (JnSterslty; hshottld be, to the teiichers of the ^thte^ a 
««Cho«l>f Bttii^ ^djiainohat culture, touching tfie liatbre of 



11 

.TJ;i9 ^(^;iQ^l teffp «hpuld q9^^V¥ a>0^tal>e.4tatfd:Qf<lllaiJlca- 

^exj^ic.j^^f ^j(id Xh^ imxf^l^ffH of tea4i9)»'ii3lass.9hoiiMl;IUve 

, .,,^99^f3 to ll^ j^tun^ Qf..tihe,pther di^poitme]^iof;tiibeUiiiiner- 

j^. J^ufii^ ihe.mii^,^f ihe^jWTy the iNifim*! ^tofovor 

, x^^tsbe u^^l^, ^^qgapd m hMmg ^%9Bcbax^ , iutittttes 

,jti?i9Pgbpi;t ftie S^fe, ,9fqr/ we^a.^f^h judioinl . ^islikt ; Ihe 

, ^ffie ^Q . be j^termJA^d. by , f^ liberality ^ ^f iW«aI famrilvitfDn, 

. ^,9^d^the tjiJaijice.^f ,(he ie^q>ease to betdiAVfatfiwi .4;hie.i]Hsome 

of l^e Sfc^ol i; PRd- it is t bwUwwl /tbut ia :Nonml ayitftrai/ 

..Wte^yiW ^^^ Yi^i^8,.\r6iB wf^QWl ftttd TigpffMifidy c^ed 

9|:|t^ Wffpid. infuig)i|xato.a p^we^a ifa the i^^atiMALmoveiMnt 

JUj^V^ffOOpsin. The^Board(WQuJfiJJl?e»uwt huppy! tocontiect 

the Ui^yemty yritli.^^cU.A syptep^^wd jiwafce it trlimt^iy^ to 

, a ^jipTP ^^^ajlsd tope of .ip^^Uectual : ciilt^i:e vJfc^9^ghftUt the 

.(^ta^ ^ , ._, . .• . . 

.A ttioTough rjey|9J/)n.li«s been .made of tl^ by-law^ of ihe 

Upjyfijprity, T)^e w)g^ct8 of study h^ve been. so airanged) as 

.to Qf^ t^ at^vQ^4l, dep^mfn^ts ^ ,i)istni|Qtian lot olber ^n 

. regular students, a^d to provide 4or. gni4uatioDa M siiehvde- 

partments as the students piay, under proper '.aflfiMmtaty 

. . §dficf. By . referring .to tb^ , ^o^i t^^jneunto appteDdiBd^ . i% will 

. be seei) to be the pplipy ,qf the rBofisd to .feouioatber .ivimost 

^Ipicipnfy in tijie in,3j^rwfi^ioP|^l body, a^d :to pn>mde.agi4Wt all 

; , .^,\^t;si4e jen^Mf^n^e^ iJiBopiflpatabjie with that entifQ fidekty 

, ^and ^e VQt^on justly dueifram every offieer to /the Uoimnity 

interest, and to the duties of his especfal trust. : ^• 

iTlj^ cpwjpjptioi^ of thp i?eipi,tral eidiftoft will ppeja tfrCj way 

, tp.tbp fiidi|iis;siop jpf f^pialejpupil^.tp l^be Normal. a<^t)^eot)»er 

. ^^rtqajep^tof . Jhe Ujpiye^i^jjLty. J^t is ja g^w^tipp, nowmwh 

j^^}^, w^^etf^j^r tl^e libwal culturiejOftherfepaJe-Biiilwifisiai 

e^4/iji9Pf ^pp^cip^ately fUt^ii^^ undw tbe^wstv* -weftW'of 

,. ^p/aji;^tp eduWfiWf^ ^r^Ji^to^nts, dMWwg.tfw \wmj, »d 

^.qflaclfj^pifBg.i^h,^ WPWAe of, the ipstruotionj. 'JRbe wtfre 

success which has j^^df^ ^ qftpp^W .i^a^tj^p. pCitfie 



12 

WKe0 in the Nomial i§ehooLs and the higher Academies of the 
-^ £a0forli>9tMel^;|l<i>es ftiV tdwiit9s settling the question for the 

• iDhi^TBWitjr. "lliere is riot wanting 'collegiate experience of 
'sbme auth^ty in the sam^ direction, and the whole question 

" is noti^ in process W being conclusively tested at Antibch 

' Gdlloge/tmder the PMisidency of Horace 'Mann. It may be 
alleged that public sentiknent in Wisconsin is not yet ripe for 
dispensing '^(h separate female schools; still the Board 

".'deem it right to prepare to meet the wishes of those parents 
icwho desire Univerrity culture for their daughtiers, by extend- 

I ing to «U sueh the privileges <sK the Institution. The residence 
of the fiuntlies of the faculty ih the buildings, and the admir- 
able conduct of the commons hall, will, render the inember- 
ship of female pupils, pleasant, economical uid safe. 

The exteiision^ of thie accommodations for the board of 
University students is a measure of vital importance to the 
success and usefulness of the Institution. The Executive 
Committee have been instructed to report to the Regents, at 
their aiinutl meeting in January, some plan of improvement, 
which fihail be adequate to the growing patronage of the 
University. 

The Cabinet of Mitierals has been set up in the room 
temporarily furnished for it, in the south college. It is now 
a very valuable collection, the speciiiiens purchased last year 
^m Professor Garr, for the sumof $1200, having been added 
to the original collection made by the gratuitous agency of H. 
A, Tenney,Esq, 

Through the munificence of Hon. L. J. Parwell, the Uni- 
' verstty has, during the past year, come into possession of a 
collection in Natural History, comprising the Fauna of Wis- 
consin and of the Northwest, and enriched by specimens 
fiom oth^ portions of this Continent and from the Old World. 

• A skillfhl taxidermist has been employed to put the collection 
into a state of 'preservation in preparation for its removal to its 
appropriate location in the central edifice. 



IS* 

A^^t Hi 5M have b^«a a{^opni^d# dniipg the ywlry Jtor • < 
the ijgifrciase of ijf^je. JUibnuy, . The^^bov^k* ha^e hedr^ attMsteii^r^ 
with qire^aqd J^^tei^Ql^ And iha.gpaU^ oS Ikio 'Wmayyg&n* /> 
eraUyy^ia ;^t ^surpasped hy aay puhUciCoU^Qltoa tifi hbbks'of 
equ«^ Qp^ With a fj^jl. aiip?=aoiat|oB- of the ;ibsliu6ttoiiai^ I 
yali;|Q of tba Ul^rfuy^ and tha.crefdU whi^h wtU. ftOtoniQ to> ihe^ r 
Insti^tipo. fromit^ io^xoase, it wiU b^. th^ IK^ItQ)^ ^lllla Beard: jd 
to m^jke , aa laige^ annui^ appri^^nc^fiane !lo .thlaoj^oit^ las^ ir|iU o^ 
be tf^ compatib^ with, the jwpt 4epv«P.4p.^fvllx& «Uiei dqaaxt* i. 
meats ^ educa^9i^al$ery]oa. ■; , . [i : . m = ■ t- - • 

LaigQ ad4ition3 have beeq i]^^. to. .Ibf^i PhMeaQfAAoaliaaid • '. 
Chen^cai . Aff P^^^^^ since th^e date 4](f d^e tot i reporiy And; * 
these (|^p^Lrtxi|ienk[are,now.in,gopdr ^oilQQg ovder> «pzcfrid*d.' 
with the ordinary means of illustration). Tb^ Mp^ndiiai^^n . 
this direcfic^, hiiy3bi9enab9Ut|ll500< : i i 

Th|d fiuingiup of the apaxtmenta ft>£ tbeixeeeptHwt >of these, 
aids to ii^ttrmction^ the impror^emeiit ^ rooms i for Hscitateov >' 
and lecture, .the. repair wd . pr^frwtio a of the Vmsaaaty* 
property, afid the. care ot the gfofmia^ hisfff^ veofif od dUe offi^ . -^ 
cial atteptioQ ] ai^d the expenditur^a mtd^ on . th^e olfscte , 
hav^ befin so directed as to be c^f permaaent ^ti^ty{. 

The e|[)tif^ annual rBvenv^p <d tbia Uniyeoraify at Wiseoiuui^ 
although respectable as an original foundation,. jbSa'teryiftff . 
short; of the incpioa of the first class Instilutionsi of karaing'i 
in the pldeir Statji^ of this Union, to siqr w^iug of tfieiUiii-.a: :! 
Yeisici^a.pf Europe. , The intcff^ of thefd^bt,^ utevoidably • u 
inciuice4,l)y tl;i;e l^U9S^y in tbfii.^pp9tnio)iou.44' b^il^gs, ia a : . ; 
aensjbte diniui^o^ of . the cuixentimews of the UniTenAty^ ^m' 
and ihe pay^ntitof the pifinoipal o^. the. d^h( W WiMihLii^ < 
gtaUui^, TYiJl stiU farther (»iyp}p4l|| QpeiaHifHiM ffftrnt^jOM of. .: « 
yeaifr ..Qnv.|if^b9P9g St^tOfi of JUniFa^ e^ ^fiasooiii.Have' o^ 
provi^tMr. QniyeopBity edifiees iinthpi:^ch«l«e U|^.thei)£ .M 
Tespeet|]iFe,^pda). which Xund9haiKi^.h#en:iQ¥esfediM>rikteil fifjj >n 

P(^lmx\L9^\mTi^m^W^^W^^ aA4mttitigitfied] ts 

of cha^ng the settler but seren per cent on arreatfs;')^ 



u 

of yuttlme niOMy/ it' is qvi:ite' ap^i<Mit that;' aft^ ttre'^v^- 
chatomtae^iiM otioe^Qiem pdd IntoiH^^ 't]^a^ttiry,'4t'iar bt^ 
simpie ju9lwe to tUi tm^' %6 'tii-itk^eBt U at VM hM htt^; coh- 
sifltdnt^^itrith! the Mtfity* of tbeendotrm^^ It would tettiiaif ' 
be dtffentetb demonsiratcfthe wisddm'or the beheficenee of' 
that'pnUiapeiiify, wtikh awai4d^ to thef capitkli^, whefli^ 
citi^en:^ alteH) ttie-jyt^vilege^of loaning motey at 'twelve p^' 
eent per aniltttli while ibe' ednb^^nal fnnds' bf th^ State ^ '' 
cax^hOfT inestri^Ced by' law; «o but iHtle 'thot^ Hiati a moiety of 
-that rate of increase; the more espedally ^inc^ ihb secdrity of 
the loasi is nol^ aOiattfenfaaneed'>by 'the restrititidn. * It would ' 
seeiti thatif a dUMrenbe is to be set np, at all, in thepreitii- 
seS) ^AbdisqriminatiMf'shotdd be'iti fatof ^of the' edVibatiohal 
intem^j and i^or against it 

Under the influence of thltt^^oAVifctifcfh; thi Board Would 
very^nrfpebtfiitty iteoum^nd to th^' Legfslatui^ stich "a modi-' 
ficatiMV «tf the 'eii«ttlig» law, us > will «^ure ' to^ the trusty the 
highfBtirateiof intfertot allowed Id priTtite transabtibns, oil %I1'' 
sumaila th^ AreaMty itib^ to Ibslh/bekhgitig' to ttie tfniver- 
sity Fuflt^.' The statute ofight Vfrrftier ditect, th,at Ul ezcesr of 
interest on im^esttii^iltfi ijwt ^er^ per tetitj should' Cdnyflfute' 
a suMsagfoJoA Ibr the iiquicfcidbh of the existing' indebt^i^en * 

of thAiI^8tkUlSlMl.f' 

T^e r 0ai^e»ity <of > Wfo<A)nefh ' had- gHih^ Its' piisseM porii-' ' 
tion^-iti'ibsiGLdd «tfooMMdrrafling'inflilen<^ds; Various, serio^;*' 
andBkikfelamiilflg«i' It^hacr wonfthe <^nlS!^toce'of th^ pnblfti^'' 
andauoceni(i»ti<ylongei')^r<ifbI^^%i«al. ItsliIHtiydSMi^tiilJM^' 
the fa^M(S(yiit^>'of leiMlng'ih <mf Tiind;^ i^'ah*'<b«jt^Vil6flMy^'' * 
conneotM^iwith thb hbiior anA'weiil of iLh«'tS<M^;> aiME'jttitf^ ^' 
claiola MiMghi^if^iadA beii^fiU^t^^^^ It )s to'^the te^' ' * 

complMhiMUft'of <hib<itra)INlble 'ot^^fel'Ib&^W^lk^'bmUs i^'^ 
the BoaMfWiUt otmUiMr'td «6 «ti^tty v^d'^bMifiaiMtly^'tti''' 
leeteil) tn^liMitegi^df th^1Mp«flftl^ti^'<hi^faif««^ 
at thirlliidiliip<tf^6.«0ditfMlM«)Ml8^ HfihS^iUlMP^ 



15 



For fimher iafoimation relatire to the internal arrange- 
mentSi the condition and progress of the UniTerBity, the Board 
would very resptetftilly refer the Legislature to the Communis 
eation of the ChanceUor, to the Reports of the Standing Com- 
mitteesy of the Secretary and Treasurer^ and to other relevant 
doeuments, hereunto appended. 



/ 



J* * 

I 



■ 1 



APPENDIX. 



iA*^» 



[ 



fi 



; 1 



j^4 






r * • t 

■1 I , r 

. ! I 



■4 - 



• *. 






I 






, I 



« 



I 






k » 



IM 



, Julv 2r5t. 1857, 

V0ihe'S^fmi:t^ the UM^snitifqf^miitD^^Mm:' hu)* -i.-m 

Th^ year 1856-7> now about to close, lias been one of 
substantial ]!»Tosperity . to tlie important eaucatioiial ' interest 
coQnded to your care. 

In compliance" with a standing omer bf tlie Boaro, the 
several Professprs have made detailed reportij orme'cohdrtiopf 
actioiiy and w^^ of their riBspQclive departments, 'wTiicn I 
herewip lay before you,. , , ^ 

The instructional forca of the 'University, duy^ing tfie first 
or fait term of the year, consjsted pf the* Chancellor/ tHree 
l^rofessoris, a Tutor, and ,a Frencji iTeacher employed teiii^- 
rarily, during the vacancy in the chair'of Modem Lan^akgeSy 
occasioned by thd resignation of Professor 'B*hchs. Tfie Tro- 
fesapr of Chemistry And It^aturaf Ijistoiy was absent' onl^ve 
for the ennre term. . ' ^ 

During the second term the !l^aculty was full,' With the iMc- 






By the dactfon of Professor Korstetner to Ihe dialr of 
^ Modem Languages and Literature/' and his emtrance om 
the duties of the office, the Faculty of Arts has been filled^ 
and instruction has been rendered in all the departments dur- 
ing the summer term, subject to the interruptions occasioned 
by the temporary absence, on leave, of the Professor of Ma- 
thematics, on account of sickness in his family, and of th# 
Professor of English .l.ilereilGr6 dnhng attendance on the 
Board of Examiners at West Point, and the purchase and 
collection of books for the University Library. 

There is fiQ principle ol^ more nv>inoni, in tha conduct of 
an Institution of learning, than a rigid ordeir, both in instruct 
tion and disc^pUn^, ^nrhick assigns a time and a place for 
ey^Tf duty, and secures its performance in its own time and 
placa Absence of members of the instructional body, during 
term time, bvedcs thii^ otdei; and Ihe ednsideraiioii of -do«tte 
duty when present, eVen if rendered, is by no mean/9 an 
amende adequate to the eviL I deem it proper, therefore^ in 
revising the statutes of the University, to' recommend such 
provisions as may tend to secure a prompt and continued at- 
tendance, during term, confiding to the Executive Committee^ 
■ ill the recess of the Board, the sole power of granting leave 
of absence, when justi&eii hf the reasons of the special casa 
The good officer, with, his heart in the cause, will accept 
cheerfully the most stringent provisions on a point of such 
vital interest to the order and success of the Institution 

The,, daily naeoting of the whole Collegiate body in the 

^^Cbapisl^. for reading of thjs scriptures and prayer, is an estate 

. i|i|i)ied regulation pt great yalue in^be conduct of the Univer^ 

sily. It presents, to the inspection of tlie Faculty^ the habit 

of each student, in the matter of regularity and general deco* 

i «9a,?pe9ial 
any department 
kli by every auooessful discifdiBarian of a suitable fonim' tot 



•1 




i^ of Wei/^oV^rn^^^^ '^t se^ltrf^d^ 'of dignlfi^ifii^ 

willing obedience to law, dufing th(»^ period of educatS^iS^? 
whfle the youthful nSe^tiire is- in process of bein^ tiioulaeay ibr 
ffood or for evil' a^'d nafdened' into' the pertnilttleiit form^6Jf 

L^oo4/;.^;^\ ;\ ;;;;";; "'';^^;"': "/'' "'-• '"^'"' 

Stated m^ting8 of ^he ^acutty are hel^^ web1i^;f6r e(itt^' 
saltation on tlie or<ier.a^d me admintstration of the Iki^ 
•traction \and disctplihe of '^e Institution;* 'ahd6ti''o&e^ 
topics of general or special interesC to the eommoif caosei 
This fj:eqaent and^staW interchange of 8entiiiitot'fn<6e*fii^ 
stractiona] body, is of tltie higher pra<lticar'^pidrtkn6l^. fal 
oaen0hiug , the proper espnt du corp^ ^mon^ OTlIe^^es; 
in adjusting the claims of ttie seteral dej^rbn^Hts of study j 
soiSl^'geiiei^lly, fn'brinj^lri§tne knowledge aii^ ezjp^ifience Wf 
iach infe^'coriimoli' bto<ift;.foi^ ^H^eticitilV'^'^^^ 
meetinfi^^'tiie name of eaV^''J^(itfeh/is (klt^di#lce-4)ti(ie^ 
iB^^ from each 'i^'li'is'^iistrd^^^ oii the' (^i'^tfofm 
recitations and o^er exercises for the Week/ ^nd 'once agam 
j^or repbrf on ^e r^ularity^^ his ftttcittdande slndt^e dottect^ 
Biess ofliis Wi^par{incfhC libff results of these M^(rrtB^'(ip6& 
d^e merit rons for eacb W^^k^ knd ifiefar ^^gregat^ is' 'enteral 
oa the permanent re^Wds ^t ^ci ^1[7ni^ersit)r at the' clora of 
^^e term. "tlieV sition of 'eabH 'studedV i^' schM&lfship ^m 
l^portment is thtis orotight distinctly tb the noUte 6t ea^h 
oificen week by weekly ob^ioh and material is fdrnish^^ibt 
'Hie appli.catioh'of siiec^al dVsc)fpYihey If atiy case reqtiiri^'^^^^ 
^4 topics are si^ggesced tdi aildress befbre^iAie'l^ody of llie 
kudedts; with & Vi^ t6' ke^p 'tip tl^^ general standard liSft 
We of scholalshiji ahtf cliaracf^f iii the Wsttttifion. '' '' '»' • ' 
'^'tli an'W(itutionb^'gdn^r^ticaAlon,s6 ddmlpt^hetiiiU 
'iii'lts'i^Wact^r'aii k£e '6n»4e i^rd' d^e^^nitig and^'gonstnictiilg 
WtHisi^oand/it itf '^ctf 'cb^ deiltable t6at all'^He sdVaii. 
^1^^ '<if- A petM '4iV^ ^Wb 



9» 



^mifijUne^ ^bou^4f \h^ so^ numeroas^ and so juxuratel j deftir 
^ f^ t;<|ij .^f^^ ^^. VMf¥ ^^^ ?' inatruction. This absolute 
1^^^9^\ kpw^Yet^ j^evei'^^ihe^ in the aption of ow 

#^ ^fl^ifH^ W/^^ ." ^^^^^^^^ looted for in a 

ll^i^ , IJpiv^rsity }iV^ purs^ .with limitea annual revenues ai 
best, and these burdened with the whole charge ior puildingH 
aij^gi^n^^^^ijn^.alf the. tempox^itiea, so to speak, of iM- 
■trP^Wi-V, y;5l[^r tf^^j^ ^.c6n4itions, here as elseWtere, an 

iKiiq;^fe8jt j^alue«^ t^ut iiot s|)ecialljy qistrlbuted to the de]|>arl- 
9lfQti|> .,8Hch duties ipusi be assun^ed fis a common bura^ 
^ tj^ifi iq^trucljiop^ body^pr thej^ must remain undischarged. 
. ..Th^ Upiv^itv is a unit — a cause — to which each mem- 
be().(u tjhe. Faculty. Qw^w parampi^nt fealty and servlca — 
y)iU,sei;Yi9fi,is ^^trjDbut^ i^tf) dfipfirtments, simj^ly becaus^ 
^^if^ by the^divi^iQ^^f ja\^ th# c^jp[^jfXon cause an^ interest 
Ifjl^^b)^ J^est .fijll^s^rved, . ,AJi^ undisfrihuted instructional ser- 
][|gei^ as, .:w^|. 9fi th^ oii^f th^ discijpline, the action of the 
Jbfij^tuUoArQSf.Qn fhe.^houlder^. of instructional body as 
a^ ^ffiffflkf^jf. l^^rdeDu . Each ^^oi^l^ qhQprfuUy a^d loyally bear 
)^^^fMr^.^prdu^/a,US^^^ to re-adjustjmeiu, if need 

{M^'by. th.^ Faculty in f)q|Ui<aljj ^or,. o^ appeal^ hy the Board. * 
)^ l^h^ m^^fion of th? fiXf^lfet , jjo^i,tion,pf eaph member of the 

HMf^?fWftft^.>P<ly» il^ ^b^.injprnil^econp^^^ ap institution 
jif j^^^^Qatipn^i ,f ugg^t^ ^the questipii of bis ^ust relations to the 
^tfji^^ ibjifsiine^^ YPA^, ' V^ ^f J^m^^^J ^^fofesaiofisd schools, 
y/f^pi^ .qi^u ^^socij^)p-,toge^^ % ^ portion of the year, eifr 
iNm ^.yerfom.^.c^n;l^uoJ^l^tJP^ duty— to deliver, for 
(WRVRl^ »j«TO Wiflv^f^^f jectprp^fo^ for a fixed 

stipend, tha Pf?i»4fJ9^ 9|^ ^ha ^^Uf^stion ii^ ef^* The prosecutio^ 
#^,ffi(»iWTOrpPi;o(es8i^A^^ ^pj^ef.Jp^a^jf^ extent jp.ot^ incpmBat 
^ft.Wrti.f^Uj!.fo^t|)e.(^^ the,mutual 

body by a chance employment of men in other avocations 

/ 



wjjilip. Wfilv « W*V pVf ^»Wi tN, \mplication diat ,i|^ 
lfp|lMf.ii,i((|i^;tote n^f) by the pomiAue^prosf^ution of oav 
gya^ 4u<iff^. ^ JU ^.hfWfver^iu these eases, well unde^itbod: 
Ihjit Iheiinatitatiott abtaim 1)iit a. meagre and piofitleas set*. 
yi4», aam tliiit |l few a4dJitioQi^ names adorn the pictoreA. 
p^P9(lhe«im^ cat^og^e. i ., ,l. ^ ^ 

Dfat Mf HP w)^ ^.D^mi 1^ oonsecniled his energies totiie 
eflgaalMfDU^ pic^Ep^ i^pliated in thf^ service of an insti/ 

tficii^ of Mf^THifffti ffn ffH^Jf^* Such 4 man does not belong 
tir JiiiDM^If i/b^ bffs b^ .flight with ^ price. His tirike^ his 
taliipft^, ^ia <fjM>BJi^,bis.fi]ae^aHy^ the pwcii^e 

C((lflp4^F9^iw. whii?br b9 has yielded up for the honors . ^d' 
ei(¥Jpinyitj>,Qf bl9 ]HMiiti0|i. He.Qwe^ to the institution not 
emlphw^aily rputii^^ il^ltruetion« be pweshouys of jp^pa*^ 
rttti^bydw ai)4,by uigbt; his reading, an^ his thpqght|,i^ 
^Mir^widest raKgi^yishoiUcff with entire singleness of puiqpose^ 
b#/iM4fi tributary to the treasures of the lecture room. , He 
99P^ 10 ibe ipatitiitipn eve^ bis YaG;iEi.tion& For wb^ ^, ^^ 
flplMophjFy w4 vb^t the jipstification of the vacation, sav^ 
tbM itr i» neoiMy b9tbi by instructorwd pupil, to restore the 
tone of the system, exha\iate|d by therprerdrafts oHhe hterary 
]i(4, Whaierer is- metre than, tbis^ is in fraud of th^ g^od 

o/Iaasa y dapce with tbjbs cpmoKoxi aenpe riew of the J^ubj^^ct, 
^ dQ9ti)P/a> thivl the profe/ssor on full pay^ shall n,ot engage in 
4ll^ piaofloe of avy proffifaion^ art, or calliing in ihe^^businete 
ifQ^d^-^hall assume no pp^itian in Church or Sta^ exacting 
thm wd' th9Ugbt^-^aa found its w:a7 iqto the statuteS| of ou^ 
best Universities: and if not in all. it is because it has not 
^n deen^ necessary tq enfproe by formal enactmeut a 
4pfilrixi^'of panlfrwt ]^opriety and of. common acceptation^ ^ 
Yj Ik would, be wel). to s/^ttle ffxfi policy of tbe Univei^ity of 
JVifmowh^^^ tbl^. k^^ by sp^e gencp^al proyision, whicb 
jfMlv ^PViiPpMi th0 ^ffiff^ of tb^ Boani; to (go upon tba reycpnl, 



'At the lasi meeting of fhe l^oard, Ihe iiiititfSTs vtnB tOak - 
of opening in thelToiversity, adeparimentdf Civil BiigtiMto^ • 
ing. Some correst>on(]ence has been had, Wnd several namfls 
have been suggested in candidacy for the proposed chait 
There is no department of applied science tnore deserving of 
a fpll development in this Institution 'tlhian that bf Civil Ite- 
gmeeringy as supplying a felt want In the cdmmtinitf. IbaX 
there i^ no room in the present bditdingl/for t1i6 school^ and 
while prosecuting the construction of the ttmin editce, greal- 
economy in current etpenditures niust be practibed, and aB 
surplus income be faithfuify devoted to ihe cbmptetioiii of Iha 
building and its preparation for use. ' tn accordance with jCUS' 
idea, the Executive Committee/ on consultation, rraolvod, 
that, in their judgment, it was inexpedient lo elect a Profesaor 
of Civil Engineering, or to enlarge the instrdetional body it 
any direction, until suitable apartnlents should be ptovidad^ 
and the treasury relieved of the heavy bu^en of con9thiefilt>& 
r would advise, therefore, that the matter be suffered to rsei 
here, with the understanding that the preliminary ^teps be 
taken in the mean time for a prompt opening of this depaf^ 
ment, when the proper time shall arrive. 

It is undoubtedly true, that the main design of the tTniT0r- 
sity land grant was, to provide for the youth of Wisconsin an 
institution of general liberal education, thus crowning the 
system of public instruction endowed' by the* School land 
grant fhis action of Congress is but the expression, in OM 
form, of the sentiment of modern civilization, that the ititel* 
lectual culture of the citizen is one of the functions of cfvfl 
government * 

Professional education obviously stands on different gtound 
It may be considered more distinctly in the light of an indl^ 
i^dual investment, and, like other investments, may be aafelf 
left^ in an intelligent comtilunity, to individtialeAterimM,— 
"the precise expected return being, in all cases, persoMlwealb 
and disdhction. It is, however, for the mtktaal advantage af 



pranntstliB dM&ot,yb*ftof M Aafi«:iMt) Umr98ity-Hpiifvi^> 
bopefii^ (kubtleis^^tikaD aoy of* the.tiai#M» oHgixgil Ibmaiofi 
ttoUiqvvrsilf'flfidieioldirorliL'. TlM.fffasttnoe #£ t)iApn>fiMh 
8teiqJi«di6oU dcisMioc debaM^fure sowoMi.buCeMltt U bfr 
tlKd CMMaiiisii|M*A|ott ^i|8, koneficBirt mcuiI omb^ white thti 
fMMEibe of theicintial dcheo^ of genoial t»ielle<)ta«l outtufi^ 

miirew«Ml bigoted !mlirs)n8flteU)rigW0M(idNft^iil^^ mif4 
specific technical jchoota^' ead' by iodifciiigi tk^BM^ CUthciIlt 
ajqpffiidaimL o£iQ|hei pditacoiis of the ioeial Aoomn^ It px- 
j^:|heli»an, vhiie ilekiTttlei tl|e ^taQ4«id€if.6weU9]il}^4fi 
mi. Uis jantiiuitdtolief <itUijs»Cio») that the, social vank f^ 
Ae> aeirflnLlj csUiiiga . ia ljife< is:4etermi)i^ by the am/fuii^ qi^ 
SismmX\*jmnQJMX mHare dewisfl .^s^^ntiial to l^[ca^ance 4|i 
.eaeh^i. Th^ fanoet may ind^Qr in the sanie^ professicHii^ 

m 

piide wtih the lairy^er^ when it is ^n^Bietopd that th^ aveiage 
p«tseii%l cuUiiife of Ib^ fornix is, the same a^ th;at pi the lattei; 
The.groupj|Dg;df the' profosional is^ools prjMents. the 9ct^ 
sioB oli this compaiisony aiid promotes a gepeseus i^yalry y^ 
iBMl^iQg li like high standard; and the c^tral school of phlr 
leeojkby aii4 scieoce fa^iobhes the ready means pj^ this gene» 
«} leyding up. 

The office of the professional school is to supply the Mfuoit 
ing imd ihe.^ullur^^neectfQl to the j^uQcesrful prosecution of 
nny bmich of .the bus^iess of li&w ^ Adyancipg civilizivtion 
^Wl^ the e|ti4flguo of the. proless^wx^^ by extendi^ tl^ 
nlpKiQations of science to the; fur^, and si]ggeating the n^^es^ly 
oC apsK^ific cultttie to the eiMididalp for .juractica .The tcpji 
Smfessien is. no, longer ponfii^ed to Thedogy^ JMedicine aa^ 
X^aw. The SQhools of JBoginf«|ciqBi ^C Qidaptiei^ pf ;Technojt- 
4tff.otAKnc^tm^ of Skn\ AjchitoP^ure i|nd. tho, Aits.qf XN^- 
aigOy itan'Conunsreinl'Opll^B^ aiealiprop^yly ypfessiOHnl 
schools, and as sach, should: beihronghit within the soop^ qf 
4g 



I 



ML 

l iW^l e ^iw^ been ^gniied wkh ibe profiMnomal namto aai 
dkimcM. B» in thte giMpnig of ^dil» puftniemd oshMliv 
diM^hould <lie^ eMMbed, that the buxdm of tbrib aajppeit 
riKNitdiiM^ te 00 flnr asMmed-by th« treattifey » tir.iMteBib 
tN fiill'dwetopmeiiidf the MKitediH%i»«f tli6 UoiirtDHiily^afr^ 
a^ttehtot <d£ gen^l winiiiiflo and^ pUloeopiueai edoeetaim far 
lll« yotttb ctf^ Wkwonmij Tb j^vovide an able* and SuHkUt 
Fdetilly, iceoditmcft^tlie neeanuy bnildiage^ auiito <uliahr 
ijte'phbHe looMi^ iirhfe aiaple ^aidti of^lilHiabiaaMoliM^ irilia 
fttrt'tendpaMEtaietmtdiity ofadbi . . 

^Ttfe d<^ytment in ike ptottsin&ael gioap^dettmad to ayir«> 
Mund' the cendfal schoel, ^hich ealla for the esrliflit deMlifk 
ittetiij wMId' sMm^t^be ihatof iNefiaaiilBatraetiob,^^-^^ 
ii^i^iMmi^nt i^hkh, fhroUgh tfie' high protettnenal onllwe of 
fife tettdhety brings' the Unir^feity inta a benefieent and mmok 
ifily advftntiigeou0 relation to the e3rslBm of pnUic inslraoliaK . 
Next in the oirder of de^relopment and of interest to the im- 
Akntion; shonU be ranked what have been £unitiar)y MfM 
the learned professions, because : Pirst^ Whether ve diiim it 
M Aoe, if iS'SCitt trae, that a more liberttl style of gMend auk 
ttii^ is demanded' in these professions than in the oth«»; 
l^eohdly. Because a mor^ potent influence and a betiet 
ance of success is thus secured to the parent school, th^an 
be derived' from any odier quaiter. 

' Nelt after these, provision shotild be made for the pioftii^ 
iKonal i^chools of Engineering, of ]>esi^, of Comm^f^^ of 
'Aj^ieuItUT^, and of* the IMteohanfc Arts, in the otder and^a^ 
Itie eitt^t ivliich the sentiment of the <iomnianity bo4 ika 
4tieans at the disposal of the Boatd may Seem, on due d€Mi>a^ 
^Mltotf; tb jQstify or' require. €am should be exercised' in tliis 
ibattisr, that die- tMisury skouidnetbe'cointttitied to tbeta^ 
#te de^)i>pment of amy one' of thebe depaMnenta/in d««^ 
^ttMtt o#offteif intercfitseqni^y'itteriiioridus and' e^j^Oally 
\hy of thefbstMlng tere'of th« ]feardi 



tibd ^t^icine, iVdiild eat^^stiyte^Wiftnettd ^OM/ dfW leon^ 
pt(^¥^ tlie 'sthictbres noW cotittnipUttM; thtijr tiitt^ tta'pM 
ir^h siicft' a fbotiog k^to '][jtddi^ p^Mtinitfttts/ lUld 8tttt<«M>" 

a&ii' iliat 'df A^d&fmi^, ate MH'tbdd^cid'bt titt dmrad «(|J 

propr(all<in of »5bl4*td'fea6b; ' "'"• "'•' " •■ ""• ■ -""V 

' Ttld Sch-^t of Mkc^ <^'mr&iil'In!i(MMdli fit' in'Mfi 




nttaftyi tlie'laky«yk% 'Apyfi, kiid'fl^^iu8« df pMftyitiiMl 

inamicdon ^chtisttidt^liiilhb'timaiislt itiitii.' A NUiinU \muff 

#&pnk^ bf'ctototibA;'iktia''a'gtfba tit^nlillii^ Iraibfeen 

iittldet ^Kfitho^t chai^ to %'e' tlM VeMity ' except for ifreij^ht tt 

ii^mVtthhi t&'^ mean»'<^f i86^ tTiiiV^ity to'titak^ (Hi^tM 

itliodl 6f M^kaal'lnstt'a'didn f(^ Oie'Stkte ; tibotiglh'Hs -petrfiMt 

and entire development would nquire tdd'iibin' oth^ ifiilldfc- 

^''^n dd^itiijii'to ih^ stated anatM^ a'pptopriaiaftn of if ^bd for 

\li^ sappoi^ of the'proYeisicraal ^diool of Ag^cAltthr^, tke BoaW^ 

at'their last ahhutil 'Me^dn'g, apptbpfttiUid J^ ftrir 'flttlDrg ti^ 

JVorkifig Lkhomofy'^dike {^tcfiase <^' stppa^tilii ftkWi^ 

'ibi&ine; which* app^pMiion ' v^ placed 'in die htLhds'of'tKk 

Profi^Bsot, in April litet ^6 -nsci ^irHli^ ha^ been mkdedf 

tifiis ta)a6, A4 course ' of insinnic^tiori h^tfe the lAgricttttHSha 

class, the number of pupils, and the genera} ftouditfbn bf flie 

'fiepi'/tntient will 1>e 'b«st dnden^od fibifi' thte'Ildp(Mt''6^'the 

fi6T«kMt iii' Sitge. •• ■••'■'•^ '■■ '■ *• ■' '•'■ '* '■» 

' ;Atf 'appropiiiition of fiWhtitid^a''doUU-(9f!ibo)' toihe d«. 

;|p{ittmeht ottfilta'tat Mifdidphy, fM thepiiMhiUe'df at^MMU 

'yi; Vas made lf>iiie!fi6«iitf attfieh^ltet'aihVdai ituietl^.^'TiiD 

^'<Aey A^AB pti^^ib ike hands 6f itie'Ptmioi df 'that ^ 

^'art&enf, an'A has bben''jltil7"^ndecl t6r ^ik ' U^tiiM- 

mnts peAiVlnal^'la^le^'ili M <Jiste'th 'etJIel ' 'Yhe'Aiifdiitftt 

''of piirciiii«K«fe mivm^iitiUim:'- ''**' '• ■■■'■■ =• ^- - ' ■ ^- .•" 



d^Uars^ of th^iFholo .^mu, weye^fifpeiMJed b/jPrqfesa^r^aad^ 
Ejwaioer9 at West Pqiiit^ Jbe p^rchaaos wf^ .«W*o ^-i^ 

yalue, piocuied at very reduced pfij^^^^a^^. <^ wboJ^ con- 
9tMfrt<^ t)Hi bi^uio^f 9f;.ji ^^^1 VofWug , librarjr. ^ TJie-jao- 
dfvmit of PfoC^i^ Head>^^^i3^yrMli,pj|^ote^,. One|jun|ahped 
Wiud filtX.dollw o( tJ>e^prpprUtiofx ,w$re i%R^ ^ Pkk 
ISpwqi (;^r; for.tbep\ifc^«^ pf ^pjp ,fjtjre%^a^ W bif dfi^ 

fwi»«^n?fi wW«^t t^ b?, ^wmffi^ foT,tO; tiie Bo^i^^ • 1; 

. Five^bundTed 4f4tai^ ^ero^ap^^ipp^atf^d f^ fh^ samj^.me^teb 
IP tbQ.Medical 4^p,vUi;^pt^,fo/[ Ui^ rpi^fc^e of }hf .ipateonf 
tif^^ ;^> wuucjtio^. itt tbfi^ deparl^aipjjit Tbia «}|pi..w|iB |^ 
jneoLced to the Tte^ux^r pi^ ihfi^J4j^c^\Ffi^v\^^^ 
cftpotJ ber6Wjjai.pre9eat. . .. , .j.. ....,, , , , ^, , ,*., 

^ Ifi oa^es of appropri^jLipQ^ it, baa be^a^.jpuajtomary for 4lie 
Secretary to iaaue hS^ ly^^rrant to tbe jf^o^ . oerti&ed by ^ 
|freai4fS|nt.pC tba Qcpj^fl.^.tbe prop^r pt^e^i th^,oeitifici|j^.l^ 
iflg'^rc^&loed aD4 pA^ced OA file by tbe Se(;ret»r]r^ Astoace 
.qwnting for the^e^cpej^dUure.of the money,.there has beeuno 
jjppecific r^le. f I if o^lfl ^coip/neA4 that the >hoJe subject \)p 
ir^iflated by.^theBpard ^y aayitab^ atatu^^ to bav|e^i^p^f^ 
jUpopg^lMi by-^awa. ...... . . . .. .^ .. :.-.•.. .'-..i' ' 

^.rPjcelimiiiafy w^mi^s bay? beepiak^^ /qr tb^ <|o^D|^ctit^ 

of the main edifice of the Univeraity, of which r^^pprt will be 

.Blade to the Board by tbe iBa^^i^ ComipiV^<v, ^ ia i^ con- 

tfupplatiop tp ^y t^Q fouo4at^u,i)f;aU|iraAd,i^^ fi«ft 

^ry a^ye.ijrouijfj; tbi/;(«eaaoij,. ia ori^r ^^^^^op^^le^o^^t 

j^edifioe duri^.t^e.aeft jjeair.^ Xb?, p^ati ia op^ of |^ 

^])faW^^and fitoeafi for tbe^poaiti^in^^ If Qooatructfi^ ybpUy 

,(rfatopi5,.tla'Coatwili poj b^^j^ friip.«46^(?^^^^ 

ing wood where it wiU del^^f ffitjiif^fji^^ ^l^g^ea^^. ni 






money from the ^reastriy of thef'^Ifili^Srsity/l)/ forbiddiiig 
iiiy'pc^trieWiiliAtytef'exKcpt'V^tt^y^ from the Se^ro- 

'tttiV; (^Ha'tMk^rtKiti^'ihe oc^ ^hibh flie Secr^t^ 

lilii&rytie^rarraTiie:' It Sftppfiarir t6 ttie to be equally frnjiotta A 
that tlife'lSecretftry, as Vhe* accotinWng dfflc^ of the BoAti, 
•honld be apprized of every dollar that g6is into the Treasbiy 
6f ftie tJhfversity/dhd chiBirgte ihe samte to the Treasnier! To 
^Ms'eihd lyonM recommend ' i!hat no portion of flie Unifer- 

^iiy Pandf^Yncome be rimoredfrom the Trettsury of the Statt 
liito th'e Treasury of the TJhiversity,' except by ordier of the 

^^bbardybr of the iStectitive' Committee, under seal, and at^sted 
by the Secretary — and that these orders should be for sperciBb 
rtnis^the same being charged to the Treasurer on the Secr^ 

'tary^s bodkisi' With regard to othe^ dues paid into the Trea- 
imiyy It JBihbuNt be the duty of the Treasurer to jiresent every 
receipt given by him to be countersigned by the Secretary, 

'who shoiild duly dhdrge the same. 

' ' "It slioiiid be tnadA the duty of the Secretary to keep himself 
w'etl ihfbrmed of the iconditibit of ttie 'Universiry Puhd and 
fid Income; to'ihakerfcpbrtof the samii at the annual meeting 

'*oftlie Board; aifid; iii the iiiterim; dit the call of^e Bzectt- 

■tivS Committee. '•' ; ••■'••••' /--fi • i •■.•:^ 

' It idlA'iiiy judgmchfiidMV&ble^ that'ib^ rcicord shdtild 

H>6 V^pt than h6W!tolbriB o^Hh^ doings of &e' Board; that Ole 

^rtoik)'rts' of committed and communications be spread 6ut cm 

A ' I' 

' tfie V4cord ^'Well as ^ecifiid orderft^aivi i«<bltitiOD9, - stf tfrat 
''ttt«'bo61(kof tfr^^oitdlnay-iioii^aifo, at Iea», all thb'tfdci^ 
'Vnifcritaiy hiMo^'df'^ iiitti^ttoii ^te& ^6eif not go iita (o 
the books of tho Socretary of Statft ' ' ' ''' 

" "iftts kl^ ateirWife; diA an iiia«z «lMiM be Hiaa* and kept 
^iAt^e^miiikiilAsier&fhiefilbie^eisiMk to ekaihiitf the 



desire the Secretary to ren^iear^ 9$ tbf^ lflfard^Kg,l^^d fQ90i4p;i^ 
o^per Qf title ifn^^ilutio^ I de^ it ii^y 4ufjr to itqc^i^i^eDd 
tbiik the pay ef tl^e,i()ffice be duly i»<?reflyBp4 . . t : 

Oia, the oth)9r hand, I w^uld aubmit.to Itbe 3oard| that^ a« 
|)pye,4acoin6 fmd difibu^nt/onj^s of .t|ie JUi^titaCipA UiqrQase,, tbis 
per pen^e to the T^wnrer as dif ][>uj|piiig . officer, should be 
SQbj^ to.re^j«rtB»fiPt, iu order tbfjt, if jui^t, a sa^og ipay 
jtccrue V> the institution. 

The chao^ >^hich l;iS3 bden mad^^ in the iLOie of b^gUmiii^ 
and ending t^e. fiscal ye^ wiU ,mi)(e it uececjipuy for the 
Bo^d tp a:eport.to t^ (IpoyerBor, on,, or .before^ the first da^ 
of Qctobfsr. As this is the last staled maetijiig before that dnJ^ 
499m6,pseliniinary. action^ in.^is bjpb^l^ will be n^edfifl.a^ tljii 

, I popwup^c^, h/eiewith,. ft resojlfttion of the. Faculty hi- 
commending; qa^didates for the ^di^igrees of ^ B^ .f^^d ^ M, 
jn cpurse,,,to beconfened at th^ . app,r€^bi9& . Con^pience- 

^■►V**"* f ' »t., .«'| 

By the arrangements for this A«mversiury|. to b^ celebn^ 
>^ipofro,w, a place wiU be assigued tp the Board in the. pro- 
qeffsipi^f^m tl^e. wept. portico. of, the Cayitpl to the baptist 
Ci^fb, and seats wiU be reserv;^ in ^ ; Church on ih^ left 
pf. ^ ^yte^^ It^s Tpry luijchto he^dj^if^ thitti^th^ orderjip 
these matters should be duly observed It will add to l^e io- 
l^irpstt of tha 0091^01^ ^t the* uusjlo will l^e by ti^e l^niyeisity 
oboijr. ; Ftqfeaaoi . Kvrstaine^ of ^le depf^rti^ent of Modep 
liSiPWrn/^^ hc^ f^goial^ Ifia ^eviOjUou. to t^ Ipstf tutipft, jjy 
; i^ly; in|t|r^ption of pjtudenta in the Theoryi fifii,^ of ^Uf^ 
Frx^ thirty to^foi^ly studfsdiit? hasre ^v/a^liedi t^papelyes, pf ^bjs 
*ervlces^dm|ng.]^e fpfVf^ ^jijt ^^ lt^«ie|i|1tor W; * AsjiffjUt 
the Institution. ^ ^ ." . . / ' ' " '' 

Faculty to the teceT^miffJt^fi J^^ <>Ci^Ql|i*W«t|ij. » 



4i «»tetofiBdtlHil.thB7]iiMiteBi< of thi»;Bwid:'w|U evibme 

•ppto a UM^ Bdantiir >€DU0ctuMil^ and the otiier «lem«ipyl|8 ,^( 
fMpetitfyHoA liam b^oti got togetJi^^ not foigettiogjti^e 

^BottAiiig estahliihmMt, vitkout wiikh^ in ttfw kicftliWy ^l 
olhef admntagM wonU haTe;pDoviad ^s^fa^y lUtftTi^iliAgi «l|d 
without the enlaigement of which, thjPj^fOape^^yet growth of 
/te iMtitalidu wiU not'borfoUf arenluwA. J WQ^M tbes^ore 
cstt die opttsinl attention of the? AoMd to thi^ poipt, , 

hi thA Department of £tbid^ Civil Polity, and Polf tical 
^Beptunoy, daily: instaruoiioahae'bden rendeBedbyjiyi^ thxoqgh 
tkepaetyeur^'ie memlMis^ ofikB eenior olaea ax^l ^.siHQh 
other young gentlemen as elected d^ pursue i^p sujigeotS'om- 
JMwed in this depaitiiieni. The* Imt tQiOft waa i>ceupied ?^th 
4h6^ sid>j0ct ' of Bthiiss. ; 1 1%6 4eaM. book, Way land -s fUen^en,ts 

i.o€'|»fiNral SeienGP^, ««aiaaed)aB flnggestifig, .foif elas^ 4iB^ufiysH0i, 
a conyeliient 'etddr ofytopieaui ^lhiBfteaiiia^i|t)y,ii|iK)f»Aiflit 
branch of atiMy* Qbil fitf ity, with a thorough analysis of 
th^'Ck^nstitlalaa'oi the United States, and with illustrations 
drawn from the constitutional history of other States, ancient 
and modem, was taught by a course of oral lectures and al- 
temate examinations, and occupied the second term. During 
the third term instruction was rendered in International Law 
and Political Economy ; in the former by lecture and exami- 
nation ; in the latter through Say's Treatise as a text book. 
These several topics were pursued with interest by all, though 
with various success — ^the advantage generally being on the 
side of those who approached this class of subjects, through 
a previous mathematical and classical training. My personal 
instructions have been extended to several other classes dur- 
ing the year, according to the demand for assistance in the 
other departments. 

Of the students of the University for the year ending the 
SSd of July, sixty-two are from the town of Madison, eighty- 
two "Irom odier p<»tiona of Wisconsin, and thirty from other 



1. 



y» 



'Stote^ and TkntMim:' The. itotf tntMi, mM't& pMoMgv m 
tr^ff as teBonttM} may now* be ragankd - as «0E{|aUiahied mk a 
krecure basis. It is iii^ a comdifioti to dictate' the teraut of ad- 
mission to t^e sereral classes, and sbomld draUitaelf of liia 
ftdirantages of it^ ^otiition. I uroald reconmiMd a thoiongbk^ 
Terision of out ccm^ ^f scndy, iii * conaexioa with a new 
editibii of o»T by^}a1ir&> 

It is highly importanf Ihat die Ihiivemty be firequeaflf 
Tisited by the Board, indiVidtially or by oonunhlees, and re- 
poit made for the informalion of the publie, rdative to its 
means of instruction, the character of its daily ezeretaes, and 

« 

the qoality of its public examinations. I commend this topie 
to the due attention of the Board. 

In conclusion, gentlemen^ I* need hardly renew tfan aaan- 
' ranee of my hearty Goncun^ence with the Board in all mdar 
iores calculated to bear onward to a suocessfnl issue the great 
trust which has been edmnutted to your handa 

Reapedfully, kc^ 

I H. JUATHROR 



. I 



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• •;•(■'. •: 






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t 1 



APPENDIX B. 



REPOIfcT €ff T^B EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

i 

To ^ the .Board (^ Regents : 

The Executive Committee, charged with the administratioii 
of the University during recess of the Board, have, at stated 
and called meetings, continued to exercise the general powera 
conferred upon them under the hy^laws, as the exigencies ol 
the Institution seemed to require, and have executed the spe- 
cial orders of the Board requiring action on the part of the 
Committee. 

* 

They have the satisfaction to be able to report the Univer-^ 
sity in a sound and healthful condition, enlarged in its means 
of instruction, enjoying the confidence and commanding the 
patronage of the public. The extension of the boarding 
establishment will occupy the attention of the Committee^ 
and, in compliance with the order of the Board, report wiU 
be made on that subject at the annual meeting in January. 

Mr. Madison Evans resigned the office of Tutor at the 
close of the last academic year. Mr. John F. Smith, a grad> 
uate of the University, has been appointed to the vacant post^ 
and is now in the successful discharge of the duties of the 
office. 

Accounts against the University have been audited, from 
time to time, and warrants have been issued by the Secretary 
on those which have been allowed. 

5g 



34 



For a mora perfect understanding of the doings of the 
Committee^ the Board are referred to the Secretary's record of 
their proceedings, and to papers on file in this office, of whidi 
profert will be made at the call of the Board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. a LATHROP, 
L. B. VILAS, 
D. W. JONES, 
CHAUNCEY ABBOTT, 
If, W. PBAN, 

Cammiiiee. 



1 .' ' 



< r 



I • 



, ) 



I . 



I 



■ k 



I ' I 



I I 



1 1 > 
1 



I !• i 



. u 



Ok 
inn 111 ^^o•l^>[ ulj'ffi 1,» ^jluasi orfj Jiindii-. aottrmmoo adT 

APPENDIX C. 



REPORT OF BUILDING COMMITTEE. 

To the Board qf Regents qf the University qf fVisconein : 

The BuUdiDg Commiltee of the Board of Regents, to -whom 
vas entrusted the procuring of a plan for the Central Uni- 
Tersitf Edifice, and to adrertise and receive proposals for 
building, and award a contract for the same, hare discharged 
that duty in a manner satisfactory, it is believed, to all con- 
cerned and for the best interests of the institution. The plan 
finally accepted, was furnished by Mr. Tinsley, of Indiana, 
and the contract for the building awarded to James Campbell, 
of Madison, for the entire work complete, at 036,550, he being 
the lowest bidder therefor. 

The stone work of the basement story is already in an ad- 
vanced state of forwardness, and it is hoped and expected 
that it will be completed this fall,se as to enable the cotnmit- 
tee, should their finances permit, to complete the entire struc- 
ture on or before the Ist day of November, 1858. 

The exterior plan of the building is a model of architec- 
ture, imposing and massive ; and the internal arrangements 
are such as to most fully meet the wants and necessities 
of the institution, in all its several departments, so far as they 
could be foreseen, and provided for in advanc& 



36 

Tbe committee submit the results of their labors in fall 
confidence Aat they will meet the approval of the Board and 

public generally. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

H. A. TENNEY, 

CfCn Building Committee, 
Madison, October ist, 1857. 

\ 

uioflv/oi , 'Jiit.^i'U !«) i. t.^'M ••I'lj'lo a.'Jiii.if oj ^. jiilniJl oT f 
-iiV' Ir.fjiisf) oflJ lol iiiiij; 5: 'lo ^•iinjoin'[ '.'t .', . 1 !]»>> ■- ■• 
td't 'A\\^(yi[(^v\ •)Vi:' ji /'.{.. it^uirAm oi bfiu /j.'ti'l»'J \U' '*"• 
1 ■ VH ;!''^.ii) jjvjuf /'fiir.^ nrli ii.'l jj£-.' )0 a} Incv.j. Ltii. .i.'(iL« . d 
-u • Jlxj 0) J'»v»i(n(l .-i ji ^yiol-n^Vi: a feiijion.' xi n; \-jiH» :b;I; 

.«ni:il)iil tf. ^V'lJ'iiiT .(Ik \k\ \y:.^<iiY\\]\ vmi^ ^'r^\^^r)i: ' " fl 

*.r xiAi iii ybujri*.. i ^{ioU tnom-'-'Ctl ori) 1<> yl> )vr ;*ifoirf vriT 
-Miiiiih*:) 0/lt Dl(i,.n{» oi «j3 OB Jli>l i-.iiii b' •)■;]< [rno:> i* !'i'«' tj jii;ii 

j'.j'rjui'>;incTfiJ li^motui oil/ bin; :'>vi&i>i(i i (ir. viii '»«'iiil ."jJ 
j-'liif^ojo'jff bii* Rliij.v f.(t! J; -in \llij^ i^'.Oifi or ^'; 'l-ii' • *^:i^ 
VMilj ?fi lift o« ^>'llf•'^^I:^*q .[1 ij.TiV ^> r)i ii;! i:i ^if Ufti: .li •• r u- 

.otMUvf'B iti lo'i l.^abi^ nq bfic ^iro'.uoi r f- m.c 



^t 



\iv\s\zi,'\M\:\i\ 



TlA 



- APPENDIX D. 






1 



t/ rr" 
r) ' Of 



.1 



10?. 



TREASURER'S BKPOja?,-; 



). j ( '. .tnu\* 



[Th the B^d qflUgenU jqftbt Uniomky 'qfr fViactmrini, 

j ' ^The undemgned respectfully snbibitB the Ibllowitij^.T^poity 
allowing a complete statement of tbe receipts ai^d 4i$bunie- 



n 



nients by Wm. N. Seymput", Trea:?uipet. of said Boai^ fOt^e 

.fi^^alyeat 1857, ending thisdate. ' 

o-.. . K,W. DEAN,:' 

(^, ; 'Itfeofitrer, pro tern. , 

JRtpwrt qf Receipts and Disbursements by^iht^ Treasurer^frgm 
\ the 3\sf day x^Becemker^ 1956, Yi> S/ejkitmheT SOth^ ISif: 

[ Receipts. . ,! 



f-i*- 



p-»i*- 






1857. 



1 



Jsanary 1, 



Jaunaiy 

JfBvarj 

: Juiuary 



ytVy 
.April 

:^ 

.. Apiil 

Afsil 



8.. 

9,. 
10^. 
14^. 
90- 
93- 



i i l . » t I K ■* III 



»• 



3- 

9.. 

13m 

18.. 

8,. 

?: 
S; 

1%. 



Balance on Band Slat Beeea^l^« 1850, aa p^ 

_ report, ••.'..,^«^«.^......^... 

Reeeiyed from State Treaaorer,../ ,«,.. 

....do .....do .^.. ,^ ,». 

....do do • 

Iteceiyed from S. Mills, late Tieaaqrer, . . ^ . . . . 

Receiyed from fitate Treiaarer,^ , 

.••.do.... .... ....do .•.•^•^•..•« ....••«.. 

....do.... .... ....do .... ........ ....••••. 

do .'....». .do « 

,....do...*..^ ^OD •«• • 

do ....do ....• ,.•••••. 

....do ....do «... 

....do.... ...••.. .do ••..*••• ••«.^J..»*«. 

• b. .do. .•■•••.... .do .•.« ..y.**-** 4rf*««**> 

....do.... .... ....do ••«•.*•. .«^..^..pk^. 

....do .l..do •• 

....do.... .... ....do ............ ....••«• 

Hacehed from 7. H. Laflurop, itm tuition,. p«*. 
fieeelred from Jolm Oonilin, for lola,....*... 

Receired from' X H. Latlirop» lor toitian, » ««,. 



la« 



• •♦• 



• •»• 



Total, 



'*> n'- 



•£/•*' 
^t;' 



Amonnl' 



■M O 



li 



m 

40000 

ao5 to 

^00 00 

500 JDO 

100 00 

3.781 00 

\fm )D0 

9|000 00 
li&OO 00 
l,500,0t 
^00 00 

slooooo 

9^,00 

^00 00 

660 75 

111.97 

m,o» 



T 



•Hoe^;4B 



ll.lill 



36 



Disbursements. 



Dat6. 



No. of 
Warrant 



19! 



1857. 
January 1. 
January 1. 
January 1 . 

Jagflary l-.j 
J«!Sry l^.i 

January 9.. 
Jatattt^^lCUc 
January 13.. 

January. 14,. 

516 

18- 



January 39.. 
January 29., 
January SO".'. 



February 3.'. 




-j^- 



To whom paid. 



501 jJ.H. Lat hrep 



Amoont. 



eau 
iMUMlCMBht. 
511 Weed <fc Eberhard 

5Q3 JohnConklin...... .......' 78 00 

468. A.S.Woqd...: i ^ 30 00 

iJ3 445' ''|lkjB;W)odU Jil'jiOlUJ'Jii .•-I'J.'jjOfi-. i V.' : '*^*'i*^ 

ift^3*b'tUySneiLs"tt£^& y.' ' flsniii 

B. Brown..,^^.*-.,;„'^.^^-;L„^...a;i<^j.i 49^0 

* 4 Castleman .':?:.:.:.?:'.: :t. ^< 44 50 

6^uitleworth 43 00 

^^. LS^ Treasurer—interest on loaa 2,800 00 



^2i 

5^2"^^ 



515 * 

518 

534 

526 
527 



"^ebruar.lS.. 

Pebruar. 18.. 

Pebruar.24.. 

*FBbruar,5J5'.,. 

Aarch 3-;. 
-March- - ^.v4 — 528- U, H,-CoIUmu«^w^ 



Ledyard 406 00 

> County Bank.. <,., _. ^^ ^ 1,00Q.00 

Alex. Schji^e.v ... ^ 
James GfeMl.i... 
Tt. AT Bake r . r.-. ■:. 
G. H. Slaughter.... 
John Bathgoh 



March 




S. H. Tracy.... 

Tibbitte <fr -Gordon. ;...i...-:':::l '. 

w-.tk-L:tB:^otirifev:.v. ..':vvi.':'>.":\'>?ii' •" 

:Tnim Bathiroh. -i-' - - ■ • _-.- .... '1' - . . , 



John Bathgoh. . . . . 

J-. -G; ^foMyWlf. .J. :'.-ii^' .'l:'.U J: ! ' i:».>?ll^ •^J- 
J; H-.-Lathrop -.-. i J V.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-Ji^ . t-. •. |.- '*'i-' 
•John- W.- Jofif*. rk-. .-.-.•.-.•.•.-.•.--•.<'^l ■.-.•.-..- '^^ 
liiringstmr, -FarTO^A- Oo.-.---.-.-.-.-.*',»l-.-.-.-.|.- r^- 
"Wisconsm -State *Ftiegraph*Go,- .- 1' ' 1. -.-.-.-.j.- - 

■Mr; fiyan& .-.-.•.-. I'P.-.v--. -.-.-.•.•.•.•.•* 'J L-.-.-.-.(.4^- ' 

h{ 

e 
11 



• 1- 



rMr.- fivans;. •.-.•.-. i'!'. 

J.-WrStwiitig.-.?;. -r.-.- -.-.-. .-.-.-.^}^. 
J. W-.-SteHmg.-.V^. r:.-.-rr...-.-.-.-<>|>. 

J,W; SteHmg: .9J*: ; t''> 

J. W-.-Bterimg. «'J.-: 



. • . . I 



'-4 



$500 00 

250 00 

17 88 

100 00 

450 

131 00 



litifel'Keffl"'" !•*' ."C moii h. i »...>ii,.,Cr 



15iitit'er*etol 
Mons. Trenibleau.. . y. . .^. . 
Nichohw Otnana.*.-. . J^hT. - 
3JicholM0man& 



■ »«■ 



450 00 

449 10 

500 00 

37 00 

€-00 

. 138 00 

' 300 00 

27.00 

130 98 

•. ao^ifo 

114 37 

' iwieo 

<.<^10f-56 

• 401 ii*iwi9ki0 
:!«tOT60 

'/"§•• Joo 
«^74 
'3*0 

r YJ70 

3*1 100 

'.^^50 

^f'*0 

^» •0|fi75 

<<9oroo 

(lOO-'OO 

jtw'oo 
Woo 

IfiS^O 

^97^^00 

100 00 

34 00 

25 00 



J I 



\ 



%9 



Ditbursement* — continue^ 



Otift 



1857 
Apti 30,... 
▲pril 25,... 
\AjM 28,... 
Ju^ 2,... 
Jfay 11,... 






12, 

'lo,.. . 
13,... 
16,... 
16,... 
16,... 
16,... 
16,. . . 
3ia7 16,... 



]f^ 



May 



aisf 


23,.:. 


Maif 


25.... 


May 


30,... 


June 


5,... 


Jane 


5,... 


Jvin* 


5,-, 


June 


%... 


June 


v22,... 


Jtme 


^o,... 


-June 


S(^... 


June 


30).., 


Jane 


su,« . « 


Jane 


«fv,. • • 


Jane 


30,... 


Jane 


30,-.. 


Jane 


30,... 



Jnly 
Jnly 
Joly 
Jaly 
Jaly 
Jaly 
Jaly 



1,... 
1.... 
<»,. . . 

7,... 
7,... 
7,.., 



July 11,... 

July 11,... 

July 11,... 

July 11,... 

July II,... 

July 14,... 

July 17.... 

July 17,... 

July 21,... 

July 21.... 

July 22,.-. 

July 27,... 

July 29.-.. 

July 29,... 

July 29.... 

July 29,. . . 



Ko. of 
Wanrant 



555 

541 

556 

557 

563 

559 

564 

558 

565 

570 

568 

567 

566 

569 

572 

573 

562 

574 

575 

576 

577 

.578 

561 

584 

581 

5b2 

583 

579 

580 

585 

587 

586 

588 

589 

592 

591 

590 

594 

595 

596 

597 

593 

599 

600 

601 

598 

602 

604 

603 

605 

607 

606 

608 



TOiirhom paid. 



>*•••*. A^a f • I 



T*^*0«»4.«««»« m»t»^ •.-< 



-r ' 



T 



... . ...^ 



S. H. Tri^^, ;«, ^»^ ^ ;. , -^ 

O. M. Oonover, .^h. ••....^•. ,^^. .*.,.- 

Crosby, NichdU dk Co^ — -.» ..^.- 

John Goiiklin,..,4 ,.». .... .,4! ..^^ 4.- 

Alex. McBride,! ,,..,.l.-*..k.4.. 

Darwin Clark,.,, ..— ,..!.. ^w.. 

D. Holt,.... 
P.C.Poole,, 

Paniel Barry,. .« •^«».j,4. .••,... 

J. H. Lathrop,.,w,.. .-..„*,'. ^... ;..,*... 
R, B. Gibson, .-^.m*-..*.,!..!...**^ ;... 

James Fariley, .,* . ^^^^ ,.^« j. ..• — . 

M. A M. iUilroad do ........u 

Vaughn, Ray, <fc Hediii..*.^ _.... 

P. Rcad,.,..^ 

Joseph Chailtersoii,..,,^.-...*,.,..^... 

Wm.A, Mean,» ^... 

H. A. Tenoey, 
Wm. Tiosley, 

E.T.Mix. J- 

James Douglass, t 

I>. fi. Dairie .'. 

Powers dk Skinner, 

John N. Jones. .;. 

Student's Miscellany, 
Nicholas Omans..... 
R. D. Oibsoii* .... .... 

Livingston, Fargo A dko., 

W. E, Cramer, 

Livingston. Fargo A Co., , 

A. Kursteiner, 

E S.Carr, 

Madison Erans, 

O. M. Conover, 

J. H. Lathrop, 

M. A M. Railroad Ca, 

John N.Jones, .•. 

E. Chilson, , 

0. L. Williams, 

P. McCabe, 

J. Memhard , 

C. S. Mears A Co., , 

S. H. Tracey, , 

O. C. Buck dt Co., 

J. W. Sterling, 

Adams dt Adams, 

J. L. Pickard, 

Madison Evans, 

Henry Pellage 

Quinor it Hallden, 

Wm. Fannigan, 

C.L.Williams, 

D. Read,.... 



AjBttauL 




123 86 

200 00 

133 60 

50 00 

50 00 

12 37 

6 25 
5 15 

32 12 

28 00 

--^50 

485 

10 Oq 

8 70 

250 00 

375 00 

125 00 

312 5 

500 

37 59 

3 24 

18 85 

36 00 

27 00 

7 00 
63 95 

16 97 
21*00 

312 50 
22 68 
12 50 
54 17 
10 00 

102 05 

17 33 
95 90 

375 00 



» 



40 



i>tMtir^em«n/^— condnued. 



SMe. 



Mr 

July 

Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Tef. 
Aug, 
Aug, 



1857 



#-• - 



Aug. 
Aug. 
Aug. 



S9,. 
99,. 

4,. 

6,. 

5,. 

5„ 

8,. 
11.. 
11,. 
11.. 
17,. 
95.. 
99f 
SI,. 

9,. 



fiepi 30,... 



No. of 

Wamikt. 



610 
ftno 

611 
6U 
618 
619 
615 
616 
59S 
617 
690 
619 
681 
618 



693 
637 



Td irhom pud. 



M. 4s U. RaUroMl Oo., 

T. D. Coryell, 

J.D. Ruggles,. 

H. ATeoDer, 

O. L. Willi«mfl, 

Wright A Puue, 

Jolm Oonklin, 

Peter Newman, 

HibUrd ALuee, 

▲twood A Rublee, 

J. L. Piolurd, 

ThoratoB A Muldoon, 

James Liysey, - 

8. Foren, 

Joeeph L. Boee, 

Wm. TinaleT', 

Wm. N. Seymour, Treasurer's fees on 
Beoeipte, $940 Sl^ftes on Disburse- 
ments, $197 37, 



Balance in hands of the Treasurer,. 



to 41 


19 00 


50 00 


400 00 


176 49 


90 34 


59 00 


90 19 


98 58 


49 50 


19 50 


15 00 


93 05 


800 


79 47 


304 50 


438 18 


$90,174 94 


3,90654 



$94,081 48 



APPENDIX E. 



REPORT OF THE AUDITING COMMITTEE. 



\' 



The Auditing Committee of the Boai;d of Regenls of 
the Um¥er8it7 of Wisconsin lespectfiflly repor^, that o^ 
the let .day of October, 1857, they met at the office, of the 
Secretary of said Board and compared the warrants issued 
by the Secretary with the books and vouchers therefor ; and 
also the account of the Treasurer of said Board with; the 
warrants drawn on him by said Secretary, and certify to said 
Boaid that we found the same to be correct and tma 

And we further certify that the aforesaid Treasurer delivered 
to us warrants and authorized vouchers paid by him during 
the first three quarters of the year 1857, in the sum of jNO^- 
174 94, which were canceQed by us. 

JOHN a LATHROP, 

Chfn Estecutivt CommittetL 

J. D. RUGGLES,. 

8e(^y Board (/ Begenta. 
I, October 1st, 1857. 



6g 



APPENDIX F. 



SECRETARY'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Regents qf the University qf Wisconsin: 

* ' 'fhW nfidersigncd, Secretary of said Bdard, resp^tfully re- 
*^brfe, that during^ 'the first three quarters of the year' 18St, 
'^Wurtfirits feav^ beih fefcrkwn'tipon the Tl^easufer of the BottM, 
'aSMowijto^it: ' • • 






.•-*• 






Mc 



ons. Trembleau, . . . . 
MadinoB Evans,... ^•. 
WMdAEbwUrd,.-, 



January i) JkiSLdlsriUt'. '■'*(... a. •« 
.January- 2 J. H. Lathzop*. 
' Janufei^ ^S O. If.OonbTW, 
,^imyfui^^ ,3: 4, W< Sterlipg, ^.,u 
'■January DlJohn Conklib, 

January 7 
January 7 
January 9 
January 10 

January 23 
January 29 
JanQar|(,^ 
January 30 
January 30 
Febr*y 2 
Fel^r'y 2 
Febr*y 11 
Febr'y 21 
Febr'y 25 
Febr'y 28 
March 2 
March 7 
March 9 
March 11 



>■' 



0. SbutUeworth, 

J. D. Ledyard, 

S.H.Tracy, , 

Hibbard <fr Luce, ... 

James Green, 

A., A. Baker, 

Q. H. Slaughter, 

Jno. Bathgate, 

J. H. Coltonifr Co,.. 

8. H.Tracy, 

8. P. White, 



Whailhr. 



MW^p*- 



■ «l »» m * % > < < « 



J^a 



Balanrr^ -— 

-4» ■ 

.<10. — "^ ' ..*... 

-do... ,.. 

Services afi Janitor, .'..'.. 
Qatar V % •. . y,^ -^.. ••»<.» 1^ 

do : :. 

Qiploma Lithographed in N. Y. 

do.''/.".V.".V.".'.".V.'.V:".".V.".". 

Labor and mat. fur. on building. 



'--'l4 



J. Wetber^ee, ^•^•«»«« Wood, 

Beriah Bi^trVf;: .:.!..: peff diein and mileage as Regent 



do... .....do. 

Medical Dept. of UniTersity,.. 

Interest on loan and exchange,. 

Labor and materials, 

Lumber furnished, 

Philosophical apparatus, 

Patent door springs, 

Wood, 

..do 

Maps for University Library,.. 

Labor and materisjs, 

[Labor on building, 



i.ij I 



500 00 
HSOOO 
350 00 

78 00 
dl^-OO 
100 00 
WOO 
131 00 
375 00 

90 00 
234 97 
449 10 

4a 00 

44 50 
500 00 

43 00 
406 00 
203 07 

98 53 

37 00 

600 

138 00 

300 00 

37 00 
130 98 



^ 






.J.! 



J«fr' 



11 A 



? 



oiw 



[ay 



To l^y^if: 









,T 



i 



1 



Ll9hig«ton,i'arga A Co E^r% xh«rg«l/,^i{? -^-Ili-ilS 
31 W*K State- TWej;Oo.i:mp»AfroiiiB??C&^^ • 

2^kTAlif»-fhit1kmtA • ^WlTrtK^I .".17)1. .>! Tl 

J 



f: 







7 

9 



\3: W: Stef 



I? 

11 
14 

18 
18] 
20 
28 

\ 

a 



1^ 



Bf.'BVtOlBy I J.^ 



I.M.J 



'*<IAA 






tu 






L'fb W ^ppn./I'f : : , . .;. '/^ /_• ' ' 
Laboratory and ;Ajppv;atti8; . :};. • 
_ fctV^-axy Apfpn:,. * .•„ .... * 

Mori«. DnTreTtibjitJ;: '..d6.; .-, ,4* 

NicbtokiOiiiii^^, ::f. : j^drvkesM-JanWif^,.. ;!?.,;.:.. 

dA ''*• -do '^ '" '1 V--' 

S. H:Ti-aw, ::::::J.. i;a!)'ot and iiiat^^^i;j.-iL^4* 
Obfibr/Wfcbcjs ACa; Sef!ein^:::: .^??v/l:'S:;V?JtF 

jobbObwWiii; ;:;;:,-?: feff^> Jair.^-^l^fbTpft^i^ ^^ 



if, Srckrf/. 

do...V: 

(if . . ..w 



D;a Poole;.;.;., .. :. 



June 
Jnne 
June 
June 
June 
June 
Jone 
June 
June 
June 
Jvne 



5 
5 
5 

18 
22 
29 
29 
29 
29 
29 
39 



ph nhaUgTmn, . 



H. A, Tenney, 
WHliam Tinsley, . 
E. Townsend Mix, 
James Douglass, . . 

D. S. Durrie, 

Livingston, Fargo it Co. Express Charges, 
W. £. Cramer, Adyertising, 



Attdint. 



Of 
1 

r 
« 

1 
I 
1 
I 

r 
1^1 






w . BretiiTig, - ,. , . . .|^in?tbaw'8Jonratf,W tfiSfc.J;; 
.wcrS* ^kKineh.:.': AaTenigmg',:.'.-Jl".:':'iiJ.': J'.;;'^' 

Wto/A: Mtaf8,:::..'j.'i:.ninber; .::: •:l*V:'r^<.':il'^; 
Alex. ■ KtfBfWtf, :;;;..:' JShiuib l^ea,' 'iv.^.^i .-;, ^.1':r}S-} 

Davi-d Holt; :::,::;:'?.• tt^.Wemx^^:.:•;l;r.^L":r^*.'^-i■ 



^„ .V, ... v-ibsbp';'/...;:^:: Cb'rtgVpMroTTatdebftW Jj.^';;-, 6 t^.- ^sAq 
1? Vaugh,.Kay';£^J^e<fll,'^ ^U^rtw'' notice 1\» Cti^ajM^ •^ftUpJftO 

2ir 

2? 



d; Ke«i.:-.v.: .'.?.*i.^'mTf LibfWy^hjiit^A^^^ 



EatinQktfia ioL main building .. .. 

Grading do 

Premium ior design do 

Plans .^..do 

..do do 

Merchandise 



Student's Miscellany, . Miscellaney and Adyertisinff,.. 

Nicholas OmauB, Labor in Lab^andongroanda,. 

R. B. Gibson. . . . .^ Congressional debates, . .'. 

J. N. Jones, .' {PobUge, 



20, 
SDITDO 
133 60 
50 00 
50 00 
12 37 

4 85 
10 00 
32 12 
28 00 

3 50 

5 15 






mi 



\ 



ToifiWrtV 



1 
I 

7 

i 

II 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
16 
31 
93 
93 
23 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 



y TVlSjoi'J*!?? ,^ 9^ 



K^j^8,u^;::.:.. 



i^rr 



unftemer 
Madiflon'BVahi^ 
0. M. Opi|o?er, .'^,> ,i, 

J/ N.' Jones,.... ^ 

M. AM. R.R.Oa,... 
J/ H. L'atlirop, .J .... . 

0. L. Wmiams, 

Pat TTcOabe,.. ;:.::. 

John Memhard, 

Adams A J^dunft,,,.^, 

O. 0. Buck A,0o», ^,.. 
J. "W. Sterling, .•,,*. 
J. L. Pickar4» »,...*«. 

Henry Pelliijge,, 

Madison £iraQS» . •: ^ . 
Quinn A Matthexrs,.. 

[0. L. WmUms, 

Wm. Flanegan^ 
D. Read 



m¥> 



K4 2"l%- 
M. w M, JK. Uo.j , 

"WxigkS Paine/ 



4, „ -,, 

4 0. L. Williams 

4 H. A^^ennej^..*... 

$ John Conklin, 

8 Peter Kewman 

8 At wood A Rnblee,.. 

8 Simeon Foren, 

5 Mnldoon A Tkavston 
11 J. L. Pickard, 

90 James XiTssej, . . 
31 Joseph L. Roas,.^ 

9 Wm.Tinsle7, 

8S.I>. Oarpenter/ 

91 Calkins A Webb, 

30 Wm. N. Seymour* «.^. 



1 



T^f^t^fr* '} 



T 



4 










•^ • '■*"■■■"■ •^'^ *'^"J 

. . QO «... ■*«.^(«Hf'|l'^* ^4 * a, « *«f « 

£08tSfle, ........ ^ ,^ , yj4 .J, ^^^ ^ , 

7;:eight on books, 
dalsu-y; .. 
J4^mbsr, . 
Labor,, . . . 
TuriiitiiriB, 

LaV{or, ^ .•^... ..,...«• 

Moving *'Farwe110o1Iectiont'*. 

Mychnndiae ^.^ .^. 

'work and materims« ..p. ,. . • • 
y.armture, ....I.... 

Sali^, ----l: ^ 

Attend, and mileage as Begettt, 
Mufiio '^or Oommbncemcnt, .... 

Balai^ of salary, .M^ 

Gri&dirig for main bQil4ing,.^«« 

Salary as, Steward^. . — 

Service as Janltor> 

Salary^ 

Engineering, ;, 

Freight, * ,--... 

Salary as Secretary, .•:...,..••. 
Drugs and Ohemicals, ...J.... 

Boai'ding establishment^ ...... 

Appn. Misement main bnilding 
Services as Janitor to Jane 10» 
Carpentai work. 

Printing 

Wheelbarrow, .. 
Blacksmithing, 



• »»■ . 



i. . p. 



per diem ahd oditoaM aa Regent 

Mason work on bnudings, 

Furniture for Preparato^ Dep. 

SerTioes aa architect, 

Adyeiftisf ng and printing, 

Printing and adrertlsiflg, 

Treasarer's fees, ....fJ 



Afipopt 




19 
500 

63 
18 Us 
38 00 
.27 00 
700 
99 88 

18 97 
9100 

319 50 

19 60 
10 00 
54 17 

109 OS 
95 90 
17 33 

37500 

19 te 

8 41 
50 00 
99 34 

178.49 
480 80 

ssio 

90 19 

49 60 

800 

15 00 

19 80 

19 €9 

» 47 

384 50 

99 tS 

SM63 

488 18 



4i 



;i 



*■ if 



* 



Secretary of Starfj^il^SiiFlWI^ io if»"op 1"! oilJ lo «s3Btioq 

,l-.'>Hl(r;(<«e •^I'ldjoo'ifei ai rioirfw lo HA 
▲moontdM on cert^MtfvMMbL. _...... $965,439 96 

Amoiint doe on Lokbii.'l '..'...' : S0,S91 90 

BilA\W»Sfe.ift^>.«?ft.\«.V:-jyft 61S 01 

Total. ^.r.^.UfX ;.qt|! A'.9. "yRRiin? 

The amount of fund shown ^ aboye^ except the balance 
in the Treasury, is drawing interest at the rate of seven per 
cent per annum, which interest constitutes 

• 

The University Income. 

This is annually paid by the State Treasurer to the Trea- 
surer of the Board, and is applied towards defraying the cur- 
rent expenses of the University. The amount of the fund 
drawing interest is as follows : • 

Amount dae on certificates of sale, $265,433 S16 

Amount due on Loans, 50^91 UO 

ToljJ, $315^53 46 

The interest on this amount for one year at teven per cent, per 
annum, isb 22,116 74 

From which sum, howerer, there must l)e deducted for oyer 
payments made by the State Treasurer to the UniTeraity, 
during the three financial quai-ters of 1857, 360 39 

Leaving the balance of Income, ^1,756 35 

Sales of the remaining Uniyeraity Lands, howeyer, and Loans, - 
irill probably increase the Income during the winter, to such 
an extent that the amount to be drawn in Haroh next, will 
reach thesum of, 99,000 00 

The report of the Treasurer of the Board will exhibit in 
detail a statement of the amounts received and disbursed by 
him during the period embraced since the date of the last 
annual report, from which it will be seen that a balance of 



penaes of the last quarter of f^ JKMi^ J^»Sn \< i. > -. : > 
All of which is respectfally submitted, 

MMiiPfQ, Octobw 1st, 1857. 



il'* It- .0] 



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rn ^i':. '/. » lli » . M •.•., ; •.-•11 , ,: r Y . ir 4,, t-1 , • ' • ./• 
\i\ {' )^irj(^.jl) *' . ■!. ^ v n ^ .u.. mj? jM.'t 1 . ' j f-rj N j: \hiiM 
Jr" I 'Mil 1o •• i;l 'i :»•>•:;-» ^ ' o L(.i, • .').{• }. ' ''ib 'mI. 



J 



APPENDIX a 



CATALOGUB 

OF TBI 

OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



or TBI 



UNIVEBSITY OF WISCONSIN, 

For the Tear ending Jufy 21, 1857. 



1 • , t ' 



• I 






« ••■» 






•''i ••'.;■, I, 



. I 



♦ . • I 



t • ' K ■ > 



BOIRD OF REGENT3. 



J. H. Lathbof, President, Madison. 

Charles Dcjnn, Belmont 

Chauncey Abbott^ Madison, 

Nelson Dewet, Cassville. 

John K. Williams, ShuUsburg. 

Levi B. Vilas, Madison. 

A. L. Castlbman, ^ Madisofu 

8. L. RosjB, ; . Beaver Dank 

K W. Dean, Madison. 

D. W. Jones, Madison. 

A. C Barbt, • Racine. 

H. A. Tennst, Madison. 

J. L. PiCKA^D, PlaiieviUe. 

J. 6. McMtnn, to ••••••• Racine. 

R S. Cabr, . • Madison. 



J. D. RuooLEs, Secretary, Madison. 

R W. Dxan, Treasarer^ ,,••••• 



»f 



■ » 



I 



^.;' 



PACULTY OP SCIENCE, LITERATURE AND ARTS. 



JOHN H. LATHROP, LL. D., Chaneellor, 

Mai Ttotamme of Bthicm OWil Pulitj, «nd Politieal Kemtomj. 

DANIEL KEAD, LL. D., 

Pi«iMMr«f Mortal PUlaiopby, Logic, Kliotorio uid Eii(lith Litentm^ 



JOHN W. STERLING, A. M., 

PrrfiflT of Uathamstics, Natural Pbilutopby'aod Aatronomy. 

EZRA S. CARR, M. D. 

Froftfiflor of Chemifttrj and Natural Hiatorj. 

O. M. CONOVER, A. M,, 

ProfeMor of Ancient Languogea and Litoiiitaraii 

AUGUSTS KURSTEINER, J. U. C, 

Pnifeaaor of Modern Laoguagisa and lateirataiai 

JOHN F. SMITH, A. B., Tuior. 



HOBMAI. DEPARTMENT. 

DANIEL READ, LL. D., 

Profeitor of the Theory and PracUca of TettGhiBg, 



AOBTCULTURAL DEPARTMRNT. 

EZRA S. CARR, M. D., 

ProfeoBor of Agricultural Cii«iniHiry and tlia Apiilicalions of SclenM 

to tbo Art*. 



« 

T "I 



• « 



..I • ■ 
t 



J . d . ■ 



^ , 



r . 



il. » 



'I I 



• • 



\ ' 



I.. If. 



• t . 



b • \ 



STUDSNTa 






Sinclair WAlkar Botkin, 
Thos. Deboice Coryell, 
Charles FairchihJI, 
Wm. Greene Jenckes, 
John Francis Smith, 



Richard W. Habbell, 
John Wv Sr«cigliter, 
William P.<Vih9, 



Alex.aBiilkiB, 
Hill C. Bradford, 

Richard 0. Cheney, 
William W. Church) 
Leonard &» Clark, 
SamuelPallows, 
Samuel T. Ferguson, 
Mouttoa DeForest, 
Edward B. Qsild, 
Henry Gburdncr^ 
Elbert Oi Hdndv 
Theodofe dDi ^Kanouse, 



Stntcrs. 

T0WD1 
Madison^ 
Verona, 
Madison, 
Terre Haute, 
Verona, 

Junion$. 

Milwaukee, 
Culpepper, <X H. 
Madiaon, 

Madison, 

CuipepqpwCo. 

Madison, 

-Madison, 

San FranciMb, 

Hatieb6ttvill0^ 

Moiutioallo^ 

M/&tfi3dTi, 

Mudiavn, 

Bujriie, 

HudaaA, 

Cottage .Oiote, 



0lMa* 
Wlscansiit 

Wlaeonda 
Wiaeoniin. 
Indiana^ 
Wiaeonski. 



WiaeondiL 
Viigiiiia; 

Wisooinaini 



/. 



</ 



WisoonstiL. ' 


'/ » 


Vligimia. 


• # 


Wisconsin. 


A 


Wtecensln. 


• 


California^ . 


• 


Wiseonsia . 


. '.1 


Mioiie$Dta4 


.;a 


Wiscttiatai 




WiHonsia 


• 1 


Wiadonslm. 




W>Moiiala< 




WilP0M»ilW 


. Nil 



64 



Sophomare9-~con&njitd* 



Kamfli. 


T0vn* 


state. 


Edwin Marsh, 


Beaver Dam, 


Wisconsin* 


1 W. McKeevcr, 


West Middleton, 


Pennsylvania. 


Lawson C. Merrill^ 


Green Bay, 


Wisconsin. 


Philip C* Slaughter, 


Culpepper, C. H. 


Virginia. 


James M. Stoner, 


Madison,- 


Wisconsin. 


George W. Taylor, 


Madison, 

* 

Freshmen. 


Wisconsin. 


George W. ^Lshmore, 


Arena, . 


Wisconsin. 


George W. Bird, ' 


Madison, 


Wisconsin. 


James K Bf tcton, ' 


Madison, 


WisconsiiL 


LeaDder M. ComiAs, 


East E4ding|on, 


Maine. 


Rufus R Dawesi t 


Malta^ 


Ohio. 


Randall W« Hanson, 


Minneapolis^. 


Minnesota. 


George C. Hill, 


Waterloo, 


W isconsin. 


Nicholas G. Iglehart, 


Chicago, 


Illinois. 


John B., Parkinson, 


Fayette, 


Wiseocnn, 


John D. Parkinson, 


. Madison, 


Wtscoinsia 


William<P. Powers, 


Madiaon, 


Wisconsin^ 


Granville S. P. Stillmaii 


, Oneida, 


New York. 


William R Spencer, 


Somerset, 


Ohio. 


John EeSotton, 


Hancbettvilley 


Wjacottsin, 


Edward B. Tayiol*, 

r 1 


Milwaukee, 

■ 


Wisconsin. 


Ckme$ im Science and Engliih LUtralure. 


P. Q. Ball, 


Monroe, 


Wisconsin. 


Robert G. Beacham, 


Sun Prairie, 


Wisconsin. 


Alfred L. Bostedo, 


Weyanwega, 


Wisconsin. 


Spencer K Bryant, 


Lake Mills, 


Wisconsin. 


Gastavus H. Bryant, 


Lake Mills, 


Wisconsin. 


0. M. Babcock, V 


Columbus, 


Wisconsin. 


William Brown, ^ 


Caledoaia, 


Ne^ York. 


David li&W^, 


Madison» 


WistotMin. 



H 



Classes in S^mfiC 

MT apiis Ikiishi ; 
Alviu P« Clark» / 
Albert D. CiB^elwid, 
Bthati A.,Colvin; 
Atigiistua A. Uttr^a^y 
Otis Rernicjiy , 
William Reukeu^ 
Willtaip Ri)bjon^': 
Williaru H. Syeari/es, 
Collins SliacUelford, 
Andrew Smith, 
Samuel W. Smilb» 
Frank liu L^ Smith, 
Benjamia F. Stevens, 
William Swaio, 
George Ward, 
William F. Welling, 
Leroy B. Whaelqr, 
Edward M. White, 
Peter D. Wigginton, 
Johu Wiggiatoiv 



a^ Bngliak i4/ara(ia'e-**cotttinued 



Jfames R. Bailey, 
Adrian L. Bancrfft, 
Wm. W. Bird, 
J. W. Blaichley, 
Arthur L. Brooki, 
William I). Burmll^ 
lohn M. Byrne, . 
James Byrne, 
Wm. H. Camacki 
Charles C Cbitt^den, 



Tuirm* 


8^t^. , 


Waterloo, •, 


WiscoQsia , ;. 


Montrose^ 


Wisoonsia , r 


Yurk, 


Wiseonsia , 


Kewaskum, 


Wispooflio.^ ^ 


Minueapoli^ 


Minnesota. 


Cornish, 


Maine* 

• 


Grafton, 


W isconaia 


Fitchburg, > 


Wisconsin. 

1 • 


Madison, 


Wisconsin* 


Madison, 


Wisconsin* 

< • 


Madison, 


Wisconsin., m 


Mineral Point, 


W isconsia 


Madison, 


W isconsin/ .j 


Milford, 


W isconsin. 


Milwaukee, 


Wisconsin . 


Fort Atkinson, 


Wisconsin. 


Black Earth, 


Wisconsin. 


Verona, 


Wisconsin. 


Madison, 


Wisconsin. 


Dodgeville^ 


Wisconsia 


Dodgevilla, 


Wisconsia 


oratory Classes, 


Wisconsia 


Madison, 


Columbus,. 




Ohio. , 


Madison, r 


Wisconsia 


Dan?, , 


Wisconsia 


Madison, 


Wisconsia 


Madison, 


« 

Wisconsia 


Madison, 


Wiscon«Ja , ^ 


Madison, 


Wisconsia 


Dane, 


Wisconsia 


MadlsoG^ 


Wiaconsia .. 

1 >^ 



w 



I^^tptLTOfbfy CllUit9 0MtiM6dL' 



Ashley J. Clark, 

Jerome D. Ctark, 

Samnel P. Ciark, 

John Conkfin, 

Ambrose B. Curtis, 

Romayn D. Davenport, Lockport, 

Wm. A. I>avenport, Madison, 



CanA)ridge^ 

Madison, 

Montrose^ 

Mkdison, 

Madison, 



Fernando A. Davis, 
Francisco H. Davis, 
Daniel W. Dawes, 
Newton De Forest, 
Henry C. De Forest, 
Newell H. Dodge, 
Charles O. Eaton, 
Levi Emery, 
James A. Palkner, 
John Fellows, ' 
Fhineas A. Flower, 
Herrick A. Fotbe^, 
Edward J. Fost^f^ 
Philander W. French, 
Andrew Gardner, 
Almerin Gillett, 
Jonathan D. Goodrich, 
Joseph R Gougar, 
Lewis Gongar, 
Henry L. Gray, 
Wm. A. Greene, 
Edward Grosvenor, 
Azariah S. Hal), 
Paul Halverson, 
Brant flfammoiid, 
John We&ley Htod, 



Madison, 

Madison, 

Malta, 

Madison, 

Madison, 

Madison, 

Madison, 

Portland, 

Madison, 

Hanchettville, 

Madison, 

Scote, 

Mayville^ 

Fifchbufg, 

Weyauwega, 

Hudson, 

Husvisford, 

JoHet, 

Joliet, 

Madison, 

Milford, 

Athens, 

Hanchettville, 

Pleasant Spring, 

Veronaj 

HuAion; ' «' 



Wiiconein. 
WiscoDsio. 
WiseoBsiiii 
WiscoDsia 



IlliDoisL 

Wtsconsiiii 

Wisconsin. 

Wtsoonsia. 

Ohia 

Wisconsin. 

^fsconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin;. 

Wisconsin. 

WisooDsio, 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin, 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Illinois. 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Ohio. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin.' 



• I 






I 
\ 



I 
f 





» 



/>4M^a'^^ Clkw«i^--MaUiM^4< 



Flaviu9 J. Harrington, 
Joha HamngtoQj 
Clemen! I* Hart, 
Thomas M. Haynes, 
Wm. Mati Heiniibaagb, 
William a Hill, 
TheodQffe ML Hobby, 
Charle9 J. Holl, 
Elijah D. Huat^ 
De ForQ9t Huat, 
Nichdlafi K. Iglebart, 
Edward H. Jone^, 
James E. Kara, 
Wm. Httnry Keepers, 
Henry G. W. Kiitfedge, 
James P. BL Ktiight, 
George Kul^bock, 
Edward N. Larkin, 

4 

Michael Leahey, 
Charles W. Leavens, 
James M. Lee, 
Henry B. Lighthizer, 
Charles E. Lum, 
William J. Madden, 
AlHcd H. MarstoD, 
Oscar F. Matttce, 
Henry K. McCord, 
Wm. McPherson, 
Emery R. Mears, 
Miletus E. Miles, 
Milton F. Mills, 
William S. Morrow, 
Edwin E. Noyes, 

8g 



Ell^horis i ' 

Beloit, 

Hustttfofd, 

Black ^artki 

MadisQD, 

Fulton, 

Madison, 

Madiaoo^ 

Madison, 

Maratfion, ' 

Cincinnati, 

Oconomowne, 

Madison, 

Madiaon, 

Chicago, 

Madison, 

Madison, 

Madison, 

Portland, 

Caldwell's Prairia 

Waterloo, 

Madison, 

Hanchettville, 

Dodgeville, 

Madison, 

Waterloo, 

Middleton, 

Fort Atkinson, 

Maidison, 

Coldwater, 

La Grange, 

Madison, 

Madison, 



euu.. 
Wiaconsi^. 

Wiscppria 
Wiiconsiii. 



/• 
I 



Wiaconsia^ 

Wiscontiiv 

Wi3C0fisia 

WiaconttOr 

Wisconaia. 

New York, 

Qbiow 

Wisconsin.. 

Wisconsin. 

Wiscouaip. 

Illinois, 

Wifl^nain, 

Wiaconsut* 

Wiscwsi^. 

Wisconsia 

Wisconsia 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsia 

Wisconsia 

Wisconsia 

Wisconsia 

Michigan. 

Wisconsia 

Wisconsia 

Wisconsia 



5h 



I^^epda^aiofff C/oMe^-HSOiilfiiiml' 



Kanea. ' 

' Hiram J. Piirker, 
Thomas B. Parkinson^ 
Levis Ji Patch, *^ 
Charles E. Pease;» 
John D. Plackett, 
Warren Porter, ' 
George K Posrers, 
Edw^ard Read, 
Eden Reed, 
Charles' Saxer, 
Addison A Sterlitig, 
John Tunnicliff, 
Martin Van Bergen, 
Henry Vilas, 
Thomas J. Vimbnt, 
William E Voigt, 
Daniel O. Williams^ 
George A. Williams. 



Lake Mills, 

Madisoh, 

St Paul, 

Dayton, 

Vienna, 

York, 

Madison, 

Madison, 

Lockport, 

Madison, 

StertirYgrille, 

Warren, 

Madison, 

Madison, 

Bourbon Co., 

Madison, 

Madison, 

Madison,' 



Steto. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisoonsia 

Minnesota. 

Ohio. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisoonsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Illinois. 

Wisconsin. 

Pennsylvania. 

New York. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Kentucky. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 

Wisconsin. 



Total, 



1^4 



0> 



► » » *. 5 i > i\A 



r I 

■ 1 1 . 1 • • 



I. / i, ! . i ' ■ 









. !i 



' I 



SUBJECTS OP INSTRUCTION 

.ik- I .\ ' ■ • - ■-; '. • - / . . ^ .. . 

Z{,,Vaif'f EirJSJ^fli PfifA^aTMRKTS of 6CI^NGE. LITEaATCr£B 

ANDAItTS. . 

/I 

V ' ' ' '^ 

• • « . 1 » r 

, ; ' 



L— PREPARATORY COURSE. 



<i > I 



Occvtp^mg one or two years, according 'to the proficiency 
of the student 

!• English Grammar, — Bullioa'^L ', . v^ 

2. peogfapby,—- Mit(jheJl'«. . 

3. AriUjnmic,— Riiy'^, 3d part, 

4. ]$h9aQ.eni9 of Aigehra,-^R;iy'a, 

5. Lariii Grammar, — ^ A iidresirs aod Stoddard*^ 

6. Virgil's JE\itid^-^0 Bookf^ 

7. Greek Grammar,— Bullioii'a '•' >'^* * '^ •-• 

8. Greek Reader, — Bullion's. 

9. Cicero's Select Orations. 

'-II;i-SUB-aRADUATE COURSa .'. 

Occupying four.years, and distributed as folioirs: 

Yf BS'r tKMJU 

r Fint Term. — Algebra,-^Laomis's. - 



^^^.y 



.-?\ 



4 « 



r ^ 



y , Roman History, — Liry, 
I ! Greeian History,~FelU)Q'j Greek Hiato- 

( ,; } «i«t)a . ' 



60 

Second Temk — Algebra and Plane Geometry,— Loomta 

Roman History, — ^Livy. 
Grecian History, — Felton's Greek Hist 

TUrd 7%na— Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometrf* 

Latin Lyric Poetry, — Horace. 
Greek Epic Poetry, — Homer. 

EBG0NDTBA8. 

FInt Temk — Men. Sur.,Nav., and Spher. Trig. 

Latin Poetry,— Hor. Satirei and Epbtfc^' 
Greek Epic Poetry, — Homer. 
French aud German, — (optional) 

Second Term, — Spher. Trig, and Analytic Geometry. 

Cicero de fXratora 
V Ancient History of Aeia^^Herodotiift 

French and German, — (optional) 

Third rcrm.— Calculus. 

German ia and Agrieola^ — ^TacitUS. 
Egyptian Hrstory, — HerodotusL 
French and' German, — (optional) 

THIRD TEAB. 

First Term» — ^Mech.anicM Phitosophy* 

Tacitus and Greek Oj:amft,' , > 

Rhetoric 

German and French, — (optional) 

Second TVrnl^^H^dtostatioiiy Ptiea3i[iatI<t$,audsPhy8tc8» 

Juvenal and Plato. 
Logic and Evidences of Christianity. 
German akid French, — (optional.) 

nUrd Term. — Acoustics and 0|itic8* 

Select Latin, and Demoitheneai 
-t'' ' -* ' ■ ' Menial Philosophy, Intellectual PowenL 

German and Freifcb,-<-{optional) 






iTfr^t JtVii— Ethics, i ! ,! 

! }Atuta] rihhojsoplijr, Aptiv > Potire» - 

, f hemical Ptulbsophy, | \ i 

I ■ I ' ' > ill 1 

]fik^ond )renii.— Civil Po)iry,;ConktUutionaI mi iflftXT»r 

j tionul Lawj ! ' i ■ : 
i . : ' Philosopliiical Gri|mniir slnd jCritifcfeniL 

I . Qheipislry, 0|-gati|c. .Thcj Me^U' 



Third Teni^ 



I 



AgriQultural Chediistrjr, — joptMiiaU 
.*— Political : Scoiomtt, ; i p^ 



1 



Organic (^hediistry an^ G^ologtr. 
I Astr<^non[iy. | ;! j j 'j 

j Art of T^achSng,-i-(optioqal.) j 

. fThe chsirfi on the next page, will "present tp jhe cye^ In ap» 
Other ibrni^ thei8ubject»of atudy in their' order. 



t 



• I 



»i 



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■t 



1 1 

V 
I 

t. 

\ 
I 

1 

i; 



t 

{•» 

I 4 



1 1 



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I ( 



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il 



r 



(d 












& 


i 






1 


1 


I- 


] 




•* 


1 


1 




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J 


1 


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H 


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u 




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b 



U. U hs '3'S<3< 



($3 



. Stiidetit^ desiring to pursue a eeleci cfmrn^ of fltudy, will 
be admitted to recitations and lectnres, in connexion with the 
regular classes In order to a ready selection, the following 
tabular view will set forth all the subjects of study, in the 
aub-graduate course, for the year, arranged by \iestmx 



»t>i^ 



•^•m^mmm:^^ 



FIRST TKRM, 

begiiiiiMiff the Uiird Wed. 

ef Septeoiber. 



Algebn, 

Livj. 

Qreek HMmriana, 

yirgil's iEiieid — romplete, 
' M«nsiiratii»ii, Suireyinif, 
l^aviffHt ion. anri Seller* 
ical Tritfunometry. 
Hiinice— iSatirea, ««. 
Htimef. 
French. 

Mi'cliaiiiciil Philosophy. 
Taei f IM-— 4*ontiutied. 
Grfek Drama. 
Hhtftitrtc 

gur>i<an. 
ihicfl. 
<4^tiorHl Ohemiiiftrf» ' 
lleiifal Pliilcwnphy* 
(Actire rowera). 
Be Aiiiicitia. 
Do Souvclute. 



SECOND TERM. 

begioiiin^jr the fii-st Wed. 

of Januarj. 



A Igebra— remplete. 

Qf^omctrj — PJHnei 

LiTj— rnutinued* 

Greek Historiaiia, 

Cicero. 

Analjiic Geometry* 

De (iratore. 

Herodutue. 

Pretich. 

Mecbanioi and ^jaiea. 

Juvenal. ' 

Pkto. 

Lo^ic. 

Bvidenccfl of Chrietimity. 

Gerinftn. 

Civil Politr. Cor8t»ta- 

ti«)tial it iule/'naliunal 

Law. 
Organic Cbemiblfy. 
Metals. 

Phil'tsnphical Qrammar^ 
Cri/.icism. ^ 

En^tineerm^. 
Agricultural CBeml^iry.. 



THIRD TBRM, ' ' 
beginning the fuiuth Wfd. 
of ApriL 



Solid Qeometry, 
Plane Trifrfuiometvy. 
Horace — Oilefl. 
tl« »nier. 
|B■Uu^t 

Calcnlua 
Taritus. 
HerodittitfL 
French. 

AcowMics, Optica. 
Select Latin. 
Domoi'lli^n^^. 
•Mental Philosophy, 

(IntullMtMii Fow«lt^ 
Oermiin. 

Poliui al Eeonemy* 
QeiJf^y, Ad. 
Afftroniimy. 
AH of TuiUiio^ 



Classes will be formed, each. term, if necessary. In each of 
the studies of the Preparatory course. 
' The foregoing subjects of study are distributed intodepart- 
iTients; each one of which is placed under the change of a 
Professor, whh such assistance as may be liecessary, nrbo ii 
responsible for the progress and attainments of the ttudeutf 
therein. ■ f 



1 .« 



* ' 



I , 



i» 



Ir^tNT ANCIBNT LANOUACES AND LITEfiATUBR 



o. iccoHOYBR, iuiLi Proftssor. 

lOHIf W» SMITH, A. B., Tuior. 

In this derpaitment, instraction is rendered in the Latin nad 
•Greek Languages^ and in the Mythology, Geography, Anti- 
quities, and Literary and Civil History of the Greeks and 
Romans. 

For the order of subjects in this dej>artment, reference is 
made to the general scbevlule of {he . preparatory and sub- 
graduMe courses. 

Exercises in Ldtin and Greek composition will be com- 
menced at an early period in the course, and continued to its 
closa The subjects of Ancient Mythology, Geography and 
History, will be taught mainly through the Greek and Ladn 
authors themselves, supplemented by occasional lectures. 

The follawing books of reference are recommended to stQ- 
daukU iu this department, to wit: Anthbn's Classical Diction- 
ary; Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities; 
Finlay's Classical Atlas ; Andrew's Latin Lexicon ; Liddell 
and Seotf s Greek Lexicon. 

lU-OF MATHEMATICS, NATURiAL PHILOSOPHY, 

; AND ASTRONOMY. 

« 

fOHH W. STSHLING^ A. BL, PrqfeSSOV. 

" JOHK F. SMITH, A, B., TuiOT. 

■ • 

- Thepreparatery course, in this department, in addition to 

i) Aritibmetic And tjbe Elements of Algebra^ will comprise rudi- 

ttoMtal instruction in Natural Philosophy and Astronomy. 

c la (be ftub-graduate course the order of subjects, ia indicated 

in the general programme of studies. Mechanical Philospp^y^ 

Hydrostatics, Pneumatics, Electricity, Magnetism, Acoustics, 

and Optics, will be illustrated by experimental and theoretical 

lectures. Meteorology, Astronomy and Engineering have been 



* I 



thob'fteHattsidhedrto'^thlsdetpair^ niare pdrKct distfi* 

bution of subjedls will koM h^ ihad«^ Ui6iling it to pure Ma- 
thematics and Mechanical Philosophy ; a relief which will 
render its instructions, within its proper sphere, more thorough 
and effective. 



J ■ 



III.— OF CHEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 

EZRA S. CABR,'li. Vif ProfyUCT.^ 

The instruction in this depslrtment Is given by lectures 
and demonstrations on the part of the Professor ai^d students, 
together with examinations. 

The recitation of the student consists in his giving a lec- 
ture, illustrated with experiments and demonstrations on the 
same subject and after the manner of the Professor^ thus not 
only necessarily acquiring an intimate knowledge of the 
subject discussed, but at the same time the facility of com- 
municating his knowledge. 

The subjects discussed are such as constitute the Philoso- 
phy of common life and the useful arts.. 



/ ' I 



Physics of ChMkJfatry, Ohemacal Philosophy^ Chemistry of 
die non*Metallie Elements. 



WTKTEB TBRfir. 



Chemistry of the Metals, Organic Chemistry. 



SPRING AND SUIOCER TBRJC 



Organic Chemistry and Geology. 



(, 



* 







' »j I . 



98 



66' 

DANIEL RRADy LL. D., PvoftSSOT. 

j'-Kori.il" "H.r, .• • 1(5 • ■' ,r •• fi-rlrv .Mf f».''»j'.«.:ii \.\ vAww 

JOHir SMlTH, A. B., TutWT ^ 

The subjects of this department fall properly into two divi- 
sion».i-'''"* :..<>"• ' J""-; ii j •! » - 

I. — PhilosophUal^ ^embraotngtitt : ..{.-w- 
.4rr AllQ^pPl^y^f the ^.-xt^Jl^pfftfl ;?ffWflrs.,,,, ,^,, ^ ,, ,,.'^. 

3. LiOglC. jifiniJiiifiHij;:/ fji'v >')f:J:»i5f» 

.*! 9mfi^|Of,jP^^os9phy,. ,j..,,,,r. .„i ,: nnwntr.' fi'^' 

••1. it^jts/i^^-ynj^cltidingi^'^^*''''^- i"'v j'«)i. %;:j:i • :r 

1, Rhetoric and Criticism. 

'%. E^nglwn *Liierature, ' embracing 'the 'history of the'^Eng- 

hsh Language, an examination of its elements, powers, 

and 
^ 'Its' various aepari 

The method of instruction is mainly by lecture. The 
student is required in his ddiJy eoilctiiiinations to give, orally 
oTmp«iitiHi({blaok(1)oaody'analy&iaridf th^fdiieitat isubfaotK^f 
study, as well as to present carefuiijrMpn^mdi/wtitteaitta^t 
stracts and dissertations upou a$3igJ^^ topic. 

« 

v.— OF ETHICS, CIVIL POLITY, AND POLITICAL 

CHANCELLOR J. H. LAl^HROP, LL. D., TrofeSSOr. 

The instructions of this department are rendered, in course, 
to sub-graduates of the fourth year, and to such other stu- 
dents of the University as elect to attend The subjects of 
instruction are eminently adapted to prepare the student to 
become a good and useful citizen of the Republic, and, as 

8t 



I Grammar, and the history'^dV^ feiiglish' liit«ra^^ 
various aepartments. 



eft 

# 

s(¥adelon/ 'iTh«y'd(?ci^y AMI yeAr-M)ne ^xerfcise eaeh dfty. ' 

•| " • •»i ' -n :j:(: ?«•: i ■ j- .:•• -^ i ::j '.j. . .■ • ' ••■ . ..'♦, 

FALL TPRM. 

J54^*,^--i]Vf ori^l.pyjgat^ou ; PpvclopiOjent ofMaml La^f Saxuv.. 
.ftioj^<>£ jVfoT^l Lf^^; Pjjactipal ftpplicationspf the Sci^ac^. 

The^textibooky Wayland'ft Blemienta' o£ Mot al ^i^a^e, \B' 
uMdj^inttrely aft^suggsstsng^aconi^eirient sericnr of topics: for 
oral tedtat^, and foffamiliaT discossiMi^un class. 



»i ' ' 



WINTER TERM. 



CSviii/ -Po/i^y^T-Political Ethics; Science of Government 4 The. 
.A^jerican Constitution ^ Interiiutional La^. 

:This'c]aiS8.of subjects' IS. taii§;ht wholly by lecture, withia-^^ 
tenaediate examination aiid discUsssion. The student ia 
Tequiced to writa but hi3 vieiwa on each topic, firom minutes- 
taken in the lecture room and, at stated periods, to read hte 
lesullai belbte the. class., 

...L' ,. :; ';•..' t THikn TERM. "■'• 

PoUticat Economy] — Production of Material Wealth ; Distri- 
'l)ution. Exchange and ConsiimptioQ; Applications of the 
Science ;*Relaliou5 to Civilizatibri.' 

. Th^ ^i^cugsion of this subject, in cla3s, is in the.wrder. of 
topics, suggested. J)y Say in his Treatise on th^ Production, 
IjistriVution ^nd. Cpnsuiiu)tioi\ of Wealth. 

YI^OPI^bRPRN LANGUAGES AND UTERATURR 

jibuiJST^' KURSTEINEfr, JT. tJ. C, PtofeSSOT. ' ' 

^ It liiki dMl^tt- of ih^ Pr4&ssot in "thifi 'd^alrtment, to com- 
bine, in useful connection;' the th^ry with the ncacti<;e ixL- \ 
teaching the mo4#Xll hQgiiages,-*^,Ta true knowledge of a 
Hjtodcajn l^gl^e,JunpUes the ability to read, write, and speak 
the sam& ^s « ^a^ .fp,^ ^4i^tructi9ii in Frelbtbh, he uses .^ 



x 



I. 



^•Di 



. I 



66 

% 
the Gmnunai of FatqueUe ; for the German, he follows the 

coarse of Woodbury ; yet he treats the topics contained in 
the different lessons, as far as possible, independently, accord- 
ing to his own judgment After having acquired a certain 
proficiency in the fundamental and grammatical roles of the 
language, the student is led gradually into the very heart of 
' il^ by Bieans of reading, writing, and conversational ezeidsses. 
It is deemed neoeasary for the student to acquire the art of 
thinking in the language the study of which he pursues, — 
therefore, as soon as he is far enough advanced, he is required 
to write letters and essays, which are critically corrected by 
the Professor. For the reading exercises, are used Wood- 
bury's and Fasquelle's Readers, at first, and for the advanced 
classes are proposed, any classic authors of the language, as, 
for example, the works of GcBthe, Schiller, Jeain Paul Rlchter, 
Lossing, &C., of Lamartine, Chateaubriand, Racine, Comeille, 
Moliere, &c. 

In the advanced classes, the Professor adopts the plan of 
' conducting the exercises entirely in French and German, 
whereby the conversational powers of the student will be de- 
veloped. The Professor will, at the beginning of each 
academical year, form beginning classes, with which he will 
pursue the course above described. 

The Professor of this department will also form a class in 
vocal music, at the beginning of each academical year, and 

'eive during the year, as members of it, such students only 
1^ qualified to join the class by previous instruction in 

as. 9f^ "ittging. The choir of the Hniversity t^ill render 

*6 art of ^y public exercises of the Institutioa 

^wstoncein^ TICS, OR THEORY AND ART OP 

m^OP DJDAC. 'TEACHING. ^ 

LUh., Prqfiiasor. 
„._,_ ■• the fourt'h Wednesday of 

The Normal term h • ^^^^ ""^ '"'''• 

April anrf ,1 ^ ''*8"»» ol 

. ''"•°*«^<«e3 on the fourth Wedu 



• 69 

The subjects of inttttaeti^n tte Mch as the following : edu- 
^tioa, wliat is it? physic^ledMo&tiioii ; intelleetaaLfEfduoiitlon ; 
moral education ; > sestfaeiical educnttioii ; ma exaiiilaatioii of 
.^ powers of rth$ naind as Co. aommunicating aad leceiying 
knowledge; who do the work of education, the office of the 
teacher, and the importance of making teaching a distinct 
profession; the sch^l house and its proper furniture and 
ftppcrmtm^ntsv school polfty alid discipline; inceiltlVe^ to 
i^tudy; mode of lieariiig recitations ; ptinishments'; premf- 
nmii graded schools'; school liWaries ; proper Inethods' of 
teaching different subj^ctB; what can the state do; ^6ho6l 
laws of Wisconsin, &c. ' • > i 

Ttochers tod studehls whoattehd the lecttnres on didactic^, 
attend klsbotheri^bjecfti of instruction in the different dci- 
partments at their option. ' ' ' 

The design of establishii^g a course of inlstruetion of this 
tiature, niew as'a Univemity'couWe, is especially to aid, en- 
coiirage and Mstract teachers, and to ^aken in all who i£tky 
^<rttetta]|it' a dieepir interest in that greatest wdtk of fminan 
society, ihe proper education of its youth. ' ' ' : o 

The class in attendance on the second annual course Of 
lectures in this department, in 1857, numbered tti^enty-eight* 

The next course of Normal instruction will begin 'and 
end \¥ith the summer term; iii 1858. " ' i 

. , ' » t 

VIIL^OF THE APJPLlCATIONg OF CHEMISTRY AJNTD 
NATURAL HISTORY TO AGRICULTURE AND THE 
USEFUL ARTS. . .[ 

BzliA s. cARB, M. D., PrafissoT. '^ 

The design of this department is to afford instruction in 
the applications of Chemistry and Natural History to indus- 
trial pursuits. 

The instructions for the present, and until further provf- 
sibns ^re made, will consist of a course of lectures commenc- 
ing with, and continuing through the Winter' temi. 



70 

i<a%eidiipM»Mait9 of BnginMring'V'Of ^tPbytitts Md Atttott- 
x>niy } Jtf/iiMT; Md ^iMttdlcina, i«rittimt to iopaned b«fiM« 
Ihe^^eonplccioat'dfrtimimain edifi^^ »iipFOc«fliyyf>ie«M- 

IJOiU" 'li^: «'•: ,;( I j-j;: » **: . •• '/ '»r u -i' v "•: ••7':if ^ 

PEGREES. 

.find,jjf^«fi,rt»e,^^\^red,fixw*aa^ffsr stiftimeWlM toirfw* 
Those who complete the studies of.j^e,fjljf)p^uctraiDiH8 ^MD' 

.g^es,*»,WLUUffi, »hay,)>e,a4iftftt^ ^o.^^eg^^.of. Jafilwtef 

of Arts, in course. .<.<:, :n<: fi. •; ••i;-.n:..j; 

.,.,Tttoa9,^hfi. <H?mpJet^.,%.c(juisft„nfgHJEed ^ii4})^,4eg|iie of 

.^cjbjeK of .^R^i,^,yb8itityju#,M(»4s»ifo.t AflSi«Pfc|L»ng«ft- 

connected with the t\if;^ ssyei^al |i;qi^^,indi99jltfd^\>ove„W[m 
.]bep^ti^,pP(^;ef5<>wnjBiidjt^o^.of..$j)p.,fflflpltif, tw,the„^a8. 
■ teff'f*«g'^.«5i Wh»:»^.;fre,ead of tl^Tpft.jte^,, ,,,, „ . .;, .. 
j.f.Tb«sfii,Fh|0-poq»B|p^? *B co?tfW in ^VY onp,.of dm dflpwt- 
ments of the University, ^all Ije «^tiiiIed,^r^,Pif^pDmyA:citir 
fying thetn to be graduates of said department 
' 'U h^ToAg4>«en a subject of complaint thalt no prorisioB is 
inade iA'-Our ^Colleges te encourage by suitabt'e ^ Academic 
honors those who are unwilling to complete the pi^cribed 
course ef classica},TiQa^uig,.an4 tttftt thus,.baweTer high their 
«fMp|i%.^P,<i I^li;.l9?oi?bic, i^lfafpm^Rt?, .tj)ey,.ar^.,jgflOTfid;as 
JTpjjfersity,. stu^^nts, , It .is,,^pp,ed.t;;i.^,t;-th9, 9fJ^pff(^fl,^^ ^e 
degrees of Bachelor of Science, and of Philosopi^, to be c/ffir 
fep[e,(J ^ith, tf^e S9,mfi f9^pa|jti,es^ aiji,4 aftpr ji^^, .r^^uijpn^^t of 
py^^lic p^ercjffi?,,.,p.in tb,e„c^e of,t^p?e a4mi,Ui94,tQ,j^e,(^fiT 
gree of Bac^|or.9f,Af^,.inay,,^emov;^ tljis,pbje^^ou;..iyhi|e 



^"71 
none can compltfift dnttaeflnftighm'niviproduced as to the 

-riT IJiv/ -ma /.Muiijiov bttmffidl' AiMlsasoiri ^ .K'inrrmo:? :M',i5)v 
studies of the preparatory school, ftir^l^eit 'S^rmftiBfifl." '''''• 

■f%yffifl«kte'{a*'!fi«bfttMfe'a{iHasiib'ii. ■^•" " '^"^'"»'' ■':'"'-'^- 

It is proTiaMritfflW'V^-Mfs/'i!Ra<'Htt''iMd«"sh4lI'bA''&d. 
"ihfftea'bf ^e'WHiWi«floi'WBeSiaeri«* iii'flW'Wli!aihg»,'%r to 

'"Vodto'fer'^dy'*«a'IMglh^«mirti'4'fy%eitt'paldi^'iiI^^ 

The University edifices contain public rooms for recitation, 
lecture, library, cablfi6if/^tfe.;''btiia'3r^nd lodging rooms for 
' fstudetits tii«ptotm«nii»forA'the' imidcm»lo£\voii^ 
iiiUm efiiAtt SUboky^iB(nfi^/larg0idiMiig>imU ftr'^he bcMOD^ 
o ttefUbnltyiftMiln sMdentJu 1 1 Ailaiaaiary idtadioittttaolLcA taithe 
establishment The buildings ami(waim6dpidnirihg<«'iwiaier, 
by furnaces in the basement. 

Furniture, for lodgifi^'U^Ad kti'^y rooms, must be furnished 

'^> '<(Bi^ l(«IksdJafe^s tht^Ve«Mlttori^)^iMlflf§(l'^aiiy/)<^ 
are also frequent exercises in declamation and coaip6^\tiki1L 



>ii" '* 



^•^'^4^fe^n*il¥tbii»;' 



!H[/;fBaQli tarnYfJi8i)oli)0edifb]9}ajf)abiio>6xaiiiiiiftl^ the 

^bdb»9a^o«lbvrlnch .«tenf)itiMkiN9Tiiof >daoh/dfia(i)'iflit^i^ to 

be present jcmnn'ro )]!/* 



. 72 



The library, which is open to all the students of the tJiii- 
versity, comprises over thvee thouflistd volumes, and will re- 
ceive yearly £^dditions by the purcbia^e of the moat valuable 
standard ^ofks... 111^50 have ]been. apj>ropri?ited to this ob- 
ject duiipg.tij^. year 1857. . ....,..,:... ,, 

Jn the cabinet of J^in^als^,ttie^^}are ^over foui: !th9U3and 
specimei^,. and the whole is of ^es^t iK^ientific valu& !^all 
suits of specimens, collected in the geological survey, of the 
State, are directed, by la.w tQ be ^poqited in, the University." 

.The Farwell collection of specimeipis jn Ni^tural Histor7, 
recently donated to the University, is in. exqellent copdition, 
and, is of hi^ scienti^c and in^tru^tioi^i^ val^e. . 

The philosophical and chemical apparatus hbs been en- 
larged and improved during the year. $5Q0 have Ij^n ap- 
. propriated. to the philosophical depfurtment, and jt750 for 
fitting lip and furnishing a working laboratory, for analysis 
and practical instruction in 6faemi^try and its applications. 

LITERABT SOpiKTI£S. 

* . . ■ 

There are two literary societies connected, with the Umi- 
1^evaity. : These are valuable auxiliaries in the inental train- 
ing of .the* students. Each of them has already a library of 
several hundred volumea. 



MERIT BpLL. 



A permanent record is kept of the daily aU^ndance, con- 
duct, and. recitations of each student ; and information of his 
standing communicated, from time to time, to his parent or 
guardian. , ^ 



RSitioious. Exsacisss. 



The students are assembled at prayers daily, in the chapel 
of the University, at the maming hour for dommencing study 
and recitation. * 



73 



•l.-j. . "..• TWUiftf,, i.. . 



The collegiate year is divided into three terms or sessions, 
of thirteen ^eeks each, beginning as follows : ' 

1. The third Wednesday of September. . ,. j 

2. The first Wednesday of January. 

3. The fourth Wednesday of April 

' Ooniiliencemeiit feinmTndXHary, the fdurth Wednesday of July. 

I . f • • ' • »! . .JMRPIJOTBS. .... . \ 

' Tuidon, per term, . . : . : . . . . : . . . »4 00 
Room, : . . . . . . . . . : . . ...'...; 3 00 

The bill pf wood for furnace heat is three dollars per term. 

These comprise all the University charges, except for actual 
damage done by. the student. Occasions for this item of 9ha)rge 
are very rare. 

BOABDIKO, AC. 

The families of several of the members of the Faculty re- 
side in a portion of the new edifice, and take their meals in 
the hall. Students are admitted to the several tables of the 
Faculty at a charge not exceeding two dollars per week. 

Many of the students board themselves at their rooms, at 
rates varying firom 111 to $1 50 per week. 

Washing is done in laimdry for forty^four cents per dozen. 

As the expenses of this establishment are to be defrayed 
out of the current receipts, it is strictly provided, that no stu- 
dent shall be admitted to board in the hall, till he shall have 
deposited, with the Steward or the Chancellor, |[25 for the 
term of thirteen weeks, or at the rate of two dollars per week 
for any less time ; also $5 for washing — ^the proper drawback 
in each case, if any, t^ be paid to the student, at the close of 
the term. • 

Furniture for private study and dormitory, may be pur- 
chased at reduced prices of the locating officer, by the student, 
lOg 



^74 

on entrance, and re-sold to llN^VIime officer at the termination 

These armng^l^,^;^ ^'^IMk^^ ^^f^^^M^Mi^'^- 
versity offers to pupils a more economical and safe residence, 

than any othefi(iisuiiitio|i' of learning iij%e "Vilest.' 

/'fjim/i:. (I riD'.'Uityt ' ',111 mTV J. 

7'iiTh^ 'WPWJWW fifr^P»^fl|ua^#lMl^WBMl»f^^ of 

stadents, from the beginning to the end of each term, cannot 

be too highly estimated. VM'^ffis of a single day bears un- 

fayors^];)ly (ffi the character and thf^^^Qg^j9ss^^,^|ifS scholar. 

The ^tr^bution of vacations, and their aggre^j^ length, 

leave no justification for encroachment ftbon term time by 

mrther 'unnecessary absence. It us to be Hoped that puents 

and guardians will concur with the Facullv- m refusmg leave 

dl absence m ordinary cases. 

•rr ''li;.';jJ '. ?i!! n .:'»i(fn'jin mi) (i rif) -•;-; (I tiiliiifj;! jji",' 
IJ <nj'»J/f ffMit MM Mil i''.t\l\)t V'nl Ml) n fOinri f ; fi »jJl-. 

Jit) ': I'KiiJi ir.v'")'! !ii] .jf •v.uUnf^)ii nrj '.jiifMUf^r .[i,ji ♦u; 

}rr"iMMn Ml II fwj ir'7(ii(.:!|{n;;v-j :.|ii (I .. fi«; (::•• M/t .« 

r'-ji' l;;;!^'. ni !i .1 iu mi] n ).f/M >i ) 7lrni/j«; m liju- m'5j» 

')iU '<M .'i.- ( »i'.' 'Jf-;:'' Ml) o ji;,'7'M' n|t iJiV ) 71- ; i:m> 

;:»*rv .•H( .:nlI<Mj )"7 n 'iitT ijji j; (i •.:'-p7 I'l 71Hi) (• il»'M 

l"jj(rvi.n -Mfcj If Mil-- - :'riir':»j^v r.i .,-|. r.:»,j >iinj '.-7 'Uf; oj 

• .n '7 till 

' :H{ Ml 'Jiff ''cMitM nij jif/; ")JM'. )jrP'Mf mm M/JfliiMJ I 
;if?Mjn;o 7fi »M ••• ifhi |ifi»jrMn mU (i 7Mi.(f jM!7j]jjr jj r»v«U'.» 



'a. 



' »» 



DOCUMENT "H." 



I 



REPORT 

OF THB 



STATE PRISON COMMISSIONER 

OF THB 

STATE OF WISCONSIN. 



^^^W^«N^«^ 



Stat£ Pbiboh OunoB) Waapmi, Jan. iy ]i86& 
To His Ekeellneoj, 

ALEXANDER W. BANDALI^ 

Gfou&morqf Wisctmrnk: 

Bm:— In consequence of my inability to obtain money on 
my appropriations, settlements with the parties baring cTaims 
against the prison -were necessarily deferred nntil after the 
time fixed by law for making my annnat report Hy anxiety 
to report in Ml the whole oi my official acts, induced me to 
defer, and is tibe only apology I have to oifer fbr delay. 

On iSie 1st day of Jannary, 1857, as appean from my Ittt 
report, there were confined in prison 108 prisoners, since then 
I have receired 109, which makes the whole number iii pris- 
on for the last year, 310, fifty of whom I have discharged, 
which leaves in prison on the 1st of Jannary, 1858, 160 pris- 
oners ; which makes the average number for the past year, 
ohe hundred and thirty-five and one-third, being an average 
increase of about forty five and two-thirds, l^his fact shows 
that crime is fearfoUy on the inerease, the cause of 



shoTxldy if possible, be discovered and the proper remedy ap- 
plied. Of the namber of convicts received bj me, within 
the last two years, seven of them have served their times in 
this institution under my predecessors in office. They did not 
seem to have any horror for returning, but looked upon the 
institution as a secure harbor of repose, rather than a place of 
punishment. 

The remedy I would suggest for this is a more rigid enforce- 
m^t of discipline^ withontr which our 3tat^ Prieon b no mocv 
ttem kn expensive Immbug, a huisance of a State college for 
young criminals to graduate in, and then be let loose upon 
the community no wiser, but more wicked men than they 
were whon they first cauie in. , If thf y are t9 be go vended up- 
on the humanitarian principles, it would be much better to 
leave the government and. support of aach an institution to 
an association of philanthropists, than it would be to have the 
State a party to such expensive folly. 

In my last annual report, the balance of indebtedness for 
the current expenaes and fbr. convict labor, was reported bj 
me to be $8,076.68. A farther investigation has enabled me 
to discover that my predecessor had paid several sums of mo- 
ney to convicts and neglected to charge it to them on the 
Prison books, in all amounting to $208.62, which reduces tlie 
indebtedness of 1856, to twenty-seven hundred and sixty-eight 
dollars and sixteen cents. To which add the sum of thirty- 
six thousand one hundred and twenty -five dollars and ninety- 
nine cents, as the total indebtedness for 1857, which make the 
whole liability of the prison for the past and present year, 
$38,894.13. I have also received from coavicts on entering 
the prison, money to the amount of one hundred and fifty nine 
dollars and fifty-six cents, which I have charged myself with , 
which, if added (o the above foremontioned sums, makes in 

ih the sum of $39,058 71 

)f which I havc^ paid in cash and convict labor, 33,405 61 

Toftal amount due and to be provided for to p«y «ff 

the indebtedness of both years, - . - $ 6,643 10 



a 
Of 



As an offsett against the indebtedness, or * 

balance as above, there are reliabre cred^ 
its on the books to the amount df $ 878 '8S 

Groceries, pork, beef, flour, wood, cloth, 
leather, and other supplies on hand to 
the amount of - - - - '4,688 28 



■**dM«a 



Total am*t for stock and book acct., |l^,247 08 • ' 

1 i 

Which is properly chargable to thcr current expeiise£^of 
1858, and should be tatto from my estiniate of tBe imotint 
to provide for the current expenses ol th^ ensuing year! For 
a detailed sta\;ement of the faints, I~ refer you to tiie foUbwfng 
tables, whieh h'ave been' carefully prepardd by my e£Scieat 
Deputy, Ml*, ^ohn Lowite. 

The whole Valance of indebtedness, reported by me ms due 
on the Slst day of December, 1856, was $2,976 68, 

In arriving. a t,.this conclusion, I took certain' balances which 
purported to be due prisoners for over- work, on a prisoner's 
account book kept by ray immediate predecessor. On a strict 
investigation, I have since found that some of these balances 
were settled and paid, even before I took possession of the 
C!ommissi9ner's office, and that the true balance, due at the 
close of tl^e year 1856, should be somewhat less than was 
stated in my report for that year, and amounted properly to 
•. $2,7^8 16, which I phall assume to be the correct balance of 
indebtedness against the Prison for the year 1856. . , 

," Balance of indebtedness for 1856, - - S 2,768 16 
.The following statement will show the 
\ iadebtednesB of the prison for the cur- 
' rent expenses for the year 1857, exqlp- , . . ,. . ,j 

i.\- wvf) of the expenses of building^— as . \ 

appears from the prison books to be ia / . 

the ag^gttt^, * - - . r' - . • $36^136 09 
As follows: ■ . , . 

For Officer^s Salaries, *- *- •- JlS^OSS^S • 
" Merchandise, - - * . - ' 2,828 321 



it 

it 



a 



it 



it 
it 



it 



Beef and Porl^ - - - 3,966 53 

Floor imd Com Meal, - - 1,342 46 

Wood, - - - . - 3,101 13 

Leather and findings for shoe shop, 1,100 90 

Oroqeriei^ as Oil,Mola8Be9,Fish, &C., 1,530 56 

*< Hardware, .... 85 90 

^' Freight om Baalroads and otherwise, 148 13 

Coal, • . - • . 19 40 

Medicine, Paints, &€.» - - 70 86 

^ Medioal attendance, - - 375 00 

« Lamber, 9 82 

^^* Printing, Advertising, Newspapers, 118 13 

" Postage and Postage stamps, - 22 67 

*^ Btationeiy & Books fbr Prisoners' 

Library, - - - - * 279 80 

Boofing Wash Honse, - - 48 20 

Arms and Amunition, - - 141 11 

" Counsel on trial of Commissioner 

before Governor, &c,, - - 665 00 

Money paid discharged Prisoners, 225 25 

Discount on negotiating appiropria- 

tion, 2,299 99 

« Credits ot Com. other than for sal,, 2,691 74 

^ Bepairs on Gate Keeper's House, 27 60 

-$86,135 •» 

The following statement will show ^the amount of money 
which I have received from all sources during the year 
1857. You will perceive that I charge myself with the 
whole amount negotiated at any time, and credit myself 
hereafter with the discount paid on such amounts negoti- 
ated, in my statement of disbursements, $45,866 20 

Received, March 16tb, 1857, on first appropri- 
atiom passed by Legislature of 1657, - $ 5,900 09 

Received, March lOtn, 185?, on 2d appropri- 
ation, 15,000 00 

Received on negotiMion with People's Bank, 10,000 00 
" ** Maniball & Illslej, 8,000 00 



1 

^ <« William HobUrk, 1,024 55 

' ^ ** M*8pill«M|» WW »• . 
"«. "^ riero^Smit&ikCa jtQQ 00 

- . ^ KM. Dirlimi 500 00 . 

^ froi^ pni^ shops, &o., . • 1,081 97 

^ '^ Priiboners on entering prison, 172 47 
Cash on Iia»^ Jan. 1st, 1857, belonging to 

common eq^oae fand, • • • J27 23 
Cash on hand Jan. Ist^ 1857, belonging to 

Building Fupd, . • . » • 1,758 68 

The following statement will ahowfte smomit of Oaah ^afll 
on the indebtedDess of 1867, and also on the balance ot ii^ 
debtednesa of 1866, as follows : 

On OflScer's Salaries, excIoaiTe of Oomr.% - 412,228 M 

^ Merohandise, . ; • . • l^M M , 

** Beef and Potk, i4»l 75 

"* Flonr and Core Meal, » . « UW it 

** Wood, ..•••. 8,100 01 

'^ Leather and Findings for Shoe Shop, . 744 19 

^ Srooerfes, soch as Oil, Molasses, Ac, ^ . 9Q6 U 

^ Hardware, 4 lU . j 

^IWghtage, , liJ^U 

^ Ood 19 40 

'« Medicine, Paints, Ac, • ' . ^ ^ «7 

^ Medical attendanee, .. « • • ,8 99 

* Lumber, • • • . • ^ • # 89 

'« Printing, AdrerUsing and Jlmwpiifmi^ JbQl M 

^ Postage and Postage stamps, • . 22 67: 

^ Stationery and Books for Briso*. LiVy, 8^9 08 

^ Roofing Wash House, ... 48 20 

'* Arms and Ammiitien, • « • Hil H j 

'^ Counsel Fees, . - . • . . 1065 OO 

M Money paid Prisoners ondiaaha^ga, « <2i 95 i 

** Discount -paid on Negotiating Approp. 2,299 99 

^ Repairs on G«(e Super's House, • . 27 50 

'^ Money held in trust for Prisoners,. ' Ii9 Itf 

oniffdebtedness'of 1856, • H^fiW M 

628,896 96 



»< 
I 



'! 



The foUowicg statement' iriU sbbw the manner in 
ihe indebtedness of 1856 and IS&T, has been farther settled 
and paid, as follows^ . . « . . $1,5M 41 

By sale of artides from ya^ $577 50 

« Work in Shoe Shop, .'.-.. 607 87 

« '- Stone, « . .... 92 65 

" « Tin /« . . . . 15 49 

• « TailoA Shop, '..*.-.. 66 OO 

** " Blacksmith's Shop, . . . 64 00 

^, OiM|l^« Incidental credits-^woik InshopSjetc, 147 17 

:* , W^Kk ia Shoe Shop, applied on debt of 1856, 24 73 

.;.... — i % 1,644 41 

BBCAPITUtATION OF INDEBTEDNESS & DISBURSEMENTS. 

Balance due on Indebtedness of 1866, . . t • I 9,768 16 
Cash paid on IndisbtedneBfi of 1856, . ^ $2,093 06 
Work in shop to tapply on indebtedness. of 1866, S4 S7 



$2,117 78 

Indebtedness, . . « $2,76^ 16 

Payment on Indebtedness^ 2,117 78 

LeaTes Babfod^ due for 1856, ^ . « . . 660 98 
As follows: 
To Jno. N. Ackerman, on claim of 1855, and 

included in reported balance due of 1866,. $250 80 

To Horace Warden, balance due of . . • . . 23 64 

"* Several prisonere for overwork^ne since 1855, 376 04 



a^mm^^ 



•$660 as 



Whole indebtednesB for current eDqpenaefe of 1867, . $36,126 M 



Cash paid on Indebtedness of 1867, . . $26,303 61 

* ^ to apply on Comm. credit 1857, 3,464 57 

P^ by w'k in ehops Ac^befiore inentiMied^ 1,619 76 



$81,287 83 
Indebtednto mt 1867, ... , . $36,126 ftd 

Payment <«i iadel^ednesa of 1857. . . . ^1,287 8a 



^a,Y^ Balance o^ Indebtedness due for 185?, 
Balance due Frisoners of money held on trust^ 



I ^,838 16 
650 88 
159 56 



8 5,6i8,10 



Leaves total balance to be provided for on the 
current expenses of Prision, for the years 
1856 and 1857. , ,. ... 

The following statement will show the- amount due Friaoa- 
ets now in ]Prison for overwork mnce 1855, and far mopej 
told in trust for Prl^onjera) receiye^. from tbem^inee mj^ offi- 
^1 term commenced : • . • ' .• 

Due to neory Ricfaards, specially reported kstyeart 

^ A. 0. Lawson^for overwork due in 186^1 . • 

•« Wm. Watts, ** 
• '« « Charles Wirths," 
■ « « Jno. Clancy, " 

<" Solah Mathewsv " 

^ Frank Drum, now du^ to B. B. l^aldwii) ou. order, 

** Samuel Nortop, for overwork,. • . . 
*' "Maurice O'COnneU, fo? overwork, 
^ < ** James Coanaugbtoa, for overwoifkf 



u 



M 
CI 
H 



it ' 


|i 


44 


u 


1 


44 


44 


It- 


14 


i( 


«( • 


4( 



.^ 



f^ 


' *" Thon^as Dexter, 


44 


4< 


u 


• * Wm.» HaneoD, 


U 


.M 


« 


*• Elias.Long, 


44 

ft 


44 

• 


.44 


" S. .Fows, 


44 


«4 


M 


« Wm. BirgC; 


44 


44 



• 



$160 08 


.» 62 


M 95 


... , 44 73 


S lit 


4 13 


9 44 


1 67 


I 00 


. . U 16 


,7 58 


1 44 


83 45 


. 80 


10 



Total. 



$876 04 



* Money received from prisoners on eoiitiAgpvikort,' and/nsed 
forpWson purposes, andnowdtfd a» a balfencfe algainst the 
tetafe: ' • • ,■.■/..' »^ ^« 

bu^ to John B. Spencer,' .'.'.'. . ' '; lOO OO 

« « Louis Franck, . • . . . - ' • 1 26 

. « . " G. R. Spencer,, . . . . ,..,/. ^ 

" " JofiR Giillagher, . .* . . . '. ," 2 40 

« ,** Michael Connell, . ." . '. .'.•." lO 97 

« « C. Barney, . . . ' . . . .' . ' 6 76 



^ ^ lohn Owens, ^ «•»«•* • 

^^ << P. Bammerlee, « 

« •* Wm. Boy lea, . ... . ^. 

« " J. C. Frey, 

'* '' John Gainet, ••»•••• 



$150 50 

The following statement will show the balance due on the 
indebtedness of 1857, and to whom due : 
bahmce due E. Hunger^ for Herohandisdi . f 5 10 



13 00 


13 50 


8 00 


85 


8 00 



u 

u 

H 

u 

4t 
M 
4i 
U 
U 
ti 

u 
u 
u 

44 

It 
It 
tt 
«<« 

M 
U 
ii 
it 
it 
(I 
t( 
tt 



tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt. 

tt 

At 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 

tt 



Pfidter & Co., for Leather and FindifigB, 187 Gt 

Boyd and Ledyard^ Merohandise^ 69 86 

Starkweather ft Oo., order for transfer of Oredit, 27 81 



H. Friend ft Bros., Merohaodise, . 
Bradford ft Bros., Merohandise, 
Samael Smith, services as chaplin, 
A. D. Alls, stone boat plank, • 

Jno. McCane, order for transfer of eredtt, 



146 88 
662 S5 
125 00 
S 75 
883 84 



Pierce, Smith ft Co., order for transfer of credit, 103 85 



W. S. Wells ft Oo., merchandise, . 

H. L. Butterfield, sendee as physioiaD, 

Oeo. H. Batterfield, medicines and paints, 

Dahlman ft Go., groceries, 

Thos. Sampey, order for transfer of credit, 

J. M. Moore, ••.•«- 

L. B. Preston, merohandise, . • 

P. Gole, order -for transfer of credit, 

A. Lumsden, leather and findings, 

A. J. Sheldon, order for transfer of credit, 

Zi.B* Podge, « ^ <* 

W.H. Taylor, « " « 

Albert Walker, merchandise, 

O. Hill, order for transfer of credit. 



tt 



J. R Case, 
H. G. Garman, ^' 
Mrs.H.Boothe, '^ 
Jno. Taylor, " 
Furlong ft Son, ^' 



tt 



tt 



tt 



it 



tt 



tt 
tt 
it 
tt 
tt 



189 58 
864 25 

89 20 
213 04 

80 00 

20 60 
2 «0 

15 00 
169 19 

14 50 
224 64 

91 00 

45 00 
6 21 

40 60 

41 08 
18 00 

854 56 
000 00 



ti 


H 


€( 


tt 


it 


H 


U 


it 


U 


it 


€t 


ti 


tt 


ti 


it 


tt 


tt 


a 



FttrloDg ft Son, grooeriea, i 664 41 

Seymoar Wilooz, Older for tremfer of «Ndk, .' 90 QD 

D, C. Fairbwjks, " w " . W «8 

M. M. Pomeroy; printiog «n^ nairgptpeM, fl 16 

P. V. Dorter, • " « > l M 00 

D. FergoBon, order fi>r tiranaflBr of eredU, . 146 80 

Wm. Ware, « '« *^ . HI » 

H.UtIey, " « « . 18«0 

L. Booney, senrioes as innikey, M 40 

Total, . . . . Hf888 IC 

• 

^e fbllowmg statement will show how much is due tbe 
prison from individoals for work pet€oimedi by them in the 
prison shops in the year 1S67 ; also how much remains due 
from individuals sinee 1S66, and how much of proTuioiiB, 
wood, &c«| remains on hand for nse dnring the year 1858y 
which* to all intents and purposes j is a ftir offset against the 
balance due on indebtedness of 1867 : 

AlitOUNTS DUE PROM INDIVIDUALS FOR ISiQ. . 

From T. C. SnoW| of Waupun, for cut stone^ • . t 6 44 

^ D. B. Dingman, « ." '• . • •74 76 
* R. Pebbles, « . f' " . j 27 67 

** L. Raymon, ^' <' workiaUadtsmitblAM^; 11 08 

« H. Van Winter, of Portoge City, fer oul aloae, . 48 86 

AMOUNTS DUB FROM INDIVIDUALS FOR ^857, 

"Srwa Hatcher & Moore, of Waupun, for cut stone, . .• 9161 22 
'< Wbitney & Danforth, . '< '< oojavi^labac, . 1^98 

M C. Rank & Co., « "«<<.. «4 89 



• * !■ 



Total amount due from i(idiyi4nal^ « . . 9$7{B 85 

* 

. There is on hand and for use in the year 1868 : 

» 

Leather and findings for shoe 8hop> * . ' 6148 98 

Material for clothing, . 805 52 

'BeAdy-made clothing, • •• • •• • . «, • 60 76 



i^ 



ffltotdc Id store rogni; Biicli as oU; molasses, &e., 
Provision^; pdcKad^ poiatoeBi flour, pork, &o«, 

ff QCHl^ .• • • • • • 

Taim stock and fkTm tools^ • 

•Bookft for J rson library, . « « • 

'fiumiturQ for CommiaBionera aj^partments, 
Sairbtnks' weigbiog scales, . ... 

•jStock ia paint shop, .... 

I Material in black3mith shop, and articles made, 



398 eo 

5;3 91 
1,556 90 

2^1 26 

200 00 
88 09 
60 00 
50 60 

503 66 



' ^ Total amount of stock on hand. 
Amounts due from indiyiduab added, 

T 

Total of offset against balance due for 1857, 



»4,668 23 

578 86 



15,247 08 



/Whieih aetoally leaves a balance in favor of priison of,. 

INVENTORY OF STOCK IN STORE ROOM. 
100 pounda bar lead,. . • . ^ . 
1 barrel syrup, . . 

110 yards blue drilling, . 
64 yards summefr catesimere, 
' 8 calf skins,. . • • 
* 2 kip skins, 
• * -'2 cow hides^ ... 



\ I 



' 5 poinds split leather, 
40} yards coMon flannel, 
125 yards black satinett, 
640J " grey " *. 
818 J « black « 
12 pieces EsCrel printa, 
86 yards browti twill cloth,' 
72J •* hickory stripe, 
84 '< in shirts, . 
8 pounds saleratofl, 

7 bunches lamp wipk, 

8 water pails, 

^i ppundsstocking yam, 
14 vest patterps, «. 



»408 92 

810 00 

32 25 

13 75 

12 80 

10 60 

9 00 

»00 

2 10 

6 06 

56 26 

844 00 

186 76 

30 00 

36 00 

9 06 

10 50 

72 

70 

1 60 

6 60 

7 84 



M 



22 yards raveas duok, 
1 can mustard, 
1 set counter scales, 

1 largo set of scales, • 
8 coverlids, . .* 
5 summer hats, 

4 blankets, 

2 boxes glass, 8 by 10, 
8 balls shoe thread, 

5 " wrapping twine, 
.16 pcmndB alipe nails. 

6 quarts shoe pegs, 
i chest tea, 

7 summer coats, 

8 " vests, 
29 lamp chimneys, 

, 1 wash dish, « . 

25 axe handles, 
. 34 files, ... 

24 dozen woollen socks^ 

1 block and tackle, 
39 sheep skin liniog, 
73 papers shoe wax, 

2 bedsteads, 2 stands, 

2 carpets, 
1 large scale, 

S052 pounds fine flour, 
4 barrels lamp oil, 
10 " pork, 
1 spade, 

4 lengths stove pipe, 24 hickory shirts, 

3 boxes glass, 12 by 16, • 

1 hair mattress, .... 

2 barrels pork, . . . • 

4 1 boxeR can()!e&i, , . • . 

5 bushels onions, . • 

.1 plow apd drag, . . . , 
2 garden rakes, 



6 18 
1 00 

h 00 

T 00 

12 00 

«8 

10 00 

4 60 
80 
86 

1 60 

86 

8 76 

Y 00 

5 00 
4 00 

25 

8 00 
18 60 
d6 00 
28 00 
44 50 

72 

60 00 

80 00 

60 00 

60 14 

180 40 

218 50 

1 00 

11 24 

9 88 
20 00 
43 70 
26 60 

1 50 
1,8 00 

2 00 



1^ 



8 pitohforkBy 

1 beetle and three wedge8| 

1 oauIdroQ kettle^ 

6 shovels, 

1 coltiyator; 



258 Yolames of books, • • 
€r pocket rales and three nusors, 
1 oil can, 1 molasses can. 



INVENTORY OP STOCK IN SHOE AND TAILOK 

2 cowhides, - . . - . 

1} kip skins, ..... 

1 patent calf skin^ - - - 

. 8 pair calf fronts, .... 

2 '^ cowhide fronts, ... 

3 " kip fronts, - - ' • - 

8 sheep skin linings; ... 

G pair calf boots, .... 

6 '^ small shoes, .... 

f4 " women's shoes, .... 
20 quarts shoo pegs, .... 

& pair cowhide uppers, .... 

1 ball of webbing, .... 

} yard gum elastic. , . . • 

i. pound shoe thread. ... 

34 *' split leather, 8 pairs uppers, 
16 ^nter vests, . • • « 

65 pair summer pants, • . . . 

67 summer coato, - - ... 

88 vests, ...... 

60 pounds wire, . '• • . 

12 summer caps, ..... 



2 26 
2 00 
9 00 
6 00 

8 00 
200 00 

9 00 
14 00 



$1,993 78 

SHOP. 

- «6 00 

6 00 

2 60 

2 60 

75 

1 00 

2 00 
30 00 

8 76 
6 00 

1 26 

2 00 
50 
76 
50 

2 00 

9 88 
16 12 
84 50 

8 25 
6 00 
1 50 



INVENTORY OF STOCK IN PAINT SHOP. 

4 kegs white lead, - • . ' . - 10 00 

6 gallons linseed oil, • - . . 6 00 



40b 00 


4 00 


8 60 


|1,6«6 90 


166 00 


14.00 


76 00 


50 00 


16 00 



INVENTORY OF STOCK IN BLACKSMITH SBOP. 

200 poundB oast steel, 20o., - - • - 40 00 

9000 '^ common iron, 4}o., 
800 '* stone ooal, .... 

1 sett slating tools, .... 

INVENTORY OF STOCK AND WOOD. 

650 48-128 cords of wood, ... 

826 bushels potatoes, • . • . 

80 " eoni ..-•-. 

19 hogs, ..... 

2 cows. - - . - - - - 
1 heifer, - - • 

AMOUNT OF MATERIAL ON HAND FOR MAIN BUILDINO. 

41,335 feet lumber, ..... 1,010 28 

40,000 " lath, 148 00 

41 26-128 cords block stone, - - - 1,084 00 

S9,000 brick, - - - - - - 239 26 

400 bushels sand, - - - - - 44 00 

5G cords rubble atone, ...» 265 50 

18 << cut, or 22 before dressed. - - 672 09 

INVENTORY OF FURNITURE & STOCK IN SUFT^S ROOM. 

1 carpet, 1 gross buckles^ * - - - IS 00 

1 roam paper, • - - - - 3 00 

1 box buttons, . - ... 60 

2 receipt books, - - - - - 1 00 
6 pounds thread, • - - - - & 00 
6 cards shirt buttonSj • • - - 2 26 
1 gross ooat buttofs, •--•.#( 
9^ dozen large comba, doz. fine condbs, - - 24 20 

INVENTORY OF MATERIALS, Ac, IN THE YARD. 

20 socket blocks for grave stones, * , * - 30 00 

f stone window sills for custom work, • , • 3 5t 

i cranes and gearing, -.-.■- 388 5B 

2f barrels water lime, • » • - d 13 



la 



1 Qv^noK,. ' - 

7 locks. . . . - 

13 tons of hay, at Albert Walkers', ' 
84^ gallons of linseed oil, 8s, 



51 00 


4 25 


78 00 


84 50 



18,443 00 



Received t)M above fii;iicle(i from E. M<?OAERr, 

EDW. M. MAC GEAW, 

State Prison Commissioner. 

mVJBXTORY OF ARTICLES OMITTED IN J3L ACBSMITn SHOP. 

" 10 staples and rings for ox yokes, at $1 each, ... |10 00 

70 horse shoes, " - " - - - - 8 75 

5 pounds horsd nails, - •- - • < - 1 88 

10 hooks and 11 staples for bam doors, < - 2 00 

817 pounds drag teeth, at Oc per lb., - - - 28 55 

INVENTORY OF CUT STONE ON HAND. 

Such as bottle and fillet steps, circular steps, cornice for octa- 
gons, "Wheel steps, concave and convex bushed ashler 
stones, for pinnacles and balconies, • ' " <> $481 00 

Amount of block stone for same, cords, • • 156 00 

To labor, dressing 18 cords cut stone, at 15c per foot, - 518 40 



t0,615 00 



Hie above bill is correct as to amount of property. 

EDW. M. MAC GRAW. 

. INVENTORY OF T00I5 IN SHOE SHOP. 

1 Size Stick. 3 Lap Irons. 18 Knives. S Size Straps. 3 
Sand Stones. 8 Shoulder Sticks. 4 Long Stioks. 7 pair 
Pinchers. 4 setts Crimping Boards and Irons. 7 Ilamnriers. 
2 Shoe Shaves. 2 setts Peg Knives and Floats. 12 Bnrmsh* 
ing Irons. 7 Kpee Straps. 7 Pegging Awls and Handles, 
J-2 gross Awls. 7 Shoe Seats. 1 Punch. 4 Last Hooks. 3 
setts of Clamps. 3 Ran Files. 7 Hasps. 1 0:i Can. 1 
Lamp. 30 pair Lasts. 20 Single Lasts. 1 Spoke Shave. 1 
£l|hapk Iron. 1 pair Edge Planes. 4 pair Compasses* 8 



Buttom IkoiBheB. 1 Dosl PM. 8 Pidb. i Sprinkler; .t 
Slop Tab. ISlove; 1 €Itovri aadi Pokef . 7 l«ngtln of Pip« 
and a CluritB. 

iNTENTOItt OF GOODS IN TAnX)K SHOP. 

8 sett of SheimB. 3 Sleeve Boards. 1 Store and l^ipe. 1 
Cboee. 6 Thimbles and 1 ShoyeL 

D? viasrroRr OF TooiEa IN tm SHOP. 

1 Tin Poldfer. 1 Qtoovet. 1 Store Pipe Roller. 1 VTif^ 
Mftehii^. STanx^nr. 3 Snrrers. 1 Setting dbwn Machinel 
1 dmall Swedge. 1 Stove Pipe Folder. 1 small Phnch M^ 
oUiie. 1 small Gutter 'Besdef. 1 Oandle ikaehine. 1 SqniM 
PuMb. i Hammer S wedges. 1 Oral £lbow^ B Wedge. 1 
doable seam Back Horn. 8 pair Shears and 1 pair snips. 1 
Square Stake. 1 Blow Qom Stake. 2 Oandle Mould Stages. 
1 sett of Hollow Panches. 1 two inch Oonductor Stake. 1 
Planishing Hammer. 1 Needle Case Stake. 8 Baising 
Hammers. 1 pair of Plan Irons. 2 Fire Pots. 2 Long Irqn 
Stakes. 1 Tise. 2 pair Compasses. 2 pair ronnd Pliers. 
4 Files. 4 Groovers. 2 Bivet Setts. 3 Chiaols. 6 Panches. 
1 Oil Can. 1 large Swedge Machine. 3 Mallets. 2 Work 

Benches. 1 Machine Bench. 1 Charcoal Kettle. 

. < 

INVENTORY OF TOOLS IN STONE SHOP. 

185 Points. 154 Chisels. 47 Pitching Tools* 58 Naib 
Hammers. 27 Axes« 82 Squares. 12 ScabbUn Hammenk 
10 Crow Bars. 5 Bosh Hammers. 42 Scraeth AwJs. 1 Shovel* 
& Stoves with Pipes. 

INTENTORY OF TOOLS IS CARPENTER SHOP. 

6 3-4 setts of Bench Planes. 8 Plows. 28 Bitts. 1 larg« 
Iron Clamp. 4. setts of Braces. 77 Bitts. 1 FiUister. 9 
Panel Planes. 8 Moulding Planes. 14 Gages. 1 sett of 
HoUower and Bounds. 1 sett Bead Planes. 7 Babbitting 
Planes. 7 Back Saws. 6 Rip Saws. 6 Cross Cut Saws. S 
Pannel Squares. 7 Try Squares. 5 Steel Squares. 8 Bevels, 
6 Claw Hammers. 1 Riveting Hammer. 8 Oil Stones. 11 



w 

^ages, 4 Whip Saws, 9 Screir Dri^^ra 1 Toothing Fkiifi. 
ll Morticing OhiseLk 1 Iroa CUmp. 5 Draw Enivea. 10 
Framing Chisels. 12 Angus. 8 Bitts. 20 Firmer Chiaeh. 
1 Morticeing Macbiue. 8 pair, Matching Planes. 2 Dodoes. 
8 Bead Planes. 4 pair Compasses. 2 pair Table Planes. 8 
t'iles. 1 Basp. 2 Spoke Shaves. 2 Hand Saws. 2 Sash 
planes. 2 Olae Pots and £ettles. 1 Orind Stone and frame. 
6 Work benches. 7 Bench Screws. 2 Chalk Lines. 3 Scratch 
Awls. 8 Brad Awls and Handles. 4 Roles. 1 Tool Chest. 

1 Saw Sett 10 Bnsh Saws. 2 sett of Saw Horses. 1 Moa* 
kej Wrench. 2 Nail Boxes. 8 Malletts. 1 Shingle Hatchet 

2 Lath Hatchets. 1 Adze. 1 Broad Adze. 1 Shave Hone. 
1 Water Pail. 2 Stores, 23 lengths of Pipe and 4 ElbowB. 
1 Pit Saw. 1 Screw Arm Sash Plane. 

INVENTORY OP TOOLS IN BLACKSMITH SHOP. 

■ 

86 pair of Tongs. 4 Anvils. 4 Bellows. 8 Vises. 2 Grind 
Stones. 8 Sledges. 1 Stove and Pipe. 1 Swedge Block. 
1 !Panching Block. 8 Hammers. 8 pair Swedges. 4 setts 
Hammers, 2 Flatters. 7 Hand Punches. 2 Creasers. 2 
dozen of Files. 6 Wrenches. 11 Drills. 1 Iron Brace and 
Bitts. 1 Field Drill. 5 Screw Plates with Caps and Djea. 
1 Square. 3 Buttises. 2 Horse Shoo Hammers. 1 Draw 
Xnife. 2 pair of Pinchers. 1 Itasp. 1 Nail Block. 4 hard 
Ofaisels. 8 sett of Fullers. 8 Centre Punches. 8 Ardises. 
97 Hand Pnnches. 1 Cast Steel Stone Hammer. 12 Head* 
ing Tools. 8 Pokers. 8 Fire Rakes. 8 Fire Shovels. 1 
Scoop Shovel. 4 Oil Cans. 2 pair Compasses. 1 pair Can^ 
nipers. 85 Mundels. 1& Cold (Niseis. 1 Stamp. 1 small 
Stone Hamm^. 

jNVENTORt OF TOOIS USED ON MAIN BUttDINQ. 

1 Fine Seive. 2 Plastering Trowels. 3 Hoes. 4 Spirit 
j[ievels. 4 Stone Hammers. 14 Trowels. 3 Shovels. 9 
Picks. 6 Hods. 8 Setting Bars. 1 large Sand Screen. € 
^lum Rules, with Bobs. 



19 

' nrvEifn^BT op BiDDoro, *©.,' of oEUi boom. 

Ofwhioh there ar« of Coverlids B - - 27d ' 

u u ii M BUnteta, ' " * • ' W 

' u 14 w « Sheete,^ J 8' ' 8W ' 

. 1^ u a tt tillows, . • g *1W 

^^^ «< n ' II ''neks, ?;• - • 180 ' 

u u u u WaahDiabee, - - -. IW'- 

Oipboard,. - - - - . '^ . ;l 

Two Sprinklere. 10 ftdW fttotea, - - • r O- 

INVENTOBT OF FIHB ASdO: ' 

Of which there are of Rerolnn, . * • If 

« " ..« w Muskeg - - "1# 

u u .u u BuUelMeahlfly * - 4.> .jC 

A 4< .44 44 Powder Flaaka, • ' t 

mVENTGrRY OP FURNTTtmE IIT BtrPEMirEENbj 
ENrS OFFIOE AND DINIITG ROOM. 

1 Secretary. I'Gapboard. 10 Ohairs. 8 Tables. jS Ward 
Robea^ 2 Stoves, and Pipe for the same. 8 WardRob^in 
Clerk's office. 1 Clock. 1 Mirror. 7 Ohairs. 1 Secretanr; 
2 Tals^les. 2 Stoves, and Pipe for the same. ^ ,|Oop^,]^ve, 
with Pipe, in Superintendent's kitchen. ..•.,( 

INVENTORY OP ARTICLES IN PJEMALB DBPART- 

. MENT. 
24Bed Covers. -18 Sheets. 8 Pillow Ctases. B Bed Ticks. 
8 Pillows, a Pails and 1 Dipper. 3 pair Blankets. 1 Bed 
Coyei^. 1 Bed ISok. 1 Bed Stead. 1 Table. 1 'Stftnd. 4 
Chairs. 1 Clock* 27 Pillow Cases. 38 Bb^6t». '0 Bed 
Steads. 2 Mattresses. 2 Stoves, with Pipa 
Fumber of Stoves in Guard House,' 6 

44 4* 44 a Kitohfen, 1 Stove and Cauldren. 
•« " « «' 1 Boiler Kettle. 

u tt a 44 3 gtoves in second and third stories of Super- 
intendents Rooms. 
The above Inventory is correct as to amount of property 

and uumber ot articles. 

EDW.M.MAOGRA'^. 



^ 



on tbe Slst.of Decemberi 1856. The nomber received and 
disQliiarged jdoring the year 1857* The number pf prisonerB, 
in p(i|i«0D| 09 the first of Janoary, 1858, Ibe areiage number 
duQiig the year. The crimee for whiob they wece ooavietedi 
andtfie counties . in which they conunitted the crimeafor 
whidi they were convicted. 

llumber of convictB in prison January Itt 1857, •• IM' 
Ifumber received from the Ist of Jasuary Ilat> to 

theftfBtof Jaovary^ldM^ .. • • «. .102 

lolal number in prison for the ps^t jesr^ « • 810 

Xf mber in Prison Jannary 1st 1808^ . 160 

Sumber dttcharged daring the peat jes% . ' • • 50 

itrerage number for the yesTy. » » « • 1S6^ 

^qgiaaiaosseseoFeclsstyesco^ «, ^ iff 

Of the 21Q.prifoafr| te pristm inw^ ttus^pssl feai^ 
j^ilwaukee county furnished 



Sock QDunij^ 
Bsdne county,, 
IVaukesba county, • 
Walworth county, . 
Dodge county, 
teaikii couaiy, . 
Dane county, • 

Ibtd du LaQcemlljri 
Marquette oooatyi 
Keoodii^ Coua^, « 
Columbia ooanty^ . 
Jeflforson county^ • 
Bichland coun^, • 
Sauk county^ 
Bad-Az county, 
Manitowoc county, 
Pierce county, • 
Winnebigo county, 
Iowa county, 
U,Oi9oeN caiiBty« 



106 
13 
21 
T 
6 
4 
t 

8 

10 

8 

6 
6 
1 
1 

t 
4 
1 
1 
1 
I 



Mortage oonntyy -• 

AdMOM ooonty, ' • 

brant ooimtyy • « • •• « 

La&yettetioaiitjry • • • • ' » 

Oalumet oonnty, • • 

Crawibrd'coaiity, « 

Waoslutm oountj, 

AmMloftiii, . • • 

Suropeai&Sy « « • • 

' It inMiirtii mn't " ' 

"*• luiiBiif ' *• • « • ' • 

'^ BagMMy 

^ Btiathndy • * « # 

^ Wal6% 

C[RIM£S FOft Wmo ti THOSB KOW HT 

IfBtKE OOHVICIED. 

Murder In Oie 4rat degree, • • 

^ •* teoond •* . c • ; 

« •* «|||]|[ «• ^ 4 1* 

Manilimghtari trat ^taifiM, * • 

"* aeadAd «« 

' . •< >' (i^iiiab *^ 

JB»baigilamegt» ^ 
BuijgUiy, 

PoiaoniDg Well^ • 
Assault ?rith iiiteiit to Kill, 
Assault with intent to (x>mixiit lla{>e^ 
Arson, , . « , 

Perjury, . , , . " . 

Bobbtiy, . . ', 

Sodomy, . ' . 



I 

k 

4 
I 

1-810 



Mi-^ib 



w 



' t 
I 

4 



I f 



1 

9 
I 
4 
8 
JO 
1 

■ 

. 4 

8 
'8 

» 

t 



^ » 






iAdiiltiy, . 



1 



'98-160 
160 



Passing Coanter&it JAonpjt , • , • . . 8 

Polygamy, .. .. .. . , 1 

Keeping House of HI Fame, . • . • . • 2 

tweeny, . , . . • _ . 

Total nmpber in Prison JTannary Ist, 1868 

MAIN BUILDING. . 
The Legislature last wii^ter fiji{>re|^riatod $1^3,000 to be ap- 
pliediin constrncting the main building. I am happy to saj 
ithat ivie havf made^conaiderable progress in its construction. 
The open winter was fayorable tp.iuk The building is now 
closed in, aqd secure from, the action of the frpst As its con- 
struotaon h%9 created some curiosity in cposequence of the 
charges that were preferred agaipst m^ for the alkged alter- 
ationi I was charged with making, a brief dee<tf^tlon -of this 
monument of State pride may not be uninterestuig to the tax- 
payers of this States- The building is situated north and joins 
to the south wing, which was built by Andrew Proudfit, Esq. 
^e b^iUdipg is serenty-twp ffet . fr^nl^ by eighty-flve deep^ 
four stories high, with fimt octagons, in o^e of which there is 
a flight of stone winding stairs, that le^ from the Commiss- 
ioner's Office to the. top of the octagon. The basement is di- 
Tided into fonr principal rooms, the west, part of which is de- 
signed for the use of convicts, for cooUag, wadiiDg^ Ac The 
east part is intended for the use of thh Oommissioner and his 
fitmily. The floors are flagged with stone, and the cellans and 
corridors are to be- arched over with' briok. The principal 
story is intended for a Guard Boom and Matron's Boom. 
The east side of the building is intended for the Superintend- 
ent's Office, Sitting Boom and Deputy Warden's Office, and 
a fire proof vault. The partition wf^Us in this story are piin- 
eipally stone. The rooms are spacious and well ventilated. 
The height of story is 12 feet 5 inches from floor to ceiling. 
Theire are two flights of stone stairs, one leading from the 
basement to the principal story, and the other from the piin- 
eipa^ story to the Hospital. In a word, the building is de- 



iigbedtobi^aAntoHjr^fli^ proof as' possible. The extemkl 
appearance of the bfrildizig, aad ' the intefnal arrangement,' 
reAeetd great credit on' the architectSy Messrs. Mygatt A 
Sehmidtner, who designed it, and Messrs. 0. B. Whitton, and 
Wyatt, and ShoefBer, who carried bat the design. Mr. Bhoeffletr 
the master stone-cntter, is deserving of special notice, for th4 
tteefaanical skill and ability he hAs displayed in teaching the 
ctoTicts in this mnchto-be-admired art ; and the willingnesd 
they hare evinced to learn and tiaake themseltes nsefnl ihA 
gratifying to me, and profitable to tho State. ^ 

llie second story consists of a male and female Hospital^' 
Siiperintendent's parlor, library, bed rooms and nursery. The 
#9male hospital is so arranged that there is no communication 
Wt^een it and any other room on that floor. Tho hall, liin* 
liing through the centre from east to west, to a balcony, thii 
"floor of which is 13 feet by 4 feet 6 inches. This floor fif 
covered with one stone that covers the whole of the platform: 
The height of this story is 13 feet 4 inches from floOr to ceil^ 
ing, the principal partition walls of which are brick. 

The west half of the third story is for a chapel. Its dinien* 
fiions, 89 feet by 67 feet ; 17 feet 6 inches in height Thet^ 
are three stairways leading to it; one from the female depa^ 
ment, and one from the male, and 'a public stairway for the 
Oommisssioner's family, and for citizens. The east half <ff 
this story is to be used for convalescent hospital, bed rooms 
and closets, and there is in it a water tank, 10 feet by 10 feefc 
6 inches in width, and 5 feet 4 inches deep, from which soft 
water is to be conducted by pipes to the various departments 
below. The height of this story is 14 foet 6 inches, from floot 
to ceiling. The partition walls of this story are aJl brick. 

The upper or attic story on the east side is divided into fouir 
large sleeping rooms by brick partition walls, upon which rests 
the roof, and are designed to support the cupalo or bellfry. 
These rooms are lighted by small windows between brackets 
that support the cornice, l^is is a departure from the origiii- 
al design, but I think a justifiable one, as it will make these 



; « 



99Qips mort hoaltbj «nd na^fo}^. #p4 fiJld t«i^ ruther 
4|i2Qiniah from, the egcberngl appeai^Q^. 

The outside undls are ^oniplet^i expept th^ pionadM^ 
ffidch I believe are cut and rea^ to pat up in the spring; 
TIu) height of the walls of the main buildiiigi ft-em baaement 
HoQr to the top of pinnacles, is aixty-five feet eiz inohee* 

:Tbe carpenter work of this baildtag h#a been d<Hie bjr ^w* 
}ricta, under the direction of Mr lUohard Archer, and I am 
latisiS^ i that that portion of the woc^ is done as well as {I 
could be done by outside m^chauies* The roof is as per&ot 
ipad as eoinplete as the hands of man conid make it There 
I9 a copper gutter laid in its place,. and copper coaductois ave 
|U ready to be, put np« I have agreed with a Mr. B. Barret^ 
pf Yermont, to cover the roof with slate, at $12^50 per square^ 
mi4 I am satisfied it is the ohesjpeat and most durable covep* 
1^ we could put OQ, and more in keeping widi that class of 
ImUdings than any other roof would be. The slate has bee9 
^%7ed by ihe extreme cold smp we had in the early part of 
winter. The y^ssel that has them on board put up for the 
irinter in some port at the head of. Lake St. Clair. She 
arill be in early, in the spring, and the sla^ wiU be put on bj 
JlCr. Barrett, as soon it arriyes.- 

J. herewith subjoin an estimate of the yalue of conyiot li^ 
fordone on t)i# main building during the past year, from 
which it IS ssceriained, that aft^r deducting the amouivk 
jpaid tf>r outside labor, that the convicts employed on the main 
)»i41diDg eam^ $16,5Q1.78, to which add the provisions and 
building material unconsumed auni unused ss per inventorisa 
.J^with, $12,978.09 ; which if you dedot |29»589.83 from 
$36,125.99, it will show that the institution for the past yew 
4[)ply cost the, Stajte $6,58fi.l7« ID^ese conclusions are based 
upon facts and figures, to be found in the tables contained in 
this report. In fact I might almost demonstrate that the ii^- 
^tutioQ, for the past year, supported itself. I am satisfied 
4bat the State could not get the work done by contiaot 
in the manner we have done^ for less than fifi;y thoosand dol- 
lars. 



• In the present financial crisis, I will not recommend the 
Legislature to appropiate anj more for the main bailding 
Chan whal is necessary to pay for the material already purchas- 
ed, and what may be necessary to pay for slate, lime, sand and 
glass. There is five or six excellent carpenters in die carpenter 
shop, that can, under the direction of a proper man to snperin. 
tend and direct them, do all the carpenter work. The amount 
I would recommend to be appropriated is as follows^ to wit: 

To defray the current expense of tha prison for the ensu- 
ing year, and to complete the main bnildinj^, • |85,000 00 
To pay the balance due on the indebtedness of '67, • 4,838 10 
Balance due for constructing the main building, • 6,184 96 



' Total amount necessary to be appropriated, • • 146,028 11 

Several of the parties to whom it»e State ia indebted for 
supplies furnished the priaoj^ have expressed a desire to hai^i 
the amounts due to them approropriated direcftly to tibedir 
selves, in order to pass their claims over to their creditor ; 
and in order that the Legislature may do so understandingly 
and correctly, I give the names oif the parties and the 
amounts due to them. I hope that their request will be com- 
plied with. 

Messrs. Mygatt A Schmidtner claimed from me some ettth 
compensation for services rendered, as did some Other men 
employed in the construction of the main building ; but I 
deemed it more prudent for me to refer such matters to whom 
it properly belonged. AH I can do is' to say that they are 
deserving of liberal consideration and I hiEive no doubt but 
ihey will receive what is just and right from you. 

The Legislature appropriated three thousand dollars to lay 
the foundation of a wall around the prisoUi but I did not upe 
any of ;t for the, purpose it was appropriated| believing it was 
better to secure the main building than it would be to com- 
mence and leave them all in an unfinished state. 

There is another reason why I did not comsieoce the wail 
and it is this : The south wing is situated on the extreme 



southern line of the priaon gronncL This I •deem to be wrong, 
as it wonld bring the houses ol the citizens in too close con* 
tact with the prison, so much so that thej could, from their 
own houses talk to the prisoners in their cells. To obviata 
this, I would recommend the purchase of a strip of land sondi 
of the prison, before any wall is built I would recommend . 
the Legislature to abandon the idea of building the nortli 
wing, and make, provisions for the building of a Slate Priaoa 
for those that are sentenced for life, and for periods of from 
five to ten years, and let the present prison serve for the con- 
finement of those that are guSIty of petty offence. I could 
assign a great many good reasons for this recommendation, if 
time and space would allow. I will let one suffice, and that 
is, that their will never be a market for convict labor at Wau- 
pun, as it costs too nftich for transportation of telw material, 
and of the articles when manufactured, to make it pay, and 
• there will never be any competition. The Legislature should 
give this subject their serious consideration. 

The following statement wUl show how much material and 
labor of citizen mechanics has been purchased for the 
erection of the main centre building of the Prison, in the 



year 1867, 


) ■ 


$18,461 83 


For block stoas, ; 


• 


14,282 71 


*' rubblQ8tQn«, . 


• 
• • 


810 76 


'** lime, . . . 


• 


653 42 


'^ Band, . 


• • 

r 


1,070 68 


^ lumber, 


4 


2,299 06 


« lath, . 


• • 


148 00 


^ common brick, 


• 


1,821 06 


*^ firebrick, 


• • 


41 00 


*' copper for roof gutter, 


• 


969 20 


^ iron, steel, tin plate, tools, <fec, 


• • 


1,360 74 


** castings and machinery for cranes, . 


116 84 • 


^ ' hauling lumber and bricks, 


• • 


340 29 


^' coal, 


• 


118 91' 


^ ^ advertiidog !br contracts, 


• • 


32 70 



M«l 



87 



<* oitijsen meohanics and architect, » 4,174 OH 

** work on footgutter, . . ; 78 44 

^ fineighiage on railroadsi • • ,• , 193 IS 

^ water lime, • . • • » 93 

*^ bouldei; atone), d^c.| for oven in kitcliei^ 22 00 



118,461 82 



The follawlog iBtatoment will show the luupuut of ca^li that 
lias been paid for matertal-^n^ labor ou nuua or centre ]mu)4* 
ing of prison, in the year 1857, and also how muohiiat bften 



paid on indebtedness for 1856, 


• 


• 


$18^08 41 


Paid on indebtedness of 1856, • 


» 




Ml 38- 


*' ^ Block aiid Bubble Stone*, 


• 




B,890 85 = ' ' 


" " Lumberi' . i 


ft 




1,523 56 


« « Brick,- . . V t 


k 


• 


1,400 W ' 


« " Sand,' . . 


• 

• 




• 688 70 


« « lame^ • . . ^ 


• 


^ 


• 117 «1 


" " TooIb, ; ' . * I 


( 




• 5l 22 


" " Iron, Steel and Copper for 


Boo^ 




1,647 eo- * • ' 


" « Freigbtalge, . . * . 


» 




1S8 93 


^ ^ Mechanic's Labor, , • 


• 




3,845 17 


« " Coal, \ . . . 


• 




113 9l 


** « Advertising, . 


• 




32 70 


<" «" Water Lime, . 


• 




13 '• ' 


« « Haulifig, 


* 




. 95-96 '' »" •• 


'• " Rope, ... 


« 




. 58 80 ' ' 


' <* ** Work on "Roof and Gutter, 


• 




78 44 




l3,4«#Htl 
The indebtedness for building purposes has been fuhher 

paid^f work in shops,. and avtiisles. sold fasakjBxi, to . 

the amount of 81^ lO 

Making total p^d on building indebtedness, . . $14,280 56 

:beoapititl\ti(>n' op BUiiiDnra' indebtednes3 aiTd dm. 

BOBSBMEWTS. 

Balance due on building indebiednM for 1856,' . . |1,100 'Of 

Puid on « . . " . " . ** $93 J 68 

JE^ Wyatt, (included in Cr. of parents of 

current expenses),' • ' • ' . ' • ' • ' 9A OO 



Leaves balance .due f9r 1856, 



$1,027 418 



< « 



ii4i 



» 



At follows: 
To M, Rich is Sons, Y2 41 ■ ■ 

Whole buUdiDg indebtedness for 185f . . 1 13,46 L 
Gash paid indebiedness of 1857 « . $12,587 18 
Pud by work in shops, Ao., ? . 812 10 



Total of psyments, . 
Leafes balance of indebtedness for IBVI 

As follows : 
ro E. Hunger, . 

** Haney di DePow, 

•* Jno. Peiriii, ^ 
'<* Willson k Moore, 

** Mygatt dr Bohai^tner, 

** L. M. Dariing, • 

"^ Heroe, Sfnith 4 Ck>^ 

« ttAJ.F.HiU, . 

'' jr. 0. Dolw 

*^ Thomas Sanpsff 
^ A. IngersoU, 
•• H. Fess, Jr., 
'' M. Bpilane, 
« T. OHrer, . 
•* D. Hiler, . 
^ A. Sumner, « 



tl8,849 28 



« 5,112 M 



4 Ite 68 

849 84 

1 2% 

6 68 

106 75 

481 06 

634 28 

41 00 

85 

44 81 

496 46 

18 25 

2,081 60 

67 18 

185 68 

75 00 



46,U2M 
72 41 



Add ike balanoedne on the indebtedness of 1856, 

Leaves balanoe dne to be profided for, « 85,184 95 

* 
■ 

■ « * 

Ilie following statement will sbow bow nmch of material 
tbere i» now on hsHd whieh wae purohaaed for main or oo&Ire 
bnilding, and may be oonsidered a fair oflbet against the bal- 
moe ^ue on building iadebtedaeaa : 

Lomber on hanc^ • * 81»OlO 28 

Lath, « . • 148 00 

41 26-128 oords Blook Stone, 1,084 00 

18 cords, or abont 28 xsords before dressed, . 572 00 

88 <« Bubble Stone, 265 50 



• 



2» 

tp Socket Blooks for graye stone, • t • • 3d 59 

S90O0 Brioks, « • ..tB9 25 

400 biuhels of Sand, ...... 44 00 

Oraines, Derrick and Oean nga, . . . . . 080 60 

cords of Dimenaion Stonee, ••••.• 156 00 

d| barrels of Water Lime» ....••. 6 Oo 

13,948 15 

Tbe following statemeut will slipwi bj way of reoapitnla* 
Uon, the amoant of moaoj reoeiyed from all Qoorce^ dufing, 
Qm joar 1857, for the porpoee of dofraying the corrent ez« 
pensea of the year, paying part indebtediioB% and for boildiog 
parposesy and how the aame haa bean diabniBed : 

Hie whde amoant of cAsh receired from all sonrcei add 
orders on the State Treasurer, considered aa cash, • $45,885 fO • 

Paid on indebtedness o^ 1856 and 1857, |28,806 56 
• ^ building « « « 13,468 46 

<^ *• Commissioner's credits^ • * 8,404 57 

Total of Disbursements, - • #45,3M 59 

Beceipts of Cash, - ^ 045,835 80 

Dbbursements, - - - - « - - 45,880 59 



tmm^-^m.' 



Leares balance due from me toFriaos, • • » 15 61 

AMOUNT OF LABOR DONE ON MAIN BXnLDING OF PBIS* 

ON FOR THE TEAR 1857* 

Feet. Perch. Dollaia. 
Of ivUch there has been Masonry in oalside 

walls of Main Building, at 12 75-100 per p'ch, S68a 7,810 50 

Am't of feet of common Ashler, at 2s per foot, 7757 2filB 00. 

^ *' Caps, Sills, Belting, Gonnert 

and Cornices, - . - - - • 5504 2,237 00 

Dimeadon StonesjArohes, Consoles or Biacketa, 
Projections, Moulding Caps and Blind Wind- 
ows, 1,008 00 

Dressing 66 steps for S. E. octagon, with colanui 

head, 432 00 



I 



80 



Dressing i Layibg Fldgs uiider stairwlayi - 
'* Stone from side of basemeiit'to sedond 
story, and steps from basement to the sanie^ 
Laying put Stone stain frooi basement to second 
storj, and rough masory* connecting with the 
same, - - ' - . * . * - . 
To dressing and laying oorer stones over Sap^ts 
Vault, door jams, arch with pannel for inside 
door of vestibule, * - 
Amount of rough masonry in partition of base* 

*ment, principal and second stories, 
Sk>ne masonry in atxAes over basement, • 
Amount of flagging in baaemeat^ dressing and 

laying the same, - . - 
Liiboif on angular archies in attie story, 

^ on inside Gaps and Siila for doors and 
windows, •• * - - - • . - 
** to drilling holes in windows to reo^ve 
iron bars, ------- 

Gutting holes for additional flues in south wing, 
Tb 28 yards excavation, at 2s per yard, in fur- 
•. nace room^ - . 
To dressing one sill Jand two caps in basement^ 
The bottle and fillet steps for main door of ^ach 

front are all cut, - - • • 

11 cir<iular steps fox* 8. K oclagon, - 
1 capitol for each front, - - - w 
1 pannel stone for base of column, - 
8 steps for re^ front, with eireular heads, 
)00 feet of concave and convex budi'd Ashler, 

1 enp for rear balcony, - . - * 

2 octagon pinnacles for balooniea, * 
25 pieces of octa^n cornice, - - - 
6 pinnacles, - - - - 
Laying brick in arches over basement, 

*< << in partition walls of principal, sec 

end, third and attic storiee, - - . - 

Laying fire-place in third story, - . - 

^ 60 feet of superficial bride flooring in 



20 CO 



156 00 



115 00 



236 00 

1,117 M 
66 800 60 

64S OO 
40 00 

)5 00 



40 00 


10 00 


7 00 


17 00 


187 50 


65 00 


5 00 


10 00 


B4 00 


40 00 


10 00 


10 00 


125 00 


15 00 


80 00 


691 50 


15 00 



100<00 


ISO QO 


12 00 


fi 00 


509 00 


26 OQ 



SI 

,' east odiar, ......' 909 

Laying brick vobM orardrottlai and godm 

windows^ - - 

Laying bake ovan in basement,' ... 

^ Arob under octagon atairwaj, 

'* Three arolies in principal story, • 
To labor on iron for windows, ancbors to sup- . 

port trusses and masonry, and bolts for trussea 

orer cbapel, to support roof, ... 
Making centers for arcbes over basement, 

*• •^ «• principal, second, third and 

attic stories, * -- -- - lOOOO 

Liiiteis of inside doors, windows, of outside 
' walls, and wall plates to receive joists and bond 
* timbers for windows and doors, ... (^00 

Labor of preparing and laying joists of principal, 

seoond, third and attio stories, ... 
Labor on trusses and chapel, ' . . . 

.** preparing and building rool^ 

*' in kitchen of basement, • » 

** on centres of octagon windows^ 

'* making 21 registers, including solder and 

wire, -.-... 

Labor, making 693 feet tin pipe, ... 

** " 20 elbows, - - - - 

" laying in walls the above tin work, 
' ** on 44 window frames, at 12s per frame, 

•* on copper gutters of roof, - - - 
To labor preparing floors of principal and second 

• ' stories, for deafning, 

To making copper elbows and conductor pipes, 
Labor for 18 cords of cut stone, which is now on 

hand at 16 cents per foot, > . . . 

Total amonnt of convict and other labor, |20,40^ 90 

In my last report I alluded to the &ot of my being arraign- 
ed before the Gh>Temor for allegied malfeasanice and misiccvi!* 



784,00* 


200 00 


260 00 


80 od 


49 Oft 


• 

it OQ 


m^w 


25:00 

t 


10 00 


66 00 


74 cor 

f 


• 

X66 00 


80 00 

4 


51 a 40 



4iict in office. As yoa are aware, I did appear before ium, 
on the 15th of January las^ for the purpose of aaBweria^ 
diofle charges. Not knowing what personal malice might 
prompt these reckless men to do, I employed MessiB. Byan & 
AmcAd to defend me ; bat after sabjecting me to heavy ex* 
pense, the charges turned ont to be pure fabrications. They 
utterly failed to prove that I was even guilty of an oQicial 
indiscretion. 

In view of these facts, I thought the Legislature would 
iiave (without hesitation) appropriated to me as much money 
aa would have indemnified me for the loss I sustained by rea- 
son of the unjust prosecution. The very official act that in* 
duced these reckless mea to prefer these charges against me 
^as an act that saved the State over thirty thousand doUara^ 
Therefore it is unreasonable and usjnst fbr the State to refuse 
to pay me the full amount of my reasonable demand^ while 
tiiey pay the parties that preferred the charges they were ua- 
aUe to maintain. They refuse to pay me the sum of eighteen 
bundred dollars, and even refused paying me eiglit hundred, 
although the State Prison Committee, by A Scott Sloan, re- 
ported a bill to appropriate to me that amonnt, but because 
flie Ooveruor had not decided the case, the Legislature refosed 
to allow the amount so reported. 

I awaited on the Gk)vemor several times, but could not get 
him to decide. My counsel waited on him, but to no pur- 
pose« Finding myself thus baffled and abused, I procured 
the passsge of a resolutian through the Aesembly, calling on 
the Governor to give a decision in my case ; but he paid no 
regard to it. Another resolution was passed, calling on him 
to decide, and publish his decison, with the testimony in the 
ease ; but he neglected to do either, and leaves the public to 
draw their own conclusions as to my guilt or innocence ; and 
the Legislature allow me to labor under pecuniary cmbatrass* 
ment by refusing to pay me what I was justly entitled to. 

Now I respectfully submit that the Ojvemor's neglect of 
dnly should not be allowed to delay the payment of my daim ' 



3d 

17 longer. It will be seen that a large amount of it has 
)en paid for counsel fees. I have credited myself on the 
nson books for $660.00, which I paid Messrs. Byan & Ar- 
Ad ; but that is a small portion of the expense that I have 
)en subjected to. There is yet due and unpaid $1,160.00. 
lat amount I hope you will immediately provide for by an 
>propriationy in doing which yon will do no more than sim* 
justice to me and to the people. I am satisfied they do 
>t wish to deprive me of the emolument of my ofElce, by 
impelling me to defend myself at my own expense, when I 
ire acted in good faith and done what I thought and proved 
> be for the public good. 

In conclusion, I wish to ret^nl Hi^hi ^'tif^tnj fkiihMctlt' 
08 who have co-operated with me in discharging the arduous 
lilBai^ df ,mr ■• gAoa^ - aoA I «||»eefell^ thy l^^pttltfy Iffr. John 
fftr^ TBq Wtwey^ifl wWeh* th^ l^do^ have b^eti'Keptls'l 
lffitB»itK>tb 8rti4Et^itaiy'i^r#dtt^w^ -^'his aMity. '' 

or myself, I have nothia^^l&b#&*fc) say^flifttt thi^ I httve en- 
BavofM ^o^iny^iduty during the last year. We have had 
l)'ieifth^*«oi«lfo|i^dor ittieM^ ^i^i/p^i' 6M t'thihk ^l 
lay safely say that the morals of the prisoners are no worse, 
id I Ihiiil^liii^diidipBn/iiUlJlle more perfect than I found it 
Qoipiiig^QiJyvi^ifflcSkl imfSi^- ^1^ inettt fh^approbatioh of 
our Excellency, and the Honorable Legislature, 
I remain, respectfully, yours, &c., 

EDWARD MoQAERT, 
State i¥uon (hmmimoner qf Wisconsin. 



STATE OP WlSOOirSIN, ) ^ 

Milwaukee Douinx. I 

SDWijBD HcGAJEoory baiag duly swon^ sajs, tlimlfl 
matters and statomentB Mt fbiih in thefocegM^g Bepoiti bj 
him 8ab0cribe(^ are juat aud true, a^ocivdiQg to die beitof 
hiQi knowledge, ii^nnalioa and beliel 

Sabioribed and awom tf>y ihia 16ih day el jMiiaiy, A. Di» 

1858, 

^ JOHK A. fflEGtBR, 



DOCUMENT I 



• 1 1 

I 



OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTE. 



phesidknt: 
Rbv. S: C. BURNHAM. 

TBBASUBSm: 

W. A. LAWRENCE. 

f 

SXCHBTABT .* 

L. J. BARROWS, M. D. 



TBU8T£B6 : 



Bmw. 8. 0. BUBNHAM, L. J.^BARBOWS, 

L MILTIHOBE, J.IF.IWULABD, 

W. A. LAWBENCE, W. H. TRIPP. 



S^g^erintendeni — ^W. H. Chubchman, A M. 
Mairan — Miss R M Cvbtis. 
Prqfusor qf Music — ^F. A Campbell. 
Jtuiatant TVocAcr— Miss M. R Hahp. 
Master qf HanHctqft — C. K Nixsov, 



I < • t 






t I 



TRUSTEES' MgfOBT. 



To His ExCELLBNCr, COLSS Bashfoad, 

Oovemor qf the State qf TFisconsin : 

The Board of Trustees, charged with the management of 
the Wisconsin Institute for the Education of the Blind^ would 
respectfully submit to the Legislature, through your Excel- 
^ncy^ the Eighth Annual Report of their official labors on 
behalf of the State. 

It is a source of extreme gratification to the Board, to be 
able to present their interesting charge as in a very flourish- 
ing conditioa Another year's experience, with this one of 
the educational interests of the State, has but served to iii- 
crease their conviction of its utility, and they would earnestly 
commend it to the continued fostering care of the Legisla- 
ture. 

The several officers employed in the ministration of the 
internal affairs of the Institute^ have discharged their respec- 
tive duties during the past year with A^elitY^ and are emi- 
nently entitled to the confidence of the public 

For 9f full history of the internal management and opera- 
tions of the Institute since our last seport, your Excellency is 
referred to the appended report of the Superintendent^^ to 
whoap the details of its management are confided. 



The Board fully unite with the several su^estions and 
commendations of the Superintendent, and ask for them the 
earnest consideration of the Legislature and yourself 

The report of the Building Committee, also 6ubjoined^ will 
make you acquainted with the details of our building opera- 
tions since the date of our last report From it you will per- 
ceive that the interior of the center building and east wing, 
with the exception of the third, fourth and attic stories of die 
former, have been cmmf leted in a neat and substantial man- 
ner, such as best comports witlvthe character and design of 
the Institute. In addition to the interior, we have also caused 
to be erected the wall of an area along the entire south front 
of the building. This is constructed of stone masonry, and 
is very substantially built. 

Following the example of all other similar institutions, East 
and West, the Board have introduced gas pipes throughont 
the building, during its progress, and while they could be 
concealed without marring the floors and walls, as would be 
^e case if done at some future time, after the building shall 
have been finished. 

These pipes were not put in with the expectation of procur- 
ing a supply of gas from our city works, for we are too remote 
from them to admit of this, without incurring more expense 
than would seem expedient. Our plan is to manufacture our 
own gas with some one of the portable gais-machines now 
successfully used, in many parts of the country, in both public 
apd private buildings. They are quite simple and compara- 
tively inexpensive. . 

'^his apparatus will be introduced as soon as the means of 
the Institute tvill justify the expenditure ; for it is highly es- 
sential, not only as a matter of economy, but also as a pre- 
ventive against accident by fire. For though the pupils do 
not themselves need to handle lights of any kind, yet they 
are extremely liable to danger from those left in their way by 
others. The greater safety of gas, consists in the matter of 



liie buTiieni being immoTably* Axed in a position #here tkey 
are inaceeefiible to chUdren and 'out of the way ot adaHs. < « 
' '^oril'amiijg the btiUding the Board, after a caieful eofi^ 
Mde^atiiyn of the various systems in u^, ^conelUdM to adopt 
^at knc^Mra as Gold's Patent Steam Heating' Appamtns^ and 
entered into a contract tor its introduction with Messrs. Wal- 
"worthy Hubbard & Co., of Chicago, agents for the ' Stale <tf 
Wis^nsin. The necessary fixtures have been put up in a 
fMisiactoiry nianner, and the apparatus is now ready for lii^ 
We have, of course, had but little opportunity as yet to test 
its efficiency, but have full confidence in its successful oper- 
aii(m. 

In the .application of the above named system, the apart^ 
mentr are warmed by direct radiation from sheet iron con^ 
densers placed in them. These radiators vary in size and. 
number to suit the dimensions of the rooms, and are of smIi 
a form as to occupy but little space. They are filled wMi 
ateam, at a very low pressure, which is conveyed to them 
Ikroagh iron pipes, from a boiler placed in the o^ar and •»- 
ieloaed by heavy stone masonry. 

The water, formed by^ condensation in the radiators, retnntti 
19 the boiler by the same pipes which convey the steam (e 
them. A perfect circulation is thus kept up between the boiltt 
and the radiators, preventing the loss of heat which wouM 
take pkee if the condensed. steam were allowed to escape. 

Attached to the boiler are several contrivances for r^gultl- 
ittg the draft, the sui^ly of water, and the pressure of steaMiy 
Ikus making it a complete self^regnlaiaiig apparatus, and re- 
moving all liability to danger. This renders the whole dnnig 
»mmfl^ in its openitioa as to require the direct caie of no 
but aa oidinary fireman in iIb managonent 
It is daiqied for this ajipaiatus, among odMr advantage, 
It the* wneumption of fuel is much less than by any 
»thed ff wanning. * -^ . > 



Tbe ttilseci of wanaiiig Ike iMlitttte buiUUng waa OM 
upon yfbk^ the Board had awch anxiety, and we £ovmi 
amme difficult in decidu^ upon the UMthod to bc^^fwloiMd. 
])foirihat woiMve at a. loss in pronouncLag judgmcAt upgn 
tba m^ril^ of the yajrious. ajriteiiia in use, but we J^eaitaled 
Bkmt ad^^i^ that which we deemed the best one, 'On oo- 
oouftt of its gioaler cost ofer acm^ othars* We ml it to be 
our dutr, however, to select that which combined, in die 
fnaleet 4«gEee, the advantages df Bi^ty, healthi^ilBese and 
aeonomy. 

The uee of stoves was found .inadmisaable, not ovAf in 
point of danger to the building and inmates, but likewise 
on aecount of their unhealtfafalnesa and laige conmmption 
id fuel We are consiantly hearing of ciuBualties bem this 
Bimroe, even among those who have jsight, and the dang^ 
Umald obviously be greatly enhanced in an institution for the 
SKiid 

We wei!6 left, then, to choose between the hotnair furnaaa 
and' soma one of the several methods of waraning by staMi 
and hot-water circulation. The. former was at first sefttkd 
up^m, onaooMmtefitafirstcoiit being less than that of the 
tottery but, upon fiuther investigation At was fouad, aocofding 
ta 4k^ univeisai tes^mony of those well qualified to judge, tt) 
be liablit even in a much faighlor degree tovthe objeetionauiEiged 
agamat the uao >of abevea The luifchealtliiiihiesa of tha devifc* 
dined air tfarawn into (the xooma thuaugh the fhxes haa become 
jpnvBrbiai) aa wril .as the nqpedioonsuimpliGnL of fcri; and 
4hBre are on raoord ahnoat numherlead iastancas of tifcafeaa ^ 
jhnUdhBgaby fltc^ ftaukiDg from iu usa In vfew of Dme 
Acts, tim BoMdichanged their detemiiaiaAiqn akid e<Midudad 
finally to adopt atawii .aa a moiiuKsfor wwittibg) and^believ^ 
iiig^ iqpoh e»itain«lku)^ that flaldfi Parent ApptaMw was 
MlMr.adaptad M thei^ wants fthantatiy «ih«a, amngaaMMe 
were made for its introduction as heretofoora at«tofc in lUi^ 



step we are confident that the best interests of the State and 
the I^kdtitttte harre been subserved, even in an economical 
prail'of "fiew, though the first cost of the fixtures may seem 
large. 

We have dwelt somewhat at length upon this subject, be- 
«« w. b*,e i. «, b, «. of e,«».l u««« «, o« ««. 
at this time, when she is meeting so many jpubllo buildings ; 
and we feel it to be our duty to offer our modictfta of «K]^- 
ience, by way of suggesiiony to those hating thefnin chafge. 
There is ptobably no one thing pertaining to the constitietien 
of pubhc buildings which is of greater moment than proper 
methods of warming. 

In fitting up the laundry and bathing rooms of the build- 
ing, we have also adopted the use of steam in these for heat- 
ing water, drying clothes, &c, thereby rendering these domestic 
operations more expeditious and convenient 

The Trustees, while they have ever kept in view tl\e prin- 
ciples of true economy in the construction and^ fitting up of 
the Institute buildings, have felt it incumbent upon them to 
unite permanency and good taste with adaptedness to the ob- 
ject ; so that, in these respects, as well as efficiency of ^ man- 
agement, the Wisconsin Institute will lose nothing by com- 
parison with other similar establishments. East or West This, 
they flatter themselves, they have thus far succeeeded in doing, 
and that at a small cost, compared with the outlay Sot similar 
objects in other States — the total amount expended upoa the 
buildings up to this time being only about forty-three thou- 
sand seven hundred dollars. True, they are not yet completed ; 
Ibut the suni still needed to perfect them, cannot swell the en- 
tire cost to an equality with that of almost any other institu- 
tion for the Blhljd, as Will be seen by reference to the following 
abstract firoih a tat)Ie in !6amard^s American Journal of 'fildu- 
cation : 



J 



10 



yame of Inatitation. 



LocatioB. 



Perkins* Ifistitation for the Blind 

]|#irTotk.:.d« d#'J...do 

PennsylTmniado Jo do 

Ohio* do do.. ..do 

Yiiginia Ingtit.lbr Deaf A Daoab dr Blind 

Ke&tDckj Instltation for the Blind 

TiidkfMi.,..'.^d»^ do.«..do 

Illmoifl ao do.... do 

Mlnoiti do do.«..do 

Lonifluina Ingtit for Deaf A Dumb A Blind 
Mlehi^an..^ do do.. 



Boston, Mass. 
Ni^Tork... 
Philadelphia. 
Colambns. . . 
Stanaton.... 
LonisTille... 
iBdianapolia. 
Jackflonyille. 

Stlioala 

Baton Rouge. 
Flint 



mated Talae 
ofBoildiwgii 
A Grounda. 



Onmnt 



t 



$150,000 

195,000 
40,009 

70/XH) 

1004m 

80,000 

4S/M0 

198/)00 

150,000 



|»IM> 



IMOO 
lljMO 
lljDOO 
15JM0 
UfiOO 



The work yet to be done upon the main building and 
grounds of our Institution is as follows, viz. : 

1st The joinery, plastering and painting of the third, fourtk 
and attic stories of the center structure. 

2d. The construction of the cupola, portico and verandab 
of the same, together with the piazzas of the east wing. 

3d. The erection of stone walls and steps to enclose the 
areas under the piazzas above named. 

4th! The construction of two large cisterns and as many 
wells. 

5th. The extension of the warming apparatus and plum- 
ming into the third story of the central division of the build- 
ing. 

6th. The putting up of a small apparatus for manufacture 
ixig gas for lighting the building. 

7th. The grading of the grounds and enclosing them with 
a substantial fence. 

Beside the completion of the main buildingi tic^ as above 
specified, a commodious shop building, suitable for the eany- 
ing on of several mechanical branches, is highly essential 
During the current session of the school, a temporary frame 
building will be used for one trade only, that of broom-mak- 



II 

mg^ this being all that it will accommiMiate. Other trad^ 
should be introduced/ but it is impracticable ^thout an in- 
crease of shop room. 

The immediate' executibit- 6{ all of this wdrk* is impera- 
tively demandect^by the necessities of the institntioB^ but tH^ 
^Pru2$tees are destitute of the necessary means for the aceom- 
pHshmeht of the object It i^ therefore respectfully ' urged 
i2](>on the members of the Legislature that they make, at theit 
next seflsion, a sufficient appropriation to supply thid impori 
tant demand, in addition to that necessary fbr the cUrment 
support of the Instituta Estimates for both, will be submit- 
ted through the usual Visiting Committee appointed by the 
Legislature, from year to year, to examine the accounts of the 
TVustees, and inquire into the condition and wants of ' the 
several departments of the Institute. 

For a detailed statement of the receipts and disbursements 
of the Institute since the date of our last report, your Ejccel- 
lency is referred to the accompanying reports 6f S. W; Smitfi, 
former Treasurer, and W. A. Lawrence, his succesn^or. 

The statement of the former shows disbursements on orders 
of the Board, amounting to |[8,161 62, and that of the lattisr 
dhows disbursements amounting to |I18,549 78 — ^makihg a 
^tal of 026,711 40; dedudtiug from this total, the amount of 
the several sums paid by the Treasurers in discharge of loans, 
with interest, and accounted fbr in detail, |I8,190 00, we have, 
as( the nett expenses of th^^ Board for the year, 018,49^ 40. 
Of this sum, 010,742 29 were spent for building purposes, 
and the remaining 07,751 11 for current support, fiimitute, 
school apparatus, and sundry other personal propetty for the 
use of the Institute. 

It will be perceived that the present Treasurer's receipts on 
account of appropriations by the last Legislature, do not equal 
in amOirtrt the sums tiamed in the act. This is to be account- 
ed for by" the fact, that the Bdard have not been able to obtain 
a single ddllar of said approj^otiohs from the treasury, and 



12 

were theieibre obliged to sell their warrants at a considerable 
sacrifice jin order to progress with the building and keep up 
the Institute. 

This necessity was entirely unanticipated, by them^ and, as 
it greatly curtailed their resources, pro ved the cause of serious 
disiqppointment as to the amount o{ work upon the buildings 
accomplished this season. We trust that in future we may 
not be subject to like embarrassment from this sourca The 
interests of the State, as well as those of the Institute, demand 
that it shall be otherwise. 

There ii still due the Institute an appropriation for current 
support, which cannot be realized until the beginning of Feb- 
ruary next, as it was to be paid from the revenue of the pre- 
sent year, A portion, at least, of this appropriation must be 
anticipated, by loan, in order to make it avadlable for supply- 
ing the necessities of the Institute until after the nest session 
of the Legislature. Here, too, we will be subject to loss, by 
^ payieept of interest on loans, necessarily made for de* 
fraying current expenses ;, and the same has been the case for 
several years past, on account of the manner in which the 
appropriations have been made. The Board would respect- 
fully suggest, therefore, that future appropriations for support 
of the Institute be made from mcmey already in the treasury, 
rather than that to^ccrue from a. prospective revenue, as the 
present piactice.subjects us to annual loss, as above stated. 

In taking a retrospective view o| the history of tbis humane 
institution,— tracing its career back to the time when, through 
the philanthropic efforts of a few sympathizing friends, a 
handful of the afflicted '^ children of i^igbt " were gathered 
within the walls of a small rented tenement in our city, in 
order that they, though shut put :from the beauties of the vis- 
ibly world, might be brought to, see with the eyes of the spirit, 
and bask in the diviner l\ght of knowledge, — we caJUl to mind 
the struggles of that little b9A4; of sightless omes^in their 
ipoorly equi{]^d school-rooxn^ straying tp master the rudiments 



13 

of kno'wledge, or trace out with ^ the quick discerning finger ** 
the words of holy writ, that told them of a better land, upon' 
ifrhose beauties their unsealed orbs might one day gaze widi 
Tspturons delight We contrast the picture with that now 
presented to the visitor by our stately edifice, well furnished 
and thronging with beings made happy by their newly 
awakened hopes and prospects ; the contrast makes us feel 
that we hare much cause for congratulating the firiends of the 
blind in the complete success of our enterprise. 

It is now about eight years — and they have been years of 
trial and labor — since the incipient steps towards the estab- 
lishment of the Wisconsin Institute for the Blind were taken. 
Some of the present Board have been connected with it from 
its earliest beginning, and have watched over its progress 
with much anxiety during its struggles through the many 
difficulties which are incident to such an undertaking. To 
them the present prospects of the Institute are especially 
g;ratifying, and they feel themselves amply rewarded for their 
years of gratuitous labor, by the opportunity now afforded for 
witnessing the good fruits of that labor. 

The Trustees would not be understood, in the foregoing re- 
marks, as taking to themselves an undue share of credit for 
the present prosperous condition of the Institute. Justice to 
#ur experienced Superintendent, Mr. W. H. Churchman, re- 
quires at our hands an acknowledgment of his invaluable 
services in bringing about the favorable results alluded to. 
4nie Institute is indebted to him, not only for his very efficient 
management of its internal affairs, but likewise for much val- 
uable aid rendered to the Board in adapting the building, 
with its numerous appliances, to the end in view. 
Respectfully submitted, en behalf of the Board, 

S. C. BURNHAM, 

L. J. Babrows, Se^j/. President. 

Janesville, October 1st, 1857. 



t. 



r 



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9 
■ 



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• I 



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. I 
• > 



. : a 






• 1 



1 1 



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I '* 



" 1. * 



» • ■ * 



^ ■ « « 



APPENDIX. 



tt, 






1. ii ■? [/ 



•7 - jI 



r^l 



* 
* \ I 









• • \ 



APPENDIX A. 



.1 



I J 



1 1 



H 



« > W 



BUILDINiG OOtt^lIrlTTEE'd REPORT. > 

To the Board of Trustees : 

GsFTLBMXK — Your Building Committef; b^ [f^Y^p iu i«uw 
cpxi^mp with yx>¥V instructions, to present .^ foUtOiTOig 
SjHUQfi^iQ^iy as thw,FrC\uith Annual Report: ui' • ..,. 

Qn ^cpount of tl>§ change of .the -fiscal year of the ^tatf^ 

epw^tsd.hy the last JU^gJsJature^ an^ con^quent requireoMK 

that the Annual Report of the Iustj^te,s^¥il4,iV)9 niade up>tf| 

tiii€( (first of OctQber, J^nstea^.of th^, fixst of Ja&|||g^ as hmto- 

fore^ the Coo^itte^ ^iU JMt ^e fible.^ this early, date -tOii^ 

j^tL.X\^ full completion of all the virork unde)rtat(^n for t^^ 

mmixiy some parts, beings yet ixk haod 

' It will be impracticabk^ liieivfow^ to give you a statement 

of the exact cost of all the impittvements for the year, when 

completed. ' Yqii will fi^d below, however, an approximation 

Uf tl^ which cannot vary owtteKiaUy from, the truths together 

with a pnoisp- statetnetit of 'th^ aoDciufBt p«id out upon «h^ 

sreveral departments of the x«i);otk u^ to the first bf October. 

.^ itp the end that they migjit avail themselves of the adyaiv- 

ligis of competition, the committee, before comoBfliieiiitgaBf 

6f the work in the spring, advertised for sealed propo8absff<M: 

Ike exetution of such ^arts of it as could be appropriately let 

in this way, and^ in bWy instahce awarded the contracts to 

the''lo^«t rtei;^nsible m^ers. The s^ccessfol compentpn 

were as follows, viz : 

is 



18 

For the joinery of the entire building, excepting the third, 
fourth, and attic stories of the center structure, James Mills. 

For the painting of the same, together with the glazing of 
the basement and transom windows, Messrs Wormworth & 
Higgins ; and for the stone masonry and flagging of the main 
south area, Ira Miltimore. 

Private contracts were also made with Meissrs. Walworth, 
Hubbard & Co., of Chicago, for putting up Grold's Patent Steam 
Heating Apparatus, and with Messrs. Foord & Babcock, for 
inserting gas pipes throughout the building. 

For such parts of the work as could not be let by contract, 
the best practicable arrangements were made for insuring 
economy tod fidelity. ' 

Some of tine above named contracts have been completed, 
and the remaining ones will be, it is thought, by the middle 
of the present month. So fhr as the worit has been accom- 
(Ushed, the committee take great pleaisAre in stating that it 
nietits your unqualiAed approval. ' ' 

- The following is 'an estimate ot the 6ost of the building 
operations of the present seasott, when completed: 

▲mount of contract for joinery, $iJSt7 00 

do. LatJudir fl»d tdteflterinlf, IjSSf^ 9$ 

d<x Painting, and gbujig, — ^.....•«» 505 00 

do. Warming apparatna,*. , 3»650 00 

da Gaa pipea, , 100 00 

IBsUmat^d coat of area wall, with coping and flagging, when com- 

j^te» uidiiding excatmtionfbr tlifdsame,..'. 900 01 

iMmated coal of ii6amin7 and mtmv^bfa k ciU«& for etdaifemant 

of boikrxoom, etc.. Cor warin^a|)fwratus«4 400 00 

Amount paid for castings, (ciatem, condalt, and columna,) 97 00 

jlmonnt paid for bricks, and hauling the dame, 69 00 

iUflroad fH^flktM,.... H9i 

;Pn>bAble co«( of ineidontalv qot 8tN)«i$^ al>OTe» 5IOO0. 

. .^, F, TVILLARD, 

., C^airmfm ^tdUing: Conk 

Janc«riDe, Oct lei, 185T. 



APPENDIX B. 



FORMER TREASURER'S REPORT. 



To the Sowd (^ Tnuieet : 



fi 



The nndenigMd Tramuer for the Wiaeoiistn Imtitate fbt the £du- 
eation of the Blind, would report that he has paid the following 
deaeribed ordan^ amoantinf to the flam of $8»t6l 99 

Aad that he has receired for the aeoonnt of aaid Institate, 
aoMMiBt on hand Dee. 81, 1856 587 51 

▲mount fipom State Treasarer. 5^008 80 

Anovnt fiwn TmaleeB Feb. 16, 1857 8,500 00 

Sjm 51 

Leairiaf doe me $154 11 



Jaaearille, March 98, 1857. 



S. W. SMITH, 

TVeasurer^ 



Date. 



1856. 
Feb. 10, 
Jol^lO, 

▲vg. 9, 
▲«g. % 



118 
375 



To whom paid. 



J,lf.AldeiiACk>..... 
BCiOa d( Loekwood.. . . 



418 Fat. Fituerald.. 

419 JameaOuuea... 
491 
441 
458 



Intereai 



583 



OharleiRiehards 

Milk^Loekwood,...! 5 19 
T. Z. Bvek 



For what paid. 



Brick 

Btdldinff SzpensM. 

....do.....f. 

....do 

....do..., 

• • • • U w .... •••• •••< 

....do 



Ammuit. 



f79 80 
05 88 
17 81 
16 35 
9 19 
105 19 
100 



.Appendix 


5 — condoued. 




,l-id. 


iDtBT. 


For what paid. 


AjDOODt. 






Building EzpexsM... 


•4 50 


A 


4B3 

set 
s'w' 

,9 66 


10 00 










....do 

....do 

':"do:"*::::::::::: 


103 61 


ie«n 

lirood.... 


65 67 
103 33 




7600 


kvood.... 


393 


....do 


109 99 




:;:::; 


,„.do 

....do 

....do 

....do 


60 61 
100 00 
100 00 
111 34 
450 






Bailding Ezpeiuee 

C«m«geHire 

M«t 

Building Eipensea..,. 




ItoMgU... 

Ddmui... 




' 6300 
18 00 
23 09^ 








^^e"'" 




do 

....do 


> 51 9C 
9 00 




"bh& 


...JdO.-.J.. .......... 

■■::3!:r::::::::::: 


6 00> 




It ffl 









3».7tA 
33 00 






ci. .*«:... .-■....;.. 
....do 

stores and Bardware. 
Building ExpemB^.. 


181 «* 

36 00 
135 16 






34 46 




B 11 


308 11 














30 00 












323 

'3'72" 
3 72 
3 75 
a '75 




ssas 


Standard. 

B, Secret' J 
Icwood... 


SecretATT'B SerricaB.. . 
BuildiBgEipensea... 

::::do::::."""".'i:: 

BuS^;^^:: 

:;:t;:;;:;::-;::; 
Brtex":: ::;:;. ::r:;; 


MOO 
103 73 








lioe4s 




j .^ 








,4,flc.... 


...".. 










ft:::::::: 







ii 



wf/^T^^j^ JB^(MhtiAtted. 



!Daie. 



1856. 




6, 
6, 
6, 
>e6. 6, 
Bee. 13, 
Dec. 13» 
Jtec. 12, 
Dec, ^; 
Dec. 20, 
Dec. 20, 
Dec. 20, 
Dec. 20, 
Dec. 20, 
Dec. 1, 
1857, 
Jan. 8, 
Jan. 9, 
Jan. 10, 
Feb. 10, 
Feb. 10, 
Feb. 10, 
Feb. 10, 
Feb. 10, 
Feb. 10, 
Feb. 11, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 
Feb. 14, 



I 

I 



dSrHnme 



>S4 
35 

637 
38 
39 

64a 

jB42 
643 

644 
1645 
j&46 
647 
iS48 
/650 
652 

i654 
;655 
«656 
657 
658 
659 
660 
661 

662 
663 
664 
665 
666 
667 
668 
669 
670 
671 
672 
673 
674 
675 
676 
677 
678 
679 
681 
682 
683 
684 
685 
686 
687 



tlo 'Witom paid. 



Norton A Lat^rence.. 
J. "M'. 6ixnth.. ....,.'. 

J. Jl» Wood. .'»....'.. 

J.F.WHUtfd 

George Qi'et 

R. Brand ft Oo...... 

O.J. Dearborn 

J. M. Riker..., 

WmRTrippe...... 

D.Y. K^jon -I-, 

T.Z.Bnfet.. 

Wm.H.Tritt|)e. 

Moseley A Bro 

J. F. WiUard 



BarPDW, Secreitarr. . - . 
a. W, Smith, for Diect, 

George (Jrey -. 

Mills A; liockwood*. . . 

AOo 

Mills <& Lodrwood,. . . 

J. F.WUlard 

William Wilson 

Miss M.E. Hand 

W . M. Churchman ... . 
MiasE. M.OariiflB.... 
W. M. Ohurchman.... 
RoeweUHill 



J. O.Clair 

R. S. Burdick 

PixlejifeEimbaU. 

Jacob Jones. 

Rice & Osborne . . . 

L. Doyle 

Daniel Scanlin. . . . 
James Nesbit . . . . , 
William Nesbit... 



Thomas Thornton . . . . 

Andrew Keckle , 

R. 0. Bent. 

E. W. Hovey 

do 

R.Hill 

J. Sutherland A Co.., 

John R. Beale 

Babcock A Foord 

Wm. Ohapin 

E. Heller 

N.F.Lund 

M. C.Smith «fe Co.... 
Democratic Standard.. 
T. B, Woolliacioft.... 
Morse A Martin 



Ikter. 



T* 

■h ■ 



2-'6^' 



2 "69* 



10 50 



For tf hat paid. 



2 Espys for Ohimt^eTn. 

Groceries *.. 

Hardware... ... ..... 

Bal. of Services 

Painting 

Furniture. 1.... ..... 

Cfarpets, <j^c« 

Hafrnees, Ac . .. . — 

Bal. of Services 

Repeins on Infititate. 
0se Horse A Wagon. 

BaL for Horse 

Day Book A Ledger. 

Soap, Oats, Ac 

Sahuy. 

Loan 

Building Expenses.. 

Work on House 

DrawingfPlans 

Building Expenses,. . 

Store Hog 

Milk 

Services as Teacher.. 
Senr. as Music Teacher 
Services as Matron.. . 
Services as Superinten. 
Building Expenses . . 



....do 

....do 

..-.do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

Wages 

Meat 

Flour 

Merchandize 

Blacksmithing 

Stationery 

Buffalo RobM 

Merchandize 

Lime 

Flour 

Copying 

Merchandize 

Advertising. 

Crackers and Bread 
Furniture 



Amntikt. 



91 



•96 

lis 

42 93 

'10 81 

1^ 

HW 

6«0 

S8r^ 

510 ««► 

!>3«9 

4'«0 

10 W 

130 93 

6 00 

7 72 

18 75 
75 00 
83 33 

250 00 
10 10 

12 34 
33 00 
28 74 
51 19 
25 00 
33 18 
10 00 

12 00 
14 37 

13 52 
144 00 
146 28 

20 46 
25 94 
9 43 
36 85 
16 00 
91 06 

19 20 
30 77 
25 00 
46 84 

3 50 
13 84 
63 25 



9a 



appendix .B-^-continued. 



Date. 

1»7. 
F«b. 14, 

7eb. 14, 
7«b. 14, 
Peb. 14, 
Peb, 14, 
7eb. 14, 
7eb. 14, 
7eb. 14, 
Fab. 14, 
Peb. 14, 
7»b. 16, 
lUr.ll, 
Mar. Jl, 
Mar. 11, 
Mar.U, 
Mar. 11, 
Mar. 16, 
Mar. 28, 



688 

689 
690 
691 
692 
693 
694 
695 
696 
697 
698 
702 
703 
704 
705 
706 
707 
708 
709 



To vlioni paid. 



J5. Mahonj. . . • . ^ . . . 

J. & J. Bradahaw 

U. Story 

Penii. Blind InBtitnte, 

P. A. Pierce 

Madison Exp... 

tT. M.Smith 

Perkin BJind Institote 

Joseph Church 

Penn, Blind InBtitate, 

W. H. Ohorchman 

E. Lamoin 

McKey ABro 

Wood <b Moon 

Free Preas..,.. 

Ira Miltimoro 

Ezp.Madi8on, Barrows 

Edwin Kield 

I. MilUmore 



Inter, 



' • " - 



For what paid. 



Moaic 

Feathers. 

Sleiffh 

Books 

Milk and Batter 

Madifloii Expenses..., 

Groceries , 

Books 

SOOordsWood. 

Beads. ..« 

Ineidentel, 

Building Expenses... 

Merchandize 

Lirery •, 

Advertising, <fcc.. .... 

Madison Expenses.. . 

do •. 

Potatoes. 

Expenses to Chicago . 



Amonat 



•9509 
62 30 
900 
53 50 
€7 50 
64 50 

158 94 
50 24 

895 00 
34 14 

100 93 

90 as 

24 50 
13 00 
650 
950 
10 00 
31 25 
20 00 

f 8,161 02 



I .J 



• ' \ v'.' 



• 1* 



'I 



• ^ 



APPENDIX C. t ' 



>« ■ 1 



• Rcrport of Wm. A^ Lawience, TreabBuror of Wisconsin In- 
siitute for the Bducatioh of the Blind, to 1st October, 1857, 
showing his receipts and disbursements, from his appoint- 
m^nt to said date, 8r$ such. Treasurer, to wit : 



ji* » 



Receipts. 



April 8, 
Aiffil33, 
l&f 18, 

June. 24, 

Aog. n. 



By loan from OeDtnd Bflcnk of WiaooDain, 

do. do;' do. do* < 

By ap|m^>fiation in part) aold Btate Bank of 

WiieoiMii], ftlOiOOO at90e., 

t»Mld Oentra] Bank 



By appropriation in part» Mid i 
of Wuconsin, MOOaaitfSe., 
By appfoprlation in pavt^ sold ( 



approp] 
6fl^» 



Central Bank 



iBOonaiD, $3,000 at S9o., 



$9,000 00 
9^)00 00 

9,000 W) 

1340 00 

31,760 00 



18,600 00 



•***- 



•yti I j .iii»«iii ) 



It • 



Disbursements. 



Bicte. 



VSb, 10, 
?eK 10, 
3*66. 10, 
Feb. 10, 
¥e}>. 10, 
Mar. 98, 
Mar. 98, 
Mar. 98, 
Mar. 98, 
Mar, 98. 
Mar. 98, 
Mar. 98, 




485 Charles Ricliards,. 

498 Jno. Knight^ ^ 

499 Pat McQIooB, 1. 

68(^ E.H. Strong, ..... 
554 James O'Connor^ . . 
556 A. K. AUen,..., . . 

710 8. C. Bumham,... 

711 P. L. Smith <fr Co. 
719 R.H. Bent,-..: 

713 W. H. Chnrchman, 

714 „-.do 

715 ^,..do 1..., 



Bnilding ezpenaeSi 

do ?. 

Postage, .«...,...,•.. 

Building ej^penaeBf... 
Groceries, ^j. ..... ^ ^ . -'-. 

Cow, ' 

Carriage,^ 

Meat, ..w. 

Incidental expensea,. l 

Piano, 

Honae fvuTiiture,. ...*•. 



Amount, 



"*.♦" 



^ 9 18 

5 50 

5 5i6 

9 33 

4 13 

189 

40 00 

925 Od 

58 67 

100 36 

960 00 

341 56 



24 



Appendix C--continued. 



Date. 



1857. 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 28. 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 26, 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. 28, 
Mar. ^ 
April 22, 
AMI 22, 
April 22, 
April 22. 
April 22, 
April 22, 
April 22, 
April 22, 
April 22, 
April 22, 
AprU 22, 
April 22, 
April 22, 
April 22, 
April 18, 



t 



April 27, 
April 27, 
i^Mmj 4. 
May 4, 
May 4, 
May 23, 
May 23, 
June 1, 
Jnse 2, 
June 
June 
June 6, 
June 6. 
June 6, 
J^nnci 6, 
Jtizie 8, 
Jtiiie 8. 

Jnse 8, 
11116 8, 
June 8, 

JtZDC 8, 

June , 8, 
June 8, 
Juhq 8, 
June 8, 



716 
717 
718 
719 
720 
721 
722 
723 
724 
725 
726 
727 
728 
799 
730 
731 
732 
733 
734 
735 
736 
737 
738 
73» 
740 

741 
C99 

700 

701 

742 

743 

7441 

745 

746 

747 

748 

749 

750 

751 

752 

753 

754 

755 

fOtr 

757 

758 



To whom paid. 



•«•»*&» 



E. W. HoTcy, 

Williston & Lakin, 

8. Antisdel, 

E. W. Hovey 

J.F. Peaae, 

— Blockhurst,. 

L. DayiB, 

W. H. Churchman 

MiflB E. M. OartiB, ...... 

Mifls M. E.Hand, 

Mrs. M. M. Ohurchman, . 
S^reteryof the Board,.. 
S. W.Smith, Treasurer,.. 

M. Stockmao, 

Treasurer,... ,.,. 

do 

W. H. Ohurchman. 

Ogilyie & Barrows, 

L. J. Barrows, 

D. Y. Kenyon, - , . . 

E.K. Strong 

American Bible Society,. 

L. Davis, 

Henry Hurlbert, 

I. M, Smith,. ,.. .ht.« .... 
W. H. Churchman, 
Treasurer, f 1,000 loan. «(iui 

interest, $17 50, 

Treasarer^ 

....do... 

E.W. Hovey, 

J. W. Story, 

Treasurer, 

Ira Miltimore, 

.... do 

E. Lamoin, 

R. W.Davis, 

J. H. Vennilye, 

Wm. Nolling 

James Mills 

R. W. Davis, 

E. Lamoin , 

Wm. NoUing, 

Henry Thornton,... 

I.M.Smith, ^ 

Secretaiy, 

R. C. Bent, 



For what paid. 



Flour and eggs,. 

Groceries* 

Proyiaions, 

Hama, 



•• ^« 



Tuning Pianos, 

.....do 

Sawing wood,, 
fiaknr, 

do 

....do 

....do :.; 

Balance due Treasozy, 

Wood, -* 

Interest on loans, 

....do 

IncidenUl flxpeneM, . . 

Mdze, 

Med. attendance. 

Repaira, 

Postage, 

Raised Bibles, 

liabipr, 

Painting, • 

GiiooerieBy ».••.. 

looi^BBtal 



Amomt. 



7591 H. A. Wheeler, 

760 

761 

762 

763 

764 



P. A; Pierce, 

Tim Jackroan, 

Iforton A Lawi^ence, . 
O. J. Dearborn <fe Co., 
W. H Churchman,... 



lioap^,*.. ..«...•• .. 

....d<>«^.^ ..... 

....do 

Provisions, 

Horse, 

Interest on note, 

Building expenses,. . . 

do 

do... 

....do 

Inaunkocei, 

Building ezpensei^. .. 

do 

....do..^ , 

do 

do ^..^ 

....do 

Groceries, 

Salary, .., 

Meat, — ..: 

Cement, ...:,... 

MUk, 

Furniture^ d;c., ,: 

Groceries, 

Mdae, *...... 

Incidental expeases,.. 



« 897 


130 49 


868 


29 46 


650 


800 


33 90 


950 00 


62 5ft 


37 50 


75 00 


5000 


154 11 


157 50 


65 00 


^50 


50 00 


19 11 


99 50 


550 


469 


8100 


U50 


1^ 


77 « 


83 00 


1017 50 


1000 00 


500 00 


1194 


200 00 


30 00 


900 00 


25 00 


400 


10 00 


45 00 


400 


300 00 
To 00 


400 


400 


900 00 


96 15 


SO 00 


IdOM 


3 75 


95 T4 


109 SO 


110 99 


499 


76 19 



25 



JippinlHa: C— C6tttfnu«d. 



^&te. 



1B57 . 
Jnse 9/ 
Jpne d, 
June 8, 
Jtine S, 
June 23, 
Juse 13, 
June 13> 
Jjme IS, 
Jnpe 16, 
Jqdo 20, 
Jnne 20. 
Jane 20, 
Jpne 20, 
Jtine' 20, 
June 90, 
June' 20, 
June 20, 
Jnne 20, 
Jnne 20, 
Jnne 30, 
Jnne 20, 
Jnne 20, 
Jnne 20, 
Jnne 25, 
June 27, 
Jnne 27. 
Jnne SJ7, 
Jane 27, 
Jnly 3, 



3, 
3, 
3, 
3, 

4, 

n, 
u, 
11, 



11, 
n, 
", 
n. 
11, 

18, 



J^uly 
Jnly 
July 
July 
July 
Jnly 
Jnly 

Jiily . 
Jnly 11, 
July 11, 

July 11. 
July 

July 
Jnly 
July 
Jnly 

Jnly . 
July^ 18, 
July 20, 
July 20. 
J^.99» 
July 25. 
July 25, 
July 27, 
Aug. 7, 



To whom paid. 



\ ' 



.765 

ff67 
768 
1769 



MT. H. Ohurcbm'An,- . 
MIbb E. M. Curtis, .. 
MiBB M. E. Han<), . . . 
F.J. Campbell,,,,,. 
James Mills, 



Wm, Nolling, .. 

'£. Lanmoin, ^ . 

do 

Ira Milthnore,.. 
8. C. Bumham,. 
Rees W. Daris, . 
Wm, tolling,. . 

E. Lamoin,.., 

Wm. H. Tripp, . 

James Mills 

E. W. Hoyer, .. 
H.W, Wheeler Ado. 



P. S. A S. F.Eldred, Lumber, 



7701 Rees Davis. 

771 

&7^ 

773 

^^74 
775 
776 
,777 
f778 
779 
780 
781 
782 
783 
784 
785 
786 
787 
788 
|789 
796 
791 
;7»2 
793 
794 
1795 
796 
|797 
798 
799 
860 
801 
862 
803 
804 
805 
806 
807 
808 
809 
810 
811 
812 



for what paid. 



■4f_4 ft< 



" •«"• •,•■• fe* ^ 



S»l8i7, 

--..do.^ 

BuUdlni ezp^nsea . . : « 

:!::t.::::::::::::: 

• « « a \MJ ■• «••• ««■« ••»« 

—.do., 

....do.. 



..-.do 

....do...... 

— do 

do.. •«.. 

.:..do 

Proyisions, . . 
Castings, Ac. 



815 
816 
817 
818 



F. 8. Lawrence,. 

J. A J. A.T{6e,..L. 

Babcock A Foord, 

Cen. Bank of 'Wisconsin . . . 

... \M,%J ...a ..... .1... ....I 

James Mills, '..:*. , 

Rees W. Davis, 

Wm. Nolling. 

E, Lamoin, '. 

Wm. H.Tripp...... 

James Mills, 

E. Lamoin, ..1 , 

Henry Thornton, 

.uO 1 

Rees W. Dav^s,* 

Wm Robinson, 

Ira Miltimore, 

James MillB, " 

Thos. M. Lynch, 

J.F. Wlllard, 

J. W. Hobson A Co., . 

F.Honack, 

Wm. H. Churchman. 

Ira Miltimore, , 

James Mills, 

Henry Thornton, 

(10 

Wm. Nolling, 

Rees Davis, 

....do ......^ 

....do ....'....••• ...... 

James Mills, 

Ira Miltimore. . . . .r-. . ^ 

Henry Thornton, , 

Pat Kelly, 

i4 



^ •* « 



• » *> 



Groceries, .*.,,. 
Repairs^....... 

Qas pipes, Ac., . 
Bank note, .... 

Building ezpenaes, .,. 
..-.do 

» . « . uo .. .... ||.«— ■*. 

'.'...do-..:.....:.-. 

....do... 

do.^..-.. 

.-do :,... 

....do J... 

..-.do..,^ :,-. 

....do..: 

. . . , UO ....... .4— « ... 

do,> 

....do 

Meat, 

Butter, Ac.j 

Lim^, ' 

Services 

Suudries, 

Building expenses... 
do 



....do. 
....do. 
....do. 
.-..do, 
....do. 
....do. 
....do. 
.-..do. 
....do. 
....do. 



Amount, 



r4r- 



iteo 00 

37 50 

75 00 

700 00 

10 op 

800 

200 

6 75 

35 00 

•' 10 00 

10 00 

4 00 

4 00. 
22.00 

200.00. 

12 0^ 
50 45: 
23 32 
56 69 

5 JS 
100 00 

2,000 00 

8,000 00 

250 00. 

10 00. 

4 00. 

4 06. 

50 00 

550 00 

13 00 
100' 00 
100 00 

XOOO 

'40 00. 

30 00 

175 00 . 

56 43 

23 35 

19 50 

89 00 

143 77 

150 00 

100 00 

100 00 

50 00 

6 65 
10 00 

t 10 00 
50 00 
50 00 

saoo 

50 00 
1 12 



^j^mdix C— cootiQued. 



To whom paid. 


Foi what paid. 


Amonat. 


[. OboTchnuui 


Traveliiig with popih, 

Printiag, 

Toning pi«DO, 


«49 97 


rsticSUndani 


800 


loll, ,. . 






Flour and re«d, 














Building eip«Dsee,... 




C. RR.O0., 

limball, .... 


U40 
13 » 


tF.dDL.E.R.O(.,.. 


....do 


98 


riwrnton, 

Mills, 


....do 

....ao 


XOO W 
485 00 


Millfc 

ThnrntoD 


....do 

....do 


100 00 
&0 00 


Itimore. 

J: Tripp 


....do 

....do 

.do 


1S5 0D 
15 00 
IS 00 




do.. 


as 00 


rolling, 




600 








Voaburgh A Oo., ..„ 


....do 


14 00 


























WhedockACo., 


....do 


3124 




Broom machine, 

Traveling expensea, .. 
Sanrond te^, 




Jd. Miner 4 Co.. 


117 83 
El Si 


r.':o*?sK..d 


50 00 








i 


ie.600 00 



Oct. 1,1857, To balance on hand, (SO 9 

WM. A. LAWRENCE, Tnasurtr. 

Janesville, Wis., October 1, 1857. 



' H 



.'t 



APPENDIX D. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 

To the Board of TYusiees: 

■ I t 
Gentlemen — The following summary of the operations of 

the Institute, in its educational and* domestic departments, 
with the accompanying remarks and suggestions, is respect- 
fully submitted as the Eighth Annual Report of the Superin- 
tendent: 

It is not without a profound sense of gratitude to the me|^- 
eiilil Dispenser of all good, for his protecting care over our 
numerous household, that we find ourselyes able to jeport au 
almost complete exemption from sickness on the part of both 
officers and pupils, no case of protracted illness having oc- 
curred during the past year. This, in view of all the circum- 
stances, n^ay justly be deemed remarkable ; particularly when 
we consider the known predisposition of a large proportion 
of the blind, as a class, to physical ailments. The crowde4 
state of our limited apartments, combined with other causes 
existing in the past, rendered us peculiarly liable to indispo- 
8ition« But, thanks to the enlightened liberality of the last 
Legislature, most of these obstacles have been removed, and 
a brighter day now dawns upon our enterprise:^ 

The number of pupils received during the last session was 
twenty, — ten males and ten fcmiales. Of these, one was from 



28 

Rock county, two from Walworth, two from Milwaukee, two 
from Kenosha, four from Jefferson, two from Dane, three from 
Dodge, two from Fond du Lac, one from Waupaca, and one 
from Columbia. A catalogue of their names, showing the 
residence and other particulars of each, will be found appen- 
ded hereto. Eighteen of those admitted remained until the 
close of the school in July ; the other two — George Ross, from 
Jefferson county, and M are^ Beandreau, from Fond du Lfac 
— proving restive under the wholesome restraints thrown 
around them by the necessary disciplinary regulations of the 
institution, and preferring idleness to industry, returned to 
their friends, after a few weeks stay with us. As they were 
both possessed of good natural ability, and capable of bei^g 
trained to usefulness and honorable independence, it was a 
source of deep regret to us that they should thus cast from 
'them the proffered benefits of the institution. 

Concerning those who remained with us up to the close of 
the session, we are most happy in being able to assure you 
that they entertained an appreciative sense of the privileges of- 
fered by the Institute, and manifested a praiseworthy anxiety 
to improve them to the utmost of their ability. It need hardly 
t>e added that their progress was in consequence most satis* 
factory. 

With the enlarged accommodations afforded by the im- 
provements made upon the building during the past summer, 
we will be enabled to receive more than double the number 
heretofore in attendance; and much pains has been taken to 
'bring this fact to the knowledge of the friends of the blind 
throughout the State. We have reason to expect, therefore, 
that there will be a considerable increase in our number du- 
ring the next session, which will commence on the 5th inst 

With a view to extend a knowledge of the Institute, and 
its readiness to receive pupils from any and all parts of the 
State, a circular was prepared, and handed to our city papers, 
which, together with many others, gave it a gratuitous inser- 



i9 

tioI^, For this act of pourtesy, ojft the part of the press of the 
Stti^, the thanks. of the Institute are due. ..To the same end, 
it waa, deemed advisable for the undersigned to visit certain 
Sections of the State in persojn ; and therefore a tour of the 
coijint^es of Kenosha, Racine, Milwaukee, Waukesha, Dane, 
Cplumbia, Marquette, Waushara, Winnebagjo, Qutagami^ 
Bi;ow;n. Waupaca, Portage s^d Adams was made, in the 
months of July and August . The Professor of Music and 
the Matron^ together with nine of our pupils,, accompanying 
me to the cities of Milwaukee, Racine and Kenosha, we gave 
in. ^ach place a public exhibition and concert, for the purpose 
<)f showing in a practical way the scholastic attainments of 
whii^b the blind are capable. These jsntert^inm^ts gave to 
many of our citisjehs, who might n^ver fiud it convenient to, 
visi(. thp Instiipte, an opportunity, of witnessing the fruits, of 
the I Stc^te'js beneficence, and were everywhere greeted witl^ 
hearty manifestations of pleasure., 

Much fatui;e good might be effected through similar visite 
with a f<^w pf ouj^ pupils, to other parts of 'the State; a^d s^o 
f^ afl the means Qntrusted to yoiur ch^ge will justify the ez>. 
penditure, the plan is earnestly, recommended, aapne of the 
most e^cient agencies that can b^ employed for bnnging 
within the walls of the Institute the unfortunates for whose 
amelipration we are laboring, as . well as for in^urmg a con- 
tiji^uance of the confidence and support of the public. 

Ijtithe tour, referred to, it was presumed that much aid in 
the matter of ascertaining the residences of the Blind would 
be derived, from a law passed by the last Legislature, requir- 
ing certain returns to be made, to the county clerk ; but the 
v;ery . ip^perfect manner in whi^^h the provisions of this, act 
were carried out by the parties concerned, xendered it a nul- 
UtjF,&r this year at least The hope is indulged, however, 
ihf£ifi6ise gtt^jition will be given it hereafter, as its design her* 
cpifiL^p better under8tp.9d. ,.,.„. 

Of the fidelity of the officers who are asi^ociated with me 



30 
t 
in the conduct of the several departments of the Institate, it 

affords me great pleasure to be able to bear most &yorable 
testimony. They seem^ with one accord, to be actuated by 
that true spirit of disinterested benevolence, which consUtates 
one of the most important qualifications for a work like oms. 
The mere ability to impart knowledge in the school, or to 
manage affairs with system and economy in the household 
department, however important in itself, forms by no means 
the only or highest test of competency for the position of an 
officer in such aii institutf m. There are qualifications para- 
mount to this, which are necessary to all, no matter what the 
department iii which they are engaged They must possess 
hearts which will enable them to put away selfish considera- 
tions, and devote themselves to the work with a true mission- 
ary spirit In a word, they must become Yather, mother, 
brother and sister, to the afflicted ones confided to their 
care. It is theirs, not only to minister to the physical neces* 
sities of their charge, and to store the mind with knowledge, 
but likewise to labor with the will and the affections — to 
throw around them such influences as will lure them from 
the temptations of evil ; fortify them against those eccentrici- 
ties of thought and feeling, those uncomely attitudes and 
manners to which the untutored blind are so lamentably 
prone ; and develop those higher traits of character which 
distinguish the sterling man or woman from the aimless, lack- 
energy drone whose unearned bread is filched from the larder 
of honest industry. This is the only kind of training that 
will set the Blind upon their feet and cause them to ^ rejoice 
as a strong man to run a race." 

On the first of April last, Mr. F. J. Campbell, referred to in 
my last report as being chosen for the post of instructor in 
music, entered upon the duties of his charge ; and judginig 
from the success attending his labors thus far, will doubtless 
prove a very acceptable teacher — ^he brings to his work several 
years experience in a similar position. 



31 

Mr. C. A. Nels6n, late of {fie Indiana Institute for the edii- 
cation 6^ the BUnd^ has been appointed to the charge of the' 
handicraft department^ and will enter upon duty by the begin- 
ning of the next session. He also has several years experience 
in Ws vocation. ' • - **' 

These two gentleiiien, with Miss E. M; Curtis; continued as 
matron, and Miss M. E. Hand as assii^nt teacher, will form 
our corps of assisting officers for the ensuing session. 

In the School Department, much the same routine has 
been pursued as was reported last year. The branches stud- 
ied are spelling and definitions, reading, writing, arithmetic j 
geography, grammar and algebra. In alll these, commendable 
progress was mad^; 'but especiat 'credit Is due to the first class 
in algebra, for the advancement made in that science, and to 
the class of younger pupils, who entered 'school at the begin- 
ning of thie session without the knowledge of a single letter, 
and yet became very fair readers by fts close. The progress 
male l^y &ese two classes would do credit to any school ot 
persK^hs possessing all of their faculties. 

During the next session, other branches will be introduced, 
as the scholars are prepared for ' them. Such ias geometry, 
natural philosophy, history, &o.' 

The study of geography has been somewhat retarded by 
the want of apparatus ; but we have ordered a globe and 
complete set of maps which, when received, will greatly fa- 
cilitate thb instruction in this science. 

In the Music Departinent, considerable advancement has 
been made^, both in the vocal anil' istrumental classes. 

The entire school have attended the exercises in singing, 
while nearly alt^have received more or less instruction upon 
Uie ^iano forte ; and though much bt the time has necessaifljf 
been devoted to th^ elements, they have nevertheless learned 
to perform iii a creditable mann^ a choice variety of piano 
jSFdtos, songs,^ duetts, trios,' quariettes, glees, choruss^, &C. 

Appiropriate instruments for a small brass band have been 



32 

ordered from the East^ and we l^ppe to receive them ear^ in 
the session^ so that a timely commeBcement may be made in 
this very desirable part of their musical, instiuction. 

Quite a number of our scholars evince such a degree of 
musical talent as warrants the belief, that with proper train.- 
ing^ they may become -suecessfiilteacl^rs, organists and oom- 
pos^a It is our plan, Aerefore, iq give sucb^ eyery facility 
for improvement, th^t can be afforded; for of all the intellec* 
tual pursuit^ engaged in by the Blind, the profession of music 
s\ippli^s the greater number with an available means of self 
maintenance. It hardly need be added that to prepare them, 
however, for successful competition with well qualified seeing 
teachers in this Apartment, much time, must be spent la 
st^u^y a^d practiccr^ whic|^ presupppses a corresponding out* 
lay for instruction aiyl instruments. As to the matter of in- 
struction, Qur resouTf ef,. are ample for the present-, but we 
greatly^n^ed an oig^n apd more piano fortes, of which latter 
instrument we now hf^e,p|ily two. It is eamea|^y hjQ|»e4f 
therefore, that you will, s^t ^he pearliest practicable d^te, snpjdy 
this important necessity. ,,;... 

There m^ \t, jhos^^W;Uo^^i^ould.j,lpok upon the requisite 
expenditure for the proper support of .t}ais department of the 
InstitTxte, as injudicio,i;is, but we would not have such unier- 
Tate the ipipor^yjce ^of miisic.in ^e education of tl^e Blind, 
Be it what it ma|y to, the seeing,, it i^ to those who are shiU 
out from the visible beaiities^of ore^tic|q, ai}.^ inya^uable ac- 
complishmentj ^he^heir \Y<^ regard it ^s an pajlalj|ie pieansof 
obtaining an honorabj^e ind€;pendencp, or as a reQner of the 
affections, and a .source ^pf .innocent , recreation. As the visi- 
ble world, with all its ^lepsing varieties of form,, its endl^ 
^e^binations, and be^utffiU blendings of light and shad^ is 
fo |he soul that is pern^Ued to look out V|pyn.)iV ^^ ^^ i^ 
refining, najr^ |ts , regenerating influences, so . i^ ,^9, world of 
soi^pd to hi^ who isdenied^tl^e conteny>lationt of j^^e be^^- 
tieg,: In ihp varied , strewn ^f wArblii>jj,jnelo(Jyj;MU,. winds 



S3 



.n 



its w^7 11^ gn^oofol meanderings to the 4f ep reoBsses of his^ 
0oul, x>x. of ncib ^and boundless hannony^ as it swells and 
rolls its i>onipoas tide around him> he finds a sqlace and com«- 
pensation for the absent joys of sight Consequently, the 
educated h^nd musician becomes, enthfisiastic in his admira^- 
tion of the science and art of music ^ Secluded ever from 
the joys of vision, he seeks for consolation here. Oft, in the 
pensive musings of his active mind, when lonely and retired, 
he contemplates the excellence of music, and seeks the 
80i:^rces of its powerful charms^ He runs through the nice 
gradations and minute divisions of its scale, and fancies an 
unlimited extent, in gravity and acuteness, beyond the reach 
of all perception — thence he traverses the rich and devious 
maze of combinations which result from harmony and all ite 
complicated evolutions— th^ soft and loud, the mingling light 
and shade of music — the swelling and decreasing tones, 
which form the Wisd tracery and fading tints of just pn>S; 
pective — all are to him, the body, color, strength and outline,, 
which compose the vivid picture his imagination has created* 
He ponders next upon the various sounds produced in na- 
ture— ffom the soft and balmy whisper of the veral breeze to 
the loii^ pealings of the deep-toned thunder, heard amid the 
wailings of the fircely raging storm. Lost in the tumidt of 
his strong emotion?, he ex;claiips : — ^ What is there in the wide 
creation so sublime, magnificent, or bciafitiful, as sound ? ' ^' 

}xi the department of Handicraft, no^ifjjpg has yet been dona- 
by. the males, in consequence of our wimt/of roem £s>i; work- 
ahqpe, aqd lack of iqoans for the emf^ymi^nt of an, inntniie- . 
toor,ppurchase.pf t4ol% 4v^ Aimogev^nts aie.now being, 
made, l^o^ever, ^rceom^^ing the tiaddiiof broem^making^ 
as .^ ^niybri^y ifraq^ . J^ldlng h^M^oie iiMe<) for dattealio 
purposes has jf^ ^^ VMPl^d; Thia, Iheitth amall, witt^^aa- 
»ver present ]>ttrppses fottfEi^cM hmnffc^pohsn of,.bui irta 
Ii0t.admit.i9f,o«vj|%)|ip^ r :ji ', / . 

In view of the great and obvious importance of manual 
is 



54 

labor to a very large class of those who will look to us for 
that practical education which is to fit them for' honorable in- ' 
dependence, it is hoped that your Board will urge upon the 
next Legislature the great importance of making an appro- 
priation for the erection of a suitable, permanent building for 
work-shops, and providing it With the necessary fixtures, so 
that ii may be occupied by anothfer year. Too much time, 
for the welfore of the pupils, has already passed without the * 

r * 

organization o( this department 

The female pupils, under the instruction of the Matron," 
have worked some thi'ee hours of each day during the past 
year at plain sewing, knitting and fancy work in beads, tc 
The articles fabricated were alike creditable to both instructor 
and learners, and found ready sala This division of the 
work department xHUof course be continued as heretofore. 

The household affairs, under the immediate direction of 
our efficient Matron, ha\' e been'managed very judiciously by 
that officer, and she i$ liher^ore eilfitled tb the continued Con- 
fidence of your Board. • . ' 

* While our scarcity of room,* fend consequent lack of maLny 
of even the most common' appliances and conveniences of^ 
such an establishment, have hitherto pro^d a serious iihpedi-' 
ment to our progress in all the departments, there is probably 
no other that will be so greatly benefitted as die domestic, by 
the occfftpancy of the* additional rooms just finished fn the 
central part and east wing of our building. We nbw have 
more comfortable donliitdries and sitting rooms for boA offi- 
cers and pupils, as wfeU as domestics ; a laiger and more con- 
venient kitehen and dining room;' a W6H afrranged laundry 
and ironing room; and am^er arrM^em^Bts for warm and 
oodd bathing; all t>f whieih are cAl^latisd, not only to pro- 
mole the healthi tttid eomfbrt of the iKimsehoIcl, but Ukewise 
to^syalimiie and fteMfatethe donieMe dperati<m& 

l^e n^iperior gfnt^ of urarmUg jiM' intiodiiced, mtiM 
also prove a valuable acqutfiitibn tDOttl* MMt df domestie ap^'* 



35 

ptiaaces, not alone for its convenience and healthfalness, but 
VkwdKf^wwMMM dtiitv «aiet7)ta4ie^\i!fliiD9 aaid:iuiiBMi, /r 
and tb» eompitatitfety Miall amoaiit of labov invohrdd iflkkam) 
mooagementr ■ n .j'V 

With the ocbtm^latM intiroduotibnl ofiigia light, and the • ) 
completion of the hospital rooms/irith their ptuftnbing fiz^ . i 
tmosi for bsthiag^^ft&y om instit»tioD, though smaller thatt 
aome, will: yields la iione other in the couatry la, the niatlcr of.*).) 
doMeolic ooiivanlences. • . j 

Ta the uninitiated in the practical details of the'inaniige- -^a 
laemt of such an eatablighaaeat, it may seem that too laaeh >i- > 
aCrees is here laid upon the importance of what /Aey might) / 
deeria mattais'of 'seqaBdary consnLsration. If sor^ wa b^. toi' 
aaann them bhat one short lesson in the school, of experiance . ^) 
would flbateni^ ohange their views upon the subject 'They *J 
iroaddtoeoi'diseelrer that Uie relation which thts' department i 
holds: to theother^ is like that whijch exists between body ^ 
andknsouL ' Derange the functions of the one, and the/othec^rf 
beaamesthe prbieipal aufferen: • ..• " ii 

Not the least of the advfantagesr to "be derired^ from ooriii 
aopaentadon oflmiUing accommodations^ iis theimore can-' 
plele siiaoe8amth.arhiehithe-disoiplinqTy regime maybe ad-- c 
miBisteifd; Kd fittle diffloulty has been experidncied bitheilo. '• i 
m tUaTCgendyiirhibh was iuisepaiable from the crowded stale m 
of tkai^BT^AMnas obeupied We feel constiained to say, hdw^i * > 
ever^ whfifo vpoa tins sabjeot^-^^and it is a source of mmb oj 
pleasure to be able to do so — ^that a very marked improMre* « «' 
aaesrt^was TisiUe befooie the dose of the last wssiosL YoU 
aeediun he told dnt thereteodsted an mgeotneoesaitytftMr thaoi 
ettfreeeneatt of iMnr and wholesome regolatiiHiSyiiarda |Ml h. 
Mad any anli|^ismnent'aa to the caliseL ^ b >i> 

It fuMtbaeaour. desire that tha pupiis should attftid ngn&vr^ 
laily a^fSB dsrine serTi<^9 at jriaces selected by tbemsalvMjid 
er Iheir Meada) Ibitt the dislancaof darfeoaiiim fi^nk the clty^ff) 
is sikoh'aaia fltthaijt infpiaaticliblalhfbad weMhfa«^> 



Si 



) ' 



To. ttunt thii diffietilly. Ire have wi MvAal woaMWit invited ^ 
our eitjr olergjrmen to hold lenrkes mk BMnA aftemadBa. 
This call has been cheerfully and promptly anaveied tajr 
them, and the acknowledgments of tho 'kmmhold for tha 
kindness are hereby tendered. 

As we now hare a good room in the huiUivgiflnr Ihe pxa^ 
poab, we design, so far as practicable^ to have f^kr senrioes 
on Sunday afternoons during the session, which wili be opes 
lo such others out of the Institute as may see fit to akteadl 
Clei^gymen from different denominaiaoiis will of comae be iii>- 
▼ited to officiate. 

While we are free to admit that the i»i»aTemeiita made ' 
this year place our institution in a far better ooiidiitioD ow 
that of any former time, we cannot forbear to expcesa.tfae jm^ 
gret that the buildings and grounds could not iMTe been fiUly 
completed according to the plans adopted, and aUo the eameaf ' 
hope that your Board wUi feel the impoitiinee of aiging npoil 
ttie Legislature the necessity of a suflteieiit afprop r iatiettts^- .' 
finish all at the earliest practicable dasia ; ' ^ -^ 

Tkoogh some oi the uoifinislied postbhb eT tfie baildiBg' ' 
are much needed, perhaps the most ptessiag'wmiA now, it '- 
the erection of the portico and verandkUs, and tKe iihfMra^ i: 
ment of the grounds ; for, without diese, the bdild|hgijo'dafll» n i 
cnlt of access, and there is butlittfe nilprirtimiry fat thmpftiiili '^' 
to ekaroise freely in the open mf uponf the pie mi se s } eMrfar vbl v^ 
good or )md weather. t ii ' 

I cannot close this* communication wMhbut ek^ressi^g/tha <: 
honek cbnyietion that you have ahmidadt tsKbab^tat^tbtifful^ -« 
nlatiirg yisuiaelrea and the puhlio ujpen'the pnMbt tmrniUni - 
and prospects of the noble^^ enlterpMeg cornijMtaJnlo i3!^ir 
gnaidiatishipi At no time aiocb itS'feonmibnsemwrt^hag' M 
enjoycid in so great a degree the confiflUnice of .the^peoi^ ff^f'i 
thcP^lBtate, as is shown bytbeincgraalBi|g«iilsi»A infill aioM* w 
ewmf^hm^ tednifetted, Ud the gwUpnistetof^ofmpiiMsdmaite 
lor a participation in the blessings which it dtspensos. Its 



37 

stately edifice is rapidly drawing towards completion, and 
the time is at hand, when erery citizen who rejoices in the 
progress of education, or who has a heart attuned to christian 
loTe and sympathy, will ezultingly point to it, as one of the 
proudest monuments of the enlightened liberality of his native 
or adopted State. 

In conclusion, allow me, gentlemen, to tender to you my 
grateful acknowledgpients, for i\x^ pniform courtesy and ki 
eonsideration shown me during the past year, together 
your continued manifestations of confidence ; it affords me 
much gratification, to know that our association as co-laborers 
in a most us^l and interesting 'cause, has been marked by 
unyarying harmony of sentiment, intercourse and action. To 
, continue to ment your kindness and confidence shall still bei 
ae It has been, my most earnest endeavor. 



i» I 



Respectfully submitted, 

W. a CHURCHMAN, 
Janesville, Oct' I, 1657. Superintendent 



'«) 



.-1 



1. 



. I 



APPENDIX E. 



r ■ 



LIST OF NEWSPAPERS, 

F'or the following papers^ which are sent to us gratuitoiuif 
by their respective proprietors^ the acknowledgments of 
loBtitute are hereby tendered : 

JanesviUe Morning Gazette, Janesville, 

Weekly Democratic Standard^, Js^esville^ 

Milwaukee Weekly Sentinel, Milwaukee, 

Daily Wisconsin, Milwaukee, 

Daily Argus and Democrat, Madison, 

Wisconsin State Journal, Madison, 

Beloit Journal, Beloit, 

Badger State, Portage City, 

Kenosha Tribune and Telegraph, Kenosha, 

Racine Daily Journal, Racine^ 

Appleton Crescent, Appleton, 

Monroe Sentinel, Monroa 



» « , 



APPENDIX F. 



CATALOGUE OF PUPILS 



Received during the Session ending Jufy 29M, 1857. 



V 



ITd 



1 

3 
3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
.9 
10 
11 
13 
13' 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 



NameB. 



Eliza 0. Boorman, '. . 

Qeoig^ Ro«. 

iVadCes A. Raleigh, . . 1 . . . 

Carrie O, Porter^. 

Mary Fitzeerald, 

Laoj Randall, 

If . Maria Slaoten 

Atigpaal Oale, 

Loaiaa 9>nith> 

Hentj HendrfckiMti,' 

SvWeater B. Van Ajgtine,. 

lAarcua Beandreaa, 

Flora F. Window, w 

Alexander Hnghee, 

Dorothea Lichtenbeiy, . . . 

JohnBiaohoff, 

EliiaEeaL ..^. 

James GiblMiiSy 

John H« TonnfT, 

Jameh A. Hand, 



Residence. 



Walworth Oo.,. 
Jefferson Oo.,.. 
Wanpaca Co.,. 
Jefferson Co.,.. 
Milwaukee Oa, 

Dodge Co., 

Dane Co 

Milmrakee Co., 

Rock Co.. 

jTedSBTBonCo.,.. 
Eenoaha Co.,.. 
P; du Lac Co,,. 
Kenosha Co«».. 

Dodge Co., 

.... do ....... 

F. dn Lao Co.,. 
Jefferson Co.*. . 
Walworth Co.,. 

Dane Co., 

Oelumlyia Co.,. 



When ad- 
mitted. 



dia.* 



■u. 



Ottoher 

..ao 

.4.do ... 
March.. 
October. 
..do.... 
..do.... 
'. .so. ... 
May.... 
October. 
..do.... 
..do.... 

do 
..do.... 

«.do 

..do.... 
..do.... 
..do.... 
..do.... 
May.... 



18S0 

.do. 

.do. 

1651 

.do. 

1853 

.do. 

.do. 

1854 

.do. 

.do. 

1856 

-do, 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

.do. 

1857 



Cause of Blind- 



SeroMa. 

Accident. 

ConjpenitaL 

Accidents 

Cataract. 

Cataraot» 

Inflammation. 

Infla«nMtion. 

Acddeot 

Inflammatidii. 

Measles. 

Small Poz. 

Accident, ^ 

Inflammation. 

SmaUIVNb 

Meaalea. 

Inflammation. 

Accident. 

Inflammation. 

Amaoroflis, 

. ■ ■■■ .(; 



r*. 



APPENDIX G. 



CIRCULAR 
Of the Wisconsin Institute for the Education qf the BUnd^ 

LOOATIOK AND OBJECT. 

This Institution is located at Janesville, occupying a beau- 
tiful and commanding site on the east bank of Rock riTer, in 
the soudi-western portion of the city. 

It has for its object, the moral, intellectual and physical 
training of the young blind of both sexes residing in the 
Stata . 

It was established in the year 1850, conformably to an act 
of the Legislature of the State ; jQrom vblch body it receives 
its entire support, through the medium of direct appropria^ 
tions, made upon estimates of its wants, furnished annually 
by the officers in charge. 

OaOAKIZATION ANP MANAOBMXNT. 

The Institute is. organized under three separata dej^art- 
ments, viz: the Sch6ol, the Industrial and the Household 
Department, each performing its respective office of minister- 
ing to the improvement and comfort of the pupils. 

The general government of the Institute is entrusted by the 
L^islature to a board of trustees, who receive their appoint- 
ment from the Governor, while the immediate control and 
management of its several departments are confided to a gen- 
eral superintendent, chosen by the Board. 



.w 



41 . 

The Superintendent is assisted in the School and Industrial 
^4^6partriieUl8^!^ (J^petdiLt niitm«f<Mtt/tibd'in'lhb*HQ^ 
^^Vfspinviirkiy)iy kH experienced tnatmh, who administenlhe 
'^^Diestic eohcerns, littVHig the immedfikteMper^eiandof *)he 
female pupils when out of school, anft the -direction' of 'Ihe 
"^ lieVie^aT domestics in? thipe^^miancfe df iheir alTotted duties 
'^'Tiiese assiiit^nt bfficers ais6^ teceite ihMir appbintmeftt ftbm 
'^6 Board, upon iiie nomination of the Superintendent, but 
^^9^ dii^ctly^ responsible to the latter for the faithful discharge 
'^'if' th^lrrest^ective trusts. ' ' ' , 

, . PLAN OF EDUCATIOK. 

The plan of education pursued at the Institute i$ designed 
.''tobettl^Mm^y pract&ciil^ comprdheilding all that is neoes- 
hsmatf- for snah a developentient pf the mental ai^d, physical 
^^f^wei9:of Ibe blind, asiis best calculated to place themuj^on 
an equal footing with seeing perso^ in their capacity fov ns^ 
^•fiikiess^and sel£4BiAihtcda&noe. 

.ih The course of inatruftion, therefoee,. embraces, in addition 

10 the ordinary routine, of school br^ohes, the science and 

^.fqtcttoeof vocal and instiumentalvmusic, sereral appropriate 

^7H0phanie art^ moral aild religious culture, and jsueh, other 

training as serves to establish becoming personal habits^ en- 

V' oigy of character^ j^l^sineHs iaQt,.&c. >i . >' ' 

I. V In th^ . SohooL DepaUment,. the following are the porincqpal 

j<JvMcbes,<if th0 C0ur%e: Orthography, Rpding, Writing, 

jtJM^m^y .^g^bra, Geograi^hy, Gcammar, Qeomeitry, His- 

iitoffy M#Eal ao^iMeOtal^Rhilcisophy, Elements of Physiology, 

.vK)ietOri$y N^m«^ Hiptory, Vocal ^nd Instrumental Mu^ic, 

f>i , .SffUdivf i^ftaA^.byi mqana of i^i^ed lette^i iwhich are 
'jiTlowd *itfc ^' Angi^r&L Tbeire are now.ejjtant a:<iumber of 
ruinmbom^ vr^tHs^ for the BUn4> apiong wbich are the follow- 
biiPgi^ .Tbkf^.BibJe^i in eight ^uairto^irola;. th» New Testament, 
iiM 4iriify^ f :^il^tlbQA «f ^OftFid^ th9 KrMyo)op«edii^ Ar the 



42 

. . , • -I ' • ' • 'ft • i . .. , ' i 

< BtiMdy Pilgrim's ProgKWh JE|wt(»r's QtOl, Boglub RMdas 

. PUIospphF o^ Natural Hifstory, Parley'i^ Histoiy, Howni 

. 'Geography, Ws^t'a Pl^s^lms , an4 Hymi^, Guide to Sevotip% 

.Paca4i8e: Lost, &a ^c . 

.; .Qrdiuiurjr wriUng is peifcMrmed wiih alea4 P^cilf ti;ie paper 

• (teiug plaQsd upon a icard contawQg parallel grooves, wh^ 

^. serve, tp keep the lines straight, and the letters of wifoim 

. aiza ..There is aJbo used a sgr^tem of embossed writing. or 

printing, which is executed with a species of type, the httar 

being formed of pin points arranged in the ends of woodem 

blocks. This kind of writing can of course be read by the 

Blind themselves* 

The principles ofl ArilihmeCic add Algebra are taught eniiy, 
and the problems are solved either mentally or upon a mislal 
frame with moveable figtires and signs, answering as a enb- 
^ stitnte.fortbe slate and pencil 

Geography is taught by familiar lectures, iUustrated by 
globes and maps, prepared for the purpose, by rendering the 
rivers, boundary lines, &a, tangible. 

In Geometry, embossed diagtams are used until the pqpB 
acquires jsufficient'expertness to demonstiate from imagi— ly 
ones.*' ' 
Grammar, Rhetoric, Natural History, jtc, are for the moil 
'• part taught orally. Music being a branch in which blind 
^ persbhs seem particularly adapted to excel, a very promineiii 
place is assigned it in the aouxse of instruction. This is dme, 
not only on account of the fund of iratioital and innocevt en- 
joyment to be derived from it by all who are denied thepriv^ 
ilege of beholding the visible creation, but also because of its 
availability as h m^lins of an hohotebie independence, Is 
' those *#hose talents and incHnktion qualify tftem fer poieuhig 
' it as a profession!. '« Many eokinent examples of bfind peieons 
- who are now suty^essfuHy engt^ed asteachets, oiganisti and 
composers, both 4n this liouatry'aiid ih fiiaye^ migfaft be feMe 
cited if space would permit ; while history tells us of mMttf 



43 



f»n 



n 



c ) 



oHiMBwhjo bove dicAingHishedj Uiemselves in, past.^tti as 

piaetitioneis and composer^ JA ^^ various ^axim/pnts of 

f«iUsic< ' , f 

. I In the^Manofactuiing Dep^^rtment, the pupils, vill ^in- 

stmetediin a yari^^y ^£ useful artS3:.l)y moans of whiq^^fhey 

will be enabled .to. mjwt^in , them9^ vep T^hoUy, or in part, 

• ' after plu^sing through their cou3:^ of ois^rpctio^s. 

'• . Sovie of the articles usually' jnade by the Blind are as fol- 

. Wis^ yiz,r* by the males, willow carriages, cradles,. chairs, 

.leliciilctf^ md baskets of i all kinds, also brushes of mapy des- 

criptions, corn brooms rag carpeting, matrasses, ropes, Ibot- 

,»ats, &Ci; and by the females, various article^ of netting, 

knitting^ crofpheting, braiding, bead and zephyr work, &a, 

such as ho$e^ chil(|ren^s socks, comforters, lamp mats; pen 

.wipers, chair, tidies, purses, ari?ilets, watch ca^s, reticulea, 

r. neckla^;^) cac4 beskets, and a variety of bead toys, b^9ides 

sundry arUclee oil, pl4i«i jsewing. 



.i 



DOMESTIC ARBANOEMENTS. 



In the householiidepartment,, every means that experience 
can suggest for th^e promotion of the health and comfort of 
. 'the.pupilsas provided. Among these, are commodioud, well- 
>. veutUated dormitpfies, sehooi rooms, hospitals,.. and various 
4 ather.apartments;. spacious h&Us, jdazzas, and oUt^door ptfom* 
^enades^ suitable £>r ex»seiae in all kinds of .weather; aii^ple 
f anaQge^ents for cold,, waxm, and shower balhiog; gOod 
wholesome food, and oomfsfftablebods; prompt medicaid ad- 
vice, with other necessary attentions in case of sickness ; and 
above all, kind, sympathizing friends, whose duty and plea- 
M^ It is toi minister to the JV^oraJL. and physical wants of their 
|.^ li|dbp(unat0^ chaiges, striving, .i^, each of their various. Jrela- 
.'i; t|9|i% itp suj^Iy Ui them all t}fkf, desirable ^cppf^rts of hq||)& 



ai 



i/. 



iji. 



< I 



l> f'F 



AOE OF PUPILS. 



• t\* h ^• r.:£ 



From ten to fourteen is the most favorable age for entering 



; 



44 

the Institute, provided the pupil have judicious care and 
trainiug at hdme, prior to that age. but an this ib not allrajfs 

^ tfie ^ey and as there are Many who lose their sight after flbmi 
age ; or, having lost it earlier, do not find an opportuniif of 

^* going to schobl at the proper time, the r^titations of the In- 

^ stitute allow of the admission of all proper subjects who are 
liot under eight or above twenty-one years of aga 

It must'&d borne ih mind, however, by the friends of blind 
children, that though they have the privilege of sending them 
to the Institute at a later period than the one mentiimed as 
the best, ';^et it is of the highest importance that they should 

^ be sent within said period ; for, as tfiey grow older their n^- 
lected powers lose their susceptibility for cultivatioB, render- 
ing the training more and more difficult, until they become 

^ wholly incapacitated for receiving such an education as will 
fit them for a life of usefulness, independence and happinesa 
It is not lin^dmmon to witness results of this kind, arising 
out of the morbid tenderness with which a blind child is re- 
garded by his friends^ they being unwilling to entrust him at 
the proper age to the care of strangers, lest some harm should 
befal hioi. ^ Indeed every year's experience but serves to indi- 
cate more clearly, the lamentable prevalence lof .this an|ust 

' neglect ; as there are constantly applying for admission into 
die several Institutions of the country, those whose meku^ 
•choly 16t it is to lead a life of hopeless ignom«iee and depen- 
dence^ but who might, with proper training, in early jomth^ 
> have become happy and useful members of soeietfv ffiaintain- 

iag themsrives comfortibly and Tespectably. 
• • ■ ■ . . . ■ 

TXBM OiF IJ^STaUCTIOK. 






This is not limited to any definite number df yeaM, MR is 
detetotiised in each individual case, by 'file ^c4uiretaieHtt of 
the pupil ahd consequent fitness for graduating': • The' leligtiL 
of each one's term will of course depend upon his aptness lo 

learn, and the extent of the course pursued. 

I • ' l: ' ■ * ^ <J . " . oj I • .n«»'. I 



■ T .♦ 



45 



f« 1 



SCHOOL 8S88IOH. 

Tli^ flesrtofi of ibe' Institule commences on the fiist Mob* 
day of October m each year, and doses'on the last Wedxite^ 
day iki July ibUikflirii^ ; lea^ng a vacation of more than two 
mondi^, duaring which' time the pupils have an opportdnity 
of visiting their homes and replenishing their clothing. • t 

4a)MI88X0N 6V PUPILS. 

▲ay person wishing to make application ibr the admissioffL 
of a pupil into the Institute^ must address the Superintendei3b||. 
giving definite asid truthful answers to the following que^r 
tions,.via: .. . . r.( ; 

1st What arQ t^e nAn^es and post oflSice addr^iss of th^ pn^, 
rent9 or guardians of the person for whom application if 

%^ AriB ^uch parents ox guardians legal residents of the 
StiUpiofiyisconsin? ,, 

3d^ What are the . name and age f>{ the person :for whom 
appUca^ i^midej 

4ttu At^wbia^'&ge did he or she become bUndj*aj|d from f 
what4^usfi? 

5thi js beior she of sound mind, and susoep^^ of intelr.. « 

lectualcuMN»!i9? .. I 

qth. Is h^: oc«she free from bodily deformity and all infOQi^ 
tious disefii(i^^ ... " « ; . 

7th. What are his or her personal habits and moral char- 
acter? 

Upon the receipt of such application by the Superintendent, 
the applicant will be notified as to whether or not the person 
in question will be admitted, and no one must be sent to the 
Institute until such notification shaU have been received 

No person of imbecile or unsound mind, or of confirmed 
immond character, will be knowingly received into the Insti- 
|Ute ; and in case any pupil shall, after a fair trial, prove in- 
competent for useful instruction, or disobedient to the whole> 



46 

some regulations of the Institute, such ptipil will be thereupon 
discharged. 

No mbaige is made for the boarding and instruction of pu- 
pila from the Stale of Wisconsin, but all are expected to come 
provided ifith an adequate supply of good, eoialbrtable cloth- 
ing/ vhidi must be repl^oished firom time to^ytime^ as it b^ 
comes neoeasary. 

The stock of clothing should embrace suitable articles for 
both summer and winter, and a sufficient number of each 
kind to admit of the necessary changes for washing and re^ 
paking. 

All of the clothing must bo sent in good order and condi- 
tion, not only upon the first entrance of the pupil, but also at 
each Subsequent return from homeafterHhe vacation.' 

Bach artide should also be dij^tinetly marked with the 
owner's name or initials, in order to prevent confusion or loss. 

ft is important that new pupils shofild enter upon their 
term of instruction at the commencement of a seteion, and it 
is eitpected of all others th^ they shall be '{)resent kt the opmi- 
ing of the school, and remain until it closes,' on the kist day 
of the session, tmless prevented from doing so by sickness or 
other emei^ency. It is also expected that timely arrange- 
ments will be made for the departure of every pupil firom the 
Institute within a few days after the close of each session. 

AH letters to the pupils should be addressed to the care of 
the Institute, in order to insure their prompt reception. 



•» 



• 



I) 



< > 



' ■ t 



I 



■';'• i*- 






j'' 



DOCUMENT "J 



^ «T »♦ 



4 • 






.(• "' , vfl fT 



/ •) .■ / 



" . • r 



{ 






) 



.-, ...!< r T 



, 1. . . 



•/ • r X( " ' 



. V.'-' ;.■, 



:r . .. 



»/ r J '■ • A ' '*'' 



To Hi8 EzcKLLiEKoir, A. W. Bakdall, 

Qwe^&t^oflht State of Wiaoonsm : 
I have tl^ Hd^o? }otf pi e^nfin^ ypx^ ber^Vvf^r^b^ -Sixth An- 
nnal Report of the Trustees of the ** Wisconsin Institute for 
the Education of the Deaf and Damb^" by order of the Board 

ofsmmK ■ • '- .■..'...v.. ..... 

DpMlW**! December 19, 1867» , ■ ,. '^ " I I* 

j .•'•'• 

• • ♦ '. -I « • # 



' • . J : . . ■ * /J • I 



•i 



1 
• 






BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



H. HunT, M. D., 
Hon. WiL 0. Allen-, 
Ohaumoet Betts, 
Mo8E8 M. Strong, 

J. D. MONBLL, Jb., 

Salkok Thomas, - 
Habbisok Bbed, - 
Joseph Bakeb, - 
WillAlBd Ibham, - 



I ' 



Ddavan. 



cc 



Milwaukee. 

Ddavann 

Darien. 

NeenaK 

Delavan. 



n 



OFFICERS OF THK BOARD. 



M 



EDehdebsov Huht, 

J. D. HONBLL, Jb., - 



• • 



secretary, 
nvtumtr 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

J. S. Oftioebi a. M., .... 

ir. Phtllip3, 
Z. M0C0T4 
J. A. MoWhobtbb, 
EmLT Eddy, 

DOMESTIC DEPARTMENT. 

Otrto Satlbs, M. D., - 

J. S. Offioeb, 

MnB Obpha Tatlob, - . « « 



PrmdpdL 
Profeswn. 



Phj/sicum. 

Steward, 

Matron 



1 '» 



. . !♦ 



EEPORT OF TMiTRDSTBBS 

* 

OP THE WISCONSIN INSTITtTTE" l-Op THE EDTTqA- 
TION OF THE i)EAF AND DUMB. 

' « f 



I ^ 

L « 



f » 



!7%« Board of Trustees of the Wisconsin InsiittUs for (Ks JBHueoh 
thn f^ the Deaf tmd Vumb, hy th^ir Sectary, Heg leave to Htb- 
fnii to tJ^ ZfsgjaiaJtUire ih^ 

During the past year this Institute has been in a prosper- 
iiim oonditioli, M\j meeting the xnost-ianguine expectations 
of its friends and founders. This Instigation was organized In 
X^% at which time^ hut threa of that . nnfvrtipyQa:^ .<AfW Ar 
:v^^om it was des]gned,|X^c^iye<)^its bi^qefits; and, from tnat 
fiiaU begina. , it ha&jgrpdaaUj2.|;)ii.t ft^adilyjiKciiteased, nn- 
^til i\ now dispenses its untold bl^in^.^^o.^/^/y-M;^ persons, 
, who. without its beneficent aid, would still begfpyeling in 
^b^ lowest depths of ignonance — ^unfit for cilize^v.ef oompan- 
^ons — ^a heavy charge on theijr ptUvf fli^P' depending on the 
charities of the public for a common subsistence. By the 
,f^d fi^ benefits imparted to* their otherwise dark and be- 
Bjg^ted nn.deigtju^c^ngp, 4^e "JDuj^b; -wie tfiiif^t to spmk," 
ap4 ^^^ y^ .^9^i^rg^ ^ duti^ iiloiiaibe^Ji on thedOi, us cUat- 
aw^» to puiBi^e bpnoriibl^, yocatioiis ; ;to. b(9i obedi<wiftOi4lie 
(^oYievi^ment mide^ wJbticbtl^^. ii^a, an4r to d^t^wtf^^^^ 
duties riequire^ i9f it^ose who are j^l^ssed wilh iii^ fUl 4e[Tfk- 
9pmeat ot all t^e mental and physi4^al faculties. : . ^ ^t^a^A^ 
dumb t^e use of If^igpage, tl^^ b^iid,tQ:$epvf^^'V^toifeteaMi 
to the insane, are objects tba)b .B^^R^d. mUptth^ most j se^ioiia 
atteipt^qn of the benevolent, the wise ai\d^ the good ^ and i^ 
State or Fhilanthropistv6ati bestow charities for a more, laud- 
able purpose jh&n in contributing. to ihp elevation of these nn- 
fortunate classes. 



Hie Imtitate is under the management of J. S. OmcEB, as 
Principal, aided hj a corps of able and eflScient aaeo&tantB. 
As the head of an Institation of this character, the Tmstees 
feel that they', hare 4>eeii' pecnllarljf foftaaale in secoiing one 
so well iltted bj ji^tJ\r^ and large ezperieaoei to manage its 
ihterDal afiauisl To his unwearied efforts, aided bj the har- 
monious co-operation of all connected with the Inatitnte, k it 
indebted for its present prosperity. To the varied wants of 
the pupils, the Principal and his amiable Ladj exercise a pa- 
rents) c^rO; and, instead of a School, the Instlt^e presents the 
Sjppearanoe of a well regulated family,, where each of its mem- 
bers Ties with Ae otbmn in promotiog its general improve- 
ment and harmory. 

There hare been appropriated to this Inatitiition, at aad 
sinpo its organizatioa.by the Legislature, 

186tatHil9W. Pbrbulldtng'Etet Lateral Wing, - $S,OO0 

•** Support of School, - - - 3,000 

18M. ^ :Building East Thmsrerse Wing, 5,000 

•* " Supportitij^ School, - . . 4^000 

1866. " u • 4i ... T,600 

1W«. ^ « * • . . 7^000 



f88,800 
Out of ^thesef tr^prepriatioM h)ite been paid for Teacher^ 
^Alaries, btiik^ fuel, ^ovlsions, iiite^M;, Insurance, and other 
Id^identel ^expens^, f 90,«00 ; and, fcft Buildings, $8,000, 
iMivlbg demimds against the tndtitute, on the lldli of Decern- 
iM^r, 1856) of $8,000; to meidt Mrhich indebtedAess, the Legis- 
teteore nvade the necessary appropriation. (For the disposi- 
Hett of the ap^opriation-of 1^56, you are referred to that part 
<^ Aie 'IVesiSursi''s ^pbrt mariced A.) 

The' Legt^ature, in' 1857, made ah appropriation of $34,500 
Covering the above indebtedness of - . $ 3,000 
For building mainJBuilding, - - 15,000 



. Sbpportof^cjhool, < ^ ^ ^ - 12)009 $84^000 

Oat of the above appropriations have been paid-^ ' 
iOrdendrswn by the Fmeft and See'y on TreiB., $05,064 61 
.Obdi onhand, « . « - . . ^ • . 12,015^ 
State Watranfts in the Treainm^s hands^ - 4,000 M) 

$84,8009^ 
having on bmd to pay last qnartclr'ft expetood 

School and outstanding orders, •» . • 99,116 8^ 
{As appears by the Treasurer's Sciportt, maiLed &.] 
After »tbe appropriation was made in 1857, it wSsiotmdllii- 
.possible to draw the amount apprc^nriated, or a&y part of tit 
4>itmg to the financial coBditioa^ the St»te Trwaaty. Tt^ 
Aeoretary of State therefore issued StKte Wamtiits in Sttiall 
MiMots^ covering ihb appropriation^ that we might dispOM 
of them to bettor advantage. GChelbllawu^ is the mattef M 
«9iifih they hate been 'disposed <»f : 
1867^ April 2fr-Sold Panhm' and IfiUem^ 

Baoik, Milwasikee, - f^tW 

At a discount of 10 per cent, $800 * 
1867. April 20 -Sold 2L Hunt, Delayao, - 4^000 

Discount of 12 per cent, 510 

1867* May 7-«fiold Kenosha Bank, Kenosha, 6|000 

Disootmt of 12 per oe^ti ^TSO 

1857. J^ne l-^-Sdd f amieie' & KiUeit' B% 18/)00 

/' , Discount of 10 per «nt» 1|800 

1867/Ma^i4-^dd;Er.Siztw,£lkhoiiiB,atpar« • l^POt 

1857, June ft- •* «. « " . " },00» 

;L857. Deo, 8^old W, W. Stawteran^ Deka* 

van^atfa?! - *• - . -.. 8fl0 

Discount, - . ^,780 $98,006 

As will be seen by the above statement, the Institution hato 

vMtiined A:tdsS'of 19^780,. by beinjr oompelled to take Staib 



IB 

Warrants instead . cjf xfte^ifmg . tb^ . mpQ^, ; wd .w» WMld 
therefore^ won a former occasion, eamosUj i^t yn est thftt die 
BfDcl apporopri^tion be made specific^ atid . {aqrabl^ at least 
quarterly^ 

I Atameetmgofthe]^oA^of ;'B;iiateeS) bald. mi the lltk 
4fk7 of |£arch, 1857, a Building Committee, cpnsiting of H. 
^uxT^^tf . D., Preaii^efit of }k» JBoard, Hon. O. Bfins, and 
Hon. &> Thomas, were appointed to take charge of the erec^ 
Itpl} of (h4i main building, shop, barn, ottt-buildings, and other 
improvements for which .the apprdpriaij^oas wene Kiada. Thegr 
iSiQvnliatelj entered upon the. duties 'entrusted to them, by 
causing plans and speeifieatibossto be pvepared, and oontract- 
iog.for find ooUecting maierialsu. Bj tha<(omliinfued efforts of 
fi; HusT, OfaAtraD^n^ and tl^q^tfaer members ef the Gomicit- 
teOy the main ol'oenti'e baiidiDg has been elected and encloe- 
Hd dpning tbft paeC season, in snoha manner as to seoure it 
ifgeiiKIt the damegingefiects; of the weathbr. SThe work on tte 
J^ildlng.baS'fcieArly all beendbnaby the day, and, when com- 
pleted, will be one of the most sufaftantial Pabiic Edifices ia 
the State; and, wUh it&'4haeike Arohhectnhs andJ>eautifuI.pro- 
fiertteps, will be an endmjng! nonitnoiit of its enterprise and 
bencToleBce. ..: 

Fo^ full particniare inf relkiion to the erebtlon of Mam Build- 
ing, Shop, Barn, and othdr improvements, - and the amounts 
Required for their conviction, we wtmld reifer you to the re- 
ports of the Architect and Bail<ttBg Ooraitiittee. 
><'*Aa appears fi^m their IteportB> there has already %ben paid 
for the iikkio buildings banii sliop, ^and olJier improvements, 
f 17,629 88 ; and to co^plet^ the cetHirftl btiilding, and pay for 
A^f Materials already contracted for, will require aitii*ther ap« 
propriation of fiK^OOO ; making {he entire cosft 4f the main 
Ifdlding $80«000, as originally estimated.'^'' 

iF^ Heatu;^ Apparatus for wholfi buib^ng, - - $ 5,000 
J*ar excavation and walls for Furnc^e, • • - (00 

for Water. Tasiks, Distributing Fipes imd Gas Ptpei, 1^000 



. I 



' {Serial flarti.eBlahi o# the lost tthnb l^bMns, we woiil4 ' 
' i mfer jon to the report of B. -Oi KEtfanri ArohfitMt.] ' ! 
T6 compiafee.th^ otl^er Baildirige) alr^dy com0i0ifMd, 6T6 

For the support of the school daring the coming year, ' 

(as per Kepoi^c of the Prmcipaland Stewa^), 19^70 
Grading, FenciD^j, and Paving, - ; - - - • 80P 
Farnitnre for Main Bailding, in part) • ..; r tOO 

The Trtistees, during the ^past ye^r.^pi^cbaa^d. of KB. 
(^•ATKS, twet^ty-tvo .acres of land, laying on. threor sides pf rthe 
site on which the Institute iserecte'di; which, witp th^ eleven 
acres donated by F. K. 'P^(ESJX. Esq., to the State, makes 
thirty-three acres of land, well situated for the wants of ^e 
Institution, affording adequate pa^turQ and water fot t)^» losti- 
tute, and play-grounds for the pupils. For this last piece of 
purchased land, a warranty deed has been made to the State, 
and the sum of Five Hundred Dollars paid down on the 
purchase, leaving a balance of Fifteen Hundred Dollars, 
which falls dae in February next. For this amount the 
Trustees have given their notes in their corporate capacity, 
and would respectfully ask the Legislature to make an appro- 
priation to liquidate the same. 

To recapitulate the amount of appropriations asked for, for 
the current year : 
To complete the Main or Center Building, - - $15,000 
For Heating, Lighting, and Water Apparatus, . - 6,600 
To complete Shop and other improvements, - - 657 
To pay Trustees' Notes for Land, • - - 1,600 
For the support of School and Repairs, - - 18,370 
Grading, Fencing, and Paving, - - • 800 

Furnishing Main Building, in part, ... 700 

Total of appropriations, .... $38,545 
We would urge upon the Legislature the great necessity of 
making the above appropriations, as the number of pupils 
has steadily increased, until the accommodations are entirely 
inadequate for the due regard to their health and intellectual 
and moral improvement 



10 



And, in eondoaiM^ the T^inteefi vodd'sajs tbafc in aeUng 
for th^ttbolvtd q>pit>{>riaitioid8/ihe7 iMT^e n6t br ctn tmmindiiil 
(irf the ftttMioial oonditioii of the cotmtrj' lat large^ or of this 
State; bat have considered at the Bame iime, the peeoUar 
oircfdtnstaQoes of that unfortunate ohna whom we represent^ 
*|md have been actuated by w^t we eotffitAer the best inter- 
ests of the Institation. We would also respectfully invite an 
examination of fhe Institution and its affairs, by your honor- 
JBkble body,' believing l3iat yon will not only be satisfied with 
'the manner in which fhe means at our disposal have been 
used, but also of the necessity of the further aid for which we 
ask H. HUNT, PresidenL 

^, Mt. HABBmoTON, Secretary. 



' I 



i: . 



p •• 



REPORT OF THE PMNCIPAL 



OF TEE WISCONSIN INSHTDTE FOK THE EDUQA- 
(riON OP THE PEAF AND DUMB. 



f I 



To the Boa^d. of Trustees ^ the Wi^cmsia Jnetituie-/^. ihsJBAMh 
iion.cfthe JJeaf and l)umh. .^ 

Gsiirxx^PfiSN : — ^A review ot ihe inoidente =af the y eair jap( 
j)ft8ty maf well inspire gratitude U> the Antbor of M lo^itoi^ 
^4 atoxoj^Jat? to .contuuiod 9/nd ohoerful ^So^ . r 

, , :iPa;9,pifomp;tnee& with whioh tbe Legielatare respoiiiledto 
•OTi^ri^ppealB. in behatf of tJie Deaf and Dii^b ; the betl^¥«r- 
lent interest which it cDanifeate^,, asd the liyiely abdigvowiiig 
public sympathy, so apparent on all sides, in this branch of 
State charity, are faett Wihich caU for iMortfelt congratulation 
, Young as is our State, theseiare but few of t^be propfs.yilpoh 
phe iurni^hea of a vigorous iatelledual and moral life. Prpf/t- 
iug by the experience and lessoas of the older Sta^s, JO/a^ 
starting at the point to which they attained only after yeaift 
of patient and toilsome pioseer effort in building }$p pidbUp 
cb^ritie^, aiid in nurturing a Cbriatian public ^pi^it^akeadTan- 
ces side by side with theoa in )he inarch of t^ocial program 
and, as if by the touch of a magic wand^^e ^ears ujpfr i^stitfr 
tionsc^ public beneficence to gladoa the hearts. oi the g)«1- 
dreu of misfortune. . • « 

The time is not Ipng past when Legis^atourea a<id .S^fitas 
were slow to hear the appeals that came to them Irom ihf 
voiceless mute, and from the friends who had enlisted #ieir 
efforts in his behalf. The effects o{ thosQ jpioneer efforts for 
mute education have not ccaaed wiith those who.miide thw^ 
nor have they been confined to narrow bcalitiea. 7ht cirtlee 
of their influence have been widening. They haye roUed 
westward with the tide of population ; and, as if rejoicing, to 
escape from the Jaill and mountain barriers of the East, hava 



13 

spread with exnlting speed oyer the broad praries of the West 
Sach a public spirit we must regard as a legitimate result 
of that Gospil le^veA whjch ^penja^ing.the maas of Society, 
and silently elevating its depths. 

' The genera^ health that has been enjoyed by the inmates, 
calls for profound gratitude to God. In a family as large as 
this, uninterrupted health for a year could not be looked for; 
and yet, ev^n of tliose of oar number most predisposed to 
disease, sickness has been rare. For a short period in the 
4q»ring, and again In the fall, during the seasons of prevailing 
4lidrxi64S through the surrounding country, we h ad to bear a 
part of the common vnitation. While someof the pupils were 
'atta^ed severely, there were but few cases whfch.dMnot 
teadily yield to mefdical treatment and eate. ' W^ haTe not 
hwa dialled' upon to lament ike death of any. 

IUBDK5rr trnPSaCffTSUESTS* 

' The aspect of things ithmediately around us is clieerfng. 
Much has been done. Ihe main edifice stands in tasteful 
AfegHiice upon a sightly elevation, attracting the eye of the 
traveller for miles around. Although far from completion, 
it is bright With promise for the fdture.' 

'W'ear by, in the grove, stands a two-story brick building, 
tasteflil in* kfchitecture, where tve hope, ere long, to hear the 
€in of industry. The boys are irapatietit to be handling tools, 
lAyln^ their muscles, and testing theirmechanical skill inside 
its walls. Many a time have they proposed the inquiry — 
** When shall we commence to work in' the shops ?'^ Such 
Indutttrial promptings riierit substantial encouragement. 
' West of the fehop stands a commodious barn. , The addi- 
tional land, for t*he purchase of which an appropriation was 
made, has been' procured and fcfnced. '• - '* 

* Insid'^ of the portion of the building now occupied, there 
exists an air of home-like comfort, which' contrasts pleasantly 
with, the 'baldness and gloom that not long since characterized 

It ' -' • ■ ■• •■ ■ ■ • k ' 



Id 

lUBxs oar raoftsaa, ' 

Hie improvefnents just mentioned, are the externa/, aspects 
which wonld readily meet the eye of. the visitor, iand prompt 
a tribute of eomtnendation. But they are Dy do means the 
mofet cheeing portion of the picture: — ^The. mellow back- 
gronhd, the delicate' shadings, the more unpretending and 
wirituat parts, are what most excite the ti^acher's interest and 
cheer hid heart. Intellectual, social, moral, and spiritufil^ 
groWtti, are the beauties for which he looks,' and hppes an4i 
labors. In these repects, gratifying results are visible. The 
pupils In general have made comthdndable progress in their, 
fltudfes, and have been surnioiinting, day by day, many ot 
liiosi^ peculiar and (Stubborn obstacles that stand in the way of 
their education. Their general deportment is praiseworthy, 
and has frequently called forfli 'the unqualified approbation 
of those who have had favorable opportunities of xjomparing, 
it with that of others. 

Order, contentioent, . industry, and obedience, ar^ yirj;M0[ 
which have grown in their esteem, and. which now mor^ yifi*; 
bly mark their behavior. Generally they are moro Qu^d^aii* , 
spifct, coDjBcientioufi and faitJifuL They perveive.pK>re readily 
moral di^nction^, and feel more seitsibly the force of moy^ 
Qbligati(»is ; and, from th^ sleep of intellectual, ax^^ morjal 
night, have awakened to a more vivid perception of duty fuid 
destiny, accountability and immortality. . ., 

Sectarianism is not taught ; but the plain prinoiplee wd, 
the specific duties that enter iAto the substance of al} endiihx 
ring virtue, are daily illustrated anoboijiforced, . , 

Since mj last amnual repor^t, the corpp t>f Instruetoxs 1^ 
been increased by the addition of Miss^Emd^x £in>Y« IbejaiT 
portance of a better claasific^tioA of the pupiVt rendered Ihis- 
step neccQsaiy before the clp^^ of laat teru^ Shehaaupw 
charge of the pupils who entered the preseut term ; ^ai^d I hare 
no l^esitation in saying^ tb^jt^ho poesess^i in. an nnusagi de- 
gree, the qualifications th^t. ensure, ^occefs. : .. 



14 

Of the other teaohefSj I need not repeat \rhat has been said 
on preripus occasions. T^e improvoment of their respeclnre 
classes, the love and este/pm of the.pnpils, ai!e,te3tiiiioniA)9not. 
likely to be obta^ied nnles^ merited. 

The office of Matron was left vacant U^st summer by. the 
resignation of Mrs. M. MabsAall. Properly to^ fill this diffir 
cult and trying position, requires a rare combinatioA of .qiial- 
ities. Miss O&pha Tatxx>b, of St. Charley, Illinois, acisepted 
a tender of the place, and entered upon its duties in Avgnat, 
She .has tljius far filled it very acceptably. 

The w^ole number of pupits in attendance during the jrear 
is fifty-seven, although at no particular time hasrtbat number 
been in actual attendance.. A list of their i^ames, residences^ 
&G,f is appended. The present year we )iave had an acoeob*. 
Bsiqn of fourteen new pupils ; and, as one a^ter another baa 
come we have felt it almost impossible to find room for thena. 
&o crowded has the building been, that it w^ Aot adyisable, 
the past year, to make any special efforts to increase the num- 
beff of applicants. The difficulty of providing accommoda- 
tions for the pupils in the present buildings, has been greatly 
inf^^tosed by the small proportion of gitls. Less than one- 
tkihl of the pupils are females. There is no good reason for 
mrf disproportion in this respect. We can conceive of no 
Vfkj of accounting for it, except by tracing it to the cruel' 
tblidness or ciminal indifference of parents. Their daughtetv 
need education as much as theif sons ) and that ^»rent as- 
sbnies a most fearful responsibUity, and acts a most mkuman 
cl6Bes, In the falce of a daughter, the only available door part, 
to intellectual and mor^l Kght. 

' I^ availed myself of the release afforded by the tast annnal 
Yft6ation, to visit several of the oldest and best Institutions for 
life Deaf and Dumb in the country, for this purpose, mainly, 
of getting a more satisfiictory insights into their management 
and intemi&l arrangements. 

It ib but proper 'that I should embrace this occasion to tisn- 
der my most gratefbt acknowledgments to the several Princi- 



Ifl . 

pals aipeciaUj, Mid to oilleift aBsdeiaMl.irMk ikdm^^.tn^ tip*? 
gntilirons and coofdial attentibma recdmdv andfortiiQ fiieilittat 
extended in aebocnplishiiig tb^ objects of my yiiEt, 

Asrfepecti the «igti laagnagi, and modM of initradJMn^ 
thkre ard DO OMential diflfiereMes between the eaeiera'flBi^ 
wlttterh InstitntioQs. ^J%0 latter are« f er the mo0t'paat,t.off4. 
skiiota of the fbrmen, and tb^ improrementB of one, readiljd 
beeooAe kndwn to tbe others. * Pointe of diffMwnce ve^peotingi 
xnodee of InetraotioB ure felly di0<^»Bed in the* Bi<ttuiial Oon^ 
yentions of Instrnctors, and in the Qaarterly pnblicatieft' 
"Vf&ich iaaoee from Hartford. 

Jl Tiew of the ample aocomniodatiDnfl) Mlu^ed iMiilitl^ 
aikd) libetal arraagsments that are enjoyed to a greatev or' 
Ifaasf oxteot by those establishmente, togetheritrith iv.kDowledjgBri 
cf.ieKifitiDg difficulties, and previona em})afraaimentB) eaaoioA'' 
fail to impre6a.ofie with the necessity of experience, oaolioii 
and judgnaent with every step that is taken* > 

The derelot>eraent'of a complete plan for stich an Inaks*,' 
trition^ in ^hich all its varions purposes 'can be: well setered^! 
an ifa departmeiits* properly arranged, and its maaifoliLoiMn-: 
attoni carried on withotit eollisioti, is a triumph of •eapani^Mifi' 
dndshiU.' ' - i 

r The manner in which most Institntioira fbr t^e Boafi.fttd; 
Qnmb layer been built np, has been nn&yoriible to therMsaiisig: 
of fiio>deairable a resvilt. The nlew efifiea^ the "^w^ Yrorkl 
In^Htttioa must be regarded as the model boildisig^t eU Hm 
dofeets. beibg of a minor efaaraqter, and rdadily tadmittKngifcyr 
remoi/^al. ' 

; Tbe Ihdiana Institntton ifr weH arranged,; and aftesJfa bMi 
bpen provided with a laundry aaidftn ^ideut h^atfng appat 
catus,, will be quites complete. 

The buildings of the American Asaylwii at Se^ord^ avid. 
of t^e Pennsylvanif^ Instftatjon, haive Ofu^ thc^r peculiar 
i|dvantag^i but aa a. ivb^ole are felj^ to ppeseoi. ifoporla^: 
defects. :-•..» ; , ^ 

Every well doyeloped' plan f<^ aft lustitiftiou foo: the Xtei^i 
and Damby must embrace some safe and efficient mode for 



16 

mofpljing At eslmUiilMMit with Ught, ham^.wfttor, 
flkl ooM ; and of Mckuing Teatilirtioo imd drmiiuifeu Ike 
ordinary mellibdA of ^^Tidldg for tbcM taMntiafe in ptirate 
dwaUiogSy Md ia soma lai^ge ettaUiAiteQta, sre mpeik to 
flMioiia ol^tioiiB in an lastilntioa fdt Ihe Dtaf and DnmK 
lliey are not safO) daaalj, economdaali con^eilient or efficioifc. 
8tot«i) l^mipty and commoii pnfenpa are adminUa contrivanoea 
in their jriaooi but, we ooneeite, ahonld liave aa little la do 
with rack -an loatitatibn aa Canadian jtomitB with a train of 



Hot air-furnaces bave^ in some caaeaWilrked wdl^bilt fli 
order to Una, a bailding thonld be oonstmcted with reference 
to thanu The American Aaylam at Hartford ia not Very 
aatiafiMtorily warmed in this way. Kine or ten famaces and 
aemral storee are employed, bnt to find space for them and 
the fael reqnii^d, makes it necessary to oocapy a large portion 
of the basement and cellar room. Every square foot of HkB 
basement of this institntion ie otherwise provided tor, while 
f(Ar oellar xtx>m/ we *faa¥e none. HotHiir fomaces for thSa* 
Inatltation would seem thensibre'to be ent^tiy impraeficable. 
The general intifodiction of steani aa a heating agent for fan^ 
establishments, its efBciency and cleanliness, the health^ 
teoiperatdre prodooed, and other incidental adrantages seem 
to demand for it the prefrrence. It calls for a heavier oat* 
lay alt first, hui when all ooUateral in^tereits are taken into 
the aceoont, it is mosttmly eoofaomicab The cost wonM de« 
pend Mttoh' on tfik kind of apparattaa selected. That now ia 
nse in the Blind Institution at Janesville, — (a smaller estab- 
lkihbent'<&aii this) — did nofteosti o<rclr iWent^-six hundred 
dblldrs. It is not likely thdt an a^para^' of sufficient capa« 
city for this Institution could be purohastfd and fitted for less 
than dve {honsand dollars. 

As respects the lighting of the buildJftgs, tiie best of light 
is em|^bsl(ica1Iy the only proper otte foi< j^tlpiUr Who depend 
so much upon the eye, who must necessarily use it a great 
d^al 'by tfi^t, and M^io selem peculiarly liable to disease in 



■* . • . • \ 1 ' 1 1 t 



17 

that organ. Where t|oat-ga8 can be obtained there need be 
no hesitancy in deciding what kind of gas to use. Bat for 
this Institution, it is a matter for investigation, whether the 
Benzole light, Halsey's Patent Coal Gas Generator, or some 
other, weuld best answer our purpose. 

* A.n abundant supply of water is another necessity : Water 
— ^warm and cold— convenient to all parts of the establish- 
ment, for the various domestic purposes, and for safety in ease 
of fire. The necessity of some better contrivance than com- 
mon pumps aud pails to supply with water an establishment 
five stories in height, and, when complete^ two hundred feet 
in length, must be apparent to every one. I know of no 
more available method of obtaining such a supply than by 
tanks in the attics, filled from the roof, and, in case of ex 
haustion, by a horse-power force-pump. This arrangement, 
is in use in the Indiana Institution, and has thus far, I believe, 
given satisfaction.' That great caution is needed in selecting 
the methods oi accomplishing these several results we are 
well aware. The apparatus that suits one edifice is ill-%dapt- 
ed to another ; and the most simple and complete, will be a 
source of annoyance, if erected by unskillful hands. The . 
proper constihiction of modern household conveniences calls 
for the vigilant exercise of the best mechanical and scientific 
skill. We conceive that no mechanic who is not master of 
the scientific principles of the apparatus he constructs, should 
be entrusted with such work. 

TSTow is the only proper time to decide upon and provide 
for these important ftrrangemenfis. The introduction of any 
temporary contrivances will not only call for a heavy outlay 
at first, but will be attended with great inconvenience while . 
in use, and great loss and additional expense at last The 
adoption of cheap expedients will, we confidently believe, 
prove in the end to have been short-sighted economy. Profit- 
ing by the experiments and failures of older institutions^ we 
may without loss, and without great delay, place this estab-. 

lishment, in respect to convenience and completeness, almost 
on a par with the best equipped in the land. 



18 

It has been estimated that the maia^difice could not be 
erected and finished for less than thirty thousand dollars. 
One half of this sum was appropriated by the last Legisla- 
ture. The building ia under roof and will soon be enclosed, 
when operations will be entirely suspended till further appro- 
priation is made. The urgency of completing this work isr 
so apparent that we deem it unnecessary to press the matter. 
Further increase of the School with our present accommoda- 
tions is impracticable. Unless the main Edifice is ready for 
occupancy before next Fall, new applicants for admission 
must be denied. Bnt we fear no such result. Wisconsin ia 
not the State, "after having begun to build," to feel herself 
"unable to finish." 

As yet no appropriation has been made for paving. The 
want of pavements^ even aboat a private residence, is felt to 
be a great annoyance : How much greater must it^be to an 
establishment of over sixty persons! The labor of keeping 
the floors clean, is not unlike the fabulous toil of Sysiphus. A 
tidy housekeeper would grow elQquent upon such a theme. 

SevA*al division-fences are needed, to separate the garden, 
yards, pasture, orchard, &c. The land lying North of the 
Institution requires drainage. A small outlay for this pur- 
will greatly add to its beauty, and will be repaid in pasture. 
Some alterations in the interior of the wings, it will be impor- 
tant to make, in order to adapt various apartments to new 
purposes, after the main edifice can be occupied. 

We have thus presented, somewhat in detail, the preseirt 
condition, prospects and wants of the Institution, and, for 
convenience of reference, furnish the following estimate of 
sums needed for the year one thousand eight hundred and 
fifty-eight : 

Board of 75 persons, at $1,50 per week, - $4,950 
Salaries of Principal, Teacher^ Matron, 

Physician and Secretary, - - 3,836 

Wages of Hired Help, .... 750 
Wages of a Mechanic, - - - . 600 



19 

Took, Materials, &c., of Shop, - - - 400 
Ordinary Improyementa and Bepairg, • 800 

Fnrniture, - 200 

Fuel, - - - - ^ . - - 800 

Lights 880 

Barn aqd Stable expenses, - - - 200 
Postage, Printing, Books, Apparatus, Insurance, 475 

Miscellaneous, ^200 

Eighty .Olass-room Slates, at $3 each, - - S4;0 

Amount for Ourrent expenses, - . .$18,870 
Finishing Main Edifice, - - - $15,000 
Furnishing " " in part, - - 700 

Steam Heating Apyaratus, - - - 6,000 
Ezcayation and Walls for same, ... 500 
Gas Pipes, Tanks, and Water Pipes, - 1,100 
Grading, Fencing, and Paving, - - 800 

Finishing Out-buildings already commenced, 676 
Paying Trustees' Note for Land purchased, - 1,500 

Amount for Special Improvements, • 25,174 

Whole Appropriation needed, - - $38,546 
Although the appropriation here asked is not large when 
compared with what other States have done, and are doing 
in the samcNfield of humane effort, yet nothing but a sense of 
their immediate importance, and a confidence in the benign 
public spirit that annimates our State, would encourage us to 
spread so many of our wants before the people and their Rep- 
resentatives, in a season of extensive financial embarrassment. 
While the pressure of the tinies calls loudly for retrenchment 
in almost every way, benevolent contributions are the last 
which a wise man will curtail. ^*He that watereth shall be 
watered also himself." 

BespecfuUy submitted, 

J. S. OFFICER, Pmkoipal. 



CATALOGUE OF PUMIS,. 

IN ATTEN J>ANCE WITHIN THE TEAR ENDING KO- 

VEMBER 80, ISW. 



Names. * 
Arnold, DwtLe 
Bingham, H. L. 
BoflBettf Jane A. 
Baaeett, James A. 
'Benneck, Tlieodore 
Bishop, Amelia A, 
Bishop, Oharies 0. 
Britton, NelBon 
Ohnrchill, Austin 
Churchill, Irene 
Olarkson, Oharies 
Ohesbro, Ariadna P. 
Dudley, Jamea A. 
Dressier, Louisa 
Downie, John J. 
Englehardt, Philip S. 
Farrarr, "Washington 
Fitzgerald, Sarah 
Fountain, Sarah 
Grout, Adelbert, 
Hews, Abram 
Hews, Oharies S. 
Helmeri William L« 
Hilgen, Gerhard 
Hogue, Barely 
Huyck, Ansel 
Johnson^ Al^ontOi 



Town. 
Hudson, 
Koskonong, 
Rttttvilte, 



(( 



Beanrer Dam, 
Union, 

Altaian, 
Waukesha, 

Ashton, 
Darien, 

Milwaukee, 
Root Creek, 
Milwaukee, 
Summerville, 
Milwaukee, 
Sugar Creek, 
Fox Lake, 

Eagle, 

■ << 

Hartford, 
Cedarburg^ 
Cascade, 
Clinton, 



St. Oroir. 

Jefferson. 

Grant 



i% 



Dodge. 
Rock. 



» 



Jefferson. 
Waukesha. 



C( 



Dane. 
Walworth. 



a 



Milwaukee. 



<c 



cc 



Rock. 

Milwaukee. 

Walworti. 

Dodge. 

Waukesha. 



a 



aaoingtoiu 

Ozaukee* 

Sheboygaiu 

Rock. 



cc 



ai 



Jones, ThomAfl 


Sullivan, 


Jeflerson. 


8j Azebe 


Watetown, 


cc 


JKeley, Honrj 


Janesrville^ 


Book. 


Kingpaau^OUriflw B.Bac^oo, 


. Swfc 


liover, Annie 


Mauston, 


A^aw^ 


Morgan, Sylvester 


Beaver Dam, 


Dodge. 


McCoy, Julia 


Hazel Green, 


Grant. 


O'Donnell, John 


ICilwauk^, 


IfilWAVkM* 


O'Neil Mathew 


Mi^le Grov^ 


Haoitowoc. 


Orvis, Matilda A. 


Little Prairie, 


Walworth. 


O'Conner, Ellen 


Hartford, 


Wa^iqgton. 


O'Conner, Mary 


cc 


cc 


Palm, Peter 


Madison, *^ 


Dane. 


Palm, Barbara 


(C 


u 


Pierce, Albert 


Waukesha, 


Waukesha. 


Bhines, Delos D* 


Greenfield, 


Ifilwaukee. 


Eobertson, Flora 


Fulton, 


Rock. 


Itolt, Harvey M. 


. Albany, 


GreeQ. 


Sorenson, Oscar 


Toland's Prairie, 


Washington. 


Shelden, Olarinda J.Decatur, 


Green. 


Sisson, Selena S. 


FaVmington, 


Tia Crosse. 


Stickles, Silar 


Genessee, 


Waukesha. 


Sullivan^ William 


Muskego Centre, 


cc 


Thorn, Benjamin 


White Creek, 


Adums. 


Trembor, John 


Mineral Point, 


lowaCoi 


Tyson, Jacob 


Sheboygan, 


Ozaukee. 


Van-Winter, 


Portage City, 


Colmnbi^. 


Willis, Benjamin 


Delevan, 


Walworth. 


Whiling, John E. 


Butte•des-n^)rts^ 


Winnebago. 


Whole number < 


>f Pupils within the 


yev — 56. 



REPORT OF BUILDING COMMIHEE 

OF THE WISCONSIN INSTITUTE FOR THE Et)UCA- 
HON OF THE DEAF AND DUMB. 

2b the Board of. Trustees of the WisSifism InstitiUe for &t 

SiticcUian of the Deaf and Dumb. 

Oestlemen — ^Yoar committee would respectfally submit t» 
your honorable body the following report as the result of their 
labors for the past year, together with the Architect's report^ 
8. 0. ElElset. 

Immediately after our appointment we entered upon the 
duties assigned us, by engaging S. 0. EjsrBET, the former 
Architect, to complete the Plans, Drai^v^gs, and Specifications 
of the central building, bam and shop ; and to superintend 
the erection of the same, so far as the plans and specifications 
were concerned. And in order to facilitate the operations of 
building and getting ready to commence early in the spring, we 
immediately commenced contracting for labor and material& 
And by the time the frost was out of the ground, the well was 
dug, and the excavations for the basements of Main ouil^ng 
and bam were commenced. Therefore, by be£:inning opera- 
tions early, constant application, and perseverance, we were 
enabled to complete all the mason work of the walls early 
in October; giving them ample time to harden and diy 
before winter set in. And at the present time we are hap^ 
py to be able to report the bam, shop and main building en* 
closed, and secured from all damage from winter storms. 

There were appropriated at the last session of the Legisla- 
ture, the following sums for building purposes . 
For Fencing, common, ... . . $660 00 

*" Shop, 2,000 00 

« Bam, . • 700 OO 



• 



28 

" Cistern and Well, . . . . . 200 DO 

" Privy, ...*.... 100 00 

" Erection of Main building, . . . 16,000 OO 



■*■ 



Amounting to, $18,600 00 

It was fonnd quite difficult, and vfe thought it unnecessarji 
to keep entirely separate the cosf of materials and labor of 
each individual dej^artment ; or in other words, to apply just 
the specific amount to each particular object named in the ap- 
propriation. And therefore we took the aggregate, and used 
it to the best advantage for the Institute, in frnthering the ad- 
vancement and interest of the whole. 

1. There has been built during the past season, about 980 
rods of good substantial board fence, the most of which is five 
boards high, capped, and cleated. 

This encloses the •entire lot, ;^8 acres, by joining on the 
west line the farm of Mr. John De Wolf, the half of which 
line of fence will need to be built soon; also interior fences 
to separate the pasture from the meadow, the barn-yard from 
the garden, etc 
The cost of the above fence is about . . $300 00 
And will require about the same sum to com- 
plete the common fencing, viz : 300 00 

Amount appropriated, .... $600 00 

2. The shop is built of brick on stone foundation, laid deep 
and broad, below the reach of frosts 

It is 24 by 4S feet on the ground, and two stories high. 
When completed it ^ill accommodate quite a number of Pu- 
pils, in at least two branches of mechanism, or trades. 
The cost of this building, so far as completed, is 

about $1,600 00 

And will require, to complete, the sum of . 600 00 

^mounting to the sum appropriated, viz : 2,000 00 

8. Hie barii is btiilt of wood with stone basement, 24 by 88 

feet, 16 fee( in hight above basement, and is about completed. 



84 

It will cost not quite the sam approp«4ated, viz ; $700 00 
4 The cistern is beneath the basement of- the centr&l 
building, walled up with stone and arched with brick, an d 
will hold at least 200 barrels. It needs another coat of water 
lime, before completed. It will cost $150. 

The well is dug and curbed, SO feet deep, and fumisheB an 
abundant supply of excellent water. The coat of thig, when 
completed, will be $125 ; which, added to the oost of the oia- 
tem, will exceed the appropriation for t2ie same, at; least $76. 

6. The Privy, owing t*> the unusuaUy cold weather, is not 
built. The brick is on hand, a part of the carpenter work is 
done. The excavation is completedi the masonry is let, and 
tlie wall commenced ; but it will not be completed until 
spring. Thia very important edifice is to be 16 by 24 feet on 
the ground, and calculated to accommodate the entire male 
department, Th^ estimated cost of ths building is 300 00 

The appropriation for the same is . • . 100 00 

The cost will exceed the appropriation . • 200 00 

But there are nearly materials enough on hand to balance 
this deficiency ; viz : brick, sand, etc. 

6. The main central building is enclosed and the windows 
nearly ready to be put in. It is 56 by 60 feet on the ground, 
five stories in hight, including the basement and attic. 

We would here refer you to the accoi^panying report of 
the Architect for a full description of the central building ; 
and for the cost of materials and labor, for all the buildings 
^d fence, to our bills and contracts, which are quite too nu- 
mergus and bulky to incorporate into a repoirt 

In order to secure the best materials, and at the same time 
at the most economical pricea, we were obliged to negotiate 
ii;)rthe lutme at various points, and at some distance from this 
jjaoe ; as the following summary, will ijgidicat^ : 

The common brick came from K. Se?|ton's yard, |]Ikhora* 
lEhe pressed brick were purcliaaed of <}^org^ Bumham, in ^ 
tihe ci^ of Milwaukee. 



96 

» 

Tba cQmmpn stoipke eame irom Burlington , and weira pur- 
chased of the R, & M. R. B. Oo, 

The dfe98od sto^e oame fi^otn the Athens ^uany, Dl., wd 
'were purchased of Messrs. King & Wheeler, Ohicago. 

The lime came from Bacine, and is of superior qualitj. 

The pine lumber came from N. Pendleton's yard in Rapine. 

Black walnut lumber, from Bradley, Meder & Co., Racine. 

The long hewn and sawed timber came from G. W. 1^- 
con's Milwaukee Woods. 

The balance from P. Matteson's saw-mill, near this place. 

The castings for window and door caps, and sills and col- 
umns, came from J. Sheriff's foundry, in Milwaukee. 

^The copper and lead, for flashing and gutters, etc., were fur- 
nished by Ira Ford, of Delavan. . . 

The bill of glass for m^in building, eame from the glMs 
factory, Pittsburg, Pa., and fairnished by Oha^dler & Barksor 
Delevan, to order. 

Sai^h, Doors, etc., were mannlaqtoi^ at the Dele^aa Plan- 
ing Mill. 

The^ard-ware and nails were furaished in part by Mosstb. 
Ford and Smith, hard-.ware dealers, of this place, and the bat 
lance obtained at Raeine, Beloit, Milwaukee, Ohioago and 
Elkhorn. 

A bill of dressed stone, for ashlery and coping, for jEgrea 
walls has been contracted for, with D. Barnes & Oo., Wan 
kesha. 

Che mason work for bam, basement, and walls and shop, 
was done by the job, by Z. B. Sturtevant. 

The job for the masonry, for walls of main building, was 
let to, and done by, Messrs. Fisk <fc Warren, recently from 
New York. 

The joiners' and carpenters' work was done by the day, 
under tne snperuision of W. W. Sturtevant, of this place, as 
foreman. 

Having parohased all thettiatrial^, nmi panomally examined 
the same, and the work during ttKa.ptocesa cf erection, we 



26 



edifice, so fieur as it is now oonstrncted, to be built of 
good materials, i^nd well and thorongUypnt together : eon- 
stitntiog one of the best buildings, so far as completed, to be 
found in the State. 

ITEHS OF 008T TO FINISH BUILDINOS, BTC., GOHBCKZSTCSD. 

Well and cistern, $75 00 

Privy, 100 00 

Shop, - 500 00 

Main Central Building, ..... 15,000 00 



BILI^ NOT AUDITEaX 



N. Pendleton — ^Lumber, . . I . 

Bradley, Header & Oo. — ^Lumber and Work, 

Delavan Planing Mill Company, . 

Richard Williams — ^Paint and Glass, . 

D. Barnes & Oo. — Dressed Stone, 

Story — Painting Barn, 

Fisk & Warren — balance due on contract. 



$15,675 00 

$8,669 00 

59 84 

160 40 

63 96 

700 00 

12 00 

|^81 05 



Amounting to. 



MATSBIALS ON HAIO). 

1 bbl. Oil, (42 gallons.) $1 06, . 
200 lbs. Lead— $10 per 100 lbs., . 
60,000 feet of Lath, 
221,000 feet Olear Flooring, 
160,000 feet Oloar Plank and Boards, 
8,000 Pressed Brick— $22 per M., 
80,000 Common Brick— $7,50. . 




(5,036 19 


$44 52 


20 00 


225 00 


449 00 


650 00 


72 00 


225 00 



Amount, $1,686 58 



AMOUNT APPBOPRUnn. 

For Fence, Barn, Bhop, Outrbuilding, Cistem, 



Well and Main Buflding, 



. $18,600 00 



27 

BILLS ADDTTED. 

By Building Oommittee, Dec. Oth, 1857, amonnting to $15, 
602 48, as follows: 
For Labor, . • . . . . . . $4,562 60 . 

Common Brick, • . .. . • . . 2,000 00 

Pressed Brick, 500 00 

Dressed Stone, . . • . . . . 765 Ql 

Oommon Stone, . . . . . . . 456 00 

Casting, . i .!•... 671 60 

Lumber, * , 1,800 00 

TKmber, . 815 20 

Iron and Blacksmithing, 286 66 

lime, ..,.•.... 608 07 

Architect's Services, . . . . . 200 O'O 

Glass, 258 08 

Nails and Hardware, . . . . . . 206 08 

Fainting and Glazing Shop and Bam, . . 51 26 

Traveling Expenses, ...... 89 66 

Freight, . 542 02 

Lead Ooppcr and Labor, . . . . . « 56t> 80 

Oil afd Lead, . . . , . 79 65 

Stationery and Blank Book, .... 14 60 

Sand, . . 241 10 

Advertising, . •. 15 00 

Team Work, * . 1,27 42 

Mason Work and Brick, etc., for Shop, . • 675 00 

$15,602 48 

Mnandited and to be paid, 1,165 85 

Andited by Board Trustees, • . . . 860 ©• 

Total amount expended, .... $17,929 81 



REPORT OF ARCHITKCT 

» 

OF THK WISCONSIN INSTITUTE FOR THE BDUOATION OF 

THE DEAF AND DUMB. 



To ih^ Building OommUtoe of ike Wisconsin Institute for ih0 

Education of the Deaf and Dumb : 

Gbmtlgmsn : — Upon taking charge of the ereotion of die 
main body of your bnlldiDg the 1st of last Jane, (aside ftoxi 
preparing the details and specifications,) the excavation had 
been nearly completed, and a portion of the material deliToiv 
ed, nnder the supervision of HI Hant, M. D., and Gen. Betts, 
members of your committee. The walb were then immedi- 
ately commenced ^y the contractors, Messrs. Fisk <fe Warren, 
and the preparation of the wood work, nnder Mr. W. W. 
Stnrtevant, as foreman. From that time till the ll&i^ng of 
the stone and brick work in October last, the whole has pro- 
gressed with as much rapidity as the character of the work 
and^ weather would admit, aeide from two short delays in de- 
livery of material, and one from defects in the iron oaps, 
which required the whole to be re-cast. But after the com- 
pletion of the walls, the workmen were delayed so mndi in 
potting up the coniice and roof, from the inclemency of the 
weather, that they were not finished until the last of last 
mouth* The buildiug noy^, however^i has the exterior 
walls completed, the cornice and roof on, and the fioor tim- 
ber laid ; and when the window sash are glazed and fitted, as 
they soon will be, will have the inside well protected from the 
effects of storms. 

To give the general dimensions of your building, and char- 
acter of the work : It is fifty-six by sixty feet on the outside 
above the wat^r table, and five stories in height, including the 



89 

basement and attic. It is sixty-two feet from the foundation 
to the top of the walls, and the walls ebow fifty-four and a 
half feet above the ground. Dividing the basement into a 
kitchen on the north, and a dining room, on the south is a 
brick partition extending up through the first and second 
stories. The exterior walls of the basement^ foundation of 
the brick partition, and the dwarf walls beneath the base- 
ment floor, have been laid with stone. The main walls were 
commenced at the basement floor, on footings four feet in 
width, at the bottom, and thirty inches deep ; and have been 
carried up twenty-eight inches thick, to the first story floor, 
eleven feet above. From the ground to the water table on 
the south sides, these walls have been faced with neatly bush- 
hammered stone, and the window openings and comers trim, 
med with rustic joints. - The cut stone are laid in fciot courses, 
and neatly pointed. They were famished and cut by Messrs. 
King & Wheeler, of Chicago, from the Athens quarries, Illi- 
nois. They are a durable magnetian limestone, nearly pure 
white, and, taken together, as laid in the wall, with the heavy 
Thaler table, show six feet above the ground, and give a fine 
character to the front. The north side is faced with rough- 
hammered stone, laid in random-coursed wofk, with the com- 
ers and the water table the same as on the south. 

Above the cut stone on the south side, the walls have been 
faced with Milwaukee pressed brick ; but on the north, with 
good comm on weather brick. The brick walls are twenty-two 
inches thick, in the first story, sixteen in the «econd, and 
twelve above. They give a clear hight to each story of 
twelve and a half feet to the first, fourteen to the second, elev- 
en to the third, and eight to the attic. The brick partition 
is sixteen inches thick in the basement, twelve in the first 
story and eight in the second. 

Your foundation could not well be better, if desired, being 
based immediately upon a stratum of cemented loam and 

* 

gravjel, from one to two feet thick, resting upon a deep bed 
of clean sand and gravel that outcrops immediately north of 






80 

jonr building, on the brow of the hill, and some distance 
above the water-leyel. This will, from its porons character, 
keep yonr basement and foundation comparativelj dry. 

Upon consultation with yourselves, and Mr. OflScer, the 
Piincipaldf the Institute, the iron columns were removed 
from the chapel in the second story, and the ten shown on th 
plan of the several stories, reduced to two in the basement- 
* The chapel floor is supported upon .these by the partition 
each side of the main hall in the first story, and the ceilings 
and floors above by two framed partitions in the third story 
These are thirty-flve feet in length, thirteen iii hight, and ex- 
tend from the front wall to the brick partition. By this 
means the chapel is left free from obstructions to the sight o 
the pupils ; so necessary during their exercises. The chapel 
will be a fine room, thirty-five by fifty-seven feet, and four- 
teen feet high. 

All the fioors have been set with heavy joists, twelve inches 
deep — generally sixteen inches from center to center, and 
stiffened by stout tiers of bridging, not over seven feet apartL 
The principal timbers* of the roof have been framed of the 
best oak that could be obtained, of such size and in such a 
manner as will support a metal covering, if desired. It is 
now, however, covered with shingles, laid four inches to the 
weather. The cornice is of wood, having a heavy projection, 
and is trimmed with heavy brackets, and has its gutter lined 
with coppei;^ The juncture of all roofs with these walls, and 
of this roof with the chimney shafts, have been protected 
with heavy lead flashing, let into the brick. The water- 
table has been pointed with lead, and the best endeavors used 
throughout to render the building, when flnished, as durable 
as possible. 

To complete the building will require the whole inside 
work to be done, including the laying of floors, setting par- 
titions, lathing and plastering, putting up wainseotting and 
bases, building stairs from basement to attic, making and 
casing doors, trimming windows, fitting up closets, plumbing, 



81 

paintisg, i&c, and* the coyering of the dome, pattiDg up Iront 
fiteps and area walls, and building the front porch. Estimating 
by the present prices of material and labor, and including 
what has been contracted for, and what is on hand, it will re- 
quire not less than fifteen thousand dollars to complete it in 
a si^bstantial manner, and as plain as the character of the 
building as an Institution of the State, and the purposes for 
which it is designed, would justify. The cj^timate embraces 
a good system of ventilation, and the construction of a main 
sewer, but does not include any apparatus for heating, light- 
ing, or supplying water. 

Bespecting these last items, provision has been made in 
the walls for heating the basement, first and second stories, of 
this part with hot air, but when the extent of your whole 
building is considered, being one hundred and ninety-six feet 
in lenotb, and from Yoor to five stories in high t, nearly the 
whole of which will require warming for a part of the year, 
it becomes a serious question whether it will be best, or will 
even answer your purpose. That these three stortes can be 
heated by that system is undoubtedly true ; imt when extend- 
ed to the whole range will, at best, require from six to eight 
furnaces ; taking up much valuable room in ^our basement, 
and be scattered in separate roomi^ over one hundred and 
eighty feet between the extremes. There would, besides be 
the danger of fire, and disagreeaUe effects that usually at- 
t;end their useJ For these reasons, with the best informatibn 
I cati gain. I cannot recommend that system for your build- 
ing, as it would leave so large a portion un warmed, except 
by a disagreeable and expensive system of stoves, or a dupli- 
cation of furnaces, dictated by anything but economy. For a 
building like yours there are but two methods to my knowl- 
edge, capable of distributing an agreeable and sufficient 
warmth to all parts from one fire. These are by hot water 
and steam. But to the first therp are so many disadvantages, 
arising from the pressure the apparatus is required to sustain. 



S3 

and the nicety of adjtBBtment and management, to obtain fa- 
vorable reBults, tiiat I do not think it adapted to yoar wants. 
Of the other, however, it Beems to hare been brought to ftuch 
a degree of perfection in Gold's patent steam heating appa- 
rati», as to leave but little to be desired. The pressure » 
confined to from one to two ponnds to the inch, tbe hea1»to 
213 degrees, doing away with the dangel- of fire where the 
pipes come in contact with wood, and its action being simple 
requires bat little care and attention comparatively, in its 
management. Besides, its automatic attachments regelate its 
own supply of water, and the bumisg of the fire after the 
fael is in, causing it to give out from its radiators a mild, 
equitable, and agreeable warmth to the most remote parts of 
the building ; free from dirt, dust, or gas. Wherever it haa^ 
t'» my knowledge, received a fair trial, it has met with un- 
qualified approbation* 

Should it be adopted, the boiler furnace can be placed be- 
neath what will be the west lateral wing, or in a separate 
building in the rear of the main one. The latter would prob- 
ably be the best I think an apparatus sufficiently large for 
your, whole building, with pipes and radiators for the parts at 
present up, can be put in for five thousand dollars, and tlie ex- 
cavation and extra walls for the furnace can be done for five 
hundred more. 

The lighting and supplying your building with water, are 
subjects scarcely less important than the last, and demand 
your early attention. Kot only the danger and inconvenience, 
but cost of candles, oil, fluid and campheae, for a building of 
that size, and number <^ inmates, call for some other means 
of lighting. But without specifying at this time any particu- 
lar apparatus for that pupose, I would tuggest that in rbw of 
the improvements yearly made in manufacturing gas for soli- 
tary buildingB, and the ultimate adoption of s<mie plaa tor 
that purpose, that the necessary pipes be laid for its distriba- 
tion, as it can be done so much more satisfactorily, and ak leas 
cost now than when the work is finished. For the distriution 



88 

of water, two tanks can be placed in the attic, resting on the 
brick partition, withont inconvenience, and be nsnally supplied 
from the roo£^ Should that source fail at any time, a simple 
force pump, driven by horse power, can be used at little ex* 
pense. From these tanks water citn be rettdily conducted fto 
all parts of your building, and heated wherever requiredf 
with a simple apparatus, by your steam. I would recommend 
its adoption, and the putting in of the necessary pipes. These 
last two items would require an expenditure of one thousand 
dollars beyond the general estimate for finishing. 

Your building, .as Hie State increases in population, will 
soon become the home of nearly or quite three hundred peiv 
sons ; where diey are bot only to live, board and lodge, but 
attend school ; and will require for convenience, economy of 
labor, and healUi, a large amount of appUanoes, a family of 
a few persons can but imperfectly experience the need of, and 
you will, therefore, by an early attention to these and kindred 
prospective wants, be able, at a eomparathrely small present 
cost, to teve largely on the ultimate ezpenee of the whole 
building, besides securing a degree of convenience to be no 
otherwise obtained. 

To recapitulate the items required to finish your buildin|^ 
and to heat, supply it with water, and prepare for Mghtini^ 
there are , 

To finish main body, - . . . . $16,000 00 ' 
Steam boiler and furnaces ibr whole, and pipe 

and radiators for part built - - 5,000 00 

Excavation and walls for furnace, • • 600 00 

Oas pipes, tanks, and water pipes, • - 1,000 00 



DeUvan, December 8th, 1867. 



$31,600 00 
8. 0. EELSEY. 



KULES OF ADMISSION OF PUPILS, ETC. 



!• All tlie Deaf and Dumb of the State^. between the agw 
of ten and thirty years^ aie entitled to an edmoatioo, Tfithont 
ebtrge for board or tuition, in this insiitnticm upon oon^liance 
wadi the mla$. "So ceitifioate of any kind is repaired for adnua- 
tton. Persona^ however, desironfl of placing * pnpil in the 
•ohool^Bhoald write to the Saperintendeot, inlorming him of the 
iiaiBe, age, and residence of the mute ; the cauee, if known^ 
d deafiieas, (be. TheSupmntendent will immediately answer, 
sirtiiiy the time when the pnpil will be reeeived. This eonise 
ia in all cases reoommendedi though none will be refused who 
emus St the oommsncement of the sessite. Applications in 
bahalf of persons of more or less than the required age, will 
be considered by the Trustees, who reserve to themselves die 
i^gbl to aoospt or ivject such applicants, as they may deem 
jnsl and preper. 

2. Pupils from other States, are received at a rate of $100 
pev annum, for board and tuition. 

3. The length of the coarse of instrootion is five years ; and 
ihat the stndents may become more proficient in their studies 
they are allowed and advised to remain one year more. At 
the end o£ six years, the Superintendent may select such pu- 
pik-as-he may consider would be particularly benefitted by 
continuing longer at school ; and if approved by the Board 
of Tmateea^ they shall be permitted to remain an addjitional 
year. 

4. Pupils will be admitted on the following conditions : 1st, 
The pupil, well provided with clothes, is to be brought to the 
Institution punctually, atjthe commencement of each session, 



fbr llie period of flte years, xinleeB detained at home by liig 
or her skimett; Sid; The papil is to remain at school nntQ 
the l«iit Wednesday in Jnne, of each y^ur. S. Tio parent or 
gnardian shall be allowed to take a pnpH out of school wlth^ 
ont the consent of the Board of Trustees. 

5. It is the intention of the Trustees to render the instito- 
tion self-supporting, as far as practicable, and that every pu- 
pil, on leaving its walls) shall be so proficient in some usefal 
occupation or trade, as to be able to procure a livelihood, 
without reliance On the charities of others. In accordance 
with the design, all the scholars will be required to labor a 
portion of each day ; Hk^ gUrls perfoi-ming the lighter kinds 
of house*work, and in various kinds of. needle- work, as plain 
sewings ornamental work, dress-making, or millinery, Aqj; 
and the boys at various trades, the necessary wt)rk about tht 
Asylum, and the cultivation of the tsiem and girden. 

6. The annual sessiohs of tibe school eontinue ten months, 
commencing on the first Wednesday in September, and close 
on the last Wednesday in June. Every pupil is to come 
promptly on or before tiie first day of the session, and is to re- 
main until the last of the same. The only exceptions allowed 
ax^ cases of sickness, or where leave of absence in writing 
kas been granted, either by the Principal, or in case of the 
icbsenoe ef Ihe Principal, the Professor to whom lie has dele- 
gated the power. 

^. Ko pupil, unless under extraordinary circumstajoices, Can 
be recdved at any other fime than the commencement of the 
session. 

S. Parents or guardians are required, if possible, to fhmish 
annually, to each pupil, the following supply of clothing': 

FOR MALE PTJPIU3* 

« 

2 or 8 Oofllts, 6 Fairs of Bocks, 

aorSVeste, 1 Pair of Boots, 

2 or 3 Pairs of Pantaloom^, £ l^alrs of Shoes, 



86 

SShirta, 2 Hate, or 1 Hat and 1 Oap. 

2 Flannel Shirte, 2 Pairs of Dfawera. 

AlaOy (for small bojB), 8 or four check of gingham sacks or 
aprons. 

aUKMSB GLOTHIKG^; 

2 Ooate, 2 Pairs of Pantaloons^ 

2 Tests, 1 Palm-Leaf Hat, 

ADDmONJLL ARTICLES. 

2 Ivory combs, 2 Pairs of Suspenders. 

2 Pairs Wooden Combs, 4 Pocket*Handkerchei&. 

FOB FEMAXE PUPIIfi. 

8 or 4 Calico Dresses, 8 Pairs of Summer Stocking! 

2 Woolen or Worsted Dresses, 8 Pairs of Winter Stockings 
1 Sunday and 1 Sun Bonnet, 2 Night Gowns, 
4 Pocket H'dk'^ & 1 Hood, 8 Pairs of Shoes, 1 pr. Rubbers. 
8 or more changes of under clothing. 

AJyomONAJL ABTIOLVB. 

l^awl or Cloak, 1 Hafr Brush, 

1 Coarse and 2 Ivory Combs, 2 Hair Combs. 

In addition to the above outfit, a sum of not lees than $8, 
is to be deposited with the Superintendent for incidental ex* 
pei[ises, repair of shoes, &c; any part of which remaining 
unexpended, will be returned at the close of the session. 

9. -It is not intended that the clothing should be of an ex- 
pensive kind. For boy^s winter apparel, plain home-made 
cloth is sufficiently good. For summer wear, country linen 
will answer for pante, with some kind of dark goods or prints 
for coats and veste. Girl's calico dresses may be made of a 
cheap article, which will not fade ; and while, ioi^older girls, 
at least one pair of morocco shoes should be furnished, one or 
both the other pair^should be of good calfskin. On all arti- 
eles of clothing which it is possible to mark, the full name of 
Ibe pupil should be written with indellible ink. Each pupil 
should be supplied with a trunk or chest 



87 

10. Those persons bringing pnplls and taking them awaj, 
caimot be foraished with board, lodging, or hoise-keeping at 
the Asylam* 

11. All business letters, or letters of inquiry in regard to 
pupils in iaie Asylnm, or those whom it naaj be designed to 
place there, should be addressed to 

J. 8. OFFIOEE, 
Principal of the Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, 

Delayan, Wisconsin, 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



1 JC^^ 

Deaf and Dumb InsHhUion in account wim J. D, MONELL^ J 

Treawrer, , 



M 

It 

M 
II 
II 
II 
M 
II 

a 



«i 



II 
II 

M 

•• 
M 
(I 
U 
li 



71 

110 

14 

121 

129 

104 

120 

67 



To Paid order No. 103 

i( (I 

obeck 

order " 
11 <i 

ii tt 

oheck 

order " 
it II 

u u 

II M 

« note W. C. bank 
*« order No. 148 
cbeck 

** order No. 100 

•* " " 101 
(I 

11 

a 

u 

u 

ti 

cbeck 

" order No. 131 
M <• « 12 



1 127 

« 126 

" 102 

** 106 

" 126 

** 130 



% 62 26] 


309 07 


6 25 


60 00 


2 60 


26 00 


18 00 


9 00 


120 00 


100 00 


20 00 


4 00 


6,369 64 


> 926 00 


91 62 


10 00 


12 30 


20 00 


14 00 


14 00 


6 60 


16 00 


10 00 


30 00 


4 92 


10 00 


16 00 


16 00 


$7,300 00 



Ry amount of Appropria- 
tion tbe last year 1866^ 
received of the County 
Treacorer^February let, 



1867. 



$7,300 



$7^300 00 



We, tbe undersigned, to wbom tbe above Report was referred, fi» 

examination, do report, tbat we bave proceeded to examine tbe same^ 

and find it correct in eacb and every part tbereo^ together with th« 

vouchers accompanying the same. 

Dated Deo. 12th, 1867 . WM. 0. ALLElf, Ch^n^ 

JOSEPH BAKER, 
WILLARD XSHAM. 



•k 



TREASTJKER'S REPORT. 



To ]^aid order No. 279 
u I* "161 

u ' u 
a u 

.< <4 

•c u 

check 



ti 
it 



u 

d 
tt 

14 



« 

U 

*» 

u 
tt 

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a 



« 247 

<• 183 

» 184 

w 149 

*• 137 

«* 139 

^ 8a 

« 81 



14 
U 



*' ordefUo. 118 
" 116 
w 107 



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289 

294 

292 

291 

290 

267 

295 

296 

298 

300 

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302 

308 

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307 

805 

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8»7 

304 
812 
815 
819 
817 
814 
816 
810 
822 
318 
826 
327 
306 
828 
818 
824 
325 
332 
342 
340 
384 
330 
820 
838 
311 
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335 
331 
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6 

69 

64 

12 

88 

200 

86 

2 

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260 
45 
18 
83 

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15 

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77 
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724 
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Cash on hand, 9,^5 '39 

Appropriatifjn .VW# • ^> W ^^ 



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Amount of Appropria- $84,500 00 
Hon for the year 1857 34,500 00 



u 

KBOAPmTLATION. 

Amaimt jMid, per rtatttnant and roachen^ $25^)84 «l 

(kA mhand^ 1^9619 

ISnim, . - 1.52000 

AppropriatioB iDwMly 6.600 00 



$34.500 00 
Amoant of Aj^yropnation hr tho year 185Y, $34,500 00 



Wi, the nnderngned. to whom the within Beport was i cfig r e dfa 
examination, do report, that we have examined the same^aDdibdit 
correct in eadi and every pan theno^ together wilk tha voabhan 
thei6o£ 

WM. a ALLEN. Ck% 
WILLABD KHAM. 
JOSEPH BAKES. 
Dated December 11th, 1857. 



>e 



DOCUMENT "K." 



3E 



STATE MILITAIIY OFFICERS. 



4*»» ► 



. COLES BASHFORD, Commander-in-Ohief, Oslikosh- 



GENERAL STAFF. 



Amasa Cobb, 
Yolkert W. Roih, 
Thomas Stevens, 
H. C. Bull, 

E. L. Buttrick, 
John W. Hunt, 



Adjutant General, Mineral Point. 

Commissary General, Madison. 
Inspector General, Dodgeville. 

Quarter Master General, Madison. 
Pay Master General, 
Judge Advocate General, Milwaukee. 
Surgeon General, Madiscm. 



AIDS DE CAMPS. 



Walter D. Mclndoe, 
Charley Shutter, 
D. A. Clin, 
G. E. Dexter, 
A. E. Bovey, 

W. S. Grubb, 



Wansau. 

Milwaukee. 
Monroe. 
Bipon. 
Sauk Co. 



J. C» Howells, Military Secretary, Madison. 



Adjutant General's Office, ) 
Madison, Wis., Dec. 30tb, 1857. ) 

To THE Governor — 

I have the lionor to submit my Annual Eeport : 

The aggregate number of the militia of this State, as shown 
by the annexed table, cdmpiled from the returns received 
from the several Eegimeuts, is 95,806, exhibiting an increase 
of 60,781 since last year. 

The cause of this very large increase is to be foundin the 
fact that for the first time we have obtained returns nearly 
complete from all the counties of the State — the counties of 
Trempealeau an4 LaPoint being the only ones which hare 
failed in their returndi, while, lor the year 1k56, not one half 
of the counties returned their numbers. 

The system which I have adopted will, I think, prevent all 
difficulty hereafter in obtaining the necessary reports from 
the several towns and counties of the actual number of the 
militia of this State; and next year, this office will, I hope, 
be able to give a full return of every man in the State capa- 
ble of bearing arms, and subject to military duty. 

Until this completeness of returns is reached, this State 
will be unable to obtain from the General Government the 
full quota of arms to which it is entitled. The value of the 
arms which we may expect to receive during the present year 
and with what we have on hand will propably be about $*25,- 
000, end I would respectfully suggest that measures t^e taken 
to erect or procure a suitable building, wherein the arms and 
ammunition belonging to the State can be safely stored until 
they are distributed. 

There are about twenty uniformed companies in the State, 
but not one of them -has made a report to this office for the 
past year, and I am therefore unable to report the number, 
kind, or condition of the arms and ordnance heretofore dis- 
tributed to them. It is to be hoped that such neglect of duty 
will not occur in future. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

AMASA COBB, 

Adjutant General.' 



LIST OF RETURNED MILITIA, 



FOR THE TEAR 1857. 



The following is a tabular statement of tlie abstracts of Mi- 
litia Lists, as forwarded to me from the several counties of the 
State, for the year 1857. 

FIRST DIVISIOlSr. 

MILWAUKEE COUNTY. 





y^o, Returned. 




No. Returned. 


Town of Franklin, 


210 


8d Ward City of Milwaukee, 1749 


«' Greenfield, 


400 


4th " 


" 1165 


** Wauwatosa, 


564 


5th " 


" 641 


** Granville, 


256 


6 th " ** 


« 436 


'• Oak Creek, 


308 


7th " 


" 947 


^ *• Lake, 


• 209 


8th « •* 


*• 524 


* •• Milwaukee, 


292 


9th " *•■ 


** 632 


Ist Ward city of Milwaukee, 521 






2d ** 


" 785 


Total, 


9,639 




WAUKESnA COUNTY. 






No, Returned. 




No. Returned 


Brookfield, 


330 


New Berlin, 


269 


Delafield, 


175 


Ooonomowoc, 


421 


Eagle, 


213 


Ottawa, 


149 


Gen esse. 


245 


Pewaukee, 


258 


Lisbon, 


227 


Summit, 


169 


Menomonee, 


265 


Vernon, 


194 


Merton, 


173 


Waukesha, 


677 


Muckwonago, 


225 






Muskeko, 


148 


Total, 


4138 



6 



JEFFERSON COUNTY. 





No. Returned. 


No. R< 


)tnmed. 


Aztalan, 


87 


Palmyra, 


275 


Gold Spring, 


164 


Sulivan, 


183 


Oonconi, 


100 


Waterloo, 


216 


£mm6tt| 


165 


Ist Ward City of Watertown, 450 


Farmington, 


160 


2d •* '* " 


123 


Hebron, 


150 


3d " •* ** 


85 


Ixonia, 


17« 


4th " •* " 


100 


Jefferson, 


200' 


6th " *< •• 


114 


Koshkonong, 


150 


6th « « " 


106 


Lake Mills, 


300 






Milford, 


100 


Total 


3,617 


Oakland, 


145 








WALWORTH COUNTY. 






No. Returned. 


No. Returned. 


Sharon^ 


186 


Oeneva, 


337 


Darien 


173 


La Fayette, 


169 


Richinondy 


107 


Troy 


167 


Whitewater, 


415 


Bloomfield 


112 


Walworth. 


200 


Hudson, 


154 


Delavan. 
Sugar Creek^ 


377 
157 


Spring Pnurie, 
East Tfoy, 


173 
221 


La Grange 


168 


Rlk Horn, 


221 


Lerin. 


135 






Total, 


8,422 




RACTNE COUNTY. 






No. Returned. 


No. Returned. 


1st Ward city of Racine, 29 1 


l^own of Mount Pleasant, 


177 


2d " " 


" 209 


" " Norway, 


90 


gd " " 


" 419 


" " Racine, 


254 


4th '« « 


a 271 


" " Rochester, 


146 


6th " " 


« 202 


« '* Waterford, 


188 


Town of Burlingto 


n, 338 


« " York Villa, 


118 


« " Caledonia, 202 


^' Raymond, 


148 


" « Dover, 


145 






X7 v 


Total, 


3,204 




KENOSHA 


COUNTY. 






No. Returned, 


No. Returned. 


Brighton, 


167 


Salem, 


200 


^3 

Bristol, 


125 


Somers, 


100 


Kenosha, 


603 


Whitewater, 


75 


Paris, 


92 


• 




Pleasant Prairie, 


212 


Totol, 


16$i 



SEOoisnD r>i^isiojsr. 





DANE COUNTK. 






Ha BaUtroed. 




No. BetWMd. 


AlbioOi 


110 


Medina, 


186 


Blai^'Earth, 


»5 


Middleton, 


80 


156 


Montrose, 


116 


Blooming Groye, 


108 


Oregon, 


lj86 


Blue Moundsy 


120 


Peny, 


125 


Briatol, 


125 


Primrose, 


115 


Burke, g 


108 


Pleasant Spring, 


152 


. Christiana, 


158 


BAxbury, 
Budaud, 


159 


Cottage Grove, 


107 


124 


CroBs Plains 


157 


Spring Dale^ 


124 


Dane, 


60 


Springfield, 


148 


Deerfield, 


64 


Sun Prairie, 


102 


Dunkirk, 


164 


Vermont, 


120 


Dunn, 


40 


Yienna, 


70 


Fitchburg, 


146 


Verona, 


105 


ttadison. 


142 


Westport, 


72 


l8t Ward City of Madison, 854 


Windsor, 


119 


2d « . « 


« 244 


York, 


75 


8d « « 


" 310 






4th ** " 


" 256 


Totol, 


5108 




BOCK COiDNTY. 






No. Beturaed. 


• 


No. Betumed. 


Avon, 


98 


Janesyille City, 


1264 


Spring Vallej, 


119 


Fulton, 


270 


Magnolia, 


145 


Turtle, 


213 


Union, 


242 


L& Prairie, 


180 


Kewark,* 


122 


Harmony, 


168 


Flymouthy 


119 


Milton, 


278 


Centre, 


111 


Clinton, 


182 


Porter, 


150 


Bradford, 


138 


Beloit, 


65 


Johnstown, 


191 


Beloit City, 


704 


Lima, 


152 


Bock, 


125 






Janesyille, 


112 


Total, 


5059 




GRRKN COUNTY. 






No. Returned. 




N«. Retuniedw 


Albany, 


208 


Monroe, 


429 


Adams, 


78 


Mt Pleasant, 


105 


Brooklyn, 


90 


New Glarus, 


30 


Cadiz, 


106 


Spring Groye, 


67 


Clamo, 


156 


Sylyester, 


116 


'Decatur, 


151 


T^ashington, 


78 


Exter, 


109 


York, 


74 


Jordon, 


74 


w 




JeffeTson, 


127 


Total, 


1988 



e 





BOWA COUHTY. 






No. Returned. 




No.Retoined. 


Arena, 


91 


Mineral Pt City, 


Ist Ward 166 


Clyde, 


69 


(4 44 


2d * 178 


DodffeviUe, 

Highland, 

Linden, 


261 


Pulaski, 


86 


S68 
141 


Ridfi^ay, 
Waldrich, 


1107 
£9 


Uifflin, 


107 


Wyoming, 


54 


Mineral Point, 


93 








# 


Total 


^ 1811 




LAFAYETTE COUNTY. 






No. Returned. 




No. Retonied. 


Afiryle, 


140 


Monticello, 


90 


Benton, ' 


310 


?ew Diggings, 


295 


Belmont, 


64 


Sliullisburg, 


206 


Centre, 


270 


White Oak' Springs, 91 


Elkgrove, 


90 


Willow Springs, 


123 


Fayette, 


170 


Wyota, 


214 


Oratiot, 


165 


Wayne, 


S3 


Kendall, 


236 










Total, 


2547 




GRANT 

• 


COUNTY, 






No. Retnmed. 




No Returned. 


Beeiown, 


167 


Marion, 


122 


Blue River, 


39 


Miilviile, 


87 


Clifton, 


69 


Muskoda, 


104 


Classville, 


147 


Paris, 


39 


EUenborongh. 


87 


Patch Grove, 


115 


Fennimore, 


lOl 


Plattville, 


347 


Hazel Green, 


249 


Potosi, 


331 


Hickory Grovei, 


48 


Smeltzer, 


105 


Harrison, 


80 


Wingville, 


67 


Jamestown, 


166 


Watertown, 


25 


Lancaster, 


208 


VVyal using. 


68 


Liberty, 


32 


Waterloo, 


61 


Lima, 


87 






Little Qrant, 


36 


Total 


2949 


X XXX JtvJLi XJX V XcJX\^-LN • 




MARQUETTE COUNTY. 


• 




No. Returned. 




No. Returned. 


Berlin, 


101 


Markford, 


146 


« 1st Ward, 


166 


Marquette, 


121 


u 2d " 


46 


Mecam, 


60 



9 



. « 8d « 


40 


Nesbroe, 


120 


*' 4th " 


105 


Newtown, 


119 


BrooUys, 


121 


Oxford, 


83 


Buffalo, 


106 


Pine Lake, 


53 


Crystal Lake, 


109 


Princeton, 


235 


Cay ton, 


•^ 91 


Parkwankee, 


111 


G reen Lake, 


176 


Shields, 


125 


Harris, " 


51 


St. Main, 


01 


Manchester, 


122 


Seneca, 


36 


Kingston, 


134 


Westfall, 


37 


M oundville. 


112 






Montello, 


64 


Total, 


2901 



FOND DU LAC COUNTY. 



U 



t( 



tt 



il 



cc 



u 



u 



i( 



i 



No. Returned. 
Ist Warf City of Fond du Lac, 203 

60 
92 
123 
110 
117 
195 
144 
68 
146 
133 
153 



2d 

dd 

4th 

6 th 

Alto, 

Ashford, 

Calumet, 

Auburn, 

Eden; 

Empire, 

Eldorado, 



No. Returned. 



Forrest, 

Friendship, 

Metomen, 

Oakfield. 

Osceola, 

Ripon, 

Rosindale, 

Springvale, 

Tavchedale, 

Waupun, 

Village of Waupun, 

Total, 



175 

63 

243 

170 

94 

282 

165 

170 

194 

124 

114 

■ ■■»'■ 

3638 



WASHINGTON COUNTY. 





umed. 


• 


No. Returned. 


Addison, 


279 


Kewasbkum, . 


155 


Barton, 


191 


Polk, 


220 


Erin, 


196 


Richfield, 


182 


Farmington, 


231 


Trenton, 


238 


Germantown, 


207 


Wayne, 


177 


Hartford, 


270 


West Bend, 


217 


Jackson, 


199 







Total, 
OZAUKEE COUNTY. 



2862 



• 


No. Returned. 


^ 


No. Returned. 


Belgium, 


118 


Mequon, 


255 


Cedarburgb, 


221 


Port Washington, 


827 


Fredonia, 


111 


Saukville, 


168 


Grafton, 


234 




- 



Total, 



1433 



10 
DODGE COUNTY. 





No. Betnraed. 


No. Retained. 


Beaver Dam, 




• 


148 


Lomner, 171 


u u 


City, Ist Ward 


,131 


Lowell, 228 


<c u 


" 2d 


i( 


106 


Oakgrove, 207 


C( ti 


•* 3d 


a 


140 


Rubicon, 255 


U M 


•• 4th 


u 


64 


Trenton, 246 


Burnett, 






138 


Tberesa, 2»5 


Calamus, 






61 


West^ord, 36 


Chester, 






115 


Williamstown, 2d9 


Clyman, 


• 




168 


Fox Lake, ^ 412 


Eerman, 






147 


Elba, 224 


Hincon Village, 




301 


South Ward of Waupun, 151 


Husterford, 






200 


Hubbard, 108 


LeRoj, 






90 





Xotal, 



4509 



COLUMBIA COUNTY. 





No. Returned. 




No. Returned 


West Point, 


130 


3oott, 


89 


Pacific, 


69 


Lowville, 


130 


Arlington, 


105 


Newport, 


105 


Springvale, 


87 


Port Winnebago, 


103 


Lodi, 


188 


Portage City, 


506 


Wyocena, 


154 


Columbus, 


327 


xjeeflp. 


62 


Otsego, 


130 


Hampden, 


85 


Portage Prairie, 


120 


Randolph, 


126 


Lewistown, 


150 


Caledonia, 


131 


Marcellon, 


120 


Decora^ 


117 







Total, 



8020 



SHEBOYGAN COUNTY. 





No Returned. 




No. Returned. 


Abbott, 


109 


Ruflsell^ 


31 


Oreenbush, 


164 


Scott, 


84 


Herman, 


93 


Sheboyaui 


50 


Holland, 


107 


" city, l8t Ward, 213 


lima, 


156 


" « 2d 


« 211 


Linden, 


215 


»< " 8d 


u 24 


m^tchell, 


62 


Sheboygan Falls, 


328 


Mosel, 


56 


Willson, 


09 


Plymouth, 


279 








Bkine^ 


74 


Total 


2,324 



11 

WAUSHARA COUNTY. 





No. Returned. 




No. Betnrned. 


Bloomfield, 




60 


Poysippi, 


87 


Colonna, 




•47 


lUchford, 


80 


Dacotah, 




n 


Boae, 


21 


Deerfield, 




16 


Sacramento, 


82 


Hancock, 




60 


Saxeville, 


72 


Iieon, 




128 


Spring Water, 


64 


Marion, 


• 


76 


Warren, 


26 


Mount Morris, 




82 


Wautoma, 


161 


Oasisis, 


• 


62 






Plainfield, 


• 


107 


Total, 


1,266 




^CALUMET COUNTY. 






No. Betnrned. 




No. Bctamed. 


Bullion, 




21 


Rantont, 


27 


Brothatown, 




183 


Stookbridge, 


172 


Charlestown, 




184 


Woodville, 


24 


Cbilton, 




205 






Lima, 




60 


Total, 


849 


New Holsteen, 




71 






M 


OUTAGAMIE COUNTY. 




« 


No. Returned. 




No. Returned. 


Appleton city, 1st. 


Ward. 


153 


Grand Shnte, 


98 


€c " 2d 


iC 


130 


Green Villa, 


108 


V' " 8d 


a 


134 


Hortonia, 


86 


Bosird, 




51 


K!aukauna, 


168 


Centre, 


9 


68 


Medina. 


lis 


Ellergton, 




116 






Embarras, 




66 


Total, 


1,830 


Freedom, . 




73 







FOXTRTBE DIVISION^, 



BROWN COUNTY. 



No. Retamed. 

Rockland, 04 

Village Depere, 127 

City of Green Bay, 854 

New Denmark, 127 

Wrightstown, 58 

Lawrence, 90 

Town of Green Bay, 860 



Fort Howard, 
Glenmore,. 
Holland, 
MorristowD, 

Total, 



No. Retomed. 

80 

48 

131 

76 



1,645 



12 
MANITOWOC COUNTY. 



• 


No. 


Returned. 




No. Ketomed. 


Centreville, 




148 


Meeme, 


154 


GooperstowD, 




186 


Meshecott, 


350 


EatoD, 




» 168 


Newton, 


242 


Franklin, 




230 


Rockland, 


9e 


Kossuth, 




175 


Schleswig, 


74 


City of Manitowoc, 




761 


T woRivers, 


403 


Manitowoc RapidS; 




211 


« 




Maple GrovCi 




100 


Total, 


3,258 




WINNEBAGO COUNTY. 






No. 


Returned. 




No. Returned. 


Algomahf 




109 


Omro, 


847 


Black Wolf, 




140 


Poy Gun, 


119 


Clayton, 




119 


husbford, 


226 


Menasha^ 




473 


Vin Land, 


118 


Neenah, 




361 


Utica, 


160 

• 


Nicimi, 




180 


Wynona, 


224 


Nepuskin, 




131 


Winchester, 


154 


Town of Oshkosh, 




102 


. 




City of Oshkosh, 
Onhula, 




1304 


Total, 


4316 




64 







DOOR COUNTY. 





No. Returned. 


No. Retumei 


Otumba, 


154 


— 


Forestville, 


120 Total, 


274 


No returns from the remaining towns in this County. 






WAUPACCA COUNTY. 






No. Returned. 


No. Returoei 


Waupacca, 


1 1 3 Mukwa Precinct, 


60 


Weyauwega, 


320 Rovalton, 


65 


Lebanon, 


35 Little Wolf, 


24 


Lind, 


315 Bear Creek, 


16 


Scandanavia, , 


76 Caledonia, 


26 


St. Lawrence, 


68 Dayton, 


131 


Farmington, 


81 





lola, 


68 Total, 


1,484 


Mukwa, 


164 





FIFTH X)IVISIOIsr, 

CRAWFORD COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 
City of Hudson, Ist ward, 143 Kimeckimic, 



No. Returned. 
59 



13 



C4 ti 



M 
M 



Hammond, 
Pleasant Vallej, 
Somerset, 
Star Prairie, 
Matone, 



2d 
8d 



M 

M 



31 
177 
22 
19 
85 
60 
37 



Hudson, 
Arden, 
Care V 8, 
Rush River, 

Total, 



69 
11 
40 
58 

74C 



OCONTO COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 

162 Precinct No. 2, 

38 Saumen, 
• 67 
54 Total, 

LA CROSSE COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 
City of La Crosse, 1st Ward, 175 Greenfield, 



Oconto, 
Penaaukie, 
Stile, 
Marrinette, 






«i 
a 



Bangor, 
Burns, 
Buchanan, 
Barry, 



2d 
8d 



M 



*♦ 394 North La Crosse, 

127 Farmington, 

51 Stevenson, 

96 Onalaska, 

3d Neshonoc, 



104 



Total, 



No. Returned. 

18 
17 



346 



No. Returned. 

58 

58 
163 

40 
156 

82 



1548 



BAD AX COUNTY. 





No. Returned. 


No. 


Returned, 


Viroqua, 


258- Greenwood, 




40 


Bergen, .^ 


36 Union, 




43 


Jefferson, 


136 Steriing, 




34 


Forest, 


38 Harmony, 




54 


W.ebster, 


45 Wheatland, 




64 


Clinton, 


34 Kickapoo, 




102 


Christiana, 


44 






Franklin, 


72 Total, 




994 




CHIPPEWA COUNTY. 

» 1 




' • 




No. Returned. 


No. Returned. 


Chippewa Falls, 


149 Necotah, 




18 


Savaon Precinct, 


17 French town. 




57 


Eagle Point, 


44 






Brunette, 


41 Total, 




406 



14 



Wausau, 
£au Claire, 



Almond, 

Amherst, 

Belmont, 

Buena Vista, 

Linwood, 

Lanark, 



Adams, 
Chester, 
Del Prairie, 
Edston, 
Grand Marsh, 
Jackson, 
New Haren, 



Freeman, 

Seneca, 

Marietta, 

Clayton, 

Easttram, 



Aken, 

Buena Vista, 

Bloom, 

Dayton, 

Eagle, 

Forest, 

Henrietta, 

Ithaca, 

Marshalli 



MARATHON COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 

348 Moeena, 
17 

Total, 

PORTAGE COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 

56 New Hope, 

89 Plover, 

40 Pine Grove, 

85 Stockton, 

34 Stevens Point, 



43 



Total, . 



No. Retanied. 
41 

336 



No. Returned. 

37 

156 

34 

49 

492 

1065 



ADAMS COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 

43 Preston, 

40^ Quinoy, 

74 Richfield, 

84 Strongs Prairie, 
39 Springville, 

87 White Creek, 

62 

Total, 

CRAWFORD COUNTY* 

No. Returned. 

23 Scott, 

48 Utica, 

89 Prairie du Chien, 

62 

46 ToUl, 

RICHLAND COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 

42 Richland, 

141 Richmond, 

66 Rockbridge, 

67 Sylvan, 

85 Willow, 

88 Westford, 



No. Returned. 

lOO 
62 
34 
60 
70 
40 

697 



No. Returned. 

34 

44 

359 



644 



No. Returned. 

149 
71 
58 
54 
46 
35 



60 
99 
46 



Total, 



1,446 



.^-1 



16 



SAUK COUJH'Y. 



Ba^aboo, 

D«UmoD, 

Fairfield, 

Fraokiin, 

Freedom, 

Greenfield, 

Hone J Creek, 

Kingston, 

MaFston, 

Merrimack, 

New Buffalo, 



Weston, 
Pine Valley, 



Bear Creek, 
Dunn, 
Pepin, 
Eau Galla, 



Richmond, 
Mattesen, 



Grand Rapids, 

Centraliai 

Rudolph, 



Kewaunee, 

Wbl^ 

Uaeeo, 



No. Returned. 

276 

134 
67 
37 

122 
67 
80 
79 

138 
61 

197 



No. Returned. 

Prairie du Sac, 286 

Reeilsburg, '228 

Spring Green Precinct No. 1, 51 

I. <t t< « 2, 19 

Washington, '69 

Weatfieid, 773 

Wingfield, 4 

Woodland, 44 



Total, 



CLARK COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 

41 Lewis, 
48 

Total 

DUNN COUNTY. 

No. Returned. , 

27 Rock Creek, 
29 Menominee, 
94 Spring Brook, 
46 

Total, 

SHAWANO COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 

'66 Shawano, 
22 

Total, 

WOOD COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 

184 I^emlock, 
40 
80 Total, 

KEWAUNEE COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 

1 1 3 Montpelier, 
106 Frederickstown, 
75 

Total, 



2,074 

4 ' 



No. Returned. 
14 



9S 



No. Returned. 
30 
46 
44 



316 



No. Returned. 
6 



83 



No. Returned. 
31 



236 



No. Returned. 

94 
66 



444 



16 

MONROE coxjimr. 





Vo« Returned. 


No. Returned. 


Adrian, 


53 Portland, 


51 


Angel 0, 


113 Ridgville, 


54 


Clitton, 


42 Sparta, 


319 


Eaton, 


50 Sheldon, 


54 


Gle'ndale, 


46 Tomah, 


104 


Greenfield, 


68 Wilton, 


58 


Little Falls, 


84 Wellington, 


42 


Leon, 


53 




Lafayette, 


70 Total, 
JUNEAU COUNTY. 


1256 


1 


No. Returned. 


No. Returned. 


Armenia, 


33 Necedah, 


109 


Clearfield, 


18 Orange, 


i7 


Fountain, 


41 Plymoutb, 


41 


Germantown, 


112 Seven Mile Greek, 


40 


Eildau, 


61 Summitt, 


43 


Lisbon, 


137 Wancedab, 


39 


Lindira, 


l5l Wonowoc, 


59 


Lemonwier, 


103 * 





Eau Claire, 
Bridge Creek, 
Brunswick, 



Total, 

EAU CLAIRE COUNTY. 
« 
No. Returned. • 

128 Half Moon Lake, 
26 
15 Total, 



1004 



No. Returned. 
163 

332 



Albion, 

Alma, 

Bristol, 

Brooklyn, 

Hexton, 



JACKSON COUNTY. 

No. Returned. 

320 Irving, 

57 Manchester, 

77 Springfield, 
23 
66 Total, 

POLK COUNTY. 



No. Returned. 
64 
86 
17 

660 



LeRoy, 
St.. Croix, 



No. Returned. 



No* Returned 

150 » Apple River Precinct. H 

101 — 

Total, < 265 



Alma, 
BearCreek, 
Belvidere, 
Buffalo, 



X 



Martell, 

Perry, 

Oliflon, 

Tirmbell, 

LutbeL 

OakgroTBy 



17 

BUFFALO COUNTY, 

Na Returned. 

114 Cold Creek, 
87 Naples, 
69 Wauwandeei 



No. Betomed. 

28 

49 
48 



» . ' 



• « 



541 



PIBECE COUNTY. 
No. Betnined^ 



No.Betiini6d« 

90 

18 City of Prefloott, 1st Ward, 68 



* ' I 



33 . tt «i a .^jj, ; ;i^. i X28 

55 Diamond Blufl^;, ■ <• : '{75 

88 Pleasant Valley, 50 

80 

;B9trtf 609 



4 « 



Er?S&?:} »»«— 



..•1 



•»• ' 



I . t ' , t , I 



f ■« t 






> 1 



' I 



! f :. I ♦ 



1 1 



I 






fj .n • 



v^. ^' ' M I 1 ■ . I 



I • • 



t 

•4! 



* ) 



.*■ •' 



• f 'J 



• ■• ,:i: 



•■ 



: . fi. 



18 



f 



REOApiTU1i.^TION. 



** 



^* FIRST DIVISION. 

i P!nt«Brig«de, . . . . . 17,894 
^ (boond Brigade, • « 8,100 

25/184 

SECOND DIVISION. 

Fint Brigade, ., 12;i49 

Beeottd Brigade, Y,277 

19,426 

THIRD DIVISION. 

RiBt Brigade, 11,696 

. Seoond Brigade, . • • 10,267 

— 21,953 

FOURTH DIVISION. 

lint Brigade, 9^857 

. leoond Brigade, 3,149 

18,006 

FIFTH DIVISION. 

:nn« Brigade, 10,002 

• BeooBd Brigade; 5.835 

— 15,887 



wim 



Ghwid Total, • . • « 95,806 



/ 



19 



aElSTERAr. ORDERS ISTo. 1. 



Head QtrABTSMy Maduov, Wn., ) 

Janoaiy, 10, 1868 ) . ' 

It ii ordered that the terenJ Independent Umfonn Company'i of 

thb Staie^ exoept the levend CknnpMiys cC the Citj and Coon^ of 

Milwaukeei be» and tihejr are hereby attached to the Begiment of tlie 

c 
p geyet County, oi pert of ooun^, where the armory or head^qnarten 

« 

of auch CoQipany is situated, and the seteral Commandem of sueh 
CoiBpanys wiU repovt aooording^y. 

By order of the Commander in Chie£ 

AMASA. OOBB^ 

Adjutant Oeneral* 



GENERAL LAWS OF 1857....CHAPTEB 84. 



•>. ' . .( * •:>'/'! 



t • 



AM ACT to amend Chapter 187 of the Sendon Lewi of 1861, entilkd 

"An Act relating to the BUlitia." 

Th^pufple of the IS^k cf l/^isconsii^ represented in Senak and 
I Asseniilj/i^doiiefiact mJoUows: 

o foonoKX -Cboptei 187 of tbo Session LawBiof 1851.eoti- 
tied ^^ an act relating to the Militia," is hereby so amenaedas 
to ^tttfaori^e atid'i^qnire lAie Adjdtaftt^OMieralHKf tlM^Stata, 
IBlHndd^^Iy Hfter. the poasage of this ftct to. re-organize ^ 
Militia of this State, and to diVide the Eitate up in new miB* 
taty divisions, bHgiide8,'regiityento,flra;tCldioflM aad tsempaiiM^ 
ilx«n«]?L m^ojaeir ^ ho shall de^m advisable and convenient 

Seo. 2. Such alterations of i&e divisions, brigades, regimentii 
battalions and companies, shall bembiddiAiinrfitiog;bj tWAd* 
jutant General, and iwbep approved by tbp.Goverr o^. shall be 
filed in the office of the Secretary 6t State ; arid tipon filiog 
the same^'Hi^va^J&lii^ offices of such divisions, brigades, regi* 
m^ii^t^.wd bftttvJjions shall be deemed vacant, and they shall 
be filed in the manner now provided by law. 

Sec. 3. All acts and parts of acts contravening the provis- 
ions of this act are hereby repealed. 

Seo. 4. If any town or ward Assessor, or any Clerk of any 
town or city, or any Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of any 
county, shall fail or neglect to make return ot the number of 
persons liable to military duty as required by law, the persoa 
so offending shall forfeit and pay a sum not less than fifty dol- 
lars nor more than one hundred dollars, to be received [recov- 
ered] in an action of debt in any court having competent ju« 
risdiction. 

Sec. 5. This act shall take effect and be in force from and 
after its passage. 

Approved, February 28, 1857. 



21 

' ■ ■ ^^ *' ' ' IfAriisoN, ian. l«i i85ft 

1% £riB ftxOELLKlWTr AuX vf . KaZTDALL, GtOYER^OA OF V?BI^ 

ooNfior: 
Snt: — ^After Bome dtftigit T 'BarQ -nt' length performed the 
duty impoteA ujMiii »ii» Is^r tlw fiiwt Motion e£ tber#ot entitled 
*' an act to amend chapter 187 of the Session Laws of 1851i 
entitled ^ an act relating to the SCilitia.' " And I have the 
|Lonor to herewith preMfnt fbr yonr approval a plan to re- 
brgaiiize HJM iBHtia of UMb State, attd to divide the State into 
tu&vr xnDitaijr AviBions; brigades, regiments, battalions eaA 
companies. 

I db notfflbttet ttyself thae the jptm % perftct, yelilt is be- 
Hirtei t£at it Wffl to^ ^ Teasonabfo extent meet Ifhe object ot 
the Legislature in passing the act Imposing ibe diity. 
I have the honor to be jour ExcaUwcy's 

Mo^ obedient servant, 
AM AS A OOBB,. 
^ Adft Getiirat, 



1 1 



. IBkim finriiBnMD^ Thai I, Atii«a& Oobb„ Adjuta&t Oweml 
of the State of Wisconsini, by virtue and iti porMiMae of m 
act of the Legislature, entitled '' an wt to amend chapter 187 
of the Session laws.of 1857, entitled ^an act relating to the 
militia,' " approved Feb. 28th, 1^57, have this 18th day of 
Jaiiuarj, 1868, re-organi2ed the Militia of this State, and di- 
vided the State into new miKtkry divisions, btiga^, rc^ 
ments, battalions and cOMjMtties, ftee<»rding to the annexed ta- 
bp^ sta^^i^t. , And J dO| hereby Aubgieqt ^tbe a{)|prov9l of 
the Gjovemor te declare suoli re-orgaaization and )ie-dis(;ri^ 
uiff of the Militia pf the State of Wisoonsin,: to ta}i:e effect .azi4 
tie in foree from apd afteir thisd^. 
' 'Dated January l$th, 1858. 
< ^ • • :^' AMASA^C03B; . 

Adjutdvd Omerci^ 



tOie State of WiBoonsin is hereby divided into Militaiy dii- 
trietB and the Militia of aaid State are hereby re-oiganised u 
feUowB, to-wit: 

FIRST DIVISIOK; 
of MUwankee. Watdceaha aa4 Baeine. 



FIBST BBIOAPB. 



Oonnty 

iBt Begiment— mmpriaea the lat, 2d, ith, avqi Tdi wardflof 
the dtj of Milwankee, and the towna of Hilvaukee and 
Gnmyille. ' 

2d Begimenir— comprieee the Sd, 4thy and 5th wards of the 
city of Milwaokoe, and the towns of Wauwatosa^ Qreenfield, 
Lake, Oak Creek and Franklin. 

BBOOim BEIOADS. 

Connties of Wankesha and Bacine. 
8d Begimidnt — Coun^ of Waukesha. 
4th Begiment — County of Bacine. 

SECOND DIVISION. 
The counties of Kenosha, Walworth, Jefferson, and the 
towns of Beloit, Turtle, Clinton, Bradford, La Prairie, Ear- 
mony, Johnstown, Lima, Milton, and the savefal wards of the 
elty of Beloit, in the county of Bock. 

HBBT BBIOABX. 

The Counties of Walworth and Kenosha. 
5th Begiment — County . of Walworth. i 

. 6th Begiment — County of Kenosha* 

sBooim BaanuM. 

The county of Jefferson and the towns of Bel6i1^ Turtle^ 
OtintoD, Bradford, La Prairie, Harmony, Johnstown, Lims, 
Milton, and the city of Beloit; in Bock county. 

7th Begimentr-towns of Beloit, Tqrtle, Clinton, Bradfoi^ 
La PrairiC) Harmony, Johnstown, Lima, Milton, and the ci^ 
cf Beloit, in Bock county. 



88 
»• 

■ « 

8ih Begiment — Oonnty of Jefferson. 

^ TflXBD DIYISIOR 

• the iowns of Janefiville, Sock, Paltori, Porter, Ventre^ fty- 
month, Newark, Avbiii Spring Yalley, Magnolia, Unioiii ttd 
the several wards in t!ie citj of ^anesVille, ih tiie c(niiit]r of 

■ 

*^ck. Hie counties of Oreon, La Fajett and Iowa. 

Hser 1I9IQAP1B. . 

The towns of Janefmlk, Book, Ful^n, Fotferi Oantre^ S^- 
^iBonllh, Newark, Atoi^ fipriag YAlley, Magnolia^ Uaiani and 
Uie several wards in the city of JanasFiUei. in Bock qmb^, 
and the county of Green. 

9th Begiment — ^the towns of Janesville, Bock, Fulto% 
Porter, Centre^ Plymouth, Newark^ Avon,, Spring Yalleyi 
Ifagnolia, Union, and the several wards in the city of Janea- 
ville, in Bock county. 

10th Begiment— the county of Green. 

. ' SECOND BBIgJlDB. 

: . ,' ' . ...» 

Counties of Iowa and La Fayette. 
11th Begiment— ^County of Iowa. 
12tli Begiment-^CMu^ty of La Fayette. ' 

FOUBTH DIVISION. , .'t . 

The counties of Grant, Crawford, Bichland and Bad Ax. 

ITBST BBKOAmp. 

• IT ' • 

The counties of Gmnt and OrawliMnl. 
18th Begiment — Ooimty of Qraut, i 
14th Begiment— <]loun);y of Crawf9r^*f 

Counties of BicUand and Bad Az. 
l&th Begiment — County of Bichland. 
16th Begiment — County of iBacl Ax. 

FIFmDiVlSiON.. ." 
The counties of DfrniSi. Sauk, !J.^Jlxwfi.B;fiAJ^iif9f^' 'r 



u 

m 

f 

1XB8T BBIOABl. 

:$fm PnMi^ej.Mftdi^n Blooming Gropv^e, Goitafe Gxt^e, Deer- 

t^leU, Y^ropmy Fitehbiirgy Zhqap, Plea^tot Spring, ChristiaBt, 
Hontrofle^ OiegoD, BaUand, Dunkirk and Albion^ in DaM 
eonntj. 

ISUi Begiment— the towns of l^zbnry, Dane, Yknnai 

9fccb Bmttk^ ^l^t^r SpidBgfield, ITMtport, Yenaont, Gtosb 

<Plaina^Mlddirtci%Mad<hooi> BhieMoturfB^Sprfi^DaleypOTy, 

fAmtom^maA. the 8tr««l wardar of the eitjr of Ifaiiaoiii ii 

Dane county. 

BEOOND BBIGADB. 

Obuiities of Sank, Jnneaa and Adams. 
l9th Beglment— the County of Sank. 
SOth Begiment— the Oounttes of Juneau and Adams. 

SIXTH DIVISION. 
Oounties of Oolumbia. Dodge, Washington and Ozaukee. 

FIRST BBiaADK. 

Counties of Colombia aodDodgja. 
Slst Begiment — County of Columbia. 
S2d Begiment — County of Dodge. 

RftOOSTD^BBIGAl]®. 

Counties of Washington and Ozaukee. 
28d BegiBieBi^*4Jb>utity of WashiBgtbn. 
24th Begiment — County at C^qJcm. 

SEVENTffDiT^iSIok 
Oounties of Marquette, Wauslrara, Fond du Lac and Sheboj- 



FIRST BBia^DB. 



Counties of Marquette and Waushara. 
86th Begiment— County of ttfai^quette. 
SeOi "BkfjfibiiMhAJetditj of WaVAhMil. 







I). 

26 

.•ij; ;5::., r]y. . i;-- 
BHPOND BBiaAJffi. 

97th jftegjnifpH^lW^^ . i/ ' :i 1^ 

28th Begiment — County of Sheboygan. 

,., , , UGHTH DIYXSION. ., . „ 



39th Kegiment — Oonntj of. Cojl^met 

80th Begiment — O^nntgr of l^a^itowoc-T 'jj 

Ooonties of Browo^ KeiMUMMe, and Door. 

I. ^l8b^i?a«if^P?pt7 9fB«>v»- ,,, ... I... 
82d B^iment — conntiea of Keirsimee and Door. 

Ooimties of '#'iiiae1>a^; "Oata^mie, i^awtiiid; 6<i6n<(il 'ihxd 

'^■■'*'''^'" ' Wanpacii.,' " ••■■ 

VQWT BBIOADB. 



./..'J CVl. ; 



Op«9tM. of W}imi4^»g9' nd . OntagpiDi^ 



S8d Begiment-^coanty of Winnebago. . V 



' ' "•• . lun -li;).!. 



^th Qegimenjrr-cpjui^ ,o£ Optagamie. 

SBOOlia) BBCOAPE. ,. , i 

Oonnties of Shawano, Oconto,' ana W anpacai 
86th Begiment-— county of Waupaca. 
86th Begiment— -counties of Shawano and Oconto. 

TENTH DIYISIOK 

Oonnties of Wood, Portage, Olark, Marathon, Ohippewa, La 

Fointe, and Douglas. 

VntST BBIGADB. 

Oounties of Wood, Portagei and Ohurk. 
87th Begiment — Oounty of P6rtage. 
88ih Begiment — Oonnties of Wood and Ohurk. 



38 

SaoOHD BRiaADB. 

* 

OonntioB of Marathon, Chippewa, La Fointe, and Douglas. 
89tb Be^ment — counties of Marltthon and Chippewa. 
40th Begiment-^onnties of I^ Pointe and DonglaB. 

^ ELEVENTH DIVISION. 

<k>antie8 of La Crosse, Trempealean, Biffalo, Ean Ckure, 
Pitoce, Dnnn, Bt. Croix, Jackson, Monroe, FoSk, and Btunelt 

nssT BsioAns. 

Oonnties of La 'Cro(9Be, Trempelean, Btiffalo, Jabkson, and 

Monroe. 
41st Begiment — ^La Crosse and Monroe. 
42d Begiment— BuffiriOi Trsmpeleaa, and Jackson. 

SBCOlTD BBmAraL 

Counties of Fierce, Dunn, St. Croix, £!au Claire, Polk^ sod 
••\ • " Burnett 

48d Begiment— Fisi«,D«im} jwt JBw Claire. 
I , , ^4ih B^gf ment— St Croix^ Folk, . and Burnett. 

Each town and ward in this Sta|je shall constitute a 
eompany beat, and the lawful militia of such town and waid 
shall constitute a company, to be designated hj letter in sadi 
manner andorder astlie Commander 'of ieaeh resptetiTe regi- 
ment may adopt ' 

Dated, January ISth. 1868. ^ 

' ' t • • • 

A 

.r. .1 '• '1 



> 1 



* • I I ^ * ' • • ■ 1 . 1^, 






\ 



I 



!■-•■■ f t-. • f ' 

< • 






MuxBov, JaBnaiy lOth, 1888. ) 

I kerebj ftppKMre die fwegoiDg orgaaiiation of thelfilitift 
of the State of Wiseomini made hj the Adjutant Qeneral, 
vnder Uie Mt anUioiiBiiig th« Iaw, appioTed Febrtiaiy fiSUi, 

issr. 

ALEX. W. BAKDAU^ ^ovariMr. 



A i. -Ml * • 

. . It' 



1 I 



■ 1 • 



vn*' \y'\' .. i U J^* ' ii '^ 



. t 



DOCUMENT "L. 



Mr » 



V 



« 



« ■ 



• V ; 



JbiJEPORT 



Op nSDB 



flOUTIVE OO^MJTTBB FOB 1867. 



.TqHibIBxobubiot AuxIidibW. IUwpatj^ Qofnnon or xbb Stati or W]» 

Sib : — ^In oomplianoe with the requirements of law, the Exee- 
utiye Committee of tUe State Agricultural Society would i^pect- 
ftiily !REPO»r,-^That' duriiig ine past year of 1857, the' State 
• Agricultural Society has, through its proper channels of action, 
been pursuing its.accustomed course, and discharging tothe best 
of its ability and means, its vanous duties and responsibilities. 

As hitbeko, the field of useful ' labor that has seemed to pre- 
sent itself for the consideration and action of the Society, has 
been in no degree diminished ; but, from year to year, seems to 
widen and deepen in its demands. In view of these facts, the 
' Society has aimed to do more than merely to provide for and 
' hold an Annual Fair. Ample pains have beedt taken, through 
agricultural Journals and otherwise, to arousd and devate the 
^bition and spirit of all dasses, to adopt more fiystem and care 
in what they do, to cultivate better, to be more careful in the 
selection of seed ; and for the purpose of aiding in tiiis highly 
important work on the part <^ the Society, seeds and cuttings^ 
particularly the former, have been purchased and distribated to 
a large extent, and generally of very choice descriptions ; oil in 
all, ' probably hot lesb ihan twenty thousand packages, during 
iSki p^t fMe. Th&t some; of 'th^m huve fallen upon go<$d 



ground^ and will spring np and bear an hundred fold of higUj 
improved and useful products, the Society already has abundant 
assurance. The leading article of distribution — tiie Chinese 
Sugar Cane«-was distributed from our rooms to the extent of 
nearly ten thousand packages, into eyery part of the State. 
We learn that it has been veiy generally planted, and in the great 
majority of cases, g?6wb to thjb entire satisfaction of the cultiya- 
tors, except in the matter of ripening its seed, in which it has 
generally failed, although obviously and wholly owing to the 
extraordinary backwardness of the season. Some few experi- 
mentalists have demonstrated, however, that the seed might have 
been ripened generally, even the past season, by simjdy planting 
that portion intended for seed more open to the sun, and sucker- 
ing it out to but few stalks in a hill. Several who pursued this 
course inform us that they fully ripened their seed. But the 
rich saccharine properties of the cane have been fully demonstra* 

. ted lo every one who has grown a hill of it the past season. The 
fact of its- having b^a so widely distributed and advertised in 
this manner, to every neighborhood, will undoubtedly lead to 
its being extensively and profitably cultivated the present season. 

.In £RCt,. we doubt not but that the extra impetus given to this 
subject alone, tbr6ugh the aid of this Society, will eventuate in 

. more advantage to the State than the Society has ever yet been 

• expense to it, since its organization. 

Not wishipg to confine its labors wholly to the more masculine 
and substantial interest^, to the neglect of the more refining and 
t^stefoli tJti^ Society has, among other things, distributed some 
thousands of packt^es ol flower seeds^ mainly of new and choice 
yarietiiea;. liiat they have proved a profitable and (^h^p embel- 
. lishmentto many a wayside cottage and happy hom6| can hardly 
. b^doijibted. . ' - / 

In the way of euttipga, considerable quantities of the Ckrmi^n 

• Osier WUlo.w hav^ jbeen distributed,, not so much from the Sod- 
. ety's bavin:g auj ^traordin^ry &ith in. its probable profitable 
r culU.vation in our State, aei in obedience to a strong desire oa 
^ the. ps^ of -m%ny to expieriment in i^ cultivation. Its cultj- 
^ vatioQ, both for homi^ use and ^portation t(y eastern cities, mBj 

prove important as our State gets older. 



60 

Prompted by a desire to improve still fiirtBer, if possible, in 
the cultivation of our great staple, wheats by the introduction of 
the best possible kinds of seed, the Society despatched aa expe- 
rienced and sagacious practical farmer, (Hon. David WilliamS| 
ctf Walworth county), to Canada, during their wheat harvest, 
with instrnctions to examine their different kinds and qualities 
of wheat, grown upon their various soils and under various dr* 
cumstances ; and to report his views upon the advisability of its 
introduction, as seed, among our fanners. The gentleman per^ 
formed his mission in a highly satisfactory manner, and duly 
reported its results, which have been spread before the people, 
and will undoubtedly lead to the obtainment of new and valuable 
seed. 

Early and ample pains were taken, on the part of the Society, 
for the holding of its Annlial Fair ; and in view of the extensive 
hotel acoommodationSy convenient fair grounds, railroad approach- ^ 
es, and promising public spirit of the citizens of Janesville, thai 
place was settled upon for the purpose. In anticipation of a 
large turn out, not only among our own people, but also from 
the neighboring State of Illinois, (unto whom we wished to 
make a creditable show), very ample, and somewhat expensivCi 
pi^parations were made for the occasion ; providing not only for 
the show of the more substantial features of agricultural produc- 
tion, but also for the more attractive novelties sometimes employ- 
ed to embellish such occasions 

As was anticipated, the occasion and the outlay met witH a 
fair and full response on the part of the people, both exhibitors 
and spectators. The entries were considerably larger than at 
any previous fair, and embraced many animals, articles, and pro- 
ducts that are not surpassed in quality in the United States.' 
Every department of the f&i/. Animal, Agricultural, Horticul- 
tural, Floral, Mechanical and Miscellaneous, was well filled, and| 
altogether^ displayed a striking evidence of the progress of our 
young State. How much of this progress and improvement is 
'attributable to the teachings and effects of the State and county 
£drs, we will leave for the observing and philosophic to deter- 
mine. 



^. 



Owing to thQ occurrenoe of a severe autoibual storm dming 
tbe last two, and principal days of the fair, the scttendaiice of th^ 
people, as well as the reoeiplts, were yei7 mJEiterlally diminished; 
and but for the State appropriation to fall back npon, the Sod- 
etj, notwithstanding all the capeful fbresight in ics power, would 
have been, in con^uence of the aforesaid misadventure, fiff 
b^nd, pecuniarily, and obliged to h&ve left BCfxea of HtS^ bSb 
/ unpaid, until time and good luck aSbided them the means. All 
m aJlf the fair was a decided success over any of its predeoesson, 
notwithstanding the uncongenial weather ; and notwitibitauding 
a very illiberal and unaccommodating spirit manifested by one 
q£ the principal railroads of the State^ to wit: the La Crosse and 
Milwaukee. Their utter refusal to carry stock and articles fiir 
exhibition, short of fuU fore price^ and general disposition he 
^tnobliging, so disgusted the great aortheastem and central 
counties, that they were scarcely represented at the &ir. It 
is the sincere hope of your humble servants, that this pampered 
and spoiled child of misplaced State liberality, will, when its 
corruption fund emmisaries come around the capital the present 
winter, asking for new favora, be met with the same spirit with 
"which they met the poor farmers who have mortgaged their farma 
to build, not only their their road, but flue palacesy also, for the 
gentlemen who have (mis) managed it^ Of all companies in the 
State, they were the last who should thus have given the cold 
shoulder to the formers of the State. 

But notwithstanding the foregoing drawbacks, the society has 
been able to close up its pecuniary affairs for the past year in a 
creditable and satii^ctory manner to all concerned, and with a 
small balance in the treasury, as will be seen by reference to the 
financial report of the Secretary, at the close of this conmiunica' 
tion . With a full belief, on their part> that the Society is now placed 
upon a firm foundation, and more fully grounded in the hearts 
and approving good will of the masses of the people, than ever 
before. The undersigned would commend its various interesi 
to your kind care and consideration ; and they do so with a full 
faith that the cause of agriculture, nor agricultural association^ 
will not be likely to retrograde during your administration. 



Sut, with ufl^ iijre|feel{ iaaaared that your will duly i^pprdciata tLdr 
fact that the great principle aud purpose ODderlTing all theflo^ 
associations, public displajii^ and premiaia lisla,i8 toproy^ta 
labor that of its own production, there is abundant material to. 
please die ^ncj and stisfy ambition ; and by biingiog diem^ 
together, combined and arranged, to a%>xd,a noble opportimitj^ 
for study to the student,. and ^ aplendid and profitable holiday, tor 
the idle. For thia reason iihe Socii^ty seekB to please all, ,for. it ia 
prqfitable for all to come. No person can leave an agiiculturat 
exhibition as ignorant as he came. Its annual showft give to 
all an opportunity to ; study the lesson qf iabor|. which, perhsj^ 
but one has properly illustrated. 

To inaugecate annually a great industrial gathering, where the 
Icnowledge of one may be spread over the minds^of many— 4iu 
gathering where eaol^ may not only prove to himself his own,i 
'' but mark his neighbors faults and: follilesi'^ — ^where the incrus^ 
ation of old habits may be broke^ up and fallowed fpr new 
ideas, proving; to each that the end of knowledge is not* y^et 
reached, nor the opportunity of learning lost — an annual gaihr 
ering where the industry and skill of the State may meet and 
iiecite to all theyeaxs before, and the success or £ulure of its efforts, 
to solve that portion of the great industrial ppoblon embraced 
within the field c^ its labor. In theory each and all these. sevQ^ 
ral steps of progress might be considered bb so many evidencev 
of oni. progress in the primal art of arts. But practically, it i!^ 
not true, for the reasbn that most of these eviden^ces of success^ 
tffQ the results of an accidental combination of circumstance^--* 
th^ isy mx)st of the evidences are not the result of the .practical 
application of known and well established principles of agricAtt 
tural science, but too often the accidental result of a tboughtleas 
combination of forces, thrown together without design, thus bx 
effect, teaching nothing conclusively ; consequently a repetition 
almost imrariably proves a failure. Improvements in agrioul- 
ture are no doubt being, made ; but tihe laws of nature, upon 
which all successes are based, are most of them too dimly seen 
too conduct to a successful repetion. Consequently we are, as 
agriculturists, qonstantly falling back fiom each seeming advance^ 



ment, not, peiliaps, completely, but partially, at every step, lor 
ihe reaaon that we have but slight foot-hold upon those laws of 
nature upon which success depends. Yet all these succes- 
ses and failures, as shown in the annual exhibitions of the 
Society, tend to teach them; but in such a qualified, ques- 
tionable, and fragmentary manner, that by far the greater part 
is useless. Had the Sodely a Farm School, where the philoso- 
phy of practice and the science of schools might mingle and 
perfect each other — ^where ail that is prored in practical labor, 
and all that is true in scholastic science,* could be blended in one 
concrete mass, affording a substantial foundation fpr the more 
elevated up-building of the industrial labor of the State— a &nn 
school within whose ample fields and halls the State Society 
might hold its annual Fairs, thus giving to each laborer an oppor- 
tunity to prove or disprove the correctness of his theory or prac- 
tice — ^where the practical labor of the State could compare the 
results of its toil with the more pretentious ones of the school — 
a point where each isolated fact could be concencrated, combined 
with others and made practical — ^where the progress of labor 
could be noted, the principles upon which it depends developed, 
and thus substantial advancement secured, and thus the school 
be as the Mistress of Labor and the Master of Science. The 
need of labor is too great to be profitably mocked with here a 
bone and there a crust — ^its wants too great to be satisfied with such 
fostering care as may be found in a teanio of some overshadow- 
ing edifice. The winds and tides no longer command commerce^ 
because commerce concentrates capital^ and a half million experi- 
ment is readily made, and commerce is finally eminently succesr- 
ful. But agriculture diffuses wealth, while affording to all other 
pursuits the means of concentration ; thus labor not unfrequently 
appears as a petitioner for a moity of that which its own munifi- 
cence has bestowed. 

The greatest wealth of the State consists, first^ in the moral 
and political purity, and the intellectual culture of its inhabit- 
ants. Secondly, in the productive character of its industrial 
pursuit^ and the fertility of its soil. Comparatively productive 
as our agricultural labor no doubt is/ yei^ in most cases, it is so 



9 , 

at the expense of the means of subsistence of the next or buo- 
ceeding generations. Thus by our general want of thorough 
and sufficient agricultural knowledge, we are rapidly squander-^ 
ing the original munificent gift of the Great Benefactor. His^ 
knowledge has much of it to be created, and more to be oonoen- 
trated and made effectiye. 

The fostering care of State and National governments hare 
made munificent provisions for general education ; yet for the 
education which this State's great agricultural interest require, no 
provisions are made. For these reasons we respectfully askyour 
Excellency to reccommend the Legislature to make suitable pro- 
visions for the founding of an Agricultural Ciollege, in couneo^ 
tion with an ample Experimental Farm, and their endowment 
with sufficient means to secure their eflfective and practical ope;* 
ration, either by a grant of a portion of the swamp lands belong- 
ing to the State, or by memorial to Congress for a special grant 
of lands for that purpose. 

The present time seems peculiarly appropriate for such a move- 
ment, especially for memorializing Congress, inasmucL as it will 
be in harmony with the action of many other of the Agricultu- 
ral States, who are now urging similar claims upon their 
attention. An additional voice from the Great Northioesi vnYL 
deepen the tone and strengthen the effiDrt, and undoubtedly even- 
tuate in ultimate success.. 

And what is more reasonable or proper than that at least a 
little fraction of the wide and almost unlimited public domain of 
this and other States, should be assigned and devoted to a more 
thorough and systematic development of the great . scientifio 
principles and practical action on which every thing like eminent 
agricultural success must rest. The liberal donation to Bailroad 
Companies, (which are but the servants and carriers of the tillers 
of l^e soil), would seem to indicate at least the equal pro- 
priety of making every needful provision for the fullest devel- 
opment of this great primary interest, on which not only Kail- 
roads, but Governments, and all subordinate interests essen- 
tially, constantly, and forever depend. 

Without this Agricultural College and Experimental Farm, 



1 r 



> 

five years will not elapse before some of our sons, wko would be 
first in their great calling, will be crossing over to Michigan to 
her already promising institution, to avail themselves of thai 
knowledge, which, for want of a proper foresight and enterprize^ 
has not been secured and provided for them at home. Let us 
not, from our supineness now at the proper time, be thus depend- 
ent then. 

The law: of the last session of the Legislature, passed in oon- 
formitj with a request in our last annual report, for the eoUeo* 
tion, on the part of the several town Assessors, of Agricultural 
and Mineral statiistics, seems to have been but partially com- 
plied with, and consequently the report of the Secretary of Stat^ 
on that subject is necessarily incomplete and somewhat imperfecti 
Still, what there is of it is highly valuable, and shows conclu- 
sively how valuable a perfect work of the kind would be ; show- 
ing at once, and annually, the exact agricultural, mineral, and 
business condition and production of each county in the State . 
It is almost as valuable information to the observant and intel- 

» 

ligent citizen, as are the merchant V account books to him, in the 
\f ay of explaining and teliing him how his matters'stand. 

The law is of indispensable value, and with some slight 
amendments, which will be duly and seasonably presented by 
its friends, mil undoubtedly remain a fixed, feature upon our 
statute books. 

As in our last year's report, we again call attention to the 
policy and necessity of some law for the protection and encour* 
agement of sheep husbandry and wool growing, which would 
necessadly involve a law for the restricting and thinning out 
of dogs, which, (as is natural in new coimtries), have become a 
great 'nuisance and drawback upon our annual incomes and 
aggregate receipts &om this important and natural source of 
prosperity. It is confidently believed that some judicious law 
might be enacted that would, in due time, abate the evil without 
much growling^ and eventuate in substituting numerous fiocks of 
fine wooled sheep, with their yearly golden fleeces and tat, savory 
mutton, in place of our present barking cur dog population. Such 
an exchange is, in the opinion of the undersigned, devoutly to 
be wished and earnestly prayed for. 



Hoping tlxat your Exoellenoy will bave the Idudoeas to sAbmit 
such of our suggestions to the L^gidatioe m may, in your jitdg^ 
ment, be deen^d proper^ 
We remain, very truly, 

Your obedient servantii* , 

In behalf 0/ the Execative CommiUee, {d'^yh) WILLIAMS. ^ 



STATEMENT 

or THE nSOAL hMWhJSA Of THB WIBOOHBIH BTATB AOBIOUIffUEAL iOOIVrT, 

VOB THB YBAB KNDINa DBO. SI, 186t. 



IKOOKB. 

To balance on hand, December 81, 1857, $ 968 62 
'^ of seed and outstanding premium 
fund not used, - - - - 879 80 
To Standing Appropriation, - - - 8000 00 
From Annual and Life Members, - • 1903 00 
To nett Beceipts of State Fair besides mem- 

ber's tickets, .... 2868 21 

■• $8804 68 

SXPSNDITUBES. 

By Premiums and cost of Diplomas awarded 

for 1857, - • * - - . $2701 11 
By purchase of Seeds, Cuttings, &c., • 485 20 *^ 

Salary of Secretary, .... 1000 00 
By Office rent and Incidental Expenses, 262 18 

By Express charges, $88,71, Postage, $55,71, 94 42 
By Bill paid at State Fair, - - - 2388 09 
By Miscellaneous bills for the year, • 1676 10 
By Cash to balance, .... 502 58 

$8804 63 



11 

Bills and voncheiB for all the above items, are on file in this 
office, and open to examination. 

George 0. Tittakt, Secretary. 

State Aqricui/tubal Booms, ) 
Madison, December 81, 1857. f 



I 



DOOTJMENT "N.'* 



REPORT. 



OfFTOK or BOABD OF CoiOOSAIOKlB&g FOB BuiLDmO THE WlBOOSr- 

8IN StATB HosFiTAL FOB THK Insanb, Madiflos^ Oct 1, 186T« 

Tc Ms MKelkncy Ootes Bash/brdy €hv<erhor of the "Skrie of 
Wbamsin: 

In compliance with the la^ providing a State Hospital fbr 
the Infiane, for the State of Wisconilin,* approved March 6th 
A. D. 1867, the nndersigned OoramiBSioners appointed in ac- 
cordance with, and to carrj into eflbct the provision of said 
Act respectfblly snbmit their fil^t Annnal Beport. 

Upon receiving our appointment,a8 Commissioners, we met 
in the citjr of Madison on the 6th daiy of May, 1867, and or- 
ganized onr Board by electing L. J; Parwel!, President, John 
P. McGregor, Secretary, and Levi Sterling, Building Superin- 
tendent, and employed S. V. Shipman as Architect In de- 
termining the location of this Instihition, yonr commissioners, 
after a careftil examination of the snbject, were nnanimoxis in 
the opinion that the land formerly piirchased of L. J. Farwell 
for this purpose, combined the necessary advantages for the 
site, and was in point of economy, healthfulness, and many 
other natural advantages, as^ judicious a selection for the best 
interest of the State, as could be made. The exact location 
of the building on the lot has been a subject of thought 
and enquiry on the part of the commiBSibners, and notwith- 
standing a portion of the excavation has been made, find a 
large amount of material deposited oli a former contract at 
the old site, they have deemed it necessary for the perfect 

* 

drainage and the better ^orkin^: of the Institution in many 



other respects, as well as for the greatly augmented beautj of 
scenery, which should never be lost sight of in providing for 
the treatment of this peculiarly afflicted class of citizens, to 
place the building on higher ground, at a distance of about 
twenty rods further from the Lake. 

*' The present site is fifty -four feet above the surface of the 
Lake to the bottom of tbe celftin ' 

After carefully examining the plans in the possession of 
the State and of nearly all the principal Hospitals of modem 
ooDfltruction ia this country, the Board have adopted, after 
submitting the same to meti eminent in the profession as 
superintendents and assistants of simikr Listitutions, the plans 
made by Mr. 8. V. Shipman, Architect, which are a modifica- 
tion of origlr^al plans by the eminent Dr. Elirkbride, to 
whom the people of this country owe a lasting debt of grati* 
tude for almost a life time spent , in the service of this unfor- 
tunate class of our fello.w beings, and in devising the moat 
effectual means for their recovery. The commissioners take 
occasion to say here, th^t they are largely indebted to Dr. 
J. . Edwards Lee, fimnerly assistant Physician in the ITtica 
Lisane Asylum of H. Y., and afterwards, for several years, 
acting in the samecapaciliy ia the Pennsylvania State Hoepi- 
tal for the Insane at Philadelphia, for many valuable anges. 
tions and much important information in relation to the con- 
struction and managemait of Institutions of this kind. Dr. 
Lee is n^w a resident of our State at Sextonville, Richland 
Co., and the Board have great satisfaction in speaking of his 
uniform gentlemanly deportment, and the thorough knowl- 
edge he possesses in his profession in the treatment of the 
unfortunate Insane. 

After the adoption of the plans, specifications and detail 
drawings necessary to a thorough and complete understand- 
ingof the work to be put under contract,and after filing the same 
in the office of the Secretary of State, notice was published in 
one or more papers in each and every city in the State, that 
Proposals would be received by the Board until the first day 



of September A. D. 1857^ at the o^ce of Secretary of State, 
for doing all the work, and forDiahing all the materials for 
said buildiDg in aocordance with the plaxm and specifioatioca* 

On the first daj of Septen^ber, above named, th9 Boarcl 
met at their office, and proceeded, publicly to open all the 
proposals received and filed in the ofice of Secretary of 
State, and after haying openly declared the same and. r^ord- 
ed ^ch bid in a book provided for that purpose and filed the 
original in the office of Secretary of Stale, awarded the work 
to, and entered into contract with Nelson McNeil of Portage 
City, for building the central or main building, one longitu(]U- 
nal and one traverse wing for the sum of seventy three thoi||- 
»nd five hundred dollars. (^V^,6o0.) 

The work of excavating the cellar and foundation was com- 
menced on the 22d day of September inst., and has been 
pushed forward with commendable diligence, and no doubt 
will soon be finished. A small amount of material has been 
delivered on the ground, and it is the intention of the contract- 
or to commence the mason work during tiie present week, 
and to employ sufficient force to raise the cellar stor^ walls 
and get the first floor limbers in place before winter com- 
mences. * 

The following is a list of payments made up to the close of 
the fiscalyear : 
To S. Y. Shipnaan, Architect, - - - $419 86 

That portion of the building now under contract will con* 
taiu the cooking arrangement, the chapel, and afford accom- 
modations for the officers andi att^idants necessary for the 
institution when the whole is complete. There are three full 
wards capable of accommodating twenty patiwts each, and 
three partial wards to be full wards (^^hen the building shall 
le extended) that naay be used to accommodate from five to' 
seven patients each, other rooms may be fitted up in the main 
building for the more quiet class of patients. 

The classification of patients will of course be yerj imper- 
fect, as there will not be as many wards, as it is probable 
there will be classes of patients. 



6 

The Board bad hop^d to be able to put tmder contract the 
main building and one lon^tndinal and one' traverse wing on 
each side, and have it come within the limit of one hundred 
thousand dollars. This would have accommodated 125 to 
ISO patients, an equal number of each set, and it was believed 
by the Board, this would meet the wants of the State for some 
years to come. The lowest bid for the whole of that portion 
above named was $9S,900, without the heating and cooking 
apparatus or plumbing. The lowest bid for the contract build- 
ing and the wings on one side was $73,500, wMch does not 
include the heating and cooking api)aratus. 

This will accommodate some 75 padente of one set, but less 
in case temporary arrangements are made to accommodate 
both sexes. 

Altbongh the board believed that it would be for the best 
interest of the State, to put up at once the whole structure ac- 
cording to the plans adopted by us, we were forced 
to the conclusion, that the law under which we act, required 
the entire completion and perfection in all particulars, of so 
much as was undertaken and we were therefore compelled, 
against our own convictions of what was for the interest of the 
State, to enter into contract for a part only. 

We would at this time say that while the present deraDge- 
ment in the financial worM presents much to discourage the 
undertiaking of any improvement requiring a large outlay of 
money, we can but urge the Legislature to consider the de- 
mands of the unfortunate in ouf State and provide at an early 
day for the wings on the west side of fche main building, corres- 
ponding with those on the east side now under contract. , To 
have finished it under one contract would have cost the ad- 
ditional sum of $^o,000, but to contract for these two wings 
separately will probably cost the State a larger amount, say 
$30,000. With that additional expenditure, the Institution 
would accommodate twice the number of patients. 

Frequent enquiries am made by persons from different 
parts of the State, when the building will be in readiness for 



the .reception of patients, and from the number of such en- 
quiries, we can but beliere that the Hospital will be filled to 
its utmost capacity in a short time after it is open for the re- 
ception of patients. 

The engine house, bakery, laundry, together with the heat- 
ing and cooking apparatus, and the plumbing work, has not 
been put under contract, but will be early enough to have 
the same finished by the time the building is completed, which 
Is to be by the first day of September, 1859. 

Begarding ourselves as the agents of the State in the man- 
agement of this great trust, intended for the benefit of every 
class of citizens, and every part of the State, we are fally sen- 
sible of the responsibility, to see that there is a wise expendi- 
ture of the means placed at our disposal, and at the same 
time have felt called upon to see that the building in all its 
parts was perfect and suitable for the purposes for which it is 
intended. 

The system of Ventilation adopted is that of i^brced Venti' 
JaUany which experience has proved to be the most certain 
and reliable in an Institution of this kind. 

It is believed| by the Board, that when completed the Build- 
ing will be second to none in the Oountry, in point of efficien- 
cy and economy. 

The construction of the engine house, laundry, wells, sew- 
ers, and the apparatus for cooking, heating, plumbing, lighting 
and putting the building, now under contract, in running or- 
der will cost about $28,600, and we confidentiy hope to have 
the whole completed and ready for occupancy within the 
time named in the contract 

L. J. FABWELL. 

J. P. McGregor. J- Ommissumers. 

LEVI STERLING 



' •* 



. T 



I . 
. -I » 



,> 



I 



1. 



s 



"rk n 



DOCUMENT "O. 



ToHisExCBLLENcrr, Coles Bashfoed, Governob of the State. 

Sir : — ^I herein transmit to you a report of the proceedings 
of the Board of Eegents of Normal Schools, in accordance 
with section eight of an "Act for the enconragenient of 
Academies and Normal Schools. 

With sincere regard, 

I have the honor to be, 

Tour obedient Servant, 
D. T. KILGORE. 
Secretary of the Board. 
Madison, Sept 6th, T857. 



INTRODUCTION. 



At the last session of the Legislature a law was passed, ap- 
propriating twenty-five per cent, of the income from the sale 
of the swamp lands of Wisconsin, for the purpose of aiding 
snch Colleges and Academies as might comply with certain 
regulations. 

The design of the law was two fold — Ist. To aid Institui 
tions of learning, which have labored eflSciently in the cause 
of education in this new State, although they have hitherto 
been entirely dependent upon private enterprise. 2d. To 
give what encouragement they could in such a manner as 
would enable such Institutions to render an equivalent for the 
funds received, by preparing persons for teaching in our pub- 
lic schools. 

The Board of Regents, appointed Dy the Governor, to carry 
out the provisions of this law was organized on the 16th day 
of July, 1867. 

On the following pages will be found the' transactions of this 
body at their first meeting, and also the law under which the 
Board was organized. They are commended to the notice 
and critical examination of educators in our State. We ask 
that any suggestionjby way of improving either the law or 
the regulations, will be freely communicated to the President 
or Secretary, For these things are tlic beginning of an 
enterprise, which,'if rightly managed, will eventuate in the 
promotion of general education, in our growing State. 



6 

There is, it mnBt be confessed, a preasing need of thorongfa- 
1 J trained teachers, to preside over the manj schools that ars 
springing into being, as if by magic, in every partof this com* 
monwealth. 

In these schools are our children, and ihert all of them will 
receive the rudiments of their education, and the great ma- 
jority of them will there complete their course, except as it 
may be prolonged in the business eugagements of life. With 
reference to all our J^Outh^ them, tke.c(>nm]on schools sustain 
an important relation which cannot be too highly estimated. 
Nor can too much be done 16 place in these schools persons 
well qualified for their high calling. 

Our legislators displayed their wisdom, in tlie liberal pro- 
visions of this act, and coming generations will owe them a 
debt of gratitude. 

It 'is the design of this Board to carry out and make efficient 
their proyisions ; and the kind co-operation of all who desire 
tLe successful advancement of so noble an enterprise, is eam* 
estly desired. 

Blank forms of reports will be forwarded to those Institu- 
tions that give timely notice to the Secretary of this Boar d 
of their intention to comply with the law. 

M. P. KINNEY, 
D. T. KILGORE, 

Committee of PuUioatzan. 



PROCEEMK&S: 



• e 






The following personsi appointed by his i^zcellency, the 
Governor of the State of Wisconsin, to carry out the provis- 
ions of an act entitled ^^Aos, Aor fob thb Enooubagemsnt of 
AoADEHiEB akdNobual Scetools/' met in the Assembly Oharn- 
ber of the Capital, afc Madison, on Wedneadajr, July ^ISth, 
1857, at 2 o'clock, p. jl 

At.to.«t> BEU^GB^g;, - Pr&iriii du Ohim. 

MABTdr P. Bjnk^, • BamM. 

EDWAm> OoQKX) - - jijgfletm^ 

Noah a YiMiBr, . - - PlalteviJkf 

J. J. Enos, - - - - Watertotmi, 

ZoBs G. MoKiNDLET, - KenmhoL 

DAMOijr Y. E4LQOBB, - MajdHson. 

A. 0. Spioeb, - - - iRUon» 

Samuel A. Bran, - - Wavkeaha. 

On motion of E. Oookb, A. Bbunson was called to the 
Ohair, and D. Y. Ejloobb was appointed Secretary. 

Hon. A. D. Smith, Associate Justice of the Supreme Oourt^ 
came in and administered the oath of office to the members. 

The Board was then divided by lot Into threie claw^ as 
follows : 

FIBST GLASS. 

Noah H. Vibgin, A. 0. Spioeb, and Edwabd Oookb, whose 
term' of office will expire January Ist, A. D. 1858. 



10 

RIHOT TO THE FLOOR. 

4th. When two or more members shail rise to speak at the 
same time, the chair shall decide the right to the floor. . "So 
member shall be interrapted while speaking unless by a call 
to order. 

iNTBODuanoN OF Busnncss. 

6th. All the business of the Board, excepting such as may 
be brought forward by the presiding officer, shall be introduc- 
ed by motion or resolution. 

OBDEB OF BUSINESS. 

6th. The order of business shall be 

1st. The reading of the minutes of preceding meeting 
which shall be corrected, if need be, and approved. 

2d. Unfinished business. 

3d. Communications from the Governor or State De- 
partments. 

4th. Beports of Committees. 

5th. Motions, orders, resolutions, petitions, and applica- 
tions for the benefit of the income ftm4. 

MOTIONS. 

7th. Every member of the Board shall have a right to 
make, or second a motion ; and every motion made and se- 
conded, shall be disposed of by the Board, unleeus withdrawn 
by the mover. 

RESOLUTIONS MUST BB IN WBITINa. 

8th. All resolutions i^hall be reduced to writing and be 
signed by the mover and second ; and all motions shall also 
bo put in writing if the President so direct, or at the request 
of any member. 

WHSN PAPESS SHALL BB READ. 

9th, If the reading of a paper is called for, bat objected to 
the Board shall decide. 



11 

BHPOBIB. 

10:^ Reports may be committed, or recommitted ; qites- 
tionsi^aj be diri^d. when the s^ose will admit of ib 

OEDEE or MOTIONS. 

11th. Motions skall have precedence in the fallowing or- 
der : to adjourn ; to lay on the table ; the previous question ; 
to postpone to a certain day ; to' commit ; to amend ; to post^ 
poae indefinitely. * • . , 

REOONSlDERATIOir.' 

12th. When a question has been decided, any m^mbef 
who voted in the majority may move a reconsideration, and 
if seconded, shall be open to debate and be disposed of by 
the Board. 

AYKS AND KOES. 

13th. Any two members of the Board may call for the 
ayes and noes, when the vote shall be so taken. 

appointment of commtttees. 

14th. All committees shall be appointed by the Chair, un- • 
leas otherwise ordered by the Board ; but no member shall be 
appointed on two committees at the same time, without his 
consent, unless all the uther members are on committee. 

OHAXBMAN OF OOMBOTTEES. 

15th. The member first nanied on any committee shall be 
chairman thereof, and in his absence the member next in or- 
der shall be chairman. All committees shall consist of three 
members, except otherwise ordered. 

QUESTIONS OF ORDER. 

16th. All question3 of order shall be decided by the Chair, 
which decision shall prevail, unless' overruled on an appeal to 
the Board ; any two members dissenting from the Chair shall 
have a right to appeal, in such case. 



13 

PBSVIOVB QUBTION. 

17th. It shall be in order for anj member of &e Board, 
when he thinks the qnestion has been snfBcientlj discnssed, 
to move that the qnestion be taken without further debate, 
and if the motion be sustained bj two thirds of the members 
present and voting, the main question shall then be put 

ANmJAJb MEETINa. 

18th. The Annual Meeting of the Board shall be held at 
the Capitoly in Madison^ on the first Tuesday of March. Spe- 
cial meetings may be held as provided fer in the Act organ- 
izing this Board. 

8USP£NSI0N OF BULV8. 

19th. By consent of two- thirds of the members present 
a standing rule may be suspended ; and new By-Laws may 
be edoptcd by a two-thirds vote. 

Adjourned to 2 o'clock, p. m. 

Thursday Afternoon. 

Mr. Bean, from committee to prepare a course of study, 
made a report, which, after considerable discussion, was re- 
ferred to a special committee, consisting of Messrs. McKisn- 
LEY, OooK, and Spicer, who were instructed to report Friday 
morning at nine o'clock. 

Mr. Spicer offered the following resolution, which was 
adopted. 

Hesolvedj That the Secretary be, and he is hereby author- 
ized to procure and furnish an office, purchase a desk, and 
such books for recods, blanks, forms, warrants, etc., as may 
be necessary. 

Adjourned till Friday, 9 o'clock, a. M. 



13 

TfflRD DAY. 

Friday Morning. 

The meeting was called to order by the President, and 
opened with prayer by Doot Ooox. Minutes oi last meeting 
were read and approved. 

On motion, the Secretary's compensation was fixed at twa 
dollars and fifty oents per day. 

Xhe report of the committee on applications for the benefit 
of the Fand, was presented and laid on the tabJe. 

£. CSooK aSeiBA the following resolution, whieh was ftdoptr 
ed: 

Hesolvedj That the President and Secretary of this Board 
be, and are hereby authorized and required to procure the 
publication of two thousand copies, in a neat pamphlet form, 
of the Act under which this Board was cheated, to(>e:her with 
the Proceedings of this meeting. They are also instructed 
to prepare and publish such form^ as niay be necessary for the 
operations of this Board. 

On motion of Mr. Bean, the Secretary was instructed to 
forward to each member ot the Board, for distribution, fifty 
copies of the above pamphlet, and to distribute copies among 
teachers, educational institutions, and school officers. 

Mb McKiNDLEY, Chairman of the Committee to prepare a 
Course of Study, made a report, which was adopted, as fol- 
lows : 

REPORT: 

The Board of Regents of IN'ormal Schools for the State of 
Wisconsin,vin pursuance of an act passed at the last session 
«»f the Legislature, entitled ^^An act for the mcouragemeixt of 
Academies and Normal Schools,^^ do hereby ordain the follow- 
ing rules and regulations, by which they will be governed in 
the distribution of the said fund : 

KOSJiCAL SCHOOL DEFINED. 

1st. A Normal School or Normal Department, as contem- 
) .ated in this Act, is in the estimation of this Board; one in 



^ 



14 

which students are educated wifli especial reference to fitting 
them for teiaching in our public Schools. 

WHAT OOLLEOBS AND A0ADEHIE8 KAY BS/CETVE AID. 

2nd, Any College or Academj that shall institute such a 
Normal Department, and comply with the regulatioiiB whidi 
the Board may irom time to time make, as contemplated by 
the Act above referred to, shall be oomidered as coming with 
in its provisions and entitled to its benefits. Such Depart- 
ment ho we ver, shall be distinct and separate from the origi- 
nal Academic or Oollegiate ^Department, and its design and 
only aim shall be, to qualify students for the business of 
teaching in our Public Schools. 

TEKHS OF ADMISSION. 

3d. Pupils may be admitted to this Normal Department 
who shall have attained the age of 14 years, and shall pass a 
satisfactory examination by the Principal or Conductor of said 
Normal Department, in Elementary Sounds, Reading, Spell- 
ing, Intellectual Arithmetic, (as tar as Percentage,) Geogra- 
phy and Pennmanship. 

And it shall be understood that no student shall be allowed 
to take up any study, till he shall have passed an examina- 
tion, in the manner prescribed, in all studies, previously laid 
down in the course of study adopted by the Board. 

TVHAT STUDENTS ENTITLE INSTITUTIONS TO DRAW PRO RATA« 

No Institutions shall draw j5ro rata tor the income of this 
fund for any student in attendance at such Normal School for 
a less terih than three months, nor unless he shall have passed 
a. satisfaDetory examination in one-third of -a year's couwe dl 
Sfndy. 

INSTITUTIONS MUST MAKE REPORT. 

Institutions receiving the benefits of this fund, shall make 
their Annual Eeports to the flecretary of this Board on or be- 
fore the first day of February in each year ; such Beport, 
embracing the calender year terminiating in Decenlber, shall 



1 



14 



include the oam^$> rasidence, «^ and stmdSe^ of 'Cff eh pppi) 
taught in the N^ormal Depairtnient, yerified as the law directs. 

NOnCB OF APPLICATION. 

The President or Principal of aay iDstitution intending to 
apply for the benefits of this fund, shall give notice to the 
Secretary of this Board of such intention, and of the time of 
examination of pupils in tbe Kormal School or department, 
to take place at the close of the academic term next ensutug, 
which Botiee shall be.giren at least six wet^ks pte^ious to fhe^ 
elose of said term. 

^XAMlKIHa OOaOBTTEB. i 

It shall be thadutyof the Prestident of thid BOard to ^p-) 
point a committee to attend the examination of ptipils iasueh 
Normal School or department, who shall report to thi$ Board; 
at its next annual meeting a full statement of the restilts of 
such ezamiaation, and of the oondition of said school* 

COUBSE OF STUDY. 

. The course of study shall be as felloXvs : 

Fli^i Tear. — Kfcading, Spelling and Defining, Mental Arith- 
metic, Geography with map drawing, Wriltieni Aritlfinetic^ 
Elements of Sounds, Eilglish Grammar, I3iec«y atid Practice 
of Teaching, Analysis of Words, Principles, cff English -Qom^ 
position. ' /. 

^ Secqnd Tiar^-^Higber AtiKhmetic, Elemeatjtfy Alg^brai, 
History (Ancient and Modern), E ocution, Theory e«nid' Pr^e-t 
tice of Teaching, English Composition, Physiology, Vocal 
Music 

Third Teao'* — Higher Algebra, Geometry, Book-Keiepipft 
Vocal Music, Natural Philosophy, Logic, Ehetorip, Elocu^ 
tion. Science of Goyeitom6iit, Chemistry, Astronomy, — 
Optmial — ^Latin or Greek Languages, Cl^sical Geography. 

Fourth Tear — ^Trigonometry, Conic Sections, Botany, Geol- 
ogy, Mental and Moral Philosophy, Political Economy, Sur- 
veying, Optics, Mechanics, Hydrostatics, Electricity, Magnet- 
ism, Meteorology, Natural History. Qp^tonat-rLanguages as 
above, and History of Civilization. 



10 

EEPORT OF COMMITTEE ON A DBTINOr KOfiM AL 

SCHOOL. 

E. Cooke, from the Committee to take into coii8iderati<m 
the BQbject of a distinct Normal School, presented the fol- 
lowing report which was adopted : 

REPOTIT- 

Your Committee haying dnl j considered the subject refer- 
red to them, hare arrired at the following oondnaLooff, viz : 

Ist. Howeyer desirable separate Normal Schools, not con- 
nected with any other institntions, may be to the interests of 
education, in the opinion of jonr committee, the «ct entitled 
"iln aatf(3T (he encouragement o/Aeademm and Normal Schools^ 
does not empower this Board of Regents to take any steps in 
that direction, other than to receiye proposals from towns, 
yillages and cities proposing to erect and donate such institu- 
tions. 

3d. Wheneyer this Board shall haye selected one, from those 
so ofifored, to be adopted by and secured to the State, as a 
State Normal School, this Board can, in acco: danoe with said 
act, appc^ion to said Normal School a sum not esoeeding 
three thousand dollars perannum for the support of said School 
And that as soon as the Board shall haye made choice of a lo- 
cation, a portion of the Normal School Fund shall be appro ' 
priated for that purpose. 

Should any towns, yillages or cities make an offer of such 
Institute, in accordance with the proyisions of said Act, your 
committee recommend that information embracing the follow- 
ing items, be giyen in such proposition : 

1st. Plat of ground, size, yaluation, abstract of title, fa- 
cilities for reaching it. 

2d. Plan of buildings, yaluation, and any other information 
necessary, respecting its adaptation to the purposes of a Nor-, 
mal School, as contemplated in this Act. 

On motion of Mr. Bean, the President and Secretary were 
instructed to memoralize the Legislature in the name of this 



IT 

Board, with reforence to moh. obangea ia the Aot uud^ wMc^ 
this Board is oirgaoized, as may be necessary to meet thi^ ex- 
penses of this Board and its committee m carrying onl Ihe 
proYisions of said act. 
Voted to adjotim. 

H. Y. KcLGOBEy Sscretary, 
M1SOABH9 Jnly 16, 1S57. 



M. P. KINNEY, BmdenL 



AN ACT 

FOE THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF 

ACADEMIES AND NORMAL SCHOOLS- 



I%fi People of the State of Wi^consin^ represented tn Senate anpl 
Aeaemhly^ do enact as foWms: 

mrrr of ooioaBsiOBiss to AFPOBnoH obbxain niBSB. 

Sbohok 1. It shall hereafter be the duty of the Oommifi- 
sioners of School and UiiiTeiBity lands, to apportion the in- 
come of twenty-fiy^e peir ceqt. of tha - gross proceeds arising 
from the sale of swamp and overflowed lands granted to this 
State, by aa ^^Aetof Gqngreas entitled an act to. enab^i^ the 
Stuta 0f Aricansas and other States to jredaipi the «W9m9 -^d 
ovmryfbwed lands within their limite,?^ appro/ved Septembier 
Si9^f 1850, to Normal Ipstitotes and Academies as herei^i- 
«fter provided*' 

ju?Toamaan of Jl boabd of BsoianB. 

Seo. 3. For the purpose of more folly carrying ovt the pro- 
'tisions ci this act, there shall be constitnted a Board of Aine ' 
Segents, to be ealfed the Board of Begtats of Noniial 



18 

Schools, no two of whom shall reside in anj one oonniy of 
tills State. They shall be appointed by the QoTemor, by and 
with the approval of the Senate. The Goyernor andSa- 
perintendent of Public Instruction shall be ex-officiomemben 
of the said Board of Begents. They shall have a voioe, bat 
shall not be allowed to vote on any of the 'business of the 
Board of Kegents. The Governor shall have power to fill aH 
yacancies which may occur by death ^ resignation, or other- 
wise, until the next meeting of the Legislature, or while the 
Legislature is not in session, but the appointments thus made 
shall be confirmed by the Senate during the next succeeding 
session of the Legislature. Provided^ that the first Board of 
Begents shall have power to act though appointed by the 
Governor after the adjournment of the present session of the 
Legislature. 

TElUMB OF OFFICB. 

Sao. 3. The Board of Begents thus appointed, shall be 
divided into three classes. The term of office of the first class 
shall expire on the first day of January, a. d. 1858 ; the term 
of office of the second class shall expire on the first day of 
January, a. d. 1869; the term of office of the third class 
shall expire cMithe first day of January, a. d. i860, and there- 
after their terms of office shall continue three years. 

BDLBB ASD OVF10UJK8. 

Seo. 4. The said Board of Begents shall haye authoritjr 
to make all by-laws and needful regulations necessary for 
carrying into effect the provisions of this act, not inconsistent 
with the constitution and laws of this State. The oAoeiB of 
the Board shall be a President, Vice President, and Secre- 
tary ; they shall severally hold their offices for the tenn of 
three years, and until their successors are elected, and shall 
perform the duties incident to their several offices. 

nESTHBirniro akd oompenbation of mkwbkhb. 
Se». 6. The first meeting of said Board of Begents shall 
be held at mxjk time and place as tlie Governor may 



1ft 

nate, and he shall notify eaoh member of the Board of Ke- 
gjenta of the time and place of holding the first meeting, giy- 
iiig written or verbal notice thereof, at least ten day^ prior to 
the time of holding sach meeting, and thereafter they shall 
hold an annual meeting at the Capitol of the State at such 
time as thej may designate. The said Regents shall not re^ 
ceive any oompensation for their serviceSy but shall be allow* 
ed from the income of the said school fund, ten cents per 
mile for the distance traveled in attending any such meeting, 
on the most direct and usual routes of travel. The Secretf^ 
ry shall receive such additional compensation from the said 
income fund for his services as the Begents may designate, 
not exceeding two dollars and fifty cmts per day for the 
time actually demoted to such service, an account thereof 
shall be made and verified by affidavit 

QU0KT7H, SPECIAL MEBnTOS, AND BSMDVAL FXOIC CNTREOS. 

Seo. 6. A majority of the Board of Regents shall consti- 
tute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a less 
number may adjourn Irom time to time. Special meetings 
of the Board may be called by the Governor, on a petition 
signed for that purpose, by any six members of the Board. 
At all special meetings of the Board, two-thirds of all the 
Regents shall be necessary to constitute a quorum. Any Re- 
gent may be removed from office for cause, by a vote of 
two-thirds of the Board. 

APPLTOATON FOB FUSSS. 

8b<x 7. All applications for any of the inc(»n6 of the 
school fund, pursuant to the provisions of this act, shall be 
made to the Board of Regents of Normal Schools, in suoh 
manner as they shall direct, and the School Land Oommis* 
sioners shall distribute the income fund specified in section 
one of this act to such Normal Scbools^nd Academies, and 
in such ratio as the Board of Regents shall designate, and no 
religious test shall ever be required of any student or scholar 
in any of the institutions and schools receiving any of the 
income ihnd designated in this act 



ao 

AHHUAI. BXFQRnk 

Bbo. 8. Hie Beger ts shall reqaire of each Institation ap- 
pljing for any of the income fand designated in section one 
of this act, satisfactory evidence, which shall be nniform, 
that the provisions of this act have been fhlly complied with. 
They shall require a report annually at snch time as they 
shall designate, of the number, age, residence and stadies of 
of each pupil or scholar, returned to them, entitled to the 
distributive share of sa^d income fund. And they shall 
make a report of the state and condition of such institution, 
drawing from the income fund, to the Governor, at the same 
time that other State Officere are required to report. . A copy 
of the proceedings of the Board of Begents, fully and fairly 
kept and certified b^ their President and Secretary, shall be 
filed annually at the close of each fiscal year of this State, in 
the office of the Secretary of State. 

OOKDinOHS OF BEOBtVUIG FUlfDS. 

8eo. 9. Every chartered Oollege or University in this 
State in which the usual College course of studies have been 
established and prosecuted, having corporate property to the 
amount of fifty thousand dollars above all encumbrances, and 
every incorporated Academy having corporate property to 
the amount of five thoufand dollars which shall ^tablish and 
maintain a Normal Institute in connection therewith, tor the 
education of teachers, shall receive from the income of the 
fund, as provided in section one of this act ; and such (Col- 
leges, Universities and Academies, shall be allowed to bor- 
row at usual rates from School and University fund, a sum 
not exceeding five thousand dollars for building purposes, or 
to ^y indebtedness incurred for building, on giving to the 
State satisfactory security therefor in at least double the 
amount of the loan applied for, to be approved by the CSora. 
missioners of School and University Lands, according to thia 
act. But no University, College or Academy, shall be entitl- 
ed to such loans, unless it shall be proved to the satisfaction 
of said Commissioners that the corponvtion has expesded 



t 



money eqaal to the snm ap{>li6d for^ to ihe erection of a 
bnilding wlia*ein Kormal School Instruction is given, or that 
an equal sum has been raised hj such institution for building 
and no installments of such loans shall be paid over until 
proof bj affidavit' is made bj the Principal or President of 
said institution, that an equal amount with the sum asked for 
has actually been expended in building since the last install 
nient paid on such loan, and the corporation shall) before 
drawing any n:oney for building purposes, give real estate 
security to the Commissioners, owned by such corporation or 
by individuals in double the amount asked for the payment 
of the sum loaned within ten years at the usual interest and 
terms for such loans. The security shall be for the entire 
sum applied for, but the corporation shall be holden only for 
the amdtmt actually received. 

RATIO o!F jymrwBTJTum, 

Sko. 10. All the income of the fund provided for in sec- 
tion one of this act, shall be distributed to the Oolleges, Uni- 
versities and Academies severally, except the State U niversl- 
ty, having established and maintained such Kormal Institute, 
according to the number of pupils so instructed in such stud- 
ies and for such a period ot time as the Board of Begents 
may designate as a qualification or condition for receiving 
the benefits of this act, until the amount awarded to any one 
of such schools shall reach the sum of three thousand doltars 
annually. 

NUACBEK OF STUDENTS TO BE BE?0ET£D. 

Sbo. 11. The number of students pursuing the course of 
studies which may have been designated by the Board of 
Regents in each Normal Institute or Normal Department, or 
any College, University ox Academy, receiving the benefits 
of this act^ shall be reported to the Board of Begents upon 
the oath of the President or Principal, and the Secretary of 
the Board of Trustees of said Institution. 



STOW nrHDS SBLilX BB PAID. 

' Sec. 13. . Warrants of the Board of Regents signed hj the 
President and Secretary thereof and conntersigned bj the 
Secretary of State, shall be drawn on the State Treasurer in 
favor of snch institution for the amonnt appointed to them 
severally, which shall be assessed on or before the fifkih day of 
March annually. Each Listitntion shall ^ve a receipt ngned 
by its Treasurer or by the President and Secretary of the 
Board of Trustees to the State Treasurer, on receiving any of 
the fund provided for in this act, and the State Treasurer is 
hereby authorized to pay each and all Institutions their just 
proportion of the said income fund as designated by the said 
Board of Regents. 

PENALTT FOE MAKIKa FALSE BEPOKT. 

Sec. 13. If any person authorized by this act or by ihe 
rules and regulations provided by the Board of Regents to 
make report from any Normal School of the number of schol- 
ars taught therein, shall make any false report of the number 
of students, the person so offending shall on conviction there- 
of be punished by fine, not exceeding two hundred dollars, 
nor less than fifty dollars, or by imprisonment in the county 
jail, not exceeding six months, nor less than one month, and 
if any person or persons shall for the purpose of obtuning 
any loan to any College or University or for the purpose of 
enabling any College or University to draw any monies as 
hereinbefore provided, make any false statements relative to 
the value of the property of such College or University, or 
as to the establishing and maintaining of a IN'ormal Institute 
in connection with such College or University, for the educa- 
tion of teachers, the person so offending shall, on conviction 
thereof, be punished by imprisonment in the county jail not 
more than one jear, nor less than six months, and by fine 
not less than one thousand dollars, nor exceeding three thou- 
sand. 



28 

DONATIOK OF BITB AND BUILDING FOB NOBMAX SCHOOL. 

Sbo. 14. Whenever any town, city or yillage in this State 
shall propose to give a site and suitable building and fixtures 
for a State Normal School, free from all incumbrances, said 
Board of Regents may consider the same, and if, in their 
opinion* the interests of education will be advanced there- 
by, they may, in their discretion, select from such proposi- 
tions the one most feasible and located in such place as is 
deemed easiest of access, and apportion to the same annu- 
ally a sum not exceeding three thousand dollars for the sup- 
I>ort and maintenance of teachers therein. 

NO OHA.SGV FOB TUITION., 

SEa 16. No charge shall be made for tuitiop to any pnpil 
or scholar in eaid Noni&al School whose purpose i^ to fit him- 
self as a teacher of Oommon Schools in this State, and difs 
liomber and qualifications scholarsi and regdlations under 
which they shall be admitted, shall be determined by the 
Board of Regents. Of the remainder, of the income men- 
tioiled in section one of this act, every incorporated College 
in this Stated wilih a; clear capital of $50,000, (except the State 
IJniyersity) shall be .entitled to receiris $20 for every female 
graduate who 6haU have pursued the regular course of study 
in saeh college^ ot such a course as the Board of Regents in 
this act shall prescribe in lieu thereof. 

Seo* 16. This act shall take effect and be in force from and 
after its passage, and all acts and parts of acts contradicting 
the provisions of this act are hereby repealed. 

WTMAN SPOONER, 

Speaker of Assembly, 
0. L. BHOLES, 

Pres. pro tern, of Senaie. 
Approved, March 7th, 1867. 

COLES BASHFORD. 



u 



STATE OP WISCONSIN, ) 
Seosbtabt'b Office. ) 

The Secretary of State, of the State of Wiscoiiain, does 

herebj certifj, that the foregoing act hae been compared with 

the original enrolled act deposited in thia office, and that the 

eame is a correct and tme copy thereof, and of the whole 

of such original. 

In witnees whereof the aaid Secretary of State, has hereon- 

to eet his hand and affixed the Great Seal of 

L. S. the State, at the Oapitol in Madfaon, this Ut 

day of April, A. D. 1867. 

D. W. JONES, 

Secretary 0/ Stak. 



DOCUMENT "P. 



M-n » 



REPORT. 



To His ExCELLENOT CoLES BasHFORD, 

Qovemor of Wiaomsm: 

1 herewith submit a Beport upon the Geological Sarveyof 
;Wi8ConsiDy made in accordance with an act providing for the 
Geological Sturvey of the State, passed March 8d, 1857. 

Since assuming the duties of mj department of the Snrvejy 
I have labored diligently to promote its objects, and with 
such trifling exceptions as were caused by tlie fulfilment of 
duties and responsibilities previously assumed, I have devoted 
my whole time to the work. The entire results of the sea- 
son cannot of course be giv^ in a matured form at 
this early period as much of it is connected with the work of 
subsequent seasons, and the precise value of other portions 
can only be ascertained by studies which cannot be carried 
on in the field. 

I shall therefore attempt only a report of progresa and ap- 
pend such matter as I have thought important to be published, 
from its bearings upon the undeveloped resources of the State. 

In undertaking a work, which according to my contract 
with the State, was to continue during a series of years, it 
seemed proper first, to ascertain precisely what had already 
been done in perfecting our Geology. I therefore devoted 
some little time to collecting whatever materials might be in 
existence which would be of value in this effort. These nia* 
teriaU were scattered through the Kcports of the IT. S. Geol* 
ogist, in unpublished notes of lines to Kailroad surveys,^ and 
in the annual Beportsof other State Geologists, for (Jie years 
1854-*55 and ^56. 



I had also considerable material of mj own gathered from 
time to time incidentally in mj travels oyer the state. These 
scattered materials I endeavored to arrange and compDe so 
as to indicate the stage of advancement already attained to- 
wards nndeiBtanding the Geology of Wisconsin. 

Thus what had been done, and what still remained to do, 
conld be seen at a glance, and a chart was fnmished from 
which valuable hints conld constantly be drawn by the ex- 
plorer. 

Snch a review of the ground was a prerequisite to the eco- 
nomical conduct of the survey as it would save the r^ctition 
of studies already faithfully performed and point out at 
once the unexplored fields of investigation which remained. 

In prosecuting ray work, as well as in its organization, I 
have endeavored to keep in view the circumstances under 
which this survey has been initiated. 

It is in a now state wlioso population is sparse, whose ter- 
ritory is of vast extent and much of it in a state of nature 
and whose resources are ^ct to be found out and developed 
The condition of its treasury admits of no large expenditure 
for objects which are not of inr mediate necessity or followed 
by a prompt return in kind. It M'ould be obviously impossi- 
ble under any appropriation that the State could afford to 
make to visit every section of land within its limits, examine 
minutely its soil, its roclis, and every circumstance wLich 
might be of interest to the geolglst. Such a survey could 
only be wisely undertalcen by a rich and densely populated 
country. 

We have an example of this kind in the very thorough and 
minute geological survey of Groat Britain, which is still in 
progress, and is a splendid model of its kind, both in the 
perfection of its organization and the masterly ability with 
which it is being prosecuted. 

Yet it would be absurd for us to attempt an imitation of 
that noble survey in detail. Our entire appropriation would 



8CftrcelysQstaia tho work over a single Cov^oship) aad tUo pre- 
sent generation would pass a way, while half the state still re* 
mained unexplored. 

In a new and unsettled state, witih aa extensive territory, 
a widely diflferent policy must govern. 

The geologist should aim : 1st. To grasp and present clearly 
the great geological features of his district, and the promi- 
nent pljysical resources which it contains. 

2d. To study minutely those points only which promise the 
richest economical and scientific lesults, and to study these as 
a general rule in the order of their relative importance, so 
far as this can be known by a cursory survey. 

3d. To present the knowledge thus obtained in such form 
as to bo intelligible to every citizen of the state or to those 
abroad who may be interested in its geology, or tho devel- 
opement of its resonrces. 

While this plan of action may be less satisfactory to tlie 
Geologist and less favorable Yo his reputation than researches 
prosecuted more regularly and minutely, it seems to me the 
only one at all compalible with the idea of bringing rapidly 
into notice the resources of a new State, and furnishing to its 
inhabitants, who are now living, a general^ chart of its geol- 
ogy. 

My work during the past season has been prosecuted in the. 
light of the ideas just expressed, and has been mainly of a 
general nature. I have made a series of accurately measured 
sections across the State in such directions as seemed to ex- . 
hibit most clearly its general Geology. 

Sec. No. 1. Extends from Racine along the line of the Ra- 
cine & Miss. R. R. to Rock River, at Beloit, thence westward 
alons: the line of the Southern Wisconsin R. R. to the Missis** 
sippi River, opposite Dubuque. 

Sec. No. 2. From Milwaukee west along the line of the Mil. 
& Miss. R. R. to Rock River, at Janesville. 

Sec. No. 3. From Milwaukee along the lice of the Water- 



6 

town R, R., throagh Madtson and the Blue Mda^ to die 

ri^er. 

Sec. No. 4, From Madison down the Black Earth and Wis. 
Riyer vallies to the MisB. Biver. 

Sec. No. 5. From Milwaukee northweatalong the line of the 
La Oroese B. B. to Portage Citj, tbenoe westward to La 
Croflse. 

Sec. No. 6. From Sheboygan west, through Fond da Isc, 
Bipon and Oreeti Lake to Piinceton, Marqnette Go^ on the 
Fox Biyer. 

Sec. No. 7. From Manitowoc westward to the Fox Biver at 
Appleton, thence to Wolf Biv^er at New London, and thence 
to the Wisconsin Biver, at Stevens Point. 

Sec. No. 8. From Beloit throagh Madison to Portage City. 

Sec. No* 9. From Beloit north through Watertown, Fond 
da Lac, Oshkosh, Appleton and Lake Shawano, along the line 
of the Chicago, St Paul, Fond da Lac and Lake Superior R 
R, to the State line north. 

Sec. No. 10. From Kewaunee on Lake Michigan, westward 
to Green Bay City, thence to Lake Shaypino and Wolf River. 

These ecctions generally run across the dip of the strata and 
exhibit the outcrops and relations of the various rocks expo^ 
along the lines which they traverse. They are generally 
made on lines of survejed Bailroads, or along the valleys of 
the principal streams, as it was only by following these tliat 
we could get any reliable standard of reference for heights 
and distances. These standards are of great value with us as 
we have no topographical survey in conjunction with our geo- 
logical survey, and when reliefs are so uniform as ours, very 
little can be done with the barometer without bestowing more 
attention upon it than we could well afford. 

As soon as these sections can be properly executed onpaper 
they will be safely deposited and kept, so that in case of acci- 
dent they will not be lost to the State. The failure of some 
Geologists to put their work into such shape as to be under- 
stood by others, has been a cause of great loss where death or 



other cirenmateiiGfiahftyei teitaiixiatod tbeis conMeiiMl. .with H 

In ad^tion to thesa^eetbos I have, ex^oiiaed th^diiimitt 
between the Wolf aadFozriTen Andaloiigtheahoro^iofrGrBeni 
Bay aS'far as^ the Oeonto, also .the ooimtry lying het^WMn . tbe^ j 
Wisconsin rirer and the . Miaakaippi aa far Nqrth. aa^ Bfaid^ 
Itiyar Falls. 

In order toibrward aa jrapidly as possible, theueeonj^oaliiian. 
snlts of the survey, I.haTemadejspeeial^Yisiti to«mehi|iDi]il»f. 
as seemed likely tp yield* aay^ng of j ^ne. These general 
explorations have' deter£inied many points of interest 

I have collected and forv^arded to Madison over 2,000 spec- 
imens of ores, rocks, fossils, etc., daring the season. For their 
temporary accommodation I have fitted np a room in one of 
the buildings of the State XJniyersity where the specimens 
may be stored, examined and classified preparatory to being 
permanently arranged in the State collection. These speci- 
mens win be a valnable addition to the cabinet, and can be 
seen by yourself or the Legislature at th^ TTniYersity. 

The great importance of the Iron interest of our State has 
induced me to make it an object of special attention. Accord- 
ingly I have examined with great <sare every locality which 
promised any considerable yield of valuable iron ore, and in 
a few cases where important interests were involved in the 
quality of the ore I have submitted specimens to the distin- 
guished chemist Dr. Charles Jackson, of Boston, for analysis. 
The results and all questions connected with the manufacture 
of iron in our State I have considered in a paper herewith ap- 
pended, ''On the Iron Ores of Wisconsin," to which I beg leave 
to call your attention. 

In concluding this notice of my season's labor, it is proper 
to state that I have had no permanent assistant, the condition 
of the fund not allowing me to employ one, I have however 
employed such help as I could not do without at my own 
expense. 



8 

I wisn here also to express my thanks to the citizens of ihose 
portions of the State where my work has led me for many acts 
of couttesy and co-operation. I am under great obli^tions 
also to 8. F. Johnson, Chief Engineer, CSdeago, F. & St P. 
R R ; Bobt L. Harris, Esq., of the Badne andM. R R ; E. 
W. Woodward, Esq., of the LaOrosse R B. ; Jasper Ylietv 
Esq., of the Berlin &.HoriconB. B., for the nse of profiles 
and mn(^ yalnable information and fadlities for carrying for- 
ward the simrey along their respective roads. 

Bespectfolly submitted, 

EDWARD DAinEIfi. 



^xm $xts nfMismslt 



9 

No metallic ores are so abundantly distributed as those of 
iron. They enter more or less largely into all the great min- 
eral masses of our globe, so that it would be scarcely possible 
to find a fragment of rock or a handful ^f soil entirely desti- 
tute of iron in scnne one of its varied forms. In our own 
State these ores are unusually abundant. They occur in con- 
nection with rocks of various geological age from -the primary 
slates to the lower members of the upper silurian formation. 
They are found generally in one of the following modes of 
occurrence : 

1st. In place as beds or veins in the rocks where they were 
originally formed or introduced. 

2d. Deposited from aqueous solutions in low ground, as 
bog ore or ochre. 

8d. Scattered over the surface or mingled with the soil and 
superficial deposits in firagments or minute particles. 

The valuable.depositB of ore belong mainly to the first and 
second class. Instances of the last are however much more 
common, and though worthless, often excite large expecta* 
tions. They are especially abundant in the sandy regions of 
the State, where fragments of ore are found on every hillside, 
and the soil is everywhere stained with iron. The coloring 
matter of the sandstone itself is generally derived from ores 
of this metal disseminated through it, whose decomposition 



10 

originateB the chalybeate spriogs which ao frequently 
in the valleys along its outcrop. 

Fragments of magnetic, specular and micaeeofos iron ore 
are yerj abundant in the drift of the central part of the Btate, 
also patches of sand, generally on the lake shore, containing 
minnte grains pf magnetic ore. These are found in connec- 
tion with booldera of igneons rocks and fragmeDts of native 
copper and have undonbtedly a common or gin. 

We hare the most conclnsive eyidence that Ihey were de- 
rived from the north, some o( them as far even sa Lake Su- 
perior, where we know similar ores and rocks exist, in place. 
To explain their transportation to the distant localitiea where 
we find them so abundantly, we have only to refer to the ac- 
tion of causes now producing similar results. On the ocean, 
ice-bergs are often seen by navigators floatiDg southward ftr 
into the Temperate Zone, borne along by submarine currentSi 
and carrying with them rocks, gravel and other materials de- 
rived from the colder regions where they were formed. As 
they gradually melt under the warmth of mildpr latitudes, 
their lading b slowly distributed along the path of the great 
current which moves them on, and thus the bed of the ocean 
is being strewed with the ruins of northern lands. 

At a period of high absolute antiquity, but comparatively 
recent in the geoloeical chronology, the greater portion of our 
State was covered by the sea. 

Far to the northward were elevated lands around which 
ice-bergs were formed, freezing into their mass the rocka and 
soils upon whioh they rested. Great fields of ice also stretch- 
ed away from the base of hills and mountains from whose 
sides the avalanche came thuadetaag down, loading the ice 
with rocks, ores and the loose material of the surface. When 
summer came, tie iee, released from the shores where it was 
formed^ and moved by currents setting southward, bore away. 
its burden and dropped it from place to place as it slowly 
melted away« 



11 

There is reason to beliere that sadden elevittions of great 
masses of land in distant portions of the globe also occurred ' 
daring this period, causing immense waves to rash witli tre* 
mendoas force «over the sabmerged lands, and transporting • 
the rabbiah of the ocean bottom from place to place. Thus we 
can explain the diatribntion of those scattered primary iron 
ores, and pieces of native silver and copper, in companj with 
boulders of igneous rock, from Lake Superior, south across ■ 
Wisconsin, as far as Springfield, Illinois. 

We know tbat those and other ores occur abundantly in the 
region around Lake Superior, and we have only to recur to the 
changes thrpugh which our globe has passed, to account for 
their transportation hither. The ice-bergs of an ancient ocean- 
were the first explorers of our northern mines. ' 

They, tore open the stony treasnries of nature with their 
giant arms, artd seizing upon the glittering ore boro it away 
only to scatter it in their sport over the oeeafi floor. 

The ocean has returned to its limits, and we now find our 
home on the very spot wbere its waves once rolled. The 
wandering red man pidcs np these scattered metals and treas^^ 
ares them as charms and fetishes, or fashions them into arrows 
and hatchets, and his civilized brother, the white man, founds* 
upon their discovery extravagant visions of wealth. 

From this explanation, (which I have made because it is a 

subject of very frequent inquiry,) it will be seen at once that 

no valuable expectations can be safely based upon the discov- 

ery of these isolated fragments of ore. Where, however, 

pieces of ore are found very abundantly, and especially where 

they are not accompanied by boulders or drift gravel, they 

may be the float of some deposit not far away, and justify a 
careful examination. 

The deposits of bog ore are very numerous in the swamps^ 
and marshes of the State, but I have found none as yet xof 
snfflcient extent or richness to be of value. It is ^uite im- 
portant that these ores should be discovered here in quantity^ 
as fhey are valuable to mix with the harder and richer ores. 



13 

Thej geuerallj occur near the edges of marshes, and maj 
be easily recognized by the appearance ot ochre or iroa mat 
which they present. Their extent may be readily ascertained 
by sinking a few test pits over the low grounds to a suflGLcieat 
depth. 

I shall proceed now to speak of those deposits of ore which 
are likely to become valuable as a basis for the manufacture 
of iron in our States 

ORES 07 TBS IRON BIDQB — IX>DaB OOUNIY. 

The principal part of this ore is located on sections 12 and 
13, in the town of Hubbard. It occurs in the form of a bed, 
interposed between a massive grey limestone above and a soft 
blue shale belcw. 

It makes a presentation at the surface along the outcrop of 
these rocks for more than a mile, and dips conformably with 
them eastward. Its greatest thickness is at the eastern end 
of the bed, where the limestone has been removed and the 
whole mass has crumbled down so as to be shoveled up like 
dirt It is here about 26 or 30 feet thick, but where it lies in 
place under the limestone, it ranges from 10 to 15 feet, thin- 
ning towards the east 

The underlying shale has been pierced 20 feet in sinking a 
well, and a hard blue limestone filled with fossils encountered 
at that depth. 

The geological position of this ore is probably very correct- 
ly stated by )L Whittlesey, who visited it while connected 
with the U. S. Geological Survey. 

He refers it to rocks of the same age as the Clinton group 
of New York. The base of the ridge along which the sand- 
stone, the ore, and the upper part of the shale present them- 
selves, is coverel deeply with drift, and no rocks are seen 
upon the surface for several miles in any direction. 

North and west about 8 miles, the Trenton limestone is 
found, capped by 15 feet of Galena limestone. ^These rocks 
dip es^tward and a careful examination of the ground proves. 



13 

clearly that the upper surface of the Galena limestone ca&not 
be more than 40 or 50 feet below the ore bed at Iron Ridge* 
This fact serves to point at once to^ the equivalency of the 
blue shale with that which overlies the Galena limestone in 
the lead region of the State. 

I discovered that shale first in 1851, and afterward noticed 
it in my first *annual report upon the geology of Wisconsin in 
1853, under the designation of " Nucula Shale." It seemed 
to have been previously overlooked by the geologists who 
had visited the mines on account of its very general removal 
by erosion. Notwithstanding its great importance as one of 
our formations, (attaining as it does a thickness of 60 feet,) 
when its soft and perishable nature is considered, it does not 
seem strange that it was not observed before. It forms the 
base of the large conical '^ mounds " or hills of the mining 
region, and its position can readily be ascertained by the 
. springs, which mark it everywhere. Its lower portions there 
are highly fossiliferous, and contain pyrites and occasional 
seams of beantiful crystalized gypsum. It is very finely ex- 
hibited in the great cut at Scales Mound on the Illinois Cen- 
tral K. R, just south of the State line. It is not seen east of 
Blue Mound until we encounter it at Iron Ridge. 

In the wett it is capped by about 400 feet of limestone 
which form the upper strata of the "mounds." These lime- 
stones contain abundant fossils, and were first properly loca- 
ted by Prof. Hall in the upper silurian, the equivalents of the 
Clinton and Niagara groups of New York. They are evi- 
dently identical with the limestones which form the upper 
portion of Iron Ridge, and which extend thence unintenoipt- 
edly south as far as Joliet, Illinois, and north nearly as &r 
around the shores of Lake Michigan. 

The shales are also identical, and have beenj^recognized by 
Prof. Hall in Foster and Whitney's Report on Lake Superior 
and district, as belonging to the Hudson River group. The 
geological poeition of this ore and its accompanying ro(^ 



14 



may therefore be ooneidered.iu settled. The limestone aboF* 
• tile ore is a coarse cavemoiis sab-crjstalliae rock, in lajen 
from 4 idches to a foot thick. It is intersected bj Tery laise 
open Sssnres, which extend back some distance from the ledge, 
and can be seen ramifying in all directions on the thinly cot- 
ered snrface. 

I observed similar f ssnres in the same formation, on the 
east shore of Green Bay, above the Bay Settlement. This 
rock at Iron Eidge contams but few fossils, and those mostly 
casts. It is a magnesian<»rbonate of lime, quite pure. 

The i»hy8ical character of tiie Iron Eidge ore is different 
from tiiat of any other deposit known in tiiis country. It is 
apparently related to the oolitic ores, though it differs from 
c any of them that I have seen described. It consists of smaU 
grains or concretions, varying in size from a mustard seed to 
four times as large, quite irregular in shape, but usually 
Bhghtly oval and flattened to a disc Color bright red, witlj 
. a glistening polished surface, which feels greasy to tiie touch 
and stains like red chalk. 

These grains are apparently concretions formed around mi- 
nute particles of silica, as is shown in Dr. Jackson's analysis. 
Their flattened form seems due to gravitation. The deoogit is 
unquestionably of aqueous origin, but I have as yet found no 
fossiU m It nor do I know of any being found by othera. 

When found in place, tiie grains are cemented together 
into a moderately firm mass, which is regularly stratified like 
the limestone above, and intersected by joints and cleavage 
pUmee. The grains lie flatwise parallel with tiie beddinff 
»d are occasionaUy mingled witii nodules of very compact 
.lieipatite, which seems to have been formed by chemical 
changes, induced since the original deposition ot the ore 
llMsee are of various forms and sises and have tiie color and 
gltttemng sur&ces of tiie small grains. 

■Where the limestone has been removed, tiie cohesion of the 
pattieles is soon destroyed bj atmospheric agencies and all 



15 

traoes of stratifioation dieepp^ftrg. A large fquantity of ore 
has bee& thus partially decomposed, aud . in Boine inetanees 
' 'washed down the hill eide- and formed a «libordinate deposit 
In some cases it has mingled with clay, and forms an e;]ioel- 
lent red chalk and mineral paint. 

This loose ore is known as '^ seed ore " among the farnace 
men who work it. 

QDie limestone in' eontact with the ore bed is often filled 
with cavities containing crystals of specular ore and pyrites, 
and much iron is diffused through the whole mass. 

The amount of ore existing in this bed cannot of course be 
calculated with precision. It is safe, however, to estimate a 
continuous layer of 10 feet over 600 acres of ground, which 
would give us 27,225,000 tons of available ore, capable of 
yielding 13,612,500 tons of metalic iron. This bed of ore 
would, therefore, supply one furnace, producing 10 tons of 
iron per day, for 87,391 years, or ten furnaces 'of the same 
capacity for 8,739 years. It may therefore be regarded as 
inexhaustible. 

The chemical composition of the Iron Ridge ore is a mat* 
ter of great importance^ and as several analyses had previ- 
ously been made which differed considerably on points of 
practical moment to the iron interest, I thought best to have 
a new examinotion. I therefore submitted this ore to Dr. 
Charles Jackson, of Boston, whose distinguished reputation 
both in this country and Europe, invests his results with au- 
thority wherever they may be read, and whose large experi- 
ence in the examination of iron ores, especially q[ualified him 
for the task. 

The specimens selected were from the ore as it was prepared 
for the fhmaee, and where all Ihe^qnalities of that kind of ore 
• would be likely to present, and Dr. Jackson was requested to 
spare neither pains nor expense in ascertaining the existence 
of any substances' which viroiild injare the. quality of the iron 
made from it. 



16 



The results here given ia his report upon specimen No. 8, 
apply to the great mass of loose ore at the western extremity 
of the outcrop where the Northwestern Iron Go. obtain 
ore. 



State Assayeb^b Offtceb, ) 
82, Somerset st., Boston, Dec 17, 1857. ) 

Pbof. E. Daihkls, 

State Geologist to Wisconsin, 

Deas Sib : — ^I have analyzed sample No. 3. of the iron ores 
yon left with me, and have obtained the following result. 

It is an oolitic iron consisting of flattened grains, the sphe- 
roids having grains of quartz sand as nuclei. These grains 
are cemented together by a clayey like mass of fine ore. 

On chemical analysis, made with the utmost care, the fol- 
lowing results were obtained per cent.: 



Water, 


. 8,750 


Silica, 


. 7,760 


Magnesia, . 


. 0,640 


Alumina, . 


8,400 


Oxido of Manganese, . 


1,400 


Lime, 


. 0,660 


Peroxide of iron, 


. 72,500— 60.77 metallic iron. 



100,000 
This ore was searched for phosphoric acid, sulphur and sul- 
phuric acid, arsenic and arsenious acid, but no trace of them 
can be discovered. The magnesia and the lime are combined, 
not with carbonic acid, but with silicic acid or silica. The 
alumina is combined with silex, forming with the above nam- 
ed silicates a clay, which is mixed with the iron ore. Oxide 
of manganese, in the proportions in this ore, is benefidal to 
the iron, and improves the quality of bar iron made iiom it, 
giving it a good steel forming quality. 



17 



Proparly smelted, tlib ore will make good pig and bar iron 

Yours, Chajkles T. Jacebon, 

State Assajer. 



It will be seen by this analysis diat Dr» Jackson failed to 
'fmd phosphonu in this ore, thongh carefnl search was made 
fbr it The ore has long been reported to contain that noxions 
9abstance, which was supposed to cause tibe brittleness seen 
in castijigs made iroin it, when ooid. 

It is the opinion oi Dr* Jadson thai itito brittleness is caus- 
ed by the sileor wUdi fborms the nnoleus of the grains of ore, 
and which, from its intricate combination, is not separated by 
the ordinary process, of reduction. He recommends a mix- 
ture of calcareous ores, or. a flux .of lime, with careful experi- 
ments as to amount ot materials. This peculiarity does not 
injure the ore &r bar iron or steel, and its composition is em- 
iAently favorable for. those purposes. 

The location of this bed of ore Is such as to make it the ba- 
sis of an extensiye manufacture of iron. It is encircled in all 
directions by heavy hardwood timber, most of which will be 
tributary to the furnaces, fumishiug charcoal cheaply and 
abundantly for a long time to come. 

It is but 40 miles from Lake Michigan, with which it is con- 
nected by the Kijwaukee & La Crosse R. R. This road runs 
directly through the ore bed, and fhrnishes means of trans- 
portation for the iron east or west, connecting with other linbs 
at its termini and along its course. When the present stock 
0^ fael ^hall be exhausted, coke from the coal beds of Illinois 
can be brought to the ore, or the ore carried to the coal at a 
trifling expense above the present cost of charcoal. 

All the materials that are required for fluxes, lime, sand 
and clay, are found in great abundance near the ore bed. 

The expense of mining the ore is trifling, not es^ceeding 
12 1-2 cents per ton. It requires no roasting, and yields its 
iron by the simple application of heat id its original state. ' 



18 

The Korthwestem Iron Company have a blast fnraace in 
operation at Mayville, i 1-2 miles from the ore bed. Hiis lo- 
cality was selected on acconnt of the water power, which 
they use in driving their blast and other machinery. 

lliey make a ton of pig iron from two and a quarter tons 
' of ore, allowing for all waste in manofactnre. They haTe 
also an estensire foundry just completed, where they aie 
making water and gas pipe, lamp posts, building fronts, and 
heavy castings generally, at prices which defy all competi- 
tion. Tbey are able now to supply the home market with 
' castings of the best quality made directly from the cm. 

The product of their last blast was 8528 tons of pig iit»^ 
'They are preparing to erect extensive works at the ore bed 
as soon as the demand for iron shall justify it 

There can be no reasonable doubt of the feasibility of man. 
nfacturing profitably, iron, nails and steel whenever capi- 
tal enough can be tamed in this direction to sustain the ex- 
tensive works required for such a purpose. 

The experiments thus far made, amount to nothing in de- 
termining the full value and capacity of this ore, and we are 
fully justified in placing it, when all its circumstances are con. 
ered, at the head of the iron deposits of the Northwest 

In consequence of the failure of the first experiments at 
Iron Ridge, this ore fell into disrepute, and is even now sup- 
posed to be worthless by many who are not familiar with the 
recent successful resaltd. It should be remembered, however, 
that nearly all mines of iron and coal, are at first regarded as 
valueless. Every ore bed presents some new feature, and re- 
quires often patient and long-continued experiment to ascer- 
tain its true value, and the best mode of rendering it availa- 
ble. It is rare also to find an ore which is valuable for many 
uses, unless combined with other ores. 

Even the best Scotch pig is improved by a 'mixture with 
this iron. We may be quite certain, therefore, that as exper- 
iments shall be made with our ores, either by new combina- 



19 

« 

tions or modes of working, llatent properties and values now 
unknown will te developed. 

The accompanying certificates from several of the princi- 
pal iron manufacturers of the west, are the best possible at- 
testations to the value of this deposit of ore. The North- 
western Company deserves great credit for the quiet, perse- 
vering manner in which it has proceeded in the development 
of this great 'nte^est. It is now realizing rich returns upon 
its heavy investments, and promises to be a most profitable 
concern to its stock holders. 



OmoAGO, Jane 11, 1857. 
lo the Norihiveslem Iron Chmpany^ Dodge Ch^ Wtsoonsin: 

Gentb: — ^Ihave used in my foundry here, and been ac- 
quainted with your pig iron, made in Wisconsin, nearly four 
years ; and can say from its peculiar solidity, and the smooth 
ness with which it runs, that no better pig iron can be pro. 
cured here for gas, steam or water pipes, lamp posts, etc. For 
machinery, I find by mixing with stronger irons, it improves 
the smoothness of the. castings, and by its always running 
solid, prevents the loss of castings, which might occur with 
more open or pjrous irons. Yours respectfully, 

Fbank Letz. 



OmcAoo, June 11, 1857. 
To the Noriliwesiem Iron Company: 

Gents : — TTe have used your iron made in Wisconsin, and 
can say that from the smoothness of the castings, and its solid- 
ity, we consider it a superior pig iron for the manu&cture of 
all kinds of water, gas and steam pipe. 

For machinery purposes it requires an admixture of strong- 
er iron, giving the stronger iron solidity and smoothness of 
surface. Bespectfully yours, 

Stonb, Boomeb & BoyroN^ 



20 

MiLWAUKKg, June 12, 1 857. 
To the NorAwestem Iron Company: 

Gkntb : — "We have used your pig iron in our foundry in this 
city for nearly four years, and from our knowledge of its pe- 
culiar qualities, can recommend it as being a very durable and 
superior iron for building purposes, water, gas and steam 
pipes, lamp posts, etc 

For machinery it requires an admixture of stronger iron, or 
scrap, but on account of its solidity, and the smoothness with 
which it runs, it improves the quality of stronger and even 
higher priced iron. 

Dboksr & Seville. 



Milwaukee, June 8, 1857. 
To the Northwestern Iron Company: 

Gents : — ^We have used your pig iron some four years, and 
from the smoothness of the castings made from it, and its ao- 
lidUy^ which is peculiar to your iron, we consider it the best 
article that comes to this market for house building purposes 
and more especially for gas, water and steam pipes. 

For machinery purposes, when mixed with stronger iron, it 
gives solidity and smoothness, and improves the same, al- 
though too weak to use alone for this- purpose. 

A. J. Laitgwobthy. 



OsHKosH, June 8, 1857. 
This is to certify that, we have used the pig iron manufac- 
tured by the N. W. Iron Co., for three years, and by mixing 
1-3 H. R. iron, 1-3 Scotch and 1-3 Wisconsin, it makes an ex- 
cellent machinery iron. Bat for building purposes, or for gas 
steam and water pipe, the W^^isconsin iroii manufactured by 
the N. W. Iron Co., used without any admixture of other 
ironsj cannbt be excelled by any iron that comes to this ipar. 

ket. "' POWEBS, BOGESS & Co. 



21 

Fond dtt LiLo, June .8, 1857«, 
Ih the Norihwestern Iron (h., Dodge Co.. Wiss: 

Gents : — We have been using your iron for four years, and- 
find by mixing 1-3 Kos^see, and 1-8 strong scrap iron, it makes 
excellent machi^ery. "So better mixture of iron can be pro-^ 
cured in this market, 



On, account of !ts solidity and the smoothness of its surface, 
it is the best quality we know of for building, castings, and 
especially for gas, water and steam pipe, requiring no admix- 
ture with other irons for those la^t purposes. . 

TTiLBBB, Peaoo<?k <fc Oo, 

I have just received the foUowing letter from the Hoa. 
Byron Eilbonm, Superintendent of the Milwaukee & La 
Ofosse S. -IL The analyses made by Dn Ghilton agree in the. 
main witU- those of Dr. Jackson, but they avttleM iaotaplet e 

ANALYSIS BY DB. JAB. B. CHILTON. 

1*^ Sard or Natural Qre — Iron Bidge. 
Peroxide of iron, . . • 77.40 — ^iron 54. 18 



Silica, 
Alumina, 
Lime, . 
Magnesia, 
Water^^wil^. loss, 



9;U 
2.26 
e.72 
d.41 
4.10 
100, 

2d^ Ssed, Ore — Of DkirUfgrat^ Ore. 

Peroxide of iron, .... 79.8fiT-iroa, 65i47* 

Silica, 6.18 

' Alumina, 9.49 

Lime, 6w81 

MagnesiHi ; • • 0,14 

Vater — withlo^ . . . 6.13 

-100 

MiLWAUKBS, January 6, *SS 

£. Danibls, Esq., Statb' GIbologist, 

DiBAR Sir : — ^Tours of 2d inst has been duly received. 

Above I hand you the result of analysis by Chilton, in which 

you find neither sulphur, phosphorus nor Manganese. Hie 

two first I requested him particularly to look for. 



22 

I had several experiments ma^ by.pniddlmg, and nnifonn- 
ly with excelldht results Whatever pubstance it is that pro- 
duces cold shortness in the ^pig or cast iron, seems to be ex- 
pelled by the process of puddling, as in every instance we 
have obtained a first class of wrought iron, without any in- 
termixture of other ores. For railroad iron it is of the first 
class, and can be produced cheaper at that locality, as I be' 
lieve, than at any other place in the XT. S. Tliis is in conse- 
quence of the great ease with which the ore is procured, being 
at a nearly nominal cost, and the vicinity of a finely settled 
and productive agricultural xfigiflfl, in which supplies of eve- 
ry kind are to be procured with fieicility. 

I will send you a* piece of the bar iron made from the 
Mayville pig at Fall's village, Salsbory Oo., by the first op- 
portunity that offeTB. Yonra very truly, 

BtBON KiLBOTJBZr. 



IBOK ORE OF HABTFOKD, WASHINGTOlf 00., ASD OF DEPEBB, 

BBOWK 00. 

At Hartford, 14 miles southeast of Iron Bidge, a bed of 
ore occurs, having the same physical character and geologi- 
cal position as t|uit just described. 

The country between these two points is covered with drift 
and it is impossible to ascertain whether this is a distinct de- 
posit, or connected with that at the fortner place. It is pro- 
bably a distinct bed, as the Iron Ridge ore thins rapidly east- 
ward. This bed attains a thickness of 6 or 7 feety and is 
found ne^ the surface in the valley of the stream. It has 
been struck in digging wells, which have been sunk into it on 
the town plat, where it occurs at a depth of from 15 to 20 
feet from the surface. The bed is not as thick here as at Iron 
lUdge, and has a less horizontal extent. It is generally covered 
by the limestone, and very rarely decomposed. Its chemical 
composition is undoubtedly very similar to that of Iron 
Eidge. 

The same ore is found again * 80' miles N*. N-E. of Iron 
Bidge, in the town of Depere, about 4 miles east of the vil- 



33 

1^26, aad aboat 7 miles south-east of Green Baj. It occun 
oil the western face of the ledge, which extends along the Fox, 
River and Green Bay, nearly parallel with their valliea. 

This ledge is formed by the outcropping edges of the Clin- 
ton and Niagara litnestones,and at its base, generally conceal- 
ed beneath tlie rubbish, the shales of the Hudson River group 
are found. 

At this point a spring brook pours its waters, forming a cas- 
cad'e whose rare beauty rivals even the famed Falls of Min- 
nehaha. The falling water has excavated the underlying 
rocks, and exposed a clean section, including the upper por- 
tions of the shale so generally concealed, and revealing be- 
tween it and the limestone a bed. of lenticular ore 6 1-2 feet 
in thickness. It presents an occasional outcrop as we trace it 
along the base of the escarpment for about 200 rods, and is 
not seen again, as the slope is deeply covered. 

It is identical in age, composition and structure with the 
Iron RidgQ and Hartford ores, but the shale seems to be more 
mixed with the ore than at those places. 

Its position in respect to watQ^ transportation is very favor- 
able, and as the whole region is covered with forests of hard 
timber as yet scarcely touched by the woodman's axe, fttel can 
be easily supplied; It is only 4 miles from a steamboat latid- 
ing, and its products can be cheaply transported to any wos^ 
em market. The land on which it occurs is mainly owned b;^ 
Hon. James Howe, of Qreen Bay, and D. M. Loyj Btfq^, Bepere* 

Traces of the same ore are also seen aloag the ledge north- 
east of Green Bay, but no considerable deposit occurs. 

QtOK 0BB8 OF BLAOK BIVEU FALLS. 

. The ores of this region have hitherto remained almost en- 
tirely onncfticed, althongh their great value justified a much 
earlier exploration. 

They were first discovered by Mr. Spaulding, one of the 
proprietors of the town, while connected with the Govejrnment 
.wrveys. They are mentioned by Dr« Shumard, the accom- 



24 

plished palaeontologist, of the Missouri Geological Suryey, in 
Owen^s report of 1851. 

The Geology of this portion ot the Black River Valley pre- 
sents many points of interest both scientific and economicaL 
The Potsdam sandstone is the prevailing rock, giving ori^n 
to the sandy soil which covers the surface everywhere except 
on the hillsides or in the lowest valleys, where patches of 
clayey soil occur. The surface is generally level or gently 
rolling, but occasionally the outliers of the sandstone rise in 
castellated cliSa and towers of great beauty. These are usual- 
ly the culminating points of the relief and from their tops 
magnificent views of the surrounding country can be obtained. 
At a lower level rounded hills are seen composed of the softer 
beds of sandstone, or of the primary slates which underlie 
them. 

The Potsdam sandstone contains fewer calcareooa bands 
h^re than farther east^ and is generally soft and crumbling. 
The configuration ot the country is due to the erosion of the 
sandstone, which cnce stretched across the broad valleys, as 
high as the loftiest outliers wliich now remain to mark the 
ancient limits of thi» formation. 

Occasional fossiliferous beds occur, one at the base of the 
sandstone, filled with dim casts of large crustaceans, others at 
higher levels with, lingula prima 9ad lif^gula antiqua, often 
so abundant as to compose half the bul]( of the layers in which 
th^ are found. The decomposition of these shells has had a 
very important influence upon the soil, redeeming it in great 
measure from the sterility which is so common where sand 
predominates. Immediately beneath the sandstone and occa- 
sionally rising through it in rounded hills from 100 to 200 feet 
high we find the azoic and igneous rocks. The former con- 
sist of chloritic, micaceous and argillaceous slates; the latter 
of granite, trap and sienite. 

The-sandstone gives no evidence of disturbance or meta- 
morphism by heat, but reposes upon the upturned edges of 



the slates or rotinded BTiminitB of igneous trocks, with only 
such slight dips as would natorallj result from deposition ou 
an uueyen surface. In its lower beds near the line of jonc- 
tioQ it often contains waterworn fragmentsof these rocks miz^ 
ed with pebbles of quartz. The slates and igneous rocks are 
seen only at comparatiyely low lerels where they haye been- 
uncovered by the removal of the. sandstone. The igneous 
rocks are entirely confined to the batiks and bed of the river.. 
Yery fine sections of the junction of these rocks with the over- 
lying sandstone are exhibited along the river. 

The iron ore is associated with the chloritic and micaceous' 
slates of the azoic rbcks. It occurs in the isolate ridges or 
mounds formed by these rocks, and is encountered occasion^' 
ally over the space of a township. The most important de- 
posit however is located on sections 10 and 11, township 9X 
north, rsiuge 4 west, about two miles abote the village of 
Black River Falls. In iiescending the river we first meet 
with this ore, about 60 rods below the mouth of ^en's creet| 
on the west bank; The slates here rise from the waters eclg!^ 
and present a clean exposnre of about 18 feet dipping S, W. 
46^. They are very soft and fissile and exhibit a curved la- 
mination. The upper portion of the slope is concealed by 
debris but the surface is covered with fragments of ore and 
white quartz and a brecciated conglomerate of sand, ore and 
slatle. Sixty feet above the water the sandstone is seen form- 
ing the top of the bhi£ This exposure extends about 15 rods 
and is then covered for a short distance but soon emerges 
again and rises in a bold cliff 60 feet above the river. It con- 
tains here bands of hard massive hematitic oie, from 6 to 40 
feet wide. The slates are divided by smooth joints into large 
angular blocks, and the same joints pass uninterruptedly 
through the ore, which partakes also of the slaty cleavage. 
It has often a Ugniform structure, occasionally so distinct as to 
resemble perfectly pieces of fossil wood. Quartz is sometimes 
found combined with it in alternate layers, giving it a band- 



38 

ed appearanoe. It is nsaallj masfiiye, having a sab*oonchoid- 
al fracture, dark grey color tinged with red, sab-metallic lus- 
tre, and sometimeB magnetic. Yeins of red ochre resulting from 
decomposition are common. From this point the slates and 
ore sink rapidly towards the south-east^ and 40 rods below 
just emerge from the water. ' Here thej seem to cross tlie riv- 
er as they occur on the opposite side, presenting nearly the 
appearance before described. 

13ie ore has been mined here in the edge of a low bluff on 
the K E. qr. of the S. W. qr. of sec. 11, about 6o feet above 
the river. It is here a mixture of red and brown hematite 
with numerous nests and seams of ochre, often banded and 
uniform and at its junction with the slates very siliceous. 

It is bounded on the north by very fissile chlorite slate 
which seems to shade off gradually into the ore. The open- 
ing luade in the bank displays the connection of the slate 
and ore very clearly. They both dip conformably 55®, in a 
direction nearly £. S. E., and ace intersected by joints and 
cleavage planes similar to those on the other side of the river. 
The sur&ce is covered with ore for about 40 rods south of 
tbiB opening but no clean exposure occurs. 

After passing over a space of a few rods covered with drift, 
and destitute of ore, we strike a heavy deposit of black oxide 
highly magnetic. This deposit rises southward and has been 
quarried for the furnace, so as to present a clean exposure 46 
feet high fronting the river, showing a dip of 75^ S. E. No 
rock is seen in connection with the ore here, but it has the 
general dip of the slates which have no doubt decayed and 
^ left it alone. It is mixed with veins and nests of quartz, 
which separate from it by burning. By this last process it 
seems to lose ite magnetism also. 

From this point the ground rises rapidly about 40 rods 
south, till it culminates in a large hill known as Tilden's 
Mound, 180 feet above the river. Hie base of this hill is oc- 
cupied by chlorite slate, but the upper portions are covered 



27 • 

witli ore. South of this place no slate or ore is seen bnt about 
12 rods from the base of Tilden's Mound S. W., in the bed of 
the river occurs a low mound of greenstone trap rising 6 
feet above tlie water, and a few rods farther west are two 
small islands of the same rock, which are seen in the accom- 
panying section. It is a very heavy, fine grained greenstone, 
highly ferruginous, and divided by joints into angular blocks 
and tabular masses. Its proximily to the ore may perhaps 
have some connection with the magnetic condition, which this 
portion of the deposit has assumed. West of these trap is- 
lands about 15 rods, a light colored reddish sienite, composed 
of red feldspar and green hornblende, rises 12 feet above the 
water and forms the lower portion of the river bank. This 
rock extends with occasional interruptions S miles below^ 
sometimes rising 50 or 60 feet above, and again sinking be- 
neath the water. At the fall^ it extends across the river and 
forms a natural dam^ to which is due the splendid water-power 
which constitutes the principal interest of the town. At the 
Falls it is intersected by veins of quartz, in which aro occa- 
sionally found minute particles of sulphuret of copper. 

Small veins of specular iron ore are seen also, often trace- 
able for 20 or 30 rods, accompanied by Jght colored quarts, 
the sienite is last seen near Ledyard's mills where a soft, de- 
composing gneiss or stratiform granite rises 12 feet above the 
river. 

The texture and hardness ot this rock are very irregular. 
It contains seams of quartz which are left by the decomposi- 
tion of the feldspar and mica, aad also scattered specs of cop-* 
per pyrites. Its dip is about 65°. The lines of stratification 
are curved near the edges as if bent down by some great 
weight resting upon them. 

Above this rock, and resting almost horizontally upon its 
upturned edges, is the Potsdam sandstone. Hie lower layer 
is a band of conglomerate with micaceous sandstone, suc- 
ceeded by a thin seam of micaceous shale, and this again by 
coarse sandstone, which rises to the top of the bank. 



28 

The upper portion of the gniess has often decomposed, and 
in some instances its constituent elements have been recom- 
posedy and have formed a rock beneath the pressure of the 
sandstone, more enduring than that from which it originated. 
The product of this chemical change seems to be a sort of 
consolidated kaolin containing mica, and perhaps chlorite, 
which it resembles in softness and greasy feel. It cuts read- 
ily with a knife, and when polished and wet, presents a beau- 
tiful mottled surface, oaused by a light colored mineral like 
feldspar, semi-crystalizcd upon a ground of green and gray. 

Some fine blocks have been cut from it, but the rock is 
probably too limited and fragmentary to be of any commer- 
cial value. 

This gneiss continues above the river for about a mile be- 
low Ledyard's, where it passes beneath the sandstone a short 
distance above Shepherd's mill. At this mill a small island 
of sandstone occurs, composed of. the coarse grits which lie 
just above the granite. The upper layers are filled with casts 
of very large trilobites, and on a smooth surface of the sand- 
stone, beneath a seam of' shale, the tracks of these animals 
are seen marked by two rows of double impressions parallel 
with each other. The position of these remains and tracks 
cannot be far from the base of the lower Silurian, still it is 
quite possible that the igneous and azoic rocks on which these 
sandstones rest were hills in the ocean of the Potsdam period, 
and that older beds have been deposited in its valleys. I 
have made this extended notice of the geological association 
of the Black Biver ores en account of their peculiar and un- 
usoal interest 

The accompanying section from the iron works through the 

ore at Tilden's Mound, and across Slack Biver, will exhibit 

clearly, itd connection with the rocks. . 

The following analysis by Dr. JaoksoHi made wiih great 
care indicates me qnality of these ores : 



J? - '» 



» u 



29 



I«<. JSetZ Qa?icfe (j/" Iron in ligniform masses. 



Water, 
. Silica, 

Oxide of MaDganeae, 
Peroidde of iron, 
Loss, . . • 



1.50 

26.75 

8.65 

67.50—47,27 metallic iron. 
60 



100.00 

2rf, Specular and Magnetie Iron ore. 

This specimen was analyzed only for iron. It yielded : 
Sllex, 86 



:o 



JliAXtJIVAli/ <«»,».««.•«. _ 



t 
t 

e 
1 

6 

il 

e 
of 



80 

fiiel secnred, with an outlay very much less than required hj 
the purchase of timbered lands, or the transportation of char- 
coal. 

An enterprising German Company have recently erected 
a blast furnace, driven by water, on the east bank of the 
river. They mix the red oxide and magnetic ores, and flux 
with lime. 

They have attempted to use hearths from the Potsdam 
sandstone of the neighborhood, but have failed to make them 
work, on account of die lime which they contain. 

They have also burnt out a hearth from Amherst, Ohia 
In consequence of £hese failures they have not yet made much 
iron, but the results are so far highly satisfactory. 

From their experiments the following facts are ascertained : 
Two tons of the ore will yield one ton of pig iron ; cost of 
mining, $1,50 per ton, including delivery at furnace ; twenty 
per cent, of lime required to flux the ore. 

An approximate estimate of the amount of ore at this point 
will be entirely safe at the following figures : 

TVest bank of the river, on land ownei by Darrow and 
Curts, 15,000,000 tons ; east bank of the river, 28,000,000 
tons, including the Iron Company's location and Tilden's 
Mound, giving an aggregate of 43,000,000 tons of available 
ore. 

Other deposits exist in the vicinity, which a ill no doubt be 
valuable in time, but which are less favorably located for 
present working. 

This locality is well worth the attention of iron masters and 
capitalists, on account of the accessibility and superior qual- 
ity of its ores. 

It is also a good agricultural region, and lands may bo ob- 
tained very cheaply for farming purposes. The soil, though 
less durable than in some localities, is warm, quick and easily 
worked, and the adjacent pineries furnish an excellent mar- 
ket for the products of the farm. 



«1 

BKOWK HEMATTTB OF EKONTON, BAtTK OOXmTT. 

This ore is located in the (own of Marston, on sections 9 
and 10, town 18, range 2, east. Its geological position is in 
the Potsdam sandstone, which occupies most of the snrronnd- 
ing country, capped on the higliest points by limestone, (lower 
magnesian limestone.) 

The ore presents itself on the east bank of Tower's creek, 
and extends from the brow of the hill down ita slope, and 
some little distance into the valley. The surface is coyered 
with fragments over about ten acres, generally small, but 
sometimes attaining a ton's weight. 

Several shafts have been sunk through the ore on the hill- 
side to the depth of 10 to 20 feet. It was found extending 
to that depth, mixed with fragments of sandstone and flints, 
but no rock in place has been found yet in excavating. Large 
masses of sandstone lie upon the surface, in the fissures and 
cavities of which veins of fibrous hematite occur ; also frag- 
ments of very pure white honistone similarly mineralized. 

No clean section can be obtained here, as the entire slope 
is covered with loose material. It is therefore impossible to 
state the precise form or extent of this body of ore. On the 
surface it extends about 60 rods east and west, and 80 rods in 
width. 

The valley of Tower's creek in which it occurs has been 
worn out of the sandstone, which rises on either side over 300 
feet, and is capped by limestone on the west. 

The ore was no doubt formed in the sandstone previous to 
the wearing down of the valley, and by the removal of the 
rock in which it was once contained, has been left scattered 
upon the surface, or mingled with its rubbish. 

No marks of volcanic action are seen in the vicinity. The 
strata of the sandstone are undisturbed, generally soft and 
crumbling, but furnishing some layetB bard enough for good 
building material. 



r«3 

Some very fo^Biliferond bands oocnry filled mainly 
trilobites, rarely however well preserved. 

The apecimeDS collected for analyses were not forwarded 
to me in time, and I cannot therefore present in this report 
the composition of the ore. 

It iS| however, clearly a hydrated brown oxide, qnite pnre, 
generally massive, but frequently stalactite and mamillary, 
often« assuming beautiful imitative forms. In the seams it is 
fibrous, and sometimes banded. It occasionally contains 
small pebbles of quartz, intipiately mixed with the ore like a 
conglomerate. 

It will yield 45 per cent of metallic iron. It is safe to esti- 
mate its amount as equal to a solid bed 5 feet thick over 10 
acres, which wo aid give us 272,500 tons of ore. 

The country around is heavily timbered, aud lime and oth- 
er qiaterial needed in a furnace convenient. 

Jonas Tower, Esq., an ironmaster of large experience and 
great practical skill, has erected a small blast furnace, capa- 
ble of producing about 3 tons of iron per day, and intends to 
manufacture stoves, castings, etc., on the spot. The amount 
of ore is of course too small for an extensive or permanent 
business, but will do well to supply the local demand. 

I observed a similar ore in the same geological position, in 
the tunnel west of Tomah, on the La Crosse Railroad. The 
top oi the hill above the tunnel is covered, with fragments, 
which occur also occasionally in the dirt thrown out of the ex- 
cavation. Largo fragments of white hornstone, intersected 
by small scams filled with black hematite, are common from 
Q-arrisonville, on the Baraboo, westward and northward as far 
as Black Kiver. They are also frequently met with, east of the 
Wisconsin as far ab Lake Mills, Jefferson county. 



SrSOULAB AND TITANIFKROUS IBON OF BABABOO. 

The lower part of the Baraboo valley is one of the moet 
interesting portions of the State. In variety and. pictoreoque 



'\ 



88 

beaatj of aoenerj, it cauaot be surpassed in the west. The 
Potsdam saadstone has here been violently disturbed, oud ivk 
some ca^es changed, from a sofb crumbling state into a very 
hard quartzite, usually of a red color, but often grey or band- 
ed with red and white. . Bapges <^ this quartzit^ extend of- 
ten several miles, and form lofty hills ^Ith preciptious es^ 
carpments. The high blufis of the Baraboo at the fTarrowsi 
at Spirit Lake^r and at Garrison ville, are mainly compose4 of 
quartaite. 

At the latter place, just back of Mrs. Garrison's house, the 
quartzite forms the top of the bluff, while at the base, the 
sandstone seems only slightly changed, and furnishes a build- 
ing material of excellent quality. 

On th0 opposite bank of the river the rock is unchan^d, 
but a band of limestone occurs in it so pure and extensive as 
to be quarried and burnt for lime. This is located on land 
owned by Mr. Eiky, and is the only instance of the discovery 
of good lime in the Potsdam sandstone of this State. 

The quartzite is magnificently developed at Spirit Lalce^ 
where it rises SOO feet above the water, in almost perpendicu- 
lar cliffs, whose lower portions are concealed by huge masses 
which have fallen down from above* 

Veins of ,mUky quartz, sometimes containing geodes lined 
with fine crystals, traverse thja. quartzite in many localities, 
without any constancy of direction. Associated iwrith these 
are also veins of specular and titaniferous iron ore. 

This ore is vwy irregularly distributed, but follows the 
general co^rse of the quartz in its passage throufi;h the iTOcks. 
It is not* however, confined immediately to the veia but io- 
lated bunches of it occur in the quartzite adjacent to the vein. 

It is usually made up of thtr lamincB, slightly waved and 
cleaving readily apart The planes of lammation intersect 
each other in all directions, giving to the mass an appearance 
like some of our lead ones. 

It is very brittle, slightly magnetic and tas a brilliant srilt 

metallic luster and lead grey color. No perfect crystals occur 
but crystalline faces are occasionalls observed. • •■ , .r 



I 

I 



84 

I have examined these reins with considerable care but 
have been unable to discover the ore in snflScient qnantity to 
be of value. It was supposed by some to contain silver and 
analyses were reported to have been made which discovered 
a large per centage of that metal. I therefore submitted it 
to analysis, and it proves to be a specular and titanif^^us 
iron ore, containing some tungsten. 

This mineral is usually associated with igneous rocks, and 
volcanic emanations, and may have been introduced by the 
same agencies, which have vitrified and upheaved the sand- 
stones of the Baraboo. 



The region in which it occurs deserves a careful and minute 
study, which it will be my aim to give It at an early period. 

The ores that I have described include all those of any con- 
siderable value yet discovered in the acoessible portions of 
the State. 

From specimens brought to me and informatim gathered 
from reliable sources, I have reason to believe that large and 
valuable beds of ore exist in the unsettled districts of the 
North. 

These deposits are valueless now on account of their dis- 
tance from navigable waters, or other modes of transportation. 

This region is now about to be opened by the Chici^ 
Fond du Lac and Lake Superior R R., and the means will 
thus be furnished for bringing the resources of this hitherto 
neglected and almost unknown country within reach. 

A thorough exploration of the Western portion ot the State 
will be the first work of the survey next season. 



MANTTFACrSBE OF DBtOK IN WIBOONSIN, 

It has been shown that we have an abundance of good ores 
oapable of being cheaply mined, reduced, and transported. 

It is proper now to consider to what extent these ores can 
be profitably used in the manufacture of iron in our State. 



8$ 

The qnestioQ fairly stated is this : Can iron be made from 
these oresy on the ground, as cheaply as irpn of the same qual- 
ity can be imported from those minesy which now mainly 
snpply oar market. 

A comparison of the cost of making iron here^ and the cost 
of imported iron, will enable us to leach a conclusion not far 
from the truth in prosecuting this enquiry. 

Unfortunately, however, the elements of such a comparison 
are deficie9t on our side, as the production of iron thus far 
has been <K>nfined to a single furnace which has only been in 
operation a short period and devoted wholly until recently 
to pig metal. Still enough has been done to indicate the 
feasibility of a large home production, when our iron works 
shall have become fully established. The following estimates 
will show what can be done here in producing pig iron. 

Estimate of the cost of producing a ton of pig iron from the 
Iron Eidge ore : 

2 1-1 tons of ore at 75 cts per ton. 

150 bushels of charcoal at 5 cts. per bushel. 

Fluxes if used. 

Labor. 

Carting iron to R. K dept. 

Management, Interest on capital, <&c. 

$15 70 
Cost of producing a ton of iron from Black Biver ore : 
2 1-2 tons of ore at furnace. $1 50 

170 bushels of charcoal 8 50 

Fluxes. 4 00 

Labor. 4 00 

Cartage to flat boat per ton. 50 

Management, Interest on capital, &c. 1 00 



$1 ro 


T50 


1 00 


4 00 


50 


1 00 



Total. $19 60 

The cost of iron at Black Biver is increased nearly |i per 

ton over that of Iron Bidge, by the expense of lime for flux, 



85 

and also of fuel. A considerable redaction in these items 
will take place when the railroad communication is perfected 
to that point As to the local market its inland position will 
afford it a protection quite equal to this increased cost. 

These estimates will not vary much from Ifhe actual results, 
though in some minor particulars thej maj be found incor- 
rect, as the cost of labor, fkiel, &c. is subject to fluctuation. 

The following figures show the cost of making pig iron in 
those districts where it can be produced most cheaply at 
present, and which consequently control the market : 

Scotland, (scotch pig.) per ton. $12 50 

England and Wales. " 18 75 

New York. " 18 60 

Ohio. « 18 00 

Pennsylvania, " 16 00 

To these prices we must add transportation and duty to the 
foreign iron, and transportation to the American iron. 

. The former at present quotations, are selling at 28 to 85 per 
tqn and the latter, about 80 to 33. As prices are now ruinously 
low, we may safely take these figures in our comparison. 
According to these prices we have an advantage of from $10 
to $18 per ton, over any other furnaces whose products are 
sent to our market 

An expenditure of $10 per ton more than the cost of 
pig iron, turns the ore into castings of every description, with- 
out the expense of smelting. 

The manuiacture of bar iron has not been attempted as yet 
in our State, and the impression seems very general that we 
must always import it from abroad. It is diflScult to find any 
support for this conclusion. The capacity of our ores to pro- 
d;ace good bar iron and steel is undoubted, and there is nfothing 
in the nature of things to prevent their being used for these 
pQrp,09eB,ezcept the want of capital and skiU,to bring out thier 

latent value. 

Tl^e making of bar iron is neither so intrieate nor so e:q>en- 
siTe a business as to be monopolized, ^e following ooixlea'- 



ST 

ged remarks from ^^ Oyermaos Treatise upon the Manufacture 
of Iron" will enable those not practically familiar with this 
subject to judge for themselves, as to the practicability of es- 
tablishing this branch of iron manufacture. 

^^ Pig or crude ir<Hi is converted into wrought or bar iron 
by refining, forging, or drawing. 

Considerable wrought iron is also manufactured directly 
from the ore. 

The difiCerence in the quality of wrought iron consists main* 
ly in its different,degree8 of ductility and malleability. Good 
wrought iron is nearly pure iron with amecbaoical admixture 
of cinder. In most kinds of commercial iron we find from 
one quarter to one half jper cent, of carbon, more or less sul* 
phur^ silicon or silex, phosphorus, manganese, and in all 
Swedish iron, more or less arsenic. 

The nature of wrougl^t iron is seen ly examing the operation 
of puddling. In melting crude iron in a puddling fdmace it 
comes in contact with cinder, containing oxides of iron man- 
ganese. In mixing the fiuid or semifluid iron with this cin^ 
der, it will cause the oxidalion of such substances as are more 
easily oxidized than iron, which of course diminishes the 
fusibility of the metal. 

Constant work and mixing cinders with it prevents the 
formation of large crystals, and the metal cryetalizes and ad" 
heres by cohesion in small particles, forming a soft spongy 
mass. The large pores in this mass are filled or covered with' 
a coating of cinder, and when compressed by squeezing or 
otherwise, form a mixture of iron and cinder. 

In drawing or stretching such a condensed mass, the crystals 
are elongated, form threads, and these together with the oxidi- 
zed matter which keeps them apart form the fibre of the iron. 
We thug see that the fibre is the result of a particular form ^f 
metal, and may be produced with very iinpure iron, which 
notwithstanding its ixopnrity, may be very strong. 

Strength depends upoi^ the fineness of the fibre. In many 
parts of the United States wrought iron is manufactured di- 
recly from the ore in bloomery fires. 



•88 

Large quantities of iron are made in this manner in Xew 
England, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Micliigan 
and other States. 

A small capital only is required to work these forges, and 
where ore is cheap they are profitable. The quality of the ore 
determines in a great measure both the quantity and quality 
of the iron. Only rich ores can be used with success. A 
large bloomery will make about 2000 pounds of iron daily, at 
a cost of about $35 per ton. This article is generally purer 
than puddled iron and very suitable for ^nall iron. This 
mode of manufacturing is sometimes called the Catalan 
method. 

AU experience however has shown that first rate pure and 
uniform iron cannot be made directly from the ore nor from 
hot blast iron in competition with the foreign prices. The 
iron most In demand and for which best prices are obtained 
is wire iron, steel iron, and iron for the use of hardware man- 
ufacturers. 

The cost of making iron of course varies very much, and 
the following estimates are only applicable in a general sense. 

Ore is obtained in some localities at 75 cents a ton of 2240 
lbs., in others it costs $4, and even higher prices are paid. 

Hematites and all hydrated oxides work cheapest in the 
fiimace. The ease of melting one kind of ore so much exceeds 
that of others, that a very marked difference in price is no 
objection to using the most e cpensive kind. Some furnaces 
in New England pay as high as $10 per ton for ore, but it is 
not uncommon to see suflScient ore for a ton ot iron brought 
to the ftirnace for $1, 

The amount of flux (which in most cases is limestone) varies 
from 1-2 to 1 1*2 tons to a ton of iron, and is furnished at from 
60 cts. to $5 according to location. Fael differs much in 
price and quality. From 180 to 200 bushels of charcoal are 
required to smelt the ore for a ton of iron, the price of which 
ranges from 6 to 8 cents per buushel. One ton and three 
quarters to two tons of anthracite, answer the same purpose. 



89 

In case raw bitamunoos coal is used an amount equal to 
that of anthracite is required ; and as this coal may be obtain- 
ed verj cheaply in some of the Western States, the advanta- 
ges of that region for manufacturing iron are very obvious. 
An equal amount of coke to anthracite is required per ton. 
Smelting a ton of coke iron, where the coking is included, 
costs $3 to $4 per ton. Iron may be refined in a run out, fire 
with a loss of 8 to 10 per cent, the use of half a ton of coke 
60 Dushels of charcoal, and at an expense of $1,00 for labor, 
and $1,00 for general expense. Puddling is done from 
$3,00 to $4,50 for labor per ton of iron, with a waste of 8 15 
per cent, and consumption of 1400 pound of coal. When 
the balls are hammered, the hammer man receives $1,00 per 
ton. Drawing of the blooms into rough bars costs about 40 
cents a ton. 

In re-heating, from 3 to 10 per cent, of iron is burned, 400 
pounds to one-half ton of coal used, and 60 cents to $1,00 
in wages is paid to furnace men. The drawing at the rollers 
costs in wages about $1,00 tor heavy bar, $2,00 for common 
bar, and $5,00 for small iron. The general expenses in a roll- 
ing mill are high, because of the extensive machinery, heavy 
capital, and vicissitudes of trade. It may not be too high if 
we assume $6,00 as an average expense per ton of .bar iron. 

The expense of rolled sheet iron can hardly be estimated cor- 
rectly, but $10,00 per ton for fuel and wages may be neat 
the amount. The amount of iron produced in the United 
States is estimated at about 800,000 tons per annum. The 
labor of 250,000 persons is required to manufacfure it. The 
consumption of iron is 1,100,000 tons annually, — ^300,000 tons 
of which are imported from Europe. One-third of all the 
iron manufactured in the United States, comes from Pennsyl- 
vania, whose furnaces are capable of yielding 600,000 tons 
per annum. 

From the above remarks it will not be difficult to calculate 
nearly, the cost and conditions of making.iron, at any given 
locality. Let us now examine the prices of bar and rolled 



40 

iron with which oar furnaces and forges must compete. The 
present New York quotations are as follows : 
English bar, - - - $ 56 to $70 per ton. 

American rolled, - - - 60 62 ** ** 
Swedes iron, - . . - lOO « « 

Railroad iron, - . - - 65 a u 

Abont $12 per ton must be added to these prices, for trans- 
portation to our market. 

The following table exhibits the prices of EngUsh biur iron 
during 7 years, from '48 to *50. They were prepared by the 
U. S. Treasury Department : 



1848, . . 


■ • $57,45 


1847, - • 


■ - $65,ir 


1844, - - 


63,12 


1848, . - 


■ • 56,83 


1845, • • 


68,05 


1849, - - 


• - 44,67 


1846, - ■ 


74,76 


1860, - • 


■ - 43,12 



'^is table covers a period during which iron was lower, 
than ever known before or since, and we may safely calculate 
its average as expressing the full extent of competition, 
which the American manufacturer must encounter. 

The price of railroad iron ranges from $50 to $80 per ton 
in New York. It is mostly brought from England and is 
usually made of an inferior iron. Considerable railroad 
iron has been made of late in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. 
A very general opinion seems to have obtained, that the man- 
ufacture was very complicated and difficult This opinion is 
without foundation. Mr. Overman remarks that ^' the mak- 
ing of rails may be considered the most pleasant and easy 
branch of iron manufacture." 

There is no good reason why eveiy mile of western rail* 
way should not be laid with Wisconsin iron. 

' Upon the home manufacture of railroad iron I am glad to 
be able to quote such authority as that of James Buchanan, 
the present Chief Magistrate of the United States. The fol- 
lowing remarks were made by Mr. Buchanan, on the floor of 
the U. S. Senate, in 1844 : 

'' Railroad iron is not to be confounded wi& articles (^ 



41 

trade, It oomes in to form the material of onr highways, 
stretching orer ihotisands of miles, and to be lengthened still 
more from year to year ; not simply to be constructed once* 
btit to be renewed from time to time. 

"It is not more possible for any country to sustain itself 
^nder a course of importations for such a purpose, than in 
the importation of materials for its houses, and the fences on 
its farms. Whatever measures are required, to secure the 
early and effectual manufacture of this article here, should 
be promptly applied. But it has been asserted that railroad 
iron has not been, and cannot be, manufactured in the United 
States, even at present prices, the duty included. 

. '^ But why has not this iron been manufactured in our coun- 
try ? Is it for want of capital, skill, or enterprise ? Surely 
this will not be contended. There is no mystery in the man- 
ufacture of railroad iron. It is a very simple process. We 
are informed by Mr. Oakley, of the New Jersey Iron Co., 
that, ^ there is no difficulty in making railway iron, or much 
less than in making many other kinds, which have long been 
produced in this country.' All that I hare heara or read 
upon this the subject, coroborates the truth of this opinion. 

'^ I confess, sir, that I have a little American feeling upon 
this subject. As an American citizen, I cannot brook the idea 
that we shall be dependent upon Great Britain for the very 
materials necessary to construct the roads on which we trav- 
el. Surely, American railroads ought to be constructed of 
American iron.'* 

These sentiments are the expression of a genuine patriot- 
ism, and do honor to their distinguished author. 

The market for our iron is by no n^eans confined to our 
State. There are no valuable iron ores in the Northern part 
of Illinois, in Eastern Iowa, or in Minnesota, as yet discover- 
ed. We have thus an extensive district, much of it already 
densely populated, and all of it capable of sustaining a dense 
population, which can be supplied with iron from our cnres, 
more cheaply than from any other quarter. This district in* 
elades the great cities of Milwankee, the metropolis of Wis* 



conftin, and ^^Chicago, the metropolis of the Northwest, and 
holds a popapulation of 2,100,000 people. Its annual con- 
sumption of iron in various froms of ordinary use, cannot be 
less than 22,000 tons Allow^ing it to build SOO miles of rail- 
road per annum, and adding the consumption of iron in re- 
rolling of old track upon the 2,000 miles of road slready com- 
pleted, onco in ten years, and the annual demand for railroad 
iron will not fall short of 35,000 tons. The entire demand for 
iron will therefore be about 57,000 tons, the market value of 
which will be not less than $2,280,000. 

This may seem a very large amount in the aggregate, but 
let any one sit down and calculate the amount of iron in all 
the stoves, ploughs, tools, machinery, pipe, railroad bars, and 
other fabrics of iron, used in the four or five great States which 
we may include in the limits of our market, and he will soon 
convince himself that it does not exceed the actual consump- 
tion. 

This extensive demand will of course increase with the 
population, wedth, and facilities ^of intercommunication. 
New applications of iron are constantly being made, and 
these will be more numerous with the advancing civilization 
of the West 

But whatever extension this demand may take, our capaci- 
ty to supply it will never be exhausted. We have ore enough 
above water, and within easy reach, to make 14,000,000 tons 
of iron. At 100 tons per mile, this would build five lines of 
railway around the globe, and still leave enough for 15,000 
miles at home. The entire annual consumption of the Unit. 
ed States, could be,jjupplied fromour ore beds 12 yesrs, with, 
out exhausting them. 

Suppose the four . States of Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa and 
Minnesota, to use 60,000 tons annually^ we could supply these 
States with their iron for 233 years. 

Our fuel too, is no less inexhaustible. We have an im- 
mense wooded district in the north from which charcoal can 
be obtained tor present wants. • A little distance south of our 
border, in Illinois^ lie the exhaustless coal beds of the g:reat 



43 

La Salle basin, Trom which fnusi come our permanent supply 
of fuel* for the redaction of ores, and the heavy processes of 
manufacture. 

We have cheap motive power, abundant facilities of water 
And railroad transportation, fireclay, fluxes, and every materi- 
al requisite for manufacturing iron. 

With bounteous hand the Great Providence has filled the 
earth beneath our feet with ores, stowed away in its secret re-^ 
positories, or spread out upon its suaface, exhaustless supplies of 
fuel ; scattered in profuse abundance fluxes of every kind ; 
dammed up the channels of the rivers for water powers ; and 
above all, conferred upon man the inventive intellect, to coh^- 
bine and organize all these elements, and evolve therefrom a 
thousand forms of use and beauty. We have as yet scarcely 
begun to learn the extent of these magnifioent pi'ovisiond. 
We send thousands of miles to foreign lands for iron rails, 
and lay them down over our beds of ore. We turn over the 
soil, red with iron, we stir and cultivate it, with ploughs, and 
harrows, and hoes, made of foreign sto^k. We thus in our 
ignorance, insult nature and spurn her richest gifts. Why 
ahoold we tkus waste the best portion of oar glorious herit- 
age } We have imported into the West nearly 300,000 tons 
of iron during the last 10 years, worth $20,000,000, at $40 per 
ton. How much this would have done to build up our own 
industry, had it have been expended at home ! 

I am not willing to admit that American skill is so inferior 
to European, that we cannot find means of converting our 
ores into articles of the most common use, as cheaply as they 
canb^ made three thousand miles away, oat of similar mate- 
rial, and brought to our market. 

Our elder brother of the Saxon race has come tr> us to learn 

many things more difficult than this, and he is proud to ac^ 

knowledge the debt, for it is in his own family. We taught 

him steam navigation. We have worked up his iron into lo» 

comotivee, which hcv6 neverbeen equalled for speed, strength, 

or draft, and which to-day are vindicating American skill and 
genius on the iron highways of £urope. ^g^ pug* u. 



The Old World does tribute to the capacity of our eugin- 
.eere, by employing or oonsulting tbem on its grandest works. 
The American Engineers are reflecting more lustre upon our 
country's fame abroad, than all its foreign representatives, or 
its army and navy combined. In the improvements of ma- 
chinery, and processes of manufacture, in all that gives evi- 
dence of progress in science and art, we have stood side by side 
with the most advanced people across the water. 

A few weeks since a small party met, by invitation, at the 
magnificent iron works of Fbanois Algsb, Esq., in Boston, to 
witness the ciM»ti{ig of one of those great cannon, which they 
axe daily turnijog out (roqx that establishment, for the use of 
the American navy. Among other distinguished persons 
present were Col. Fremont, Dr. Jackson, and Sir Charles Fox, 
the latter gentleiiaan an Englishman of great celebrity, and in- 
timately familiar nj^ith Buch operations in his own country. — 
It was with feelii^gs of patriotic pride, as an American, that I 
heard the generous Briton applaud the beautiful and connect- 
ed mechanism, of the works, and admit the superiority of the 
guns to any yet made in England. 

Every gun used in the English service is mariced condemn- 
ed, when it bae been fired 750 times. Our guns can be safely 
fired more than twice that number of times. Mr. Alger is 
willing to warrant his guus to stand 1,600 charges«in proving. 
(The theory is that every caimon will burst sooner, or later, as 
each discharge changes the crystilization of the iron and 
weakens it. Hence the danger of using old condemned guns^ 
at celebrations, &c.} 

Eh guns are made ^tirely of American iron, and he has 
succeeded in giving it this wonderiul tenacity, by combining 
scientific knowledge and practical skill, in a oouise of long 
continu/ed and careful ei^periments. 

With such results as these before us, we cannot doubt that 
our country can achieve its independence of foreign sources 
of supply, in its iron fabrics. In this work our young State, 
so full of energy and capabilities of good, must do its part — 



45' 

To this end onr resonrcea in tins direotion mnst be made 
known ; tha valne of this interest must be inipredsed npon onr 
people, and such a patriotic feeling aroused^ that we shall give 
the first ])reference always to 9nr own iron. 

The State in its organized capacity might properly nse only 
WiscoDsin iron in the erection of its public baiidings, and ex- 
empt all iron works from taxation during a reasonable period 
after their establbhment. With such encouragement, and un- 
der such a state of public feeling, capital will flow in this di- 
rection, and the production of iron and iron ware will become 
one of the great interests of our State. 

We have now only three furnaces, and produce only a few 
thousand tons of pig metal per annum, but we are to remem- 
ber that from small beginnings like this, the mighty iron and 
coal trade of Pennsylvania and other States, has grown up. 
Anthracite coal was esteemed worthless as dirt, till Yankee 
ingenuity, a few years ago, found out it could be burned; and 
the best ores now used were, many of theni, tried repeatedly, 
and pronounced worthless. Hme, energy, and perseverance 
have done all that we see in the iron trade of Germany, of 
England, and the most advanced portions of our own country. 
The original conditions are here as favorable as they were at 
fErst in those places, which have succeeded so well. They 
have some advantages over us, and we can boast others of 
eq^ual value over them. 

It is well to consider the value of this trade in sustaining 
and fostering other branches of industry. Agriculture is the 
great paramount interest of our State ; but its prosperity de- 
pends not less upon the marketing, than the raising of crops. 
All experience has shown that the market (treated by home 
manufactures, is far better and more reliable,, than any other. 

We have a fine illuatration of this in our vast pineries, and 
their iqfluenee upon agriculture. Whatever the state of the 
foreign market, the pineries have always absorbed large 
quantities of farm produce at high prices. 

Look now at the splendid larzaing distriqt boordering Lake 



46 

Winnebago, and the Fox and "Wisconsin rivers, studded with 
beautifal homes and thriving towns, radiant erery where vith 
evidences of wealth and prosperity, and yon have a triamph- 
ant vindication of the value of a home market. 

The agricultural counties of the central part of the State 
are quite as much indebted to the lumber interest for their 
rapid growth in population and wealth, as to their natural fer- 
tility and beauty. It is a matter of vital importance to our 
farmers to secure a market for their surplus products. These 
products are being multiplied more rapidly than the old sourc- 
es of demnnd. The emigrants who once used our surplus, 
have settled and become producers. The pineries are sup- 
plied and the home market is exhausted. The same process 
is going on in the great agricultural Sbates around us, tending 
still to aggravate the difficulty. We are thus largely depen- 
dent upon a distant market, both as buyers and sellers. Our 
remedy is to multiply the variety of home products, and en* 
courage home manufactures. 

Every ton of pig iron manufactured consumes $10 worth, 
and every ton of bar iron, $26 worth, of agricultural products. 
If this iron is worked up into tools, utensils, and machinery 
the amount of consumption per ton will of course be greatly 
increased. If therefore our iron mines were worked upon a 
scale equal to their capacity, and the legitimate demand 
which they can supply cheapest, a home market of at least 
$1,500,000 worth of agricultural products would be created. 

This vast sum thus kept at home, would not only do much 
to sustain and advance our agriculture, but to rear side by 
side with it a diversified manufacturing and mechanical in- 
dustry, supplying the wants and increasing the comforts of 
our people. 

If we would prosper permanently, we must do everything 
possible within ourselves. Whatever the Creator as given us 
in soil, mine, forest, lake and river, that is so much fundamen- 
tal capital which we are to make the most of, if we would 
carry out the designs of nature, and reap the reward. When 
we have improved all our resources to their fullest extent^ 



47 

and ezhauated invention in attcfmpts to create new valneS) 
there will still be enough that we shall need, and cannot pro* 
dace, to sustain onr foreign and 'domestic trade, and help to 
'^ind the silken chain of commerce round the world ;" and 
more, what will be well, both for our i eputation, and otir 
pockets, we shall then have means to pay our distant neigh^ 
bors for what we buy of them. 

Iron is truly one of the precious metals. Its production 
enriches without demoralizing. Its returns are sure and 
steady, coming as the legitimate fruits of capital, skill and 
labor united to master the secrets of nature, and unravel her 
i^ubdest combinations. 

Our iron mines are more precious than veins of gold. 
^Spain owning half the New World, sending her ships ac- 
cross the sea with every favoring breeze, guarded by invinci- 
ble armadas and loaded with the gold of her provinces, dis- 
pised her iron and drove away her craftsmen. 

England shut up in her island home, wrought silently among 
her mountains of iron, and supplied every market with her 

fabrics and her wares. 

Look now at the noble, growing, and beniticeht civilization 
of the one : Contrast it with the rottenness and decay, verg- 
ing fast upon dissolution, of the other. 

The expansion and development of our iron interest is well 
worthy of the serious attention of the State. It will add 
largely to our wealth, population and prosperity ; it will en- 
large our material dominion and give us commercial inde- 
pendence, and by introducing a new element into our indus- 
try, exert a healthy and prosperous influence upon the inven. 
tive genius of the people. 

A people devoted to a few simple pursuits cannot perma- 
nently maintain a high intellectual character. The varied 
talents and tastes found in the diiTerent members of every 
family, require each its specific vocation. 
A diversified and refined industry, gathers up and distributes 
every germ of mind, gives to each the place best suited to 



4» 

)m capacity^ and tlias secores the eotapletest edaoafeion of the 
general intelleet The riph and varied resources of our State 
were desigued not only to fornish ne the meaoB of physical 
ceimfort, but also to offer a field for the culture of that higher 
nature, for whose traneient home the great giobe itself was 
biV>ught into being. 

COAL OF NOBTHSEN ILLINOIS. 

I present below a few facts pertaining to the Goal deposits 
of Northern Illinois, which have an important connection 
with our supply of fuel ; especially that portion of it required 
lor the manufacture of iron. 

The most important of these deposits to us, is that located 
at La Salle, on the Illinois river, about seventy-five miles 
south of our State line. It consists of three seams, one six 
fcet, one five feet, and one three to four feet thick. 

I made, some time since, a thorough examination of this 
coal district, and am fully convinced that its immense resour- 
ces can hardly be over estimated. The La Salle coal basin 
is about twelve to eighteen miles in diameter, and contains 
not less than 1 50,000^)00 tons of coal. This basin is situated 
at the terminus of the canal, and at the head of steamboat 
navigation on the Illinois river. It is also traversed by the 
Bock Island and Illinois Central Railroads. It ha», conse' 
quently, the most extraordinary facilities for shipping coaL 

Bie Illinois Central Railroad runs north from La Salle, and 
connects with the Mississippi river at Dubuque, with the Ga- 
lena and Chicago Railroad at Freeport, and through it with 
the Madison and Beloit Railroad, Milwaukee and Mississippi 
Railroad, and all the Roads which intersect the southern por- 
tion of our State. We are thus brought into immediate con- 
nection with these coal deposits, from which, at no distant 
day, we miist derive a largo share of oar fuel. 

I extract from the Annual Report of O., N. Adams, Esq. 
the capable Superintendent of the Little Rock Mining Co 
the following table of analyses, and accompanying remarks. 



i» 



which enable ns to decide by clo&e compai'iflon with other 
standard coal, i^pon the yalae of this. 

"The coal of the lowest seam will compare favorabiy, for 
manufaotariog or domestic purposes, with the best coab of 
Ohio aad PennsylTsnia, as shown bj the following 

Con^MurativB Kblo of Analyaes. 



SfATB. 



Peon'a. . 

ti 

A 
It 
II 

Ohio.... 



(I 



II 



Illinois.... 



II 



LOCALITT. 



I I » I 



BlosBburg, . . . . 
Venango Co., . 
Crawford Co., 
Mercer Co.,.. 



Summit Ca,... 
Hfunmondvine, . 
Briar Hill 



La Salle Co. 



La Salle Co., 



> » < I < I ^' 



DSaiQNiLTION 

OF 

GOAL BED. 



ANALYSIS. 



BlOBftborg,. 

^andjBidge^... 



u 

I 



Ormsby, 

UpaoDfl,-. 

Strip Vein 
1st Analysis,.. 
2d Analysis,... 

Briar Hill, 

Little Bock, 
" Lower Bed," 
Ist Analysis,... 
2d Analysis, . . . 
Little Bock, 
" Upper Bed," 
2d Analysis, . . . 



^1 


Volalile 
Hatter. 


' 62 80 
49 80 
59 46 
67.80 
64.40 
53.40 


82.80 
43.20 
38.76 
40.45 
88 20 
44.30 


70.80 
65.60 
58.41 


26 40 
29.20 
88.13 


.53.20 
57.60 


44.00 
38.40 


48.80 


39.60 



aS 



5.2d 
7.00 
1.80 
L70 
2.4<) 
2.2d 

2.80 
5.20 
3.46 



2.80 
4,00 

11.60 



The coal from the Little Eock Oompany's shaft on, the lower 
bed, has given general satisfaction for all domestic purposes. 
Whether aaed in open grates or close stoves it bums freelj, 
leaving but little ashes, and scarcely forming any clinker. 

The cost of mining this coal and putting it upon cars or 
boats, is about $1,15 per ton. As the coal trade assumes 
magnitude and permanence, it can be raised from ten to 
twenty cents per ton cheaper than now. This coal now sells 
at $3 per ton at the top of the shaft ; cost of transportation 
to Chicago by canal, 60 cents per ton I 

The demand for the coal during the past two years has been 
fully double the supply. 

Dr. Norwood^ the veiy able Geologist of Illinois, says of 
this coal district : 

^' The position of the La Salle basin is not surpassed by that of 



60 

tmy oth«r in the West. It is eooseeted v^tti Lake Michigan 
and the Mississippi river by means of the Dltaoia river and 
the OanaL It is alao intereected hj the ilUnoie Oentral Rul- 
road, giving acoTinoetion with both noiiJiern and sonthem 
markets ; and by the Ohteago and Rock Island Railroad, giv- 
ing it access to matketa both east and mat. Thus at no time 
need yon fear an overstock in the market, as yon can send 
year coals in all directions, both winter and snmmer, and the 
demand will always be equal to the supply. 

Hie accompanying table of analyses of Illinois Coals, com- 
pared with those of other well known coals, will enable any 
one to jndge of their relative valne. I send also a table of a 
fsw foreign coals, which bear a high reputation among manu- 
factores of iroo. I do this beoatise the iron ores of the North 
are very abondant, and can be made a«ceseiblo to the 1* 
Salle cotUfl. 



ILLIKOIB COAIm 



Wataon's Uii 
TuMiar'i,* (MorriB) 

MBTseillee 

OnawBit 

La bcllt BaUfi, 
(l^ADtr Bed,) 

IralMid^ 

Seelej'B,, .,.:.... 
Field A Bounds',.. 

Uattebone'^ 

Hitt'a, 

BigVermillion, . . . 
Eirkpatrick's,.... 

^leaton'g, 

(^pperRd) 

La PaUe Coal Mh 

Ing Co 



Jl 



Gtundy, 
LaSaUe,' 



1.23T 

1.2234 
122S 



3 0B5.1 'Grer. 
16 63 Red. 
B 2 b:) 4 Red. 

t e:54.i8 I 

ia8j47.6 
1 i\bt B 



IBB. 
3.S; 



(2.» G 



iSAijTSEa OF soBsiair ooaa, itsed is the HANrrAorusB or iroh. 



CODOTBT. 


LOCAim. 


BAi£E or fini. 


.9 
S 

> 




i 


s^ 


f oreaC of Dean, 


LinderfoTd, 


88,00 


6a. 




Red. 




Parkend, 




39,00 


fiSS 


2B 


Ochre. 






High DeU, 


33 03 


63.71 


4 35 


Bad. 




Starkej, 




«ia 


61-68 


176 


Red. 




3. SUffordahin^ 


Ket7 Ulne Top, 


46.100 


62.776 


3 126 


KdIc 






TraTft^ 


16 as 


62 40 


3 IS 


Buff. 




Bentfe7, 


34 18 


63 57 


2 26 


White. 




LnDeKod, 


BaB»eyUu.«v 


B8.7e 


SB SO 


3.00 


Fbk. 




(N. Swffordahire) 














Luie End, Oort 














.-'r^i^* ., 


















32 80 


6B.30 


2.60 


Wbile. 




Qolden Hill, 


SponAjToft, 


89118 


58.81 


1-7S 








Lictle Bow Bed, 


34 63 


62 47 


3.00 


Gkey. 






RanJIe CoaL 


32 81 


64 19 


8. 


v/hite. 






Double Coal, 


41.38 


H87 


.15 


Fawn. 


North 1 


BTjmbo 


Three Yard, 


35 70 


63.70 


1.6 


Light 


Wales f 




BraHBey Teio, 


Si 100 


61682 


1.31B 


GSy. 


En^nd, 


Churdiway, 




35 67 


60:33 


4. 


Brown. 








34.71D 


94.133 


1.13B 


Fawn. 






Corbjn'B Hall, 








: 






(Ton Coal,) 


10.6' 


61.9 


7.5 


Qrey. 






Corbyn'B Hall, 














(Heathing Coal,) 


13.83 


6<17 


2.E0 


Buff. 






(Bottom Vein,) 




63.810 
49 if 


5 126 


Pink. 




'■ BeaUey, 


(Sfbet8plintCoal, 


15 93 


4.76 


Red. 






Ten Feet Coal, 


39.11 


68.89 


i. 


Qtey. , 




Qoldeu Hill, f 


Qreat Rbn Coal, 


37.70 


60 SO 


1.75 


GreJ. 


" 


" 


Utile Bow Cod, 


34 63 


m-v 


S3 


Grey. 



H. 0. Freemen, Esq., the skillful mining 'engineer, and 
manager, of tlie LaSalle Coal Co., says in a late report : 

"The lower bed compares favorably with coals of high 
repatatioa, Ite middle or six feet bed is scarcely inferior, 
and its greater thickness will render it more profitable in 
working. The seam of Oannel coal in connection with it 
gives it additional valae. We have been using this coal for 
eight months, in oar engine, atld Sti'd it an excellent coal for 
generating steam. Id bumiog, the residnnm is coke and cin- 
ders, and leaves the grate b&ts perfectly free and clear." 

Mr. Freemen iDForias nae tbat the LaSalle coal is now h4- 
ing used at (Galena and Dabugne'iEi the gas works of those 
towns. 



62 

There can be no question as to its adaption to iron mann 

factures. 
Bituminous coal is very largely used for this purpose, both 

raw and coked, in many parts of the globe. 

In a letter just received from James 0. Clarke, Esq., Gen. 
Supt Bl. Central K. R., he states : 

^'In May, 1856, 1 ordered some slight changes to be made 
in an ordinary wood burning engine, for the purpose of test- 
ing the practibility of using Iliinois coal as fuel for the loco- 
motives of this company. This engine was run upwards of 
a month doing regular service, making 16,600 miles. The 
experiment was so satisfactory, that this company ordered 20 
coal burning engines, which are now in use. Nearly all our 
freight trains are run with coal burning engines. They are 
working well, and give entire satisfaction, at much less cost 
for fuel than engines burning wood. 

The lower vein at LaSalle is. quite free from sulphur and 
other objectional matter. There is no doubt in my mind that 
it will eventually be used as locomotive fuel in all northern 

Illinois. 

The LaSalle coal basin is being rapidly developed. I en- 
close a tariff of prices, adopted by this line. You will ob- 
serve that it is based upon a sliding scale, discriminating in 
favor of consumers at a distance. 

In reply to your enquiry as 16 "what this company would 
carry iron ore for ; I will say upon the same terms as coal^ 

We feel dispored to foster the mineral traffic as far as 
possible. In adopting our tariff, we did not look to the im- 
mediate revenues to be derived from the traffic, but rather to 
the development of the coal fields, and the increase of min- 
ing population along our line." 

"I speak of this coal matter from an experience of 10 years 
on the Baltimore and Ohio B. TL and in the coal. regions of 
Maryland." 

By the tariff of prices alluded to, coal or iron ore carried 
120 and under 150 miles is charged 1 3-4 cts. per ton per 
mile ; 160 miles or over, 1 1-2 cts. per ton per mile. 



63 

The liberal and ehlightenecl policy adopted by the III. C. 
R. R., looks to nltimate rather than immediate results, and 
offers substantial eDconragement to the opeQiug of oar mines 
of coal and iron. 

I append a few tables and accompanying remarks, from 
Overman's great Work upon iron. These are of great value, 
too, in a praotical point of view, both to the public generally 
and to iron inongers, as famishing valuable data for judging 
of the relative valae of different kinds of fael. 

The specific gravity of the different kinds of wood, is 0* 
the first importance. This is the proper criterion of their value, 
though wood is generally boaght by measurement. Its spe- 
cific gravity ia directly in proportion to its amount of carbon, 
hydrogen, and oxygen. The following table shows the spe- 
cific gravity of wood, water being the standard imit, and the 
relative value of the mo3t common varieties: 



TABLE BHOWIBG: THB VALUE OT WOOD. 



Kind of Wood. ; 


1 

■s 


III 


•s . 


i 


:_ 


4§ 


s 


White ash. 


712 


84S0 


26.74 


^Mt 


28.78 


81 


.77 


White beech, 


724. 


8236 


1».62 


.518 


37.26 


28 




66 


Batteroat, 


667 


2534 


20.79 


.287 


12.47 


42 




61 


BedCtedar, 


683 


2525 


24 72 


.238 


l!i.52 


' 60 




58 


Ohestnnt,, 


G22 


3S8S 


S5.2B 


. .879 


19.94 


80 




62 


Dogwood, 


816 


8843 


21 


.550 


29.94 


26 




76 


Shell-bark hickory, 1 


000 


4489 


28 22 


.636 


8S.89 


86 


1 


00 


Haid maple (fugor), . 
Soft maple, 


644 


2873 


21. M 


.481 


^.68 


.. 87 




SO 


697 


2668 


20.04 


.370 


19.47 


28 




64 


UagQohk 


SOB 


270* 


21.59 


.406 


21.86 


27 




66 


Ohestont oak, 


886 


B955 


32,76 


.481 


26.81 


8S 




86 


White o«k, 


855 


8821 


«.62 


.401 


31.10 


89 




81 


Blaokoak, 


728 


8254 


28 80 


.887 


20.88 


88 




71 


Bed oak, 


728 


8254 


22.43 


.400 


21.05 


80 




69 


Yellow Pine, 


B61 


2468 


; 28.75 


.888 


lJiB& 


88 




54 


Jersey Pine, 


478 


2137 


24.88 


.886 


' 20,26 


26 




48 


Pitah: pine. 


426 


1904 


26.76 


.298 


16.68 


88 




48 


White pine. 


416 


18B8 


24.86 


.298 


16.42 


80 




43 


Poplar, Tellow, 
Poplar, Lobibardy, 


568 


2516 


21.81 


.888 


20.16 


37 




62 


897 


1774 


25 


.246 


12.89 


84 




40 


Sjoimore, 


jsa6 


2891 


28.60 


.874 


19.68 


36 




62 


Blaokwalont^ 


681 


8044 


as.6B 


.418 


88. 


81 




H 



54 



TABLV SHOWInO THR YALT7E OF GOAL. 



Kind of Coal. 





P:^ 


H 


b-| 


14H 


78.61 


1.458 


76.46 


1.873 


72-25 


1.488 


766T 


1.240 


65.25 


1881 


70.04 


1.246 


6556 


1.416 


76.43 



Lehffh ooal, 
Sohnylkill, . 
StifqehaDnti, - 
Rhode IslADd, 
OaDoel Coal, - 
Liverpool, 
Richmond, - 
La Salle coal, 

The value of wood by measure, corresponds directly with 
its specific gravity after being dried in the kiln. Oak is, 
therefore, worth nearly as much again as pine for making 
charcoal. 

This subject deserves the close attention of the Iron Master, 
for it is his business to select wood, and regulate its price ac- 
cording to quality. If a cord of hickory is worth one dollar, 
white oak is worth 77 cents, beech 65 cents, sugar maple 60 
cents, white oak 81 cents, pine 54 cents, &c. 

The comparative value of coal and wood may be gathered 

from the following table du-efully prepared, and indicating 

the results of numerous experiments : 

' Coal at $5,25 per ton, equals best wood at $2,28 



(C 



(( 



(( 



a 



5,50 


(C 


(( 




2,39 


5,75 


a 


(4 




2,50 


6,00 


u 


(( 




2,61 


6,26 


a 


(( 




2,76 


6,50 


a 


ii 




2,83 


6,76 


li 


f* 




2,94 


7,00 


.< 


(( 




8.06 



OBJECTS OF THE SURVEY. 

A few general remarks upon the Oeological Survey, may 
not be out of place at the close of this report. 

The obectB of this survey are to ascertain the character^ 
positicm, thickness, and horizontal extent of the various beds 



.£6 

of rock that oecar in Mir State ; to discover tke localictti, 
qn^ity, xoode of occiurranoe, and amount of all valuable mia- 
eral substances ; to examioe dhe soil in various looalitiee tfitk 
a view to its agricultural capacities, uses, and the best motilns 
of improving it ; and, in genetral terms, to ooUeet, armnge, 
and pabliah all knowl^ge that oan be obtained of the phgrs*- 
ical resoarces of Wjiaeonsln. 

By this means onr own oitieMs, and the world at ku^e, will' 
be fumish^ed with reliable information ooncemuig onr natntal 
endowments as a State. The diesemination of enoh knowU 
edge will invite population, hasten the developiaaent of otir 
known resources of wealth, and at the same time open np 
new mineral treasures, as yet undiscovered. In this way ev- 
ery citizen ia to be a sharer in the substantial benefits of the 
survey^ and l^ae a direct interest in its successful proMBecuitioa* 

To accomplish these objects, the Geologist must visit eveiy 
part of the State, and make the best examinations possible 
with the means at hid disposal. In a State so large as ours^ 
this must occupy considerable time, and therefore it is impor- 
tant that where paints of special interest or value occar, they 
should be early noticed. In this particular, as well as in 
others, the co-operation of the citizens of the State will be of 
great value. If every intelligent person would carry out the 
following simple suggestions, he would not only be accumu- 
lating useful knowledge himself, but also advancing the Geo- 
logical Survey, and contributing to science. 

1st. Observe the character of the rocks, if any are exposed 
in your vicinity, whether they are arranged in layers, (strati- 
fied), or occur in irregular masses, (unstratified) ; whether 
they contain any curious petrifbctions; or shapes of animals 
or plants in stone. 

2d. If there are different beds of rock lying one above 
another, as sandstone, limestone, &c., note their thickness, 
extent upon the surface, and order of superposition. 

3d. In excavations for railroads, canals, sinking shafts for 



66 

wells, minuig, Ac^ preserve speeimeiis of the rocks, clays, 
BoilS) ScCj of ererj foot in depth, and take carefnl minntes in 
Writing, of the order in which they oocnr. 

4th. OoUect specimens of All rocks, clays, marls, peats, 
and all soils remarkable either for productiveness or ster- 
ility in yonr vicinity. These shonld be fair average specimens, 
and such as would afford, on examination, a test of the composi- 

tfon- of the entire mass from which they are taken, 
t Sth. Oarefolly preserve all petrifactions, and all bones, 
teeth, tusks, or other remains of animals foond in the soils, 
olays, gravels or elsewhere. 

6th. If b^ds of limestone, fit for marble ; grindstone quar- 
ries ; sand, which might be used for glass, &c.; clay for pot- 
tery ; metallic ores ; or any mineral substance which, in your 
opinion, might be valuable, occurs, collect and forward speci- 
mens of each kind. 

7th. Where veins of ore are being worked, (in tne "lead 
region particularly,) notice their length, direction, increase 
and diminution in thickness, as they traverse the rock, depth 
below the surface, and product of ore. Accurate drawings 
of particular veins which can be prepared easily by the prac- 
tical miner, as he works them out, would be of great value. 

8th. Let the owners of all works for the reduction of ores, 
furnish a statement of the amount of ore worked, cost and 
method of reduction, and pure, metal produced, during the 
year. 

9th. When quarries are being worked for building stone 
capable of being dressed or polished, let owners of such quar- 
ries prepare blocks or slabs, polished or dressed in the best 
style, and forward them to Madison. Such blocks should 
be at least 1 foot square and of the thickness of the layer to 
which they belong. They will be arranged in the cabinet of 
Economical Geology with the name of the owner, and will 
represent their locality lor all time to come, in the State Col- 
lection. 



67 

It is ot course for the interest of every quarryraan to ad- 
vertise his stone in this manner, and it would be a great pub" 
lie cbnrenienee, enabling any one tD see at a glance, tiie build- 
ing material of our whole State. Accompanying such spec- 
imen should be, a 'statement of the precise location of the 
(Juarry, distance from railroad or water transportation, cost 
of quarrying, and amount of stonQ accessible. This inform- 
ation will be filed in the cabjnet, so that an architect may 
Corhe to Madison and obtain such information as he needs for 
publid 6r private purposes. 

10. In general, collect all specimens, and facts, which! in 
your opinion will be interesting or useful to be generally 
known. 

* PerBona residing near locations wliere interesting petrifac- 
tions are attained, may do much for science by a little care. 
Yery good local collections of that kind have been made by, 
Gen. Smith of Mineral Ft, L A. Lapham, of Milwaukee, £. 
O. Hobart, City Engineer of Beloit, Henry Woolson, Esq., of 
Iron Bidge, and T. J. Hale, a talented young naturalist 6i 
Bacine. 

Specimens of rock or ores sKould be about 4 inches square. 
Petrifactions should bd sent whole, whatever may be their 
size; if brdken in extracting from the rocks, carefully preserve 
the fragments. Soil, sands, &c., may be put up in four ounce 
vials. Each specimen should be wrapped in paper by its6lf 
with a label, stating it^ precise locality, written with ink. 
"When thus prepared, specimens may be forwarded in a box 
carefaliy packed, to fhe Staie Geologist, Madison, in care of the 
Chvernor. They may be sent by the member elect from each 
assembly district, who will no doubt see to their safe deliv- 
ery as a matter of public interest, or for wared by any other 
means which may be thought proper. 

All communications may be directed to E. Daniels, Sivte 
Geologist, Madison, where they will be sure to reach me at 
iany time. 



68 

NATURAL HISTORY. 

The great naturalist, Prof. Lonis Agaf»iz, is now engaged 
in writing and publishing his work upon the animals of 
America. Its completne^s will, of course, depend upon the 
number of specimens that he may ma^ be able to examine. 
For several yearo, many public spirited persons have aided 
him, by collecting and forwarding specimens of animals. 

It is certainly desirable that the animals of our State should 
have as large a place as possible in that work. Kew and 
strange animals are found, from time to time, which are lost, 
for want of a little care. 

Let such persons, as are willing to aid the advancement of 
science, preserve in spirits, or otherwise, according to the 
nature of the specimen, everything which seems strange or 
new. Collect all the fishes of the streams, ponds, or lakes ; 
also, the crawfish and shellfish, as well as, toads, frogs, lizards^ 
turtles, snakes, ius<^cta, &c. These can be put into cans, bot- 
tles, or kegS) sealed and forwared, labeled with locality, Ac, 
either to me, at Madison, or directly to Prof. Agassiz, at Gam- 
bridge, Mass. They will be properly acknowledged, and 
whatever is new among them will be named and described, 
in the forthcoming work of Agassiz. 

As a matter of public interest, and connected with the Na« 
tural History of our State^ I call attention to the labors of 
Dr. Weinland, a highly scientifiic German, now at Cambridgei 
and bespeak for him the co-operation of the friends of 
science. Dr. Weinland is fully endorsed, by Prof. Agassiz, 
with whom he was formerly associated in Europe, by Dr. A. 
A. Gould, of Boston, the distinguished CoDchologist,Dr.'Wy- 
man, and the highest scientific authorities of the world. 

I give an extract from his circular, and trust that in a flat- 
ter of vital importance to the public health, as well as great 
scientific interest, he will meet the response that he merits : 

^^ I have commenced writing a hand-book on the PARAsnxs 
OF Man, comprehending all the parasitic (intestinal) worms, 
insects and plants (Fungi) that have been found in or on man. 



59 

This book is intended for the nse of every person who would 
become acquainted with the interestiog history and organiza- 
tion ot this groap of living beipgs, so mnch dreaded by, and 
jet so dependent npon, mankind. 

Our view is this : that only a thorough zoological ai d phy- 
siological J^nowledge of these parasites can lead to a sound 
understanding of the pathological phenonomena which they 
produce in the human body, and, when necessary, to a suc- 
ceasfal therapeutic treatment 

Thus we shall, for instance, when beginning with the Hel- 
minthes, or intestinal worms of man, first give a fulLaceount 
ol the nature and organization of Helminthes generally, of 
their embroyological development, their wanderings from one 
animal into another, from man into animals, and from animals 
into man, &c. Then on this theoretical zoological view will 
naturally be based the practical medical view, aiming at a 
thorough knowledge of all the different species that have been 
found in man, of the prophylactic against them, of the patho- 
logical symptons that indicate their presence in the humaa 
body, and ot those remedies that have been proved success- 
ful. *' 

One example may show how necessary it is for the practi- 
sing physician, and for the people generally, to be acquainted 
with at least some facts ot the embroyological development of 
these worms, viz : 

Wehww nowbyexj?erimmtihat(meofthe moat common tape* 
worms of man {the Tcenia solium), when eaten h*/ a hog^ prodiuxs 
in the muscles of the hog the measles {rneasly porJc), We know thai 
these measles contain the larcee of that tapeworm^ and that, if one of 
them is eaten by man^ in an nninjured state, the larva develops it- 
self into a regular tapeioorm m the intestine of the man. 

In the same manner the dog gets its tapeworms from the 
measles, found in the mesentery of the hare and rabbit, the 
cat, from those found in the liver of rats and mice, etc. 

I would most respectfutty solicit your assistance, and ask 
of you to send me specimens of the parasitic worms of man 



60 

and animals. Any specimens sent to me, e^en the most 
common, will be highly acceptable, and thankfully acknowl" 
edged in my work. The cdfnmon earthworms, which are 
generally considered as one species (Lnmbricns terrestris, L.), 
but of which we have undoubtedly a number of diflferent 
genera and species in the United States, and the hairworms 
(Gordius aquaticus, L.), which show an extremely interesting 
embryological development, are also much needed from the 
diflferent parts of the country for careful examination. Liv- 
ing specimens would be very valuable. Parisatic worms 
may be kept alive for several days in the white of an egg, 
hair worms in water, and earthworms in moist earth. To 
send them alive is of course possible only in the warm season. 
Dead specimens can be forwarded in small phials with alco 
hoi of about 60 per cent., or with common whiskey. 

Any specimens you may be able to send, please forward by 
express to Dr. D. F. Weinland, at Prof. L. Agassiz's Zoologi- 
cal Laboratory, Cambridge, Mass., — labelled concerning the 
locality or the animals in which they were found. Also oth- 
er remarks, which you might deem useful, would be grate- 
fully received. 

Trusting that ray labors will prove worthy of the support of 
my scientific friends, I subscribe myself, 

Respectfully, yours, 

David P. Wetxland, 

OAMBEiDoe, Mass., October 27, 1867. 



61 



EXPENSE OF GEOLOGICAL 8URTEYS. 



As it has been supposed by some persons that our State had 
made very large expenditures in Gjeological surveys, with 
small results, as compared with other States^ I give below 
some facts which wUl enable every one to judge intelligently 
upon this poiQt. The three Western, States nearest us, who 
have surveys of this kind, in progress, are Missouri, Ulinoiq, 
and Iowa. 

r 

The Geological survey of Missouri was commenced in 1859 
with an appropriation of $10,000 per annum, under the super- 
intendence of Prof. Swallow. About $40,000 have been ex- 
pended, and twp very creditable annual reports published- 
lowa has an appropriation of $5,000 per annum. The survey 
hrs been conducted by Messrs Hall and W hitney and has 
been in progress three years. No report has yet been pub- 
lished, but I understand one will soon appear. 

Tlie Geological survey of Dlinois has $6,000 per annum. 
It began in 1852 with $5,000, but has since been increased. 
Dr. Norwood its able chief has made only reports of progress, 
but has a large amount of materials for an interesting and 
valuable final report. 

Our own survey was commenced in 1858 with an appropri- 
ation of $2500 per annum for tour years. Of this appropria- 
tion, about $7000 was expended. 

The uork was interrupted by the death of Dr. Percivaj 
and as the appropriation was too small to sustain a creditable 
survey, it remained suspended during 1856. Last winter the 
survey was revived with an appropriation of $6,000 per ann- 
um for six years. I was entrusted with one department of 
that survey. Under my contract with the State, I have 
drawn from the treasury $1,997 91 during the year 1857. 
This covers all the expenses of my department f^r that year. 



62 

including outfit, team, transportation of specimens, fitting up 
rooms, assistance, together with the cost of analyzing the iron 
ores, which was necessary in order to determine their value, 
before the publication of my report 

There has been no other expenditure in this State, ibr Geo- 
logical surveys than those here named. 

It is but just to allow the Geologist time to matni^ his re- 
sults, before finding fault that he has not done more. 

In this State we have thus far had constant intermptioDs 
and no one has been allowed to carry out to completion any 
branch of the survey. The utility of such surveys is not at 
this day to be questioned, after being so abundantly proved 
by the experience of every important State in the Union, and 
the united concurrence of the most intelligent nations of 
Europe. 

But that utility can only be developed by hard work and 
patient study extended over a series of years. 

EDWARD DANIELS. 



DOCUMKNT "Q." 



I y 



:;vFiRST:pimAi: REPORT ;,;,:; 

OF THE COMMISSIONERS APPOINTED TO LOGAffB 

AND ERECrr A HQDSE OS REFUGE , i /, 
FOR JUTENILE DELm9"UENT8. .,,, , 

of IFwqmwn.* , , ., 

The undersiKiied corqinissionei t en- 
titled 'Ian Act to aathorize die io,of 
Refa'aefor ja»enile deljuq^aeota,' LSW, 
iDpureatuice of tlie terms of aaid j 

^ ';/ REPORT.' ■■■;;;■■;£■" 

The datiiBs to, the commissipnerB^ooDtafapl^^ldin: fl)^,^{;f) 
were new and peculiar. The fact of ttaifdiag Ho|if^ of Rf^u^ 
to reform jbuth, seperate from prisoae, is Qf, recent dat^ ,. f^ 
ficBt. one erected in this co.notry waa |)tijltip New I^pr^ j^. 
18'26, bat mom completely and poifec^y atiraiig«d l^ld ii^-lrpjlt 
ia .1853r-and a jj^aeralldea offeforjo^jjiygiul^d^lioqpaata 
as U noff obtioiti^ ,baS'9Dly. practically „rl^y^{)^ its^ .■jflAA 

1849,' , . ■„- ,' ,. ..,.,'„ ,1 ■: ., ,A.^_.., 

Since wliicli time most of the institutions in .iKtiit 
coontry for the reformatioQ of youth ^ave .either, been 
built 'new or re built Id new and 'ioiproTMl style, , and 
not QDtll* the month of May Uist,^ haa~ t^e' subjeot. ot 
juTenile reform 'elicited among ltd friends ^Veni safflbieBt hi- 
ttnreit t6 meet in conVdntioa for consultatioti 'add ^wcwfon as 
toiidpn^Ved plkuct of building, thd suhj^cki^ goveiromen^' 
the Importance 'of ^laseificatiod^'aiiii other' Bntteft of Snticest' 
'connected'ffithtiibUepifrttuynt of ditty! ''^^c^ tonVebtion 



aascmbled in New York city on the 12thy 13th, and 14th 
days of last May, on an invitation of a committee of the 
board of m anagers of the New York House of Befuge, and 
seventeen institutions of this kind were represented, in the 
attendance of about 60 delegates from widely distant points of 
our country. *^ One heart, one mind, one grand aim pervaded 
the whole. Tiie problem of juvenile reform was the one grand 
question/' and all figre^ed that the Ajrat di)ty of any people is to 
provide suitable facilities fbr the reformation of juvenile de- 

A buildU)]^ "best adifpt^d to facilitate a successf nl plaii of 
wholesome government, was a subject of so much importance 
AatMbs columissioners were obliged to visit other similar in* 
stitntions, and consult those who had experience in their uiao- 
agement;* We therefore visited the Western House of Bef- 
fu^ at KochQster., N. T., the Ma8sachu^etts State Bef rm 
S6hool at' ^estboro^ the Maine State Betbrm School at Cape 
Elizabeth, and the Iteform School for Juvenile Delinquents 
al; Bandle's Island, N« Tt C|by^ 

Our reception was cordial and satisfactory. We are under 
Aaiiny obligations to the Superintendents of the Institutions 
1^ filched, i^nd others with whom we have corresponded. 

*We were Je^rdtifiM to see die intelligent, active, cJieerful 
cAediiitil anjhjironiising appearance of the yoiith placed in 
lM^ iti^tiiS^yWho would compare favorably (with per- 
KaipS' i^W ekceptions) with an equal number collected indis- 
HirittiinM^y lii'^lf of^t)ur public ecbobU, indicating the ne- 
cessity of their commitment, to bad home influences or none 

F 

And'trueitis the pi^nciple ne<|e68ity, for ejecting. Hoosesj 
pf i{^nuge conpist in coDseqpepce of an alarming .criminal 
ne|;lect in. the exercis^ , by parents ai^ gpardjana of proper 
and safutarv i^,n^^ influences* . Ax^ our att/^ntion wa^dif* 
looted to ^, the TC^^Mw.oflB^ tl^fj institution id rei^^jife^^ 
tb yjDriS^rin. . The. jfpnth oj^ the: State*, co^uu^cipg .•* 
vicious life, ^i^owiup to.b^ ifs MuU . crinpna^fa^ ^^Ji o£ theia, 



lis' great c^miiiab. Oar porpMo ii to reclaid] and: eduott^ 
thetn ^hile they may be TeGlaimed and edneated, aiMi thenp- 
Ibm to the homeless ragrant, and the tra^at^ '▼IcieQi'ydttrli, 
this institution provides an inatroetor, a gaardian and pareht) 
and compels the receiviag of salutary infltieAeeS' to mould 
the mind aad habits while mataring to manhoods 

And tbis period, thou^ brfef^ is an i^ in tile life cf a 
ebijd, it is the formative period irhieh fixea the ehamttter juti 
as it is ripening into maturity, and is the^ 'pfOpar tim^ 
ti> verify tke traism of fldlo&vDn i ^' Train up a obild in 
the way he should ge, aodwben he is eld ksirill moltdepoA 
ftamit" 

For purposes of Reform Schools anS Htotises of R^ffbge, 
buildhigs have beem planned frotn the pTisoti form And ap*- 
pearance, to the simple domestic d^elliD'g and siirrotinded 
with massive walls, 20 feet in height, to simple, Ordinary fen^ 
ces. 

The Commissioners have endeavored to avoid (and undoubt* 
ediy great facilities to reformation citistin e^duding as much 
as possible), the appearance of a prison, sfnd in ai^anging a 
building to provide it with suitable and distinct appartmenti^ 
to admit of a careful classification of its intnates, separating 
the larger from the smaller, and the more viscious iVom th6 
less advanced in criminal life, thereby instituting distinct and 
congenial ibmilies. 

A Reform School and Agricultural Colony, at Mettray, in 
3^ancc, established in 1889, h eondticte.^ acfcording to this 
plan, and now contains over scfven hundred boJ%, divided ihW 
twelve distinct families, and is called th* " j^ami^ Systenfi^^ 
ih contradistinction to the hig house cell or prLon sysitem^ attd 
was the first, we believe, to adopt thid plan, and is now iii 
successful operation, tt^ main diflbrences are thikt instead bf 
one large building there are several detached on'^s, and eactf 
contains one family with a Chief, or JbiHer^ and two ^b-chiefs, 
or elder brothers. All the various kinds of agriculture, and 
a few of the more simple and generally dlfi^ed mechanical 



trftdds^ form ihe ftonrce of emplqyinent. ltd diaoipliBe le thtft 
of a fatciilj.WhoBe snbeistence e^rings- from labor. Is their 
l&od) .drew, ledgfcgB^ &cl, tliej stndy to adhere to the kind of 
lifelefllby the mass of the eommtiDity. 

In I this covntiy the beeft mode of^ discipliniDg deliDquent 
youth has received much- atteatioii; and the elaasifying, or 
&1Dciil1r fayetem^i seezDS to mecit wilSh favor by iotiany eminent 
jnnfenilerelbnQdrai and k. regarded .by them the beet adapted 
to tefonq yojQtb^ ! , i 

. Th^Ohicage Beforfii School nnder the nuuiagement of Mr; 
Ni^hblfl^ is reputed to be very stieoessfnl with tbie form of 
government His institution supported by a city tax at an 
anni^alr^xpense of only $8,600, has been in operation two 
years ; there have been tinder his charge 185 boys and 1 girl ; 
during this time no corporal punishment has been resorted to 
an4 e:(cept for a few weeks at first, no bars, bolts or lock-ups 
have been used, Mr. Nichols says '^When our school was 
fir^t cipened, 30th Kov.^ 1855. The house was all barred at 
length, and the cells had strong, and massive bars and locks 
}ipon the doors. jBut the day pame when the bars, bolts and 
lojcke^ lay scattered in the wildest confusion about the yard. — 
Tbi8 fire did this work, ai^d so far the fire did a good worh. 
We gathered tl^em together in heaps, and there they remain. 

^yii0n we rempved into ournew building we had no tence, 
bars or lock-ups. We were without a fence until last May, 
when we were so exceedingly annoyed by the parents and 
frienid^ of the. inmates, on the iSahbcUh especially ^ that we were 
obliged to have a .fence as a matter of self protection, to 
keep ovidde influences from our boys. Some of the boys 
were ibold by tbejr parents to escape the first opportnnily 
that offered itself. Some did escape from the known repeat- 
ed solicitations of their parents or friends. Thus a fence 
was deemed necessary to the wholesome discipline of the 
school. Our experience is, that if we were situated far 
enough from the city to deter the frequent visits of the 

iriends of the inmates^ that we should need no fence around 
our buildings. 



'. Odr iMds ars' airanged either in l^irih^' -cnr h$mt 
moekii:; tb« latter ■ we* ibink preferaUbw'to iike ijnv 



ndT*." •-.;.'••., ■/ . i, .1. ' v;i . .1.1 



I ' , 



' Sr. Nloliob bas 'estaiblithed gvades of honas/ wfai<di<dva(w; 
after them:nibetaiitial beaeftto^ The eoliool ia dstided into 
five dasBM^i^aeli eiass haviog five gimcke8';:flie'flfUi'gnid6 
i& the fltBt' olaiB » -the highest, aad the lyame.of thlB lad 
who gain it is regiatered in a pectiliar book b£ honoi^ the 
*^Eed Book ;'^ they have a mo^e choice: diet) if their hmp^ 
pens to b^ Ivxariea in the honse^' a^^ ^^7 alooe. are> p&th 
mitted to idsit the. city, JtaeedB at least. 1^ urcieka lOf mn 
emplaty condnot and of indnitiy to reaGhlany jriAoe. in tfua 

Each daas has its own table* If a boy is degcaiiid.' tb 
the fourth class, he loses his play. Another class iUalldwad 
everything except izhelit- and coflRse; anolber o6fiee, aoid^so 
on, the power of the penalties is thns to be fbtmd in'tlie 
sense of disgrace attached to them, and in thei fiust that tihe 
substantial goods and evils of every, day are so directly con* 
nected with condact. '..'.'■ 

The vagabond boy whom blows wonld not infln^nce xror 
cnrses drive, feels a new impnlse in this appeal to liis pride, 
he attains a Certain degree of self government — ^he fdels, at 
least a higher sentiment appealed to than fear j and he comes 
soon to have a certain spirit ol pride for his class, and a 
pleasure in keeping up its credit. The motto over the door 
is, "We are one family." 

The commissioners for building a State industrial school in 
Massachusetts, in their report of 1855, in discussing the ques- 
tion what is or what should be the elementary character of 
that government and organization which is best adapted to ef- 
fect ah essential change of character and at the same time a 
change of habits, say : 

'^ We entertain no doubt that the organization should be, 
that of a family, and the govenunent, as nearly as practicable,' 
that of a parent We believe that great moral and religious 



8 * 

jMirAr aftkidtti inihe idea«f paiBotelgQTeivment Md fiiiDil7 
oifjanimtioD whiob has a))ot bwn developed in mj pablk re- 
fonnatoiy iostitation in this conntrji and that if this legitiinatii 
pQfivar'wiBra ^piought oali ijotp ittltiiQato actiott it vonld eflbct 
locae in ilia' way of refotming: JAMntte dalioquania, than 
meaoiiros.baaed i^pott aqy other i4ca» Xhis T^hMipn ol parent 
and fiimilj, ia primitiTii^ cooti^noua and pei|>eitiial, it al* 
way^ baa and always wtill epesata in the apdal syBten wi& ^ 
fopte as sure apd In a direction as nnening aa that of graTifj 
n t^ie matenai ^orld« By and throagfa it the -wisdom of Ap 
msrtnve is brought into a justand proper relation to the inoea- 
Bant yeamiiigs and nascent ^^pimtions of tike yooBg, and tk^eie 
is ever a tendency to cluster around it the innocence, synipa* 
thy, deltgj^ and happiness which are embnced in the one 
wmd.nJSoiae/'^ 
SsiYlLDg tiicQ^ ci^f^^llj ex9n4D^ the fml^jeict of tbf| best plan 

fer.t^* gPTOmxw^At of t^^is p\^ of Q^nde^ w:e w^^e pr^pacT 
%^ tQ ftAopt ft tAv^ 9f building a4apt§4 thefeto, tbo fluUinp^ oi 
Tyhipb WW <JeBignefL ^j W^. B- Ldiooln, Esq., Siqipi^ri^t^n- 
dentof the Maine State Beform School, at Augusta — ^man ^ 
bulge e^pofienoe aqd pr^ctipal pb^ery^tiQn — b^vijig given the 
i^ubjeft of a suitable bP^ldingfit^Yidral moptb'^ dose study, a,D.4 
produced ^ pl^i^ at tb^ in^|t^noja and c^n ajpplic^atiou of Coua- 
^^SE4c]^^ qf tb^ State of New Bfi^uapsbire, appointed by thf^ 
Qoiyi9);n9]^ Ifq bu^H ft ^oui^e of Beforfpatioi^ for tb^ juvenile 
4PJ^a^^^ pf \\^ti. StPjto. ^b.9. order of wpi^, dividing iAto 
appartments, height of stories, and providing (^opaplet^ and 

WRIp ^^^^^1*^0^ tP ^|1 ^^^ rpq^, y(^, pranged as iii our 
}^g;^^^\ jyjppl4 b^Tjtify ai>d adapt th^. bpil^ing tq the pur- 
yosp? deeiri^d. Thp ^rpbitectural dr^yfipg^ ^ud gro^pd plpuft 
0^ tJifQ b^il,4j,pg5 no^^ ifljthe offiop off tb^ QpvfsrnoT.of tbp St^.te, 

VWr ^^4^, ty ^WW- ¥j^f jt^i ^ §Qlwidjtp^r, vcl^itects, of 
Milwaukee, 

51}^ ipjla^i.pf b»ildiijg cfoijfiists c(f ijly^e detached, paral- 
^m^^ 9^^W^^ flffi^ fpfij Vf^<?^i 9^f W ^ cei^fpe^»pd cross-. 



wise of each building, extending tbrongb the whole» adapting 
all, in theiir internal accommodation and eKteraal view, in 
appearance to one bnilding ; each bttilding liimkhing conn 
p^«^te aceoma^QdatioQy to tbe extent of ita eapafiity, as well 
without as with tibe others ; and if oFar needed, more bnild-t 
lags Wii^y he %dded and the corridor eztsoded, enlarging ti^ 
eapaeity indefinitely, and preserring the beauty 4)i the straetf 

The central bailding ia U by |dO &et, exeUMine of ateaa 
and tQw^ra, mA ia tp be 4 stoides above (he basement ; the 

side b^^^^g^ fti^ to ^^ 6"^ ^y ®^ ^^^9 <^ three atories abo^al 
basement ; the eorridor two stories above basenv^nt ; the base^ 
jpmit ifli to set 8 )'9 fe^t below the suriaoe of fte ground anA 
T feet above. The building is to be built with Waukesha 
ston^, inhioh consists of an impenrishable <|uality of lime^ston^ 
of fine drab col4^r, to be \M in (bourses from 8 1-2 to 6 inebea 
in thickness, and p^ginted with raised pointing. One inoalosf- 
lable value that this material is possessed is its proof against 
decay, of even tarnish. The stone, as broken from the quar- 
ry, before their edges are mutilated by the pean of a hammer, 
possess choice beauties, relieving the necessity of costly labo^ 
to beautify the exterior, even if desired by the most fastid- 
ious, and when erected will be a standing monument of un- 
fildiog beauty. The carpenter- work is to be built with good 
materials in a plain, becoming manner, and the building is to 
be covered with slate. 

Itothing has been done tor mere ornament — even the 
towers are used as ventilating shafts — but care has been taken 
in the architectural plan to combine beauty widi usetulness, 
and inasmuch as material was to be used and money expend- 
ed in the erection of a building to so arrange the plan that 
when erected it should possess in its internal arrangement and 
external view a combination of beauty and practical utility. 

It wi!! b »)d«.rved that the cost of this entire structure will 
exceed largely the appropriation — $20,000 appropriated for 
this object. But having a full and complete plan arranged, 



10 

we were prepared to oontract to build saeh portion of the 
building as the appropriation would admit, and the part erect- 
ed would be adapted to be united with ofller parts when built, 
and the work done would be eompleto in itself, thereby ear- 
ing to the State expenditures made by such adaptation. It 
eonld not have been intended by the last Legislatare tiiat 
tSO,000 would build and furnish for use aceomniodationB of 
suitable capacity demanded by the State for this puipoee, if 
so, their estimates were very imperfectly made. 

The amount heretofore appropriated, $20,000, only admit- 
ted of dosing a contract to build part of one building, (each 
building bmg divided by a ooiridor, with walls of stone, ad* 
xoits of building one half of each building, separate if desired,) 
but the State will need at once the whole of one building, and 
presuming that at tjhe present session of the Legislabire, the 
requisite amount for that purpose would be provided, a con- 
dition was entered in the contract requiring the builders to fin- 
ish the whole of one building at like pricea, and at the same 
time required for the part now under contract — ^provided the 
superintendent of the building shall give the builders notice 
to that effect^ by the 15th day of March next. 

It is estimated to cost to enclose the groondsi erect one 
building, Aimish the same with cooking and heating apparatus, 
supply with water and sewers, and erect neoossaiy shops, $20,- 
000 more than has been heretofore appropriated. 

The cost of buildings, lot and fixtures of Houses of Refuge 
in other states, is shown in the following table : 






d-^2"S'2 



rp 5 S 5 5 o o o » 3 00 en CJ 5 

i^^ eS'S'SSS'sV ESS" 



lJ1_ 



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These comprise all the Houses of Befuge and Tteform 
Schools, (of cities ^od states,) in onr country, and af- 
ford a view of the principal features of sncfa institutions, 
with the cost of eFMtiBg and expense ^f maintaining the 
same. OompanBg the eost of epeoting etrnctiures in other 
states and their accommodation, it most be apparent to all that 
Wisconsin can not, for $20,000, complete suitable buildings, 
demanded b; this State, for a House of Befuge. 

The economy of the plan, however, and the cheapness of 
building material at the place of locatien, will insure a bet- 
ter buil<Jiug with equal capacity, much cheaper than most 
other structures built for this purp<^se in many of the older 
states. Its need is i^parent to every observing pereon. Po- 
lice and Justices records show the nece^ty of providing a 
suitable place to restore youth. 61 youths under 16 years of 
age have been arrested and placed in jail, in the city of Mil- 
waukee, from January Ist, 1857, to January l^t, 1858. 

Juvenile offendeiscan be confined in county jails and pris- 
ons, but can the State afford to punish youth in jails and pris- 
ons among old offenders, by whom they are taught the very 
science and masteries of crimS) from its lowest to its highest 
branches ; where crime with all its fascination is i genfously 
expounded to the young and curious loarnor ; where they be- 
come charmed with the heroism of daring and undetected 
fellonies, and when discharged, whether it be in twenty days 
or six month?, go forth with bolder and n^ore lawless designs 
than they had ever be{bre conceived, AiHy educated and pre- 
pared to commence a career of vice and <^rime. 

Is it not infinitely cheaper to reclaim y<>uth, than to pursue 
an expert vilKan to prison ; to properlyi educate and give 
them tradoa, than to have them committling their daily and 
nightly depredations all over our State^ 

If it were not cheaper^ is it christian, is'it humane even, to 
thus take tlie child ia his formative perioq, while the mind is 
moulding into manhood, and habituate him in a prison to a 
life die like of which he can not find in the world at large, and 



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forwbatt (with rare exoeption) simply beoaase tbe child has iio 
ptoiddeDt parent on whom to rely agjunst want, aad comiuita af 
petty .tbe& to satisfy hiHigi«r^--or whose pajenb are too care* 
leea-of Ibe interests ol their own offspring to encourage tbem 
in the improTement of the priTtls^ss so freely provided for all 
^*-aatd other parents who though saffieiently atiatous for the> 
Wieifare of dieir children^ are wholly destitnte of parenial aa>- 
thorhy* There are orphans too^ with no inheritance btilP 
porerty and ignorancd, and with no faithful guardian to warn 
them against temptation, to which their hard tot has enpesed- 
them« And iatmipemnoe in the hesids of tbrntlies also adds its 
long list' to the sad roll of yoinhful deliaqnents. 

These elasses are they who are to find a school and a home' 
in this House of Itifoge And at; the period of dependadce, 
and edcioalioii in the life of a child, its importance, therefore^ 
who can Sxreigh^ for these are t«) become future husbands^ 
fathers, and roters, in our midst, tor good or evil, as- their 
culture and training ^hall develop, atid establish hi their heartif 
virtue, truth, and integrity, or its oppot^ite. In view, therefore, 
eft the Oiffice of this institndon,^ we recom^nend its tnle be 
changed from '^ House of Refugn^," to "^ State Aetottn School" 
The plan of buiiding, and archirectaral style (with other 000- 
sidieraitiMiis) have been adopted tosv«nd a» much as p^issible, a^ 
pri oniike appearance. Sbifis tirte should not be tiid least' 
repr<«achfnl and its saljjects^ sent Ibrrh should go as iVee^ ftfomi 
reproach. as) from any sobool in the'Staca 

We>flt86 sufbidit the pmprieey of appropriarisfg, la psrrt' or 

whole^ the eipense of buii<iing aaid maintemiicev (Win the^ 

sefaool fand ol tbo'State^^tfae ooDthigait fuiiA bttinjf largely 

taxed^ in thiS' erecAioBi .and support (ait preaen b) .of other asiifui' 

State Institiitiions^ } nd this differiaff inall respects tirunr* other* 

charitable and prisim' institutimis^ of the State, aaikoiily re«; 

cei^et to its ohargoyobth, <M>ass<M;iaites with'tluise wfcjo aire 

beiAg^olantarilytedneated.iu the coHimon sehbols! clit dlighM > 

oMtbe Stala^ may perhii|is,fitem*it8intiusat«) re'ati»ns$ (in the* 

dwehapgft of dntj;),' t9< the comomai ichooli .bb'^oitided tfoi br*f 
aminatiun in this respect. 



Hi 

' Hie sehool fand has be^n wisely set apart for edacatiiig tbe> 
youth of the Statte, and its distribation is intended to be made 
equal and alike, and invites all to come and be educated ; and 
in this respect our municipal goremmisnty by rearing her sys- 
tem of common schools, performs the part of a bountiful ben* 
efactor, placing the means of education within the reach of 
the poor as well as the rich ; but this noble system is itoi 
complete while there are children who, whether by the ne- 
glect of their parents and iipiardians, or by their Own perrer- 
sity are deprived of its advalntages. , 

In establishing a B^orm School, the State providecufor, and 
with parental authority, compels erring and neglected ycmth 
to accept her liberality, and adds one more to her numeitxis 
^istiutions ^&r the educatioil of children; but' if it shall 
not appear that this class of youth hare an eqtial $ukd proper 
tionate right, at least, to that:beneficient lund^ for the educa- 
tion of children, without diyettipg the same from its strict 
and legitupate intention, it then follows that its support mdst 
be provided from <^ther sources. . / 

In selecting a location cai:e was taken that it shonld be 
where the« building could be\ supplied with running water,- 
and the groiimU so elevated as to.adiliit of perfect sewarage. 
Also to select a healthy location, and> aa labor is to form ait 
important part of the exercise of delinquents, to select such 
land as was susceptible of easy and profitable tillage. Aiter. 
examining several places in view of a suitable location for the. 
building, it was agreed to make the location at Waukesha, 20 
miles west of the city of Milwaukee^ and situated on the Mil*. 
Ss Miss. R R, affording certain- and easy access from all parts 
of the Stata^ and from, its* contiguity tO' the priaeiple cities 
of the State is perhaps as central (if ndt imore so) for the par* 
poaes required, as any point that could have been- seiectad. 

Besponsible.citisens of Waukesha have given their bond 
due the first day of January, 1859, to payferOOacraiof land 
to be given to the State for the; the purpose of a location, attd • 
will be ddiveved at any time>tthe buildifig is Yeady fbr oecu^* 



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pftnojr, f?o -which the commifiBioners hare added by parcUtoe 
10 80-100 flores at $100 per acre in sqaare form, in iho 
centre "of which, the present builditig is located. The 
deefd for the location, with the • certificate from the Beglsteir 
of Deeds and clerk of the court of the oonnty of Waukesha 
certifying Hie land to be iree from mortgage, leiii, or jndg^ 
ment^' have been filed with the Secretary of State, making in 
tlie aggregate for a lo<^tion oyer 70 acres. • 

The land constttnting the location is an excellent piece of 
productive, tillable prairie soil, well adapted to gardenings 
forming and horticultural ndes, with a grove of timber in one 
comer of about 8 acres, consbting of hickory, white burr and 
red oak ; in the opposite cDrner is a spring . of pare limped 
water, discharging a large stream ' foirming a pond. 6 rods isk 
diameter, walled around its edge, and fall of pickerel, bass and 
other«fishj common to our streams, and laife easily caught in 
considerable numbers.) It seems to-be ' an inviting spot for 
the finny tribe, far • tbey run up the outlet of the pond 
firom For river until it is Ml to its d^acity. Fox river runs^ 
pa^y on the lane :and partly thpongh^ the premises, over 
dean^-gravelty bottooa. With a rapid anrrent admitting of no. 

standing or sta^ant water. n 

The Jlocation is about one half mile from the M. & M. De- 

pot, and. Xbe M. & M. B. B. passes in front and in view of 

the premises for nearly two miles. The building can be sup-^ 

plied with ter by the ui^e of hydraulic ram from the spring 

on thci premises or from springs in the vicinity which are suf-^ 

ficiently elevated to flow into, the buildinfi^ 
The contract for ejtcavation and stpne work was awarded[ 

to Ira A. White, and the carpenter work for the enclosing to' 

Leander Hill, both of Waukesha, (the finishing not having yet 

been let.) ' . * ; 

■ ' • 

The contract now closed applies to building the basement of 

one building, and so much of the first, second, and third sto* 

ries as is ii^ th^ rear of the cotxldor fthrough the centre] of said 

building. 



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Tbe ooDtmofc far tlie ezcavatioii and levding tlie eartb 
moved is 22 o. per cnbit yard — ^$2,50 per perch for stone wdl 
of the baaemeat, -first and second stories^ and $8^00 per perch 
for the 8d storjr of said building. Cut sUme at from 88 c to 
70 c per foot according to thickness and siee, bond timteiBy and 
lintles, and brick for chimneys, to be famished at extra thsrge^ 

The contract for the carpenter vratk on the bttement, and 
rear part of the firsts second and third stories is $4-165| and ibr 
the front part of the firat| second and tiiird stories, (if builfi) is 
$4600. 

The bnilding now under contract is 67 feet by 94, ezclnaive 
of towers, th^ half of building in rear of corridof is divided^ 
the basement (2 1-2 fifot below ground, and 71-2 abov^) into 
ao'^eller wash room, laundry, drying room, and iiim- 
ace apartment, thto Ist or principle story (11 feet high) int6 
closets, pantry^ hail, passge for steam, store room 14 by 18, 
boys dining room 26 by 29, and one extra room 14 by 18. 
The second story, (16 feet high,) has two tier of dormitories 5 
by 8 and h/ feet high, 96 in miiiaber the third story 16 foet 
high, may be divided as the second or partly into hospital 
rooms, and partly to provide rooms fbr giils. This part of 
the bnilding can be bnilt and finished with thef present ap 
propriation, and n^jll furnish aCcommodatiotis far 80 boys 
i^ithoUt school room, living rooms, for the Sttp^rintehdett 
and family, ainl oA(5^ for the KCCOitimodation of the biiitding. 

The half of bttilding iii tH)tit of corridor is divided ; tbe 
basement into a kitchen Id by 2», bed room 19 by 18; dining- 
room 16 by 26, and sitting room 18 by 21, for m^ of Soper- 
intendent and tamilj ; the first, or principle story, 1 1 feet high, 
into a parlor 19 by 24, bed-room 12 by l9, reception room 18 
by 19, and Snp-rintendent's office 18 hy 19 ; the second story, 
16 feet high, into a school room 38 by 39, teacher's room 19 
by i9, and a recitation room 17 by 10; the third story may 
be divided into hospital rooms, and apartments for girls, 
which will then allow of fini^ing the rear of third story for 
boys, and ample accomodations will then be provided for 8u 



17 

poys and 20 girls. A considerable item in the expense of 
this bnilding will not, if , the plan adopted is adhered to, bo 
necessary in erecting other briilclings of tne plan — such as the 
expebi&o of examining other Institntions, making pla^i), archi- 
tectural drawings, enclosing- the grounds, making sewerage, 
supply with water, as these and other items necessary to a 
.commencement will be ample for the enlargement 

The plan adopted and the contract for building were ap- 
proved by the Hon. Coles Bashford, Governor, David Jones, 
Secretary and Wm. R. Smith, Attorney General, of the State 
of "Wisconsin. 

The plan as adopted, when fully executed, will provide am- 
ple convenience for over 400 delinquents, and can^ be com- 
.pletely finished for $100,000. 

About 1000 perch of stone have been laid in the basement 
walls of one building, the walls of which are laid to the height 
to receive the floor timbers of the principal story, and is ready 
for the inspection of the Superintendent of the bnilding ; the 
floor timbers of the principal story are all framed ready to 
put on the wall, and will be so placed as soon as the work is 
accepted. Over 160 coxds of stone have been hauled on the 
spot for spring nse ; a considerable qoantity of cut stone for 
belting, caps and sills for windows and doors, and quoind for* 
towers are now on the gronnd, the window frames for the flrst, 
second and third stories are nearly all complete, and if the 
work shall not be embarrassed for want of itlnds one build 
ing may be early completed and prepared for nse. 

The grounds are to be enclosed with a tight board fence 
6 1-2 feet high with oak posts set 8 feet iu the ground, and 
rails 2x5 nailed to the posts with 6 inch spikes, the boards to 
be nailed perpendicular with fiance nails, making a sufficient 
ly protective and durable fence. 

W.D. BACON, ) 

EDWm PALMER, [ (hnrnrn'rCrs. 
MiJlTIN MITOHELL, ) 
WAunsHA, Jan; 1st, 1 bpS. 



REPORT 



or 



STJPEIIINTENDENT OF THE HOUSE OF REFDi 

BUILDING, 



Statb of Wisconsin io acoonnt with W. D. Bacon, 
1857. CR. 

Jaoe, Reoeived appropriation from See^ of Stote, (Serip,) - $5001 
Dae W. D. Bacon to ballanoe acooont - • - 899 

DR. 

Paid W. D. Baeon per diem aod travel fees as $5,896 

Oommissioner and Superintendent, in exam- 
ining plans and locating building to Oct 13, $ 696 20 
^ Edwin Palmer per diem and travel fees as 

Oommissioner, to Oct 13, - - - 449 90 

•« Martin MtcheU, do, " " - - • 494 00 

Oct ^^ Brick for chimney fines, - - 62 50 

" Leander Hill on contract for carpenter work 1,000 00 
*^ Ira A. White on contract for stone work, 450 00 

*^ S. M. Booth, adyertising proposals for bnilding 10 OO 
" R.E3ng&Co., " "^ " « 10 00 

« Milwaukee News " " ." " 600 

Milwaukee Wisconsin do, " " " 4 OO 

Racine Advocate, do " «♦ u ^ GO 

"" JanesTilk Gazette^ '- '' '' 2 50 

^^ . L. Hill, on contract for carpenter work, 1,000 OO 
" I. A. White, on contract for stone work, ^0 00 

^* y. Tichenor, Esq., drawing contracts, 15 75 

" W. R. Williams, survey and map ground, 20 00 

^ iU^^tt d? Schmidtner, AxohiteotflL 300 00 

Deo. ^^ W; D. Bacon, per diem and travel fees as Su- 
perintendent of building and Oommissioner, 

to JaiL 1. 1868, 275 50 

Edwin Palmer, as Oommis^nr to Jan* 1, 1858, 82 20 
KMltoheD, '^ " " " " 12 80 

4,804 ft bond timber, Unties, and wall strips, at 

$14 per M. 67 25 

'' 2,018 ft, 1 inch boards to ooT«r wail, at $15, 80 19 
^^ L. ffiU^on carpenter contract^ • - - 400 00 
^^ Ira A. Whit^ stone contract, - - « 200 00 
^ Express charges 2 00 






it 

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$5,892 89 
la the month of Ootober received from the Secretary of State $6,000 \ 
ioript) there being no money in the Treasury, Uie same is yet unpaid. 

W. D. BAOON, Superintendent 
Waukisha, Jan. 1st, 1858. 



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