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Full text of "Public health reports (1881). v. 32 pt. 2 no. 27-52, 1917"

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► 




GIFT 
from 
U.S. PUBLIC HIALni SEi:VICT:. 



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PUBLIC HEALTH 
REPORTS 

ISSUED WEEKLY 

BY THB 

UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE 



CONTAINING INFORMATION OF THE CURRENT 

PREVALENCE OF DISEASE, THE OCCURRENCE 

OF EPIDEMICS, SANITARY LEGISLATION, AND 

RELATED SUBJECTS 



VOLUME 32— PART 2 

NUMBERS 27-62 

JULY-DECEMBER, 1917 




WASHINGTON 

GOVERNMENT POINTING OFFICE 

1918 



5SP; 



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ADDITIONAL 00PIB8 

or THIS PUBUCATION MAT BE PBOCUItKD FROM 

THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

OOVEBNMEKT PRlNTIKa OiTICK 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

AT 

6 CENTS PER COPY 
V 



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.t,z 



PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 

VOL. 32 JULY 6. 1917 No. 27 

VreULENT SMALLPOX AT DOUGLAS, ARIZ. 

Acting Asst. Surg. Edward W. Adamson has reported that an 
outbreak of smallpox began in Douglas, Ariz., in May. The date of 
the first case is given as May 21. Up to June 25 there had been 
repK)rted 46 cases with 10 deaths. The virulence of the infection is 
shown by the fact that a considerable number of casds were in per- 
sons giving a history of previous successful vaccination and pos- 
sessing what appeared to be good vaccination scars. The disease, 
however, ran a mild course in most of the cases having vaccination 
scare. 

POLIOMYELITIS REPORTED IN OHIO. 

Mr. Jas. E. Bauman, Secretary of the Ohio State Board of Health, 
reports! July 5 that there were 11 cases of polfomyelitis (infantile 
paralysis) at Marlins Ferry and 6 case^ in Tease Township, both in 
Belmont County, Ohio. 

OUTBREAK OP DYSENTERY, ARKANSAS. 

Passed Asst. Surg. Preble reports that there is an outbreak of what 
appears to be baciUary dysentery in Mississippi County, Ark. Many 
fatalitu^s have occurred » but owing to the absence of records of cases 
and also of the registration ot deaths, the extent of the outbreak has 
not as yet been ascertained. The outbreak seems widely scattered 
and to have numerous foci. According to unofficial reports and 
items in the newspapers, there have been many cases also in Poinsett 
CJounty, Ark., and in Dunklin and Scott Counties, Mo. The local 
undertakers' records indicate that there were 40 deaths during May 
and June in the town of Bly theviUe and the neighboring communities. 
It is probable that there have been at least 400 cases in Mississippi 
County. Most of the cases have been in children under 5 years 
of age. 

It is reported locally that similar outbreaks have occurred in past 
years but have been less severe and caused little attention. The out- 
break this year is looked upon as being unusually virulent. The 
fatality rate appears to be about 7 per cent. The present outbreaks 
are being investigated. 

77 (1075) 

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45944 ^ 



July 6, 1917 1076 

SEWAGE DISPOSAL UNDER RURAL CONDITIONS. 

SOIL POLUmON AND THB PBACTICAL USB 09 THE L. H. 8. METHOD ffOB mKCWOBTA 
DISPOSAL IN THE COUNTST AND SUBURBS. 

By Cha8. T. Nksbttt, M. D., HeaKh Offlcer, Wflmington and New Hanover Goonty, H. C. 

In our effort to find a means for the sanitary disposal of human 
excreta where sewer connections are impossible and where sufficient 
dilution for sewage in streams can not be foimd, especial attention 
has been given to the system known as the L. R. S. method of excreta 
disposal, as this method promised to give less need for scayenging 
than any other. Suburban and rural dwellers have been encouraged to 
install these tanks and especial attention has been given by the depart- 
ment of health to designing and locating tanks for use with privies and 
with plumbing installations. The construction of many was super- 
vised by an officer of the department. In 1913 we designed for a 
local contractor a set of L. B. S. tanks to be made ol reinforced 
concrete, and since that time several hundred such tank sets Ukve 
been constructed and installed in the county, and a great number 
have been constructed for use in other sections of the South. 

Observations made on the use of these tanks during the past four 
years have led us to beheve that the L. R. S. method offers the most 
satisfactory solution of the rural excreta disposal problem that has 
yet been devised. When tanks of proper eo»»traction and properly 
located are installed either for privy use or use with plumbing in- 
stallations, we find that their continued use with proper care gives 
almost perfect results with our soiL None of the tanks in use have 
required scavenging except when connecting pipes have become 
stopped or the tank sets have been used beyond their capacity. Our 
experience during the past four years has led us to adopt in practice 
the following standards: 

The capacity of the sludge tank is determined on the basis of 3 
cubic feet for each user under privy conditions, and 5 cubic feet 
for eadi user wh^i the tanks are connected with a plumbing in- 
stallation. 

Waste from baths and kitchen sinks should not be discharged into 
the sludge or the effluent tank. The waste from the kitchen sink 
interferes seriously with septicization and the bath waste suppUes too 
much water. A great number of our tanks receive the bath waste 
and work satisfactorily, but no tank works satisfactorily that receives 
waste from a kitchen sink. It is our practice to connect the kitchen- 
aink waste into the drain from the effluent tank. 

We have observed the best results in tanks that have a relatively 
small sludge mat area. Diameters of from 30 to 36 inches at the 
water line with a depth adjusted to the capacity desired in the cylin- 
drical tanks work best. The effluent tank should be similarly de- 
signed and should not be less than one-half the capacity of the 
sludge tank. 

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1077 July 6, 1917 

Whto tanks are used with plumbing installations, the inflow pipe 
from the house should discharge by vertical drop not less than 2 
feet below the water line. The pipe discharging into the effluent tank 
from the sludge tank should rise vertically from a point not more than 
18 inches from the bottom of the tank and should discharge into the 
effluent tank not less than 18 inches below the water flne. The 
outflow from the effluent tank should rise vertically from a point not 
more than 12 inches from the bottom of the effluent tank and should 
discharge near the surface of the groimd into a tight line of tile pipe, 
or other tight conduit, leading to a contact bed located with due 
regard for the proximity of cisterns and weUs and some distance 
away from the dwelling. 

The contact beds that we are using are constructed of loose stones 
or shells in a ditch 2 feet deep by 18 inches wide, near the surface of 
which is laid a line of agricultural drain tile that is continuous with 
the effluent drain. The extent of this bed is determined by the 
amoimt of effluent to be treated. Wherever possible we persuade the 
owner to refrain from covering the bed with earth, leaving it open for 
the ingress of fresh air. 

The tanks must be thoroughly waterproof both inside and out to 
protect them from seepage from without in, and the bottoms in 
concrftt^e tanks should be made continuous and in one piece with the 
sides. If there is seepage of ground water into the tanks, the efl^ect 
will bethat of overloading. 

Both privy tanks and tanks used with plumbing installations should 
be filled with water to the level that is reached when the tank is in 
full use before beginning to use them. Two or three pails full of 
fresh horse manure should be placed in tlie sludge tank. 

Tanks used with plumbing installations should be tightly covered 
and operated without other ventilation than the house stack. Hand- 
holes should be located in the inflow pipe at the point of ingress to tho 
sludge tank and in the horizontal pipe connecting tlie two tanks to 
facilitate rodding in case of stoppage. These handholes should be 
supplied with stoppers that can be tightly sealed. 

Privy tanks should be constructed so that the seat with its lid shall 
rest upon the top of the tank itself and the lid shoukl be made to 
close automaticaUy when not in use and to cover the hole as closely 
as possible to prevent the ingress of flies. A vent not less than 3 
inches in diameter should be carried from tho tank through the roof 
of tho privy house, and this vent should be screened to prevent the 
possibility of flies finding their way down tho vent. Privy tanks 
should be kept filled with water to tho levol of the outflow at all 
times and when flies gain access kerosene should be applied to the 
surface of the mat to prevent fly breeding and feeding. The kerosene 
should be sprinkled on the mat in order that as little of it as possible 

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July 6, 1917 



1078 



may reach the underside of the mat surface. In all other respects 
privy tanks are installed in the same manner as tanks for use with 
plumbing installations. 

We have attempted to gain an idea of the extent to which the use 
of these 'tanks protects the soil from widespread pollution. The 
method used was suggested by Prof. Earle B. Phelps, of the United 
States PubUc Health Service. The data secured is, of course, incon- 
clusive and appUcable only to the soils of this section. We endeav- 
ored to make the tests as severe as possible, taking samples of ground 
water only in such locations as were so saturated that water could 
be obtained by driving a pipe not more than 15 feet into the ground 
and attaching the pump to the top. These shallow-driven pumps 
were pumped only to the extent of determining that a supply of 
water had been reached and were then permitted to stand two or 
three days before samples were taken. When the samples were taken 
only enough water was pumped off to clear the pipes of that which 
was either put into them to start the pump or that which had re- 
mained standing in the pipes since they were last pumped. Half the 
samples were taken at plants using privy tanks and the remainder at 
plants using septic tanks with interior {dumbing installations. By 
reference to the table it will be noticed that in all cases the contact 
beds were within 10 feet of the eflSuent tank, and none of these plants 
had been in use less than six months. 

Table 1 gives the essential physical data of the plants and Table 2 
the data of the test wells and results of examinations. The B. eoli 
are reported ag positive (-h) or negative (0) in the various dilutions. 

Table I. —Description qf plants. 

PRIVY TANKS. 



PUntNo. 


DaU. 


8oil.i 


Plant 
inote. 


iUmarkB. 


1. 

2. • 

3. ■•-... 
^-.""^ 
5../*- . 
6 "■••- 


S«pt. 18,1»1« 

do 

Dec. 15,1916 

do 

do 

- Dec. 20,1916 

D«(. 22,1916 


8/C 

sc 

Soft 8C. . . 
s 


Mos. 
24 
24 
18 
24 + 
24 
6+ 
24 


Dehrsdo School (boy«). 

Railroad section hotiiie. 

R*dden:e. 

KinderiTjrten. Plant overloaded. 


8 


Delpodo School (girls). 


7.'."!;;; • 


SC 

8C 


East Wilmington School. 
Residence. 



SEPTIC TANKS. 




Now.-: 



Son poorly drained. Samples from near a drainage ditoli, 
Nurserj farm. Soil heavily manured. Drainage poor. 
Drainage poor. 
Drainage poor. Drainage ditch nearby. 

Swampy ground and undergrowth. 

S-aand; C-clay; L-heavy loam; S/C-eand underlaid with day; SC-aand mod day. 
distance from effluent tanlks to nttrlfleatkm bed generally 10 feet. 




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1079 



July 6, 1917 



Table 2. — Remits of examinations of ground water from test wells driven near nitrifica- 
tion oeas of privy tanks. 



Plant No. 



2 

3 

4 

5 

« 

7 

8 

9 

W 

U 

/I 
12 ,... 

13 

14 



WeU 
No. 



Distance 

from 
contact 

bed. 



FC€t. 


10 
20 


15 
30 


10 
20 


10 
20 


10 
20 


10 
20 


10 
20 


10 
20 


10 
20 


10 
20 



10 

' 20 


10 
20 


10 
20 


10 
20 



Deptb. 



Fe€L 
9 
7 
7 
8 
8 
8 
10 
10 
10 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
11 
14 
10 
10 
10 
10 
12 
13 
13 
10 
10 
10 
7 
7 
8 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
10 
10 

7 
7 
6 



Bacteria per c.c. 
oh plates in- 
cubated at— 



aO". 38*. 



183 
72 
39 
2,200 
1,700 
1,100 
145 
120 
120 
60 
45 
60 
80 
60 
42 
160 

m 

145 

600 

800 

600 

»0 

300 

300 

1,200 

500 

. 700 

HI) 

60 

65 

110 

90 

150 

250 

90 

160 



B.coll- 



10 c. c. 



60 

30 

10 

40 

20 

20 

80 

26 

8 

1,200 

600 

450 

85 

40 

30 

5 

3 

12 

40 

25 

15 

90 

15 

110 

250 

350 

300 

100 

130 

80 

800 

120 

150 

15 

30 ' 
10 
00 , 
»K) 
300 

120 



1 c. c. 0.1 c. c. 







































+ 

















+ 


+ 


+ 





-f 





+ 





















































-»- 


+ 








-f 


+ 


-K 





+ 





+ 





+ 





+ 





+ 





+ 


-f 


+ 





f 





























+ 











-f 


















In presenting the results of this investigation it would be highly- 
desirable to present a detailed investigation of the same sort on 
ground waters taken from the immediate neighborhood of pit privies. 
There being no pit privies in the county, such samples are not readily^ 
obtainable. We have, however, some striking evidence that the 
sandy clay soil in this section does not present a filter medium j^hat 
will protect ground waters from fecal pollution. 

Tliere are in this city and in the county a great number of shallow- 
driven wells. Of these we have examined bacteriologically about 
seven hundred. The only wells of this kind that we have found 
free from poUution are those which are located from two to five 
hundred yards away from any concentrated source of pollution, 
stables, privies, pig styes, etc. The l>acteria counts in water from 
these wells not so located are extremely high and the presumptive 
test for colon bacilli gives unfailing positive results. The drilling of 

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Jalj6,191T 1080 

deep xrells in the city and near dwdlings in the county must be 

conducted with great care and these wells must find in the coiu^e 
of their descejit a perfectly impervious protecting stratimi of lime- 
stone through which the casing must be carried and into which an 
outer casing must be imperviously seated, in order to assure a con- 
tinuous supply of impoUuted water even from these deep sources. 

Before the introduction of the use of septic tanks at the rural 
schools in this county which were supplied with water from shallow- 
driven pumps, every such pump was found to produce polluted 
Water. Since the introduction of the use of septic tanks at the 
schools, it has been necessary only to move the driven pump to a 
new location to obtain a supply of ground water that is free from 
pollution and that remains free. In two instances shallow-driven 
wells that were polluted when surface and pit privies were being 
used at schools and which we could not have removed, cleared up 
after the installation of the tanks and are now producing impolluted 
water. 

These facts lead us to deduce that where a concentrated solution 
of excreta is apphed to the soil, as is the case with pit privies and 
badly kept surface privies, there is more or less widespread poDutiou 
of groimd water, and wherever the protecting stratum is imperfect 
there is pollution of the deeper water deposits. The ground water 
about a dwelhng or schoolhouse is very generally polluted in this 
section irrespective of the presence of privies and stables, as in other 
soils in other sections of the country. This fact must be taken into 
consideration in connection with the investigations herewith sub- 
mitted. It is remarkable that any water samples taken in the loca- 
tions from which these samples were obtained shoidd prove to be 
unpolluted in any of the quantities used for investigation. 

Perhaps the only deductions that are warranted from this investi- 
gatioQ are that the use of these L. R. S. tanks has made no material 
addition to the normal soil pollution about the buildings, and, in the 
light oi the experience quoted above in connection with unprotected 
^excreta disposal, that the amount of septicization accomplished in 
them produces an effluent very much less liable to pollute soil than 
any. other process of treatment that it is possible to use with se 
UtUe expense and trouble. In our experience we have had no reason 
to regret having encouraged the widespread use of the L. R. S. 
tanks. There have been, of course, numerous complaints about their 
action, but these complaints have invariably arisen from the st^idi 
iiduch results from leaving privy tanks open, failure to keep the water 
at the proper level in the tanks, and failiure to provide proper ven- 
tilation for the tanks. Trouble with tanks used in connection with 
phimbing installations has invariably arisen from two sources — over- 
crowding and the admission of kitchen sink waste to the sludge tank. 



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1081 July 6, 1917 

In a number of instances, contact beds have been badly located, the 
tend^icy bemg to locate the contact bed too near the tank and, as 
foflows, too near the dwelling. This is evidently in order to save 
the expense of installing a line of tight pipe to convey the effluent 
to a more favorable plac^ of deposit. Notwithstanding this, no com- 
plaints have reached this office in which the contact bed was the 
source of complaint. 



ANOPHELES PUNCTIPENNIS. 

A NOTE ON rrS ABILITY TO SERVE AS A HOST FOR PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM. 

By M. Bkton Mitzmain, Tecbnical Assistant, United States Fublic Health Service. 

The snsceptibihty of Anopheles punctipennis Say to infection with 
the parasites of subtertian malaria has heretofore not been estab- 
lished in studies in connection with malarial investigations by the 
United States Public Health Service. In a previous intensive 
study/ negative results were obtained, following attempts at trans- 
mission through repeated bitings of two human subjects by mos- 
quitoes previously given multiple feedings of blood of gametocyte 
carryifig patients: these experiments also included the dissection of 
219 specimens, all of which wove negative. 

On account of tlio apparent ease with which Anopheles punctipen- 
nis coilld he infe'jt( vl with the parasites of tertian malaria, it might 
be infoiTcd that this mosquito exhibited a specific predilection similar 
to tliat rc}M)rtcd fen- Anopheles qiLadnmaculaius and Anopheles 
crucicuis by local invesilii:atoi's. In a further series of experiments 
recently conducted in Xew Orleans, Anopheles pundl pennis has 
proved ea.^ily infe?tible with Plasmodium falciparvm Welch. Of 
one scrie^s of 16 mosquitoes, given a single feeding, one became 
infectc:i; in a second gi'oup of 36, given a variable number df feed- 
ings, 15 infections resulted; in the 'two groups, 27 per cent of infec- 
tions were observed. Of 8 examples of Anopheles quadrimaculatus 
used as controls, 4 developed infections. 



» Anophfles punctipennis Say: Its relation to Iho transmission of malaria. Report of experimental 
data relative to subtertian malarial fever, by M. Bruin Mitzmain, United States Public Health Reports, 
Feb. n. J91fi. 



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July e, 1917 



1082 



The following table summarizes the positive findings; and gives the 
developmental period in each mosquito: 



Date or 
dissection. 


Devekm- 
nMntal 

period— 
(days). 


Oct. 28,1916 
Nov. 15.1916 
Nov. 18,1916 
Nov. 19,1916 


11 
13 
15 
17 


Nov. 20,1916 

Nov. 25,1916 

Dec. 3,1916 

Do 


19 
24 
31 
31 


Do 

Doc. 24.1916 


3a 

37 


Dec, 25,1916 


53 


Dec. 25,1916 


47 


Dec. 29,1916 


57 


Jan. 1,1917 


50 



Btaee of devetopraent. 



18 oocysts; sire 20-22 n finely pigmented. 

8 oocysts without protoplagmic dilTorentiation: size approximately 25 nTS/i. 

Approximately 250 oocysts in all stages preceding the sporoblastic. 

8 oocysts, 2 of wldch still retaining pigment, remainder granular without 
sporoblasis. 

Approximately 200 oocysts in all stages up to sporoblastic. 

43 oocysts; size 25^0 n, mostly with malarial pigment, a few with sporoblasts. 

About 120 oocysts, hJalf of them retaining pigment, only 1 with sporoblasts. 

Approximately 250 ooevsU, oC which 50 were quit« small (I5>20;i) with mala- 
rial pigment; remainaer various sizes, but more matured. Few with sporo- 
blasts. 

30 oocysts in various stages; few, however, with ygung sporobbists. 

1 oocyst rcprespntcd by shrunken capsule, without content^}; oocyst appa- 
rently full sized and firmly attached to gut wall. 

5 oocysts- 4 with contents cxi)ened, 1 with sporoblnsf dc\'clopment barely 

commencing (only 4 segments discernible). Remainder of body of oocyst 

undifforenliated and grannlar. Size, TO /* x 33 m- 
3 oocysts with ccuueuts nipturci all torn from gut wall daring diss x?t ion. No 

evidence of sporozoitcs m mounting liquid surroun ling the gut wall or in 

the glands. 

2 ruptured shrunken oocyst raembranes on p<Kjtcrior end of mid gtit. No 
inoicatioos of sporobl ists or sp jt jzoite^. 

1 oocyst, 22 25m, ^f>ntiininic griuul'^s only. And 4 ruptured oocj^st capsules 
still attached to stomach wall. No sporozoites present. 



One control specimen of Anopheles quadrimacnlatus which proved 
infoctod was oxamincd on the twelfth day aft^r biting the blood donor. 
The gut wall was coverexl by at least 200 oocysts. These were not 
over 35 m in size, the majority exhibiting malarial pigment ai^d aver- 
aging 20-25 M in size. No mature oocyst was seen, and the glands 
were devoid of sporozoites. 

The second control Anopheles gtuidrimaculatus found infected was 
examined 40 days after biting the blood donor. On the gut wall of this 
specimen were seen 3 oocysts and 3 shnmken capsules devoid of 
sporozoites or other bodies. The oocysts measured 59 m to 67 m in 
size, with undifferentiated granules lacking evidence of sporoblast 
development. A prolonged search was made of the mounting fluid 
surrounding the gut wall, but sporozoites were not found. The six 
lobes of the sahvary glands were hkewise uninfected. 

Another specimen of Anopheles quadrimaculatus was found infected 
on the fortieth day of development. Here were seen three empty 
oocyst capsules and three large oocysts, one of which measm^d 59 
by 65 M and the other two were as much as 67 m in diameter. The 
development of these oocysts was apparently abortive, as sporoblasts 
were absent and sporozoites were not present on stomach wall or in 
the six gland lobes. 

The fourth specimen of this species to be found infected was dis- 
sected 54 days after its initial blood meal. The only indication *of its 
infection was the presence of two apparently full-sized oocyst en- 
velopes devoid of contents except for a few sporoblasthke bodies in 



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1083 July 6, 1917 

one of them. The glands were negative, except for a moderate inva- 
mon of sporozoites m the mid lobe of one gland. 

Throughout this series no mature forms of oocysts or gland sporo- 
zoites were encountered, except in the one instance noted. This is 
ascribed to the relatively low temperature in which development took 
place rather th&n to other factors. 

Discussion and summary. 

TTie experimental determination of the r61e of Anopheles punctir 
pennis as a potential host for the common forms of malaria has been 
established, as ascertained by King.^ No additional findings have 
been developed whereby previously reported negative results with 
this anopheline and Plasmodium falciparum might be accounted for. 

In the present series, 52 specimens of Anopheles punctipennis were 
fed upon the blood of cases of subtertian malaria, and 14 infections 
lasolted. Of 8 specimens of Anopheles qwdrim4icvlitus\ used as 
coiiti*ols under identical conditions, 4 became infected. 

Anopheles punctipennis, while highly susceptible to infection with 
Pl%6modMLm vivaXf exhibits no especial predilection toward this 
apttciee; but it has been shown to be a sufficiently receptive host of 
PUtsmodium falciparum to be held of sanitary importance. 

From the writings of Beyer and his coworkers,' Craig,* and others, 
it has been concluded that a specific relation exists betweea American 
anophehnes and the several varieties of malaria. The transmission 
of tertian and quartan malaria has been held to be effected by Ano- 
fheUa qwdrimaculatuSf while to Arhopheies crucians has been ascribed 
the incidence of subtertian malaria. Craig concluded that: ^'The 
tbeorrations noted explain cleariy why certain localities suflter more 
avrerely than others from certain types of malarial infections. Given 
a locality in which only Anopheles crucians occurred and we could 
hmrm nothiag but estivo-autumnal infections; but if Anopheles quad- 
fimmmlrtfus were the only Anophdes present, we mig^t have either 
tertian or quartan infections, but no estivo-autumnal malaria.'^ 

The present status of the common American anophelines with 
reference to their susceptibihty to infection with the several species 
ol malarial parasites is as follows: 

Anopheles quadrim^iculatus may serve as a host for all three para- 
site of malaria. 

Anopheles puncUpenms and Anopheles crucians are susceptible to 
infection with Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. 

*' King (1014): Erparii—itt on tbt derelopiiieiit of aftlaiia pwasites In tbree Ameiioan species of ano- 
pheles Tbe Journal ol Ezperimeatal Medicine, June, 1916, volume 23, No. 6, pp. 703-716. 

• Befer, Potbier, Coaret, and I^mann (1902): Rxperimental Inyestigations with zoaloria in conoeetioo 
with the mosquitoes of New Otleans. New Orleans Medical and Surgical Journal, vol. 50, -No. i; 
January, 1002. 
» Craig (1»14): The prophylaxis of malaria with speotel reference to the military service. War Depait- 
i Bulletin No. 0» August, 1914, pp. 43-44. ^ i 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 



No health department^ State or heal, can effectively prevent or control disease mthoui 
knowledge of when, where, and under wJiai conditions cases are occurring. 



UNITED STATES. 



CURRENT STATE SUMMARIES. 
California Report for the Week Ended June 30, 1917. 

The California State Board of Health reported concerning the 
status of preventable diseases in California for the week ended June 
30, 1917, as follows: Of cerebrospinal meningitis, 2 cases occurred 
in San Francisco, 1 case in Stockton, and 1 in Santa Clara County. 
One case of poliomyelitis was notified at Los Angeles. Diphtheria 
increased a little, 34 cases having beort notified, 12 of these in Los 
Augeles, 7 in San Francisco, and 4 in Sacramento. Ten ca?es of 
smallpox were reported, 7 in Fresno County, 1 each in Oakland, 
Los Angeles, and Needles. Eighteen cases of typhoid fever were 
notified, 1 each in Alameda, Martinez, Glendale, Los Angeles, Placer 
County, Sacramento, San Diego, Stockton, vSanta Barbara, and 
King City, 3 in Santa Clara County, 5 in San Francisco. Scarlet 
fever showed a slight increase of cases over the previous week. 
Cases of measles, mumps, and whooping cougli continued to decreafe^ 
in numbers. 

The details of notifiable disease cases reported in the State during 
the week ended June 23 are as follows: 

Cerebrospiual meningitis 4 I Piieumonia 31 

C'hioken pox 74 j Scarlet fever 56 

Diphtheria 32 j Smallpox 4 

Dysentery 15 Syphilis 19 

Erysipelae 9 | Tetanus 1 

German measles 26 j Trachoma 1 

Gonococcus infection 23 , Tuberculosis 119 

Malaria 2 Typhoid fever 19 

Measles 358 ! WTiooping cough 68 

Mumps 145 1 

(1084) 

Digitized by vJOOQIC 



1085 

CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS. 



July 6, 1917 



Ccmnecfticiit 

Collaborating Epidemiologist Black reported June 27, 1917, that 
cases of cerebrospinal meningitis were present in Connecticut as fol- 
lows: Two cases at Camp Dewey and one case each among the 
militia at Hartford and Norwich. 

Stete Reports for May, 1917. 



Place. 


lit 


Place. 


New 

cases 

reported. 


California: 

Abmedft Ommty 


1 

1 

1 
3 


Iowa— Continued. 

Pottawattnraie Comity.^ ..........*. 


1 


Contra Costa Caantv 


Total. 




Los AogeJes Coamy^ 


4 




New York: 

AU)ftT>y Co^inty 




Bm Fnndseo County- 
Ban Francisco 


1 




Erie County 


9 


Total 





Greene County 


1 






3 




3 

1 
2 


Rensselaer County 


1 


Marion County '. 


Schenectady County 


1 


Kanflolph Cpifniy 


Steuben Cooocv 


1 


8t. Joecph County 


Sutf oik County. 


1 




New York Citv 


60 


Tot4l 


6 


Total 






78 


^Fae:© County 


2 

1 


Wyoming: 

Campbell County 






Polk County 


1 









Oregon Report for AprU, 1917. 

During the month of April, 1917, 1 case of cerebrospinal menin- 
gitis was reported at Portland, Orog. 

Ctty Reports for Week Ended June 16, 1917. 



Place. 



Oas«». 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



micnnore, JAa...k.. 

Berkeley. Col 

Bingbamton, N. Y. 

Boston, Mass 

Bridgeport, Conn. . . 

Canton, Ohio 

Chicago, 111. 
ClDcinnati, ( 
Oivalaiid. Ol 
Da}-ton, Ohio.. 

Detroit. Mich 

Dubuque, Iowa.... 

Dtihitb, Mhin 

Dunkirk, N.Y.... 
Eliiabeth,N.J.... 

Erie, Pa 

Oahreston, Tex 

Hartford, Conn... 
Tndianapolfe. Ind. , 
Lawreooe, Mass... 



I^xington, Ky 

Los Anfetes, Cal 

Milwaukee, Wis 1 

Minneapolis, Minn 

Newark, N. J 

NewYork, N. Y 

Niagara Falls, N. Y 

Omaha, Nebr 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburch, Pa 

PittsfieM, Mass. 

Richmond, Va 

Rochester, N. Y 

St. Louis, Mo 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

San Diego, Cal 

South Bethlehem, Pa 

Springfleld , Mass 

Toledo, Ohio 

Washington, D.C 



Digitized by 



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July 6. 1017 



1086 



DIPHTHERIA. 
Massachusetts — LoweO. 

CoUaborntiug Epidemiologist Kelley reported that during the pe- 
riod from Juno 1 to 27, 1917, 52 cases of diphtheria were notified at 
Lowell, Mass. During the month of May 47 cases were reported in 
the same city. 

Set* also Diphtheria, mcaHlcs, scarlet fever, and tuborculosis, page 1094. 

DYSENTERY. 

Arkansas — Mississippi County — ^Bacillary Dysentery. 

Passed Asst. Surg. Preblo reported June 30, 1917, the occurrence 
of a disease outbreak, regarded as bacillary dysentery, mainly 
among children, in Mississippi County, Ark. The same affection 
has been reported present in nearby counties in Arkansas and Mis- 
souri. 

ERYSIPELAS. 

City Reports for Weeic Ended June 16, 1917. 



riace. 


Cases. Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Alanip*lo , Cal 


1 1 

1 

1 

1 


KansasCUv. Mo 

Lawrcnc<». Xla^js 


2 




Ann \rtH)r. Mirh 


1 


Ballii.u) f Mil . .. .. 


Ix>s Aniroh'S Cal 


3 


1 


B») 'on. M isN 


Melrotie, Mass 


1 


Hui; lUi N V 


4 1 

1 

21 ' 1 
1 


Mjlwanicpe. Wis 

Newark. N.J 

New York, N.Y 

Niajj-ira Falls, N. Y 

rhilad^lphia. l*a 


4 
5 

2 

7 
15 

i 




Hiith't \'i\ 




n i ..' ♦ III 


10 


iUv iivciti, « »hio 




i'U ^ .>1 .1'.l. (>hn> 


2 

1 




(Ill : ii VJa.^ 


PittslmrRh, Pa 

Provi<Ionc^. U. I 

Koarlmp Ta ... 


2 


|),-i' i Mu!i 


r 5 

2 

1 

2 • 

1 

1 


1 


I»m1 .(I- Minn . 




KLm HI 


Richmond. Va 


1 


K"- . I'l 


; RcKhr.for. N. Y 

St. Loiu-, \Io 


i 

13 

1 
1 




Kl'. • Mi t 


4 


yor\ Wo ih. Trx 


San Dioco, Cal 


!K 


Ii , H lui, ' I'a 




San Frunt'isLO, Cal 




Hit '-.' il < 'Mn 


2 

2 

1 


SvniMiso, N. Y 


....,..,.. 


Jv.^ > » ilv, N. J 

Kalnin i/v>o, Mifh 


1 Troy. N. Y 




2 







LEPROSY, 
aty Report for Week Ended June 16, 1917. 

Dnrinp the week ended June 16, 1917, one case of leprosy was 
reporlrd in New York, N. Y. 



Digitized by 



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1087 

MALARIA. 
OaHfornia R^»ort for May, 1917. 



July 6, 1M7 



FlM*. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


Newcaaee 
reported. 


Catifornia: 

AkmedAOomitj— 

Berkeley 




California— Continued. 
Ban Joaquin County- 
Stockton 




Butte C<ffl]ii^ .. r 


BhaiftA npinity . . , , . . , 




Fresno County— 

Iteedley 


Reddinff .'. 




Sierra County 




Qleim County— 
Orland 


Sutter County ....• 




Trinity County 




Lo0 Angeles County— 

l/os Angela* 


Tulare County 




Tuolumne County 




Nevada Couiity 


Yolo County 




Rocklin 


Yuba County 


2 


Total 




Ban Francisco County— 

San Franciaoo 


33 











aty Reports for Week Ended Jane 16, 1917. 



Place. 


C«MS. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Qases. 


Deaths. 


Berkeley.Cal 


1 

12 
3 

1 
1 




Memphis, Tenn 




1 


Binninf ham, Ala . 





Morrfstown, N. J 


I 
2 




Boston, Maa 




New Orleans. La 




1m( Orange, N J '.. 




Richmond, va 


1 


l^Ang^]^ Cal 




• 













MEASLES. 

See Diphtheria, meaeles, scarlet lever, and tuberculosis, page 1094. 

PELLAGRA. 

CaHfomia Report for May, 1917. 

During the month of May, 1917, three cas3s of pellagra wore 
reported \a California: one case each in San Bernardino County, out- 
side of San Bernardino, one case in San Bernardino, and one case in 
San Diego. 

Oty Reports for Week Ended Jme 16, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Coses. 


Deaths. 




9 


1 


Nashville, Terai 




3 


Gbarleston,S C 


New Orleans, La 


1 


2 


fSMtoea, Ma<w 


1 


Norfolk, Vft 


1 


H Paso, Tex 


1 
1 

1 
1 
3 


Savannah, Oa 


4 


1 


Port Wirth, Tex 




Somerville. Mass 


1 
1 
1 

2 




ImichlMire,' Va. 




Taunton Mass 




Wemph^ff, ^Min. 




Washington, D. C 




lCobife,X]m. 




WUmington, N. C 













PLAGUE, 

CftUfomia — Alameda County — Plague-Infected Squirrels Found. 

Passed Asst. Surg. Williams reported that during the period from 
June 13 to 23, 1917, eight plague-infected ground squirrels were found 
in Township 2, within a radius of 6 miles to the east and northeast 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



July 6, 1917 



1088 



PLAGUE— Continued. 

of Altamont, Alameda County, Cal. One of the infected squirrels was 
found on the Amelia Webber ranch, one on the Annie Owen i:anch, 
one on Flynn Brothers ranch, three on the Frank Floyd ranch, one 
on the John Egan ranch, and one on the M. J. Crocker ranch. 

California — San Benito County — Plague-Infected Squirrel Found. 

Passed Asst. Surg. Williams reported that on June 19, 1917, a 
plague-infected ground squirrel was found on the B. D. Sindel ranch, 
3 miles southeast of Paicines, San Benito County, Cal. 

PNEUMONIA. 
City Reports for Week Ended June 16» 1917. 



Place. 



Baltimore, Md 

BinghamtOD, N. Y 

Boston, Mass 

Braddock, Pa 

Brockton, Mass 

Chelsea, Mass 

Chicago, 111 

Chicopee, Mass 

Clevelanq. Ohio 

Dayton, Ohio 

Detroit, Mich ^ 

Dubuque, Iowa 

J)uluth, Minn 

Fall River, Mass.: 

!• itchburg, Mass 

Flint, Mich 

Haverhill, Mass 

Jackhon, Mich 

Kalamazoo, Mich 

Kansas City, Mo , 

LawTence. Mass 

Los Angeles, Cal 



Cases. 


Deaths. 


4 


n 


2 
25 




8 


4 
1 
3 






2 


HO 


68 


1 
22 




23 


3 


2 


8 


16 


1 


1 


5 


1 


3 


1 


1 


1 


5 


3 


1 

1 
C 
1 








10 


1 
7 




8 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Lowell. Mass 


1 
2 
1 

2 

1 

i 

3 
2 
59 




Lynn, Mass 




Milden, Mass 


"• 


Manchester, N. H 


2 


Medford, Mass 




Meln^e, Mass 


1 


Newark, N.J 


3 


New Bedford. Mass 


2 


Pasadena, Cal 




Philadelphia, Pa 


26 


Pittsburgh. Pa 

Pittsfield, Mass 


^t 


16 


Reno, Ncv l 




Rochester, N. Y < 12 

San Diego, Cal ' 1 

San Francisco, Cal ' 3 

Saginaw, Mich 1 


3 

1 
3 


Sandusky. Ohio ' 2» 

Sc-henectadv, N. Y i 4 


2 


South Rethlchem, Pa 1 




Springfield, Mass ' 5 

Worcester, Mass ' 4 


4 







POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS). 

Ohio— Belmont County. 

The State Board of Health of (31iio reported July 5, 1917, the ocwiT^ 
renco of 17 cases of pohomyehtis in Belmont County, Ohio; 11 of 
them at Martins Ferry and 6 in Tease Township. 

Stote Reports for May, 1917. 



Place. 



Xcw cases 
I reported. 



California: 

Kanta Crur County- 
Santa Cruz 


1 


Tulare County 


1 






Total 


2 






Indiana: 

Jackson County 


1 


Iowa: 

C-arroll Coiiiitv •.. 


1 


Fayel tc County 


1 






Total 


2 







riace. 



New cases 
I reported. 



New York: 

Dull licss County 

Eric County 

Fulton County 

Saratoga Comity 

lister County 

Westchester County 
New York City 

Total 



10 



10 



Digitized by VjOOQlC 



1089 



July 6, 191T 



POUOMTELrnS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS)-<:k)ntlnued. 
Oregon Bepori for April, 1917. 

During the montii of April, 1917, one case of poliomyelitis was re- 
ported in Clackamas Comity, and one case in Portland, Oreg. 

City Reports for Weeic Ended Jane 16, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


BnMwl:, Ffr......,-.T 


1 

1 


fl 1x18 Anceles, Gal 




1 


TfiiflUo « . T 


::..;::.:. NwarklTj^::::::::::...: 




fMrm ni 


:... New York. N. Y 




nmAiati, Alifi> 


Port«^mmith* N, TT 




T^rrnw*. wh 


SpringOeld, kass 


1 


Lima Ohio 


1 U 'mntoo,N. J 











RABIES IN ANIMALa 
City Report for Weelc Ended June 16, 1917. 

During the week ended June 16, 1917, one case of rabies in animals 
was reported in Detroit, Mich. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER. 

Nevada. 

During the period from June 1 to 20, 1917, cases of Rocky Moun- 
tain spotted fever were notified in Hmnboldt County, Nev., as fol- 
lows: One case each at Winnemucca, Rebel Creek, and VThiskey 
Creek. 

Wyoming Report for May, 1917. 

During the month of May, 1917, one case of Rocky Mountain 
spotted fever was reported in Gillette County, one case in Carbon 
County, one case in Sweetwater County, three cases in Natrona 
Chanty, and two cases in Washakie County, Wyo. 

Oregon Report for Aprfl, 1917. 

During the month of April, 1917, one case of Rocky Mountain 
spotted fever was reported in Grant County and one case in Jefferson 
County, Oreg. 

SCARLET FEVER. 

See Diphtheria, meades, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1094. 

SMALLPOX. 

Arizona — ^Douglas — Virolent SmaHpoz. 

Acting Asst. Surg. Adamson reported that during the period from 
May 21 to June 25, 1917, 46 cases of smallpox, with 10 deatlis, were 
notified at Douglas, Ariz. 



Digitized by 



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July 0, 1017 



1090 



SMALLPOX—CofuUnued. 

DHsoifl— Cairo. 

Acting Asst. Surg. Barrows reported that during tho week ended 
June 23, 1917, two cases of smallpox were notified at Cairo, IIL, 
making a total of 31 cases reported since January 1, 1917. 

Minnesota. 

CoUaborating Epidemiologist Bracken reported that during the 
week ended June 30, 1917, throe new foci of smallpox infection were 
reported in Minnesota, cases of the disease having been notified as 
follows: Bigstone Comity, Ortonville, 1; Renville County, Franklin, 
1 ; Stevens County, Donnely Township, 1. 

State Reports for May, 1917. 





Now 
cases re- 
ported. 




Vaccination history of cases. 


Plaoe. 


Deaths. 


! 

1 


Number 
novrr suc- 
cessfully 
vatiinaled. 


VftO'inaiiou 
b 1*^1 cry not 
ohiMiri'Hi or 
uniH Tt^in. 


CuIifornU: 

Aliini«*<lr\ Cotmty 






1 
1 
3 
1 


AIujiuhIu 






Iiiit^Ti^I Count v.. 


1 


Kl (Viitro 








Iah Ant'r!'"-* Count y— 

I'dllloilU 









4 

1 
I 




Marin < <;nn:\ - 

Saii^ali'o . . 


' 






San H<r itar'lino County 


i ( 




1 


I 


Stilt t'l CUuii County ...... 






I 


8ba'*ta(VMuity— 

KtMlMiiij,' 


1 


1 
1 




SoUnoComuv— 

Vallojo 


1 1 ■ 






I 




Total 


16 






14 


2 











New Yf»rk: 

Ml iiwy County 


8 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 

13 
1 


1 




5 
3 

1 


3 


Ch iiit.utouti Countv 


1 






I>ut( lic^N County 


1 


1 




h'tic Ciiiint V 


t 


X 


Mont k'omcry County 






1 


I 


N;i*<.'sau Countv 




1 




Tiopn County 




i 

6 




Wa'-hinj'ton County 




1 


« 


Wcvtchp>t^r County ..•«.. 




1 




New N'ort Citv . . 


1 




1 


I 







1 




Total 


33 




1 


3 


17 


12 









Digitized by 



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1091 

SMALLPOX— ConHnued. 
Miscdlaneons State Reports. 



July e, 1917 



PlAce. 



Oases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Indina (Mav 1-31): 
Macklord County... 

Boaoe County 

CkT County 

mbartOountr. 

Bflbntaln County.... 

Qibeon County*^ 

Qtant County 

Qreeoe County 

Hancodc County 

Hendricks County. . . 

Howard County 

HunUx^ton County . . 

JiMkion County 

liy County 

Knox County 

Lacransc County.... 

Lakr County 

Lapofte County 

Lawrence County 

Madison County 

Marion County 

Morgan County 

^vkeCounty 

Vokakl County 

UipWy County 

BmUvM Comty. 

Tippectnoo County.. 

Tipwo County 

Vanderburc County. 

Vermilion County. . . 

Vigo County......... 

Wirren County 

Wirrick County 

Wells County 



Total. 



low* (May 1-31): 

Adair County 

Apponooso County.. 

AudufKW County 

Benton County 

Bhfkhawk County. . 

CWhonn County 

OmtoII County 

Cedar County 

Cerro Gordo County . 

Cherokee County 

^awford County.... 

Dalia* County 

^ Moines (Wity. . 
Jjjnklinc^wnty.... 

"Dtiirif County 

g*Qll7tiin County... 

Harrison ^^>nty — 

^ttuyO^iy 

JtHtiJoxi County.... 



36d 



Iowa (May 1-31)— Continued. 

Johnson County 

Lee County 

Linn County 

Bfahaska County 

Mills County 

Mitchell County 

Monona County 

Osceola Coimty. 



PageCxmnty 

Plymouth County. 

Polk County 

PottawaHamie County. 

Riuf^old County 

Sac County 

Scott County 

Shelby County 

Sioux County 

Tama County 

Van Buren County 

Wapello County 

Webster County 

Winneshiek County 

Woodbury County 

Wright County 



Total. 



Nevada (May 1-31): 
Humboldt County.. 



North Dakota (May 1-31): 

Bowman C«uniy 

• Biu-ke County 

Foster County 

(lOlden Valley County. 
Orand Forks County. . 

OriRits County 

Hettinger County 

McKenzie County 

Morton County 

Mountrail County 

Nelson (3ounty 

Pembina County 

Bamsey County 

Richland County 

Stutsman County 

Wells County 

Williams County 



Total. 



Wyoming (May 1-31): 

Campbell County 

Sweetwater County.. 
Albany CJoimty 



Total. 



43 



Oregon Report for April, 1917. 

During the month of April, 1917, 23 cases of smallpox were reported 
in Clatsop County, Oreg., and 4 cases in Portland, Oreg. 

78 



Digitized by 



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Jaljr 6, 1»17 1092 

SMALLPOX--Ck)utiniied. 
City RepOTis f«r Week EMed June 16» 1917. 



Pteee. 


Ctms. 


Deaths. 


1 Ptooe. 


Cms. 


Deaths. 


Akron, Ohio 


13 

1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
9 
1 

10 
1 
2 
1 

8 
1 
3 
1 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 




1 

1 Indianapolis, Ind 


9 

18 
8 

13 
3 

30 
7 
2 
3 
2 
9 
5 
1 
8 
1 
1 

11 
5 

10 
4 
2 
4 
2 
1 




AlnmHft <>I 




1 Kansas (^ty, Mo 




Albimy, ^.Y 




; Little Rock, Ark 




Alton. lU 




Memphis, Tenn 




Ann Arbor. Mich 




' Milwaukee, Wis 




Braddock, Pa 




Minneapolis, Biion 




Butte, Moot 




' New Britain, Conn 




Cairo. Ill . 




NewCa.stle, Pa 




I'Anton, Ohio 




New Orleans, La 




(Tiitaj»o, 111. 




New York, N. Y 

Oklrtlioma City, Okla 

Omaha, N©br 




Cincinnati, Ohio 






Cleveland, Ohio 






CofT«n'ville, Kans 




Pittsburgh, Pa 




Cohmibus. Ohio 




C^uiiicv, 111 




Da\ ton, Ohio 




Houuoke, Va 




Denver, Coki 




Ro.'k IslancL 111 




Detroit, Mi(h 




Si . Louis, Mo 




Dubuflue, Iowa 




Salt I>Jik<^Citv, Utah 




Duluth, Mum 


4 


iSioox Cit V, Iowa 




Elgin, 111 .. . ... 


.siuiii^nord. Ill 




Krie, Pa 




SHnih*^n\ ilie. Ohio 




Kvan«>ville, Ind 




T;von».i, Wu li 




FUni, Mich 




Terro ll.i ite, Ind 




Fort Wji>Tie, Ind 




AVorfOslcr, Ma s 




Grand Rapids, Mich 















TETANUS. 
City Reports for Week Ended June 16, 1917. 



PlUA-C. 



Bo<;ton, Mass 

Cbariovton, S. C. 
Ckn eland, Ohio. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Cases. 



l*ittslmTt:h. Pa.. 
Kirli-nond. Va.. 
Spnir;iicM, .Ma^- 



Deaths. 



TUBERCULOSIS. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculoj^Ls. pa^'o 1094. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 
State Reports for May, 1917. 



Place. 


New 
ca -t^ ; re- 
p;rt(Ml. 


Place. 


Now 
cases re- 
ported. 


California: 

Alameda County — 

Alanioda 


1 
1 
12 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 
3 

2 

1 


, California -Continued. 
Kiiitr-^ Cotinlv — 

H^iftini; 


1 


Ua vward 


Los .Vngele ; County 

Alhanibra 


3 


Oakland 


1 


Cohvm c^oiinty ^ .. . 


El Monte 


1 


Contra CostA County— 

Pittsburg 


Long Beach 


1 


Lo.; -Vngeles 


8 


Richmond 


Monrovia 


2 


Fresno County— 

Reedley 


Pasadena 


4 


Watts 


1 


Imperial County 


Monterey County 


1 


El Centro 


Orange Oounty 


1 


Kern (^ounty — 

Bakerslield 


Fullcrtou 


1 


Placer Coimty— 

Auburn 




Delano 


1 



Digitized by 



Google 



1093 



July 0, 1917 



TYPHOID FEVER— (%>nthuipd. 
State Reports for May, 1917 -Contimied. 



Plac«. 



CttU/omJa- rontinued* 

SacTftineuto Ccijjity— 
SaiTamenlo 

San Diego County- 
Ban Diego 

6^ Francisco 

Stn Joaquin County^ 

Lodi 

Stockton 

Bsnta Clara County^ 

San Jose 

Santa Clara 

Tehama County- 
Coming 

Yolo County 



Total. 



XiidiaBa: 

CaasCounty 

Clark County 

Delaware County ... . 

Elkhart County 

Fayette County 

Howard County.. ., . . 
Huntington County.. 

Jennings County 

Lake County 

Manor County 

Owen County 

Ripley (^ouHty. 

St. Joseph Cotrnty . . . 

Sollivanrouniy 

Tipton ( 'ounty 

Vanderburg 0)unty.. 

Warrick County 

Wadiington County.. 
Wells County 



Total. 



Narada: 

HombokltC^xmty. 



New York: 

Albany County 

Allegany County 

Cattaraugus County . . 

Cayuga County 

Chautauqua County. 
Clinton County 



New 
cases re- 
ported. 



70 



71 



riace. 



Now 

I ca ■ .\s re- 
port cd. 



New York— CiPtinued. 

('•Miiiil'i \i I uiUy 

Diitvhos Cftinty 

KrioC'Mmty 

IJreeno County 

Herkimer County 

JelTersr.n County 

Madison County 

Monroe County 

Montgomery County. 

Niagara County 

Oneida Coimty 

Onondaga County 

Ontario County 

Orange County 

Orleans County 

Rensselaer County . . . 
St. Lawrence County 

Saratoga County 

Schenectady County . 

Schoharie County 

Suffolk County 

Sullivan County 

Tioga County 

Ulster County 

Wayne Coimt v 

Westchester (\)unty . . 

Yates County 

New York City 

North Dakota: 

Cass Coimty 

Mclnt osh C oimty . . . . 

Pembina Coimty 

Ransom Coimty 

Richland i'ounty . . . . 

Stutsman t^ouuty 

Ward County 

Total 

Wyoming: 

Wash ikie Coimty 

Uinta County 

Fremont County 

Albany County 

Total 



2 
2 
17 
2 
1 
6 
1 
5 
1 
3 
4 
6 
4 
4 
1 
3 
2 
4 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
106 



24 



10 



Oregon Report for April, 1917. 

During the month of April, 1917, one case of typhoid fever was 
reported in each of Clatsop, Jackson, and Wallowa Counties, Oreg, 

City Reports for Week Ended June 16, 1917. 



Piara. 



AflgUn^Ttx 

Baltimore. Md 

B«iT«rF^Pa... 
Birmingham, Ala.. 

BMton^lCan 

BoflWo,N.Y 

QMndan,N.J 

Cblcaffo.m 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Cincinnati, Ohio.. 
Cleveland, Ohio.. 
ColiunbiLs, Ohio.. 

PanvilKIIl 

Detroit, Mich 

Diiliith, Minn.... 

El y&Ho, To\ 

I Everett, Ma-ss.... 
Everett, Wa-h . . . 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Digitized by 



Google 



July 0, 1»17 



1094 



TYPHOID FEVER— Continiwd. 
City Reports for Week Ended Jvne 16, 1M7— Oontmued. 



Place. 



JUltvw, Mai: .. . 

-^mt Mjx:]^ 

Fnrt \VVHb Tc't... 
Ga]o&tHir& lU. . . . 
GdveqtotJ, Ttj^ 

Iridifiniipolk. Ind. .. 

JoJiti^jjwQ, i'a 

Liiiidiliter, Pn.. .,.. 

LyGclibtiry. V'a 

MormftiltiT win . . . , . 

IJc^phii^p Ttiim 

M^blfp, Alft...,. ,. 
NU.Hbi,4Up. TeiDBL. - . . 

Nf^wsttLj K. J* 

Kew CasUc, Pa. 

K&w Hai'iai, Oonn.. 
New OrleftM^ La . . 
Him York^, Y . . . 
HbrrrlsUifm, Fa, 

Omi^er K J 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Pasadena, Cal 

Passaic, N. J 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Providence, R. I 

Quincy, III ^ 

Reno, NeT 

Roanoke, Va 

Rutland, Vt 

St. Louis, Mo 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Sau Franci^i o, Cal 

Sacramento, Cal 

Savannah, (Ja 

South Bend, Ind 

Springfield. Mass 

Superior, Wis 

Toledo, Ohio 

Trenton, N.J 

Washington, D. C... 

Wilnungton, Del 

Winston-Sttlem, N. C. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



DIPHTHERU, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER. AND TUBERCULOSIS. 
State Reports for May, 1917. 





Cases reported. 


State. 


Cases reported. 


State. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


California ... 


228 
197 
32 


4.011 
3,908 


422 

443 

194 

8 


1 
Now York 


1,606 
23 

1 


11.446 
221 
356 


1,779 


Indiana 


! Nort'i Dakota 

Wyoming 


48 


Iowa 


65 


Nevada 


43 











Oregon Report for April, 1917. 

During the month of April, 1917, 9 cases of diphtheria, 688 cases of 
measles, and 112 cases of scarlet fever were reported in Oregon. 

City Reports for Week Ended June 16, 1917. 





Popula- 
tion as of 
Julv 1,1910 

(estimated 

&?• 

Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
culosis. 


City. 


from 

all 

causes. 


1 


Q 


i 


1 


i 


i 

s 
p 


1 


1 


Over 500,000 inhabitants: 

Baltimore, Md 


589.621 

756, 476 

2,407,722 

674,073 

671.784 

508,812 

5,602,841 

1,709,518 

579,090 

767,309 


177 
227 
ftSl 
196 
189 

"i,'36i" 

497 
136 
200 


3 
91 
96 
36 
98 

6 
241 
58 
16 
67 


1 
8 

24 
2 

11 

a 

20 
10 
2 

4 


233 
238 
755 
85 
36 
142 
1,089 
280 
213 
95 


3 
2 
6 

'"3' 
1 

26 
3 
2 


10 
23 

3«7 

17 

63 

5 

116 
33 
16 
74 


1 

...... 

"■3* 
"2 


49 

72 

227 

3d 

27 
33 
343 
95 
31 
48 


27 


Boston, Mass 


24 


Chicago, 111 


«7 


Oleviland, Ohin, 


18 


Detrait,Mich 


2S 


hm Angeles, Cal 


21 


New York, N.Y 


179 


Philadelphia. Pa 


70 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


6 


St. Louis, Mo 






Digitized by 



Google 



1095 



July 6, 1917 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS— 

Continued. 

City Reports for Week Ended Jane 16, 1917— Continued. 





Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1, 1916 
(estimated 
by U.S. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
lever. 


Tuber- 
culosis. 


City. 


27 
13 
8 
12 


1 
1 


1 


2 
...... 

'i' 




Q 


i 


1 


From 300,000 to 500,000 Inhabit- 
ants: 
Buffalo,N. Y 


468.558 
410,476 
306,345 
436,535 
363,454 
408,894 
371,747 
463,516 
363,980 

214,878 
260,800 
271,708 
297, 847 
295,463 
254,960 
256,417 

104,199 
181,762 
121,579 
106,233 
127,224 
128,366 
104,562 
128,291 
110,900 
100,3) 
113,24.5 
102,425 
148,995 
117,057 
118,158 
149,685 
198,604 
165, 170 
109.381 
156,687 
117,390 
105,942 
155,624 
112,770 
191,554 
111,693 
163,314 

85,625 
63,505 
58,65© 
57.660 
69,893 
57,653 
53,973 
67,449 
60,852 
60,734 
57,144 
94,495 
86,690 
63,705 
75,195 
76,078 
54,772 
76,183 
72,015 
77, 21 4 
68.529 
99,437 


207 
121 
82 
120 

"iiV 

""m 
97 

66 



84" 

44 

70 
76 

88' 

29 


"'2 
2 
2 


55 
43 
62 
118 
40 
59 
2 
63 


10 

iJ 

59 
15 
16 

2 
12 

4 

8 
8 
10 
14 
11 
3 
16 

6 

1 
4 
2 
16 
1 

3 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 


5 

' i* 


46 
25 
13 
20 


28 


OfnrinnAtl^ Ohio , , , . 


14 


JersevCitv, N. J 




Milwaukee, Wis 




Minneapolis , Minn 


20 

16 1 2 

7 1 




Newark.N.J 




44 
30 
18 
22 

7 


12 


New Orleans, La 


21 


San Francisco, Cal 


9 
9 

17 


2 




Washington, D. C 


160 ' 




From i200,0db to 390,000 inhabit* 
ants: 
Columbus, Ohio 


6 
38 

129 
23 
10 
14 

189 

30 
46 
18 
16 
42 


"*3* 


t 


Denver, Colo 


6 ' 

23 

5 , 

9 1 


12 


Indianapolis, Ind 


...... 

'i* 




30 
1 

12 
50 
16 

8 
21 
3 
3 
4 
11 




Kansas bi ty ,' Mo , , 


10 


Portland, (3reg 




Providence, R.I 


11 
5 

3 


2 

1 




Rochester, N. Y 

From 100,000 to 200,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Albany, N . Y 




Birmingham, Ala 


10 


Bridgeport, Conn 


6 




2 


CainUen,N.J 




Dayton, Ohio 


38 
31 
21 
36 
45 
21 
28 
22 
41 
27 
33 

63' 

49 
26 
41 
19 
36 
49 

74* 

36 
33 

26' 


■ ■■2':::::: 


2 


Fall River, Mass 


3 




76 j 2 




Fort Wortn.Tex 


2 


Grand Rapi'ls, Mich 

Hart lord , Conn 


1 
9 
1 
6 


1 61 

1 1 22 




i2 
3 
6 
2 
4 

15 
5 
9 
5 


2 
2 


Lawrence, Mass 


•S 


Lowell, Ma-js 


6l 


2 


Lynn, Moss 


?::;:::i I 




2 


li^mphis, Tenn 


7 


Nash\ ille, Tenn . . 


1 
4 
3 




3 


New ned/orJ,Mass 


.K) 




4 


New Haven, Conn 


' 


120 


1 








Oakland. C^il 


12 

58 


.] 




3 


Omaha, i^ebr 


i 




6 


Reading, Pa 1. 


9 






5 
4 


1 


Richmond. Va ... , . 


.. 




8 


Salt Lake Cltv, Utah 


1 

18 
2 
1 
8 
2 
6 

24 
1 

4 


* '4* 


5 
44 

39 


...... 


15 
10 
11 

1 
24 

1 
4 








7 
3 




Syracuse N Y 


4 


Qraooma 'Wash 




CTcdedo, bhio 


1 


46 
7 
18 

U 


' 


2 


1 
8 
7 


4 


Trenton, N.J 


4 


Worcester, Mass 


1 


From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Akron, Ohio 




Allentown, Pa 




4 




8 
1 
5 




Altoona,Pa 




4 
42 






Atlantic City, N. J 










Baycmne, N.J 










4 
1 
3 
7 
1 






" Berkeley, Cal 


14 
U 
10 
17 
29 
12 
25 
• 23 
63 






1 

49 
2 
4 
2 


...... 

...... 








Binghftintftn, N. Y 


i 

4 
2 
3 
1 
5 
1 






2 




Brockton. Mass 




Canton, Ohio . 




1 


3 


Charleston, S. C 


4 


Covington, Ky 






1 
3 
6 


1 


Duluth, Minn 


1 


32 


1 


2 
4 

1 




1 


Elizabeth, N.J 


4 


El Paso, Tex 




7 
9 
7 

20 
27 
18 
24 
25 
6 


3 


8 


Erie, Pa 








6 
1 


22 


ic-vnii<t7fne, Tnd X . 


is 

12 
12 
18 
15 
25 


3 
5 
4 
2 
4 

2 




-L- J J. 


2 
17 
4 
1 
2 

Hi 


...... 


1 


FMntJMldi 




Fort Wayne.lnd 


1 


2 


Harrisbirrg, Pa 


2 


Hoboken,^^. J 


SrSr 


2 
T 3 


2 


76hnstown, Pa 


1 


Kansas City, Kans. 












J nr^eo uy x^j v^ ^^^ "-^^ 





Jul? e, i»iT 



1096 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES* SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Oontinued. 

€hy Reports Hk Week Bii4«4 Jwie 16, 1917~0ontinued. 





Popute- 

tion as of 
July 1, 1916 
(estimated 

by U.S. 
Censua 

Bureau). 


Total 

deaf^ 

from 

all 

CftUSCS. 


DtphtherlB. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
culosis. 


City. 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 

P 


i 


1 
1 


From 60,000 to 100,000 Inhabit- 
ants—Continued. 


60,853 
57,343 
51, l.'i.'i 
78,283 
68,221 
58,794 
89,612 
92,943 
71,744 
59,411 
63,867 
55.18.5 
00,895 
55,042 
53,330 
68,805 
90,519 
57,078 
87.039 
68,946 
61,120 

ae,0R3 

77.916 
70,722 
70.776 
94,26.5 
51,656 

27.732 
37.3H5 
34,814 
32.730 
27,632 
. 43, 425 
46, 192 
29,319 
26,074 
32. 261 
39.873 
28, 7« 
42, -IM 
28,203 
39, 233 
35,486 
41,781 
41.SH3 
25, H79 
40, 4yti 
48. 177 
35.368 
48,SS6 
31,576 
26,771 
38,676 
31,677 
41,097 
35,3«y 
46, 515 
27, ?tS7 
36,9^ 
32,9-10 
30,699 
47, 521 
26,234 
26,318 
27,327 
29,603 
41,133 
30,108 


ii* 

8 
38 
31 
12 


1 




25 
4 

41 
6 
5 
1 
4 
1 
3 




3 




3 




Little Rock, Ark 




MftMon Mf^sH , . 


9 






1 





1 
2 




Miuiph'^Vw, N, tf 


2 


Mobile, Ala' 


1 




1 




" 


3 


Nflw Piitain, Conn 


8 






3 


Norfolk, Va.' 








4 


6 


Oklahoma City, Okla 


13 
16 
12 
15 
16 
19 

ao 

21 

33 

17 

1 

18 
24 
14 
17 


1 
6 
4 

2 
1 

1 






1 






•pftss^ir» N J ■" 




4 


3 


Pawtucket, R. I 




2 

1 
3 






Portland, Me 




23 
35 
7 
2 
67 
10 
40 




1 




2 


Rockford,lll 




Sacramento. Old. 




5 

1 
4 
3 


4 


Saginaw, Mich 




4 






SanDiojro, Cat 






1 


Savannah,' Ga 


1 
1 










2 


Scheuectadjr, N. Y 




2 

4 
1 
8 
2 




4 


Sioux City,'towa 




Somervillc, Mas'? 


4 
1 




20 
26 

9 

6 
19 

1 
63 

7 






6 


4 


South Brud.Ind 


3 


Springfiel;],IIl 






1 


Terre Haiitp, Ind 


1 
2 


*** i* 






3 


Trov, N. Y.... 




4 
4 
3 
2 




4 

2 
3 
2 
2 


13 


Wicliita, Kans 




"Wilkes-Barre, Pa 


12 
28 

3 
9 
14 

6* 

1 

16 
4 
6 
6 

3 

4 

I 

6 
8 
16 









Wilmington, Del 


3 

1 






York, Pa 




From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
A lameda, Cal 








3 






Aubiu-n, N. Y 


. 1 

1 
2 
1 
1 
4 
1 


; 


3 








2 


Austin, Tex 








1 
2 


4 


Brooklme, Mass 


;;;;;; 


8 
1 
4 
8 
1 
6 
6 
1 
11 








Wutlor, Pa 








Butte, Mont 




9 

1 








Chelsea, Mass 




5 
1 
4 


1 


Chicopce, Mass 




Cumberland, Md 








1 


Danville, III 








1 
2 
3 







Dubuaue, Iowa 


1 


1 




1 


1 


East Cnicago, Ind 


2 


East Orange,N. J 







40 




3 

a 

1 




Elgin, lU :... 







1 

4 

3 

20 






Everet t, Mass 


1 












Everett, Wa-h 




2 




2 


Fltchbiirg, Moss 


9 










Galveston. Tex 










2 


Haperstown, Md 


.../.'."" 


1 












Hamilton, Ohio 


6 
11 
13 
12 

8 

4 


1 
2 
1 
1 
2 






a 

1 
1 






1 


Haverhill. Mass 


;;;;;; 


41 




5 
2 
2 

1 




Jackson, Mich 




Kiianiar«o. Mich . . 


90 




1 


Kenosha, Wis 


41 

4 

1 




2 


1 


1 


King<:fnn, N Y , 




Binorrilte, Tenn 












3 

3 




Lii Cross*, Wis 


3 
18 

9 
13 

5 


6 







1 
1 






Lexington, Ky 




8 
4 

14 
8 
1 

18 
3 
1 

U 
4 
8 
3 
1 
1 




2 


T^mn, Ohio 






1 






IJncoln, N«*b«* 


1 






2 






Long B«ach, Cal 








Ijorfun, Ohio 








3 

1 
4 




1 




LynchSurff, Va 


18 









flidiff^n. WiTi 












MeKeesDort, Pa 


7 
4 
6 
ft 
7 

io 


1 
2 

1 










Mtd/offf Mnn^ 








1 
3 


1 


libntclair, N. J 










N^5d»n» T* FT 










Newburgh,N. Y 


1 
1 


1 




1 
4 




1 




NiwCartIe.Pa 




Newport, K.I 









Digitized by 



Google 



1097 



July (J. 1917 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCAKLBT FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

. Gontinued. * 

City Reports for Week Ended June 16, 1917— Continued. 





Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 
bv U. 8. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Tote! 

deaths 

trom 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Bcarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
culosis. 


aty. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 
1 


Tram XLOQO to 100,000 Inhftbit. 
ants— CoDtinaed . 
Mewton.Mass 


4S,715 
37,353 
31,401 
31,404 
33,080 
40,450 
41,185 
38,629 
39,651 
36,798 
38,136 
46,486 
43,2ai 
28,926 
27.445 
46,226 
30,283 
48.726 
30,570 
29,891 
43,139 
43,377 
29,892 
31,15.> 
30,803 

22,874 
15,010 
13. '.32 
13.599 
21,&H.5 
15, 794 
» 13.075 
17,518 

22,t.cq 

20,743 
24,276 
16,950 
23,539 
20,930 
15,395 

114,610 
17,445 
13,284 
17,500 
23,126 
15,243 
20,985 

122,019 
19,926 
23,805 
11,666 
14,869 
12,067 
14,831 
20,193 
13,821 
24,2(M 
21,618 
15,969 


7- 
10 

7 




10 
10 

7 
14 
13 

6 

6 
13 
11 

8 

5 

8 

8 


1 
4 




ao 

31 

2 
3 

4 

\ 

42 
6 
3 
2 








2 

2 


1 


Niasara Falls. N. Y 




2 






Norristown, Pa 




Ogden, Utan 


1 







3 
7 








Orange, N.J 




1 
1 
3 
2 




Pai»Jeiia, Cal 






1 


Perth Aniboy, N. J 


i 

1 












Pitf^fiAl<1, Mas^ 




i 

5 




1 


PortAOMoth, Va 
















Quincy, Mass 


2 






3 






2 






3 
1 




Rxianoke, Va 


3 




5 
5 








1 


R<M*Ts1»Tiit m 




2 






Bteobanville', Ohio 












• 


Sopericr, Wis 


3 




....... 


::::::::::: 






Taimton{lifas9 


1 : 


2 
2 








TnppVn , ICans. , . . .... 






G 
19 
9 
9 
3 
3 
3 
2 

3 
40 











Walthain, Ma« 








1 


1 


Watertcrwm.N. Y 

















W&tt Hoboken, N.J 

Wheeling, W. Va 


6 
12 
17 
15 


1 






5 





3 




Wilmington, N.C 









1 

2 






1 


Winston-Salem, N. C 








4 


3 


Zanesville, Ohio 









From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Alton. Ill 


3 

8 

4 

6" 

4 

M 


2 






1 
4 


1 


Ann A rbor . Mich 





1 






Bea\ er Falls, Pa 


1 




1 






Berlin, N.H 




!"■;;: 




1 
3 




Braddock, Pa 


1 




7 i- 


1 




Cairo, ni 


1 
9 

1 

40 


1 i 




Clinton. Mass 






1 : ' : 






CofTevWUe, Kans 


""2 


.'./... 


1 


1 




Concord, K. H 


1 1 




Dunkirk, N.Y 


11 
32 
9 
12 






1 1 


Oalesbunr.Ill... 


7 


2 










! 


Harrison, N.J 








2 ' 


Kearny, i^. J 


6 
2 

1 
4 
4 
4 








,. 




1 




KoJconu), IxtA 


2 




1 
2 











Lonj( Branch, N. J 








6 




Mftrfjiptf^, Wis 








2 






Melrose, Mass 


3 




6 






2 




Morristowp. N. J. 










Muscatine, towa 










1 








Nantlcoke,Pa 


8 

4 

7 
5 

4 

' 7' 


8 
1 
















Newburyport, Mass 








1 














.1 

5 










North .\dains, Maw. 
















Northampton, Mass 




.... 




2 






1 




PlainOfllff N J . 






.....!..:::; 




PortSBontfa N. H 


1 
1 





2 ' 


2 
1 






Rime, Nut.., 












Rocky Mount, N. C 




3 
3 











Rutland, Vt.!.. 








1 








Pandi^sVy. Ohio 












Saratoea'dprings, N. Y 

South Bethlehem, Pa 




.... 








2 








3 
10 




1 
1 






Wft!|h|figtnn, Pft 


4' 


1 










Woburn, Mass 



























I Population Apr. 15, 1910; no estimate m«d«. 



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FOREIGN. 



CORRECTION. 



Tho report of epidemic prevalence of cerebrospinal meningitis 
at Chihuahua, Mexico, appearing in the Public Health Reports, 
Jime 22, 1917, page 1000, has been officially stated to be erroneous. 

CUBA. 

Commiinicable Diseases — Habana. 

Communicable diseases have been notified at Habana as follows: 



f 


June 1-10, 1»17. 


RemAin- 
ing under 


Disease. 


Now 
cases. 


Deaths. 


treatment 

June 10, 

1917. 


Diphtheria 


7 


1 


13 


lu^prasv - 


10 


Mahirid 


6 
31 




34 


MOL slcs 




36 


Pftrat vphoid fever 




3 


Typhoid fever 


14 




49 


Varicella 




4 











CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, AND TYPHUS FEVER. 
Reports Received During the Week Ended July 6, 1917.^ 

CHOLERA. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India: 

Rangoon 


Apr.29-May5 


6 


3 









PLAGUE. 



Ceylon: 

Colombo. 
Chinas 

^oy 

Egypt.. 



Prordno 

jieh., 

Siout 

India: 

Mftdras Presidency. . 
Rangoon 



May 6-12 

Apr. 29-May 5.. 



May 12-17.. 

May 11-17.. 

May 17 

M&y 12-15.. 
May 12 



May 6-12 

Apr. 29-May 5.. 



Present and in vicinity. 
Jan. 1-May 17, 1917: Cases, 231; 
deaths, 116. 



1 From medical officers of tlie Public Health Service, Airerican consuls and otlier sources. For reports 
received from Dec. 30, 1916, to June 29. 1917, .see Public H xilth Reports for June 29, 1917. The tables oC 
' epidemic disease are terminated semiannually and new tables l>egun. 



(1098) 



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1099 , July 6, 1917 

CEOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, AND TYPHUS FEVER— Continued. 
Report Received During the Week Ended July 6, 1917— Continued. 

SMALLPOX. 



Place. 



AostraUa: 

New South Wales 

Brewarrina 

Quambone 

Queensland- 
Thursday Island Quar- 
antine Station. 



Canflda: 

Manitoba- 
Winnipeg 

Nova Scotiar— 

Port Hawkesbury.. 
Ceylon : 

Colombo 

CTiina: 

Amoy 

Chungking 

Harbm 

Ilongkong 

ICaschuria Station .... 

M.uJcden 

Sbanfbai , 

Tsitshar Station 

Tsinjjtao 



Date. 



Apr.27-Mayl0., 
do , 



May 9., 



Alexandria 

India: 

Madras 

Rangoon 

Portu^: 

Lisbon 

Rus»a: 

Riga 

Vladivostok 

Turkey in Asia: 

TrcliTond 

Union of .'^outh Africa: • 

Johannci-burg 



June 10-16., 
June 17-23.. 
May 6-12... 



Apr. 
May 

Apr. 
May 
Apr. 
May 
May 
Apr. 
May 



29-May5.. 

6-12 

23-May6.. 

6-12 

23-29 

20-26 

H-30 

16-22 

22-29 



Apr.30-May27.. 



May 6-12 

Apr. 29-May 5. 



May 13-26 

Mar. 11-May 5.. 
Mar. 15-21 



Feb. 25-Apr. 13. 
Mar. 12-24 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Remarks. 



Apr. 27-May 10, 1917: Cases, 6. 



From s. s. St. Albans from Kobe 
via Hongkong. Vessel pro- 
ceeded to Townsville, Bris- 
bane, and Sydney, in quaran- 
tine. 



Present in district. 



Present and in vicinity. 

Present. 

On Chinese Eastern Railway. 

Do. 

Present. 

On Chinese Eastern Railway. At 
another station on railway, 1 
case. 



Jan. 1-31, 1917: Cases, 7. 



TYPHUS FEVER. 



China: 

Tsingtao 

Alexandria... 
Russia: 

Riga 

Vladivostok., 



May 20-29 

Apr.30-May27., 



Mar. 29-Apr. 4 . 



1 
830 



232 



Jan. 1-31, 1917: Cases, 1. 



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PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 

YOE.32 JULY 13, 1917 No. 28 

TRACHOMA AND THE ARMY. 

THE DANGERS INCIDENT TO ENUSTING RECRUITS AFFECTED WITH THE DISEASE. 

By John McMullkk, Surgeon, Unitad States Public Health Service. 

Now that our country is engaged in raising a great army; it is our 
duty to prevent the admission to the Army of recruits who may 
spread disease. 

The history of European wars shows that trachoma has been a 
grave menace to the efficiency of the fighting forces* invaliding 
thousands of men and bUnding hirge nimibers of its victims. So 
great has* been the prevalence in the armies that trachoma was at 
one time termed "military ophthalmia'' and believed to be confined 
to soldiers. Various articles of their equipment were condemned as 
being the cause of the disease. 

Trachoma has been said to be ''as old as the Nile, the simoom, and 
the desert.'' It has an historical importance as an epidemic disease 
of both military and civil life and has made fearful ravages in prac- 
ticaUy every European coimtry. 

Despite the confusing and contradictory statements in connection 
with trachoma, the contagious character of this disease is unques- 
tionable. 

During the first half of the nineteenth century 1 soldier in every 5 
of the Belgian Army is said to have suffered from trachoma. It is 
alleged that upon the recommendation of a noted authority at that 
time the trachomatous soldiers were discharged from the army to 
their homes. This procedure cleared the army of trachoma at that 
particular time, but carried the disease directly to the homes and 
the civilian population, where it •previously did not exist. This 
removed all doubt as to the contagiousness of trachoma, which at 
that time was denied by some, and subsequent cases in the army 
werfe isolated in special hospitals, which caused a diminution in the 
disease. 

It is stated that in some countries there were frightful epidemics of 
trachoma, and that the English, Prussian, Russian, and other armies 
suffered from the ravages of this disease. 
79 (1101) 

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July 13, 1917 1102 

During the Russo-Japanese War trachoma was a formidable enemy 
to be reckoned with in the Japanese Army and large numbers of 
troops were isolated and treated for this malady. 

Some months since it was reported that an epidemic of trachoma 
was causing considerable anxiety in France, the disease haying been 
brought to that country by African soldiers and laborefs. In tlie 
army the disease was checked l)y the quick isolation of all victims 
and other drastic measures. Among the civiUan population, howler, 
the epidemic was still spreading, especially in the larger cities, and 
the health authorities were taking every precaution. All persons 
whose eyes showed any inflammation were examined by specialists 
and isolated if suspicious. 

Statistics from the medical inspection of aliens at United States 
ports indicate that trachoma is found most extensively among the 
Syrian, Armenian, Hebrew, Italian, Polish, and Greek races. Trar- 
choma, however, extends more or less over the whole world and 
exists in many places in the United States as an endemic disease. 
Lasting aslt does for years, it is a constant irritation and discomfort to 
the patient, impairing his earning capacity and efficiency as a work- 
man and soldier, ruining the life and happiness of entire families 
and finally terminating in many instances in total blindness. After 
nearly a lifetime of misery the patient is often seen dwarfed in mind 
and warped in body with the trichiasis, entropion, and other sequelae 
still remaining to harass and irritate the now sightless eyesc 

Several years ago the Pubhc Health Service instituted an investi- 
gation into the prevalence of trachoma in the United States. Inves- 
tigations were made among the Indians, and the residents of the 
Appalachian Mountain range and other sections of the country. 
The Indians were found to be almost universally infected and on 
some reservations 90 per cent had trachoma. This survey showed 
that the disease exists more or less throughout '* Appalachian 
America" and, in some portions the infection was found to be as 
high as 10 to 12 per cent of the population and in some communities 
oven a higher rate of infection was found. In sections of Minnesota 
trachoma was found. The disease is also reported from Ohio, 
Indiana, Kansas, and other States. In fact, it is found to be widely 
distributed in om* country. It is not an imcommon thing to see 
in one family several generations with trachoma. So prevalent 
and widespread is the infection in some sections of the United States 
that the Pubhc Health Service has estabhshed and maintains in 
those sections six ophthalmic hospitals for the treatment of tra- 
choma, which is classed by the Government as a dangerous contagious 
disease. 

These hospitals have now been in operation for several years and, 
during the past year, a total of 19,530 patients were treated; 1,880 



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1103 Jaly 13. 1917 

patients were admitted to the hospitals and 1,687 operations were 
performed. Of this number, 1,153 were under local and 534 under 
general anesthesia. The records show that at least one-half of our 
trachoma patients have impairment of vision, ranging all the way 
from slight defects to total blindness. Ulcer and corneal opacity 
occur in 25 per cent of the cases; pannus is present in 20 per cent; and 
photophobia was recorded in 33 J per cent; entropion and trichiasis 
in 10 to 15 per cent of the cases. Entire famihes are found suffering 
from trachoma, including both extremes of Ufe. 

The diagnosis of trachoma is still based on cUnical evidence, 
since the causal organism is as yet unknown. Diagnosis, therefore, 
is in many cases difficult. There are many cases which are found 
only by careful examination as but few if any symptons may be 
piesent at the time of examination and the condition may be said 
to be latent or dormant. Sooner or later, however, by reason of a 
foreign body or other excitant, there arises a condition analogous 
to- acute granulations with the watery secretion so characteristic of 
the disease and the other famihar symptions. In this stage the 
disease is highly infectious. 

Trachoma is transmitted from the sick to the well by the secretion 
which is conveyed to the healthy eye by means of such infected 
articles as towels, handkerchiefs, bed linen, etc. 

Like most communicable diseases, trachoma spreads where people 
are crowded together, as in barracks, penal establishments, orphan 
asylums, etc. 

Armies originally get trachoma from the infected civil population 
in the areas from which recruits are accepted, and give it back to the 
people, often with interest, when men are discharged who have served 
their enhstment or become incapacitated. 

Trachoma is essentially a chronic disease, and untreated lasts ordi- 
narily the better part of a hfetime. It is a surgical affection and, 
if anything hke satisfactory or permanent results are to be obtained, 
it must be by properly and skillfully conducted surgical proceedings, 
and, in many cases, hospital care. 

With the proper surgical procedure followed by the after care and 
treatment, any case of trachoma can be cured, the length of time 
required to effect a cure depending upon its duration, severity, and 
other factors. In children, when seen early, the disease is usually 
readily eradicated and they can return to school in a short time. 
While occasionally cases of trachoma continue for years with but 
comparatively small damage to the cornea, others produce corneal 
compUcations early and persistently and the eye is lost in a short 
time. 

The results that are being obtained in the 6 Public Health Service 
trachoma hospitals are exceedingly satisfactory. Durin^^ the past 

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Jnly 13, 1917 1104 

fiscal year about 1,500 cures have been effected. Adults who have 
suffered from trachoma for years and were dependent upon their 
friends or the county for support, some being inmates of the 
poorhouse, have been reUeved, are no longer foci of mfection, have 
taken their places in the community, and are earning a hvelihood for 
themselves and family. Children unable to attend school because of 
the constant physical suffering and impaired vision are now securing 
the education which would have been impossible but for timely 
interference. 

There is no lack of evidence that we have a great deal of trachonna 
in this country, and that it is a public health problem to be dealt with 
before the disease establishes foci everywhere. 

As previously stated, trachoma often exists in a latent or dormant 
stage, and there is grave danger that recruits may be enlisted su^iar- 
ing with this disease unless the greatest rare is exercised. 

The eyehds of all soldiers and apphcants for enlistment should in 
every instance be everted, the examination to include the retro- 
tarsal fold, and the condition of the membranes noted in a space 
on the blank form reserved for this purpose. If the eyelids are not 
smooth and pink, if there is any redness or secretion, especially in 
the retrotarsal fold, such cases should be segregated for examination 
by those trained in the diagnosis of trachoma. An apphcant who 
is found to be suffering with a weD-marked trachoma, should not 
be immediately rejected, but should be given treatment and his 
trachoma cured. He can then be again examined to determine 
whether ho has resulting visual defects suflicient to cause his rejec- 
tion. In this way a case of contagious disease will be ehminated 
and probably a good soldier gained. 

Any case of trachoma or suspected trachoma detected among 
soldiers or sailors should be immediately isolated under care and 
treatment imtil cured or until the suspected diagnosis is found to 
be in error. 



POLIOMYEUTIS IN JAPAN. 



The following information regarding the occurrence of poliomye- 
litis in Japan has been furnished by the American consul general 
and was obtained through the courtesy of the Japanese authorities 
and medical men. While the data are essentially fragmentary, as 
is true for this disease in most countries, they show that poliomyehtis 
has been present in Japan and in a measure the degree of the 
prevalence. 

Reports made to the section of pediatrics of the Fourth General 
Congress of the Japanese Medical Association give the following frag- 

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ja ^^Diqitize 



1105 Jaiy i:{. 1917 

mentary information regarding the prevalence of poliomyelitis in 
Japan: 

FvJcuoka Prefecture. — ^During the period from 1904 tx) 1913, 243 
cases of poliomyelitis were admitted to the pediatric clinic of the 
Imperial University. Most of the cases were of children of from 1 
year to 2 years of age. The disease prevailed most severely during 
the month of May. 

Kagawa Prefecture. — In 1913 a small epidemic occurred, chiefly 
affecting children. 

Kumamato Prefecture. — ^An epidemic of poliomyelitis with 28 re- 
ported cases occurred in 19 12, the greatest prevalence being in May 
and June. 

Kyoto Prefecture. — Since the year 1911 poliomyelitis has prevailed 
sporadically but on a small scale and within a restricted area. The 
greatest prevalence has been observed in June and July. Children 
of from 1 year to 2 years have been found most susceptible to the 
infection. 

Kyushu Prefecture. — No severe epidemic has been reported. 

Niigata Prefecture. — From March, 1912, to the close of 1913, 22 
cases of poliomyelitis were treated at the Niigata Medical College. 
Most of these cases were in children between the ages of 1 year and 2 
years. The greatest prevalence was during the period from April to 
August. 

Okayama Prefecture. — In 1912 an outbreak of poUomyelitis oc- 
curred, the period of prevalence being the months of May and June. 
More than 500 children were attacked and a comparatively large 
number of cases occurred among adults. 

Tokyo. — During the past 26 years 449 cases of poliomyeUtis have 
been diagnosed at the Imperial University. The disease prevailed 
most severely during the months of June, July, and August, and among 
children between 1 year and 2 years of age. 

In July and August, 1916, five cases of poliomyelitis were notified 
in Japanese and foreign children at the summer resort of Karuizawa. 



EXPERIMENTAL TYPHUS FEVER IN GUINEA PIGS. 

A DESCRIPTION OP A SCROTAL LESION IN GUINEA PIGS INPECTED WrTH MEXICAN 

TYPHUS. 

By If. H. Neill, Passed -Assistant Surgeon, United States Public Health Service. 

It is well known that the intraperitoneal inoculation of guinea 
pigs, with 2 to 4 ec. of blood containing the virus of typhus fever, 
is followed by a rather characteristic elevation of temperature which 
will be observed about 10 days subsequently. Not many descrip- 
tions of pathological changes as a result of the above procedure have 



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July 13, 1917 1106 

been reported. Baehr and his coworkers consider certain changes 
in the spleen, "wliich is enlarged and congested, with its maliMghiaa 
bodies prominent,'^ * as typical of typhus fever in the guinea pig. 
Aside from the above, most workers seem rather to have insisted on 
tlie absence of gross lesions, due to the typhus virus, in these experi- 
mental animals. 

The striking similarity, in many respects, of typhus fever and 
Rocky Mountain spotted fever, led to the examination of the scro- 
tuins of typhus-fever guinea pigs, since very definite lesions of the 
scrotal tissues are almost uniforndy present in the former disease. 
These changos have been described by RicT^etts 'and other workers. 

While the observations recorded in this paper luive been in progress 
there has been ample opportunity for comparative study, as a strain 
of Rocky Mountain spotted fever has been carried on by traaster 
from guinea pig to guinea pig. 

Lest there be any possibility of misunderstanding, it seems (k^ir- 
iihle to state that the nonidentity of the two diseases has apparently 
bc(Mi thoroughly established by immunological studies. 

The guinea pigs on whicli tlie observations were based were 
those inoculated with Mexican typhus directly from human cases 
or from other guinea pigs or monkeys in which the strains of Mexican 
ty[)hus were being propagated. The ol>servations were made 
during 19H) and 1917. 

A series of guinea pigs infected with a strain of the so-called 
''endemic typhus ' or I^rilPs disease, which had been propagated in 
monkeys and guinea pigs for several yeaiN, was examined before 
attention wtus focused on the s^-rotal lesions. While it is possible 
that a mild type of the lesion may have been present, it certairdy 
was not sniiiciently conspicuous to attract attention. 

hi well-developed male gninea pigs, which had been intraperito- 
neally injedtul with the Mexican typhus virus, the fallowing changes 
have been observed: From 9 to 15 days after inoculation, the tem- 
perature of the animal becomes elevated to from 40.5° to 41® C, and 
if the scrotum, with the testicles in place, be examined, a definite 
swelling is observed. If the skin be of a light color, some redness 
may be noted. These external changes subside in a few days. If 
the animal be killed whcMi the fever and scrotal changes are at their 
height, diss(»ction reveals the following gross findings: The skin of 
the scrotum looks apparently normal, but if it be carefully dissected 
from the tissues immediately beneath, definite hemorrhages appear 
in the cremasteric fascia, just external to the parietal laminae of the 
tunica vuginalLs. If the.se structures be incised and the testicle and 
epididymis exposed, hemorrhages of a similar nature will be noted 



I OntBky, Doner and Husk, J. Am. U. Ass., 1917, vol. 08, No. 16, p. 1167. 
I J. Am. II. Asi., 1900, 47, p. 33. 



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1107 July 13, 1917 

inuacdiately beneath the visceral laminse of the tunica vaginaUs. The 
extent of these hemorrhages varies, from a few minute petechias to 
nearly complete envelopment of the testicles by hemorrhagic areas. 
If the animal be examined at the height of the process, i. e., one to 
two days after the swelling is first noted, the lesions above described 
are indistinguishable in their gross appearances from the lesions of 
Rocky Mountain spotted fever at the same stage of development of 
the disease, that is, one or two days after the sweUing of the scrotum 
is first noted. In the spotted fever animals, in contradistinction to 
the typhus animals, the disease becomes progressively more severe. 
Hemorrhages into the skin of the scrotum take plac^, and in some 
cases typical necroses of the scrotum, paws, and ear tips are observed 
before the death of the animal, which usually follows. On the other 
himd, the lesions of typhus fever rapidly clear up and soon the animal 
is as well as ever. 

Twenty-six out of 37 male guinea pigs killed at the height of the 
febrile reaction showed the lesions to be as described. These animals 
represent several strains of typhus received from El Paso, Tex., and 
Laredo, Tex., this year. 

Lecount * and Wolbach ' have emphasized the significance of vas- 
cular lesions in the pathology of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, both 
in human cases and in guinea pigs. These lesions consist of various 
grades of reaction to injury of the cells of the endothehum, i. e., 
endarteritis, and of rather peculiar and characteristic perivascular 
accumulations of cells. 

E. Frankel,' AschofI,* and Poindecker,* and apparently several 
other workers Whose pubUcations are not now available, have de- 
scribed certain histological changes in typhus fever, especially as re- 
gards the exanthem. These writers all describe as characteristic, 
lesions of the smaller arteries consisting of necrosis of the intima and 
the perivascular accumulation of cells among which, as in spotted fever, 
the mononeuclear elements predominate. 

In the present study the writer reports that: In guinea pigs in- 
fected with Rocky Mountain spotted fever and typhus fever, and 
killed at about the same stage of development of the lesions, sections 
of the testicles, epididymis, and their envelopes revealed similar 
changes. They were as follows: 

A. Subperitoneal hemorrhages, presumably due to, 

B. Vascular lesions, characterized by degeneration of the intima, 
proliferation of the endothehum and connective tissue of the vessel 
walls. Pronounced perivascular infiltration, as noted above, was 

1 Journal of Infectious Disease, 1911, vol. 8, p. 421. 
s Journal Med. Research, 1916, vol. 34, p. 122. 

• ICOncb. ICed. Wclmschr., 1914, vol. 61, p. 57. 
« Med. KUn, 1915, p. 798. 

* Mflncb. Ubd. Wchnschr., 1916, vol. 63. No. 5, p. 176. 



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July 13, 1917 1108 

found in both diseases. This consisted chiefly of cells of the lympho- 
cyte series and of endothelial leucocytes. Polyneuclear leucocyteB 
were present, but distinctly in the minority. The changes were par- 
ticularly abundant in the small vessels. Thromboses were occasion- 
ally observed in the early lesions. 

The lesions in spotted fever showed more necrosis, exudation, and, 
in older specimens, more proliferation in the vessel walls than oc- 
curred in the typhus-fever animals. 

Summary. 

1. Definite, gross, and minute pathological changes in the genitak 
of male guinea pigs reacting to Mexican typhus-fever blood have been 
described. The gross lesions occurred in about 70 per cent of such 
animals examined. 

2. These depend. on lesions of the blood vessels. 

3. The lesions are similar in process to, but milder in character 
than, those occurring in guinea pigs infected with Rocky Mountain 
spotted fever. 



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PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 



No heaUh departmerU, Stale or local, can effectively prevent or control diseoBc xoithout 
hnowUdge of when, where ^ and under what conditions cases are occumng. 



UNITED STATES. 



CURRENT STATE SUMMARIES. 

California Report for the Week Ended July 7, 1947. 

The California State. Board of Health reported eonceming the 
status of preventable diseases in California for the week ended July 
7, 1917, as follows: The cases of reportable diseases, with the excep- 
tion of typhoid fever and cerebrospinal meningitis, were greatly re- 
duced <lijring the week. Of typhoid fever, 21 cases were notified* 
from scattered points in the State. Four cases of cerebrospinal 
meningitis occurred, 2 in San Diego, 1 each in Snn Francisco and 
Placer County. One case of dengue was reported in Kem County. 
Mumps cases were mostly in the southern part of the State. Diph- 
theria was notified principally in northern California. Of scarlet 
fever 53 castas were notified, mostly in San Francisco and Ijos Angeles. 

The details of ngtifiable disease cases reported in the State during 
the week ended June 30 are as follows: 

On?brr>si>inal meningitia 4 1 Pneumonia 30 

Chicken |)ox 60 ' Poliomyelitis 1 

Diphtheria 38 I Bcarlet fever 68 

Er>tui)elas 10 Smallpox 10 

German meafiles 32 S>T)hilis 12 



Goaococcus infection 18 

Malaria 6 

Measles 266 

Mimipe 417 



Trachoma 1 

Tuberculosis 119 

Typhoid fever 20 

Whooping cough 52 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITia 
Massachusetts. 

Collaborating Epidemiologist Kelley reported that during the week 
ended July 7, 1917, cases of cerebrospinal meningitis were notified 
in Maasachusetts as follows: Boston, 1 ; Northampton, 1 ; Pittsfield, 2. 

(1109) 

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July 13, 1917 



1110 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS— Continued. 
State Reports for May, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Alabama: 

Jeflorson County 


2 

1 
1 
1 


Connecticut— Continued. 

Hartford County— Continued. 

New Britain 




Leo County 


4 


Monroo Count v 


IMainvillo 


2 


Walker County 


South Windsor 


1 




Windsor 


2 


Total 


5 


New Haven County— 

Naugatuck 






1 




1 
1 

27 
3 


New Haven 


4 


Fairfield County— 
nHdmnort 


Waterbury 


2 


Total 




strS^ : 


48 


Hartford County- 
Hartford 


Washington: 

King County 






Manchester 


5 









City Reports for Week Ended June 23, 1917. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Akron, Ohio 

Atlantic City, N.J. 

Baltimore, Md 

Binghamton, N. Y . 

B^on, Mftss 

Bridgeport, Conn. . . 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Chicago, Ul 

Cincinnati, Ohio — 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Columbus. Ohio — 
Davenport. Iowa . . . 

Dayton, Ohio 

Du>)uque, Iowa 

Elgin.lU 

Klitabeth, N. J 

Erie, Pa 

Harrisbure. Pa 

Indianapolis. Ind. . . 
Jersey Cit^N. J 
Kenosha, 



t^r^: 



Lowell, Mass 

Milwaukee. Wis.... 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Newark. N.J 

New Britain, Conn . 
Newburyport, Mass. 
New York. N. v.. . 

Norfolk, Va 

Omaha, Nebr 

Pawtuckot, R. I.... 
Philadelphia, Pa. . . 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Pittsfteld, Mass 

Providence, R. I. . . 

Quincy.Ill 

St. Louis, Mo 

San Diego. Cal 

San Francisco, Cal.. 
Springfield, Mass... 

Supwlor, Wis 

Troy,N. Y 



DIPHTHERIA. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1117. 

ERYSIPELAS. 
City Reports for Week Ended June 23, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Binghamton, N. Y 


1 


2 


New York, N. Y 




2 


Boston, Mass 


Oakland, Cal 


1 
1 
6 

13 
2 
1 
1 
1 

10 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 




Buffalo, N.Y 


3 

22 
1 
4 

? 

1 


Oraaha. Nebr 




Chicago,lll 

Cincinnati. Ohio 




Philadolphia. Pa 


2 




Pittsburgh, Pa 




Cleveland, Ohio 




Portland. Orcg 




Dayton, Ohio 

Detroit, Mich 




Readinji. Pa 




1 


Rochest<r NY 




Duluth, Minn 


St. Jos-ph. .Mo 




El iPaso, Tex 


1 


St. Lori^. lo 

San Fr.inc isc.^, Cal 




Harrisburg, Pa 


1 
2 

\ 

2 

5 
9 




Kalamazoo, Mich 


1 


Seattle. Wash 




T/ancaster, ^a 


South Bolhli'hom, Pa 




Los Angeles, Cal 




Tak nm:\. Wiish 




McKeesport, Pa 




Toledo, Ohio 




Milwaukee, Wis 


1 


Trenton, N.J 


1 


Newark,N. J 











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1111 

MALARIA. 
Report for May, 1917. 



Jnly 13, 1917 



Place. 



New cas«^ 
reported; 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



Blount County. . . . 
BuUook rounty. . . 

Butkr County 

Calboan County... 
Ctioetaw County. . 
Clarke County.... 

Coffee County 

Gran^aw County. 
Coilman County . . 
Escambia County. 
Etowah C^wnty. . 
Geneva County... 

Greene County 

HaleCoimty 

Jeflo'son County . . 



Alabama — Continued. 
Lawrence Coauty. 
Madison (Vmty. . 
Marengo County.. 

Marion County 

Mobile County.... 
Monroe County . . . 

Perry County 

Pile© County 

Shelby County 

Sumter County... 
Tallapoosa County 
Tuscaloosa County 

Total 



1 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
10 
1 
1 



67 



City Reports for Week Ended June 23, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Tl irm fnir^rn AIa. 


» 7 




Lcog Branch, N. J 


1 




Boston. Mass 




Memphis, Tenn. 


1 


Brockton Mass 




Mobit<^, 4)a , , , 




1 


Bro^llne Mass 




Newark, N. J 


2 




0obokMi. N.J 




Washington, D. C 


1 







» The reason that Birmingham had so many more cases of malaria reported than any other city is not 
becau^ the disease Is more prevalent in Birmizigluun than In other cities of Alabama and neighboring 
Stat^, but undoubtedly because of the succcssfufefforts the health department has made in securing the 
coop^ution of the practicing physicians in reporting eases. 

MEASLES. 

See Diphtheria, measlee, scarlet fever, and tnberculoeis, page 1117. 

PELLAGRA. 
SUIe Reports for May, 1917. 



PhMse. 


New 

cases re- 
ported. 


Place. 


New 
cases re- 
ported. 


A&bama: 

Antanra Cotmtv 


2 

1 
2 
2 
3 
4 
1 
6 
1 
1 
• 1 
1 
1 
2 
6 
1 
2 
2 
2 
5 
10 
14 


Alabama— Continued. 

Lee Coimty 


1 


Barbour County 


IJmc srone County » 

Macon Count v 


1 


Butler Count V 


4 


Calhoun C'Ounty t . - 


Ma'U'^on County 


7 


fS*(tnih<»r<j Coiintv 


Marenjrn County . . * 


I 




Mobile County 


35 


Choctaw Countv 


Mont K'omery County 


1 


CtMike County . ......... ^ .., ^ 


Perrv County 


1 


Clay County 


Pickens ( 'ount y 


3 


CleSume County 


Pite County 


2 


Coffee County 


Randolph County 


6 


Colbert County 


St . Clair ( -ounty 


1 


Coosa County 


Sumtor County 


1 


Crenshaw County 


Tallaclec^a County 


3 


DnllA<$ fVMintv - 


Tallajxiosa County .... 


7 


P«kalb County - - - , « 


Tuscaloosa County 


14 




Walker County 


15 


Stovah County r ...... . 


Washington (V>imt.y. ..... 


1 


Payette County 


Wilcox County....' 


3 


QrwMLQ Countv 


Total 






175 


Jefferson County 











Digitized by VjOOQIC 



July la, 1917 1112 

PELLAGRA— Continued. 
City Reports for Week Ended Jnne 23, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. • 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Binningham, Ala 


»13 


2 

1 
5 
2 


Mobile, Ala 




5 


Buffalo NY 


Now Orleans, La 


2 

1 
1 




Charleston, 8, C 




Roanoko, Va'. 


1 


El Paso, Tox 




Wilmington, N. C 


3 


Haferstown Md. . 


i 

1 
4 


Winston-Salem, N. C. 


1 


Kafaniazoo, Mich 


1 
1 


1 Worcester, Mass 


1 




Memphis, Tenn 


! 









1 The reason that Birmingham had so many more cases of pellagra reported than any other city is not 
because the disease is more prevalent in Birmingham than m other cities of Alabama and neighboring 
States, bat undoubtedly because of theituccessful efforts the health department has made in securing the 
cooperation of the practicing physicians in reporting cases. 

PLAGUE. 

California — Plaffne-Infected Squirrels Found. 

Passed Asst. Surg. Williams reported the finding of plague-infected 
ground squirrels in California as follows : In Alameda County during 
the period from June 16 to 27, 1917, 5 infected squirrels were found 
in township 2, all having been foimd within a radius of 4 miles of 
Altamont. In Santa Cruz County, on June 27, 1917, a plague- 
infected squirrel was found 9 miles east of Watsonville, on the 
G. F. Silliman ranch. 

PNEUMONIA. 

City Reports for Week Ended June 23, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


DMths. 


Akron, Ohio 


1 

14 
1 
1 
3 
73 
10 
10 
1 
2 
2 
2 
4 
1 
3 
1 
8 
2 
1 




Memphis, Tenn 




2 


Boston, Mass 


16 


Muscatine, Iowa 


1 

16 
2 
1 
1 

40 
11 
1 
9 
2 
8 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
5 




Braddock, Pa 


i Nowarlc,N. J 

' Newport. Kr 


4 


Cambridge, Mass 




2 


Chelsea , Mass 


2 
57 
23 
21 

3 


1 Nortn Aaanis Mass 




Chicago. Ill 


] Northampton. Mass 




Cleveland. Ohio 


1 Philadelphia. Pa 


29 


Detroit Mich 


1 Pittsburgh Pa 


16 


Duluth, Minn 


' Heading, Pa 




Everett, Mass 


Uochester, N. Y 

San Diego, Cal 


3 


Fall River, Mass 


1 
1 


1 


Fiichburj;, Mass 


' San Francisco, CaJ . 


5 


Flint. Mich 


i Schenectady. N. Y '.'.'.'. 

Somerville, Mass 




Haijerst own , Md 




1 


Haverhill, Mass 


1 
1 
4 
2 


Terre Haute, Ind 


1 


Lawrence, Mass 


Wichita, Kans 


1 


Los Anj^clos, Cal 


Wilmington, Del 




Lynn, Mass ; 

McKeesport, Pa 


Worcester, Mass 















POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS). 

Illinois. 

The State Board of Health of IlUnois reported that during the period 
from July 3 to 9, 1917, four cases of poliomyeUtis were notified in 
Illinois; one case each in Chicago, Joliet, Zion City, and Melrose 
Township, Adams County. 



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1113 



jQly 13, 1017 



POUOMYEUnS (INFANTILE) PARALYSIS— Continued. 

Bfasmehiisefts. 

Collaborating Epidemiologist Kelloy reported that during the week 
ended July 7, 1917, cases of poliomyelitis were notified in Massachu- 
setts as follows: Haveriiill 2, Medford 1, Beverly 1, Springfield I, 
Lowell 1. 

Minnesota. 

CoUaborating Epidemiologist Bracken reported that during the 
month of June, 1917, four cases of poliomyelitis were notified in 
Minnesota, making a total of 21 cases reported since January 1, 1917. 

New York— New York City. 

The Department of Health of New York City reported that during 
the month of June, 1917, 66 cases of poliomyelitis were notified in 
the city of New York, making a total of 99 cases reported since 
January 1, 1917. In 1916 the nxunber of cases reported during June 
was 380, with a total of 409 cases notified from January 1 to June 30. 

VermoKt. 

CoUabcwating Epidemiologist Dalton reported the occurrence of 
cases of poliomyelitis in Vermont as follows: In the toMTi of Barre, 
from June 16 to July 7, 4 cases; in Fayston on July 7, 1; in Mont- 
pelier, from June 19 to July 7, 29; in Waitsfield, from June 16 to 
July 7, 6; in Washington, from June 27 to July 7, 2 cases. 

State Reporte for May, 1917. 



Place. 


New rase? 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Alabama: 

Clebome Ccwinty 


i 
1 , 

1! 

:\ ^ 

1 
1 


Conn€it lout— Continued. 

New Haven County— Continued. 
XauKituck 




JcUer^iMi Countv 


1 
1 

5 


Tuscaloosa County 


New Haven 


TotjJ 


Total 




Hawaii: 
Oabu- 

Honolulu........... . 


rpnnoclicut: 

rairfidd County— 

Stamford 


1 


Hartford Co- inty - 

Bout bins ton ................. 


Washington: 

Island County— 

Langley 


New Haven County— 

Branford - 


1 







Place. 



City Reports for Week Ended June 23, 1917. 

Deaths. \\ Place. 



Hiicago.Hl 

Cincinnati, Ohio.. 
Cleveland, Ohio.. 
Covineton, Ky... 
Haverhill, Mass.. 
Jersey City, N.J. 



Cases. 



NowarV, N. J 

Now V'ork. N. Y.. 
rortsraoiHli, N. H 

St. Louis, Mo 

Worcestt r, Mass . , 



Cases. ' Deaths. 



8 

{|::::::;::: 

I i 



I 



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July 13, 1917 



1114 



RABIES IN ANIMALS. 
City Report for Week Ended June 23, 1917. 

During the week ended June 23, 1917, 4 cases of rabies in animals 
were reported at Detroit, Mich. 

'ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER. 
Nevada — Humboldt County. 
The State Board of Heallh of Nevada reported July 10, 1917, that 
five cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever had been notified in 
Humboldt County, Nev. 

Washington Report for May, 1917. 
During the month of May, 1917, 3 cases of Rocky Mountain spotted 
fever were reported at Odessa, Lincoln County, Wash. 

SCARLET FEVER. 
See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosb, page 1117. 

SMALLPOX. 
Minnesota. 
Collaborating Epidemiologist Bracken reported that during the 
week ended July 7, 1917, 5 new foci of smallpox infection were 
reported in Minnesota, cases of the disease having been notified as 
follows: Chisago Coimty, Rush City, 17 (cases occurred in May and 
June) ; Crow Wing County, Manganese, 1 ; Polk County, Angus Town- 
ship, 1; Todd County, Moran Township, 1; Washington County, 

Marine, 1. 

Miscellaneous State Reports. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Alabama (Mav 1-31): 

Calhonp County. 


1 
24 

5 
13 

4 
4 
U 
1 
5 
1 

a 




Washington (May 1-31): 
Chelan County— 

Wenatchec 


1 

1 
3 

2 

1 

1 

1 
1 
3 

9 
1 

22 
5 

1 

3 
3 

1 

2 




Chambers County 

Vfft^tih Coiint.v 








Clark Ck)untv 




Jackson C^iiTity 




P.idge«eld 




Limestone County 

Macon County 




King Coimty— 

Scittic 








Madison Countv 




Kit^ip County— 

Cnarleston 




Mjirflhftli County . . . 






MontKomenr County 

Talladega County 

Tallapoosa County 




Kittitas County— 

EHensburg 

Klicld tat C!oimty 














Pftfdflc Coirntv 




Total 


71 




Pend Oreille County 

Pierce (bounty- 

Tocoma 










Connecticut (May 1-31): 
Fairfield County — 


2 

22 
2 
1 

1 
7 

1 

1 

2 
2 
4 

1 

55 






Snohomish County 

Spokane County 




Norwalk 




Hartford County — 




Spokane 




Berlin 


Walla Walla Coimty- 
Waitsburg 




Bristol 






Hartford 




Whatcom County— 




New Britain 






Southington 




Yakima County 




Litchfield County— 




North Yakima 

Toppenish 




Torrington 




Winchester 




Total 




New Haven County — 




59 




New Haven 






Oxford 






Southbury 






Wallingford 






Waterburv 







New London Ck)unty— 
Oroton 












Total 













Digitized by 



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Cttj 



1115 

SMALLPOX— Oontihued. 

te Week Ended ime 23. 1917. 



July la, 1917 



Place. 



Akroo, C%io 

Alton, m. 

Austin, Tex 

Cairo, III 

Canton, Ohio 

Qiicago.Iil 

Cincinnati, Ohio. . . 
Clev<«lan4,Ohio... 
CafiefviJle. KoDS.. 

CoJombus, Ohio 

09fiaglmi.Ky 

Danville, III 

Dayton, Ohio. 

Detroit, Mich 

DabaqiM, Iowa.... 

Dohith.Minn 

Erie, Pa 

ETansvlfle,Iiid.... 
FitchbuiF. Mass... 

FlintJCkh. 

FortWorth-Tex.. 
Green Bay. wis... 
Indianapolis, Ind.. 
Kansas Oty,Kans 
Kansas City. Mo... 

Kenosha, wis 

LUtJe Rock, Ark.. 

Madison, Wis 

Memphis, Tenn.... 
MUwau]Dee,Wis... 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



MInnea|)oli.'^, Minn... . 

Miiscdtine. lima 

Kash\ille. Tcnn 

Newcastle, Pa 

New r>rleen.s. La 

Okiahoraa (Ity, Okla. 

Omaha, Xebr 

Philadelphia. Pa 

Pidsbuirh. Pa 

Pontiac, Mich 

Portland. Orog ....... 

Quincy,IIl 

Roanoke, Va 

Kork Island, 111 

8t. Joseph. Mo 

St. I>ouis, Mo 

Salt Lake nty,rtah. 

Sioux Citj'. Iowa 

Sprinirfiold, 111 

Sprintfield, Ohio 

Steelton. Pa 

Superior, Wis 

Tacoma, Wash 

Terro Haute, Ind 

Toledo, Ohio 

To| eka. Kans 

Wichita, Kan5, 

Worcester, Miiss 

Zaneh.ille, Oliio 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



N TETANUS. 
City Reports for Week Ended June 23, 1917. 



Place. 


Casea. 


Deaths. 1 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Boston Masn 


1 


1 


Lone lieach. Cal 


1 - 


Charleston, S C 


i ' 


Xo\v.R)..N. J 


1 




Chicago Hi 


X 
1 
1 


i; I'iti.shurgh. Pa 


1 


DanvFlle, IH . . 1 . ! ! 


1 1 St. L.>i:is. Mo 


3 




Evans\ille, Ind., 


1 1 


Whtvling, W. Va 


1 












TUBERCULOSIS. 

See Diphtheria, meaales, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1117. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 
Slate Reports for May, 1917. 



Pkce. 


1 
New eases 1 
reported. 


Place. 


NewcMes 
reported. 


Alabama: 

Bibb County 


2 
7 


Alabama— Cont inued. 

Elmore Count v 


5 


Butler County 


E.Ncambia (^3Ui^y 


4 


niiJtoa County 


Etowah County 


3 


Cboctsw County •. 


Franklin County 


1 


dartre ronnty 


Grci'no County 


1 


Ooffie Comity 


IIalc(\)untv 


1 


Cenecoh County 


JclTerson County 


62 


Cooaa County 


Lamar C-mmty 


1 


Ooviafltmi County. t r - 


Loe Cotjntv 


1 


Orpimliaw Countv r 


Llmci'tone Coimty 


1 


Galtean County, 


Madi.son County 


1 


Dilteromity. ... 


Mnrenjfo County 


5 


IMaOk County 


MifcTsball County 


2 



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July 13, 1917 



1116 



TYPHOID FEVER-<k)ntmued. 
State Reports for Maj, 1917— Continued. 



Place. 



Alabama — ("ontinued. 

Mobilo (V)iinty 

Montgomery County . . . 

Morgan County 

Piko County 

Randolph County 

Russell Cojinty 

Sbolby (bounty 

St. Clair County 

Sumter County 

Talladega County 

Tallapoosa County 

Tuscaloosa Coimty 

Walker County 

Washington County. . . . 

Wilcox County 

Winston County 

Total 

Connecticut: 

Fairfield County- 
Bridgeport 

Danbury 

fireenwich 

Norwalk 

Hartford County— 

Enfield 

Cilastonbury 

Hartford 

Litchfield County- 
Canaan 

New Ilavon County — 
Now Havon 

New I/ondon County— 

(•riswold 

Jowclt ('ily 

Windham County- 
Woodstock 

Total 

Hawaii: 
Howail- 

Haraakua TLstrict. 

Hilo 

Puna District 



New cases 
reported. 



189 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



Hawaii— Continued. 
Kauai— 

Hanalei District. 

li— 

Hana District.... 
Oahu— 

Honolulu 

Total 

Washington: 

Bentoo County 

Prosser 

Chelan County— 

Wenatcfaee 

Clark County- 
Vancouver 

Franklin County 

King County 

Seftttle 

Lincoln County 

Davenport 

Odessa 

Okanogan County. . . 

Conconully 

Pierce County— 

Tacoma 

Skagit County- 

Snohomish County — 

Edmonds 

Everett 

Index 

Spokane County — 

Spokane 

Stevens County 

Wahkiikum Count v. 
Walla Walla CoiuitS'. 
Whitman County— 

Colfax 

Yakima County 

Total 



City Reports for Week Ended June 23, 1917. 



Place. 



Akron, Ohio 

Albany,N.Y 

Baltimore. Md 

Beaver Falls, Pa... 
Birmingham, Ala.. 
Boston, Mass 

Sridgeport, Conn. . 
rockton, Mass 

Cambridge, Mass.. 
Charleston, B.C.. 

Chelsea, Mass 

Chicago, 111. - 

Cleveland, Ohio... 
Columbus. Ohio... 

DanviUe,ill 

Dayton, Oliio 

Detroit, Mich 

Duluth, Minn 

East Orange, N.J. 

Erie, Pa 

Fall River, Mass... 

Flint, Mich 

Fort Worth, To-,. 



Cases. • Deaths. 



2 l( 



Plac*. 



(Jrand luipids, Mich 

Hamilton, Ohio 

ImUumipolis, Ind 

Kunsiis Cit\ , Mo 

Little Uoik. Ark 

Long Branth. N. J 

Los .\ngoles, Cal 

Jyowcll . Mass 



Cases. 



LynchburK, Va.. 

Madison, \Nis 

Memphis, Tenn 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Minneapolis. Minn... 

Mobile, Ala ^... 

Nashville. Tcnn 

Newark, N. J 

New Haven, Conn.. . 
New Ix)ndon, Conn.. 
New Orleans . La ... . 
New York, N.Y.... 
Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Norristown, Pa 

Oakland, Cal 



Deaths. 



1 




2 


1 




3 




















1 




1 
1 




i 


















20 


3 





Digitized by 



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1117 

TTPHOm FEVER— Continued. 
CKy R^iNMls for Week Ended June 23, 1917— Continued 



July 13, 1917 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


np^ Utah . 


2 

1 
32 
2 

1 
1 
4 
1 
3 
10 
4 
4 




Schenectady, N. Y 


2 
2 




OElahomaClty.Okla. 

Ptmncket.R.I 




Seattle. Wwh 






South bond, Ind 




Phfladfihrfifa. Pa 


2 

1 


Tauoton. Mass 




Httsburfei, Pa 


Toledo, Ohio 


1 


PttnPf MVk J 


Trenton, N. J 


2 

1 




PWtl«»»4,'H« 




Troy,N.Y 

Washington, D. C 










RorkTlfonnt NO 




Willianwport.Pa 




St Louis, Mo.'. \V. 




Wilmington, t>el 


2 


8iit Lake CitT. IJtyi 


2 


Winaton-Salem, N. C 




8tn Fymrifpo, Cal 


Worcester, Mass 




mfritiM>nto, C^l . . 




Zanesville^ Ohio 


1 













DIPHTHERU, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS. 
State Reports for Maj, 1917. 





Cases reported. 


State. 


Cases reported. 


state. 


Dlph- 
tbcria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


AUhama 


21 
142 


2,050 
1,430 


25 
140 


HawaiL 


3 
36 


16 
201 


1 


Coonasticut 


Washington 


68 









aty Reports for Week Ended June 23v 1917. 



City. 



Over SOOUXn inhabitants: 

Baltimore. Md 

Boston, Mass 

(liiOM50,ni 

aevAnd. Ohio. 

Detroit. Mich 

Los Anceles. Cal 

NewYork,N.Y 

Phitodelphia,Pa 

Pittstnirgh. Pa. 

St. Look, Mo 

From 300,000 to SOO.OOO inbabit- 
ants: 

Boflalo,N. Y 

CiDdnnati. Ohio 

J«eyaty,N.J 

Milwaukee. Wis 

MhuMapolfe, Minn 

Nfwark.N.J 

New Orleans, La 

Ban Fcanciseo, Cal 

Seattle, Wash 

Wachi^Um, D. C 

l^roDi 200^ to 300,000 inhabit- 
uu: 

Columbus, Ohio 

Denw, Colo 

tndiamjnolis, Ind 

KansaaCity, Mo 

Portland, Or« 

ProTklenoe, R. I 

RoetMater. N. Y 

80 



Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1, 1916 
(estunated 
bvU.S. 
Census 
Bureau). 



589,621 

756,476 

2,497,722 

674,073 

6n,784 

503,812 

5,602,841 

1,709,518 

579,090 

757,309 



468,358 
410,476 
306,345 
436,535 
363,454 
408,894 
371,747 
463,516 
348,639 
3e3,980 



214,878 
2fM),«)0 
271,708 
297, M47 
295,465 
254,960 
256,417 



Total 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 



160 
242 
629 
181 
184 



1,339 
462 
103 
189 



138 
123 
74 
92 



91 



147 

67 



67 



Diphtheria. 



4 
74 

181 

36 

97 

7 

245 
60 
23 
75 



Measles. 



166 
192 
450 
69 
22 
79 
843 
175 
149 
73 



52 

12 

128 



Scarlet 
fever. 



14 
26 

246 
11 
81 
18 

113 
17 
14 
71 



Tuber- 
culosis. 



56 
54 

243 
45 
29 
56 

248 
94 
28 
51 



20 
32 
56 

22 

14 
25 
221 
52 
18 
10 



18 
16 
6 



12 
5 
6 



6 
15 



11 
4 

10 

7 



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Julj 13, 1917 



1118 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AMD TUBERCULOSIS— 

Continued. 

City Reports for Week Ended June 23. 1917— Condnued. 





Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1, 1916 
(estimated 
by U. S. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
culosis. 


City. 


«Q 


1 


i 


1 


J 


1 


i 


1 


yrom 100,000 to 200,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Albany, N.Y 


KM, 199 
181,762 
121,579 
112,081 
106. 2 J3 
127,224 
128,366 
104.562 
128,291 
100,560 
113.245 
102,425 
14^/^95 
117,057 
llh,l.'i8 
140 ftHo 
li:s,n>l 

10;.. i7(» 

10:',3M 

15(>.ris7 

Ii7,;ty3 

105. 942 

15.'),G2i 
112.770 

i<,i,:>rA 
lujm 

163,311 

W, «•);{ 
57.r«*>; 
5{.y7.i 
(•".119 

m, N52 

CO. 731 
57, 144 
94,495 
ST), 090 
G3, 70o 
75, 195 
76, ()7S 
54.772 
76.1 S3 
72,015 
77,214 
68,529 
99,437 
50,S53 
57,343 
51.155 
78,283 
58.221 
53,791 
89,612 
92,943 
71,744 
69.411 
63,867 
55,185 
66,89,'i 
55,642 
8,^236 
53,330 
99.519 
57,07H 
87,039 


.. 






36 
14 

8 
18 
18 
27 
37 


...... 

1 
1 

"2 


4 

1 
2 
2 
2 
8 




9 
34 

4 
8 
3 
4 
15 




Birmingham, Ala 


92 
2S 
22 

46' 

39 
26 
30 
19 
31 
19 
GO 
31 
41 

."^9' 

no 

25 
37 
42 

ns' 

37 

42 

ii" 






11 


Bridgeport, i onn 


5 
3 

8 

1 

2 
2 
3 

17 

1 






Cambridge, Mass 




Camden, N.J 




Dayton, Ohio 




Fall River, Mass 




Fort Worth, Tc\ 








«rand Uapids, Mich 




37 








1 
5 
7 
6 
29 
3 
6 
8 
3 

4 
3 












Lowell, Ma,s.s 




1 


6 
11 










Lynn, Ma.ss 




7 
3 

1 


1 





Mtemphis, Tcnn 




Nashville, Tenn 






1 
32 
72 






New Bedford, Ma-w 


"■3 
3 


1 
1 




New Haven v'onn 










o?\l:lftnd, Cal. 




3 
15 
3 







Omaha, NoLr 

Heading, l*a 


1 
5 




23 

1 
13 

3 
18 
50 






Richmond, Va 






Salt lakcCitv, I'tah 


i 1 

6 1 
2 1 




16 
5 

12 
2 

21 
I 

U 






Springfield, Maw 




9 

3 




Svracuse, N . Y 




Tiicoma, Wash 


1 
4 






Toledo, Ohio 


1 


51 
4 

8 

9 
1 


...... 


1 


1 
5 
5 

12 


II 


Trenton, N.J 

Worcester, Mais 

From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Akron, Ohio. . 


2 

2.5 

2 ' 

2. 




AllentoMii, Pa 




3 







Altoona, I'ti. 


4 

22 

1 
S 






1 
1 
2 




Atlantic ( ity, N.J 

Bayonne, N.J 

Berkeley, (al 






1 








8 
23 
17 
14 
36 
15 
14 
24 
56 

■■". ie 
10 
22 

29 
14 
24 







1 






Binghamton, N, Y 


7 , 3 


lai 

8 1 

2 


3 
1 

1 


:::::: 


1 


Brockton. Mass 




3 

1 


3 


Canton, Ohio 




Charleston, S.C 


3 


Covington, Ky 


2 






3 
2 
2 
1 

8 


'..'.'.'.'. 


1 
3 
3 


5 


Dulutn, MJnn 




.30 i 

52 

4 




EUtabeth.N. J 


4 1 


2 


El Paso, Tex 


9 


Erie, Pa 


2 


5 







4 
4 
6 
21 
3 
6 
3 
2 


30 


P.vfuvsvllk. Tnd 


2 




4 


Flint, Mich '.. 


2 
2 
3 
2 




26 
23 
12 
12 
12 
2 
8 




i3 
2 

1 
4 

7 
3 

1 




1 


Fort Wayne, Tnd 




Harrisburg, Pa 




Hobokcn,Tsr. J 


1 


Johnstown, Pa 






3 




1 


Lancaster, Pa . 




Little Uock, Ark '.. 


9 

7 

28 

31 

13 












Maiden, Mass 


5 

1 
1 


...... 


30 
2 
2 
3 
3 




2 
1 








Bianchester, N. H 




1 


3 


Moblle,Ala 


3 


Now Britain, Conn 












Norfolk, Va 












4 


2 


Oklahoma City, Okla 


17 
17 

i9' 

13 
28 
23 
18 
33 
10 












3 


Paaaaic.N. J 


10 

1 
2 
2 

1 
2 

4 


2 

1 

...... 






2 






3 


Pawtuckct, R. I 










1 


Portland, Me 


19 
23 
8 
3 
3 
33 
55 










2 


Rockford, 111 




2 
2 

7 
5 


1 


1 
2 




Sacramento, Cal 


8 


Saginaw, Mich 


a 


St. Joseph, Mo 




2 
9 
5 


3 


San Diego, Cal 


3 


Schenectady, N. Y 


3 










3 


Sioux City, Iowa. .. . 




3 
2 






Somerville, Mass 


22 


6 


1 


20 






4 


3 



Digitized by 



Google 



1119 



July 13. lOlT 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS^ 

Continued. 

at7 Reports for Week Ended June 23, 1917~Continued. 





Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1, me 
(estimated 
bv U. 8. 
Census 
Bureau). 


ToUl 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
culosis. 


aty. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabit- 
ants-Continued. 
Soath Beod, Ind 


68,946 

6i,iao 

61,550 
66,083 
77,916 
70,722 
76,776 
94,265 
51,656 

27,732 
34,814 
32,985 
32,730 
27,632 
43,425 
46,192 
29,319 
26,074 
32,261 
48,811 
39,873 
28,743 
42,458 
28,203 
39,233 
35,486 
41,781 
41,863 
29,353 
25,679 
40,496 
48,477 
35,363 
48,886 
31,576 
26,771 
38,076 
31,677 
41,097 
35,384 
46,515 
27,587 
36,904 
32,940 
30,099 
47,521 
26,234 
26,318 
27,327 
29,603 
41,133 
31,927 
30,108 
43,715 
37,353 
31,401 
31,404 
33,080 
46,450 
41,185 
38,029 
39,651 
36,798 
38,130 
46,486 
43,284 
28,U20 
38.902 


16 

15 
39 


1 
3 
3 


...... 


17 
9 

16 
9 

11 
1 

32 




3 

1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 




1 




**pH|^«»M, 111 




Sprin^eld, Ohio 




2 


2 


TferelHaute, Ind 




Troy.N. Y 


1 






6 
2 

7 
3 


4 


Wichita, Kans 


1 


Wilkes-^arre, Fa 


18 
28 

3 
11 

J 

10 

7* 

7 
3 
10 


1 
2 

1 




2 


Wilmington, Del 




York, Pa....' 




3 
3 






From 25,000 to 50,000 hihabit- 
ants: 
AUnieda.Cal 




1 








Austin, Tex 


1 








2 


BeUinghom. Wash 




1 
4 
1 
1 
4 
2 
3 
7 
5 












Brookline, Mass 


2 

1 
1 
3 
2 

1 


...... 








1 




Butlor,Pa 








1 


Butt«, Mont 




3 








Chelsp«,Majw 




2 

1 
1 
1 




Chicopw, Mass 




1 




1 


Cumljerland, Md 




Danville, Ul 










Davenport, Iowa 












. 


Dubuque, Iowa 






1 




3 
2 

2 




1 
2 


1 


East Chicago, Ind 






6 
12 
2 
9 
2 




1 


Kast Orange, N.J 


6 
9 
6 
4 
6 
11 
12 






1 


Elgin, III.... 






1 


Everett, Mass 


3 






............ 


5 


1 


Everett, Wash 




4 




1 


Fitchburg, Mass 


1 

1 




32 ' ' 1 3 




2 

1 


1 


Galveston,' Tex . . .• 


... .'::::::i.... i;::::: 


1 


Green Bay, Wis 








Ha^nstown, Md 






3 
1 






Hamilton, Ohio 


7 

is' 

25 
4 

7 


1 

1 
1 
2 




. 


1 !:::::: 

2 


2 2 


Haverhill, Mass 


1 :::::. 

28 ! 


4 
2 


4 


Jackson, Mich 


1 


Kalamasoo, Mich 


59 




1 
3 




2 


Kenosha, \<ris 




15 
6 








Kingston,N.Y 










1 


KnoxviUe, Tenn 






2 




1 ,!!!".!! 


3 


LaCiosse, Wis 


11 
10 
8 
17 

8 

ii' 


1 




1 


2 


Lexington, Ky 




2 

I 

6 






Lin»,Ohio 


3 
2 


2 




2 
2 








Uncohi, Nebr 




1 
2 


1 


Long Beach, Oal 




Lorain. Ohio 


1 






2 

1 

3 




1 ' 


Lynchburg, Va 




7 
3 

1 
6 






3 


Sidison.wis v..:.:.:.: 












McKeesport, Pa 


7 
5 

8 
8 
10 








1 


1 


MedtoKLMass 








2 






Montclair, N. J 


1 






1 


1 


Nashua,N. H 












Newburgh, N. Y 







1 








2 




New Castle, Pa 














Newport, Ky 


12 
8 
8 
15 
5 
5 
12 
14 
7 
16 
11 
9 

10 
12 
10 












1 


1 


Newport, R.I 










2 






Newton, Mass 


1 




11 
5 






i 


Niagara Falls, N. Y 








2 


2 














1 


Ogden, Utah 






1 

1 

3 

1 

39 

1 
2 


;;;;;; 


2 
2 








Orange, N.J 

Pa»Kna,Cal 


3 


1 




1 


1 
1 

5 


Perth Amboy, N. J 


1 










1 


PittsfTdd, Mass 




2 
4 




Portsmouth, Va 


1 
1 









1 


Quincy.ID.'. 








Qtiin<^' Mass 


5 




1 


1 




Radne,'Wls. 








1 




Roanoke, Va 


2 




2 
3 
7 




I 




1 


Rock Island, ni 




1 






8anJose,Cai 


::::::i:::::; 





3 




i 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Jtrijr 13, 1917 



1120 



DIPffTHERIA, MEASLES, SCABLET FBVSt, AND TUBS8CIfL08»- 

Ooaitlaiied. 

CUtf BcvMte f^ Week Ended Mwme tZ, ISlT-CooiaimL 





Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 
by U.S. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 

deaths 

from 

aU 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
culosis. 


City. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


J 


1 






1 


From 25,000 to 50.000 iBtoabit- 
ants—Continued. 
SteubenFille, Ohio 


£7,445 

46,226 J 

36,283 

48,726, 

80,570 

29,894 

43,139 

43,377 

33,^09 

29,892 

31,155 

80,863 

22,K74 
15,010 
13,532 
13,591 
21,685 
15,794 

113,0Z5 
17,548 
22,669 
24,276 
16,950 
23,539 
20,930 
15,395 

U4,610 
17,445 
13,284 
17,500 
23,126 
15,243 
20,985 

122,019 
19,926 
23,805 
17,524 
11,666 
12,067 
14,831 
20,193 
13,621 
24,204 
15,548 
21,618 
28,228 
16,969 


ID 

14 
8 
9 


I 
















Superior wU 


2 


1 














Taunton, Ma&s 


3 
3 
28 
23 

16 










3 


Toneka. Kaiu 








1 








wStham, Mass 


- . .. 
2 


1 




i 

1 

2 




Watertown. NY 










West Hoboiwn, N. J 

Wheelii^, W. va 


8 
19 

W 

23 

7 

7- 

r 


1 






3 





i 


Willi^MntTM^rt, Pa , ' ' * 


6' 














Wilmin^n "S C 










3 


Winston-Salem N C 








1 
2 

1 




3 


1 


Zanesvillo, Ohio 


1 


1 


1 


From lO/no to 25,000 inhabitants: 
Alton, ni . . 




. .....J 




Aim Arbor lOch"" 




1 




Beaver Falls, Pa...., 

Berlin, N. H 




























Braddbck. Pa. .1 








1 




^ 




Cairo, 111 . 


7, 






1 


Clinton, ifass. . . * * 






' 








2 




Coffey v'lUe. K£uu 












2 


Concord, N. H.* 


7 
6 






30 
6 
6 

10 








1 




Oatesbufg, III 














Harrison, N J 
















Kearny, N. J....""][,l/... 


4 








1 




-^.... 




Kokomo, Ind 










1 


Long Branch, N. J.*., 


1' 

6 
4 


1 




5 








1 




Marlhette, Wis. . 








1 


Melrose, Mass 


5 




6 










1 


Morristown, N. J. . 








1 




Muscatine, Iowa ,... 










1 






NantlwAe, Pa 


5 
4 
8 
4 
4 
3 
















Newburynort, Mass 

New London, Conn ... 






5 
2 
23 
4 


























North Adams. Mass 








2 








PlalnftH'CN. / 








1 
1 


1 














PonttftC, lifich 






12 




9 
3) 






Portsmouth, N. H 














Rocky Mount, N.C.' 


6i 
SI 
« 
2 












1 

....„ 

1 
1 
6 




Rutland, Va.. 






2 




1 






i?Andusk'y AMo 








flaratoa'^prinp, N. Y 

South B^ehem, Pa 


1 




















Steelton, Pa .' 


3 






6 
2 

2 










WashiDgton, Pa. 














Wilkinabure, Pa 


10 
5 


1 







1 




1 




W^bura, Mam , . 


1 





















"POi 



A|irU 15^ 1910; no 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOREIGN. 



PLAGUE ON VESSEL. 

FnrOier ReUtire to Steamship "Sardiitia'*— Port of London.^ 

Two additional cases of plague occurred among members of the 
crew of the steamship Sardinia at the port of London during the 
period from May 3 to 8, 1917. 

CHBiA. 

Enininatfcm of Bats — Shanghai. 

During the period from May 6 to June 2, 1917, 1,186 rats were 
examined at Shanghai. No plague infection was found. The last 
plague-infected rat at Shanghai was reported found May 6, 1916. 

MEXICO. 
Yellow Fever — Peto, Yucatan. 

A fatal case of yellow fever was reported Jimc 23, 1917, at Peto, 
State of Yucatan, Mexico. The patient had recently arrived from 
Mexico City. 

Peto b the terminal of a railroad connecting the town with Merida 
and Progreso. 



CTOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEYER. 
R^iorts Recehred During the Week Ended Jnly 13, 1917.' 

CHOLKRA. 



Ptoof. 


Dat«. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


xMwancs. 


Indto: 


Apr. 1-21 




7 

56 

1 

7 




Cafcotta 


Apr. 29-May 5 






MMdns 


Apr. 22-2S 

Apr. 21-28 


1 
19 




RincoQn ... 




TklBninilslmnds: 

rroviooes 


May 20-20, 1917: Cases. 191; 
deaths, 88. 


AlhftT 


May 20-36 


19 

43 

42 

1 


10 
43 

15 

1 


B<iboI 


do 




O^ba 


... .do 






do 




TilyaKs 


do 











I PobUo Health Reports. June 22, 1917, p. 1000. 

* From medical ofBcers ot the Public Health Service, American consuls, and other soiu^es. 



(1121) 



Digitized by 



Google 



July 13. 1917 



1122 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER- 

Continued. 

Reports Received Daring the Week Ended Jal j 13, 1917— Continued. 

PLAGUE. 



Place. 


Dat€. 


Casos. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Arabia: 

Aden 


May 3 14 




24 
30 




Ceylon: 

C'oiombo 


Apr. S May 14... 
June 2 


33 




China: 

Kwangtune Province - 
Ta-pu district 


Present. 


Great Bntain: 

London 


May 3-8 


2 


2 


In hospital at port. FVon s. s. 
Sardinia from Australian and 
Oriental ports. 


India 




Basseln 


Apr. 1-21 




31 
96 
10 
20 
214 
88 

1 
41 

1 
51 

2 

8 


Bombay 


Apr.22-2S 


115 




C-alcutta 


ADr.2»-May 5.... 




Hcntada 


Aprii^r.^. ;:::r- ■• 




Karachi 


Apr.22-May5 

Apr.22-28 


229 
100 




Madras Presidency 




Mandftlay 


Apr.»-14 


1 


Houlmeln 


Apr. 1-21 






If yingyan 


Apr, 1-7 






Rangoon 


Apr. 15-28.. 


52 




Toungoo .' 


Apr. 8-14 




8iam: 

Bankok 


Apr.22-Mayl2.... 


8 









SMALLPOX. 



Canada: * 

ilaltiax 


June 18-23 


2 

1 




Varioloid. 

Present. 
Do. 
Cases foreign; 
natives. 

Varioloid. 




China: 

Antung 


May 21-27 






Chefoo 


May 20-28 


1 




Chiingkiiig. 


May 13-26 






Mukden 


May 27- June 2 








Shanghai . . 


May 21-Juno 3. . . . 
May 13-26 


6 
5 

26 


9 


deaths amtiOf 


Tientsin 


India: 

Bombay 


Apr.22-28 


9 
7 
2 
11 
3 

8 

7 




Calcutta 


Apr. 29— Mays.... 




Karachi 

Madras 

Rangoon 


Apr.22-May5 

Apr.23-May5 

Apr. 15-28 


4 
19 
17 

20 

19 

1 

114 

5 

5 

1 




lUly: 

Turin 

Japan: 

KotH? 

Nagasaki 


May21-June3.... 

May 27- June 10... 

May2*-Junc3 

May 1G-June5 

May 13-19 




Osaka 

Philippine Islands: 

UHnllft 


37 




Straits 8culements: 

Penang 

Sweden: 

Stockholm 


Mar. 18-May 12.... 
Mav 20-26 


2 













TYPHUS FEVER. 



Oreo or: 

Saloniki., 



May 6-12.. 



12 



YELLOW FEVER. 



Me\»ro: 

Yiimlnn Slate - 
IflO 



June z; 



1 I In person recently arriTed I 
Me.xi "• 



de.xico City. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



U23 



July 13, 1017 



GHOLBA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX. TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER— 

Gontiiiued. 

Reports Received From June 30 to Jtdy 6, 1»17.^ 

CHOLBBA. 



Pltfoe. 


Date. 


Cases. 


DMths. 


Remarks. 


Indift: 


Apr.2»-M»y5 


5 


3 









PLAGUE. 



Gokmibo 

CMoa: 

Amoy 

EOTPt 

fioci 

Prorinces — 

Fayoum . , 

Girjwh . . . 

Minieh... 

Siout 



Madras Presidency. , 
Rangoon 



May»-12 

Apr. 20-llay 5.. 



May 12-17. . 

May 11-17. 

May 17 

May 12-15. 
May 12 



May 6-12 

Apr. 29-May 5. 



53 



Present and in vicinity. 
Jan. 1-May 17, 1917: Cases, 231; 
deaths, 116. 



SBfALLPOX. 



Australia: 

Netr South Wal« 

Brett-anlna 

Q(iamlx>ne 

Queensland - 

Thiirsday Island Quar- 
antine Sution. 



Canada: 

Manitoba - 

Winnlj>e? 

Nova Scotia 

Port Hawkesbury. 
Ceykm: 

Colombo 

China: 

Amoy 

Chunf;king 

Harhin 

Hongkong 

Manchuria Station 

Mukden 

Shanghai 

Tsitshar Station 

Tsingtao 



n^ 



lexandria.. 



Madras... 
Rangoon. 
Portugal: 
Lisbon... 



Riga 

VladlTostok..* 

Turkey in Asia: 

Treblzond 

Union of South Africa: 

J(diann«burg 



Apr. 27- Ma V 10.. 
do 



Biay9.. 



June 10-16... 
Jqne 17-28. 
May 6-12... 



Apr. 29- May 5.. 

Mavr.-12 

Apr. 21- May 6.. 

Ma> (.12 

Apr. 23-29 

May 20 26 

Mav 14-20 

Apr. IG 22 

May 22-29 



Apr. 30-May 27.... 



May6-12. 

Apr. 29- May 5.. 



May 13-20 

Mar. U-May5.. 
Mar. li>-21 



Feb. 25-Apr. 13. 
Mar. 12-24 



Apr. 27- May 10, 1917: Cases, G. 



From s. s. St. Albans from Kobe 
via IlonslronR. Vessel pro- 
ceeded to lownsville, itris- 
bauc, and Sydney, in quaran- 
tine. 



Present in dislrlct. 



Present and in vicinity. 

rrcscnt. 

On Chinese Eastern Railway. 

Do. 
Pre.sent. 

On Chinese Eantorn Railway. 
At another station on railway, 
1 case. 



Jan. 1-31, 1917: Cases, 7. 



* From medical offlcers of the Public Health Service, American consuls, and other sources. For rep<«ta 
rtcrtved from Dec. 30, 1910, to June 29, 1917, sec Public Health Reports for June 29, 1917. The tables of 
•pidemic diseases are terminated semiannually and new tables begun. 



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July 13, 1917 



1124 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVEB- 

Continued. 

Reports Received From June 30 to Julj 6, 1917— Continued. 

TYPHUS FEVER. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


China: 

Tsingtao 


May 20-29 


1 
890 






Alexandria 


Apr. 30-May 27.... 


232 




Russia: 

Riga 


Jan. 1-31, 1917: Case, l; 


Vladivostok 


Mar. 2^Apr.4.... 


2 













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PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 

VOL. 32 JULY 20, 1917 No. 29 



MEDICAL CARE OF INJURED FEDERAL EMPLOYEES. 

HOSPTTALS AND STATIONS OF THE PUBUC HEALTH SERVICE TO FURNISH FREE 
BfENCAL TREATMENT TO EBfPLOYEES OF THE UNITED STATES INJURED IN THE 
PERFORMANCE OF THEIR DUTKS. 

Washington, June 27 , 1917. 
To commissioned medical officers, acting assistant surgeons, customs 

officers, and others concerned: 

Section 9 of act of Congress approved September 7, 1916, entitled 
**An act to provide compensation for employees of the United 
States suflfering injuries while in the performance of their duties, 
and for other purposes,'' reads as follows: 

Sec. 9. That immediately after an injury sustained by an employee while in the 
performance of his duty, whether or not disability has arisen, and for a reasonable 
time thereafter, the United States shall furnish to such employee reasonable medical, 
suigical, and hospital services and supplies unless he refuses to accept them. Sucl^ 
services and supplies shall be furnished by United States medical officers and hos- 
pitals, but where this is not practicable shall be furnished by private physicians 
and hospitals designated or approved by the commission and paid for from the em- 
ployees' compensation fund. If necessary for the securing of proper medical, sur- 
gical, and hospital treatment, the employee, in the discretion of the commission, 
may be furnished transportation at the expense of the employees' compensation 
fund. 

The commission referred to above has been created and is known 
as the '^United States Employees' Compensation Commission." 
This commission has immediate jurisdiction over matters pertaining 
to the medical and surgical relief of Government employees who arc 
injured while in the performance of their duties. 

In accordance with the provisions contained in the above quoted 
section of the act of Congress approved September 7, 1916, civil 
employees of the United States who are injured while in the per- 
formance of their duties, shall be furnished, upon appUcation and 
without personal charge, reasonable medical and surgical treatment 
by all medical officers at first, second, and third class relief stations 
of the service, in accordance with rules hereinafter prescribed : 

1. An injured civil employee of the United States, in order to receive treatment, 
shall present to the medical officer a certificate stating that he is a Government em- 
ployee and that he was injured on a certain date while in the performance of hia 
81 " (1126) 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



July 20. 1917 1126 

duties. Such certificates must be signed by the employee's superior officer, or by 
the medical officer, United States Employees' Compensation Commission. 

2. An injured civil employee of the United States, in order to obtain the benefits 
of the service, must apply in person (or by proxy if too seriously injured so to do) at 
the local office of the Public Health Service, or to a medical officer of said service. 

3. At marine hospitals, no charge shall be made for services or supplies furnished 
injured civil employees of the United States. Expenditures incurred at said hos- 
pitals for the care and treatment of such injured employees are payable from appro- 
priations for the Public Health Ser\ace. 

. 4. At second and third class relief stations of the service, expenditures incurred 
on account of either office or hospital treatment furnished injured civil employees of 
the United States shall be taken up in special vouchers rendered against the United 
States Employees' Compensation Commission. The rat^s charged for the care of 
seamen, as approved by the department, shall be charged for the care of injured 
Government employees at all contract hospitals of the service, and vouchers for such 
care should be rendered against the above-named commission. All vouchers for 
services or supplies furnished in the treatment of said injured employees will be paid 
direct by the irnited States Employees' Compensation Commission, and such vouchers 
should be forwarded to the bureau for reference to the proper officer of that commis- 
sion, unless otherwise instructed. In preparing said vouchers, the words ''Em- 
ployees' compensation fund" should be written in at the station after the word "ap- 
propriation" appearing on voucher forms, and 8tul)6 attached to such vouchers should 
be altered to show that payment is made on account of the United States Compensa- 
tion Commission. Until further notice, vouclu rs for said services or supplies should 
be rendered on blanks issued by the Public Health Service, Forms lf)26 and 1949. 
Expenditures payable from the above-mentioned fund should not be listed amon^ 
the exix'nditures noted in monthly schedules of encumbrances. Form 1955. No 
charges shall be made for professional services furnished said injured employees by 
medical officers of the serNice, nor shall any charge be made for supplies in slock 
furnished such persons. 

5. Treatment furnished injured employees of the United States, in accordance 
with the above-mentioned act of Con<.^ress, shall be taken up in monthly reports of 
patients admitted to and discharired from ho.-pital treat niont at first and second 
clavss relief station?, and relief certificates and hospital permit.^ shall be issued in case 
of treatment furnished such patients at third-class relief stations of the service. On 
such reports the class of patient should be designated or shown and authority for said 
treatment should be cited as "Act of September 7, 1916." Treatment furnished said 
patients shall also be taken up in "Medical officer's monthly report of relief. Form 
1922," and in annual reports of medical and surgical relief furnislied office and hos- 
pital patients, Forms 1923, 1924, and 1925. 

6. Upon the termination of both office and hospital treatment, a copy of the clinical 
record of treatment furnished injured employees of the United Staters shall be for- 
warded, through the bureau, to the medical officer. United States Employees' Com- 
pensation Commission. Such clinical records shall include the history, diagnosis, 
treatment, and other pertinent information connected with each case, and shall be 
prepared on service Forms 1946 A, B, C, and D. 

7. When it is in the interest of economy and to the welfare of injured employees of 
the United States, the above-mentioned commission will order the transfer of such 
patients from one station to another, including authority for the necessary expenses 
involved in such tmnsfers. No injured employee should be so transferred without 
special authority from the Unit(^d States Employees' Compensation Commission. 
Upon the transfer of an injured einployee from a second or third class relief station to 
a marine lK)S})ilal, for the purpose of receiviiiLr further treatment, a copy of the clinical 
record should be forwarded to the medical officer in charge of said marine hospital; 

Digitized by VaOOQlC 



1127 July 20, 1917 

and upon discharge of the employee from the marine hospital a complete clinical 
record (covering his treatment at both the contract relief station and marine hos- 
pital) shall at once be forwarded, through the bureau, to the medical officer. United 
States Employees' Compensation Commission. 

Officers in charge of second and third class relief stations are 
directed to obtain letters signed by the proper authorities of the 
local contract hospitals to the effect that civil employees of the United 
States, injured while in the performance of their duties, will be 
received at said hospitals and furnished quarters, subsistence, nurs- 
ing, and necessary medicines, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1918, at the same rates as named in their proposals submitted for 
the care of seamen during said fiscal year; the services to be the same 
as that furnished seamen. These letters should be addressed to the 
chairman. United States Employees' Compensation Commission, 
Washington, D. C. They should be obtained without delay and for- 
warded through the bureau. 

Receipt of this circular should be acknowledged. 

Rupert Blue, Surgeon General. 



QUARANTINE STATION, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. 

EXECUTIVE ORDER DESIGNATING THE ISLAND OF CAUIT, CEDU, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, 
FOR USE AS A QUARANTINE STATION. 

Whereas by Executive order dated October 25, 1904, Luke E 
Wright, civil governor of the Philippine Islands, set aside and re- 
served the Island of Cauit, Province of Cebu, Philippine Islands, 
'^For the use of the Quarantine Service and the Marme Hospital 
Service,'* and said island is now used as a United States quarantine 
station; and 

Whereas the act of Congress approved August 29, 1916, provides 
that all the property and rights which may have been acquired in 
the PhiUppine Islands by the United States under the treaty of peace 
with Spain, except such land or other property as has been or shall 
be designated by the President of the United States for military and 
other reservations of the Government of the United States * * * 
are hereby placed under the control of the government of said islands 
to be administered or disposed of for the benefit of the inhabitants 
thereof, 

I hereby designate, confirm, and set aside the island of Cauit, 
Province of Cebu, PhiUppine Islands, for use as a quarantine station 
under the Treasury Department of the United States. 

(Signed) Woodrow Wilson. 

The White House, 

28 June, 1917. 



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July 20, 1917 1128 

MALARIA IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

PREVALENCE AND GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION. 

August 1, 1913, the poriodical circularization of the physicians of 
North Carolina was begun to determine the prevalence and geographic 



U. S. Marine IXospital, New Orleans, La. 

Dear Doctor: The UniU»d States Public Health Service has under- 
taken to collect information of the prevalence and geographic distribution 
of malarial fevers in the United States. In order to obtain such informa- 
tion, this form of postal card, which requires no stamp ^ has been prepared 
for your reply. 

Your report will be of value whether you have had cases or not. In 
every instance, please fill in your post-office address, county, and State, 
with your signature, as all data thus furnished will bo tabulated and used 
in a report on the prevalence and geographic distribution of malarial fevers 
in your State. 

Please keep a record of your cases of malaria, as postal cards will be 
sent you every quarter. 

Thanking you for yoiu" cooperation, I remain, 
Respectfully, 

R. H. VON EzDOiiF, Surgwn, U.S.P.H.S. 



(Post oflire.) (Counly.) (State.) 



(Onto.) 
The following numbers of new cases of malarial fevers occurred in my 
practice? durini,' the nioiilhs uatnt^d. of tin* year 1915: 



July. Au(jlm. ' SLPTKMiiKa. I 

__ _. l_^ _^l t 



White. Colored. White. < Colored. I Wliile. 



I 



Colored. 



The (lia'/nosos won; coulirined by tli<- use of the inicrosroiMvin 

of thes** cart*'.^. 

NoTK. Any a'lditionjl infomiiilion Ijcariir.: <»ninilnrial i'ner<. their (\t-<»s. the l;iiid of 
nin-.iiiit'M^ in the I'ivulilx. ^Uf i i.-^!»nrc of brc, iin/ cl-i'.e^cf ttv-^ .lit'-f^', pr >ph'. l.vtie 
HK'-u'in >. ilir <!Hc m;ii/i:i. i»n>(» )rlijii ol ..hilduii aik U'J, a.ijil li.i :n -. 1-' iaiTU iovers, 
vhnul'l »'<- ^t' u^d iinflcr n'lnirks. 

Remarks- 



., }f.D. 



Vv] : li.cti' t] nf rfj'ly )>' .:;il '/.ird. 

di-ii! ii)uti()n of mahiria inf(Mli(>n in \]\o Sf;<t(\ This was a continua- 
tion of tho work ^vUi'h lia'l Ix* 'ii K-mmi mnn* limn two years boforo 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1129 



July 20, 1017 




July 20, 1917 



1130 



with the State of Alabama, and which had been carried out in the 
meantime in a number of other States. At regular intervals reply 
postal cards were sent to the practicing physicians in North Caro- 
lina. Those cards were at first sent out each month. During 1915 
and 1916 they wore sent out quarterly. A reproduction of the card 
used in 1915 and 1916 is given on page 1128, showing the instructions 
sent to each physician and the schedule which ho was requested to 
fill out and return. 

The work of circularization and of compilation of the data on the 
returned cards was carried on by the late Surg. R. H. von Ezdorf up 
to the time of his death in September, 1916. Since then it has been 
carried on by Asst. Surg. Derivaux and Asst. Surg. Gen. Carter. 





Jan. 


Fab, 


Mar. 


Apr. 


Ma7. 


Jon. 


Jul. 


Auff. 


Sep. 


Cot. 


Hov, 


Deo. 




























































































A 






-^^, 




















A 




r 


> 


V 
















y 


^ \ 




/ 




\ 






CO 

o 










/ 




V J 


f 




\ 






8 










/ 




\/ 








^ 














/ 




V 








\ 






\ 






/ 














\ 






> 


V, 




y 














> 


< 






V- 


■— ^ 


















\ 











































































































Kelatir.e prcvalon-o of malaria in North (^arolina. by m.»n;hs, as indicated by the numbers of 

case.^ rop rled. 

The collection of data by circularization of physicians is not en- 
tirely satisfactory in the results it gives. Only about 16 per cent of 
the physicians fill out the schedules and return them. It is impossible 
to know the controlling reasons why these 16 per cent return the 
blanks and 84 per cent fail to do so. One is likely to wonder whether 
the 16 ])cr cent represent the more cnpable and conscientious physi- 
cians. It is probable that tliey do and that the replies re[)resent the 
information of th(^ bettor practitioners. Tlie number of cards sent 
out and numl)ers of schedules returned, and the other results of the 
circularization, are shown briefly in Table 1. 

The results of circularization in this way, depending as they do 
upon voluntary cooperation of the physicians, do not show the actual 
number of cases of the chsease that occur. The method, however, is 
dependable and furnishes quite satisfactory information regarding 

Digitized by VjOO 



1131 



July 20, 1917 



the ge(^aphic distribution of the disease. The replies fr( m the 
various localities also serve as a convenient and sufficiently accurate 
index of the relative prevalence of malarial fevers. The data re- 
turned by the physicians are probably as dependable an index of the 
relative prevalence of malaria in the several counties as are the mor- 
tality records which it has been customary to use as an index of the 
relative prevalence of typhoid fever and other diseases. 

The numbers of cases reported by months for the entire State are 
given in Table 2, the cases reported by counties in Table 3, the types 
of infection reported to have been diagnosed microscopically in Table 
4, and the counties in which hemoglobinuric fever was reported in 
Table 5. 

The map on page 1129 shows the relative prevalence of the disease 
in the several counties, the heaviest shaded counties being those in 
which the infection is heaviest, the unshaded those in which the 
infection is lightest. The relative density of infection was determined 
by ascertaining the number of cases reported in each county from 
August 1, 1913, to December 31, 1916, per 1,000 population. The 
population used was that of the 1910 census. 

It will be noticed in Table 4 that tertian infection was reported as 
having been diagnosed microscopically in 57 counties, quartan in 18 
counties, and estivo-autumnal in 34 counties. Hemoglobinuric 
fever was rpj)orted in 4 counties, namely, Johnston, Martin, Person, 
and Bertie. 

Table 1.— Results of circularizallon of practicing physicians. 



Period. 



1913. 
August to November.. 

1914. 
Jaooary !o December. 

1915. 

January lo Mart'h 

April to June 

July to j'pptemljer 

October lo De:emljer. 



Inqriry 
i (Ar<\< Replies 

I fo u o I received. 
I)hy.^i i ins. 



1910. 

Jtnoary to Manh 

April to June 

Jimr to September 

October to December. 



,849 



21, I2G 



5,547 
1,SI9 
1,849 
1,819 



1,849 
1,849 
1,849 
1,849 



408 
3,320 



780 
268 
331 

:^8o 



300 
304 
220 
26C 



Pouc 
of ic.'lie 



I Counties 
*■ 'reprevsente<l 
in replies. 



15.72 



14.06 
14.49 
17.90 
20.55 



16. 24 
16. 45 
11.89 
14.4ti 



Count ie"? 

not iH'Hnl 

from. 



Coses of 
miilaria 
reported. 



«3,901 



82C 
1,144 
2,(V44 
1,844 



465 
1,363 
1,524 
1,081 



Year. 


Jan. 


B13 




1914 


867 


1915 


351 


19W 


lao 







' Includes 500 cases estimated. 
Table 2. — Cases of mntnria reported by montfis. 
Feb. 



579 
205 
125 



Mar. 



476 
2W 
201 



Apr. 



619 
228 
280 



May. 



1,004 
350 
434 



June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 






>i,a3i 

1,050 
797 
,502 


U,160 

678 

1, la-i 

649 


«783 

8S9 
554 


»427 
425 
653 

292 




l,2»i') 


444 

373 


314 
302 
235 



500 additional cases estimated; not distributed by raonthfj.gi^j^g^j ^^ CjOOQIC 



July 20. 1917 1134 

Table 4.— Types of infection reported diagnosed microscopically y by counties— ConxA 



County. 



Forsyth 

Franklin.,. 

<}a5ton 

<iatct 

Ciraharn 

tiranviUo... 

iJrecno 

(Jullford.... 

HBlifAX... 

Harnett 

Haywood . . 
Hcndonon . 
Hertford... 
Hoke.. 



Hyde 

Iredell 

Johnston 

!>«» 

I^enoir 

Lincoln 

McDowell 

Martin 

Mecklenljurg.. 
.Montpomery. . 

MtxH^ 

Nash 

Vcw Hanover.. 
Northampton.. 

Oii^slow , 

<)r.»nire , 

i'ainlico 

fa-^'iu^tank 

!'<'f',nimaa!? 

l'« n;nn 

I'm 

Tolk- 

i^.iiMloIph 

Knhmond 

U<>t»esoB 

U(MkJngham.. 

UoMon 

Uiitherford 

^amiwon 

^ootland. 



Total.. 



Tertian. 



August- .January- 
Novem- Septem- 
ber, 1913. ber,1914. 



15 



Quartan. 



Estivo>«utuinnal. 



August- 'January- 
Novem- ! Septem- 
ber, 1913. ber,1914. 



+ 
+ 



August- I JanoaiT- 
Noven>' Septem- 
ber, 1913. ber,1914. 

I 



10 ; 



5 ' 
3S 

1 
4 ' 



10 I 



+ 



+ 



+ 



10 



22 1 



I 



I 



10 
I 
13 



2 ! -f 

3 1 



13 
1 








, 


+ 

-4- 
+ 

4- 
■f 

-}- 






+ 




' i 














4- 






2 


4 






3 ' 
. .. . 1 




+ 






-t- 




4- 








-1- 






I 




1 
33 





I 








3 ... 


1 




4 







.^tAnly 

Stokei 


■*- 






3 
1 . 


+ 




4- 


1 


4- 


1 


+ 
















1 






• 


1 


TraiKvl VAnia ' 








I . 




T>rr»'ll 

r nu*n 




9 

1 


4 

4 
+ 


2 

14 
2 . 

5 ,' 

2.-. ' 






4- 

4- 




4- 




+ 








3 i 




Vance 






Wake 


+ 


1 
1 


■f 




4- 


I ! 


+ 


1 


7 


W.irrcn 






Wn-^hington 

Wa\ne 


4- 


13 












H- 




4- 
4- 


1 

5 ,' 


4- 


1 




3 


\Vilki-« 

Wilsiin 


+ 

4 




4 


12 


+ 


^ 


+ 
















^'*'* -^ 













116 



The (igurci intlicato the niirii> .r- «)f fa-e^ reported 'liatrnosed microscopic illy. The si:in + indic»t«l 
that < v^'.w*r. Tv\>>r\i 1. l-nt •!,. in.': . ua. not i-onUimcd l>y the i')Krost.o|)c. Thi>^ informiitlon Wi« 
oo!le<lo<J during ihr year-; lyii ^h1 Vj\\ -nly. 





Tahi e 5- -If*inoglohinuric/ei€r reported, 1916. 






Coiniiv. 


Period. 
Second quarter.... 


C«»8. 


j(,>,. vton 




1 


>1 if' in 




Third quarter 

Third quarter 

Fourth quarter.... 


s 


!'• r <>n 




1 


ItctUc 




1 









1135 July 20, 1917 

HAY FEVER. 

ITS CAUSE AND PREVENTION IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN AND PACIFIC STATES. 

By WiLUAM SCHKPPEORXLL, A. H., M. D., New Orleans 

The pollens which cause hay fever in the Eastern and Southern 
States have been the subject of considerable investigation, and the 
principal poUens have been identified. West of Kansas, however, 
this subject has received little attention, most writers having con- 
tented themselves with the vague statement that hay fever in this 
repion is uncommon. 

Investigations during the past year, however, have shown that 
hay fever in this section, wliile not as common as a whole as in the 
Eastern and Southern States, is by no means infrequent and is, 
moreover, constantly increasing. Reports from Cahfomia and 
Colorado show that hay fever is a common disease in these States. 
A correspondent in Santa Fe, New Mexico, states that there is a 
'gKiat deal'' of hay fever in that section. .Vnother from the State 
of Washington claims that hay fever is exceedingly common. Re- 
ports also show that hay fever is common in Montana, Orecjon, Idaho, 
Arizona, Wyoming, Utah, and Nevada. In view of thi^ prevalence 
of hay fever in these States the need for a careful investigation of this 
subject is clearly indicated. 

The main difficulty in estabhshing the exciting cause of hay fever ^ 
in this section is that the common and giant ragweeds (Ambrosia 
daiiar and irifida), which are the usual cause of autumn hay fever 
(85 per cent) east of Kansas, are found west of the 100th meridian 
in insufficient quantities to be of importance in hay fever except in 
a few localities. 

In correspondence with the various State boards of health of the 
Pacific and Rocky Mountain States, we found uniform interest in 
the subject of hay-fever prevention, but a lack of information as to 
the exciting causes of the disease. With a view, therefore, of ob- 
taining definite information on this subject, we have conducted a 
series of investigations during the past 18 months, which has enabled 
us to determine the principal hay fev er plants of this section. 

Hay Fever Plants. 

The identification of hay fever plants in general is simplified by 
the fart that they are all wind-pollinated. Many insect-pollmated 
and self- pollinated plants contain pollen which will produce the 
hay fever reaction in the biological test, but as their pollen is not 

' The biolocicaJ propertie^of the pollens dejicrJbed in this article have all been determined b5' direct te^ts 
oo bij'fovw Mibjects. In th« unimportant pollens which have pro\ed uepiitive or, not being wind- 
*WM, can cause hay fever only on direct inhAlation, only a few tests have been made. In the important 
^Ufrfcrer pollens, however, many hundreds of le>l^ (in the ra'4 weeds several thousands) have been mad« 
teerdtr Codetttmint both qualitatively and quantitatively their responsibility in hay fever. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



July 20, 1917 1136 

found in the air and can not therefore reach the nasal passages in 
ordinary respi'uiion, they are not responsible for hay fever. 

Wind-pollinated plants arc chai'acterized by inconspicuous flowers, 
which are without bright co^or? or scent, and by the large quantity of 
pollen which they generate.* Many wind-pollinated plants, however, 
have pollen which does not produce hay fever (pines, sedges, etc.), or 
which causes reactions of a mild character (amaranths (AmarantJius), 
docks {Rumex)y chenopods (Cheriopodium), etc.). These efiFects can 
be determined only by means of the biological test. 

Biological Test for Hay Feyer. 

The method of making the biological tast for hay fever is as follows: 
For the pollen of botanical genera which have not yet been tested, a 
weak saline extract (1 to 20,000) of the pollen is first used. Care 
should be taken that the saline solution used is a one-half of 1 per 
cent solution, as a stronger or weaker solution causes irritation of the 
nasal mucosa independent of the action of the pollen extract. When 
the subject fails to react to this weak extract, stronger extracts are 
applied. When these also prove negative, some of the poUen is 
applied directly as a final test. 

The pollen extract is prepared by adding 1 centigram of the speci- 
fied pollen to 10 c. c. of 5 per cent salt solution. After the soluble 
extracts have been dissolved, the liquid is filtered and 7 per cent 
aicohol added. When used for testing the reaction of a patient, or 
fov immunizing, this is diluted so as to represent a pollen extract of 
1 to 10,000 to 1 to 200,000 or more according to the toxicity' of the 
pollen used. In our research work, we are using a unit representing 
0.001 milligram of pollen extract which has proved of practical 
value. 

For the conjunctival reaction, the extract is applied to the con- 
junctival sac, the reaction being indicated by the hyperemia pro- 
duced. The skin reaction is secured by making a number of 
fight scratches on the skin and rubbing in a drop of the pollen extract 
to be tested. A positive reaction is indicated by reddening and edema 
of the area surrounding the abraded surface, accompanied by itching. 
In the hay-fever clinic of the Charity Hospital of New Orleans we use 
individual syringes in capillary tubes, by which a drop of the extract 
is injected into (not under) the skin. The reaction is similar to that 
obtained by scarifying the skin. The cutaneous tests have the ad- 
vantage of being available when the patient is suffering from hay 
fever, when the conjunctival reaction is not practicable. 

> "Hay fever and its prevention," Wm. Scheppeprell, l*iiblic Health Reportu, July 21, 1916. 
• ** Toxicity " in conne?lion with poUen.-* refers to the posit ive reaction in hay-fever subjects. The exist- 
CDce of a true toxin in hay-fever poIlen« is still under invent igation. 



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1137 Joly 20. 1917 

Before enumerating the hay-fever plants of the Pacific and Moun- 
tain States, it will be well to make a brief resum6 of the principal 
hay-fever plants of the Eastern and Southern States. 

Principal Hay-Feyer Plants of the Eastern and Southern States. 

In this section, we have two distinct seasons of hay fever, which 
differ in the various States only in their dates and duration. The 
average dates for the two seasons of these States are May to July for 
the early form, and August to October for the autumnal form. 

The early form of hay fever in this section is due principally to the 
pollen of the Graminese, which includes the grasses, both wild and 
cultivated, and some of the cereals such as rye, oats, and wheat. 
Theoretically, com also is included, and is frequently referred to as 
a common cause of hay fever. The size of its pollen, however, is 
relatively so great (80 microns) that it causes few cases of hay fever 
and then only in close proximity to such crops. Rye and wheat also 
have large heavy pollen grains (50 microns) which gives them a 
limited potential area of distribution by the wind. 

The trees, which are largely wind-poUinated and frequently dis- 
tribute their pollen in enormous quantities, usually bloom in the 
spring, but are rarely responsible for hay fever. The pines (Pinus 
scopylorum and other species) are especially prolific in their pollen 
(fig. 1) but have always given a negative reaction in our biological 
tests. The pollen of some of the oaks, willows, ailanthus, and other 
trees give a mild reaction for hay fever, but not sufficiently to be of 
importance in a general consideration. 

The autumn hay fever which forms about 65 per cent of all the 
cases, is due usually (85 per cent) to the pollen of the common rag- 
weed {Ambrosia elaiioTj fig. 2), this being replaced in some sections 
by the giant ragweed {Ambrosia trifidaj fig. 3). The remaining 15 
per cent of cases are due to the pollen of other plants, of whicli the 
various species of cockle bur {Xanihiums) and the marsh elder {Iva 
cUiata) are the most important. 

Hay-Fever Seasons in the Pacific and Rocky Mountain States. 

In this region there are also two hay-fever seasons, but these have 
a greater tendency to merge and the fall hay fever usually comnionccs 
earUer. The cause of this will be understot)d wlion the pollinating 
periods of the hay-fever plants are examined. The dates of the hay- 
fever seasons in these States are as follows: 



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State. 


Spring and summer 
form. 


Autumnal form. 


Arizona 


May 5-June 5 . ......... 


July 15-Oct. 1. 
July 15-Sept. 15. 
July 2(>-Sept. 15. 
Aug. 1-Sept. 16. 
Aug. 5-Sept. 15. 


California 


May 5-July 5 


Colorado 


Mav lO-Julv 1 


Idaho 


May 5-June 10 


Montana 


May 15-Jiilv 15 


Nevada 


May 1-July 15 


Aug. 12-Sept. 15. 


New Mexico 


May 3-Jiily 5 


July 12-Sept. 28. 
July l-'Sept. 1. 


Orej^on 


Apr. 25-May29 

June 22-July 27 


Utah 


Aug. 5-Sept. 15. 


Washington 


June 12-Julv 1 


.July o-Oct. 7 (fall rains. 


Wyoming 


May 1-May 15 


Aug. 5-Sept. 15. 









Early Hay-Fever Season. 

As in other sections of the United States, the early hay fever is due 
principally to the pollen of the grasses (Graminese), including both 
the wild and cultivated grasses. Other pollen which contribute to 
vernal hay fever in this section are those of the following plants in 
the locahties in which they are found: Bud-brush, Ariemi^ spine- 
scens; poverty weed, Ii>a axillaris; sand-bur, Gxrtneria dumosay and 
Gsertneria hipinnatifida. 

While all the grasses give a positive hay-fever reaction in the 
biological test, these naturally vary in different sections. The prin- 
cipal grasses responsible for hay fever in CaUfornia * are as follows: 
Johnson grass, Holcus halepensis; GaiUeta grass, Pleuraphis rigiJa; 
crab grass, Syntherisma sanguinalis; knot grass, Paspalum distichuin; 
barnyard grass, EcJiinocliloa crus-galli; velvet grass, Nothoholcus lana- 
tus; Bermuda grass, Capnola daciylon; salt grass, Distichlis spicula; 
walk grass, Poa annua; blue grass, Poa pratensis; broncho grass, 
Bromns villosus; rye grass, Lolium perenne, and barley grass, Hordeum 
murinum. 

In Oregon, the most common grasses are the following: ^ Sweet 
vernal grass, AnthoxantJium odoratum; velvet grass, Nothoholcus lana- 
tus; brome grass, Brortius carinatus; orchard grass, Dactylis glomeratn; 
rye grass, Lolium perenne^ and blue grass, Poa pratensis. 

In the State of Washington ': Velvet grass, Nothoholcus lanaius; 
early hair grass, Aira praecox; rye grass, Lolium perenne; squirrel- 
tail grass, Iloi'deum juhatum; chess, Bromus secalinu^, and other 
species of Bromus, 

In Wyoming: * Western wheat grass, Agropyron sinithii; hair grass, 
Sporobolus airoides; blue grass, Poa pratensis; timothy, Phleum pra- 
tense; crested hair-grass, Koeleria cristata; squirrel-tail grass, Hor- 

•Report of Professor H. M. Hall, University of California. 

* Ueiwrt of Professor Howard S. Hammond, University of Oregon. 

• He[X)rt of Professor (leornc B. RigR, Univerhity of Washington. 
*Tirj)ort of I'rofcssor Aveu Nelson, University of Wyoming, 



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1139 July 20, 1917 

dewm jubatum; reed meadow grass, Panicvlaria grandis; tall fescue 
grass, Festuca eJoHor; smooth lymo grass, Ely^mus condensatuSj and 
tufted hair grass, Deschampsia caespitosa. 

In Colorado:^ Short-awned chess, Bromtis hrizaeformis; downy 
brome-grass, Bromus tectorum.; western wheat grass, Agropijron 
smithii; Kentucky blue grass, Poa pratensis; orchard grass, Daciylis 
glomerata; crested hair-grass, Koeleria cristata; grama grass, Bouieloua 
gracilis; silk grass, Agrostis hiemalis; timothy, PMeum pratensej and 
squirrel-tail grass, Hordeum jubatum. 

In Arizona:^ Annual fescue, Festuca octoflora; six weeks grass, 
Bouieloua ariMidoides; mesa grama, Bouieloua rothroclcii; annual 
poverty weed, Aristida bromoides; blue grama, Bouieloua gracilis 
and silver top, Andropogon sacckaroides. 

The most common grasses in Idaho, Western Nevada, Now Mexico, 
and Utah are the following:^ Hungarian brome grass, Bromus inermis; 
wild odt* grass, Stipa viridula; long-awned grass, Arisfida longiseta; 
sleepy grass, Stipa vaseyi; false oat grass, Trisefum spicaium; western 
wheat grass, Agropyron smithii; bearded wheat grass, Agropyron 
richard^omiif and other tall wheat grasses. 

Important Hay-Fever Plants of the Pacific and Rocky Mountain States. 

While the common ragweed (Ambrosia elatior, fig. 4), the principal 
cause of fall hay fever in the Eastern States, is uncommon west of 
Kansas, it is found in certain sections. In some parts of Colorado 
it is .very abundant in the towns * being usually found in company 
with the *' Great ragweed" {Iva xanthlifolia^ fig. 5). The latter 
should not be confused with the Great ragweed of the Eastern and 
Southern States, which, while belonging to the same family (Ambro- 
siaceae), is Ambrosia trvfida. Their hay-fever reaction, however, is 
similar. 

The great ragweed {Ambrosia trifida, fig. 6) which is a cause of 
autumnal hay fever in portions of the Eastern and especially in the 
Gulf States, is also found in -a few sections of the Pacific and Mountain 
States. It is found in Wyoming^ as well as the western ragweed 
{Ambrosia psUostachyay fig. 7), but is not as abundant as Iva xanthii' 
folia and sage brush {Artemisia tridentata). 

In Arizona, some of the ragweeds are found, these being the 
"great ragweed" (not Ambrosia trifida of the Eastern States but 
Ambrosia aptera) and the ''small ragweed" (not Ambrosia elatior 
of the Eastern States but Gxrtiuria tenuifolia). 

» Report of Professor Francis RamAJey, University of Colorado. 

* Report of Professor J. J. Thornbcr, University of Arizona. 

'Report of Professor P. L. Ricker, Assistant Botanist, U. S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, 
D.C. 
« Report of Professor Theo. D. A. Cockrrell, University of Colorado. 

* Report of Prof, Aven Nelson, University of Wyoming. 

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1140 



The western ragweed (Ambrosia psUostachya, fig. 7) is so common 
in some parts of California; that it is an important factor in hay fever ^ 
in that State. It is found in moist, open soil from Illinois to Sas- 
katchewan, Texas, Mexico and California. It is a perennial weed, 
2 to 6 feet high, growing from running root stocks, thicker and 
stouter than the common ragweed, covered with loose shaggy- 
white hairs; loaves thick, much divided, the lobes of the leaves 
lanceolate and acute; the staminate heads on short pedicels; the 
fruit soUtary in the axils below. 




Fig. 4.— Common rag weed (Avjbrosia datior). The principal cause of hay fever 
in the Eastern and Southern States. (From "Illustrated Flora of North 
America," by Britton and Brown.) 

The most important hay-fever weeds of the Pacific and Mountain 
States, and which give the most severe reaction, are the worm- 
woods (Artemisias) , While their pollen is not produced in the same 
profusion as that of the ragweeds (Ambrosias), they give a marked 
hay-fever reaction which in some species is five times- as active as 



» Report of Prof. H. M. Hall, University of California. 

• The A rttmisia heUrophylla produces a reaction in dilutation of 1 to 100,000. 



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1141 



July 20, 1917 



that of the ragweeds (Ambrosias). The pollens of all the Atiemisicis 
examined are three-lobed, and are all smooth with exception of 
Artemisia biennis, which is sUghtly spiculated. 

In California, Artemisia heterophyUa (mugwort) and Artemisia 
trideniaia (sagebrush, fig. 8) are the principal hay-fever plants. 

In Oregon the Artemisia^ are also the principal cause, being far 
more abundant than other hay-fever weeds, such as the Ivas, Xan^ 
HiiumSf Gstrtnerias and Amhrosia psUostachya,^ and this is the case 




Fia. S.—Bur marsh elder, also known in the West as the ''groat 
ragweed'' ilvaxanthii/olia). Grows In moist soil and is a cause 
of baj faver from Idaho and 8askat<^hewan, Iowa to Mexioo, 
but b not found on the Pacific Coast. (From "Illustrated 
Fktra of North America/' by Britton and Brown.) 

in most of this section except in the moist region near the Pacific 
Coast. In Colorado ' on the western slope of the mountains, Arte- 
misia tridenUUa covers vast areas almost to the exclusion of other 
plants. In the sagebrush district persons suffer a great deal from 
what is popularly caUed ^'moimtain fever." This has all the symp- 
toms of severe hay fever and is prevalent from August to November, 
the period of pollination of the sagebrush, and is evidently due to 
the pollen of the Artemisia tridentata. 



» Report of Prof. Howard 8. Hammond, Univendty of Oregon. 
I Report of Prof. Theo. D. A. Cockerell, University of Colorado. 



82 



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July 20, 1917 



1142 



In view of the importance of the Artemisias from a hay-fever 
standpoint a description of the most common varieties is given: 

The Artemisias in the Rocky Mountain and Pacific States.^ 

Artemisia is a genus of meetly bitter and aromatic herbs and shrubs, of which the 
European wormwood is perhaps the best known. It belongs to the mayweed section 
of the Compositae family, but, unkke the mayweed, the flower heads of .4rtem«ta are 
small, inconspicuous, and without rays. In some cases the flowers are apparently 
self-pollinated; in others the pollen is wind-carried, and in those it is produced in great 
abundance. There is no reason to suppose that insects aid in their p>ollination. 
Only those which are wind-pollinated are important from a hay-fever standpoint. 




Fio. C— Giant rag weed (Ambrosia trifida). Replaces the conunou rag weed (Ambrosia elaiior) in most 
parts of the Eastern and Southern States and is also (oiind in some sections of Nebraska, Colomdo, and 
New Mexico. (From "lUustnUed Flora of North America," by Britton and Brown.) 

The genus comprises some 200 species. Its greatest development is in the Mediter- 
ranean region and in arid North America. Aljout 50 species are found native in the 
Rocky Mountain and Pacific States, but most of these are of limited distribution, 
or occur only at high altitudes, or because of some other peculiarity are not important 
as causes of hay fever. On the other hand , a few of the species grow in great abundance 
in the neighborhood of towns and in agricultural districts, where they constitute a 
serious menace. The (]^alifomia mugwort {ArtemUia heterophylla) is perhaps the most 
common of these on ditch banks and in waste places, while the Sagebrush {Artemisia 
tridentata) is the most abundant shrub in the Great Basin area. Both of these have 
been tested in the Biological Laboratory of the American Hay-Fever-Preventioa 
Association and have been found to give a marked hay-fever reaction. 



« Report of Prof. H. M. Hall, University of California, 

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1143 



July 20, 1917 



California mugwort, Artemisia heterophylla. ThiB name includes several forms, 
some of which arc considered as distinct species by some botanists, but they are all 
much alike and the properties of the pollen are probably the same for all. The mug- 
wort is an erect perennial herb 3 to 8 feet high. The leaves are rather broadly oblong, 
2 to 4 inches long, either cleft or entire, and green above but white beneath. The 
plants are in bloom from about July 1 to late autimin. They grow either scattered or 
in masses, often forming thickets on river banks or along ditches. They are especially 
common on low, moist land. 

The banks on which mugwort grows are usually too uneven to permit cutting by 
mowing machines, but it could be cut by hand with a scythe. The plants would grow 
up again from the roots, but by cutting the tops occasionally the amount of pollen 




Fhs. 7.— We3t«m rag weed (Ambrosia psiloitaehifa), western representative of the rag weeds (A mhraiiat), 
Mobt open soil from Illinoia to Saskatchewan, Texas, Mexico, and California. (From "Illustrated 
Flora of North America," by Britton and Brown.) 

could be greatly reduced. In suitable situations, the mugwort may be expected 
•nywhere from southern California to British Columbia, and east as far as Nevada. 
It does not grow above an altitude of about 5,000 feet, but from Oregon to Alaska it is 
replaced by the closely-related ArtemxHa tilesii, wtiich ranges higher. 

Dark-leaved mugwort, Artemisia ludovicUma. In general habit this species is much 
like the mugwort, but the leaves are usually narrower and are whitened on both faces 
by t woolly pubescence, at least when young. (In Artein isia g^naphalodes, a very closely 
related species and likewise common, the leaves are permanently and densely white- 
Ittiry.) It grows in waste places, especially in dr>'. stony stream bods. In California 
rt is quite scattered, only occasionally growing in masses, but it is much more common 

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1144 



in the Northwest and in the Rocky Mountains, where it grows both on the plains and 
on slTeam banks. Its period of bloom and the method of control are similar to tlwie 
indicated for the mugwort. 

''Indian hair tonic," Artemma dracunculoide$. The stems of Uiis perennial herb 
are stiffly erect and grow to a height of 4 to 6 feet. Unlike most artemisias the herbage 
is glabrous and green . All of the other species here described, except Ariemima biefmit 
have a gray or whitish herbage. The leaves are mostly entire, 1 to 3 inches longuid 
less than J inch wide. June to September is the period of bloom. Next to the sage- 
brush, this is perhaps the most plentiful species in western North America. It grows 
in mountain valleys and on the plains, but is generally absent from the deserts. Some- 
times it forms dense stands. In such cases its subjection by mowing would i 
feasible. 




Fig. 8.— Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentala). A cause of hay fever over an extended area, as it grows from 
New Mexico and Lower California north as far as Washington and Montana. (From "Illustrated Flora 
of North America," by Britton and Brown.) 

Sagebrush (Fig. 8), Artemisia Iridcntata. The sagebrush is an erect, much-branched, 
gray shrub with a distinct trunk and shreddy bark. The narrowly wedge-shaped 
leaves are only J to IJ inches long and mostly 3-toothed across the summit, although 
some of the upper ones are narrower and not toothed. The pollen is produced from 
August to November. This shrub grows from New Mexico and Lower California, 
nortli across the high plains of the Great Basin States, extending even into Washington 
and Montana. It is by far the most abundant and best-known shrub in this whole 
region, forming the principal vegetation over thousands of acres. It belongs to the 
arid districts of plains and mountains but does not grow near the coast nor in the hot 



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1145 July 20, 1917 

deeerts of the south. In Califomia it is scarcely known west of the Sierra Nevada. 
The sagebrush is sometimes known as '*black sage/' but it ie not to bo confused with 
the true black sage nor with the white sage, both natives of Southern California* 
These true sages belong to the mint family and do not cause hay fever. Because of its 
woody, almost arboreous habit and great abundance, the elimination of sagebrush will 
form a difficult problem. 

Bud brush, Artemina spinewens. This is a low, gray shrub with many stiff branches 
ending in spines. It grows ) to 1) feet high. The very small leaves are densely 
white-hairy and much lobed. The flowering period is earlier than that of most 
Artemisias, the pollen being produced from March to June. The bud brush grows on 
sandy or somewhat alkaline soil from the Mohave Desert of Califomia, north and east 
to eastern Oregon, Wyoming, and Colorado. It is especially common in Nevada and 
Utah. Eradication is difficult because of the woody natiure of the stems. 

"Califomia old man," or hill-brush, Artemma cali/omica. This is a gray, highly 
aromatic shrub. 2 to 4 feet high, best identified by its leaves, which are parted into 
almost thread-like segments. It blossoms from June to October. Geographically it 
is restricted to the hills of the Coast Ranges from middle Califomia southward, but 
^lere it often forms dense growths of considerable area« especially in southern Cali- 
fornia. Since the stems are decidedly woody the eradication of this plant is also 
difficult. 

Wormwood sage, Artemisia frigida. The stems of this plant are woody at base and 
mostly 1 to 11 feet high. The herbage is gray and soft because of the many short hairs 
which cover it, and the leaves are finely cut into linear lobes. The plant blooms 
from July to October. It grows from Idaho, Nevada, and New Mexico, to Minnesota 
and Texas, and is especially common on the plains of Utah and Colorado. There is 
much of it around Denver. In Estes Park, Colo., hay fever is coincident with the 
blooming of the wormwood sage. 

Biennial wormwood, Arttmisia biennis. This is an erect herb 1 to 3 feet high. 
It grows from a slender annual or biennial taproot, whereas all others here described 
have tough, perennial roots, many of them more or less woody. The leaves are green 
and scarcely at all hairy. They are I to 3 inches long and deeply cleft into narrow 
bbes which are sharply toothed. The pollen is shed from July to December. This 
plant occupies open places, especially ditch banks and neglected yards, throughout 
wwtem North America, b iit is not often present in large amoimts. 1 1 can be destroyed 
easily by pulling, especially when the ground is soft, since the root is not deep. 

Artemisia cana, Artemisia canadensis, and Artemisia discolor, as well as a few others, 
may be found in quantity at a few places but usually not in proximity to closely 
populated districts. 

Artemisia absinthium, the common wormwood, seems to have been introduced with 
seed into eastern Washington, adjacent to Idaho and Oregon, it is spreading rapidly 
throughout those localities.^ 

The Iva8« GflBrtnerias and Cockleburs. 

Next in importance to the Artemisias are the burweed marsh elder, or ''Great 
ng^weed " {Iva xanthiifolia), and the rough marsh elder (Iva axillaris). 

Their pollens, which are spiculated like those of the rag- weeds (Ambrosias), also 
give a similar reaction for hay fever. 

IVAS. 

Western elder or poverty weed, Iva aodllaris. (Fig. 9.) The povertyweod belongs 
to the rag:weed section of the Composite family but is unlike all the ragweeds in its 
leaves, which are only an inch long, sessile, and not at all toothed or cut. The 



> Report of Prof. Howard S. Hammond, University of Oregon 

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1146 



1 



Btems are not woody but prow from perennial creeping root^tocks, so that eradication 
would be extremely difficult. Cutting close to the ground at the beginning of the 
flowering season would greatly reduce the amoimt of pollen produced, but the stems 

would again shoot up from the same 
root?torks. The plants grow in alka- 
line or saline soil from the Rocky 
Mountains to the Pacific Coast and 
from Canada to Mexico. The blocmi- 
ing period is March to September. 

Biu^eed marsh elder or great rag- 
weed, Iva ranthiifoHa. (Fig. 5.) 
This is a tall, coarse, annual weed 
with ovate, sharply toothed leaves 2 
to 6 inches long. In habtt and foliage 
it resembles the common sunflower, 
although it is not so large, hut the 
small, homely heads of flowers are 
borne in long terminal clusters. It 
grows from Idaho and Saskatchewan 
south to New Mexico but is absent 
from the Pacific coart. It blooms in 
late summer and autimin. Since the 
root is of only annual dtu^tion, any 
practice which will prevent the plants 
px)m going to seed will be effecti\'e as 
a method of eradication. Mowing is 
adxdsable where the plants grow in 
dense stands. 

Next to the Artemisias and Ivas, 
the GiTrtnerias were foimd to bo im- 
portant as an active cauec of hay fe- 
ver. Their pollen, which resembles 
that of the common ragweed {Ambrosia elatior) so closely that it is difficult to dis- 
tinguish microscopically, also gives a similar reaction. 

G^RTNERIAS.* 

Gartneria (sometimes called Frnnseria) is a genus of herbs and low shrubs with 
alternate leaves which are often gray with short stiff hairs and usually lobed or toothed. 
It belongs to the ragweed section of the Compositee family and has pistillate and 
staminate flowers on the same plant as in the ragweeds. The Gajrtnerias differ from 
the ragweeds in the biu^ which surround the pistillate flowers; these burs are armed 
with several rows of spines or prickles, while those of the ragweeds have the prickles 
arranged in a single circle. It is probable that the species are all wind-pollinated, 
but some of them may be self-pollinated. The most common species in the West are 
the following: 

Sand bur, Gxrtntria dumosa. The sand bur is a low, spreading, white-stemmed 
shrub, with brittle, woody branches. The leaves are less than an inch long, parted 
into many small lobes and white with minute hairs, which cover the surface. It 
grows in great abundance on the hot, dry deserts from southern Utah to southeastern 
Galifomia and southern Arizona. It is very common along some of the railways croes- 




FiG. 9.— rover 1 y weed or western elder ( Im arillam). A 
cause of hay fever. Alkaline or saline soil from the 
Rocky Mountains to the I*aclftc Coast and from Can- 
ada to Mexico. (From "Illustrated Jlora of North 
America," by Britton and Brown.) 



» Report of Prof. H. M. Hall, University of California. 



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1147 



July 20. 1017 



ing the southwestern deserts. The flowers shed their pollen from about the first of 
Ifarch to the end of June. 

False ragweed, Gxrtneria acanthioatpa. (Fig. 10.) This is a spreading and bushy 
annual or biennial weed. The leaves are ashy gray, ovate in outline, but cut info 
short, rounded lobes somewhat as in ragweed. The flat spines of the bur are straight 
or only slightly curved. This species inhabits sandy plains and stubble and is com- 
mon in arid sections from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific coast. In California it 
is restricted to the southern and eastern parts of the State, and similarly in Or^on and 
Washington it is found only in the drier parts away from the coast. It is reported as 
one of the commonest weeds in New Mexico. The blooming period is August to De- 
cember. Since the roots are short-lived, the weed may be easily held in check by 




July-Sept. 



Fn. 10.—" False rag weed " {Omrtnerin acanihkarpa). A common cause of hay fever. In sandy plains and 
■tabWe on the arid sections from the Roclcy Mountains to the Pacific coast. (From " Illustrated Flora 
of North America/' by Brittonand Brown.) 

mowing or burning before the burs ripen. Hand pulling is very effective, and may 
be practiced where the area covered is not too large. 

Qsatneria ienuifolia. This perennial very closely simulates the western ragweed in 
general appearance, but may be distinguished by the burs, which have more than one 
low of spines, and these are incurved or hooked. It grows in warm, dry districts from 
ti« westerly part of the Mississippi Valley to Colorado, Nevada, and southern Cali- 
faniia, and ranges south to Texas, but it is not so common as the other species. The 
pollen is produced during late summer and autumn. 



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July 20, 1917 1148 

Osertneria hipinnatifida. The stems of this plant spread along the ground from t 
perennial root. The white-hairy leaves are much cut into spreading lobee. The bun 
form in dense clusters toward the ends of the branches, and each cluster is eunnounted 
by a fingeriike projection made up of the staminate heads, which yield the poUen. 
This pollen is produced from April to December. The species grows only on the sea- 
shore, usually on the beach sands or dunes, and extends from Lower California to 
British Columbia. From middle California northward it is accompanied by Gasrtnerk 
ehamisaonis, a very closely related species with merely toothed or cut leaves. Either 
sort would be diflicult to eradicate because of the deep, perennial roots. 

COCKLEDURS. 

The cockleburs (Xanihium) give a positive reaction for hay fever, but less marked 
than the ArtemisiaSf Ambros^ias, Ivas, and G'^tncrias. The p>ollen is also spiculated, 
but their large size (36 microns) reduces their potential area. It is abundant in some 
localities, especially on bottom lands along the rivers. It is a cooroe annual, with 
branching stems and alternate petioled leaves. Leaves broadly ovate, cordate, 
usually three-lobed, and simply or doubly dentate. Sterile and fertile flowers in dif- 
ferent heads, the latter clustered below, the former in short spikes. The fruit, a rough 
bur, usually has two curved beaks and ie covered with prickles straight-tipped or 
hooked, 2 to 6 feet high. It blooms from June to December. 

Other Hay-Fever Plants of the Pkclfic and Mowitain States (Minor Importance). 

The hay-fover plants of minor importance in this region are the 
following: Dock, Rumex conglmrueratus and obtusif alius; sheep sorrel, 
Rumex aceiosella; goosefoot or lamb's quarters, Chenopodium ambro- 
sUndes; tumbleweed, Amaranthus grsecizaiis and salt bush, Hymmo- 
clea salsola. Most of these plants generate poUon in abundance, but 
the\so produce only a mild hay-fever reaction similar to that of the 
docks, Rumex crispus, and amaranths, Amaranthus s-pinosus of the 
eastern States. 

Among the trees, the pollen of the majority have proven either 
negative or so slight in reaction as to be of little importance in hay 
fever. An exception, however, is the cottonwood (Populus). Of the 
varieties tested, the pollen of Populus sargentii (fig. 11) gives a 
marked reaction and is responsible for hay-fever cases in localities 
in which it is found in sufficient quantities. Populus angusiifolia 
gives a much milder reaction, and also the Arizona cottonwood, 
Populus arizonica. 

Plants Not Responsible for Hay Fever. 

While describing the plants which are responsible for hay fever, it 
is also opportune to say a few words regarding the much abused 
roses and goldenrods. The rose is insect pollinated and could, 
therefore, cause hay fever only on direct inhalation, as the pollen is 
never found in the atmosphere. In addition to this, its reaction is 
practically negative, so that in spite of the common term applied to 
the early hay-fever rose cold it is not responsible for hay fever. 



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1149 



JuJy 20, 1917 



The goldenrod has a spiculated pollen (20 by 22 microns), which 
gives a positive hay-fever reaction. The flowerS; however, are in- 
sect poUinated and cause hay fever only on direct inhalation or when 
used for ornamental purposes, as in room decorations. In most sec- 
tions the goldenrod continues to bloom many weeks after the hay- 
fever season is over. In the atmospheric-poUen plates exposed in 
New Orleans during the whole of the past hay-fever season the pollen 
of the goldenrod (Solidago) was never found.^ In spite of its repu- 




Fio. 11.— Western Cottonwood {Populua Mtrgentii). One of the few trees whose 
poHen Cfluae hay fever. River bottome Saskatchewan to North Dakota, Ne- 
braska, Kansas, and New Mexico. (From "Ulustrated Flora of North Amer- 
ica," by Britton and Brown.) 

ttticrai, therefore, the goldenrod is an insignificant factor in hay 
fever. 

Another falsely accused plant, whose reputation, however, is lim- 
ited to the Rocky Mountain States, is the resin weed, Grinddia 
gquarrosa (fig. 12), which is blamed in Wyoming and the adjoining 
States for the prevalence of hay fever. Specimens of this were sent 
to a Uologifeal laboratory by Dr. W. A. Wyman, of the Wyoming 

> "Hay-fever and Hay-fever PoHens," W. Scheppegrell, M. D, The Archives of Internal Medicine, 
^~ ^ ^^^' Digitized by GoOglC 



July 20, 1017 



1150 



State Board of Health. The pollen was found to be spiculated and 
measures 20 microns in diameter, which is the size of the Trifida rag- 
weed pollen, which it also resembles very closely microscopically. 

The pollen, however (fig. 13), hke the flowers, is sticky and resin-- 
like, as imphed by the popular name. The pollen itself gives a posi- 
tive reaction, but as it is not wind-borne, and therefore not in the 
atmosphere, it is not a cause of hay fever. The probabihty, there- 
fore, is that the resin weed, on account of its prevalence and con- 
spicuousness, was selected in the same manner that the goldenrod 




Fig. 12.>-Resin weed {Qrindelia tquarroaa). Popularly supposed to b« 
the cause of hay fever in Arizona, Wyoming, and the adjacent Statea. 
The plant is harmless, as it is not wind-pollinated. (From "Illustrated 
Flora of North America," by Britton and Brown.) 

has been so long held responsible for hay fever, while the real but 
insignificant hay-fever weeds were unsuspected. 

Potential Area of Pollen Distribution. 

In regard to the responsibUty of the noxious plants for hay fever, 
this depends, first, on the proximity of these plants and, secondly, 
on the size of the pollen, which has a marked effect on their buoy- 
ancy. As already stated, the pollen of corn, in spite of its toxicity, 
is rarely responsible for hay fever, as its relatively S^y^kpWlX^O 




■. as ^ tt o 

''^ 3 CO .b c 
*- Bj « 0) 3 

MM oaf E 
u. 





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n 



I? 

I 



4> 




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1151 Joly 20. IJ)17 

microns, fig. 14) reduces its potential area to a short distance from 
the plant. Ite other extreme is the poUen of the common ragweed 
{Ambrosia datior), whose poilen measures 15 microns (fig. 2) and 
whose buoyancy is so great that a wind velocity of 20 miles or more 
will carry it several miles. 

Mostof thegrasseshave pollen of consid^able size (35 to 55 microns, 
fig. 15), so that their pollen is not carried to a great distance. On 
this account, municipal efforts for ihe control of the early hay fever 
due to these grasses have been attoidod with considerable success. 

While the pollen of the Artemisias (fig. 16) gives a severe reaction, 
their pot^itial radius is reduced by the size of their pollens (average 
24 microns) to about one-eixth of that of the conunon ragweed (15 
microns). Their pollen also, although produced in great quantities, 
is many times less abundant than that generated by the ragweeds, 
and the resiilting infection of the air is, therefore, proportionately less. 

The bur marsh elder, Iva xanthiifolia, has spiculated pollen (fig. 17) 
which gives a reaction sindlar to the Ambrosias. Its pollen \diich 
is ovoid, measures only 15 by 20 microns, which gives it a considerable 
potential wea. The western ragweed, Ambrosia fsHostachya, has a 
pollen (fig. 18) similar to the common and great ragweeds (Ambrosia 
datior and trifda), but as the pollen is larger (25 microns) it has a 
much more restricted potential area. 

TTie Omrtnerias give a reaction similar to the ragweeds (Ambrosias). 
The poUen is also spiculated and their small size (average 17 microns) 
gives them a considerable potential area. 

Preyention. 

« 

The prevention of hay fever by the eradication of the weeds that 
produce the noxious pollen is a more compUcated problem in the 
Pacific and Rocky Mountain States than in the Eastern States. 
llus is due to the fact that the fall hay fever is caused by the poUen 
of a larger number of plants. 

In the early (vernal) form of hay fever, which in all the States is 
due principally to the poUen of the grasses (Graminex), this presents 
no great difficulty. The potential area of the grass pollens is not 
great and the enforcement of suitable grass-weeds ordinances should 
be sufficient practically to eliminate grasses as a factor.* 

The fall hay fever, however, which is due principally to the pollen 
of the Artemisias, Ivas^ and Gsertnerias, presents greater difficulty 
both on account of the larger number ol these plants and the greater 
buoyancy of their pollen. 

While the fall hay fever of the eastern States is due almost entirely 
(85 per cent) to the pollen of the common ragweed (Ambrosia elatior), 

> The N«w Orleans grass-weeds ordinance, adopted Jan. 25, 1916, was published in the Public Health 
ReporU of Aug. 25, 1916, p. 23ia 



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July 20, W17 1152 

the fall hay fever of the Pacific and Rocky Mountain States is due to 
many varieties of the ArtemisiaSf as well as of several of the Ivas and 
Gsertneri/is and also to the western ragweed (Amirosia psUostachya). 

Tlie larger number of plants^ however, is offset by the far greater 
buoyancy of the pollen of the common ragw eed ot the Eastern States. 
Measwing only 15 microns in diameter and having a spiculated 
surface, which adds almost 50 per cent to its buoyancy, the potential 
area of the common ragweed pollen is so great that it will traverse 
several miles in a wind of 20 miles per hoiu*, as has been frequently 
demonstrated by atmospheric-poDen plates. 

The ArtemisiaSj however, on account of the size of their poUen, 
which average about 24 microns, will traverse only about one-sixth 
of the area of the common ragweed, this area being still more reduced 
by the fact that their surface is smooth instead of spiculated, as in 
the ragweeds. In spite of the great prevalence of these plants, 
therefore, legislative measures for their eradication from the vicinity 
of municipalities should prove quite eflFective. This also applies to 
the western ragweed (Ambrosia psUostachya) whose pollen measures 
25 microns, which also restricts its potential area of distribution. 

The GaertneriaSj however, which bear a resemblance to the rag- 
weeds both in the spiculated poDen and in their hay-fever reaction, 
also have a light buoyant poDen (average 17 microns) which give 
them an extended potential area. On this account special efforts 
should be made to eliminate them from the neighborhoods of com- 
munities. 

The education of the public in the noxiousness of these weeds 
from a hay-fever standpoint is of the greatest importance. When 
this has been accomplished, suitable legislation will be* enacted. 
When we observe the stringent laws enacted by various Statee for 
the exclusion of parasites injxu*ious to their agricultural intereatSi 
suitable legislation for the protection of the large number of hay- 
fever sufferers should present no great difficulty. 



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PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 



No health department J State or local, can effectively prevent or control disease without 
knowledge of when, where, and under what coriditions cases are occurring. 



UNITED STATES. 



CURRENT STATE SUMMARIE& 
CaOfoniia Report for the Week Ended July 14» 1917. 

The California State Board of Health reported concerning the 
status of preventable diseases in California for the week ended July 
14, 1917, as follows: The prevalence of cerebrospinal meningitis 
increased. Six cases were reported in San Diego County, one case 
each in Oakland, San Francisco, and in Alameda County. There 
was a sharp increase in typhoid fever. A total of 53 cases was re- 
ported, well scattered over the State. Of measles, mumps, and 
chicken pox, the numbers of cases continued to decrease. Diph- 
theria cases were shghtly reduced. 

The details of notifiable disease cases reported in the St^te during 
the week ended July 7 are as follows : 

r-erebroepinal meningitis 4 , Mumps 101 

Chick on pox , 50 Pellagra 1 

Diphtheria 27 Pneumonia 22 

I>enf;iie 1 Scarlet fever 57 

EryBip)ela9 7 Smallpox 2 

(ierman measles 36 Syphilis S2 

Gonococtu» infection 23 j Tiihertulosis 87 

Malaria 4 Typhoid fever 21 

Mcaalee 184 • Whooping cough 38 

ANTHRAX. 

Bfassachnsetts. 

During the month of June, 1917, 9 cases of anthrax were notified 
in the State of Massachusetts. 

CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS. 

Kansas. 

During the period of two weeks ended July 14, 1917, cases of 
cerebrospinal meningitis were notified in Kansas as follows: Two 
at Kansas City, one each at Independence and Leeds. 

(1153) ^ . 

Digitized by VaOOQlC 



July 20, 1917 



1154 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS— CV>ntiniied. 
State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


District of Columbia 


3 


Massachusetts— Continued. 
Suffolk County- 
Boston 








Maryland: 

KAltimore Citv 


23 

2 
1 





Chelsea 


2 


Baltimore County— 
O&Tflenvillfi 


Worcester County— 

Templeton 


1 


8t)arrows Point 


Worcester 


2 




Total 




Total -.. 


26 


36 




West Virginia: 

Marshall County- 

MoundsviUe 




Massachusetts: 

Berkshire County— 

Plttsfield 


6 


1 


Essex County- 
Beverly 


Wisconsin: 

Bavfield County 






OIotioestAr . . 


1 




Douglas County 




Haxnpden County— 
Chicopee. 
SnrinEfield . ... . . ... . . . 


Kenofba C^ounfy , 




Ifftnltnwnc C>0»intV, ,^-,-,-^ ,- 




Milwaukee C<mnty 




Palmer 


Racine County 




Middlesex County- 

Oracut ... 


Sheboygan County 




TrempcAleau County 




Lowell 


Winnebago County.' 






Total 




WatertowiL. '.. 


10 









Virginia Report for Maj, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Virginia: 

AnTMinattox Countv ••••.. 


2 

1 


Virginia— Continued. 

Orange County. -,-.r- 


2 


Buchanan County 


Pulaski County 


1 


Charlotte Countv 


Rockbridge C<junty— 

Buena Vista 




PYanklln Countv . • • • . 


1 


Gravson Countv 


Russell County 


2 


Greene Countv • 


Warren County 


1 




Total 




Liinenburc Countv 


16 









Citj Reports for Weeic Ended June 30, 1917. 



Place. 



Cases. Deaths. 



Place. 



Cases. Deaths. 



Akron, Ohio 

Albany, N.Y 

Altoona, Pa 

Baltimore. Md 

JJoston, Mass 

l,uffalo, N. Y 

( htcago, 111 

(lev eland. Ohio 

Dayton, Ohio 

Dubuque, Iowa...., 

Duluth, Minn 

El Paso, Tex 

Hartford, Conn 

Kansas City, Mo... 

Kokomo, Ind 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Madison, Wis 

McKeesport, Pa.... 
Minneapolis, Minn., 



10 



Nashville. Tenn 

Newark, N.J 

New Britain, Conn . . 
New London, Conn.. 

Newport, R. I 

New^ork, N, Y.... 
Philadelphia, Pa.... 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

PittsfleldTMass. 

PlainfleM, N. J 

Providence, R. I 

Quincy, 111 

Rochester, N. Y 

St. Louis, Mo 

San Diego, Cal 

San Francisco, Cal... 

Springfield, Mass 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. . . . 



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1155 



July 20, 1017 



DIPHTHERIA. 

See Diphtheria, meaeles, scarlet fever, and tuherculoeis, page 1165. 

DYSENTERY. 

Arkansas, Missouri, and Tennessee. 

Passed Asst. Surg. Ridlon reported July 13 and 17, 1917, concerning 
the outbreak of dysentery in Mississippi County, Ark., and vicinity 
as follows: The epidemic of dysentery is rapidly decreasing in this 
vicinity. The virulence of the infection is much lessoned, and it is 
difficult to find acute cases. There are no official records of cases or 
deaths. Have epidemiological histories of 75 cases, and 300 case 
reports from six physicians. The disease is most prevalent in Out- 
lying districts, and has also been reported prevalent in southern 
Missouri and western Tennessee. The disease has been reported 
prevalent in Mississippi County, and adjacent counties in Arkansas, 
and in Dunklin, New Madrid, Scott, and Stoddard Counties, Mo. 

ERYSIPELAS. 
City Reports for Weelc Ended June 30, 1917. 



PhM». 



BaltinM>re, Md 

Birmini^ham, Ala.. 

Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Cambridge. Mass. . 

Chicago, nl 

Cincinnati, Ohio... 
Cleveland^ Ohio... 

Dayton. Ohio 

Denver, Co^o 

Detroit, Mi-h 

IHiluth, Minn 

Harrisburgj Pa 

Jackson, Mich 

Kalamazoo, Mich. . 

Lancaster, Pa 

ttos Angeles, Cai... 



Cas«9. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Lynchburg, Va 

MeKeesport, Pa 

Milwaukee, wis 

Newark, N.J 

New York, N.Y 

Northampton, Mass. 

Oakland. Cal 

Orange, N. J 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsbureh, Pa 

Racine, Wis 

Rochester, N.Y 

St. Louis, Mo 

San Fmacisco, Cal... 

Seattle, Wash 

Wilkinsburg, Pa 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



LEPROSY. 
California— Los Angeles. 



A case of leprosy was reported July 13, 1917, in a Japanese woman 
at Los Angeles, Cal., where the patient has resided one year. 



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July 20, 1017 



1156 



MALARIA. 

State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 



Maryland: 

CbarlM County- 
Bel Alton, R.D 

LaPlaU 

Port Tobacco 

White Plains, R.D. . 
Harford County— 

Abingdon 

Prince Georges County— 

Aocokeek, R. D 

Piscataway, R. D.... 
Wicomico CouBty— 

Clara 

RockawaDcing 

Salisbury 

Total 



New cases 
reported. 



PlaM. 



Massachusetts: 

Bristol County- 
Fall River 

Norfolk County— 

Brookline 

Dedham 

Plymouth County- 
Brockton 

Suffolk County- 
Boston 

Franklin County— 

Enring 

Montague 

Total 



New oases 
reported. 



16 



Virginia Report for May, 1917. 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



Virginia: 

Accomac County 

Chincoteague 

GreenbackvOle 

, Albemarle County 

Alexandria County 

Alleghany County- 
Clifton Forge 

Amelia County 

Appomattox County 

Augusta County 

Bedford County 

Brunswick Coimty 

Buckingham County 

Campbell County 

AltaVista 

Brookneal 

Caroline Coimty 

Carroll County 

Charles City County 

Chesterfield County 

Wlnterpock 

Clarke County 

Cumberland County — 

Dinwiddle County 

Eliiabeth City County . . 

Phoebus 

Essex County 

Fairfiax County 

Floyd County 

Fluvanna County 

Gloucester Count v 

Greensville County 

Emporia 

Noiih Emporia 

Halifax County 

Houston 

South Boston 

Hanover County 

Henrico County 

Richmond 

Isle of Wight County. . . . 

Smithfleld 

James City County 

Williamsburg 

King and Queen County 
KlngWilliam County. . . 

WestPoint 

Lancaster County 

Irvington 

Lee County 



Virginia— Continued. 

Loudoun County 

Leesburg 

Louisa County 

Limenburg County 

Victorfe 

Mathews County , 

Mecklenburg Countv 

Clarksviile 

Middlesex County 

Montgomery County 

Christiansburg , 

Nansemond County 

Suffolk 

Nelson County 

New Kent County , 

Norfolk Countv 

Northampton bounty. . . , 

Cape Chariot 

Northumberland County 
Nottoway County 

Blat'kstone. .*. 

Orange County 

Page County 

Pittsylvania County . . . . . 

Powhatan County 

Princess Anne County . . , 
Prince Edward Counly . , 

Farmville 

Prince George County 

Prince William County.. 

Richmond County 

Rockingham County 

Davton 

RusseU County 

Scott County 

Southampton County . . . , 

Franklin 

Spottsylvania (^ounty — 

Fredericksburg 

Stafford County 

Surry County 

Sussex Coimty 

Warwick County 

Washington County- 
Damascus 

Westmoreland County . . . 
York County 

Total 



1 

3 

4 

6 

S 

1 

9 

I 

3 

2 

1 

8 

23 

1 

6 

21 

16 

1 

7 

1 

1 

1 

2 

35 

12 

28 

4 

3 

12 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

3 

23 

3 

4 

2 

1 

14 

13 

10 

1 
2 

8 



548 



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1157 



July 20, 1017 



MALARIA— Continued. 
City Reports for Week Ended June 30, 1917. 



Plaoe. 



B«keley,CaL 

SIxinixi^tiAni. AIa., 
Charleston, S. C . . . 
Kansas Ci^, ICo... 
M€mnhis.Teim.... 
NewMk.kj 



Cues. 



DflHtbs. 



Place. 



New Orleans, La. . 

Orange, N.J 

San Frandscq. Cal, 
Sacramento, Cal . . . 
Savannah, Ga 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



1 Tlie reason that Birmingham had so many more cases of malaria reported than any other citv is not 
that the disnse is more prevalent in Birmingham than in other cities of Alabama and neighboring 
States, bat ondoabtedly because of the suooessml efforts the health department has made in securing the 
oooperatlon of the practicing physicians in reporting cases. 

MEASLES. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1165. 

PELLAGRA. 
State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 


New 

cases 

reported. 


Places. 


New 

cases 

reported. 


Dfetrict of Cohimbia 


3 


Massachusetts— Continu ed. 
Essex County- 
Dan vers 








Marylind: 

'^fertem iLryland Hospital 
Qiarles County— 

Bolton, R. D 






Lynn 




Middle^x County- 

Somerville 




Suffolk County- 
Chelsea 




Dorchester County- 
Pishing Oxwk 




Worcester Coimty— 

Worcester 




Washington County— 




Total 




Nanticoke 




West Virginia: 
Lewis Coimty— 








Total 


5 






2 


Massachusetts: 

Bristol County— 

Tauntcn 


2 











Virginia Report for May, 1917. 




Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Virginia: 

J^c*winac CouPty. ............... . 


} 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 
4 
1 

1 
1 
2 
2 


Virgtaia-Continued. 

Hftnov^r Coiuity - 


2 


Albemarle County 


Henr V Countv l 


2 


Am<^ County . . .^\ 


James City County 


2 


Amhmt County 


WilHftmshiirg 


1 


Amhetat . . .'. 


King and Queen County 


1 


Angusta County 


Mec^enbufg County. . ' 


2 


Campbell Countv 


Pitt^ylvffnJA PoiiTity ... 


1 


GarroU County 


RockWidge County— 

Buena Vista 




Charlotte County 


1 


Qiesterfield County 


Russell Coimty 


1 


Colpeper Count V 


Scott County 


1 


Wnwiddie County 


fimyth Cou»)ty , ..... 


3 


Greene County 


Washington County- 
Damascus 




Greenesville County— 


1 


Bmporla 


Wise County 


1 


Nocth Emporiar 


York County 


1 


Hriite County 


Total 




Sooth BosfOTi.".!!!"!]!'.]!!'.!!!'. 


IS 







83 



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1 



July 20, 191T 



1158 



PELLAGRA— Oontinued. 
City Reports for Week En^ed June 90, 1917. 



Place. 


Gases. 


Deaths. 


PJaon. 


Caset. 


Deaths. 


Birmingham, Ala 


»8 


Mobile. Ala 


2 
1 

1 


i 


Galveston, Tex 


i 

1 


Nftshvlllft, Tfinn,,..... .., 


I 


Kalaraaroo, Mich 


1 

1 


New Orleans, La 




Kan5as('ity, Mo 


Savannah, Ga 


s 


Memphis, Tomi 


2 















> The reason that Birmingham had so many more eases of pellagra reported tbmn any otbw citv Is not 
that the disea^^e is more prevalent in Birmiiii^ham than in other cities of Alabama and neignborins 
States, but undoubtedly boeau.^ of tiic successful elTorts the health department has made In securing tbi 
cooperation of the practicing physicians in reporting cases. 

PLAGUE. 

California — Alameda County — Plague-Infected Squirrels Found. 

On June 29, 1917, a plague-infected ground squirrel was found on 
the H. B. Goechen ranch, 3 miles west of Altamont, Alameda County, 
Cal. 

California — San Benito County — Plague-Infected Squirrel Found. 

During the period from June 22 to 28, 1917, plague-infected ground 
squirrels were found in San Benito County, Cal., as follows: Two on 
the Blanchard & Whitman ranch, 3 miles south of Hollister, and 
ohe on Dooling brothei-s' ranch, 7 miles northeast of Hollister. 

PNEUMONIA. 
City Reports for Week Ended June 30, 1917. 



Place. 



Atlantic City, N.J 

Baltimoro, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Cambridge. Mass 

Chicago, 111 

Cleveland. Oliio 

Detroit, Mich 

Duliith, Minn 

Everett, Mass 

Fall Ki V or, Mass 

Flint, Mich 

Grand Rapids. Mich 

Haverhill, M;*ss 

Kalaraa/oo, M ich 

LawTcuce, Muss 



Cases. I Deaths. | 



1 


3 


2 


12 


4 




1 




61 


51 


22 


17 


1 


14 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


a 




? 




1 


1 


1 





Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


lyexlnpton, Ky 

I /OS Virole.-, t'al.. 


u 

30 
12 
5 
2 
17 
1 
1 




McKf^c^|)ort, Pa 




M(>rnsto\\-n. N. J 

New ark, N.J 

Wnv Hfdford, Ma.'^s 




OakLuid Tal 




I'tiilu'lrlphia. Pa 


22 


i iUsl'tjr 'li, I'a 


14 


Roflu'^U'r \ S' 




Siin 1 io ,o, Tal 

San I'Vaii eisco, ( 'al 




SonuTsilic, >.Iass 

Toledo, Oliio 









POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS.) 
Kansas — Kansas City. 

During the week ended July 14, 1917, one case of poliomyelitis 
was notified at Kansas City, Kans. 

Massachusetts — HaverhilL 

At Haverhill; Mass., cases of poliomyelitis were notified as follows: 
One case each on July 10 and 11, two cases July 17. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1159 



Jaly 20, 1917 



POUOMTELrnS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS)— CJonUnued. 
Missouri— ^lohmibia. 

On July 13, 1917, three cases of poliomyelitis were notified from 

Ooltmibia, Mo. 

Yermoiit. 

Dnring the week ended July 14, 1917, cases of poliomyelitis were 
notified in Vermont as follows: MontpeUer 8, Waterbury 2, Barre 
(town) 1, East Montpelier 1, Worcester 2, Duxbury 1, Rochester 2. 

Virginim— Theological Seminary. 

On July 14, 1917, a case of poliomyelitis was reported from Theo- 
logical S^ooinaryi Alexandria County, Va. 

West Virginia. 

During the week ended July 14, 1917, four cases of pohomyehtis 
were notified in the State of West Virginia, two of which were in 
Marion County, one in Jackson County, and one in Ohio County. 

Wisconsin— Cottage Gro?e. 

On July 1, 1917, one case of poliomyehtis was notified at Cottage 
Grove, Dane County, Wis. 

State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 


New 
cases re- 
ported. 


Place. 


Now 
cases re. 
ported. 


MtnrkDd: 

Gamtt County— 

DtvPErk. 


1 
1 


Vermont: 

Orange r^inty. , . r 


2 


Washington f'-onn^y 


31 


Jnminfs 


Total .... 






33 


Total 


2 


WestVirylnia: 

Tucker County— 








EsnxCotmty — 


1 
5 

1 

2 

2 

1 
8 


1 


Amesbtinr 


Wisconsin: 

Juneau Countyr , r ,.,,,. r ....,,,,.,. . 




H*T»hIlf 




Hiinpden County— 

^riii^14 




La Crosse County ; 




Ifiddksef County— 

OunMdf*... 


Manitowoc rounty - . , , . 




Milwaukee County 




*X£S^- 


Shawano County.". 




Total 




Woreester Coimty— 

Sotton 


5 






Worcester 








Total 


15 









Idaho Beports for January and February, 1917. 

During the month of January, 1917, 1 case of poliomyelitis was 
reported at Twin Falls, Twin Falls Coxmty, Idaho, and in February 
2 cases were reported at Payette, Canyon Coimty, Idaho. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



July 20, 1917 1160 

POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS)-Oontiniied. 
Virginia Report for May, 1917. 

During the month of May, 1917, cases of poliomyelitis were notified 
in Virginia as follows: One case each in Bath, Campbell, and Craig 
Counties. 

City Reporte for Week Ended June 30, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


I 
Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Akron, Ohio 


3 


I /OS Angeles, CaL 


1 
2 
9 
1 
1 




Boston, Mass 




• Newark, N.J 

' NewYork, N. Y 




East Orange, S.J 




a 


Haverhill, Mass 




' l^hiladelphia, Pa 




Jersey City, N.J 




Wheeling, W. Va 


1 


Kansas City, Kaus 

















RABIES IN MAN. 



Tennessee — Mempliis. 



During the week ended June 23, 1917, a fatal case of rabies was 
notified at Memphis, Tenn. Tiie health ofTicer of Memphis was un- 
able to secure a history of the case as to the manner of infection or 
the attendant circumstances prior to the development of the disease. 

City Report for Week Ended June 30. 1917. 

During the week ended June 30, 1917, 1 case of rabies in man was 
reported at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

RABIES IN ANIMALS. 
City Reports for Week Ended June 30, 1917. 

During the week ended Juno 30, 1917, one case of rabies in animals 
was reported at Detroit, Mich., and two cases at Kansas City, Mo. 

SCARLET FEVER. 

See Diphtheria, meawles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1165.- 

SMALLPOX. 
Minnesota. 

During the week ended July 14, 1917, four new foci of smallpox 
infection were re])ortcd in Minnesota, cases of the disease having 
been notified as follows: Carver County, Chanhassen Township, 2; 
Kittson County, Karlstad, 1; Mower County, Lyle Township, 9; 
Scott County, Glendale Township, 1. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1161 

SMALLPOX— CJontinued. 
State Reports for June, 1917. 



July 20, 1917 





New cases 
reported. 


Deaths. 


Vaccination history of cases. 


Place. 


Number 
vaccinated 

Within? 
years pre- 
ceding 

attack. 


Number 
last vacci- 
nated more 
thanTvears 
preceding 
attack. 


Number 
never suc- 
cessfully 
vaccinated. 


VaoeinaUon 
history not 
obtained or 
uncertain. 


Maryland: 

Baltimoro County— 


1 








1 














Uanachosetts: 

Worcester County— 

Blackstooe (Town) 








1 
2 






Pltchburg..^ .'. 










Shrewsbury 




2 
1 
1 






webstttr?!:;.;:::::';;:: 










Worcester 


2 


1 


2 








Total 


10 


2 


4 


4 


2 









MiflceUaneoos State Reports. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Idaho (Kay 1-31): 
Bannock County— 

PocateUo 


6 




Virginia— Continued. 

Isle of Wight County 

Northampton County .... 
Prince George County .... 

Richmond County 

Stafford County 


27 
9 
4 

1 
3 








* 




Vennoot (June 1-30): 


1 
1 
6 






Chitt«oden County 

Kntlann CrOimf v 






Total 






WashhigtOD County 




105 ' 




Wisconsin (June 1-30): 




Total 


8 




I 






6 




West Virginia (June 1-30): 
Barbour County . . .. 


1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
8 




Brown County 


1 

1 
1 

14 
1 
2 
1 
2 
6 
4 
1 
7 

23 
3 
1 

12 
5 
1 
2 





Chippewa County 

Clark (^unty 




Hancock C^untv 






Kanftwh^ C-ounty 




Dane County 




McDoweU County 

KanhallConntv 




Douglas County 






Green County 




Manon Countv 




Jackson County 




Ifason Cotmty 




Juneau County 




Afinco Countv 




Kenosha Ck>unty 




Ohio County 


.......... 


La Crosse (bounty 




Pntnam Countv 




Manitowoc County 

Marathon (bounty 

Milwaukee County 

Portage CJounty 




Wood County 












Total 


22 








.... 


RaHha Countv 




Virginia (May 1-31): 

AocDmaAnonntv . 


6 

1 

40 
13 

1 




Roclc Countv 




St. Croix County 




Botetourt County— 
Trootville.. 




fiawver (Countv. 




Wood County 




CarTDll nonntv 




Total • 




Qravnn OomtT 




94 




Halifax County^ 

Houston. 















Digitized by 



Google 



July 20, 1917 



1162 



SMALLPaX— Continued. 
City Reports for Week Ended June m, 1917. 



Place, 



Akron, Ohio 

Alton,Ill 

Butte, Mont 

Chicago, HI 

Cfleveland, Ohio 

Cofleyville, Kans . . . . 

Columbus, Ohio 

Danville.lll 

Denver, Colo 

Detroit, Mich 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Duluth.Minn 

FUnt,Mich 

Fort Worth, Tex..., 

Galesburg, 111 

Grand Rapids, Mich 
Indianapolis. Ind — 

Jackson, Mich 

Kansas City , Kans . . 

Kansas City , Mo 

La Crosse, Wis 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Los Angeles, Cal 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Memphis, Tenn 

Minneapolis, Minn. . . . 

Muscatinej Iowa 

New Britain, r^nn... 

New Orleans. La 

Nov York. N.Y 

Norfolk. Va 

Oakland, Cal 

Oklahoma City, Okla, 

Omaha, Nebr 

Pontiac, Mich 

Quincy,Ill 

Racine, Wis 

St. Louis, Mo 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Springfield , Ohio 

Tacoma, Wash 

Toledo, Ohio 

Topeka, Kans 

Wichita, Kans 

Zanosville, Ohio 



Cases. 



Deaths, 



TETANUS. 
City Reports for Week Ended June SO, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths, 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Birminpham, Ala 


1 
2 




Mobile, Ala 




3 


Charleston S C .. . 


Omaha Nebr ... 




1 


Chicago, 111 


Philadelphia, Pa 


1 




Dayton, Ohio 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


1 


Kansas Cit v , Mo 




Savannan, Ga 




1 











TUBERCULOSIS. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1165. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 
State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 



District of Columbia. 



Now f a^^ 
reported. 



Maryland: 

Allc^'any County — 

Mcjrantown. , 

Parlon 

Western Mnrybnd Ilosjntal., 

Allc;,any Hospital 

Anne Anin<lcl County— 

McKcji'lrce 

8u<lley 

Cilcnl)ui nic , 

Baltimore t ity 

Baliin.oro County— 

WoDdla r/n 

II i ''hia nd town 

Hillyjulc 

JuHcrton 

8hei)piir<l Pratt Hospital 

Luthorville 

Towson 

HoflniansviJle, K. D 



Place. 



'New cases 
reported. 



Maryland— Continued. 

iJivItim^ro ('- idity- Continued. 

KnUind I'ark 

Kelay Sanitarium 

Cecil (ounlv 

Ui^in^! ■^nn, R. D 

Charles ' (vjutv — 

Poui^rol. ll, D 

Wl.ile ; Irtins 

HuehcsMllo, U. D 

Dort'ho.-: IT County— 

LakcsMlle, II. D 

T(Kl(l\ilIc 

Ilurlock, R. D 

Frederick County— 

Middle! own 

Maryland School for the Deaf. . 
Garrett County - 

Hlooinin^ton 

Harford County— 

Joppa, R. h..^. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1163 



July 20, 1917 



TYPHOID FEVER— Continued. 
State Reports for June, 1917— Continued. 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



Place. 



Newc 
reported. 



Itorriand— Continued . 
Howard County— 

EUicottCity 

SlmpsonTilfe 

Kent County— 

Bcttcrton, R. D 

Oalaia,R. D 

M oDtfomery County— 

BetbesOa 

Takoma Park 

Cabin John, R. D 

Brighton 

Friendship Heists . . . 
Prince Georce County- 
House of Reformation. 

LandOTer 

Croom Station 

Bladensburg 

Buena Vista ,R. D.... 

Piscataway, R. D 

Seat Pleasant 

Queen Annes County- 
Hay den, R. D 

Somerset County— 

PoGomoke City, R. D . 
St. Marys County— 

Chaptico 

Washington C<iunty— 

Hancock 

Ha ^eisUiw iA. 

Hancock, R. D 

Dargan 

Wicomico County— 

Fruitland 

Worcester County- 

Girdletroe 

Snow Hill R.D 

Stockton 

Snow Hill 

Berlin, R.D 

Welboume 

Total 

Massachusetts: 

Berkshire County- 
Adams 

Hinsdale 

North Adams 

Pittsfleld , 

Bristol County— 

Attleborougb , 

FaU River 

Taunton , 

Essex County— 

Andover 

Beverly. 

Danvers , 

GlcucestCT 

Havwhill 

Ipswich 

Lawrence 

Lynn 

M^blehead 

Middletcn. 

Peabody 

Selem 

Fnoklin County— 

Ashhdd 



87 



Massachusetts— Continued. 
Hampden County— 

Brimfield 

Hoi yoke 

Ludlow 

RiL<^sell 

Springfield 

Middlesex County— 

Cambridge 

Chelmsford 

Everett 

LoweU 

Maiden 

Somerville 

Waltham 

Watertown 

Norfolk County— 

Braintree 

Brooklino 

Quincv 

Stoughton 

Plymouth County- 
Brockton 

Waroham 

Suffolk County- 
Boston 

Chelsea. 

Revere 

Worcester County— 

Sout hbrldge 

Sterling 

Total 

Vermont: 

Addison County 

Franklin County 

Orleans Coimty 

Rutland County 

Total 

West Virginia: 

Kanawha County — 

Charleston 

Dunbar 

Lewis County 

McDowell County 

Marion County 

Raleigh County 

Randolph County 

Total 

Wisconsin: 

Dane County 

Dodge County 

DouKlas County 

Fona du Lao County... 

Juneau Countv 

Kenosha County 

Marinette County 

Milwaukee County 

Sheboy ran County 

Waukesha County 

Waupaca County 

Total 



1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

6 

1 
3 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

n 

2 
3 

5 
1 



105 



79 
10 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 



OT 



23 



Idaho. 



During the month of January, 1917, 1 case of typhoid fever was 
reported at Wallace; in March, 8 cases at Harrison; in April, 17 cases 
atHaFrison; and m May, 1 case at Pocatello. Digitized by GoOqIc 



July 20, 1917 



1164 



TYPHOID FBVER— OontinuedL 
Virginia Report tiift May, 1917. 



Place. 


Ne^v cases 
reported. 


Place. 


NewcuM 
reported. 


Virginia: 

Accomac rounty 


2 


Virginia- rontinued. 

Leo County 




ChiucotcaKiio. . 


Lunenburg County .- 




Grftcnbaokville 


Middlesex Conn tr 




Albemarle rounty 


Nansemond County— 

Suffolk 




Alleghany Coanty— 

Clifton Korco ...... .. 




Norfolk County- 
Norfolk 




A mclia Count v 




\upusta County ... . 


Oranjro County 




IJasic <.'ity 


Pac;e County 




Bedford County 


Shenandoah 




Bedford C^ity 


Powhatan County 




Botetourt County 


2 

• 

2 


1 Prince (Jeorpe County....... 




Buchanan County 


Prince William Coanty— 

Potomac 




Camplxjll County 




Lynchbiirg 


1 Roanoke County— 

' Roanoke 




CarrollCounty 




Clarke County 


1 
2 

1 
1 

4 

1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 


\ Vinton 




Culpeper County 


Rockingham County 




Culpcper 


Russell County 




Dickenson County 


Honaker 




Elizabeth Citv County— 


Scott County 




Phoet)Us 


Shenandoah County 




Essex County 


Sou thampton County 




Tanpah'vnnock 


TazoweJl 'County ...'. 




Floyd rouut V 


Graham 




Fluvivnna <'ountv 


Warren Coimty 




Franklin County 


Wise County— 

Appalachia 




Halifax County 




South Bo uon 


St. Paul 




Hanover <'ounty. 


Wythe County 




Isle of Wiu'hi. I'ounty 


Total 




Lancaster Ooimiy. .". 


S 









City Reports for Week Ended Jane 30, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deftths. 


Bait imore, Md 


3 
21 

1 
2 
3 
1 

14 
7 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 

18 
3 
1 
1 
2 
f. 
2 
2 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
2 


1 

2 



i 

i 

2 


Nashville. Tenn 


9 

2 
13 
20 

1 






Newark. K. J 

New Orleans La 




Brook lino, Mass 


6 


BulT:ilo, N. Y 


Now York, N. Y 


4 


Cambridge, Mass 

Camden, N. J 


Niag.ira Falls. N. Y 

1 Pn-:;i(lena Cal 




i 


Charleston, S. C 


' Philadelphia. Pa 


10 
6 
1 
2 

1 
1 
8 
1 
I 
1 
8 
Q 
1 
5 
1 

2 

3 
1 

1 
2 
3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

10 
1 


6 


Chio:\go, 111 ;.. 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


1 


Cincinnati, C)hio ... 


Piftsfield Mass 




Clevoluid, Ohio 


PlamJiold, N. J 




Colli hihus, Ohio 


1 PoTili.ir. Mich 




Davton, Ohio 


Portsmouth, Va.. . . ... 




Den V er, ( olo 


Providcufo. li. I 


i 


Detroit, Mich 




1 


Rich niond , Va 




Duluth, Minn 


1 Roanoke, Va 




Elgin, 111 




1 Rockv Mount, N C . 




El Paso, Tex 


2 


St. Louis, Mo 

Salt Lake City. Utah 

1 8.in Dio.uo.Cal 

1 San Fr.inci-^'o, Cal 




Evansville, Ind 






1 
1 

1 




Hiiii, :.li. jj,. . 




yOft \\ Ll^'tU" If 


1 SacranKnto, Cal 

,Sar:itou'aSi)rin}:s, N. Y 

' Sav.'.niiah, <;a 

Se-attir. Wash 

Soutii iJfnd Ind 




(Iflh <^>Un), Tf ■* 




Gnind liapid>', Mich 

Hiirt ifi If 1 1 1 '{jna 


1 


i 

1 


IndiaUkjirxJUs, lud 






K»i*>Ija, Wii . 


1 


1 SprintfK'ld, Ma-<s 

SnrinLlif>ld Ohio 




LflXing^toPj ICy 






1 


Sieubcnvilic Ohio.... 




Uttle Rm*. \rk 


1 
2 
1 
4 
8 
4 
3 


Toledo Ohio 


i 


Lcu£ Hraueh, N. J 




Tope k. I, Ivans 


1 


LCM AJiJ4e|o;«» C ftl 




Troy. NY 

Wli.Mlin^' W Va... 




LvnE-hbufv:, Vii 


1 
1 
1 




Rf p'tn phji, Ton n 






MUwttwlfoc, W'h 


Wiiiuiiijjton Del 




MinmaiiOliJi, Mjpi^ 


Win.stun-Salem, N. C 

Zanesville Ohio 


i 


Mo*»mAla,.. 


1 











Digitized by VjOOQiC 



1165 July 20, 1917 

TYPHUS FEVER. 

Utah— Ogden. 

During the week ended June 30, 1917, 2 cases of typhus fever, 
with 2 deaths, were reported at Ogden, Utah, 

DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS. 

State Reports for Juie, 1917. 





Cases reported. 


State. 


Cases rei)orted. 


state. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Measles. 


Scariot 
feTer. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


DistofCoIambca.. 
Maryted 


18 
£5 
793 


573 
1,648 
3,786 


28 
66 
413 


Vermont 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 


26 
16 
159 


905 

115 

1,143 


37 

7 

473 









Idaho. 

Two hiindred and nineteen cases of measles and 2 cases of scarlet 
fever were reported in Idaho in January, 1917; 1 case of diphtheria, 
63 cases of measles, and 30 cases of scarlet fever in February; 1 case 
of diphtheria, 30 cases of measles, and 6 cases of scarlet fever in 
March; 2 cases of diphtheria, 19 cases of measles, and 13 cases of 
scariet fever in April; and 2 cases of diphtheria, 15 cases of measles, 
and 4 cases of scarlet fever in May. 



Virgiiiia Report for May, 1917. 

During the month of May, 1917, 81 cases of diphtheria, 2,206 
cases of measles, and 33 cases of scarlet fever were reported in 
Virginia. 



City Reports for Week Ended June 30, 1917. 



CUf. 



Ovtr ilftOM ItilmiiCcaiita: 
Ite^berv. Mil,. 

Sfia.i"'.::::::::;::: 

midUfiiiKrii..,„ 
' fwfl«iifvK,.. ..,,. 

^SI. Louiji, lfo...„_ ., 

msD im^rm to .^oogooo inbabti- 

lTO«y*U4y, N.I.,, ,,.„„,. 

MiBDMipdI&.ICicm 

^mrfmmm, Im. ..»..„ 

Sao Ptwirtwo, Ctrt. „..„.., 



FopolA- 
tiiTii as of 
July 1,1916 
rcsilzaatied 

C«uiys 
' Burt>t&u}, 



T.5fs 

1,703, 
S7ft, 



4m,sm 



dm, 

136. 
SET J, 

m, 

34t«, 



Total 
deaths 

from 

nil 

caijscs^ 



19(5 
IW) 



Dlphilieria. 



l,2lJrt 

I 1711 
211} 



m 

«V 

m 

Tit' 

m 
in 



7i> 

7i 

12 



Measles. 



10 

I 



2 



iii 
pi 

m 
to 



I \ Xi 



Scjirkrt 



1 I i 



5 


7 


s 


m 


a 


m 




n 




R2 




I* ' 


l.H 


ifll 


:* 


L> 


\ 


f 


I 


4i 




7 


1 


3 


1 


10 




4t 




1 


., ,. 


10 




2 




la 




D 



il 

I ^ 

Digitized by VjOOS 



TiibflT- 



^ P 



21 
IIQ 

77 
25 



24 
27 

V4 

ia 

'JOl 

u 

17 



10 

to 



July 20, 1917 



1166 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Contlnued. 

City Reports for Week Ended June 30, 1917— Continued. 



' 


P4>ptila- 
tion as of 
July IJ9W 
(cstUrmted 

Ccmm 
Bureau). 


Total 

deaths 

from 

all 


PipM^erla. 


U^All^, 


lever . 


Tub«jr- 

CulOEifl. 


City. 


i 


1 


i 


1 

Q 


u 


1 


1 


i 


Vrem 200,000 Uf 300,000 Jntuibtt- 
Columbus, Ohio 


214,878 
260,800 
271,708 
297,847 
295,463 
254,960 
256,417 

104,199 
181,762 
121,579 
112,981 
100,233 
127,224 
128,366 
104,562 
128,291 
110,900 
100,560 
113,245 
102,425 
148,995 
117,057 
118, 168 
149,085 
198,004 
165, 470 
109,381 
156,087 
117,390 
105,942 
155,624 
112,770 
191,554 
111,593 
163,314 

8.5,625 
63,505 
58,659 
57,060 
09,893 
57,653 
53,973 
67,449 
60,852 
60,734 
57,144 
94,495 
86,690 
63,705 
75,195 
76,078 
54,772 
76,183 
72,015 
77,214 
68,529 
99,437 
50,853 
67,343 
51,155 
78,283 
58,221 
53,794 
89,612 
92,943 


63 
44 

84* 

40 
75 
63 


3 

4 

16 
6 
3 
9 
6 


1 

...... 


3 
17 
66 
5 
9 
2 
107 

19 
21 
6 
20 
13 
19 
24 




14 
2 

13 
6 
7 




7 


4 


Denver, Colo 


13 


Indianapolis, Ind 




16 




KanstiiS City, Mo . 




Portland, Oreg ...... 




10 
2 

9' 

'1 

7 

'%' 

7 

1 
6 
6 
1 
9 
5 
4 
8 




Providenco. R. T 




Rochester. N. Y 


2 

' 'i' 

1 


15 

8 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 






From 100,000 to 200,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Albany, N.Y 






96 
38 

62' 

35 
30 
29 
48 
15 
20 
17 
59 
56 
16 

34' 

44 
23 
68 
21 
43 
40 






6 


Bridgeport, Conn 


2 
9 
3 

4 
1 
2 
8 
9 
4 
24 


'i' 
' i' 


2 


Cambridge, Mass 


4 


Camden, N.J 




Dayton, Ohio 


3 


Fan River, Mass 


4 


Fort Worth. Tex 




rand Rapids, Mich 

Hartford, Conn 


1 


21 
11 




1 
2 


Lawrence, Mass. 


3 


Lowell, Mass 




1 




2 


Lynn, itfass. 


3 


Mijmphis, Tenn 


1 




7 


"i* 


1 




19 
5 

10 
5 
2 


10 


NashVille, Tenn 


5 


New Bedford, Mass 


2 
3 

1 
1 
6 

1 




39 
20 






2 


New Haven, Conn 


1 






3 


Oakland Cal 


4 
9 
7 
2 

15 
8 

13 
1 

18 




1 


Omaha, Nebr 




23 
2 
6 

4 
7 
40 




5 


Reading, Pa 


"1 


9 
8 

'"'3' 
2 


3 


Richmond, Va 


3 


Salt Lake City, Utah 

Springfield, Mass 


1 


2 
1 




4 


Syracitee, N. Y 


. 2 


Tacoma, Wash 




Toledo, Ohio 


76 
32 
55 

iV 


5 
3 

4 

19 
3' 
2 

1 


1 


7 
1 
12 

8 








10 


Trenton, N.J 




9 
11 


1 


Worcester, Mass 

From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabit- 
ants: 




4 

2 
1 




3 


Ailpntown, i^ft 









Altoona:^ !^ 




3 

17 










AlbmdcCitTr N.J 








4 




Buvonnj?, N" J 




2 
2 
2 
4 
2 






Berkoby VqI 


11 

24 
8 
19 
23 
19 
13 
23 
70 

23' 

17 
16 
19 
12 
21 






4 

23 








5 


3 






1 


BrocktODj Mo^ 




4 

1 


1 


Canton, 6hJo. 


1 
1 
2 
3 
11 
1 
1 








1 


Chiu-]cst<m, 8. C 


1 
...... 










2 


Ct)v[n;^on, Kv. 


2 
28 




1 
5 
2 


1 


7 
6 
5 


1 


Diiliuh^ Minn, 




Eli Babe til. N. J. 


i 


El Vam Tex 


3 

3 

5 
13 

6 

2 

4 
13 

2 
17, 


6 


tt 


Ktiif, Pa...„ .,. 


11 
1 

13 
1 
7 
2 
2 
1 




:::::: 

1 


7 

4 
1 
5 
3 
3 

6 


20 


EviinsvilJe^ Ifid 


? 


Flint Mich.. _ 






1 


Fori WajniiS. Ind 


1 




2 


HjifrLsibufgj Pa 




HobQkoii,"N. j" 


3 








1 


KaaaosCity, Kmns 


2 




X 


1 jm^cL^lAp, V^L 




IJttln Uort Ark 


16 
10 
19 
23 
8 

25" 














Maiden, Mass 


3 


2 


27 




1 




1 




Miuwihcsler N H 




Mobile .Vltt 


1 




4 
1 
2 








1 


2 


'ti^w {iritAJci t^orui 





1 






Norfolk. Va 

OWahtimaniv' Okla 


1 























Digitized by 



Google 



1167 



fuly 20, 1917 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Continued. 

CUy Reports for Week Ended Jane 30, 1917— Continued. 





Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1, 1916 
(esthnated 
by U. S. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 

deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
culosis. 


Y ctty. 

1 


o 


1 


1 


1 


1 


J3 

1 


1 


1 


Tnm SOfiCO to 100,000 inhabit- 
ants — Continued. 
Pw^mir V J 


71,744 
50,411 
06,895 
53,330 
68,805 
57,078 
87,039 
68,946 
61,120 
61,550 
66,083 
77,916 
70,722 
76,776 
94,265 
51,656 

27,732 
37,385 
32,730 
27.632 
43,425 
46,192 
29,319 
26,074 
32,261 
48,811 
39,873 
42,458 
28.203 
39.233 
35,486 
41,781 
41,863 
29,333 
48,477 
35,383 
48,886 
31,576 
26.771 
38,670 
31,677 
41.097 
46,ol5 
27,587 
32,940 
30,609 
47,521 
28,234 
26,318 
27,327 
29,003 
41,133 
31,927 
30,108 
43,715 
37,353 
31,401 
31,404 
33,080 
46,450 
41,185 
38,629 
39.^51 
36.798 
38. 130 
46, 486 
43.284 


20 
20 
15 
20 
36 


34 
3 

4 




1 








5 


3 


Pawtucket, R. I 










Sacramento, Cal 




8 
22 








2 
2 




San T*{^, ^'ftl 




1 




2 


Ravannah, G«i,.. 






5 


Sioux City, Iowa 










4 
1 
6 










19 
17 
13 
17 
21 

U 

36 



3 

1 
2 


...... 


17 
10 
13 
5 
3 
5 
2 
36 
3 






8 

1 




SUiIh Bend, Ind 




8ihnKfleM,ni 




SMingneld, Ohio 




3 






1 


Ivre llauto, Ind 










1 


Titoy.N. Y 


3 

1 






2 




1 


4 


WlcWta. Kans 




Wllkes-Barrc, Pa 




1 




11 




Wilminffton. Del 








Yark.Pa. 













2 

2 
- 2 

1 




From 3S,000 to 50,000 inhabit- 
Alameda, Cal 


5 
10 
6 
3 

ii' 

7 
4 
6 






1 




4 
1 






AolMtm. N. Y 








Bfookllne, Moss 


1 
2 
3 
2 
1 




11 

1 
1 
8 






BitlCT, Pa 










Be Ue. Mont 




3 

1 
1 
1 








Chelsea, Mass 




2 




ITiicopee, Mass 


2 


Cumberland, Md 




9 
1 

16 
1 

18 
4 
9 
3 

13 






1 
2 




l>anville, III 






I 


Davenpovrt , Iowa 








1 
2 






Dtituique, Iowa 










1 
2 


1 


Ra&t Orann. N. J 


6 
8 
9 
4 
10 
14 
10 
10 
14 
15 
7 


3 




3 


Etob^inT.... ..::::::::::: 










Etvctt.Mass 


2 

1 
6 


....'. 












Etofett,Wash 




4 






1 


rar^bini:. Mass 




4 




0$lve<ton, Tex 






1 


(Jrnen Hay, Wis 


















HtterhUl, Mass 


1 
2 

1 


1 






2 




6 
1 
2 
2 


1 


JKtson, Mich 


16 
67 
8 
2 
2 




1 


I^iamazoo, Mich 




1 






K «nosha, Vi'is 






KTir«ton, N. Y 






1 






Knoillc, Tenn 


............ 


, ! 1 


1 
2 




LaCfosse. Wis 


7 
18 
11 

8 
17 
1 

22 
3 
3 
7 
8 

H 

9 
3 
7 
7 

10 
7 

13 
4 
4 

15 
6 
6 

14 

14 


3 




' 1 


1 


Lr\lneton, Ky 




3 
1 
4 


J 




2 


Uifoto, Nebr 


2 




i ' 




1 

1 
1 


1 


Long Beach, Cal 




Lynrhburc, Va 







1 
2 
2 
5 
3 
1 
8 


1 

5 




2 


kSi^V^S, 








UeKaemort, Pa. 








1 
1 
1 




Medlortf, Mass 












Montclalr, N. J 










1 


NmHiis N h 


2 
1 
1 










Ncwbureh, NY 








1 


NewCmstle. I*a 




' 








Newport, Ky 










1 


1 
















NewiiHi, Mass 


1 
1 




2 1 1 2 








Ni««arB Falls. N. Y 


3 1 1 2 




5 




Nontrtown, I*a 




1 




Ogden, rta^ 










1 
3 





2 
2 


2 


Or»n«, N.J 










3 


Pasajena, r«] 






6 
1 
9 
1 
2 






PlBTth Amboy, N. J 
















Pittsfield, Mass 












3 


1 


Portsmouth, Va... 








2 




2 


Qoincy.ni 










1 


(^ilnr>' Mafts 


i 

1 










1 
2 
3 




Barine.'Wls 




1 
2 




1 




2 


Roanoke, Va 


1 



Digitized by 



Google 



July 20. 1917 



1168 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSI&- 

CJontinued. 

City Reports for Week Ended June 90, 1917— Continued. 





Popula- 

tkmasof 

July 1,1916 

(estimated 

bv r. S. 

Census 

Buroau). 


ToUl 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


MflASlM 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
cnlosis. 


City. 


u 


a 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabit- 
ants— Continued. 
Rock Island Di 


28.926 
38.902 
27. 445 
46.226 
• 36.283 
48.726 
30. .570 
29.894 
43. 1.39 
43. 377 
33.809 
29,892 
31,155 
30,863 

22,874 
15,010 
21,685 
13,163 
l.'>,794 

I 13, 075 
22.669 
20. 713 
24.276 
16.9.S0 
23,.')39 
20,930 
15.395 

U4,610 
17.445 
13.284 
17, .500 
23,126 
15,243 
20.9S.> 

» 22. 019 
19,926 
23,8a5 
17,524 
11,666 
12,067 
14,831 
20,193 
13.821 
15,548 
23,228 
15,969 


13 


1 




2 
5 












San Jose, Cal 




5 


'" 1 ' 


Steubenville Ohio 


10 
8 
11 
10 
4 








I 


Superior, Wis . '..'.. 


1 




1 












IwHiton Mass 




3 






1 


TonAkA KAT14 


2 
1 





3 

15 
12 
5 

1 
3 








1 


WnlthAin, Mn^<: 








1 


1 


Watcrtown, N. Y 




1 
2 






West Hoboken, N. J 

Wheeling, W, Va 


7 
16 

i9' 

15 
5 

8 
15 


1 






3 

1 


1 
1 


Willlamsport, Pa 


1 












Wilmington N. C 












Winston-Salem, N. C . .'.*!... 














5 
I 


1 


Zanesville, Ohio 


1 





3 

1 

17 
2 










From 10,000 to 25,000inhabitants: 
Altcm, m.... 










Ann Arbor, Mich 




.... 




1 








Braddock. ^a. 








1 




Brownsville Tex. 


3 
6 
2 
10 














r>airo, HI.. 


1 
















Clinton Mass 














1 


Concord, N. U.'. 


2 




20 
4 












Dunkirk, N. Y !".".'.!.... 








I 


2 


(Jalcsburg, 111 


2 


2 










1 


Ilarrison, N. J 




4 

1 

1 
5 












Kearny, N.J 


7 
8 
9 
10 
4 
5 












2 I 


Kokomo, Ind 












5 
2 




Lonjr Branch, N. J 












1 


Marinette, Wis 








1 






Melrose, Mass 


3 




3 








i 


Morristown, N. J 




1 
1 




i 


1 


Muscatine, Iowa 






1 






Nanticoke, Pa.... 


9 
4 
4 

7 
6 
3 






. ... 


^^ 




Ncwburyport, Mass 






4 

7 
40 
10 













New London, C^mn 












3 

1 
1 
2 

1 


1 


North Adams, Mass 








2 
1 






Northampton, Mass 








Plainfield, N. J 








Pontiac, Mich 






6 

1 




6 
2 




1 


Portsmouth, N. H 










Rocky Moimt, N. C 


7 
4 
7 
6 
5 
6 
6 








1 




Rutland, Vt.. 


1 




2 




1 






Sandusky, Ohio 




^* 




Saratoga Springs, N. Y 

Steclton. I^ 














2 

I 








3 
2 










Wilklnsburg, Pa 








1 






Wobum, Msss 



























1 Population Apr. 15, 1910; no cstimate'made. 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOREIGN. 



ARABIA. 



Further RelatiTe to Plague— Aden.' 

From May 3 to 14, 1917, 24 cases of plague were notified at Aden, 
Arabia, making a total from the beginning of the outbreak, April 8, 

1917, of 69 cases. 

)i AUSTRIA-HUNGARY. 

I- ■ 

r. 

Typhus Fever. 

The following information relative to the occurrence of typhus 
fever in Austria-Hungary was taken from the Bulletin of the Inter- 
national Office of Public Hygiene for May, 1917: 

Austria, — During the period from October 22 to December 17, 
1916, 2,371 cases of typhus fever were reported in Austria, the great- 
est prevdience being in the Province of Galicia with 809 cases, Bohemia 
with 634 cases, and Styria with 243 cases. 

Hnngary. — From February 19 to March 25, 1917, there wore 
notified in Hungary 1,381 cases of tjrphus fever, of which 83 occurred 
at Budapest and 12 in seven other urban communities, the remainder 
being distributed in 11 counties. 

CUBA. 

Communicable Diseases- Habana. 

Communicable diseases have been notified at Ilabnna as follows: 



; 



Disease. 


June II- 
New 


20, 1017. 
Deaths. 
.......... 


Remain- 
ing under 
treat- 
ment 

June 20, 
1917. 


TJlphthem 


8 


u 


l/ftMosy 


10 


^larift 


IS 

19 




15 


Measles -. . 




19 


Paratyphoi d fe ver 




1 


scarietw :: ....::.: :.:....:...: 


13 
I 






"^pholdfever 


..... 


33 


y&ik : 


1 











» Public Uealth Reports, May 2.'), i'U7. \\ 822, and June 15, 1917, p. 901. 
(1169J 



Digitized by 



Google 



July 20, 1017 



1170 



GERMANY. 
Smallpox — ^Typhus Fever. 

The following information relative to the occurrence of smallpox 
in Germany, was taken from the Bulletin of the International OflBce 
of PubUc Hygiene for May, 1917: 

Smallpox. — During the period from March 18 to April 28,~1917, 
715 cases of smallpox were reported in Germany. Of these, 241" were 
urban cases, the greatest prevalence being at Berlin with 106 cases, 
Hamburg with 50 cases, Leipzig with 20 cases, Charlottenburg with 
18 and Bremen with 16 cases. The cases occurring outside of cities 
were reported from 32 government districts and other divisions of 
the empire. 

Typhus fever. — From March 18 to April 28, 1917, 40 cases of t^^phus 
fever were notified in Germany. Of these, 13 occurred among the 
civil population, mainly in the district of Oppeln, and 27 in prison 
camps. 

PERU. 

Plague. 

During the period from May 16 to 31, 1917, 15 cases of plague were 
notified in Peru. The cases were distributed according to depuir 
ments as follows: Arequipa, 4 cases occurring at MoUendo; Ckllao, 
1 case at city of Callao; Lambayeque, 2 cases at Chiclayo; libertad, 
7 cases at Salaverry, San Pedro, and TrujiUo; lima, 1 case «t the 
city of Lima. 

CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FJEiVER. 
Reports Received During the Week Ended July 20, 1917.^ 

CHOLERA. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. \'' 


India: 

Calcutta. 


Apr. 15-28 




97 




Java: 

East Java 


Apr. 2-8 


1 




West Java 






Apr. 13-19, 1917: 1 case. 


Batavla 


Apr. 1^19 


1 




Philippine Islands: 

Provinces .^ 




May 27-June 2, 1917: Cases, 166; 
deaths, 116. ^^ 


Albay. 


May 27-Jun6 2. . 

do 

do 


22 
37 
66 
40 
5 


14 
26 
33 
40 
3 


Bohol 

Cebu 




Sorsogon 

Tayabas 


do 

do 











1 f^m medical officers of the Public Health Service, American consuls, and other sources. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1171 



July 20, 1917 



CaOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER— 

Continued. 

Reports Recehr«d Dwiag the Week Ended July 20, 1917— Continued. 

PLAGUE. 



Place. 






Date. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Remaiics. 



Hongkong 

CataitU 

Java: 

East Jara 

Sunbaya 

Sorakarta 

Peru 

Departments— 

tLambayeque.. 
Xibertad 



MayS-14.. 



May 13-». . 
Apr. 15-28.. 



Apr. 2-22-. 
do 



Mayl&-dl.. 

do 

do 

do 



.do. 



Apr. 8-May 14, 1917: Cases, 
deaths, 51. 



Apr. 2-22, 1917: Cases, 18; deaths 
18. 

May 16-31, 1917: Cases, 15. 

At MoIIondo. 

At Callao. 

At Chiclayo. 

At Salaverry, San Pedro, and 

Trujillo. 
At Lhna. 



SMALLPOX. 



BruH. 

Bahia 


May&-12 


1 
35 






RiadnJaneiro 


May 13-26 


8 




Ouada 

atoraBcotia- 

Port Hawkesbury 

Oiina: 

Amoy 


June 24-30 


Present in district. 


May 13-19 






Present. 


mossha I 

Dalren 


May 27- June 2 

Mayl3-June2.... 
May 20-20 


5 
11 
6 
4 






1 
5 

1 




Ho^^ong 

Tslngtao 




May30-June».... 




Gtfmany. ... 


Mar. 18- Apr. 28, 1917: Cases, 715. 


Bertln. 


Mar.Vs^Apr.is... 
do 


106 
16 
18 
50 
20 

2 
10 

1 




In cities and 32 States and 


Bremen 




districts. 


Char lotten burg 


do 






Haabtire 


.. . do 






LeilSSy^:::::::::::::::::: 


do 






lAirfMdC 


.. ..do 






Munich 


do 






fibitt#mrt --- 


do 






India: 

Calcutta 


Apr. 15-28 


3 

8 
18 

1 

1 




Japan: 

Kobe 


June 11-17 


31 

48 




Osaka- 


Junel-10 




Yokohama ,,,..-, ,. 


May 21-27 




J»Ta: 

Ea^t Java 


Apr.2-29 


11 
16 




Mid- Java 


Apr. 1-21 




West Jara 






Apr. 13-May 10, 1917: Cases, 40; 


Bats via 


Apr.l3-May3 

June 3-16. ., 


11 
95 


2 


deaths, 7. 


Mexico: 

Mrxico City 




Monterey 


June 18-21 


24 




Russia: ^ 

Petroerad 


Feb. t8-Mar. 10. . . 
Apr. 29-May 21... 

May 1-31 


186 
12 




Vladivostok 


3 

3 
5 




Spain: 

MadrW 




Seville 


do 






Valencia 


June 3-16 


2 
2 




Tunisia: 

Tunis 


June 2-8 















Digitized by 



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July 20, 1917 



1172 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW PEVEE- 

Gontinued. 



Reports Received During the Week Ended Joly 20, 1917— Continued. 

TYPHUS FEVER. 



Place. 


Bate. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Austria-Hungary: 

Austria 








Oct. 22-Dec. 17, 191^ Gastt, 
2,371. 


Bohflmia 


Oct.22-Dec. 17.... 
do 


634 
809 

47 
617 

10 

243 

5 




Galicia 






Lower Austria 


do 






Moravia 


do 






Silesia 


do 






Styria 


do 






Upper Austria 


do 






Hungary 






Feb. 19-Mar. 25, 1917: Cases, 


Budapest T.. 


Feb. 19-Mar. 25. . . 
May30-June9.... 
May 15-19 


83 
1 




1,381. 


China: 

Tsingtao 






(Jreeco: 

SalonUd 


3 
2 




Java: 

Mid-Java 


Apr. 1-30 


7 




West Java 




Apr. 13-May 10, 1917: Om«, 36. 


Batavia 


Apr. l^May 10... 
June 3-16 


22 

193 

16 
3 




Mexico: 

Mexico City 






Russia: 

Petrograd 


Feb. 18-Mar. 10... 
May 15-21 


3 




Vladivostok 




Spain: 

Madrid 


May 1-31 


2 













Reports Received From June 30 to July 13, 1917. 

CHOLERA. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India: 

Bassein 


Apr. 1-21 




7 
66 

1 
10 




Calcutta 


Apr. 29-May5 






Madras 


Apr. 22-28 


1 
24 




Rangoon . . 


Apr.2l-May5 




Philippine Islands: 

Provinces 


May 20-26, 1917: Ctm, l^I 
deaths, 88. 


Albay 


May 20-26. 


19 
86 
43 
42 

1 


10 
42 
20 
15 
1 


Bohol 


do 




Cebu 


do 




Sorsogon ; 


dp 




Tayabas 


do 











PLAGUE. 



Arabia: 

Aden 

Ceylon: 

Colombo 

China: 

Amoy 

Kwangtimg Province: 

Ta-pu district 

Egypt 

Suez ^ 

Provinces— 

Fayoum 

Oijngeh 

MfaSeh 

Siout 

Great Britain: 

London 



May 3-14 

Apr. 8-May 14.. 
Apr. 29-May 5.. 
June 2. 

May ii^i?.' !!!.*! 



May 11-17. . 

May 17 

May 12-15.. 
May 12 



May 3-8. . 



37 



Present and in vicinity. 

Present. 

Jan. 1-May 17, 1917: Cases, 
deaths, 116. 



2 In hospital at port. IPrtgaB.S. 
Sardima from Australian and 
oriental ports. 



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1173 



July 20, 1917 



CHOLERA* PLAGl^, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER* 

(Continued. 

Reports ReceiTed From June 30 to July 13, 1917— Continued. 
PLAGUB— Continued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


iDdU 








''5«th.fsri5»'"='*^'"'"* 


Bftssetn 


Apr. 1-21 




31 
96 
10 
20 
214 
126 

1 
41 

1 
72 

2 

8 


Bombay 


Apr. 22-28. 

Apr. 29-lf ay 5 . . . 


115 




CakutU 




nfiiiadii 


Apr. 1-21 






KMfchI .,. 


Apr. 22- If ay 5..... 
Apr. 22^ May 12.... 
Apr. 8-14.... 


229 
153 




Madras Presideiicy. 




IfaiMfalfty 




Umilm«in 


Apr. 1-21 






ICyingyan. 


Apr. 1-7 






RangioDii 


Apr. l^May6 

Apr. 8-14 


75 




Tounfoo 




Slam: " 

Rttfi^kok 


Apr. 22-lfay 12.... 


8 









81IALI1H>X. 



Australia' 

New South Wales. 

Brewairina 

Quambone 

QuMusland— 

Thursday Islaiid Quar- 
antine Station. 



Maaitoba— 

Winnipeg 

IJovaSootla— 

HaUlax 

Port HawkealMiry.. 
Ceykn: 

Colombo 

China: 
Amoy.. 
Anti 
Chn 



Hoogkong 

Manchuria BUtioo. 
Mukden 

Timtsin .*.*.' *.**!!!.'! 
Taitahar BUtioo.... 
Taiuetao 



, Alexandria.. 



Bembay. 

Calcutta. 

Karachi.. 

Madras.. 

Bangoon, 
Italy: 

Turin..., 
Japan: 

Kobe.... 

Migasaki. 
^ Osaka.... 
Philippine 
^ ManUa, 
Portinl: 
^ iSbOD 



Riga 

_ Vladivortok 

StnitsSettleme&ts: 

fvouig 



84 



Apr.27-liaylO.. 
do 



May 9.. 



June 10-16. 



June 18-23. 
June 17-28. 



May6-lX 

Apr. 29-May 5... 

ICay 21-27 

May 6-26 

Apr. 23-May 6... 

May 6-12. 

Apr. 23-29. 

May 27-June 2. . 
May21-JuDe3.. 

May 13-26 

Apr. 16-22. 

May 22-29 



Apr. 30-May 27.. 



Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



22-28 

29-May 5.. 
22-May5... 
22-May 12.. 
lS-May5... 



May21-June3. 



May 
May 
May 

May 

May 



27-June 10. 
28-June3.. 
16-June5.. 

13-19 



13-26.. 



Mar. 
Mar. 

Mar. 18-May 12. 



. Il-May5.. 
.15-21 



4 

30 
17 

20 

19 

1 

114 

5 

4 

2 
11 



Apr. 27-May 10, 1917: Cases, 6. 



From s. s. St. Albans lh>m Kobe 
via Hongkong. Vessel pro- 
ceeded to Townsville, Bria- 
bane, and Sydney, in quaran- 
tine. 



Present in district. 



Present and in vichiity. 
Present. 
Do. 
On Chinese Eastern Railway. 

Do. 

Present. 

Cases foreign; deaths among na- 
tives. 

On Chinese Eastern Railwaje 
At another station on railway, 
lease. ' 



Varidoid. 



Jan. 1-31, 1917: Cases,?. 



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July 20, 1917 



1174 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS PETfiR» AND TBLLOW FEVERr- 

Continued. 

Reports Received From June 80 to July 13, 1917-— Continued. 

SMALLPOZ-ContlniMd. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Romaics. 


Sweden: 

Stockholm 


May 20-26. . . 


1 






Turkey in Asia: 

Trebixond 


Feb. 25-Apr. 18... 


15 




Union of South Africa: 

Johannesburg 


Mar. 12-24 


4 











TYPHUS FEVER. 



China. 

Tsin?tao 

Egypt: 

Alexandria. . , 
Greece: 

Saloniki , 

Russia: 

Riga 

Vladivostok., 



May 20-29 

Apr. 80-May 27. 
MayG-12 



Mar. 29- Apr. 4 . 



1 

830 



232 
12 



Jan. 1-31, 1917: Case, 1. 



YELLOW rEVER. 



Mexico: 

Yucatan, State— 
Peto. 




In person recently arilTed from 
Mexico aty. 



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PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 



VOL. 32 JULY 27, 1917 No. 30 

DYSENTERY— ARKANSAS-MISSOURI. 

Passed Asst. Surg. Ridlon reported July 22 that the dysentery 
outbreak in northeastern Arkansas and southeastern Missouri was 
subsiding. It will be difficult to ascertain how extensive the out- 
break has been, as the disease is not notifiable, and most of the 
physicians do not keep case records, nor is the registration of deaths 
such as to give any useful information. The undertakers' records are 
also of little value in this connection. 

The disease has been widespread in southeastern Missouri and 
northeastern Arkansas and probably few communities in this area 
have escaped. Statements of physicians indicate that the disease 
has also existed in near-by territory in Tennessee and Mississippi. 
It seems to be the experience of physicians that similar outbreaks 
of enterocoUtis are of annual occurrence, usually beginning in May 
and extending into June. The outbreak this year is believed to be 
more severe than usual. Certain physicians in Dunklin Coimty esti- 
mate that there have been several hundred cases, with probably 50 
deaths, in the county. Measures have been taken to ascertain defi- 
nitely the specific organism causing the outbreak. 



MENINGOCOCCUS CARRIERS. 
THEIR RECOGNITION AND TREATMENT. 

The "meningococcus carrier" is an individual who harbors the 
meningococcus without exhibiting symptoms of meningitis. He is of 
hnportance to us at this, time because of the prospective concentra- 
tion in camps of a large number of young adults of a susceptible age. 
These young men are brought into intimate contact with one another 
and furnish ready material under conditions which have been shown 
to be favorable for the spread of epidemics of meningitis. The 
iiasopharynx is the location in which the meningococcus is most f re- * 
quently found, and is the site affected ; a fact which is of practical 
importance in the dissemination of the organism. Here it flourishes, 
86 (1175) 

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July 27, 1917 1176 

sometimes in great numbers, and probably is expelled by talking, 
sneezinjLT, or coughing, or is mixed with the secretions of the nose 
and imphinted. by indirect contact, on the mucous membrane of 
another indi\ i(hial. 

SeA eral careful analyses conducted during an epidemic and for a 
period of two or more years in the absence of an epidemic, have 
shown that meningococcus carriers are of wudespre^d distribution 
among the general population, the numbers varying from 1 to 13 
per cent of those examined. The higher of these figures has been 
found in the examination of troops quartered in barracks, except in 
one study to be referred to later. These analyses exclude those in 
whom there was a history of contact with a case of meningitis, 

'* Carriers" are of three general tyi>es: Individuals convalescent 
from an attack of epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis, or posterior 
basilar meningitis: "contacts" with a case of the disease; and per- 
sons who can not he shown to have had any previous contact with 
the disease. The seccmtl and third groups are frequently classed as 
one. These groups may be subdivided into temporary and per- 
sistent, or " chronic." carriei-s, dependent upon whether they exhibit 
cultures of meningococci for from a few days to three weeks, or for 
several weelcs or months. 

During the first w^ek of convalescence the meningococcus is present 
in the nasopharynx of the patient in from 60 to 80 per cent of 
the cases, the number of those carrying the organism progressively 
decreasing with the convalescence; but in some series of cases there 
have been as many as 6 per cent positive after two months. 

In convalescent cases the meningococcus in the nasopharynx is 
usually not accompanied by many contaminating organisms, and 
yields nearly pure cultures. In contacts, however, the numl>er of 
meningococcus colonies developing from a swab varies, from two 
or three to a plate to an approximately pure culture. 

The recognition of meningococcus carriers is difficult, chiefly be- 
cause of the parasitic nature of the organism, and because of its very 
great sensitiveness to drying. Hence the technique adopted should 
provide for a rapid transfer of the material collected from the 
patient or contact to a medium which is moist, at approximately 
body temperature, and containing plasma or other animal fluid. 

The collection of material from the nasopharynx is best accom- 
plished with a sterile cotton swab, mounted on a piece of iron wire, 
which is bent for a half to three-quarters of an inch, at the swab 
end, through an angle of approximately 45°. 

The swab is carried horizontally through the mouth to the 
pharynx, avoiding the buccal surfaces and the tongue; upon reach- 
ing the pharynx the swab is tilted upw^ard, rotated across and against 
the posterior nasopharynx, and brought out through the mouth in a 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1177 JuJy 27, 1017 

horizontal position, but with the bent part pointing in the opposite 
direction to that in which it entered. 

The buccal surfaces and secretions should be avoided because of 
the numerous contaminating organisms, many of which seem to be 
antagonistic to the growth of the meningococcus. The saliva also, 
probably, has an inhibitory effect on the meningococcus growth. 

The avoidance of contamination from the mouth may be accom- 
plished by the use of a West swab. This consists of a swab made 
as above, using a pliable wire, inserted in a metal or glass tube of 
about one-quarter inch diameter, bent as indicated for the swab. 
This tube shield is plugged with cotton, sterilized in dry heat or in 
the autoclave, and used by withdrawing the plugs, introducing 
through the mouth as above described, and when it reaches the 
pharynx, pushing the swab out past its end to make the sweep over 
the posterior nasopharynx, and drawing it back into the tube before 
withdrawing through the mouth. 

Phonation by the patient frequently aids in making the swab of 
the posterior nasopharynx. The area swabbed should be the same as 
that covered by the curette in the removal of adenoid vegetations of 
the nasopharynx. 

Tlie material collected should be planted immediately on the media 
on which the organism is to be grown. The time elapsing between 
the collection of material and its implantation on media affects the 
results: the longer the "time the poorer the results in obtaining 
cultures; even though the swabs be kept moist, there is a marked 
falling off in the success of cultivating the meningococcus. 

The medium on which the material is planted should, preferably, 
be at body temperature, or but slightly below it, and should be 
incubated promptly at 35°-37° C. after sowing. 

The medium should include some animal fluid, such as ascitic 
fluid, hydrocele fluid, blood serum, or laked blood. In the absence 
of such fluids, the addition of an extract of peaflour serves well. 

A medium which has been found very satisfactory is made as fol- 
lows: 

To five parts of a nutrient, 2 per cent neutral agar, made of beef 
infusion, with 1 per cent glucose, is added at 50°-52° C. one part of 
sheep serum water (sheep serum, 1; water, 2). Neutrality is tested 
to phenolpthalein. 

The glucose agar is sterilized for one and a half hours in stream- 
ing steam. The sheep serum water is autoclaved for 15 minutes 
with 15 poimds pressure. The mixture of serum water and agar is 
made shortly before using, with aseptic toclmique. The tubes of 
the finished medium should be incubated previous to use, and should 
be kept moist at all times. 



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July 27, 1917 1178 

This medium is comparatively clear, and permits easy recognition 
of the colonies on the plate. It is well adapted to the growth of 
the meningococcus, so that visible colonies develop with six to eight 
hours' incubation, and colonies develop to two to three millimeter 
size overnight. 

In the absence of sheep serum, an excellent medium can be made by 
the addition of laked rabbit, or human, blood to the agar above 
described. The blood is laked in distilled water, 1 part of blood to 4 
of water, and added to the melted agar at 45° to 50° C., in the pro- 
portion of 1 part of laked blood in (> to 10 parts of the agar. Rabbit- 
blood agar (1 part of blood in 20 of agar) affords a good growth, but 
has the disadvantage of being opaque, and masking the color of the 
colony as well as its structure. , 

The various serum agars are made by the addition of the animal 
fluid to the agar, in the proportion of from 1 to 3 to 1 to 20. 

The English workers exhausted their supply of Witte's peptone, 
and, finding it difficult to get animal fluids, improvised a medium 
containing an extract of peaflour, added to a trypsinized meat agar. 

The method of its manufacture, as given by Gordon, Hine, and 
Flack,^ is as follows: 

Formula for Trypagar. 

1, PEAFLOUR EXTRACT. 

Take 100 grams of ijeaflour and add 1 Hter of distine<l water with 100 grams 
of salt. Mix and steaiu for one-half hour, stirring constantly. Allow to setUe 
and fiUer. thon sterilize and Ial>el "saline pea extract." This peaflour extract 
should preferably be freshly made for each batch of agar. 

2. TRYPSIN BROTH. 

Take some fresh bullock's heart, free from fat and vessels, mince the meat 
very finely and weigh. To each one-half kilo add 1 liter of water and make 
faintly alkaline to litmus with 20 per cent KOH solution. Heat this slowly to 
lo" to 80° C. for 5 minutes. Cool to 37° C, add 1 per cent of liquor trypsina 
comp., and keep It at 37' C. for 2i to 3 hours. When trypsinizing is finished, 
te<t for peptone with copper suli>hatc and KOH, as holow, tlien render slightly 
acid with glacial acetic acid, and bring slowly to the lM)il for one-fourth hour. 
I>eave overnight in a cm»l ])lace. and siphon ofi* the clear liquid in the morning. 
Make faintly alkiline to litmus, and sttMilizc in an autoclave at 118** C. for 1 
hour on each of 2 days (if not to ho used at once). 

TO MAKK TUYPAGAR. 

Take a nj-asured quantity of the tryi)siniz«il broth. ad<l 2 per cent of agar 
fiber, ami 0.125 grams of calcium chloride per liter. Autoclave at 118° G. for 
throe-1* urths hour to dissolve the agar. Mix together in a Siiucei>an; titrate 
with X/IO KOH to give an absolutely neutral nniction. Cool to 60° C, add 

* Gordon, Uino, and Flack. 1016. Brit. Mrd. Jour. No. 291C, p. 078. 

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1179 July 27, 1017 

white of two eggs beuteu up with the crushed shells, autoclave again at 118** O. 
for 75 minutes (or in the steamer for 2 hours). 

Filter, add to the filtrate 5 per cent of the sterile pen extract, and sterilize 
in the ordinary way. 

BIURKT REACTION FOR PEPTONE. 

Take 5 cubic centimeters of broth, add 0.1 cubic centimeter of 5 per cent 
solution of CuSOi, mix, and then add 5 cubic centimeters of normal NaOH. A 
true pink color indicates that trypsin ization is sufficient; a blue-purple shade 
that it Is incomplete. 

PREPARATION OF FIBER AGAR. 

Weigh out the required quantity, cut up small with scissors, place in a flask, 
and wash quickly, twice, In water. Drain thoroughly; add water just to 
cover, and put in glacial acetic acid, 2.5 cubic centimeters per liter of water. 
Mix thoroughly and leave for one-fourth hour. Pour off the liquid and wash 
thoroughly, four or five times, to make sure that all the acetic acid is washed 
out Drain carefully and use as above. 

Having grown the colonies overnight, they can be recognized by 
their lack of color^ translucency, regularity of contour, uniformly 
granular structure, and ease of homogeneous suspension in salt solu- 
tion. 

The organism is Gram negative, exhibiting usually many "ghost," 
or " invohition," forms in a young culture ; the diplococcus form pre- 
dominates, this arrangement showing even when fished from solid 
cultures. 

The fiuther identification of the organism can be divided into two 
stages — that for the immediate detention of a suspect carrier, and 
that for the definite identification of a carrier. 

The first is accomplished by making an agghitination test on an 
8 to 18 hour culture with a polyvalent antimeningococcus serum, 
controlled always in equal titer, with a normal serum, from an ani- 
mal of the same species as that producing the antimeningococcus 
serum. The suspension of the meningococci should be sufficiently 
heavy to facilitate the reading of the test. A turbidity in the final 
dilution should, as a minimum, be equivalent to that of the typhoid 
vaccine made by the Army Medical School or the Hygienic Labora- 
tory of the Public Health Service, This is equivalent to 500 parts 
per million of silica, made in accordance with the standard methods 
for turbidity determination in water analysis. This turbidity is 
usually obtained by suspending tlie overnight growth of a serum agar 
slant, seeded over the entire surface, in 2 to 5 cubic centimeters of 
saline solution, and using equal parts of the saline suspension and 
serum dilution to be tesled. The agglutination should be carried out 
at 55° C. for a i^eriod of 12 to 20 hours. 



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July 27, 1917 



1180 



The polyvalent semin should have a titer of at least 1 in 300 for 

control meningococci of various types. 

Agglutination with the antimeningococcic senmi in titer of 1 to 
100, and the failure of agglutination in the normal serum at half 
this titer, are suflicient evidence on which to detain an individual as 
a carrier; but proof of the identity of the organism must be sought 
in order to avoid detaining those who are not carriers, since the ag- 
glutination test on meningococci is irregular and is not specific. 

The second stage of identification is accomplished by fermentation 
tests on sugars. 

A solid medium, such as the agar above described, but with a reac- 
tion of +0.2 to -|-0.5 and without the glucose, to which enough pure, 
sterile litmus solution is added to give a blue tint, serves as the most 
rapid differential base. The sugars to be selected are glucose, mal- 
tose, and mannose. The 10 per cent solutions of each of these should 
be sterilized in distilled water in the autoclave at 15 pounds pressure 
for 15 minutes (or better by heating in the Arnold sterilizer for half 
an hour at 100° C. on three successive days) and 1 cubic centimeter 
of the solution is then added to 10 cubic centimeters of the agar. 

The reaction of the (iram negative organisms common to the naso- 
pharynx is as follows: 







[+ 


-Acld; - 


- -No acld.1 










Glu- 
cose. 


Mal- 
tose. 


Man- 1 
nose. 1 




Chi- Mal- 

cose. tosc. 


Man- 
nose- 


M. pharyngis siccus 

M. flavusl 


+ 

4- 
+ 


+ 
4- 
-i- 


-f 
+ 

-f 


M.flantifni 


'+.+ 


4- 


+ 


Menin^CKHMTUs 




M flaws II 


Af. caiurrhfjiis .......... 


__ 









Stock cultures of the meningococcus must be transferred every 48 
houi^s in using serum media ; but a 1 per cent cornstarch nutrient 
agar, of neutral reaction, sterilized for 15 minutes in the autoclave 
at 15 poimds pressure will preserve the organism at the top of a stab 
culture for a longer tinie. in event further work in differentiation is 
desired. 

In the present state of our knowledge, the examination of all prob- 
able contacts with carriers or patients should be made. However, we 
do not know just what the value of this procedure is. 

Mayer, Waldman, and Gruber^ examined i),000 men in barracks, 
when the garrisons were free from the disease, and found that the 
number of carriers in the ditferent contingents varied from '2 to 8 
per cent. Reexaminations of the various contingents showed more 
carriers in toto each time, but with wide fluctuations in the indi- 
vidual contingents. In one regiment, l,iK)0 men were examined dur- 



' Mayer, WaMman, Fiirst & (Jnibcr. 1910. Milnch. McU. Wchnschr. VoL LVIII, p. 1584. 



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1181 July 27, 1917 

ing an epidemic, and the carriers isolated. This measure seemed to 
have no effect on the number of carriers or on the spread of the 
epidemic. 

W. M. Scott* found tluit K3.7 per cent of 138 noncontacts, in an 
outpatient dispensary, carried organisms similar to meningococci. 
(Scott's agglutination tests were not controlled by normal serum.) 
On the other hand, there is circumstantial evidence to the effect that 
carriers are responsible for the dissemination of the disease, and that 
they in turn may develop the disease. 

The treatment of such carriers is by isolation from contact with 
others in quarters, in the mess hall particularly, and 'n\ gatherings 
indoors. They should not be hospitalized, but should be kept in the 
open air, be well nourished, and given such exercise as will maintain 
a good physical condition. Occasionally, removal to another climate 
seems to clear up the condition quickly. They may be isolated in 
groups, but these groups should not be large, since carriers may de- 
velop the disease and infect other carriers, or may harbor meningo- 
cocci which are virulent for the other individuals. 

Xo reports of satisfactory results in treating the carrier by the use 
of sprays, swabs, or irrigation have been confirmed. 

Gordon's method of the inhalation of chloramine vapors is in the 
experimental stage, though it has shown some promising results. 

Summary. 

A routine examination of probable contacts should be made by 
means of post nasal swabs. 

The material can best be collected through the mouth by swabbing 
the posterior nasopharynx. 

The swab should be immediately seeded on a recently prepared 
solid meilium containing sheep serum or laked human, or rabbit, blood 
in from 5 to 10 per cent strength. The medium should be at body 
temperature when seeded, and incubated at this temperature for 12 
to 20 hours. 

To identify the organism, fish the colonies and stain by Gram's 
method, selecting those colorless, translucent colonies wliich yield a 
Gram negative coccus. Subculture such colonies on a slant of the 
serum agar and suspend the 8 to 18 hour growth in salt solution. 
Test the agglutination of the suspension against a poly\ alent serum 
at 55° C. overnight. 

Continue the identification by sugar fermentation tests on glucose, 
maltose, and mannose. 

Treat carriers by isolation from indoor contact with others and by 
general hygienic measures. 



» Scott, W. M. 1916. Jour, of Hygieno, Vol. 15, No. 3. ^-^ , 

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July 27, 1917 



1182 



MALARIA IN LOUISIANA. 

PREVALENCE AND GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION. 

The periodical circularization of the physicians of Louisiana tc 
determine the prevalence and geographic distribution of malarial 
infection in the State was l)egun May 1, 1914. At regular intervals 
rej)ly postal cards were sent to the practicing physicians. These 
cards were at fii*st sent out each month. Beginning April 1, 1915, 
they were sent out quarterly. A reproduction of the card used during 




Relative prevalence of malaria in lyouisiana, by pwishes in proportion to the population, as 
indicated by the numbers of cases reported. 

1015 and 1010 will be found on page 1128 of the Public Health 
Keports of the issue of July 20, 1917.^ 

Of the cards sent to pliysicians less than 10 per cent of the total 
were returned. Presumably those returning the cards represented 
the better class of practitioners, those best able to understand the 



^ Tho work of circulari/alion and of compilation of the data on the return cards WM 
carried on by the lato Siirt'. K. JJ. von Kzdorf up to the time of his death in September, 
191G. Since thon it has been carried on by Asst. Surg. R. C. Derivaux and Asst. Surft 
Gen. U. R. Carter. ^^^^^1^ 

Digitized by VjOOQIc 



1183 



July 2T, 1017 



value of the work and what was wanted. The number of cards sent 
out, the number of schedules returned, and the other results of the 
ckcularization are shown briefly in Table No. 1. 

The return of the schedules by the physicians being a matter of 
voluntary cooperation, the data are undoubtedly reliable to an 
unusiial d^ree as regards the experience of the physicians who 
coopemted and the number of cases seen by them. It is to be borne 
in mind; however, that the cases reported represent only those 
occurring in the practices of the physicians who cooperated. The 
total number of cases of malaria occurring in the practices of all 
the physicians of the State must have been many times greater, 
also the number of cases that occurred in which no physician was in 
attendance or consulted was probably much greater than the 
number coming under medical care. 



«HmB* 


Fob. 


Ifar. 


Apr. 


May- 


Jan. 


Jul. 


A««. 


Sep. 


Oct. 


lov. 


09C* 


-» 




















f 






















• 














































A 
























A 






















/ 


\ 






















/ 


\ 


















^ 


y 






y 


















/ 






\ 
















/ 








\, 
















/^ 








V 


v_ 








_^ 


^^ 


^J 












N 








y^ 




>• 














•Ns 
















































^ 



























BflktiYo preralence of malaria In I^uisiana, by months, as indicated by the numbers of 

cases reported. 

The physicians who cooperated wore distributed as to locality 
throughout all sections of the State, so that the data of the occurrence 
of malaria furnished by them show the geographic distribution of 
the disease and reasonably accurately its relative prevalence in the 
various localities. 

The cases reported throughout the State by months are shown in 
Table Xo. 2. The relative numbers of cases reported by months are 
shown in the above chart. 

The number of cases reported from tlu» several parishes of the 
State are given by race and year in Table Xo. 3. 



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July 'l7, 1917 



1184 



The map on puge 1182 shows the relative prevalence of the dis- 
ease in the several parishes of the State, the heavier ^aded parishes 
being those in which the infection is heaviest, the unshaded parishes 
those in which the infection is lightest, as indicated by the numbers 
of cases reported. The relative density of infection was determined 
by ascertaining the number of cases reported in each parish from May 
1, 1914, to the end of the calendar year 1916 per 1,000 population. 
The population used was that of the 1910 census, it being impracti- 
cable to estimate populations for the period of the circularization. 

Tlie types of malarial infection reported to have been diagnosed 
microscopically are shown in Table No. 4. It will be noted that 
tertian infection was reported to have been so diagnosed in 47 par- 
ishes, quartan in 17 parishes, and estivo-autumnal in 34 parishes. 
The total number of parishes in the State is 64. , 

By Table 5 it will be noted that hemoglobinuric fever was i'eported 
in 5 parishes. 

Table 1^ — Results of circularization of practicing physicians. 



Period. 



Inquiry 
cards 
sent to 
physi- 
cianfs. 



Replies 
received. 



POTcent- 
ape of 
replies. 



Parishes 
repre- 
sented in 
replies. 



Parishes 

not 

heard 

from. 



Cases of 
malaria 
reported. 



1914. 
May to December 

1915. 

January to March 

April to June 

July to September 

October to December. . 

1916. 

January to March 

April to June 

July to September 

October to December... 



19,981 



7,500 
2,070 
2,070 
2,070 



2,070 
2,070 
2,070 
2,070 



1,603 



692 
320 
191 
191 



142 

128 

188 
136 



R02 



9.23 
15.46 
9.23 
9.23 



6.86 
6.18 
9.08 
6.57 



^1 

.16 

20. 



13,016 



1,456 
2,754 
5,133 
3^249 



2,239 
3,17» 
7,040 
2,460 



Table 2. — Cases of uuilavia reported hy months. 



Year. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. June. 


July. 
2, 2(15 


Aug. 
2 171 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


19M 






659 i 2,58S 
493 , 1,(0 
967 1,543 


2,291 


17.4 


704 

1,070 

789 


584 


1915 


415 

578 


57-t 1 167 
577 1 084 


1,252 
668 


1,180 1,579 
1 977 2 4F,\ 


2,374 i!439 
2 612 1 OSQ 


740 


1910 


672 



















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1185 July 27, 1017 

Table 3. — Cases reported hy parishes, hy years, and'^y color. 





May 1 to Dec. 31, 1014. 


Calendar yew 1916. 


Calendar year 


1916. 


Pariah. 


White. 


Col- 
ored. 


CJom- 
bined. 


White. 


Col- 

ored. 


Com- 
bined. 


White. 

• 330 

370 

112 

11 

73 

83 

50 

3 

479 

14 

23 


Col- 
ored. 

7 

265 

145 

6 

74 

41 

61 

16 

613 

30 

17 


Com- 
bined. 


^jpadia * '* * 


a05 
325 
110 

41 
162 
115 
144 

27 
275 

56 
179 


3 
173 
43 
38 
41 
20 
49 
82 
285 
27 
90 


2QR 
498 
153 

79 
203 
135 
193 
109 
560 

83 
269 


152 
313 
131 

39 
106 
146 
251 

65 
394 

63 

49 


'*'"27i' 
9 
6 
1 

48 
168 
32 
632 
26 
53 


152 
584 
140 

45 
107 
194 
419 

97 
1,026 

89 
102 


337 


inMi 


635 


AS^w/r;:;;.: 

^(fpituntLmn ,, -. 


257 
17 




147 


BcftUiftiwd • -........-.-•- 


124 


Bi«*n' ille 


111 




19 


C^tjo 


1,092 




44 


Caldwfll 


40 






d^tftkKMlI'^ ..-- 


66 

34 

190 

400 

95 

50 

84 

131 

67 

460 

85 

180 

88 

8 

121 

118 

192 

36 

115 

335 

S8 

195 

256 

363 

323 

28 

62 

228 

37 

34 

00 

4 

16 

40 

135 

63 

80 

94 

47 

103 

104 

27 

118 

74 

254 

107 

68 

104 

56 

13 

2 

70 


ii 

15 

353 

348 

53 

106 

94 

39 

37 

234 

51 

148 

46 

3 

18 

2 

IM 

13 

35 

56 

103 

184 

95 

117 

220 

29 

81 

113 

90 

31 

33 

ii" 

19 
100 
75 
45 
72 
33 
63 
92 
569 
63 
35 
33 
57 
33 
106 
83 
3 
1 
55 


96 

49 
543 
748 
147 
156 
178 
170 
1(M 
694 
136 
328 
\M 

11 
139 
120 
298 

49 
150 
391 
161 
379 
351 
480 
543 

57 
143 
341 
127 

65 

93 
4 

50 

m 

235 
138 
125 
166 

80 
166 
196 
596 
181 
109 
287 
164 
161 
210 
139 

16 

3 

125 


23 

16 

9 

421 

80 

58 

76 

14 

11 

191 

14 

317 

123 

3 

110 

(>') 

23-> 

10 

1S2 

177 

5 

301 

103 

427 

205 

29 

29 

99 

1 

45 

213 


i4' 

67 

279 
21 

109 

57 

1 

3 

121 
14 

149 
78 
2 
9 
81 
86 
4 
98 
57 
11 

472 
46 

152 

132 
63 
14 
30 

ie' 

71 


23 

30 

76 

700 

101 

167 

133 

1') 

14 

31=i 

28 

466. 

291 

.> 

119 

149 

321 

14 

280 

234 

10 

773 

149 

579 

337 

92 

43 

129 

1 

61 

281 


161 
61 
87 
446 
266 
31 
96 


160 

90 
184 
254 
198 
102 
102 


330 




151 


Om<xm\\iy.i 

D^Sto^Q 


271 
700 


v-att n-nrnn RcMMrn. 


464 


East r.irral) -.- * 


133 


East Fi nMtna. . ,1 . ^-,-, 


196 


Esaii'** lio6 




Frar. Un.. 


20 

11 

262 

251 

12 

11 

101 

112 

360 

1 

38 

235 


11 

'■■'266" 

116 

6 

46' 

64 
137 

16' 

63 


31 


(truDt - 


11 


Ibrria 


468 


Ibcfxi:io '. 


367 


Jftckrofi .. 


18 


it^tTMa, 


14 


J^fTrtTf'M Davis 


141 


LaSaUc 


176 


l^ato^fl^f.. 


497 


lAioitrr^r 


1 


LbKTi*n ., 


48 


IJ^in^^tfBi ........ 


298 


MiKli-tkn 




MOIT''<ri'r 


669 

57 
115 
206 

"iis" 

103 


852 
42 
53 

363 
4 

136 
89 


1.521 


Na^r- itnrhcs. .* 


99 


OrUn^Tuv 


168 


i.)\Lv tta - 


569 


Pliiqi:naiiio8 .. 


4 


Pointc ('oupee 


249 


RupifHrt 1 


192 


Rf4 I'.lM-^ 




Richland 


27 
168 


42 
43 


69 


SaHiir 


211 


8( HrniATd 




St.Clar'^ 


ii 

53 
28 
117 
85 
148 
164 
137 
202 

156 
245 
217 
149 
20 
72 
102 
28 
14 


18 
16 
27 
124 
57 
87 
149 
198 
106 
89 
24 

m 

20 

no 

121 
24 
166 
139 
34 
11 


29 

69 

55 

241 

142 

235 

313 

335 

308 

166 

71 

340 

265 

327 

270 

50 

238 

241 

62 

25 


24 

37 

45 

108 

91 

116 

450 

101 

437 

97 

21 

24 

411 

260 

90 

63 

12 

120 

11 

263 


32 
15 
121 
131 
66 
96 
276 
108 
238 
181 
1 

10 
52 
207 
84 
65 
45 
52 
23 
101 


56 


Fl. HrWrut'.. 


5? 


St.Jamft'.' 


166 


8t. John ih* Bnptist 


239 


8t. tandry^» 


157 


St. Martin 


212 


St. Mary 


726 


fit , Timimany . . ^ 


209 


Ttotcipoboa.'. 


675 


Tensa^. 


278 


TefTtbonne 


22 


Union 


34 


Vennilbn 


463 


V'fmon 


467 


Washington 


174 


Webdti^r 


128 


Wtot l^iton Kotige 


57 


H«.tfVirrolI 


172 


Wttt Feliciana 


34 


Winn 


364 






Total 


7,716 


5,300 


13,016 


7,379 


5,213 


12,592 


8,352 


6,555 


14,907 







Digitized by 



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July 27, 1917 



1186 



Table 4. — TypcH of infection reported diaf/HOMcd wieroscopicaUy by panshes, 

May to December, 19 L^. 



Parish- 


Tertian. 


Quartan. 


Estivo- 

autum- 

nal. 


Parish. 


TerUan. 


Quartan. 


Estivo- 

autum- 

nal. 


Acadia 


2 
24 
10 

+ 

6 

+ 
+ 

42 
3 

16 
+ 

45 
50 
17 
2 
35 

+ 
+ 

19 

7 

2 

29 

10 

103 

8 

8 

175 

55 

9 


+ 
2 

+ 
+ 

+ 
1 

6 

+ 
10 
2 
+ 
15 
1 


I] 

3| 
+ 

+ 
15 
31 
5 
4 
23 
+ 
+ 
+ 


Natchitoches 

Orleans > 


8 

54 

158 

9 

3 
2 

18 
4 

22 

+ 
5 
65 
8 
10 
20 
23 
29 
1 

20 
12 
4 
+ 
13 

+ 
+ 


+ 


10 


Allen 


37 


Ascension 


Oifa^hita 


12B 


Assumption 

A voy oUes 


Plaquemines 

Pointe Coupee 

Rapides 


3 


+ 

1 
+ 
+ 
10 
1 




Beauregard 

Bienville 


22 


Red River 


7 


BoK.sier 


Richland 


2 


Caddo 


Sabine 


4 


Calcasieu 


St. Bernard 

St Charles 


1 


CaldwcU 


4 


Catahoula 


St. Helena 




+ 


Claiborne 


St, James . . 


11 

+ 

+ 

+ ... 

+ 

+ 
2 
6 


^ 3 


CH)ncordia 


St. John the Bap- 
tist « 




DeSoto 


4. 


East Baton Rouge. 


St. Landry 


^ 3 


East Carroll 


3 


St Martin 


■*■ 2 


East Feliciana 


St. Mary 


E\'ageline 


+ 

+ 


Tangipahoa* 

Tensftfl 


1 


Franklin 


5 


C.rant 


3 


Iberia 


Terrebonne 

Union 


2 


Iberville 


+ 
+ 


5 

+ 


+ 

1 
15 

+ 
+ 
+ 


+ 


Jack^n 


Vermilion 


8 


JefTerson 


Vernon 


+ 


Jefferson Davis 

I.ii Salle 


+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 


1 
2 
19 

+ 
+ 

14 

+ 


Washington 

Webster - 


8 


Lafayette 


West Baton Rouge. 

West Carroll 

West Feliciana 

Winn 


1 


Lafourche 


+ 


Lincoln » 






Li virjfjston 


+ 








Total 






Morehouse 


+ 


1,187 


89 


4(H 









1 125 confirmed but type not stated. 
> 20 eonftrracd but type not slated. 
8 30 confirmed but type not stated. 

Th" flKurcs indicate the numbers of cjisps diacnosed microscopically. 

The sign + indicates that eases were reported, but the diagnosis was not confirmed by the microscope. 
This information was collected during 1914 only. 

Hemoglobin uric fever reported, 1016. 





Parish. 


Period. 


Cases. 


Caddo 


Third quarter. 
do 


2 


l)c Soto 


2 


Iberville . . i 


do 


3 


West Carroll 


do 


3 


St. Landry : .. 


Fourth quarter 


1 









MEASLES. 

RECORDED PREVALENCE BY STATES, 1916. 

The table whicli follows show^s the recorded prevalence of measles 
in the several vStates (hirin<i; the calendar year 1916. The data were 
furnished by the health departments of the respective States. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1187 ^Jaly 27, 1917 

Measles Reported During the Calendar Year 1916. 



state. 



Arisona...;., 

California. :>. 

Colorado... 

Ck>nne;ticut 

District ol Columbia. 

Hawaii 

Indiana 

Iowa 



Louisiana 

Maine 

Monrlaiid 

Massachusetts.. 

Michigan 

MinncsotaJ 

Mississippi'. . . . . , 

Montana..' 

New Jersey.... 

New York. J 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania- -. 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina . 

Tejas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington.... 
West Virginia.. 

WiaconsiD 

Wyoming 



Ca-ses 

re- 
portod. 



219 
94 
4,2ti8 
4,14H 
10,426 
2,642 
1,614 
22,765 



13,836 
4,037 
1,342 

14,670 
25,460 
10,744 
19,480 
1,691 

3,aoo 



67,010 

53,966 

1,790 

99,421 

2,133 

1,850 



2,548 
35,964 
16.924 
•10,822 
16,153 
552 



Death.<; 
regis- 
tered. 



131 

204 

218 

158 

13 



106 
388 
344 
2^ 
13 
11 
344 
913 



10 



134 
25 
63 
25 

400 
78 



172 

2 



Indieatedj Indicated 
case ralr death rate 
(>cr 1,0(11 
inhalnt- 
ants. 



\KiT 1,000 
inhabit- 
ants. 



0.094 

.36K 

1.452 

4.312 t 

s. ;?7>i 
7.259 
7.481 
8.082 



7.563 
2.207 
1.737 

10. 7a-. 

6>J«i 
3. 517 

4.159 

.806 
7.182 



6.523 
10. 478 

2. 142 
11.667 

3.472 

1.144 



7.006 
11.845 

11.031 
7.808 
6.460 
3.074 



0.001 



'*' .014 


.96 


.112 


1.33 


.016 


.23 


.607 


8.12 


.072 


.90 


.098 




.066 


1.14 


.007 


.32 



.078 
.101 
.113 
.111 
.007 
.024 
.117 



.218 
.015 
.014 
.069 
.182 
.051 



.060 
.011 



Indicated 
fatality 
rate jht 
100 cases, 



1.37 



Esti- 
mated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1916. 



.72 

1.52 

3.20 

2.68 

.77 

.33 



1.36 
'*66 



6.28 
1.34 



.98 
1.54 
.46 



1.06 
.36 



2,332,608 

2.V..M4 
2, 93s, 654 

962.060 
1,214,179 

363,980 

215,741 
2, 816, 817 
2, •220,321 
1,829,545 
1,829,130 

772,1X9 
1,362, S07 
3,719,155 
3,051, S54 
2,279,r4)3 
1,951,674 

459,494 
2,948,017 
10,273,375 
5, 150, 356 

83.-.. 741 
8,522,017 

614,315 
1,625,475 
4,429,566 

363,699 
2,192,019 
1,531,221 
1,386,038 
2,500,350 

179,550 



1 The health ofBcer states that cases are known not to be completely reporte4. 



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PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 



No health deparimenl^ State or local, can effectively prevent or control disease vnthout 
knowledge o/vhcn, where, and under what conditiofis cases are occurring. 



UNITED STATES. 



CURRENT STATE SUMMARIES. 
California Report for the Weelc Ended July 21, 1917. 

The California State Board of Health reported concerning the 
status of preventable diseases in California for the week ended July 
21, 1917, .as follows: Nine cases of cerebrospinal meningitis were 
reported, 8 of these in San Diego County and 1 in wSan Francisco 
city. Scarlet fever showed an increase; 56 cases, scattered widely 
over the State, were reported. Typhoid fev(*r was reduced; 35 cases 
were report<*d, mostly from rural districts. One case of poliomye- 
litis was reported in Berkeley. Of diphtheria, Los Angeles and San 
Francisco both showed increases, with 24 cases report<?d in the State. 
^\n outbreak of paratyphoid fever occurred in Sausalito, Marin County. 

The details of notifiable dist^'use cases reported during the week 
ended July 14, are as follows: < 

Cerebrospinal meningitis 9' Pneumonia 19 

Cliicken pox 25 Ophthalmia neonatorum 1 

Diphtheria 27 Scarlet fever 35 

Er>'sipelaH 5 Smallpox 2 

German meai'les 13 Sypliilis 21 

Gonococcufl infection 21 Tetanus 2 

Leprasy 1 i Trachoma 1 

Malaria 10 Tuberculosis 99 

Measles 165' Tyi)hoi(l fever 54 

Mumps 81 ' Whooping cough • 47 

(1188) 



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1189 



July 27, 1017 



RECIPROCAL NOTIFICATION. 
Minnesota. 

ClM8i o/ communxeable dtseases referred during May, 1917 j to other State health depart- 
ments by department of health of the State of Minnesota. 



DiMftM and kxaUty of noU- 
ficatiai. 



Referred to health authority ( 



Why referred. 



Diphtheria: 

MbmeapoUa Hesltii De- 
nt, fieimepin 
Dty. 



GamuB PaDs, Goodhue 
County. 

MtamcapoUs Health De- 
nartment, Hemupin 
County. 



BmaUpox: 

idnoMipolis Health J)^ 
partrnvnt, Hennepin 
County. 



Special noUOcatlon of 
p«sona exposed to Tir- 
uieaiC amallpox at St. 
MftTv'S Hospital, Du- 



Tnbcrrulo»u(: 

Mayo Clinic. Rochester, 
Ofaosted County. 



Pokegama Sanatorium, 
Pine County. 



Chlcaeo, Cook County, lU.; Adjutant Gen- 
eral s office, headquarters Central De- 
partment, Ctiicago. 



Kalamazoo, Mich., R. F. D. No. 2; Kala- 
mazoo County. 



Farm 5 miles from Windsor, Stutsman 
County, N. Dak. , 

SpartaR. F. D. No. 1, Monroe County, Wis . 
Weyerhauser, Rusk County, Wis I 



Davenport, Scott County, Iowa. 
Huron, Beadle County, S. Dak.. 



Nerada. Story County, Iowa; Kenton, 
. Houghton Cjiinty, Mich.; Ironwood, 
CM);jebic Cjunty, Mich.; South Kau^e, 
lloujjhton Cjuntv, Mich.: A^hlc , Mc- 
IntoshCjnnty, N. Dak.: Graft jn.VVi:l-h 
County, 2^. Dak.; Lake Neba^amon, 
Dmiplos Ciunty, Wi^.; Cumberland, 
Barron County, Wis.: Superior, Doug- 
las County, Wis. (10 person^); Iron River, 
BayfieM Count v. Wis.; Uurlev, Iron 
County, Wis.; Ila^ra, I>ougIas County, 
Wis.; (J rand Raj ids, Wood County, 
Wis.; llayward, Sawyer County, W i^.; 
Frederic, I'olk Cjunty, Wis.; "Plover, 
Portage County, Wis.; Maiden Rock, 
Plorte Count V, Wi.^.: Stone Lake. Siw- 
yerCjunty, wi^.; Winnipeg, Manitoba, 
Canada (2 persons). 

Rcdlands, San Bernardino County, Cal.; 
Cjloraoo Springs, El PasoCDunty, Colo.; 
Kewanee, Henry County, 111.; "Fulton, 
Whiteside Count V, 111.; Indiana Jfarb >r, 
Lake County. Ind.; (iary, LakeCjunt>, 
Ind.: I>akotah,HumboldtCountv.b)\v:i: 
Alchi-jon U. F, D., Atchisj?i (jimty, 
Kans.: Kansas Citv, Jackiion Cjunt'v, 
Mo.; New Ilonkford, Eddy Cjuutv, N. 
Dak.; Marietta. Washinpton County, 
Ohio; <irand Rapids, Wood County, 
Wi'i.; Jano^ville, Rock County, \\h.; 
Curaberl'ind, liarrcn CMinty, Wi'^.; 
Denzel, Saskatchewan, Canada; Port 
Artha-, Ontario, Canada. 

Estherville, Emmet County, Iowa; Wool- 
dridge, Valle; Count v, Mont.; (jrand 
Forks, Grand Fork.s Count >. N. J>ak.; 
Klldoer. Dunn Cotnitv, N. Dak.; Par- 
shall, Mountrail Cjiintv, N. Dak.; 
Minot, Ward C nintj , N. Dak.; Den/cl, 
Saskatchewan. Canada. (KeiK)rted al>o 
by Mayo Clinic.) 



Boy 9, developed diphtheria en 
route from CaUfomia to 
Minnesota. Exposed 4 chil- 
dren of oflieer of Regular 
Army en route to Chicago. 

Transient left Minnesota for 
Michigan before it was known 
that liis throat culture 
showed diphtheria bacilli. 

Patient broke quarantine and 
went from Minnesota to 
North Dakota. 

Patient developed diphtheria 
on arrival home after spend- 
ing vacation in Wisconsin. 

Patient developed diphtheria 
after attending funeral of 

■ brothor-in-law who died after 
having a tonsillar abscess 
opened: case diagnosed as 
twisillitis. 

2 persops exposed to smallpox 
in MinneapolLs went home to 
Iowa. 

Patient exposed to smallpox in 
S3uth Dakota developed dis- 
ease in 4 days after arrival in 
Mirmesota. 

29 persons di^harged from St. 
Mary'< Hospital Apr. 22- 
Juuo 15 returned to homes 
outside of State. 



9 advanced; 4 moderately ad- 
vanced; I far ad\-anred; 1 ap- 
parently arre-ted; 1 dia.^nosia 
not niven; cases left Mayo 
Clinic for homes. 



3 far advanced; 2 open casee; 1 
moderately advanced; 1 diae- 
nosed negative, improved; 
ca^es left Pokogama Sanato- 
rium for homes. 



Digitized by 



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July 27, 1917 



1190 



RECIPROCAL NOTIFICATION— Continued. 

Minnesota — Conti nued . 

Cases of conimunicahle diseases referred during May, 1917, to other State health depart- 
ments by department of health of the State of Minnesota — Continued. 



Diseases and locality of noti- 
flcation. 



Tuberculosis— Continued. 
St. Paul Bureau of 
Health, Ramsey 
County. 
Typhoid fever: 

Two Harbors, Lake 
County. 



Duluth Health Depart- 
ment, St. Louis 
County. 

Columbia Heights, 
Anoka County. 

Minneapolis Health De- 
partment, Hennepin 
County. 

St. Taul Bureau of 
Health, Ramsey 
County. 



Referred to health authority of— 



Bear Creek, Outmagle County, Wis.; 
Wausau, Marathon County, wis. 

United States Public Health Service; Con- 
neaut, Ashtabula County, Ohio. 

United States Public Health Service , 

Norma, Renville County, N. Dak 

Farm near Max, McLean County, N. Dak 
Spooner, Washburn County, Wis 



Why refened. 



2 open cases moved from Mifr 
nesota to Wisconsin. 



Working as fireman on Great 
Lakes steamship 3 weeks pre- 
vious to first symptoms. Ill 
In Minnesota; home in Ohio. 

Worked as seaman on ship 
Castalia, plying Great Lake& 
3 wesks previoos to first 
symptoms. 

Visithij; friends in North Da- 
kota 3 weeks previous to first 
symptoms. 

Working on farm in North Da- 
kota 3 weeks {vevioas t« first 
symptoms. 

Lived at Spooner, Wis. , 3 weeks 
previous to first symptoms. 



ANTHRAX. 
Kansas — ^Reno. 



During the month of June, 1917, one case of anthrax was report^ 
in Reno, Hutchinson County, Kans. 



New Jersey. 

During the month of June, 1917, two cases of anthrax wore re- 
ported in the State of New Jersey. 

CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS. 

Massachusetts. 

During the week ended July 14, 1917, new cases of cerebrospinal 
meningitis were notified in Massachusetts as follows: Boston 3, 
Haverhill, Maiden, New Bedford, and Pittsfield, 1 each. 

State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 


Now ctises 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
rex)orted. 


Kansas: 

Jewell County — 


1 
1 
3 


I/Ouis.ana: 

Ascension Parish 


1 


Formf)sa (R D.). 


MinnP'^ntiV 

Bro\Mi County — 




Reno County— 

Hutchinson 


1 
1 


Wyandotte County— 

Kanfias City 


Cass County— 
npna 




Crow WiuK' County— 
Bruinord 




Total 


5 


1 




Rlverton 


1 



Digitized by 



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1191 



July 27, 1917 



CEREBROSPINAL M£NIN6ITIS--Continued. 
State Reports for Jane, 1917— Continued. 



Plice. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


IfiniMsote— ContinoAd. 
Faribault County— 


1 

12 

1 

1 
1 

1 

7 

1 

1 
1 
2 

2 

1 


Ohio: 

Clermcmt County 


1 


Jfw Davis Town?Aip ,,,.... .... 


Coshocton County- 

Cosbooton 




Hennepin County— 


1 


Minne»pnK?. . 


Cuyahoga County 


23 


BtoomioKton Township 


Franklin County- 
Columbus 




Martin County— 

Rutland Township 


2 


Guernsey County— 

Cam n^ Idge 




Wavwiy Township 


1 


Mower County— 


Bamilton County ',. 


4 


AnMin 


Lucas County- 
Toledo... 






2 


St. Paul..:. 


Mabnninpr County 


9 


White Bear Township 


Medina fV>untVTTT.. ...... . 


1 


ncnviUe County— 

Wang Township 


Mont^raery County- 
Dayton 


1 


Rice Coimty- 


Pirkaway County 


1 


Wanow Township 


Portage County 


3 


Stearns County — 


Stark County 


2 


St. Cloud.. 

St. Louis County— 


Summit County- 
Akron 


6 


Dulotb 


Van Wert County 


1 


Vindnia 


Total .... 




58 


Total 


dR 


South Pakota: 

Turner County 






NewJersev: 


1 

15 
8 


1 


Atlantic County 






Rsw\ County. 




Union County.- 








Totfll ^ 


24 





Oregon Report for May, 1917. 

During the month of May, 1917, 1 case of cerebrospinal meningitis 
was reported at Portland, Multnomah County, Oreg. 

City Reports for Week Ended July 7, 1917. 



Pbwe. 



Cases. Deaths. 



Place. 



Casen. 



Deaths. 



BaUlmore^Md 

fifiKhamton.N. Y. 

Bo^w.Mass 

Bridftport, Conn... 

Btttte.Mont 

Cuiton,Ohio 

Qika«o,IU 

gBdnaatt.Ohio... 
Oeveland.OhJo.... 

g«rott,Wldi 

vabouu«, Iowa. . . • 

Dohith, Mian 

Sittbith.N.J 

KPtoo.fex 

E"rtWayna,Iad... 

Htnli«i,N.J 

Birt*ml,(>»mi 

JWByOty.N.J... 
|««8Cay.lUni. 
XvumC^.ICo... 



Little Rod[, Ark 

Manchester, N. H .. 

Newarlc.N.J 

New Britain, Conn 

New Haven, Conn 

New York. N.Y 

Northampton, Bfass 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Pittsfield,Mis8 

Providence, K.I 

Kacfae,Wb 

St. Louis.Mo 

St. Paul, Minn 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

San Diego. Cal 

San Francisco . Cal 

Saginaw. Mich 

Zanesville, Ohio 



DIPHTHERIA. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberciilods, page 1205. 
86 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



July 27, 1917 



1192 

ERTSIPELAa 
Oitj R^^orts for Week EMed J«l7 7, 1M7. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


AUentown, Pa 


1 




Milwaukee, Wis • 


2 
3 

6* 

4 

2* 

8 
1 

1 
2 

1 




Boston, Ma"^s 


M 


Newark, N.J 

New York. N.Y 

Philadelphia, Pa 




Brockton, Mjvss 


i 

1 

8 
2 
4 
2 
2 

? 

1 


8 


Buffalo, N. Y 


1 


1 


Chicago, III 


Pittsburg, Pa 




Cincinnati, Ohio 




Provi<!cnee,R-I 

Kochester,N. Y 


1 


Cleveland. Ohio 






Davton, Ohio 




gt. Louis, Mo 


1 


Denver, Colo 




Kt PfinI, Vffinn 




Detroit, Mich 




San Diejro.Cal. 




Duluth , Minn 




San FrAnei.«5Co . Cid 




Kansas Citv, Mo ....... . . 


Schenectady, N. Y 











LEPROSY. 

Lonisif BartyHle— E«at Baton Rtaf e Pariah. 

Collaborating Epidemiologist Deeding reported that dunng the 

month of June, 1917, one case of leprosy was notified at BurtviUe, 

East Baton Rouge Parish, La., in the person of F. J., a colored male, 

about 55 years old. 

MALARIA. 

State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reportad. 


Place. 


Newcasw 
reported. 


Kansas: 

Butler County- 
Douglas 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


Ouaddta Parish 




Pla<]nemJne.s Parish 




Crawford County — 






Pittsburg 


Rapides Parish 




Geary (^oimty— 


T^i<^Iand Parith 




Junction City 


Sabine Parish 




T,.eAVAnwnrth County- 


8t Charles Pari-sh. , , 




Leaven worth ..I 


St. John Parish 




Monteomory County — 


St. Landry Parish 


16 


Coffejrdne 


fit. Martin Parish 






8t Marv Parish 


le 


Total 


£ 


St. Tanimanv Parish.... 




TnTwHriAhnn Pnrf«h 






22 
8 
5 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
11 
19 
2 
1 
6 
2 
5 
1 
2 
5 


Union Parish 


Acadia Parish 


Verrnflfon Parish 


D 


Allen Parish 


Vernon Parish 




Ascension Parish 


Washington Paiisli * 




Avoyelles Parish 


West Carroll 




Beaur^urd I*arish 


West Feliciana Ptolsh. 




Caddo Parish 


Total 




Claiborne I'arish 


313 


Concordia T^arish 


New Jersey: 

Bnriin^on County .......... 




DeSoto Parish 




East ('arroll Parish 




East Feliclnna Parish 


Essex (5oimty....r 




Jackson I'arish 


Hudson County 




Jeirerson Davis Parish 


Mercer County '.'. 


Lafavettc Parish 


Monmonth County. 




Lincoln Parish 


Somerset . . .'. . .... 


Livingston l*arish 


Sussex 


Morehouse Parinh 


Total 




Natchitoches Parish 


22 









Digitized by 



Google 



1193 

MALAMA— Continued. 
GHy Reports for Week Ended July 7, 1917. 



July 27, 1917 



Ptem. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Rimiin^m Atft 


1 


1 


New Orleons. La 


1 




Hoboktt.N.'J 


New York, K. Y ! 


1 


wip*<^ rity, iro 


1 


Richmond, Va 


1 
1 




iiSnS,N:i":. 


1 


Savannah, Ga 


1 









> The nasoi that Binningham had so many mora cases of malaria reported than any other city is not 
that the disease is more prevalent in Blrmiosham than in other cities of Alabama and neighboring States, 
tat ondaiibtediy because of the successful efforts the health department has ixfade in securing the coopera- 
tioD of the praeneiiig physiclaiis in reporting cases. 

MEAI^LES. 

See Diphtheria, meMke, ecarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1205. 

PELLAGRA. 
SUte R^^orto for June, 1917. 



Place. 



New 

r^xnted. 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



Cherokee County— 

Galena 

Cowley County — 

Wbield.. 

Oiwford County — 

Plttsburjt (R.D.) 

Jackson County — 

Holtcn..... 

Ubette County — 

Parsons 

Miami County— 

Osawatomie (SUte Hospital) 
MoDtfomery County— 

Ckney 

Bcno County— 

Hutchinson 

Total 

Acadia Parish 

Beaarecard Parish 

Caddo Pariah 



Louisiana— Continued. 

Cald wen Parish , 

De Soto Parish 

East Baton Houzo Parish 

East Carroll Parish 

East Felidana Parish 

Franrlin Parish 

Iberville Parish 

Jackson Parish 

Lincoln Parish 

Madison Parish 

Morehouse Parish 

Natchitoches Parish 

Orleans Parish 

Ouachita Parish 

Rapides Parish 

Sabine Parish 

St. Mary Parish 

Tangipahoa Parish 

Tensas Parish 

Vernon Parish 

Washington Parish 

Total 



2 
1 
3 
2 

4 
8 
1 
4 
2 
1 

16 
1 
6 
1 
3 
1 
2 
6 
1 
6 
2 



79 



aty Reporto for Week Ended July 7, 1917. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



AiKttn, T»x 

g nringham , AhL 
a»«teten,g.C.. 
Gtlv««t«LTBx.. 
BatOty Mo. 



>8 




MohUe.Ala 

NashTtUe, Tenn 

New Orleans. La 

New York, N.Y 

Sacramento. Oil 

Savannah, Ga 

Syracuse, N.Y 

Winston-Salem, N.C. 



J* The reaioo that Binningham had so many more cases of pellafra reported than any other city Is not 
J«*t the diMase is more pre\'aient in Birmingham than in other cities of Alabama and neighboring States, 
^^Uadoobtedly beoauae of the suooeanul efforts the health department has made hi securing we coop- 
*>«0Q of the pnotietog phyaftJans hi repcrthig cases. 



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Jaly27,lMT 



1154 



PMGUE. 

Oalifonda-TAIameda County-— Ptefpe-Iiifeete^ Stprirrels Found. 

During the period from July 3 to 12, 1917, 5 plague-infected 
ground squirrels were found widiin a radius of 5i miles of Alta- 
mont, Alameda Coimty, Cal., one each on the following ranches: 
Flynn Bros., Frank Floyd, F. Rahmstorf, C. W. Carroll, and Mary 
Klesorth. 

Hawaii— Paaii]imii-~Fhic«e-bifec(ed Rat Found. 

A plague-infected rat was foimd July 15, 1917, at Paauhau, Hawaii. 

PNEUMONU. 
City Reports for We^ Ended Jnly 7, 1917. 



Pltc«. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Oases. 


Deaths. 


AluiMtla, <V. 


74 
14 




GrMid Bapids, Mleb 

Fftv^rhni MftM , 


1 
3 
1 
4 
3 
18 
31 
13 
1 
3 
U 
3 
1 
3 




Atlmtichty N.J 






BaltliBora Md 


10 


Kfi^in**^ Mi'^b 


1 


BlmrhttniDton N.Y 


I^ Am^wW C>l.. _ _ . 


s 


Boston, lipss 


4 


T.ynn MaS?^ ^ . * . x x . . 




Braddock Pa . 


Newark, N. J 


8 


Cam bridge, Mass 


1 


Philadelphia, Pa 


f 


rbpi<s^fi fiim.. 


Httsburgh,Pa 


13 


Chicafo, HI ', 


63 


Reading, Pa, , 




nfio^tand Ohio 


Rochtfter.N.Y 


3 


Detroit, itoi 


San Franosco, Oil 


10 


PnUith'^ Minn 


Bandiisky, <^hio . . 


1 


Kvcrett Mass 




Sooth Bethlfthem, Pa. 




Flint, ^cb 


2 











POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS). 
Connecticat 

During the week ended July 21, 1917, 4 cases of poliomyelitis were 

notified in Connecticut, 1 case each at Bristol, Derby, Thompson^ 

and West Havai. 

Massadiasetts. 

During the period from July 8 to 23, 1917, cases of poliomy^tis 
were notified in Massachusetts as follows: Groveland (town) 3, 
Groton (town) 1, Hadley (town) 1, Haverhill 2, Lowell 1, Maiden 1. 

Minnesota. 

During the i)eriod from July 1 to 22, 1917, 4 cases of poliomyelitis 
were notified in Minnesota as follows: One case each in Keene 
Township, Clay County; Long I^ake Township, Watonwan Coimty; 
Lyons Township, Lyon County; Minneapolis, Hennepin Coimty, 

OMo— Uliridisville. 

Durin<i: the week ended July 21, 1917, 'two cases of poliomyelitis 
were notified at UhrichsviUe, Tuscarawas County, Ohio. 



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1195 



July 27, 191f 



POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS)— Continued. 

Vermont 

During the week ended July 21, 1917, cases of poliomyelitis were 
notified in Vermont as follows: One case each at Barre, MontpeUer, 
and Waterbury. 

Virginia— Rockingham County. 

The State Board of Health of Virginia reported July 18, .1917^ 
that 4 cases of poUomyeUtis had been notified at points near EHkton, 
Rockingham Coxmty, Va. 

West Virginia— Mononga. 

During the period from July 15 to 20, 1917, 6 cases of poliomyelitis 
were notified at Mononga, Marion County, W. Va., making a total of 
8 cases reported at that place since July 7, 1917. 

State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 


New eases 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Kansas: 

Ckrad County^ 

01asco(K. D.) 


1 
1 
1 


New Jersey: 

Berwi Owintv.. 




Essex County 


Uncohi County- 
Sylvan Qrore (R. D.) . . .•. 


Hudson County 




Hunterdon County . , ^^ 




Wyandotte Coanty — ' • 


Mercer County ...'. 




Kansas City 


Middlesex County 






Total 




Total 


3 


15 




Ohio: 

Belmont rnunty 




Louisiana: 

BienriUe Parish 


1 


jj 




Cuyahoga Coimty— 

Cleveland 




liichigan- 


1 
1 




Lenawee County— 

HudMm Township 


Franklin County- 
Columbus 




Wai^tenaw County- 


Qallia County 






Hamilton County— 
Cin<innati . . .... 








Total 


2 


Lucas County- 
Toledo 








-lOttDisota: 

Pine County- 


1 
1 
1 


Pickaway County— 

CInlcvillc 






Stark County— 

Massillon 




Pope County- 

LancheiToirnahip 




Summit County- 
Akron 




WilWn County- 
Bradford Township 




"Williams rv>iintv.. 






Total 




Total 


3 


23 




South DakoU: 

Corson County 








I 









Oregon Report for May, 1917. 

During the month of May, 1917, 1 case of poUomyelitis was 
rqx)rted in Clackamas County, Oreg. 



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jTi1y2T,V©l7 



1196 



POLiOMYELmS <INFANTILE PARALtSISV-CSMttiised. 

City Reports for WeekCadc^ Jtily 7, 1917. 



PUoe. 


Cases. 


Bcatlis. 


Pbce. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Albany, N. Y 


1 
1 

fi 

1 




NcwYork. N. Y 

Philadelphia, Pa 


2 


S 


Chioai:o 111 






Haverhill, Mass 





8cb«Bi£H'tadr, N. Y 


1 


Lowell Mass. 


SiiringD<M,'Mai«s 


1 


1 


Mcdford, Moss 















RABIES IN MAN. 
City Report for Weelt Ended Jidy 7, 1917. 

During the week ended July 7, 1917, 1 death from rabies was 
reported at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

BABIES IN ANIMALS. 
City Reports for Week Ended July 7, 1917. 

During the week «ud^ July 7, 1917, 4 cases of rabies in inimah 
wrere reported at Detroit, Mich., and 1 case at St. Paui, Minn. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER. 
Orecwi Report for May, 1917. 

During the month of May, 1917, 2 cases of Rocky Mountain 
spotted fever were reported in Baker County, Oreg. 

SCAttLET FEVER. 

See Diphtheria^ measles, ecariot ferer. and tubenculosis, page 1205. 

SMALLPOX, 
rt for May, 1917— Correction. 



The report of a death from smallpox in Hancock Coimty, IihL, m 
the State report for May, 1917, pobhshed in the Public Health Re- 
ports of July 6, 1917, was an CTror. One death occurred in Hendricks 

County in May. 

Minnesota. 

Dxiring the week ended July 21, 1917, five new foci of smallpox in- 
fection were report-ed in Minnesota, rases of the disease having been 
notified as follows: Carver Coimty, Chaska I; Dakota County, Em- 
pire Township 2; Hennepin County, Riclificld Township 5; Itaska 
County, Deer River 1 ; Martin County, Silver Lake Township 1. 



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1197 



July 27, 1917 



SMALLPOX— Continued. 
Stole Reports for June, 1917. 







Dmths. 


VaeelUfltlon history of caset. 


Vhc^, 


Nuralj«r 
t"ftCcl«atBd 
withlii T 
years pri*- 
eodinif 
attack. 


Number 

last Tacci- 

njkti!>d more 

lUan T yoars 

pntceaiixg 


Number 

(M?5s fully 
vocdDatcd, 


Vsccfnotioti 
history not 
flbtaltip-l or 
uncertain. 




1 

5 
2 
2 
2 

1 
3 
2 

1 

1 
1 

5 

4 

1 
2 

2 

7 

6 

4 

27 

1 
2 

i 4 

1 

1 

12 








3 
I 

5 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 




Muscotah 










Barton County— 

HoRJnrtnn , 






1 




Bourbon CSbunty— 

Fulton 








Broini County— 

Horton 










Butler County- 
Augusta 










Cherokee County- 
Baxter Springs (R. D.).... 
Chetopa (R. u.) 
















Cohiznbus. 








Galena 




1 




McCune (R. 1>.) 








Cowley County— 

Cambrldg© 








Win6cld 








(^wford County- 
Anna .... , . . , 








Breezy lUU (R. D.) 

CherokeeCR. !>•) 














FninVlln 








Girard 










Hulberry 










Pittsburg ( R D.) 






1 




Da^han County— 

Elwood 








Hlis County— 

Hays(l R. D.) 










Pimiey County- 










Ford County— 

SDearville^R. D.) 










Oow County— 

Grinnell 










Greenwood County- 
Fall River 






2 




Jefferson County— 

Oskaloosa (R. D.) 








Johnson County— 

Eudora(R. D.) 






• 1 




Labette County— 

Oswego 






1 

5 

4 

1 
2 

2 

7 




PftTS^J* 










LeaYenworth County— 
I^iRvenworth 










Uncoln County— 

Unooln (2 R. D.) 










Marion County— 

HiUsbcro (R. D.) 










Marion . 










MePheraon Coiinty— 
Marquette...... . 










Miami County- 

Paoto...: 










Montgomery County— 

Coffeyville 






1 
1 


5 
3 

27 

1 

a 


1 


ifidependenoe 






Morris County— 

CouncU unnre 








N«nahaCounty- 

Oentralla (R. D.) 










Coming (R.D.) 








1 ..,.:: 


Neodio County— 
Channte 








4 


Erie (R.D.) 


, 




l\ 


Shaw 


1 




i i\ ^ 


South Mound (R. T).) 


I i 



Digitized by 



Go( 



Julj 27, 1917 



1198 



SMALLPOX— Omtinoed. 
State Reports for June, 1917 — Continued. 





Newcasea 
reported. 


Deaths. 


Vaccination history of cases. 


Place. 


Number 
vaccinated 
witWn7 
years pre- 
ceding 
attack. 


Number 
last vacci- 
nated more 
than 7 years 
preceding 
attack. 


Number 
never suc- 
cessfully 
vaccinated. 


Vaccination 
history not 
obtahiedor 
uncwtain. 


Kansas— Cont inued. 
Osborne County— 

Osb<MTi© 


1 
30 








1 
6. 




OtUwa County— 

Mlnneftpnfis ,^T-T 






1 




Pawnee County- 
Lamed 








Pratt County— 

Pratt (I R. D.) 










Reno County— 

Hutchinson 










Republic County— 

Belleville 










Rlee C^xinty— 

Sterliii 










BUey County- 
Manhattan (3 R. D.) 










Rush County— 

Timken r r.,.. 










Scott County— 

BcottCitv 










Sedgwick County— 

ChenoT (I R. D.) 


* 








Valley Center 










Wichita 










Seward County— 

Liberal 






1 




Shawnee County— 

Topwa 








Stafford County— 

8t. John 










Sumner County— 

Caldwell 










Wabaunsee County— 

McParland 










Wallace County- 
Wallace 










Wilson County— 

Altoona 










Buffville 










Wyandotte County- 




















Total 


229 









220 












Michigan: 

Alpena County— 

Alpena Township 


1 

a 

3 

2 
2 
14 

5 

1 
3 

1 
14 








2 
14 

r-^ 14 




Green TowiLship* 











Long Rapids Township... 
Alpena. 


















Benzie County— 

Weldon Township 

Berrien Countv— 

Bertrand 'township 



















Nile.... ..::::: 










Chippewa County— 

SaiiltSte. Marie 










Emmet County- 
Bliss Township 










Pelhton 










Ar^entujp 'Town'ihip 










Ociift^ce Township 










Flint 










Gratiot County— 

Lalavctte Township 










North Star Township 










Alma 










Ingham County— 

Williamston 










Lansing 








• • + 



Digitized by' 



1199 

SMALLPOX— Contlntied. 
State Reports fbr June, 1917— Con tinned. 



July 27, 1917 





New cases 
reported. 


Deaths. 


Vaccination history of cases. 


France. 


Number 
vaccinated 

within? 
yeare pre- 
ceding 

attack. 


Numl>er 
last vacci- 
nated more 
than 7 years 
preceding 
attack. 


Number 
never suc- 
cessfully 
vaccinated. 


Vaccination 
hi torynot 
obiainedor 
uncertain. 


Mkhjsaii— Conttnaed. 

£ast(Hi Towoahip 


13 

15 

46 








1 




Jtttaon County — 

TUv^n Tnwmhfp 








1 


Jftckson 








2 

4 
1 
1 




K«it Countv— 

Grand Rapids 










MarquetU County— 

laiipeming 










HMon County— 

Ludinston 










Mecosta County- 
Big Rapids TowMhip 

Fork Township 








1 








1 
1 
13 

4 

1 




Hintoo ToivTubip. 










Big Rapids * 










IfidlandCounty- 










lIuBkagan County— 










Oakland bounty— 

Pontiac Township...* 

Southfield Town&ip 

Watarford Township 

Pontiac 






1 








8 
1 
7 
15 

3 
2 
2 

1 
1 

1 

a 
1 




























Ottawa County— 

Bleodon Township 

OU\e Township 


















WriAt Township 










Pr«fiqo«nsle County— 

AIH^ Tnwnshfp 










Onaway T 










Bajinaw County- 
Brant Township 




3 






Frenumt Township .. 1 . 11 . 
St. Clair County- 
Emmet Township 

Grant Township 




















1 




Port Huron ... .^ .. I m 1 m 






3 




Sanilac County— 
DeckaryllJe .. 






1 




Sanilac Township 






2 




fihiawasBea County- 
Rush Township 

Shiawassee Township 

Owosso 






1 








I 

3 
8 
2 

1 

1 
9 












VaD Buren County— 

Decatur Township 

Washtenaw County- 
Ann Arbor 


















Wayne County— 

DearbcHrn . .... 










St. Clair Heiriits 










Detroit 




1 


37 






....... 




Total 


2M 




3 1 4 1 158 


39 








lOmesota: 

Bigstone County— 

Ortcnviil© 


17 








17 




Bhie Earth County- 
Lake Crystal 










Chisaco County- 
Rush City . . 










Chisago Lake Township... 
Oay County— 
Hawley 


















Uoorbaadi. !'!!!.! 











Digitized by VaOOQ I 



r 



July 27, 1817 



1200 



SMALLPOX— Continued. 
State Reports for Jane, 1917— C)ontmued. 





New cases 
reported. 


Deaths. 


Vaccination history of cases. 


Place. 


Number 
vaccinated 
within 7 
yeare pre- 
ceding 
attack. 


Number 
last vacci- 
nated more 
than 7 years 
preceding 
attack. 


Number 
never suc- 
cessfully 
vaccinated. 


VacdnatiflB 
history not 
obtained or 
uncertain. 


Minnesota— Continued. 
Crow Wing County— 

Brainerd 


3 
2 

1 

17 
116 

23 

1 

I 
2 

o 








3 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 
16 

4 

1 




IrontrOn . .■ 










Dodgo County— 

Wasioja Toxmshlp 

Fillmore County— 

Rushlord 


















Newburg Township 










Freebom County— 

Alden Township 




.. 






London Township 







i" 




Goodhue County- 
Pine Island 








Hennepin County— 

Edina 






1 
1 
8 




ExcelsicH' 




1 




Minneapolis 




108 
3 

1 
2 




Wayzata 








West Minneapolis 

Maple Grove Township . . . 



















Minnetonka Township 




1 






Plymouth Township." .... 






1 




Hubbard County— 

Arago Township 









1 


W Wte Oak Township 









4 
3 

1 

1 
2 

1 

2 
8 

5 

7 




Itasca County— 

Bovey 










Martin County- 
Fairmont 










Pleasant Prairie Township 




1 




Tenhassen Township 










Morrison County- 
Belle Prairie 










Mower County- 
Austin 




1 






Lyle Township 




1 




Olmstead County— 

Rochester 








Pennington County- 
Thief Kiver Falls 










Polk County- 
Angus Township 








1 


Ramsey County— 

St. PauL 








9 

1 
1 




Renville County- 
Franklin .... 










Olivia 










Roseau County— 

Huss Township 




1 

1 






St. Louis County— 

Dulutb 




7 

1 


14 


1 


Proctor 






Sherburne County— 

Orrock Township 






1 

1 

1 




Steams County- 
Eden Lake Township 










Steele County— 

BloonUng Prairie Town- 
ship 










Stevens County- 
Donnelly Township 






1 




Todd County- 
Staples 






1 
2 

1 

1 
6 

6 




Bruce Township 










Hartford Township 










Wadena County— 

Vcmdale 










Wadena 










Watonwan County— 

St. James 











Digitized by 



Google 



1201 



July 27, lOlT 



SMALLPOX-— Coutiuued. 
State Reports for June, 1917— Continued. 





New cases 

reported. 


Deaths. 


Vaccination history of cases. 


If 


Number 
vaccinated 

within 7 
years pre- 
ceding 

attack. 


Number 

last vacci- 

nateil more 

than 7 ycirs 

prece<lin(; 

attack. 


NumlxT 
never siic- 

cossfally 
vaccinated. 


Vaccination 
history not 
obtained or 
imcertain. 


Hhmesols-Continued. 
Winona County— 

Winona 


1 
3 
1 








1 

1 




WriAt County— 

rnuokfort Township 










Ytlknr Medicine Coonty- 
Vergeland Townalilp 




















Total 


279 




5 


21 


250 


s 








Ohio: 

AllenCounty 


7 
1 
5 
30 
18 
11 
12 

1 
48 
17 
4 
2 
6 
11 

4 

15 

1 

2 
10 

7 
3 

33 
2 

8 
23 
5 

6 

1 
1 
2 

1 
6 

1 
13 

8 
64 
8 
2 
2 

2 

2 








4 
1 
3 
28 


3 


Ashtabula County 










Athens ('oimtv 








2 


But'er Cmintv 








2 


Behnont County 








18 


Clark Couutv 








6 
4 





Columbiana "Coimty 




1 




7 


Coshftcton County— 

i'oiho'^ton 






1 












48 


Darke C^ounty. ..'. 








15 
3 


2 


Dela\far« County 








1 


Fairiie'd Coimty 








2 


Franklin County 








4 


2 


Greene County/. 








11 


HamUton County- 
Cincinnati 










4 


Hancock County— 

Flndlay 








3 
14 

1 


8 


Hardin County 








1 


Henry County 










Jackson County— 

WeUston 








2 


Jefferson County 






1 


16 

1 


2 


LogaTi County 






A 


Lucas County 








3 


Mahoning County— 

Youngstown 










33 


Mercer Coun t y 










2 


Miami County 






1 


5 
19 


2 


, MontnMnery County 






4 


Morrow County 








5 


Muskingum County— 

Zanosville 








6 




Perry County 








1 


Portage County 






1 






Preble Count y 






2 




Rkhland County- 
Mansfield 






1 




Scioto County 








5 


Seneca County— 

Fostoria 








1 
10 

8 
12 
2 




Shelby County 






1 


2 


Stark County- 
Canton 








Summit Coujitv 






1 


51 


TrnrabnU Couritv 






6 


Van \\ ert County 








2 


Warreu County 










2 


Washin^on County— 










2 


Williims County 










2 














Total 


410 




1 


6 


!fl7 


M!i 









Digitized by 



Gc 



July 27, 1917 



1202 



I 



SMALLPOX— Continued. 
Miscellaneotts State Reports. 



Place. 



Louisiana (Jun? \-?,0): 
Assumption Tarisli. 
Livingston Parish.. 

Orleans Parish 

Rapides Parish 

St. Lcmdry Parish.. 
Tangipahoa Parish. 

Union Parisli 

Vermilion Parish . . . 
Winn Parish 

Total 

New Jersey (June 1-30): 
Hudson County 

Oreeon (May 1-31): 

Clatsop County 

Douglas County 

Multnomah County ~ 

Portland 

Washington County 

Total 



Cases. 

2 

1 
6 
7 
1 

11 
1 
5 
1 


reaths. 






















35 

1 




^==^— 


r — ^=^C=r 


23 

1 

3 
3 










29 







Place. 



South Dakota (June 1-30); 
Bon Homme County. 

l>av Iscn County 

(JranK ounty 

< Jregory County 

Han J County 

Hughes (.k)unty 

Jerauld County 

I-awrcnce County . . . . 

Miner County 

Minn?haha County. . . 

Sanborn County 

Spink County 

Tripp County 

Turner County 

Yankton County 

Ziebach County 

Total 




City Reports for Week Ended July 7, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Alton, Ul 


25 




Muscatine Iowa 


1 
6 
11 

1 
2 
5 
4 

4 
2 
5 
10 
2 
5 

5 
5 
1 
1 
3 
2 
4 
1 
2 




Ann Arl>or,Mich 




New Orleans La 




Butte. Mont 


Oklahoma ( ity Okla '. 




Chicaco,lll 




Omaha, Nebr . " 




Cleveland, Ohio 


7 1.......... 


Philadelphia, Pa. 




Columbus, Ohio 







Pittsburgh. Pa... 




DaiiviUc. Ill 





Pontlac Mich 




Davenport, Iowa 


6 
14 




Portsmouth Va 




Dayton, Ohio 




Quincy, 111.'.. '. 




Denver, Colo 




Ilichmond Va' 




Detroit, Mich 




St.Josenh Mo 


J 


Dubuque, Iowa 




St. Louis. Mo....!..*."!.";!!.'"; 

St. Paul, Minn 




Erie, Pa 






Flint, Mich 




Salt Lft'xc Citv Utah 




Fort Wayne, I nd 




Sioux (ity, Iowa... 




C.rand Rapids, Mich 




Sprlneficld, 111 




Indianapolis, Ind 




Sprinjjfleid, Ohlo.I^ 




Kansas City, Kans 




S«ip»rior, Wis 




Kansas City, Mo 




Tacoma, Wash 




Kokomo, Ind 




Terre Haute Ind 




Lln^ln. Neb 




Toledo, Ohio' 




Memphis, Tenn 




Whoelmii W Va 




Milwaukee, Wis 




Wichita. Kans 




Minneapolis, Minn 




Zanesville, Ohio 














TETANUS. 
City Reports for Week Ended July 7, 1917. 



Place. 



Baltimore. Md.. 

Chicfttro, 111 

Harri:jburp, Pa. 



Cases. 



ths. 


Place. 


C««e8. 


Deathi. 


1 


Providence, R. I 




1 


1 
2 

1 


Trenton, N.J 




1 



TUBERCULOSIS. 

See Diphtheria, measles, pcarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1205, 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1203 



July 2'*'» 1»1T 



TYPHOID roVER. 
State Re^rts for Jvne, 1917. 



FlaoQ. 



AtchisHi- ,,„., 

> Bourboti CdEinlT^ — 

Fort ScQtt.. .,,»,.,. 
BtiLler County^ 

Cberokee roiinty — 

FmlkDer 

Cowler County — 

AdnnsasCitT 

N«wS«lem(R. D.). 

WinfieM 

Cnwiard County— 

PitUburg 

Djckinson Gmxnt7r-> 

Htrincton 

Hope 

flimey County — 

Garden City 

G«ai7 County— 

Fort Riley 

Greenwood County— 

Qoincy 

Medison -.. 

Kearny County — 

Deerfleld. 

1 County— 



LebeUe County— 

Edmond 

Leavenworth County- 
Leavenworth 

Montflomery County— 
Cnenyvale 

Riky County- 
Leonard "* 



vil]0 (B. J>.). 



Sedgwick County — 

wichiU....:, 

Shawnee County— 

Tepeka 

Somner County— 

CaldweU 

Washinrton Oeunty— 

Wa^ihicton (H. D.). . 
WDson County— 

Fredonl* (R. D.) 

VFoodaon County— 

Yates Center (K. D.>, 
Wjaadotte County— 



^wincs. 
City.... 



Total. 



Looi^ana: 

Acadia Parish 

Allen Pariah 

Ascea^on Parish , 

Assumption Parish 

Avoyefles Parish 

Bossier Parish 

Caddo Parish 

Calcasieu Parish 

CaldweH Parish 

Catahoula Parish 

Caaibome Parish 

Concordia Parish 

East Baton Ron^ Parish. 

East Fclidana Parish 

Pranldin Parish 

Iberia Parish 

Iber\aic Parish 

Jackson Parish 

JeCtraon Parish 

Jefferson Davis Parish 

Lalayette Parish 

Laloorche Parish 



ropart-eJ , 



-i 



r'bc«. 



12 



Louis rainfl—Cniitfnued« 

L^ Saitc Piirtsh., „„.„.,, 

Li V i nrst iJTi I 'afiih , 

NfltHjilwhrs Pariah,,.....* 

Orlesirui Parlih - _ _ 

Oror'utn Parish. .„,,,..„. 
Fli. ,.r-,Li::L-- Pftfiih,*...... 

T'l i -r ' .> .,A'c Parish..,,.- 

Kapkles Parish 

Red River Pariah 

Richland Parish 

Sabhie Parish 

St. (Charles Parish 

St. James Parish ,. 

St. T/andry Parish 

St. Martin Pariah 

St. Mary Parish 

Tangipahoa Parish 

Union Parish 

Vermilion Parish 

Washinirtoa Pa^ah. 

West Baton Bou^ Pariah. 

West Carroll Parish 

Winn Parish 



Total.. 



Michigan- 

Alpena County— 

Alpena 

Bay County^ 

Bay City 

Berrien County— 

Niies 

Branch Ccuntr— 

Bronson Townddp.. 

Calhcaa County- 
Battle (Yeek 

Chippewa Coimty— 
Santt Ste. Marie 

Clinton County- 
Bath Township 

Viitcr Township 

De Witt Township.. 

Dickinson I'ountv— 
Iron Moimtam 

Geneve County— 

FKnt 

Hillsdale Coimty— 

Wright Township... 

Ingham County — 

I.anNinji 

Kalk:i> a ( fiinty- 
oiiser Towiiship — 

Kent Ci'uiity- 
(JiMiid liai 



28 

4 
3 



pids 

Lapeer C< iinlv— 

Hurnsi(]t' Yownship... 
Maiii->teeC 'iiuty— 

Maiii^foo 

Marmietle Ci unty— 

Ncj^iiuie? 

MeCi ^la C( iinly— 

Bfirrylon 

Mis.>.iu:.c.><\ iinly— 

<'lani rni'.n TowTiship 
Montcalm r ii'ify- 

Ilowanl <'ity 

Muskegon C'liuly — 

Musk<»s n 

Ogeinav. 'Ounty — 

l{()^(» TounNhip. ...-,. 
Sagiiiiv.'(\)unty - 

Oak.cy 

^apin »\v 

Shiaw:i- ;ooC( iiniy— 

Woodhiill 'l\)\vnihip 

Ru^i Towp-.lij;^ 



New cases 
reported. 



I 
4 
i 

81 
8 
1 
4 

10 
1 
6 
1 
4 

10 

13 
5 
5 

13 
1 
5 
1 
1 
2 
3 



242 



80 
2 
3 

1 

10 




Digitized by 



July 27, 1017 



1204 



TYPHOID FEVERr -Continued. 
State Reports for June, 1917— Continued. 



Place. 



M kshlpui— Continued. 
Van Buren C( uuty— 

Almona luwiiship. 
Wayne Ccuiity— 

Hamtram-k 

Detrclt 

Wyaifkite 

Ypsi.auti 



Total. 



Minnesota: 

Anoica County - 

Columbia lIoiKhts 

Blue Earth County- 
Lake Cr/slil 

Mapleton 

Brown County - 

New Ulm 

Carloton County— 

Cloquet 

Crow Wing County— 

Croaby 

Hennepin County— 

Minnoapoiis 

Jackson County— 

Tleron Lake 

McLeod County— 

riato 

Marshall County- 
Oslo 

Morrison County— 

VitTT Township 

Polk County— 

Mcintosh 

Johny)n Township 

Pope County— 

Olenwojd 

Rice County— 

FarUailt 

Roseau County— 

Roseau 

St. Ixjuis County— 

Duluth 

Aneora Township 

lading Town.ship 

Scott County - 

Belle I'loine 

Sherburne County— 

Livonia To'A-n.Hhip 

Steams County— 

Wakefield Township. . . 
Steele County— 

Owatonna 

Watonwan County— 

Madelia 

Roaendale Township. . . 
Yellow Medicine County— 

Omro Township 



Total. 



New Jersey: 

Atlantic County 

Berren County 

Burlinfton County. . . 

Camden County 

Cai»e May County 

Curalierland County. 

Eh'Wx County 

01ouc*^ler County . . . 
Hunterdon (bounty... 

Mercer County 

Monmouth County. . . 

Morrb County 

Oceiin County 

Pa «ts-ic County 



New cn.scs 
reported. 



30 



Place. 



New Jersey— Continued. 

Salcm County 

ITnion County 

\N'orrcn County 



Total. 



Ohio: 

Adams County 

A.shland CM'n'y 

Ashtal ii.a County— 
C^nrnaut 

Belmont County 

Brov n Coimty 

Butler County— 

ITamiltrn 

Clark County— 

."'pring.leld 

C4)lunili*na Cvunty 

Crau' ford Count , 

Cuyahoga County— 
Cle el»ind , 

Delavt-are County- 
Delaware 

Erie County— 

Sandusky 

Franklin County 

•Oallia County 

Hamilton County- 
Cincinnati 

Henry County 

Hiut»h County— 

Norwalk 

Jefferson County 

Licking County 

Lognn County- 
Belief »ntnine 

Lorain Ckwiniy 

Lucas Count y— 

Toledo 

Mahoninc County 

Medina t ounty 

Molps County 

Miami County— 

Piquo 

Monroe Coonty 

Montgomery County— 
Da>-ton 

Morrati County 

Muskingum Connty— 
Zanes\ ille 

Noble County 

Ottawa County 

Perry County 

Pickaway County— 
Cirdovillo 

Bos'? Connty 

Sanilusky County 

Bcioto Countv 

S^noca County 

Stark County— 

Massill^n 

Summit County 

Trambull County 

Tuscarawas County ... . 

Warren County 

Wa '-ne County 

Williams County 

Wood County 



New a 



Total. 



South Dakota; 

Lawrence County. . . 
Minnehaha County.. 



Total . 



Digitized by 



Google 



1205. 



July 27, 1917 . 



TYPHOID FEVER--Oondiuied. 
Oregon Eeport for Maj, 1917. 

During the month of May, 19^17, 5 cases of t} j^hoid fever were 
rqK)rted in Oi*egon, as follows: Columbia County, 1; Multnomah 
County, Portland, 4. 

aty Reports for Week Ended July 7» 1917. 



Place, 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Albaay.K.Y 

ADent^wn, r» _.. 

Altoaoa,Pa ^ 

AllantfcCttjr, N. J 

B altimor»,M 

"irniWM***^^ Ala. -••••• 

BrownsnlliL Tex 

BiilWo,N. V 

Botta.Mont- 

Cundn^N. J 

Canton, Ohio 

Charli^oii, 8. C 

Ctettnaoea, Tom 

ChkioTlB^. 



CiDci^Mti, Ohio 

Gleveiand, Olno 

(Mervflle, Kans 

ODhnalHia, Ohio 

Corington, Ky 

Deaw, Cola _ 

Detr(dt,Kicli. 

B^m 

SlFfloa^Tex 

Brie,Pk 

SvaniTiUe, Ind 

Ever^Man 

Fall Bivcr, Mass..... 

Fort WsyiH^ Tod 

Hacostown, Md 

BartfMd,GMm 

HavarWU, Maai 

Indiatt^lj^liid.. .. 

lohostovii, Pa 

KansMCity, Mo 

LoDS Branch, N. J.. 
Lo8.\Bgelea,CaL..„ 

Loved, Mass 

lUlrQn,MaM. 



Mt'inpnrs 1 «.!nn ..».. 

MirLTi««{^lifs Miiin 

"' Ir, AfeL... 

■ -^ilK J 

■ WJ... 

HftvpE, 0>na*^. 
■ OH -in-. In 



1 



M 
M 

N 

N.' 
N. 

Norfolk, Va 

Omaha, Nabr 

Philaddphla. Pa 

Pittsburg^TPa 

ProvidcDce, R. I 

RichawwLVa 

Roanoke, va 

Ro?ky Mount, N. C 

St. Joseph, Mo . 

St. Louis, Mo 

St. I»Bui, Mian 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

San Francisoo, Cal 

Sa vamnah, Ga 

Schenectadv, N. T 

South B«nd. liid 

South B«thMheni« Pa. 

8prinKflald,Ohio 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Taunton, Mass 

Toledo. Ohio 

Top<da, Kaas 

Trenton, N. J 

Washington, D. C 

Wheeliag, W. Va. 

WicSiita, kans 

Winston-flatom, N. C 

Worcester, Mass 

Yorli, Pa 



IHPHTHESU, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS. 
State Reports for June, 1917. 





Casei reported. 


3t»ta. 


Cases reported. 


fltela. 


Diph- 
theria. 


UMslee. 


Bevlet 
fcver. 


Diph- 
C^ieria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


^«rt^ 


82 

30 
611 
299 


1,110 

101 

1,739 

1,287 


157 

13 

814 

277 


New Jersey 

Ohio 


351 

519 

13 


690 
2,303 

74 


354 


Louisiana 


539 


Michipui 


South Dakota 


55 


tfhnmttn. 





Oregon Report for May» 1917. 

During the month of May, l6l7, 10 cases of diphtheria, 515 cases of 
measles, and 124 cases of scarlet fever were reported in Oregon. 

/Google 



Digitized by' 



July; 



, 11)17 



1206 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Continued. 



City Reports for Week Ended July 7, 


1917, 












Popola- 

tionasof 

July 1,1016 

(ostimated 

by U. 8. 

Census 

Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

Irom 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles, 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tubi^ 


City. 


s ^ 


1 


1 


J 


1 


1 


i 

•J 






1 


i 


1 


OTor 500.000 inhabiUnts: 

naltimoro. If d 


589.631 

766,476 

2,497,722 

674,073 

671,784 

603.812 

5,602,841 

1,709,518 

679,000 

767,309 

468,558 
410.476 
306,345 
436.535 
363,454 
408.894 
371,747 
463,516 
363,980 

214,878 
280.800 
271.708 
297,847 
295.463 
254.960 
256,417 
247,232 

104,199 
181.762 
121,579 
112,981 
106,233 
127,224 
128.366 
128.201 
110,900 
100.560 
113.245 
102,425 
148.996 
117,057 
118. 158 
149.685 
10S,W>4 
165, 470 

109.:i81 

156.087 
117,399 
105.942 
155,624 
112,770 
191,554 
111,593 
163,314 

63,505 
58.aS9 
.•>:. OfiO 
69.Kg3 
57.653 
.•i3.973 
e7.449 

«n.<«2 

«0.7:J4 . 
W) ()7.*i ' 


144 
211 

588 

" "iw 

370 
156 
197 

99 
106 

72 
106 

90 

128 
123 
90 

63 
62 

62' 

41 
56 

44* 

' m 

36 

7* 

28 

40 
16 
26 
22 
53 
38 
30 

36" 

42 
28 
66 
31 
21 
27 

fli* 

40 
40 

14 


3 
68 

140 
27 
77 


255 
65 
17 
55 

15 

7 


29 
2 
12 

12' 

3 

...... 

1 



75 

128 

258 

37 

14 

36 

456 

74 

76 

27 

21 
16 




3 

"is* 
...... 

1 


9 

U 
129 

6 
47 
16 
76 
10 

7 
29 

6 
6 


* ••3 

11 
...... 

""4 
...... 

2 


49 


n 


(U^ct^^ti, MaKi 


m\ J7 


Chicago, lU 


307 a 


(levelaiKi, Ohio 


S3 ' tt 


Detroit, Wich 


22 ' U 


Ix)s Ancelfs, C'al 


46 11 


Now York. N. Y 


803 

lis 

24 
81 

35 
83 


Ul 


PhiladeJDbia. Pa 




Fittsbmxh, Fa 


7 


St. Louis. Mo 


a 


From 300,000 to 500,000 iobabit- 
ants: 

Bunralo,N. Y 


IT 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


u 


Jersey (Ity, N.J 


• 7 


Milwaukee, Wis 


14 
9 

8 
9 
11 

4 

? 

7 

4 
6 
6 

4 

r 

1 


2 




52 
12 

27 




84 
6 

4 
1 

12 
2 

2 
12 




14 


9 


Minneapolfa, Minn 




Ncwark.N.J 

New Orleans, La 




36 
29 


17 


San Francisco, (^ 


'"2* 

" i' 


43 
70 

4 

12 

47 
3 
5 

1 

n 
37 

20 

16 

2 

13 
5 
17 
22 
16 
5 


1 


16 11 


Washincton, I), r 

From 200,000 to 300,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
('olumbus, Ohio 


20| tt 

1 
8' i 


Denver, Colo . . . . 




14 


In<li:inai>olis, Ind 




9 


Kansas City, Mo 


2 |. . 


Portliuid, OrcR 


2 

■*2' 

' i 
• 2 


3 
2 
16 
6 

4 


1 


4 3 


rro\ idonce, U I 




11 

1 


Rochester, N. Y 


1 


12 


St. TauJ. Mhin 


13 

5 
13 
7 
3 
3 
1 
7 
2 
4 
3 
1 
2 
16 
6 
11 
6 
3 
1 
1 
7 


: 


From 100,000 to 200,000 inhablt- 




Itii'n.ini'hani, *t.t» , 


9 


BrJilrfOfiH , '•'*i'Qi> 


6 
7 

1 
1 
1 
6 
6 
3 
31 
2 
1 


...... 


8 

1 
8 
2 
3 

1 




4 


Trtfrj tii' Mfv MiMLi , 


3 


f'iH!nr!*Hj S J 




TJ^rt^n, Oh(n 


5 


Fafir^iT^r. Wtvj 

Onuul RtiiiU^. Uuh 

HarilcKil, i 'tmn 


3 

4 
1 


t^lktlfSlCC, M^XJ. ,, 








1 


I.^rrrftt, UuS 




3 

7 
1 








4 


ii^ijkik.TmnlV^V.','.'.'.'.''. 


'.'.'.'.'.'. 


1 
2 
1 

1 




3 

1 


Hm^^lXhttmn ■■■ 




N#w iliiibf^, Moi^ 


2 

1 
2 
2 
9 

1 


...... 

1 


25 

35 
2 

10 
2 
6 
2 
9 

89 
1 

21 
1 

14 

1 
4 
9 


...... 


3 


S«w HamMi. tmm 


3 


'Hklan^^rKV 


2 

4 

8 





3 


OnuJ^Hifcr 


8 
3 


RJchntutH] Va 


8 


Sfth Utr<1tv, I^Li«h 


1 
...... 


10 
11 
12 
1 
8 
1 
8 




1 


2 
6 
1 
9 

7 

7 

4 
3 
2 


• Y 






1 


nirfMm#, tt^ i.^^h. ,.••••••»• 




8 


3 


|ejjj^0g»«j 




36 
8 

U 

8 


11 

3 


Vfm^/Uv^ 

Vn*m rnxm to mm tnhablt- 
bdh: 
Alleniown, Pa 


3 


Altoona Pa. 




1 






Atlantic City , N. J 




33 
4 
1 
8 
8 


I 


Davonne, N.J 




8 

1 






Berkeley. Cal 


7 
14 

9 
15 
28 






1 
10 






Ilin'hamton NY . . 


3 
1 
2 
2 






nnx'k'tcin. Mass 




1 
1 






^ ant n Ohu 




:":::'::::::i 


1 


Chnrt^k^lnn H C 




M 










( hatt inooira Tenn 










7 

4 


Co\iti;:ton, K.y 


57.144 
»4.4\t.S 


10 






••"•2"i::::::| 


1 


AJ'^A**, 


8 


I>iil«itb. Mmo 


i 




25! ' r»' 


T^» 



Digitized by* 



1207 



July 27, 1917 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS— 

Continued. 

Qty Reports for Week Ended July 7, 1917— Continued. 





PopiiJft- 
lioQ as of 
JyJ7l,We 
(c^lhiiated 


Total 
deaths 


Diphtheria. 


Mf3l£tPS. 


Seurlot 
fever. 


Tubor- 


ritf. 


ffota 
all 

CftllB«S. 


1* 




QJ 


1 

Pi 




is 




i 

1 
t3 




en, 705 

7©,07S 

75, 1S3 
72,015 
77, 2H 
68^539 

S7,M.l 

7K,2!<J 
5^,231 

89,613 
B2,&I3 
7L744 
59,411 
63,867 
fi5,l»5 

m,m 

55,IM2 
85,236 
53,330 
68,HU5 
HO, £19 
fi7/07S 
Sr,D39 

61,1^ 
Si,5M 

m.fm 

77.9ie 
70,722 
70,T7fl 
94,2fl5 
51,656 

27,732 
34,!I14 
32,7^6 
37,633 
43,i25 
40,li>3 

3^,074 
33,201 
4!^, Mil 
3t*,Krj 
43, 4o^ 
2S,2aj 

3y,2:j3 

3.^4^4 
4K7hL 

41.^ 

^,:j&3 

35,670 
4S,477 

ai,576 
2»\,771 
:L*i,*;7(V 
31hI»77 
41,OJ7 

411. rit J 
3:j5H7 


1« 
39 

i4' 

15 
17 

as 
....... 


4 
3 
1 


1 


2 
6 


...... 

r 


4 
1 
i 
1 
13 
3 




5 


a 


si P^ tei 


Jl 


Erf**, Pa .„..*,. 

E vBriisTUIt!, Lnd , . _, 


10 
2 


2e 


in«"fL Mif'h J.. , ■ 


1 
3 
I 
4 
3 






Fort W ayii«, lad, 




1 
3 

i 

5 


2 


H:iJTi^bu.rf ^a +*.- **,+ 


3 


HobottD, N, J , 

JohtistflTFii^ Pa , ^ „ , 


1 


10 




1 
E 

I 




1 


Kan^s City, Kacs.. ........ 












n 






Little Rock, Ark. .... ^ - ... , 


25 
15 
24 

3i 
s 

5 

30 

n 
""n 

13 
14 

IS 
30 
25 
IS 
















Ma.ldcn Masa 


4 


1 


30 
3 


...„. 


1 


:;:::: 


4 

6 
2 




M^iiii^lif^icT N H 


% 


Mobile. AUi,., ..., 


1 


...... 


% 


Jifw 1! rrt^n, C^inii. . .,*.„, 




1 
3 

...... 






Norfolk V» 


1 

" ii' 

2 
3 












4 


DIdaliv-ma City, OUa. . ..... 

Pnssaic N J 


...... 


""\' 


^i!i^" 


3 


3 
3 


Fawtuckct, H. l....,,,,..„ 


( 


J 


Fofll^ficL Mo . . . „ 


. . 


10 





1 
3 
3 
2 
1 




4 

1 




Bockford, 1H» .-..-„.,,,*,. . 


a 


BftannDfUC^^ r^] 






2 


suiQflv, Midi. .;;//. ;;;;;;; 

Bt Ja»pht Ma 


1 




1 

1 

13 
1 
17 












1 


3 


&n Diceo Dil 


I 
1 




i 


Hifc^^mHrMli, Q^ ^ ^ _ . 








1 


3 


IMMrwetwIy N Y 




1 
3 
4 
3 
2 
1 







noox City, Iowa **/. . .^. 






1 


BoraerTllte^ Mass 


" io' 

21 

a 

14 

!1 


7 


1 


13 

ft 
13 




...... 


4 1...... 


ffonth T^'^Tid Ind 
















Spriu^ield^ Ohio 






7i::::;; 




4 




Tare Haute Ind 


2 
4 


...... 


1 

a 






Troy, N* Y.. ...!*[[.. 




7 
3 




1 


3 




3 1 




Wilktti^^ifto. P^ 


15 

i 

10 
6 
3 
7 

7 
7 

7, 

& 

3 
9 

""'io' 

13 

10 
10 
17 

5 


4 

I 

I 


1 


16 

1 




I 


Wllmi^op, M.. ...... ... 








3 
3 






1 







n«il SSgOOO to SOiOodin^bltanta: 
Alsmeda, C&l 




1 






Aostln "t^ex 


3 












1 


HrfWi^cJi-nfS WiUtS 




3 
3 

I 

I 
1 
3 










2 


ButJcT Fa 


5 
1 
3 
5 


""i" 












BDtt«, Mcrot... _.„... 




3 
3 


::;::: 


1 
3 




Cbdsea, Mass. ......,„„, 




C!h.LmnfH^ M.a£S 


2 


C^imbcrland Md 








2 




TtanviJle 111 
















3 
1 






i 

1 


.„„. 






Dubunu^, Iowa. . , 

East Dranee N J 




"h 

1 
4 
1 

7 


...... 


".... 


1 


1 


Elpti, UK. 








3 








1 


...„. 








EvpTf*tt Wash 












FilcbUnrgj, Mass. .....,,,... 




1 


.„... 


3 


2 






f 5 iron Hav Wis 








' 












3 
















HBffintnrt nh^n 








3 








ffavHPiiiii hrn.^4 


1 
1 
5 




2 
11 

43 
7 
3 






4 


3 


7«cksan iSich 








1 


Kakun-oxoo Mk:li 




1 
3 

i 














King^f^T! N. Y 











1 










3 
1 
31 




LaCtoffip^'Wb.. 


9 
17 

8 

s 


1 


1 


3 








1 







& 


lima Ohio 


1 
1 
1 




...... 1 





1 


lininm Nebr 




1 


'**i»,%* 


Lcog B«ach Oil 




1 


:,... , . -^ 




J 


87 






Digitize 


dbyC 


3OC 



July 27, 1W7 



1208 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Oontinned. 



Wli.-.!.'..., x'c. \a. 

V\ '111 11- [>. rr. I'a , 

^\ .iii'.i. ' ■,!. < r j 

V. >;. . •— .1 •••■1. N. (' i 

y.-'^ !<•.- I" I 

I'r. ru l().'i»<» to 2'>.«>») inh^l.il- - 



4;i,. 
:vt,s.»'.i 



Alt .1,111 

AUU \r\H>T, Ml<'h 

r4..\.r 1 all>. J'a 

i .ri I.. N H 

] M»^ i\W. To\ 

( .. r>., :il 

(h'U. I . M .. 

(■ : .Mllr, K ui> 

Vonf'T^l, \. II 

<;: 1.' l''iri:.lll 

II .rr.. n. N. J 

K« rru, N. r 

K > -en In I 

L' I ii •.r.i:,.K.N. J 

\i . [.■■t<' W .^ 

M. 'n ,, \i 

M- ['. •.-• II, N.J 

N ." ' VI . ] 1 

N* ^ ;.^i. 't. M . , 

N.-' '..:.:,« - -i 

N^ 'h \.l -.-, M - 

N "! ' -■ • n. \! , 

11.'. ... \ J 

!■<.,,■ I. . '< -h 

} 't: i/'./'i. .\. H 

l: ' . M...',i, N. <' 

It-.*';- 1. \ I 

- • 1 . V, <•) .M 

* II :..-, N.Y.,. 



\ PI' 



, l\i. 



22, ST* 

l.-.,<)10 
li. '.12 

1.1. vt» 
l.i.l«.{ 

» l.t.i).., 
17,:, IS 
22.M,',> 
•j\ /,(, 

If'! o 



IH .. 

1| 



' ni'.io 


1 :.--» 


j' • '. 'i 


^■l"^ 


-' ^ '•' 


1 1 . " '•. 


i-'.'" ; 


11 -;i 


i***, ' i 


r . M H 



7 
2 
4 
4 

'2 ' 
fi 
i> 
4 
H 



3 

1 

14 



aL 



8 
4 
10 



City Reports for Week Ended July 7, 


1917— Continued. 








Popula- 
tion as of 
Juhr 1,1916 
(estimated 
bvU.S. 
Ocnsufl 
Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

from 
• all 

CSUS08. 


Diphtheria. 


McAsles. 


8ca 
fev 


rlet 
er. 




city. 


i 


1 


il 


1 


•a 

1 


1 


Fum 25,000 to 50,000 inhabit- 
ants— < 'out inued. 
Lorain, Ohio 


3«,964 
33,940 
30.690 
47,521 
26,234 
27,451 

3<i,:iis 

27,;i27 
29,003 
31,927 
30,108 
43, 715 
31,»01 
31. 101 
33,»iS0 
40, 150 
41, IM 

38. <ij^» 
.19,*.' I 

34i. T'JS 

as. i;k) 

¥>. l^J 

4f.2s| 

o^. '->*)_' 

27, U. 
4»..l>l>«i 
.31 ». -'^^i 


7* 


1 




1 

3 


2 






LynchbiiTK, Va 








2 


Madison, \^ is 






5 1 


1 








McKccsiKJTt, Pa ^ 


11 
10 

4 
4 
7 

12 
3 
6 

14 
6 
6 
8 
9 
4 

13 
8 

10 
13 
6 


1 




__ 


... 
1 


"i 


Medford, Mass 7. 




■**ii'i:::::T " 


1 


Molino.fn 






2) 


I 




Montcluir, N. J 






2 1:::::: ::::::» 


2 . 


Nasl)na, N. H 






.- --.' 






NcwburKh, N. Y 


**:; .1 


13 


1 : 


S 


1 


New|H)rt, Ky 


:....j 




Ne\vi)ort, K. I 


2 




,..,... 







j 


Newton, Mass 




3J./.... 


1 








NorrMown. Ta 


1 









3 


()j;(hii, I t.ih 







t 




()iaP,o. N. J 




1 


2 ! ■ *.i 


rav.drriii. I'al 




3 




», 


I'eith Arn*'OV, N. J 




1 :::::: 




Pill tuhl. .Mii>s 




17 1 


1 1 1 ! 9 


^rt^inouih, Va 




1 


! : 


Quin- \. Ill 






1 


giijru \ , M.i^s 




4 

.. .- 


,::'"'T""2 i 


I{;. 'iru', Wi. 


1 


1 : i 2 , I 

...1 3 1 I 


l{o.ai^.p, Va 


Ro k 1 hill. Ill 




1 

5 ) 


'"•i 1 ' 


Snn 1.- .'.( ;1 


1 


i •::*i :: 


Men vn\ilU'. * )lao 


8 
11 
12 

9 
10 






Kai-Mor, W 1- 







3 . . I 1 


TiuuiK.n, M.- ^ 






1 2 ' 1 


'ro|'»'»^'i- *^;" • 4s.:j»i 

\\.il'h.rt!. M.. ^ 1 :«»,'.:.i 

W '.Ttowii. \. V 2»<«,^'.M 


4 

4 


2 1 

1« 1 

n 

2 


1 1 1 

1 1 ' 1 

2 1 2 ' 


A\, -• lloi.o^, n. N.J -J.i. i t» 


7 




I t 1 



1 1- 



1 . 

3 . 

31 



il. 



I 1 u\ ul .uoti Ai»r. 15, I'jlO. not'tinruU' niivJo, 



Digitized by VaOOQlC 



FOREIGN. 



VENEZUELA. 
Mortality, 1916. 



During the year 1916 there were notified m Venezuela, 66,186 
deaths from aU causes, including 5,132 deaths from dysentery; 2,366 
from infantile tetanus; 10,442 from malarial fevers; 3,261 from 
pneumonia; 4,266 from puhnonary tuberculosis; and 2,149 from 
typhoid fever. (Population of Venezuela, 2,824,934.) 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE. SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER. 
Reports Received During the Week Ended July 27, 1917.' 

CHOLERA. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India: 

Basein 


Apr. 2i>-May 5 




1 
98 
1 
2 
1 
5 




Calcwtta 


May 6-19 






tfomlahT 


May6-12. 






Moalnwfn . 


May 13-19 






Pakokko 


Apr. 29-May 5.... 






lUnfcom 


May 6-19.... 


6 




Phmpp^ Islands: 

Ptorinoes 




Jane 3-9, 1917: Cases, 162; Deaths, 


Albay 


Jane 3-9 


20 
2 

84 
1 

11 

44 


17 

1 

61 


Ambos Camarines 


do 




Bobol 


do 




CapU 


do 




C«Bu; 


do 

do 


10 
28 













PLAGUB. 






AnbU: 

Ad«n 


May24-«). 

May 13-19 


1 


11 
2 




CeytaST 

Cotofflbo. 




iwBi-... .^.....:...::...;..i; 




May (V-19. 1917: Cases, 10,000; 
deaths, 8,144. 


Btsfin 


Apr. 29-May 19.... 




8 
146 
13 
13 
285 
45 
8. 


Bombay I 


MVy 13-26... 

Mi^y ^19 


164 




Cafcatta. 




^nnada 


Apr.29-Ma7l9.... 






Khrarhi . . , . 


May ST:.....::: 


307 
67 




Vidrai Pmideooy. 


May 13-26. 

Apr. 29-May 12.... 




UmdalaT 




ii-iinitta : ::: 


Apr. 29-May IX... 






Jtwimm 


MSy^9.....\T..: 


40 
3 

1 




Oipe oC Good Hope State- 


May 13-26. 

Jan* 6....... 













* fJTom BMdloaloffloersof the Public Health Service, Amerkan consriN, and oth«r nourcm, 

(1209) 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



July 27, 1917 



1210 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW PEVEE^ 

Continued. 

Reports Received During the Week Ended July 27, 1917— Continued. 

SMALLPOX. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Brazil: 

11 io dc Janeiro 


May 6-Jimel6 

July 1-7 


78 
1 


16 




Canada: 

Nova Scolia — 

Halifax 




China: 

Amov 


Mav2a-2« 






Shanpliai 


June 4-10 


2 
17 

13 

42 


3 
2 

1 

16 

1 
3 
15 


Cusos, (oroicn; doaUtt, naUft. 


Tsin^atao 


May30-Junon... 
Mayl4-JanolO... 
Mav 13-20 


Egypt: 

A le xan<l ria 




India: 

Hornl>f\v 




(M uMa 


Mav 13 19 




K '^ii hi 


M;iv6-19 


9 

26 
8 

1 




Malrt^ 


Mav 13-20 .. . 




11 iivj.xui 


May 0-20 




riiilli.piM' islands: 

M u.il 


Jiuic 3-9 






Portn.ruis*- KasJ Africa: 

L uriMK^o Muniuor 

Ar^li'Ui^rcl 


Mar. 1-31 


1 
2 




May 1-14 


1 
1 




Si)ain: 

N'altMicia 


Juno 17-23 

Apr. 22-28 




B\\'i"U\\: 

Mai mo 













TTPHl'S FEVER. 



Epypt: 

Aloxindrta ' May 14-June 10... 

Jajf':! 

\iM :ki ^ Juae 11-17 

Tor! I. ' .. ^r I,. I-' ArTra: 

I,' ii.' I' u M iKini'z Mar. 1-31 

At.u.M'id May 1-14 



591 

1 



ISl 



Reports Received From June 30 to Jaly 20, 1917. 

CHOLERA. 



rhoo, ! Date. 


Ca<:c5. Deaths. 

1 


Remarks. 


In.liT 1 

i5. Miii Apr. 1-21 * 

( .: .fi \pr. 2(^May 5. . .. 




7 

153 

I 

10 






i 

24 
1 




li *'n \nr 'M Miv S 




1 >la..i \pr. 2-> 




\\i' ' I \ 






Apr. 13-19. 1917: 1 casa. 


]', ,l...i \i)r. I'i I'J.. . 


1 




1 r ■ , 




May 20-june 2, 1917: CaMS. >^'. 
deaths, 204. 


A' Mn .^' Jii:io2 

}■ ! 'do 


iV 21 

123 ' <m 


( ' ' do 


1 


15 

I 




1.. .1 ......!"!!!.. !.!!M')!!""!!]!'.* 









Digitized by 



Google 



1211 



July 27, 191f 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TTPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW PETER— 

Oontinaed. 

Reports Receif<ed ProM Jane M «• Joly 20, I^IT—Oontinued. 

PLAGUS. 



Piao». 



DAto. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



RobatIcs. 



Anfeia: 

Aden 

Ceylon: 

Colombo 

China: 

Amoy 

Hong kong .. ^^...^ 

Kwanj^ttmp Province— 

Ta-pu district 

F.f>-pt 

AoM 

Provincw — 

Fa>oam 

Oiripeh 

>flnJeh 

SiMlt 

Gtmi nn:ain: 

Ixmdon 



May 3-14 

Apr.^MayU. 

Apr.29-Msy5. 
May 13-26 

Jime2 



May 12-17.. 

May 11-17.. 

May 17 

Mav 12-15.. 
May 12 



liay3-8.. 



India 

IJa^-'pin 

bt^nhn* 

Calc-Ua 

H^..::.ii 

Ki^ri'hi 

M' r - I'residencv. 

M^ iliv '.. 

M.- i.'in 

Mi. an 

};.•>'; >m 

TfliDgOC 

Java: 

Ea-^t ^ava 

^anr»avn 

I^nnuarta 

Tmi 

Ai. juipa 

falU* 

Lan:l r o |ue... 
Libt^riiid 



Lima 

Siui: 

Bangkok 



Apr. 1-21 

Apr. 22-2<< 

Apr. 2&^May5 

Apr. 1-21 

Apr. 22- Mav .5 

Apr. 22-Mavl2... 

Apr. S-14 

Apr. 1-21 

Apr. 1-7 

A or. 1.' May o 

-\pr.,s U 



May ie-31. 



.«lo.. 
.do.. 



'I' 



.do.. 



Apr. 22-Miy 12.. 



"uh'\ 



22*) 
ISi 



13 

5t 



n 

20 

214 

12(i 

1 

41 

1 



Apr. 8-May 14. 1917: Cases, 09; 



^pr. 8-May 
deaths, 51. 



Present and In vicinity. 



Present. 

Jan. 1->!av 17, 1917: Cases, 231 
deaths, 116. 



2 In hospital «t p-vrt . Fnm <?. 8. 

Sanji'jia fr >ni ».»;><* ruian ind 
orio'it.'.] rut' t^. 
Apr. !.•- V iv * 1 H7: Caof,>, JO.-O-J; 
deaths, 21,409. 



Apr. 2-?2.ni7: nr-^'.T*!; f!oatIis, 



May 10-31,1 i)l 7 



,15. 



4'. 

1 . 

2 . 



At Mollondo. 

Af <\i!h^. 

At ( (u -'a ->. 

At .■ il ■ .-11 •, Sun re if), and 

Tt-1 ill .. 
At I ina. 



SMALLPO.\. 



Austr.i'h: 

.\ev.- >.vifh Wales 

Jtrt-warrina 

Qiumbooe 

Quwn-liPd - 

Tlu.r.i..yTsl;md Quar- 
antine Station. 



Brazil: 

Bahia 

Rio dc Janeiro -.JK 

Canada: 

Manitol)a~ 



Winnipeg - 

Nova S- . 



Hol.f.x ^.. 

_ . I'ori Hawkosbury.. 
Ceykm: 

Cotombo 



AiJT. 27 May 10. . 
do 



May 9. 



May r,^ 12.. 

May 13 2tJ. 



JunelO-lG., 
Juno 1^ ?:{.. 



1 
3:i 



1 



Apr. 27 May It). l'.»17: Catm, 6. 



4 




2 




1 1 


Frr m ^. :. «♦. AUkuis fr'un Kobe 


1 


\'\\ n>.i I'kMi . Vo i,l ino- 

c, < (1 '.■. V ns ill-', liijs- 

b- i)»\ and Js^dnt-y, in cpi.^KiU- 
tiue. 



Juni' 17 .JO ' I'rosent in district. 

MuyC-12 1 1 , I 



Digitized by 



Google 



Jnly 27, 1917 



1212 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER* 

Continued. 

Reports Received From June 30 to July 20, 1917— Continued. 

SMALLPOX— Continued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


China: 

Amoy 


Apr. 2^Mayl9.... 






Present and in vicinJty. 
Present 


Antunf , 


May 21-27 


K 




Chungking 


May 6-26 




Do. 


Changsha 


May27-June2 

May 13- Jane 2 

Apr.23-May6.... 

May 6-26 

Apr. 23-29 

May 27- June 2 


5 
11 
7 

7 

1 






Dairen 


1 




Harbin 


On Chinese Eastern Railway. 


Hongkong 


6 


Manchuria Station 


Do. 


Mukden 




Present. 


Shanghai 


May21-June3.... 
May 13-26 


8 
5 
1 
8 

20 


16 


Cases foreign; deaths among na- 
tives. 


Tion tsln 


Tsitshar Station 


Apr. 16-22 




On Chinese Eastern Railway. 


Tsingtao • 


May 22- June 9 

Apr. aO-May 27. . . 


1 
6 


At another station on rai]Vay> 


Alexandria 


lease. 
Mar. 18-Apr. 28. 1917: Casoi, 715 




in cities and 32 SUtes and 
districts. 


Berlin 


Mar.18-Apr.28... 
do 


106 
16 
18 
50 
20 

2 
10 

1 

26 






Bremen 




Charbttenburg 


do 






Hamburg 


do 






lyciprig 


do 






Liibeck 


do 






Munich 


do 






Stuttgart 


do 






India: 

Bombay 


Apr. 22-28 


9 
10 
2 

8 
15 




Calcutta 


Apr. 29-Mav5 . . 






Karachi 


Apr. 22-May 5.... 
Apr. 22-May 12.... 
Apr. 15-May 5.... 

May21-June3.... 

May27-Junel7... 
Mav 28-June 3 . . . . 
May 16-June 10... 
May 27-June 1 

Apr.2-29 


4 

30 
17 

20 

50 

1 

161 

11 

16 




Ma'Iras 




Rangoon 




Italy: ^^ 

Turin 




Japan: 

Kobe 




Nagasaki 




Osaka 


55 

1 

1 




Yokohama 




Java: 

East Java 




Mid-Java 


Apr. 1-21 




WestJava 






Apr. 13-May 10, 1917: Cases, 46; 


Batavia 


Apr. 13-May3.... 
June 3-16 


11 
95 


2 


deaths, 7. 


Mexico: 

Mexico City 




Monterey 


June 18-24 


24 




Philippine Islands: 

Maiiili 


Mav 13-19 


6 

4 

186 

2 

23 


Varioloid. 


Portugal: 

Lisbon 


Mav 13-26 






Russia: 

Petrograd 


Feb.l8-Mar. 10... 
Mar.ll-May5.... 
Mar. 15-21 






Riga 




Jan. 1-31, 1917: Cases, 7. 


Vladivostok 


7 

3 
5 




Spain: 

Malrid 


May 1-31 




Seville 


do 






Valencia 


June 3-16 


2 
5 

1 
2 




Straits Settlements: 

Pcnang •• 


Mar. 18-Mayl2.... 
, May 20-26 


2 




Sweden: 

Stockholm 




Tunisia: 

Tunis 


June 2-8 






Turkey in Asia: 

Trebirond 


Feb. 25- Apr. 13... 


15 




Union of South Africa: 


Mar. 12-24 


4 













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1213 



July 27, 1917 



CHOLERA. PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER. AND YELLOW FEVER- 

Continued. 

Reports Received From Jnne 30 to Jnly 20, 1917— Continued. 
TYPHUS FEVER. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Aostria-Hungary: 

Au5trii ............ 








Oct. 22-Dec. 17, 1917: Cases, 


Bohemia 


Oct. 22-Dec. 17.... 
do 


634 

809 
47 

617 
16 

243 
5 




2,371. 


(rulj'ia 






Lowfr Austria 


. .do 






Moravia 


do 






SUesia . . - . 


do 






St\ria 


do 






Upper Austria 


do 






Hunjarv 






Feb. 19-Mar. 25, 1917: Cases, 


Budapest 


Feb. 19-Mar. 25... 

May 30- June 9 

Apr. 30-May27.... 
May 13-19 


2 
830 




1,3S1. 


China: 

Tfingtao 






jfl^xundria 


232 
15 

2 




SaloQJkl 




HM-Java 


Apr. 1-30 


7 




We>t Java 




Apr. 13-May 10, 1917: Cases, 36. 


Batavia . .... 


.\pr. 13-May 10.... 
June 3-16 


22 

193 

16 
1 
5 




Mexiro: 

Mp\icoCity 






Bmsia: 

Vh ro^ad 


Feb. 18-Mar. 10... 
Jan. 1-31 


3 




Ki,'u.... 




_ Vladivostok '. 


Mar. 29-May 21.... 
May 1-31 






Spain: 

Madrid 


2 













YELLOW FEVER. 




In T)or>on ro^onily arrived from 
Mexico ( ity. 



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PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 



VOL 32 AUGUST 3, 1917 No. 31 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT LABORATORIES. 
THE NEED FOR THEIR CAREFUL SUPERVISION. 

Recently in a city in New England an unusual number of cases of 
diphtheria were recorded. 

Study of the cases showed that the diagnoses were based upon 
laboratory examinations. Further inquiry revealed that dining the 
period of the unusual prevalence the examination of diphtheria cul- 
tures in the laboratory had been carried on by two different men, 
the usual bacteriologist and a temporary substitute who did the work 
part of the time. The findings of these men differed widely. The 
substitute bacteriologist did the work from May 27 to June 2, and of 
46 specimens submitted for diagnosis he found 33 positive, 12 nega- 
tive, and one liquefied. 

¥rom June 4 to Jime 16, inclusive, the regular bacteriologist was 
on duty, and of 51 specimens examined he found 8 positive and 43 
negative. 

From June 18 to July 7 the substitute was again on duty, and of 
104 specimens examined he reported 77 positive and 27 negative. 

From July 8 to 10, inclusive, the regular bacteriologist was on duty, 
and of 18 specimens examined he found 2 positive and 16 negative. 

The apparent prevalence of a considerable outbreak of diphtheria 
was evidently due to the inexperience and lack of training of the 
substitute. In this connection one is reminded of the bacteriologist 
of the health department of a lai^e city who, instead of examining 
his diphtheria specimens, threw them into the waste basket and 
marked the reports negative, a practice that was without serious 
result until a diphtheria epidemic assumed unusual proportions and 
was discovered only by accident. 



MALARU IN KENTUCKY. 
PREVALENCE AND GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION. 

The periodical circuJarization of the physicians of Kentucky to 
determine the prevalence and geographic distribution of malarial 
infection in the State was begun July 1, 1914, and continued to the 
end of the calendar year 1916. At regular intervals reply postal 
cards were sent to the practicing physicians. These cards were at 
88 (1215) 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



August 3, 1017 



1216 




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Google 



1217 



August 3, 1917 • 



first sent out each month. Beginning v\dth April 1, 1915, they were 
sent out quarterly.* A reproduction of the card used during 1915 
and 1916 will be found on page 1128 of the Public Health Reports of 
the issue of July 20, 1917. 

Of the cards sent to physicians an average of less than 15 per cent 
were returned. Those returning the cards with the requested data 
filled in undoubtedly constituted the better class of practitioners — 
those who understood most clearly what was wanted and the value of 
the work. The number of cards sent out, the number of schedules 
returned, and the counties represented at each circularization are 
shown in Table 1. 

It is to be borne in mind that the number of cases reported by the 
physicians by no means shows the number of cases that occurred, for 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


Jun. 


Jul. 


Aug, 


Sep. 


Oct. 


Bov. 


Deo. 


























































































































,^ 


'\ 
























/ 


\ 








• 
• 














/ 




\ 








s 














/ 






\ 


















y 








\ 


















/ 








V 
















/ 










— N 


V 














y 












\ 








,,^0-^ 


"-"^^ 


--^ 
















^ 


















































» 





























Relativ« prevalence of malaria in Kentucky, by months, as In Ji-utad by tha uumbors of c.:i.>i r p jrted. 

an average of less than 15 per cent of the physicians returned the 
schedules. 

Tile return of the schedules by the physicians being a matter of 
voluntary cooperation, the data arc undoubtedly reliabl-? to an 
unusual degree as regards the experience of the physicians who 
cooperated and •the number of cases seen by them. However, the 
cases reported represent only those occurring in the practices of the 
physicians who cooperated. The total number of cases of malaria 
occurring in the practices of all the physicians of the State must have 
been many times greater, also the number of cases that occurred in 

* Hm work of aroularixation and of compilation of the data on the return cards was carried on by the late 
Smg. R. H. von Eidorf up to the time of his death in September, 1916. Since then It has been carried on 
l>yAs8t.Siirg. R.C.D«lYaux and Asst. Surg. den. H. R.Carter. 



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. August a, 1917 



1218 



which no physician was in attendance or consulted was probably 
much greater than the number coming under medical care* 

The physicians who cooperated were cUstributcd as to locality 
throughout all sections of the State, so that the data of the occur- 
rence of malaria fiimished by them show the geographic distribu- 
tion of the disease and reasonably accurately its relative prevalence 
in the various localities. 

The cases reported throughout the State by months are shown 
in Table 2. The relative numbers of cases reported by months are 
shown in the chart. 

The number of cases reported from the several coimties of the State 
are given by race and year in Table 3. 

The map on page 1216 shows the relative prevalence of the disease 
in the several counties of the State, the heavier shaded counties being 
those in which the infection is heaviest, the unshaded coimties those 
in which the infection is lightest, as indicated by the numbers of cases 
reported. The relative density of infection was determined by 
ascertaining the number of cases reported in each county from July 1, 
1914, to the end of the calendar 3^ear 1916 per 1,000 population. The 
population used was that of the 1910 census, it being impracticable 
to estimate populations for the period of the circularization^ 

The types of malarial infection reported to have been diagnosed 
niicro3coi)ically are shown in Table 4. It will be noted that tertian 
infection was reported to have been so diagnosed in 42 counties, 
([uartan in 13 counties, and estivo-autunmal in 15 counties. 

Table 1. — IU\<iults of circuhirization of practicing physiciaris. 



Period. 



1914. 
July to December 

1915. 
JantiHry to March.... 

April to June 

July 10 September. .. 
October to December. 

1916. 

January to March 

A])ril to June 

July to Soptemlior. . . 
October to Deceiul^r 



Inquiry 

cards sejit 

to physi- 

ciaris. 



20,990 



10. rm 

3, ")!)(> 

3, "-(>*• 
3,500 



3. r.oo 

.^..-00 
3. ''K) 
3,5(X> 



Replies 
received. 



PeroentARe 
of replies. 



3,3.34 



1,798 

.-.{0 ! 

(hJO I 



4b- I 
45<i 

37:> 

273 



15.88 



17.12 
13. 2(i 
l.->. 43 
18.00 



11.85 
13.02 
10.71 
7.80 



Counties 


Counties ! 


represented! notheanl I 


in replies. 


from. 1 


120 





110 


10 


110 


10 


U3 


7 


94 


26 


100 


20 


98 


22 


78 


42 



Cases of 
malaria 
reported. 



6,648 



800 

2,751 
1,560 



642 
1,331 
2,123 

£64 



Table 2. — Cases of malaria reported, by months. 



Year. 


J«L 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dms. 


1914 










1,552 

742 
632 


1,071 
907 

756 


955 

1,102 

735 


07 
744 

220 


1,909 

5ai 

187 


834 


191.') 


263 
162 


33t 
183 


263 
297 


219 
314 


272 
396 


403 
621 


au 


1916 . . . 


157 







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1219 August 3, 1917 

Tablb 3. — Oases reportedf hy counties, by years ^ and by color. 





July 1 to Dec. 31, 1914. 


Calendar year 1915. 


Calendar year 1916. 


County. 


White. 


Col- 
ored. 


Com- 
bined. 


White. 


Co.. 
ored. 


Com- 
bined. 


White. 


Col- 
ored. 


Com- 
bined. 


Adttir 


33 
23 

2 
79 
64 
18 

3 


1 
1 

i7' 



1 


34 
24 

3 
96 
73 
19 

2 


41 
60 

8 
253 
56 
22 

1 


85* 

7 
5 


41 

60 

8 

338 

63 

27 

1 








^%n 


12 


1 


13 






mnmA. 


242 
43 
24 


41 
9 
14 


283 


Btnrtn 


62 


B«tb 


38 


BeU . 




B«nt 










9 

3 

11 

8 

22 

141 

65 

101 

165 

139 

6 

110 

27 

11 

3 

923 

6" 

5 


6 

s" 

11 
7 
11 
41 
13 

io* 

"*525* 
2 


15 

3 

11 

8 

27 

152 

72 

112 

206 

152 

5 

126 

27 

11 

3 

1,448 

8 

5 


3 
3 
16 




4 


3 
3 
20 


1 
2 

4 




1 


BOTd. 


2 


B<^1* 


4 






Breathitt 


4 

80 

153 

24 

54 

131 

10 

186 

6 

6 

33 

93 

6 

18 


io' 

5 

26' 

12 

■" M* 

1 

69' 


4 

108 

158 

24 

80 

143 

10 

224 

7 

6 

33 

162 

6 

18 


1 

34 
2 


is* 

1 


1 


Breckinridge 


49 


BdUtt. 


3 


Batter .• 




CUdveU 


94 

132 

3 

112 

8 

8 

9 

28 

1 

4 


26 
6* 

48* 


120 


C*lIo«»y 


132 


Cunpbdl 


3 


Carlisle 


117 


(VUTOU 


8 


Cftrtf r 


8 


Ctsfj 


9 


rhrlstUm 


76 


Clark 


1 


Clay 


4 


runton 




r-ritientirn 


'8 
36 
162 


1 
1 
18 


9 
36 
180 


15 
44 

418 

7 

2 

7 

11 

38 

8 

32 

177 


is' 

107 
3 

i' 

3' 

58' 


15 

62 

525 

10 

2 

8 

11 

41 

8 

32 

235 


24 
40 
418 


4 

10 
141 


28 


ruin> <*rl:ind 


50 


DaiK^s 


559 


Edinon*(in. 




Elliott 














F<l,|| 


7 
6 
17 
4 

14 

213 

10 

16 

12 

165 

4 

3 

15 

35 

66 

7 

15 

41 

101 

27 

85 

59 

18 

403 

13 


1 
2 

4i* 

3* 

3 
39 

i* 

5 

4* 

36 
8 
17 
12 

84 


8 
6 
19 
4 
14 
254 
10 
19 
15 
204 
4 
3 
15 
36 
71 
7 

Jt 

137 
35 

102 
71 
18 

487 

13 




13 

6 

32 

1 

35 
226 


5 

3* 

1 

79' 

1 


18 


Fayette 


6 


Flemimr 

Floyd 


35 

a 


Franklin 


35 


Falton 


306 


Onjhilln 


1 


(•amrd 


26 


2 


28 






<^rant 








Onxts. .\\ ., ............... . 


214 

20 

1 

14 


28 
2 


242 

22 

1 

14 


270 
21 


14 


284 


Ony«m 


21 


^•rptnap 

Huicock 


1 




1 


Uardin 


108 
10 
4 
83 
96 
16 
82 
100 
22 
549 
45 
9 
12 
62 
8 
63 
8 
3 
4 
4 
3 
17 
25 

158 
10 
125 
8 
39 
9 
12 
8 


6 
3 
3 
23 
15 
8 
7 
73 

40' 

7 

i 

17 



3* 

1 

3' 

4 

28' 

10 
3 

23' 

i' 


114 
13 

100 

111 

24 

89 

173 

22 

589 

52 

9 

13 

79 

8 

63 

8 

3 

7 

5 

29 

(i 
18,i 
20 
128 

8 

r.2 


12 
y 


66 
2 
4 


1 

i' 


67 


Btrlan 


2 


Hwrtsoo... .. .............. 


5 


Hart 




Henderjon.. . ! i i .!!!!!.! 1 ! i ! 


96 
1 

17 

45 

30 

213 

32 

1 

3 

7 

8 

4 

4 

1 

4 


18 

6* 

22 

34' 

3 

i" 

1 

i' 


114 


Hoir\' 


1 


Hfckman ... . 


23 


Hopkins , 


67 


iftdSoo..:;: : 


30 




247 


levtmiiM 


35 


iSn^.. :.::::;:::...: 


1 


Keotoo. ,[ 


7 
3 


12 
7 
2 

57 


i9' 


7 
3 
9 

7 
2 
76 


4 


Xnon 


8 


Knox.... :: 


8 


Uroe. . . . .. 


4 


u*eL.. ::::::::::. :::::::.: 


4 


Uwr«ic« 


2 


Let. . 


4 


usue..; : 




Letcher :.'. 

Lewis , 


4 

1 
32 

2 
124 
51 
181 

6 

?i 

4 
24 


i2' 

ii' 

21 


4 

1 
44 

2 
158 
72 
209 
5 
99 
14 
4 
30 


40 

8 

23 

3 

130 

46 

211 

1 

11 
(i 
2 
1 


20 

i* 

1 

35 
33 
12 

2 


60 
8 


Ltacoto..:: ::*::::::::: :::: 


24 


LWacston 

LfllMl 


4 
165 


Ltoo 


79 


lfcCr»ck«n...l 


223 


ItcCntrT.. 


1 


}fc^...::::::::::;::::::. 


13 




6 


ManAii 


a 


KflT::::::;;::::::::::::: 


G 


1 



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Jtnctt»t 3v 1917 1220 

Table ^. — Coses rrported, hy counHes^ ky jwant, wmd by foior — CcatiTiiu<l. 



County. 



Marliii.... 



July 1 to Dec. Jl, ttl4. 



White. , 



238 



fnl- 
ored. 



37 



Cnra- 

binrd. 



Calendar 7esrl4>15. Calendar year 1910. 



White- 1 ^rot 



Com- \vhite , ^^t 
bined. ^^'^'f«] ored. 



ai8 I 



Mason 


4 

24 

2S 

40 

%\ 

4 

4 

183 

4 

2 

54 

2 

a 


1 
6 
2 
2 
4 
4 
2 

4 

4 

7* 

2* 

i' 

1 

s" 

1 

2' 

5 
3 


5 


Moidp 

Monifce 


20 


Mer.or 


30 


M'*tPftlfr 


44 


Monroe 


27 


NfoiitfjQflwry 


C 


^^v■^an 

NfiililontxM-f 

N*-l>ort 


4 

8 


Nicholas 


2 


Oliio 


61 


Oldham 


2 


Ou'on 


2 


0\\ nIcV 


2 
2 


P<Mi.lI(ion.. 


•> 
11 

12 


18 
5 
2 
3 

40 

<> 

. IS 

17 


I'PITV 


12 


Flip*. ;.. 


13 


INnv-M....: 


6 


Pulaski 


28 
G 


Ru '<»u' tie 

Ho .'.an 

Kn^^dl 

SrH 

Slu'lhy 

vMiui'son 

S*^ <Mii pr 


8 

3 
40 

8 
18 

ao 


Tnvlor 


14 

21 
17 

5.-» 
lOi 

(i7 
G 
6 

*4 
2 

13 

12 


10 

14 

3 

60' 

9 

2' 

17 


24 


Toihi 

Tii-'i: 

'rriinl)le* 


35 
20 
55 


Viiioii . 


163 


Wiirreri. 


70 


Wii^hin^ton 


6 


Wuvne 


8 


Wchvtor 


VA 


Whiiloy 

Wt.lfe 

Woodford 


2 
13 
12 



4 
32 



10 
U 

9 
47 

2 

7 

6 
15 

203 I 



1 



Total 5,361 [ 1,2S7 6,648 5,110 



7 ! 



aaa 



4 

29 , 



2.5 


1 


as 


40; 


8 


48 


-^1 


10 


86 , 


4 , 


1 


5 


a .. 




2 


sc 


B 


1 


1.. 




6; 


136 , 


t4 


140 


3 1 


2 


•■i 


1 L. 




11 


1 |.. 




1 i 


3 1 


1 


4 


u 


18 


31 


12 .. 




12 


5|.. 




& 



8 

34 . 
10 .- 

8 >. 
53 



3 - 
3D. 

3I 



l! 



Cora- 
bined. 



3S7 



10 

13 



3 

91 
3 



6 

90 ^ 
U 



C i 

28 I 



6 

31 

i3r 
11 



:::::r 



10 

9 
fti 
2 

7 
7 

15 

1 

75 

252 



34 
10 



39 
7 
II 



18 



12 
2 



5 < 


7 


134 


42 


* -- 




1 '.. 




21 


19 


29 


2 


11 


2 


1 .. 





6,065 ■ 3,809 , 



791 



n 



12 
22 

18 



13 

176 

5 

1 

31 

It 
1 



*.«» 



Digitized by 



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1221 Augugt 3. 1917 

Table 4. -Type* o/infecHon reported diagnosed microscopically, by counties. 

fThe tigans Indicate the numbers of cases reported diagnosed microsoopically . The sixn + indicates that 
CUBS were reported, bat tlio diagnosis was not confirmed by the microscope. Tms information was 
coQected lor tliree numths ooly.l 





July-Septembef 


, 1914. 


County. 

1 


July-September 


, 1914. 


Goiiaty. 


Tertian. 


Quartan. 


Estlvo- 
autum- 
nal. 


Tertian. 


Qtiartan. 


EstiTO- 

autum- 

nal. 


AdMr 


+ 
+ 
+ 
3 

+ 
+ 

+ 

+ 

t 

5 

+ 
24 
10 

+ 

7 

+ 
1 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
6 
+ 
2 
4 
1 
4- 
+ 
+ 

+ 
4 
+ 
1 
5 
+ 
6 
+ 
+ 
8 
4 
1 
1 
1 

48 
+ 

1 


+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 
1 


+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 


I Knox.. . . 


+ 
1 
2 
+ 
2 
+ 
6 
4 
1 

20 
+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 
3 

+ 
+ 
2 
+ 
+ 
2 
+ 
15 
+ 
+ 
+ 






Allen 


Larue 







Ballard 


, Laurel 






Banwi 


' l>awrence 


+ 




Bath 


Lee 


-1- 


BelL 


Lewis 


4- 


4- 
4- 
3 






+ 


Lincoln!. 


Bo>Ti 




IxH^an. . . . 


4- 
1 
1 


Boyle 






Lvon 


4- 
1 


Brackt^n 






McCriicken 


BrwtJuti 


+ 


+ 
+ 
+ 
4- 
+ 
13 


Mc'Yeary . . .. 




BrecLinridge 


1 McL^u 


: 


+ 


Ballitt 


' Madison 




Butler 


+ 

+ 
3 

1 
+ 
5 

+ 

+ 


' MazoTm. 




Caldwefl 


1 Marion 


4- 
4- 




Calloway 


Marshall . . . 


+ 


Campbell 


Mason 




Carlble 


3 
6 


Meade. •.. 


+ 
+ 
4- 
4- 


+ 


Carroll 


Menifee . 


^. 


Carter 


Mercer... •••;••• 


+ 


Chru^ian, 


Metcalfe.. 


1 


Clark 


Monroe 


4- 


CUy 


1 


Montgomery 

Morgan 






Chnton 








Cntt^nden 




+ 
+ 


Muhlenberg 

Ohio 


5 

+ 


12 


Ciimf^land 


+ 


+ 


Davle^ 


Oldhftin.... 




EstiU 


Owen. . 






Fayette 






Owsley 




+ 


Fleming 


2 


1 


Pendleton 


"2 

4- 
6 
+ 
1 

+ 
+ 
2 
+ 
+ 
1 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
20 
3 
+ 
+ 


4- 
4- 


4. 


Floyd 


Perry 


+ 


Franklin 






Pike . . . 




Fulton 






Powell 






fi*n*tin , . 




..._...., 


Pulaski... 










Robertson 


+ 




Grant 


+ 
14 
2 


+ 
6 


Kowan.. . 




Gmves 


Russell 






Ciraysim 


Scott 






Green 


1 


Shelby 






Greenup 




Simpson 






Haocock 


+ 


Tavlor 






Hardin. 


+ 


Todd 


+ 
+ 
4- 
4- 
4- 


+ 


Harrison 




Tri^j; 




Hart 


+ 


4- 

+ 

+ 


Trimble 


4- 


Henderson 


I'nion . 


4- 


Henry 


Warren 


2 


Hickman 




Washington 

Wavne 




Hopkins 


+ 
+ 
13 

1 






JacKson 


2 
26 

+ 
+ 


Webster . . 


4- 


4- 


Jefferton 


Wnitley 


4- 


Jftoaniine 


Wolfe.. 


2 


+ 




Kenton 


Total 




Knott 




246 


50 


87 













DIRECTORY OF CITY HEALTH OFFICERS. 

CONTAINING THE NAMES AND OFFICIAL TITLES OF THE HEALTH OFFICERS OF CITIES 
HAVING A POPULATION OF 10.000 AND OVEB IN 1910. 

During 1916 a directory of city health officers was compiled and 
published in the Public Health Reports of June 30, 1916, and as 
reprint No. 346. 

The foUowing is the directory for 1917, and was obtained by send- 
ing blank forms requesting information to the health officers of 



Digitized by 



Google 



AngUHt J, i9rr 



1222 



cities m the Uiiited States having a population of 10,000 an<f orer in 
19'1'0. The cities listed below are Ae ones from wfaieb the- iafoom- 
tion was returned, and the data are as given by ti» respeda£V9 henlth 
departments. 

Full-time officers are indicated by an asterisk (*). For the pur- 
pone of this directory, a full-time officer is defined as c«ie who does 
not engage in the private practice of medicine or in any occupation 
other than his official duties. 



City. 


Name of health officer. 


Oficial title. 


Alabama: 

fUrminghara 


♦F. E. Harrington, M. D.».... 
Chas. A. Mohr, M. D 


Health officer. 


Mobil©' 


CHy health offictr. 
Health officer. 


Arizona; 

Phoenix 


H. K. Beancliamp, M. D 

Meade Clyne,M D 


Tucson 


City health offlow. 
Do. 


Arkausiis: 

Argeiita - 


Ardan Thomas McKinney, 

Cons. P. WUson, jr,, M. D 

Johns. Wood, M- D 


Fort Smith 


City health ofTicer and bafltfidologirt. 
City health officer. 
Health commi.Si^nen 


Hot Spring's 


lattle Rock 


Mjlton Vaughan, M. D 

A. Hieronvmus, M". D 


California: 

Aiain wla 


Healfch officer. 


Bakersfield 


P. J. Cuneo, iL D 


City health officMr. 


Berkeley . . •. 

Fresno 

LonR Hfia^h 

Los A up'los 


J. J. Benton, M. E) 

A. H. Sweoncy, M. D 

♦liaji.h L. Taylor, M, D 

*L. 5r. Powers, M. l> 


Health officer. 
City health officer. 
Healtli officer. 
Health commissioner. 


Oakiaml 

Pasadena ^ 

Pomona 


Kirby B. Smith, M. D 

Stanley P. Blak,>l. D 

Nowton J. lUce M D 


Health officer. 
Do. 
Do. 


Redhm<ls 

Riversifle 

Sa<raniento 

San Hernaniiuo_ 


*F. n. Folkins, M. D 

Chas. W. <;inllcstonfl, M. D... 

♦0. C. Simmons, M. D 

Fr.iJik M. Cardner, M. D 

Alfred E. Banks, M. D 

*Wm. C. Hastier, >LD 

D. A. BeaiLie, M. D 


City health physlciaii. 
City health officer. 
Acting liealth officer. 
Health officer. 


San I)!e\'n 

San Kran-lt^o ' 


Do. 
Da 


San Jovp 


Do. 


Santa Barbara 


C. S. Slovens, M. D 

H. E. Piper, M. D 


Do. 


Santa Cniz 


Do. 


Stockton 


Linwood Dozier, M. D 

OmerR. (Ullctt. M. D.... 

*Wm. H. Sharpley, M. D.» ... 
a. W. Kobinsmi, M. D 

♦Walter H. Brown, M. D 

Ar\rinW. Klein, M. D 

*Ghaa. P. Botsford, M. D. . . , . 

Louis F. Wheatley, M. D 

♦T. E. Reeks, M. D. .. . 


Do. 


Colorado: 

Colorado Springs 


Do. 


Denver 


Manager health and Hiarlty. 
City physician. 

Health officer 


Trinidad 

Connecticut: 

B r id j^'oport 


G rcenwich 


Do 


Hartford 


Supwlntaiident Of healdL 
City health officer. 
Superintendent of health. 
Health officer: 


Meriden 


New Britain 


Iforwalk 


Wm. J. Tratey, M. 



* Fnll-thne officer. 

1 Also health officer for Jefferson County and aU cities and towns in the county. 

> Also health officer for Denver County. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1223 



AQfcuat S, ^^17 



aty. 



Name of health oflOco'. 



Official title. 



Oonnecticnt— Continued. 

Orangv 

Stamford 

WalliQ^rord 

Water bury 

WUUmantie, 

Piitrict of Colambia: 

Washington 

Florida: 

JaelwmTillc 

KeyWest 

Tampa 



AtlanU.. 
Augusta.. 



Bmnswick.. 



Macon 

SsTannah 

DlinoU: 

Alton 

Aoi«ra. 

BeDewUe 

CWro 

Champaign...... 

Chicago 

ChioAKo Hf ights. 

DaaviBe 

Decatur 

East St. Louis.. 

Elgin 

Efanston 

Galesburg 

QrHiit«nty.... 

Jacksonville 

U&iU« 



Oak Park. 



Ogletbf.. 
Peoria... 



Bock Island... 
Springfield..., 
Indiana: 

Andersoo . , • « , 

Elkhart 

El wood 

Part Wayne,. 
Hammond... 
Hmtingtoo.. 
IndiaaapoUs. 



C. A. Beran, M. D 

£. Everett Rowell, M. D.... 

Wm. J. Riordan, M. D 

Tbomas J. Kilmartin, M. D. 
Qias. A. Jenkins, M. I> 



•Wm. C. Woodward, M. D.. 



♦C. H. Dobbs, M. D 

J. N. Fogarty, M. D 

Sheldon Stringer, M. D.. 



♦J. P. Kennedy, M. D 

Eugene E. Murpbey, M. D 

•Thomas F. Abercrombto, 
M. D.» 

O. H. Weaver, M. D 

♦Wm. F. Brunner, M. D 



A. P. Robertson, M. D. 

O. B. Schwachtgen, M> D 

B. H. Portnondo, M. D 

W.C. Clarke, M.D 

W. B. Schowengerdt, M . D. . . 
John DiU Robertson, M. D.».. 

IraC.Harman, M. D... 

Seiward L. Landaner, IC D. . . 

Wm. J. Harding 

R.X.McCracken,M. D. 

A.J.Volstorfl 

darenoe T. Roome, H. D 

FredG.HaU,M.D 

L. D. Darner, M. D 

A.M. King, M.D 

•O. P. Roediger, M. D.« 

F.E.Ben, M.D 

♦Carl E. Buck 



•O. 7. Ruediger, M. D.t.. . . 

E. A. Oarrett, M. D 

♦O. F. Roediger, M. D.t.. . . 

C. G. Poster, M. D 

Otto H. Deichmann, M. D. 



Town health officer. 
City health officer. 

Health officer. 
Aeting health officer. 

Health officer. 

City health officer 
Do. 
Do. 

Health officer. 

President board of health (ex-offleia 

healOi officer). 
Commissioner of health. 

Chairman board oX health. 
Health officer. 

Health commiaslonac. 

Do. 
President board of health. 
'City physician and health oOoer. 
Health officer. 
Commiasioner of health. 

Do. 
Health oonunisaionei. 
Health officer. 
Health oommissionec. 
Health officer. 
Commissioner of health. 
Health commissioner. 
Cttyi^ysician> 
City health physician. 
Health commisHJoner. 
Health officer. 
Commissioner of health and h)M] rcf 

istiar. 
Health commissioner. 
Commissioner of health. 
Health commissioner. 

Do. 
Superintendent public health. 



l.aLong,M.D 

L. A. Elhott, M. D 

J. P. (MnB, M. D 

J. H. QUpio, M. D 

Wm.D.Weis,M.D 

B. H. Grayston, M. D 

♦Herman G. Morgan, M. D. 
♦ Full-time officer. 

> Also health officer for Olyim County. 

> Health officer for La Salle, Oglesby, and Pern. 



Secretary city health board. 
Secretary board of health. 

Do. 
Secretary. 



Secretary city board of hoaltbi 

City sanitarian. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Aocust 3, 1917 



1224 



City. 


Name o( health officer. 


Official Utle. 


Indiana— Continued . 

JefTcrsJnvlUc 


O. P. Graham, M. D 

Edgar Cox, M. D 


City health officer. 


Kokomo 


Do. 


La Fayette.... 


D. C. McCleUand, M. D 

Harry J. Thompson, M. D 

Rodney E. Troutman, M. D.. 

Merrill S. Davis, M. D 

C. A. Dresch, M. D 


Secretary board of health. 
(Mty health officer. 


Laporto 


Logans{>ort.... 


Secretary board of health. 
City health officer. 


Marion 


Mishawaka 


Health officer. 


Muncie 


Clarence G. Rea, M. D 

Chester C. Funk, M.D 

S. G. Smolser , M. D 


Secretary board of health. 


NewAlbany 


Do. 


Rlchniopd 


Da 


South Bend 


Charles S. Bosonbury , M. D 

T.W.Moorhead,M.D 


Da, 


Terre Haute 




Iowa: 

Burlington 


O.W. Boatman, M.D 

H.R.Sugg.M.D 

Chas. H. Bower, M. D 

♦Thomas P. Kennedy 


charity. 
City health officer. 


Clinton 


Health officer. 


Council BliifTs 


Do. 


Davenport 


Do. • 


I>ubuque 


Chas. M. Linehan. M. D 

C.H.Fegers,M.D 

Aaron C. Conaway , M. D 

*A. L. Wheeler, M. D 


Do. 


Keokuk 


Physician to board of health. 


Marshallto>%'n 


Health officer. 


Mason City 


Superintendnent department of health 


Muscatine 


Arthur S. Weaver, M. D 

B. Caurshon, M. D 


City health physician. 


Sioux City 


Health officer. 


Waterloo 


J. E. Ridenour, M. D 


Do. 


Kansas: 

Hutchinson 


W.F.Schoor,M.D... . 


City physician and secretary board of 

health. 
City physician. 


Indepen<lenoe , 


W. B. Kelly, M. D 


Kansas City 


C. W. McLaughlin, M. D 

Chas.J.McOec.M.D 


Commissioner board of health. 


Leavenwortli 


City physician. 

President board of health and city phy- 


Parsons 


George W. Gabriel, M. D 

Chas. A. Dudley, M. D 

♦Herbert L.Clark, M.D 

Joseph M. O'Maley, M. D 

R.M.Cohlin.M.D 

W.A. Poole, M.D 

♦John D. Ma^uire, M. D 

♦W.Ed. Grant. M.D 

John To.l<i,M. D 

A. McKcnney, M.D 


Pittsburg 


sician. 
Health commissioner. 


Topeka 


City physician and health officer. 
Health officer. 


Kentucky: 

Covington 


Frankfort 


City health officer. 
Health officer. 
Da 


Henderson 

Lexington 


Louisville 


City health officer. 
Da 


Newport 


Owensboro 


Do. 


Pa*lueal\ 


H.P.Linn, M.D... 


Health officer. 


Louisiana: 

Alexandria 

Monroo 


LA. White, M.D 

F. C. Bennett, M. D 

W. 11. Robin. M. D 


President city board of health. 
President board of health. 


New Orleans 


Superintendent of public healUi. 
President board of health and health of* 


Shreveport 


G. C. Chandler. M D 


Maine: 

Augusta 


George .\. Coombs, M. D 

F. C. Tliuyer, M. D 


fleer. 
Health officer 


Water\ille 


Da 



' Full-time officer. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1225 



iiuguRt 9f ittn 



Ctfcy. 



Nanw of h«aMb oflkm*. 



Official tltto-. 



llarylaod: 

Baltimore 

Camberland. 

Frederick.... 
MassBthtj setts: 

Attlebcat) 

B««rlr 

Boston 

Brockton...., 

Brookllne 

Chelsea 

Chicopee 

Clinton. 

Everett 

Fall River.., 

Fitchburg... 

Gardner 

Greenfield... 

Lawxenco... 

Leominster.. 

LoweU 

Lynn 



Medibrd 

Uclrose 

Xcw Bedford.. 
J^ewbaiyport. 

Newton 

North Adams. 
Northampton . 

Peabody 

PittsfieW 

Quincy 

Salem 

SoMwffle.... 
Springfield.... 



Waltham... 
Watcrtown., 

Webster 

Westfleld... 
WInthrop... 



Itictdgan: 

Adrian 

Alpena 

Ann Arbor 

Battle Creek... 

Bayaty 

Dirtraft. 

Flint 

Grand Rai^ds.. 

Jadoon 

Kalamazoo..... 
Ishpeming 



J«hBF>. Bkri»,»I> 


Comm issioner of health 


<«axJ.Colfcan 


Health oiflcer. 


Ir»J.McCttrdy,M.D 


1 City health officer. 


IUtpbP.KMi«,]f.I> 


Hetfthofieer. 


AlonxoO.Weadbtffy 


Clerk and agent. 

Health commisBiOTWi. 

ExecuUve officer of the board ofBealtb 

Ag^t and health offiaae. 

Health officer. 


*Piwwis X.liahoaer.M. D.... 

♦George M. Gifford 

Froncia P. Denmy, M . D 

*^m. J. RaodaU 


♦Chas. J. (ySfiaii 


Agent board of health. 


*edward De Cour«7 ,. 


Do. 


*J)olm W. SMver 


Agent heakh department. 
Agent board of health. 


•SwnuelB.Morrias 


♦Fred R. Brigham 


Do. 


Win. P. (VlXmneU 


Heirithofleer. 


George P. Moore 


Board of health agent. 


♦Hfm. T. Sellen 


Clerk of pubUe health. 

A nmt (md nhiiBhinfr inantetor. ' 


♦BHchael J. Bntler 


•Frederick A. Bates 


Agent. 


♦John W. Tapper 


ChairouuL. 


Chas.E. Prior,Br. D 


Chairman beard of health. 


PaolJ. D. Haley, M. D 

Clarence P. ITolden, M. D 

♦Wm. G. Kirschhanm,. ........ 

♦Wm. Thurston^ 


Medical InstMw tor. 
Chairman board of health. 
Agwit and executive offloer. 
Health offioar. 


♦Francis George Curtis 

•D.W.Hyde 


Chairman. 

Agent board of health. 


George R. Turner 


De. 


jMfVW 7 ^P^ 


Agent. 


Maurice 8. Eisner, M. D 

•Edminl J. LenoDOv 


Medical agent board of health. 


♦John J. McG rath 


Agent board of health. 


Flrank L. Morae, M. B. 


Ifo^eal inspector. 


♦Wm. T. Ya^»0 


Agent board of health. 


TbonBU J. KoUnsOB, M. D.... 

•A. L. 8tw», M. D. 

B^erett B^ JohoflOB 


Chairman beard of hMOth. 
AgottboMMlofhealttu 
Da. 


OttoK. Ooiolw 


Agent. 


Walter HL JenklM 


Agent board of bealtlk 


♦Smith A- Mowry 


Agent. 


Ja««BC.Cofley 


E M>cuti veoffieer. 


J. P. BiRikd, M. D 


Health offioat* 


James KiridM, M. I>. 


Dot 


WtaA.Wei8liigeF,M.I>v 

Fngene Milter, M. I> 


Doi 

D«i 


JakBA.Kah»>M.D 

•AnNvW.IiMhea^M.IX 

•Wfcv DeKIcinc, M. D 

•C. C. SlemoBay M. D 


D«. 
Da 
Do. 
Deu 


♦r. G.Pftn»ll>1#. T> 


Dev 


R. GenungLeiand, M. D 

OeargeG. Bar»ett,M.D 

•Chat. F.Lysofa 


Do. 

D« 

Do. 


♦Full-time officer. 


Digitized by CaOOQ I 



August 8, 1917 



1226 



City. 



Name of health officer. 



Official Utie. 



M ichlgan— Continued . 

Manistee 

Marquette 

Muskegon 

Pontiac 

Saginaw 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Traverse City , 

Minnesota: 

Mankato 

Minneapolis 

St. Cloud 

SUllwater 

Vii^inia 

Winona 

Mississippi: 

Hattiesburg 

Jackson 

Meridian 

Natchez 

Missouri: 

St. Joseph , 

Springfield 

Webb City 

Montana: 

Billms3 

Helena 

Nebraska: 

Grand Island 

Lincoln 

Omaha 

Nevada: 

Reno 

New Hampshire: 

Berlin 

Concord 

Dover 

Kecoe 

Manchester 

Nashua 

Portsmouth 

New Jersey: 

Asbury Park ^ 

Atlantic City 

Bayoone 

Bloomfi^ld 

Bridge ton 

Camden 

East Orange 

Elitabeth 

Hackenvick 

Harrison 

ilolKiken 

♦ Full-time ofllcrr. 



KUsworth S. ElUs, M. D 

♦Arthur K. Bennett, M. D... 

Arthur B. Egan, M. D , 

Chas. A. Ncafl% M. D 

Wm. J. O'Ueilly, M. D 

J. J. Orimn, M. D 

♦Qeorga A. HoUiday 



A. V. Denman, M. D 

H. M. Guilford, M. D 

P. E. Stangl, M. D 

J. H. Hain?s, 1^. D 

John H. Crowe, M. D 

Donald B. Pritchard, M, D. . . 



Bobert Donald, M D. » 

Nolan Stewart, M. D 

T.J. Houston, M. D 

Richard D. Sessions, M. D.... 

♦Hasbrouck Delamater, M. D. 

♦Edwin F. James, M. D 

O. 8. Wilfley, M. D 



Louis W. Allar.l, M. D 

Wm. C. Ridddl.M. D 



Leo Phelan, M. D 

♦Chauncpy F. Chapman, M. D. 
R. W. ConneU, M. D 



W. L. Samuels, M.D. 



♦Lawrence P. Geer 

Chas. E. Palmer 

♦Hubert K. Reynolds 

John J. Brosnahan, M. D.. 

♦Robert N. Hoyt 

♦Frank B. Shea 

♦Daniel J. Scott 



Health officer. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
City health offiotf. 
Health officer and milk inspeetor. 
Health officer. 

Health oommissioocr. 

Do. 
City physician. 
Health commissiooer. 
Health officer. 

Do. 

City health officer. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Health offloer. 

Commissioner of health and aaaJtatiOL 

City physician. 

Health officer. 

Sccr.'tary city board of health. 

City physician and health officer. 
Huprrinten 1 ^nt of health. 
Health commissioner. 

Secretary city board of health. 

Health office and milk inspector. 
Sanitary officrr. 

Executive officer, board of health. 
Member board of health. 
Health officer. 
Do. 



♦B. H. Obert.. 



Health officer and registrar oC vital sta* 

tistics. 
Health officer. 
Do. 
bo. 
Sanitary Inspector. 
Health officer. 

Health officer and registrar of viul st*- 
tisUcs. 

♦Louis J. Richards Health officer. 

George W. Finke, M. D 

•John T. McCliue, M. D Do. 

Joaeph F. X. Stack, M. D Health commissiooer. 

I Also health officer for Forrest County, 



•Talbot Reed, M. D 

John T. Connelly, U. D. 
Joseph C. Salle, M.D... 

♦Chas. E. Bellows 

John F. Leavitt.M. D.. 
♦John Hall 



Digitized by 



Google 



1227 



Aogast 8, 1817 



/ 



aty. 


Name o( health ofikxr. 


OflOdalUtle. 


^Wew Jwsey— Continued. 

Jtnt'jCiij 


♦FrtnkH. EdsaU, D. P. H.... 
*H. V. Amerman 


Saperintcndemt of health. 
Health inspector. 
Health effioer. 


Kcwny 


Long BrftDch 


♦JR. C. Errlckson. 


;inivi»^ 


Fmnk BiillnRV 


He^th inspector. 


Montolair 


♦OiesterH. Welk 


HtMtlth oUcer. 


Mcrristown 


♦John J. Belbey 


Sanitary inspector. 
Health officer. 


New Brunswick 


E. L Croak, M. D 

♦Chas.V.Craster,\£J).,D.P.BL 
♦T. P. Ballinger 


NewiTk 


Da 


Ortnge 


Do. 


Pissaic 


John N. Ryan, M. D 


Da 


PatcTwn 


OnriUe Reed Hagen, K. D. . . . 
»Wm.J. WiUsey 


Do. 


Perth Amboy 


Da 


Phfllipsburg • 


Alma L. Wilist^, M. D 

•N. J. Randolph Chandler. . . . 
Alton 8. Fell, M. D 


Health inspector. 


PlainCcld 

Titnton 


Health officer. 
Do. 


Wff hawken 


♦Rudolph Kunze 


Cliief inspector. 


West HobokoD 


•Frank A. Frederick 


Health officer. 


West Orange 


♦James A. Tobey, 8. B 

Arthur Sautter, M. D 


Do. 


New York: 

>Vlbauy 


Da 


Amsterdam 


H. M. Hidks, M. D. 


Da 


Aubom 


Thomas C. Swaycr, M. D 

Victor M. Rico, IL D 


Da 


Batftvia 


Do. 


Btagharaton 

Buffalo 


C.J. Longstreet, M. D..: 

♦Francis E. Fronczak, M. D... 

Clarence H. White, Af.D 

Frank 6. Swain, M. D 

AlbCTtC.Knapp,M.D....... 

George E. Ellis, M.D 


Da 
Health romtnissioner. 


Coboes 


Health officer. 


Coming 


Health officer and registrar. 


Cortland 


Health officer. 


Dunkirk 


Da 


Elmirt 


Reere B. Howland, M. D 

Albert L. Hall, M. D 

Floyd Palmer, M. D 


Da 


Ftaton 


City physk!ian and health officer. 


Glens Falls 


Health officer. 


OloversvlHe 


Alex. L. Johnson, M. D 

H. H. Crum, M. D 


Da 


Ithaca ^ 


Da 


Jamestown 


♦John J. Mahoney, M. D . ». . . . 
Frank M. Neuendorf, M. D.... 

FrankA. J6hniton,M.D 

Augustus B. Santry, M. D . . . . 
F. A. Watters, IC D 


Superintendent of public health. 


Johnstown 


City physician and health officer. 


Kinoton 


Heaith officer. 


Uttle Falls 


Da 


Loekport 


City i^ysfcian and health olBoer. 


MJddletown 


J. L. Hanmer, IL D 


Health officer. 


^UnaX Vernon 


Chas. M. guinn, M. D 

♦Edwin H. C^dney 


Health officer and registrar of vital sta- 


NewRochelie 


tistics. 
Health officer. 


NewYorkCily 


♦Haren Emerson, M. D 

Tfaoiiia>J.Burke,M.D 

Manias P. C^Daraard, U. D . 

JcAn A. Johnson, M.D 

Robert T. Irvine. M.D 

James K. StockweU, M. D . . . . 
E. D. M. Lyon.lLD 


Commisaiooer of health. 


Newborgh 


Health officer. 


North Tonawanda 

Otem 


Da 
Da 


Osiining 


Da 


Oswego 


Do. 


Peekskffl 


Da 


PUttJburgh. 


Joseph fl. La Rocqne, H. D .. 

Wm. J. Sheehan, M. D 

Jeha 8. Wilson, M. D / 

Richard B. Gray, M. D 

♦George W. Goler, M. D.i 

officer. 


Da 


Port Chester 


Da 


PfflighkffpBli a . s 


Do. 


Kenaelier...... 

Boehetter 


Da 
Da 


• Full-time 
'Dtwnote 


'''^'^!XCooQ\e 



August 3, 1917 



1228 



aty. 



Nam« of health officer. 



Official title. 



New York— Continued. 

Rome 

Saratoga Springs 

Schenectady 

Syracuse 

Troy 

Watertown 

\VTiite Plains 

Yonkcrs 

North Carolina: 

Asheville 

Durham 

Greensboro 

Wilmington 

Winston-Salem 

North Dakota: 

Fargo 

Grand Forks 

Ohio: 

Ashtabula 

Bellaire 

Cambridge 

Canton 

Chilllcothe 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Dayton , 

Elyria 

FIndlay 

Hamilton. 

Lakewood 

Lancaster 

Lorain 

Mansfeld 

Marietta 

Masslllon 

Middlctown 

Newark 

Norwood *. 

Piqua 

Portsmouth 

Sandusky 

Springileld 

Stcubcnvillo 

Toledo 

Warren 

Youngstown 

Zanesville 

Oklahoma: 

Enid 

Muskogee 

Oklahoma City 

Tulsa 



Chas. R.Mahady, M. D.... 
A. Sherman Downs, M. D.. 
Joseph B. Garliok, M. D. . . 
Frederick W. Sears, M. D. . 
♦Calvin E. NIthoLs, M. D... 
PageE.ThorahiIl,M. D.., 
Edwin G. Ramsdcll, M. D . 
Wm. 8. Coons, M. D 



C. V. Reynolds, M. D 

*A. Cheatham, M. D.» 

F. C. Hyatt, M. D 

♦Chas. Torrence Nesbitt, M.D.« 
♦John Thames, M. D 



Paul Sorkuen, M. D.. 
Alfred Dean, M. D... 



A. W. Hopkins, M. D 

D. W. Boone, M. D 

O. F. Lowry, M. D 

F.M.Sayre, MD 

J. M. Hanlcy, M. D 

♦J. H. Landis, M. D 

♦R.H. Bishop, jr., M.D.. 

Louis Kahn, M. D 

♦A. L. Light. M. D.» 

G. E. French, M. D 

♦Amos Beardsley 

♦A. L. Smedley, M. D 

W.J. Beimer, M. D 

C. H. Hamilton, M. D 

Valloyd Adair, M. D 

Guy T. Goodman, M. D... 

F. S. McGeo, If . D 

T. Clarke Miller, M. D 

O. D. Luramis, M. D 

W. H. Knauss, M. D 

Frank Perry, M. D 

J.H. Lowe, M. D 

W. W. Smith, M. D 

H. C. Schoepflc, M. D 

♦E. B. Starr, M. D 

♦Theodore W. Smith 

Clarence D. Selby, M. D . . 
George N. Simpson, M. D. 
H. E. Welch, M. D 

G. W. McCormick, M. D.. 



Health officer. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Superintendent of health. 

County health officer. 
City health officer. 

Health officer. 
Do. 

Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Commissioner of health. 
Health ofTloer. 
Commissioner of health. 
Health officer. 

Do. 

Do. 
Inspector of health. 
Health oflicer. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Director of public health. 

Do. 
Health officer. 
Commissioner of health. 
City health officer. 
Health officer. 

Do. 



C. E. Thompson, M. D.. . 

John Reynolds, M. D 

George Hunter, M. D 

S. DeZell Hawley, M. D.. 

* Full-time officer. 

> Also health officer lor Durham County. 

* Also health officer for New Hanover County. 

3 Does not engage in the practice of medicine except consultatloDf. 



City physician. 
Superintendent of health. 
Health commissioner. 
Superintendent of healtli* 



oogle 



1229 



August 8, 1017 



aty. 




Official title. 


Oregon: 

Portland 


*Jcim 0. Abelo, If. D 


Acting city health officer. 

CHy physician and heal; h officer. 

Uealth officer 


Salem- 


O. B. Miles, M. D 


Pfflinsylrania: 

Allmtown 


J. Treichler Butt, M. D 

♦LB. CriUy 


k]iDmA 


Health officer and bacteriologist. 
Health offioer 


Bethlehem 


♦Edgar E. Hauser. 


Braddock 


^a*n«»F WiiLi 


Do. 


Bradford 


Wm. RoedelL 


Do. 


Butler 


*R. B. Fowzer 


Do. 


Carbondale 


♦M. E. Gallagher 


Sanitary officer. 
Health officer 


Carlisle 


♦A T». T.ifR'rian . 


Carn'i;!? 


A. A. Tart?r 


Do. 


Charcbrrsburg 


Rotxrt v.*. Walker 


Secrrtary and health officer. 
H«*alth officer and assi^^tant seeretary 
board of health. 

Health officer 


Coat^sriBc 


•G. B. Boyd 


Coan-lLsville 


♦George Hetsel 


DuBoif? 


JamwE. Ginter, M. D 

John Helfrick 


Do 


Du<}u?sne , 


Henlth and ordinance officer. 


Easton 


J. James Condrao, M. D 

J. W. Wright, M. D 


Health officer 


Erie 


Do 


Farr^l 


♦Ffwik ChuUck 


Board of health officer. 


Harrisbui^ 


Jotan U. J. Baonick, M. D. . . . 
♦P. J. Bonner 


Health officer and director of bureau* 


Hatelton 


Health officer. 


Holiest ^d 


W. E. Lawson 


President board of health. 


Johnstoivn 


L. W. Jones, M. D 

E. H. Gingrich, M. D 


Health officer. 


Lel^anon 




McKe^Dort 


♦Fred W. Hooper 


Health officer. 


Mabanoy 


^ohn Sullivan 




Mealville 


Frank Dakc 


Do. 


Mon%s'^n 


B. H. Clendeoan 


Do. 


Nanticoke 


♦Philip Edmunds 


Do. 


New Castle . 


W. L. Steen, M. D. ... . 


Do. 


NoTistown 


*Chas. E. White 


Secretary and health officer. 


OUCity 


♦E. M. Voochies 


Health officer. 


PhomixTille 


JohnJ. Horria. 




Pittsburgh 


*J. F. Edwards, M. D 


Director department of health. 


Pittston 


♦Thomas P. Tracey 


Health officer. 


Plynwotti 


H. O. Timpleton, M. D 

♦Oscw L. Kleckner 


Do. 


Pottsville 


Do. 


Reading 


♦Chas. Roland, M. D 


Do. 


Scranlon 


O.J.V8nVechten,M. D 

E. G. Butler 


Director department of publio health. 


Steelton 


Health officer. 


Sunbury i 


Victor A. Koble. 


Do. 


VvimkUmn 


♦Ifiss Elixabeth V. Haney, 

R.N. 
•H. J. Bieroe 


Do. 


Warrm 


Do. 


Washington .. 


♦W.B. Winter 


Do. 


Wifliamsport 


J. Harrison F»ber, If . D 

♦Wm. A. Schk)88W 


4 

City health c^Bcer. 


York : 


Sanitary officer. 


Khode Island: 

Central Falls : 


Adolph. R. V. Fenwick, M. D. 

R»ynonWoodh««i,M. D 

Georgs F. Allison, M. D 

♦J. W. Sampson 


Superintendent of health. 


Cumberland 


East Providenoo 


Health officer. 


Newport 


Executive officer board of health. 


PawtuckBt 


Gtes. H. Holt, If . D 


SuperiDtMMlfloi of health. 



♦ Full-time officer. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Aagust 3, 1917 



1230 



City. 

Rhode Island "Continued. 

Providence 

Warwick 

Woonsjclcet 

South Carolina: 

Charleston 

Columbia 

Greenville 

Spartanburg 

South Dakota: 

Aberdeen 

Sioux Falls 

Tennessee: 

Jackson 

Knoxville 

NashvlUe 

Texas: 

Austin 

Beaumont 

Brownsville 

Cleburne 

DaUas 

Denison 

El Pasa 

Fort Worth 

(lalveston 

Houston 

MarshaU 

Paris 

San Angelo 

San Antonio 

Tyler 

Waco 

Utah: 

Ogden 

SaltLakenty 

Vermont: 

Barre 

Burlington 

Rutland 

Virginia: 

Alexandria 

Danville 

Lynchburg! 

Newport Xcws 



Norfolk . . . . 
Petersburg. 
Roanoke . . . 
Richmond . 
Washington: 
Abcrtleen.. 
Belli ngliam 



Name of health officer. 



♦Chas. V. Chapin, M. D 

Ralph F. Lockwood, M. D . . . . 
Thomas J. McLaughlin, M. D. 



*J. Mercelr Qreen, H. D 

Skottowe B. Fishbume, M. D 

*Clarence E. Smith, M. D 

*Chas. £. Low, H. D 



•Carl F. Raver, M.D. 
W. F. KeUer,M.D... 



W. Q.Saunders, M.D... 
Wm. R. Cochrane, M. D. 
•Wm.E.Hibbett,M.D. 



S. A. Woolsey, M. D 

Wie T. WUUams, M.D 

E. E. Dlckason, M. D 

A. D. Yatcr, M. D 

•Chas.SaviUe 

A. B. Gardner, M. D 

Hugh 8. White, M. D 

Webb Walker, M. D 

Walter Kleberg, M.D 

P. U. Scardino, M.D 

Chas. K . UcartsiU, M.D 

Perry Pinson, M. D 

J. P. McAnulty, M. D 

♦W. A. King, M. D 

Albert Woldert, M.D 

R. F. MInnock, M. D 



♦(loorge Shorten 

•R.W.Ashley, M.D. 



J. W. Stewart, M. D 

•Francis J. Emus, M. D 

Frederick H. (Icbhardt, M. D 

Kdward A. Gorman, M. D 

•('. C. Hud.son, M. I) 

Mosby (J. Perrow 

R. A. Davis, M.D 



P. 8. Schenck, M. D 

Robert A.Martin, M. D 

•W. Brownley Foster, M. D.. 
•Roy K. Flannagan, M.D... 



J. B. Kinne, M. D 

Wm.W. Ballaine.M. D.. 

E verett L. <] . Wood fortl , M . D . . . . 

North Yakima *Henjamin S.Ccrswcll.M. D.». 

•FuU-ttme officer. > Also health 



Offldal Ui\*. 



Superintendent orhealtn. 
Health officer. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Commissioner of health* 
Director of health. 

Health officer. 
City health offloar. 

Health officer. 

Director department of hMltt 

Health officer and rogistni* 

City health offloar. 
Health officer. 
City health officer. 

Do. 
Director of public health. 
Health officer, 
aty health officer. 
City physician. 
City health officer. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Health officer. 



J^onitary inspector, 
liealt h commissioner. 



Health omcer. 

Health officer and milk inspeoCor. 

City health officer. 

Health officer. 
Do. 

1)0. 

Health officer and president board •! 

Iiealth. 
Health commissioner. 
Health officer. 

I>o. 
Chief health officer. 

City health officer. 

Do. 
Health officer. 
City and county health offlo«, 

officer for Yaktma County. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1231 



Aug08t8,iei7 



city. 


Name of hetlth officer. 


Official tide. 


s» WMbingloii-Ooiittnaed. 

Bitttle 


•J. 8. McBride, M. D 


CommiKiioner of health 


gnoktlM 


♦John B. Anderson, M. D 

J. E. HtnrjfU.T) 


Health officer. 


l^oma 


Health officer, bacteriologist and chemist. 


WftDftWalfai 


Wallace A. Pratt, M. D.> 

Edwin M. Easley, M. D 

Eugene Davis, M. D 


City and county health officer. 


WMtVlrginiA: 

BhwAeld 


President board of licalth. 


ChwlMtan ... 


Healtli commissioner. 


Mirtiiuibcirf 


C. E.Clay.M.D 


Commissioner of health. 


Pirker^rarg. 


Wm. Richardson, M. D 

W. C. Etzler,M. D 


City health officer. 


WhMlinf 


Health commissioner. 


Wisoaosiii: 

ADDleUm 


Frank P. Dohearty, M. D 

C. 0. Hertiman, M. D 

H. E. Burger, M. D 


Do. 


Ashlmd 


Chahman board of liealth. 


B«]oit 


Health officer. 


fiiin^ink 


J. F. Farr,M. D 


Executive officer board of health. 


Food 4q t^ 


F. M. Harris, M. D 


Health commissioner. 


Onm B%y 


T. J. Oliver, M. D 


C>ommissloner of health. 


JanesviUe 


Samuel B. Buckmaster, M. D. 
♦Herbert L. Wright, M. D. . . . 

♦J. M. Furstman, M. D 

Harry E. I»urceU, M. D 

J. E. Meaiiv,M. D 


Health officer. 


KeDosha 


Health commissioner. 


UCroisse 


CommLvsloner of health. 


yadisoD 


Health officer. 


Manitowoc 


Do.' 


Marinette 

MOwauk»e 


8. P.Jon*»s.M. D 

♦ficorge C. Ruhland, M. D. . . . 
♦A. H. Broche, M. D.. 


Do. 
Commissioner of liealth. 


Oshbosh 


CommLssionor of hmhli and city physi- 
cian. 
Commissioner of public health. 


Sfaeboyinia 


H. C. Reich, M. D 


^pcrior 


D. R. Searle, M. D 


Health (oramlsslonor. 


^«san.... 


Wm. E. Zilisch. M. D 


Health oirH*er. 







♦Full-tfane officer. 

» Also health officer for Walla Walla County. 



Digitized by 



Google 



PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 



No health department, State or local, can effectively prevent or control diaoie wUkoui 
knowledge of when, where, and under what conditions cases are occurring. 



UNITED STATES. 



CURRENT STATE SUMMARIES. 
California Report for the Week Ended July 28, 1917. 

The California State Board of Health reported concerning the 
status of preventable diseases in California for the week ended 
July 28, 1917, as follows: Seven cases of smallpox were notified in 
Fresno County, focus at Pineflat. Of poliomyelitis, one case was 
reported in Santa Clara County and one at Belvedere. Two caa^ of 
cerebrospinal meningitis occurred at San Francisco. Of typhoid 
fever, 21 case-s were notified, 1 each in Oakland, Fresno Countj, 
Fresno City, El Centre, Stockton, Santa Barbara, Santa Qara 
County, Hercules, and Santa Clara; 2 each in Stanislaus County, and 
Walnut Creek; 3 in Los Ajigeles, and 5 in San Francisco. There was 
a marked reduction in the prevalence of reportable diseases. 

The details of notifiable disease cases reported during the week 
ended July 21, are as follows: 

Cerebrospinal meningitis 9 Pellagra 1 

Chicken pox 20 Pneumonia M 

Diphtheria 26 Poliomyelitis 1 

Dysentery 1 Ophthalmia neonatorum 2 

Erysipelas 12 j Scarlet fever 61 

German measles 27 j Smallpox 2 

Gonococc us infection 22 | Syphilis 20 

Leprosy 1 ! Tul;erculogis 115 

Malaria 24 \ Typhoid fever 38 

Measles 100 1 Whooping cough - 32 

Mumps 59 I 

CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS. 

Louisiana — ^Doyle. 

One case of cerebrospinal meningitis was notified at Doyle, li'v* 
ingston Parish, La., on July 27, 1917. 

(1232) 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1233 



AugOHt 'S, 1917 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS— (Vnjt limed. 
State Reports for June, 1917. 



PhM. 



ConzMcticat: 

Ftirfiekl County- 
Bridgeport 

Htrtfordi oimty— 

Hartford 

Mancbester 

New Britain 

PlainviUe 

Windsor 

Kiddlesex County— 

Middletown (town) 
New Haven County — 

New Haven 

Orange 

WaUmgford 

New l-ondon County— 

Mont\-iDe 

Total 

lodiuia: 

Blackibrd County 

Delaware County 

Howard County 

Lake County 

Marion County 

Total 

Iowa: 

Scott County 

Kisi^asippt: 

Copiah County 

Harrison County 

Total 



Newca^es 
reported. 



35 



Place. 



Pennsyh'Jinla: 

Allegheny County 

AmiUrons County 

Bedford ( oimty 

Berks County 

Blair County 

Bradford County 

Butler County 

Cambria County 

Carbon County 

Clearfield County 

Crawford County 

Cumberland t ounty. . . 

Dauphin County 

Delaware County 

Erie County 

Fayette County 

Indiana County 

Jefferson Counly 

Lawrence County 

Luiernc County 

Mercer County 

Montgomery (ounty . . . 
Northampt-on 'ounty. . 
Pbllaielphia ''ounty. . . 
.Schuylkill County.". .. . 

Snyiifi ( tmnly..! 

Vc'nanpo (^ouiily 

West nioieland ('ounty . 



Total . 



Wa.'^hlnKton: 

Kit<ap Coimly. 

Bremer ton. 

I'kTce Count v.. 



Total . 



New cases 
reported. 



30 
2 



Arkansas Report for May, 1917. 

During the month of May, 1917, 2 cases of cerebrospinal menin- 
gitis were reported in Arkansas, 1 each in Craigliead and Izard 

Counties. 

City Reports for Week Ended July 14, 1917. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Brockton, Mass 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Canton, Ohio 

niicago.Ill 

Rncinniti. Ohio 

^HeveLind, Ohio 

l^ayton. Ohio .' 

•Mroit.Mich 

HamU/tiri:, I*a 

Haver ill. Mass 

iohnsiown, Pa 

Kansas City, Ktms 

Kansas Citv, Mo 

Lynn, Mass 

Halden, Mass 

Manchwter, X. H 

JlcKeesport, Pa 




Deaths. 



IMaco. 



3 I 



J 



Mihvankoo, "Wis 

Miunc ipoli-^, Minn. . . 

Nt'^^arV, K. J 

New Hrifurd, M!L-)S... 

Now York, X. V 

NorfoU. Va 

Xorri-loi\n, I 'a 

Oinalm. --.'cljr 

PhilA/JoloMia. I'a 

I'ittsbiir! h. I'a 

Kacinr. W i^ 

Hi. Loiii*, Mo 

Halt 1 a"' r ' ilv, Clah. 

San r-irrM, (ij 

San Fr.iiici-:(o, ('a| 

Sprinu.U'M, Mass 

Toledo. Ohio 

Wluvliti^. W. Va 



Ca>cs. I Deaths 

I 



4 I 



Digitized by 



G( 



AiigaBtd«1917 1234 

DIPHTHEBIA. 

See Diphtheria, measles, Bcarlet fev^, and tuberculoeis, page 1244. 

ERYSffELAS. 
City Reports for Week Ended July 14, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


ClMS. 


Deaths. 


Boston, Mass 




1 


Lynchburg, Va ,. 




1 


BiiTalo N Y 




Maiden, IkUss 




1 


Chioaco, III 


2 


McKecsport. Fli.. 






cievciand Ohio . . 


Milwaukee, Wis 




Clinton, Mass 


1 


Nashville. Tenn 




Ifavloii Ohio 


Newark, N.J 




Denver, Colo 




Now York, N. Y 


I 


i^otroit, aich 




Oakland. Cal 






Duluth Minn 




Omaha, Nebr 




Fort Worth, Tex 


1 


Philadelphia, Pa 




Harrison, N.J 




Pittsburgh, Pa 


J 


Jersey City, N. J 

Kulumazoo, Mich 


1 
1 


Rochester, N. Y 




St. Louis, Mo 


I 


Los Angeles, Cal 


2 













LEPROSY. 
New York— New York City. 

On July 26, 1917, a case of leprosy was notified in New York City, 
in the person of G. K., a native of Greece, 53 years old, who came to 
the United wStates in 1913. 



City Report for Week Ended July 14, 1917. 

During the week ended July 14, 1917, 1 case of leprosy was re- 
ported at Los Angeles, Cal. 

MALARIA. 

State Reporto for June, 1917. 



Place. 



Mississippi: 

A<latns Coiinty 

Alcorn <'o«uity 

Amite County 

AtiaUCoMJitv 

»oIi arC i:n"»v... 
Culhotni County... 

Carroil ( omiiy 

Clvk'ka.^a\» County 
(Uiociaw County.. 
Claiborno County. 

Clarke Coun'y 

Clay Couniy 

Coaiionia ( uunty., 
CopiiUi C«tunty.' .. 
Co\in.4i»'n Coiniiy 
I)e ^«.t^)<'own y... 
Forrest ('oi.niy . .. 
Krati ln' '>Mnty.. 

Ci>(/r (M .. 'iiLy 

(iroe' «• C.un'y 

<''ir' :• la < i»unty . . 
1 aiivf i ^ ' ounty.. 
IJairi-oi! < 'ounty.. 

Ilir.us t (Mimy 

Holmes County... 



Now 

cases 

reported. 



53 
71 

84 I 
14G 

87.; 

203 , 
93 

S2 

CI 

21 
13, 
7l'.> 
H3 

ye. 

rni 
142 

43 

4U 
42 
11.5 

370 
4.".0 



Place. 



Missis.sippi — Tont iniied. 

ls>n'iuena Couniy 

It ( a v\ ainba t 'ounty 

Jark>on Coinitv 

Je or.son Cour»iy 

Jo; (»rson l>a\ is ('ounty 
I J (iTir.-^ County 

Kiinj.er County 

Lafayelti' Ciwuity 

' Lair ar Count y 

I l«kuJ<»rd:i!e < V»unty 

I u^ri'inc*' Couni y '. 

I oaV(. County... 

l^o ( ouniv 

Lci1or« County 

I.ini-oln County 

Lowndes Comity 

I, Mattison County 

;l Marion Coimty 

i| Marshall County 

jl Monroi> County 

[; MontKonuwy Coiuity... 

I I Neshol»a Comity 

j N<'A ft. n County 

i No\ 11 Ix'o Count V 

I, Uklibbuha County... /m 

litized ' ~ 



New 

oaws 

rcporte<l 



& 
W 
CI 
«7 
3t. 

WH 

92 
1&) 

47 
IIJ* 
14*. 

?i 
802 
687 

91 
103 

85 
137 
179 
103 

72 
109 

41 



ibyGoog-te 



1235 

MALARIA— Ck>ntiiiued. 
State Reports for June, 1917— Continued. 



AugU8t 3, 1»17 



Place. 


New 

cases 

reported. 


Place. 


New 

cases 

reported. 


Misissippi--C0Dtiiiii«d . 

PanlokCoanty 


188 
87 
45 
108 
64 
95 
92 
145 
110 
85 
35 
796 
235 
45 
115 
123 
23 
384 
469 
70 
38 


Mississippi-Continued. 

Yalobusha County 


03 


Pearl RiTor Comity 


Yazoo County 


483 


PttryCoonty 


Total 




PUreCoanty 11II!;!I.'I.*III.!!;' 


11,349 


Pontotoc County 


Pennsylvania: 

Philadeh)hia Countv 




Pren^ss County 






1 


Sharkey County 


YorkCounty '. 


1 


Simpson County 


Total 




Smith County 


2 


BtcoeCounty 


South Carolina: 

Beaufcvt County 




Sunflower County 




TateCounty 


18 


Tippah County 


Chester County 


6 


Tisnaminco County 


Dorchester County 


32 


Union County '. 


Marion County 


20 


Walthall Countv 




1 


Warren County'. 


Spartanburg County 


4 


Washington County 


Williamsburg County 


5 


Wavne Coimly 


Total 




WeKster County ..!]....!!!..!.!.!!! 


86 









Arkansas Report for May, 1917. 



Place. 


New 

cases 

reported. 


Place. 


New 
reported. 


ArkaiuaK 

.\sbley County 


7 

1 

12 

26 

1 

5 
5 
5 
2 


Arkansas— Continued. 

Monroe County 


2 


Oarroil County.. 


Newton County 


:i 


(Vaiwav Countv 


Perry Countv 


3 


<irt€ne County. 


Scott Countv 


10 


Hnnpstead County 


Sevier Cotint v 


100 


I?artl Cotmtv. . ... 


St. Francis Countv 


34 


Jetic rs<«i County 


Washington County 


1 


Johnson County 


Total 




I-aCavctle County 


275 


Mississippi County 











City Reports for Week Ended July 14, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Case^. 


Deaths. 


Binnin^ham, Ala . • 


«6 




Newark. N..T 

New Orlonns, La 

I*ort5.mouth, \'a 


1 
1 




Hiarie^tan, S. C ! 


'I 


1 


Coirv\'\ ille. Kans 


1 


1 


Memphis. Tenn 


i 

1 


Richiiionci, Va 


i 




Mowie.AU .:.:.: 




SjivaJifuih, Ou 


i 


Nashville, Tenn 




Trenton, N.J 


3 











'The reason that Birmingham had so many more ca*<es of malaria reported than any other city is not 
that the disease is more prevalent in Birmingham than in other cities of Alahania and neigliViorin^j Siate>, 
n?itandoobtedly because of the siiccevNfnl efforts the heaUh dep-irtment ha< made in set^uring the coopora- 
^•ffli of the practicing physicians in report ins civ^e>. 

MEASLES. 

See Diphtheria, measles, .srarlel fever, and tiil)er<'ulo^i8, pai^e 1244. 



Digitized by 



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August 8, 1917 



1236 



PELLAGRA. 
State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 



New 

cases 

reporter! . 




Ncv 



Connecticut: 

Uartford Comity-- 
.Simsbury 



Missbsippi: 

Adams County 

Alcom County 

AmlteCounly 

Attala County 

BoIi\-ar County 

Calhoun County 

CiUToll County 

Chickasaw ( ounty 

(%octaw County 

Claiborne County 

ClarkB County 

ClavCoimty 

Coahoma Cwmty 

Copiah County 

Co\*ington < bounty 

Do Soto'ojnty 

Forrest County 

Franklin County 

OeorRo CoT'uty 

(Ireenc County 

Hancock County 

Harrison County 

Ilinds ('ounty 

Holmc'it'o.-iity 

iBBaquonuCoTinty 

UtAwanil)a<'o'.nity 

Jactscm ( 'oanty 

Jolfcrson Coanty 

JciIor^on !>ii>i^ County. 

JonosCownty 

Keniper Tooulr 

Liilayrt t^^^"^t ul y 

I«a«i«r Coi-iily 

Lau<l«M-«l'^l(' If) nty. . .. 

Law Tvuer i o;aity 

Ix»ttkc( 'ounty 

lJir> Cn .iitv 

I,ol^«-o('oun»v 

Linroln bounty 

Lov^ii<ii'> ("«n-nty 

Mndfnn ♦oinity 

MiMon ''ountN 

M.ir,) ;kll 'ounty , 

M«itr«H' {'oMi'v 

Mujit4;uniiT> t ouuty.... 
N<'^holm County , 



36 
10 

5 

10 

26,-) 

14 

6 
30 

4 

8 

9 

11 

200 I! 

36 , 
20 1 

39 I 

40 ' 

16 j 

3 II 
31 

3.S ^ 

2 '' 
I" > 

n ! 

16 

ir. 

10 

13 I 
2*\ 

Hi ' 

12 , 

41 ' 

66 ; 

31 I 

37 I 

* I 

IT! 



Mississippi — Continued. 

NcntonCocnty 

Noxubee County 

Oktibbeha County 

Panola County 

Pearl Ri\aer County 

Perry County 

Pike County 

Pon t otoc ( 'ounty 

lYentiss County. 

Scott County 

Sliarkcy (^mmty 

SinuwOTi County 

Smith Cormty 

Stone rwmty 

Sunflor. or (^ounty 

TatoCVinty 

Tippah (^TOintv 

Tisbomiiyio ( ounty 

Cnion County i 

Wall hall County 

Warren Coimty ■ 

Washinirtan County i 

Wa\'ne County : 

Webster County j 

Yalobusha County 

Yaioo County ! 



Total. 



f 
IT 
U 
U 
% 
« 
M 

1 
II 
If 
17 
U 

I 

u 

14 

12 
U 


Iff 

« 

«: 

2jn 



South Carolina: 

Re-.iufoTl County 

t 'herokco Coimt y 

Chftvter <'«unty 

I>orcbo'-ter Coimty . . . 

FairfteJd County 

<)reonviI!p(^o»rlv. . ., 
(Jreenwood Co nty. . , 

K«T<hnw County 

I^uurcns County 

Majinn Count v 

Marlboro (oonty 

Onuuji'Hurp ( ounty. . . 

Ilic jI'Ui'I Coi'.nty 

Si» u t!uit)in: i 'ounty . . 

l'ni>>n '"o iilT 

Willhni.^h- m County . 
YocK t ounly 



Total. 



Place. 



Arkansas Report for May, 1317. 



Now 

en .PS 

rep«r»e«l. 



Arkan^a*' I 

nr;Hll^v CjMUitv I 4 

Cnir % < .-t'htv 3 

1).. I I '■' •!• t\ ■ < 1 

F:i' • ruf( npiity } 7 

(.I'liii ! ' oM.tv' i 6 t! 

(if. ' ■ < oiiiUv 2 ■ 

H«-:n' '. mK oimty ] 1 

T/ .r I ' *>':ntv 1 1 ( 

I,.:.^»lt^' irmly I 1 

I>(VJJi ' ')'inlr j 1 



Place. 



.\rk.tnn''— Continued. 
MiMcrCmiTiiy. ... 
>Ii^ is^il*pi ( ounty 

Protf Coniitv 

S<i\ irr C<»im!y 

Hi . Kr iiu 1^ < ounty 
W-i-!iiiu:t(«n ("«>unt 
White County 

Total 



N«* 



Digitized by 



Google 



1 

9 
I 
2 

U 

« 



Hooo. 



1237 

PELLAGRA— Oontinued. 
City Reports for Week Ended Juiy 14, 1917. 

Cases. Deaths. Place. 



August 8, 1917 



AiBtiii,Tex 

Bimlndiam. Ala.. 
ClnrkstaLS.C... 
Fort Wortt, Tex.. 



Oahestoo, i^. 



««-saty,Mo.. 
LexiDftoii, Ky. 



Memphis, Tenn. 
Mobile,;' 



,Ala.. 



>8 



Cases. 



Nashville, Tenn 

New Orlcajis, La 

New York, N. Y 

BlchmoiKl. Va 

Roanoke, va 

BacraMento, Cal 

Wichita, Kans 

Wilmington, N.C 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Deaths. 



1 Tbfi reasoo that Birmingham had so many more cases of pellagra reported than any other city is not 
that ttad disease is more prevalent in Birmingham than in other cities of Alabama and neighboring States, 
tnt nsdoobCedly because of the successftil efforts the health department has made in securing the coop- 
ciatioQ of the precticing physicians in reporting cases. 

PLAGUE. 

California— Alameda County— Plague-Infected Squirrels Found. 

The finding of two plague-infected ground squirrels in Alameda 
County, Cal., has been reported; one each on July 12 and 14, 1917, 
within a radius of 3 miles of Alt,^mont. One was found on the 
Frank Floyd ranch and the other on the Peter Barthe ranch. 

PNEUMONIA. 
City Reports for Week Ended July 14, 1917. 



Place. 



BsWmore, Md 

Bingiamtoo, N. Y 

Boston, Mass 

Chica<?o,UI 

Ckvcland, Ohio. . . 

Detroit, Mich 

DTilath,Minn 

Erie, Pa 

M River. Mass... 
Htveriiill. Mass.... 

{•ebon, Mich 

Los Angeles, Cal... 



Cases. 


Deoths. 


2 


6 


2 

3 




3 


50 


47 


r, 


14 


7 


19 


2 

1 
1 






1 


1 


1 


1 
9 




2 



Place. 



Lynn, Ma«?s , 

i>ewark, N. J , 

rhila^elphia, Pa.. 

Pitts] •urgh. Pa 

Rochester, N. Y... 

Sari Di(^o, Cal 

San Francisco, ("al 
Sprinpiiold. M iss., 

Toledo, nbio 

Woburu, Ma?s 

Worcester, Mass . . 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



1 


1 


25 


3 


16 


8 


11 


12 


5 


1 


3 




4 


5 


2 


1 


1 




1 


2 


1 


2 



POUOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYvSIS). 

Alabama — Raf^Iand. 

On Jidy 16, 1917, one case of poUomycUtis was notified at Ragland, 

St. Clair County, Ala. 

California. 

During the week ended July 28, 1917, two cases of poliomyelitis 
were notified in California, one each in Belvedere, Marin County, 
and in Santa Chira County. 

Comecticiit — New Britain. 

During the we^k (i.c'd July 28, 1<H7, one case of poliomyelitis 
was notified at New Briiain, Conn. 



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AiigaBt8,1917 1238 

POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS)— CJont I nued, 

Illiiioi^-Chicago. 

During the week ended July 28, 1917, 6 cases of poliomyelitis werc 
notified in Chicago, 111. 

Kaims. 

During the week ended July 28, 1917, poliomyelitis was notified 
in Kansas as follows: Kansas City, 3 cases; Fall River, 1 case. 

Maryland. 

During the period from Jime 1 to July 28, 1917, oases of poliomye- 
litis were notified in Maryland as fellows: In Allegany Conjity, 13 
(July 15-28); Anne Arundel County, 1 (July 22-28); Baltimore 
County, 1 (July 8-14); Dorchester County, 1 (July 1-7); Garrett 
County, 4 (June 1-July 28); Baltimore city, 3 (July 8-28). 

M asga c hwaette— Hi»v6rhill and Lynn. 

During the period from July 24-27, 1917, 3 cases of poliomyeKtis 
were notified at Haverhill, and from July 24-31, 5 cases were notified 
at Lynn, Mass. 

Minnesota — Pope County. 

During the week ended July 28, 1917, 8 cases of poUomyehtis were 
notified in Pope 0>unty, Minn., 7 being in Bluemoimds Township 
and 1 in Langhei Township. 

Vermont 

During the week ended July 28, 1917, cases of poliomyelitis wew 
notified in Vermont as foUows: Barre, 2; Bolton, 1; Waterbury, 1. 

Virginia. 

The State Health commissioner of Virginia reports that during the 
month of July, 1917, cases of poliomyehtis were notified in Virginia 
as follows: Rockingham County, 22 cases with 7 deaths; Page County 
3 cases; Rappahannock County, 4 cases; Albemarle County, 1 case; 
Louisa County, 1 case: Goochland County, 1 case; King and Queen 
County, 2 cases; and Pittsylvania County, 2 cases. 

West Virginia. 

During the week endetl July 28, 1917, cases of poliomyelitis were 
notified in West Virginia as follows: In Marion County, Monongah 8, 
Anabelle 1, Wliiterock 1; in Jackson County, Kenna 3; in Tucker 
County, Davis 2; in Pro-itoii County, Nowbiirg 1; in Braxton County; 
Mapleton 1 ; and in Upshur ("ounty, Buckhannon 1. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1239 A<irist8,l«17 

POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS)— Continued. 
State Repflrte for Jane, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


FlBOt. 


New cases 
reported. 


Zafina: 

mhart^^fra^ 


3 

1 
1 
1 


PeoDSYlvania: 

Alie0)eny County 




T4fk<» rnnnty . .' , . , . _, 


Br&dlord Count>\. 




Kuion County .........^ 


Oambria County 




Wayne County.... ; 


Clearfield County *! 






Faretie Coontv . 




Total 


5 


I«anca^ter County 






Montsomerv Countv . 




>I2?r«iiitr 


5 
1 
2 
1 


Philadolphfa County 




Bdkuylkiil County.' 




Choctaw CoimtT 


Total 






IS 


Smiti County .'...— 


South CaroUna: 

WIIHamshnrg C^mty 








TOW 


9 


1 




Wyoming: 

Natrooft Coimty 








1 









€Hj S^eite fcr Week Ended Joly 14, 1917. 



in Arbor, Mich... 
BDBhi0iazn, Ala... 

B«lon,Ma6s 

|(Alo,N,Y 

<aicKo,ni 

<S«»«tod,Ohio.... 
DeWt.Mich 

HwertiiD ijass 

I"«sCity, Kans.. 



Gases. Deaths. 



S 



Place. 



Kesny, N.J 

Lowell, Mas* 

Maiden, Mass 

Newark, N.J 

Newcastle. Pa 

New York, N.Y.... 
Perth Amboy, N. J., 

1 PhiladOpbia. Pa 

Pittsbnrgh, Pa 

RIchmDnd, Va , 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



EABDES IN ANIMALS. 

CttF Reports for Week Ended My 14, 1917. 

During the week ended July 14, 1917, 2 cases of rabies in animals 
ware reported at Detroit, Mich., and 2 cases at Memphis, Tenn. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER. 
State Rtporis for June, 1917. 

During the month oi June, 1017, 5 case^ of Rocky Mountain spotted 
ferer were reported in Humboldt County, Nov., 1 in Golconda, and 
4 in Paradise Valley; and in Wyoming, 1 case was reported in Camp- 
bell County. 

SCARLET raVER. 

See Diphtheria, measlee, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1244. 

SMALLPOX. 
Massaclinsetts — Virulent Smallpox. 

During the period from January 16 to July 2K, 1917, 48 cases of 
«nallpox, with 9 deaths, were rep<)rte<l in Massacnusetts, as follows: 
Wwjester 38, Fitchbiu-g 4, Shrewsbury 3, Webster 3. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



August 3, 1917 



1240 



SMALLPOX— Continued. 
Minnesoto. 

During the week ended July 28, 1917, five new foci of smallpox 
were reported in Minnesota, cases of the disease having been notified 
as follows: Crow Wing County, Einily Township, 5; Pilmore Cotmty, 
Mabel, 4; Houston County, Spring Grove, 1; Itasca County, Deer 
River, 1; St. Louis County, Rice Lake Township, 11. 

MisceDaneons State Reports. 



Flaoo. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Oues. Dcttte. 


Arkansas (May 1-31): 

Brndlcv C'ounty 


3 
6 

r> 

40 
3 
3 
1 
5 
6 
1 

21 
1 
4 
7 
2 
4 

27 
1 

43 
7 
6 

13 



1 Indiana (June V-3e)-Coiitd. 

Ft Joseph County 

Sulliyan Oounty 


43 




Carroll Tounty 






CoTiwav Count v 




Tipp-- anoo County 

NanderburR County 

VerPiilioii Countv 




Craighead County 

Dulhis Counlv 










Drew Count v 


ij VixoCountv 




Fatilknfr County 


i, ^V!1]•;lsh CoTittty . . 






i lorland Count y" 


li "NVarv'it'k Couniy 


4 1 1 


i 1 rccnc (^ounty 


'1 "VVhHi» roiintr 


1 1 


H«nipstead County 

Hot springs County 

Ijard County 




] 






Total 


229' 1 








J cirrn^on County. . 




Iowa (Juno 1 3o): 
Adfiir (\kiinir 


Lo?an County 


. . , , ^ .- , . , 


3D ' 


Marion County .. 


* Aiifliil)cin (>»iintv . _ 




Miilor County 




1 rJonton County 


1 \"" 


Mi^-i>MpT)i (ounty 

Monrot' ( cnmt v 




' Bremer County 


1 ' 




1 nutier t <->iint» 




rtil.i^ki < ijMtit V 


■' Carroll C)tiniy 




S('\ irr Count v 


1 C^^d'ir County 






St . Francis < ount y 

Wahiucton County 


1 CIterokcp Cjunty 




) Clav County 




Wlutt' ( ounty 


! Diifkiv (\iiiniv 


\ \ 




2<.) 




1 Doi-:itnr County 




Total 


Dcs MDJiies (\mnl y 

' Frrfuklin <y»unt V 


ii ::: 




3 

K 

1 
36 

ft 




2 1 


Connorllnit (Jump 1-30): 


' Frewwrnt County 


1 ' 


FairfirKl County- 


1 Hnmihon <'onntv 


« 1 


Norw.Jk 


' liar lin Cotinl y 


14 




Ilartforfl Co\mty-- 




Henr V Cunt v 


2 
C 


1 


TUrlin 


J:vk'" »n C-);intv 


Nt w firitain.. 




J;i >( t r • Vniut '.' 


1 


lAlohlifhi < (Kinty 

Torriueion 




\ Fi'.M .- »iH oiiiily 5 

1 <*• f otrnty i 






\Vm^hi^ur 




I.iim i Diiuiy 


J 




New llrtNon ( ounty— 




1 LyoTi <■■> int'y 





Water hury 


Miln^k I { ounty 








^ 


] Mill { ouiit ' ...! 


2 t 


Total 


r-'"i ■-- 


Mit- iwll Crmt V 


Indiuna (June 1-30): 


! O'Hrirn C..;in(y 

I'lviiMiiil h ' ■ iiinfv 




r 


All<'ti < ount V 


2 Vih horiJ ..CMUTlfV ' 2 

■J VuWi t , iri.v ■ 7 




B.utholorrii u County 

Klkharl CoMiitv. . ... 




-, 

j 

4 




pof t'twril t'l'nic Co'H't V ' * 




K«>unta]M < vniiiiy 

FiiUon Coiiru v 





1 Srnll ( ,in., » .' 

S''fM|\ CO'f! tv 

Van hiir«-ri ('.•iiiity 

\V ipf l!o < <>nrr v' 


\ 

2 
31 
12 

3 
1 

4 








• If .ml Coil 111 N 




« ,i,...np Cu'i'ifv 






il >':iitt«n t 'Mjptv 


1 


\Vet'<trf County 




lit U'lr^k .( or.iiiv 


4 

1 

24 

10 

1 

1 
1 
4 
■i 
1 
- 
i 




AVinrir !i>(k ( ounty 

"Worth <>>unl y 




11 Ml' ii»rt*»M <'■)■.! nty 







J H K •!! i OMIlt V. 


1 Wnpht Courity 




Kji >^ Cf'UMl > 




Total 




l/.iki < f>:iiifv 







j->s 1 


l..i|'ort) r<.'ii.t\ 

I/*u r«*t" *' t (uini y 

M ■, 1 >'i < o'lnf \ ' 


1 Mi.^si<: ippi(Junel 30): 

' I'.olnar <'()Mi(\ 




■"^=^ 


M ^ ' ■!!• ".:"V.. 







I lu iciLViw <'>mity 

CI rke< M'iMt 

i Cov tnuf >n < '<»uiuy 

l'\>ru i Cviiu t ■. . .' 

<.r. M'l.' * . iMiy 

Itni.,.' i ,' M, 




Mm' , r ..■ 1^ 







!..'/. . .1 •• 




]' r » <• . 1 ,• 






1. .: , - ■ ■ • 




I*'. , . . 







^1 < 


Il<.l:n.',> HiiU\ 




^]» 1 « 1 t «'il»!\ 




iss iqiienn County ..... .(7 

iitizeo by v. 


r 



1241 



August 8, 1917 



SMALLPOX— Continued. 
MiBceOuieoiui Slate Reportft-^ntinued. 



piaoa. 



Caais. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Mississippi (June 1-30)— Coil 

luwamtia County 

Jackson County 

Joocs County 

Kemper County ".... 

Lafafette County 

Lauderdale County 

Leo County 

IfadLson County 

IIarshallC\>unty 

Montgomery County 

Panola County 

Pike County 

Pontotoc County , 

Sterkey County 

Sunflower County 

Tate County 

Union Countv 

Washington County 

Yalobusha County 

Total 

NcTada (Juno 1-30): 

Elko County 

Humboldt County 

Total 

North Dakota (June 1-30): 

Benson County , 

Burlei^ County 

Cass County , 

Qoidcn VaOey County. . . . 

Grant County , 

Grists County 

U Moure Co»mty 

Pembina Coiuity 

Ramsey County 

Richbnd County 

Traill County 

Ward County , 

Wells County 

Total 



12) 



Pennsylvania (June 1-30): 

Allo/Jheny County 

Beaver County 

Bedford County 

Crawford County 

Dauphin County 

Erie County 

Indiana Count y 

Lawrence ( ount y 

Lurorno ( ount y 

Mercer ( ouuty 

Philadelphia County. . 
Warren County 

Total 

South Carolina (June 1-30): 

Berkeley Count y 

Grcen\ iUe ( ounty 

Kershaw (^ounty 

Marlboro ConntV 

Sumter (otiniy 

York County 

Total 

Washington (Jiuie 1-30): 
Adams County- 

find 

Franklin Coimty— 

I*asro 

King < ounty-- 

Seattle 

Pierce County 

Tacoma 

Spdkane Coimty - 

Spokane 

Yakima County 

TofJl 

V yoaiinj? (June 1-30): 
Carapl)ell County 



City Reports for Week Ended July 14, 1917. 



Place. 



Akron. Ohio 

BeUmsham,Wash... 

Buffalo. N. Y 

Butte.Mitnt 

Cairo,Ill 

(hicaKo.Ill 

Clerelsnd.Ohio 

Columbus, Ohio 

Danville. 111. 

Davenport, Iowa 

Denver, Colo 

Detroit, Mich 

Dulath,Minn 

Flint, Mich 

Fort Wayne. Ind — 
Grand Raoids, Mich 
Indianaoolls, Ind. . . , 
KansasCity, Kans.. 

Kansas City, Mo 

Little Rock. Ark.... 

Madison, Wis 

Memphis, Tann 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



l*lACl«' 






^JinnonrolU, Wttiti„._„ 

Miisrni ill ", Iowa.,.,.,., 

! Nashvid*'. Tfum., ,..►. 

Nor *J I AUs^ t»...,,, . 



I'itio. 
I'oMiii 

p.) tlA' 

FOi-l.-i 

St. I.o 
Salt L. 

Sioux 
Sprin- 
8f rini; 



'ifihr...,,. 

, *rMi. ,. . 

,i^<.\'a 

ri 

\(o, 

itv, titih. 

■uAi 

- -I ni .....,, 
<. ■Mila...... 



i.ln 



•I 



Wi<-!'i I. : 
I Zau<'s\ LJi^ 



n 

I 
1 

5 

4 ' 

;! 

I 

3 1 

V 

2 

I 
I 



I>«fttJlK 



Digitized by 



cboai^ 



Aagost 3, 1917 



1242 



TETANUS. 
City Reports for Week Ended July 14, 1917. 



Place. 



Chicaw), HI 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Los Angeles, Cal-- 

Newark. N.J 

New Orleans, La. 



Cases. 



I 



Deaths. 



PteM. 



Norfolk, Va 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Quincy,III 

Sacramento, Cal.. 
Trenton, N.J 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



TUBERCULOSIS. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1244. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 
State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 


New casps 
reported. 


Place. 


Now ewes 
reported. 


Connecticut: 

Fairfield County— 

IJrid;;eport 


1 
1 
2 

1 

1 
1 
4 
1 

1 

2 

1 
3 

1 
1 
2 

1 

1 
1 


Mis'^issippi: 

A dums County 




Alcom County 




Danbury (town) 


Amite County 




Norwalk 


Attala County 




Weston 


Bolivar County 




Hartford ( ounty — 


Calhoun County 




Hri'^tol 


Carroll County 




Farminrlon 


Chickasaw Coimty 


.. 


Hurt ford 


Choctaw County 




New Britain 


Claiborne Coimty 




latchneld ( oimty - 


Clirkc Coiuitv 




Salibburv 


Coahoma Coimty 




Middlesex County — 


Copiah County 




Kiist Hauij)ton 


Covington County 

UeSoto County 

Forrest Count v 




New Haven ( omity — 

New Haven 




\Vaterb\iry 


Franklin Countv 




New l.oiulon County- - 

Fran^iln 


(Jeorfje County 

Greene County 




Jewett ( ity 


Hancock Cou nt y 




New IvOndon 


Harrison (^ounty 




Tolland Coimty — 


Hinds CotmtT 




Man •afield 


Holmes County , 




Windham County— 


Ittawaraba Coimty 




I'liiuf'eld 


Jactson Countv 




\\ i 1 .i man tic 


JctTerson Countv 






Jefferson Davis Countv. 




Total 


2G 

1 
1 
6 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
5 
7 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

10 
1 
:{ 


Jones County 






Kemper County 




Indiana: 


Lurayettc County 




iJocatur Coiuity 


T>amar Count v 




Fountain Count v 


Liuidordule ( 'ount v 




Hen<lricks County 


Lawrence County 




Honrv (^ountv 


Le lie County 




Hunt in;4ton County 


j Lee t^ount V 




Jav ( 'ouiU V , 


lyoMore County 




Johnson Count V 


Lincoln Countv 




Ko<k iu^ko ( Ount v 


Lowndes Countv 




Lake Conntv 


Mafliv)n County 




Laporte Countv 


Marion County 




I^au renco Cotintv 


Monroe Count y 




Marion Conntv 


Marslmll County 




Marl in Couni v 


Neslutba Countv 




M(»r»»;:<)ii!orv < onntv 


Newton County 


\ 


Oraiii r Count V 


<) k t i 1 » W^ha ( ounty 




Hit !o\ (\)iuitv 


Cr-nola County 




Kcot I « ouni V 


I f u 1 l>i er i oihUv 




Hi. ,'(* «■: >h Countv 


1 e r\ f"o'.uji\ 




Suit t rhmd Coniitv 


1 i «' Countv 




Vaii'iorl lui Ii < > . ,i v 


1 |^o-'n'o/C(Vihlv 




Wa lunuton Co uit V 


1 I'rrni i'^s <"ounl V 






1 hcot! Countv 




'Jot U 


1 Sinv,>on C(»untv 


\ 




» Sniiil» County .' ^^-^ 


i 




Digitized by VjOOQ 


le 



1243 



August 3, 1917 



TYPHOID FEVER— <)ontlnned. 
State Seporttf for Juie» 1917— Continued. 



Place. 



Mississippi— Continued. 

Stone Coontj...^ 

Sunflower County. 

Tate County 

Tipfieh County 

TisIuRuingo County. 

Uni on County 

Warren County 

Wadiln|ton County 

Wavne County 

Woteter County 

Yalobu3ha County 

Yazoo County 

TotaL 

Nevada: 

Washoe County 

White Pine County 

Total 

North Dakota: 

BurtoCoimtv 

BnrWsh County 

OBttsCwmtv 

Bddy Cojinty 

McT^ean ('mn'r 

MorUm CoiiDty 

W oantrail County 

Ndson County 

BirMond County 

R<^ett4> Coimtv 

Stctsman County 

Ward County 

Wrlls County 

Total 

Aiudns r!>finty 

AMe^fftittiy CotJOtt .. .'..'/. 

JifiBstrcin''; i 'ounty 

^^ ~T t '(HJt*t v., '..'..'. 

_d CcHinlly.,^..]*.'!] 

«,--*t*Oljn!v.,_. 

WMr €mmt%\ _ , , 

UraftfiT'ii <VttntT 

Btirka C Vjimt v . ' ....!!!!! 
Untlf 'f < ^f^ i ri I y . ....'...,,. 

Vtiesitar i ounty . ........ 

Clarion C mm ty.... 

Clearfield County 

Crawtord County. .,,', ,,] 

Bauplun County 

DelAvaro County . ..[ 

Erie County 

Favette County 

Fraokiin County 

Orecnc County 

HmtincdaD Oounty .' ',.'.. 

Indiana County 

Joflfcrson (^ounty .'...'. 

Juniata County ,.,, 

Lancaster County 

lAwrence County 

LelMBMn County 

Lehigh County 

Luzerne County 

Lycoming County 

Mercer County 

Mifflin County 

Montgomery County 

Montour County 

Northampton County 

Northumberland County. 
Perry County 



New cases 
reported. 



495 



Place. 



I New cases 
reported. 



Pc nnsy lyania— Cont inued . 
PhiladHpWa Coimty . . . . 
SchiiyJiiU County ...... 

Snvdcr County 

TioRa County 

Venango County 

Washington Coun ty 

Westmoreland Coimty . . 
York County 



Total. 



South rwoiiiui: 

Utsmiion fVrfiiitv 

Ber kflif y < ^10 a t V 
1JbmrSi*»Cchii rmin i v 

I^ijrolii'jJ* f I wuily 

Fairaiid ( uimty .\ 

(3 rf **nw(»cii i oiini y 

K^r:.lifi.w f^tajnty /. 

hiUlttUf i'QMTXlf , . 

If aXioCl ( IfElTit J ._'_.,. 

ll>%Jit>r>rH ( nuilty 

Ni'Wl«-fTj < OiiOly,,... 

I h-oiiae 1 1)1 J n I V ,...,., . 

PSctjpDj * naD I y . . . _ , . 
Hi r- tilttk I ( t*iimy . . [ [ 

3kj]JLid<i Coun! V ».. 

lifiiilsmJ'itiif TiituiTy.. 
:feijiLl4ir 'fumty , .... 



Total. 



Wa5hlnf!;ton: 

Benton Coimtv 

Clarke Count V 

RldRefield 

Cowiitz Count V— 

Woodland" 

Klnu County— 

Seattle.'. 

Kltaap Count y— 

Chariest on 

LiBC<dn ( 'ounty 

Davenport 

Pacific Cminl y— 

Dwaco • . .' 

Pierce Coimtv— 

Tacoma 

Skagit Count y- 

Mauit X'enion... 
Snohomish ("onnty- 

Everett "... 

Monroe 

Spokano Coimty— 

S|X)kane 

SterensCoinUv 

Walla WalliWountv. 

WuUu Walla..;.. 
Whitman County 

St. John 

Yakima County 



Total. 



Wyoming: 

Uinta County.. 
Carbon (ounty. 



Total. 



92 
1 
1 
2 
2 

11 
7 

10 



D i g i t i zed by ^ 



29H 



6 
1 
4 

30 

2 
1 
2 

10 
4 
7 
1 
1 
5 

20 
3 

10 

13 
2 

IK 
3 

12 
1 
1 

IftS 



1 

2 

9 
5 

12 
1 
2 

2 
2 
1 
6 



Gbogk 



AuffUHt 3, 1917 



1244 



TYPHOID FEVER— CoutiHued. 
Arkansas Report for May, 1917. 



Place. 


Newciscs 
reported. 


Place. 


NewciM 
reported. 


Arkansas: 

Garland County 


8 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 


Arkansas— Continaed. 
MKsissijnpf Coanty. . . . 


S3 


Greene Count v 


Sev ier (^cHint v... .'. ; . 


8 


Hempstead < ountv 


Washington County 


8 


Hot nnrins C ountv 


Total 




Jefferson Coi.nty 


56 


Marion County 











City Reports for Week Ended July 14, 1917. 



Place. 



Albany, N.Y 

Baltimore, Md 

Beaver Falls, Pa 

Birmingham, Ala 

Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Cairo, ill 

Cambridge, Mass 

Charleston, S. C 

Chelsea, Mass 

Chicago, 111 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

ColToy\illc, Kans 

Columbus, Ohio 

Cuml)erland, Md 

Danville, lU 

l>en\er, * olo 

Dolroit, Mich 

El I'lLSo, Tex 

Everett, Mass 

Fort Worth, Tex 

(Jalvc>^ton, Tex 

Grand Rapids, Mich.. 

HarrLsburg, Pa 

Hartford, ( onn 

Hol)o}>en, N. J 

Imllanapniis, Ind 

Jaclson, Mich 

JohnsUnrn, Pa 

Kansas < ity, Mo 

Knowille, Te.nn 

Little Rock, Ark 

Los Angeles, < al 

L>^lchburg, Va 

Lynn, Mass 

M'em[)his, Tenn 

MihvanKee, Wi^ 

Mobile. Ala 

Nashville, Tenn 

Newark, N^. J 

New lied ford. Mass... 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



New Britain, Conn 

Newcastle, Pa 

New Haven, Conn 

New Orleans, La 

Newton, Mass 

NewYork, N. Y 

Niagara Falls, N. Y 

Norfolk, Va 

Norrlstown, Pa 

North Adams, Mass 

Oakland, (al 

Oklahoma ( Ity, Okla 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsbiu^h, Pa 

Portland, Me 

Providence, R. I 

Qnincy , Mass 

Richmond, Va 

Rocky Mount, N. C 

Rutland, Vt 

8t. Louis, Mo 

Salt Lake ( ity, Utah 

San Francisco, Cal 

Sacramento, ( al 

SandiKky, Ohio 

Savannah, Go, 

Schenectad v, N.Y 

Seattle, Wash 

South Hend. Ind 

SpriTigficld, Mass 

Stcelton. Pa 

SteubenTiile, Ohio 

Syracuse, K. Y 

Toledo, Ohio 

Trenton, N. J 

Troy, N.Y 

Wa.shington, T>. C 

Whe<'linp, W. Va 

Wichiia, Knn^^ 

Wilmington, N. (^ 

Wjjision-Salem, N. C ' 

Worcester, Mass ] 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS. 
State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 



Connecticut 

In !i ma 

Iowa 

Mi ;. is.-;ippi . 
Nevada 



Cases reported. 



Cases reported. 



1 diph- 
theria. 



Measles. 



137 



9.S-1 i 



Scarlet 
fe\er. 



114 

22 



Place. 



I>iph- I vp.^i„^ 



I 



North Dakota. . 

IN'miv' h -ani;^ . . 
Soiiih aroiitia. 
WaUiin-tcn.... 
Wyomiiii; 



33 
<^1 
94 



'jitized' 



ed-ByXl^j' 



HI : 

4,3S9 1 
7^ t 
48.5 I 

oo ^1 

1_ 



Scarlet 
fever. 



32 
564 

4 

89 
94 



1245 



Aufost S» 1917 



DIPHTHBRIA* MBASLBS, SCARLET FEVBR, AND TUBratCULOSIS— 

Continued. 



\ Report te Miqr, 1917. 
During the month of May, 1917, 6 cases of diphtheria, 474 cases of 
metries, and 8 cases of scarlet fever were reported in Arkansas. 
City Reporta for Week Ended My 14, 1917. 



City. 



OrtrSaOJOOO 

Baltimof 



Md 



Baltimore^ If 

Bostoo, Ibw 

Chiewo,Dl 

C]rrAiid.Ohla.. 
D«tr»lt,Mieli.... 
L« Aneales.Oal.. 
New rock, N. Y. 
PhgMlelphi».P«k. 
Ftttsbur^Pa... 



BtLouli, 

Vnb 90O»O0e to MO/XM> 



.N.Y.... 
CfeKimMti, OhM. 
I<f»y City, N.J. 
— ^ ;Wto.. 



Newark, N.J 

NewOrteus,].*.. 



8an FraacteOpCal 

Seattle, Wsili 

yfttttiaetm^D.C 

Vnn »D^ to 300,000 inbabit- 



m,Ohk) 

Dcavet.Coko 

ZMiKHAoUs, Ind 

JCuKsstltv, Mo 

yoryjMid, Ow^ 

Piorktooce, £L I 

Roebcstcr N Y 
Flea 100,060 to 10Q|,000 'iaimiaii- 
aotK 

Albu&y,N. Y 

Birmiactuun, Ala 

BridRMMft, (^<iiin 

Ca^dS^lL 
OamdeaTN J 

r^ River. Mast ^ 

Fort Worth, Tex j 

Grand Baoids, Mich 
HarUord, roirn. 
Lawraxoe,Mi 
I'ffvelLlUBS. 

LrnD.MMas 

Meaphia, Tenn 

MadiTiOe, Tenn. 

Mew Bedford, Mass.. 
Ntnr Ila>F«ii,Cotm... 

Oakkad.Cal 

Oaaba,Nebr 

Reading, Pa 

BiDhmouL Va 

fcttXakeCIty, Utah. 

ss«4- 



1V)Mo,6kio. 

TT«ntoo,N.J , 

_ Worceetar, Mass 

hmk 20.000 to 100,000 inhabit- 
ants: 

Akron, Ohio , 

Afientown, Pa , 

Atlantic city. N.J 

Bayoon^N.^ 

Berkeley. Cal 

BJnghamtoiv M. Y 



Popul*- 
tkmasoC 
Julv 1,1916 
(estimated 

by V, 8. 

Boreao). 



750,479 

2,407,722 

674,073 

671,784 

503,812 

5,602,841 

1,300,518 

579,000 

7S7,300 



408,558 
410,476 
300,345 
416,535 
303,454 
408, 8M 
371, 747 
403,516 
348,639 
363,980 



214,878 
flO,80D 
271,706 
2n,847 
2K,463 
254,960 
260,417 



104,199 
1^1.768 
1M,579 
Ut,981 
101,213 
117,224 
128,306 , 
104, Mft ; 

II^SSO 

100,000 

U3.M5 

10t,42S 

140,915 I 

117.057 I 

U8,158 

140, 6)15 

198,604 

165.470 

109,381 

I56,G.S7 

117.;iW 

155. (i24 
191,554 
in,5W 
163,314 



!l.5,625 

63.5a'» ; 

57,r.oo . 
69. SW |. 

U,97i 



Total 

deaths 

from 

all 

oausei. 



183 
597 
187 
194 



1,134 
430 
161 



156 
114 

77 
80 



101 



143 



100 



83^ 

27 
28 

2S 
44 
19 
16 

26 
37 
47 
22 



Diphtheria. 



5 
57 

149 

29 

57 

4 

257 
44 
15 
40 



V 

12 
17 
16 
11 

7 
8 



17 " 



Measles. 



93 
173 
34 
16 
26 
355 
72 
63 
20 



Scarlet 
fever. 



6 
24 

159 

7 

53 

9 

58 

18 

4 

30 



DigitiiJdHay' 



Tuber- 
culosis. 



64 
131 
394 
44 
23 
45 
326 
151 
30 
54 



3l 
23 

6 
12 

7 

5 



13 
26 
74 
14 
18 
16 
162 
60 
10 
11 



12 
11 

4 
10 



18 
27 
11 
3 
16 



11 
4 
4 



gk 



August 8, 1017 



1246 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUSratCULOSIS- 

Continned. 



City Reports for Week Ended July 14, 1917— Contmued. 








Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 
by U. 8. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

from 

aU 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
lever. 


Tuber- 
culosis. 


City. 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


From 50,000. to 100,600 inhabit- 
ants—Continued. 
Brorliton, Ma"W 


67,449 
60,852 
60,734 
57,144 
M,495 
63,705 
75, 195 
76,078 
54,772 
76,183 
72,015 
77.214 
6S,529 
99,437 
50,8r>3 
57,343 
51,155 
78.283 
58.221 
.'>3,794 
89.612 
92.943 
71.744 

00, S9.'i 
55,042 
53.;i30 
68,Ha> 
99..') 19 
57,078 
87,039 
6S.946 
6L120 
3l.a,-i.l 
6(i,OS3 
77,916 
70, 722 
76, 776 
94,265 
51.6.16 

27.732 
37.3S,> 
34.204 
34,814 
32, HW 
32, 730 
27.632 
43,425 
46. 192 
29.. -^19 
26,tt:4 
32. m 
4<.Ml 
3'* >»73 


17 
18 
36 
10 
14 
48 


1 
4 
1 








1 
1 




1 


2 


Canton, Ohio 








1 


Charleston, S. C 




1 








1 


Covintrton. Kv 




1 






2 


Duliith, Minn 






19 








I 


El Paso, Tex 














6 


Erie, Pa 










1 




5 
1 
3 


28 


E vansviUe, Ind 


17 
16 
23 
18 
14 
22 

30' 

6 
21 
21 
12 










3 


Flint, Mich 


6 

4 
2 
3 
2 

1 
1 
1 
2 




...... 


3 
5 
5 

4 
6 





8 


1 


] 


Ft. Wavne, Ind 


2 


Harrisburg, Pa 




1 
5 

1 
1 




5 
7 

1 


2 


Hoboken, N. J 

Johnstown, Pa 


2 
2 


Kansas Citv, Kans 




Lancaster, ^'a 





3 










Little Rock, Ark 


... 











Maiden. Mass 


1 


15 
3 

1 








3 
2 




Manchester, N. H 




1 




2 


Mobile, AH 








New IJritaiD, Conn 
















Norfolk, Va 






1 




i 

1 




2 


4 


Oklahoma City, Okla 

Pa^^aic N J 


19 
17 
11 
27 
6 
11 
33 
14 






2 


i6 
1 

1 
1 


1 








2 




Rockford, 111 . .... 


5 
5 





2 

1 
2 

1 




2 


Sacramento. Cal 






6 


Saginaw, M ich 




1 

42 

1 

4 




San I>icgo Cal . . 




40 

1 
15 




4 


Savanniui. CJa 






3 


Schenectady. N. Y 














Sioux City, lowa 








5 
6 
1 






Somerville, Mass 


9 
12 
17 
11 
13 


7 




■"•s" :::::: 




3 
2 


1 


Soiith Hend, Ind 


4 
5 
9 
1 

46 
3 

17 
5 





1 


Springfield, III 


2 






Spriii^'field, Ohio 




1 




5 


1 


Terre Halite, Ind 








Troy, NY 

Wichita, Kans 


5 






3 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 





11 
2 
2 

5 
3 


4 

1 


Wilke>-Barro, Pa 


15 
27 

4 

10 

U 

4 
9 
9 

1 
13 

; 


9 
2 
1 


1 
1 




W'ilininjjtou, Del 


5 


York, Pa 




From ri.'JOO to .^ OOOinhabitanUs: 
Alameda, Cal 




1 




1 


Anbiim N Y 


1 
1 










Aurora 111 






4 

1 








Austin. Tex 














liellingham, Wash.. 
















Brookline, Mass 


1 
1 
4 
5 




4 




1 
2 
3 
2 




1 




Butler, I'a 




Butte, Mont ! 




1 






4 
2 
6 
2 

1 




Chelsea, Ma^s 


1 


Chicopec, Mass 




2 
5 
2 
2 




2 


Ciiml>erland Md 












1 


Danville, III'. 






















2 

1 
2 






l)ubu<jiio lowa 














E.L4 Orange, N.J 

FlL'in III 


■12.1.VS 
2^.2.'.? 
;<'),2.j.{ 
3.'>, J.Mi 
41.7S1 
4l.Sf;:j 

4S.477 
3'.,.'^(Vi 

31.. '.70 
3N.676 
31,077 
4LO'.»7 

!6.:,i:» 
27. .s7 


5 
6 

I 

10 
15 
11 

8* 
13 
6 

22 
15 
12 

1 S 


1 

1 
1 




12 

1 

'! 

3 
1 








1 


1 


E\ orrtt Mns»5 












Evervlt, Wa^h 





1 
2 




I 
3 




Fitch' >nrg, M jss 


1 

1 




1 


(iaIve>ton Tex . .. 


1 














Haverlii 1 f. 'Mass 


1 
1 
1 








1 




2 


1 






2 
33 
4 






Kaliiiiiaz'K) .Mich..... 








4 

1 
1 


2 


Kenosha, Wi-; 


1 


...... 


1 




Kno.wille, Tenn 


....^. 






La (rosso ^^'ls 


1 


Lexington. Kv 




1 
1 

1 

2 








1 


2 


Lima Ohio 








3 






Lincoln. .NpIt 


■ ■ 











Long Wt'irh, « al 

Lorain, Ohio 


t 

i;::::: 






...... 









Digitized by 



Googfe 



1247 



August 3, 1917 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS— 

Goutlnued. 



City Reports for Week Ended July 14, 


1917 


— Continued. 








Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 
by U. S. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scariet 
fever. 


Tu 
culc 

1 

1 


ber- 
)sis. 


City. 


1 


i 


1 


a 







1 


From 2SJX30 to 50,000 inhabit- 
ants—Continued. 
I/Tiidibiire. Va 


32,940 
30,699 
47.521 
26,234 
26,318 
29,603 
41.133 
31,927 
30,108 
43,715 
37,353 
31.401 
31,404 
33,080 
46,450 
41,185 
38,623 
39.6.51 
.36.798 
38,136 
46,480 
43,28^1 
28,926 
38,902 
27,445 
46,236 
36,283 
48,726 
30.570 
29,8^ 
43, 139 
43,377 
33.800 
29,892 
31,155 
30,863 

22.874 
15,010 
13,59J 
21,685 
15,794 

» 13,075 
17,518 
22,669 
20,743 
24.276 
• 16,950 
23,. 539 
20.930 
15,395 

« 14,610 
17,445 
13.284 
17,500 
23, 12») 
15,243 
20, 9H.) 

> 22,019 
19.926 
23.S05 
17,524 

ii.o»;g 

12,007 
14.831 
20.193 
13,821 
15. .548 
21.618 
23,228 


10 
2 

13 
9 


12 








1 


li^adison, Wis...... 






2 

1 
3 

1 
7 

1 




7 


1 






1 




2 


1 


Medfonf Mass 








1 


Montclalr, N.J 








1 
3 




2 




Newbnrgb, N. Y 






4 


New Castle, Pa 








12 
3 




Newport, Ky 


8 
10 
10 
20 
6 
5 
7 
7 
5 
5 
6 
6 
8 
13 
11 
9 












3 


Newport, R.I 










2 
1 




I 


Newton, Mass 








1 


...... 








Niagara Falls, N. Y 










1 


Norrlstown, Pa 














Ogrt«»n, TItfllh 


















Oraiige, N.J 


. 








2 





2 

1 
4 
8 


1 


Pasadena, Cal ' 






1 
1 
5 

1 
1 
3 




1 


Perth AmlM>y N. J 














Pilt«fleld, Masi 












1 


Portsmouth, Va. 








2 




G 


Quincy, ni.l 












Quincv, Mass ... 








2 
1 






1 


Racine, Wis ', 








i 

1 




Roanoke, Va 














1 

* 


Rock Island. Ill 


1 




2 
5 

1 
1 




1 
1 






San Jose. Cai 




1 

1 




Steubenville, Ohio 


8 
10 
7 
3 
10 










Superior, Wis 












2 


Taunton, Mass 









2 
3 

1 








Topeka, Kans 












'I 


1 


Waltham, Mass 


4 




17 
11 

1 
1 
1 




1 


W&lertown, N. Y 






V«*tHoboken, N. J 

VSTweling, W. Va 


2 
13 

is" 

15 
10 

11 

5 

5 

....... 

1 

ii" 

3 
3 

e' 

5 
3 
2 
7 
4 


1 




! 2| 


1 
1 


I 


>Vi/iiam^>ort,«Pa 


3 




] 







mimington, N . C 




1 






U inston-Salem, N C 






1 




! ft 


2 


Zancsvi lie, Ohio 






2 :::::: i 


2 


From lO.or^Uo 25,000lnhabitants: 
Alton, 111 : 






s 






6 


1 


Ann A^^o^, Mich 


1 




...::j '2 




BerUn. N. H 


1. 




Kraddock, Pa 


1 




1 




» 




. .. 1 


Cairo. lil 




1 


Clinton, Mass 












2 




CkrfTejrvUIe, Kans 


1 
1 








1 




Concord, N. H 




2; 









1 


Dunkirk. N. Y 




' 






(JaJesburg. Ill 


5 
1 

1 




1 


' \ 


Harrison, N.J 


::;:::!. ..::j.:::.:i...::: .::.:: 


Keamy,N. J 


1 


III. 


Kcdf^omo, Ind 


1 




i 1 r 




Long Branch. N.J 

Mannette, Wis 






11 






1 










1 




Melrose, M ass .... 


1 


" 






' 




Morristown, N. J 










2 


Muscatine, 1 owa 




1 1 ::;■■■ 




1 


1 


Nantlcoke, Pn 


2 
2 
8 
8 
6 
4 












Newburypwt, Mass 






2 


1 




1 




New London, Conn 






11 
2 
1 


( 






North Adams, Mass 










1 
3 
1 




Northampton, Mass 






1 ' 




1 


Plainfield, N J 








Pontlac, Jkfich 






7 


; 11 






Portsmouth. N. H 


5' 

2 

5 
2 

4 


2 










Rocky Mount, N. C 







' 




2 




Rutland, Vt 






1 


1 






Sandusky, Ohio 










2 




Saratoga Springs, N. Y 

8teelt(Mi,}^ 






1 
1 








1 





•^ 




2 





Washington, Pa 

Wilklnsburg, Pa 




1 






7 






1 



















90 



1 Population April 15, I'UO; no ^ 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOREIGN. 



CUBA. 
Communicable Diseases — Habaiuu 

Communicable diseases have been notified at Habana as follows: 



Disease. 


June 21-80, 1917. 


Remain- 
ing under 


IVI - 


June 21-ao, 1917. 


Remain- 
ing under 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


treat- ^™««. 
ment. i 


Caaes. 


Deaths. 


treat- 
mmt. 


Diphtheria 


6 


1 


6 Paratyphoid fever. . 
10 1 1 T vDhofd fever 


2 

13 




2 


Leprosy 


3 


38 


Malaria 


9 

8 


1 
1 


19 1 
19 • 

1 


Varicella 


I 


Measles 















CHOLERA, PLAGUE. SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER. 
Reports Received During the Weeic Ended August 3, 1917.' 



CHOLERA. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India: 

Prtloiitta 


May 20-26 




22 

108 


m 


Indochina: 

Saigon 


Apr. 23-M:ay27.... 
Feb. 3 


163 

1 
4 
1 
3 




Persia: 

Mazanderan Province— 
\nilr Kela 






Jan. 15-17 








Jan. 17 






Mwhidpssitr .... 


Jan 31 






Philippine Islands: 

Provinces 






June 10-16, 1917: Cases, 134; 
deaths, 96. 


Albav 


Jime9-16 


16 
44 

3 
32 

6 
31 

2 


11 

34 
4 
27 

.1 

2 


Bohol 


do 




Capiz 


. .. do 




Cehu 


do 




Lcvtc 

Sorsogon 


do 

do 




Tayaoas 


... do 











PLAGUE. 



Arabia: 

Aden 

China: 

Hongkong. 
India 



Bombay 

Calcutta 

Indo-1'hlna: 

Saigon 

Cnion of South Africa: 

Orange Free State . 



June 5-11 

May 27-Jane 9. 



May 37-June2 

May 20-36 



Ai«-. 23-May27.. 



27 



15 



May 20-26, 1917: Cases, 4,339; 
deaths, 3,423. 



Apr. ie-22, 1917: 1 < 
Apr. 9-22, 1917; 
deaths, 17. 



Total, 
26; 



> From medical officers of the Public Health Service, American consuls, and other sources. 

(1248) ^ , 

Digitized by VjOOQlC 



1249 



August 8, 1917 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER-- 

Continued. 

Reports Received During the Week Ended Angnst 3, 1917— Continued. 

SMALLPOX. 



Place. 


Dat«. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


ChlnA: 

Aotiiiif 


June 11-24. 

May 27-June2 


3 




Varioloid. 


Chungiriof 




Present. 


Dairen 


June 3-23 


15 

1 
4 
7 
10 

20 


3 

1 
11 






June 9-16 




siianghalT 


June 11 24 

Juno 3-9 


Cases foreign; deaths native. 


Ttentsiii 




Tsingtao . 


Juno 12 16 

May 27- June 2 

Mav3(V26 


2 

? 

42 

4 




iDdla: 

Bombav 




Calcutta 




Indo-China: 

Saigon 

Italy: 

Tiuin 


Apr. 23 May 27. . . 

June 1» 24 

June 18-24 

Juno 17- 30 

May 27 June 9 

Apr. 15'May 12. . , 
May 13-19 


132 
12 

2 
67 

4 

145 
1 




Japan: 

Kobe 




Mexico: 

Mexico City . 






Portugal: 

Lfebon 






Ru5.sia: 

Petrocrad 






RiRa; . 






Sweden: 

Stockhcdm 


MaT 27 -June 2 . . . . 


1 




Venezuela: 

Maracalbo 


June I8-July 1 . . . . 















TYPHUS FEVER. 



China: 

Hankow I June&-16 

Gr«t Britain: | 

Cork • June 17-23 

Orewe: I 

Salomki May i» June 16. 

Japan: I 

Nagasaki I June lH-21 

Mexico: i 

Mexico (lly I June 17 30 

Xctherlan^U: t 

Rotterdam ' June 9 23 

Rus^: 

Tetrograd Apr. 15 May 18. . .: 68 



Reports Received From June 30 to July 27, 1917. 

CHOLERA. 



Place. 


1 Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India- 

BassiHn 

Cakuttfi 


... Apr. 1-Mav 5 

. .. Apr. 2" M ly VJ .. 




8 
251 
1 
1 
2 
1 
15 




Madrid 


Apr. 22 2^ 


i 




Maiii.Uy 


... M;iy r>-i2 




Mmilrrc.ii 


...! May ir< 19 






i*a',..>-ku 


.., Apr. .".'-.Miu .- 

..! Apr. 21-May lU.... 

..j Apr. 2-8 

1 






Rangoon 

Ja\*a: 

Ea>l Java 


30 

1 




West Java 




Apr. 13-19, 1917: 1 case. 


r.;il ivia 


..' Apr. 13^19 


1 




Philippine I>lands: 

l*ro\incc.> 


• 1- • 




May 20-Juno 9, 1917: Cases, 519; 
deaths, 321. 


All»y 

.VmljosCamarlncs... 


.. Mav2i)^Junc9 

..! Juiio.i 9 


61 

2 

207 

1 
111) 

I 


41 

1 

129 


Bohol 

C-apiz 


..I May 20-Juno9 

. . June ;}-9 . . . 




Cebu 


.lo 


43 
1 




Sorsoeon 

Tayaoas 


do 




1 dn 






, , I i^r\r^\^ 









August 8, 1017 



1250 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TTPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW 

Continued. 



Reports Receired From Jnne 30 to July 27, 1917— Continued. 

PLAGUE. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Arabia: 

Aden 


Hay 3-30 




35 
82 


^Siffl."''"'='^'''= 


CJeylon: 

Colombo 


Apr.8-Mayl9 

Apr. 29-May5 


39 


Amoy 


Presrait and in vicinity. 


HonEkonc .... . 


May 13-26 


8 


5 


Kwangtiuip Provinee— 
Ta-pu district 


June 2 


Present 


Egypt 








Jan. i-May 17, 1917: Cases, 2S2; 


* Suez 


May 12-17 


4 

12 


2 

6 

1 
2 

1 


deaths, 116 


Provinces — 

Fayoum 


May 11-17 




(f ir^eh 


May 17 




Minieh 


May 12-15... 


2 
3 

2 




Siout 


May 12 




Great Britain: 

London ; 


May 3-8 


2In hospital at port. From 8. 8. 

Sardinia from Australian and 

oriental ports. 
Apr. 15-May 19, 1917: CSasM, 

30,206; deaths, 39,613. 


India 






Bassfin 


Apr. 1-May 19. ... . 




39 

242 

30 

33 

411 

171 

9 

52 

1 

110 

2 


Bonihay . , . 


Apr. 22-Mav26.... 
Apr. 29 May 19. . , 
Apr. 1-MUV19 


....f*. 


Calcutta 




Uenzada. 




Karachi 


Apr. 22 May 26. . . 
do 


400 
210 




Madras Presidency 




Mandalay 


Apr. *-Mayl2 




Moulmein 


Apr. 1-May 12 






Myin^van 


Apr. 1-7 ! 




Ran^bon . . . 


Apr. 15-Mayl9... 
Apr. 8-14 


115 




Toungoo 




Java: 

East Java 






Apr. »-42, 1917: cases; 18; deaths, 


Siirabava 


Apr. 2-22 


13 

5 


13 
5 


Siirakarta 


do 




Peru 






May 16-31, 1917: Cases, IS. 

At Mollendo. 
At Callao. 
AtChiclayo. 


Departments— 

ArtMjui|ta 


May lG-31 




4 

1 
2 

1 
11 

1 




callao 


do. ..*. .' 




]vainl)a vcqiie 


do 




Libertad 


. ...do 






Lima 


do 




Trujillo. 
At Lima. 


Siara: 

Bangkok 

Union of South Africa: 

Cape of (iood Iljpe Stale- 
ly uecnstown 


Apr. 22 May 20. . . 


10 











SMALLPOX. 



Australia: 

New South Wales I 

Brcwarrina i Apr. 27- May 10... 



QiiamlKmc. 
Queensland - 

Tlmrsday l^lnnd Quar- 
antineVtulion. 



MayO 12 

May 6-Junel6.. 



Brazil: 

Bahia 

Uio de Janeiro 

Can-Ida: 

Manitoba- 
Winnipeg 

No\ a Scolia— 

Halifax 

I'ort llawkesbury i June 17-30 

Cc.vlon: I 

' Colombo I May6-12.. 



.do. 
May 9. . 



June 10-16 

June 18 July?. 



16 



Apr. 27-May 10, 1917: Cases, «. 



From s. s. St. Albans 1mm Kobe 
via Hongkong. Vessel pro- 
ceeded to Toamsville, Bris- 
bane, and Sydney, in « 
tine. 



Preseotindistilet. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1251 



Aufust 3, 1917 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER- 

Continued. 

Reports Reedred Prom June 90 lo July 27, 1917— Continued. 
SMALLPOX— Continued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


China: 

Amoy„ 


Apr. 29-May 26. . . 






Present and in vicinity. 
Present. 


Antiipg, . . . , . ......-- 


May 21-27 


1 




rhiingkfng. ^ . _ 


May6-26 




Do. 


rhangsha - r - - 


May 27- June 2 

May 13-June 2.... 
Apr.23-May6.... 
MayO-26 


5 
11 

7 
7 

1 






Dairen 


1 




Harbin 


On Chinese Eastern Ry. 


Hongkong . . . 


6 


Manchuria Station 


Apr. 23-29 

May 27-Jime 2 


Do. 


Mokden... 




Present. 


Shanghai 


May 21- June 10... 
May 13-26 


8 
5 

1 
25 

33 


16 


Cases foreign; deaths among na- 
tives. 


Tientsin 


Tsitshar Station 


Apr. 16-22 

May22-Junell... 

Apr. 3a-JunolO... 


On Chinese Eastern Ry. 
At another station on railway, 
lease. 


Tsingtao. 


3 

7 


Alexandria 


G«rmanv 


Mar. 18 Apr. 28, 1917: Cases, 715 
in cities and 32 States and 


Berlin 


Mar. 18- Apr. 28... 
. . .do 


ioG 

16 
18 
50 
20 

2 
10 

1 

68 




Bremen 




districts. 


Charlottenburg . 


do. .. 






Hamburg 


. . .do 






Leipzig . . .. 


do 






Lobeoi- :::.:::::.:.... 


. ...do 






Munich 


do 






Stuttgart 


do 






India: 

Bombay 


Apr. 22-May 26... 
Anr. 2^Mav 19 


35 

11 

5 

35 

4 

8 
15 




Calcutta 




Karachi 


Apr. 22-May 10.... 
Apr. 22-May 20.... 
Apr.l5-May26.... 

May 21 -Juno 3 

May 27- June 17... 

May 2?v-June 3 

May 1(3-June 10. . . 
Mav 27-June 1.. . 


13 
66 
25 

20 

50 

1 

161 




Madras 




Rangoon 




Turin 




Jipan: 

Kobe 




Nagasaki 




o^a^.. ..:.:::::::. : 


56 

1 

1 




Yokdiama 




Java: 

East Java 


Apr. 2-29 


11 

16 




Mid-Java 


Apr. 1-21 




West Java 






Apr. 13-May 10, 1917: Cases, 46; 
deaths, 7. 


Batavia 


Apr. 13-May3 

June 3-10 


11 
95 


2 


Mexico: 

Mexico City 


Monterey : 


June 18-24 


24 




Philippine Islands: 

Manila 


May 13-June 9 

May 13-26 

Mar. 1-31 


6 

4 


Varioloid. 


Portugal: 

Lisbon 






Portuguese East Africa: 

_ Lourenco Marque* 


1 
2 




Russia: 

Archangel 


May 1-14 


7 

186 
2 
23 




Petrograd 


Feb.18-Mar.10.... 

Mar.ll-May5 

Mar.15-21 




Riga 




Jan. 1-31, 1917: Cases, 7. 


„ Vladivostok 


7 

3 
5 




Spain: 

Madrid 


May 1-31 




Seville 


do 






„ Valencia 


Jnne3-23 ..». 


3 

5 

1 
1 

2 




Straits Settlements: 


Mar.l^Mayl2.... 
Apr. 22-28- .. . 


2 




Sweden: 

Malmo 




Stockhohn 


May 20-26 






Tunisia: 

Tunis 


Juno 2-8 . 






Turkey in Asia: 

Trcbizond 


Feb. 25- Apr. 13 


15 




IJnion of South Africa: 

Johannesburg 


Mar. 12-24 


4 













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August 3, 1917 



1252 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FFTER, AND YELLOW PEVER- 

rontiiiu**d. 

Reports Received From June 30 to July 27, 1917— Continued. 

TYPHUS FEVER. 



Place. 


Date. 


(ases. 


Deaths. 


Austria-Hungary: 

Austria 




Bohemia 


Oct.22-Dec.l7.... 
do 


(34 

soo 

47 
617 

10 
243 

5 




Galicia 




Lower Austria 


do .... 




Mora\ ia 


do 




Silesia 


do::::: 




Stvria 


do 




Upper Austria 

Huntrarv 


do 


:' 






Butiapcst 


Fob. 19-Mar.25.... 
May 30- June 9.... 
Apr. 30- June 10.... 
May ia-19 


83 

2 

1,421 




China: 

Tsingtao 




Alexandria 


413 
15 


Greece: 

Saloniki 


Japan: 

Nagasaki 


Jmie 11-17 


1 
7 


Java: 

Mid- Java 


Apr. 1-30 


2 


West Java 




Batavia 


Apr. ii. May in.... 
June;j-lt; 


22 
1H3 

1 

2 
10 

5 




Mexico: 

Mexico City 




Portuguese Kas* Vfrica: 

Louren^o Marquez 


Mar. 1-31 





Russia: 

Archan^^cl 


Mav 1-14 




Petroia"a(.l . . 


I>|). is-Mar. 10.... 

•Ian. 1-31 

Mar. 29 .May 21.... 

May 1-31 


... . 

3 


Rira 


Vladivostok 


. 


Spain: 

Madrid 


2 









Remarks. 



Oct. 22-Dcc. 17, 
2,371. 



1917: Cuei, 



Feb. 1&-Mar. 25, 1917: Cases. 
1,381. 



Apr. 13-May 10. 1917; Cases, 26. 



YELLOW FEVER. 



Mexico: 

Yucatan, State- 
Polo 



June 23. 



In person roceiUly arrived from 
Mexico nty. 



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PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 



VOL 32 AUGUST ie» 1917 No. 32 

POUOMYEUnS (INFANTEiE PARALYSIS) SITUATION. 

A statement of the cases of poliomyelitis reported since Jmie 1, 
1917, appears in this issue, b^inning on page 1283. Up to the first 
of June the disease had not been reported in unusual prevalence in 
any locality. 

In June an outbreak developed in Washington County, Vt. Up to 
August 4 there had been reported in the coimty 57 cases. Many of 
the cases were in the city of Montpelier, which is in this county. 

In Ohio an outbreak was reported in Belmont County, with the 
principal focus at Martins Ferry. 

In West Virginia an outbreak began in July in Marion County, with 
the principal focus at Monongah. 

In Maryland 15 cases were reported in Allegany County between 
July 15 and August 4. 

In Massachusetts 18 cases were reported between June 1 and 
August 4 at Haverhill, a city of 44,115 population. 

In Minnesota seven cases were reported in Blue Moimds Township, 
Pope County, between July 22 and 28. 

In Virginia 22 cases were reported during July in Rockingham 
County. 

These are the only localities in which it can be said that outbreaks 
have occurred. For the most part the localities involved have had a 
comparatively small population and altogether the number of cases 
has not been large. While cases of the disease have been reported in 
small numbers from most parts of the country, this can not be con- 
sidered other than usual. 



TYPHOID FEVER AT NASHVILLE, TENN- 

There appears to be an imdue prevalence of typhoid fever at 
Nashville, Tenn., the number of cases reported during the five weeks 
ended August 4 being 7, 10, 40, 24, and 40, respectively. 

01 (1253) 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



August 10, 1917 1254 

EXTRA CANTONMENT ZONE REGULATIONS. 

BEGULATIONS GOVERNING THE SALE OF FOOD AND DRINK IN THE SPECIAL SANTTAST 
ZONE AROUND CAMP PIKE. NEAR LITTLE ROCK, ARK. 

The State Board of Health of Arkansas, on July 24, 1917, adopted 
the folloTving regulations **govemmg the establishment and conduct 
of all food and drink stands in the special sanitary zone around the 
Twelfth Division Army Camp.'' 

Section 1. The word person used in these regulations shall be confltrued to include 
and moan the word person, firm or society, association, copartnership, corporation, 
or individual. 

Sec. 2. The word food used in these regxilations shall include all articles used by 
man for food; food products, drink, liquor, confectionery, condiment, whether sim- 
ple, mixed, or compound. 

Sec 3. The regulations hereinafter described apply to those persons whose placet 
of business are located >\-ithin 5 miles of the cantonment site or the training camp 
area in Pulaski County known as the Twelfth Division Army Camp: Provided^ That 
nothing in these regulations shall be construed to apply to the cities of Little Rock 
and Argenta. 

Sec. 4. No person shall engage in the business of restaurant, hotel, lunch counter, 
grocery, delicatessen, fruit store, ice cream parlor, refreshment stand, push cart, 
wagon, or any place where food or food products, within the meaning of the word 
as herein described, are stored, prepared, handled, sold, exchanged, offered for sale, 
given away, or intended for human consumption, without first obtaining permit for 
the conduct of said place of bu.^'iness as above enumerated, from the health officer 
of the State of Arkansas: Prondcd, That any person engaged in the above business 
at the time of the promulgation of these regulations within the territory described 
in section 3 of these regulations shall procure permit for the continuation of said 
business from the health oflicer of the State of Arkansas within 10 days of the date 
of the promulgation of these regulations. 

Sec 5. No person shall hereafter engage in the business, as herein described, nor 
in the business of any hotel, lodging house, rooming house, or public inn, in any 
manner or in any capacity and no person shall engage for employment in any of the 
above enumerated businesses, any person not in possession of a certificate from a 
regular licenced and practicing phj-sician, who is approved by the State health officer, 
certifying that the person so employed in the bubiness has been examined by him 
within the last 30 da>^ and at that time was free from any contagious, infectious, or 
communicable disease of any nature. No person shall engage in the business as herein 
described, in any capacity, who is exposed to or has come in contact with any com- 
municable disease. Each person engaged in any capacity in the business herein 
described shall be vaccinated against typhoid fever and smallpox in a manner ap- 
pro\t?d by the State hoalth oflicer. 

Skc. G. No person shall etigage in the businoFs herein described or shall maintain 
on the premises, cart, wagon, stand, or shall prepare, store, handle, sell, offer for 
sale, or give away, barter, or exchange any food within the meaning of the word as 
herein described which is not clean, pure and wholesome, and suitable for human 
consumption within the broadest meaning of these terms. 

Sec. 7. Each person engaged in the business as herein described shall at all times 
maintain the premises of the place of business in a clean and sanitary condition. 
The place shall be well illuminated and ventilated, free from vermin, foul odors, 
dust, dirt, accumulations of wastes and refuse of all character. 



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1255 August 10. 1017 

Sic. 8. All food within the meaning of the word as herein described, maintained, 
or offered for sale or exchange, within the meaning of the words as herein described, 
shall be covered by some permanent means such as glass, wood, metal, or pasteboard, 
or paper or other suitable material in such manner or means as to adequately protect 
it^m flies, dirt, dust, or contamination. No covering other than that of fixed and 
permanent character will be recognized as conforming to the requirements of these 
regulations. 

Sec 9. All utensils used in the preparation, sonice, and sale of any food or drink 
within the meaning of these words as herein described, shall be properly and ade- 
quately cleansed after being used and no such utensil shall imder any circumstances 
be used a second time unelss it shall have been, after such use thereof, so cleansed. 
In such cleansing the use of water which has become insanitary from previous use 
or water which has not been certified as safe and suitable for human consumption 
by the Stat^ health officer is prohibited. 

Sec. 10. Watcr-do^ta and privies. — All persons engaged in the business shall provide 
a privy which is amply illuminated, ventilated, properly and adequately screened 
and otherwise made fly-proof, and the receptacle bo constructed and maintained 
water-tight. The dispopal of excreta shall conform to existing State laws regulating 
Mune. All privies shall be located at a proix^r distance from the place of business. 

Sec 11. Washing fad lilies.— AW such persons engaged in llie business shall provide 
waehing facilities, ample for the use of the employees, and these facilities shall at all 
times be maintained in a clean and sanitary condition. Running water from an 
elevated container, soap, and individual clean towels shall be liimished those employed 
therein. 

Sec. 12. Persons engaged in the business as herein described shall provide suitable 
receptacles for all garbaj^e. refuse, and waste. Such re( cptacles shall be ample in size 
and sufficient in quantity to meet the needs of the business; constructed with a tight- 
fitting cover of metal. They shall be placed at least 9 inches from the ground, and be 
amply removed frorsi the place of business, and emptied at least once every 24 hours. 
All garbage, wa.sic, refuse, or other matter within the meaning of these terms shall be 
rCTttoved, burned, buried, or otherwise destroyed in a manner conforming to the re- 
quirements of existing State laws. 

Sec. 13. Water supply.— The water supply for all places of business, as. above de- 
scribed, shall be ample in quantity and obtained from a source which has been cer- 
tified by the hygienic laboratory of the State of Arkansas as safe and suitable for hiunan 
consixmption. The water pupply, if drawn from the di?tributing system of the com- 
munity or <nher source and stored in such places of business, shall be drawn, stored, 
and maintained in such a manner as to preclude all possibility of iwllution or con- 
taminaiifui l»y any matter or by any means which will render the water uncleanly 

in its broadcH meaning, or unsuitable for hiunan consumption. 



PUBLIC HEALTH ADMINISTRATION IN SPRINGFIELD, 

OHIO. 

By CAijROLL Fox, Surpeon, United States Public Ilenlth Service. 

The following report gives the results of a study of health or- 
ganization and administration in the city of Springfield, Ohio. The 
study was carried on throughout a period of approximately two 
months, from February 19 to April 14, 1017, and included investiga- 
tions in both tlie office and the field. 



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I 



AngoBt 10, 1917 1256 

Springfield is a prosperous city, situated in the southwestern sec- 
tion of the State of Ohio, 80 miles north of Cincinnati, 25 miles 
northeast of Dayton, and 45 miles west of Columbus. It is the county 
seat of Clark County. A small stream, known as Buck Creek, passes 
through the city. This creek empties into the Mad River just with- 
out the city limits. 

Springfield is a manufacturing community, surrounded by agri- 
cultural country. Among the industries of magnitude may be men- 
tioned the manufacture of road rollers, agricultural implements, gas 
and gasoline engines, steam radiators, windmills and pumps, auto- 
mobile trucks and pleasure cars, emery wheels, chemicals, flour mills, 
steel structural work, house furnaces, electric fans and motors, 
coffins and caskets, productive machinery, piano plates, and motor 
washers. Springfield is also noted for its horticultural industries. 

The city is served by four railroads (the Big Four, the Pennsyl- 
vania, the Erie, and the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton), in addition to 
five traction lines. 

The population figures used in this report were obtained from tJie 
United States Census Bureau, which estimates the population as of 
July 1, 1916, at 51,550. The colored population of the city is 5,350. 

For assistance and information received during the coui-se of this 
study acknowledgment is made to the officials of the health and 
other city departments and to other citizens connected with various 
charitable organizations or otherwise interested in public health. 

ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

The city of Springfield is under the commission-manager form 
of government. The commission is composed of five members, 
elected from a nonpartisan ticket. This commission appoints the 
city manager as the administrative head of the municipal govern- 
ment. He in turn is authorized to appoint certain of the city officials 
as deputies in departments over which he has immediate control. 
Among these deputies is the health officer, who is officially known as 
the director of public health. 

The activities engaged in by the health department are the regis- 
tration of births, deaths, and diseases; the control of diseases, in- 
cluding the operation of an antituberculosis dispensary and field 
work in connection therewith; the maintenance of a diagnostic labo- 
ratory; the inspection of milk and other foods; the abatement of 
nuisances; plumbing inspection; and the treatment of the indigent 
sick. 

Personnel, — The personnel of the health department, together with 
their respective salaries, is at present as follows: 



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1257 August 10, 1917 

1 director of healUi (full time) $2,500 

1 assistant director nud city physician (full time) 1, 500 

1 public-health nurse * 1, 080 

1 public-health nurse 960 

1 dairj' aud focxl inspector aud city veterinarlau 1, 400 

1 sanitary inspector 900 

1 plumbing inspector 1, 400 

1 clerk 840 

1 poundmoster (six months) ' 480 

1 laboratory attendant, paid at the rate of 15 cents per hour for not more 
than 100 liours per month. 

The director of health. — The director of health is a physician, ex- 
perienced in public-health work. The city manager makes the ap- 
pointment and it is to him that the director is responsible for the 
work of the health department. 

The powers and duties of the health officer are defined by State 
laws. In addition he is required to enforce the city oi-dinauces per- 
taining to health and sanitation and to perform such other duties 
as the city manager may direct. 

The duties of the director may be defined as administrative, epi- 
demiological, bacteriological, and professional, the latter furnished 
at the dispensary for the treatment of the tuberculous and the indi- 
gent sick. 

The assistant director of health. — The assistant director is in 
reaUty the. city physician. His duties are mainly concerned with 
the treatment of the city's poor, and professional services furnished 
to the city jail. He is I'equired to respond to night calls. He is em- 
ployed on full time and, therefore, is in a position to assist the di- 
rector in work of a strictly public health nature as well as to perform 
the duties of a city physician. 

During the year 1916 the work performed by the health depart- 
ment on account of diseases other than those affecting the public 
health included 792 visits made to homes of sick persons, 335 treat- 
ments given at the dispensary, and in addition there were 37 physi- 
cal examinations made for the police and fire departments. 

The clerk. — ^The clerk of the department has numerous duties to 
perform. He is telephone clerk, vital statistics clerk, complaint clerk, 
order clerk, license clerk, record clerk, bureau of information, and 
stenographer and typewriter. 

The sanitary inspector. — The sanitary inspector is engaged in the 
customary duties of that office, including the posting of placards and 
fumigations. 

Office hours. — The office, dispensary, and laboratory are located in 
the city hall. The official hours are from 8 a. m. to 5 p. m.. with one 

* The salary of this niirso is psild by Iho FMloraUMl (Mul)S. 

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Anguit 10, 1917 1258 

hour for lunch every day except Saturday, Sunday, and holidays. 
On Saturday the office closes at noon. On Sundays and holidays it is 
closed, but burial permits may be secured from the residence of tiie 
dii*ector or the clerk. 

The dispensary is open to the tuberculous from 1 to 3 p. m. 
on Tuesdays and Fridays, and for the treatment of the indigoit 
suffering from other ailments frcnn 8 to 9 a. m. and 1 to 2 p. m., daily. 

Each employee may be granted two weeks' vacation a year with 
full pay. 

Transportation. — The director, the assistant director, and the dairy 
inspector are each furnished with inexpensive automobiles. This 
form of transjiortation enables these officials to perform a large 
amount of work efficiently and expeditiously at a reasonable figure. 
During the year 1916 the cost of operating the three machines was 
$()30.90, or $210.30 for each machine, including gas, oil, tires, and 
repairs. Tliis amounts to but 67 cents per machine per working day. 

The phimbing inspector is furnished with street-<;ar tickets. TV 
sanitary inspector and nurses ride free on the street cars. 

Dissemination of information, — Except for the annual report, there 
is no bulletin published by the health department. On a few occa- 
sions public health exhibits, including the State board of health 
exhibit, have been shown, and talks on public health subjects arc 
occasionally given. Articles of a public health nature are published 
in the newspapers from time to time. 

In order that bettor cooperation may be obtained between the vari- 
ous local health officers throughout the county and that uniform 
procedures may be established, the director of health has been instru- 
mental in organizing the Clark Coimty Health Officials' Association, 
which meets once a month at the health department in Springfield. 
Here talks are given and there is an interchange of ideas. It is an 
educational feature that should be productive of great good. Very 
frequently a representative of the State board of health is in attend- 
ance at these meetings. 

Discussion, — The system of government in the city of Springfield, 
when considered with the efficiency of the officials in charge, may be 
said to be one approaching the ideal. Under this fonn of govern- 
ment there has been developed the nucleus of a health department 
which requires only a little financial aa^istance and the cooperation 
of the people to expand into a highl}'' efficient organization. 

The cooperation of the people can be obtained only after a cam- 
paign of education, which has not in the past been carried on to an? 
great extent. It is thought that the scheme of education which will 
produce the best results is that which will instruct the school children 
on the subject of disease prevention. To accomplish this it would 



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1259 August 10, 1917 

be advisable for the board of education to place the health officer 
on its staff, he to give lectures on public health once a week in the 
high school, and if time will permit, in the grade schools as well. 
The health department shouhl then publish a small weekly bulletin 
to be distributed to the children at the close of the lecture and to 
contain briefly the subjects v. hich have been lectured upon. 

This course in public health ^should be made a part of the regular 
curriculum and the pupils should be made to pass an examination 
upon it, as in the case of other subjects taught. 

The health department has been making very conunendable efforts 
to keep accurate statistics on births, deaths, diseases, etc. Such sta- 
tistics, together with the record of expenditures, are the bookkeeping 
of the public health, and it is only by comparison of these various 
records that the health department can determine its profits and 
losses. It is a difficult matter to keep accurate figures with continual 
interruptions, and it is thought advisable to employ an additional 
clerk, who could act as telephone clerk and bureau of information 
and thus permit the clerk already employed to devote his time purely 
to clerical matters. 

As is usual in most health departments, the sanitary inspector is 
engaged to a large extent in the abatement of nuisances which have 
little or no bearing upon the public health. He should be in a posi- 
tion to devote his entire time to the elimination of those nuisances 
which are really important from a public health standpoint, such as 
surface privies and surface wells, accumulations of manure, and 
mosquito breeding centers, and to the enforcement of the requirement 
that householdei"s provide themselves with garbage cans. 

The abatement of such nuisances as bad odors, ash heaps, dead 
dogs, chickens, slop water, etc.,^ should be left to the police. The 
cleaning of alleys is as much a duty of the btreet department as is 
the cleaning of streets and should not be made a duty of the health 
officer. An ordinance requiring the cutting of weeds is needed, but 
this matter should be placed in the police depnrtment for its enforce- 
ment. 

It is necessary that the work of the employees of the health depart- 
ment be systematized and it would be wise to formulate a book of 
instructions, so that each employee of the department would know 
exactly what were his or her duties, authority, and jurisdiction. 

REGISTRATION OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS. 

The registration of births and deaths is carried on under the 
authority of State law. The health officer of Springfield is the local 
registrar for the city and the adjoining townships. The registrar's 



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August 10, 1917 



1260 



fees paid by the county to the registrar are transferred to the city 
treasury and may be made available for carrying on public-healA 
work. 

Registration of deaths. — During the year 1916 there were reported 
as occurring in the city of Springfield 849 deaths, exclusive of still- 
births, making a crude death rate of 16.4 per thousand. 

Of the above deaths, 417, or 49 per cent, were due to diseases or 
conditions which might be classed as preventable, according to the 
information contained on the death certificates. 

During the same year there were 95 deaths of infants under 1 year 
of age. The infant mortality rate was 80.3 per 1,000 births. 

The number of stillbirths reported during the year was 59. 

Among the colored population there were 98 deaths, exclusive of 
stillbirths, making a death rate of 18.3 per thousand. Of these 
deaths, 11 occurred in children under 1 year of age. The infant 
mortality rate for colored was, therefore, 98.2 per 1,000 births. 

Registration of births, — During the year 1916 there were reported 
as occurring in tho city of Springfield 1,183 births, exclusive of still- 
births, making a birth rate of 22.9 per thousand. 

The number of births among the colored population was 112, 
making a colored birth rate of 20.9 per thousand. 



Recapitulation. 










White. 


Colored. 


TotaL 


Population 


46,200 
751 
16.2 


5,350 

98 

18.3 


51,550 
849 


Number of deaths 


Death rate per 1 ,000 


16.4 


Deaths duo to preventable causes 


417 


Deaths In infants under 1 vcar 


84 

78.4 

1,071 

23.1 

48 


a 

08.2 

112 

20.9 

11 


95 


Infant mortality rate per 1,000 births 


803 


Number of births 


1.183 


Birth rate per 1,000 


S.9 


StiUbirths 


59 







The following table gives certain statistics relative to morbidity 
and mortality compiled from death certificates filed in the health 
department during the year 1916 : 



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1261 



Anpjst 10, 1917 



Diseases. 


Total 
deaths, 
aUages. 


Death 
rate per 
100,000. 


Number 
ofcaso«5 
reported. 


Ca.«»e 

fatality 
per 106. 


Death! 

under 1 

voar 

o^age. 


TnNvc9il<k5is, pilrncff^fUT'. 


61 
11 
74 
17 
35 
7 

t 

10 
7 

11 
1 

4 
1 


118.3 
21.3 
143.5 
32.9 
48.4 
13.5 
7.7 
5.8 
19.3 


105 






Ti^herailadK, oth^r fomu 




1 


fWmnonia. .' .. , x^ , x 


12 
SO 




14 


TrplKrfdfeYCT 


21.2 




fnoiKIlza 




Meiries 


919 

51 
105 
246 


.7fl 
7.8 
2.8 
4.0 


t 


Diphtheria 




Scarlet fever 




WhocntiDs cou£h 


3 


Mci5Ss.^T.;/.::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


2 


Septicemia 








Kmiprias 








SypMlis 




8 
1 
302 
9 
5 
7 
4 
4 




2 


Trcanus 








Chicken pox 








Oooorrhea. 










Mumps 












' 








Smallpox 










Trachoma 










Diarrhea and entwiUs 


29 
7 

38 
6 
47 
18 
13 
23 






17 


Other inlectlotu 




.................. 




MaUfnant growth 3 


73.7 


1 






Occupatioo accidonto 






Other accidents 










Premature 










18 


Convulsions, malnutriti(m, etc 








13 


Other causes peculiar to early infancy 








S3 










Total 


417 






05 











EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES. 
Report of Diseases. 

The notification of diseases is required by law and by the regula- 
tions of the State board of health. These regulations are baaed on 
the model law for morbidity reports. 

Methods of procedure, — In reporting diseases physicians usually 
make use of the telephone. The information reported is noted tem- 
porarily on a blank form, which is referred for necessary action to 
the official responsible for the enforcement of the regulations to pre- 
vent the spread of the disease. It is likewise entered on a card for 
the permanent records of the department, ns well as on a morbidity 
report card, which is forwarded weekly to the State board of health. 

Control of Diseases. 

Requirements of laws and ordinances, — The reciuirement*? of State 
laws have been summarized in a previous report. It is not thought 
necessary to summarize the local ordinances. 

Methods of procedure, — ^The State laws form the basis on which 
are applied the preventive measures for the control of the communi- 
cable diseases. 

A record of certain data, as for instance the date of release of quar- 
antine, date of fumigation, number of children in household, etc., 



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Ausust 10, 1917 1262 

is made on the morbidity report card filed as a permanent I'ecord of 
the department. 

An epidemiological history is obtained of each case of smallpox 
and typhoid fever, the former by the health officer or his assistunt, 
the latter by these officials or by one of the nurses. 

At least one follow-up visit is made by a nurse to each case of 
typhoid fever and diphtheria, and some supervision is maintained 
over tuberculosis. 

In the case of scarlet fever and diphtheria houses are placarded by 
the hen 1th officer or his assistant, who at the same time gives the 
necessiiry instructions relative to isolation of the patient, quarantine 
of contacts, etc. In the case of other disease, placards are posted 
by the sanitary inspector, who also performs the fumigations re- 
quired by law. 

After recovery from a communicable disease a certificate is fur- 
nished to the patient, stating that he has had such a disease. This 
is not only of value for future use in determining immunes but also 
serves as authority to return to school. 

A monthly record sheet, to serve as a " daily reminder," is kept, 
shoAving the name and address of patient and the diagnosis for each 
disease requiring quarantine, together with the date on which quar- 
antine is due to be raised. 

The school is notified whenever a pupil has, or is exposed to, a 
quarantinable disease. 

The following table shows the amount of work engaged in by the 
health department during 1916 in matters relating to quarantine and 
kindred subjects: 

Total number of houses quarantined 1,150 

Total number of throat cultures taken 400 

Total number of persons given antitoxin 22 

Total number of vaccinations made 108 

Total number of certificates of Immunity issued 980 

Total number of medical examinations made for differential diagnosis.. 306 

Total number of houses fumigated ^ 196 

Total number of rooms fumigated 563 

Typhoid fever, — Typhoid fever is endemic in the city of Spring- 
field. During the year 1916 there were 80 cases notified, with 17 
deaths, making an indicated death rate of 32.9 per 100,000, and a 
case fatality rate of 21.2 per cent. The number of cases of typhoid 
fever reported during the years 1914, 1915, and 1916, as well as for 
the combined periods, is shown in charts 1 and 2. The records for 
the years previous to 1914 are not complete and have, therefore, 
not been used. 

The health department is now making a careful epidemiological 
study of v\\r\\ case of t\ plioid fever as it is reported, but as yet there 

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1263 



August 10, 1917 



is not sufficient data on which to base conclusions. Previously the 
investigations as to the source of the infection were confined almost 
entirely to the milk and water supply of the households 
Houses are not placarded for typhoid fever. 



d6 
34 
51 
30 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


MAY 


June 


July 


Au& 


Sot 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 
































































































• 












' 






























% 
























\ 






















/ 


\ 






2t 
















"/ 




\ 






26 

Zt 
20 
















/ 




V 
























\ 


























Si23 




























ft 
lb 
14 
It 
10 

8 
6 

4 

9 






















\ ' 














1 






























\ 
























\ 








'9 
















\ 








A 




A 












w 






J 


r 1 


Vy 


r\ 


J 














y 




Y/ 




H 












^ 


J^ 






















A 










































1 









CnAOT I.' — OMes of typhoid (erer reported by months, three-year period, 1914-1910. 

Diphtheria, — ^During the year 1916 there were 51 cases of diph- 
theria notified to the health department,* with four deaths. This is 
an excellent record, meaning an indicated death rate of but 7.7 per 
100,000 and case fatality rate of but 7.8 per cent. 

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August 10. 1917 



1264 



When a case of diphthoria is reported the house is placarded and 
quarantined, a culture from the wage earner is taken, and an im- 
munizing dose of antitoxin given to contacts, either by the attend- 
ing physician or a physician of the health department. Antitoxin 
is issued free of charge, both for treatment and prophylaxis. At 



2e 

If 
16 

n 
It 

10 

8 

4 

2 

• 


Jan. 


Fea 


Mak. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aud 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 
















*^ 
























b 


V 






















\ 


X 








W 


6 










\ 




\,« 
























\ 




















' 






V 
























\ 
















/ 








> 


V 








A 






/ 










\. 






y 


r \ 


V- 


A 


J 












i-_ 




*^ 








N/ 












10 

8 
6 

♦ 

z 






















J? 






19 


6 












U' 


>- 


^\ 


















v 


^ 




\ 


















/ 








V 






5_ 




3 


..i 


.y 










\ 


^ 






N 


L. 


-^ 










n/ 












to 
8 

4 

2 
fi 


















'2 










19 


4- 












A 
























/N 






















/ 




V 












i 




A 


>.? . 


../ 




\s- 


f 


Ik 








L. 


/ 


^y 


XS 


W 


r 















Chart 2. — Cases of typhoid fever reported by months, 1914, 1915, 1916. 

the same time cultures are also taken of contacts outside of the 
household, including pupils of public and parochial schools. The 
patient is released from quarantine after two successive negative 
cultnros are obtaim d, taken not less than 48 hours apart. At the time 
of taking the kccoik] cnlture, swabbings are also made of contacts 

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1265 AQfost 10. 1017 

in the household. Routine cultures are taken either by one of the 
physicians of the health department or one of the nurses. 

If practicable, cases of diphtheria are isolated in the hospital, 
when adequate isolation can not be obtained at the home. In this 
case, all contacts are released without quarantine immediately after 
finding the nose and throat free from diphtheria bacilli. 

The isol<ition hospital. — ^The isolation hospital is conveniently lo- 
cated on the grounds of the general hospital, operated by the city of 
Springfield. It is a brick and wooden structure, formerly a residence, 
and is now out of repair. It contains two bath rooms and eight other 
rooms, one of which must be used by the nurses in attendance and 
one for a diet kitchen, which leaves six rooms for ward purposes. 
Fourteen patients may be isolated without overcrowding. The pres- 
ent condition of the building makes its use as a hospital undesirable, 
and taking into consideration its age and construction, as to material 
and design, to remodel would be impracticable. The building at pres- 
sent is not in use. Plans are completed for a new building which will 
be constructed in the near future. 

Tttbeimdosis. — During the year 1916 there were reported to the 
local registrar 61 deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis. During the 
same period there were notified 105 cases. The indicated death rate 
was 118.3 per 100,000. There were also reported 11 deaths from 
other forms of tuberculosis, making a death rate from tuberculosis, 
all forms, of 139.6 per 100,000. 

The antituberculosis dispensary. — ^The city health department op- 
iates an antituberculosis dispensary, which is open twice a week with 
a doctor and a nurse in attendance. 

Patients are referred to the dispensary from various sources, in- 
cluding phyacians of the city, the city hospital, and the visiting 
nurses. 

Such information as may be necessary subsequently to identify an 
applicant for relief is entered in a ledger. The personal and family 
history and the results of physical and laboratory examination, to- 
gether with the advice and treatment given are entered on a filing 
card devised for the purpose. On another card is noted the informa- 
tion relative to temperature, pulse, weight, etc., obtained from time 
to time at subsequent visits. 

Patients are provided with paper napkins and medicines free of 
charge. 

Each case is followed up by a visiting nurse, who gives the neces- 
sary advice as to the right way of living to effect a cure and to pre- 
vent the spread of the disease to others. 

A record of her visits, together with the social history of the 
patient, is kept by the nurse in a separate file. 



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August 3. 1917 



V2 



•J 



CHOLERA. PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYT 

Coiiti 

Reports Received From June ^ 

TYPHI'S 



i-.^Bf^^^ -■* *'-*J 



Place. 



Dntc. 



AusUia-Huniniry: i 

Austria 

Bohoraia I 0<jt.23-D©c.l7.. 

(•alicia I <lo 

Lower Aastria j do 

Maravia i do 

SUesia I do 

Styria ! do 

Upper Austria i do 



HuniTiu-v. 
Klai 



Bu(lape5)t I Fell. 19-Mar.25. 

China: , 

TsiiiKtfto : May 30-Jujic y 

Alexandria ! Apr. SO-Juno lo. 

Greece: ! 

Sttloniki May la-lU.... 

Japan: ! 

Nagasaki Jiine U-17.... 

Java: I 

Mid- Java 1 Apr. 1-30... 

\Vest Java 

Batavia ' Apr. la-.Muv i 

Mexico: I 

McxlcoClty t Junc3-1«/... 

PMtugiicsc I.a>' \frica: ! 

Loiirertvo Morqiiex Mar. 1-31. . 

Rua^ia: I 

Archan^l Mav 1-14.. 

PeiroKia*! IVii.ls Mor. 

Ki'a ' .lau. I.il.. 

Vladivostok NLir. 2«J - Mn\ 

Spain: \ 

Madrid ' Ma> U3I.. 



YK. 



Mexico: , 

Yucatan, State— ' 

I'cto June 23. 




m* 



•It 



_— -^* 



^■t 



^ ■■■• 






Digitized by VjOOQIC 




1267 



AngoitlO.lftlT 



PtBllCIL:_ 




an infant welfare camp, at which are em* 
ndniits and nurses. 

■y where the parents can not afford to buy it. 
i€t4^d to pay if only a small part of the actual 

A nurse», — There are two public-health nurses 
I errision of the health officer, one of whom is 
. 1 tinent funds and one by the federated clubs. 
me nurse employed by the board of education, 
i, iQ Life Insurance Co., and the, antituberculosis 
inve>;tigator, who is not a nurse. These em- 
►PT the eontnil of the health department. 
f!n«Mit nurs.s are engaged in practically all of 
'.a iii a 1 nltlic-health nurse, including prenatal 
work, communicable disease nursing, some school 
and di^pen^ijii'v work in the health department. 
i» made to each case of typhoid fever and diph- 
rrigion is omintained over cases of tuberculosis. 
I'k i?^ carrit'd on during the winter. During the 
'f this clas^i of work is performed by the infant 



^'(1 ilivitU^d inlro two districts, one for each nurse. 
" [aiixni to kt'up daily records of visits made, with 
^ isits puid tii cases of tuberculosis, together with 
"f'iiil ^tutti^ of the family. 
' '^^ pnpil n^irst s are detailed from the city hospital 
'Hment to receive instruction and practical ex- 
J"*u lu^siltli nursin^f;. This is an excellent idea. 
•iri|p tflbtt^ indicates .he field work performed by the 
ctf the henlfch depurtment during the year 1916. One 
'"fv fhirini!: the entire year. The second nurse did not 
r •. -nei^ until Otober, so worked only during the last 
'•f tiw year. 



•i^r**_ 



— — ^ 879 

-— ~^— ., 90 

^-----,_^,_ _ _ _ 183 

fci dl|ihl|ii.rl«^ " ~ Q7 

^vf^r. ______ ;_;~^^- ^^ 

^"*u^U^^^l ' 

^^ -— — ^-^„ JL 78 

^^''———^^-^ 162 

—~ ^. 7 

— — ^^ ^ ^^ 60 

^— — ^-^_ 25 



tUi^ 



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August 10, 1917 1266 

During the year 191C the following work was clone in the anti- 
tuberculosis dispensary : 

Nuuil)er of new cases treated IDS 

Number of oUl ciises treatnl W 

Total visits to dispensary 238 

Number of patients referreil to tuberculosis bospital 41 

The tuberculosis sanatorium, — The tuberculosis sanatorium is t 
four-county institution, pleasantly located just without the limits of 
the city of Springfield. It is composed of a community cottage for 
both male and female patients, 14 small cottages, a nui'ses' quarters, 
and an administrative building, originally a private resilience, in 
which are located a dispensary, office, the main kitchen and dining 
room, quarters for the help, and rooms for the care of advanced cases. 

The physician in charge docs not reside on the premises. 

The normal capacity of the institution is 40 patients. There are 
at present 41 inulergoing ti*eatment, most of them citizens of Spring* 
field. 

The water supply is deiived from a drilled well and is furnished 
to the buildings and grounds under pressure from a pi'essure tank. 

Sewage is disposed of by means of a sci>tic tank and filter beds. 

The community cottage, administration building, nurses' quarters, 
and laundry are connected to the sewer. 

The sanatorium operates its own dairy and chicken farm, and 
products are raised from the soil. 

The antituberculosis leagu4^, — This league is a charitable organiza- 
tion which employs one field agent or investigator whose duty it is io 
mvestigate the social status of families in which there is a case of 
tuberculosis and who have applied for material assistance. Supplies, 
including milk, eggs, coal, etc., are issued free of charge to worthy 
applicants. The paper napkins used in the dispensjiry of the health 
department are furnished by the league. The league will also support 
patients in sanatoria. While most of the public-health activities con* 
cemed with tuberculosis are now carried on by the health department, 
a certain amount is still performed by tlie investigator of the league 
who has not the qualifications of a public-health nurse. 

A portion of the income of the antituberculosis league is derived 
from a percentage of the profits accruing to moving picture houses 
at Sunday shows. 

The infant welfare society, — During the period from April to 
September, inclusive, the infant welfare society, a charitable organi- 
zation, employs a nui*se to do infant welfare work in the field and 
operates a dispensary located in the courthouse, where children may 
be taken for a<lvicc aiul treatment. Physicians give their services 
free of char^'o. The s<)cioty also maintains during the hot months of 



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1267 August 10, 1917 

the year, July and August, an infant welfare camp, at which are em- 
ployed the necessary attendants and nurses. 

Milk is issued free only where the parents can not afford to buy it. 
Otherwise they are expected to pay if only a small part of the actual 
price. 

The pubUc-health nurses. — There are two public-health nurses 
working under the supervision of the health officer, one of whom is 
paid from health department funds and one by the federated clubs. 
In addition there is one nurse employed by the board of education, 
one by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., and the antituberculosis 
league employs one investigator, who is not a nurse. These em- 
ployees are not under the control of the health department. 

The health department nurses are engaged in practically all of 
the activities required of a public-health nurse, including prenatal 
and infant welfare work, communicable disease nursing, some school 
nursing in the field and dispensary work in the health department. 

At least one visit is made to each case of typhoid fever and diph- 
theria, and a supervision is maintained over cases of tuberculosis. 
Infant welfare work is carried on during the winter. During the 
summer the bulk of this class of work is performed by the infant 
welfare society. 

The city has been divided into two districts, one for each nurse. 
The nurses are required to keep daily records of visits made, with 
special record of visits paid to cases of tuberculosis, together with 
a card giving the social status of the family. 

When practicable, pupil nurses are detailed from the city hospital 
to the health depaitment to receive instruction and practical ex- 
perience in public-health nursing. This is an excellent idea. 

The following table indicates .lie field work j^erformed by the 
nursing staff of the health department during the year 1916. One 
nurse was <mi duty during the entire year. The second nurse did not 
enter upon her duties until October, so worked only during the last 
three months of the year. 

Visits made on acoount of — 

Tuber< iilosls 879 

Typhoid fever 90 

Diphtheria 183 

ExiH>sures t<» diphtheria 97 

Scarlet fever 159 

ExiKisures to soarlot fever « 18 

Whooping cough 69 

Measles 78 

Chicken pox 162 

Mumps 7 

Sore throats 60 

Trachoma 25 



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August 10, 1917 1268 

Visits made on account of — Continued. 

Ophthalmia neonatorum 22 

Varltws diseases of the eyes 119 

Prenatal 170 

The puerperal state 91 

Infant welfare 186 

Medical and surgical 210 

Miscellaneous 446 

Total - 3.071 

Number of throat cultures taken ^ 307 

The Diagnostic Laboratory. 

The city health department maintains a bacteriological laboratory, 
equipped to perform all necessary examinations of a routine nature. 
A part-time laboratory assistant is employed, but most of the teclini- 
cal work is done by the health officer, the assistant health officer, and 
the milk inspector. 

In the laboratory are performed examinations for the diagnosis of 
diphtheria, the release from quarantine, and the detection of carriei's; 
examinations to determine the Widal reaction and the presence of 
tuberculosis, gonorrhea, and ophthalmia neonatorum. Analyses of 
urine are rarely made. The milk inspector examines, bacteriologi- 
cally and chemically, all milk samples collected. Well and city 
waters are also analyzed bacteriologically, the former when it may 
bear some relation to a case of typhoid fever, the latter only occa- 
sionally. 

Three specimen outfits are furnished to the physicians of the city. 
These may be obtained free of charge from various drug stores 
designated as distributing stations. 

The outfit to be used in suspected typhoid fever contains an alumi- 
num foil and a small wire loop. In the case of suspected tuberculosis 
a wide-mouth bottle is furnished, while for diphtheria the outfit con- 
tains two sterile swabs in a sterile tube. 

Each outfit is accompanied by a card on which to note the necessary 
data, and which contains directions for the collection of the speci- 
men. 

A record is kept by the filing-card system of all examinations 
made. 

During the year 1916 there were made in the laboratory 3,791 
examinations, as follows : 



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1269 



August 10, 1917 





Positive. 


Negative. 


Total. 


For tobgfcniorig ^ . ^ . . u .. x ^ . ^ 


75 

29 
26 
16 

4 


164 

214 

119 

295 

19 

2 

2 


239 


FordipfatherU: 

DiafDOfiS ••• .......X..XXW ax wxxxxax X 


243 


Bftlease of quarantine 


145 


Contacts..^ 


311 


Fort7plioidr«Ter(Wldal) 


23 


r-_ .Xit-Tjl— jT /.-xxaa.xx.a.x**.*.x_**.**.* * 


2 


Fflropbtlnhnianecnat<mni xx.x.x*x.*xxxx..x . . , .. 




2 


Urtae'analiTihi..ax....,.xx x.xx ....xx.,....u..*.a...... x..*.* x x 




8 


Water analysis: 

Wallorsprins...... 






55 


aty;!^^!^?^ii:;i;i!ii;;:::;:::;;;;:;::;:;::;;:;::::;:;;:::::;:::::: 






24 


Biver 






1 


Milk analysis: 

Bacteriolodcal 






872 


chwnkai^ . ..".. r ;r II 11 






928 


Visible dirt 






928 










Grand total 


150 


815 


3,791 







Disciissioii. 

According to the modem view, a proper supervision over the 
individual who is sick or who has been in contact with one who is 
fiick is of more importance than a supervision over the environ- 
ment, for it is the animate and not the inanimate things which are 
most concerned in the spread of the communicable diseases. 

A very important factor in the control of disease is, therefore, 
the public-health nurse. It is the nurse who reaches the homes of 
those persons who are most in need of instruction and nursing care 
and who can ill afford to pay for it. The work of two nurses in 
a city the size of Springfield must necessarily be superficial, and 
it is therefore believed advisable for the city to employ two addi- 
tional nurses, who, with the one already employed and nurse paid 
for by the federated clubs, woiild make a staff of four nurses. 
The city should then be divided into four districts and a nurse placed 
in each district to carry on within her district all of the duties 
required of a public-health nurse. 

It would be still better if the school board could be induced to 
employ an additional nurse and then to combine its nursing staflf 
with that of the health department. The antituberculosis league 
should employ a nurse instead of an investigator and attach her to 
the health department. This would give the health department 
seven nurses, and the city could be divided into seven districts, 
making the work still more effective. 

The work performed by the child welfare society is of great im- 
portance. It pertains strictly to public health and is therefore a 
governmental fimction and should be taken over by the city and 
made a duty of the health department, which could carry on the work 
during the entire^ year. Steps in this direction have already been 
taken, since for the year 1917 the city has appropriated to the society 
the sum of $2,000, which will be spent under the direction of the city 
manager. 



92 



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10. 191T 1270 

It is planned to add a wing to the present city hospital, and ampk 
provision should be made for an airy ward for the care of diildPHL 

To carry on the child- welfare work extensively every birth re- 
ported should b? followed up by a visit to Uie home. Upon the first 
visit the nurse should be provided with a " certificate of registration'' 
to be presented to the parents. Such certificates would have to be 
provided by the health department. 

The typhoid- fever death rate in the city is very high. All of tiie 
factors concerned in its spread are present in the city, including the 
surface privy, the surface well, flies, contacts, a water supply which 
at times shows evidence of contamination, and a milk supply which, 
though 95 per cent is pasteurized, is not always of certain purity 
because the " flash " method is used in some cases, and this method 
is unreliable. All of these things should be corrected without delay. 

Typhoid fever should be made a placardable disease, and dis- 
infectants should be issued free of charge. 

All children should be required to be vaccinated against smallpox 
before they are permitted to attend public or parochial schools. 

A bacteriologist should be provided for the laboratory of the 
health department, and it is suggested that the laboratory might be 
made available to all of the physicians and health officers of the 
county, and that financial aid might be received toward its main- 
tenance from the various townships, or the county commissioners. 

It is highly satisfactory to know that the city of Springfield has 
plans completed for the construction of a modern isolation hospital 
for the isolation of the communicable diseases, including smallpox, 
to occupy the site of the present hospital. It should contain not 
less than 30 beds. It should be operated by the city general hos- 
pital, but the admission and discharge of patients should be left to 
the health officer. 

MUNICIPAL ENGINEERING ACTIVITIBS. 

The water supply, — The municipal water supply is a ground water, 
obtained from a large dug well located in a valley about 3 miles 
from Springfield. Through this valley runs a stream, known as 
Buck Creek. The actual water-bearing stratum consists of a natural 
gravel bed on each side of the valley from 16 to 20 or more feet in 
thickness and extending down to clay. That part of the gravel 
basin from which the water supply of Springfield is obtained has 
an area of about 35 acres and is limited above by an outcropping of 
the hardpan, while below a curtain wall of concrete has been con- 
structed extending from the creek to high groimd to conserve the 
ground water, causing it to back up into the well instead of flowing 
on down the valley. 

During warm weather, when the ground water is low and the 
amount of v nter pumped is excessive, not enough water filters into 



1271 August 10. 1917 

the well to supply the demand, so that it has been necessary to 
resort to an underdraining system extending up the valley as far 
as the outcropping of the hardpan and having its outlet into the 
well. In addition to this it is necessary at times artificially to 
augment the natural ground-water supply by flooding the surface 
of the ground with water from the creek by means of a sluice way. 
The underdrain has the effect of diminishing the amount of filtration 
and percolation that naturally takes place and forms a more or less 
direct means of communication between surface water and the well. 
Flooding the land with a polluted water places an added burden 
on the natural filter bed between. the surface of the ground and the 
underdrain and is a dangerous procedure. 

In order permanently to increase the supply of water for present 
and future needs, it has been suggested that the system of under- 
drains be extended above the outcropping of the hardpan, and then 
cm up the valley where water may be obtained in abundance. This 
extension would include the utilization of water from a number of 
springs, one of which is said to flow about 7,000,000 gallons per day. 
The advisability of such a procedure must be left to the sanitary 
engineers, and it is therefore suggested that before taking any action 
a comprehensive study be made of the situation with a view to 
securing a permanent supply that will be satisfactory both as to 
quantity and quality. Certain it is that the quality of water from 
surface wells and springs in a limestone country is uncertain. 

The Springfield water is always clear, but bacteriological exami- 
nations made at infrequent intervals show at times evidence of the 
presence of colon bacilli. Daily examinations should be made cover- 
ing a long period through varying conditions. It is also thought 
that it would be good practice to install a chlorine plant and treat 
all water before furnishing to the consumers. Such a plant could 
be installed at little expense and would serve until such time as a 
more permanent source of supply can be developed, to coimteract 
the ill effects that may occur through occasional pollution. 

In addition to the public water supply there are in the city a 
number of privately owned surface wells of varying depths, many 
extending down to bedrock (limestone) . 

During the year 1916, 55 samples of water from as many different 
wells and a few springs were examined, and 28 showed positive 
evidence of pollution. There were also made 24 examinations of the 
city water, with the result that 10, or 41 per cent, of the samples 
examined showed evidence of the presence of colon bacilli in 10 cubic 
centimeter amounts. Similar results have been obtained at the lab- 
oratory of the State board of health, and in addition the colon 
bacillus has occasionally been detected in 1 cubic centimeter. 

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10^ mr 1272 

Disposal of sewage, — The city is fairly well provided with sew^rs^ 
both storm water and sanitary, and the system is being ext^ided 
rapidly. Storm-water sewers empty into Buck Creek and the con- 
tents of sanitary sewers pass into the Mad River and into Back CnA 
untreated. Plans are already laid for the installation of a modern 
disposal plant. 

There are still a number of insanitary privies in the cit^ but 
these are being abolished as rapidly as possible. During the year 
1916 there were 954 premises connected with the sewer, 254 in new 
and 700 in old buildings. 

The disposal of garhage wnd refuse. — Garbage is collected by con- 
tract from residences only, and is fed to hogs. Hotels, restaurants, 
and commission houses must have their garbage removed by private 
contract. 

The supervision over the system of collection is under the juris- 
diction of the city manager's office. The rules adc^ted to expedite 
the collection require that all garbage be kept in a metal can witii 
fly-proof cover and that the cover be kept on, that the can be put 
in a place where it may be easily found by the collector, and that 
no water, glass, tin cans, grass, etc., be put into the garbage can. 

The system of garbage collection used in the city of Springfield 
is not to be recommended. The city realizes its deficiencies and has 
plans under way eventually to take over the collection and to erect 
an incinerator. At the same time a collection of rubbish will be 
instituted. At present rubbish is collected annually instead of 
weekly. 

FOOD INSPECTION. 

The inspection of foods, including milk, and the inspection of 
pltirc^s handling foods are carried on by the dairy and food inspector, 
who is a doctor of veterinary medicine. He also performs the labo- 
ratory examinations of samples collected. Samples of milk are col- 
lected and examined once a week. With but one inspector for food 
inspection it is not practicable to exercise a thorough supervision 
over the sale of foods' from all of its various angles. The ante and 
post mortem inspection of animals killed in the local slaughterhouses 
is not attempted. Of all foods, milk is by far the most important 
from the standpoint of the public health, and the inspector has 
therefore very properly devoted much of his time to the control of 
the milk supply. 

The fninis supplying milk to Springfield vary, from those with 
no oqnijuuent, primitive methods, and poor stock, farms that score 
to (I:., e- modern in equipment and methods with tuberculin-tested, 
registend stock, and which would score 90 or above. There are, 
in all, about 350 farms producing milk for sale in Springfield, most 



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1273 August 10. 1917 

of tbem operated by farmers who carry on the dairy business merely 
as a side issue. 

Milk is brought to the city in unsealed cans, much of it by wagons 
or autotrucks. Some is shipped by interurban electric and a small 
I>art by railroad. The longest haul is about 12 miles. 

It is estimated that about 95 per cent of the raw milk is pasteurized 
before reaching the consimier. There are four pasteurizing plants, 
two using the holding and two the flash method. The latter is im- 
reliable and should be supplanted by the holding method, meaning 
briefly that the milk should be heated rapidly to a temperature of 
145° F. and held at that temperature for 30 minutes. To secure 
accuracy each plant should be equipped with a temperature recorder 
and a thermoregulator and the technique should be checked fre- 
quently by the milk inspector by bacterial counts made during the 
different stages of pasteurization. After pasteurization the milk 
should be immediately cooled and bottled. All milk should be de- 
lirered to the consiuner in machine-capped bottles. 'At present there 
is no law prohibiting the sale of dipped milk. 

All milk sold in the city should be pasteurized as above and a 
bacterial standard should be set for pasteiu-ized milk, which should 
contain not more than 50,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter when de- 
livered to the consumer. 

There are 7 slaughterhouses located in and around the city of 
Springfield. In none is there any inspection of animals slaughtered. 
One has permission from the Federal authorities to carry on an 
interstate business. An additional inspector in the city health de- 
partment could devote some time to meat inspection under the veteri- 
narian of the department, and it would be wise for the city to estab- 
lish a municipal slaughterhouse, so that slaughtering could be carried 
on in one place and a better supervision maintained. 

The following is a summary of the inspection work carried on by 
the dairy and food inspector during the year 1916, together with the 
results of the examinations of milk samples. 

Number of samples of milk having 100,000 bacteria or less : 

Raw 421 

Pasteurized 34 

Number of samples of milk having over 100,000 bacteria : 

Raw 397 

Pasteurized 20 

Number of Inspections made : 

Dairies 437 

Ck)W8 4, 480 

Milk plants 53 

Groeori*^. meat stores, restaurants, abattoirs, etc - 1, 683 



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AmgoMi 10» IdlT 1274 

THB HEALTH SUPBRYISION OF £tCHOOL8. 

The health supervision of schools is paid for and is under the 
jurisdiction of the board of education, which employs one nurse for 
field and dispensary work. There are no medical inspectors em- 
ployed. A di^)ensary is maintained in one of the schools, well 
equipped for medical and dental work. The medical work consists 
chiefly of the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the eye, ear, 
nose, and throat. A specialist gives his services free of charge. TTie 
dental work is performed alternately by different members of tbe 
dental society, whose services are furnished without cost. 

It has already been suggested that the board of education add to its 
nursing staff and then attach its nurses to the health department 
This would be in line with modem views and should result in great 
benefit to all concerned. 

BXPBNDITURBS AND APPROPRIATIONS. 

There was allotted to the health department for use during the 
year 1916 the sum of $1^,450. This allowance is elastic and may 
be increased or decreased from time to time by the city commission. 
During the same period there was expended for operaticxi and 
maintenance the sum of $10,785.95, as determined fr<Mn the records 
on file in the health department The cost of operation is shown in 
more or less detail in the accompanying table. 

In addition to the above, the auditor's statement shows tiiat there 
were certain sums paid out during the year as reimbursements for 
the payment of bills contracted during the previous year. These 
expenses have not been included in the itemized statement as not 
being connected with the actual cost of the department during the 
year 1916. 

During the year there were collected in fees $2,552.35. 

That part of the income of the city for the year 1916 which could 
be used for expenses incurred in ordinary operation and maintenance 
of city government was $409,045. From this amount there was ex- 
pended for the protection of the public health but 2.6 per cent as 
against 12.9 per cent for fire, and 10.2 per cent for police protection. 

The amount allowed for the protection of the public health during 
1917 is even less than Uiat allowed for 1916, although the presence 
of smallpox has made it necessary to appropriate an additional sum 
for emergency purposes. 

The city of Springfield may take just pride in the fact that it has 
the foundation of an excellent health department which, by a little 
rearrangement and some additions, could be made a highly eflBcient 
organization. As it is, it is only possible to take up the various 
problems in a more or less superficial manner. 



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1275 



August 10, lOlT 



To carry on the work, as outlined in the foregoing report, would 
require a mmunum expenditure of $17,000 a year, which figure 
represents about 4.1 per cent of the available revenues of the city, 
and which is little enough to spend in the prevention of disease. 

The sum might be expended as follows : 



health officer $2, 500 

assistant health officer and city pliysician ' 1, 500 

bacteriologist 1,000 

dairy and milk inspector 1, 400 

food inspector 900 

public-health nurse 960 



public-health nurses, at $900 1, 800 

sanitary inspector 900 

Tital statistic clerk 840 

telephone clerk 480 

1 laboratory attendant (part time) 180 



Total 12. 460 

Transportation, office, and dispensary supplies, etc 4,540 

17.000 
It will be noticed that the above scheme contemplates the employ- 
ment of 5 additional employees, namely a bacteriologist, 2 public- 
health nurses, a food inspector, and a telephone clerk and stenog- 
rapher ; the transfer of the plumbing inspector to a building division 
of the engineering department; the continuance of the work of treat- 
ing the indigent sick, which the health department is now required 
to do; and the transfer of the poundmaster. 





Is 


1 


1 


1 


6 

• 

ad 


i 


1 




1 


9i 


^ 


Badns 








$5.50 






$2.75 








$8.25 


Ilhwfln* 










$6.00 








6.00 


Soto!:::::::::::::::; 


15.00 


















5.00 


DniB, chemicals, and 


$257.40 


$17.14 














$128.12 


402.66 


Ktactrkal supplies 

iBMnraocT services. .. . 


8.00 










$3.73 




6.73 


3.00 


















3.00 


IxuSt... 








. 








$11.50 




11.50 


In :.;:::::::::::; 


' 




21.00 
100.02 












21.00 


itborttory supplies . . . 





















100.02 


liaiiiteitt]iceoTp«>ple 
taiqn^rantiTif. . . . . 




57.03 
















57.08 


Ibdical supplies 


















4&10 


45.10 


MbMllaneoas 




0.33 

















9.33 


Mming suppUes 






laoo 

4.50 














10.00 


OlBw ^dd1& 


4.00 
85.00 


1.20 






1.50 








.60 


12.70 


Poitatt^:.. 




laoo 

101.50 

i,4oaoo 




4.5.00 


pS^ : 


33.90 
1 621.22 


ia75 

153.00 

14.00 

0.80 


SM'ii 


$2L25 

i,3oaoo 


83i.'59 


11.75 
793.12 






179.15 


bnuj...: 


2,143.37 




» 621. 23 


8,658.74 
14.00 


Bdnrtiftc apper^us. . . 


Ipiciiiien outfits 




















0.80 


KSd^!:. .;:;::;; 


45.45 
2ia30 

7.70 


15.00 
» 105. 15 






L25 








Z75 
U05.15 


64.45 


TliospoHatian 






•617.97 




flaoo 




1,098.57 


Typivmen and ra- 
ptiii... 










7.70 


vffirii 


16.20 


















ia2$ 
























Total 


2,454.73 


1,113.43 


326.81 


914.61 


1,839.22 


840.34 


807.62 


1,576.23 


11.50 


902.95 


10,785.98 



> OnMialf of salary ai^ transportation charged against epidemiology and one-half agalnst4ceatment oi 
".SSSSa^icrto.on.n.wm.ch.n.. Digitized by GOOgle 



ABffiUiil0^1917 1276 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

As a result of the foregoing study and after careful consideration 
of conditions, certain conclusions have been reached which have been 
made the basis of the following recommendations : 

1. That a full-time bacteriologist be employed at not less than 
$1,000 a year. 

2. That the nursing staff be increased by the addition of two public- 
health nurses, each to receive a salary of not less than $900 a year. 

8. That a telephone cleric be added to the staff of the health de- 
partment. 

4. That a food inspector be employed at not less than $900 a year 
to work under the supervision of the milk and dairy inspector. 

5. That the board of education employ one more nurse and attach 
its staff of nurses to the health department. 

6. That the antituberculosis league employ a nurse instead of an 
investigator and attach her to the health department. 

7. That the city be divided into seven districts and a nurse placed 
in each district to perform within that district all of the duties re- 
quired of a public-health nurse, including post and prenatal work, 
infant welfare work, school nursing, and services required in the 
control of the communicable diseases. 

8. That the work of the infant welfare society be taken over by 
the health department. 

9. That a nurse follow up every birth reported to the health de- 
partment, and that she be provided with a " certificate of registra- 
tion " to present to the parents, this certificate to be furnished by the 
health department ; and that activities concerned in the conservation 
of child life be carried on during the entire year. 

10. That provision be made in the new wing of the city hospital 
for the care of infants. 

11. That an isolation hospital of not less than 30 beds be con- 
structed on the site of the old hospital ; that it be used for the isola- 
tion of all communicable diseases (including smallpox) except tuber- 
cidosis. 

12. That the isolation hospital be under the supervision of the city 
hospital, but that the admission and discharge of patients be placed 
under the control of the health oflScer. 

13. That typhoid fever be made a placardable disease, and that 
disinfectants be issued free of charge to families in which there is a 
case of that disease. 

14. That all children be required to be vaccinated against small- 
pox before entering the public or parochial schools. 

15. That all surface wells and privies be abolished within the city 
limits. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1277 Ansust 10. 1917 

16. That the city water supply be treated by chlorination before it 
is delivered to the consumer. 

17. That daily bacteriological examinations be made in the labora- 
tory of th& health department of the city water supply. 

18. That all of the milk of the city of Springfield be pasteurized 
before delivery to the consumer. 

19. That the standard for pasteurized milk shall be as follows: 
That it be heated rapidly to a temperature of 145"^ F. and held at 
that temperature for 30 minutes; tiiat it be cooled immediately to 
a temperature of 50° F. or lower and promptly bottled: and that 
it contain not more than 50,000 bacteria per cubic centimeter when 
delivered to the consumer. 

20. That milk from dairies which do not score 60 or above be 
excluded. 

21* That milk be transported from producer to distributor in 
sealed cans, and that only bottled milk be sold to consumers. 

22. That the board of education appoint the health officer as a 
member of its teaching staflf to lecture to the pupils of the high and 
granunar schools on the subject of public health, and that the pupils 
be required to pass an examination on that subject upon the com- 
pletion of the course. 

23. That the health department issue a weekly bulletin on the 
subject of the lecture, a copy to be given to each pupil. 

24. That the city install as soon as practicable a modern disposal 
plant for the treatment of sewage, a chlorJhe plant for the treatment 
of the water supply, a municipal abattoir and an incinerator for the 
disposal of garbage. 

25. That thorough and comprehensive study be made looking 
toward the development of a satisfactory water supply for the city. 

26. That ordinances be passed requiring the proper disposal of 
manure and stable refuse and the cutting of weeds. 

27. That the sanitary inspector be authorized to devote his entire 
time to those matters which have a direct bearing on the spread of 
communicable disease, including the abolition of surface wells and 
surface privies, the proper disposal of manure, and the requirement 
that all householders provide themselves with a garbage can. 

28. That the police department lend its cooperation by making 
it a duty of the patrolmen to abate those nuisances which have no 
direct bearing on the spread of communicable disease, such as ash 
piles or other accumulations of rubbish, unsightly matters in general, 
weeds, chicken yards, slop water, bad odors, etc. 

29. That the plumbing inspector be transferred to a building di- 
vision or the engineering department. 



Digitized by 



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August 10, 1917 1278 

30. That the poundmaster be transferred to the service depai-tment 

31. That as soon as practicable the city inaugurate a system of 
garbage and refuse collection, including manure. 

32. That not less than $17,000 be appropriated to the health de- 
partment to be spent as outlined in the body of the report. 

33. That in the building code, now being written, ample provision 
be incorporated to prevent block congestion and overcrowding of 
houses ; to regulate the construction and use of tenement and lodging 
houses, etc. ; to require ample toilet and bathing facilities and sewer 
connections, etc. 

34. That certain changes be made in the system of filing records 
in the department and that there be added to this file a record of 
expenses. 

35. That the work of the department be systematized and that rules 
be published showing the exact duties, authority, and ]uri9diction 
of the various employees. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 



No "kedlQi department^ State or local, can effectively prevent or control disease withotU 
hnpwledge of when, where, and under what conditums cases are occurring. 



UNITED STATES. 



CURRENT STATE SUMMARIES. 
^^^ California Report for the Week Ended AugUBt 4, 1917. 

Th6^ California State Board of Health reported concerning the 
status of preventable diseases in California for the week ended 
August 4, 1917, as follows: Two cases of anthrax in man were notified 
at Dos Palos, Merced County, contracted in skinning a cow. Fifteen 
cases of anthrax in animals were notified on 7 ranches in the central 
part pf Yolo County. Preventive measures, including vaccination, 
were employed to control the spread of the disease. One case of 
pohomyeUtis occurred at San Francisco. Of cerebrospinal menin- 
gitis, two cases were notified, one at Oakland and one at San Fran- 
cisco. Thirty-three cases of typhoid fever were reported, scattered 
over the State, four cases having occurred in a mining camp in 
Nevada County. Four cases of smallpox wore notified near Selma, 
Fresno County. 

The details of notifiable disease cases reported during the week 
ended July 28, are as follows: 



Owtbrotpinal meniogiUs. 

Chlck«npoz 

Dipfatbtfk 

Dji^aierj 

Erysiptias. 

0«rman measles 

Oopococcu s iofection 

MalariA 



Xuiops. 



One*. 

2 

» 

18 

1 

5 

4 

41 

24 

68 

43 



Oatet. 
1 

10 



Pellagn 

Pneumonia 

Poliomy-elltis 2 

Scarlet fex^er. 41 

Stnallpox 9 

Syphilis 18 

Tetanus I 

Tuberculosis 1 18 

Typhoid fever 28 

Whooping cough 22 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS. 

Massaehaseits. 

During the week ended August 4, 1917, new cases of cerebrospinal 
meningitis were notified in Massachusetts as follows: Boston, 2; 
Gloucester (Town), 2; Springfield, 1; New Bedford, 1. 

(1279) ^ T 

Digitized by VaOOQlC 



▲ngust 10, 1017 



1280 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS— Continued. 



Minnesota. 

The outbreak of epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis in Minnesota 
seems to have subsided, if we may judge from the reported cases, 
which are shown in the accompanying table. The crest of the 
outbreak seems to have appeared in April. 



Cases. 

January, 1917 5 

Frt)ruary, 1917 81 

March, 1917 75 

April, 1917 103 



Casai. 

May, 1917 ; « 

June, 1917 S7 

July, 1917 IS 

August 1 to 6, 1917 I 



State Reports for Jane, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


NewciMS 


Alabama : 

Hou?rton County 


1 
1 

1 


New York— Continued. 

Erie County 


10 


Jackson County , 


Essex Countv 




Limest<ffle County 


Greene County 






Monroe Countv 




Total 


3 


Nassau County 






Niatf^ra Countv 




New York: 


2 

1 
1 


Onondaga County 




Albany County 


New York City 


37 




Total 




Delaware County 


57 









City Reports for Week Ended July 21. 1917. 



Place. 



Akron, Ohio 

Baltimore, Md 

Borton, Mass 

Brockton, Mass 

ChunKO, 111 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Coin minis, Ohio 

Dayton, Ohio 

Detroit, Mich 

Duluth, Minn 

EIl7a»cth, N. J 

El I'lvso. Tex 

K\ am VI He, Ind 

Galveston, Tex 

Grand Ranids, Mich. 

Hartford . C/Onn 

Haverhill, Mass 

Jersev City, N. J 

Lexington, Ky 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



I Los Anpeles, Cal 

1 Milwaukee^ Wis .... 

Minncanolis, Minn. . 
1 New Bedford, Mass. 
I New Britain, Conn.. 
I New Haven, (^onn. . 

Now Yor!:.N. Y.... 
I Niairarafalls, N. Y. 

j Passaic. N. J 

' Philadclnhia, Pa 

! Pittsueld, Mas5 

I Pro\iienrc, R. I 

Raci'.e, AVis 

I St. L'.iii^ Mo 

I Ban Pio-^o^Cal 

San Frauci.sco, Cal. . 

Stcui>envillc, Ohio. . 

Washington, P. C... 

Wheeling, W.Va... 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



DIPHTHERU. 
Rhode Island — ^Newport. 

The Secretary of the State Board of Health of Rhode Island 
reported August 6, 1917, that there w^as an outbreak of diphtheria 
in Newport and vicinity. 

See also Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1288. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1281 

ERTinPELAS. 
City BepoHs for Week Ended Mf 21, 1917. 



AQcntt 10. 1017 



Plaoe. 



ADcntowo, P».. 
BaltlBora.Md.. 
BnflWo, N. y... 
Ctaitco, Ohio. . . 

Cbkseo,!!! 

Ctoretiod. Ohio, 
DeoTCT, Colo. . . 

Flint, lOdi 

ItAiostowtif Fft. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Gases. 



Lancaster, Pa 

Lone Beach, Cal.... 
McKeesport, Pa.... 
lCilwau&ee,Wis.... 

Newark. NT. J 

Philadelphia, Pa... 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Rochester, N.Y.... 

8t. Joseph. Mo 

St. Loafs, Mo. 

San Frandsoo, Gal.. 



Deatha. 



'sX ; 



LEPROSY. ' 

Cttf Report fer Week Ended Jolj 21» 1917. 



During the week ended July 21, 1917, 1 case of leprosy was reported 

at Los Angeles. Cal. 

MALARIA. 

Alabama Report for June, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


RlMTnt Coonty ^ 


3 
2 
1 

1 

4 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
7 
3 

25 
2 

30 


Alabama— Continued : 

Lauderdalo t ounty 




Bultoclr Pwinty 


Madison rrHinty .... 




Qierokcx^ County 


Marmgo County 




ClMKftaw County 


MithnmCif^mty " , , , , , , 




Clarke County .'..... 


Monroe Co^iniy , 




C/kfliM Cnunty, . - , - 


Montfomery ('bounty 




ColtM^ County 


M<M^an County 




riMMM«iih (^miritv 


Ferry ( 'mmty « . r , - 




PaHaJi County 


Pickens County 




Ktowah County 


Russell County 




V%jr4r^ rmuity . - , - . ,-.,.,-,, 


Shelby County 




Franklin CounV 


Sumter County 




^'•wiTa County! 


Talladega County 




RfwffM^ Pounty 


Tuscaloosa County . . „ 


17 


Hate County . '. . . 


WfilkfT county , .'. 


2 


Houston County 


Washington County 


1 


TiU^Vonn Prumtv 


Total 




Jefferson County . 


133 









City Reports for Week Ended July 21, 1917. 



Place. 


Oases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Bfrmfai^bfim, Ala 


16 
4 

1 




New Orleans, La 


2 

1 
5 

1 




Columbia. S.'C 




San Francisco, Cal 




Little Rock, Ark 




Savannah, (Ja 




Monphis. Tenn 


3 


Schenectady, N. Y 




Newark,k.J 


1 













^ The reason that Birmingham had so manv more cases of malaria reported than any other city is not 
that the disease is more prevalent In BIrralngham than in other cities of Alabama and nciphhorinj; States, 
but tmdoobtedly because of the successful efforts the health department has made In securing the coopcra^ 
tioD of the practicing physicians in reporting cases. 



MEASLES. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1288. 

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August 10, 1917 



1282 



PELLAGRA. 
AJabama Report for June, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Alabama: 

A utaugft ^'OUT}ty , 


3 
2 

1 

33 

1 

5 

8 
60 

4 


Alabama— Continued. 

Lauderdale County 




Barbour Countv 


j T impstone County . - , , ^ - . , - - x - . - , . 




Bullock County 


! Leo County 




Butler Countv . 


I-K)wndes County 




Calhoun County 


1 Macon County . ! 




Chambers Countv 


1 Madison County 


14 


Cherokee County 


1 M.irongo County , . , r - . - 




Choctaw Countv 


1 Marshall County 




Clarke Countv .... 


Mok ilo County .'. 


30 


Coffee Countv 


Monroe County 




Colbert Countv . . . 


Montgomery (Jounty 


10 


Conecuh County 


Morgi^n Cwinty . , , ^ . . 




Coosa County 


Perry County ' , - . , 




Dallas Countv 


Pickens County 


,.., M 


Dekalb Countv 


Randolph (V)unty 




Flmore Countv 


Shelbv Countv r 


\' 2 


Escambia Countv 


St. Clair County 




Etowah County 


Sumter County .-. 


' 1 A 


Favette C/Oiintv , . . r 


'rgiiadeea Co«»nty ■. 


^ 5 


Geneva County 


Tallapoosa County 


3 


Greene County 




ao 


Hale County 


"Waiver Cmmty ..',..... x 


15 


Henrv County 


WMhinptftfi C-ounty 


5 


Houston C'Ounty . r , . . r 


Wilcox County....' 


15 


Tftckson C-ountv 


Winston C-oun'ty - x 


1 




Total 




T<A.mAr Countv 


303 









City Reports for Week Ended July 21, 1917. 



Place. 



Birmingham, Ala.., 

Colombia, 8. C 

Kalamazoo, Mich. . 

Lexington, Ky 

LynchburK, Va 

Memphis, Tenn — 

Mobile. Ala 

Na8hyiue,Temi... 



Cases. 



Ul 



Deaths. 



Place. 



New Orleans, La 

New York, N.Y , 

PhUadolphia. Pa 

Richmond, va 

Washington, D. C 

WichiU, Kans 

Wilmington, N.C.... 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



1 The reason that Birmingham had so many more cases of pellagra reported than any other city is not 
that the disease is more prevalent in Birminriiam than in other cities of Alabama and neighboring States, 
but undoubtedly because of the successful efforts the health department has made in Fo?urlng the cocp- 
cration of the practicing physicians in reporting cases. 

PNEUMONU. 
City Reports for Week Ended July 21, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Boston Mflffif 


46 
12 

2 
1 


5 


Griiad HapiJ"^ Bfich 


11 
16 


1 


Braddock. Pa 


K;iliiniiiK[K3', Mit'li 


1 


Brooklhifl Ma.ss 


1 


Lf'^^ \nKr!r--; r-il 


X 


Chelsea, Uass 


N ' 


e 


Chicaffo'. ni 


49 
12 
1 

17 


P 


9 


Clevemnd. Ohio 


Q 




T>Avtnn. Ohio 


R.w fuy U-^r^ N . \' 


2 


De&x>it,Mich 


Stfi Franclwo. TfiJ 


1 


Brie Pa 


Sjiringflclc], Mij;H 


1 


TEvansvllle, Tnd--XT r--,- 


2 


■VVorcpstflr^ "il^R^ - 


1 


Fort Wortn. Tex 













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1283 



▲agQitlO.1017 



POUOMTELinS (INFANTn£ PARALYSIS). 
GMes B^«rted to die Publie Haftltli Seniee fWim Jane 1 to Antf. S, 1917. 



Ptoca. 


Period. 


Cases. 


Pboe. 


Period. 


Oases. 


AMbvnm: 

Ctobume County 

9fiI«rsQo County— 

Bifminirhain. 

St. OafrOocmtyr 


Janf 


1 
13 

1 

2 


Masaacbosetts— Con. 
Essex County— Con. 
Haverhill r 


June 




JnlyO-Aoff. 4... 

June 

Julyl6-2L 

do 


g 


Do 


July. 


10 


Do 


Aug. 1-1 

July 

do 


3 


RuchoHl ,' . . 


Lawrenoe 

Lynn 


3 


CWitomia: 


5 


Alameda Coonty— 


Do 


Aug. 1-1 

July. 


1 


BerkBliyT?.. 


Salem 


1 


LoaAnfelas'Coanty— 
Long Beach 


June 3-0 


8augus(Town)... 
Hampden County— 

fipringfldd 

Do 


do 

June 


3 


Los Annlei 
MitfinCoiSy- 

„ BeJvedere. 

8«n Frandsoo 


June 10-30. 

July 23-281 

July»-Ang.4.. 
July 22-28 

July 15-21 

do 


1 


July 


3 


Hampehire County- 


July 


1 


SttitaOiara County... 
CoooKticut: 


Middlesex County— 

Cambridw 

Groton (Town)... 
Lowell 


June 


3 


New Hikwi County- 
Derby 


July 


1 


July 


3 


W^stHsveiL 


IfAlHmi 


July 


1 


Htftford County— 
Brkiol : 


do 


Medford 


July 


1 


Natick(Town)... 

Norfolk County— 
Quincy 


Aug. 1-4 

do 


1 


Kecr Britain. 


July 23-28. 

July 16-21 

July 34 


1 


WindlMun County— 
Thnmpsoa 


July 


1 


Delaware: ' 


Weymouth 

Plymouth County- 
Brockton 


July 


1 


Kent County- 
Dover 


July 


1 


BUnofe: 


July 3-0 


Do 


Aug. l-« 

June 


3 


Adams County— 
Melrose Township. 

Cook County- 

Chiraco. 


Suffolk County- 
Boston 


2 


June lO-Aof.4.. 
July20-Aug.4.. 

July 3-0 


Worcester Coonty- 
SuttOD 


June 


1 


WUuMtte 


Worcester 


do 


3 


Lake County— 


Do 


July 


1 


ZiooCity 


Do 


Aug. 1-1 

July 20- Aug. 4.. 
June 


1 


BMBunon County— 

^^,^in«fleld 

Will County— 


June 3-0 


Michigan: 

Jackson County- 
Jackson 




July 3-0 


1 


Joliet... 


Lenawee County- 
Hudson Township 

Washtenaw County- 
Ann Arbor 




ladlaiia: 


June 


1 


SIkhart County 


do 




Leke County... 


do 


1 


EastChJkaco 


July 2^28. 

June 


Do 


July h-14 

. ...do . 


1 


Marion County 


Wayne County— 
"Detroit 




. Wayne County 


do 


1 


Iowa: ' 
Woodbury County— 

Cloiid County— 

o:asooR. D 

Oreenwoo;! County— 

Lincoln County- 
Sylvan Grove 


June 3-0 

June 

July 23-20 

June * 


MinnesoU: 

Clay County— 

Keeno Township. 
Hennepin County— 

Minneapolis 

Lyon < onnty— 

Lyons Township. 
Pine County- 

W i n rf m c re 

Township 

Pope County— 

B 1 u ni o u n <1 s 

Tovnsliip 

Lanrlu'i Town- 

^''jP 

Do 

Wash In <» ton County— 

.^tillwatrr 

Watonwan ( ountv- 
Lon^'liiko Town- 
ship 

Wilkin < Oiinlv— 

linvlfnnJ Town- 
•ihip 


July 1-22 

July r-21 

July 1-22 

Juno 


1 

1 
1 

1 


R.D 


July22-2S 

June 




Wyandotte County— 
Kansuaty...... 

Kentucky; 

Kenton County— 


June 24- July 28.. 

June 17-23 

June 


7 
1 


, Bienville Parish 


July :^2-2S 

JuIylVLl 

July 1-22 

June 


1 
1 


Mwyland: 

Allemy County 


July 15-21 

July 22-Auf. 4,. 

Julv 22-28. 

July 8- 28 

July}^-28 

July 1-7 


I 


Anne Arimdei County 
Baltimoro County.... 
Baltimore City 


1 


Dorchester County ... . 


Mississippi: 

Amilo County 


Oo 




Oarrett Coimty 


July 22-28 

Jiipp . , 


5 


Deer Park 


Ch«icti\v County, , . 


.. ,5o 


I 


Jennings 


do.. 


Konipor County 


do . . . 


2 


Worcester County 


July29-AuR. -1.. 
Junf 


Smith County . ... 


do 


1 


Mtsaachusetts: ^ 
Essex County— 

Amesbu^ 


Missouri: 

U< one ' ot!nty— 

( ohinibi.i 


Julv Vi 


8 


Beverly 


July 


Cnllnn .iv Ci»'int\ — 


AuT.2 




Grovelanj 


July::::::::::::: 


3 Fulton.....* 


1 



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August 10, 1917 1284 

POUOMTEUnS (INFANTILE PARALTSIS)--Go]itinued. 
Cases Reported to the Pnblic Health Serrice from June 1 to Avf . 8, 1917— Gontd. 



Place. 



Missouri— ConUnoed. 

Jacksoo Coonty— 

iDd*: ' 



BClty 

St.LooJs 

Ifantana: 

Carbon County 

Cascade County 

Custer County 

Granite County 

Nebraska: 

DouKlas County- 
Omaha 

New Hampshire: 

Rockizigham County- 
Portsmouth 

New Jersey: 

Bergen County 

Essex County 

Newark 

Hudson County 

Hunterdon Coimty . . . 

Mercer County 

Middlesex County 

Perth Amboy 

New York: 

Albany County- 
Albany 

Cayuga County- 
Auburn 

Chautauqua County. . 
Dunkirk 

(*olumbIa County 

Erie County- 
Buffalo 

Jefferson County— 
Watcrtown 

Now York City 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Onondaga County — 
Syracuse 

Orange County 

Saratoga County- 
Saratoga Springs. . 

Schenectady County— 
Schenectady 

Sullivan County 

Tompkins Coimty. . . . 

Westchester County. . 
North Carolina: 

Edgecombe County- 
Rocky Mount.... 
Ohio: 

Allen County- 
Lima 

Belmont County- 
Martins Ferry.... 

Do 

Tease Township.. 

Cuyahoga County- 
Cleveland 

Do 

Franklin County- 
Columbus 

Gallia County 

Hamilton County- 
Cincinnati 

Lucas County- 
Toledo 

Montgomery- 
Dayton 

rickawav County— 
Circle villc 



Period. 



July 

Aug. 2 

July 13-18.. 
June 17-23. . 



June... 
....do. 
....do. 
....do. 



July 22-Aag. 4. 
June 3-23 



June 

....do.... 
July 8-21.. 

June 

....do.... 
....do.... 
....do.... 
July 8-14.. 



July 1-7.... 

June 17-23. 

June 

July 22-28.. 
June 



June3-July28.. 



July 15-21 

June 

July 1-7 

July 8-14 

July 15-21 

July 22-28 

JuJy2^Aug.4. 



July22-Aug.4. 
June 



July2»-Aug.4, 



June 24-30. 

June 

....do 

....do 



July 29-Aug. 4. 



June 10-16 

Reported July 5. 

July 22-28 

Reported July 5. 



June 

July 8- Aug 3... 



June... 
....do. 



....do 

....do 

Julyi:-28. 
June , 



Gases. 



Place. 



Ohio— Continoed. 
Stark Cotmty— 
Canton. 



Summit County— 

Akron 

Do 

Tuscarawas County— 
UhriebsvfUe 

Williams Coun^ 

Pennsylvania: 

Allegheny County . . . . 
Pittsburgh 

Bradford County 

Butler County- 
Butler t. 

Cambria County 

Clearfield County 

Dauphin County— 
HarrisbuK 

Fayette Counfy 

Lancaster County . . . . 

Lawrence County- 
New Castle 

Montgomery Comity. . 

Phikulelph& County. 
Philadelphia 

Schuylkill County.... 
Rhode Island: 

Provkience Coimty- 

Providence 

South Carolina: 

Williamsburg County. 
South Dakota: 

Corson County 

Vermont: 

Chittenden Coimty— 
Bolton 

Orange County 

Washington County. . 

• Barro 

Barre (Town) . . . . 

Duxbury 

EastMontpelier.. 

Fayston 

Montpelier 

Waterbury 

Worcester 

Windsor County- 
Rochester 

Vlrgtoia: 

Albemarle County 

Alexandria County- 
Theological Sem- 
« inary. 

Goochland County. . . . 

Henrico Coimty— 
Richmond 

King and Queen 
County. 

Louisa County 

Page County 

Pittsylvania County. . 

Rappahannock 
Coimty. 

Rockingham County. 
Washington- 
King County- 
Seattle 

West Virginia: 

Braxton County 

Mapleton 

Gilmer County 

Jackson County 

Kcnna 

lycwis County 



Psriod. 



Oues. 



July 2^38.. 
Jane 



....do... 
July 1-21. 



July 15-21. 
lane 



.do.. 



JnlyS-Aog. 4.. 
June 



July2»-Aug.4. 

June 

.....do 



July 8-14. 

June 

.....do.... 



Jnly8-Aiig. 4. 

June 

.....do 

July 1-14 

June 



July 15-21. 

June 

do 



July 22-28 

June 

do 

July 15-Aug. 4 . 

July 8-14 

.....do 

do 

July7 

July 8-21 

July8-Aug4... 
July 8-14 



.do. 



July.... 
July 14. 
July...., 



July 8-21. 
July 



..do... 
..do... 

do... 

..do... 

..do... 



July 22-28., 



July 

July 22-28 

July 29-Aug. 4. 

July 8-14 

July 22-28 

July 29-Aug. 4, 



Digitized by 



Google 



1285 



Aurust 10. 1017 



POLIOMTELinS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS) Continued. 
Casta Reported to the PabUc Health Service from Juae 1 to Aug. 8, 1917— Contd. 



Ptoce. 


Period. 


Cases. 


Place. Period. 


Cases. 


West Virginia— Contd- 
UarionCounty— 
AnnbcU... 


July 22-28 

July 20 


1 

1 

1 

10 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

a 


West VIrginia-Contd. 

Upshur County 

Buckhannon 

Wisconsin: 

Dane County- 
Cottage 'Grove 

Juneau County 

La Crosse County 


July 29- Aug. 4.. 
July 22 -28 

July 1 


1 
1 


FHirmont,. x 




MoiioRgah(braiich 
of Fa&mont). 


July29-Aug.4.. 
July8-Aug.4... 

Jaly2»-28 

Julyfr-n 

June 24-30 

July 22-28 

June . . . r , r . T - r T 


1 


June 


1 


White Rock 


do 


1 


Ohio County 


Manitowoc County . . . 


do 


1 


WhMlfp^ 


Milwaukee County. . . . 


do 


1 


FrwtonCoimty— 

Newborg 

Tmbker CoontT— 


Shawano County 

Wyoming: 

Natrona County 


do 

do 


1 
1 










BaTfa. 


July 22-28 









State Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 


New oases 

reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Alabama: 


1 
1 


New York-Continued. 
Cohii'ibift bounty 




Rt. Clfllr C<nin^ 


Orange Coun t y . ' 






Sullivan Count v 




Total 


2 


Tompkins County 






Wcstbhcster Conntv 




New York* 


1 
1 


New York City '. 


32 


Cavtimi Pnnntxr 


Total 




C^wniaiKina Coimtv , . . . . 


40 









City Reports for Week Ended July 21, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Akron Ohio 


2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 




Newcastle. Pa 






Borvefey, Cal 




New York. N.Y 


2 


Bfi^ififiham, Ala 








GiBveland, Ohio 




Philadelphia, Pa '. 


1 


I^yton ^hio ......,-,, 




Providence, ft. I 






Hav^ririn Mass 




Q^ilncy, M^..... "'" \. 




Kanmff Citv. Mo 




^Inhm<>nd, Vft. ..,; / 




Lo»^,M&... 


1 


Watertown,N.Y......: 




irimwMmnll* Iflitn 


1 
1 


Wilkes-Barre, Pa 


1 


NeSuSNT'j^TTT:::::::::.:: 




Worcester, Mass.. ^. .^..... 


1 













RABIES IN ANIMALS. 
City Reports for Week Ended Joly 21, 1917. 

During the week ended July 21, 1917| 1 case of rabies in animals 
was reported at Covington, Ky., and 3 cases were reported at Detroit, 
Mich. 

SCARLET FEVER. 

Sec Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1288 
93 



Digitized by 



Google 



August 10. 1017 



1286 



SMALLPOX* 
New York Report for Jme, 1917. 



Plfice. 



New 
reported. 



Deaths. 



Vaccination history of 



Number 
vacci- 
nated 
within 
eeven 
years 

preceding 
attack. 



Number 
last vac- 
cinated 



than 



preceding 
attack. 



Number 



fiiUy 
vaod- 



VacdDA- 
tionhii- 
torynot 
obtaiiMd 
orun- 
cotain. 



New York: 

Albany County 

Dutchess County . . . 

Steuben County 

Waahington County 
New York City 

Total 



AJabama Report for June, 1917. 

During the month of June, 1917, 6 cases of smallpox, with 1 death, 
were reported in Jackson County, Ala. 

City Reports for Week Ended July 21, 1917. 



Place. 



Akron, Ohio 

Austin, Tex 

BulIalo.N.Y...., 

Butte, Mont 

Chicago, III 

Clevefand, Ohio., 
Columbus. Ohio.. 
Davenport. Iowa. 

Dayton, Ohio 

Denver, Colo 

Detroit, Mich 

Duluth, Minn.... 

Erie, Pa 

Evans\ille, Ind-. 

Flint. Mich 

Ilamiiton, Ohio.. 
Indianapolis, Ind 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Kansas City. Kans... 

Kenrsha, Wis 

Little Rock, Ark 

Minneapo:is, Minn.... 

New Orleans, La 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Omaha, Nebr 

Pontlac, Mich 

Rocky Mount, N.C.. 

St. Joseph, Mo 

St. Louis. Mo 

Seattle, Wash 

Sicux City. Iowa 

Steubenvilie, Ohio.... 

Superior, Wis 

Wichita, Kans 

Worcester, Mass 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



TETANUS. 
City Reports for Week Ended July 21, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Allentown, Pa 


1 
2 




Jackson, Mich 




1 


BufTalo, N. Y 


Loratn, Ohio 


1 
1 
1 




Cbicapo, 111 


Los Aixgolos, Cal 




Columbus, Ohio 


1 


New York, N.Y 




Detroit, Mich 






* 


_ 



TUBERCULOSIS. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1288. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



ot 



1287 August 10, 1917 

TYPHOID FEVER. 

Tennessee — Chattanooga. 

Burmg the month of July, 1917, 22 cases of typhoid fever were 
notiSed at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

State Reports for Jute, 1917. 



Flftce, 



New cases 
reported. 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



Aataoia County 

Bakdwm County 

BarboorCouniy 

BibbCoonty 

Bkxint County 

BnDock County 

ButterC^Mnty 

Calhoun County 

Cberokee County 

(Mton County 

Clwctaw Ceunty 

Chrkc County 

Coffee County 

j Colbert County 

Conecuh County 

CooeaCounty 

Covington County 

Cunman v'ounty 

1 Da!c County 

I>«Bas f 'ounty . . . , 
\ DeKalb < 'ounty . .*. .' . 

1 'EtauvcGounty 

J Escambia County 

I EtowahCounty 

- » rranklin County 

^Qeaeva County . 1 1 1 1 ! 
Greene County 

HaleCounty 

HouT County 

BwBuni County ... . 

Jackson County 

Jenerson County 

Laniar County , 

leukrdale County . . 
Ifwrence County... 
Limestone Coumty . . 

. wonCounty 

J 5&AboiiCounty 

Jfarengo Comity 

Jurion County , 

"^giall County 

I,* ilo\>flfcCounty 

JfonrocCounfy 

"ootgomery County 

MprganCounty 

-^ JteVena County 

Pike County... 

Bt.C\aIrCounty.... 
Sumter County 



1 

1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
8 
3 
7 
4 
4 
3 
1 
4 
2 
1 
3 
1 

20 
8 
1 
1 

10 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
4 

87 
1 
7 
1 
1 
7 
2 
6 
3 
1 

21 
4 
6 
2 
4 
1 
5 
1 

10 
1 



A labMua— Continued. 
Talladega County — 
Tallapoosa County . . . 
Tu9caloo6a County. . . 

Walker County 

WashingtonCounty . 
Wilcox County 

Total 

New York: 

Albany Coimty 

Allegany County 

Broome County 

Chautauqua County. 

Chenango County 

Clinton County 

Columbia County 

Cortland County 

Dutchess County. . . . 

Erie County 

Essex County 

Franklin County 

Fulton County 

Genesee County 

Greene County 

Herkimer County 

Jefferson County 

Lewis Coimty 

Montgomery County, 

Niagara County 

Oneida County 

Onondaga County . . . 

Orange County 

Orleans County 

Otsego County 

Ren^elacr County. . . 

Rockland County 

St. Lawrence County 

Saratoga County 

Schenectady County. 

Schoharie County 

Steuben County 

Suffolk County 

Ulster County 

Warren Coimty 

Wayne County 

Westchester County. 

Yates County 

New York City 

Total 



4 
1 

24 
11 

1 
1 



313 



15 

12 
1 
4 
5 
2 
3 
1 
3 

12 
2 
1 
2 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
4 
2 
5 
5 
1 
1 
2 
4 
2 
4 
1 
fi 
1 

84 



205 



Digitized by 



Google 



iagti«tio,mT 1288 

TYPHOID FEVER— Continued, 
aty Reports for Week Ended Jvljr 21, 1917. 



Plioe. 


Omm. 


DeaClia. 


PiBoa. 


f^ 


BwUm. 


AJcnm, Ohio 


1 

4 

S 

22 
3 




McKeemort, Pa 


1 




Albany.N. Y.--. 




IfMnphi^'TWfn 


1 


Baltimore, ICd 


2 


Milwaokee. Wis • 






B^fV--li V. Cal 


Minneapolfif, Minn ... 




Binuuijihain 'lift 



1 
2 


Mobile, Ala. 


f 


B<wk!i, Mmu 


Mociistown, N. J 

NartiTlUe, Tcnn 


40 

31 


t 


BoffiJo, M. Y. 


1 


Cimbiidst, Mass 


1 
2 

4 
1 
6 
1 
1 
6 
8 
6 
2 
1 



Newark. U. J 




Canton, filiJo.- 




New BodfDTd, lUts 




Oiirrestoii, S. C 




New Britain/Cwin 




(>^L^a, UiLHf 




Maw trkven/ronn 




Oskaio. IIL 


X ...... New Orleans. La . .. 


3 


^ctADfttx, Ohio ;. 


New York. N'.Y..:.: 


3 


divelvKl, Ohio 




Norfolk, Va 




rdTcfviik KaJis 




Norristown, Pa... 




CoJiuohi*, a. r 


1 


Oakland, Cai 




CoJtimNiMf Ohio 


Oklahoma City. Okla 




rumbftrJaail, Md 




PhihMlelphia, Fa 


2 


Dtylon Obio 




Pittsburgh, Pa.. 


8 


Dcfrwt. Mltih 


2 

1 


Portland, Me 


1 




PiiiijMi, Minn 


Portland^ breg 




ICuir '^r^tiri'. V J 


1 
1 


PortsmouUi, "^a 




RliE»ij<*th, N'. J 


1 
2 


Providence, 'R. I 




Bl FJWi>. Tt^s, 


Reading, Pa 




Kri*, V% . 


1 
1 
3 
1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 

11 
2 
5 
1 
6 
1 

15 
4 
2 


Richmond. Va 




K¥iiM¥tl]^, lad 


1 
1 


Roanoke, Va 


2 


PiJI Rivpf Mass 


Rochester, N. Y 

Rocky Moimt,N. C 




Flint, MjUih 




Ffirl Wcifth, Tex 




St. Louis, Mo 


3 


Qitivn'Himf TVw 




Ban Francifico, Cal 




Im^rntuvii Md 




Sacramento, Cal 




ffarnjitiurft. Pft 




Seattle, Wash 


1 


U^vtwhiU, Mass 




Somcrrille, Mass 




K^lotio N J 


1 


Syracuse. 1^. Y 




Ijifi Ijitf r Af flII* , I nd 


Toledo, Ohio 




Jol>ii.rtuwTii, Pq 




Trenton, N.J 




EaJAmanxj, Mii'h 




Troy,N. Y 




K^BavviHer Tvnn 




Washington, D. C 


1 


Lao^^j^'M^ Pa 




Wheeling. W. Va 


1 


L*ttl# lUv.k, Ark 




Wiehil*. Kwis .... 






Loriuii , Ohio 




Wilkinsburg, Pa 




Los AnRelea, Cal 


.. 


Wilmington, Del 




LowHl.Mass 




Wilmington, N. C 

Whiston-Salem, N. C 


1 


Lynchbnrf, V» 


3 

1 






York, Pa 




Madison, Wis 













DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER. AND TUBERCULOSia 

State Reports for June, 1917. 

During the month of June, 1917, 21 cases of diphtheria^ 525 cases 
of measles, and 37 cases of scarlet fever were reported in Alabama, 
and 1,571 coses of diphtheria, 9,384 cases of measles, and 1,070 
cases of scarlet fever were reported in New York. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1289 



AumiBt lu, 1917 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS— 

Continued. 

City Reports for Wetk Ended July 21, 1917. 





Julvl,1tl6 

(«it4tflAted 
liy U. B. 

C«QSIIS 

Buteau). 


Total 
dcAtbs 

aU 1 


Dipblb^ria. 


MfSfilea. 


Scariat 


Ttibttw 

frosts. 


aiy- 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




ii 


1 


OmiOOJMVl inh«li|t4uaU; 


560,1121 

7^.479 

3,407,732 

«74^073 

S7r,7S4 

SGT.«12 

5,W2,>U1 

l,7frj,.'>l8 

57^, (Ml 

7S7j303 

4«S,5£« 

410,476 

306,345 

43i),53^ 

36.1, 4.S4 

40S,894, 

371,747 

463,516 

348,639 

3«3,0^ 

214.^78 

271, 70H 
387, S47 

2&l,9CiO 
256,417 

104. 1B« 
im,7«2 
121,57$> 
112, D!^] 
106,233 
127,224 
128,366 
104,503 
12S,291 
110,900 
113,245 
102,425 
I4».9tf5 
117,057 

149, 6S5 
I9!t,604 
105,470 
100,3*1 
156,6§7 
105,942 
]fi5,634 
113, 770 
191,554 
]11,J^ 
16;}, 314 

55,625 
fl3,e05 
57, (MO 

m,m3 

57,«53 
53,973 

07,440 

m,im 

90. ^34 


m 

IS4 

6J3 

17S 

lai 

"iilBO' 
444 
1S3 
199 1 

133 
US 
7S 
99 

' ios 

" IM 
40 

04 

fll 
52 

is" 

58 
57 


1 g 
50 
148 
38 
00 

3lt 

7 
8 
R 
10 
18 
11 
11 
11 


IS 
4 
& 

19 
6 
« 



48 
74 

lOS 
19 
11 
31 

426 
45 

11 

3 

30 
10 
33 
1 
3H 
10 
39 


3 

...... 

1 

1 

...... 

1 


1 

1« 
114 

3 
39 

6 
40 
15 


1 


29 
74 

m 

3S 

3a 

ft2 

203 

m 

371 
21 
16 
16 


!6 


Bostoa, ]4>s$. .^.* . 


3R 


n^ji^rn, m 


OH 


Ocr^uid Ottfa , 




liolTQlt^lCch^ >.-.-.. 


15 


I>^ADr*I<» cil * ,•-. 


19 


Kew Vork, N. Y., 

PJiiiadeJplila Pa *....*»* 


146 
<E3 


HtUbunb, Pa.*. , 


fi 


Si. LdR!9,lC^..,..„....,.w 


29 

a 

4 
M 
17 
3 
1 


1 
1 

" i 


25 


Tnm 300p€b0'lo 500,000 inhatdt^ 
aat$: 

BuffoJo^N. Y.....,.„. 


10 

IS 


J«»^aty,N, J. ,„........ 


8 


lOJvaiito. Wis., „ 


7 






NoBrarli, N/J.„.., 




:h 
so 

15 

15 
5 


as 

26 


Smn VruiQiscQ, CaJ 


1 


4 


1 


16 


S^Hp, Wft&h .,....* 






4 


Wmsiyins^toa^ r>. C . . . 

FtttfQ aO0,00(} to 300,000 inbfthlt- 1 
mts: 
Octjumbufr Ohio *. ^„, 


1 

6 

3 

12 

1 






i 

1 

3 
2 

8 
5 
4 

13 




19 

4 


Denver Tfjlo 


1 


4 
Ifl 
2 
I 
3 
54 

14 
2 
3 
2 
3 
7 



"**i" 





lndJ^inapolLs Ind _ **.,' 


' i 


22 

a 

(I 

1 

20 

7 
ft 
4 

14 I 

3 




FortlaiKl , Ore^ 


11 
3 


PtOviJenire, R.I, . _ ... 


s 


1 
1 


10 


RocJ:e??ter, N. Y , 

Fr:tm 100«€00 to 20O,OOO Inliftblt' 

Altwa^pX V 


3 


liiTTQjJxghaifi A la * „ . . 


79 
33 
27 

si" 

23 
20 
33 

» 

19 






3 


BrideeporE, Ctsm ...,.....„ 


5 
2 

3 
1 

4 


a 


]"!" 


3 


ft 


OamBrldm, SCafiS... „„,..,. 


1 


t^m^att, N. J.,. 


...... 

^^ 


1 
9 
1 
1 
3 
1 






DajtiBj, Ohio,.. ....„,.,.. 


3 


Fort W«th. Tei.. ..„,...,. 




nrMtrl Raplrl*j MIcJi 


3 
7 

i 
3 


1 
1 


14 

10 

e 


^ ^ ^ 


■ 3 


2 


Ljnn, ltii6« ., 




4 


(j 


1 


Mwnplrti!, Tenn.,. 


11 


XaahTilJe, Tenn....,,„ 


40 

m 

51 
24 

46 

4?" 

41 
37 

■ 19 








1 






6 
16 


2 








10 

5 


1 
1 

3 
2 

2 
2 
6 
5 
2 
10 




1 


Now MMYim, Coiju .*».».,*», 


1 




i.. ,'; 5' 


B 
3 


Omaha, N6br........„ . .. 


1 

a' 
t 

10 
3 
1 

B 
6 
3 

SO 
3 


■**2 


2 
3 
3 
6 

1ft 
1 

a 

I 

3 

3 
J 
V 




t 


nm4tog Pa 


a 


RidiJii5iif,Va,,,.,„.,,.„. 
s^ritutfltld , M&99 


I 


2 

7 






8 


Toledo, Ohio........ .,. 


•M 


4 


Trcnion, N. J ... 




r* 


5 


Worci&ter, Uoss. . .......... 

From 50,000 lo 100,000 inhabit^ 
antp;: ' 


1 

;;;;;; 


4 

3 
1 
1 

2 
2 


... . 


ID 


1 


.^Jlentown, P& .„,..,...... 


::. ., 


4 

1 

a 

1 3 
a 




AtknUcCltr.N J* 




Ba jonnc N' J 


22 
12 
11 

30 


1 






Berktfey Cal. *.\ 





3 
3 




2 


Bix^^taintaa N Y 


1 


1 


t 


Brockton Mils^ 








1 


Cli»rl<^ton, 8, C ,.....„ 


1 






1 






* * ' " ■ r " 






t 





Digitized by 



GoogI 



▲iiCiiBtlO,1917 



1290 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Continued. 

aty Reports for Week Ended J«b^ 21, 1917— Continued. 





Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1,1916 

by U.S. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

Irom 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Meules. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber, 
culosb. 


city. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


From 60,000 to 100,000 in- 
habitants—Continued. 
CoviniEtan. Kv 


67,144 
04,495 
86,690 
63,705 
75,195 
76,078 
64,772 
76,183 
72,015 
77,214 
68,529 
99,437 
60,853 
67,343 
61,155 
78»283 
68,221 
63,794 
89,612 
92,943 
71,744 
69,411 
63,867 
65,185 
66,895 
55,642 
85,236 
63,330 
68,805 
99,519 
57,078 
87,039 
68,946 
61.120 
51,550 
66,0K3 
77,916 
70,722 
76,776 
94,265 
5L656 

27,732 
34,814 

32,«i5 
32,730 
27,G32 
43,425 
46, 192 
29,319 
34,611 
26,074 
48,811 
30,873 
42, 458 
28,203 
39,233 
41,781 
41,^G3 
29, 35.3 
25, 679 
40,496 
48,477 
35,363 
4*J.S86 
31,576 
3^.G7G 
31,677 
41,097 
35,3^4 
46, 515 
27,587 


94 
24 
13 
68 

28* 

11 

ao 

18 
16 

16 


2 








1 
7 
8 




1 


1 


T>nhi|n^yinn 




18 
8 






Ellxabe'tb. N. J 


6 






4 


a 


El Paso, Tex 


14 


Erie, Pa 


8 




2 









• 
2 


u 


Rvansvilip, Ind r . , 


t 


FlintjMic^ 


4 
2 
2 
2 

1 
1 




7 




C 






FortWayne, Ind 






1 


HarrisbuTE. Pa. 




2 
8 




1 
1 






2 


Hoboken,N. J 




3 

3 
4 


1 


Johnstown, Pa 




Kansas City. Kam 










t Ancastffr, Va . ^ . . . . x 




2 










Little Rock, Aiki....'. 


16 
9 
14 

18 
9 












2 




Mft1d«n Mm^ . 


4 
2 

1 




4 
8 








1 


Manchesto-, N H 




2 








Mobile, Ala... . .'.'.'.' 






1 


Naw Tt'ritAin Onnn 




2 












Norfolk, Va. 














3 


Oklahoma City, Okia ....... 


17 
26 
19 
17 
19 
20 
23 

,? 

25 
20 
















8 


10 
4 












2 


2 


Pawtucket, R. 1 








1 




1 


Portland, Me 




17 
6 
3 

1 










Rockford, 111 ...!!!!'.*.*.*.! *. '. *. ! 


1 
3 


...... 




1 




6 




Sacramento, Cal 




Saginaw, Mich..."!]!!!!!!.!! 




2 






1 


St r Joseph, Mo.. 


1 






1 
1 
1 
6 


2 


San V'Wfao, Ch]. 




16 

1 
11 


1 


6 




1 


Savannah,' Ca 






4 


Schenectady, N. Y 


1 










1 


Sioux Citv/lowa. 




3 

1 






Somerville, Mass ! . . ! ! 


i6 
12 
14 
13 
16 


2 




4 
2 
15 
6 






1 
1 


1 


south IJend, Ind 


2 


Springfield III 






2 


Springfield, Ohio.!!!!!!!!!!! 








3 

1 
2 
2 

1 
2 




4 


I 


Terre Haute, Ind 


1 




1 


Trov,N. Y 


1 


14 
2 
5 
1 






3 
8 
2 
6 

1 


S 


Wichita, Kans 







• 2 


WUkesBarre, Pa 


17 
60 


9 
1 






Wilmington, Pel 




York, Pa 




From 25,000 to SO.OOO iiihaMtan'ts': 
AlAiTiodA Cal 


3 
14 
















Austin. Tex 
















2 


Bellincham, Wash . . 














3 
1 


2 


Brookline, Mass !!!!!!! 


9 
3 

ii* 

10 
12 
2 


• • 














Butte, Mont 

Chelsea, Mass 


1 
...... 

1 


...... 

1 


1 
4 
1 
1 
2 




4 
1 




""4* 
8 
8 


i 


Chicopee, Mass. 


1 


Ccriumbia, S. C !!!!!!!!! 




1 




1 


Cumberland Md 




Davenport, Iowa 

Dubuque, Iowa . 


1 








"i' 






■ 2 


East Orance. N. J 


3 
3 
3 
9 
9 
9 

9* 

11 

17 
8 

1 

i 12' 

21 

1 10 
1 8 


2 
1 
3 
2 
8 
...... 





15 
...... 

2 






2 




Elghi, 111 !!!!!**"! 











Everett, Mnss 




Fitchbiwg Mass 








1 


Galveston Tex 


1 






1 
...... 

1 
1 
3 
4 




Green Bay, Wis 

Hagerstown, Md 








Hamilton, Ohio 














Haverhill, Mass. 


1 




1 
7 
37 
3 








1 


Jackson, Mich.. ' '! 










Kalamazoo, Mich 

Kenosha. Wis 


2 






""z 




s 


Jijioxviiie, lenn 

La Crosse, Wis 

Lexington, Ky 


1 
3 














3 


Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln Nebr 


...... 




i 




i 






2 


Lont! Beach Cal ... 




2 








i 











Die 


itized t 


)yG< 


00^ 


!le 



1291 



August 10, 1917 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS— 

(Continued. 



aty Reports for Week Ended July 21, 1917— Continued. 








Popula- 
tion as of 
Joly 1,1910 
(esUmated 
by U. B. 

Bnreaa). 


1 

ToUl 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tubcr- 
cii'osis. 


otj. 


1 


1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


a 
1 


Trom 35J0OO to 100,000 inbabtt- 
ADts— Continued. 
Loratn. Ohio 


88,984 
82,940 

47*821 
28,818 
27,827 
29 005 
81,987 
80,106 
48,716 
87^368 
81,401 
31,404 
38,080 
48,450 
41,185 
38,029 
39,6.'>l 
36,798 
38,136 
46,486 
43,284 
28,926 
38,CQ2 
27,415 
46,226 
36,283 
48,720 
30,570 
29,894 
43,139 
43,377 
.33,809 
29,892 
31,156 
30,863 

22,874 
15,010 
21,685 
15,794 

1 13,075 
22,609 

.20,743 
24,276 
16,950 
23,539 
20,930 
15,395 

1 14,610 
17^445 
13,284 
17,500 
23 126 
15,243 
20,985 

1 22,019 
19,926 
2),805 
1 7, .'524 
11,666 
12,067 
14,831 
20,193 
13,821 
15.548 
21,618 
23,228 


U 


I 








3 








LTDcbbon. V* 




1 






1 
1 
1 
2 


2 


i^discm^is.... ..::::..::; 








3 






McKaesport, Pm. 


16 
6 
9 
8 
9 
7 
6 
15 
8 
1 

17 
12 
11 
10 
10 
9 
11 
12 


4 










Mont<*]JrrN, 7 














'JMhrni, N. H 
















NewbaTKh,N.Y 






6 








2 


1 


NewporTfey;...::::::::;:: 














Newport, R.L 
















1 


Vmmhwi\t^^ 


5 
3 
1 


1 


4 
1 












Niagara'FaU*, N. Y 








2 


2 


NoiTistown, ?• 








2 


Ogden, Utah 








1 








OiwA, N. f 


1 




6 




1 


1 
1 
1 
4 


2 


FM»Jexia,CaI 






3 


Perth Amboy, N. J 
















Pittsfield, Maas 






7 
1 






" 




Portsmoath, Va 








1 




2 


Qolncy, Dl.r 












QuKncy. Van 


5 




3 

1 




1 




2 

1 
1 




Radne,'wir. ..;..;:.;;:... 


3 


Roanoke, Va 













2 


l^nrV T«Vii7H^ Tl| 


7 


1 














f^Ttl^^^Cfl^ 




6 




2 


" 


1 
1 




Steubenvine, Ohio 


5 
10 
3 
3 
14 










2 

1 
1 














TwnrtonL>fa!<3 . .w 












3 
1 
2 
2 

1 




TopB^a, ^am 





1 
8 
8 
3 




2 







WaJtham, Maw 


3 


Watertown. N. Y 








1 
2 

1 






West Hoboken, N. J 


5 
17 

1 

11 
17 

7 

11 
12 

5' 

6 

5 

4 

10 






2 


Wheeling, W.Va 






2 


Williamsport. Pa 


9 

1 


1 


2 










WnTnlT,p/^« N 




1 
2 




WhKton-Salem, N. C 




1 




1 




3 


Zaneaville, Ohio 








From 10,000 io 35,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Alton, lU 


















Ann Arbor. Mich 


2 
3 




9 

1 




'31....:. 

1 


1 


1 


BraddocV, W 




Cairo, ni 




t 




1 


C^inUm, Mftjff . ^ , _ , , 






1 



... 


1 




2 


Concor<i,N.H 


1 






1 









Dunkirk,N.Y 


. 






Oatesburg, HI 


8 




1 
3 
2 








. . . 




Harrbmn, N. J 













Kearny,^. J 


6 
4 
4 
2 
7 
6 


1 










.. . . 
2 




Kokomo,ind 








3 


LongBrandh, N. J 






4 
























Uelro-A itavf 


1 














lCflrristown.N.7 
















Muscatine, towa 






2 












Nanticoke', Pa 


5 
1 

10 
5 
6 
7 








2 








Newburynort, Mass 












2 

{ 

2 
2 




New London.'Comi 


3 


1 


3 
8 
2 










North Adams, Mass 








1 


Northamptoni Mass 








3 




4 


Plahifl€Uf,N.'J 








PonUac,Mich 






1 
2 




4 
1 






Portfmonth, N. H 


6 

6 
8 
5 



1 


1 






1 


Rocky Mount. N. C 








^ii^Xvt. 


1 




1 




1 








SandnakT, Ohio. 








flaral'Ha'HnrfiiM. N, v 














1 
4 




8te^5i,Fa...... 






2 
2 

1 










Wwhfmrtffli. ^a 


'*:::i:::::: 




2 






WOkiivjburr, Pa 


6 


2 1 




1 


1 

















« Fopulalion Apr. %\ I'UO: no estimate madv. 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOREIGN. 



CHINA. 
Pbigne — Hongkong. 

During the two weeks ended June 9, 1917, 5 cases of plague with 
3 deaths were notified at Hongkong. 

Pfaigiie-Infectod Rate— Hmii^ontf. 

During the six weeks ended June 16, 1917, out of 11,339 rats exam- 
ined at Hongkong, 14 were found plague infected. The last plague- 
infected rat at Hongkong was found during the week ended June 2, 
1917. 

CUBA. 

Commnnicabie Disease* — Habana. 
Communicable diseases have been notified at Habana as followB: 





July 1-10, 1917. 


Remain- 
Ine under 


Diseases 


July 1-10, 1917. 


BsBMin- 


Disease. 


New 
casee. 


Deaths. 


treat- 
ment 


N«v 


Deaths 


Diphtheria 


4 




7 
10 
23 


MeasiM 


10 
18 


1 
2 


4 


Leprosy 




Typhoid fever 


47 


Malaria 


8 










_ 



INDO-CHINA. 
Cholera — ^Plafne — Smallpox — ^February, 1917. 

During the month of February, 1917, 20 cases of cholera, 101 cases 
of plague, and 593 cases of smallpox were notified in Indo-China. 
The cases were distributed by Provinces as follows: 

Oholera, — ^Province of Anam, 3 cases; Cambodia, 8 cases; Cochin- 
China, 8 cases; Tonkin, 1 case. 

Plague. — Province of Anam, 31 cases; Cambodia, 67 cases; Cochin- 
China, 13 cases. 

SmdUpox. — Province of Anam, 297 cases; Cambodia, 36 cases; Co- 
chin-China, 193 cases; Tonkin, 67 cases. 

Cholera showed a decrease in the month of February, 1917, as 
compared with the preceding month, only 20 cases being notified in 

(1292) 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1293 



▲ncnst 10. 191f 



Fabmaiy, 1917, as against 52 in January, 1917. In January, 1916, 
915 cases of cholera were reported, and in February, 1916, 417 cases. 

The plague cases rq>orted in February, 1917, exceeded the number 
reported for January, being 101 as compared with 82. 

SmaU^x increased considotibly during the month of February, 
1917, 593 eases being reported as compared with 174 in January 
TIm prevalence was much greater than in the corresponding month 
of 1916, when 96 eases were reported. The greatest incidence during 
the month of February, 1917, was in Anam with 297 cases and 
Cochin-China with 193 cases. 

UNION OF SOUTH AFBIGA. 

Plaf«e— -Orange V^ee State. 

JL fatal case of plague was reported May 28, 1917, in Winburg 
jtataici, Orange Free State. The case occurred on Strydfont^>in 
faim. 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS RYES, AND YELLOW FEVER. 
Repwte BeceiTed Dartet the We^ Ended Amgmai 10, iai7.« 

CHOLBBA. 



Place. 


Data. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Mk^ 


llay27-JunB2.... 
do 


1 
I 


1 




RttifiKm 




Feb. 1-28, 1017: Cases, 20; deaths, 
12. 


^""^^ 






Anam 


Feb. 1-M 


a 

8 

n 

1 

1 




C^rabodia.^ 


do 


6 
6 




CociHD-Cliina 


do 




T(H\ldn 


do 




Fbflhwtne Islands: 


June 17-23 






ftovinces 




June 17-23, 1917: Coses, 143; 

dCAlh* MO. 


Albav 


Jun© 17-23 

do 


27 
1 
29 
35 
31 
10 


18 


Batangas 


1 ' 


Bohol 


do 


26 
10 
10 
ft 




Capiz 


do 




Cebu 


do 




BorsogOQ 


do 











PLAGUE. 



India: 

Bombay 


June 3-0 


38 

57 

25 


33 
62 
12 

28 




KwftchL -r 


do 






Ifay2?-June2..... 
do 




Ranroon . ' 




Indo^iilpa: 




Feb. 1-2S, 1917: Cases, 101. deaths 


Anam 


P(Bb. i-28 


31 
57 
13 
20 

1 

1 


i5* 

47 

11 

1 


71. 


Cambodia 


... .do 




Ccchin-ChiTMi 


do 




Saigon 


May2K-Junea..... 
May 27- J una 1.... 
iirm ?-«..., 




Stem: 

i^angVoV T r ,.,..,. . 




BtialtsScttlements: 

Singapore 




Unlcm of §outh Africa: 
Orange Free State— 

Winburg district 


lfay^28 


1 








.— 




VFn 



offiaen of the Public Health Service, Am^rtenii coastals, and oiIkit t^irmt. 

Digitized by VjOOQ; 



I 



AugUHt 10, 1917 



1294 



CHOLERA. PLAGUE. SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW RSVBR- 

Continued. 

Reports ReceWed Dnrinf tke Week Ended Avfosl 10, 1917— Conlioiied. 

SMALLPOX. 



PlMf. 


Date. 


Ouet. 


Deatba. 


ReiiiArks. 


AustraUa: 

New South WalM 








■J- 
May 37-JiiiM at, mr: cum, 14. 


nrcwftirirm. ............ 


Juneg-21 

May2S-June7.... 

June 10-23 


a 

13 




CoooabarAbniL. 






Cbongklng 




Present. 


Dairen...T 


June 34-30. 

June25-Ju]7l.... 
June la-JuJy 7. . . . 


4 
1 






flhAll^hM _ 


5 
3 




Tsingtao 




France: " 

Paris 


May 6-12. 


1 

35 
7 

13 
3 




India: 

Bombay 


Junea-0 







irftny»ii| 


do 




MmJrM . 


May27-June2..... 
do 


3 




Rangoon 




Indo<aiIha: 

Provinces 






Feb. 1-38, 1917: Cases, 593; dcetts 


Anam. 


Fib. 1-38. 


307 
30 

103 
67 
67 

1 
8 

1 


7 
1 

53 
1 

31 




'>inibodia„ X X X X X 


do. 




(ochln^aiina. 

Tonkin 


do 

do. 




BaiKon 


May28-JunelO.... 

June25-Julyl.... 

June 36-30. 

June25-Julyl.... 

July 11-17 




Japan: 

Kobe 




Osaka 


4 




Yokohama 




Mexico: 

M^ffAtlftn... ... 


3 


.1 


Portujsal: 

Usboo 


June 10-30. 

May 13-10. 


6 

38 

1 




Peirocrad 






Riga 


Mpy ^17, . 






Venexuela: 

Maracalbo. 


July 2-8. 


3 













Algeria: 

Algiers 

China: 

Antung... 

TslnU>.. 
Russia: 
. Pctrograd. 

Riga 

Switxerland: 

Basel 

Tunisia: 

Tunis 



TYPHUS FEVER. 



June 1-30 

June 2>-July 1 

JuneK-JuJy 7.... 



May 13 19. . 
May&12... 



June 17 23 

June 30 July 6. 



Place. 



India: 

B»-^in 

Calcutta.... 

Mr.lri. 

Ma-^'liliy... 

I'll', -kku..., 

Hu'' ' .-on. ... 
li»»l- - 1 .fi i: 



J.i\ 



Reports ReceiTed from Jane 30 to Aug. 8, 1917. 
CHOLERA. 



Date. 



Apr. 1-May5... 
Apr.2^M^a9.. 

Apr. 23-28 

May 6 12 

May 13 19 

Apr. 20 May 6... 
Apr. 21 May 19.. 



Ai»r. 23 May 27.... 



Vi.a \pr a H... 

' na 

..' IMI \1»T. 1 { P». 



Cases. Deaths. 



30 
t«3 



8 

273 
1 

1 
3 
1 
15 

108 



Remarks. 



^^^J^t^ogte 



'S^ 



1295 



August 10, 1917 



CBOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEYERr- 

Continued. 

Reports ReeeiTed from Jiue 30 to Aug. 3, 1917— Continued. 

CHOLERA— Continued. 



Ptece. 


Date. 


Cases. 


i)eaths. 


Remarks. 


Amir Kels 


Fab.S 


1 
4 
1 
S 






Barfouroodie 


Jan. 15-17 






Wain«ft Kela 


Jan. 17 






UtrhfdffKnr x . 


Jtn.81 






PUUppliw Islands: 






Hay 20-June 16, 1017: Cases, 653: 
deaths, 417. 


All»y 


HayaO-JunelO... 
J^me 3-9 


77 

2 

251 

4 
142 

117 
S 


52 

163 
4 

00 
2 

50 
3 


Bohol 


Mayao-Junel«... 
Jun6»-16 




Canis 




CBbu 


do 




Lerte 


June 10-16 

June 3-10 








TftTaoas 


do 




.. 







PLAGUB. 



AnbU: 
Aden. 



Ctjkn: 

Colombo 

Ctett: 

Aney 

BoD^kDOg 

I Kwao^tung Province— 
Ta-pu di-itrict 



?roi<nees— 
Fayocun. 
Oirrefa... 



8loat. 
t Britain: 



Bombay 

CUcotta 

Heozada 

EarMiii 

IWras Presidency. . 

Uandalay 

Moulinein. 

Jylncyan. 

lUo«oon 

, Toangoo 

8ii|oo 

fcu: 

EwtJtva 

8unbaja 

Surakarta 

nri 

IJtp^rtmnits^' 

SZ"* 

Ufi^:?"!:::: 



ta:""- 



^'»*««8oath Africa: 
Ch» oC Good Hope State- 

^Qmenstown 

^>«*a«»Fre«SUto 



)Cay3-JuneU. 



Apr. »-lCay 10. 

Apr. 2»-iay 5. 
Mayl3-June0. 

June2 



May 12-17.. 

Hay 11-17.. 

Hay 17 

Hay 12-15. 
Hay 12 



Hay 3-8.. 



Apr. 1-Hay 10. . 
Apr. 22-June2.. 
Apr. 20-Hay 26. 
Apr. 1-Hay 10.. 
Apr. 22-May 26. . 

do 

Apr. 8-May 12. . 
Apr. 1-May 12. . 

Apr. 1-7...- 

Apr. 15-Hay 10. 
Apr. 3-14 



Apr. 23-May 27.. 



Apr. 2-22.. 
do 



Hay 16-31. 
....do.... 
.....do.... 
....do.... 



....do 

Apr. 22-Hay 26. 



June 6. 



13 



343 



460 
210 



115 
27 



39 

297 

37 

33 

411 

171 



52 

1 

110 

2 



A^^Iay 14, 1017: Cases, 60; 



Present and in rldnity. 



Present. 

"m.l-lL 

deaths 



Jan.l-Hay 17, 1017: Cases, 231; 
^"-•^-, 116. 



2 In hospital at port. From s. s. 

Sardinia from Australian and 

oriental ports. 
Apr. 15 -May 26, 1017: Cases. 

34,545; deaths, 23,036. 



Apr. 2-22, 1917: Cases, 18; deaths, 
18. 

May 16-31, 1917: Cases, 15. 

At Mollendo. 

At CaJlao. 

At Chidayo. 

At Salavcrry, San Pedro, and 

TrujiUo. 
At Lima. 



Apr. 16-22, 1917: 1 ease; Apr. 9 -22; 
1917: Cases, 26; deiths, 17. 



Digitized by 



Google 



August 10, 1917 



1296 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE. SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW PEVER- 

Continued. 

Reports Received from June 90 to An^. 3, 1917— Continued. 

SMALLPOX. 



Place. 



Date. 



Australia: 

New South Wa 1 .\« 

Brewarrina 

Quamljone 

Queensland- 
Thursday Tsl ind Q uar- 
antiucStitlon. 



Brazil: 

Bahia 

Rio de Janeiro 

Canada: 

Manitoba- 
Winnipeg 

Xo\'a Scotia- 
Halifax 

Tort Hawkesbury., 
Ccjlon: 

Colombo 

China: 
Amoy.. 



Antune. 

Chungking 

Changsha 

Dairen 

Harbin 

HonskonR 

Manchuria Station. 

Mukden 

Shanghai : 

Tientsin 

Tsitshar Stat ion... 
Tsingtao 



Egypt: 

Alexandria 

(icrmany 

Berfin 

Bremen 

Charlottenburg 

iramburg , 

Lcipiig , 

Labeck 

Munich 

Stuttgart , 

India: 

Bombay , 

Calcutta 

Karachi , 

Madras , 

Rangoon , 

Indo-Chnia: 

Saigon 

Italy: 

Turin 

Japan: 

Kobe 

Nagasaki 

Osaka 

Yokohama 

Javrt: 

East Java 

Mid-Java 

West Java 

Batavia 

Mexico: 

McNicDCity 

Monterey 

Philippine Islands: 

Manila 

Portu^: 

Lisbon 

Portuguese East Africa: 

Louren^ Mar<iucz. . 



Apr. 27-May 10. 
do 



May 9.. 



MavO-12 

May G-June 16. 



June 10-16 

Junolft-July 7.. 
June 17-30 



May 6-12 

Apr. 29-May 26. 
May21-June24. 
May 6- June 2... 
May27-June2.. 
May 13-Juno23.. 
Apr. 23-May 6. . , 
May ^Junel6.. 

Apr. 23-29 

May 27-Juno2.. 
May 21-Juno 24. 
May 13- Juno 9.. 

Apr. 16-22 

May 22-June 16. 



Apr. 30-Jimo 10. , 



Mar. 18-Apr. 28- 

.do 

do 

do 

do 



.do. 
.do- 
.do. 



Apr. 23- June 2... 
Apr. 29-May 26.. 
Apr.22-Mayl9.. 
Apr.22-May26.. 
Apr. 15-May26.. 

Apr. 23-Ma7 27. . 

May 21-Jmie 24. . 

May 27- June 24. . 
May 28-June3... 
May 16- Juno 10. . 
May 27- June 1... 



Apr. 2-29. 
Apr. 1-21. 



Apr. 13-May 3. . . 



Jiiiiea 30.. 
June IS 24. 



May 13- June 9.. 

do 

Mar. 1 at 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



33 



106 
16 
18 
50 
20 

2 
10 

1 



13 
56 
25 

132 

32 

52 

1 

161 



11 
162 



16 



Remarks. 



Apr. 27-lCay 10, 1917: Cas^^'e. 



From s. 8. St. Albans from Kobe 
via Hongkong. Vessel vn- 
ceoded to Townsville, Bris- 
bane, and Sydney, in quaran- 
tine. 



ny'^. 



Present in district. 

Present and in vicinity. 
Present. 



On Chinese Eastern Ry. 

Do. 
Present. 
Cases foreign; deaths among ot* 

tives. 
On Chinese Eastern By. 
At another station on raflway, 

lease. 



Mar. 18-Apr. 28, 1917: Case?, 715 
in cities and 32 Statear. and 
districts. 



Apr. 13-May 10, 1917: Cases, 4«; 
deaths, 7. 



Varioloid. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1297 



August 10, lOlf 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVEI 

Continued. 

Reports ReceiTad from June SO to Aug. S, 1917— <bntinaed. 
SMALLPOZ-Contlnoad. 



Plaoe. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Arc4ianrn] 


ICavl-li. 


7 

331 

3 

23 


2 




PMrosrad 


Feb. lS-Ma7l2... 
Mar.ll-Mayl»... 
Mar. 15-21 

lCavl-31 




rS!!vv..:.:.:.:..:::::::: 




Jan. 1-31,1917: Cases, 7. 


Vladivostok 


7 

3 
5 


Spain: 

Madrid. 




Serine 


do 






VfilfAd* 


June 3-23 


3 
5 

1 

1 

2 




Straits Settlements: 

Peoanr 


Ifar. IS-May 12. . . 

Apr.22-28. 

Iiay20-June2.... 

June 2-8 


2 




Sweden: 

Malmo 




Stockholm 


1 




Tunisia: 




Turkey in Asia: 

Trebiioad 


Feb. 25-Apr. 13 


15 




Union of South Africa: 
Johannesburg 


liar.12-24 


4 




Vanezoela: 

Maracaibo 


June 18-July 1 


5 













TYPHUS FEVER. 



Austria-Hungary: 

Austria 








Oct. 22-Dec. 17, 19IC: C^ses, 2,371. 


nAh#tmlft 


Oct.2J>-Dec.l7.... 
do 


634 

809 

47 

617 

243 




Qalicia 






Lower Austria 


do 






- Monvia 


do 






Silesia 


do 






Styria 


do 






Upper Austria 


do 




Feb.l9-Mar.2o, 1917: Cases, 1,38L 


Honeary 






Dudaiiest 


Feb.19-Mar.25... 
June9-lfl 


83 
1,421 




China: *^ 
n«ikow 






Tsingtao 


May30-June9.... 
Apr.30-JunelO... 
June 17-23 






Alexandria. 


413 
1 
26 




Great Britain: 

Cork 




Greece: 

Saloniki 


May 13-16. 






Japan: 

Nagasaki 


June 11-24 

Apr. 1-30 






Java: " 

Mld-Jara 


2 




WestJava 




Apr. 13-May 10. 1917: Cases, 86. 


Batavia 


Apr. 13-Moy 10. . . 
June 3-30 


22 
431 

84 




Mexico: 

Mcxicoaty 






Netherlands: 


June 9-23 


2 




Portuguese East Africa: 

Lourenco Marqaes 


Mar. 1-31 




Boasia: 

Ar(4iance1.. 


May 1-14 






Petrograd 


Feb. l^May 18.... 
Jan. 1-31 


3 




Biga 




Vladivostok 


Mar.29-May21.... 
May 1-31. . 






Spain: 

Madrid 


2 













YELLOW FEVER. 



Mtxioo: 

Yucatan, 8tat»- 
Peto. 




In person recently arrived from 
Mexico (Ity. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



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PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 

VOL. 32 AUGUST 17, 1917 No. 33 

CERTAIN MILITARY ASPECTS OF HOOKWORM DISEASE. 

By Ch. Wardell Stilus, Professor of ZooIog>', United States Public Health Service. 

A uewly formed militia unit, recently mobilized for war service, was 
quartered temporarily at a Government reservation where the writer 
was conducting some experiments. Within less than two days after 
reaching their quarters one of the recruits was suspected of trymg to 
shirk his duty and the commanding officer planned to place him in 
confinement for discipline. The man claimed that he was not feeling 
Will, and the lieutenant, as a matter of justice to the recruit and of 
protection to himself, requested me to pass upon the case medically. 
Tho diagnosis of light hookworm infection was made upon the basis 
of symptoms and was immediately confirmed microscopically. 
Treatment was instituted, and the patient promptly gained about 
8 pounds in weight. 

On the third day after reaching quarters a second recruit was 
brought for examination. He had stood guard the night before, was 
unable to sleep later, and complained that without sleep he was unable 
to drill. He gave a history of insomnia, for which he had been under 
treatment that had not given satisfactory results. The writer again 
diagnosed light hookworm infection from general symptoms and con- 
firmed the diagnosis microscopically. After treatment this man re- 
covered completely from his insomnia, changed remarkably in ap- 
pearance and disposition, and became one of the leading spirits in the 
unit. 

A tentative diagnosis of hookworm infection was then made of ten 
or more other men from their general appearance, as noticed on the 
most casual observation, and specimens were collected for micro- 
scopic examination. 

In a total of 75 miUtia recruits recently examined by the writer at a 
Government reservation, 47 men (63 per cent) showed hookworm 
infection, 3 Ascaris lumhricoides, 1 Hymenolepis nana, and 1 a heavy 
infection with Sirongyloides',^ two recruits had double infections; 25 
examinations were negative. 

' Hec(kiniQeiidAti<ni was made that the recruit (who was in the galley) with the StrongyloHes infection l)o 
discharged, on the groonds that: (o) No satisfactory treatment is known for this condition and {b) the 
rtsUofan early breakdown and resulting pension were so great as not to be justified. 

W (1299) 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



August 17. 1917 1300 

Treatment of the infected men was instituted, and although the 
writer left the reservation for another station before this was com- 
pleted, the physical improvement and the gain in weight and efficien- 
cy among the recruits were so marked as lo procfuce commait €fv«i 
from the nonmedical men. 

One of the hookworm patients was an ex-cadet from W^t Point, who 
had been ^'foimd'^ by a very narrow margin in his midyear examkukr 
tions. Theoretically his infection was ample to account for his 
failure and the financial loss incurred thereby by the Government. 

The foregoing experience has its lessons in the |Hresent war con- 
ditions, and the following important points in particular should be 
noticed : 

(1) These recruits represent an unselected instance of what may 
be expected in certain portions of the country among average en- 
listments. 

(2) Two volimteers were rejected because of remediable conditions 
clearly due to hookworm infection, and these men represent instances 
of a very large number of cases that will probably soon be noticed in 
many counties in both the Gulf-Atlantic and the southern Pacific 
regions. 

(3) Several recruits were rejected because of underweight, and in 
the forthcoming selective draft there wiH imdoubtedly be hundreds 
of similar cases. If the regulations permit, numerous cases of this 
type might justifiably be accepted provisionally, subject to the results 
of treatment as respects probable increase in weight. 

(4) A failure to treat the hookworm cases and to eliminate at lea^t 
the severe infections of Strongyloides will undoubtedly result in unjust 
and preventable punishment for oflFenses due to remediable condi- 
tions, considerable physical and mental inefficiency, an imnecessarily 
high daily *'sick call,*' and premature and preventable pfehsions. 

(5) If even light cases of infection with hookworms are sent to the 
trenches in Europe the danger is present of causing a widespread 
epidemic similar to the St. Gothard Tunnel epidemic, or fer^en to the 
Andersonville stockade epidemic. 

(6) The danger is also present that our military forces may cause 
a widespread infection in Franco and Belgium that it will take yeara 
of work and large expenditures of money to control and eradicato 
after the war. 

(7) The dangers referred to (inefficiency, sickness, epidemics, etc.) 
can be prevented to a very great extent if all the recruits (or at least 
those from certain States) are systematically examined for intestinal 
parasites and either treated in the American training camps or dis- 
charged, as necessity indicates. 

(8) The examination can best be a "3-shde" C'lO-cover glass") 
test, preferably by the centrifuge method. If an examination for 
hookworms only is made the work will be materiaUy lessened. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



I 



1301 August i7. 191T 

(9) This examination could be made more economically, more 
efficiently, and more rapidly at a central laboratory than at the 
separate conoentrktion camps. The specimens could be collected at 
the camps and sent by parcel post, imder proper precautions, to the 
central laboratory. This plan is evidently not free from objection 
from certain administrative points of view, but if adopted it would 
save the duplication of equipment and unnecessary training of many 
assistants and it would make for uniform examination. 

10. As a preliminary and tentative estimate, subject to revision if 
necessary, it may be said that the examinations suggested would cost 
somewhere between 20 cents (possibly 15 cents) and 30 cents (pos- 
sibly 40 cents) each. Certain factors in the expense can not, however, 
be definitely foreseen at present. 

11. The writer's experience indicates that girls are better for this 
work than men, but existing circumstances make it more feasible to 
train men enlisted in the hospital corps to make the examinations. 
It takes about 1 to 8 weeks to tram a person to bo trustworthy in the 
examination. The best results are obtained if tlio microscopist (^oes 
not have to work more than half a day at a tune. 

12. It would be wise to begin promptly with all units at present 
organized. , ^ 

, 13. While the hookworm and Strongyloide>i examinations are the 
most important ones involved, the other parasites should be con- 
sidered. Accordingly, the examination of recruits from the warmer 
portions of the country is at present more pressing than the examina- 
tion of mpn from colder localities. The question of extending the 
iBspectioi>: to all recruits Is, however, an important one to be con- 
skjered and it would be wise to extend it if time permit. 

I 14. It secerns highly probable that, even leaving out of considera- 
tion the money value of increased efficiency, the entire expenditure 
iftvolved in the examination would bo saved in the reduced pension 
roll 

• 15. It would be well to consider the question whether it would not 
be wise to combine the examination with a newspaper campaign to 
induce prospective recruits to take the initiative to have themselves 
examined and treated. 



MALARIA IN EASTERN TEXAS. 

PREVALENCE AND GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION. 

The periodical circularization of the physicians of eastern Texas 
to determine the prevalence and geographic distribution of malarial 
infection in the eastern part of the State was carried on during the 
last nine months of 1915, and the first, second, and fourth quarters of 



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August 17, 1917 



1302 



1916. At regular intervals reply postal cards were sent to the prac- 
ticing physicians. These cards were sent out quarterly.* A repro- 
duction of the card used during 1915 and 1916' will be found (m 
page 1128 of the Public Health Reports of the issue of July 20, 1917. 

Of the cards sent to physicians an ayerage of less than 14 per cent 
were returned. Those returning the cards with the requested data 
filled in undoubtedly coi^tituted the better class of practitioners, 
those who imderstood most clearly what was wanted and the yahe 
of the work. The number of cards sent out, the number of schedules 
returned, and the counties represented at each circularizaticm are 
shown in Table No. 1. 

It is to be borne in mind that the number of cases reported by the 
physicians by no means shows the number of cases that occurred, for 
an average of less than 14 per cent of the physicians returned the 
schedules. 





Apr. 


Itoy. 


JniiA 


i^tti. 


Aof. 


Sep. 


Oot. 


Hov. 


Deo. 


































A 




















A 




















f \ 








n 










y 




V 
















/ 




\ 














y 






\ 














y 








\, 








' 


,-^ 












s, 






'"^^^ 
















. 





















Eelativc prevalence of malaria in eastern Texas, by months, as 
indicated by the numbers of cases reported. 

The return of the schedules by the physicians being a matter of 
voluntary cooperation, the data are undoubtedly reliable to an 
unusual degree as regards the experience of the physicians who 
cooperated and the number of cases seen by them. It is to be home 
in mindy however, that the cases reported represent only those 
occurring in the practices of the physicians who cooperated. The 
total number of cases of malaria occurring in the practices of all 
the physicians of the State must have been many times greater, 
also the number of cases that occurred in which no physician was in 
attendance or consulted was probably much greater than the 
number coming under medical care. 

> The work of drcularizatlon and of compilation of the data on the rettim cards was carried on by tii0 
jate Surg. R. H. von Esdorf up to the time of his death in September, 1910. Since then it bas been KXcAfA. 
oD by Asst. Surg. B. C. DeriTiux and Asst. Sure. 0«n. H. R. Garter. 



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1303 



August 17, lOlf ' 



The phyfiicians who cooperated wore distributed as to locality 
throughout all sections of the State, so that the data of the oc<;urronce 
of malaria furnished by them show the geographic distribution of 
the disease and reasonably accurately its relative prevalence in the 
various locahties. 

The casoK reported by months arc b-hown in Table No. 2. The rela- 
tive uumbors of cases reported by months are also shown in the chart 
herewith. 



LA. 




Behlirr iir<->To Vnc » of miUriu iu caslern 'i\\.s, by counlif.-:, in pr.»{v»rlion to the pojnllutlon, as 
inrlicated by the numbers of cat.e> rcp3r(e 1. 

The number ot cases reported from the bcvoral counties arc given 
V race and year in Table No. 3. 

The map on page 1303 shows the relative picvalence of the disease 
8» the several^counties, the heavier shaded (ounties being those in 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Avgoflt 17, 1917 



1304 



which the infection is heaviest, the unshaded countieB those in which 
the infection is Ughteet, as indicated by the numbers <rf cases reported. 
T^e relative density of infection was determined by ascertaining the 
number of cases reported in each coimty during the entire period (or 
which reports were received per 1,000 population. The population 
used was that of the 1910 census, it being impracticable to estimate 
populations for the period of the circularization. 

By Table No. 4 it will be noted that hemoglobinuric fever was 
reported in seven counties. 



Table 1. — Results of circularizcUion of practicing physidanB. 



Pwlod. 



Inquiry 
cards 
sent to 
pliysi- 



R«plles 
raoHv 



ved. 



replies. 



Countitt 
repre- 
sentMl 
in re- 
plies. 



Ooontiefi 
not 



from. 



rasas o( 
inalanA 
reported. 



1915. 

Aprilto June 

July to September 

October to D«oeinber . . 

1916. 

January to March 

Aprilto June 

October to December. . 



3,450 
3,450 
3,450 



3,450 
3,450 
3,500 



584 
676 
492 



450 
368 
402 



1«.P3 
16.70 
14.26 



13.04 
10.67 
11.49 



6,7:3 
21,259 
11,5% 



2,4i5 
5,9« 
3,5» 



TABtB 2. — Cases of jnalaria reported by -months. 



Year. 


Janu- 
ary. 


Feb- 
ruary-. 


MartJh. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


Jnly. 


Au- 
gust. 


Sep- 
tem- 
ber. 


Octo- 
ber. 


No- 
vem- 
ber. 


De- 
own- 
ber. 


1915 








1,606 
1.179 


2.161 
1,752 


3,006 ! 4.129 


6,455 


10,675 


5,525 
1,515 


3,771 
1,233 


2,280 


1916 1 74« 


700 


907 


3:977 

















Table 3. — Cases reported by counties, by years, and by color. 



County. 


Apr. 1 to Dec. 81 


, 1915. 


Jan. I to June 30 and Oct.i 
to Dec. 31, 1916. 


White. 


ColoncL 
103 


Com- 
bined. 


White. 


Colored. 


Com.' 
bined. 


Anderson 


236 

90 


339 
90 


lOG 
52 


15 


121 


Angelina 


52 


Aran.<as 











Archer 


i 

380 

671 

5 




1 

747 

770 

5 








Austin . 


367 
99 


187 

% 


52 
58 

1 


239 


IJastiop 


155 


Bavlor 


4 


Beo . 






BpII 


iin 

71 
206 
381 

d» 
100 

22 

12 




118 
78 

216 

488 
73 

104 
56 
14 


57 
31 
65 
137 


1 
15 

2 
62 


M 


Bexar 


7 

10 
104 
35 

4 
34 

3 


46 


Bosque » 


67 


Bowie 


199 


Brazoria 




Bruzos 


25 
19 
14 





25 


Biirlo'^on 


48 
11 


67 


Caldwell 

Calhoun 


25 


Camp 

Cass 


74 
121 


44 

28 


118 
149 









8 
56 

6 
40 


4 
38 


12 


Chambers 


M 


Cherokee .. 


250 
34 


180 
3 


439 
87 


6 


Clay 


4 


» 



Digitized by 



Google 



1305 August 17. 191T 

Table 3. — Caus reported by counties, by years, and by color — Continued. 



County. 


Apr. 1 to Dec. 31 


, 1915. 

Corn- 
Lined. 


JSLD. 1 to June 30 and Oct. 1 
to Dec. 31, 1916. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


^o»o"^- binSd. 


ColUn 


402 
87 
101 
204 
41 
548 
352 
301 
61 


60 
38 

6 
10 

2 
113 
58 
25 
47 


462 
125 
110 
214 
43 
661 
410 
326 
111 


180 11 


191 


Colorado 

CooaJ 

Cooke 


21 
43 

14 


33 

8 


54 
51 
14 


Coryell 

Dallas 

Delta 


7 




7 


418 
110 
138 
11 




56 
22 
3 
5 


474 
133 


Denion 

DeWitt 


141 
16 


Eftstland 




Ellis 


350 
63 
233 
352 


i7i 

37 

51 

.172 


521 
100 
287 
52-1 


255 
62 
46 

109 


40 
37 
11 
47 


295 


Falls 


89 


Fannio 


57 


Fnrettf 


156 


Foard... 


13 




13 


FoctB«iui '. . 


98 


126 


224 


266 
24 
2 
338 
173 
87 


18 
19 
60 
16 


24 


Franklin 


83 


Freestone 


1,504 
20 
14 
56.5 
149 
102 


217 
17 
1 

106 
96 

168 


1,721 
37 
15 
671 
245 
270 


326 


G(*ad 


40 


Gonzailes 


2 


Grayson 


24 
128 
116 


362 


Gic^ :::::.:.:.:::.:.....:.:... 


301 


Gnmes 


203 


Guadalupe 




Hardeman . . 


11 

167 
1,.'j1U 
3H 
16 
169 
2.^H 
463 

6:m 

614 
2.> 
192 
286 

28 
■V) 
733 




11 

211 
2,027 
67 
17 
211 
287 
644 
1.112 
662 
30 
263 
700 
.36 
63 
856 


3 




3 


Hardin. 


44 

.)0S 
29 

I 
42 
49 

181 

488 

71 
414 

8 

8 

123 


4 


2 


6 


Harris 


298 1 29 
22 ( 35 
11 1 10 

550 1 133 


327 


Hamson 


57 


Hav5 


21 


Hendenon 


683 


Hill 


3 
91 
103 
152 

29 

85 
11 
28 
88 
14 




3 


H<^kins 


45 
71 
29 


136 


Houston 


174 


Hunt 


181 


Ilcksan.. .. 


7 


Ja5*r ;.;.!. .!..".!...!.!.!;..!.'.! 


25 
9 


.54 


Jeaerson 


W 


Johnson 


11 


Karnes 

Kanlman '. 

Klehenj 


I 
31 

1 


29 
119 
15 


Knox 


12 

i,09 

99 

326 

1.74.1 

110 

1.731 

270 

1,012 


■; 


i2 

1.378 
119 
390 

2,4.36 
140 

2,013 
321 

l.OKJ 




Lamar . . 


.'69 

70 
691 

30 
282 

51 

81 


119 
33 
101 
235 
325 
28 
111 
92 
62 
39 
82 
24 


44 

1 

28 

177 

73 

7 

52 

14 


ia3 


Lavaca. 

Lee • 

lmo ..:..::.:...: :..;::::::: 

Liberty 


31 
129 
412 

39S 


Limestone 

McLennan 


35 
163 


Madison 

Marion 


106 
62 


iSSf"'!.:".:'.:::::::;:::..:::- 

Mwta^ic 

MontRoni TV . . 




' 115 
3-13 

' 18 


133 
148 


218 

491 

18 


22 
53 


61 
135 
24 








MorTg...^.:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 

Xacogdothi:- 

NaTarro 

Nerion. 


1,493 

, 474 

23.1 

I7r. 

' ins 

! 7 


800 
308 


2.2".^:? 

7S2 

1 291 

170 

192 



1 


90 70 
234 92 
86 45 


160 
320 
131 


Ofancc 


24 

1 1 







Panob '../^['.'.y/^//^y/^ .['...[['.'.'.[ 

Polk. 


67 

13' 
100 
209 


49 


116 
13 


Rains... 







100 


RedHixcr .' .'....*. 

Refocb 


877 


) 210 


1 i,as7 
1 


34 


243 


Roben5ton 


280 

I.Vi 

754 

182 

189 

20 

2 

340 

VA) 

220 

i 372 

\ 79 


! 337 
5U 
283 
22 
28 
27 


1 017 

245 

1,037 

204 

217 

! 53 

; 2 
3,-.0 

' .-.84 

290 

382 

84 


i 238 1 66 
7 , 3 

130 1 68 


304 


Rock\Ta!l 


10 


Rosk 


204 


flrt)ine V..V.:[V. 


199 
575 


19 
26 


218 


8tn \n^\%t ine 


001 


8anJarintn. . , . 




SanPatTirio 


' 3' 




3 


Bhelbv 


io 

128 
70 
10 

i 5 


, G3 


: -jii 


1 k: 


8mwK :.;::::...::.:::::::": 


, 197 1 \V\ 

1 5,3 1 111 

51 , a 


* 21U 


Tarrant 


J OS 


Titns 


M 


Travis ::::::::::::: :■:";■ 


30 1 19' m 



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AugVfft 17, 1917 1306 

Table 3. — Ca#«s reported 6y counties, hp ytan, and bf coior — ContiBued. 



C<unty. 


Apr. I to D«c. 31 


, 1915. 


Jan. 1 to June 30 and Oct. 1 
to Dec. 31<1916. 


White, 


Colored. 


Com- 
bined. 


White. 


Colored. 


Com- 
biBcd. 


Xiinlty 


180 

179 

624 

64 

34 

26 

96 

112 

6 

37 

9 

477 

37 

850 


215 

16 
458 

16 
4 

25 
119 

29 
2 

19 


395 
195 

80 

38 

51 

215 

141 

8 

56 

9 

534 

42 

1.076 


60 
54 
83 
78 
4 
14 


24 

28 

30 

7 




Tyler 




Upshur. . ..► 


m 


Van Zandt 




Victoria 




Walker 


is 






Waller 




WAshinirt(m 


6 
25 
11 






Wharton . 


19 

1 


44 


Wichita 


12 


Wilbarger 




W illiarason 


57 

5 

217 


159 

2 

190 


78 

1 
106 


B7 


Wilson 


3 


Wood 


m 


Total 


29,504 


10,104 


39,608 


9,073 


2,809 


ii,aB 



Table 4. — Hemoglobinuricfevar reported, 1916, 



County. 



Period. 



i Casn. 



Denton 

Hopkins... 

Wood 

Delta 

Henderson . 

Men- is 

Titus 



First quarter.... 

do 

do 

Second quarter.. 
Fourth quarter. 

do 

....do 



TYPHOID FEVER. 
EPIDEMIC AT CHARLESTON, W. VA., APRIL-JUNE. 1917. 

By A. W. Freeman, Epidemiologist, Unltel States Public Health Service. 

During the month of May, 1917, an unusually large mmber ef 
cases of a fever, diagnosed by the local physicians as typhoid, began 
to be reported to the health commissioner of the city of ObarlestoB. 
The dates of report of these cases are given in Table 1. 

During the months of May and June, 127 cases were reported, 
and early in May the matter attracted the attention of the West 
Virginia State board of health. An investigation was immediately 
begun by the board. Shortly afterwards request was made of the 
Surgeon General of the Public Health Service that an investigation 
be made into the causes of the epidemic. This investigation, df 
which the following is a report, was begun on the evening of June 16, 
and completed on the evening of June 26. It was conducted in 
cooperation with the city and State boards of health, and much of 
the information used in this report was obtained from these 
authorities. 



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1307 



August IT, 191T 






Scape of die iareofigslion. 

The investigation included the collection of the usual epidemi- 
ological evidence regarding all reported cases, and regarding alto a 
number of unreported cases which were discovered during the 
investigation. In addition, investigation was made of the public 
water supply, the milk supply, and the general sanitary environ- 
ment of the commimity. Associated with the writer were Prof. 
Earl B. Phelps, professor of chemistry in the Hygienic Laboratory, 
and Sanitary Bacteriologist E. E. Smith. Prof. Phelps conducted 
the investigations into the public water supply and sewerage sys- 
tems, and Mr. Smith made bacteriological examinations of the raw 
and treated water from the public supply. 

Table 1. — Dateof report of ca$es, typhoid fever, Charleston, May 1- June 25, 1917. 



. Date. 


Cas«. 


Date. 


Cases. 


MftTl 


2 

1 
1 
2 

1 
8 
2 

\ 

1 

1 

1 

i 

1 


Xonel 


i 


s;:::. :::::::. ::.::.:..! 


2 


I 


9 


4 


9 


11 


7 


13 


14 


8 


« 


15 


9 


4 


16 i 


11 


2 


17 


n 


7 


Ig. 


13 


s 


20. 


14 


. 1 


28. 


16 





as 


17 


3 


as 


Ig 


2 


27 


19 : 


1 


a. 


20.*. 


3 


29 


21 


s 


M. 


23 


1 


31 


23 


3 




25 


2 




ToW 




Total 


43 


83 









May 43 

June 83 

Unknoini 1 



Total. 



127 



Epid««i«logktl bFe^CigalkMis. 

Epidemiological investigations were made of 141 cases of reported 
and probable typhoid fever. Of these, 1 13 were cases reported to the 
health comnussioner by physicians, and 28 were cases occurring in the 
neighborhood of reported cases* which were not reported, but were 
discovered during the course of the investigation. The homes of 
tbese 141 patients were visited and the data collected at first hand. 
For the detailed work of investigation of these cases, the writer is 
indebted to Dr. Harold B. Wood, Assistant Commissioner of Health 
ior West Virginia, who personally visited most of the cases and 
supervised the visiting of the remainder. 

Diftfnoiis. 

Of the 127 reported cases, 120 were diagnosed as typhoid fever by 
the attending physician. The remaining sevwi were diagnosed 
"paratyphoid" or "probable paratyphoid." The diagnoses u^ 

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August 17, 1917 



1308 



I 



'^ paratyphoid^' and *' probable paratyphoid'' were aU made by two 
physicians. The remainder of the physicians who reported cases 
agreed that the disease was true typhoid fever. Positive Widals were 
obtained on numerous cases by the city chemist and by other physi- 
cians who made laboratory tests, and the cases seen by the writer 
were apparently true typhoid fever. There seems, therefore, no rea- 
son to doubt the fact that the epidemic was one of typhoid fever. 

Clinical Course. 

The clinical course of the disease was apparently imusually mild. 
Many cases had fever for only a few days, and severe ( ases were 
apparently rare. In at least one instance, however, three cases in 
children, members of one family, who were attacked at the same time 
had strikingly different combes. One child had fever for one day 
only, another had fever for three or four days, while the third went 
into a typical course of prolonged fever with the usual picture of 
severe typhoid infection. Only three fatalities had occurred at the 
time of closing the investigation. 

Age Distribution of Cases. 

The age distribution of the cases was quite striking, by reason of 
the preponderance of children among those attacked. Of the 141 
cases investigated, 4 were imder 1 year of age, and 29 were under 
5 years of age, while 37 were between 5 and 9 years, 30 were between 
10 and 14 years, and 16 were between 15 and 19 years of age. Of 
the 141 cases, only 29 were 20 years of age and over. The age dis- 
tribution of the cases is shown in detail in Table 2. 

Sex Distribution. 

As is usual in typhoid outbreaks, the males were attacked in 
marked excess as compared with the females, 80 males being com- 
prised in the present scries as against 61 females. The preponderance 
of males is found at all ages, except for the group between the ages of 
15 and 19, in which there were 5 males as against 11 females. 

Table 2. — Typhoid fever, Charleston, W. Va., April -June, IV 17 Age and se>' Oi^tri- 

hution of cases. 



Age in years. 


Number 

of 
males. 


Number 

of 
females. 


Both 
sexes. 


Number i Number n^.u 

Age in years. of , of *ijlj 

1 ' males, 'female.. '^•^'^^- 

1 


Under I 


4 
14 




n 


4 
25 


i 25 to29 1 3 < 


lto4 


\ 2(\tnU 1 :t I « ' 6 




. |l -jn ♦.. -in 1 o I 1 3 


Total under 5 


18 
23 
18 
5 
7 


11 
14 

12 
11 
5 


29 

37 

30 


i 40to44-!!!!.!!!!!!.! i i o ! i 


6to9 


' 45 and over 2 ' 1 3 


10 to 14 




15 to 19 


U, 1 Tolal ' 80 1 61 1 m 


20to24 


12 ii . 1 , 






1 1 ' 1 



Digitized by 



Google 






i; 



1309 



Ausuat 17, 1917 



TABtB 3. — Occupation of fMiUnt9. 



School 57 

Noiie* 4^ 



Ho^iiwwife 


10 


Booitkeepcr 




Nur*^ 




Clerk 




Tgilor 




Real estate 




Ccal deader 




Toftcher 




Ax grinder 




Re^auT&Dt 




Servant 





Park manager 1 

Waiter I 

Bankderk 1 

Telephone* ojx^rator 1 

Klaehimst, 

Collector 

Solcli«F 

Groe«r 

Street car caoductor 



I 

I 

1 

2 

,.. 1 

Unknown 5 

Tot»} 141 





Table 4. — Onset of asm, by days. 


• 


Dat«. 


Cases. , 


Date. 


Cases. 

3 

1 
I 
3 
5 
1 
2 

a 
. 4 

s 

5 
5 
4 
5 
3 
5 


i 

Date. 


Cases. 


Apr. H 

20 


1 
1 
If 


Maylfe. 


June 1 ,... 

i 1. 


1 


11 


• 8 


29 


M 


1 3 


g 




19 


t 4: : 


1 




3 


20 


5 







2L 





1 


May 1 


4 


22 




3 


2 


4 
1 
4 
3 

] 


23 


8 


6 


3 


24.::::.::::::::.: 


9 


3 


4 


36 


10 

14 


6 


5 


26 


1 


6 


2; 


! 15 


1 


7 


28 


18 


1 


g 


3 
2 

V 

'i 


29 


j Date uuknovn. 

1 




10 


30 : 


46 


11 


31 




12 




I 


IS- 


91 



aUMMART. 

A pril cases 3 

May cases , 91 

June cases 46 

Unknown date 1 



Total. 



141 



OfCttpadan. 

As might be expected from a study of the age distribution, a krge 
Bvxnber of o«se» occurred in school children, and in children without 
occupation. The occupations ol the remainder of the patients, 
however, were widely diversified, and inchided practically all grades 
and classes of society in Charleston. The occupations of the various 
cases are given m detail in Table 3. 

Chronology. 

Tha chronology of the cases is given in detail in Table 4. The first 
c^^es appeared cm April 14^ 20, and 29, while the epidemic proper 
may be said to have begun on May 1 . Between May 1 and 15 occurred 



* Mof tly cbildran under sobool ^^. 



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August 17. 1917 1310 

a group of caseS; 36 in number. This period was succeeded by a 
period of four days in which only a few cases occurred, and this in 
turn by a period, lasting from May 19 to June 10, which was the 
most severe of th<^ entire epidemic, and in which 93 cases occurred. 

Location of the Cases. 

The location of the cases was quite striking, in that the best 
residential districts of the city were most severely attacked, the 
outlying territory being almost free from the disease. In particular, 
cases occurred mainly in those portions of the city covered by the 
public water and sewerage systems. That portion of the city in 
which are found the majority of weUs and privies had but few cases. 
The major portion of the cases were in the thickly built up sections, 
where general sanitary conditions are best. 

Food. 

Careful investigation was made into the sources of the water used 
regularly and of other water used occasionally for drinking by the 
patients, and into the source of ice, butter, ice cream, shellfish and 
fresh vegetables used by the patients. The results of this inquiry 
are summarized in the following paragraphs. 

Water Supply. 

There are available as sources of water supply in the city of Charles- 
ton, the pubhc water supply, which is said to be used by approxi- 
mately 90 per cent of the population, 172 private wells which serve 
approximately 600 families, or 10 per cent of the population, and sev- 
eral spring waters which are vended in the city for drinking. 

Of the 141 cases, all occurred on premises supplied with the public 
water supply. One case, an infant of six months, was said to have 
drunk only boiled water, the remaining 140 having used the city 
water regularly for drinking. Eleven cases had been out of town 
during the period of probable infection and had drunk other waters 
at that time. Of the 141 cases investigated, however, 129 had drunk 
no water other than the city supply. No cases occurred in a family 
which used well water for domestic purposes, and no cases occurred 
in the users of the vended spring waters. . 

MUk. 

There are 135 dealers supplying milk in the city of Charleston. 
Most of these are located in or near the city and furnish only a few 
gallons of milk a day. A small amount of milk is shipped in from a 
distance, but is pasteurized before delivery. The local milk is sup- 
phed without pasteurization. There are no large dealers, the largest 
dealer supplying only about 5 per cent of the population of the city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1311 August 17, 191T 

Of the 141 cases investigated, the source of milk supply could be 
determined accurat-ely in 129 cases. In 10 eases the' source of vthe 
supply was not known, and in 2 cas^ the supply. came from various 
sources. Of the 129 cases whose source of supply was accurately 
determined, 14 used no milk whatever, 16 used only condensed milk, 
9 kept a cow on the premises and 7 purchased milk from a neighbor 
who kept a cow. 

Of the 129 cases, therefore, 46, or 35.6 per cent, did not use milk 
from the general supply. The 83 cases using milk from the general 
supply were distributed among 41 different dealers, and not more 
than 7 cases bought milk from any one dealer. 

Ice. 

Of the 141 cases, the source of supply of ice was determined in 103 
cases. The supply in these cases was as follows : 



lU&it€Krtm«r"A" 46 

Manufacturer **B" 23 

No ice prior to illness 34 

"A" and **B" are the only two manufacturers of ice for domestic 
purposes in the city. Their daily eapacity is as follows: 

Tons. 

Pilot * A" 42 

Plant **B" 25 

The ice supplied by these manufacturers is all made from distilled 
water uader the Gonditioofi usual in sueh plants. 

Ice Cream. 

There are no large manufacturers oi ice eream in the city, and 
most of the cream manufactured is made from pasteurized milk or 
cream. Of the 141 cases c^ typhoid, 25^ stated positively that they 
liad not eaten any ice cream other than that made at home during 
the probable period o£ infection. Tiie history of the remainder was 
doubtful as to having eaten any cream, and no evidence pointing to 
the \ise o£ any common source of supply could be obtained. 

SftelUfoh. 

The epidemic came at a time of the year when little or no shellfish 
was on the market at Charleston, and no history of having eaten 
any raw shellfish could be obtained from the cases. 

Fresh Vesretables. 

Theireah vegetables used in Charleston are almost entirely shipped 
m from a distance. At the time of the outbreak practically no fresh 
vegetables of local origin were on the market. The som-ces of supply 



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August 17, 1917 1312 

of the coses were distributed through the various dealers of the city, 
the large majority purchasing at the nearest greengrocery. There 
was no evidence of any common source of supply. 

Public Entertainments. 

The extent of the epidemic, lasting over a period of nearly two 
months, in itself precluded the possibility that the outbreak might 
have arisen from infection received from any single public gathering. 
Early in the epidemic the suspicion was aroused that the coming 
of two circuses, on April 28 and 30, respectively, might have given 
rise to the epidemic. The outbreak came too soon after the coming 
of these circuses, however, and lasted too long after their departure 
to make this supposition tenable. 

Absences from Home. 

Of the 141 cases, only 11 had been away from Charleston during 
the probable period of infection. The infection of the majority of 
the cases, therefore, was undoubtedly received in Charleston. 

Sununary of the Evidence. 

The evidence presented above may be summarized as follows: The 
infection was evidently contracted in Charleston. The chronology 
and distribution of the case^ would indicate that the infection was 
present in repeated instances in some medium of food or drink of 
general distribution throughout the city. 

The infection was confined to those parts of the city which are 
supplied by the pubUc water supply, and the sections of the city 
supplied by wells were markedly free from disease. The sections of 
the city which are unsewered, and in which surface privies are com- 
mon, were also spared to a marked degree. 

Tlio infection was confined to the habitual users of the public 
water supply. 

Milk, ice, ice cream, shellfish and fresh vegetables could be definitely 
excluded as possible causes of such an outbreak. 

The absence of the disease in the unsewered sections of the city, the 
al)sence of flies at the beginning of the outbreak, and the general 
chronology of the outbreak would tend to exclude spread from 
insanitary privies by fUes and other mechanical means as possible 
causes of the epidemic. 

Conclusion from Epidemiological Evidence. 

The conclusion to be drawn from a study of the epidemiological 
evidence, is that the outbreak was caused by infection conveyed by 
the public water supply. 



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1313 August 17, 1917 

Recommendations Made. 

Recommendations were made to the water plant regarding the 
proper operatiwn ol tke fttrnt to tormr theimmccKfttci emergency, and 
further recommendations were made thdt a competent bacteriologist 
beat once employed, and that the €>per»tion of the plant be placed in 
his hands witlx daily bacteriologieal controls of the raw and filtered 
water, cMitmuous appIieatiMi ol coagitlants and it dose of chlorine 
approximately 0.5 parts per million. It is believed that these 
recommendations, if faithfully carried out, will prevent a similar 
outbreak in the future. 

In view of the large number of surface privies in the city, recom- 
mendations were made to the acting health commissioner that the 
effort be at once made to secure the fly proofing of all privies in the 
city, the immediate removal of all accumulations of manure, and the 
general cleaDing up of the coiismumty, for the purpose of preventing the 
access of fliea to potentially inf eeied feces a&d also, as far as possible, 
to prevent the breeding of flies* Unlesfl these precautions are taken^ 
aseeoiidary outbreak of typhoid fever, caused by fly transmission, is 



la view of the kigffr number of dairies supplying the city the danger 
of a McoAdary raSk outbreak of lai^e proportions is not as great as it 
ought be. Small outbreaks nu^y be expected, however, and can be 
prerented only by the installation of a pasteurizing plant for the 
ptatettrizatioiiv of all milk sold in the city* 



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1 



PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 



No health department^ State or locals can effectively prevent or control disease uilhoui 
knowledge of when, where, and under what conditions cases are occurring. 



UNITED STATES, 



CURRENT STATE SUMMARIES. 
California Report for tlie Week Ended August 11, 1917. 

The California State Board of Healtli reported concerning the 
status of preventable diseases in California for the week ended August 
11, 1917; as follows: Two cases of anthrax in man, one fatal, were 
notified in San Francisco, contracted near Sonoma, Sonoma County, 
where there is an outbreak on ranches. Of cerebrospinal meningitis, 
four cases were notified, one each at Oakland, San Diego, San Fran- 
cisco, and Stockton. One case of poliomyelitis was reported at Oak- 
land and one case at Pasadena. Cases of typhoid fever were notified 
as follows: Sacramento, 6; Modesto, 5; San Francisco, 3; Oakland, 3; 
Turlock, 2 ; San Diego, 2 ; Long Beach, 2 ; Colusa, 2 ; Pinole, 1 ; Rich- 
mond, 1 ; Los Angeles, 1 ; Stockton, 1 ; Rio Vista, 1. Slight increases 
were noted in measles, mumps, chicken pox, and whooping cough. 

The details of notifiable disease cases reported during the week 
ended August 4, are as follows: 



Cases. 

Anthrax 2 

Cerebrospinal meningitis 2 



Cases. 

Pneumonia 10 

Poliomyelitis. 1 



Chicken pox , 11 ! Scarlet fever 2S 

Diphtheria 17 ' Smallpox 4 

Erysipelas 3 Sj^ihilis 30 

German measles 17 1 Tetanus 1 

Gonoooccus infection: 61 Trachoma 1 



Malaria 14 

Measles , 48 

Mumps 47 

Pellagra 2 



Tuberculosis 95 

Typhoid fever 33 

Whooping cough 15 



ANTHRAX. 
Mississippi — Harrison County. 

On August 10, 1917, 4 cases of anthrax were reported from Harri- 
son County, Miss., 2 cases having occurred on June 25 and 2 cases 

on July 12. 

(1314) 



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1315 AnguBt.rv.iwr 

ANTHRAX— Continued. 
New York— Endkott. 

On August 1, 1917, a case of anthrax was reported at Endicott, 
Broome County, N. Y. The patient contracted the disease on June 
25, probably in handling India hides. 

South Dakoto— Mitchell. 

On August 9, 1917, a case of anthrax was notified at Mitchell, 

S.Dak. 

Texas. 

On July 20, 1917, a case of anthrax was notified on a ranch in 
Refugio County, Tex. The patient contracted the disease on July 
18 while skinning dead animals. 

CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS. 
Kansas. 

During the two weeks ended August 11, 1917, new cases of cere- 
bfospbal meningitis were notified in Kansas, as follows: Kansas 
City, 1; Newton, 1; Waverly, 1; Wellington, 1. 

Louisiana — ^Jackson. 

On August 7, 1917, one case of cerebrospmal meningitis was 
reported in Jackson, East Feliciana Parish, La. 

Massachusetts. 

During the week ended August 11, 1917, new cases of cerebrospinal 
meningitis were notified in Massachusetts as follows: Boston, 1 ; Pitts- 
field,!. 

State Reports for July, 1917. 





New cases 
reported. 


Ptaoe. 


New cases 
reported. 


DWrktofColamWa 


2 


MassachuseUs- Continued. 
Plymouth County- 
Brockton 








MtMdnittit*: 


3 
1 




BeftahlreCoonty- 

WtUfleM...... 


Suffolk County- 
Boston 




Bristol County— 

Attteboroirii 


Total 




16 


NewB«jSd 


West Virginia: 

Kanawha County 




EMexCoontT— 

HtTerbffl 




^JSSLS^ 


Ohio County— 

Wheeling 




IWg^jCouS^- 


Roane County- 
Reedy... 


2 


Malden...'!'. 


Total 






5 


■ — 







Digitized by 



Google 



August 17. 1917 



1316 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGmS-Continued. 
State Iteparts for June, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


Nevcws 
rcponid. 


Montana: 

Ca"*riidc County 


2 


Vireini a— Continued. 

Montgomery County 










Virginia: 


1 

1 
1 
1 


Russell County 




Ailephanv County 


Smvth Count V 




Apihprst {''nniily . . , . 


8taff<w<i County 




Carrol 1 Coiui t y .' 


Total 




Lunenburg County 


10 











City Reports for Week Ended July 28, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


DetUa. 


Baltimore, Md 


1 
1 
6 
2 


2 


Newark, N.J 




1 


Bridpepor t , Conn 


New Bedford, Mass. . . 




Chicuf-'o, III 


4 


NewDort.R 1. 


{ 


Cleveland . Ohio 


New York, N.Y .'.*" . 




1 


Detroit, Micli 


1 
1 


Omaha, Nebr . . 


a 


Duluth, Minn 




I»hiladelphia, Pa '.'".'.. 


J 


Eliiabeth, N.J 


2 

1 


Pittsburgh, Pa, 


3 


Everett, Mass 




Pittsflela, Mass 


1 


Haverhill. Mass 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


Providence, R. I. .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'//.'. 

San Francisco, Cal 






Kenosha, Wis ' 


1 


McKeesport , Pa 1 


1 .Sftpni^w, M>f*h , , , 


2 


Memphis, Tenn 


Syracuse, N. Y... . 


M 




Milwaukee, Wis 


1 


Washington, D. C 








. 



DIPHTHERU. 

Rhode Island — Newport. 

An outbreak of diphtheria began at Newport, R. I., July 24, 1917, 
reaching its climax between August 1 and 5. Surgeon McCoy, of the 
United States Public Health Service, reports that indications point 
to contaminated dairy products, principally ice cream, as the means 
of distribution. A large proportion of the patients are adults. There 
have been no deaths reported. Since the beginning of the outbreak? 
281 cases have been notified in Newport, 50 cases in Portsmouth, and 
21 cases in Jamestown. 

See also Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1327. 





ERYSIPRIAS. 
City Reports for Week Ended July 28, 1917. 






Place. 


Cases. 


Deatlis. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Baltimore, Md 


I 


1 
1 


1 Kalamazoo, Mich 




I 


Boston, Mass 


' Long Beach, Cal 


1 

2 




BridfiTCDort. Conn 


1 

2 


Los Angeles, Cal 


• 


BuffSuTN.YlT:: :::::.:: 




Maiden . Mass . . ......... 




Cambridge, Mass 


i 

1 


Milwaukee. Wis 


S 
2 

4 
1 

1 


...••••1 


ChioaRo,lif -- 


9 


Philadelphia, Pa 


» 


Cincinnati, Ohio 




2 


. Pittshiifffh. I'a -- 




Denver, Colo 


1 
3 
1 


I St. "i^iih. ka. 




Detroit, Mich 


1 



Springfield, 111 





Harrisburg, Pa '.'. 


Wichita. Kans 











____^,^ 










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1317 



August 17, 1917 



GLANDERS. 

Massachasett^ — Human Case. 

CoDaborating Epidemiologist Kelley reported the occurrence, dur- 
ing the month of July, 1917, in Massachusetts, of a case of glandei-s in 
the person of a stableman. 

LEPROSY. 

Nevada— White Pine County. 

On August 13, 1917, a case of leprosy was reported in White^Pine 

County, Nevada. 

MALARLi. 

Massachusetts Report for July, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


UsmAnxits: 

Hampden Count y— 

Chloopee 


2 
1 
2 


Kassaehusetts -Continued: 
Suffolk County- 
Boston 





Middlesex Coun^y- 

Natick(towTi) 


Total 




11 


Karfclk Coonty— 

T)fdh)^ni (To'nii) . . 











Vbginia Report for June, 1917. 



Place. 



AccomacCotinty 

Chincotea^ue Island . 
Oreenbackvillc 

Albemarle County 

Akiandria County- 
Alexandria 

Amherst County— 
Amherst 

Appomattox County 

Bedford Coonty 

Bnmsvick County 

LawreDoevllle 

Backinyhnm County 

Cimpbell County 

AltaVista 

Brookneal 

Caroline County 

Charles aty County 

Charlotte County 

Drakes Branch 

Oiesterfieki County 

Winterpock 

Comberlaod County 

IXckeiisoii County 

Dinwiddle County 

Eliabethaty County- 
Hampton 

EssexCounty 

Ftiriax County 

FluTsmia County 

Otawester County 

wMosrllle County 

Emporia 

„ NorthEmporia 

Halliu County. 

HoQston , 

Stnth Boston 



New cases 
reported. 



Place. 



Virginia —Cont J nued. 

Hanover County 

Henrico County 

Henry County 

Martinsville 

Tsle of Wight County 

Smithilcld 

James City Coimty 

King and Queen Coimty . 

King George County 

King William County 

West Point 

Lancaster County 

Loudoun County 

I^esburg 

Louisa County , 

Lunenburp County 

Victoria ^- 

Mathews County , - 

Mecklenburg County — . 

Clarksville ,. 

South mn - 

Middlesex County 

Urban na ^. 

Nanseraond Coimty , 

Suffolk 

Nelson County 

Norfolk County— 

Norfolk 

Northampton Coimty. . . . 

Cape Charles 

Northum)>crland County. 

Kecivillc , 

Nottoway ( ounty 

Burkevillc 

Orange Counly ^ 

Page County 

Lnr.jy 





New cases 
reported. 








Jii 




;j 




1 




11 




10 




13 








1 







13 
13 
4 



,1 

n 

i 
III 

2 
LT 



m 

lit 

) 

li 
Iti 

I 

1 



Digitized byi 



August 17, 1917 



1318 



MALARIA— Ck>iitmued. 
Virginia Report for Jose, 1917— Continued. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Phoe. 


reported. 


Virginia— Continued. 
Patrick Comity — 


1 
32 

2 
11 

1 
15 
22 

1 
3 

1 
I 


Virginia— Cont inued . 

Shenandnah Crmnty -,--r 


I 


Stuart 


Southampton County -- 


2B 


Pittsylvania County 


Franxiin 


u 


(Iiatham .' 


Spotsyl vania County 


3 


Powhatan County 


Stafford County 


9 


Princess Anne County 


Surry County 


8 


Prince Edward County - 


Claremont ......... 


2 


Farmville 


SussexConnty 


22 


Prince George County 


Warwick County.... .............. 


» 


Hopewell 


West more land County 


» 


Richmond County 


Colonial Beach 


2 


Rockbriifje County 


York County 


11 


Scoi t Count V 


Total 




Gate City 


m 









Colorado Report for May, 1917. 

During the month of May, 1917, 1 case of malaria was report^ 
in Montezuma County, Colo. 

City Reports for Week Ended Jvly 28, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Dcatiis. 


Baltimore, Md 




1 
5 


Memphis, Tenn 




1 


Birmingham, Ala 




Newark. N J 


1 
1 




Boston, Mass 


4 

5* 

1 
3 


New Orleans, I>a 


1 


Charleston. S. C 

Columbia, S. C 


1 
1 


New York, ?/.Y 

Portsmouth Va . 


I 
1 


East Oranw, N.J 


Richmond, Va l.!.!.l'!""' 


2 
2 




Little Rock, Ark 




Savannah, Ga 













f 



MEASLES. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1327. 

PELLAGRA. 
State Reports for July, 1917. 



Plaee. 


New cases 
rcporled. 


Place. 


Newcascs 
reported. 


District of Columbia 


2 
1 


Vermont: 

RiUlaod County 






I 


Massachusetts: 

Middlesex County — 

Natick (town).,. 


West Virtioia: 

Randolph Coimty— 

Mill Creek 




Worcester County— 


1 


MiUord (town) 


1 










Total 


2 ; 
1 











Digitized by 



Google 



1319 



AugBst 17. 1917 



PELLAGRA— Continued. 
Yindnift Beport for Jiuie» 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Placf. 


Newcasee 
reported. 


Vifrinla: 

Alflxandrift Conntf 




Virginia— Continued. 

Henry County ... ....... ... . . 




Amelia Cotrnty...! 


James City County 




Ambf rst County 


WiUiamsburgl 




Amherst , 


King and Queen County 




AuKQSta County 


Lee County 




B<)9(6rd COiiiitV'— 


Mecklenbure County 




B«dl6nlClty 


Middlesex County- 

TTrhann* 




Bniiuwfck County — 




lATnwwvllte, r 


Nottoway County— 

BurkeviUe 




Bockiof ham County^ 

Bocklnithiim 




Patrick County 




Campbell ONinty 


Rti?f^ . . , 




OMoIlne Cbuntyl 


Pittsylvania County 




Chasterfiekl Coun^— 


Povfiatan County ,'. 




Winterpock 


Kichmond County 




Dinwlddie ODonty 


RoAHOkA County .,.,,... 




Fkhtix County .'. 


Rockbridge County 




Flnranna Ooontv 


BuenaVisto 




QreeosrlUe County 


Spotsylvania County— 

Fredericksburg 




Emporia. 


1 


North Bxhpoiia 


Taj&ewell County ...... 




Halifax County . ' 


Wa^lngton Count}' 


8 


Sooth Bofl^n 


Total 




Banovw County . 


69 











City Reports for Week Ended July 28, 1917. 






Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Mrmfmrlia^. AH| 


19 




New Orleans, La 


1 


1 


Charlcrton,8.C 


3 

1 
1 


New York, N.Y 


1 


CohunWa^S.C 




Philadelphia. Pa 


1 




Kiltinaroo, Mich 


1 
1 


Richmond, Va 


1 


KfloTTille, Tenn * .... 


Rocky Mount. N. C 

Rutland, Vt 


1 

1 




I^Bohbonr. Va 


1 
2 




M^ASi :: vz:::v.:.. 




Savannah, Ga 


2 


T'MhTfIku Tenn - » . 


1 


Wilmington, N.C 




1 








. 





* The reason that Birmingham had so many more cases of pellagra reported than any other city is not 
thai ibo dbease is more prevalent in Birmingham than in other cities of Alabama and neighboring States, 
batuadoottfedly because of the snooessful efforts the health department has made in securing tnc coop- 
entioo o( the practicing physicians in reporting cases. 

PLAGUE. 

Washington— Seattle— Plftgne-Infocted Rats Found. 

During the period from March 16 to 28, 1917, 3 plaguo-iiifected 
rats were found at the Pike Place Market, Seattle, Wash. 

PNEUMONU. 
CHy Reports for Week Ended July 28, 1917. 



Place. 



AgiBtfcClty,N.J 
5«Wey,CaI 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



























56 


39 




9 




18 




2 




7 







Place. 



Case^. 



Lvnn, Mas 2 

Maiden, Mass 1 

Manchester, N. H 1 

McKeesport, Pa 1 

Newark, N.J 12 

Newport, Ky 1 

Philadelphia, Pa 21 

Pittsburgh, Pa :« 

Pontiac,Mlch 2 

Rochester, N. Y ' 4 

San l-Yancisco, Cal | 6 

Worcester, Moss 1 



Deaths. 



Digitized by 



Google 



August 17, 1917 1320 

POLIOMYEUnS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS). 
Cases Reported, Avgrnst 9 to 15, 1917. 

The foUowmg table shows the number of cases of poliomyelitis 
reported to the United States Public Health Service from August 9 
to 15, 1917. This is an addition to and continuation of the table 
pubUshed in the PubUc Health Reports, August 10, 1917, pages 
1283 to 1285. 



Place. 



Period. 



Cases- 



Place. 



Period. 



Cam. 



California: 

Alameda County- 
Oakland 

Los Anpeles County— 

Pasadena 

Connecticut: 

Middlesex County 

Delaware: 

New Castle County— 
McClellandsvIlle. . . 
niinols: 

Cook County 

Hancock County 

McT can County 

Will County 

Kansas: 

Allen County— 

Elsmore 



Aug. 6 to 11. 

....do 

,...do 



Aug. « to 12. 

Aug. 6 to 11. 

do 

....do 

....do 



Moran 

Riley County- 
Randolph 

Shawnee County — 
Topeka 



July 2» to 

Aug. 4. 
do 



Sumner County- 
Milan 

Kentucky: 

JeiTerson County— 

Louisville 

Marylaiid: 

A lie -'any County 

»';.it iraore County 

T ri . George County.... 
MaNsa hiisfttts: 
EsscK County— 

Haverhill.. 

SauRiH, 

Middlose Couity— 

Lowell 

Marlboro 

Natitk (town) 

Stoneham ( town) 

Plymouth County— 

East Bridgewater 

(town) 

Ohio: 

Behnont Coimty— 

Martins Ferry 

Bridpeport . .* 

Morristown 

Pultney Township. . 

Wayne Township. . . 
Cuyahojra County- 
Cleveland 

Middleburg Town- 
ship 

Defiance Coimty— 

I'elaware Township. 
Franklin County— 

Grand\iew Heights. . 
Quemsev County— 

CamoridKe 

Jefferson Coimty— 

Stcubenville 

Mahoning County— 

Youngstown 



Aug.Stoll., 

July 29 to 
Aug. 4. 

Aug. 5 to 11.. 



Aug. 3 to 9.. 

Aug. 6 to 11. 

do 

do 



Aug. 5 to 15. 
Aug. H 



Aug. 5 to II. 

do 

....do 

do 



.do. 



July. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 

.do. 



.do. 



July.. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Jaly. 



.do. 
.do. 



..do.... 
..do.... 



.do. 
.do. 



Ohio— Conttoued. 

Montgomery Caanty — 
Dayton 

Monroe County— 

Jenisalem 

Perry County- 
New Lexington 

Pickaway County— 
I'eercreek Township. 

Por^^ County- 
Stark County— 

Canton 

Summit County— 

Cuyahoga Falls 

Tuscarawas County— 
Uhrichsville 

Wood County- 
Plain Township 

Troy Township... 
Virghila: 

Alexandria Coimty— 
Alexandria 

Amherst County 

Augusta County- 
Fisher ville 

Mount Meridian . . 

Fauquier County — 
Hume 

Greene ('ountv — 

Ruckersviile 

StandardsviUe 

Middlesex County — , 

Saluda ' Aug. l2tol4. 

Page County I do. 

Roanoke County I do. 



.do. 



.do., 
.do.. 



Aug. 12 to 14 
do 



do 

Aug. 1 toll.. 

....do 



}•■•• 



do 



Aug. I to 11. 
Aug. 12 to 14 



....do 

Aug. 1 toll. 
Aug. 12 to 14, 
Aug. 1 toll. 



do. 
do. 



do. 



Rockhngham County, 
Dayton 

Shenandoah County— 

Conicville ." 

Quick.sburg 

Warren County 

Front Royal , 

West Virginia: 

Qilmer County- 
Duck Run 

Harrison County- 
Bristol 

Clarksbiu-g 

Lewis County— 

Wc-ton 

Marion County— 

Middloton 

Monongnh I do 

Near Monongah ' do 

Mineral County— 
Ke>NOf 

Monroe County- 
Laurel Brandi.. 

Tucker County— 
Davi<» 

Upshur County- 
Crawford 

Wetzel Count y— 
Kodal 

Wood County— 
Parkersburg. . . . 



Aug. 5toll.. 



...do 



do. 



do. 
do. 



Digitized by 



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1321 



August 17, 1917 



POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS)— Continued. 
Stote Reports for July, 1917. 



Haw. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New rases 
reported. 


IbMdiosetts: 
Esaex County— 
Bererly. . . 


2 
3 
10 
2 
5 
1 
2 

2 

1 

8 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

1 


WestVirrinIa: 

BraTf on Comity 


10 


Qilmer County .... 


2 


Grovf land 


Harrison County— 

Stealy Heights 




Hav#rh(n r-- , . . . , 




I^wniiOQ . T ,.,-,,- 


Jacksnn Cwinty * , 




Lynn 


Kanawha County 




Salem 


Marion County— 

Monongah 




Sancus (Town). 


14 


Hampden County— 

Bpdngfleld 


Fairmont 


2 


Annabell 




Hamnshire County— 


White Rock 


1 


liineral County— 

Keyser 




MkkQesex County- 
Lowell 




Ohio County : 




Medrord 


WheeUng 




MiMen 


Patterson 




nroton (Town)................. 


Preston County 




Narlolk County- 

Qnincy . .•■.■■■.«.. 


Turker Cotmty ^ 




Thomas 




Weymouth ..................... 


Davis 




Plymouth County- 
Brockton 


Parsons 




Upshur County— 

Buckhannon 




Worcester Countjr— 

Worcester •■ 




Wetzel County 






Total 




Total .... 


3S 


54 








Vtimoat: 

Chittenden County 


1 

1 

22 
2 




Oraoge County- 
Washington ^..rr... 




WtshliiPtoii'Countv 




Windsnr County t r 








Total 


20 









State Reports for June, 1917. 




Place. 


Now cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


MflDtana: 

(^rboo CoontY 


1 
2 
1 
2 


Vii^iia— Contfaiued. 
lialifax County- 
Houston — 




Onrade C-ouniy 




Coster CountyT 1 


Nelson County 




Qnnite County 


Orange C^ounty . r ..... ^ 






PaceX^untv " . 




Total 


6 


Shenandoah 




Bedford County — 
Bedford Cltv 


■■ . , 

1 
2 
1 


Pittsylvania County 

Princess Anne County 




RodciDgham County 




Total 




CSiarles Qtv Conntv 


10 


I^h^enson Ckmnty . . . 













aty Reports for We^ Ended July 28, 1917. 






Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


BdtiiBore,Md 


2 




Haverhill, Mass 






B«teley,Gtl 


1 

1 


Kansas City, Kans 




5ni«iniam^Ato;::; 




T^wr^nce. Ma.«s 




S^^mm V.:::::::::: 


1 
2 
1 
5 

1 
1 


Lowell. Mass 




J<*lo,* Y^ 






Lyno. ^ass 




^^Ohio 




New Britain. Coim I 






2 


Newcastle, Pa 


1 


gjiad, Ohto 


New York/N. Y 


1 










w2Jo&>"^;* 




Pittsburgh, Pa 




5**!iii,lowa.*l*. 


1 
2 


Seattle, Wash 




aHaS(a|o.lnd..*.V 


3 

1 


Syracuse, N.Y 


1 


*SS|^™.::;.: 













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Ansast n, 1017 1322 

RABIES IN MAN. 
City Report for Week Ended July 28, 1917. 

During the week ended July 28, 1917, one death from rabies in man 
was reported at Kansas City, Mo. 

RABIES IN ANIMALS. 

City Report for Week Ewled July 28, 1917. 

During the week ended July 28, 1917, two cases of rabies in animals 
were reported at Detroit, Mich. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER. 
Montana Report for June, 1917. 

During the month of June, 1917, cases of Rocky Mountain spotted 
fever were reported in Montana as follows: Carbon County, 2; Fer- 
gus County, 1; Musselshell County, 2; and Stillwater County, 1. 

Nevada — ^Humboldt County. 

On August 13, 1917, a case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever was 
reported in Humboldt County, Nev. 

SCARLET FEVER. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tubtTculoeis. page 1327. 

SMALLPOX. 

Minnesota. 

During the week ended August 11, 1917, a new focus of smallpox 
infection was reported at Galena, Martin County, Minn., two cases 
having been notified. 

Arkansas — ^Pulaski County. 

On August 11, 1917, 11 cases of smallpox were reported near 
McAlmont, Pulaski County, Ark. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1323 



August 17, 1917 



SMALLPOX— Continued. 
Colorado Reports for May and June, 1917. 





New cases 
reported. 


Deaths. 


Vaccination history of cases. 


Flac«. 


Number 
vaccinated 

within? 
years pre- 
ceding 

attack. 


Number 
last vacci- 
nated more 
than 7 years 
preceding 
attack. 


Numl)e: Vaccination 
never su?- history not 

ccssfiilly ol>Uiiied or 
vacciuttted.; uncertain. 

; 


Odfcndo (May 1-31): 
Denver County — 

Denrer 


1 

1 

1 
1 

5 
9 








i 
1 .... 


El Paso Cotmty— 

Cokndo Springs 




1 






Kit Carson CountyT 






1 1 


Mesa CooBty 




1 


ii:::: : 


OtCTOCminty— 




1 


1 

5!.. 


Sedgwick Count-y 






9 , 




1 




Total 


18 




1 


J, 




.. 




C(dorado(Jimcl-30): 
Arapahoe CfHinty . 


1 

6 

1 
2 
1 




1 1 


DenVer County— 

Dnver 




4 1 2' 

1 


El Pas© Count y— 
Colorado Spriog;; 




FresBoaC Count V 




M } 


Jeflieison C^onnty 




LariicorC'Ountv 


1 
1 
t 




1 , 


Sedj5wick Count v 




1 


wSSntv..: 










Total. 



MisoellMieous State Reports. 



Place. 



Ifootana (June 1-30): 
BeavdliPttd County 

Blains County 

Cascade County— 

Gm^ Falls 

Cii8l«r County 

Dawson County 

Fen^us County 

HO! County 

Lincoln CountT 

Missoula Cotuity. . . 

Ravalli County 

Sanders County 

Yellowstone County 

BiiUngs 

Total 

Owfon (June 1-30): 
ClackantBS County . . 

Clatsop County 

Harney County 

Multnomah County- 
Portland 

Total 

Vermont (July 1-31): 
Franklin County... 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



1 

3 




I 

2 

1 
2 
1 





8 




1 




2 




28 




====— 




1 




6 




1 




2 








10 





4 





1 lace. 



Virginia (June 1-^): 

rarroll County 

Halifax ( onnfy 

lioi'stoii. ." 

Foiilii Ho Ion 

Wo of >\ iT< t • oinity 

Pavco '^ oi ]ity 

SLcia;! !oa"i 

PriiKr (ico ;.v ' ounty 

Pulaski ( ij\ ntv- 

1 rlj'^ki..; 

Roanoke ( ounty- 

Hoanokf 

Total 



Deaths 



32 



West Vircinia (Jiilj 
Fayi ttc « ounty 
HancocK: Count 
Kanawha ( oiin- 

( hario.ston., 
Lincoln ( ounty . 
Marion County. , 
Mingo County . , . 
Ohio fount y— 

Wlioflinj; 

Putnam < ounty - 
Mercer County 1 




Digitized by 



<idgU8tl7, 1917 



1324 



SMALLPOX—Contiuued. 
Citjr Reports for Week Ended July 2S, 1917. 



P1EC5. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Butte, Mont 


10 
10 




MUwaokee.WIs 


1 
9 
1 
4 
1 
4 
2 
1 
5 
3 
1 
2 
8 
6 
2 
1 
22 




ChlcaKo,IIl 




Mfnneapnifjf, Minn 




Cleveland, Ohio 




Ofdpn trtflli 




Payton, Ohio 




Oklahoma City. OkllL 

Philadelphia. Pa 


1 


Tetroit, Mich." 




I 


Dubuque, Iowa 




Pontiac.Mich 




Duluth. Minn 


2 


Portland, Oreg 




Evan«rsine,Ind 


Qiilncy, 111 




Flint. Mich 




St. Joseph, Mo 




Fort Wayne. Ind 




St. Louu, Mo 




Galesburg, III 




Salt Lake City, Utah 




Indianapolis Tnd 




Seattle. Wasli.' 




TTanfmic "^f^ y, K"ftns - t ....... . 




Sioux City, Iowa 




Kansas City j Mo 




Springfield. Ill 




Lima, Ohio 




Springfield. Ohio 




Lincoln, Nebr 




Tacoma, wash 




Little Rock. Ark 




Zanesvllle, Ohio 













TETANUS, 
atjr Reports for Week Ended July 28, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Boston, Mass. ...•......•• . 


1 


1 
1 


Detroit, Mich 




1 


Buffalo, N.Y 


MobUe,Ala 




1 


Chicago.Ill 


1 


New York, N. Y 




1 


Columbus, Ohio 


1 


Philadelphia, Pa 


1 


1 











TUBERCULOSIS. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculoeis, page 1327. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 
Stete Reports for July, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


Newcasw 
reported. 


District of Columbia 


26 


Massachusetts— Continued. 
Hamnshire Coimty— 

Williamsburg (Town) 








Massachusetts: 


14 


3 


Berkshire County- 
North AdAms 


Middlesex County- 
Arlington (Town) 




Bristol County- 
Fall River 


(Cambridge 




Everett 




Dishton (Town^ ... ... 


Hudson (Town) 




New Bedford '.'.'.'.'. 


Lowell... 




North Altleboro (Town) 

Somerset (TownK . . . . 


Medford 




Mebose 




Taunton 


Newton 




\\estport (Town) 


Somerville 




Essex County— 

Amesbury (Town) 


Norfolk County— 

Dedham (Town) 




Beverly 


Milton (Town) 




Gloucester 


Norfolk ( Town) . 




Hf^vf^rhitl^ , 


CJuincy 






Plynaouth' County- 
Plymouth (Town) 

Rockland (Town) , 




Ljmn 




Newburyport 




North Andover (Town) 


Suffolk County- 
Boston 




Peabody (Town) 


IS 


Franklin County— 


Chelsea ^.^ 




Colram (Town) 


Revere 




Montague (Town) ] 


Worcester County — 

Athol(Town) 




Hampden County— 

(Tiicopoc 




Fitchburg 




Springfield 


Gardner (Town) 





Digitized by 



Google 



1326 



August 17, 1917 



TYPHOID FBVER— Continued. 
State Reports for July, 1917-— Continued. 



I 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


MiflsachTiaetts— Continued . 

Wore^feter County ~Ck>ntiiiued. 


1 
1 
4 


West Virginia— Continued. 

Kanawha "ounty 


9 


Upton (Town) 


Charleston . .". t.. 


16 


mi)ster (Town) 


Dunbar 


13 


Worcester ^ 


McDowoU County 


2 






\ 


Total 


109 


Marion County- 
Dakota Mines 






14 


VenDQQt: 


2 
2 

2 

7 


Mercer Comity 


1 




Mineral (^ounly ., 


1 


Clutt(»)den County 


Mingo County 


3 


OrM»gf< Tffl^nty , , , . , 


Monongalia cfounty 


3 


i^^itlniv) f'-ounty 


Ohio County— 
Wheeling 






65 


Total 


13 


Prest<Hi County 


1 




Putnam County . . . 


4 


West Vtf^iia: 

Berketev County 


3 
4 

6 
6 

1 
1 


Raloi^h County 


2 


Randolph County 


2 


Brooke County 


Roane Counly 


4 


Orpfnhrier County 


Tyler County 


2 


Hancock C><ftinty '. 


Total 




Hardy County 


164 


JadcsoD Counly 











SUte Reports for June, 1917. 



Place. 



Colorado: 

Boulder County- 
Boulder 

Chaflee County 

Denver Coimty— 
Denver 

Bade County 

ElFasoCounty 

Colorado Springs. 

Fremfflit County 

Larimer County 

Otero County— 

aocky Ford 
County— 

PteWo.... 

WeldCounty 



Total. 



MoQtana: 

Cascade County 

Great Falls.... 
dioteau County . . . 

Custer County 

Fergus County 

Flathead County.. 

KattspeU 

OaBaHn County- 




Lewis and Clark County . 

Helena 

Madison County 

Musselshell County 

Park County 

Ravalli County 

Mhrer Bow County 

Yellowstone County 

BOMngs 



Tbtal. 



Oreun: 

Beotaa County . 
Clatsop County. 



Oregon— Continued. 

Linn Counly 

Marion County 

Multnomah (oiinty— 
Portland 

Total 

Virginia: 

Aocoraac County 

Parksloy 

Albemarle County — 

Chark)ttesville 

Allcehaay County — 

Clifton Forge 

Amherst County 

Augusta C.unty 

Basic City 

Bedford County 

Hcdf rdCty 

Bototuurl (V)nnty 

Brunswick Count y . . . ; 
Buckini;ham Cjiinty.. 
Oampl)ell County 

LAnchbtirg 

Chestorfiold County . . . 

Culpcpcr Cjimty 

CnmlxTland Coimty. . 
Dinwidd.o (\)unty - 

retersbiirK 

Elizftl)oth ("tty County 

I^Ikp'mi^. .'. 

Faumiicr (' unty 

Warnnion.! 

Floyd Cjutiiy 

Franklin C Minly 

Frederick ( \)unty 

(iray.Hon County 

flrceno C )unty 

(Jrcensvillo County 

North Emporia... 
Halifax County 

Hou^ston 

South Boston 



1 

G 

. 1 

1 
8 
1 
1 
U 
1 
3 
32 
1 
1 
1 

3 
1 

1 
2 
2 



Digitized by 



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Angust 17. 1917 



1326 



TYPHOID FEVER— ContJniied. 
State Reports for June, 1917— Continued. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


PUkw 


New cases 
reported. 


Virginia— Ckmtlnued. 

HftPover County 


6 
3 
1 
2 

1 
2 
2 
2 

1 
4 
1 
3 
1 
1 

1 
2 

\ 

1 
2 
1 
3 

4 
1 
1 
1 
2 


Virginia— Continued. 

Rockbrldgf Comity 




Henry County .'. 


Lexington 

Rn^ir jnphfiin County 




Martinsville 




Isle of Wight County 


EUrton ;.. 




James City C- iinty 


Rii{f!tAll c>ouTity , , 




Lancaster County 


Sooti County.' 




Lee County ' 


Gate City 




Loudoun County 


Smyth County 




Mathews County 


Marion...„::::..::::::::::::::: 




Mecklenburg County 


Southampton County 




ChascCity 


FranMin '... 




MlddleMX Coimty 


Spotsylvania C<oiiiity.. 




Montgomery County 


Fredericksburg 




Ctristliuisburg .'. 


Stafford C<innty , , . ... 




Nansemond County — 


Surry County ........ 1 


1 « 


Suffolk 


Sussex County 


3 


JiJclson Coimty 


Tazewell County 


' ' 3 


Nor/olk County— 

Portsraoutn 


Pocahontas 




Richlands... 




Orange County 


Washington County 




Page County 


Westmorelsmd County ... 




Patrick County 


Wise Coimty.. . 


J 


Pittsylvania County 


Wj-the County . 


3 


Princess Anno County 


York County 


1 


Prince Edward Countv 


Total 




Prince George County 


m 


Pulaski County 






Richn>npd County 




Roanoke County.'. 




Roanoke 






'■' 



Colorado Report for Aifay, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Colorado: 

Alamosa County 


3 

10 
2 

1 
1 


Colorado— Com inued. 

Logan County 


2 


Denver County — 


Mesa County 


1 


Denver 


Montrose County 


1 


Fremont Countv . 


Total 




Huer&no County 


21 


Jackson County.' 











CItjr Reports for Week Ended July 28, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths, j 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Albany, N. Y 


1 
1 
6 
4 
7 

25 
7 
1 
3 
2 
1 


1 


Columbia, S. C 


5 
3 

1 
1 
1 




Alton, 111 




Columbus, Ohio 




Altoona Pa . 




Covington, Ky .. . 




Atlantic City, N. J 




Cumberland, Md 




Baltimore, Md 


2 i 

4 ; 


Dayton, Ohio 




Birmingham, Ala 


Denver, Colo . .. . 


1 


Best on, Mass 


Detroit, Mich 


22 

1 


2 


Braddock, Pa 




Duluth, Minn 




Bridgeport, Conn 




East Chicago, Ind 


1 


Buffalo. N. Y 




El Paso. Tex 




2 


Butte, Mont 




EAT^insviliei Tnd 


1 
8 
1 
1 

11 
2 
3 
3 




Cairo. Ill 


1 


Fall River, Mass 




(^araden , N . J 


3 





Fitch burg,' Mass 




Canton, Ohio 


Fort Wayne, Ind 




Charleston, S. C 




Fort Worth, Tex 




Chelsea, Mass 




Galveston, Tex 




Chicago, 111 




Hagerstown, Md 




Cincinnati. Ohio 


i l\ 


Harrisburg, Pa 




Cleveland, Ohio 


Haverhill, Mass 


1 


Cofrey^ille. Kans 


1 





Hoboken, N.J 




1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1327 



August 17, 1917 



TYPHOID FEVER— Continued. 
City Reports for Week Ended July 28, 1917— Continued. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases, i' 

f 
1 1 
4 1 
3 

ii 

1 

2 
1 

I 

3 


Deaths. 


TfMlian^polls^ Tnd ............. 


1 
1 
3 
2 
3 
2 
7 
1 
1 
1 
5 
3 
1 
8 
2 
1 




Pittsburgh, Pa 




Johnstown, Pa 




Portland, Me 








Portland, Orej? 




irftn^<irit - Kftn« . ,.. 




Portsmouth, V'a 




Vim^S nt r' Kn 


1 


ProvldcmH?, U.I 

Reading, Pa 




Keootba, Sfis 




Knoxvine, Teirn 




Rlchracmd. V^a. . .. ... 




Kokomo. tnd 




Roanoke, Va 




Lsncaster, Pa. 




Rochester, N. Y 

Rockford, 111 






2 


1 


littlcllock.Ark 


Rock Island, 111 




Los Anseles,Ca] 


1 


St. Joseph, Mo 




i.flw©n,lfft«, 


St. Louis, Mo 


1 


Lynchburg, Va 




Salt Lake City, rtah 




Lynn. Mass 




Sail FrancLst'o, Cal 


2 


ifcKeesport, Pa 




Sajonaw, Mich. 






2 


Saratoga Springs, N. Y 


1 


Minneapolii, Minn 


2 




' Seattle, Wash 


1 
1 


1 


MolMle/AlZ 


i 


1 Somerville, Ma^s 




Montdair, i.J 


1 
2A 

1 
1 
3 

20 
1 

31 
1 
8 


Sfliith Rpnd. ItuI 


1 


Nashville. ' 'emi 


i I South nethlbhem. Pa 

SDrinefiold. Ill 


2 
3 

1 1 
1 ' 

I 1 

s ; 
11 

7 < 
3 i 
1 

1 [ 
9 1 

'J. 




Newark,N J 


1 


New Castle, Pa 




■' Springfield, Mass . . 




New Haven, Conn 


; T lodo. Ohio 


1 


New Orl^ns. La. 


6 '! Trenton. N. i. . . ._. 




Newton, Mass 




; Washington. I). C 

i Wjilortown. N. V 




New York, N. Y 




7 




Niagara Falls. N. Y 


\\ Wh«'plin2. WW A 




NOTfolk,VA..' 


I 
1 


Wichit a, kans 




North Adama, Mass 


Wiliiamspwt, I'u 




Oftklaf»<l Cftl 


1 
2 
8 




! Wilmington, N. C 




Oklahoma Mty, Okla 




1 Winston-Salem. N. C 

! York, Po 




Philadelph a, 1^'a 


i 






1 








TYPHUS 
Colo 


FEVER, 
rado. 





During the month of June, 1917, 1 case of typhus fever was reported 
in Colorado. 

DIPtlTHERU, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS. 
State Reports for July, 1917. 





Cases reported. 




Cases reported. 


State. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet ! 
fever. 

15 
241 , 

1 


SUte. 


^^P*»- \CAfLslP<; Scarlet 
theria. ; Mea.sles. j^^.^,. 


Distrkt of Columbia 


16 

507 


192 
1,347 


Vermont 


20 321 ' 59 


■assachusetts 


West Virginia 


IH 1 59 1 19 
1 1 






State 


Reports for June, 1917. 




State. 


C 

Diph- 
theria. 


ises report 
Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


State. 


Cases reported. 

^*I»^- Measles ' ^^^^^^ 
theria. «^as'<*^ fever. 


Colorado 


36 
19 


419 
207 


37 

7H ' 


Oregon 

Virginia 


24 139 I 58 


Montaoa 


52 1,119 , 73 










,^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



AugUHt 17. 1917 



1328 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Continued. 

Colorado Report for May, 1917. 

During the month of May, 1917, 53 cases of diphtheria, 1,355 
cases of measles, and 52 cases of scarlet fever were reported in Colo- 
rado. 

Ciiy Rerr0.t3 for Week Ended July 28, 1917. 





I*opula- 

tion as of 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 

by U. S. 
Census 

Bureau). 


ToUl 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 


City. 


1 


i 


1 


M 


. 


1 
1 


1 


1 


Over 500,000 inhabitants: 

Baltimore Md 


589,621 

750.476 

2,4»7,722 

674,073 

571, 7d4 

503,812 

5,602,841 

1,709,518 

579,090 

757,309 

468,558 
410,476 
306.345 
436,535 
363,454 
408,894 
371,747 
463,516 
348,639 
363,980 

214,878 
280,800 
271,708 
297,847 
295,463 
254,960 
256,417 

104,199 
181,762 
121,679 
112,981 
106,233 
127.224 
128,366 
104,562 
128,291 
100,560 
113,245 
102,425 
148,995 
117,057 
118,158 
149,685 
198,604 
165,470 
109,381 
166,687 
117,399 
105,942 
155,624 
112,770 
191,o,S4 
111,593 
163,314 

m,:iOo 
.'J8,6.'>9 
.''.7.660 
69,893 


200 
188 
585 
186 
206 

'*i,'2i6* 
469 
167 
225 

133 
126 
60 
92 

""m 

150 
123 
38 
121 

61 
65 

33' 

71 
68 


5 

49 

125 

16 

62 

1 
152 
33 

6 
M 

4 
5 
2 
9 
11 
12 
10 
4 
1 
7 

3 
2 
8 
4 


1 
4 

12 
1 
4 

"12 

7 
1 
7 

2 

""2 

""2 

...... 

1 
...... 


42 

52 

108 

19 

12 

10 

242 

47 

38 

8 

8 
2 
7 

22 
5 

19 
4 
9 
3 

31 


1 





...... 

1 
1 
1 


3 
12 
76 

4 
29 
10 
39 
...... 

29 

7 

4 
5 
16 
3 
6 


...... 

a 
■ '2' 

...... 

...... 


109 
c 63 

^m 

V34 

.. 17 

W 

442 

89 

'35 
24 
20 
33 


19 


Boston, Mass 


U 


Chi'^zo. Ill 


71 


Cleveland, Ohio 





Detroit, Mich 


13 


I/03 Aneeles, ("al 


IS 


New York, N.Y 


143 


Philadelphia. Pa 


(0 


Pittsburgh, Fa 


15 


St. I.ouis, Mo 


17 


From 300,000 to 500.000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Buflalo,N.Y 


12 


Chidnniati, Ohio 


18 


Jersey City, N. J 

Milwaukee. Wis 


5 

8 


Minneapol^*^ Minn 




Newark. N.J .".'.'.'.'.'.... 


1 


49 

37 

7 

23 

6 


17 




19 


San Francisco, Cal 


1 


8 
2 
4 

3 
3 
6 

1 
4 
6 
12 

5 
2 
2 




1.1 


Seattle, Wash 


8 


Washington, D. C 


9 


From 200,006 to '300,000 Inhabit- 
ants: 
Columbus, Ohio 


3 


Denver, Colo 


6 
6 
3 
2 
2 
32 

15 
6 

3 


...... 


13 




...... 


40 

4 

5 

...... 




Kansas lity,' Mo 


7 


Portland, Ofeg 




Providence, r" i 


4 

15 




6 


Rochester, N. Y 

From 100,000 to 200,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Albany, N. Y 


4 


Binninghain, AiB........... 


71 
30 

26* 

29 
22 
26 
9 
21 
11 








30 
6 
3 
4 
3 
6 


6 


Bridgep<)«^^, t'onn 


2 
6 
2 
4 




3 


CambrMw. Mass 


4 


nfltn^^en'W T 




2 
6 
5 










Davton. Ohio 


"l 


3 

1 




3 


FfiOl River, Mass 


6 


Fort Worth, Tex 






2 


Grand Rapids, Mich 

Lawrence, Mass 


1 
3 
2 
2 




2 




1 




2 
6 
6 
3 


2 
2 


LoweU.MW "".. 








1 
4 






f'jim, Wftss . . 





10 






Ufemphis, Tenn 


7 


Nashville, Tenn 


33 
30 

34" 

69 
31 

22' 

29 
35 


2 

1 
1 
3 

""2 
5 

1 

"4' 


... 






i 

1 




I 

8 
10 

1 


S 


New Bedford, Mass 


'i' 
...... 


5 
5 
.> 
4 
2 




6 


New Haven, Conn 


5 


Oakland. Cal 








3 


Omaha, l^ebr 


1 


4 
4 
3 
7 
3 
2 
1 
12 




6 


Reading Pa . . 


1 


Richmond, Va 




* *"i' 


14 


6 


Salt Lake City, Utah 

Sorincifield. Mass 


' i' 


5| 1 
14 




•? 


7 


synwSse,N.Y!::: :: 


1 


Tacoma, Wash 








Toledo. Ohio 


60 
41 

52 

15 


2 




10 






3 
8 
12 

3 


6 


Trenton, N.J 


4 
4 

3 




1 


Worcester, Mass 


1 


2 




2 




6 


From 50,000 to 100,000 Inhabit- 
ants: 

\.llentown Pa 




Altoona Pa 












1 


Atlantic City N.J 




3 




::::::::::::' 


■■■'i':::... 


Bayonne, N'.J 




'.'.'.'.'.'. :.'.... 




;^ 


1 


t2' 



Digitized by VjOOQlC 



1329 



AnriBt IT. 1917 



DfPflTHraiA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS— 

Oontinaed.' 



Guy Reports for Week Ended July 28, 1917--Continu 


ed. 

riot 
er.- 








Popula- 

tioaasof 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 

by U. 8. 
Census 

Bureaa). 


Total 
deaths 

from 

aU 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Sea 
fe\ 


Tuber, 
culosis. 


aty. 


1 


i 


2 


2 

1 


1 


3 

i 


1 




from 50000 to 100,000 inhabit- 
ants -Conftinaed. 


57,653 
67,440 
60.862 
60,734 
57,144 
M,495 
86,690 
63,705 
76,078 
54,772 
76,183 
73,015 
77,214 
68,580 
90,437 
50,853 
57,343 
61,155 
78,283 
58,221 
63,794 
80,612 
02,043 
71,744 
50,411 
63,867 
55,185 
66,895 
55,642 
85,236 
53,330 
68,805 
09,510 
87,039 
68,046 
61,120 
51,550 
66,083 
77,916 
70,722 


• 
14 
17 
24 
15 
11 
20 
35 
19 
14 
15 
17 
12 
26 






) 

! 






I 


Prw^tflo, M4»i^. .[.. 


2 

1 




1 




1 
1 




Owiton Ohio 





1 


:i 






<^>ark»ton 8 C. " . . . r , 






2 


CoA'inftan ' Kv 










1 




1 


5 


T>Qi^itlh >^inn 


1 
2 







2 
5 




6 


Ki^f^heth N. /. 


...... 


4 
1 




7 


4 


£iPaso fex. ' 


g 


'Rv»n7vllb» Irwl 


1 








I 


FlinrMicb 


3 ' 


2 




4 








Port4Vayne,IiKi.... 


4 

3 

1 




1 




1 






t 


1 




1 


iM^Xfn, N. J 




3 
4 






5 
1 

4 
1 
1 
4 
2 




Jofaasiovii, Fa 

ITaahi Tfty. Kaiu 


' 




1 


Z4»fafiter ra 








1 


1 






LftHe Rock, Ark...' 

M«M^, Ua^ 


81 
8 
20 
20 
17 


1 
4 
1 
1 












1 ] 










t 1 




2 


KoWle, AJa' . ..'.,"....,.. 




4 


, 




3 


NffV Bruain. rinnn 


I 


i 


9 


2 


Noriolk.Va . ... ', 


1 


, 


1 




12 


Oklahoma Cit'y/Okla 


24 
19 
18 
10 
It 
23 
11 
26 
19 
32 
23 
12 
10 
19 
11 
14 




1 


... . 








p.....^...... 




3 


2 


Fftw^jokrt. R f 


3 




• 


3 




3 


Pr^t]fkii4 ^f 




i2 

4 






:::::::::::: 


1 


Bocadbnl, HI 




2 


..:;:;i:::::: 




%!Taii»wito, Cal 


5I 


2 1 4 








^Inaw, Mich 


1 











St J<^^ph Vo 




j 








San DicKO, Call.. ....!.. 1 1 




11 




1 


3 

6 
3 


2 




1 


::::::•:::;:.; 


4 


Rrh4»Tvo<la}lr. N. Y 




10 
2 








SomarvWjiaw..:: .:. 

Rnnth RatuI Trwf 


3 


! ' 




2 




i 

1 


• i" ::::::! i 


1 


1 


^^HnxIMd Ohiio. 


5 
1 
2 

1 

8 






1 




TrtreHantp Tnd 


1 


1 






1 
3 


Trov NY 


j 




3 


Wichita, Kaos . 






2 






Wilkca4iarre,Pa...] 


76,776 


26 


2 




i 

1 
1 




^Omfngti>n V>fi 


0«,265 
51,656 

27,732 
37,385 
32.085 
32,730 
27,632 
43,425 
46,102 
29,319 
34,611 
26,074 
32,261 
48.811 
39,873 
28,743 
42,458 
28,203 
39,233 
41,781 
41,863 
29,353 


33 


14 
7 
4 
4 
1 






1 


yoSpSl!: 


2 




1 J . 








1 1 


1 






Anbmn-'N. Y.. .'.I 


1 


2 






2 2 


BtOinrhan, Wash. 


j 






2 


2 


S^^tiiau 


1 


2 
1 









2 




Btitkr , Pi 


"i':::::: 








Butt^/Mont 


3' 1 


3 




2 
5 
2 

1 
1 




Ghdsea^Mass 


7: 3| 1 4 

15 1 1 - ! 2 








1 


Cduinbla,S C 


10 1 1 


i 


' 




1 


Comhertabd, Mdl rr 


1 
7 




« ! ' 






nanrU)f» fll' 


1 








1 


DarnniMrt, Iowa.. 


:::::::::::: 


1 


1 








Dufauotie, Iowa 








3 


■Mt Oilram liiii' '* 


1 .**"':: 








1 
2 




iMt Oranse. N J 


4 
9 

6 
5 
13 

8 


1 


10 








1 


EWn, TH 7 


•i 


I 
3 
4 










f^wrett, Mnitn , 









1 
2 
2 




ntrhhuv Mast 













Oalvestan^Tax. ..." . . 


1 











Gram Bay.Wk 


! 










1 




40,490 6 


i 










1 
2 

3 
4 


1 


HaTnrhffli Mam 


48,477 




::::::;:::::: 












JM!k«on iiich 


35,363 
48,886 
31,576 
38,676 
31,677 
41,097 
35,384 
46,515 


10 
22 
10 


1 ■"] 


4 
12 
7 
3 








1 


Kaiatnacoo, Miefe 














KeooshiLlll^fc. :_ 

Kno^^^Hn. ToBn .. ...... 








i 

1 




1 








1 

1 




1* Crowe,' Wis...: 

Lexinfton, Kt 


11 
12 

15 
11 


5 


1 


X 


1 








1 


LbnaJOhib ' 


2 











1 
2 


t 


Lbacoiii,Uehr.... v. '.','.'.'.. y.'j 









2 




V 



Digitized by 



Google 



Augu«t 17, 1917 



1330 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Continued. 



City Reports for Week Ended Joly 28, 


1917— Continued. 








Popula- 
tion as of 
Julyl.im 
(esUmatBd 
by U. 8. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


MeMlM. 


Scarlet 
feTer. 


Tobv- 
calNh. 


aty- 


1 


1 


J 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


From 26,000 to 50,000 inhabit- 
ants-Continued. 


27, a? 
36,9C4 
32,040 
30,690 
47 521 
26,234 
26,31g 
27,327 
31,»27 
30,108 
43, 716 
37,353 
31,401 
31, 4W 
33,080 
46,450 
41,185 
38,629 
39,651 
36,798 
38, 130 
46,486 
43.284 
2.S92a 
38.902 
27,445 
46,226 
36,243 
48,726 
30,570 
29,894 
43,139 
43,377 
33,809 
29,892 
31,155 
30,863 

22,874 
15,010 
13,532 
13,699 
21,685 
15,794 

> 13,075 
17,548 
22,669 
24,276 
16,950 
23,539 
20,930 
15,395 

1 14,610 
17,445 
13,284 
23,126 
15,243 
20,985 

122,019 
19 036 
23,805 
17,524 
11,666 
12,067 
14,831 
20,193 
13,821 
24,204 
15,548 
23,228 
15,960 


8 
14* 






1 
1 








1 




T.nra1n Oh in 


1 




...... 


4 










1 


I 


ludkon Wis 






1 





2 

1 






lff>Kf>Afmort Pa 


13 
5 
3 
6 
7 
4 
11 
10 
8 
3 
10 
8 
12 
10 
17 
16 


5 

1 











Mndfrir^ WftM 




1 

1 






31 


MAntcl&»- N J 









2' 


Uiuhiia. N H 
















NpWBATt Kv 














a 


2 


N«WD4Vt It. T 


1 

1 
2 








1 






Npwton Uaas 




7 








1 


NiAffAra FaIU N Y 








4 


a 
















Offdf^n ITtjUi 










1 








Oramrp N J .... 


1 










6 
2 


I 


Pasadena, Cal 




2 





1 




3 


Perth Amboy, N. J 

PitL<;fieId Mass 


2 








13 








1 


1 


Portsmouth Va . . . 








5 




2 


Ouincv III 























1 








5 




Racino WL-> 


9 

•10 

7 












2 


Rnnnnkf^ Va 


1 
2 














1 


Rock Island HI 








1 
1 








San Jose ( 'al 










3 




Stfiubonvillc Ohio 


10 
3 

10 
7 












Siinfirfnr Wis 


1 

"l 

8 


















1 












1 




1 




2 




. . 




Waltham. Mass 





1 


1 


Watcrtown N. Y 




4 








4 


West Hobokcn N J 


5 
16 

1 

11 
17 

7 

8 
15 
1 












3 

1 


1 


Wheeline W.Va 


1 
4 












1 


WilliamsDort Pa 


1 


2 




1 






Wilminfffon N C 






i 


Winston-Salem, N. C 










1 




3 


2 


Zanesville Ohio 






1 






From 10,000 to'25,000*lnhabitante: 
Alton III 














3 


Ann Arbor, Mich 

Beaver Falls, Pa 


1 
1 


1 
1 


4 













Berlin, N. H 

Braddoclc,Pa 

Cairo, III 


3' 

6" 








!!!!!! 
'.'.'/.'.'. 


1 






i 


Clinton, Mass 

CoflcjrviUe, Kans 

Concord,N.H 


...... 




i 









..... 




GaUMburg,IU 

Harriston.N.J 

Kearny, N.J 


5 

6' 

7 


2 





4 
1 
3 




...... 




..... 
1 • 




Kokomoylnd 
















Long Branch, N. J 

Marfaiette.Wis 

Melrose, Mass 


1 

5 
2 
6 
9 

8 




1 




3 










.*."... 


NanUcoke,Pa 

Newburyport, Mass 






...... 

...... 

3 
2 








2 . 

3 . 
2 . 




N^AXtr T<nnnrtn Hnnn 




North Adams, Wa<fi? 














Northampton, Mass 








2 






Plalnflel<.N.'J 




1 




Pontiac, Mich, 

Portsmouth, N. H 


3* 

3 
4 
4 

7' 

5 


•'2' 




1 




2 








Rocky Mount, N.C 

Riitlfttwl Vt 


.'.".'". 


Sandusky, Ohio 

Saratov Springs, N. Y 

SouthBethtehem, Pa 










1 




7 '. 
1 . 


...•• 


1 
2 








1 




..••• 


Stoelton, Pa .' 




...... 




..••• 


WUklnsburg, Pa 

Wobum, Mass 



















— 



' Population Apr. 15, 1910; no estimate madib ^^ , 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FOREIGN. 



CUBA. 
Commiuiicable Diseases — Habana. 

Communicable diseases have been notified at Habana as follows: 



DiSMM. 


July U-20, 1917. 


Remain- 
ing under 
treat- 
ment 

July 20, 
1917. 


D^iheria 


1 


1 


4 


I^DDsy 


10 


jSSS.. 


ii 

8 
4 





'l^ 


Mttsies. .:.:::..:::.:;:;;;::::;;:::::::::::::::::::::::::::.: :. 




f. 


Pant v|tboid fever ... . 


1 


V. 


Typhoid (ever 


23 a 


48 











UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA. 
Plague — Cape of Good Hope Siate. 



A fatal case of plague occurred May 28^ 1917, in Tarka district. 
State of Cape of Good Hope. 






CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER. 
Reports Received During tlie Weeic Ended Aug. 17, 1917.^ 

CHOLERA. 



Plice. 1 Pate. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


OricutU May 27-June 2*. . . . 




30 
1 

1 
1 




Moolraein do 1 




Pepj ' do 






RiDi^oon ' June3-9 






te>pme Islands: 
Provinces 






June 24 30, 1917: Cases, 2G1: 


Albav ' Juno24-30 


9 

88 

23 

58 

S 

1 

70 

4 





Bohol 1 do 


02; 


Capii ' do 


17 


C«DU 1 do 


41 


Leyto ' do 


3 


RlT^ '. .do 






Sor;ogon • do 


33 


Tayabas . . do. . . . 


4 




1 



» From m-^ii'Al <tfli'^'^rs of the Public Health Service, American consuls, and other sources. 
96 (1331) 



Digitized by 



Google 



August 17, 1917 



1332 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYl^HUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER- 

Continued. 

Reports Received During the Week Ended Aug. 17, 1917— Continued. 

PLAGUE. 



Place. 


DaU. 


Gun. 


Deaths. 


RemadB. 


Braxil: 

Bahia 


June 10-30 


1 






Ceylon: 

(V)lonilx) 


Jimp 3-fl 




India ' 


May 27-June 2, 1917: CaiM,S,7QI; 


Ba-ispfn 

Bonibay 

Cakutta 

Madras Presidency 


Mav27-June2 




SO 
20 

2i 

1 


deaths, 3,050. 


June 10-W 


«7 




May 27 -June 2 




June 10-16 


28 




Moulmetn. ! 

Pepu 

KaniTunn 


May 27-Jiiiie 2 




do 






Jiino.VO 


25 
1 




Union of South Africa: ^ 
Cape of Good Hope State— 

Tarka district May 28 


At SummerhU! Fann. 







SMALLPOX. 



Bracil: 

Bahla 

Riode Janeiro. 



E,y^U 



Alexandria 

India: 

Bombay 

Madras 

Rangoon 

Japan: 

Kobe 

Osaka 

Mexico: 

Ven Cruz 

Portuguese East Africa: 

Lourenco Marquez. . 
Russia: 

Archangel 

Petrograd 

Riga 

Spain: 

Madrid 

Valencia 

Sweden: 

Stockholm 



June 10-30., 
June 17-30.. 



JunelS-July 1... 



June 10-16.. 

....do 

June 8-0.... 



July»^.. 
Julyl-«.. 

July 1-7.., 

Apr. 1-30. 



Jun€lfr-28. 

May 20- June 2. 
May 27-June 2. 



June 13-10 

June 24- July 7., 

June 17-23 



16 

lao 

1 



Mar. 1-81, 1017:20*909. 



TYPHUS PBYBB. 



•^li 



Alexandria.. 
Greece: 

Saloniki 

Russia: 

Archangel... 

Petrograd... 

Riga 

Spain: 

Almeria 

Trfaiidad 



Jtuaa^-Jaljrl. 
June 17-30 



June 15-28 

May 20- June 2... 
May 27-June 2. . 



May 1-31., 
Jime 4-0.. 



227 



Mar. 1-31, 1017: ic 



Digitized by 



Google 



1333 



August 17, 1917 



CHOLERA* PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER-^ 

Continued. 

Reports Received from Jane 30 to Aug. 10, 1917. 

CHOLERA. 



Plaoe. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India: 

Fttfffif f n 


Aor. 1-Mav 5 ... 




8 

273 

2 

1 

2 

1 

15 




Calcutta 


Apr. 29-May 26... 






Madras 


Apr. 22-June2.... 
]lav6-12 


a 




MAPf^nlAY 




MouhiM^ 


May 13-19 






Pakokku 


Apr. 29-May 5 






Jtaojfoon 


Apr. 21-May 19... 


30 




iBdo-Chiiia: 


Feb. 1-28. 1917: Ca.«5es,20; deaths, 
12. 


A nam 


Feb. 1-28 


3 

8 

8 

1 

163 

1 




Cambodia 


do 


6 
6 




Cochin-Chfha 


do 




Tonkiii 


do 




Sairnn 


Apr.23-May27... 
Apr. 2-8 


108 




lEut Jtva 




West Java 






Apr. 13-19, 1917: 1 c«se. 


Datavia 


Apr. 13-19 

Feb. 3 


1 

1 
4 

1 

1 




Pmtt: 

Mazanderan Province- 
Amir Kela 







Barfourouche 


Jan. 15-17 






Hamze Kela 


Jan. 17 .. . 






Meciiidessar 

Philippine Islands: 

Provinces . 


Jan. 31 






June 17-23 




May 2VJune 23, 1917: Cases, 795; 


Albay 

Ambos Camuincs 

Bohol 

l^apiz 

Cebu 

Leytc 

SorswwMi 

Tavabas 


May20-June23... 
June 3-9 


1(M 70 
2 1 1 


deaths. .100. 


June 17-23 

May20-Junc 23... 

June3-23 

. . .do 


I' 1 
280 189 
39 t 23 
173 109 


June 10-10 

June 3-23 


6 2 
136 65 


June 3-16 . . 


3 1 3 1 








. 



PLAGUE. 



Aratila: 
Aden., 



Ceylon: 

Colombo 

China: 

Amoy 

Konjckong 

KwauKtunc Province — 
Pa-pu district 

*«yp< 

Suez 

Pnninoes— - 

Tayoum 

Oirgeh 

Minieh 

Sioul 

Great Britain: 

London 



Basisein 

Bombay 

CAknitta 

Henaoda 

|fftr |>/»hl 

Madras Presidency. 

Mandalsy 

Moalmem. 

Myingyao 

Baocooo 

QToongDO 



May 3- June 11. 



Apr. S-May 19. . 

Apr. 29- May 5.. 
May 13- June 9. 

June 2 



May 12-17. . 

May 11-17.. 

May 17 

May 12-15. . 
May 12 



May 3-8. 



Apr. 1-May 19 

.\pr. 22- June 9 

Apr.2&-Maya6.... 

Apr. 1-May 19 

Apr. 22- June 9 

Apr. 22-Jime2 

Apr. K-May 12 

Apr. 1-May 12 

Apr. 1-7 

' .\l)r. la-June 2.... 

i Apr. 8-14 



379 



467 
219 



39 

306 

37 

33 

411 

183 

9 

52 

1 

no 

2 



Apr. S-May 14, 1917: Cases, 69; 
deaths, 51. 



l*rcsent and in vicinity. 



Present. 

Jan. 1-May 17, 1917: Cases, 231; 
deaths, llf.. 



2 in hospital at i>ort. From s. s, 
Sardinia from Australian and 
oriental ports. 

Apr. 15-May 26, 1917: Cases, 
34,545; deaths. 23,036. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Ausust 17, 1917 



1334 



CHOLERA, PLAQUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND TQXOW 

Continued. 

Reports Received from Jane 30 to A«g. 10, 1917— Continued. 

PLAGUK-Oonynued. 



Place. 


Dftte. 


Cases. 


Dwths. 


KeflMAi. 


Indo-China: 

Provlnpcs 








F^b. 1-28, 1017: Coses, 101;dsiCbs, 


Anarn 


Feb. 1-28 


SI 
57 
13 
47 


16 
47 

35 


71. 


Cambodia 


....do 




Cochin-China 


do 




Saieon 


Apr. 23-Jiine 8 




Java: 

East Java 


Am. 2-22, 1017: Cases, l|;dasth9, 


Surabaya 


Apr. Z-22 


13 
5 


13 
5 


Surakarta 


do...*. .."!!.. 








May 16-31, 1917: Cases, U. 


Departments— 

Arequipa 


May 16-31 


4 
1 
2 
7 

1 

12 

1 




AtMoIIendo. * 


Callao 


do 




At Callao. 


Lambayeque 


. . do 




At Chlolayo. 


Libertad 


do.. I. !*...'.! 




At Salaveiry, San Pedro, mi 


Lima 


do 




Trujillo. 
At Lima. 


Siam: 

Bangkok 


Apr. 22- June 1 . . . . 
June 3-9 


11 




Straits Settlements: 

Singapore 




Union of South Africa: 

Cape of (tood Hope State— 
Quoenstown 


June 6 






Orange Free Slate 






Apr. 16-22. 1917: 1 ca«e: Apr.9-», 


Winburg district 


May 28 




1 


1917: Cases, 26; deaths, 17. 







SMALLPOX. 



I 



Australia: 

Sew v«onth Wnles 

Brewarrina Apr. 27 June 21.. 

Coonabarabran Ma.v 2*-Jiiiic 7.. . 

Qiiaiiihonc Apr. 27 June 21.. 

Queen.slaiKl i 

Thursday Inland Quar> ' May 9 

antine Station. i 



Brazil: 

Bahia 

Rlode Janeiro , 

Canada: 

Manitoba - 

Winnipeg , 

Nova Soolui- 

Uaiifax 

Port llawkesbury., 
Ceylon: 

Colombo 

China: 

Amoy 

Antiing 

Chungking 

Chanysha 

Duinn 

Harbin 

Hongkong 

Mam-h uria St at ion ... . 

Mukden 

Shanghai 

Tient.'«in 

Tsitshar Station 

Tsingtao 



May 6-12 

May 6^ June 16.. 



June 10-16. 



June IH July 7.. 
June 17 30. 



May 6-12. . 

Apr. 29-May 26. , 
Mftv21 JunVaj. 
May (» June ii . . 
May 27 June 2.. 
Mav m June 30. 
.Nr-r. 2.} May 0... 
Mav (^ June 16. .. 

Apr. 2J 20 

Mav 27 Jnue 2.. 
Muy 21 July 1... 
Mav Vi Juno 9.. 

Apr. 16 22 

May 22- July 7... 



Alexandria 

France: 

Paris 

Germany 

Berlin 

Bremen 

CharlottenbuTf . . 



Apr.30-June 10.. 
May 6-12... 



Mar. 18^ Apr. 28.. 

do..... 

do , 



Apr. 27-Jun4' 21. 1917: Cases,*. 



12 1 

2 ' 

1 ' T'rom s. s. 8t . Alban.s from Kobe 

i ; via Hongkong, ^'e5sel pn>- 

' • r.eded to Towns. il!e, Bns- 

baue. and Svdney, in quarsa- 

tine. 



rV 




5 ' 

30 : 

7 ' 

8 

1 



106 
16 
18 



32 



Present In district. 



Present and in viclnHT 
Present. 

On Chinese Eastern Ry 

Do. 
Present. 
Cases foreign: deaths i 

tivos. 

On Chinese Eastern Rf. 

At another statien oo no^"'' 

lease. 



Mar. 1»-Apr. 2i, 1017: ^O^S^l!* 
in cities and 32 SUta^ <i" ^"^ 
tricts. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1335 



Aujfust 17, 1017 



CflOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER. AND YELLOW FEVER— 

Continued. 

Reports Received f^om June 30 to Aug. 10, 1917— Continued. 
SMALLPOX— Continued. 



Pteee. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Oennany— Continued. 

IT*mhimr 


Mar. 18-Apr.28... 
do 


SO 

ao 

2 
10 

1 

m 






Leipzig. 






LQbeck — 


do 

do 






liunkh 






l9lQttiBkrt 


do 






India: 

Bombfty 


Apr. 2a-Ju]ie 9 

Apr. 2»-May96.... 


48 
U 
5 

38 

4 




Calcutta 




Karachi 


Apr.21-Juiie».... 
Apr. T^hxm 2. . . . 
Apr.l5-Junea.... 


60 




Mf»iinv« 




Rancoon ................. 




Indo-China: 

I*rovinoes 


Feb. 1-28, 1017: Crises, 503; dciths, 
62. 


An^m 


Feb. 1-28 


297 
36 

193 
67 

199 

32 

53 

1 

169 

1 

11 

16 


7 

1 
53 

1 
63 

12 

15 


Cambodia 


do 




C^chin-t hina 


do 




Tj»kin 


do 




fltt«V» 


Apr. 27- June 10. . . 

May21-June24... 

Mnv 27 July I 

May 2^June«.... 
May I6-Jnne30... 
May27-Julxl 

Apr. 2-29 . . 




Italy: 

Tarfe 




Jtpn: 

Kobe 




Nniwnki 




OsaVa, 


55 
1 

1 




Ynkohaina -,,..-,, ^ . 




Jan: 

East Java 




Mid-Java 


Apr. 1 21 




W«6tJ<i\*a 




Apr. 13-May W, 1017: Cases, 46; 
deaths. 7. 


Batavia 


-Vpr. I3May3.... 

July 11-17 

June 3 30. . 


11 

"162' 

ft ' 
14 

7 

3:)0 

4 

23 ; 

1 


2 
2 


Mexico 

Mazatlan 

Me\icj<Ity 




M-mterev 

PhOipcioc LsUiiis: 

Mu»i 


J0f» W 21 

May 13 June 9 

May 13 June 30... 

Mar. 1-31 

Mnvl 11 

Feb. IS Ml. li>... 
Mar. 11 Miiv lO. . . 
Mar. 15-21.: 


24 


Varioloid. 


Portnml: 

Lisbon 

Portui!aeBe East Africa: 

Russia: 

Archangel 


1 
• 2 




PeUograd 




WJW 

\Tadivostok 


' 

3 
5 



2 

H 
L 

% 

..:i 


Jan. 1 31, 1917: V.\-^, 7. 


Spain: 

Madrid. 


Mayl-<il. . 




Serine 


do 


-S 

5 . 

1 
1 

2' 

4 




Valen ia 

StraiU SettJcnwfrtv: 

Penang 

Malino 

Sto?klK>lm 

Tnnisa: 

Tunw 


Junc3-2J 

Mar. IH-Md> 12... 

Apr. 22-28 

Ml,- 20- June 2.. 

June 2 S 




Turkey in A. via: 

TreW/ond 

Ciiio of South Africa: 

idhanne^burs 


Feb 2->-\pr. M.. 
Mar. 12-24 




"Mill 111 

Miracaibo 


June IH-Julr H ._ 
TTPHIS 








Alcwia: 

Alciw* 


June I ^) 


5 




Anatria-iitiQcary: 

Aortria 




*>'* 22 //♦' 17 ;V ' ' w**" 2J7U 


JKWif IIMB. 

Galtria. 

Lower Austria 

Meraria. 


Oct. 22 Dec 17.. . 

do 

do 

do 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



August 17, 1917 



1336 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE. SMALLPOX, TYPHUS PEVER, AND YELLOW PEVER- 

Coptinued. 

Reports Received from June 30 to Aug. 10, 1917— Contiiiued. 
TYPHUS FEVEB-Gontinued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Austria-Hungary— Continued, 
Austria— Continued. 

Silesia 


Oct.22-Deo. 17... 
.... do 


16 

343 

5 






8t\Tia 






Upper Austrbi 


do 






Hungarv 






Feb. 19-Mar. 25, 1917: Cases, l,SSl. 


Budapest 


Feb.19-Mttr.25... 

June 25-July 1 — 
June 9-16 


83 

3 

1 
4 

1,421 




China: 

Antung 






Hankow 







Tsingtao 


May 30- July 7 

Apr. 30- June 10... 
June 17-23 




Alexandria 


413 

1 
26 




Great Britain: 

Cork 




Greece: 

SaioniW 


May 13-10 






Japan: 

Nagasaki 


June 11-24 


4 
7 




Java: 

Mid-Java 


Apr. 1-30 


2 




WestJava 




Apr. 13-May 10, 1917: Cases 86. 


Batavia 


Apr. 13-MaylO.... 
June 3-30 


22 

431 

3 

1 

2 

98 
1 
5 




Mexico: 

Mexico City 






Netlierlands: 

Rotterdam 


June 9-23 


2 




Portuguese East Africa: 

Lourengo Marquez 


Mar. 1-31 




Russia: 

A rchangel 


May 1-14 






Peirograd 


Feb. 18-Mayl9.... 
May 6-12 


3 




Riga 


Jan. 1-31, 1917: 1 casa. 


Vladivostok 


Mar.29-May21.... 
May 1-31 






Spain: 

Madrid 


2 




Switzerland: 

Basel 


Jiuie 17-23 


1 




Tunisia: 

Tunis ,r r - - , 


Jiuie 30-July . 


1 













YELLOW FEVER. 



Mexico: 

Yucatan, State— 
Peto 




In person recently arrived from 
Mexico City. 



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PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 



VOL. 32 AUGUST 24, 1917 No. 34 

POUOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS). 

ITS PRESENT PREVALENCE IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Occasional cas^ of poliomyelitis (infantile paralysis) are reported 
from all parts of the country. This has been so for a number of 
years. During the present summer, however, the only localities in 
which the reported prevalence of the disease has been such as to 
indicate the presence of outbreaks are: Washington County, Vt.; 
city of HaverhiU, Mass.; city of New Castle, Pa.; Allegany County, 
Md.; Br&xton Coimty and Marion County, W. Va.; Rockingham 
County, Va.; Behnont County, Ohio; and Blue Mounds Township, 
Pope Coimty, Minn. All these outbreaks have been comparatively 
small and with but few cases. In no locality in the United States 
is there an outbreak of any size, or one that seems Ukely to develop 
into a serious epidemic. 

Washington Couniy, Vt — ^In Washington County there were diu-ing 
June, 31 reported cases, and during July, 22. Comparatively few 
cases have been reported since the 1st of August. The main focus 
of the disease was in the city of Montpelier, where there were four 
cases reported between Jime 16 and June 22, and 29 cases between 
June 19 and July 7. The next most important focus was in the town 
of Barre, where there wore 15 cases reported between June 16 and 
August 18. At Waterbury there were eight cases between July 7 
and August 18. The outbreak seems to be on the wane since the 
latter part of July. The population of MontpeUer at the time of 
the 1910 census was 7,856. The population of Washington County 
was approximately 42,000. 

HaverhiU, Mass. — ^In Haverhill 5 cases of poUomyelitis were re- 
ported in June, 10 in July, and 16 between August I and 22. The 
outbreak here seems to be still on the increase. The population of 
Haverhill, estimated as of July 1, 1916, is 48,477. 

New Castle, Pa. — In New Castle 4 cases of poliomyelitis were 
reported between July 1 and July 28. In the next two weeks, ended 
August 11, 9 cases, and in the week ended August 18, 14 cases. The 
97 (1337) 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



August 24, 1917 1338 

disease here is on the increase. The estimated population of New 
Castle, as of July 1, 1916, is 41.133. 

AUegany County, Md, — In AUegany County, Md., 23 cases of 
poliomyelitis were reported between July 15 and August 18. For 
the five weeks ended August 18, the nimibers of cases reported by 
weeks were 7, 6, 2, 3, 5. The main focus was at Barton, where 10 
cases were reported in July. The outbreak in this locality seems to 
be diminishing. The population of Allegany County at the time of 
the 1910 census was approximately 63,000. 

Braxton County, W. Va. — ^In this county 10 cases were reported in 
July and 7 cases during the first 18 days of August. The outbreak in 
this county seems to be diminishing. The population of Braxton 
County m 1910 was 23,023. 

Marion County, W. Va, — ^Thirty-one cases of poliomyelitis were 
reported in Marion County up to August 18. The first cases were 
reported in July. The principal focus was at Monongah, where 14 
cases were reported in July and 8 in August up to the 18th. The 
disease in this locaUty does not seem to be increasing at the present 
time. The population of Monongah in 1910 was 2,084. The popu- 
lation of Marion County in 1910 was approximately 43,000. 

BocTdngham County, Va, — ^The only county in Virginia in which 
there has been a noticeably unusual prevalence of poUomyditis is 
Rockingham County, where there have been reported since June a 
total of 33 cases. There was 1 case reported in June, 22 cases were 
reported in July, and 10 cases since the 1st of August. The cases 
during July were reported at Elkton, Harrisonburg, Grottoes, and 
McGaheysville. The disease does not seem to be increasing at the 
present time. The population of Rockingham County in 1910 was 
approximately 35,000. 

In Greene County, Va., seven cases have been reported since the 
1st of August, in Page County six cases since the 1st of July, and in 
Warren County seven cases since the 1st of August. Of the cases in 
Warren County, six were at Front Royal. 

Belmont County, Ohio, — In Belmont County 11 cases were reported 
in June and 15 in July. The main focus was at Martins Ferry, where 
19 of the cases were reported during June and July. The population 
of Martins Ferry in 1910 was approximately 10,000. 

Pojye County, Minn, — In Blue Mounds Township, Pope County, 
Minn., seven cases of poliomyelitis were reported between June 14 
and July 19. This constitutes a markedly unusual prevalence of the 
disease. The population of Blue Mounds Township in 1910 was 657. 
The outbreak seems to be at an end. 



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1339 August 24, 1917 

MALARU IN TENNESSEE. 
PREVALENCE AND GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION. 

The periodical circularization of the physicians of Tennessee to 
determine the prevalence and geographic distribution of malarial 
infection in the State was begun in 1913, and continued during 1914, 
1915, and 1916. At regulw intervals reply postal cards were sent 
to the practicing physicians. These cards were at first sent out each 
month. Beginning with April 1, 1915, they were sent out quarterly.* 
A reproduction of the card used during 1915 and 1916 will be foimd 
on page 1128 of the Public Health Reports of the issue of July 20, 
1917. 

Of the cards sent to physicians an average of less than 9 per cent 
were returned. Those returning the cards with the requested data 
filled in imdoubtedly constituted the better class of practitioners — 
those who tmderstood most clearly what was wanted and the value 
of the work. The number of cards sent out, the number of schedules 
returned, and the counties represented at each circularization are 
shown in Table No. 1. 

It is to be borne in mind that the number of cases reported by the 
phjTBicians by no means shows the number of cases that occurred, for 
an average of less than 9 per cent of the phjrsicians returned the 
schedules. 

The return of the schedules by the physicians being a matter of 
voluntary cooperation, the data are undoubtedly reliable to an 
unusual degree as regards the experience of the physicians who 
cooperated and the number of cases seen by them. It is to be borne 
in mind, however, that the cases reported represent only those 
occurring in the practices of the physicians who cooperated. The 
total number of cases of malaria occurring in the practices of all 
the physicians of the State must have been many times greater, 
also the number of cases that occurred in which no physician was in 
attendance or consulted was probably much greater than the 
number coming under medical care. 

The physicians who cooperated were distributed as to locality 
throughout all sections of the State, so that the data of the occurrence 
of malaria furnished by them show the geographic distribution of 
the disease and reasonably accurately its relative prevalence in the 
various locaUties. 



1 Tbe work of circularixatioo and of compilation of tho data on the return cards was carried on by the late 
Barf. R. H. yon Exdorf up to the time of his death, In September, 1916. Since then It has been carried on 
by AagL Sorg. R. C. Derlvauz and Asst. Burg. Gen. H. R. Carter. 



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AiiSU8t24,1917 



1340 



The cases reported throughout the State by months are shown in 
Table No. 2. The relative numbers of cases reported by months are 
shown m the chart. 

The number of cases reported from the several counties of the 
State are given by race and year in Table No. 3. 

The map on page 1341 shows the relative prevalence of the disease 
in the several coimties of the State, the heavier shaded coimties being 
those in which the infection is heaviest, the tmshaded coimties those 
in which the infection is lightest, as indicated by the niunbers of cases 
reported. The relative density of infection was determined by asoa- 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May; 


Jun. 


Jul. 


AU^. 


S«p. 


Oct. 


Hov. 


Ue. 














































^ 
























y 


^^ 
























/ 




V 






















/ 




\ 




















/ 






\ 




















y 






\ 




















/ 








i 




1> 












/ 










\ 
















/ 










\ 














y 












\ 






\ 








/ 














\- 




^ 


V 




/ 


« 




















V' 






















' 





















































Relative prevalence of malaria In Tennessee, by months, as Indicated by the numbers of 

cases reported. 

taining the number of cases reported in each county during the entire 
period for which reports were received per 1,000 population. The 
population used was that of the 1910 census, it being impracticable 
to estimate populations for the period of the circularization. 

The types of malarial infection reported to have been diagnosed 
microscopically are shown in Table No. 4. It will be noted that 
tertian infection was reported to have been so diagnosed in 31 coun- 
ties, quartan in 21 counties, and estivo-autumnal in 24 counties. 

By Table No. 5 it will bo noted that hemoglobinuric fever was 
reported in 5 coimties. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1341 



August 24, 1917 




Digitized by 



Google 



Aufmit 24, 1917 

Table 1. 



1342 

-Results of dreularization of practicing physictani* 



Period. 



Inquiry 
cards 
sect to 
phyai- 

CiSLDJ. 



RopUfis 
received. 



Percent- 
age o( 
replies. 



Counties 
ropr»- 

aeniedtn 
replies. 



Countiei Cass of 

not beard I mtlirii 

from. 



1913. 
August to NoTember. . 

1914. 
January to December. . 

1915. 

January to March 

April to Juno 

July to September 

October to December. . 

1916. 

January to March 

April to Juno 

Jul V to September 

October to December. . 



3,338 
39,594 



10,014 
3,338 
3.338 
3,338 



3,338 
3,33$ 
3,338 
3,338 



609 

4,734 



1,187 
379 
230 
140 



«3 
164 

287 
449 



18. ai 
11.93 



11.35 
8.36 
6.89 
4.37 



1.89 
4.91 
8.60 
13.45 



7, 
31 < 









m 

3,fl07 
2,^ 



Table 2. — Cases of malaria reported^ by months. 



Year. 


Jan- 
uary. 


Feb- 
rtiary. 


March. 


Aprfl. 


M»y. 


June. 


July. 


Au- 
gust. 


Sep. 
tem- 
ber. 


Octo- 
ber. 


vem- 
ber. 


ceo* 
Ur. 


1913 




1 

1 










1,482 
6M) 
633 

1,342 


1,556 
788 
770 

1,335 


1,383 
745 
413 
979 


651 


1914 


735 
1S9 
17 


289 
177 
31 


396 
206 
31 


362 
132 
103 


597 
223 
163 


757 
3S5 
333 


554 

336 
940 


443 

lis 

689 


sy 


1915 


n 


1916 


3S 







Tablb 3.— OtMct reported, by counties, by years, and by color. 





Aug. 1 to Nov. 30, 
1913. 


Calendar year 
1914. 


Calendar year 
1915. 


Calendar y«r 
1916. 


County. 


S 


1 


.0 


5 


1 


1 


1 

4 

103 


1 


s 


1 


. 


i 


Anderson 






3 
45 
59 
12 

7 
23 
31 

2 
?J 

2 
IV 
82 

1 

3 


■'i?' 

18 
13 

'■'5" 

1 

"22' 

4' 
33 


3 

*^ 

2o 

7 
2x 
35 

,0? 

3 
23 
115 

1 
3 


■39' 


1 

4 

141 


"23 

132 

3 

9 

16 

3 

1 

151 

3 


...... 

48 

■'2 




Bctlford 


17 

38 


1 
6 


18 
44 


u 


Htnt.'n 


m 


}i\u\ -K' 


i 


jilohiit 


6 
3 





6 
3 


1 




9 


}U ullov 


39 
2 
6 

74 

2 
20 
93 


3 
*27* 

"is' 
33 


42 

2 
5 

101 
2 
44 

136 


» 


CaiiipWMl 


I 








1 


C:i'^.ll 

( .ir. r 


16 
1 

32 


7 

■ 28' 
31 


'23 

1 

83 

63 


iti 

J 


( hi t' h im.. 




Vfi 


<■>.. '.r 


154 


IM 


(') jK' rne 






( 1,.' 1 ... ' 


6 1 


6 


5 
14 
22 
36 
76 
58 

176 
13 
13 

276 
95 
2 
14 

272 
34 

o§ 


1 S 


( .^ Vp 


19 


,i 


19 

4 

338 






7 
6 
18 
36 
U 
35 
3 
S 

66 
150 

* ii«' 
.J 


n 


1<»11,«' 


17 

71 

3 

255 

85 

32 

40 

151 

7 

1 

17 

4K2 

54 

« 


3 
35 

'**35* 
8 

3 
7 

5 
18 

■ '3" 
151 
13 

1 


20 

106 
3 

290 
93 
35 
47 

I.5f> 

25 

1 

20 

6*1 
7 








% 


('r.>» : f tt 


118 


35 


18 


53 


Si 


C'li. T'.inil 


IM 


Da 1 1 ')n 


4H 
43 
6 
152 
54 
6 
13 
77 

1 


23 
6 

« 

"31' 

36 

...... 

39 
3 


179 

54 

49 

6 

173 

90 

5 

17 

116 

2o 

1 


55 
64 


33 
19 


88 

73 


• 


1»,. I* If 


ai 


!)<: 1'. 


11 


It. ,<n 


52 
166 

4 


7 
38 
S 


69 
194 

7 


i« 


J, , , 


Ml 


J •- 'o 

1. r. , 


s 


} r .... lu, 








u 


1,, <,:j 

(,... ...', 


74 
19 


28 
1 


103 
30 

Go 





OtAiiiiieT 


3 




Digitized by 


rr* 



1343 August 24. 1917 

Table 3. — Cases reported^ by counties, by years, and by color — Continued. 





Aug. 1 to Nov. 30, 
1913. 


Calendar 3 
1914. 


•ear 


Calendar year 
1915. 


Calendar year 
1916. 


County. 


^ 


1 





S 


J 


1 


S 


d 


1 

Xi 

B 

d 


1 


1 


^ 


Greene 


3 
12 




3 
12 


5 

. 21 

2 

140 

1 

91 

251 


' "5' 

"l5 

"49' 
44 


5 
26 

2 
155 

1 
140 
295 


3 
10 


...... 


3 
11 


2 
36 


*'2' 


2 

38 


Gnmdy 


Hamblen 


niMnilton 


73 

6 

15 

45 


18 
'19' 


91 

6 

34 

45 


53 


13 


66 


95 


25 


* 120 


Han'^rk 




HaMAman 


33 

86 


38 
39 


71 
125 


123 
M 

4 
30 
59 
57 
29 
12 
44 
45 

2 


106 
23 

"io' 

43 

52 
2 
U 

1 




229 


Hardin 


107 


Hawkins 


4 


Ha jwood 


3 
1« 

9 
54 

48 
10 
9 


1 
9 


4 

36 
9 
58 
57 
10 
9 


7 

42 
67 
18 
22 
37 
15 


1 

10 
9 
3 
7 
2 


8 
52 
76 
21 
29 
39 
15 


19 
20 
IS 
22 
25 
139 
2 


30 
8 
5 
5 


49 
28 
23 
27 
25 
139 
2 


40 


Henderson 


102 


Henry 


109 


girVman 


31 


&oust<ni 


23 


Dinnphrvy^ ... . 


45 


Jackson./. 


45 


JaiQfs. 


3 


Jeflersrai 


11 
4 

53 
30 
121 
53 


. 2 
...... 

15 
91 


13 
4 

57 
45 
212 
53 


21 

1 

201 

16 

95 

16 

12 

107 

18 

5 

84 

7 

144 

67 

31 

16 

2 

8 

100 


""2 
s 
65 

"25* 

* "23* 

3 

48 

...... 

4 
...... 

113 


21 

1 

203 
24 

100 
16 
12 

132 
18 
5 

107 
10 

192 
57 
32 
20 
2 
11 

213 


1 
2 
6S 
201 
12 
24 


**"'5* 
212 


1 
2 
73 
413 
12 
24 




Johnson 








Knox 


46 
60 
224 


108 
5 


47 


Lake 


113 


Lauderdale 


332 


Lawrence 


76 


Lewis . ... 




Linoohi 


84 


16 


100 


51 
4 

18 
30 


16 
...... 

9 


67 
4 

22 
39 


31 
3 

8 
74 


11 
...... 

11 


45 


Lwldon 


3 


McMinn 


1 




1 


u 


McNairy 


85 


Ma*m?..::::: ::;;:;:: 












Madison 








53 
6 
23 
32 
1 

17 
80 


5 

4 
9 

...... 

38 


58 
10 
32 
38 
1 

18 
118 


277 
50 
21 
6 


110 

28 

3 

1 


387 


Marwn 


270 
56 
11 


136 
9 
5 


406 
65 
16 


78 


Marshall 


27 


Maury :..;.:...:... 


7 


Meigs ......::: :::::: 






Monroe 


3 
31 


"23' 


3 
54 


12 1 
91 34 


13 


Montgomery 


12.5 


Moore 




Morean 


5 
174 




5 
174 


1 










3 "". 


3 


OWon '.'..'..'.'".. 


169 

% 

12 
1 
60 
11 
3 
45 
97 
31 


52 

...... 

36 



221 
27 
9 
12 
I 
61 
11 
3 
56 
133 
31 


6 

7 
5 




6 
7 
5 


107 

10 

208 


65 
.... . 


172 


Orerton 


10 


Perry 


17 




17 


210 


Pickett 






Polk 


21 
18 
I 

16 
20 
11 


4 

4 

' "T 



25 
22 

1 

16 
25 
11 


8 
9 









8 
9 


9 
63 


...... 


9 


Putnam 


67 


Rhea ' ' 




Bone *../..'..*.*. 


2 
28 

8 
20 


71 


2 
31 
79 
20 


6 
59 
32 
13 


3 

45 


6 


Robertson 


62 


Rutherford 


77 


Bcott 


13 


Sequatchie 


1 






Sevier 






8 

813 

22 

21 

7 
34 
84 


'746" 

4 
3 

""6* 
69 


8 

l,5.'i9 

26 

24 

7 

40 
153 








"'ie':::::: 


16 


Shelby 


972 
63 
85 
8 
2 
47 


709 
24 

16 

46 


1,681 

87 

101 

8 

3 

93 


227 
21 

4 
8 

76 
50 


226 
12 

"2i' 

52 


4.t3 

33 

4 

8 

97 

102 


147 

102 

25 

3 

171 


145 

18 

3 

2 

155 


292 


Smith : 


120 


Stewart 


28 


Sullivan 


5 


Sumner ** 


326 


Tipton 




Trousdale 


6 1 20 


^ 


Unicoi 


""3 

1 

31 




3 

1 

31 


1 ( 


1 










Union "** 








5 

8 
22 
17 

100 

31 

36 

5 


6 
3 
5 

""19 
6 
1 

11 
i 


11 


VanBuren ['. 


17 
19 
15 

6 
46 
17 

7 
18 


4 

4 

9 
10 
7 

jl,8U2 


21 
19 
lo 
9 

50 
26 
17 

2j 


1 

38 
6 


...... 


1 

42 
6 


11 


Warren 


27 


Waisbinrton 


-■i-|:;:... 


2 


17 


Wayne.:...::.:..:;;:::*" 


94 


Weakley ;' 


132 
5 
10 


'"'i' 


132 
5 
11 


37 
6 
22 
13 


'""2 
2 


37 
6 
24 
15 


106 


White.. 


32 


Willlams,7n . . 


47 


Wilson ■' 


9 












Total 


3,560 


1,514 


5,074 


J4,852 


|o,G^J 


2,467 


X098 


3,565 


.4,iS3 


I^SII 


^^ 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Anput 24, 1»17 



1344 



Table 4. — Types of tnfecHon reported diagnosed miaroseopieaUy^ by eountus,hy ywt. 



fThe figures indicate the numbers of cases reported 
oasee were reported, but the diacnoeis was not 
collected during the years 1913 and 1914 <m]y.] 



losed microscopically. The sign + indicates Uat 
~ ' by the microscope. TtUs infonnstka w 





Tertian. 


Quartan. 


EstiyoaatommL 


County. 


August- 
NoTem- 
b©r,1913. 


January- 
Septem- 
ber, 1914. 


August- 
Novem- 
ber, 1913. 


January- 
Septem- 
ber, 1914. 


August- 
Novem- 
ber, 1918. 


ber,mi 


Anderson ...••*•••• 




+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 
3 










Bedford 


+ 
+ 




+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 




+ 


Benton 


+ 




+ 


Bledsoe 




^ 


Blount 






+ 
+ 




Bradley *-*^- *---*• 






3 


Campbeii ...- 








Carroll li 




+ 









Garter '. '."..'."." 




1 

+ 
+ 


1 




Cbftfttham ....r.,....rTr 


+ 
+ 


+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 


+ 
+ 






Chester 


+ 


+ 


Claiborne 


+ 


Clay 










+ 


Cocke ** 


+ 










Coffee ,". I! 


4 
+ 

3 
67 

+ 
1 

+ 
7 
3 




+ 
+ 




+ 


Crockett 


ao 


35 




+ 


Cumberland 






Davidson 


44 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
41 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 


13 


1 

+ 


13 


7 


I>ecatur . . 


+ 


Dekalb 


+ 
+ 
+ 
8 


+ 
+ 
+ 
1 


+ 


Dickson!;;!; 


4- 
10 

+ 


+ 


Dyer 


S 


Fayette. 


+ 


Fentress.....^ 

Pmnlclin 




+ 
54 

I 
+ 


+ 
3 

+ 


4- 
6 

+ 
+ 




+ 


Gibson 


+ 
+ 


« 


OUes ^ 

Grainger .....•........*................ 


+ 


Orwn© X ............_..<.... 


+ 
2 






...« 


Gnmdv ..^ 

Hamblen 


+ 
+ 
1« 


+ 






... 






** 


Ilamilton , 


18 


3 
4 


+ 


7 
3 

+ 
+ 


" 6 


Hancock 


...• 


TTardpTTian . ^ 


+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 


+ 
9 


+ 
+ 


+ 


Hardin 


+ 
3 

+ 


+ 


Hay wood.... .••.••............. .......... 


2 


Hpndprson 


+ 
+ 
+ 
3 
3 
+ 
+ 


+ 
+ 
+ 






Henry 




+ 


Hickman. 


+ 
+ 
+ 






Houston 


+ 

+ 
+ 
1 




+ 


Humphreys 


+ 
+ 
+ 




1 


Jack son 




Jefferson 


3 

4 
11 

4 
+ 
5 


1 


•" 2 


Johnson. 




Knox 


49 

+ 
9 

+ 

4 

t 

+ 
1 
15 

+ 

+ 
10 





3 

+ 
+ 


13 


63 


Lake 




Laiidprdale 


2 


3 


+ 


La\\ roncc 


+ 


Lcwi<; 











Lincoln 


+ 


+ 


2 


+ 


+ 


Loudon 


+ 


McMinn . 












McNairy 






+ 




+ 


Miicon , , 








+ 


^luiJi-on.,., 






4 

+ 




4 


Marion 


+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 






+ 


Mar^iiall 


+ 


+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 


+ 


Maury 




+ 


MonrfK? 






+ 


M on t u'omcry 




+ 


S 


Morgan 




Obion 


14 
1 
1 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


Ovv>rloD 


1 


Porrv 










4 


Pickett 










+ 


Ptitnara 


+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
10 




* + 




i*"' 


Koano 


+ 

+ 
+ 






•f 


KolKrJson 


^1 


1 


Rut iicrford 






Digitized by 



Google 



1345 



August 24, 191T ! 



Table 4. — Types of infection reported diagnosed microscopically, by counties , by years— 

Continued. 





Tertian. 


Quartan. 


Esti vo-autumnal. 


County. 


August- 
Novem- 
ber, 1913. 


Septem- 
ber, 1914. 


August- 
Novem- 
ber, 1913. 


January- 
Septem- 
ber, 1914. 


August- 
Novem- 
ber, 1913. 


January- 
Septem- 
ber, 1914. 


0eott 




+ 

+ 

+ 

137 




+ 




.f 


flfnmtfhiff 










Sevier 












Shdbr 


869 

+ 
+ 
4 
+ 
+ 
+ 

1 


82 
6 


6 

+ 


141 

+ 


31 


Hm'th. .,, 


4. 


Stewart 


+ 


SnlUran, 


+ 


1 


1 


4. 


Homner r 


4 
2 

+ 




TlptoQ 


+ 


2 


+ 


1 


Unicd 




Union. 










Ven Rnren 


4 
+ 

5 

+ 


+ 


-1- 


1 




Wsrren ■ 


4. 


Wuhinstoo 


+ 








4. 


Wftyoe 










WeakSey 


2 

+ 
+ 


+ 


1 


+ 


1 


White... 




VilHnguKTn ......... t ... - - r , t , t ,..,..,,,. , 




1 
+ 


1 


4. 


Wilson 
















Total 


640 


468 


147 


88 


183 


137 







Table 5. — Eemoglohinuric fever reported, 1916, 



Comity. 


Period. 


Cases. 


Hv^-mRn 


Thirfl quarter 




Haywood ...•«• . 
WttUev 




do." 






do 




ctoT«a.....;::L. 






Hvdmsn 


do 




l^ndfrdale 


do 











Digitized by 



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August 24, 1917 1346 

THE NOTIFIABLE DISEASES.' 

PREVALENCE DURING 19IB IN CITIES OF 10.000 TO 100,000. 

DIPHTHERIA. GONORRHEA. MALARU. MEASLES. EPIDEMIC CEREBROSPINAL MENIN- 
Gins. PELLAGRA. POLIOMYELITIS. RABIES IN MAN. RABIES IN ANIMALS. SCARLET 
FEVER. SMALLPOX. SYPHILIS. TUBERCULOSIS (PULMONARY). TUBERCULOSIS (AU 
FORMS). AND TYPHOID FEVER— CASES AND DEATHS REPORTED. INDICATED CASE 
RATES PER 1.000 POPULATION. INDICATED FATALITY RATES PER 1QN» CASES. 

Pursuant to the practice which has been carried out for a number of 
years, a schedule, of which a reproduction appears on page 1347, was 
sent on January 15, 1917, to the health officers of cities of the United 
States having a population of over 10,000, according to the census of 
1910. With the schedule was sent a letter which is also reproduced. 
The data of the prevalence of disease contained in the following tables 
have been compiled from the schedules returned by the municipal 
health departments. While not all of the cities returned the schedules 
it will be noted that practically all of those with active health depart- 
ments have done so. 

The absence of figures in the "deaths*' column in the tables may 
mean that no deaths occurred, or that the data as to deaths were not 
furnished by the health department having jurisdiction. 

It will be noted that some of the cities are apparently much more 
successful in obtaining reports of notifiable diseases than are others. 
This may be due to the greater activity of their health departments 
or to a greater interest in the public welfare on the part of the prac- 
ticing physicians. The completeness of the notification of disease 
may be taken as a fairly dependable index of the efliciency of the 
health department and of the sanitary knowledge and training of its 
personnel. 

To so great an extent is this true that the small number of cases 
reported in some cities indicates grossly incomplete reporting of cases 
and defective health administration, and not an actual freedom from 
disease. 

Another interesting point brought out in the tables is the illustration 
of the extent to which the prevalence of disease may vary without 
being manifest in the death rate. According to the typhoid table on 
page 1374 Elgin, III., had 4 registered deaths from typhoid fever and 

1 In studying these tables it should be kept in mind that a relatively large number of reported cases of 
a communicable disease, as indfc-ited by a high case rate (and more especially when accompanied by ft 
relatively small number of deaths, as indicated by a low fatality rate), usually means that the health 
department of that city is active, and that the cases of the disease are being properly reported by the pno* 
ticing physicians. It does not necessarily mean that the disease fs more prevalent in that city than in 
other cities. A high fatality rate may mean that the disease was imusually virulent In a city, that tlw 
physicians did not treat the disease in that city with the success usual elsewhere, or that the practicing 
pkj'slcians did not report all of their cases to the health department. On the other hand, an unusually 
low fatality rate may be due to the fact that the disease in the city was unusually mild, that the physicians 
treated It with unusual success, that the practicing phjrsicians reported their cases satislactorily, or that 
the registration of deaths was incomplete, or the assignment of the causes of death inaocoratt. 



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1347 



Aiicn8t24.181T 



218 reported cases. Hazleton, Pa., had the same number of deaths 
but only 13 cases. With the same number of deaths, Elgin had over ' 
16 times as many cases as had Hazleton. Both have approximately 
the same estimated population, a little over 28,000. Tlie one, how- 
ever, had an indicate case rate of 7.7 and the other a rate of less than 
0.5. So far as known, the cases were as completely reported in one 
commimity as in the other. 

Another striking illustration of the difficulties frequently met in 
using the number of registered deaths as an index of the prevalence 
of a disease is to be foimd in the smallpox table. Newcastle, Pa., had 
two deaths from smallpox. EvansvUle, Ind., had none. Neverthe- 
less, there were 153 cases of smallpox reported in Evansville, while 
there were only two cases in Newcastle. 

Reproduction of Schedule sent to Cities. 

ANNUAL MORBIDITT AND IfOBTALTTT SUMMABT. 

City of , State of 



NoTE.—In tliis blank the number of reported cases should be filled in of only those diseases that havt 
been made notifiaUe by law, ordinance, or regulation. Known prevalence of other diseases can be noted 
on a separate memorandum. 

The numbers of fatal cases (deaths) registered should be filled in for all the diseases Ibted, excepting 
gonorrhea and syphilis. 

A lettered death of a case not previously reported is to the health department and the epidemiologist 
simply a delayed report of a case and should be considered as a case as well as a death and included in the 
cises recorded in this report. 

Note with a star (*) tlie olBcialiy notifiable diseases 6/ which the cases are known not to be satisfactorily 
reported. 



Diseases. 



Calendar year 1916. 



Cases 
reported. 



Deaths 
registered. 



Do not use 
this column. 



Diphtheria 

G<morTbea 

Vahria 

Measles 

If eiingitis (epidemic cerel)rospinal) . 

Pellagra 

Poliimvelitis (bifantile paralysis) . . . 

Ilables (in man) 

Kabies (in animals) 

Scarlet fever 

&nallpox 

SvDhilis .'. 

Tttberculosis (pulmonary) 

Tuberculosis (all forms) 

Typhoid fever 



I 



I certify that the foregoing statement is made up from the official records of the 

dty of and that the number of cases and deaths corresjwnd 

therewith. 

(Date). 

, Health Officer, 

, RegUtrar. 

To the Surgeon Gbneral, 

United 8uuei Public Health Service, Waehington, D. C, 



Digitized by 



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Aagost 24, 1917 



1348 






Treasury Departmentt, 
Bureau of the Public Health Service, 

Washington. 
Dear Sir: It is desired to ascertain the reported prevalence of certain diseases 
during the calendar year 1916. 

For this purpose there is inclosed a blank, and it will be appreciated if you wiB 
kindly have it filled in with the information for your city and returned in one of the 
inclosed enveloi>es. 

As the blank calls for a statement of the deaths registered, as well as of the cases 
notified, space has been provided that both the registrar and the health officer may 
sign the report. In those cities where the health officer is also registrar he should sign 
in each capacity. 

You will find also inclosed a separate blank prepared for data regarding the number 
of cases of leprosy in your city. It is desired that special care be taken in the filling 
out of this blank so that a complete census of the lepers in the country may be obtained. 
Very truly yours, 

Rupert Blue, 
Surgeon General, 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916. 



DIPHTHERU.i 



City. 



Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1916. 



Cases 
report- 
ed 



Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 



Cases 

report- 
ed per 
1,000 
inhabit- 
ants. 



Indi- 
cated 

fatality 

rate 
per 100 



From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants: 

Atlantic City, N.J 

Augusta, Oa 

Bayonne, N. J 

Berkeley , Cal 

Binghamton, N. Y 

Brockton, Mass 

Canton, Ohio 

Covington. Ky 

Dululh, Minn 

Elizabeth, N. J 

El Paso, Tex 

Erie, Pa 

Evansville, Ind 

Flint. Mich 

Fort WajTio. Ind 

Harrisburg, Pa 

Hoboken.N.J 

Holyoke, Mdss 

Lancaster, Pa 

Maiden, Mass •. 

Manchester, N. H 

Mobile, Ala 

New Britain, Conn 

Oklahoma City, Okla 

Passaic.N.J 

Pawlucket, R. I 

Portland, Me 

Rockford,IH 

Saginaw, Mich 

St. Joseph, Mo 

San Diego, Cal 

Schenectady, N. Y 

Somerville, Biass 

Tampa, Fla 

Troy, N. Y. 



Utica.N. Y. 
Wichita, Kans.. 



Wilkes-6arrc. Pa 

Yonkcrs,N. Y 

York, Pa 

From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants: 

Alameda, Cal 

Aurora, IIL 

Austin, Tex 

Battle Creek, Mich 

Bay City, Mich 



57,660 
50,245 
69,895 
57,653 
53,973 
67,449 
60,852 
57, 144 
94,495 
86,690 
63,705 
75,195 
76,078 
54,772 
76,183 
72,015 
77,214 
65,286 
50,853 
51,155 
78,283 
58,221 
63,794 
92,943 
71,744 
69,411 
63,867 
55,185 
55,642 
85,236 
53,330 
99, 519 
87,039 
53,S.H6 
77,916 
85,692 
70,722 
76,776 
99,838 
51,656 

27,732 
34,204 
34,814 
29,480 
47,948 



41 

22 

104 

30 

357 

161 

117 

88 

111 

343 

80 

116 

153 

144 

28 

124 

248 

85 

79 

173 

82 

21 

60 

47 

137 

162 

133 

67 

77 

100 

128 

113 

159 

92 

72 

86 

47 

138 

166 

71 

26 
45 
07 
27 
79 



11 

1 

11 
15 
11 

8 
11 

9 

1 

8 

3 I 
12 1 
• 10 

8 

1 

6 
15 

8 

8 
21 

1 
10 

5 

8 

6 
14 

3 



0.711 
.438 
1.488 
.520 
6.614 
2.387 
1.923 
1.540 
1.175 
3.957 
1.255 
1.543 
2.011 
2.629 
.368 
1.722 
3.212 
1.302 
1.553 
3.382 
1.047 
.361 
.929 
.506 
1.^10 
2.727 
2.062 
1.033 
1.384 
1.173 
2.400 
1.135 
1.827 
1.707 
.924 
1.004 
.665 
1.797 
1.663 
1.374 



1.316 
1.925 
.916 
1.648 



9.76 
4.55 



10.00 

11.48 
3.73 

12.82 
4.65 
7.21 
7.29 

90.00 
5.17 



7.64 
8.57 
8.87 
6.05 
12.94 

iai3 

6.36 

10.98 
4.70 

16.00 
6.3S 
8.75 
9.88 
6.02 
1.75 
7.79 

15.00 
6. 25 
7.08 

13.21 
1.09 

13.89 
5.81 

17.02 
4.35 
8.43 
4.23 

3.85 

*i6.'4S 

"7.W 



^ Cities in which no cases of this disease were reported are not Included in this table. 



1349 



August 24, 191T 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR ISlS-Contmued. 
DIPHTHERIA— Continaed. 



aty. 


EBtimatfid 
populo- 

Urn July 
1, 1916, 


Casps 
rejxjTt- 


reKis- 
tPre<J. 


rcporl- 
1,0(X> 
ant^. i 


rated 
fftluUty 

rate 
period 


From 25,000 to 50.<X)3 lnhabH4«it5— Continued. 


32,9SS 
33,846 
32,730 
25,030 
37,308 
25,636 
46,192 
27,386 
34,611 
31.484 
25,987 
26,074 
32,261 
48.811 
39,631 
39,873 
42,458 
28,203 
28,591 
39,235 
41,781 
29,353 
40,496 
26,171 
48,477 
28,491 
35,363 
29,737 
4S,S86 
31,576 
26,771 
38,676 
31,677 
40,498 
27,809 
41,097 
46,515 
27,587 
36,964 
32,940 
30,699 
47,521 
26,234 
27,451 
26,318 
37,fX)9 
25,424 
26, KX) 
41,133 
31,927 
30, 108 
37, T.VJ 
43,715 
37,353 
31,401 
26,654 
31,404 
33,080 
36,065 
41,185 
3S,f)29 
36. 79H 
38, 136 
43,284 
2S.92(3 
48,562 
38,902 
27,415 
46,226 
36.283 


2 
1 

26 
4 

19 
66 
58 
15 

131 
14 
35 
57 
17 
33 
43 
8 
64 
9 
38 
9« 

197 
20 
37 
37 

169 
69 
75 
67 
29 
71 
38 
35 

126 
79 
8 

195 

100 
27 
48 
28 
19 

211 
34 
26 
35 
36 
21 
6 
39 
33 

106 
53 
46 

107 
88 
23 
47 
97 
9 

130 
.•yi 
45 
CO 

no7 

37 
47 
»68 
51 
70 
31 


1 

........ 

5 
4 

2 

1 

6' 

2 

1 

h' 

9' 

1 

22 
2 

1 
2 

14 
3 

7 
3 

io" 

4 

12 

3 
1 
3 

6 

2" 

i3* 

1 

1 
3 

1 
1 

2* 

2 

6 
3 
1 

10 

11 

1 

2 

4 

5' 

8 
6 
1 
7 
3 
2 
4 
4 
3 

e 


0.061 

.030 

.794 

.160 

.609 

1.755 

1.2S6 

.547 

.896 

.445 

1.347 

2.186 

.527 

.676 

1.065 

.201 

1.607 

.319 

1.329 

2.523 

4.715 

.681 

.914 

1.414 

3.486 

2.422 

2.121 

2.253 

.503 

2.249 

1.419 

.905 

3.978 

1.951 

.288 

4,745 

2.150 

.979 

1.299 

.850 

.619 

4.440 

1.296 

.947 

1.330 

.973 

.820 

.230 

.918 

1.034 

3.521 

1.404 

1. 052 

2.865 

2.802 

.863 

1.497 

2.932 

.2:-o 

3.302 
1. 372 
1.223 
1.573 
2.472 
1.279 

.968 
1. 748 
1.858 
L5I4 

.Sfi4 


50.00 


RAMII,^trlAllO , . . 




BmnVliffe, M*MW 


3 85 


Burlington, Iowa 




Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


26.32 


Ctotral Falls, R. I 


6.06 


Chelsea, Mass 


3.45 


Clinton, Iowa 


6.67 


Columbia, S. C 


12.90 


Cooncfl Bluffs. Iowa. 




Cranston, R. l. 




Cumberland, Md 


10.53 


Danvflle,IU. 


11.76 


Davenport, Iowa 


3.03 


Decatur, ni 




Dubuque, Iowa .^ 




Bast Orange, N. J 

Elgin, nT!.. ..... 


7.81 


E^anston,Ill 


23.68 


Everett, Mass 


1.01 


Fitchburg, Mass 


11.17 


Green Bay, Wis 


10.00 


Hamilton, Ohio 


2.70 


Bammond, Ind '. ,. 


5.41 


flaverhill, \ffts« , ' , ', 


8.28 


Haxlcton,'Pa 


4.35 


Jtckson.Mich 


9.33 


Jackson, Miss 


4.48 


Kalamazoo, Mich 




Kenosha, Wis 


14.08 


Kingston, N.Y 


10.63 


KnoKvflle, Tenn 




laCrosse.Wis 


9 62 


Lansing, Mich 


3.80 


Lewfeton.Me 


12.60 


I'exington. Ky 


1.64 


Lincoto, Nebr 


6.00 


I^ong Beach. Cal 




Lorain. Ohio 




Lynchburg. Va '.. 


7.14 


Madison, Wis 




McKeesnort, Pa 


6.16 


Medfard.Mass 


2.94 


Moline,Ill 


3.85 


Montolalr. N. J 

Mount Vernon, N. Y 


8.57 
2.78 


Muncie.Ind... 


4.76 


Muskegon, Mich 




Newcastle. Pa 


5.13 


Kevrport, Ky 


6.06 


JJewport.R.I 

NewRochelle, N. Y 


5.66 
5. 66 


Newton, Mas 


2.17 


Niagara Falls. N. Y 


9.35 


Norristown, Pa 


12.50 


or^pnrkJu. :::::::::.::::::;:::::::::::::::::::::;: 


4.36 


Oriieij. I'ta^ 


4.26 


Omngt, N.J 


4.12 


S^^Kw^j::::::::::;:::::::::::::::::;:::::::::::: 




PfTtli Ainl.r.', N. J 

Pnt5{i6iu, M^ ; 


3.68 
15.09 


Sq1W7,113 . 


13.33 


gtiincy.MMi ! 


1.07 


lawaKva.: ::;v;;: 


6.54 


f«kJskran,rii. ......... 


8.11 


l*»e«i,MiE,...:: . . 


4.26 


Steabtnvnifl, Ohio 


5.88 
7.84 


eppflrEor,Wh . 


4.S9 


Tauuujn, M iss 


19.35 



' The health olBcer states that cases arc known not to be completely reported, 



Digitized by 



f 




August 24, 1917 1350 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Oontmued. 
DIPHTEUSRIA--Continued. 



aty. 



Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1916. 



Cases 
report- 
ed. 



Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 



Cases 
report- 
ed per 
1.000 
inhaUt- 
ants. 



Indi- 
c»t«d 
fatality 

rate 
p^lOO 
cases. 



From 25,0C0 to 50,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

Tulsa, Okla 

Waltham, Mass 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Watertown. N. Y , 

WestHoboken, N. J 

■Wheeling, W. Va. 

Winston-Salem, N. C 

From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants: 

Aberdeen, Wash 

Adrian, Mich 

Albuquerque, N. Mez 

Alexandria. Va 

Alliance, Ohio 

Alton, 111 

Ann Arbor, Mich 

Appleton, wis 

Argenta, Ark 

Asbury Park, N. J 

Ashevillp. N. C ,. 

Bakersfield, Cal 

Batavia.N.Y 

Baton Kouge, La 

Bellaire^dfiio 

Beloit, Wis 

Berlin. N. H ^ 

Beverly, Mass 

Billings, Mont 

Bloomfield, N. J 

Bluefleld, W. Va 

Bradford. Pa 

Brownsville, Tex 

Brunswick, Ga 



Burlington, Vt 

CairoTni 

Carbondale, Pa 

Champaign, lU 

Chickasha, Okla 

ChlUocothe, Ohio 

Clinton, Mass 

Coffeyville. Kans , 

Concord, N.H 

Connellsville, Pa , 

Coming, N.Y 

Cumberland, R. I 

Danville, Va 

Dover. N. H 

DuBois, Pa 

East Liverpool, Ohio. 

Eau Claire, Wis 

Elwood, Ind 

Elyria, Ohio 

Escanaba. Mich 

Eureka, Cal 

Farrcll, Pa 

Fond da Lac, Wis 

Fulton, N.Y. 

CJardner, Mass 

Grand Island, Ncl)r- . 

Granite City, III 

Grcenvillp, S. C 

Grconwicli , Conn 

Hatkensaok, N. J 

Harrison, N. J 

Hattio,>l)urK, Miss 

Helena. Mont 

Homestead, Pa 

Hornell,N. Y 

Huntington Ind 

Irunwood, Mich 

Ith-ua, N. Y 

Jackson, Tcnn 

Janesvillo, Wis 



80,575 
80,570 
S5,559 
29,804 
43,139 
43,377 
31,155 

20,334 
11,458 
14,025 
17,S46 
18,960 
22,874 
15,010 
17,834 
14,907 
14,007 
20,823 
16,874 
13,350 
17,176 
14,348 
18,072 
13,509 
21,645 
14,422 
18,466 
15,442 

» 14,544 
13,163 
10,872 
21,617 
15,794 
19,242 
14,508 
15,447 
15,470 

1 13,075 
17,548 
22,669 
15,455 
15,406 
10,848 
20,021 
13,272 
14,665 
22,586 
18,807 

» 11,028 
18,618 
15,485 
14,6S4 

» 10, 190 
21,113 
11, 90S 
17,140 
12,826 
15, 142 
18, ISl 
19. lo9 
16,045 
Hi, U50 
16, 1S2 
13,612 
22.466 
14,085 
10, 880 
14, 779 
15, 848 
17,807 
14,339 



22 
49 
23 
31 
52 
54 
128 

2 

5 
39 

6 
20 
44 
33 
10 
12 
15 
23 

8 


30 
24 
19 
15 
33 

2 
45 
36 

4 

3 

7 
73 


38 
23 

6 
15 

5 
21 
50 
15 

6 
16 
30 
19 
47 
17 
20 
11 
35 

3 

1 
10 

4 

23 
96 

3 
31 
13 
13 
15 
13 
17 

4 
30 

5 

2 
122 

5 
14 

6 



0.720 
L603 
.647 
1.037 
L205 
1.245 
4.108 

.008 

.436 

2L781 

.336 

1.055 

1.9M 

aLl1» 

.661 

.806 

L071 

L105 

.474 

.674 

1,747 

L673 

L051 

L103 

L525 

.139 

2.437 

23)1 

.275 

.238 

.644 

3.377 

.570 

1.975 

L585 

.388 

.970 

.3S3 

L197 

2.206 

.971 

.390 

1.475 

1.498 

1.432 

3.205 

.753 

L063 

.997 

L880 

.194 

.068 

.981 

.189 

L931 

5.601 

.234 

2,047 

.715 

.679 

.885 

.767 

1.031 

.294 

1.335 

.340 

.184 

1.489 

.315 

.786 

.418 



> Population Apr. 15, 1910. 

^The health omcer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1351 



August 24, 191T 



BEPOBTED PREVALENCE FOR THE TEAR 1916--Coiitinued. 
DIPHTHEBIA— Continued. 



■m. 


Estimated 
Tpopw Ga- 
llon July 
1, 10 IG. 


rflport- 
cd. 


Vmihs 1 
tared. ' 

1 


CHJ503 1 Tndi- 
rwort-l Gated 
ed ptr ffltnlity 

l^OOrj rate 
TilwiUt^ Xm 100 

tints, eases. 


Frr ' • ' " » 25.«» Inhabitants-Continued 

Johnstown, N. Y 


10,648 
14.230 
23,539 
20,930 
21,286 
12,221 

» 19, 303 
11.S38 
13,451 
19,879 
21,046 
15,395 

U2,381 
13,805 

110,365 
22,734 

U4,610 
19,sa4 
13,712 
15,310 
12,582 
IS.HIO 
15, 625 
14,110 
21,630 
13,284 
23,126 
23,629 
20,562 

122,019 
19,926 
13,768 
20,951 
22.2S6 
16,624 
13,705 
24, 101 
24.842 
18,360 
18,530 
15,605 
14,152 
18,599 
23,805 
12,837 
19,100 
17,542 
11.666 
11.000 
ll.sr.i) 
l<», 7r);{ 
23. 737 
li.sni 
20.27S 
16,9iri 
20. 193 
14.816 
14..')^ 
13.S21 
13,919 
lo, 026 
14,205 
21,365 
15,458 

J 10, 198 
13,875 
20,780 
15, 193 
13,059 
14.737 
21,«il8 
14,867 


7 
89 
38 
74 

5 
30 
70 
60 
15 

6 

6 
33 

6 
22 

3 
10 

2 
46 
25 
51 
11 
102 
45 

8 
94 
35 
34 
13 

8 

8 
14 
43 
10 
25 
25 
18 
21 
40 
18 
36 
54 
13 
23 
16 

8 
23 
30 



1 

2 
11 
21 

in 

8 
9 
12 
4 
2 
64 
27 
11 
42 
24 
21 
9 
4 

24 

5 

9 

. 15 

; 40 


1 

4" 

2. 
6 
1 
5 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 
2 

i 

1 

5* 

4 

5 

1 
1 
5 
3 
2 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 

2 

4* 

2 

3* 

2 

2 

i* 

i" 

i' 

2* 

4 
1 
4 

1 
3 

i 

■■■■■■, 

2 
1 


1 

0.667 

6.2&4 

1.614 

3.536 

.235 

2.455 

3.615 

5.068 

1.116 

.302 

.285 

2.144 

.485 

L594 

.290 

.440 

.137 

2.319 

1.823 

3.331 

.874 

6. 452 

2.880 

.567 

4.346 

2.635 

1.470 

.550 

.389 

.363 

.703 

3.123 

.477 

1.122 

L504 

L313 

.871 

1.010 

.980 

1.943 

3.460 

.919 

1.237 

.672 

.023 

1.204 

1.710 

.771 

.071 

.135 

.557 

. 8S-, 

.671 

0.395 

.531 

.594 

.269 




KankAkeo Dl . - t 


4.49 


Kaarny. K. J 

Vokomo. Ind. 


6.26 
8.11 


LaFAVGtte. Ind. 


20.00 


LaSiile, UL 


16.67 


T/ea von wnrth, Kanx 


2.86 


Lincoln, ni .'. 


6.00 


Little Falls. N. Y 


6.67 


Lockport,N. Y 


16.67 


Loeansport , Ind 


33.33 


Loot Branch, N.J 


0.06 


K %»il^tf^, ^ifh - 




Manitowoc, Wis 




llnakoto, Minn 




Ifqp^f^M ^hi" 




Maiinettft' Wis 


5a 00 


Marion. Ind 


2.17 


Marshall, T***^ . . 




Maasillon, Ohio 


9.80 


Mattoon.lil 


36.36 


Middletown, N. Y 


4.90 


Middletowii, Ohio 


2.22 


MiYf^rd, ^^<t 


12.50 


Monrssen, Va 


5.32 


Morristown.N. J 


8.67 


Nanticoko, Pa 


5.88 


New Albany, Ind 


7.09 


Newport News. Va 


12.50 


Kortn Adams, Mass 


37.50 


Norihampton! Ma<n . ... . . ... 


7.14 


North To'nawanda, N. Y 


4.65 


North VaVIttiii, Wash 


10.00 


Norwood, Ohio 




Clean, N. Y 


8.00 


Owinlnr.N. Y 




OswrgoTy, Y 


19.05 


Paducih. Ky 




Pea>>ody, Mass 


11.11 


Peekskilf, N. Y 




PhlJIipsburg, N. J 


5.56 


Plmia, Ohio 


15.38 


Pittston, Pa 




Plalnfleld. N. J 

Plattsburgh. N. Y 

Plymouth, Pa 


'"8*76 


Pontlac, Mich 




Portsmouth, N. H 


11.11 


R«dlaads,Cal 




Reno. Nov 




Rive^sid^Cal 




Rome, N. Y 


4.76 


Rntland.Vt 




Salem, Oreg 




San nemardino, Cal 




fiazidatky, Ohio 




Santa Barbara, Cal 


25.00 


SanUCnu, ral 


.137 


Saratoga Springs, N. Y 


4.631 
1.940 

.704 
2.957 
1.123 
1.358 

.88-3 


3.13 


Sault St. Marie, Mich 


14.81 


Behna. Ala 


9.03 


Boathnridge, Mass 


9.52 


Spartanbwg, 8. C 

Steelton, Pa 


4.17 
11.29 


Stillwater, Minn, 




Trinidad, Colo 


.288 , 25.00 


Uniontown, Pa. v 


1.1.% 1 


Virginia, Minn 


.320 1 


Warren, Ohio , 


.089 
1.018 
1.850 
3.632 


33.33 


Warren, I*a 


6.67 


Washinf ton, Pa 


5.00 


Watertown. Ma»a. 


1.85 



»Population Apr. 15, 1910. 



Digitized by 



Google 



August 24, 1917 



1352 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 191^— Continued, 
DIPHTHERIA— Continued. 



aiy. 


Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, mt. 


Cases 
report- 
ed. 


Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 


Cases 1 Todi- 
rep(*rt- 1 catrf 
ed per 1 faUlitT 

1,000 nu* 
inhabit- prr MO 

ants. 1 ctet 


From 10.000 to 25.000 inhabitants— Continued. 

WauKegan, 111 


20,244 
19,239 
13,210 
13,176 
18.391 
18,773 
13,550 
22,465 
» 18. 583 
12.092 
15,860 


13 
10 
44 

7 
18 
72 
48 
45 
19 
11 
47 


i 

5 

2 

2 
2 

6 


aM2 


Wausau, \^l8 


.5»' 


Webster, Mass 


3.331 


West Chester, Pa 


.531 • 14* 


Westfleld, Mass 


.»7» 1 r.Ti 


West New York, N. J 


zms, ... 


Ww!t Orftnge, N.J 


a 542 > i 17 


White I'lains, N. Y 


2.003 l«4 


Wlnonn. Minn 


1.022 las 


Winthrop. Mass 


.«7 .... 


"Wobum, Mass 


2.iH3 j ItLM 







GONORRHEA.* 



MALARU.S 



From 50,000 to 100,000 Inhabitants: 

Berkeley. Cal 


57, «3 
00,852 
63,7«4 
8'i,23« 
99.838 

47.942 
25,030 
37,308 
27,380 
31.484 
48,811 
39.873 
2fl.l71 
29.737 
48,880 
41,007 
30,961 
2«,3I8 
31,927 
38,902 
35,559 

14.318 

in,4fA 

15,794 
15,470 

22. :m 

14,fi84 
20,030 
21, (M« 
l.S,395 
15.310 
15,r,25 
22,2Vi 
14.152 
20.1<« 

n,avj 


•67 

»1 

6 

>34 
12 

10 
78 

7 

23 
•1 
139 
88 
•7 
752 
53 

3 
13 

n 

30 
•1 

56 

5 

1 

47 

•5 

13 




.016 
.113 




Canton, Ohio 




New Britain. C'Onn 




St. Joseph. Mo. 


....:::: :m2 




YonkersTN. Y 




.130 

.309 
3.116 




From 25,000 to 50,000 InhaUtants: 

Bay City, Mich. 




BurlixLnon, Iowa 




Cedar Kaoids. Iowa 


.1S8' 


Clinton, Iowa. 


MO 1 


Council Bluffs, Iowa 


032 ' 


Davenport, Iowa 


2! 848 1 


Dubuque, Iowa ." 


.953 1 




.267 


Jackson, Mis 


35.2SM 


Kalamaioo, Mich. 


1.0H4 ; 


Lexington, Ky 


.049 ' 


Lorain, Ohio 


452 ' 


Montclalr, N. J 

Newport, Ky 


.418 

.940 ■ 


San Jose, Cal 


.0» 
1,575 

.349 
.054 
3.9T6 
.323 

.576 
L022 
.191 
.0B5 




Waterloo, Iowa. 




From 10,000 to 25.000 Inhabitants: 

Bellalre, Ohio 




Bloomfteld, N. J 




Cairo, III 




Chllhcothe, Ohio 




East Liverpool, Ohio 




Eureka, Cal 


15 1 

•4 1 

•2] 

•3 ::::::: 

•8 

6 

5 




Kokomo, Ind 




LoRansport, Ind 




Long Branch, N.J 

Massillon, Ohio 


.195 

.361 1 


Middle town. Ohio 


l.l.V> 


Norwood . <^)nio 


1.077 - -- 


ri<pift, Ohio 


.565 . 
.297' 




Pan<I tLsk y, ( )hio 




War rt 11, Ohio 











From rjn.oiY) to 100,000 inhabitants: 

|i<rtoIrv, ( al 


57,653 
86,090 
7o,195 
77,214 
&H,22l 
53, 7W 
71,744 


16 

1 
1 
4 
122 
2 
9 


i5 


0.989 
.013 
.013 
.033 
.37» 
017 
'125 




I.'./ulHlh, N. J 

Kr;..ra 




llol oken. N. J 

M<.biIo, Ma 


* ■«.» 


N«*w MriJain. t'onn 

ra>^.i»c. N. J 





' roTiuIatlon Apr. 15, 1910. 

-Cilio"* in which no cases of thb' disease were reported are not included In thU tal4#> 

>The health ofhcer sutes that cases are known not to be compIet«ly reported. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1353 



August 24, 1917 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 191G— Continued. 
MALAHU-Continued. 



aty. 



Estimatod 
popula- 

tioD July 
1, 1916. 



CasM 
report- 
ed. 



Deaths 
regia- 
tered. 



inhabit- per 100 
cnts. cases. 



Cases 
report- 
ed per 
1.000 



Indl- 
cated 
fatality 
rate 



From 50^000 to 100,000 tnhabitants— Continued. 

Tmrnpa^Pla 

Wiehlta, Kans 

Yonkcrs^N.Y 

From aMQBD to 50,000 inhabitants: 

Chelmo,Mass 

East Orann, N.J , 

EventtrWash 

HawMULMass , 

JaoksoQ, Miss 

Lone Beach, Cal 

Montflteh'.N.J 

'H^mtmk.ibm 

Oranffp. N. J , 

Pertti Amboy, N. J 

Taunlon, Mass , 

WaUkara Mass 

Wimtoo-Salcm, N.C 

From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants: 

AalWTiDe.N.C 

Bakeraflt]d,Cal 

BtoomlMd,N.J 

CoOeTTine, Kans 

Saatlirerpoo), Ohio. 

OreiOTille, S. C 

Greenwich, Conn 

Hackensack, N. J 

Hattie8burg,Miss 

Kearny, N.J 

Newport News, Va 

Flalnfleid, N. J 

Ran Bernardino, Cal 

Sania Barbara, Cal 

Seliaa,AU 

Waleriown, Mass 

West Chester, Fa 



63,886 
70,722 
00,838 

46,ltt 
42,458 
35,486 
4K,477 
29,737 
27,587 
26,318 
43,716 
33,080 
41,185 
36,2S3 
30,570 
31,156 

20,K23 
16.874 
18,466 
17,548 
22.586 
18. 181 
19.159 
16.945 
16.483 
23.:>39 
20 562 
23.806 
16.»(5 
14,846 
15.626 
14,867 
13, 176 



27 


2 


3 











1 














2,137 


13 




UO 














1 








2 


122 
























12 


.....'... 






2,049 


........ 










^3 












53 


11 











0.501 


7.41 


.042 




.090 




.(M3 


saoo 


.071 




.028 




.021 




71.863 


.61 


.109 




.266 




.229 




.151 




.073 




.028 


loaoo 


.131 




.160^ 


4a 00 


6.86(r 




.415 




.05«« 




.114 




.044 




.066 




.626 




.118 




24.317 




.042 




.049 




.126 




.060 




.087 




3.392 


20.75 


.067 




.152 





MEASLES.' 



Fran 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants: 

Atlnntlr Oty, N J 


67,660 
60,895 
57.653 
53.973 
67,449 
60.852 
57. 144 
94,495 
86,600 
63.705 
75.195 
76,078 
54.772 
76,183 
72.015 
77,214 
66,286 
60.853 
61. 1.S5 
78,283 
58,221 
63,794 
92,943 
71,744 
50,411 
63,887 
65,185 
65,642 
85,236 


206 

281 

12 

751 

2,235 
130 
310 

1.307 
357 
239 

2,317 
37 
771 

1,881 

2.530 
510 
400 

1.663 
231 

1,101 
»5 

1,270 
232 
574 
1106 
306 
863 

1.017 
385 


11 
24 
5 
3 

7 
10 

8 
20 

7" 

1 
21 
3 

3' 

19 

4 

9' 

4 
3 

2 


3.607 

4.020 

.280 

13.914 

33.136 
2.136 
5.425 

13.831 
4.118 
3.752 

30.813 

.486 

4.131 

24.691 

35.132 
6.G05 
6.127 

32.702 
4.516 

14.061 
.0»^ 

23.009 
2.496 
8.001 
1.818 
4.791 

15.63^ 

18.278 




Bayonne, N^ J 




Berkeley, Cal 




Bingt^mntnn, NY 


1.46 


BroclctoD. Mass 


1.07 


Canton, Ohio , 


3.85 


Ctjiyrinrtetn Ky 


.97 


Doloth.Minn 


.54 


IQii^bf ih N- J 


2.80 


El Paso, Tex 


3.35 


Erie, I^ 


.86 


l?T|iiv?vill*», Tnd 




Flint, Mich 


.90 


Fort wa3me,lnd 


.05 


HaiiisbarF, Pa 


.83 


Hoboken, N. J 


.57 


Holyoke, Mass 




I^mflistpr, Pa 


.18 


VftldAn lliUM , . 




Man^liMtAr N. H 


1 73 


Mobile, Ala. 




New Britain. Ccnn . . , , , . . . , , , , , 


* .31 


Oklahoma C(ty. Okla.i '.'. 




Passaic, N.J... 

Pawtuckct, R. I 

Portland. Me 


1.67 

3.70 

.65 


Rockfortf.ni 




fterinAw/Mirb... 


.20 


8t: Joseph, Mo 


1.81 



> The health officer states that cases are known not to bo completely reported. 

* Cltios in which no cases of this disease were reported are not included in this tabl«. 



98 



Digitized by 




August 24, 1917 1354 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Contmxied. 
M E ASLES— ContimMd. 






aty. 


Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1916, 


Cases 
report- 
ed. 


Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 


Cases 
report- 
ed per 
1,000 
inhabit- 
ants. 


Indi- 
cated 
fatality 

rat* 
per 100 
cases. 


From £0,000 to 100,000 Inhabitants— Conntinucd. 

San Piceo. ("al 


53.330 
99.519 
87. (m 

77,916 
85.692 
70.?22 
76,776 
99,838 
61,656 

27,732 
29,480 
47, MS 
32,985 
33,846 
32,730 
25,636 
46,ld2 
34,611 
31,484 
25,987 
26,074 
32,261 
48,811 
39,031 
39,873 
42,458 
28,203 
28,591 
39,235 
35,486 
41,781 
29,3,53 
• 40,496 
26,171 
48,477 
28,491 
35,363 
29,737 
48,886 
31,. 576 
20,771 
38,676 
31,677 
40,498 
27,.<«9 
41,097 
46,515 
27,. 587 
36,964 
32,940 
30,699 
47,521 
26,234 
27,451 
26,318 
37,009 
25,424 
26,100 
4i;i33 
30,108 
37,759 
43,715 
37,353 
31,401 
26,6^ 
31,104 
33,0.*^0 
36,065 
41,185 
38,629 


817 
259 
119 
22 
28.3 

1,640 
lOS 
200 
785 

1,345 

20 

582 

355 

9i 

10 

»121 

45 

250 

»180 

M6 

20 

1,125 

2,211 

2 

956 

150 

654 

00 

55 

58 

176 

678 

40 

683 

296 

123 

71 

1,003 

58 

160 

853 

15 

625 

82 

100 

3 

• 186 

101 

8 

307 

1,539 

177 

1,467 

89 

10 

399 

239 

>733 

84 

525 

'207 

la-) 

'433 
1,506 
613 
100 
575 
78,-> 
182 
21 
16 


1 
2. 
2 


15.320 
2.«03 
1.367 


.13 


Schoncctsuh N. Y 


.77 


Sonicrvillo,Ma.ss 


1.® 


Tanipn, Fla 


1 .408 




Trov.N. Y 


1 
11 

1 

6 
11 


3.632 
19.138 
1JI27 
J. 685 
7.96S 
25.909 

.721 


.55 


Utica.N. Y ; 


.67 


Wichita. Kans . 




Wilkes 15arre. Pa 


.55 


Yonkers.N. Y 

York. I'a 


.64 
82 


From 23,000 to 50,000 inhahilanls: 

Alameda, Cal 




Battle Croek. Mich 


2 i 19.742 
15 1 7.-405 


.34 


Rftvritv,Mich 


4.23 


Bellinjrham , Wiush 


2 

1 

i' 

4 

5' 

3' 

i* 

3' 

2 

2' 

4" 

i* 

1 

3' 

4* 

2 

4 

i' 

i* 

3 

1 

i" 

22 

1 

5* 

13 

1 
1 


2. SOT 
.295 
3.607 
1.755 
5.412 
6.201 
1.461 
.770 

43.146 

68.535 
.041 

24.123 
S.988 

15.403 
3.191 
1.934 
1.478 
4.032 

13.834 
1.363 

14.300 

11.310 
2.537 
2.492 

28.363 
1.950 
3.273 

27.014 
.560 

16.160 
2.589 
2.469 
.108 
4.526 
2.279 
.290 
8.305 

46.721 
6.766 

30. sn 

3.393 

.364 

15.161 
6.458 

28.831 
3.218 

12.763 
6.875 
2.781 
9.905 

40.318 

19.522 
3.752 

18.310 

23.730 

6.046 

.510 

.414 




Boise, Idaho .^ ,.. 




Brook] in e , Mass 




Central Falls, K. I 

Chelsea. Mass 


SO 


Colranbia.S. C 

CduBcll Bluffs, Iowa . 


.« 


Cranston, R. I '..!.. .1.1. 1 

Cumberland , Md 


.09 


Danville, ni ! !!!..;M.! 


.IS 


Davenport , Iowa 




Decatur, 111 


.a 


Dubuque, Iowa 




East Orange, N. J 

Elgin, III 


.46 


Evanston,IU 


1.82 


Everett, Mass li* 




Everett, Wash 




Fit<5hburg, Mass 




Green Bay, Wis 




Hamilton, Ohio I.!;;!*'!"*.!.... 


.51 


Hammond. Ind 


.(S 


Haverhill, Mass 




Hazleton.Pa 


2.82 


Jackson, Mich 




Jackson, Miss 




Kalamazoo, Mich '. '. 




Kenosha, Wis 


.47 


Kingston, N.Y !..!'.'!..*".'!! 




Knoxville, Tenn 




La Crosse, Wis.- WV 


*' i.22 


Lansing, Mich 


1.00 


Lewiston,Me .......'.' '. 




Lexington , Ky 


1.61 


Lincoln, Nebr 




Long Beach, Cal ',.[... 




Lorain, Ohio 




Lynch Dure? Va .1... 


*" .26 


M'adison, Wis [ 


1.13 


McKeesport , I'a 


.27 


Medford.Mass 




• Moline,Ill 




Montclair.N.J 

Mount Vernon, N. Y 

Muncie, Ind 


.42 


Muskegon, Mich 


l.W 


New Castle, I*a 


.57 


Newport. K.I ',.'.'.'/.'." 

New Kochelle. N. Y 

Newton, Mass 


.48 
.'23 


Niagara Falls, N. Y 


1.46 


Norristown , I'a 


.16 


Oak Park, 111 :.*;; 




Ogdon,Utah 


87 


Orange. N. J ',.'" 


1.66 


Oshkosh,Wis 


S 


Perth Ambov. N. J [," 

Plttsfield.M^ 


4.78 



J The health officer states that cases arc known not to be completely reported. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1355 Auga8t24. 1917 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 191&— Continued. 
MEASLE&-Coz.tiiiued. 



aty. 


Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1916. 


Cases 
report- 
ed. 


Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 

• 


Cases 
report- 
ed per 

1,000 
nl-' It 
ants. 


Indi- 
cated 
fatality 

rate 
per 100 
cases. 


From 25,000 to 50,000 inliabitants-Continiied. 

QuincY.ni 


36,798 
38,136 
43,284 
28,926 
48,562 
38,902 
27,445 
46,226 
36,283 
30,575 
30,570 
35,559 
29,804 
43,139 
43,377 
31,155 

20,334 
11,458 
14,025 
17,846 
18,960 
22,874 
15,010 
17,834 
14,007 
16,874 
13,350 
14,348 
18,072 
13,599 
21,645 
14,422 
18,466 
15,442 

» 14,544 
13,163 
10,872 
21,617 
15,794 
19,242 
14,508 
15,470 

113,075 
17,548 
22,609 
15,455 
15,406 
10,848 
20,021 
13,272 
14,665 
20,743 
22,586 
18,807 

« 11, 028 
18,618 
15,485 
14,684 

« 10, 190 
11,908 
17, 140 
15,142 
18,181 
19,159 
16,945 
16,950 
16,482 
13,612 
22,466 


805 

91 

1585 

23 

142 

»7 

328 

157 

155 

69 

53 

315 

813 

65 

1,404 

706 

3 
2,218 

40 

3 

155 

283 

11 

20 

35 

283 

9 

184 

62 
187 

35 
241 
162 

46 

80 
158 
UO 
422 

45 
190 

44 
234 

81 

91 
382 
326 
370 

15 
346 

81 

236 

1281 

73 
1351 

86 
127 
166 

24 
266 

23 
456 

21 
1304 

46 

774 

1178 

21 

20 
215 


2 

h' 

7' 

4 

1 
1 
1 

7' 

9* 

• 

i' 

2" 

6 

i* 

4 

2 

i' 

2 

i' 

8' 

i* 

2" 

8* 

1 

3* 

9 

i* 

2' 

6" 

i' 

1 
1 
1 

5 

i 

9 


21.876 
2.386 

13.515 

.796 

2.S84 

.180 

11.961 
3.396 
1.516 
2.257 
1.734 
&859 

27.196 
L507 

32.367 

22.661 

.096 

21.644 

2.852 

.168 

8L175 

12.372 

.733 

1.121 

2.499 

16.771 
.674 

12L824 
3.431 
0.396 
6.617 

16.711 
8.773 
2.979 
6.501 
4.406 
.920 

19.522 
2.849 
9.874 
3.033 

15.126 
6.195 
5.186 

16.851 

21.093 

24.017 
.461 

17.282 
6.103 

16.093 

13.547 
3.232 

18.663 
7.798 
6.821 

ia720 
1.634 

26.104 
1.931 

26.604 
1.387 

16.721 
2.401 

45.677 

ia501 
1.27i 
1.409 
9.£7U 


25 


qnini4;i'ft'm . 






.85 


^V»^ Inland /Til .. ...... . 


SalMn, Iffum. 




San Jose, Cal 




SteobcoiTiUe.oKib *. 


2.13 
2 55 


SiqwriQr,Wis 


TfmfitoTi, Mass. 


1.82 
1.45 


Tulsa, Okla 


WftltKAm Mam . , ..... . 


L80 


Waterloo. Iowa 




Watcrtown, N. Y 


.86 


West UobokoD, N. J 




Wheeliiif;, W. Va 


64 


WinstGn-Salem, N. C 


.85 


Tnm 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants: 

AberdMm, W^h . . . . .x . .. 




Adrian, ifaoh 


.05 


Albuquerque. N. Max 




AJexaSSS.^^*. ™ 




Allianc5,oiiio.. . ; .. 


1.29 


Alton, III :::::::::;:::::.:::::::::;::;;;;::::::.. 


2.12 


AnnArhnr U^rh 




Applf'tflts ISTIs 




^sbiiry Park, N.J 

BatersO^ld, U] 




BE^rtivk. N. Y 


11 11 


lie Ikirc, Ohio .. 


2.17 


Bcioit, Wis.. 




Berlin. >5.ii 


2.30 


H*ifwly,Masa .... . . 




Binagi Moot I...;.:::::::::::::: 


.41 


BbomS^M N. J 




Bhi8feM/%.\^v:":;::::;;::::::::::;;:;;:;::::;;:: 


**'*i36 


Bfadford^Ptt. 




Bm^TiivUle, Tioc... .. . 


1.72 


Bnijuirkk, ^la. 




BurliiiiKBi, Vt 


L90 


CairoTIiJ. '. , .. 




Cftrbiind»l«, Pa, 




Chsmpaign III ;; 




Cbilifcotlie, omb 




Clbitau, Mass 




Coffcjvillp. Kaus 


'"i.io 


Cmcm^.ii. H 




CaajwH^viJlf, Fa ', 


"" .61 






i>mTiiit,va,..".."**i;";[i"i"";'"*' 


■"'i*3i 


1>0VCT,N.H.. 


1.23 


I^ubois, Fa '.'.'.'.'. ".'." 




Ihinkifk, N. Y. 


1.07 


Etot Liverpool. Ohio !....* ."* 


12.33 


Eau Claire, Wis ", 




llwood, lad 


1.16 


Elyrta, Obio... '..".'." 




Eacanaba, Mlcb 


1 20 


surntB,cai... ! !. ;;;"** 




FameU.Pa 


2.26 


FuJion, N. V. :;;: 




Qardoer, lijiai, " 


.22 


subUii cuy. Ill : ;..; 


4.76 


OfBin¥tUe,aC ; 


.33 
2.17 


BlKl[inviM%, 1^ J 


.65 


HaiT]aon,N:j :....' ::;;:: 

BattlHrtniri?, Miss 




Bti604, MiSt.i. . ...:;•• 


JkUQ 




4.19 



1 The health oflBcer states that cases are known not to ba completely reported, 
« Population Apr. 15. 1910. 



Digitized by 




August24,1917 



1356 






REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916-€oiitmiied. 
MEASLES— Continued. 



City. 


EsUmat«d 
popular 

tionJuly 
1,1916. 


Cases 
report- 
ed. 


Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 


Cases 

report- 
ed per 
1.000 
inhabit- 
ants. 


Indi- 
cated 

fatality 

rata 

per 100 

cases. 


From 10,000 to 25.000 inhabitants— Continued. 

Homell, N. Y 


14,6S5 
10,KS0 
14,779 
15, MS 
14,339 
10,648 
14,230 
23,539 
20,930 
21,286 
12,221 

« 19,363 
11,838 
13,451 
19,879 
21,046 
' 15,395 

» 12,381 
13,805 

no, 365 
22,734 

•14,610 
10,834 
15,310 
12, 582 
15,810 
15,025 
14,110 
21,630 
13,284 
17,500 
23,12'j 
23,029 
20,562 

« 22, 019 
19,926 
13,76S 
20,951 
22,280 
16,624 
13,705 
24,842 
18,360 
18,530 
14, 152 
18,599 
23,805 
12,837 
19, 100 
17,542 
11,666 
14,000 
14,860 


124 

26 

1251 

>527 

131 

37 
136 
291 
434 
25.5 
112 

30 
412 
3S8 
947 
555 
U2 
349 
180 

33 
416 
192 
180 

17 
161 

no 

288 

15 

160 

353 

437 

7 

3 

210 

217 

182 

457 

306 

059 

455 

9* 

21 
113 

16 
t52 
111 
475 
700 
177 
285 
400 

35 
9 

39 
907 
231 
499 

17 
416 

68 
1 

10 
U27 
584 
US 
4 
294 
106 

79 
491 
107 


2 

2* 

2 

i 

f 


&444 
2.3M 

16.98* 
33.253 
9.136 
3.475 
9.55T 
12.362 
20.786 
11. «W 
9.165 


LIS 


Huntington, Ind .. 




I ronwood, Mich \ 


.80 


Ithaca,N.Y 


.3S 


JanesvUlo, Wis 




Johastown, N. Y 


2.70 


Kankakee, 111 . 




Kearny, hf.j '. '.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'.'.'..'.'...'. 


.69 


Kokomo, Ind 


.23 


La Fayette, Ind 




LaSafte,Ill 




lieAvenworth, Kans 


1.85» 


Lincoln, 111 


) 3*4. S03 1 


Little Falls, N. Y 


1 t 28 S45 


.26 


Lockport.N. Y 

Lopansport, Ind 


7 


47.638 

26.371 

.779 

28,188 


.74 


l^cnc nranch .N.J 

Manistee, Mich 


2 


Is 


Manitowoc, Wis 


4* 


13.039 
3.184 

18.299 

13.142 
9.075 
LUO 

12-796 




Mankato. Minn 




Mansfield, Ohio 




Marinette, Wis 




Marion, Ind 


.56 


Massillon, Ohio 




Mattoon, 111 


2.48 


Middletown, N. Y 


i 6.958 

3 18.432 

........ 1.063 

1 7.397 

' 26.573 

11 24.971 

.303 

1 .127 

1 1 10.505 

I g.jKi; 




Middietown, Ohio 


1.04 


Milford, Mass 




Monesscn, Pa 


.63 


Morristown, N. J 




Muscatine, Iowa 


2.53 


Nanticoke, Pa 




New Albany, Ind 




Newport News Va 


.46 


North A dam s, Mass 




Northampton, Mass 


2 
6 

i' 

3 





2 

3' 

2 

1 

4' 

i' 

2 

i* 

1 


9.134 
33.193 
14.606 
29.570 
27.370 
.657 
.845 

6,155 
.864 

3.674 

5.968 
19.954 
54.530 

9.267 
ia247 
34.288 

2,600 
.606 

1.973 
38.210 
15.575 
24.608 

1.003 
20.601 

4.920 
.064 
.704 

5.944 
37.777 

L765 

.288 

14.148 

6.977 

&049 
33.318 

4.0S0 


LIO 


North Tonawanda, N. Y 


LSI 


North Yakima, Wash 




Norwood, Ohio 


.15 


Clean, N.Y 


.6S 


Osslntoe, N. Y 




Paducah, Ky 




Peabody, Mass 




Peekskm. N. Y 




Piqua, Ohio 


i'85 


Pittston, Pa !...!.!!*!!!! 




Plalnfleld, N. J 


.63 


Pittsburgh, N. Y :.,.; 


.» 


Plymouth, Pa 


.56 


Pontiac, Mich 




Portsmouth, N. H 




Redlands, Cal 




Reno, Ncv 




Riverside, Cal 




Rome.N. Y 


23,737 
14,831 
20,278 
16,945 
20,193 
13,821 
15,626 
14,205 
21,365 
15,458 
'10,198 
13,875 
20,780 
15,193 
13,059 
14.737 
21.618 




Rutland. Vt...-. 




Salem, Orcg 




San Bemarclino, Cal 




Sandusky, Ohio 




Saratoga Springs, N. Y 




Sehna.Ala [[',', 




Scuthbridge, Mass 


laoo 


Spartanburg, 8. C 




Stcelton, Pa 




Stillwater, Minn ] 




Trinidad, Colo 




Uniontown, Pa *'* 




Virginia, Minn 

Warren, Ohio 


""h» 


Warren, Pa ',.',.'.',',','.'.'.'. 


.» 


Washington, Pa 


.9S 



1 The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. 
'Population Apr. 15, 1910. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1357 



Ausuftt 24, 1917 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— (Continued. 
MEASLES— Continued. 



aty. 



rrom 10.000 to 25,000 inhibitants— Contlnaed 

Watertown, Mass 

Waukesanum 

Waioan, wis 

Webster. Man 

Wert Chester, Pa 

Wsstflekl. Mass 

West New York, N. J 

West Oranise, N. J 

White Platau, N. Y 

WtaioiM, Mtam 

Wlnthrop. Mass 

Wobnm, Mass 



Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1016. 



14,867 
20,244 
19,239 
13,210 
13,176 
18,391 
18,773 
13,550 
22,465 
1 18,583 
12,602 
15,060 



Cases 
report- 
ed. 



90 

80 
4 

51 
276 

42 
144 
285 
575 
212 
300 

55 



Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 



Cases 
report- 
ed per 
1,000 
inhabit- 
ants. 



6.054 

3.052 

.208 

3.861 

20. M7 

2.28t 

7.671 

21.033 

25.505 

11.408 

23.637 

3.444 



Indi- 
cated 
fatality 

rate 
per 100 
cases. 



6a 00 
1.96 



.70 
.70 



.33 
3.64 



MBNINOmS (EProBMIC CESEBBOSPINAL).i 



RmMimft, N J^ 


69,806 
63,073 
67,440 
04,405 
86,690 
78,078 
64,772 
77,214 
78,283 
53,704 
n,744 
50,411 
55,642 
53,330 
09,510 
87,030 
77,016 
85,692 
70,722 
00,838 

27,732 

20,480 

37,308 

25,636 

46,192 

31,484 

39,235 

41,781 

26,171 

48,477 

28,491 

48,886 

41,097 

46,515, 

36,964 

26,318 

37,003 

26,100 

41,133 

31,927 

43,715 

31,404 

33,080 

38,629 

36,798 

48,562 

38,902 

27,445 

36,283 

30,575 

43,130 

43,377 

31,155 


4 


i* 

2 

i' 

21 
2 
14 

2 

4 

1 
2 
3 
7 

5' 

1 
1 
3 

1 

i 

2 
3 
5 
3 

1 
1 

1 
1 

3* 

1 
2 
1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
7 

3' 

2 
3 

7 


a 014 

.074 
.015 
.063 
.023 
.030 
.018 








Bn?rkt4]n. Mms 




i>ilQth, Alnn 


20.00 


KKabtth, N. J . 


100.00 


STtnsville, Ind 




FUnt.Mioli 


100.00 


Boboken.N.J . 




Manrhttitcr.N. H 


.026 


100.00 


New Britain, Coon 




Pamir, N.J 


.014 
.023 
.018 
.038 
.040 
.057 
.013 
.023 
.067 
.080 

.036 




PawtockM.R. I 


100.00 


Saginaw W|ch . 




SonDiceo.Cal 


5a 00 


Schenectady, N Y ... . 




SooifliTiUe.'liass ... ... 


80.00 


TroT.N.Y 


100 00 


tJti«,N. Y 


100.00 


WlnMta, K^n3 


75 00 


Yoiilnn,N. Y 


87.50 


From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants: 

Alaoi«da,raJ 




Battle Creek, Mich - 




Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


.027 
.030 
.065 
.032 
.025 
.024 
.038 
.041 
.070 


100.00 


Cntrml l4lls, R. I 


100 00 


riielMa, Mms 


100.00 


Coundl^BIuffs, Iowa. 


100 00 


ETerett,Ma8s 




Ffk^bfirr. Kms 


10 000 


HammoncI, Ind 




BaTorhiil, kass 


50.00 


HasleCoo, Pa 


100.00 


Kafauaaxoo, Mich 




Uxincton/Ky 






uwoEtnW)^:::::;::;:;:;::::::::::;:::::::::::::::: 






Lonln,Ohio 


.027 
.076 
.054 
.077 
.024 
.004 
.023 
.064 
.030 
.052 
.027 
.041 
.026 


100.00 


Montchlr,N.J 


5a 00 


Mount Vernon, N. Y 


5a 00 


Mo^Mrao, Midi 


50.00 


NawcistVerS.;:::;::::;:::::::::: "': 




Newport, Ky ].'....'..'.'.'" 


100.00 


N«wS;'i?;j;: :::::; . ; 


100.00 


Ofden.tJtah 


100.00 


Oi«ng»,N.J *" 


100.00 


vSS^Au^ 


50.00 


QntDcy,Dl .'...;.;.".]."■■ 


10a 00 


SierafUftss:.. ..:;::..:::::::;::;: ::::::::': 


100.00 


8enJcoe,C^ 


100.00 


Steabsnrille, Ohio 




Tatmum,^^, . 


.028 
.008 
.046 




Tuiaa^fcTTr.. ............: ..:.:.::..:.:.::;;;:;:::: 


10a 00 


W«itHoboken.N. J 


10a 00 


^^»»«Hn«,W Va 




WinstooSalem, N. C 







> Population Apr. 15, lOia 

scttlis In which no oases of this disease were reported are not 



included 



jSzl^y'^oogle 



August 24, 1017 1358 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE TEAR 1916— Continued. 

MENINGITIS (EPIDEMIC CEREBROSPINAL)— Continued. 



City. 



Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1916. 



Cases 

report- 
ed. 



ants. 



Indi- 
cated 

fatality 
rate 

per 100 



From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants: 

Bellairo, < hio 

Billings, Mont 

Dloomridd, N.J 

Bluefield, W. Va 

Bradford . Va 

CHntonj Mass 

Coffevville, Kans 

Dover, N.H 

Kau Claire, Wis 

Elwood, Ind 

Eureka, Cal 

Fond da Lac. Wis 

Gardner. Mass 

Grecnnioh. Conn 

HackensAck. N. J 

Homestead. Pa 

Ironwood. Mich 

Ithaca. N.Y 

Jackson , Toon 

Leavenworth, Kans 

Lincoln, 111 

LoCkport,N. Y 

Mansfleld, Ohio w 

Morristown, N.J 

Museatine, Iowa 

Northampton, Mass 

01oan,N. Y 

Oswego, N.Y 

PhilUpsburg. N. J 

Ban Bemardmo, Cal 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y 

Southbridge, Mass 

Warren, Ohio 

Washington, Pa 

Wausau,Wis 

Wostfield , Mass , 

West New York, N. J 

White Plains, N. Y 

Winona, Mipn 



14,348 
14,422 
18,46<5 
15,442 
»14,M4 
> 13,075 

17, MS 
13,272 
18,807 

» 11,()2H 
14,681 
21,113 
17, 140 
19,15'} 
16.tM5 
22,466 
14,779 
15,84H 
17,807 

> 19,363 
11, ^S 
1£,879 
22.731 
13,2&4 
17,500 
19,926 
16,624 
24,101 
15,605 
16,945 
13,821 
14,205 
L-J.059 
21.018 
19,239 
18, 391 

18, n3 
22,465 

» 18,583 



0.140 
.347 
.182 
.130 
.344 
.076 
.057 
.075 



t 



.091 
.201 



.261 , 



.015 
.068 
.063 
.168 
.103 
.084 
.050 
.132 
.075 
.114 
.050 



.1 2.490 ; 
.064 
.351 
.072 
.070 



.046 
.156 
.019 
.107 
.089 
.054 



PELLAGRA.* 



From 50,000 to 100,000 hihabitants: 

Augusta, Ga 

Manchester, N. H 

Mobile, Ala 

Saginaw, Mich 

St. Joseph, Mo , 

Wichita, Kans 

From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants: 

Columbia, S.C , 

Jackson, Miss 

KnoxvUle. Tenn 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Long Beach, Cal 

Lynchburg, Va 

Newton, Mass 

Taunton, Mass 

Waltham.Mass 

Winston-Salem, N. C 

From 10,000 to 25,odo inhabitants: 

Albuquerque, N . Mex 

Ann Arbor, Blich 

Argenta, Ark 

Chickasfaa, Okia 

Coffeyville, Kans 



50,245 
78,283 
58,221 
55,642 
85,236 
70,722 

34,611 
29,737 
38,676 
46,515 
27,587 
32,940 
43,715 
36,283 
30,570 
31,155 

14,025 
15,010 
14,907 
15,447 
17,548 



6 

1 

21 

1 

1 

1 

7 
362 
3 
1 
1 

10 
1 
2 
2 
8 

1 

1 
5 
2 
2 



» Population Apr. 15, 1910. 

« The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely rep 

•Cities in which no cases of this disease were reported are not includea 



0.013 


100.0 


.018 


100.00 


.012 


100.00 


.014 


moo 


12.173 


4.43 


.078 




.021 


loaoo 


.036 


100. 00 


.304 


3a 00 


.023 




.055 




.065 


loaoo 


.071 




.067 


100.00 


.335 




.129 





.114 



Digitized by 



xted. 

in this table. 



Google 



1359 August 24, 191T 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continued. 
MKNINGrnS (EPIDEMIC CEREBROSPINAL)-<^ntinued. 



City. 


Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1. 1916. 


Cases 
report- 
ed. 


Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 


Cases 
report- 
ed per 
1,000 
inhabit- 
ants. 


Indi- 
cated 
fatality 

rate 
per 100 
cases. 


From 10,000 to 25flO0 inhabitants— Continued. 

DanTille,Va.\T...... 


20,021 
18,181 
16,482 
17,807 
11,838 
19.926 
16,624 
18,360 
14,846 
15,626 
21,365 


14 
»10 
191 

»10 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 

13 
31 


10 
8 


a609 
.550 
1L588 
.562 
.064 
.151 
.060 
.054 
.067 
.832 

1.451 


42.86 


0reenTille,8.C ? 

llAttiMhnT^, Mi<f9 , 


100.00 


Jtfksofi, Tenn.. . ....... x.x .... .. 


5a 00 


Lincoln; lU 


loaoo 


Northampton Ma59 . . . . 


100.00 


Clean, N.Y 


loaoo 


Pn^Kftrty Uftff, 


loaoo 


8anU Barbara, Cal 


100.00 


8elma,Ala 


53.85 


Spartanbui^, 8. C 


25.81 







POUOMYELinS (INFANTILE PABALYSIS).^ 



From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants: 
Atlantic City, N.J 

Augusta, Qa 

Bayonne, N. J 

Btnghamton, N. Y 

Brockton, Mass 

Covington. Ky 

Dnhith.Minn 

Blixabeth.N.J 

El Paso, Tex 

Erie, Pa 

Evansville, Ind 

Flint^ch 

Fort Wayno, Ind 

Hob(Aen. N.J 

Holyoke, Mass 

Lancaster, Pa 

Maklen,Wius 

Manchester, N. H 

Mobile, Ala. 

New Britain, Conn 

Oklahoma City, Okla 

PassaicN.J.. 

Pawtucket, R. I 

Portland, Me 

RocWoTd.ia 

Saginaw, Mich 

St. Joseph, Mo 

Schenectady, N. Y 

8on»ervUle,Mass 

Tampa, Fla 

Troy,li.Y 

UUca.N.Y 

Wichita, Kans 

WUkes-iarre. Pa 

YoQkers,N.Y 

, York.Pa 

Fwn* 25,000 to 50,000 Inhabitants: 

Aurf»m.nr.._. 

Batik OrwJc. Midi 



5*7 City; Ml4iV 



— I, ..riihrt 



gentn]FflJI$,li.l... 

jCiiirtfiit, IowHh 

wAmnibtg^S. C.„... 
Cfuaitoti, B>I 
Camberland, Md.... 

Syyjliejll 

™enport, lowft.... 

l't«^lMf 111 



67, 
60, 
69. 
53, 
67, 
57, 
M, 
86, 
63, 
75, 
76, 
54, 
76, 
77, 
65, 
60, 
51, 
78, 
68, 
53, 
92, 
71, 
59, 
63, 
66, 
66, 
85, 
99, 
87, 
63, 
77, 
85, 
70, 
76, 
90, 
61, 

34, 
29, 
47, 
83, 
32, 
25, 
37, 
25. 
4^, 
27, 
34, 
26, 
26. 
32, 
48, 
89, 



660 


27 


1 


0.468 


245 


2 




.040 


895 


44 




.630 


973 


7 


3 


.130 


449 


3 




.044 


144 


2 




.035 


495 


6 




.063 


690 


71 


21 


.819 


705 


6 




.078 


195 


7 




.003 


078 


7 




.002 


772 


44 


9 


.803 


183 


8 




.105 


214 


10 


4 


.130 


286 


117 


27 


1.792 


853 


21 


1 


.413 


155 


46 


12 


.899 


283 


18 


6 


.230 


221 


10 


1 


.172 


794 


28 


2 


.521 


943 


2 




.022 


744 


8 


2 


.112 


411 


13 


1 


.219 


867 


5 




.078 


185 


1 




.018 


642 


18 


3 


.323 


236 


1 




.012 


519 


10 


1 


.100 


039 


48 


9 


.551 


K86 


1 




.019 


910 


20 


2 


.257 


692 


36 


7 


.420 


722 


1 




.014 


776 


6 


1 


.078 


83S 


140 


42 


1.402 


65»; 


1 




.019 


204 


4 


1 


.117 


480 


34 


5 


1.153 


918 


25 


9 


.521 


8Jrt 


1 




.030 


73() 


21 


5 


.M2 


OSO 


3 


1 


.120 


308 


5 




.134 


636 


1 


1 


.039 


192 


8 


1 


.173 


386 


4 




.14ft 


Oil 


»2 




.058 


987 


12 




.462 


074 


5 


1 


.192 


261 


2 


1 


.092 


811 


3 


1 


.061 


631 


15 


4 


.37S 



3.70 
'4i'86 

'29.'58 

'20." 45 

'40.66 
23.08 
4.76 
26.00 
33.33 
10.00 
7.14 

25.66 
7.09 

'i6.'67 

*i6.'66 

18.75 

16.66 

19.44 

'i6.'67 
30.00 



25.00 
14.71 
36.00 

'"23.81 
33.33 

166.' 66 
12.50 



20.00 
50.00 
33.33 

2awfl7 



^ The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. 
•Cities in which no cases of this disease were reported are not Inchided in this table. 



Digitized by 



G( 



August 24, 1917 1360 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continued. 



POUOMYEUTIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS)-Conimued. 



City. 



From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

East Orange, N.J 

EIciTi, 111 

K vanslon, 111 

Everett, Ma«5S 

1- itchburg. Moss 

(ireen I'av, Wis 

llaverliiir. Moss 

Hazlet OD , 1 'a 

Jackson, Mich 

Jackson, Mis:: 

Kiilamaroo, Mich 

Keno^hn, Wis 

Kimiston, N. Y 

La C'r(^^sc. W is 

I.nn^ine, M icli 

I,e\inKt(»n, Ky 

Lincoln , Nebr". 

Lyncbbl'r^;, Vo 

Ma'iison. Wi.s 



M,: ir.jrd, Shir... 

M^iliie. U\ 

MunUliiif, N. J ».. 

Moimt %irii(Tit, N. Y 

Kew I'ftit I* , i'n 

Nc\vi!'^>tl< 1' . 1 

l^i^vr it^Mh fl N.Y 

K«?irtfm, M 

NJar^Tt 1 * : "S'. Y 

Korrlit^wu. la 

OiikFuk.111 

OranfP, N. J.. 

Oihfcwii, ^vis 

Vfrth Atnl^y, N.J 

I'ttuifleld. lift* 

Qtjiriry, iir. , 

fiuinr V( M.T w . 

kD«noki«, V(i. 

Hf^ck htand, Ul 

eUni3«M»A 

TmnJtnn, U$M» 

Tubm.Okln 

Wiath4m, Unsa 

H litwr \af\ If^Wtt 

Tft a*m«*n. S Y 

Vie0L IlDbDk«ii, N. J 

W!i««r'lluit, W. va 

Win ,N.C 

10 10 inhabitants: 

AAri.t^ 

Al»iJWid»i:t, ^ •* 

A]ipiim.wit 

A£Su^]%k,N.J 

Anlifrrfltr.N r 

li^iUvIn, N. V 

npitf.it v^u 

B»'k«U\ lfi^<t 

HlllW;i< llufit 

lUortttitlfH, N.J 

I^niniwlrk, t;a 

ftlifi*HCtr>ri, VI, 

CflfljufidJitr, I'a 

a3Ami«*i-ii. lU 

VHntmi, Wfio 

C^fk^Hl, SV It 

C<im»rU^vl[ik'K i'a 

C-ftrulnc, NY 

C^mbfTia#i<i« U.I 

IiidirJik.Va 

pmm.S U 

DtttMils,l*a 



Estimat«d 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1016. 




4?, 458 
2«.203 
28,591 
3U.23.5 
41, 7M 
29.353 
48,477 
28.491 
S5.363 
29,737 

31,576 
2fi,771 
31,677 
40,498 
41.097 
46,515 
32,940 
30.699 
47,521 
26.234 
27,451 
26,318 
37,009 
41.133 
30.108 
37,750 
43,715 
37,353 
31.401 
26.^54 
33.060 
36,065 
41.185 
38,629 
36.798 
38.136 
43.284 
28,926 
48.562 
3^>,2<^3 
30,575 
30,570 
35,559 
29,891 
43,139 
43,377 
31,155 

11,458 
17,S46 
17,S34 
14,007 
20,S2:J 
I3.:t:« 

18.072 
21.<i45 
14,422 
18, 4t'iO 
10, H72 
21,617 
19,242 
14,508 
« 13, 075 
17,548 
22,0(39 
15, 455 
15, SOtj 
10, MS 
20.021 
13,272 

n,«i«v5 



56 

2*1 
8 
27 



12 

7 
9 
1 

11 
7 
8 
4 

15 
3 
3 

20 
2 

12 

20 
4 

32 

54 
1 

13 
125 

20 
1 

19 
2 



CasM 



iBdi. 

rai«d 



^*"^ inhalil- per 108 
I anu. i»*— 



10 



82 


20 


o 








30 


10 


67 


14 


4 


1 


06 


10 


«5 




4 


1 


8 


2 


4 





1.319 , 

.on ' 

.2» 

. 21 :. 

.rs 

.24S 

.24<-. 

.2S^ . 

.034 . 

.225 

.223 

.299 . 

.12fi 

.617 

.073 

.OW . 

.007 

.»>5 . 

.253 . 

.762 

.146 . 
1.216 , 
L43) , 

.024 . 

.43J 
3. 310 . 

.458 



.075 
2.479 
.055 
.72V 
1.731 
.109 
1.731 
.116 
.138 
.165 
.110 

.(m 

.910 
.141 
.100 
.SU 
.046 
.082 

.SM 

.056 
.449 

1.856 
.144 
.IfiO 
.055 
L109 
2.080 
1.900 
.092 
.278 
.156 
.138 
.076 
.»5 
.014 
.130 
.130 

.m 

.200 
.075 
.136 



• The health officer states that cases are knomi 
•ropulalion Apr. 15, 1910. 



17.^ 

25^ 'JO 
4.'.S4 



<1 » 
42-^ 

2:^00 

3113 



23.01 



25. <« 



2107 
lh.«i) 

'.<t.QO 



ia59 

24. S9 



33. n 

/IQO 
24. :4 

'25.00 
2&.00 

•6. 07 
10 71 

90 no 

€<Kt7 

SlOO 
100. oo 



100.00 
34.02 



35.00 

anao 



00. €7 



».oo 

100.00 



iooJoo 



not to be completely reported. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1361 Aogust 24, 1917 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916 -Continued. 

POUOMYEUTIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS) -CoutJnued. 



«^ 


Eiillm«C4rd 

1, m&. 


cd. 




cA l^tT 

1 1 /f 1) 


Indl^ 
catfd 
ratailty 

rate 
per log 
caaeft. 


From irf,ooo to 2S,qoa lohabiunts-rontinuftj. 

Dunkirk, N.Y 


20,743 
22, .V% 
18,H07 
14,rj^J 

« 10, 190 
21,113 
11,908 
17, 140 
1K,1S1 
19, 159 
16,945 
16,950 
16,4S2 
14,685 
15,S4S 
10,648 
U,ZVi 
23,539 
20,930 
21.2^6 
12.221 
13, '.51 
19, S79 
21.016 
15.:^9.-» 
13,805 

I10,36.'5 
22,734 

t 14, 610 
19,834 
12,582 
15,810 
15,625 
14,110 
21,630 
13,284 
17,500 
23,126 
23,629 
20,562 

« 22, 019 
19,926 
13,768 
22,286 
13,705 
24, 101 
18,360 
18,530 
14, 152 
18,599 
23,805 
19,100 
17,542 
11,666 
14,000 
14,869 
19,763 
23,737 
14,831 
20,278 
20, 193 
14,846 
13,821 
14,205 
21,365 

no, 198 
13.059 
14,737 
14,867 
20, 244 
19,230 


16 
1 
5 
1 
1 
2 

31 
4 
5 

46 

21 

36 
4 
4 

26 

10 
3 

46 
2 
2 
6 
3 
2 
2 

25 
6 
1 
3 
3 
2 
1 

18 
1 
4 
4 
6 
2 
2 
2 
2 

38 

22 
1 
2 

23 

69 
3 

16 
2 
3 

45 
6 
9 
1 
1 
2 
4 
1 
2 
7 
1 
2 
9 
5 
1 
1 
1 

2 
3 

8 


1 
2 
2 

2 

10 

i' 

8 
4 
14 

3" 

6 
1 


.280 


16 67 


£ast Liverpool, Ohio 




Kftii ClaiT**, wis ... . . . - r 


.266 
.068 
.09S 
.095 

2.fxn 

.233 
.275 
2. 401 
1.239 
2.124 
.213 
.272 
l.(V41 


40 00 


Kiitrlrji^ f>l , . , 




FarreU/Pa .' 




Fond a« L?ir. Wis . 


100 00 


Fulton, N.Y'. 


32 26 


Gardaer. Mass . . 




Grwairille, S. C 

Greenwich, Conn 


20.00 
17 39 


Hackensark, N. J 


19 05 


Harristm, N. J 


38. S9 


Horncll,N."Y 


75 00 


Ithaca, N. Y 


23 08 


Johnstown, N.Y 


10 00 


Kankakee, III 


211 




Kearny, >/. J 

Kokomo, Ind 


11 

i* 

2 

1 
2 

1 

i' 

i' 

3 

i' 

2 

i' 

12' 

4 

1 

3 

9 
1 
2 

i2' 

2 
3 

i' 

4* 

i' 

i' 

i' 


1.95» 
.096 
.094 
.491 
.223 
.101 
.095 

1.6'24 
135 

132 
i»5 
101 
rr79 

J. 1,39 
'»4 
J83 
l85 
152 
il4 
1I86 
.'185 
197 

1.104 
.073 
.090 

1.678 

2.448 
.163 
.863 
.141 
.161 

1.890 
.262 
.513 
.086 
.071 

.ia5 

.202 
.042 
.135 
.345 
.050 
.135 
.661 
.352 
.047 
.098 
.077 
.068 
.135 
.14^ 


23.91 


La Fayette, Ind 


rx) 00 


1^ fi^ih 111 




Little Falls, N.Y 


C4\ 67 


Lockport, N. Y 


50.00 


Lqgan<tport. Ind 


100.00 


Long Branch, N.J 

MMatowoc, Wis ... 


4.00 


Mankato. Minn 




Mansfield, Ohio 




Marinette' Wis 


33.33 


Marion, Ind 




Mattoon, III 


100.00 


Middletown, N. Y 


16.67 


Middletown, Ohio 




Miltord, Mass 




Mooessen, Pa 


25.00 


Morristown,N. J 


33.33 


Muscatine, Iowa 




Nanticoke, Pa 




New Albany, Ind 


50.00 


Newport News, Va 




North Adams, Mass 


31.58 


Northampton^ Mass 


18.18 


North Ttmawanda, N. Y 


100.00 


Norwood, Ohio 




Ossinin*, N. Y 


13.04 


Oswego, N.Y 


15.25 


Peabody. Mass 


33.33 


PeekskflJ, N. Y 


12.50 


Piqua, Ohio 




mis ton, i^a ,. ......................... 




PhinfleW, N. J !!.!!"... 


28.67 


Plymouth, Pa 


40.00 


Pontiac, Mich 


33.33 


Portsmouth, N. H 




Redhmds, Cal 


100.00 


Reno, Nev 




Riverside, Cal 




Rome, N.Y 




Rutland, Vt 




BAlem Onw ^ , , ^ ^ . , ^ . . ^ 




Sandusky, Ohio 




Santa Barbara, Cal 




Saratoga Springs, N. Y 


44.44 


Sottthbridge, liass 




Spartanburg, 8. C 




StillwatAT Wfnn 




Warren, Ohio '. 


100.00 


Warren, Pa 




Watertown Mivn . ^ ^ .,.^...^... . 


m 00 


Waukegan,Ili 




Wausau. Wis 


,4H' 1? 50 



> The health officer states that cases arc known 
tpopulaUon Apr. 15, 1910. 



not to be completely repinrtwi. 



_.Goo^ 



August 24, 1917 1362 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continued. 

POLIOMYEUnS (INFANTILB PARALYSIS)— Continued. 



aty. 



Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1916. 



Oases 
report- 
ed. 



Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 



Gases 
rep«t- 

1,000 
inhabit- 
ants. 



cated 
fatality 

rate 
per 100 



From 10,000 U 25,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

Webster, Mass 

Westchester, Pa 

Westfleld, Mass 

West New York, N. J 

West Orange, N. J 

White Plains, N. Y 

Winona, Minn 

Winthrop. Mass 

Wobum,Ma8S 



13,210 
13, 176 
18,301 
18,773 
13,550 
22,465 
118,583 
12,002 
15,060 



aSTO 

.076 

.761 

2.504 

2.052 

2.003 

Z045 

.315 

.376 



7.14 



7.50 
4.44 
St5B 
25.00 



BABIBS cm MAN). 



Ann Arbor. Mich - 


15,010 
32,261 
75,105 
58,221 
21,365 






0.067 
.031 
.013 
.017 
.047 


100.00 


Danville, III 


loaoo 


Erie, Pa 


loaoo 


Mobile, Ala 


100.00 




100.00 







1 Population Apr. 15, 1910. 
RABIES (IN ANIMALS). 



City. 



Arm ArbQf, Mlch. . 

Anit^ustH, (ill 

BliicMd, W. Va.. 

Cali-O, III... 

CMekttsha, Okla. . 
rh[lUrotbfl.<>Wo.. 

Uaii^HlU!, Vfl 

Klwood, ind. 

Erie, Pa 

Everett, WiL^ih — 
HEi^fiiisaek, N.J. 
Imuwood, MKjh... 



Cases 
reported. 



City. 



Jackson, Miss 

Little Falls.N.Y 

Lockport.N.Y 

Lorain, Ohio 

NlaKara Foils, N.Y 

North Tonawanda, N. Y 

Ogden, Utah 

Saginaw, Mich 

San Diego. Cal 

Steuben viile, Ohio 

Warren, Ohio 

Warren, Pa 



Cases 
reported. 



SCARLET FEVER. I 



City. 



Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1016. 



Cases 
report- 
ed. 



Death.s 
regis- 
tered. 



C-ases 
report- 
ed per 
1,000 
inhabit- 
ants. 



Indi- 
cated 
fataUty 

raU 
per 100 



From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants: 

Atlantic Ciiy, N . J 

Augusta, Oa 

Bnyonne, N.J 

Berkeley, Cal 

Binghamton, N. Y 

Brockton, Mass 

Canton . Ohio 

Covington, Ky 

Duluth,Minn 

Elirabetb.N.J 

El Paso, Tex 

Erie, Pa 

Evansville, Ind 

FUnt.Mich 



57,660 
50,245 
60,895 
67,653 
53,973 
67,449 
60,852 
57, 144 
94,495 
86,690 
63,705 
75,195 
76,078 
54,772 



60 

6 

100 

123 

56 

70 

265 

39 

254 

207 

90 

75 

67 



* Cities in which no cases of this disease were reported are not included in4,^ tabl*. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Li 



.79 
L45 
l.ll 
1.33 



L20 



1363 



August 24, 1917 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continued. 
SCARLET FEVEB— Continuod. 



aty. 



from 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

Fort Waj-ne; Ind 

Hoboken,N. J 

Holyoke, Mass 

Lancaster. Fa 

MfUden , M ass 

Manchester, N.n 

Mobile, Ala 

Now Britain, Conn 

Oklahoma City, Okla 

Pasaaic, N. J 

Fawiucket , R. I 

Portland, Mo 

Rockford.Ill 

Sa^naw, Mich 

St. Joseph. Mo 

San Oieso.Cal 

Schenectady, N. Y 

• Somerville.Mass 

Tain pa, Fla 

Troy,N.Y 

Utica.N.Y 

Wichita, Kans 

Wilkcs-Barre 

Yonkcrs,N.Y 

Y'ork.Pa 

From 23,000 to 50,000 inhabitants: 

Alameda, Cal 

Aurora, lU 

Austin . Tex 

Battle Creek, Mich 

Bay City, Mich 

BeUin^iam, Wash 

Boise/Idabo 

Brookline, Mass 

Burlington. Iowa 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Central Falls, R. I 

Chelsea, Mass 

C1intoc,Iowa 

Columbia. S.C 

Coancil Bluffs, Iowa 

Cranston, R.I 

Cumberland, Md 

Danville, 111 

Davenport. Iowa 

Decatur, nl 

Dubiique, Iowa 

East Orange, N. J 

Elgin, ni 

Evanston.UL 

Everett, Mass 

Everett, Wash 

Fitcfaburg, Mass 

QreenBay,Wls 

Hamilton, Ohio 

Hammond, Ind 

Havertiill, Mass 

Hasleton.Pa 

Jackson, Mich 

Jackson, Miss 

Kalamazoo, Midi , ., 

Kenosha, Wis 

Kingston, N. Y 

KDoxvflle, Tenn. 



LaCroase. Wis. 
Lansing, Mich.... 
L«wl8ton,Me..... 
Lexington. Ky... 
Iii]oom,Nebr.... 
Long Beach, Cal.. 

Lorain. Ohio 

Lynchburg, Va... 



I 



Estimated , 



Cases 



1, 1916. *^^- 



7ft, 183 
77,214 
05, 2^) 

5l,i:>5 
78,283 
5S.221 
53.704 
92,*Jt;{ 
71,744 
59,411 
63,. Vm 
55, !*<.'. 
55.042 
85, XH'y 
53,330 
99,511) 
87, («9 
53, SST) 
77,'.>16 
8,=), m>2 
70. 7*22 
76,77(> 
99,838 
51,656 

27,732 
34,204 
34,814 
29,480 
47,942 
32,985 
33,846 
32,730 
25,030 
37,308 
25,636 
46,192 
27,386 
34,611 
31,484 
25,987 
26,074 
32,261 
48,811 
39,631 
39,873 
42,458 
28,203 
28,591 
39,235 
35,480 
41,781 
29,353 
40,496 
26,171 
48,477 
28,491 
35,363 
29,737 
48,886 
31,576 
26,771 
38,676 
31,677 
40,498 
27,809 
41,097 
46,515 
27,587 
36,964 
32.940 



49 
226 
154 

30 
S3 
94 
21 
25 
173 
45 
54 
.V. 
210 
201 
133 
71 
IM 
110 
51 
195 
1(W 
02 
101 
280 
32 



Denths 
rc?i-- 
tered. 



Cases 

report- 
ed per 

1,000 
inlmHt- 

ants. 



36 




101 


1 


62 




75 




53 


3 


1 




8 




71 


1 


10 




24 


3 


18 


1 


77 


1 


42 




»40 




298 


is 


55 




34 




40 


1 


206 


1 


57 


1 


70 


2 


83 


1 


29 


1 


178 


7 


81 


2 


32 


1 


62 




45 




51 


1 


72 




87 


1 


32 




282 


6 


8 




48 


3 


42 


2 


79 


1 


31 




24 




265 




20 


1 


106 


1 


121 


6 


24 




138 


2 


21 


1 



Indi- 
cated 
fatality 

rate 
per 100 
cases. 



0.643 

2. 927 

2..H59 ,. 

.5<K) |. 

1.623 I 

1.201 . 

.361 (. 

. 4*v'> ( . 

l.Htil I 

.627 1 

.909 I 

.h77 (. 

3.914 I 

3.666 I 

1.5f>0 I 

i.:yi 



2.04 
3.98 



..58 
2.22 
3.70 



.93 
1.47 
3.01 
1.41 



l.oH>i 

i.:;t,7 


1.27 
l.«)S 


i:^; 


1.85 
1.27 


1.272 


.92 


.877 


1.61 


1.316 


1.98 


2.805 


2.14 


.619 




1.298 




2.953 


.99 


1.781 




2.544 




1.100 


6.60 


.030 




.236 




2.169 


1.41 


.400 




.643 


12.60 


.702 


6.56 


1.667 


1.30 


1.534 




1.156 




9.465 


5.03 


2.116 




1.304 




1.240 


2.60 


4.220 


.49 


1.438 


1.76 


1.756 


2.86 


1.955 


1.20 


1.028 


3.45 


6.220 


3.93 


2.064 


2.47 


.902 


3.13 


1.245 




1.533 




1.259 


1.96 


2.751 




1.795 


1.15 


1.123 




7.974 


1.77 


.269 




.982 


6w25 


1.330 


4.76 


2.951 


1.27 


.802 




.758 




6.544 




.719 


6.00 


2.679 


.94 


2.601 


4.96 


.870 




3.733 


1.45 


.638 


4.76 



> The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



August 24» 1917 



1364 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continaed. 
SCABLET FEVER— Continued. 





Estimated 

t!S?July 
1, 1916. 


Caaos 

report* 

od. 


Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 


Cases 


Indl- 
eated 
Istality 

rate 
pfflOO 
cases. 


aty. 


Inhabit- 
ants. 


From 25.000 to 50,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

Madlflon Wis -. 


30,099 
47,521 
26,234 
27,451 
•26,318 
37,009 
25,424 
26,100 
41,133 
31,927 
30,108 
37,759 
43,715 
37,953 
31,401 
26,654 
31,404 
33,080 
36,065 
41,1S5 
38,029 
36,798 
38, 1.16 
43,284 
28,026 
48,562 
38,902 
27,445 
40,220 
36,283 
30,575 
SO, 570 
r5,550 
29,894 
43,139 
43,377 
31,155 

20,334 
11,458 
14,025 
17,846 
18,960 
22,874 
15,010 
17,834 
14,907 
14,007 
20,823 
16,874 
13,350 
17,178 
14,348 
18,072 
13,599 
21,645 
14,422 
18,466 
15,442 
'14,544 
21,617 
15,794 
19,242 
14,508 
15,447 
15,470 
: 13, 075 
17,548 
22,609 
15,455 
15,406 


77 

38 

48 

53 

27 

56 

112 

308 

•34 

21 

23 

72 

42 

107 

125 

50 

66 

31 

29 

7 

249 

119 

75 

36 

131 

24 

67 

47 

20 

57 

56 

5 

46 

37 

208 

20 

9 

43 

62 

22 

32 

28 

20 

6 

25 

24 

8 

24 

5 

5 

47 

3 

12 

14 

19 

5 

9 

3 

3 

50 

29 

10 

20 

38 

1 

18 
40 
18 


2 

1 
1 

i* 

6* 

i* 

i' 

3* 

i* 

1 
1 
1 

3* 

2' 

■ 1 

i' 

2 

2' 

2 

2" 

5 

i* 

i* 

;;;;;;;; 

i' 

2* 


1508 

.800 

1.830 

1.931 

1.096 

1.513 

.472 

11.600 

.817 

.658 

.764 

1.907 

.961 

.643 

.223 

4.014 

3.900 

1.511 

1.830 

.753 

1.010 

.190 

6.529 

.439 

2.503 

.741 

.797 

.874 

1.449 

1.205 

.654 

1.865 

1.575 

.167 

1.066 

.851 

6.676 

.984 

.785 

3.066 

3.474 

1.160 

1.300 

1.865 

1.121 

.402 

1.785 

1.1S3 

.474 

1.798 

.291 

.348 

2.601 

.221 

.554 

.971 

1.029 

.324 

.619 

.139 

.190 

2.598 

1.999 

.647 

1.293 

2.906 

.067 

.794 

Z588 

1.168 


100 


McKeesDort. Pa 


1» 


MAdffM-d Maas 


106 


MoIine,IU 




Montclair. N J 


3. 70 


Mt Vernon, N Y 




Mimcie.Iiia 




Muakegon, Mtch 


LOO 


New Castle. Pa ... 




NewDwt. Ky 




NewDort. R I 






L30 


Newton. Masa 




Niagara Falls, N. Y 


4.17 


Norriatown, I^a 




Oak Park, ni 


100 


Ogden, Utah 




Onnge, N.J. 


100 


Oshk<»h. Wis 


LO 


Perth Amboy, N. J 


3.23 


Pittsfield. Maes 


150 


Quincy, ill 




Quinoy, Mass 


1.20 


Roanoke, Va .... .....-- 




Rock Island, ni 


167 


Salem , l(ass'. 


17» 


Saii Jose. Cal 




Ste»ibenviIlo, Ohio 




Biiperior, Wis 


L40 


Taunton. Mass 


420 


Tulsa, Okia 




Walt ham, Ma« 


151 


Waterloo, lowo.-. 


1S7 


Watoftown, N. Y 




West Hoboken, N.J 




Wheeling, W. Va 


&41 


WInston-Salem, N. C 


1« 


From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants: 

Aberdeen- Wash 




Adrain, lilich 




Albuquerque, N. Mex 




Alexandria, v a 




Alliance, Onio 




Alton. Ill 


lis 


Ann Arbor. Mich 




Applcton, Wis 




ArKenta, Ark 




Asburv Fark, N. J 




Asheville, N. C 




Bakcrsfieid, Cal 




natavia,N.Y 

Baton Rouge, La 




Bellaire, Ohio 


20lO0 


Beloit, Wis : 




Berlin, N H 




Rcvcrlv, Mass 




BJIlhips, Mi>nt 




Bloomneld, N. J 

BIuoHold, W. Va 


"20.66 


Bradford, Pa 




Burlington, Vt 




Cairo, 111 




Carbondale, Pa 


400 


Ctmrnpalgn, III [. 




Chlckasha, OkIa 




Chiilicothe, Ohio 




Clinton, Mass 




Coffeyville, Kans 




Concord, N.H ! 




Connellsville, Pa 




Coming. N.Y 





1 The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. 
'Population, Apr. 15, 1910. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1365 



August 24, 1917 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continued. 

SCARLET FEVER— Continued. 



my. 



vmmneriand (to-wn), R. I 

DanviHe. Va ^ 

Dover, N.H 

Dubois, Pa 

Dunkirk, N.Y 

East Liverpool, Ohio 

Eau Claire, Wis 

Elwood.lnd 

Elyria, Uhio 

Escanaha, Mich 

Eurok:^, Cal.. 1 

FarrclJ-Pa 

Food du Lac, Wis 

Fulto<i,N.Y 

Gardoer, Mass 

Grand Island, Ncbr 

Graoit^ritv, lU 

Greenville, S.C 

Orecn^-ich.Conn 

Hackcnsack, N.J 

HarrBoa,N.J 

Hattieshtirg, Miss 

Helena. Mont 

Homestead, Pa 

Homcn,N.Y 

Huntington, Ind 

Ithaca, N.Y 

Jackson, Tenn 

Janesvflle, Wis 

Johnstown, N.Y 

Kankakee, 111 

Kearny, N.J 

Kokomo.Ind 

LaFaTBtte.Ixid 

Laaalle,m 

. Leavenworth, Kans 

Llnooin.111 ..• 

Little Falls, N.Y 

Lockport,N.Y 

Losansport, Ind 

Long Branch, N.J 

Manistee, Midi 

Manitowoc. Wis 

Mankato.Minn 

Mansfield, Ohio 

Marinette, Wis 

Marion, Ind 

Marshaij,Tex 

MasBillon.Ohio 

Mattoon,Ill 

Mlddl©town,N. Y 

Middletown,Ohio 

MilIord,Mass 

Mooes9en,Pa 

Morristown.N.J , 

Mnacaiine, Iowa , 

NaDticoke,Pa 

New Albany, Ind 

Newport News, Va 

North Adams, Mass 

Northampton, Mass , 

North Tonawanda, N.Y , 

North Yakima, Wash 

Norwood, Ohio 

Olean.N.Y 

Ossintog.N.Y 

Oswego. N.Y 

Paducah,Ky 

Peabody.Mass 

PeekskilI,N.Y 

Phillipsbarg,N.J 

Piqua,Ohio 

Pittston,Pa 



EsUmaicd 
popiila- 

tI«Wi Jillj 

I, m^. 



W,n4S 
20,021 
13,272 
14,665 
20,743 
22,586 
18,807 

«11,028 
18,618 
15,485 
14,684 

« 10, 190 
21, 113 
11,908 
17, 140 
12,826 
15, 142 . 
18. 181 
19,159 
16,945 
16,950 
16.4K2 
13,612 
22.466 

I4,r,8.'> 

10,S«0 
15,848 
17,807 
14,339 
10,648 
14,230 
23,539 
20.930 
21,286 
12,221 

1 19, 363 
11,838 
13,451 
19,879 
21,046 
15,395 

« 12, 381 
13,805 

•10,365 
22.734 

t 14,610 
19,834 
13,712 
16,310 
12.682 
15,810 
15,625 
14,110 
21,630 
13,284 
17,500 
23,126 
23,629 
20,562 

> 22, 019 
19,926 
13,768 
20,951 
22,286 
16,624 
13,705 
24,101 
24,842 
18,360 
18,530 
16,605 
14, 162 
18,599 



report- 
ud. 




20 
20 
10 

9 

6 

2 
18 

1 

7 
60 

3 
34 

7 
60 
30 
16 
99 
43 
44 
36 

S 

4 
20 

6 
10 
13 
61 
20 

5 
37 
17 
23 
181 
25 
15 
24 
16 
49 

2 
13 

7 

6 
53 
62 
12 

8 
16 
20 
25 

9 
19 
49 
.5 

8 
15 

5 


i 

1 

i 

3 

2 

i" 

1 

i 

"" i 

4 

'*'" "2' 



fndl- 

ralo 
perlDQ 



0.461 
.400 
.829 

3.341 

.f.20 

1.595 

1.632 

.913 

6.006 

1.090 

.393 

.521 , 

3. 107 

2. 859 

.702 

.462 ! 

1.100 

1.044 

.590 

.531 

.36* 

.147 

.801 

.068 

.643 

3.786 

.168 

2.371 

.657 

4.216 

1.274 

.764 

4.661 

3.619 

2.272 

3.041 

.505 

.201 

.950 

.390 

.808 

.942 

6.885 

L144 

1 , >4>:, 

1 . 2A\\ 

1 , rnU 

.ma 

L701 
. 740 

3.080 
.114 
.5£A 

.292 

2. 407 
3,112 

.fi73 

,718 
1.203 
LS34 

/37S 

*m5 

2.069 

Mi 
1.00 



1 The health oiBoer states that 
tpopulaUon Apr. 15, 1910. 



cases are known not to be completely feiiorfedt. 

Diciitized by Vj 



12.50 
7.14 
3.33 



4.30 
6.25 
50.00 



2.04 



5.56 



3.03 
4.65 



2.78 



2.21 



e,«: 



&ia 



s.n 



mm 



Jgle 



August 24» 1917 



1366 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— OontiDued. 
SCABLET FBTBB— Continued. 



City. 



Estimated 
popula- 

tioDjuly 
1, 1910. 



report- 
ed. 



Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 



Inhabit-* per m 
ants. 



Cases 
report- 
ed per 

1,000 



Indl. 
Citsd 

rate 



From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

Plainfleld,N.J 

Platt8burg,N.Y 

Pi ymouth . Pa 

Pontiac,Mich 

Portsmouth, N. H 

Redlands,Cal 

Reno, Nov 

Riverside.Cal 

Rome,N.Y 

Rutland, Vt 

Salem, Oreg 

San Bernardino, Cal 

Sandusky. Ohio 

Santa Barbara. Cal 

Santa Cruz, Cal.. 



Saratoga Springs, N. Y 

Sault Ste. Mtiilb, Mich 

Selma. Ala 

Southbrldge, Mass 

SOmratSrjBlnn. .*.'. *. 

Trinidad, Colo 

Uniontown, Pa 

Virginia, Minn 

Warren, Ohio 

Warren, Pa. 

Washington, Pa 

Watertown, Mass 

Waukegan,Ul 

Wau8au,wi5 

Webster, Mass 

Westchester, Pa 

Westfleld, Mass 

West New If ork, N.J 

West Orange, N.J 

White Plains, N. \ 

Winona, Minn 

Winthrop. Mass 

Wobum« Mass 



23,805 
12,837 
19,100 
17,542 
11,666 
14,000 
14,869 
19,763 
23,737 
14,831 
20,278 
16,945 
20,193 
14,846 
14,594 
13,821 
13,919 
15,626 
14,205 
21,365 

110,196 
13,875 
20,780 
15,193 
13.050 
14,737 
21,618 
14,867 
20,244 
19,239 
13,210 
13,176 
18,391 
18,773 
13,550 
22,463 

U8,583 
12.692 
15.969 



1.680 

.234 

.576 

.865 

.006 

.500 

4.035 

.455 

.379 

4.450 

.481 

1.003 

.297 

.337 

.548 

1.809 

.287 

.192 

.211 

2.940 

S.236 

2.523 

.722 

3.225 

.689 

.475 

1.627 

1.816 

1.017 

1.195 

l.OSO 

.152 

4.296 

2.034 

2.140 

.134 

.915 

1.024 

2.943 



9. OB 



L«7 



3.01 



6.01 



K» 



153 



SMALLPOX.) 



From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants: 

Augusta, Qa 

Canton, Ohio 

Covln£ton, Ky 

Dulutn, Minn 

El Paso, Tex 

Erie, Pa 

Evans vllle, Ind 

Flint JMidi 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

Oklahoma City, Okla 

Rockford,Ill 

St. Joseph, Mo 

8anDieeo.Cal 

Tampa, Fla 

WichiU, Kans 

From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants: 

Aurora, 111 

Austin, Tex 

Battle Creek, Mich 

Bay City, Mich 

BeUlngham, Wash 

BolseTxdaho 

Burlington, Iowa 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Clinton, Iowa •. 

Columblo. 8. C 

Council Bluds, Iowa. 



50,245 
60,852 
67,144 
94,495 
63,705 
75,195 
76,078 
54,772 
76,183 
92,943 
65,185 
85,236 
63,330 
63,886 
70,722 

34,204 
34,814 
29,480 
47.942 
32,985 
33,846 
25,030 
87,308 
27,386 
34,611 
81,484 



274 




5.453 


7 




.115 


5 




.087 


38 




.402 


111 


19 


1.742 


2 




.027 


153 




2.011 


19 




.347 


15 




.197 


114 




1.227 


30 




.544 


74 




.868 


6 


... . 


.094 


8 




.148 


103 




1.456 


9 




.263 


27 


3 


.776 


3 




.102 


3 




.063 


12 




.364 


1 




.030 


12 




.479 


66 




1.709 


166 




6.061 


•3 




.067 


7 




.222 



17.12 



1 Population Apr. 15, 1910. 

'•Cities In which no cases of this disease were reported are not included in this tablai 

^The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. t 

oogle 



11.11 



1867 



August 24. 1917 



BEPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 191^— Continued. 
SMALLPOX— Continued. 



CItv. 



From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants- C?ntinucd- 

Danvill<*, III 

D3v6ni>ori . Iowa , 

D€oatur. Ill 

Dubuqu*^. Iowa 

El|;ln.Ill 

FiUdiDui^, Mass 

Green Bay, Wis , 

Hamilton. Ohio 

Hammond, Ind 

Jackson, Miss.... 

Kalamazoo, Mich. , 

Knoxville, Tenn 

LaCVosse, Wis 

Lansing, Mich 

Lcxin^on, Ky 

Llnooln, Nebr 

Lon^ Beach, Cat 

Lorain, Ohio 

Madison, Wis 

MoUnc, III 

Munde, Ind 

Muskegon, Mich 

New Castfo, Pa , 

Oshkosh, Wis 

Quincy, 111 

Roanoke, Va 

Rock Island, lU 

Steubenville. Ohio 

Superior. Wis 

Tulaa,Okla. 

Waterloo, Iowa. 

Wheeling, W.Va 

Winston-Salem, N. C 

From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants: 

Aberdeen, Wash 

Adrian, Mich 

Albuquerque, N. Mex 

Alliance, Ohio 

Alton- UL 

Ann Arbor, Midi 

Appleton, Wis 

Asbury Park, N.J 

AshevUle, N. C 

Bakersfield, Cal.. 



Baton Rouge, La 

Bellaire, Ohio 

Belolt,Wi8 

Billings, Mont 

Bhiefield, W. Va 

Drowns viUe, Tex 

Brunswick, Ga , 

Qiampaign, 111 

Chickasha, Okla. 

ChiOicothe, Ohio 

Cofleyville. Kans 

Comtag,N.Y 

Danville, Va. 

East Liverpool, Ohio.. 

Eau Claire, Wis 

Elwoodjind. 

Elyria,Ohio 

Eacanaba. Mich 

Eureka. Cal 

Grand Island, Nebr... 

Granite aty, lU 

Hattiesburg, Miss 

Helena, Mont 

Janesvillo, Wis 

Kankakee, lU 

Kokomo, Ind 

LftFayette, Ind 

La Salle, III 

Leavenworth. Kans... 
Loganiport, lad 



T 






Cas-s r„,i|. 

rctorf- catod 

e.l ler f.iu.iity 

l/'X) raio 

i-)U .hit- p-rl'j) 
a-i-^- cas>-,. 



4K.^ll 

2S.'>Jt{ 
41,TSI 

40, \m 

26.171 

29.737 

4«.>K6 

38.fi7ri 

31,r,77 

40,4<»S 

41,097 

4fi, 515 

27, '^^1 

36,90^4 

30,600 

27.4*1 

25,421 

26,10) 

41,1.^3 I 

3r>.(W»-, 

30, Tn.H 

43, 2*^4 

2S, 926 

27,445 

46.226 

30,575 

35,559 

43,377 

31,155 

20,334 
11,458 
14,025 
18,960 
22,H74 
15,010 
17,834 
14,007 
20,823 
16,874 
17, 176 
14,348 
18,072 
14,422 
15,442 
13,163 
10,872 
14,50S 
15,447 
15,470 
17,.';4S 
15,406 
20,021 
22,586 
18,807 
*11,028 
18,618 
15,485 
14, 6i^ 
12,826 
15,142 
16,482 
13,612 
14,339 
14,230 
20,930 
21,286 
12,221 
s 19, 363 
21,046 



173 , 

210 

UV3 I 

2*» 

4 

39 
5 
3 
6 
6 

t 

12 I 

52 

19 ! 

1 ' 

2| 
28 

14 i 
4 1 
2 

46 

2 ! 
«16 

75 

1 

16 
57 
275 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

18 
12 

3 

1 

8 

3 
19 

1 

2 
11 

1 

1 

1 

7 

3 
20 
24 

1 

1 
21 
»9 

7 

1 
27 

1 

144 

18 

1 i 
21 

2 I 
45 i 
63 , 

2 I 

1 



5.?63 ' 

4. 1 P 1 

'. 142 1 
.263 1 

.123 i 

!202 
.133 
.1V> 

.l-H 
.20t> 
.049 

1.118 
.689 
.027 
.065 

1.020 
.157 
. 153 
.(M9 

1.275 1 
.0:4 
.370 

2.593 
.036 
.346 

1.864 

7.734 
.023 
.032 

.049 
.087 
.143 
.053 
.787 
.799 
.168 
.071 
.384 
.178 
1.106 
.070 
.111 
.763 
.065 


"ioo.oo 

••• 



... ....a 


.092 

.483 

.194 

1.293 

1.368 

.065 

.050 

.930 

.479 

.635 

.054 

1.744 

.068 

11.227 

1.189 

.061 

.147 

.139 

3.162 

3.010 

.282 

.l&l 

.052 

.048 


"■i'22 

i:::::::: 



*The health officer states that cases are known not to bo com] 
^Population Apr. 15, 1910. 



'P^^^glg^trz^erb'yCoOgle 



Augoflt 24, 1917 



1368 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Gontmued. 

SMALLPOX— ContiniMd. 



aty. 



From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

MMiitowoc, Wis 

Mankato,Minn 

Marinette, Wis 

Marahall, Tex 

Mattoon, 111 

MIddletown, Ohio 

Muscatine, Iowa 

New Albany, Ind 

North Yakima, Wash 

Faduoah.Ky 

Fiqua, Ohio 

Pontlac.Mich 

Redlands,Cal 

Reno, Nev 

Salem, Oreg 

San Bernardino, Cal 

Sandusky. Ohio 

Virgtoia.Minn 

Warren, Ohio 

W«isau,Wis 

Wi^ha,Minn 



Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1918. 



13,805 
U0,305 
U4,610 
13,712 
12,5S2 
15,625 
17,500 
23,029 
20,951 
24,S42 
14,152 
17,542 
14,000 
14,860 
20,278 
16,945 
20.193 
15,193 
13,059 
19,239 
118,583 



Gases 
report- 
ed. 



Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 



Oases 
report- 

1,000 

inhabit-' 
ants. 



4.636 
4.9Xf 
.411 
.146 
.9M 
.064 
2.857 
.043 
.048 
.362 
.980 
.570 
.143 
.067 
.247 
.118 
.248 
.263 
.536 
.364 
.484 



Indi- 
cated 

Cstaljty 
rate 

per 100 



8YPHILIS.X 



From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants: 

Berkeley, Cal 

Brockton, Mass 

Canton , Ohio 

Holyoke, Mass 

St. Joseph, Mo 

ean Diego, Cal 

From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants: 

Battle Creek, Mich 

Burlington, Iowa 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Clinton, Iowa 

Davenport , Iowa 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Jackson, Mich 

Jackson, Miss 

Kalamazoo. Mich 

Lorain, Ohio 

Moline.IU 

Montclair, N. J 

Newton, Mass 

San Jose, Cal 

Stoubenville, Ohio 

Waterloo, Iowa 

From 10,000 to 25.000 inhabitants: 

Alexandria, Va 

Bellaire, Ohio 

Bloomfield, N.J 

Cairo,IU 

East Liverpool. Ohio 

GrccnvUle, S. C 

Greenwich, Conn 

LaFayetto, Ind 

Long Branch, N.J 

Massillon, Ohio 

Middletown, Ohio 

Morristown, N.J 

NewpOTt News, Va 

Norwood, Ohio 

Sandusky, Ohio 

Trinidad, Colo 

Warren, Ohio 

West Chester, Pa 



67,653 
67,449 
60,852 
65,286 
85,236 
53,330 

29,480 
25,030 
37,308 
27,386 
4H,Hn 
39,873 
35,363 
29,737 
48,886 
36,9G1 
27,451 
26,318 
43,715 
38,902 
27,445 
35,559 

17,846 
14,348 
18,466 
15,794 
22,586 
18, 181 
10,150 
21,286 
15,395 
15,310 
15,625 
13,284 
20,562 
22,286 
20,193 
13,875 
13,059 
13,176 



»15 
131 
»2 
11 
51 
7 

'1 
7 
5 
3 

42 

7 

1 

388 

27 
G 
1 

29 
1 

»1 
1 

10 



1.042 




.033 




.168 




.598 


13.73 


.131 




.034 




.280 




.134 


20.00 


.110 




.880 




.176 




.028 


100.00 


13.048 




.552 


3.70 


.102 




.036 


100.00 


1.102 




.023 


100.00 


.026 




.036 




.281 




.056 


100.00 


.070 




.162 




2.650 


1L91 


.443 


20.00 


.110 


100.00 


.209 




.141 


100.00 


.195 




.131 




.640 


20.00 


.151 


100.00 


.146 


6&67 


.045 




.050 




.216 


66.67 


.306 




.076 


100.00 



titles in which no cases of this disease were reported are not included in this tablt. 
sThe health officer states that cases are known not to be completely report 



pulation Apr. 15, 1910. 
irhich nc 



Digitized 



by Google 



1369 



August 24. 1917 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continued. 

TUBERCULOSIS (PULMONABY).i 



Oly* 



AtlanticCity, N. J 

Augusta, Ga , 

Berkeley, Cal 

Binghamton.N. Y 

BrocktOQ , Mass 

Canton, Ohio 

Covinfton. Ky 

Duluth,Mlnn 

Erie.Pa 

EvansviUe,liid 

Flint.Mich 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

Hairisburp. Pa 

Holyoke, Mass 

Lancaster, Pa... ». 

Maiden, Mass 

MobilcAla 

New Britain, Conn 

OklahoniaCity,01cla 

Passaic,N.J 

RocWord.IU 

Saginaw, Mich 

8Senect«dy,N.Y 

Somerrille, Mass 

Troy.N.Y 

WIrhlta, Kans 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa 

Y(mkers,N. Y 

York. Pi 

From 2S.00O to 50,000 Inhabitants: 

Alanwda,CaI 

Aurora, 111 

Austin, Tex 

BayCity,Mich 

Brookline, Mass 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Chelsea, Mass 

Columbia, S. C 

Cumberland , Md ^ 

Davenport, Iowa 

East Orange, N. J 

Elgin, m.:.. 

Evanston, HI 

Everett, Mass 

Everett, Wash 

FttchburK,Mass 

Green Bay, Wis 

Hammond, Ind 

Haverhill, Mass 

Jackson , M ich : . 

Jackson, Miss 

Kalamasoo, Mich 

Kenosha, wis 

Kingston,N.Y 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Lincoln , Ncbr 

Long Beach, Cal 

Lorain, Ohio. 



Lynchburg, Va.. 
ltodison,\V4s.... 
McKeesport.Pa. 
MedfordLMass... 

MoUne.lll 

Montelair,N.J.. 

Muncie,Ind 

Newport, Ky..-. 
Newport, R.l... 



Est imi Lex} 

pcwuiatioti 

July 1, 



57,660 
50,245 
57,653 
63,973 
G7,449 
60,852 
57,144 
94,495 
75,195 
76,078 
64,772 
76,183 
72,015 
65,286 
50,853 
51,165 
68.221 
53,794 
92,943 
71,744 
66,185 
66,642 
99,619 
87.039 
77,91ft 
70,722 
76,776 
99,838 
61,666 



Ca5?s 

njport- 

id. 



102 
4 

43 
107 
128 
«43 

30 
184 
247 
117 
241 

64 
204 
104 

60 
104 
103 

97 

11 
137 
tll8 
112 
208 
166 
193 

74 
206 
239 
130 



^ Cities in which no cases of this disease were reported 
> The health officer states that cases are known not to 



27. 732 21 11 

34,204 2 31 

34,814 M 

47,942 146 

32,730 62 

37,308 7 

46, 192 113 

34,611 50 

26,074 »91 

48,811 5 

42,468 68 

28,203 13 

28,591 16 

39,235 105 

36,486 33 

41,781 88 

29,353 

2o,171 11 

48, 477 83 

35,363 142 

29,737 234 

48,886 161 

31,676 35 

26,771 65 

38,676 64 

46,516 a 18 16 

27,687 17 32 

36,964 12 10 

32,940 79 51 

33,699 20 

47,621 18 25 

26,234 26 

27,461 16 16 

26,318 60 23 

25,424 3 3T 

31,927 110 Tt} 3.445 

33,108 40 30 1. 

are not included ia l^ls. labia. 
be completely repof tod. 



£)«iths 
t«mi. 



108 
21 
79 
46 
43 



41 
60 
74 
73 
68 
25 

132 
43 
50 
76 
40 
29 
46 
86 

148 
20 
27 

113 
15 



rt'|n>rt- 

JnimLiJt' 
nuts. 



1.769 




.746 


2.06 


1.982 


1.35 


1.898 


2.84 


.707 


1.00 


.626 




1.947 


2.16 


3.285 


2.67 


1.638 




4.400 


6.88 


2.833 


2.76 


L693 


L42 


2.033 


4.16 


1.803 


2.26 



1.910 
2.138 
2.013 
2.090 
L907 
2.4n 
1.046 
2.683 
2.394 
2.617 



1.712 
4.016 
7.869 
3.089 

i.ias 

2.064 
1.655 
.387 



MnmEg.. 
berof 
cases 
r#iKirt' 
ed lof 
mch 
death 
reigls- 
tired. 



.325 

2.398 

.684 



.991 

.583 

2.280 



1.80 
2.95 
3.86 
4.52 
1.93 
1.3J 
3.70 
7. 63 
2.12 
8.67 



.757 


1.91 


.116 
3.046 
1.689 


*' "3.04 
1.93 


2.446 
1.445 
3.490 
.102 
1.602 


2.2,^ 
1.16 
4.33 
2.50 
2.13 


.625 
2.670 

.930 
2.106 


1.25 
3.00 
1.27 
2.32 


" 





1.64 
4.73 

;-). iiTj 
3 02 
2.92 
1.62 



1.13 



1.20 
1.65 



i.od 

2.61 



1,67 



99 



(o (hl& labia. J^il^hi 

Digitized by Vn^^^pK 

J 



August 24, 1917 1370 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continued. 
TUBERCULOSIS (PULMONARY)— Continued. 



aty. 


Estimated 
population 

1916. ' 


Cases 
ed. 


Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 


Cases 

1.000 
inhabit- 
ants. 


Nam. 
berof 

eadi 
death 
r^is- 
tSS. 


From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

Npw Rochel]f> NY - 


37,750 
43,715 
31,401 
26,654 
31,404 
33,080 
38,629 
38,136 
43,284 
28,926 
48,562 
3H,902 
27,445 
30,570 
35,559 
43, 139 
43.377 

11,458 
17, M6 
15,010 
17,834 
14.007 
13,3.50 
18.072 
13,599 
21,645 
14,422 
18,466 
15,442 
15, TIM 
15.470 

s 13.075 
15, 4.55 
15,406 
20,021 
13,272 
14,065 
22,586 
1S,S07 

Ml, 028 
IK.OIH 
15,4«5 
14,084 

« 10, 190 
17,140 
18.181 
19,159 
10,950 
13,612 
22,466 
14,685 
10,880 
15,848 
17,807 
14,339 
10,648 
14,230 
23,539 
20,930 
21,286 
12,221 
11,838 
13,451 
19,879 
21,046 
15,395 


37 
40 
17 
12 

2 
79 
81 
91 
160 
13 
76 
»64 

3 
29 

4 
106 
23 

6 
15 
166 
12 
16 
24 
15 

4 
40 

4 
36 

6 
40 
10 
26 

1 
29 
52 
15 

4 

i34 

5 

6 

107 

8 

9 

19 

»25 

25 

M5 

»4 

54 

19 

3 

56 

M4 

23 

31 

2 

79 

133 

4 

17 

95 

31 

27 

11 

U9 


20 
17 
33 
13 
2 

32' 

35 
56 
62 
45 
39 
13 
28 
4 

27 
41 

6 
15 
5 

9' 

i3* 

I 
8 

9" 

2 

i2' 

12 
10 
20 
28 
10 

26" 

5 

is' 

8 
17 

8 
25 
17 

2' 

14 
1 
2 
13 
26 
11 
4 
18 
19 
26 

n 

95 
11 
13 
23 
9 


0.960 
.915 


1.85 




2.S 


Nnrristown Pa ...•••••••• 




Oak Parle 111 






Ogden Utah 


.OM 
2.388 
2.097 
2.386 
1.386 


1.00 


OranjrcN.J 

Pittsfleld. Mass 


'"is 


Ouincv . Mass 


2.60 


HofiJiOKG Va -. ... •• . *••••••••• 


1.07 


Rock Island .III 




Salem , Mass 


1.565 
1.388 


1.69 


San Jose Cal .. 


1.38 


Sitpiiibenvillc Ohio .... 




Waltham, Mass 


.949 

.112 

2.457 


1.04 


Waterloo. Iowa 


1.00 


West Hoboken, N. J 

WheeUng W. Va 


3.93 


From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants: 

Adrian. Mich 


.524 

.841 
11.050 

.C73 
1.142 
1.780 

.S31 

.294 
1.H48 

.•>77 
1.950 

.3^ 
2.533 


LOO 


Alexandria. Va. 


LOO 


Ann Arbor. Mich 


33.20 


Appleton, Wis 




Asbury Park. N. J 

Batavla.N. Y 

Bclolt, Wis 


L78 

""'i.'ii 


Bprlin N H 


4.00 


Beverly, Mass 


5.00 


Billinps.Mont 




Bloomflcld, N. J 

Blueficld, W. Va 


4.00 
3.00 


Cairo, III 




Chillicollie.Ohio 




Clinton. Miiss 


1.989 


2.17 


Connellsville, Pa 




Comi ne, N . Y 


1.882 
2. .597 
1.133 
.273 
.133 
1.808 
.453 
.322 
6.910 
.545 


L45 


Danville, Va 


l.» 


Dover, N.H 


L50 


DuBois, Pa 




East Liverpool, Ohio 




Eau Claire. Wis 


L31 


Elwood, Ind 


LOO 


Elvria, Ohio 




Escanaba, Mich 


7.13 


Eureka. Cal 


LOO 


Farrcll Pa 




Gardner. Mass 


1.109 
1.375 
1.305 
2.655 

.294 
2.537 
L294 

.184 
3.534 
2.471 
1.604 
2.911 


2.38 


Greenville. S. C 

Greenwich , Conn 


LOO 
L47 


Harrison, N.J 

Helena. Mont 


"' "i'oo 


Homestead, Pa 


4.07 


Hornell N Y ,. 


19.00 


Huntinpton, Ind 


LOO 


Ithaca N. Y 


4.31 


Jackson. Tonn 


Le9 


Jancsville, Wis 


2.09 


Johnstown, N. Y ,, 


7.75 


Kankakee. Ill 




Kearny, N.J 


3.350 
1.577 
.188 
1.391 
8.025 
2.305 
1.358 


4.16 


Kokomo, Ind ,.'. 


L27 


LaFavette, Ind [[ 




La8allo,Ill 


LOO 


Lincoln, III 


LOO 


Little Falb. N. Y '„ 


2.82 


Lockport, N. Y 


2.06 


Logansport, Ind 




Long Branch, N. J 


i.234 


i'ii 



1 The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. 
iPopulaUon Apr. 15, 1910. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1371 



August 24, 1917 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continued. 
TUBERCULOSIS (PULMONARY)— Continued. 



aty. 



From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

Mraktce^Mich 

Manitowoc. Wis 

Haakato.Mhin 

Mansfield, Ohio 

Marniette,Wis 

Marion, Ind 

Massillon. Ohio 

Mflford,ltass 

Monessen, Pa 

Muscat QIC, Iowa 

New Albany, Ind 

Newport Nc ws. Va 

North Adams, Mass 

Northampton, Mass 

North Tonawanda, N. Y 

North Yakima, Wash 

Olean.N.Y 

Ossiniog.N.Y 

Osw€«o,N.Y 

Peabody.Mass 

PeekskiltN.Y 

Piqua,Ohio 

Pittston,Pa 

Plainfield,N.J 

Plattsburgh.N.Y 

Plymouth. Pa 

Pontiac.Mich 

R©dlands,Cal 

Saiem, Oreg 

Santa Barbara. Gal 

Sault Sto. Marie, Mich 

Selma,Ala 

Southbridge, Mass 

Steelton. Pa 

Trinidad. Colo 

Virginia, Minn , 

Warren, Ohio 

Washington, Pa 

Watertown , Mass 

Wausau, Wis 

Webster. Mass 

West Chester, Pa 

WeslfleW, Mass 

West Orange, N. J 

White Plains, N. Y 

Winona, Minn 

Winthrop. Mass 

Wobum, Mass 











Num- 








Cases 


ber of 


Estimated 

population 

July 1, 

1916. 


Cases 
report- 
ed. 


Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 


report- 
ed per 
1,000 
inhabit- 
ants. 


cases 
report- 
ed for 
each 
death 
rt«is- 
t^. 


1 12,381 


64 


18 


5.169 


3.56 


13,805 


7 
13 


14 
5 






i 10,365 


1.254 


2.60 


22,734 

« 14,610 

19,834 

15,310 


15 


24 






3 


8 






2 


18 






5 
25 


8 
20 






14,110 


1.772 


1.25 


21,630 


16 


9 


.740 


1.78 


17,500 


13 


13 


.743 


1.00 


23,629 
20,r62 


4 


. 34 






46 


39 


2.237 


1.18 


122,019 


«26 


11 


1.181 


2.36 


19,926 


86 


36 


4.316 


2L39 


13,768 


24 


12 


1.743 


2.00 


20,951 


21 


15 


1.002 


L40 


16,624 


28 


16 


1.684 


1.75 


13,705 


31 




2.262 




24,101 


62 


13 


2.573 


4.77 


18,360 


44 


10 


2.397 


4.40 


18,530 


36 


14 


1.943 


2.57 


14, 152 


10 

8 


11 






18,599 


.430 




23,805 


54 


16 


2.268 


iis 


12,«37 


18 


7 


1.402 


2.57 


19,100 


35 


3 


1.832 


11.67 


17,542 


40 


4 


2.280 


laoo 


14,000 


37 


21 


2.643 


1.76 


20,278 
14,846 
13,919 


5 


12 






4 


10 






70 


7 


5,029 


laoo 


15,626 


»37 


29 


2,368 


1.28 


14,205 


20 


5 


1,408 


4.00 


15,4r>8 


85 


13 


5.498 


6.54 


13,875 


18 


18 


, 1.297 


LOO 


15, 193 


12 


7 


, .790 


1.71 


13.059 


3 


3 


t .230 


1.00 


21,018 


40 


i7 


1. 850 


1.48 


14,St57 


13 


8 


.874 


1.63 


19, 239 


3 


11 






13,210 


19 


10 


1.438 


1.90 


13, 176 


12 


12 


.911 


1.00 


18,391 


34 


6 


1.849 


5.67 


13,550 


30 


16 


1 2.214 


1.88 


22, 4(35 


48 


15 


2.137 


3.20 


U8,58J 


«1 


1 


.054 


1.00 


12,692 


13 


4 


1.024 


3.26 


15,969 


18 


14 


1.127 

1 


1.29 



TUBERCULOSIS (ALL FORMS).* 



from 50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants: 



AtlanticCity,N. J. 
Bayonne,N. J.. 
Berkeley, Cal.... 
Brockton, Mass. 
Canton, Ohio..-. 
Duluth.Minn... 
Elizabeth, N. J.. 

Erie, Pa 

Evansville, Ind. 

FUnt,Mich 

Harrisburg.Pa.. 
Hoboken,N.J.. 
Holyoke, Mass.. 



57,CG0 


258 


09,895 


104 


57,053 


M7 


07, 449 


140 


00, s:>2 


51 


94, 495 


201 


80,090 


279 


75,195 


286 


76,078 


126 


54,772 


245 


72,015 


219 


77,214 


252 


65,286 


127 



25 
55 
51 



124 
125 



4.475 
2.346 

.815 
2.165 

.838 
2.127 
3. 218 
3.803 
1.050 
4AT3 



> Population Apr. 15, 1910. 

> The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely rep 
* Cities in which no cases of this disease were reported are not included 



or ted 
in this 

itized by 



5.86 



1.88 
2.65 
1.00 



2.25 
2.29 



45 I 4. 47J 5. 44 

89 I X041 2.41} 

91 j X2M %77 _ 

90 I LQ4S L4I ^^^^ 

ithistaWa. ,J^f 

ized by VjOOS|^r^ 



J 



August 24, 1917 1372 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continued. 
TUBEBCULOSIS (ALL FORBfS)— Continued. 



City. 


Estimated 
1916. 


Casts 
ed. 


Deaths 
r««is. 
tered. 


Cas«s 

report- 
eaper 
1,000 

inhabitr 
ants. 


Norn- 
bcrof 

CMfa 

death 

tSS. 


From 60,000 to 100,000 inhabitants-Continued. 

New Britain Conn ^ 


53,794 
71,744 
85,236 
53,330 
99,519 
87,039 
53,886 
77,916 
85,692 
70,722 
99,838 
51,656 

27,732 
29,480 
32,730 
46,192 
32,261 
42,458 
41,781 
40,496 
26,171 
48,477 
35,363 
29,737 
48,886 
31,576 
26,771 
38,676 
31,677 
41,097 
46,515 
27,587 
26,234 
27,451 
26,318 
37,009 
26,100 
41,133 
43,715 
37,353 
33,080 
36,065 
41,185 
38,629 
28,926 
48,562 
38,902 
36,283 
30, 570 
29,894 
43, 139 
31,155 

20,334 
17,846 
15,010 
17,834 
13,350 
14,348 
21,645 
18,466 
M4,544 
10,872 
15,794 
19,242 


100 
158 
108 
270 
225 
187 

48 
212 
159 

86 
256 
130 

28 

68 

60 

123 

»70 

82 

110 

58 

11 

104 

153 

272 

169 

37 

67 

69 

14 

118 

U9 

18 

32 

19 

78 

54 

85 

40 

52 

107 

104 

41 

77 

87 

13 

96 

55 

83 

33 

28 

111 

70 

7 
26 
172 

8 
46 
50 
16 
46 
46 

3 


51 
106 
100 
136 

73 
108 

71 
167 

99 

23 
130 

15 

30 
15 
34 

38' 

36 
46 
36 
24 
65 
40 
50 
59 
14 
52 

45' 

104 

36* 

14 
19 
27 
18 
13 
29 
25 
52 
51 
25 
32 
33 
89 
50 
47 
80 
38 
20 
32 
93 

7 
26 

5 
18 
22 

9 
10 

i'o 

20 
46 
5 


L850 
2.203 

Las? 

5.063 
2.261 
3,148 


L96 


Passaic, N.J 

8t. Joseph, Mo 


L4» 
LOB 


San Dieeo. Cal 


L99 


Schenectady, N. Y 


3.06 


Somerville.Mass 


L73 


TftiDfM Fla •.•••••••• 




Troy.K. Y 


2.477 
L855 
L216 
2.564 
2.517 

1.010 
2,307 
1.833 
2.663 
2,170 
1,031 
2.633 
1.432 


L30 


Utica, N. Y 


L6I 


Wichita, Kans 


8.74 


Yonkers, N. Y 


L97 


York, Pa. . . . . 


8.67 


From 25,000 to 60,000 inhabitants: 

Alameda, Cal 


L40 


Battle Creek. Mich 


4.53 


Brookline, Mass 


L7B 


Chelsea, Mass 




• DanvUle.Ill 


LSI 


East Orange, N. J 


2.S 


Fitchburg, Mass 


2.39 


Hamilton,' Ohio 


L61 


Hammond, Ind 




Haverhill, idass 


2.145 
4.327 
9.147 
3.457 
M72 
2.129 
L784 


Leo 


Jackson, Mich 


3,83 


Jackson, Miss 


5.44 


Kalamazoo, Mich 


180 


Kenosha, Wis 


2.64 


Kingston, N. Y 


LIO 


Knoxville, Tenn 




La Crosse, Wis 




Lexington, Ky 


2.871 
.408 


LIS 


Lincoln, Nebr 




Long Beach, Cal 




Mcdford, Mass 


L220 
.692 
2,964 
1.459 
3.257 
.972 
1.190 
2.865 
3.144 
1.137 
L870 
2.252 


2.39 


Molino,Ill 


LOO 


Montclair, N. J 


3.89 


Mount Vernon, N. Y 


3.00 


Muskegon, Mich 


6.54 


New Castle, Pa 


L38 


Newton , Mass 


2.06 


Niagara Kails, N. Y 


2.06 


Orange, N.J 


3.04 


Oshkosh, Wis 


1.64 


Perth Amboy, N. J 


2.41 


Pittsficld, Mass 


2.64 


Rock Island, Ul 




Salem, Mass 


i.977 
2.000 
2.288 


L92 


San Jose, Cal 


L17 


Taunton, Mass 


L04 


Waltham, Mass 




Watcrtown, N.Y 


.937 
2.573 


L40 


West Hoboiccn, N. J 

Winston-Salcm, N.C 


3.47 


From 10,000 lo 2.').000 inhabitants: 

A V)ordecu. Wash 


.611 
1.457 
11.459 
1.682 
L948 


1 00 


Alexandria, Va , 


1 00 


Ann Arbor, Mich '.'..'/.'. 


34 40 


Appleton, Wis 


1 67 


Batavia, N. Y ..',,., 


1.18 


Bellaire, Ohio 




Beverly, Mass 


2,125 
3. 70S 
LlOO 
4.231 
2.913 


4.00 


Bloomfield, N. J 




Bradford, Pa 


1 80 


Brunswick. Ga '..'.'".' 


3.30 


Cairo, Ul... 


LOO 


Carbondale, Pa '..'.'.'. 





1 The health oifioer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. 
* Population Apr. 15, 1910. r .r ■— 



Digitized by 



Google 



1373 August 24, 1017 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— CoiiUnued. 
TUBERCULOSIS (ALL FORMS)— Continued. 



City. 






Cofim 
eti. 



I an 13. 



Nanj- 
berof 



•dftar 

«ech 
death 
rigts- 
tend. 



Fn;nn 10,000 to 2S,000 luliabJiancs^^Canlliiiied. 

C<jfle¥t^iUe. Kaos 

C^imiiiK,\. ¥..........„.......„.„.... 

Dunkirk, N. Y 

Eacanaba, Mich 

Eureka, Gal 

Fulton, N.Y 

Gardner, Mass 

Granite City, 111 

Greenville, S. C 

Hackcnsack, N. J 

Harrison, N.J 

HatUesburs, Miss 

Hontingt^Ind 

Ironwood, Midi 

Ithaca, N.Y 

Johnstown, N. Y 

Leavenworth, Kans 

Lincoln, ni 

LitUe Falls, N.Y 

Lockport,N.Y 

Long Branch, N. J 

Manistee, Mich 

Manitowoc, Wis 

Middletown, N. Y 

Middlctown, Ohio 

MUI<ird,Mass 

Morristown, N. J 

Muscatine, Iowa 

Nantiooke, Pa 

Newport News. Va 

Northampton. Mass 

Norwood, Ohio 

Oasfaiing,N.Y 

Phniipsburg, N. J 

Plainfield, N. J 

PanUac,Mich 

Portsmouth, N. H 

Redlands,Cal 

Rome, N.Y 

Salem, Orcg 

Sandusky. Ohio 

Santa Barbara, Cal 

Saratoga Springs, N.Y , 

Spartanburg. S. C 

Trinidad, Colo 

Uniontown, Pa 

Virginia, Minn 

Warren, Ohio 

Warren, Pa 

Washington, Pa 

Watertown, Mass 

Waukegan.in 

Webster, Mass 

Westfield, Mass 

West New York, N. J 

West Orange, N. J 

White Plains, N. Y 

Winthrop, Mass 

Wobum,Mass 



15,485 
11,084 
11,908 
17,140 
15, 142 
18.181 
1G,945 
16,950 
10,482 
10,8S0 
14,779 
15,848 
10,648 

«19,3C3 
11,838 
13,451 
19,879 
15,395 

« 12,381 
13,805 
15,810 
15,625 
14, 110 
13,284 
17,500 
23,126 
20.562 
19,926 
22,280 
13,705 
15, Wo 
23,805 
17,542 
11,660 
14,000 
23,737 
20,278 
20,193 
14,846 
13,821 
21,365 
13,875 
2a, 780 
15, 193 
13,059 
14,737 
21,618 
14,8()7 
20,244 
13,210 
18,391 
18,773 
13,550 
22,4()5 
12,092 
15,909 



21 

53 
'^ 
108 
24 
39 
20 

1 

»29 

23 

54 

»258 

2 
44 
63 
31 
25 
109 
34 
29 
^23 
66 

7 
72 

8 
27 
17 
21 
23 

eo 

88 
27 
33 
23 
61 
41 
17 
40 
186 

7 
21 


43 

6 
20 
i 14 
14 
11 
63 
41 
17 

7 
21 
37 
70 
31 
83 
16 
19 



14 
4 

21 
109 
10 
15 
9 
21 
10 
39 
22 
22 
10 
21 
12 
48 
38 
14 
2 
13 
29 
4 
15 
31 
111 
17 
21 
12 
25 
49 
20 



1.398 
6.974 
1.634 
2.435 
1.167 



1.505 
1.357 
3.186 
15.653 
.184 
2.977 
3.975 
2. 911 
1.291 
9.208 
2.528 
1.459 
1.494 
5.331 



4.551 I 



1.914 
1.28 
1.200 
.995 
2.018 
4.416 
L212 
2.408 
1.474 
2.562 
2.337 
1. 4.57 
2.S.'V7 
7.836 



SL18 
3,21 
1.53 
5.14 
1.00 
2.23 
L67 



1.00 
2.30 



LOO 



4.50 
7.75 
1.19 
1.00 
2.13 
L93 
2.56 
3.14 



L85 



L23 
L70 
LOO 
L92 
L25 
2.33 
L93 

16.50 
L77 
2.10 

10.25 
L13 
129 
1.C8 



1.040 


LOO 


3.111 


L72 


L441 


LOO 


.674 




.921 


2.00 


.842 


2.20 


4.275 


4.50 


1.897 


L28 


1.144 


L55 


L590 


L75 


2.012 


5.29 


3.729 




2.288 


L63 


3.695 


3.77 


1.261 




1.190 


L36 



> The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. 
* Population April 15, 1910. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Angiiiit 24, 1917 1374 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE TEAR 191&— Continued. 

TTPHOm FEVEB.> 



1 



City. 


Estimated 
popuhi- 

tionJuly 
1, 191ft. 


Caaes 
report- 
ed. 


Deaths 
regte- 
tered. 


Cases 
report- 
eaper 

1,000 
inhabit- 


Indi- 
cated 

fatafity 

rate 
per 100 
cases. 




ants. 


From 50,000 to 100,000 inhaWtanU: 

Atlantic City, N. J 


67,660 
50.245 
69.895 
67,653 
63,973 
67,449 
60,852 
57,144 
94,495 
86,690 
63,705 
75,195 
76,078 
64,772 
76,183 
72,015 
77,214 
65.286 
60,853 
51.155 
78,283 
68,221 
63.794 
92.943 
71,744 
69.411 
63,867 
65.185 
65,642 
85,236 
53.330 
99,519 
87,039 
53,886 
77,916 
85,692 
70,722 
76,776 
99,838 
51,656 

27,732 
34,204 
34,814 
29,480 
47,942 
32,985 
33,846 
32.730 
37,308 
25,636 
46,192 
34,611 
25,987 
26,074 
32,261 
48,811 
39,631 
39,873 
42,458 
28.203 
39,235 
35,486 
41,781 
29,353 
40,496 
26,171 
48,477 
28,491 
35,363 
29.737 


76 
33 
9 
17 
20 
23 
65 
33 
82 
24 
60 
36 

200 

227 
48 

402 

15 

8 

38 

16 

9 

63 

23 

41 

8 

6 

115 
12 
78 
20 
38 
32 
16 

105 
60 
14 
81 
38 
16 
64 

18 
24 
«19 
18 
186 
4 
6 
6 

20 

6 

29 

«67 

6 

60 

43 

13 

27 

2 

9 

218 

16 

13 

13 

3 

44 

82 

16 

13 

30 

76 


11 
17 

4' 

6 
2 
7 
9 
6 
2 
29 
6 

26* 

8 
56 

2 
2 
8 
4 
3 

16 
2 
7 
2 
S 

12 

is* 

9 
5 

4 
1 
9 
10 

1 
3 

4 
1 
7 



4' 

13 
2 
21 

6* 

3* 

12 

3* 

6 

7 

6 

4' 

2* 

3 
3 

7 
27 

4 
4 
6 
9 


1.318 
.657 
.120 
.295 
.371 
.341 
.838 
.677 
.868 
.277 
.785 
.479 

2.629 

4.144 
.630 

6.582 
.194 
.123 
.747 
.293 
.116 

1.082 

:12 

.112 

.101 

1.801 

,.^ 

.235 
.713 
.322 
.184 

1.949 
.642 
.163 

1.145 
.495 
.160 

1.239 

.649 
.702 
.546 
.611 

3.880 
.121 
.177 
.153 
.536 
.234 
.628 

1.936 
.192 

1.918 

1.333 
.266 
.681 


14.47 


Aueusta Ga ..........•.•.•••• 


51.52 


Bayonne, N. J 




Berkeley Cal 


219 




aaoo 


Brockton. Mass 


8.70 


Canton, Ohio. . . * '.'.'. '..'. 


12.73 


Covincton. Kv.. 


27.27 


Dtiluth, Biinn 


6.10 


Elizabeth. N.J 


8.33 


ElPaso, Tex 


58.00 


Erie Pa. . . 


13.80 


Evansville, Ind....I.! *.! 




Flint Mich . . . 


11. 4& 


Fort Wayne, ind. .'.'...'.....'..'. 


16.67 


Harrisburc. Pa. . . 


13 68 


Hoboken, N. J 


13.33 


Holyoke, Mass 


25.00 


Lancaster. Pa .. . ... 


21. OS 


Malden,Mass * 


26.67 


Manchester N H 


33 33 


Mobile,Ala-. ! ... .! 


2181 


New Britain, Conn 


8.70 


Oklahoma Cfty, Okla 


17.07 


Passaic, N.J '.'. 


25.00 


Pawtucket, R. I 


SO. 00 


Portland, Me 1 


10.43 


Rockford, 111 




Saginaw, Mich 


i9.23 


St. Joseph, Mo 


45.00 


San Diego, Cal 


13.16 


Schenectady, N.Y 


12.50 


flomerville, Mass..... 


6.25 


Tampa, Fla 


8-57 


Troy;N.Y 


20.00 


Utica, N.Y 


7.14 


Wichita, Kans 


171 


Wilkes-Barre, Pa 


lass 


Yonkors,N.Y 


6.25 


York, Pa 


laM 


From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants: 

Alameda, Cal 




Aurora, III 


16.67 


Austin, Tex 


68.42 


Battle Creek, Mich 


11.11 


Bay City, Mich 


11.29 


RelHnghani,Wftsh.._ 




Boise, Idaho 




Brookllne, Mass 




Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


25.00 


Central Falls, R.I 

Chelsea, Mass 


'ioiss 


Columbia, S.C 


17.91 


Cranston, R. I.. . . 




Cumberland , Md 


6.00 


Danville, 111 


13.95 


Davenpcttl, Iowa 




Decatur, HI 


25.93 


Dubuque, Iowa 




East Orange, N.J 


.212 

7.730 

.408 

.366 

.311 

.102 

1.087 

3.133 

.309 

.456 

.848 

2.622 




Elgin, 111 I.! 


1.83 


Everett, Mass 




Everett, Wash [,[ 


15.38 


Fitchbiu^, Mass 


2101 


Green Bay, Wis ',,'.' 


100.00 


Hamilt'^n, Ohio. 


15.91 


Hammond, Ind ..'..".'.'.'. 


32.93 


Haverhill, Mass '.'.'.' ' 


26.67 


Hasleton, Pa 


30.77 


Jackson, Mich 


20.00 


Jackson. Miss 


12.00 



1 Cities in which no cases of this disease were reported are not Included in this table. 
* The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. 



Digitized by 



Google 



1375 August 24. 1917 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 1916— Continued. 
TYPHOID FEYER—Contlnued. 



City, 


Esrimaied 

tfSfjiity 


Cases 
repOTl* 


tensd. 


l,Ol« 

inhiibit- 

ants. 


ittdi- 
rated 
totality 

rale 
per 100 
ams. 


From as,00(Ji^ SO.OOO inlmbiUmU^-Contimifld. 


31,5?S 

38,676 
31,677 
40,498 
41,097 
46,515 
27,587 
36,964 
32,940 
47,521 
26,234 
27,451 
26,318 
37,009 
25,424 
26,100 
41,133 
31,927 
30,108 
37,759 
43,715 
37,353 
31,401 
26,654 
31,404 
33,080 
36,065 
41,185 
38,629 
36,798 
38,136 
43,284 
28,926 
48,562 
38,902 
27,445 
46,226 
36,283 
30,575 
30, 570 
29,894 
43,377 
31,155 

11,458 
14.025 
17,846 
18,960 
22,874 
15,010 
17, 834 
14,007 
20,82} 
16,874 
13,350 
14,348 
18,072 
13,699 
21,645 
14,422 
18,466 
15,442 
a 14, 544 
10,872 
21,617 
15,794 
19,242 
14,508 
15,470 


43 

ao 

61 

2 
114 
SO 
33 
19 
14 
90 
50 

9 
97 

8 

15 

137 

4 
60 
19 
10 

• i 

16 
41 

14 
25 

9 
10 

7 

9 

»70 

16 

6 
»11 

9 
36 
10 
39 

9 
31 
84 
179 

13 

29 

20 

3 

13 

107 

2 

9 

5 

23 

46 

20 

6 

1 

17 
5 
3 
7 
13 
26 
5 
2 
6 


3 
5 
5 

8' 

7 
7 
3 
5 
11 
8 

8* 

2' 

5 

5* 

4 
1 

i' 

5 

4 
2 

5* 

2 

1 

2" 

7' 

4 

3 

? 

7 
1 

16 
1 
3 
12 
11 

3 

I 
6 

1 
4 
8 



v.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

4* 

2 

...... 

1 

i" 

1 
3 

1 

i' 

2 


o.sso 

-633 

2.092 

1.577 

.063 

2.815 

1.217 

.70) 

.683 

.379 

2.732 

1.052 

.343 

3.534 

.304 

.405 

1.455 

.153 

1.459 

.595 

.332 

.185 

.595 

.428 

1.306 

.750 

.191 

.423 

.693 

.219 

.259 

.190 

.236 

1.617 

.553 

.103 

.283 

.328 

.779 

.276 

1.276 

.294 

1.037 

1.937 

5.745 

1.135 

2.068 

1.121 

.158 

.568 

7.129 

.112 

.643 

.240 

1.363 

3.446 

1.394 

.332 

.074 

.785 

.347 

.162 

.453 

.894 

2.391 

.231 

,127 

.nt 


6.98 
35.00 
8.93 


KHU^vh^i. ^Vb..._, ,„ , 

Kir-^i i:i N, Y"^ 


Knoxvill«, Tenn. _ 

Ta f'TOffS**, Wi«| ... , 


T4ui«ing, Mirfi . 


7 02 


lAfxiDgi/on, Ky 


14 00 


I^iKMHn N^hr . 


21 21 


T.<mjrTUt|M^,rftI. 


15 79 


T>irain Ohio. . , , . 


35 71 


I^ynch(Hirg, Va. ... 


11 11 


kcKeesport, Pa. 


16 00 


^4^f^jr4^K<» 




IfoliTlA.fl) . .. .. 


8 25 


ifont^iiair, N, J . ^ , 




Mount Vernon. N. Y 


13 33 


Mimcie,Ind.... 


13 51 


If nvkaigm. If inh 




New Castle, Pa. 


8 33 


Newport, Kt , 


21.05 


Newport,R.I 


10 00 


New RocheUe, N. Y 




ti^mrU^Usm^. 


3 85 


Ni^gw* FftlLs N Y 


31.25 


Narristown, I*a. 


9.76 


Oak Park, 111 


10.00 


Oeden. Utah 




OrmiM V T 


35.71 


Oshkosh.Wis 


8.00 


Perth Amboy, N. J 


11.11 


Pitt8field,Mass 




Qiiin«y, til . . . 


28. 57 


Qninflv! MaiB 




Roanoke Vft.... ... 


10.00 


Rock Island, 111 


25.00 


8a]f»m, Mass . .,. 


60 00 


San Jose, Ca2 '. 


18.18 


Steubenville, Ohio 


77.78 


SuDerior. Wis 


19.44 


TMlllvOn. Mas??. . .. .. ,.„ ........ , 


10.00 


Tulsa, Oida 


41.03 


Waltham, Mass 


11.11 


Watertown, N. Y 


9.68 


WhAAling, W. Vft . . 


14.29 




6.15 


From 10.000 to 25,000 inhabitants: 

Adrian, Mich 


23.08 


Albuquerque, N. Mex 


3.45 


Alexandria. Va 


30.00 


Alliance, Ohio 


33.33 


Alton, Dl 


30.37 


Ann Arbor, Midi 


34.40 






Asbury Park, N. J 





Asheville, N. C 




Bakersfield.Cal 




Batavia,N. Y 


8.70 


R«n»iM Ohin , 


10.00 


Beloit,Wis 




Berlin,N. H 




Beverly, Mass 

Billings, Mont 

Bloomfleld, N. J 


5.88 


Bluefield,W. Va 


14.29 


Bradford, Pa . 


7.69 


Brunswick, Ga 


11.54 


Burlington, Vt 


20.00 


Cairo,fll 




Carbondale, Pa 


l6Ji7 


Champaign. Ill 




ChilUcotho,Ohio 


9,m 



> The health oflicer states that casss an known 
* Population Apr. 15, 1910. 



not to be completely reported. 

Digitized by CjOmSIC 



w^ 



August 24, 1917 



1376 



REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 191&— Continued. 
TYPHOID FBTBB-^ODDtiiiued. 



1 Population Apr. 1& 1910. 

* The health officer states that cases are Imown not to be completely reported. 



aty. 


Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1916. 


Cases 
report- 
ed. 


Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 


Cases , iDdi- 

report- cated 
edper (atalitj 

1,000 rate 
inhabit-jpcrlOO 

ants, cases. 


From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

Clinton Mass 


» 13,075 
17,54^ 
22,669 
15,455 
15,406 
10,848 
20,021 
13,272 
14,665 
20,743 
22,586 
18,807 

» 11,028 
18,618 
15,4S5 
14,684 

1 10, 190 
21,113 
11,908 
17,140 
15, 142 
18,181 
19, 159 
16,945 
16,950 
16,482 
13,612 
22,466 
14,685 
10.880 
14,779 
15,818 
17,807 
14,339 
10,648 
14.230 
23.539 
20,930 
21,286 
12,221 

» 19,363 
11,838 
13,451 
19,879 
21,046 
15,395 

112,381 
13,805 

» 10, 365 
22,734 

» 14,610 
19,834 
15,310 
12,582 
15,810 
15,625 
14,110 
21,630 
13,284 
23,126 
23,629 
20,562 

J 22, 019 
19,926 
13,768 
20,951 
22,286 
16,624 
13,705 
24,101 
24,842 


1 
53 

8 
16 
34 

1 
45 

5 
40 
tlO 
19 
10 

1 

9 
13 

1 

6 

4 
14 
14 

6 
15 

7 
18 

n 

61 

22 

5 

8 

24 

19 

19 

«28 

1 

3 

32 
6 
28 
12 
25 
10 
60 
15 
60 
19 
7 
15 
10 
4 

12 

12 

9 

5 

8 

5 

3 

6 

52 

17 

2 

23 

62 

27 

12 

53 

23 

8 

16 

3 

4 

«16 


6* 

1 

4* 

i* 

1 

2 

9 

1 

1 

6' 

5* 

1 
3 
2 
2 

1 

i' 

4' 

2 

1 

3 
2 

1 
3 



4 

1 
6 
2 
3 
1 

13 
1 
5 
5 

2' 

1 

i' 

2 

i* 

1 

i' 

2 
2 
4 
2 
4 
2 
5 
2 
1 

i* 

1 


a075 

3.020 

.353 

1.035 

2.207 

.002 

2.348 

.377 

3.341 

.482 

.841 

.532 

.091 

.4S3 

.840 

.068 

.589 

.189 

1.176 

.817 

.396 

.825 

.365 

L062 

.050 

3.701 

1.616 

.223 

.545 

2.206 

.600 

L199 

1.572 

.070 

.282 

2.249 

.255 

L338 

.564 

2.046 

.516 

5.608 

1.115 

3.018 

.903 

.455 

1.212 

.724 

.386 

.528 

.821 

.454 

.327 

.636 

.316 

.192 

.425 

2.404 

1.280 

.086 

.973 

3.015 

1.226 

.602 

3.850 

1.098 

.359 

.962 

.219 

.166 

.644 




Coffeyville, Kans . . 


U.SI 


Concord N H " . 


12. SO 


ConnellsviUe. Pa 




Coming, N. Y 


U.77 


Cumberland, R.I. . 




Danville Va . 


2.22 


Dover, N.H 


2a 00 


DuBois, Pa 




Dunkirk, N. Y 


2a 00 


East Liverpool, Ohio . ... 


47.37 


EauClah^e, Wis -. 


laoo 


Elwood, Ind 


loaoo 


Elyria, Ohio 




Escanaba, Mich 


4&15 


Eureka, Cal 




Farrell, Pa 


8133 


Fond du Lac, Wis 


25.00 


FultMi, N.V. 


21.43 


Oarr1n«r M^SS , , . , , , 


14.29 


Granite (ity, 111 


33.33 


Greenville, S. C 


6.67 


Greenwich, Conn .* 




Hackensack, N.J.. 


5.50 


Harrison, N.J 




HatUcsburg, Miss 




Helena. Mont 


18.18 


Homestead, Pa 


40.00 


Homell, N.Y 


12.50 


Huntington, Ind 


12.50 


Ironwootl, Mich 


22.22 


Ithaca, N.Y 


5.2S 


Jackson, Tenn 


ia7i 


Janes\ille, Wis 




Johnstown, N.Y 




Kankakee, III ".. 


12.50 


Kearny, N.J 


16.67 


Kokomo, Ind 


21.43 


La Fayette, Ind 


16.67 


LaSarte,!!! 


12.00 


Leavenworth, Kans 


10.00 


Lincobi,Ill 


21.67 


Little Falls, N. Y 


6.67 


Lockport, N.Y 


8.33 


Logansport, Ind 


28.32 


Long Branch, N. J 




Marustee, Mich 


13.33 


Manitowoc, Wis 


laoo 


Mankato, Minn 




Mansfield, Ohio 




Marinette, Wis 


&3S 


Marion, Ind 


22.22 


MassiUan,Ohio 




Mattoon.Ill 


' ii'so 


Middletown, N.Y 


2aw 


Middletown, Ohio 




Milford, Mass 




Monessen, Fa 


i.93 


Morristown, N. J 


11.75 


Nanticoke, Pa _ _ 

New Albany, Ind 


100.00 
17.89 


Newport News, Va 


3.2S 


North Adams, Mass 

Northampton, Mwn . ... .^.^ ^ 


14.« 
lflu67 


Nwth Tonawanda, N. Y '", 


9.43 


North Yakima, Wash _ 

Norwood, Ohio 


&70 
1%S0 


01can7N.Y 




OMln/ng^V.Y 


3i'33 




25.00 


Paduci4,Ky ]][[ 





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Google 



1377 August 24, 1917 

REPORTED PREVALENCE FOR THE YEAR 19ie-Continued. 
TYPHOID FEVER— Continued. 



City. 



Estimated 
popula- 
tion July 
1, 1916. 



Cases 
report- 
ed. 



Deaths 
regis- 
tered. 



Cases 
report- 
ed per 
1,000 
inhabit- 
ants. 



Indi- 
cated 

fatality 
rate 

per ICO 



Fh>in 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants— Continued. 

Peabody, Mast 

Peekskfll,N.Y 

PhilUpsborg, N. J 

Piqua,Ohio 

Ptttstoo, Pa.... 

PhUnfleW, N. J 

Plattsburgh.N.Y 

Plymouth. Pa 

Pontiac, Mich 

Portsmouth. N. H 

Bedlands,dftl 

Reno, Nev 

Riverside, Cal 

Rome, N.Y 

Rutland, Vt 

Salem, Oreg 

San Bernardino, Cal 

Sandusky, Ohio 

Santa Barbara, Cal 

Santa Cms, Cai 

Saratcwa Springs, N. Y 

Sault Ste. Marie, Blich 

Selma. Ahi 

Southbridge, Mass 

Spartanburg, S. C 

Stedton, Pa 

StiUwater, Minn 

Trinidad, Colo 

Uniontown, Pa. 

Virginia, Minn 

Warren, Ohio. 

Warrai, Pa 

Washington, Pa. 

Watertown, Bftass 

Waukegan.111 

Wausau, Wis 

Webster, Mass 

West Chester, Pa 

Westfleld, Mass 

Whit« Plains, N. Y 

Winona, Minn 

Wobam, Mass 



18,300 
18,530 
15.605 
14,152 
18,599 
23,805 
12,837 
19,100 
17,542 
11,666 
14,000 
14,860 
19,763 
23,737 
14,831 
20,278 
16,945 
20,193 
14,846 
14,504 
13,821 
13,919 
15,626 
14,205 
21,365 
15,458 

no, 198 
13,875 
20,780 
15,193 
13,059 
14,737 
21,618 
14,867 
20,244 
19,239 
13,210 
13,176 
18,391 
22,465 

« 18,583 
15,969 



6 
16 

3 
124 

2 

6 
13 
11 

8 

1 

10 
17 

6 
14 

8 



14 


3 


9 


2 


8 


2 


12 


2 


1 




13 


3 


26 


1 


34 


7 


1 




28 


7 


57 




3 




13 


2 


23 




11 


4 


44 


5 


9 




42 


3 


11 


... 


8 


3 


28 




6 




3 


7 


8 


3 


16 




7 










a 337 
.809 
.192 

1.696 
.108 
.252 

1.013 
.576 
.456 
.086 
.714 

1.143 
.304 
.590 
.539 
.690 
.531 
.396 
.808 
.060 
.941 

1.868 

2.176 
.070 

1.311 

3.687 
.294 
.937 

1.107 
.921 

3.369 
.611 

1.943 
.740 
.395 

1.195 
.454 



.435 

.n2 

.377 
.376 



16.67 
20.00 



12.50 



33.33 
15.38 
9.09 
37.50 
100.00 
10.00 
11.76 
16.67 
14.29 



21.43 
22.22 
25.00 
16.67 



23.08 
3.85 
20.50 



15.38 



36.36 
11.36 



7.14 
'37.56 



37.50 



1 The health officer states that cases are known not to be completely reported. 
X PopulaUon Apr. 15, 1910. 



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PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 



No health department ^ State or local y can effectively prevent or control disease wUkout 
knowledge of when, where ^ and under what conditions cases are occurring. 



UNITED STATES. 



CURRENT STATE SUMMARIES. 
California Report for the Week Ended August 18, 1917. 

The California State Board of Health reported concerning the 
status of preventable diseases in California for the we^k ended 
August 18, 1917, as follows: Two cases of anthrax in man were 
notified in Kem County,, where three large herds of cattle are infected. 
Three cases of poliomyelitis were reported, one each at San Fran- 
cisco, Burlingame, and Santa Rosa. Thirty-six cases of typhoid 
fever were notified, 14 of which occurred in Los Angeles. Nine of 
these were not of local origin. Diphtheria increased, 25 cases having 
been reported. Ten of these cases occurred in San Francisco. Five 
cases of smallpox were notified in Fresno County. Other com- 
mimicable diseases show a reduction. 

The details of notifiable disease cases reported during the week 
ended August 11 are as follows: 



Anthrax 

Cerebrospinal meningitis. 

Cliicken pox 

Diphtheria 

Dysentery 

Erysipelas 

German measles 

Gonococcus infection 

Malaria 

Measles 

Mumps 



Cases. 
2 
4 

15 
24 
2 
5 
21 
28 
22 
. 100 
55 



Cases. 

Pneumonia 25 

Poliomyelitis 2 

Ophthalmia neonatorum 1 

Scarlet fever 31 

Syphilis 25 

Tetanus 2 

Trachoma 1 

Tuberculosis 74 

Typhoid fever 31 

Whooping cough 73 



ANTHRAX. 
New Jersey — ^Jersey City. 

A case of anthrax was notified July 6, 1917, in Jersey City, N. J. 
The patient was a freight handler and had been unloading hides 
from railway cars. 

(1378) 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1379 



August 24, 1917 



ANTHRAX— €ontinued. 
Texas— Victorku 



A case of anthrax was notified in Victoria, Tex., July 2, 1917. 
The patient had been engaged in the work of skinning cattle which 
had died from anthrax. 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS. 
State Reports for July, 1917. 



Plac«. 


Now cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


ICtfTland: 

B&ltimore City 


1 
5. 

} 

1 


Ohio— Continued. 

T.4>g|in r/mnty - - - , - 


1 


Baltimore County — 


Lucas County 


1 


Rnarrow P(4nt ...• 




3 


Rehy 


Stark County...'. 


1 




Total . . 






26 


Total 




Pennsylyania: 

Allegheny County 






New York: 




21 


BmamA CouDtT.. ..*..... 


Beaver County 


1 


Erie County 


Cambria County 


1 


Ni&mra CountT... 


Delaware Coimty 


1 


OnondftFft f'^nnty ,-.,^,,, 


Lancaster C-ounty 


3 


0«wAffo County 


Luzerne Count y 


1 


Wftstchester County 


Mercer Countv 


1 




Montgomery bounty 


2 


Total 




Philadelphia County 


13 




Washington County 


2 


Ohio: 

Brawn County ..... 




Westmoreland County '.^... 

Total 


1 


Cr&wford C-ounty 


47 




Wisconsin: 

Barron County 




Delaware County % 




Fnuiklin r<wintv ^ . , . . ^ , . , ^ 


1 


Hamilton <^^^»niy 


Milwaukee County 


4 


Hitron County 


Total 




JrfTerson County 


5 









City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 4, 1917. 



Place. 



Baltimore, Md..... 

Boston, Mass 

Cbicai^, III 

Cincinnati .Ohio... 

Dayton, Ohio 

Doluth, Minn 

EUiabeth, N.J.... 
Hartford, Conn.... 
Indianapolis, Ind.. 



Lexincton, Ky... 
UttleRock, Ark. 



Mnwaokee, Wis 

Newtrk,N.J 

New Bedford, Mass.. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



New York, N.Y.... 

Norristown, Pa 

North Adams, Mass. 

Oakland. Cal 

Orange. N.J 

Passaic, N. J 

Philadelphia, Pa.... 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Pittsfleld, Mass. 

Portsmouth, N. H... 

St. Louis, Mo 

San Francisco, Cal.. . 
Springfield, Mass 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



DIPHTHERIA. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1388. 



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August 24, 1917 1380 

ERYSIPELAS. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 4, 1917. 



Place. 



Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N.Y 

Chicago, 111 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Cumberland, Md 

Detroit, Mich 

Grand Rapids. Mich.. 

McKeesport, Pa 

Newark, N.J 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



New Orleans La. . . 
New York, N.Y... 
Philadelphia. Pa... 

Pitt<?burgh. Pa 

Portland, Oreg^ 

Rochester, N.Y... 

St. Loui«, Mo 

San Franci'^co, Cal.. 
Trenton, N.J 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



MALARU. 
State Reports for July, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


Neweaaas 
reported. 


Maryland: 

Charles County— 

Bolton, R. D 


1 
1 
1 

1 

1 


Pennsylvania: 

rh^^t^r Conxttj. , „ , , 


1 


Westmorelancf Coun*^y 


1 


Malcolm R D 


Total 




White Plains..!!.!'...!!..! ! 


2 


Frederick County- 
Brunswick 


Wisconsin: 

Fond du I.#ac County... . 




Somerset County— 

Westover 


1 










Total 


5 









City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 4, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Boston Mass 


1 
1 




Nashville, Tenn 




1 


Columbia 8 C 




New York, N. Y 




1 


Kansas Citv. Mo 


1 


Oakland, Cal 


1 




Little Rock Ark 


2 


Savannah, O'a 


2 


M^'mphis, Tenn r-rr.........^. 


2 


Worcester, Mass 


1 













MEASLES. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1388. 

PELLAGRA. 
State Reports for July, 1917. 



Place. 


New 

cases 

reported. 


Place. 


New 

cases 

reported. 


Maryland: 

Allegany County— 

Wcstcrnport 


1 

1 
1 


Pennsylvania: 

Phlladelpliia County 


1 


Dorchester County- 
Lower Hoopers Island 






Fishing Creek 








Total 


3 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1381 



Ao^Bt 24, 1917 



PELLAGRA— Continued. 
CUT Reports for Wedc Ended Aug. 4, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Austin, Tex 




1 
4 
1 

1 


Mobile, Ala 


1 
1 
1 






»7 


Nashville, Tenn 


3 


Cbarleston, 8. C 


New Orleans, La 


1 


C(^mbia, S. C 




New York, N. Y 


1 


KifHTni^«v)^ W}^h 


1 


Richmond, Va 


3 




Fanias Hty. Mo 


1 
1 


Rutland, Vt 


1 


Lexln^on.'ky . .... 




i San Diego, Cal 


1 
1 

1 




Little Rock, Ark 


1 
1 


Washington, D. C 

Wihnington, N. C 

Winston-Salem, N. C 




Los Angeles. Cal 




1 


Vnnphn, Tenn 


4 


1 















1 The reason that Birmingham had so manv more cases of jiellagra reported than any other city is not 
that the disease is more prevalent in Birmingnam than in other cities of Alabama and neighboring States, 
but undoubtedly because of the successful efforts the health department has made in securing tno coop- 
eration of the practicing physicians in reporting cases. 

PLAGUE. 
Hawaii— Plague-Infected Rats Foond. 

The finding of two plague-infected rats in Hawaii was reported on 
August 15; one was found in a mill camp at Paauhau and the other 
in a store camp at Kukaiau. 

PNEUMONU. 
City Reports for Weelc Ended Aug. 4, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Baltimore, Md 


1 
3 
1 

34 
6 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 


2 


Los Angeles, Cal 


12 
16 




Boston. Mass . . . 


Manchester, N. H 


1 


Chelsea, Mass 


2 
44 
12 
13 


1 Nowark.N. J 

Philadelphia. Pa 


ti 


Chicago, Bl 


2t 


Cteve^d, Ohio 


! Pittsburgh, Pa 


9 


Detroit, Mich 


1 Reading, Pa 




Erie, Pa 


' Rochester, N. Y 


I 


Evaasville Ind ... 




' San Die-io, Cal 




FaU Kiver, Mass 


1 


1 San Francisco, Cal 


c 


» 


Grand Rapids Mich 


1 Worcester, Mass 


1 1 






1 







POUOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS). 
State Reports for July, 1917. 



Fket. 



New CAMS 

ri'p^jrtt^d- 



Hacie. 



rjjpnTinl. 



MiiiTland: 

Bulilmort City .„,, 

AllcKiuiv County— 

Barton 

Barton, R. D 

Mount Savage 

Cumberland 

Green Ridge, R. D... 
Eckhart Mines 

Anne Arundel County- 
Lake Shore, R. D.... 

Baltimore County— 
Bighlandtown 

Dorchester County— 
Federalsburg, R. D. . , 

Garrett County- 
Merrill 

Worcester County— 
Pooomoke City, R. D 

Total 



22 



New Yort! 

Albany Coutiry.....,, 

Chaiauqua uouniy 

Columbia County 

Erie County 

Jefferson C/Ounty 

Niagara County 

Orange County 

St. Lawrence County. 



Saratoga County . 
New York City. 



3 

1 
2 
1 
5 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
24 



Total. 



Ohio: 

Belmont County.. 
Cuyahoga County . 
Deflanco County . . 
Franklin County. . 
Guernsey County . 
Jefferson County. 



15 
8 
1 
1 



'jifize'cT by 



5.^60 



gl^f 



Ausu8t24,1917 1382 

POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS)— CJontinued. 
State Reports for July, 1917—- Continued. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


Newcaaes 
reported. 


Ohio— Continued. 

Mahoniii£ County 


2 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 


Pennsylvania— Continued. 

Dauphin County 


7 


Monroe County 


Lancaster County 


15 


Montgomery County 


Lawrence County 




PerryCounty .'. 


Lureme County 




Pickaway County 


Mercer County 




Portage County 


Philadelphia County 




Stark County 


Venango County 




Summit County 


Total 




Tuscarawas County 


41, 


Wood County 


Wisconsin: 

Barron County 








Total 


43 








Pennsylvania: 

Allegheny County 


6 

1 
1 

1 
1 


Chippewa County 




Pane County. .., ^. ^. ^ *4...*^. 




Beaver County 


Oneida CouRty 




Butler County 


POTtage County'! i..!!!! 




Chester County 


Total 




Crawford County !.. 


5 









City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 4, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deatiis. 


Akron, Ohio 


2 

1 
2 
1 
4 
3 




Newcastle, Pa 


2 
12 

1 
2 




Birmingham, Ala 




New York, N.Y.. . . 


I 


Brockton, Maw? 




Omaha, Nebr 


I 


Butler, Pa 




Pittsburgh, I*a 




Chi(»go, 111 


1 


Quincv, Mass 


I 


Clevemnd. Ohio 


Rocky Mount, N. C. . 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




Dayton, Ohio 


1 


San Francisco, Cal '.'.'..' 




Havorhin, Mftss 


3 

1 
3 
4 


Saratoga Springs, N. Y 

Syracuse, N . Y. 




Jackson, ilich 


1 

1 




Lynn, Mass 


"Worcester, Mass 


......*••• 


Newark, N. J 













RABIES IN MAN. 
Mississippi— Tishomingo. 

On August 17, 1917, a case of rabies in a child was reported in 
Tishomingo, Tishomingo County, Miss. 

RABIES IN ANIMALS. 
Florida — Jaclcsonyille. 

During the month of July, 1917, examinations in the laboratory 
of the State Board of Health of Florida showed 3 cases of rabies in 
animals in Jacksonville, Duval County, as follows: In a cow, 1 case; 
in dogs, 2 cases. 

Mississippi— Tishomingo. 

On August 17, 1917, several cases of rabies in dogs were reported 
in Tishomingo, Tishomingo County, Miss. 



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1383 August 24, 1917 

RABIES IN ANIMALS— Ck)ntinued. 
Washington. 

During the period from October, 1916, to July 31, 1917, examina- 
tions in the laboratory of the State Board of Health of Washington 
showed 30 cases of rabies in animals. 

The following table shows the localities in which the cases oc- 
curred, the species of animals, and the numbers of persons given 
antirabic treatment in the State of Washington during the period 
stated: 



County. 


PosiUve. 


Number 
of persons 
treated. 


County. 


Positive. 


Number 
of persons 
treated. 


Benton 


4 coyotes. . 
2 dogs. .... 


4 


Kittitas 


2 coyotes. . 






Klickitat 


Iwolf 

1 horse 


2 


^^h«lif 




1 




Chfiltn 


1 coyote . . 


Lincoln 




2 


Douglas 


...do 


2 
3 


Paciflc 


Idog^. ... 




Fnakiiii 


3 coyotes.. 
1 sheep. - . . 


Snohomish 


1 cow 

2 does 


3 




^Vhitman 




Grant . 


2 coyotes . 




Yakima 


.do 






2dogs 

...do 


3 




2 coyotes.. 




ir^nF , 















West Virginia. 

During the period from January 1 to July 31, 1917, investigations 
of the State department of agriculture of West Virginia showed 20 
cases of rabies in animals. 

The following table shows the localities where the cases occurred, 
the species of animals, and the month: 



Place. 


PosiUve. 


Month. 


Place. 


Positive. 


Month. 


Calhoun County: 

Grantsville 


Cows 

Idog 

Dogs 

2 cows 

.do 


July. 

June. 
Do. 

Do. 
July. 
Jime. 


Tyler Coimty: 

SistersvUle 


Idog 

1 cow 

2 dogs 

2 hogs 

3 cows....'. 


June. 


Jackson County: 

Ravenswood 


Wirt County: 

Palestine 


Do. 


ftrndyville 


Do 


Do. 


Boane County: 

Grace 


Do 


Do. 


Wood County: 

Washington 




Do 


Do. 


Beedy 


Scows 

Icalf. 

Hogs 






I&::::::::::;:.:;:: 




Do 









City Reports for Week Ended Angnai 4, 1917. 

During the week ended August 4, 1917, cases of rabies in animals 
were reported as follows: Atlantic City, N. J., 1; Chelsea, Mass., 1, 
and Detroit, Mich., 3. 

SCARLET FEVER. 

See Diphtheria, measlee, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1388. 



Digitized by 



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August 24, 1917 



1384 



SMALLPOX. 

Minnesota. 

During the week ended August 18, 1917, four new foci of smallpox 
infection were reported in Minnesota, cases of the disease having 
been notified as follows: Bigstone County, Graceville village, 2; 
Itasca County, Grand Rapids village, 1 ; Polk County, Tabor Town- 
ship, 1; Washington County, Omeka Township, 1. 

Wisconsin — Sparta. 

During the three weeks ended August 14, 1917, 22 cases of small- 
pox were reported in the State home for children at Sparta, Monroe 

County, Wis. . 

State Reports for July, 1917. 





New cases 
reported. 


Deaths. 


Vaccination history of cases. 


Place. 


Number 
vaccinated 

within 7 
yejrepre- 
• ceding 

attack. 


Number 
last vacci- 
nated more 
than 7 years 
preceding 

attack. 


Number 
never suc- 
cessfully 
vaccina tei. 


VacdnaUoo 
history not 
obtained or 
uncertain. 


Massachusetts: 

Worcester County- 
Worcester f 


1 








1 














New York: 

Albany County 


8 
1 
1 
2 




1 






7 


Chautauqua < ountv 








1 


Erie County 










1 


St. Lawrence County... 




2 














i"" ' 


Total 


12 




3 






% 












Ohio: 

Allen County 


14 
2 

'\ 

'I 

21 
40 
3 

1 

18 
10 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
3 
8 
2 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
29 
3 
1 
4 
14 
3 
13 
5 
2 
4 
1 








11 
2 

1 
2 
7 
1 
6 


3 


Athens County 










Belmont County 








13 


Butler County .'. 








2 


Clark County 








5 


Clinton County 








1 


Columbiana County 








15 


Cuyahoga County 








40 


Darke County..." 








3 




Delaware County 








1 


Franklin County 






1 


15 

8 


2 


Gallia County. .' 






2 










2 


Hancock County 








1 


3 


Hardin County. ... * 








1 


Highland County 








1 

1 




HuronCounty... *\ -! 










Jackson County. . ... 








3 


Jefferson County. ! ! * . ' 








3 

1 


5 


Logan County. . . 1 








I 


Lucas County .... 








4 












1 


Medina County 










1 


Mercer County 










2 


Miami County 

Monroe County 








1 










1 


Montgomery (5ounty 








6 
2 

1 


23 


Muskingum County 








1 


PrebleCounty 










Sandusky County 








4 


Shelby County 








9 


5 


Stark County 






1 
3 


2 


Summit County.. .......a... 






8 
3 


2 


Trumbull County 






8 


Union County. /. 








2 


Warren County.... ........... 








4 

1 




Wood County. 










Total 


252 






h 


98 


149 








tIj- - 










uigitizea 


DyGOO' 


^W 



1385 



August 24. 1917 



SMALLPOX— CJontinned. 
MisceUaneoufl State Reports. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. Ca%s. 

1 


Deaths. 


FMm^lTania (July 1^1): 
Aliei^eny County 


3 
1 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 


1 


Wisconsin (July 1-^1)— Coa. 
Dou|flas County . . 


35 




Blair County 




Eau Claire 




Erie County 




Juneau County 


4 





Luzenie County 




KoQOsha Cour ty 

Milwaukee County 

Oneida County 






Ifereer County 

Philadelphia County 

SchuyUffll County 












St. Croix County 








Sheboypan County 

Walworth County 

Washburn Cou ity 

Winnebago Co inty 

Wood County .... . 




Total 


14 













WiseonMn (July 1-31): 


15 

21 

3 

1 






BuflSalo County 




Chippewa County 

Columbia County 




Total 








115 




^^ane County... T 















City Reports for Week Ended Au^. 4, 1917. 






Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Akrcn.Ohlo. 


6 

1 
1 
4 

17 
1 
9 

11 
2 
2 
1 
8 
1 
2 
2 
1 

10 
1 




Lincoln, Nebr 


1 




Altoooa^Pa 




Little Rock, Ark 




Belliotfluun, Wash 




Milwaukee. Wis 




Butte,Mont 




Minneapolis, Minn 


5 




Chi(^,ni 




Oklahoma City, Okla 


3 
2 
1 
2 

1 

2 
5 
7 
2 




CiDcinnati, Ohio 




Omaha, Nebr.'.'.. . 




Cicveland/Ohio 




Pontiac, Mich 




Dayton, Ohio 




Portland, Oreg 




Detroit, Mich 




Portsmouth, Va 




Erie, Pa 




Quincy. 111.... 




EvansvUle, Ind 




Rocky Mount, N. C 




Flint,Mich. 




St. Joseph, Mo 




Grand Rapids, Mich 




St. Louis, Mo 




Harrisburg. Pa 




Salt Lake City, Utah 




Indianapolis, Ind 




Sioux Citv, Iowa 


3 
1 




Kansas City, Kans 




Springfield, 111 




Kansas City, Mo 




SprinEfield. Ohio 2 




Lima, Ohio.'. 

















TETANUS. 
City Reports for Week Ended Au^. 4, 1917. 



Place. 



s City, Mo 

LosAn^cs,Cal 

Memph« , Tenn 

Momstown.N. J 

Oklahoma aty, Okla.. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Rockford.m 

Schenectady, N.Y... 

Springfield, Ohio 

Syracuse. N.Y 

Toledo, Ohio 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



TUBERCULOSIS. 

See Diphtherial measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1388. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 
Kansas — Leavenwortli. 

During the week ended August 18, 1917, 26 cases of typhoid 
fever were reported in Leavenworth, Kans., and 6 cases outside of 
the city limits. During the week ended August 11, 1917, 18 cases 
were reported in Leavenworth. 

1^ Digitized by Google 



August 24p 1917 



1386 



TYPHOID FEVER— Continued. 
Tennessee — Chattanooga. 

From August 1 to August 18, 1917, inclusive, 56 cases of typhoid 
fever were notified at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

State Reports for Jnly, 1917. 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 




NevQun 
reported. 



Maryland: 

Baltimore City 

Allegany County- 
Cumberland 

Allegany : 

Westemport 

Western Maryland Hospital 

Midland 

Anne Arundell County— 

Marley 

Drury 

Glenbumie 

Fairfield 

Crownsville 

Eastport 

Elkrfdge, R. D 

Annapolis, R. D 

Admiral Junction 

Annapolis 

Best Gate 

Skidmore 

Baltimore County- 
Thistle Mills 

Sparrow Point 

Towson 

Woodlawn 

G ovanstown 

Roland Park 

Highlandtown 

Upper Falls 

Rosodale 

Hereford 

Woodbrook 

Rossville 

Lansdowne 

Baltimore Highlands 

Summerfleld 

Middle River 

Calvert County— 

Sunderland 

Caroline County- 

Ridsely 

FederaJsburg 

Cecil County- 
Rising Sun, R. D 

Elkton, R. D 

Elk ton 

Charles County— 

Ripley 

Brentland 

LaPlat^ 

Waldorf, R.D 

La Plata, R. D 

Bryantown, R. D 

Hughesville, R. D 

Bryantown 

Dorchester County— 

Crapo 

Reids Grove 

Taylors Island 

Vienna, R. D 

Hurlock 

Reids Grove, R. D 

Chu rch Creek 

Linkwood 

Toddvllle 

East New Market 

Cambridge 

Hawk Eye 



36 

1 
6 

1 
2 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 

1 

3 

1 i 

3 I 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 ! 
1 I 



Maryland— Continued. 
Frederick County- 
Peters ville 

Frederick 

Brunswick 

Union Bridge, R. D 

Garrett County— 

KitxmiUer 

Bloomington 

Harford County- 
Dublin 

Howard County— 

Elkridge 

Clarks ville, R. D 

Marrlottsville 

Kent County— 

Mlllington : 

Montfiomcry County— 

Dickorson 

Rockville, R. D 

Prince Georges County— 

Sik.sia 

RosaryviUe, R. D 

Tuxeao 

Laurel. R.D 

Scat Pleasant 

Quocn Annes County— 

Ilayden 

Stovensville, R. D 

Somerset County— 

Princess Anno 

Hopewell 

Deals Island 

West 

Crisfield, R. D 

St. Marys County— 

St. Marys City 

Talbot County— 

Bcllevuo 

St. Michaels 

Tilghman 

Washington County — 

Hagcrstown 

Bro\>TisviIlo 

Security 

Wicomico County- 
Pennsylvania General Hospital. 

Eden, R.D 

Salisbury 

Bivalve 

Worcester County — 

Bishopviile 

Snow Hill 

Pocomoko City 

Pocomoke City, R. D 

Berlin, R. D 



Total. 



New York: 

Albany County 

Allegany County 

Broome County 

Cattaraugus County.. 

Cayuga County 

Chautauqua County. 



Chemung County. 
Clinton County . . . 
Columbia County. 
Cortland County.. 
Dutchess County.. 



173 



20 
5 
1 
3 

1 
5 
3 
2 

4 
1 
5 



Digitized by 



Google 



1387 



August 24, 191*r 



TYPHOID FEVER— Continued. 
State Reports for Jnly, 1917— Continued. 



Place. 



Kew York— Continued. 

Erie County 

Essex County 

FoltoQ County 

Oenesoe County 

Oreene County 

Herkimer County . . . . 

Jefferson County 

Lewis County 

LlriQgston County. . . 

Ifodiaon County 

Monroe County ..... . 

Nienre County 

Oneida County 

ODOodaga County.... 

Ontarfo County 

Oimnge County 

Orleans County 

Otsego County 

R«QSBelaer County . . . 
St. Lawrence County 

Saratoga County 

Schenectady County. 
Schoharie County — 

Steuben County 

Suffolk County 

Sollivan County 

Tioca County 

Ulster County 

Wayne County 

Westchester County.. 
New York City 

ToUl 

Ohio: 

Alko County 

Ashubula County . . . 

Athena Count V 

Belmont County 

Brown County 

Champaign County. . 

Clark County 

Clermont County . . . . 

Clinton County 

Columbiana County.. 
Coihocton County.... 

Crawfard County 

Cayahoga County ... . 

]>arke County 

Erie County 

Fiirflcld County 

Fayette Coimty 

rtanklin County 

Oieene County 

Oormsey Cmmty . . - . 
Hamilton County.... 

Hancock County 

Hardhi County 

Harrison County 

Highland County.... 

Horon County 

Jefferson County 

Kaox County 

Lawrence County. . .. 

Licklni County 

Locas County 

Mahoning County.. . . 

Medina County 

Miami County. 

Montgomery County. 

Morrow County 

Maiklngum County.. 

Jtekaway County..,. 

^ottaga County 

Richland County.... 

Roes County 

gMwJnsky County.... 

gdoto County........ 

SoecaCoon^ 



New cases 
reported. 



242 



Place. 



Ohio— Continued. 

Shelby County 

Stark County 

Summit County 

Trumbull County 

Tuscarawas County 

Washington County 

Wood County 

Wyandot County 

Total 

FennsylTania: 

Allegheny County 

Armstrong County/ 

Beaver County 

Bedford County 

Berks County 

Blair Coun.ty 

Bradford County 

Bucks County 

Butler County 

Cambria County 

Carbon County 

Center County 

Chester County 

Clarion County 

Clcarrjeld County 

Columbia Ccninty 

Cumberland Coimty 

Dauphin County 

Delaware County 

Elk County 

Erie County 

Fayette Ccwnty 

Franklin County 

Greene County 

Uuntingdon County 

Indiana Countv 

JcHerson County 

Lackawanna County 

Lancaster County 

Lawrence County 

Lebanon County 

Lehigh County 

Luzerne County 

Lycoming County 

Mercer County 

Mimin County 

Montgomery County 

Montour County. . .* 

Northampton County 

Northumberland County 

Perry Ccunty 

Philadelphia County 

Potter County 

Schuylkill County 

Somerset County 

Venango County 

Washington County 

Wayne County 

Westmoreland County 

York County 

Total 

Wisconsin: 

Bayfield County 

Dane County 

Dunn County 

Eau Claire County 

Fond du Lac County 

Kenosha County 

Milwaukee County 

Sauk County 

Sheboygan County 

Washington County 

Winnebago County 

Wood County 

Total 

Digitized by 



New cases 
reported. 



165 



119 
3 
2 
5 

13 

24 
2 
8 
1 

1 
1 
7 
1 
3 
2 
8 
7 
4 
2 
2 
5 
4 
5 
4 
1 
6 
1 
9 
3 
1 
7 
3 
1 

15 
3 

17 

12 
7 
4 
1 

36 
1 
S 

13 
2 

10 
1 

11 

21 



22 

Google 



Ansu8t24,1917 1388 

TYPHOID PEVBE— Contiiiued. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 4, 1917. 



Place. 



Akron, Ohio 

Allentown, Pa 

Alton, D! 

Altoona, Pa 

Atlantic City, N.J 

Austin, Tex 

Baltimore, Md 

Berkeley, Cal 

Birmingham, Ala 

Boston, Mass 

Braddock, Pa 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Buflalo.N.Y 

CaiTt),Ill 

Cambridn. Mass ■ 

Camden, N.J 

Charleston, S. C 

Chicago, 111 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

COffeyville, Kans 

Columbia, S.C 

Columbus, Ohio 

Covington, Ky 

Davenport, Iowa 

Dayton, Ohio , 

Detroit, Mich 

EUiabeth.N.J 

El Paso, Tex 

Erie, Pa 

Evansvillo, Ind 

Everett, Mass 

Fall River, Mass 

Flint, Mich 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

Fort Worth, Tex 

Oreen Bay, wis 

Harrisburg, Pa 

Hoboken.N.J 

Indianapolis. Ind 

Jersey nty, N. J 

Kansas rily. Mo 

Kokomo, Ind 

Lancaster, Pa 

Lax^rence. Mass \. 

Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Little Rock, Ark 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Il 



Long Beach, Cat 

Los Angeles, CaL 

Lynchburg, Va 

lUnchester, N. H 

IfcKeesport, Pa 

Memphis, Tenn 

MUwaukee.Wis 

Minneapolis, Mlmi 

Nashville. Tenn 

Newark, N.J 

New Bedford. Man 

Newcastle, Pa 

New Orleans. La 

NewYork, N. Y 

Niagara FaUs, N. Y 

Oaiaand,Cal 

Oklahoma City, Okla.... 

Passaic, N.J 

Perth Amboy, N. J 

Philadelphia. Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Portland, Oreg 

Portsmouth, va 

Providence, R. I 

Reading, Pa 

Richmond, Va 

Roanoke, Va 

Rochester, N. Y 

Rockford. Ill 

St. Joseph. Mo 

St. Louis, Mo 

Salt Lake City, Utah... 

San Francisco, Cal 

Sacramento, Cal 

Saginaw, Mich 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y., 

Savannah, da , 

Seattle, Wash 

Springfield, Ohio 

Symnise, N. Y 

Toledo, Ohio 

Topeka, Kans 

Trenton, N.J 

Wa-ihiriRlon. D. C 

Wheeliiij;. W. Va 

Wirhita, Kans 

Wilmington, Del 

Wiu^tou-Salem, N. C... 



TYPHUS FEVEB. 

New York CHy Report for July, 1917. 

During the month of July, 1917, 2 cases of typhus fever were 
reportinl in Now York City. 

DIPHTHERU, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSia 
Sute Reports for July, 1917. 



Bute. 



Mar\I ind. 
New > (irk 
Ohio 



Casoi rpportc<l. 



W- ! Measles. 



theria. | 



1/2x9 I 
317 I 



602 



vl. 


State. 


Cases rvportad. 


Scarlet 
fever. 1 


thlffi: M^***-^ 


BttrW 


39 
572 


Pennsylvania 

Wixoiisin 




1,8X1 
338 


m 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1389 



Angust 24, 1917 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS— 

Continued. 

City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 4, 1917. 





jQiyl.lWO 

(e^limaeed 

bvU.S. 

C*n*i» 

Bure*a}» 


Tofal 

a«atbs 


DlphtbCTJn. 


Hearts?. 


SLWlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
cuJoals- 


aty. 


aU 

CflU5S9, 


1 


1 


1 


i 

1 


1 


j_ 


J 


1 


Otbt mm tnhsN lants: 

Baltimore Md 


589,621 

756,476 

2,497,722 

674,073 

571,784 

503,812 

5,602,841 

1,709,518 

579,090 

757,309 

468,558 
410,476 
306,345 
436,535 
363,454 
408,894 
371,747 
348.639 
363,980 

214,878 
260,800 
271,708 
297,847 
295,463 
251,960 
256,417 

104,199 
181,762 
121,579 
112,981 
106,233 
127,224 
128,366 
104,562 
128,291 
110,900 
100,560 
113,215 
102.425 
148,995 
117,0.57 
118,158 
149,GJ'5 
198,604 
165,470 
109,381 
156,687 
117,399 
105,942 
155,624 
191,554 
111,593 
163,314 

85,625 
63,505 
58,659 
57,660 
69,893 
57,653 
53,973 
67,449 
60,734 


' *249' 
719 
2«5 
383 

*2,'i7i' 

677 
.271 
235 

133 
128 
153 
109 

"**i69' 
147 
28 
156 

60 
51 

42 
81 
96 


5 
41 
130 
21 
38 

4 
140 
31 

7 
31 

13 
6 

10 
7 
8 
6 

10 




2 

13 
1 

1 

"16 

4 

3 

1 

" i" 
' "i 


38 
43 
73 

8 
8 
8 
169 
19 
27 
8 

4 
1 
9 

17 
3 

25 






19 
78 

179 
28 
24 
44 

339 
67 
13 
52 

34 
31 
11 
17 


2A 


Boston Mass 





12 
74 
2 
15 

1 
28 
8 
3 
14 

2 


1 
1 


76 


Chictgo. 1 11 


83 


Cleveland. Ohio 


13 


Detwit.Mich 


14 


Los Angeles, Cal • 


22 


NewYork.N.Y 

Philadelphia, Pa 


195 
04 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


13 


St. Louis Mo 


13 


From 300.000 to 500,000 inhab- 
itants: 
Buffalo.N. Y 


9 


Cincinnati Ohio 


17 


Jersey City, N.J 




5 

21 

3 

3 

1 
1 
1 

1 
2 
1 
3 
4 
3 
3 


'"l 


5 


Milwaukee Wis 


4 


Minneapolis. Minn .,,-.,- 




Newark.N.J 

New Orleans, I->aT 




43 
37 
18 
25 

5 


8 
27 


Seattle, Wash 


1 




5 
16 




5 


Washington, D. C 




9 


From 200,000 to 300,000 inhab- 
iUnts: 
Columbas, Ohio 


1 

4 
24 




4 


I>cnver,Colo 


i 


44 



* 




10 


Indianapolis, Ind 




7 




Kansas City, Mo 


'1 




7 


Portland, Orcg 




1 
1 
13 

5 
6 

I 
1 
2 


1 
2 




9 


2 


Providence, R. I 


6 
15 


1 
3 


1 


Rochester,N.Y 

From 100,000 to 200,000 Inhab- 
itants: 
Albany.N. Y 


1 


10 

2 
17 

4 
3 
9 
6 
8 


18 


RirminfhaTn, Ala 


98 
68 
28 


1 


1 


2 
2 
1 




8 


Bridgeport, Conn 


" •5I 


2 


Cambndce .Mass 


4 





3 


Camdcn,N.J 




Dayton, Ohio 


49 
49 
19 
32 

34' 

50 
19 


5 

4 






1 




4 


FallRiverMass 


1 


5 


1 


4 


Fort Worth, Tex 






3 


Grand Rapids, Mich 

Hartford, Conn 


1 
9 
3 
3 
4 


1 
1 


1 
6 




2 
1 




1 
8 
2 
3 
5 


3 


Lawrence.Mass 


5 


LowcU,Mas8 










2 


Lyrni, Vfftcs 


3 








3 


Memphis, Tenn 








5 


Nashville. Tenn 


48 
55 

26' 

49 
54 

87 
23 
61 
50 

78 
48 
67 

i8* 




1 




1 
1 




I 

3 

I 

4 
3 


3 


New Bedford, Mass 


1 
1 
1 
2 

1 
1 
2 


1 
""i* 


3 

10 

4 
1 
1 


'" i 


6 


New Haven, Conn 


4 


Oakland, Cal 


3 




3 


Omaha, Nebr 


^1 


4 


Reading, Pa 


2 


Richmond. Va 


2 
6 






6 


Bait Uke Citv, Utah 

Springfield, Mass 




1 




1 


( 




3 


fiyracuse.N Y 


6 
3 
4 

19 


...... 

...... 


5 


1 

8 


2 
5 
12 


3 


Toledo. Ohio 


5 ':::'■■ 


7 


Trenton.N. J 


3 

6 
3 




3 




..:.::..:::::::: 


3 


From 50.000 to 100,000 inhab- 
itants: 
Akron, Ohio 




2 






. .. 


Allentown, Pa 




t 




Altoona.Pa 


7 


1 1 






1 

2 
3 
1 

7 
I 


... 


AtlanticCity,N.J 


1 


3 








Bayonne.N:^ 


7' 

11 
9 
26 


1 
1 
1 
1 
3 






1 




^^keley,Cal 




2 
4 




• 


i 


BInghamton, N. Y '.['.[ 




He;; 




Brockton, Mass 


1 1 




ch«rie8tai,8.c....::::r.;; 







1 



Digitized by 



Googfc 



August 24, 1917 



1390 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Continued. 

Citr Reports for Week Ended Aug. 4, 1917— C!oQtmued. 





Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 
bv U. 8. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria 


. Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tube- 

CUkKil 


City. 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


From 60,000 to 100,000 inhabit- 
, ants-Continued. 

Covin£ton. Kv, ,..^,..,^ 


67,144 
94,495 
86,690 
63,705 
75,195 
76,078 
54,772 
76,183 
72,015 
77,214 
68,529 
99,437 
50,853 
67,343 
51,155 
78,283 
58,221 
92,943 
71,744 
59,411 
63,807 
55,18.5 
60,895 
&).<)42 
85,236 
53,330 

C8,sa5 

99,519 
57,078 
87,039 
68,946 
61, 120 
Sl^.'iSO 
66,083 
77, 9K. 
70,722 
76, 770 
94,265 

27,732 
34, SU 
32,9S.> 
32,7.30 
27,632 
43,425 
46, 192 
29,319 
a4,Gll 
26, 074 
4S.S11 
30 S73 


15 
16 
28 
45 

24' 

i9' 

29 

40 
22 

28' 

7 

20 
28 
12 
39 
27 


1 
1 
6 




1 
8 
3 

1 




2 

1 
1 
1 
4 




1 
2 

8 


i 


T)n|utn, Mint)^ .^. .^^ 


i 


Klixabeth. N.J 

El Paso, Tex 




Ene Pa 


6 






11 
2 


V 


Ev^nsvllle, Ind ...r..- 




1 


1 


I 


Flint, Mich 


1 
1 




2 






Fort wavne. Ind 










1 I 3 


HarrisbuTK, Pa 




1 
1 




1 
2 
2 
2 




21 1 


Hoboken, r»f. J 


3 

1 
1 

1 




7 ; i 


Johnstown. Pa .... 


2I .. 


KAnsas City. Kans 








3 


Lancaster, "Pa 




1 

1 
2 




1 1:..:.: 


Little Rock. Ark 










Maiden, Mass 


2 
2 
1 










3 

I 

1 
2 




MftTi'>he«»ter N. Tt 




1 






Mobile. Ala' 




1 
1 
3 


1 




Oklahoma City, Okla 

Passaic N J 


1 






8 

1 


...... 




Pawtucket R I 










Portland Me 


6 
3 
2 


2 


1 
1 








Rockford 111 


20 
28 
11 
29 
19 
24 
22 












Sacramento, Cal. 


3 

1 
3 
2 
2 

1 


1 




4 
1 




Sa£lnaw Mich . . 











St Joseph Mo 














San Diego, Cal 




2 




3 




4 




Savannah, Qa 




Schenectady, N. Y 




2 








2 




Sioux Citv, Iowa 




2 
2 
1 






SomerviUe, Mass 


18 
22 
17 
19 
17 


1 

1 


1 


1 






4 
3 




South Bend, Ind 




Springfield, 111 










Springfield, Ohio 






2 








3 




Terre Haute, Ind 


1 
3 












Troy, N. Y 





1 








3 
4 

5 
5 

3 




Wichita, Kans 




2 
2 






Wilkes-Barre, Pa 


31 
50 

I 
20 
2 
6 
9 

i9' 

23 
14 
3 


5 




4 
1 






Wilmington, Del 




From 25,000 to .50,000 inhabitants: 
Alameda, Cal 














Austin, Tex 


1 












4 


Beliin£ham Wash 

















Brookline, Mass 






2 













Butler, Pa 


1 
2 

1 










2 




■ Butte, Mont 


■■'2' 

1 


1 




3 







Chelsea, Mass • • * • * * ^ ^ ^ 





1 


4 


Chioopoe, Mass 




i 






3 


Columbia S C 


1 








Cumberland Md 






2 
1 






1 


Davennort Iowa 












1 
















2 


2 




2S, 743 
42, m 
2H, 203 
39. 2.13 
3.J,-ISG 
41,7.S1 
41,8fi3 
29,353 
48,477 
3.5,363 
48,RS6 
31,576 
26,771 
31,677 
41,097 
3,5,3H-4 
46,515 
27,.5S7 
36,9&4 


3 
6 
6 

12 
2 
7 

10 
9 

is' 

15 
6 
10 
7 
24 
16 
14 
12 




1 












Eiist Orange, N.J 


5 








1 
1 




T"~- 'M 














i , . ' " ■ " - 






3 










KVt'JHt t . ^V Lfcill , 
















Fltirhbnnt, Mtki^s 


1 




1 








3 




tialr**^U3n, Tt* ,^ 








2 


Grcon Buv, Wis 


















Iltivi'thSd. Miisj 


1 




1 
2 
16 
1 








1 
2 
3 

1 




Jackson, Jlith. 




1 






K^I&m.a£(H^ Mich 


1 




2 


Kenoshfi, Wis 










KlHL^^totl, K. Y 

La Ofosdo^ Wjj 












1 


1 
















IjCTEiiiRt^i* Ky 














8 


Umti, uNo 


3 

1 


1 


1 




1 






2 


Lincoln* N#br 




1 
2 

1 




Lane lieat'h, Cil 















LonOD.Ohio.. 


i 















Digitized by 



Google 



1391 



August 24, 1017 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER. AND TUBERCULOSIS— 

Coiitinueil. 

City Reports for Week Ended Auf. 4, 1917— Continued. 



City. 



rrom 2S.0Q0 to 50,000 inhabit- 
ants—Continued . 



Lynchburg, Va. 
Madison, Wis. 



McKeesport, Pa 

Medlord. Mass 

Montdair, .^I. J 

Newbur-h. N. Y 

Newcastle. Pa 

New3»rt, Ky 

Kt'wtoTj, Mji.%^. 

Nuucivri Fill, N. Y.... 

IftttttMowu, l^il. 

Otan», N. J_. 

PtMe^a. Cal , 

Pinh Amh(>>% N. J.... 

Vl%tc&(^d, Ua.^ 

PortainoTith, Va 

QiTitiry, nL,_, 

Qulnty , Mass , 

Tlaiiiic , W is - . . , , 

Koonokf?'. %'a. , 

Roc* tslantl. Ill 

Sail Jot* , C't L 

eteub^tiviU? . Ohio 

Suipwior, Wis. 

TkWfltfiTI , M 05.^ , 

TtiTK:ka, Katii 

Wall^»Oi. Mits.^ 

Wciit lIulhjkcri.N.J.. 

miw>liui:, W. Va 

^'vniim^jJOT T . Pa 

Wilminctf-ti, S'.C 



Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 
bv U. S. 
Census 
Bureau). 



Ttum lu.wAi M> zo,000 inhabit- 
ants: 

Alton, 111 

Berlin.N. H 

Bnvddock, Pa 

c*»iro.iih ;;,. 

' ' ••-'ti^ M'1,S5.. '.. 

UiU-yvllJc, Kalis 

I'ftiureff] , N . n.. 

(jiJwUuf lU, 

WittTison. %'. J., , 

Kcjuny, S'. J., 

U&kattto, Tnd.. 

Uti^ BniDrh. N. J 

lUriiirtt,', Wi^. 

Mf ko*, M jiiiS _ 

^oniito^-n, N. i 

Nintieulr, l*A._ 

Nfwbtipviiof t , Mass 

Jpw Lcindon, C*mui 

^_^b. \thim, '-^.ss 

JvufUumiittmi, Mass 

mnn*kl. N^J 



i;imikf.liieh,. 

TmUtujKiOi.N.H.. 

li^k} Mi>titit,N^C 

RulliUjcj.Vt.,. 

SiTidiiaky, oHio 

5s*ltllD,lfft..,^: 

^i«li]tietcrft, Pa 

^obuni,Mass 



32,940 
30,099 
47,521 
26,234 
26,318 
29.G03 
41,133 
31,927 
43,715 
37,353 
31,401 
33,080 
46, 4M 
41,185 
38,629 
39,651 
36,798 
38,136 
46,486 
43,284 
28,926 
3K,902 
27,445 
46,226 
36,283 
48,726 
30,570 
43, 139 
43,377 
?}.S09 
2<J,J'92 
31,155 
30,863 



22,874 

21*685 
15,794 

M3,075 
17,548 
22.669 
24, 276 
16,950 
23,539 
20,930 
15,395 

1 14, 010 
17,445 
13,2S4 
23.126 
15,243 
20,985 

122,019 
19,926 
23,S05 
17,524 
11,666 
12,067 
14,^1 
20,193 
13,821 
15,548 
21,618 
23,228 
15,969 




» Population Apr. 16, 1910; no estimate made. 



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Google 



FOREIGN. 



EGYPT. 
Plague. 



During the week ended June 27, 1917, 6 cases of plague with 4 
deaths were reported at Alexandria. Of these, 1 case occurred in a 
European. In the government of Port Said from April 30 to May 19, 
4 cases with 3 deaths were reported and at Port Said, June 25, 1 case 
was reported. In the government of Suez, from April 30 to June 2, 
23 cases were reported, of which 5 were septicemic, and at the port 
of Suez, from June 22 to 28, 34 cases with 21 deaths, 3 of the cases 
being pneumonic and 12 septicemic in form. 

In the provinces, 2 cases were reported in the Province of Fayoum, 
June 26; 1 case was reported in the Province of Galioubeh, June 28; 
and in the Province of Minieli, from June 25 to 28, 2 cases were 
reported. The total number of cases reported in Egypt from January 
1 to June 28, 1917, was 564, with 313 deaths. During the correspond- 
ing period of the year 1916, the total number of cases reported was 
1,634, with 792 deaths. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 
Anthrax— Bradford and Vicinity. 

Two fatal cases of anthrax have been reported as occurring in 
July, 1917, at Bradford, England, and the suburl)an town of Shipley. 
The first case, reported July 9, occurred in a workman eng^ed in 
sorting gray wool, alpaca, white goat hair, etc. The second case, 
occurring at Shipley and reported July 14, was in a workman em- 
ployed by a wool-combing finn, the wool handled being a blend of 
low mohair, goat hair, and Egyptian and Scotch wool. 

Durmg the year ended Octob.T 31, 1916, 19 cases of anthrax were 
reported in Bradford and vicmity, and for the 10-year period pre- 
ceding the year 1916, 127 cases in Bradford district and 15 cases 
m adjoining districts.^ 

UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA. 
Plague — Glengrey District. 

Plague was reported August 13, 1917, in Glengrey district, Cape 
of Good Hope State, 100 miles inland from Port Elizabeth. 

I Public Health Reports, May 4, 1917, p. 675. 
(1392) ' 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1393 ' Ausust 24. 1017 

GHOUBBA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER. 
Reports Received Daring the Week Ended Aug. 24, 1917.^ 

GHOLEBA. 



Place. 


Bate. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India: 

GUcQtta 


June 3-9 




32 

1 


"^j&."' 






do 


1 




PhiUppiDe Islands: 

novixioes 




1917: Oases, 315; deaths, 


Albay 


July 1-7 


2 
66 
19 
54 

7 
4 

79 

1 
82 

1 


1 

46 
16 
38 
4 
4 
54 


Bobol 


do 




Ctoix 


do 




Cebu. 


do 




nollo 


do 




Leyto 


do 




Nocroe Oriental . . 


. ..do 




Rl«^l 


do.... 




8orsos<m 


....do 


39 

1 




Tayabas 


..do 











PLAGUE. 



^gypt. 



Alexandria 

Port Said govt . 

Port Said.. 
Provinces— 

Fayoum . . . 

Gatioubeh . . 

Minieh 

Suez g07t 

Suei 

India 



Madras Presidency 

Siam: 

Banked 

8trait9 Settlements: 

Singapore 

Union of South .\frlca: 

Cape of Gocd Hope State— 
Glengrey district 



June 21-27 

Apr.3(KMayl9. 
June 25 



June 26 

June 28 

June 25-28 

Apr. 3(>-June2. 
June 22-28 



June 3-9.. 
July 3-23.. 
June 9-16.. 



Aug. 13. 



Jan. 1-Juna 28, 1917: Cases. 564: 
deaths, 313. 



June 3-9, 1917: Cases, 2,708; 
deaths, 2,101. 



Present. 



SMALLPOX. 



Bradl: 

Rio de Janeiro.. 
China: 

Mukden 

Shanghai 

Alexandria 

India: 

Madras 

Russia: 

Petrograd 

Siam: 

Bankok 

Spain: 

Valencia 

Straits Settlements: 

Penang 

Uruguay: 

Montevideo 



July 1-14., 

July 8-14 . 
July 2-15., 



July 2-8.... 
June 3-9.-.. 
June 3-9..., 
June 9-23 .. 
July ^14... 
June 17-23.. 
May 1-31... 



50 



Present. 
Among Chinese. 



1 From medical officers of the Public Health Service, American consuls, and other sources. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Auffust 24» 1017 



1394 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER- 

Continued. 

Reports Received Daring the Weelc Ended Ang. 24, 1917— Continued. 

TYPHUS FEVER. 



riace. 


Dat«. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


China: 

Antune 


July 9-15 


2 

1 

73 
12 
13 
2 


1 




Tientsin 


June 17-23 




Egypt: 

Alexandria 


July 2-8 


23 

1 




Japan: 

Nagasaki 


July 9-22 




Rufisia: 

Petrcgrad 


June 3-9 




Switzerland: 

Basel 


July 8-14 


1 











Reports Received from June 30 to Aag. 17, 1917. 

CHOLERA. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


ReniArks. 


India: 

na"isein 


Apr. 1-May6 




8 
303 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
16 




Calcutta 


Apr. 29-June2 






Madras 


Apr. 22-June2 

Mav6-12 


2 




Mandalay 




Moulraein ' Mayl3-Jimo2 






Pakokku ' Anr. 29-Mav5 






Pegu 

Ranpoon 

Indo-China: 

Provinces 


Mav27-Juno2 






Apr. 21-June9 


30 


Feb. 1-28, 1917: Cases, 20; deatbf, 


Anam < Fob. 1-28 


3 

8 

8 

1 

163 

1 




Cambodia •- -do.. . 


6 
6 




Coch in-China 

Tonkin 

Saigon 

Java: 

East Ja\-a 

West Java 


do 




do 




Apr. 23-May27.... 
Apr.2-8 


108 








Apr. 13-19, 1917: 1 case. 


Batavia i Apr. 13-19 


1 

1 

4 
1 
3 

1 




Persia: 

Mazanderan Province— 
Amir Kola 


Feb. 3 






Barfourouche 


Jan. 15-17 






Hamxo Kola 

Machidossar 


Jan 17 






Jan. 31 






Philippine Islands: 

Manila 


June 17-23 






Provinces 






May 20-June30, 1917: Cases,l,W»; 
deaths, 673. 


Albav 


May 20-June 30. . . 
June 3-9 


113 
2 
1 

368 
62 

231 
14 
1 

196 
7. 


76 

1 

1 

251 

40 

150 

5 


Ambor> Camarincs 


Bat;iug<is 


June 17-23... . 




Bohol 


May 20-June 30. . . 
Juno 3-30 




Capiz 




Cebu 


. ...do 




Levte 


June l«KiO 




Rizal 


June 21-30 




SorsoRon 


Juno 3-30 


88 
7 




Tayabas 


...do 











PLAGUE. 



Arabia: 

Aden 

Bratil: 

Bahia 

Ceylon: 

Colombo 

China: 

Amoy 

Hongkong 

Kwangtune Province— 
Pa-pu district 



May 3- Juno 11. 



June 10-30.... 
Apr.8-Junc9. 



Apr.29-May5... 
May 13-June9.. 

Jime2 



13 



Apr. 8-May 14, 1917: Owes, 69; 
deaths, 51. 



Present and in yloinity. 

Google 



Present, 

Digitized by 



1395 



August 24, 1917 



CHOLEBA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER— 

Oontmued. 

Reports ReceiTed from June 30 to Aug. 17, 1917~Oontinued. 
PLAGUE--Continued 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


ECTOt 








Jan. 1-May 17, 1917: Cases, 231; 
deaths, 116. 


^^::::::::::::::::::::::: 


If^y 12-17 


4 
12 


2 

6 

1 
2 
1 


Prov'izioes — 

F^Toum ... 


May 11-17 




Oireeh 


May 17 




Minfeh 


May 13-15 


2 
3 

2 




Siout 


Iffty12 




GrcBt Britaixu 

London 


May3-« 


2 in hospital at port. From s. s. 

Sardinia from Australian and 

orientalports. 
Apr. 15-Juno 2, 1917: Cases, 

38,250; deaths, 26,092. 


Indk 






Bassein 


Apr. 1-June 2 




42 

326 

38 

33 

• 411 

203 

9 

59 

1 

2 

134 

2 


Bombay 


Apr.22-June 16... 
Apr.2»-June2 


406 


Calcutta 




Hfltii*4o . . ... 


Apr. 1-May 19 






Karachi ..... 


Apr.22-June9 

Apr.22-Junel6... 
Apr.8-Mayl2. . . 


467 
247 




Madras Presidency 




MandAlay 




Moalmeiii 


Apr. 1-June 2 






Mying3raii . 


Apr. 1-7 








May 27-June 2 








Apr.l5^une9.... 
Apr.*-14 


143 




Toungoo 




Indo-ChmaT 

Provinces 






Feb. 1-28, 1917: Cases, 101: deaths, 
71. 


Anam^, ,,, 


Feb. 1-28 


31 
57 
13 

47 


15 
47 
9 
26 


Cambodia 


do 




Cochin-Chlna 


do 




Saigon 


Apr.23-June3.... 




Java: 

East Java 


Apr. 2-22, 1917: Cases, 18; deaths, 


Surabajra 


Apr. 2-22 


13 
5 


13 
5 


Surakarta 


do 




Peru 




May 1&-31, 1917: Cases, 15. 
At Mollcndo. 


Departments— 

Arequipa 


May 16-31 


4 
1 
2 

7 

1 

12 
1 

1 
1 




CaUao 


do 




At Callao. 


Lambayvque 


do 




At Chiclayo. 

At Salaverry, San Pedro, and 

Trujillo. 
At Lima. 


Libertad 


do 




Lima 


do 




Slam: 

Bangkok 


Apr. 22-Junol.... 
June 3-9 


11 




Btiaits Settlements: 




Union of South Africa: 

Cape of Good Hope Stat©— 
Tarka district 


May 28 


1 


At Sununerhill Farm. 


Quoenstown 


Juno 6 




Orange Free State 






Apr. 16-22, 1917: 1 case; Apr. 9-22, 
1917: Cases, 26; deaths, 17. 


Winburg district 


May 28 




1 











SMALLPOX. 



Australia: 

New South Wales 








Apr. 27-June 21, 1917: Cases, 20. 


Brewarrlna 


Apr. 27-June 21 . . . 

May25-June7 

Apr. 27-June 21... 

May 9 


6 

12 

2 

1 

4 
126 

1 
3 




Coonabarabran 






Quambone 






Queensland- 
Thursday Island Quar- 




From s. s. St. Albans from Kobe 


antine Station. 

BradI: 

Bahia 


May6-June30.... 
do 




via Hongkong. Vessel pro- 
ceeded to Townsvllle, Bris- 
bane, and Sydney, in quaran- 
tine. 


^ RiodeJaneiro 


31 




Ctaada: 

Manitoba— 

WinnipAg ^ 


June 10-16 




Nova Scotia— 
Halifax... . 


June 18-July 7 

June 17-30 






Port Hawkesbury 




Present In dlstriclv^ t 



gitized by 



Coogle 



I 



August 24, 1917 



1396 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVElt- 

Ck>ntinued. 

Reports Received from June 30 (o Aa^. 17, 1917— Continued. 
SMAIJLPOZ-<>mtinued. 



Place. 



Date. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Remarks. 



Ceylon: 

Colombo 

China: 

Amoy 

Antung 

Chungking 

Changsha 

Dairen 

Harbin 

Hongkong 

Manchuria Station . 

Mukden 

Shanghai 

Tientsin 

Tsitshar Station 

Tsingtao 



Egypt: 
Ak 



Alexandria 

France: 

Paris , 

Germany 

Berlin 

Bremen , 

Cliarlottenburg 

Hamburg , 

Leipzig , 

Ltlbcck 

Munich 

Stuttgart , 

Indii: 

Bombay 

Calcutta 

Karachi 

Madras 

Rangoon , 

Indo-China: 

Provinces , 

Anam 

Cambodia , 

Cochln-China 

Tonkin , 

Saigon , 

Italy: 

Turin 

Japan: 

Kobe , 

Nagasaki , 

Osaka , 

Yokohama , 

Java: 

East Java 

Mid-Java , 

West Java 

Batavia , 

Mexico: 

Mazatlan 

Mexico City , 

Monterey 

Vera Cruz 

Philippine Islands: 

Manila 

Portugal: 

Lisbon 

Portuguese East Africa: 

Loureuco Marquez . . 
Russia: 

Archangel 

Petrograd , 

Riga 

Vladivostok 

Spain: 

Madrid , 

SeviUe 

Valencia 

Straits Settlements: 

Penane 



May 6-12.. 



Apr. 
May 
May 
May 
May 
Apr. 
May 
Apr. 
May 
May 
May 

May 



29-May26.. 
21-June24.. 
6-June23.., 
27-June2.. 
13-June30.. 
23-May6..., 
&-Junel6... 

23-29 

27-June2... 
21-JulyL.. 
13-June9... 

16-22 

22-July7... 



Apr.30-JulyL 
May 6-12 



Mar. IS- Apr. 28. 

....do..... 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Apr. 22-Jime 16. 
Apr. 29-May 26.. 
Apr. 22-June9.. 
Apr. 22-Junel6. 
Apr. 15-Junc9.. 



Feb. 1-28 

....do 

...-do , 

....do 

Apr.27-June 10., 

May21-June24., 

May 27- July 8... 
May 2S-June3.. 
May IG-July 5.., 
May 27-July 1.. 



Apr. 2-29.. 
Apr. 1-21.. 



Apr. 13-May3. 



July 11-17.. 
Juno 3-30... 
June 1*^24.. 
July 1-7.... 



May 13- June 9.. 

May 13-Junc30. 

Mar. 1-Apr. 30.. 

May 1 -June 28.. 
Feb. IS- June 2.. 
Mar. Il-June2.. 
Mar. 15-21 



May 1-June 19. 

May 1-31 

June 3- July 7. . 



Mar.l8-Mayl2.. 



39 



106 
16 
18 
50 
20 
2 
10 
1 

149 



297 
36 

193 
67 

199 

32 

56 

1 

177 

1 

11 
IG 



162 

"i 

6 
14 



23 



Present and in vidnity. 
Present. 

On Chinese Eastern Ry. 

Do. 
Present. 
Cases foreign; deaths among na^ 

tlvcs. 
On Chinese Eastern Ry. 
At another station on raflway, 

lease. 



Mar. Ifi-Apr. 28. 1917: Cases, 715 
in cities and 32 States and dis- 
tricU. 



Feb. 1-28, 1917: Cases, 593; deaths. 
62. 



Apr. 13-May 10, 1917: Cases, 
deaths, 7. 



Varioloid. 



Jan. l-Mar.3l, 1917: Cases, 9. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1397 



August 24, 1917 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER- 

Continued. 

Reports Received flrom June 30 to Aag. 17, 1917— Continued. 

SBIALLPOZ— Continued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Sweden: 


Apr. 23-28 


1 
2 

2 






Stockholm 


May 20- June 23... 
June 2-8 


1 




Tunisia: 

Tunis 




Turkey in Asia: 

Trebizood 


Feb. 2S-Apr. 13... 


15 




Unioo of South Atrica: 

Johannesburg 


Mar. 12-24 


4 




Veneracla: 

Maracaibo 


June 18-July 8 


8 













Mexico: 

Yxicatan. State— 
Peto 



TYPHUS FEVEB. 



Algeria: 

Algiers 


June 1-30 


6 


3 




Austria-Hungary: 

Austria 




Oct. 22-Dec. 17, 1916: Cases, 2,371. 


Rnh^mia . . , 


Oct.22-Doc.l7.... 
do 


634 
809 

47 
617 

16 

243 

5 




Galicla 






Lower Austria 


do.. 






Moravia 


do 






SOesia 


do 






Styrla 


do 






Upper Austria 


do 






HuMarr 






Feb. 19-Kar. 25, 1917: Cases, 1,381. 


BudaDest 


Feb. lfr-Mar.25... 

June 25- July 1 

June 9-16 


83 

3 
1 
4 

1,648 






China: ^^ 

Antung 






Hankow 






Tsingtao 


May30-July7 

Apr.30-Julyl 

June 17-23 






Alexandria 


478 

1 

32 




Great Britain: 

Cork 




Greece: 

Saloniki 


May 13- Juno 30. . 






Jspan: 

Nagasaki 


June 11-24 

Apr. 1-30 


4 

7 




JtTa: 

Mid-Java 


2 




West Java 




Apr. 13-May 10, 1917: Cases, 86. 


Bata\ia 


Apr. 13-MaylO.... 
June 3-30 


22 

431 

3 

1 

4 

113 

2 

5 




Mexico: 

. MexicoCity 






Nethwlands: ^ 

^ Rotterdam 


June 9-23 


2 




Portuguese East Africa: 

_ Lourenco Marques 


Mar.1-31 




Bussia: *"^ «« 

Archangel 


Mav l-June2S 

Feb. 1^ June 2.... 

.May G -June 2 

Mar. 2i^Iay2l.... 

May 1-31, 






Petrograd 


3 




Riga . 


Jan 1-31. 1917- 1 case 


Vladivostok 






Spain: 

Almeria 


5 
2 




Madrid 


do 






Switzerland- 

. Basel 


June 17-23 

Juno 4-9.. . 


1 
2 




Trinidad 






Tumsia: 
Tunis. 


June 30-Julv 6 


1 













YELLOW FEYEB. 




In person re?ently arrived from 
Mexico City. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 

VOL.32 AUGUST 31, 1917 No. 35 

POUOMYELinS IN CHOSEN (KOREA). 

The following information in regard to the prevalence of polio- 
myelitis in Chosen (Korea) was received from the American consul 
general at Seonl, under date of May 26, 1917. 

No definite history of epidemic poUomyelitis in Chosen is available. 
Reports from physicians resident in five localities for periods of from 
5 to 21 years indicate that no acute case of the disease occurred in 
their practice. Cases of poUomyelitis have been reported by Provinces 
as follows: 

Heian Nando. — ^Three cases examined at hospital and one case 

examined by the pubUo physician in Shukusen district. 

Emkyo HoJcudo. — One case treated in hospital in February, 1915. 

KanJcyo Nando. — ^Two cases occurring in persons 11 and 39 years 

old, respectively. Both cases were treated in hospital, 1 in 1915 

and 1 in 1916. 

Keikido. — ^Twenty-two cases have been reported, of which 2 were 
treated, in 1915, 6 in 1916, and 2 in 1917 to date of report (May 26, 
1917). These cases were treated in the Government hospital and at 
other points in Seoul. The remaining 12 cases were reported at 
Songdo, the former capital of Chosen, 25 miles distant from Seoul. 
The patients were for the most part between the ages of I and 5 
years. The character of the disease was light. 

Keisho HoJcudo. — Number of cases reported, 17, occurring in persons 
between the ages of 2 and 22 years. Paralysis of lower hmbs was 
present. 

Keisho Nando. — Seven cases reported, of which 4 were treated in 
1916 and 3 in 1917. No special area of prevalence in the Province 
was indicated. 
Kofjendo. — Three cases reported in Kanjo district. 
Zenra Nando. — ^Thi*ee cases present at date of report, the ages of 
the patients being between 2 and 5 years. Paralysis of the lower 
limbs was noted. 

101 (1399) 



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August 81, 1917 1400 

THE MALARU PARASITE IN THE MOSQUITO. 

THE E FF E CTS OF LOW TEMPERATURE AND OTHER FACTORS ON ITS DEVELOPMENT. 

By M. Bruin Mitzm am, Teelmical Assistant, United States Public Health Serrioe. 

In accounting for the geographic distribution of malarial fever 
early investigators realized that temperature was an important 
factor. Following the incrimination of the mosquito as the carrier 
of malarial parasites, writers on the epidemiology of the disease were 
of the opinion that thermic conditions were in part responsible for 
the infection. The influence of temperature on the developmental 
cycle of the malarial parasites was fully recognized by the Italian 
workers, an<l their first experiments to establish the insect r6le took 
this important correlation into consideration. 

HIstorieaL 

BastianoUi and Bignami (1899)* in experiments with 50 s[>ecimens 
of Anopheles maculiperwiis and Plasmodium falciparum attempted to 
transmit the infection at alow room temperature, 18° to 22° C. Dur- 
ing a period of 20 days these mosquitoes when dissected showed only 
forms of early development. When they were removed to a teiinpera- 
ture of 30° C. lor two days or more, however, sporozoites developed. 
''Evidently at a temperature of 18° to 22° C. the life cycle of tiie 
parasite {Plasmodium falciparum) is completed very slowly.'' 

Marchiafava and Bignami (1900) ^ noticed that the temperature 
exerted a certain influence upon the time necessary for the completion 
of the cycle. At a temperature of 20° to 22° C. the development was 
foimd to be much slower in estivo-autiunnal malaria and it appeared 
from their observations that development did not occur at all at 14** 
to 15° C. 

Giles (1902) ' pyrites relative to geographic distribution, *' Itis a long- 
established fact that the northern limit of malaria corresponds 
roughly with tlie summer maximmn isotlierm of 76° F., or, according 
to Ilirsch, to a mean summer temperature of 15° to 16° C. (60° F.), 
\^hich is much the same thing. Recent Itahan researches show that 
the dovelopmeut of the hirmosporidia witliin the mosquito can not 
take place at a lower temperature than 20^ C. (GS^ F.), or at a higher 
temperature than 30^ (\ (SO^ F.), and in the existence of this upper 
limit we find an explmiution of ilie fact that tlie hot dry weather in 
northern liuha. vl)ei\^ for inoiUbs t()<:ollau- the temperature falls 

1 )?:iyliHnolli. (r. wrA l>!„':'?.n i, A. ( 1< ''t\ S- il )svil'!|)yH)<l"i [>.irasitod«>Ii' tpr/,\ii;i noli' Ari'^f^trU^ clqHyir. 
Hull. d. U. Acc;..l. Mt-U. .1. K.>,. -i, .\r/ > z'j t-^>\: o, A}>r. I'.i. ^uoiod from < rai;;. Iho niaUrial iexta. 
\^f\ Win. A\ ood <V Co', > .■•,< > )iv, j) k^ 

'■ M>irilii;ifav.i. V. . and W :iii..i, A. ( I.. );. Mai iria. Twtn'iptli couti ry pnuli(t». Wm. Wood d- Co., 
New ^'(irT<, j). >^*^. 

"(/ilcs, <;. M. fl"'L«. \- K tii'iijjok oj the f:uuis or moi'iuitoes. Kciond cdiiiun. Jolm Balei Sons & 
DanieUson, I^otido'i, j.p. 1 4 It/J. 



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1401 Angust 81. 1917 

rarely as low as this, is, in spite of the unbearable heat, by far the 
healthiest season of the year, and during it, primary cases of malaria 
are practically imknown.'* 

Braun (1906)* states that the development of the sporonts in mos- 
quitoes is dependent on the atmospheric temperature and the species 
of parasite; that the Plasmodium of the malignant tertian completes 
its development within eight days at a temperature of 28*^ to 30° C; 
below 18** C. the development ceases. 

Stephens (1908)^ quotes Grassi by stating that the sporogonic 
developmental cycle requires, in the case of the malignant tertian 
parasite, an optimiun temperature of about 27° C. and ceases at such 
lower temperatures as 15.5° to 17.5° C. In the case of the simple 
tertian, however, provided a suitable initial temperature has been 
maintained, development will still go on at temperatures as low as 12° 
or 9° C. But the appearance of sporozoites is then delayed for 21 
days. Further, the lowest temperature at which the simple tertian 
parasite will develop in the mosquito is 20° to 22° C. and in the case 
of the quartan parasite, 16.5° C. 

Craig (1909) ' writes: '*Wo know that the malarial plasmodia will 
undergo development oxdy in stomachs of mosquitoes hving under 
proper conditions as regards temperature, it having been proved by 
Jansco that the oocysts develop best at a temperature of between 20° 
and 30° C, while if the temperatiffe be lower than 16° C. the organ- 
isms perish." 

Ross (1910) * in accounting for the number of ingested sexual para- 
sites which reach maturity and develop protospores (sporozoites) 
asserts that it depends among other things upon temperature. He 
agrees with Jansco, who finds that the zygotes develop best at 24° to 
30° C, temperatures above and below these hmits retarding the 
process; and that they die if the mosquito is kept constantly below 
16° C. after feeding. On the other hand, Ross finds that they often 
continue to grow if the mosquito carrier is subjected merely to an 
intermittent low temperature. 

Howard, Dyar, and Knab (1912) * discussing the incubation 
period of the sporogonic cycle as influenced by temperature, state 
that the most favorable temperature Ues between 22° and 28° C. 
and beyond these conditions the development of the parasite goes 
forward more slowly, ''and there are observations which show a 
period of more than 50 days.^' 

I Bzami, M. (1906). The animal parasites of man. Third edition. Balo Sons St Daniolsson, London, p. 98. 

« Stephens, I. W. W. (1908). Malaria In its relation to the mosquito. Nothnagel's Eueycl jpedia of Prac- 
Ueil liodidne. I^ainnders Co., Philadelphia and London, pp. 129-130. 

•Craig, C. F. (1909). The malarial fevers. Wm, Wood & Co., Now York, p. 109. 

< Rob, R. ( 1910). The prevention of malaria. John Murray, London , pp. «7-S 8. 

»Howard,L.O.,Dyar,H. G., and Knab, F. (1912). The mosquitoes of North and C^sntral America. T^ 
Ovnegie Institution of Washington, Vol. I, p. 194. 



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A»ia8t81,1017 1402 

Castellani and Chahners (1913) ^ write that the results of experi- 
ments tend to show that temperature has most effect upon the ookbete 
before it pierces the wall of the stomach of the mosquito and becomfis 
encysted; and that it would appear that if the temperature is below 
15° to 16° C. no further development of the oocyst will take place in 
any form. 

Hindle (1914) ' writes, '*At lower temperatures the development k 
very much prolonged, and cojisequently the mosquito does not be- 
come infective imtil after a much longer incubation period." 

Walker and Barber (1914)^ in the Phihppines found that during 
the warm season Anopheles could be infected with sporozoites of 
P. falciparum in 12 dayB, while in the cool season sporozoites ap- 
peared to require from 13 to 15 days to develop. 

Grassi * was probably the first among the early investigators <rf 
the etiologjvof malaria to appfreciate the correlation of the influence 
of temperature on the development of the exogenous cycle with the 
seasonal variation of endemic malaria. The epidemiological signifi- 
cance of temperature relations was brought early to his notice when 
he attempted unsuccessfully to produce infection in mosquito6s4ield 
at 14° to 15° C. in the firat hours after biting. Infection resulted 
imder the same conditions at a tetnperature of 20° to 22° C. Follow- 
ing the extension of these observations, in a series of carefully con- 
trolled experiments, Grassi came to the following conclusions: 

If The development of the tertian and subtertian parasites can 
not be produced at temperatures varying from 15.5° to 17.5° C, but 
after the development of the parasites in the insect's midgut has 
begun, the temperature can without jeopardy be lowered to 9° to 
11° C. 

2. The tertian parasite in tho Anopheles will develop at a tempera- 
ture at which subtertian crescents will not develop. 

3. The important epidemiological factor of the effect of low tem- 
perature during the first hours after biting is ascribed to the fact 
that oxflagellation and fertilization are not produced at these low 
temperatures. After these phenomena take place and the ookinete 
is formed mature development ensues, even in the presence of low 
temperatuies. 

4. The minimum temperature for exflagellation of crescents was 
cstabhslied at 17*^ C, aUliough at this temperature exflagellation is 
by no"*mcans frcciiient. At 18° to 20° C. exflagellation is certain. 

1 CustoUani, A., and Chaimcis, A. J. (,1913). Manual of tropical medicine. Wm. Wood & Ca, New 
York, p. hiio. 

Ulindlo, E. (1914). Flirs and disease. The blood sucking flics. Cambridge University Press, Caoh 
bridge, Englaud. 

2 Waikcr, K. h., and Barl cr, M. A. (1911). Malaria in the rhilippines. The Philippine Journal of 
Science, Vol. IX, No. 5, soc. H., S«:]aenii>or, iyl4. 

* Cuussi.i, B. (1901). l)ic malaria. Stud ion cincs zoologen. Jena. Quoted from Jansco. 



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1403 



August 81. 1917 



5. The minimum temperatures for development of the various 
sporogonic types r*^ parasites were established as 16.5*^ for quartan, 
17.5° for tertian, and IS** C. for subtertian. 

These findings of Grassi have been confirmed by the several authors 
whose work is detailed in the table presented later. 

Jansco (1904)* repeated the experiments of Grassi and coworkers 
with essentially different results. Grassi's conclusion that tem- 
peratures under 16° C. during the first hours after biting prevent the 
formation of oocysts on account of the inhibited fertilization of 
macrogametes is held as imtenable by Jansco. The latter's experi- 
ments indicated that fertilization occurred even imder 16.0° C, not 
under artificial conditions on a glass slide, but in the stomach of the 
anopheline where the blood is supposed not to cool so quickly. 
Experiments showed that Anopheles became infected with tertian 
and subtertian gametes when kept from the moment of biting for 24 
hours at a t«mperatiu*e of 11° to 13° C. and then exposed to a tem- 
perature between 20° to 30° C. However, when maintained at the 
original low temperature, infection did not result. Jansco concluded 
that greater importance should be attached to that stage in which 
the blood is already digested and the ookinetes are in the act of 
penetrating the gut epithelium than to the first hoiu^ after biting. 

The essential principle in the difference in results obtained by 
Jansco and.. Grassi may be ascribed to their interpretation of the 
eriticdl temperature involved. Grassi holds the critical temperature 
to be that immediately after biting — the temperature favoring fer- 
tilization; Jansco establishes the critical temperature as that favoring 
penetration of the ookinete preliminary to cyst formation. 

The following table summarizes the experiments of these investi- 
gatore: 

Table No. 1. — Details of experiments of various authors relative to low temperature and 
development in the mosquito. 



Author. 


Ex- 
peri- 
ment 
No. 


Type of 
malaria. 


Initial 
temperature. 


Time held. 


Second 
tempera- 
ture. 


Time held. 


Results. 


Grassi 


1 

2 

3 

4 
6 


Tertian. 
Subtertian 
with A. 
claviger. 

Tertian. 
Subter- 
tian. 

Quartan 

Subtertian.. 

Tertian 

Quartan 


•c. 

15.^17.5.... 

Sufficient for 
ookinete 
formation. 

do 

18 and above 

17.5 and 

above. 
16.5 and 

above. 


Immediately 
after bit- 
ing. 

After foki- 
pete forma 
tion. 

do 

Immediately 

after biting 

do 


•c. 




Nodevelop- 

mtnt. 

Developed nor- 
mally. 

Do. 

Full develop, 
ment. 
Do. 




n.9 

16.5 


Indefinite. 
...do 










do 






Do. 



^}usco,N. (1904). Zur Frage der Infection der Anophdt* claviger mit Malariaporasiten bei niederef 
^mpwto'r. CentralbL f. Bi*t Vol. XXXVI, p. «24. ^ I 

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August SI, 1917 



1404 



Table No. 1. — DetaiU of expenmenU of various authors relative to low temperatwend 
development in the wioa^tto— Continued. 



Author 


V.x- 

reri- 

mjnt 

No. 


Type of 
malaria. 


Initial 
temperature, 


TimehekL 


Second 
tempera- 
ture. 


Time held. 


Remits. 


Van der Scheer 


1 

2 

1 
2 
3 

1 
2 

3 


Tertian 

do 

Subtertian.. 

do 

do 

Tertian 

do 

do 


•c, 

14.5-16.5 


do 


•c. 




Negative. 
4 oat of 5 be- 


and Van Ber- 
lekom. 


18-21.5 


do 






Martirono 


17 and below 
18 


do 




Several 

hours. 

25-30 min- 
utes. 

20-30 min- 
utes. 

12 days.... 
18 days.... 

10 days 


came inieetr 

©d. 

Negative. 




do 




Development 




18-20 


do 




observed. 
C r es cents 


Schoo 


15 


do 




(changed to 
round bod- 
ies). 
Negative. 




18.. 


.do ... 




Oocysts mi- 




Sufliclentfor 
oocyst for- 
mation. 


...do 




ture. 
Do. 











Table No. 1A. — Details of temperature experiments of Jansco. 



Ex- 
peri- 
ment 

No. 


maErto. 


Ini- 
tial 
tem- 
pera- 
ture. 


Time 
held. 


Sec- 
ond 
tem- 
pera- 
ture., 


Time 
held. 


Third 
tem- 
pera- 
ture. 


Time 
held. 


Results. 


1 
2 

3 
4 

5 


Subtertian. 

Subtertian 
with A. 
daviger. 
do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 


81- 
31 

30 

30 

11 
11-1.3 

:«) 

13 

30 
1.3 

.3v3 

c an 

21 


30rain 
30min 

30min 

30min 

^ ho;irs 
lUd.i vs 


13 
13 

11 
11 

30 


7 hours.. 
22 hours. 

6 hours.. 

8 hours.. 
10 days. . 


30 
24 

30 
30 


4 days 16i 
hours. 

6 days 21 J 
hours. 

5 days 17i 
hours. 

5 days 15i 
hours. 


2 of 4 raosquitoes'with oocyst, 

size 17 m. 
2 of 6 mosquitoes with woDft- 

003 ooc^^ts 6-8 M ^ size. 

4 of 10m(»qultoes with oocysts 
22-28 M. 

1 of G mosquitoes found in- 
fected. 

1 w ith oor v'sts to size of 44 ih 


(5 








Noqc infprtod (13 used). 
8 of 12 infociod. 


7 


10 diVs 










8 


2 hoars 
4 (la vs 


22' 


4 days 






1 of 5 infw^ted with oocj-sts 


9 








6-9 M. 
1 of 8 Infected. 


10 
11 


22 hrs . 

2 days. 
!■' d l''^ 


22 

8 


21 hours. 

5da5-s... 


»22 
30 


9 da>-s 14 
hoiirs. 

5 days 


2 of 4 mosquitoes infected— 1 
with 1 ooc\3t (sporoblast), 1 
with 12 orx'-ysts, siie ^)t^- 

.r— al: ne-^ative. 

.3 of 7 inf tufted 


13 
14 


1 duy.^. 


8 


4 days... 


20 

38 


3 days 

5 days 


1 witii 1iV5() oocysts 7-9/1 in siM. 
Several infected \<\V\ oocysts 


15 


Tcrliui witli 

A.ciV I'JCT. 

do ' 

<lo 

do 


11 

13 


22 hrs. 
■I d.rs 


21 
22 


5 days. . . 


i;]> (0 11 p in ii-o: son)© 

ookint'lo found iL.o!'.:npod. 

Tl.o MTiK'f i;>'.> <.vVna' used 


1*) 


lOdavs . 






fo 111 I with G oDcvsli 7 jt in 
7 r.«-Mi i\T». 


j7 


20 


ltd' V 








•) ( .LI'. C 


IS 


1 i d.l "si ' 






2i) o ii of 40 infeoted. 




•■ 1 1 









1 After iK.Mim^ 12 hours at 10°. 



2 After Loldiug 3 days at 2(»*. 



In analyzing: the H'-^uUs of leinperatiire oxperimontSj it is apparent 
that no cou'iiizimcc is tak'^n of the lack of sporozoite development 
either in oocysts or in glanfl cells at low temperatures. This may be 



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1405 August 31. 191f 

due to the fact that the infected mosquitoes have not been kept ahve 
long enough to pennit the development of mature forms, or the 
workers may have assiuned that the presence of oocysts up to the 
development of sporoblasts was sufficient evidence of the infcctibility 
of the mosquito. 

In this connection, the epidemiological appUcation of the ex- 
periments of Jansco and Grassi is open to question, as the exposure 
of anopheline mosquitoes to a change of temperature of 8 to 22° C. 
immediately after engorgement could not be expected to occur under 
natural conditions. 

The writer has attempted to extend the low temperature experi- 
ments of previous writers in order to determine what changes occur 
in the malarial parasite within the body of the mosquito during the 
period of hibernation under natural conditions. Mosquitoes were 
kept at living room temperature during 10 to 13 days following the 
initial gametocyte bearing blood meal. They were then subjected 
gradually to outdoor winter temperature (New Orleans) in a large 
cage protected from wind and rain. They were removed from time 
to time in order to permit them to obtain a blood meal from rabbits 
kept for this purpose. 

The specimens were laboratory-bred anophelines kept individually 
in commoaious lantern chimneys fastened at both ends with bobinet 
held by tape and rubber bands. Moisture was provided in the {;auze 
pad in a tray in which four of the cages were placed on end and 
raisins were placed on the upper ends during the intervals of blood 
feeding. As many as three bites were taken by each mosquito 
when applied to the patient and subsequently a rabbit was employ^^d 
to supply blood to increase the longevity of the mosquitoes. It 
was observed that blood was taken more readily when the raisin 
diet was withheld. 

A ^adual adaptation to low temperature was attempted by the 
following precautions: 

The mosquitoes after biting were kept in the room with the patient 
for several houre, then transferred to a living room for the period 
stated during wliich time the temperature was maintained at 20° to 
26° C. At this itime the outdoor temperature being much lower, i he 
specimens were retained for several days in the low-temperatuic 
incubator regulated through the use of ice and electricity, at 15° to 
18° C. Then the outdoor cage was used; the temperature being 
recorded as shown in table No. 2. 

The following table represent*^ the temperature and humidity to 
which the mosquitoes were exposed in the outdoor cage dui-ing tho 
period of the experiment, November 1 to January- 11. 



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Aotost 81, 1»17 



1406 



Table No. 2. — Record ofdaiiif lemperm^ures and avenge relalive hvmidiijf Now. 1, 29il, 

to Jan. 15, 1917. 





November. 


December. 


Jaanary. 


Pate. 


Maxi- 
mum. 


Mini- 
mum. 

»C. 

19 

17.5 

18 

IQ 

19 

17 

19.5 

20.5 

19 

18 

18 

19.5 

21 

6 

3 

4 

7 

ie.5 

10.5 

13 

16 

17.5 

13 

10.5 

7 

7 
13 
IG 

15.6 
15 


Mean. 

•c. 

23 

23 

23 

23 

23 

22 

24 

25 

23.5 

20.5 

23 

24 

25 

14.5 

7 

8.5 
13.5 
14 

16.5 
18 
21 

22.5 
16.5 
14.5 
10.5 

15.5 
21 

19.5 
18 


Hu- 
mid- 
ity. 


Maxi. 
mum. 


Mini- 
mum. 


Mean. 


Hu- 

mid- 
ity. 


Mazi- 

tntiTti- 


Mtai-Mean. 
muHL^^^ 


mid. 

tty. 


1 


•c. 

27 

28.5 

28 

2S.5 

28 

27 

2S 

29.5 

28 . 

21 

27 

28.5 

28.5 

22.5 

12 

13.5 

20.5 

18 

22 

25 

27 

27.5 

19.5 

17.5 

15 

17 

19 

27 

25 

21 


64.5 

48 

54.5 

76 

84.5 

91.5 

89 

89 

88.5 

84.5 

85.5 

95 

93.5 

77 

52 

55.5 

75 

56 

78 

83 

86 

87 

72.5 

61.5 

64 

72.5 

87 

93 

95.5 

84, 


•c. 

21 
23 
24 

28 

27 

26.5 

26 

25 

11.5 

15.5 

16 

11.5 

16.5 

22.5 

10.5 

17 

19.6 

20.5 

15.5 

2S'.5 

24 

10.5 

17 

22.5 

22 

26.5 

27 

24.5 

20.5 

20.5 

19.5 


•c. 

9.6 
10.6 
15 
19 
19 
18 
19.6 

9 

6 

6.5 

9 

3 

7 
Id. 5 

2.5 

5 
11.6 

6.6 

i 
16 

6 

2.5 

5 
13 

15.5 
19 

23.6 
20.5 
17 
15 
16.5 


•c. 

15.5 

16.5 

19.5 

23.5 

23 

22 

23 

17 

8 

10.6 
13 

7 

12 
16.5 

6.5 
10.5 
15.5 
13 

9.5 
22 
15.5 

6.5 
10.5 
17.5 
18 
23 
25 
22.5 
18 

17.6 
18 1 


70 

80.5 

84.5 

84.5 

87.5 

96.5 

95.5 

88.5 

63 

79 

75.5 

63.5 

74 

8.5.5 

75.5 

67.5 

97 

71 

83 

91.5 

89 

71.5 

93 

97 

99.5 

94.5 

94.ir 
96.6 
87 
•97 


•c. 

35 

27 

28 

29 

20 

17 

1H.5 

22 

25.6 

27 

13 

18 

24 

11 

11 


•c. 

18 

10 

».5 

21 

17 

11 

12 

13.5 

16.5 

21 

9 

7.5 
16.5 

3.5 

7 


•c. 

21.5 

18.5 

24-2 

25 

18.5 

14 

15.2 

17.2 

21 

24 

11 

13.2 

20.2 

7.2 

9 


m 


2 


M7 


3 


7S 


4 


n 


5 


MS 


6 


51 


7 


587 


8: 


59 


9 


7R 


10 


ffl 


11 


42.7 


12 


Ma 


13 


m 


14 


MS 


15 


fits 


16 ^ 




17 










18 




> 







19 












20 










21 ... t 


* 








g:::::::::::::::::::::::::^ 


















24.:::::::::::..::.:::::::.. 










25 










26 










27 .< 










28 










29 










30 










31 


























_ 


Monthly averages 


24 


14.5 


18.5 j 77.6 


20.6 


11.5 


16 


84.7 


21 


14.9 


17.3 


30.6 



In order to detormine the effect of transferring to much higher 
temperatures, at the close of the experiment 8 specimens were removed 
from the outride cage and placed in the room incubator, which, during 
the two weeks of the test, registered 20"^ to 32° C, with a mean tem- 
perature of 24. p° C. The mosquitoes wore dissected at intervals with 
the following results: Two of the 8 specimens were found infected. 
One of the infected moscjuitoes was found with 2 empty oocysts 
shrunken and ruptured and containing only gianules of residual proto- 
plasm. The glands proved negative. The infection of the other 
specimen was represented by empty oocyst capsules, apparently fuM 
sized-, devoid of contents except for a few sporoblast-Uke bodies in 
one -oocyst. The glands were not inf<>cted in this specimen. 
;Tho results of su])jecting mosquitoes to low temperatures after 
feediilg are dctailcd^in the foUowmg table: 



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1407 

Tablb No. 3. 



▲ogostSLloir 



Spni- 

meoNa 


Nam. 
berof 
bUes. 


Dale of 
disseo. 
Uoo. 


meot. 


Result. 


Speoi. 
men No. 


Num- 
ber of 
bites. 


Date of 
dissec- 
tion. 


velop- 
meot. 


Result. 


1 


2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
S 

2 
3 
8 
3 
9 
3 
3 
2 
t 


Nov. 15 
Nov. 17 

...dQ 

Nov. 18 

...da.... 

...do 

Nov. 19 
Nov. 20 

...da.... 
Nov. 22 

...do 

...do 

Nov. 23 
Nov. 25 

...da.... 
Nov. 28 
Nov. 29 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 2 
Dec. 3 

...do 

...do 

Dec. 4 

...do..... 
Deo. 5 
Dec. 8 

...do.....J 


13 
15 
15 
15 
18 
1« 
17 
18 
20 
10 

5 
20 
23 

8 
25 
26 
27 
29 
30 
31 
31 
33 
32 
32 
33 
35 
36 


Positive. 
Negative. 

Da 
Positive. 
Negative. 

Da 
Positive. 
Negative. 
Positive. 
Negative. 

Da 

Do. 

Da 

Do. 
Positive. 
Negative. 

Do. 

Do. 

Da 
Positive. 

Do. 

Da 
Negative. 

Do. 

Da 

Do. 

Da 


28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48. 

49 

50 

61 

52 

53 

54 


3 
2 


Dec. 9 
Dec. 10 
Dec. 12 

...do 

Dec. 14 
Dec. 17 
Dec. 21 
Dec. 22 
Deo. 24 

...do 

Dec. 25 
Dec. 26 
Dec. 28 
Dec. 29 
Dec. 30 
Dec. 31 
Jan. 1 

...da.... 
Jan. 3 
Jan. 4 

...do 

...do 

Jan. 5 
Jan. 11 

...do 

...do 

...da.... 


30 
88 
40 
40 
35 
46 
34 
52 
53 
37 
53 
47 
41 
57 
58 
44 
59 
45 
47 
48 
62 
48 
49 
70 
69 
70 
70 


Negative. 
Do. 


2 


3 


Da 


4 


Do. 


f 


Do 


6 


Do 


7 


Da 


1 


Do 


9 


Po 


10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

U 

It 

17 

18 

19 

30 

31 

» 

n, 

21 

31. 

28 

27 


Positive, 

Do. 
Nc«ative. 
Positive. 
Negative. 

Da 
Positive. 
Negative. 
Positive. 
Negative. 

Da 
Positive. 
Negatiye. 

Do. 

Da 

Da 

Da 



A total of 15 infections resulted among 54 specimens of AnopThdes 
functipennis fed 10 to 70 days previoiisly on blood containing many 
subtertian gametocytes. The resulting infections are described in the 
following table: 

Table No. 4. 



Date of 
dissc^ 
tlon. 



Day«or 
develop- 
ment. 



Stage of development. 



Not. 15 
Nov. 18 
Nov. 19 
Not. 30 
Nov. 25 
Dec. 3 
Do.. 

Da. 
Dec.* 24 

Dec 25 



Dee. 26 

Dee. 29 

1017. 
Jan. 1 

Jen. 3 



48 



8 oocysts without protoplasmic differentiation, size approximately 25|< to 2^. 

Approximately 250 oocysts in all stages preceding the sporobiJastic. 

8 oocysts, 2 of which still rotoining pigment, remainder graaular without spdroblasts. 

Approximately 200 oocysts in all stages up to sporoblostic. 

143 oocysts, site 2o/i to 40;* mostly with miliriai pigment, few with sporoblasts. 

About 120 oocysts, half of them "retaining pigment, only one vith sporoblasts. 

Approximately 250 oocysts, of which .'jO wore t]uile small (15p to20^), vith malarial 

pigment , remainder various sizes but more raaturwl. Few with sporoblasts. 
3<> oocysts m varioua stages, a few with immilure sporoblasts. 

One oocyst represented by shrunken capsule witliout contents, oocyst apparently full 
V sized and nrniH- attachecj to gat wall. 
5 00C5-Nt8~4 with contents expelled. I with spnroblast development barely com- 

meming (only 1 soirment.s dist*a-nil»le). Kem.ander of body of oocyst undllTeren- 

llated aii<i granular, t^ite .iOn by a:V- 
3 0'>?\sts witli (oTients ruptured, all torn from ijut^wull d'lfinT dissection. No evi- 

derice of rpoio oiles in moiintin-: lijuid surrounding the piU wall or in the ^^laii.ds. 
2 ni|»luri'<l h'lr'iiut n uj yst mLuiliiaiU's oa posterior tnd of uud^ut. No indications 

of sporobla~»t s or sporo foiUis. 

I oocj-st 22>itn2.Vcontainin2: jrranul'^s only. Aho 4 ruptured oocyst capsules still 

attached lo.Nfoni i<-h Wi:M, no <i)oro'oti('>: prryi-nt . 

23 o6?\iti, iDt ninJont> of wlua: wm- Uv. ^e, k\-*' up to fVV; 2 ho lic^ still retained 
smaM uuiuunl uftiaVut.'nt: 1 very sm I'l '-ibt) u 2')m>. !l;nnin .- - _'l (K)"y-(.. of tho 
u.<itol jJort wil^j luidiifiTcTitiatrd.proiopi.um except t!iat 'i of iwuii \.'»Tedi"^ eloped 
to.sporobl'i tr^.ij;*!. No' anyX)f tjh-in ' oatuiu 'd sporo/.oilt's. on'i » inpty sliriuiken 
capsule was srrii. Midlobc or e.iou .i^.^iiil para>ili/rd wiih a mo I'Tute number of 
Kporo;.oile-'.ike .ilanients (n'>.Mii<»ti'i - an.i «l!'1 not <i.v'i \vi*ii dU-ni-.i. 

Inlectloh reprosrulcd ouly by iwo empty oo.'yst shells attached to gut wall. No 
sporo :oites on gut or in glaii Is. 



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August 31, 1917 1408 

The eight control specimens of A. quadrimoLCvlatus yielded 4 infec- 
tions as follows: One specimen of A. qiuvdrimaailcUus which proved 
infected was examined on the 12th day after biting the blood donor. 
The gut wall was covered by probably at least 200 oocysts. These 
were not over 35m in size, the majority exhibiting malarial pigment 
and averaging 20m to 25m in size. No mature oocysts were seen, 
and the glands were devoid of sporozoites. 

The second control -4. quadnniaculaius found infected was examined 
40 days after its bite of the blood donor. On the gut waU of this 
specimen were seen 3 oocysts and 3 shrunken capsules devoid of 
sporozoites or other contents. The oocysts measured 59m to 67m 
in size with undifferentiated granules lacking evidence of sporoblast 
development. A prolonged search was made of the mounting fluid 
surroimding the gut wall but sporozoites were not found. The six 
lobes of the salivary glands were likewise uninfected. 

Another specimen of A, quadrimaculatus was found infected on 
the 40th day of development. Here were seen three empty oocyst 
capsules and three large oocysts, one of which measured 59m by 
65m and the other two were as much as 67m in diameter. The 
development of these oocysts was apparently abortive as sporoblasts 
were absent and sporozoites were not present in the mounting fluid 
about the stomach wall or in the six gland lobes. 

The fourth specimen of this species found to be infected was dis- 
sected 54 days after its initial blood meal. The only indication of 
its infection was the presence of two apparently full-sized oocyst 
envelopes devoid of contents except for a few residual sporoblast- 
like bodies in one of them. The glands were negative except for a 
moderate invasion of sporozoites in the midlobe of one gland. 

The single specimen of A. quadnmacnlaius in which sporozoite 
development was demonstrated had been kept at room temperature 
(gas heated, mean temperature of approximately 22"^ C). The other 
three specimens were subjected to the same conditions of temperature 
and humidity as the specimens of A. punctipennis. 

The mosquitoes employed in these experiments were allowed a 
maximum period of 70 days in which to produce gland sporozoites. 
Only one of the scries kept at low temperatures showed bodies which 
resembled sporozoites, but because of their pecuUar character and 
unusual behavior their identity is questionable. These bodies, 
found in a specimen of A. pundipennu after an interval of 47 days 
following a single infective bite, were of the usual filamentous type, 
of normal size but with no appearance of nuclei. Only the two mid 
lobes of the glands contatned a moderate number of the filaments. 
None of the oocysts ijivaduig the stomach wall contained filaments, 
although sporoblasts were seen in 3 of the 23 oocysts, the majority of 
which were of mature size. The salivary glands of this mosquito 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1409 AiisnEt81,1917 

were given a prolonged study, but no evidence of the characteristic 
writhing movement or other sign of viabihty was observed in the 
spindle forms present. Slight warming to 30® C. caused no change 
in the material placed in normal saline, and when the inland cells were 
ruptured by pressure and macerated, no activity followed. When 
stained with Giemsa solution, the bodies smeared from the glands 
did not take the stain so as to be recognizable. 

The contents of the salivary glands of two other specimens were 
also suspected on account of the presence of sporozoite-like bodies, 
but in these instances one could feel fairly confident that they were 
only the pecuUar threadUke crystals described by Stephens as 
artifacts. 

FACtors Other Than Temperature Influencing Parasitism. 

It has been shown that other factors besides temperature may 
influence infectivity, but aside from the degree of parasitism in the 
human host and the nxunber of gametocy tes ingested by the mosquito, 
little is known. 

Daniels (1901) * emphasizes the fact that infection is directly 
dependent on the number of bites the mosquitq takes from the patient 
and has shown that the infection varies from 26 per cent to 66 per cent, 
depending on the number of times the mosquitoes were permitted to 
lite the gametocyte carrier. He reported 21? infected mosquitoes of 
57 appUed, distributed as follows: 

Nombo- Percentage 

oTbitei. infected. 

1 26 

2 46 

3 62 

4 66 

In the work prfesented here analogous results were obtained. The 
percentage of infections was proportional to the number of bites the 
insects took. In the foUowing table 19 mosquitoes of two species are 
accounted for in relation to the number of infective bites obtained 
from the human host, a subtertian case: 

Table No. 5. 



-4.. 



il# 



Nmnhrr ' NdWlnf . 


Vutrifutrl ^'*^' 




pKfinrt, 




I 


aa 




12,4 


3 


tn 




1H.< 


a 


'M 




»! 4 


I ' 


r» 




a^p 


L! 1 


4 




mo 


;t 


1 







J IiiUiiQU, C, Vf.^mih MilnfU^ mnuu Mo^ycul Jonrml. Muu n Uiea trj IHAsLibL, W. tt il« 




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August 81. 191T 1410 

The elimination of gametes through digestive activity of the mos- 
quito may be considered another factor, relative especially to the 
loss of infection in certain Anopheles j and is discussed because it has 
bfeen ignored or overlooked heretofore. 

Darhng (1910) ^ has ingeniously accounted for the failure of infec- 
tion in the mosquito host to the extent of 97 per cent mainly throu^ 
the phenomenon of phagocytosis. He concludes that the ga^etocytes 
accruing from three successive blood meals are retained by the insect 
and that the fertihzed gametes, if they do not become phagocytized 
have abundant time to wander out of the blood clot and reach the 
gut waU. 

In addition to this, one must take into account the peculiar habit 
of the mosquito to ** clear'' itself, by discharging blood per anum 
during and for some time following a blood meal. It should be 
considered as an important source of gametocyte elimination. This 
means of hmiting the number of zygotes is demonstrated in the finding 
of as many as 12 crescents in a single field of the bloody dejecta. 
This process takes place at the time most opportune — before fertil- 
ization and subsequent encystment of parasites. The early excre- 
tions — during perhaps the first 24 hours — are the most important in 
this regard, as the clearing process is a mechanical oi^e and the phe- 
nomenon of exflagellation does not get an opportunity to establish 
itself. To be sure, this elimination process requires 1 to 5 days or 
more for completion, depending on the temperature. Later defeca- 
tions are associated with normal degenerative changes, so that this 
elimination is not significant after the early hours of biting. 

In a study of the contents of excreted blood nmncrous crescents 
have been encountered possibly just as relatively abundant as, or 
more so than, those contained in the peripheral blood of the human 
host. The forms seen are similar to those in the patient's blood 
except that in addition to deformed crescents, many fragmentary 
bodies suggestive of active phagocytosis or changes due to insect 
alimentation arc commonly seen. A scries of counts made of stained 
film's of this excreted material, taken from 10 to 30 minutes after the 
moscjuitoes had bitten, indicated that the crescents were somewhat 
concentrated. There were present 87 crescents to each 100 leucocytes, 
while in the blood film taken previously to the biting, 63 crescents 
per 100 leucocytes were counted. 

A true valuation of this observation could be obtained only in 
careful weighings of mosquitoes at various stages after biting, and in 
blood counts and estimations such as Darling has employed in his 
studies. 

Concentration of the gametes in the dejecta, if it does occur, may 
be tentatively explained by the rise of these bodies in the same way 

> Darling, S. T. (1910), Studies in relation to malaria. Bulletin Isthmian Canal Ca{Qmis8ion|Prca. 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1411 AsgostSl.lOlT 

thai the (crescents rise when a tube of infected blood is centrifuged in 
Bass and Johns' (1915) ^ method of concentrating the parasites for 
diagnostic and cultural purposes. These workers discovered that 
when blood containing crescents was centrifuged the parasites 
rose to the top of the cell coliunn so that a mass of almost pure 
crescents coidd be thus obtained. The alimentary canal of the 
mosquito may be compared to a centrifuged tube in which the blood 
is agitated through the processes of biting and subsequent peristalsis. 
It is suggested that the action may be aided by the raising of 'the 
caudal end of the abdomen which is done by the anopheline in biting 
and rating. 

This theory may be further strengthened by the fact, observed 
by all investigators- of the mosquito cycle, that there is a decided 
concentration of oocysts on the gut wall toward the anal end. 
Especially is this the case when only few oocysts are present. We 
may presume that the developed bodies appear in thiis location on 
accoimt of the presence of the greatest nmnber of gametes at the 
distal end of the gut. 

Interpretation of Results and Summary. 

In the work presented here it is indicated that development of the 
exogenous elements in the mosquito is restricted or prevented 
during an intermittent low temperature even when temperatures 
favorable to parasite development are present in the early stages 
and subsequently. 

That the presence of even great niunbers of oocysts in various 
stages does not give assurance of subsequent maturity and infectivity 
is evidenced in these experiments. 

Of the 18 infected Anoptidines kept at low temperature only one 
appeared to giv6 rise to mature parasites, while the one control 
specimen of .4. quadrimaculatus retained at room temperature reached 
nomial maturity relative to sporozoite development. Plasmodium 
Jdciparam was the species of parasite used. 

The oocyst stage was maintained up to 59 days in the mosquitoes 
employed in these experiments. A peculiar appearance of these 
bodies gave the impression that dewlopmeni would not be carried to 
maturity even if at this period rfiosquitoes were ex})osed to salubrious 
temperatures. Sporozoites were not .produced in eight mosquitoes 
of this series which had been exposed as much as 60 days to inter- 
mittent low temi^erature, then transferred to an ^optimum tempera- 
ture for two weeks longer. Two of the eiglit mosquitoes proved to 
be infected by only a variable number of shrunken and ruptured* 

oocyst capsules. 

. ^» 

• Bass, C. C, and Johns, F. M. (1915). A mcthcxl of con oont ratine; nmlarla plasmodla for diagnostic and 
^^^ paipoatB. Am. Jour, of Trop. Dis. and Prev. Med., Vol. Ill, No. 6, November, pp. 298-303. 

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I 



Aagost31,1917 1412 

A suggestion of the mode of evolution in the growth and subsequent 
degeneration of the bodies found in the mosquitoes may be given as 
follows: 

The nature of the oocyst throughout the incubation period was 
such as to indicate that development was practically negligible after 
about 19 days and up to 59 days. Taking as an illustration the 
development produced in a mosquito during 47 days of incubation, 
we find bodies indistinguishable in morphology and size from similar 
bodies seen in mosquitoes during 13 to 19 days of development. 

Even up to 31 days the presence of malarial pigment could be 
demonstrated in numerous oocysts. This of course may be inter- 
preted as aborted development brought about by low tempera- 
tures. Also up to this time (31 days) few sporoblasts were seen 
among the oocysts encountered, possibly another influence of low 
temperature. Begimiing with the thirty-seventh day it was found 
that oocysts conMnenced to degenerate, rupturing prior to sporozoite 
development. Numerous ruptured oocysts were seen up to the fifty- 
ninth day, and not in a single instance was the presence of sporozoites 
revealed. During this interval many oocyst capsules were found 
unattached to the gut wall, probably having been dislodged in the 
process of dissection. 

The absence of sporozoites, with one exception, in the 18 specimens 
infected is significant. In the one exception it is to be noted that 
the presence of sporozoites is open to question on account of the 
uncharacteristic form and behavior of the bodies seen. 

The loss of infectivity tlirough temperature change is significant in 
relation to hibernation of infected mosquitoes. Much can be ex- 
plained if it should be definitely proved that low temperature pre- 
vents sporozoite development in mosquitoes inactive during the 
winter. 

It is indicated in the results of these experiments that an inter- 
mittent low temperature does interfere with sporozoite formation; 
consequently it is expUcable that mosquitoes procuring gametocyte 
bearing blood before winter sets in, may become sterile or innocuous 
during the hibernation period. 

The writer has obtained a partial confirmation of the results of 
Daniels in the relation of infection to the number of bites which the 
mosquitoes obtain. Fifteen examples of A. punctipennis gave the 
following results relative to infection with the parasites of malaria: 
One, two and three bites gave 12.5, 18.8 and 34.8 per cent respec- 
tively. The results obtained with 4 specimens of A. gu(idnmaculahi8 
were 20, 50, and 100 per cent relative to one, two, and three bites 
obtained. 

Another factor besides low temperature which possibly influences 
infectivity was found to be the loss of gametocytes through the 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1413 August 31. 19ir 

"clearing process'' in the mosquito. This is indicated in the blood 
count of the mosquitoes' dejecta, in which numerous crescents were 
found. In one instance blood from the human host yielded 63 
crescents to 100 leucocytes and in the blood after passing through 
the mosquito 87 crescents to 100 leucocytes were counted. 

AddendunL 

In a recent paper Bang (1917),* working in New Orleans, has shown 
some interesting results relative to low temperature influsnce on the 
sporogonic development. He shows that the parasite of tertian 
mdaria in Anopheles quadrimaciilatns is able to survive exposure to 
a temperature of 30° F. for a period of 2 days, 31° F. for 4 days, 45° 
to 69° F. for 6 to 7 days, and in two mosquitoes 38° to 59° F. for 17 
days. In a smaller series of tests the sporonts of P. falciparum 
showed a resistance to 35° to 57° F. for 1 to 2 days. 

In these experiments the parasites in the mosquito were permitted 
to develop during 7 to 23 days at room temperature before the insects 
were exposed to temperatures of 29° to 69° F. for periods ranging 
from 1 to 16 days, following which they were maintained at room 
temperature for an additional period of 1 to 19 days. 

It is indicated from these tests that exposure to low temperatures, 
for a limited period at least, did not affect the viability of sporo- 
zoites assuming that provision had been made for the mosquitoes 
to develop sporozoites at room temperature. 

> King, W. V. (1917), The effect of cold upon malaria parasites in the mosquito host. The Journal oT 
Experimental Medicine, VoL XXV. No. 3, March, pp. 495-408. 



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PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 



No health depcartment. State or locals can effectively prevent or control disease withoul 
knowledge of when^ where , and under what conditions cases are occurring. 



UNITED STATES. 



CURRENT STATE SUMMARIES. 
California Report for the Week Ended August 25, 1917. 

The California State Board of Health reported that during the 
week ended August 25, 1917, there were few changes m the preva- 
lence of communicable diseases in the State of Califomia. The 
reporting of venereal diseases has been stimulated by the new bureau 
of venereal disease in the State department of health. Fifty-eight 
cases of gonococcus infection were reported during the week. Forty- 
one cases of typhoid fever were notified, scattered throughout the 
State. One case of poliomyelitis was notified in Yuba Coimty, one 
case of smallpox in Oakland, and one case in San Francisco. 

The details of notifiable disease cases reported during the week 
ended August 18 are as follows: 



Cases. 

Anthrax 2 

Chicken pox 13 

Diphtheria 26 

Dysentery 1 

Erysipelas 2 

German measles .' 29 

Gonococcus infection 34 

Malaria 17 

Measles 38 

Mumps 33 



Gises. 

Pneumonia 15 

Poliomyelitis 8 

Rocky Mountain spotted fever 2 

Scarlet fever 85 

Smallpox 5 

Syphilis 18 

Tetanus 1 

Tuberculosis 135 

Typhoid fever 39 

Whooping cough 33 



RECIPROCAL NOTinCATION. 

Minnesota. 

Cases of communicahle diseases referred during July, 1917 ^ to other State health depart- 
ments by department of health of the State of Minnesota. 



Disease and locality of noti- 
ncation. 



Diphtheria: 

Minneapolis Health De- 
partment, Hennepin 
County. 
it. Paul Bureau of 
Health, Ramsey 
County. 



Referred to health authority of— 



Webster, Burnett County, Wis. 
Phillips, Price County, Wis 



(1414) 



Why referred. 



Patient came from Wl^coodn 
sick, to consult MinneapoUi 
physician. 

Cmture from mother positive 
after she had left for Wisooo- 
8in. her child haying died or 
diphtheria at atyHospitilt 
StTPaul. 



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1415 



▲ucost 31, 1917 



Caui of communioahU diseases, referred during JtUff, 1917 ^ to other State health depart' 
menu by department of health of the State of Minnesota — Ck)ntinued. 



Diseue and locality of noti- 
flcatlon. 



Referred to health authority of— 



Why referred. 



MhiTif poUii City, Hen- 
nepin County. 



Scarlet fever: 

Savage VfUage, Boott 
County. 

Smallpox: 

Landon Townsliip,Free- 
bofn County. 

MinneapoUs Health De- 
partment, HenneplD 
County. 



Tuberculosis: 

Mayo Clinic, Rochester, 
Olmstcad County. 



Pokegama Sanatorium, 
Pine County. 

Thomas Hospital, Min- 
neapoUs, Hennepin 
Ckwnty. 

IChmeapolis Health De- 
partment, Hennepin 
County. 

St. Paul Bureau of 
Health, Ramsey 
County. 
Typhoid fever: 

Star buck village, Pope 
County, 

liumeapolis Health De- 
partment, Hennepin 
County. 



LeMars^Plymouth County, Iowa; Her- 
man, wasnlngton County, Nebr. 



Lake Mills, Whmebago County, Iowa 

Hartford, Hartford County, Conn 

Mobridge, Walworth County, 8. Dak. 



Chicago, Cook County, HI.; Uttle York, 
Warren County, 111.; Toledo, Tama 
County, Iowa; Orange City, Sioux 
County, Iowa; Conrad, Grundy County, 
Iowa; Dubuque, Dubuque Coimty, Iowa 
(2 cases); Shell Rock, Butler County, 
lf,^r Fort P.-,!;:.-^, Webst^rr County, 
kiv I, iJdU CoiiT^iv, M.- h.; 

Kr ■ : • n I oiJlify; M*-.'. < "i , d, 

Tf U .li t ou n 1 V ., MuUt . ; I*ali5in Sr , i 1 1 1 1 :h- 
cock t-Ujun t V , N c br . i l>e V I [s T-Ji ke, K - m- 
sey CouDty N. Pflk.; Kermlt, M.ide 
County, N. Dak.: Winr* Biirkifrti ( 'un- 
tvi N* Dak*: Shawnee, Potrnwir- niie 
CSjnnly, OklOi.: Merrick, (jrfpiry ' mm- 
ty» a. Dak.; Wcllctte, Bplok Omnlj, 8. 
Dak. J Florctieo, Cculingloii County, 8. 
I>»k4 Becrfleld, Dane Countv, Wis.; 
CamdnH. Saskat^^bewBii, rftna-b. .Pun- 
itory district Dol Kivcii, Ssi^ktslrln^tin, 
(>mdEi, 

BelptrftUe, (;;uJla1iti CfMintv, Moot.L Ilay- 
wtirdi, ^aiTTer Coimty, Wis. 

Hat ton, TtWII C- nut v. N. innk . Dr^^^cer, 
I'olk Couniy, ^\ 

Spring Brook, Williams County, N. Dak. 



Grantsburg, Burnett County, Wis . 



Bancroft, Kossuth County, Iowa. 
Conde, Spibk County, S. Dak.... 



Working in NcbrasVa, came to 
Minneapolis broken out with 
measles; stopped off at Le- 
Mars, Iowa, 10 hours. 

Mother and 2 children exposed 
to scarlet fever in Mixmesota; 
went to Iowa. 

Left Minnesota for Connecti- 
cut after extensive exposure 
to smallpox; vaocinatian his- 
tory imknown. 

Case developed smallpox in 
Minneapolis. Contracted 
while visiting daughter in 
South Dakota, who also had 
smallpox. 

4 advanced, 14 moderately ad- 
vanced, 3 apparently ar- 
rested, 2 diagnosis not given; 
cases left Mayo Clinic for 
homes. 



1 death, 1 open case discharged 
from Pokegama Sanatorium. 

2 open cases left Thomas Hoa- 
pital for homes. 

Sputum examined while \W\U 
ing in Minnesota; posilivp; 
patient returned to North 
Dakota. 

Open case left City Hospital, 
St. Paul, for home in Wiscon- 
sin. 

Suspected typhoid carrier from 
Iowa visiting in Minnosnta. 

Patient from South Dakota 
died of typhoid fever at St. 
Barnabas Hospital, Minne- 
apolis. 



ANTHRAX. 
Kansas — Hutchinson. 

During the month of July a case of anthrax was notified in 
Hutchinson, Reno County, Kans. The patient was a Mexican 
employed m a raihoad camp. 
102 



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Aiikli8t81,l»lf 1416 

ANTHRAX— Gontmuod. 
Loyisiaiui Report for Julj, 1917. 

Dming the month of July, 1917, six cases of anthrax were reported 
in the State of Louisiana. 

Marylaiid — Harnej. 

A case of anthrax was notified at Harney, Carroll County, Md., 
August 13, 1917. The patient was taken ill August 10. It is believed 
that the infection was acquired while handhng boards on which the 
carcass of a hog had lain. 

CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS. 
Minnesota— Fort Snelling. 

During the week ended August 25, 1917, a case of cerebrospinal 
meningitis was reported at Fort Snelling, Minn. 

State Reports for Jnly, 1917. 



PlaOA. 


New 

oases 

reportad. 


Place. 


New 

cases 

reported. 


California: 

Alameda County ,. 


17 


V. PAifcftrm Vi^T\*h 


1 


Oakland 


Livingston Parish. . . 


1 


Los Angeles County— 

Wmttier 


Total . . 




i 


PlftCftT Countv 


Minnesota: 

Carlton County- 
Moose T4kk« 




San DioKO County 




San Diego 


1 


Ban Francf !«rt, . . . .. x . .... 




Veotura County ...... 


Chippewa County— 
Lonetree Townshlo 






1 


Total 


38 


Crow Win* County— 
Riverton 






1 


Connecticut: 


4 

2 

1 
1 

1 
2 

1 


Fataileld Township j 


1 


Fairfield County- 
Bridgeport 


Freeborn County- 
Albert Lea Township 


1 


Hartford County- 
Hartford 


Hennepin County— 

Minnwpolis.. 


3 


New Britain 


Koochiching C-ounty— 

Rat Root Township 




Plainville 


1 


New Haven County- 
Cheshire 


Ramsey County— 

St. Paul 


3 


New Haven 


St. Louis County— 

Duluth 




Orange. . , . , . ....... . 


1 




Sherburne C-oimty— 

Haven Township 




Total 


12 


1 




Total 




Iowa: 


1 


U 




Montana: 

Silverbow Coimty 








Kansas- 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 


1 


Crawford County— 

Pittsburg 


New Jersey: 

Essex County 




Elk County — 


9 


Leeds (R. D.) 


Hudson County 


3 


Harvey County- 
Newton 


Passaic County 


3 


Uni; n County 


3 


Montgomery County — 
Independence. 


Total 




17 


Sunuier County- 
Well i n jrt on 


1 South Carolina: 

York County 




Wyandotte County- 
Kansas City 


1 


South Dakota: 
1 Charles Mix Coimty 


- 






Total 


8 


1 









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1417 

CEREBROSPINAL MENrNCITIS^^onHnued. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aug, 11, 1917. 



August 31, lOlT 



Place, 


Cases. 


Deaths, 


Vlmx. 


ra.r^. 


Deaths. 


Akron^ Ofaio.. . ....... ^ . , . 


1 
1 
4 
5 




Manchester, N.H.... 




1 


AlilflSiti^wTt Pa . **...,. 


1 


Mllwaukoe Wis .. .».i 


I 


Bdtimore^ Ifd. . ^,.,,._^. 


Musc^tiofi^ Iow9 .., ^... 


1 


Boston, Mass..,,.., *,.. 


1 


Newark, N.J.,. „: 

NflW York, N.Y.. ........... 

Norfolk Va .,**.*.*»..*» 




Brirf^ri^rt ^ rofiTi . . . „ 


I 


Buffalo K Y . 


1 


1 


CSitlse^ Ma^........ 


1 

a 


Onin^ii, N.J , 




1 


Clti<tu»n ni 


9 
1 


Phnivli^iphia. Va , 




t 


Clerclartii . Ohio . . .,. 


I'dishiimh, I'q 


I 


I>ftf toD Ohio * , * * * * 


2 

1 


ntiTtadLcl Mss^.. , . . .. 






Betroit.Mldi........ 




SI. Louis, Mo.... 


1 


Tii^tmnirp<^m,ln'i T < . 


i 

1 
1 
1 


Hun Diejjo. Cat .... . . 








Sua Francisco, Cal .... 




liC»ni***^*v' Xan5 t ..l 




Stockton Cal-. . . 


t 


Kansas CUf^ Ho 















DIPHTHERIA. 

See Diphtheria, measles, Ecarlet fever, and tuberciilotua, page 1433, 

DYSENTERY. 

Kentucky— War Creek. 

All outbreak of dysentery was reported August 25. 1917, at War 
Creek^ Breathitt Comity j Ky, Sixteen deaths oceurred between 
August 1 and 25, and 5 new cases were notified August 24* 

Mas^chugetts. 

A report dated August 24, 1917, states that there had been an 
outbreak of dysentery in the Grafton State Hospital, 45 cases ha\'ing 
occurred in the Worcester department, with three deaths , and 30 
cases in the Grafton colony. With the exception of the tliree ciines 
which proved fatal, all recovered rapidly and without difficulty. 
Laboratory examinations of fecal specimens from several of the more 
typical cases proved absence both of amebaj and also of any of the 
known strains of haeiUi dysenteris^, 

ERYSIPELAS. 
City Reports for Week Ended Au£. It, 1917. 



Flan. ' 


Cws. 


Deaths. ' 


Pliu», 


CmKa. 


Deaths. 


B«rton,MAss . . ........ 




3 
1 


Passaic, N. J 






SSSSi.lnr' ::::::::::,:::: 


6 
1 
1 

1 
1 

i 


PWIudelphia, Pa - 




Citiciniiatl Ohio * *.*,*.-** 


PlU>hur»!h, Pa.. ..., 


1 
2 

i 




Cleveland Ohio 


i 


FltimflcH, K. J. 

Ilo^hc^Ier, N. Y....... ..... 


"""■"■ 


t>mutli Minn . . *,.,p.. 




Kinsas'City, Mo ,.. 




: Bt, LonU, Mo 




Lotic Bcicfi. Cal . 




Ban Francis ""o^ Cal. ,., p. ...... . 


MUw.iukce Wis 




Scat lie, Waah 




Ntw BritaLo. rtmo . . , 


I 
1 


BprLiiille[4, Ul 




N«wY«rk, N. Y./.;.;;;i;... 




1 


.....,- 







Digitized by 



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Aiisunsi«m7 



1418 

MALARIA. 
State Reports for July, 1917. 



Place. 



California: 

Butto County 

Biegs 

CWco 

Calaveras County 

Colusa County 

Colusa 

Fresno County— 

Firebaugn 

Olenn County— 

Orland 

Kern County 

Bakersficld 

Merced County. 

Placer County — 

Rocklin 

San Francisco 

San Joaquin County- 
Stockton 

Tehama County- 
Red Bluff 

Tulare County 

Tuolumne County . . . . 

YoloCoimty 

Total 

Kansas: 

Crawford County— 
Pittsburg 

Miami County— 

Loulsburg 

Sumner County— 
Conway Springs... 

Wyandotte County- 
Kansas City 

Total 

Louisiana: 

Acadia Parish 

Allen Parish 

Ascension Parish 

Avoyelles Parish 

Beauregard Parish 

Bienville Parish 

Bossier Parrlsh 

Caddo Parrish 

Calcasieu Parish 

Claiborne Parish 

Concordia Parish 

De Soto Parish 

E. Carroll Parish 

E. Feliciana Parish... 
Evangeline Parish . . . . 

Franklin I'arish 

Grant Parish 



Newckscs 
reported. 



75 



Place. 



NewcMii 
reported. 



Louisiana— Continued . 

Iberia Parish 

Jefferson Davis Parish. . 

La Salle Parish 

Lincoln Parish 

Livingston Parish 

Natchitoches Parish 

Ouachita Parish 

Plaquemines Parish 

Rapides Parish 

Red River Parish 

St. Charles Parish 

St. James Parish 

St. John Parish 

St. Landry I'arish 

St. Martin Parish 

St. Mary Parish 

St. Tanmiany Parish.... 

Tangipahoa Parish 

Union Parish 

Vermilion Parish. 

Vernon Parish 

Washington Parish 

Webster Parish 

W. Baton Rouge Parish. 
W. FcUdana Parish 



Total.. 



New Jersey: 

Bergen County 

Burlington County.. 

Essex County 

Hudson County 

Mercer County , 

Middlesex Coimty... 

Morris County 

Passaic County 

Somerset County.. . . 
Sussex County 



Total. 



South Carolina: 

Beaufort County. 
Chester County . . 
Laurens County.. 
Marlon County... 
Pickens County.. 
Kichlaod County.. 



Snartanburg County. . 

Union County 

Williamsburg Coimty. 
York County 



Total. 



20 



10 
« 
S 

1 

» 
S 

4 

4 
1 



City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 11, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Desths. 


Birmingham, Ala 


136 

1 
1 
1 
3 




Memphis, Tenn 




1 


Boston. Mass 




New Orleans, La 


2 


1 


Brookline, Mivss 




Orange, N. J ,''. 




Cambridge, Mass ^ 




1\ ichmond. Va 




Columbia 8 C 




San Francisco, Cal 




Fort Wayne, Ind 


1 


Sftvannf^h, ^^a . . . . t 




Little Rock, Ark "' 


I 
1 


Stockton, Cal 




Los Angeles, Cal .■ 


1 








_ 



> The reason that Birmingham had so many more cases of malaria reported than any other city is not 
that the disease is more prevalent in Birmingham than in other cities of Alabama and neighboring StaUii 
but undoubtedly because of the successful efforts the health department has made insecuiing thecooptft* 
Uon of the practicing physicians in reporting cases. 



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1419 



August 31. 1917 



MEASLES. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1433. 

PELLAGRA. 
State Reports for July, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Cdifornja: 

lios Arg3les County- 


1 
1 
1 

1 


Louisiana— Contlnu>d. 

De Soto Parish 


1 


Los Angeles 


East Daton Roufe Parish.. 


5 


Merced Connty x ....... . 


East Carroll Pafish .... 


1 


Onnge County. . . .. ... ... . 


East Feliciana Parish 


1 




Morehouse Parish 


6 


Sftcramento. . .' 


Orleans Parish 


8 




Ouachita Parish.. . 


12 


Total 


4 


Pointe Coupee Parish 


1 




RaDides Parish 


1 


Connecticut: 


' 


Richland Parish 


2 


Hartfoiti County- 


St. Martin Parish 


1 


Hartford 


St. Tammany Parish 


2 




Union Parish 


3 




2 

4 

1 
1 

1 


Vernon Parish 


1 


Cowlev Coiinty— 


Wuui Parish 


1 


Wlnfleld 






Labette County— 


Total 


V) 


Chetopa. . /. 


South Carollno: 

Abbeville County . . 




Montgomery County— 

Cnaney , , 


2 


Independence 


Beaufort County 


1 


Sedrwick County— 

>¥iclilta. 


Chester County 


2 


QreenviUeCounty. . . 


1 




Laurens (5Winty ".. 


2 


Total 





Pickens County 


6 




Richland County . . . 


s 


T^nlstanft: 


1 
2 
2 


Spartanburg County 


5 


Allen Parish 


Sumter County 


1 


Oiddo Parhh 


Total 




CaWwell Parlih 


23 









City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 11, 1917. 






Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Binninf^hani, A la ,,....-- 


»8 




Nashville, Tcnn 


2 




Charleston 8 . C 


1 
1 


New Orleans, La 


2 

1 




ChattanoofTA, Trnn 




New York, N.Y 




Columbfai "s. C 


1 


Norfolk, Va 




Fort Worth, Tex 


1 
2 

1 


Richmond, Va 






Memphis, Tenn 


32 


Wilmington, N. C 

Winston-Salem, N . C 






Mobile Ala 
















* The reason that Birmingham had so many cases of jiellagra reported is not that the disease is more 
prevalent in Birmingham than in other cities of Alabama and nciKl»l>oring States, but undoubtedly l)e- 
caose of the successful efforts the health department has made in securing the cooperation of tiic "prac- 
ticing physicians in reporting cases. 

PNEUMONIA. 

City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 11, 1917. 



Place. 



Allentown. Pa... 
Auburn, N.Y... 
Baltimore, Md.. 
Boston, Mass.... 

Cte^famd, Ohio.' 
Detroit, Mich.... 
Fan River. Mass. 
uncDfai, Nebr... 
Us Angeles, Cal. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Cases. Deaths. 



Newport, Ky 

Oakland. Cal 

Philaflelphia, l"a. . 

Pittsburgh, I'a 

Rochester, K. Y... 

Rcckford, III , 

8an Dicgj, Cal 

San Franciscj, Cal 

Topeka, Kans 

Worcester, Mass . . . 



2 


2 


I 


3 


23 


12 


11 


11 


1 


I 


1 


I 


T 




10 


( 






'J 





Digitized by' 



August 31, 1917 



1420 



POUOMYEUTIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS). 
Cases Reported, August 16 to 2$, 1917. 

The following table shows the number of cases of poliomyelitis 
reported to the United States Public Health Service from August 16 
to 29, 1917. This is an addition to and continuation of the tabk 
published in the PubUc Health Reports, August 17, 1917, page 1320. 



Place. 



Period. 



Cases. 



Place. 



Period. 



Cms. 



Alabama: 

Jefferson County — 

Dooena 

Montgomery County- 
Montgomery 

Connecticut: 

Hartford Connty— 

Bristol 

Delaware: 

New Castle County— 
McCIellandsyille . . . 
Illinois: 

Coles County 

CookCoimty 

Kankakee County 

Knox County 

Lake County 

La Salle County 

Madison County 

St. Clair Connty 

Iowa 

Kansas: 

Allen County — 

Moran 

Lyon County— 

Emnoria 

Morris County— 

Wilsey 

Sedgwick County— 

Pe<* 

W3randotto County- 
Kansas City 

Maryland: 



Aug. l»-25. 
do 



•do. 



Aug. 1»-18. . . 



do 

Aug. 12-25. 
Aug. 12-18. 
do. 



Aug. 19-25. 
Aug. 12-18. 
Aug. l»-25. 

do 

Aug. 1-22. . 



Aug. 19-25. 
Aug. 12-18 . 
....do 



Allegany County. 
Garrett County... 



Massachusetts: 

Bristol County- 
Fall River 

Essex County— 

Haverhill 

Lynn 

Saugusftown) 

Plymouth County— 
Hingham (town). 

Worcester County— 
Winchendon (town) . 
Missouri: 

Jackson County- 
Independence 

Ohio: 

Wayne County— 

Ck>ngress Township. , 
Chip|)ewa Township 

Plai n Township 

Pennsylvania: 

AUe«honv County- 
Pittsburgh 

Texas: 

Angelina County— 

Luflrin 

Vermont: 

Franklin County— 

St. Albans 

Enosburg Falls 

Fairneld 

Orange County— 

Orans^e 

Washington County— 

Barre 

Barre(towii) 



Aug. 19-25. . 

Aug. ^18.. 

Aug.l3-K.. 
do 



Aug. 12-18.. 

Aug. 1^-28.. 
Aug. 25-27.. 
Aug. 12-18.. 

....do 

....do 



Aug. 14., 



Aug. 12-18 . 

do 

Aug. 1-28. . 

Aug. 16-23.. 

Aug. 22 



Aug. 19-25.. 
Aug. 12-18.. 
Aug. 19-25.. 

Aug. 6-11... 



Aug. 5-18.. 
do 



Vermont — Continued. 

Washington County — 
Continued. 

Calais 

Montpelier 

More town 

Waltsfteld 

Waterbury 

Windham County- 
Bellows Falls 

Brattleboro 

Windsor County- 
White River Jono- 
tion. 
Virginia: 

Albermarle County- 
Ivy 

Fauquier County- 
Near Orlean 

Greene County 

Near Quinque 

Standardsviile 

Halilax County— 

Ingram 

Rockbridge County— 
Raphlne 

Rockingham County.. 

Grottoes 

Harrisonburg 

Penn Laird 

Warren County- 
Front Royal 

Washington: 

Whatcom County— 
Bellingham 

Whitman County— 

Colfiix 

West Virginia: 

Barbour County— 

Belington 

Volga 

Braxton County— 
Knawl 

Gilmer County- 
Peter Creek 

Harrison County- 
Broad Oaks 

Clarksburg 

Shinnston 

Marion County— 

Edgemona 

Ida May 

Mannington 

Mlddieton 

Monongah 

Plum Itun 

Minora 1 C^>unty 

OhioCo,unty— 

Edgowood 

Greggs\ille 

Preston County— 
Eglon 

Taylor County 

Grafton 

Tucker County 

Davis 

Upshur County— 
Buckhannon 

Wood County— 

Parkcrsburg 



Aug. 13-18... 
Aug. 12-25.. 
Aug. 19-».. 

...^do 

Aug. 5-25.... 



Aug. 12-18. 
Aug. 19-2S. 

Aug. 12-18. 



Aug. 21-27. 

Aug. 15-20. 

do 

....do 

Aug. 21-27. 



.do. 



....do 

....do 

Aug. 15-20. . 
Aug. 15-27. . 
Aug. 21-27. . 

Aug. 15-20.. 



Aug. 12-18. 
....do 



....do 

....do 



.do.. 



.do., 
.do.. 



Aug. 12-25. 
Aug. 12-18. 



....do 

Aug. 1^25. 
Aug. 12-18. 
Aug. 1^25. 
Aug. 12-25. 
Aug. 19-25. 
....do 



.do., 
.do.. 



.do., 
.do.. 



Aug. 12-18. 
Aug. 19-25. 
Aug. 12-18. 

Aug. 19-25. 

Aug. 12-2S. 



Digitized by 



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1421 Aagust 31. 1917 

POUOMYELITIS (fNFANTILE PARALYSIS)-0>ntinue(l. 
State Reports for Jaly» 1917. 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



CaUfoniia: 

Afatmeda Comity— 

Berkeley 

Marion County— 

Belvedere 

Orange County 

Santa Clara County 

ToUl 

Connecticut: 

Hartford County- 
New Britain 

New Haven County- 
Derby 

Windham County- 
Thompson 

Totel 

Iowa: 

Fayette County 

Marion County 

Pago County 

Total 

Kansas: 

Allen County— 

Elsmorc(R. D.) 

Wyandotte County— 
KansasCity 

Total 

Maine: 

Knox County— 

Rockland 

Michigan: 

Washtenaw C-ounty— 
Ann Arbor 

Wavne County- 
Detroit 

Total 

Minnesota: 

Aitkin County- 
Rice River Township 



Minnesota— Cont inued. 

Clay County— 

Kecne To.vnship 

Hennepin County- 
Minneapolis , 

Lyon County- 
Lyons Township , 

Pope County- 
Blue Mounds Township. 

Ramsey County— 

St. Paul 

Watonwan County- 
Long Lake Township — 



Total. 



Montana: 

Carbon County 

Cascade County- 
Great Falls..., 

Fergus County 

Granite County... 



Total 

New Jersey: 

Essex County 

Hudson County 

Middlesex Coimty., 

Passaic County 

Sussex County 

Union County 



Total 

North Dakota: 

Grand Forks County. 

Williams County , 

McLean County 

Emmons County 



Total. 



South Dakota: 
Clark County . 



Wyoming: 

Natrona Coimty . 



City Reports for Week Ended Au|f. 11» 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deiths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Akron, Ohio 


3 

1 
9 

1 
4 
1 




Mobile. Ala 


1 




Boston, Mass 


I 


Newark, N.J 

New Castle, Pa 




1 


Oi^CA^ ni 


7 


Qncinnati, Ohio ../. 




New York. N.Y 

Oakland, ('al 


5 1 2 


CleTeland 'dhlo . . 


1 


1 




Evansriile, Ind 


Omaha, Ncbr 


4 
1 
3 
I 


1 


Haverhin, Mass 


1 


Pasadena, Cal 

Sioux City, Iowa 




KfknmsritT Mo 


1 






Lorain, Ohio 


} 




Troy, N.Y 




Lowell, Mass '. 















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▲aciist81,1917 1422 

RAMBS IN MAN. 
City Report for Week Ended Aug. 11, 1917. 

During the week ended August 11, 1917, a fatal case of rabies in a 
child was reported in New Britain, Conn. 

RABIES IN ANIMALS. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 11, 1917. 

During the week ended August 11, 1917, 1 case of rabies in animals 
was reported in Detroit, Mich., and 4 cases were reported in New 
Britain, Conn. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER 

Stete Reports for July, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


Neweasei 
reported. 


Colorado: 

Moffat County 


1 
4 


Nevada: 

F|lro Cntnity ^ x . ... 


1 


Rio Blanoo County 


Fuvnhntdt ^-omity .... 


I 




Total 




Total 


5 


i 




Wyoming: 

Campbell County 




Montana: 

Fergus County 


1 
2 
2 


i 


Madison County 


Sweetwater County 


1 


StillwAtAr Cotmtv 


Total 






s 


Total 


5 











SCARLET FEVER. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1433. 
SEPTIC SORE THROAT. 
Massachusetts. 

An outbreak of septic sore throat was reported August 24, 1917, 
in Massachusetts; 39 cases having been notified in Natick; 74 cases in 
Wellesley, with 2 deaths; and 6 cases in Dover. 

The disease was believed to have been distributed by milk. 

SMALLPOX. 
Minnesota. 

During the week ended August 25, 1917, two new foci of smallpox 
infection were reported in Minnesota, cases of the disease having 
been notified as foUows: Hennepin County, Fort Snelling, 1; Ramsey 
County, North St. Paul, 1. 



Digitized by 



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1423 



-Aiifmie81.1917 



SMALLPOX-rOontinued. 
SMe Reports for July, 1917. 





New cases 
reported. 


Deatbs. 


Vaccination history of cases. 


Plaoew 


Number 
vaccinated 

within? 
years pre- 
ceding 

attack. 


Number 
last vacci- 
nated more 
than 7 years 
preceding 

attack^ 


Number 
never suc- 
cessfully 
vaccinated. 


Vaccination 
history not 
obtained or 
uncertain. 


CUUaniia: 

Amador Countv— 

Sutter Creek 


1 
7 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 










l^i*snA County .......... ^ ..., ^ 










Fresno .. . ..... 










Selma - 








1 


Riverside County 












San Bernardino County— 
San Bernardino 










Ban Mateo County- 
South San Frandjico 








1 


Yxiba C<Hinty 










, 1 














Total 


14 










3 












Denver County- 
Denver 


3 

4 
2 




2 








Garfield County— 

Glenwood Springs 






4 


WeW County-* ~ 

Greeley 










2 














Total 


9 




2 


















Kanaas: 

Allen County- 
La Hame 


2 

1 

1 
3 

1 

3 

1 
6 

1 
1 

2 

1 
2 
5 

1 
1 
2 

10 
3 

1 

1 

2 

1 

6 

1 

1 

4 

2 












i3aT\ .:::.:.::::::... 










AtchisQa County— 

Atdiisan 










Brown County— 

Horton 










BrtterCountjr- 

Bl Dorado 










Cberokee County— 

CohlmbllS r - - r - - 










HaUowell 










West Mineral 










Cowley County— 

CMn^iridge r , 










Geuda Springs 










Crawford County— 

Glrard(R.D.) 






1 
1 




Hepler (R. D.) 








McCmie(R.D.) 






%- 




Mulberry 










Doniphan County— 
T)oniphan . 










Sparks (R.D.) 






< 




Troy (R. D.) 










Douglas County— 

Eudora (R. D.) 










Vinland 










Ford County— 

Spearville (R. D.) 










Geary County— 

^ortRUey 










Harvey County- 
Newton 










Jefferson County- 
Valley Falb 










Jewell County- 
Lebanon (R. D.) 










Lyon County— 

Emporia 










Marion County- 
Marion (R. D.) 










Mcpherson County— 

Marquette 










Miami County- 

Paola.... 








^,..4At0 



Digitized by ^ 



Alikt>&t81,1017 



1424 

SMALLPOX— Continued, 
State Reports for July, 1917— Continued. 





New cases 
reported. 


Deaths. 


VacdnatioD history of cases. 


Plato. 


Number 
\'accinated 
within? 
years pre- 
ceding 
attack. 


Number 
last vacci- 
nated more 
than 7 years 
preceding 

attack. 


Number 
never suc- 
cessfully 
vaccinated. 


VacdnatioD 
history not 
obtained or 
uncertain. 


Kansas— Continued . 

Montporacry County— 

Independence (R. D.) 

Neosho Ccunty— 


2 

1 
8 
5 
3 
6 

1 

8 

1 

1 
19 








2 

1 

8 

5 

3 

C 

1 
1 

8 

1 
1 












Norton C-ounty- 

AlniAnn ^ R Ti \ 










Ottawa County— 










Russell County— 

RussclKR.D.) 

• Bedew ick Cx)unty— 
Wichita 


















Sumner Ccunty— 

Milan 










Mulvanc 

Wilson county— 
Covvilln fR D ^ 


1 

1 






Woodson Coimty— 

Tnmntn ^R. Ti \ 








Wyandotte County— 

RosedaJe (R. D.) 


1 






Kansas City 






19 




ToUl 


122| I i 2| 120 


Michigan: 

Alleean County- 
Hopkins Township 

Alpena Cx)unty - 

Long U lipids Township... 
Antrim Ccninty— 


3 

1 

3 

2 
3 

1 

2 

1 

2 
23 

3 
7 

1 

1 
2 

2 



2 

1 

1 

3 

1 
3 
11 










3 








1 
1 










2 


Chippewn CouiHy— 

Dctcur Township 









2 


Sault Stc. Maric 

Crawford County— 

OraylinK I ownship 

Emmet Count v— 

Bliss Township 








3 


1 








2 

1 




rcllsti.n 

Gcnpftc Count y— 

( : jimos Township 


1 

1 




2 


FlintCity 

Ingham C< imly— 

William ton 


1 

;_;; \ 




23 

3 

7 

1 




Lansa-KCity 

Jackson (^ouiity — 

Jx»cni Twwnship 

Kent Comity— 

Alpine i ownship 


1 

1 






1 




1 
2 

2 

G 

1 




(Jrand liap.ds 

Livingston (\iinty— 

Ccnway Township 

Mackinac ("oiinty— 

I'crtaro I'ownship 

Mace ml) C\ unty— 

Mt. Clemens 


1 

1 






i 

t . 






1 




1 


Marquette County — 


1 


1 
1 




Mecosta County— 


1 






Montmorency County— 
Rrilev Towni'shin 


1 


3 

1 
3 
11 




Oakland County- 
Pen tiac Township 

Watcrf . rd Township 

Pcntiac 


1 






1 1 




::::::::::!::::::::::::i:::::::::::: 





Digitized by 



Google 



1425 



A«<«st«1.1917 



SMALLPOX— Oontlnued. 
State Reports for J11I7, 1917T-Ck);atiiiued. 





New cases 
reported. 


Deaths. 


Vaccination history of cases. 


Piano. 


• 
Number 
vaccinated 
withm 7 
years pre- 
ceding 
attack. 


Number 
last vacci- 
nated more 
than 7 years 

attack. 


Number 
nevor suc- 
cessfully 
vaccinated. 


Vaccination 
history not 
oltained or 
uncertain. 


MiAigan-Conttaued. 
Pre^ue Isle County— 

Belknap Township 


6 

2 
3 
20 








1 
2 

1 




RogErs.. 










Onaway 










Saginaw County— 

Sttfnnaw 






1 




St. Clair County— 

Kimball Township 






1 
3 

1 
6 

1 




Sanilac County— 

Sanilac Township 








1 


Shiawassee County— 

Durand 










Tuscola County- 










Wayne County- 
Ford 






1 




Hi0ilandPark 






3 


Detroit 








20 














Total 


127 






4 


\(A 


15 










MimiesoU: 

Becker Cdunty— 

Detroit 


3 

10 
2 

52 








2 
10 




Blue Efcrth County— 

^ Rapidan Township 

Sleepy Eye 


















Albme Township 










Carver County— 

ChosVft 










Chanhassen Township 

Loketo wn Townshin ... . 


















Clay County- ^ 

Moorhiad 










Crow Wing County— 

Braincrd 










Crosby 








1 






:::::::::::::::::::::::: 


1 


Emi^Townshlp 








50 




Dakota CJounty— 

Farmington 










Empire Township 










Donidas County- 
Carlos Township 










KUmore County- 
Mabel 










Freeborn County— 

Froebom Township 










Goodhue County- 
Pine Island . . . 










Hennepto County- 
Minneapolis.. 


1 




2 




Richfield 






Houston County- 
Spring Grove 










Itasca County- 
Deer River 










Jackson County- 
Jackson.... 










"^'"^^'r,. . 










Lyon County- 
Tracy 










Martin County- 
Fairmont 










Pleasant Prarie Township. 
Silver Lake Township 


1 




1 


!!!;!!!!!>!!!!!!!!!!!!'!!!!.! '. 


1 



Digitized by 



Gc 



August 81, 1917 



1426 



SMALLPOX— Contiuned. 
State Reports for July, 1917— Continued. 





New cases 
reported. 


Deaths. 


Vacdnatioo history of cases. 


Place. 


Number 
vaccinated 
within 7 
years pre- 
ceding 
attack. 


Number 

natedmore 

than 7 years 

preceding 

attack. 


Number VacdrntioB 
no Tsuc- history not 

ceisfully obtained or 
vaccinated. | uncertain. 


Minnesota— Continued. 
Mower County- 
Austin .. . 


2 

11 
U 

C 








2 




Murray County— 

Hollv TownshiD 








1 

1 
3 

10 




Olmsted County- 
Rochester 










New Haven Township 

Ramsey County— 

St. I'aul... 














1 




Rico County— 

Farit)ault 






S 


St. Louis County— 

Duluth 


6 


4 


2 

1 


3 




HibliinR . . . 




Rico I»ako Township 

Scott County— 

Olendalo Township 

Todd County- 
Hartford Township 

Momn Townshin 






11 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 
1 

6 

2 




























Wadena County— 
Wadena 










Washington County- 
Forest I^ko 










Marine 










Forest Lake Township 

Watonwan County— 

St. James 


1 








1 




3 










Total 


IfiS 


7| 5 


6 


149 


8 


Montana: 

Beaverhead County 


5 
10 
2 
3 
3 
3 

1 
2 
2 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
4 
11 

6 










5 


Cascade County . 








10 
2 
2 




Chouteau County 








. 


Custer County . .'. 








1 


Dawson County 








8 


Flathead County 










3 


Gallatin Coimty— 

Bozeman 










1 


Jeflfcrson Coimty 






i 


2 


Lewis and Clark County 

Lincoln County 






1 1 










1 
3 




Musselshell County 










Rinhli^nd rouTlty 








1 


Sanders County . 








2 

1 






Sheridan County 








^^ 


Silverbow County 








4 


Butte 




1 




10 

2 




Yellowstone County— 

Billings 






8 













Total 


59 




1 


1 


34 












Digitized by 



Google 



1427 

SMALLPOX-^Oontiniied. 
MiseeOaiieoiis State Reports. 



'liogim 81.1917 



Tha. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Connaeticut (July 1-31): 
UtobiOeld County— 
Winchester , . . , 


5 

1 




Matae (June 1-30)— Contd. 

Washington County- 
Forest Station (Town) 
MiUbridgo(Town).... 
Vanceboro (Town) . . . 

Letter A (Town) 

Total 


1 
6 
2 

1 




New Haven County— 






Waterbury 








••* •••••• 


Total 


6 








■ 


40 




Iowa (July 1-ai): 

Adair County 


7 
1 

1 
3 




Maine (July 1-31): 

Aroostook County- 
Fort Kent (Town).... 
Frenchville (Town)... 

Linneus (Town) 

Penobscot (bounty— 
Hampden (Town).... 
Oldtown 


1 
1 
17 

4 
1 

1 
4 

1 
1 

1 
17 


■ 


Appanoose C!ounty 

Audubon County 










Boone Countv 






Ceno Qordo County 


2 






Crawford (Countv 


3 
1 
1 






Dallas County 






Decatur County 






Dubuoue County 


2 

4 
3 




Somerset County— 

Anson (Town) 

Hartland (Town) 

Palmyra (Town) 

Pittsfield (Town) 

Steams County— 

Brookton (Town) 

Wasbinjrton County— 

Steuben (Town) 

Vanceboro (Town)... 

Total 




TranVlIn County t.-- 







Ida County 






Jefferson County 


2 

3 

1 

4 


:::::::::: 




Lee County 






Linn County 













Lyon (bounty. 






Mahaska County 


6 






Mitchell County 


1 

1 
5 
1 
3 
4 
7 
1 
5 
1 
1 






Monona County 







O'Brien County 




60 




pftfA County 




Nevada (July 1-31): 

Humboldt County 

North Dakota (July 1-31): 
Burleigh County 


... 


Pak) Alto County 




1 




Plymouth County 






Pottawattamie County. . . 




1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 
8 
2 




Poweshiek County. ...'.... 






ScottCounty ...'. 




Cass County 




Story County 





Golden VaUey Ckmnty. . . . 

Grand Forks Ck>unty 

Grant County 




Wapello County 






Wairen County 


5 






Webster C<MinCy . . 


6 

1 

2 

6 


Olirer County 




Winnebege County 


Ramsey County 




Winneshiek Count'y 


Ward County 




Woodbury County'. 


Williams County 






Total 




Total 


110 




21 








South Carolina (July 1-31): 
Aiken (%>nnty. .... ....^ 




Loaitiana( July 1-^1): 

Aeadia Parish 


1 
2 




1 

6 




AUen Parish 




Berkeley Ck)unty 

Total 




r^lMciMi P^rtalt 


? :::::::::: 

17 

?i:::::::::: 

8 ' 

2 ! 




Jadraon Parish . ... 


7 




Orleaii!^ Parish 


South Dakota (July 1-31): 
Clark County 




Bapides Parish 


7 
13 
2 
5 
1 
4 

3 

1 
1 
6 
3 
2 

3 ; 




8l. Tammany Parish 

Tangipahoa Parish 

Winn Parish 




Davison County 




Day County. . .1 






Deuel County 




Total 


«l 


Grant County 






Jerauld County 




Maine (Juna 1-30): 


? 




Lake CJounty 




Aroostook County- 
Fort Kent (Town).... 
Hodcdon (Town) 


Lawrence County 

Roberts County 








Spink County 




Hancock County- 
Hancock (Town) 




Tripp Crounty 




Wal A'ortb County 

Yankton County 

Ziebach Coimty 


3 


Penobscot County— 






Bangor .'. 




Eddmcton (town) . . . 
Knfleld(Town) 




Total 




1 1 
13 , 

ll 

'\ 
^1 




67 1 


3 


Hampden (Town).... 
Howund (Town) 




Wyoming (July 1-31): 

Crook Cour.ty 




1 
1 
3 




Lee (Town) 






OrQoo(Town) 

Piscataquis County — 




Naircna County 




. 


Campbell County 




^ Green vUle (Town).... 
Somerset County— 


Total 






5 




Anson (Town) 













Digitized by 



Google 



August Zt, 19X1 



1428 



SMALLPOX— Continued. 
City Reports for Week Ended Avf. 11» 1317. 



Place. 



Akron, Ohio 

Butte, Mont 

Chicago, 111 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Columbus, Ohio 

Dayton, Ohio 

Denver, Colo 

Detroit, Mich 

Flint. Mich 

Grand Rapids, Mich 
Kansas Citv, (Cans.. 
Little Rock. Ark.... 
Memphis, T%nn 



Cases. 



Death?. 



Place. 



Minneapolis, Minn... 
Oklahoma dty,Okla 

Omaha, Nebr 

Pittsburgh, I*a 

Pontiac,lflcb 

Rocky Mount, N.C.. 

St. Joseph, Mo 

St. Loub,Mo 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Seattle, Wash 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Tolodo.Ohio 

Zanesville, Ohto 



TETANUS. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aof. 11, 1917. 



Place. 



Chicago, ni 

Clevehmd, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Lexington, Ky.. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



New York. N.Y. 

Norfolk, Va 

Sacramento. Cal.. 
St. Louis, Mo 



Deaths. 



TUBERCULOSIS. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1433. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 
Arkansas— Paragould. 

A report dated August 22, 1917, states that there had been 80 
cases of typhoid fever in Paragould, Greene County, Ark., within the 
preceding six weeks, and that from 3 to 5 cases daily were being 
notified. 

Kansas — Leayenwortlu 

During the week ended August 25, 1917, 16 cases of typhoid fever 
were reported in the city of Leavenworth, Kans., and 5 cases in 
Leavenworth County. 

Massachusetts — Gardner. 

On August 24, 1917, an outbreak of typhoid fever was reported 
from Gardner, Mass., 5 cases having been reported on that day, and 
31 cases previously. All cases were traced to one milk route. It was 
found that an intermittent carrier of the typhoid bacillus was supply- 
ing milk to the distributor. Both the carrier and the distributor 
have discontinued selUng milk. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1429 



Aiisa9t81.X91T 



TYPHOID FEYER-^kmtinTied. 
State Reports for J«ly, 1917. 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



Place. 



New cases 
reported. 



CaIilomi&: 

Aiamoda County — 

Berkeley , 

Hayward , 

Oakland 

Batte County — 

Chioo , 

Colusa County 

Contrft Costa County— 

Ctmcord 

Ri<dinioxHl 

El Dorado County 

Fresno County 

Fresno 

Imperial County 

El Centre 

Imperial 

Kern County— 

Bakersfleld..... 

Los Angeles County , 

IxM Angeles 

Pomona 

Napa County 

Nevada County , 

Placer County— 

RoseviUe 

Riverside County 

Corona , 

Sacramento County 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino County. . 

San Bernardino 

San Francisco. 



San Joaquin County- 
Stockton 

San Mateo County— 
I>alyaty 

Santa Barbara County- 
Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara Ck>unty 

Palo Alto 

SanJose 

Santa Clara 

Siskiyou County— 

Dunsmuir 

Montague 

Solano County 

Soaonia County 

Healdsburg 

Santa Rosa. 

Stanislaus County 

Modesto 

Tehama County 

Tulare County— 

Dinumba 

Tulare 

Yuba County 



Total.. 



Colorado: 

Archuleta County 

Boulder Ckmnty 

Chaffee County 

Denver County— 
Denw 

El Paso County- 
Colorado Springs. 

Qunnison County 

Larimer County 

Mesa County 

Otero County 

Rocky Ford 

Puebk) County- 
Pueblo 

Routt County 

San Miguel County. . . 



Total.. 



165 



Connecticut: 

Fairfield County— 



Brid|»eport.' 
Fairfield... 



Fa 
Oreenwich. 

Norwalk 

Ridgefield 

Trumbull 

Hartford County- 
East Hartford 

Hartford 

New Britain 

Litchfield County- 
Salisbury 

Winchester 

Middlesex County- 
Old Saybrook 

New Haven County— 

Branford 

MUford 

New Haven. 

Waterbury 

Tolland County- 
Ellington 

Tolland 

Windham County — 

Plainfield 

Windham 

Willimantic 



Total. 



Kansas: 

Allen County- 
La Harp€(R. D.).. 

Anderson County- 
Harris (R.D.) 

Westphalia 

Bourbon County- 
Fort Scott (R. D.). . 

Brown County- 

Hiawatha 

Butler Countv- 

Augusta (R. D.) 

Douglas 

Eldorado 

Potwin 

Chautauqua County- 
Elgin 

Teed5(R. D.) 

Sedan 

Cherokee County — 
Columbus 

Cloud County— 

Concordia 

Gla^co 

Coffey County- 
Burlington 

Comanche County— 
Coldwater(R. D.).. 
Protection (R. D.).. 

Cowley County — 

Arkansas Citv 

Atlanta (R. D.) 

Burden 

-WinTield 

Crawford County— 

Cirard (ir. D.) 

Mulberry 

litt'^burRCR. D.)... 

Decatur County— 

Hcmdon 

Norcatur 

DicVinson County— 
IJerin^on 

Doniphan C junty— 



46 



Wathena 

Douglas County- 

Ualdwin 

Lawrence 



Digitized by 



Ooogl^ 



Aucast 81, 1917 



1430 



TYPHOID FEVER-^Continned. 
State Reports for Jnlj, 1917— OontiDued. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. , 


Newctto 
reported. 


Kansas-Continued. 
EIlswoiHi County— 

FlUwnrth fK D ^ 


1 
74 

32 

2 

7 


Kansas— Continned. 
Republic County— 

Belleville 




Franklin County- 
Ottawa (R. D.) 

Geary County- 
Junction City 


Rice County- 
Chase (R. D.) 




Sterling 




Riley County— 

Riley (lU D.) 




Graham County— 

Morland (R. D.) 

Gray County— 

Cimarron .......... 




SaUne County— 

8alin* 




Sedgwick County— 




In^ls 




Greenwood Coxmty- 


SedgwTckjfR. D.) 

Wichita (R. D.) 


U 


Hamilton 


Shawnee County— 

Topeka 




\f AHLqon fR D ) 




Quincy(R.D.) 

Severy 


Smith Coimty— 

Smith Center (R. D.) 

Stafford County— 

RjtHiiini 




Virgil (R.D.) 




Harvey County- 
Newton 




Sumner County- 
South Haven (R. D.) 

WelUngton 




Haskell County— 

Satanta 




Jewell County- 
Burr Oak 


Waphlnpton Coimty— 

Washlnirfon (R, D.) 




Formosa (R. D.) 


Wyandotte bounty- 
Ronn^r Springs. . . 




Ionia (R.D.) 

Johnson County— 
Olathe 




ITfmiffts rfty, .*; 




Total 




Kearny County— 

Lakln(R. D.) 

Kingman County— 

Kinpraan 


291 


Louisiana: 

Acadia Parish 




Labette County— 
Chetooa 


• 


Allen Parish . 




F-<lTif^(R Ti,) , 


Assumption Parish 




Leavenworth County- 
Lea venworth (R D ) 


A vnyellM PAriith . . , . 


I 


Caddo Parish 


1 


Tonpanoxie (H. n,)' *' 


Caldwell Parish 




Linn Coimty— 

La CvKne (R. B.) 


Catalioula Parish 




Concordia Parish 


( 


Lyon County— 

Olpe.... 


De Soto Parish 




East Baton Rouge Parish 




rivmouth 


Franklin Parish 




Marshall County- 
Blue Rapids 


Iberia Parish 




1 bcrville Parish 


( 


Vermillion 


Jefferson Parish 




Mcpherson County — 
Lindsborg... 


' Jefferson Davis Parish 


1 


Lafavetlc Parish 


i 


Mcpherson 


Lafourche Parish 




Miami Coimty— 

Osawatomie (R. D.) 


La Sallo Parish 




Livingston Parish 




Paola 


Madison Parish 




Montgomery County— 
C'anov... 


Morehouse Parish 




Orleans Parish 


13 


Cherry vale 


Ouachita Parish 




ColTeyville (R. D.) . 


I Plaquemines Parish 


1 


Independence 


Rapides Parish 


1 


Lil>crtv (R. D.). ] 


Richland Parish 




Nemalia County- 
Seneca 


St. Charles Parish. 




St. James Parish 




Neosho County— 
St. Paul. 


St. Landry Parish 




St. Martin Parish 




Ness County— 

NessCity 


1 St. Mary Parish 




1 St. Tammany Parish 




Norton County— 

Norcatur (R. D.) 


Tangipahoa PaVish. 




Terreljonne Parish 




Norton 


Tensas Parish 




Osage County— 

I/vndon 


Union Parish 




VermiUon Parish 


] 


Olivet (R. D.) 


Vernon Parish 




Osborne County— 

Osborne 




] 


Webster Parish 




Pawnee County- 
Lamed (R. D.) 


West Baton Rouge Parish 




West Carroll Par&h 




Pratt County— 
Cuiliscm fR D ^ 


W*nn T*<kHsh 




Total 




Reno County— 

Hutchinson (R. D.) 


2i 







Digitized by 



Google 



1431 



August 31. 1917 



TYPHOID FEVER— Continued. 
State Reports for July, 1917— Continued. 



Place. 



Maine: 

Androsoogsin County— 
Durham (Town) 

Aroostook County — 
Fort Kent (Tfown).. 
Portaf^ (Town) 

Cumberland County- 
Portland 

Penobscot Coun^ — 
Hampden (T^wn) . . . 

Eomerset County — 
Madison (Town) 

Total 

Xl^an County — 

Clyde Township 

Bay County- 
Bay City , 

Benzie County— 

Blaine Township 

Franklort 

CaQioon County— 

Albion 

Battle Creek 

Ctere County — 

Garfield Township . . 

Clinton County- 
Bath Township , 

Emmet County— 

Petoskey... 

Otnceee County- 
Argentine Township. 
FHishinE 

FitotTT :. 

Ingham County— 

Lan^ng 

Jackson County- 
Jackson 

Kalamasoo (>>unty— 
Slalanuuoo 

Kent County- 
Tyrone Township. . . 

Lapeer County- 
Oregon Township. . . 

Unawee County— 
Fairfield Township. . 
Madison Township. . 

Macomb County- 
Richmond 

Manistee County— 
Manistee 

Monroe County- 
Bedford Township . . 
Dundee Township. . 

Montcalm County- 
Day Township 

Newaygo (bounty- 
Goodwell Township. 

Oakland Ck)unty— 
Holly...: 

Baginaw 0)unty— 

Brady Township 

St. Charles 

Saginaw 

St. Clair County- 
Wales Township 

Sanilac County- 
Marion Township. . . 
Sandusky 

Tuscola County— 

Wisner Township. . . 

Washtenaw County — 
Ypsilanti 

103 



New I 
reported. 



18 



Place. 



M ichican — Continued . 

Wayne County- 
Huron Township. 

Ford 

Highland Park.... 
St. Clair Heights.. 

Wexford County— 
CadUlac 



Total. 



Minnesota: 

BocVcr Coimtj'— 

Fraaee 

Beltrami County— 

Spooner 

Blue Earth Count v- 

Vemon Center. . 
Brown Count V— 

Comfrev.* 

NewUim 

Carlton County— 

Cloquet 

Clav County— 

Ulen. 



Dakota County- 
South St. taul , 

Hennepin County- 
Minneapolis 

Lincoln County— 

Hendricks , 

Lyon County- 
Balaton 

Coon Creek Township. . 

MOle Lacs County- 
Princeton 

Nicollet County— 

St. Peter , 

Nobles County- 
Adrian 

Olmsted County— 

Quincy Township , 

Ottertail (bounty— 

Clitherall 

Leaf Lake Township. . , 

Pennington County— 

Thfef River Falls 

Polk County- 
Hill River Township.. . 

Ramsey County— 

St. Paul 

Rice County— 

Faribault 

Northfleld Township.. . 

St. Louis County— 

Duluth 

Ely 

Sherbtune County- 
Elk River 

Stearns County— 

St. Cloud 

Brockway Township. . . 

Steele County— 

Owatonna 

Stevens County- 
Morris 

Wabasha County- 
Elgin 

Wadena County— 

M^idow Township. . . . 

Wilkin County— 

Donnelly Township. 

Wright County- 
Otsego Township 

Total 



New cases 
reported. 




. ugust 81. 1017 



1432 



TYPHOID FEVBRr-Oontintied. 
State Reports for July, 1917— Contmued. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New aw 
reputed. 


Montana: 

Carlxm Countv 


1 
9 
2 

2 
2 
2 

1 

2 

1 

5 


North Dakota: 

Burleigh County 




Dawson County 


Cass County '. 




Flathead Countv 


Richland dounty 




Lewis and Clark County- 

Helona 


Rolette County .' 




Williams County ,,.,,,,_-- , 






Total 




Musselshell County 




Park- County— 

Liviiigston 


South Carolina: 

Aiken County 


== 


SDverbow County— 

Butte 




ChMtAr noiin'ty - . , 




Stillwater County 


Chesterfield County 




Yellowstone County- 
Billings 


Dorchester County. 




Florence County /. 






Greenville Coimtv 


s 


Total 


27 


Laurens County 






Marion County 




Nevada- 


2 


Orangeburg County ! . ! 




Churchill County 


Pickens County. . .^ 






RirblAnH Coiintv 


14 


New Jersey: 

Atlantic County 


4 
6 
7 
3 
3 
10 
1 
8 
5 
3 
4 
2 
4 
1 
4 
4 


Rpartanbiire County . 


13 


Sumter County 




Bersen County 


Williamsburg County 




Btirlinirton Countv 


Total 




Camden Countv 


92 


Cane Mav C^mtv ...^.-. 


South Dakota: 

Jackson County 




Cumberland County ,r-r 




Essex Countv 


1 


Oloucoster Coiuity ,...Tr 




1 


Hudson Countv 


Spfnk C^mty . ..'... V. 






TotaL 




Middlesex County ..»-^t 


3 


Monmouth Countv 


Wyoming: 

Washakie rvrnnty . 




Morrifl County .•••.••••••••*••.•• 




Passaic County 


2 


Salem Coiuitv' ,t r 


Natrona County 


1 


Somerset County 


Uinta County ', 


3 




Total 






6 


TotaL 


74 











Maine Report for Jnne, 1917. 



Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Place. 


New cases 
reported. 


Maine: 

Androscoggin County- 
Durham (town) 


2 

7 


Maine-Continued. 
York County- 
Water borough ( town) 


1 


Cumberland County- 
Portland 


Total 




10 









City Reports for Weelc Ended Aug, 11, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Caaes. 


Deaths. 


Akron, Ohio 


1 
2 
1 

15 
2 

36 
3 




Charleston, 8. C 


3 
27 
1 
5 
3 
8 
1 
3 
3 
2 
2 




Alton, 111 




ChftttAnnrkVA- Tmin 


4 


Atlantic City, N. J 




Chelsea, l^iss 




Baltimore, Md 


4 

1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 


Chicaeo 111 




Beaver Falls, Pa 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


1 


Birmingham, Ala 


Cleveland,' Ohio ... . . . . 


1 


Boston, Mass 


Cnff^yvf lie, Kans 




Bridgeport, Conn 


Columbia, 'S. C 




Buffalo, N. Y 


6 
2 

1 


Columbus, Ohio 




Cambridge, Mass 


Covincton. Kv. . ... 


» 


Camden.V.J 


Dayton, Ohio 


1 



Digitized by 



Google 



1433 August 81. 1917 

TYPHOID FEVER— Continued. 
aty Reports for Week Ended Aug. 11, 1917— Continued 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Dforer, Colo 


4 
11 


1 
2 

1 


Orange, N.J 

Phi'adelphia, Pa 


1 

19 

3 
3 
3 




Detroit, Mich 


1 


Eist Chicapo, Ind 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


3 


Elkab€th,N. J 


3 
28 
6 

4 
1 
3 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
5 

3 
1 


Portland. Me 




ETan^ville, Ind 


2 


Pcrtland Oreg 


1 


Fill River, Mass 


Pcrtsmt uth, Va 


1 


FliDt^ch 


1 


Providen-e, U. I 


1 


Fort Wayne, Ind 


Qulncy, III 




Fcrt Worth, Tex 




Reading, Pa 




Grand Rapids, Mich 




Richmond. Va 


2 


Bartibrd, tonn 




Rockfcrd, III 




iDdianarolbf . Ind 




Sacramento. Cal 




KfthinaFoo Mich 


1 


St. Joseph, Mo 




KflKtff ntv, Kan<? 


St. Lcuw, MO 


3 


Kin<w nx'y, Mo 




Salt Lake City, Utah 








San Diego, Cal 




Kokoiso,Ind 




San PraH'^isco, Cal 




I<tnf«n«r Pa 




Savannah, f^n'. 




Lawrence Mass ^ . 


1 
2 
1 


Seattle, Wash 


1 


Uxlngtcn. Ky 




Springfle'.d, III 


1 


LoQf Beach, Cal 


2 
1- 

1 
12 

1 

1 
16 

1 

3 

1 
14 

1 

1 

13 
35 

1 
10 

2 

5 


SpringAeld, Mass 


2 
3 
3 
1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
2 
1 
8 
2 
8 
13 
3 
5 
4 
2 




Um Annies, Cal 


Springfield, Ohia 




loimcmmIp . ::: : 




Steubenville. Ohio 




LrnehSurc. Va. 




Stockton, Cal 


1 


McKMsport. Pa 


1 


Tacoma, Wa^ 




MMtfonfJur^ff . 


Taunton. Mass 




Memphis. Tenn 


2 


Toledo, 6hio 




Milwaakee, Wis 


Topeka, Kan^ 




lOnncapolb, Minn 




Troy,N. Y 




MoWle.AIa 


1 
1 


Wa.tham, Mas; 




NtahTllIe, Tenn 


WashiTTtn, D. C 

Watertovm, N. Y 


4 


Neirark.N.J 




N*v Haren Conn 




Wheeling, W. Va 


2 


New Orleans. La. 


2 
3 
1 


Wilmin^t^n, Del 


1 


NewYork,!^. Y. ,.. 


Wilmington, N.C 

Winst n-Sa'.om, N.C 




Nlsttia rails, N. Y 


1 


Norfolk, Va. 


Worcester, Mas> 


1 


Otkknd.Cal...! 




Zanesville, Ohio 




0klahainaCity,6kJa 















DIPHTHERU, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS. 
State Reports for July, 1917. 





Caees reported. 


State. 


Cases reported. 


Bute. 


Diph. 
thetia. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


OiUforaia^... 


97 
24 

142 
55 
65 
55 
5 

471 


665 

66 

327 


199 
21 
41 
74 
99 
5 
3 
371 


Minnesota 


444 

29 


303 
64 
12 

359 
27 
2 
24 
27 


161 


Colortdo '.",[ 


Montana 


55 


GannecUcnt. 


Nevada 


11 


lowi... 


Now Jersey 

North Dakota 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Wyoming 


323 
46 

48 
8 


170 


Kamas..:: 


328 

41 

119 

526 


15 


Lonisiana.. 


15 


Mtine....::::::::" 


14 


Miehigui 


18 











Maine Report for June, 1917. 

During tho month of Juno, 1917, 18 cases of diphtheria, 374 cases 
of measles, and 7 cases of scarlet fever were reported in the State of 



Digitized by 



Google 



vAnffust 81, 1917 



1434 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Coutinued. 



City Reports for Week Ended Aof. 11 


, 1917. 










Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 

bv U. 8. 

Census 

Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
ctUoeiB. 


City. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 
1 


Over 500,000 inhabitants: 

Baltimore. Md 


589,621 

756,476 

2,497,722 

674,073 

571,784 

503,812 

5,602,841 

1,709,518 

579,090 

757,309 

468,558 
410,476 
306,345 
436,535 
363,454 
408,894 
371,747 
463,516 
348,639 
363,980 

214,878 
260,800 
271,708 
297,847 
295,463 
354,960 
256,417 

104,199 
181,762 
121,579 
112,981 
106,233 
127,224 
128,366 
104,562 
128,291 
110,900 
100,560 
113,245 
102,425 
148,995 
117,057 
118,158 
149,685 
198,604 
1&5, 470 
109,381 
156,687 
117,399 
105,942 
155,024 
112,770 
191,. 554 
111.593 
163,314 

85.625 
63,-505 
58,(159 
57.660 
69,S93 
57,tl.>3 
.53,97.^ 
67,449 
60,852 
60,734 


261 

'"'628* 

'"'»7* 
125 
1,448 
668 
199 
171 

91 

'"'iio* 

116 
100 
39 
100 

61 
50 

42' 

75 
52 


7 
49 
96 
26 
45 

3 
129 
39 
20 
28 

8 
7 
4 
14 
8 
12 
11 
15 

a 

2 

5 
5 

30 
3 
1 

12 
7 


2 
4 

16 
3 
3 
2 

15 
3 

• -J 

1 
1 

•j* 
"2 


19 

40 

28 

8 

6 

9 

111 

32 

20 

3 

4 
3 
3 


2 

4 

"'i' 

1 
1 






69 
70 

254 
34 
23 
32 

302 
74 
18 
58 

38 
23 
17 
23 


31 


Boston, Kass 


7 
43 

2 
18 


18 

7 

5 
23 

5 
2 
1 

12 
2 

.. 6 


...... 



...... 


19 


Chicago. Ul 


56 


Clfivetand Ohio 


a 


Detroit Mich 


16 


L.OS Angeles Cal 


9 


New York. N. Y..: 


168 


PhiladriDhia Pa 


SI 


Pittsburch. Pa 


9 


St. Louis, Mo 

From 300,000 to 500,000 Inhabit- 
ants: 
Buffalo N Y 


S 
IS 


Cincinnati Ohio 


16 


Jeraev Citv. N. J 


to 


Milwaukee, Wis 


4 


Mineaoolis. Minn. 


1 
13 

2 
20 

4 
5 






Newark. N.J 


...... 


U 
26 

38 
9 
15 

7 
* "57* 


17 


New Orleans. La. 


16 


San Francisco. Cal 


12 


5:iAatflA WiL«h. 


2 


Washington, D. C 

From 200.000 to 300,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
rnlnmhns. Ohio 


7 

5 


Denver Colo 


' 

...... 

1 


14 

2 

1 

1 . ... 




5 

4 
2 
4 
3 


1 


Indianapnlis, ind 




TTftn^AJi Citv.' Mo 


% 


Portland Orec 






3 


5 


Providence. R.I 






7 


Rochester, N. Y 


13 

2 
11 






U 

11 
18 
5 
11 
3 
4 
4 


4 


From 100,000 to 200,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Albany,N. Y 




1 






BlrmlnghMP, Ala. -r --.,.... 


60 
39 
36 

48* 

47 
15 
21 
46 
24 
50 
17 
37 
37 
27 






5 


Bridgeport, Conn 


3 
2 
2 

1 
9 
1 
3 
8 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 






1 




6 


Cambridge, Mass 




1 
2 
4. 
3 




10 


Camden, w. J *. .. 










Dayton, Ohio 




2 




4 


Fall River. Mass 




2 


Fort Wortn,Tex 










Grand Rapids, Mich 

Hartford , Conn 




2 
2 




2 
1 

1 




7 
5 
8 
5 
5 

18 
6 

10 
4 
3 
1 


1 
3 


Lawrence, Mass 


4 


Lowell. Mass 








4 


Lynn, ^ass 


1 


3 
1 




1 
1 
1 




4 


Memohis. Tenn 


4 


Nashville, Tenn 


2 


New Bedford, Mass . . . 




4 
11 




2 


New Haven, Conn 








4 


Oakland . Cal 


34 
38 
18 
47 
33 
30 
37 








1 
3 




2 


Omaha, ^ebr 










3 


Readine Pa 


3 

4 
3 
5 
6 


...... 

...... 


2 

1 




2 


Richmond, Va 




4 
4 

2 

4 
1 
3 
2 

1 




1 


5 


Salt Lake City, Utah 

Springfield, Mass 




1 
9 






10 


3 


Syracuse, N. Y 


2 


Tacoraa, Wash 








Toledo, Ohio 


53 
48 
45 

i9* 


4 
2 

8 
11 




2 
2 






7 

4 


4 


Trenton, N, J 

Worcester, Mass 


3 


From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabit- 
ants: 
Akron, Ohio 




2 










A lien town, Pa 








1 

2 

4 




Altoona. Pa. 


1 






1 






Atlantic City, N.J 


1 




1 


Bayonne, N.J 

Berkeley , Cal 


9* 

12 
11 
19 
27 


1 


1 




1 
1 






1 








2 
5 
5 




Binghamton, N. Y 


3 

1 




2 




1 


Brockton, Moss 




1 







Canton . Ohio 










Charleston, 8. C 


2 


1 


D^ 


ti'z'e'd b* 


Gt 


kyg 


k- 


5 



1435 



August 81. 1917 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS^ 

Ck>ntinued. 

aty Reports for Week Ended Aug. 11, 1917— Continued. 





Popola- 

tkmasof 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 

by U.S. 
Census 

Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 

from 

aU 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tuber- 
culosis. 


City. 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


From 50,000 to 100,000 inhabit- 
ants— Continued. 
Chmttanooga, Tenn. 


60,076 
57,144 
94,495 
86,690 
63,705 
76,195 
76,078 
54,772 
76,183 
72,015 
77,214 
68.529 
57,343 
51,155 
78,283 
58,221 
53,794 
89,612 
92,943 
71,744 
63,867 
55,186 
66,805 
55,643 
85,336 
53,330 
68,805 
99,519 
57,078 
68,946 
61,120 
51,550 
66,083 
77,916 
76,776 
94.265 
51,656 

37,733 
37,385 
34,814 
32,730 
37,633 
43,435 
46,193 
39,319 
34,611 
39,074 
33,361 
39,873 
38,743 
43,458 
38,203 
39,233 
35,486 
41,781 
41,863 
29,353 
40,496 
48,477 
35,363 
48,886 
31,576 
26,771 
38,676 
31,677 
41,097 
35.384 
46,515 
27,587 
36,964 












2 






1 


CoTinKton, Ky... 


15 
4 

30 
39 


1 
7 
7 
1 










3 
3 

1 


4 


DnluCh, lUnii;.'.! ;.....;. ; 


...... 


2 
3 

1 




1 
2 


1 




EUzabeih. N. J 


1 


EIPaao.Tex 





Erie, Pa 




3 




7 
3 
6 


14 


ETBns\iUe, Ind 


34 

19 

32 
11 
19 
5 
8 
19 
24 
34 


2 

4 
2 
1 

1 








2 


Flint, Mich 




3 










Fort Wayne, Ind 








5 


HarrisburR, Pa 




1 




5 

1 




4 
2 


1 


Uoboken, N. J.. 


2 


Johnstown, Pa 










little Rocfc, Ark... 















1 

4 
8 

1 
1 




Hailden, Mass 


4 

1 




3 

1 




j' 


3 


Manchester, N.H.. 




1 


3 


MobUe. Ala 


f 1 


2 


New BriUin, Conn.. 


1 


1 


2 










Norfolk, Va.. 










1 


Oklfttioma City, Okla. . 


17 
28 
13 
19 
31 
20 
33 
14 
30 
13 
1 
13 
14 
16 
35 



















Passaic, N.J 


5 
1 

1 
3 




1 
6 








3 


3 


Portland, Me 




1 






Rockfordf,!!!,...;::;:::':::: 








fliK«r4ni«n?^. OU 




4 




1 
5 




3 
6 


4 


Saginaw, Mich... .11. i;.;;!* 


3 


St. Joseph, Mo 








5 


San Diego, Cal 






4 

1 
4 




1 




8 


5 


8sTannab,Ga 


1 






SebcnectaAy . N. Y. ...'."!.'! " 








3 




eioax City, Iowa 








2 

1 


• 




South Bend, Ind 






, 






2 , 


Bpringaold,lll ;...; 






1 
4 






1 


Springfield. Ohio 


3 

1 


1 








3 


1 


T%rre Haute, Ind 








1 


TK>y,N.Y.. . 












3 
3 


4 


WUkes-Barre.Pa 


35 
32 


1 
3 














Wilmington, Del 




1 
1 

2 




1 






York.A...: :::::::::: 




1 
2 




FrQma5,000to50/)00inhabitants: 
Alameda, cy 


4 
14 
10 
6 
8 

is' 








1 




1 


Auburn, N.Y 








Austin, Tex 


1 




1 










2 


Brookline, Man 




2 






: 1 




Butler, Pa 


3 
3 








1 




Butte. Mont 








2 

1 
1 
5 


1 




Chelsea, Mass ' 


1 


■ 1 




1 




Chicopee, Mass 


1 


OplumbU,8.C : 


17 
2 
7 


1 


1 










Cumberland, Md 






1 




Danville, ni 












• 




Dubuque, ni 






.... 




1 


' 1 




4 

8 

4 


3 




... 






.. 


2 


Eut Orange, N. J 




1 


1 







4 

1 
2 




Elgin, 111.. . . 




1 








Everett, Mass 






1 


1 


Everett, Wash 


3 

7 
8 
9 
10 
















Fttchburg, Mass 






.... 






1 


Galveston, Tex 













.... 


1 1 3 


Green Bay, Wis 
















1 


nanUton Ohio. 














1 


Haverhill, Mass 












.. 




2 


Jackson, ttlch 


8 
18 
3 
9 

n 

17 
11 
11 
13 






1 
20 






.*.. 


2 
4 




Kalamaioo, Mich 


1 












Kenosha. Wis 


2 










Kingston, N.V 











i 


Knox\1ile, Tenn 


1 
1 




1 


3 


1 1 ' 


UCro68e,Wls 




1 




1 . 1 


Uxlngton,Ky 




1 


............ 




3 
2 


lima, Ohio 


2 




1 


1 
1 


. 1 1 


Uncob,Nebr 








Lcng Beach, Cal 


1 
1 


1 




1 


.....i. 


Lorsin, Ohio 




1 


....^ 


I^^U 



August 81, 1917 



1436 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBBRCUL0SI8- 

Ck>ntiiiT]ed. 



aty Reports for Week Ended Anfl 


. 11. 


1S17— Continued. 








Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1, 1916 
(esiimatod 
by U. 8. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 


Diphtheria. 


Measles. 


Soarlat 
fever. 


Tubf^ 
coksit 


City. 


from 

all 

causes. 


1 


1 


1 


.a 

1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


From 25.000 to 50,000 inhabit- 
ants—Continued. 


32,040 
47.521 
20,234 
20,318 
27,327 
20,603 
31,027 
43,715 
37,353 
31,401 
31,404 
33,080 
46,450 
41,185 
38,620 
30,651 
36,708 
38,136 
46,486 
43.284 
38,026 
38,902 
27,445 
36,358 
46,226 
36,283 
48,726 
80,570 
29,894 
43.139 
43,377 
33,809 
29,892 
31,155 
30,863 

22.874 
13,532 
21,685 
15,794 

U3,075 
17,548 
22.669 
24.276 
16.950 
23,^9 
20.930 
15.39:> 

114.610 
17.445 
13.284 
17.600 
23.126 
15.243 
20,98.') 

»22,019 
19.926 
23.>05 
17, 524 

ii.fiea 

12.<»fi7 
14.S3I 
20.193 
13. 821 
24.204 

15.:.'K 

2I.«»18 
23.22N 

15.969 



11 
4 
6 
13 
9 

12 
18 

6 
12 
10 
13 
6 
12 
8 

8 
9 
7 






- 








1 






4 








3 




1 


MMfArd Mft«i.. 




1 








Ifontclafr N.J 








1 






Nashua, N.H... "* 










' 


] 


Newburgh, N. Y 


1 




' 








' 


} 


Newport. Ky , 




2 






Newton ^ass. ...! 


1 








:::::'i ::::: 


3 


Niagara FaUs-NVYl '. 
















Noirtstown, ^ 
















1 


Ogden, Utah.. **!!!... 


1 
















Oranro, N.J.....'.'.'.'.; 

Paadena,Cal. 








* 




1 

3 


1 






I 






Perth Amboy, n! j" " 














pittafleid, Mass ....'.'..;;;;! ; 


2 


1 


2 




4 

1 




1 


Portsmouth Va 




Quincy, ni.. 












, 


I 




2 


1 






1 


1 




Radne.'WIs.. 










1 


Roanolce, Va." 


1 












1 


Rocic Island. HI 














San Jose, Cai.. 










1 


1 2 




Steuben ville. Ohio 


5 


1 










Stockton, OU . . 








I 
1 


3 


I 


Superior, Wis 


5 

17 
9 
5 












Taunt on'^ais 


1 












5 


3 


Topeka, iKans ------- 












1 


Waltham Mass 






2 
2 

1 
1 




..........<- 


Watertown N Y 










2 

3 




West noboken. N.J '.V.V.'.'.'. 
WhecUng, W. <ra 


4 
13 



10 




1 




1 1 


1 


WilUamsDort Pa 


3 


1 




..I ! ! 


Wilmington, N. C 




1 ! 


Winston-Salem n"c 


1 








3 


..» 


Zanesville Ohio 











1 




From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants: 
Alton, ni 


10 

1 










1 


4 


Reaver Falls Pa 










:;::;:i:::::..:. .. 




Braddock Pa. 






2 








Cairo, m.. 


"3 

1 








I 


Clinton. Mass. 






1 




4 ' 


CofTo yviUe, Kans. .1 ] 










I 

I 


Concord, I^. II.....' V.V.V..'. 


I 






1 
2 
2 

1 




2 


Oalesburg. Ill . . . 






1 1 


ilarrison, N.J 








1 


Kearny N J 


4* 

4 
4 
2 
3 
5 
2 
4 










Kokomo Ind. 








1 1 


I 


Lorn Branch N J 


1 






3 






Marinette Wis 




1 
1 




Melrone, Mass... ] ! 


2 








1 


Iforrittown N J 






.' ... 1 


Muscatine, Iowa 










1 


1 


Nantocolcc l*a 










1 




Ne^burvDort Moss 


3' 

9 

7 
9 






1 
1 






New Lxindon Conn 




.. 1 


North Adam.<< Mass 








1 


Northampton, Moss 






2 




2' 4 


3 


Plainflcld. N. J... 






;;:::: 


1 


Pont too Mich 




2 


.1 




1 




Port.MntHil h N. il 






1 1 ■... . 


Rock V Mount N C 


" 3 
5 
9 
5 

2 




1 






Rutland, Vt..'.. 




I 




1 


1 J 


1 


Hsndusky Ohio 






1 




_. • "Vj 


t 


Karat OKU t^prinRs, N. Y. '.'.'. '. '. 

HoiitJi lirthlchrm. Pa 

Htf^Mon l*a 




. .. 




::;;::: :::i:::: 




1 
1 


1 






...... 


'i 














Washington, Pa 


.( 




1 


{ 




Wilkin^liiirfj I*a,. 


3 

1 








1 


1 


i 


Woburn Mom 








1 








- 





r^ 





> Poputation Apr. 15; 1910; no estimate mad^j 



jrfrzed by 



Google 



FOREIGN. 



CHINA. 
Examination of Rats — Slianghal. 

During the period from June 3 to July 14, 1917, 1,666 rats were 
examined at Shanghai. No plague infection was found. The last 
plague-infected rat at Shanghai was reported found May 6, 1916. 

Plaifoe-Infected Rats — Hongkong. 

During the period from June 17 to 30, 1917, out of 3,709 rats exam- 
med at Hongkong, 3 were found plague infected. -During the week 
ended July 7, 1917, 2 plague-infected rats were found at Hongkong 
out of 2,015 examined. 

CUBA. 

Commnnicable Diseases — ^Halmna.. 
Communicable diseases haye been notified at Habana as follows: 





July 11-20, W17. 


July 21-31, 1017. 


Re- 
maining 


Disease. 


New 
cases. 


Deaths. 


New 
cases. 


Deaths. 


under 
treatment 


Dfphtberia , 


1 


1 


2 




5 


LmrofT 




10 


fflbX: ;;;:;;;:;;;;;;:;;:::::::;; ; 


11 
* 8 

4 




16 
11 

1 

29 
2 




31 


mSS;::::::::::::::::::::::::::;::::::::::;::::::: 






10 


Pvityphoid fever 


1 




3 


sctrkJBSiw.r.T!.;;::"::.™:::::"::":::::::^ 




1 


Typhoid feTer 


23 


6 


7 


64 


viSwn*..!!.;:;::;;;;:;;:;;;;;;;;;;;;;:;:;:;;;;:;;: 


2 













INDO-CmNA. 
Cholera — Plaifoe — Smallpox— March, 1917. 

During the month of March, 1917, 41 cases of cholera, 97 cases of 
plague, and 1,023 cases of smallpox were notified in Indo-China. 
The cases were distributed by provinces as follows: 

Cholera. — ^Province of Anam, 3 cases; Cambodia, 1 case; Cochin- 
China, 36 cases; Tonkin, 1 case. 

Plague. — ^Province of Anam, 41 cases; Cambodia, 35 cases; Cochin- 
China, 20 cases; Tonkin, 1 case. 

Smallpox. — ^Province of Anam, 491 cases; Cambodia, 37 cases; 
Cochin-China, 461 cases; Kwang-Chow-Wan, 2 cases; Tonkin, 32 
cases. 



(1437) 



Digitized by 



Google 



August 31, 1917 



1438 



The numbar of cholera cases occurring during the month of March, 
1917, was double that for the preceding month, being 41 as against 
20. For the month of March, 1916, the number was 685, of which 
457 were reported from the Province of Anam. For March, 1917, only 
3 cases were reported in Anam. 

The number of cases of plague was the same as for the correspond- 
ing month of the year 1916. For the month of February, 1917, the 
number of plague cases was 101. 

The number of smallpox cases reported during March, 1917, was 
almost double that for the preceding month, being 1,023 as against 
593. During the corresponding month of the year 1916 the number 
of smallpox cases was 266. The increase in the prevalence of small- 
pox is beUeved to be due to the discontinuance of vaccination tours 
throughout the country during the past two years. 

ITALY. 



Deratizadon of Vessels — ^Naples. 

Fumigation of vessels to destroy rats was ordered at Naples to be 
put in force from July 23, 1917, for all vessels having traversed the 
Suez Canal and destined for ports in the United States, option being 
given of fimiigation at Naples or at United Stages port of arrival 

MEXICO. 

Yellow Fever— Peto, Yucatan. 

During the two weeks ended August 11, 1917, six cases of yellow 
fever were reported at Peto, State of Yucatan, Mexico. The cases 
occurred in soldiers brought into Yucatan during the past year. 

A fatal case of yellow fever was reported at Peto June 23, 1917.* 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVEB. 
Reports Received During the Week Ended Aug. 31, 1917.^ 



CHOLERA. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India: 

Bombay 


Jane 24-30 




1 
1 




Madras 


do 




IndoChina: 

Provinces 




Mar. 1-31, 1917: Cases, 41; deaths, 
28. 


Anam 


Mar. 1-31 


36 


1 

1 

26 


Cambodia 


do 




Cochin-China 


do 




Tonkin 


do 




Java: 

West Java 






Hay 11-June 28, 1917: Cans, U; 
deaths. 6. 


Batavia 


May n-June28.... 




2 





t Public Health Reports, July 13, 1917, p. 1121. 

* From medical officers of the Public-Health Service, American consuls, and other sources. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1439 



August 31. 1917 



CHOLERA, PLAGITE, SMALLPOib TYPHUS FEVfiS, AND YELLOW FEVER^ 

Continued. 

Reports Receired Dnriiig the Week Ended Aug. 31» 1917— Continued. 

PLAGUB. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


remarks. 


Chtna: 

HooEkflie , 


June 17-30 


7 
6 






cSr!^::::::;::::::::::: 


July 1-7 




Tivli» - 




June 24-30, 1017: Cases, 1,482; 
deaths, 1,002. 


Bombay - 


June 24-30 


35 

2 

33 




K»ni^*^l 


do 


Madras Presidency 


do 




Indo-Chixia: 

Provtnoes 




Mar, 1^1, 1017: Cases, 97; deaths, 
70. 


Anam 


Mar. l-s] 


41 
35 
20 

1 




Cunbodf^ 


do 




rVK!bin-Oftim 


do 




Timktfv 


do 




Jara: 

East Java 




Apr. 23-May 20. 1017: Cases, 11 
deaths, 11. 


DJociakarto R«8idaicy. 

KedWResideiicy 

Bamanmg Residancy. . . 
Surabaya Residency . . . 
Sorakarta Residency. . . 


Apr.23-May« 

do 

Apr.28-May».... 

do 

Kay 7-20 


1 

1 
3 
5 

1 









SMALLPOX. 



AostfBUa: 

New South Wales 








June 22-JuIy 5, 1917: 48 caaet. 




June22-July5.... 
do 


1 
47 

1 




Warren district 






Canada: 
Ontario- 

Ottawa 


July30-Aug.5.... 
July 1-7 






China: 

Chrniffkinc. 




Present. 


Dairen 


..!^do........:::: 


I 






Hankow , , . . r . r 


June2+-30 

July 15-21 






Mnkden -t^.t 






Chosen (Korea): 

Chemulpo T...r...-TT,- 


May 1-31 


1 

14 
2 
5 






bidia: 

Bombay ...•...•••••...... 


June 24-30 

do 


4 
2 
5 




Karachi 




Madras 


do 




Indo<nilna: 

Provinces 




Mar. 1^31, 1917: Cases. 1,023; 
deaths 178 


Anam . ^.-..-r.... 


Mar. 1^ 


491 

37 

461 

2 

32 

9 

18 
36 


56 
16 
105 


Cambodia.. 


do 




Cochio-China 

Kwanj?-Chow-Wan 


do 

do 

do 




Topf^in . 


1 




Japan: 
^5>be - 


July 16-22 

May6-Juncl7.... 
May5-Jiir.„'10. ... 




Java: 

East Java 


1 
3 




Mid-Java 




WestJava 


May 17-J.une 28. 1917: Cases, 160; 
deaths, 23. 


Batavia 


May 17-June 28. . . 
Aug. 1-7 


18 


4 
7 


Mexico: 
Maratbin 




Mexioo 


June»-28 


09 
20 




Do 


Aus.5-11 


6 




Spain: 

Sevine 


June 1-30 




Straits Settlements: 

Rinjapon* 


June 24-30 


1 











Digitized by 



Google 



Ausnst 31, 1917 



1440 



1 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW PBVER^ 

Continued. 

Reports Received During the Week Ended Aug. 31, 1917— Oontinued. 

TYPHUS FBVER. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


China: 

Antung 


July 16-22 

July 9-15 

July 1-14 


2 
72 






^'^Jfticandrl. 


27 
10 


' 


Greece: 

Saloniki 




Java: 

East Java 


May6-Junel7.... 


6 




Bild-Java 




May 5-June 10, 1917: Cases, 21; 
deaths, 2. 


Samarang 


May&-JunelO.... 


14 


2 


West Java 


May 17-iune 21, 1917 Cases. 57; 
deaths, 6. 


Batavia 


Mayl7-June21... 
June S-28 


44 

340 
105 

3 



1 


6 


Mexico: 

Mexico City 




Do 


Aug.5-U 






Netherlands: 

Rotterdam 


July 15-30 






Norway: 

Bergen ••.. 


July 8-14 






Switzerbnd: 

Basel 


July 14-21 















YELLOW FEVER. 



Mezioo: 

Yucatan, State— 
Peto 




Reports Received from Jane 30 to Aug. 24, 1917. 

CHOLERA. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India: 

Bassefn. ....•■.••••••.**.rT 


Apr. 1-May 5 




8 
335 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
16 




Calcutta ----- 


Apr- 29-Jime 9 






Madras. ......•••••••••••■•. 


Apr. 22- June 0.... 


3 




Mnndatay ,.,.,,„ 




Moulmefii.. ••«••••••••••• IT 


May i3-Jtme 2 






Pakokku 


Apf.20-May5 






Pegu 


May27-June2 






Rangoon... •...•••••••••... 


Apr. 21-June9 


30 




Indo<:hfea: 

Provinces •......••.•. 


Feb. 1-28, 1917: Cases, 20; deaths, 


Anam ■..■■.■■•«>t 


Feb. 1-28 


3 
8 
8 
1 
163 

1 




Cambodia 


do 


6 
6 




C-och in-China - . 


do 




Tonkin .....r 


do 




Saigon.. 


Apr.23-May27... 
Apr.2-8 




Java: 

East Java 




West Java 






Apr. 13-19; 1917: 1 case. 


Batavia 


Apr. 13-19.... 


1 

1 

4 

1 
3 

1 






Persia: 

Mazanderan Province- 
Amir Kela 


Feb. 3 






Barfourouche 


Jan. 15-17 








Jan. 17 






Machldessar 


Jan. 31 






Philippine Islands: 


June 17-23 






Provinces 




May 2a-Junc 30, 1917: Cases, 795; 


Albay 


May 2O-June30.... 
July 1-7 


113 
2 
2 

1 
368 
66 


76 
1 
1 
1 
251 
45 


deaths, 500. July 1-7, 1917: 


^ :::::: 


Cases, 315: deaths, 201 




June 3-9 




Batangas 


June 17-23 

May 20- Juno 30... 
July 1-7 




Bohol 




Do 


r^^^^T^ 



1441 



August 81. 1917 



CHOLEBA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER-^ 

Continued.' 

Reports Received from Jane 30 to Aag. 24, 1917--^ntinued. 

CHOLESA— Continued. 



Place. 



Date. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Remarks. 



PhlUppine Islands— Contd. 
Prorinces— Continued. 

Capit 

Do 

Cebu 

Do 

noao 

Lejrte 

Do 

Negros Oriental 

RitaL 

Do 

Sorsogon 

Do 

Ta]rabas 

Do 



June 3-30.. 
July 1-7.... 
June 3-30. . 
July 1-7,... 
July 1-7.... 
June 10-30.. 
July 1-7.... 
July 1-7.... 
June 24-30. 
July 1-7.... 
June 3-30. . 
July 1-7.... 
do.. 



July 1-7.. 



19 
231 

54 
7 

14 
4 
4 
1 
1 
196 

82 
7 
1 



40 
15 
150 
38 
4 
5 
4 
4 



PLAGUB. 



Arabia: 
Aden.. 



Brufl: 

Babia 

Ceyloo: 

Colombo 

China: 

Amoy 

Hoogkoog 

Kwangtunf Province— 
Pa-pu district 

Alexandria 

Port Said government . . 

Port Said 

Provinces— 

Fayoum 

Galioubeb 

Girgeh 

Mlnieh 

Siout .- 

Sues govemmenf 

Suet 

Great Britain: 

London 



India 

Bassein 

Bombay 

Calcutta 

Hentada 

Karachi 

Madras Presidency., 

MandaUy 

Moulmein. 

Myln^yan 

Pepi- 

Rangoon 

Tounicoo 

lodo^hlna: 

Provinces 

Anam 

Cambodia 

Coehin-China. . . 



lava: 

East Java 

Surabaya. . 
Surakarta.. 



Hay 3-June 11. 



Juno 10^. 

Apr. 8-June 9. . 

Apr. 29-May5.. 
Iirayl3-June9. 

June 2 



June 21-27 

Apr.30-Mayl9.. 
June 25 



May 11- June 20.. 

June 28 

May 17 

May 12-June 28.. 

May 12. 

Apr. W-June 2. . 
Ifoy 12-June 28.. 

Maya-8 



Apr. 1- June 2... 
Apr. 22-JtmelO. 
Apr. 29-June2.. 
Apr. 1-May 19. . 
Apr. 22-June9.. 
Apr. 22- June 10. 
Apr. 8-May 12. . 
Apr. 1-June2... 

Aor. 1-7 

May 27-June 2. . 
Apr. 15- Juno 9.. 
Apr. 8-14 



Feb. 1-28 

....do 

....do 

Apr. 23-June 3 . 



Apr. 2-22.. 
....do 



13 






4 


4 


3 


1 




14 


7 


1 





406 



467 
268 



143 



42 

326 

38 

33 

411 

233 

9 

59 

1 

2 

13 1 

2 



Apr. »-May 14, 1917: Cases, 60; 
deaths, 51. 



Present and in vicinity. 



Present 

Jan. 1-June 28, 1917: Cases 564; 
deaths, 313. 



2 in ho s p ital at port. From s. s. 

Sardinia from Australian and 

oriental porta. 
Apr. 16^ Jane ft, 1017: Cases, 

40,958; deaths, 28,193. 



Feb. 1-28. 1917: Cases, 101; 
deaths, 71. 



Apr. 2-22. 1917: Cases, 18; 
deaths, 18. 



Digitized by 



Google 



August 81, 1917 



1442 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER- 

Gontinued. 



Reports Received trom Jnne 30 to Aug. 24, 1917— Oontinued. 

PLAGUE— Continued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Peru 








May 16-31, 1917: Cases, 15. 


Departments— 

Arequipa 


May 16-31 


12 
2 




At Moltondo. 


canio.: ....:..:!! 


do 




AtCaUao. 


Lambayeque 


do 




AtChiclayo. 

TnijiUo. 
At Lima. 


Libertad 


do 




Lima 


do 




Siam: 

Banslcok 


Apr. 22-June2 

July 3-23 


11 
3 

1 




r>o. ::::::::::::::::::: 




Straits Settlements: 

Singapore 


June 3-16 




Union of South Africa: 

Cape of Good Hope State— 
Glengrcv district 


Aug. 13 


Present. 


Tar ka district 


May28 


1 
1 


1 


At Bnmmerhill Farm. 


Queenstown 


June 6 




Orange Free State 






Apr. 16-22. 1917: 1 case; Apr. 9-22, 
1917: Cases, 26; deaths; 17. 


Winburg district 


May 28 




1 











SMALLPOX. 



Australia: 

Now South Wales 

Brewarrina 

Coonabarabran 

Quambone 

Queensland- 
Thursday Island Quar- 
antine Station. 



Bra?il: 

Bahia 

Riodo Janeiro 

Do 

Canada: 

Manitoba- 
Winnipeg 

Nova Scotia— 

HaUfax 

Fori Hawkesbury. 
Ceylon: 

* Colombo 

China: 

Amoy 

Antting 

Chungking 

Changsha 

Dairen 

Ilarliin ,..., 

Hongkong 

Manchuna Station 

Mukden 

Do 

Shanghai 



Tsitshar Stotlon. 
Tsingtao 



E?yr.f 

Alexandria 

Do 

Fr^rice: 

i'uris 

Co n.any 

i'crlm 

I-romen 

Charlottenburg. 

Hamburg 

Leipzig 

Labock 

Mimich 

Stuttgart 



Apr. 27-June 21 . 

May 25-June7 

Apr. 27-June 21 . . . 

May 9 



Mav6-June30. . 

...:do 

July 1-14 



June 10-16 

Junel8-July7.. 
.Tune 17-30 



May 6-12..:. 



Apr. 29-May26. 
May21-June24. 
May 6-June23.. 
May 27-June 2.. 
May 13-June30. 
Apr. 23-May 6. . 
May 6-Junel6.. 

Apr. 23-29 

May 27-June 2.- 

Julya-14 

May21-Julyl... 



Apr. 16-22 

May 2?-July 7.. 



Apr. 30- July 1. 
July 2-8 



May 6-12.. 



Mar. 1»-Apr. 28. 
.do...:. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



4 

126 
50 



13 



106 
16 
18 
50 
20 

2 
10 

1 



Apr. 27-June 21, 1917: Cases, 90. 



From s. s. St. Albans from Kobe 
via Hongkong. Vessel pro- 
ceeded to Townsvllle, Bris- 
bane, and Sydney, in quarsO' 
tine. 



Piiesent in district. 

Present and m vidnitj. 
Present. 

On Chinese Eastern By. 

Do. 
Present. 
Do. 
Cases foreign; deaths among Qi" 

tives.' 
On Chinese Eastern Ry. 
At another station on railwayi 
lease. 



Mar. 18-Apr. 28, 1917: Cases, 715 
in cities and 32 Stotes and dis> 
tricts. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1443 



August 31. 1917 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER— 

Continued. 

Reports Received from June SO to Aug. 24, 1917— Continued. 
SMALLPOX— Continued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


.Deaths.. 


Remarks. 


India: 

Bombay 


Apr. 23-Junel6... 
Apr. 29-May26... 


149 


SQ 
12 
5 
43 

4 




CalcutU 




Karachi 


Apr. 22-June9.... 
Apr. 22- June 16... 
Apr. 15-JuneO.... 


20 
78 
SO 




Madras 




Raneoon 




Indo-Chuia: 

Provinces 


Feb. 1-28, 1917: Cases, 583; deaths, 


Apftin . . . , 


Feb. 1-28 


297 
36 

193 
67 

199 

32 

S6 

1 

177 

1 

11 

16 


7 

1 
53 

1 
63 

12 

16 


CAmhfMliA. 


do 




Corhin^hioA ... ..^ ... . 


do 




Tnnkit, , . 


do 




Saigon 


Apr. 27-JunelO... 

May21-June24... 

May27-July8 

May28-June3.... 

Maylft-JulyS 

May27-Julyl 

Apr. 2-29 




ItalyT^ 




Japan: 

Kobe 




NamaaU 




oaSka... ..::::::;:::::::::: 


55 

1 

1 




Yokohama a 




Java: 

East Java 




Mid-Java 


Apr. 1-21 




West Java 






A^lg-ltoy 10, 1917: Cases, 46; 


BatavU 


Apr. 13-May3.... 
July 11-17 


11 


2 
2 


Mexico: 

Masatlan 




Mexico City 


JuneS-ao 


162 




Monterey 


June 18-24 


24 




VeraCrax 


July 1-7 


1 
6 
14 




PhiUnpine Islands: 


Mayl*nJune«.... 
Mayl3-June30... 
Mar. 1- Apr. 30.,.. 




Variokiid. 


Portugal: 

Usbon 






Portagueso East Africa: 

Lourenco Marques 


2 
2 




Russia: * 

Archangel 


Mayl-June28.... 
Feb. 18-June9.... 
Mar. Il-June2.... 
Mar.l&-21 


23 
495 

4 
23 

6 




Petrograd 




Riga 




Jan. 1-Mar 31, 1917: Cases, 9. 


Vladivostok 


7 

3 

4 
5 


Siam: 

Bangkok 


June 9-23 




Spain: ^ 

Madrid 


May 1-Junel9 




Seville 


Mayl-31 






Valencia 


June 3-23 


5 
2 

6 

1 
2 

2 




Do 


July 1-7 






Straits Settlements: 

Penang 


Mar. lg-Juno23... 
Apr. 22-28 


3 




Sweden: ^ 

Malmo 




^ Stockholm 


May20-June23... 
June 2-8 


1 




Tunisia: 

Tunis 




■^key in Aria: 

Trebizond 


Feb. 25-Apr. 13... 


15 




Union of South Africa: 

„ Johannesburg 


Mar. 12-24 

Mayl-31 


4 
2 




Uruguay: 

„ Montevideo 






Venetoela: 

Maiacaibo 


June 18-July 8 


8 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



August 81, 1917 



1444 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX. TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER- 

Continued. 

Reports Received from June 30 to Aug. 24, 1917— Continued. 

TYPHUS FEVER. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Algeria: 

AlgiOTS 


June 1-30 


' 


3 




Austria-Hungary*: 

Austria 




Oct. 22-Dec. 17, 1916: Cases, 2,371. 


Bohemia 


Oct.22-Dec. 17.... 
do 


617 

16 

343 

5 






Galicia 






Lower Austria 


do 






Moravia 


do 




Silesia 


do 






Btyria . 


do 






* Upper Austria 


do 






Hungary 






Feb. 19-Mar. 25, 1917: Cases, 1,W1. 


Budapest 


Feb.19-Mar.25... 

June25-Julyl.... 
July 9-15 


83 

3 
2 

1 
1 

4 

1,648 
73 




China: 

Antung.. .. 






Do . .. 


1 




Hankow 


June 9-16 




Tientsin,,.. 


June 17-23 






Tsingtao 


May ?(>-July7.... 

Apr.3a-Julyl 

July 17-23 






^^exandria 


478 
23 

1 

32 




Do 




Great Britain: 

Cork 


Junel7-23 




Greece: 

Saloniki 


Mayl3-June30:... 






Nagasaki 


Junell-24i 


4 
12 

7 




^r::::::::::::::::::: 


July 9-22 


I 
2 




Java: 

Mid-Java . 


Apr. 1-30 




West Java 




Apr. 13-May 10, 1917: Cases, 90. 


Batavia 


Apr.l3-MayiO...- 
June3-30 


22 

431 

3 

1 

2 
5 






Mexico: 

Mexico City 






Netherlands: 

Rotterdam 


June 9-23 


2 




Portuguese East Africa: 

Lourenco Marques 


Mar. 1-^1 




Russia: 

Archangel 


May 1 -June 28 

Feb. 18-June9.... 

May31-June2 

Mar.29-May21.... 

May 1-31 








3 




Riga 


Jan. 1-31, 1917: 1 case. 


Vladivostok 






Spain: 

A Imeria 


5 
2 




Madrid ; 


do 






Switzerland: 

Basel 


June 17-23 


1 
2 
2 




Do 


July 8-14 


1 




Trinidad 


June4-9 




Tunisia: 

Tunifl 


June 30-July 6 


1 













YELLOW PEVEB. 



Mexico: 

Yucatan, State— 
Pcto, 



June 23.. 



In person recently arrived from 
Mexico City. 



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PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 

VOL. 32 SEPTEMBER 7, 1917 No. 36 

TETANUS IN COURT-PLASTEB. 

A report just received from the Director of the Hygienic Labora- 
tory of the Public Health Service states that out of 13 specimens 
of court-plaster examined, 2 were found to be contaminated with 
tftanus bacilli. The specimens were secured from drug stores and 
were in original packages just as the product goes to the consumer. 
There is no ground for beUeving that the contamination was an 
intentional one. Whether contamination occurred during the process 
of manufacture through the use of infected ingredients, or subse- 
quently by careless handling remains to be determined by further 
investigation. 

It was also found that coiui;-plaster is not ''clean'' in the surgical 
sense. 

The report of the laboratory findings in the examination of the 
specimens of court-plaster appears elsewhere in this issue. 



RODENT DESTRUCTION ON SHIPS. 

A RBPORT ON THE RELATIVE EFFICIENCY OF FUMIGANTS AS DETERMINED BY SUB- 
SEQUENT INTENSIVE TRAPPING OVER A PERIOD OF ONE YEAR. 

By R. H. Creel, Assistant Surgeon General, and Fbiench Simpson, Passed Assistant Burgeon, United 

States Public Health Serrice. 

Much has been written of the effectiveness of various agents used 
in the fumigation of ships for the purpose of destroying rats, but thus 
far practically all definite data have been obtained from experimental 
studies performed imder artificial conditions. 

For many years arbitrary standards for the strength of sulphur 
dioxide as a fumigant have been provided in the United States quar- 
antine regulations and the length of exposure has been Ukewise 
indicated. Although based on experimental investigation, the effec- 
tiveness of these standards has been supported to some Extent by the 
general observations of quarantine officials. It has frequently been 
nojted that a very large nimiber of rats have been killed on ships as a 

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September?, 1917 1446 

result of sulphur fumigation, but regardless of the number d^troyed 
it has alwajrs been a matter of speculation as to how many survived. 

In more recent years tentative standards have been adopted for 
the cyanide fumigation of vessels, both as to strength of the gas and 
duration of exposure. It is repeated, however, that both the stand- 
ards for sulphur dioxide and cyanide gas were based on experimental 
studies, and, as is well known, artificial conditions rarely coincide 
with the natural, however painstaking the attempt may be to simu- 
late the natural. A true test of efficiency would be that applied to 
the procedure as carried out in routine practice. Generally speaking, 
an opportunity for such practical test has been wanting until recently 

During the past year the combination of conditions at New Orleans 
made such a test feasible. These favorable circumstances were, first, 
the fumigation of a large number of vessels at the port of New 
Orleans and at the Service quarantine station at the mouth of the 
Mississippi River; second, the availability of a large and experienced 
force of trappers at New Orleans. The Public Health Service, in carry- 
ing out plague eradicative and preventive measures in the city of New 
Orleans, has maintained an adequate force of trappers throughout 
the entire city, and during the past year or two those men trapping 
along the wharves and river front have been specially selected for 
their efficiency and reliability, and their work has had the very 
closest supervision. The pattern of trap generally employed (almost 
exclusively so) was the snap trap, and on the various vessels trapped • 
the number used has varied from 20 to 140, according to the size of 
the vessel. The nimiber of days trapped varied from one to ten, 
depending on the length of the vessel's stay in port. 

Accordingly, therefore, it was planned to make careful record of 
the intensive trapping of all vessels subsequent to their fumigation, 
and in this way to obtain a fairly reliable estimate of the efficiency 
of the fumigation. Re<iord was maintained of the results on 214 
vessels, the inclusion of a gr-eater number of vessels fumigated being 
precluded by inability of trapping on account of the departure of the 
vessel immediately after fumigation. 

The results obtained are divided into groups, according to the 
nature of the fumigant employed, and the part of the vessel where 
the rats were either destroyed by the fumigation or were subsequently 
trapped. The proportion of cyanide used was 5 ounces per 1,000 
cubic feet of space with duration of exposure of IJ hours for holds 
and one-half hour for superstructures. Some 10 vessels fumigated 
with cyanide at the New Orleans quarantine station were not taken 
into consideration as they varied somewhat in the proportion of 
cyanide and duration of exposure from those fumigated at the city 
of New Orleans. Throwing out of consideration these 10 vessels, 

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1447 



September 7, 1917 



however, produced no material change in the estimate of efficiency 
of that gas. Sulphur when used was in the proportion of 3 potmds 
per 1,000 cubic feet of space, with duration of exposure of 6 hours 
for holds and superstructures alike. 

Scries 1. 

TE8SBL8 FUiaOATBD BrTHER WITH CYANIDE OAS OR SULPHUR DIOXIDE. 

In this group the results of fumigation are considered in respect to 
the entire vessel, regardless of the condition of the ship (loaded or 
empty) or location from which rats were taken. 

Table 1. 



Nature of fumigant. 



Number 
of vessels 
treated. 



Number of 
rats killed 
by fumi- 
gant. 



Number 

of rats 

trapped. 



Peroentage 
ofofflciency 
of fumi- 
gant. 



Sulphur dioxide.. 
Cyanide gas 



62 

183 



747 
2,811 



223 
121 



Percent. 



n 

95 



Table 1 affords a fair estimate of the relative efficiency of cyanide 
gas and sulphur dioxide. It would appear that whereas cyanide 
fumigation of 182 vessels resulted in the destruction of 95 of each 
possible 100 rodent inhabitants, sulphur dioxide destroyed only 77 
of a possible 100 in a series of 62 vessels treated with that fumigant, 
and this notwithstanding that the duration of exposure to sulphur 
fumes was 6 hours, in contrast to li hours or less when cyanide 
was used. 

Series 2. 

Tablb 2. 



Nature of fumigant. 



Number 
of vessels 
recorded. 



Compartment of 
Tessel considered. 



Number of 
rats idlled 
by fumiga- 
tion. 



Number of 
rats subse- 
quently 
trapped. 



Percentage 
of eflScien- 
cy of fumi- 
gant. 



Sulphur dioxide . 

Cyanide ns 

Sulphur dioxide. 

Cyanide gas 

Soiphor dioxide. 
Cyanide gas 



Superstructure! 

...Tdo.» 

Holds (empty). 

do 

Holds (loaded). 
do 



133 
729 
702 
854 
101 



107 
45 
28 
9 
89 
20 



55 
94 
90 
99 
64 
80 



> Soperstmcturos include st or erooms, crews' quarters, cabins, poop deck, etc. 

Table 2 represents the efficiency of fumigation as appUed to 
various compartments, such as superstructure3 and holds, both empty 
and loaded. The various groups recorded in Table 2 are those taken 
from Table 1 in all cases where rodents were reported with reference 
to compartment of ship as either destroyed by fumigation or captured 

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September 7, 1017 1448 

by trapping. The groups in Table 2 do not represent partially 
fumigated vessels, since all vessels were fumigated throughout, 
excepting ei^ine rooms of some vessels. The comparatively smaller 
number of vessels in Table 2 is due to the fact that during the first 
six months, reports included only total number of rats without refer- 
ence to compartments from which taken, and also that on a con- 
siderable number of vessels n^ative residts were reported both as to 
trapping and fumigation. The grouping was made from records 
where available and thus can not be considered as ''selected cases." 

The residts obtained from the two methods of fumigation are 
contrasted and indicated in the table, and it will be noted that there 
is a very marked disparity in the efficiency of sulphur dioxide as 
compared with cyanide gas, in the treatment of superstractures. 
These compartments, such as store rooms, poop decks, crews' quar- 
ters, etc., are generally partially filled with suppUes, stores, dunnage, 
etc., and it would appear that the greater effectiveness of cyanide 
gas is due to its greater penetrating powers, as well as toxicity. It 
may also be that sulphur dioxide, on account of its odor, may pro- 
vide more of a warning to the rats and enable them to secure greater 
protection; whereas cyanide with less odor and without the physically 
irritating properties of sulphur dioxide, may result in the destruction 
of the animal before it can secure available covert. 

In the fumigation of the empty holds of vessels there is no material 
difference in the results obtained, although here as elsewhere there 
should be considered the difference in the length of exposure. Con- 
sidering the respective gases, the results on vessels fumigated with 
cargo-laden holds indicate a greater efficiency for cyanide gas, 
although the number of vessels tabulated is rather small for the es- 
tablishment of any general coniclusions. Conditions in storerooms, 
crews' quarters, poop decks, etc., are more or less similar to those of 
loaded holds, and on the basis of the results of the fumigation of 
these superstructures, it is behoved that it can safely be asserted 
that cyanide gas is far more effective in the fumigation of loaded 
holds than is sulphur dioxide. 

Rodent Infestation of Engine Flreroom. 

The question frequently arises in the minds of quarantine officers 
as to the advisabihty or necessity of including the engine fireroom 
of a vessel when performing fumigation for rodent destruction. 
Inasmuch as there is very limited harborage in the engine fireroom, 
and very httle in the way of food to invite rat infestation, it is gener- 
ally considered that the fumigation of this compartment is of ques- 
tionable value. Aside from this aspect of the case, the thorough 
fumigation of the engine fireroom entails a very considerable increase 

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1449 September 7, 1917 

in the detention of vessels undei^oing fumigation; since the fires have 
to be either drawn or banked, and the funnels carefully covered over 
with tarpaulin in order to prevent the escape of the fumigating gas. 
Subsequent to the fumigation of these compartments there is a 
further dday incident to renewing the fires or raising steam. 

From the records maintained during the past year opportunity 
has presented for estimating the amount of rodent infestation of 
engine firerooms. In the case of 99 vessels fumigation of these 
compartments was omitted. The total number of rats killed in 
otiier parts of vessels by fumigation was 2,026. The trapping of 
these 99 vessels resulted in the capture of 31 rats in engine fireroom, 
the total being taken from 1 1 vessels. Computed on the total number 
of vessels considered it woxild appear that the rodent infestation of 
tiie engine fireroom compartment was one-third rat per vessel. Com- 
puted on the total infestation, the number infesting the engine fire- 
room compartment was 1^ per cent. 

The number of days each vessel was trapped varied from 1 to 13, 
and the average niunber of days trapped for each vessel was 3.6 
days. The number of traps placed on. the vessels ranged from 16 
to 140, according to the size of the vessel. The average number of 
traps placed was 37 traps to each vessel. On one vessel on which 172 
rats were destroyed by fumigation, and on which the engine fire- 
room was not fumigated, three days* trapping of this compartment 
failed to demonstrate any rodent infestation. The same applies 
to two other vessels, on one of which 109 rats were taken and on the 
other 140 rats. On the other hand, of the li vessels on which rats 
were trapped in the engine fireroom, one ship yielded 8 rats captured 
in this compartment during the 13 days 'of trapping, although only 
3 rats were killed in the other parts of the vessel. This was a very 
exceptional case, as in most instances where rats were trapped in non- 
fumigated engine fireroom compartments the number was generally 
one or two. 

General Conditions. 

The writers have considered two sources of error in presenting 
these figures: First, notwithstanding the thorough search of vessels, 
it is probable that a certain number of rats destroyed by fumigation 
were not recovered by the searchers, and to this extent, therefore, 
the percentage of efficiency woxild be greater than that indicated; 
second, while it is believed that the trapping results were fairly 
dependable, and for the most part represented (with the exception of 
a negligible figure) the total number of rats that escaped fumigation, 
it is nevertheless apparent that trapping results can not be considered 
as perfect, and to this extent the percentage of fumigation efficiency 

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September?, 1917 1450 

woxild be less than that indicated. After thorough ccmsideration of 
both factors, knowledge of the dependability and effici^icy of the 
trappers and fumigators, and the general conditions attending bodi 
the fumigation and trapping of vessels, the writers are of the belief 
that the one source of error will offset the other, and that the per- 
centages of eflficiency indicated in Table 1 and Table 2 are trustworthy. 

It is apparent that sulphur fumigation is not effective for tiie de- 
struction of rats on loaded vessels or in superstructures. Whether 
this deficiency can be remedied by an increase in the amount of sul- 
phur used or in prolonging the exposure, or whether a change in the 
procedure woxild be justifiable in the face of results of cyanide fumi- 
gation, are problems requiring further consideration. 

The effectiveness of cyanide gas when used according to the 
tentative standards now in practice seems sufficient for empty holds 
and superstructures. It woxild seem probable, however, that in ves- 
sels with cargo-laden holds either a greater strength of the gas is re- 
quired or a more prolonged duration of exposure. It is not to be 
expected, however, that any method of fumigation can result in 100 
per cent efficiency. 

Judging from the results of our observations it would appear that 
the fumigation of engine and fire rooms can, under ordinary condi- 
tions, be omitted, without materially reducing the effectiveness of the 
destruction of rodents on vessels. The omission of the fumigation ot 
these compartments on 99 vessels apparently resulted in the escape 
of H P^r c®^^ ^f ^^^ rodent inhabitants, but inasmuch as it seems 
probable that in ordinary practice the efficiency of fumigation can 
not be expected to exceed 96 per cent, the addition of H P^r cent in 
effectiveness seems immaterial. In exceptional cases, such as 
demonstrable plague infection on board vessels, it is believed that the 
engine and fire rooms should be included in the procedure. 



TETANUS IN COURT-PLASTER. 

RESULTS OF THE BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF 14 SPECIMENS. 

By O. W. McCoy, Director, Hygienic Laboratory, 3. P. Leake, Passed Aaeistaiit Surgeon, and B. B. 
CoRBiTT, Sanitary Bacteriologist, United States Public Health Service. 

So much has appeared in the public press about alleged intentional 
contaminations of court-plaster with tetanus, and so many inquiries 
have reached this laboratory on the same subject, that the following 
record of our experience with the examination of court-plaster is 
presented. 

We have no evidence whatever that any specimen we examined was 
deliberately contaminated. Indeed, so far as our work goes, we do 

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1451 September 7, 1017 

not have clear evidence that the court-plaster as it leaves the manu- 
facturer carries the organism of tetanus; but we have proved that 
when the plaster reaches the user this oi^anism may be present. 

Source of Material. 

The first specimen submitted for examination came from a State 
department of health. This specimen did not bear the name of the 
maker, though it did bear that of the distributor. 

When work on this specimen indicated that tetanus was present, 
but before the results could be considered conclusive, we secured 13 
other specimens by purchase from local pharmacies. Two of these 
specimens showed the presence of the tetanus organism. 

Technique. 

The medium we used for the cultivation was plain broth made from 
veal. The reaction was +0.5 per cent to phenolphthalein. The 
broth was sterilized in Smith fermentation tubes* by streaming steam 
for H hours at 100® C. Just prior to use, thes* were steamed for 30 
minutes at 100*^ C. in the Arnold sterilizer and the air was removed 
by tilting. 

The court-plaster was cut into pieces about 1 centimeter square, or 
a little larger, and one piece put into each fermentation tube. After 
incubating for three or four days, smears were riade from the growth 
at the bottom of the bend of the tubes in which gas was present in the 
closed arm. When the Gram staining showM that characteristic 
drumstick-shaped organisms with a terminal sporo were present, the 
cultiure was incubated for three days longer, At which time it was 
used to inoculate mice. In the majority of cises two series of ani- 
mals (mice) were used, one having been given a protective dose of 
antitetaniis serum. 

A pure culture of the tetanus bacillus was is(»iated from one of the 
tub(^ by planting dilutions in deep tubes of melted agar and picking 
characteristic colonies. 

Summary of Experimentii. 

Specimen 1. In all, 64 fermentation tubes torero inoculated with 
small pieces of court-plaster, using three sheets. Thirty-three of 
these showed gas in the closed arm of the tube after three days. 
Smear preparations showed tetanuslike organisms in the great 
majority of the tubes showing gas. 

A small amoimt of the culture, 0.01 cubic centimeter to 1 cubic 
centimeter from each tube^ was used to inoculate each white mouse. 
llurty-eeven of the animals died during the ensuing night, but it 
was not known whether characteristic symptoms preceded death. 

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1452 



However, four showed distinct symptoms of tetanus in from 18 
to 42 hours. 

While we felt certain that the tetanus geim was present, it was 
reaUzed that the evidence was not wholly convincing, and resort was 
had to protection tests, as is shown by the following protocol. Tlie 
most promising tubes, judged by gross and microscopical appear- 
ance, were selected for the test. Each of the "protected'' animals 
was given 10 iinits of commercial antitetanus serum about 30 minutes 
before the inoculation with cultures. 



Guinea pigs. 


White mice. 




Volume 


Protected (10 


Controls (no anti- 
toxin), symp- 
toms, and re- 
sults. 


Volume 


Protected (10 


Controls (no ami- 


Tube No. 


of culture 
given. 


units of anti- 
toxin), results. 


of culture 
given. 


units of anti- 
toxin), restUts. 


toxin), synap- 
suJts. 




e.e. 
f 0.1 


No symptoms: 


Tetanus; died 


e.€. 
0.1 


No symptoms 


Tetanus under 






discharged 


second day. 




of tetanus; 


17 hours; die-i 






well twenty- 






died sixth 


18 hours. 






second day. 






day. 
do 






.01 


do 


Tetanus; died 
third day. 


.01 


Tetanus; died 


B6 1 






second day. 


1 


.001 


do 


Remained well... 


.001 


Died under 17 
hours; symp- 
toms not ob- 


Sli]Erbt symptoms 
44 hours; se- 












vere later; 












served.* 


chloroform od; 
moribund 




.1 


do 


Tetanus; died 
second day. 


.1 


No symptoms 
of tetanus; 


sixth day. 
Died under 17 






hours; symp- 
toms not ob- 












died four- 


1 










teenth day. 


served. 


1 

1 


.01 


do 


Tetanus; killed 
second day 
while mori- 


.01 


No symptoms 
of tetanus; 


Do. 


i 








died sixth day. 




PSa 1 

1 






bund. 








.001 


do 


Tetanus; died 


.001 


No symptoms 


Tetanus; died 








third day. 




of tetanus; 
died seventh 
day. 
No symptoms 


second day. 




.0001 


do 


Remained well... 


.0001 


Symptoms 
fourth day; 












of tetanus; 












died fifteenth 


marked sixth 




.1 


do 


Tetanus; died 
second day. 


.1 


day. 
No symptoms 
of tetanus; 


day. 
Dead under 17 
hours: symp- 
toms not ob- 












died sixth 












...'^Si 


stfrred. 


P9 


.01 


do 


Tetanus; killed 


.01 


Tetanus under 






third day while 






17 hours; died 








moribund. 






second day. 




.001 


do 


Remained well... 


.001 


do 


Symptoms seo- 
ond day; 
marked sixth 
day. 



» Cause of death unknown. Had the cause of death been tetanus, the mouse receiving the largest dose 
of culture should have died, not the one on the smallest dose. 
3 Later this tube yielded a pure culture of the tetanus organism. 

Specimens 2 to 14 (inclusive).: Tliesc specimens were purchased 
at various drug stores in Washington. Culture tubes were inocu- 
lated as in the preceding experiment; however, but two fermenta- 
tion tubes were inoculated from each package. On the third day 
after planting smears were examined, and on the sixth day the 

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September 7. 1017 



material was used to inoculate a series of "proteetod'' and a series 
of normal white mice, with results which are shown in the following 
(aUe. On account of shortage of mice, fewer were used than in the 
preceding examination. 

Mice. 



firoon faniMii- 
tation tubes on 
tlOrdday. 



Dose of 

calture 
(sixth 
day). 



' Protected » ( 10 units of nn- 
titoxin), results. 



Controls (no antitoxin), 
symptoms, results. 



9 



Nei^ative ! 

Tetamislikeorganisms . j 

ao H 

Negative 

TetanusUkcorganlsms. !• 

do 

do 



-do.. 



10 i Negative... 

11 I Suspicious. 

12 do 

13 Negative... 



14 i Suspicious. 



Ce, 

None. 

None. 

0.1 

.01 

None. 

.1 

.01 

.1 

.01 

.1 

.01 



None. 
None. 
None. 
None. 
.1 

.01 



Negative; dischar^ fif- 
teenth day. 
....do 



Negative; dischar;^ fif- 
teenth day. 
do 



.do. 

.do., 
.do.. 



.do., 
.do.. 



.do., 



Negative; discharged fif- 
teenth day. 
do 



Negative; discharged fif- 
teenth day. 
Do. 

Dead under 18 hours; symp- 
toms not observed. 

Symptoms of tetanus after 24 
hours; died third day. 

Negative; discharged fif- 
teenth day. 

Died seventh day; not teta- 
nus. 

Negative; discharged fif- 
teenth day. 
Do. 

Dead under 18 hours; symp- 
toms not observed. 
Do. 



Negative; discharged fif* 
teenth day. 
Do. 



This series demonstrated that specimen 6 was contaminated with 
tetanus. The symptoms in the mouse given 0.01 cubic centimeter 
of culture were quite characteristic. 

As both of the control mice inoculated with culture No. 9 died in 
the night following the day of inoculation without symptoms being 
observed, a series was inoculated with the seven-day culture and 
included smaller doses than in the preceding experiment. The 
"protected'' mice received the usual dose, 10 units of antitetanus 
senim. 



Dose of 
culture 9. 


Protected (10 units of antitoxin), symptoms 
and results. 


Controls (no antitoxin), symptoms and results. 


cc. 
0.1 

.01 


Symptoms suggestive of tetanus 2, 3. and 4 
days; recovered. Discharged well four- 
teenth day. 


Pronounced symptoms tetanus, 18 hours; died, 
between 28 and 42 hours. 

Pronounced svmptoms tetanus, 42 hours; dead, 


.001 


do 


45 hours. 
Slight symptoms tetanus fourth to eighth day; 

recovered. 
No symptoms. 


.0001 


do 



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September 7, 1917 1454 

It would seem that the antitoxin failed to neutralize coin[de(dy 
the 0.1 cubic centimeter dose of cidture. 

This series demonstrated that culture 9 also contained tetaniB, 
which with the positive results from culture 6 gave 2 positives among 
the 13 specimens. We consider it not improbable that had a laiger 
number of pieces of plaster been planted, as was done with specimen 
1, a larger number of positive results would have been secured. 

Note. — In order to determine approximately the degree of contamination of cowt- 
plaster with aerobic organisms, four specimens were examined in the following maniMr: 
A single sheet of the size found in the package was shaken with 100 cubic cenUmetm 
of sterile 0.6 per cent sodium chloride solution, and 1 cubic centimeter of the suspo- 
sion plated on plain agar. Colonies were counted after three days. The numbcc 
of organisms per sheet was estimated as follows: 

Specimen 1 1.300 

Specimen 2 2,700 

Specimen 3 1^500 

Specimen 4 7,0(10 

No attempt was made to identify the organisms. 

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PREVALENCE OF DISEASE. 



No health department, State or locals can effectively prevent or control dUease withotU 
knoicledge of when^ where ^ and under what conditions cases are occurring. 



UNITED STATES. 



CURRENT STATE SUMMARIES. 
California Report for the Week Ended September 1, 1917. 

The California State Board of Health reported concerning the status 
of preventable diseases in California for the week ended September 1, 
1917, as follows: The cases of typhoid fever showed an increase 
during the week, with 52 reported cases in the State. The disease 
was unusually prevalent in Riverside County, in Hemet and vicinity, 
and in IjOs Angeles, where" 12 cases were reported. Five cases of 
cerebrospinal meningitis were reported, 3 of which were in San 
Diego and 1 each in Contra Costa County and Oakland city. Scarlet 
fever and pneumonia showed some increase, while other reportable 
diseases showed reductions. 

The details of notifiable-disease cases reported during the week 
ended August 25, are as follows: 



Chicken pox 17 

Diphtheria 23 

Dysentory 2 

Eryeipelas 8 

German measles 28 

Gonococcus infection 60 

Malaria 33 



Pneumonia 15 

Poliomyelitis 1 

Scarlet fever 33 

Smallpox 2 

Syphilis 30 

Tetanus 2 

Trachoma 1 



Measles 38 Tuberculosis 106 

Mwnps 37 I Typhoid fever 47 

Pellagra 1 I Whooping cough 29 

CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS. 

Minnesota. 

During the period from January 1, to September 1, 1917, 338 cases 
of cerebrospinal meningitis, with 165 deaths, were reported in the 
State of Minnesota. 

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September 7, 1017 



1456 



CEREBROSPINAL MENINGITIS— Continued. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 18, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cuts. 


DHtta. 


Boston, Mass 


1 


1 
1 
3 
2 


Milwaukee. Wis 


s 
1 
I 

4 


J 


Buffalo, N.Y 


Minncipnii;«, Minn 




Chicago, HI 


8 


Newark, N.J 

New York, N. Y 


T 


Cleveland, Ohio 


} 


Columbus. Ohio 


Passaic, N.J 


. . 


t 


Detroit, Mich 


4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


Philadelphia, Pa 1 4 

Pittsburgh. Pa i 1 

Saginaw, Mich ' 


1 


Fvorett, Kass 


3 


Fall River,Mass 


1 


Fort Wayne Ind 


St. Louis, Mo 


3 
1 
1 




Hartford, Conn 


Salt Lake City, Utah 


1 


Kansas City. Mo 


Wlnston^lem, N. C 


1 


McKeesx>ort, Pa 











DIPHTHERU. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1460. 

ERYSIPELAS. 
City Reports for Week Ended Ang. 18, 1917. 



Place. 



Bnflalo,N.Y 

Chlca^.ni 

Cleveland, Ohio... 

Denver, Colo 

Detroit, Mich 

Kalamazoo, Mich., 
Kansas City, Mo.. 
Los Angeles X^al.. 
Milwaukee, Wis... 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



1 I Newark, N.J 

1 New York. N.Y... 

.. I Philadelphia. Pa... 

1 , Pittsburgh. Pa 

3 RochoUer.N. Y.... 

1 . St. I^uis.Mo 

1 I I San Francisco, Cal. 

2 I I York, Pa 

1 



DMtta. 



MALARU. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 18, 1917. 



Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Place. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Baltimon, Md 




ll 

1 

1 


Mitmnhi^ TVinn , , , . , 


4 
1 
I 
1 


3 


Birmingham. Ala 


»47 

i' 

4 


Newark, K. J 




Charlestoo, 8. C 


New Orlfans. Ia. 




Columbia, 8. C •..*. 


Stockton, Cal 




Little Rock, Ark 















t The reason that Birmingham had so many more cases of maUria reported than any other dty b net 
that the disease is more prevalent in Birmintnam than in other cities of Alabama and neighboring Statas, 
but undoubtedly because of the successful efforts the health department has made in securing the ooopaor 
ticn of the practicing physicians in reporting oases. 

MEASLES. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1460. 
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PELLAGRA. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 18, 1917. 



Place. 



AnstiD, Tn 

Binnio^hai&, Ala. 

Boston, Mftas 

Qarle8toD,8.C... 

CUagcTm 

CQh2mUft,S.C 

Fert Worth, Tex.. 



Cases. Deaths. 



U4 

1 



Place. 



MemphKTemi 

Moblte, Ala 

Nashville, Tcnn 

Oklahoma City, Okla.. 

Washington, D. C 

Winston-Salem* N. C . 



Cases. Deaths. 



13 



> The reason that Birmingham had so many more cases of pellasra reported than any other dty is not 
that the disease is more prevalent in Birmingham than in other cities of Alabama and neighboring States, 
bat undoubtedly because of the sucoesBful efforts the health department has made in securing the coop- 
fltatiflD of the practicing physicians in reporting cases. 

PLAGUE. 
Hawaii—Kiikaitii. 

On September 2, 1917, two fatal cases of plague were reported at 
Kukaiau, Hawaii. 

POLIOMYELITIS (INFANTILE PARALYSIS). 

Minnesota. 

During the period from January 1 to August 31, 1917, 47 cases 
of poliomyelitis, with 4 deaths, were reported in the State of 
Miimesota. 



City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 18, 1917. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Akron, Ohio 

CWcago^U 

Darenport, Iowa... 

Dftroll,MXch 

FaU River, Mass... 
UtvcrhULMass.... 
KaosasCity, Kans. 
Kansas aty. Mo. . . 
Newark, N.i 



New Castle, Fa. . . . 
New York, N.Y.. 

Omaha, Nebr 

Pittsburgh, Pa..., 
San Francisco, Cal 
Sioux City, Iowa. . 
Washington, D.C. 
Wheeling, W. Va, . 



PNEUMONIA. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 18, 1917. 



Place. 



Baltimore. Md... 

Boston, Mass 

Chtatto,Ill 

Clsvetend, Ohio. . 
Detroit, Mich.... 
ntdibuig.Mass.. 

Flint, Mich 

Hcksoajfioh.... 
Kansas City, Mo. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



1 


5 


2 


5 


32 


29 


10 


12 


3 


9 


2 




1 




1 


1 


1 


3 



Place. 



Lawrence, Mass 

Los Angeles, Cal . . . 

LowoU, Mass 

Manchester, N.H.. 

Newark, N.J 

Philadelphia, Pa. . . 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Rochester, N.Y.... 
San Francisco, Cal . 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

13 
9 
2 
3 



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RABI£S IN ANIMALS. 

City Reports for Week Ended August 18, 1917. 

During the week ended August 18, 1917, one case of rabies in 
animals was reported in Alameda, Cal., two cases were reported in 
Detroit, Mich., and one case was reported in Los Angeles, Cal. 

SCARLET FEVER. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever,' and tuberculosis, page 1460. 

SMALLPOX. 
City ReporU for Week Ended Aafi. 18, 1917. 



Place. 



Cases. 



DeatJis. 



Place. 



Coses. 



Deaths. 



Akron, Ohio 

Austin, Tex 

Buffalo. N.Y.... 

Butte, Mont 

Cleveland, Ohio.. 

Dayton, Ohio 

Denver, Colo 

Detroit, Mich 

Dubuque, Iowa... 

FUntVMich 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
Kansas City, Mo.. 



La Crosse, Wis 

Little Rock, Ark 

MUwaukoe, Wis 

Minneapolis. Minn 

Oklahoma Cfity, Okla.. 

Omaha, Nobr 

Rock Island, HI 

St. Joseph, Mo 

St. Louis, Mo 

Salt Lake City, Utah.. 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Terre Haute, Ind 



TETANUS. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aafi. 18, 1917. 



Place. 



Canton, Ohio 

Chicago, 111 

Detrdt,Mich 

Erie, Pa 

£vansYiJle,Ind... 
Kansas City, Mo.. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Place. 



Ixw Angeles, Cal.. 
New Orleans, La. 

Norfolk, Va 

Oakland, Cal 

Pittsburch, Pa... 
Springfield, Mass. 



Cases. 



Desths. 



TUBERCULOSIS. 

See Diphtheria, measles, scarlet fever, and tuberculosis, page 1460. 

TYPHOID FEVER. 

Kansas — ^Leavenworth. 

During the week ended September 1, 1917, 16 cases of typhoid 
fever were reported in the city of Leavenworth, Kans., and 3 cases 
in Leavenworth County. 

Tennessee — Chattanooga. 

The outbreak of typhoid fever which prevailed at Chattanooga, 
Tenn., during July and the first half of August has subsided. Only 
10 cases were reported between August 20 and September 1 and 
none since September 1. 

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TYPHOID PBVER—Contlnued. 
Oty Reports for Week Ended Aug. 18» 1917. 



PfaMt. 



CasM. 



DmUu. 



PhM. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



ikroD,Ohfo. 

iBBBtovn^Pa 

JUUB^m 

AlUNDt, Pa 

Athatic City, N.J. 

Baltimore, Md 

BiaTer Falls, Pa.... 



Brtdfeport, Conn 

Buflalo,N.Y , 

Ound«i,N.J 

GhntOQ,Ohio 

Charlaston, 8. C 

QMttanoqga, Tenn. . . 

ClKla«.Mass 

ailci80,ni 

CtDctaDati, Ohio 

Oereknd. Ohio 

Oofl«yYiUe, Kans 

Columbia. 8.C 

Cokiinbos, Ohio 

CumbcrlaDd, Md 

DttTllleJII 

Dajtoo,Ofalo. 

Dcnwr.Colo , 

Detroit, Mich , 

Dultith. Minn 

EMtOrangr.N. J..., 

EUxabelhTN.J 

ETamvillc, Ind 

Everett, Mass 

PallRlm,Mass 

Port Wayne, Ind 

Fori Worth. Tex 

Qnod Rapids. Mich.. 

HvTisbure,Pa 

HtftlOrd.Conn 

lUverhill.Mass 

Hobok«i. N,J 

iDdlsnapolls. Ind 

Jwsry CltyTN. J 

Johnstow n , Pa 

Kansas City, Kans... 

Kansas City. Mo. 

Knox vflJe, Tenn 

Uncastcr.Pa 

Ltxington.Cy 

Uffla,Ohio 

Uttle Rock, Ark 

Us Angeles, CaL 

Uwall.Ma88 

LTnohburg, Va. , 

Lvnn.llass 

luncbester, N. H... 
McKMsport, Pa 



Memphis, Tenn 

Mihrmikee.Wis 

Minneapolis, Minn 

MohUe,Ala 

Montclair, N. J 

Nashville . Tenn 

Newark,N.J 

New Bedford, Mass...: 

New Haven, Ccnn 

New Orleans, La 

Newtcn, Mass..., 

New York, N.Y 

Norfolk, Va 

Oakland, Cal 

Oklahoma City, Okla.. 

Omaha, Nebr 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsbureh.Pa 

Plalnfleld,N.J 

Portland, Ores 

Portsmouth, va 

Providence, R.I 

Quincy, Mass 

Kadne,Wb 

Reading, Pa 

Richmond, Va 

Rcanoke,Va 

Rockford,Ill 

Rock Island, III 

Rocky Mount, N.C... 

Sacramento. Cal 

St. Joseph. Mo 

St. Loms,Mo 

Salt Lake City, Utah.. 

San Francisco, Cal 

Savannah, Ga 

South Bend, Ind 

Springfield, 111 

Springfield, Mass 

Steelton,Pa 

Stockton, Cal 

Topeka. Kans 

Troy,N.Y 

Washington, D.C 

Washington, Pa 

Watertown, N. Y 

West Hobokcn, N.J... 

Wheeling, W. Va 

WichiU, Kans 

Wilkos-Barre.Pa 

Wilmington, Del 

Wi'mtngton, N. C 

WlnstoD-Selom, N.C 

Worcester, Mews 

York, Pa 



TYPHUS FEVER. 

CItr Report for Week Ended August 18, 1917. 

During the week ended August 18, 1917, a case of typhus fever 
was reported in New York, N. Y. 

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1460 



DIPHTHERU, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS. 
City Reports for Week Ended Aug. 18, 1917. 





Popula- 
tion as of 
July 1,1916 
(estimated 
by U. 8. 
Census 
Bureau). 


Total 
deaths 


Diphtheria. 


Measlflo. 


Scvkt 
ferer. 


Tobif. 
colosis. 


City. 


from 

all 

causes. 


1 


1 

s 


1 


1 


i 


1 


1 


i 

1 


Ovor500,000inliabitants: 

Baltimore, Md 


689,621 

756,476 

2,497,722 

674,073 

671,784 

603,812 

5,602,841 

1,709,518 

679,090 

757,309 

468,658 
410,476 
306,345 
436,535 
363,454 
408,894 
371,747 
463,516 
863,980 

214,878 
260,800 
271.708 
297,847 
295,463 
254,960 
256,417 

104,199 
181,762 
121,579 
112,981 
108,233 
127,224 
128,330 
104,562 
12S,291 
110,900 
100,560 
113,245 
102,425 
148,995 
117,057 
118,158 
149,685 
198,604 
165,470 
109.381 
156,687 
117,399 
105,942 
191,554 
163,314 

85,625 
63,5a5 
58,659 
57,660 
69,893 
57,653 
53,973 
67,449 
60,852 
60,734 
60,075 
67,144 
94,495 
86,680 


165 

173 

625 

41 

"i,'359' 
476 
205 
180 

"*"i65" 
75 
76 

""'iso' 

117 
123 

50 
58 
... . 

42* 

63 
64 


6 
63 
95 
20 
67 

4 
178 
25 
15 
26 

5 

7 

. 4 

14 

? 

12 
10 
2 

3 
12 

30 

4 


...... 

15 
3 

7 

■ 'ii' 

4 

3 
4 

2 

1 


1 


14 
15 
46 

8 
8 
3 
101 
6 
9 
1 

3 


"4" 
1 

1 

1 


S 
9 

46 
3 

35 
5 

19 
7 
4 

14 

4 
4 
1 

11 
4 


1 

""3 

1 
1 


18 

65 

323 

38 

26 
37 
403 
66 
31 
40 

38 
16 
23 
17 


u 


Boston, Mass 


30 


Chicaeo.Ill 


» 


Cleveland, Ohio 


30 


Detroit,ldlch 


13 


L.OS AnEoIos.Cal 


IS 


Now York, N.Y 


174 


Phlladelnhia Pa 


43 


Pittsbureh. Pa 


16 


St Louis Mo 


18 


From 300,000'to 600,000 Inhabi- 
tants: 
Buflalo.N.Y 


17 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


17 


Jersey aty.N.J '... 

Milwaukee, Wis 


7 
3 




7 
7 


UinriAttnnliQ Minn . 




Newark.N J 


1 
...... 


14 




2 




37 19 


New Orleans La 


1 


14 1 15 


San Francisco. Cal 


23 
13 

2 
9 

1 




1 


6 
3 

1 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
3 


1 
1 


33 
23 

7 


7 


Washington, D. C 

From 200,000 to 390,000 inhabi- 
tants: 
Cohimbus, Ohio, 




T)AnvAr Colo 


11 


Indianaoolis. Ind 




7 
71 
5 




KansasCitv. Mo 


14 


Portland Ore*' .. ... 







4 




11 


1 
1 


1 

8 


1 


2 


Rochester, N. Y 

From 100,000 to 200,000 inhabi- 
tants:. 
Albftnv N Y 


1 


14 

5 
17 

8 
11 

2 

4 
14 


7 


TllrmincrhATn AIa 


80 
25 

3i" 

49 
26 
34 
43 
33 


3 
4 
4 

1 
2 
3 




2 








3 


Bridfenort. Conn 








2 


PAmnridiFn Mfun 




5 








2 


Camden N J 










Dayton, Ohio 





2 
4 
1 




6 




1 


Fall River Mass 


1 


Fort Worth Tex 








1 


Grand Rapids, Mich 

Hartford, Conn 


2 
6 


1 
1 




i 

1 




15 
9 
2 
2 
5 

18 
6 
8 
4 
4 


1 


1 




1 




2 


T^well Mass 














3 




14 

48 


3 
3 













3 


Memphis, Tenn 




1 





4 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 




6 


Nftshvillo Tenn 


5 


New Bedford, Mass 


28 

31" 

46 
45 
52 
23 
28 
67 
68 

i?' 

8* 

20 
8 
24 
24 


4 
2 

i 

1 

6 
1 
3 
4 
3 

4 

1 
2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
3 




8 

4 
1 


'.'.'.'..'. 


1 


New Haven, Conn 


2 


Oakland. Cal 


3 




2 


Roadine Pa 


...... 


1 
1 








2 




' 1 




1 


7 


Salt Like City, Utah 

Snrin?field Mass 




2 
3 
2 
3 

3 






1 

1 






""2 


6 
19 




Tolodo Ohio 






9 


Worcester, Mass 

From 50,000 to 100,000 Inhabi- 
tants: 

AVrnn Ohio 






3 
























3 

1 
1 
3 
1 
4 
3 




Allnonfi Pa 














AtIanticCity,N.J 




2 












1 
1 
1 






Berkeley, Cal 




1 
1 






Binglmmton, N. Y 


2 






Canton Ohio 








1 
3 






Charleston 8 C 


3 












S 


ChftttAnooea Tenn 












S 


Cnvinffton Kv 


14 
6 
18 


4 
3 

4 














1 


Dnlutn Mfain . .. 








3 




4 




Eliiabeth. N. J 




i 




9< 3 



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1461 



September 7, 1917 



DIPHTHERU, MEASLES, SCARLET FEVER, AND TUBERCULOSIS— 

Continued. 



City RepoHs for Week Ended Aug 


.18, 


1917- 


-Continued. 








Popular 

tkmasof 
Julyl,;si6 
(estimated 

by U. S. 
Census 

Bureau). 


Tolal 
deaths 
from 

an 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


Heaskj. 


fever. 


Tub»r. 

CulffiCiB. 


city. 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


M 


i 


1 


From 50^030 to 100,000 bihabit- 
snts— Cantinaed. 

Erie, Po 


76, IW 
76,078 
54,772 
76,183 
72,015 
77,214 
68,529 
99,437 
.50,853 
57,343 
51,155 
78,283 
r>8,221 
53,704 
89,612 
92,943 
71,744 
63,867 
5.5,185 
66,895 
55,642 
85,236 
53,330 
68,805 
99,519 
57,078 
87,039 
68,946 
61,130 
51,5.50 
66,083 
77,916 
70,722 
76,776 
94,265 
51,656 

27,732 
34,814 
32,730 
27,632 
43,425 
46,192 
29,319 
34,611 
26,074 
32,261 
48,811 
39,873 
28,743 
42,458 
28,203 
39,233 
41,781 
41,863 
29,353 
25,679 
40,496 
48, 4n 
35,363 
48,886 
31,576 
38 676 
31,677 
41,097 
35,384 
46,515 
27,587 


32* 

7 
17 
19 
24 
21 


3 

1 
3 
11 

1 
2 

1 
1 








1 




2 
2 


26 


Evansville Ind 


1 






2 


Flint. Micli.. ../. 


1 










Fort Wavne Ind 













Harrisbnrg, Pa. 








2 




2 


Hob<d;en 1^ j" 


1 




5 










2 






l^aruras CitV Ktutn . . . 








1 


T^anraster Pa 




» 










IJttleRock Ark 


12 
6 
22 
21 
15 

22* 

22 
20 
21 
20 
13 
20 

iS 

27 

22 

1 
















Halden, Mass. ..! 


4 
















ICanchcster N H 




2 








' 




Mobile Ala' 












4 


Nf>w Britain " Ckmn 
















Norfolk Va 


1 


.. |.. 






i 


4 


Oklahoma City, Okte . ...... 

PtwwHifr N J 


1 




1 
2 


1 


2 


2 

1 
1 
1 






1 3 


1 


PortlanVl, UV» , , 


1 * 


1 


1 


RoddcHti III 








1 


Sacramento, Gal .../. 












2 
2 
1 
4 
1 
2 


4 


•Sarinaw Mich 








3 






St. Jo%ph, Mo 


1 
1 








4 


San Diego Cal .. -... . 












4 


SarwiYflUl, <tA * 












2 




1 






1 






2 


Sioux Citv Iowa 






2 






Somervilto M^ ^ .. . 










1 


1 


South Bend, Ind ... '. 


15 
19 
19 
16 






1 




1 


....:.|-2- 





Sprinjarfield 111 






1 


Springfield, Ohio*'. ...'. 


1 












4 


1 


Terns Haute, Ind 

Trov,N. Y 

WirhitA, ITanr? 














3 




2 




1 





3 

4 


4 


Wilkes-fiarre.Pa 


30 
54 

7 
22 

5 
11 

ii' 

12 
15 

4 
12 


3 

1 
1 


1 


1 
1 










Wilmln'^ftn T>»1 






:::::::::::: 


5 


York, Pa....'....!. 








2 
2 




From 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants: 




2 




»• 




1 


.\ustin, Tex 












2 


Brook line, Mass 






2 






:::::: ::::::i 




Butler Pa 








1 
3 

1 








Butte, Mont 


2 
3 

1 
1 
1 











7 




Chelsea, Mass . ••••• 


1 






1 


r>i{onpM> Mf|<i9 ,, "7 








1 


4 


Colombia, S. C 








5 






Cumberland. Md 










1 




Danville, III 












2 


Davenport. Iowa 






1 








1 




Dubuque, Iowa 














2 


East Qiicago, Ind 










1 


1 




1 
3 
1 
3 
2 
1 


1 


East Oraneo. N. J..,.^ 


2 

4 
4 
8 
10 
7 










Elgin, 111..... 














1 


Everett, Moss 


3 




2 

1 




1 
1 






Fitchbu'rg, Mass 




Galveston, Tex 


1 




2 
















Hagcrstown, Md ,^.. 










1 








TTftmntnn Ohio 


7 

s' 

18 

7 

9* 

16 
12 
J3 
12 




:::::::: ""I 






1 
4 
1 


1 


H^kvPrhfii. Mafw .. . 


2 




1 
1 

4 










Jackson, Mich 










Kalamar.oo, Mich 


1 






3 






Kenosha, Wis . 


1 




Knox villc, Tcnn 


1 
1 








1 


1 4 




La Crosse Wis . . 










Lexington, Ky '.'. 




1 






1 


I 


Lima, Ohio 


1 








1 




Lincoln, Ncbr 




1 
1 




1 




2 


Long Beach, Cal 




. 


.....J .3 





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Invest In the SECOND LIBERTY Ltl 

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S^ptembei* 7, 1917 



1462 



DIPHTHERIA, MEASLES, SCARLET FBVBR, AND TUBERCULOSIS- 

Continued. 

City Report for Week Ended Aog. IS, 1917— Continued. 



City. 



From 25,000 to 50,000, inhabit- 
aDts— Continued. 

Lorain. Ohio 

Lynchburg, Va 

McKeesport, Pa 

Medford, Mass 

Montclair.N.J 

Nashua, N.H 

NewburKh,N.Y 

Newcastle. Pa 

Newport, Ky 

Newton, Mass 

Niagara Falls. N. Y 

Norrlstown. Pa 

Ogden,Utah 

Orange, N.J 

Fasaaena, Cal 

Perth Amboy, N.J 

Pittsfleld, Mass 

Portsmouth, Va 

Quincy, 111 

Quincy, Mass 

Racine,WIs 

Roanoke, Va 

Rock Island, ni 

San Jose, Cai 

SteubenvUlc, Ohio 

Stockton, Cal 

Superior, Wis 

Taunton^Mass 

Topeka, Kans 

Waltham, Mass 

Watertown, N. Y 

West Hob<*en, N.J 

Wheeling, W. Va 

Williamsport. Pa 

WihnIngton,N.C 

Winston-Salem, N. C 

Zanesville, Ohio. . * 

From 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants: 

Alton, 111 

Beaver Falls, Pa 

Berlin,N.H 

Braddock, Pa 

Cairo, ni 

Clinton, Mass 

Coffeyville, Kans 

Concord, N.H 

Galesburg.Ul 

Harrison. N.J 

Keamy,N. J 

Kokomo, Ind 

Long Branch, N. J 

MarSiette, Wis 

Melrose, Mass 

Morristown, N. J 

Nanticoke, Pa 

Newburyport, Mass 

New Lonaon, Conn 

North Adams, Mass 

Northampton Mass 

Plainfleld, N. J 

Pontiac, Mich 

Portsmouth, N. H 

Rocky Mount, N. C 

Rutland, Vt 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y... 

Steelton, Pa I 

Washington, Pa ! 

Wilkinsburg, Pa I 

Wobum, Mass 



Popula- 
tirn as of 
Julvl 1910 


Total 
deaths 

from 

all 

causes. 


Diphtheria. 


"«»•- '' 1^';* 


Ttiber- 
ctilosis. 


(esiimated 
by r. S. 
Census 
Bureau). 


1 


i 




1 


u 


Deaths. 
Cas«s. 


i 
1 


36,964 


7 
10 
4 
2 
9 
13 


3 






i , 




32,940 
47,521 
26,234 












1 


8 




1 




1 








1 


26,318 
27,.?27 
29,603 
41 133 






1 




1 
1 




1 2 




2 










' 






1 1 


2 








1 






31,927 


8 
6 

17 
5 
6 
7 
8 

13 












t 1 
J 


I 


43 715 


2 
1 
5 




3 










37,353 








! 2 
1 


1 


31,401 












1 


31,404 










1 




33,060 
46,450 


2 








3 
2 


:::::;! I 










2 


41,185 


1 










1 3 
1 2 




38,629 




1 








I 


39,651 


7 
16 

5 

7 
17 

8 








1 






36,798 


1 
4 




1 
2 






1 


38,136 








2 
' 1 

1 4 




46,486 








] 


43,284 
28,926 
38,902 


2 
2 












4 
























2 




•27,445 
35,358 
46 226 


U 

5* 

18 
8 
5 
















1 
1 
1 












1 * 










1 






36,2*^3 










1 3 


1 


48,726 








3 






30,570 


2 










1 




29,894 




3 
2 

1 








1 


43,139 


2 












> 4 




43,377 












*i 


33,809 


is' 


7 

1 






1 
1 
1 






29,892 
31,155 








1 


1 








1 2 




30,863 


8 

4 
2 

4 

7 

2 






2 






1 




22,874 
13,532 
13,500 
21,685 
15,704 
» 13,075 
17,648 
22,660 
24,276 
16,950 
23,539 














1 


1 








::::::r'""i 













1 


1 


2 



























1 


























1 
1 









7 
11 

6" 

6 
2 

1 
6 
5 
2 
6 
5 
5 
8 
10 

7 

6 
5 
3 






2 




::::::i:::":i 


1 










1 


1 


::::::::: 







I 






2 




' 




1 




20 930 













1 


15,39.5 
^ 14,610 


1 









.. . . 


*■ 1 






i 


: ::"i r::... 


17 445 


4 








1| 


13! 284 










23 126 


1 








t ' 


15 243 




.'.".'.J'.'.'.'.. 




' 1 "I 


20 9K.'. 






\ 




1"::.. 


> 22.01<» 














2 1 
2 1 

2 


19.9.0 






1 








2:i, >«o.'i 


2 

2 

1 










17.524 




2 








6 1 2 


11,666 




2 




\ 


12,067 




1 




I 


14.831 






1 


".*' 




1 


13,821 




......^. ............ 




15,648 


1 


1 1 




1 
1 


4 1 


21,618 




1 






23. 22X 


4 

2 




1 


' 1 


l.->.Mi» 




i:...:. 




' 1 3 



• Population Apr. l'», 1910; no estimate made. ^ 

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FOREIGN. 



PLAGUE ON VESSEL. 

Steamship ''Matiana"— Graresend. 

The steamship Matiana arrived at Gfavesend, England, August 13, 
1917, with three cases of plague on board and a history of the occur- 
rence of nine cases of plague, with six deaths, at sea during the period 
from July 14 to 18, 1917. The disease occurred among members of 
the crew. 

CUBA. 

Communicable Diseases — Habana. 
Communicable diseases have been notified at Habana as follows: 



Disease. 



Aug. 1-10, 1917. 



New 
cases. 



Deaths. 



Remain- 
ing under 

treat. 

ment 
Aug. 10, 

1917. 



Diphtheria 

Cerebrospinal meningitis. . 

irg::::::::::::::::::: 

Measles.. 



Pirttyphoidfjver. 
Typhoid fever 



4 
2 
10 
22 

7 
7 
74 



ECUADOR. 
Plague— Yellow Fever— February, March, April, 1917. 

Plague and yellow fever have been reported in Ecuador as follows : 

Plague. — Month of February, 1917: Guayaquil, 56 cases; Estancia 

Vieja, 1 case; Nobol, 2 cases; Salitre, 1 case; Taura, 3 cases. Month 

of March, 1917: Guayaquil, 33 cases; Milagro, 1 case. Month of 

April, 1917: Guayaquil, 9 cases; Milagro, 1 case. 

Yellow fever. — Month of February, 1917: Guayaquil, 18 cases; 
Babahoyo, 1 case;MiIagro, 1 case. Month of March, 1917: Guayaquil, 
17 cases; Babahoyo, 2 cases; Chobo, 1 case; Milagro, 1 case. Month 
of April, 1917: Guayaquil 17 cases; Milagro, 1 case. 

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MADAGASCAR. 



Epidemic Cerebrospinal Meningitis. 

Epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis was present in Tananarive, 
Madagascar, dm'ing the latter part of the year 1916. The outbreak 
was almost wholly confined to the native population, occurring prin- 
cipally among native soldiers. The disease also appeared in Tama- 
tave, on the east coast, where it is believed the infection was carried 
by soldiers. The total number of cases reported at Tananarive from 
the beginning of the outbreak, about October 1, to December 31, 

1916, was 212, with 138 deaths, and from January 1 ta February 4, 
1917, 199 cases, with 149 deaths, the greatest numberof cases reported 
during this period for one week being 58 and the lowest number 20 
cases. No report of nonfatal cases has been made since February 4, 

1917. From February 25 to March 31, 16 fatal cases were reported, 
and from April 1 to June 3, 23 fatalities. The native population of 
Tananarive is 62,410. At Tamatave, where the native population 
is 6,701 and the European 3,200, there were reported during the 
month of January, 1917, 21 cases, with 14 deaths. 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER. 
Reports Received During the Weeic Ended Sept. 7, 1917.' 





CHOLERA. 






Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India: 

Calcutta 


Jane 24-30 




12 
3 
4 

1 
4 
7 
1 




Do 


July 1-7 






Madras 


July 1-7 


6 




Ma'i'ialfty 


June 24-30. 




Pegu '. 


June 25-30 






Do 


July 1-7 








June 24-30 


1 




Java: 

West Java 




June 29-July 5, 1917: C^ses, 52: 
deaths, 25. July 6-12, 1917: 


Batevia 


June 2^July 5 

July 6-12. 


1 
2 




Do 













PLAGUE. 



BrasU: 

Bahia 


July»-21 


4 

1 

56 
33 
9 
1 
1 
2 
1 


1 




Ecuador: 

EstandaVieja.... 


Feb. 1-28 




G uayaquil 


do 


29 
18 
4 




1)0 


Mar. 1-31 




Do 


Apr. 1-30 




MilaiiTO 


Mar. 1-31 




To...::::::::;:;:;:::.: 


Apr. 1-30 


1 




Nobol 


Feb. 1-28 




Salitre 


do 






Do 


Mar. 1-31 


1 
2 




Taura 


Feb. 1-28 


3 





^ From medical officers of the Public Health Service^ American consuls, and other sources. 
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1465 



Beptember 7. 1017 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER. AND YELLOW FEVER— 

Continued. 

Reports Received During the Week Ended Sept/ 7, 1917— Continued. 
PLAGUE— Continued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. ' Remarks. 


Great Britain: 

Cravewnd 


Aug. ia-34 


3 


1 ' From S. S. Mati&na. 


India 




June 24-33, 1917: Cases. 1,4H2 


Basvin 


Juno 24-30 




1 

25 
2 
2 
58 
15 
16 
35 
42 


denths. 1,002. July 1-7. 1917: 
Cases, 1,870; deaths, 1,322. 


Do 


July 1-7 






Romljay 


do 


36 




Ucniada • ..... 


Juno 25-30 




Karachi 


June 2a-July 4 

July 1-7 


. 3 
70 




Madras Presidency 

Moulmcin 




June 17-30 




Do 


July 1-7 






Rancoon 


Juno 24-30 

July 1-7 


40 
46 

1 
9 




tS^ 




straits Settlements: 
Sin^pore 


do 




Atfea '. 


July 14-18 


6 i 8. 8. Ifatlana en route for nort of 








London. 



SMALLPOX. 



Brasil: 

Bahia 

China: 

Amoy 

Chungking.. 

Dairen 

Mukdrn 

.^hinghai 

Etuador: 

Guayaquil . . 

oo.![;.*: 

AlcKandria.. 

(^iro 

Do 

India: 

Bombav . . . 

Karachi 

Ifadras 

Itancoon 

T)o 

Java: 

East Java... 

Mid-Java.... 

West Java.. 



Batevia 

Mexico: 

Vera Crur 

Philippine Islands: 

Manila 

Portnnl: 

Lisbon 

Russia: 

Archangel 

BfNdn: 

Malaga. 

Valencia 

Venezuela: 

Maracaibo 



July 22-28. 



Jtme 
July 
July 
July 
July 



17-33. 
Jt-14. . . 
8-28... 
22-28.. 
2-29... 



Feb. 
Mar. 
Apr. 

July 
Feb. 
Mar. 

July 
June 
July 
Jime 
July 

June 
June 



1-23.. 
1-31.. 
1-30.. 



23-29 

12- Mar. 4. 
5-18 



1-7 

28- July 4. 

17 

24-30 

1-7 



18- Julv 1. 
11-Julyl. 



June29-July5... 

Aug. 5-11 

July 8-21 

....do 

May 15- June 14 . 



Apr. 1-30.. 
July 2-2H. . 



July 17-2:J. 



36 



Present. 
Do. 

Present. 
Among Chinese. 



June 29- July 5, 1917: Cases, 33; 
deaths. 11. July 6-12, 1917: 
Cases, 9; deaths, 1. 



TYPHUS FEVER. 



China: 

Hankow I July 8-14 

^Iwcmndrla. I July 16-29 

CWro. -^ I Jan. 22-Mar. 18.... 



75 1 
96 I 



34 I 
40 I 



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CHOLERA, PLMHJfi, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FBVER, AND YELLOW FEYEB— 

Continued. 

Reports Received During the Weel( Ended S^t. 7, 1917— Continued. 
TYPHUS FEVER-Continued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Japan: 

Hakodate 


July 22-28 


1 

7 






Nagasaki 


July 23-Aug. 5 






Java: 

East Java 




June 2^ July 1, 1917: 1 case. 


Surabaya 


June 25-July 1 

June 11-24 


1 

7 




Mid-Java... 


1 




WcstJava 


1 


June 30-July 5, 1917: Cases, 4; 
July (>-12, 1917: Cases, 8. 


Batavia 


June2^Julyl2... 
May 15-June 14 . . . 


11 

7 




Russia: 

Archangel 


2 







YELLOW FEVER. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


R^narks. 


Ecuador: 

Babahoyo 

oaouiioyo.. .............. 


Feb. 1-28 


1 
2 
1 

18 
17 
17 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
7 
9 
9 






Mar. 1-31 




Chobo 


do 




tiuavaauil 


Feb. 1-28 




D^!^.:::. ..:::.::::. 


Mar. 1-31 




Do 


Apr. 1-30 . . 




• BiUagro 


Feb. 1-28 




X.::::::;::::::::::::: 


Mar.1-31 






Do 


Apr. 1-30 


1 











Reports Received from June 30 to Aug. 31, 1917. 

CHOLERA. 



Place. 


Date. 


.Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


India: 

Bassein 


Apr. 1-May5 




8 
1 
335 
4 
1 
3 
1 
1 
16 




Bombay 


June 24-30 

Apr. 29-June 9 


1 




Calcutta 




Madras 


Aj)r.22-June30... 
May6-12 


5 




Mandalav 




Mnultnfiiii • • . • 


May 13-June2 






Pakokku 


Apr. 20-May5 






Pegu 


May 27-June 2 .... 






Rangoon ,,-,--,-,.,..- r 


Apr. 21- June 9 


30 




Indo-Chma: 

Provinces 


Feb. 1-Mar. 31. 1917- Cases 61 


A naTT» . . , . r T - - r , . , . . . r , - 


Feb.i-Mar.31.... 
do 


6 
9 
44 
2 
163 

1 


i 

7 
32 


deaths, 40. 


Cambodia 




Cochin-China 


do 




Tonkin 


do 




SaiKon ^,, 


Apr.23-May27... 
Apr.^-« 


108 




K>CU5WU 

Java: 

East Java 




West Java 






Apr. 13- June 28, 1917: Cases, 19; 


Batavia 


Apr. 13-June28... 
Feb. 3... 


6 

1 
4 
1 
3 

1 


2 


deaths, G. 


Persia: 

AmirKela 




Barfourouche 


Jan. 15-17 






Hamze Kela. 


Jan. 17... . 






MA<rhidfx*«ftr . .....r 


Jan. 31 






Philippine Islands: 


Junel7-23 






Provinces 






May 20-June 30, 1917: Cases, 795; 


Albay 


May 20- June 30... 
July 1-7 


113 
2 
2 

1 


76 

1 
1 
1 


deaths, 506. 


Do-.....:::.::::::: 


JiUy 1-7, 1917: Owes, 315; deaths, 


Ambos Camarlnes 


June 3-9 


Batangas 


June 17-23 





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September 7, 19171 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TTFRUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER^ 

Oontinued. 



Reports Recehred ftrom June 90 to Aug. 31, 1917— Continued. 
CHOLBRA— Continued. 



Pteoe. 



Date. 



Cases. 



Deaths. 



Remarks. 



Philippine Islands— Continued. 
Frovinoes— Continued. 
BohoL 

Do 

Capi* 

Do 

Cebo. 

Do 

Uoik) 

I-eyte 

Do 

Negros Oriental 

Riial 

Do 

Sonc^n 

Do 

Tayabos 

Do 



May 2&-June30. 

July 1-7 

June 3-30 

July 1-7 

June 3-30 

July 1-7 

.-..-do 

June 10-30 

July 1-7 

do 

June 24^30 

July 1-7 

Jime3-30 

July 1-7 

do 

....do 



368 

66 

02 

19 

231 

54 

7 

14 

4 

4 

1 

1 

196 

82 

7 

1 



251 
45 
40 
15 
150 
38 
4 
5 
4 
4 



PLAGUE. 



Aniliia: 

Aden 


May 3-June 11 




38 
3 
33 


Apr. 8-May 14, 1917: Cases, 69; 
Seaths,6i. 


firuU: 

Bahia 


June 10-30 


6 
40 


Ceylon: 

Colombo ....*. 


Apr.8-June9 

Anr.29-May5 


• 


China: 

Amoy . ^ 


Present and in vicinity. 


Hom&rong 


Ifayl9-June30. .. 
July 1-7 


20 
6 


•1 


^0^ . :.::::: 




Kwangtnnf ProTlnoe— 
Pa-pndistriot 


JtiDe2 


Present 


Egypt.....^ 








Jan. 1-June 28, 1917: Cases, 564; 
deaths, 313. 


Alexandria. . . .. ........ 


June 21-27 

Apr.30-Mayl9.... 
Jtme25..... 


6 

4 

1 

14 

1 


4 
3 


Port Said government 

Port Said 


PioTiucea 

Fayum 


Mayll-June28... 
June 28 


7 




Oa!loabd) 






May 17 


1 
3 
1 

23 




i2Seh::::::::::::::::: 


Mayl2-June28... 
May 12. 


4 

3 
23 

38 

2 




Siout 




Suez government 


Apr.30-June2.... 
Mayl2-June28... 

May 3-8 




Suei 




Oreat Britain: 

London 


2 in hospital at port. From s. s. 

Sardinia from Atistralian and 

oriental ports. 
Apr. l^-June 30, 1917: Cases, 

42,440; deaths, 29,193. 


India. 






Bassein 


Apr. 1-Jnne2 




42 

363 

38 

33 

413 

250 

9 

59 

1 

2 

134 

2 


Bombay 


Apr.22-June30... 
Apr. 29-June 2 


441 


CaJcutU... 




Henzada.. 


Apr. 1-Mayl9 






KarachL 


Apr.22-June30... 
do 


468 
301 




Madras Presidency 




MandalAy 


Apr.8-Mayl2 




Mttiimehi . 


Apr. 1-June2 






Mylngyan. 


Apr. 1-7 






Pegu.7 


May27-June2 






Rangoon 


Apr. 15-June9.... 
Apr.8-14 


143 








Indo^toa: 

Provinces 






Feb. l-Mar. 31, 1917: Cases, 19S; 


Anam, 


Fcb.l-Mar.31.... 
.do 


72 
92 
33 
47 


39 
SO 
21 
26 


deaths, 141. 


Gtoibodia 




Coehln-China 


do 




Saigon 


Apr. 23-June3 





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1468 



CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEYER, AND YELLOW FEVER— 

Continued. 

Reports Receired fh>iii June 30 to Aug. 31, 1917— Oontiniied. 
FLAG UE— Ckintinued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Caaes. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Java: 

East Java 








Apr. 2-M^ 20, 1917: Cases, 2»: 


Dj-cJakarta Residency . 

Kediri Residency 

Samarang Residency. . . 
Surabaya 


Apr. 23-MayO 

do 

Apr. 23-May 20. . . 

Apr.2-May20 

.do 


1 
1 
3 
18 
6 


1 
1 
3 
18 
6 


Surakarta 




Peru 




May 16-31, 1917: Cases, 15. 


Departments— 

Arcquipa 


May 16-31. 


4 
1 
2 
7 

1 

12 
4 

2 




At MoUendo. 


Callao 


do 




AtCallao. 


Lambayeque 


do 

do 




At Chidayo. • 


Libertad 






Lima 


do 




Tnijiiio. " 
At Lima. 


Siam: 

Bangkok 


Apr. 22-June2 

Juiya-23 


11 
3 

1 




^0 .::::::::::::::::::: 




straits Settlements: 

Singapore 


Juno 3-16 




Union of §outh Africa: 

Cape of Good Hope State— 

Glengrcy district 

Terkadistrlct 


Aug. 13 


Present. 


May28 


1 
1 


1 


At Summerbill Farm. 


Queonstown 


June 6 




Orange Free State 






Apr. 16-22, 1917: 1 case: Apr.9-a, 
1917: Cases, 26; deaths, 17. 


Wlnburg district 


May 28 




1 









SMALLPOX. 



Australia: 

New Sonth Wa'.es 

Brewarrina 

Coonabarabran 

Quambone 

W arrenili Jtrkt 

Queensland- 
Thursday Island Quar- 
antine Station. 



Brazil: 

Bahia 

RiodeJaneiro 

Do 

Canada: 

MaiMtoba— 

Winnipeg 

Nova Scitia— 

Halilax 

Port Hawkcsbury. 
Ontario — 

Ottawa 

Ceylon: 

Colorabo 

China: 

Amoy 

Antune 

Chungking 

Do , 

Changsha 

Dairen 

Do 

Hankow 

Harbin 

Honglcong 

Manchuria Station 

Mukden 

Do , 

Shanghai 



Apr. 27-June 21 . 
May2.VJuly5... 
Apr. 27-June 21 . 
June 22- July 5.. 

May9 



May d-June30.. 

do 

July 1-14 



June 10-16 

June IH- July 7.. 
June 17-30 



July 30- Aug. 5.. 
May(>-12 



Apr.20-May26.. 
May 21-June 24 . 
May 6-June 23 . . 

July 1-7 

May 27-June 2.. 
May 13-June 30. 

July 1-7 

June 24-30 

Apr. 23 May 6... 
May H-Juno 16.. 
Apr. 23-29....... 

May 27-June 2 . . 

JulyR-21 

May21-July 1... 



4 
126 
50 



13 



32 



Apr. 27-July 5, 1917: Cases, 68. 



From s. s. St. Albans from Kobe 
via Hongkong. Vessel pro- 
ceeded to Townsville, Bris- 
bane, and Sydney, in quaran- 
tine. 



Present In district. 



Present and in vicinity. 

Present. 
Do. 



Do. 
On Chinese Eastern Ry. 

Do. 
Present. 

Do. 
Cases foreign; deaths among i 
tlves. 



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CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER— 

Continued. 

Reports Receired lirom June 90 ito Aug. 81, 1917— Continued. 

SMALLPOX-Oontinued. 



Pter«. 



China—Continued. 
Tsitshar Station.. 
Tsingtao 



C'bomn (Korea): 
Chemulpo.. 



Uexondria 

Do 

France: 

Pari* 

Germany 

Berlin 

Bremen 

Charlattenburg.. 

Hamburg 

Lelpiiij 

LObeck 



Munich 

Stuttjtart 

India: 

Bombay 

Calcutta , 

Karachi 

Madras , 

ft^mpwii 

Indo^niina: 

Provinces , 

Anam , 

Cambodia 

Cochin-Chlna 

Kwang-Chow-Wan. 
Tonkin 

Saijton 

Italv: 

Turin , 

Japan: 

Kobe 

Nagasaki 

Osaka 

Yokohama , 

Jav-a: 

East Java , 

Mid-Java 

We?t Java , 

Batavia 

Mexico: 

V«^»ft tk>n 

Mexico City 

Do » 

Monterey , 

Vera Crux 

PhiUppine Islands: 

Ptftugftl: 

Lbbon 

Portuguese East Africa: 

Letirenco Marques , 

Russia: 

Archangel 

Petrograd 

Riga 

Vladivostok 

Siam: 

Bangkok 

Spain: 

M«Wd 

Seville 



Do 

Straits Settlements: 

Pcnang 

Stngapore 



Date. 



Apr. 16-22 



^y22-July7.. 



Cases. 



May 1-31 

Apr.30-July 1 1 

July2-« 



May&-12.. 



Mar. IH^Apr. 2H. 

do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 

....do 



Apr. 22-Jiuio30... 
Apr.2»-May26....'. 
Apr. 22-Juno30...! 

do ; 

Apr. 15-June» 



106 
16 
18 
:iO 
20 

2 
10 

1 

163 



Feb. 1-Mar.31... 

do 

do 

Mar. 1-31 

Feb. 1-Mar. 31... 
Apr. 27-JunelO.. 

May21-June24.. 

May27-July22... 
May28-June8... 
Mayl6-July5.... 
May27-Julyl.... 



Apr. 2-Junel7.. 
Apr. l-JunelC. 



Apr. 13-Juxie 28. 

Julyll-Aug. 7.. 

June 3-30 

Aug. 6-11 

Junel&-24 

July 1-7 



May 13-June9.. 

May 13-June 30. 

Mar. 1-Apr.30.. 

May 1-June 28. . 
Feb. 18-June9.. 
Mar. lWune2.. 
Mar. 15-21 



June 9-23 

May 1-Junel9. 
May l-JunedO. 

June 3-23 

July 1-7 



Mar.l8-June23. 
Juno 24-30 



788 
73 

654 

2 

99 

199 

32 

66 

1 

177 

1 

29 
52 



162 
69 



23 
495 

4 



Deaths. 



63 
17 
158 



24 



Remarks. 



On Chinese Fastern Ry. 
At another station on railway, 
lease. 



Mar. IH-Apr. 2K, 1917: Ca^es. 7i:» 
in cities and 32 States and dis- 
tricts. 



Feb. l-Mar. 31, 1917: Case,, 1,010; 
deaths, 240. 



Apr. 13-June 28, 1917: Ca5^s, 20ft; 
deaths, 33. 



Varioloid. 



Jan. l-Mar. 31, 1917: Cases, 9. 



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CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX. TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER- 

Continued. 

Reports Reeeiyed from June 30 to Aug. 31, 1917— Continued. 
SMALLPOX-<»ntinued. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Sweden: 

MftlmO r . r - - 


Apr.22-28 

Kay 20-June23... 

June 3-R 


1 
2 

2 






Stockholm 


1 




Tunisia: 

Tunis . . r . , . r r r - r 




Turkey in Asia: 

Trebizond 


Feb. 25- Apr. 13... 


15 




Union of South Africa: 

TnhnnfUMhiinr 


Mar.12-24 

May 1-31 


4 

2 




Uruguay: 

MontevldM 






Venezuela: 

Marm^bo 


June 1&-July 8 . . . 


8 











TYPHUS FBVER. 



Place. 


Date. 


Cases. 
5 


Deaths. 


Remarks. 


Algeria: 

Algiers. 


June 1-30 


3 




Austria-Hungary: 

Austria 




Oct. 22-Dcc. 17, 1«16: Cases, 2^1 


Bohemia . . 


Oct.22-Dec.l7.... 
do 


634 
809 

47 
617 

15 

243 

5 


.::::::::: 




<?a1icia 






Lower Austria 


.do 






Moravia 


do 






Silesia 


do 






Styria 


do 






Upper Austria .... 


do 






Hungary ..^ 






Feb. 19-Mar. 25, 1917: Cases, l^L 


Budfapest 


Feb. 19-Mar. 25... 

June25-July 1 

July 9-22 


83 

3 

4 
1 

1 
4 

1,648 
145 






Cliina: 

Antuug 






Do 


1 




Hankow . . . '. 


Juno 9- 10 




Tientsin 


Juno 17-23 

May30-July7 

Apr. 30- July 1.... 
July 17-23 

June 17-23 






Tsingtao 






Alexandria, r ^ . . , 


478 
50 

32 
10 




Do 




Great Britain: 

Cork 




Greece: 

Saloniki 


May 13- June 30. .. 






Do 


July 1-14 




Japan: 

Nagasaki 


June 11-24 

July 9-22 


4 
12 

5 

7 

14 




^dT 


1 




Java: 

East Java 


May 6-Juiiol7 

Apr. 1-30 




Mid-Java 


2 
2 


May 5-10, 1917: Cases, 24; deaths, 


Samarang 


Mtty5-Junol0 


2. 


West Java 


Apr. 13-Juue 21, 1917: Cases m* 


Batavia 

Mexico: 

Mexico Citv 


Apr. 13-MaylO... 
June3-30 


60 

431 

324 

3 
3 

6 

1 

4 

126 

2 

5 


•6 


deaths ,6. 


Do.. _:;.;:::::::::::: 


July i>- Aug. 11 

June 9-23 






Nelherlands: 

UoUerdam 


2 




Do 


July 15-30 

July ^14 




Norway: 

BcrKcn 






Portuguc'c East Africa: 

LoureiHO Marques 


Mar. 1-31 






Russia: 

Archangel 


. 
Mayl-Juno28.... 

Feb. 1H-June9 

May31-Junc2 

Mar. 29-May 21 . . . 






Pet rograd 

Riga 

Vladivostok 


3 


Jan. 1-31, 1917: lease. 








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CHOLERA, PLAGUE, SMALLPOX, TYPHUS FEVER, AND YELLOW FEVER— 

Continued. 

Reports Received from June 30 to Aug. 31, 1917 — C'Ontiuued. 
TYPHUS PEVER-Continuod. 



Place. 


1 Date. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Rcmorks. 


Spain: 
Almwia 


1 
1 Mavl-31 




5 
2 




Madrid 


....!do 






Switierland: 

Basel 


1 June 17-23 

i JulyJi-21 

' Junc4-9 


1 
3 
2 




Do 

Trinidftd 


1 




Taniiia: 

Tunis 


June30-July6 


1 













YELLOW FEVER. 



Mexico: 

Yucatan ,Statc — 
Peto 



Juno 23 

July 2g- Aug. 11... 



In perspn recently arrived fr<te 
MexeioCiiy. 



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PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS 



VOL. 32 SEPTEMBER 14, 1917 No. 37 



DYSENTERY OUTBREAK IN KENTUCKY. 

By John McMullen, Surgeon, United States Public Health Service. 

Pursuant to telegraphic orders of August 27, 1917, to investigate 
an outbreak of suspected dysentery in Breathitt County, I left Lex- 
ington on the morning of the 28th, and proceeded to Jackson. 

On the morning of August 29 I went to Oakdale, a distance of 
miles from Jackson. From there I rode on horseback to the home 
of Mr. M. on War Creek, a distance of about 5 miles, and ascer- 
tained from him that there had probably been about 25 to 30 cases 
of what is described locally as '^flux". The history, as obtained 
from the patients and their neighbors, there being no physicians in 
attendance on practically any of the cases, is that the patients were 
attacked suddenly with severe diarrhea, sometimes accompanied 
with chill and vomiting, and severe tenesmus, succeeded shortly by 
the passage of blood and mucus described by them as ^'jelly'' and 
blood. Some fever was present at the onset, but the patients soon 
became cold and clammy. 

At the time of my visit tliove wore only a few cases in existence, 
as the majority had died, and as stated by the citizens of the com- 
munity the disease appeared to have lessened. It appears that 
the entire outbreak in this community was confined to a radius of 
about 3 mUes, near the mouth of War Creek, and on Rock Lick 
Creek on the north fork of the Kentucky River, and about 12 miles 
below Jackson. Practically none of these cases were attended by 
physicians, and I was therefore imable to gain any information 
from the physicians in regard to the present epidemic. However, 
I am informed by Dr. Bach, of Jackson, Ky., that a very similar 
outbreak occurred last summer up the north fork of the Kentucky 
River from Jackson about 20 miles, at a community called Crocketts- 
ville, and on Long Branch which empties into the River at Crocketts- 
ville. 

I am also informed by Dr. Bach that he has learned on very 
reKable authority that this Long Branch neighborhood has, within 

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September 14, 1917 1474 

the past month or two, had a large number of cases of this same 
trouble, which is termed '^flnx'' by the local community, and that 
18 deaths have already occurred. During the epidemic on Long 
Branch last summer there were about 20 deaths, a majority of the 
cases, according to Dr. Bach, proving fatal. 

It appears that the first case in the War Ci'eek neighborhood 
occurred about June 25 of tliis year in the family of Rev. W. M., a 
local minister. In conversation with Mr. M., he informed me that 
his child, about 2 years of age, was taken sick on or about June 25, 
with aU the symptoms of dysentery which he observed in aU the 
subsequent cases. 

The family of Mr. M. consists of about 13 members, and five 
other cases occurred immediately after that of the small child, who 
died in nine days from the onset of the disease. Mr. M. further in- 
formed me that he had seen every case of the disease which had 
occurred, and in every case the patient was taken sick in the same 
manner, with precisely the same symptoms, and about every other 
one died in from a week to 10 days after the onset. 

He further informed me that his family had used the water from a 
spring, situated practically in the creek bed, for drinking purposes 
and he feds confident that this is the cause of the sickness in his 
family. All of the other families in which the sickness occurred had bad 
drinldng-water suppUes, many of which were springs similar to the 
one used by Mr. M., and the wells were shallow and polluted from the 
stream. Since the death of his baby he has prepared a well on the 
hillside and suflBiciently deep to supply good drinking water. 

The next group of cases which occurred was among neighbors of 
Mr. M., and of the same name. They visited the minister during the 
sickness in his family and several of their children promptly con- 
tracted the disease and some of them died. One boy about 11 
years of age died the day previous to my visit. Visiting and assist- 
ing in caring for the sick are customs in the mountains, and the 
neighbors visited and assisted at all of the cases. 

I visited two of the patients who were sick at the time of my visit 
to Breathitt County. One was a woman about 40 years of age, 
who was recovering after an illness of about a week, and the other 
was an elderly woman about 60 years of age. This patient had 
considerable prostration, no fever, constant desire to go to stool, at 
which time only mucus and blood was passed. A specimen of tiiis 
was collected and forwu*ded to the Hygienic Laboratory for exami- 
nation. This patient had been ill about five days. The tongue was 
red, rather dry, and the prognosis was imf avorable. 

In the opinion of a nnmber of people with whom I talked this is 
not an imcommon infection in the moimtains during the months of 

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1475 September 14. 1017 

July and August, and it has been usually a fatal disease. The 
locality affected in the neighborhood of War Creek is a sparsely 
settled one, with a total of possibly 25 houses, and the majority 
of these had cases of the disease. A widow and her three sons all 
contracted the disease and all the boys died. 

A tentative diagnosis of bacillary dysentery was made pending 
receipt of the findings of the specimen submitted to the laboratory. 
In addition to the polluted drinking water used by practically all of 
flie families there is an entire absence of hygiene, and they all live 
under the most imsanitary conditions. 

In addition to this there are swarms of flies everywhere, particu- 
larly on the dining tables at the time of meals. No precaution, with 
the possible exception of occasionally burying the stools, is taken to 
prevent the flies having access, the stools being emptied not very far 
from the house. The flies, therefore, have access to the stools and to 
the dining tabl^ during meals. It is therefore not a very difficult 
task to ascertain how the disease is spread. 

The local registrar (Mr. T. L. M.) was absent from his home at the 
time of my visit and I was therefore unable to see him, but the local 
minister, Mr. M., I bcUeve probably has more definite information 
than anyone whom I was able to interview, and he states that there 
were 13 deaths and about 30 cases. 

One patient, the son-in-law of Mr. J. M., on War Creek, whom I 
visited, was sick for a number of weeks, and his case was diagnosed 
by his physician as typhoid fever. This diagnosis appears to be 
accepted by the community. 

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A NEW WATER SAMPLE SHIPPING CASE. 

WTTH SOMJI OBSBRTATIONS ON THK CHANGBS THAT TAKK WhACM DC nOKBD 
SAMPLES OF WATEB. 

By R. R. BmrcxB, Assistant SorfeoB, and H. P. Lnrov, Sanitary Kwginatr, Uatad Stataa 

Public Health Service. 

vShortly after the establishment of the laboratory of the sanitarf 
district of the Great Lakes at Chicago in 1915, it was found that for 
the proper carrying on of the work of this district it would be neces- 
sary to ship water samples from points as far away as Buf!ak>, N. Y*^ 
and Duluth, Minn. This necessitated a shipping case whii^ would 
maintain the samples at a low temperature for a period of at leAsi 
48 hours. 

Information was obtained from several State boards of health as 
to the type oi shipping case used by them and the results obtained 
therefronL It was found that most of the cases in use were co»- 
stnkcted of wood and insulated with hair felt. The majority ol them 
would not hold a sufl&eient amount of ice to keep the samples below 
10° C. for 48 hours. Furthermore^ as a general rule, they were not 
designed to hold more than two 4-ounce sample bottles or four 
2-oimce sample bottles. The only case which would maintain a low 
temperature for the requisite time was patented, and the main 
objection to this case was that it was designed to hold only four 
2-ounce sample bottles. 

The work to be carried on at the Chicago laboratory consisted 
largoly of bacteriological examinations of samples of water collected 
from lake vessels, and it was important that a considerable number 
of these samples bo collected from the larger ports during the few 
months during which navigation was at its maximiun intensity. 
It was therefore evident that a shipping case to answer the purpose 
should be' capable of holding at least eight 4-ounce sample bottles, 
and should have a sufficient ice capacity to maintain them at a tem- 
perature of not more than 10® C. for 48 hours. 

With these requirements in mind, a case was designed which has 
proved entirely satisfactory. 

The experience of other laboratories using wooden cases showed 
that these cases went to pieces rather rapidly undor the severe hau- 
ling received from express companies. It was therefore deemed ad- 
visable to (le.^ign a case wholly of metal which would stand up imder 
the s(^vero traffic conditions to which it would be subjected. A 

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SeptoinlK I- 14, 1017 



study of insulating materials showed that pressed rorkboard would 
provide the greatest amount of insulation with the least, amwuit of 
space. 

Tho details of constructii)n as finally worked out are us follows: 
The CJ180 is construct<?d of 'XJ'ivanized iron with presided eork])oard 
insulation. The outside of (he lave is made of 20-gauge galvanized 
iron and measures 15 inches in length, 8 inches in width, and 13 
inchc*s in depth. Tho pressed corkhoai'<l is 1 inch in tliickness and 
is inclosed within an inncn- lining of •i4-gauge galvanized iron, which 
make^ a water-tight joint with the outer casing. Tho inside dimen- 
sions arc 1 inch less than the outside dimensions. Tho insulated 
^^^/■^ 



^ 






T 



\ I.. 



^jB4<y/^ 






<«Vc''/- 



v^- 



/J - 



'i 



/^sff^ C0r/r^i!wr</ 



FiGUEE 1. 

tapering cover of the dimensions shown in figure 1 drops into the 
inside of the case. Over this cover fits a second cover of 22-gaugc 
galvanized iron, hinged on one side and with a padlock hasp on the 
other. This outside cover is wired entirely aroimd its lower edge to 
stiffen it. Within the outside case, held in place by a circular band 
of galvanized iron, is a second can. This can is made of 26-gauge 
galvanized iron, is 5 inches in diameter and 10 inches in depth. It 
has a slip cover, the sides of which are 2 inches in depth. The de- 
tailed dimensions and form of construction are shown in figures 1 
and 2. On each end of tho case is riveted a heavy piece of strap iron 
tJirough which is inserted a rope handle. This handle makes the 

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September 14, 1917 



1478 



case convenient to carry (see fig. 3). The inside can is jxist larg» 
enough to hold eight. 4-ounce ground-glass stoppered sample bottfes 
in two layers of four each. 

As ordinarily shipped out, in the inner can are placed the eight 
bottles, protected from breakage by paper or cotton. Outside of the 






1, 



lj>fjj^ (/y^M^an/;- 



'A^i 



^ ::-v- 



FiouKX a. 

bottle can are placed eight descriptive blanks and eight manila en- 
velopes, together with a shipping tag for the return of the case to the 
laboratory (see fig. 4). 

When the sample is collected the descriptive blank is filled out and 
placed with the bottle in one of the envelopes, which is then placed 

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Public Health Reports. September 14, 1917. 




FIG. 3.— PHOTOGRAPH OF CASE. 




FIG. 4-— PHOTOGRAPH OF CASE AND CONTENTS AS SHIPPED OUT FROM 

LABORATORY. 



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] 479 September 14, 1017 

within the inner can. The space around this can is filled with broken 
ice and requires about 13 pounds to completely fill the case. 

Numerous tests have shown that the case will maintain eight 
4-ouuco samples at a tempenUuro below 10** C. for a period of 48 hours. 

The shape of the inner can is such that instead of the eight 4-ounce 
bottles, a Uter bottle can bo (»asily packed within it. 

The first 25 cases purchas< <l in 1915 cost complete $6.50 each. A 
similar lot purchased in 1917 cost $8 each, the additional cost being 
due to increases in the cost of galvanized iron. 

In designing a shipping case, the importance of accomplishing the 
bacteriological examination of drinking water at the time of collec- 
tion was fully appreciated. Immediate analysis, however, is not 
always practicable. In fact, at the present time a large proportion 
of all samples are not analyzed at once but are shipped to a central 
laboratory, either city or State. In order to minimize the bacterial 
change, all such samples should, of course, be well packed in ice. 
There is no doubt that this chilling process greatly lessens the prob- 
ability of an erroneous interpretation, but, on the other hand, it is 
a well-known fact that the results are not entirely dependable, es- 
pecially when the analysis is to be delayed a period of 24 hours or 
longer. 

In the above connection, the 1917 issue of the ''Standard Methods 
of Water Analysis" of the American Public Health Association gives 
the following directions: ''The time allowed for storage or transpor- 
tation of a bacterial sample between the filling of a sample bottle and* 
the beginning of the analysis should bo not more than six hours for 
impure waters and not more than 12 hours for relatively pure waters. 
During the period of storage the temperature shall be kept as near 
10® C. as possible. Any deviation from the above limits shall be so 
stated in making reports." 

A knowledge of the changes that take place both in the total count 
and the B. coli content of waters when kept for various lengths of 
time under different conditions is certainly a matter of great im- 
portance. 

The results of Whipple's experiments to determine the changes in 
total count that take place in stored waters caused him to draw the 
following conclusions: "After the collection of a sample in either a; 
large or a small bottle, there is a slight reduction in the number of- 
colonies that can be obtained uj>on the gelatin plate, due apparently] 
to the effect of changed environment upon the bacteria present. 
This re<luction is perhaps somewhat greater when a small volume oft 
water is collected, as its temperature change is naturally more rapid. 
The subsequent growth takes place more rapidly when the bottle is 

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September 14, 1017 1480 

but partialiy filled than ^en it is completely full. With bottles of 
the same size the growth is more rapid in small vdumes of water 
tiian in large v<dumes. The explanation of this is not wholly dear^ 
but undoubtedly the supply of oxygen is an important factor, and it 
is probably the controlling factor." In his experiments the changes 
in coli content were not considered. 

Jordan and Irons have shown that considerable changes take place 
in the total count of ice-packed samples, even within a few hours, 
and state that ''The initial temperature determines to a lai^e extent 
the course of events. * * * The influence of ice packing upon 
such colon bacilli as may be present in polluted water does not 
appear to be injurious. We have not been able to observe any 
marked disappearance of B, c<ili, either in ice-packed waters or in 
those maintained at a higher temperature during a period such as 
may ordinarily lapse during transportation." In a later publication 
Jordan states that ''Our own experiments are too few in number to 
warrant generalization, but so far as they go, they indicate that no 
material change occurs in ice-packed samples within 48 hours, a 
period longer than that usually consumed in transportation." 

Since the work of this district required long periods of storage, 
investigations were carried on to determine just what changes actually 
occurred in the bacterial content of the water. Observations were 
tabidated on some 30 series of water samples which contained or 
were inoculated artificially with strains of B. coK. The organisms 
selected for inoculation were obtained by fishing characteristic 
colonies from Endows medium. 

The three tables given below are in some d^ree typical of the 
results in ail cases. However, the oondusions are based cm the 
entire smes. 

Table No. 1. 

A portion of a colony of B. coli was emulsified in 10 cubic centi- 
meters of normal salt solution, and 1 liter of sterile distilled water was 
inoculated with 2 drops of this emulsion. The water was then 
thoroughly shaken to give an even distribution of the organisms and 
apportioned in