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p 



public ]§oaxmeid& d Passar^tisttls : 



BXIH8 THB 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF VARIOUB 



PUBLIC OFFICERS AND INSTITUTIONS 



TOR THE YKAB 



1896. 



PUBLISHED BY THE SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH. 



Vol. X. 



BOSTON : 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO. t STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 
1897. 



* # 



«• •■ * 



••; 



' *$*>* • 



i \ 



UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 
LIBRARIES 

266892 
MARCH 1930 



PUBLIC DOCUMENTS 



For the year 4896. 



Yol. I. 

Report of Secretary of the Commonwealth, . 
Report of Treasurer and Receiver-General, . 
Report of Auditor of Accounts, . 
Report of Attorney-General, 
Report of Commissioner of Public Records, 



Doc No. 

46 

5 

6 

12 

52 



Yol. II. 



Report of Tax Commissioner, 

Aggregates of Polls, Property and Taxes, . 
Abstract of Returns of Corporations, . 
Report of Controller of County Accounts, . 
Report of State Board of Arbitration and Conciliation, 
Number of Assessed Polls, Registered Voters, etc., 



16 
19 
10 
29 
40 
43 



• Yol. III. 

Report of State Board of Lunacy and Charity, . 
Report of Trustees of the Lyman and Industrial Schools, 
Report of Trustees of the Danvere Lunatic Hospital, . 
Report of Trustees of the Northampton Lunatic Hospital, 
Report of Trustees of the Taunton Lunatic Hospital, . 
Report of Trustees of the Worcester Lunatic Hospital, 



17 
18 
20 
21 
22 
23 



6 

Doc No. 

Report of Trustees of the State Farm at Bridgewater, . . 24 
Report of Trustees of the State Almshouse at Tewksbury, . 26 
Report of Trustees of the Perkins Institution and Massachu- 
setts School for the Blind, 27 

Report of Trustees of the Massachusetts School for the 

Feeble-minded, 28 

Report of Trustees of the Westborough Insane Hospital, . 30 
Report of Trustees of the Massachusetts Hospital for Dipso- 
maniacs and Inebriates, . 47 

Report of Trustees of the Medfield Insane Asylum, . . 59 



Vol. IV. 

Report of State Board of Health, 34 

Report of Board of Registration in Medicine, ... 56 



Vol. V. 

Report of Railroad Commissioners and Returns of Railroad 
Corporations, 14 



Vol. VI. 

Report of Commissioners of Savings Banks (Part I. — Sav- 
ings Banks, Institutions for Savings, Safe Deposit, Loan 
and Trust Companies. Part II. — Co-operative Banks, 
Collateral Loan Companies, Mortgage Loan and Invest- 
ment Companies) , .... * ... 8 



Vol. VII. 



Report of Insurance Commissioner (Part I. — Fire and 
Marine. Part II. — Life, Casualty and Assessment) , 



Vol. VIII. 

Doc Nn, 

Report of Board of Education, ; 2 

Report of Librarian of State Library, 3 

Report of Free Public Library Commission, ... 44 



Vol. IX. 

Report of Secretary of the Board of Agriculture, 

Report of Board of Control of the Hatch Experiment Sta 

tion, 

Report of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Report of Board of Cattle Commissioners, . 



33 
31 
51 



Vol. X. 

Report of Chief of the District Police, .... 32 

Report of Commissioners of Prisons, 13 

Report of General Superintendent of Prisons, . .41 

Report of Board of Police for City of Boston, ... 49 

Report of Board of Police for City of Fall River, . 58 

Report of Adjutant General, . . . 7 



Vol. XL 

Report of Registration of Births, Marriages and Deaths, 
with Statistics of Divorce, and of Deaths investigated by 

the Medical Examiner, 1 

Report of Bureau of Statistics of Labor, . . • .15 

Statistics of Manufactures, 36 

Report of Board of Gas and Electric Light Commissioners, . 35 

Report of Inspector of Gas Meters and Illuminating Gas, . 55 



8 



Report of 
Report of 
Report of 
Report of 
Report of 
Report of 
Report of 
Report of 
Report of 
Report of 
Report of 



Vol. XII. 

Doc No. 

Contested Elections (no report in 1896), . . 87 

Commissioners on Inland Fisheries and Game, . 25 

Board of Harbor and Land Commissioners, . . 11 

Board of Metropolitan Park Commissioners, . 48 

Massachusetts Board of Registration in Dentistry, 38 

Massachusetts Board of Registration in Pharmacy, 39 

Commissioners on Topographical Survey, . . 50 

Civil Service Commissioners, .... 53 

Massachusetts Highway Commission, ... 54 

Metropolitan Water Board, 57 

Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners, . 45 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 32. 



BEPOBT OF THE CHIEF 



OP THB 



Massachusetts District Police, 



FOR 



The. Year ending December 31, 1896, 



ZKCLrDINO 



THE RESULT OF THE INSPECTION OF FACTORIES 

AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



BOSTON : 
WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Offick Square. 
1897. 



Comnwnfoealifc rf gtassar^usttts. 



Office or thb Chibp of the District Police, 
Boston, Jan. 1, 1897. 

To His Excellency Roger Wolcott, Governor of the CommonwecUlh. 

Governor : — I have the honor to submit a report of the 
duties performed by the district police for the year ending 
Dec. 31, 1896. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

RUFUS R. WADE, 

Chief of District Police. 



Commanfoealife at gfassacjwsttts. 



REPORT. 



In accordance with the provisions of the statute estab- 
lishing the district police, I beg leave to submit to Your 
Excellency my eighteenth annual report, which, in connec- 
tion with the facts and statistics herewith submitted, shows 
what has actually been accomplished by this force during the 
past year. It is also my duty to make such recommendations 
as experience in the enforcement of the laws may reasonably 
suggest. 

It is now more than seventeen years since the law was 
passed establishing the existing system of the district police. 
My first report shows that the roster then contained nine 
officers, including the chief. Our principal duties then 
comprised the enforcement of the laws relating to the hours 
of labor, the employment of children and inspection of 
factories and public buildings. For this latter work three 
officers, including the chief, were designated by the governor, 
and the rest were employed in the detection and punishment 
of crime, acting in many instances under the direction of the 
district attorneys in their respective districts. 

An instructive comparison might be made between the 
reports showing what the district police had done during 
the earlier years of its work and the report herewith made. 

Among the many laws which the inspectors are now called 
upon to enforce are the following : the laws relating to the 
hoars of labor ; the protection of operatives from unguarded 
machinery; the employment of women and minors; the 
schooling of children employed in factories and workshops ; 



6 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

the preservation of females employed in mechanical, manu- 
facturing and mercantile establishments ; reports of accidents 
in manufactories ; safety appliances for elevators ; provisions 
for escape from hotels and other buildings in case of fire ; 
proper ventilation for factories and workshops, and uniform 
meal hours for children, young persons and women employed 
therein ; the suppression of nuisances from drains, and provi- 
sions for water-close ts, etc., for the use of each sex employed 
in factories and workshops, and various other sanitary regu- 
lations ; the inspection of buildings alleged to be unsafe or 
dangerous to life or limb in case of fire or otherwise ; the 
submission to the inspector for approval of a copy of plans 
and specifications of any building designed for certain public 
purposes, as factory, workshop, mercantile structure, hotels, 
apartment houses, lodging or tenement houses, above a 
certain height ; communication between engineer's room and 
each room where machinery is run by steam, in every man- 
ufacturing establishment; proper safeguards at hatchways, 
elevator openings and well-holes in public buildings, factories 
and mercantile establishments ; forbidding the use of porta- 
ble seats in aisles or passageways in public halls, theatres, 
school- houses, churches, public buildings, etc., during any 
service or entertainment held therein ; requiring fire-resisting 
curtains, approved by inspectors, for use in all theatres, etc. ; 
competent watchmen, lights in hotels, gongs or other proper 
alarms, and notices posted describing means of escape from 
fire in boarding and lodging houses above a fixed size, family 
and public hotels ; fire-escapes on tenement or lodging houses 
three or more stories in height ; prohibiting during working 
hours the locking of any inside or outside door of any build- 
ing where operatives are employed ; public buildings and 
school-houses, in respect to cleanliness, suitable ventilation 
and sanitary conveniences; the weekly payment of wages 
by certain corporations to each of their employees; the 
inspection of uninsured steam boilers; the examination as 
to the competency of engineers and firemen in charge thereof; 
the enforcement of the act relating to the manufacture and 
sale of clothing made in unhealthy places ; the enforcement 
of the act relative to the heating of street railway cars ; and 
the enforcement of the act requiring specifications to be fur- 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 7 

nished to persons employed in cotton, worsted and woollen 
factories. 

The results achieved by the district police in the earlier 
years of its existence gained for it the confidence of the Leg- 
islature and of the people of the Commonwealth, — a confi- 
dence which, I am proud to record, has never been qualified 
or withdrawn ; and, as additional labor legislation, so called, 
took its place in the statutes, and better knowledge of the 
measures needed for the protection, comfort and prosperity 
of the industrial classes was obtained, the work of the force, 
as will be seen, was vastly increased. 

The provisions of the Legislature which define the duties, 
obligations and powers of the district police have also been 
greatly enlarged since the enactment of chapter 305 of the 
Acts of 1879, which established this department. 

The entire number of the force at the present time is forty- 
five. Thirteen officers are designated for service in the 
detective department; six for the inspection of uninsured 
boilers and for the examination of engineers and firemen as 
to their competency to operate the same ; two officers are 
employed in the enforcement of section 44, chapter 508 of 
the Acts of 1894 ; the remainder are detailed for duty in the 
inspection department. 

It is but simple justice that I should record my commenda- 
tion of the officers of this force for the discretion and intelli- 
gence shown in their official action. They have retained, as 
they deserve, the confidence and respect of all law-abiding 
citizens, and especially court officials, who from personal 
knowledge have stated that the officers of the detective 
department of the district police are efficient and upright 
servants of the Commonwealth. 

The Inspection Department. 

No form of statistics, however complete, can furnish an 
accurate description of a year's work of this department. 
Eliminating matters comparatively trivial, but which cannot 
properly be disregarded, it may be said that the work of in- 
spection in all its divisions demands the most diligent and 
incessant labor of the entire force. 



8 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

The oversight of operatives and machinery, in so far as 
the statutes relate to them, whether it be the hours of labor, 
the sanitary conditions under which labor is done, the pro- 
tection against fire in factories and workshops, the employ- 
ment of women and minors, the schooling of juvenile workers, 
and other requirements of law which I need not here men- 
tion, must be continuous, to be effective; so that, in a large 
sense, however well the inspector may discharge his duty in 
a particular locality or in a special building, he must not 
relax his vigilance and conclude that no further attention is 
needed from him in such places. 

The experience gained by the inspectors, some of whom 
have been connected with the department since its establish- 
ment, and all of whom have my confidence as efficient offi- 
cers, enables them to do better work each year. 

Inspection or Uninsured Boilers, and the Examination 
of Engineers and Firemen in Charge thereof. 

The experience of another year has made more clear that 
which was apparent before, — that no more important duty 
in the line of inspection work is entrusted to this department 
than the enforcement of the provisions of the following stat- 
utes. Certainly no more important legislation for the pro- 
tection of life has been enacted. 

[Chapter 418, Acts of 1895 ] 

An Act relative to the Inspection of Steam Boilers. 
Be il enacted, etc., as follows : 

Section 1. It shall be the duty of every corporation, firm or 
individual, owning or using, or causing to be used, within this 
Commonwealth, a steam boiler or boilers (excepting boilers upon 
locomotives, boilers in private residences, boilers under the juris- 
diction of the United States, boilers that are under the periodically 
guaranteed inspection of companies that have complied with all 
the laws of this Commonwealth, boilers used exclusively for agri- 
cultural, horticultural and creamery purposes, or boilers of less 
than three horse power), within sixty days after the passage of 
this act, and annually thereafter, to report to the chief of the dis- 
trict police the location of such steam boiler or boilers. 

Sect. 2. Each of the boilers designated in section one shall be 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No, 32. 9 

inspected by the inspector of boilers for the district in which said 
boiler or boilers is located, as thoroughly as in the judgment of ttie 
inspector is necessary, and if the inspector so directs, it shall be 
the duty of the owner or user to have the boiler or boilers blown 
off dry, and the man-hole and the hand-hole covers thereon re* 
moved, ready for inspection upon the day designated by the in- 
spector, the inspector giving the owner or user of said boiler or 
boilers fourteen days notice in writing of the day upon which he 
will make such internal inspection, provided that such inspection 
shall not be required oftener than twice a year. 

Sect. 3. If upon examination said inspector shall find the boiler 
inspected to be worthy and in safe working order, with the fittings 
necessary to safety, and properly set np, he shall grant to the 
owner or user of such boiler or boilers a certificate of inspection, 
and upon receipt of such certificate said owner or user shall be 
permitted to use the boiler or boilers mentioned in the certificate. 
And if in said inspection the inspector shall find that the boiler is 
not in safe condition, or not provided with fittings necessary to 
safety, or with fittings not properly arranged, he shall withhold his 
certificate until the boiler and fittings are put in condition satis- 
factory to him ; and it shall be unlawful for any owner or user to 
then operate or cause to be operated such steam boiler until the 
inspector has granted his certificate, and the owner or user oper- 
ating such boiler without said certificate may be enjoined from 
such use, in a proceeding to be had before the superior court or 
the supreme judicial court, at the instance of the inspector, with 
the approval of the chief of the district police ; and upon the filing 
of a petition therefor any judge or justice of the court in which 
said proceeding is pending may issue a temporary injunction or 
restraining order, as provided in proceedings in equity. 

Sect. 4. If upon such inspection the inspector finds that the 
owner or user of any steam boiler is putting too much pressure 
upon the same the inspector shall have the power to fix the maxi- 
mum pressure to be allowed to be carried by said boiler, and shall 
adopt, and the owner or user shall place or cause to be placed upon 
•aid boiler, such device as the inspector shall deem expedient to 
prevent the boiler from carrying any greater than the maximum 
pressure designated, said device to be approved by the chief of the 
district police ; and no person shall in any manner tamper with 
such device, or load the safety valve to a greater pressure than that 
allowed by the inspector, as hereinbefore provided. 

Sect. 5. The owner or user of a boiler or boilers coming under 
the provisions of this act shall pay to the inspector at each inspec- 



10 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE, [Jan. 

tion the sum of two dollars for each boiler inspected. All sums paid 
as aforesaid shall be paid over by him, monthly, to the treasurer 
of the Commonwealth. 

Sect. 6. The chief of the district police is hereby authorized to 
adopt such rules and regulations, to be approved by the governor, 
as may be necessary to properly enforce this act. 

Sect. 7. All persons violating any of the provisions of this act 
shall, upon conviction, be punished by a fine not exceeding five 
hundred dollars, or by imprisonment not exceeding six months, or 
both, at the discretion of the court. 

Sect. 8. The governor is hereby authorized to appoint three 
additional members to the inspection department of the district 
police qualified to perform the duties required by this act, who 
shall each receive an annual salary of fifteen hundred dollars and 
their actual travelling and necessary expenses. 

Sect. 9. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Ap- 
proved May 29, 1895. 

The fact that a law controlling the use of steam boilers 
is upon the statute books has alone been of large benefit 
in compelling the discontinuance of unsafe boilers. Many 
boiler owners who were willing to go to extreme risks in 
using dangerous boilers have shown a disposition to antici- 
pate the inspection of the inspector by keeping the boiler in 
much better condition than ever before. Some have rea- 
soned that, as the visit of the inspector may come at any 
time, possibly at a time when they cannot afford to be shut 
down for any length of time, it is better policy to keep the 
boiler in good condition, so that the visit of the inspector 
may not result in the issuing of orders for repairs that might 
result in a considerable shut-down. It has been the policy 
of many manufacturers always to keep their boilers in the 
best condition, but there is a marked increase in the regular 
care given to their boilers by steam users who have, previous 
to the passage of this law, been dangerously neglectful in this 
respect, and some of them almost crimiually so. This dis- 
position to recognize that the boilers must be kept in the 
best condition is a most encouraging feature, and must add 
greatly to the safety of all working about them, which is a 
result that was not contemplated when the law was passed. 
There remains, of course, a considerable class who will let 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 11 

everything go until forced to make needed repairs by order 
of the inspector ; but I am of the opinion that this class is 
growing less, and I am encouraged to hope that in a few 
years it will become simply a matter of course amongst these 
men to maintain their steam plants in a safe condition, of 
their own volition, without direct orders from the inspectors 
of this department, but by the recommendation of their own 
engineers. The fact that the engineers will be a better class 
of men in the future will also assist in this direction ; but 
having a good engineer will not answer alone, for, in such 
cases where repairs are made only upon order of the in- 
spector, no attention would be paid ordinarily to the sim- 
ple recommendation of an engineer. It is quite a frequent 
occurrence for an engineer to report to the inspector the 
appearance of a dangerous defect in his boiler, which he has 
been totally unable to make his employer heed. He believes 
the boiler to be in a dangerous condition, yet his need of em- 
ployment and the difficulty of getting work compels him to 
submit himself to the risk he knows should not be allowed to 
exist. Most of these reports are made with the understand- 
ing that the employer is not to know that complaint has been 
made, for that would cost the engineer the position he can 
ill afford to lose, and in investigating the case the inspector 
is obliged to do so in such a manner as will not bring sus- 
picion upon the employee. Some of these cases have not 
been as dangerous as the engineer feared, some not at all ; 
but many have been actually and positively dangerous, and 
need immediate attention. As it becomes recognized, how- 
ever, that the inspections of the department will become 
more regular in time and more frequent, attention to these 
recommendations of the engineer having the boiler in charge 
will be more frequently paid, safer boilers insured, defects 
promptly remedied, and the work of the department made 
easier in carrying out the object for which the law was 
passed. 

The large number of men to be examined for licenses as 
engineers or firemen has made it impossible to inspect as 
many boilers as was expected would be done. In deciding 
whether many boilers should be inspected, or the engineers 
examined, it seemed to me wiser to examine the men first. 



12 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

The license law placed so many difficulties in the path of an 
engineer without a license, in regard to obtaining work, that 
much hardship would result if there should be any consid- 
erable delay in the issuing of licenses. When this work 
is finished greater attention than ever will be paid to the 
boilers, which are in number estimnted about as before, some 
being under the care of the insurance companies, while others 
have allowed the insurance to expire, and asked to be in- 
spected by the inspectors of this department. 

Another point to which particular attention is called is the 
important matter of second-hand boilers. There are dealers 
in second-hand machinery who will not allow a boiler to leave 
their hands until they know it is perfectly safe for the work 
it is to do. The reports of the inspectors show that there 
are others who wilfully or ignorantly allow boilers that are 
totally unfit for use to be sold to unsuspecting purchasers. 
These are boilers that have previously been condemned 
by other parties and thrown out of use, only to be red- 
leaded and painted, to sell to some other steam user ; and, 
as the boiler might be in use some time before the inspector 
discovers it, considerable danger here exists. An inspector 
of this department might condemn a boiler as unfit for use, 
and the boiler be removed. He has no authority to mutilate 
the boiler in any way, and that boiler could be sold to the 
junk heap and be painted and come again into use in the 
same or a neighboring city. I believe that there is ample 
authority given in the present law to fully control this mat- 
ter ; and a set of rules to govern the matter of second-hand 
boilers will be formulated, and submitted as the law directs 
for Your Excellency's approval, which will control and follow 
the output of these second-hand shops, and I expect that 
much good will result therefrom. 

So far the law has worked very satisfactorily and without 
friction, and appears to be generally endorsed as most 
excellent legislation. I have not expected that all these 
matters could be regulated and settled in a short time, but 
gradually and as speedily as possible to bring all the various 
channels by which boilers reach the steam user under some 
supervision, so that not only shall the boilers in use be kept 
in a perfectly safe condition and run at safe pressures and 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 13 

with proper appliances, but that new boilers and all boilers 
sold shall be properly made of approved materials, and be 
passed upon before they are pat into use. 

The act relative to the inspection of steam boilers was 
farther strengthened by the following acts, to regulate steam 
engineering : — 

[Chapteb 471, Acts of 1896.] 

Am Act to regulate Steam Engineering. 
Be it enacted, etc, as follows : 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any person to have charge 
of or to operate a steam boiler or engine in this Commonwealth, 
except locomotive boilers and engines, boilers in private residences, 
boilers under the jurisdiction of the United States, and boilers used 
for agricultural purposes exclusively or of less than eight horse 
power, unless he holds a license as hereinafter provided ; and it 
shall be unlawful for any owner or user of any steam boiler or 
engine, other than those above excepted, to operate or cause to be 
operated a steam boiler or engine for a period of more than one 
week without a duly licensed engineer or fireman in charge. 

Sect. 2. Any person desiring to act as an engineer or fireman 
shall make application to so act to an examiner of engineers, upon 
blanks furnished by the examiner, and if upon examination the 
applicant is found trustworthy and competent a license shall be 
granted to said applicant to have charge of or to operate such 
steam plants as the examiner may find him qualified to have in 
keeping. Such license shall continue in force for three years 
unless after proper hearing it is sooner revoked, for intoxication 
or other sufficient cause, and may be renewed every three years on 
application to the authority granting the same, or at such time as 
may be determined by said authority. 

Sect. 3. Licenses shall be granted according to the competency 
of the applicant, and shall be divided into classes as follows : — 
First Class. Engineers' licenses of this class shall be unlimited 
as to horse power. Second Class. Engineers' licenses of this 
class shall be limited to one hundred and fifty horse power. Third 
Class. Engineers' licenses of this class shall be limited to fifty 
hone power. A fireman's license shall be issued to any person 
who, after having passed an examination, as herein provided, shall 
have been found competent to take charge of or to operate any 
steam boiler or boilers. Any person desiring to operate any par- 
ticular steam plant may so state to the examiner, and he shall be 
examined as to his fitness to operate that particular plant, and if 
found competent and trustworthy shall be granted a license, termed 



14 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

a special license, for that particular plant, and each license shall 
be in force for three years. 

Sect. 4. The fee for examination for applicants for license 
shall be one dollar, to be paid at the time of the application for 
examination, and one dollar for each renewal of license. All sums 
paid as aforesaid shall be received by the examiner, and shall be 
paid over by him monthly to the treasurer of the Commonwealth 
if such examiner is a member of the district police, otherwise to 
the treasurer of the town or city by which such examiner is em- 
ployed. 

Sect. 5. The members of the boiler inspection department of 
the district police shall act as examiners and enforce the provi- 
sions of this act 

Sect. 6. It shall be the duty of the examiners to notify every 
person operating a boiler or engine mentioned in section one and 
not included among the exceptions therein specified, to apply for a 
license under this act and to give such person a reasonable oppor- 
tunity to take an examination therefor within the town or city in 
which he is engaged in operating such boiler or engine. The ex- 
aminer shall issue a license or shall notify the applicant of his 
rejection within forty-eight hours after his examination. 

Sect. 7. Any person dissatisfied with the action of an exam- 
iner in refusing or in revoking a license may appeal to the chief of 
the district police, whose decision shall be final. 

Sect. 8. Whoever, after being notified as provided in section 
six, intentionally violates the provisions of section one of this act 
shall be punished by fine not exceeding three hundred dollars or 
by imprisonment not exceeding three months. 

Sect. 9. This act shall take effect on the first day of August 
in the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five, and any person 
applying for a license as engineer or fireman on or before that 
date shall be deemed to have complied with the provisions of this 
act until his application is passed upon or rejected by the proper 
authorities. [Approved June 5, 1895. 

[Chapter 546, Acts of 1896.] 

An Act concerning the Licensing of Stationary Engineers 

and Firemen. 
Be U enacted, etc , as follows : 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any person to have charge 
of or to operate a steam boiler or engine in this Commonwealth 
(except locomotive boilers and engines, boilers in private resi- 
dences, boilers used under the jurisdiction of the United States, 
boilers used for agricultural purposes exclusively, boilers of less 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 15 

than eight horse-power, and boilers used for heating purposes only, 
provided with a device approved by the chief of the district police 
limiting the pressure carried to fifteen pounds to the square inch) 
unless he holds a license as hereinafter provided, and it shall be 
unlawful for any owner or user of any steam boiler or engine (other 
than those above excepted) to operate or cause to be operated a 
steam boiler or engine for a period of more than one week without 
a duly licensed engineer or fireman in charge : provided, however, 
that every person who has been employed continuously as a steam 
engineer in this Commonwealth, for the period of five years next 
prior to the passage of this act, and who files with his application 
a certificate of such fact under oath, accompanied by a statement 
from his employer or employers, verifying the same fact, shall be 
entitled to a license without further examination . 

Sect. 2. Any person desiring to act as an engineer or fireman 
shall make application to so act to an examiner of engineers, upon 
blanks to be furnished by the examiner, and if upon examination, 
the applicant is found trustworthy and competent, a license shall 
be granted to htm. Such license shall continue in force for three 
years, unless for a sufficient cause, affecting the trustworthiness or 
competency of the person licensed, and after a hearing, the same 
is sooner revoked ; and the said license, unless so revoked, shall 
at the end of said three years be renewed by an examiner of engi- 
neers, upon application, and without examination. 

Sect. 3. All applications for licenses shall be accompanied by 
a fee of one dollar, and a like sum shall be paid for all renewals 
of licenses. All fees so paid shall be accounted for by the exam- 
iners to the chief of the district police, who shall return the same 
monthly to the treasurer of the Commonwealth. 

Sect. 4. The members of the boiler inspection department of 
the district police shall act as examiners, and shall enforce the 
provisions of this act, and the governor of the Commonwealth is 
authorized to appoint two additional inspectors to act as exam- 
iners of engineers, under this act, at an annual salary of fifteen 
hundred dollars and their actual travelling and necessary expenses. 

Sect. 5. Any person dissatisfied with the action of any exam- 
iner in refusing or revoking a license, may appeal from his decision 
to the five other examiners, who shall together act as a board of 
appeal, and a majority of whom shall have power to hear the par- 
ties and pass upon the subjects of the appeal. The decision of 
said majority of the remaining examiners so acting shall be final, 
if approved by the chief of the district police. 

Sect. 6. It shall be the duty of the examiners to notify every 
person whose names and addresses are known to them, and who 



16 REPORT CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan- 
will require licenses under the provisions of this act, to apply for 
said licenses, and to give such persons a reasonable opportunity 
to be examined within the city or town where they reside or are 
employed. 

Sect. 7. Whoever intentionally violates the provisions of sec- 
tion one of this act shall be punished by a fine not exceeding 
three hundred dollars, or by imprisonment not exceeding three 
months. 

Sect. 8. All acts or parts of acts inconsistent herewith are 
hereby repealed. The provisions of this act, so far as they are 
the same as those of chapter four hundred and seventy-one of 
the acts of the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five, shall be 
construed as a continuation of that chapter and not as new enact- 
ments. 

Sect. 9. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Ap- 
proved June 9 9 1896. 

Licenses will be graded as follows, as provided by section 
3, chapter 471, Acts of 1895 : — 

Sect. 3. Licenses shall be granted according to the competency 
of the applicant, and shall be divided into classes as follows : — 
First Class. Engineers' licenses of this class shall be unlimited 
as to horse power. Second Class. Engineers' licenses of this 
class shall be limited to one hundred and fifty horse power. Third 
Class. Engineers' licenses of this class shall be limited to fifty 
horse power. A fireman's license shall be issued to any person 
who, after having passed an examination, as herein provided, shall 
have been found competent to take charge of or to operate any 
steam boiler or boilers. Any person desiring to operate any par* 
ticular steam plant may so state to the examiner, and he shall be 
examined as to his fitness to operate that particular plant, and 
if found competent and trustworthy shall be granted a license, 
termed a special license, for that particular plant, and such license 
shall be in force for three years. 

By the appointment of additional inspectors it is made 
possible to make such assignments of territory as to promote 
the efficiency of the service in the certification of engineers 
and firemen and the vigilant inspection of steam boilers, 
which it is the object of the law to secure. 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 17 



Summary of Examinations. 

Number of applicants examined, 11,703 

Number of licenses issued, 11,493 

First class 1,029 

Second class, 1,154 

Third class 1,324 

Special, 3,075 

Firemen, ....... 4,182 

Hoisting 729 

Number of licenses refused, 210 

Revoked, 5 



Summary of Inspections. 

Boilers inspected, • . • • . . • • 719 

Number of defects found, 766 

Number of dangerous defects found, .... 454 

Boilers ordered repaired, 155 

Boilers condemned, 19 



Ventilation of Factories, Workshops, School-houses 

and Public Buildings. 

Probably do measure for the welfare of the industrial 
classes has been provided of more immediate and beneficial 
results than those relating to ventilation and general sanitary 
improvement. It is surprising, in view of the discussions 
and investigations which have resulted in much so-called 
labor legislation, that attention was not earlier called to the 
bad conditions of air and imperfect drainage so common and 
pernicious in factories and shops. It was thought that those 
evils were necessarily incident to such employment, and, if 
any attempts were made to ameliorate or remove them, the 
devices were so crude and cumbersome as in most instances 
to be useless. As soon as the facts were better understood 
and intelligently presented, suitable legislation, which also 
embraced school-houses and public buildings, was provided. 

In the public school buildings the imperative necessity for 
better ventilation and sanitary appliances had long been 
manifest; but it was not until the conviction was forced 
upon the attention of the proper authorities that overheating 
and nnderheating of school-houses and the constant breath- 
ing of an atmosphere filled with the germs of disease must 



18 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

be dangerous to health and life that suitable remedies were 
sought. Medical authorities of course have long known 
that something should be done to correct such glaring evils 
in the construction and management of our school buildings. 
The strongest argument for the cleanliness, proper drainage 
and ventilation of such structures comes from them. When 
the community was awakened to the knowledge that the 
sanitary condition of many of our school-houses was intol- 
erable, the way was open to suitable legislation. 



Ventilation practically considered. 

The practicability of ventilating school-rooms admits of no 
doubt. It is as much a matter of exact knowledge as any 
problem in engineering or mathematics. It can be done by 
the aid of power, and may be accomplished by heated shafts 
or by fans. All dependence on natural ventilation should 
be abandoned. The system of mechanical ventilation can be 
relied upon with certainty. By mechanical means a steady 
inflow of pure air, under all conditions and atmospheric 
changes, can be secured. The extra expense for power to 
move air should be recognized, and met without question. 

When so many are inquiring how best to secure good 
ventilation in school and other public buildings, the correct 
methods gained by years of experience should be made 
known. In this matter of ventilation there are compara- 
tively but few who have made it a specialty and have felt it 
necessary to perfect their knowledge. The time has been 
reached when the importance of ventilation is generally ap- 
preciated, and there seems to be a willingness to do some- 
thing for the health and comfort of the pupils in our public 
schools, and it would be a misfortune not to achieve some 
real progress. 

Good ventilation consists in the proper arrangement and 
distribution of the ducts for the incoming and the outgoing 
of the air, and their relation and correspondence with each 
other, that the perfect removal of the foul air and the thor- 
ough diffusion of the fresh air will be secured. How to 
supply the occupants of school-rooms or crowded apartments 
with the proper quantity and quality of air has not always 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 19 

received the attention its merits demand. Something, how- 
ever, during the past few years has been done towards an 
intelligent solution of the problem. To know how much air 
is needed for a given number of pupils in a school-room and 
to supply it by exact mechanical measurement is now no 
secret. 

In former reports I have explained some of the methods 
advocated and in operation in school buildings in the State. 
One of the methods or systems concerns itself only with 
supplying air, leaving it to make its way out through ducts 
provided for that purpose. This is done by means of fans 
or blowers forcing the air into the room. It is the plenum 
method. Another system or method advocated is directed 
to the extraction of the foul air by natural laws, requiring no 
mechanical means, depending upon the difference between 
the external and internal temperature, — or, in other words, 
the tendency of warm air to rise. 

In our experience of the past eight years we have found 
that the interior temperature of foul-air ducts is practically 
the same as that of the room. The changes in the tempera- 
ture are so frequent and the velocity of the wind so various, 
that, unless additional heat is applied to the duct, the power 
of the duct or shaft to draw air from the room will fail in 
many instances to cause upward motion enough to be meas- 
ured by the anemometer. 

The ways of adapting the means to the end in furnishing 
to and removing air from crowded rooms are not questions of 
experiment. The size of ducts, shafts, etc., their location in 
the rooms and their distribution are not at the present time 
severe problems. The questions, " Shall the fresh air be 
taken in at the floor or at the ceiling?" or "Will an up- 
ward or a downward movement in the air work to the 
best advantage?" have been settled upon principles which 
are available for the practical solution of the problem of 
ventilation. 

For the effective working of any system of artificial ven- 
tilation it is imperatively required that proper provisions 
should be made to promote air currents in the right direc- 
tion, and first in the fresh-air inlet, — the supply of fresh, 
pare air from pure external sources. The size of this fresh- 



20 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

air inlet is of great importance. In many instances when 
provided in our public buildings it has been found to be too 
small. The warming of the incoming fresh air should be 
considered at this point. Varieties of heating appliances 
are in use for the purpose of warming the air, two of which 
I will mention, — the hot-air furnace and the high-pressure 
or low-pressure steam apparatus. 

As I have stated in former reports, the best mode of heat* 
ing is that in which the air is drawn from without the build- 
ing and passed through coils of pipe filled either with steam 
or hot water. Having a supply of fresh air properly warmed 
and ready for distribution, how should it be delivered to the 
rooms where it is required ? Experience has demonstrated 
the fact that the best results are obtained by placing the 
fresh-air inlets six or eight feet above the floor level, and in 
the walls central in the building. In our observations it has 
been seen that, where fresh-air inlets are so located and the 
warm air admitted unimpaired above the heads of the persons 
occupying the room, a much less supply is needed to secure 
the freshness of what is breathed than would be necessary if 
the air were brought first to the feet, to become mixed with 
foul currents. It has also been observed that there is a 
better circulation of air when the foul air is drawn to the 
floor level. To bring fresh air to the face to be breathed 
before it sweeps the body is quite important. 

Of equal importance are the outlets for the removal of 
vitiated air. Foul-air outlets should be placed as near the 
fresh-air inlet as practicable, and at the level of the floor. 
The ducts or pipes conveying fresh air to the room should be 
of sufficient size and registers ample to admit a large volume 
of air at a low degree of temperature. 

During the past year the requests for information on the 
subject of beating and ventilating school-houses and other 
public buildings have been frequent. That all interested in 
this important subject who may desire the benefit of the ex- 
perience of this department may have the same, I present 
in this portion of my report details of construction of different 
methods of ventilation, submitted to me by the inspectors 
specially assigned to this scientific branch of our inspection 
work. 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 21 



Description of Plans for Ventilation of Four-room School* 
house, as designed bt inspector john t. white. 

In compliance with yonr request, I have the honor to submit 
herewith plans for the ventilation of a small school building, show- 
ing how the best results have been obtained in such buildings in 
my district during the last two years. I have adopted a plan very 
similar to the one made by me for your report of 1894, for the 
reason that it is for buildings of this class that information is most 
required by school authorities and local contractors. 

In the plans now submitted I have shown how such a building 
may be heated and ventilated by the use of either steam or furnaces. 
The heating as shown on the floor plans is by steam, the four 
principal rooms being heated entirely by indirect radiation, and 
the corridors, teachers' rooms and sanitaries by direct radiation. 
There is a foot warmer in the lower corridor floor, but, as the air 
is taken from the corridor to the radiator, the effect is the same as 
in direct work. 

Most of the larger school-houses are now heated by steam and 
many of them are ventilated by mechanical means, but in buildings 
of from four to eight rooms gravity systems are most used, be- 
cause they are simpler and require less expensive janitor service. 
This last is in many smaller towns an important matter. 

Hot-air furnaces are cheaper than steam in first cost, and if 
properly set up may not be more expensive in fuel. In the plan 
shown the small cast-iron sectional boiler is as safe and easily 
cared for as a furnace, and requires no special skill beyond that 
possessed by any intelligent janitor. 

The plans sufficiently show the general arrangement of the 
rooms, and in this respect need no description. 

On Plate No. 1 is shown a plan of the basement, location of 
boilers, fresh-air room, fuel room, ventilating chimney and san- 
itaries. 

The sanitaries are of the best modern make, and are ventilated, 
as shown, by an undergrade duct to a special flue in the chimney. 

The large boiler is a steel return tubular, of thirty horse-power. 
The small one is a sectional cast-iron boiler, of sufficient size to 
heat all parts of the building except the four main rooms. These 
boilers are so arranged that the large one may heat the whole 
building, including the ventilating chimney, or it may be used 
to heat the school-rooms only, and the other portions be heated 
by the small boiler. If furnaces are used in place of steam coils 
for heating the school-rooms, as shown on Plate No. 4, the small 
boiler will still be used for the other work. 



22 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

Usually in such buildings there are, in addition to the furnaces 
required to heat the school-rooms, a separate furnace for the cor- 
ridors and a " stack heater" for the vent flues ; thus there are two 
additional fires, and an increased danger to the building. By the 
arrangement shown, the fires are all in one room and remote from 
the stairways, and in every way safer and easier to care for than 
as usually planned. 

Plate No. 2 shows the plan of the first floor. The ventilating 
registers from rooms and corridors are shown and marked. 

The two registers in the floor of the passage between the 
school-rooms open directly into the fresh-air room. Under these 
registers there should be tin-lined trap doors. When the schools 
are not in session the outside windows to the fresh-air rooms can 
be closed and these trap doors opened, thus taking the air down to 
the radiators and returning it, heated, to the rooms. Of course at 
such times the valves in the ventilating flues should be closed. In 
this way the building is ventilated only while occupied, about six 
hours a day, and the heating necessary at other hours is done 
practically by the direct method, which is the most economical 
yet devised. There should be from 360 to 400 feet of surface 
radiation for each school-room, in two separately piped stacks for 
each room, and from 20 to 25 square feet in each vent flue. 

On Plate No. 3 are sectional drawings of the steam coils, 
warm-air ducts and ventilating chimney. These drawings also 
show the sizes and arrangement of the warm-air and foul-air 
ducts, mixing valves and dampers. The scale of feet is marked 
on each plate. 

On Plate No. 4 is a plan of a portion of the basement, showing 
furnaces in place of the steam radiators, with sectional drawings 
of furnaces and hot-air ducts. The method of removing the viti- 
ated air from the building is precisely the same, whether the 
school-rooms are heated by steam or furnaces, the small boiler 
being used in both cases. There is also shown on this plate a 
sectional view of the foot warmer. 

The manner of admitting the outside air to the furnaces or steam 
radiators, the size, form and arrangement of the ducts and valves 
and the location of the inlets for fresh air to the rooms and the 
outlets for foul air are all important, and it should be borne in 
mind by all parties interested that if the best results are desired in 
the ventilation of a building the main features of the scheme 
should be laid out by the architect when the building is planned. 
It may be as difficult to properly ventilate a building that is 
planned without regard to such work as it would be to secure 
good egress from one that was planned without stairways. 



, 




1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 23 

The following plans and description are by Inspector 
Joseph A. Moore, and are intended for a two-story, eight- 
room grammar school building, to be constructed of red 
brick, with granite trimmings and slated roof: — 

Tbere are four school and two smaller rooms on each floor, with 
a long, well-lighted corridor extending the entire length of the 
building, with entrances and vestibules at each end. The build- 
ing is set well above grade, to give a good basement. 

Tbe corner rooms are each 32 by 28 feet and 12 feet high, in- 
tended for 49 pupils. The centre rooms are 32 by 30 by 12 feet, 
and 56 pupils can be accommodated, although for larger pupils 49 
would be better. 

The two centre rooms in the second story can be thrown into 
one, by means of rolling partitions, if desired. Between the 
rooms are closets with doors opening to rooms each side. 

Book cases can be placed in the space between the heating and 
ventilating shafts. No platforms are used, but a table desk is 
provided for the teacher. 

The corridors are 15 feet wide, and serve also as clothing rooms, 
being provided with stout wire screens, on which the clothing is 
hung. Wire shelves are also provided, about 9 inches above the 
floor. Under these wire shelves are two lines of one and one- 
quarter inch steam pipe, for drying clothing in stormy weather. 
Vestibules at each end prevent rapid cooling of the corridors. 
The stairways are six feet wide, railed and well separated from 
each other. At the rear of the corridors are two small rooms on 
each floor, those on the lower floor being for sanitaries, and on the 
upper floor one for the teachers, the other for the master, each be- 
ing provided with toilet appliances. The doors opening from the 
school-rooms to the corridors each have a light of heavy plate 
glass, placed high enough so the pupils when seated cannot look 
into the corridors. Midway in each corridor is placed a hand 
bowl, with two faucets and drinking cups. Above the bowl is a 
mirror. 

There are two inside stairways and two outside entrances to the 
basement, which is 12 feet high, except the boiler room, which is 
2 feet deeper, to give a good distance between the water line in 
the boilers and the radiators. In the basement, which is concreted 
and covered with rock asphalt or Portland cement, are rooms for 
the boilers, coal, janitor and fan ; also two fresh-air chambers and 
four other rooms, two being for boys and two for girls, for use at 
recess in stormy weather. If desired, one can be fitted for manual 
training or gymnasium and one for cooking-school purposes. In 



24 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



the basement corridors can be placed bicycle racks or stalls. U 
desired, lunch rooms can be provided, having Russia iron closeUj 
through which pass steam pipes for warming lunches. 

Double windows are provided, except in the boiler room, fa^| 
room and fresh-air chambers. The expense of double window! 
will be more than repaid by the saving in fuel, and also by preJ 
venting rapid precipitation of air in extremely cold weather. I 
very warm weather they can, by lowering the inner window at th 
top and raising the outside one at the bottom, be made useful ii 
preventing too strong drafts on windy days. 

If desired, the attic can be used for drill purposes, by puttin 
on a high .roof and continuing the two stairways up. 

Fire-stops to be provided in accordance with the requirement 
of this department. 

The entire basement to be plastered on expanded metal lath in 
which it would be advisable to use throughout the whole buildin 

If desirable, the wood finish in the corridors may be omitte 
and white or cream-colored faced brick used, or a good smoo 
brick used and painted with light paint. 

The building to be heated with two horizontal tubular boile 
48 inches diameter, 15 feet 3 inches long, having 49 three-in 
tubes, 14 feet long. A supplementary boiler is 36 inches in diam 
ter, 9 feet 3 inches long and having 34 two and one-half in 
tubes, 8 feet long. This smaller boiler is for running the fan e 
gine and furnishing heat for the vent shafts when it is not desir 
to fire the large boilers. The heating is to be by a low-pressu 
double-pipe system, with indirect steam for supplying fresh a 
to the school-rooms and direct steam to the corridors, teache 
rooms, sanitaries and basement; the basement being heated 
steam pipes placed near the ceiling, the exhaust steam from t! 
engine being used in one and one-quarter inch pipes placed abo 
and in front of the fan. 

The supply and return pipes being of large diameters, proper 
pitched, graded and dripped, to secure the free and noiseless r 
turn of the water of condensation to the large boilers by gravit 
expensive and complicated pumps, traps or other appliances a 
avoided. If desired, the condensed steam from the small boil 
after passing through the engine and heating pipes in the fan roo 
may be conducted directly outside the building, or from the engi 
without passing through the pipe heater. However, if desired, 
pump, pump governor and grease separator can be provided f 
the small boiler. All the boilers are to be so piped and valv 
that either one or all may be used at the same time, and a differe 
pressure may be carried on the large boilers from that on the sm« 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 25 

boiler. When desired to use the large boilers at a very low press- 
ure for heating the building, the small boiler may be used at a 
higher one for running the fan and heating the vent shafts. When 
desired, the fan and vent shaft heaters may also be run from the 
large boilers. The engine for running the fan to be run on not 
exceeding fifteen-pound pressure and the fan at not exceeding 
one hundred and sixty revolutions per minute ; large cylinders of 
short stroke are provided. 

The fan is intended to furnish 40 cubic feet of fresh air per 
minute for each pupil and teacher. By increasing the speed, 50 
cubic feet may be had. 

It is intended that either a fan or gravity system can be used, 
as desired. During a greater part of the time the fresh air can be 
supplied by the gravity system, but there are times, during mild, 
calm or damp weather, when the fan can be used to better advan- 
tage. When the fan is used, the windows in the fan room are 
opened, the windows in the fresh-air chambers closed and the air 
passed through the fan and exhaust steam pipes, through the 
galvanized-iron ducts into the fresh-air, chambers, through the 
radiators in the fresh-air chambers into the .ducts to the several 
school-rooms. When the gravity system is used, the fan room is 
shut off and the windows in the fresh-air chambers opened. By 
this arrangement the building can be supplied with fresh, warm 
air without danger of having the supply shut off and the building 
warmed by direct radiation, as has been the case with some elab- 
orately devised schemes, when the fan could not be run. In such 
cases the pupils have been compelled to breathe air as bad as in an 
unventilated building, especially when the outlets were obstructed 
by worse than useless flap valves or similar devices. 

In the fan room are placed lines of one and one-quarter inch 

pipes, about 2 inches below the openings into the galvanized-iron 

ducts leading to the fresh-air chambers. These pipes use the 

exhaust steam from the engine for warming the air which is forced 

np and through them by the fan, and which then passes into the 

galvanized-iron ducts. The radiators in the fresh-air chambers 

are of the Bundy Newport or other equally good pattern, set up 

4£ inches on centres, to give free passage for the air. When 

radiators of the gold pin or of other extended surface pattern are 

used, the results are not as satisfactory, as the free passage of the 

air is obstructed by the radiators being placed too close together. 

In many cases what would have been first class has been made 

second or third class work from this cause. The tops of these 

radiators are placed 1 inch below the openings into the warm-air 

ducts, which openings should be of the full area of these ducts. 






26 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

At the bottom of each warm-air duct an opening is left, not less 
in size than the area of the duct. This is for admitting cool air 
for mixing with the warm air that passes through the radiators. 

A mixing valve is provided, to be moved by a chain (No. 2 
safety pattern), held in place by a catch in the school-room. By 
a slight movement of this mixing valve the temperature can be 
easily controlled by the teacher. The practice of some teachers, 
of throwing the valve wide open and then closing it tightly, should 
be condemned ; a gradual movement, say about one inch at a time, 
wii give far better results. If automatic temperature regulators 
are used on these mixing valves, they should be of a pattern which 
gradually moves the valve, and not of a kind that throws the 
valve wide open or closes it tightly with a quick movement. 
In the warm-air inlet to each school-room should be placed, about 
three-quarters the distance up from the bottom to the top, a four- 
inch-dial metallic thermometer, to enable the teacher to see the 
temperature of the incoming air. Similar thermometers should be 
placed in the side of the galvanized-iron ducts leading from fan 
room to fresh-air chambers. A piece of ribbon one-quarter inch 
wide and eight inches long, tied just below the thermometer on 
the inlet grating, will enable the teacher to judge the velocity of 
the incoming air* 

The warm-air ducts are 24 by 30 inches in area. The openings 
into the school-rooms are 30 by 36 inches, and are covered with a 
wire grill or screen, made of one-eighth inch iron, one and one-half 
inch diamond mesh, set in a channel iron frame. The use of cast- 
iron register faces reduces the area of the openings one-third, 
besides causing more friction. When the warm-air inlets into a 
room are properly located and of sufficient size, the use of worth- 
less and useless diffusers and deflectors is entirely obviated, and 
these unsightly and costly devices can well be dispensed with. 

In all cases the radiators in the fresh-air chambers should be 
placed on the front side of the warm-air duct, and the cool air 
should pass up on the back part of the duct ; by doing this, uncom- 
fortable drafts will be avoided when cool air is let into the room. 
Strict attention to this will be well repaid by the results obtained. 

By allowing beams to project down below the ceiling, the air 
will be deflected and bad results often obtained. All school-room 
ceilings should be smooth and unbroken by projections. When 
the warm-air ducts are smoothed up inside with adamant plaster, 
better results are obtained than when the brick ducts are laid up 
rough and uneven. 

In each fresh-air chamber there are for each school-room 380 
square feet of radiation, single banked, and divided into tiro 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 27 

stacks, one of 160 and one of 220 square feet of surface. The 
radiators for each room are separated by galvanized-iron parti- 
tions, extending down to 15 inches below the bottom of the radia- 
tors, which are entirely open at the bottom. 

The galvanized-iron ducts leading from the fan room to fresh- 
air chambers are 24 by 60 inches in cross section, and are each 
provided with an adjustable damper, to regulate the air supply to 
either fresh-air chamber, or cut it off altogether. By using adjust- 
ing or cut-off dampers at each warm-air inlet in the fresh-air cham- 
bers, the supply can be regulated for each room, or cut off entirely 
from any room not in use. 

In the floor of the two closets between the school-rooms in the 
first story is placed a floor register, connecting directly with the 
fresh-air chamber below it. This is for rotating air at night and 
when the schools are not in session, and also to warm up the 
school-rooms quickly in the morning before school opens. Under 
no conditions should these registers be used when the schools 
are in session. By opening these registers and the school-room 
doors and closing the vent shaft outlets and also the windows in 
fresh-air chambers, the air can be rotated when the rooms are not 
occupied, and a considerable saving can be made in fuel ; or, if 
desired, all the doors from the school-rooms and into the basement 
and fresh-air chambers can be opened, and the air rotated in that 
way. The under sides of these rotating registers are provided 
with tin-covered trap doors that open down into the fresh-air 
chambers and can be opened and closed, as also can the inlet 
windows, by cord and pulley. 

The entire tops of the fan room and fresh-air chambers should 
be covered by extra coverings of non-heat-conducting incombusti- 
ble material, to prevent the cold passing up through the floor of 
the first story to the school-rooms. If not well protected, the floor 
over them will be cold. 

In the corridors, teachers' rooms and sanitaries the heating is by 
direct steam. There are two floor registers in the lower corridor 
for foot warmers, the air being rotated. Each corridor has two 
vent ducts, in each of which is placed 30 square feet of one and 
one-quarter inch pipe radiation. Each corridor vent opening is 
provided with a wire grill of the same pattern as in the school- 
rooms, also with a curved galvanized-iron damper and chain to 
regulate or shut off the outflow of air. 

With a good exhaust, the leakage of air into the corridors will 
be sufficient to keep them in a fresh condition. The leakage of 
air in buildings, as shown by hundreds of tests by inspectors, is 
often very surprising, and is a matter commonly overlooked by 



28 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

engineers in planning ventilation. It can be turned to good ac- 
count in corridors, etc., where there is a good exhaust. 

The basement rooms are also provided with similar bat smaller 
openings into the same ducts that serve for the corridors. 

Each sanitary room is provided with a vent register, with valves 
in the floor and leading down through a brick duct to a twenty-four 
inch round Akron pipe, laid well underground outside the building 
and leading into the base of the brick shaft which encloses the 
boiler smoke stack. Sixty square feet of pipe radiation are also 
placed in this shaft, just above the level of the first floor, for use 
when the large boilers are not fired up. In the bottom panel of 
each door leading from the corridor into the sanitary rooms is 
placed a wire grill or fancy register face, to allow air to be drawn 
from the corridor into the sanitary rooms. There being a stronger 
exhaust from the sanitary rooms than from the corridors, and no 
air being forced into the sanitary rooms by a fan, a plenum condi- 
tion cannot exist, and the foul odors will not be driven into the 
corridors and school-rooms, as is sometimes the case when a plenum 
condition exists in the sanitaries. Neither will cold air fall down 
a vent shaft directly into this room, and, after being warmed 
there, the odors be carried up into the school-rooms through an 
air duct if the fan is not running, as is the case in some buildings. 
The flooring in the sanitary rooms is of rock asphalt. Each closet 
seat is vented, and the vent carried in one large duct (not shown 
in drawings) to the vent shaft. The plumbing is of the open or 
exposed pattern, and well trapped. Automatic flushing is pro- 
vided. Soil pipes, well trapped, pass down and outside the build- 
ing, underground, to sewer, or, if no sewerage is provided, to large 
double cesspools. The divisions between closets being raised eight 
inches above the floor and on metal standards allow thorough clean- 
ing and washing out. The heating is by four rows of one and 
one-quarter inch steam pipe, placed on the walls back of closets, 
which are placed away from the walls, to guard against freezing 
and also to provide space for soil and vent pipes. Urinal has 
automatic flush and discharge pipes, and is well trapped. The 
bowls in corridors and teachers' rooms are also well trapped and 
ventilated, as is also the sink in janitor's room in basement. 
Wood finish is not provided in sanitary rooms, the brick walls 
being painted. 

Separate vent ducts are provided for each school-room, and are 
24 by 30 inches in area. They are placed in the inner angle of 
the rooms, with openings level with the floor. The openings are 
26 inches high by 30 inches wide, and covered with wire screens 
or grills similar to those over the inlets. 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 29 

Inside each school-room vent duct and about 1 foot above the 
top of the opening from the room are placed 20 square feet of one 
and one-quarter inch steam pipe radiation, for causing an outflow 
of vitiated air. This radiation is made into a coil and placed the 
long way of the duct, the header being along the front and the 
pipes running up and inclining at about an angle of sixty degrees 
towards the back, each coil being provided with a one-inch return 
pipe and an automatic air valve. 

Valves for shutting off the steam are placed in the basement. 
A curved galvanized- iron damper, well wired and stiffened, is 
provided for each vent opening. These are operated with a 
chain and catch to regulate the outflow of air. In moderate 
weather they should be kept wide open when school is in ses- 
sion, but in very cold or very windy weather they may require 
to be kept partly closed. They should be closed at night in such 
weather. 

In very cold and very windy weather it may not be required to 
have steam on the vent heaters ; but the higher the outside tem- 
perature and stiller the air, the more heat will be required in the 
vent heaters. 

By using the galvanized-iron dampers instead of flap valves or 
similar devices much better results will be obtained. The use 
of automatic flap valves cannot be too strongly condemned, as 
they obstruct the outward flow of vitiated air, and are often closed 
when they should be open and open when they should be closed. 
At times they make a very objectionable noise, by rapidly opening 
and closing when the wind is strong. 

Vent ducts not heated or connected with an exhaust fan are not 
to be relied upon to properly carry away the vitiated air under the 
various conditions of wind and temperature. 

The top of brick vent shafts should be carried well above the 
ridge of the building, and should be open and unobstructed by 
caps or coverings. Placing them where they will be under or 
near towers or projections should be carefully avoided, to prevent 
reverse drafts caused by deflected air currents. 

The warm-air ducts where they enter a room should be curved 
at top and bottom of the opening, and it is advisable to bevel 
the sides of these inlets, to give better direction and reduce the 
velocity of incoming air. 

For details of ducts, mixing valves and dampers, see drawings 
by Inspector John T. White. 

The following plans, drawn by Inspector F. W. Merriam, 
show the method of heating and ventilating the Johnson 



30 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

* 

school, North Adams, Mass. (Edwin Thayer Barlow, 
architect) : — 

Tbe building is two stories in height, of local brick with brown 
stone trimmings and standing lock metal roof. The basement 
contains two large, well-lighted playrooms, the motor, boiler and 
fuel rooms. The first and second stories each have four class 
rooms, stairway and coat-rack corridors, toilet and sanitary rooms, 
the latter in first story connecting with playrooms by separate 
stairs. The seoond story has in addition an office, teachers' room 
and two large storage or supply closets. The roof story has an 
assembly hall and ample storage space. The arrangement of 
stairs and division of basement and corridors is such that each 
class room and the assembly hall have two separate ways of egress, 
and the boiler, fuel and sanitary rooms are all located in an annex. 

The heating is by steam, from two horizontal tubular boilers, 
connected so either or both may be nsed. The radiation for the 
class rooms is all indirect, elsewhere direct surface. 

The ventilating of the main building is by an exhaust fan in 
ventilating flue, driven by an electric motor. The connections of 
class rooms with the ventilating flue are down, thence by under- 
ground ducts in basement, while those of corridors and the assem- 
bly hall are direct. The sanitary rooms and toilets are ventilated 
by gravity or mechanical means, as desired, the flues connecting 
both with the boiler and ventilating fines. 

Referring to the plates, the basement plan shows boilers, piping, 
indirect radiation with fresh air connections, and underground 
ducts and returns. The first, second and roof story floor plans 
locate the warm or fresh air inlets, tbe outlets and direct radiation. 
In the sectional views, AA is through one section of flues and BB 
a cross section through warm or fresh air flues and the indirect 
radiation and chamber for the first-story room, together showing 
the general arrangement and the manner of controlling the mixing 
valves from both the rooms, and the front of their respective radi- 
ator or heating chambers. CC is through one section of heating 
chambers, the fresh-air room and connection with underground 
return, and DD a cross section through the foul-air or exhaust 
flues and the connection of that from the first-story room with 
the underground duct and return, together showing the method 
for returning the air from the rooms to the heating chambers, 
if desired, for heating when the rooms are unoccupied. ££ is 
through ventilating, boiler and sanitary vent flues, showing the 
exhaust fan, shafting, pulley and bearings, and the connections of 
the boiler, smoke pipe, underground duct, corridors, assembly hall 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 81 

and the sanitary vent flues, the latter, by means of switch valves, 
being operated from the motor room in the basement. 

The requirements of the heating and ventilating apparatus are, to 
exhaust from the building whenever the fan is running at maximum 
speed not less than 20,000 cubic feet of air per minute, properly 
divided at the different outlets, and to maintain a temperature in 
class rooms, coat-rack corridors, assembly hall and sanitary rooms 
of 70° F., and in stairway, corridors and basement of 65° F., in 
coldest weather. 

The following plans, drawn by Inspector Joseph M. Dyson, 
show the method of heating and ventilating the New Union 
Church, Worcester, Mass. : — 

The cut and floor plans of the New Union Church, Worcester 
(Earle & Fisher, architects), which society is the first in this dis- 
trict to practically adopt a modern system of ventilation, are worthy 
of description. 

This is one of the largest and most complete Congregational 
churches in the State. The main auditorium, cruciform in plan, 
has a seating capacity of 1,000 on the main floor, with a liberal 
space for passageways, and with gallery only over the front vesti- 
bule. The platform occupies the central space of an apse 45 feet 
wide, with choir space sufficient for a large chorus choir around 
and raised above it. The church has an open timber roof finishing 
to the ridge. To the south is the parish house and the chapel. 
The latter is 35 by 50 feet, with open timber roof. The parish 
house has an area of 55 by 67 feet, and comprises on the first floor 
a Sunday-school room 34 by 59 feet, extending up two stories, 
with flanking class rooms in each story ; a ladies' parlor, 28 by 35 
feet, in first story ; and an infant class room of the same size over 
it, with large rooms for social purposes in the basement. The 
building is Gothic in style, with the exterior of pink Milford 
granite, relieved by brown stone, with red slate roof, and is 
throughout very substantial in construction, with very little wood 
except in floors and roofs. The interior finish is oak and the walls 
richly decorated, built by the Webb Granite and Construction 
Company of Worcester. 

The heating and ventilation are by the blower system, installed 
by O. S. Kendall & Co. of Worcester. Steam is taken from two 
50 horse-power horizontal tubular boilers, located in the basement 
where indicated on the plan, only a small amount of direct surface 
being used, to heat the toilets, galleries and rooms in the towers. 
The other parts of the building are warmed by a 22 section heater, 



32 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

containing 8,400 linear feet of one-inch pipe. Fresh air is taken 
in from three openings on the north side of the church, and drawn 
through the large heater into a room provided for the purpose by 
a 9 feet 10 inches fan. This fan has three-quarter inch steel plate 
housing, and is connected to a system of galvanized-iron pipes, 
shown on the basement plan, which conveys the warm air to the 
different parts of the building, each branch provided with dampers, 
so that it can be partially or wholly shut off, as may be desired. 
The fan is driven by a 20 horse-power electric motor, belted 
directly to the pulley on fan, speed regulated as desired, conden- 
sation returned to the boiler by automatic pump. The system of 
piping from the boilers and valves is so arranged that one or both 
boilers can be used, as may be required. The foul air in the Sun- 
day-school rooms and the main auditorium is taken into two large 
ventilating ducts in the rear of the apse. The smoke stack passes 
through one of these, and the other has a steam coil for the purpose 
of ventilation in cold weather ; also in each flue there is placed an 
arrangement so that they will be heated by gas in warm weather, 
providing for a complete change of air throughout the entire build- 
ing once every twenty minutes, and for a thorough warming of the 
whole structure in zero weather, with a guarantee to do the same. 

Improvements at State Normal School, Framingham, 

Mass. 

At the last session of the General Court an appropriation 
was granted for the purpose of building an electric light 
plant and improving the heating and ventilating of May, 
Crocker and Normal halls. 

Several sets of plans were submitted, and those of the 
Huey Brothers, No. 4 Oliver Street, Boston, were accepted, 
being deemed most complete, all things considered. This 
work has been completed and is very satisfactory. The 
accompanying plan and description will give a clear idea 
of what has been accomplished : — 

Light Plant. 

A power house, 76 by 34 feet, with a chimney 88 feet high, has 
been built 20 feet to the rear of May hall, and divided iuto work- 
shop, engine and dynamo room, store, boiler and fan rooms. 

In the boiler room are placed three horizontal tubular boilers, 
two of 80 and one of 30 horse-power, together with the injector, 
pump and receiver. These boilers are so arranged that any one 



1 



1 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 33 

may be ran at will, the smaller one being especially intended for 
summer use. The coal is brought to the fire room by means of a 
car and track, and weighed on platform scales and a record kept. 

The shop is fitted with forge, anvil and an engine lath driven 
by 1 horse-power motor, making a fully equipped shop for any 
repairing which may be required. 

The store-room is for general stores, such as oil, lamps, etc. 

Engines. 

# 

In the engine room are placed two direct-connected Mcintosh & 
Seymore engines, with general electric dynamos, one a 35 K. W. 
and one a 25 K. W. These machines are connected with a marble 
switch board 6 by 6 feet, on which are placed switches for the 
various buildings, the system being so arranged that one machine 
will always be in reserve in case of accident to the other. The 
engines are equipped with all the latest devices, such as separators, 
grease extractors, etc. The exhaust steam is used through a feed 
water heater and a tempering coil in the fan chamber. 

Heating and Ventilating Mat Hall. 

The heating and ventilating of May hall is by the double me- 
chanical system. A fan 8 feet in diameter, and driven by a 15 
horse-power electric motor, is placed in the fan room, and at 160 
revolutions per minute delivers 40,000 cubic feet of air through a 
galvanized-iron duct 96 by 36 inches, to the various up-takes to 
the different rooms. Four exhaust fans with direct-connected 
electric motors are placed in the four vent shafts in the attic, 
as shown on the detail plan. 

A preliminary heater (or tempering coil) of 6,000 feet of one- 
inch pipe is placed in the fan room, one-half of which is connected 
with the exhaust steam from the engine, the other half direct to 
boiler pressure, on which is placed one of the Johnson Company's 
thermostatic valves, which controls the air delivered by the fan at 
70°. At the base of each up-take to each of the several rooms 
is placed a supplementary heater of 60 square feet, which is also 
controlled by a thermostat from each of the respective rooms. 
A by-pass 6onnfection to the supplementary heaters is so arranged 
that they can be run at night on the gravity system. 

The air is delivered in the usual manner 8 feet above the floor, 
with the ventilation at the floor, curved dampers being placed in 
each of the ventilating outlets, the usual diamond guards being 
fitted in each inlet and outlet. The sanitaries are ventilated by 
an 18 inch fan with direct-connected electric motor, This fan is 



34 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

connected by galvanized-iron pipe to the local or seat vents, so that 
the ventilation of these rooms is down through the seats. 

Crocker and Normal Halls. 

These buildings were originally heated by hot water, with " Gur- 
ney " and " Perfect" heaters. With the present system steam is 
carried at boiler pressure to them in conduits, in which are placed 
the electric light and telephone wires, and connected with three 80 
horse-power National feed water heaters, the steam being con- 
nected with the brass coil, the water in the system circulating 
around the coil. The temperature of this water is controlled from 
130° to 212° by Powers No. 9 regulators, as the outside tempera- 
ture may demand. The water of condensation from these heaters 
is returned to the receiving tank in the boiler room, and thence 
through the feed water heater in the engine room to boilers at 
210°. In the attic of Crocker hall are placed three direct-con- 
nected electric fans. All the fans and motors have regulating 
speed rheostats, and they are perfectly noiseless in their operation. 

Telephone System. 

A private telephone system has also been put in, with intercom- 
municating instruments, one in each of the halls and one in the 
engine room. Everything has been designed and executed with 
the very best skill, convenience and economy being the cardinal 
principles. 

Tenement-house Clothing. 

The efforts of the inspectors to make effective the provi- 
sions of chapter 508, sections 44-48, relating to the manu- 
facture and sale of clothing made in unhealthy places, have 
met with a measure of success that it is gratifying to record. 
The wisdom of the law has been fully shown, and its faith- 
ful enforcement by the inspectors assigned to this special 
duty has secured the results intended. 

From the reports received I find as follows : — 

Number of licenses outstanding Oct. 1, 1895, . . 988 
Number of licenses granted during 1896, • . , 453 

Total number of licenses granted, . . • • 1,391 
Number of licenses revoked during 1896, . . . 519 

Number of licenses outstanding Oct. 1, 1896, . • 872 
Total number of tenements visited during the current 
year, .......... 2,624 



\. •>/ 






I 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 35 

Inspector Griffin reports : — 

No serious difficulty presented itself during the year in enforc- 
ing the law governing the manufacture and sale of clothing in 
unhealthy places, and it is worthy of notice that the home manu- 
facture of men's and boys' clothing in this State is now almost 
entirely confined to the finishing of trousers. While the home 
manufacture of ladies' wrappers, waists, aprons and children's 
dresses shows a slight increase over last year, yet they are mostly 
made by an intelligent and clean class of people, living in the 
suburbs and occupying good, healthy homes. The license section 
of the law has been very effective in compelling cleanliness among 
home workers, preventing the manufacture of clothing where dis- 
ease exists, and could hardly be improved upon. The sending by 
the Board of Health of a daity list of all places where contagious 
and infectious diseases exist has enabled us to promptly prevent 
clothing being sent to such places, and to insure the proper disin- 
fection of any such clothing if found therein. The strict enforce- 
ment of the law has checked all attempts that from time to time 
have been made to establish tenement-house workshops. 

The regular tailor shops are for the best part in good condition, 
although considerable trouble has been met with in having many 
of them keep their floors and water-closets clean enough. How- 
ever, this trouble has hardly been serious or great enough to war- 
rant further legislation. In conclusion, it can be positively as- 
serted that, while we look for still greater improvement, yet, 
through the strict and just enforcement of our present law, there 
is no State in the Union wherein olothing is made under more 
healthful conditions than in Massachusetts. 

Inspector Plunkett reports : — 

I have experienced no difficulty in enforcing the law relating to 
the manufacture and sale of tenement-house clothing in my district 
during the year. The few violations of its provisions relating to 
tenement-house workshops were due to ignorance of its require- 
ments, which were complied with without recourse to prosecution. 

The most beneficial improvements accomplished were due to the 
enforcement of the license clause of the law. In fact, the only 
labor performed on men's and boys' clothing in private families 
under this regulation is the finishing or hand-sewing on trousers. 
A great many licenses have been granted to persons engaged in 
making children's dresses, wrappers, overalls and underwear, the 
great majority of whom reside in the suburbs and towns of the 
district, in clean and healthful homes. During the year access to 



36 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

the records of the boards of health has been cheerfully given 
where necessary, by means of which information of the occurrence 
of contagious diseases in any building in which a license bad been 
granted was gained ; bat ia this connection I am pleased to state 
that parties to whom a license had been granted have complied 
with the requirements imposed, and have immediately notified me. 

Steam and Hand Laundries. 

Safeguards against injury from machinery, insufficient ven- 
tilation, hours of labor and disease, consequent on marking 
and sorting clothing in washing, ironing and drying rooms 
in laundries, have received special attention. 

It will be seen, by the report of Inspectress Fanny B. 
Ames, that the methods adopted and the precautions taken 
in the laundries visited by her reduce to a minimum the 
possible exposure of the employees to contagious diseases. 

Mrs. Ames reports : — 

I have, at your request, made a special inspection of several 
steam laundries, employing from 50 to 100 women, and also of 
several small so-called hand laundries, with reference to the possi- 
ble exposure of the women employed to contagion from disease 
and to vermin from filthy lodging-bouse washing. 

I find that all clothing brought into a laundry first passes under 
the hands of " markers." These persons are certainly exposed to 
such vermin and disease as the clothing contains ; but, though I 
was given entire freedom to talk separately and alone to the 
women employed, I could not find that any of them had ever 
suffered from getting vermin on their persons or from disease 
contracted in the laundry. Later inquiries of the officials of the 
Board of Health establish the fact that their precautions against 
the spread of infectious diseases by clothing or bedding would re- 
duce the danger to a minimum. 

It would be well, perhaps, that laundries, as well as school 
and clothing inspectors, should receive daily notification of places 
where there are infectious or contagious diseases, and be warned 
not to receive washings from such places till first disinfected by 
the Board of Health. 

After the process of marking, the clothing is so handled in all 
the great steam laundries that there is no danger or annoyance 
possible from filth or disease. Each lodging-house and hotel wash 
is placed separately in a boiler, or compartment of one, and satu- 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 37 

rated with steam and water, while revolved in these great churn- 
like machines. There is very little hand contact with the clothes 
until they are clean and dry. 

The laundries find it difficult to adjust their work to the law 
limiting them to fifty-eight hours per week. Monday is their short 
day, and most of the employees have nothing to do on that day. 
All the other five days are very busy ones, and many of the pro- 
prietors would be glad to run the entire fifty-eight hours in five 
days for the majority of their workers. The statute regulating 
the hours of labor prohibits more than ten hours employment in 
any one day, except when a different apportionment of the hours 
of labor is made for the sole purpose of making a shorter day's 
work for one day of the week; and in no case may the hours 
of labor exceed fifty-eight in a week. Time tables are accordingly 
arranged, which usually provide for three to five hours Monday, 
and divide from fifty-five to fifty-three hours among the five re- 
maining days. 

Hours of Labor of Women and Minors in Manufact- 
uring and Mechanical Establishments. 

In my annual reports from 1880 to the present year I have 
at considerable length entered into the details of labor legis- 
lation. Laws have been enacted leading to regulations which 
have proved to be of the greatest benefit to the industrial 
classes throughout the State. During my services as chief 
of this department I have seen the gradual rise and progress 
of labor legislation and the constantly increasing demands 
made upon the factory inspectors. The development of the 
labor question has brought to the attention of successive 
Legislatures such facts in relation to the employment of 
women and minors, that, whether from motives of humanity 
or from other considerations, the Legislatures, representing 
the wishes of the people generally, from 1874, when the so- 
called ten-hour law was enacted, down to the session of the 
current year, have thrown the safeguards of law around the 
laboring people, and sought to protect them from the evils 
and dangers to which they were exposed by the cupidity or 
thoughtlessness of others. 

Many difficulties have been overcome in the enforcement 
of the so-called labor laws. The patient efforts of the in* 



38 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

spectors and their avoidance of undue friction have resulted 
in securing the co-operation of employers of labor and their 
cheerful compliance with the laws. The attitude now ex- 
hibited by manufacturers and others, employers of labor, 
towards the inspectors, has been earned by this quiet work, 
and it has become an important factor in the successful 
application of the statutes especially intrusted to this de- 
partment to enforce. 

In looking back to the early history of labor legislation, 
in limiting the hours of labor for women and minors in 
factories and similar establishments, it will be found that 
many years elapsed before the Legislature could be prevailed 
upon to take action upon the subject. The history of what 
was called the ten-hour law is a record of constant, feverish 
struggle, maintained year after year, passed in one branch of 
the Legislature and defeated in the other. It was not until 
several annual sessions had elapsed that the bill so earnestly 
and bitterly fought over became a law. 

It seems strange to think now that the exercise of legisla* 
tive power in behalf of the operative classes was formerly de- 
nounced as despotic and unconstitutional. It was regarded 
as an unwarrantable attempt of the State to control the con- 
tracts of labor which her citizens might desire to make. 

Prior to that early effort, say forty years ago, the cus- 
tomary hours of labor of our large manufacturing establish- 
ments were twelve to fourteen each day. This time was 
reduced to eleven hours by the voluntary action of the man- 
ufacturers, and this was the case down to the period when 
the law was passed limiting the hours of labor to ten each 
day. As the operation of the act of 1874 and the enforce- 
ment of its several provisions developed beneficial results, 
further acts and amendments thereto were suggested and in 
succeeding years were enacted into law. In 1892 the law 
of 1874 was amended, making the number of hours of labor 
for women and minors in manufacturing and mechanical 
establishments fifty-eight in a week. It is safe to say that 
never in the history of Massachusetts have the laws in rela- 
tion to the employment of labor been better complied with 
than at the present time. The growing interest in all ciril- 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 39 

ized communities in movements intended to improve the 
condition of the industrial classes is a work of progress in 
the right direction. 

I wish briefly to refer to the laws which have been passed 
by the Legislature in relation to the employment of children 
and their attendance in the schools. In 1876 an act was 
passed prohibiting the employment of children under ten 
years of age. In 1883 the limit was extended or raised, by 
providing that no child under twelve years of age should be 
employed during the hours in which the public schools were 
in session. Again, in 1885, another change was made, which 
provided that no child under twelve years of age should be 
employed at any time during the day in which the public 
schools were in session. In 1888 these several statutes 
were repealed, and provisions were made that no child under 
thirteen years of age should be employed at any time in 
any factory, workshop or mercantile establishment, thereby 
raising the limit without any qualification to thirteen years, 
and making such period the time for compulsory school 
attendance. Other acts of legislation touching this subject 
contain in them provisions for the attendance at school of 
children who have reached the age limit for a certain num- 
ber of weeks during each year, and requiring in each case 
a certificate showing the number of weeks of such attend- 
ance, or showing the age, birthplace and other facts, as the 
case may be, relative to the child. 

Restrictions as to the age, hours of employment, school- 
ing, sanitary provisions for comfort and health have been 
made and enforced with a view to lessen as much as possible 
the evils which are admitted to be inherent in any industrial 
system which permits and encourages the employment of 
child labor. If there is no alternative, no escape from 
methods which seem so destructive of the natural rights of 
children, and which are a barrier to physical development 
and mental culture, then we are shut up to such remedial 
measures as experience has shown to be available. 



40 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Heating op Street Railwat Cars. 

By an act of the Legislature approved March 16, 1895, 
a law was passed as follows : — 

[Acts or 1895, Chaptbk 186. J 

An Act Relative to the Heating of Street Railway Cars. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The board of railroad commissioners shall require 
street railway companies to heat such cars when in Use by them 
for the transportation of passengers, at such times, by such means 
and to such extent, as said board shall determine. 

Sect. 2. Every street railway company shall forfeit twenty-five 
dollars for each trip run by any of its cars not heated as provided 
in section one, except in case of accident to the heating process 
or apparatus. 

Sect. 3. It shall be the duty of the district police to see that 
the provisions of the preceding sections are enforced. 

Sect. 4. This act shall take effect on the first day of November 
in the year eighteen hundred and ninety-five. [Approved March 
16, 1895. 

As required by section 1 of the above law, the Railroad 
Commissioners issued the following requirements : — 

IN BOAHD 07 RA.ILBOAD COMMISSIONERS, Aug. 1, 1895. 

Under the provisions of chapter 186 of the Acts of 1895, en- 
titled, "An act relative to the heating of street railway cars," 
after notice to tbe several street railway companies and a public 
hearing of such as desired to be heard, and upon consideration by 
the Board, it is determined and 

Ordered, That the following requirements and regulations be 
prescribed and notified to the several companies relative to the 
subject matter of the aforesaid act: — 

Regulations for the Heating of Street Railwat Cars. 

1. The several street railway companies shall equip such electric 
box cars as are used by them for the transportation of passengers in 
the months of November, December, January, February or March in 
each year, with suitable apparatus for heating tbe same by electricity : 
provided, that other than electric heaters may continue to be used in 
such cars as are now equipped therewith, until the further order of the 
Board. 

2. Electtic box cars, while in use for the purpose and during the 
months aforesaid, shall, whenever the outside temperature is less than 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 41 

50° F. above zero, be kept warm by such electric or other heaters to an 
inside temperature (as near as may be) of not less than 50° nor more 
than 60° above zero, except at times when the company is temporarily 
prevented from so doing by storms, accident or other controlling emer- 
gency. 

8. These regulations shall take effect on the first day of November, 
1895, and may be modified from time to time in general or in particular, 
as experience and the public comfort may seem to the Board to require. 

Attest: Wm. A. Crafts, Clerk. 

Under the provisions of the above statute, it was made 
the duty of the district police to enforce the requirements 
and regulations of the Board of Railroad Commissioners 
relative to the provisions of said act. 

The requirements that electric box cars, while in use dur- 
ing the months of November, December, January, February 
and March in each year, shall, whenever the outside temper- 
ature is less than 50° F. above zero, be kept warm by means 
of electric or other heaters to an inside temperature (or as 
near as may be) of not less than 50° nor more than 60° 
above zero, received my prompt attention. Early in Novem- 
ber last past officers were detailed to inspect all street railway 
cars coming under the law, and to make daily reports as to 
the temperature found therein. The several officers detailed 
for this work, from Nov. 1, 1895, to March 1, 1896, made 
2,917 inspections; of that number, 100 cars were found 
not having the proper temperature. The officers noticed 
that this was occasioned by the heaters not being large 
enough to convey heat sufficient to warm the cars. Four 
hundred cars were found moderately heated, and in these 
cases the officers observed that the opening of the front and 
rear doors of the cars at the same time was one of the causes 
why the cars were at times uncomfortable. It was also 
observed by the officers that in some instances the wires 
leading to the heaters were not large enough to carry the 
amperage for which the heaters were made. Insufficient 
power to generate heat and defect in heating apparatus were 
found to be some of the factors why the temperature could 
not be kept up to the standard. The officers found one or 
more beaters that were cold, while the rest of the heaters in 
the same car were emitting more or less heat. 



42 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

To comply with the law requiring the heating of street 
cars, the West End Street Railway Company made contracts 
for additional engines and generators early in 1895, and at 
its central power station on Harrison Avenue changed over 
two 1,000 horse-power engines, to add 250 horse-power 
capacity to each engine. The first of these was started on 
Nov. 3, 1895, and the second on Nov. 16, 1895. It also in- 
stalled one new 2,000 horse-power engine, which was com- 
pleted and started on Dec. 27, 1895, making 2,500 additional 
horse-power started at central power station during Novem- 
ber and December, 1895. It also contracted for and built 
at Charlestown a power station containing two 1,000 horse- 
power engines, one of which was stalled on Jan. 8, 1896, 
and the other on Jan. 31, 1896. In addition to the above, 
it has installed this year 3,000 additional horse-power at 
central power station, consisting of an increase of 250 horse- 
power on four engines changed over, and one new 2,000 
horse-power engine. It has also built at Dorchester, on 
Freeport Street, a new power station, containing two 1,500 
horse-power engines, making a total of 6,000 horse-power 
added for use during the winter. 

Unsafe Elevators. 

The laws relating to the inspection of elevators are rea- 
sonably complete, and this department intends that by no 
negligence of its own shall their beneficial results be lost to 
the public. I find by the reports of the inspectors that 763 
elevators have been inspected during the past year. 

Factories, Public Buildings and Tenement-houses. 

Careful attention has been paid to the enforcement of the 
provisions of the law relating to means of egress from facto- 
ries, public buildings and tenement-houses, and the future 
must show a good result from the law. Neglect to provide 
safe means of egress should not through any negligence or 
thoughtlessness of owners of buildings be permitted. The 
law is clear and explicit; no discretion is given the in- 
spectors in its enforcement. 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 43 



Seats fob Female Employees. 

Section 30, chapter 508 of the Acts of 1894, is as 
follows : — 

Sect. 30. Every person or corporation employing females in 
any manufacturing, mechanical or mercantile establishment in this 
Commonwealth shall provide suitable seats for the use of the 
females so employed, and shall permit the use of such seats by 
them when they are not necessarily engaged in the active duties 
for which they are employed. 

The public interest awakened by the statements of medi- 
cal men and others, based upon the practical hardship of 
compelling women and girls employed many hours daily in 
manufacturing, mechanical and mercantile establishments to 
remain standing at their respective occupations, led to the 
enactment of the above sensible statute. It is gratifying to 
be able to state that there is a general compliance with its 
provisions. The law has done much good, and I have never 
heard of any desire for its repeal. 

Safety of Operatives. 

Another act of the Legislature which experience has 
shown to be necessary is here appended. Sections 53 and 
54, chapter 481, Acts of 1894, read as follows: — 

Sect. 58. No outside or inside doors of any building wherein 
operatives are employed shall be so locked, bolted or otherwise 
fastened during the hours of labor as to prevent free egress. 

Sect. 54. Any firm, person or corporation, being the owner, 
leasee or occupant of any such building shall, after receiving five 
days' notice in writing from one of the inspectors of factories 
and public buildings, comply with the provisions of the preceding 
section. 

The danger to life and limb in case of fire or panic, by- 
keeping locked the doors in factories and workshops during 
the hours of labor, was shown to be so imminent that the 
prohibition of the practice was demanded by considerations 
too weighty to be overlooked, and its enforcement has doubt* 
less prevented some public calamities. 



44 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Protection from Machinery. 

Careful attention has been given to the enforcement of the 
provisions of the law for the protection of operatives from 
exposed and dangerous shafting. The record of accidents 
to employees and others has been diminished by reason of 
the wise legislation requiring belting, shafting, gearing, etc., 
to be properly guarded. Section 23, chapter 481, Acts of 
1894, reads as follows : — 

Sect. 23. The belting, shafting, gearing and drums of all fac- 
tories, when so placed as to be, in the opinion of the inspectors 
of factories and public buildings, dangerous to persons employed 
therein while engaged in their ordinary duties, shall be as far as 
practicable securely guarded. No machinery other than steam 
engines in a factory shall be cleaned while running, if objected 
to in writing by one of said inspectors. All factories shall be well 
ventilated and kept clean. 

Summary of Inspection Wokk. 

The record of work performed by the inspectors shows 
that 5,306 manufacturing, mechanical and mercantile estab- 
lishments have been inspected since my last report. 

Orders have been issued to the number of 2,740, and 
there has been a general compliance with said orders. The 
number of children and young persons employed in facto- 
ries and workshops thus far visited is 13,974; young 
persons employed, between fourteen and sixteen years of 
age, 13,847 ; children employed, between thirteen and 
fourteen years of age, 127. 

Number of males employed, 208,502 

Number of females employed, ..... 160,514 
Whole number of males and females employed, . 369,016 

Report of Buildings inspected, including Plans re- 
ceived and Changes recommended. 

Report of Inspector White. 
Sir : — I have the honor to submit herewith, in the usnal tabu- 
lated form, a report of the work done by me in inspection of public 
buildings in District No. 1 during the year ending November 1. 



i 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



45 



As you are aware, there is bat a small portion of the work done 
by an inspector who is detailed for inspection of public buildings 
and ventilation that can be made to appear in such a report. 

In the first place, he must carefully examine all plans for such 
buildings after they are deposited with him, before approval, and 
frequently spend a great deal of time in consultation with archi- 
tects and owners before the buildings are erected. Then he 
should (if he can find time) visit every building while in process, 
to see that his orders and suggestions for changes are properly 
carried out, and the laws and regulations of this department com- 
plied with. A careful inspection of the means of ventilation is 
also required after the building is completed, and tabulated reports 
of the results obtained filed in this office. 

A large number of requests have been made by local authorities 
daring the past year for examination of buildings represented to 
be dangerous, and such work has taken considerable time. 

In the list of buildings inspected I have included those only in 
which I found it necessary to give written orders for changes to be 
made. In the list of plans received I have included, under the 
head of " changes recommended," oral suggestions given in some 
cases to architects before the plans were filed, as well as written 
orders given after the plans were finally deposited in the office for 
approval. 

In the matter of safety from fire and in means for ventilation I 
believe the school buildings erected in my district during the past 
year are in advance of any heretofore constructed, and there is 
every reason to hope that improvement will continue. 



Flans Received and Changes Recommended. 

District No. 1. JOHN T. WHITE, Tntpector. 



BUIUKVQ. 


Location. 


Changes Recommended. 


Kenwood Club, 
German Central Club, 

Bijoo Theatre, 

Washington school, .... 
Wlnelow school, 


Maiden, • • • 
Lawrence, . 
Wakefield, . 
Lawrence, • 
Bradford, • 
Lowell, • • 
Lowell, • • • 
Everett, . 
Everett, . 
Everett, • • 


Plans of addition only. 

Better egress. 
Better ventilation. 
Fire-escape; Are-stops. 
Better egress ; ventilation. 
Better egress; fire protection. 
Ventilation plans only. 
Ventilation plans only. 
Ventilation plans only. 



46 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Plans Received, etc. — Continued. 



BUILDIXO. 



Location 



Changes Recommended. 



Centre school, .... 
Bavarian Club, • • . • 

School, 

First Chnrch of Christ, . 
Wcstford Academy, ... 
Euclid Avenue school, . • 
Woborn Skating Academy, • 
Ward 1 school, .... 
First Congregational Church, . 
Bt. Mary's C. T. A. Society, . 

Female Asylum, 

Pilgrim hall, .... 
Odd Fellows hall, 
Bt. Joseph's C. T. A. Society, . 
Free Baptist Church, . . 
Bt. Augustine Church, • • 
Knights of Pythias hall, . 
Ellery's block, .... 
School, . . . . . 
School, • • • • . 
Evangelical Church, • • • 
Cradock school, • • • 

Chapln sohool, .... 
Wyoming school, . . . 

East school 

St. Joseph's school, ... 

Town hall 

T. M. O. A. building, 

Swan school, .... 

Parochial school, . 

Reformed Presbyterian Church, 

Everett school, .... 

St. Patrick's Home, . 

High school, .... 

Grace Church 

Kellcy school, .... 
St. Paul's Chnrch, . 
Pine Street school, 



8augus, . 

Lawrence, 

Wakefield, 

Lawrence, 

Westford, 

Lynn, • 

Woburn, 

Cambridge, 

Lawrence, 

Lynn, . 

Tewksbury, 

Lowell, . 

Chelmsford, 

Lynn, • 

SomervlUe, 

Andover, 

Maiden, . 

Gloucester, 

Wakefield, 

Wilmington, 

Cambridge, 

Medford, 

Winchester, 

Melrose, 

Saugus, . 

Haverhill, 

Dan vers, 

Cambridge, 

Medford, 

Lynn, . 

Cambridge, 

Medford, 

Lowell, . 

Amesbury, 

Lawrence, 

Newbury port, 

Lowell, . 

Lowell, . 



Ventilation. 



Better ventilation. 

Plan showing changes ordered. 
Better fire protection. 
Better ventilation. 



Fire-escape. 
Better egress. 



Additional stairway. 
Better ventilation. 

Better ventilation. 
Better ventilation. 
Better ventilation. 
Better ventilation. 
Better ventilation. 
Better ventilation. 

Improved ventilation. 
Better ventilation. 

Improved ventilation. 

Better ventilation. 

Better ventilation. 
Change in stairs. 



I 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 3S, 



47 



Flams Received, etc. — Concluded. 



Btoukjto* 



HlgUudKhooU 

ButleUKBool, • 

Llonio school, • • - 

G. A. E. balkllng, 

OkUrigfaiehool, 

TnfUichooU 

JumkIkmI* • • 

Uaabmm, • • 

How tehool, • 

?Ua Street school, • 

C%mt Street school, - 

J. T.QBiwe school, . 

Cfcjfcll addition, 

LraanaV& Centre school, 

Qeetre athool, » 

FlBftaCub, 

Aattsad Street school. 

It. £. Church, 

CbelBufordOeotro ■ehoolf 
Booth Medford Baptist Chapel, 



Middlesex Traders Association, 

ILC. Church, 

Bk Mary'a Church, • • 

Chapel, State Almshouse, 



Melroee, • 
Lowell, • • 
. i Lowell, . • 
. Everett, 
. Medford, • 
. , Medford, • 
• I Medford, • 
Medford, 
mileriea, 
Lowell, • • 
Lowell, . • 
Somerville, • 
Somerville, • 
Lynnaeld, 
Lincoln, • 
Cambridge, • 
Newbury port, 
West Medford, 
Chelmsford, . 
Medford, 
Lawrence, • 
Wakefield, • 
Meihoen, • 
Everett, . 
Tewksbury, . 



Changes Bccorn mended. 



Flre-stope* 

j Improved sanitaria*. 
Improved eaaltaries. 
Improved saaltaries. 
Better ventilation. 
Improved ventilation. 



Improved ventilation ; addition to 
building. 



Improved ventilation. 

Ventilation. 

Fire-stops; better ventilation. 



Addition; ventilation. 



Report of Buddings Inspected. 

Class No. 1, Distbict No. 1. JOHN T. WHITE, Itupector. 



Nam or Buildixo. 



_. „ Andover. 

Thtlfaifmve, . . 

Tow hall, 

tol _, Bradford. 
Klog*i block, . . 

KtaibaH Street school, 
Loekt Street eehool. 



Orders Given. 



Oompllan 



Better escape; protection from lire, 



. i Stand-pipe and hose in corridor, 



Fire-escape; better protection from 
Are. 

. I Better care of sanltaries, • . . 
• Better care of santtariee, • 



Compiled. 



Compiled. 



48 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE, [Jan, 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Concluded. 



Nam of Bun.Duro. 



Orders Given. 



Compliance!. 



Cambridge*' 
Gannett school, 

Chelmsford. 
Centre school, . . . 

Dracut. 
Lake View Theatre, 



Bverett. 
Home school, . • 
Deveos school, • • • 

Gloucester. 
Ferguson's block, . 

Lowell. 
Associates hall, 

Lynnfleld. 
Centre school, . . • 



Maiden. 
Brown's block, . 

Medford. 
Cradock school, • 
Bverett school, • • 
Opera Houae, . 
Odd Fellows hall, . 



Bomerville. 

Luther V. Bell school, . 

Stoneham. 
Walton block, . 



Winchester. 
Chapln school, . 



Woburn. 
Skating Academy, . 



Better protection from fires, . 

Better ventilation 

Doors to open ont; fireproof onrtaln ; 
proscenium wall made fire-proof; 
means to extinguish fire. 

Fire-escapes, ...... 

•Additional stairway; better ventila- 
tion. 

Fire- escape to be extended ; means to 
extinguish fire. 

Escape from gallery; better guards 
against lire; exits to be marked. 

Better ventilation, .... 

Fire-escape, ...... 

Better ventilation 

Better ventilation, . 

Additional egress, . • . . 

Fire-escape extension, • 

Better ventilation, . 

Fire-escape; door to open out, • 

Better ventilation, • 

Additional egress; better saoltarles, 



Complied. 



Being compiled 
with. 



Complied. 



Complied. 
Compiled. 
Compiled. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 



Complied. 



Compiled. 



Report of Inspector Bardwell. 

Sir: — In submitting the tabulated statement* of inspections 
made and plans received by me during the past year, I beg to 
report that, while most of the orders given have been complied 
with, there have been considerable trouble and delay with a few, 
caused chiefly, I believe, by the financial inability of the owners 
to comply promptly, rather than by a desire to evade the law; 
with such cases I have endeavored to be considerate, and have 
allowed them as much time as I properly could. 

I seldom find a lodging-house or hotel completely equipped witb 
rope fire-escapes, even if supplied the previous year, some befog 
lost or stolen between visits of the inspector. 

The requirements of the department regarding fire and smoke 
stops have been carried out in most of the new buildings for whicb 
plans have been received, and in some instances additional ways 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



49 



of egress have been ordered. Many of the larger buildings have 
been visited several times, to see that the work was being properly 
done. 

A few of the tabulated orders have not been complied with, but 
I think will be in a short time. 



Plans Received and CJianges Recommended. 

District No 1. HENRY J. BARDWELL, Inspector. 



Building. 


Location. 


Changea Recommended. 




Cambridge, . 


None. 


Ward b engine honae, 


Cambridge, . 


None. 


Colbaae'i apartment honae, 


Cambridge, . 


Flre-atopa. 


Green's apartment honae, . 


Cambridge, . 


Fire slope. 


UaiTtrrity Prase, - . . . 


Cambridge, . 


Fire-escapes. 




Cambridge, . 


Tinned door. 


HeCloekey'c apartment bloek, . 


Cambridge, . 


Fire-stops; better egreaa. 


Sana's apartment block, . 


Cambridge, . 


flre-atopa; one balcony. 


Hoffman's apartment block, 


Cambridge, . 


Fire-stops ; two balconies. 


PuHnski's tenement honae, 


Cambridge, . 


Fire-stops; iron balconiea. 


Dyne's tenement honae, . 


Cambridge, • 


None. 


DuuMn's tenement honae. 


Cambridge, . 


Better egreaa. 


Abjaa'i apartment honae, 


Cambridge, • • 


None. 


O'Connor'* apartment home, . 


Cambridge, . 


Additional doorway. 


Hue's box factory 


Cambridge, . 


Encloaed stairways. 


Claverly hall, 


Cambridge, . 


None. 


SterUag'e apartment block, 


Cambridge, . 


None. 


Hfarr Ofeea'a apartment bloek (5 

houeea). 

Joaflah Green's apartment block (5 
boo*?*). 

frtaarifa candy factory, . 


Cambridge, • 
Cambridge, . 
Cambridge, . 


Fire-stopa. 
Fire-stops. 
AddiUonal stairway 


Hanlon'e apartment hoaee, 


Cambridge, . 


None. 


&*d'M block 


Cambridge, . 


None. 


Everett Cycle Company'* factory, . 


Everett, 


Flre-atopa. 


Kingman's apartment honae, . 


Everett, 


Fire-atope. 


The Raweon lodging hoaam, 


Everett, 


None. 


HMoaaetCe'c tenement bourne, . 


Everett, 


Fire-stopa. 


The Jaaoaion CTooaa, . - . 


Hudson, 


Fire escape. 


6*7BMmr*e tenement nouaa. 


Hudson, 


Fire-escape ; door cot. 


Bmfaahoe factory, . . 


Hudson, 


Additional stairway. 


HamePa tenement hooae, . 


Lowell, . • • 


None. 


Boiaven'a tenement houea. 


Lowell, . 


None. 



50 REPORT CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Plana Received, etc. — Continued. 



Building. 



Location 



r 



1 






Hamilton Manufacturing Company's 

•tore bonne. 
Old city hall building. 

Hall's apartment house, . 

Vinoent Bros.' tenement bouse 

Bibeadt's tenement house, 

Pelletier's tenement house, 

Latonr's tenement house, . 

Hamel's tenement house, . 

Benoit's tenement house, . 

Peinault'a tenement block, 

Thompson's apartment house, 

Bernstein's tenement house, 

Bramm's tenement house, . 

0. 1. Hood's apartment blook, 

Hebert's tenement block, . 

Bhattuek'a tenement house, 

Ohalfouz's tenement house, 

Haworth & Watson's factory, 

Turner's tenement block, . 

Marin's block, . 

Bennett's tenement house, 

Murphy's tenement house, 

Dugdale's apartment house, 

Cady's tenement house, 

Mllot's tenement house, . 

Southwick's apartment bouse, 

Middlesex Last Company's factory 

Hudson's apartment house; 

Rich's blook, 

Richards' apartment bouse, 

Bice, Hutchlos & Co.'s factory, addi 

tlon. 
Henry Parsons' factory, . 

Potter's apartment house, 

Taylor's apartment block, 

Moore's factory, 

Symond's box factory, . 

Bdgarton Company's suspender fac 

tory. 
Beaudet's apartment house, 



Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell* . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Maiden, . 
Maiden, • 
Maiden, . 
Maiden, . 
Maiden, . 
Marlborough, 
Marlborough, 
Medford, 
Newton, 

North Chelmsford 
Reading, 
Shirley, . 
Somerville, . 



Changes Recommended. 



None. 

Fire-escape; flre-stops. 

None. 

Brick partition wall ; flre-stopi. 

Fire-escape; flre-stops. 

Brick partition wall ; flre-stopi. 

None. 

Fire- stops. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire stops. 

Brick partition wall; additional 

stairs. 
None. 

None. 

Brick walls ; balconies; Are-stops. 

Fire-escape; doors cut; flre-stopi. 

None. 

None. 

Brick walls; balconies; lire-stops. 

Fire-escape; fire-stops. 

Additional egress. 

Fire-escape. 

None. 

Fire-escape 

Additional stairway. 

Flre-stops. 

Additional stairway. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire-stops; cut doors through. 

None. 

None. 

None. 

None. 

Cut doors through. 

Enclose stairs; flre-stops. 

None. 

Fire-escape. 

Iron bridges; flre-stops. 



WI] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



51 



Ptans Received^ etc. — Concluded. 



BoLDnio. 



Location. 



Cbanges Recomme n ded. 



Edgeriyiiptrtrntm 

Broad wy lira statSon, 

Hortoo'i trunk factory, 
fteri apartment bouse, . 
ttrooet'i apartment bouse, 
Oaite'sapsrtmeotboiise, . 
DevfaVi apartment block, 
CoUoo'i apartment bouae, 
Graft apartment bouae, . 
Sov&srlend's apartment block, 
Merma'e piano stool factory, . 
Gtiavpaf • tenement block, 

VaiUwB Mannfactarlng Company's 

factory. 
Waihan Manufactorlng Company's 

*wory(So.2). 
American Waltbam Manufacturing 

frapaoy'a factory. 
HMd'i rubber factory, 

I'rim Carpet Lining Company 'a fac- 
tory. 



Bomerrille, . 
Bomerrille, . 
Bomerrille, . 
Bomerrille, • 
BomerrlUe, . 
Bomerrille, . 
Bomerrille, . 
Bomerrille, • 
Bomerrille, . 
Bomerrille, . 
Sooth Acton, 
Wakefield, . 
Waltbam, . 
Waltbam, • 
Waltbam, . 
Watertown, . 
Watertown, . 



Flrcetope. 

None. 

Enclose stairway. 

Fire-atone. 

Flre-etope. 

Nona. 

Two balconies ; flre-etope. 

Fire-escape; doors cut; fire-atone. 

Flre-etope. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire- escape. 

Fire-escapes. 

Fire-escape. 

Encloeed stairways. 



Enclosed stairways. 
Encloeed stairways. 



Report of Buildings Inspected. 

Class No. 1, District No. 1. HENRY J. BARD WELL, IntjHdor. 



Kajob of BuruHJie. 



Orders Given. 



Compliances. 



Aw AT/ 

Tke Union House, ." 
n*. , «- Cambridge. 

Hstjl Waahington, .... 
5"^tog Proceaa Company, . 
J-^Dsvis & 8on, soap factory, . 
«**** Close, candy factory, . 
Charles Place, box factory, . . 

^USA ^ -.JNMWwra. . . . 

SS^^ty Preaa building, . . 
Bcbwsju lodging bonse,. . . 
H- X.Sawyer It Son Co., . . 

TnT^^V • ' 
t^o^M's tenement block, *. \ 

n*.in .. Hudson. 



Rope fire escapes ; fire palls, 



X/ionOf . . . . • . . 
Fire-escape; stair railings, . 

None, 

Repair fire-escape ; stair railing, 
Enclose stairways; Iron bridges; stair 

railings. 
None, ....... 

Enclosed stairways, . 
Fire-escapes, ...... 

None, 

Rope fire-escapes, . . . . 



TekZZT* w £? a * <*■'• factory, 




Enclose stairway, ..... 
Additional stairway; rope fire-escape, 
Fire-escape, 



Repair fire-escape, 
Additional stairway, . 

None 

None, . • . . . 

None 

Rope fire-escapes; fire palls, 



Complied. 



Complied. 

Complied. 
Building 
burned. 

Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 



Compiled. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Compiled. 
Compiled. 



Complied. 



52 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Continued. 



Nams of Building. 



Hudson — Con. 
American House, . 

W. O. T. D. House, . 

Mansion House 

Stowe. Bills & Hawley's factory, . 

Jefts' shoe factory 

Brett's shoe factory, 

Lowell. 
Rault's tenement block, . 
Tbtbauli's tenement house (No. 1), 
Thlb mil's tenement house (No. 2), 
Bean Men's tenement house, . 
Josselyn's tenement hou»e (No. 1), 
Joaselyn's tenement bonse (No. 2), 
Josselyn's tenement house (No 3), 
Julien's tenement house (No. 1), 
Ju lien's tenement house (No 2), 
Julien's tenement house (No. 8), 
Julien's tenement house (No. 4), 
Criterion Knitting Company, . 
American Card Clothing Company 
L 8. Kimball's factory, . 
Wheelock's tenement house, 
Riopelle's tenement house, 
Hall's apartment house, . 
Stover's shoe factory, . 
Vincent's tenement block, 
The Brooks House, . 
The Old Washington Tavern, 
American House, 
Franklin House, 
Trilby House, . 
Ladd House, 
Bt. Jamea Hotel, 
Bt. Lawrence Hotel, 
Bt. Charles Hotel, . 
Lowell Inn, 
Central House, . 
Gallagher House, 
Globe Hoteh 
Merrlmac House, 
St. Cloud Hotel, 
Waverley House, 
Moody House, . 
The Bon Marche building, 
Mitchell's block, 
C.I. Hood & Co. 'e laboratory, 
Delisle's tenement house, 
Young's lodging house, . 
Harris' tenement bouse, . 
8 paid logs' block, 
Wentworth block, . 

Murphy's tenement house, 
Donovan's building, . 
Sawyer carriage factory, . 
Boisvert'a tenement house, 
Murphy's tenement house (No. 1), 
Murphy's tenement house (No. 2), 
Murphy's tenement house (No. 3), 
Fay's tenement house (No. 1), 
Fay's tenement house (No. 2), 
Bropby's tenement house, 
O'Donnoll's tenement house, 



Maiden. 
Hotel Evelyn, . 
The Victoria, . 
The Howard House, 
Hotel Maiden, . 
Central House, . 
Griffith's lodging house, 



Orders Given. 



Compliances. 



Repair rope fire escapes; fire pails, 

Fire palls, 

Fire-escape; fire pails, 

None, 

None 

None, 



Repair fire-escape, 
ttepair fire-escape. 

None, 

Repair fire-escape, 
Fire-escape; change windows, 
Repair fire escape. 
Repair and rebuild fire-escapes, 
Fire-escape, .... 
Kepair fire-escape, 

None, 

Repair fire-escapes, 
Fire-proof over boilers, 
Unfasteu outside doors. 
Remove obstructions to fire-escape 
Fire escape, .... 
Fire-esoape; outdoors, 

None, 

Fire-escape 

Repair fire-escape doors, 
Hope fire escapes; lire pails, 
Rope fire-escapes ; fire pails, 

None, 

Fire-escape; rope fire-escape. 
Rope fire-escapes; fire pails, 
Rope fire-esoapes ; fire pails, 
Rope fire-escapes; fire palls, 
Rope fire-escapes; fire pails, 
Fire pails, .... 

Fire pails 

Fire pails, .... 
None, ..... 
Rope fire-esoapes ; fire palls, 
Rope fire-escape; red lights; fire palls 
Fire pails, .... 

Fire palls 

None, ..... 
Fire alarm gongs; fire pails, 

None, 

None, ..... 

None, 

Rope fire-escapes; fire palls, 

None, 

Rope fire-escapes, . 
Flre-eseape; rope fire-escapes 

pails. 
Repair fire-escape, 
Rope fire-escapes, 
None, .... 
Fire-escape, . 
Fire-escape, • 
Fire-escape, . 
Fire-escape, . 
Fire-escape; stair railings, 
None, .... 
Fire escape, . . 
Fire-escapes, 



fire 



Repntr fire-escape; rope fire-escapes, 
Rope fire-escapes; fire pails, 
Rope fire-escapes ; fire pails, 
Rope fire-escapes; fire palls, 

None, 

None, 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 

Compiled. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Vacated. 

Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 
Compiled. 
Complied. 



Complied. 

Complied 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 



Vacated. 

Vacated. 
Complied. 

Complied. 



Compiled. 

Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 



Compiled. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



53 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Concluded. 



Nam of Butlddio. 



Marlborough. 

Hotel Preston, . 

Marlborough Hotel, 

Hotel Beaodreau, 

Windsor House, 

Central House, . 

RoaaeU ft Co.'s shoe factory, 

Stevens box factory, 

Howe Shoe Company's factory 

(No.l). 
Howe Shoe Company's factory 

(No. 2) 
Rice ft Hotchens shoe factory, 

Melrose. 
Shepard Manufacturing Company, 

Newton. 

Central block 

Parker House, 



Orders Given. 



Compliances. 



Ilou House, 



Beading. 



8hirley. 
C. A. Edgarton Manufacturing 
Company. 

8omerville. 
Catkman Bros, ft Co.'s factory, . 
Miller Bros, ft Co.'s corporation, . 
Derby Desk Company, . 
Horton's trunk factory, . 

South Acton. 
Merrlam ft Co., piano stools, . 

8toneham. 
Blank Bros, leather factory, . 
Cogan ft Son's shoe factory, . 
S. L. Patch Company's laboratory, 

Wakefield. 
Gillespie's tenement block, 

Waltham. 
Waltham Manufacturing Company, 
American Waltham Manufacturing 

Company. 
The Adams House, . . . . 
Hotel Riverside, . 
Hotel Crescent 



Rope fire-escapes ; fire palls, 
Rope fire-escapes, . 

None, 

Rope fire-escape; fire pails, 
Kope fire escapes, . 
Extend flre-eaeape; remove obstruc- 
tions. 

None, 

None 



None, 

Remove obstructions; stair railings, . 



None, 



None, 
None, 



Rope fire-escape; fire pails, 



Fire-escape; stair railings; unlock 
doors. 



None, 

Repair wooden bridge, 
Fire-escapes; unlock doors, 
None 



Fire-escape ; stair rails. 



Compiled. 
Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 



None, 
None, 
None, 



Fire-escapes, 



Fire-escape, 
Fire-escapes, 



Rope fire-escapes, 

Rope fire-escapes; fire palls, 

None, 



Compiled. 



Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 



Report of Inspector Moore. 

Sir : — In making a report of the duties performed by me, it is 
impracticable to show in tabulated form more than a small portion 
of the work done. 

In list of buildings inspected there are included only such as have 
required orders to be given. Many others in which no orders 
were given are not included. 



I 
• I 

1 

I 

■ I 



; i 



..•! 



I I 



i ■ 
i" 
ii' 
il- 
ii 

"I 

I 



4 
i 

H 

'I 



54 REPORT CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE- [Jan. 

In the list of plans received a tabulated report shows bat a small 
part of the work performed. In many cases preliminary plans 
have been submitted for criticism before the finished plans were 
filed, and in most cases suggestions have been made, either in the 
construction and means of safety against fire or in heating and 
ventilation; these suggestions having been adopted, no changes 
were made in the finished plans. 

A very considerable part of my time has been used in consulta- 
tion with architects, heating and ventilating engineers, contractors 
and building committees ; in visits to buildings in process of con- 
struction ; testing various heating, ventilating and sanitary de- 
vices ; also in examination of buildings and structures reported as 
unsafe. 

I am pleased to note a decided improvement in the construction 
and ventilation of public buildings. 

Plans Received and Changes Recommended. 

Districts Nob. 2, 3 axd 6. JOSBPE A. MOORE, Inspector. 



Building. 



Location. 



Changes Recommended. 



Four- room school building, 

Two-room school building, 

Odd Fellows building, 

Bozbury and King streets primary 

school. 
Gyrus Alger school 

Everett school 

Norcross grammar school, 

Dorchester Everett grammar school, 

Druce Street school building, . 

Public bath house, .... 

St. Lawrence Chapel, 

Grand stand N. E. T. II. B. A., 

8ears library 

Police building 

American hall, 

Armory, 

St. Micbael*s Church, 

Harrison Street school building, 

Davenport school building, 

8. P. Wlnslow school building, 

East Globe Street school building, . 

Cormier's block, 



Avon, . 
Attleborough, 
Attlebo rough, 
Boston, . 
Boston, . 
Boston, . 
Boston, . 
Boston, . 
Brookllne, 
Brookline, 
Brookllne, 
Dedham, 
East Dennis, , 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
FaU River, 



Fire-stops; guarantee of ventila- 
tion. 

Heating and ventilation not yet 
approved. 

Main doors to open out. 

Reheating and ventilating plant; 

guarantee of ventilation. 
Reheating and ventilating plans; 

guarantee of ventilation* 
Reheating and ventilating plans; 

guarantee of ventilation. 
Reheating and ventllHtlng plana; 

guarantee of ventilation. 
Reheating and ventilating plans; 

guarantee of ventilation. 
Change in ventilation. 



Heating and ventilation not yet 
approved. 

Fire-stops; guarantee of ventila- 
tion. 
Guarantee of ventilation. 

Fire-stops; additional egress; 
ventilation. 



Widen doors; ventilation not ap- 
proved. 



Re ventilation to be guaranteed* 



1897.] 



PUBLJC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



55 



Flans Received, etc. — Continued. 



BuiLDiira. 


Location. 


Changes Recommended. 


Oxford primary school building, . 1 


Palrharen, . 


. 


Fov-room school building*, • 


Foxborough, . 


. VentUattoo to be guaranteed. 


Primary school building, . 


FramlDgham, 


. Fire-stops; change in ventilation. 


Stale normal school buildings* . 
W.H. Chase building. 


Framingham, 
Hudson, 


. Reheating sad ventilation to be 

guaranteed. 
. Additional egress; fire-stops. 


Hywrif training school building, . 
Hrasnis Yacht Club building, . 


Hyannls, 
Hyaonla, 


. Fire-stops; guarantee of veotl- 
lation. 


Addition Bolton Street school build- 
Ptrocsisl school building. 


Marlborough, 


. 


Marlborough, 


. Change In ventilation. 


Addition Pleasant 8treet school, 


Mlltoo, . 


. Fire-etops; change in ventilation. 


Ietnmid Morse Hospital, - 

Btfcacbool, 

Dsndsoo building, . 


Nstiek, . 
Natick, . 
Newtoa, 


. Additions] exit; guarantee of 
ventilation. 

. Reheating; ventilation guaran- 
teed. 


KB. Church, ... 


Newton, 


. 


assotrk building, - 


Newton, 


. Ventilation not yet approved. 


High school, ... 


Newton, 


. Ventilstion not yet approved. 


K.R. Church, • • 


Newton, 


- 


Bflsasmm building, . 


Newtoa, 


. Fire-escapes; ventilation. 


dt. Anthony's Chapel and school 

vanmng. 
rsrish House Unitarian Cbarch, . 


New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 


. Fire-stops; ventilation not ap- 
proved. 
. Ventilation not yet approved. 


Adawon Masoolo building, 


New Bedford, 


i • — — 


Qnud Opera House, .... 

Dsuettt building 

Baaed Heart Chapel and school 

braiding. 
HaU't block, 

Three-room school building, 


New Bedford, 

New Bedford, 

New Bedford, 

North AtU* 

oagh. 
North Dartn* 


. Asbestos ourtsin ; change In ven- 
tilation. 
. Fire-stops; main doors open out; 

ventilation. 
. Fire stops* ventilation not yet 
approved. 
»bor. Additional exits; doors to open 

out. 
rath, Change la ventilation. 


Park and Downs Union Chapel, 


Quiocy, . 


. 


Ward 4 school building, . 


Qolncy, . 


. Change in ventilation. 


Ward ft school building, . 


Qoiney, . 


. Change In ventilation. 


Addition Woodward Institute, 


Quincy, . 


. Ventilation not yet approved. 


Qotocy Barings Bank building, 


Quinsy, . 


. Extend fire-escape. 


Adams school building, 

School building, 


Qnlnoy, . 
Stoughton, 


. Reheating; ventilation to be 
guaranteed. 

. Fire-stops; guarantee of ventila- 
tion. 


St Jean Baptists Society building, . 


Tauntoo, 


Addhion city hall, . 


Taunton, 


. 


Addition South school building, 


Taunton, 


. Guarantee of ventilation. 


Addition North Shore Street school 

building. 
Fruit Street primary school, 


Taunton, 
Taunton, 


• Guarantee of ventilation. 
. Guarantee of ventilation. 



56 REPORT CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Plana Received, etc. — Concluded. 



Building. 


Location. 


Changes Recommended. 


Mangos Club house, . 
Flake Manorial library, . 


Taunton, 
Wayland, 
Wellesley, . 
Wrentham, . 


Ventilation not approved. 
Fire stop*; change in ventilation. 



Report of Buildings Inspected. 

Class No. 1, Districts Nob. 2, 8 and 6. JOSEPH A. MOORE, Inspector. 



Namb of Building. 



Avon. 
Gifford school, . 




Barnstable. 
Saturday Night Glub building, 

Bralntree. 
Pond Street school, . 

Dedham. 

Ames school. .... 
Memorial hall, .... 



Fall River. 
Wonderland Theatre, 

Davenport school, . 
Casino rink, 
Sullivan's block, 
Llgne Des Patriots hall, . 
Mellen building, 

Framingham. 
State arsenal, . 



Hudson. 
E. P. Lawrence block, 
A. K. Graves block, 
W. H. Chase block, . 
Grove school, • 
Broad Street school, 

Mansfield. 

Briggs school, . 
Baloom school, . 



Needham. 
Kingsbury's block, . 

New Bedford. 

Masonio building, 

Newton. 
Old Adams school, . 
Eliot Hall building, . 

Norton. 
Number One soboot, 

Provincetown. 
I. O. O. F. building, . 



Masonic hall, 
Public library, . 



Compliances. 



Means to extinguish fire, 



Additional egress, 



• • • 



Special report, 



Special report, 
Special report, 



Fire-proof curtain; means to extin- 
guish fire. 
Better ventilation, 
Additional egress, 
Additional egress. 
Additional egress, 
Additional egress, 



Special report, 



Means to extinguish fire, 
Fire-escape ; means to extinguish fire. 
Improve rear exit, • 
Better ventilation, .... 
Better ventilation, . 



Better ventilation, 
Better ventilation, 



Strengthen building, 



Doors to open out, 



Better ventilation, . 
New fire hose; remove obstruction In 
corridor. 

Better ventilation 



Fire-stops; additional egress; metal 

ducts ; means to extinguish fire. 
Additional egress; means to extin- 

5ul*h fire, 
ditional egress; means to extin- 
guish fire; sanitary provisions. 



Compiled. 
Complied. 



Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
In process. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Compiled. 
Complied. 



Complied. 

Compiled. 

Compiled. 
Complied. 

Complied. 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



57 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Concluded. 



Namk of Buildiho. 



Orders Given. 



Compliances. 



Taunton. 
Shore Street school, . 
Wlnthrop school, 

Upton. 
Upton Centre school. 



Upton primary school. 
West Uptonpi 
Batehelder House school, 



eat Uptonprimary school, . 



Waltham. 
High school, .... 
North grammar school, . 

Weymouth. 
Fogg's Opera House, 

Wrentham. 
Plalnvllle lower primary school, 



Metal dncts, 
Metal dncts, 



Better ventilation and egress, 

Better ventilation, 

Better ventilation and egress, 

Condemned for school purposes, 



Better ventilation, 
Belter ventilation, 



Strengthen gallery; fire- resisting cur- 
tain. 

Better ventilation, . . . . 



Plainville high school and hall, . Means to extinguish fire, 



Complied. 
Complied. 



Appropriation 
made. 



Use disoontln- 
' ued. 

Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 



Waiting action 
on new build- 
ing. 

Complied. 



Report op Inspector Brown. 

Sir: — I have the honor to submit a tabulated report of the 
work of the past year, with an additional statement of some of the 
work not shown therein. 

Considerable time has been spent in consultations with com- 
mittees, builders and architects, in regard to the several require- 
ments of the building and inspection laws ; visiting buildings in 
process of erection ; and in testing the ventilation of new school* 
houses. 

The public buildings and manufactories inspected were found 
in such good condition that but few orders have been given for 
any changes or improvements, the health and safety of their 
occupants being in most cases well provided for. 

The summer hotels and boarding- houses, of which there are 
many in this district, require an annual inspection in regard to 
the several laws applicable to this class of buildings, particularly 
as to the means of preventing fire and ways of escape therefrom, 
and to see that all lodging-rooms are provided with portable fire- 
escapes. It often happens that a house found well supplied with 
means of extinguishing fire and with the rope fire-escapes will at 
the next inspection be found unprovided with either, owing to a 
frequent change of proprietors ; and, even when the proprietor 
has reason to believe that his lodging-rooms are supplied with 

the escapes, they may be missing in one or more rooms, taken 

down by some fastidious boarder and consigned to some obscure 



58 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

closet, or perhaps used by some departing lodger to securely 
fasten his trunk. 

The copies of plans received show an increase in the number of 
new buildings. These have been given proper attention ; ample 
ways of egress have been provided, and all precautionary measures 
that the law requires have been practically carried out. In most 
cases these plans have been promptly deposited ; occasionally it 
has taken one or more letters and a personal demand before the 
required plans were forthcoming. Included in these plans are 
those of ten school-houses, located in the following towns : three 
in Brockton, and one each in Chelsea, Hanover, Plymouth, Revere, 
Scituate, Wareham and Winthrop, — an aggregate of fifty-five 
school-rooms, all of which have been provided with modern means 
of ventilation. 



Plans Received and Changes Recommended. 

District No. 4. EDWIN T. BROWN, Inspector. 



Building. 

1 


Location. 


Changes Recommended. 


Grand Army building, 
Lincoln school-house, 


Abington, 
Brockton, 


Additional way of egrets; fire- 
stops. 
Ventilation not approved. 


Huntington school-house, . 


Brockton, 


None. 


Franklin school-house, 


Brockton, 


None. 


Tobey's apartment house, 


Brockton, 


Fire-stops. 


First Congregational Church, • 


Brockton, 


Fire- stops. 


Brockton Power Company's build- 
ing. 

Addition to George B. Keith's shoe 
factory. 

Addition to Commercial House, 


Brockton, 


Fire-escapes. 


Brockton, 
Brockton, 


None. 

Fire-escapes; Are-proofing. 


Addition to Field's block, 


Brockton, 


Fire-escapes. 


Addition to Unity Church, 


Brockton, 


Fire-stops. 


Buck's apartment house (No. 1), . 


Brockton, 


Fire-proofing; belter wsy oi 


Buck's apartment house (No. 2), 


Brockton, 


egress. 
Fire-stops; better way of egre». 


Highland school-bouse, 


Chelsea, 


None. 


Kimball's apartment house, 


Chelsea, 


Better ways of egress; flre-stopa. 


Bond's apartment house, . 


Chelsea, 


Better ways of egress; fire-stops- 


Addition to Lowe's building, . 


Chelsea, 


Better ways of egress. 


Hattekesett hall, 


Dor bury, 


Fire-stops. 




Duzbury, 


Fire-stops. 


Washburn library building, 


East Bridgewater, 


Fire-stops. 


Curtis school -house, • 


Hanover, 


Better ventilation ; fire-ttopi. 


Ocean View House, .... 


Hull, 


Better ways of egress; Ure-st*!* 


Atlantic Clnb house, .... 


Hull, 


Fire-stops. 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



59 



Plans Received, etc. — Concluded. 



Building. 



Location 



Change* Recommended. 



Hotel Tivoll, 

Town hall, .... 

Grand Army building! 

Russell Street school-house, 

Unitarian Church, 

Bradatreet Avenue school- house, 

Sherman & Hannah's block, 

The Cliff (hotel), 

Hatherly school-house, 

The Grandon (hotel), 

Bate* building, . 

Grand Army Memorial building, 

High school building, 

Wadsworth*s block, . 

Addition to Bartlett House, 



Hull, . 

Mattapoieett, 

Pembroke, 

Plymouth, 

Plymouth, 

Revere, . 

Revere, . 

Scituate, 

8cituate, 

Whitman, 

Whitman, 

Whitman, 

Winthrop, 

Winthrop, 

Winthrop, 



Fire-stops. 

Better way of egress; fire-stops. 

Fire-stops. 

Additional way of egress; better 

ventilation. 
Better ventilation. 

Better ventilation; flre-stops. 

None. 

Fire-prooflng. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire-proof stairway; fire-stops. 

Fire-stops. 

Additional ways of egress; fire- 
stops. 
Flre-stops. 

Better ways of egress; fire-stops. 

Better way of egress ; flre-stops. 



Report of Building* Inspected. 

Class No. 1, District No. 4. EDWIN T. BROWN, Intpector. 



Nam of B gilding. 



Orders Given. 



Compliances. 



Abing-ton. 
Keene** Hotel, . 
Centennial Hotel, 
Culver House, . 



Bridgewater. 

Brtdcewater Inn, . 

If eSlwala'e ahoe factory, 

Brockton. 
Thompson's factory building, . 

Patten's manufacturing building, . 
Bax»ndale*e heel and counter fac- 
tory. 
Knterprtse building, 
Hotel Keswick, 
Carton's block, 
Star building, . 
Mrs Power's Hotel, 
Hotel Belmont. . 
Metropolitan Hotel, . 
Whipple, Freeman building, 

Whitman school boose, . 
Warren Avenue school house,* 

Keith's manufacturing building, 
City Hotel, .... 



No order, 

No order, 

No order, 

No order, 

Fire-escape 

Additional ways of egress from third 
floor. 

Fire-escape, 

Repair fire-escape, . 

Fire-escape, 

More direct egress from rear stairway, 

Rope fire-escapes in lodging rooms, . 

Rope fire-escapes in lodging rooms, . 

Rope fire-escapes in lodging rooms, . 

No order 

No order, 

Fly doors between stairways to be 
closed when hall is occupied. 

Inspected ventilation ; no order, . 

Special report; new building con- 
structed. 

Fire escape, 

No order, 



Complied. 



Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 



* Special inspection, at request of mayor. 



60 HEPOBT CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. [J«d. 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Cootinned 




Em* or BoiLDlKO. 




Order* 


«-. 




O-rt— 


CiMlaM 












AmerlBan Circular Loom Company, 








Compiled. 




Ho order, 






Compiled. 


Braidwi) flonH 








. 
















Ropu H re cecapee 1 






Compiled. 


Black Rook Honae 


































Hotel Pemberlon munoi, . 


Rope fi»-aaeap« 1 


lodging 


noma, . 


Complied. 














Ailintlo Club Ilooio, 

Baa Foam Doom 


Noo"rd™,* 


IUD..I 


lodging r 


oom., . 


Compiled. 






lodging r 




Compiled. 






^fiTgn 










































































Mechanic* 












More rop 


fira-eacapee Id 


od ging- 


Cora piled. 


Hold tJ.nte.ekol, .... 


Maaneloe- 








Compiled. 






















































































Rope flro-e 


•capetl 


lodging r 




Complied. 




























































































- 


Plymouth. 












Reoommen 


dad additional p 


er* and 


Compiled. 
















"KhHp* 


eapelo 








Hovers 












































•capeel 


lodging r 




Room. DeedlDI 




Rop, flre-c 


cipe.1 


lodging r 


ooma. . 


DVaeontSnea 


Lai College bnlldlng, 


M"™ 1 ™ 1 


lodging r 




Partly compiled. 




























Rail atalrn 


ttngulah fire. 


.,.„. 


Compiled. 

Compiled. 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



61 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Concluded. 



'Name of Building. 



Orders Given. 



Complianc 



Scituate. 
The Cliff, .... 
Mitchell House, 
Hotel Humarock, 
The Florence House, 
Bee View House, 
The Glades, 
Harbor Houpc, . 
Masonic building, 

Whitman. 
Whitman House, 
Linden Hoose, . 
Reed's Block Hotel, . 
Fourth of July grand stand,* 



Winthrop. 
New Winthrop Hotel, 
Young's Hotel, . 
The Leighton, . 
The Argyle, 
The Aloha, 
The Shirley, . 
The Winthrop, . 
Adams Hoose, . 
The Worcester, 
Hotel Dearborn, 
The Shirley Hoose, 
Colonial House, 
The Hawthorne, 
Nevada House, . 
The Bartlett House, 



No order, 

No order. 

Mechanical electric gong, 

No order, . 

No order, . - . 

No order, 

No order. 

No order, 



Rope fire-escapes in lodging rooms, . 
Rope fl re-escapes in lodging rooms, . 
Rope fire-escapes in lodging rooms, . 
Recommended further strengthening 
by extra supports, braces, nailing. 



No order 

No order, 

■No order 

No order, 

Rope fire-escapes in lodging rooms, 

No order, 

No order, 

Rope fire-escapes in lodging rooms, 

No order 

No order 

No order, 

No order, 

No order 

No order 

No order, 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 



* Special inspection, at request of selectmen. 



Report of Inspector Dyson. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit to you the following report 
of the work done by me in the inspection of buildings and the 
construction and ventilation of the same in District No. 5 during the 
present year. In the list of buildings inspected I have included 
only those in which it has been found necessary to issue written 
orders for changes required, in order to comply with the require- 
ments of the Public Statutes, and no doubt all of said orders will 
be complied with in due time. Under the head of " Plans received 
and changes recommended " will be found a list of the buildings 
constructed during the present year, to which the provisions of 
chapter 382, sections 24 and 25 of chapter 481, and sections 40 
and 41 of chapter 508 of the Acts of the year 1894 are applicable. 
In the report of changes recommended it would be impossible to 
include the suggestions made at the frequent meetings held with 
owners, architects and committees, which take up a large part of 
the time of the inspector. 



62 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Report of Building* Inspected. 

Cuti No. 1, District No. 6. JOSEPH M. DYBON, Iniptctor. 



Hui or Bdildinb. 



Oitlan GlTon. 



AthoL 

Atbol fiouati. '. '. 



North nchooi. 
Son lb achool, 
High uboot, 



0. Hyde If hr*ry bl 

Worcester. 



We atborouKb . 



Rupa Art . eacapca. 
Additional egreaa ; doora to open < 
.Urged di 






IlDM (Or besting; ventilation changea, 

Additional egreaa; Improved aanlta- 

Obatractlon to egreaa removed, 
Additional agreaa; a ~- "■ 

Ropo fin-acipH, . 



ftolt 

Com piled. 

Compiled. 

Complied. 
Compiled. 



Plans Received and Changes Recommended. 

District No. *. JOSEPH 11. DYSON, Tntptder. 

Bdii.dino, I Location. Chanfas Recommended. 



Pa rid la Bra 
W. P. Hlggl 



. Nonhbrldgc, . 
. Worcester, . 



. | Addition*) agrees end van 
. Flra slops. 

. Additional egret"; dooi 
. ' None! 



No rib school, 



Hotel Metropol, . 

J. T. Sheedy block, . 

Union Congregation*! C 



Sturbridge, . 

North bridge, 



. Constrooilonofstnlre. 

. Additional cgrow; •>' 

I Olalalre. 
. | Additional In aide alali 

. I Hoot. 

. Additional Malrs. 

. Ftreatop*. 

. | >"one. 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



63 



Plans Received, etc. — Continued. 



Location. 



ChaOgSS RMOCBOMDdtd. 



Oxford North school, . 
Duncan block, . 
Town hall, . 

fire department beedqnartei 
Bockdalp school, 
Sooth Baptist Church, 
Sooubrldge Street school, 
Opera House, 

Goegiegatlonsl Church, 

tfkHsnd Street school, 

iM TTi *i^, Street school, 

Wmbm ht. Stone block, 

fiwedkh Lotheran Church, 

A. J. Bates shoe shop, 

her Johnson block, . 

Betel Paxton, 

Opera Boose, 

Harlem Street Baptist Church, 

Notre Dame parochial school, • 
block, addition*} story. 



Hospital for Con. 



sampth 

Flskdsle school, 



City hall. 

Oilman block, ...» 
Providence Street school, . 
Hubley factory and store-house, 
High school, 

North school, . . . • 
Qolnalgamood school, 
Union Congregational Cboreh, . 
Oxford school, . . - • 

Town hall. 

Rockdale school, 
Soothhrtdge Street school. 



^^^■wi Street school, 

Street school. 



. Oxford, • 

. North Brookfleld, 

■ • Auburn, 

Worcester, 

Northbridge, 

Worcester, • 

Worcester, . 
i Gardner, 

Auburn, 

Worcester, 

Worcester, . 

Worcester, . 

Fltchbnrg, 

Webster, 

Fltehburg, 

Paxton, . 

Gardner, 

Worcester, . 

Worcester, • 

North Brookfleld, 

Shrewsbury, . 

Rutland, 

Stnrbrldge, . 

Worcester, • 

Worcester, 

Worcester, . 

Worcester, . 

Sterling, 
Winehendon, 
Worcester, . 
Worcester, . 
Oxford, . 
Auburn, • 
Northbridge, 
Worcester, • 
Gardner, 

• 1 Worcester, • 
Worcester, • 



None. 

Additional egress; fire-stops. 

Doors to open ont. 

None. 

Fire-stops 

None. 

None. 

Additional tower stairs; firs 

stops. 
Vsntllattng dnets provided. 

Rone. 
None. 

Stairs enclosed In brick; elosete 
removed from under stairs. 

Additional Inside stairs; fire- 
stops. 

Additional tower stairs. 

None. 

Additional egress: rooms con- 
nected on each floor. 
Tower stairs; ventilation. 

Changed location of stairs. 

Additional stairs. 

Firs-escape. 

None. 

None. 

Additional egress. 

None. 

None. 

None. 

Two upper floors to be used for 

storsgs only. 
Ventilation approved. 

Ventilation approved. 

Ventilation approved. 

Ventilation duets enlarged and 

located. 
Ventilation; increased air supply. 

Ventilation; enlarged ventilating 

ducts. 
Veutilatlon approved. 

Ventilation approved. 

Ventilation ; enlarged dnets. 

Ventilation approved. 

Ventilation approved. 



»r 



fl 



i , 



64 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Plana Received, etc. — Concluded. 



Building. 


Location. 


I Changes Recommended. 

1 


Grafton Street school, 


Shrewsbury, . 
Worcester, . 


Ventilation; enlarged ducts and 

mixing valves. 
Ventilation; increased air supply. 


Massachusetts Hospital, . 


Rutland, 


Ventilation not approved. 




Stnrbridge, . 
Worcester, . 


Ventilation; enlarged ducts and 

air supply. 
Ventilation approved. 


R. 0. Taylor'* office building, . 


Worcester, . 


Bridge for escape. 


C. H. Prenllee apartment block. 


Worcester, . 


None. 



»'■ 



I 

i 

'> 

1 

1 

t 

t 



{. 



Report op Inspector Foulds. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit the following report of work 
performed by me in inspecting buildings since my last report. 

A large number of the buildings were found in good condition, 
so far as the State laws apply. There has been an unusually large 
number of plans for tenement-houses filed at this office the past 
year, and to this class of buildings I have given special attention, 
in order that suitable ways of egress and means of preventing the 
spread of fire should be properly placed in the same, and have care- 
fully watched them in course of construction, to see that the laws 
were complied with. 

The hotels and lodging-houses in this district were in good con- 
dition, with very few exceptions, and to these I issued the neces- 
sary orders. In most cases they have already been complied with ; 
those that are not, are on account of orders being issued to them 
but recently, and are now in course of compliance. 

I have consulted with a large number of architects and contrac- 
tors during the year, and I am pleased to note the improvements 
they are making in relation to means of egress and fire-stops, 
and the ready compliance with any suggestions which I have made 
regarding either. 

Plans Received and Changes Recommended. 

District No. 6. JOHN E. FOULDS, Inspector. 



Building. 


Location. 


Changes Recommended. 


Mason box factory, .... 
Howard & Bullough joiner shop, 
Horton, Angell & Co., factory, . 


Atlleborough, 
Attleborougb, 
Attleborough, 


None. 
None. 
None. 



.+ 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



65 



Plans 



, etc. — Continued. 



Buiu>UG. 



Location. 



Wlhon tenement home, . 
Clarke tenement bonne, • 
Ballanger tenement honee. 
Smith tenement honee, 
Conehene tenement honee, 
Dnrand tenement honee, . 
Perron tenement hoaaa, . 
DeebJea tenement honee, . 
Oayne tenement bonaa (No. 1), 
Gnynt tenement bonaa (No. 2), 
Mahette tenement bonaa, . 
Dmemeu tenamaat bonaa, 
Hanfaon block, .... 
Won tenement bonaa, 
Vaffleneonrt tenement bonaa (No 
VaOkneonrt tenement bonaa (No 
OrineUe tenement bonaa, 
Wbert tenement bonaa, 
Ortbott tenement bonaa, 
Tecemeeh mill, . . 
I*«J tenement bonaa, 
Bonra tenement bonaa, 
Oaellett tenement bonaa, 
Griffaalt tenemeot hooae, 
Vantrin tenement hooae, 

Gun tenement bonaa, 

tabe tenement house, 

Meilo tenement bonaa, 

King*, block, . . 

Botaelle tenement houee, 

Dnvally building, 

8»*li Broa. fictory, . 

Deforge block, . . 

Belanger tenement honee, 

Leirlvlere tenement bonne 

Geetellen tenement bonne, 

Blmard tenement bonne, 

Pontalne tenement hoaaa, 



I 



Fall Hirer, 
Fall River, 
Fall Hirer, 
Fall River, 
Fall Hirer, 
Fail River, 
Fall River, 

. • Fall River, 

I 
. ! Fall River, 

. ' Fall River, 

. Fall River, 

. | Fall River, 

Fall Hirer, 

Fall River, 

1), Kail Hirer, 

2), Fall River, 

Fall River, 

FaU River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall Hirer, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

F*ll Hirer, 



Change* Recommended. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-atop*. 

Fire atopa. 

Firestone; flre-ceeapee. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Nooe. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope; amoke doore; flre- 

eeeape. 
No change. 

Fire-etope. 

Fire-etope; ant doore. 

Fire-etope. 

Flre-atope; ont doore. 

Fire-etope; cut doore. 

Fire-etope; flre-eecape. 



66 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Plans Received, etc. - 


- Continaed. 


BdlLDIHS. 


Location 




Change* Recommended. 


Lavaaqna tenement ho dm, 
Champagne tenement boon, 
Standing tenement bouea, . 
Lavolr tenement houae (No. 1) 
I, avoir tenement honaa (No. I) 
Lavteque tenement borne, 
Cahlll tenement bonaa, 
Old Colony Browing Company, 
Lamaratayne building, 
Harding tenement honae, . 

Hacking block, . 

Colomba tenement boue, . 

Lavlgne tenement home, . 
Simla balldlng, . 

Thorp tenement houae, 
Wal.h tenement home, . 
MalUri tenement bonne, . 
Barry'a block. . 

Murray tenement honaa, . 
Laforreai tenement honae, 
Dtaaart tenement bouee, . 

Sablna block, . . . 
City Hotel addition, . 
Flint building, . 

Hatbeck tenement honae, , 
Manning tenement houae, . 
Union Saving* Bank, . 
Win lor bottom tenement home 
Carter tenement honae, 
Magnant tenement bonaa, . 




Fall Rlvar, 
Fall River, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Fall Rlvor, 
Fall Rlvor, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
FaU River, 
Taunton, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Pall River, 
FaU River, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Fall River, 
Fall River, 
FaU Blver, 
Pall River, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Taunton, 
Taunton, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Fall Rlvar, 
Fall River, 
FaU River, 
Fall Blver, 
Fall River, 
New Bedford 
New Bedford 




Flre-atopa; autdoon. 
Ftreatopa; cot doon. 
Flre-atopa; cut doom. 

No change. 

Flro-etope; additional egraaa. 

Fire, elope. 

No change. 

Flre-atopa. 
Flre-atopa. 
Flro-atope; ant doore. 

Fire-nope. 

No change. 
No change. 
No change. 

No change. 

No change. 

Fire-atop.; amoka doota. 

Ontald* flra-eaaapaa. 

No change. 

Pln-etopi; additional egraai. 

Additional egreaa. 
No change. 
No change. 
No change. 

Fircatopa. 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT -No. 32. 



67 



Plans Received, etc. — Concluded. 



Bmu>aio. 



Dutmooth Mitts, 
BBri* tenement house, 
Martd & Bonoeau tenement hoo 
Porrier tenement house, 
TWsoo tenement boose, 
Wu»» tenement house, 
Owstm bolldlof , . 
JWbnblotk, 
Dutmoath block, 
Hwrtogton tenement block, 
BttriBtnbnUdlng, . 
k*trboilding, . 
HuitmtbQlldlog, . 
Zi**!^ building, 
McDoa«Id bofldlng, . 
Aidwwi building, . 
ktfitbidJdinf, 
**W»y tenement house, 

Tnbu tenement bourn*. 
Parish boast), 



Location. 



New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 

] New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 

| New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 
New Bedford, 



Changes Recommended. 



OaUlde 

Flre-etope. 

Firestone. 

Fire slope. 

Flre-etope. 

Flre-etope. 

Flre-etope. 

Flre-etope. 

Fire-stops. 

Flre-etope; additional egrets. 

Fire stops. 

Fire stops; cot doors. 

Fire-stops; smoke doors. 

Fire-stops. 

Flre-etope. 

Fire stops. 

No change. 

Fire stops; cut doors. 

Additional egress. 

No change. 

No ehaoge. 



Report of Buildings Inspected. 

Class No. 1, Dibtmct No. 6. JOHN X. FOULDB, Itupector. 



Nam ot Buiunxe. 



Orders Given. 



_ Attleborougb- 

King braiding, , Additional egress, 

Central House, ' Means of extinguishing fire. 

Park Hotel Change books to portables, . 

ChUson House, None, . . , . . 

Simpson House, . . . ; None 

Briggs House, None, 



Barnstable. 

wwtait House ; Portable lire-escapes, . 

CrosbyHoose, Means of extinguishing fire, 

g°^f l|, jMs Portable fire-escapes, . . 

Haltett House, None. . ... . 

£o*Vlew Non* 

Ijannoagh House, . .None 

Hotel Palmer, None, .... 

M«el Palmer annex,. . . . ! None, .... * 
^beeet House, . . . . I None, .....' 
Otobe Hotel N ona ; . . . . [ 



Compllan 



Complied. 
. Complied. 
. Complied. 



Complied. 
. ! Complied. 
. Compiled. 



REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Report 


0/ Buildings Inspected — Continued 


. 




NlXl Or BOtLDIRQ. 


Ordera Given . 


Compliance!. 


Cottage City. 
Howl Metropolitan 

Callage City Eloueo 

Oak wood Homo, .... 

Proapeet Ho™ 


Iffjaoi of ei tin go lab Jug Bra. 
«»!■ of eiilngolahlng Are, 
Meiniofeitlogulefalogflre, . . 

Mean, of eillngnlehln.- flra, 

Portable flr«.e.cipei ; meana of M- 

M«mo( eillngulihlngflre; nortible 
fire^icapea; repair ooulda flra- 

»ST: 


Compiled. 
Compiles. 
Complied. 
Compiled. 

Compiled! 
Compiled. 

Compiled. 




: 


__ Chatham. 












Dennis. 






Kdgrartown. 










- 


Falmouth. 
Vineyard Bound Homo, . 


Red llgbla; electric gouge; partible 
flre-eaenpee ; cat doori; additional 

Meene of eitlngiUinlng lira; .ddl. 
llonal egreae; portable fl re-eaoapai. 


Compiled. 
Compiled. 
Compiled. 

Compiled. 


Nobpkn House 


Fall River. 


Additional meana of agreae, 

Oulilde flra e.canee 

Repair Bre-ccepe., . 

Ootilde flro eacapee, . . . . 

Additional meem of egreea, 

Oureldc Are-eecape; culdoora, . 
Ouuide Are eacape; doora lo open out, 
Repair Are eecape 

Uulalde Are eicapei ; cut doora, . 
Ouiiiile flnaacapt; cut doora, . 

Addition^ meanatf egreea! '. '. 

On wide flre-eaeepei. . '. 

Additional meana of tgnaa, 

Remove obetrucilou from rear etalra. 






Compiled 

Compiled 

Complied 

Compiled 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Complied 
Compiled 
Complied 
Compiled 
Complied 
Complied 
Compiled 
Complied 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Compiled 
Complied 
Compiled 
Complied 
Complied 
Compiled 
Compiled 




J3,*SJSJJJ™^ d,D ' *""•■ • ■ 




Berard tenement honae, . . . 
Caiinhnu block 




D.vli lencment huu.e, . . 
Gagnon tenement nouie, . 




crdSJet'teo^nthouU!'. '. '. 








Hliiney block 








Taylor 1 , tenement taouta" 

Lam ou rei u !.' Venom i ■ m t' ho 
Raullmnl icncine 
Border Clly mill* :No.2} 


(No. 1), 
(No. 2), 




Corrueio tenement honae, 









1897.} 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



69 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Continued. 



Naxx or Buildiho. 



Fall River— Con. 
Audstt block, . 
Bembe tenement house, 
Lereaqoe tenement bouse, 
Jones lenement house, 
Barry tenement bouse, 
Csabot tenement house, 
Puritan House, . 



Ordera Given. 



Beneon block, . 
Welsh tenement bouse, 
Leveea.De block (No. 1), 
Levesqne block (No. 2), 
Jackson tenemeDt boose, 
City Hotel, 
Font mill, . 
Sl Janes Hotel, 
Bales mill, . 
French block, . 
Waxing building, 



Gregaii block (No. 2), 
Calmhan block (No. 1), 
Lrreeque tenemeDt house 
Bras House, . 
Wllbor Hotel, . 
Kellen Hooee, . 
fteidtDg block. . 
Brlghiman building, 
erogaDbloek (No. 1), 
Leveaque block, 
Geaaeh tenement house, 
Beeaj tenement boose, 
Chsrrett tenement house, 
Mfcheod tenement house, 
Areamd block. . 
H&rracansett House, 

Harwich. 

Belmont House, 

Bsov cottage, . 



cut doors; 
from 



Outside fire 

Better means of egress. 

Better means of egress. 

Additional means of egress. 

Additional means of egress, 

Additional means of egress. 

Means of extinguishing fire; portable 

fire-escapes. 
Additions! means of egr 
Additional means of 
Outside fire escapes. 
Additional egress. 
Additional egress. 
Doors to open out. 
Extend and repair fire-escapes, 
Means of extinguishing fire, 
Outside fire-escape, 
Rail let ; cut doors. 
Outside fire-escape; 

more obstruction 

stairs. 
Outside fire escapes. 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, • 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 



Outside fire-escape; means of extin- 
guishing fire; portable fire-escapes. 
None, 



. Complied. 
: Complied, 
i Complied. 

Complied. 

Compiled. 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Compiled. 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Compiled. 

Complied. 

Complied. 
! Complied. 
i Complied. 

Compiled. 

In process. 

In pi 



Will 



ply. 



Mansfield. 
Maaafekl House, 



Central House, . 
American House, 



Test hooks; replace portable Are- , Complied. 

escapes. 
Portable fire-escapes, . . ; Complied. 
None ' 



Nantucket. 

Ocean View House, . 
Bay View House, 
Sfaerbourn House, 

BeaClifflnn 

Ocean View House annex, 
Point Breeze Hotel, - 

Ocean House 

Springfield House, . 
Bprincfield House annex (No. 1), 
Springfield House annex (No. 2), 
Nesbit House, .... 
The Nantucket, 



. ! 



New Bedford 
Lebean block, . 
Mennter tenement bouse, 
Polaaoln block, . 
Dartmouth mill. 
Silvia block. 
Mansion House, 

Douglas block, . 
Standard building, . 
Taylor tenement bouse, 



Repair fire-escapes. 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, . . 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 



Complied. 



Additional egree», 
Outside fire-escapes, . 
Outside fire-escapes, 
Outside fire-escapes, . 
Doors to open out, . 
Means to extinguish fire ; portable fire- 
escapes. 
Outside fire-escapes, . 

Repair fire-escape* 

None, 



Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Compiled. 
Complied. 



70 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan 



Report of Buildings Inaperled — Concluded. 



N»m« or Buildimo. 


Ordara Olien. 


OoopUaaeea. 


New Bedford — Cod. 

Goetet block* . . ' ! '. '. 

BowltblfMk 

Luelertanementhonea, . 
Tbeilenlan«raelillion«(No.l), . 
Therlan la nam ant hou M (So. 2), . 

alaohatun Bouaa 

Parker lodging bouaa, . 

Parkar Houae 

Bancroft Houae 

Park Hold 

Wlnthrop Honaa 

Megnantteoement houae, . ■ 

Fraaguer leonneDI houae! 
FradoLU Icoemcnt hou 

North Attleoorousrh. 
Iolernatlou.1 Hon], . . . . 

Orleans . 

Bbattnck Honaa, . 

Provl ncetown. 
Glflord Home, 


t 

3 

ijmmm H , I 


Com piled . 


Pilgrim Hou 


Non 




Sandwich. 
Taunton. 







CUt Hotel, 


lo hook 


rsz 


attach partablaa 
ol eitlngnlahlng 


Complied. 


Wlnaor Houae 

8 lap lea building 

Bowl Briilo 

Taunlon Houae, .... 


Nods, 

_\onr, 


Are 
ol 


*"•• 


ulehlng 


■ to open out, 


Compiled. 


Tisbury. 
Taebmoo Houae, .... 


None, 

NO OB. 














Westport. 

Holel Weatporl 


None. 












': 


Wellfleet. 

















1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32, 



71 



Report of Buildings Inspected. 

Class No. 1, Dmtbict No. 7. WARREN B. BUXTON, Jmtpedor. 



Nasi or Buu-diho. 



Orders OWtn. 



Belchertown. 
R. H. Long Shoe Manufacturing 
Company '• factory . 

Soathwlck. 
HetsJ Congamond, • 



Additional moan* of 

to extinguish flro, 



egress; better 



I 



No change*, 



Ware. 
Ware Lumber Company's factory, , Outside Are-escape, 
Starred Hotel Oateide fire-escape, 

Chester. 

Chester Hotel, .... 
White's Hotel, .... 
Haralltaa's block, 



Compiled. 
CompUad. 



Hantlngton- 

Psrk Hotel, 



No cbaagae, 
No ehaogee, 
No changes, 



No changes, 



Chicopee- 

D. PKeefe's buildings : — 
» Market Street, 
3 Market Street, 
W Market Street, 
H Market Street, 
U Market Street, 
B Market Street, 

Qacopee Manufacturing 
peny's buildings: — 
tt Market Street, 
a Market Street, 
3 Market Street, 
54 Market Street, 
S Market Street, 
» Market Street, 
8 Market Street, 
A.M.Moore's Hotel, 
Wild's Hotel, . 
J. H. Ash's Hotel, . 

8pringfLeld. 
Hooker school, . 
Cooky's Hotel, . 
Hotel Hankine, . 
American House, 



Com* 



No changes, 
No changes, 
No shanges. 
No changes, 
No changes, 
No changes, 



No changes, 

No changes, 

1 No changes, 

. No changes, 

; No changes, 

No changes, 

! No changes, 

i No changes. 

No changes, 

No changes, 



i 



City Hotel, 



SroekerVs boarding house, 

Evens House 

Chandler Hotel, 

Y. W. C. A. boarding house, . 
Lerche's Hotel, . 
Mansion House, 



United States Hotel, .... 

Holyoke. 
F. X. Miner's block, 87 Park Street, 
P. X. Miner's block, 
O.Ruel, .... 
M. P. Harlbart's block, . 
O. Ganache'e block, . 
N. Gagne** block, 
A. Lavnorie's block, . 
T. L. Curren's block, 
C. T. Lyman's block, 
R. P. Kerton's block, 

C. A. Corsier*a block, 

D. Gagna's block, 
U . Perreaolt's block, 
R. M. Bolton's block, 



Better means of ventilation, . 
Red lights ; notices in rooms, 
Notices In sleeping rooms, . 
Red lights ; notices In sleepiog rooms ; 

fifteen -inch gong. 
Red lights ; gongs ; notices In sleeping Complied. 

rooms. 

No changes 

Red lights ; notices in sleeping rooms, 
Red lights ; gongs ; notices In sleeping 

rooms. \ 

No changes, ' - 

No changes, 

Red lights; notices In sleeping rooms; , Complied. 

remove rubbish from back stairs. | 
No changes, I 



Compiled. 
Complied. 
Compiled. 



Complied. 
Compiled. 



No changes, .... 

No changes 

No changes, .... 
No changes, .... 
No changes, .... 
No changes, .... 
No chanices 

No changes, .... 

No changes, .... 

Remove rubbish on fire-escape, 

No changes, .... 

No changes, .... 

No changes, .... 

No changes, .... 



Complied. 



78 EEPOET CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [J«». 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Continued. 


Nam or KaiLmse. Orderi Given. 


Compliance!. 


Holyoke — Ooo. 
Q. Patvln'a block. MLymeo Btraet, 

11 . F. Daka'a blook 

ll.Gagae'e block, 62 Bridge Street, 

G.Polvln'a block, 103 Lyman Stmt, 
G. Poutn'a blook, 17 Groier Stmt, 
G. PotvlD'a block, la Grovar Btreel, 
J. A. Lapolnl'a blook, . 
J. A.Cempeyne'abloek. 
J. 11. Filial mmune' block. 


Remove rubblah on flre-oeoape, 
Nocbangea. . . . . 
Nochangoa, .... 

No change* 

Nochaogea, .... 




Compiled. 


J. Beeudoln'e blook, 

J. rJeeodoin'a block (No.S), . 

W. H. Pryer-a block, 

Ofaarlea Provoal'a block', ! '. '. 
Holyoke Btreel Ral Iroad Oompany'e 

M Nelll'i block, 17 and 10 Bowara 

Btraet. 
M. Nelll'e block, 21 Bowara Street, 

Gilbert PotvlD'a bolldlDga : — 
107 Lyman Street, .... 

83 Lyman Street, .... 
R. O.Dwlght'a blook, . 

T. L.Uurren'a block, 

U. Parreanlt'e blook, . . . 
B. Reau II ard'a blook, 

J. St. Martin 

Vol Moqoln'a blook, 

J. J. Konner'a blook, . . . 

A. Le p pooi Ii lock 

A. Roberta block 

W. F. Wheeler' t block, . 
Cfaaa. Rannlbnrg'a block, 
Kennedy ct Bull i van 'a block, . 

J. Gnbluvllle'a block, . . . 
Frank Minora' blook, 
A.St. Mary', block, 

D. Pronli'o block 

D. Pronli'a Mock, 68 Cabot Slreot, . 
J. St. Martina block, . . 

J. Galea block, 

J. Galea No. 2 block, 

G. LamagtlelalDo'a block, 

A. D. Durcho'a block, . 

Che.. Provoal'a block, . . . 

I. Hebert'e block. 689 Beat Street, . 

J. J. Eagan'. block 

T. L. Baauleau-i block, . 
A.Sl.Wetj'eblock, 


Belter meana or ogreaa, 
Remove obatrucliona on Bre 

Belter meana of egreeej 

Cnt doora In partition nn ve 
Out doora In partition on ve 
Better meana of egreaa, 

Belter meana of egreee. 

Remove ra lib lib from flre-ei 
Remove obatrucliona from H 

NoXngoj," . . . 

Remove rubblah on flre-eeca 
Nocbengee, . . . 
NocbaDgaa, . . . 

Nochengea, . . . 
Repair Bre-eecape, 
Additional meana of egreaa 

Aiidltlooal meana of egreaa 
Nochangea, . 


rand 


pe. 
•pe 


Compiled, 
Compiled. 
Compiled. 
Compiled. 
Compiled. 

Compiled. 
Compiled. 

Compiled. 

Compiled. 

Compiled. 
Compiled. 

Compiled. 
Compiled. 
Gompllrd. 
Compiled. 
Compiled. 
Compiled. 

Compiled. 

Compiled. 
Compiled. 
Compiled. 

Compiled - 
Complied. 
Compiled. 

Compiled. 


B. Deleneyl 16s Main Btreel', . 
B. Delanay, 1S3 Main Blreet, . 


Uonoectoaieonybyatalrw. 


y». 




Complied. 



1891.] 



PUBL.IC DOCUMENT— No. 82. 



78 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Concluded. 



Bin op Bbudum). 



I 



Orders Given. 



Complt 



Holyoke — Con. 
C. P. LyrasnV block, 
C.LKellogs/s block, 
G.J.Prs«'sblock, . 
J. Bolton's block, . 
Bivenide Paper Company's block, 
K. 8t. Mary's block, . 
A Lanorle'B block, . 
J.Potrin's block, . 
L.Croebler*s block, 
G. Lain&fdelalne's block 
8. Yalta's block, . 
K.BeHTtau's block, 
J. Kennedy** block, 
W. B. C. Pearsoo's block, 
M.S. Duke's block, 
W.B C. Pearson's block, 24 Cabot 

Street. 
M. N eCarty'a block, 
C. ParqoeU's block, 
A. Leeoole's block, . 
T. Dacbarroe'e block, 
J.ff.Prew's block, . 
8. Dif resoe*s block, 
H. Pourner's block, . 
Qu. Provost block. 



Connect balconies by stairs. 

No changes 

Additional means of egress, 
Additional means of egress, 

No changes 

No changes, .... 
No changes, .... 
Additional means of e g ress, 
Additional means of egress. 
No ch-tnges, .... 
No changes, .... 
Remove obstructions, . 
Additional means of egress. 
Additional means of egrets. 
No changes, .... 
AddlUonsl means of egress. 



No changes, • 
Additional means of egress, 
Remove rubbish, . 
Additional means of egress. 
Better means of egress, 
Better means of egress. 
Additional means of egress, 
No ohanges, . 



Compiled. 

Compiled. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Compiled. 



Complied. 

t Compiled. 

Compiled. 

Complied. 



Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Plans Received and Changes Recommended. 

Dmtbict No. 7. WARREN 8. BUXTON, inspector. 



Birnj>rjre. 



Location 



B.P.Tiytor*s block, . 

I*. W. Bessie's block, . 

Lesord's block, 

<U. Game's block, • . 

KsHodsJ Needle Company's factory, 

SoMe Hospital 

J. A. Latin's block, . 

8. C. Hall's block, . 

Loiter Manufacturing Company's 

mill. 
Weslsyaa Academy Gymnasium, • 

Ware Lumber Company's mill, 

J. H. Storrs Hotel 

Boston Duck Company's mill, . 

H. Founder's block, . 

A. TrepanLer*s block, 

*. T. fit. atartta's block, 

*.*ay»s block, . 

J • Av. 0*T>ouo*U'i block, 



Bpringfleld, 

Springfield, 

Springfield, 

Springfield, 

Springfield, 

Westfleld, 

Westfleld, 

Westfield, 

Westfleld, 

Wllbraham, 

Ware, . 

Ware, 

Palmer, . 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Obicopee, 

Ohester, . 

Chicopee, 



Changes Recommended. 



Fire-stops. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire-stop*. 

Fire-stops. 

Additional 

Ventilation. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire-stops. 

Additional 



of 



Additional 

Additional egress; fire-stope. 

Fire- stops. 
Firs-stops. 
Flre-etops. 
No changes. 
Fire-stops. 



74 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Plans Received, etc. — Concluded. 



Building. 



Location 



Change* Recommended. 



Daniel Dunn'e block, .... 

Taylor & Bramley'e factory, . 

Grace Chapel, 

Holyoke high echool, .... 

Gilbert Potvln'e block, 

Hampden Glazed Paper Company's 

mill. 
Kenney's blook, 

G. Pottin's block, . 

John Bt. John's blook, 

B. Essonette's block, .... 

State Hospital for Epileptics, . 

Herman & Liohton, straw factory, . 

Maeonlo Temple 

T. J. Dewey's block, .... 

W. C. Gooney'e Hotel, 

Dormitory Smith College, 

Ward 6 eohool, 

Highland Brewing Company'e Hotel, 

National Photograph Paper and 

Chemical Company's factory. 
W. D. Kinsman's block, . 

D. L. Fuller's block 

George D. Nelson's block, 



Chicopee, 

Chtcopee, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Monson, 

Monson, 

Northampton, 

Northampton, 

Northampton, 

Northampton, 

Springfield, . 

Springfield, . 

Springfield, . 

Springfield, . 

Springfield, . 

Springfield, . 



Fire-stops. 
Additional egress. 
Fire-stops. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire-stops. 
Fire-stops. 
Fire-stops. 
Fire-stops. 

Additional egress. 
Means of egress; fire-stops. 
Means of egress; fire-stops. 
Fire-stops. 
Fire-stops. 



Additional means of egress; Are- 

stops. 
Additional 



Fire-stops. 
Fire-stops. 
Additional egress; fire-stops. 



Report of Inspector Cheney. 

Sir : — At the close of each year we are expected to make a 
report of the work performed by us daring the past year, and to 
make such recommendations and suggestions as seem to us nec- 
essary- and proper to better protect people in our district. 1° 
accordance with those requirements, I herewith submit my annual 
report, together with a tabulated statement of the work performed 
by me. 

Two hundred and forty-one buildings have been inspected and 
eighty-six orders issued, and numberless visits have been made to 
places for the purpose of informatipn and observation. Seventeen 
buildings have been provided with outside fire-escapes, and many 
rooms have been equipped with portable escapes. Sanitaries have 
been put into several buildings, and various less important matters 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 75 

attended to, as my tabulated report will show. The proprietors 
of several of the largest hotels, requiring two watchmen to be 
on doty between the hours of nine p.m. and six a.m., have availed 
themselves of the provisions of chapter 228, Acts of 1884, and 
have put in electric watch clocks ; and I feel that these hotels 
are better watched, with one watchman, than they have ever been 
before with two. In one hotel in my district, with a little over 
one hundred rooms, there are twenty-six stations to which the 
watchman has to go every hour; they are so arranged that he 
covers the entire building several times every round ; and it would 
seem as if it were nearly impossible for a fire to get any headway 
under such a complete and effective system of watching. 

While there has been no fire in hotels in my district involving 
the loss of life, yet I feel that I should not be doing my full duty 
if I neglected to call your attention to the importance of the law 
requiring watchmen in hotels of less than fifty rooms. A hotel, 
boarding or lodging house having forty-eight rooms or less than 
fifty is not required to provide red lights, watchmen or gongs. 
I have known several to be erected in my district just below the 
Dumber required, especially to avoid the expense of providing 
these things. There is practically no limit to the height of such 
a building, which of course adds to the danger of the same, and I 
feel confident that the time will come when we shall have to record 
a terrible calamity on this account. Because a hotel or boarding- 
house does not contain fifty rooms, does not eliminate all of the 
danger of one that contains fifty or more. I believe that this law 
should be amended, — perhaps not to provide watchmen, but by a 
provision that they shall be equipped with some mechanical device 
which will notify the guests of such hotels of the presence of fire 
in unusual places in these houses. 

The law providing that plans of certain buildings being erected 
in this Commonwealth shall be deposited with the inspector of 
factories and public buildings for the district in which said build- 
ings are to be erected, has been fairly well complied with during 
the past year, and plans have been received for sixty-three build- 
ings, not including public buildings, as Inspector White has the 
plans of such buildings to look after in this district. 

The plans received by me are classed as follows : twenty-five 
wooden tenement-houses, twelve of which are four, and thirteen 
three, stories high, and containing from four to sixteen tenements 
each; nine factories and two additions, eight of brick and one 
of wood, ranging from three to seven stories in height; seven 
apartment-houses, three of brick and four of wood, all being 
three stories in height; four lodging-houses with stores on the 



76 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

lower floor, three of brick, four and five stories in height, two 
of them containing upwards of one hundred rooms ; eight hotels 
and three additions, seven of wood and one of brick (the most 
of which are located on the seashore, and for summer use) ; four 
lodging-houses, three of brick and from three to five stories in 
height, two of which contain over one hundred rooms; one 
boarding-house ; one church addition ; one convent ; one office 
building. 

In all of them careful consideration has been given to the 
construction. Fire-stops have been required in the walls, floors 
and partitions. The light wells and elevator shafts are required 
to be metal lathed, also the under side of stairs, when exposed 
to danger from fires. In many of the larger tenement-booses 
brick walls have been required from cellar to roof boarding, 
practically dividing the same into small houses, and making 
what would be one large block, through which the flames would 
spread with great rapidity in case of fire, into two or three 
separate apartments, as the case may be, and lessening the 
danger to the occupants in the same proportion. In addition 
to this, in all frame buildings the space between the studding 
in the wall is cut off with fire-stops at every floor, and between 
the flooring on every partition cap coming into the halls and 
entryways, thereby preventing the spread of fire between the 
floors, and preventing its communication with the stairways and 
natural exits of the building. 

In all cases where stores are to occupy the lower floor of a 
tenement or apartment house, or where the upper floors of 
a building are used for halls or the assembling of people, I 
have insisted upon the partitions around the stairs on the lower 
floor being filled with brick, laid flatways, to the full width of 
the studding, thereby providing the most thorough fire-stopping 
around the stairways that circumstances will permit, and no 
doubt adding very materially to the safety of the occupants 
in case of fire. 

In brick buildings the space between the furring stripe on 
the walls is filled with mortar to the depth of five inches below 
the ceiling, and practically the same precaution taken in floors, 
partitions and stairways as that previously described. 

I feel confident that, in case of fire in any of these buildings, 
the spread of the same would be greatly retarded, and the occu- 
pants much safer than they would be in a building constructed 
before these laws were made and put in effect. 

The most of the buildings the plans of which I have received 
have been located in the larger cities of Essex County, where 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 77 

the buildings aa well as the population are most dense; and I 
have taken particular pains to ascertain if the fire-stops required 
were put in, visiting them several times daring their construction, 
and approving no plans unless these stipulations were in the 
specifications. 

The past year has been a very unusual one in some respects. 
During the first part of it there seemed to spring up an unusual 
number of cheap theatres in the various cities of Essex County, 
located in such unsafe places and constructed in such a manner 
that when I inspected them I concluded that the greatest duty I 
had to perform for the Commonwealth and the community in which 
they were located was to order them closed, as they were veritable 
death traps, should a fire occur in one of them. To illustrate, let 
me describe one that I found in one of the principal manufacturing 
cities on the Merrimac River. 

It was located on the upper floor of a three-story brick building, 
built for and occupied on the lower floors as a livery stable. The 
room or audience hall, which was capable of holding more than a 
thousand people, was finished, both walls and ceiling, with canvas 
stretched between the posts of the building, upon which were 
painted landscape and marine views. The ceilings overhead were 
made of the same material, and dressing rooms also. The dress- 
ing rooms were heated with two large stoves, standing six or seven 
feet high, and long runs of stove pipe ran through holes in this 
canvas and through an open unfinished space, in one case going 
through both partitions of a staircase to a chimney in the wall. 
On the second floor of this building, directly under the audience, 
were two portable furnaces that furnished heat for the theatre 
above. No part of this building was finished inside, and the 
under side of the floor above these furnaces, as well as the entire 
surface, was covered with cobwebs, the same as ordinarily found 
in any stable that has been built a long time. The floors were 
covered with carriages and sleighs, as this room was used for the 
storage of sleighs and old carriages. Under the stage on this floor 
they kept the hay and grain for the horses, and, as this was a Very 
large stable, capable of accommodating one hundred or more horses, 
you can imagine that the quantity of hay and grain was not small. 

There was a play booked for that evening, and I felt that, as a 
duty I owed the citizens of that city, I must act immediately ; and 
I notified the owner that his theatre was a death trap, and that I 
should take the responsibility to order him not to hold another 
entertainment in that place until it was put in a proper and safe 
condition for an audience to assemble in, and until he had a cer- 
tificate from this department authorizing him to use it as a theatre . 



78 EEPOBT CHrEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

He seemed considerably stirred up at first at my sudden and em- 
phatic criticism of his playhouse ; but when I poiuted out to bin 
the possible danger and loss of life in case of fire, he concluded to 
be od the safe side aud take no chances, and immediately took 
steps to discbarge bis company, which he did ; and since then no 
theatre or assembling of people has been allowed in this place, as 
I afterwards refused to give bim a certificate to occupy it as a 
public hall. 

The other two theatres were in a city in the southern part of 
the county. They were not so large, nor situated nnder such 
hazardous circumstances ; but I considered them not properly 
constructed for theatre purposes, and they were closed. 



Report of Buildings Inspected. 

Cue* No. 1, Distinct So. B. ANSEL J. CHENEY, Intpector. 



Nahi op Btjildirs. 




rder i Ol 


... 






Compua»» 


Amcflbm-y. 










































American BODM 


Ked light* 






a». 


Compiled. 
















North An (lover. 


























Compiled. 
















Bonth Congregational Church, 














Beverly . 




















































- 






















































































































































































































re-ficapei 


notice; 
























notices; 


po 


table 


Are. 


Compiled. 














Complied. 


The Fair View Home, . 
























Complied. 
















The Tit race. 










Compiled. 












































The Manas Collage, 


■"■""-■ 










" 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



79 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Continued. 



Same or Buhj>ino. 



Orders Given. 



Gloucester — Con. 
Province Cottage, 



Delphfoe Hotel, 

The durfside, . 

Oak Grove House, 

Pavilion, . 

St. Ann Church, 

8t. Ann Catholic school, 

Harvard House, 

Hamilton. 
Chebaoeo House, + 
Wennepsyken House, 

Havernlll. 
Sautes block, . 
Academy of Music, 
Almshouse, 
Webster block, . 
Webster block (No. 2), 
Chase factory, . 
Kimball block, . 
Merrill block, . 
Byron Noyee factory, 
Arnold block, . 
TUion Jk Bragg block, 
Phinney blocs, 
Eagle House, . 



Corli* block, . 
O'Brien block, . 
Rosenqnard's tenement honse, 
Jakobouaky's tenement bouse, 

Ipswich. 
Hayes Tavern, . 
Board of Trade factory, . 
Agawam House, 



Lynn. 
Newhall block, . 
Lyan Theatre, . 
MuBlc hall, 
Hotsl Puritan, . 



Foster Honse, 
8troot block. 



Keith block, 

C. B. Tebbetts block, 

Qnrney block, . 

Charles Wilson factory, 

Heffernan Building Theatre 

Hogg & Heath factory, 

Miles building, . 

People's Theatre, 

Harney Bros, factory, 

Btrooi block (No 2), 

Hecnmingway building, 

Lennox block, • 

Lennox block (No. 2), 

Putnam's block, 

Gardner & Mclf anus factory, 

Ctapp'e block, . 



Ooodell'a block, 
Bouthworth block, . 
Union House, . 
Woodbury building, 
Foster block, 
Woodbine Cottage, . 
Phelan's block, • 



Compliances. 



Means for extinguishing fire ; portable 
fire-escapes. 

No order, 

No order 

No order, 

No order, 

No order 

No order, 

Portable Are-escapes, . 



No order, 
No order, 



Fire-escape,' .... 
8tand-pipe and hose on stage. 
Fire-escape, . 
Fire-escape, . 
Fire-escape, . 
No order. 
No order, 
Fire-escape, . 
Fire-escape, . 
Fire-escape, . 
Fire-escape, . 
Remove obstruction to fire-escape, . 
Bed lights; notices; portable flre- 
escapes. 

No order, 

Fire-escape, 

No order, 

No order 



Fire-escape, 

Rail main stairway, .... 
Protect floor under laundry stove; 
portable fire-escape; notices. 



Fire-escape, ...... 

Put fire curtain in working order, 
Put fire curtain In working order, 
Extend outside fire-escape; put in 

portable fire-escapes. 
Portable fire-escapes, . 
Remove obstruction to egress on 

stairs. 
Fire escape, . 
No order, 

Portable fire-escapes, 
Repsir fire escape, 
Close the same, 
No order, 
Fire-escape, . 
Close the same, 
No order, 
No order. 
Fire-escape, . 
Bxlts not to be obstructed, 
Exits not to be obstructed, 
Portable fire-escapes, . 
Additional egress, 
Remove oombustlble material from 

cellar. 
Portable fire-escapes, 
Portable fire-escapes, 
Portable fire-escapes, 
No order. 
No order, 

I Portable fire-escapes, 
Portable fire-escapes, 



Compiled. 



Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Compiled. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 

mm 

Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 



80 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jm 
Report of BuHding* Inspected - - Continued. 




Fuk» HmIm* boUdliia, 

St-Mnrj'.pBroektaHehool. . 
A.O H.bBlMtnc, ■ ■ 

Fort'.HJL . . . . 

St. M.rv'. Olkof* Chun*. . 

Iwi tVimr mull aebeot, . 

DurHj Msct, ! " ! ) 
Bl»ofr.rd'. An» Hotel, . 
Tb. b™. kt Iloul, . . 
ItWburj block. 
PlUbury factory, 
Iwi Room, . 
In 8du Buk bulWlnr, 
Iwi Bonk bulWI»«. 
?"«'•« """"" 



. I Portable An 
. ' No onimt, 
. No order. 
.No order, 
. Additional . 




fcitH(No.t!, Fln-w 



OonptW. 

emptied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 



Oo-nlW. 
Compiled. 

UanpHnl. 



L.TC DOCUMENT — No. 38. 

/ Buildivgs Inspected — Continued. 



.. 


Ori.™ Glv*a. 


0-,*-. 


m 












• (So. »), 




: 
















Portable An Mtpfi, i 
















(Ko-«. - 






■t. 


















rah. . . 


Kernuir eonibnadW* malarial hn 




































Portable flre-oesapea 








- 




























Remore chliDMj or make It Ufa, 


OompllKi. 




No cider 






























Portable Innapil, .... 














Compiled. 








riri-llnrui fOBC* 


- 
















































" 




Robot* obMrnctlou Is pM—fwy, . 


Compiled. 
















Compiled. 




Rrsy : 


Compiled: . 






" 



8* REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Report of BmOdimg* Inspected — Coneloded. 




Hospital, 
8*. Joseph Charch, 
Chapel, 



Jackson's 



Topefleld. 
Odd Fellows ball, 
A. O U. W. hall, . 
Town ball, 
Henick shoe factory, 



No 
No 
No 
So 

So 
So 



So 
So 
So 
So 

So 
So 



Pat 



No 
So 
So 

So 

'■ So 
No 



No order. 
No 



of gallery. 
No order. 



No order, 



No order, 
No order. 
No order. 
No order. 



Complied. 



on each aide 



gallery. 



Compiled. 

Compiled. 

Compiled. 
Oonpoad. 



Plans Received and Changes Recommended. 

Dirrmicr No. 8. AN8SL J. CHBNET, Jaepecfor. 



BUTLODIO. 



Location 



The Terrace, 

Province House, 

Btacj's Hotel, 

Ocean Side Hotel addition. 
Garland's tenement bonse, 
Anguatna tenement house. 
Bookaway Honae, .... 
Killom block, . . . . . 
Wlnchell factory addition, 
Brlckett building, alterations, . 
Green factory, 



Gloucester, 

Gloucester, 

Gloucester, 

Gloucester, 

Gloucester, 

Gloucester, 

Gloucester, 

Haverhill, 

Haverhill, 

Haverhill, 

Haverhill, 



Changes Recommended. 



Fire-stops. 

None. 

Flre-stopa. 

None. 

Additional 

Flre-stopsj. 

None. 

Fire stop*. 

None. 

Tin elevator well. 

Additional flight of stain. 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



83 



Plans Received, etc. — Continued. 



Building. 

Bulftnoh block, 

Bennett factory , 

Manning block, 

Sagamore block, 

Proctor block, 

Hemmlngway building, . 
Harney Bros, factory addition, 
Bentou'a building, 

Btrout block, 

R&cy block, 

Twentieth Century building, . 
Street's block (No. 2), 

Aycr block, 

MeBvoy'e tenement bonae, 
McCormack tenement bonae, . 
La Fatm'a tenement bonae. 
La Palme tenement boose (No. 2), . 
Dyer fc Bakir*s tenement bonae, 
Lang's tenement bonae, . 
McDermot's tenement bonae, . 
Fairfield's block, . . . . 
Moran'a tenement bonae, . 
SalBran'a tenement bonae, 

ArHngtoa mill, 

Hornc*a tenement honae, . 
Dearborn's tenement bonae, . 

NoweD'a Mock, 

Bulflvan'a block, 

Austin's block, 

Currier's tenement bouse, . 
HartwelPa tenement bonae, 
Bea/ttfe's tenement bonae, . 

Wingnto block, 

St. Peul'a Cbnrch addition, .. 
Broderlek block, . . . , 
6 am peon block, - . • . . 
St. Joseph's Oonront, . . . 
Batlabory House. 



Location 



Ohangea Recommended. 



Lynn, . 

Lynn, . 

Lynn, • 

Lynn, . 

Lynn, • 

Lynn, . 

Lynn, . 

Lynn, . 

Lynn, 

Lynn, . 

Lynn, 

Lynn, . 

Lynn, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrenoe, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Lawrence, 

Newbury port 

Peabody, 

Peabody, 

Peabody, 

Salisbury, 



Fire-stops. 

Stairs to be inoloaed. 

Additional means of escape in 

case of fire. 
Additional egress. 

Additional egress. 

Fire-stop stairways. 

Change location of stairs. 

None. 

Fire-proof stairways. 

None. 

Fire-stops; additional egress. 

Stairs to be Inclosed with brick. 

None. 

Brick fire-stops in partitions. 

Fire-stops. 

Two brick fire walla. 

Two brick fire walla. 

Brick fire-stops. 

None. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire-stops. 

Fire-stops. 

None. 

None. 

Brick fire walla. 

None. 

Additional egress. 

Brick fire walla. 

None. 

None. 

Fire-stops; metal lath light well. 

None. 

Additional egress. 

Fire-escape. 

Fire-stops. 

Additional egress. 

None. 



84 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

Plant Received, etc. — Concluded. 



The BeDcrUw House, 

FtmiMIb bolldtoi. »H«r«loM, 




s™. 



Report of Inspector Splaink. 

Sir: — I respectfully submit herewith a tabulated annual report 
of my inspections in District No. 9 of such buildings as come 
under the provisions of sections 24 and 34 of chapter 481, Acta 
of 1894, and of my official action in the treatment of such new 
buildings as are affected by section 25 of same chapter and sob 
above cited. 

I have inspected the many manufacturing and other establish- 
ments in my district, and have enforced the provisions of sections 
24 and 34, which require that ample means of egress shall be 
maintained and that suitable means of extinguishing fire shall be 
provided. Under authority of section 25 I hare required that 
plans of sucb new buildings in course of construction and of such 
projected new buildings in my district as are affected by this 
section be submitted, for tbe purpose of securing at the proper 
time ample means of egress in case of fire and suitable means of 
extinguishing fire. 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



85 



Plans Received and Changes Recommended. 

Dutkiot No. 9. HENRY 8PLAINB, Jntptdor. 



Buildiso. 


Location. 


Changes Beoommended. 


Talbot apartment house, . 


Brookllne, . 


Fire-stops. 


Phillips apartment borne, . 


Brookllne, . 


Additional egress. 


Plneo apartment noose, . 


Brookllne, . 


Better egress. 


Bird building, stores and apartments, 


Brookllne, 


None. 


Keentag*s apartment house, 


Brookllne, . 


Fire and smoke stops. 


Edwards ft Sons' shirt factory. 


Natiek, . 


Fire-escape; means to extinguish 
fire. 



Report of Buildings Inspected. 

Class No. 1, District No. 0. HENRY SPLA1NE, Inspector. 



Namb of Buildikq. 



Orders Given. 



Compliances. 



Ashland. 
Ashland Shoe and Leather 

Wsrren Thread Company, 
Scott's HoteL . 
Central Bonae. . 
Ashland almshouse, . 



Avon. 

L. O. Uttlefleld's shoe factory, 
J. B. Lewis' ahoe factory, 
Avon House, .... 



Com- 



Bellingrham. 
Taft, Ifurdock ft Co , cassimere 

factory. 
S. A. Greenwood's box factory, 
Bay Woolen Company mill (No. 1), 
Rav Woolen Company mill (No. 2), 
Beungham almshouse, , 

Blackstone. 

Lawrence Fell! og Company mill, . 
Lawrence Felting Company, shoddy 

mill. 
Lawrence Felting Company, shoddy 

mill (No. 2). 
Central boarding house, . 
Woonsocket Rubber Company mill 

(No. 1). 
Woonsocket Rubber Company mill 

(Ko. 2). 
Woonsocket Rubber Company mill 

(So 3). 
Woonsocket Rubber Company mill 

(No. 4). 
Burns tenement building, 
Keoairh** tenement block, 
Fletcher tenement bulldtng, 
Con loo tenement building, 
O'Gara'e tenement building, 
Warren block, . 

Big Store block, .... 
Blackstone Manufacturing Com 

pany mill (No. 1). 
Btaekstoue Manufacturing Com- 
pany mill (No. 2). 



Erect fire-escapee, 



None, 

None, ..... 
Means of extinguishing fire, 
Means of extinguishing fire, 

Repair railing of stairs, 
Means of reaching fire-escape, 
Means of extinguishing fire, 



None, 

None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 



None, 
None, 

None, 

None, 
None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 

None, 



In course of 
erection. 



Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



88 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [«Tu. 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Continued. 



lllanltatono — Cod. 
Blacketone M an u factorial Oom- 

Cnj-ml" (No. I). 
k«oo. MuufulDrlDa Com. 
Snj mill (No. *) . 
k.ton. 1I.1111 ruin ring Com- 
pimy mill (Mo. »). 



I'* building, . 

BrooJtJJne. 
ck'a Hotel. . 
r, Oabol Electric Company'i 



Tha Ftwdick, apart 

The I brook! apartc 
The Monies lb, .pai 

TheSl" Andrew?, ■ 
D..1. Uai.aloo. bui 
WcLeotl UanaloD,! 
Seamao'e block, 
Sulllvao'i block, 
Clem eon apart mso 

t'h».r building", ! 
Btearna building, 

Whyt* bnlldlng, 
Grafton building, 
Tha Adelaide, apai 
Tha Kern p. ford, a 
Boynf.n bull-Hog. 
B.lfen.ulu block, 



The lUthraorc boarding hout 
Ook'. bl„c«. . 
Hcrrlck & Co. apartmint 



Mm. Mnllcf. bearding ho 
Jib. i HhlrJdi'workahop, 
The KIm, apartnM nt, 
Tbf L-ni-r. apanm.nt, 
Kfn.F K Smith 1 , bo.rdl 
Tho WIclHeld, apanmem 
The Verona, apartment, 
O'Brl.n Broe. building, 



Meana to • itlugnlah fli 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



87 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Continued. 



Namje or Building. 



Orders Given. 



Compliance*. 



Brookllne — Con. 
Plneo bonding, apartments, . 
The Linden, apartments. 
The RHsabeth, apartments, . 
Doctor Morphy's building, 
DiiCtor Murphy's building (No. 2), 
Cook's apartment house (No. 1), . 
Cook's apartment house (No. 2), . 
O'Brien's building, apartments, . 
Bailer's lumber mill, 
Brook Hne almaboose, 
Lynch's block, apartments, . 
The Oratton, tenements, . 
The Kansas, tenements, . 
Ftemming building, . . . . 

Canton. 
American Net and Twine Company 

factory. 
Xnreka Silk Company mill (No.1), 
Zoreka 811k Company mill (No. 2), 
Bureka Silk Company mill (No. 3), 
Morae Broe stove polish factory, . 
Draper Bros. Co. factory, 

Wellington Houa* 

Gspsn's block, tenements, 

Canton Manufacturing and Bleach- 
ing Company. 
Canton almaboose, . 

Foxborouffh. 
Ionian & Kimball's factory, 
Caton Bros., Bizby & Co. factory, 
Coeassett House, 
Foxborough House, . 
A. F. Beasts Bat Company, 
Foxboroogb almaboose, . 
John Castik>*a hat factory, 
The Mark A. Torrey Co., 

Praminffham. 

Q reg o ry. Shaw & Co., . 
Banders tenement honse, 
A.M Barnes *Co,. 
SaaUey St Co. straw factory, 
T L Barber & Co., . 
Old Colony House, . 
The Proctor House, • 
Frank F Avery, 
Wmthmp House, 
Irving Square lodging house, 
Fnmtngbam Box Company, 
H. L. Sawyer tenements, 
MeFarland'e tenement block, 
Anbnrn L*»t Company, . 
Cnston'a block, . 
Sanitarium tenement block, 
Ordway & Co., 



Blades building (No. 1), . 
Blades building (No. 2), . 
French Bros, building, . 
Central House, . 
Home for the Aged, . 
Mrs. Moultoo's honse, 
Simpson's tenement building. 
Church Mock, tenements, 
Frsmlnghmn almshouse, . 

Holbrook. 
Pafne Shoe Company, 
Whtteomb, Paine & Co , . 
J. B. BUttnmV shoe laetory, 
Edmund White's shoe factory 
Ooeree Bros , 
O/NeJI Shoe Company, . 
Thomaa White St, Co., 



None, 

None, . 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, ....... 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None 

Means to extinguish fire, 

None 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None 

None, 

None, 

None, 

Fire-escape; means to extinguish fire, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

Means to extinguish fire, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None 

None 

None 

None, 

None 

None, 

None, 

Means to extinguish fire, 

None, 

None 

None, 

None 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None 

None, 

None, ....... 

Means to extinguish lire, . 

None 

None, . . ... 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

Additional egress, . 
Additional egress, . 
Additional egress, . 
None, 



Complied. 



In course o f 
erection. 



Complied. 



Complied. 



Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Continued. 



Nami op Bwldins. 


Order. Given. 


Com pi lanes. 


Holllston. 

C. J. Drlwoir. faoiory. . 
O.F. Drttcoir. factory, . 
Uughcn & Co hameaa factory, 
C. H.Goodwin', factory, . . 
Jobn Clancy •b« r.ctory, 
Bollard Houae 


Hon 

None! '.'.'.','.'.'. 

Mean, to oxtlngnlah Hra, 

llaana to aitlngnltli Ore, . 

None 


Compiled. 

Complied. 
Compiled. 


Holllaiou ilaraei. Company, . 

Hopedale. 

Hopedale MacbToe Company, . 
Uulober Temple Company, . 
The Hopedale Machine Screw C 

The Hopedale Houm, 

Hopkinton. 


n, 

i). 
3), 


None. 
None, 








C cm piled. 


Hopkinton Hoi»t, . 

(ferry >■ boarding bouts, . . 

Centra) Houte 

Park Horn* 

A. Coburo ft Son*, . 
Retervolr Hou», . 
Hopkinton i] mi boms, 

Hyde Park. 

Hamblln'i factory, . 
Hamblln-. tenement block (No 
Hnmc-lln'a tenement block (No 
Hamblln'. tenement block (No 


None! 

No"| 
None, 

Haw* to 

None, 
None. 


extlngulah Ore, 


Complied. 
Complied. 


Not" 1 "" 




Hamblln'i tenement block (No 


«>, 


None, 












Mr.. Frank Luker'i building, 

Hedfleld. 

Burli, Dalley ft Co. itraw wor 


■,. 


None . 

None 




The Klmwood Hotel, 
Medfleld almehouae, 

Medway. 


Non 

Mean, to eitlngnlah Are, . 

None 

E^rcai; iieidi to aallnfuUh Bra, 

Ucnui to 01 tin guild fire, 


Compiled. 
Complied. 




om- 

r, ■ 




N. E. Awl and Needle Compao 
Abnor M.8mlLb'**boe factory 
Medway almahoBW, . . . 

Mendon. 


Non 

Non 

Moane to aitlnfol.h Bra, . . 
None 


Complied. 
Compiled. 


MUford. 

alllford Shoe Uompmy feet 

(No. 1> 
Milford Shoe Company fact 

(BTo.fi. 
Bamual A. Eutman'i piper 

factory. 
Samuel A. Ka.tman'a paper 

factory (No. i). 
Clapp, Hnoklna ft Temple, 


'y 

boi 


None, 










Non. 




(Tone, 

Non 


• 



^IC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 

/ Buildings Impeded — Continued. 





















w work., . 


N™' ' 




















































(Ambro- 


Wr.-^,,; 


naua to utlBfotab In. 










1 tutor* 


Fire-nope; 


hu to utlDfnkita Br*, 




















*Um*h, : 






None. . 




ore 
















Benin W en 









J- 


Me.ni u., mlnfuhh Ore, 
Unn> ID enlngnHb Br< ; rop. 

Keep carlaln door on locked 


•■Capo*, 
















\u ' ' 


Ueau to eitluiniih Bra, 












■ wn> to eiUneul.ll Br., . 


u 

ompmne, . 












Additional <U1»; nun to a 
Bra. 

Hon* lo «Un|ulBh Bra, 


"— 


np«nj(No.'l) 


Hoc*, '.'.'.','.'.'. 



90 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Concluded. 



or Bgildixo. 



Orders GIt 



Scrathborooffh — Go*. 
Coffd»>Ttil«WootaaCa«p*ay(So.2j, None, 
Bt. Mark's school, . . ; Xone, 
Fay school, 



• t 



X< 
, None, 



Stouffhton. 
J. ft H. Fhxpatncfc's shoe 
Charles Tenuey's shoe factory, 
Geo. K. Belcher's last factory, 

Milton House, ' Means to extinguish fire, 

J. G. Phtnoey Counter Company, .Xooe, .... 
French ft Ward, upper mill, . . J Nona, .... 

• 1 ^^ ODC| • • • a 

• »«OuCf • s> • • 



French * Ward, lover mill, 
;htoo almshouse. 
Stratum ft Bone, 



Upton. 
William KnowUoo ft Sons strai 

works. 
Hotel Pleasant, .... 
Know tarn's boarding-house, . 
The Sharp block, . 



Walpole. 
Union Band paper ft Smery Cotn- 

Neponset House, .... 
Walpole almshouse, .... 
Bradford, Lewis ft Son, . 
Chandler Adjustable Chair Com- 
pany. 



Weymouth. 
Edwin Clapp'e shoe factory, 
John Carroll ft Sons, 
Strong ft Garfield Company, 
Kloo Sherman's Sons, 
Weymouth Millen Company, 
H. B. Beed & Co. shoe factory, 
Cashing House, ... 



S. H. Stetson ft Co. shoe factory, . 
Frederick Cate*s wrapper factory, . 
George K. Porter's shoe factory, . 

John W. Hart ft Co 

George H. Bicknell's factory, . 

Weymouth almshouse, . 

M. Sheehy's shoe factory, 

Bast Weymouth paper box factory, 

M C. Dlzer ft Co. shoe factory, . 

Juniper House, 

Torrcy, Curtis & Tlrrell, . 
John K. Mann, wool scouring, 
Wesssgussett House, 
Monatiquot House, • 

The Bayside boarding house, . 



Wrentham. 
Cowall ft Hall's jewelry factory, . 
Wrentham almshouse, 
Daniel Brown's straw works, . 
Lincoln ft Bacon's building (No. 1), 
Lincoln ft Bacon's building (No. 2), 



Xooe, . 
Ropes In position; 
guish fire. 



to extin 



Complied. 



Complied. 



Xooe, 

Xooe, 
Xooe, 
Nona, 



Xooe, 



Means to extinguish fire, 
Xooe, .... 
Xooe, .... 
Xooe, .... 



CompBsd. 



None, 

Xooe, ...... 

Xone, 

None 

Xone, 

Xooe, .......! - 

Place ropes ; provide means to ex- j Complied, 
tinguish fire. i 

Xone, I . 

Xone ; 

Xone, | - 

None, | 

Means to extinguish fire, . . Complied. 

Xone, - 

None, j - 

Nooe 

None, 

None, . 

None, 

None, 

Xone, . . ■ . . 

None 

None 



None, 
None, 
Xone, 
Xone, 
None, 



[C DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



Summary. 
t&blishments inspected during the year, 
24 snd 3-1 of chapter 481, Acts 



:abliahracnls visited for inspection, which 
ime under the provisions of the sections 



nspectlon, which were found to be abso- 
i account of business depression, 



port of Inspector Merbiam. 

be honor to submit the following report of 

f me during the past year, tabulated so far 

>r of boNdings has been inspected and plans 
jceived ; and in all cases, except a few where 
iled to get appropriations sufficient to do the 
recommend at ions have been promptly complied 
to this, much time has been given in testing 
buildings finished late last season, aud the 
7 work connected with those in process of 
ding several buildings where changes have 
ipliance with former notices. Of the plans 
>leased to note the general improvement, in 
list the spread of fire, better means of egress 
*ionB, over prior years. 



Received and Changes Recommended. 

Jo. 10. FRKDEKIOK W. 1IICRRIA.1I, faiptetor. 



Coawar, 

Ornt Rarringtoi 
Stat BarclDgtot 
Grvufiald, . 
Honttgue, . 
KoaUfiw, 



Flra-atopa. 



92 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Plans Received^ etc. — Concluded. 



Building. 



Location. 



Changes Recommended. 



Jones building, . 
Hastings block, ,. 
Hagerty block, . 
Braytonville school, . 
Dowllng block (No. 1), 
Bowling block (No. 2), 
Johnson school, . 
Flaherty block, . 
Parochial school, 
O'Brien block, . 
Fraternal ball, . 
Lutheran Church, 
Notre Dame Church, 
St. John's Church, 



North Adams, 
North Adams, 
North Adams, 
North Adams, 
North Adams, 
North Adams, 
North Adams, 
North Adams, 
North Adams, 
North Adams, 
Orange, . 
Orange, . 
Pittsfleld, 
Wllliamstown, 



Better egress. 

None. 

None. 

Better egress; suggestions on ven- 
tilation. 
None. 

None. 

Suggestions on ventilation. 

Fire-stops. 

Suggestions on ventilation. 

None. 

Better egress. 
None. 
None. 
None. 



Report of .Buildings Inspected. 

Class No. 1, District No. 10. FREDERICK W. MKRRIAM, IntpecUtr. 



Name of Bunj>ixe. 



Orders Given. 



Compliance*- 



Adams. 
Commercial 8treei school, 

Amherst. 
North Amherst school, . 

Cheshire. 
Dean's Hotel, . 



Better ventilation, 



Suggestions on ventilation, 



Rope fire-escapes, 



Dalton. 



High school, Special report. 



Easthampton. 
Union Centre school, 

Great Barrington. 
Duram building, 
Berkshire block, 
Miller House annex, . 
Courier block, . 
Banrord block, . 



Better ventilation, 



Complied* 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Rope fire-escnpes, ! Complied 

Fire-escapes, \ Complied 



Greenfield. 
Franklin County court house, . 

Hinsdale. 
Bowen blook 



Holyoke. 
I. y roan 8treel school, 
Hargent Htreol school, 
Nouoluok Street school, . 



Rope fire-escapes, 
Fire-escapes, . 
None, 



Suggestions on ventilation, . 



Additional egress, 



Better ventilation, 
Better ventilation, 
Changes in flues, . 



Complied. 
Complied. 



Under cob 
siderstioo. 

Complied* 



Complied. 



I 

\ 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



93 



Report of Buildings Inspected — Concluded. 



Najck or Building. 



Order* Gives. 



Compliances. 



North Adams. 
Bearer mill, . 
Eclipse mill, . 
Y.M.O. A. building, 
Drnry Academy, 
Union Street school, 
Church Street school, 

Orange. 

Htgh school, . 

Putnam Opera House, 
Orange ahiit mill, . . 

Palmer. 
Village grammar school, . 

Pittafleld. 

England block 

Berkshire County court house, 

Sheffield. 
Sheffield House, 

South Hadley. 
High school, . 

Stockbridffe. 

Edwards Anna, 

Wales. 

Centre school, . 
South Centre school, 



None, .... 
None, .... 
Additional egress, 
Suggestions on sanitarles, 
i Suggestions on sanitarles, 
Suggestions on sanitarles, 



Better ventilation, 
Fire curtain, . 
Swing doors out, . 



Better ventilation, 



None, 

Better ventilation, 



Additional egress, 



None, 



None, 



Better ventilation, 
Better ventilation, 



Complied. 
Compiled. 
Compiled. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 



, Under consider* 
t ation. 



Under consider, 
atlon. 



Complied. 



Certificates Issued. 



Public Buildings, Factories, 

Workshop*! and Tenb- 

xbnt Houses. 




i 



Date of 
Certifi- 
cate. 



Spragoe & Hathaway Co.'s factory, 
8pragoe & Hathaway Co.'s factory, 
Sprague & Hathaway Co.'s factory, 
Spragoe & Hathaway Co.'s factory, 

E, Edwards ft 8one' shirt factory, 
S. Edwards 8c Sons' shirt factory, 
E. Edwards St Sons' shirt factory, 
Ginn ft Co.'s publishing establish- 
ment. 
Qiao at Co.'s publishing establish- 
ment. 
Ginn fc Co '• publishing establish- 
ment. 
Ginn St Co.'s publishing establish. 

meet. 

Eevaraibie Cottar Co.'s factory, 

Etarerettkle Collar Co '• factory, 

Beveretble Collar Co.'s factory. 

Rrveraible Collar Co.'s factory, 

Ett<* ball building, . . V 

Rttc* ball building, . . . 

Elloihiill building, . . . 

Mcdlord Opera House, . . 

Mcdford Opera House, . . 






1 
2 
3 

4 



1 
2 
8 
1 

2 



1 

2 
3 

4 
1 
2 

3 

.* 

-t 



West Somerville, 
West Somerville, 
West Somerville, 
West Somerville, 



Natlck, . 
Natlck, . 
Natiek, . 
Cambridge, . 

Cambridge, . 

Cambridge, . 

Cambridge, . 

Cambridge, . 
Cambridge, . 
Cambridge, . 
Cambridge, . 
Newton, 
Newton, 
Newton, 
Med ford, 
Medford, 



1895. 

slay 0, 

», 
9. 
0. 

1896. 

Feb. 27, 
27, 
27, 
27, 

27, 

27, 

27, 

Mar. 14, 
14, 
14, 

H. 

18, 
18, 
18, 
24, 
24, 



Inspector. 



H. J. Bsrdwell. 
H.J. Bard well. 
H. J. Bard well. 
H.J. Bard well. 



Henry Splaine. 
Henry 8plaine. 
Henry Splaine. 
H.J.Bardwell. 

H.J. Bard well. 

H.J.Bardwell. 

H.J.Bardwell. 

H. J. Bard well. 
H.J.Bardwell. 
H.J.Bardwell. 
H.J.Bardwell. 
Jos. A. Moore. 
Jos. A.Moore. 
Jos. A. Moore. 
John T. White. 
John T. White. 



* Main auditorium. 



t Gallery. 



94 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Certificates Issued — Concluded. 



Public Buildings, Factories, 
Workshops and Tene- 
ment Houses. 



Story. 



Location. 



Date of 
Certifi- 
cate. 



Inspector. 



Drill hall Eighth Regiment armory, 

Wonderland Mtuee and Parlor 
Theatre. 

Wonderland Muaee and Parlor 
Theatre. 

American Waltham Manufacturing 
Company. 

American waltham Manufacturing 
Company. 

American Waltham Manufacturing 
Company. 

Horton's trunk manufactory, 

Horton's trunk manufactory, 

Horton's trunk manufactory, 

A. H Ord way's factory, . 

A. H Ord way's factory, . 

Charles H. Allen's building, 

Charles H. Allen's building, 

E. G. Park's Grand View apart, 
ment house. 

E. O. Park's Grand View apart- 
ment house. 

E. G. Park's Grand View apart- 
ment house. 



-t 
-t 
1 



1 
2 
3 
2 
8 
3 
4 
1 

2 

3 



Newbury port, 
Lowell, . 

Lowell, . 

Waltham, 

Waltham, 

Waltham, 

Somerville, . 
Somerville, . 
Somerville, . 
So Pramingham, 
So. FramlDgnam, 
Lowell, . 
Lowell, . 
Somerville, . 

Somerville, . 

Somerville, 



1890. 

Mar. 27, 
April 15, 

15, 
May 7, 

7. 

T. 

7, 

7, 

7. 

16, 

16, 

July 9, 

Oct. 12, 

12, 

12. 



John T. White. 
John T. White. 

John T. While. 

H. J. Bardwell. 

H. J. BardwelL 

H. J. Bardwell. 

H.J. Bard well. 
H. J. B» rd well. 
H.J Bardwell. 
Henry Splsioe. 
Henry Splsioe. 
H J. Bard well. 
H. J. Bardwell. 
H.J. Bardwell. 

H.J. Bardwell. 

H.J. Bardwell. 



* Main floor. 



t Main auditorium. 



t Gallery. 



A Model Massachusetts Cotton Mill. 

It has been my custom from year to year in my annual 
reports to bring to notice some special feature of interest 
that has attracted my attention during the fiscal year. 

The following description and illustration of the Berkshire 
Cotton Manufacturing Company's mill, at Adams, Mass., 
shows the great progress that has been made in modern 
factory construction. 

This new mill building is from the design of Mr. F. P. 
Shelden, mill engineer, of Providence, R. I., and possesses 
points of interest, inasmuch as it is said to be the first 
cotton mill in this country in which steel floor beams are 
used. As mill buildings have gradually increased in size, 
thus increasing the width of the buildings and necessitating 
larger window spaces and larger spaces between the rows 
of interior columns, the floors have become weaker and 
more subject to vibration. It was thought that, owing to 
the increased cost, steel would never make its appearance 
in. buildings of this character ; but this objection was over- 
come by placing longitudinal girders on the steel girders, 



* * 



96 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

running from each room to the engine room and connecting 
with the engine ; thereby, in the event of an accident, the 
machinery may be stopped instantly by the pressure of a 
button from any one of a number of given points in each 
room. 



Reports by Districts of Factories, Workshops and 
Mercantile Establishments inspected and Orders 
issued. 

Report op Inspector Halstrick. 

Sir: — I respectfully submit herewith a tabulated report of 
factories and workshops inspected by me during the past year. 

The law relative to the guarding of dangerous machinery has 
been strictly enforced, and the orders given cheerfully complied 
with. The sanitation in factories and workshops I have found to 
require constant supervision, more especially in the smaller work- 
shops, which are not at all times kept in a condition conducive to 
health. Considerable progress, however, has been made, and 
good results have been attained under the provisions of the l&*< 
which are manifest in every instance where orders have been given 
to remedy the imperfections. 

I find in nearly all of the manufacturing establishments of this 
district where children are employed a disposition on the part ot 
those employing them to live up to the law, and a thorough in- 
vestigation of the district shows quite a decrease during the p&*t 
year in the number of children employed under the age of fourteen 
years ; and good results have been attained in regard to the pro- 
hibition of child labor under the age of thirteen years, as it is 
seldom that a child under that age is to be found in any manu- 
facturing establishment in the district. 

The law relative to the reports of accidents, requiring factories, 
manufacturing and mercantile establishments to send to the chief 
of the district police a written notice of any accident to an 
employee, has not in all cases been observed by the mercantile 
establishments, their plea being ignorance of such law. 

The elevators in the district have been constructed in the manner 
required by law, and invariably provided with some form of safety 
device, whereby the car is held in the event of an accident to the 
hoisting rope or gear; and the openings to the well-holes hav* 
been provided with doors, automatic gates or bars. The I** 
relative to the employment of custodians of elevators (wherein ll 
is provided that no person, firm or corporation shall permit any 



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IXJCUMENT — No. 32. 



t of Inspector Mullen. 
your instructions, and in compliance with 
tabulated report of duty performed during 
is of factories and workshops, tlieir condi- 
, and the enforcement of the various laws 
if this department, I beg leave to state aa 

ay case where the conditions of any estab- 
i be changed. The ventilation and sanitary 
ad to be in every particular comfortable and 

guarding machinery have been issued, owing 
?ers see the necessity for so doing, and this 
it the sending of orders to comply with the 

>loyment of children under thirteen years of 
.gesof fourteen and sixteen, the number has 
w, and for such aa have been found certifl- 
been provided, 
aints of the nonpayment of employees under 

iccidents have occurred in my district, both 
about eighteen years of age. These acci- 
ir, yet happening in different establishments, 
to repeat what I have said in my former 
e should be used by those operating eleva- 
en the number of fatalities and the public 
J. 

een posted wherever orders have been Bent 
me. 

Dwling alleys resulted in the finding of boys 
ige, without certificates, who were employed 
j ; and in these cases the employers were 
ith such as were employed contrary to law ; 
in every instance complied with, 
the heating of street railway cars, which 
and ended in March, 1896, met with very 
; to the fact that the methods used for beat- 
igether new, and the system and modes had 
I into. The duties attending this branch of 
>us ; being ft matter of grave importance to 
necessitated careful attention to see that the 
adhered to. Taking into consideration the 



104 REPORT CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. [Ja 

Dumber of cars operated and the meagre facilities for heati 
them, very few complaints were made, and those were of a tiivi 
character and immediately remedied. 

Under a special order I inspected the several bakeries located 
my district, to ascertain their condition. A report relating 
these establishments was made, and legislative enactments ha 
been provided governing the inspection of bakeries throughout t 
State. 

The increase of establishments of various kinds entails a rigo 
ons and careful Inspection, requiring every energy for this increast 
field of duty. The opening of new fields of employment is co 
stantly going on, and such additions make it incumbent to I 
active sod diligent. 

Summary. 

Number of inspections made, 893 

Number of orders issued 45 

Number of compliances, 45 

Number of children under thirteen, 1 

Number of children between fourteen and sixteen, . . 1 

Number of males employed 3,828 

Number of females employed, 1,006 

Total number employed, 4,834, 



106 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



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Complied 
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Post time table, .... 
Guard stairway ; guard belts, 
Designate closets ; post time table, 

Post time table 

Box belts ; cover set screws, . 
Guard engine, ... 

Box belt ; post time table. 
Illiterate minor attend evening 


Guard circular saw, .... 

Post time table 

Procure certificate ; post time table, 
Repair rail on engine ; guard belt, . 

Guard belt; designate closets, 
Designate closets ; post time tnblo, . 


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ClfARLESTOWN. 

Wm. Litchfield, 

£. A.Gillett & Son, . 

Stevens Bros., 

G. F. Caller, 

Furbush & Co., . 

Rowell, Dodge & O'Brien, 

.1. D. Robertson, . 

H. II. Osgood* Co., . 

Natl. Tufts, 





1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



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117 



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122 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Summary. 

Number of factories inspected, 423 

Number of buildings inspected, . ... . 54 

Number of elevators inspected, 152 

Number of orders issued, 72 

Number of compliances 70 

Better egress needed reported to Mr. Dyson, . . 5 

Total number of employees, 50,345 

Number of males over sixteen years of age, . . . 31,963 

Number of females over sixteen years of age, . . 16,477 
Number of children between fourteen and sixteen years 

of age, 1,892 

Number of children under fourteen years of age (vaca- 
tion certificates), 13 

Visited 139 factories, to investigate accidents and complaints, 
and in relation to compliance with the laws. Visited and reported 
upon 31 bakeries and 11 bowling alleys, situated in Worcester, 
Fitchbarg, Leominster, Clinton, Webster and West borough. Quite 
a number of factories have been closed for a time during the past 
season, which has necessitated a second visit to make an inspection. 



Report of Inspector Tiernet. 

Sir: — In addition to the tabulated report which is enclosed 
herewith I desire to make a statement in regard to the working of 
the different laws which I am called upon to enforce. 

Sections 14 and 16 of chapter 508 of the Acts of the year 1894, 
in relation to the employment of children, call for a great deal of 
time and care on the part of an inspector. The overseers and 
foremen of the different workshops and factories in this district 
have their orders from the superintendent not to employ children 
unless they have proper certificates. However, quite frequently I 
find children under sixteen years of age employed in workshops 
and factories without proper certificates, and, as I am required by 
law to give notice in writing to the parties concerned that I shall 
proceed against them unless they comply with the law, this notice 
has the desired effect, and the certificates are procured or the 
children discharged* Rarely are children under fourteen years of 
age found employed in this district, the disposition being to employ 
over that age rather than under. 

The evening schools of this district last season were well attended 
and bid fair to have as good attendance this season. 

Relating to sanitary appliances, the past year of inspection has 
been a notable one for the improved conditions of sanitary and 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 123 

ventilation arrangements in the different workshops and factories 
of this district. I have given the strictest attention to patting in 
new water-closets with flush bowls and automatic tanks, also to 
connect the water-closets with the sewers, and have had other 
closets remodelled which required improved conditions, and made 
as clean as practicable. I can safely say that the sanitary ar- 
rangements in the manufacturing and mercantile establishments 
of this district are in first-class condition, with improvements still 
going on. 

The elevators in my district I have had placed in good condition 

as regards safety appliances, new cables, gears, automatic gates, 

trap doors, etc. In looking over the different elevators in the 

• large manufacturing establishments in my district, I find a great 

many of them have the elevator drum on the top floor, directly 

over the elevator well. Drums placed in this position I consider 

very dangerous, as the continued working of the drum on the key 

slot causes the drum to burst and fall down the well, and kill or 

cripple for life the elevator man. In all cases of this kind I have 

ordered a flooring put in under the drum, to take in the entire 

length and width of the elevator well, so that, in case of accident 

to said drum, the flooring will arrest the same and prevent any 

one from getting hurt. This arrangement has met the approval of 

the superintendents of the different establishments in this district. 

I have found but few instances of fastening of outside doors 

daring the hoars of labor, except by spring catches or bolts readily 

operated from the inside. 

The guarding of gears, set screws and other dangerous parts of 
machinery I have found to require constant supervision, especially 
in the smaller workshops and factories, less care being exercised 
in that respect than in the larger ones ; and in those using old 
machinery there is often a lack of the safeguards found to be 
necessary and applied by the manufacturers of the new. 

The fifty-eight-hour law for the benefit of women and minors is 
as a general thing well observed by the manufacturers, and I must 
say there are no better running mills as regards to running on the 
time posted in the different rooms than are found in this district 
at the present time ; in fact, it is the desire of the manufacturers 
to comply with all the laws when explained to them by the inspect- 
or, and I have been told by them that it was a good thing that 
the State had officers to see after such things. 

In conclusion, I would bear testimony to the spirit of courtesy 
shown in nearly every instance by employers, and the readiness 
with which suggestions have been received as well as the prompt- 
ness with which orders given have been carried out, the greater 



124 HEPOBT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

Dumber realizing that the inspectors, who are daily visiting man- 
ufacturing establishments and making a study of dangerous ma- 
chinery, elevators, etc., are in better position' to determine what 
precautions are requisite than are those whose observations are 
largely confined to their own buildings, and whose familiarity with 
their own machinery has bred contempt for its dangers. 

Summary. 

Number of inspections made, 500 

Number of orders issued, 260 

Number of orders complied with, .... 260 

Number of children between fourteen and sixteen, . 3,000 

Number of children between thirteen and fourteen, . 5 

Number of males employed, 27,200 

Number of females employed, 33,700 

54,935 



1897.] 



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130 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

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Post time notice 

Post time notice, 
Post time notice 

closets. 
Box up gears an 
Put flooring uni 
Hie school certff 
File school certif 
Post time notice; 
Box up pulleys, 
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tificates. 
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132 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [J<n. 





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134 REPORT CHIEF Of DISTRICT POLICE. [Jn. 



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136 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Report or Inspector Knight. 

Sir : — I send you to-day my tabulated report for the year 1896. 
I am able to add but little that is new to what was contained in 
my last year's report, regarding the laws I am called on to enforce. 
The year just closing ia one marked by the depressed condition of 
business in many manufacturing industries, therefore very man; 
calls have been made by the inspector when the factory was found 
shut down, or running with a reduced force. 

It has been found necessary to give orders for better sanitary 
arrangements and better ventilation in factories or workshops, 
which orders have been complied with, or are in process. I find 
that the sanitary condition in factories is steadily improving. In 
many of the new buildings this fact is especially noticeable. Par- 
ticular attention has been given to mechanical ventilation, where 
a few years ago it was unheard of. The usual attention has been 
given to guarding machinery, gearing, set screws, etc. Chapter 
508, Acts of 1894, regarding the employment of children in fac- 
tories, workshops and mercantile establishments, has received the 
usual attention by the inspector, and very few wilful violations 
have been discovered. Occasionally a child or young person his 
been found without the proper certificate on file, through the 
neglect of the overseer. Notices have been given, which were 
complied with at once, 

I enclose herewith a summary of the work accomplished during 
the past year. 

Summary. 

Number of factory inspections made, .... 381 

Number of building inspections made, .... 62 

Number of hotels 10 

Number of orders issued, 163 

Number of orders complied with 159 

Number of elevators inspected, - 205 

Number of children employed between thirteen and 

fourteen years,. 14 

Number of children employed between fourteen and 

sixteen years 1,432 

Number of females employed, 13,771 

Number of males employed, 20344 

Total number of males and females employed, . . 34,115 



IOCUMENT— No. 32. 



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138 EEPOET CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [J.o. 



1 


I 


Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied 

Complied. 

Complied. 


1 


Provide self-closing hatches or gates 
to the elevator openings for pro- 
tection. 

Guard set screws; guard fly wheel 
and crank to engine ; post time 
table ; keep outside door unlocked. 

Guard set screws on shafting; box 
belt near entrance to wood room. 

File certificate for one minor, . 

Post time tables in workrooms, 

Post legal notices ; file certificates 
for two minors. 

Provide new wire cable to elevator 
in main building of weaving-de- 
partment; guard shafting under 

sewing tablus of finishing ilepart- 

Filo (iortificates for two minors. 


Is 


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Bicycle tires, 

Firearms, 

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Cotton w aste. 

Shoes, . . 

Elastic goods. 

Elastic goods, 




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144 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 







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uard set screws in collars on 
shafting, near pullejs or hangers, 
ost time tables in workroom ; des- 
ignate water-closets. 

rotect elevator openings, 

etter sanitary arrangements in 


rovide new cable to elevator; pro- 
vide exhaust fan in buffing and 
polishing room 
ost time tables In workroom, 
rovide three additional water- 


61 

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148 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 



Report of Inspector Puts am. 

Sir : — I herewith transmit to you the tabulated report of my 
work as factory inspector for the past year. 

Much time has been spent (of which no account appears in the 
tabulated report) in the inspection of electric street cars during 
the winter of 1895-96, relating to the, proper heating of the same; 
visiting bowling alleys, to see that the laws relating to the em- 
ployment of minors were being complied with ; dry goods and 
small-ware stores, looking for fraudulent silk, cotton and linen 
thread. 

The larger portion of my time, outside of the regular inspection 
of factories and elevators, has been occupied in the enforcement 
of sections 51 to 54, chapter 508, Acts of 1894, and chapter 438, 
Acts of 1895, requiring the weekly payment of wages by persons 
and partnerships engaged in manufacturing, and employing more 
than twenty-five persons. 

The laws in regard to the guarding of dangerous machinery 
have been strictly and impartially enforced, and I have been able 
to have my orders in this respect complied with without the dis- 
agreeable necessity of calling the matter to the attention of the 
courts, by pointing out and demonstrating the danger to the 
employees. 

Most of the manufacturing establishments in my district being 
located in inland towns and cities, and without any sewerage 
system, I have found it a difficult matter to arrange the sanitary 
conveniences as they should be. However, advances are being 
made in the right direction, and the district is in a fairly good 
condition in this respect, considering the circumstances. 

No cases of locked doors during working hours have come under 
my notice, and no violations of the hours of labor for women and 
minors. Complaints have been received, but upon investigation 
were found to be groundless. 

Elevators are generally in good condition, and but few orders 
have been issued for repairs ; those have been promptly and 
cheerfully complied with. The necessity still exists that means 
should be provided for signalling between floors, bo that the 
elevator will not be moved while it is in use. 

While last year I had 18 children between thirteen and fourteen 
years of age and 610 between fourteen and sixteen, this year I 
have none under fourteen years and only 154 under sixteen years. 
While the fact that there are but few large textile factories ia 
my present district will account for a part of the reduction in tbe 
number of children employed, it will not account for all, and I 
am sure that employers are finding that child labor is unprofitable. 



I DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



Summary. 

i inspected 298 

s inspected 98 

orders issued, 763 

compliances, 734 

' orders issued, .... 18 

' orders complied with, ... 18 

:>yed 81,411 

14,873 

6384 

between fourteen and sixteen years, 154 
between thirteen and fourteen years. 



150 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jsn. 





i 

1 

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Compiled. 

Compiled. 
Complied. 

Complied, 

Compiled 

Complied. 
Shut down 

Compiled, 


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Control power on sewing-machino 
shaft ; guard set screws and coup- 
ling pins, roller and skiver; re- 
pair gear; post timetables; pay 
weekly. 

Guard set screws, .... 

Control power on skiving and sew- 
ing-mauhine shafts; guard set 
screws, coupling pins, akiver and 
roller. 

Guard set screws; procure certlft- 

Gminl set screws, roller and splitter. 

Control power on sewing-machine 
shaft; guard set screws, coupling 
pins, roller and splitter. 

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pins ; procure c.rti (lento. 


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152 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jn. 







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158 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [J«n. 







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J DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



t SilEKIIAN. 

ig report is respectfully submitted as to the 

Jo. 9 for the past year. 

the employment of women and minors, known 
law, has caused but little trouble during the 
depression of business causing the factories 

alf time, and the universal complaint being of 

of 18'J4, relating to the employment of children 
jf age in factories, workshops and mercantile 
satisfied, after careful inspection and observa- 
ing better complied with. There is a marked 
aber employed under fourteen years of age, 
rs generally manifest a disposition to comply 
ing child labor ; yet, notwithstanding the laws 
to obey them, they are frequently violated, 
void of conscientious scruples, and allow their 
to their age, in order that they may be allowed 
om that a child under thirteen years of age is 

r 481 , which relates to the guarding of belting, 
.rums and set screws, has been carefully at- 
r safeguard that is practical has been ordered. 
e occurred by people coming in contact with 
j, from the fact that it is more difficult to place 
nd about belting. Frequently belts break and 

by being struck or entangled in the broken 
ie floor or hurled against some object, causing 
th. All belts passing through floors or located 
» work in close proximity to them are in any 

are cased in. It is impracticable, however, to 
.list may cause accident, but some protection 
>st cases. All shafting that is so located as to 
>r employees or others to receive injury by 
herewith is substantially encased, wherever it 

rotruding set screw is being covered, counter- 
'ith a headless screw, in obedience to orders 
lector. One observing the revolving shaft or 
;here is an exposed set screw must admit that it 
tie device, and should be properly protected. 
:t\on of elevators has been made. The openings 
ills have been found properly protected by self- 



174 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan. 

closing batches, gates or bare. The general rule observed in 
manufacturing establishments where elevators are in use is thai 
one person is detailed to operate the elevator, and no otlici 
employee is allowed to operate it, and notices are posted to that 
effect. 

Elevators, whether freight or passenger, should be operated bj 
careful and thoughtful persons ; for in the handling of elevators. 
as in the management of all machinery, the precaution taken tc 
prevent accident is not complete unless those who are in ehargi 
are always alert and vigilant. Taking into consideration the great 
number of people daily using elevators, the speed at which th< 
machine is ran (with the builders trying to exceed each other ii 
velocity) and the youthfulness of many of the persons in charge 
the greatest care must be taken by the inspector that the lam 
regulating the guarding and use of all classes of elevators an 
strictly complied with. 

There has been a decided improvement during the last year in tb< 
sanitary condition of many of the factories. I have had occasoi 
to give several orders for additional water-closets to be put ii 
where required ; in some instances old and unventilated closet 
have been replaced by modern and well- ventilated ones. I hav 
observed in my inspections that there is great difficulty in alwsy 
keeping the closets in the condition of cleanliness that alionli 
be found, owing to the indifference of many of the operatives 
and it requires a constant watch of the overseers to see that the; 
are kept in as good condition as practicable, where there is a larg 
number of operatives employed in any one establishment. Tb 
manufacturers in general show a disposition to do all that is reason 
able to remedy evils, and promptly comply with any recommends 
tion made to them. 

The law requiring specifications to be furnished to person 
employed in cotton, worsted and woollen factories is generall 
observed in this district. I find all looms and frames with ticket 
of specifications of goods manufactured, and also lists posted i 
the several rooms. 

The law relating to the hours of labor required of condactoi 
and motormen on street railroad cars is working in a very satii 
factory manner in this district, and there have been no complaint 
the last year. The corporations have also complied with the la' 
in regard to heating the cars. 

The act relating to the employment of minors who cannot res 
and write the English language meets with favor by employers, 
had occasion to investigate a complaint in this district by the con 
mittee and teacher of the evening schools, and found no truth i 



BLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 175 

general desire to co-operate with them in carrying 

rod good feeling shown by the employers, and the 

hich all suggestions have been received as well aa 

with wh\ch orders given have been carried out, 

>tli pleasant and agreeable to all parties 



Summary. 
ents inspected. 



der fourteen years, 
der sixteen years, 



.22^45 
. 14,954 



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192 REPOBT CHIEF OF DISTEICT POLICE. [J 







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194 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jan 

Summary. 
Number of establishments inspected, .... 544 

Number of elevntors inspected, 148 

Number of orders sent, 88 

Number of compliances, 88 

Total number employed In factories 16,245 

Number of males employed in factories, .... 10,452 
Number of females employed in factories, . . . 6,109 

Number of minors under fourteen years 1 

Number of minors between fourteen and sixteen years, . 663 

Report op Inspector Waslet. 

Sir : — I have the honor to submit herewith the following tab: 
lated report of the work performed by me during the past year i 
the eleventh district. 

Business in my district for the past year has been very dul 
and most of the manufactories have been working on short Lou 
more or less. Some plants, especially woollen factories, ha' 
been entirely closed, but I think business looks more encouragii 
at the present time. 

The fifty-eight-hour law relating to the hours of labor for woro< 
and minors in my district has been fully complied with, there ha 
ing been but few complaints in regard to this law the past year. 

The employment of children under fourteen years of age 
factories and workshops shows by investigation a remarkab 
decrease. Last year 1 found 152 minora under fourteen yea 
of age employed; this year I find bat 16, and the majority > 
those are employed in one factory. 

In regard to the enforcement of the law relating to sanita 
conditions and ventilation in the different manufactories, 1 fii 
great improvements have been made. Some corporations ha' 
placed blowers and fans in the basements, to force up the war 
air in winter and the cold air in summer. All sanitary arrang 
meats in the factories and workshops I have generally found 
a good state of cleanliness. 

The law requiring reports of all accidents to be made to t! 
chief of the district police within four days, when death has r 
suited from Baid accident, and in all serious accidents, has bet 
generally complied with. I find on investigation that carelessae 
of the employees in cleaning the machinery while in motion, n 
taking heed of notices forbidding them to do so, posted in t 
different rooms, is the cause of many of the accidents in factorit 

I have given much care to the inspection of elevators, and a 
glad to inform you that there are very few of the 183 elevato 
inspected by me that are not in first-class condition. I think tl 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



195 



agents and superintendents require tbe master mechanics in many 
factories to look closely after all cables and safety devices con- 
nected with elevators. All orders issued in regard to elevators 
inspected have been promptly fulfilled. 

Section 1, chapter 584, Acts of 1894, requiring specifications 
to be furnished persons employed in cotton factories, 1 am pleased 
to say is in full force in all factories in the eleventh district, and 
as far as my investigations extend the law is obeyed, all looms 
and frames being properly marked with tags and cards, as the 
law requires. 

In all factories and workshops in the district under my charge 
the illiterate minors are carefully looked after, and, with the 
assistance of the truant officers in the cities where evening 
schools are in session, I think nearly all have attended such. 

The enforcement of section 1, chapter 136, Acts of 1895, an 
act relative to the heating of street railway cars, caused me some 
trouble last winter, but 1 was soon able to make the management 
of the different lines of railways understand what this law required 
of them, and the cars were kept as near the required temperature 
as possible through the coldest weather. 

Section 51, chapter 508, Acts of 1894, in regard to the weekly 
payment of wages, has caused several complaints. I made it 
ray duty to investigate immediately, and arrangements were made 
with all parties interested, and at the present time all are now 
complying strictly with this law. 

Your special order, requiring me to visit all theatres and places 
of assemblage, I have attended to. I think this law has been 
fully enforced, and when the aisles have been obstructed in any 
manner by portable seats or crowding or sitting in the aisles in 
the galleries, blocking the egress to fire-escapes, etc., I have given 
the managers notice, and all obstructions were immediately removed. 

All manufacturers show a commendable desire to inform them- 
selves in regard to the provisions of the various factory laws. 
I have been treated most courteously by all that I have had 
occasion to meet in the performance of my duties. 



Summary. 

Whole number of inspections made, . 
Whole number of orders issued, . 
Whole number of compliances, 
Children between thirteen and fourteen, 
Children between fourteen and sixteen, 
Whole number of females employed, . 
Whole number of males, 
Total number of males and females, 
Elevators inspected, , , t 



600 

2:i9 

2:57 

16 

2,782 

26,473 

32,239 

68,712 

183 



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196 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jut. 







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Complied. 
Complied, 
Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied, 

Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 


i 
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| 


Guard belt and set screws, 

Guard glass door; designate water- 
closet. 

Guard belt and belts and fly wheel 
on dynamo engine. 

Guard set screws in collars of shaft- 
ing and on twisting machines in 
two rooms; platform and stairs; 
circular saw. 

Guard two belts in mule room, one 
In basement, 

Guard belts on steam pipes, card 
room and wheel room. 

Guard set screws in three rooms, 
belt on extractor; procure one 
certificate. 

Guard sewing-machine shaft, belt 
running through floor. 

Guard fun in wail of basomisot. 






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Dyed goods, . 


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Bay State Dyeing and Furnish- 
ing Co. 
Bright wood Mfg. Co., 

Marland Mills 

Smith & Dove 

Sutton Mills 

Ballardvale Mills, 

Stevens Mills, .... 

M. F. Campbell, .... 
Bay State Dyeing Co., 



DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



■8 3 J 1 



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198 BEPOBT CHIEF OF DISTBICT POLICE. [J 





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\m^ TOBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



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202 REPORT CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. [Jit 







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sal s* si" 
33a 6 66 



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1897.3 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



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Guard set screws on washing and 
squeezing machines ; repair two 
elevator hatches. 

Guard set screws in six rooms, trap 
door In attic, belts in carpenter's 
shop, belts in engine room, fans 
in wall, pulley and belt on ex- 
tractor; elevator hatches to repair 
in four rooms; guard belt nnd 

^Muting i UU m: H « B ™ p U „ U J u„ 

scouring machine. 
Guard set screws and fly wheel on 

Guanl fly wheel of engine ; repair 

stairs and place rail on same. 
Guard belt on dynamo, . 


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Luwkll — Continued. 
Whlttier Cotton Mills, 

Hamilton Mfg. Co., 

Lowell Steam Carpet and Cleans- 
ing Works. 
1.. D. Gumb 

Middlesex Machine Co., , 



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1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



215 



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REPORT OF IXSPECTKESS FANNY B. A.MKS. 

I have had occasion several times during the year to report 
to you the excellent arrangements made by some of the larger 
mercantile firms for the comfort and welfare of their women em- 
ployees; and it has seemed desirable to call attention more fully 
to the conditions affecting women and children employed in mer- 
cantile establishments throughout the State. The present legis- 
lation affects these in but three respects: 1. Hiring of children; 
2. Providing seats for women ; 3. Providing separate closets for 
the sexes, where two women are employed, and their sanitary 
condition. 

But it is a growing custom in all the larger and older houses to 
do more than this. In most of them there are well-appointed 
dining-rooms, furnished with tables and chairs, and gas stoves for 
cooking and heating food ; retiring rooms with couches and medi- 
cine closet for cases of sudden illness, and an attendant in charge. 
There are, besides, many kindly arrangements made for vacations 
and other absences. Many of the women, too, have found scope 
for business ability beyond the ordinary. One, who usually stands 
behind the counter of a department, told me that she was sent 
abroad by her firm to buy lace ; visited several countries and 
noted foreign cities, lived at the best hotels, went and came on 
one of the best steamers, and with her party was permitted many 
extra pleasures of sight-seeing, — all at the expense of the 6rm. 
Her knowledge of lace and good business sense was worth all this. 
But the other side of the story, and one which shows the need 
of every alleviation which invention and the sympathy of the em- 
ployer can afford, is found in the excessive strain which the huge 
modern store imposes on all employed. The constant presence of 
a crowd; the necessity of continual alertness, attention, accuracy 
and courtesy ; the irritation consequent on long standing, elbowed 
^ fellow workers, who are not always considerate of the comforts 
w rights of their companions, — all tend to a nervous strain which 
*ay well break down the strongest. If to this be added the dis- 
comfort of no proper place where a noon rest can be taken and 
lunch eaten hot and decently, the strain is much greater. The 

ftomh? siT™ 01 fr0m * W ° rking girl8 D ° te WU1 tdl thC St ° ry 

oi^riin/f^^ *^ ^ place to heat our tea or coffee,— only a room 
"lining trora the water-oln*«.t t\ , ., , , 

make cocoa over the L\ w "* a whlle WG St ° al a chanC ' e to 

dinner, so vou can Jul ,w d ° ROt earn enou " h to S° out aml l)U >' :i 

b its* mat we are not very comfortable. There is 



t 

1 

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I 



216 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [ 

no place to rest or to which we can go if we are sick, when t 
minutes' rest would often be enough ; bat now we must stay bebin 
counters in misery. The girls are faithful and conscientious, i 
think it is only fair that they should be given some decent place of 
Of course we hold back to ask for such, each one fearing she will 
her work. 

Here was a case where the inspector could only " suggest " 
rections. But alas! the employer declared he "neither ki 
restaurant nor a hospital," and declined to consider any chan 
his present arrangements. 

The bad ventilation of most stores also affects serionsl; 
health and contributes to the nervous strain of women and clii 
employed. Many stores have introduced mechanical ventili 
with exhaust fans ; but the great number of persons to a | 
area and the necessity of utilizing air space overhead by displi 
goods make good ventilation practically impossible. All 
conditions — the crowd, the narrow space given each workei 
strain, the bad air — make life in a great store more of a U 
nerve force than that in a cotton factory. When it is rememl 
that each employee in a mill is practically isolated, and has 
floor and overhead space ; that the noise is monotonous, and 
grows soothing (a worker once said to me that it rested her ' 
a great silence"), — it will be seen that the store compares 
unfavorably. 

In regard to hoars of employment, in the absence of legisli 
except as it refers to minors, most of the large stores have ad< 
the custom of short hours for all the summer months ; thi 
opening at 8 a. u. and closing at 5 or 5.80 p. it. After the Chris 
holidays of last year a public suggestion that the shorter hot) 
resumed was very generally adopted and kept up till the s 
trade had fairly opened. But in two or three stores in Rox 
several in South Boston, East Boston, Chelsea, and two in B 
proper, the hours are often seventy-two each week, running ti 
and 11 at night. In the towns and cities throughout the 
evening opening is the rule. As the law limits the em ploy (ik 
minors to sixty hours per week, it is stipulated that if ev 
service is required (he hour of beginning should be placet 
enough to comply with the law. 

In sanitary matters, as well as in the extra accommodation 
small stores fall behind the large ones ; but it should also bt 
that the strain is not so great and the relations with employers 
direct. 

Another feature of the crowded, modern city life, which i 
sitates the utilization of every bit of space for purposes of r 



218 EEPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. | 







! 


H. 

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Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 


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Procure certificate, . 

Clean closets ; furnish seats, , 

Furnish certificates, . 

Procure certificates, . 

Procure certificates,. 

Procure certificates, . 

Post lime schedules in workroom, 

Separate closet for women. 

Post time schedules in workroom. 

Give women separate closet, . 

Post time schedules, . . . 


Furnish scats; separate closet. 
Furnish seats ; procure ceilificatoa 
whiten and separate closet fo 






•, 












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Mereantile, . 

Mercantile, . 
Mercantile, . 
Mercantile, , 

Mercantile, . 
Mercantile, . 
Mercantile, . 
Mercantile, . 
Mercantile, . 
Mercantile, . 
Candy man u foci 


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Conrad & Co., . 
Alexander Staoridas, 
A. Stowoll & Co., 
Gross & Strauss, 
S. A. McDonnell, 
W. N. Connor, . 
J. M.Chanet, . 
A. L. Gordon & Co., 
Roland Met'urdy, 
St. Clair & Co., . 
St Clair & Co., . 


-5; 

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1897.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



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C DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



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LIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



Summary. 
Ttlons made, 



■en employed between thirteen and 

3 

■en employed between fourteen and 

2,109 

es employed. 10,417 

employed, 17,590 

ployed 36,119 

>rt8 of Clothing made in Tenehent- 
tousEs and Workshops, 
port of Inspector Griffin. 
the usual custom of presenting a brief revision 
isLed during the year, 1 have Ibe honor to sub- 
dangers pertaining to, the so-called Bweating 
been either lessened or regulated by private 
lid of wise and efficient 'legislation, would be 
lintain. Only through the enforcement of 
I with special reference to the origin, growth 
system, supported by the earnest and intelli- 
ress, pulpit and good citizens generally, could 
d or ameliorated. Without doubt the princi- 
tem is the danger to the health of the public 
jthing that is made in unhealthy places or in 
erein contagious or infectious- diseases exist. 
ary to dwell upon the serious danger to the 
orant and careless persons, with habits of do- 
nconsistent with our enlightened modern ideas 
ife or approved sanitary conditions, were per- 
nately manufacture clothing at their homes ; 
said that at least one-half of the people who 
home work are of snch a class. The Massa- 
commend itself in this respect. Its license 
very person engaging in the making of cloth- 
>le or in part, to procure a license before so 
; a heavy fine upon the person giving any such 
t holding such license, has proved to be prac- 
in preventing the manufacture of clothing in 



228 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jac 

filthy aDd undesirable tenements, in forcing invaluable habit 
of cleanliness upon many of those holding a license, and sat 
etantially removing the danger of spreading disease through tl: 
community. The conditions governing this license are so simpl 
to observe that they do not impose any hardship or burden upo 
the holder, or interfere in any way with the established rules o 
business. They are as follows : first, absolute cleanliness of apart 
ments and surroundings ; second, no room or rooms used as sleer 
ing apartments shall be used for the purpose of finishing or makin 
any articles of wearing apparel intended for sale, nor shall any o 
such articles of wearing apparel while in process at finishing o 
making be allowed to remain therein ; third, in case of removal o 
in case of any contagious or infectious disease in the family of Hi 
person holding the license, or in any family residing in the sam 
building, notice must be at once sent to the inspector of the dis 
trict ; fourth, no person or persons not members of the family shai 
be employed in finishing or making any such articles of wearing 
apparel intended for sale. Should the third condition, the mos 
important one, be violated through failure of the person bold in 
a license to report a case of disease, we become aware of sue 
violation by reference to the printed list of contagious and infer 
tious diseases which is mailed to us daily by the Board of Health 

An example or two may better explain. On the above- mentions 
list we find that scarlet-fever exists in the building numbered 70 
Dorchester Avenue, South Boston, where Mrs. F., who holds 
license to make shirts and overalls, resides. On investigation, it i 
found that her child is afflicted with the disease, and that there ar 
five dozen overalls in process of manufacture in a room adjoinin; 
the sick chamber. Having failed in reporting the above case i 
this office, her license was revoked, the employer notified to sem 
no more work there, and the goods being made there were proper!; 
fumigated before being returned. Another and more frequent on 
follows : Mi's. L. applied for a license to finish men's trousers a 
No. 4 Stillman Place, Boston. On consulting list, we find diph 
theria reported in above building. It is needless to say that : 
license was refused. 

The fourth condition prevents the maintenance of tenement 
house workshops, wherein others than memhers of the family ar 
employed. The oft-repeated history of these shops, where lb 
privacy of the home has been sacrificed for pecuniary advantages 
has shown its demoralizing effects not only upon the family bo 
also npon the workers employed, in rendering their toil more Bevere 
their surroundings more dreary and their lot more depressing 
The attempts that have been made from time to time to foun 



C DOCUMENT— No. 32. 229 

. ineffectual, through the strict enforcement 
id the tog section, which compels them to 
isde therein with a tag staling that they are 

will serve as an instance. Mr. R. occupied 
the second floor of a filthy tenement- bouse 
treet, Boston. His family consisted of wife 
'lie of the rooms he used as his workshop, 
d cutting men's trousers, he did the machine 
; the finishing ; and he honestly stated that 
d employ a couple of women finishers. He 
ew days previously, buying a few rolls of 
and he intended to sell the trousers, when 
He could speak but very little English, and 
of the law; but, upon being informed that 
manufacturing there without a license and 
n members of his family, and it was ex- 
license would not be granted in such a filthy 
I garments made therein must be labelled 
omised to obtain a proper workshop at once, 
wing day. 

meats where a license has been granted, 
,ry districts, where they have plenty of room, 
sanitary arrangements, do not require con- 
tbe crowded tenement districts of the city 
ntly made, to prevent violations of the law 
r regard for cleanliness. Many such visits 
y tabulated statement will show. 
iops are in fairly good condition, the principal 
heing in having the floors and water-closets 
. They, too, are like the tenement-houses; 
rays kept in good sanitary condition, while 
cal visits to insure the desired measure of 

it-hour law for women and minora has been 
irders have been issued in regard to careless- 
iiig table posted. It is gratifying to observe 
» increase in the employment of children. 
luable aid from the clothing merchants, in 

list of their tailors and their prompt action 
rork from shops where the orders issued by 

not satisfactorily complied with. As must 
rport, the aid given by the Board of Health 
e in the performance of my duties, for which 



230 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Ja 

I gratefully express my sincere thanks. The following table w 
show the work accomplished during the year : — 

Summary. 

Number of licenses outstanding Oct. I, 1895, . . . 472 

Number of licenses revoked during the current year, . 278 
Number of licenses granted renewed during the current 

year 250 

Number of licenses outstanding Oct. 1, 1896, . . . 441 

Number of licenses refused during the current year, , 156 

Number of tenements inspected during the current year, 681 
Number of visits to licensed und unlicensed tenements 

during the current year, 575 

Total number of tenements inspected and visited during 

the current year 1,259 

Number of workshops inspected during (he year, . . 186 

Number of visits to workshops during the year, , 297 

Number of orders issued, 68 

Number of compliances 68 

Number of children between thirteen and fourteen years 

of age 

Number of children between fourteen and sixteen years 

of age 10 

Number of males employed, 7G7 

Number of females employed, 799 

Total number of males and females employed, . . 1,666 



.IC DOCUMENT — No. 



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234 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [. 



Report of Inspector Pldnkett. 

Sib : — My experience of the past year in the enforce men 
the law governing the manufacture of clothing in tenement-he 
convinces me of the necessity for its enactment. While t 
have been but few attempts to violate its provisions in the die 
daring the year, still, sufficient instances have occurred to dei 
strate what the conditions wonld be but for its existence. 

The requirements exacted by that portion of the law rela 
to tenement-house workshops are anch as to prevent their 
cessful operation ; and its enforcement has created a dec 
improvement over conditions which formerly existed in 
industry, particularly in the city of Boston, where the tem 
tion to combine the home and the workshop seems to be great 
There have been four attempts to operate this clasa of works] 
during the year. These were all started in ignorance of the '. 
and were suppressed immediately upon discovery. The pa 
controlling them, being unable to comply with the requirem 
of the law, were obliged to vacate the premises so occupied, 
secure shops in buildings devoted exclusively to manufacto 
purposes. 

That portion of the law which requires that a license shal 
obtained where members of the immediate family are engi 
in any part of the labor on wearing apparel in their home 
undoubtedly its most important provision, and the one to 
enforcement of which the greater portion of my time has 1 
devoted. The wisdom of the Legislature in enacting this 
of the law is evident, for by its enforcement we are enable* 
know every place in the State where clothing is being made, 
conditions upon which these licenses are granted are such 
the person holding a license is required to notify the departs 
of the occurrence of contagious or infectious disease in the bi 
ing in which be resides ; and also in the event of changing 
place of abode. To insure a strict compliance with these < 
ditions, an arrangement has been entered into with the Boart 
Health of the city of Boston, by which, through the court 
of the Board, we are supplied with a daily list of the contagi 
diseases. By this means a careful watch is kept over all prem 
in this city in which a license has been granted. In other pla 
where necessary, access to the records of health boards has t 
cheerfully given. By this arrangement it ia almost impose 
for clothing to be made in any premises during the exist* 
of contagions or infectious disease. Although several case* 
contagious diseases have occurred in buildings wherein licei 



u 



SSI.} 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



235 



\^#d been granted, still, in no case was it necessary to take any 
measures beyond revoking the license, thereby preventing any 
clothing from being made in the building during the existence 
of the disease. 

The benefits derived from the operations of this part of the law 
cannot be fully appreciated except by one engaged in its enforce- 
ment. The wretched condition of some of the buildings from 
which applications for licenses are received is simply beyond 
description, and quite frequently an application is received from 
a building wherein contagious disease exists. 

In some instances a two-fold advantage is derived from the 
enforcement of this part of the law. If the persons desiring to 
pursue this occupation are reliable tenants, the landlord in some 
cases has renovated the building in order to retain them. The 
tenants are thus benefited by having a more cleanly and whole- 
some place of abode, and the conditions surrounding this branch 
of the industry are thereby improved. 

The amount of labor required to enforce the license clause of 
the law can be thoroughly understood by reviewing the appended 
table : — 



Number of tenements inspected during the year, , 
Number of tenements visited, licenses revoked, 
Number of tenements visited, due to other causes, 

Total number of tenements visited, 



662 
171 
532 



1,365 



There has been a large decrease in the number of licenses granted 
this year, as compared with 1895, to persons engaged in the tailor- 
ing trade, owing, no doubt, to the great depression of business in 
this industry. This decrease is almost entirely offset by the large 
number of licenses granted to women, who are forced, on account 
of the hard times, to seek employment in order to assist in the 
support of their families, and who are engaged in the making of 
shirts, overalls, wrappers, women's and children's underwear and 
dresses, and are generally intelligent people, residing in clean and 



well-regulated homes. 



Number of licenses outstanding Oct. 1, 1895, . . . 466 
Number of licenses granted during the current year, . 203 



Total number of granted licenses, . 
Number of licenses revoked during the year, 



669 
241 



Total number of licenses outstanding Oct. 1, 1896, . 428 



236 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. | 

The regular factories and workshops inspected during the 
have been found to be in good condition, with few except 
Tbe laws regulating the employment of labor are general); 
observed. I have found that the proprietors have as a rule 
corned my visits of inspection and gladly indorsed and com 
with whatever has been required. The worst of my dntiet 
been the enforcement of sanitary laws in the workshops of ' 
who were the former tenement-house employers; and, after 
years* experience, I find that nothing but constant visits to 
places, with threats to prosecute, will cause this class of emplt 
to maintain anything like a decent degree of cleanliness in 
shops, the dirty condition of which is due in a great measure t 
careless and filthy habits of some of the employees. 

The number of children employed has decreased daring tbe; 
and none are now employed without the required certificate. 

Number of workshops inspected, 12; 

Number of orders issued 3' 

Number of compliances, 31 

Number of children between thirteen and fourteen years, 5 

Number of children between fourteen and sixteen years, 31 

Number of males employed, 1.I9S 

Number of females employed, . . . . 71J 



r 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



237 



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238 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jat 







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ean room and w 
ost time table; c 
vaier -closet 

ean and designa 
ost time table, 

ist time table, 

mew ash water-c 
ost time table, 
ost time table ; 

closet 

ost time table, 
ost time table ; 

closet 

ost time table, 
oat time table, 
rocure certifleate 
ost time table, 
esignatc water-c 
oat time table. 


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2 DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



<rt of Elevator* Inspected. 

a. t. MALCOLM BILLARS, latptctar. 



KU. 


&;. 


Order* Given. 


piluicm. 


































1 




Prorlde new eonnur-baliinos 




















































































1 








I 


Goo.!, 


»«, 


- 



wi of Elevators Inspected. 

>. 5. LEWIS F. F. ABBOTT, Iinptcfor. 



No. or 

Ele- 


Con- 


Order. Given. 


,£=;.. 


1 
2 


Good, 
Good! 


JSoM, 


j 


1 

2 


Gold,' 
Good, 


None 


: 


1 


Good, 


Automatic hMebea, . 


Complied . 


i 


Good, 
Good, 






3 


Good. 


NO" 


- 


J 


Good! 
Good, 
Good, 


Now 


; 


1 


Good. 
Good, 




: 



240 REPORT CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. [Ja 



Report of Elevators Inspected — Continued. 



Nasi or Boldibo. 


No. of 
Kla- 


SS,. 


Ordera Given. 


pfc 








































Flichbnrg Wonted Co.. 
F.rwrtl £ Hnwley, . 
Fllchburg Mfi. Co., 




















Good, 
















Fltshburg Flnr Oo., 




Good, 


Nona, 




OrawoTI Ml)!, .... 














































Fllchborg Colton Kill, . 


















































BloootMlg. Co., . 




































































Haywood Bro*. It Co., . 


















































Fiabor Mfg. Co., . 




















G. E. Gilbert M fa;. Co., . 


s 


Good. 
















Jaffenon M fg. Co , 




































































C. W. Warron & Son, . 








- 










































Wnlmay Paper Boi Co., 










































Good, 


























WeHlDRtoo Piano (Jim Co., . 




















F. A.Lapharn, ■ * 










< 






































Paul Whllln Mfg. Co., . 


1 






* 






















H. a. Brown*. Co., . . 


1 


Good. 







1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



241 



Report of Elevators Inspected — Continued. 



Naxz or Building. 



No. of 
Ele- 
vator!. 



Con- 
dition. 



Orden Given. 



Com- 
pliances. 



Oxford. 
A. L. JoaUn As Co., 

Bouthbrldge. 
Hamilton Woolen Co., . 
Central MiUe, . 

Spencer. 
T. Pronty St Co., Incorporated, 
W. A. Barr & Son, . 
J. E. Bacon, .... 
E. Jonea St Co., 
Bacon Si Sibley, 

8turbrldge- 
Hakdale Mills, 

Sutton. 
Mancbang Mfg. Co., 

Templeton. 

J. M. Greenwood ft Co., 
Bourn, Hadley ft Co., . 
T. T. Greenwood St Son, 
Smith, Day As Co., . 
Walte Chair Co., . 

D. L. Thompson St Son, 

TJxbrldge. 
C. C. Oapron, • . . • 
HeeleMlll, . 
Calumet Woolen Co., . 

Warren. 
Koowles Pomp Works, . 
Warren Cotton Mills, . 
Fanny Jane Mill, . 

Webster. 

Slater Woolen Mill, 

A.J. Bates, 

Slater Cotton Mill, . 

Westborougb. 
Hunt Mfg. Co., 
0. B. Brigharn, ... 
Gould ft Walker, . 

West Boylston. 
L. M. Harris Mfg. Co., . 
Clarendon Mills, . 
West Boylston Mfg. CO., 

West BrookfleUL 
Olmated Qnabog Corset Co., 

Wlnchendon. 
Nelson Mill, .... 
Glen Allen Mill. . 
Mason ft Parker, . 
M. E. Convert ft Co., . 
N. E. Baby Carriage Co., 

Worcester. 

E. D. Thayer, Jr., . 

need ft Prince, ... 
Knowles Loom Works, . 
Eke, Barton ft Pales, . 
Pakaehoag Mill, 
Worcester Carpet Co., . 
M. J. Whlttsil, 
Wright ft Cotton, . 
Hammond, Beed Co., 
Warcrley Shoe Co., 



3 
1 



6 
1 
2 
1 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
1 
1 



1 

4 
1 



8 
1 



i 
i 
i 



l 
i 
l 



l 
l 

2 
1 
2 



1 
2 
8 
2 
1 
2 
8 
2 
1 
1 



Good, 



Good, 
Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 



Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



None, . 

None, . 
None, . 

None, . 
None, • 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 

None, . 

None, . 

None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 

None, . 
None, . 
None, . 

None, . 
None, . 
None, . 

None, . 
None, . 
None, . 

None, . 
None, . 
None, . 

None, . 
None, . 
None, . 

None, . 

None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 

None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, . 
None, • 



242 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Ja 



Report of Elevators Inspected — Continued. 



Naur or Builjuhh. 


No. of 

Kit- 


Con- 


Ordere alien. 


Con 


Worcester — Oo 

Cromplon Loom Works 

Woreealar Pula bo., 
E.H.SIark&Co., . 

Gleeco Thnsitd Co., 

Uuon-Rlach Co., . 
Globe Coreet Co., . 




1 

1 
1 
I 

1 


Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good. 
Good. 
Good, 
Poor, 

Good. 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good. 
Good, 

Good, 
Good, 

Goodi 
Good, 


Hone, 

get np galdee; provide new 

Nod 

Nod 

Discharge boy on aeeonnL of 

None 

None, 

ProTlde safety eatehee, . 

Provide self .closing doom, 


Coo^n. 


The Win Gooda Co., 
Walkar & Browo, . 




: 


Obue BnlldlBg, 

Format Boildlng. . 
Hortlcnllti rm] Hall, . 




LUeon 



Report of Elevators Inspected. 

District Ho. 6. JOHN F. TIEBHEY, Inipector. 



If elacomet Mfg. Co., . 
Fall River Bobbin and Bhc 
tie Co. 

Union Coll,™ Mfg. Co. 



er Iron Worka Co. 



American Piloting Co., 
Beacon not 1! Ilia, . 
Hargratee alUla, . 
Blade Mills, . 
Troy Cotton nod W 

■Of. Co. 
Banford Spinning Co., 

Coniulcul Mills, . 
Flint blllla, . 
Merchants Mig. Co., 
Globe Tarn Kills, . 
Jo.se Eddy Mfj. Co.. 
Pooaeaet Mfg. Co., . 
Richard Borden Mfg. Co., 
Tecamaeb Mills, . 
Durfw llllla, . 
B.meby Mfg. Co., , 
Barnard Mfg. Co., . 
Fall River Bleacherr, 
Kerr Thread Kill*, 



Repair safety device; pot < 



Repair aafety device, 

Pot on Dew automatic galea, . 

Put (loortug under •letntor 



None,. 

BS- 

pffflooiti 

Pnt floorln 

None": 

None,. 
Repair safnl 
Nona, . 

Nona,. 
None, . 


yde 

g n 

yd 

yda 


der ale 
Oder tie 

vice, 
aiauigmt 


**. 



Cotnplh 
CospUf 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32, 



243 



Report of Elevators Inspected — Continued. 



Naxb of Buildixo. 



No. of 
Ele- 
vators. 



Fall River— Con 

KMMMlt lite. Go., 
lAorel Lake Milla, . 
American Linen Co., 
Fall Hirer Manufactory, 
King Philip Milla, . 
Union Belt Co., 
Algonquin Printing Co., 
Border City Mfg. Co., 
Mechanic* Milla, . 
WeeUmoe Mllle, . 
Nairaganaett Milla, 
Sagamore Mfg. Co., 

Granite Milla, . 
Stafford Milla, . 
Wampanoag Milla, . 
Btevens Mfg. Co., . 

Parker Milla, . 
Metallic Comb Co., 
J. H. Kate* ft Son, . 



Freetown. 
Crystal Spring B. ft D. Co., . 

Westport. 
Westport Factory, . 

Somerset. 
6omes ft Jobneonburg Mfg. 
Co. 

Sandwich. 
Cape Cod Decorating Co., t 
Boeton and Sandwich Glaaa 
Co. 

New Bedford. 
Hathaway Mfg. Co., 
Colombia Milla, . 
Bennett Milla, . 
Aenahnet Milla, 
Grlnnell Milla, 
Bristol MUle, . 
Wamsutta MUle, . 

Hew Bedford Mfg. Co., . 

Potomaka Milla, 

City Mfg. Corporation, . 

Pierce Mfg. Co., 

Botch Spinning Corporation, 

Howland Milla, 

Palrpoint Mfg. Co., 

National Cordage Co., . 

Moras Twtat Drill Co., . 

Hathaway, Sonto ft Harring- 
ton. 

D. A. Snell, .... 

Whitman Milk, 

J. C. Rhoadea ft Co., . 

Bay State Chair Co., 

New Bedford Evening Stand- 
ard. 

Dartmouth Mfg. Co., . • 

Fair haven. 
Falrhaven Iron Foundry Co., 



Thatcher Bros , 
Atlas Tack Co., 

Taunton. 
Nemaaket Milla, . 



1 
2 
4 
1 
5 
1 
2 
4 
2 
2 
8 
2 

6 

4 
4 
1 

1 
1 
1 



2 



1 
1 



3 
3 
2 
4 
2 
1 
11 

2 
8 
8 
2 

4 
2 
6 
2 
2 
1 

2 
1 
2 
1 
1 



1 
2 



Con- 
dition. 



Orders Given. 



Com- 
pliances. 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 

Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 

Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 



Good, 



Good, 



Good, 
Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 

Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 

Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 

Good, 



Good, 



Good, 
Good, 



Good, 



None, 

None, 

None 

None, 

Put on new automatic gates, . 

None 

None, 

Repair safety device, 

None 

None, 

None, ...... 

Put flooring under elevator 

drums. 

None, 

None, 

None, 

Put flooring nnder elevator 

drums. 
None, ...... 

None, 

None, 

New ropes, .... 

None, 

None, 

Repair trap doora, . 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

Box op elevator dram, . 
Repair trap doors, . 
Automatic gate and floor under 
elevator drama. 

None, 

None, 

Put floor nnder elevator drum, 

None 

Repair aafety device, 
Repair safety device, 
Automatic gates. 
Automatic gates, 

None, 

None, 

Repair aafety device, 

Floor nnder elevator drum, . 

Floor nnder elevator drams, . 

None, 

None, 

Floor under elevator drums, . 



Repair aafety devioe; put on 
automatic gate and flooring 
under elevator drum. 

None, 

None, 

None, 



Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 



Compiled. 



Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 



Complied. 



244 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Ja 



Beport of Elevators Inspected — Continued. 



Sum or B<nu>n». 


No. of 
El*. 


&. 


Ordera Given. 


Coo 


Taunton — Oon, 
Morion Broa.' Steam Laun- 
dry. 
BUaabetb Pool if lib., . 

A. Flelda k Boo, . 
Taunton Tank Co., 
Bead ft BaiUn, 

WhlttsntonMfg.Co., . 

Oakland Milk, 
Oobannal K Ilia, . 

Eagle Ullla 

Oanoa Elver Ullla, . . 

Taunton Locomotive Oo., 

Maeon Ueehine Co., 
WaatTllle Ullla, . 

Norton. 

Horton Ullla Co., . 

Attleboroutfh. 

Dodgevlllo Mills. . 
Hebron Ullla 

Attleboroueh rails. 

Gold Uadal Braid Co., . 

Mansfield. 

Burpee, Rumaey ft Co.,. 

Bouth Baston. 
Boaa Heal Co 


I 
i 

3 


Good, 
Good, 

Good, 

Good, 
Good. 

Good, 
Good, 


Pnl on automatic gatea, . 
Pnl flooring nnder elevator 

None. 

Pnt flooring nnder elevator 

Bepalra and aafety device; 
pot flooring under elevator 

Pnt flooring nnder elevator 

Pnl flooring nnder elevator 

New gataa and aafety device; 

Pat oo new automatic galea, . 
Pnt flooring nnder elevator 

Bepalra ; safely device, . 

Pot on new automatic gatea, . 

Won 

Non 

Pnl on naw automatic galea, . 


Compu. 
ComplW 

Complk 
Compl 

Compl] 
Compl 

CompH 
Compl 

Compl 



Report of Elevators Inspected. 

Diarnjor No. T. JOHN L. KNIGHT, Imprclor. 



Nan or BdildiBs. 


No, ol 


Con- 


0*.«_ 


nUu 


Afrawam. 

Worthy PaporOo.,. 

Amberst. 

TbaHlll.Oo. 

Geo. B. Burnett ft Son, 

Oblcopee. 

LambUfg.Oo 

Tbe J. Stevens Anna and 

Tool Co 
Overman Wheel Co., . 
Dwight Utg. Co 

Ohleopea Ufg. Oo 

Amee BwortT Oo 

Ames Ufg. Oo, . 
Hampden Brewing Co., . 

Taylor k Bromley,. 


1- 

3 

S 
I 


Good, 

Good, 
Good, 

Good, 
Good, 

Good, 
Fair, 

Good, 
Not 

■food,' 


None, 

Hon*. 

Provide new cable to tba eleva- 
tor In No. 1 and X mill. 

Bepalr galea to elevator open. 
log.. 

Provide new galea to the open- 
Ingi to elevator welL 


Cusp 
Coup 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No- 32. 



245 



Report of Elevators Inspected — Con tinned. 



Name or Butldihg. 



No. of 
Ele- 
vators. 



Con- 
dition. 



Orders Given. 



Com- 
pliance^. 



Easthampton. 
Willlston & Knight, , 

Easthampton Spinning Co. t . 
Nashawanuck Mfg. Co., 



Willlston & Knlgbt, Ivory 
Dept. 

Holyoke. 
HadJey Thread Co., 
Lyman Mills, . 
Holyoke Envelope Co , 
Parr Alpaca Co., . 
Whitcomb'a Building, 
Albion Paper Co., . 

Griffith, Axtelle, Cady Co., . 

Linden Paper Co., . 

Nonotnek Paper Co., . 

T. P. FlannJgan's Building, . 



Wsnregan Paper Co., . 

Massachusetts Paper Co., 
D. Mackintosh & Sons Co. 
National Blank Oo., 
Parsons Paper Co., 
American Pad Co., 
Valley Paper Co., . 
Springfield Blanket Co., 
Braith, Wilson & Sears, . 

Essex Paper Co., . 
Beebe & Holbroke, . 
Merrick Thread Co., 

Huntington. 
Chester Paper Co., 

Ludlow. 
Ludlow Mfg. Co., . 



.v — Monson. 
D. W. Ellis & Son, 
R. M. Reynolds, 
R. M. & T. Reynolds, . 

S. P. Cnshman & Sons, . 

m Northampton. 
W.H.Abbott, 



P. H. Davis & Co., . 

Central Oil Gas Stove Co., 
8mlth-Car Baking Co , . 

Beldmg Bros., 
Florence Mfg. Co., . 
Williams Mfg. Co., 



2 
2 



8 
7 
2 
4 
2 
3 



8 
4 
2 
6 
2 
8 
2 
2 

1 
8 
6 



1 
1 
2 

1 
1 



4 

1 

3 
2 
1 



Fair, 

Good, 
Fair, 



Good, 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Fair, 



Good, 

Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 

Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 



Good, 



Keep doors to elevator open- 
ings closed. 

None, 

Provide new cable to the eleva- 
tor In main building of 
weaving department. 

None 



None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

Provide new cable to the rag- 
room elevator. 

Keep elevator gates closed 
when not in use. 

Provide new wire cable to rag- 
room elevator. 

Provide new wire cable to ele- 
tor running through to the 
rag room. 

Provide automatic gates to ele- 
vator openings on second and 
third floors; repair all other 
gates. 

Provide new wire cable to rag- 
room elevator. 

None, 

None, 

None, ...... 

None, 

None, 

None, ...... 

None 

Provide additional guard to 
elevator opening 

None, 

None 

None, . 



Complied. 
Compiled. 
Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 



None, 



None, 



Good, None, 
Good, None, 
-* Keep elevator gates 
when not in use. 
Good, ' None, 



closed 



„* 



Good, 
Fair, 

Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Provide self-closing hatches or 
gates to elevator opening; 
safety catch to prevent car 
from falling in case of acci- 
dent to hoisting rope. 

Provide safety device; self- 
closing hatches or gates. 

None, 

Keep hatches closed when not 
in use. 

None, ...... 

None, 

Repair gates, • 



Complied. 
Compiled. 



Complied. 



Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 



* Not good. 



246 EEPOET CHIEF OF DISTEICT POLICE. [J« 



Report of Elevators Inspected — Continued. 



Kin op Bdtldihq. 



Bussell. 
Cbepln fc Gould, . 
F.lrfltM Paper Co., 

South H&dley. 
Qleag ow Mil Co., . 
Hunpehlre Paper Co., . 

Springfield. 
CMblD Cm) and Paper Cc 

Bey State Coreat Co., . 



Chapmen Valve Mfg. Co., 



BpilRhl'i Block, . 

Sprlngfleld Printing and Bind- 

Bprlnufloia Brewing Co.. 
Wn . Young'. Building, 



al Needle Co., . 

■uoMfg. Co., 

; e Paper and Card Co. 

KlbbeBroe., . 



American Wblp Co., 
Town, Puller Co., . 



Cbea A. Bieveni 8: < 



Repair galea to elevator open. 
Repair galea to elevator open - 



Prortde eelf-eloalng hatchet 
and gate* Is protect elevator 






Protect opening! to elevator 
walla by •elf-elo.lug beiebee 

Provide new cable, . 
Provide aatomatlo galea to 
elerator opening*. 

None 

Provide eafetr device to eie 

Provide new cable 10 elevator, 









Provide I 



Addltlooal protection t 



Oompll. 



Iddltioual pre 
vator opening 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



247 



Report of Elevators Inspected — Continued. . 



Naju or Building. 



No. of 
Ele- 
vator*. 



Con- 
dition. 



Orders Given. 



Com- 
pliances. 



West Springfield. 
Mlltroeague Paper Co., . 
Agawam Paper Co., 

West Ware. 
West Ware Paper Co., . 



1 
1 



Good, 
Good, 



Fair, 



None, 
None, 



Provide galea to elevator open- 
ings. 



Complied. 



Report of Elevators Inspected. 

District No. 8. EDWARD B. PUTNAM, Inspector. 



Nams op Building. 



No. of 
Ele- 
vators. 



Con. 
ditton. 



Orders Given. 



Com- 
pliances. 



Abln-rton. 
M. N. Arnold & Co., 
W. E. Lyon, . 

Lewis A. Craasett, . 

Brain tree. 

D. B. Cloaaon & Co., 
Williams & Kneel and, . 

Bridgewater. 
Bridgewater Box Co., . 

Brockton. 
Boove\ Crawford & Co., 
George G. Snow, . 
Lilly, Brackett ft Co., 
F. M. Shaw & Son, . 
Nelson Paper Box Co., 
3taeey, Adams & Co., 
A. C. Thompson, . 
Henry M. Kingman, 
Brockton Last Co., 
Howard & Foster, . 
Howard T. If arahall, 
T. D. Barry & Co., 
F. E. White & Co., 
Marcus Leach, 

Lorenzo B. Terry, . 

Thomas White, 

W. L. Douglas Shoe Co 

E. M. Low, . 
Charles S. Pierce, . 
Elmer C.Packard, . 
A. M. Herrod, 

0. 0. Patten & Co., 
N. R, Packard & Co., 
Oliver A Miller, . 
D. 8. Packard & Co., 
J. 8. Benson Jt Son, 
James Means, . 
Field, Hazxard Co., 
Brockton Power Co., 



Canton. 
Canton Mfg. and Bleaching 
Co. 

Dedham. 

John Cochrane, 



2 
1 
1 



1 
1 



1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
8 
1 
1 
8 
1 
2 
1 

1 
3 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Fair, 

Good, 

Good, 



Good, 
Good, 



Good, 



Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Fair, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Bad, 

Good, 

Fair, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Fair, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 

Good, 



Good, 



Fair, 



Repair gear, . 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, ...... 

None, 

None, 

Repair safety, . 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None 

None, 

None, 

Repair safety; protect en- 
trances. 

None, 

Repair gates; new cables, 

None, 

None 

Keep hatches closed, 

None, 

None, ...... 

New cable, . 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, ...... 

None, 

None 

None, 



Repair safety and scupper 
rope. 



Complied. 



Complied. 



Complied. 
Complied. 
Complied. 



Complied. 



248 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jt 



Report of Elevators Inspected — Continued. 



Foxborough. 



Mnrdoek Parlor Or.tr Co., 
Leonard Ss Barrowi, 
Clirfc ft Cola, . 



Norwood. 

H. U. Plimpton & Co., 
J obi. N. Bill, . 



Qulncy. 
live I and etc 



Tubular Rivet and Slud Co., 

Rockland. 

The Rockland Go... 
Kloo & antcMoi, . 

BtOUffbtoll. 

Wallace. Elliott ft'Co., .' 



Wheal Co. 

Woy mouth. 

ft Co.. . 

m 



), Roods Co., 
:.DIr.arftCo., 

ji ft Oarfleld C 
Carroll i - 



K. H Btoiaoi 
John K. If ant 



Curtli&Tlrt 






None, . 



New eablo, . 
Nona! - 



None, . 

Nona, . 
Repair aafety, 

Onatn out ran oca 









1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



249 



Report of Elevators Inspected — Continued. 

District No. 9. JOHN J. SHEEHAN, Inspector. 



Samm of Building. 



No. of 
Ele- 
vator*. 



Con- 
dition. 



Orders Given. 



Com- 
pliances. 



Amesbury. 
Hamilton Woolen Co , . 

Merrimae Hat Co., . 
Biddle, 8mart Co., . 
Colchester Mill Co., 

Bradford. 

KnlpeBros., . 
Island Park Co., . 

Beverly. 

Beverly Building Associa- 
tion. 
Wtnslow ft Sogers, 
Cornelius Mnrp 



gers, 



Essex Bhoe Co 

Danvera. 

George Plainer ft Co., . 

Gloucester. 
Net and Twine Co., 
Mat-chant Box Co., . 
Russia Cement Co., 
Gape Ann Shoe Co., 
Improved Process Glue Co., 

Groveland. 
Veasey ft Hall, 



Haverhill. 
Chick Bros., . 
John Owens ft Co., 
John W. Boss, 
Bpaoldlng ft Bwett, 
W. W. Spanldtng, . 
A.P. Jaqnes, . 

Stevens ft Co., 
J. H. Wlnchell ft Co., 
Gardner Bros., 
C. H. Hayes, . 
TUton ft Bragg, . 
Elijah Fox, . 
W. B. Thorn, . • 
John A. Gale, . 
C. W. Arnold, 
Gale Bhoe Co., 
C. N. Hoyt, . 

George H. Hoyt, . 
J. B. Swett, . 
X.F. Keller, . 
Harry Tapfey, 
Wra.Jowett, . 
Levi Taylor, . 
John Pilling, . 
Jesse D. Neweomb, 
Chase ft Laubham, 
Kennedy ft Newton, 
C. W. Emerson, 
Orlando Brown, 
Kdw. Hateh, . 
H. H. Oilman, 



7 


_• 


1 


Good, 


1 


Good, 


1 


Good, 


1 


Fair, 


8 


Good, 


4 


Good, 


1 


Good, 


2 


Good, 


1 


Fair, 


1 


Good, 


1 


Good, 


1 


Good, 


2 


Good, 


1 


Good, 


1 


Fair, 


• 2 


Good, 




Fair, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Poor, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Poor, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Fair, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 




Good, 



New cable for elevator No. 4; , Complied, 
guard well for elevator No. 7. 

None, 

None 

None, 



None, 
None, 



None, 

None, 
None, 



None, 



None, 



None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 
None, 



None, 



Ad J ast hoisting machinery, . 

None, 

None, 

None, ...... 

None, 

New cable for elevator car; 

clean and adjnst safety fan 

on car. 

None 

None, 

None 

None, , 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None. 

Repair safety device on car; 

repair and adjnst hoisting 

machinery. 

None, 

None, ...... 

None, 

None 

None 

None 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None 

None, 

None, 

None 



Complied. 



Complied. 



Complied. 



* Four good, three fair. 



250 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [J: 



Report of Elevators Inspected, — Continued. 




Null OF BoILDIRu. 


No. of 
Kle- 


Con- 


«_.». 


Coo 


Ipswich. 

IpawlchllTilaCo 

Milieu & Woodbury, . 


























Ipawlcb Building Aaeoelatlon, 


1 


Good, 
















Frank Bpauldlog, ' '. '. .' 


1 


Good, 


New cable for eleralor Ho. 1, . 


CWpH 


Skinner * Bcoti, . 


1 


















































4 


-t 


New cable for elerator No. 4; 
guard e levator well No. 4 on 




Bennett & Ifonlloo, 


















George H Breed, . 










J.OlutMerehali. . 










3 


-t 


Repair anfetj device on ear: 
adjn.t boCtlng machinery 


Compl 










Snuihworlh & Campbell, 
























































































































Wm. H. Boynion, . 


s 


Good, 






I 


Good, 




- 






















Bay Bute Cordage Co., . 








































NewburyporieboeCo., 


















Peabody. 


















































T.B BouthwIcK, . 


i 


Good, 


Hon 




Kocltport. 
Crowell Mfg. do., . 


, 


Good. 






Balsm 




















Hamilton & Baleonib, . 


i 


Good, 


Repair eelf-eloalng hitrhoi 


Coiopll 










George L . Newconib, . 


















Frank Tottlell Co., 


1 


lair, 







• Ooe fair, two good. 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



251 



Report of Elevators Inspected — Continued. 

Dmtkiot No. 10. JAMXS H. HOWBB, Ituptctor. 



Nams of Buildixo. 


No. of 
Ele- 
vators. 


Con- 
dition. 


Orders Given. 


Com- 
pliances. 


Adams. 
Berkahire Gotton Co., . 
Berkshire Gotton Co., . 
Berkahire Cotton Co., . 

Buckland. 
Ruins Covell, .... 

Conway. 
Toeker ft Cook ll/g. Co., . 

IjOO. 

8mhh Paper Co.,* . 
Holbnrt Paper Co., 

North Adams. 
W. H. Bperry ft Co, 
C. T. Sampaon Mfg. Co., 

Bearer Milk, . 

Barber Leather Co., 

Eclipse Mills, .... 

Plttsfleld. 
X. D. Jones ft Bon, . 
BhakarMme, . . . . 


6 
1 
2 

1 

1 

2 
1 

1 
1 

2 

1 

2 

1 
1 


Good, 

Fair, 

Bad, 

Fair, 

Fair, 

Fair, 
Fair, 

Fair, 
Fair, 

Fair, 

Fair, 

Fair, 

Fair, 
Fair, 


Repair hatches, . 
Provide new shears and springs 
for safety device. 

Guard hatches, .... 

New cable or rope, . 

Repair elevator gates, 
Repair springs to elevator, 

Repair gates to openings, 

New cable on elevator; guard 
elevator openings. 

Automatic guards for all ele- 
vators. 

Automatic gate at bottom of 
elevator. 

Automatic guards for all ele- 
vator*. 

Repair elevator gates, 
Safety device on elevator, 


Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied. 

Complied. 

Compiled. 
Complied. 

Complied. 
Complied. 

Complied.* 

Complied. 

Complied* 

Complied. 
Complied. 



Report of Elevators Inspected. 

District No. 11. FRANK G. WAS LEY, Intpector. 



"Same or Bunj>nra. 



No. of 
Ele- 
vators. 



Con- 
dition. 



Orders Given. 



Com- 
pliances. 



Draoot. 
Michael Collins Mills, . 

Blllerlca. 
Faulkner Mfg. Co., 

Andovor. 
Smith ft Dove Mills, . 

North Andover. 
Wffihun Button's Mills, . 

Methuen. 
MethnenOo^ . 
Arlington Cotton Mills, . 

Lowell. 
Lawrence Mfg. Co., 
Lawrence Mfg. Co., Store 

House. 
Boott Cotton Mills, 
Merrimack Mfg. Co., . 
Merrimack Croquet Co., 
Lowell Bienehory, . 
F. W. Kitridge Block, . 
U. 8. Bunting Go., . 
U. 8. Bunting Co., Worsted 

Mill. 



8 



17 
1 

17 
17 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 



Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 



Good, 
Good, 



Good, 
Poor, 

Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Good, 
Poor, 



None, 

None, 

None, ..... 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, ..... 
Repair safety device, 

None, 

None 

None, 

None, 

None, 

None, 

Proctire new safety device, 



Complied. 



Complied. 



* In process of construction. 



252 REPOBT CHIEF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jul 1 
Report of Elevator* Inspected — Concluded. 




Pnnkeiun MUK . 
• ' 5mm lpi. 



AtluDc MM * 



K. Fruk Lc-H Wool HUI, 



O.O.Adun* Block. . 
C. 8. M.io Piper Mill. . 
George W Htdlajr ft Co., 
" "— - Wkfon Fkiotj, 



EiwHi 
ArHnpo _ 
PaxiflcMUIa, 



Good, Hone,. 
Good, Som,. 
Good, i Hobo, . 



rfo«, . 

Nooo, 

Bapulr nil* y dcrtm. 

Repair hMt deri™, 
rrocarr wnr MHtJ d«rl™ ; I 



Boiler Inspection Department. 



REPORTS OF INSPECTORS. 



BOILER INSPECTION DEPARTMENT. 



Towns and Cities in District assigned to Each 

Inspector. 

Inspector Thomas Hawley (District No. 1). 

Cambridge, Everett, Maiden, Somerville, Stoneham, Wakefield, 
and Suffolk County. 

Inspector David H. Dyer (District No. 2). 

Plymouth County. — Bridgewater, Carver, Duxbury, East 
Bridgewater, Halifax, Hanson, Kingston, Lakeville, Marion, 
Marshfield, Mattapoisett, Middleborough, Norwell, Pembroke, 
Plymouth, Plympton, Rochester, Wareham, West Bridgewater, 
Bristol, and Dukes, Barnstable and Nantucket counties. 

Inspector Louis Amell (District No. 8). 

Worcester County. — Ashburnham, Athol, Auburn, Barre, 
Berlin, Bolton, Boylston, Brookfield, Chariton, Clinton, Dana, 
Douglas, Dudley, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton, Hardwick, Har- 
vard, Holden, Hubbardston, Lancaster, Leicester, Leominster, 
Lunenburg, Millbury, New Braintree, Northborough, Northbridge, 
North Brookfield, Oakham, Oxford, Pax ton, Petersham, Philiip- 
ston, Princeton, Royalston, Rutland, Shrewsbury, Southbridge, 
Spencer, Sterling, Sturbridge, Sutton, Temple ton, Uxbridge, 
Warren, Webster, Westborough, West Boylston, West Brookfield, 
Westminster, Winchendon, Worcester. 

Inspector George A. Lord (District No. 4). 

Berkshire County. — Adams, Alford, Becket, Cheshire, Clarks- 
burg, Dalton, Egremont, Florida, Great Barrington, Hancock, 
Hinsdale, Lanesborough, Lee, Lenox, Monterey, Mount Washing- 
ton, New Ashford, New Marlborough, North Adams, Otis, Peru, 
Pittsfield, Richmond, Sandisfield, Savoy, Sheffield, Stockbridge, 
Tyringham, Washington, West Stockbridge, Williamstown, Wind- 
sor. 



256 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [J 

Franklin County. — Ashfield, Bernardaton, Buckland, Cha 
moot, Colrain, Conway, Deerfleld, Erring, Gill, Greenfi 
Hawley, Heath, Leverett, Leyden, Monroe, Montague, I 
Salem, North field, Orange, Rowe, Shelburne, Shutesbury, Snu 
land, Warwick, Wendell, Whately. 

Hampden County. — Agawam, Blandford, Brim fie Id, Che* 
Chicopee, Granville, Hampden, Holland, Holyoke, Longme&c 
Ludlow, Mooson, Montgomery, Palmer, Russell. Sou th wick, ' 
land, Wales, West Springfield, Westfield, Wilbraham. 

Hampshire County. — Amherst, Belchertown, Chesterfield, C 
mington, Easthamptoo, Enfield, Goshen, Granby, Green* 
Hadley, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlefield, Northampton, Fell 
Plainfield, Prescott, South Hadley, Southampton, Ware, T* 
hampton, Williamsburg, Worthington. 



Inspector Charles Ferguson (District No. 5). 

Middlesex County. — Acton, Ashby, Ayer, Bedford, Bille 
Boxborough, Burlington, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Dracut, Dnnsta 
Groton, Littleton, Lowell, North Reading, Pepperell, Read 
Shirley, Tewksbary, Tyngsborough, Townsend, Westford, 
mington. 

Essex County. — Amesbury, Andover, Beverly, Boxford, E 
ford, Danvers, Easez, Georgetown, Grove land, Hamilton, Ipsv 
Lynnfleld, Manchester, Marblehead, Merrimac, Methnen, Mi< 
ton, N ah ant, Newbury, North Andover, Peabody, llock 
Rowley, Saugua, Salisbury, Swampsoott, Topsfield, Wenl 
West Newbury, Gloucester, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lynn, 1 
bury port, Salem. 

Inspector John H. Kazae (District No. 6). 

Norfolk County. — Avon, Bellingham, Brain tree, Brook 
Canton, Cohasset, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Franklin, 
brook, Hyde Park, Medfield, Met! way, Millie, Milton, Need: 
Norfolk, Norwood, Quitiey, Randolph, Sharon, Stougbton, ' 
pole, Wcllesl ey, Weymouth, Wrentham. 

Middlesex County. — Arlington, Ashland, Belmont, Com 
Framingham, Holliston, Hopkinton, Hudson, Lexington, Lin< 
Marlborough, Maynard, Natick, Newton, Sherborn, Stow, 
bury, Waltham, Watertown, Wayland, Weston, Winche 
Woburn. 

Plymouth County. — Abington, Brockton, Hanover, Hiogl 
Hull, Rockland, Soituate, Whitman. 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 257 



Repobt of Inspector Hawlet. 

m 

District No. 1. 

Sir: — I herewith submit my fourth annual report, covering 
work done in the inspection of steam boilers and the examination 
of engineers and firemen. During the year 2,292 applications for 
examination for license have been received ; to this should be 
added 7,529 applications unacted upon at the date of previous 
report, making a total of 9,821 applications to be considered dar- 
ing the year. Of this number, I have examined 3,824 men, grant- 
ing 3,709 licenses and in 115 cases refusing licenses, the men so 
refused being totally ignocant of a steam boiler, and dangerous 
men to be allowed to operate a steam plant in any capacity. The 
fact that the license law made it punishable by fine and imprison- 
ment to operate a boiler without a license, made the demands for 
examinations by those engineers in search of employment so im- 
perative that the bulk of the year has been devoted to the exam- 
ination of this large body of men, and the inspection of boilers 
has of necessity been receiving less attention than I should like. 
In this work only those boilers that appeared to be of questionable 
safety were inspected, and of the number inspected 10 were found 
totally unfit for further use, this number including one school- 
house boiler. 

The last Legislature made some changes in the engineers' license 
law, the principal one being that those engineers who had been 
continuously employed in the Commonwealth for the five years 
next prior to the passage of the act, June 9, should be en- 
titled to their license without further examination, provided they 
took oath to the fact, and the men for whom they had worked 
also certified to the fact. This was expected to afford some relief 
from the work of examination, but very few engineers cared to 
avail themselves of this exemption. Although the license issued 
under this exemption clause was identical in every way with the 
license obtained after passing an examination, less than 300 of 
the 10,000 in this district cared to avail themselves of the privilege, 
preferring instead to stand the examination. Notice was sent to 
all engineers who came under this clause, with the proper blank to 
fill oat, and it is probable, therefore, that this hnmber represents 
ail who intend to avail themselves of this exemption, and, so far 
as forming any material relief from the great bulk of examinations, 
this provision has been practically of no assistance. 

The work of examination is proceeding as rapidly as possible, 
and on very much the same lines outlined in detail in my last 



258 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [J 

report. Tbe matter of written examinations is variously regai 
by engineers, and I Km Steadily in receipt of letters asking fo 
examination in writing. I find, however, that the majority 
engineers can stand a better examination orally, and the » 
of examination is now wholly oral. The recent division of 
district into three districts, by the addition of two new inspect 
has divided the work, so that I have now less than 2,000 app] 
tions yet to be examined. Of this number, about 1,000 have 1 
notified to appear for examination and have failed to do so. 
many cases the notice did not reach the applicants, and in ot 
conditions prevented their responding, while others have prob 
gone out of the business. These men will be given another op 
tunity for examination before their applications are finally pa. 
upon. Looking at the work at this time, it seems reasonably 
tain that the bulk of the examinations In this district will be c 
pleted within three months, and after that time applicants wil 
examined within a few days of their application, and a more r 
enforcement of the law carried out than has been possible wh 
man's application most wait six or more months before it coul< 
reached. No prosecutions have been made of men who bad ap[ 
for a license and who operated an engine pending their exam 
tion, the men being willing and ready to take the examioat 
tbe large number of applicants making it impossible to reach t 
for many months. Prosecutions, however, were made of i 
men as were refused a license and continued to operate an en 
or boiler, and in each case the law was upheld and tbe men f 
by the court. 

The very large amount of clerical work to be done, witi 
clerical help of any kind in this department, forms a serious di 
back to the work, as fully one-third of the time most be dev 
to clerical work. Nevertheless, I feel confident in saying 
before another year has passed both the license law and the b- 
inspection law will be in thorough operation. 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 259 



Summary of Examinations* 

Applicants for license examined, 3,824 

Licenses granted : — 

First class, 551 

Second class, 408 

Third class, 446 

Special, 742 

Firemen, 1,241 

Hoisting, 321 

Total licenses, . 3,709 

Licenses refused, 115 

Licenses revoked, 8 

Summary qf Inspections. 

Boilers inspected, ........ 74 

Number of defects found, ...... 174 

Number of dangerous defects, 77 

Number of boilers ordered repaired, .... 46 

Number of boilers condemned, 10 







! 
























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1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



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262 EEPOET CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. 





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1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



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264 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [J 

Report or Inspector Dyer. 
District No. 2. 

Sir : — Id obedience to your request I have the honor to h: 
you my tabulated annual report of boiler inspections and exs 
nations of engineers and firemen in District No. 2, comprit 
Plymouth, Norfolk, Bristol, Barnstable, Nantucket and Du 
counties, during the months of August, September and October 

It must be well known to yon that the tabulated reports g 
only a portion of an inspector's work, much of which, though q 
as useful and necessary in securing compliance with the laws 
the Commonwealth as inspections and examinations, cannot 
presented in tabular form. 

During the three months of my service I bave received net 
five hundred letters, most of them asking for information ab 
the law, which all seemed desirous to know and obey ; and, w 
many of these letters could be answered by mailing copies of 
law, a very large proportion of them required written replies. 

In making examinations of engineers and firemen, I have b 
able, through them, to call the attention of many owners and ui 
of boilers to the fact that they were violating the law, and t 
secure their willing conformity to its requirements. I have 
found a single instance of unwillingness to comply with all requ 
ments, when fairly explained ; on the contrary, I bave found 1 
owners and users of steam plants universally approve of both 
inspection and license laws of the State, so far as my limi 
observation has extended. 

Of course, with my short experience, comments or suggests 
of value can scarcely be expected. 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



2G5 



Summary of Examinations. 



CLASS. 



Appllea- 
tlons re- 
ceived. 



Applicants 
examined. 



Licenses 
granted. 



Licensee 
refused. 



First class, 
Second class, 
Third class, 



Special, . 
Firemen, 



Hoisting and portable, . 
Total, 



33 


61 


43 


49 


71 


69 


45 


74 


84 


33 


38 


67 


99 


138 


117 


16 


20 
402 


20 


275 


400 



1* 
1 



Summary of Inspections. 

Boilers inspected, 

Boilers ordered repaired, .... 
Number of defects found, . . 
Number of dangerous defects, . 



28 

15 

32 

2 



* For Intoxication. 



266 BEPOKT CHIEF OF DISTRICT 





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1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



267 



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2C8 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [Jb 

Report of Inspector Ahell. 
District No. 3. 

In compliance with the rules of the department, I submit to y 
my annual report. 

Upon examination of the books and papers of this office, I « 
convinced at once that the work of inspecting boilers was far 
arrears ; I therefore started with a determination to bring this wt 
up to date as soon as possible. Much difficulty is experienced 
finding out the location of uninsured boilers, not more than 01 
fourth of the owners of such boilers reporting them in accordai 
with the law, many pleading ignorance of its requirements, 
place the law before them I have sent copies to those who 
suspected had boilers coming under the supervision of the Sta 
and have posted the law in public places. I bave met with 
difficulty in enforcing the law where the arrangements of the both 
were Buch as to require repairs or changes in surroundings. 
„ One case will suffice for illustration. In a hotel I found t 
boiler so near the floor that it was impossible to get on top to t 
man-hole. The safety valve was beyond the reach of any on 
the man-hole had been closed in before the floor was laid, and h 
not been opened for ten years. The owner was wealthy, 
requested that a trap door be cut in the floor large enough so tl 
the man-hole could be removed, and that the safety valve be plac 
where it could be attended to properly. At first the owner object 
strenuously, but when he saw that my orders were imperative, 
complied. The result of this inspection showed the following cc 
dition of the boiler. The tubes were pitted, so that they bad to 
removed. The safety valve was so near to a floor timber as 
render it inoperative. This was in a public house. Finally, 
me Bay, in this connection, that the owner was not only aatisfi 
when the work was completed, but spoke in the highest terms 
the work of this department. I am convinced that the work 
this department demands discretion and sound judgment, as w 
as practical ability, and that the law will give satisfaction as 
becomes better understood by those wbo come under its jurisdictic 

In eounection with the examination of engineers and fireuii 
no difficulty of a serious character has presented itself. Quid 
number of applications bave been received for re-examination, t 
applicants not having received what they wanted at the hands 
the former inspectors of this district. Such examinations hi 
been refused unless the applicant was changing his position or * 
going to a situation, then a new application was considered ; I 



1897.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



269 



when the applicant was to remain where he was when he received 
his license, a second examination could not be given until all 
applicants had been examined. 

In conclusion, let me add that, general satisfaction is expressed 
both by employers and employed regarding the working of this 
law; and property owners are satisfied that many of the long 
shut-downs and long delays in making repairs are due to incom- 
petency on the part of the men in charge of their steam plants, 
and that a proper co-operation between employer and employee in 
this department will secure better service and better workmen. 



Summary of Examinations. 



class. 



Applica- 
tions 
received. 



Applicants 
examined. 



Licensee 
granted. 



Licenses 
refused. 



First, 
Second, . 
Third, . 
Special, . 
Firemen, 
Hoisting, 
Total, 



14 


11 


5 


12 


8 


15 


16 


15 


18 


33 


21 


43 


80 


66 


30 


15 


14 


22 


170 


185 


133 



1 
1 



Summary of Inspections. 

Number of boilers inspected, 67 

Number of defects found, • 64 

Number of dangerous defects, 17 

Boilers ordered repaired, 20 

Boilers condemned, 1 



270 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [J 



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272 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRIC 
II ! 



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276 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POIJCE. [Jt 



The boiler insurance companies, previous to the passage of 
boiler inspection law, were insuring and inspecting boilers wb 
had no fusible ping. Wherever I have fonnd a boiler inso 
without a ping, I ordered one in, and gave the parties a copy 
the law relating to safety fusible pings. I now find that the bo 
insurance companies are ordering pings put into every bo 
insured by them in this State, — return tubular, water-tube i 
cast-iron sectional. 

Quite a number of the boilers which I have inspected have si 
the inspection been insured by the boiler insurance compan 
Previous to my issuance of orders of changes the companies wo 
not insure them, but as soon as my orders had been complied v 
they took the risk. 

With a very few exceptions, all parties who have received ore 
of changes have complied and received their certificates 





Summary of Examinations. 






CLASS. 


AppUewti 


LleuM 


1Mb 




107 
128 

164 
177 
437 
11 


87 
33 
SO 
37S 
459 
32 
















Firemen, 
Hoisting, 






Total, . 




1,024 


1,014 


1 



Of the 459 firemen's licenses granted, 181 were special, 
applicants having knowledge of but one kind of boiler. 

Number of applications received since Oct 29, 1896, . 685 

Number of applications received last year, . . 1,713 

Total number of applications received, . . . 2,398 
Summary of Inspections. 

Boilers inspected, 435 

Number of defects fonnd. . . 300 

Number of dangerous defects, .... 233 

Boilers ordered repaired, 55 

Boilers condemned, i 



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278 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [ 



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288 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [J«i 



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288 EEPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 





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UMENT— No. 38. 



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IC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 305 

)bt of Inspector Ferguson. 
Dittrict No. B. 

relative to inspection of boilers and licensing 

come under my observation for the past year 
i to state was wholly without accident of any 
ewith submit to you. 

istant they are put to use, begin to deteriorate, 
nother. Cases of the total destruction of a 
lave been avoided had the boiler been con- 
rated properly. 

•es much pleasure from meeting a man who 
er which he has in charge, or an owner who 
n his steam plant. Bat in the majority of 
3 the owners are without the slightest idea 
of a steam boiler, and have been for years 
ineer. Proprietors or owners should look at 
lancial or safety stand-point, and the advan- 
m. 

on the part of owners are numerous, but one 
txation. An owner had purchased a superior 
o have it erected and operated properly. I 
it vicinity, and was requested to inspect said 
.tion I found that the boiler was set bo that 
e dry sheet for its entire circumference was 

of the fire, and, consequently, burned. The 
Ded off, showing beyond donbt that the expan- 
s carried beyond the strength of rivet ; and 
boiler were in similar condition. The owner 

the boiler was originally set in the manner 
ining that that was the proper position and 

ieing operated without safety valves are the 
nblic safety, and constitute a neglect which 

the many things that are of great importance 
! its fittings. I have known three boilers to 

only one safety valve, and a stop valve on 
etween the safety valve and the boiler. All 
iteam boilers, for their own personal ad van - 
y, ought to procure men of recognized ability 

on the erection and attachment of their 

number could be related of the abuses of 
he application of the provisions of the law 



306 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [ 

will in due time remedy these abases, and meet the appro 
a grateful public, by whom the value of the work of this d< 
mertt is folly recognized, and the law it is enforcing acknowl 
to be second to none on the statute books of the Commonw 

The law relating to engineers is being carried out, as c 
seen by referring to the tabulated report. As a general tbii 
seems to meet with approval. 

But the education of the engineer is not yet complete. I 
for the time when the license law for engineers in this State 
be considered a compulsory means of higher education, ant 
sequently insure a better-protected public. Improvement 
already be Been in the classes of men who are engaged i 
business of steam engineering, even in the short time our pi 
law has been in force. 

By the acquirement of a certain amount of knowledge 01 
eubject, whether practical or theoretical, we insure the ' 
development of the faculties. While all cannot become er 
proficient in the mechanical world, the Industrious stndc 
average talent should earnestly resolve to win success i 
engineer, and will find himself successful by combining ap 
tion and perseverance. 

Summary of Examinations. 
Total number of applicants examined, . 
Total number of first-class licenses granted, . 
Total number of second-class licenses granted, 
Total number of third-class licenses granted. 
Total number of special licenses granted. 
Total number of firemen licenses granted, 
Total number of hoisting and portable licenses granted, 

Total number rejected, 

Total number revoked 



Summary of Inspections. 
Total number of boilers inspected, . 
Total number of boilers ordered repaired, 
Total number of boilers condemned, 
Total number of defects found. 
Total number of dangerous defects found, 



JC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



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312 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 



Repobt of Inspector Kazab. 
District No. 6. 

Sir : — I respectfully submit the first annual report of my 
as inspector of steam boilera and examiner of engineers an 
men. 

My duty for the first seven months was confined to Woi 
County, and the applications for licenses from that d 
amounted to nearly three thousand. Several hundred 1 
were reported for inspection, and the amount of clerical 
incumbent upon the office was excessive. 

August 10 I was transferred to Boston, and afterward est 
to District No. 6, which comprises Norfolk and a portion of 
outh and Middlesex counties. 

So great has been the demand for licenses, that ray tin 
been mostly devoted to the examination of men and the it 
of these certificates. I have visited many towns and exa 
men of a variety of calibre, from the intelligent, thorough 
formed engineer to the ignorant foreigner who cannot speak 
lish and knows only how to shovel coal on a fire. This last 
of men is not unfrequently found in small mills, where the 
competition of trade makes cheap help a consideration, e\ 
the risk of disaster. I have also found them in the empl 
large firms and corporations, who are either careless or igt 
of the importance of hiring trained men. Some of these : 
have rejected, while others have been placed under the super 
of intelligent engineers and firemen. 

During the past year a number of small reference books, 
ing upon the engine and boiler, has been published and i 
circulated. These books are advertised to contain the que 
asked by the examiner, with their relative answers. The 
misleading, and many young men file applications for first 
licenses upon the superficial knowledge gained from this si 
They are disappointed and often indignant that they do no 
the required examination. 

A large number of our engineers have been deprived o 
privilege of technical knowledge, but by long experience i 
care of steam plants have become familiar with every piec 
part of the machinery under their charge. These men 
proved by years of faithful service their ability to control an 
this dangerous but essential element, both for motive powe 
heating. They are usually highly endorsed by their emplc 
and always receive a license. 



JC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 313 

s which I have examined I would refer espe- 
;d by a large educational institution. These 
' thorough construction, and bad been run but 
found all of the tubes so badly fitted and in 

condition that the; were unsafe for use. I 
em renewed. This involved an expenditure 
dollars, which in my opinion might have been 
s been under the care of an experienced man. 
nt of the license law a most gratifying advance- 
dge of engines and boilers is evident among 
nen employed to run them, and the consequent 

is unquestionable, while the greater safety of 
ipparent to all. 

tummary of Examination*. 

ipplicants examined 2,956 

first-class licenses granted, . 183 

second-class licenses granted, . . 268 

third-class licenses granted, . 379 

special licenses granted, . 1,071 

hoisting and portable licenses granted, 166 

firemen examined, .... 666 

ected 28 

ition, 9 



Summary of Inspections. 

epaired 

s found, 



314 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTR 



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C DOCUMENT— No. 32. 



TS OF ACCIDENTS. 



320 EEPOET CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. [ 

the aforesaid chapter 481. Said sections 8, 9, 10 an 
read as follows : — 



[Acts or 1894, Chsvthji 481.] 

Rkport of Accidents. 

Sect. 8. All manufacturers, manufacturing corporations 
proprietors of mercantile establishments shall forthwith sei 
the chief of the district police a written notice of any accide 
an employee while at work in an; factory, manufacturing or 
cantile establishment operated by them, whenever the ace 
results in the death of said employee or causes bodily injui 
such a nature as to prevent the person injured from returnii 
his work within four days after the occurrence of the acciden 

Sect. 9. When notice of any accident is sent to the chi 
the district police under the provisions of section eight of thi 
he shall forthwith return to the sender of snch notice a writb 
printed acknowledgment of the receipt of the same. 

Sect. 10. The chief of the district police Bhall keep a reco 
all accidents so reported to him, together with a statement o 
name of the person injured, the city or town where the ace 
occurred and the cause thereof, and shall include an abstra 
said record in his annual report. 

Sect. 61. Any person or corporation failing to send noti< 
any accident, as required by section eight of this act, shall be 
iehed by a fine not exceeding twenty dollars. 

During the year, 897 accidents were reported ; an 
these are included 141 cases where those who were inj 
were employed at the time at work not connected with 
ning machinery or any motive power. The persons 
engaged were, in the main portion, laborers, and the cin 
stances in such cases were, of course, many and varied, 
to this number about 250 cases which are not enumei 
in the list presented further on, being of that nature « 
it would be impossible to provide means to prevent ' 
occurrence, and we have a few cases more than 500 w 
the injuries received were due to causes connected wit) 
operation of machinery, elevators, hoiatways and such c 
facilities necessary in every factory and workshop. 

Twenty-three accidents caused loss of life to that nnt 
of persons. In 7 cases death was caused by being ca 
and crushed by elevator car ; in 3 others the persons 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 321 

fatally injured by being carried around shafting ; in 2 others 
explosion of gas was the cause ; and 1 in each of the 
following-named causes : caught under and crushed by a 
mule carriage; thrown backward from an emery wheel, 
striking head against edge of bench; received an electric 
shock; by the falling of a cast-iron exhaust pipe; being 
caught between a lathe and the side of the building ; burned 
by the flames of kerosene oil ; by falling from the top of an 
electric pole ; struck on head by an iron bar falling, in con- 
sequence of a fastening breaking; by the dropping of an 
elevator car ; being caught on driving wheel of an engine ; 
falling through an elevator well. These fatal cases, having 
been investigated, as far as could be, by the inspectors, are 
referred to more at length in another place in this report. 

In the list of cases which follows, the causes leading to 
injuries are given, and the number thus injured from each 
source. The causes not here enumerated will be described 
in a general way, which will convey some idea as to their 
nature. The fatal cases are not included in this list. 

Injured by machinery, in most cases in shoe factories, cotton, 

woollen and paper mills and electric works, .... 291 

Injured by machinery in planing mills, machine shops, iron 
works and other mechanical establishments (23 by circular 

saws), 85 

Injured while employed about general work, principally 

laboring work, 141 

Injured by elevators, 27 

By being caught between elevator car and flooring (in 

most cases while riding on car), 21 

By falling of elevator car, 3 

By falling through elevator well, 3 

Injured by falling through hatchway, 2 

Injured by belting, shafting and pulleys, 44 

Injured by scalds and burns, chiefly from molten iron and dye 

vats, 27 

Injured by explosions, (in 3 cases by gas), .... 5 

Injured by electric shock, 4 

Injured by flying shuttle (included in figures first above 

given), 7 

Injured while cleaning machinery in motion, or attempt- 
ing to remove waste, bobbins, etc., which had fallen 
into running machinery (included in figures first above 
given), .......... 123 

Injured by causes not here enumerated, ..... 248 



322 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. | 

The 248 cases of injury arising from causes not eou 
ated in the foregoing list were of that description to w 
very likely, it was intended that the statute would no 
pty. Among the cases, 41 persons were injured by 
by stumbling or slipping on wet floors or on stairway* 
others received injuries by falling from ladders or from 
iag. There were 82 more hurt in various parts of the 
by having been struck by weighty articles which had : 
from trucks and otherwise, and in many instances by 
and trucks having run over their feet. In 33 other 
splinters, nails and pieces of wire injured feet and b 
but in most cases the feet. Flying pieces of steel 
sparks from anvils and forges contributed 9 more to th< 
and 15 injured their hands while using knives or some 
of cutting tool. All these, with a miscellaneous remai 
constitute what are mentioned as causes not enumei 
The statute makes no distinction in this matter, how 
and, whatever may be the cause of an accident, it is rec 
and recorded alike with all others. 

One source of injury which some time ago was pron 
in these reports was the shuttle, which, becoming det 
or breaking away and flying from the loom, inflicted ii 
in many instances very serious. Four years ago the 
ber of cases of this kind was 36. Each year since has £ 
a reduction in the number till the present, when, by 
ence to the list as already presented, the number of 
cases is reported as 7. This fact in itself is very gt 
ing, and is evidence that methods for better securit 
being adopted, and have already served to greatly ■ 
the evil. 

As in previous reports, attention is called in the p 
one to the many cases where accidents happened s 
result of carelessness on the part of the persons injui 
cleaning running machinery, or attempting to remove 
same waste, bobbins or other materials which had in 
way got entangled therein. There were 123 persons ii 
in this manner, or nearly one-third of the entire m 
injured while operating machinery. The report of las 
showed in this respect about the same proportion. 1 
ever the, safeguards may be which are provided for I 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 323 

protection, they are of little avail where reckless or thought- 
less persons venture on such chances. 

The great majority of injuries sustained were of a slight 
nature. Injury to the hand and arm constituted the largest 
proportion, the number being 531 , and of these injury to the 
thumb and fingers numbered 324. In each of 2 cases three 
fingers were lost, in each of 4 cases two fingers were lost 
and in each of 11 cases one finger was lost. Partial loss of 
one or more fingers occurred in 53 cases. In each of 5 cases 
one hand was lost. There were 10 cases where the arm 
was broken and about as many cases of sprained wrist. 
No serious injury is reported in any case to the foot. Seven 
persons suffered from broken legs. About 50 cases reported 
injury to the head, but few were of a serious nature. One 
person suffered the loss of an eye. In 6 cases ribs were 
broken and other parts of the body were more or less 
injured, but in few cases reported seriously. 

In a case where loss of one hand was the result, the cir- 
cumstances were as follows : the man who met with this 
accident was in a room where there was an exhaust fan used 
for the purpose of taking out steam from the room. He 
put his hand up to ascertain how much draft there was to 
the fan. Placing his hand too near, it was caught and drawn 
in, and injured so that he was sent to the hospital, where it 
was found necessary to amputate the hand at the wrist. It 
was his left hand. 

Another case was that of a female operative who was at 
work tending four cards. She had stopped one card and was 
cleaning same, being at the time in a stooping posture. In 
moving about, her dress was caught in one of the cards in 
motion, and she was pulled from her feet and thrown against 
the frame. Her jaw was split and she received a fracture on 
one side. She was taken home, and a doctor attended to 
her injuries. It was his opinion that the wounds would heal 
without leaving any disfigurement. 

There was a case of another female operative who was sit- 
ting on a waste box between the ends of spinning frames, 
her hair being worn in a long braid. In some manner her 
hair was caught by one of the belts, and the scalp was torn 
from the back of her head, causing a frightful wound. She 



324 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 

was taken to the hospital and attended, where at last 
her condition was thought to be favorable. 

While at work in a leather shop, a man in bant 
four-ply rope caused it in some way to get around his 
the other end of the rope getting caught in a revolving 
and he was drawn over the shaft once, when, fortui 
the rope broke, and he was released. His injurie 
attended to at his home. When last heard from 1 
progressing favorably. 

A man was on a step-ladder engaged in cleaning sb 
when the middle finger of the left hand was caught 
waste he was using, and was wound around the sbafti 
torn off at the middle joint. At the same time 1 
thrown to the floor, and struck against the side of an 
machine. He sustained a comminuted fracture of th< 
of bis left arm near the wrist, and it was feared t 
received internal injuries. 

A boy employed in one of the mills met with an a 
causing the loss of his left arm. He was sixteen y> 
age, worked in the card room, and was what is know 
"alley boy." It seems that the man employed 
machine where the accident occurred went away for 
and left the iron door on the card open, and while aw: 
supposed the boy came along and rested his elbow 
frame of the card, and while in this position his 
slipped, causing his arm to be caught on the carding 
cylinder, and drawing the arm between the cylinder t 
door frame. Before the card could be stopped bis f 
was horribly crushed. He was held fast in the car 
twenty minutes before he could be extricated, the n 
having to be taken apart in order to release him, and 
while the sufferings of the unfortunate boy were intet 
pitiful. When taken to the hospital it was found ne< 
to amputate the arm about one inch below the shonldt 
* A narrow escape from a fatal result was the ca: 
workman who was in the dry room getting stock fr 
dryer. He got on top of a frame for the purpose, a 
caught and carried around the shaft which runs throi 
room from the main shaft. There were no projectioi 
the shaft at the part on which he was caught. Fortu 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 325 

he escaped without serious injury, and the doctor who 
attended him reported that one or two weeks would bring 
about recovery. 

A workman employed in a machine shop, in attempting 
to unwind a belt which had wound itself around the shafting, 
had his left hand caught on the shaft in such a manner that 
the hand was torn off above the wrist. 

The circumstances in each of the cases resulting fatally, 
so far as the same could be obtained by inquiry and investi- 
gation, are a part of the record of these reports, and they 
are here given substantially as the written report in each 
case was filed in this office. In those cases where the sad 
occurrence was not witnessed by any one, of course, to 
arrive at a conclusion regarding its origin, the immediate 
and silent surroundings alone furnish us with information of 
any kind, and thus it must remain only a matter of con- 
jecture. The inspectors, however, in cases of this kind, 
are enjoined to diligent and searching examination, to secure 
everything possible. As in previous reports, the name of 
the person is given, the city or town and the establishment 
where the fatal accident happened, as follows : — 

Arthur Abbott, Lawrence. Washington Mills Company. 
Date of accident, Jan. 6, 1896. Abbott was attempting to put 
a belt on a pulley of counter shaft which was running to the 
ceiling of the woollen spinning room, when in some manner he 
was caught on the same and was injured to such an extent that he 
died. 

Daniel Carnody, Worcester. Bowler Bros. Date of accident, 
Jan. 6, 1896. This accident was caused by Carnody being caught 
between the elevator platform and top of door casing to elevator 
abaft. No one saw the accident. He was last seen to pall the 
shipper rope to bring the elevator down, and it is supposed that 
before getting on the car he reversed the motion in order to go up, 
and in attempting to step on the car he slipped, falling on the 
platform, with part of his body hanging over the same, and before 
be conld recover himself was caught, as before stated. Workmen 
on the next floor, hearing his outcry, ran to his assistance and 
reversed the elevator. His back was found to be broken, and he 
lived but a few minutes after the accident. 



326 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 

Fred. Hiscock, Chelsea. Magee Furnace Company. D 
accident, Jan. 20, 1896. Hiscock was at work as a carp en t< 
was engaged in tearing down a shed where there had been 
There was a line of shafting running the length of this shed. 
ten feet from the ground. Hiscock was on some cross-) 
pushing along some timber, when he slipped, and, instead of 
ing h> the ground, some five or six feet, he threw himself up 
shafting, which caught his clothes, and he was carried arou 
shaft, his body striking against the plank walk which wa 
the shafting. Several men who witnessed it ran to Btop the 
which was shut off at once. His injuries were such as to mm 
death a short time after the accident. 

Johk W. Hendry, Fall River. Borden Block. Date c 
dent, Jan. 20, 1896. Hendry was with two other boys 
corridor of the building, about seven o'clock in the evening 
ing for admission to the performance in the Academy of 
which is in the block. A lady who was on her way op stai 
meeting saw the boys. When she bad reached the fonrtl 
she heard a scream from below, and, descending to learn the 
she saw the Hendry boy lying on the third floor near the eli 
She at once gave the alarm. From all the circumstances it 
posed that Hendry went to the elevator on the third floor 
purpose of having a ride, and, finding the door to the well fai 
he climbed up to the transom, which was open, and, leaning < 
took hold of the starting rope and started the elevator np. 
rose, the top of the elevator caught his head, crushing it i 
tbe top of the transom, the elevator ascending to the top 
bnilding and the boy falling to the floor, where his boc 
found, the right Bide of the head being completely torn off. 

Andrew Beuqin, Boston. Pintseh Compressing Coi 
Date of accident, Feb. 3, 1896. This accident was cam 
Bergin being caught in the driving wheel of the engine. I 
seen by one of the employees at about 7 o'clock p.m., am 
few minutes later was found dead, his head and arm in the i 
wheel. 

Nora Haley, Boston. Clifton Manufacturing Company, 
of accident, Feb. 5, 1896. Nora Haley was seen on thi 
floor of the building, going in the direction of the elevator 
was found at the bottom of the elevator well and removed 
hospital, where she died soon after. How the accident oc 
could not be ascertained. 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 327 

Frederick Barker, Fall River. Slade Mills. Date of acci- 
dent, Feb. 10, 1896. Barker was employed as a back boy in the 
mole room. He discovered that an oil can had fallen from the 
end of a roller beam. Spilling the oil on the floor, he secured a 
piece of waste and crawled under the roller beam to wipe up the 
oil, and while so engaged, and before he could get out from under 
the beam, his head was caught between the moving mule carriage 
and leg of beam, crushing it in a horrible manner. He died about 
an hour after the accident. 

Fred. Derosiers, Lowell. Lowell Machine Shop. Date of 
accident, April 3, 1896. Derosiers was at work at an emery 
wheel, polishing steel coverings to fly frames. He was holding 
one of the coverings upright on the wheel, which is covered with . 
leather, throwing the top end over, which struck him on the fore- 
head, cutting him badly between the eyes, and knocking him ten 
feet backwards, striking his head on a bench, and receiving injuries 
at the base of the brain. He was conveyed to his home, where he 
died on April 10 from the effects of his injuries. 

William Hayes, Springfield. United Electric Light Company. 
Hayes was employed as a dynamo engineer. Discovering that 
something was wrong with the electric current, he reported the 
matter to the inspector, who directed him to make the necessary 
changes on the switch board. While doing this Hayes held in 
his hand a conducting cord, which connects the two sides of 
the switch board. He had drawn one of the plugs attached to 
the cord from the board, when his hand came in contact with the 
socket on one of the wires. The full current entered his body 
through the right hand, causing almost instant death. 

Ellen Laplante, Lowell. Appleton Company. Date of acci- 
dent, May 21, 1896. This accident was caused by the falling of 
a cast-iron pipe, one hundred and forty feet long, running 
obliquely across the weaving room. It was a ten-inch pipe, and 
was suspended from the floor beams above. It was held by rods 
every eight feet. From some cause unknown, one of these rods 
broke, causing the whole pipe to tear from the ceiling. The 
Laplante girl was leaning over her loom, when one length of the 
pipe, weighing about eight hundred pounds, fell on her back and 
neck, pinning her to the loom and killing her instantly. It took 
four men to lift the pipe from her body. 

« 

Joseph B. Robins, Boston. Apartment house, 20 Mt. Vernon 



328 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 

Street. Date of accident, June 15, 1896. Robins was em; 
to run the passenger elevator. Between 12 o'clock and 
Robins conveyed two passengers to the sixth floor. On a: 
at the sixth floor the passengers left the elevator. Robin 
caused the elevator to ascend several feet to its extreme 1 
From the position in which he was found, it is presumed t 
raised himself up so as to get his body over the edge of tl 
or shed floor, and in so doing by some means came in contai 
the wheel used to move the elevator, causing the car to de 
catching his body between the top of the car and the edge 
shed floor, crushing him to death. 

Alfred J. Barkley, Boston. North Packing and Pre 
Company. Date of accident, June 19, 1896. Barkley wi 
ployed as a distributor of mail. At about 6.25 p.m. it is su 
that Barkley, having mail to deliver to the employees of the 
floor, attempted to get onto the elevator car, and in bo 
stumbled over the combing of the Bill to the entrance • 
elevator and caught hold of the wire rope to save himael 
falling, which act caused the elevator to ascend, catcbin 
between the car and the side of the elevator well. He was < 
up nearly to the top floor, and was crushed to death. Hi 
nothing of the workings of the elevator, and bad been em 
only about ten days. His body had to be extricated by c 
the floor of the elevator car. 

John O'Neil, Fall River. Fall River Machine Con 
Date of accident, Aug. 11, 1896. O'Neil was employed 
above-named machine Bhop. On the first floor of the sho; 
iron planer running the entire width of the shop. An opet 
the wall had to be made to allow the table to run in about 
six inches. It is supposed that O'Neil left his work to lo 
of a window situated over the opening in the wall at a p 
train of cars, and while standing at the window the plane; 
came back on him, crushing him between the wall and table 
was taken to the hospital, where he died at 9.30 p. si. 

James J. Dalev, Worcester. Rice & Griffins Manafac 
Company. Date of accident, Sept. 7, 1896. Daley wa 
ployed as a fireman. He made a heavy fire under one < 
three boilers, and upon closing the fire doors an explosioi 
place, filling the space in front of the boilers with flames, 
was burned about the head, arms and body. He was oonve; 
the city hospital, where he died on the 18th of September. 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 82. 329 

Henry E. Blake, Holyoke. Holyoke Paper Company. Date 
of accident, Sept. 15, 1896. Blake was employed as an oiler and 
general workman about the mill. On the morning of the above 
date he was seen to go into the engine room, as it is supposed, to 
fill the kerosene feeders used for supplying the tubular boilers 
with kerosene oil. In a few minutes after he came running out 
of the room, his clothes being ablaze. One of the employees 
threw water over him and extinguished the flames. His body was 
badly burned, and he was removed to the hospital, where he died 
several days afterwards. 

Thomas Lynch, Salem. M. Robson Paper Company. Date of 
accident, Sept. 17, 1896. Lynch had proceeded to repair the 
drain that conveys the bark when ground from the mill where it is 
stored. The space to work in was very narrow, and quite close to 
the shaft that operated the mill. He failed to stop the power, 
although the shipper was but a short distance from him. Some 
one had removed the covering from the shafting, causing it to be 
exposed. The clothing of Lynch was caught on the swiftly 
revolving shaft, and he was whirled around and horribly injured. 
He was conveyed to the hospital, where he died on the afternoon 
of the same dav. 

Hiram T. Gregg, Springfield. United Electric Light Company. 
Date of accident, Sept. 26, 1896. Gregg was a lineman in the 
employ of the above company. On the afternoon of September 26 
he sustained a fracture of the skull, from which he died at the city 
hospital. The immediate cause of the accident was the slipping 
loose of a knot in a rope attached to a pair of tackle blocks, which 
were being lowered from the top of a pole, allowing the blocks to 
fall in such a manner that one of them struck Gregg, who was 
about fifteen feet from the ground, on another pole immediately 
adjoining. The blow knocked him from the pole, causing him to 
fall backwards, striking on his head. 

Barney Woxley, Fall River. Richard Borden Manufacturing 
Company. Date of accident, Oct. 9, 1896. Woxley was en- 
gaged in the mule room stretching cotton binding for use on the 
spinning mule. To stretch this binding it had to be passed over a 
cleat fastened to the ceiling secured by two one-half inch lag 
screws, which had held secure for the past twenty years or more. 
Woxley, with two other boys, was putting on the binding to 
stretch it, when both bolts which held the cleat broke off, causing 
the cleat to come down with great force, striking Woxley on the 



330 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 

head, fracturing his skull. He was removed to the b 
where he died the same afternoon. 

George Steavens, Lowell. Hamilton Cotton Mills. 
accident, Oct. 23, 1896. Steavens had charge of the cle 
Mill No. 4. On account of the overloaded condition of 
vator, when it was started, one of the five bushel basket* 
too high, came in contact with the floor above, which pus 
truck boxes wbich were on the elevator towards Steavens, 
ing him off the elevator, he having but a very email s 
stand on. Catching the floor of the elevator, he held on 
elevator reached the floor above him. He was caught bet* 
floor and elevator, in the middle of the body, breaking h 
and right arm. He lived but Ave minutes after he was ; 
from the elevator. 

Frank Bobland, John Williamson and Thomas Will 
West Upton. William Knowlton & Sons. Date of a 
Nov. 10, 1896. This accident occurred in a small bricl 
ing containing a new gas plant which was nearly complet 
was being put in operation. There was a naphtha tank wl 
a leak. Bohland was about to commence repairing the let 
an explosion took place, filling the room with flames. 1 
and the two Williamsons were so badly burned that th 
shortly after the accident. 

Alexander McCattgban, Boston. Honghton & Dutton 
of accident, Oct. 29, 1896. McCanghan was employed at 
ton & Dutton's, on the freight elevator. By some means 
the ropes jumped the sheave, causing the elevator to fal 
Caughan was injured so badly that he had to be conveyed 
hospital, where he died at 8 o'clock the flame day of the ao 

J. E. Bailey, Boston. Webster, Cook & Co. Date of a. 
Nov. 7, 1896. Bailey was employed as a cabinet maker, 
minutes before 7 o'clock he went Into the eBtabliahmec 
appearing somewhat confused, was asked by one of the em 
what was the matter. Bailey, placing his handa to hi: 
replied that he had dreadful pains there. After a few mil 
went into the elevator car and sat down upon the seat. A : 
of dripping water was heard, appearing to come from the d 
of the elevator. An employee, looking towards the e 
found that it had ascended, and the door to the well wai 
Upon further investigation it was found that blood was d 



1897.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 331 

down from overhead, and upon looking up he discovered the head 
of Bailey hanging down under the elevator car. The elevator had 
gone up and crushed him between the wall and the edge of the 
elevator floor. His neck was horribly crushed, and when found he 
was dead. It is supposed that Bailey, feeling badly, arose from 
his seat in the elevator, became dizzy and fell forward, grasping 
the rope in his fall, which caused the elevator to ascend. His 
neck was so wedged between the side of the well and the elevator 
as to cause the elevator to stop. 

Randolph Trottier, Fall River. Tecumseh Mill No. 2. Date 
of accident, Nov. 24, 1896. William Churnley, together with 
Trottier and another employee, were on the elevator, returning 
from the first floor to the upper floor with a load of boxes and 
other articles. Trottier laid himself across one of the boxes, 
which is equipped with a truck, so as to be pushed along the mill 
floor. Just before reaching the mule room the box upon which 
Trottier lay, it is supposed, worked out, so that it protruded 
, beyond the edge of the elevator platform. As the elevator was 
ascending, the protruding box was caught by the under side of the 
mule room floor, and Trottier's head was crushed between the edge 
of the box and the floor. The top of his head was torn off just 
above the eyes and pushed over back of the head. He was killed 
almost instantly. 



DETECTIVE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE DETECTIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Increase of Crime among Juveniles. 
The ranks of ignorance, idleness and vice are too readily 
recruited, even under conditions most favorable to a contrary 
state. A late issue of the " Law Journal," London, com- 
ments on a new volume of criminal statistics, published by 
the " Home Office," showing that convictions for burglary, 
robbery and forgery are increasing, and that nearly a third 
of the burglaries are committed by youths between sixteen 
and twenty-one. In our own State, during the year 1895, 
out of the total number of 774 committed to the reformatory 
at Concord, 483 were minors. 

The significance of such statements is startling, and it is 
not enough to say that the weak and nerveless treatment of 
offenders, the inadequacy of punishment and the false notions 
concerning the criminal classes are responsible for the in- 
crease of crime among the youth of our country ; for it must 
be admitted that the ranks of juvenile offenders, in some 
sections at least, are being swelled at au alarming rate. 

The adoption of the strictest criminal code and its rigid 
enforcement is but the beginning of what needs to be done. 
The chief remedy for crime is not the punishment of crimi- 
nals. To mow the weeds from the field is but a partial 
remedy, as another season a similar crop will appear. 
Weeds can only be kept down and as nearly extirpated 
as possible by preoccupying the soil with food products. 
Is there any way to prevent the making of criminals? 

It was once contended that it was an injury to the child's 
mind to inculcate precise notions of morality and religion. 
Let the child grow up with a mind open and unprejudiced, 
and in mature years form its own opinions. But, if you 
want a crop of wheat or corn, you must prepare the soil and 
sow suitable seed, otherwise your land will be prejudiced in 
favor of weeds. Something will influence youth in its primi- 
tive period. What shall it be ? 



336 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 

The reformative agencies connected with onr Mass 
setts prison system have been shown by the codcl 
testimony of the wisest experts to be conducted on 
lines and to be justified by results. Many of out 
citizens, and of honorable women not a few, have aj 
themselves for years to the solution of the question, 
is the most effective method available for the reformati 
juvenile offenders ? 

The courts of the State, in dealing with this class, 
recognized the wisdom of trying probation, especial 
first offences, and in those cases whose special circumst 
appear to promise favorable results. Such leniency 
be shown under any administration of law which tei 
justice with mercy. If that leniency is occasionally p 
to be mistaken in its object, it remains true that it mi 
recognized in any administration of law which preten 
be humane. 

But we must go farther back than the treatment < 
knowledged criminals if we would reach the sources c 
problem of crime. We must prevent the constant add 
to the ranks of juvenile offenders.' The causes that < 
criminals must be ascertained and removed. Anion 
most prolific causes of juvenile offenders is truancy. 
Commonwealth bas made ample provisions for the edut 
of all the children within its borders. The euppressi 
ignorance is a long stride in the direction of good ci 
ship. 

Among the difficulties encountered are the indiffe 
and lack of discipline shown by parents. In proof of 
look at the streets of our cities after nightfall, swai 
with rude, loud-voiced, unmanly boys, taking their 
lesson in " hoodlumism," a preliminary stage of crime 
it must be apparent that home training and wholesom 
straint are sadly lacking in these reckless youths, 
before they reach maturity many of them have crosses 
line which separates good morals from vice and at) 
And, even if their wrong-doings are misdemeanors, ant 
the more serious crimes, they are sure to bring miser) 
shame in their train. 

The history of many of the complaints under the si 



[AC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 337 

orn children discloses much that makes 
. the remedy. DisobedieDce to the lawful 
ants, keeping company with idle and dis- 
heriting improper places, growing up in 
eness, wandering about the streets at un- 
if the night, reading dime novels, — these 
ight to light in numerous cases in which 
de against stubborn children. 
ases probation is sufficient to restore the 
ranks of the law-abiding. In much the 

commitment follows, and the offender 
ol, exercised in some suitable institution, 

But the appalling fact remains that multi- 
to a life of crime, and become defiant of 
f- 
situation is the prevention of crime by 
d agencies as the wisest experience has 
ive. 

to habits of attention and industry is half 

jus influences. " An idle brain is the 

Any bright boy or girl may be inter- 

ful employment. Ambition to excel is a 

No child, however well disposed, should 

choice of his companions nor control of 

is no longer the distressing experience 
ly to multitudes. Instruction by abstract 
id little or no meaning, has been largely 
hods of which the kindergarten is a type, 
i to specify all the means that must be 
e children from crime. But we should 
r is necessary to prevent the recruiting of 
criminal class shall be done. It costs the 
is to educate the children than to provide 
matory institutions. 

ens more fully realize their responsibility, 
steps to arrest the evils which threaten to 
)er of juvenile offenders, the result will 

ly for crime, then, is to save the children 



338 REPORT CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. [ 

from criminal associations. The homes, the schools and i 
agencies must exert their legitimate influence, It mut 
remembered that local authorities have jurisdiction to i 
late, and, if necessary, suppress, degrading, demoral 
and corrupting shows, exhibitions and performances. ; 
of these not only encourage the attendance of juveniles 
derive much of their support from this class. In e 
town and city there is a public sentiment which, if bi 
ized, would be strong enough to secure the suppressu 
these dangerous menaces to the welfare of society. 

It has been contended that children are better off at 
in factories, workshops and stores, than to grow up in i; 
ance and idleness. But such employment is open, i 
our laws, only to children who have had a stated amou 
schooling and who are of a prescribed age. There is a 
class who, for one or both reasons, are ineligible to 
employment. 

The child problem challenges universal attention. O 
the most impressive statements recently made public r< 
to the city of New York. Superintendent Jasper states 
in that city there are 192,929 children attending p 
schools ; 35,285 attending all the other schools, inch 
private and parochial ; 22,780 at work, simply because 
cannot find room in the schools ; 983 who have seats rest 
for them in the public schools, habitual truants; and 16( 
children who neither work nor go to school. The stal 
of other large centres of population will of course va 
the aggregate ; but, making these allowances, it wi 
readily seen that a state of things exists which call 
serious consideration. 



Work performed by the Detective Depabtmej 
A large amount of strictly detective work is done b; 
force from year to year, the results of which cannot be 
lated or set forth in detail in reports of this departi 
When complaints are made, as thorough an investig 
as possible follows. But in some cases it happens I 
patient examination of all the facts discloses either the ; 
ficiency of the evidence or the innocence of the ace 



LIC DOCUMENT — No. 



llojed in such service, and frequently with- 
results, notwithstanding the officer's vigi- 

ation of the district police the Legislature 
ed to provide the governor with a force that 
y summoned by him to act in any part of 
suppression of disorder and crime and the 
le public peace. The existence of such a 
g the authority of the Commonwealth, for 
if the peace, not restricted in jurisdiction to 
limits, exerts a repressive influence, which 
verestimated. 

Special Duties. 
force have been called upon for special duty 
)1, Cambridge, Centennial Grove, Clinton, 
mmington, Douglas, Falmouth, Great Bar- 
Waldron, Lexington, Marsbfield, North 
, Provincetown, South Framingbam, South 
bridge, Taunton, Westford and Worcester. 

Arrests. 
sea made to the number of 531 ; total num- 
estigated, 1,191 ; total value of property 
'9.01. 

ts of Officers, by Districts. 
ahire and Hampden Counties. 
H. Pease. Total number of cases investi- 
number of arrests, 115. 
ost important cases investigated were the 



Crime, perjury. Turned over to New York 
Crime, perjury. Turned over to New York 



Iobbs. Crime, embezzlement. Found guilty ; 
ins than six years nor more than ten years in 



340 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. [, 

Prosper Lokette. Crime, adultery. Found guilty ; detail 
Charles A. Thater. Crime, adultery. Caw now pendin 
Michael O'Neil. Crime, adultery. Case now pending. 
Clarence E. Fat. Crime, arson. Case now pending. 

Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes and Nantucket Countiei 
■Officer Simeon F. Letteney. Total number of case 
vesligated, 92; total number of arrests, 40; total vaJi 
property recovered, $615. 

Among the most important cases investigated wen 
following: — 

Isaac Small. Crime, breaking and entering. Fonnd g> 
sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

Frank Bush. Crime, breaking and entering- Found g 
sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

Lestos W. Shall. Crime) breaking and entering. 1 
guilty ; case placed on file. 

Hiram B. Eldridge. Crime, adultery. Found guilty 
tenced to two years in the House of Correction. 

Lillian Rogkrs. Crime, adultery. Found guilty ; sen 1 
to two years in the Reformatory Prison for Women. 

Albert W. Rood. Crime, forgery. Found guilty; sen 
to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

MANUEL Rogers. Crime, assault with a dangerous w 
Found guilty ; sentenced to pay a fine of $50. 

Alliston D. Rogers. Crime, breaking and entering. In 
Found not guilty. 

Oliver Pocknett. Crime, larceny. Found guilty", sei 
to three months in the House of Correction. 

Millard F, Grev. Crime, larceny. Found guilty -, se 
to pay a fine of 815. 

Warren R. Aubtin. Crime, assault with intent to kitt 
pending. 

Eugene R. Guilds. Crime, rape. Indicted. Case p* 

Enrico Gallarini. Crime, murder. Indicted. Case j 

Officer Thomas A. Dexter. Total number of caaei 
tigated, 81 ; total number of arrests, 28 ; total V 
property recovered, $357. 

Among the most important cases investigated w 
following: — 



C DOCUMENTING 32. 341 

se. Crime, assault and battery. Found 
ninety days in jail. 

rth, alias Frank C. Cartlege. Crime, lar- 
'ound guilty ; sentenced to six years in State 

i. Crime, polygamy. Indicted. Awaiting 

,l. Crime, burglary. Found guilty; sen- 
i in the Reformatory Prison for Women. 
rime, burglary. Awaiting trial. 
oe, larceny. Found guilty ; caae placed on 

Crime, attempt at rape. Indicted. Await- 

Crime, larceny from building. Found guilty ; 

>o. Crime, larceny from building. Found 
on file. 

F. Seaver died Dec. 31, 1805. Tlie fol- 
t of his work since last report: Total 
ivestigated, 7 ; total Dumber of arrests, 2. 
. Hodges was appointed a member of the 
6, 1896, in place of George F. Seaver, 
number of cases investigated, 72 ; total 
i, 16; total value of property recovered, 

it important cases investigated were the 



alias Georce V. Nelson. Crime, breaking 
larceny. Found guilty ; sentenced to three 

:. Crime, accessory to incendiarism. Await- 

e. Crime, incendiarism. Awaiting trial. 

as John Phei.ps. Crime, forgery and uttering. 

■enced to three years in State Prison. 

Essex County. 
1 W. Hammond. Total number of cases 
i total number of arrests, 16 ; total value 
mired, $168. 



342 REPORT CHIEF OP DISTRICT POLICE. 

Among the most important cases investigated we 
following : — 

Mast L. Edwards. Crime, arson. Found guilty; sei 
to fifteen months in the House of Correction. 

Josiah Browk. Crime, larceny. Found guilty ; Bentei 
two months in the House of Correction. 

John Allen. Crime, embezzlement. Case pending. 

Andrew Nolan. Crime, breaking and entering. Casep 

George Botler. Crime, obtaining money by false pi 
Case pending. 

Herman G. Barnes. Crime, embezzlement. Case pen 

John Ehmett. Crime, larceny. Found guilty ; sentei 
pay a fine of $30. 

Dennis McKenka. Crime, larceny. Turned over to Pi 
Me., officers. 

Officer George C. Neal. Total number of cases 
tigated, 67 ; total number of arrests, 18 ; total va 
property recovered, $229. 

Among the most important cases investigated we 
following: — 

Daniel Donohde. Crime, indecent assault. Found 
sentenced to fifteen months in the House of Correction. 

George Varney, alias James C. Duffy. Crime, larcei 
building. Found guilty ; sentenced to not less than tbre 
nor more than five years in State Prison. 

Edward J. Francis. Crime, breaking and entering, 
guilty ; sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

John M. Hickky. Crime, embezzlement. Found guilt' 
placed on file. Hickey was arrested in New York City, 
and brought back on requisition papers. 

Clarence Murphy. Crime, embezzlement. Found 
sentenced to not less than ten years nor more than fifteen j 
State Prison. Murphy was arrested in San Francisco, Ci 
brought back on requisition papers. 

Timothy J. L*ne. Crime, highway robbery. Found 
sentenced to not less than eight years nor more than twelv 
in State Prison. Lane was arrested in Tyrone, Pent: 
brought back on requisition papers. 

Henry W. Calson. Crime, embezzlement. Awaiting 
Calson was arrested in Belfast, Me., and brought back on i 
tion papers. 



LIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 343 

vAiiii. Crime, forgery and uttering. Found 
o not less than three years nor more than five 
ison. Howard was arrested in Philadelphia, 
back on requisition papers. 
3RKW3. Crime, larceny. Found guilty; sen- 
is in the House of Correction. 
k. Crime, embezzlement. Awaiting trial. 
leb. Crime, forgery. Awaiting trial. 
knee. Crime, breaking and entering. Await* 

.berk. Crime, breaking and entering. Await- 

Crime, larceny from building. Awaiting trial, 
id in Philadelphia, Penn., and brought back on 



Jclin and Hampshire Counties* 
Munyarj. Total number of cases inves- 
al number of arrests, 25; total value of 
d, $500. 
>st important cases investigated were the 

f. Crime, breaking and entering. Found 
o eight years in State Prison. 
h. Crime, breaking and entering. Found 
o eighteen months in the House of Correction, 
Crime, breaking and entering. Found guilty ; 
issachusetts Reformatory. 

rime, breaking and entering. Found guilty; 
issachusetts Reformatory. 
creh. Crime, abuse of female child. Found 
itence. 

Crime, larceny. Found guilty ; sentenced to 
Reformatory. 

boll. Crime, adultery. Found guilty; sen- 
nonths in the House of Correction, 
rime, lewdness. Found guilty; sentenced to 
e House of Correction. 

Crime, larceny of team. Found guilty; sen- 
setts Reformatory. 
;. Crime, abuse of female child. Awaiting 



344 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 



Middlesex County. 

Officer Josiah A. Bean. Total number of cases 
tigated, 129 ; total number of arrests, 72 ; total va 
property recovered, $261.45. 

Among the most important cases investigated we 
following : — 

Patrick Sullivan. Crime, murder. Found guilty of i 
in the second degree ; sentenced to State Prison for life. 

Patrick J. Foley. Crime, murder. Found guilty of i 
in the second degree ; sentenced to State Prison for life. 

Cornelius Nagle. Crime, murder. Pound guilty of i 
in the second degree ; sentenced to State Prison for life. 

Angelo S. Schroder. Crime, larceny of team. Found) 
sentenced to five years in State Prison. 

John Morrill. Crime, highway robbery. Fonnd guilt; 
tenced to not less than three and one-half years nor more th 
years in State Prison. 

William C. Hall. Crime, forgery. Found guilty ; sen 
to four years in the House of Correction. 

James Shay. Crime, breaking and entering. Found f 
sentenced to two years in the House of Correction. 

George Smith. Crime, breaking and entering. Found g 
sentenced to two years in the House of Correction. 

Patrick S. Coolet. Crime, larceny. Found guilty 
tenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

Henry P. Costf.llo. Crime, assault with a dangerous wi 
Found guilty ; sentenced to six months in the House of C 
tion. 

Charles E. McGregor. Crime, larceny from building. 3 
guilty ; sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

John C. Newcomg. Crime, larceny from building. ' 
guilty ; sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

George Mahoney. Crime, attempt to commit rape. 1 
guilty; placed on probation. 

Louis Ruben. Crime, larceny of team. Found g 
defaulted. 

Julius Ruben. Crime, larceny of team. Found g 
defaulted. 

Daniel T. Young. Crime, assault with a dangerous we 
Found guilty ; sentenced to nine months in the House of C 
tion.* 



rC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 345 

i. Crime, breaking and entering. Found 
the Massachusetts Reformatory. 
>H. Crime, breaking and entering. Found 
not less than three years nor more than four 

'rime, lewdness. Found guilty; sentenced to 

•formatory. 

rime, lewdness. Found guilty ; sentenced to 

louse of Correction. 

. Crime, polygamy. Awaiting trial. 

ield. Crime, breaking and entering. Await- 

Crime, assault with a dangerous weapon. 

Crime, abortion. Awaiting trial. 
ib. Crime, accessory to abortion. Awaiting 



i H. Whitney. Total number of cases 
total number of arrests, 46 ; total value 
ed, $13,050.56. 
; important cases investigated were the 



Crime, larceny from building. Found guilty ; 
sachnsetts Reformatory. 

a. Crime, defrauding an insurance company. 

Crime, breaking and entering (four counts), 
iced to the House of Correction for two years 
the other counts sentenced to the Mass&chu- 
r five years, said sentence to take effect upon 
ir sentence. 

b. Crime, breaking and entering. Found 
the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

Crime, breaking and entering. Found guilty ; 
rs in State Prison. 

i. Crime, burning a building. Awaiting trial. 

Crime, burning a building. Awaiting trial. 

Crime, burning a building. Awaiting trial. 

ll. Crime, attempt to commit abortion. 

need to one year in the Reformatory Prison 



346 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE 

Jonathan G. Hunton. Crime, conspiracy to defraud. 
guilty ; awaiting sentence. 

Charles Olapp. Crime, conspiracy to defraud. Foun 
awaiting sentence. 

Fred A. George. Crime, conspiracy to defraud. 
Acquitted. 

Hugh T. Maguire, Jr. Crime, conspiracy to defrs 
dieted. Acquitted. 

Cleveland Cheney. Crime, conspiracy to defraud. 
Acquitted. 

James M. Tagney. Crime, larceny from building. 
guilty ; sentenced to the House of Correction. 

Robert R. Howhv. Crime, larceny from building. 
guilty ; sentenced to the House of Correction. 

George Albee. Crime, defrauding an insurance < 
Awaiting trial. 

Reuben Johnson. Crime, defrauding an insurance c 
Awaiting trial. 

George M. Bruce. Crime, breaking and entering ani 
Found guilty ; sentenced to tbree years in State Prison. 

Norfolk and Plymouth Counties. 

Officer George C. Pratt. Total number of cases 
gated, 73 ; total number of arrests, 30 ; total 
property recovered, $350. 

Among the most important cases investigated i 
following : — 

John E. Sullivan. Crime, burglary. Found gai 
tenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

John E. O'Leart. Crime, burglary. Found guilty; 
to the House of Correction. 

John L. Carter. Crime, forgery. Found guilty. 1 
probation. 

John E. Sullivan. Crime, breaking and entering 
guilty ; sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

William L. Quigley. Crime, breaking and entering- 
lock-up. 

William H. Furgesok. Crime, larceny. Found go 
tenced to the House of Correction. 

Fred Bates. Crime, breaking and entering and 
Found guilty ; placed on probation. 



C DOCUMENT — No. 32. 347 

k, alias John Long. Crime, breaking and 

trial. 

ld. Crime, breaking and entering. Await- 

Crime, forgery. Awaiting trial. 

Suffolk County. 
i A. Rboades, detailed for duty at head- 
lumber of cases investigated, G2; total 
, 39 ; total value of property recovered, 

.t important cases investigated were the 



ker. Crime, forgery and uttering. Found 
i not less than four yeara nor more than eiglit 
l. Lindner was arrested at Yonkers, N. Y., 
i requisition papers. 

(. Crime, making a false nomination paper. 
need to four months in the House of Correo 

in. Crime, aesault, false imprisonment and 
I. Awaiting trial. Newbegin was arrested 
., ami brought back on requisition papers. 

Worcester County. 
Murray. Total number of cases investi- 
number of arrests, 20 ; total value of 

1, $1,880. 

st important cases investigated were the 



5nd. Crime, arson. Found guilty; sentenced 
years nor more than ten years in State Prison. 
>. Crime, breaking and entering. Found 
> two years in the House of Correction- 
Crime, breaking and entering. Found guilty ; 
fears in the House of Correction, 
s. Crime, breaking and entering. Found 
to not less than twelve years nor more than 
itate Prison. Thompson was arrested in New 
and brought back on requisition papers. 



348 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 

Thomas Rian. Crime, breaking and entering. Found 
sentenced to not less than twelve years nor more than t 
years in Slate Prison. Ryan was arrested in New Yor 
N. Y., and brought back on requisition papers. 

Hiram P. Gerald. Crime, embezzlement. Found 
sentenced to seven years in State Prison. 

John Fulton. Crime, breaking and entering. Found 
sentenced to two years in the House of Correction. 

John Mohan. Crime, murder. Pleaded guilty to mar 
ter ; sentenced to not less than twelve years nor more thai 
years in State Prison. 

John Hollaran. Crime, arson. Found guilty ; sente 
not lees than nine years Dor more than twelve years i 
Prison. 

Ernest Kendall. Crime, larceny. Found guilty; se 
to pay a Bne of 875. 

Thomas Lawrence. Crime, false pretences. Found 
sentenced to three years in State Prison. 

Coka Phillips. Crime, larceny. Found guilty; pla 
file. 

James Ward. Crime, perjury. Found guilty; placed 

Frank E. Hkrrick. Crime, rape. Case now pending. 

Charles R. Graham. Crime, arson. Case now pendii 

Mart J. Stanton. Crime, arson. Case now pending. 

William M. Bond. Crime, arson. Case now pending 

Special Dott. 
By authority of chapter 389 of the Acts of 1888, \ 
H. Proctor was appointed an additional district police 
and it was made my duty, upon said appointment, to 
him for service under the direction of the Commissioi 
Inland Fisheries and Game. For purposes of record 
with append bis report, relating to the operations of 1 
and game laws, which it is his special duty to enforce 

Report or Officer William H. Proctor. 

Total number of cases investigated, 70 ; total number of 
G4 ; amount of fines imposed, $3,614 50. 

I have patrolled Buzzard's Bay in the steamer " Ocean 
from May 16 to October 8. 

I have furnished blanks for about 1 ,000 "fishermen, seized 
short lobsters and planted 1,500,000 eggs. 



UC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 349 

■p Laws relating to Fish and Game. 

has been made that under the existing 
ion of the enforcement of the laws relating 
Buzzard's Bay is ao divided that the best 
(cured. The officers in command of the 
bich is the boat detailed for the purpose of 
's, are assigned by the chief of the district 
ninally subject to his orders ; they also act 
imissioners, and are subject to the control 
lissioners. No actual conflict of authority 
the contrary, the relations between the Fieh 
id this department have been harmonious 
>ut it is worth the consideration of the 
er better results cannot be achieved if the 
icers employed in this service should be 
executive head. While it is not my desire 
es of the office, especially by diminishing 
other commission or department of the 
respectfully suggest, in view of the fact 
ty of the officers in this department is the 
;nal laws, that it is reasonable to expect 
1 ft more efficient administration if the 
i to enforce the provisions of the laws 
es are put under the sole charge of the 
ct police. 

r, who is assigned for this special duty, 
, " under the present system, there is con- 
;ary delay in receiving complaints. Com- 
to this office have been forwarded to the 
d from them to me, while complaints are 
> the commissioners while they are absent 
s, and by the time I receive the complaints 
:end to them." 

lers having no established headquarters, it 
er such conditions, to give complaints of 
>mpt attention which insures success in the 
e lawn relating to fish and gnme. Under 
lo I desire to reflect upon the action of the 
len who comprise the Board of Commis- 



350 REPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 

eioners. But, in view of the many complaints ths 
been received by me during the past year, and the fai 
reach the officer promptly, owing to my lack of koo 
of bia whereabouts, it seems to me that some better 1 
should be adopted to enforce the laws relating to fi 
game. It is reported to me by the officer that orde 
him oftentimes conflict, and that he would obtain 
results if the business were under one head. 



C DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



DATED STATISTICAL REPORT. 





3 


Keeping a disorderly houae, . 


6 




2 


Keeping a gaming house, 


1 


g abor- 






53 




1 


Larceny from building, . 


9 




11 


Larceny of team, . 


7 




7 


Lewdness, .... 


7 




40 


Making false nomination pa- 




so anient 






1 




1 


Malicious mischief. 


11 


gerous 




Manslaughter, 


1 




i 




1 


) kill, . 


1 


Non-support of family, . 


3 


enter, . 


3 


Obstructing an officer, . 


1 


xirtion, . 


2 


Obtaining goods by false pre- 




ape. 


3 




1 




2 


Obtaining money by false pre- 






3 




5 


gal gam- 


5 


Practising medicine 
registered, . 


not being 


6 


g. ■ ■ 


49 
3 
6 
3 


Polygamy, 




4 
4 

6 
4 


d, . . 


6 


Receiving stolen property, 


3 




e 


Selling lottery tickets, . 


1 




t 


Stubborn child, . , , 


1 


ce corn- 




Transfer of prisoners, . 


37 




3 


Uttering forged paper, . 


1 




69 
7 
1 
1 


Violation of the engineers 

license law, .... 

Violation of the fishery law, . 


11 

2 

30 


on paper. 


1 


Violation of the game law. 


16 




6 


Violation of the insurance law. 


3 




3 


Violation of the liquor law, . 


19 




4 

1 


Violation of the lobster law, . 
Violation of the milk law, 


12 

1 




4 


Violation of the oleomnrga- 






3 
1 


Vlolation of the Sunday law, . 


1 
3 


of person, 


1 








8 






G31 



LIC DOCUMENT — No. 32. 



position op Forfeited Liquors. 
;ctioD 38, provides as follows : — 

liquors bo forfeited shall, by the authority of the 
! trial justice or court, be delivered to tiie chief 
e. Said officer shall Bell the same and pay over 
the treasurer of the Commonwealth. 

e of 1887 passed an act providing for the 
ants and furniture used in the illegal selling 
|Uors, which is as follows : — 

[Chapter 406.] 
for the seizure of implements and fiirn1tdre 
llega.l selling of intoxicating liquors. 
follows : 
ion thirty of chapter one hundred of the Public 

amended by inserting after the word " con- 
:nth line of said section the words : — and all 
and furniture used in the sale of such liquor. 
n thirty-three of chapter one hundred of the 
hereby amended by inserting after the word 

third line of said section the words : — and all 
and furniture need in the sale of such liquor. 
ict shall take effect upon its passage. [4p- 
87. 

e showing the cities and towns from which 
n received, and the quantity that has been 
np to the present date. 



354 EEPORT CHIEF OF DISTRICT POLICE. 



Forfeited Liquors from Dec. 1 


1895, to Dec. 1 


, 1896. 




si 

i 1 


SrauToot* 


.Uw. 


CITY OR TOWH. 


! 


! 


c 


4 


i 

7 


| 


I 


Abington, 


13 


47 


2 






95 


2 




Ames bury, 




3 




1 






4 


1 




Arlington, 




3 




2 


- 


_ 


62 


- 


_ 


Ash burn ham, 




1 












1 




Athol, . 




3 




2 








1 




Auburn, . 




1 
















Avon, 









2 






73 


2 


1 


Aver,-' . 









2 


1 


2 


87 


1 


1 


Bedford, 




1 










1 






Belling ham, 




2 




- 


1 


- 


27 


3 


1 


Belmont, 




1 








2 


28 


2 








2 




2 






18 


3 


1 


Beverly, . 




10 


29 


1 


1 


- 


66 


- 


- 


Boston, . 




726 


448 






2 


6,686 


3 


1 


Boylston, 




1 




2 






20 






Bratatree, 




3 










21 






Bridgewater, 
Brockton, 




1 




3 


1 












123 


173 


2 


1 


2 


661 






Brookllne, 











1 




65 


2 




Cambridge, 




7 








_ 






_ 


Chelmsford, 




1 






' 1 




39 






Chelsea, . 




31 


26 






2 


214 


3 


1 


Chester, . 




2 










7 






Clinton, . 




10 










246 


3 








6 






l 


2 


2 




1 


Danvers, 




6 






1 


1 


185 






Dedham, 




4 










25 


2 




Dennis, . 




3 






1 




7 






Douglas, 




3 






_ 


- 


12 


2 


- 


Dracut, . 




2 










8 


3 




East Bridge w 


ter, . 


1 






- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


Easton, . 




1 










10 






Everett, . 




2 












2 




Fall River, 




66 


178 




1 


2 


398 




1 


Fitch burg. 




11 


24 




1 




27 


- 


_ 


Foxborough, 




1 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


F rami Tig ham, 




1 














1 


Franklin, 




7 


16 








31 






Gardner, 




S 








2 


10 






Gloucester, 




124 


61 






1 


S58 


1 


1 


Great Barring 


on, . 


1 






- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


Greenwich, 




1 


24 




1 




26 






Groton, , 




1 










15 


2 




Halifax, . 




2 






1 


2 








Hanover, 




1 








1 








Hard wick. 




2 




2 






6 






Hingham, 
Hoi brook, 




1 


7 


2 






117 




1 




4 


3 


3 


l 




12 


3 




Holyoke, 




42 


16 


- 


l 


_■ 


493 


3 


- 


Hubbardston, 




1 






1 


1 






Hull, . 




6 




1 


1 




14 


-i - 


Hyde Park, 




4 


6 


2 


" 


~ 


~ 


3 | - 



LIC DOCUMENT— No. 



failed Liquors, etc 


— Continued. 








4 
l 


BriuTuoc*. 


Hut. 


I 


| 


i 

£ 


4 


1 


i 

i 


I 


i 


l 
















2 


l 


7 


8 








8 






s 


~ 


z 


z 


260 


z 


z 


7 




3 


1 


1 


29 








62 


29 






2 


92 




1 


1 


107 


53 


2 




1 


623 








81 


26 


1 


1 


1 


698 
3 


1 


1 


2 


8 


4 


_ 


z 


2 


z 


z 


z 


6 


22 








40 




1 




9 










27 








3 


3 


3 


1 




2 


1 


1 




7 




2 






187 








2 

1 
8 


4 


2 


- 


- 


10 


1 

2 


- 


- 


8 


1 


1 


z 


23 


1 


2 


1 






1 






1 


1 


2 


S 


1 


1 


1 


2 




8 






1 


7 








25 








12 


6 








269 


2 






6 


6 


- 


- 


3 


26 
6 
21 


1 


- 


- 


16 


6 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


5 


2 


2 


1 


2 


12 








16 


6 








96 








11 


644 


2 


1 




1,314 






1 


1 




3 






3 








1 




3 




3 


80 








3 


1 


1 


1 




14 








4 


6 


1 


1 




18 




1 




1 










130 








16 


12 


1 


- 


3 


68 

14 
103 


2 


1 


2 


2 


fi 


z 


z 


I 


z 


I 


_ 


2 


9 


1 


1 


2 


17 








1 




3 


1 




8 


2 






10 


86 


3 


1 


2 


98 








6 


10 


2 


- 


- 


96 
3 

69 


2 


- 


- 


1 


8 


z 


1 


z 


2 


1 


I 


48 


9 




1 


2 


278 




1 




7 


8 








22 








3 


16 






2 


82 


3 






3 


4 


- 


- 


- 


24 

7 

212 


2 


- 


- 


81 


63 


8 


1 


z 


3 


z 


- 


7 


6 




1 


3 


10 


2 


1 




2 




2 








3 


1 


3 


1 


3 








23 








SI 


17 


2 




3 


103 


3 




2 


1 


8 


~ 


~ 


~ 


11 


2 


" 


" 



,IC DOCUMENT— No. 32. 

Conclusion. 
sd, this is the eighteenth ann 
the honor to submit to the CI 
lonwenlth. During this entire 
)oae and aim to make the w 
orm strictly to the laws the ei 
entrusted to this department. 
be able to report that the discij 
g to be desired. Its workings 
ie officials have shown an earne 
ities faithfully. 

w the expression of my obligal 
the State government for its at 

tspectfully submitted, 

KUFUS R. W 

Chief ■Massachusetts Dist 



INDEX. 



nt 7 

ired boilers, 8 

ories, workshops, school -houses and public 

17 

t for ventilation of a four-room school house, 

T. White, 21 

is for ventilation of a two-story, eight-room 

uilding, by Inspector Joseph A. Moore, . . 28 
ation In the Johnson school-house, North 

Inspector Frederick W, Merriam, ... 29 
s showing the heating and ventilation of the 
:h, Worcester, Mass., by Inspector Joseph M. 

31 

tion of Crocker and Normal halls. Slate Nor- 

i FramiDgham, Mass 33 

thing, 34 

ndrics 36 

'omen and minors in manufacturing and mer- 

ents 37 

il way cars 40 

tion work 44 

John T.White, 44 

Henry J. Bard well 49 

Joseph A. Moore, £3 

Edwin Y. Brown 57 

Joseph M. Dyson, 61 

John £. Foulds, 64 

Warren S. Boston 71 

Ansel J. Cheney, 74 

Henry Splaine, 84 

Frederick W. Merriam 91 

etta cotton mill, 94 

Joseph Halstrick 96 

Isaac S. Mullen 103 

Malcolm Sillars, 107 

Louis F. F, Abbott, 118 

John F. Tieraey 123 



Report of Inspector John L. Knight, .... 

Report of Inspector Edward B. Putnam, 

Report of Inspector John J. Sheehan, .... 

Report of Inspector James R. Howes 

Report of Inspector Frank C. Wasley, .... 
Report of Inspectress Fanny B. Ames, .... 
Report of Inspectress Mary £. Halley, .... 
Report of Inspector John E. Griffin, .... 
Report of Inspector John H, Plunkctt, .... 

Elevators inspected, 

Report of Inspector Thomas Hawley, .... 

Report of Inspector David H. Dyer 

Report of Inspector Louis Amell, ..... 
Report of Inspector George A. Lord, .... 

Report of Inspector Charles Ferguson 

Report of Inspector John H. Kazar, .... 

Report of accidents, 

Increase of crime among juveniles, .... 
Report of work performed by the detective department. 
Enforcement of the law relating to fish and game. 

Roster of district police, 

Disposition of forfeited liquors 

Appropriations and expenditures 



r-SIXTH ANNUAL BEPOBT 



[Onees of Prisons 



SSACHUSETTS: 



ININO THE BTATE PRISON. 

INING THE REFORMATORY PRISON FOB WOMEN. 

tNINO THE MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 

(NING THE JAILS AND HOUSES OF CORRECTION. 

ALL PRISONS, OF ARRESTS AND OF PROBATION. 

KMENTS OF CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 

ONH AND B0GGE8TION8. 

S OF PRISON FOR MINOR OFFENDERS. 



CAB ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1896. 



JANUARY, 1897. 



BOSTON : 
rER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Squabe. 
1897. 



cm 



bjealtfe of Ittassaclmsetts. 



ienaie and the House of Representatives in General On 

assembled: 
with, chapter 219 of the Public Statutes, chapters 
82 and chapter 255 of the Acta of 1884, the twenl 
art of the Commissioners of Prisons is respectfu 
is document covers the year ending Sept. 30, 185 
© reports of the State Prison ; of the Beformatc 
aen -, of the Massachusetts Reformatory ; of the j* 
orrection in all the counties ; statistics compiled fin 
irrests ; and tabulated statements showing the resu 
prosecutions in the courts of the Commonwealth. 
luded in this document an appendix containing 
rian of a prison for the confinement of persons ci 
ir offences (in accordance with chapter 89 of I 
l 5), with specifications and estimates. 
en do change in the membership of the Board si: 
vas presented. 

Henrt Parkman, 
Margaret P. Russell, 
J. Warren Bailet, 
Mart V. O'Callaghan, 
Herbert D. Ward, 

Commissioners of Prison 
ETTIGBOTE, 
• Secretary. 



INTRODUCTION. 



the distribution of public documents provides 
i ted, of that portion of the report of the Board 
risoDB referring to the State Prison, 500 copies 
len ; of that portion referring to the Reforma- 
in, 500 copies for the use of the superintendent ; 
ferring to the Massachusetts Reformatory, 500 
the superintendent. It is therefore necessary 
in four parts; but for convenience of reference 
■secntively from the beginning, and at the end 
pbabetical index to the entire document. The 
.ivisions of the report are summarized in the 

ing on page 9, refers to the State Prison, and 



11 

financial statement and statistics, ... 27 



or aiding discharged convicts, 
te Prison, .... 



ining on page 65, refers to the Reformatory 
and contains : — 



-t, with statistics, . 

irt, with financial statement., , 



or aiding discharged female prisoners, . 
Formatory Prison for Women, 



6 INTEODUCTI 

Part No. 3, beginning on page 109, 
Reformatory, and contains : — 

1. Commission era' report, .... 

2. Superintendent's report, with statistics and 
S. Physician's report, 

4. Pardons from the Massachusetts Reformats 

5. Opinion of the Attorney-General as to the 

health, etc., 

Part No. 4, beginning on page 163, n 
of correction and other matters, and cot 

1. Reports on jails and houses of correction, 

2. Statistics of all prisons, .... 
8. Arrests, 

4. Probation cases, 

5. Criminal prosecutions, .... 

6. Libraries in prisons, 

7. Recommendations, 

8. Appendix, 

9. Index 

The list upon the following page incli 
referred to in this report. 



C DOCUMENT — No. IS. 

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IV 



Concerning the State 
Prison. 



MMISSIONEES' REPORT. 



Boston, Oct. I, 1896. 
note anA the Souse of Representative* in General Court 
assembled : 

i no change in tbe principal officers of the State 
date of the last report. The official organization 
can be found by reference to the appendix to the 
which gives a list of all the officers, with rank, 
lent and salaries, 

Expenditures and Receipts. 
affairs of the State Prison are exhibited in detail in 
tement. A general view is given in the following 
e expenditures and receipts for the last two years, 
for salaries is more than the amount paid for that 
receding year, but the total expenditure is less. 
if prisoners is considerably higher, the cost per 
ally reduced. 

Da. 

IIM-N. 1M3-M. 

□ iiing of year, . . . tl 1,353 20 1 12.886 87 

1,278 66 1,837 26 

72,920 45 74,616 78 

75,844 55 70,170 77 

1160,896 86 |159,011 68 
Cr. 

|8,197 70 ,7,879 75 

[ 1,337 26 680 45 

3 of year, .... 12,886 87 12,608 43 

at of support, . , . 138,475 02 137,843 05 

1160396 85 $159,011 68 

pport as above shown is ascertained by charging 
the stock on hand at tbe beginning of the year 

amount paid for salaries and other expenses ; and 
refrom tbe receipts for rents, etc., and the stock on 

of the year. 



12 



STATE PRISON. 



The foregoing account relates only to the maintenance, 
not represent the cost to the State, because there should t 
from this balance any income derived from the industrit 
the law the acconnts relating to the industries must be k* 
apart from those for maintenance. The warden's repor 
industries gives the sum of $44,421.28 as the profit fron 
of prisoners. By deducting this amount from the cost 
there is given a balance of $93,421.97, which is the acti 
the prison for the year ending Sept. 30, 1896. The net 
a decrease of $16,149.76, as compared with the precedinj 

Repaibs and Improvements. 

In addition to the amount expended for ordinary supr> 
maintaining industries, there have been paid out during t 
account of the special appropriations certain sums for i 
improvements ; a full account of such special expenditu 
found in the statement of the warden. 



Prison Population. 
During the year the courts committed 234 prisoners, 
than last year, and the highest number in any year since 
number of commitments and the average number of p 
custody during each year since 1872 are shown in tht 
statement : — 



C DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



13 



:ommitted by the courts there were received 
i was returned from escape, 1 from the lunsi- 
ho commissioners for violating the conditions 
£37 as the number received in all ways. 
even prisoners were discharged upon the expi- 
as shortened by deductions for good conduct ; 
ed to the lunatic hospital ; 7 were pardoned ; 2 
Massachusetts reformatory; and 7 were given 
rty by the commissioners with the consent of 
uncil, in accordance with chapter 440 of the 
ended by chapter 252 of the Acts of 1895. 
ted in all ways was 141 ; and 796 remained in 
of the year, — the highest number reported for 



Commitments. 
committed from Suffolk County, being 
•eceived from that county in the preceding year. 
that show an increase in the commitments are 
blk, Plymouth, and Worcester. Dukes County 
i sent no prisoners in 1895, committed respec- 
ts year. The counties that show a decrense 
npden, Hampshire and Middlesex. Barnstable 
nitted 4 prisoners in 1895, sent none this year, 
received from the United States courts, against 



from the different counties during the last Ihir- 
l in the following table : — 





i 


£ 


! 


1 


I 


; 


5 


| 


i 


s 


s 




10 

2 
11 

s 


i 

s 


13 

11 
10 

10 

» 


2 


IB 


l 

2 
20 


i 


3 


12 

IT 

4 


1 
11 

B 


4 
I 


2i 




128 


102 


ua 


m 


154 1S8 


2US 


140 


IBB | 1T2 1 234 



UBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



3 for the past twelve years, and tlic average sentences 
afore 1896, are shown in the following table : — 









Af*. 


"— ■.£££." , - 




CbBUtltM. 


Y-* 


H-th. j Dv. 






139 

128 
102 
160 
133 
164 
1A8 
203 
140 
166 
172 
234 


30 

30 
32 
29 
31 
31 
30 
30 
32 
32 
30 
32 


5 

5 

5 ■ 

5 

4 

5 

5 

ft 

6 

E 

ft 


1 

2 
1 

8 
11 
10 

4 
10 
6 
3 
10 


16 
6 

7 

20 
27 
2ft 
23 
27 
18 
20 



nd sentences of the prisoners who came from the 
i three months prior to Jan. 1, t8i)fi, are set out in 
le, and in a table immediately after are set forth in 
es and sentences for the remainder of the year : — 

leniences in Detail for Year ending Sept. 30, 1806.* 











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STATE PRISON. 





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140 


166 



of 12 ye»r> and the other 



during the last £ 
goners remaining ii 
3 following statem< 















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I 


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150 


20 




146 


24 


B- 


133 


28 


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124 


19 


fi- 


139 


23 


7- 


128 


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102 


15 


4- 


160 


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164 


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203 


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166 


34 


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172 


SI 


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234 


ss 



STATE PRISON. 



Details concerning Prisoners committed during the Tear to ti 
for the Second Time — Concluded. 



j 


Oct. M, 'SI, 
Fab. VW, 


1 


Feb. lt.'ST, 

Fell. 10, -M, 




Oflt. 14, "81, 

Feb. 12, 'M, 




May n, T M, 

Feb. 14, 1M, 




No». II, W, 

Feb. It, 'SB, 




Deo. 10,'Te. 




Feb. 30, ■»"., 


j 


Feb. 11, "TO, 
Feb. 20, >H, 


J 


Jut. J7, 'SB, 
Feb. IB, -W, 




net. 14, '», 



Apr. n, ■«, 
Aoc.1V 



Feb. 10, 'BS, 
May K.'BB, 



Snffglk, 

Suffolk, 
Buffolk, 






Sept. 16, 'Ml, 
A ok, 8, 'SI, 
Sept. IB, >M, 



Suffolk, 
Norfolk, 



Larceny from peraon, 



15^' 



Break'*; nd eotar*g, 

Larteny ( roro peranti 
Bu rgluV too la, hiY'g 

Lareeny of hone, 
Cheatlngby felt 
Forgery," . 
Aiiault end eod 

Unnatural eel, . 
Robbery, . 



Breik'iud entar'g. 
Robbery, emu-" 

■nd lereeoy, 

Break'g nd ei_ ... .. 
Brenk'g and finler'g, 
and lareauy, . 

Break" | and en tor'g, 
Bnak'iaod eoler'g, 

Breaks and enteral 
Larceny from b'H'- 
Break'g and entar' 

Break 1 ! and eater' 

Break'g and eoler'g, 



and £" 
Rape, 



To. It— Betoroed July 14, IMS, dleoherged War 1, ISM. 



JC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



tiers committed during the Tear to the State P 
for the Third Time. 



I 


— 


i 


E 

e 

% 




jj 


W 

DlKb 


10 I 


Braak'f ud enlerV 




Uaaa.. 


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- 


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» 










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Breaking mud enter- 
Injaud liranj, . 
Break's uid enter'e. 
Braking and enler- 
Idi ud lum;, ■ 


S3 


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Me., . 


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Oat. 


1 


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si 


P.E.I. 


P.E.I. 


P.E.I. 


Apf 



n«-* committed during tht Year to the State P 
for the Fourth Time. 



t 

3 


Break's aud anler'j. 


*s 


Mui., 


In.., . 


Ira., . 


Mar. 

Mar' 


I 

lis, 


L«™nJ; ; '. '. 

anaaull lo' kill, ' 


18 


Maaa., 


: 


-" 


Mar. 
June 


S 
S 
S4 


Breaking ead enter- 

1ns and larceay, . 

Recii'a Ma len good., 

HablUa] criminal, '. 


3S 


Coon., 


In., . 


Ire., . 


Dec. 
Not. 

Ant- 



Habitual Criminals. 
ed 6 prisoners who had previously served 
:he State Prison. Of this number only 
abitual criminal. All the men who were 
liable to the penalty of that act were 
ies. In the list of those committed for 
two men each of whom was sentenced e 
inty, and one who was sentenced twice 1 
Norfolk. Of those committed for the fo 
d four times in Suffolk County, and anc 
ind once in Essex. 



STATE PMS02J. 



Nativity and Parentage of Prisoner* committed 


'vring 


a 


OFFENCES. 


11 

i! 

1* 


la 


1,8 

fSfi 


it 
Ik 


5-g 

III 

< 


I 


Abortion and aeoeeaory 

Aeeaoit to murder, 


i 


t 


t 

i 
i 

33 

8 
1 

f 

1 

4 
1 

13 

1 


I 


1 




Braking mod entering 

Braking nud entering ■ railroad oar, . 
Burglar.' loola, hating, .... 

Cheitlnf by falie pmteneaa. 


36 
1 

1 
1 
1 




Lmrceny of a horae, Wlion, etc., . 


2 














Reerftrlna atoten gooda 

Unoataral and laedriwu aat, , 


3 
1 

■ 

t 

1 






T3 


a 


77 


i 


11 





Parole op Prisoners. 
Since the date of the last report 7 prisoners have hi 
on parole from the State Prison with the consent of t 
and couocil. One of these has been returned to the pr 
lating the terms of his release ; one was drowned soon 
the prison ; and the others have reported regularly, and t 
known, faithfully observing the conditions of the parol 
under which these prisoners were released was passed in 
chapter 440 of that year ; it was amended in 1895 for 
of giving it a broader scope, but it will be seen that the 
releasing on parole has had a very limited application 1 
Prison. The inquiry is therefore suggested, whether tin 
not be further changed. 



496. J PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 25 



Sentences to the State Prison. 

Since the first of January all sentences to the State Prison have 
^eo imposed in accordance with chapter 504 of the Acts of 1895, 
- iich provides that the judge shall fix a minimum and maximum 
^rm of imprisonment. The table on a preceding page shows that 
3 yet there is no substantial agreement in sentences as a result of 
ais law, and that its application has not removed the inequalities of 
ie definite sentence. In some instances it seems to have been the 
ttention to fix the minimum and maximum in such a way that the 
ie served will be practically the same as if under the old law ; 
it is to say, the difference between the extremes is about the same 
ie that a prisoner could earn as a commutation for good conduct. 
one case the judge imposed a minimum of nine years and a maxi- 
ma of ten years ; this will require the prisoner to serve a year 
iger than if he had received a ten-years sentence under the old 

One difficulty has been found in the administration of this law, 
rich requires legislative correction. In some instances the judges 
Ive imposed sentences to take effect on and after previous sen- 
ices, and the question arises whether the additional sentence 
•aid begin* upon the expiration of the preceding minimum or 
isimum. It is recommended that the law be made definite, by 
raiding that, when a sentence is awarded against a convict who is 
idy under sentence of imprisonment to the State Prison, the 
litional sentence shall take effect upon the expiration of the mini- 
im term of the preceding sentence. 



Condition op the Prison. 

\ The prison buildings are now taxed to their utmost capacity. At 

W date of this report there are no vacant cells in the institution, 

jbd the number of prisoners to be released in the ordinary way is 

likely to be as large in the immediate future as the number com- 

>d by the courts* It will therefore be necessary to provide addi- 

4 cell room at the State Prison, or to furnish relief in some 

This euhjcct is respectfully urged upon the attention of 

i .-* for sach action as seems desirable after examina- 
<rever*1 court w 



\ & nd'm^y 



86 STATE PRISON. 

The remarkable financial showing on the first page an 
that constant attention has been given by the warden to t 
matters of the prison ; and the prevailing good order an> 
show that in other respects he has been equally mindful < 
ests of the Commonwealth. 

Estimates. 
According to the estimates submitted by the warden tl 
needed the following sums for the maintenance of the pr 
the next year : ■ — 

For salaries 

provisions i38,000 

clothing 8,500 O 

education 600 

discharged prisoners, 600 

fuel and lights 16.5G0 

repairs and improvements, 5,000 0- 

repairs on machinery, 1,000 

■water, 5,000 

incidental and contingent, 14,000 

repairs on warden's and deputy warden's houses, . 600 

Total 

The only sources of income on the maintenance accoi 
rents of houses and the board of prisoners, etc. ; and fr 
is estimated that the sum of $8,000 may be derived. It 
of the General Superintendent of Prisons there will Ix 
estimates for carrying on the industries, together with i 
of the probable income from the labor of the convicts. 

HENRY PARKMAN, 
MARGARET P. RUSI 
J. WARREN BAILETf 
MARY V. O'CALLAG 
HERBERT D. WARD 
CommiasionG 
Fbid. G. PzinaROVE, 

Secretory. 



STATE PRISON. 





So 








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3LIC DOCUMENT- 



285 

Sis 


17,403 35 
12381 63 
23,679 82 
4,206 90 
74,616 78 


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3LIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



[B.] 

era, Date of Appointment, Bank, Annual Sa. 
mounts received during the Tear. 



3.UU0O0 



STATE PRISON. 



6 




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IC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



R S 

S 


i 




1 


3 So3 




* ' 's. s 
$ .. * .= 

a. £ h .» 9 - ! 
5"-- < — 3 . o. 

.JP fapS | 

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«« MO 35 


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111 

toO£ 



STATE PRISON. 



STATISTICS. 



Table No. I. 

Whole number of convicts Oct. 1, 1895 

Received under warrants from the courts during the year ending a 

ing Sept SO, 1896 

Returned by Commissioners of Prisons, 

Returned from escape, ■ . , ... 

Returned from lunatic hospital, ...... 

Discharged between Oct 1, 1895, and Sept 80, 1896: — 

By expiration of shortened sentence 

Died 

Pardoned, 

Released on parole, 

Removed to lunatic hospital, 

Removed to Massachusetts Reformatory, 

Total number Sept. 30, 1896 



Table No. 2. 

Ages of Convicts note in P-ison. 



From 15 lo 20 years, . 


. 26 


From 61 to 60 years. 


21 to 25 years, . 


. 210 


61 to 70 years. 


26 to 30 years, . 


.' 183 


71 to 80 years. 


31 to 40 years, . 


. 191 




41 to 50 years, , 


. Ill 


Total. . 



IC DOCUMENT -No. 13. 



Table No. 5. 
of Convicis received Last Year, 



. 10 


From 51 to 60 years. 


. 16 


. 65 


61 to 70 years, . 


3 


. . 65 







. 65 


Total, . 


. 231 


. 80 







Table No. 4. 
net of Convict* now i: 



jomrait 
;oramit 

b; As- 
<; Rob- 



Breaking ami entering, 

Breaking and entering ; Assault, 

Breaking and entering; Assault 
with intent to murder. 

Breaking and entering; Assault 
with Intent to commit rape, 

Breaking and entering; Assault 
with intent to rob, . 

Breaking and entering; Attempt 
to break and enter, . 

Breaking and entering; Escape, 

Breaking and entering ; Having 
in possession burglarious tools, 

Breaking and entering; Receiv- 
ing stolen goods. 

Breaking and entering; Receiv- 
ing; Assault to murder, 

Breaking and entering and lar- 

Breaking and entering and lar- 
ceny from realty. 

Breaking and entering anc 
ceny in building, 

Breaking and entering anc 
ceny; Assault, . 

Breaking and entering and lar- 
ceny ; Assault to rob. 

Breaking and entering and lar- 
ceny ; Escape, . 

Breaking and entering in night- 
time, .... 



STATE PRISON. 



Table 


No. 4 


— Concluded. 


Breaking and entering in night- 




Larceny from conveyance 


time; Assault, .... 


2 


Larceny from the person 


Breaking and entering in night- 




Lewd and lascivious c 


time ; Larceny, .... 


4 


tion 


Breaking and entering ft railroad 




Making and presenting f 


car nnd larceny, 


1 


sion claim, . 


Breaking nnd entering a vessel, . 


1 


Manslaughter, 




4 


Manslaughter ; Breaking 


Burglary ; Assault to kill ; Escape, 


1 


tering armed with da 


Burglary ; Assault to kill ; As- 




weapon, , 


sault on officer ; Escape, . 


1 


Mayhem, . . 


Burglary; Rape, .... 


1 


Mingling poison with fo 


Carnnl abuse of child, . 


10 


intent to kill, 


Common and notorious thief, 


22 


Murder — death pennliyr 


Counterfeit coin, making, . 


1 


Murder in second degree. 


Counterfeit coin, passing, . 


2 


Obstructing engine. 


Embezzlement, .... 


11 


Perjury 




6 


Perjury in pension case, 




9 


Polygamy, . . 


Forgery ; False pretences, . 


I 


Polygamy ; Adultery, . 


Forgery and uttering, . 


9 




Forgery and uttering; Breaking 




Rape; Escape; Atternp 


and entering; Larceny from 




cape ; Assault on office 




1 


Receiving stolen goods. 


Habitual criminal, , 


27 


Robbery, 


Having in possession burglarious 




Robbery, armed, ■ 




4 


Robbery, armed ; Break 


Having in possession moulds for 




entering and larceny. 


counterfeiting, .... 


4 


Secreting and embezzlin; 


Incest, 


14 


Sodomy, 


Incest; Carnal abuse of female 




Stealing from U. S. mail. 




t 


Unnatural and lascivious 


Larceny, 


17 


Unnatural crime, . 


Larceny; Escape,. 


1 


Uttering a forged on 


Larceny; False pretences, . 


1 


money. 


Larceny in building. 


17 




Larceny in building; Assault, 


1 


Total, . 


Larceny in building; Robbery, . 


i 





) DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



TABLe No. 6. 
f Convicts received Last Year. 



tools, 
I lar- 






Forgery and uttering, ... 7 
Forgery and tittering; Breaking 
and entering ; Larceny from 

person 1 

Habitual criminal, ... 2 
Having in possession burglarious 

tools, 1 

Having in possession moulds for 

counterfeiting, .... 1 

Incest 2 

Larceny, 3 

Larceny in building, ... 6 
Larceny from person, ... 7 
Lend ami lascivious cohabita- 
tion 1 

Manslaughter, .... 8 

Mayhem 1 

Murder in second degree, . . 5 

Perjury 8 

Polygamy, 1 

Polygamy ; Adultery, ... 1 

Rape, 10 

Receiving stolen goods, . . i 

Robbery, 28 

Robbery, armed, .... 1 
Robbery, armed; Breaking and 

entering and larceny, . . 2 

Secreting and embezzling letter, . 2 

Unnatural and lascivious act, . 2 

Uttering a forged order for money, 1 

Total, 231 



Table No. 6. 
tcet of Convicts now in Prison. 



For 4,i years, 
bi years. 



STATE PRISON. 



Table No. 6 — Concluded. 



For 6 years, 

7 years, 

8 years, 

10 years, 

11 years, 

12 years, 
18 years, 
14 years, 
16 years, 

16 years, 

17 years. 



For 20 years, 
21 years, 
21J years, 
28 years, 
24 years, 

81 years, 
32 years, 
64 years. 
Life, 



Total under determii 
tenets, . , 



For 24 to 3 years, 

2jto 34 yes 

24 to 4 years, 

24 to 6 years, 

24 to 6 years, 

3 to 4 years, 

3 to 5 years, 

8 to 6 years, 

3 to 7 years, 

3 to 8 yei 

3 to 9 years, 

3 to 15 years, 

4 to 6 years, 
4 to 6 yei 
4 to 7 years, 

4 to 8 rears, 

5 to 7 yen 

6 to 8 yes 
6 to 10 years, 
6 to 15 year 
6 to 8 yei . 
6 to 10 years. 



years, 



o 12 years, 
years, 



to 10 
to 12 

to 18 



For 7 to 14 


years, . 


7 to 15 


years, . 


8 to 12 


years, . 


8 to 14 


years, . 


8 to 15 


years, . 


9 to 10 


years, . 


9 to 15 


years, . 


10 to 12 


yean, . 


10 to 15 


years, . 


10 to SO 


years, . 


101 to 14 




12 to 15 


years, . 


12 to 16 


years, . 


12 to 18 


years, . 


14 to 20 


years, . 


15 to 30 


years, . 


16 to 24 


years, . 


18 to 22 


years, , 


18 to 25 


years, . 


20 to 40 


years, . 


23 to 30 


years, . 


Total under in del 


sentences, . 



IC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



Table No. 7. 
* of Convicts received Latt Year. 



For 18 years, 
20 years, 
2fi years. 
Life, 




Total under determi- 
nate sentences, 



^or indeterminate sentences as 
per Table 6 



Table No. S. 
< of Convicts now in Prison. 



Louisiana, 

Maine, . 

Malta, . 

Maryland, 

Massachusetts, 

Michigan, 

Minnesota, . , . 

Missouri, 

New Brunswick, . . 

Newfoundland, 

New Hampshire, . 

New Jersey. . 

New York, . 

North Carolina, . 

Norway, 

Nova Scotia, . 

Ohio 

Oregon, . 

Pennsylvania, 

Poland, . 

Portugal, 

Prince Edward Island, . 

Rhode Island, 

Russia, . 

Scotland, 



STATE PRISON. 



Table No. 8- -Concluded. 



South Carolina, 
Sweden, 
Texas, . 
Turkey, . 
Vermont, 
Virginia, 
Wales, . 
West Indies, . 



West Virginia, 
Western Islands, 
Wisconsin, . 
Wyoming, . 
Unknown, 

Total, . 



Table No. 9. 
Birthplaces of Convicts received Last Tear. 





1 


Michigan, 




. 2 


Missouri, 


Cape de Yerd Islands, . 


1 


New Brunswick, . 


California, . 


2 


New Hampshire, . 






New Jersey, . 






New York, . 




2 


Nova Scotia, . 






Ohio 






Pennsylvania, 


District of Colombia, . 


2 


Portugal, 






Prince Edward Island, , 






Rhode Island, 




1 


Russia, ■ 






Scotland, 




1 


South Carolina, 






Texas 




17 


Vermont, 






Wisconsin, . 








Malta 


I 


Total, . 


Massachusetts, 


. 108 





Table No. 10. 
Convicts now in Prison were convicted as follows : 



Barnstable, 

Boston, . 
Cambridge, 



Dedham, 
Edgartown, 
Fall River, 



JC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



Table No. 1C 


— Concluded. 






11 
11 

27 
17 
19 
18 
13 
39 
22 


Springfield 23 

United Slates Circuit Court, . 3 
United States District Court, 11 



Table No. 11. 
id Last Year were convicted as follows : — 

9 Pittefield 

6 Plymouth 

1 Salem 

1 Springfield 

3 Taunton, 

3 Worcester, . 

9 United States Circuit Court, . 

3 United States District Court, 
8 

4 Total 



Table No. 12. 
/ment of Convict* Sept. 30, 1896. 

For State Account.* 



ojed Id the different Jndnitrlei, «) given ibore, include* runners, 



STATE PRISON. 



Tabu No. 12 — Concluded 

For Prison Account. 

Barbers 

Carpenters, 

Clerks and printers, 

Firemen, machinists, etc., 

Tinsmiths, blacksmiths and pipers, 

Menders, tailors, etc., 

Painters, white washers, runners, etc., .... 

Kitchen, 

Yard, 

Library 

Storehouse, 

Hospital staff, 

Hospital 

Confined to cells,* 

Strong rooms, 

Old and infirm, 

Whole number of prisoners, 



* Thii Item includes all the men confined la tt 
ployed at tbe close of tbe fiscal year because o( a s 
in which thev are regularly employed. 

Table No. 13. 
Sentences of Convicts now in Prison expire as follows 



In Oct., Not., and Dec., 


1896, . So 


1910 






1911,. 












1912,. 












1913,. 












1914, . 












1915, . 












1916, . 












1920,. 








1904 


. 10 


1925,. 












Life, . 












Indefinite, 


















Total, . . 


1909 


1 





1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 45 

Table No. 14. 
Life Sentences. 

Number under sentence for life Oct. 1, 1895, was 49 

Committed during year, 6 

65 

Pardoned during year, 1 

Whole number Sept 30, 1896, 54 

' ' ■ ■ i ■■ ■ i i i i i i ■ * ■ 

Table No. 15. 
Crimes of Life Prisoners. 

Accessory to murder, 1 

Arson, 2 

Assault to commit rape, 2 

Carnal abuse of female child, 1 

Murder — death penalty remitted, 5 

Murder in second degree, 41 

Rape, 1 

Robbery, armed, 1 

54 

Table No. 16. 
Crimes of Life Prisoners received Last Year. 



Murder in second degree, 5 

Robbery, armed, 1 

6 



Table No. 17. 
Recommitments. 

Of 796 convicts now in prison, 137 are recommitments, viz : — 

For the second time, . 98 

For the third time, 27 

For the fourth time, 10 

For the fifth time, 2 

137 



STATE PEISON. 



. 17— Concluded. 



Of 334 convicts received last year, 38 are recommitments, vis : 

For the second time, 

For the third time 

For the fourth time, 



Table No. 18. 
Of Numbers, etc., of Convicts during the Tear 



The largest number at 


any time 


December, 1895, . 


during the year was . 


. 797 


January, 1896, 




Tbe smallest number a 


any time 


February, 1896, 




during the year wns 


. 697 


March, 1896, . 




The average number during the 


April, 1896, . 




year, per day, was 


. 759 


May, 1896, . 
June, 1896, . 




Monthly average : — 




July, 1896, . 




Octolwr, 1895, 


. 702 


August, 1896, 




November, 1895, . 


. 724 


September, 1896, 





Table No. 19. 
Pardons granted Last Year. 



Dele of 

Heleuc. 


NABS. 


— . 


f! 


ISM. 

>c. SI, 
31, 

Fail. 3, 

1", 

11. 

iprll 3, 

Sept. S. 


Paler Bbellmar, 
Q«r|a lleQueene 

AmodIo Ardlto, 
PrUt Corrlgan, 
Joeeph Wird, 

Coilmo OUnr, 




Robbery, 

Mttrdar lu taoond degree. 
Braking «nd umorlug cur, 
Larceny from perron, 


Lit*. 

:j 

..I 



(LIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



Table No. SO. 
to Pardons for Twenty-seven Tears. 




1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 49 

Patients admitted to hospital during the year, ...... 68 

Days 1 residence in hospital, 2,836 

Out-patients (total daily applicants), 3,784 

Men excused from labor for a day, 571 

Patients in hospital Sept 30, 1896, 9 

H08P1TAL CASE8. 



Medical. 
Anaemia, • • 
Anaemia, progressive, 
Catarrh, acute gastric, 
Catarrh, chronic gastric. 
Catarrh, gastro-intestinal 
Diarrhoea, 
Dyspepsia, 
Febricula, 
Heart disease, . 
Heart disease, chronic valvular, 
Hemorrhage, pulmonary, 
Icterus, catarrhal, 
Influenza, 
Insanity, . 
Malaria, . 
Malingerer, 
Mania, 
Mania, acute, 
Mania, suicidal, 
Melancholia, . 
Phthisis, incipient, 
Phthisis, pulmonary. 
Pleurisy with effusion, 



1 
1 
2 
2 
3 
8 



2 



Medical — Con. 
Ulcer, gastric, . 
Varicella, 



Surgical. 
Abscess, alveolar, . 
Amputation, finger. 
Anchylosis, shoulder, 
Cut, throat, 
Felon, . 

Fracture, radius and ulna, 
Hemorrhoids, . 
Herpes Zoster, 
Polypus, nasal, 
Polypus, rectal, 
Sprain, ankle, . 
Stricture, urethra (divulsed),. 
Tooth extracted, persistent hemor- 
rhage, . 
Tuberculosis, . 
Ulcer, arm, 
Wound, incised, 
Wound, lacerated, 



Very respectfully, 



Oct. 1, 1896. 



Joseph i. Mclaughlin, 

Physician and Surgeon Massachusetts State Prison. 



STATE PRISON. 



CHAPLAIN'S EEPOKT. 



To the Commissioners of Prisons: 

The usual Sunday services in the chapel — Mass, 
Sunday-school, 9.80 a.m. ; general service, with sei 
a.m., — have been held as heretofore. 

The Sunday-school with an average attendance of alx 
dred, was omitted during the months of July and A 
service in the hospital has been held through the year, 
it has been impossible for the chaplain to conduct i 
The choir of the prison has steadily sustained this aervic 
with good "service of song." Prayers and remarks up< 
of the day are always a part of the service. This servic 
predated and much enjoyed by the disabled men who | 
it. Ou the second Sunday in each month a praise or 
has taken the place of the sermon. 

The attention given at the chapel services was neve: 
the interest shown in them more sincere. The spir 
among the men is very encouraging. 

The presence of Rev. Robert Cameron, Mrs. Mam 
Booth, Miss Ben Oliel of the City of Jerusalem, A 
Livermore, Rev. S. S. Searing of House of Correi 
Boston, and evangelists Gibbud, Greenwood and W.l 
and missionaries Allan and King of the Water Street St 
Charlestown, has made impressive and effectual to a mi 
the various services which they have conducted. Mr 
quested all who desired to do so to write to her, prot: 
swer such letters, and to send the "Volunteer's Gazette 
might wish to subscribe to it. The wish seemed to 
thing needed, as the " Gazette " has been sent each one v 
without " money or price" being suggested. About si 
came her correspondents. Her part of the correspond! 
helpful of a good life in the prison, noticeably. 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 51 

The Ashman family have been constant at the praise service every 
month, with all helpful spirit and the usual instrumental and vocal 
talent, greatly to the satisfaction of all listeners. Their services are 
among the most useful that come to us. 

All felt the power of Mrs. Mary A. Livermore's expositions of the 
"Kingdom of God, and how to establish it," as a message from God. 
Mrs. W. G. Harris, who accompanied her, rendered a few songs or 
hymns in a manner to make them and the singer memorable for good. 

The singing of Mr. Greenwood also will never be forgotten. The 
effect of hymn or song singing in the chapel in our different relig- 
ious services has proved a revelation to many, as a source of good 
feeling and good-hearted purpose. 

Saturday afternoons, during the liberty in the yard, a prayer- 
meeting, sometimes comprising thirty men, assembles in the school- 
room for an hour. It has been a constant encouragement to those 
present, and the influence it exerts is more and more helpful of good 
life in the prison. 

It is the custom to hold funeral services in the hospital ; and, sad 
and pitiful as they may be, they are gratifying to those allowed to 
be present, while the idea of the service is in harmony with the sen- 
timent of the prison. 

Sometimes the feeling of regret that a death should occur in the 
prison is expressed with considerable tenderness of feeling; when, 
however, death occurs here because no friend or home offers to re- 
ceive the dying, if allowed to be free, the bitterness of error and 
the sting of death are felt as at no other time. When the sick pris- 
oner becomes convinced that such an end awaits him, death hastens 
and pain is more painful. 

The endeavor to reach every one to whom he can be of any service 
has been, as aforetime, the constant rule in the work of the chaplain 
in all parts of the prison. 

"I have learned in whatsoever state I am to be content." So 
said Paul the Apostle, and so must say every prisoner. To see that 
he is able to say so is part of the business of the chaplain. If each 
prisoner had the experience and means possessed by the Apostle, 
he might also learn the lesson, for learn it he must; but, deprived of 
both experience and means, and for that matter without means, his 
condition is painful. It is a pleasure to say, however, that the 
minor sources of discontent may be provided for in frank and 
sympathetic conversation and intercourse, with helpful attentions. 



52 STATE PRISON. 

Most men are amenable to reasonable reflections. I 
who feels himself to be in prison because of a conspiracy 
of his record, or because of misdefence, or no proper defe: 
his want of money or ignorance, or bewilderment, or in 
other or when another more guilty than he escaped wi 
leaving a helpless wife or children, or both, with home to I 
and children to be scattered to the four winds of charity, 
or for other like grave reasons for remorseful trouble ; for t 
be ever did do may arise to trouble him as in some way 1 
the painfully bitter climax of his life, — the idea of being 
impossible to him. Time, observation, a spirit of well-d< 
opening of his nature to the coming of Christ, must be 
Buch aid as he needs. Reading well-chosen books and th 
books " has proven the most generally available way out i 

For the past year, added to the above general reason 
tent, disparity of sentences and questions arising under 
law" have asserted themselves with painful persisted 
the strangest of things, in the judgment of the prisoner 
against him as a criminal is so swift of foot, while that 
encouragement to well-doing or reformation is so slow, 
those who legislate for him have no confidence in him, 
for him with which to overcome the prejudice against 
community? 

How to help the average prisoner to see that all thes 
be made to work together for good to him must, if poe 
veloped to him in the prison. 

" Without natural affection" is sometimes charged ai 
in the character of prisoners. If said of them as a wl 
can be more untrue. Indeed, the " natural affections 
basis for the severest mental distress and deepest heart- 
to prison life. 

The reformation supposed to be accomplished in pris 
comprehends a purpose to live honestly, and to this em 
of Belf-control. Judging from observation, and such ex 
statistics as have been available, this much is practi 
sixty-five to seventy per cent, of nil who leave the pi 
trial. The reformation which establishes a life of re 
arise from a moral awakening which will dissipate do 
ranee and subordinate one's nature to the teachings ai 
Master, Christ. 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 53 

Happy is the man who accepts the Master as his Exemplar and 
Life ! He thus becomes a new man, recreated and furnished to 
every good work. The endeavor is constantly put forth to lead 
every one to such an experience, and the presence and labors of 
Mrs. Booth, Mrs. Livermore and Mr. Williams have caused us to 
feel that possibly some, if not many, of our community are nearing 
it, while some have attained the fact, and are patiently perfecting 
what is begun within them. There are those, a small minority of 
the whole, who expect to grow in shrewdness by present and possi- 
ble experiences in prison, and still follow a life of sin and crime. 
They see no other way. To turn is not possible. 

The following from the year's experience tells its own story : — 

Three young men, two of whom were brothers, were members of 
the Lowell high school, the younger of the brothers first. All were 
more or less dependent on their own efforts for means to attend 
school. 

The younger brother completed the course of study prescribed, 
and post-graduate studies, all without reprimand or failure. He en- 
tered college, graduated with honor, pursued post-graduate courses 
at home and abroad, and became a professor in his Alma Mater, 
which position he held for years, in which, also, he died, and was 
buried with honors. 

The young man, not a brother, also finished his study in the high 
school with great credit and promise. He entered a university, 
made an excellent standing in his classes, but left in his second 
year because his father died, and also to become the support of his 
widowed mother and family. His close attention to study and busi- 
ness secured to him later on the coveted university degree and 
honors from his fellow citizens. He toiled and grew into the esteem 
of the people, and became governor of the State, in which office he 
died, — the lamented Frederic T. Oreenhalge. 

The older brother left the high school to follow a highly honorable 
calling, requiring genius and skill, in which he attained signal promi- 
nence and consideration. 

The three were equally happy in marriage and equally blessed in 
children. But on the hilltop of his manly career the older brother 
thought he saw the way to riches by a short road. He entered it. 
After a little fitful sunshine he met the stormy consequences of 
error, found his way to prison, from which he escaped to a fugitive 
life ; then to prison again, and finally, once more to prison, — because 



54 STATE PRISON. 

of the previous escape, — and on the 28th of Decembe 
in our hospital. Here, as one of the singular exponent 
life, he met one who seemed a companion, because he t 
from the college of, and from the classes of, the " your 

During the year, on two occasions, the officers of tl 
those of the reformatory, so far as duty would allow 
nized in a banquet, on the last occasion preceded by a 
ball. All this commended itself to our serious cons 
seemed strongly suggestive of good to the men and t 
tions they represented. We are encouraged by the b 
know of each other. We gain in hope, zeal and purp 
arity with men and their methods. We learn the vak 
by knowing men. It also affords a gain in esprit d 
should be coveted and studied. 

Intoxicants and drugs, with the exposure they entail, 
a record in the physical system that will sometimes I 
any observer. As money gathers interest in invest m 
agencies accumulate possibilities of misery, which in t 
development; perhaps it will be when one most wish 
and strong — in prison. The change to prison life, wit 
to the individual, often affords occasion, and the em 
this repeated experience, and in the study of crimin 
there comes to us, steady as the roar of the devou 
warning against intoxicants and the cry for their suppi 
are the men who find their way into prison unless aidi 
strong drink or strong drugs. 

The new separate prison has come to be a spec! 
One enters the door and looks down the corridor, — 
closed, all is still and glum ; mount the stairs, — each 
you enter, — the neatness, cleanliness, the newspapei 
books, all suggest a busy, contented occupant, and pe 
one. Each room adds to these impressions, and you 
tarily, "This is the best part of the prison, a perfect i 
corridor at the bottom of the stairs." Below is acci 
happiness; above, the possible enjoyment of prison li 
makes the difference ? an idea only, except in case of i 

The satisfaction every one takes in the condition c 
both instructive and assuring. Those who care for 
portions have brought them to as perfect condition a 



LIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 55 

its have cared for the grassy portions, hrighten- 
huro everywhere, until flowers are always in 
it of all this by the men is seen in the quiet 
heir movements, refraining even from taking a 
' picture and fitness of things be disturbed, 
yard seem to have a high value, from several 
te could doubt this who had opportunity to 
at deal of general, as well as special, physical 

breaking up sluggish conditions peculiar to 
ormal restraints and mental conditions peculiar 

get exposed to the influences of freshened life 
rod lose for a while their hold on the down- 
ig, the " half dead." 

itness of the yard and the cleanliness of the 
ong suggestion of rest, which is very helpful, 
ens secure attention as men pass them, and 

some tell the story of innocent life, of home 

rer stood for greater good, nor have the pupils 
vances than in the year past. Aged men and 
ished themselves by attention to study and by 
s. Some of the Italians bave made most com- 
- themselves. It has been a fine illustration of 
i there ie a will there is a way," and it is all 
men who know less, and to the teachers and 
experiment. There ie always a pressure from 
ted, and the pleasure of gain on the part of 
ed to read and write and a little arithmetic, 
in giving way to the illiterates crowding in. 
e school has been striking in its quietness, at- 
uniformly good behavior. 
iciation is regular in its life and steady in its 
ting, discussions, observance of parliamentary 
lcism — well considered — of all matters and 
arising in their experience. These exercises 
imulating, making membership in the school as 
tive and desirable. As heretofore, an ample 
zines and the " Scientific American " are pro- 
I use. 



56 STATE PRISON. 

The library, as popular and useful as ever, is represt 
following statement, viz. : — 

Number of volumes at opening of the jear, .... 
Number of volumes added during ihe year, .... 

Number of volumes worn out or lost, 

Number of volumes now in library 

Number of volumes issued in the year, 

Number of volumes daily average, 

Yearly average per reader 

Percentage of fiction, 

Number of men taking books, 

Number of men uot taking books, 

Books rebound, 

Books covered, 



No issues of books are made on Sundays or holidays, 
son can change his book twice each week. Some who 
books are too busy to do so. School books and appan 
by a large number of men in their rooms. Some etude 
earnest as to give promise of radical change in their Hv< 

Mail statistics are as follows, viz. : — 

Letters written and mailed 

Daily average 

Letters received, 

Daily average 

Pieces printed matter received, 

Daily average, 

Total pieces mail handled, 

Daily average, 

Newspaper and magazine reading is as conducive to 
mental conditions and contentment as any other reading 
the prison, except the reception of good, clean and affe 
ters. Each paper has many readers. The change of ti 
etc., from one reader to another is no small part of the 
of the prison. 

To provide reading for the sixty days of the year wh 
were issued, the following publications have been us< 
given in number of copies taken), viz.: "Times of ] 
300, monthly ; " Sabbath Reading," 100, weekly ; " Gos 
200, weekly; " Parish Visitor," 50, monthly j" Your Ft 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 57 

monthly; "Union Signal," 10, weekly; " Watchword," several 
hundreds, monthly, miscellaneous ; "Zion's Herald," 10, weekly; 
"Christian Witness," 7, weekly; "Volunteer's Gazette," 60, 
weekly ; " Sunday School Times," 10, weekly. With the exception 
of "Times of Refreshing," 100, " Sabbath Reading," 100, all the 
above have been gifts from the publishers or friends. 

A friend has sent us several bundles of a useful pamphlet on 
" Anger," an analysis of Matt, v : 21-26, by Aaron Crane. A lady 
in Spencer gives to every one wishing for it an autobiographical tract 
by the editor of "Ram's Horn," of great interest. The Colportage 
Association of Chicago, Dwight L. Moody, president, supplied each 
man in the prison who desired it a copy of some one of the best 
of their publications. The Massachusetts Bible Society has kindly 
furnished those who cannot read English with the scriptures in other 
tongues. 

With a sense of real loss, as this report comes to a close, must be 
chronicled the death of Mrs. Susan H. Bertram, who lately passed 
away. For years, until laid aside by sickness, she gave cheer and 
profitable sober thought and more considerate courage to inmates of 
this prison, and especially to many who seemed to be the most help- 
less. Her great good sense, quick understanding, sound judgment 
and intelligent sympathy made her a tower of strength to many who 
could see no way before them. Her unselfishness was an assurance 
of deliverance and peace to many. Troubles without were settled, 
and within were the counsels of peace. Her interest in the wel- 
fare of discharged prisoners was unfailing, their miseries were 
lightened, courage confirmed, as they sought her advice and minis- 
try. She knew how to consider the weak and what to do with the 
deceiver. 

The influence of certain visitors who have made it a cheerful duty 
to care for some men has proved very helpful in directing study and 
mental effort and enthusiasm of character, and cannot be too much 
commended. A certain gentleman among them, who not only comes 
himself, but constantly brings such aids to life as will make impris- 
onment profitable, should be kindly acknowledged in his many 
labors in our behalf. 

The power to get on with one's self, with books, with work, with 
men is increased, and stimulates to better doing, as the influence of 
such visitors is felt. If more visitors were like these, we should have 
more and sweeter peace and life. 



58 STATE PRISON. 

With grateful heart for all the good that has com 
thanks to all who have aided ita coming ; with rem 
thanks for all attentions and kindnesses extended by tl 
officers of the prison, and to all prisoners of good will 
prayer that the Father of Mercies may have us all in 1 
end that His will may be done in the care of men, this 

Respectfully submitted. 

J.W.F 



C DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



THE AGENT FOR AIDING 
tARGED CONVICTS. 



g Sept. 30, 1896, 1,092 discharged prisoners 
and advised by the agent. Assistance was 
■om the funds of the Commonwealth appro- 
its discharged from the State Prison. 
ig for aid were 150 men who had been in- 
serts State Prison, 80 from the jails and 
i this State, and 5 from prisons in other 
nay be interested in statistics I beg leave to 
reference to the 285 men from the State 
:tion and jails : 58 were of American parent- 
;lish, 12 were from the British Provinces, 
French, 3 Scotch, 3 African, 2 West Indies, 
1 Hebrew ; 72 were married and 163 were 

and 7 colored ; 168 were intemperate and 
1 a collegiate education, 3 were well educated, 
te and 6 could neither read nor write. One 
sn convicted more than once. One hundred 

within twenty-five miles of Boston, 58 in 
jnty-five miles from Boston, 28 came from 
I no home. One hundred and seventy-five 
h board or family stores, 110 with clothing, 
29 with tools, 4 with license and peddling 
, 4 employment fees and 1 with spectacles. 
Lime of discharge was 34.19 years; average 
ars, 6 months, 14 days. 



60 STATE PRISON. 

The following amounts have been expended from the 
Commonwealth in aiding men discharged from the Stat 

For board, and family stores for discharged convicts while set 

employment, 

clothing 

transportation, 

license and employment fees, 

incidentals, stationery, postage, medicine and spectacles, 

Total 

In aiding discharged prisoners, each man's circumsti 
considered separately. If a man has plans of bis ow 
intends to try to make an honest living, I have found i 
him in that direction. His case is comparatively easy 
because he has a certain amount of ambition and is wi 
an effort. There are many, however, who appear to I 
tion to work, who have managed to live for years npoi 
the labor of parents or relatives, becoming more and 
and idle, until at last they get into prison. As they g 
become deprived of the support of family and friends 
wandering from place to place and from prison to prisi 
object in life seeming to be to avoid work and keep on 
of the police. These men frequently apply for tnti 
some other town or State, seeking a place where they 
out steady, honest work. How they get enough to eat 
It matters not how far away you send them, they con 
after a few months. 

Not infrequently a man is discharged from prison 1 
in this country bat a few months previous to his se 
reputation had been bad in his own country and wbc 
come here to escape punishment for crime committed » 
such a case is found it seems but just to society that 
sent back to his own country and some method adopt 
his return. If such a law could be enacted by the gc 
ment, it would be of much benefit in dealing with 
Many men who have been helped during the past y< 
well and most, have been grateful. One man bron 
amount that had been expended in aiding him after h 



,IC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 61 

o apply it towards " helping some other man 

aers are sometimes ridiculous, when compared 
have had men apply for a winter overcoat in 
jmeter registered over ninety degrees in the 
er of instances young men without a home or 
; have preferred to have a derby hat rather 
it could be done for them. These of course 
and probably not different from what one 
same number of people who bad never beeu 

prisoner loses himself in the community and 
upon the prison records, it is an evidence that 
oan who is sincere in his desire to reform tries 

thing to do is to aid him at this time, not 
all necessary facilities wherewith to make a 
le world. When he has been placed in this 
ood circumstances as the majority of honest 

State haa done all that it can, and in my 
mid, towards helping him, materially. The 
i to live upon sympathy he commences to go 
ids himself in a condition where be is brought 
committing crime or going to the poor-house, 
rcentage of these men are weaker than men 
, and prefer to be carried along rather than 
nselves. These drift about seeking aid from 
ifter another until they become well known to 
immit some crime and are returned to prison. 
t nevertheless true, that a lack of co-opera- 
different charitable organizations engaged in 

the discharged prisoner. The men whose 
r to advance are apt to Snd this out and take 
srent deal of harm is done in administering 
diciously beBtowed. In order to get the best 
should have all the information about the 
practicable to obtain. In this respect the 
tage over others, in that a more or less com- 

the inmates of the different prisons, which is 

times. 



12 STATE PRISON. 

Without wishing to disparage the efforts of the mi 
wople who are engaged in the noble work of charity f< 
irisoners, I cannot help believing that, if their zeal 
vith better business methods, an increased amount ol 
esult. 

With sincere thanks to all who have aided this work 
ind hoping for their continued support, I remain, 

Very respectfully, 

GEO. E. CORN 

October, 18B6. 



3LIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



FROM THE STATE PRISON. 



ave been pardoned from the State Prison d 
ions for granting these pardons, as set foi 
il message to the Legislature, were as follow 

Convicted of robbery, Superior Court, S 

94. Sentenced to the State Prison for seven 

95, upon the recommendation of District All 
id one George McQoeeney were married to i 
□t house or six tenements. The party assault* 
a helper who lived in this tenement house, an 
.rly in the morning for him. The prisoners, t 
evioUB mornings, lay In wait for him, believiuj 
everely assaulted him. There was no evidenc 
Ited. The district attorney was of the opinio; 
lit under a misapprehension. Shellmer's emp 
n an industrious, sober and hard-working mat 
us to give him employment as soon as he coi 



n. Convicted of robbery, Superior Conrt, S 

94. Sentenced to the State Prison for seven 

95. The circumstances which led to the pan 
j to the case of McQueeney. 

Convicted of murder, second degree, Supren 
County, Dec. 15, 1879. Sentenced to State 1 
in. 3, 1896. The details of the crime it is not 
m say that it was believed to have been done 
i under the influence of liquor given him in the 
ommitted. Ardito, who bad been in this count 
sited, was unable to speak a word of our lanj 
reter was advised to plead guilty. His two s 
he same sentence, had been pardoned. The [ 



64 STATE PRISON. 

committee believed that the granting of the pardon would h 
to justice. He was released upon condition that he leave the 
to return. He sailed for Italy immediately upon hia release. 

Pkter Corriqan. Convicted of breaking and entering 
Superior Court, Middlesex County, June 20, 1895. Sent* 
Prison for three years. Pardoned Jan. 17, 1896, upon the n 
of the warden and prison physician. The prisoner was 
gastric ulcer and cirrhosis, with little prospect of recovery. 

Joseph Ward, alias Winstos. Convicted of larceny ft 
and attempted larceny from the person, Superior Court, S 
April term, 1895. Sentenced to the State Prison for Ave yet 
Jan. 30, 1896, upon the recommendation of District Attorm 
Inspector of Police Knox, on the ground of innocence. The 
who were the prosecuting officers, have since become satisfi 
another party, closely resembling Ward, who committee 
Ward's bad reputation, as well as his resemblance to the 
contributed to the mistake. 

Louis Bowcock. Convicted of arson, Superior Court, B 
Feb. 12, 1894. Sentenced to State Prison for five yea 
April 2, 1896, upon the recommendation of the mayor and 
citizens of Fall River and the district attorney. The prison* 
counsel at the trial. The burning was technical, rather than i 
came forward at the time of the sentence to say a word for 
bad done so, he would undoubtedly have been placed on pt 
seived a much lighter sentence. 

Casimo Oldtab. Convicted of assault with intent to 
Dourt, Suffolk County, August term, 1895. Sentenced to th 
'or ten years. Pardoned Sept. 3, 1896, on the ground 
The district attorney, after a careful investigation into th 
;ase and interviewing certain witnesses who did not testify at 
>f the opinion that the shooting was not done by Olivar, bat 
Siseste, who has fled the country. 



68 REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOM 

Although there has been during the entire year a lai 
prisoners, the expenditure for salaries and other expel 
been less than in the preceding year. The cash receij 
great as in 1895, but the earnings are considerably 
being due and unpaid several thousand dollars for la 
in the year. 

The cost per capita for the support of prisoners ii 
less than last year, owing partly to the decrease in thi 
and partly to the larger number of prisoners. 

In addition to the amount paid for ordinary suppo 
been made under the direction of the commissionei 
improvements at the Reformatory Prison for Women, 
named expenditures : — 

For repairing chimneys and battlements, $752.94. 
farm buildings, the sum of $288.45 ; this, with the pr 
diture, makes a total of $2,351.66 expended for this | 
chapter 77 of the Resolves of 1895. There has also be 
erecting and repairing farm buildings, in accordance w 
of the Resolves of 1896, the sum of $1,095.52. The : 
for farm buildings were $3,000 and $1,500 respectively 
ing, $661.07 of the amount appropriated by chapter ■ 
solves of 1894. For plnmbing, the sum of $828.82 ; 
total expenditure for this purpose of $13,9^6.46, in a< 
chapter 107 of the Resolves of 1894 and chapter 77 o! 
of 1895. 

Commitments. 

The courts committed during the year 352 prisoners, 
number received in any year since 1880. Forty-one 
for offences against person or property, 63 for on 
chastity and 248 against public order, etc. Compt 
preceding year, there was an increase of 13 in the fir 
crease of 12 in the second class and an increase of 1 
class. The commitments for drunkenness account en 
larger number in the third class, because for this offe 
received, being 33 more than last year. 

In addition to the prisoners that came from the con 
turned by the commissioners for violating the terms ■ 
to be at liberty; 1 was returned from the lunatic ho 
removed from the Dedham House of Correction an 



AC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 69 

of Correction ; and 6 girls were transferred 
School for Girls, upon the application of the 
ition. 

irged by expiration of the full court sentence 
l of the sentence as shortened by deduction 

; 201 were given permits to be at liberty by 
on the recommendation of the superintendent ; 
>ved to the lunatic hospital ; 7 were pardoned, 
uses of correction, — 1 each to South Boston, 
brd and Worcester ; and 1 to the State Farm, 
e year there remained in custody 350 pris- 
m at the close of last year, aod the highest 

the prisoners committed by the courts for all 
s ; of those committed for drunkenness, 31 
one year older than in 1895. 
all offences average 1 year, 1 month and 22 
lays longer than in the preceding year. The 
mess were 1 year and 20 days, being 1 1 days 

prisoners were native born, 134 in Massachu- 
itates. Sixty-seven were born in Ireland, 50 
ces, 17 in England, 11 in Scotland, 2 in Ger- 
Belgium, Hungary, Poland, Sweden and one 
he 200 American-born prisoners, 47 were of 
10 of foreign parentage, 31 of mixed parent- 

tion of the prisoners were intemperate and 60 
>rity of them were married. 
-e had served one previous sentence or more 
d been there once before, 14 twice, 7 three 

ir of commitments was larger, Suffolk County 
inn last year, the number being 164; whereas 
■ 191 were received from that county, — con- 
tlf of all the commitments. Next to Suffolk 
umber came from Middlesex, which shows a 
prisoners came also from Berkshire, Bristol, 
ipden, Hampshire, Norfolk and the United 
oket sent one prisoner, whereas none was re- 



70 REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMI 

reived from that county id the year before. Plymou 
lame number, and Worcester 14, against 20, being th« 
except Suffolk where there was a decrease. 

Detailed statistics concerning the offences, sentem 
particulars about the prisoners committed by the cour 
pear ending Sept. 30, 1896, and of the prisoners 
custody at that time, will be found in the pages immec 
ing the text of this report. 

Condition of the Prison. 

The only special appropriation of which any am 
available for repairs and improvements is that for bu 
bouse ; and in order to keep the buildings in good con 
be necessary to grant some special sums the present y< 

In the superintendent's report a reference is made to 
jf Dew flooring in the laundry yards, and we endort 
mendation, that an amount not exceeding $1,500 be 
for that purpose. It is also recommended that the s 
be granted for repairing the prison fences, the sum 
repairing the bathrooms and the sum of $2,000 for 
repairs. 

During the year the electric wiring has been tho 
rated. It was necessary to do this work out of the g 
priation, because the wires were in a dangerous cond: 
Deeded repairs could not be safely delayed until a sp- 
obtained. 

Salary of Deputy Superintendent. 
The recommendation contained in the last report it 
of the deputy superintendent should be increased is 
it is suggested that the salary lie definitely fixed at 
would be an increase of $200, and changing the law 
would bring this officer's salary under the same rule th 
every other salary in the prison service. 

Estimates. 
It is estimated that there will be needed for the ord 
of the prison next year the following sums : — 



3LJC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 

W, 

$8,000 

7,000 

ig, 2,000 

500 

:hokl articles, .... 1,500 



airs, 2,000 

8,000 

3,000 

i agent expenses '2,500 

ent 2,000 

am, maintaining sewer, . 600 



»57 

efer only to the maintenance account. T 
and improvements which seem desirabi 
;d to ; and if any sums are needed to ca 
will be estimated in the report of the C 
'risons. 

HENRY PABKMAN, 
MARGARET P. RUSS] 
J. WARREN BAILEY, 
MARY V. O'CALLAGB 
HERBERT D. WARD, 
Commissi*! iters of Pt 
iVE, 



72 REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOME 





i 

I 

I 

I 
% 




ei SS B,t " JOai * B '' 




| 


1314 87 
266 80 
263 30 
263 27 
301 38 
198 21 
247 64 
254 69 
278 96 
260 64 
228 11 
268 22 
237 78 
190 18 


a 

1 

03 


HI 


363 
346 
222 
345 
284 
269 
246 
219 
216 
230 
219 
196 
246 
386 




969,860 19 
68318 78 
47318 66 
64,666 16 
49360 26 
40376 52 
48314 86 
43394 87 
47,792 12 
45380 46 
36377 68 
37371 90 
42,386 85 
83,986 40 


3 
3 

* 


I 


1 5,987 86 
7,103 16 
10,910 98 
9334 98 
7308 67 
11,095 97 
12,133 31 
12,061 31 
11381 06 
14,044 47 
14377 98 
12,789 95 
13,636 11 
30,392 65 


I 
1 


1 

S 


! 


•75347 56 
65,121 93 
68,429 64 
64301 14 
57,168 82 
51,972 49 
60,647 56 
66,756 18 
59,173 17 
59,924 99 
49,955 61 
50,611 85 
66,020 96 
54378 06 


1 

1 


i 

! 
1 

1 


153,84.5 48 
42309 04 
36383 26 
43,669 42 
37,661 28 
80,789 72 
38.679 97 
32370 62 
35,199 13 
863*8 27 
26322 80 
27,449 42 
83364 12 
31,195 86 


i 1 


122,002 07 
22,612 89 
22,046 38 
20,841 72 
19,512 54 
21,232 77 
21,967 59 
38,185 66 
23,974 04 
23,376 65 
23,632 81 
23,162 43 
23,456 84 
23,182 69 


05 




1 


xjiioii|lK9)£Ksa««i 



IC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



STATISTICS. 



Table No. 1. 
xes of Prisoners remaining Sept. 







% 


11 

5 


it 


(I 

ill 




2 
S 

19 

1 
% 


•12 


_ 


i 


2 
1 


3 

3 
2 
1 
3B 

3 


•ity. 


27 

6 
18 

S 

8 
12 

2 


16 

8 

5 

2 
7 


; 


; 


3 


4 

9 
23 

1 
10 
19 

3 


■dtr. He. 

*T, • ■ ■ 


49 

a 

164 
21 

3 


18 

7 
S 

3 


tl 


4 


3 

6 


71 

3 

2 

171 

1 

1 

30 

13 
2 
S 




199 

27 
199 


19 

16 
18 
19 


I 


4 


10 

3 
10 


229 

BO 

71 
229 




275 


53 


1 


8 


13 


350 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOM] 



Offences and Sentences of Prisoners committed by the Co 
Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



1. — Againtt Ptnon or Property. 
Abandoning child, . 

Assault, 

Breaking and entering, . 

Neglect of child, • 
Referring stolen goods, . 

Total 

2. - -Againtt Chattily. 

Abortion, 

Adultery 

Common night-walker, • 

Fornication, 

Lewd cohabitation 

Lflwdnea 

Polygamy 

Total 

3. — Againtt Public Ordtr, tte. 
Disorderly home, keeping, . 
Disturbing the peace. 

Drunkenness 

Forgery 

House of Ill-fame, keeping, ■ 

Idle and disorderly, 

Stealing letter* from U. S. mall, . 

Stab born nee a 

Taking liquor into Indian country, 
Vagrants, 

Total 



Rrcapitulalion. 

1. — Against person or property, 
2.— Against chastity, . 
3. — Against public order, etc., 
Total 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOl 



Table No. 4. 
Ages of Prisonera committed during the Tear < 



OFFttstree. 


i 


J 


5 


s 


\ 




» 


1. — Agaiail Ptrton or Property. 
Broking end entering, . 




' 


f 


1 


* 


1 

4 


2 


ReoeMng Molen goodi, . 




2. — Jgaintt CAatttty. 
Common nlghl- walker. 




1 


i 
a 


1 

8 


1 

1 


• 


a 
1 


3 Agatntt Publlt Ordtr, etc. 

Disorderly home, keeping, 

Stealing letlen from TJ. 8. mill. , 

Btubbornnei* 

Taking llqgorlmo Indlu oouotry, . 


1 

1 


l 


3 
1 


3 

2 


4 


ao 
l 

4fl 

10 


Recapitulation. 
1.— Againat permn or properly. , 
2.— Agalnet chaatlly, 

3. — AinlDil public ardar, etc., 


T 
J, 

- i 

1 4 

l|, 


13 


', 


10 

17 





si 

- 



LIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



Table No. b. 
mitted during the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 





Uhitbd 


j 


1 

K 


H 


1 

I 


i 

1 


1 


1 


B 

3 










A\ i 
Jljjl 


j* 


1 1 


1 




1 
1 


s 

3 


] 


I 


: 


■ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




30 




■ 

3 

1 


w 

B 
1 


a 
i 


■ 


. 


3 


' 


- 


' 


- 


1 


1 


11 

3) 
11 

s 




34 

u 

13 
S 


I 

1 


3T 
I 


w 

3 
1 


13 


' 


3 


1 


1 


~< 


" 


: 


m 

s 

300 

IT 






103 

S 
M 

in 


Si I 

IB 

15 j 
U ' 


30 
• 
Si 


M 
U 


s 
u 





. 


- 


1 


- 


1 


; 


349 

u 

w 

34S 




1U 


M 


so 


H 


IT 


11 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


■ 


H62 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOM 



Table No. 6. 
Birthplaces of the Parents of Prisoners committed during i 
Sept. 30, 1896. 



OFFENCES. 


: 

H 

i 


g 

| 


E 


1 


1 


§ 


1 


1 


Ij 

5 


l.—Agahut ftrmor Property, 

AhuII 

Breaking and entering, . 

Receiving stolen xooda, . 


i 


'- 


1 

1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


■ 


Tola], 

'J. — Againit Chattily. 

Oonucon night-walker, . 

Lewd cohabitation 

Lewdncai, 


13 

1 
S 

s 




■ 


- 


i 


- 


- 


■ 


■ 


S. — Apalntt Pu6Hc Ordtr, tit. 
Disorder Ij house, keopinj, . 

Idle and disorderly 


n 


a 


11 

in 

n 
s 
s 


■ 


2 
4 


■ 


i 


- 


j 


Taking liquor Into Indian eonnlrj, 


■ 










SteapUuttttha. 
1.— Agattart penon or property, . 
2. — Agalnat chastity, 
!. — Against pnbUa order, etc., 


IT 
13 

11 


IS 


130 
1 


10 


* 


- 


- 


. 


» 




4T 


ST 


155 


ID 


* 


t 


i 


■ 


a 



KEFOBMATOEY PRISON FOB WOAU 



Table No. 8. 
Habits, Conjugal Condition and Education of Prisoners co 
ike Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



\\\ * ; 1 

omacis. | tefi E j 


1 

31 




7 — J>rt«K Ana ar Pnptrtf. 

*— ». 

BwUhwIMkIH, .... 

Bigfact at cUU, 

KacHrtif Ulo g»«U. .... 


M 19 
U : » 

ts ■ 

n j, « 


1 

11 


-_ 

" 




a.— AfaimM OatUir- 

Ooainoo mlgkt-nJkar, .... 
L**d MUMn. 


I 

1 
1 

1* 

1 




».- AfStui ftaWfc Orrfn-, ale. 

Dtardarfr tan, kaaplDc . . . 

Honwof IIUuH, kwpJDfc 
BUallBf lBUn from U. B . mill, 
Taktaf llqoor Into Indian •mbOJi ■ 


■! ■ 

; ; 

ti } it 

* 1 * 
l l 


u 

3 

» 

l 


in 




**HrfrirftWim. 

1. — Afalnitpanoa orpropaity, 

*• — Afalort duality, .... 

B. — Afatart pnnlte order, ale., 


WS [| IB 

.. ; r, 

MB l| 58 


14 


1M | 

1 
It 1 

M 1 




SM 1 M 


MB 


~ 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOM] 



Table No. IS. 
Courts where Prisoners commuted during the Tear toert 



Superior Courts. 

Berkshire, 

Bristol 

Franklin 

Hampden, 

Hampshire, 

Middlesex, 

Plymouth, 1 

Suffolk 61 

Worcester, 3 

Total, 

Municipal Courts. 

Boston, 

Dorchester, 

East Boston S 

Roxbury, 1 

South Boston 8 

Total, 

Police Courts. 

Brockton, 

Chelsea, 

Fitchburg, 

Gloucester, 3 

Haverhill, 

Hoi yoke, 

Lawrence, 

Lee 

Lowell, 

Ly™ 

Marlborough, 

Kewburyport, 

Newton 

Somerville, 

Springfield S 

Total 

District Courts. 
Berkshire, Central, . 
Berkshire, Northern, 
Berkshire, Southern, 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOK 



Tablb No. 10. 

Transfers of Prisoners to the Reformatory Prison for 
was established. 



TEAKS. 


51 

■Sa 

m 


58 

lii 
M 


i 




20 
IB 
■ 
1 


i 


i 

3 




3 
3 
3 

3 

3 


- 




': 




144 


si 









Table No. 16. 
Commitments by Counties since the Prison was estt 



TEARS. 


1 
I 

i 


i 


| 


1 


! 


s 

% 

1 


t 

! 

IB 


| 

5 




K 


I 




187T-7S, 
19TS-7B, 
1879-80, 

ibsi-sV, 

I8S2-S3, 
1883-84, 
18S4-8&, 
ISM -SO, 
1880-87, 
1897-88. 

is»-oo| 
im-n| 

IBB* -98, 
1898-94, 
IBM 95, 
1895-tfl, 




3 


3 

7 
11 
4 

12 


IS 

22 

21 

34 

21 
14 

24 

40 
23 

22 

23 


ie 
21 

3-1 
23 
SB 

se 

3S 

28 

IB 


i 

2 
1 


IB 

10 

27 
17 

IB 
28 
14 

29 

11 
33 


2 

I 

1 

7 

2 
4 


SB 

S3 
42 
M 

40 
31 
ST 
«B 

n 

21 
33 

as 
n 

76 


J 


s 
a 

i 

2 

4 


3 

l 

3 

4 

1 

s 
a 




ToUl, 




T 


119 


449 


643 


11 


83B 


U 


819 


4 


&2 


in 





86 REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOME 

One 18 in regard to infants who are sent to the pris< 
a year old, at which time they should no longer be de 
their mothers. A child's first and most lasting im 
received at a very early age, and these older babie 
to priaon with mothers who are under sentence, may s 
lives from the influence of the unfortunate surrounding 
they practically begin their careers. 

Another change suggested is in regard to women * 
years and schooled in vice to a degree which renders 
hopeless as subjects for reformation, and utterly unfit f 
with younger and less hardened criminals. To illustn 
I would cite the case of a professional fortune-teller 
years old, recently committed to the prison. She has 
in the practice of her profession, and her influence u; 
prisoners is extremely harmful. 

The third point I would make is in regard to irrespot 
epileptic, bordering on insanity, or who have been dis 
insane asylums as cured and are not cured. In frenzy 
drink to which they soon return, they commit some i 
not sent back to the asylum where they belong, but 
sentence. This state of things is most injurious and ui 
to the woman herself, but to the prisoners who cann 
society, and to the prison compelled to receive her. 

A new farmhouse has been erected and is nearly con 
water pipes have been extended beyond the new fan 
hydrant put in, thus securing greater safety to all tt 
ings. 

The Bysteni of electric wiring was this year exa 
expert and pronounced dangerous. The insulation 
worn away, and the old adjustment was unsafe. The e 
has therefore been rewired, and the system is now in e> 

Some special appropriations seem necessary to the 
prison during the next year. 

The laundry yards are greatly in need of repairs, 
being of boards, has decayed until it has become di 
several serious accidents have already resulted. The 
be relaid in some substantial material, such as stone or 
estimate by a reliable firm places the amount ncedi 
$ 1,500. 



SLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 87 

iding the prison is in a precarious condition, 
lened from time to time by setting new posts 
b, but a hundred feet of it blew down in a gale 
whole structure is in such a condition that n 
olutely necessary. The estimated cost of this 

i of repairs in the prisoners' bathrooms. Tem- 
beeu made during the year, to guard as much 
longer to health, but the old tubs should be 

method substituted. It is estimated that the 
ratioas would be about $1,200. 
and the houses occupied by prisoo employees 
To keep these in good condition requires one 

every two years. The roofs of the houses are 

md should be reshiugled. An appropriation 

g and repairs is needed for this work. 

nation once more to the matter of the deputy 

ry mentioned in my last report. 

' prosperity has attended our work this year. 

State of the land opposite the prison has added 

rivileges and opportunities of the work. It is 

t to the women to be taken out of doors for 

within their strength, and the knowledge that 
s a helpful purpose is good for them and for 



ing used by us has been the subject of so many 
■omit in detail may not be out of place here, 
ers the prison she comes in charge of an officer, 
the superintendent or deputy. The mittimus 
the crime of which she is convicted, but as a 
not critically examined by the superintendent, 
3 to deal with the prisoner unbiassed by any 
of the past. After the usual inquiries as to 
ad ancestral history, the prisoner is taken to 
she undergoes vigorous treatment with soap 
prison garb and goes to the dispensary. Here 
on is made as to her entire physical condition, 
icorded in a book, together with any marks or 
igbt aid in identification. 



88 REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOM! 

She is then placed in a department called '* probatio 
remains usually for one month, secluded from the com 
her fellow prisoners, visited only by the superintend 
and matron in charge, but under constant watchful co 
provided with work and with reading matter, and for 
she performs some active labor in a part of the prison t 
while the other prisoners are at their duties elsewhere, 
of this probation is that those to whom the prisoner is 
have opportunity to learn her habits, tendencies anc 
that she herself may recover in some degree from th 
past surroundings and the effects of rpcent dissipation, 
in this month ample time for reflection. She becom< 
to her new environments, and is prepared, not by resi 
but by an awakening of hope and courage, for the step 

During her stay in probation she wears a suit of pla: 
and is allowed no privileges beyond those needful for 
receives no letters, and is permitted to write none exi 
emergency, such as sickness, death or pressing basin 
month is allotted to probation; hut if a first-comer i 
and there is no reason to believe that her presence woi 
to the other prisoners, she is sometimes taken to the c 
weeks. On the contrary, if it be a second sentenc 
may be required, that the way of the persistent trui 
prove doubly hard. On the same principle, a priso 
second sentence goes from probation to Division 1, hi 
hation, however, being deducted from the time re 
division ; but if it be her first, offence, and her sent 
than two years, she passes directly from probation to 

On leaving probation she is taken to the office of th 
ent, where she receives some plain but kindly a 
assured of the personal interest of those in charge and t 
tion in all her efforts to reform. She is directed not 
her companions the sins of her former life, but to cor 
curtain has dropped upon her past, and that she be 
experience a new life upon a better basis. The syste 
on which promotion is founded is also made as clear as 
a record card assigned her, giving the number of mark 
promotion to the next division, the number of days 
obtain those marks, and the date on which those day 
provided no marks are lost through misconduct. 'I 



iLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 89 

<ek which is perfect in work and deportment, 
the following form : — 

Record Card. 
tered Division 2, Nov. 15, 1881. Will be promoted 
credit marks are gained. If no marks are lost, 
t, or on the third day of March, 1882. 



work or iiudy, will 
Record. 







10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10 


10.0 

1 


10 


,. 


,. 


,. 


10 


10 


10 


10 


,. 


,. 


ID 













































































































































































>es not usually remain in the prisoner's posses- 
• for examination every Tuesday, the day when 
ide. A hook is also kept, containing a similar 

card is lost we may not do the prisoner the 
at her standing. 

i interview the prisoner exchanges her suit of 
: one of blue and white gingham, the number 
gnates the number of her division, and enters 
assigned her, with an increase of privilege cor- 
igher rank. In the two lower grades letter 
ce each month, and the number received is not 
upon the daily school session is granted to 
ision if they are illiterate and under a short 

privilege is usually withheld until Division 3 
s rated, not by the amount accomplished, but 
oiper of the worker. No stints are imposed, 
ut whatever is done, be it much or little, shall 



vision 3 confers privileges additional to those 
members are designated by gingham dresses 



90 REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOM 

with throe stripes. They begin regular attendance up 
they are allowed to write a letter once in two week 
they desire join the club belonging to that division. 

But the hope and effort of the prisoners centres in 1 
highest in point of rank and privilege ; and everythi 
with a view to foster this feeling. The dress, like 
divisions, is of blue gingham, but its four stripes sho 
rank. The sleeping rooms of this division are pleas 
cell-like, and the occupants are allowed the electric 1 
evenings. The crockery in Division 4 dining roon 
condition, the imperfect dishes being reserved for 
visions. Tea is given in generous allowance on : 
nights in every month, while in Division 3 it is gi 
times, in Division 2 twice and in Division I once, 
provided every Friday morning. The members of 
permitted to write a letter every week, and spe< 
privileges are allowed, a Temperance Society mai 
women themselves being one of the most valued and 
this division, moreover, there are two grades, one 
those who have attained it only after repeated trials : 
and the other of those wbo have gone through ' 
divisions with a perfect record, and have manifestly 
make the most of their opportunities. These latter 
by a special badge, and are known as " trust women," 
considerable freedom aud entrusted with certain resp 
They also receive some special privileges, such as tea * 
night, letter writing every week, and front rooms h 
outlook than J those at the back. It is very rarely tbi 
women betrays the trust reposed in her, and the sense 
cultivated, as well as the tasks in which she is trained 
excellent preparation for the time when she shall b 



The result of this healthful strife for a prize which i 
shown by the fact that the higher grades contain by f 
number of prisoners, the average number in Divisiot 
16, while the badge or trust women number 111, ont 
population of 336. 

The benefit of this system becomes apparent, also, 
ening face of the prisoner as she rises from grade to 
growing ambition to attain the highest rank in her lilt 



JLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 

verance with which Bhe executes her daily U 
iO sphere is recognized as another efficient ai 
, and the members of all the divisions an 
lily prayers, held in the chapel at six in 

og the village priest says mass in the chape 
rvice is conducted at half-past eight, a ger 
sld at one p.m. and a special Sunday-school 
ichool-room at two. In the evening at six 
he chapel again to listen to an address by s 
.side, or a praise service is held, in which 
ly, thus making five regular services on Sum 
day evenings the women are assembled in 
tainment, sometimes musical or literary, sr 
■e women themselves. Every effort is mad 
leerful, hopeful and resolute in their purpoe 
same time to relax nothing of the discipl 
rays under perfect and instant control. Th 
10 essential difficulty, for a prisoner is quid 
t the moral power that compels obedience, 
obation to Division 4 the prisoner comes in < 
y matrons and officers, who differ necesss 
pirit with which they govern their various 
variety of temperament affords in itself no n 
trol. 

'eprimand is generally sufficient to prevent 
t offence. A deliberate breach of disciplin 
i of one or more credit marks, placing pro 

farther away. The loss of ten credits fori 
called " commuted time," a remission of tl 
h month, allowed by law to every well-beha 
nt, in case of an ordinary misdemeanor 
ice, and increases in severity with each rej 

improper conduct at the table, any viola 
equires silence and respectful behavior dm 
' obliging the woman to eat' alone in her n 
r a second offence, her solitary meals are i 
Ihe punishment, like all others, is cumulat 
lemeanors call for severer penalties, and a sr 
lience is sometimes repressed only by conf 



2 REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMI 

lent in a Bolitary workroom. This is a lighted room, 
set, where the prisoner can have her work, receives h 
nd lives much the same as before, except that she i 
be companionship of her mates, and is allowed no bot 
>unday. It is a simple but wonderfully effective puni 
reme cases of insubordination, destroying State prop* 
ning life, are punished by what is known as "the a 
estraint is imposed beyond the mere confinement, ai 
read and water. The prisoner is released as soon a 
ee the superintendent, and declares her penitence i 
aination to conform to rules, this state of mind being 
bject aimed at in the whole system of prison tre 
' dark Bolitary " is a punishment seldom called for. 
eaches that physical causes have always to be taken into 
.re responsible for many of the outbreaks among fern 
I have given this account of our graded system, ho 
rherein its efficiency lies. Other items are being add 
o time as the need arises, and it is this close attentioi 
finch we attribute the success of the system. 

I wish to express my thanks to those friends whose i 
ielp have encouraged us during the year, and to 
ocieties who have sent us gifts of flowers and reading 
itting, also, that I mention the gratuitous services of t 
iriests, who have been very helpful to us in our work. 

ELLEN C. JOE 



LIC DOCUMENT — No. 13, 



ANCIAL STATEMENT. 



urces, 169362 55 

3 Ed auditor's department and 

rer in hand, .... (69,353 55 

169363 55 169353 55 



RECAPITULATION. 

usurer, as per twelve monthly 

auditor's department, . . (55,756 47 

ontbly schedules, vouchers in 

155,756 47 

»55,756 47 155,756 47 

l for 1895, and not expended 

115,474 27 

•m Oct. 1 to Dee. 31, 1895/ . 115,441 33 

ject to draft, .... S3 94 

115,474 27 115,474 27 

Appropriations for 1896, 

125,000 00 

needing 32,000 00 

nonths, to Sept. 30, 1896, . ? 18,406 78 

ses, nine months, to Sept. 30, 

21,908 36 

ject to draft, salaries, . . 6393 22 

ject to draft, current expenses, 10,091 64 

157,000 00 $57,000 00 
g expenditure! under chapter 179, Acta of IBS*. 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMJ 



EirENI ITURES. 

Salaries, 

Subsistence, |7,676 

Clothing and bedding 1,916 

Furniture and furnishing, 1,058 

Hospital 559 

Boobs, printing, etc., 272 

Fuel 6,548 

Lights, 951 

Engineer's department, 2,873 

Laundry 204 

General alterations and repairs, 1,126 

Agriculture, . 2,577 

Stable and bams, 2,967 

Miscellaneous, 2,670 



Income. 
Machine work, shirts (Edgar A. Buffiutou), 

Laundry work, 

Needle-work, 

Rent of electric lights, 

Bent of pastures 

Board of United States prisoners. 

Sale of junk, etc., 

of calves, 

of pigs 

of wool and pelts, 

of butter, 

of milk and cream, 

of flowers and plants, 

of fruit and vegetables 

of pork, 

of beef, 

of stone, 

of hay and fodder, 

of barrels, 

of dynamo, hardware, etc (old stock). 

Outstanding account, .... 

Farm Products. 

Beets, 39 bushels, at 50 cents 

Beans, shell, 36 bushels, at $1 

Beans, baking, 65 bushels, at 92, . 



LIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 95 

.' . 824 80 

678 60 

14 63 

18 00 

15 00 

24 00 

216 75 

44 50 

1 20 

85 00 



. , . 1 25 
3G 00 

4 71 
11 10 
63 10 

2 10 
6 15 

5 70 
2 40 

22 38 

6 06 
88 65 

14 10 
19 40 

15 12 
70 95 

6 91 
80 00 
41 10 
137 60 
6 95 
13 48 
24 16 
422 50 
244 60 
11 16 
19 70 
1,081 00 
13 25 

nto, 72 75 

ents 4,191 66 

1,900 00 

112 812 00 

42 00 

i 96 00 

8 872 00 



96 REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMEX. [Oct. 

Oat straw, 9 tons, at $14, $lf(, $ 

Rye straw, 81 tons, at (18, 153 K' 

Ground bone, 40 barrels, at $1, 40 *\ 

Manure, 143 cords, at $6, &.? •.* 

Manure, hen, 20 barrels, at 91, 20 •> 

Sale of flowers, 41 & 

of pigs, 434 ■>' 

- •• of calves, 1 j 

of wool and pelts, 14 

of stone, 6 * 

Rent of pastures, 75 >• 

OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES. 

Names of Officers and Employees, with Dale of Appointment, Rail. 

Annual Salary and Amount received. 



1 NAME. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


RANK. 


Annual 

Salary. 




1 Ellen C. Johnson, .... 


Jan, 1884, 


Superintendent, . 


$2,0C0 00 


frifW ® 


1 Sara J. Williams, . 




• • 


July, 1895, 


Physician, . 


1,090 00 


!.•»>; v 


1 Etiie L. Lee, . 




• * 


Nov., 1892, 


Chaplain, 


1,000 00 


i.«ri* 


1 Frances A. Morton, 




• • 


Nov., 1892, 


Deputy supt.. 


800 00 


ST '* 


Susie P. Brooks, . 




• • 


May, 1884, 


Clerk, . 


800 00 


$P* 


Gertrude Brannen, 




• a 


Oct, 1879, 


Matron, • 


400 00 


4* * 


Nellie Parker, 




• • 


April, 1880, 


41 

• • • 


400 00 


3* >* 


Lydia J. Perry ,• . 




• • 


Dec, 1890, 


•« 

... 


400 00 


?H H 


Ella R. Arerill, . 




• • 


Feb., 1891, 


«< 

• • • 


400 00 


2£ ~ 


Myra E. Gardner, 




» • 


Aug., 1892, 


•a 

• • • 


400 00 


2£ r 


Kate R. Hoi ton, . 




► • 


Jan., 1996, 


• 4 

• • • 


400 00 


irr 


Jennie M. Baker,* 




► • 


June, 1892, 


• • • 


400 00 


u> •* 


Martha A. Stafford, 




» • 


Nov., 1895, 


• • 

• • • 


400 00 


z* * 


•« •* 

* 




k • 


- - 


Deputy matron, • 


350 00 


*> - 






► • 


- 


Assistant matron, . 


300 00 




1 Emma A. Pond, . 




► • 


April, 1892, Deputy matron, . 


350 00 


11 « 


Mary E. O'Reiley, 




• 


Aug., 1892. | " «• 


350 00 


I*" £ 


Catharine A. Van Allen 


U ' 


• 


July, 1886, ! " 


350 00 


S50 ;f 


Julia D. Pierce, . 




• 


May, 18S4, j ■• •' 


350 00 


£?f ^ 


Lena R. Ballon, . 




• 


Aug., 1891, j •• " 


350 00 


SB ~ 


M M 




• 


| Assistant matron, . 


300 00 


7* :» 


Nellie Bolton, 




• 


Oct, 1893, . Deputy matron, . 


350 00 


«i* * 


Sophia W. Monroe, 




• 


Aug., 18S8, , •• *» 


3S0 00 


IC i 


Mary R, Fitch, . 




• 


Mar., 1893, j " •« 


350 00 


14* V 


«• u 




• 


— — 1 Assistant matron, • 


300 00 


n.* 


Sarah H. In man, . 




• 


Jan., 1S94, Deputy matron, . 


350 00 


>- u 


4» «< 




• 


i Assistant matroo, . 


300 0V 


71* 



• Recifned. 



196.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 
Names of Officers and Employees — Continued. 



97 



NAMK. 



11a J. Graham, . 



u 



<< 



i« 



jrence V. Woodward, 
len B. Masters, 
ina G. Ware, . 
)rence A. Ramsay, 
belii £. Barnham, 
ixa 8. Batchelor, 
iDces A. Finkenaner, 
lie P. Kibbe,* . 
ate M. Packard,* 
ira L. Howes,* . 
iiaheth C. Warren, 
ibtlla R. Farley, 



it 



«t 



>rtnce Pierce, 



ii 



ii 



lit M. Pease, 



it 



•i 



liette Eaton, 



•• 



<< 



kn G. Brannen, 
"7 E. Adams,* 
na Mackenzie,* 
r» L. Byron, 
£osta T.Martin, 
wles Holton, . 
fvL. Gilson, . 
mklin Gaines* 
rdner H. Haynes, 



ii 



«ne Hyde, 



u 



ii 



i< 



Henry Putnam, 
liter A. Geissler ,* 
tot Morris, 
l*on L. Haynes, 
nlel Whitehead, 



ii 



*1 H. Harrington, 
ink P. Stockwell, 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Oct., 1895, 



June, 

Oct., 

Mar., 

Nov., 

Joly, 

April, 

Oct., 

Jan., 

Feb., 

Jan., 

June, 

April, 

April, 

May, 

Mar., 

Jan., 
Dec, 
May, 
Mar., 
May, 
Nov., 
Mar., 
Nov., 
Nov., 

April, 



May, 

Nov., 

April, 

Nov., 

May, 

Mar., 
April, 



891, 
894, 
895, 
895, 
894, 
894, 
895, 
892, 
895, 
895, 
895, 
896, 

896, 

896, 

896, 

894, 
896, 
896, 
896, 
896, 
885, 
885, 
887, 
895, 

896, 



890, 
890, 
895, 
895, 
895, 

886," 
888, 



RANK. 



Annual 
8alary. 



Deputy matron, 
Assistant matron, 
Employee, . 
Assistant matron, 



« 

<i 
<i 
ii 
« 

it 
•i 
ii 



ii 
<t 
ii 
ii 
« 

« 
<< 
ii 
ii 
ii 



Employee, . 
Assistant matron, 
Employee, . 
Assistant matron, 
Employee, . 
Assistant matron, 
Employee, . 



41 
l< 
II 
tl 
II 



Engineer, 
Watchman, . 



ii 



<i 



Employee, . 

Watchman, . 
« 



ii 



Fireman, 



ii 



ii 



ii 



Stableman, . 
Farmer, 



$350 00 

300 00 

240 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

240 00 

300 00 

240 00 

300 00 

240 00 

300 00 

240 00 

240 00 

240 00 

240 00 

240 00 

240 00 

1,300 00 

2 per day. 

2 •« " 

2 «« «« 

50 per mo. 

40 " " 

45 " " 

50 " " 

800 00 
50 per mo. 
50 



50 
55 
60 
60 
60 



ii 
ii 
it 
ii 
it 
ii 



41 
II 
It 
II 
It 
II 



Amonnt 
recelred. 



$58 34 

225 00 

20 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

275 00 

260 00 

249 17 

293 33 

190 00 

207 49 

50 83 

55 83 

73 33 

12 00 

50 00 

20 00 

76 00 

40 00 
50 00 
75 33 

240 00 
142 67 

41 33 
8 67 

100 00 

1,800 00 

366 00 

62 00 

670 00 

50 00 

80 00 

90 00 

100 00 

800 00 

68 33 

600 00 

650 00 

55 00 

660 00 

720 00 

720 00 



* Resigned. 



38 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMEN. [Oct. 



Names of Officers and Employees — Concluded. 



NAME. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


RANK. 


Annul 
8aluy. 


* * 

mane. 


George F. Arnold, 


May, 1892, 


Farmer, 


f60 per mo. 


r»<* 


Joseph H. Wheeler, 




May, 1892, 


« 


60 " " 


«D A 


George £. Cozzens, 




Oct., 1892, 


<« 

• • 


40 " " 


430 OC 


Oscar P. Dadmnn, 




Jane, 1896, 


«< 

• • 


50 " " 


»• 


« i« 




- 


* • 


55 " " 


165(1 


Charles W. Woodward, 




Feb., 1891, 


Employee, . 


45 " •• 


i»* 


Willard O. Patton, 




Not., 1895, 


tt 


40 «« " 


49 if 


Frank G. Proctor, 




Jan., 1896, 


a 

9 • 


40 «« " 


4d« 


M «t 




- 


• • 


45 M «« 


1£» 


<« M ( 




- 


it 

• • 


50 " " 


1« » 


«< <« 




- 


it 

m • 


05 «« « 


1&# 


J. Hendry Flett, . 




Jan., 1894, 


Carpenter, . 


65 " M 


16$ » 


<t «< 

• a i 






<< 


60 «« " 


«« 









6.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



he Commissioners of Prisons; 

he nineteenth annual report of the medical work in the Refoi 

' Prison for Women is hereby submitted. 

r average of prisoners for the year, 1 

■ average receiving treatment, not in hospital, 

v average sick in their rooms, not in hospital, 

v average at sick call 

iber of prescriptions to dispensary patients, 7,1 



Dispensary 


Work. 










If* 


in 

111 


ill 

ill 

Ssa 


h 

it 


•si 

Si 


is»o. 

eh, . .' 

1 


593 
674 
443 

666 
548 
278 
312 
460 
501 
514 
448 
376 


67 

95 
80 

66 
79 
36 
49 
65 
66 
70 
83 
80 


86 
100 
170 

245 

167 
184 
175 
220 
201 
189 
190 
103 


18+ 
28+ 

18+ 

18+ 

18+ 
19+ 
17+ 

»+ 

18+ 
18+ 
20+ 
19+ 


: 
; 

: 



100 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMEN. 



[Oct. 



Medical Cases treated in the Hospital. 



Alcoholism, 1 


Hysteria, 5 


Anaemia, 






1 


Malaria, 








6 


Angina pectoris, . 






1 


Malingerer, . 








* 


Articular rheumatism, . 






4 


Mania, . 








1! 


Asthma, 






3 


Morphinism, . 








* 
* 


Bronchitis, . 






I 


Nephritis, 








! 


Catarrhal jaundice, 






1 


Otitis, . 








1 


Cystitis, 






1 


Pertussis, 








!* 


Cellulitis, 






1 


Pharyngitis, . 








i 


Chorea, . 






1 


Phlebitis, 








, 


Cholera infantum, 






1 


Phthisis, 








' 


Delirium tremens, 






1 


Pleurisy, 








. 


Diarrhoea, 






1 


Rheumatism (muscular), 






Epilepsy, 






1 


Synovitis, 










Erysipelas, . 






2 


Taenia solium, 










Gastrectasis, . 






1 


Tonsillitis, . 










Gastric ulcer, 






1 


Typhoid fever, 










Haemoptysis, . 






2 


Ulcerative stomatitis, 








Hystero-epilepsy, . 






8 


1 _ 





Obstetrical Cases. 



Births, 19 



Albumenuria, 



Surgical Cases. 



Abscess, 10 


Hemorrhoids, 




Acne, 








8 


Herpes labialis, 




Bubo, . 








1 


Herpes zoster, 




Cancer, . 








1 


Psoriasis, 




Cancrum oris, 








1 


Scabies, . 




Conjunctivitis, 








2 


Syphilis, 




Colloid cyst, . 








1 


Teeth extracted, . 




Corneal ulcers, 








2 


Ulcers, . 




Eczema, 








52 


Urticaria, 




Furunculosis, 








14 


Vaccinations, 





PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



Gynaecological Cases. 



orrbea, . 

,'lamata, 
enorrhea, 

rrhagia, 



Metrorrhagia, 
Ovaritis, 
Pelvic cellulitis, 
Procidentia, . 
Retroflexion, . 
Retroversion, 
Vaginitis, 
Vegetations, . 



ght women have been transferred to the lunatic asylum. 
en have been transferred for surgical treatment. Fou 
ren have been admitted with their mothers. Two chi 
died : one of tuberculosis ; the other, a premature child, 
1 weeks. 

Respectfully, 



SARA J. WILLIAMS 

Phy«i 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMEN. 



CHAPLAIN'S REPORT. 



To Ike CommitHoners of PrUotu : 

I herewith submit my report for the year ending Sept. 30, W 

Although the individuals under our care are not the same * 
year to year, their needs are similar, and our plans and efforts a 
be essentially what they have been. 

The special means employed for the success of our impor 
work are as follows : — 

First. — A school, to the day classes of which are admitted 
prisoners, except those of the first grade, who could not reu 
write intelligibly at the time of their commitment. All, eld 
young, manifest great desire to learn. Members of the third 
fourth grades are admitted to evening classes, in which oral inst 
tion is given in geography, language, arithmetic and spelling- ^ 
prisoners at their discharge hare expressed much gratitude for 
school and text-book privileges granted them. 

Second. — The library, which as formerly, lends aid to discip! 
instruction and entertainment. The increasing demand for r» 
matter is an evidence of the value of this department to the w« 
While the demand has largely been for fiction, we are plea** 
note a change, in the direction of biography, history and relir 
We believe it just to say that this may be attributed to several 
operative influences; viz., our school, Sunday-school, Bible c 
the moral effect produced by the appeal made to every thons* 
prisoner, and by the kind consideration of those in antborii 
restore them to ways of right living. Our store of reading n- 
has been augmented by papers and magazines sent to the s 
intendent, by whom they have been distributed. 

Third, — The religious services. The regular Sunday *r* 
are held at 8.30 a.m. and at 1 p.m. Following the latter if a 1 
class, to which the Protestant women are invited. Bev. Fr. 
non, assigned to attend to the spiritual needs of the Roman Call 



96.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



103 



isomers, accomplishes much good by his visits to all the inmates 
his faith. Mass is celebrated every Sabbath morning at 7.15, and 
itruction given and confessions heard on Mondays and Fridays 
jpectively. During the summer we occasionally held evening 
ivers in the yard. The close attention of the women and their 
ident interest in the truths presented have been gratifying, and, 
hope, effective beyond our ability to see. 

Among the clergymen who have kindly visited us and conducted 
r chapel services is Bishop Whipple of Minnesota, who will long 
remembered for his earnest words to the unfortunate, cheering 
im to renewed efforts for better life. 

Die aim of all our work — industrial, educational and religious — 
hat these who are under our care should understand that no prog- 
s can be made in prison or in civil life without fundamental 
orm. But in our appeals to induce them to form good resolutions, 
find that the will to do better is oftenest the very thing that is 
ilaved. To see the right and follow the wrong is the weak point 
our humanity. In view of this fact, we do well to take into con- 
eration hereditary propensities and the influence of habitual vices, 
wever, every effort is put forth to encourage these women to 
ieve that to each is given the power of choice, and to recognize 
fact that, of all reformatory agencies, true religion stands first. 

Respectfully submitted, 



aaaoRx, Oct 21, 1896. 



ETTIE L. LEE, 

Chaplain. 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMEN. 



REPORT OF THE AGENT FOR AIDING DI 
CHARGED FEMALE PRISONERS. 



To the Commissioner* of Prisons : 

The chief evils with which humanity baa to contend are pore 
ignorance, disease and vice, the latter too often running into cr: 
No elaborate argument would be needed to prove that the first I) 
are almost entirely consequences of the last. 

In forestalling, preventing and remedying vice and cruw 
reach the ills and misfortunes of the human race. To some it 
been given to work on the lines of protection and prevention, 
my work is the less cheerful one of trying to guide into stn 
paths those who have turned aside into the ways of the tran.-fre 
against divine and human laws. 

We are apt to look upon those who have served terms in pi 
as exceptional people. We regard them as running counter i 
current of society, and causing disorder and mischief. We thir 
them as persons who have voluntarily aunk to a level from ■ 
they will never rise. But the so called incorrigible, the ba* 
wrong-doer, has in more than one instance been known to ch 
front, and struggle eagerly, perseveringly against her hew 
temptations, and, though perhaps stumbling at times into to- 
Bin, casting aside discouragements to grapple again with her ew 

Were it best, I could in this connection cite names of indivi; 
Who were rated as hopeless at the institutions to which they 
frequently committed, who have realized their own folly tail 
have been for years striving for sobriety and respectability. aoJ 
dread the recurrence of the suffering which has come to them t 
direct consequence of their own wrong-doing. 

Such cases give the needed encouragement for patient, per*: 
labor, as repeated efforts to influence for good seem to fall p' 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 105 

less, bat at last the desire may be aroused and the weak will 
strengthened. The hungry may be fed, clothing and fuel may 
bring protection and warmth where both were bitterly needed ; but 
these are only help for the body, and from day to day, yet they 
often lead to more enduring improvement. 

In my years of work I must have seen almost every phase of the 
prison woman's character. During the past year I have received 
more than twelve hundred calls from women who have served 
sentences. To those who come for the first time special attention 
is given; I try to convince them of the possibility of making it 
their last. As each one enters, the first question to be decided is, 
whether aid shall be granted ; if so, what kind of work is best 
suited to her training, to her physical and mental power, never 
forgetting that she must not be in any degree relieved from the 
sense of responsibility for her own support. I find them generally 
anxious for work. Some of them are excellent laundresses, some 
good cooks* and occasionally I find some who are skilful in the use 
of the needle ; but the majority of them are best suited for general 
housework. 

But good places are often closed against persons who cannot fur- 
nish evidence of capacity and faithfulness. 

I have applications for workers, and have during the year sent two 
hundred and forty-one women out of town to their homes or to 
places for service. If after a time some drift back, I count it a gain 
to get them away from their old haunts even for a few months. 

A large majority of the women who come to me for help are the 
victims of intemperance. That drunkenness is the father of crime 
and misery, most ruinous to its special votaries, needs scarcely to be 
stated. 

Some are undoubtedly beyond reform, but we must exhaust every 
known resource for their redemption. When disregard of the laws 
of health has placed an individual in the position of a patient, and 
perhaps laid her on a hospital bed, sympathy and pity are never 
wanting ; but when the transgression of moral and enacted law has 
brought about punishment, then too many pass by on the other side, 
saying, " It is her own fault ; let her take the consequences." 

While we recognize justice in penalties, see their necessity for 
the protection of the community and condemn all morbid commis- 
eration for offenders, let us be merciful, as " our Father is also 
merciful." 



106 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMEN. [Oct* 



The expenditures for the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, have beel 
as follows : — 



Amount paid for board for discharged female prisoners. 

Amount paid for clothing, 

Amount paid for transportation, 

Amount of cash paid, 

Amount paid for rent, 

Amount paid for sundries, 

Travel of agent, 

Office expenses (postage, stationery, books, etc.), . 



$166 
1.115 



444 



dX< 



lul 

m 

75 



$2,6>; ^ 



Respectfully submitted, 



SARAH E. FRYE, 

Ago*- 



Boston, Not. 1, 1896. 



* There has also been paid, daring the year, to the Temporary Asylnm f«r Dinted 
Female Prisoners at Dedham, the sum of $170.72, in accordance with chapter 177 of tfe* i* 
of 1886. F. G. r. 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 107 



PARDONS FROM THE REFORMATORY PRISON 

FOR WOMEN. 



Seven prisoners have been pardoned during the year from the 
Reformatory Prison for Women. The reasons for granting them 
are stated in the governor's special messages to the Legislature, as 
follows : — 

Margaret A. Foley. Convicted of stubbornness, Municipal Court, 
South Boston, May 24, 1895. Sentenced to the Reformatory Prison for 
Women for one year. Pardoned Oct. 10, 1895, upon the recommendation 
of the Commissioners of Prisons. Daring her imprisonment she had been 
quiet and well-behaved. Since her sentence her mother has died, and her 
father, who is nearly blind, left without a housekeeper. The pardon com- 
mittee were of the opinion that she would profit by the punishment she 
had received, and that it had been sufficient. 

Bridget Mahoxey. Convicted of drunkenness, Municipal Court, Bos- 
ton, June 19, 1895. Sentenced to the Reformatory Prison for Women for 
one year. Pardoned Oct. 31, 1895. The prisoner was a married woman, 
but nineteen years old. She had a child twelve months old, who was ill 
and needed a mother's care and attention. The father was not able to 
provide for its wants in the mother's absence. It was believed that the 
young woman would profit by the imprisonment already served, and would 
hereafter abstain from the use of intoxicating drink. 

Mart Gibbons. Convicted of being idle and disorderly, Municipal 
Court, Boston, Aug. 24, 1895. Sentenced to the Reformatory Prison for 
Women for one year. Pardoned Dec. 12, 1895. The prisoner was the 
only daughter of most respectable parents. As this was her first offence, 
and as her home surroundings were good, she was thought to be a proper 
subject for executive clemency. 

Mart Reagan. Convicted of drunkenness, Western District Court, 
Hampden County, May 14, 1895. Sentenced to the Reformatory Prison 
for Women for one year. Pardoned Feb. 13, 1896. The prisoner had a young 



108 REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMEN. [Oct.* 

3hild, Berioualy ill with scarlet-fever. The father was unable to meet u 
expense of a proper nurse. Upon the recommendation of the selectm? 
jf West field, where the offence was committed, as she had bat thirty da; 
more to serve after deducting the time for good behavior, a pardon r. 
granted on the ground of humanity. 

Olive Taylor. Convicted of drunkenness. Police Court, Lowell, Ik 
25, 1895. Sentenced to the Reformatory Prison for Women for fift« 
months. Pardoned April 16, 1896, upon the recommendation of the Co: 
missioners of Prisons. This was the prisoner's first offence. She <tu a 
seventeen years of age. The probation officer was away at the thw : 
sentence ; if he had been present, the com missioners were satisfied li 
would have been placed on probation. 

Nellie Donohue. Convicted of being idle and disorderly, CeoC 
District Court, Worcester County, Jan. 6, 1896. Sentenced to the E 
formatory Prison for Women for one year. Pardoned April 16, 1?S 
upon the recommendation of Judge Utlcy, who imposed the sentence, 
was believed that she was innocent of the crime for which she was sentence 
She was arrested with other inmates of a disorderly house, but it has sir- 
been learned that she was employed as a domestic, and had nothing to 
with the proceedings of the house. 

Margaret Johnstone. Convicted of drunkenness, Police Court 
Holyoke, Sept. 17, 1895. Sentenced to the Reformatory Prison I 
Women for two years. Pardoned Sept. 17, 1896, upon the reconmwu- 
tion of the Commissioners of Prisons. During her imprisonment she I: 
been a well-behaved prisoner. She was pardoned after serving one-t 
of her sentence, and sent to her former home in Scotland. It was belie 
that she had been sufficiently punished for the crime committed. 



\eport Concerning the Massa- 
chusetts Reformatory. 



112 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Oct. 



tendent's report shows that the profit from the labor of the prisoner? 
was $25,798.18. By taking this amount from $196,752.40 th*n- 
remains a balance of $170,954 22, which is the actual cost to the 
State for the year ending Sept. 30, 1896. 

In addition to the sums paid for support, there have also Urn 
expended under the direction of the commissioners the following 
sums from special appropriations for repairs and improvement* : — 

For constructing and furnishing school building, under chapter 
45, Resolves of 1895, there has been paid during the year the ?ue 
of $9,693.11, which makes a total expenditure under this resolve if 
$24,971.76. 

For the construction of workshops, the sum of $10,000 wj: 
appropriated by chapter 85 of the Resolves of 1895, and $8,171 -^ 
has been expended. 

For painting and repairing officers' houses there has been paid 
during the year $879.96, which, added to the amount previous* 
expended, makes a total of $1,909.85 paid out for this purpart 
under chapter 85 of the Resolves of 1895. 

/ Number of Prisoners, etc. 

There were 799 prisoners received at the reformatory during thi 
year. Of this number, 753 were committed by the courts ; 15 ^c» 
returned by the commissioners for violating the permit to he at 
liberty ; 2 were returned from escape and 1 was returned from tit 
lunatic hospital ; 28 were removed to the reformatory by the c*»c- 
missioners. Of t!he last number, 2 were taken from the Sui* 
Prison, 8 from the Lyman School for Boys, 14 from the S*^A 
Boston House of Correction and 1 each from the houses of correct m& 
in Cambridge, Dedham, New Bedford and Plymouth. 

Upon the recommendation of the superintendent, 805 pri^ociTJ 
were given permits to be at liberty by the commissioners ; 43 wort 
discharged upon the expiration of sentence ; 6 died ; 4 were pardon**! 
and 2 escaped. Three were removed to the lunatic hospital by oriirr 
of the governor, and 14 to other prisons by order of the commis- 
sioners. Of the number removed by the commissioners, t> wrv 
sent to the Cambridge House of Correction, 3 to South Boston, 1 ' 
New Bedford and 4 to the State Farm, There remained in cu>tt>.i/ 
933, being 78 less than last year. 

The statute prescribes thirty-five years as the maximum a^c * 
persons who may be sentenced to the reformatory for dninkenur^ 



114 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



rOd 



The average age of the prisoners committed for all offences to 
21 years ; the average age of those committed for drunkenness to 
25 years, against 26 in the preceding year. In the following ta^e 
there is shown the number of commitments for each year since 1>S\ 
with the average age of the prisoners sentenced for each class of 
offences : — 



Average Age of Prisoners committed to Massachusetts Reformatory y? 'k 

Past Eight Tears. 



TEARS. 



1889, 
1890, 

1801, 
1803, 
1803, 
1804, 
1805, 
1808, 



1. — AGATHSfe 


THX PXBSOH. 


1 




S S 


& 


e a 


9 M 


z* 


S« 


14 


22 


18 


28 


25 


22 


46 


22 


40 


21 


87 


21 


80 


20 


86 


21 



2. — AOAIKST 

Propzbtt. 



1 

.§0 

eg 



• 6fi 



810 
276 
844 
886 
468 
608 
466 
486 



20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
21 
21 



3. — Aoaixst 

Public 
Obdxb, etc. 






.§8 



208 
216 
243 
816 
812 
206 
260 
282 






26 
24 
24 
24 



23 
28 



DXUYKKK- 



Omn- * 



Number 
Onmmltted. 


Averege 
Age. 


130 


17 


104 


28 


118 


28 


186 


27 


188 


24 


164 


24 


357 


26 


168 


26 




Details concerning the ages and birthplaces of the prisoners t&i 
the nativity of the parents can be found in the report of the supe*- 
intendent, wherein will be also found information about the reforma- 
tory in other respects. 



vl n 



Commitments by Months. 

By the following table, which gives the number of commitment; 
in each month for the different classes of offences, it will be .<**« 
that there was the same number in November as in June, and th* 
the smallest number was in December. The table does not ^jv 
particular offences, but it may be of interest to know that tbe h>~\* 
number committed for drunkenness was in April and the lowv-r 
August. For breaking and entering, the highest number wa- - 
ceived in February and the lowest in December; for larceny, tii 
highest in January and the lowest in December. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 















MOKTH.. 












OFFENCES. 


J 

O 


| 

1 


i 

I 


a 


I 

& 


| 


i 


s 


1 


i 


i 


! 
I 


i 


Unit property, . 

■lut pnblle ordsr, tie , . 


1 

St 

56 


3 

46 
2S 


2 

IT 
30 


40 

26 


66 


■ 

SO 
13 


8 
3& 
Bl 


s 

4! 
2! 


41 

29 


23 
■0 


20 
13 


4 
28 
2T 


s 

43 
5S 


Tor*! 


93 


TO 


as 


;a 


70 


42 


M 


" 


TO 


03 


62 


80 


T * 



Condition op the Reformatory. 
be financial account shows a reduction in the amount expendcc 
:h could not have been secured even with the decreased popu 
■n except by the most careful attention to details. The building! 
ill in good rep>tir, and the new school-house erected during thi: 
■ under the personal direction of the superintendent is probablj 
best building for its purpose to be found in any institution Ir 
United States. It is so situated and constructed that th< 
mers can be safely taken to it in the evening. A descriptioi 
lis building nnd of the new shop, built by the prisoners, is con 
id in the superintendent's report. 

Recommendations. 
'e renew the recommendation contained in our report last year 
an appropriation be granted to provide a new building, to bi 
tally adapted to a hospital department. The superintendent' 
uate is that the sum of $30,000 would be required for thi 
lose. 

"e also recommend that the various appropriations suggested '">; 
superintendent be granted, as follows: for new boilers urn 
ings, water mains, hydrant service and additional electrica 
lrutus. 



Estimates'. 
Iter a conference with the superintendent, it is estimated that thi 
tning sums will be needed for the maintenance of the reformatory 
ing the year 1897: — 



116 MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 

Salaries and wages : — 

Officers f80,200 00 

Instructors, teachers and other employees, . . . 24,900 00 

Current expenses : — 

Fuel and lights, f 16,000 00 

Provisions, 42,700 00 

Clothing and bedding, 21,700 00 

Tools and utensils, 4,000 00 

Education, 4,000 00 

Repairs and improvements, 9,000 00 

Water 3,300 00 

Incidental, contingent and travelling expenses, . 9,000 00 



\\ 



1105.1- 



it * 



109,7* 



The above-named sums refer only to the maintenance, and &~t 
amounts that may be needed for carrying on the industries will :* 
stated in the report of the General Superintendent of Prisons. It ? 
estimated that about $8,000 may be received from rents, etc. 



HENRY PARKMAN, 
MARGARET P. RUSSELL, 
J. WARREN BAILEY, 
MARY V. O'CALLAGHAX, 
HERBERT D. WARD, 

Commissioners ofPris'* 



Fred. G. Pettigrote, 

Secretary. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



COXCOBD, Oct. 1, 1896. 

Commissioners of Prisons: 

e superintendent herewith submits his twelfth annual report of 
lussnchusetts Reformatory for the year ending Sept. 30, 181)6, 
her with the appended tables, showing the financial condition 
e reformatory for the year, and other tables of statistics per- 
ig to the population, etc. 

e year which this report covers has been one of general satis- 
n. The health of the inmates has been good, the standard of 
dine has been maintained and much material progress made. 
lg the year the new school building has been completed, giving 
iple and excellent facilities for the school work of the refoim- 

; also a new shop building, for which an appropriation was 
, has been finished. The main buildings have been kept in 
• and the whole plant is in excellent condition. 

Financial Summary. 
penditurea and Income. — On Oct. 1 , 18t'5, there was an unex- 
id balance of the appropriation for the year 1895 of $6*1,218.10. 
! was expended of this appropriation $57,744.88, leaving 
3.22 unexpended of the appropriation for the year 1895. The 
'jmation for the year 189u* was $214,800, and of this there 
een expended to Oct. 1, 1896, $147,072.83, making the gross 
of the reformatory from Oct. 1, 1895, to Sept. 30, 189li, 
nstitution year, $204,817.71. The unexpended balance of 
27.17 will be sufficient to meet the expenses for the remaining 
months, and there will be no deficiency in the appropriation. 
net income from the industries for the year in review was 
I 1 *. 18 and the amount collected for rents and small sales was 
5.31, leaving the net cost of the reformatory for the year 
954.42. The average population for the year was 975, mak- 
ie gross per capita per diem cost $0,574 and the net per capita 



118 MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. [Oct 

per diem cost $0.48. The gross cost of the reformatory wi- 
$4,394.01, less than the preceding year; but the net co*t to 
somewhat more than the preceding year, which was due to smaller 
earnings in the industries. A number of causes conspired to re- 
duce the earnings. The industries here, like all industries, bve 
felt the depression of the year ; one of the contracts expired isl 
had to be renewed ; the number of men in the reformatory is m> 
terially less than the previous year, and a larger number has bees 
employed in construction work than previously. 

There were unexpended from the accounts of special appropria- 
tions Sept. 30, 1895: — 

For the construction of new shops, ..... . $10,000 00 

For painting and repairing officers' houses, .... 1,470 I! 

For the school building, 9,721 $5 

Of these there have been expended : — 

For the construction of workshops, $8,171 £ 

For painting and repairing officers' houses, . . . . 879 96 
For the school building, 9,693 11 

Population. 

Commitments and Discharges. — In the appended tables it *ill 
seen that there were confined in the reformatory Oct. 1, 1895, 1,01 
prisoners. There were committed during the year 799, making 
total of 1,810 confined during the year, which is 52 less than ii 
preceding year. The largest number during the year at any 
time was 1,048 and the smallest number 912. The average due': 
for the year was 975, or 61 less than the preceding year. 

Of the 799 commitments, 753 were committed by the court*. I 
were returned by the Commissioners of Prisons for violation n 
their permits and 28 were transferred from other institution? 
were returned from escape and 1 from the insane asylum. Of ti 
753 committed by the courts, 39 were sentenced for offences ap* 
the person, 568 for offences against property and 292 for offeaa 
against public order and decency. The average age of those o£ 
mitted was 21 years and 4 months. Of the whole number commits 
49.9 per cent, were intemperate, 5 per cent, were illiterate. 70 pt 
cent, were without occupations, 90 per cent, were without tni' 
20 per cent, were of foreign birth and 70 per cent, of fort 4 
parentage. 



i 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 119 

During the year 877 prisoners were discharged from the reforma- 
tory, of whom 805 were released on permit, 43 upon expiration of 
sentence, 14 were transferred to other institutions, 4 were pardoned, 
2 escaped, 3 were transferred to the insane asylum and 6 died, 
leaving 933 confined in the reformatory at the end of the year. 
There were 564 discharged during the year who were serving 
sentences for felonies, and the average time served by them was 
16 months and 15 days ; there were 313 discharged who were serv. 
ing 8 entence 8 for misdemeanors, and the average time served by 
them was 11 months and 12 days. The average time served by all 
discharged was 14 months and 13 days. 

In the twelve years since the establishment of the reformatory 
there have been 8,760 commitments to it; 7,801 came from the 
courts, 517 from other institutions, 413 were returned by the Com- 
missioners of Prisons for violation of their permits and 29 were 
received from all other sources. During the same period there have 
been 7,827 discharged; 6,872 were upon permit, 517 were upon 
expiration of sentence, 277 were transferred to other institutions 
and 161 were released by pardon, death or escape. 

The work of this institution undertakes the reformation of these 
men, and it is the aim of this report to set forth as briefly as possible 
the means employed to this end and to give a few of the innumerable 
phases of the work. There are many theories advanced at the pres- 
ent day as to the cause of crime, and there is a great diversity of 
opinion among penologists as to the best methods to be employed 
for the reformation of criminals. It is no easy task for the person 
who finds himself in charge of a large number of this unfortunate 
class, whose great needs constantly appeal to him for his best efforts 
in their behalf, to know his duties towards them. He looks about 
him for help, and finds that many maintain that bad heredity, and 
others that bad environment, are the chief causes of crime. Even 
the famous quotation of the great sage and wit of Cambridge, if he 
had been talking of reformation instead of education, might have 
read, " The way to reform a man is to begin with his grandfather ; " 
while another eminent person, a strong believer in the influence of 
environment, has said: "Give me the child and I care not who 
makes the laws." 

It is evident to any one who is a close student of human nature 
and who has had an extensive experience in dealing with his fellow- 



120 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Oct 



men, whether they be criminals or otherwise, that there is much is 
the heredity and environment of every person which shaj>e? nil 
character ; but in the story of the fall of Adam we are told that 
none had a purer heredity or wholesomer environment, and \ethf 
fell ; from which we are to conclude that there is no heredity, how- 
ever pure, nor environment, however perfect, which will prevent i 
man from falling, should he choose the downward path ; neither a 
there any heredity nor environment, however bad, which can keep 
a person down whose desires are for the right ; if he be established 
in a self-will sufficient to assert itself, he will rise above anv o&- 
ditions or influences which may surround him. 

He is told by the physician and criminal anthropologist thai 
reformation can only be accomplished through the development of 
the physical nature, and that a healthy mind can only have a scat a 
a healthy body. The pedagogue maintains that only through it* 
promulgation of intelligence can we hope to lessen crime or m rt 
reformation in the criminal, and the industrialist believes that ulIt 
through the door of manual training can the criminal hope to escaj*; 
while the moralist holds that the chief motive in the reformatiou & 
the criminal is religion and morality. 

The superintendent in charge of prisoners finds no specific pao&Yi 
for their reformation ; but, if he be wise, he will not hesitate to u* 
any agency, whether it be moral, intellectual, industrial or pby>ieau 
for their rehabilitation and reformation, and will use any ami & 
measures which experience proves to be judicious and benefit 
He will provide his prison with ample work for the prisoner? suai 
place them under the best industrial training, establishing theivti* 
trade schools, by which each prisoner may be equipped indu-trail* 
to take his place beside the honest mechanic when he is released. 
He will also place him under the most scientific treatment and e*tjV 
lish schools for the cultivation of his intelligence, and will not ne^t 
to provide healthful, religious and moral instruction ; recogniing 
that, no matter how well the prisoner be equipped physically, nwo* 
tally and industrially, his reformation cannot be a complete wo:k it 
the wrong heart be not converted, — not turned to right purine -in- 
action. 



Prisoners are to be corrected by discipline* By many di<cipl -* 
as a corrective force is underestimated. It is in itself a valuabu 
agency in inculcating self-control found so essential in the returns 



] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 

>f men, besides being indispensable in bringing the 
he proper state of mind for the reception of other f 
nces which experience has proved to be beneficial to h 
.' intent of the discipline of this reformatory is to insr 

prisoner for bia reformation. It is sought to p!ac< 
'ration of it upon a plane which will command the | 
•t and confidence, and, even should he bring down upoi 
misbments, he cannot deny its justice. For this rea 
ted of every officer in whose bands discipline lies, thai 
icting nnd firm, but at the same time fair and gentle 
; dealings with the prisoner. Ol^dience at all times is 

prisoner, but bis willing obedience is sought if poss: 
y see the necessity and feel the desire for well-doing 
er neglects or refuses to respond to the disciplii 
Is to his better nature, then the necessary force must 
w him to a proper course of action. 
the indeterminate sentence and marking system the c 

reformatory utilizes for his reformation the prisone: 
rase, arousing him to his greatest effort to reach the e 
fil of him to obtain it. By grading him accordtn 
tig so that his privileges increase, as he passes from 
, another motive is given him for his best endeavoi 
tunity afforded to test his ability to maintain himself u] 
restraints are removed by his rise in grade. When hi 
Dint where he is able and desires to exercise self-conti 
i*ciplined, and that discipline is the best which bring: 
forces which spur him on to make the greatest effort 
■dint in the shortest possible time. To accomplish 
mtory endeavors to make this discipline paternal, to ad 
ily, evenly and kindly; to require implicit ol«die 
l obedience, if possible; to make it hopeful and ii 
lizing any response to it without overlooking any o 
msj to make it uplifting rather than depressing, wbe 
>t standards required can be readily reached by co 
; to treat each prisoner as a man, making him reliant, 
, and in no' wise subservient nor hypocritical. Unde 
i, which has been the aim of this reformatory, it 1 
It in the main to transform this great number of undis 
pun their reception into an orderly body of men, loyi 
ilion and its methods, receptive to its endeavors, a 



122 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Oct. 



earnest to make such personal application and effort as will enable 
him to reach release and maintain himself when it is consummated; 
such discipline in itself cannot fail to be corrective. 



In last year's report the rules governing the prisoners were 
printed, but a few words descriptive of the discipline may be of 
interest. The prisoner learns from the manual, which is placed in 
his hands when he is committed to the reformatory, that he will he 
credited with marks for his industry, diligence in study, progress in 
trade school and for his general efforts, and .that they will be takes 
away from him in the way of ^nes for derelictions and misconduct. 
At the time of his commitment he is placed in the second or 
intermediate grade, from which he can rise, by acquiring ceruia 
standards, to the first grade, or, by failing to maintain the requisite 
marking, he will descend to the third grade. 

Each grade has a distinctive dress. The third grade has a bn£& 
red and the second grade a black suit. The first grade has a klxi 
suit with a distinguishing chevron of blue and yellow upon the ara, 
and new suits are given to first-grade prisoners only. The privi- 
leges and comforts increase materially as the prisoner rises in grain 
The first and second grade prisoners mingle in the shops at worksui 
eat in a common dining-room, but at different tables, and occupy 
different cell blocks in the prison. The third-grade men at pre?** 
are entirely separated from the other grades. They have a cA 
block by themselves which is entirely separated from the othca 
they work in a shop connected with their cell block, attend a cla* 
in school by themselves and eat in their cells. The only trcs 
during the week that they are seen by the other prisoners is at ti* 
chapel service on Sunday. This is a new experiment and it promt* 
good results. Infractions of the rules, for which loss of marks « 
deemed insufficient, are punishable by solitary confinement ia a te-l 
cell, m which there is a mattress and running water. The time of 
detention is somewhat longer than when dark cells were used, tal 
the effect upon discipline is such that there is no desire to return W 
the use of the dark cells. During the past year offence report* 
punishments and the average number in the third grade ban 
materially decreased, and never before has the spirit of obetIi«*ca 
been more manifest. 

Prisoners are to be trained intellectually. Some men fall in® 
criminal ways after receiving the benefits of a liberal education, ^ 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13, 123 

the number is comparatively small. The great mass of prisoners 
have very little education, and, while the number termed illiterate 
is comparatively small, the greater proportion can do little more 
than read and write, having but a slight knowledge of numbers and 
other subjects. 

The schools at the reformatory have from its inception been one 
of its prominent features, but their facilities have been greatly en- 
hanced during the past year by the completion of the new school 
building, which has a seating capacity for one thousand persons. 
There are nine school-rooms, each furnished with fifty-four desks of 
the most approved pattern, ample slate blackboards, an abundant 
supply of text-books and other furniture incidental to the modern 
school-room. In addition to this, there is a hall suitable for the 
larger classes, with a seating capacity of five hundred, which affords 
us the best school facilities of any prison in the country. There 
are . fourteen classes, instructed by competent teachers, under good 
methods, in which all of the ordinary branches of a grammar school 
course are taught. In addition to these classes, special instruction 
is given in ethics, American history and civil government, which 
have been found especially beneficial. The interest and progress 
made in the class of ethics is especially noticeable and the good 
results from it are decidedly apparent. President Hyde of Bowdoin 
College has permitted the use of his outlines, which are peculiarly 
adapted to young men of this class. The men are particularly 
earnest in their school work and appreciate the opportunity afforded 
them. The development of their intellectual powers is quite marked, 
even in the short time they remain with us. Every illiterate must 
learn to read intelligently, write legibly and express himself with a 
degree of accuracy, and all must maintain the standard of marking 
required before they can attain their release. 

Prisoners should be placed upon a good industrial basis. Every 
one in charge of prisoners realizes the efficacy of manual labor in 
prisons, not only as a means to lessen the burden of expense and 
maintain discipline, but as a reformatory agency. Labor is neces- 
sary and all labor beneficial, but when it is directed with a view to 
instructing, disciplining and developing the prisoner, it becomes 
one of the most prominent factors in reformatory work. The pris- 
oner who has learned a trade and has learned to love that trade, not 
only has the means to support himself honestly but has a definite 
purpose in life. 



124 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Oct. 



The superintendent in regulating his industries should bear tfe 
in mind, and, while it is commendable to obtain such industries a* 
are remunerative, the chief aim should be to obtain those which are 
in the largest degree beneficial to the prisoner, and at the same time 
the least competitive with outside labor. While every prince: 
should spend some portion of each day in the trade school to l*e 
taught a definite trade, there remains a large portion of the day in 
which he can be profitably employed upon remunerative Ww. 
With this view the industries and trade schools of the reformatory 
have been inaugurated. The remunerative industries and the tnia 
schools are run continuously throughout the working hours of tb* 
day, and one-half of each prisoner's time, especially the younstf 
portion, is spent in the workshops and one-half in the trade school*, 
with the exception of some of the older men and those who fore 
already acquired trades, who are kept in the shops all day. Witk 
the very young portion it is found that better results are obtaiwi. 
by keeping them in the trade schools two hours each day. 

The trade schools are doing excellent work, even though tier 
have less room and facilities than they should have to do the l*& 
work. The superintendent of trade schools is in charge of a cook, 
petent corps of instructors, directs the work and makes the a>^ 
ments of the prisoners to the different classes. Ordinarily e*l; 
class is divided into two divisions, the forenoon and afternoon 
division, consisting of twenty-five prisoners each. The trad* 
taught are plumbing, tinsmithing, blacksmithing, bricklaying 
plastering, masonry, engraving, printing, cabinet-making, in** 
turning, wood carving and painting, and a large number of thi 
younger and more defective prisoners are given instruction in tb» 
Sloyd system of wood working. This class has been under tte 
instruction of graduates from the school in Boston of which Mr* 
Larrson is principal, who has given a great deal of thought tsA 
attention to the work, with a view to applying it to the defeat™ 
classes. It is not intended merely to make the pupil skilful * 
much as to awaken his perceptions and develop his faculties T* 
quote from a pamphlet recently issued by the Sloyd Training Scb*** 
in Boston, the following is of interest: — 

" Sloyd is not a set of models, it is not a prescribed conrH?*i 
exercises, it is not the use of certain tools. Sloyd is tool work & 
arranged and employed as to stimulate and promote vigors. :> 
telligent self-activity for a purpose which the worker recognize? * 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 125 

good. The spontaneous exercise of the creative faculties for a use* 
ful and good end is a moral tonic." 

It is especially adapted to the formative period of the youth's 
character, and with the large number of young prisoners in the re- 
formatory it holds a valuable place. The fine specimens of work 
which are constantly on exhibition in the trade school attest the 
progress of the pupils, and a very large number obtain a degree of 
proficiency which enables them to take a position when they reach 
the outside, while others receive the elements of a trade with suf- 
ficient instruction to make them valuable assistants. The large 
amount of construction work during the past year has afforded the 
trade schools ample means to apply the knowledge which the 
prisoners have acquired in the different schools. The new school 
building is a monument to their work, all of which was done by the 
members of the different trade classes. It is a brick building with 
stone trimmings, corresponding in architecture to the rest of the 
buildings upon the premises. Its length is 177 feet, its width 60 
feet, and it is two stories in height. The inside finish is of hard 
pine, with maple floors, it is heated by the Sturtevant blast system, 
and is as thoroughly equipped as any school building in this section. 
This building afforded practical work to the masons, bricklayers, 
plasterers, carpenters, plumbers, electricians and painters, and the 
plans from which the building was erected were designed and drawn 
in the drawing class of the trade school. Experts, who have in- 
spected the building, pronounce the workmanship first class, and 
equal in every respect to buildings erected by outside labor. Be- 
sides the school building, the different classes have also erected, 
since the first of May, a two-story brick building, 210 feet in length 
and 50 feet in width, for shops, so that the different classes have 
been constantly employed in practical construction, as well as 
receiving the elements of their trade in the classes. 

The remunerative industries have been carried on, as in the pre- 
vious year, under the piece-price plan. There are four contracts, 
one for men's and women's shoes, one for the manufacture of cane- 
seat chairs, one for the manufacture of rattan chairs and one for the 
manufacture of rush-seat chairs. The shoe contract expired in July 
of the present year, and has been renewed with the same firm. The 
product has been somewhat lessened during the past year, owing to 
the depression of the times and the less number of prisoners, but 
the grade of work seems to have improved. The remunerative 



126 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Od. 



industries occupy nineteen shops, each 50 by 100 feet, and they ire 
well supplied with machinery and equipped to do good work. There 
were manufactured in the different departments during the past yea: 
360,623 pairs of shoes and 193,667 chairs of different designs. The 
prisoners have labored well in the shops, and a disposition is shora 
to do good work and as much as possible of it. An observation of 
the labor in the reformatory leads one to the conclusion that work 
should be introduced which requires a considerable degree of skill. 
as the prisoner's interest is more readily awakened and he labor* 
more cheerfully if the article produced requires skill and good work- 
manship, than otherwise. They certainly take more pride in doing 
good work upon a good article than upon a cheap and poor one. 

Much good has been derived from the farm connected with lie 
reformatoiy. It is run with profit, and affords an opportunity m 
out-of-door work to a number who are in delicate health, and wb<se 
health might be impaired if they were required to labor in ti* 
shops. The farm at the reformatory might be extended with p& 
to the institution and benefit to the inmates ; there ought to bi 
raised at least all of the produce consumed by the prisoners. 

Prisoners should be awakened morally. This view has t#* 
strongly before the mind of the administration in the inaugurate 
and carrying on of the reformatory. It seems almost useless ■ 
discuss the advisability of moral and religious work in an institute* 
of this kind, when its beneficial results are so apparent, ^'aa 
prisoners are recognized as men, they are found needing the ssffli 
motives and influences as all. It has been the aim of theadta* 
istration to have moral and religious influences permeate the iost t» 
tion, not only in the chapel but in the workshop, or wherever ill 
prisoner may be, and that they should at all times feel its in>pa» 
tion. That prisoners are receptive to moral and religious influew 
is apparent to all who observe them, and that they are benefited 
them cannot be doubted. Nothing so awakens good resolution* & 
right purposes in the prisoner as moral and religions teaching* ** 
all other work, no matter how successfully done for the prisoner a 
the way of equipping him mentally, physically and industre'l* 
cannot accomplish his reformation unless his purposes and Jrrifl 
are right. 

The chaplain, Rev. William J. Batt, is indefatigable in bi? < 
at the reformatory. He conducts the general service on Sun.U] 
has charge of the Protestant Sunday-school, and has an op|wk*' 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 127 

each evening of the week, before the school hour, to have special 
meetings of the men. His week-day meetings are varied in char- 
acter, and a large proportion of the prisoners are in attendance at 
one or more of them each week. 

The Catholic population is ministered to by the Rev. Edward J. 
Moriarty of Concord, who celebrates mass in the reformatory chapel 
each Sunday morning. On Monday evening of each week he con- 
ducts, with the aid of a valuable assistant, a large class of about 
600 men in catechetical instruction, while almost every day finds 
him at the reformatory attending to the needs of those who may 
apply to him for assistance. Father Moriarty commands the respect 
not only of the Catholic portion of the reformatory but of ajl with 
whom he comes in contact, and it is intended to give him every 
facility to carry on his work, which has proved so beneficial to the 
institution and helpful to the inmates. When the large extent of 
his parish in Concord is considered, and the sacrifice which he is 
obliged to make to so faithfully attend to his duties at the reform- 
atory, the earnestness of his endeavors can be appreciated. The 
Catholic population at the reformatory certainly would consider it 
a great loss were they in any way deprived of his valuable services. 

The annual report of the chaplain for the year 1895, submitted to 
the superintendent, while too long to be printed in full in this re- 
port, is too valuable to be passed without copious quotations from 
it. No one connected with the reformatory feels his responsibility 
more keenly, has given greater thought to the problems which pre- 
sent themselves in dealing with this large body of men, or has been 
more enthusiastic in his work, than the chaplain ; therefore, his re- 
marks upon the moral work of the reformatory seem to be especially 
pertinent at this time. While a large part of the most valuable 
matter is necessarily omitted, a few of the conclusions reached by 
him may convey a partial idea of his views, and they are presented 
under the following heads : — 

44 Prisoners can be reformed." 

44 Every prisoner can reform himself, who will." 

44 We can help earnest prisoners to reform. We have helped many ; we 
can help any." 

44 If any man ont of the six thousand who have gone out from here has 
been unreformed, it was either because he was not in earnest himself, or 
because we did not do for him all that we might have done, or for both 
reasons combined." 



128 MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. [Oe 

" We cannot, reform prisoners who do not wish to be reformed." 

"No reformatory work is satisfactory, or reliable, which does not mc!& 
a change of disposition , a change of purpose, a real change of heart, in i 
prisoner." 

" As working to promote a change of disposition in men, we are taps 
in an occupation that has long been pursued by many of the most totti 
gent, capable, devoted men in the world." 

" The whole work of promoting a change in human dispositions msj 
regarded as long since reduced to a science, many of whose laws its h 
perfectly well known and clearly defined." 

" While engaged in this work, we in this reformatory are subject to i 
same laws and the same limitations as other associations of men who n 
for a similar end. We need not be surprised, therefore, that, — 

" Prisoners cannot be reformed by force, or by machinery, or by rootii 
or by any merely mechanical process." 

" The work of reforming men in prison, the same as anywhere ri». 
the largest and most difficult and most costly work undertaken in the worl 

" The work of reforming men requires the skilful and patient use o'. ' 
greatest forces and the strongest motives which can be brought to bear c; 
character." 

" The most efficient reforming, renewing power, is vested in persons.' 

" Relatively, the prison is not a good place in which to reform men." 

" We use the prison for reformatory purposes, not because it is the ^ 
place, necessarily, but because it seems the best place for some men u. 
some circumstances." 

" It is chiefly in its reformatory provisions that the reformatory <i- 
from other prisons." 

" A prisoner should be as far as practicable trained so that he will br 
closely as possible adapted to free life when he is released." 

" Penalty is a subordinate instrumentality of reform." 

" The supreme agency in the reformation of men is one which cuM 
furnished at command." 

" If the history of the reformatory work from the beginning of the « 
until now has established anything, it is the supreme power of lo" 
changing human dispositions." 

" If love is the greatest force in reforming men, the success of u* 
formatory will be measured in the end by the patience and persistenfv ' 
which this supreme force is here used in dealing with men." 

" The use of the highest motive does not make other motives odd" 
sary, but, on the other hand, requires the nse of all subordinate ftft' 
that are at hand." 

" In a word, working upon the character, disposition and haM» 
human beings, if we work according to established laws that govern > 
things, we are certain to have a reasonable i 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 129 

Prisoners should be strengthened physically . The great majority 
of prisoners respond to disciplinary, educational, moral and in- 
dustrial forces, and by using these means intelligently, continuously 
and persistently the reformation of many is accomplished. Right 
disciplinary forces bring the prisoners to receptive moods, moral 
forces awaken in them right desires and purposes, educational forces 
evolve their powers, and industrial forces equip them for honest 
living, subdue their violent impulses, creating in them a capacity 
for methodical work which undoubtedly promotes their morality. 
There still remains a considerable number who are so defective or in 
such a state of physical degeneration that they cannot be reached by 
any of these means unless their physical regeneration can first be 
accomplished. The expert easily recognizes this class of prisoners, 
to whom they immediately become the most interesting subjects. 
They are diseased, undeveloped, stupid, obtuse, unimpressionable, 
perverse, or perhaps nervous and hysterical. Is it not possible to 
reclaim some of this class by scientific treatment? 

It is commonly believed by physicians that there are intimate 
connections between the brain " centres" and the physical functions 
which they control, and that it is possible, by developing the various 
physical functions, to stimulate the brain "centres," and thereby 
materially strengthen the mind. It would seem possible, by a care- 
fully selected course of manual training and exercise, together with 
a scientific dietary, to so tone up the physical organization that the 
mental faculties might reach that state of development to enable 
these defectives to be reached by the other forces and reclaimed. 

Recommendations. 

1. The recommendation for the building of a new hospital, which 
was urged in last year's report, is renewed. As stated in that 
report, the hospital is inadequate and unadapted to our needs. 
There are no means of isolation in contagious diseases, and, with 
the present treatment of tuberculosis as a contagious disease, some 
further arrangements seem to be absolutely necessary. To erect a 
building suitable to our needs, to give us ample hospital accommo- 
dations and to provide for the physical treatment of defectives above 
referred to, would cost $30,000. The labor upon this building 
could be furnished by our trade schools, and I recommend that an 
appropriation of that amount be made for the building of a hospital. 



130 MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. [Oct. 

2. The engineer reports that many things in his department are 
in need of renewal and extension. The boilers used for heating the 
prison have been in use for twenty years, and are not safe under 
the pressure which we are obliged to maintain. There have been 
no hydrants placed in the yard since the building of the prison, 
although extensive extensions have been made to the buildings and 
new ones have been erected. The hydrant service is very inade- 
quate, and, since the State carries no insurance upon its buildings, 
they should at least be protected by a good hydrant service. There 
must also be an immediate extension of the power in the differ- 
ent shops. The new shop building, which has just been erected, 
is some distance from the central power plant, and it would seem 
advisable, instead of extending the main shafting and belts, to 
convey the power to this building by means of electricity. 

The electric lighting plant, which was put in a few years ago, 
does not have the capacity to light all of our buildings at once, and 
must soon be extended. By a small outlay for dynamos, generators 
and motors, the lighting could be efficiently done and power con- 
veyed to the outlying stations, where it is now conveyed at a great 
loss of steam, and also to the new shops. 

I recommend an appropriation, for expenditure in the engineer's 
department to furnish four new boilers and settings, for extending 
the water mains and hydrant service and for the furnishing of addi- 
tional electrical apparatus, of $13,000. 

3. The recommendation of last year for an increase in the salary 
of the engineer is renewed. 

The existence of the reformatory has extended over a period of 
nearly twelve years, during which period nearly nine thousand per- 
sons have been committed to it. We are many times asked the 
percentage of reformations, but this cannot be exactly stated. We 
know that only twelve per cent, have been returned to the reform- 
atory and a less percentage have gone to other institutions within 
this Commonwealth ; but, laying figures aside, a great number of 
these men to-day are known to be leading upright and honorable 
lives, and are holding good positions in the community. While the 
failures seem numerous, we are always cognizant of them ; the suc- 
cessful ones are soon lost to the public view. The general results 
seem to justify the undertaking of the Commonwealth, and such 
failures as have occurred are owing to the fact that we have not 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 131 

done enough rather than too much for them. The general con6dence 
of the public in the reformatory is gratifying to those who have it 
in charge, and as age, experience and new facilities are added to it, 
better results are not improbable. 

In closing this report, I desire to thank all who have been asso- 
ciated with me in the work for their faithfulness and loyalty to the 
institution and their universal courtesy to me personally. The aid 
and support of the commissioners and secretary are always very 
helpful, and I thank them for their continued confidence and support. 

Your obedient servant, 

JOSEPH F. SCOTT, 

Superintendent. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



Statement III. 
Showing Offences of Prisoners received.' 



i>tthe Perion: 

Lbortion, .... 

iccessory to intent to murder, 

iSsault 

.s<utnlt, felonious, 

lunt-kughler, 

lay hen) 

lurder, attempt to, . 



•( Property : 

newmry to malicious burning 

Iteriog money order, 

lack mail 

reaking and entering, 

urglary 

immnn and notorious thief, 
wealing leased property, 
Ms pi racy, .... 
■hIm'/.z [fluent, . 

nihezzling a letter, . 
irgery and uttering forgery, 

•aud 

using burglars' tools, 
aving counterfeit money, 

ireeny of a ride, 
nlicious mischief, 

limning animals, 
■ceiring stolen goods, 
ibbing the mails, 
iitlatiog U. S. postal laws. 



U Public Order and Decency .- 

lottery, 

'(rging, publicly, 

curbing the peace, . 

*unk eon ens, 

cape, 



• Not Including f.etaped men recaptured. 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 
Statement III. — Concluded. 





i 

i 


| 


: 


I 

i 


III 


Against Public Order, etc. — Con. 


1 

75 
1 
1 
1 
S 
4 

25 

3 
2 

4 
2 
1 

184 

180 

1 

1 
289 


u 

1 

1 

7 

41 
39 

41 
1 


i 

20 

1 

2 

2 
1 
1 

1 
52 
30 

1 

23 


37 

1 

53 

25 
1 
1 

25 


1 , 


Going armed offensively, 
Idle and disorderly, . 
Illegal sale ofliquor, . 
Illegal voting, . 




33 

I 

1 

2 

1 

37 

21 

1 

21 


K 


Indecent exposure. 
Keeping common nuisance. 




! 


Libel, criminal, , 
Maliciously firing a gun, 
Neglect to support family. 




} 


Selling obscene literature. 










S3 


Tramps and vagabonds. 




Unnatural act, . 
Violation of pardon, . 
Violation of permit, . 
Walking on railroad track. 




li 




2,041 


347 1 330 


310 


278 


m 


SCVHABT. 


Against the person, .... 
Against public order and decency, . 


275 
2,041 


49 
411 

347 


47 
482 
330 


45 
545 
810 


43 39 

494 <6S 
278 Mi 




4,554 


807 


859 


9O0 


815 j 71* 


PERCENTAGES. 


Against property 

against public order and decency, , 


6 

49.1 
44.9 


6.1 

>0.9 
3 


5.5 

6.2 
18.3 


5 5.9 4-9 
>0.6 60.6 W.J 
H.4 34.1 36.T 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



Statement IT. 
Showing Ages of Prisoners received.* 





Under 


•0 

mo 


M 


20 

H 


as 

40 


49 


a* 


Oxer 
Yaua. 


Total. 


><U ending BepL 30, 1885, . 


202 


168 


99 


79 


40 


28 


25 


M 


663 


Sept. so 


isst, . 


204 


13V 


M 


44 


46 


41 


21 


28 


618 


hpt.a 


1887, . 


191 


158 


86 


66 


62 


36 


24 


34 


862 


Bepl.SO 


iasa, . 


182 


145 


101 


66 


60 


33 


10 


10 


607 


Bcpt.Sfl 


1589, . 


207 


110 


M 


46 


32 


1 


1 


- 


660 


Sepl.SO 


1890. . 


156 


161 


■ 


43 


20 


4 


1 


- 


646 


Bepl. 30 


HM, . 


831 


141 


66 


87 


82 


a 


1 


S 


62B 


Sept. 30 


urn, . 


M 


204 


83 


44 


88 


4 


- 


- 


766 


Bept.SO 


1S03, . 


434 


2Sfl 


SB 


61 




4 


- 


- 


836 


Bepl. SO 


ISM, . 


(ST 


287 


102 


40 


12 


1 


- 


- 


876 


Sep!. 90 


1896, . 


381 


133 


104 


66 


19 


1 


- 


- 


794 


Btpl.X 


18M, . 


368 


254 


09 


61 


17 


2 


- 


- 


781 






3,692 


3,329 


1,071 


928 


S87 


164 


85 


96 


8,122 



• Including 6 recaptured. 

Statement V. 
As to Habits of Prisoners received. 





1 


t 

1 


I 


? 
3 


i 


£ 

1 


i 


i 


i 


J 

A 

s 


t 


s 

2 

s 


i 


-oWt.n.p.rM., 


16 

65 


37.2 

62.9 


33 
(7 


3T 
to 





















Statement VI. 

ng Sentences for which Prisoners have been committed during the Year 
ending Sept. 30, 1896. 

* of sentence (returned by Commissioners of Prisons), ... 15 

rminnte sentence, limited to two years 291 

nninate sentence, limited to five years, 452 

:o sentence, from four months to twenty years, 30 

ity (transfers from Lyman School for Boys) 8 

->!sl 796 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



Statement VII. 
Summary of Commitments by Counties for the Year id 
Sept. 30, 1896.* 





I 


i 


i 


i 


5 




COUflTIES. 


IS 




8.3 
| 

* 


| c 


1 




Barnstable, .... 




4 






_ 


. 






S 




26 










20 




85 










1 














15 




6 


2o 
















t 


Hampden 


_ 


4 


_ 


10 


18 












7 


- 








40 




66 


49 






















14 




7 






Plymouth, 




7 




2 








2 


113 


179 


9 


3 




Worcester, .... 


- 


24 


- 


27 


6 


1 




3 


249 


179 


196 


no i; 



* Trftntlerl, recaptures and n 



ib upon revoked permit not Included. 



Statement VIII. 
Commitments by Counties, Classified aa to the Nature of Ojftw 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1S9S. 9 



COUNTIES. 


sr 


£££. 


■££ ' 




_ 


4 


_ ■ 




i 


20 


s 




i 


32 


22 






1 






2 


33 


11 


Franklin 


- 


2 


4 




- 


20 


12 




1 


5 


I 




5 


97 


60 




- 


2 


- 




1 


20 


i 




2 


8 






19 


1C0 


127 ' 




4 


40 


18 




36 


443 


274 



* Tmnefers, recapture* usid returns upon revoked permit dm mdnded. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



Statement IX. 
ing Commitments to the Reformatory from A3X Sources since its 

Establithment. 









F 


i 
J 

! 




£■ . 
||1 


Tkihshbb. 






il 




1 

i 


i 

| 


I 

11 


Total. 


■21' * 


isas. 
isct, 

ibso! 

1W3, 
J8M, 


425 
047 

an 

743 
US 
163 




SO 

64 

47 
H7 

23 
21 


i 


! 


71 
IS 

6 

a 

6 


1 

1 


153 
23 

a 

3 


IS 

IB 


2 


6(13 

MB 

706 
813 

Bit 

lit 

MO 
004 
813 


i, . . 




T.S01 


« 


413 


1 


4 


1*3 


8 


J04 


37 


73 


a, 730 



Statement X. 
Nativities of Prisoners received during the Year ending Sept, . 
1896. 



Foreign Countries. 



Edward Island, . 






United States. 

Alabama 2 

California, 3 

Connecticut, 12 

District of Columbia, . . , 3 

Illinois 2 

Iowa, 2 

Kansas, 1 

Kentucky 1 

Louisiana, 1 

Maine, SI 

Maryland, 2 

Massachusetts, .... 493 

Michigan, 1 

Minnesota, 2 

New Hampshire, ... IS 

New Jersey, 4 

New York 27 

Ohio 3 

Pennsylvania 10 

Rhode Island 12 

Vermont, , ■ - . ■ ■ 6 

Virginia, 3 

Total 624 



138 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Ort. 



Statement XI. 

Showing Parentage of Prisoners, classified with the Nature of the Ofim, 

for the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



Against 
Person. 



Against 
Property. 



Agtlnst | 
\ Public Or- TjIl. 
1 der. 



American, 
Canadian, 
English, 
German, 
Irish, . 
Italian, . 
Norwegian, . 
Portuguese, . 
Russian, 

Scotch 

Swedish, 
West Indian, . 
American and foreign, ,. 
Mixed foreign, 
Unknown, 

Total, . 



11 


136 


4 


67 


1 


10 


— 


10 


11 


117 


1 


1 


1 


2 


— 


1 


— 


5 


— 


5 


— 


2 


— 


1 


7 


63 


2 


29 


1 


26 


39 


465 



59 

27 

o 

3 

107 
5 

2 
o 



27 

25 
13 



277 



p 



-:>j 



4' 



Statement, XII. 

Showing from what Sources Prisoners were committed* and the Nat"* •/ 
the Offences for which they were committed, for the Tear ending Sq*>& 
1896. 



COURTS. 



Against 
Person. 



Against 
Property. 



AgtlnH 
PahHc Or- 
der. 



To. 



Superior Courts : 
Barnstable, 
Berkshire, . 
Bristol, 
Dukes, 
Essex, 
Franklin, . 
Hampden, . 
Middlesex,. 
Norfolk, . 
Plymouth, . 
Suffolk, . 
Worcester, . 



2 
1 
2 
13 
3 

21 



4 

3 

18 

1 

13 

2 

4 

36 

13 

4 

85 

19 

202 



2 

9 



1 

15 
2 

26 



1 

4 

4 
4 

H 

« 

:* 



•lil 



8%.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



139 



Statement XIT. — Continued. 





Against 


Against 


Against 




COURTS. 






Public Or- 


Total. 




Person. 


Property. 


der. 




Lstriet Courts : 










Berkshire Central, 


— 


3 


2 


5 


Berkshire Northern, . 










1 


10 


5 


16 


Berkshire Southern, . 










— 


— 


1 


1 


Berkshire Fourth, 










— 


4 


— 


4 


Bristol First, 










-. 


6 


9 


15 


Bristol Second, . 












— 


8 


10 


13 


Bristol Third, . 












1 


5 


1 


7 


East Boston, 












— 


4 


5 


9 


Essex rirst. 












— 


4 


2 


6 


Franklin, . 












— 


— 


1 


1 


Hampden, Eastern, . 










— 


4 


2 


6 


Hampden, Western, . 










— 


1 


3 


4 


Hampshire, 










1 


5 


1 


7 


Middlesex, First Eastern, . 








— 


11 


6 


17 


Middlesex, Second Eastern, 






_ 


6 


— 


6 


Middlesex, Third Eastern, 






— 


14 


5 


19 


Middlesex, Fourth Eastern, 






1 


4 


12 


17 


Middlesex, Central, . 






— 


8 


2 


5 


Middlesex, First Southern, 






— 


1 


1 


2 


Norfolk, Eastern, 






— 


4 


2 


6 


Norfolk. Southern, . 








-. 


1 


— 


1 


Plymouth, Second, . 








— 


1 


— 


1 


Plymouth, Fourth, . 








• 


— 


1 


1 


Worcester, First Eastern, 








— 


- 


1 


1 


iVoreester, Second Eastern, 






— 


2 


— 


2 


Worcester, Central, . 






1 


10 


9 


20 


Worcester, First Northern, 






— 


1 


2 


3 


iVoreester, Second Southern, . 






5 


— 


1 


1 




107 


84 


196 


inicipal Courts : 












6 


56 


90 


152 




• 


2 


1 


3 




— 


1 


2 


3 




- 


9 


7 


16 




6 


— 


5 


5 




68 


105 


179 


ice Courts : 










irockton, . . 


— 


3 


4 


7 


Srookline, . 












— 


2 


— 


2 


'helsea, 












- 


1 


2 


3 


'bicopee, . 












- 


1 


- 


1 


■'itch burg:, . 












- 


4 


2 


6 


larerhill, . 












1 


1 


— 


2 


loljoke, . 












— 


3 


6 


9 


-awrence, . 












1 


10 


4 


15 


-•OWC11, 












1 


12 


22 


35 



140 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Oct. 



Statement XII. — 


• Concluded, 






COUBTS. 


Against 


Against 


Against 
Public Or- 


Total. 




Person. 


Property. 


der. 




Police Courts — Con. 










Lynn, 

Marlborough, 


— 


2 


2 


4 


— 


1 


2 


3 


Newburyport, 


— 


1 


8 


4 


Newton, 


1 


5 


2 


8 


Somerville, 


— 


3 


— 


3 


Springfield, 


— 


7 


1 


8 




4 


56 


50 


110 


Trial justices : 










Essex County, Newton P. Frye, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Essex County, Charles A. Say ward, 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Franklin County, William S. Dana, . 


- 


— 


1 " 


1 


Middlesex County, George L. Hemenway, 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Middlesex County, Ralph E. Joslin, 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Middlesex County, Henry C. Mulligan, . 


- 


1 


3 


4 


Nantucket County, Allen Coffin, 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Nantucket County, George E. Mooers, . 


- 


1 


— 


1 


Worcester County, Horace W. Bush, 


- 


— 


1 


1 


Worcester County, Luther Hill, 


— 


8 


- 


3 


Worcester County, Frank B. Spa Iter, 


— 


1 


— 


1 




— 


8 


9 


17 


Transfers from : 












1 


1 


w 


2 


Lyman School for Boys, .... 


— 


7 


1 


8 


House of Correction, Boston, . 


2 


12 


— 


14 


House of Correction, Cambridge, . 


— 


1 


— 


1 


House of Correction, Dedham, 


— 


1 


— 


1 


House of Correction, New Bedford, 


— 


— 


1 


1 


House of Correction, Plymouth, 


— 


— 


1 


1 




8 


22 


3 


28 






2 




2 


Returned for violation of permit, 


— 


— 


15 


15 


Summary : 










From Superior Courts, .... 


21 


202 


26 


249 


From District Courts, .... 


5 


107 


84 


196 


From Municipal Courts, .... 


6 


68 


105 


179 


From Police Courts, 


4 


56 


50 


110 


From Trial Justices, 


— 


8 


9 


17 


By transfers, 


8 


22 


3 


28 


Returned for violation of permit, . 


— 


- 


15 


15 


From United States Courts, 


— 


2 


— 


2 




89 


465 


292 


796 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 



141 



Statement XIII. 
Showing Releases from the Reformatory in All Ways since its Establishment. 





• 

*• 

g 

4) 


• 

<m a 

O » 

w 

a a 
© « 

3 00 

(9 

»-> 

•m* 
P. 

H 


T3 

g 

ct 


• 

« 

• 


• 

V 

•r* 


• 

• 

9 

a 

k. 
O 

2 

eS 


• 
V 

a 

e 
a> 
33 

"5 
HI 


1 


Transfers. 


1 

• 

• 

3 

O.) 

i* 




■ 


1 
1 1 

i • 


a 

« 0) 

Sfc 

9 O 


• 

** • 

O 9 
•"2 

9*H 

O 


• 

g 

® 


13 

a. 

U o 

«*CQ 
a 

9 


• 

3 

o 




pa 


w 


cu 


W 


a 


S 


»^ 


1 QQ 


B 


»■>* 
►m 


02 


J 


o 


Eh 


Tear ending Sept. 30, 1886, . 


76 


33 


1 


. 


l 


. 


3 


i«| . 






1 




125 


Sept. 80, 1886, . 


435 


61 


2 


3 


- 


_ 


1 


; 6 19 


• 


— 


7 


- 


523 


Sept. 80, 1887, . 


445 


106 


3 


3 


2 




- 


I 2 8 


— 


16 


6 


1 


691 


Sept. 30, 1888, . 


667 


46 


3 


2 


3 


. 


- 


! 3 J 11 


— 


34 


1 




760 


Sept. 30, 1889, . 


616 


28 


2 


5 


7 


- 


1 


1 - I — 


1 


1 


3 


- 


664 


Sept. 30, 1890, . 


477 


19 


1 


3 


4 


- 




1 1 1 - 


• 


- 


2 


- 


507 


Sept. 30, 1891, . 


614 


36 


6 


- 


5 


- 


1 


i i 


12 


- 


12 


2 


- 


689 


8ept. SO, 189*2, . 


641 


31 


15 


3 


5 


2 


- 


2 


82 


- 


2 


3 




736 


Sept. SO, 1893, . 


682 


32 16 


2 


- 


1 


- 




19 


• 


7 


1 




760 


Sept. 30, 1894, . 


751 


45 12 


5 


4 


2 


- 


i 


22 


- 


3 


— 


— 


844 


Sept. 30, 1896, . 


773 


47 13 


2 


8 


2 


— 


I - u 


- 


- 


- 


- 


351 


Sept. SO, 1896, . 


806 


43 J 4 


2 


6 


- 


- 


, -, 10 


- 


4 


3 


- 


877 


Total, .... 


6,872 


617 


78 


30 


40 


i 


6 


| 18 | 150 


1 


79 


28 


1 


j 7,827 


_ . . 









1 






















. - 



Statement XIV. 
Concerning Prisoners returned upon Revoked Permit. 



To Sept. 30, 1886, 

Year coding Sept. 30, 1887, 
Sept. 30, 1888, 
Sept. 30, 1889, 
Sept. 30, 1890, 
Sept. 30, 1891, 
Sept. 30, 1892, 
Sept. 30, 1893, 
Sept. 30, 1894, 
Sept. 30, 1896, 
Sept. 30, 1896, 



Percentage who 

had been In- 
mates of Other 
Institutions. 

70 

80 

84.6 

83 

73.1 

71.8 

61.2 

47.8 

60 

66.6 

73.3 



Percentage | Percentage of 



of each 

Year's Releases 

Returned. 



9.2 

13 

11.8 
9.3 
7.6 
2.9 
8.6 
2.1 
3.6 
1.3 
.8 



Returns 

to Releases 

Granted. 

5.96 

7.32 

8.53 

8.19 

9 

8.89 

6.3 

3.3 

3.3 

2.7 

1.8 



Statement XV. 
Concerning Prisoners committed a Second Time by the Courts. 



J Percentage who 


Percentage 


Percentage of 


1 had been In- 


of Each 


Returns 


mates of Other 


Year's Releases 


to Releases 






Institutions. 


Returned. 


Granted . 


To Sept. 30, IKSft, 




66.7 


12.3 


1.9 


Year ending Sept. 30, 1887, 












81.6 


9.1 


6.5 


Sept. 30, 1888, 












81.3 


6.7 


5.9 


Sept. 30, 1889, 












54.3 


4.8 


6.4 


Sept. 30, 1890, 












60.5 


5.6 


6 


Sept. SO, 1891, 












64 


2.9 


6.7 


Sept. 30, 1892, 












65.8 


2.4 


10.8 


Sept. 30, 1893, 












48.8 


3.2 


6 


Kept. 30, 1894, 












46.4 


4.4 


18.9 


Sept. 30, 1896, 












37.1 


2.9 


12.6 


Sept. 30, 1806, 








56 


1.4 


13.7 








_ 


, 



142 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Oct. 



Statement XVI. 

Concerning Prisoners returned by the Courts and by the Commissioners 
during the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896, showing Offences for which 
formerly committed and Offences for which returned. 



FomMBB Commitment job 




PKB8INT COMMITMBHT FOR 


Assault and battery, . 


1 


Adultery. 


Assault and battery, . 




1 


Breaking and entering. 


Assault and battery, . 




1 


Drunkenness. 


Assault and battery, . 




1 


Larceny. 


Assault, felonious, 




1 


Drunkenness. 


Breaking and entering, 




9 


Breaking and entering. 


Breaking and entering, 




3 


Drunkenness. 


Breaking and entering, 




1 


Idle and disorderly. 


Breaking and entering, 


• 


10 


Larceny. 


Breaking and entering, 




1 


Stubbornness. 


Burglary, . 




1 


Larceny. 


Drunkenness, 






1 


Assault and battery. 


Drunkenness, 






1 


Disturbing the peace. 


Drunkenness, 






28 


Drunkenness. 


Drunkenness, 






1 


Idle and disorderly. 


Drunkenness, 






5 


Larcenj. 


Drunkenness, 






1 


Receiving stolen goods. 


Drunkenness, 






1 


Stubbornness. 


Drunkenness, 






2 


Vagrancy. 


Fraud, 






1 


Breaking and entering. 


Idle and disorderly, . 






2 


Breaking and entering. 


Idle and disorderly, 






2 


Drunkenness. 


Idle and disorderly, 






2 


Larceny. 


Incendiarism, 






1 


Malicious mischief. 


Keeping nuisance, 






1 


Larceny. 


Larceny, . 






5 


Breaking and entering. 


Larceny, 






5 


Drunkenness. 


Larceny, 






1 


Embezzlement. 


Larceny, 






1 


Felonious assault. 


Larceny, 






1 


Fornication. 


Larceny, 






1 


Fraud. 


Larceny, 






1 


Idle and disorderly. 


Larceny, 






20 


Larceny. 


Larceny, 






1 


Receiving stolen goods. 


Receiving stolen gooc 


Is, 




1 


Larceny. 


Robbery, . 






1 


Breaking and entering. 


Robbery, 






2 


Drunkenness. 


Robbery, . 






2 


Larceny. 


Stubbornness, . 






1 


Assault and battery. 


Stubbornness, . 






2 


Breaking and entering. 
Embezzlement. 


Stubbornness, 






1 


Stubbornness, . 






2 


Larceny. 


Stubbornness, . 






1 


Threatening commissioners. 


Vagrancy, . 






2 


Breaking and entering. 


Vagrancy, . 






2 


Drunkenness. 


Vagrancy, . 






1 


Stubbornness. 


Vagrancy, 


2 


Vagrancy. 


Total, . 






185 

i 





1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



143 





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144 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Oct. 



Statement XVIII. 
Receipts. 

Cane chairmaking department, $3,329 68 

Rattan chairmaking department, 7,616 70 

Rush chairmaking department, 699 30 

Engraving department, 109 40 

Pearl button department, 6,927 13 

Printing department, 1,632 88 

Shoemaking department, 33,809 19 

Real estate department, 4,750 00 

Maintenance department, 3,315 31 

162,189 09 



Statement XIX. 
Current Expenditures. 



Salaries and wages, 
Provisions, 



Clothing, boots and shoes, 
Fuel and lights. 
Repairs and improvements, 
Dry goods, beds and bedding, 
Tools and utensils, . 



Stationery and office supplies, 
Water, .... 



Incidentals, 



Medical supplies, 

Industrial and evening schools, 



Individual per 
Diem. 



10.283 
.103 
.055 
.031 
.027 
.004 
.009 
.002 
.009 



031 



.003 
.017 



•0.574 



Grow. 



#100,991 56 

36,619 57 

19,498 63 

10,979 05 

9,614 88 

1,555 13 

3,314 68 

838 25 

3,300 00 

10,970 43 

1,140 00 

5,995 53 



$204,817 71 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



145 



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146 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Oct. 



Dr. 



Statement XXI. 
Massachusetts Reformatory Farm Account. 



Cr. 



To Inventory Sept. 30, 1895, 
hay and grain, . 



•win, 

tools and utensils, 
livestock. 



halincm (being profit of nrm), 



$27,381 80 

3,733 14 

80 00 

75 16 

945 34 

66 87 

842 00 

82 00 

74 76 

2,408 87 



$36,453 82 



By Inventory Sept. 30, IBM, 

milk rated. 

Eork raised, 
restock, 

produce (not oaed to feed stock), 



ff.Ul 60 

5,358 77 

1,780 21 

501 75 

881 40 



$35,463 82 



Officers of the Reformatory, their Positions and Salaries. 



NAMES. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



Position. 



A firms. I 
Salary. 



Total 



Joseph F. Scott, . 

Charles 8. Hart, . 

Percy W. Allen, . 

William J. Batt, . 

George E. Titeomb, 

Peter H. Bollock, . 

Robert W. Browning, 

Walter 8. Leland, . 

George V. Ball, 

W. Irving Park. . 

Prank H. Burrill, . 

Amos M. Elmes, . 

B. Frank Howe, . 

Benjamin F. Russell, 

John Bordman, 

John H. Lorlng, . 

Calvin 8. Robinson, 

William H. Wood, 
Kenneth T. MeKenzie, 

Daniel N. Barrett, 
William Chaplin, . 

John L. Brace, 
Wayne W. Blossom, 
Henry H. Qua, 
George W. Tonng, 
Fred W. Gale, 
James H. Sweet, . 
Forest E. Shapleigh, 
Daniel A. Lakln, . 
Jostah H. Chase, . 
Herbert L. Greene, 
Gay W. McAllister, 
Fredson P. Brooks, 
Elmer E. 8hattack, 
Frank H. Watson, 
George W. Bourne, 
John D. Wilson, . 
George F. Knowles, 
Alberto E. Payson, 
Herbert A. Blade, . 
William O. Cad well, 
8. Thompson Blood, 
Milo B. Stearns, . 
Edgar H. Hatch, . 
Frank W. Gale, . 
AloozoJoy, . 



J Jan. 20, 1892, 
Feb. 1, 1892, 
• Mar. 1,1892, ' 
May 18, 1885, ; 
Dee. 20, 1884, i 
Dee. 20, 1884, 
! Dee. 20, 1884. 
■ Dec. 20,1884, 
i Dee. 20,1884, 
Jan. 7, 1890, 
' Dee. 20, 1884, 
Dec 20, 1884, 
Dee. 20,1884, 
Dee. 20, 1884, 
Dec 20,1884, 
Dec. 20, 1884, i 
Dec 20, 1884, j 
Dec. 20,1884, 
Dec 20,1884, 
Dec. 26,1884, 
Feb. 1, 1885, 
1,1885, 
6,1885, 
30,1885. 
31, 1885, 
1,1885, 
3,1385, 



Superintendent, 

Deputy supt-, 

Clerk, 

Chaplain,. 

Physician, 

Engineer, 

Turnkey, . 

M 

Watchman, 

M 
fl 
•« 
«• 



i Feb. 
1 Mar. 
! Mar. 
, Mar. 

' May 
I June 



July 27, 1885, 
Oct. 31, 1885, 
! Jan. 1, 1886, 
I Mar. 7, 1886, 
. Jan. 22, 1887, 
I May 8, 1887, 
May 9, 18*7, 
! May 13,1887, 
• June 1, 1887, 
Sept. 22, 1887, 
Jan. 26,1888, 
1, 1888, 



< Oct. 
1 Oct. 
i Nov. 
• Jan. 
i Jan. 
i Mar. 

; Aug. 

■ Aug. 



8,1888. 
1, 1888, 
1, 1889, 
1,1889. 
1, 1889, 
1, 1889, 
6,1889, 



•< 

41 
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«• 

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2,000 
2,000 
2409 
1,000 
1,500 
14» 
1,209 
13» 
1,200 
1,200 
1390 
1,209 
1400 

1400 
1400 
1400 

1400 

1400 
1400 

1,200 
1400 
1400 

1400 
1400 
1400 
1400 
1.200 
1400 
1,200 
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1,200 
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1,200 
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1.200 
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2,000 00 

2,00000 

1,000 00 



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140000 

1400 00 
1400 00 
130000 
140000 
1400 00 
140000 
130000 
140900 

1400 00 
1300 00 

130000 
140000 
1300 00 
1400 00 
140000 
1400 00 

130000 
1400 00 
1400 00 
1400 00 
1400 00 
1400 00 

1,209 00 

140000 
1400 00 
1400 00 
1400 00 
1499 no 
1,200 00 
1400 00 
1400 00 
1400 00 
796 €7 
1499 00 
14» 00 

1400 00 

1409 00 
1409 00 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 



147 



Statement XXII— Concluded. 



' ~ 


Date of 




Annual 


Total 


NAMES. 


Appointment. 


Position. 


Salary. 


Payment. 


Charles T. Judge, 


Oct. 27,1890, 


Watchman, 


$1,200 00 


$1,200 00 


Wlllard A. Parsons, 






Nov. 3, 


, 1891, 


«• 




1,200 00 


1,200 00 


John V. Cbapraan, 






Sept. 1, 


, 1891, 


•< 




1,200 00 


1,200 00 


William A. Curley, 






Jan. 24, 


1894, 


•« 




1,200 00 


1,200 00 


George M. Bowker, 






May 1, 


,1890, 


<• 




1,200 00 


1,083 33 


Lawrence P. Fallon, 






May 4, 


,1896, 


** 




1,200 00 


490 00 


Franklin B. Emery, 






Aug. 10 


1892, 


«< 




1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Robert Neff 






April 30, 


1896, 


<< 




1,000 00 


1,000 00 


Thomas F. Shaughnesicy,* 






June 26 


, 1891, 


a 




1,000 00 


88 33 


Edward E. Lapham, . 






April 3, 


1893, 


M 




1,000 00 


898 89 


Walter A. Wright, 






July 1, 


,1893, 


if 




1,000 00 


976 12 


David L. Ball, 






July 4, 


,1893, 


M 




1,000 00 


848 34 


James R. Lawrence, . 






July 7, 


1893, 


<« 




1,000 00 


846 67 


Ellin J. 8. Miller, . 






July 11, 


,1893, 


• 1 




1,000 00 


844 46 


George F. Nason, . 






May 4 


,1896, 


•< 




1,000 00 


408 34 


Thomas R. Cook,f 






July 11 


,1893, 


«( 




800 00 


293 34 


Edwin G. Sexton,* 






April 16, 


,189ft, 


It 




800 00 


400 00 


Patrick Prendergast, 






April 24, 


,1895, 


fl 




800 00 


800 00 


Frederick W. Reed, . 






May 6 


,1896, 


<< 




800 00 


800 00 


John P. Allen, 






May 6 


, 1896, 


«« 




800 00 


800 00 


Wiener Park, 






April 13, 


, 1896, 


«< 




800 00 


378 38 


John Bowers, 






April 20 


,1896, 


<• 




800 00 


357 77 


Patrick Rowen, . 






April 22 


, 1896, 


U 


800 00 


863 38 



* Resigned. 



t Died. 



Statement XXIII. 
Massachusetts Reformatory Industries. 



Dr. 



Cane Chairmaking Department. 



Outstanding accounts, Sept. 30, 1896, 
Inventory, Sept. 30, 1895, . 

Paid for salaries, 

To balance (being profit of depart- 
ment,) 



$1,329 68 

1,250 97 

266 68 



5.305 71 



$8,153 04 



Receipts during the year, . 
Outstanding accounts, Sept. 30, 1896, 
Inventory, Sept. 30, 1896, . 



Cr. 



$3,329 68 
8,206 67 
1,616 69 



$8,158 04 



Rattan Chairmaking Department. 



Outstanding accounts, Sept. 30, 1895, 
Inventory, Sept. 80, 1895, . 

Paid for salaries, 

To balance (being profit of depart- 
ment), 



$8,208 89 

2,314 66 

266 64 



7.355 83 



$18,146 02 



Receipts during the year, . 
Outstanding accounts, Sept. 30, 1896, 
Inventory, Sept. 30, 1896, . 



$7,616 70 
7,003 08 
3,526 24 



$18,146 02 



Bush Chairmaking Department. 



Inventory, Sept. 30, 1895, . 
To balance (being profit of depart- 
ment), 



$186 45 

958 05 

$1,144 50 



Receipts during the year*, . 
Inventory, Sept. 30, 1896, . 
Outstanding accounts, Sept. 30, 1896, 



$699 30 

375 00 

70 20 

$1,144 50 



148 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Oct. 



Dr. 



Statement XXm — Concluded. 
Engraving Department. 



Cr. 



Outstanding accounts, Sept. 80, 1895, 
Inventory, Sept. 80, 1895, . 




Receipts during the year, . 
Outstanding account*, Sept. 80, 1896, 
Inventory, Sept. SO, 1896, . . . 
By balance (being deficit), . 



$109 40 

10 10 

480 77 

21 26 

$621 63 



Pearl Button Department. 



Outstanding; accounts, 8ept. 30, 1895, 
Inventory, Sept. 80, 1896, . 
Paid for tools and implements, . 
Paid for materials, 
Paid for salaries 



$1,468 92 

9,917 55 

18 62 

1,327 91 

392 01 



$18,125 01 



Receipts during the year, . 
Outstanding accounts, Sept. 30, 1896, 
Inventory, Sept. 30, 1896, . 
By balance (being deficit), . 



$6,927 13 
1,484 08 
2,510 25 
2,208 55 



$18,125 01 



Printing Department. 



Outstanding accounts, Sept. 30, 1895, 
Inventory, Sept. 30, 1895, . 
Paid for tools and implements, . 

Paid for materials 

To balance (being profit of depart- 
ment) 



$269 50 

2,278 17 

8 03 

644 26 

871 00 



$4,060 96 



Receipts during the year, . 
Outstanding accounts, Sept. 30, 1896, 
Inventory, Sept. 30, 1896, . 



$1,682 88 

340 86 

2,088 23 



$4,080 96 



Shoemaking Department. 



Outstanding accounts, Sept. 30, 1895, 
Inventory, Sept. 80, 1895, . 
Paid for tools and implements, . 

Paid for salaries, 

To balanoe (being profit of depart- 
ment), 



$2,957 67 

14,111 01 

4,550 18 

13,822 64 

18,582 40 



$48,978 80 



Receipts during the year, . 
Outstanding accounts, 8epU 80, 1896, 
Inventory, Sept. 30, 1896, • 



$88,809 19 

1,947 56 

13,217 05 



$48,978 80 



Summary of Industries. 



Outstanding accounts, Sept. 30, 1895, 
Inventory, Sept. 30, 1895, . 
Paid for tools and Implements, . 
Paid for materials, .... 

Paid for salaries, 

To balance (being profit of industries), 



$14,263 47 

80,646 48 

4,671 83 

1,972 17 

14,747 97 

25.798 18 


$92,000 05 



Receipts during year, .... 
Outstanding accounts, Sept. 80, 1896, 
Inventory, Sept. 80, 1896, • 



$64,123 7$ 
14,062 04 
28,814 23 



$92,000 06 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 149 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



Concord, Sept. 30, 1896. 
To the Commissioners of Prisons : 

I herewith respectfully present the twelfth annual report of the 
medical department of the Massachusetts Reformatory. 

Number of patients admitted to the hospital during the year, . . . 725 

Whole number of days 1 residence in the hospital, 6,747 

Average residence of each patient in the hospital, . . . 9$|§ days 

Largest number of patients in the hospital July 30, 1896, .... 48 

Smallest number of patients in the hospital Oct. 26, 1895, . 11 

Number of patients discharged from the hospital, 708 

Number of patients discharged from hospital cured, or able to work, 689 

Number of patients discharged from the hospital with " permit," 10 

Number of deaths, 6 

Number of insane transfers, 2 

Number transferred from the hospital to the State Farm, Bridgewater, . 1 

Number of patients in the hospital Sept. 30, 1896, 17 

Number applying to the physician for treatment outside the hospital, . 6,065 

Average daily application for treatment outside the hospital, . . 19-f- 

Number applying for treatment to the officer at dispensary, . . 3,393 

Average daily application, 10+ 

Number of days 1 labor excused, 316 

Number of prescriptions prepared for patients in the hospital, . 383 

Number of prescriptions prepared for patients outside the hospital, . 1,978 

Number of prescriptions renewed, 165 

Number of men vaccinated, 694 

Number of attendants in hospital, 3 

The following-named men were discharged from the hospital with 
"permit:" Charles McManus, 7426, rheumatism, April 9, 1896; 
Joseph Cote, 7165, rheumatism, April 13, 1896; John Noon, 5612, 
lacerated wound, May 2, 1896; George Miskell, 6979, phthisis, 
June 22, 1896; Arthur Dolby, 6571, epilepsy, June 26, 1896; 
Joseph McGourty, 7500, June 29, 1896 ; Thomas Lannigan, 6472, 
phthisis, July 20, 1896 ; James McCann, 7544, phthisis, Aug. 8, 
1896; Elissimus Morin, J595, phthisis, Sept. 11, 1896; Warren 
Ince, 6530, phthisis, Sept. 23, 1896. 

The following-named men were transferred to an insane asylum 
by order of His Excellency the Governor : Walter Crawford, 6674, 



150 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 



[Oct. 



Oct. 30, 1895 ; Paul Beack, 7876, May 2, 1896 ; and James Clinton, 

7981, was transferred to the State Farm at Bridgewater, Jane 13, 

1896. 

Deaths. 

John Kernell, 7998, mania a potu, cellulitis, May 13, 1896. 

John White, 7798, pneumonia. May 23, 1896. 

Edward Davis, 7696, pericarditis, Jane 8, 1896. 

Benjamin P. Collins, 8149, cerebral hemorrhage, July 13, 1896. 

James Doherty, 7190, phthisis, July 23, 1896. 

John B. Green, 8281, typhoid fever, Sept. 26, 1896. 

Diseases treated in the Hospital. 



Medical. 


Surgical — Con. 




Alcoholism, 3 


Bubo, 


1 


Bronchitis, acute, . 






1 


Bruise, 


5 


Conjunctivitis, acute 


» • • 




2 


Burn, 


1 


Cold, 






51 


Cellulitis, 


1 


Diarrhoea, 






79 


Circumcision, 


3 


Dyspepsia, acute, . 






9 


Erysipelas, 


3 


Eczema, . 






5 


Fall with injuries, . 


2 


Epilepsy, 






5 


Fistula in ano, . 


2 


Fever, typhoid, 






1 


Foreign body in eye, 


1 


Gastritis, acute, 






5 


Fracture, 


2 


Influenza, 






50 


Fracture, compound, 


1 


Insane, . 






2 


Fracture of radius, . 


4 


Jaundice, 






2 


Frozen toe, 


1 


Malingerer, . 






27 


Furuncle, 


7 


Malaria, . 






5 


Gonorrhoea, 


5 


Miscellaneous, 






89 


Hernia, 


a* 


Pericarditis, . 






2 


Ophthalmia, 


I 


Phthisis, . 






. 22 


Orchitis, 


2 


Pneumonia, 






■ 5 


Otorrhoea, 


3 


Rheumatism, acute, 






. 38 


Scald, ...... 


3 


Sunstroke, 






2 


Sprain, ...... 


. 25 


Tonsillitis, 






. 174 


Synovitis, . 


1 


Tape-worm, . 






1 


Syphilis, 


1 


Varicella, 






1 


Stricture of urethra. 


1 




Tubercular disease of ankle joint, 


1 


Surgical. 


Wound, contused, . 


1 


Abscess, 16 


Wound, lacerated, . 


. 16 


Abscess, alveolar, 






. 3 


Wound, incised, . 


4 


Abscess, axillary, 






. 1 


Wound, inflamed, . 


1 


Abscess, palmar, 






. 2 


Wound, punctured. 


5 


Abscess, tonsils, 






. 7 


Wound, septic, 


o 


Appendicitis, . 






. 4 


Ulceration of cornea, . 


. 3 


Balanitis, 






1 







1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



151 



Diseases treated Outside the Hospital. 



Medical. 

Diarrhoea, 
Eczema, . 
Herpes, facialis, 
Herpes, zoster, 
Pediculosis pubes, . 
Pericarditis, . 
Rheumatism, acute, 
Ulcer, 
Urticaria, 
Vaccinia, 



Surgical. 

Abscess, . 
Abscess, alveolar, . 
Abscess, anal, . 
Abscess, palmar, . 
Balanitis, 
Bruise, . 



88 
14 
4 
3 
21 
1 
6 
1 
1 
2 



10 
3 
1 
2 
1 
4 



Surgical — Con. 

Burn, 
Felon, 

Foreign body in eye, 
Furuncle, 
Gonorrhoea, . 
Hernia, . 
Scald, 
Syphilis, . 

Stricture of urethra, 
Teeth extracted, 
Warts, venereal, 
Wounds, contused, 
Wounds, incised, 
Wounds, lacerated, 
Wounds of cornea, 
Wounds, punctured, 
Wounds, scalp, 
Ulceration of cornea, 



5 
3 
5 

28 
5 
5 
1 

11 

6 

207 

6 

3 

20 

39 
1 
8 
1 
1 



I feel very much the need of a hospital, and will repeat in sub- 
stance what was said in my last year's report in regard to the matter. 
At present we use for a hospital a large room over the guard room. 
With the present or possible methods of ventilation, this room is too 
small for the population of this institution. The location is such 
that the foul air from the cell blocks gains admission to this room, 
and it is not possible to prevent this. The ventilation is carried on 
mainly by the opening of windows, a method totally inadequate. 
There are no accommodations for the isolation of contagious diseases, 
and the construction of the building is such that it is impossible to 
keep the room clean and avoid the lodgement of germs in the cracks 
and crevices. Medical and surgical cases are cared for together in 
this room, making it difficult to obtain the best results in surgery. 
Tuberculosis, a germ disease, which is most apt to affect individuals 
between the ages of fifteen and thirty years, is now known to be 
infectious ; and we are compelled under the present arrangement to 
care for these cases, of which we have at all times a number, in the 
same room with patients suffering from other diseases, who may be, 
through feebleness attendant upon sickness, more susceptible to 



152 MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. [Oct, 

germ diseases. There is no place about the institution for the 
proper care of erysipelas, of which we have many cases during the 
year. The germ of this disease is virulent, and has a serious influ- 
ence upon all surgical conditions. 

I would again recommend that there be built a hospital with 
wards, suitable for an institution of this size. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. TITCOMB, 

Physician. 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 153 



PARDONS FROM THE MASSACHUSETTS 

REFORMATORY. 



Four prisoners were pardoned from the Massachusetts Reforma- 
tory during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896 ; and the reasons for 
granting these pardons are set forth in the special messages of the 
governor, as follows : — 

William G. Bennett. Convicted of vagrancy, District Court, Northern 
Berkshire, Aug. 9, 1895. Sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory 
on an indeterminate sentence. Pardoned Feb. 1, 1896, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Commissioners of Prisons, who had carefully investigated 
the case, and learned that Bennett, who was a young man of good family 
in New York, was arrested while sleeping in a barn with some tramps. 
Being young, well dressed and without visible means of support, he was 
considered a vagrant and sent to the reformatory. As has since been 
learned, he was in no sense a vagrant. His sentence was thought to have 
been too severe. 

Charles J. Parslow. Convicted of manslaughter, Superior Court, 
Suffolk County, Oct. 23, 1895. Sentenced to the Massachusetts Reforma- 
tory on an indeterminate sentence. Pardoned Feb. 20, 1896. The district 
attorney and the Commissioners of Prisons were satisfied that the crime 
committed by Parslow was entirely accidental, and that he had been 
sufficiently punished for an act of criminal carelessness. 

George Fliege. Convicted of larceny, Municipal Court, Boston, Feb. 
11, 1896. Sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory on an indeter- 
minate sentence. Pardoned Feb. 20, 1896, upon the recommendation of 
the judge before whom the case was tried, who certified that, had all the 
facts regarding this case been known at the time of trial, he would have 
allowed him to go without sentence. Owing to a misunderstanding, the 



154 MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. [Oct. 

friends of the prisoner failed to appear at the trial, and consequently he 
was tried without counsel. The prisoner, who was but eighteen years of 
age, had always borne an unblemished reputation. 

Patrick Buckley. Convicted of drunkenness, Superior Court, Essex 
County, Oct. 26, 1895. Sentenced to the Massachusetts Reformatory on 
an indeterminate sentence. Pardoned March 26, 1896, upon the recom- 
mendation of the district attorney, the mayor and all the city officials of 
Beverly, to afford the prisoner an opportunity to take the Eeeley or gold- 
cure treatment for drunkenness. 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 155 



APPENDIX. 



The following is the opinion of the Attorney-General of the Com- 
monwealth pertaining to the authority of the Board of Health of the 
town of Concord over the premises of the Massachusetts Reform- 
atory : — 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Officb of the Attorney-General, Boston, Dec. 4, 1895. 

Joseph F. Scott, Esq., Superintendent Massachusetts Beformatory. 

Dear Sir : — The questions submitted in your letter of October 30 are 
important, and are by no means free from difficulty. They involve an 
inquiry into the extent of the jurisdiction of a local Board of Health over 
the property of the Commonwealth, and over its officers in their charge of 
such property. They are : — 

1. Has the Board of Health of the town of Concord authority to inspect 
the plumbing and drainage of that part of the Massachusetts Reformatory 
within the walls, or order changes therein ? 

2. Has the said Board authority to inspect the houses occupied by the 
superintendent and deputy superintendent upon the front of the said prison 
building, or to order changes therein ? 

3. Has the said Board authority to inspect the unattached tenements 
belonging to the said Reformatory and upon the land of the Commonwealth, 
and occupied by its officers, or to order changes therein ? 

4. Has the Board of Health authority to make regulations concerning 
the keeping of swine by the Massachusetts Reformatory, and, if so, do we 
come under the regulation prohibiting piggeries to be within six hundred 
feet of the highway ? 

5. Has the said Board of Health authority to order the discontinuance 
of the transportation of swill from the State Prison at Charlestown to the 
Reformatory piggeries? 

G. Has the town of Concord authority to demand that the dogs belong- 
ing to the Massachusetts Reformatory shall be licensed? 

The Reformatory at Concord was first established as a State Prison. By 
Resolves of 1872, ch. 39, the inspectors of the State Prison, which was 
then at Charlestown, were directed to report to the next Legislature, among 



156 MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. [Oct. 

other tilings , upon the expediency of building a new prison upon another 
site. The inspectors having reported that a new prison was expedient, an 
act was passed (Sts. 1873, ch. 155) authorizing the governor to appoint a 
board of commissioners, with full power to select a plan of a State Prison, 
to purchase an eligible site therefor within the limits of the Commonwealth, 
and to cause to be erected thereon a suitable prison, " together with such 
household accommodations for the warden and his family, and for sub- 
ordinate officers in attendance, as said Board may deem necessary." The 
commission entered upon its work, and, after much discussion and considers- 
tion of plans, selected the present site of the Reformatory at Concord, being 
a tract of more than one hundred acres, and proceeded to erect thereon a 
prison, with workshops, dwelling-houses for the officers, cook houses, 
a chapel and other buildings deemed necessary for the maintenance of a 
prison. Its plans and doings were reported to the Legislature (vid. Legis- 
lative Documents 1875, House No. 120, 1876, Senate No. 3, House No. 
70), and appropriations were made by the Legislature from time to time 
for the prosecution and completion of the work in accordance with those 
plans. 

By Sts. 1884, ch. 255, the State Prison, which had been established in 
the buildings built therefor at Concord, was ordered to be removed back 
to Charlestown ; and the governor was authorized to issue a proclamation 
"establishing the Massachusetts Reformatory in the buildings now owned 
by the Commonwealth in the town of Concord and occupied as the State 
Prison ; and said buildings and all land and buildings owned by the Com- 
monwealth in said town of Concord are hereby devoted to the use of said 
Reformatory." The Reformatory so established comprised, and still com- 
prises, buildings used as dormitories for the prisoners, other buildings for 
workshops, cook houses, farm buildings, dwelling-houses for the warden 
and for the other officers of the institution, and an extensive farm carried 
on as a part of the institution. Some of these buildings are enclosed by 
the prison wall, while others, particularly the officers' houses, are not so 
enclosed, but yet are on the land taken and held by the Commonwealth for 
prison purposes. In the construction of these buildings elaborate pro- 
visions were made for plumbing and other sanitary arrangements, all of 
which were duly reported to and approved by the governor and the Legis- 
lature. Whatever buildings or structures, therefore, exist upon the land 
owned by the Commonwealth in Concord are a part of the Reformatory, 
and may be considered to exist and to be established as such by authority 
of the Legislature. 

Sts. 1884, ch. 255, provide in section 28 that the Commissioners of 
Prisons " shall have the general supervision of said Reformatory, and 
shall make all necessary rules and regulations for the government and 
direction of the officers in the discharge of their duties, for the discipline 
of prisoners and custody and preservation of the property of said Reform- 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 157 

atory." Section 24 further provides that the superintendent shall have 
"the management and direction of the Reformatory under the rules and 
regulations of the same . . . and shall have the custody and control 
of the buildings and property of the Commonwealth connected therewith." 
Section 32 further provides that the prisoners confined in said reformatory 
44 may be employed in the custody of an officer on any land or buildings 
owned by the Commonwealth in the town of Concord." 

The first four questions contained in your letter raise the inquiry whether 
in any respect this institution, the general control and management of 
which is so vested in officers of the Commonwealth designated for that pur- 
pose, is in any way subject to the supervision and regulation of the Board 
of Health of the town of Concord. 

The town Board of Health derives its authority from the provisions of 
Pub. Sts., ch. 80. Under this statute it is authorized to " make such regu- 
lations as it judges necessary for the public health and safety, respecting 
nuisances, sources of filth and causes of sickness within its town " (section 
18) ; to " examine into all nuisances, sources of filth and causes of sickness 
within its town ... ; " and to u destroy, remove or prevent the same as 
the case may require " (section 20) ; to 4t order the owner or occupant, at 
his own expense, to remove any nuisance, source of filth or cause of sick- 
ness found on private property " (section 21 ) ; and if the owner or occupant 
fails to comply with the order relating thereto to "cause the nuisance, 
source of filth or cause of sickness to be removed ; " and to " collect the 
expense thereof from the owner or occupant or person who caused or per- 
mitted the same" (section 23). It is further authorized, " when satisfied 
upon due examination that a . . . building in its town occupied as a 
dwelling-place has become, by reason of the number of occupants, want of 
cleanliness or other cause, unfit for such purpose," to " issue a notice in 
writing to such occupants or any of them, requiring the premises to be put 
into a proper condition as to cleanliness ; or if they see fit requiring the 
inmates to quit the premises within such a time as the Board may deem 
reasonable" (section 24). Section 27 further provides that, when the 
Board thinks it necessary for the preservation of the lives or health of the 
inhabitants, it may enter any land, building, premises or vessel within 
the town for the purpose of examining into and destroying, removing or 
preventing a nuisance, source of filth or cause of sickness ; and when the 
Board or any agent thereof sent for the purpose is refused such entry, 
44 the Board may make complaint to a justice of the peace, who may issue 
a warrant directed to a constable commanding him to take sufficient aid 
and to repair to the place where the nuisance exists, and to destroy, 
remove or prevent the same under the direction of the Board." 

Sts. 1894, ch. 455, provide in section 7 that every town having a system 
of water supply or sewerage shall " by ordinance or by-law, within six 
months from the passage of this act, prescribe rules and regulations for 



158 MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. [Oct. 

the materials, construction, alteration and inspection of ail pipes, tankB, 
faucets, valves and other fixtures by and through which waste water or 
sewage is used and carried . . . But nothing in this section shall prevent 
boards of health from making snch rules and regulations in regard to 
plumbing and house drainage hitherto authorized by law, which are not 
inconsistent with any ordinance or by-law made under the authority of this 
section." 

The Board of Health of the town of Concord, in pursuance of the authority 
of the statutes above quoted, and perhaps of other statutes not quoted, has 
established certain regulations relating to disinfection, swine, swill, etc., 
and to the prevention and restriction of disease ; and also certain rales in 
relation to plumbing. These regulations and rules are minute and explicit 
in their character, providing for the manner of constructing privies, water- 
closets, privy vaults, sewers and cesspools ; and for the manner of keeping 
and removing swill and house offal, for the cleansing of cellars, for the 
keeping of swine, for the disinfection of houses in which contagious diseases 
break out, and for the construction of plumbing in dwelling-houses. No 
question is made that these regulations are lawful and within the authority 
conferred upon the Board. 

It is obvious that the enforcement of these rules would be in many 
respects inconsistent with the exclusive control and direction of the build- 
ings and property of the Reformatory, which by the statutes is vested in 
the officers established for that purpose. Some of them could not be en- 
forced except at the expense of prison discipline, while others would require 
the admission of persons not connected with the Reformatory within the 
walls of the institution without the authority, and even against the objec- 
tion, of the persons in charge. It is not difficult to come to the conclusion 
that, so far as concerns, for example, the inspection of the plumbing within 
the walls of the Reformatory where persons are confined under sentence of 
court, and in the exclusive control and care of the officers of the State, the 
regulations of the Board of Health cannot well be enforced, and must be 
held to be inapplicable. 

The same objection does not arise in the case of officers' dwellings, 
which are at some distance from the main prison and are not enclosed by 
its walls, nor perhaps even in the case of the warden's house, although, as 
I am informed, it is connected with the prison itself. I am told, also, that 
the swine are kept outside the prison. It would be practicable, and per- 
haps not necessarily inconsistent with the government of the convicts, for 
the Board to inspect and regulate the plumbing in those buildings. Nor 
would it be subversive of prison discipline if the rules of the Board with 
relation to the keeping of swine were enforced upon the grounds of the 
institution. But I am of opinion that it was not the intent of the Legis- 
lature to subject the conduct of the Reformatory, or the control and 
management of the property connected therewith, to the regulations or 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 159 

interference of any other tribunal or board than the officers constituted 
and designated therefor, to wit, the Commissioners of Prisons, and, under 
them the superintendent of the Reformatory. As was well stated by 
Birdseye, J., in People v. Roff, 3 Parker (N. Y.), Criminal Reports, 216, 
225 (a case involving the validity of the regulation of a town board of 
health over the property of the State), " the institution of the State, the 
object of its bounty and its constant legislative attention, presided over 
by officers carefully selected by the highest executive authority of the 
State, and who are vested with large powers, and set apart for the per- 
formance of highly important and delicate duties, permanent, comparatively 
speaking, in the tenure of their offices ... is to be preserved, to be 
kept in full vigor and efficiency ; it is not to be sacrificed to the local, lim- 
ited board of health of a town or village, whose members may change 
from year to year." 

This view derives some support from section 49 of the statutes (Pub. 
Sts. ch. 80), describing the duties of town boards of health. This section 
provides that " when a person confined in a common jail, house, of correc- 
tion or workhouse, has a disease which in the opinion of the physician of 
the Board ... is dangerous to the safety and health of other prisoners, 
or of the inhabitants of the town, the Board shall by its order in writing 
direct the removal of such persons to some hospital or other place of 
safety, there to be provided for and securely kept so as to prevent his 
escape until its further order." This provision would obviously be un- 
necessary if it were the intention of the Legislature that the jurisdiction 
of boards of health of towns should extend over State or county penal 
institutions situated within the limits of the town. 

The establishment of a town Board of Health, and the authority given to 
it to make regulations with regard to sanitary matters, is a delegation of 
the police power of the Commonwealth. Such a delegation is to be strictly 
construed. It is a well-recognized principle governing the interpretation 
of statutes delegating such authority, that boards of health are to be strictly 
confined to and by the statutory provisions of the acts by which they are 
created. (Spring w. Hyde Park, 137 Mass. 554; Rogers w. Barker, 31 
Barb. N.Y. 447; Wattuppa Reservoir Co. v. McKensie, 132 Mass. 71.) 
Nor can a local board under a general grant of authority adopt a by-law 
which is repugnant to the public policy of the State. (Dillon on Municipal 
Corporations, Vol. I., section 329, and cases cited.) It has been uniformly 
held, too, that a legislative grant of authority is made subject to certain 
implied reservations. For example, in the case of Beer Co. v. Massa- 
chusetts, 97 U.S. 25, a corporation was chartered by the State to manufac- 
ture and sell liquors. At a later date the Legislature passed a prohibitory 
liquor law. The court held that the charter was subject to the implied 
reservation of control under the police power of the State. So, too, when 
a general grant is given to a railway company to take land for the con- 



160 MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. [Oct. 

struction of its road, there is an implied exception that its rights shall not 
extend to the land of the State. It is a presumption of law that the Legis- 
lature in creating its laws has primarily in view the establishment of rules 
regulating the conduct and affairs of the citizen and not those of the 
sovereign. (Endlich on the Interpretation of Statutes, sec. 167.) 

The fountain of the police power of the Commonwealth is the Legislature, 
acting under the authority of the constitution. The Legislature has seen 
fit to delegate a portion of this police power to local boards of health. 
Although this delegation is absolute in terms, it is not to be construed as 
exclusive of the authority of the Commonwealth, or as against its public 
policy. It would certainly be against public policy to hold that a local and 
transient board should have greater authority over the property of the 
Commonwealth, cared for and controlled by the officers of the Common- 
wealth, acting under direct authority of the Legislature, than those officers 
themselves. It is much more consistent to assume that in the delegation 
of police power to boards of health there is an implied reservation as to the 
property of the Commonwealth which is specifically and fully provided for 
by legislation, and the care and control of which is committed to boards 
and officers established for that purpose and acting under the direction and 
authority of the Legislature. Any other position is inconsistent with the 
sovereignty of the Commonwealth. It follows, therefore, that, although 
the delegation of authority to local boards of health is general in its terms, 
and purports to embrace all persons and property within the limits of the 
town, there is an implied exception of such property as is cared for and 
controlled by the Commonwealth itself, and under its special and peculiar 
jurisdiction. 

I am of opinion, therefore, that your first three questions relating to the 
authority of the Board of Health of the town of Concord to inspect and 
order changes in the plumbing and drainage (1) of that part of the Re- 
formatory within the walls, (2) of the superintendent's house, (3) of the 
unattached tenements belonging to the Reformatory and on the land of 
the Commonwealth and occupied by its officers, must be answered in the 
negative. 

The same considerations, in my opinion, apply to the keeping of swine 
within the limits of the property of the Commonwealth occupied by it for 
the purposes of the Reformatory. It is unnecessary to decide whether the 
penal statutes of the Commonwealth, or even such provisions of the com- 
mon law as have the force of penal statutes, are in all cases applicable to 
the officers of the Commonwealth. Many of them, obviously, are bo ap- 
plicable. An officer of the Commonwealth, even under the direction of 
the superintendent or the Commissioners of Prisons, may not commit 
felony or any other grave crime or misdemeanor. On the other hand, 
statutes relating to hours of labor and to fire-escapes, and even the ordinary 
rules of law relating to assault, are inapplicable to the conduct of the Re- 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 161 

formatory. It may be a question whether, if the officers of the Reformatory 
permitted a preventable nuisance to exist upon the land of the Common- 
wealth, such, for example, as a decaying heap of vegetable matter, a filthy 
and offensive piggery, or other source of pollution of the health of the 
neighborhood, they could not be indicted and punished for maintaining a 
nuisance. It is not to be presumed that the officers of the Commonwealth 
will direct or authorize acts which are in violation of the rights of the com- 
munity ; and if such acts occur, it may well be that the court would hold 
them to be unauthorized ; or, if authorized, that the persons in charge ex- 
ceeded their own authority. So, if the keeping of swine should become, 
in fact, a nuisance to the extent that people residing in the neighborhood 
were endangered in their health, it may be that the persons in charge or 
responsible for such keeping would be liable to be indicted therefor as for 
a nuisance. 

But this is a very different question from that which involves the right 
of the local Board of Health to prescribe an arbitrary distance from the 
highway within the limits of which swine shall not be kept. That is a 
local police regulation in which a limit is fixed for convenience, and under 
which the question of the actual nuisance does not arise. An offensive 
and unhealthy pigsty more than six hundred feet from the highway could 
not be complained of under such a rule, while, on the other hand, one that 
was clean and in fact inoffensive, would still be unlawful within that limit. 
Even if the officers are liable for maintaining what is in fact a nuisance, it 
by no means follows that they are subject to the regulations of the Board 
of Health, with respect to the place where swine shall be kept, or that, in 
order to keep them, they shall be required to obtain a license from the 
Board. I assume that the keeping of swine is an incident of the business 
of carrying on the Reformatory, an institution which involves manufactur- 
ing, farming and other industries, carried on under the exclusive jurisdic- 
tion of the State. For the reasons above stated with reference to the 
plumbing, I am of opinion that the rule of the Board of Health which 
prohibits the keeping of swine within six hundred feet of the highway does 
not apply to the land of the Commonwealth which comprises the Reform- 
atory. 

Question 5, relating to the right of transfer of swill through the public 
streets, stands upon a different principle. There is no exclusive authority 
over the streets of Concord conferred upon the prison officers. When they 
leave the property set apart for the uses of the Commonwealth and travel 
upon the public streets they should be, and in my opinion are, subject to 
all reasonable regulations and laws, whether of the Commonwealth or of 
the town or its officers, in regard to the use of such streets. And, if swill 
is carried by the officers of the Commonwealth through the streets of Con- 
cord in violation of the regulations of the Board of Health, I think the 
persons so offending may be prosecuted and convicted and that they cannot 



162 MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. [Oct. '96. 

plead in justification any authority or direction of the officers of the 
institution. 

The statutes of the Commonwealth (Pub. Sts., ch. 102) provide for the 
registration, numbering, describing and licensing of dogs. This is a police 
regulation, made for the protection of the community. The license fee is 
not a tax. It is not authorized or designed for a revenue, general or local, 
but is in the nature of a license under a special police regulation, and is 
an exercise of the police power rather than the power to levy exercises. 
(Desty on Taxation, 1404; Blair v. Forehand, 100 Mass. 136, 142, 143.) 
The object of the law may be said to be the identification and regulation 
of dogs running at large. There is, it is true, no exemption in the statutes 
of dogs which are not allowed to run at large, and it may well be that the 
Legislature contemplated the possibility that dogs, which, although not 
beasts feres natures, are yet less under subjection than neat cattle and 
other like domestic animals, would run at large. I see no reason why dogs 
kept by the officers of the Commonwealth, even though they be the prop- 
erty of the Commonwealth, should not be registered, described and licensed ; 
and, inasmuch as the fee is not in the nature of a tax, but for the registra- 
tion and license, it should be paid as well in the case of dogs kept by 
officers of the Commonwealth, or owned by the Commonwealth, as in the 
case of other dogs. It would destroy the purpose of the law if any dogs 
were allowed to go at large unlicensed, and without the provision for 
identification prescribed in the statutes relating to the licensing of dogs. 
The Commonwealth, of course, may not be prosecuted for the keeping of 
an unlicensed dog ; but whoever, whether a State officer or other person, 
keeps a dog, in my opinion, must have him licensed and pay the fee there- 
for, and is subject to the penalties of the statutes for failure so to do. 

Yours very truly, 

HOSEA M. KNOWLTON, 

Attorney- General. 



Report Concerning the Jails 
and Hotises of Correction. 



Statistics Relating to all Prisons, to 
Arrests, to Probation, etc. 



Tabular Statements from Returns of Criminal 

Prosecutions. 



Recommendations and Suggestions. 



EEPORTS ON JAILS AND HOUSES OF COR- 
RECTION, ETC. 



Boston, Oct. 1, 1896. 

To the Honorable Senate and the House of Representatives in General Court 

assembled : 

The preceding parts of this report" refer to the State Prison and 
reformatories, and in the pages immediately following there are 
reports on all the jails and houses of correction. Each county has 
at least one jail, and, excepting Dukes County, at least one house 
of correction. Until the present year there has been only one house 
of correction in Suffolk, but by chapter 536 of the Acts of 1896 
the Boston House of Industry was made the House of Correction at 
Deer Island. 

There are now 22 county prisons, comprising five separate jails, 
three separate houses of correction, and fourteen other institutions 
where the jail and house of correction are combined under one 
management. As a rule, all sentenced prisoners who do not go to 
the State institutions are committed to the houses of correction, and 
the jails are used mainly for the detention of witnesses and of per- 
sons awaiting trial. Generally the sheriff acts as jailer, but he has 
authority under the statutes to appoint a keeper of the jail. He 
has like authority as to a master of the house of correction in every 
county but Suffolk ; in this county the master is designated by the 
institutions commissioner, who is appointed by the mayor of the city 
of Boston. 

Following the special reports on the county prisons there will be 
found general statistics relating to all the prisons above named, 
together with the State Farm at Bridgewater. The last-named in- 
stitution is not under the supervision of the commissioners, but is 
included for the purpose of making the statistics complete. 

The statistics of arrests, the tables relating to probation, and 
the tabular statements of criminal prosecutions are presented in the 
same order as for several years past. 



166 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 



THE COUNTY PRISONS. 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 

Jail ant> House of Correction in Barnstable. 

Master and keeper, George H. Cash ; salary, $350 00 

(With board and use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 14 

House of 
Jail. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, .... 23 17 

40 

Total within the year, 64 

Discharged, 27 10 

Died, - 1 

Pardoned, *1 - 

89 

Number in custody Sept. 80, 1896, ....". 15 



Expenditures. 

For salaries, $570 00 

other expenses, 2,189 91 

$2,759 91 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, - 

other sources, $532 61 

Balance, 2,227 30 

$2,759 91 

Average number of prisoners, 12. Net cost per capita, f 185.60. 
Number of volumes in library, 90. 

• Pardoned by the President. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 



167 



There were 15 prisoners in custody on Sept. 30, 1896, being one 
more than in 1895. The average number for the year, however, was 
only 12, whereas in the preceding year it was 16. 

In consequence of the reduced number of prisoners the cost per 
capita is a little more than last year although the balance against 
the prison is a trifle smaller. There are no receipts from the labor 
of prisoners as no work is provided here except such as is to be 
found in caring for the building and grounds. The only income is 
derived from the sums paid for the support of prisoners by the 
United States Court which together with a few small, items make up 
the amount named in the statement. In former years quite a num- 
ber of United States prisoners have been received here, but the 
master's return does not show that any such commitments have been 
made this year. 

The master reports that there has been a new system of sewerage 
introduced here in connection with the county court house at an 
expense of about $5,000. He cannot state the amount expended 
for the prison, as this sum includes the cost of plumbing in the court 
house as well as in the jail buildings. 

The offences and sentences of all the convicted prisoners com- 
mitted to this jail and house of correction during the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1896, are shown in the following table : — 









Sentences. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

• 

o 
O 

•o 

s 

© 

a 

6 


Less than 6 
Months. 


6 and Leas than 
IS Months. 


8 Teara and 
leas than S. 


9 Tears and 
More. 


i 

i 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Breaking and entering, . 
Common night-walker, 
Disturbing the peace, 

Larceny, . 
Liquor laws, violating, 
Neglect of family, . 
Rape, . • ■ • 






1 
1 

1 

i 




3 

i - 
1 

5 


i 

i 
I 

-1 

~ i 
- 1 

i 

i 


2 

3 


1 
1 


1 

1 

i 

i 2 




2 


i 

- i 

i 


1 
1 

2 
1 
6 
1 
1 
8 
1 


1 


1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
6 
1 
1 
8 
1 


Total 


6 i - , 


2 


- | 17 


1 


18 



168 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 

Jail ajcd House of Correction in Pittsfield. 

Master and keeper, Charles W. Fuller, Sheriff ; salary, . $1,000 00 

(With use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 104 

House of 
Jail. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, .... 144 429 

573 

Total within the year, 677 

Discharged, 142 416 

Removed to lunatic hospital, 1 1 

660 

Number in custody Sept. 80, 1896 117 



Expenditures. 

For salaries, f 5,058 30 

other expenses, 12,997 29 

$18,050 59 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, - 

other sources, $288 32 

Balance, 17,762 27 

$18,050 59 

Average number of prisoners, 84. Net cost per capita, $211.46. 
Number of volumes in library, 538. 

In January last there was a change in the management of this 
prison, owing to the election of a new sheriff* 

The number of commitments to this jail and house of correction 
for the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, was very large, and the number 
remaining in custody was higher than in the preceding year. The 
length of the sentences was about the same as usual, and the average 
was therefore brought up to 84, -r- ten more than in 1895. 

The last Legislature passed an act providing as follows: "The 
county commissioners of the county of Berkshire are hereby re- 
quired to provide shower baths for the prisoners in the jail of said 
county. The expense incurred for said purpose shall not exceed 
one thousand dollars, and the whole or a part of the necessary sum 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



169 



may be borrowed by said commissioners on the credit of said county. 
Said commissioners may use the labor of the prisoners in said jail 
in making said improvement, and the work shall be completed before 
the first day of January in the year eighteen hundred and ninety- 
seven." In compliance with this act, baths have been provided in 
both the men's and women's departments. A fence or wall is much 
needed for the discipline and good government of this prison ; and 
it is recommended that an act similar to the above be passed, to 
compel the county commissioners to provide a suitable enclosure. 

The offences and sentences of all the convicted prisoners who 
came directly from the courts during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, 
are set forth in the following table : — 





Sentences. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

• 

8 

s 

« 
a 


Less than 6 
Months. 


6 and Less than 
IS Months. 


1 Year and Less 
than 8. 


8 Years and 
Less than 8. 


8 Years and 
Less than 3. 


S Years and 
More. 


i 

*» 

OS 

to 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


i 
F. 


M. 


F.j 


M. 


F. 


M. 


p. 


M. 


»■! 


M. 


F. 1 Tot. 

1 


Assault, 

Assault to ravish, . 

Common beggar, . 

Cruelty to animals, 
Disorderly house, keeping, . 
Disturbing the peace, . 

Drunkenness,. 
Bmbezzlement, . . 

Fornication, .... 

Fraud, 

Indecent exposure, 

Larceny, 

Lewd cohabitation, 
Lewdness, .... 
Liquor laws, violating, . 
Lord's Day, violating, . 
Malicious mischief, 
Neglect of family, . 

Physician, unregistered, 
Profanity, .... 
Receiving stolen goods, . 
Rescue, ..... 
Stopping railroad train, 

U.S. mal 1, obstructing, . 
Unlawful taking, • 

Walking on railroad, . 


7 

2 

1 

19 

161 
1 

1 

6 

1 
1 

1 

4 
218 


1 
1 


24 

6 

1 

2 

17 

108 

2 
28 

2 

1 


1 

" 1 

- I 

l\ 
il 

_ i 
i 

-1 

_ i 

i 

- 1 
-1 


3 
8 

1 

3 

1 
6 

1 

22 


1 
1 

1 


8 

6 

1 
10 


i 
3 

- 1 

"I 

-1 

i 
1 
1 
I 
I 

i 

4 i 


1 

1 - 
2 




i 


"-" 


1 

1 - 

i 1 


i 


7 

34 
1 
1 
1 
7 
2 
8 
3 
36 

272 
40 

1 

13 

4 

462 


8 

1 
2 

1 

1 

8 


10 

84 
1 
1 
1 
7 
2 
8 
4 

86 
1 
274 
2 
4 
1 
2 
2 
1 

40 
2 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
7 
1 
1 

18 
4 


Total 


213 

1 


2 ! 


470 



170 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 

Jail and House op Correction in New Bedford. 

Master and keeper, Josiah A. Hunt ; salary, 12,000 00 

(With use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 251 

HOQMOf 

Jail. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, . .251 1,734 

Removed from other prisons, .... 20 3 

2,008 

Total within the year, 2,259 

Discharged, 232 1,689 

Removed to other prisons, 30 17 

Died, - 2 

Pardoned, - 3 

Sentence vacated, - 1 

1,974 

Number in custody Sept. 80, 1896, 285 

Expenditures. 

For salaries |18,469 24 

other expenses, 26,328 14 

144,797 38 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, 1640 80 

other sources, 281 63 

Balance, 43,874 95 

$44,797 38 

Average number of prisoners, 317. Net cost per capita, f 138.41. 
Number of volumes in library, 250. 

The number of commitments to this jail and house of correction 
was about 400 greater than in the preceding year. The number in 
custody at the close of the year and the average number were also 
higher. 

The new boiler room and certain other improvements mentioned 
in the last report have added to the efficiency and economy of ad- 
ministration. During this year there have been quite large expendi- 
tures for repairs 9 such as a new brick floor in the cook house, and 
bath tub and plumbing in the keeper's dwelling ; the balance against 
the prison is therefore larger. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



171 



It would not be proper to present a report upon the condition of 
this institution without again calling attention to needed changes in 
the women's department. It has been urged that the buildings 
could not be conveniently enlarged without great expense. If such 
changes here are thought to be impracticable, there is no reason why 
a larger institution could not be built at Taunton, where there is 
plenty of room. 

The offences and sentences of the convicted prisoners committed 
by the courts during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, are set out 
below : — 





Sbntbhcbs. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

a 

s 

Q 

s 

« 
a 

£ 


• 

3 • 
.§ 


h 

a flt 

3 * 

• 


3 

Sot 

- s 


a 

3 ft 


I?* 

1 ft 


s 

J* 

* 

10 


• 

J 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


1 

Bu. • Jj • 

1 1 


M. 


F. 


M. F. 

i 


1 

M.JF. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Adultery 

Assault, .... 

Assault, felonious, . 

Assault to kill, . 

Assault to rape, 

Breaking and entering, . 

City ordinance or town by- 
laws, violating, 

Common brawler, . 

Common night- walker, . 

Contempt of court, . 

Defranaing a boarding- 
house keeper, 

Disorderly house, keeping, 

Disturbing meeting, . 

Disturbing the peace, 

Drunkenness, . 

Embezzlement, . 

Escape, .... 

Fish laws, violating, 

Fornication, . . 

Fraud, .... 

House of ill-fame, keeping, 

Idle and disorderly, . 

Indecent exposure, . 

Larceny, .... 

Lewd cohabitation, . 

Lewdness, .... 

Liquor laws, violating, . 

Lord's Day, violating, 

Malicious mischief, . 

Manslaughter, . . 

Neglect of family, . 

Non-payment of taxes, . 

Rape, 

Stubbornness, . 
Threats, .... 
Unlawful taking, 


78 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
1 
138 
476 
2 
1 
2 
4 

1 
43 

1 
6 
1 
9 

7 
37 

1 
1 


6 
1 

1 

80 

47 

4 

8 1 
8 1 
1 

2 
102 


i 

37 

18 
404 

2 

- 
1 

I 

42 
- 

10 
11 

4 

22 

3 

16 


2 
1 

- 1 

- 1 

! 
1 

7 , 
104 

-, 

1 

4 
1 
12 
4 i 

" l 

" 1 
1 

i i 
1 3' 


24 

4 

1 

2 

1 

50 

1 

2 

2 

31 

1 
3 

3 
2 
3 

2 


1 

1 
4 

2 

13 

-1 

i 

1 ' 
6 

2 ! 

1 1 
2, 

I 

1 

t 

I 


2 

10 

2 

7 

3 
1 

1 

1 

8 
1 


1 

-1 

i 

2 
1 

1 i 

1 ' 

-1 
i 

- 1 


1 
1 

4 

1- 
1 - 

1 

1* 
1- 

i " 

1- 


1 

t 

i 
- 1 

i 

i 
" l 


1 
2 

1 
8 


.1 

1 
. 1 

— 
i 
i 

- 1 


i 

I" 
i „ 

1 
2 


-1 
i 

_ i 
-1 
" i 

1 "* 


4 
149 
9 
1 
1 
15 

1 

2 

1 

9 

1 

157 

931 

3 

3 

2 

4 

2 

1 

9 

8 

129 

1 

12 

20 

I 

16 

3 

32 

87 

2 

1 

2 

1 

8 

1 

1 

18 


8 
7 
1 

1 

1 
6 

8 

37 
165 

4 

2 
14 

15 
2 

14 
6 

2 

1 

3 
292 


7 
156 

10 
1 
1 

16 

1 
1 
6 
2 

1 

17 

1 

194 

1,096 

3 

3 

2 

8 

2 

3 

28 

8 

144 

8 

26 

26 

1 

18 

8 

82 

87 

2 

1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

1 

21 


Total, .' 


816 


686 140 | 


Il32 
1 


"i 


'37 

1 


6 


12 

1 


I 1 


1,693 


1,885 



172 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 

Jail in Taunton. 

Keeper, Edwin H. Evans, Sheriff ; salary, {800 00 

(With board and use of house.) 
Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 74 

Jail. 

Committed by courts during year, 546 

Removed from other prisons, 46 

Returned from escape, 1 

593 

Total within the year, 667 

Discharged, 573 

Removed to other prisons, 21 N 

Writ of habeas corpus, 2 

Escaped, 1 

596 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 71 

Expenditures. 

For salaries, $4,451 00 

other expenses, 5 f 477 34 

$9,9*8 34 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, « 

other sources, |268 81 

Balance, 9,664 58 

*9,928 34 

Average number of prisoners, 51 . Net cost per capita, 1189.50. 
Number of volumes in library, 145. 

Owing to the election of a new sheriff, there has been a change in 
the management of this jail since the last report. 

There were only a few more commitments than last year, and the 
number in custody on September 30 was 3 less ; the average, how- 
ever, was 1 more. 

The amount paid for salaries is about the same ; the other expenses 
show a slight increase, due to a considerable expenditure for repairs. 
The repairs consisted of the construction, at the rear of the cell 
block, of a brick building 20 feet long, 10 feet wide and 12 feet 
high, to be used as a bucket room. This is a good institution, but 
a small one. There is land enough, however, to permit of any en- 
largement that might be needed to carry out the suggestion made in 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No, 13. 



173 



the report on the New Bedford House of Correction in reference to 
the imprisonment of women in this county. 

The statement on the preceding page gives nearly 600 as the 
number of prisoners received here. Only 373 of them, however, 
were under sentence; the rest were held for trial or detained as 
witnesses. 

The offences and sentences of the convicted prisoners received 
during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, are set out in the table 
below : — 



OFFENCES. 



Adultery, ...... 

Assault, 

Assault, felonious, . 
Breaking and entering, . . . 
Common night-walker, . . 

Cruelty to animals, . 

Defrauding a boarding-house keeper, 
Disorderly house, keeping, . 
Disturbing the peace, . 

Drunkenness, 

Embezzlement, 

Fornication, 

Fraud, 

Idle and disorderly, .... 

Indecent exposure, . . . . 

Larceny, ...... 

Lewd cohabitation, . 

Lewdness 

Liquor laws, violating, 
Malicious mischief, .... 
Neglect of family, .... 
School laws, violating, .... 

Unlawful taking, 

Total, 



o 
O 

1 

e 
a 



M. 



F. 



1 
17 



2 
1 

32 
161 



1 
1 



4 
6 



2 

1 

2 
1 

1 
5 
1 
2 
1 
2 



234 



18 



Sentences. 



c 

si 



ii. 



8 



3 

81 

1 



3 



4 

1 
2 



F. 



106 12 






5 

a 
o 

Is 



3 



M. 



1 

1 



3 



1 
26 



2 

1 

36 
243 
1 
2 
1 
8 
2 
6 
1 
3 
6 
1 
6 
1 
2 



346 



i 



F. 



1 
1 



1 

4 
18 



28 



Tot. 



1 

27 

1 

2 

1 
2 
1 
1 

40 
259 
1 
4 
1 
4 
2 
8 
1 
4 
6 
1 
6 
1 
2 



373 



174 COUNTY PRISONS- [Oct. 



DUKES COUNTY. 

Jail m Edgartown. 

Keeper, Hiram Crowell ; salary, $200 00 

(With 08* of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 2 

Jail, 

Committed by courts during year, 11 

— 11 

Total within the year, 13 

Discharged, 11 

— 11 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 2 



Expenditures. 

For salaries, $200 00 

other expenses, 347 10 

$547 10 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, 

other sources, - 

Balance, $547 10 

$547 10 

Average number of prisoners, 2. Net cost per capita, $273.55. 

This is one of the five separate jails, and is the smallest in the 
Commonwealth. Only It persons were committed here during the 
year, and but 2 remained in custody on September 30. The expendi- 
ture for salaries is the same as it has been for many years past, and 
the other expenses show a slight decrease, as compared with last year. 
There has also been paid for the support of prisoners convicted in 
this county and sentenced to the New Bedford House of Correction 
the sum of $305.14. 

The secretary visited this prison in August, and found it in its 
usual good condition. It is clean and well kept. Two prisoners 
were then in custody. Three sentenced prisoners were received in 
the year; one was convicted of assault and battery and given a 
sentence of 90 days, and two convicted of drunkenness were com- 
mitted for non-payment of fines. 



1896,] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 175 



NANTUCKET COUNTY.* 

Jail and House of Correction in Nantucket. 

Master and keeper, Frederick F. Parker ; salary, .... f 60 00 

(With use of house.) 
Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 2 

Honte of 
Jail. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, .... 4 5 

— — 9 

Total within the year, 11 

Discharged, 6 6 

— — 11 

Number in custody Sept. 80, 1896, 

Expenditures. 
For salaries, $50 00 

other expenses, 208 43 

$268 43 

Receipts. 
From labor of prisoners, - 

other sources, - 

Balance, f 258 43 

$258 43 

Average number of prisoners, 1. Net cost per capita, $258.43. 

The above statement shows the usual expenditure for salaries, but 
a considerable increase in the other expenses. No more prisoners 
were received than last year, and none remained in custody on Sep- 
tember 30. The county treasurer does not report any expense of 
supporting prisoners convicted in this county and sentenced to im- 
prisonment in another county, and it is therefore presumed that 
those named in this report last year have been released. 

Since the last report this jail and house of correction has been 
visited by the secretary, but he found no change in the conditions 
to which reference has been made from year to year. It is not suit- 
able in its construction for a prison, nor is it kept in a way that 
would be tolerated if any considerable number of inmates should be 
imprisoned in it. In any event, no more money should be wasted 
upon the old jail. If it is to be kept as a curiosity, it can serve that 
purpose without additional expense. A brick jail large enough to 
answer all the purposes of a local prison here would cost very little. 

Only 3 sentenced prisoners were received, — 1 woman and 2 men. 
They were all committed for drunkenness, one of the men for 30 
days and both the other prisoners for 90 days. 

* For the purpose of keeping the reports of each of the larger prisons upon opposite pages, 
Nantucket is presented out of alphabetical order. 



176 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 



ESSEX COUNTY. 

House of Correction in Ipswich. 

Master, Charles W. Morrill ; salary, $1,200 00 

(With use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 119 

House of 
Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, 176 

Removed from other prisons, 307 

Returned by revocation of permit, 1 

484 

Total within the year, 603 

Discharged, 463 

Removed to other prisons, 14 

Escaped, 2 

479 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 124 

Expenditures. 

For salaries, |7,321 57 

other expenses, . 10,130 70 

$17,452 27 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, $2,401 60 

other sources, 479 97 

Balance, 14,570 70 

$17,452 27 

Average number of prisoners, 1 14. Net cost per capita, $127.81. 
Number of volumes in library, 200. 

This is the oldest house of correction in the State, and is one 
of the three where no jail is connected ; it therefore receives only 
sentenced prisoners, either directly from the courts or by transfer 
from other institutions* An unusually large number were committed 
this year, but the number in custody on September 30 was only 5 
more than on the preceding year, and the average number was 2 less. 

No extraordinary repairs and improvements have been made here 
for a long time, and, in fact, it would be money wasted to expend 
anything for changes in the old buildings. The cells are small and 
poorly ventilated ; it is therefore difficult to keep them in good con- 
dition with the class of prisoners who are sent here. The master, 
however, does everything in his power to .keep the place in a satis- 
factory state ; and he maintains good order at all times. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 



177 



One hundred and seventy-six prisoners were received directly 
from the courts ; some of these were given more than one sentence, 
and this will account for the discrepancy between the number com- 
mitted by the courts, as given on the preceding page, and the total 
number of sentences in the following table, which gives the offences 
and sentences of all the convicted prisoners committed by the courts 
during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896 : — 







8KNTKNCB8. 


OFFENCES. 


Fine and Costs. 


Less than 6 
Months. 


6 and Less than 
18 Moi.ths. 


• 

•9 

es S| | 
S a ; 

£- 1 

"l ~' [ 

Aft. 1 iv. 


8 Years and 
Less than 8. 


5 Tears and 
More. 


i 

& 

9 

60 
M) 

< 




M. 


P. 


M. 


F. 


i 
iM. 

t 

1 


p. 


>M. 


F. 


M. 


i 

F.| 

i 


M. 

8 
12 
1 
1 
1 

10 
2 
1 
1 

8 
115 
1 
1 
8 
1 

17 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
100 


F. 


Tot. 


Assault, .... 

Assault to rape, 
Breaking and entering, . 

Breaking and entering 

larceny. 
Breaking; and entering 

road ear. 
Burglar's tools, having, . 

Burning a building, . 

Common night-walker, , 

Disturbing the peaoe, 

Drunkenness, . 

Smbezzlement, 

Idle and disorderly, 
Indeeent exposure, . 
Larceny, . 
Liquor laws, violating. 
Malicious mischief, . 
Manslaughter, . 
Receiving stolen goods, 
Bobbery, .... 
Tramps, . . 
Vagabonds, 


e 

• 
• 

and 
rail- 


5 

5 
66 

8 
1 
1 

1 


- 


5 
1 

8 

41 
1 

2 



1 

1 
60 


1 

4 

6 


! » 

i 
i 

7 

1 

i 

i J 
i 18 


1 
1 


1 
6 

1 
8 

18 




8 

1 

7 


- 


1 
1 


i 
i 


1 
1 

1 

4 

7 


4 

18 
1 
1 
1 

10 
2 
1 
1 
1 
8 

no 

1 
1 
8 
1 

17 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 


Total, . 


82 


- 


107 



178 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

Jail and House of Correction in Lawrence. 

Master and keeper, Horatio G. Herrick ; salary, .... f 1,300 00 

(With use of house.) 
Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 212 

HODMOf 

Jail. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, .... 245 1,064 

Removed from other prisons, 58 9 

Returned by revocation of permit, .... - 3 

from escape, ....... 2 

1,381 

Total within the year 1,593 

Discharged, 293 978 

Removed to other prisons, 39 94 

Writ of habeas corpus, .... . - 1 

Died, - 2 

Pardoned, - 1 

Escaped, - 4 

1,412 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 181 

Expenditures. 

For salaries, f 5,545 74 

other expenses, 16,172 28 

|2i,718 02 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, $5,121 89 

other sources, 223 55 

Balance, 16,372 58 

$21,718 02 

Average number of prisoners, 199. Net cost per capita, $82.27. 

Number of volumes in library, 500. 

A few more prisoners were committed to the jail than last year, 
but about 200 less to the house of correction. The aggregate, 
therefore, shows a large falling off, and the number in custody on 
September 30 was 31 less. The expenditure for salaries was about 
the same, but less was paid out for other expenses ; and, although 
the receipts for labor show a decrease, the balance against the prison 
is not as large as in 1895. 

Some changes in the buildings here have been under considera- 
tion, but nothing has yet been done in the matter. It is desirable, 
however, that some rearrangement of this prison should be made if 
men and women both are to be kept in it. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 



179 



The following table shows the offences and sentences of all the 
convicted prisoners received directly from the courts during the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1896 : — 





Sentences. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

• 

6 

•B 

s 

a 
S 




Less than 6 
Months. 


6 and Less than 
18 Months. 


• 

• 

o 
i-3 

s« 

* 9 

1 * 


8 Years and 
Less than 8. 


• 

& 

i 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

! , 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Assault, felonious, .... 

Bastardy, ...... 

Breaking and entering, 

Breaking and entering and larceny, . 

Burning a building 

Oity ordinance or town by-laws, rio- 

Concealing death of child, . 
Conspiracy 

Disorderly bouse, keeping, 
Disturbing the peace, .... 

Fraud, ....... 

Gaming laws, violating, 

Larceny, 

Larceny from U. 8. mail, . 

Liquor laws, violating, 

Malicious mischief 

Neglect of family 

Stealing a ride 

Trespass 

Unnatural act, 

Vagabonds 

VagranU 

Total, 


82 
1 

88 

488 

2 

11 

11 

16 

8 



1 
1 

2 

660 


2 

1 

14 
64 

1 

8 
1 

IT 
i 


1 
25 

1 

2 

1 

170 

1 

2 

1 

10 

48 

8 
8 

1 

10 
24 

320 

i 


1 

1 
1 

44 

8 

1 

2 

6 
1 

1 

1 
"1 

" 1 

" 1 

03 i 


2 
11 

1 

37 

1 

4 
31 

2 
01 


1 

* 

1 
18 

1 

1 
1 

i 

IT; 


i 
i 

2 

4 

11 
1 

1 
30 


8 
3 


1 
1 

1 

i 
i 

I 3 


1 

1 

i 


i 

8 
70 
2 
1 
3 
8 
1 

1 

1 
1 
2 

87 
663 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
8 

14 

1 

102 

1 

11 

28 


1 

1 
1 
1 
2 
12 
26 

1,004 


1 
8 

2 

1 

1 

8 

14 

110 

4 

1 

2 

10 
1 

1 

1 

164 


4 

78 
2 
1 
8 
8 
1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
6 

61 
772 
1 
1 
1 
6 
8 
3 

16 

1 

104 

1 

21 

24 
6 

10 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

12 

26 

1,168 



180 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 



ESSEX COUNTY. 

Jail in Newbubyport. 

Keeper, Charles L. Ayers ; salary, $900 00 

(With use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 27 

Committed by courts during year, 252 

Removed from other prisons, 54 

Returned from escape, 1 

307 

Total within the year, 384 

Discharged, 247 

Removed to other prisons, 73 

Escaped, 1 

321 

Number in custody Sept, 30, 1896, 13 



Expenditures. 
For salaries, $2,300 00 

other expenses, 2,602 10 

$4,902 10 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, - 

other sources, . . . . . 

Balance, $4,902 10 

$4,902 10 

Average number of prisoners, 23. Net cost per capUa, $213.13. 
Number of volumes in library, 50. 

This is another of the separate jails, and is one of the best in the 
State as far as buildings are concerned. The lot of land, however, 
is small. The only reason for keeping this small prison here is that 
the court sits in Newburyport, and it is necessary to have a build- 
ing near to the court house for the safe keeping of prisoners and the 
detention of witnesses. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No, 13. 



181 



The aggregate expenses show a slight decrease from last year, 
but, as the average number of prisoners was 2 less, the cost per 
capita is a little more than in 1895. 

The statement on the preceding page gives 252 prisoners as the 
number received from the courts, and of these 220 were either com- 
mitted for non-payment of fines and costs or upon term sentences. 
The offences and sentences of those who came from the courts are 
set out in the following table : — 



OFFENCES. 



o 

o 

s 

a 



M. 



Assault, • 

City ordinance or town by-laws, violating, 
Disturbing the peace, 
Drunkenness, 
Fraud, 

Idle and disorderly, 
Larceny a 

Liquor, giving to prisoner, 
Llqnor laws, violating, 
Maliciou* mischief. 
Manslaughter, 
Non-payment of tax, 
Tramp, . 
Total, 



6 
1 
8 



13' 



168 



F. 



1 
6 



Skntbkokb. 



s 



«-» 

a 

o 

3 



M. 



3 



2 
34 



1 
2 



43 



F. 



1 
3 



a 
2 • 

5 I 

« o 

►J* 

•5« 



9 



M. 



2 



M. 



9 
1 

10 
172 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 



207 



S 
& 



F. 



2 
10 



13 



Tot. 



10 
1 

12 
182 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 



220 



182 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

Jail and House of Correction in Salem. 

Master and keeper, Samuel A. Johnson, Sheriff ; salary, . $1,000 00 

(With use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 177 

House of 
Jail. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, 247 1,071 

Removed from other prisons, .... 53 8 

Returned from lunatic hospital, .... 1 1 

1,381 

Total within the year, 1,558 

Discharged, 236 899 

Removed to other prisons, 71 198 

Removed to lunatic hospital, . . . 1 7 

Writ of habeas corpus, - 1 

1,413 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 145 

Expenditures. 

For salaries, , |6,581 39 

other expenses, 10,673 71 

$17,255 10 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, $4,658 98 

other sources, 983 79 

Balance, 11,612 33 

$17,255 10 

Average number of prisoners, 146. Net cost per capita^ $79.54. 
Number of volumes in library, 650. 

The number of prisoners remaining in custody on September 30 
was 32 less than last year, bat the average for the year was 1 more. 
The net cost per capita is substantially the same. 

The master reports an expenditure of $532.44 for new skylight* 
for shop, repairs on the roof of the workshop, repairing boiler and 
completing repairs on the house which were mentioned last year. 

No report upon this jail and house of correction should be pre- 
sented to the Legislature without calling attention to the defects in 
construction and arrangement, to which reference has already been 
made many times. The most objectionable feature of the place i? 
the difficulty of keeping the women entirely away from the observa- 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



183 



tion of the men. They are compelled to pass through a part of the 
prison occupied by the men in order to reach their work in the 
laundry and sewing room. The master, who is the sheriff of 
the county, exercises all possible care to abate the objectionable 
features of this unavoidable condition, but the place can never be 
made satisfactory until new buildings are provided here or else- 
where for the separate imprisonment of the female prisoners of 
Essex County. 

The following table gives the offences and sentences of all the 
convicted prisoners committed to this institution by the courts in 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1896 : — 





Sentences. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

S 

■ 
o 
O 

•v 

a 
a 

o 

i 


Leas than 6 
Months. 


6 and Less than 
19 Months. 


1 Year and Less 
than S. 


» Years and 
Less than 8. 


8 Years and 
Less than 5. 


•a 

s 

s 
* 


• 

i 

V 

u 

•4 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M 


F. 


M. 


F. 


m'f. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Abuse of female child, . 

Assault, .... 

Breaking and entering, . 
Breaking and entering and 

larceny, .... 
Burning a building, . 
Carrying weapons, 
City ordinance or town 

by-laws, violating, . 
Common brawler, 

Cruelty to animals, . 
Disorderly house, keeping, 
Disturbing the peace, 
Drunkenness, . 

Fraud, .... 
Idle and disorderly, . 
Indecent exposure, . 
Larceny, .... 
Lewd cohabitation, . 
Lewdness, .... 
Liquor, giving to prisoner, 
Liquor laws, violating, . 
Malicious mischief, . 
Manslaughter, . • 

Neglect of family, . 
Non-payment of tax, 
Peddling, unlicensed, 
Polygamy, .... 

Robbery 

Bteallog a ride, . 
Stubbornness, . 
Tramps, .... 
Unlawful taking, 
Vagrants, .... 


46 

4 

2 

2 

13 

551 

1 
1 

40 

3 

22 
7 

4 
1 

1 

1 

703 


42 

4 
2 
2 

60 


11 
1 

3 
174 

2 
2 
2 
29 
1 

? 

6 
2 
1 

i 
18 

1 ai 

,283 


1 

4 

16 

1 

2 
1 
1 

2 
31 


■ 

4 

7 

4 

12 

1 

1 
11 

1 

1 

1 2 
47 


3 

1 
4 


4 
4 

1 
12 


1 
1 


1 

i 

1 

i * 

1 

i : 

iT 

i 


mm 


■ 

i- 
I 

1- 

1- 

1 1 
1 


- 


- 


1 
1 


1 

4 

68 

4 

3 

9 
1 
1 

4 

1 

2 

2 

16 

787 

3 

4 
8 
3 

81 
1 
6 
1 

28 

10 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

19 
1 

23 


8 

1 
1 

4 

58 

8 

1 

7 
1 
3 

4 

1 

87 


1 

7 
68 

4 
8 

9 
2 
1 

4 
1 
1 
2 
2 

20 
795 
3 
3 
4 
4 
3 

88 
2 
9 
1 

32 

10 
2 
1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

19 

1 

28 


Total, .... 


1,051 


1,138 



184 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Jail and House of Correction in Greenfield. 

Master and keeper, Charles S. Richardson ; salary, 9700 00 

(With use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 37 

Houaeof 
JalL Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, .... 61 98 

— — 159 

Total within the year, 196 

Discharged, 62 91 

Removed to lunatic hospital, 1 2 

Escaped, 1 - 

— — 157 

Number in custody Sept. 80, 1896, 89 

• Expenditures. 

For salaries, $2,005 00 

other expenses 3,631 21 



95,686 21 



Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, 9918 70 

other sources, 800 33 

Balance, 4,417 18 



95,636 21 



Average number of prisoners, 37. Net cost per capita, $119.38. 
Number of volumes in library, 300. 



There were more commitments than last year, and 2 more 
prisoners remained in custody on September 30. The sentences 
were longer as a rule than in the preceding year, and the average 
number was 7 more. 

The expenditure for salaries was a little more, but for other 
expenses a great deal less. The balance against the prison, there- 
fore, shows a reduction, and the net cost per capita is away below 
that of last year. 

The master reports an expenditure of $194.18 for steam fitting 
and plumbing and general repairs; also of $323.10 for the con- 
struction of a frame building 20 by 40 feet, with ell 16 by 26 feet, 



i 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



185 



to be used for storage of coal and wood and for other purposes. 
All the labor on these repairs was done by the prisoners. The only 
expense for outside labor in connection with the new building was 
for hiring teams to haul the dirt for grading up in front of the 
building. 

The buildings are well arranged, and the institution is always in 
good condition. An improvement in the place, however, could be 
made by the erection of a suitable fence about the ground, as recom- 
mended in these reports for several years past ; that recommendation 
is earnestly renewed. 

There are set out below the offences and sentences of all the 
convicted prisoners who came directly from the courts during the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1896 : — 





SlNTSNOBS. 


OFFENCES. 


« 

3 

J 

3 

• 

a 


Less than 6 
Months. 


6 and Less than 
19 Months. 


1 Year and Leas 
than 8. 


9 Years and 
Less than 8. 


8 Years and 
Less than 5. 


{ 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Assault, felonious, . 
Breaking and entering, . 
Disturbing the peace, 
Drunkenness, .... 

Larceny, 

Malicious misehlef, . 
Peddling, unlicensed, 

Tramp, • 


2 
22 

1 

1 

26 


- 


4 

20 

2 

10 


2 


1 
2 

5 
18 


1 
1 


1 

2 

1 


- 


2 


2 


1 
1 


- 


8 
8 
1 
8 
6 
48 

8 
15 


2 

1 

1 
2 


6 
8 
1 
8 
6 

48 
1 
1 
7 
2 
1 
1 
1 
8 

17 


Total, ..... 


46 


8 


6 


- 


2 


2 


99 


6 


105 



186 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct, 

HAMPDEN COUNTY. 

Jail and House of Correction in Springfield. 

Master and keeper, Embury P. Clark, Sheriff ; salary, . $1,000 00 

(With use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 286 

Honte of 
Jail. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, . . . .860 1,692 
Returned by revocation of permit, .... - 5 

2,057 

Total within the year, 2,848 

Discharged, 352 1,746 

Removed to lunatic hospital, 1 8 

Writ of habeas corpus, 1 - 

2,103 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 240 

Expenditures. 

For salaries, f 7,741 53 

other expenses, 17,661 01 

(25,402 54 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, $3,953 03 

other sources, 382 16 

Balance, 21,067 85 

$25,402 54 

Average number of prisoners, 235. Net cost per capita, $89.65. 
Number of volumes in library, 1,250. 

There were not as many commitments to either the jail or house 
of correction as in the preceding year, and the number remaining in 
custody was very much smaller than at the date of the last report. 
The expenditure for salaries was about the same, and for other pur- 
poses a little more. The largely increased receipts from the labor 
of prisoners, however, make a substantial reduction in the balance 
against the prison. The net cost per capita, therefore, although the 
number of prisoners was smaller, is a few dollars less. 

This jail and house of correction has 262 cells, — 206 for men and 
56 for women. The buildings were completed in 1887, and about 
all the time since then have been fully occupied. It is well arranged, 
well kept and satisfactory in all respects. The change in the chapel 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No, 13. 



187 



building, to which reference was made in the last report, was a 
much-needed improvement, brought about by the sheriff, who keeps 
the institution himself. 

The offences and sentences of all the convicted prisoners received 
here from the courts during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, are set 
out in the following table : — 





Sektbnobs. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

• 
o 
O 

s 

© 

a 


Less than 6 
Months. 


6 and Less than 
IS Months. 


1 Year and Less 
than*. 


ft Tears and 
Less than 8. 


1 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Assault, 

Assault, felonious, .... 
Breaking and entering, . 

Carrying weapons, .... 
City ordinance or town by-laws, 

Committing a nuisance, . 
Common night-walker, . 
Counterfeit money, 
Cruelty to animals. 
Disorderly house, keeping, . 
Disturbing the peace, . 

Embezzlement, .... 

Intelligence office, keeping, . 

Lewd cohabitation, 

Liquor laws, violating, . 

Neglect of family, .... 
Peddling, unlicensed, . 

Profanity, 

Receiving stolen goods, . 
Refusing to aid officer, . 
Unlawful taking, .... 


84 

1 

1 

1 
1 

27 

991 

1 

4 
2 

28 

1 
2 

3 
1 

1,169 


2 

1 

78 

8 
1 

2 

2 
94 


16 

2 

175 

8 

36 

1 

4 

1 

4 
82 

327 


8 

4 

1 

2 
1 

2 

18 


9 
1 

1 

81 

2 
12 

66 


10 
1 

11 


1 
2 
1 

3 

1 
6 

1 
19 


1 
2 

4 

3 


2 

8 
6 




1 

60 
8 
3 
1 
2 

2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
29 
1,200 
1 
1 
7 
6 
3 

79 

84 
60 

1,666 


2 

2 
98 

12 
1 

1 
2 

2 
2 

4 


1 

60 
8 
8 
1 
2 

2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
8 

29 

1,298 

1 

1 

19 
6 
8 
1 

81 
1 
8 
6 
4 
7 
4 
1 
2 
1 
7 

88 

60 




126 


1,692 



188 



COUNTY PRISONS. 



[Oct 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTT. 

Jail and House or Correction in Northampton. 

Master and keeper, Jairus E. Clark, Sheriff; salary, 

(With board and use of honse.) 

Number of prisoners Oct 1, 1895, 36 

JalL 

Committed by courts during year, .... 153 307 

Returned by revocation of permit, ... - 1 

from escape, - 1 

from lunatic hospital, .... 1 - 

463 

Total within the year, 499 

Discharged 143 296 

Removed to lunatic hospital, 2 

Escaped, - 2 

443 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 56 

Expenditures. 

For salaries, f 3,362 40 

other expenses, 6,509 01 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, f 1,382 60 

other sources, 276 66 

Balance, 7,212 15 



Average number of prisoners, 41. Net cost per capita, $175.91. 
Number of volumes in library, 100. 



f 1,000 00 



$8,871 41 



$8371 41 



There was a much larger number of commitments than in 1895, 
and the number in custody on September 30 was 20 more. The 
expenditure for salaries was a little less, and there was only a slight 
increase in the amount paid for other expenses. The receipts from 
the labor of prisoners show an increase of about $200 ; and, as the 
average number of prisoners is higher than last year, the net cost 
per capita is considerably less. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



189 



A jail has been kept in Northampton since a very early period in 
the history of Massachusetts, the first one being a small building 
16 by 24 feet, erected in 1707. The present buildings were com- 
pleted in 1852 at a cost of about $50,000, and have separate cells 
for 66 men and 22 women. 

The prison is under the personal direction of the sheriff, who 
makes the best use of the facilities under his control.. 

In the following table are set forth the offences and sentences of 
all the convicted prisoners received here directly from the courts 
during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896 : — 





Sbntbrosb. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

! 

o 
9 

E 


Leaa than 6 
Months. 


6 and Leu than 
IS Months. 


1 Tear and Leaa 
than*. 


i 

& 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Breaking and entering and larceny, . 
Disturbing the peace, .... 

Embezzlement, ..... 
Becape, ....... 

Liquor laws, violating, .... 


5 

1 
185 

8 


1 
5 


2 

2 

70 

• 

1 
1 

6 

1 
83 


8 

1 

4 


S 
2 

4 
4 

13 


1 
1 


1 

1 
2 


- 


10 
2 
1 
8 
260 
1 
1 
1 

14 

1 
2 
1 

296 


1 


1 

11 


10 
2 
1 
4 
208 
1 
1 
1 
14 
1 
1 
2 
1 




198 


6 






307 



190 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

Jail and House of Correction in Cambridge. 

Master and keeper, John R. Fairbairn ; salary, .... $2,500 00 

(With use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 571 

House of 
• Jail. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, . 746 2,902 

Removed from other prisons, .... 387 25 

Returned by revocation of permit, ... - 4 

from escape, - 2 

4,066 

Total within the year, 4,637 

Discharged, 1,110 2,880 

Removed to other prisons, .... 48 40 

to lunatic hospital, .... 6 12 

Writ of habeas corpus, 3 2 

Died, - 2 

Pardoned, - 3 

Escaped, - 4 

4,110 

Number in custody Sept 30, 1896, 527 

Expenditures. 

For salaries $22,338 95 

other expenses, . 43,305 67 

$65,644 62 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, f 1,573 37 

other sources, .* . 5,253 40 

Balance, 58,817 85 

$65,644 62 

Average number of prisoners, 511. Net cost per capita, $115 10. 
Number of volumes in library, 1,148. 

Since the last report there has been a change in the management 
here. Capt. John M. Fisk, who had been keeper and master for 
many years, died May 3, 1896, and the present master was ap- 
pointed June 1, 1896. 

There were not as many prisoners received at either the jail or 
house of correction as in 1895, and the number in custody on 
September 30 was 44 less. The expenditure for salaries was sub- 
stantially the same, but in other expenditures there was a decrease 
of more than $10,000. The cash receipts from labor were small as 
compared with the preceding year, but the balance against the 
prison shows a reduction. The average number of prisoners being 
smaller, however, the net cost per capita is a few dollars more. 

The master reports an expenditure of $1 ,000 for refurnishing the 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



191 



bouse, $2,000 for rebuilding prison wall and gate as extraordinary 
expenses. 

The offences and sentences of all the convicted prisoners received 
directly from the courts during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, are 
shown in the following table : — 





Bent-knobs. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

a 

• 

8 

s 

s 

G 


h 

a 


S" 


3 

J 

a • 

4 « 

3 3 




S» 

a 
• * 


i 
£ 

8 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Abandoning child, . 
Adultery 

Assault, .... 
Assault, felonious, . 

Bicycle laws, violating, . 
Breaking and entering, . 
Breaking and entering and 

Burglars tools, having, . 
Oity ordinance or town by- 
Cruelty to animals, . 
Defrauding boardlog-honsc 
keeper, .... 
Disorderly conduct, . 
Disorderly house, keeping, 
Disturbing meeting, . 
Disturbing the peace, 
Dog laws, violating, . 
Drunkenness, . 
Election laws, violating, . 
Embezzlement, . 
Escape, .... 

Forgery, .... 
Fornication, 

Fraud, .... 
House of ill- fame, keeping. 
Idle and disorderly, . 
Indecent exposure, . 
Larceny, .... 
Lewd cohabitation, . 
Liquor laws, violating, . 
Malicious mischief, . 
Manslaughter, . 
Neglect of family, . 
Obscene literature, . 
Peddling, unlicensed, 

Perjury 

Receiving stolen goods, . 

Stealing 

Stealing a ride, . 
Stealing letter from U.S. 
mall, .... 
Stubbornness, . 
Threats, .... 
Tramps, .... 
Trespass, .... 
Unlawful taking, 
Vagrants, .... 
Walking on railroad, 


66 

1 
1 

6 
> 

1 
10 

1 

80 

2 

1,670 

8 

2 
1 
1 
1 
28 

82 
1 

8 

1 

18 

1 
2 
1 

8 

1 
2 

06 

2,060 


1 

1 

10 
40 

! 

~ i 

— i 

-1 

i 

;l 

Z i 
-1 

71 1 


1 

83 
2 

8 

2 
15 

400 

5 
8 

2 
8 

4 

1 

58 

21 

4 

8 
1 

8 

2 

1 
53 

628 


2 

2 

1 

26 

2 

6 
1 

4 

1 


1 

14 
3 

2 

1 

2 

56 

6 
2 
1 

1 
1 

14 

mm 

8 

1 

1 

5 


3 

1 

1 
2 


8 

13 
1 

2 
3 

4 
2 

2 
7 
2 
1 

40 


1 

1 
1 

i 

3 


1 

1 
2 

2 

7 

6 
2 


1 


8 
1 

1 
3 

8 


, 


6 
2 
127 

2 
1 
7 

18 
1 
1 

11 
1 


1 

10 
1 
8 

07 

2 

2,180 

1 

10 



8 

3 

2 

8 

1 

6 

3 

115 

1 2 

1 56 

! 5 

1 2 

! " 

1 18 

1 1 

1 

5 

2 

1 

1 

10 

J ? 

3 
58 
06 


1 
1 

8 
1 

4 
11 
70 

2 
1 

8 

2 

18 

1 
127 


1 
7 
2 
180 

2 
1 
7 

14 
I 
1 

11 
1 


1 

10 
5 
8 
108 
2 
2,218 
1 

10 

8 
3 
4 
8 
2 
6 
3 
128 
4 

60 
6 
2 

17 
2 

18 

• 
1 

6 
2 

1 
1 

10 
16 
1 
8 
50 
06 


Total, .... 


133 


8 


28 


1 


2,001 


3,028 



192 



COUNTY PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

Jail in Lowell. 

Keeper, Henry G. Cushing, Sheriff; salary, $1,000 00 

(With board and use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 128 

JalL 

Committed by courts during year, . . . 1,492 

Removed from other prisons, 86 

Returned from escape, 2 

1,580 

• __—__■.-. 

Total within the year, 1,708 

Discharged, 1,172 

Removed to other prisons, 404 

Escaped, 5 

1,581 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 127 

Expenditures. 

For salaries, $6,917 33 

other expenses, 11,441 75 

$18,359 08 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, $2,102 64 

other sources, 557 77 

Balance, 15,698 67 



$18,359 08 



Average number of prisoners, 119. Net cost per capita, $131.92. 
Number of volumes in library, 452. 



This jail received a very much smaller number of prisoners than 
in 1895, but the number in custody on September 30 was about the 
same as in that year. The expenditure for salaries was a little less, 
and there was also a large reduction in the amount paid for other 
expenses. As the receipts for labor increased somewhat, the balance 
against the prison shows a substantial reduction. 

This is the only one of the five separate jails where work is pro- 
vided for the prisoners, and the sheriff is to be commended for 
taking advantage of his favorable situation to secure employment 
for them. 

The prison buildings are well suited to the purposes of a county 
jail and house of detention, and the management of the institution 
is all that can be desired. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



193 



The foregoing statement gives 1,492 as the number of commit- 
ments daring the year. Of these, only 1,181 were convicted 
prisoners; and their offences and sentences are set oat in the 
following table: — 









SlNTBNOBB. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

S 

o 

S 

i 


• 

S,J 

a 


"3 m 

J! 

S * 


i 

n 


• 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Assault . 


80 

1 
1 
1 
1 

4 
1 
1 

16 

616 

1 

4 
4 
2 
2 

44 

6 
1 

6 
6 
1 
2 
1 
8 
4 
6 
3 
1 


6 

1 
98 

6 

8 
6 
1 

120 


18 
1 

1 

1 
81 

2 

1 

1 
46 

8 

7 
1 

1 
8 
1 


87 
1 

8 

4 
2 

1 


4 

13 

20 
1 


1 

2 
16 

mm 

4 


4 


2 


62 

1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

2 

16 

714 
1 
1 
4 
6 
8 
2 
1 

108 
1 

14 
1 
1 

12 
6 
2 
2 
1 
3 
4 




7 

8 

168 
1 

18 

11 
8 
1 

1 


69 


Assault, felonious, . 

Breaking and entering, . 
Breaking and entering an 

Disorderly honee, keepln 
Disorderly in publlo oom 
Disturbing the peace, . 

Embezzlement, 


• * 

• • 

dlaroenj 

g, • 
reyance, . 

• ■ 

• 4 


1 • 


1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
4 
4 
2 
16 
867 
2 
1 
4 
19 
8 


Gaming laws, violating, . 
Indecent exposure, . 


* ■ 

• 




2 

1 

120 


Liquor laws, violating, . 
Lord's Day, violating, . 
Malicious mischief, 

Non-payment of tax, 
Officer, obstructing, 
Profanity, 

Receiving stolen goods, 
Removing baggage, 
Street, obstructing, . 


• 

S 4 

• 

* 

■ • 

» • 

■ • 




1 

22 

1 

2 

12 

6 

2 

2 

2 

3 

4 
ft 








4> - 


4 


Vagrants, . 


ft • 




4 
1 


1 - 
1 

198 


4 
1 




767 


172 


63 


40 


23 


4 


2 


983 


1,181 



194 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 

Jail and House of Correction in Dedham. 

Master and keeper, Augustus B. Endicott, Sheriff; salary, $1,000 00 

(With use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895 118 

HODMOf 

Jan. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, .... 148 426 

574 



• 



Total within the year, 692 

Discharged, 155 449 

Removed to other prisons, - 2 

to lunatic hospital, 1 2 

Sentence vacated, - 2 

Died, - 2 

Pardoned, - 1 

Escaped, - 1 

615 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 77 



Expenditures. 

For salaries, f 6,460 00 

other expenses, 7,045 85 

$13,505 85 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, $2,407 56 

other sources, 94 46 

Balance, 11,003 83 

$13,505 85 

Average number of prisoners, 94. Net cost per capita, $117.06. 
Number of volumes in library, 500. 

More prisoners were received at the jail than in 1895, but not as 
many were committed to the house of correction as in that year. 
The number remaining in custody on September 30 was 41 less. 
The amount paid for salaries is exactly the same, but for other 
expenses a little more. About the same amount was received from 
labor of prisoners. 

It is necessary to repeat the explanation that has frequently been 
made in reference to the accounts of this institution ; namely, that 
not all the expenses can be returned by the master, as he has no 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



195 



knowledge of the amount paid for fuel and lights. The county 
commissioners furnish these for all the county buildings, and it was 
estimated last year that about $1,500 of the expense should be 
charged to the jail and house of correction. 

During the year a new engine has been purchased and other 
repairs made at a cost of $1,773.55, which is included in the amount 
stated in the foregoing account. 

The offences and sentences of all the convicted prisoners received 
directly from the courts during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, are 
as follows: — 





BlNTBKCBS. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

3 

1 

•a 

s 

« 


• 

a 

is 


a • 

• 


J 

2 « 

H 


"2 
« 


Se' 


• 

3 

s 

s 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Breaking and entering, . 
Common nuisance, . 
Cruelty to animal*, . 
Disturbing the peace, 
Drunkenness, .... 

Evading fare, 

Indecent language, using, 

Liquor laws, violating, . 
Loitering around railroad eta- 
Milk laws, violating, . 
Neglect of family, . 
Non-payment of tax, 

Unlawful taking, 

U. 8. mall, using Illegally, 

Vagrants 


13 

1 

14 
21ft 

2 

1 

12 
5 

1 

8 

278 


1 

1 
8 

1 
2 

8 


1 
12 

2 
88 

1 

10 
1 

1 4 

1128 

i 


2 

1 
3 

1 
7 


2 

1 

8 

5 
1 

1 
20 


i 


1 
8 

1 

5 
1 

12 


- 


2 


- 


mm 

1 


. 


2 
28 

1ft 
308 

32 

8 

1 
4 

2 
1 
1 

1 
8 
3 
1 
6 

486 


3 

1 

4 

3 

1 
3 

16 


2 
31 

17 
312 

88 

11 

3 
3 
1 
6 




3 


- 


460 



196 OOUNTT PRISONS. [Oct. 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 

Jail and House of Correction in Plymouth. 

Master and keeper, Alphecs K. Harmon, Sheriff; salary, . . $1,000 00 

(With board and use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 85 

House of 
JalL Correc tion . 

Committed by courts during year, . . .114 358 

472 

Total within the year, 557 

Discharged, 115 353 

Removed to other prisons, - 1 

Died, 1 

470 

Number in custody Sept 30, 1896, 87 



Expenditures. 

For salaries, $5,673 20 

other expenses, 7,022 18 

$12,695 38 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, $1,113 76 

other sources, ........ 

Balance, 11,581 62 

$12,695 38 

Average number of prisoners, 72. Net cost per capita, $160.86. 
Number of volumes in library, 117. 

# 

As compared with 1895, there was a falling off in the number of 
commitments to the jail, but, as more prisoners were received at the 
house of correction, the number in custody on September 30 was 2 
more than in that year. The account as returned shows an ex- 
penditure of more money for salaries but less for other expenses, 
the aggregate being a little smaller than last year. The receipts 
from the labor of prisoners and the balance against the prison are 
about the same. The average number of prisoners was 10 higher, 
and the net cost per capita, therefore, considerably less. 

The figures used in the financial statement are taken from the 
return of the county treasurer, because his account shows nearer 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



107 



than that of the master the items which are uniformly charged in 
other places. 

The following table shows the offences and sentences of all con- 
victed prisoners committed directly from the courts during the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1896 : — 





SlKTKNOBB. 


OFFENCE8. 


■ 

3 

s 
s 

o 

a 

s 


Less than • 
Months. 


• and Leea than 
I* Months. 


1 Year and Lees 
than*. 


• Yeara and 
Less than S. 


S Yeara and 
Leaa than S. 


1 
& 
2 

3 
< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 

i 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Adultery, ..... 

Assault, 

Assault, felonious, • 
Breaking and entering, . 
Cruelty to animals, . 
Disorderly houae, keeping, 
Diaturblog the peace, 

Idle and disorderly, • 
Larceny, . • • • 

Liquor laws, violating, 

Lottery, advertlalng, etc., . 
Malicious mischief, • • 
Neglect of family, . 
Peddling, unlicensed, . . 

Physician, unregistered, . 
Polygamy, 

Rescue, attempt, 
Selling or concealing mortgaged 
or leased property, 


13 

8 

18 
161 

8 

22 

1 
2 
1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

3 


14 
1 

1 

4 
38 


10 

1 
1 

1 


8 
2 


8 
1 

2 

• 
1 


1 
2 


1 
2 

1 
2 

8 


- 


2 
1 

2 
1 


- 


1 
1 


.1 

1 

' 1 

" i 


8 

88 

1 



4 

1 

22 

201 

1 

8 

1 

2 

4 

2 

18 

33 
4 
1 
8 
2 
1 

2 
1 
1 
1 

1 
2 

356 


1 
1 
6 

1 

1 

T 

16 


3 

88 
1 
6 
4 
2 

23 
206 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
4 
2 

18 
1 

40 
4 
1 
8 
2 
1 

2 

1 
1 
1 

1 
2 




248 


T 


88 


6 


8 


8 


8 


- 


872 



198 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

Jail in Boston. 

Keeper, John B. O'Brien, Sheriff; salary, $1,000 CO 

(With board and use of house.) 

Number of.prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 197 

JatL 

Committed by courts during year, 6,221 

6,221 

Total within the year, 6,418 

Discharged, 6,193 

Removed to other prisons, 1 

to lunatic hospital, 4* 

Died, 4 

Executed, 1 

6,203 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 215 

* Expenditures. 

For salaries, $19,943 92 

other expenses, 17,655 94 

$37,599 86 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, - 

other sources, ....... $644 48 

Balance, 36,955 38 

$37,599 86 

Average number of prisoners, 200. Net cost per capita, $184.78. 
Number of volumes in library, 808. 

A larger number of prisoners were committed than in 1895, but 
not as many of them were under sentence. The* number remaining 
in custody was higher, but the average was the same. 

The county treasurer reports that the sum of $5,763.43 has been 
expended for extraordinary repairs on buildings. 

This institution has been considered for a long time as a model 
jail in construction and arrangement ; it is well managed, under the 
immediate direction of the sheriff of the county. There should be a 
new cell block for the exclusive imprisonment of women, and the 

• One to Hospital for Dipsomaniacs at Foxborongh. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



199 



cells now devoted to that purpose could then be used for the 
imprisonment of juvenile offenders. This much-needed improve- 
ment would greatly add to the convenience of an institution that 
has always held a high rank. 

Only 995 of the prisoners committed here were convicted, and the 
offences and sentences are shown as follows : — 



OFFENCES. 



Sentences. 



6 

8 

S 



M. 



laws, 



Affray, 

Assault, .... 
Bastardy, 

Breaking and entering, 
City ordinance or town by 
Common night-walker, 
Contempt or court, 
Cruelty to animals, 
Discharging tire arms, . 
Disturbing meeting, 
Disturbing the peace, • 
Dog laws, violating, 
Drunkenness, 
Embezzlement, . 
Evading fare, • . 
Fast driving, . . 
Fornication, • 

Fraud 

Gaming laws, violating, 
House of ill-faro e, keeping, 
Idle and disorderly, 
Indecent exposure, 
Intelligence office, keeping, 
Junk laws, violating, . 
Larceny, . . • 
Liquor laws, violating, 
Lord's Day, violating, . * 
If aiteioos mischief, 
Nf gleet of family, 
Obscene language, using, 
Opium law*, violating, 
Peddling, unlicensed, . 
Perjury, .... 
Playing ball in street, . 
Profanity, 

Refusing to obey officer, 
Robbery, 
Belling or concealing mortgaged 

property, . 
Sidewalk, obstructing, . 
Street car, obstructing, 
Btreet, obstructing, 

Threats 

Throwing missiles, 
Trespass, 
Unlawful taking, . 
U. S. revenue laws, violating 
Unlicensed hack, . 
Vagabonds, . • 
Voting Illegally, . 
Walking on railroad, . 



violating. 



or leaaed 



Total, 



8 

161 

1 

1 

12 

4 
8 
2 

4 



1 
160 

4 
2 
2 
4 
7 
29 

1 

1 

1 

1 

04 

24 

11 

9 

2 

1 

29 

2 

10 

8 

1 

2 
16 
1 
24 
6 
1 
2 
2 
2 
8 
1 
1 
4 

628 



F. 



12 
1 

8 
1 



81 




1 
1 



72 



I 



a 

o 



M. 



F. 



2 
2 



188 
1 



2 
2 



22 
1 



282 



8 
1 



83 



41 



e 

« . 
.a • 

2a 

•v m 



1 

16 



22 



M. 



8 

167 

1 

8 

12 

6 
8 
2 

4 
1 
1 
863 
6 
2 
2 
4 
8 
29 

4 

8 

1 

1 

86 

26 

11 

9 

6 

2 

1 

29 
1 
2 
10 
8 
1 

2 
16 
1 
24 
6 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
8 
1 
4 

In" 



i 
& 

i 

tS 

< 



F. 



3 
2 



46 



12 
1 

3 
3 



84 

6 



1 
1 



Tot. 



118 



8 

174 

1 

8 

12 

3 

8 

8 

2 

4 

1 

1 

408 

6 

2 

2 

16 

9 

29 

8 

7 

3 

1 

1 

120 

31 

11 

9 

6 
o 

ma 

1 
80 
1 
2 
11 
8 
1 

2 
16 
1 
24 
A 
1 
2 
2 
2 
8 
3 
1 
4 

996 



200 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

House or Correction at Deer Island. 

Master, James R. Gerrish ; salary, (2,500 00 

(With board and use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 1,677 

HOQMOf 

Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, 9,506 

Removed from other prisons 2 

Returned from escape, 3 

9,511 

Total within the year, 11,188 

Discharged, 9,517 

Died, 43 

Escaped, 10 

9,570 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 1,618 

Expenditures. 

For salaries, (41,94« 82 

other expenses, 128,225 30 

$170,174 12 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, (61,014 26 

other sources, 3,*70 56 

Balance, 105,289 30 

$170,174 12 

Average number of prisoners, 1,540. Net cost per capita, (68.37. 
Number of volumes in library, 1,000. 

The institution at Deer Island is the largest prison in the State. 
Up to the present year it has been known as the Boston House of 
Industry, and only the courts of that municipality have been author* 
ized to commit prisoners to it. Since the 1st of July, however, it 
has been called the House of Correction at Deer Island, the name 
having been changed by section 9 of chapter 536 of the Acts of 1896, 
and it now receives prisoners from any place in Suffolk County. 

The receipts from the labor of prisoners are quite large, but it 
should be explained that the amount returned as derived from that 
source includes all sums paid for stone which is sold on account of 
the institution. 

The prison is well managed, under the direction of a master who 
was for several years the superintendent of the institution when it 
was known as a house of industry. 

The foregoing statement shows that 9,506 prisoners were received 
here from the courts during the year ending Sept. 30, 1 896. Some 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



201 



of these received more than one sentence each, and this will explain 
why, in the following table of offences and sentences, there are 259 
more sentences than prisoners : — 





Sentences. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

§ 

s 

« 
a 

£ 


Less than • 
Months. 


• and Less than 
lfJ Months. 


1 Year and Less 
than fJ. 


S Tears and 
Leas than S. 


• 

» 

ft 

£ 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot, 


Affray, •••••• 

Assault, felonious, 
Bathing, unlawfully, . 

Bonitre, raakiug 

Carrying weapons, 

Children, exhibiting, illegally, . 

City ordinance or lown by-laws, 

Common beggar, .... 
Common brawler, . 
Common night-walker. 
Contempt of court, 
Cruelty to animals, • • 
Discharging fire-arms, 
Disorderly nouse, keeping, 
Disorderly In publla conveyance, 
Disturbing meeting, . • • 
Disturbing the peace, . . . 
Dog laws, violating, . 
Drunkenness, • • . 
Embezzlement, .... 
Evading fare, .... 
False fire alarm, giving, 
Fornication, 

Onming laws, violating, 
Idle and disorderly, . 
Illegal meamues, using, . 
Indecent exposure, • 
Infants' hoarding-house, keep- 
ing, unlicensed, . • 

Liquor laws, viohtlng, . . 
Loitering around railroad station. 
Lord's Day, violating, 
Malicious mischief, . . . 
Milk laws, violating, . 
Neglect of family, . 
Obscene language, using, . 

Opium laws, violating, 
Peddling, unlicensed, . 
Profanity, . 
Receiving stolen goods, 
Rescue, ■••«.. 
School laws, violating, . 
Sidewalk, obstructing, . 

Stealing a ride 

Btrert cars, obstructing, 

Threats, 

Throwing mUsllea, 

Trespass. 

Unlawful taking, . 

Vagrants, 

Walking on railroad, . 


2 
881 
6 
8 
2 
1 
1 

21 

1 
8 
1 
2 
1 
7 

82 
6 
8,647 
8 
4 
1 

68 
4 
8 
1 
2 
1 

1 

210 

2 

19 
4 
7 

85 
1 
6 
1 
6 
1 

12 

11 

6 
1 

24 
1 
1 
2 
8 

89 
20 

10 
41 


80 
2 

1 

1 
6 

286 

82 

22 
14 

8 

2 

4 

2 

1 
411 


129 
8 

2 

1 

1 
1 

5 

! 2,469 

1 6 

2 
6 

76 

6 

222 
1 
1 

17 
18 

1 
8 

4 
169 


11 

1 
1 

47 

4 

2 

493 

8 
1 

24 

27 
3 
3 

2 

2 
4 


18 
1 

1 

2 

489 
i 2 

21 

86 
1 

2 

8 

8 
80 


19 

1 

2 
188 

1 

9 

8 

1 
10 


5 

1 
82 

6 

1 
46 


1 
20 

21 


1 
1 


- 


2 
628 
9 
8 
2 
3 
1 

21 
2 

1 
4 

1 
6 
1 
7 

37 

6 

6,687 

16 
4 
1 

65 
9 
8 

98 
2 
6 

1 

484 

3 

21 
4 
7 

54 
1 

82 
1 
6 
1 

12 

11 
1 
9 
1 

24 
1 
1 
2 
8 
1 

89 

24 
4 

199 

41 


41 

2 

1 

1 

66 

7 

1 
10 

937 

86 
1 

88 

67 

3 

17 

10 

2 

4 
2 

3 

1 

14 

1,299 


2 
669 
9 
3 
2 
3 
1 

23 
8 
1 

66 
1 
4 
1 

18 
1 
8 

47 

6 

7,574 

16 

4 

1 

161 

10 

8 

181 

2 

6 

1 
641 

6 

88 

4 

7 

64 

I 

82 

1 

7 

1 

12 

16 

3 

9 

1 

24 

1 

1 

2 

8 

1 

89 

27 

6 

218 

41 




4,679 


3,182 


628 


609 

1 


239 


8,466 


9,765 



202 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

House of Correction in Boston (South Boston). 

Master, JonN C. Whiton ; salary, $2,500 00 

(With board and use of house.) 
Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 563 

HAUtt of 
Coirecoon. 

Committed by courts during year, 977 

Removed from other prisons, 4 

Returned from escape, 5 

from lunatic hospital, 1 

987 

Total within the year, 1,550 

Discharged, 957 

Removed to other prisons 16 

to lunatic hospital, 17 

Died, 5 

Sentence vacated, 3 

Pardoned, .11 

Escaped, 15 

1,024 

Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 526 

Expenditures. 

For salaries, $30,360 74 

other expenses, 69,470 72 

|99331 46 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, $19,390 55 

other sources, 1,010 17 

Balance, 79,430 74 

$99,831 46 

Average number of prisoners, 599. Net cost per capita, $132.61. 
Number of volumes in library, 2,000. 

There were 150 less commitments than Inst year, and the number 
of prisoners remaining in custody on September 30 was considerably 
smaller. The receipts from the labor of prisoners amounted to a 
little more than was derived from that source in 1895, hut the 
increase in the expenditures makes the balance against the prison 
higher than last year. 

The Legislature of 1896 passed an act authorizing the building of 
a Suffolk County reformatory, and provided for the discontinuance 
of the house of correction at South Boston ; nothing, however, has 
yet been done towards carrying out the act in that respect. 

In this prison good discipline is maintained, although the inmates 
are largely from a class that cannot be governed without great diffi- 
culty ; and the buildings are kept in as good condition as possible. 

The offences and sentences of the 977 prisoners who were com- 



3896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 



203 



mitted directly from the courts to this institution during the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1896, are set out in the following table, and the 
reason for the discrepancy between the number of sentences and 
the number of prisoners is - that some prisoners have two or more 
sentences each : — 





f 

Sentences. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

1 

s 

• 


• 

u 

• 3 

3* 


h 

a 2 

• 


a 

s « 
'J 


« 


- a 

m 

►« 1 

M 

SI 


s 

e . 

s s 

10 


i 

i 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


'*. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


J&«| Mf m 


m.'f. 

i 


OLm , jr. 


Tot. 


Assault, 

Assault, felonious, . 
Assault to rape, . 
Assault to rob, . 
Breaking and entering, 
Breaking and entering and 
larceny, . 
Burglar's tools, having, . 
Carrying weapons, • 
Common brawler, 
Common night* walker, 
Counterfeit money, . 
Cruelty to animals. • 
Disorderly house, keeping, 
Disorderly in public con- 
Disturbing meeting, . 
Disturbing the peace, 
Drunkenness, . • 
Embezzlement, . . • 
Escape, .... 
Forgery and uttering, 
Fornication, 

Fraud. 

Gaming laws, violating, . 
House of ill-fame, keeping, 
Idle and disorderly, • 
Indecent exposure, . • 
Larceny, . • • 
Lewd cohabitation, . 
Lewdness, • 
Liquor laws, violating, 
Lord's Day, violating. 

Malicious mischief, . 
Manslaughter. . • 
Keglect of family, 
Obscene publications, 
Park laws, violating, . 
Peddling, unlicensed, 
Perjury, . 

Receiving stolen goods, . 
Rescue, • ■ • • 
Robbery, . 

8elling or concealing mort- 
gaged or leased property, 
Threats, . 
Unlawful taking, • 
Unnatural act, • • . 
Vagabonds, . . . 


2 

1 

1 

1 

79 

8 
1 

mm 

6 

mm 

8 
2 


mm 

6 
6 

3 

4 

a* 

mm 


40 
10 

66 
8 
2 
1 
2 
6 
1 
1 
8 
2 

84 

8 

4 
2 
1 

6 
1 

mm 

4 
249 


8 

4 
4 

82 

4 

1 

11 
1 

6 
67 


1 

48 

6 

1 

1 

84 

1 

mm 

1 

8 

2 
14 

6 
114 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

4 

1 

1 
1 

3 
247 


8 

8 

20 

1 

4 

6 
2 

1 

1 
41 


3 

19 

2 

19 
1 

15 
1 

7 

68 
1 
6 

1 
1 

2 

5 
1 
2 

8 
1 

168 


1 

7 
1 

1 

mm 

10 


1 
3 
1 

22 
2 

1 
2 
2 

29 
1 
3 

1 

2 
3 

76 


1 

1 


1 
2 

4 
9 

2 

7 
1 
1 

4 

1 

84 


1 

T 


1 

1 
2 


mm 

"1 


6 

114 

24 

1 

4 

51 

3 
2 
2 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 
184 
6 
2 

13 
6 

10 
2 
8 

22 

7 

304 

4 

10 

17 
1 
2 
4 
3 
3 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 

17 
3 

10 

1 
8 
6 
4 

4 
2 

876 
1 


1 
6 

1 

7 

4 

mm 

64 
1 

9 

2 

4 

21 
6 

11 

1 

137 


7 
120 

24 
1 
4 

61 

3 
2 
2 
1 
7 
1 
1 
5 

2 

1 

1 

248 

7 

2 

13 

14 

10 

2 

5 

26 

.7 

325 

9 

10 

28 

1 

2 

4 

3 

3 

2 

1 

2 

8 

1 

1 

18 

3 

10 

1 
3 
5 

4 
4 
2 




114 


17 


1,012 



204 



COUNTY PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



WORCESTER COUNTY. 

Jail and House of Correction in Fttchburo. 

Master and keeper, Benjamin D. Dwinnell; salary, . . . . $1,400 00 

(With board and use of house.) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 107 

HOOMOf 

JalL. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, .... 120 602 

Removed from other prisons, 42 104 

Returned from escape, - 1 

769 

Total within the year, 876 

Discharged, 149 581 

Removed to other prisons, 15 3 

Writ of habeas corpus, 1 - 

Escaped, - 2 

751 

Number in custody Sept 80, 1896, 125 

Expenditures. 

For salaries, $7,502 95 

other expenses, 9,060 09 

$16,563 0* 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, $2,927 48 

other sources, 789 72 

Balance, 12,845 84 

$16,563 04 

Average number of prisoners, 1 18. Net cost per capita, $108.86. 
Number of volumes in library, 500. 

At the close of tbe year there was a larger number of prisoners 
in custody than were held here at the date of the last report. There 
is no material change in the amount expended for salaries and other 
expenses, but the cash receipts from the labor of prisoners are about 
$500 less than last year. 

This prison is under the management of an intelligent and capable 
master, who does everything in his power to mitigate the unfavorable 
conditions that unavoidably exist in a county prison where misde- 
meanants of all kinds are received ; moreover, he tries to furnish 



1896,] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



205 



useful employment for all the prisoners under his charge. By keep- 
ing men employed upon the land, he has raised in recent years all 
the vegetables used in the institution. 

It has been reported in regard to many of the county prisons that 
they are unsuited for the imprisonment of women, and this criticism 
applies to the Fitchburg prison. There is no need of keeping any 
sentenced women in this place ; they can just as well be sent to 
Worcester, where there is a department especially provided for 
them. 

The offences and sentences of all the convicted prisoners who came 
directly from the courts during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, were 
as follows : — 









Sentences. 


OFFENCE8. 


• 

s 

• 

2 


Less than 6 
Months. 


6 and Less than 
1» Months. 


1 Year and Less 
than ft. 


% Years and 
Less than S. 


1 

u 

S 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Adultery, 
Assault, . 

Breaking and entering a 
City ordinance or towi 

violating, . 
Crnelfiy to animals, 
Disturbing the peace, 
Drunkenness, 
Bmbeszlement, 
Bvading fare, . 

Gaming laws, violating, 

Lewd cohabitation, 
Liqaor laws, violating, 
Malicious mischief, 
Neglect of family, . 

Threau, .... 

Unlawful Uking, . 
Walking on railroad, . 


• 

• 

odla 
l by- 


• • 

• • 
rceny, 
laws, 


1 
20 

6 
1 

10 

240 

1 

2 

4 
1 
6 

12 
3 

1 

1 
4 

314 



1 


2 

16 

mm 

6 
86 

1 
1 

10 
1 
6 

1 
10 


1 
1 

mm 

1 

1 

_ 1 

i 


8 
3 

6 

4 
1 

2 


1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

e» 

1 

- 
- 

mt 

6 


- 


1 


- 


4 

40 

4 

6 
1 

10 
833 
1 
2 
1 
6 
1 

20 
1 

10 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

13 
4 

488 


1 

7 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

13 


5 

40 

4 

6 
1 

10 
840 
1 
2 
2 
6 
1 

29 
2 

19 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

14 
4 




148 


4 ! 20 


2 


1 




601 



206 COUNTY PRISONS. [Oct. 

WORCESTER COUNTY. 

Jail and House of Correction in Worcester. 

Master and keeper, Robert H. Citaxberlain, Sheriff ; salary, . . $1,000 00 

(With use of house ) 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, ....... 220 



Home of 
Jan. Correction. 

Committed by courts during year, .... 805 1,373 
Removed from other prisons, ..... 15 4 

Returned by revocation of permit,. ... - 1 

2,198 

Total within the year, 2,418 

Discharged, 775 1,216 

Removed to other prisons, 50 96 

to lunatic hospital, 1 1 

Writ of habeas corpus, 1 - 

Died - 1 

Pardoned, - 1 

Sentence vacated, - 1 

2,143 

Number in custody Sept 30, 1896, 275 



Expenditures. 

For salaries $12,181 19 

other expenses, 16,504 57 

$28,685 76 

Receipts. 

From labor of prisoners, $2,425 79 

other sources, 276 87 

Balance, 25,983 10 

$28,685 76 

Average number of prisoners, 247. Net cost per capita, $105.19. 
Number of volumes in library, 643. 

This institution had also a larger number of prisoners on Sep- 
tem1>er 30 this year than were held in custody on that date in 1895, 
and the average number for the year was 44 higher. There were a 
few more commitments to the jail and a great many more to the 
house of correction. 

There was a slight increase in the amount paid for salaries, but 8 
considerable decrease in other expenses. The receipts for labor 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



207 



amounted to a little more, and the balance against the prison is 
therefore materially reduced. 

This prison is in good condition, having been recently enlarged in 
capacity and the old buildings extensively repaired. It is under the 
direction of the sheriff of the county, and is well kept and orderly. 

In the following table are set forth the offences and sentences of 
all the convicted prisoners received from the courts during the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1896 : — 





i " ' ~~ 

8SNTXH0B8. 


OFFENCES. 


a 
S 

s 

• 
a 


• 

a 

« . 

9 § 


a 

if 

1 • 


3 


% Years and 
Leas than S. 


8 Years and 
Leas than 5. 


1 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 

1 


F. 


M. 


F. 


If. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Abuse of female child, 

Assault 

Assault, felonious, 
Assault to rob, . • 
Breaking and entering, 
Breaking and entering and 

Burning a building, 
Carrying weapons, 
City ordinance or town by- 
laws, violating, . . . 
Contempt of court, . • 
Cruelty to animals. 
Disorderly conduct, . 
Disorderly house, keeping, . 
Disturbing the peace, . 
Drunkenness, 
Embexzlement, . . 
Extortion, .... 

Fornication, . 
Fraud, ..... 
Indecent exposure, 
Larceny, .... 
Lewdness, .... 
Liquor laws, violating, 
Lotiorlng around railroad 

Malicious mischief, 
Neglect of family, 
Peddling, unlicensed, . 
Physician, unregistered, 
Rape, ..... 
Receiving stolen goods, 
Sidewalk, obstructing, 

ThreaU 

Tramps, .... 

Unlawful taking, . 
Vagabonds, .... 
Vagrants, .... 
Walking on railroad, . 


86 

1 

7 

4 
1 

48 

678 
1 

6 

2 

8 

80 

14 

6 

12 

8 

1 

1 

4 

1 
16 


1 

1 
1 

1 
8 
6 

6 

" I 

" i 

»l 
1 
_ 1 
- 1 
2 

1 


2 

16 

2 

8 
1 

16 
808 

2 

1 

2 

21 

8 

17 

1 

V 
8 
1 

84 

428 


1 

27 

1 

1 
1 

2 
88 


10 
1 

1 

1 

60 

1 

1 
24 

1 

8 

8 

106 


1 

1 

7 

2 
1 

1 
18 


6 
6 
1 

8 

6 
1 

1 

24 


1 

1 


1 
2 

1 
11 


1 
1 


1 
2 

1 
4 


- 


1 



66 

4 
1 
7 

6 
1 

4 

7 
1 
4 

1 
1 

60 
086 
2 
8 
1 
6 
8 
6 

81 
4 

81 

1 
8 
12 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
7 
2 
2 
1 

87 
16 

1,337 


8 
1 

1 
1 

2 

3 

40 

7 

2 
8 

4 

2 

4 


1 
12 

66 

4 
1 
7 

6 
1 

4 

8 
2 
4 
1 
8 

02 

076 

2 

8 

1 

12 
8 
6 

88 
7 

86 

1 
8 
12 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
T 
2 
2 
1 
41 
16 


Total, .... 

_ 


766 


26 


73 


1,410 



208 



COUNTY PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



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1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



211 



Earnings and Expenses. 

Heretofore there have been presented at this point in the report 
tables showing the cash earnings in the jails and houses of correc- 
tion, and a comparison of the expenditures. The figures in the 
following tables, however, cannot be compared with those given in 
former reports, because the Boston House of Industry, which was 
made a house of correction on the 1st of July last, is this year in- 
cluded for the first time among the county prisons. For the purpose of 
making a comparison of the earnings for two years upon an equal basis, 
the expenses of the Boston House of Industry for 1895 have been 
added to the amount shown last year under the head of county prisons. 

Compared with the preceding year there was a net increase of 
$11,536.40 in the amount derived from the labor of the inmates. 
There was a decrease in a number of prisons, the largest' of which 
occurred in Cambridge ; but, as these figures represent only the cash 
receipts, it should not be inferred that there has been any less work 
on account of the reduced amount. The difficulty in disposing of 
the product will furnish a reason why the receipts have fallen off, 
and, moreover, in the table last year Cambridge was credited with a 
considerable payment on account of earnings in a preceding year. 

The table on the following page, which gives the expenditures in 
the county prisons for 1895 and 1896, including the Deer Island in- 
stitution for both years, shows an increase for 1896 of $12,735.63 : — 

(D) . Earnings in County Prisons in 1895 and 1896. 



FRI80N8. 



1895. 



Barnstable Jail and House of Correction, 

Boacpn Jail, 

Boeton Honae of Correction, . . 
Cambridge Jail and Uouse of Correction, 
Dcdham Jail and House of Correction, . 
Deer Island Honae of Correction, . 

Bdgartown Jail, 

Fitch bar g Jail and Honae of Correction, 
Greenfield Jail and House of Correction, 
Ipswich Honse of Correction, 
Lawrenoe Jail and House of Correction, 

Lowell Jail, 

Nantuekel Jail and Honse of Correction, 
New Bedford Jail aod House of Correction 

New bury port Jail, 

Northampton Jail and House of Correction 
PitUfleld Jail and House of Correction, 
Plymouth Jail and Honse of Correction, 
Batem Jail and House of Correction, . 
Springfield Jail and House of Correction, 

Taunton Jail, 

Worcester Jail and House of Correction, 



Total, 



$4 60 

10,182 84 

0,854 82 

2,608 01 

♦41,998 40 

8,446 02 

786 46 
8,680 24 
0,352 17 

2.000 20 

2,040 87 

1,16086 

00 07 

1,284 78 

8.001 70 
1,047 77 

1,025 67 



$100,406 61 



190)6. 



$10,800 66 
1,678 87 
2,407 66 

♦61,014 26 

2,02748 
018 70 
2,401 60 
6,121 80 
2,102 64 

640*80 

1,382*00 

1,118 76 
4,668 08 
3,063 03 

2,426 70 



$112,033 01 



Increase. 



$267 71 

10,016 86 

182 26 

889 

223*25 



067 10 
2,006 26 

600 12 



$24,005 02 



Decrease. 



$4 60 



7,781 46 
186 46 



517 64 

1,128 64 
1,230 28 



1,400 07 



00 67 
121 02 



$12,468 <« 



♦ Includes amount received for labor and sale of atone. 



212 



COUNTY PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



(E). Amount of Each Class of Expenditures in County Prisons for the 
» Tears ending Sept. 30, 1895 y and Sept. 30, 1896 % respectively. 



EXPENDITURES. 



1694.05. 



1S0O-04. 



Increase. 



Doc 



Salaries, 

Provision*, .... 

Clothing, 

Beds and bedding, . 

Medicine, ete 

Fuel and lights, 

Instruction 

Reading matter, 

Aid to discharged prisoner*, • 

All other expenses, . 

Total, 



$901,141 82 

901,602 42 

41,676 47 

4,784 67 

6,761 09 

64,850 06 

1,706 48 

084 68 

8,007 81 

00,860 28 



$627,002 06 



$216,078 27 

103,704 76 

41,480 08 

8,770 68 

7.823 70 

61,406 27 

287 06 

674 80 

■ 8,764 76 

111,218 98 



$640,688 67 



$19,886 45 



1,679 77 



657 46 
11,858 00 



$96,494 67 



$7,797 67 

246 39 

1,014 09 

2,863 78 

1,607 48 

269 64 



$13,689 06 



Comparison of Receipts and Expenditures in the Jails and 

Houses of Correction. 

The table of earnings on the preceding page, as has already been 
stated, refers only to the cash receipts from the labor of prisoners. 
In the table immediately following there are also included the 
receipts from other sources, for the purpose of showing the actual 
net cost of the jails and houses of correction for each year since 
1893. It has not been practicable to make the comparison for an 
earlier period, because prior to 1893 returns of the expenses of the 
Boston House of Industry were not received. To avoid confusion 
in comparing this report with former years, it should be borne in 
mind that the expenditures of the county prisons, as presented 
heretofore, will not agree with the figures in this table, because the 
prison at Deer Island is now included for the first time. 



(F). Receipts i Expenditures and Balances in County Prisons for Each 

Tear since 1893. 



YEARS. 



Average 

No. of 

Prisoners. 



Expenditure*. 



Receipt! for 
Labor and from 
Other Source*. 



Balance 
against 
rrieoxta. 



1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1890, 



4,162 
4,582 
4,881 
4,782 



$814,858 71 
832,667 59 
027,902 95 
640,688 57 



$143,145 16 
127,402 69 
121,204 66 
128,648 27 



$471,711 66 
605,264 90 
606,608 89 
612,096 89 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



213 



Fines and Costs. 

(6). Number committed for Non-payment of Fines and Costs, and 

Amount received for Same. 



PRISONS. 



Number com- 
mitted for 

Non-payment 

of Fines 

and Coats. 



Number 
who paid 

Flnea 
and Costs. 



Amount 
received for 

Flnea 
and Coats. 



Barnstable Jail and House of Correction, 

Boston Jail, 

Boston House of Correction, . 
Cambridge Jail and House of Correction, 
Dedham Jail and House of Correction, . 
Deer Island House of Correction,*. 

Edgartown Jail 

Fitchburg Jail and House of Correction, 
Greenfield Jail and House of Correction, 
Ipswich House of Correction, . 
l^awrence Jail and House of Correction, 

Lowell Jail, 

Nantucket Jail and House of Correction, 
New Bedford Jail and House of Correction, 

Newburyport Jail, 

Northampton Jail and House of Correction, 
Pittafield Jail and House of Correction, 
Plymouth Jail and House of Correction, 
Salem Jail and House of Correction, 
Springfield Jail and House of Correction, 

Taunton Jail, 

Worcester Jail and House of Correction, 



Total, 



6 

650 

137 

2,317 

104 

4,920 

2 

820 

2ft 

75 

588 

903 

4 
849 
174 
200 
228 
263 
728 
941 
248 
756 



14,532 



879 

88 
994 

92 

1,514 

2 

97 
7 

89 

176 

826 

2 

826 

40 
109 

56 

58 
148 
820 

96 
218 



6,021 



$5,114 60 

865 00 

8,203 00 

1,624 75 

11,626 32 

22 08 

1,264 00 

67 00 

264 CO 

1,696 80 

1,885 40 

10 00 

4,462 64 

209 98 

880 00 

841 06 

748 35 

2,223 00 

2,728 00 

1,-276 54 

2,595 65 



$47,944 16 



(H). Commitments to County Prisons for Non-payment of Fines and 

Costs, Number released, etc. 



Nnmber 
committed. 



Paid Fines 
and Costs. 



Remained. 



Amount 
received. 



1875 

1876 

1877, 

1878, 

•I vl V| • • • * • • • 

1880 

1881, 

1882 

1883, 

1884, 

1885 

1886, 

1887, 

iW5| • •••••• 

JooVt ••••••• 

1890, 

1891, 

jov*, •*.•>• . 

1893 

1894, 

1895 

1896, 



7,398 

6,656 

6,473 

6,645 

6,171 

6,079 

6,339 

8,240 

9,055 

10,650 

10,008 

10,692 

11,286 

13,255 

16,089 

14,588 

10,211 

2,634 

4,177 

8,684 

10,160 

•14,582 



2,247 
1,916 
1,689 
1,447 
1,852 
1,667 
1,658 
1,766 
1,862 
1,956 
1,834 
2.828 
8,067 
8,837 
4,211 
4,314 
3,266 
1,108 
1,625 
8,062 
3,658 
♦6,021 



5,151 
4,740 
4,784 
6,198 
4,819 
4,422 
8,781 
6,484 
7,203 
8,694 
8,174 
7.869 
8,219 
9,418 
10,878 
10,224 
6.945 
1.626 
2,552 
6.622 
6,502 
♦9,511 



$40,016 15 
87,174 00 
82,980 87 
88,686 97 
22,872 67 
22,600 08 
21,542 19 
24,588 18 
28,169 38 
29,636 02 
27.001 67 
86,667 06 
42,425 68 
53,209 46 
57,487 06 
68,600 29 
42,310 81 
25,931 89 
28,861 72 
83,458 90 
88,054 81 

♦47,944 16 



• The Institution at Deer Island, formerly known aa the Boston IToase of Industry, which became a 
houso of correction on July 1, 1896, is Included In all tables of county prisons this year. 



214 



COUNTY PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Total Cost of Prisons. 

The cost of supporting the State Prison, the Reformatory Prison 
for Women, the Massachusetts Reformatory or any one of the jails 
or houses of correction, can be ascertained by reference to the 
particular reports upon the institutions. For convenience of refer- 
ence, the total figures of the statements set out in detail in preceding 
pages are reproduced below, to show the cost of maintaining all the 
institutions to which this report refers. 

It must be borne in mind that the Boston House of Industry, 
which has heretofore appeared in the table, is this year omitted, 
but the expense of maintaining it is put under the head of county 
prisons, it having been made a house of correction on the 1st of lust 
July. 

The average is 224 higher than in £he preceding year. It should 
be remembered that the State Farm, which is included in the table, 
receives paupers and lunatics as well as convicts ; and, for the pur- 
pose of making a fair comparison of the expenditures with other 
institutions, it is necessary to include all the inmates. This will 
explain why the average number shown here is not the same as in 
other parts of the report. 

There was an increase of $19,281.96 in the total expenditures, 
and an increase of only $6,706.39 in the receipts; consequently, the 
net increase in the cost of supporting the State and county institu- 
tion for the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, as compared with the 
preceding year, was $12,575.57. 



(I). Cost of Stale and County Prisons. 



PRISONS. 



Average 
Number of 
Prisoners. 



Expenditures. 



Receipts. 



Balances. 



State Prison, .... 
Reformatory Prison for Women, 
Massachusetts Reformatory, . 
County Prisons, 
State Farm, .... 
Total 



750 

836 

076 

4,762 

•1,098 



f7,930 



$159,011 68 

65,756 47 

204,817 71 

640,638 67 

114,001 06 



#1,174,225 49 



$65,589 91 
19,332 41 
33,863 49 

128,643 27 
3,622 03 



$99,421 77 
86,424 06 
170,954 22 
612,006 SO 
110,379 03 



$250,951 11 $923,274 38 



* Of this number, only 678 wero prisoners under sentence. 

t Five hundred and twenty of tbeee were paupers and lunatics at the State Farm. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 13. 



215 



STATISTICS. 



Statement showing Number of Prisoners received and discharged, in 
All Prisons, for the Ykar ending Sept. 30, 1896. 

Number of prisoners Oct. 1, 1895, 7,628 

Committed by courts during year, 



Removed from other prisons, 
Returned by revocation of permit, 

from escape, . 

from lunatic hospital, . 



87,238 

1,269 

32 

27 

8 



Total within the year, 

Discharged, 

Died, 

jCiScapevi, ■••••■•••••• 

Executed, 

Pardoned,* 

Released by commissioners, under chapter 440 of the Acts of 189 A, 

on writ of habeas corpus, 

Removed to lunatic hospital, 

to other prisons, 

Sentence vacated, 



38,574 



46,202 



37,106 
89 
68 

1 
39 

7 

12 

96 

1,255 

7 



38,680 



Number in custody Sept. 30, 1896, 7,522 

The foregoing statement is intended to show at a glance the 
number of prisoners received at the State Prison, the Reformatory 
Prison for Women, the Massachusetts Reformatory, the State Farm 
and the jails and houses of correction (including the Boston House 
of Industry, which became a house of correction the 1st of July), 
during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896. The number committed by 
the courts includes all sentenced prisoners and all persons committed 
to await trial or detained as witnesses. It will therefore be readily 
understood why the number is larger than appears in the commit- 
ment tables, which relate only to sentenced prisoners. 



* One pardoned by the President. 



216 STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS- [Oct. 

It will be perceived that fourteen more prisoners were received 
by transfer from other prisons than were removed to other prisons. 
This apparent discrepancy is accounted for by the removals from the 
Lyman School and the Industrial School for Girls, neither of which 
is included in the statistical part of this report. Eight prisoners 
were transferred from the Lyman School to the Massachusetts Re- 
formatory and six from the Industrial School to the Reformatory 
Prison for Women. 

Commitments op Sentenced Prisoners. 

For the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, the commitments of prisoners 
under sentence to all the prisons included in this report amounted 
to 28,955, — 25,829 males and 3,126 females. The commitments 
to the State Prison were 234 ; to the Reformatory Prison for Women, 
352 ; to the Massachusetts Reformatory, 753 ; to the jails and houses 
of correction, 23,553 males and 2,741 females, making a total of 
26,294; to the State Farm, 1,289 males and 33 females, making a 
total of 1,322. 

As compared with 1895, there was an increase of 62 in the com- 
mitments to the State Prison ; of 18 to the Reformatory Prison for 
Women ; of 1,171 to the county prisons ; of 259 to the State Farm ; 
and a net decrease of 21 to the Massachusetts Reformatory. The 
total increase was 1,489, — 1,424 males and 65 females. 

In the table immediately following are given the details of the 
offences of all the persons committed to these institutions during 
the year. It has not been considered necessary, however, to print 
the offences in all cases precisely as they are returned by the prison 
officers ; but in making the consolidations, of which fewer have been 
necessary this year than heretofore, care has been exercised to join 
only offences of the same nature, and to keep them all in their 
proper classes. Wherever a peculiar offence is returned it has been 
considered better to consolidate than to lengthen the table by print- 
ing a new title for a few cases ; for example, two men were com- 
mitted to the South Boston House of Correction charged with 
"confining for purposes of stealing," and these cases have been 
added to those for robbery. One case of burglary has been joined 
with breaking and entering, although this is an offence which varies 
in degree to such an extent that the cases amounting to burglary 
might well be shown separately. If the common law rule were 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 



217 



observed in stating offences in the commitment papers, this might 
be done, but, as no distinction is made generally, it is not possible 
to show how many of these cases amount to burglary. A single 
case of burning a bridge is put with " burning buildings ; " one case 
reported as " carrying away with intent to steal " has been put with 
44 larceny ; " " driving a horse without right" and *• unlawfully using 
a boat belonging to another** are put with " unlawful taking;" the 
term " dog laws" includes all offences relating to dogs ; " violation 
of the election laws" includes " voting illegally," "falsely making 
nomination papers" and like offences ; " refusing to work in alms- 
house;" " refusing to perform a reasonable amount of work for 
food" and "refusing to work in tramp-house" are all included 
under " vagrancy," as the statutes provide that any person found 
guilty of so refusing shall be deemed a vagrant; one offence of 
"leaving vehicle in the street "is put with " obstructing street." 
In this table no distinction is made between a first and second con- 
viction of drunkenness ; all offences of this kind are included under 
the single term of drunkenness. Attempts to commit offences are 
invariably counted with the offences themselves. 

The figures in the following table represent the number of 
offences and not the number of persons actually committed. Some 
are committed upon more than one sentence at the same time, and 
the number of commitments is therefore in excess of the number of 
prisoners. 



Table No. 1. — Whole Number of Commitments to Jails, arranged by Sen- 
tences and Sex of Prisoners, for the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 





Sentences. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

• 

6 

s 

• 
a 


Lesa than 6 
Months. 


6 and Less than 
18 Months. 


1 Tear and Less 
than 8. 


►J 


8 Tears and 
Less than 5. 


3 Tears and 
More. 


• 

• 

as 
® 

w 
M 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F, 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M.F. 

i 


M. 


F. 1 Tot. 


1. — Against the person, . 

2. — Against property, • 

3. — Against public order, 

etc., ... 


282 
174 

1,495 


16 
86 

162 
214 


86 
97 

461 
603 




106 
116 


7 
28 

40 


1 

4 

28 


6 

6 


2 
2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




274 
294 

2,001 


17 
49 

298 


291 
843 

2,299 


Tout, .... 


1,001 


70 


33 


- 


2,569 


364 


2,933 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 2. — Whole Number of Commitments to Souses of Correction, 
arranged by Sentences and Sex of Prisoners, for the Tear ending 
Sept. 30, 1S96. 





SnroeM 








j 


• 


I! 


1 


1 «' 


£« 


| 








1 

a . 
s 


*| 






|i 


e 




I 




J 5 




j3 


h j 




a 






























1 1 












,J J J. 


-4 ! - 


„|_ 


,1 , 


Mfli 




















3. — A g»t nit public order. 


i 






10 






"ie- IB'*' 






















MB , 


1.M1 


1,440 3*141654 1M. 7 


8 | 1 


"■"* 


i,3T7 tt.»t 



Table No. 3. — Wfiole Number of Commitments to Jails and Houses of 
Correction, arranged by Offences, Sentences and Sex of Prisoners, for 
the Year ending Sept. 30, 1896. 





B..T..C... 


OFFESCES. 


3 
& 

E 


I 1 


9 . 


i 






^1 


J 








«■ 




•■ 








"•I- 




Abandoning child, 

. '.h|.i>« - 

ThreiU 


1 

n 
i 

21 


1 

I 
n 


5i 


11 


1H 
1 

1 


i 


1 


I 


: 




i 


1 


J J , 

Hi 


Total, 

a— Auurn Pw>n uti. 

Breaking and entering, . 
B nuking mil enuring 

Ernbtnlero.nt,* . . 
Extortion, . '. '. 


454 
DM 


oi 


in 


S3 


7S 
S3 

1 

141 


] 


£ 


' 


1 


! 


i 
- 


H 

11 

■0 

3 t! 


U| I,f34 

1 ! 

1« 1J)H 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



219 



Table No. 3 — Continued. 





Sentences. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

• 

• 

o 
O 

-o 

a 

C3 

o 

a 


• 

a 

at • 

a 
• ° 

m3 


a 

es 

*° em 
9 


• 
• 

2 

■3 

c . 

« M 

M n 

* 5 

a] Co 

*4 


•0 
a 

a> m 

91 


•0 

8 • 

a 


•0 
a 
•j 

(3 
CV £ 

>H O 

3 

IS 


• 


«■* 

OS 

£ 

on 
bo 

< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. j Tot. 


2.— Against Property 

— Con. 
Malicious mischief, 
Poisoning fowl, 
Receiving stolen goods, 
Hemoviog baggage, 
Belling or concealing 
mortgaged or leased 
property, . . 
Stealing a ride, 
Trespass, . . • 
Unlawful taking, . 


86 

4 

3 

2 

5 

53 

38 


11 
2 

1 
01 

3 

2 

2 

8 

1 

649 

127 

3 
4 


30 

8 

2 

4 
18 

816 

7 
4 

6 

7 

5 
1 
6 



1 
2 

105 

4,997 

1 

14 

2 

14 

2 

2 
119 

24 


2 
1 
1 

_* 
70 

8 

1 

3 

59 

1 
2 

16 

' 16 
846 

82 

2 
38 


10 

4 

1 

1 

371 

15 

2 

8 

2 

\ 

7 

5 

825 
8 

3 

2 
45 

11 


1 

24 

7 

1 

28 

7 

2 
286 

1 

3 

20 


6 

208 

21 

4 

66 

9 

1 
2 


4 

5 

5 
36 


3 

113 
9 

1 
2 


1 

4 


1 

82 
2 

3 


1 


3 


- 


136 

25 
3 

4 

6 
57 
57 


1 

4 

191 

19 

3 

1 
4 

89 

1 
4 

36 

1 

89 

1,816 

160 

8 
67 


149 

I 

29 

3 

4 

6 

67 

61 


Total, 

8 — Again«t Public 
Order, ktc. 

Aduhery, . 

Affr.iy, .... 

Bartturdy, 

Baihlnir, unlawfully, . 

Bestiality, 

Bicycle laws, violating, 

Bird fighting,. 

Bonfire, making, . 

Carrying weapons. 

Children, exhibiting, il- 
legally, 

City ordinance or town 
by laws, violating, 

Committing a nuisance, 

Common beggar, . . 

Common brawler, . 

Common night-walker. 

Concealing death of 
child, .... 

Contempt of court, 

Counterfeit money, 

Cruelty to animals, 

Discharging Hre arras, . 

Disorderly house, keep- 
ing, .... 

Disorderly io public 
conveyance, 

Disturbing meeting, 

Disturbing the peace, . 

Dog laws, violating, 

Drunkenuess, 

Election laws, violating, 

Escape 

False Are alarm, giving, 

Fast driving, . 

Fi-h laws, violating. 

Forgery and uttering, . 

Fornication, . 

Gaming laws, violating, 

Ilouse of ill-fame, keep- 
ing, .... 

Idle and disorderly, 

Illegal measure, using, 

Indecent exposure, 

Indecent language, us- 
ing, .... 


832 

2 
5 
2 
3 

1 
1 

2 

4 

1 

73 
1 

8 

1 

32 

1 

8 

4 

14 
495 
9 
10,656 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 

01 

47 

1 

15 
2 


1 


2,375 

66 
5 
6 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 

13 

1 

73 
1 


13 
3 

39 
1 

28 

6 

16 

605 

9 

16,444 

2 

23 

1 

3 

2 

19 

105 

49 

5 
179 

2 
46 

1 


2,566 

75 
6 
6 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 

13 

1 

76 
1 

10 
4 

89 

1 
17 

3 
39 

1 

64 

6 

17 

694 

9 

18,260 

2 

23 

1 

3 

2 

19 

265 

49 

13 

236 

2 

46 

1 



220 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 3 — Concluded. 











Sentences. 








1 


i 


• 


. a 
■ 3 • 


1 1 ; I - 

! J 1 a 


Is 


C 






l S 





_3 * 
1 - -a 


* c 


« 


• 

• 




Q 


x 


1 S *i 


, ■"» i _ S 


a 




e 


OFFENCES. 


■o 

e 
_, 


_• 


i ^ 


_j _» t» *• 

' _ c • a 


2 -° 

e 
* S 


§2 ' 


as 




• 
a 




!1: 


>«5 i -3 






es 




fc. 


^ 


i • 


' - 1 et 


•9 


i e 


< 



M. 



3. — a gainst pcblic 

Obder. etc. — Cod. 

Infant*' boarding-bouse, 

keeping, unlicensed. 
Intelligence office, keep 

log, 
Jaok lawn, violating, 
Lewd cohabitation. 
Lewd ne«<>, 
Liquor, giving to pris- 
oner, . 
Liquor laws, violating, 
Loitering around rail 

road nation. 
Lord's Day, violating. 
Lottery, advert Mng.etc 
Milk laws, violating, 
Neglect of family, 
Nonpayment of tax, 
Oh*c«>ne langtinire, using 
Obscene literature. 
Obscenity, 
Officer, obstructing, 
Opium laws, violating, 
Turk laws, violating. 
Peddling, unlicensed, 
Perjury, . 

Physician, unregistered 
Polygamy, 
Profanity, 

Railroad laws, violating 
Refusing to aid officer, 
R^cue, . 
School laws, violating, 
SMewalk. obstructing, 
Street, obstructing, 
Ptrvet ear, obstructing, 
Stubbornness, 
Throwing missiles, 
Tramps, . 
U. 8. mall, obstructing 
U. S. mall, stealing, 
U.S mail, using Illegally, 
U. 8. revenue laws, vio- 
lating, . . • 
Unnatural act. 
Vagabonds, . • 
Vagrants, 
Walking on railroad, 

Total, 



1 

1 

li 
-! 

10! 
I 
1 
106 

.! 

2«' 

I! 

60i 

46i 
3. 
1. 
5. 

II 
2 
1 
66 

2 

28 

4 
8 
2 
41 
28 
2 
1 
4 



2 

14 

214 



12,160 



40 



3 



F. 



F. ! If. F. If.! F. M . F. . If. F. M. 



3 
10 

1 
101 



72 
2 

1 

2 



1 

2 



1 
4 



25 
1 
1 
1 



1 

13 

433 



030:6,016 



4 
2fr 



27 



15 



12 



15 



- 1 



35 




51 



1 
11 



1,0861,050 384 



4 
6 



5 
2 



3 

4 



H - 

3 : 



133 50 



1 

-1 



1 



1 
1 



i I 



-, -' 

_. i _,! 
i 



- 



-' -. - 



"I -I 



-: J J 



1 2 



.1 -| - 



22! 6 



.1 - 

-I - 

-I - 
I 



10 






1! 
1 
13 

■ 
2 

no 

i 

i 

28 

Si 

3 

U7, 

47 
3 
4. 
5 
3 
2 
1 

66 
7. 
4^ 

28 



4 

151 

2! 
41 1 
28 

2| 
6 

41 
61 



1 



2! 
6: 

26} 
400 
214 



13 
37 



83 



1 
5 



j 

-I 
li 

-I 
.1 

i 



1 
SO 



Tot. 



1 

26 

80 



6 

26 

3 
3 

m 

47 
Z 

4 
7 

3 



T 

4 

— > 
i 

33 

1 
4 

15 

• 

41 

28 
2 
7 
4 

61 
1 

1 

2 

6 

27 

52$ 

214 



-1 10,429 2,465 21,804 



RECAPITULATION. 



1. — Agntnst the person, 
2.— Against properly, . 
8. — Against public or- 
der, etc., . . 


9P< 
83'J 

12,18* 


57 
01 

030 


452 
816 

6.016 


21 
70 

1.086 

1,177 


180 
871 

1,050 
1,610 


6 7o| -1 24' - 
24 208, 4 113 1 

I'M 
384 133) 50 22; 6 


10 
32 

10 


1 


1- 
-1 - 


1 I 
1,7401 85 1 1,854 
2,375 191- 2,56d 

19, 4292, 465 27,994 


Total, 


14,011 


1,087 


;;«* 


414 420 64 159' 7 

i 1 1 1 


61 


1 


8 I 

1 


23,553 2, 74 1,26. 294 

1 1 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 



221 



Table No. 4. — Commitments by Counties to Jails and Houses of Correc- 
tion for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 



CODNTIES- 


1. — Offences 

against thb 

Person. 


■ 
2.— Offences 
against Prop- 
erty. 


3. — Offences , 

AGAINST t'UBLIC 

Order, etc. ) 


Aggregate 

Offences of All 

Classes. 




M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


i 
Tot. | 

i 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Barnatable, . 




4 


- 


4 


7 


- 


7 


6 


1 


7 


17 


1 


18 


Berkshire, . 




86 


- 


I 
86 


00 


- 


60 


866 


8 


374 


462 


8 


470 


Bristol, . 




193 


10 


203 


182 


18 


200 


1,663 


292 


1,866 


1,938 


320 


2,258 


Dukes County, 




1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 i 

| 


3 


- 


8 


Etfscx, . 




173 


6 


179 


285 


10 


296 


1,994 


266 


2,249 1 


2,452 


271 


2,723 


Franklin, . 




9 


- 


9 


11 


1 


»! 


79 


6 


«: 


99 


6 


105 


Hampden, . 




63 


- 


63 


102 


8 


105 ! 


1,401 


123 


1,524 > 

i 


1,666 


126 


1,692 


Dnmpabiie, . 




12 


- 


12 


18 


- 


18 1 

t 


266 


11 


277 I 


296 


11 


807 


Middlesex, . 




208 


11 


219 


815 


23 


838 


3,361 


291 


3,652 , 


8,884 


326 


4,209 


Nantucket, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


4 


2 


2 


4 


Norfolk, 




28 


8 


31 


49 


1 


60 


858 


11 


369 


436 


15 


460 


Plymouth, . 




34 


- 


34 


82 


- 


32 


290 


16 


306 


366 


16 


372 


Suffolk, 




871 


64 


926 


1,164 


131 


1,285 


8,193 


1,369 


9,562 

1 


10,218 


1,654 


11,772 


Worcester, . 




117 


1 

86 


118 
1,834 


160 


4 

191 


164 ' 


1,548 


81 


1,629 

i 

21,894 < 

i 

i 


1,826 


86 


1,911 


Total, . 


1,749 


2,875 


2,566 

1 


19,429 


2,465 i 


23,563 


2,741 


26,294 



Table No. 5. — Commitments to the State Farm, by Sentences, Offences 
and Sex of Prisoners, for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1896, 















Sentences. 








OFFEXCE8. 


than 6 
sths. 


a 

Si 

-.2 

• a 

55 


3 

a 

•o 

« St 

t: a 


•o ■ 
c « 

"a 

S3 




I 

9 






I 1 




Si 




3 






• 


* 


m 




-< 






M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


If. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Drunkenness, 


86 


• 


734 


25 


168 


6 


1 


- 


938 


30 


968 


Escape, 








1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Idle and disorderly, 








1 


- 


9 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


11 


- 


11 


Lewdness, . 








- 


- 


*m 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


Tramps, . 








- 


- 


108 


- 


86 


- 


2 


- 


140 


- 


140 


Vagabonds, 








- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Vagrants, . 








6 
43 


- 


136 
983 


1 
26 


46 
260 


6 


9 
18 


1 
2 


197 


2 
33 


199 


TotU, . . . 


1,289 


1,822 



222 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 6. — Whole Number of Commitments for Non-payment of 
Fines and upon Term Sentences to All Penal Institutions by Sen- 
tences, Offences and Sex of Prisoners, for the Tear ending Sept. 30* 
1896. 





Sentences. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

3 

5 
Q 

•o 
a 
« 

© 

a 


• 

a 

C3 • 

flJS 

a 

J5 


c 
-5 

• 


S 

a • 
* • 

H 


a 
m « 


a 


■o 
a 
eg 

u 

g i 


• 

e 

w 

6S 

< 


- 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M 


F. 


M. F. 

i 


M. 


F. 


M. F* M. 

i | 


F. 


M. F. i Tot. 

1 1 


1. — Against the Pkb- 

bok. 
Abandoning child, 
Abuse of female child, . 

Assault 

Assault, felonious, 
Conspiracy, . 
Manslaughter, • 

Rape, .... 

Robbery, 

ThreaU, .... 


952 
7 

1 

1 
29 


55 
2 

67 

2 
75 
11 

2 

1 
91 

1 i 

i " 


419 
26 

4 

1 

2 

452 

5 

18 

2 

24 

696 

89 

8 
2 

i 

816 

7 
4 

e 


21 

21 

1 

2 
60 
2 
1 
1 

8 
70 

8 


159 

17| 
1 
2 

1 
180 

19 
2 

4 

5 

9 

817 

10 

4 
1 

_i 

371 

15 
2 

a 


5 
6 

23 
1 



24 

7 


63 
10 

I 

2 

J 

i 

79 

63 

2 
5 

i 

4 

128 

6 

208 
21 


3 

~~6 
1 

1 

1 

25 
2 

30 
11 


3 

7, 
8 

5 

j 

"i 


- 


4 

9 

!' 

19 

19 

1 

11 

32 
2 


1 


1 
5 

j 

1 
3 


1 
1 

1 

■ 

1 


3 
1,602, 

77 1 
T 

11 

1 

i2 

32| 


4 

84 

2 

i 

1. 


4 

m 
O 

1,6*5 

7* 

2 

U 

1 

6 

13 

32 


Total, 

2.— Against Propebtt. 
Arson, .... 
Breaking and entering, 
Breaking and entering 

railroad car, 
Burglar's tools, having, 
Burning buildings, 
Embezzlement, 
Evading fare, . 
Extortion, 
Fraud, .... 

Larceny 

Malicious mischief, 
Poisooing fowl, . . 
Receiving stolen goods, 
Removing baggage, 
Boiling or concealing 

mortgaged or leased 

property, . 
Stealing a ride, 
Trespass, . . . 
Unlawful taking, . 


990 

1 
6 

23 
27 

82 

552 

86 

4 
S 

2 

5 

53 

38 


24 

56 

4 
1 
1 

2 
45 

-1 

3 

118 
9 

1 


2 

6 
1 

9 
6 


1,749 

2 

168 

\ 

30 

3J 

Tl 
1,750 

136 

25 
3 

6 
57 
57 


91 
3' 

j 

3 

190 

13 

1 

II 

- 

1 i 


1,840 

171 

2 
4 
« 

54 

39 
3 

75 

1,940 

149 

1 

$2 
3 

4 

6 

57 

61 


Total, 

8. — A gainst Public 
Order, etc. 

Abortion, 

Adultery, • 

Affray, • • • . 

Bastardy, 

Bathing unlawfully, 

Bestiality, 

Bicycle laws, violating, 

Bird fighting, . 

Bonfire making, . 

Carrying weapons, 

Children, czhibiiing, ille- 
gally, .... 

City ordinance or town 
by-laws, violating, 

Committing a nuisance, 


832 

2 
5 
2 
8 

1 
1 
2 
4 

1 

72 
1 


2,375 

66 

5 
6 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
IS 

1 

73 
1 


> 225 

87 

- 

> : 
i 

i 3 

1 - 
i 


2.600 

i 

i 

5 
6 
3 
« 

1 

1 
•■» 

13 

1 • 

! r : 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



223 



Table No. 6 — Continued. 



OFFENCES. 



Sentences. 



a 
I 

9 

o 




M. 



3.— Against Public 

Order, etc. — Con. 
Common beggar, . 
Common brawler, . 
Common night-walker. 
Concealing death of 

child, . . 
Contempt of court, 
Counterfeit money. 
Cruelty to animals. 
Discharging fire-arms, 
Disorderly house, keep 

log, 
Disorderly in publli 

conveyance, 
Disturbing meeting, 
Disturbing the peace, 
Dog laws, violating, 
Drunkenness, 
Election laws,' violating 
Escape, ■ • . 
False tire-alarm, giving 
Fast driving, . 
Fish laws, violating, 
Forgery, . 
Fornication, . 
Gaming laws, violating 
Douse of ill-fame, keep 

lng. 
Idle and disorderly, 
Illegal measure, using, 
Indecent exposure, 
Indecent language, us 

ing, ... 
Infants' boarding-house 

keeping, unlicensed, 
Intelligence office, keep 

ing, 
Junk laws, violating, 
Lewd cohabitation, 
Lewdness, 
Liquor, giving to prls 

oner, . 
Liquor laws, violating. 
Loitering around rail 

road station, 
Lord's Day, violating, 
Lottery, advertislrig.etc 
Milk laws, violating, 
Neglect of family, . 
Non-payment of tax, , 
Obscene language, using, 
Obscene literature, 
Otacenlty, 
Officer, obstructing, 
Opium laws, violating, 
Park Jaws, violating. 
Peddling, unlicensed, 
Perjury, . 

Physician, unregistered 
Polygamy, . 
Profanity, 
Railroad laws, violating, 



8 

1 

82 

1 

8 

4 

14 
405 
9 
10,556 
1 
1 
1 
8 
2 

01 

47 

1 

15 

2 

9 



1 
1 

10 

1 
106 

6 

26 

2 

3 

60 

45 

3 

1 

6 

1 

2 

1 

66 



2 
28 



F. 



2 



8 



1 
71 



648 



127 



1 

6 

40 



a 

cS . 

•a S 

P 

4) « 
•J 



M. 



F. 





1 
2 

105 



5,032 
1 
15 



2 

14 

2 

2 
120 



24 



8 
10 

1 
101 



8 






72 
2 



1 
8 

50 

1 
2 



16 



16 



846 



82 



2 
38 



4 
26 



27 



i 



CO w 

* a 

a * 

es m 



M. 



F. 



1 

28 



1,550 311 



8 



8 



2 8 
54 20 



11 



« 

•J 

a 



a 
as 

5 



3 



M. 



234 







12 



15 



10 



8 



235 



1 

23 



a 

CS ** 
(0 • 

*2 



M. 



10 
13 



6 



a 

u JS 

c •* 
a> s 

* i 

« 



M. 



F. 



8 



5 - 



*3 

a 



o 



I- 



M. 



F. 



•J 
6© 

<5 



M. 



F. 



Tot. 







13 
3 

39 
1 

28 

5 

16 

605 

9 

17,382 

2 

24 

1 

3 

2 

19 

105 

49 

5 

190 

2 

46 

1 

1 

1 

1 

13 

52 

2 
810 

6 

26 

3 

3 

147 

47 
3 
4 
5 
3 
2 
1 

66 
7 
4 
6 

28 
1 



1 

4 
112 

1 
4 



89 



10 
4 

112 

1 
17 

8 
89 

1 

67 

5 

17 



1 
91 

9 
2,046 9,428 
2 
24 
1 
3 
2 
1 20 
163 268 
49 



9 

84 



21 
56 



83 



14 

274 

2 

46 



2 



3 



2 
1 

34 
108 

2 
893 

6 

26 

3 

8 

149 

47 
3 
4 
7 
3 
2 
1 

69 
7 
4 
9 

33 
1 



224 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct, 



Table No. 6 — Concluded. 



OFFENCES. 



3. — Against Public 
Ordeb, etc.— Cod. 
Refusing to aid officer, 
Rrscne, ... 
School laws, violating, 
Sidewalk, obstructing, 
Street, obstructing. 
Street cars, obstructing 
Stubbornness, 
Taking liquor Into In 

dian country, 
Throwing missiles, 
Tramps, . . 

U. S. mail, obstructing, 
U. 8. mall, stealing, 
U.S. mall, using 11 legally 
U. S. revenue laws, vio- 
lating, . 
Unnatural act, 
Vagabonds, . 
Vagrants, . 

Walking on railroad, 

Total, 



SENTENCES. 



o 
Q 

•o 
a 



a 



m. ; F. I M. 







O 



-3 
C 



' >• o 

s 



T 



4 

8 
2 
41 
28 
2 
1 



4 



2 



o 

mm 

14 

214 



25 
1 
1 
1 



1 
13 
3 439 



15 



JA. Jf» , Jft. IT. «a. ■?• j4- r. 



ll 



-i - 



j d ^ : 






-j 1; -! 4 - 
! j i' 



138 



-i 36 -j 2 

1 - "I " 



10 



2 - 1 



I i 






-J 
2 -I 






-I . 



-1 - 1 

51 3 






- I. - - 



187, 12 47 6' 9 

■ '■I 



-| - - -; -I -: -! 



2 - -: - - 



Tot. 



\ 

4 

15 
2 

41. 

28 
2 
6 



4 

901 
1 
2 

N 

2 

6 

28 

690 

214 



T 
1 



1 
37 



4 
15 

« 

41 

13 

1 
4 
201 
1 
3 
1 

2 

6 
29 

7X3 
214 



12,189 939 6,059 1,0862,042410 383338 35 36 10 

I I i I ! I . ! 



-j -' 120,718 2,810 23,528 



RECAPITULATION. 



1. — A gainst the person, 
2. — AgAinst property, . 
3. — Against public or- 



der, etc., 
Total, 



990 
832 



57' 452 



91 



i 



816 



I I I ' I I 

21 180> 6 79 6 24| 

70 371! 24:208. 30,11 






lit!' I 

-j 19| -! 5 1 1,749 91 1.S40 



9! 32 1 

.i-J 



3 -. 2^75 225 2,600 



12,189 939 6,0591,0862,042 410383338 35i 36, 10j - -, 120,718 2,81023,525 

z\7~7Z'T7Z!ttlZi'Zr M ~;;j~T7!™l~~:'"~: *r zrzrr. r*r::- • 



. 14,0111,087 7,32711,177,2,593440.670374 172; 451 61 1 8, 224,842 3,12627,968 

I I I I I III 



1 



Table No. 7. — Commitments for Non-payment of Fines and CWs, and 
upon Sentences to All Prisons^ for the Tear ending Sept. 30^ 1896. 



OFFENCES. 


Committed for 

NOIf-PATMENT OV 

Fines and Costs to 
County Prisons. 


Committed or 
Sentences to All ; 

Prisons. ! 

1 


j Aggregates. 




M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


i 

! M ' 


F. 1 Tot. 


1. — Against the person, 
2. — Against property, . 
8. — Against public order, 
etc., • • . . 


990 
832 

12,189 


67 
91 

939 


1,047 
923 

18,128 


871 
2,098 

8,849 


34 
134 

1,871 


905 
2,232 i 

10,720 i 


1,861 
1 2,930 

' 21,038 


91 
226 

2,810 


1,953 
3,156 

23,843 


Total, .... 


14,011 


1,087 


16,098 


11,818 


2,039 1 13,857 

l 


1 25,829 


3,126 


2S.95S 



* There were 987 prisoners committed on Indeterminate sentences to the Suite Prison and liases- 
chusetts Reformatory, which, addt-d to this number, gives 28,956 as the whole number of commitments. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



225 



Table No. 8. — Consolidated Statement, showing Commitments of Male 
and Female Prisoners to all Prisons for the Year e7tding Sept. 30, 1896. 





a 

o 


tory 
for 




















• 

E 


forma 
riaon 
"omen. 


!! 


County Prisons. 


State Farm. 


Aggregates. 


OFFENCES. 


o 


S 5 

• 4i 






• 












3 


*ft«£ 


£* 


















<fi 


X 


X 


















M. 


F. 


M. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. |f. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


I. —Against th* Person. 


























Abandoning child, . 


- 


8 


- 


- 


. 1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


Abuse of female child, . 


4 


- 


- 


3 


- 


8 


- 


- 


- 


7 


- 


7 






8 


17 


1,002 


81 


1,683 


- 


- 


- 


1,619 


84 


1,703 


Assault, felonious, 


17 


- 


10 


77 


2 


79 


- 


- 


- 


104 


2 


106 


Carnal abuse, . . . . 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Conspiracy, . 
Manslaughter, * 


— 


- 


• 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


• 


2 


8 


- 


1 


11 


1 


12 


- 


- 


- 


20 


1 


21 


Mayhem, . 


1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Murder, • • • 


1 * 


- 


- 


- 


o» 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


6 


Kane, • • ■ • 
Robbery, • 


10 


- 


- 


6 


- 


6 


• 


- 


- 


16 


- 


16 


jai 


- 


7 


15 


- 


15 


• 


- 


- 


53 


- 


53 




i _ 

i 

I 78 


- 


30 


32 


" 


32 


— 


— 


- 


82 


- 


32 


Total, . 


6 


1,749 


85 


1,834 


- 


- 


1,861 


91 


1.V52 


2.— Against Pbopbrty. 


1 
























Arson, . • . . • 


3 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


• 


- 


— 


5 


— 


5 


Breaking and entering, . 


76 


1 


154 


168 


2 


170 


- 


- 


- 


897 


3 


400 


Breaking and entering rail- 


























road car, . 


1 


— 


• 


2 


— 


2 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


8 


Burglar's tools, having, 


1 


- 


1 


4 


- 


4 


- - 


- 


6 


- 


6 


Burning buildings, • 


2 


- 


6 


5 


1 


6 


- 


- 


- 


12 


1 


18 


Common thief, . 


9 


- 


« 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


• 


9 


- 


9 


Embezzlement, 


4 


- 


12 


62 


2 


54 


** 


^ 


- 


68 


2 


70 


Evading fare, . 


- 


- 


- 


80 


- 


80 


- 


- 


- 


30 


- 


80 


Extortion, . • 


- 


- 


— 


3 


- 


8 


• 


— 


• 


8 


— 


8 




3 


- 


9 


71 


4 


75 


- 


_ 


- 


83 


4 


87 


Habitual criminal, . 


1 


- 


« 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


• 


2 




Id 


30 


242 


1,750 


160 


1,910 


• 


— 


- 


2,008 


190 


2,198 


Malicious mischief, 


- 


• 


2 


136 


13 


149 


- 


- 


- 


138 


13 


151 


Poisoning fowl, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Receiving stolen goods, 


4 


8 


8 


25 


4 


29 


- 


- 


- 


87 


7 


44 


Removing bavgage. 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


8 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


8 


Selling or concealing mort- 


























gaged or leased property, . 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


Stealing a ride, 


- 


— 


1 


6 


- 


6 


- 


- 


- 


7 


— 


7 


Trespass 


- 


» 


- 


67 


- 


67 


- 


- 


- 


57 


- 


67 


Unlawful taking, . 


12*1 


- 


1 
435 


67 


4 


61 


- 


— 


— 


68 


4 


62 


Total, 


84 


2,875 


191 


2,666 


- 


- 


2,930 


225 


3,155 


3. — Against Public Ordbh 


• 
























stc. 


























Abortion, • • 


e 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


1 


7 


Adultery, . ^. . . 


- 


8 


2 


56 


19 


75 


- 


- 


- 


58 


27 


85 


Affray, 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


6 


- 


- 


- 


5 


• 


5 


Bastardy, . . . 


- 


• 


- 


6 


- 


6 


- 


- 


- 


6 


** 


6 


Bathing, unlawfully, 
Bestiality, . 
Bicycle laws, violating, 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


8 


- 


- 


— 


8 


- 


3 


l 


- 


- 


2 


— 


2 


- 


- 


• 


8 


- 


8 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


«- 


1 


Bird fighting;, . 


- 


• 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


1 


Bonfire making, . • 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Carrying weapons, • 
Children, exhibiting, Illegally 


— 


— 


• 


18 


- 


13 


— 


- 


- 


13 


— 


18 


i ■" 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


City ordinance or town by- 


























laws, violating, . 


, - 


— 


- 


73 


8 


76 


- 1 - 


- 


73 


3 


76 


Committing a nuisance, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 1 - 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Common beggar, . . 


- 


- 


1 


9 


1 


10 


- | - 


- 


10 


1 


11 


Common brawler, . 


- 


- 


— 


- 


4 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


4 


Common night walker, . 


- 


23 


- 


- 


89 


89 


- 


- 


- 


- 


112 


112 


Concealing death of child, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


«• 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Contempt of court, • 


- 


— 


— 


18 


4 


17 


- 


- 


- 


13 


4 


17 


Counterfeit money, 


2 


• 


- 


8 


- 


8 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


6 


Cruelty to animals, . 


- 


- 


- 


89 


- 


39 


- 


- 


- 


89 


- 


39 


Discharging fire-arms, . 
Disorderly house, keeping. 


, - 


- 


- 


1 


• 


1 


- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


1 


• 


8 


- 


28 


86 


64 


- 


- 


- 


28 


39 


67 


Disorderly in public convey. 


































6 


• 


6 


— 


— 


— 


6 


— 


5 


Disturbing meeting, 


, - 


• 


«• 


16 


1 


17 


- 


- 


• 


16 


1 


17 


Disturbing the peace, . 


- 


2 


1 


605 


89 


694 


- 


- 


- 


606 


91 


697 


Dot* laws, violating, 


, - 


- 


- 


9 


- 


9 


- 


- 


— 


9 


- 


9 






200 168 


16,444 


1,816 


18,2G0 


938 80 


968 


17,550 


2,046 


19,596 



.226 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 





Table No. 8- 


— Concluded. 














• 

a 
o 




*2 


I 


— i — 
















a 


-c c 


= « 
























ti 


COUKTY PRISOX8. 


Stats Fasm. 


AGGREOAT 


MM. 


OFFENCES. 


• 


*-2 






















&>£.•£ 


2x 


i 


















K 


S 


•Q 




















M. 


F. 


M. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot 


M. 


F. 


• Tat. 


8. — Against Public Obdei 


t» 
























ktc — Con 


























Election laws, violating, 


, — 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 










23 


- 


23 


1 


- 


1 


24 


- 


24 


False lire-alarm, giving, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


I 


- 


— 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Fast driving, . 


- 


— 


- 


8 


— 


8 


- 


- 


— 


8 


— 


S 


Flab laws, violating, 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Forgery 


. 12 


1 


6 


19 


— 


19 


— 


- 


- 


37 


1 


38 


Fornication, • 


, - 


8 


1 


105 


160 


265 


- 


- 


- 


106 


163 


269 


Chiming laws, violating, 


- 


- 


- 


49 


- 


49 


- 


- 


- 


49 


- 


49 


House of ill fame, keeping, 


- 


1 


- 


5 


8 


13 


- 


- 


- 


6 


9 


14 


Idle and disorderly, 


- 


27 


24 


179 


67 


236 


11 


- 


11 


214 


64 


298 


Illegal measure, using, . 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Incest, . ' . . • 


2 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


— 


2 


— 


2 


Indecent exposure. 


, 


- 


2 


46 


«• 


46 


- 


- 


- 


48 


- 


43 


Indecent language, using, 


- 


- 


- • 


1 


— 


1 


— 


- 


• 


1 


— 


1 


Infants' boarding house, keep 


). 
























ing, unlicensed, . 


- 


«• 


- 


1 


— 


1 


•» 


— 


«• 


1 


— 


1 


Intelligence office, keeping, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


2 


Junk laws, violating, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


• 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


Lewd cohabitation, 


1 


8 


- 


13 


13 


26 


• - 


— 


— 


14 


21 


35 


Lewdness, 


, - 


18 


- 


52 


87 


89 


- 


1 


1 


62 


66 


103 


Liquor, giving to prisoner, 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Liquor laws, violating, . 
Loitering around railroac 


, — 


• 


- 


810 


83 


893 


- 


- 


— 


810 


83 


383 


t 
































6 


- 


6 


• 


— 


•» 


6 


— 


i 


Lord's Day, violating, . 


, - 


- 


- 


26 


- 


26 


«• 


- 


- 


26 


— 


26 


Lottery, advertising, etc, 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


8 


- 


- 


- 


8 


• 


8 


Milk laws, violating, 


, - 


— 


- 


3 


- 


8 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 


3 


Neglect of family, . 


- 


1 


- 


147 


1 


148 


• 


- 


— 


147 


2 


149 


Non-payment of tax, . 


, — 


- 


- 


47 


— 


47 


— 


- 


- 


47 


— 


47 


Obscene language, using, 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


Obscene literature, 


- 


- 


— 


4 


• 


4 


— 


— 


- 


4 


<- 


4 


Obscenity, 


- 


- 


- 


5 


2 


7 


- 


- 


- 


6 


2 


7 


Officer, obstructing, 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


8 


— 


8 


Opium laws, violating, . 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


— 




Park laws, violating. 


. - 


— 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


— 


1 


Peddling, unlicensed, . 


- 


- 


- 


66 


8 


69 


- 


- 


- 


66 


8 


69 


Perjury, .... 


. 8 


- 


3 


7 


- 


7 


- 


- 


- 


18 


— 


16 


Physician, unregistered, 


_ «• 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


Polygamy, 


2 


2 


- 


6 


1 


7 


— 


- 


— 


8 


8 


11 










28 


6 


83 


- 


- 


— 


28 


6 


33 


Railroad law*, violating, 


, - 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Refusing to aid o Ulcer, . 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


4 


- 


- 


— 


4 


— 


4 










15 


— 


15 


- 


- 


- 


16 


— 


15 


School laws, violating, . 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


Sidewalk, obstructing, • 


, - 


- 


- 


41 


— 


41 


- 


- 


- 


41 


— 


41 


Street, obstructing. 


, — 


- 


- 


28 


- 


28 


- 


- 


- 


28 


- 


28 


Street cars, obstructing, 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


• 


2 


- 


2 


Stubbornness, 


, - 


6 


52 


6 


1 


7 


- 


- 


- 


68 


<• 
• 


65 


Taking liquor into Indian 


i 
























country. 


- 


1 


- 


- 


— 


- 


— 


— 


- 


•■ 


1 


1 


Throwing missiles, 


i - 


- 


- 


4 


— 


4 


- 


- 


— 


4 


• 


4 




, - 


- 


1 


61 


- 


61 


140 


- 


140 


202 


— 


202 


U. S. mall, obstructing, 


, 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


— 


— 


— 


1 


- 


1 


U. S. mall, stealing, 


2 


1 


1 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


6 


1 


6 


U. S mall, using Illegally, 


, 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


U. S. postal laws, violating, 


- 


— 


1 


- 


- 


— 


- 


— 


— 


1 


— 


1 


U. 8. revenue laws, violating 


, - 


- 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


— 


2 


Unnatural act, . • 


2 


— 


- 


6 


- 


6 


- 


— 


- 


8 


— 


8 










26 


1 


27 


2 


- 


2 


28 


1 


29 


Vagrants, . . • 


- 


6 


19 


499 


29 


528 


197 


2 


199 


715 


87 


752 


Walking on railroad, . 


. 38 


- 


282 


214 


— 


214 
21,894 


- 


33 


— 


214 


• 


214 


Total, 


312 


19,429 


2,465 


1,289 


1,322 


21,038 


J.8I0 ; 


28,848 







RECAPITULATION. 












1 . — Against the person, 
2. — Against property, . 
3. — Against pubdc order, etc.. 


76 

120 

88 

284 


6 

84 

312 


36 
435 
'282 

758 


1,749 
2,375 
19,429 


86 

191 

2,465 


1,834 

2,666 

21,894 


1,289 
1,289 


33 
33 


1,322 
1,322 


1,861 

2,930 

21,088 


81 1 1.052 
225 ! 3,156 

2,810 1 23^48 


Total, .... 


352 


23,553 


2,741 


26,294 


25,829 


8,120 j 28,955 



1896] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



227 



Compakative Statistics of Commitments. 

Table No. 9. — Whole Number of Commitments to All Prisons in Each 

of the Past Fourteen Tears. 



TEARS. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total. 


1883, . 

1884, . 

1885, . 

1886, . 

1887, . 

1888, . 
1889, 

1890, . 

1891, . 
1692, 
1893, 
1894, 

1895, , 

1896, , 






















19,780 
22,562 
22,656 
21,649 
23,070 
26,460 
29,678 
28,870 
23,865 
16,408 
16,610 
23,216 
24,405 
25,829 


4,845 
4,177 
3,995 
8,809 
8,755 
4,223 
4,616 
4,420 
3,930 
2,453 
2,363 
3,046 
8,061 
8,126 


24,125 
26,739 
26.651 
25.458 
26,825 
30,683 
34,094 
33.290 
27,795 
17,861 
18.973 
26,262 
27,466 
28,955 



Table No. 10. — Comparison of Commitments to the Various Institutions 
for the Last Two Years, classified by Sex of Prisoners. 

Males. 



INSTITUTIONS. 


1. — Against 
the Person. 


,.-Ao.™ 
Property. 


8.— Against 

Public 
Order, etc. 


Aggregates.! 

1 


• 

s 

£1 

o 

a 


§ 




i 
1895. 1*06. 

1 


1895. 


1896. 1 

i 


1895. 


i 
1896. ' 


1895. 


i 
1896. 

1 


u 


State Prlsoo, 

Massachusetts Reformatory, 
County Prisons, . 
State Farm, .... 


66 

39 

1,745 


76 

36 

1,749 


97 

466 

2,296 

1 


120 

435 

2,375 

" 1 


9 

269 

18,894 

1,023 


88 

282 

19,429 

1,289 


172 

774 

22,435 

1,024 


234 
763 
23,553, 
1,289 , 


62 

1,118 
265 


21 


Total 


1,850 


1,861 


2,860 


2,930 | 


19,095 


21,038 


24,405 


25,829 | 


1,445 


21 



Females. 



Reformatory Prison for 
Women, .... 
County Prisons, . 
State Farm 


8 
74 




25 
157 


84 
191 


306 

2,467 

39 


812 
2,465 

88 J 


834 

2,688 
39 


852 

2,741 

33 


18 
58 


6 




77 


91 j 


182 


225 


2,802 


2,810 


8,061 


8,126 


71 


6 



Males awd Females. 



Stste Prison, 


66 


76 


97 


120 * 


9 


88 


172 


234 


1 

1 62 




Massachusetts Reformatory, 


89 


86 


466 


435 I 


269 


282 


774 


753 




21 


Reformatory Prison for 








| 










1 




Women, .... 


8 


6 


25 


34 


306 


S12 


334 


862 


18 


^ 


County Prisons, . 

State Farm, .... 


1,819 


1,834 


2,458 


2,566 


20,861 


21,894 


26,123 


26,294 


1,171 


_ 


— 


• 


1 


- 


1,062 


1,822 


1,063 


1,322 


259 


- 


Total, .... 


1,927 


1,962 


3,042 


8,155 


22,497 


23,848 


27,466 


28,956 


1,610 


21 



228 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 11. — Comparison by Offences of the Number of Commitments 

for the Last Two Tears. 

1. — AOAIUST THB PBBSOH. 





1895. 


1896. 


IHCRSASB. 


Dbcbxasb. 


OFFENCES. 






i 












1 




M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


M. F. 

1 


A wan It, 


1,636 


73 


1,708 


1,619 


84 


1,703 




11 


16 


. 


Assault, felonioae, . 






94 


2 


96 


104 


2 


106 


10 


- 


- 


- 


Manslaughter, . 






15 


- 


15 


20 


1 


21 


5 


1 


- 


- 


Murder, 






4 


— 


4 


6 


m. 


5 


1 


— 


• 


• 


Rape,. 






6 


-. 


5 


16 


- 


16 


11 


- 


— 


- 


Robbery, . • 






48 


•» 


48 


58 


- 


63 


6 


- 


• 


• 


Threats, . 






38 


- 


38 


82 


— 


82 


- 


— 


6 


. 


Miscellaneous, • 






11 


2 


13 


12 


4 


16 


1 


2 


- 


- 








1,850 


77 


1,927 


; 1.861 

1 


91 


1,952 


33 


14 


22 


- 



2. —Against Pbopbbtt. 





2 




2 


i 

5 




6 


3 








Breaking and entering, 




890 


1 


891 


400 


3 


408 


10 


- 2 


— 


. 


Burning buildings, etc., 




6 


1 


6 


12 


1 


13 


7 


- 


j - 


- 


Common thief, . 




T 


— 


7 





— 


9 


2 


• 


. 


. 


Embezzlement, 




76 


1 


77 


68 


2 


70 


- 


1 


j 8 


_ 






85 


5 


90 


83 


4 


87 


• 


— 


2 


i 


Habitual criminal, . 




2 


• 


2 


2 


— 


2 


• 


.. 










1,934 


147 


2,081 


2,008 


190 


2,198 


74 


43 


~ 


. 


Malicious mischief, . 




154 


16 


170 


138 


13 


161 


• 


- 


1 M 


3 


Receiving stolen goods, . 




50 


8 


53 


87 


T 


44 


- 


4 


13 




Miscellaneous, . 




155 


8 


163 


168 


6 


173 


13 


» 


' 'I 


3 






2,860 


182 


3,042 


2,930 


225 


8,155 I 


109 


50 


! "i 


7 







3.— 


Aoaikst Public Order, ktc 


I. 










Abortion, . • • . 


1 




1 


6 


1 


7 


5 


i 
1 , 






Adultery, . • 




53 


87 


90 


68 


27 


85 


6 




_ 


10 


City ordinance or town 


by. 






















laws, violating, 




93 


- 


93 


78 


3 


76 


- 


3 , 


20 


• 


Common night-walker, , 




— 


86 


86 


• 


112 


112 


- 


26 I 


— 


• 


Disturbing the peace, 




596 


95 


691 , 


606 


91 


697 


10 


i 


• 


4 


Drunkenness, . 




16,343 


2,030 


18,373 ; 


17,560 


2,046 


19,596 


1,207 


16 • 


- 


• 


Forgery and uttering, 




29 


- 


29 ' 


87 


1 


88 


8 


1 


- 


• 


Fornication, 




167 


203 


370 ' 


106 


163 


269 


— 


. 


61 


40 


Idle and disorderly, . 




181 


106 


287 


214 


84 


298 


83 


- 


- 


a 


Lewd cohabitation, . 




20 


12 


82 


14 


21 


85 


— 


9 


6 


.. 


Lewdness,. 




22 


84 


56 


52 


66 


108 


80 


22 


• 


. 


Liquor laws, violating, . 




841 


89 


430 


810 


83 


893 


— 


— 


81 


• 


Neglect of family, . 




163 


- 


153 


147 


2 


149 


• 


2 


6 


• 


Polygamy, 




11 


6 


16 


8 


8 


11 


- 


• 


3 


2 


Vagrants, tramps, etc., . 




851 


48 


899 


946 


88 


983 


94 


- 


• 


10 


Miscellaneous, . 




834 


67 


891 ! 


912 


79 


991 


78 


22 


- 


- 






19,695 


2,802 


22,497 ' 

1 


21,038 


2,810 


23,848 


1,470 


102 | 


127 


94 



RECAPITULATION. 



1. — Against the person, . 
2.— Against property, . 
8. — Against public order, etc., 


1,850 

2,860 

19.695 


77 

182 

2,802 


1,927 1 
8.042 l 
22,497 


1,881 

2.930 

21,038 


91 

225 

2,810 


1,952 

3,155 

23,848 


83 

109 
1,470 


14 

50 

102 


22 
89 

1 l2T 


7 
94 




24,405 


3,061 


27,466 


25,829 


8,126 


28,956 | 


1,612. 166 


188 


101 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



229 



Commitments fob Twelve Years. 

For purposes of comparison by persons who cannot conveniently 
refer to reports of former years, the following table, giving the 
number of commitments to all prisons in each of the past twelve 
years, is presented : — 



Table No. 12. — Comparisons of Commitments to the Various Prisons for 
the Past Twelve Years, classified According to Sexes. 





a 
o 


ttory 
for 
n. 


it 

• o 

9 ♦£ 


1 

1 






i 






•c 


so© 

Son 
has 


si 


Coumty Prisons. 


State Far*! , 


! Aggregates. 


YEARS. 


1 


,o -gig 


m <m 


I 
1 




I 
1 
1 


i 

t 

i 






M. 


F. 


l 
M. 


1 H. | IT. 


I 

Tot. 1 

i 


M. 


F. 


1 
Tot. 


i 

I 


F 
F. 


Tot. 


1885, . 


189 


240 


425 


21,727 


3,764 


i 
26,481 


365 


1 


866 


22,656 


3,995 


26,651 


1886, 




128 


206 


661 


20,658 


8,602 


24,260 


302 


2 


304 


1 21,649 


3,809 


25,458 


1887, 




102 


193 


647 


22,148 


8,556 


25,704 


173 


6 


179 


| 23,070 


3,765 


26,825 


1888, 




160 


222 


689 


26,483 


8,995 


29,478 


228 


6 


284 


, 26,460 


4.223 


80,683 


1889, , 




133 


206 


532 


28,624 


4,305 


32,929 


289 


6 


294 


i 29,678 


4,516 


34,094 


1890, . 




154 


189 


607 


27,826 


4,224 


32,060 i 


383 


7 


890 I 


| 28,870 


4,420 


38,290 


1891, . 




168 


207 


612 


22 794 


3,714 


26,508 1 


301 


9 


310 i 


i 23,865 


3,930 


27,795 


1892, . 




208 


263 


746 


14 009 


2,170 


16,179 


460 


20 


470 i 


1 16,408 


2,458 


17,861 


1893, . 




140 


300 


819 


15,179 


2,047 


17,226 


472 


16 


488 


16,610 


2,363 


18,978 


1894, . 




166 


302 


836 


21,395 


2,713 


24,108 


819 


31 


850 ! 


23,216 


3,046 


26,262 


1896, . 




172 


334 


774 


22,435 


2,688 


25,123 


1,024 


89 


1,063 


24,405 


3,061 


27,466 


1890, . 


234 


352 


763 


23,553 


2,741 


26,294 


1,289 


38 


1,322 


25,829 


3,126 


28,955 



* Established Dec. 20, 1884. 



f Formerly State Workhouse. 



Table No. 13. — Proportion of Males and Females in the Commitments 

for the Past Twelve Years. • 



TEARS. 



County Prisons. 



M. 



F. 



1885, 
1886, 
1887, 
1888, 
1889, 
1890, 
1891, 
1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896, 




.14-f- 
.14-- 
.13-- 
.13-- 
.18-- 
.18-- 
.14-- 
.13-- 
.11- 



.11-- 
.10-- 
.10-- 



Statb Farm. 4 



M. 



.99-- 

.96-- 
.97-- 
.98-- 
.98-- 
.97-- 
.95-- 
.96 



.96-- 
.96-- 
.97-- 



F. 



.03+ 
.02-- 
.01-- 
.01-- 
.02-- 
.04-- 
.03- 



.03-- 
.03-- 
.02-- 



All Prisons. 



M. 



.85-f 
.86-- 
.86-- 
.86-- 
.86-- 
.86-- 
.86-- 
.86-- 
.87- 



.88-- 

• 80— — 

.89-- 



F. 



.144- 
.14-- 
.13-- 
.13-- 
.13-- 
.13-- 
.14-- 
.13-- 
.12-- 
.11-- 
.11-- 
.10-- 



* Formerly Btate Workhouse. 



230 



STATISTICS OP ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Comparison of Commitments by Offences. 

The commitments for eleven years, arranged by the more common 
offences, are set out in the following table : — 



Table No. 14. — Commitments to All Prisons for the Past Eleven Years. 

1.— Against thk Person. 



OFFENCES. 


i 






a 
* 
« 


1800. 


1801. 


A 


1808. 


4 

3 


O 9 

A A 


Manslaughter, .... 
Mnrder and accessory, 

Miscellaneous, .... 


1,641 

12 

2 

3 

31 

82 


1,637 

10 e 

6 
21 
71 


1,636 

u i 

4 

10 
83 


1,799 

8 

1 

7 

27 

46 


1,732 

10 

2 

7 

18 

52 


1,692 

12 

4 

6 

31 

64 


2,078 

11 

1 

5 

42 

58 


1,959 

13 

4 

6 

38 

49 


1,867 
17 
6 
11 
38 
42 


1,8041 1,800 

15l SI 

4 * 

5j 16 

48> S3 

511 41 




1,771 


1,661 


1,754 


1,888 


1,821 


1,799 


2,195 


2.069J 1,980 


1,027 1^52 



2. — Against Property. 



Afson: Burning, 

Breaking and entering, 

Embezzlement, • 

Fraud, .... 

Laroeny, 

Receiving stolen goods,* 

Miscellaneous, . 



Total, 



11 
281 

48 

94 
1,871 

40 
358 



2,448 



7 

241 

66 

75 

1,647 

38 

375 



6 

270 

64 

95 

1,721 

44 

292 



2,449 2,491 



7 

814 

65 

116 

1,893 

39 

345 



2,779 



• 10 

269 

72 

108 

1,754 

39 

295 



2,647 



3 

821 

52 

98 

1,910 

48 

330 



2,762 



18 
845 

65 

109 

1,977 

50 
340 



i|HW 



11 

352 

51 

94 

2,034 

35 

853 

2,930 



13 8j 1? 

602 801 409 

80, 77 70 

90! 90j ST 

2,168 2,081| 2,191 

60i 53. 44 
3TT 



3 



8,280! 3,042 3,155 



3.— Against Public Order, etc. 



Abortion, . 

Adultery, . 

Common night-walker, 

Disturbing the peace, 

Drunkenness, 

Forgery, 

Fornication, 

Idle and disorderly, . 

Lewd cohabitation, . 

Lewdness, . 

Liquor laws, violating, 

Polygamy, . 

Vagrants, tramps, etc., 

Miscellaneous, . 



Total, 



81 

158 

432 

17,981 

30 

103 

242 

9 

65 

260 

7 

1,181 

700 



21,239 



8 

81 

99 

861 

19,952 

28 

172 

188 

11 

30 

290 

12 

945 

673 



22,725 



1 

68 

76 

865 

23,407 

23 

170 

139 

19 

69 

369 

10 

928 

804 



1 2 

77 79 

118| 116 

451 390 

26,879 25,686 

32 27 

159 133 

218 176 

26 16 

65 



485 

9 

1,071 

836 



72 

506 

8 

916 

796 



26,438)29,427 28,922 



1 


5 


62 


96 


128 


123 


697 


881 


19,794 


8,634 


13 


27 


147 


142 


266 


855 


19 


26 


87 


69 


398 


420 


11 


9 


800 


854 


916 


1,126 


23,234 


12,767 



4 

66 

118 

925 

10,020 

36 
153 
224 

27 

87 
421 

14 

822 

1,067 



6 17 

111 80 IS 

143 8ft 112 

780 601 1 697 

16,385 18,873il9,5M 

36 20, 33 

212J 870 269 

269] 287! 29$ 

11! 32i 35 

71 56 10S 

447 430J 893 

12| 161 11 

963! 8O0! 9*3 

1,588* 1,137, 1,216 



13,97421,002 22, 487<23,84« 

I I 



RECAPITULATION. 



1. — Against, the person, . 

2. — A gainst property, 

3.— Against public order, etc., 



Total, 




1,754 

2,491 

26,438 

80,683 





2,195 2,069' 1,980, 1,027J 1,958 



2,8991 2,930! 3.2S0 3,042' 
12,767113,97421,002 22,407 



33,290,27, 796 17, 861118,973 26,262 27, 4*6j28,9U 



3,155 
23,849 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 231 

' Review of Comparative Statistics. 

The statistics of commitments preceding Table No. 9, refer only 
to the year ending Sept. 30, 1896 ; but that table and a few tables 
immediately after it give figures relating to other years as well, for 
the purpose of exhibiting the relative conditions of the prison 
population. 

A reference has already been made on page 216 to a general 
comparison of the number of commitments, and it may be useful to 
direct attention to some changes in respect to particular offences. 

The whole number of commitments was 28,955, being 1,489 more 
than in the preceding year although less than in 1890 and for two 
years preceding that. The great variation in the numbers from 1891 
to 1894 was due to changes in the law for the punishment of drunken- 
ness. In 1891 the fine was totally abolished as a penalty for that 
offence, but was partially restored in 1893. 

As compared with last year the State Prison and the Reforma- 
tory Prison for Women received more prisoners for each class of 
offences ; fewer prisoners were committed to the Massachusetts Re- 
formatory for the first and second class of offences, but more for the 
third ; the county prisons received more prisoners in every class ; 
the State Farm had a large increase in commitments. 

A reference to Table No. 14, shows that there were 5 more 
prisoners sentenced for assault than in the preceding year ; for 
manslaughter 6 more ; for murder 1 ; for rape 11 ; for robbery 5 ; 
while for miscellaneous offences there were 3 less. The total in- 
crease in offences against the person was 25. In offences against 
property the cases of arson and burning buildings numbered 10 
more ; breaking and entering 12 more ; there were 7 less cases of 
embezzlement, 3 less of fraud, 9 less of receiving stolen goods, and 
7 less miscellaneous ; the larcenies were 117 more. The net increase 
in the second class was 113. In offences against public order, etc., 
there was a total increase of 1,351 ; of these, 1,223 are found in 
drunkenness alone ; the offence of abortion had the unusually large 
number of 7 ; there were more common night-walkers, and a few more 
for disturbing the peace ; the cases of forgery numbered 9 more, idle 
and disorderly 11 more, and almost twice as many were committed 
for lewdness ; the vagrants and tramps increased 84, the miscel- 
laneous offences 79. The other offences named in the third class 
show a decrease. 



232 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Ages, Bibthflaces, etc., of Prisoners. 



Table No. 15. — Ages of Prisoners committed to the Jails and Houses of 
Correction during the Year ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



AGE8. 



12 to 15 yean, 

16 years, 

17 yean, 

18 years, 
10 years, 

20 years, 

21 to 25 years, 
26 to 30 years, 
81 to 40 years, 
41 to 50 years, 
51 to 60 years, 
61 to 70 years, 
More than 70 years, 
Unknown, . 

Total, . 



I 1 !l 

1. — Offences i 2. — Offences 



against the 
Person. 




4 

12 

17 

43 

55 

74 

446 

364 

464 

187 

62 

19 

2 



1,749 



85 1,834 



&-. 


1 




4 


— 


12 


- 


17 


— 


43 


- 


55 


3 


77 


19 


465 


27 


391 


19 


483 


13 


200 


4 


66 


— 


19 


- 


2 


~ 


• 



AOAIN8T 

Property. 



i 



Tot. 



28 I 
28 
43 , 
78 
102 
89 

637 ; 

477 
544 
240 



1 
4 ' 

2 

4 • 
11 
46 

36 
53 ! 
24 



82 ' 


8 


25 


2 


2 


- 


— 


— 


2,375 


191 



28 

29 

47 

80 

106 

100 

683 

513 

597 

264 

90 

27 

2 






3.-Omuci8 

A6ATH8T Public 

Order, etc. 



18 | 
231 
49 ' 
134 , 
211 | 
256 , 
2,750 
3,549 
©,382 ' 
3,832 '. 
1,717 [ 
435 
77 
1 



1 

1 

5 

18 
26 

319 I 
510 j 
867 ! 
473 ' 
158 i 

56 | 

12 
2 



Aggregate 

Offences of All 

Glasses. 



Tot. , M. 



Tot- 



14 | 

24 

54 

152 

237 

273 
8,069 
4,059 
7,249 
4,306 , 
1,876 I 

491 
89 ,, 
3 ' 



45 ' 
63 
109 
255 ! 
368 
419 
3,883 i 
4,890 
7,390 
4,259 , 
1,861 
479 
81 ! 
1 



1 

2 

9 

SO 

30 

31 



573 

939 

510 

170 

58 

12 
o 



2,566 , 19,429 2,465 , 21,894 23,553 * 2,741 j 26,294 



48 

65 
1M 

275 

39* 

450 

4,217 

4,963 

S,S29 

4,769 

2,031 

537 

' 93 



Table No. 16. — Birthplaces of Prisoners committed to the Jails and 
Houses of Correction during the Year ending Sept. 30, 1896. 





1. — Offences j 


2. — < 


Offences 


8.— 


Offences 


' Aggregate 




Against the i 


Against 


Against Public i 
Order, etc. 

i 


| Offences of All 


BIRTHPLACES. 


Person. 


Property. 


Classes. 




M. 


F. 


i 

Tot.. 

i 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


i 
Tot. : 


1 | 
11. F. Tot. 

i 1 


Massachusetts, 


619 


16 


! 

635 


1,075 


37 


1,112 


6,727 


691 


7,418 j 


1 ' 1 
8,421 ' 744 9,165 


Other States, 




277 


9 


286 


505 


43 


548 


2,910 


298 


3,208 ' 


, 3,692 t 350 : 4,042 


Canada, • 




174 


3 


177 


253 


26 


279 


1,680 


275 


1,965 


i 2,107 304 i 2,411 


Ireland, , 






866 


44 


410 


282 


58 


340 


5,844 


860 


6,704 


6,492 962 


7,454 


England, 






88 


9 


97 


94 


12 


106 


1,077 


229 


1,306 


1,259 


250 


1,599 


Scotland, 






23 


2 


25 


25 


5 


30 


341 


72 


413 


389 


79 


468 


France, . 






4 


— 


4 


4 


— 


4 


19 


6 


25 


27 


6 i 33 


Oermany, 






11 


- 


11 


17 


2 


19 


108 


3 


111 


136 


5 1 141 


Sweden, 






32 


- 


82 


14 


2 


16 


204 


7 


211 


250 


9 . 259 


Norway, 






10 


- 


10 


11 


- 


11 


47 


2 


49 


68 


2 10 


Italy, . 
Finland, 






66 


- 


66 


30 


1 


31 


128 


3 


131 


224 


4 1 228 






15 


— 


15 


5 


— 


6 


82 


- 


82 


102 


- 1 103 


Poland, . 






12 


— 


12 


6 


— 


6 


89 


4 


43 


57 


4 1 61 


Rassla, . 






12 


1 


18 


21 


- 


21 


54 


1 


55 


87 


2 89 


Wales, . 






1 


• 


1 


3 


- 


3 


16 


4 


19 


19 [ 4 


SB 


Miscellaneous,* 




39 


1 
85 


40 


80 


5 
191 


36 


154 


10 


164 


223 j 16 


239 


Total, 


i 


• « 


1,749 


1,834 


2,375 


2,666 


19,429 


2,465 


21,894 


23,553 j 2,741 

1 


26,294 



* Of the 239 miscellaneous, the birthplaces were returned as follows : Africa, 4; Alaska, 1; Arabia, 9; 
Armenia, 5; Australia, 16; Austria, 21; Belgium, 7; Bermuda, 8; Cape Verde Islands, 2; China, B; 
Denmark, 13; East Indies, 3; Greece, 23; Holland, 4; Hungary, 6; Mexico, 2; Portugal, 10; Roumanb, 
1; South America, 8; Spain, 4; Switzerland, 11; Turkey, 17; Western Islands, 25; West Indies, 19; 
at sea, 1; unknown, 12, 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



233 



Table No. 17. — Parentage of Prisoners committed to the Jails and Houses 
of Correction during the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



PARENTAGE. 


1.— Offences 

Against thb 

Person. 


2. — Offences 

Against 

Property. 


3. — Offences 

Against Public 

Ordbr, etc. 


Aggregate 

Offences of All 

Clabsbb. 




M. 


F. 


Tot. 


1 

1 M. 

1 


1 
F. i Tot. 

i 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


American, . 


259 


8 


267 


602 


36 


638 


2,734 


263 


2,987 


8,595 


'297 


3,892 


Foreign, 


1,408 


76 


1,479 


| 1,602 


143 


1,746 


15,976 


2,107 


18,082 


18,980 


2,826 


21,806 


Mixed 


73 


- 


73 


i 129 


9 


138 


650 


88 


783 


852 


92 


944 


Unknown, 


14 


1 
85 


15 


1 42 


3 
191 


45 


70 


22 


92 


126 


26 


162 


Total, . 


1,749 


1,834 


| 2,375 


2,666 


19,429 


2,466 


21,894 


23,563 


2,741 


26,294 



Table No. 18. — Conjugal Condition of Prisoners committed to the JaUs 
and Houses* of Correction during the Year ending Sept. 30 ', 1896. 



CONJUGAL 
CONDITION. 


1. — Offences 
Against the 

PBR80N. 


1 

1 2. — Offences 
I Against 
I Pr.opbb.ty. 


i 3.— Offences 
, Against Public | 
Order, etc. | 


Aggrbtate 
Offences of All 

CLA88ES. 

| 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


i 

! M. 

1 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Married, . . 
Single, .... 
Unknown, . 


677 

1,071 

1 


66 
20 

85 


742 

1,091 

1 


687 
1,788 


116 
76 

191 


702 
1,864 


1 
6,248 

18,179 

2 

i 


1,526 
939 


7,774 

14,118 

2 


7,612 

16,038 

8 


1,706 
1,035 


9,218 

17,078 

3 


Total, . 


1,749 


1,834 


2,376 


2,566 


119,429 


2,465 


21,894 


23,558 


2,741 


26,294 



Table No. 19. — * Education of Prisoners committed to the Jails and 
Houses of Correction during the Year ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



EDUCATION. 


1. — Offences 

Against the 

Person. 


2. — Offences 

Against 

Property. 


3.— Offences 

Against Public 

Order, etc. 


Aggregate 

Offences of All 

Classes. 


i 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


! M. 

1 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Bead and write, . 

Illiterate, 

Unknown, . . 


1,545 

203 

1 


56 
29 

86 


1,601 

232 

1 


1 

1 2,198 

177 


169 
82 

191 


2,357 
209 


17,136 

2,291 

2 


1,828 
637 


18,964 

2,928 

2 


20,879 

2,671 

3 


2,043 
698 


22,922 

3,369 

3 


Total, 


1,749 


1,834 


2,375 


2,666 


19,429 


2,465 


21,894 


23,553 


2,741 


26,294 



* In Table No. 20 there are also presented, for the first time, statistics showing the illiteracy of 
prisoners, according to birthplaces. 



234 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



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1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



235 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



237 



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1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



239 



Table No. 21. — Former Commitments of Prisoners committed to the Jails 
and Houses of Correction during the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



NUMBER OF 
TIMES PREVIOUSLY 


1.— Offences 
Against the 
Person. 1 


1 
1 2.— Offences , 
] Against ] 
i Property. , 


3 —Offences 
Against Public 

I Order, etc. 

i 


[ Aggregate 
Offences of All 
Classes. 


COMMITTED. 


M. 




Tot J 

i 


M. 


F. 


1 
Tot. 1 


1 

1 M. 

1 


F. 
200 


Tot. 
2,247 


1 M. 

i 


F. 


Tot. 


1 time, . 




220 


6 


226 ! 


342 


16 


358 


2,047 


l 

, 2,609 


222 | 2,831 


2 times, . 




165 


13 


178 | 


234 


12 


246 


2,216 


303 


2,519 


2,615 


828 ; 2,943 


3 times, . 




08 


5 


103 ' 


1 128 


8 


136 


1,329 


228 


1,657 


1,555 


241 | 1,796 


4 times, . 




67 


3 


»i 


i 73 


7 


80 


946 


135 


1,081 


1,086 


145 


1,231 


5 times, . 




22 


4 


28 ! 

1 


1 57 

I 


4 


61 


605 


120 


725 


684 


128 


812 


6 to 15 times, 




122 


8 


130 ! 

i 


| 168 


12 


180 


2,360 


329 


2,689 


2,650 


349 


2,999 


16 to 30 times, 




17 


1 


18 , 


' 26 

i 


- 


26 


487 


102 


689 


530 


103 


683 


31 to 60 times, 




2 


- 


1 

1 


1 

i 9 


1 


10 


123 


87 


160 


134 


38 


172 


More than 50 times 




- 


40 


1 

" 1 


1 1 


1 
61 


2 


89 


7 


46 


40 


8 


48 


Total recommitments, . 


713 


753 


1,038 


1,099 


10,152 


1,461 


11,618 


11,903 


1,562 13,466 


Number of first com- 
mitments, . 


1,086 


45 
85 


1,081 


1 
1,337 


130 
101 


1,467 


9,277 


1,004 


10,281 


11,650 


1,179 


12,829 
26,294 


Whole number of 
mltments, 


com- 

• 


1,740 


i 
1,834 


I 
.2,875 


2,566 


|l9, 429 

1 


2,465 


21,894 


i 
23,668 


2,741 



Table No. 22. — Former Commitments of Prisoners committed to All 
Prisons during the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 





• 
a 

o 
• 


*5 

2-2 p 


usetts 
tatory. 


i 














NUMBER OF 

TIMES PREVIOUSLY 

[COMMITTED. 


3 
S 

00 


Reforma 
Prison 
Womc 


•5 c 

u 

01 O 

3 « 

a 08 


State Farm. 

1 


County Prisons. 


Aggregates. 




M. 


F. 


M. 


1 M. 

i 

I 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. | 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


1 time, . 




82 


60 


100 


231 


7 


238 


2,609 


222 


1 
2,831 ' 


2,972 


289 | 3,261 


3 times, . 




3 


14 


11 


76 


1 


77 


2,615 


828 


2,943 i 


2,706 


343 | 3,048 


3 times, . 




8 


7 


- 


23 


1 


24 


1,655 


241 


1,796 | 


1,581 


249 


1,830 


4 times, . 




- 


4 


- 


13 


- 


18 


1,086 


146 


1,231 ! 


1,099 


149 


1,248 


6 times, . 




- 


- 


- 


11 


- 


11 


684 


128 


812 | 


695 


128 


828 


6 to 16 times, . 




- 


^ 


- 


18 


- 


18 


2,650 


349 


2,999 ! 


2,668 


349 


3,017 


16 to 80 times, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


680 


103 


633 > 


530 


103 


633 


31 to 60 times, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


134 


38 


172 ' 

i 


134 


38 


172 


More than 50 times, 


38 


- 


- 


372 


- 


- 


40 


8 

i 


4« ( 


40 


8 


48 


Total recommitm 


ents, 


85 


Ill 


9 


381 


11,903 


1,562! 

i 
i 


13,465 


12,424 | 


1,656 


14,080 



240 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct, 



Statistics relating to Persons committed for Drunkenness, 

Table No. 23. — Comparison of Commitments for Drunkenness in 

the Last Two Tears. 



COUNTIK8. 



Oct. 1, 1894, to Sxft. 80, 
1805. 



M. 



Barnstable, .... 

Berkshire 

Bristol 

Dukes County, 

Essex 

Franklin 

Hampden 

Hampshire, .... 

Middlesex 

Nantucket 

Norfolk 

Plymouth, .... 

Suffolk, 

Worcester, .... 

Total to county prisons, . 
Massachusetts Reformatory, . 
Reformatory Prison for Women, 
State Farm, .... 

Total, .... 



15,439 
157 

747 



16,343 



F. 



2 


- 


207 


3 


957 


146 


2 


• 


2,124 


197 


42 


4 


1,168 


120 


197 


3 


3,121 


262 


1 


2 


296 


5 


197 


6 


6,189 


1,045 


986 


34 



1,826 

167 
37 



2,030 



Tot. 



17,265 
157 
167 
784 



18,873 



2 

210 jl 

1,103 :| 

2 

2,321 

46 

1,288 

200 

8,383 

3 

301 

202 

7,234 

970 



Oct. 1, 1895, to Sxrr. 30, 
1896. 



1 

272 

1,174 

2 

1,677 

48 

1,200 

259 

2,853 

2 

308 

201 

7,184 

1,268 



16,444 
168 

938 



17,550 



F. 



181 , 

191 l 

98 | 
232 

i! 

1,046 I 

47 , 



1,816 

200 

30 



2,046 



Tot. 



1 
S74 

1.345 



1. 



3,085 

3 
312 



1,31* 



18,260 
168 
200 
988 

19,596 



Table No. 24. — Ages of Prisoners committed for Drunkenness to All the 
Penal Institutions for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



AGES. 



12 to 15 years, 

16 years, 

17 years, 

18 years, 

19 years, 

20 years, 

21 to 25 years, 
26 to 30 years, 
31 to 40 years, 
41 to 60 years, 
51 to 60 years, 
61 to 70 years, 
More than 70 years, 
Unknown, . 

Total, . 



168 



1 
2 
1 
6 

2 
46 
53 
63 
20 
6 
2 



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ormi 


2** a 
a a * 
E28 


a** 


©J5 o 


3* 




M. 


F. I 

i 

i 



State Farm. 



i 



1 

1 

5 

3 

104 

154 

332 

214 

93 

25 

6 



200 I 938 



F. 



1 
2 
16 
7 
3 
1 



30 



Tot. 



1 

1 

5 

3 

105 

156 

848 

221 

96 

26 

6 



968 



OOUKTT PBIBON8. 



M. 



2 

3 

14 

58 

126 

162 

2,089 

2,989 

6,605 

3.410 

1,542 

378 

66 



16,444 



F. 



5 

12 

7 

190 

876 

658 

384 

126 

47 

10 

1 



Tot. 



2 

3 

14 

63 

138 

169 

2,270 

3,365 

6,263 

8,794 

1,668 

426 

76 

1 



AOGBBGATKS. 



2 

8 

20 

66 

140 

184 

2,247 

3,177 

5,971 

3,624 

1,635 

403 

72 

I 



I 



F. 



1 

2 

6 

17 

9 

237 

481 

737 

411 

134 

60 

10 

1 



1,816 



Tot. 



71 

157 

193 

2,484 

8,609 

6,700 

4,03$ 

1.769 

453 

82 



13,260 ' 17,550 ! 2,046 ' 19.596 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



241 



Table No. 25. — Birthplaces of Prisoners committed for Drunkenness to 
All the Penal Institutions for the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 





. 


>%u 




















3^ 

P 

el O 


o 






















State Farm. 


County Prisons. 


Aggregates. 


BIRTHPLACES. 


I 5 






















M. 


F. 


1 
M. 


F. 


Tot.j 


I 

I M. 

1 


F. 


1 

Tot. ' 

i 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Massachusetts, . 


119 


83 


858 


7 


366 ' 


i 5,713 


603 


i 
6,216 


6,190 


693 


6,783 


Other 8tates, 




17 


27 


162 


2 


164 


1 2,278 


183 


2,461 ' 


, 2,447 


212 2,659 


Canada, 




12 


27 


67 


4 


61 


1,409 


180 


1,689 i 


1,478 


211 


1,689 


Ireland, 






13 


46 


275 


13 


288 ' 


1 6,287 


702 


6,989 


5,576 


761 


6,336 


England, 






3 


12 


61 


3 


64 1 


882 


171 


1,058 


946 


186 


1,132 


Scotland, 






2 


4 


18 


1 


19 


306 


68 


864 


326 


63 


389 


France, . 






— 


- 


4 


- 


4 


15 


1 


16 


19 


1 


20 


Germany, . 






1 


- 


2 


- 


2 1 


81 


2 


83 


84 


2 


86 


Sweden, 






- 


- 


8 


- 


8 1 


171 


4 


176 


179 


4 


183 


Norway, 






- 


- 


— 




- 1 


36 


2 


38 1 


36 


2 


38 


Italv, . 
Finland, 






— 


-. 




_ 




46 


1 


47 , 


46 


1 


47 






— 


- 


_ 


— 


_ 1 


i 73 


— 


73 ' 


73 


- 


73 


Poland, . 






• 


• 


1 


— 


1 ' 


1 » 


1 


30 ' 


30 


1 


81 


Russia, . 






- 


- 


• 


- 


_ i 


1 26 


- 


26 1 


26 


- 


26 


Wales, . 






- 


- 


1 


— 


l ! 


14 


4 


18 , 


15 


4 


19 


Miscellaneous,* . 




1 


1 


1 


- 


1 
968 ' 


78 


4 


82 ! 


80 


5 


85 


Total, 


» 


i • 


168 


200 


938 


30 


| 16,444 

i 


1,816 


18,260 


| 17,650 


2,046 


19,596 



* Of the 85 miscellaneous, the birthplaces were returned as follows : Africa, 1 ; Armenia, 1 ; Australia, 
8; Austria, 7; Azores, 6; Belgium, 7; Bermuda, 6; Denmark, 8; Greece, 1; Holland, 4; Hungary, 5; 
Portugal, 4; South America, 4; Spain, 4; Switzerland, 7; Turkey, 2; West Indies, 6 ; unknown, 6. 



Table No. 26. — Former Commitments of Prisoners committed for Drunk- 
enness to all the Penal Institutions for the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



— 


i 

at 




■*" 


■ 




1 


_,_ 




NUMBER OF 
TIME8 PREVIOUS^ 
COMMITTED. 


II 

So 

r fa 


Reforraato 
Prison 
Women. 


State F 


ARM. 

1 

Tot., 

1 


County Prisons. 


Aggregates. 




M. 


i 
F. 


M. 


p.i 

1 


. M. 

i 


F. ! Tot. 


M. 

i 


F. 


Tot. 


1 time, . 


31 


42 


174 


6 


i 
180 


1,681 


139 


1,820 


1,886 


187 


2,078 


2 times, . 




7 


10 


61 


1 


62 


1,956 


236 


2,192 


2,024 


247 


2,271 


3 times, . 




- 


6 


13 


1 


14 


1,197 


192 


1,389 


1,210 


198 


1,408 


4 times, . 




- 


4 1 


7 


- 


7 1 


843 


99 


942 


850 


103 


953 


5 times, . 




- 


- 1 


3 


- 


8 ! 


651 


102 


653 


564 


102 


656 


to 16 times, 




- 


~ 1 


5 


- 


6 I 


2,202 


294 


2,496 


2,207 


294 


2,501 


16 to 30 times, 




- 


i 


- 


- 


i 


461 


91 


552 


461 


91 


552 


31 to 60 times, 




- 




- 


— 


- i 


114 


35 


149 


114 


35 


149 


More than 60 times, 


• — 


- 1 


1 263 


8 


i 

271 


38 

i 


7 46 


38 


7 


45 


Total recommitments, 


88 


61 


, 9,043 


1,195 


10,238 


9,344 


1,264 


10,608 


Number of first com- 




i 


1 






i 












mitments, . 


180 


189 ! 


[ 675 

i 


22 


697 

1 


7,401 


621 


8,022 


8,206 


[ 782 


8,988 


Whole number of com- 


» 


i 


i 








1 




mitments, . 


168 


200 ' 

1 


938 


30 


968 | 

i 


i 16,444 

1 


1,816 


18,260 


17,650 


| 2,046 

1 


19,696 



242 STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. [Oct, 



Prisoners Remaining in Custody at the End of the Teas. 

All the preceding tables of statistics refer to the commitments 
daring the year ending Sept. 30, 1896 ; and in the tables immedi- 
ately following there are presented the offences and sentences of the 
prisoners remaining in custody on that date, together with com- 
parisons of the prison population at certain periods. 

At the close of the year there remained at the State Prison 796 
prisoners, — an increase of 96 over the preceding year; at the 
Reformatory Prison for Women, 350, — an increase of 14; at the 
Massachusetts Reformatory, 933, — a decrease of 78 ; at the State 
Farm, 578, — an increase of 4. 

There were 724 prisoners in the jails on September 30, being 74 
less than last year. In the houses of correction there remained 
4,141 ; but this last number cannot be compared with the preceding 
year, because there is now included, for the first time in the county 
prisons, the population of the institution at Deer Island, which has 
heretofore been set out separately under the title of the House of 
Industry. Adding the number remaining in the House of Industry 
at the close of last year to the number then reported from the county 
prisons, for comparison, we find that the present year shows a de- 
crease of 142. The number remaining in all the prisons amounted 
to 7,522, being 106 less than were held at the end of the preceding 
year. 

A reference to Table No. 27, on the following page, shows that 
on Dec. 31, 1895, there was in custody in the institutions named in 
this report the largest number of prisoners ever under imprison- 
ment at one time in this Commonwealth. Since that time, however, 
although the number has increased at the State Prison and at the 
Reformatory Prison for Women, it has largely decreased at the 
Massachusetts Reformatory and at the State Farm ; and, although 
more prisoners were held in the jails on September 30, the whole 
number in the county prisons was nearly 100 less than on Decern* 
ber 31. 

The smallest aggregate number of prisoners was on March 31 ; 
and on June 30 there was an increase of nearly 300 in the popula- 
tion of the county prisons, as compared with the close of the pre- 
ceding quarter. This variation seems to have been the rule for 
several years past. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



Table No. 27. — Summary of Prisoners confined in All Prisons at Certain 
Dates. 



30,1883, 
SO, ISM, 

30, 1BS5, 

30, isse, 



Den. 31, 1882, 
3l' IBB*! 



lb SI, 1883, 
■1. IBM, 

31, 1884, 
SI, 1186, 
31,1881, 

in, less, 

31,1380, 
31, 1SB0. 

at! i*fl^ 
3i, was, 

3i | im. 









613 


1600 


1,303 








Mi 


1,7(9 


1,170 








8*1 


2fl06 










602 












647 












mo 




2J8sa 












S.17S 








619 












T01 


2,422 

2>s; 


sill! 1, 
3.283 1. 








798 


S.Ctl! 










724 


4,141 


*'fita 1 








m 


1,877 


2,277 








aoa 


silso 


I:JS 








414 












6 IS 


2,434 
2,700 


2,377 '] 








697 


2.720 
2,343 


1.640 ■ 








MB 


2' 423 


s|s53 1 




















6B1 


4,271 


4,962 








402 


1,BT7 


1MB 








493 












620 












604 












488 


2,273 


1,731 








574 


a!402 


l|*7B 




















338 












584 


2,834 


1,018 . 








386 












604 


S|826 


4^480 ■ 








375 


1,604 


B.4H 1 








643 


ill 1)6 


2, JIB , 
2,322 . 








665 


1.&U 

3,0 J -»J 


2^577 








487 












461 


2,007 


u,56a 








637 


2! 630 
2,274 


I'm* 1 








324 












970 


2,490 


3,1 CO 








500 


4,121 


*■'" !i 



87 


244 


. 




261 




73 


314 




103 








263 




02 


225 


7T* 


220 


142 


733 


sss 


292 


887 


361 






463 


323 


1,047 


674 


3S3 


1,011 


178 


360 


M 


168 


271 






234 




250 


200 


1ST 


266 








147 


ISO 


190 


230 


668 


S67 


229 


040 


802 




T27 






330 




306 


035 






1,054 




313 


1,002 


323 


M2 


908 


161 


260 
188 


; 


800 


234 


338 


147 


134 


710 


113 








162 




200 


233 


tag 


360 


186 


floi 


266 


302 


971 


443 


206 


1,021 


804 


363 


'960 


80 


240 


_ 








110 


148 


461 










136 


746 


130 


218 


766 


134 


140 


730 




103 


783 


302 


300 


335 


233 


SI 3 
308 


085 


480 


318 


i',m 


683 


SS8 


074 



a »t Deer Ului 
utabllibed De 



ilnded In County Piiioun (or 



244 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 28. — Showing Number of Male and Female Prisoners in AH 

Prisons at Certain Dates. 

County Prisons. 



county. 



Reft. 80, 189ft. 



Prisons. 



Jails. 



M. 



Houses 

of 

Correction. 



M. 



Barnstable, . 
Berkshire, . 

Bristol . 
Dukes County, 

Essex, . 

Franklin, 
Hampden, . 
Hampshire, . 

Middlesex, . 

Nantucket, . 
Norfolk, 
Plymouth, . 

Suffolk, . 
Worcester, . 



J! 



Barnstable Jail and House of Correction, . 
Pittsfleld Jail and House of Correction, 
New Bedford Jail and House of Correction, 

Taunton Jail, 

Bdgartown Jail 

Ipswich House of Correction, 
Lawrence Jail and House of Correction, 

Newburyport Jail, 

Salem Jail and House of Correction, . 
Greenfield Jail and House of Correction, . 
Springfield Jail and House of Correction, . 
Northampton Jail and House of Correction, 
Cambridge Jail and House of Correction, • 

Lowell Jail, 

Nantucket Jail and House of Correction, . 
Dedham Jail and House of Correction, 
Plymouth Jail and House of Correction, . 

Boston Jail, 

Boston House of Correction, .... 
Deer Island House of Correction, . 
Fltchburg Jail and House of Correction, 
Worcester Jail and House of Correction, . 

Total 



8 

16 
10 
00 

2 

35 

24 

15 

6 

24 

3 

158 

00 

1 

10 

22 

163 



5 
24 



693 



1 
8 



2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 

is i 

29 



1 
34 



1 
2 



5 

81 

207 



105 
147 

139 

29 ' 
242 

30 
364 

It 
101 

59 i 

498 , 

1,318 J 

98 . 
182 



4 
S4 



14 
28 

20 
I 

17 
2 

34 



7 

3 I 

» 

65 j 
359 i 

3 ■ 
12 



14 
104 
251 

74 

119 

21: 

177 
ST 

£** 
3* 

571 

12* 

* 

85 

197 

56; 

1,677 
107 

229 



105 



3,606 ; 603 . 6,007 



Other Prisons. 





Prison. 


Sm-t. 30, 1895. 


LOCATION. 


Males. 


Females. 


Total 


Boston (Charlestown), 
Bherboro, 
Concord, 
Bridgewater, 


Reformatory Prison for Women, . 
Massachusetts Reformatory, .... 

Number in county prisons, .... 
Number in other prisons, .... 

i 


700 

1,011 
556 


336 

18 


' TOO 

1 336 

' 1,011 

574 


Summary, . . j 


2,267 

4,299 
2,267 


354 

708 
354 


2,621 

6,007 
2,621 




6,566 


1,062 


7,628 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



245 



Table No. 28. — Showing Number of Male and Female Prisoners in All 

Prisons at Certain Dates — Concluded. 

Coumtt Prisons. 



Dec. 31, 1896. 


March 81, 1896. 


Jura 30, 1896 


m 




8kpt. 80, 189C 


\. 




House* 






Hoaiei 






Houses 








Houses 




Jails. 


of 
Correction. 


■ 

1 


Jails. 


of 
Correction. 


~3 

s 


Jails. 


of 
Correction. 


• 
*•* 

1 


Jails. 


of 
Correction. 




AL 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


• 

6 


3 


_ 


9 


_ 


12 


6 


a 


11 


_ 


16 


2 


— 


7 


1 


10 


8 


1 


10 


1 


15 


10 


6 


64 


1 


79 


12 


- 


64 


2 


68 


27 


6 


65 


1 


98 


19 


1 


91 


6 


117 


10 


2 


282 


44 


838 


8 


- 


230 


41 • 


279 


7 


1 


298 


74 


380 


18 


1 


218 


48 


286 


30 


8 


- 


- 


33 


42 


14 


- 


- 


56 


25 


4 


- 


- 


29 


64 


7 


- 


- 


71 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


145 


11 


156 


- 


- 


108 


6 


118 


- 


- 


63 


6 


69 


- 


- 


108 


16 


124 


26 


1 


167 


29 


212 


8 


1 


160 


22 


181 


8 


1 


167 


29 


205 


7 


1 


165 


18 


181 


17 


6 


- 


— 


22 


26 


5 


- 


- 


31 


1 12 


6 


- 


- 


17 


8 


5 


- 


- 


13 


38 


4 


123 


17 


182 


17 


3 


126 


10 


156 


19 


- 


94 


7 


120 


10 


1 


119 


15 


145 


8 


2 


33 


2 


40 


10 


- 


27 


2 


89 


12 


1 


22 


3 


88 


4 


- 


82 


3 


89 


6 


2 


211 


17 


285 


12 


- 


188 


18 


218 


19 


2 


202 


19 


242 


28 


6 


187 


20 


240 


1 


- 


36 


2 


89 


5 


2 


29 


1 


87 


1 


- 


34 


2 


87 


10 


3 


42 


1 


66 


120 


6 


441 


84 


600 


69 


9 


385 


32 


496 


34 


7 


879 


26 


446 


110 


29 


886 


23 


627 


80 


22 


- 


- 


102 


80 


28 


- 


- 


108 


97 


19 


- 


- 


116 


96 


81 


- 


- 


127 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


101 


9 


118 


12 


2 


61 


3 


78 


10 


- 


66 


2 


78 


2 


- 


74 


1 


77 


13 


- 


66 


2 


70 


5 


- 


45 


2 


52 


7 


2 


70 


5 


84 


19 


2 


61 


5 


87 


191 


80 


- 


- 


221 


170 


29 


- 


- 


199 


183 


34 


- 


- 


217 


183 


32 


- 


- 


215 


- 


- 


644 


71 


615 


- 


- 


662 


68 


630 


- 


- 


661 


64 


626 


- 


- 


470 


66 


626 


- 


- 


1,210 


319 


1,529 


- 


- 


1,096 


292 


1,888 


- 


- 


1,215 


306 


1,621 


- 


- 


1,269 


349 


1,618 


7 


- 


111 


4 


122 


7 


- 


80 


4 


91 


5 


- 


95 


4 


104 


3 


- 


117 


5 


126 


80 


8 
89 


186 


12 
574 


235 


18 
509 


2 
96 


166 


11 
508 


197 


82 

501 


7 
89 


219 


14 


272 


17 
602 


2 
122 


234 


22 
589 


275 


602 


8,697 


4,962 


8,318 


4,430 


3,568 


563 


4,711 


3,562 


4,806 



Other Prisons. 



Dec. 81, 1895. 


Mabcb 31, 1896. 


Jura 80, 1896. 


Sept. 30, 1696. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Total. 


Male*. 


Fe- 
males. 


Total. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Total. 


Males. 


Fe- 
males. 


Total. 


780 

998 
802 


842 
21 


730 
842 
998 
823 


774 
779 


858 
25 


774 
868 
969 
804 


784 

974 
668 


368 
20 


784 
368 
974 
688 


796 

933 
662 


860 
16 


796 
360 
933 
678 


2,680 

4,299 

2,530 


868 

668 

868 


2,893 

4,962 
2,893 


2,622 

3,827 
2,522 


378 

603 
378 


2,900 

4,430 
2,900 


2,826 

4,069 
2,326 


378 

652 
878 


2,704 

4,711 
2,704 


2,291 

4,164 
2,291 


866 

711 
866 


2,657 

4,866 
2,657 


6,829 


1,026 


7,866 


6,349 


981 


7,330 


6,885 


1,030 


7,415 


6,446 


1,077 


7,522 



246 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Proportion of Male and Female Prisoners. 

The number of male and female prisoners in all the prisons, and 
the percentage of each in custody at certain periods, for the past 
ten years, are shown in the following table : — 



Table No. 29. 
Number of Male and Female Prisoners, and Percentage of Each, 







i 




Per Cart. 


Pardon. 


DATES. 


Males. 


i restates. 


Tool 


of 


or 






1 




Males. Females. 



Dec. 31 
March 31 
June 30 
Sept. 30 
Dec. 31 
March 31 
Jane 30 
Sept. 30 
Dec. 31 
March 31 
Jane 30 
Sept. 30 
Dec. 31 
March 31 
Jane 30 
Sept 30 
Dec. 31 
March 31 
June 30 
Sept. 30 
Dec. 31 
March 31 
June 30 
Sept. 30 
Dec. 31 
March 31 
June 30 
Sept. 30 
Dec. 31 
March 31 
June 30 
Sept. 30 
Dec. 31 
March 31 
June 30 
Sept. 30 
Dec. 31 
March 31 
June 30 
Sept. 30 



1886, 
1887, 
1887, 
1887, 
1887, 
1888, 
1888, 
1888, 
1888, 
1889, 
1889, 
1889, 
1889, 
1890, 
1890, 
1890, 
1890, 
1891, 
1891, 
1891, 
1891, 
1892, 
1892, 
1892, 
1892, 
1893, 
1893, 
1893, 
1898, 
1894, 
1894, 
1894, 
1894, 
1895, 
1895, 
1895, 
1895, 
1896, 
1896, 
1896, 



4,758 
4,413 
4,113 

4,562 
5,158 
4,778 
4,450 
4,819 
5,465 
4,999 
4,611 
5,090 
5,383 
5,041 
4.610 
4,880 
4,904 
4,845 
4,780 
5,148 
5,670 
5,497 
5,297 
5,440 
5,416 
5,204 
5,138 
6,024 
6,370 
5,794 
5,895 
6,305 
6,462 
5,978 
6,192 
6,566 
6,829 
6,849 
6,385 
6,445 



737 
739 

751 
784 
719 
736 
761 
879 
818 
805 
875 
918 
789 
780 
809 
859 
710 
723 
774 
920 
949 
961 
995 
968 
932 
848 
987 
1,011 
948 
899 
992 
1,072 
954 
917 
1,000 
1,062 
1,026 
981 
1,030 
1,077 



5,495 
5,152 
4,864 
5,346 
5,877 
5,514 
5,211 
5,698 
6,283 
5,804 
5,486 
6,008 
6,172 
5,821 
5,419 
5,739 
5,614 
5,568 
5,554 
6,068 
6,619 
6,458 
6,292 
6,408 
6,348 
6,052 
6,075 
7,035 
7,318 
6,693 
6,887 
7,377 
7,416 
6,895 
7,192 
7,628 
7,855 
7,330 
7,415 
7,522 



I 
864- I 

85-- ! 

84-- | 

85-- 

87-- 

86-- 

85-- 

84-- ! 

864- ' 

86-- 

84-- 

84-- 

87-- 

86-- 

85-- 

85-- 

87-- 

87-- 

86-- 

84-- 

85-- 

85-- 

84-- 

84-- 

85-- 

85-- 

84-- 

85-- 

87-- 

86-- 

85-- 

85-- 

87-- 

86-- 

86-- 

86-- 

86-- 

86-- 

86-- 

85-- 



3+ 

tt 

44- 

24- 



34- 
S-- 

5-- 

5- 

24- 
3-U 



4— 

2— 

3+ 

5+ 
4-U 

44- 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



247 



Table No. 30. 

Average Number of Prisoners in County Prisons* and Proportion of Such 

Prisoners to Population in Each County. 



COUNTIES. 



Population, 
1890. 



Average 
Number of 
Prisoners. 



Proportion of 

Prisoners 

to Population In 

1899. 



Barnstable, 
Berkshire, . 
Bristol, 
Dukes County, 
Essex, 
Franklin, . 
Hampden, . 
Hampshire, 
Middlesex, . 
Nantucket, . 
Norfolk, 
Plymouth, . 
Suffolk, 
Worcester, . 



Total, 



27,654 

86,292 

219,019 

4,238 

330,393 

40,145 
152,938 

54,710 
499,217 
3,016 
134,819 
101,498 
589,799 
806,445 



2,500,183 



12 

84 

368 

2 

482 

37 

235 

41 

630 

1 

94 

72 

2,339 

365 



4,762 



in 

in 

n 

n 

in 

in 

n 

in 

in 

n 

n 

n 

in 

in 



2,304 
1,027 

595 
2,119 

685 
1,085 

650 
1,334 

792 
8,016 
1,484 
1,409 

230 

839 



1 in 524 



Table No. 31. 
Average Number of Prisoners in All Prisons for the Last Seventeen Tears. 













♦♦ 






a 
o 


e 

i 


| 


«S a a> 


J 1 ! 




YEAJEta 


Coonty 
Prl 


oo 


S 
to 


Befbrm 
Prlsoi 
Worn 


• 

■a 
z 


Average, 1880, 


2,794 


750 


210 


353 


_ 


4,107 


1881, 






2,704 


702 


139 


267 


— 


3,812 


1882, 


( 




2,891 


665 


109 


228 


— 


3,893 


1883, 






2,915 


611 


114 


253 


— 


3,893 


1884, 






3,284 


561 


80 


299 


— 


4,224 


1885, 






3,377 


490 


188 


291 


265 


4,611 


1886, 






3,611 


522 


169 


.263 


600 


5,165 


1887, 






8,475 


546 


146 


241 


725 


5,103 


1888, 






3,764 


556 


168 


228 


792 


5,508 


1889, 






4,212 


575 


180 


245 


648 


5,860 


1890, 






4,046 


586 


248 


237 


681 


5,798 


1891, 






3,738 


612 


244 


214 


758 


5,566 


1892, 






4,297 


649 


308 


283 


869 


6,406 


1893, 






4,152 


669 


281 


806 


954 


6,362 


1894, 






4,582 


667 


439 


310 


1,035 


7,033 


1895, 






4,681 


683 


529 


318 


1,036 


7,247 


1896, 




4,762 


759 


578 


850 


975 


7,424 



* Including the institution at Deer Island, formerly known as the Boston House of Industry, 
which became a house of correction July 1, 1896. 
t The number in Reformatory Prison for Women includes prisoners bound out. 
X The Massachusetts Reformatory was established Dec, 20, 1884. 



248 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 





Table No. 82. — Number in 


the County 


Prisons. 






COUNTIES. 


8ept.80, 
1887. 


Sept. 30, 
1888. 


Sept. 80, 
1880. 


Sept. 80, 
1890. 


Sept. 30, 
1891. 




oT 


Sept. 30, 
1894. 


Sept. 30, 
1895. 


CD 


Barnstable 


10 


7 


10 


8 


7 


10 


13 


14 


14 


15 


Berkshire, 








82 


81 


103 


67 


94 


84 


79 


71 


104 


117 


Bristol, . 








250 


294 


819 


304 


267 


298 


866 


344 


825 


356 


Dukes Count] 


u « 






- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Bssez, . 








454 


474 


681 


532 


816 


688 


461 


490 


635 


468 


Franklin, 








1 


20 


81 


29 


36 


26 


87 


84 


37 


39 


Hampden, 








179 


281 


280 


226 


186 


261 


261 


278 


286 


240 


Hampshire, . 








18 


21 


47 


87 


17 


27 


62 


S3 


36 


56 


Middlesex, . 








463 


567 


607 


567 


575 


609 


692 


640 


699 


664 


Nantucket, . 








1 


6 


- 


6 


8 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


Norfolk, 








74 


82 


86 


100 


96 


80 


104 


95 


118 


n 


Plymouth, 








57 


38 


66 


88 


60 


64 


88 


63 


86 


87 


Suffolk, . 








1,818 


1,876 


1,941 


1,767 


1,806 


1,874 


2,319 


2,438 


2,437 


2^69 


Worcester, . 








820 


866 


895 


271 


412 


824 


376 


386 


327 


400 


Total, , 


3,722 


4,071 


4,415 


3,945 


4,178 


4,290 


4,786 


4,876 


5,007 


4,866 



Table No. 33. — Changes in Prison Population in Each Quarter during 

the Last Two Tears. 



DATES. 






• 

a 

s 

2 

5 

S 
m 


Reformatory 
Prison for 
Women. 


Massachusetts 
Beformatory. 


Oouxtt Pbisonb. 


State Farm. 




M. 


P. 


M. 


M. 


P. 


Tot. 


M. 


P. j Tot. 


Deo. 81, 1894, . 

31.1895, . 
Increase, . 
Decrease, 
March 81, 1895, 

81, 1896, 
Increase, . 
Decrease, 
Jane 30, 1895, . 

30.1896, . 
Increase, . • 
Decrease, 
Sept. 80, 1895, . 

30, 1896, . 
Increase, . 
Decrease, 








671 
780 

69 

• 

681 

774 

98 

702 

784 

82 

700 

796 

96 


818 

842 

24 

809 

868 

44 

316 

358 

42 

836 

860 

14 


1,062 
998 

64 

1,029 
969 

60 

1,026 

974 

52 

1,011 

988 

78 


4,177 

4,299 

122 

8,785 

8,827 

92 

8,994 

4,069 
66 

4,299 
4,154 

146 


616 

668 

47 

692 

608 

11 

666 

662 

18 

708 
711 

4 


4,798 

4,962 

169 

4,327 

4,430 

103 

4,660 

4,711 

62 

6,007 
4,865 

142 


652 
802 
260 

633 

7T9 
246 

470 

568 

98 

656 

662 
6 


20 

21 

1 

16 
86 

9 

19 

20 

1 

18 
16 


572 
828 
281 

549 
804 
25ft 

480 

6M 

99 

674 
678 

4 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



249 



Offences of Prisoners held in Custody Sept. 30, 1896. 

The following tables concerning prisoners held Sept. 30, 1896, in 
all the institutions named in this report, are presented to show the 
condition of the prison population on that date : — 

Table No. 34. — Offences of Sentenced Prisoners remaining in County 
Prisons {Jails and Houses of Correction), Sept. 30, 1896. 





COUNTIBt. 


OFFENCES. 

/ 


• 

3 

I 

1 

« 


e 

M 


• 

3 

• 


« 

M 

3 


• 

a 
a 

M 


• 

a 

a 

* 


• 

£ 
§ 


■ 

H 

s 

3 


• 

a 
1 
si 


* 

§ 

S 


• 

M 

€ 



02 


• 

u 

5 

■ 

I 

o 
1* 


1 


1. — Against th> Pbbsox. 






















































1 




- 


6 


43 


42 


8 


10 


1 


61 


4 


7 


119 


86 


820 


Assault, felonious, 


- 


1 


8 


8 


2 


2 


- 


4 


- 


1 


18 





46 




























1 






1 


2 


1 


_ 


«» 


— 


2 


«. 


_ 


6 


«. 


1 
11 




























1 




























2 




























1 


&ape, • ....... 


S 


"• 


1 
2 


1 
2 


*■ 


~ 


*• 


8 


1 


1 


21 


~ 



29 




4 


7 


56 


62 


6 


12 


1 






9 


1 

104 


1 
42 


8 




04 


6 


421 


2.— Aoaikst Propbbtt. 






















• 












1 
16 


1 
34 


8 


6 


1 


1 
80 


11 


8 


70 


24 


a 


Breaking and entering, .... 


- 


3 


204 


Burglar's tools, having 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


• 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


4 


Burning buildings, 


- 


• 


- 


4 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


8 




— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


- 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


t 


Conspiracy to defraud, .... 






















2 


- 


2 




1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


- 


1 


8 


- 


1 


9 


1 


22 




























1 


Extortion, ....... 
























1 


1 




- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


3 


- 





- 


- 


12 


- 


24 


Injuring cow, 






















1 


- 


1 




2 


17 


49 


09 


4 


22 


6 


81 


14 


7 


800 


86 


006 








6 


1 


1 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


10 


1 


21 


Receiving stolen goods 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


8 


1 


12 




























2 




























t 


Trespass, ...•••• 






















1 


- 


1 




S 


26 


74 


116 


9 


82 


7 


180 


1 


*• 


1 
418 


2 

07 







27 


ie 


928 


S.— Aoaikst Public Oboeb, etc. 






























1 


7 


4 


11 


6 


- 


- 


6 


2 


2 


10 


14 


61 




- 


— 


— 


— 


- 


- 


— 


— 


— 


• 


1 


- 


1 




























2 


Olty ordinance or town bylaws, violat- 






















1 


^ 


1 
























2 


— 


2 
























1 


- 


2 
























1 


- 


2 


Common night walker, .... 


1 


- 


4 


2 


^ 


- 


- 


«• 


* 


- 


37 


- 


44 




























1 


Counterfeit money, 


























1 


Disorderly house, keeping, 




















1 


— 


2 


4 


- 


4 


7 


1 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


1 


8 


2 


27 


Disturbing the peace, .... 


2 


9 


20 


6 


2 


2 


- 


16 


2 


2 


6 


9 


80 


Dog laws, violating, 






















1 


- 


1 




- 


84 


109 


199 


8 


182 


84 


278 


80 


16 


1,820 


194 


2,348 




" 


1 


I : 


— 


1 


1 


1 
2 


i 


3 


1 
10 


1 



28 








x 1 














1 





250 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Table 


No 


». 34- 


- Concluded. 


























OouHTi«a 


. 










OFFENCES. 


• 

• 

1 


• 

e 
*» 

*** 
JO 


• 

3 


« 
M 


• 

a 
M 


• 

Q 
9 


2 

i 


• 

8 
8 


» 

a 

o 


• 

-a 

p 

o 


• 

M 


• 

s. 

9 


1 

i 

* 




e 


M 

u 

9 

ffl 


JB 

« 


s 


a 


§ 


a 


5 


© 


8 


o 



m 


o 




8. —Against Public Obdbr, etc. 




























— Con. 




























Fornication, 


m. 


— 


1 


2 


_ 


2 


«» 


8 


• 


1 


26 


2 


87 


Honae of ill-fame, keeping, 


— 





1 


.. 


• 


.. 


. 


«. 


. 




S 




4 








10 


6 


• 


— 


_ 


1 


i 


• 


63 


1 


72 


























1 








1 


6 


• 


_ 


1 


.. 


. 


i 


« 


6 


1 


16 


Infanta* boarding-house, keeping, un- 


















































1 


_ 




Intelligence office, unlicensed, . 




























Lewd cohabitation 


- 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


_ 


4 


«. 


• 


20 


2 


35 






1 


8 


4 


.. 


1 


• 


1 


_ 


. 


1 


4 


15 


Liquor laws, violating, .... 


— 


2 


8 


8 


- 


1 


— 


18 


4 


11 


16 


10 


73 


Lord's Day, violating, .... 






















1 








— 


- 


6 


6 


- 


8 


• 


7 


• 


-. 


7 i 


2 


81 


Non-payment of tax, .... 


















































1 


— 


























2 


1 
























2 


3 


• 




Physician, unregistered 


— 


1 


2 


s 








4 




1 


© 


1 


11 




_ 


1 






B 


— 


mm 




— 




3 ! 






























Tramps, 


1 


- 


_ 


10 


8 


- 


— 


10 


.. 


- 


_ 


1 


86 


U. 8. mail, obstructing 


- 


1 
























U. 8. mail, stealing, 


- 


- 


- 


1 


• 


• 


• 


- 


• 


• 


• 


_ 


























7 ' 


— 


























3 


„» 










2 


17 


1 


11 




A 


1 


2 


AS 


21 

• 

2«~ 


114 
SO 


Walking on railroad, .... 


6 


66 








4 


86 


12 
872 


48 


41 


14 




104 


280 


21 


168 


1,627 


8,11ft 



1.— Against the penon, . 
2.— Against property, . 

8.— Against public order, etc., 



RECAPITULATION. 



Total, 



4 


7 


66 


52 


6 


12 


1 


64 


6 


3 


25 


74 


116 





82 


7 


180 


27 


6 
12 


66 
07 


104 
324 


280 


21 


168 
207 


85 
48 


372 
666 


48 
75 


447 


36 




Table No. 85. — Sentences of Prisoners remaining in County Prisons 
{Jails and Houses of Correction), Sept. 30, 1896. 







8KNTEKCB8. 






• 

o 


« 


Q 


« 


•o 


"O 


■o 








5- 
J* 


• 


s« 


9» 


S 


• 


OFFENCES. 


O 

•a 

a 

Ct 

• 
a 


Less thai 
Months. 


Year and 
than 9. 


Yean 

Less than 


Yean 
Less than 


Years 

More. 


8 

** 



i 




E 


« 


** 


01 


ft) 


» 


< 




M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. F. ! Tot. 


1. — Against the person, . 


67 


2 


08 


8 


81 


3 


76 


. 


30 


« 


43 




5 


4 


400 12! 431 


2. — Against property, . 
8. — Against public order, 


78 


6 


103 


17 


181 


11 


187 


2 


160 


3 


68 


8 


13 


2 


870. 44j OSS 






























1 ' 




760 


80 


1,052 


247 


514 


280 


125 


48 


41 


8 


18 


2 




1 


2,510 606j 3,11) 


Total, .... 


000 


88 


1,843 


267 


776 


284 


888 


50 


240 


11 


124 


"• 


»!1 


3,708 66) 4,450 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No- 13. 



251 



Held for Non-payment op Fines and Costs. 

The offences of all the prisoners held for non-payment of fines and 
costs at the close of the year are set out in the following table : — 



Table No. 36. — Offences of Prisoners held in County Prisons for Non* 

payment of Fines and Costs, Sept. 30, 1896. 



offences. 



Hbld on Fixib and Costs. 



Males. 



Females. 



Total. 



1. — AOAINBT THE PXB80N. 

Assault, 

Threats, 

Total 

2. — Against Pbopbbtt. 

Embezzlement, 

Evading fare, . 

Fraud, • . . 

Larceny, 

Malicious mischief, 

Receiving stolen goods, 

Removing baggage, 

Trespass, 

Unlawful taking, 

Total 

3. — Against Public Or1>eb, etc. 

Adultery, 

Affray, 

City ordinance or town bylaws, violating, . 

Cruelty to animals, 

Disorderly boose, keeping, 

Disturbing the peace, 

Dog laws, violating, 

Drunkenness, 

Fornication, 

House of ill-fame, keeping, 

Idle and disorderly, 

Indecent exposure, 

Infants' boarding-house, keeping, unlicensed, . 

Intelligence office, keeping, illegally, 

Liquor laws, violating, ...... 

Lord's Day, violating, 

Neglect of family, 

Non-payment of tax, 

Peddling, unlicensed, 

Btubbornness, 

Vagrants, 

Walking on railroad 

Total, .' 



64 
8 



67 



2 
1 
6 
60 
8 
1 
2 
1 
8 



73 



1 
1 
2 
4 
2 

87 

1 

617 

10 

2 
2 
1 

31 
2 

6 
6 
4 

1 

1 

80 



760 



4 

2 



6 



6 
6 

44 

17 
1 



1 

6 



80 



66 

8 



60 



2 

1 

6 

64 

10 
1 
2 
1 
8 



70 



1 
1 
2 
4 
7 

48 

1 

661 

27 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 

87 
2 
6 
6 
4 
1 
1 

80 



840 



RECAPITULATION. 



1. — Against the person, 

2. — Agtinst property , 

8. — Against public order, etc. 

Total, .... 



67 

78 

760 



000 



2 

6 

80 



88 



60 

70 

840 



088 



252 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 37.— 


Offences of Prisoners held 


on Sentences, 


Sept. 30, 1896. 




HXU> ON SENTENCES. 








State 


Reforma- 
tory 
Prison for 


Mass. 










OFFBNCB8. 


County Prisons. 


Pris- 


Reform- 


State Farm. 


Aggregates. 








on. 


Women. 


atory. 












M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


1. — AOAIN8T THE PER- 


























SON. 


























Abandoning child, . 


- 


• 


• 


— 


8 












S 


3 


Abase of female child, . 


1 


_ 


1 


10 


• 


• 


. 


• 


_ 


11 


_ 


11 


Assault 


248 


6 


264 


1 


8 


16 


_ 


• 


• 


266 


9 


274 


Assault, felonious, . 


46 


— 


46 


81 


. 


16 


• 


-. 


_ 


142 


_ 


142 


Carnal abase, . 


1 


— 


1 


.» 


— 


1 


. 


• 


. 


2 


«. 


2 


Conspiracy, 
Manslaughter, . 


1 


• 


1 


.. 


. 


. 


. 


.. 


.. 


1 


. 


1 





2 


11 


48 


_ 


• 


. 


_ 


. 


52 


2 


64 


Mayhem, .... 


1 


- 


1 


1 


1 


— 


- 


• 


• 


2 


1 


3 


Mingling poison with 


























food, .... 


- 


— 


- 


1 


1 


_ 


— 


• 


— 


1 


1 


2 


Murder, .... 


• 


2 


2 


47 


• 


• 


1 


• 


1 


48 


2 


69 


Poisoning, attempt, . 


1 


- 


1 


; 


- 


- 


- 


— 


- 


2 




2 


Rape, .... 
Bobbery, .... 


6 


- 


6 


43 


• 


— 


1 


• 


1 


60 


- 


66 


29 


— 


29 


87 


_ 


8 


• 


. 


. 


124 




124 


Threat*, .... 


- 


10 


- 


- 


- 


1 
42 


2 


- 


- 


1 


18 


1 


Total, .... 


842 


862 


315 


8 


- 


2 


701 


719 


2. — Against Pbopbrtt. 


























Arson, .... 


8 


• 


8 





• 


_ 


1 


• 


1 


IS 


• 


13 


Breaking and entering, . 


200 


4 


204 


287 


2 


232 


1 


- 


1 


670 


6 


676 


Burglar's tools, having, . 


4 


_ 


4 


4 


« 


1 


_ 


— 


• 


9 


— 


9 


Burning buildings, . 


7 


1 


8 


16 


1 


7 


- 


— 


- 


80 


2 


at 


Burning personal prop- 


























erty, .... 


— 


• 


- 


- 


• 


1 


_ 


— 


— 


1 


— 


i 


Common thief, . 


8 


_ 


3 


22 


. 


• 


_ 


_ 


_ 


26 


. 


25 


Conspiracy to defraud, . 


2 


_ 


2 


— 


- 


- 


_ 


• 


_ 


2 


— . 


2 


Embezzlement, 


20 


— 


20 


11 


- 


12 


— 


— 


— 


43 


• 


43 


Extortion, .... 


1 


• 


1 


• 


• 


- 


• 


- 


• 


1 


. 


1 


Fraud, .... 


10 


• 


10 


6 


. 





— 


• 


• 


34 


« 


34 


Habitual criminal, . 


_ 


.. 


_ 


26 


_ 


• 


• 


_ 


_ 


26 


« 


26 


Injuring cow, . 


1 


• 


1 




- 


- 


• 


• 


• 


1 


• 


1 


Larceny, .... 


621 


30 


651 


68 


86 


846 


_ 


. 


- 


924 


65 ; 


989 


Malicious mischief, . 


10 


1 


11 


_ 


.. 


2 


_ 


• 


• 


12 


1 * 


IS 


Receiving stolen goods, . 


10 


1 


11 


7 


8 


8 


- 


• 


— 


25 


4 . 


29 


Stealing a ride, 


8 


- 


8 


• 


- 


. 


• 


- 


- 


3 


- 1 


3 


Unlawful taking, . 


2 


1 
38 


3 
844 


- 


- 


- 


2 


«. 


2 


2 


1 

79 ' 


S 


Total 


806 


306 


41 


617 


1,821 


1,909 


3. — Against Publio 






















1 




Order, WTO. 






















1 




Abortion 


. 


_ 


— 


10 


4 


_ 


• 


• 


• 


10 


4 1 


14 


Adultery 


44 


16 


60 


• 





4 


_ 


— 


• 


48 


26 1 


73 


Bestiality 


2 


• 


2 


1 


- 


- 


.. 


• 


. 


8 


- 1 


S 


Carrying weapons, . 


1 


— 


1 


. 


- 


— 


_ 


-. 


• 


1 


i 


1 


Common beggar, . . 


2 


— 


2 


_ 


. 


• 


• 


• 


. 


2 


- i 


2 


Common brawler, . 


- 


2 


2 


_ 


. 


• 


1 


_ 


1 


1 


2 ! 


3 


Common night-walker, . 
Concealing death of child, 


_ 


44 


44 


. 


28 












67 1 


67 


• 


1 


1 


• 


• 


. 


.. 


- 


.. 


• 


1 


1 


Counterfeiting, 


1 


— 


1 


7 


- 


• 


• 


• 


• 


8 


i 


8 


Disorderly house, keep- 






















I 
i 




ing 


10 


10 


20 


• 


8 


• 


_» 


-. 


— 


10 


is i 


28 


Disturbing the peace, 


82 


6 


87 


• 


2 


• 


_ 


• 


_ 


32 


7 1 


39 


Drunkenness, . . 


1,800 


381 


1,687 


- 


171 


131 


882 


13 


895 ! 


1,819 


665| 


2^84 


Escape, .... 


6 


•» 


6 


_ 


» 


• 


. 


- 


• ' 


6 


^ 1 


6 


Forgery 


28 


• 


28 


22 


1 


9 


• 


_ 


. 


64 


1 1 


66 


Fornication, . . , 


4 


6 


10 


• 


8 


1 


« 


. 


• 


6 


9 i 


14 


House of ill-fame, keep- 






















1 




ing 


1 


2 


8 


• 


1 


• 


• 


• 


*. 


1 


3 , 


4 


Idle and disorderly, . 


60 


20 


70 


- 


30 


88 


8 


_. 


9 i 


86 


60 | 


136 


Incest, .... 


1 


_ 


1 


14 


• 


• 


_ 


• 


i 
- 1 


16 


— i 


15 


Indecent exposure, . 


14 


~ 


14 


• 


_ 


1 


• 


- 


1 


16 


- 


16 


Lewd cohabitation, . 


26 





86 


8 


10 


— 


— 


— 


— 


29 


»! 


48 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No, 13. 



Table No. 37 — Concluded. 





Held oh Beniinces. 


OFFENCES. 


County Prtoona. 


Prla. 


Reform «- 

Prtion'ior 
Women. 


Reform. 
mtorj. 


Bute Farm, 


Aggregate!. 






















«■ 




8. — AOIINST Pdblio 

Orjpeb, etc. — Ood. 

Lewdoea., . . . 

LlqUOI ll«l, Violating, . 

Lottery, advartlalng, eld. 
Select of family, . . 
Obecene lltarmtara, . 

Perjury 

l"by« Irian, nnregUtered, 

Railroad, obstructing, . 

Stubborn neaa, ' * '. 
Taking liquor Into Indian 

Trampa 

U. S. mat!, obstructing, 

U. B. mall, .Haling, 

C. 8. poaul law i, vlo- 

Dn natural act, . 
Vegabonda, . . . 
▼WHl 


26 
M 

10 
30 

103 


10 


14 
25 

11 

30 
I 

a 

113 


10 

I 


13 
3 

1 


n 

27 


M 


: 


i 


26 

IT 
14 

SI 

12 


27 

1 

17 


as 

so 

SO 

1 

IT 

13 

3 
TT 

1 
M 

10 

1 
11 

240 




1,760 


™ 


2,275 


85 


30] 


17* 


653 16 


671 


2,507 


842 


3, 50B 



Table No. 38. — Whole Number of Sentenced Prisoners held in Custody, 
Sept. 30, 1896. 





Held ok Fives tv 


DC«T. 


HD SENTENCE B. 


OFFEKCEB. 


County Prlaona. 


■«• "ST* 

"■ 1 w °— ■ 


MaM. 

Reform - 


Bl ale Farm. 


Aggregate!. 








To,. 


a. 








, f „. 








]. — Agalnat the peraoo, 
8. — A galnat pn bile order, 


m 


12 


421 


EI 3 
306 


8 
41 


41 
3T4 


1 


16 


1 
S 


708 
1,894 

3,427 


10 
33 

012 


TI8 












03, 


4.4SB 


796 


330 


033 


582 


16 




0,0811 


1.0ST 


7,116 



254 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 39. — Comparison as to Sentenced Prisoners remaining in Cus- 
tody in AU Penal Institutions, Sept. 30, 1895, and Sept. 30, 1896. 





FINIS AKD COffTB. I Sxiotxcbs. 


Whole 

No. of 

Sentenced 

Prisoners 

tal. in 

Custody. 


OFFENCES- 


Male*. 


Females. 


TotaL 


j Males. 


Females. 


To 


1895. 


1806. 


1895. 

1 
5 

70 
76 


1 
1896.11895 


1896. 


1895. 1896. 


1895. 


1896 


1895. 1896. 1895. 1896. 

1 


1.— Against the person, 

2. — Against property, . 

3. — Against public order, 

e«c«, • ■ 


74 

76 

785 


67 
73 

760 


2 

6 

80 

88 


76 
81 

805 


69 
79 

840 


i «* 

U.764 

1 
i 

2,823 


701 
1,821 

2,667 


13 
73 

850 


18 
79 

842 


706 
1,837 

3,673 
6,218 


719 783 TBI 
1,900 1,918.1,979 

I 

i 

3,500 4,478 4,349 


Total 


885 


000 


961 


988 


'6,282 


5,189 


936 


939 


6,128 7,17ft 7,1 16 

i 



Prisoners awaiting Trial. 

The foregoing table shows that on Sept. 30, 1896, there were in 
the prison population 988 persons held for non-payment of fines 
and costs and 6,128 upon sentences , making a total of 7,116 con- 
victed prisoners in custody. In addition to this number, there 
remained in the jails 1 poor debtor, 8 witnesses and 397 persons 
awaiting trial ; and Table No. 40 shows the offences for which they 
were held. 

As compared with the preceding year, there was a decrease of 37 
in the number awaiting trial and in the witnesses of 4. Last year 
there were 3 poor debtors, against 1 this year. 

Table No. 41 gives a summary of the prisoners remaining in 
custody at the close of the year; and, in explanation of the large 
increase in the number held in county prisons, the statement fre- 
quently made in the preceding pages should be here repeated, 
namely, that the institution at Deer Island, which has heretofore 
been reported under the name of the House of Industry, was made 
a house of correction on July 1, 1896, and its population is this 
year for the first time included with the county prisons. On com- 
paring the number in the county institutions, it is found that they 
have this year 99 less prisoners than in 1895. The State Prison 
had 96 more, the State Farm 4 more, the Reformatory Prison for 
Women 14 more, the Massachusetts Reformatory 78 less, and the 
unconvicted persons in the jails, as has already been noted, num- 
bered 43 less. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



255 



Table No. 40. — Offences of Prisoners waiting Trial in Jails, Sept. 

30, 1896* 





Jails. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

i 

m 

§ 


s 

2 
« 

m 


i 
a 

■o 

• 


d 

2 

a 



m 


■ 

a 
* 

hi 
«s 

M 
■P 

H 


• 

o 

B 

s 

fe- 
ll 


o 
a 
>» 

hi 



o 


• 

a 

"5 

00 


• 

• 

a 
• 


• 

2 

9 
« 

a 

•c 

0. 
OQ 


• 

a 

p. 
8 


• 

• 
•o 

■c 

e 

« 


m 

S3 

• 

* 

O 


• 

8 

« 


• 

d 
o 

a 
>» 


• 

a 

5 

■ 

& 


* 

M 

hi 


s 


• 

v. 
5 
S 

o 

hi 
o 


• 

3 

o 


Abortion, 

Abuse of female child, . 

Assault, felonious, .... 
Bastardy 

Blackmail, 

Breaking and entering, . 
Burglary, ..... 

Disturbing the peace, . 

Drunkenness 

Bmbezzlement, .... 

Forgery, 

Praud 

Idle and disorderly, 

Lewdness, ..... 
Liquor laws, violating, . . 
Malicious burning, .... 

Manslaughter, 

Opium laws, violating, . 

Polygamy, 

Railroad, obstructing, . 

Receiving stolen goods, . 

Robbery 

Bednotlon, ..... 
Belling or concealing mortgaged or 

Truants, 

Unnatural act, .... 

Witness, . • 


1 

1 
2 


1 

4 
1 

8 
3 


1 
1 

2 
2 

8 

1 
1 


2 
2 

1 
1 

1 

8 
16 


1 
1 


1 
1 

1 

6 


1 
1 


1 
2 

2 
1 

1 
8 


1 

2 

4 : 


4 
1 



2 
2 

4 

1 
28 


2 
1 

2 
2 

3 

to • 


6 

6 

4 

29 

4 

2 
1 

7 

1 
1 


1 

1 

2 
1 

6 


1 
1 

T 


8 
2 

8 

8 
1 
2 

2 
1 

1 
10 


28 

28 
8 
8 
2 

16 

14 
181 


1 

1 

{ 

1 

i: 
■ i 

i _ 
i 

> 2 
3 


1 
2 

7 
3 

1 

1 
1 

1 1 

i. 

17 


8 
1 
20 
1 
20 
20 
6 
1 
1 
88 
8 
4 
1 
41 
9 
12 
6 
8 
1 
42 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
1 
8 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

12 

1 

20 

1 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
8 




id 


is : 


356 



FEMALES. 



Abortion, 

Common night-walker, , 
Drunkenness, . 
Fornication, . 
Idle and disorderly, 










- 






1 




- 


- 


8 
2 


2 
1 


1 
2 

1 

1 


1 
2 

1 
1 


- 


■» 


10 

I 

2 


- 


"I 2 
1 13 

1 1 16 

-I 7 



* Including poor debtors and persons held as witnesses. 



256 



STATISTICS OF ALL PRISONS. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 40 — Concluded. 

FKM ALVS — Concluded. 





Jails. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

3 
3 

a 

u 

« 

flQ 


• 

2 

«a 

•* 


• 

ft. 

• 

CQ 


a 

o 

a 
a 
« 


• 

a 
o 

« 

H 


• 

• 
o 
a 


• 

a 


• 

B 

• 

«s 

CO 


■ 

2 

a 
a 

1 


• 

2 

"• 
a 
ts 

CD 


• 

a 
S 

Q. 

8 

* 

o 


* 

& 
2 

«o 

8 

« 


• 

• 

a 


a' 

Q 


• 

e 

a 


• 

a 
| 

o 


3 

o 


• 

3 

1 


1 


Lewd cohabitation, • . 
Liquor laws, violating, . 
Murder, ...... 

Vagrants 


1 








1 


i 


— 
















2 






i 
3 
J 

:i ! 




1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


6 


8 


6 


7 


- 


2 


19 


- 


2 ; » 



MALES AND FEMALES. 



Abortion, 

Abuse of female child, . 

Adultery, . 

Arson, . • • • 

Assault, . 

Assault, felonious, . 

Bastardy, 

Blackmail, . . . 
Breaking and entering, . 
Burglary. . • . 
Burning buildings. . 
Common night-walker, . 
Disturbing the peace, . 

Embezzlement, 

Forgery 

FornicaUon, . . . 

Idle and disorderly, 
Incest, . 

Lewd cohabitation, 

Liquor laws, violating, , 

Malicious mischief. 
Manslaughter, . 

Neglect of family, . 
Opium laws, violating, . 
Perjury 

Poor debtor, . . , 

Railroad, obstructing, . 

Rape, 

Reoeivlng stolen goods, 

Robbery, ... 

Selling or concealing moi 

leased property, • 
Tramps, . 

Unnatural act, 
Vagrants, . . 


rtgag 


edor 


1 
1 

1 
3 


4 

1 

4 
1 

1 
3 

3 
1 

20 


1 
2 
8 

1 
1 


5 

1 

2 

2 

1 
1 

8 


1 
1 

2 


1 
1 

1 
7 


1 
1 


1 
1 

2 

2 
1 

1 

T 


1 

2 

4 


1 

7 

1 
1 

9 

4 
2 

4 

1 
88 


4 
1 

2 

3 

8 
18 


2 

7 
1 
6 

4 

28 

5 
2 

8 
1 

1 
1 


1 
2 
1 
1 

2 

1 

1 

I 
2 


1 
1 


8 

2 

3 

8 

1 
2 

2 
8 

1 


43 

38 
8 
3 

18 

2 

1 

4 

2 
14 

2 
2 
6 


1 
2 

8 


! 

7 

:l 

4 

t 

- I 
i 

-! 

1 

1 
1 

1 


21 

» 

• 

48 

\ 

2 

8 








14 


18 


78 


12 


2 


21 


160 


» 


«* 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No, 13. 



257 



Table No. 41, — Summary of Prisoners remaining in Custody Sept. 30, 

1896. 



INSTITUTIONS. 



Sentences. 



M. 



F. 



Tot. 



County Prisons, .... 
Bute Prison, .... 
State Farm, .... 
Reformatory Prison for Women, 
Massachusetts Reformatory, . 
Waiting trial in jails, 



Total, 



2,898 
706 
682 

983 



6,189 



678 

16 
360 



8,471 
796 
678 
860 
933 



6,128 



Fines and Costs. 



F. 



Tot. 



900 



900 



88 



88 



988 



988 



Total. 



M. 



F. 



Tot. 



8,798 


661 


796 


•m 


662 


16 


- 


360 


933 


- 


366 


60 


6,446 


1,077 



4,459 
796 
678 
860 
938 
406 

7,522 



Non-payment of Fines. 

Table No. 42. — Showing what Proportion of Prisoners remaining in Cus- 
tody were held upon Sentences or for Non-payment of Fines and Costs, 
respectively, for the Past Twelve Years. 



DATES. 



Held on 

Term 

Sentences. 



Held for 

Finea 
and Costa. 



Total. 



Proportion 

on Term 

Sentences. 



Proportion 
for Fines 
and Costs. 



Sept. 80, 1886. . 

" •« 1886, . 

" " 1887, . 

" «• 1888, . 

" •• 1889, . 

•« " 1890, . 

•• " 1891, . 

•• M 1892, . 

•• •• 1893, . 

•• M 1894, . 

M •• 1896, . 

•■ •• 1896, . 



8,419 
3,186 
8,278 
3,886 
8,691 
3,729 
6,801 
6,696 
6,809 
6,083 
6,218 
6,128 



1,562 

1,545 

1,760 

1,938 

1,928 

1,688 

366 

284 

806 

926 

961 

noo 
woo 



4,971 
4,681 
6,038 
5,824 
6,619 
6,417 
6,667 
6,980 
6,616 
6,969 
7,179 
7,116 



68-- 
66-- 

<*+ 
68-- 
65-- 
68-- 
93-- 
96-- 
87-- 
86-- 
86-- 
86-- 



81+ 
88-- 
84-- 
36-- 
84- 
81-- 

6+ 
4-- 

12-- 

13-- 

18-- 

13-- 



Table No. 43. — Number of Prisoners held for Non-payment of Fines 
and Costs at the Close of Each of the Past Twelve Years. 





1. — OFFENCES 


2.— 


Offences i 


3.— Otfknors 








Against the 


Against i 


Against Public 


Aggregates. 


TEARS. 


Pbbson. 


Property. j 


Ordkb, etc. 








M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. i 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


1886, . 


125 


6 


181 


96 


4 


99 1 


1,081 


241 


1,322 


1,301 


261 


1,652 


1886, 




89 


11 


100 


84 


10 


94 < 


1,102 


249 


1,361 


1,276 


270 


1,645 


1887, 




109 


14 


128 


100 


4 


104 | 


1,290 


243 


1,683 


1,499 


261 


1,760 


looo, . 




114 


10 


124 


106 


10 


116 , 


1,418 


280 


1,698 


1,688 


300 


1,938 


1889, 




108 





114 


98 


6 


98 ' 


1,426 


291 


1,716 


1,626 


802 


1,928 


1890, . 




79 


7 


86 


79 


13 


W 1 


1,261 


249 


1,610 


1,419 


269 


1,688 


1891, . 




74 


6 


79 


107 


9 


116 


189 


82 


171 


820 


46 


366 


1892, . 




86 


8 


89 


64 


4 


68 ' 


106 


22 


127 


265 


29 


284 


1893, 




101 


11 


112 


87 


8 


90 ' 


686 


69 


604 


723 


83 


806 


1894, . 




88 


8 


86 


92 


10 


102 1 


673 


66 


738 


848 


78 


926 


1896, 




74 


1 


76 


76 


6 


81 


736 


70 


806 


885 


76 


961 


1896, 




67 


2 


69 


78 


6 


79 1 

1 


760 


80 


840 


900 


88 


988 



258 



INSANITY IN PRISONS. 



[Oct, 



Table No. 44. — Number of Prisoners held on Sentences at the Close of 

Each of the Past Twelve Tears. 



YEARS. 



1885, 
IBM, 
1887, 
188$, 



1890, 
1801, 
1802, 
1893, 
1804, 
1805, 
1896, 



l.—OmjicKB I 
Agaihst thb 



F. Tot. 





616 


12 




• 400 


28 




• 620 


20 




, 515 


21 




' 685 


25 




> 406 


10 




j 555 


20 




587 


25 




1 586 


25 




. i 621 


28 




605 


13 




701 


18 



628 
518 
540 
586 



616 
676 
612 
611 
644 
708 

no 



1-OfTIKCEI 

Against 
PmoramT. 



M. 



Tot. 



1.177 j 

1,145 

1,220 

1,248 

1,354 

1,377 

1,564 

1,626 

1,737 

1,860 

1,764 

1,821 



76 

60 
81 
00 
80 
76 
75 
77 
65 
77 
73 
70 



1,252 
1,214 
1,801 
1^88 
1,484 
1,453 
1,680 
1,703 
1^02 
1,937 
1,837 
1,000 



8.— I 

AOADtST PCBUC 

Obdbb, btc. 

M. I F. > Tot. 

! I 



1,063 



1,034 
1,003 
1^» 
1,308 
2,346 
2,604 
2,600 
2,610 



2,667 



440 1,400 

304 ( 1,438 

410 | 1,512 ' 

467 i 1,607 J 

458 ' 1,761 

741 , 3,087 | 

777 . 3^81 | 

796 ' 8,306 

842 8,452 ' 

850 3,673 
842 



F. Tot. 



i mm 



2,746 
2,604 
2,774 
2,856 

3,110 
3,176 
4,466 

4,817 
4,023 
5,091 



3,500 ( 5,180 



I 

673 i 3,419 

592 j 3,131 

504 ' ZJSt 



572 j 3*691 

553 3,751 

836 ! 5,391 

870 5,691 

886 ; 5,301 

042 I 6J033 

086 . 6£1B 

036 ! 6,128 



Table No. 45. — Whole Number of Prisoners in Custody at the Close of 

Each of the Past Twelve Tears. 



1 
TEARS. 


1. — OmjrcKB 

aoaikbt the 

Pbksok. 


2.— < 

A< 

Pb< 

M. 


»ADC 

)psa 
F. 


NCBS 

BT 

TT. 


1 
' 8— Orrarcss 
1 Agaihst Public > 
Order, etc. 


Wbolx No. 

or Sbntbncxd 

Pbisonzbs. 


1 _. 

T 

1* 


te a. 




* 


F. 


Tot. 


Tot. 


1 M. 

1 


F. 


Tot. • 

i 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


* 


1885, . 


641 


18 


659 


1,272 


79 


1,351 


1 

1 

1 2,134 


827 


2,961 


4,047 


924 


4^71 


1 

1 373 


6*344 


looO, * • 


579 


34 


613 


1,229 


79 


1,308 


2,071 


689 


2,760 | 


3,879 


802 


4,681 


,332 


5,013 


1887, . 


629 


43 


672 


1,320 


85 


1,405 


2,324 


637 


2,061; 


4,273 


765 


5,038 


! 308 


• *346 


1888, . 


629 


31 


660 


1,354 


100 


1,454 


■ 2,611 


699 


3,210 i 


4,494 


880 


6,324 


! 374 


! *.«6 


1889, . 


643 


31 


674 


1,447 


85 


1,532 


2,655 


758 


3,413 : 


4,746 


874 


6,619 


,» 


| 6,008 


1890, . 


575 


26 


601 


1,456 


89 


1,545 


2,564 


707 


3,271 . 


4,596 


822 


5,417 


, 322 


, 5.7» 


1891, . 


629 


25 


' 654 


1,671 


84 


1,755 


2,486 


773 


3,258 ' 


4,785 


882 


5,667 


I 401 


1 6,061 


1892, . 


673 


28 


701 


1,690 


81 


1,771 


; 2,709 


799 


3,508 , 


5,072 


908 


6,980 


428 


1 6,409 


1693, . 


687 


36 


, 723 


1,824 


68 


1,892 


3,135 


865 


4,000 | 


5,646 


960 


6,615 


1 420 


7.635 


1894, . 


704 


26 


730 


1,952 


87 


2,039 


! 3,283 


907 


4,100 


6,939 


1,020 


6,959 


, 418 

i 


I 7,877 


1895, . 


769 


14 


783 


1,840 


78 


1,918 


1 3,558 

1 r 


920 


4,478 1 


6,167 


1,012 


7,179 


' 449 


1 7,623 


1896, . 


768 


20 


, 788 


1,894 


85 


1,979 


! 3,427 


922 


4,340 j 


6,080 


1,027 


7,116 


■ «• 


| 7,522 



Insanity in Prisons. 

The following statement shows the number of prisoners who have 
been removed to the lunatic hospitals from all the prisons named in 
this report in each year since 1891. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



259 



It will be seen that in 1896 more prisoners were sent to the 
lunatic hospitals than in any other year named in the table, and the 
increase over the number so removed in the preceding year was 
quite large. The State Prison sent 2 more than last year and the 
Reformatory Prison for Women 4 more ; while the Massachusetts 
Reformatory sent 3 this year, whereas none was sent from that insti- 
tution in the year before. It will also be noticed that the number 
of prisoners returned from the lunatic hospitals was 8, against 3 so 
returned last year. It should be remarked that the average number 
in county prisons includes the prisoners at the Deer Island institu- 
tion, which became a house of correction July 1, 1896. 



Table No. 46. — Showing Removals of Prisoners to Lunatic Hospitals 

during the Last Six Tears. 





1991. 


i 
IMS. 


1898. 


1894. 


1895. ' 

i 


1894. 




* 


o 


§ 


O 


2 


S 


o 


5 


a 


'S 


a 


a 


O 


o 


a i 


O 


2 


a 


PRISONS. 


JS 

a 




mored 
ospital. 


h 

go. 
§3 


& 

8 




if 


§3 


14 

a 




li 

if 


li 

Eg 


kl 

% 

a 




it 
a ° 


Sa 

h 


14 

a 




moved 
ospital. 


irned fro 
ospital. 


o 

JO 


It 

is 






*i 


en 


Sp3 
So 


m i 


ew 


*? 




e» 


2x 








e» 




*i 


ew 


«? 




h 








13 


1* 

3»J 


ge 

u 


v2 

1* 

DM 


11 

13 


?s 


la 


I* 
0*4 


P 

IE 


*-5 

ii 

13 


k3' 

*!! 

0M 




h8 

13 


Bo 

Sm 




< 


fc 


K 


* 


* 


fc 


< l« 


fc- 


< 


X 


5Z5 


■< X 


* ! 


< 


SB 


fc 


Barnstable, 


9 






9 


. 


mm 


10 


1 


— 


14 


^ m 


— 




1 

t— 1 


12 






Boston Jail, . 


100 


- 


- 


169 


i 


- 


171 


• 


- 


194 


2 


- 


200 


2 


- 


200 


4 


• 


Boston House 






































of Correction, 


521 





1 


584 


7 


- 


571 


26 


1 


061 


18 


1 


646 16 


1 1 


699 


17 


1 


Cambridge, 


408 


6 


- 


464 


4 


- 


436 


6 


- 


490 


6 


- 


636 


10 




611 


18 


- 


Dedbara, . 


102 


1 


— 


08 


6 


- 


100 


4 


- 


82 


— 


- 


108 


8 


- 


94 


3 


- 


Deer Island 






































House of Cor- 






































rection, . 


060 


1 


- 


1,146 


2 


- 


1,118 


1 


- 


1,393 


- 


- 


1,491 


- 


- 


1,640 


«■ 


- 


Edgartown, . 




































Fltcbbarg, 


101 


— 


• 


145 


— 


- 


132 


2 


- 


105 


— 


- 


127 


- 


- 


118 - 


- 


Greenfield, • 


87 


1 


- 


80 


1 


• 


24 


1 


- 


41 


1 


- 


30 


1 


- 


87 


3 


- 


Ipswich, . 


188 


1 


- 


166 - 


- 


130. 1 


- 


105 1 


- 


116 1 


- 


114 


- 


• 


Lawrence, 


203 


4 


- 


218 


7 


- 


209 1 1 


- 


196 2 


- 


202 


1 


- 


199 


- 


• 


Lowell, . 


108 


8 


- 


115 


1 


- 


109j - 


— 


122 


— 


- 


122 


- 


- 


119 


• 


_ 


Nantucket, 














_l 






















New Bedford, . 


216 


8 


- 


264 


3 


- 


80S 1 4 


- 


290 


1 


- 


241 


1 


mm 


817 


- 


- 


Newbury port, . 


25 


- 


- 


35 


- 


- 


33, - 


- 


26 


1 


- 


26 


1 


- 


23 


- 


• 


Northampton, . 


31 


«m 


- 


27 


1 


1 


40 2 


1 


41 


- 


- 


85 


1 


- 


41 


2 


1 


Pittsfleld. 


68 


- 


•• 


04 


1 


• 


76 1 - 


- 


76 


1 


- 


74 


3 


- 


84 


2 


— 


Plymouth, 


48 


- 


- 


59 


- 


— 


72; - 


- 


71 


- 


- 


62 


- 


- 


72 


- 


- 


Salem, • • 


155 





1 


161 


6 


1 


1 162, 6 


2 


139 


5 


1 


146 


8 


- 


146 


8 


2 


Springfield, 


210 


1 


- 


230 


2 


— 


227, 8 


- 


229 


2 


- 


249 2 


1 


236 


4 


— 


Taunton, . 


40 




— 


41 


1 


- 


41| 2 


- 


41 


2 


1 


60' 1 




61 


— 


• 


Worcester, 


202 


1 


- 


229 2 


- 


\ 197, 8 


- 


216 


8 


- 


203; 7 


- 


247 


2 


- 


Total in county 








I 




! 




| 






1 










prisons, 


3,738 


41 


2 


4,295 44 


2 


4,152, 07 


4 


4,582 


45 


3 


4,681 


68 


2 


4,762 


63 


4 


State Prison, . 


612 


» 7 


8 


649 7 


1 


069 9 


2 


667 


9 


1 


682 


,!•. 4 


1 


769 


6 


1 


Reformatory 








| 




| 






















Prison for 








I 




1 i 






















Women, 


214, 1 


— 


1 283, 6 


- 


306 10 


3 


810 


3 


1 


318 4 


- 


860 


8 


1 


Mass. Reforma- 


I 




1 




i i 


i 




l< 1 










tory, 


758, 2 


- 


869 8 


- 


1 954 1 


- .1,035 


— 


- 1 .1,036' - 


- 


976 


8 


1 


State Farm, . 


244 4 


- 


308 14 


- |' 281 2 


- ,i 43fl 


> 5 


- 


529' 18 

i 


- 


679 


16 


1 


Total in all 


| 


h 




1, 


i 






1 ! 




1 






prisons, . 


5,560 55 

i 


5 6,404 74 

i 1 . 


8 6,362 89 


9 J 7,033 02 

1 


6 


7,247 84 
1 1 


3 


7,424 


\ 96 


8 



260 



ARRESTS. 



[Oct. 



A&RESTS. 

The notice required by law as to the appointment of a city marshal 
or chief of police has been received from the clerk of each city or 
town where there is such an officer; and there has also been re- 
ceived a list of police officers and constables in each town not 
having a chief of police, excepting Blandford. No arrests have 
ever been reported from that town since the act requiring these 
returns was passed ; and, upon making special inquiries some years 
ago, the secretary was informed that there had been no arrest in 
the town for forty years. 

The following statistics of arrests for crime have been pre- 
pared from the reports received from the officers whose names 
were returned by the clerks of cities and towns, and these sta- 
tistics cover every town in the Commonwealth with the single 
exception noted above. One hundred and seventeen of the police 
officers have failed to report, but it is presumed that they had no 
cases to return, and therefore did not take the trouble to send back 
the blank with a statement to that effect, as many other officers 
have done. 

During the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, the arrests numbered 
104,871 ; of this number, 95,225 were males and 9,646 females. In 
comparison with last year, there were 5,664 more arrests of men 
and 270 of women. Of the large additional number, only a few 
appeared in the towns. The arrests for drunkenness were 5,673 
more than last year, and for other offences 261 more. 



Table No. 47. — Number of Arrests in Cities and in Towns for Each of 
the Three Classes of Offences for the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



WHERE 
ARRESTED. 


1.— Omirozs 

Against the 

Person. 


2.— OrrxNcss 

Against 

Property. 


8. — Offenoes 

Against Public 

Order, kto. 


Aggregates. 




M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


■ 

F. i Tot. 


In cities, . . 
In towns, . 


6,468 
1,844 


665 
40 


7,018 
1,808 


7,220 
1,461 


768 
66 

824 


7,088 
1,617 


68,677 
10,066 


7,868 
860 


76,645 
10,416 


82,366 
12,870 


0,101 01,646 

i 

466. 13,325 


Total, • 


7,802 


004 


8,400 


8,681 


0,605 


78,742 


8,218 


86,060 


06,226 


0,646 ! 104,871 

i 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



261 



Table No. 48. — Arrests for Drunkenness and for Other Offences in Each 
City and in Towns during the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 





PoPTTIaATIOK 


Numbkr of Arrests, 1895-96. 


CITIES. 


BT 

CENSUS OF 

1895. 


FOR DRUNKENNESS. 


FOR OTHER 
OFFENCES. 


AGGREGATES. 




M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


Beverly, 






11,806 


104 


4 


108 


Ill 





120 


215 


13 


228 


Boston, 






406,020 


27,207 


3,027 


30,284 


12,304 


2,160 


14,464 


30,511 


6,187 


44,698 


Brockton, . 






33,165 


650 


20 


670 


583 


38 


621 


1,233 


58 


1,201 


Cambridge, . 






81,643 


1,488 


201 


1,684 


1,160 


18 


1,178 


2,643 


210 


2,862 


Chelsea, 






31,264 


488 


40 


523 


481 


64 


545 


964 


104 


1,068 


Chlcopee, • 






16,420 


374 


4 


378 


251 


14 


265 


625 


18 


643 


Everett, 






18,573 


824 


10 


843 


187 


10 


107 


611 


20 


540 


Fall River, . 






80,203 


1,820 


358 


2,178 


1,467 


270 


1,746 


3,287 


637 


8,024 


Fitchbnrg, . 






26,400 


485 


15 


500 


337 


20 


367 


822 


85 


857 


Gloucester, . 






28,211 


582 


14 


506 


281 


85 


816 


863 


40 


012 


Haverhill, . 






80,200 


616 


66 


671 


382 


42 


424 


007 


08 


1,095 


Holyoke, 


\ 




40,322 


600 


00 


780 


450 


40 


400 


1,140 


130 


1,288 


Lawrence, . 






52,164 


1,678 


214 


1.787 


816 


111 


027 


2,880 


325 


2,714 


Lowell, 






84,367 


3,080 


603 


3,682 


1,232 


186 


1,418 


4,321 


770 


5,100 


Lynn, . 






62,854 


1,866 


180 


2,046 


838 


67 


005 


2,604 


256 


2,050 


Maiden, 






20,708 


203 


23 


816 


202 


40 


832 


585 


63 


648 


Marlborough, 




14,077 


406 


6 


412 


132 


2 


184 


638 


8 


546 


Med ford, 




14,474 


184 


4 


188 


167 


7 


174 


351 


11 


862 


New Bedford, , 




65,251 


1,130 


162 


1,202 


680 


106 


785 


1,810 


267 


2,077 


Newbury port, , 




14,552 


516 


10 


535 


107 


10 


207 


713 


20 


742 


Newton, 




27,500 


646 


10 


665 


421 


28 


440 


1,067 


47 


1,114 


North Adams,* 




10,135 


541 


7 


548 


423 


22 


445 


064 


20 


093 


Northampton, 




16,746 


415 


10 


425 


87 


16 


108 


502 


26 


628 


Pitts field, . 




20,461 


033 


16 


040 


341 


6 


847 


1,274 


22 


1,296 


Qolncy, 






20,712 


886 


7 


342 


250 


24 


283 


504 


31 


626 


Balem, . 






34,473 


735 


32 


767 


324 


13 


337 


1,050 


45 


1,104 


Bomervllle, 






62,200 


1,087 


42 


1,120 


505 


46 


651 


1,502 


88 


1,680 


Bpringfield, 






61,522 


1,201 


88 


1,280 


763 


66 


810 


1,064 


144 


2,108 


Tannton, 






27,115 


1,005 


41 


1,046 


246 


12 


258 


1,251 


58 


1,804 


Waltnam, 






20,876 


600 


25 


625 


250 


23 


282 


350 


48 


007 


Wobnrn, 






14,178 


708 


10 


727 


107 


2 


100 


005 


21 


026 


Worcester, 






08,767 


2,088 
55,067 


172 


3,160 


1,116 


141 


1,256 


4,103 


813 


4,416 


In cities, 


1,635,767 


6,536 


60,603 


27,288 


3,656 


80,043 


82,355 


0,101 


01,546 


In towns. 






864,416 


6,727 


156 


6,883 


6,148 


200 


6,442 


12,870 


455 


18,825 


Total, 


2,500,183 


| 61,704 


5,602 


67,486 


33,431 


8,054 


37,885 


06,225 


9,646 


104,871 



* City government organized Jan. 1, 1806. 



262 



ARRESTS. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 49. — Number of Arrests for all Offences in Bach County for 

the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



COUNTIES. 


I 
1. — Offkncbs ' 
aoain8t tbs 1 

PZBSON. 


1 2.— Offences 1 
i against Pbop- ; 

EBTT- 


1 3.— Offences 
1 against Public 
Obdbb, etc. 


AOOBBOAl 


70 a 




M. 


F. 


Tot.' 

i 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


! M. 


F. 


Tot. 


1 


F. 


Tot. 


Barnstable! 


6 


2 


8 


1 

: io 


1 


i 


21 


1 


22 


1 
1 

37 


4 


41 


Berkshire, . 


240 


5 


254, 


250 


6 


2M 


, 2,886 


77 


2,063 


1 3,886 


88 


3*473 


Bristol, 


764 


61 


825 ' 


567 


50 


626 


1 5,470 


860 


6,330 


6,801 


980 


7,731 


Dukes County, . 


6 


- 


6 

I 


1 14 


1 


16 : 


' 17 


- 


17 


36 


1 


37 


Essex, 


065 


61 


1,016 


• 000 


61 


1,060 


8,616 


760 


0,385 


i 10, 580 


871 


11,451 


Franklin, . 


22 


- 


22 


81 


1 


32 


245 


6 


251 


I 208 


7 


305 


Hampden, . 


855 


24 


370 


858 


18 


376 


8,411 


270 


8,681 


| 4,124 


812 


4,436 


Hampshire, 


02 


8 


100 


76 


6 


82 


783 


20 


762 


1 001 


48 


044 


Middlesex, 


1,136 


68 


1,104 


,1.678 


08 


1,671 


13,266 


1,227 


14,402 


15,070 


1,378 


17,357 


Nantucket, . 


4 


- 


«! 


12 


- 


12 , 


16 


6 


21 


: « 


8 


37 


Norfolk, . 


302 


21 


828 ' 

i 


864 


16 


380 ! 


1,052 


77 


2,020 


2,618 


114 


2,732 


Plymouth, . 


146 


5 


161 


178 


7 


186 


1,681 


88 


1,760 


2,006 


100 


2406 


Suffolk, 


8,202 


844 


8,646 


3,501 


587 


4,128 


138,062 

i * 


4,438 


88,300 


40,746 


5,810 


48,094 


Worcester, 


654 


25 
604 


670 


658 


28 
824 


681 


J 6,478 


870 


6,848 


| 7,686 


423 


8,108 


Total, • 


7,802 


8,406 


8,681 


0,505 1 


78,742 


8,218 


86,060 


. 06,225 


0,648 


104,871 



Table No. 50. — Number of Arrests for Drunkenness and for Other 
Offences in Each County for the Tear ending Sept. 30 ', 1896. 







Population 

BT 


NUXBSB Or ABBBflTS, 1808-04. 




FOB DRUNKENNESS. 


FOB OTHER 
OFFENCES. 


AOOBBOA1 


rSvFs 


COUNTIES. 




• 






. 






• 






Census of 




9 






8 






8 






1905. 


• 

* 


* 

a 
& 


3 

o 
H 


8 

3 


a 


3 

o 


8 


B 


• 

3 

o 


Barnstable, 


27,654 


9 


• 


9 


28 


4 


32 


87 


4 


1 

41 


Berkshire, . 




86,292 


2,076 


31 


2,107 


1,800 


67 


1,386 


3,386 


88 


3,473 


Bristol, 




219,010 


4,077 


566 


4,643 


2,724 


414 


3,138 


6,801 


080 


7,781 


Dukes County, 




4,238 


4 


- 


4 


32 


1 


38 ■ 


86 


1 


37 


Essex, 




330,393 


6,811 


661 


7,362 


3,760 


320 


4,080 1 


10,580 


871 


11,4SJ 


Franklin, . 




40,145 


160 


1 


161 


188 


6 


144 |j 208 
1,724 ! 4,124 


7 


805 


Hampden, . 




162,938 


2,624 


188 


2,712 


1,600 


124 


812 


4,434 


Hampshire, 




54,710 


622 


21 


643 


270 


22 


301 ' 


001 


« 


044 


Middlesex, 




499,217 


10,257 


982 


11,230 


6,722 


896 


6,118 | 


16,070 


1,378 


17,337 


Nantucket, 




3,016 


18 


2 


15 


, 18 


4 


22' 


81 


« 


87 


Norfolk, . 




134,810 


1,297 


89 


1,336 


! 1,321 


76 


1,306 | 2,618 


114 


*.73S 


Plymouth, • 




101,408 


1,032 


34 


1,066 


, 078 


66 


1,039 ; 2,005 


100 


*.!• 


Suffolk. . 




639,799 


27,767 


3,072 


30,830 


12,078 


2,247 


15,225 | 

i 


40,745 


5,810 


46,084 


Worcester, 




806,446 


5,146 
61,704 


205 


6,360 
67,486 | 


2,640 


218 


2,756 


7,685 


423 


Mo> 


Total, . 


2,600,183 


6,692 


83,431 


3,064 


37,385 . 95,226 


0,646 


104,871 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 263 

Probation Cases. 

From the reports made by the probation officers, in accordance 
with chapter 356 of the Acts of 1891, there have been compiled the 
following tables, showing the work performed by these officers dur- 
ing the year ending Sept. 30, 1896. The district court of Franklin 
County, which appears in the table this year, was established by 
chapter 353 of the Acts of 1896. 

The whole number of persons placed on probation in the police, 
municipal and district courts was 5,767, an increase of 340 over 
the preceding year. About three-fourths of these were convicted 
of drunkenness, the exact number for that offence being 4,342. 
There were 37 under ten years of age and 539 over fifty years 
of age. 

In the Boston municipal court one of the assistants to the proba- 
tion officer is a woman who especially investigates the cases of all 
women charged with crime before that court. Although these cases 
are included in the regular report of the probation officer, it may be 
of interest to note them particularly as follows : assault and battery, 
2 ; common beggar, 1 ; common brawler, 1 ; common night-walker, 
18 ; disturbing the peace, 1 ; drunkenness, 319 ; fornication, 5 ; 
fraud, 1 ; house of ill-fame, keeping, 3 ; idle and disorderly, 46 ; 
larceny, 23 ; malicious mischief, 1 ; peddling unlawfully, I ; stub- 
bornness, 5 ; vagrancy, 2 ; total 429. 

Under the statutes the probation officers are authorized to act 
under the direction of the justices of the superior courts, and in 
these courts there were placed on probation during the year the fol- 
lowing number of cases in three counties : Berkshire, 5 ; Plymouth, 
1 ; and Suffolk, 473. 

The probation officers are authorized, under chapter 368 of the 
Acts of 1894, to assist in certain ways persons who are put on pro- 
bation by the courts. During the year expenditures for that purpose 
have been $8.20. One report from a police court in Fitchburg is 
that two men on their way to Boston were arrested. When brought 
before the judge, he instructed the probation officer to pay their 
fare to Boston. A court in Plymouth County reports that the pro- 
bation officer sent a man who was convicted of drunkenness to the 
Soldiers' Home in Maine, also returned another drunkard to his 
home in Boston. One of the courts in Hampden County sent a 
probationer to Connecticut. 



PROBATION CASES. 



Table No. 51. — Cases taken on Probation, under Chapter 356 of the Acta 
of 1891, during the Year ending Sept. 30, 1896. 







I 

< 










Om.au. 


COURTS. 




1 
£ 

3 


1 


I 


A 

it 
V 


| 


1 ll 
I'll 


Polici Ann Mtraioi 

CHaritloton, . 

Jloxburv, . 
A'ouiA Billon, . 
Wett Roxt»i*-y, . 
Brock lull, 

Fltebbnrg, . 
Gloucester, 




SB 

a 

18 

s 

2 

3 

4 
3 

31 
3 

1 


1 

n 

4 
b 


18 


1 
I 

9 



1 

1 
o 

1 

s 


MM 

M 
47 

41 

ITS 

BS 
11 

23 

13 
107 
SO 

n 

204 
K 

104 

20 
Bl 

bs 

M 
44 

IB 

IB 

14B 
10 


j 


82 

4 

3 

a 
i 

3 


7» 

» 

2» 
3 

11 

13 
11 

3 

SB 
1 

i 


t 
i 

13 

4 

I 
1 
1 


14 

2 

It 

S 
1 

IS 

« 

■ 

1 


13 

s 

2 


IS 

n 

14 

IS 

1 

2 

11 

2 

M 

1 
3 

I 
2 


1.411 

■n 
u 

111 
m 

M 

IU 


MVlborongh, . 
Na» bury port, 

SprlniBald 1 , . 
WUUimatown, 

DISTRICT CODBTB 

Berklblre, Central. 

•■ 8on[h«rn, 

Brlitol, Pint, . '. 
» Bacon d, 
•■ Third, 

Onropden, Ea.te.n, 

BuDpahlre, . . 

Midglosei, Cent rul, 

" Pint Eiatar 

Third Eule 

Fourth Kii 

" Pint North 

" First South 

Norfolk, Bait, 

Booiharn, 

Plymouth. Second, 

Third. . 

Worcester, Ontnl, 

■• Flm Euttr 
" Second Eu 
Pirn North 
» Pint God the 
Second Buut 
■' Tblrd BoDlb 




a 
ai 

i 

If 

rn 

M 

Mf 

M 

H 

K 

« 

a 
a 

■4 




201 


» 


M 53 


1,843 


1 


103 






133 


■„ 



















1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



265 



Table No. 52. — Cases of Drunkenness investigated by the Probation 

Officers from Oct. I, 1895, to Sept. 30, 1896. 



COURTS. 



Policb and Municipal Courts. 
Boston, 

Brighton, 

Charlestown, ..... 

Dorchester, 

Eant Boston, 

Roxbury, ...... 

Smith Boston, 

West Roxbury, 

Brockton, 

Brook line, ■ 

Chelsea, 

Cblcopee, 

Fitchburg, 

Gloucester, 

Haverhill, 

Holyoke, 

Lawrence, 

Lee, 

Lowell, 

Lynn 

Marlborough, 

New bury port, 

Newton, 

Somervllle, 

Springfield 

WUliamstown, 



District Courts. 
Barnstable, First, . 
" Second, 

Berkshire, Central, .... 
" Northern, 
" Southern, 
" Fourth, . 

Bristol, First, 

" 8econd, . . . . 
•« Third, . 

Kasex, First, 

" Second, . 

Franklin, 

Hampden, Eastern, 
" Western, 

Hampshire 

Middlesex, Central, 

First Eastern, 
Second Eastern, . 
Third Eastern, . 
Fourth Eastern, . 
First Northern, . 
First Southern, . 

Norfolk, Bast, 

" Southern, . 
Plymouth, Second, . 

Third. . . . . 
" Fourth, . 
Worcester, Central, 



M 
II 
II 
II 
*l 
• I 



II 
M 

II 
II 
• I 
II 



First Eastern, 
Second Eastern, . 
First Northern, . 
First Southern, . 
Second Southern, 
Third Southern, . 



Statements of Persons Arrested. 



• 2 £ 

«•« a 



Total, 



10,710 
808 

2,077 
787 
025 

2,687 

2,371 
410 
672 
175 
618 
876 
604 
624 
686 
768 

1,771 
16 

2,308 

2,044 
254 
541 
640 
871 

1,886 
6 



817 
37 
06 

040 

2,150 

1,200 

01 

110 



138 

626 

15 

1,038 

720 

1,711 

11 

1 

280 

200 

186 

228 



2,226 
270 
282 
222 
171 
185 



56,710 



a 
s • 

„*• 

MS 
i° 



16,566 
110 

1,066 
680 
875 

2,088 

2,084 
383 
662 
176 
587 
876 
467 
621 
610 
763 

1,605 

2,252 

1,631 

00 

468 

601 

838 

1,180 

6 



8 

817 
37 
06 

878 

1,610 

1,276 

01 

100 



138 

620 

18 

1,081 

657 

1,560 

11 

1 

210 

105 

125 

228 

6 

1,416 
267 
282 
201 
136 
182 



40,240 



a • 

ge 






5* 

H-OD 



5 a 

1° 

a o 



3 « . 



:35 

• *%* 
c Sto 



8,144 




180 


- 


111 


- 


48 


- 


50 


- 


400 


- 


287 


- 


27 


- 


10 


- 


81 


- 


26 


11 


3 


- 


17 


- 


6 


- 


76 


- 


16 


— 


146 


_ 


413 


- 


26 


120 


72 


1 


58 


_ 


88 


mm 


165 


1 


20 


51 


640 


— 


28 


- 


1 


- 


6 


- 


2 


• 


7 


• 


63 


. 


151 


— 


20 


— 


14 


_ 


11 


— 


810 


- 


8 


- 


21 


— 


85 


— 


3 


- 


— 


• 


7,286 


103 



11,326 
308 
100 



480 
2,134 

672 
175 

3 

20 

420 
116 

2 
126 

641 

140 

707 

00 

1 



186 

06 



2,160 

1,177 

40 



00 



3 

72 

48 

177 

1 
276 



1,012 
20 

100 
173 

865 

28,641 



PROBATION CASteS. 



[Oct. 



- Aget of Persons taken on Probation during the Tear end- 
ing Sept. 30, 1896. 













As 




OFFEHCE9. 


i|i!i! 


J 


l!i 


; 




| 
1 


MMa 

813:8;"::": 




Abandoning oblld. 
Adulterating food, 

Amu it, .... 

Balb log iin la wf ally, . 
Bicycle lawi, Ttolallog, 
Breaking and entering, 
Burning bnudlnga, 
City ordinance or town 

Common beggar, .' . 

Common night-walker, 
Cruelty lo anlmali. 
Defacing Pobllo Llbnry 

Disorderly bonee, keep- 

DiainrblDg meeting, . 
Dlatnrblng peace, . 
DtiturMng echool, 

ISmbezilamsi'it. 

Fa las fl re- alarm, giving, 
Fa»t driving, . 
Fornication, . 

Fnad 

Gaming lawi, violating, 
Houee of ill-fame, keep. 

Idle and disorderly, . 

Indecent langnege, oa- 


; 


i 
a 

i 
i 

i 

s 

a 
l 

i 


; 

4 
12 

2 


10 

l 

IB 

1 

21 
11 


I 

t 

4 

•a 
I 

T 
2 

i 
i 


a 

2 
11 

E 

1 
1 

9 
1 

21 

1 

J 


i 

M 

t 

in 
1 

i 
1 

2D 


11 
1 

1 

12 

2 

I 

1 

2 
1 


11 
2 

= 

4 


; 

1 

_ 
*l 

- 
u 

3 
2 


3 
119 


■ 

B 

Ml 

- 


a 

4 

! 

1 

1 
1 

1 


e 

1 

2: 


1 

! 


! 

1 

7 

10 

n 
s 
ii 

IS 


1 

• 

■ 
n 

!,St» 

'- 

n 
1 

so 

61 

: 

a 

4 


IT 

IS 1 
907 

I 

T 

■ 

3 

1 

1 


1 

1 

: 
■ 

GOO 

: 

a 
1 

- 

- 

; 


, 

i 
s 

4.H2 

i 

ii 

m 

4 


Lewdnaa*, 

Liquor lawa, violating, . 
Loitering aronnd rail- 

M> Helena mlashlef, ' '. 

Newapapera.ielllng.nn- 

Peddllng, nnlloenaad, . 
PlaylngVll lo ureal, . 

Receiving' etol'en goodi, 

Btuboomneea, 

Threat. 

Throwing mieellee, 
Throwing enow-balle, . 
T™P 

Walking on railroad, . 


i 


UO 

a 

l 

in 

,1 

| 


Total, . . . 


a 


«o 


T 1 


N 


111 


lITJlOt 


33 11* 


169 


1ST 


181 


182 


ISO US 


1,014 en 


taHk.tr 



1896.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 267 



Criminal Prosecutions. 

The clerks of courts, the trial justices and the clerks or justices 
of police, district and municipal courts, have all made the returns 
as provided in sections 34 and 35 of chapter 219 of the Public 
Statutes ; and the following abstracts and tabular statements, show- 
ing the results of criminal prosecutions in all the courts for the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1896, have been prepared from these returns. 

The number of cases begun in the superior courts was 6,162, — 
an increase of 324, as compared with last year. There were more 
cases in each of the three classes of offences. In the lower courts 
and before trial justices there were 106,425 cases, being 6,059 more 
than last year. 

The tables showing the disposition of the cases in the superior 
courts contain substantially all the cases brought before those courts 
during the year. Only a few were discharged on acknowledgment 
of satisfaction or carried to the supreme court, and it has not been 
considered necessary to enlarge the tables for the purpose of includ- 
ing them. It may be of interest, however, to note them here as 
follows : cases discharged on acknowledgment of satisfaction, in 
Suffolk 23, Worcester 2 ; cases carried to the supreme court, Berk- 
shire 3, Franklin 1, Middlesex 10, Plymouth 2, Suffolk 10, and 
Worcester 3. 

Trials for Murder. 

The following summary of murder cases disposed of in the superior 
courts during the year ending Sept. 30, 1896, is prepared from the 
returns of the clerks of courts. These cases are set out in this way 
as a matter of special interest, instead of being included with the 
general statistics of criminal prosecutions. 

Arthur A. Albee, alias Arthur Tobin, indicted in Plymouth 
County for the murder of Collins A. Leaman at Brockton, on April 
26, 1892. The indictment was returned June 10, 1895, and the 
defendant was brought to trial on September 30 in the same year. 
On the third of the following month the jury returned a verdict of 
not guilty. 

Salvatore Albano, indicted in Suffolk County for the murder 
of Daniel F. Sullivan, in Boston, June 11, 1895. When brought to 



268 CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. |"O ct - 

trial, on Oct. 4, 1895, the defendant pleaded guilty of manslaughter. 
This plea was accepted by the government, and he was thereupon 
sentenced to imprisonment in the State Prison for ten years. 

Arad Taylor was held by the Second District Court of Eastern 
Worcester for the murder of Laura E. Taylor at Berlin, on Sept. 11, 
1895. The case was brought before the grand jury at the October 
term of the superior court in that year, who found no bill * c by 
reason of insanity." The defendant was then committed to the State 
Lunatic Hospital at Worcester until the further order of the court. 

Angus D. Gilbert, indicted in Suffolk County for the murder of 
Alice M. Sterling in the Dorchester district of Boston, on April 10, 
1895. The indictment was returned April 18, 1895, and the de- 
fendant was brought to trial on the 24th of June of that year. On 
the 28th of the same month the jury returned a verdict of guilty of 
murder in the first degree. In the following month the case was 
taken to the supreme court on exceptions. Dec. 10, 1895, a rescript 
was sent down, overruling the exceptions ; and in the superior court, 
on Dec. 14, 1895, the defendant was sentenced to be hanged on 
Feb. 21, 1896.* 

Edward John Carroll, indicted in Berkshire County for the 
murder of George Daverney at Great Barrington, on May 9, 1894. 
The indictment was returned July 12, 1895, but was nol prossed at 
the January term of the court, in 1896, the defendant having been 
previously convicted on an indictment for manslaughter. 

Joseph Trescott, alias Joseph Prescott, indicted in Suffolk 
County for the murder of Margaret Trescott, alias Margaret Pres- 
cott, in the Charlestown district of Boston, on Feb. 10, 1896. The 
indictment was returned March 6, 1896. On the eleventh day of 
the same month the defendant pleaded guilty of murder in the second 
degree, and was thereupon sentenced to be imprisoned in the State 
Prison during his natural life. 

Hiram H. Morrison, indicted in Suffolk County for the murder 
of Florence Morrison in Boston, on March 23, 1896. The indict- 
ment was found April 11, 1896, and on the twenty-sixth day of the 
same month thfe defendant pleaded guilty of manslaughter. This 
plea was accepted by the government, and he was thereupon 

* He was executed in the Suffolk County Jail on that date. 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



269 



sentenced to the State Prison for not more than fourteen years nor 
less than seven vears. 

John H. Moran, indicted in Worcester County for the murder 
of Bridget Moran in Clinton, on Nov. 2, 1895. The indictment was 
returned Jan. 23, 1896. When brought to trial at Worcester, in 
May, the defendant pleaded guilty of manslaughter. This plea was 
accepted by the government, and on May 27, 1896, he was sentenced 
to be imprisoned in the State Prison for not more than fifteen years 
nor less than twelve years. 

Bagdasar Sharvanian, indicted in Worcester County for the 
murder of Misak DerSahagian in Worcester, Feb. 13, 1896. The 
indictment was found May 15, 1896. When brought to trial at 
Fitchburg, in the month of August, the defendant pleaded guilty of 
murder in the second degree, and on the 27th of that month he was 
sentenced to imprisonment in the State Prison for life. 

Table No. 54. — Summary of Criminal Cases commenced before the 
Grand Juries in the Several Counties, and of Criminal Cases coming to 
the Superior Courts by Appeal during the Year ending Sept. 30, 1896. 





1.— 


Offences 


2.— 


Offences 


8.- 


- Offences 










AGAINST 
TUB PERSON. 


AGAINST 

Property. 


AGA 
Ol 

1 £ 

a 
* 

go 
© 


inst Public 

tDER, ETC. 


Aggregates. 


COUNTIES. 


Grand Jury 
Cases. 


Appealed 
Cases. 


• 

o 


Grand Jury 
Cases. 


Appealed 

Cases. 


a 

3 

o 
Eh 


Appealed 

Cases. 


• 

1 


Grand Jury 
Cases. 


Appealed 

Cases. 


• 

-a 

■— 

o 


Barnstable, 


2 


- 


2 


10 


- 


10 


2 


2 


1 
1 


i 
14 


2 


16 


Berkshire, 


14 


3 


17 


87 


• 6 


43 


34 


40 


n ! 

I 


85 


49 


134 


Bristol, . 


24 


86 


60 


65 


4 


69 


27 


144 


1 

171 


116 


184 


800 


Dukes County, 


1 


- 


1 


5 


1 


6 


2 


• 


2 


8 


1 


9 


Essex, 


02 


65 


147 


196 


14 


210 


91 


349 


440 


879 


418 


797 


Franklin, . 


3 


13 


16 


- 


32 


82 


20 


20 


40 


28 


65 


88 


Hampden, 


10 


14 


24 


41 


4 


45 


19 


67 


86 


70 


85 


155 


Hampshire, 


4 


9 


13 


1 


19 


20 


16 


8 


24 


21 


36 


67 


Middlesex, 


75 


85 


160 


197 


37 


234 


68 


401 


469 


840 


523 


863 


Nantncket, 


1 


1 


2 


- 


1 


1 


3 


1 


4 


4 


8 


7 


Norfolk, .- . 


80 


19 


49 


71 


11 


82 


26 


81 


107 


127 


111 


238 


Ply month, 


27 


6 


33 


47 


2 


49 


17 


85 


102 


91 


98 


184 


Suffolk, . 


179 


287 


416 


649 


208 


757 


167 


1,269 


1,436 


895 


1,714 


2,609 


Worcester, 


60 


44 


104 


153 


26 


179 


92 


330 


422 ] 


306 


400 


705 


Total, 


622 


622 


1,044 


1,872 


365 


1,787 


584 


2,797 


3,881 


2,478 


3,684 


6,162 



270 



CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 



[Oct. 



Criminal Prosecutions m Superior Courts. 
Table No. 55. — Cases pending Oct. I, 1895. 



COOHTIBS. 



OFFENCES. 


Barnstable. 


| 

ft. 
O 

CO 


• 

m 
X 
CO 


• 

o 

m 
o 

M 

9 

Q 


Essei. 
Franklin. 
Hampden. 
Hampshire. 


• 

• 
• 

■o 

3 


•8 



3 


« 
M 

O 

ft. 
O 


• 

a 
o 

a 


Suffolk. 
Worcestor. 


• 

*s 

o 


1. — Against thb Pbrsov. 
Abase of female child, . 

Assault, felonious, 

Carnal abase, 

Kidnapping 

Libel, ..... . 

Manslaughter, .... 

Mayhem, 

Robbery 

Threats, ...... 


2 
2 
2 

2 

2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
6 


t 

22 
2 

4 

1 

\ 

1 

33 

7 

1 

4 
1 
16 
1 
8 

86 



1 

12 
1 

46 
3 

10 
89 


13 

6 

2 

; 

3 


3 


10 
1 


3 

6 


7 

2 

2 

11 

2 
6 

6 
3 

7 

2 

83 

1 
2 
4 

I 
8 
2 

67 
3 

12 

91 


- 
1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

1 
3 

i 

4 

1 
2 

1 
12 


- 

4 
8 

1 

1 
1 

9 

19 

2 
1 

2 
3 

8 

1 
2 

1 

7 

2 
27 

4 

6 
50 




1 9 
2 

: 

32 

37 
2 

2 

4 
83 

3 

81 

I 
3 

8 
3 

14 
2 
1 

88 
2 

4 

9 
80 


8 
1 

1 
1 

12 

18 

3 
1 
9 

1 


15 , 8 

3 1 

4 - 
1 - 

4 - 


» 

S 

117 

26 

1 

1 

4 

1 

• 

11 

1 

! 1 

1 11 

17 

i « 


2. — Against Property. 

Breaking and entering, . 

Burning buildings, 
Burning insured property, • 
Detaining milk cans, . 
Embezzlement, 

Malicious mischief. 
Receiving stolen goods. 
Registered bottles, selling, . 
Selling or concealing mortgaged 
or leased property, . 


29 

27 

1 

8 
6 
18 
8 
1 

59 

1 
1 
9 

1 
5 

26 

5 

1 

89 

10 

19 
119 


8 

1 
2 

2 
1 

3 


15 

17 
4 

8 
5 
8 

1 

43 

8 
1 

1 
2 

1 

1 

19 

2 

8 


8 

1 

4 

3 

8 

8 

2 
2 

6 


27 

6 
1 

10 
14 
15 

2 
1 


9 
10 

1 

3 
1 
7 

I 

1 

i 
"5rT 

6 

2 

- 

1 

29 

I 

20 
1 

I 
» 


1 80S 

1 

! 4 

132 

3 

6 

1 

1 

45 

85 

116 

5 

15 

1 

2 
9 


8. — Against Public Ordxb, 

etc. 

Abortion, ..... 

Adulterating food, etc., . • 

City ordinance or town by-laws, 

Cruelty to animals, 
Disturbing the peace, . 
Drunkenness, .... 

Lewdness, 

Liquor laws, violating, . 
Neglect of family, 

Vagabonds and vagrants. 
Miscellaneous, .... 


27 

6 

28 

4 

81 
1 

1 

3 

73 


49 

2 
9 

1 

1 

1 

16 

X l 

25 
3 

2 
23 


6 

27 
55 

4 

6 

2* 

146 

26 

6 

805 

32 

8 

11 

6 

194 




38 


18 


93 


as 


760 



REO A PTTULATION. 



1. — Against the person, 
2. — Against property, . 
3. — Against public order, etc., . 


2 
2 
6 

10 


83 
85 
89 

167 


29 

69 

119 

207 


8 
2 
8 

8 


15 
43 
38 

96 


8 

8 

18 

34 


11 
38 
91 

185 


2 

3 

12 

17 


19 

8 

50 

77 


- 


82 
81 
80 

193 


12 
27 
73 


27 9 1 202 
49 ! 27 ! S77 
98 i 88 1 7«V 




112 


169 !l24 


1,338 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



271 



Criminal Prosecutions in Superior Courts — Continued. 
Table No. 56. — Cases begun during the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 





Counties. 


OFFENCES. 


• 

• 

S 

• 

1 

CO 


i 

3 

•s 

& 


• 
mm 

S 

m 
X 

tt 


• 

o 

O 

m 
« 

a 


• 

H 

• 


• 

a 

M 

a 
« 


• 

a 

•s. 

B 


2 

2 
• 
a 

a 

a 

a 


• 

M 

2 

•o 

5 


M 
« 

9 

a 

5 


• 
tm 


• 

5 

s 
o 

a 


• 

o 

a 

QQ 


■ 

a 

u 
O 


• 

"3 
«-» 
o 


1.— Against the Person. 
Abandoning child. 
Abuse of female child, . 

Assault to ravish, .... 
Assault to rob, .... 
Blackmail, 

Color, discriminating against, 

Kidnapping 

Manslaughter, «... 

Prise fighting and aiding, . 

Robbery, 

Threats, 


2 
2 

7 

8 

10 
1 

mm 


11 
1 

2 
3 

17 

1 

7 

10 
1 

2 
1 

20 

1 

43 

22 


46 
2 

8 

3 

2 

60 

8 
46 

2 

11 
4 
8 

69 
18 

1 


1 
l 

2 
4 

6 


2 

6 

96 

1 
1 
1 

9 

12 
1 

16 
1 

147 

108 

11 

17 
10 

50 
6 
2 

1 
210 

10 
56 

9 


3 
11 

1 
1 

16 

5 
1 

1 

19 
5 

1 
32 

1 

8 


21 

1 

1 

1 

24 
16 

3 
5 

19 
1 

1 

45 

1 

8 

1 
1 


6 
1 
1 

2 

1 
2 

13 

12 
1 

3 
1 

1 

2 
20 

7 


108 
7 

4 

2 
6 

2 

10 

1 

160 

3 
116 

17 

16 
15 

53 
3 
3 

2 

234 

1 

14 
28 

14 


1 
1 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 


35 
8 

1 

2 
1 

1 

49 

5 
36 

1 

1 
6 

24 
6 
1 

1 
2 

82 
6 

1 


26 

4 
1 

1 

1 
1 

83 

1 

27 

3 
1 

1 

14 
1 

1 
49 

4 


1 

269 

22 

6 

18 

1 
2 
7 

4 

8 

78 


68 
1 
2 

3 

2 

17 
11 


3 

9 

696 

47 

21 

20 

5 

9 

2 

9 

I 

7 

32 

3 

4 

12 

38 

122 

4 


2. — Against Pbopbrtt. 

Breaking and entering, 
Burglars' tools, having, 

Burglary, 

Burning buildings, 
Burning insured property, . 
Destroying will, .... 
Embezzlement, .... 

Habitual criminal, 

Malielous mischief, 
Receiving stolen goods, 
Registered bottles, selling, . 
Belling or concealing mortgaged 
or leased property, . 

Unlawful taking, .... 


416 

4 

234 

2 

38 

65 
30 

839 

11 

16 

1 

12 

4 

1 

757 

5 

70 
32 

1 

2 
1 
2 

3 
2 

12 

44 


104 

1 
96 

10 

9 
1 

29 
6 

15 
2 

7 

1 
3 

179 

1 

6 

65 

2 


1,044 

18 

712 

6 

51 

43 

2 

1 

114 

70 

2 

588 

43 

41 

3 

26 
3 
9 
6 


3. — Against Public Obdeb, 
etc. 

Abortion and accessory, 
Adulterating food, etc., 

Auctioneer, unlicensed, 

Bicyole laws, violating, 

Building laws, violating, 

Camp meeting, keeping booth near, 
Carrying weapons, 
Cattle laws, violating, . 
Caucus and election laws, violat- 

Clty ordinance or town by-laws, 

violating, 

Civil service rules, violating, 


1,737 

4 

9 
99 
237 
1 
1 
8 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
4 
3 

14 

72 
1 



. CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 



[Oct. 



Criminal Prosecutions in Superior Courts — Continued. 
Table No. 56. — Continued. 



8. — Aoaibbt Pdbmo Obdeb, 

Common nlubi-walker. 

Common nulHDce, 

Concealing blnb or death of child, 

Cruelly lo animate, 

Deotlet, pracilatng Illegally ae, . 

Dlatnrblug meeting, . 

Dietorbing the peace, . 
Dog lawa, violating, . 

Flab and gimelawa, violating, . 

Oaming, 

Highway lawa, violating, . 

Infanu' boarding bonae keeping, 

Intelligence office, unllcenaed, . 
Lewd cohabitailon, 

Lewdneae, 

Liquor lawa, violating. 
Lousier lawa, violating, 
Lord'a day. violating, . 
Lottery, nil venial no, etc.. ■ 

Opium lawa. violating, 
Pawnbroker, unllcenaad, . . 

Polygamy 

Ref ualog to aid officer, ' '. '. 
Bcbool laws, violating, . 

Tobacco and clgarettee, eelllng 
Trampa 


1 


IB 

12 
I 


ie 
i 

2 




10 

10* 

■ 

6 
1M 


2 


s 
s 


a 

18 

1 

M 


1 


153 

19 
11 

IB 

in 

E 

1 


; 


3 

2 
» 

1 

4 

81 

2 
I 


18 
1 


a 

17 

1 

S3 
14 

11 

31 
04 

210 
Vi 

I 
3 

I 


1 

o 

I 

t 

T 

14 

BO 

1 

1 


ga- 
la 

1 
103 

1,11 J 
13 

I 

30 
2 

41 

13 

1 

1 

11 
11 

11 

11 

n 

a> 

» 

10 

1 

l 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 13. 



27a 



Criminal Prosecutions in Superior Courts — Continued. 

Table No. 56 — Concluded. 















COUNTISS. 


OFFENCES. 


• 
9 

3 

a 

tm 

CO 


• 

8 

i 

9 


• 

s 

• 


• 

© 

m 

9 

M 
3 

Q 


• 


• 

a 
a 

8 

fa 


a 

9 

a 

a 


33 

(0 

a 
1 


■ 

M 

* 


• 

0) 

o 

a 

§ 


• 

M 

o 

o 


■ 

XX 

«-» 


O 

B 
>» 


• 

i 

a 


• 

%. 

9 

*•* 
«B 
9 

s 

O 


• 

o 


8.— Against Pdblio Order, 
btc. — Con. 

Unnatural act, .... 
Vagabonds and vagrants, . 
Weekly payment laws, violating, 


4 


1 





2 


4 

2 

440 


40 


80 


24 


3 
400 


«. 


1 


1 

102 


1 

6 

22 

1 


5 
2 

422 


4 



40 

a 




74 


171 


4 


107 


1,436 


8,381 



RECAPITULATION. 



1. — Against the person, 

2. — Against property, . 

3. — Against public order, etc., . 



Total, 



2 


17 


00 


1 


147 


10 


24 


18 


100 


2 


40 


33 


410 


104 


10 


43 


00 





210 


32 


46 


20 


234 


1 


82 


40 


767 


170 


4 
10 


74 


171 


2 




440 
707 


40 
88 


80 
165 


24 
57 


400 
803 


4 


107 


102 
184 


1,430 


422 

705 


134 300 


7 


238 


2,000 



1,044 
1,787 
3,381 

6,16* 



Table No. 57. — Disposition of Cases pending at the Beginning of the 
Tear and Cases begun during the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



OFFENCES. 



1.— Against thi PbbbonI 
Abandoning child, 
Abnse of female child, 

Assault 

Assault to kill 

Assault to ravish 

Assault to rob, .... 

Blackmail, 

Carnal noose, .... 
Color, discriminating against, . 

Conspiracy, 

Kidnapping, 

Libel 

Manslaughter, • 

Mayhem 

MnrdYr, ...... 

Prise fighting and aiding, . 

g«pe 

Robbery, 

Threats, 

Total, 

2. — Against Pxopbrtt. 

Arson, 

Breaking and entering. 
Burglars' tools, having, 
Burglary, 







• 

■a 


9 






• 

a 


Verdicts. 


. 


• 


9 
9 


o 


• 

9 


a 

s 

3 

a 

9 

I 


• 

a 

9 

B 

a 
o 


• 

tm 

a 

9 
X> 

9 

£ 

a 


el «j 

SS 
cca 

*■ @ 

•o o 
8a 


■ 

■c 

o 
** 

ja 
w> 

a 

£ 


• 


$ 

o 

* 
ca 

9 


o 
O 

* . 

S a 






S 

s 

a 

a 


a 

■c 

Im 

i 

5 

a 


a 

9 

a 

9 

m 

u 
o 

a 

9 


9 

3 

6 

* 

® « 

5^ 


D 


i 
i 

m 


« 

>» 

"B 


« 

3 

a 

9 

8 

! 

CA 

3 


a 

s 

$2 


a 


fc 


O 


fc 


CO 


E a- 


O 


fe 


3 


O 


On 


& 


a 


2 




4 






2 























8 


• 


1 


1 


2 


tm 


2 


1 


- 


8 


• 


— 


2 


• 


150 


44 


187 


110 


138 


214 


11 


00 


40 


7 


268 


32 


88 


08 


17 


37 


10 


6 


8 


10 


12 


— 


12 





- 


24 


3 


- 


18 


1 


15 


4 


5 


1 





2 


- 





1 


- 





2 


- 


6 


1 


17 





1 


- 


12 


4 


- 


16 


1 


1 


10 


1 


2 


1 


- 


4 


• 


1 


- 


3 i 


1 


— 


8 


- 


- 


8 


• 


- 


1 


<- 


10 


- 


2 




3 


3 


- 


1 


2 


- 


8 


- 


mm 


3 


- 


18 


— 


4 


- 


— 


- 


- 


• 


w 


1 


- 


1 


7 


• 


1 


_ 


— 


1 


— 


1 


- 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


•• 


5 


1 





1 


2 


8 


1 


- 


1 


m. 


• 


4 


• 


2 


_ 


27 


8 


8 


4 


12 


11 


1 





4 


- 


18 


3 


5 


2 




8 


1 


— 


- 


2 


1 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


8 


- 


— 


— 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


— 


— 


— 


- 


12 


• 


- 


2 





2 


— 


- 





— 


- 


- 


- 


1 


— 


34 


4 


9 1 


10 


7 


— 


15 


1 


- 


21 


— 


8 


8 


1 


104 


18 


19 


50 


22 


- 


61 


20 


2 


73 




1 


10 


- 


- 


1 

103 


1 
107 


1 


" 


" 

280 


13 


| 200 


08 


10 





52 


50 


2 
166 


1 


464 


130 


282 


430 


21 


10 


3 


5 




8 





» 


1 


2 







1 


1 


2 


— 


040 


67 


103 


24 


171 


442 


1 


130 


80 


12 


413 


80 


55 


76 


5 


6 


-. 


- 


1 


2 


4 


- 


2 


- 


-1 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


88 


11 


1 


1 


11 


24 







6 


** 


20 


— 


2 


4 


~ 



CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 



[Oct. 



Criminal Prosecutions in Superior Courts — Continued. 
Table No. 57 — Continued. 





i 
i 


1 


i 

s 
a 
g 

1 


5 


s 

J 


1 
ii 

r 


a . 


I 
2 


1 

1 
101 

1 


3 

1 

2 


i 


286 
14 
M 

1 

1 


■ 


< 

( 
i 

2 


as 

IS 

70 

4 

s 

s 


a 
l 


Adulterating food, tie.,' 

ARHt,7li*t*l'. '.'.'.'. 

Auctioneer. unlicensed, . 

Building law., violating 

Camp meetlng.lt eeplng booth near 
Carrying weapon*. 
Cattle lawn, violating, . 
Cancua and election law a, violating, 
Clly ordinance ot town bylaw.. 

Civil service rnlea, violating, 

Common brawler 

Common nlgbt-wnUer. 

Common nulaanc 

Conc-allng birth or death of child, 

Demist, practising Illegally ss, . 
Desecrating mmb, . . . 
Diseased an Imala, falling to notify 

Disorderly house, keeping. . 
Disturbing meeting, . . . 

Disturbing the peace, . 
Dog law*, violating, 

Engineer, unlicensed, . 

Exhibition, Illegal.' '. '. ', 
False fire-alarm giving, 
Fire-escape, neglect to provide, . 
Fish and game laws, violating, . 
Foreign flag, displaying Illegal ly, 


an 

! 

] 
1 

a 

i 

B 


1 


61 



■ 

e 
t 

4 


IS 

: 

u 

i 


i 
fii 

i 

i 
i 

! 

; 
1 

32 


rj 

11* 

11 
M 

! 

3 

I 

H 

67' 

1 


I 
1 


201 
41 

1 
11 


10 J 
I 

s 




K 

i 


ii 

: 

10 

i 

s 

ill 

: 

: 
; 


111 

! 
S( 

6 

; 

2 

I 

- 

- 


zaa 

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K 

1 

1 

4 
S 

1 


40 

1 
M 

1 

1 

1 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



275 



Criminal Prosecutions in Superior Courts— Continued. 

Table No. 57 — Concluded. 





• 

a 
p 

«8 

S 

a 

9 

§ 

9 

c 


• 
e 

9 

8 
o 

a 
o 


■ 

« 

ft* 

a 

JS 

o 

E 
§ 


Nol pros'd or quashed 1 
for Informality. | 


• 

•a 

a 

■*» 

9 

8 


• 

"3 

O 

* 
«■ 

9 
ft- 


Pleas of Nolo Con- 1 
tendere. 1 


VXBDIOT8. 


• 

S 

a 

6 

1 

a 

2 

a 
9 

QD 


• 

•a 

r 

». 

9 

s 

a 
O 


O 

a 

9 

a 
9 
QD 

ft. 

a 
* 

a 


Untried at Close of 1 
Year. | 


• 

9 


OFFENCES. 


■ 

>» 

"3 
O 


"3 
O 

*» 

i 


• 
■— 

a 

• 

S 

* 
■ 

5 


e 

S 

9 B> 


3. — Against Public Obdib, 

xtc. — Con. 

Game cock, keeping, . 

Gaming 

Health laws, violating, . 
Highway laws, violating, . 
House of ill fame, keeping, . 
Idle and disorderly, 

Indecent exposure, 

Infante' boarding-house, keeping, 

unlicensed, 

Inn-holder, unlicensed, . 
Intelligence office, unlicensed, . 
Lewd cohabitation, . . 

Liquor laws, violating, 
Lobster laws, violating. 
Lord's day, violating, . 
Lottery, advertising, etc., . . 
Milk laws, violating, . 
Neglect of family, 
Neglect to provide schools, . 
Obscene publications, . . 
Officer, assuming to be, . • 
Oleomargarine laws, violating, . 
Opium laws, violating, 
Parading with fire-arms, . . 
Pawnbroker, unlicensed, 
Peddling, unlicensed, . 

Physician, unlicensed, . 

Prize sale, ..... 

Refusing to aid officer, 
Rendering establishment, main* 

tainlng Illegally, 
Rescue of cattle, .... 
School laws, violating, . 

Selling silver below standard, . 
Sewage laws, violating, 
Stubbornness, . 
Tobacco and cigarettes, selling 

Tramps 

Truancy, 

Unnatural set, .... 
Vagabonds and vagrants, . . 
Weekly payment laws violating, 


73 
9 
2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
2 
2 

1 

mm 

65 

10 

26 

1 

3 

2 
1 
2 

22 
23 

2 

2 

8 
1 
1 

626 


7 

1 
9 
1 

4 
2 

1 

61 


19 
9 
2 
8 

6 
22 

3 

1 

mm 

15 

2 

93 

6 

5 

2 

32 

1 

25 

8 
3 

i* 
i 

1 

1 
2 

3 
2 
1 
7 
1 

785 


1 

6 

3 

6 
19 

4 

1 

1 

22 

2 

8 

1 
1 

1 
1 
4 

2 
2 
4 
8 

1 

2 
1 

1 

5 
1 

265 


5 

4 

14 
1 

9 

10 

1 

8 

1 
2 
9 
6 
258 
36 
1 
3 

8 

2 

2 

3 
5 

8 
1 

2 

1 
20 

561 


64 
16 

7 

13 

69 

1 

2 

44 

9 

187 

4 

7 

1 

19 

7 

2 
6 

12 
8 

12 

1 

2 

4 

8 
1 
6 
7 
1 

1,369 


1 
3| 
2, 
8 

1 

2 
1 
1 

3 
1 

2 

"1 

"l 

"l 
36 


5 
5 

16 
1 

7 
6 
1 
8 

1 
2 
9 
5 
121 
2 

3 

7 

8 

2 

6 
5 

1 

2 

1 
6 

313 


I 
2 

1 

1 
4 

4 

2 

162 

1 
1 

2 
1 

1 

1 

10 
238 


i 
l 

16 

1 
31 


38 
20 

28 
1 

22 

24 

1 

6 

1 

2 

42 

11 

375 

1 

5 

9 

1 

14 

8 
2 

8 
17 

2 
11 

I 
2 

2 

2 

6 

18 

1 

1^853 


7 
1 

6 

1 

6 

1 

2 

46 

2 

10 

3 

2 
1 
2 
1 
1 

2 
266 


4 
1 

12 

4 
6 

125 
5 
1 
2 

10 

1 
5 
2 
1 

1 

1 
2 
2 

333 


20 
3 

6 

1 
8 
4 
1 
2 

7 

2 

263 

14 
6 
3 
1 

16 
1 

1 

8 

4 

S 

1 

2 

2 

1 
1 

560 


2 
12 

4 

2 

1 

81 
5 

8 

«•> 

2 
1 

2 

1 
193 



RECAPITULATION. 



1. 
2. 

3.. 



- Against the person, 
-Against property, 
-Against public order, etc., 

Total 



454 103 

1,247172 

526 61 


197 
298 
785 


136 
148 
256 

539 


282 
883 
551 

1,216 


289 18 

870 9 

1.869J 36 


206 
291 
813 

| 810 


98 
107 
238 

443 


,o! 

60 

1 


439 

823 

1,353 

2,616 


52 50 
115121 
266333 

433 504 

I 


156 
233 
560 

949 


2,2273361,280 


2,528, 58 

1 



21 

40 

198 

264 



CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 



[Oct. 



Criminal Prosecutions ih Superior Courts— Concluded. 
Table No. 58. — Disposition of Cases pending at the Beginning of the 
Year and of the Cases begun during the Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896, in 
Each County. 





g* 

!i 


I, 


3 
1 


3 

1 


1 

H 
E 

I 

5 


I 

is 
fa 

1™ 


1 
i 



J 


1 

° 

to 

ij 


Vehdictb. 


ill 


S "S i* 


COUNTIES. 


o 


5 

i 


i 

i 

I 




Birouible, 
Berkshire, 
Bilatol, . 

Dukes County,. 

Franklin. .' '■ 
B.mpden, . . 

Ninluckel, ! 

Plymouth," ! 
Buffol., . . 


10 

iai 

r. 

iw 
in 

l* 


ll 

sot 
■ 

797 
» 

ui 

SSI 

l.gos 
705 


10 
III 

an 
a 

342 
111 
H! 


4 Si 
4 101 

47 111 

H 29; 

161 39 
15 11 

14 3TI 




ii 

X 


•7 1 
IIS 1 

SIS 9 

ttl 

M 1 1 

1,493 80 

IBS 7 


71 
1 

11 
>' 

4. 


■ 

ii 


: 

2 


S3 11 
332 - 

si i 

179 HI 

88 19 
70 % 


41 «S 32 

IDA S3*' - 
II IS 1 - 
47 US. N 

4 1T| - 

a «V : 
43: its! n 

13 3* 11 

ss ST*. «* 
114 «*| 73 


Total, . 


1,S3» 


1,185 


2,227 


831 


1.280 


15 4,658 68 BIO 




00 .2,6161 483 


304 B4» | SM 



Table No. 59. — Disposition of Cases for Violation of Liquor Laics, com- 
menced before the Grand Juries and coming to the Superior Courts fty 
Appeal, during tkeYear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 





1 
f 
'■* ■ 

?! 

lis 


E 





■d 




% 


i 

a 


Plh.o. 


Tbbdict*. I 


1 


s * 

I £ 


J 


COUNTIES. 


1 if 
fill 

1 13 
J 1 £ 


H 

E 

1 




1 


;" 


i 


£ 


< 1 

if 

a a! 


1 

i 

5 


Berkitalre,' 

Brl.Kl, . 
I>okr. County, 
Bhci. . 
Fmnkllo, . 

Hum r* hi re. 
Middles. 

Plymouth, 

Suffolk. . . 
Worcester, . 


1 

49 
» 

37 
Dl 


2 

M 

2 
141 

48 
90 


1 
3 


: 


2 

8 

3 
9B 

B 


3 

I 


4 

43 
I2B 
23 


6 

IB 

43 




10 

33 

38 

10 




1 

90 


- > 

: « 

4 1 48 

1 i 1 w 


1 1 j 1 1 1 

a s 1 nl 4 

35 It 4 11 

- 2« [ 1 | a 


Total. . 


306 


TBI 


4* 




93 


12 


168 


167 


3 


131 


IBS 


ii |! ■<■ 


to 


123 i M3 


a> 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



277 



Criminal Prosecutions in Lower Courts. 

Table No. 60. — Number of Cases begun in Municipal, Police and District 
Courts, and before Trial Justices, in Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



. 














Counties. 












OFFENCES. 


• 

JS 
3 

S 


• 
2 




6 




• 

a 


m 

a 


• 

u 
m 


• 

i 


• 


• 


• 




• 

M 


• 

O 

• 
4) 






a 

4 


■a 

9 


o 


$ 

M 

a 


• 

s 


a 


ft 

a 

«■ 


ft 
8 

as 


5 

mm 


a 

el 


O 

o 


8 




O 

1* 

o 


3 

o 




« 


tt 


CQ 


q 


H 


fe 


B 


DC 


3 fc 


525 


a, 


QD 


H 


1.— Against the Person. 






1 
1 








i 

1 


















Abandoning child, 


- 


- 


I - 




1 






- 


5 


- 


2 




8 


1 


17 


Abase of female child, 


- 




- 


- 


1 


1 


1 












6 


- 


I « 


Assault, .... 


88 


290 


808 


9 


949 


72 


460 


98 


1,151 


- 


298 


223 


3,681 


745 


8,710 


Assault to kill, . 


- 


1 


4 


- 


- 


- 


! i 


1 


9 


- 


3 


4 


27 


5 


56 


Assault to ravish, 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


3 


1 


27 


- 


2 


4 


9 


3 


58 


Assault to rob, . 


1 


• 


- 


- 


4 


- 


i 


- 


2 


- 


1 


6 


31 


- 


44 


Blackmail, .... 


- 


- 




- 


1 


mm 


! 2 


- 


• 


- 


- 


- 


1 


8 


7 


Color, discriminating 














1 












































1 


- 


4 


Conspiracy, .... 


























28 


- 


28 


Kidnapping, 




























5 


5 












2 












8 


- 


1 


- 


1 « 


Manslaughter, 


- 


- 


4 


- 


7 


1 


~ 


2 


8 




- 


1 


9 


1 


! » 


Mayhem, .... 


mm 


1 


• 


— 


1 


- 


_ 


- 


1 




- 


- 


1 


- 


1 * 


Murder, .... 


- 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


i 


• 


- 


• 


- 


- 


9 


5 


19 


Negligence of common car- 






























1 


Prize fighting, . 










12 








1 












18 




2 


5 


11 


- 


6 


1 


- 


1 


6 


- 


2 


1 


25 


11 


69 


Robbery, .... 


- 


1 


. 2 


- 


7 


1 


- 


4 


15 


— 


1 


1 


164 


9 


206 


Threats 


1 


18 


10 


1 


9 


2 


- 


- 


73 


- 


18 


11 


50 


36 


229 


Total, .... 


42 


318 


845 


10 


1,000 


78 


467 


107 


1,294 


- 


328 


261 


3,946 


II MH I 

824 


9,500 


2. — Against Pbopertt. 








• 


























1 


2 


2 


• 


T 


1 


1 


1 


23 


- 


4 


I 


6 


8 


67 


Breaking and entering, 


4 


39 


99 


2 


106 


8 


61 


22 


287 


2 


80 


47 


622 


161 


1,520 


Burglar's tools, having, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 




2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


11 


Burning buildings, 


- 


1 


4 


- 


18 


1 




- 


82 


- 


4 


- 


8 


6 


74 


Burning insured property, 


















1 










2 


8 


Embezzlement, . . 


- 





16 


- 


40 


2 


14 


2 


90 


- 


25 


22 


188 


24 


432 


Bvadlng fare, 


- 


ft 


6 


- 


12 


1 


— 


- 


20 


- 


6 


11 


22 


13 


96 


Extortion, .... 










1 




















1 


False statement to stable. 
































keeper when hiring team, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


™ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


w 


- 


1 


Fraud, ..... 


- 


23 


33 


2 


47 


6 


24 


- 


98 


- 


17 


5 


187 


52 


494 


Isabels, counterfeiting, 


- 


- 


8 


- 


- 


.1 


- 


- 


1 


- 


2 


- 


5 


- 


18 


Larceny, .... 


11 


157 


342 


12, 


603 


47 


286 


37 


916 


9 


181 


130 


2,860 


448 


5,939 


Malicious mischief, . 


6 


27 


48 




77 


11 


86 


3 


101 


- 


57 


27 


320 


74 


787 


Receiving stolen goods. 


- 


3 


8 


- 


9 


— 


13 


- 


11 


- 


5 


2 


75 


8 


129 


Registered bottles, selling, 


- 


- 


15 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


18 


11 


60 


Removing baggage, . 


mm 


- 


- 


- 


- 


"i 


- 


- 


17 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17 


Belling or concealing mort- 












1 




















gaged or leased property, 


- 


6 


6 


- 


9 


— 


1 


- 


27 


- 


6 


4 


73 


20 


160 


Stealing a ride, . 


- 


8 


1 


— . 


11 


-i 


- 


- 


11 


- 


2 


9 


9 1 


12i 


68 


Trespass, .... 


2 


60 


16 


3 


41 


2 


33 


4 


135 


- 


41 


18 


148 


175, 


667 


Unlawful taking, 


2| 


5 


11 


-1 




2 


15 


- 


24 


- 


2 


1 


66 


»l 


188 


Total, .... 


26 


329 


609 


19 


882 


81 


480 


69 


1,795 


11 


431 


279 


4,615 


1,012 


10,638 


8. — Against Public Ob- 
































DKR, ETC. 
































Abd action, .... 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


4 


Abortion and accessory, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


3 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


11 


- 


19 


Admitting minor to pool 
































room, .... 


- 


8 


— 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


11 


Adulterating food, 


- 


2 


1 


- 


19 


- 


1 


- 


47 


- 


6 


- 


82 


9 


116 


Adultery 


4 


27 


18 


- 


43 


10 


15 


6 


86 


- 


10 


4 


74 


60 


307 


Affray, .... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


6 


17 


- 


82 


Arrest, Illegal, 


























2 


- 


2 


Attorney, assuming to be, . 




























1 


1 


Auctioneer, unlicensed, • 


- 


1 


























1 


Bastardy, .... 


2 


8 


14 


1 


46 


1 


9 


- 


87 


- 


19 


7 


109 


41 


343 


Bestiality, .... 
Bicycle laws, violating, 
Bird flighting, 






1 












1 












2 


- 


- 


18 


- 


49 


8 


162 


4 


38 


- 


86 


11 


24 


41 


381 


- 


• 


• 


* 


8 


^ m 


^ 




• 


™ 


1 


** 


* 


13 


22 



278 



CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 



[Oct. 



Criminal Prosecutions in Lower Codrts — Continued. 

Table No. 60 — Continued. 





Counties. 


OFFENCES. 


JO 

s 

m 

a 

4 


■ 

ja 

• 

& 


m 

3 

• 

•c 
m 


• 

o 
'J 

• 

M 

a 
Q 


• 

H 

s 

• 


* 

a 

M 

g 


§ 

a 

a 

«s 
W 


• 

■ 

a 

at 

H 


i 

■M 


■ 

» 

M 

O 
3 

a 
* 


■ 

M 

* 

O 


• 

a 


O 

a 
►» 

5 


• 

a 

0Q 


• 

s 

i 

la 

o 


• 

1 

o 


8. — Against Public Or- 
der, rtc.— Con. 
Blasting illegally. 
Boarding a vessel, • 

Building laws, violating, . 
Burial laws, violating, 
Carrying weapons, . • 
Cattle laws, violating, . 
Circular, Issuing, to injure 

City ordinance or town by- 
laws, violating, 

Civil service rules, violating, 

Common brawler, 

Common drunkard, . 

Common night-walker, 

Common nuisance, . . 

Common victualler, un- 
licensed, .... 

Concealing death of child, . 

Contempt of court, 

Cruelty to animals, 
Dentist, practising illegally 

CtsV| • ■ 

Desecrating tomb, 

Diseased animals, failing to 
notify of 

Disorderly conduct, . 

Disorderly house, keeping, 

Disorderly in publio con- 
veyance, .... 

Disturbing meeting, . 

Disturbing school, 

Disturbing the peaoe, . 

Dog fighting, 

Dog laws, violating, . 

Drunkenness, 

Election laws, violating, . 

Escape, .... 

Exhibition, illegal, 

False fire-alarm, giving, 

Fast driving, 

Fish and game laws, violat- 
ing 

Foreign flag, displaying il- 
legally 

Forgery, .... 

Fornication 

Fugitives from justice, 

Funeral procession, ob- 

G-aming, .... 
Health laws, violating, 
Highway laws, violating, . 
House of ill-fame, keeping, 
Idle and disorderly, . 

Incest, 

Indecent exposure, . . 
Infants' boarding - house, 

keeping unlicensed, . 
Innhoider, unlicensed, 
Insurance laws, violating, . 
Intelligence office, unll- 

censed, • • • 
Junk laws, violating, . 
Lribor laws, violating, 
Lewd cohabitation, . 


l 

l 
l 

5 

7 
15 

2 
1 

1 
1 


4 

26 

6 
2 

2 

4 

21 

14 

1 

305 

5 
2,106 

1 
5 

j 

26 
1 

1 

9 

1 


2 

43 

2 
28 
17 
75 

3 
18 

31 

1 

699 

8 
2,566 

8 

23 

4 
26 

8 
2 
1 
7 

61 
2 

18 

1 

1 
49 


3 

1 
12 

1 
1 


5 

5 
2 

142 

1 
20 
10 

1 
1 

82 

16 

1 

852 

19 
7,273 

4 
1 
2 

2 

1 

5 

18 

2 

126 

9 

10 
47 

18 
S 


1 

1 
1 

10 
8 

4 

6 

1 
68 

173 

1 

6 
1 

8 

1 


1 

4 

104 
1 

6 
6 

2 
38 

10 

2 

204 

7 
2,802 

1 
2 
1 
1 

3 

11 
34 

18 

4 

3 

1 
2 


8 

1 
7 

2 
33 

2 

637 

1 

6 
1 


i 

4 

824 

13 

97 

1 

5 

2 

6 

106 

8 

16 

11 
2 

784 

40 

36 

10,956 

1 

4 

1 

1 

9 

38 

1 

109 
6 

1 
23 

18 

2 

2 

1 

26 


1 
2 

" 
1 


12 

107 

3 

18 

8 
81 

2 
6 

180 

6 

1,415 

1 

2 

2 

1 

4 

1 

16 
2 

1 
o 


l 

13 

7 
6 

2 
21 

4 

18 

206 

13 
1,042 

6 

18 

7 
6 

09 

9 
8 

1 


3 

8 

3 

11 

11 

1 

1,979 

18 
22 

117 
109 

1 

16 

69 

4 
2 

66 

4 

7 

299 

46 

30,848 
23 

« 
3 

5 

2 

1 

78 

486 
19 

1,002 
6 

620 

1 

40 

3 

8 

60 


1 

i 

7 

128 

1 

18 
3 
5 

. 

1 8 
51 

13 

83 
5,7« 

- 

3 

- 

16 

_ 

8, 
66 

1 

* 

6 

H 

3 

i 

? 

9 


S 

IT 

13 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Si 
85 

157 
219 

! i 

41 

3 

408 

4 
J 

3 

1 1 
164 

17 
R 

*i 

171 

65,609 

» 

S 

90 

1 

1 
T3 

134 

6H 

30 

S 

ME 

37 
4 

S2 

6S9 

4 

no 

s 
i 
i 

i 

5 
3 

146 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



279 



Criminal Prosecutions in Lower Courts — Continued. 

Table No. 60 — Concluded. 





Counties. 


OFFENCES. 


« 
9 

• 
a 


• 

•2 

9 
« 


• 

© 
CD 


d 

O 

5 

M 

9 

P 


• 

M 

9 

m 
a 

H 


• 

B 
M 

a 
g 


■ 

a 

9 

a 
S 

SI 

M 


• 

9 

• 

a 

& 


i 

9 

3 


• 

9 
M 
O 



e 

flB 


• 

1 

© 


* 


o 

e 

E 


• 

M 

I 

a 

CD 


• 

| 
1 

o 


• 

3 


8. — Against Public Or- 
der, xto. — Con. 
Lewdness, .... 
Library book, defacing, 
Liquor, giving to prisoner, 
Liquor laws, violating, 
Lobster laws, violating, 
Loitering around railroad 

Lord's Day, violating, 
Lottery, advertising, etc., . 
Measures, illegal, using, . 

Neglect of family, 
Obscene literature, having, 
Obscenity, . 
Officer, assuming to be, . 

Oleomargarine laws, violat- 

Opium laws, violating, 
Pawnbroker, unlicensed, . 
Peddling, unlicensed, . 
Perjury, .... 
Pharmacy laws, violating, . 
Phvstcian, unlicensed, 
Polygamy, .... 

Profanity, .... 
Railroad: laws, violating, . 
Railroad, obstructing, 
Refusing to aid officer, 

Rescue of cattle, . 

Savings bank laws, violating, 

School laws, violating. 

Second hand store, keeping, 

Seduction, .... 

Sewage laws, violating, 

Slaughtering, unlicensed, . 

Sodomy, .... 

Street cars, obstructing, . 

Stubbornness, 

Sureties of the peace, . 

Throwing missiles at car, . 

Tobacco and cigarettes, 
selling unlawfully, . 

Tramps, . . . 

Truants 

Unnatural act, 

Vagabonds, .... 

Vagrants 

Walking on railroad, . 

Water supply, polluting, . 

Weekly payment laws, vio- 
lating, .... 


3 
8 

1 
1 

5 
1 


14 
75 

27 

19 

8 
2 

8 

4 

1 

18 
1 

27 
15 

64 
2 

2,883 


2 

109 
2 

18 

150 
3 
2 

6 
2 
1 
4 
5 

2 

2 
3 
2 

8 

67 

4 

61 
44 

53 
55 

4,836 


5 

1 
1 

5 


67 

808 
19 

27 
2 

109 
1 
2 

15 

83 
8 

23 

1 

2 

18 

24 

35 

12 
91 


2 
17 

1 
1 

7 

4 
2 

1 

4 

16 
3 

14 
12 

867 


8 

1 
90 

11 
3 

83 
2 

4 

26 
1 

2 

2 

i* 
i 

1 

18 

1 

2 

24 

167 
59 

3,926 


1 

7 

6 

5 

1 
1 

2 
21 

745 


10 

2 
411 

186 
1 

240 

3 

75 
2 

11 

2 

2 

1 

106 

4 

89 
86 

11 
219 
111 


4 


1 

m 
i 

18 

i 

8 

13 
1 

1 
9 

1 
1 

1 

12 

2 

17 
6 

8 
81 

• 

2,171 


4 

118 
68 

89 

7 

16 

2 
3 

1 
3 
2 

1 

8 

4 

2 
9 

1 

47 
12 

2 
22 

1,908 


22 

631 
16 

258 
111 

85 

301 

2 

19 
3 
1 

62 

5 

8 

129 

12 
1 
9 

11 

2 

118 

68 

2 
88 

4 

2 
1 
1 

1 

142 

16 

4 

4 

260 

7 

38 

312 

12 

8 


10 

282 

8 

83 

8 

8 
62 

6 

1 

14 

19 

1 

41 

1 

4 
i 

4 

1 
8 

20 
1 

31 

2 
50 
46 

167 
15 

8 


140 
1 
8 

2,176 
106 

12 

617 

126 

8 

89 

968 

8 

86 
8 
6 

11 
361 
26 
8 
19 
82 

2 
172 

68 
3 

16 

41 
9 
1 

27 
1 
2 

22 
1 
6 
8 
427 
8 

18 

19 

861 

482 

7 

138 

1,180 

199 

7 

• 


Total, .... 


9,083 


14,288 


38,866 


7,689 


86,287 



RECAPITULATION. 



1 . — A gainst the person, . 

2. — Against property, 

8. — Against public order, 



etc.,' . 



Total, 



42 

26 

55 



818 
829 

2,883 



. 1123 3,530 



845 
609 

4,336 

5,790 



10 
19 

26 

65 



1,000 78 
882 81 

0,083367 



10,965,526 



457 
480 

3,926 



4,863 



107 
69 

745 



921 



1,294 
1,796 

14,288 



17,377 



11 



15 



828 
481 



4 2,171 



2,980 



261 
279 

1,908 



2,438 



3,946 824 
4,6161,012 



38,856 



47,417 



7,689 
9,475 



9,600 
10,638 

86,287 



106,428 



280 



CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 



[Oct. 



Cbdokal Prosecutions m Lower Courts — Continued. 

Table No. 61. — Cases begun and sentenced in Municipal, Police and 
District Courts during Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



- 


1. — Offences 


2.— Offences 


8. — Offences 


■ 






AGAINST THE 


against 


against Pub. 


Aggregates. 




Person. 


Property. 


lic Order, etc. 






COURTS. 


i 


• 


• 

a 


• 


• 

o 


s- ; 


' a 
a 


— *> 
9 « 




i 

m 

3 


§0. ' 

% 

m 


« 

1 


I s - 

a 

<2 


• 

• 
« 

a 


9 a 


« 
CD 


1 


s 

CB 


Police and Municipal 












* 






Courts. 








. 










Boston, 


2,034 


1,842 


2,574 


1,282 


24,687 


8,789 


29,275 


11,363 


Brighton* 








94 


61 


66 


89 


886 


297 


546 


387 


CharUstoxon, « 








228 


100 


340 


127 


2,897 


1,303 


3,266 


1,530 


Dorchester, 








ISO 


70 


186 


60 


1,160 


991 


1,416 


1.111 


East Boston, . 








256 


136 


263 


114 


1,820 


825 > 


1,828 


1,075 


Boxbury, . « 
South Boston, 








668 


818 


806 


260 


4,041 


2,875 


6,204 


3,443 








417 


76 


382 


181 


3,068 


1,548 


8,847 


1,755 


West Boxbury, 








132 


73 


107 


83 


621 


342 


860 


448 


Brockton, 








102 


63 


186 


86 


1,146 


925 


1,413 


1,014 


Brookline, 








48 


80 


124 


27 


800 


133 j 


470 


190 


Chelsea, . 








98 


88 


172 


60 


908 


822 I 


! 1,170 


no 


Chioopee, . , 








68 


48 


28 


13 


624 


418 ' 


606 


479 


Fitchburg, 








08 


86 


167 


69 


706 


624 i 


929 


CIS 


Gloucester, . . 








77 


61 


63 


82 


763 


442 


1 893 


S25 


Haverhill, 








121 


100 


92 


41 


884 


681 


! 1.097 


821 


Holyoke, 








207 


144 


206 


127 


982 


860 


1 1,874 


1,131 


Lawrence, 








248 


172 


230 


98 


2,'186 


1,098 . 


i 2,661 


1,3*8 


LSO, . • < 








33 


28 


17 


6 


89 


63 


! 139 


95 


Lowell, . 








368 


185 


638 


259 


4,257 


2,725 


5,153 


3,168 


Lynn, 
Marlborough, 








227 


144 


188 


96 


2,373 


907 ' 


2,768 


1.147 








24 


14 


87 


14 


498 


380 


559 


408 


Newburyport, 








48 


27 


76 


33 


685 


370 ! 


767 


439 


Newton, . 








90 


80 


85 


49 


887 


553 ! 


1,062 


6*2 


Somerrllle, . 








148 


76 


187 


63 


1,335 


1,135 


1,668 


1,284 


Springfield, . 
Williamstown, 








98 


64 


180 


84 


2,058 


1,546 


2,329 


1,863 








12 


11 


12 


10 


44 


«i 


68 


•5 


District Courts. 














1 

1 




Barnstable, First, .... 


26 


10 


12 


6 


40 


18 


! 77 


34 


" Second, 






17 


10 


14 


10 


15 


4 , 


46 


24 


Berkshire, Central, , 






68 


82 


76 


41 


1,191 


867 ' 


1,325 


930 


•• Northern, 






103 


60 


136 


70 


1,008 


679 


! 1,242 


799 


" Sontbern, . 






69 


35 


84 


16 


238 


162 


331 


212 


•■ Fourth, 






49 


32 


* 63 


22 


316 


200 


418 


254 


Bristol, First, 






119 


57 


131 


61 


954 


827 


1,204 


745 


" Second, . 








621 


860 


320 


171 


1,579 


1,290 


2,420 


1,821 


•« Third, 








205 


159 


168 


100 


1,803 


1,678 


2,166 


1,«7 


Essex, First, • 








110 


65 


124 


52 


1,242 


945 


1,476 


1,052 


" Second, 








42 


34 


80 


11 


186 


180 ' 


257 


225 


Franklin, 








28 


13 


15 


3 


114 


86 1 


| 155 


102 


Hampden, Eastern, 
'• Western, . 






43 


29 


19 


14 


167 


145 : 


i 229 


188 






55 


31 


50 


16 


220 


124 . 


825 


179 


Hampshire, . 
Middlesex, Central, 






107 


64 


69 


19 


745 


683 . 


| 921 


666 






26 


18 


44 


12 


139 


89 


> 208 


119 


" First Eastern, 




163 


78 


220 


62 


1,566 


1,234 . 


1,939 


1,372 


" Second Eastern, 




105 


48 


104 


89 


933 


6i7 ; 


1,142 


704 


•• Third Eastern, 




201 


91 


296 


94 


2,421 


1,921 


2.918 


2,106 


" Fourth Eastern, 




67 


42 


94 


39 


1,028 


697 


1,189 


77* 


" First Northern, 




42 


20 


60 


19 


186 


102 > 


; 278 


141 


" First Southern, ' 




34 


20 


49 


20 


416 


196 ' 


! 49$ 


236 


Norfolk, East. 




146 


78 


183 


49 


818 


645 


1,142 


767 


" Southern, 






28 


24 


30 


18 


277 


249 


335 


291 


Plymouth, Second, 






81 


54 


67 


20 


648 


479 ! 


691 


553 


«• Third, . 






20 


10 


26 


9 


95 


78 


141 


97 


•• Fourth, 






48 


88 


21 


12 


124 


109 


193 


159 


Worcester, Central, 






856 


154 


424 


184 


4,080 


1,652 | 


4,860 


1.990 


" First Eastern, 




56 


25 


88 


19 


894 


804 


633 


348 


11 Second Eastern, . 


28 


21 


88 


28 


845 


267 


i 411 


316 


•• First Northern, 


64 


30 


61 


18 


388 


285 


i 483 


333 


" First Southern, 


67 


29 


76 


13 


820 


119 


463 


161 


" Second Southern, . 


49 


31 


28 


14 


256 


174 


. Bf 


2!9 


" Third Southern, 


80 


16 


24 


18 


427 


886 


1 481 


41* 










9,028 


6,225 


10,126 


4,856 


88,038 


47,476 


102,192 


57,i'->« 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



281 



Criminal Prosecutions in Lower Courts — Continued. 

Table No. 62. — Number of Search Warrants, etc., in the Municipal, 

Police and District Courts, for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



. 


Warrants to 














Other 




^J 




search 


Warrantb to search fob 




Search 




3 




for Stolen 
Property. 




Intoxicating Liquors. 




War- 
rants. 


3 


p 

a 

M 


COURTS. 


umber is- 
sued. 


ases in which 
Property was 
found. 


umber is- 
sued. 


umber of 
Seizures. 


iquor not 
found. 


umber of 
Forfeitures. 


Iquor return- 
ed to Claim- 
int. 


ases appealed 
or pending. 


umber is- 
sued. 


umber of 
Seizures. 


9 

a 

o 

u 
o 

B 

a 


2 

s 

o 

u 
9 

.O 

8 

p 




ss 


O 


55 


fc 


h3 


fe 


■J 


O 


fc 


fc 


fe 


S3 


Police and Municipal 


























Coubtb. 


























Boston, 


34 


12 


12,920 


640 


2,281 


638 


6 


81 


729 


198 


86 


— 


Brighton, 


2 


2 


14 


8 


6 


8 


-. 


- 


— 


- 


1 


«. 


Charlestoum, . 


19 


8 


176 


31 


145 


30 


1 


• 


82 


6 


5 


« 


Dorchester, . . 


8 


4 


45 


15 


30 


12 


3 


• 


7 


6 


2 


_ 


East Boston, . . 


7 


1 


186 


164 


136 


42 


4 


_ 


6 


6 


8 


_ 


Roxbury, 
South Boston, 


37 


18 


405 


80 


. 260 


74 


2 


- 


76 


16 


11 


_ 


8 


1 


813 


75 


238 


61 


14 


- 


18 


4 


4 


_ 


West Roxbury, 


6 


2 


27 


12 


11 


12 


- 


- 


— 


. 


7 


. 


Brockton, .... 


9 


1 


213 


125 


88 


105 


7 


13 


7 


3 


1 


. 


Brookline, . 




5 


4 


80 


11 


6 


6 


6 


2 


— 


• 


8 


. 


Chelsea, 




5 


8 


769 


96 


674 


79 


15 


— 


267 


• 


9 


. 


Chloopee, 




— 


— 


8 


8 


- 


6 


2 


— 


. 


• 


• 


• 


Fltchburg, . 




26 


7 


112 


80 


71 


15 


9 


6 


8 


1 


_ 


_ 


Gloucester, . 




4 


2 


252 


81 


171 


68 


16 


4 


. 


• 


4 


— 


Haverhill, . 




2 


1 


204 


62 


152 


61 


1 


- 


8 


8 


2 


« 


Holyoke, 




e 


- 


112 


68 


64 


56 


2 


- 


8 


3 


2 


• 


Lawrence, 




7 


2 


65 


17 


48 


15 


2 


- 


2 


1 


6 


.. 


.L^ee, . . 




2 


1 


7 


2 


5 


2 


.. 


• 


• 


. 


_ 


— 


Lowell, • 




20 


9 


1 223 


59 


85 


67 


1 


1 


9 


6 


4 


. 


Lynn, . 




- 


- 


343 


145 


198 


148 


2 


— 


. 


— 


9 


« 


Marlborough, 




4 


2 


12 


6 


7 


4 


1 


— 


• 


• 


1 


. 


Newburyport, 




2 


- 


6 


3 


8 


8 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


• 


Newton, 




5 


1 


28 


19 


9 


15 


8 


— 


_ 


— 


10 


_ 


Somerville, • 




6 


5 


64 


34 


80 


26 


3 


6 


1 


1 


4 


. 


Springfield, . 
Wllliametown, 




4 


8 


63 


37 


16 


37 


. 


- 


1 


— 


13 


• 




























District Coubtb. 


























Barnstable, First, . 


1 


- 


8 


5 


3 


5 


~ 


. 


• 


_ 


— 


v 


•• Second, . 


2 
























Berkshire, Central, 


3 


3 


6 


5 


1 


6 


• 


- 


_ 


_ 


16 


_ 


" Northern, . 


6 


3 


16 


8 


8 


8 


— 


8 


- 


_ 


3 


m 


" Southern, . 


5 


3 


1 


1 


- 


1 


_ 


• 


_ 


• 


1 


«. 


•• Fourth, 


2 


- 


21 


7 


14 


6 


.. 


1 


_ 


. 


1 


„ 


Bristol, First, 


8 


2 


37 


25 


12 


18 


6 


1 


16 


10 


10 


. 


'* Second. , 




2 


- 


98 


63 


26 


60 


2 


_ 


19 


5 


6 


« 


" Third, . 




2 


2 


24 


12 


12 


11 


• 


_ 




.. 


1 


— 


Es«ex, First, . 




10 


7 


101 


62 


49 


42 


8 


3 


8 


3 


10 


«. 


" Second, 




1 


1 


86 


19 


62 


— 


_ 


_ 


• 


_ 




«. 


Franklin, 




8 


1 


1 


1 


_. 


1 


. 


_ 


. 


— 


1 


— 


Hampden, Eastern, 
11 Western, . 


2 


2 


11 


5 


6 


4 


1 


_ 


« 


_ 




mm 


4 


— 


3 


3 


- 


8 


_ 


_ 


. 


v 


8 


m 9 


Hampshire, .... 


15 


8 


, * 


2 


2 


- 


2 


• 


2 


2 


5 


«. 


Middlesex, Central, 


8 


- 


1 8 


3 


- 


3 


• 


— 


— 


_ 


1 6 


.. 


" First Eastern, . 


18 


7 


l 251 


116 


135 


101 


7 


_ 


4 


3 


1 & 


mm 


" Becond Eastern, 


3 


2 | 


1 81 


12 


19 


7 


1 


. 






14 


— 


" Third Eastern, . 


2 


1 


1 47 


19 


28 


17 


• 2 


_ 


2 


1 


> 8 


— 


«• Fourth Eastern, 


1 


- 


i 143 


88 


103 


38 


— 


_ 


_ 




| 1 


^ 


" First Northern, . 


12 


3 


1 12 


8 


4 


7 


1 


«. 


_ 


w 


, 5 


— 


" First Southern, . 


4 


8 


1 13 


7 


4 


8 


— 


a. 


1 


1 


1 12 


— 


Norfolk, East, 


6 


— 


> 144 


45 


99 


45 


— 


_ 


1 


1 


1 4 


«. 


" Southern, 


- 


- 


67 


19 


18 


12 


6 


_ 


4 


w 


1 6 


— 


Plymouth, Second, 


4 


- 


86 


53 


33 


60 


8 


1 


2 


1 


1 2 


_ 


Third,. 


2 


1 


< 6 


3 


2 


8 


_ 


— 


2 


1 




— 


'• Fourth, 


6 


4 


4 


3 


1 


2 


1 


_ 


» 




I s 


— 


Worcester, Central, . 


33 


14 


, 529 


112 


308 


108 


4 


_ 


12 


8 


1 39 


— 


" First Eastern, . 


2 


1 


14 


10 


4 


8 


• 


2 


_ 


«» 




m . 


" Second Eastern, 


1 1 


— 


1 25 


14 


11 


14 


• 


.» 


_ 


— 


2 


^ 


•• First Northern, 


5 


8 


38 


28 


18 


20 


« 


_ 


_ 


— 


4 


— 


" First Southern, . 


2 


1 


10 


2 


8 


2 


. 


.. 


^ 


— 


2 


^ 


" Second Southern, 


8 


2 


15 


11 


4 


11 


«, 


_ 


_ 


^ 


1 4 


mm 


'• Third Southern, 


1 1 

i 


- 


, " 


13 


2 


12 


1 


74 


- 


285 


1 z 
i — 

364 


- 


Total, . 


• • 


■ 394 


148 


8,442 


2,430 


6,720 


2,086 


189 


1 1,232 

i 


- 



282 



CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 



[Oct. 



Criminal Prosecutions in Lower Courts — Continued. 

Table No. 63. — Oases begun and sentenced before Trial Justices in Year 

ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



1 










1.— Offences 

AGAINST 

thb Person. 


2. — OFFKXOB8 
AGAINST 

Pbopbbtt. 


1 
8.— Offences 

against Pub- 
lic Obdeb.btc. 


AOGREGA.TK8. 


counties. 


■ 


Sentences 
imposed. 


• 

a 

& 

2 

m 

9 

a 


Sentences 
imposed. 


i 

3 

a 


Sentences 
imposed. 


• 

s 

& 

• 

9 

a 


TS 

o 

© s 

|S 

CD 


Berkshire, 


4 


4 


1 


1 


2 


1 


7 


6 


Dukes County, 










10 


6 


19 


7 


26 


20 


66 


33 


Essex, . 










131 


81 


109 


69 


816 


627 


1,066 


767 


Franklin, 










62 


24 


86 


20 


268 


146 


371 


100 


Middlesex, . 










49 


17 


91 


18 


628 


301 


763 


896 


Nantucket, . 










- 


- 


11 


1 


4 


3 


16 


4 


Norfolk, 










108 


60 


94 


38 


781 


628 | 


983 


721 


Worcester, . 










118 


67 


121 


46 i 

i 


744 


696 ! 


983 


708 


Total, . 


472 


259 


612 


184 


3,249 


2,322 j 


4,233 


2,763 



Table No. 64. — Number of Sentences imposed by Municipal, Police ami 
District Courts, and Trial Justices, in Tear ending Sept. 30, 1896. 



counties. 



« 

J3 



a 
Id 

I* 



Barnstable, 

Berkshire, 

Bristol, . 

Dukes County, 

Essex, 

Franklin, . 

Hampden, 

Hampshire, 

Middlesex, 

Nantucket, 

Norfolk, . 

Plymouth, 

Suffolk, . 

Worcester, 

Total, 



20 

190 

676 

6 

664 

87 
306 

64 
667 

187 

166 

2,204 

408 



6,484 



Offences. 



■2* 

toe 

<i o 



e* 



16 

165 

332 

7 

422 

23 

263 

19 

678 

1 

127 

77 

2,026 

393 



4,639 



3.— Against Public Obder, 
btc. 



a 

. 

M m 

<= 8 

ES 



3 

1,660 

2,249 

11 

3,979 

122 

2,282 

626 

7,806 

1 

1,186 



11,765 
8,185 



9 p • 



19 

446 

1,246 

9 

1,271 

110 

810 

67 

2,145 

2 

470 

692 

5,837 

1,122 



< - 



22 

2,006 

3,495 

20 

5,260 

232 

8,092 

683 

9,960 

3 

1,656 

1,591 

17,692 

4,307 



o< 



9 O 



2* « 
©05 

fe c J5 



36,662 



14,286 49,798 



S8 

2,361 

4,403 

33 

6,336 

292 

3,661 

666 

11,295 

4 

1,969 

1,823 

21,822 

5,10$ 

69,821 



1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13, 



283 



Criminal Prosecutions in Lower Courts — Concluded. 

Table No. 65. — Number of Cases in which a Fine was imposed by Munic- 
ipal, Police and District Courts, and Trial Justices, in Tear ending Sept. 
SO, 1896. 



COUNTIES. 



Barnstable, 

Berkshire, 

Bristol, . 

Dukes County, 

Essex, 

Franklin, . 

Hampden, 

Hampshire, 

Middlesex, 

Nantucket, 

Norfolk, . 

Plymouth, 

Suffolk, . 

Worcester, 

Total, 



Offences. 



9 

43 



a 



So 

I Oh 



20 

160 

467 

5 

492 

28- 
275 

54 
559 

167 

142 

1,957 

322 



4,638 



p > 



12 

114 

191 

3 

179 

17 

172 

9 

385 

4 

107 

74 

1,154 

249 



2,670 



3.— Against Public Order, 
etc. 


• 
a 

C a 
P 


.35 

•8-2 


All Of- 
fences in 
this Class. 



3 

1,416 

1,371 

11 

2,641 

101 

2,012 

436 

6,650 

1 

1,064 

810 

7,157 

2,123 



25,686 



11 


14 


915 


2,331 


896 
9 


2,267 
20 


948 
61 


3,489 
162 


673 


2,685 


46 


482 


1,730 
1 


8,380 
2 


418 


1,472 


599 

4,780 

913 

12,000 


1,409 

11,937 

3,036 


37,686 



o< 



w o • 

d g V 

bo 9 • 

&£5 



< 



46 

2,605 

2,915 

28 

4,160 

207 

3,132 

545 

9,324 

6 

1,746 

1,625 

15,048 

3,607 



44,994 



Table No. 66. — Number of Cases begun in the Municipal, Police and 
District Courts, and before Trial Justices, in Each County, in the Las 
Eleven Tears. 



COUNTIES. 


1886. 


I i 
1887. 1888. J 1889. 

1 i 


i 
1890. 1891., 189*. 

i 


1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


Barnstable, . 


130 


183 


213 


187 


134 


141 


118 


123 


167 


184 


123 


Berkshire, 


1,846 


1,937 


1,753 


1,825 


1,986 


1,883 


1,879 


1,981 


1,989 


2,901 


3,530 


Bristol, . 


4,685 


4,329 


4,659 


5,478 


5,511 


4,954 


3,836 


5,049 


6,517 


5,387 


5,790 


Dukes County, 


14 


36 


39 


36 


42 


49 


48 


44 


40 


49 


55 


Essex, 


6,904 


7,619 


9,017 


9,139 


9,433 


10,030 


9,290 


8,234 


9,754 


11,952 


10,965 


Franklin, 


886 


467 


432 


444 


420 


467 


555 


633 


566 


516 


526 


Hampden, 


3,673 


8,532 


4,323 


4,709 


4,417 


3,757 


3,907 


3,862 


4,760 


5,026 


4,863 


Hampshire, . • 


563 


600 


672 


697 


718 


551 


362 


608 


924 


663 


921 


Middlesex, . 


9,291 


9,659 


10,502 


11,391 


11,630 


12,259 


11,101 


12,873 


16,221 


17,324 


17,377 


Nantucket, . 


22 


17 


49 


20 


41 


18 


30 


21 


24 


62 


15 


Norfolk, 


1,986 


2,058 


2,477 


2,373 


2,606 


2,402 


2,089 


2,275 


2,430 


2,800 


2,980 


Plymouth, 


1,701 


1,685 


1,547 


1,571 


1,564 


1,447 


1,950 


2,268 


2,095 


2,086 


2,438 


Suffolk, . 


26,186 


28,815 


32,426 


38,412 


35,941 


32,945 


22,651 


27,483 


42,416 


43,003 47,417 


Worcester, . 


6,466 


6,976 7,225 


7,270 


6,812 


6,700 


5,424 


6,870 


8,836 
95,729 


8,428 


9,475 
106,425 


Total, 


62,852 


67,863 


76,234 


83,552 


81,256 


77,568 


68,230 


72,224 


100,866 



284 



SENTENCES IN THE U. S. COUKTS. 



[Oct. 



Sentences in the United States Courts. 

For several years a table has been presented in this report, show- 
ing the number of prisoners committed to State and county prisons 
by the United States courts ; and in the table below will be found 
the same information, compiled from the returns of prison officers. 

The whole number of such prisoners committed was 39, a decrease 
of 13 from last year. Two more, however, were received at the 
State Prison and one more at the Reformatory Prison for Women 
than in 1895 ; the Massachusetts Reformatory had the same number 
in both years. Cambridge usually receives more prisoners of this 
kind than all the other prisons together ; and, of the number com- 
mitted this year, 22 were sentenced to the Cambridge jail. 

It will be noticed that Barnstable does not appear in the list, 
although prior to 1896 the jail at that place received each year a 
considerable number of prisoners under sentence from the United 
States courts. 



Table No. 67. — Number of Prisoners committed to State and County 
Prisons upon Sentences from United States Courts^ during the Tear 
ending Sept. 30, 1896. 







a 
o 
• 

■c 
a, 

• 


Reformatory Pris- 
on for Women. 


■ 

s 




Jails. 


offences. 


m 

Se 

• »• 

2 


Plttsfleld Hous4 
Correction. 


• 

a 

3 

' 8 


Cambridge. 
Dedhara. 


• 

• 



a 
• 

* 

2 


.1 ; 

B B « 


Dies for counterfeit money, having, . 




! 1 

i 

i _ 
1 

i . 

1 

! 

i _ 
i 

4 


1 
1 


1 

1 

- 


i 

i 
i 


5 

13 

1 

2 


-i 1 

-i- 

- 1 - 

i 

I 

-1 - 

-i - 
i 

i 
i ■ - 


i 


Larceny from mail, 

Letters, embezzling 

Liquor, taking, into Indian country, . 
Paseing counterfeit money 

Revenue laws, violating, . . • 
Stealing a letter, ...... 

Taking letter from poet-office illegally., 
U. 8. mall, unlawful use of, ... 




i 


i 

! 

i 

i — 

' 1 

i 2 
i 

r 
1 


- 

- 


I- 1 i 

i -> ' 

1 

i 

A 

• 

1 W 

- 1 

- 1 

. s 

- 




2 5 ! 2 


I 8 : 22 1 1 


1 1 M 




1 








1 








1 





1896.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 13. 



285 



Libraries in Prisons. 

There are not quite as many volumes in the library at the State 
Prison as at the date of the last report. The Reformatory Prison 
for Women has also less books than last year, but the Ma