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Full text of "Public ledger almanac"

UNIVERSITY 


, 


OF PITTSBURGH 




LIBRARIES 




Xrw^\ PAR. RM. 
I ^S£jAY67 
^^^^ P5P82 

1897/1903 




THIS BOOK PRESENTED BY 




Dr. Samuel P. Hays 








■ 


' 





Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of Pittsburgh Library System 



http://www.archive.org/details/publicledgeralma18971903phil 



r 

PUBLIC LEDGER CALENDAR 


FOR 1897. 


w.\ 


s. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


S. 


17. 


s. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


T. 


F. 


S. 


Jan. 












1 

8 


2 
9 


July 










1 

8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


4 


5 


6 


7 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


Feb. 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


■ 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


• • • • 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Aug, 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


~ 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


Mar. 


28 

• • • • 

7 














Sept. 


29 


30 


31 










1 

8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 
13 


1 

8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 


6 


7 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


April 


28 


29 


30 


31 








Oci. 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


1 


2 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


May 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


• • • • 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 














1 

8 


Nov. 


31 

• • • • 














2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25: 


26 


27 


June 


30 
6 


31 

•7 












Dec, 


28 


29 


30 










1 

8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


1 

8 


2 

• 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 


6 


7 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




19 


20 


21 


22! 


23 


24 


25 





27 


28 


29 


30 










26 


27, 


28 


29 


30 31 


• • • • 



PUBLIC LEDGER BRANCH OFFICES FOR RECEIVING ADVERTISEMENTS. 

FREE MESSENGERS AND FREE BOXES. 



For the convenience of Ledger advertisers. Branch Offices of the Ledger have been estab- 
lished in all parts of the city and Camden, where "Marriages" and "Deaths," "Boarding," 
" Wants," and other small advertisements will be received at the regular rates of the Ledger, the 
same as at the Main Office, Sixth and Chestnut streets. Subscriptions to the Ledger also received. 
Boxes for answers to advertisements FREE at all Ledger Offices. The Branch Offices follow : 



CENTRAL. 

Girard Building, Broad and Chestnut sts., A. D. T. Co. 

S. E. Cor. Broad and Chestnut sts., W. U. T. Co. 

1403 Filbert St., Charles Leedom. 

1122 Market St., A. D. T. Co. 

106 S. Eighth St., A. D. T. Co. 

Cor. Eighteenth and Market sts., Campbell & Bro. 

Cor. Eighth and Wood sts., A. D. T. Co. 

S. W. Cor. Tenth and Chestnut sts., W. U. T. Co. 

307 Walnut St., W. U. T. Co. 

Bullitt Building, Fourth ab. Walnut sts., W. U. T. Co. 

S. W. Cor. Front and Chestnut sts., W. U. T. Co. 

Front and Vine sts., W. U. T. Co. 

334 N. Third St., W. U. T. Co. 

Dock st. Market, W. U. T. Co. 

807 Vine St., W. U. T. Co. 

529 Arch St., W. U. T. Co. 

2040 Market St., W. U. T. Co. 

Twentieth and Ann, bel. Locust St., W. U. T. Co. 

Third and Chestnut sts., W. U. T. Co. 

Windsor Hotel, A. D. T. Co. 

Betz Building, A. D. T. Co. 

1031 Chestnut St., A. D. T. Co. 

Fifteenth and Market sts., A. D. T. Co. 

Twentieth and Cherry sts., Charles Leedom. 

UP-TOWN. 

S. E. Cor. Seventh and Oxford sts., J. H. Stermer. 

N. E. Cor. Seventeenth and York sts., F. M. Apple. 

Cor. Eighteenth and Vine sts.. Dr. P. Fitch. 

Cor. Thirtieth and Diamond sts., H. C. Comp & Co. 

Cor. Richmond and Somerset sts., Edward W. Sharp. 

2258 Richmond St., W. U. T. Co. 

2457 Kensington ave., F. A. Lewis. 

2508 Kensington ave., near Cumberland, A. D. T. Co. 

N. E. Cor. Second and Poplar sts., A. D. T. Co. 

Cor. Frankford av. and Jefferson sts. C. H. Dwyer, M.D. 

1630 N. Second St., Postal Tel. Cable Co. 

Cor. Fifth and Cumberland sts., J. H. Vogelbach. 

2602 Germantown ave., Wm. K. Mattern, Jr. 

Cor. Fourth st. and Girard ave., C. G. Ivins. 

Cor. Ninth and Spring Garden sts., F. S. McCartney. 

Cor. Twelfth and Columbia ave., J. R. Elfreth. 

1415 Columbia ave., A. D. T. Co. 

685 N. Broad St., A. D. T. Co. 

Nineteenth st. and Fairmount ave., A. F. Merrell & Co. 

1923 Callowhill St., A. D. T. Co. 

Cor. Ridge ave. and Oxford St., H. F. Rhoads. 

Cor. E. Girard ave. and Palmer St., Wm. H. Faunce. 

854 N. Tenth St., H. C. C. Maisch. 

2621 Girard ave., John M. Ruegenberg. 

Cor. Nineteenth and Norris sts., Burnett Pharmacy. 

Cor. Columbia ave. and Twenty-sixth St., Eberly Bros. 

2235 Columbia av., Steltz & Co. 

2230 N. Front St., George B. Evans. 

Cor. Fifth and Glenwood ave., J. Howard Evans, M.D. 

Broad and Girard ave., W. H. Laubach, Jr. 

Thirteenth and Diamond sts., Ira Park Amick. 

Seventh and Diamond sts., H. C. Haring. 

S. E. Cor. Third and George sts., H. Edward Wendell. 

220 Vine St., E. Jungmann. 

N. E. Cor. Sixth and Green sts., E. Jungmann. 

S. W. Cor. Fourth and Noble sts., E. Jungmann. 

1207 N. Second St., W. U. T. Co. 

1921 N. Second St., W. U. T. Co. 

Cor. Nineteenth and Hamilton sts., W. U. T. Co. 

1913 Ridge ave., W. U. T. Co. 

Broad and Montgomery ave., W. U. T. Co. 

987 N. Ninth st., A. D. T. Co. 

Twenty-third and Ridge av., A. D. T. Co. 



DOWN-TOWN. 

Twentieth and Dickinson sts., McFadden's Pharmacy. 

Cor. Passyunk ave. and Moore St., E. D. McNair & Bro. 

Cor. Twelfth and Christian sts., F. G. Remig. 

Cor. Twentieth and Locust sts., A. D. T. Co. 

Christian and Twenty-fifth sts., W. L. Matthews. 

Cor. Twentieth and South sts., Charles W. Watson. 

Cor. Eighth and Federal sts., S. W. Gadd. 

Cor. Second and Catharine sts., L. A. Dix. 

Cor. Third and Chestnut sts., A. D. T. Co. 

Cor. Sixteenth and Tasker sts., John P. Frey. 

N. E. Cor. Sixth and Dickinson sts., George D. Blomer. 

1514 S. Tenth St., J. P. Frey. 

133 S. Second St., VV. U. T. Co. 

1114 S. Fifth St., W. U. T. Co. 

1402 Washington ave., W. U. T. Co. 

N. W. Cor. Twenty-third and Washington av. , A. D.T.Co. 

WEST PHILADELPHIA. 

Cor. Thirty-third and Chestnut sts., Charles P. Kirby. 

Cor. Forty-ninth and Woodland ave., George E. Dahis. 

Fifty-first and Willow av., Chas. G. Miller. 

3962 Market St., A. D. T. Co. 

4043 and 4045 Market St., Wm. J. Jenks. 

Cor. Lancaster ave. and Fortieth St., J. R. Smyser. 

929 N. Forty-first St.. W. A. Rumsey. 

Thirtieth and Market sts., A. D. T. Co. 

Lancaster av. and Fortieth St., A. D. T. Co. 

Cor. Thirty-second and Powelton ave., R. McFadden. 

Thirtieth and Chestnut sts., W. U. T. Co. 

3805 Market st., W. U. T. Co. 

Cor. Lancaster and Westminster aves., Henry Mueller. 

Cor. Lancaster and Girard aves., E. A. Perrenot. 

RISING SUN. 

3412 Germantown ave., Max Sonntag. 

TIOGA. 

Twentieth and Tioga sts., Van Dyke Bros., Tioga Phar. 

GERMANTOWN. 

Association Hall, 5021 Main St., B. B. Lister. 

Cor. E. Chelten ave. and Chew st., Alfred H. Bolton. 

8 W. Chelten ave., W. U. T. Co. 

5139 Germantown av., W. H. Galbraith. 

CHESTNUT HILL. 

Main st. opp. Bethlehem Pike, J. H. Withrow. 

WISSAHICKON. 

Ridge ave., W. W. Kneeshaw. 

MANAYUNK. 
Cor. Main and Cotton sts., Harry H. Anderson. 

FRANKFORD. 

4339 Frankford ave., W. U. T. Co. 

Lit's Central Pharmacy, Frankford av. and Sellers st. 

DARBY. 

Cor. Main and Ninth sts., Harlan Cloud. 

TACONY. 

Opposite the Bank, F. W. Jordan. 

NEW JERSEY.— CAMDEN. 

Cor. Fifth and Federal sts., G. M. Beringer. 

311 Federal St., Postal Tel. Cable Co. 

Cor. Third st. and Kaighn's ave., R. I. Haines. 

ATLANTIC CITY. 

Atlantic Review Office, Atlantic ave., John G. Shreve. 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Morning News Office, 511 Market st. 



Advertisements to be inserted in the Ledger should be left at Branch Offices by 7 p.m. 
Every office of the American District Telegraph Company is included in the above list. 

These offices are open day and night. 
If you have an American District Telegraph instrument in your house or office, you can 

call an A. D. T. messenger to take your advertisement without extra charge. You 

pay only for your ad. — not for the messenger. 
Situations Wanted, Male and Female, only Ten Cents a Line any day. 
Boarding, Rooms and Apartments, Fifteen Cents a Line any day. 



-- -— J -—-'--—-' 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



First Month.] 



JANUARY. 



[1897. 



>~ s 






2»i 






I 
2 

3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 



9 9 

10 10 

11 11 

12 12 

13 13 

14 14 

15 15; 

16 16 

17 17 

18 18 

19 19 

20 20 1 

21(21 

22 22 

23 23 

24 24 

25 25 

26 26 

27 27 

28 28 

29 29 

3° 3° 
3 1 3 1 



F 

S 

s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 
F 

S 

s 

M 

Tu 
W 
Th 
F 

S 

s 

M 



MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 

d. h. tn. d. h. m. 

Q New Moon 313 a.m. O Full Moon 18 3 16 p.m. 

D First Quarter... 10 445 P.M. j d Last Quarter ...25 3 8 p.m. 



THE SUN, 
Philadelphia. 



Rises 

A.M. 
h.m. 
22 

22 
22 

22 
2 2 
22 
22 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
20 
20 
19 
19 

*9 



7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 1a 
Tu 7 18 
W [7 17 
Th' 7 
F 7 
S 7 
S | 7 
M 7 
Tut 7 



Souths 
p.m. 
tn. s. 

4 

4 

5 

5 

5 

6 

6 

7 

7 

8 



Sets 

P.M. 



w 

Th 

F 

S 

s 



7 
35 

3 
3° 
57 
23 
49 
M 
39 

3 
8 26 

8 49 

9 12 
9 33 
9 54 

10 14 

10 34 
10 52 
10 

28 

44 
o 

12 15 
12 29 
12 42 

12 55 

13 7 
13 18 
13 28 
13 38 
13 46 



11 
11 
11 
12 



THE MOON, 
Philadelphia. 



THE TIDES, 
Philadelphia. 



46 

47 
48 

49 
49 
50 

5i 
52 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 

59 
o 
1 
2 

3 
4 
5 
6 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 

14 

15 

i6| 

17 
18 



Rises. 

A.M. 
h. tn. 



8 36 

9 7 
9 33 
9 57 

10 18 



10 39 

11 1 
11 26 

" 53 

26 

1 6 



11 

o 
1 
2 
3 
3 
4 
5 
5 
6 

.7 



56 

4 
16 
29 

39 



Souths; Sets. 

A.M. P.M. 
h. tn. h. tn. 
10 30 2 

33 
33 

28 

r 9 

5 

47 , 

28 10 48 

gin 

49 

3 2 
17 
8 5' 

8 56 

9 49 j 

10 44 ; 

11 39 



8 44 

9 47 

48 

A.M. 
O 48 



8 33 

9 45 
10 56 

A.M. 

o 

I 

2 



A.M. 

o 32 



9 

24 
39 
49 
53 

47 

3° 



23 
11 



4 3 
5o 
5i 
49 
45 
38 
14 
5o 
8 20 

8 47 

9 x 3 
9 37 



59 
47 
35 !l ° .4 

5 26 10 34 

6 20 11 10 

7 r8.ii 

8 19 o 

9 20 1 

10 20 2 

11 16 4 



53 
46 

49 

57 

9 



fee 

«* 

d. 
28 
29 

o 

I 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 

J 3 
14 
15 
16 

17 

18 

*9 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 

27 

28 



A.M. 
h. tn. 



Hierh Tide. I Low Tide. 5^ 

P.M. I A.M. j P.M. ;S 

h. tn. h. tn. h. tn. ^ S 

13 7 " 6 -3 

987 5- 6 

5 

59 



8 27 

9 24 

10 18 

11 11 

11 

o 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
4 
5 
6 



59 
3 1 
13 
54 
3 2 
13 
54 
33 
24 
17 

7 18 

8 28 

9 4i 

10 49 

11 52 
o 32 



o 

I 
I 

2 

3 
4 

4 

5 28 

6 9 

6 53 

7 44 

8 42 

9 44 

10 43 

11 41 



6 
7 



o 

1 
2 
2 

3 
4 
4 
5 

6 

7 

9 
10 

11 



6 
o 

50 
38j 

22 1 9 5210 34 
6 10 43 11 18 
48 11 32 ... 

5 

2 

49 
37 
24 

13 

59 
47 



44 
29 



o 
o 
I 

2 

3 
3 

4 
5 

6 
6 
7 



7 
8 

8 59 5-7 

9 48 5-8 
5-8 
5-7 
5-6 

21 5-5 
9 5-3 

58 5-2 

47 5-° 

37 5-° 
29 5.0 

22 5.0 
13 S- 2 

3 5-3 



13 8 34 



56, 9 
36 10 



5i 5-4 
37 5-4 



22 

5 



5-7 

5-9 



8 10 47 6.0 



i6jio 59 11 32 6.1 

•• 5-9 
46 5-8 
46 5.6 



o 48 



59 " 5i 
47 ° J 

1 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 



39 

42 

o 

23 

37 



8 
59! 
47 1 
58 

59 j 

59 1 
571 



47 5-2 

5 1 5.o 

52 4-9 
54 5- 1 

53 5-2 
47 5-3 



Phenomena. 



d Apo.,nd. 3h. p.m. 
d Per., 24a. 22I1. p.m. 



8. II P.M. 
9.52 P.M. 

2. 11 P.M. 
0.41 P.M. 

II.OO A.M. 

2.21 P.M. 

6.23 P.M. 

8.25 P.M. 

I.07 P.M. 

9.16 P.M. 

I.36 P.M. 
I2.00 P.M. 

O.07 A.M. 
IO.28 P.M. 
II.25 A.M. 

8.42 P.M. 

6.00 P.M. 

2.50 P.M. 

9.27 A.M. 

8.12 P.M. 

4.13 P.M. 
IO.OO A.M. 

7.34 A.M. 
II. CO P.M. 
8.19 P.M. 
6.23 A.M. 
9.00 A.M. 
2.l6 A.M. 
9.O4 P.M. 
6.00 A.M. 
3.52 A.M. 



9 sets. 
o*S. 
cf rises. 

d 5 c 

$ gr. el. E. 

6 9 a 

sets. 
9 sets. 

inQ 
o"S. 
cf rises. 
$ stationary. 
9 stationary. 

6<f « 

9 sets. 
$ sets. 
TJ.S. 

9 rises. 
~1J. rises. 

6 In. 
hS. 

gr.H.LN 
cf S. 
$ rises. 

6h a 

^2 rises. 
9 sets. 
9 in ft 

6H 



ASTRONOMICAL 

Chronological Cycles. 

Dominical Letter C 

Epact 26 

Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number 17 

Solar Cycle 2 

Roman Indiction 10 

Julian Period 6610 

Signs of the Planets. 



The Sun. 
C The Moon. 

Mercury. 

Venus. 




9 



© or 5 The Earth. 



°P Aries. 
y Taurus, 
n Gemini. 
?3 Cancer. 
a Leo. 
TIP Virgo. 



J 1 Mars. 

^ Jupiter. 

*2 Saturn. 

(?) or 1$ Uranus. 

tJ7 Neptune. 

Signs of the Zodiac. 

£i Libra. 
1T( Scorpio. 
£ Sagittarius. 
]£p Capricornus. 
^X Aquarius. 
^ Pisces. 



INFORMATION, Etc. 

Aspects. 
(5 Conjunction, having the same"| Longitude or 
n Quadrature, differing 90 in >- Right As- 
g Opposition, differing 180 inj cension. 

Abbreviations. 

Q Ascending node. ° Degrees. 

, 9 T-, ,. , ' Minutes of arc. 

n Descending node. 

^ & h. Hours. 

N. North. S. South. m Minutes of time. 
E. East. W. West. s. Seconds of time. 



JANUARY. 

Mercury ($) very near the Moon (d) Jan- 
uary 4. 

Venus ( 9 ) near the Moon ( C ) January 6. 
Mars (cf ) near the Moon ( C ) January 14. 
Jupiter (Tj) near the Moon (d ) January 21. 
Mercury ( $ ) near the Moon ( fl ) January 31. 



PPfU 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Second Month.] 



FEBRUARY. 



[1897. 









MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 






-a 


s 

-a 
-*» 

C4-H 

O 


d. h. m. 


d. h. m. 








s 

-a 
*-* 

O 


% New Moon 1 3 12 p.m. 


O Full Moon 17 5 10 a.m. 




-a 
-*> 


D First Quarter... 9 2 23 p.m. 


d Last Quarter ...23 10 43 p.m. 


Phenomena. 





THE SUN, ! 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 






ad 




Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


® 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


1- 


d Apo., 8d. oh. p.m. 








A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


'-* 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


-&< 


dPer.,2od. 8h. a.m. 








h.m. 


m. s. 


h.tn. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


\d. 


h. m. 


A. }n. 


h. tn. 


/;. m. 


M 




3 2 


I 


M 


7 8 


13 54 


5 19 


7 5 


8 


5 19 


29 


1 21 


I 38 


7 51 


8 37 


5-4' 


eclip. vis. in Phila. 


33 


2 


lu 


7 7 


14 I 


5 20 


7 34 


56 


6 29 


1 


2 4 


2 22 


8 43 


9 23 


5 


5 


9.13 p.m. 9 sets. 


34 


3 


W 


7 


14 7 


5 21 


7 5« 


I 40 


7 3i 


2 


2 45 


3 3 


9 34 


10 6 


5 


5 


1 5.47 A.M. § rises. 


35 


4 


Ih 


7 5 


14 13 


5 23 


8 21 


2 22 


8 33 


3! 


3 24 


3 42 


10 21 


10 48 


5 


b 


j 7.47 P.M. cf b. 


36 


5 


V 


7 5 


14 17 


5 24' 


» 43 


3 3 


9 34 


4 


4 2 


4 18 


n 8 


11 29 


5 


5 


5.50 p.m. 6 9 a 

8.56 a.m. 9 rises. 


37 


b 


b 


7 4 


14 21 


5 25 


9 4 


3 44 


10 35 


5 


4 40 


4 55 


11 53 




5 


4 


3» 


7 


S 


7 3 


14 24 


5 27 


9 22 


4 26 


11 40 


6 


5 17 


5 29 


11 


39 


5 


3 


7.38 p.m. 0* b. 


39 


a 


M 


7 2 


14 26 


5 28 


9 53 


5 10 


A.M. 


7 


5 56 


b 7 


53 


1 24 


5 


2 


3.07 p.m. 9 S. 


40 


9 


lu 


7 1 


14 27 


5 29 


10 23 


5 5b 


O 3b 


8 


6 41 


6 53 


1 34 


2 12 


5 


1 


11.55 a.m. 0* rises. 


41 


10 


W 


6 59 


14 27 


5 3° 


n 


6 45 


1 37 


9 


7 34 


7 47 


2 18 


3 1 


4 


9 


0.10 p.m. cf rises. 


42 


11 


Th 


6 5« 


14 27 


5 3 1 


11 44 


7 37 


2 36 


10 


8 32 


8 52 


3 4 


3 53 


4 


8 


2.50 p.m. 3 0* a 


43 


12 


F 


b 57 


14 26 


5 33 


36 


8 31 


3 3 2 


11 


9 32 


10 


3 55 


4 45 


4 


8 


5.36 a.m. $ rises. 


44 


13 


b 


6 55 


14 24 


5 34 


1 36 


9 26 


4 23 


12 


10 31 


11 4 


4 46 


5 38 


5 





IO.28 A.M. $ b . 


45 


14 


S 


b 54 


14 21 


5 35 


2 45 


10 19 


5 7 


13 


11 25 


... 


5 39 


6 29 


5 


1 


1 0.53 p.m. % b. 


46 


15 


1V1 


b 53 


14 18 


5 37 


3 53 


11 12 


5 44 


14 


1 


16 


6 30 


6 18 


5 


2 


n.07 P - M - $ §T' ol. W. 


47 


10 


lu 


651 


14 14 


5 38 


5 5 


A.M. 


6 19 


15 


50 


1 04 


7 21 


8 4 


5 


5 


2.07 A.M. 9 g r - BL E. 


48 


17 


w 


b 50 


14 9 


5 39 


b 15 


O 2 


6 48 


ib 


1 32 


1 52 


8 11 


8 49 


5 


7 


7.I0 P.M. (j 1| d 


49 


10 


Ih 


6 48 


14 4 


5 40 


7 2 9 


O 52 


7 i.S 


17 


2 14 


2 3b 


9 1 


9 34 


5 


9 


9.3b p.m. 9 sets. 


5o 


19 


V 


b 47 


13 58 


5 41 


8 32 


I 40 


7 4o 


18 


2 55 


3 1 7 


9 5i 


10 17 


6 





4.00 p.m. r5 0* W 


5i 


20 


b 


b 4b 


13 5i 


5 42 


1 9 57 


2 3° 


8 7 


19 


3 37 


3 58 


10 42 


11 2 


b 





5.48 a.m. 1| rises. 


52 


21 


S 


b 45 


13 43 


5 43 


11 12 


3 22 


8 3 b 


20 


4 20 


4 4° 


11 3 6 


11 5i 


5 


9 


! 3.02 p.m. 9 b. 


53 


22 


M 


b 43 


13 35 


5 44 


A.M. 


4 ib 


9 " 


21 


5 6 


5 26 


34 




5 


6 


11. 21 a.m. cf rises. 


54 


23 


lu 


6 42 


13 27 


5 45 


O 29 


5 13 


9 52 


22 


5 57 


6 18 


42 


1 33 


5 


•3 


9.07 A.M. § 1| 


55 


24 


W 


6 40 


13 17 


5 4b 


I 41 


6 13 


10 42 


2.3 


b 58 


7 22 


1 3« 


2 32 


4 


9 


5-34 A.M. I7 b. 


56 


25 


Th 


b 3 « 


13 « 


5 48 


2 46 


7 i4 


11 42 24 


8 7 


8 43 


2 39 


3 34 


4 


7 


b.52 P.M. c? b. 


57 


26 


F 


b 37 


12 57 


5 49 


3 43 


8 13 


47 25 


9 21 


10 12 


3 4i 


4 34 


4 


■7 


4.00 a.m. ^stationary. 


5« 


2 Z 


b 


b 35 


12 4b 


5 5°: 


4 28 


9 10 


1 57 26 


10 32 


11 23 


4 43 


5 33 


4 


8 


3.00 p.m. $ in Aphel. 


59 


28 


b 


b 33 


12 35 


5 5i 


1 5 5 


10 2 


3 6 


27 


" 37 


... 


5 43 


b 28 


4 


9 


0.20 a.m. }} rises. 



FEBRUARY. 

Venus (9) near the Moon (d ) February 5. 
Mars (<J) near the Moon ( d ) February 11. 
Jupiter (1/) near the Moon (d ) February 17. 
Mercury ( § ) near the Moon ( d ) February 28. 



will appear as rings. The Eclipse will only be a 
Partial Eclipse at Philadelphia, beginning and 
ending between 6 p.m. and sunset. 



ECLIPSES IN 1897. 

In the year 1S97 there will be two Eclipses— 
both of the bun. 

First : An Annular Eclipse of the bun, Feb 
ruary 1, 1897. Visible at Philadelphia as a Partial 
Eclipse about sunset. This Eclipse will be vis- j 
ible as a Partial Eclipse in Mexico, the southern 
part of the United btates and the whole of 
bouth America. It will be mainly visible in the 
Pacific Ocean lying between bouth America and 
Australia. The central path passes through the 
northern part of bouth America and just touches 
the north point of New Zealand. 

becond : An Annular Eclipse of the bun, July 
29, 1897. Visible at Philadelphia as a Partial 
Eclipse. This Eclipse will be visible over the 
larger part of North and bouth America and a 
small portion of western Africa. The central 
line will pass through Tecupan (Mexico), Havana 
(Cuba) and Cape bt. Roque (bouth America). 
In this central line the bun will appear as a bright 
ring, and the shadows of bases on the ground 



Fixed and Movable Feasts, Fasts, etc., 1879. 

Epiphany Jan. 6 

Valentine's Day Feb. 14 

bhrove Tuesday Mar. 2 

Ash Wednesday " 3 

bt. Patrick's Day " 17 

Palm bunday Apr. n 

Maundy Thursday " 15 

Good Friday " 16 

Easter bunday " 18 

Ascension Day May 27 

Whitsunday June 6 

Trinity bunday " 13 

bt. John the Baptist's Day " 24 

All baints' Day Nov. 1 

All Souls' Day " 2 

Advent bunday ..." 28 

Christmas Day Dec. 25 

bt. John the Evangelist's Day " 27 



From an investigation of the matter, the Massa- 
chusetts btate Board of Health concludes that 
many deep wells contain as many bacteria as are 
found in some surface waters. 



**-'-~r:-*-*&=-^*r---* 



1 .,„'?■•■-,,, 



• .1 ■'■ -•■ll •. - 



i .. ■ i, - -b- 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Third Month.] 



MARCH. 



[1897. 













MOON'S PHASES 


>, Philadelphia 










. 


j3 


M 


d. h. m. d. h. m. 




03 


s-i 




,a 
-** 




% New Moon 3 6 56 a.m. 


O Full Moon 18 4 27 p.m. 




-a 


— 

%-. 




]) First Quarter... 11 10 28 a.m. 


Q Last Quarter. ..25 6 59 a.m. 


Phenomena. 





THE STJN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 




03 


— 




Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 




High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


&S 


<[ Apo., 8d. ih. a.m. 








A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


«=« 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


■^»w 


d Per., 2od. 7I1. a.m. 








h.m. 


m. s. 


h.m. 


h. m. 


h . m . 


h. m. 


d. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. ?n. 


h. m. 


&J-S 




60 


I 


M 


° 33 


12 23 


5 52 


5 35 


10 50 


4 13 


28 


17 


° 33 


6 40 


7 20 


5- 1 


9.47 p.m. 9 sets. 


61 


2 


Tu 


6 32 


12 11 


5 53 


6 1 


" 35 


5 18 


29 


1 4 


1 20 


7 33 


8 8 


5-2 


2.57 p.m. 9 S. 


62 


3 


W 


6 30 


11 58 


5 54 


6 24 


17 


6 20 





1 46 


2 1 


8 25 


8 52 


5-3 


10.00 a.m. r£l stationary. 


63 


4 


Th 


6 29 


11 45 


5 55' 


6 46 


59 


7 22 


1 


2 23 


2 38 


9 12 


9 34 


5-4 


8.07 p.m. 9 in Perihel. 


64 


5 


F 


6 27 


11 31 


5 56 


7 8 


1 40 


8 22 


2 


2 59 


3 14 


9 5« 


10 15 


5-3 


6.33 P.M. cf S. 


65 


6 


S 


6 26 


11 17 


5 57 


7 30 


2 21 


9 23 


3 


3 34 


3 47 


10 42 


10 54 


5-3 


IO.56 A.M. $ S. 


66 


7 


s 


6 24 


11 2 


5 58 


7 55 


3 4 


10 23 


4 


4 9 


4 18 


11 26 


11 33 


5-2 


8.37 A.M. 3 9 d 


67 


8 


M 


6 23 


10 47 


5 59 


8 24 


3 5o 


11 24 


5 


4 4i 


4 5i 


12 8 


... 


5-2 


5.46 A.M. $ rises. 


68 


9 


Tu 


6 21 


10 32 


6 


8 57 


4 37 


A.M. 


6 


5 18 


5 27 


12 


53 


5-i 


10.00 p.M.T^ stationary. 


6q 


10 


VV 


6 20 


10 16 6 1 


9 37 


5 28 


O 24 


7 


6 


6 11 


52 


1 38 


5-i 


10.46 a.m. cf rises. 


70 


11 


Th 


6 18 


10 6 2 


10 25 


6 20 


I 21 


8 


6 49 


7 3 


1 34 


2 27 


4-9 


6.50 p.m. ^ cT C 


7i 


12 


F 


6 17 


9 43 6 3 


11 21 


7 i3 


2 14 


9 


7 46 


8 7 


2 22 


3 17 


4-8 


10. 58. p.m. If S. 


7 2 13 


S 


6 15 


9 27 6 4 


23 


8 6 


2 59 


iij 


8 48 


9 20 


3 14 


4 10 


4.8 


2.46 p.m. 9 S. 


73 i4 


s 


6 14 


9 10 6 5 


1 30 


8 58 


3 4° 


11 


9 52 


10 28 


4 9 


5 2 4-9 


1 7.38 a.m. 9 rises. 


74 15 


M 


6 12 


8 536 6 


2 40 


9 49 


4 14 


12 


10 52 


11 27 


5 7 


5 53 5-i 


4.03 a.m. If rises. 


75 16 


Tu 


6 10 


8 35 6 7 


3 52 


10 39 


4 45 


13 


11 47 


... 


6 2 


6 42 5-3 


11.29 p.m. ($ Tf d 


76 17 


W 


6 9 


8 18 6 8 


5 4 


11 28 


5 13 


M 


20 


39 


6 56 


7 29 5-5 


9.51 p.m. 9 sets. 


7718 


Th 


6 7 


8069 


6 18 


A.M. 


5 39 


15 


1 8 


1 29 


7 48 


8 15 5-6 


5.00 p.m. D cf 


78 iq 


F 


6 6 


7 42 6 10 


7 35 


O 18 


6 6 


16 


1 52 


2 13 


8 41 


9 1 5-8 


6.05 P.M. cf S. 


79 20 


S 


6 4 


7 24 6 11 


8 53 


I II 


6 36 


17 


2 34 


2 55 


9 33 


9 48 5-9 


3.00 a.m. Spring com. 


80 21 


s 


6 3 


7 5 6 12 


10 12 


2 6 


7 9 


18 


3 18 


3 37 


10 27 


10 35 5-8 


10.00 p.m. 9 gr. brill. 


81 22 


M 


6 1 


6 47 6 13 


11 29 


3 4 


7 49 


19 


4 3 


4 22 


11 24 


11 27 5.7 


10.55 p.m. 6 h a 


82 23 


Tu 


6 


6 29 6 13 


A.M. 


4 5 


8 38 


20 


4 48 


5 9 


20 


... 5-4 


II.38 A.M. § S. 


8324 


W 


5 5« 


6 10 6 14 


39 


5 7 


9 35 


21 


5 39 


6 3 


23 


1 19 5.2 


5.50 a.m. § rises. 


8425 


Th 


5 57 


5 52 6 15 


1 39 


6 8 


10 40 


22 


6 40 


7 9 


1 23 


2 15 4-8 


3.40 a.m. }} S. 


85 26 


F 


5 55 


5 34 6 16 


2 28 


7 6 


11 49 


23 


7 48 


8 28 


2 23 


3 13 4-6 


6.00 p.m. 9 gr. H.L.N. 


86 27 


S 


5 54 


5 156 17 


3 -7 


7 59 


58 


24 


8 59 


9 53 


3 24 


4 9 4-6 


10.12 A.M. cf rises. 


8728 


s 


5 52 


4 576 18 


3 39 


8 48 


2 5 


25 


10 10 


11 1 


4 25 


5 5 4-7 


2.18 p.m. 9 S. 


88 29 


M 


5 50 


4 39 6 19 


4 5 


9 33 


3 9 


26 


11 14 


11 54 


5 23 


5 59 4-8 


6.52 a.m. 9 rises. 


89 30 


Tu 


5 49 


4 20 6 20 


4 29 


10 16 


4 12 


27 


11 


... 


6 18 


6 48 5.2 


10.19 PM - h rises. 


9031 


VV 


5 47 


4 2 6 21 


4 5i 


10 57 


5 12 28 


40 


51 


7 12 


7 34 5-5 


1 9.37 P.M. If S. 



MARCH. 

Venus ( 9 ) near the Moon ( ([ ) March 7, a.m. 
Mars (cf ) near the Moon ( Q ) March 11, p.m. 
Jupiter (If) ne?.r the Moon ( ([ ) March 16. 



JEWISH CALENDAR FOR 1897. 

(5657) 

Jan. 4 — Shebat 1, New Moon. 

18. — Shebat 15, Chamisha Assar. 

3. — First Adar 1, New Moon.* 

5. — Second Adar 1, New Moon.* 
17. — Second Adar 13, Fast of Esther. 
18. — Second Adar 14. Purim. 

3. — Nissan 1, Sabbath and New Moon. 
17. — Nissan 15, First day of Passover. 
18. — Nissan 16, Second day of Passover. 
23. — Nissan 21, Seventh day of Passover. 
24. — Nissan 22, Eighth day of Passover. 

3. — Iyar i, New Moon.* 
20. — Iyar 18, Lag B'Omer. 

1. — Si van 1, New Moon. 

6. — Sivan 6, First day of Shabuoth. 



Feb. 
Mar. 



April 

it 
it 
(t 
it 

May 
a 

June 



June 
July 



Aug. 7.— 



7-- 
' 1.- 

I7-- 
30. 
7- 



" 13. 
" 29. 

(5658) 
Sept. 27. 
" 28. 

A' 2 9- 

Oct. 6. 
" 11. 

"' 12, 

" 17, 
" 18. 

" 19. 

" 27, 
Nov. 26.- 
Dec. 20.- 

" 26. 



-Sivan 7, Second day of Shabuoth. 

-Tamuz 1, New Moon.* 

-Tamuz 17, Fast of Tamuz.f 

-Ab 1, New Moon. 

-Ab 9. Fast of Ab. (Anniversary of 

the Destruction of the Temple. )f 
-Ab 15, Chamisha Assar. 
-Elul 1, New Moon.* 



-Tishri 1, First day of New Year. 

-Tishri 2, Second day of New Year. 

-Tishri 3, Fast of Gedaliah. 

-Tishri 10, Day of Atonement. 

-Tishri 15. First day of Feast of Tab- 
ernacles. 

-Tishri 16, Second day of Feast of 
Tabernacles. 

-Tishri 21, Hosha'nah Rabbah. 

-Tishri 22, Sh'mini Atzereth. 

-Tishri 23, Simchath Torah. 

-Cheshvan 1, New Moon.* 

-Kislev 1, New Moon.* 

-Kislev 25, Chanukah. 

-Tebeth 1, New Moon.* 



* The day before is the last day of the preceding month and the first day of the New Moon. 
t Observed on the following day. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Fourth 


Month.] 








APRIL 


• 








[1897. 








MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 






J3 


M 


d. h. m. 


cf. A. m. 




03 

cd 


O 


CD 

O 


% New Moon 1 n 23 p.m. 


O Full Moon 17 1 25 a.m. 




-a 


«=2 

a> 

-a 

O 


D First Quarter... 10 3 26 a.m. 


d Last Quarter. ..23 4 48 p.m. 


Phenomena. 


o 


THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 




a3 
(=1 


CO 


CO 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths! Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


CD 

hn 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


** 


fiApo., 4d.ioh. p.m. 








A.M. 


P.M. P.M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


<< 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 




d Per., i7d. 4I1. p.m. 








h.m. 


m. s. h.m. 


h. m. 


h. 7>i. 


h. m. 


£ 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h . 7>i . 


It . m . 


$■3 




91 


I 


Th 


5 44 


3 44 6 24 


5 12 


« 37 


6 12 


29 


1 21 


1 37 


8 1 


8 17 5-2 


9.31 p.m. 9 sets. 


92 


2 


F 


5 42 


3 26 6 25 


5 34 


18 


7 1 3 


O 


1 57 


2 12 


8 49 


9 


5-2 


4.59 A.M. J $ d 


93 


3 


S 


5 4i 


3 9 6 26 


5 5« 


1 1 


« i3 


I 


2 32 


2 44 


9 33 


9 4o 


5- 2 


O.IO P.M. $ S. 


94 


4 


s 


5 39 


2 51 6 27 


6 26 


1 45 


9 J 4 


2 


3 t> 


3 l6 


10 16 


10 19 


5-i 


7.OO P.M. (\ 9 d 


95 


S 


M 


5 3» 


2 33 6 28 


6 58 


2 32 


10 14 


3 


3 39 


3 44 


10 59 


10 56 


5-i 


6.45 p.m. § sets. 


96 


6 


Tu 


5 3 6 


2 16 6 29 


, 7 35 


3 21 


11 12 


4 


4 JI 


4 17 


11 41 


11 33 5-i 


n.oo p.m. 9 stationary. 


97 


7 


W 


5 35 


1 59 6 30 


1 8 20 


4 12 


A.M. 


5 


4 46 


4 54 


24 


... 


5- 1 


II.52 A.M. (5 W C 


98 


8 


Th 


5 33 


1 42 6 31 


1 9 12 


5 4 


5 


6 


5 27 


5 37 


12 


1 9 


5-2 


1.07 a.m. $ in Q 


99 


9 


¥ 


5 3 1 


1 26 6 32 


10 10 


5 56 


53 


7 


6 14 


6 31 


57 


1 54 


5-i 


3.59 a.m. (5 0* d 


100 


10 


S 


5 2 9 


1 9 6 33 


11 14 


6 47 


1 35 


b 


7 « 


7 33 


1 40 


2 43 


5-° 


1.32 p.m. 9 S. 


101 


n 


s 


5 2b 


53 6 34 


21 


7 37 


2 11 


9 


8 9 


b 42 


2 40 


3 35 


4.9 


5.24 p.m. 0* S. 


102 


12 


M 


5 26 


38 6 35 


1 29 


8 26 


2 42 


10 


9 i4 


9 52 


3 38 


4 25 


5-° 


3.00 p.m. $ in Perihel. 


103 


13 


Tu 5 25 


22 6 36 


2 40 


9 J 4 


3 IO 


n 


10 18 


10 54 


4 35 


5 16 


5-2 


6.03 A.M. (5 1| d 


104 


14 


W 


5 23 


7 6 37 


3 52 


10 3 


3 37 


12 


11 17 


11 47 


5 34 


b 5 


5-4 


0.49 P.M. § S. 


105 


is 


Th 


5 22 


A.M. 6 38 


5 6 


10 55 


4 3 


13 


11 


... 


6 30 


6 54 


5-5' 


8.31 p.m. 9 sets. 


106 


16 


F 


5 20 


22 6 39 


6 25 


11 49 


4 32 


14 


38 


1 5 


7 26 


7 43 


5-6 


8.00 a.m.c? gr.H. L. N. 


107 


17 s 


5 19 


36 6 40 


7 44 


A.M. 


5 4 


15 


1 28 


1 5i 


b 22 


8 3i 


5-7 


i 4.07 a.m. c5 $ 9 


108 


18 S 


5 17 


50 6 41 


9 5 


O 47 


5 4i 


16 


2 14 


2 35 


9 *7 


9 21 


5-7 


8.08 p.m. $ sets. 


109 


19 


M 


5 15 


1 3 6 42 


10 21 


I 49 


6 28 


17 


3 1 


3 i« 


10 14 


10 14 


5.0 


6.IO A.M. (5 J? d 


no 


20 


Tu 


5 14 


1 16 6 43 


11 29 


2 53 


7 24 


18 


3 46 


4 5 


11 10 


11 09 


5-5 


5.18 a.m. 9 rises. 


II! 


21 


W 


5 1.3 


1 29 6 44 


A.M. 


3 57 


8 28 


19 


4 33 


4 56 


5 


... 


5-3 


0.40 a.m. 0" sets. 


112 


22 


Th 


5 12 


1 41 6 45 


O 23 


4 58 


9 3« 


20 


5 24 


5 54 


8 


1 


5-i 


11.00 p.m. $ gr.H. L.N. 


in 


23 


F 


5 10 


1 52 6 46 


i 6 


5 54 


10 49 


21 


1 6 22 


6 53 


1 7 


1 54 


4-9 


5.04 p.m. d" S. 


114 


24 


S 


5 9 


2 3 6 47 


1 41 


6 45 


11 58 


22 


7 26 


8 9 


2 6 


2 48 


4-8 


8.00 P.M. 1| S. 


«s 


25 


S 


5 7 


2 14 6 58 


2 9 


7 32 


1 3 


23 


8 33 


9 23 


3 3 


3 4i 


4-7 


1 2.44 a.m. % sets. 


116 


26 


M 


5 6 


2 24 6 49 


2 34 


8 15 


2 5 


24 


9 4i 


10 28 


4 1 


4 43 


4-8 


n.oo a. M.l/ stationary. 


117 


27 


Tu 


5 4 


2 33 6 50 


2 56 


8 56 


3 6 


25 


10 44 


11 22 


4 57 


5 24 


4-9 


8.42 p.m. § sets. 


118 


28 


W 


5 3 


2 42 6 51 


3 i» 


9 37 


4 6 


26 


11 39 




5 5i 


6 11 


4-9 


10.07 a.m. $ gr.el. E. 


119 


29 


Th 


5 2 


2 50 6 52 


3 39 


10 18 


5 6 


27 


8 


27 


6 45 


6 58 


5-o 


1.20 a.m. T^ S. 


120 


30 


¥ 


5 1 


2 58 6 53 


1 4 3 


10 59 


6 6 


28 


1 51 


1 7 


7 34 


7 43' 5-i 


8.10 p.m. J? rises. 



APRIL. 

Mercury ( $ ) near the Moon ( d ) April 2, a.m. 

Venus ( 9 ) near the Moon ( d ) April 4, p.m. 

e Geminorum and Mars (cf) very close April 
8, a.m. 

Mars (c?) near the Moon (d ) April 9, a.m. 

Mercury ( § ) and Venus ( 9 ) near April 16, 
a.m. , 

THE PLANETS IN 1897. 

Mercury ( §) will have its greatest elongation 
east and be visible in the evening January 6, 
April 28, August 26 and December 20, and will 
have its greatest elongation west and be visible in 
the morning February 15, June 15 and October 7. 

Venus ( 9 ) will set after the Sun and be 
Evening Star until April 8. It will then rise be- 
fore the Sun and be a Morning Star during the 
rest of the year. 

Mars (c?) will be visible on the meridian at 
11 p.m. in the first part of the year. It will move 
east and set about midnight May 11, rising later 
every succeeding night. 

Jupiter (If) will rise about 8 p.m. January 20, 
will be south about 8 p.m. April 24. will set about 
8 p.m. August 17, and then be a Morning Star 
the rest of the year. 



Saturn (T^) will rise at 2 a.m. in the latter 
part of January, rising earlier each morning. It 
will south about midnight the last of May, and 
about 8 p.m. the last of July. It will be visible 
every evening until the latter part of October, 
when it will set about sundown. 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS. 

IN PENNSYLVANIA. 

New Year's Day . . Jan. 1. 

Washington's Birthday Feb. 22. 

Good Friday April 16. 

Memorial Day May 30. 

Independence Day July 4- 

Labor Day Sept. 4* 

Election Day Nov. 2. 

Thanksgiving Day Nov. 25!. 

Christmas Day Dec. 25. 

All Saturdays after 12 o'clock noon are half 
holidays. 

*First Saturday in September (in 1897, Sep- 
tember 4). 

fDesignated by President or Governor, usu- 
ally the last Thursday of November (/. e., in 1897, 
November 25). 

The list of legal holidays in New Jersey does 
not include Good Friday. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Fifth Month.] 



MAY. 



[1897. 





1 




MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 






■2 .* 




d. h. m. d. h. m. 




OS 


:' the Mor 
f the Wee 


% New Moon 1 3 46 p.m. 






CD 

-a 


D First Quarter... 9 4 36 p.m. 


d Last Quarter ...23 4 32 a.m. 


Phenomena. 








THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 




as 
1=1 


«s as 

(=1 : (=1 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 










Rises 


Souths Sets 


, Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


<D 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. |«J5 


, d Apo., 2d. 2h. A.M. 








A.M. 


A.M. P.M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


■a) 


! A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M.I P.M. rg^ 


d Per., i6d. 2h. a.m. 








h.m. 


in. s. ' h.m.\ h. m. 


h. in. 


A. wz. 


\d. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. in. h. in. 3; S 


([Apo.,29d. 6h. a.m. 


121 


1 s 


4 59 


3 6 6 54! 4 29 


" 43 


7 7 


29 


I 28 


1 43 


8 22 8 25 5.1 


6.27 a.m. 6 9 a 


122 


2 S 


4 5« 


3 126 55 


4 59 


29 


8 7 


1 


2 4 


2 16 


9 7 9 5 5-i 


1. 15 P.M. $ S. 


123 


3 ! ,M 


4 57 


3 *9 6 56 


5 36 


1 18 


9 5 


2 


2 3 8 


2 47 


9 50 9 46 5.0 


II.33 A.M. rf J d 


I24 


4 Tu 


4 55 


3 24 6 57 


6 18 


2 8 


10 


3 


3 11 


3 17 


10 32 10 22 5.0 


7.33 p.m. d y; a 


125 


5 W 


4 54 


3 29 6 58 7 7 


2 59 


10 49 


4 


3 44 


3 5o 


11 14 11 5.1 


8.37 p.m. $ sets. 


126 


6 Th 


4 53 


3 34 6 59 8 3 


3 5i 


11 33 


5 


' 4 20 


4 29 


11 57 11 42 5.2 


IO.59 A.M. 9 S. 


I27 


7>" 


4 52 


3 3 8 7 9 4 


4 4i 


A.M. 


6 


4 49 


5 15 


41 ... J5.2I 


4.42 P.M. d cf d 


128 


8.S 


4 5i 


3 42 7 1 


10 9 


5 3° 


O 9 


7 


j 5 46 


b b 


28 1 24 5.2 


3.52 a.m. 9 rises. 


129 


9 s 


4 5o 


3 44 7 2 


H 15 


6 18 


O 42 


8 


b 37 


7 4 


1 17 2 12 5.2 


4.38 P.M. cf S. 


I3O 


10 M 


4 49 


3 47 7 3 


O 20 


7 5 


I IO 


9 


7 34 


8 8 


2 12 2 59 5.1 


2.49 P.M. (5 7[ d 


131 


11 Tu 


4 4» 


3 49 7 4|: 1 3i 


7 52 


1 39 


10 


8 37 


9 17 


3 9 3 49 5-i 


11.59 P - M - cf sets. 


!3 2 


12 W 


4 47 


3 50 7 5 2 41 


8 40 


2 2 


11 


9 42 10 20 


4 8 4 39 5-3 


0.46 P.M. $ S. 


133 


13 Ih 


4 40 


3 5i 7 5 


! 3 5° 


9 32 


2 28 


12 


10 44 


11 18 


5 8 5 31 5-3 


8.08 p.m. $ sets. 


J 34 


14 F 


4 45 


3 5i 7 6 


5 3 


10 27 


2 5 8 


13 


n 42 


... 


6 8 6 22 5.4 1 


10.20 a.m. 9 S. 


135 


15 b 


4 44 


3 5o 7 7 6 34 


11 28 


3 32 


14 


12 


42 


7 7 7 13 5-5 


6.38 p.m. 71 S. 


136 


16 S 


4 43 


3 49 7 8 7 54 


A.M. 


4 14 


*5 


1 4 


1 3i 


8 b 8 75-5 


2.0I P.M. (^ 1} d 


J 37 


17 M 


4 43 


3 48 7 9 9 7 


O 32 


5 b 


16 


1 54 


2 17 


9 3 9 1 5-6 


1.00 p.m. 8 *$Q 


i3» 


18 Tu 


4 42 


3 46 7 10 10 10 


1 3 8 


6 9 17 


2 43 


3 4 


9 59 9 57 5-5 


O.OO A.M. § b 


139 


19 W 


4 4i 


3 43 7 11 11 


2 43 


7 19 l8 


3 32 


3 52 


10 54 10 54 5.5 


3.15 a.m. 9 rises. 


140 


20 Th 


4 40 


3 40 7 12 n 39 


3 43 


8 33 19 


4 2 ° 


4 43 


11 47 11 52 5.4 


11.3b a m. 7[ rises. 


141 


21 F 


4 39 


3 36 7 13 A.M. 


4 3 8 


9 45 20 


5 9 


5 40 


38 ... 5.2 


11.00 P.M. □ 1| 


142 


22 S 


4 3« 


3 32 7 14 O II 


5 27 


10 53 21, 


b 2 


b 3 8 


49 1 29 5-i 


0.00 a.m. cf in Aphel. 


*43 


23 S 


4 3« 


3 27 7 15 37 


b 13 


11 58 22 


b 59 


7 3 8 


1 44 2 18 4.9 


n.38 A.M. § S. 


144 


24 M 


4 37 


3 21 7 15 1 


b 55 


1 023 


8 1 


8 43 


2 38 3 8 4.8 


1 3.03 a.m. § rises. 


145 


25 Tu 


4 3° 


3 15 7 16 1 22 


7 36 


2 24 


9 4 


9 45 


3 33 3 5 8 4-9 


7.07 a.m. r 1 ) cf TjCancri. 


146 


26 W 


4 35 


3 9 7 1 7 1 44 


8 17 


3 


25 


10 4 


10 39 


4 2b 4 47 4.9 


3.00 a.m. § in Aphel. 


147 


27 Th 


4 35 


3 2 7 18 2 7 


8 5 8 


3 59 


26 


11 2 


11 29 


5 21 5 34 5.0 


11. 17 P.M. T7 S. 


148 


28 F 


4 34 


2 55 7 x 9i 


2 33 


9 4i 


5 


27 


11 53 


... 


6 13 6 21 5.0 


6.13 a.m. 3 9 d 


149 


29 S 


4 34 


2 47 7 20! 


3 1 


10 26 


6 


28 


14 


37 


7 4| 7 7 


5-o 


9.30 a.m. 9 s. 


150 


30 s 


4 33 


2 3 8 7 21 3 36 


11 14 


6 59 


29 


53 


1 14 


7 5 2 | 7 5i 


5-o 


7.09 a.m. 3 <5 d 


151 


31 M 


4 33 


2 30 7 22I ' 4 16 


4 


7 55 


30 


1 3i 


1 49 


8 3 8 8 33 


5-o 


IO.57 A.M. § S. 



MAY. 
Mercury ( § ) near the Moon (d ) May 3, p.m. 
Jupiter (1|) near the Moon ( d ) May 10, p.m. 
Saturn (T^) near the Moon (d ) May 16, p.m. 
Conjunction of Mars (cf ) and rj Cancri May 
25, a.m., very close. 

THE EPHEMERIS. 

The Ephemeris for the present year gives, as 
heretofore, the day of the year, the day of the 
month, and day of the week in civil time, ac- 
cording to which the day begins at midnight. 
Next are given the time of sunrise, the time 
before or after noon at which the sun's centre 
souths, and the time of sunset. The times of 
sunrise and sunset are in each case for the upper 
limb or edge of the sun, corrected for refraction. 
They are more accurate than usually found in 
popular almanacs, and will give the time with 
sufficient accuracy for ordinary purposes. A sur- 
veyor's level will give the horizon where the up- 
per edge of the sun should be at the time given 
in the almanac. If the telescope of the leveling 
instrument inverts, the upper edge will, of course, 
be apparently the lower one. Next are given 



the times of rising, southing and setting of the 
moon's centre, and also its age, or the number of 
days elapsed since new moon. Then follow the 
times of high and low water for Philadelphia 
(Walnut street wharf being the point at which 
the times are taken), which are now both derived 
from the elaborate tables of the U. S. Coast Sur- 
vey. Lastly is given a collection of interesting 
astronomical phenomena for the year. The local 
and standard times of Philadelphia are practi- 
cally the same in all cases except in the column 
of sun " souths." In this case 38 seconds should 
be subtracted from the time a.m. and 38 seconds 
added to the time p.m. where the nearest second 
is required in standard time. 



Five years ago the world produced about 
5,600,000 ounces of gold, this year (1896) the 
output will equal 9,000,000 ounces. 



Frequently a statement is put forth that some 
chemist has discovered a method of making arti- 
ficial diamonds. A report now comes from the 
French Academy that Henry Moissan has suc- 
ceeded in obtaining minute crystals of pure dia- 
mond. 





8 PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 


Sixth Month.] JUNE. [1897. 








MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




mZ 




J4 


d. h. tn. d. h. m. 




3 


£3 



«> 

— ; 

O 


D First Quarter... 8 2 2 A.M. d Last Quarter ...21 623 p.m. 




5 


S 

-a 


>-> 


O Full Moon 14 4 1 p.m. % New Moon 29 9 55 p.m 


. 


Phenomena. 


THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 




OS 


(=1 


OS 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 




Rises 


Souths - : Sets 


\ Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


be: 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


t* 


d Per., 13d. ioh. a.m. 








A.M. 


A.M. P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


«< 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


V 1 


dApo.,25d. 6h. p.m. 








h.tn. 


tn. s. h.tn. 


h. tn. 


k. tn. 


h. tn. 


or. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


&J-S 




152 


I 


Tu 


4 33 


2 21 7 23 


5 4 


56 


8 47 


1 


2 8 


2 23 


9 22 


9 14 


5-i 


3.02 A.M. d t£. d 


153 


2 


W 


4 33 


2 11 7 23 


! 2 59 


1 48 


9 32 


2 


2 44 


2 56 


10 6 


9 53 


5 


2 


7.00 a.m. $ stationary. 


154 


3 


Th 


4 32 


2 I 


7 24 


i 6 58 


2 38 


10 10 


3 


3 19 


3 31 


10 48 


10 34 


5 


2 


10.46 a.m. $ S. 


155 


4 


F 


4 32 


I 51 


7 24 


8 11 


3 38 


10 54 


4 


3 57 


4 10 


11 30 


11 18 


5 


4 


0.07 a.m. J gr. Bril. 


156 


5 


S 


4 32 


I 40 


7 25 


9 7 


4 15 


11 13 


5 


4 37 


4 54 


12 


... 


5 


5 


6.17 a.m. ($ tf a 


157 


6 


s 


4 32 


I 29 


7 2 5 


10 12 


5 1 


11 39 


6 


5 22 


5 44 


6 


56 


5 


5 


3.40 a.m. § rises. 


158 


7 


M 


4 32 


I 18 


7 26 


11 18 


5 47 


A.M. 


7 


6 11 


6 38 


56 


1 39 


5 


5 


1 1.37 a.m. cS 11 a 


159 


8 


Tu 


4 31 


1 7 


7 26[ 


26 


6 33 


O 4 


8 


7 3 


7 37 


1 48 


2 27 


5 


4 


1 9. II A.M. 9 S. 


l6o 


9 


W 


4 3 1 


55 


7 27 


1 36 


7 21 


O 28 


9 


8 2 


8 43 


2 45 


3 15 


5 


3 


2.27 a.m. j rises. 


161 


10 


Th 


4 31 


43 


7 28; 


2 50 


813 


O 56 


10 


9 7 


9 5o 


3 46 


4 7 


5 


3 


0.00 p.m. 3 w 


162 


" 


F 


4 31 


31 


7 28 


! 4 7 


9 9 


I 26 


« 


10 15 


10 52 


4 48 


5 1 


5 


3 


3.46 P.M. c? S. 


163 


I2 


S 


4 31 


19 


7 28 


5 26 


10 10 


1 53 


12 


11 19 


11 50 


5 51 


5 56 


5 


4 


9.38 P.M. (<, h a 


164 


13 


S , 


4 31 


7 


7 2 9i 


1 6 42 


11 15 


2 49 


13 


12 24 




6 53 


6 53 


5 


4 


10.47 P - M - <f sets. 


165 


14 


M 


4 31 


P.M. 


7 29 


1 7 5o 


A.M. 


3 47 


14 


44 


1 17 


7 52 


7 49 


5 


5 


4.51 P.M. % S. 


166 


15 


Tu 


4 3i 


O 18 


7 3° 


847 


O 21 


4 54 


15 


1 36 


2 3 


8 48 


8 46 


5 


6 


7.07 p.m. $ gr. el. W. 


167 


16 


W 


4 31 


O 31 


7 3° 


9 32 


I 25 


6 8 


16 


2 28 


2 52 


9 43 


9 42 


5 


6 


3.23 a.m. § rises. 


168 


17 


Th 


4 31 


O 44 


7 3* 


10 8 


2 24 


7 23 


17 


3 18 


3 4° 


10 34 


10 38 


5 


6 


10.26 A.M. § S. 


169 


18 


F 


4 3i 


57 


7 3i 


10 37 


3 17 


8 35 


18 


4 6 


4 28 


11 24 


11 33 


5 


6 


8.00 p.m. c5 ^ y 


170 


19 


S 


4 31 


1 10 


7 32 


" 3 


4 6 


9 44 


19 


4 52 


5 20 


12 


... 


5 


4 


8.58 A.M. 9 S. 


x 7i 


20 


s 


4 3i 


1 23 


7 32 


11 26 


4 5i 


10 48 


20 


5 4° 


6 12 


27 


1 


5 


3 


11.07 p.m. Summer com, 


172 


21 


M 


4 31 


1 36 


7 32 


11 48 


5 33 


11 50 


21 


6 28 


7 1 


1 18 


1 47 


5 


2 


3.20 a.m. $ rises. 


173 


22 


Tu 


4 32 


1 49 


7 32 


A.M. 


6 14 


51 


22 


7 21 


7 58 


2 11 


2 34 


5 





3.28 p.m. (f S. 


174 


2 3 


W 


4 32 


2 2 


7 32 


O IO 


6 55 


1 5i 


23 


8 18 


8 57 


3 ° 


3 2 2 


5 


1 


2.04 a.m. 9 rises. 


J 75 


24 


Th 


4 32 


2 15 


7 32 


35 


7 38 


2 52 


24 


9 18 


9 53 


3 54 


4 9 


5 





11. 31 p.m. if. sets. 


176 


2 5 


F 


4 33 


2 27 


7 32 


1 2 


8 23 


3 52 


25 


10 17 


10 46 


4 47 


4 58 


5 





3.00 a.m. 9 in Aphel. 


177 


26 


S 


4 33 


2 40 


7 32 


1 35 


9 10 


4 52 


26 


11 12 


11 34 


5 39 


5 45 


5 


1 


1. 11 a.m. <-$ 9 a 


178 


2 o 7 


s 


4 33 


2 52 


7 32 


2 14 


9 59 


5 49 


27 


3 


... 


6 31 


6 31 


5 


1 


8.53 a.m. 9 S. 


179 


28 


M 


4 34 


3 5 


7 32 


2 59 


10 51 


6 43 


28 


19 


46 


7 19 


7 17 


5 


2 


7.33 a.m. 3 § d 


180 


29 


Tu 


4 34 


3 !7 


7 32 


3 52 


11 43 


7 30 


29 


58 


1 25 


8 7 


8 2 


5 


2 


O.OO P.M. (5 W 


181 


3° 


W 


4 35 


3 29 


7 32 


4 5i 


35 


8 11 


1 


1 40 


2 1 


8 52 


8 46 


5 


4 


IO.54 A.M. $ S. 


JUNE. 


FISH. OPEN SEASON. 


Mars ((f) near the Moon (<1 ) June 5, a.m. 


Salmon (Penobscot) .... Mar. 1 to Aug. 15. 


Jupiter (11) near the Moon (G ) June 7, a.m. 




Saturn (Tj) near the Moon ( ([ ) June 12. 










[ Pike County claims open season from May 1 








GAME LAWS IN PENNSYLVANIA. 


to Aug. 1.] 


[In force January 1, 1897.] 


Black, Rock, Calico Bass . . May 31 to Jan. 1. 


ANIMALS AND BIROS. OPEN SEASON. 






Wall-eyed Pike May 31 to Jan. 1. 




Duck and Water Fowl . . . Sept. 1 to May 15, 
Pheasant and Prairie Chicken Oct. j to Jan. 1. 


The firefly of tropical regions, called the 
cucojo, has been put to practical use in Cuba. 
Five or six are placed in a lantern, and are said 
to suffice for the ordinary uses of a lantern. 
Thirty-eight are said to equal about one candle 


Rail and Reed Birds .... Sept. 1 to Dec. 1. 

[Bedford County.} 


power. 


King Menelik, of Abyssinia, has promised 


Elk and Deer, Turkey . . "1 

Woodcock, Quail, Partridge \ r\ . tv 

Pheasant, Prairie Chicken, | 0ct ' *S to Dec. 15. 


to open the vaults of the Cathedral Church of 


Axum. It is asserted by the Moslems that in 


these vaults are stowed the "Ark ot the Cove- 


Squirrel and Rabbit ... J 


nant," the Tables of Stone containing the Ten 


[ffuntingdon County.} 


Commandments, and the Seven-Branched Candle- 




stick of Gold once in the Temple of Solomon at 







PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 9 




Seventh Month.] JULY. [1897. 










MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 






%z 


5 


M 


d. h. tn. 


d. h. tn. 






e3 


O 


as 


]) First Quarter... 7 8 31 a.m. 


ft Last Quarter ...21 10 8 a.m. 






m 

_a 


-a 






Phenomena. 













THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 






1=1 


(=1 


o3 
<=» 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


bo 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


1* 


ft Per., nd. oh. p.m. 










A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


-H 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


•«fsj 


ft Apo.,23d. ioh. a.m. 










k.tn. 


711. S. 


h.m. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


d. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


«; -5 






182 


1 


Th 


4 35 


3 4o 


7 32 


5 54 


1 25 


8 46 


2 


2 19 


2 37 


9 36 


9 28 


5-4 1 


9.00 p.m. ® inAphel. 




183 


2 


F 


4 36 


3 52 


7 3i 


6 59 


2 13 


9 16 


3 


2 58 


3 13 


10 17 


10 11 


5 


6 


II.02 A.M. $ S. 




184 


3 


S 


4 37 


4 3 


7 3 1 


8 5 


3 


9 43 


4 


3 37 


3 53 


11 


10 58 


5 


8 


8.38 p.m. cj d ft 




185 


4 s 


4 37 


4 14 


7 31 9 11 


3 45 


10 8 


5 


4 17 


4 3 6 


11 40 


11 45 


5 


8 


2.31 P.M. (3 % ft 




186 


5M 


4 38 


4 24 


7 31 10 18 


4 3 1 


10 32 


6 


4 59 


5 22 


24 


... 


5 


9 


0.00 A.M. $ in Q 




187 


6Tu 


4 38 


4 34 


7 30' 11 26 


5 17 


10 58 


7 


5 44 


6 12 


37 


1 9 


5 


8 


3.53 A.m. $ rises. 




188 


7 W 


4 38 


4 44 


7 30 


26 


6 6 


11 26 


8 


6 34 


7 8 


1 29 


1 55 


5 


7 


n.07 p - M - 9 6 r « *!• V« 




189 


8Th 


4 39 


4 53 


7 3° 


1 54 


6 59 


" 55 


9 


7 30 


8 13 


2 28 


2 46 


5 


5 


; 8.51 a.m. 9 S. 




I90 


9 F 


4 39 


5 2 


7 30, 3 5 


7 56 


A.M. 


10 


8 37 


9 24 


3 3° 


3 4i 


5 


3 


2.00 p.m. § inPerihel. 




I 9 I 


10 S 


4 40 


5 10 


7 30 4 21 


8 58 


O 40 


11 


9 5o 


10 31 


4 34 


4 39 


5 


3 


! 4.17 a.m. rS J? ft 




192 


11 s 


4 4i 


5 18 


7 2 9 5 31 


10 2 


1 3 1 


12 


" 3 


11 32 


5 37 


5 38 


5 


3 


! 1.47 a.m. 9 rises. 




193 


12 


M 


4 42 


5 26 


7 29 6 41 


11 6 


2 32 


13 


11 


... 


6 38 


6 38 


5 


4 


11.54 A.M. $ S. 




194 


13 


Tu 


4 43 


5 33 


7 28 7 23 


A.M. 


3 35 


14 


30 


1 7 


7 37 


7 36 


5 


5 


i 2.54 P.M. 0* S. 




x 95 


14 w 


4 44 


5 39 


7 28 8 3 


O 7 


4 58 


*5 


1 23 


1 53 


831 


8 32 


5 


7 


1 9.33 p.m. 0* sets. 




196 


15 Th 


4 45 


5 45 


7 27 8 35 


I 4 


6 12 


16 


2 16 


2 38 


9 22 


9 28 


5 


8 


, 5.00 p.m. J $0 Sup. 




197 


16 F 


4 46 


5 51 


7 27 9 3 


1 55 


7 2 4 


J 7 


3 3 


3 24 


10 10 


10 21 


5 


8 


3.04 P.M. 11 S. 




198 


17 


S 


4 46 


5 56 


7 26 


9 27 


2 42 


8 32 


18 


3 47 


4 8 


10 56 


11 12 


5 


8 


4.00 p.m. 9 gr. H.L.S. 




199 


18 


S 


4 47 


6 


7 26 


9 5o 


3 27 


9 36 


i9 


4 3 1 


4 53 


11 42 


... 


5 


7 


7.42 p.m. j sets. 




200 


J 9 


M 


4 47 


6 47 25! 10 13 


4 9 


10 38 


20 


5 14 


5 38 


2 


27 


5 


6 


10.00 p.m. $ gr. H. L.N 




201 


20 lu 


4 48 


6 7 7 24 10 37 


4 5i 


11 40 


21 


5 46 


6 22 


52 


1 13 


5 


4 


9.24 p.m. If. sets. 




202 


21 


W 


4 49 


6 10 7 23 11 4 


5 34 


40 


22 


40 


7 12 


1 41 


1 58 


5 


3 


0.34 p.m. $ S. 




203 22 


Th 


4 49 


6 13 7 21 11 34 


6 18 


1 42 


23 


7 28 


8 7 


2 30 


2 44 


5 


2 


7.26 P.M. V) S. 
8.54 A.M. $ S. 




204 23 


F 


4 5o 


6 14 7 19 A.M. 


7 4 


2 42 


24! 


8 25 


9 5 


3 21 


3 32 


5 


1 




205 24 S 


4 5i 


6 16 7 18 10 


7 53 


3 4o 


25 


9 27 


10 1 


4 13 


4 20 


5 





1.42 a.m. 9 rises. 




206 25 s 


4 52 


6 16 7 18 53 


8 43 


4 35 


26 


10 28 


10 54 


5 6 


5 9 


5 


1 


10.07 A - M - c5d"H- dose. 




207 


26 M 


4 53 


6 16 7 18 1 43 


9 35 


5 25 


27 


11 25 


11 42 


5 56 


5 58 


5 


3 


2.33 p.m. 0* S. 




208 


27 Tu 


4 54 


6 16 7 17 2 40 


10 28 


6 9 


28 


16 




6 45 


6 46 


5 


4 


3.16 a.m. occ. e Gemin. 




209 28 w 


4 55 


6 15 7 17 3 42 


11 19 


6 47 


29 


28 


1 


7 33 


7 32 


5 


5 


Eclipse vis. at Phila. 




210 


29 Ih 


4 56 


6 13 7 16 4 48 


9 


7 18 


3° 


1 12 


1 39 


8 18 


8 17 


5 


7 


1.54 p.m. \i rises. 




211 


30 F 


4 57 


6 11 7 16 5 55 


57 


7 47 


1 


1 56 


2 17 


9 2 


9 3 


5 


9 


7.45 P.M. 3 $ ft 




212 


31 s 


4 58 


6 8 7 16 72 


1 43 


8 13 


2 


2 37 


2 54 


9 44 


9 48 6 


1 


8.51 p.m. o* sets. 




JULY. 


BIRDS. open season. 




Mars (q") near the Moon (ft ) July 3, p.m. 


G-y Snipe {S^Def.-s. 




Jupiter (1|) near the Moon ( ft ) July 4, p.m. 




Close conjunction of Mars (cT) and Jupiter 


Reed, Rail and Marsh Hen . Aug. 25 to Dec. 15. 




(Tj) July 25, A.M. 


Grass or Upland Plover . ) Noy> f tQ Dec ^ 

FISH. 

Black and Oswego Bass . . May 30 to Dec. 1. 




Mercury ( $ ) nes 

P.M. 

GAME LAWS 


ir the 


Moon ( ft ) July 30, 
NEW JERSEY. 




IN 1 




[In force January 1, 1896.] 
Northern Section. — Dates all inclusive. 

ANIMALS. OPEN SEASON. 


Pike and Pickerel . 




April 1 to July 15. 
May 1 to Feb. 20. 












Experiments have shown that soapsuds will 




Gray, Black or Fox Squirrel Oct. 25 to Dec. 10. 


' serve almost as well as oil for quieting the waves 




Southern Section. 


of the sea. 
















In the Johns Hopkins Hospital, at Baltimore, 
a patient under hypnotic influence was operated 




Hare, Rabbit and Squirrel . Nov. 15 to Jan. 1. 




birds. — Northern Section. 


upon successfully for c 
thetics being used. 


isea 


sed kidney — no anaes- 




l^uail,KuineQ Lrrouse . . 










European Pheasant . . . 


- Oct. 25 to Dec. 10. 


Instruction is gratuitous in the universities 




Partridge and Grouse . . 


and faculties of France. They are freely opened 




.. 


to strangers as well as to native students. A 




Southern Section. 


certain amount of preliminary study is the only 




All of above ........ Nov. 15 to Jan. 1. 


requirement. 



IO 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Ei 


ghth 


Month/ 








AUGUST. 








[1897. 










MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




%z 




M 




d. h. m. 


d. h. m. 




- 
j 55 


S3 




© 
•0 

O 


D First Quarter... 5 1 24 p.m. 


d Last Quarter. ..20 3 29 a.m. - 




© 

-a 


O 


O Full Moon 12 9 22 a.m. 


% New Moon 27 10 28 p.m. 


Phenomena. 


© 


THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 




as 


(=1 




Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


© 1 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 




1 d Per., 7<i. 4I1. p.m. 








A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


-aj 


a.m. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 




d Apo.,2od. 4h. a.m. 








h.m. 


m. s. 


h.m. 


,h. in. 


/; . i>i . 


/'; . m . 


d. 


h. m. 


h . Di. 


h . i>i . 


A . ?;? . 


=J5 -S 




213 


I 


s 


4 57 


6 4 


7 15 


8 10 


2 29 


8 37 


3 


3 17 


3 34 


10 26 


10 36 


6.2 


5.47 A.M. <\% <L 


214 


2 


M 


4 58 


6 


7 14 


9 l8 


3 15 


9 3 


4! 


3 55 


4 16 


11 7 


II 26 


6-3 


8.07 p.m. hjl stationary, 


215 


3 


Tu 


4 59 


5 55 


7 12 


,10 28 


4 4 


9 3° 


5 


4 3 6 


5 


11 52 


... 


6.2 


1. 18 P.M. $ S. 


2l6 


4 


W 


5 


5 5o 


7 10 


11 40 


4 55 


10 1 


6 


5 20 


5 5° 


19 


O 38 


6.1 


1 9.02 A.M. 9 S. 


217 


5 


Th 


5 2 


5 44 


7 9 


54 


5 49 


10 38 


7 


6 8 


6 45 


1 16 


I 28 


5-8 


8.04 P.M. £> sets. 


2l8 


6 


F 


5 3 


5 37 


7 I 


2 8 


6 48 


11 24 


8 


7 4 


7 49 


2 17 


2 23 


5-6 


: 7.07 p.m occ. n Scorpii. 


219 


7 


S 


5 4 


5 30 


7 6 


3 19 


7 5° 


A.M. 


9 


8 14 


9 2 


3 18 


3 23 


5-3 


1.46 a.m. 5 rises. 


220 


8 


s 


5 5 


5 22 


7 5 


4 22 


8 52 


O 20 


10 


9 34 


10 13 


4 21 


10 13 


S- 2 


2. II P.M. cf S. 


221 


9 


M 


5 6 


5 14 


7 4 


5 15 


9 53 


I 25 


11 


10 56 


11 18 


5 20 


5 26 


5-3 


1.47 P.M. 1| S. 


222 


10 


Tu 


5 7 


5 5 


7 2 


5 58 


10 51 


2 37 


12 


3 


... 


6 21 


6 27 


5-4 


I.32 P.M. 5 S. 


223 


11 


W 


5 8 


4 55 


7 1 


6 33 


11 44 


3 5i 


13 


19 


56 


7 16 


7 24 


5-6 


8.24 p.m. 0* sets. 


224 


12 


Th 


5 9 


4 45 


6 59 


7 3 


A.M. 


5 3 


14 


1 12 


1 42 


8 8 


8 19 


5-9 


9.00 p.m. § in £3 


225 


13 


F 


5 io 


4 34 


6 57 


! 7 28 


33 


6 12 


15! 


2 


2 23 


8 56 


9 10 


6.0 


1.07 A.M. (^ § 1| 


226 


14 


S 


5 " 


4 23 


6 56 


7 52 


1 18 


7 19 


16 


2 43 


3 4 


9 4 2 


10 


6.1 


7.56 p.m. § sets. 


227 


15 


s 


5 12 


4 " 


6 55 


8 15 


2 2 


8 23 


17! 


3 2 4 


3 44 


10.26 


10 49 


6.0 


7.54 p.m. % sets. 


228 


16 


M 


5 13 


3 59 


6 53 


8 39 


2 45 


9 25 


18 


4 3 


4 24 


11 9 


11 38 


5-9 


10.07 P - M - □ h 


229 


17 


Tu 


5 14 


3 46 


6 52 


8 59 


3 28 


10 27 


19 


4 4i 


5 3 


11 53 


... 


5-8 


2.07 p.m. D h4 


23O 


iS 


W 


5 i5 


3 33 


6 51 


9 33 


4 I 2 


11 29 


20 


5 19 


5 42 


23 


36 


5-7 


9.12 A.M. 9 S. 


231 


19 


Th 


5 16 


3 J 9 


6 51 


10 7 


4 57 


30 


21 


5 57 


6 28 


1 11 


1 22 


5-6 


I.54 P.M. tf S. 


232 


20 


F 


5 17 


3 5 


6 50, 


110 47 


5 45 


1 29 


22 


6 41 


7 19 


1 59 


2 7 


5-4 


I.40 P.M. £ S. 


2 33 


21 


S 


5 17 


2 50 


6 48 1 


11 34 


6 35 


2 26 


2 3 


7 33 


8 16 


2 48 


2 54 


5-3 


1.58 A.M. 9 rises. 


234 


22 


s 


5 18 


2 35 


6 47 


A.M. 

1 « 


7 26 


3 17 


24 


8 37 


9 15 


3 39 


3 44 


5-i 


5.49 A.M. J, W C 


235 


23 


M 


5 19 


2 19 


6 45 


O 28 


8 18 


4 3 


25 


9 45 


10 13 


4 30 


4 33 


5-2 


7.42 p.m. § sets. 


236 


24 


Tu 


5 20 


2 3 


6 44 


I 28 


9 9 


4 43 


26 


10 46 


11 7 


5 20 


5 24 


5-4 


1. 31 P.M. 8 ? d 


237 


25 


W 


5 21 


1 47 


6 42 


2 32 


10 


5 17 


2 7 


11 42 


11 57 


6 10 


6 14 


5-g 


7.07 p.m. c5 i? y 


238 


26 


Th 


5 22 


1 30 


6 40 


3 19 


10 49 


5 48 


28 


31 




6 57 


7 3 


5-8 


5.07 p.m. § gr. el. E. 


239 


27 


F 


5 23 


1 13 


638 


4 47 


11 37 


6 15 


29 


43 


1 14 


7 4i 


7 49 


6.1 


1 7.30 p.m. $ sets. 


240 


28 


S 


5 24 


56 


6 37: 


5 56 


24 


6 41 


1 


1 3i 


1 54 


8 25 


8 38 


6-3 


n.28 p.m. 3 "2/ d 


241 


29 


s 


5 25 


38 


6 36; 


7 5 


1 11 


7 6 


2 


2 13 


2 34 


9 8 


9 26 


6.5 


7.40 p.m. cT sets. 


242 


30 


M 


5 26 


20 


6 34 


8 16 


2 


7 34 


3 


2 54 


3 14 


9 5i 


10 16 


6.6 


I.42 A.M. (3 $ d 


243 


31 


Tu 5 26 


i 


6 33! 


9 29 


2 51 


8 14 


4 


3 33 


3 56 10 34 


11 8 


6.5 1 


4.52 P.M. T2 S. 



AUGUST. 

Mercury ( 5) near Jupiter (1/) August 13, 

A.M. 

Venus ( 9 ) near the Moon ( d ) August 24, p.m. 
Mercury ( $) near the Moon (d) August 30, 
a.m. 

ROENTGEN'S X RAYS. 

The most important scientific discovery of the 
year was that of Roentgen's X Rays, made by 
Professor Rontgen. of Wurzburg. He called 
them X Rays as being unknown, but the world 
named them Roentgen, anglicizing the Professor's 
name. They were at first confounded with the 
ultra-violet rays experimented with by Hertz and 
Lenard, but before announcing his discovery 
Prof. Rontgen differentiated the two kinds of 
rays, and, indeed, he did his work so thoroughly 
that the scientists of the world have thus far 
failed to add anything to what he had to say 
about them. He made photographs (or shadow- 
graphs) in the dark by the use of the rays, and 
exhibited their effects in the fluoroscope. The 



most that has been accomplished by others is to 
improve the apparatus. The rays observed by 
Hertz and Lenard may be deflected by a magnet, 
they are readily absorbed or diffused, and they 
pass through only thin sheets of glass or metal. 
The Roentgen Rays cannot be deflected by a 
magnet, they are not easily absorbed, and pro- 
ceed from a different point of the spectrum than 
the ultra-violet. They are not cathode rays, but 
are supposed to be produced from cathode rays 
at the spot where the latter impinge on the glass 
walls of the charged tube. The apparatus used 
consists of a Crooke's tube containing a lens-like 
screen to concentrate the cathode rays produced 
by a current of electricity. The resulting Roent- 
gen Rays can be used to fix shadows of opaque 
substances, such as the bones of the body, upon 
photographic plates, or to exhibit them to the eye 
upon fluorescent screens. It was this circum- 
stance that awakened popular interest in the dis- 
covery, for every one was interested in seeing the 
bones of his own hand, or having them photo- 
graphed. Use was made of the discovery for the 
location of bullets or other metallic substances 
in the flesh, and there is fair prospect that the 
discovery may prove useful in surgery. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



ii 



Ninth Month.] 








SEPTEMBER. 








[1897. 








MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




. 


-a 


M 


d. h. tn. 


d. h. tn. 




eg 





s 

O 


]) First Quarter... 3 6 13 p.m. 


C Last Quarter. ..18 9 50 p.m. 






s 

-a 


>-> 




fNewMoon,, 26 846 A.M. 


Phenomena. 


o 


THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 











Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


<a5 
fee 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


1? * 


d Per., id. 5I1. p.m. 








A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


* 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 




(f Apo.,i6d. nh. p.m. 








k.tn. 


7H. s. 


h.tn. 


h. tn. 


h. m. 


h. tn. 


d.\ 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tti. 


A. tn. 


^5 


d Per., 28d. 7h. p.m. 


244 


I 


w 


5 26 


O 17 


6 32 


10 43 


3 45 


8 40 


5 


4 14 


4 40 


11 21 




6-3 




245 


2 


Th 


5 27 


37 


6 31 


11 58 


4 43 


9 2 3 


6 


4 58 


5 29 


5 


12 


6.2 


5. 11 p.m. dhd 


246 


3 


F 


5 28 


56 


6 29 


1 10 


5 44 


10 14 


7 


5 46 


6 24 


1 4 


1 7 


5-9 1 


I.28 P.M $ S . 


247 


4 


S 


5 30 


1 16 


6 27 


2 15 


6 45 


11 16 


8 


6 45 


7 3i 


2 3 


2 8 


5-6; 


9.29 A.M. $ S. 


248 


5 


s 


5 3 1 


1 36 


6 25' 


3 11 


7 46 


A.M. 


9 


7 58 


8 44 


3 4 


3 11 


5-3] 


7.03 p.m. § sets. 


249 


6 


M 


5 32 


1 56 


624' 


3 56 


8 43 


O 25 


10 


9 26 


9 56 


4 4 


4 13 


5-3 


1 2.25 a.m. 9 rises. 


250 


7 


Tu 


5 33 


2 16 


6 22 


4 33 


9 36 


1 3 6 


11 


10 47 


11 4 


5 3 


5 14 


5-4! 


1.24 p.m. J 1 S. 


251 


8 


W 


5 35 


2 37 


6 20 


5 3 


10 26 


2 48 


12 


11 48 




5 58 


6 12 


5-6: 


i 9.00 p.m. $ stationary. 


252 


9 


Th 


5 36 


2 57 


6 18 


5 3° 


11 12 


3 57 


13 


5 


o" 3 8 


6 52 


7 8 


5-8 


' 6.26 p.m. cf sets. 


253 


10 


F 


5 37 


3 18 


6 16 


5 54 


11 56 


5 3 


14 


57 


1 23 


7 40 


8 


6.0! 


9.34 A.M. 9 S. 


254 


n 


S 


5 39 


3 39 


6 15 


6 17 


A.M. 


6 8 


i5 


1 42 


2 2 


8 25 


8 50 


6.1 | 


10.00 p.m. $ gr. H. L. S. 


2.55 


12 


s 


5 4° 


4 


6 14 


6 41 


39 


7 11 


16 


2 20 


2 40 


9 9 


9 38 


6.2 1 


11.57 A - M - % s. 


256 


*3 


M 


5 4i 


4 21 


6 12 


7 6 


1 22 


8 14 


I7 o 


2 58 


3 18 


9 53 


10 24 


6.1 


I.OO A.M. (5^0 


257 


14 


Tu 


5 4 1 


4 42 


6 11 


7 34 


2 6 


9 i5 


18 


3 33 


3 54 


10 35 


11 10 


6.o| 


10.00 p.m. n W 


258 


15 


W 


5 42 


5 4 


6 9 


8 6 


2 51 


10 17 


19 


4 6 


4 30 


11 17 


11 56 


5-8 


O.38 P.M. $ S. 


259 


16 


Th 


5 42 


5 25 


6 7 


8 43 


3 38 


11 17 


20 


4 40 


5 6 


11 59 




5-8 


3.54 p.m. T ? S. 


260 


17 


F 


5 43 


5 46 


6 6 


9 2 7 


4 27 


15 


21 


5 15 


5 47 


42 


43 


5-7 


2.44 a.m. 9 rises. 


261 


18 


S 


5 44 


6 7 


6 4 


10 18 


5 17 


1 8 


22 


5 58 


6 34 


1 27 


1 29 


5-6 


2.32 p.m. 5 w d 


262 


T 9 


s 


5 45 


6 29 


6 2 


11 14 


6 8 


1 56 


2 3 


6 50 


7 29 


2 15 


2 16 


5-4 


I.05 P.M. cf S. 


263 


20 


M 


5 46 


6 50 


6 1 


A.M. 


6 59 


2 38 


24 


7 5i 


8 29 


3 4 


3 7 


5-3 


5.15 a.m. 1| rises. 


264 


21 


Tu 


5 47 


7 " 


5 59 


O 12 


7 45 


3 3° 


25 


9 3 


9 S 2 


3 54 


3 59 


5-4 


5.56 p.m. $ rises. 


265 


22 


W 


5 48 


7 31 


5 57 


I 20 


8 38 


3 46 


26 


10 9 


10 31 


4 44 


4 50 


5-6 


2.07 p.m. Autumn com. 


266 


2 3 


Th 


5 49 


7 52 


5 56 


2 27 


9 26 


4 15 


27 


11 6 


11 24 


5 32 


5 42 


5-8 


7.01 p.m. c5 9 C 


267 


24 


F 


5 5o 


8 13 


5 54 


3 3 6 


10 14 


4 4i 


28 


11 57 


... 


6 18 


6 32 


6.0 


9.46 A.M. $ S. 


268 


25 


S 


5 5i 


8 33 


5 52 


4 45 


11 1 


5 7 


29 


15 


44 


7 4 


7 23 


6-3 


7.11 p.m. (S% a, 


269 


26 


s 


5 52 


8 53 


5 50 


5 56 


11 50 


5 34 


30 


1 4 


1 29 


7 48 


8 13 


6.6 


8.18 p.m. 1^ sets. 


270 


^7 


M 


5 53 


9 !3 


5 48 


7 10 


42 


6 4 


I 


1 48 


2 11 


8 32 


9 4 


6.7 


5.58 P.M. (5 0* d 


271 


28 


Tu 


5 54 


9 33 


5 47 


8 26 


1 37 


6 38 


2 


2 29 


2 53 


9 18 


9 58 


6.7 


II.03 A.M. § S. 


272 


29 


W 


5 55 


9 53 


5 46 


9 43 


2 35 


7 20 


3 


3 11 


3 3D 


10 4 


10 54 


6.6 


3.45 A.M. 9 rises. 


273 


3° 


Th 


5 56 


10 12 


5 44 


10 59 


3 36 


8 11 


4! 


3 53 


4 21 


10 56 


11 52 


6.4 


2.40 A.M. 3 h <I 



SEPTEMBER. 

Venus ( 9) n ear the Moon (<[ ) September 23, 

P.M. 

Mercury ($) near the Moon ( ([ ) September 
25, P.M. 

Mercury ( $) near Jupiter {%) September 
27, p.m. 

NOMINATING CONVENTIONS OF 1896. 

The Republican National Convention met in 
St. Louis, and on June 18 nominated William 
McKinley, of Ohio, for President, and Garret 
Augustus Hobart, of New Jersey, for Vice-Pre- 
sident. The platform declared against the free 
coinage of silver, except under international 
agreement. 

The Democratic Convention met at Chicago, 
and on July 10 and 11 nominated William Jen- 
nings Bryan, of Nebraska, for President, and 
Arthur Sewall, of Maine, for Vice-President. The 
platform was very radical in many respects, and 
declared unqualifiedly for the free coinage of 
silver at 16 to 1. 

The Populist Convention met at St. Louis, and 
on July 14 and 15 nominated Mr. Bryan for Pre- 



sident and Thomas E. Watson, of Georgia, for 
Vice-President. 

The National Democratic Convention met at 
Indianapolis, and on September 3 nominated 
John M. Palmer, of Illinois, for President, and 
Simon Bolivar Buckner, of Kentucky, for Vice- 
President. It adopted a platform opposing that 
of the Democratic Convention at Chicago and 
declaring for the gold standard. 

The Prohibitionist Convention met at Pitts- 
burg, and on May 27 nominated Joshua Levering, 
of Maryland, for President, and Hale Johnson, 
of Illinois, for Vice-President. It refused to de- 
clare for free coinage of silver. 

The National Party, a faction of the Prohibi- 
tion Party in favor of free silver and woman suf- 
frage, met at Pittsburg, and on May 28 nominated 
Charles E. Bentley, of Nebraska, for President, 
and James Haywood Southgate, of North Caro- 
lina, for Vice-President. 

The Socialist-Labor Convention met at New 
York, and on July 4 nominated Charles H. 
Matchett, of New York, for President, and Mat- 
thew Maguire, of New Jersey, for Vice-President. 

The Silverites Convention met at St. Louis, and 
on July 14 nominated Mr. Bryan for President 
and Mr. Sewall for Vice-President. 



12 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Tenth Month.] 








OCTOBER. 








[1897. 










MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




. 




-M 




d. h. tn. 


af. A. w. 




JO 






PS 

-a 


D First Quarter 


.... 3 31 A.M. 


ft Last Quarter 18 4 8 p.m.. 




t" 


-a 


O Full Mo 






I 41 A.M. 


% New Moon 25 6 27 p.m. 


Phenomena. 








*** 

o 



>-> 





THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 




1=1 


=3 
<=> 




Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


«5 
be 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


IS 


C Apo.,i4d. 5I1. p.m. 








A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


-a) 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


JK 


d Per., 26d. ioh. p.m. 








h.in. 


tn. s. 


h.m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


rf. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


ft. m. 


*-5 




274 


I 


F 


5 57 


IO 31 


5 43 


8 


4 39 


9 10 


5 


4 4o 


5 11 


11 52 




6.2 


10.52 a.m. £> S. 


2 75 


2 


S 


5 58 


10 50 


5 4i 


1 7 


5 4° 


10 17 


6 


5 3i 


6 7 


51 


52 


5-9; 


: 9.51 A.M. 9 S. 


276 


3 


s 


5 59 


11 8 


5 4o 


1 55 


6 39 


11 34 


7 


6 33 


Z *1 


1 49 


1 54 


5-6 


', O.45 P.M. 0* S. 


277 


4 


M 


6 


11 26 


5 38 


2 34 


7 33 


A.M. 


8 


7 47 


8 26 


2 44 


2 57 


5-3 | 


I 4.33 A.m. $ rises. 


278 


5 


Tu 


6 1 


11 44 


5 36 


3 6 


8 22 


038 


9 


9 J 3 


9 37 


3 42 


3 57 


5-3 


3.22 a.m. 9 rises. 


2 79 


6 


W 


6 2 


12 2 


5 34 


3 33 


9 9 


1 47 


10 


10 28 10 44 


4 37 


4 57 


5-5 i 


3.07 A.M. J $ 11 


280 


7 


Th 


6 3 


12 19 


5 33 


3 58 


9 53 


2 53 


11 


11 27 11 44 


5 3i 


5 53 


5-7 


9.07 p.m. § gr. el. W. 


281 


8 


F 


6 4 


12 35 


5 3 1 


4 21 


10 35 


3 57 


12 


1 17 


... 


6 21 


6 48 


5-9 


10.35 A.M. % S. 


282 


9 


s 


6 5 


12 51 


5 29 


4 44 


11 18 


5 


13 


1 36 


59 


7 8 


7 39 


6.1 : 


4.33 a.m. $ rises. 


283 


10 


s 


6 6 


13 7 


5 28 


S 9 


A.M. 


6 2 


14 


; 1 18 


1 39 


7 54 


8 28 


6.1! 


6.00 p.m. cjf sets. 


284 


11 


M 


6 7 


13 22 


5 26 


5 36 


O I 


7 3 


15 


1 56 


2 16 


8 37 


9 i5 


6.1 


9.57 a.m. 9 S. 


285 


12 


Tu 


6 8 


13 37 


5 25 


6 6 


O 46 


8 5 


16 


2 31 


2 5 1 


9 19 


9 59 6 -i | 


IO.48 A.M. J S. 


286 


13 


W 


6 9 


13 5i 


5 23 


6 41 


I 32 


9 6 


17 


3 3 


3 27 


10 1 


10 44 


5-9 


4.10 a.m. 11 rises. 


287 


M 


Th 


6 10 


14 5 


5 21 


7 23 


2 20 


10 5 


18 


1 3 34 


3 58 


10 42 


11 28 


5-8 


0.30 P.M. 0" S. 


288 


15 


F 


6 11 


14 18 


5 !9 


8 10 


3 10 


10 59 


19 


'■ 4 5 


4 33 


11 23 


... 


5-8 


9.50 P.M. ^d 


289 


16 


S 


6 12 


14 30 


5 18 


9 4 


4 


11 49 


20 


4 4i 


5 12 


12 


5 


5-7 


4.58 a.m. $ rises. 


290 


1 7 


s 


6 *3 


14 42 


5 17 


10 3 


4 5i 


33 


21 


5 24 


5 57 


58 


50 


5-7 


3.47 a.m. 9 rises. 


291 


18 


M 


6 14 


14 54 


5 16 


" 5 


5 41 


1 10 


22 


6 15 


6 48 


1 43 


1 38 


5-7 


| 2.00 P.M. )} S. 


292 


J 9 


Tu 


6 15 


15 4 


5 i5 


i A.M. 


6 29 


1 43 


23 


7 14 


7 47 


2 30 


2 29 


5-7 


4.07 p.m. ^ 9 11 


293 


20 


W 


6 16 


15 14 


5 13 1 


O 9 


7 16 


2 12 


24' 


; 8 22 


8 49 


3 18 


3 23 


5-6 


j 9.57 A.M. Tj S. 


294 


21 


Th 


6 18 


15 24 


5 12; 


I 15 


8 3 


2 39 


25 


9 29 


9 53 


4 6 


4 17 


5-7 


5.35 p.m. c? sets. 


295 


22 


F 


6 19 


15 32 


5" 


J 2 22 


8 49 


3 5 


26 


10 29 


10 51 


4 53 


5 12 


5-9 


II.08 A.M. 5 S. 


296 


23 


s 


6 20 


15 40 


5 10 


. 3 3 2 


9 37 


3 3 1 


27 


11 23 


11 44 


5 41 


6 4 


6.2 


3.43 P.M. A 1| ([ 
IO.O5 A.M. 9 S. 


297 


24 s 


6 21 


15 47 


5 9 1 


! 4 44 


10 27 


4 


28 


12 




6 27 


6 58 


6.4 


298 


25 M 


6 22 


15 54 


5 7 


6 11 21 


4 33 


29 


37 


1 1 


7 *3 


7 53 


6.5 


7.42 A.M. J $ C 


299 


26 Tu 


6 23 


16 


5 6| 


7 18 


19 


5 12 


1 


1 26 


1 47 


8 1 


8 47 6.6 


IO.27 A.M. A cf C 


300 


27 W 


6 24 


16 5 


5 4: 


; s 37 


1 21 


6 1 


2 


2 8 


2 33 


8 51 


9 43 6 - 6 


4.12 p.m. occ. 7r Sccrpii. 


301 


28 Th 


6 25 


16 9 


5 3 


9 52 


2 26 


6 59 


3 


2 51 


3 20 


9 42 10 40 6.5 


5.53 a.m. 5 rises. 


302 29 F 


6 26 


16 12 


5 2 


10 57 


3 3 1 


8 6 


4 


3 37 


4 7 


10 37 11 37 6.4 


10.08 a.m. 9 S. 


303 3° S 


6 27 


16 15 


5 1 


" 51 


4 32 


9 18 


5 


4 25 


4 57 


11 37 ... 


6.2 


6.14 p.m. T^ sets. 


304 31 S 


6 28 


16 17 5 


34 


5 28 10 30 


6 


1 5 21 


5 5 2! 33 ° 38 5-8 


9.00 a.m. in (J 



OCTOBER. 

Very close conjunction of Mercury ( § ) and 
Jupiter (1|) October 6, a.m. 

Venus ( 9) and Jupiter (1|) very close October 
19, p.m. 

THE EASTERN QUESTION. 

The " Eastern Question," as it has been called, 
has been present with us all the year, and has 
several times threatened to involve Europe in 
war, but practically nothing has been done for 
the protection of the Armenians or to compel 
the Sultan to fulfill his promises of reform in ad- 
ministration. Many thousands of Christians 
have been murdered by the Turks, but the 
Christian nations of Europe have found no prac- 
tical way to interfere for their protection. The 
Sultan's safjety lies in the jealousy of the Powers. 
No one dares to act independently, and they find 
it impossible to come to any agreement as to how 
they shall act together, for the breaking up of the 
Ottoman Empire would be sure to involve them 
all in war. Late in the year, Gladstone was so 
stirred by the stories of murder and outrage, that 
he advocated independent action by England ; 
but the Liberal Party was divided on this ques- 



tion, and Lord Rosebery resigned the leadership 
of the party that he might be free to oppose its 
probable policy. As the Almanac goes to press 
there are rumors that the Powers are preparing 
to act in concert, but there is no real evidence 
that they will do anything more than admonish 
the Porte. The Government of the United 
States asked that a small war vessel be allowed 
to pass the Dardanelles that it might be in a 
position to succor Americans in the event of dis- 
turbances in Constantinople, but permission was 
refused. It is believed that efforts have been 
made to get the United States, as a disinterested 
party, to take the lead in bringing the Sultan to 
terms. 

It has been decided to adopt the electric mo- 
tor throughout the entire length of the Erie 
Canal. The speed is .about three or four miles 
an hour, which is about as much as the condition 
of the canal banks will allow. 



The great diamond mines of South Africa 
have yielded in the last twenty years $375,000,000 
worth of diamonds. The largest diamond found 
since the mines were opened was two inches long, 
and larger than the famous Kohinoor. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



13 



Eleventh Month.] 






NOVEMBER. 








[1897. 




. 




MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




tZ 


-a 


■» 


d. h. m. d. h. tn. 




s 


E2 



ai 

O 


9 First Quarter... 1 9 36 a.m. d Last Quarter. ..17 9 2 A.M. 






s 
*^> 




O Full Moon 9 449 A.M. % New Moon 24 4 19 a.m. 

| ]) First Quarter. ..30 10 13 p.m. 


Phenomena. 


O 


THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 




0? 


S3 
(=1 




Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. ! S> High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


iH 


d Apo.,iod.i6h. p.m. 








A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. j""* j A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 




d Per., 24d. 9h. a.m. 








h.tn. 


777. J. 


h.m. 


h. tn. 


Ii. »l. 


h. tn. d. h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


*-s 




305 


I 


M 


6 29 


l6 l8 


4 59 


1 8 


6 20 


11 50, 7 


6 24 


6 54 


1 28 


I 38 


5-5 


11. 31 a.m. § S. 


306 


2 


Tu 


6 30 


l6 I9 


4 57 


1 37 


7 7 


A.M. 8 


7 32 


8 2 


2 21 


2 38 


5-4 


6.16 a.m. § rises. 


307 


3 


W 


6 31 


l6 18 


4 55 


2 3 


7 52 


O 46 9 


8 47 


9 12 


3 14 


3 35 


5-4 


10. 11 a.m. 9 S. 


308 


4 


Th 


6 33 


l6 17 


4 53 


2 26 


8 34 


1 5i IO 9 57 


10 17 


4 7 


4 33 


5-4 


0.04 p.m. cf S. 


309 


5 


F 


6 34 


l6 15 


4 53 


2 49 


9 16 


2 53 Iz IO 56 


11 18 


4 59 


5 30 


5-6 


4.30 a.m. 9 rises. 


3IO 


6 


S 


6 36 


l6 12 


4 52 


3 13 


9 59 


3 54 I2 11 47 




5 48 


6 23 


5-7 


n.co a.m. 9 gr.H.L.N. 


3" 


7 


s 


6 37 


l6 9 


4 5i 


3 38 


10 43 


4 55 13 9 


32 


6 36 


7 16 


5-9 


8.59 A.M. 1| S. 


312 


8 


M 


6 38 


l6 4 


4 50 


4 8 


n 28 


5 56 14 52 


1 12 


7 22 


8 4 


5-9 


8.07 a.m. $ in 13 


313 


9 


Tu6 39 


!5 59 


4 5° 


4 4i 


A.M. 


6 57 J 5 1 31 


1 48 


8 6 


8 52 


5-9 


IO.16 A.M. 9 S. 


314 


10 


W 6 40 


15 53 


4 49 


5 21 


16 


7 57 16 2 4 


2 24 


8 48 


9 35 


5-8 


4.26 a.m. occ. 17 TaurL 


315 


11 


Th 6 42 


15 46 


4 48 


6 6 


1 5 


8 53 17 2 38 


2 59 


9 29 


10 18 


5-8 


6.58 A.M. cf rises. 


316 12 


F 


6 43 


15 38 


4 47 


6 58 


1 55 


9 44 18 3 8 


3 32 


10 11 


11 1 


5.8 


1 2.07 p.m. 3 § 0" close. 


317 13 s 


6 44 


15 29 


4 46 


7 55 


2 46 


10 29 19 3 38 


4 7 


10 51 


11 43 


5-8 


i 4.49 a.m. 9 rises. 


318 I 4 


S 


6 45 


15 20 


4 45 


8 55 


3 35 


11 8 20 4 16 


4 44 


11 32 


... 


5-8 


2.34 a.m. 1/ rises. 


319 J 5 


M 


6 46 15 9 


4 44 


9 57 


4 23 


11 42 21 4 58 


5 27 


27 


16 


5-8 


j O.OI P.M. $ S. 


320 l6 


Tu 6 47 14 58 


4 43 


11 1 


5 10 


12 22 


5 46 


6 15 


1 10 


1 4 


5-8 


7.07 A.M. rf W $ 


321 


17 


W 


6 48 14 46 


4 42 


A.M. 


5 55 


38 23 


6 42 


7 8 


1 54 


1 54 


5-8 


0.15 p.m. T^ S. 


322 


18 


Th 


6 49 J 4 33 


4 42 


5 


6 40 


1 424 


7 42 


8 8 


2 39 


2 48 


5-7 


7.07 p.m. 3 $ h 


3 2 3 


J 9 


F 


6 51 


14 19 


4 41 


1 11 


7 25 


1 29 25 


8 48 


9 12 


3 27 


3 44 


5-7 


4.56 p.m. § sets. 


3 2 4 


20 


S 


6 52 


14 4 


4 4i 


2 19 


8 13 


1 56 26 


9 52 


10 14 


4 15 


4 4i 


5-8 


IO.59 A.M. 3 ^/ d 


3 2 5 


21 


s 


6 53 


13 49 4 40 


3 3 1 


9 3 


2 26 27 


10 51 11 14 


5 4 


5 4° 


6.0 


3.07 A.M. (f$0 


326 


22 


M 


6 54 


13 32 


4 39 


4 47 


9 59 


3 2 28 


11 46 


... 


5 54 


6 38 


6.2 


9.36 p.m. (5 9 a 


327 


23 


Tu 


6 55 


13 !5 


4 39 


6 6 


10 59 


3 46 29 


13 


37 


6 46 


7 36 


6.3 


IO.27 A.M. 9 S. 


328 


24 


W 


6 56 


12 57 


4 38 


7 25 


4 


4 40 


1 5 


1 27 


7 37 


8 33 


6-3 


4.16 A.M. (J o* d 


329 


25 


Th 


6 57 


12 39 


4 38 


8 37 


1 11 


5 45 1 1 52 


2 17 


8 30 


9 3° 


6.9 


> I.07 A.M. (5 h © 


330 


26 


F 


6 58 


12 19 


4 37 


9 38 


2 16 


6 58 2 2 38 


3 7 


9 26 


10 25 


6-3 


II.40 A.M. 0* S. 


33 1 


2 7 


S 


6 59 


n 59 


4 37 


10 27 


3 17 


8 13 3 3 25 


3 55 


10 24 


11 19 


6.2 


I.07 P.M. 3 0" h 


33 2 


28 


s 


7 


" 39 


4 37 


11 8 


4 13 


9 26 4 


4 15 


4 43 


11 23 


... 


6.0 


O.35 P.M. § S. 


333 


29 


M 


7 1 


11 17 


4 3 6 


11 39 


5 3 


10 36 


5 


5 9 


5 34 


12 


21 


5-8 


^5.09 p.m. § sets. 


334 


30 Tu 


7 2 


10 55 


4 36 


6 


5 49 


11 43 


6, 6 7 


6 31 


1 2 


1 18 5- 6 


6.32 a.m. \} rises. 



NOVEMBER. 

Near approach of Mercury ( $ ) and Mars 
(cf ) November 12. 

Jupiter ( 11 ) near the Moon ( d ) November 20. 

Mercury ( $ ) near the Moon ( d ) November 
24, p.m. 

Mars ( of ) and Saturn ( \\ ) near each other 
November 27, p.m. 

Moon ( d ) occults the Pleiades November 
10, about 4.30 a.m. 

BOND ISSUES. 

Early in 1896 gold began to be exported to 
Europe in large quantities, partly because of the 
return of securities from England due to a flurry 
in the stock market caused by the publication of 
the Venezuela correspondence and messages. 
President Cleveland sent a special message to 
Congress asking for legislation to protect the 
public credit. The House responded by passing 
a bill for a temporary increase of revenue, to be 
obtained by a horizontal increase of twenty per 
cent, in tariff rates and by a tax on wool. A 
second measure adopted by the House was a bill 
authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to is- 
sue short interest -bearing obligations. Both meas- 



ures were halted in the Senate, where the advo- 
cates of the free coinage of silver were in control. 
As there was no probability that relief could be 
obtained from Congress, the Treasury Depart- 
ment prepared for a new bond issue, and J. Pier- 
pont Morgan organized a powerful syndicate to 
bid for the entire issue ; but the call was issued 
for public subscriptions to the loan, and they were 
so large that the syndicate was dissolved. The 
issue was of |tioo.ooo,ooo thirty-year four-per- 
cent, bonds. Mr. Morgan announced his willing- 
ness to help any one to gold who wanted to sub- 
scribe for bonds, and also to care for any portion 
of the amount remaining unsubscribed. A large 
part of the loan was taken by Messrs. J. P. 
Morgan & Co., and that firm was also awarded 
$4,700,000 of bonds on which bidders made de- 
fault. The bond issues were the subject of bitter 
criticism of the Administration in the political 
campaign which followed. 



Dr. J. L. Wortman has obtained a complete 
skeleton of an extinct animal of an enormous 
size. It was found in the" Bad Lands" of Utah. 
It weighed from three to five tons in life, and 
must have been more powerful than any other 
animal, even the elephant 



ii^^u- i ^.*, ! ,; 



14 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Twelfth 


Month. 


] 






DECEMBER. 




[1897. 








t 

MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




tZ 




•S 


d. h. m. 


d. h. m. 









-a 


O Full Aloon 8 11 54 p.m. # New 






>-< 

m 


3 

*-* 

O 
>> 


<[ Last Quarter ...16 11 21 p.m. D First Quarter. ..30 2 26 p.m. ' 


Phenomena. 


o 


THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 




THE TIDES, 




a3 




c3 
1=) 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 




Philadelphia. 






Rises Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


be 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 1* > 


d Apo., 8d. 5I1. a.m. 








A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


■* A. 


M. 


P.M. 


A.M. P.M. ?S 


C Per., 22d. ioh. p.m. 








h.tn. 


in. s. 


h.m. 


h. m. 


h. in. 


h. in. 


d. h. 


in. 


h. in. 


h. m. h. nt. 5; S 




335 


I 


w 


7 3 


IO 32 4 35 


30 


6 33 


A.M. 


7 7 


6 


7 32 


1 54 2 16 5.4 


0.44 P.M. $ S. 


336 


2 


Th 


7 4 


10 9 4 35 


: 53 


7 i5 


O 46 


8 8 


12 


8 36 


2 44 3 9 5-3 


5.16 p.m. 5 sets. 


337 


3 


F 


7 5 


9 45 4 35 


1 17 


7 58 


I 48 


9 9 


17 


9 4i 


3 34 4 6 5.3 


10.38 a.m. 9 s. 


338 


4 


S 


7 6 


9 21 4 35 


1 42 


8 41 


2 49 


10 10 


17 10 44 


4 24 5 1 5.4 


II.34 A.M. (f S. 


339 


5 


S 


7 7 


8 56 4 35 


2 10 


9 26 


3 SO 


11 11 


9 11 37 


5 14 5 54 5-5 


O.55 P.M. $ S. 


340 


6M 


7 8 


8 30 4 35 


2 42 


10 12 


4 50 


12 11 


59 - 


6 3 6 47 5-5 


7.22 A.M. % S. 


34i 


7 Tu 


7 9 


8 4 


4 35 


! 3 20 


11 1 


5 5o 


13 ° 


24 42 


6 5° 7 37 5- 6 


5.46 a.m. 9 rises. 


342 


8 


w 


7 10 


7 38 


4 35 


4 3 


« 5i 


6 47 


14 1 


5 1 19 


7 36 8 24 5.6 


9.07 A.M. 3 9 lH 


343 


9 


Th 


7 « 


7 « 


4 35 


4 54 


A.M. 


7 40 


15 1 


42 


1 57 


8 19 9 8 5.6 


8.IO A.M. ^ W C 


344 


10 F 


7 " 


6 43 4 35 


5 49 


O 42 


8 27 


16 2 


15 


2 34 


9 2 9 52 5.6 


5.37 p.m. 5 sets. 


345 


11 S 


7 12 


6 16 4 36 


6 49 


I 32 


9 8 


17 2 


48 


3 8 


9 42 10 32 5.7 


6.46 a.m. j rises. 


346 


12 S 


7 13 


5 47 4 36 


7 50 


2 20 


9 44 


18 3 


20 


3 44 


10 23 11 13 5.7 


3.07 p.m. £ 9 »j 


347 


13 


M 


7 i4 


5 19 4 36 


8 53 


3 7 


10 14 


19 3 


56 


4 20 


11 4 11 53 5-8 


10.50 a.m. 9 s. 


348 


14 


Tu 


7 J 4 


4 50 4 36 


9 56 


3 52 


10 41 


20 4 


36 


5 1 


11 48 ... 5.8 


0.57 a.m. 7| rises. 


349 


15 


W 


7 15 


4 21 4 36 


10 59 


4 36 


11 7 21 5 


21 


5 46 


34 3 6 5-9 


II.24 A.M. (f S. 


35o 


16 


Th 


7 16 


3 52 4 37 


A.M. 


5 20 


11 30 


22 6 


13 


6 35 


1 17 * 24 5.9 


1. 21 P.M. § S. 


35i 


17 


F 


7 x 7 


3 22 4 37 


O 4 


6 5 


" 55 


23 7 


8 


7 29 


2 2 19 5.8 


6.09 a.m. 9 rises. 


352 


18 


S 


7 17 


2 53 4 38 


I 12 


6 52 


23 


24 8 


10 


8 30 


2 48 3 17 5.6 


2.29 A.M. (S 11 d 


353 


19 


s 


7 18 


2 23 4 38 


2 23 


7 43 


54 


25 9 


17 


9 39 


3 39 4 19 5-5 


6.01 p.m. $ sets. 


354 


20 


M 


7 18 


1 53 4 39 


3 38 


8 39 


1 32 


26 10 


22 


10 46 


4 31 5 21 5.6 


4.07 p.m. $ gr. el. E. 


355 


21 


Tu 


7 19 


1 23 4 39 


■ 4 55 


9 4o 


2 20 


27 11 


22 


11 52 


5 27 6 22 5.7 


8.07 a.m. Winter com. 


356 


22 


W 


7 19 


53 4 40 


6 10 


10 45 


3 19 


28 


18 


... 


6 23 7 23 5.8 


5.08 p.m. (5 9C 


357 


23 


Th 


7 19 


23 4 40 


7 17 


11 52 


4 29 


29 


50 


1 11 


7 21 8 19 6.0 


IO.08 A.M. Vj S. 


358 


24 


F 


7 20 


P.M. 


4 40 


8 14 


57 


5 45 


1 1 


40 


2 3 8 17 9 14 6.0 


n.48 p.m. (5 5 c 


359 


25 5 


7 20 


37 


4 4i 


8 59 


1 57 


7 3 


2 2 


27 


2 54 9 14 10 6 6.1 


II.07 A.M. 9 S. 


360 


26 S 


7 20 


1 7 


4 4i 


9 3 6 


2 52 


8 16 


3 3 


14 


3 42 10 11 10 56 6.0 


6.04 p.m. $ sets. 


361 


27 


Al 


7 21 


1 37 


4 42 


10 6 


3 4i 


9 27 


4 4 


3 


4 29 


11 6 11 46 5.9 


11.07 p.m. 5 in Q, 


362 


28 


Tu 


7 21 


2 6 


4 43 


10 32 


4 28 


10 34 


5 4 


53 


5 16 


12 1 ... 5.8 


6.40 a.m. 0* rises. 


3 6 3 


29 


W 


7 21 


2 » 


►4 43 


10 53 


5 12 


11 40 


6 5 


44 


6 5 


34 55 5.6 


4.55 p.m. Jj rises. 


3 6 4 


30 


Th 


7 21 


3 4 4 44 


11 20 


5 55 


40 


7 6 


33 


6 57 


1 23 1 47 5.4 


6.07 p.m. (5 9 cf near. 


3 6 5 


3 1 


F 


7 21 


3 33 4 45 


11 44 6 38 


1 42 


8 7 


29 


7 53 


2 11 2 40' 5.3 


9.40 a.m. \i S. 



DECEMBER. 

Venus (9) and Saturn (^) near each other 
December 12. 

Jupiter (1|) near the AIoon (d) December 
t8, a.m. 

AlARs(cf) near the Moon(<[ ) December 22. p.m. 

Mercury ( $ ) very near the AIoon (([ ) De- 
cember 24, P.M. 

Venus (9) and Mars ((f) very near each 
other, December 30, p.m. 



HOLMES-PITEZEL MURDER CASE. 

The famous Holmes-Pitezel murder case, de- 
scribed in the Ledger Almanac for 1896, con- 
tinued to attract attention until the execution of 
the murderer. On December 30 the Grand Jury 
found an indictment against William A. Shoe- 
maker, counsel for Holmes, charging him with 
attempted subornation of perjury, and on Alarch 
14 Judge Thayer suspended him from his office 
as attorney for one year. 

On Alarch 4 the Supreme Court affirmed the 
finding of the Court of Oyer and Terminer in the 
case of H. H. Holmes, all the assignments of 
error being overruled. The death warrant was 
read to him on Alarch 9. Holmes then began 
the preparation of an alleged confession, which 



he sold to a newspaper syndicate. It was a tissue 
of lies. He said that he had killed twenty-seven 
persons, and gave the details; but some of those 
he said he had murdered were found to be alive. 
The confession appears to have been made up 
by Holmes out of newspaper clippings. He 
adopted all the stories told of him . He admitted 
having murdered B. F. Pitezel in this city, and 
says that he killed him by pouring benzine over 
his face and clothing while he was drunk, and 
igniting it with a match. The medical testimony 
at the trial of Holmes showed conclusively that 
the burns on Pitezel's face were made after death, 
and consequently they could not have killed him. 
On April 29, Jephtha D. Howe, a St. Louis attor- 
ney, charged with having conspired with Holmes 
to defraud the Fidelity Mutual Life Association 
out of $10,000 upon a policy of insurance on the 
life of B. F. Pitezel was acquitted, the District 
Attorney abandoning the case. 

On Alay 7 the case came to an end, Herman 
! W. Mudgett, alias H. H. Holmes, having being 
hanged on that day by Sheriff Clement. ( )n the 
scaffold he declared that he had not killed Pite- 
zel nor any of the Pitezel children, and that the 
extent of his crimes was the accidental killing of 
two women by malpractice. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



15 



CHURCHES AND RELIGIOUS SER- 
VICES IN PHILADELPHIA. * 

When not otherwise stated, the hours of service 
are — 10^ morning and 7^ evening. 

The Public Ledger, on Saturday of each week, 
contains a summary of the Religious News of the 
week, embracing important facts relating to all de- 
nominations; Selections of Religious Thought and 
a department devoted to Sunday-school Lessons. 

On Saturdays the Ledger contains advertise- 
ments of the Religious Services of the principal 

churches. 

BAPTIST. 

American Baptist Publication Society, 1632-34 
Chestnut. 

Baptist Home, Seventeenth and Norris : Mrs. 
Levi Knowles. President, 126 N. Eighteenth ; 
Mrs. Charles H. Banes, Treasurer, 2021 Spring 
Garden; Mrs. E. B. Palmer, Cor. Secretary; 
Mrs. J. G. Walker, Recording Secretary. 

Baptist Orphanage, Angora, Philadelphia : Mrs. 
B. Griffith . President of the Board of Managers, 
2038 Chestnut; Miss Ida E. Paul, Cor. Sec, 
6769 Main, Germantown ; Mrs. H. N. Story, 
Treasurer, 1533 Poplar. 

Baptist Training School for Christian Work, 762 
S. Te&tb : Mrs. John Miller, President, Wayne, 
Del. Co.. Pa.; Mrs. B. MacMackin, Cor. Sec. 
Board of Trustees, Fifty-eighth and Baltimore 
av. ; Mrs. Emma M. Dennithorne, Treasurer, 
762 S. Tenth. 

Editor of the Examiner, Rev. H. L. Wayland, 
D. D., 511 S. Forty-second. 

Officers in American Baptist Publication So- 
ciety Building, 1632-34 Chestnut. 

Rev. A.J. Rowland. D.D., General Secretary and 
Asst. Treasurer; Rev. R. G. Seymour, D. D., 
Bible and Missionary Secretary ; Rev. O. F. 
Flippo, D. D., District Secretary Publication 
Society; Rev. Philip L. Jones, D. D., Book 
Editor; Rev. C. R. Blackall, D. D., Office 
Editor of Periodicals ; O. W. Spratt, Business 
and Depositories. 

Officers in Harrison Building, Fifteenth and 
Market. 

Editor of the The Commonwealth , Rev. J. Sexton 
James, D. D.; Rev. W. H. Conard, D. D., 
Cor. Sec. Pennsylvania State Mission Society ; 
Baptist City Mission. B. F. Dennisson, Presi- 
dent ; Rev. B. MacMackin, General Secretary; 
Rev. Frank S. Dobbins, District Secretary 
Missionary Union ; Rev. G. M. Spratt. D. D., 
Cor. Sec. Education Society, 2025 Brandy wine ; 
Rev. Leroy Stephens, D. D., Financial Agent 
Education Society, Lewisburg; Rev. E. B. Pal- 
mer, D.D., District Secretary Home Missionary 
Society ; American Baptist Historical Society : 
President, Rev. Lemuel Moss, D. D., 3114 
Berks; Secretary, Rev. B. MacMackin ; Treas- 
urer, H. E. Lincoln ; Woman's Foreign Mis- 
sionary Society of Pennsylvania: President, 
Mrs. F. W. Tustin; Treasurer, Mrs. Charles 
H. Banes; Cor. Sec, Mrs. M. R. Trevor; 
Rec Sec, Mrs. S. M. Miller; General Secre- 
tary, Mrs. H. N. Jones ; Woman's Home Mis- 
sion Union of Philadelphia and Vicinity: Presir 
dent, Mrs. J. G. Walker ; Treasurer, Miss M. 
A. I. Hart ; Cor. Sec, Mrs. C. H. Woolston ; 
Rec. Sec, Mrs. C. W. Ray. 

Alleghany Avenue, Frankford and Alleghany 



John E. Craig, 



avs. : Rev. J. G. Booker, 1840 E. Alleghany av. 
10^ a.m., 754 p.m. 

Alpha Mission, 2433 Mascher : Rev. George 
N. Spencer. 639 Snyder av. 10^ a.m., 4 p.m. 

Angora, Fifty-ninth and Baltimore av. 

Baltimore Avenue Mission. Baltimore av. and 
Fifty-second : Rev. Joseph A. Bennett, 1013 S. 
Fifty-first. 10^ a.m., 8 p.m. 

Belmont Avenue, Belmont and Westminster 
avs. : Rev. A. F. Williamson, 4229 Otter. 10% 
a.m.. 7}^ P.M. 

Bethany. Fox Chase : Rev. 
Angora. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Bethesda. Fifth and Venango : Rev. Albert L. 
Miller, 806 W. Somerset. 10^ A.M., 7% P.M. 

Bethlehem, Eighteenth and York : Rev. F. W. 
Farr, 1516 Lehigh av. 

Bethsaida (colored). Twentieth and Tasker: 
Rev. A. S. Halsted, 2013 Fernon. 

Blockley, Fifty-third ab. Haverford : Rev. 
Sumner W. Stevens, 5513 Hunter's av. 10^4 
a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Broad Street, S. E. cor. Broad and Brown ; 
Rev. Henry Boas Rankin, 1513 Brown. 10^ 
a.m., 7^ P.M. 



Byberry, Byberry. 
Calvary, Fifth bel. 



Carpenter : Rev 



Cambron, 1341 S. Fifth. 10^4 a. 



M. 



7 3 /4 



W. 

P.M. 



J- 



Cherry Street (colored). Cherry bel. Eleventh: 
Rev. Theodore Doughty Miller, D. D., 1326 
Lombard, n a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Chester Avenue, Chester av. and Forty-sixth : 
Rev. W. H. R. Corlies, 4220 Chester av. 10% 
a.m., 7^4 P.M. 

Chestnut Hill, Main and Bethlehem Pike : 
Rev. R. M. Hunsicker. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. ; 8 
P.M. summer. 

Diamond Street, Thirty-first and Diamond : 
xoYi. a.m., -]Y 2 p.m. 

East, Hanover and Girard av. : Rev. C. H. 
Woolston, 427 Richmond, io^ a.m., j% p.m. 

East Side Chapel, Woodbine av. and Boyer, 
Germantown : A. G. Patton, superintendent, 
East Coulter. 

Ebenezer (colored), Mt. Vernon bel. Broad: 
Rev. Alexander Childs, 1819 Addison. 11 a.m., 

8 P.M. 

Eleventh, N. W. cor. Twenty-first and Dia- 
mond : Rev. L. J. Denchheld, B. D., 1921 Jud- 
son Place. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Epiphany, cor. Chestnut and Thirty-sixth : 
Rev. Wayland Hoyt. D. D., 3604 Chestnut. 
io 1 /^ a.m., 7^4 P-M. ; April to October, 7^ p.m. 

Fairhill, Lehigh av. bel. Sixth : Rev. George 
Lloyd Cowen, Ph. D., 2910 N. Seventh. 

Falls of Schuykill, Queen ab. Ridge av.: Rev. 
0. B. Kinney, 126 Queen. 

Fifth, Eighteenth and Spring Garden : Rev. 
W. T. Chase, D. D., 2118 Green; Rev. F. H. 
Jacobs, assistant. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Fiftieth, Seventh and Susquehanna av. : Rev. 
Charles H. Thomas, 2121 N. Seventh. 10^ A.M., 

lYl P.M. 

First. N.W. cor. Broad and Arch : Rev. Kerr 
B. Tupper, D. D., 202 S. Thirty-ninth ; Rev. 
George Dana Boardman, D. D., LL. D., hon- 
orary pastor, 4500 Regent Square, ioj^ a.m., 
7% P.M. 

First German, Sixth ab. Poplar : Rev. L. C. 
Knuth, 2131 N. Ninth. 

First, Germantown, Price 



nr. Main : 
Charles Colman, 206 Price. ioJ4 a.m., 7^ 
Second, Germantown, Main cor. Upsal : Rev. 



Rev. 

P.M. 



i6 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



John Love, Jr., Upsal cor. Morton. 10^ a.m., 
7% p.m.; summer ioj^ a.m., 8 p.m. 

Third, Germantown, cor; Wister and Wake- 
field : Rev. Ransom Harvey, 18 Mechlin. to% 
a.m., iYz P.M. 

Fourth, cor. Fifth and Button-wood : Rev. John 
B. G. Pidge, D. D., 505 Green. 10^ A.m., 7%. 

P.M. 

Frankford, cor. Paul and Unity, Frankford : 
Rev. G. J. Burchett. io*4 a.m., 7% p.m. 

Frankford Avenue, cor. Frankford av. and 
Aramingo : Rev Charles Warwick, 2368 E. 
Cumberland. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m.; 8 p.m. summer. 

Gethsemane, Columbia av. and Eighteenth : 
Rev. Byron A. Woods, D. D., 1811 N. Eigh- 
teenth. 

Grace, Broad and Berks : Rev. Russell H. 
Conwell, 2020 N. Broad; Rev. George A. Peltz, 
D. D.,asst., 1821 N. Twenty-second. 10% a.m., 
■ji/i p.m. 

Haddington, Fifty-eighth and Race : Rev. 
Lewis Tyler, 3722 Sansom. 

Haines Street, Germantown : Robert Coulter, 
supt., 5013 Hancock. 

Hebron, Vine and Fifty-sixth : Rev. Homer A. 
King, Haverford av. and Fifty-third, io 1 ^ A.M., 
7% P.M. 

Holmesburg, Holmesburg : Rev. S. P. Davis, 
Holmesburg. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Holy Trinity, Bainbridge ab. Eighteenth : Rev. 
G. L. P. Taliaferro, 1641 Fitzwater. ioj^ a.m., 

lYl P.M. 

Immanuel, Twenty-third and Summer, Mission 
of First Church : Rev. Thomas A. Lloyd, 3931 
Aspen. 10^ a.m., 8 p.m. 

Lehigh Avenue, Lehigh av. and Twelfth : Rev. 
Raymond M. West, 2634 Jessup. \o Y / 2 a.m., 

8 P.M. 

Lower Dublin, Bustleton : Rev. Thomas P. 
Holloway, Bustleton. 

Lower Dublin Mission, Sandiford, Bustleton 
pike. 

Macedonia (colored), Paschal: Rev. J. T. 
Johnson, 73 North, Paschal. 

Manatawna, Upper Roxborough : Rev. J. 
Alexander Clyde. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Manayunk, Green lane bel. Wood: Rev. C. E. 
Cordo, Green lane bel. Wood. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Mantua, Fortieth and Fairmount av. : Rev. J. 
G. Walker, D. D., 649 N. Fortieth. 10% a.m., 
7% p.m.; summer, 8 p.m. 

Mantua Church Mission, Fortieth and Girard 
av. : Supt., G. W. Harlan, Twelfth and Arch. 

Mariners' Bethel, Front bel. Christian : Rev. 
G. W. Sheip. 

Memorial, N. E. cor. Broad and Master, io 1 ^ 
a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Messiah, Dauphin west of Amber : Rev. George 
Boddis, 2330 Coral. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Mission, Excelsior Hall, Front and Cambria. 

Monumental (colored). Forty-first and Lud- 
low : Rev. Alexander Gordon, 4064 Haverford 
av. 10% a.m., 7% P.M. 

Mount Vernon, Washington ab. Jefferson, 
Manayunk : Rev. William L. Haines, 144 Jeffer- 
son, Manayunk. 

Mount Zion, Germantown (colored): Rev. 
Morton Winston, 164 Queen. 

New Tabernacle, Chestnut ab. Fortieth: Rev. 
George E. Rees, D. D., 4116 Baltimore av. 10% 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Nicetown, Germantown av. and Brunner : Rev. 
Charles A. Soars, 3619 N. Fifteenth. 



North, Twenty-third and Oxford: Rev. W. 
Ward Willis, 1934 N. Twenty-fourth. io l / 2 A:M., 
7J/2 P.M.; April to October, 8 p.m. 

Oak Lane : Rev. R. B. McDanel, Oak Lane. 

IO^ A.M., 7% P.M. 

Olivet, cor. Sixth and. Federal : Rev. B. F. 
Liepsner, Ph. D., 1139 Wharton. 

Passyunk, Passyunk west of Broad ; Rev. H. 
B. Harper, 1154 McKean. ioj^ A.M., J% P.M. 

Pilgrim, Twenty-third and Christian : Rev. 
Henry Parrish, D. D., F. R. H. S., 6433 Kim- 
ball. IO^ A.M., J l / 2 P. M. 

Point Breeze Avenue Mission, Twehty-secohd 
and Point Breeze av. : ReV. F. J. Jones, 4836 
Walton av. 

Powelton Avenue, Powelton av. ab. Thirty- 
sixth : Rev. W. T. Harris, 4840 Mulberry, Frank- 
ford. 

Providence (colored), 4030 Lancaster av.-: Rev. 
W. H. Davenport, 119 S. Thirty-seventh. i&% 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Richmond, Neff and Clifton : Rev. Thomas 
L. Lewis, 2549 Neff. 10% a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Roxborough, Ridge av. nr. Lyceum av. : Rev. 
John W. Willmarth, D. D., LL.D., 4401 Ridge 
av. 10% a.m., 7% P.M. ; summer, 8 P.M 

St. Paul (colored), Eighth bel. Girard av.' 
Rev. E. W. Johnson, 1528 Walter. 

Second, Seventh bel. Girard av. I Rev. John 
Gordon, D. D., 3319 N. Twenty-first. 10^ 

A.M., -jy 2 P.M. 

Second (colored) (Frankford), Mulberry nr. 
Meddow : Rev. J. A. Sumlar. 10^ a.m., 8 P.M. 

Second (German), Hancock ab. Dauphin: Rev. 
John T. Linker, 2233 Hancock. 

Second, Nicetown (colored), Germantown av., 
Nicetown : Rev. J. H. Gordon. 

Shiloh (colored), Lombard ab. Eleventh : Rev. 
Wm. H. Phillips, D. D., 1124 Carpenter. 10^ 
a.m., 7 l / 2 P.M. 

Snyder Avenue, Seventh and Snyder av : Rev. 
J. Wesley Sullivan, 708 Snyder av. io 1 ^ a.m., 
Wz p.m. 

Snyder Avenue Church Mission, Twenty- 
second bel. Oregon av : J. W. Snow, supt., 2019 
S. Seventh. 2^, "j l / 2 p.m. 

South Broad Street, S. W. cor. Broad and 
Reed: Rev. G. W. Folwell, 1339 Reed, io 1 ^ 



A.M. 



P.M. 



Southeast, Moore bel. Second : Rev. Percival 
H. Lynch, 3133 Mantua av. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Spring Garden, Nineteenth and Master : Rev. 
Robert M. Green, 1844 Master. 10^ a.m., 7% 
p.m. ; April to October, 8 p.m. 

Spruce Street, Spruce bel. Fifth : Rev. A. 
Lincoln Moore, 604 Spruce. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Tabernacle. Germantown (colored), Coulter: 
Rev. James D. Brooks, Penn and Baird. 

Tacony, cor. Washington and Hagerman : 
Rev. Enoch Fullaway, 127 Page, Phila. 

Temple, N.W. cor. Tioga and Twenty-second: 
Rev. P. H. Goldsmith, 2227 Venango, io 1 ^ 



A.M. 



P.M. 



Tenth, Eighth ab. Green : Rev. John W. Wed- 
dell, 821 N. Seventh, io 1 ^ a.m., 7^ p.m.; sum- 
mer, 8 P.M. 

Third, Broad and Ritner : Rev. Adam Cham- 
bers, 2309 S. Sixteenth. io^4 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Thirty-fourth Street, Thirty-fourth and Haver- 
ford : Rev. J. W. Riddle, 525 N. Thirty-fourth. 

loY 2 A.M., 7% P.M. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



17 



1 



Third German, Dickinson ab. Sixth : Rev. G. 
Knobloch, 807 Morris. 

Tioga, Broad bel. Tioga ; Rev. Rutger Dox, 
Sixteenth and Westmoreland. 

Union (colored), Twelfth bel. Bainbridge : 10^ 
A.M., J l / 2 P.M. 

White Hall, Tacony bel. Bridge: 10% a.m., 
7%. P.M. 

Wissahickon, Terrace ab. Dawson : Rev. H, 
P. Aston, Kalos. ioj^ a.m., 7% p-M. ; April to 
October, 7^ P.M. 

Wyoming Mission, Second ab. Wyoming av. ; 
Rev. James French, 2159 N. Ninth. 8 p.m. 

Zion (colored), Thirteenth ab. Wallace: Rev. 
Horace B. Wayland, 1227 Davis. 

CAMDEN AND VICINITY. 

Baptist City Mission : Rev. A. G. Lawson, 
President ; Rev. Herbert E. Ryder, Missionary. 

Bethany, North Cramer Hill: Rev. George A. 
Sowell. 

Emmanuel, Fourth and Mount Vernon : Rev. 
J. N. Folwell, 280 Mount Vernon. 

First, Cramer Hill, cor. Cooper av. and Master : 
vacant. 

First, Fourth bel. Market: Rev. John W. 
Lyell, 419 Linden. 10% a.m., 7% p.m.; summer, 

7% P.M. 

First, Gloucester City : Rev. G. W. Lambourn, 
Gloucester City. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Liberty Park Chapel : Rev. H. E. Ryder, in 
charge. 

Linden, Ninth and Linden : Rev. W. G. Rus- 
sell, 935 Cooper. 

North, Fourth and Linden : Rev. Albert G. 
Lawson, D. D., 428 Linden. 

Tabernacle, Broadway bel. Spruce: Rev. 
Matthew M. Finch, 570 Berkley. 

Third, Broadway ab. Vanhook : Rev. John 
Snape. 

Trinity, Fifth ab. Market : Rev. Clarence 
A. Adams, D. D., pastor. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Rosedale, Burlington road ab. Cove road: Rev. 
C. M. Read. 
t Seventh, Kaighn's av. : vacant. 

Wynn Memorial Chapel, mission First Church, 
Spruce nr. Eighth : Rev. Geo. W. Hatch, 571 
Pine. 

Haddonfield, First Church : Rev. H. A. 
Griesemer. 

BIBLE CHRISTIANS. 

Christ Church, Park av. ab. Montgomery av. : 
Rev. Henry S. Clubb, 1025 Foulkrod. 10^ a.m. 



CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC CHURCH. 

Catholic Apostolic Church, 218 N. Thirteenth : 
O. M. Van Arsdale, 809 N. Thirty -ninth. 10 A.M., 

CHURCH OF GOD. 

Blessed Hope, Ridge av. and Green : Rev. 
C. C. Ramsay. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Church of God, Germantown av. and Berks : 
Rev. W. N. Yates, 1929 N. Sixth. \o% a.m., 
7% p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 



CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN. 

First, Dauphin ab. Broad : Rev. T. T. Myers, 
2408 N. Fifteenth. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 



Germantown, Germantown av. ab. Sharpnack : 
Rev. George N. Falkenstein, 6611 Germantown 
av. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

The Brethren Church, Tenth bel. Dauphin ; 
Rev. Isaac D. Bowman, 819 Cumberland. 10% 
A.M., 7^ P.M. 

CONGREGATIONAL 

Philadelphia Association of Congregational Min- 
isters : Moderator, Rev. Dwight E. Marvin, 
5336 Wayne av.. Germantown; Secretary, Rev. 
Moseley H. Williams, n 22 Chestnut. Meets 
Sept., Dec, Mar., and June. 

Congregational Missionary Society, Middle Dis- 
trict : Supt., Rev. T. W. Jones, D. D., 511 
Woodland Terrace. 

Congregational Church Building Society : State 
Secretary, Rev. Charles H. Richards, D. D. 

Central, Eighteenth and Green : Rev. Charles 
H. Richards, D. D., 2033 Green. ioj^ a.m., 
7% P.M. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

First, Germantown, cor. Seymour and Lynch : 
Rev. Dwight E. Marvin, 5336 Wayne av., Ger- 
mantown. ioj^ a.m., 8 P.M. 

Kensington, cor. C and Indiana av. : Rev. 
Neils N. Bormose, 3037 C. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Norwegian, Front and Union : 4 p.m. ; 8 p.m., 
Wednesday. 

Park, Thirty-second and Montgomery av. : 
Rev. Clinton B. Adams, 3012 Diamond. 10% 
a.m., 7^ p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Snyder Avenue, Third and Snyder av. : Rev. 
Franklin E. Wieder, 3018 N. Eighth. 10^ a.m., 
7% p.m. 

Swedish Assembly of Brethren, 304 N. Broad : 
Rev. A. P. Ljungberg, 833 N. Twenty-seventh. 

Io}4 A.M., 7% P.M. 

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST. 

First Church, cor. Berks and Mervine : Rev. 
Allan B. Philputt, 1846 N. Twelfth. 10^ a.m., 
2%, 8 P.M. 

Third Church, Lancaster av. and Aspen : Rev. 
Wallace C. Payne, 854 N. Forty-second. 10^ 
a.m., 2%, 8 P.M. 

First Church Mission, Front and Silver, Ken- 
sington : Caspar C. Garrigues, 1033 Spring 
Garden. 10% a.m., 2%, 8 p.m. 

Philadelphia Conference of Christian Churches: 
President, Rev. Joseph Taylor, 1616 Oxford ; 
Secretary, Rev. E. E. Mitchell, 2041 Brandy- 
wine. 

ETHICAL. 

Society for Ethical Culture, New Century Hall, 
124 S. Twelfth : Wm. M. Salter, lecturer, 1305 
Arch. Lectures, n ; classes, 10 a.m. 



EVANGELICAL ASSOCIATION. 

Bishop, Rev. S. C. Breyfogle, Reading. 

Rev. J. Steltzer, 2349 Woodstock, Presiding 
Elder, Philadelphia District, Atlantic Conference. 
German. 

Rev. W. A. Leopold, Allentown, Presiding 
Elder, Philadelphia District, East Pennsylvania 
Conference. English. 

Emanuel, Fourth bel. Poplar: Rev. J. G. 
Scharf, 864 N. Sixth. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. Ger- 
man. 



i8 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



St. John, cor. Sixth and Dauphin : Rev. C. 
Philipbar, 574 W. Dauphin. 10J2 A.M., 7^ p.m. 
German. 

St. Paul, Germantown av. ab. Butler : Rev. J. 
H. Fenner, 3821 Germantown av. io*^ a.m., 7^ 
p.m. German. 

Salem, Ninth bel. Morris : Rev. C. C. Weber, 
1718 S. Ninth, ioj^j a.m., 7y 2 p.m. German. 

Sixth, cor. Fifth and Indiana av. : H. P. Boll, 
2946 Fairhill. 10% a.m., 7*4 p.m. German. 

Zion, Thompson nr. Ash : Rev. J. H. Fenner, 
3S15 Germantown av. 3 p.m. German. 

Ninth Street Mission, East Pennsylvania Con- 
ference, Ninth ab. Dauphin : Rev. E. C. Krapf. 
527 W. Dauphin, io 1 ^ a.m., j 1 /^. p.m. English. 

Zion, Rittenhouse ab. Adams, Germantown, 
East Pennsylvania Conference : Rev. C. V. B. 
Aurand, 112 Rittenhouse. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 
English. — 

CAMDEN. 

Zion, Camden, cor. Berkley and William : 
Rev. M. Hoelzer, 511 William. 10^ a.m., 7% 
p.m. 

FRIENDS (Orthodox). 

Philadelphia Monthly Meeting, S. E. cor. 
Fourth and Arch and S. W. cor. Washington 
Square, or Orange ab. Seventh. — Ministers : 
Joseph S. Elkinton, 325 Pine ; Ruth S. Abbott, 
1823 Filbert; Edwin P. Sellew, 457 N. Sixth; 
and Joseph Elkinton, Media, Delaware co. Ser- 
vices : Arch st. House, 10 a.m. on Fifth days; 
Orange st. House, First days, 10 a.m., 3 p.m. win- 
ter; 4 p.m. summer 

Forty-second and Powelton av.. West Phila- 
delphia : First day only, 10% a.m. Ministers : 
Hannah Arnett, 752 N. Forty-third ; Rebecca 
Ann Cooper, 117 Claymont ; Elizabeth Russell, 
4106 Westminster. 

Northern District. Sixth and Noble : First day, 
10 a.m. ; Third day, 10 a.m. ; winter, 3 p.m. ; 
summer, 4 p.m., except middle of Sixth to mid- 
dle of Ninth month. Ministers: Elizabeth Rus- 
sell, 4106 Westminster av. ; Rebecca Ann Cooper, 
117 Claymont; Abigail Vail, Media, Pa.; Ben- 
jamin Vail. Media, Pa. 

Germantown, Main and Coulter: First day, 10^ 
A.M. ; weekdays, 10 a.m. ; j% P-M. winter. Min- 
isters : William Kite, 7 W. Coulter; Samuel Mor- 
ris, Olney, Philadelphia ; Samuel Emlen, Coulter 
nr. Green; Elizabeth Allen, 3216 N. Sixteenth. 

Western District. Twelfth bel. Market : First I 
day and Fourth day, 10^ a.m. ; First day, 7^ j 
p.m., except middle of Sixth to middle of Ninth 
month. Ministers : William U. Ditzler, 1419 
Chestnut ; John H. Dillingham, 140 N. Six- j 
teenth ; Hannah Arnett. 752 N. Forty-third ; Ara- 
bella E. Wian, Merion. Pa. 

Frankford Meeting, Orthodox and Penn : First 
day, 10 a.m. Minister: David Heston, Leiper 
and Oxford rd., Frankford. 



FRIENDS. 

Byberry, Thirty -fifth Ward: First and Fifth 
days, 10 a.m. Watson Tomlinson, Ellen Croas- 
dale Tomlinson, and Nathaniel Richardson, By- 
berry. 

Fair Hill, Tenth and Cambria : First day, 3% 
p.m. ; First day school, 2 p.m. 

Frankford, Unity and Wain: 10% a.m.; First 
day school, 9% a.m. 



Girard av. and Seventeenth : First and Third 
days, 10}^ a.m.; First day, 7% p.m., First, 
Fourth, Ninth and Twelfth months (omitted 
Seventh and Eighth months). Margaret P. How- 
ard, 1520 N. Twentieth; Isaac H. Hillborn, 1305 
Somerset; Hannah W. Linton, 1835 Park av. 
First-day school, 9 a.m. 

Green and Fourth : First and Fifth days, io% 
a.m.; First day, 7V2 p.m., Third, Sixth, Eleventh 
months. Rachel N. Mather, 1737 N. Fifteenth ; 
Edwin L. Pierce, Moorestown, N. J. 

Race st. Meeting, Race ab. Fifteenth : First 
and Fourth days, 10% a.m.; First day, Second, 
Fifth, Tenth months; First-day school and con- 
ference after meeting. Samuel S. Ash, 1717 Vine ; 
Phcebe W. Foulke ; Matilda E. Janney, 1515 Cen- 
tennial av. 

School st., Germantown : First and Fourth 
days, 10.30 a.m. LydiaH. Price, 6107 Hancock. 
First-day school, 9 a.m. 

Spruce, cor. Ninth : First and Fifth days, 10% 
a.m. (Meetings suspended Sixth, Seventh, Eighth 
and Ninth months. ) 

West Philadelphia, Thirty-fifth and Lancaster 
av. : 10% a.m. First day in summer, 11 a.m. 
rest of year. First day, -j% p.m., when there is 
a Fifth First day ; First day school, 9.30 a.m. 
Anne S. Clothier, 3221 Hamilton ; Harriet E. 
Kirk, 3523 Powelton av. ; Samuel Jones, 4006 
Market. 

FRIENDS (Professing Original Principles) 

Olive ab. Eleventh : First and Fourth days, 10 
a.m. Minister : Joseph E. Maule, 805 Windsor 
Square. 

JEWISH. 

Adath Jeshurun, Seventh ab. Columbia av. : 
Rev. Henry Iliowizi, rabbi. 2127 Gratz ; Rev. A. 
Gross, reader, 1914 Mervine. Friday, 8 p.m. ; 
Saturday, 10 a.m. 

Beth Elohim, Sixteenth and Columbia" av. : 
Mr. Jacob Rubel, 1507 N. Tenth. 

Beth Israel, Eighth ab. Master : Rev. Dr. J. 
B. Grossman, 1942 N. Sixth. Friday, in winter, 
8 p.m.; summer, before sunset; Saturday, 9^ 
a.m. summer; 10 a.m. winter. 

B'nai Abraham, Lombard ab. Fifth : Rev. B. 
Lewinthal, Eighth ab. South; Rev. Marcus 
Greenblatt, reader. 

B'nai Jacob, Lombard ab. Fourth : Rev. Mor- 
decai Schatz, reader. Daily : morning at 6, eve- 
ning at dusk ; Saturday and holy days : morning 
at 8, evening at dusk. 

Emmath Israel — Oheb Shalom, Fifth and Gas- 
kill : Rev. Dr. Moses Weinberger, 1017 S. 
Third ; Rev. M. Garfunkel. reader, 424 Gaskill. 
Saturday, 8 to n a.m., 4 to 6 p.m. 

Jewish Foster Home Synagogue, Mill, Ger- 
mantown: Rev. S. M. Fleischman, residence in 
building. 

Jewish Hospital Synagogue, Olney road nr. 
York pike : Rev. Moses Cohen and Rev. L. Saen- 
ger, residence in building. Saturdays and holy 
days, 9 to 11 a.m., 4 to 4^ p.m. 

Keneseth Israel, Broad ab. Columbia av. : Rev. 
Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, 105 E. Upsal, German- 
town ; Rev. J. Leonard Levy.asso. rabbi. 1828 N. 
Sixteenth; Rev. William Armhold, reader, 1723 
N. Sixteenth. Saturday, 10*4 a.m. ; Sunday, 
xoy 2 A.M. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



19 



Mickve Israel, Seventh ab. Arch : Rev. S. 
Morais, LL.D., 546 N. Fifth. Saturday, 9 a.m., 
and about sunset Friday, Saturday and other 
evenings. 

Rodeph Shalom, Broad and Mount Vernon : 
Rev. M. Jastrow, Ph. D.. rabbi emeritus, Upsal, 
Germantown ; Rev. Dr. Henry Berkowitz, 2219 
Gratz ; Rev. William Loewenberg, reader, 1421 
N. Seventh ; L. Schlesinger, assistant reader and 
superintendent, 1331 N. Sixth. Friday, 8 p.m. ; 
in summer, before sunset; Saturday, 10 a.m. 

Sons of Halberstam, New Market ab. Poplar. 



LATTER-DAY SAINTS. 
(Anti-Polygamous.) 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ, Hun- 
tingdon Hall, cor. Fifth and Huntingdon : Rev. 
A. H. Parsons, 2925 Rosehill ; Rev. Hosea H. 
Bacon, 3126 Athol. 11 a.m., 7% p.m. 



LUTHERAN. 

Board of Foreign Missions of the General Coun- 
cil : President, Rev. H. Grahn ; English Sec- 
retary, Rev. J. L. Sibole ; German Secretary, 
Rev. E. H. Pohle; Cor. Sec, Rev. William 
Ashmead Schaeffer, Station G, Phila. ; Treas- 
urer, William H. Staake, Esq., Franklin Build- 
ing, Twelfth ab. Walnut. Meets in Lutheran 
Publication Rooms, 1204 Walnut, on the fourth 
Monday of each month, at 2^ p.m. 

Committee of the General Council on HoJne 
Missions. 

English. — Board of Home Missions of General 
Council : Chairman, Rev. J. A. Seiss, D. D., 
LL.D., 1338 Spring Garden; Secretary, Rev. 
Samuel Laird, D. D., 1314 Spring Garden. 

Theological Seminary, Mount Airy, Philada. — 
Faculty: Rev. H. E. Jacobs, D. D., Mount 
Airy ; Rev. A. Spaeth. D. D., Mt. Airy ; Rev. 
Jacob Fry, D. D., Mt. Airy; Rev. George F. 
Spieker, D. D. ; Rev. T. W. Kretschmann, 
Ph. D., Chestnut Hill. 

Treasurer of Theological Seminary.— Rev. 
Samuel Laird, D. D. 

Superintendent of Missions in the Minis terium 
of Pennsylvania. — Rev. W. Ashmead Schaef- 
fer. 

Orphans' Home and Asylum for the Aged and 
Infirm, 5580 Germantown av., Germantown : 
President, Henry Lehman, 525 Arch ; Secre- 
tary, Rev. C. J. Hirzel, 1800 N. Twenty-fourth ; 
Treasurer, Christian Sautter, 1419 Locust ; 
Superintendent, Rev. George P. Mueller; So- 
licitor, William H. Staake, Esq., Franklin 
Building, Twelfth ab. Walnut. 

Sunday-School Association of the German Lu- 
theran Congregations of Philadelphia : Presi- 
dent, Rev. F. Wischan; Secretary, J. Roth; 
Treasurer, T. Ludwig. 

Lutheran Mission and Church Extension So- 
ciety : President, Rev. Joseph A. Seiss, D. D., 
LL. D ; Treasurer, E. Augustus Miller, Esq., 
502 Walnut ; Secretary,William H. Staake. Esq. 

Rev. J. K. Plitt, 48 N. Thirty-sixth, Treasurer 
of Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Rev. T. L. Seip, Allentown, President of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Penn- 
sylvania and adjacent States. 



William H. Staake, Esq., Treasurer of General 
Council, Franklin Building, Twelfth, ab. Wal- 
nut. 

The Lutheran, 1204 Walnut. — Rev. G. F. Kro- 
tel, D. D., editor-in-chief; Rev. G. W. Sandt, 
managing editor; Rev. E. R. Cassaday, busi- 
ness manager. 

The Lutheran Book Store, 117 N. Sixth. 

ENGLISH (GENERAL COUNCIL). 

Advent. Fifth ab. Cumberland : Rev. J. F. C. 
Fluck, 2439 N. Seventh. 10^ A.M., 7^2 p.m. 

Atonement, E. Montgomery av. bet. Frankford 
av. and Tulip: Rev.W. L. Stough, 2011 Memphis. 

Christ, Main bel. Graver's Lane, Chestnut Hill : 
Rev. T. W. Kretschmann, Ph. D., Southampton 
av. 10^ a.m., 7% P-M. 

Epiphany, Manayunk: Rev. C. P. Weiskotten. 

Falls of Schuylkill : Rev. George A. Kercher. 

Holy Communion, S. W. cor. Broad and Arch : 
Rev. Joseph A. Seiss, D. D., LL. D., 1338 
Spring Garden ; Rev. J. Q. McAtee, 1714S. Fif- 
teenth, assistant. 11 a.m., 7% p.m. 

Incarnation, Forty-sixth and Kingsessing av. : 
Rev. J. W. Horine, 4236 Regent Square. 10)^ 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Mount Airy Mission, Theological Seminary, 
Germantown av. 10% a.m., 4 p.m. 

Nativity, Eighteenth bel. Tioga: Rev. U. S. 
G. Bertolet, 3419 N. Eighteenth. 

Salem, Frankford : Rev. G. W. McClanahan, 
1738 Harrison. 

St. James, Nineteenth and Reed : Rev. Frank 
E. Whitmore, Chestnut Hill. 

St. John, Race bel. Sixth : Rev. Edward E. 
Sibole, 516 Brown. 10^ a.m., 3% p.m. 

St. Luke, S. W. cor. Seventh and Montgomery : 
Rev. J. L. Sibole, 1740 N. Seventh. 

St. Mark, Spring Garden ab. Thirteenth : Rev. 
Samuel Laird, D. D., 1314 Spring Garden, io}^ 
A.M., 7)4 P-M. 

St. Michael, Main and Church, Germantown : 
Rev. S. A. Ziegenfuss, 6671 Germantown av. 
10^ a.m., 7% P.M. 

St. Paul, Twenty-second ab. Columbia av. : 
Rev. C. J. Hirzel, 1800 N. Twenty-fourth. 

St. Peter, Reed E. of Ninth : Rev. E. R. Cassa- 
day, 1605 S. Broad. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. Stephen, Powelton av. E. of Fortieth. 

Transfiguration, Lehigh and Germantown avs.: 
Rev. H. Bronson Richards, 2038 N. Eleventh. 

Trinity, Eighteenth and Wolf: Rev. S. A. K. 
Francis, 1431 S. Tenth. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

CAMDEN. 

Epiphany, N. E. cor. Seventh and Market: 
Rev. Clarence K. Binder, 503 Linden. io'/£ 
a.m., j l /2 p.m. ; latter service, May to September, 

8 P.M. 

Trinity (German), Stevens nr. Broadway: 
Rev. H. Offermann, 446 Stevens. 

GERMAN (GENERAL COUNCIL). 

Bethanien, Roxborough : Rev. Adolph Hell- 
wege, cor. Martin and Pechin, Roxborough. 
ioV 2 a.m., 8 P.M. 

Christ, Twenty-sixth bel. Columbia av. : Rev. 
Otto Kleine, 1609 N. Twenty-sixth. 10% a.m., 

7% P.M. 

Emanuel's, cor. Fourth and Carpenter : Rev. 
H. A. Behrens, 1009 S. Fourth. 10^ a.m., 7% 

P.M. 



20 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Holy Cross, Ninth and Lehigh av. ; Rev. Wald 
R. M. Oeser, Ninth and Lehigh av. 10^ A.M., 
7^ p.m. 

Immanuel, cor. Tackawanna and Plum, Frank- 
ford : Rev. Paul Schneider, 10 a.m., 7^2 p.m. 

Salem, Twentieth and Mifflin : Rev. Hans 
Meyer, 1540 Morris. 

St. James, cor. Third and Columbia av. : Rev. 
F. W. Weiskotten, 2126 Hancock. 10^ a.m., 
and from October to June, 7% p.m. 

St. Johannis, Fifteenth bel. Poplar : Rev. A. 
Spaeth, D. D., Mount Airy; Rev. George C. 
Eisenhardt, asst.. 1220 N. Sixteenth. 10^ a.m., 
7 l /2 p.m. ; last Sunday in month, 3 p.m. 

St. Marcus. Dauphin nr. Twenty-eighth: Rev. 
Henry D. E. Siebot, 2408 Ridge av. 

St. Michael, Cumberland and Trenton av. : 
Rev. Aug. Fischer, 2126 E. Cumberland. 10^ 
a.m., 7 l / 2 P.M. 

St. Paul, N. E. cor. St. John and Brown : Rev. 
F. Wischan, 726 N. Seventh. 10%; a.m., 7^ p.m. 

St. Peter, Forty-second and Parrish : Rev. E. 
Herman Pohle, 860 Brooklyn. 

St. Thomas, cor. Herman and Morton, Ger- 
mantown : Rev. F.Jelden, cor. High and Morton, 
Germantown. 

Trinity, Sixteenth ab. Tioga: Rev. A. Linsz, 
1412 Tioga. 

Zion, Franklin ab. Race : Rev. J. E. Nidecker, 
228 Franklin. io^{ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Mary J. Drexel Home and Philadelphia Moth- 
er-House of Deaconesses, 2100 S. College av. : 
Rev. C, Goedel, rector. Regular services at 
the chapel, Girard av. nr. Twenty-second, 10^ 

A.M. 

GENERAL SYNOD. 

Lutheran Observer, 1328 Chestnut. — Rev. F. W. 

Conrad, D. D., LL. D., editor, 1720 Master; 

Prof. V. L. Conrad, D. D., 1710 Jefferson, and 

Rev. Sylvanus Stall, D. D., Bala, associate 

editors. 
Publication Society. 42 N. Ninth. — President, 

Rev. Wm. M. Baum, D. D.; Superintendent, 

H. S. Boner. 
Lutheran Mission Society of the Philadelphia 

Conference of the East Pennsylvania Synod. — 

President, Theophilus H. Smith, 123 N. Front ; 

Secretary, William Mader, Ledger Building; 

Treasurer, Henry S. Boner, 42 N. Ninth. 

Board of Directors of the Pastors' Fund of 
the General Synod. 

President, Rev. Wm. M. Baum, D. D., 630 N. 
Broad ; Secretary. William J. Miller, 509 Mar- 
ket; Treasurer, Rev. Luther E. Albert, D. D., 
cor. Main and Queen. Germantown. 
All Saints, Nineteenth and Cayuga : Rev. Wil- 
liam Kelly, 1702 Cayuga. 

Bethany, S. W. cor. Twenty-fifth and Mont- 
gomery av. : Rev. S. G. Shannon, 2623 Mont- 
gomery av. 

Calvary, S. W. cor. Forty-first and Mantua : 

Rev. Samuel A. Holman, D. D., 505 N. Fortieth. 

Grace, Thirty-fifth and Spring Garden : Rev. 

J. H. Main, Thirty-eighth and Haverford. 10% 

a.m., 8 P.M. 

Messiah, Sixteenth and Jefferson : Rev. Milton 
H. Valentine, 1545 Centennial av. 

St. Andrew, N. E. cor. Fifth and Watkins : 
Rev. W. H. Nicholas, 1703 S. Sixth. io^ 2 a.m., 
7^4 P-M. 



St. Matthew, N. W. cor. Broad and Mount 
Vernon : Rev. William M. Baum, D. D., 630 N. 
Broad. 

The Reformation, Broad bel. Ontario : Rev. 
Henry C. Shindle, 1647. Dover. 

Trinity, cor. Main and Queen, Germantown : 
Rev. Luther E. Albert, D. D., Main and Queen, 
Germantown; Rev. John T. Huddle, asst., 10^ 
a.m., 7^ p.m. 

independent lutheran. 
German Independent Lutheran, St. Paul's, cor. 
Fourth and Canal : Rev. G. J. Miiller, 1144 N. 
Fourth. 10% a.m., 7^ P-M. 

NORWEGIAN. 

Norwegian services for sailors, 767 S. Second : 
Rev. C. H. Scheen, 115 Pine. io54 a.m. 

SWEDISH. 

Zion, Ninth bel. Buttonwood : Rev. Carl H. 
Blangren, Ph. D., 1738 Beacon. 

German (Missouri) synod. 

St. John, Wharton bel. Sixth: Rev. Olaf 
Schroeder, 524 Wharton. 10% a.m., j% P-M. 

St. Matthew, Eighth and Cambria : Rev. Chr. 
Merkel, 2913 N. Eighth. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 



MENNONITE. 

First, Diamond nr. Fifth : Rev. N. B. Grubb, 
2118 Marshall. German, 10^ a.m. ; English, 
7^2 P-M. Last Sunday of each month all ser- 
vices in English. 

Mission of the First Church, Marshall bel. 
Indiana av. : Rev. N. B. Grubb, 21 18 Mar- 
shall. English, 2^ p.m. 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL. 

BISHOP. 

Rev. Cyrus D. Foss, D. D., LL. D., 2043 Arch. 
presiding elders. 

North District. — Rev. S. W. Gehrett, 1716 Tioga. 

Northwest District. — Rev. S. W. Thomas, D. 
D.. 1513 Centennial av. 

South District. — Rev. F. B. Lynch, D. D., 2127 
N. Thirteenth. 

West District. — Rev. J. S. Hughes, D. D., 3425 
N. Nineteenth. 

Philadelphia District, East German Conference. 
— Rev. J-J. Messimer, Newark, N. J. 

Philadelphia District, Delaware Conference (col- 
ored). — Rev. H. A. Monroe, D. D.,1516 Stiles. 

AGENTS, SECRETARIES, ETC. 

Board of Church Extension, 1026 Arch : Bishop 
Cyrus D. Foss, D.D., LL.D., President ; Rev. 
W. A. Spencer, D. D., 1633 N. Fifteenth, and 
Rev. A. J. Kynett, D. D., LL.D., 1728 Spring 
Garden, Corresponding Secretaries; Rev. Man- 
ley S. Hard, D. D., Kingston, Pa., Assistant 
Corresponding Secretary; Rev. J. S. J. McCon- 
nell, D. D., 1333 E. Susquehanna av.. Re- 
cording Secretary; James Long, 1529 Girard 
av., Treasurer. 

Rev. S. W. Thomas, D. D., Editor Philadelphia 
Methodist, Corresponding Secretary and Gene- 
ral Agent, 1018 Arch. 

Rev. C. M. Boswell, Corresponding Secretary 
City Mission and Church Extension Society, 
1018 Arch. 



■ 



•■— *^^"^^* 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



21 



Rev. Thomas Kirkpatrick, Chaplain House of 
Correction, 1661 Harrison, Frankford. 

Rev. E. I. D. Pepper, D. D., Editor Christian 
Standard and International Holiness Jour- 
nal, 921 Arch. 

Rev. G. W. Maclaughlin, D. D., Correspond- 
ing Secretary Pennsylvania Seamen's Friend 
Society ; office, 422 S. Front; 4122 Powelton av. 

Rev. James Morrow, D. D., General Secretary 
Pennsylvania Bible Society, 701 Walnut and 
130 Harvey, Germantown. 

Rev. J. S. J. McConnell, D. D., General Agent, 
Preachers' Aid Society, 1018 Arch. 

Rev. T. A. Fernley, D. D., Corresponding Sec- 
retary Philadelphia Sabbath Association, 1224 
Chestnut ; residence, 1949 Camac. 

CHURCH SOCIETIES — TIMES OF MEETING. 

Board of Church Extension : second Wednesday 
in each month, 1026 Arch. 3^ p.m. 

Philadelphia City Missionary and Church Ex- 
tension Society : third Monday in each month, 
1018 Arch. 8 p.m. 

Philadelphia Conference Tract Society : first 
Monday in each month, 1018 Arch. 3 p.m. 

Philadelphia Conference Missionary Society : 
third Tuesday February, May and October, 
1018 Arch. 7 1 /, p.m. 

Philadelphia Conference Education Society : sec- 
ond Monday March, May, September and De- 
cember, 1018 Arch. 3 p.m. 

Historical Society of Philadelphia Conference : 
second Monday of each month, 1018 Arch. 2 

P.M. 

Ministerial Institute, 1018 Arch : second Tues- 
day after first Monday in each month. 9% 

A.M., x% P.M. 

Philadelphia Camp-meeting and Excursion Asso- 
ciation : Rev. J. S. J. McConnell, D. D., Presi- 
dent ; F. B. Clegg, Treasurer, 1018 Arch. Last 
Monday of each quarter. 2% p.m. 

Local Preachers' Association : first Wednesday 
in each month, 1018 Arch. 1V7. p.m. 

Preachers' Aid Society, Philadelphia Confer- 
ence ; office, 1018 Arch : meets annually at the 
seat of the Conference. 

Ladies' Home Missionary Society, 1018 Arch : 
fourth Wednesday. 

Ladies' Foreign Missionary Society, 1018 Arch : 
first Wednesday. 10 a.m. 

Methodist Home, cor. Thirteenth and Lehigh av.: 
President, Mrs. Matthew Simpson; Rec. Sec, 
Mrs. M. W. Salter, 2016 Mount Vernon; Cor. 
Sec, Mrs. Theodore Stevens; Treasurer, Mrs. 
M. E. Senderling, 1934 N. Sixth; Matron, 
Mrs. Cheesebrough. 

Methodist Orphanage, Monument nr. Belmont 
av., West Philadelphia : President, Mrs. Mat- 
thew Simpson, 1334 Arch ; Rec. Sec, Mrs. C. 
F. Bonsall, 927 Spruce; Treasurer, Mrs. J. 
Parker, Jr., 19 19 Dauphin. 

Methodist Episcopal Church Hospital, Broad 
and Wolf : President, James Gillender ; Treas- 
urer, John Gillespie ; Rev. A. Rittenhouse, D. 
D., Superintendent, Broad and Wolf. 

Simpson Grove Camp Meeting and Excursion 
Association, 1018 Arch : Rev. J. W. Sayers, 
President; Rev. J. W. Harkins, Secretary; 
quarterly. 

[The Conference meets in March, and at that 
time many of the appointments of preachers 
are changed.] 



Arch Street, S. E. cor. Broad and Arch : Rev. 
W. W. Ramsay. D. D., no N. Seventeenth. 

ioj^ A.M., 8 P.M. 

Asbury, Chestnut ab. Thirty-third : Rev. R. 
W. Humphriss, D. D., 3449 Chestnut. 10% 
A.M., iYz p.m. ; 8 p.m. summer. 

Bainbridge Street (colored), Bainbridge bel. 
Twelfth : Rev. I. O'Connell, 742 Florida. 10^ 

A.M., 7% P. M. 

Bethany, Eleventh and Mifflin : Rev. F. E. 
Graeff, 1624 S. Thirteenth. xo% a.m., 8 p.m. 

Bethesda, Venango E. of Richmond : Rev. 
D. A. Keys, 2834 E. Venango. 

Blue Bell Mission, Wissahickon av. near E. 
Walnut Lane : Rev. E. S. Albany, 4441 Magnet, 
Manayunk. 2%, 8 p.m. 

Bridesburg, Kirkbride ab. Thompson, Brides- 
burg : Rev. G. W. Dungan, 2715 Kirkbride. 
ioy 2 A.M., 8 P.M. 

Broad Street, Broad and Christian : Rev. S. A. 
Heilner, D. D., 1410 Christian. 

Bustleton, Bustleton turnpike : Rev. L. B. 
Brown, Bustleton. 

Calvary, Forty-eighth and Baltimore av. : Rev. 
Herbert W. Westwood, 1932 N. Sixth. 

Centennary, cor. Forty-first and Spring Gar- 
den : Rev. J. G. Bickerton, 426 N. Forty-first. 

Central Frankford, cor. Orthodox and Frank- 
lin: Rev. W. D. Jones, 1511 Orthodox, Frankford. 

Central Roxborough, Green Lane : Rev. Wil- 
liam H. Smith, 476 Green Lane, Roxborough. 

Chelten Avenue, Chelten and Stenton, Ger- 
mantown : Rev. A. D. Shields, 445 E. Chelten 
av., Germantown. ioj^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Chestnut Hill, Main nr. Chestnut av. : Rev. 
J. J. Timanus, nr. church. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Christ, Thirty-eighth and Hamilton : Rev. 
W. Downey, Ph. D., 3507 Hamilton. 10% a.m., 

7^ P.M. 

Christian Street, Christian ab. Twenty-fourth : 
Rev. J. P. Miller, 2426 Christian. 

Clearview, Seventy-fifth and Buist av. : Rev. 
W. Pj Ellingsworth. 2451 N. Fifteenth. 

Columbia Avenue, Twenty-fifth and Columbia 
av.: Rev. W. S. Pugh, 2441 Columbia av. 

Cookman, N. W. cor. Twelfth and Lehigh av. : 
Rev. D. W. Gordon, D. D., 2608 N. Twelfth. 

IO^ A.M., "J% P.M. 

Covenant, S. W. cor. Seventeenth and Spruce : 
Rev. J. D. Martin, D. D., 1906 Arch. 10^ A m., 

jyi p.m. 

Cumberland Street, cor. E. Cumberland and 
Coral : Rev. C. E. Adamson, Ph. D., 2020 E. 
York. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m., September to June; 
8 p.m. July and August. 

East Alleghany Avenue, Alleghany nr. Frank- 
ford av. : Rev. Edward H. Hoffman, 2022 Madi- 
son av. 

East Montgomery Avenue, cor. Frankford and 
Montgomery avs. : Rev. J. G. Wilson, D. D., 
1745 Frankford av. 10% A.M., 7% p.m. 

East Park, Columbia av. and Natrona, W. cf 
Thirty-second : Rev. Benjamin LaPish, 2223 
Montgomery. 

Ebenezer, Christian bel. Fourth : Rev. Henry 
Frankland, 813 S. Third. 

Ebenezer, Manayunk : Rev. William Powick, 
168 Gay. 

Eden, Lehigh av. and Lawrence : Rev. A. 
Oakes, 2605 N. Fifth. 10% a.m., 8 p.m. 

Eighteenth Street, Eighteenth and Wharton : 
Rev. W. L. McDowell, D. D., 1241 S. Fifteenth. 

IO^ A.M., 7^ P.M. 



22 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Eleventh Street, Eleventh ab. Washington av. : 
Rev. Jacob Dickerson, 1210 S. Tenth. 

Emmanuel, Twenty-fifth and Brown : Rev. B. 
T. Callen, 2506 Brown. io 1 ^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Emmanuel, Roxborough, Gates and Wood : 
Rev. E. A. Bawden, Flesson St., Roxborough. 
io 1 ^ a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Epworth, Fifty-sixth and Race : Rev. J. H. 
Robinson, 2002 N. Twenty-second. 

Erie Avenue, Fifth and Erie av. : Rev. M. 
Graves, 506 Erie av. 

Ethel Memorial, Penn and Morris, German- 
town : Rev. W. L. Shaw, Germantown. 

Fairhill, Fifth and Clearfield: Rev. T. W. 
McKinney, 2691 N. Sixth. 

Falls of Schuylkill, Queen lane and Krail, Falls 
of Schuylkill: Rev. R. A. Mcllwain, 171 Queen 
lane. 

Fifteenth Street, Fifteenth and Clearfield : Rev. 
G. W. Henson, 1018 Arch. xo x / 2 a.m., 7% p.m. 

Fifth Street, Fifth bel. Green : Rev. A. L. 
Skilton, 1018 Arch. 

First Germantown, Haines nr. Main, German- 
town : Rev. Frank P. Parkin, 58 Haines. 10% 
a.m., 8 p.m. 

Fitzwater Street, Fitzwater ab. Nineteenth : 
Rev. G. J. Burns, 1908 Fitzwater. 10% a.m., 

7% P - M - 

Fletcher, Fifty-fourth and Master, Hestonville : 
Rev. C. W. Straw, 1421 N. Fifty-fourth. 

Fortieth Street, Fortieth ab. Walnut : Rev. S. 
H. Hoover, D. D., 4018 Baring. 10% a.m., 7% 
p.m. October to May ; 8 p.m. rest of the year. 

Forty-third Street, Forty-third and Aspen : 
Rev. William Bamford, 4305 Aspen. 

Frankford (colored): Rev. T. M. Hubbard. 

Frankford Avenue, Frankford av. and Foulk- 
rod : Rev. F. G. Coxson, 1707 Harrison. 

Front Street. Front and Laurel: Rev. Wilmer 
Coffman, 1013 N. Front. 

Germantown (colored): Rev.W. C. Dickerson. 

Girard Avenue (German), Girard av. ab. 
Twelfth : Rev. H. H. Heck, 1125 Girard a'v. 

Grace, N. W. cor. Broad and Master: Rev. 
Wallace MacMullen, 1402 N. Fifteenth. 10% 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Green Street, Green ab. Tenth : Rev. Jacob 
Todd, D. D., 1003 Green; Rev. George H. 
Lorah, 1018 Arch. 10% a.m., 8 p.m 

Hancock Street, Hancock ab. Girard av. : Rev. 
J. W. Haikins, 1227 Hancock. 10^ a.m., 7^ 
p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Haven (colored), Twenty-sixth ab. Jefferson : 
Rev. A. F. Ennals, 1228 S. Eleventh. 10% a.m., 

7% P.M. 

Holmesburg, Frankford av., Holmesburg : 
Rev. Eli Pickersgill, 8024 Frankford Ave. 

Huntingdon Street, Huntingdon ab. Twenty- 
fourth : Rev. J. H. Hartman, 2635 W. Lehigh av. 

Italian Mission, 731 S. Ninth : Rev. T. D. 
Malan, Ph. D., 721 S. Ninth. 

Kensington, Marlborough and Richmond : 
Rev. W. C. Webb, D. D., 1117 Shackamaxon. 

IO 1 /^ A.M., jl/4. P.M. 

Mariners' Bethel, Washington av. bel. Third: 
Rev. C. W. Bickley, D. D., 225 Washington av. 

Memorial, Eighth and Cumberland : Rev. E. E. 
Burriss, 2434 Marshall. 

Messiah, Moyamensing av. and Morris : Rev. 
J. Dungan, 228 Morris. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Milestown, Old York rd. bel. City line : Rev. 
W. H. Lindemuth, Oak lane. 10% a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 



Mount Carmel, Germantown av. ab. Broad : 
Rev. G. A. Wolfe, 1715 Tioga. 

Mount Pleasant Avenue, Germantown : Rev. 
W. C. Robinson, W. Mount Pleasant av. 10% 
a.m., 7^4 P-M. 

Mount Zion, Manayunk, Green Lane and Pop- 
lar, Manayunk : Rev. W. C. Best, D. D., 155 
Green Lane. 

Nineteenth Street, Nineteenth and Poplar : 
Rev. J. A. Lippincott, D. D., 1912 Poplar. 
io ! /2 a.m., 7% p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Norris Square, Mascher ab. Susquehanna av. : 
Rev. Thomas Kelly, D. D.,2039 E. York. 10^ 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Orthodox Street, Frankford, Orthodox and 
Tacony : Rev. F. Getty, 2236 Orthodox. io x /z 
a.m., 7 p.m. winter ; 7% p.m. summer. 

Park Avenue, Park av. and Norris. Rev. 
Richard Harcourt, D. D., 1936 Park av. 

Paschalville, Woodland av. and Seventieth : 
Rev. W. A. Ferguson. 

Pitman, Twenty-third and Lombard : Rev. 
Thomas W. Davis, 1316 S. Sixteenth, io 1 ^ 
a.m., 7Y X P.M. 

Port Richmond, Neff and Thompson : Rev. 
F. A. Gilbert, 2726 Ann. \oVo a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Providence, Front and Alleghany av. : Rev. 
J. T. Wright, 1213 N. Eleventh. 

Ridge Avenue, Roxborough, cor. Ridge and 
Shawmont avs., Roxborough : Rev. G. S. Broad- 
bent, Roxborough. io 1 ^ a.m., 7 1 / p.m. 

Rehoboth, Paul St., Frankford : Rev. Amos 
Johnson, 4231 Paul. 

Sanctuary, Twenty-eighth and Thompson : 
Rev. James Sampson, 1939 Mount Vernon. 

Sarah D. Cooper Memorial, Sixty-third and 
Girard av. : Rev. A. I. Collom, 432 N. Sixty- 
third. \oV 2 a.m., 7 l A p.m. ; 8 p.m. summer. 

Scott, Eighth bel. Dickinson: Rev.S. G. Grove, 
1527 S. Eighth. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. October to 
May; 8 p.m. May to October. 

Seventh Street, Seventh and Norris : Rev. J. R. 
Westwood, 1932 N. Sixth. ioJ4 A.M., 7% P.M. ; 
summer, 8 p.m. 

Siloam, E. Susquehanna av. ab. Thompson : 
Rev. J. S. J. McConnell, D. D., 1333 E. Susque- 
hanna av. 10^ a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Simpson Memorial. Kensington av. ab. Cam- 
bria : Rev. R. Whinna, 632 E. Indiana av. 10^ 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Snyder Avenue, Fifth and Snyder av. : Rev. 
J. F. Meredith, 706 Snyder av. 

Somerton, Somerton, Thirty-fifth ward : Rev. 
O. E. Stogden, Somerton. 10% a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

Spring Garden Street, Twentieth and Spring 
Garden : Rev. George Elliott, D. D., 2023 Wal- 
lace. 10% a.m., 7^ P.M. 

St. George's, Fourth bel. Vine : Rev. J. H. 
Wood, 324 New. io 1 ^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

St. James, Tabor st., Olney: Rev. Ravil 
Smith, Tabor St., Olney. 

St. John's, Third bel. George: Rev. Garbutt 
Reed, 989 N. Fifth. 

St. Luke's, S. E. cor. Broad and Jackson : Rev. 
Virgil E. Rorer, 1410 Jackson. 

St. Matthew's, Fifty-third and Chestnut : Rev. 
D. S. Sherry, 303 S. Fifty-second. 

St. Paul's, Catharine ab. Sixth : Rev. Charles 
Roads, D. D., 623 Catharine. 

St. Stephen's, Germantown, Germantown av. 
bel. Manheim : Rev. Alpha G. Kynett, 52x3 Ger- 
mantown av. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



23 



Summerfield, 2221 E. Dauphin : Rev. R. Tur- 
ner, 2223 E. Dauphin. 10*4 a.m., 7% p.m. 

Tabernacle, Eleventh bel. Oxford : Rev. G. 
Bickley Burns, Ph. D., 1332 N. Twelfth. 

Tacony, Tacony : Rev. J. W. Rudolph, 3424 
Washington av., Tacony. ■ 

Thirteenth Street. Thirteenth bel. Vine : Rev. 
S. M. Vernon, D. D., 252 N. Thirteenth. 10^ 
A.M., 7^4 P-M. 

Tioga, N. \V. cor. Tioga and Eighteenth : Rev. 
W. W. Cookman, 3419 N. Nineteenth. 

Trinity, Fifteenth and Mount Vernon : Rev. 

C. W. Buoy, D. D., 1721 Mount Vernon. 
Twelfth Street, Twelfth cor. Odgen : Rev. C. 

Lee Gaul, 847 N. Eleventh. io r 4 a.m., iY x p.m. 

Twentieth Street, Twentieth cor. Jefferson : 
Rev. J. W. Sayers, 1509 N. Twentieth, io 1 ^ 
a.m., 7^ p.m. : summer, 8 p.m. 

Twenty -ninth Street. Twenty-ninth and York : 
Rev. J. B. Graff, 2338 N. Twenty-ninth. 

Twenty-second Street, Twenty-second and 
Moore : Rev. George B. Burnwood, 2225 Reed. 
ioVi a.m., 7% P.M. 

Union, Diamond ab. Twentieth : Rev. T. B. 
Neely, D. D., LL.D., 2017 Diamond. 10% a.m., 
7^ p.m. 

Waterloo Street (colored), Waterloo ab. West- 
moreland : Rev. B. W. Berry. io!4 a.m., 8 p.m. 

West End, Pine and Sixty-first : Rev. Harrison 
A. Greaves, 1018 Arch, io 1 ^ a.m., 8 p.m. 

Wesley, Sepviva ab. Huntingdon : Rev. S. T. 
Kemble,2325 E Cumberland, io 1 ^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

West York Street, Seventeenth and York : 
Rev. J. F. Crouch, 2344 N. Seventeenth. 10% 
a.m., 8 p.m. . 

Wharton Street, Wharton bel. Fourth : Rev. 
E. C. Griffiths, 319 Reed. 

Wissahickon, Terrace and Adams, Wissa- 
hickon : Rev. T. T. Mutchler, M. D., 168 Adams. 

\O x /i A.M., 7^ P.M. 

Wissinoming, Wissinoming : Rev. R. H. 
Johnson, Wissinoming. 

Woodland Avenue, Woodland av. and Fiftieth : 
Rev. John Stringer, 1413 S. Fiftieth. 

York Street (German), E. York nr. Frankford 
av. : Rev. Henry Weber, 2210 E. Dauphin. 

Zoar (colored). Melon ab. Twelfth: Rev. J. 
A. Richardson, 1123 Ogden. 

CAMDEN AND VICINITY. 

Presiding Elder, Rev. D. B. Harris, 414 
Chambers av. 

Bethany, Tenth and Cooper: Rev. S. M. 
Nichols, 121 N. Tenth. 

Bethel, Cramer Hill : Rev. J. B. Whitton. 

Broadway, Broadway and Berkley : Rev. J. 
R. Mace, Ph. D., 507 Broadway. 

Centenary, Fifth and Cooper: Rev. J. W. 
Marshall, D. D., 430 Linden. 

Collingswood : Rev. S. M. Vansant. 

Delair: Rev. Thomas S. Brock. 

Dudley, Westfield av. : Rev. J. B. Westcott, 
Cramer Hill. 

Eighth Street, cor. Eighth and Walnut : Rev. 
J. E. Sawn, 735 Walnut. 

Ferry Avenue, Ferry and Eighth : Rev. Mr. 
Als, 687 Ferry av. 

First, Sixth and Stevens : Rev. John Handley, 

D. D., 309 S. Sixth. 

First Gloucester. S. E. cor. Monmouth and 
Willow: Rev. D. W C. Mclntire, 218 Mon- 
mouth. io 1 ^ a.m., 7 p. m. winter ; 7% p.m. summer. 



Haddonfield : Rev. George H. Neal. 

Kaighn's Avenue : Rev. T. L. Surtees. 

Pensauken, Church and Pennsylvania av. : 
Rev. E. J. Kulp, Pensauken. io 1 ^ a.m., 8 p.m. 

St. George's, Cramer Hill: Rev. J. Manlove 
Smith. 

State Street, Sixth and State: Rev. E. C. 
Sunfield, 527 York. 

Tabernacle. Third and Pearl : Rev. E. Hewitt, 
D. D., 508 N. Third. 

Trinity, Broadway and Emerald : Rev. T. A. 
Lumley, 1828 Broadway. io^£ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Trinity, Merchantville : Rev. W. F. Herr, 
Merchantville. 

Union, Fifth and Mount Vernon : Rev. J. S. 
Heisler, 1034 S. Fifth. 

Wesley M. E. Church, Cramer Hill : Rev. 
George W. Ridout, pastor. 

Wiley, Third and Beckett : Rev. William A. 
Massey, 635 S. Third, Camden. 

Woodbury : Rev. Peter Provost. 



AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL. 

African Methodist Episcopal Book Concern, 631 
Pine: Rev. T. W. Henderson, D. D., business 
manager, 1831 Carpenter: office of The Chris- 
tian Recorder, 631 Pine, Rev. H. T. Johnson, 
editor; office of The Quarter/jy A. M. E. 
Church Review, 631 Pine, H. T. Keating, 
managing editor; Bishop, Rt. Rev. Benjamin 
T. Tanner, D. D., 2908 Diamond ; Secretary 
Church Extension Board, Rev. C. T. Shaffer, 
D. D., 1821 Camac. 
Presiding Elder, Rev. John C. Brock, 539 E. 

Miner, West Chester, Pa. 

Allen Chapel, Lombard ab. Nineteenth : Rev. 
James Joshua Evans, 1034 S. Eighteenth, ioj^ 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Bethel, cor. Centre and Morton, Germantown : 
Rev. N. D. Temple, 120 West Duval, German- 
town. ioVo a.m., 7% p.m. 

Bethel, Sixth bel. Pine: Rev. L. J. Coppin, 
754 S. Twelfth, io 1 ^ a.m., 714 p.m. 

Campbell, Oxford nr. Paul, Frankford : Rev. 
G. T. Watkins, D. D:, 1661 Oxford. 10^ a.m., 
iVz p.m. 

Disney Mission. Waterloo ab. Westmoreland : 
Rev. Charles V. Monk, 3431 Emerald, 10% a.m., 
8 p.m. 

Emmanuel, Twenty-fourth and York : Rev. 
J. T. Hammond, 2329 W. York. 

Morris Brown Mission, Ridge av. and Twenty- 
fifth : Rev. Christopher Jones, 754 S. Twelfth. 

Mt. Zion (Darby Mission), Tenth and Centre, 
Darby : Rev. C. M. Tanner, 1000 Summit. 10^ 

a.m., 7^4 P - M - 

Mount Pisgah, Locust ab. Fortieth : Rev. F. 
T. M. Webster,3859 Atlanta. \oV z a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Murray Chapel, Clifton bel. South : Rev. J. E. 
W. Moore, 2341 N. Twenty-fourth. ioJ4 a.m., 
iVt. p.m. 

Payne Mission, Twentieth and Siegel : Jabez 
Polk, 907 Rodman. 

Shorter's Chapel and St. James' Mission, Mor- 
ton and Norwood, Delaware county: Rev. C. 
W. Satchell, 320 Dugan. io}^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. John, Seventy-second and Greenway av. : 
Rev. C. W. Satchell, 320 Dugan. 

Tioga Mission, Tioga Hall, Twentieth and 
Tioga: Rev. I. W. Neivell, Twentieth and Tioga. 
7 l / 2 p.m. Sundays; 7 p.m. Thursdays. 



24 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Union, Sixteenth bel. Fairmount av. : Rev. J. 
M. Palmer, 653 N. Sixteenth. 10% A.M., -]~% p.m. 

Zion Chapel, Seventh bel. Dickinson : Rev. 
Theo. Gould, 1810 Dickinson. 10^ a.m., 7^ 
p.m. 

CAMDEN. 

Presiding Elder, Rev. W. H. Yeocum, 417 
Stevens. 

Macedonia, Third and Spruce : Rev. H. C. 
Ashley, pastor, Third and Spruce sts. 

Little Bethel, Centreville : Rev. W. H. Burrell. 



AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL. 

(Zion.) 

Mount Zion, Fifty-fifth ab. Market : Rev. 
Frisby Gibson, 1514 Burton St.; Rev. J. M. 
Robson, asst., 736 Lex st. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Union, Ninth and Girard ave. : Rev. B. J. 
Bolding, B. D., 1557 Warnock. 11 a.m., 8 p.m.; 
Fridays, 8 p.m. 

CAMDEN. 

Zion, Sycamore and Ann: Rev. D. Bloice. 



CONGREGATIONAL METHODISTS. 

The Conference territory embraces the States of 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware : Rev. 
T. B. Miller, D. D., President; Rev. J. W. Ro- 
selle, Vice-President ; Rev. A. W. Bowers, 
Secretary; Francis Gale, Esq., Treasurer. 

Emmanuel, Moyamensing av. and Gerhard, 
nr. Twelfth: Rev. Dr. Miller, pastor, 1132 Rit- 
ner ; Rev. D. Cheney, 1902 S. Seventh, and Rev. 
Thos. Armour, 440 N. Seventh, assts. 

CAMDEN AND VICINITY. 

Atsion : Rev. C. B. Downdey, 710 S. Second, 
Camden. 

Helping Hand, Third and Atlantic av., Cam- 
den : Rev. Isaac Camp, Second and Walnut. 

Union, Second and Walnut, Camden : Rev. 
W. M. Halter, Atlantic av. near Third. 

Unionville : Rev. A. W. Bowers, Ashbourne, 
Pa. 

FREE METHODIST. 

Philadelphia District, Rev. A. C. Miller, Pre- 
siding Elder, Phillipsburg, New Jersey. 

First, 2227 Master: Rev. Thomas W. Scull, 
1833 Judson. T-o 1 /?. a.m., 7% PM. 

West Philadelphia Mission, Lancaster av. and 
Baring: Emily Dickson, 3503 Race. io^£ a.m., 
3 p-m. 

METHODIST PROTESTANT. 

St. Luke's, Erie, east of Broad : Rev. W. J. 
Neepier, Erie and Park av. 

St. Matthew (African Union), Fifty-eighth 
and Vine: Rev. C. H. Walker, 104 Juniata, W. 
Philada.; Rev. C. Gray, asst., Fifty-seventh and 
Chelsea, W. Philada. 

CAMDEN. 

Memorial, Liberty ab. Third : Rev. George A. 
Pettit. 

Calvary, Cramer Hill : Rev. Joshua Tushing- 
ham. 



MORAVIAN CHURCH. 

Agents of Church Educational Institutions, Fran- 
cis Jordan & Sons, 111 N. Front. 
First, Fairmount av. bel. Seventeenth: Rev. 

Charles Nagel, 629 N. Twentieth. 10^ a.m., 

7^ P.M. 
Second, S. E. cor. Franklin and Thompson: 

Rev. Edward S. Wolle, 1238 Franklin. 10% 

a.m., 7% p.m. 

Third, Kensington av. bel. Venango : Rev. F. 

Elwood Raub, 3528 K. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. 
Fifth, Germantown av. ab. Dauphin: Rev. 

Charles H. Sperling, 632 York. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 



NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH (SWEDEN- 
BORGIAN). 

First, cor. Chestnut and Twenty-second : Rev. 
William L. Worcester, 3502 Hamilton. 11 a.m., 
4 p.m. 

Frankford, New Church Society, Paul and 
Unity: Rev. J. W. MacPherson, 1708 Unity, 
ioj^ a.m., 7^ P-M. 

PRESBYTERIAN. 

Stated Clerk of the General Assembly, Rev. W. 
H. Roberts, D. D., LL. D., 1334 Chestnut. 

The Trustees of the General Assembly of the 
Presbyterian Church in the United States of 
America : George Junkin, Esq., LL. D., Presi- 
dent ; Samuel C. Perkins, Esq., LL. D., Vice- 
President; Rev. Joseph Beggs, D. D., Cor. 
Secretary; F. K. Hippie, Treasurer; Jacob 
Wilson, Rec. Secretary, 1334 Chestnut, Phila- 
delphia. 

Presbyterian Board of Publication and Sabbath- 
School Work, 1334 Chestnut : President, Hon. 
Robert N. Willson ; Vice-President, Rev. Wil- 
liam Brenton Greene, Jr., D. D. ; Secretary, 
Rev. Elijah R. Craven, D. D. ; Sabbath-school 
and Missionary Superintendent, Rev. James A. 
Worden, D. D. ; Rev. Edward T. Bromfield, 
D. D., Field and Statistical Correspondence; 
Editorial Superintendent, Rev. James R. Mil- 
ler, D. D. ; Business Superintendent, John H. 
Scribner ; Manufacture, Henry F. Scheetz ; 
Recording Clerk, Rev. Willard M. Rice, D.D.; 
Treasurer, Rev. C. T. McMullin. 

Presbyterian Historical Society, 1229 Race : Rev. 
William C. Cattell, D. D., LL. D., President; 
Rev. William L. Ledwith, D. D., Librarian; 
Rev. James Price, Recording Secretary ; Rev. 
S. T. Lowrie, D. D., Corresponding Secretary ; 
De B. K. Ludwig, Treasurer, 1229 Race. 

Presbyterian Board of Relief for Disabled Min- 
isters and the Widows and Orphans of De- 
ceased Ministers : George Junkin, President ; 
A. Charles Barclay, Vice-President ; Rev. 
William W. Heberton, Treasurer and Record- 
ing Secretary, 1334 Chestnut. 

Board of Education : Rev. George D. Baker, D. 
D., President ; Rev. James M. Crowell, D. D., 
Vice-President; Rev. E. B. Hodge, D. D., 
Corresponding Secretary, 1334 Chestnut ; Jacob 
Wilson, Treasurer and Recording Secretary. 

Committee on Church Extension, Property and 
Charters, Presbytery of Philadelphia, Trustees 
of Presbytery of Philadelphia: Rev. J. S. 
Macintosh, D. D., General Secretary, 1334 
Chestnut and N. E. cor. Locust and Magnolia 
av., Germantown; R. H. Hinckley, Record- 
ing Secretary ; George Griffiths, Treasurer, 515 
Locust. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



25 



Women's Foreign Missionary Society, 1334 Chest- 
nut : President, Mrs. Charles P. Turner; Sec- 
retary, Mrs. J. R. Miller ; Treasurer, Mrs. 
Julia M. Fishburn. 

Women's Home Missionary Societies of the Phi- 
ladelphia Presbyteries, 1334 Chestnut — Phila- 
delphia Presbytery : President, Mrs. Charles 
Hodge; Treasurer, Mrs. A. M. Robinson; 
Assistant Treasurer, Miss Abby E. Thomas. 
Philadelphia North Presbytery : President, 
Mrs. W. P. White; Treasurer, Miss M. V. 
Bockius; General Secretary, Miss M. E. Boyer. 

Chaplain Public Institutions : Rev. Andrew Mc- 
Elwain, D. D., 1229 Race. 

Chaplain Presbyterian Hospital, Thirty-ninth 
and Powelton av. : Rev. Henry L. Rex. 

Ann Carmichael (Memorial), Fifth and Erie av. 

Arch Street, Arch ab. Tenth : Rev. George P. 
Wilson, D. D., 211 St. Mark's Square, W. P. 
to^ a.m., 7^ p.m. ; in summer, 8 p.m. 

Atonement, Wharton ab. Broad : Rev. Edward 
B. Bruen, 1531 Chestnut. 

Beacon, Cumberland and Cedar: Rev. Wel- 
lington E. Loucks, 2742 Frankford av. 10^ 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Berean (colored), South College av. ab. Nine- 
teenth : Rev. Matthew Anderson, 1926 S. College 
av. 10% a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Bethany, Twenty-second and Bainbridge : Rev. 
J. Wilbur Chapman, D. D. ; Rev. Charles A. 
Dickey, D. D., 2211 St. James; Rev. George 
Van Deurs, 3932 Sansom ; Rev. J. C. Thomp- 
son, D. D,, 4103 Leidy av. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Bethesda, cor. Frankford av. and Vienna : Rev. 
George Dugan, 2314 E. Dauphin. 10^ a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

Bethlehem, N. E. cor. Broad and Diamond : 
Rev. B. L. Agnew, D. D., 1924 N. Broad. 10^ 

A.M., 7% P.M. 

Calvary, Locust ab. Fifteenth : Rev. John 
Sparhawk Jones, D. D., 1814 Pine. 11 a.m., 

8 P.M. 

Carmel (German), cor. Nineteenth and Sus- 
quehanna av. : Rev. Augustus Busch, 2208 N. 
Nineteenth. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Central, Broad ab. Fairmount av. : Rev. John 
H. Munro, D. D., 714 N. Broad. 10^ a.m., 
jYi p.m. 

Chambers, cor. Broad and Sansom : Rev. 
Thomas A. Hoyt, D. D., 21 13 Chestnut. 10% 

A.M., 3^ P.M. 

Clinton Street Immanuel, cor. Tenth and Clin- 
ton. 10% a.m., 8 P.M. 

Cohocksink, Columbia av. and Franklin : Rev. 
William Greenough, D. D., 1712 Franklin, ioj^ 
A. M., 7^ P.M. 

Corinthian Avenue (German), Corinthian av. 
bel. Poplar: Rev. John P. H. Schweitzer, 867 
Corinthian av. 

Covenant, Twenty-second ab. Vine : Rev. 
William Sterrett, D. D., 2133 Vine. 10^ a.m., 

4 P.M. 

Disston Memorial, Tacony : Rev. David 
Wills, D. D., LL.D., Tacony. io l / 2 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

East Park, Thirty-second and Oxford : Rev. 
John Graham, 3227 Montgomery av. 

Emmanuel, N. E. cor. Girard av. and Forty- 
second : Rev. David Garrett Smith, 806 N. Forty- 
first. 11 a.m., jyi p.m. 

Evangel, Eighteenth and Tasker : Rev. Mat- 
thew J. Hyndman, 1627 S. Thirteenth, ioj^ 
a.m., jYx p.m. 



7h 



Falls of Schuylkill, Ridge av. bel. School 
Lane : Rev. Sherman H. Doyle, 3520 Ridge av.; 
Rev. Joseph Beggs, D. D., pastor emeritus, Ger- 
mantown. 10% a.m., 7% P-M. 

First (Washington Square), cor. Seventh and 
Locust : Rev. George D. Baker, D. D., 906 
Pine. io54 a.m., 7% p.m. 

First African, S. £. cor. Seventeenth and Fitz- 
water : Rev. T. H. Lee, 1509 Pine. 10^ a.m., 
p.m. 

First Bridesburg. Church st. : Rev. J. P. W. 
Blattenberger, D. D., 2766 Church. 10% A.M. ; 
winter, 7% p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

First, Chestnut Hill, cor. Rex and Main : Rev. 
Ralph L. E. Graham. 11 a.m., 8 p.m. 

First Germantown, W. Chelten av. nr. Main: 
Rev. Charles Wood, D. D., Green and Walnut 
lane, Germantown. 11 a.m., 8 p.m. 

First Holmesburg, Holmesburg av. and Deca- 
tur: Rev. U. F. Smiley. 10% a.m., 7% p.m.; 
8 p.m. summer. 

First Kensington, Girard av. ab. Hanover: 
Rev. J. Hervey Beale, 1323 N. Sixth. 10^ a.m., 

7% P.M. 

First Manayunk. cor. Centre and High : Rev. 
Charles E. Burns, Sunnicliffe, Manayunk. 10% 

A.M., 7 l / 2 P.M. 

First, Northern Liberties, Buttonwood bel. 
Sixth: Rev. David J. Beale, D. D., 821 Frank- 
lin. IO% A.M., 7% P.M. 

Fourth, Forty-seventh and Kingsessing av. : 
Rev. J. K. Baillie, D. D., 4510 Springfield av. 
10M a.m., 8 P.M. 

Fox Chase : Rev. W. H. Pumphrey, Ph. D., 
Fox Chase. 

Frankford, cor. Main and Church : Rev J. B. 
Laird, 4315 Frankford av. ; Rev. Thomas 
Murphy, D. D., LL. D., pastor emeritus. 10^ 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Gaston, S. W. cor. Eleventh and Lehigh av. 

Gethsemane Chapel, Twenty-eighth and Por- 
ter : Mission of Bethany Church. 2%, 7% p.m. 

Grace, Twenty-second and Federal : Rev. A. 
F. Von Tobel, 745 S. Twenty-second ; Rev. An- 
drew Culver, pastor emeritus, 743 S. Twenty- 
second. 10% a.m., 7 x / 2 p.m. ; 8 p.m. summer. 

Green Hill, Girard av. ab. Sixteenth. 10% a.m., 
p.m. 

Greenway, Fifty-eighth and Woodland av. : 
Rev. F. E. Thomas, Fifty-eighth bel. Elmwood 
av. ioYz .iv\, 8 p.m. 

Greenv ; h Street, Greenwich and -Tasker, E. 
of Moyamensing av. : Rev. William Hutton, D. 
D., 1627 S. Thirteenth, ioj^ a.m., 7% P-M. 

Harper Memorial, Twenty-ninth and Susque- 
hanna av. : Rev. Herman C. Fox, D. D., 2907 
Columbia av. ioj^ a.m., 7^4 p.m. 

Hebron Memorial, Twenty-fifth and Thomp- 
son: Rev. Robert Graham, D. D., 2417 N. Col- 
lege av. 10% a.m., 7% p.m.; 8 p.m. May to 
October. 

Hermon, Frankford and Harrison, Frankford : 
Rev. Alexander Henry, 4835 Frankford av. 10^ 
a.m., 7Y2. P.M. 

Hollond Memorial, S. E. cor. Broad and Fed- 
eral : Rev. W. M. Paden, D. D., 1413 S. Fif- 
teenth; Rev. J. R. Miller, D. D.. 420 S. Fif- 
teenth. 10^2 a.m., 7 l / 2 p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Hope, Thirty-third and Wharton: Rev. J. 
Gray Bolton, D. D., 1906 Pine. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Lawndale, Lawndale : Rev. John H. Boggs, 
D. D., Levick St., Lawndale. 10^ A.M., 7^ 

P.M. 



7 3 A 



26 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Leverington, cor. Ridge and Leverington avs. : 
Rev. James W. Kirk, 462 Lyceum av. 10% a.m., 
7 l / 2 P.M. 

Lombard Street Central (colored), Lombard 
bel. Ninth: Rev. John B. Reeve, D. D., 1511 
Lombard. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Macalester (Memorial ), Torresdale : Rev. Ger- 
shom H. Nimmo, Torresdale. n a.m., 3% p.m. 

McDowell Memorial. Twenty-first and Co- 
lumbia av. : Rev. John Loughran Scott, D. D., 
2003 Diamond, \oV 2 a.m., 7% p.m. 

Mariners', Front ab. Pine : Rev. Henry F. Lee, 
631 Spruce, io 1 ^ a.m., 7% p.m. ; winter, 7% 
p.m. ; Scandinavian service, 3% p.m. 

Market Square, Main ab. Mill, Germantown : 
Rev. T. McBride Nichols, Market square. io'4 
a.m., 8 p.m. 

Mechanicsville Chapel: Rev. G. H. Nimmo, 
Torresdale. 

Memorial, Eighteenth and Montgomery av. : 
Rev. Samuel A. Mutchmore, D. D., S. E. cor. 
Nineteenth and Montgomery av. Rev. D. S. 
Clark, associate, io'j a.m., 4 p.m. 

Memorial Collegiate Chapel, Nineteenth and 
York: Rev. S. A. Mutchmore, D. D. 8 p.m. 

Mizpah. Eighth and Wolfe : Rev. A. S. Sharp- 
less, 1 147 Snyder av. 

Mount Airy, Germantown and Mount Pleasant 
avs.: Rev. John Calhoun. 11 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Ninth, Sixteenth and Sansom : Rev. William 
P. Fulton, 208 S. Thirty-seventh. ioJ£ a.m., 8 
p.m. ; summer, 4 p.m. 

North, Sixth ab. Green : Rev. George S. Burn- 
field, B.D.. 495 N. Fourth. io' 2 a.m., 7', p.m. ; 
summer, S p.m. 

North Broad Street, Broad and Green : Rev. 
Charles Wadsworth, Jr., D. D., 1515 Wallace. 
ioJ4 a.m., 8 P.M. 

Northminster. Thirty-fifth and Baring: Rev. 
Robert H. Fulton, D. D., 3420 Hamilton. io l / 2 
a.m., 7K P-M- 



Harvey G. 

I04 A.M., 

and Vine : 



Second, Twenty-first and Walnut: 11 a.m., 8 

P.M. 

Second Germantown, Tulpehocken and Greene: 
Rev. C. P. H. Nason, 6123 Greene. 10^ a.m., 

8 P.M. 

Second Street Mission, Second bel.Norris: Rev. 
William Greenough, D. D., 1712 Franklin. 2%, 

8 P.M. 

Somerville Mission, Somerville : n a.m., 8 

P.M. 

South Broad Street, Broad nr. Ritner : Rev. 
Charles W. Nevin, 1822 S. Broad 

South, Third bel. Federal : Rev. D. Stuart 
Moore, 306 Redwood. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m.; 
summer, 8 p.m. 

Southwestern, N. E. cor. Twentieth and Fitz- 
water : Rev. J. L. Weaver, 723 S. Twentieth; 
Rev. Irwin P. McCurdy, D. D., Litt.D., honorary 
pastor, io's a.m., 7% p.m. 

Summit Chapel, Carpenter and Greene, Ger- 
mantown, under care of Second Church, Ger- 
mantown : Rev. Francis Palmer, Frank and Sher- 
man. ioi,l a.m., 8 p.m. 

Susquehanna Avenue, Susquehanna av. and 
Marshall: Rev. R. T. Jones, D. D., 2560 N. 
Eighth, io'i a.m., 7^2 P-M. 

Tabernacle, Thirty-seventh and Chestnut : 
Rev. Henry C. McCook, D. D., The Manse, 
3700 Chestnut. io : 2 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Tabor, Eighteenth and Christian : Rev. Willis 
B. Skillman, 1808 Christian, tojjj a.m., 7% p.m. 

Temple, N. E. cor. Franklin and Thompson: 
Rev. Francis A. Hoi ton, D. D., 1705 Oxford. 
io}4 A.M., 7V2 P. M. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Tenth, cor. Spruce and Seventeenth : 

II A.M., 8 P.M. 

Third (Old Pine Street^, Pine ab. Fourth: 



10^ 



North Tenth Street, Tenth bel. Girard av. : 
Rev. A. L. Lathem, 1206 N, Twelfth. io'^ 

A.M.. 1% P.M. 

( >ak Lane : Rev. A. E. Stewart. 
Olivet. Twenty-second and Mount Vernon : 
Rev. L. Y. Graham, D. D., 2127 Spring Garden. 

IO !/ 2 A.M., J% P.M. 

Overbrook : Rev. Charles R. Erdman. 11 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Oxford, Broad and Oxford : Rev. 
Furbay, Ph. D., 1439 N. Fifteenth. 
7f£ p.m.: May to October, 8 p.m. 

Patterson Memorial, Sixty-third 
Rev. George B. Bell, 101 N. Sixty-third. 10^ 

A.M., 8 P.M. 

Peace (German), cor. Tenth and Snyder av. : 
Rev. Charles Vielleumier, 933 McKean. 

Princeton, cor. Saunders and Powelton avs. : 
Rev. J. Addison Henry, D. D., 3814 Powelton 
av. ioJ£ a.m., 8 p.m. 

Puritan, Second ab. Lehigh av. : Rev. Wm. 
M. Schall, 811 N. Twenty-sixth. 

Redeemer, Penn, Wister and Chew, German- 
town : Rev. William H. Davis, 448 E. Chelten 
av. 11 a.m., 8 P.M. 

Richmond, Richmond nr. Ann : Rev. D. B. 
Rogers, 3012 Richmond. iof-4 a.m., 7% p.m. ; 
8 p.m. summer. 

Roxborough, cor. Ridge and Port Royal avs. 

Scots, Broad and Castle av. 

St. Mary Street, 627 St. Mary: Mission of . Charles 
Wylie Memorial Church. p.m. 



Rev. Hughes O. Gibbons, D.D., 323 Pine 

A.M., 7 3 t P.M. 

Tioga, Tioga bel. Sixteenth : Rev. William L. 
Ledwith, 1). D.. 1531 Tioga. io l / 2 A.M., 7% p.m. 
Trinity. Frankford av. and Cambria: Rev. 
Andrew J. Sullivan, D. D., 540 W. Lehigh av. 
io' 2 a.m.. 7 1 2 P-M- 

Trinity, Chestnut Hill: Rev. C. C. Tyler. 11 

A.M., 8 P.M. 

Union, Thirteenth bel. Spruce: Rev. Alex. 
Waddell, 1916 Christian. 10^ a.m., 4 P.M. 

Union Mission Chapel, River road, Shawmont : 
David Bentley, supt., 1440 N. Thirteenth. 

Union Tabernacle, York and Coral: Rev. 
Robert Hunter, D. D., 2828 Frankford av. 10% 
a.m., jM p.m. 

Wakefield, Main bel. Fisher's lane, German- 
town : Rev. Thomas G. F. Hill, 23 Fisher's lane. 
io l A a.m., 8 P.M. 

Walnut Street, Walnut west of Thirty-ninth : 
Rev. Stephen W. Dana, D. D., 3955 Walnut; 
Rev. S. Ward Righter, asst., 3741 Spruce, ioj^ 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Waterloo Street Mission. Waterloo bel. Lehiyh 
av. : Rev. F. M. Earle, 2614 N. Seventh. 

West Arch Street, cor. Arch and Eighteenth : 
Rev. Mervin J. Eckels, D. D., 134 N. Twenty- 
first. IO 1 ^ A.M., 7Yi, P.M. 

West Green Street, cor. Nineteenth and Green : 

lO l / 2 A.M., 7% P.M. 

West Hope. A? pen ab. Fortieth : Rev. W. H. 
McCaughey, D. D., 754 Preston. io l / 2 a.m., 

lYx f-u. 

\\ estminster. Broad 



and Fitzwater : 



M. Alford, 1337 Reed. 10% a.m., 7^ 



Rev. 

V. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



27 



West Park, Fifty-fourth and Lansdowne av. : 
Rev. J. Henry Sharpe, D. D., 4006 Pine, ioj^ 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

West Side, Germantowh, Winona and Pulaski: 
Rev. W. Porter Lee, 334 School lane. 11 a.m., 

8 P.M. 

Wharton Street, cor. Ninth and Wharton : 
Rev. Frederick W. Johnson, 827 Wharton. \o l / 2 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Wissahickon, Ridge and Manayunk avs. : Rev. 
D. H. Martin, Wissahickon. 

Wissinoming, Wissinoming : Rev. George H. 
Broening. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Woodland, S. E. cor. Forty-second and Pine : 
Rev. James Stuart Dickson, 212 S. Forty-first. 
io 1 ^ a.m.. 8 P.M. 

Wylie Memorial, Broad bel. Spruce: Rev. T. 
W. J. Wylie, D. D., 1824 Wylie. 10^ a.m., 4 

P.M. 

Zion, S. E. cor. Fifty-seventh and Market ; 
Rev. V. D. Reed, D.D., 316 N. Thirty-seventh. 

IO 1 ^ A.M., 7% P.M. 

Zion (German 1, Twenty-eighth and Mount 
Pleasant: Rev. C. Theodore Albrecht, 1254 N. 
Twenty-eighth. 

CAMDEN AND VICINITY. 

Calvary, Second and Pearl: Rev. A. W. 
Spooner, 414 N. Second. 10% a.m., j 1 / 2 p.m. 

Central Chapel, Eleventh and Cooper. Si:n- 
day-school. 

First, cor. Fifth and Penn : Rev. W. Dayton 
Roberts. 

First, Gloucester City, cor. Monmouth and 
Burlington: Rev. Henry Reeves, Ph. D. 

Grace, Cramer Hill : Rev. H. P. Hill. 

Liberty Park (German), Liberty Park: Rev. 
Charles Schneegass. io 1 ^ a.m., 7 3 ^ p.m. 

Second, Fourth and Benson : Rev. James C. 
Russell, 426 Benson. 

Atco : Rev. Thomas H. Medd. 

Haddonfield : Rev. \V. \Y. Casselberry. 

Merchantville : Rev. I. Mench Chambers. 

Blackwood: Rev. Frederick R. Brace, Ph.D. 

Woodbury : Rev. Edward Dillon. 



PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL. 

Bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania : Rt. Rev. 
Ozi William Whitaker, D. D., 4027 Walnut; 
Rev. Winfield S. Baer, Secretary of the Bishop ; 
office, Church House, Twelfth and Walnut. 

Rev. Cyrus T. Brady, Archdeacon of the Dio- 
cese, 4439 Spruce ; Treasurer of Episcopal 
and Convention Fund. Benjamin G. Godfrey, 
Church House, Twelfth and Walnut. 

CONVOCATIONS. 

Germantown. — Rev. J. de W. Perry, D. D., 
Dean ; Rev. Joseph Wood, Jr.. Secretary. 

Northeast, Philadelphia. — Rev. H. Richard Har- 
ris, Dean; Rev. Llewellyn N. Caley, Secre- 
tary, 622 N. Eleventh. 

Northwest, Philadelphia. — Rev. Benjamin Wat- 
son, D. D., President; Rev. H. M. G. Huff, 
Secretary. 

Southeast, Philadelphia. — Rev. Leverett Brad- 
ley, Dean; Rev. H. L. Duhring, Secretary, 
411 Spruce. 

Southwest, Philadelphia.— Rev. W. N. Mc- 
Vickar, D. l>.. President; Rev. John S. Bun- 
ting, Secretary. 



West Philadelphia.— Rev. C. A. Maison, D. D., 
Dean ; Rev. S. Lord Gilberson, Secretary, 
6901 Woodland av. 

OFFICERS OF CHURCH INSTITUTIONS IN PHILA- 
DELPHIA. 

Secretary of Standing Committee : W. W. Fra- 
zier, 400 Chestnut. 

Secretary of Hospital of the Protestant Episco- 
pal Church, of Trustees of Protestant Episco- 
pal Church in Diocese, and of the Trustees and 
Overseers of the Divinity School : Rev. Win- 
field S. Baer, Church House, Twelfth and 
Walnut. 

Treasurer of Christmas Fund : George Harrison 
Fisher, 308 Walnut. 

Secretary of the Board of Missions of the Dio- 
cese of Pennsylvania : Rev. T.William David- 
son. 

Treasurer of Board of Missions : Rowland Eva-ns, 
225 S. Sixth. 

Treasurer of Hospital of Protestant Episcopal 
Church : William W. Frazier, 400 Chestnut. 

Secretary of the Bishop White Prayer-Book So- 
ciety : James S. Biddle, 1714 Locust; Treas- 
urer, William B. Whitney, 137 S. Second. 

Treasurer of Corporation for Relief of Widows 
and Children of Deceased Clergymen : W. \V. 
Montgomery, 218 S. Fourth. 

Registrar of the Diocese: Rev. S. F. Hotchkin, 
Church House, Twelfth and Walnut. 

Treasurer of Clergy Daughters' Fund : Charles 
W. Cushman. 224 Walnut. 

Treasurer of Evangelical Educational Society : 
Alfred Lee; General Secretary, Rev. R. C. 
Matlack, D.D., 1224 Chestnut. 

Treasurer of Society for the Advancement of 
Christianity in Pennsylvania : George W. Hun- 
ter, 219 S. Third; Corresponding Secretary, 
Rev. John K. Murphy, D. D., High St., Ger- 
mantown. 

Sunday-School Association of the Protestant 
Episcopal Cliurch in Diocese of Pennsylvania : 
President, Rt. Rev. Ozi William Whitaker, 
D. D. ; Vice-Presidents, George C. Thomas, 
Orlando Crease; Recording Secretary, John 
J. Reese, Jr. ; Corresponding Secretary, Rev. 
H. L. Duhring, 41 1 Spruce ; Treasurer, Wash- 
ington J. Peale, Drexel Building. 

Protestant Episcopal City Mission: President, 
Rt. Rev. Ozi William Whitaker, D.D.; Treas- 
urer, Effingham Perot, 401 Market ; Superin- 
tendent, Rev. H. L. Duhring, Central Office, 
411 Spruce; Secretary, James C. Sellers, 511 
Franklin Building ; Secretary to Superinten- 
dent, Rev. T. J. Taylor, 411 Spruce. 

Missionaries to Public Institutions : Rev. Thomas 
L. Franklin, 1 ). D., 2316 Parrish ; Rev. William 
S. Heaton, Missionary to Almshouse, 2526 N. 
Sixth; Rev. John G. Furey, Missionary to 
Homes, etc., 36 Seymour. Germantown ; Rev. 
G. A. Latimer, 4131 Westminster av.; and Rev. 
W. S. Neill, 2038 Christian. 

Permanent Court for the Trial of Clergymen: 
Rev. J. N. Blanchard. D. D.. Rev. W. N. Mc- 
Vickar, D. D., Rev. R. S. Eastman, Rev. W. 
B. Bodine, D. D., Rev. T. S. Rumney, D. D., 
Rev. T. A.Tidl.all. 1). D., Rev. R. W.Micou, 
Rev. J. K. Murphy, D. I)., Rev. Daniel M. 
Bates. Rev. Simeon C. Hill. 

Divinity School, Fiftieth and Woodland: Rev. 
Edward T. Bartlett, D. D., Dean; Rev. E. P. 



- ■ - •• - - - 



28 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Gould, S. T. D., Rev. Fleming James, D. D.. 
Rev. L. W. Batten, Ph. D., Rev. R.W. Micou, 
A. M.,Rev. L. M. Robinson, A. B., Rev. John 
Fulton, D. D., LL. D. 

Advent, York and Buttonwood : Rev. John P. 
Tyler, 517 York av. io'4 a.m., "j l/ 2 p.m. 

Advocate, Eighteenth and Diamond : Rev. W. 
W. Silvester, S. T. D., 2100 N. Eighteenth; 
Rev. Alsop Leffingwell, 2111 Gratz, asst. 10% 
a.m., 7^ p.m. 

All Saints, Twelfth and Fitzwater : Rev. Rob- 
ert McKay, D. D., 411 S. Broad; Rev. H. L. 
Duhring, rector emeritus. 

All Saints, Torresdale, Bristol turnpike : Rev. 
Rush S. Eastman, Torresdale. 10 l / 2 a.m. ; ser- 
vices Chapel of the Redeemer, Andalusia, 3^ P.M. 

All Souls I for the Deaf), Franklin ab. Green: 
Rev. J. M. Koehler, 4315 Whittier, Germantown. 
October to July, ■2 l / 2 i j .m. ; July to October, 10% 
A.M. 

Annunciation, Twelfth and Diamond : Rev. 
Daniel I. Odell, 2112 N. Twelfth. y l A, 10, ioj^ 
a.m., 8 p.m. 

Ascension, Broad bel. South : Rev. G.Woolsey 
Hodge, 334 S. Thirteenth ; Rev. Louis A. Lam- 
phor, asst., 1229 Locust. 7^, io}<£, nj^ a.m., 

2 l A, 7 3 A p.m. 

Atonement, Seventeenth and Summer: Rev. 
I. Newton Stanger. 1). 1>., Forty-seventh and 
Kingsessing av.; Rev. Benjamin Watson, 1). D., 
rector emeritus, 162 X. Twentieth. 8, 11 a.m., 

35(i iVx PM - 

Beloved Disciple, Columbia av. ab. Twentieth : 

Rev. George R. Savage, 1619 Oxford. 8, 10^ 
a.m., 7 3 i p.m. 

Burd Asylum Chapel, Market W. of Sixty- 
third : Rev. S. E. Snively, M. D., Burd Asylum. 

\oV 2 A.M., 4 P.M. 

Calvary, Manheim and Pulaski av., German- 
town : Rev. James DeWolf Perry, D. D., Man- 
heim st. 11 A.M., 4 P.M. ; 5 p.m. summer. 

Calvary Monumental, Forty-first ab. Brown : 
Rev. Jesse Higgins. 7, io 1 ^ a.m., 7.40 p.m. 

Chapel Christ Ch. Hospital, Belmont av. and 
Forty-ninth : Rev. Gideon J. Burton, 403 Chest- 
nut. \oy 2 a.m., 2% p.m. 

Chapel of St. Faith, Bristol and Sixth : Rev. 
T. J. Taylor, A.M., 3114 N. Fifteenth. 

Christ, Second ab. Market : Rev. C. Ellis Ste- 
vens, LL. D.. D. C. L., 2217 Spruce ; Rev. Fran- 
cis S. Steinmetz, asst. 11 a.m., 4 p.m 

Christ Church Chapel, Pine bel. Twentieth : 
Rev. Edward Riggs, 1538 Pine. 11 a.m., 4 p.m. 

Christ, cor. Sixth and Venango : Rev. Thomas 
J. Taylor, A. M., 3114 N. Fifteenth ; Rev. H.C. 
Mayer, associate. 

Christ, Germantown, Tulpehocken cor. Adams: 
Rev. John B. Falkner, D. D.. 59 W. Tulpe- 
hocken; Rev. C. H. Arndt, asst. 11 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Church Home for Children Chapel, Angora : 
\o x / 2 a.m., 4 and 5 p.m. according to season. 

Covenant, Twenty-seventh and Girard av. : 
Rev. J. J. Joyce Moore, 2828 Girard av. ; Rev. 
E. G. Hawkes, M. D., asst. 

Crucifixion (colored), Bainbridge ab. Eighth: 
Rev. Henry L. Phillips, 707 Florida, \o x / 2 A.m., 

8 P.M. 

Educational Home Chapel, Forty-ninth and 
Greenway av. : io 1 ^ A.M., 7 p.m. 

Emmanuel, Marlborough ab. E. Girard av. : 
Rev. Dudley D. Smith, 1847 Frankford av. ioj^ 
a.m., 7^ P.M. 



Emmanuel, Holmesburg: Rev. Arnold H. 
Hord, Holmesburg ; Rev. D. C. Millettee. D.D., 
rector emeritus, ioj^ a.m. ; also 7% p.m. from 
Easter to Christmas. 

Emmanuello (Italian Mission), 1024 Christian: 
Rev. Michele Zara, 756 S. Tenth. 

Epiphany, Chestnut ab. Eighteenth : Rev. T. 
A. Tidball, D. D., 2206 Trinity Place ; Rev. O. 
S. Michael, asst., 3642 N. Broad. 11 a.m., 4 p.m. 

Epiphany Chapel, cor. Twenty-third and 
Cherry: Rev. O. S. Michael. 

Evangelists, Catharine ab. Seventh : Rev. 
Henry R. Percival, D. D., 1110 Spruce; Rev. 
Charles W. Robinson, B. D., Priest in charge. 
7^,io^,ha.m.,8 p.m. 

Gloria Dei (Old Swedes'), bel. Christian and 
Front : Rev. Snyder B. Simes, 916 Swanson. 

Good Shepherd, Cumberland E. of Frankford 
av. : Rev. J. A. Goodfellow, 2745 Frankford av. 
8, io r 2 a.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. ; winter, 7^ p.m. 

Grace, Twelfth and Cherry : Rev. H. Richard 
Harris, 140 N. Twenty-first; Rev. C. K. Penny, 
asst. 11 a.m.. 8 p.m. 

( irace Church Chapel, Fortieth and Girard 
av. : Rev. C. E. Spalding. xoV 2 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Grace, Mount Airy : Rev. Simeon C. Hill, The 
Rectory, Gowen av., Mount Airy. 10% a.m., 4 
p.m. ; June to September, 5 p.m. 

Holy Apostles, cor. Twenty-first and Christian: 
Rev. Henry S. Getz, 2211 Trinity Place;' Rev. 
John S. Bunting, 316 S. Twenty-first, Rev. W. 
S. Neill, 2038 Christian, assistants ; Rev. C. D. 
Cooper, D. D., rector emeritus, 2026 Spruce. 
io'2 a.m., 7^ p.m. ; Wednesday, 8 p.m. 

Holy Comforter. Forty-eighth and Haverford 
av., mission of St. Stephen's: Rev. J . J. Lanier, 
4517 Fairmount av. io'<£ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Holy Comforter Memorial, Nineteenth and 
Titan: Rev. W. H. Graff, 1636 S. Eighteenth; 
Rev. G. Wharton McMullen, asst. 7, 10, \o l / 2 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Holy Communion Memorial Chapel, Twenty- 
seventh and Wharton : Rev. William F. Ayer, 
2337 Wharton. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Holy Innocents, Washington and Wissinom- 
ing, Tacony : Rev. L. R. F. Davis. 8, 10.40 
A.M., 7 l / 2 P.M. 

Holy Spirit, Eleventh and Snyder av. : Rev. 
Samuel H. Boyer, 1919 S. Broad. 11 a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

Holy Trinity, Nineteenth and Walnut : Rev. 
William N. McVickar, D. D., 1904 Walnut; 
Rev. L. B. Edwards, Rev. James F. Bullitt, 
assistants. 11 a.m., 4 p.m. winter; 5 p.m. sum- 
mer. 

Holy Trinity (Memorial) Chapel, Twenty-sec- 
ond and Spruce : Rev. Robert A. Mayo, 230 S. 
Twentieth ; Rev. R. M. Beach, asst. 11 a.m., 

8 P.M. 

Hospital of Protestant Episcopal Church 
Chapel, Front and Lehigh av. 9 a.m., 3^ p.m. 

House of Prayer, Branchtown : Rev. George 
Bringhurst, Locust av., Germantown. 10% a.m., 
iVz p.m. 

Incarnation, cor. Broad and Jefferson : Rev. 
Joseph D. Newlin, D. D., 532 Marshall; Rev. 
K. S. Guthrie, Ph. D., 1324 Jefferson, Rev. A. 
A. Rickert, assts. 

Mediator, Nineteenth and Lombard: Rev. 
Samuel E. Appleton, D. D., 1804 Delancey ; 
Rev. Charles E. Milnor, asst., 120 N. Seven- 
teenth. 11 a.m., 7^ P.M. 




Messiah, N. E. cor. Broad and Federal : Rev. 
S. R. Colladay, 1163 S. Broad. 7 l / 2 , 10% a.m., 

Messiah, Thompson and E. Huntingdon : 
Rev. C. L. Fulforth, 2640 E. Huntingdon. 8, 
XO l / 2 a.m., 7 l / 2 p.m. 

Nativity, Eleventh and Mount Vernon : Rev. 
Llewellyn N. Caley, 622 N. Eleventh. 10^ a.m., 

iYa p-m. 

Our Merciful Saviour, Forty-fourth and Balti- 
more av. : Rev. Robert F. Innes, 3819 Walnut. 
7^, 11 a.m., 4J4 p.m.; 11 a.m. Thursday; 4^ 
p.m. daily. 

Prince of Peace, Point Breeze av. and Fernon : 
Mission of Holy Trinity Church. 

Protestant Episcopal Hospital Mission, E. 
Huntingdon and Filmore : Rev. John P. Bagley. 

IO% A.M.. 2, 7 l / 2 P.M. 

Redeemer (Seamen's Mission), S. W. cor. 
Front and Queen: Rev. Francis M. Burch, 1721 
S. Thirteenth. 10% a.m.. 7 l / 2 P.M. 

Redemption, Twenty-second and Callowhill : 
Rev. Thomas R. List, 400 N. Twenty-second. 

Resurrection, Broad and Tioga: Rev. Joseph 
R. Moore, nr. Church. 

Saviour. Thirty-eighth ab. Chestnut : Rev. 
William B. Bodine, D. D., 4025 Walnut; Rev. 
H. J. Beagen, asst. 11 a.m., 8 p.m. 

St. Alban, Ridge and Fairthorne avs., Roxbor- 
ough : Rev. Charles S. Lyons, Fairthorne and 
Ridge avs. 

St. Andrew, Eighth ab. Spruce : Rev. Wilbur 
F. Paddock, D. D., 3911 Locust; Rev. John G. 
Bawn, asst. 11 a.m., 4 p.m.; summer, 5 p.m. ; 
December to April, 7% p.m. 

St. Andrew. S. W. cor. Thirty-sixth and Bar- 
ing : Rev. Charles M. Armstrong, 3606 Spring 
Garden. 7%, \oV 2 a.m., 8 p.m. 

St. Asaph, Bala: Rev. Charles S. Olmsted, 
D. D , rectory. 11 a.m., 4^ p.m. 

St. Barnabas. Sixty-fifth and Girard av. : Rev. 
Edward L. Ogilby, nr. church. 10^4 A.M., 7^ 
p.m. 

St. Barnabas, Third and Dauphin : Rev. J. R. 
L. Nisbett, 169 W. Susquehanna ave. 

St. Clement, Twentieth and Cherry : Rev. 
George H. Moffett ; Rev. Herbert Parrish, Rev. 
W. C. Clapp, Rev. Erskine Wright, assistants. 
2026 Cherry. Holy Communion, Sundays at 7, 
8, g 1 /^ and 11 a.m., and daily at 7 a.m., and on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays and saints' days at 9J4 

A.M. 

St. David, Centre opposite Wabash av., Mana- 
yunk : Rev. Francis A. D. Launt, 154 Church; 
Rev. J. W. Kaye, asst. 7, 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. Elisabeth, Sixteenth and Mifflin : Rev. 
William McGarvey, rector ; Rev. Maurice L. 
Cowl, Rev. William L. Hayward, assts., 1339 
Mifflin. 7 x / 2 , 9, ioJ-2 A.M., 7^ p.m. ; week days, 

7 A.M. 

St. George, Sixty-first and Hazel av. : Rev. 
Frank P. Clarke, Sixty-first and Hazel av. 

St. George's Chapel, cor. E. Venango and 
Edgemont : Rev. John Totty, 3553 Janney. 

St. James, cor. Twenty-second and Walnut : 
Rev. Joseph N. Blanchard, D. D., 2208 Walnut ; 
Rev. Horace A. Walton, Rev. Walter Lowrie, 
assistants, Morton Guild House, 2210 Sansom. 8, 
io<^ a.m., 4, 8 P.M. 

St. James, Fifty-second bel. Master: Rev. H. 
B. Martin, M. D., 1455 N. Fifty-fifth. 7^, 10^ 

A.M., 7 l / 2 P.M. 



St. James, Kingsessing, Sixty-ninth and Wood- 
land av. : Rev. S. Lord Gilberson, 6901 Wood- 
land av. xo l / 2 a.m., 7^ P.M. 

St. James the Less. Clearfield and Nicetown 
lane. Falls of Schuylkill : Rev. Robert Ritchie, 
nr. church, io 1 /^ a.m., 4 p.m. 

St. John's, Brown bel. Third: Rev. R. Heber 
Barnes, 1600 N. Thirty-second. 

St. John Chrysostom, Twenty-eighth and 
Susquehanna av. : Rev. Joseph Sherlock, B. D., 
2157 N. Twenty-eighth. 7, 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. John's Free Church, Cemetery av. and 
Emerald; Rev. R. H. Wright. 

St. John the Baptist, Main and Mehl, German- 
town : Rev. George William Lincoln, Fisher's 
lane. 7 l / 2 , g l / 2 , 10% a.m., 3, 7 l / 2 p.m. 

St. John the Evangelist, Third and Reed : 
Rev. John Moncure, 1208 Reed. io l / 2 a.m., 7% 
p.m. ; 8 p.m. summer. 

St. Jude, Franklin ab. Brown : Rev. Charles 
Logan, 816 Franklin. ioV£ a.m., 8 p.m. 

St. Luke. Thirteenth bel. Spruce: Rev. Lev- 
erett Bradley, 1217 Spruce ; Rev. William Bower, 
asst. 11 a.m., 4 p.m. ; November to April, 8 p.m. 

St. Luke, Main and Coulter, Germantown : 
Rev. Samuel Upjohn, D. D., 148 W. Coulter; 
Rev. G. H. Dennison, asst. 

St. Luke the Beloved Physician (Memorial), 
Bustleton : Rev. Samuel F. Hotchkin, nr. church. 

St. Mark, Locust ab. Sixteenth : Rev. Alfred 
G. Mortimer, D. D., rector; Rev. S. F. W. Sy- 
monds, Rev. N. D. VanSyckel, Rev. S. C. 
Hughson, Rev. H. Ransom, assistants, 1625 
Locust. 7, 8, \o l / 2 , i\y± a.m., 3, 4J4 p.m.; Ad- 
vent and Lent, 8 p.m. 

St. Mark's, Frankford, Frankford av. nr. Unity: 
Rev. John B. Harding, 4647 Penn ; Rev. Fran- 
cis C. Hartshorne, asst. 7,9, \oV 2 a.m., 7 l / 2 p.m. 

St.-Martin-in-the-Fields, Wissahickon Heights : 
Rev. Jacob Le Roy. St. Martin's lane, Wissa- 
hickon Heights. Matins, second and fourth Sun- 
days, io l / 2 A.M.; other Sundays, 11 A.M.; holy 
communion, second and fourth Sundays, 11 A.M. ; 
other Sundays, 8 a.m. Even song, 4^ p.m. 

St. Martin's, Oak lane : Rev. Walter Jordan. 

St. Mary, Locust ab. Thirty-ninth : Rev. 
Thomas C. Varnall, D. D., 3914 Locust; Rev. 
John Dows Hills, associate rector, 4117 Pine. 
7/4, i°/4 A.M., 4 p.m. ; 5 p.m. summer. 

St. Matthew, Girard av. and Eighteenth : Rev. 
R. W. Forsyth, 1731 Girard av. ; Rev. J. P. 
Hubbard, rector emeritus. 10% A.M., 7^ p.m. 

St. Matthias, Nineteenth and Wallace. 10J4 
a.m., 7^ P.M. 

St. Michael, High nr. Morton, Germantown: 
Rev. John K. Murphy, D. D., nr. church ; Rev. 
William Ely, 141 School lane, Rev. Arthur Wilde, 
assts. 8, zo l / 2 a.m., 4% p.m. ; summer, 5 p.m. 

St. Michael and All-Angels' Chapel, Forty- 
third and Wallace : Rev. Alden Welling, 612 N. 
Forty-third. 

St. Paul, Third bel. Walnut: Rev. E. K. Tul- 
lidge, M. A., 924 Walnut. 

St. Paul's Chapel, Forty-seventh and Kingsess- 
ing av., West Phila. : Rev. 1. Newton Stanger, 
D. D., minister in charge, Forty-seventh and 
Kingsessing av. 7 l / 2 , \o x / 2 a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. Paul, Chestnut Hill : Rev. J. Andrews Har- 
ris, S. T. D., nr. church; Rev. J. T. Mitchell, 
S. T. B.,asst. 8, io, ! /£ a.m., 4 p.m.; summer, 5 p.m. 

St. Paul's Memorial of William Welsh, Ken- 
sington av. and Butler: Rev. Edwin J. Humes, 
3450 Franklin av. 



3° 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



St. Peter, Third and Pine : Rev. Charles P. 
B. Jeflferys, Ph. B., and Rev. J. A. Montgomery, 
assts., St. Peter's Church. October to May, n 
a.m., 7^4 p.m., St. Peter's House, 100 Pine. 

St. Peter,' cor. Wayne and Harvey, German- 
town : Rev. Theodore S. Rumney, D. D., cor. 
Wayne and Harvey; Rev. J. M. Hayman, asst. 
lYi, io l A a.m., 7^£ P.M. ; 8 p.m. June to October. 

St. Philip, Forty-second and Baltimore av. : 
Rev. W. H. Falkner, 4805 Regent. 10% a.m., 
•jYx p.m. 

St. Sauveur ( French), Twenty-second and De- 
lancey Place: Rev. C. Miel, D.D., Wayne, Pa., 

II A.M., 4 P.M. 

St. Simeon, Lehigh av. and Ninth: Rev. 
Edgar Cope, 2428 N. Broad; Rev. F. A. Mac- 
Millen, asst. 8, io x A a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. Stephen, Tenth ab. Chestnut : Rev. Elwood 
Worcester, Ph. D., 1318 Locust; Rev. J. L. 
Miller, parish house, Rev. S. E. Snively, M. D., 
Burd Orphan Asylum, assistants. 11 a.m., 4 
p.m.; 5 p.m. summer; prayer daily, 11 a.m. 

St. Stephen, Bridge and Melrose (White Hall) : 
Rev. William Price. 7 l / 2 , \oV 2 a.m.. 2, y l 2 P.M. 

St. Stephen, Terrace and Hermit, Manayunk : 
Rev. Elliston J. Perot, 128 Sumac av., Wissa- 
hickon. 7, io?4 a.m.. 7I4 p.m. 

St. Thomas (colored), Twelfth bel. Walnut : 
8, 11 a.m., 8 P.M. 

St. Timothy, Reed bel. Eighth: Rev. W. W. 
Mix, 1332 Moore. 

St. Timothy, Ridge av. nr. Shur's lane: Rev. 
R. E. Dennison, rector; Rev. E. S. Stone, 

aSSt. 7, 9, IO 1 ; A.M., 4 l'.M. 

Transfiguration, Thirty-fourth and Walnut: 
Rev. George Rogers. 

Trinity, Oxford turnpike: Rev. Linus Parsons 
Bissell. 10 a.m. 

Trinity Chapel, Crescentville : Rev. Linus 
Parsons Bissell. 34 p.m. winter, 4 p.m. summer. 
Trinity Mission, Rockledge. Pa. 

Trinity, Southwark, Catharine ab. Second: 
Rev. Horace F. Fuller, 220 German. 

Zion, cor. Eighth and Columbia av. : Rev. C. 
Campbell Walker, 1707 N. Eighth. 10% a.m., 
7 3 4 p.m. 

camden and vicinity. 

Ascension. Sussex and Ridgway, Gloucester 
City: Rev. A. E. Todrig. io : 4 a.m., j% p.m. 

Christ, Palmyra: Rev. John F. Fenton. 

Christ, Riverton : Rev. R. Bowden Shepherd. 

Christ, Woodbury : Rev. A. L. Urban. 

Grace, Haddonfield : Rev. Owen J. Davies, 
rector; Rev. Gustavus M. Murray, rector emeri- 
tus. 

Grace, Merchantville : Rev. R. G. Moses. 

Our Saviour, Broadway and Viola : Rev. E. R. 
Baxter, Ferry av. and Fillmore. 10% a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

St. Augustine Chapel (colored), 744 Chestnut: 
Rev. Mr. Henderson. 10% a.m., 2%, 7% p.m. 

St. James' Chapel, Front and North: Rev. 
Howard Stoy, 525 Linden, io 1 ^ a.m. 

St. John, Broadway and Royden : Rev. Gil- 
bert R. Underhill. 7%, 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. Paul, Market ab. Fourth : Rev. Edwin A. 
Penick, 108 N. Fifth; Rev. Howard Stoy, asst., 
525 Linden. 7^, io 1 ^ a.m., 2%, 7% p.m. 

St. Paul's Chapel, Cooper ab. Eleventh: Rev. 
Howard Stoy, 525 Linden. 7J4 p.m. 

St. Peter's, Clarksboro : Rev. Jesse Y. Burk. 



St. Wilfrid, Cramer Hill : Rev. Roland Ring- 
wait, Cramer Hill. 7 l / 2 , xo}/ 2 A.M., 4%, 7% p.m. 
Trinity, Moorestown : Rev. J. H. Lamb, D. D. 
Trinity, Swedesboro : vacant. 



REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA. 

(DUTCH REFORMED.) 

First, cor. Fifteenth and Dauphin : Rev. Peter 
H. Milliken, Ph. D., 1433 Poplar, ioj^ a.m., 
7%. p.m.; Wednesday, 8 p.m. 

Second, Seventh ab. Brown: io^ A.m., 7^ 

I P.M. 

Fourth, Cotton and Cresson, Manayunk : Rev. 
P. J. Kain, 145 Grape. \o l / 2 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Fifth, Susquehanna av. nr. Cedar: Rev. C. 
F. C. Suckow, 2223 E. Dauphin. 10% a.m., 8 

P.M. 

South Philadelphia, Nineteenth and Mifflin : 
Rev. I. C Kerkeslager, supply. 10% a.m., 
, lYx P-M. 

Talmage Memorial, Pechin and Rector, Rox- 
' borough : Rev. Henry C. Willoughby, 387 Con- 
arroe, nr. Mitchell, Roxborough. 10J4 a.m , 
W\ P-M. 

REFORMED (GERMAN) CHURCH IN 

THE UNITED STATES. 

English. 

Reformed Church Publication House, 1025 Arch. 

Bethany Tabernacle, Twentieth and Dauphin: 
Rev. Henry A. Bomberger, 2345 N. Twenty-first. 
io' 2 a.m.. 8 P.M. 

Bethel, Twenty-first and Tasker : Rev. Wilson 

Delaney. 1605 S. 'Twenty-second. 10^2 a.m., 

8 P.M. 

Calvary, 'Twenty-ninth and Lehigh a v. : Rev. 
Jesse H. String, 2734 Lehigh av. io l / 2 A.m., 
j'j P.M. 

Christ, Green bel. Sixteenth : Rev. James 
Crawford, D. D., 1714 Mount Vernon, \o l / 2 

A.M.. 7 V 2 P.M. 

First, Tenth and Wallace: Rev. John H. 
! Sechler, D. D., 714 N. Fifteenth. xo l / 2 a.m., 7^ 
P.M. 

Grace, Eleventh and W. Huntingdon : Rev. 
A. S. Bromer, 614 Diamond. 

Heidelberg, Nineteenth and Oxford : Rev. Ru- 
fus Calvin Zartman, D. D., 1629 N. Nineteenth. 

St. John, Fortieth and Spring Garden : Rev. 
Henry H. Apple, 4121 Powelton ave. 

Messiah, Ninth and Snyder av. : Rev. C. B. 
Alspach, 1233 Jackson. 10J4 A m., 7 l/ 2 p.m. 

Tioga : Rev. E. W. Middleton, 834 N. Twenty- 
first. 

Trinity, Seventh bel. Oxford; Rev. C. H. 
Coon, 1541 N. Seventh. io'£ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

German. 

Bethlehem, Norris and Blair: Rev. F. W. 
Kratz, 2330 Coral. ioJ4 a.m., 7 l / 2 p.m. 

Emanuel, Thirty-eighth and Baring: Rev. A. 
E. Hofer, 413 N. Thirty-eighth. io]/ 2 a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

Emanuel, Bridesburg: Rev. John B. Forster, 
2631 Weiser. 10 a.m., \Y 2 , 7*/ 2 p.m. 

Salem, Fairmount av. bel. Fourth : Rev. F. W. 
Berlemann, D. D., 341 Fairmount av. io^a.M., 
IVt. p.m. 

St. John, Frankford and Ontario: Rev. John 
Voegelin, 3391 Frankford av. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



3i 



St. Lucas. Twenty-sixth bel. Girard av. : Rev. 
M. F. Dumstrey, 921 N. Twenty-sixth. 

St. Mark, Fifth ab. Huntingdon: Rev. G. A. 
Scheer, 2404 N. Sixth. 

St. Matthew, Fifth ab. Venango: Rev. U. O. 
Silvius, 3725 N. Fifth. 

St. Paulus, Wharton ab. Eighteenth : Rev. 
Philipp Vollmer, Ph. D., 1315 Ward. 10^ a.m., 

4 P.M. 

Zion, Sixth ab. Girard av. : Rev. P. H. Dip- 
pel, Ph. D., D. D., 1230 N. Sixth. xi# a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

REFORMED EPISCOPAL. 

Bishop of the Synod of New Yorl: and Philadel- 
phia : Rev. William R. Nicholson, D. D. ; 
office, 2106 Chestnut. 

Trustees of the Theological Seminary: Bishops 
Charles Edward Cheney, D. D. (President), 
William R. Nicholson, I>. D.. Bishop James A. 
Latane, D. D., Revs. H. S. Hoffman, D. D., 
and William T. Sabine. D.D. ; Messrs. Wiliiam 
A.Staunton (Treasurer), 35 S. Second; Rev. 
William Tracy. I >. !>., 4301 Walnut, Philadel- 
phia; Nevins Hyde. M. I>.,2409 Michigan av., 
Chicago, 111., and Charles H. Morton, Al- 
dine Hotel. 

Treasurer of the General Council of the Reformed 
Episcopal Church, John Heins, 508 Walnut. 

Treasurer of New York and Philadelphia Synod, 
Joseph Barton, 1715 Jefferson. 

Faculty of Theological Seminary, Forty-third and 
Chestnut : Bishop William R. Nicholson, D.D., 
dean; Rev. J. Howard-Smith, D. D.. 4400 
Chestnut; Rev. James William Fairley, Forty- 
third and Ludlow ; Josiah H. Penniman, Ph. 
D., 4315 Sansom. 

Office of the Episco/<<il Recorder, 718 Sansom. 

Reformed Episcopal Publication Society, 1512 
Chestnut: Rev. J. Howard-Smith, D.D., Presi- 
dent, 4400 Chestnut; Rev. F. H. Reynolds, 
1633 S. Thirteenth, Secretary : Rev. William 
Tracy, D. D., 4301 Walnut, Treasurer. 

Church Extension, Trustees of Synod of New 
York and Philadelphia: Bishop William R. 
Nicholson, D. D., President ; Rev. H. S. Hoff- 
man, D. D., 1317 N. Broad, Secretary ; Charles 
M. Morton, Treasurer; Rev. J. Howard- 
Smith, D. D., 440J Chestnut ; W. W. Latrope, 
Scranton, Pa. 

Atonement, Wayne and Chelten av., German- 
town : Rev. D. M. Stearns, 138 W. Chelten av. 

IO% A.M., 7^ P.M. 

Christ Memorial, N. E. cor. Chestnut and 
Forty-third : Rev. William Tracy, D. D., 4301 
Walnut, io 1 ^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Emmanuel, F. York and Sepviva: Rev. For- 
rest E. Dager, D. D., 2316 E. Dauphin. io>4 
a.m., 7-% p.m. ; 8 p.m. summer. 

(irace Chapel, Falls of Schuylkill : Rev. Alex- 
ander Sloan. 3430 Ridge av. \oV 2 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Intercession. Twenty-ninth and Fletcher : Rev. 
J. Howard-Smith, D. D., 4400 Chestnut. io"/£ 
A.M., 7^ p.m. 

Our Redeemer, Sixteenth and Oxford : Rev. 
H. S. Hoffman, D. D., 131 7 N. Broad, ioj^ 

A.M., 7% P.M. 

Reconcilialon, S. E. cor. Thirteenth and Tas- 
ker : Rev. F. H. Reynolds, 1633 S. Thirteenth. 
io'4 A.M., 7% P.M. 

St. Luke's, cor. Penn and Orthodox, Frank- 



ford : Rev. W. A. Freemantle, M. A., 4917 Frank- 
lin. IO r /4 A.M.. 734 P-M. 

St. Paul's, Chestnut ab. Twenty-first : Bishop 
W. R. Nicholson, D. D., 2106 Chestnut. 10% 
a.m., 4 p.m. 

REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN (General 

Synod). 

Theological Seminary, Twentieth and Vine — 
Professors : Rev. David Steele, D. D., Sys- 
tematic Theology; Rev. M. Gailey, Hebrew 
and Church History ; Rev. James Y. Boice, 
Greek, Homilitics and Pastoral Theology. 

Treasurer of Trustees of Theological Seminary 
and Church Extension Board, Samuel T. Kerr, 
Pier 31, North Wharves. 

First, cor. Nineteenth and Federal : Rev. James 
Y. Boice, 2213 Spring Garden. 10% a.m., 4 p.m.; 
last Sunday in month, 7^ p.m. 

Second, cor. Twentieth and Vine: Rev. Wm. 
Wylie, 827 Windsor Square. 10% a.m., 4 p.m. 

Third, Oxford and Hancock : Rev. Matthew 
Gailey, 1513 Franklin. 10% a.m.. 3 1 /, p.m. 

Fourth, Nineteenth and Catharine : Rev. David 
Steele, D. D.. 2102 Spring Garden. ioJ4 a.m., 
2 l /> p.m. ; summer, 4 p.m. 

Fifth. Front ab. York: Rev. W. H. Gailey, 
2420 N. Sixth. 16% a.m., 3% P.M.; first Sun- 
day in month. 7-^ p.m. 

Sixth, Front ab. Somerset : 10^ A.M., 7^ p.m. 



REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN (Synod). 

First Church of the Covenanters, Seventeenth 
and Hainbridge : Rev. T. P. Stevenson, D. D., 
1520 Chestnut. io'4 a.m., 3*4 p.m. 

Second, Seventeenth bel. Race: Rev. J. C. 
M< Feeters, 1511 Christian. 10% a.m.. 3% p.m. 

Third, Deal east of Frankford av. : Rev. R. C. 
Montgomery, 129 W. Susquehanna av. 10^ a.m., 

Mission of the Covenant to Israel, 735 Lom- 
bard : Rev. Moses Greenberg, missionary. 10^ 
a.m., 8 p.m. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC. 

Archdiocese of Philadelphia : Archbishop, Most 
Rev. Patrick John Ryan, D. D. ; Vicars-Gen- 
eral, Rt. Rev. Mgr. Nicholas Cantwell and 
Very Rev. E. F. Prendergast ; Chancellor and 
Secretary, Rev. James F. Loughlin, D. D. 
Archiepiscopal residence, cor. Eighteenth and 
Summer. 

American Catholic Historical Society, 715 
Spruce : President, Lawrence F. Flick, M. D., 
736 Pine; Vice-President, Rev. Hugh T. 
Henry ; Corresponding Secretary, Rev. Her- 
man J Heuser; Recording Secretary, Francis 
A. Cunningham; Treasurer, Ignatius J. Do- 
han, 1200 Chestnut. 

Colleges and Seminaries. 

St. Joseph's College, Seventeenth and Stiles: 
President, Rev. William F. Clark, S. J. 

Augustinian College of St. Thomas of Villa- 
nova, Villanova, Del. co., Pa. : Very Rev. L.'A. 
Delury, ( >. S. A., President. 

La Salle College, 1240 N. Broad: Brother Isi- 
dore, President. 

Roman Catholic High School, N. E. cor. 
Broad and Vine : Rev. Nevin F. Fisher, rector. 



3 2 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Theological Seminary of St. Charles Borromeo, 
Overbrook, Pa. : Very Rev. John E. Fitzmaurice, 

D. D., rector. 

Augustinian Monastery of St. Thomas of Vil- 
lanova, Villanova, Del. co., Pa. : Rev. F. M. 
Sheeran, O. S. A., prior. 

St. Vincent's Seminary, Germantown : Very 
Rev. James McGill, C. M., president. 

[Most of the parishes have parochial schools 
connected with them.] 

Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul, Eighteenth 
op. Logan Square : Most Rev. P. J. Ryan, D. D., 
Archbishop; Rev. Joseph F. O'Keefe, rector; 
Very Rev. James F. Loughlin, D. D., chancellor; 
Rev. John J. Rogers, Rev. Jaaies C. Monahan, 
Rev. J. F. McQuade, assistants, 225 N. Eigh- 
teenth. 6, jY 2 , %Y 2 , 9, 10Y2 a.m.; vespers, 3^ 

P.M. 

All Saints' Chapel, Blockley Almhouse : Rev. 

E. V. McElhone. 8Y 2 , 9Y2 a.m., 2 p.m. 

All Saints, Bridesburg, cor. Thompson and 
Buckius : Rev. Ernest Deham, rector, 2651 
Buckius 714 and 10 a.m., $Y 2 p.m. 

Annunciation of the B. V. M., cor. Tenth and 
Dickinson : Rev. Patrick J. Dailey. D. D., rec- 
tor; Rev. Francis A. Kelly, Rev. Henry A. Mc- 
Pake, assistants, 1511 S. Tenth. 6, 7%, 9, 10Y2 
A.M. ; vespers, jYi p.m. 

Assumption of the B. V. M., Spring Garden 
bel. Twelfth : Rev. Richard F. Hanagan, rec- 
tor ; Rev. John J. Hickey, Rev. John J. Dooley, 
Rev. P. J. Harkins, assistants, 1121 Spring Gar- 
den. 6, 7Y2, 9, 10% a.m. ; vespers, -3,V 2 p.m. 

Assumption of the B. V. M., Oak, Manayunk : 
Rev. Francis J. Martersteck, rector ; Rev. Henry 
Gantert, assistant, 176 Oak. 7, 8%, io 1 ^ A.M.; 
vespers, 2Y2 p.m. 

Epiphany, Eleventh and Jackson : Rev. James 
Nash, rector; Rev. E. V. Rowan, Rev. P. J. 
Hannigan, assistants, 1123 Jackson. 6. 7%, 9, 
10^ a.m. ; vespers, 7Y2 p.m. 

Gesu, Eighteenth and Stiles: Rev. William J. 
Clark, S. J, rector; Rev. L. H. Gache, S. J., 
Rev. J. J. Brie, S. J., Rev. P. Cassidy, S. J., 
Rev. D. C. Daly, S. J., Rev. J. Jansen, S. ]., 
assistants, Eighteenth and Stiles. s l / 2 , 6%, 7%, 
% l A, 9%, 10 Y\ a.m.; vespers, 7^ p.m. 

Holy Cross, Mount Airy av., Mount Airy: 
Rev. John J. Elcock, rector; Rev. P. M. Whe- 
lan, assistant, nr. church. 7, 10^ a.m., 4 p.m. 

Holy Family, Jefferson, Manayunk: Rev. Mi- 
chael C. McEnroe, rector; Rev. Joseph Mur- 
phy, Rev. Edward J. Keelan, assistants, 242 
Jefferson. 7, 9, xo]/ 2 a.m., 2% P-M. 

Holy Trinity (German), N. W. cor. Sixth and 
Spruce: Rev. E. O. Hiltermann, rector, 617 
Spruce. j%, 10 a.m. ; vespers, 3% p.m. 

Immaculate Conception, Front and Canal : 
Rev. James F. Shields, rector; Rev. John J. 
Toomey, Rev. James A. Dalton, assts., 1020 N. 
Front. 6, 7%, 9, 10^ a.m. ; vespers, qYi p.m. 

Immaculate Heart of Mary Chapel (Little Sis- 
ters of the Poor), Eighteenth ab. Jefferson : Rev. 
J. Jansen, S. J., Eighteenth and Stiles. 6 a.m., 
4 p.m. ; week days, 6 a.m. 

Maternity of the B. V. M., Bustleton : Rev. 
Charles P. Riegel, Cheltenham. 10 a.m. 

Nativity of the B. V. M., Alleghany av. and 
Belgrade, Port Richmond: Rev. Francis J. 
Quinn, rector; Rev. Philip R. McDevitt, Rev. 
James A. Parker, assts, Alleghany ay. and Bel- 
grade. 6, 714, 9, ioy 2 a.m., 7^ P.M T 



Our Lady Help of Christians, Alleghany av. 
and Gaul : Rev. George J. Wolf, rector, nr. 
church. 8, io l / 2 A.M. ; vespers, 3 p.m. 

Our Lady of Lourdes, Sixty-third and Lan- 
caster av. : Rev. James A. Mullin, rector. 

Our Lady of Mercy, cor. Susquehanna av. 
and Broad: Rev. Gerald P. Coghlan, rector; 
Rev. Thomas F. Moore, Rev. Bernard J. Mc- 
Ginnis, assts., 2141 N. Broad. 6%, 8, 9, 10% 
a.m., 7Y2 p.m. 

Our Lady of Mount Carmel. Third and Wolf: 
Rev. B. F. Gallagher. 

Our Lady of the Rosary, Sixty-third and 
Callowhill : Rev. John F. Lynch, rector; Rev. 
John B. McGinley, D. D., asst., 345 N. Sixty- 
third. 7^2,9. 10^ A.M.; vespers, 3^ p.m. 

Our Lady of Visitation of the B. V. M., Lehigh 

av. and Leamy : Rev. Alexander A. Gallagher, 

rector; Rev. James C. McLoughlin, Rev. John 

J. Walsh, assts., Lehigh av. and Leamy. t x / 2 , 

i 8, 9, 10% a.m. ; vespers, 3% p.m. 

Our Mother of Consolation, Chestnut av. nr. 
Main, Chestnut Hill : Rev. T. F. Herlihy,O.S. 
j A., rector; Rev. James E. Vaughan, O. S. A., 
asst., nr. church. 8, \oV 2 A.M., 4 p.m. ; extra 
mass, €> l /2 a.m., June, July, August and Sep- 
' tember. Clergymen from here officiate at St. 
Joseph's Convent Chapel. 

Our Mother of Sorrows, Lancaster av. and 
Forty-eighth, Hestonville : Rev. John W. Shan- 
ahan, rector; Rev. P. F. McNulty, Rev. Joseph 
J. Hannigan, assts., nr. church. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10% 
a.m. ; vespers, 3^ P.M. 

Presentation, Cheltenham '■ Rev. Charles P. 
Riegel, Cheltenham. 8 a.m. 

Sacred Heart of Jesus, Third bel. Reed : Rev. 
John J. Ward, rector; Rev. Francis J. Brady, 
Rev. Anthony J. Zeller, assts., 1404 S. Third. 6, 
7Y2, 9, xo l / 2 a.m. ; vespers, 7Y2 ?-M. 

St. Agatha, Thirty-eighth and Spring Garden : 
Rev. Daniel O'Connor, rector ; Rev. Charles A. 
McFadden, Rev. T. J. Larkin, Rev. Michael 
J. McCabe, assts., 3813 Spring Garden. 6, 7, 8, 
91/, 10% a.m. ; vespers, 3% p.m. 

St. Aloysius, Twenty-sixth and Tasker : Rev. 
Wm. A. Wachter, 2522 Dickinson. 

St. Alphonsus, S. W. cor. Fourth and Revd: 
Rev. Henry Stommjl, rector; Rev. Bernard 
Philipps, asst., 1400 S. Fourth. 7, 8%, 10 A.M. ; 
vespers, 3, 7% p.m. 

St. Ann, Lehigh av. and Memphis : Rev. 
Thomas J. Barry, rector ; Rev. David P. Egan, 
Rev. Thomas F. Ryan, Rev. Daniel A. Mor- 
rissey, assts., 2328 E. Lehigh av. 5%, 6%, 8, 9, 
10% a.m. ; vespers, 3^ p.m. 

St. Anthony of Padua, Gray's Ferry rd. and 
Fitzwater : ;Rev. William P. Masterson, rector; 
Rev. Francis J. McArdle, Rev. Daniel I. Mc- 
Glinchey, assts., 2321 Fitzwater. 6, 7%, 9, 10^ 
a.m., -]Y 2 P.M. 

St. Anthony, Lithuanian, Fifth bel. Carpenter: 
Rev. Joseph Kaulakis, 1029 S. Fifth. 

St. Augustine, Fourth bel. Vine: Rev. N. J. 
Murphy, 0. S. A., rector; Very Rev. J. D. 
Waldron, O. S. A. ; Rev. D. A. Dailey, 0. S. 
A., Rev. J. P. Gilmore, O. S. A., Rev. D. J. 
Sullivan, O. S. A., Rev. W. A. Jones, O. S. A., 
assts., 243 Crown. 6, 8, 9%, 10% a.m. ; vespers, 
7,Vi P-M. 

St. Bonaventure, Ninth and Richfield : Rev. 
Hubert Hammeke, rector; Rev. Joseph A. Ass- 
mann, asst., 2828 N- Ninth. 6, 7, 9, t.6%, a.m., 
2, -]Y 2 p.m. 



_t 'J4 — ■ ■ 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



St. Bonifacius, Diamond and Norris Square : i 
Rev. John A. Frederick, C. SS. R., rector ; Rev. 
Lawrence Werner, C. SS. R.. Rev. William 
\Volsfeld,C. SS. R.. Rev. Conrad Rebhan, C. SS. 
R., Rev. John A. Dlag, C. SS. R., Rev. Conrad 
S. Kraus, C. SS. R., assts. In charge of the Re- 
demptorist Fathers, 144 Diamond. 5%, 7%, 9, 
IO 1 /^ a.m., 3, 7 P.M. 

St. Bridget, James St., Falls of Schuylkill : Rev. | 
William Walsh, rector ; Rev. Michael M. Doyle, 
Rev. Joseph L. O'Connor, assts., 161 James. 1 
6 l /2, %/i, 1°% A.M.; vespers, 3^ pm. 

St. Charles Borromeo, Twentieth and Chris- 
tian: Rev. James P. Sinnott, rector; Rev. Joseph 
F. Nagle, Rev. Thomas F. Quinn, Rev. James 
J. MacAran, Rev. James T. Higgins, assts., 
902 S. Twentieth. 6, -j l / 2 , 8*^,9,9^ and 10^ 
A.M. ; vespers, 7^ P.M. 

St. Clement, Seventy-first and Woodland av. : 
Rev. Francis P. Dougherty, rector ; Rev. Joseph 
V. O'Connor, Rev. Maurice Walsh, Rev. John 
J. Greensill, assts., Seventy-first and Woodland 
av. 8, 10% a.m., 3^ P.M. 

St. Columba, Twenty-fourth and Lehigh av. : 
Rev. Walter P. Gough, rector; Rev. Peter 
Mundy, asst., Twenty-fourth and Showaker. 

St. Dominic, Holmesburg: Rev. Lawrence J. 
Wall, rector; Rev. Richard F. Cowley, asst., j 
Holmesburg. jY 2 , 9, 10% a.m., 3^ p.m. 

St. Edward the Confessor, Seventh and York : 
Rev. C. J. Vandegrift, rector; Rev. Michael G. 
Scully, Rev. William A. Motley, assts., 241 7 N. : 
Eighth. 6^, 8, 9, 10, 11 a.m. ; vespers, j l / 2 P.M. < 

St. Elizabeth, S. E. cor. Twenty-third and 
Berks: Rev. Bernard Dornhege, rector; Rev. 
Thomas F. Sullivnn, Rev. T. J. McCarty, assts., 
1845 N. Twenty-third. 6J^, 8, 9%, 10% a.m.; 
vespers, 7% p.m. 

St. Francis de Sales, Forty-seventh and Spring- 
field av. : Rev. Joseph H. O'Neill, rector ; Rev. 
James Carton, asst.. Forty-seventh and Spring- 
field av. 7, 914 a.m. 

St. Francis Xavier, Twenty-fourth and Green : 
Rev. Michael J. Gleeson, rector; Rev. Francis 
L. Carr, Rev. James M. Flanagan, assts., 2321 
Green. 6, 7, %%, 9, ioJ4 a.m. 

St. Gabriel, Thirtieth and Dickinson : Rev. P. 
J. Mellon, 2926 Wharton; Rev. Michael J. 
Brady, asst. 

Si. Gregory, Fifty-second and Lancaster av. : 
Rev. B. A. Conway, rector. 

St. Ignatius, Forty-third and Wallace : Rev. 
Joseph J. Nerz, Forty-third ab. Wallace. 

St. James, cor. Thirty-eighth and Chestnut : 
Rev. P.J. Garvey, D. D., rector; Rev. P. F. 
Burke, Rev. Thomas J. Farrelly, Rev. John C. 
Carey, assts., 3722 Chestnut. 8, 9, 9^, ioJ4 
a.m. ; vespers, 4% p.m. 

St. Joachim, Pine st., Frankford : Rev. Fran- 
cis P. Fitzmaurice, rector; Rev. J. E. Cavan- 
augh, Rev. Joseph L. Kirlin, assts., 27 Pine. 7, 
9, io l / 2 A.M., jy 2 P.M. 

St. John the Baptist, Manayunk : Rev. James 
A. Brehony, rector ; Rev. Eugene Murphy, Rev. | 
James H. O'Neill, Rev. Thomas F. Tobin, assts., ] 
146 Robeson. 6, 7, 8%, 9^, 10^ a.m. ; vespers, 
3H P-M. 

St. John Cantius (Polish), Bridesburg : Rev. 
Marianus Kopytkiewicz, rector, 4638 Richmond. 

St. John the Evangelist, Thirteenth ab. Chest- 
nut : Rev. P. R. O'Reilly, rector; Rev. William 
C. Currie, Rev. Francis X. Wastl, assts., Thir- 



teenth ab. Chestnut. Z2 l /2 t 6, 8, io^a.m.; vespers, 
4P.M. 

St. Joseph, Willing's alley bel. Fourth : Rev. 
John Scully, S. J., rector; Rev. A. R. Peters, 
S. J., Rev. Patrick Forhan, S. J., Rev. John B. 
Nagle, S. J., assts., 317 Willing's alley. 6, 7,8^, 
10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. Confessions heard in English 
and French. 

St. Laurentius (Polish), Memphis and Vienna : 
Rev. Matthias Tarnowski, rector, 1608 Vienna. 
8, 10% a.m., 5 p.m.; daily, -j l / 2 a.m. 

St. Leo, Tacony : Rev. Herbert P. McPhilomy, 
rector, Tulip and Unruh. 8, io l / 2 a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. Louis (German), Twenty-eighth and Mas- 
ter : Rev. Bernard Korves, rector ; Rev. Charles 
Abt, asst., 1428 N. Twenty-eighth. 

St. Malachy, Eleventh ab. Master : Very Rev. 

E. F. Prendergast, V. G., rector; Rev. Mau- 
rice Fitzgerald, Rev. Michael J. Crane, Rev. 
Francis J. Sheehan, assts, 1429 N. Eleventh. 6, 
7, 9, io l / 2 A.M. ; vespers, 3^2 P-M. 

St. Mary, Fourth ab. Spruce : Rev. D. I. Mc- 
Dermott, rector; Rev. Joseph C. Kelly, Rev. 
Joseph V. Sweeny, assts., 252 S. Fourth. 6, 6 l / 2 , 
% l / 2 , io l / 2 A.M., 3 l / 2 P.M. 

St. Mary Magdalen de Pazzi (Italian), Marriott 
ab. Seventh: Rev. Antonio Isoleri, ap. miss., 
rector. 6%, 8, 10^4 a.m., 3% P-M. 

St. Michael, Second and Jefferson : Rev.James 
J. Fitzmaurice, rector ; Rev. A. D. Filan, Rev. 
James A. Hogan, Rev. Charles J. Mullin, assts., 
1445 N. Second. 6, 7,8,9, ro l / 2 a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. Monica, Seventeenth and Ritner : Rev. 
Owen P. McManus, rector; Rev. Jeremiah D. 
Nevin, asst., Seventeenth and Ritner. 

St. Patrick, Twentieth and Locust : Rev. 
William Kieran, D. D., rector; Rev. John P. 
Connell, Rev. Denis J. Broughal, Rev. James P. 
Turner, Rev. Walter Duffy, assts., 242 S. Twen- 
tieth. 6, 7, 8, Zy 2 , 9, 10^ a.m., 3% P.M. 

St. Paul, Christian ab. Ninth: Rev. M. C. 
Donovan, rector; Rev. Peter Malloy, Rev. John 

F. Kernan, assts., 808 Lebanon. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10% 
a.m., 3% P.M. 

St. Paul's Chapel, Christian ab. Eighth. 8, 9 a.m. 

St. Peter, Fifth and Girard av. : Rev. Fidelis 
Speidel, C. SS. R., rector ; Rev. John B. Hespe- 
lein, C. SS. R., Rev. S. J. Breihof, C. SS. R., Rev. 
Pancratius Schmidt, C. SS. R., Rev. James C. 
Kessler, C. SS. R., Rev. John A. Thies, C. SS. 
R., Rev. Henry J. Borgmann, C. SS. R., assts., 
1019 N. Fifth. Masses on Sundays, 5^,6^2, 7%, 
8^4, 10 a.m. ; vespers, 3 p.m. ; sermon and bene- 
diction with bl. sacr., 7 p.m. Confessions heard 
every Friday and Saturday, in the afternoon and 
evening, in German, English and French 

St. Peter Clavers, for colored people, Twelfth 
and Lombard: Rev. James Nolan, C. S. Sp., 
rector; Rev. William 5. Healy, C. S. Sp., asst., 
1108 Pine. 8, io*4 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

St. Philip de Neri, Queen ab. Second : Rt. 
Rev. Mgr. Nicholas Cantwell, V. G., rector; 
Rev. James F. Trainer, acting rector; Rev. 
James J. Smith, Rev. Michael A. Bradley, assts., 
228 Queen. 6, 8, 9, 10% A.m. ; vespers, -$ l / 2 p.m. 

St. Raphael, Elmwood : attended from St. 
Clement's. 

St. Stanislaus (Polish), German bel. Third: 
Rev. Miecislaus Kopytkiewicz, rector, 230 Ger- 
man. 

St. Stephen, Broad and Butler, Nicetown : Rev. 
William A. McLoughlin, rector; Rev. Michael 



34 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMAXAC. 



J. Kane. Rev. Cornelius J. O'Neill, assts., nr. 
church. 7, 9, io' 2 a.m , 2, jV 2 p.m. 

St. Teresa, Broad and Catharine : Rev. Hugh 
Lane, rector; Rev. John T. Crowley, Rev. 
Daniel J. Murphy. Rev. P. J. Flaherty, Rev. 
Joseph V. O'Connor, assts., 1337 Catharine. 6 I -£, 
8, 9, io^4 a.m.; vespers, 7V2 p.m. 

St. Thomas Aquinas, Eighteenth and Morris : 
Rev. M.J. Lawler, rector; Rev. P. J. Tierney, 
Rev. John F. Graham, Rev. Francis P. Coyle, 
assts., 1618 S. Seventeenth. 6, 7, 8, 9%, 16% 
A.M., 7^2 P.M. 

St. Veronica, Sixth and Tioga: Rev. John J. 
Donnelly, rector ; Rev J. J. Rooney, asst., Sec- 
ond and Butler. j%, 9. io'< a.m., 2. 3V2 p.m. 

St. Vincent de Paul, Price st., German town : 
Rev. J. J. V. Talley, C. M.. rector; Rev. G. V. 
McKinney, C. M.. Rev. B. J. Burke. C. M.. 
Rev. James Kennedy. C. M., assts., adjoining 
church. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 a.m. ; vespers, 4 p.m. 

St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum, Tacony : Rev. 
J. G. Freude, St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum. 7%, 
914 a.m., 2)2 P.M. 

United Greek Church of the Holy Spirit, 1923 
W. Passyunk av. : Rev. John Hraber, rector. 

CAMDEN AND \ 'I' IMIY. 

Immaculate Conception, cor. Seventh and 
Market : Very Rev. 1! J. Mulligan, rector; Rev. 
John Hendricks, asst., 642 Market. 7,9, io'j 
A.M., 7 1 j P.M. 

Our Lady of Good Counsel, Moorestown: 
Rev J. W. Murphy. 

Sacred Heart, Broadway and Ferry av.: Rev. 
M. E. Brie, Broadway and Ferry av. 8, 10^ 

A.M., 3>2 P.M. 

Saints Peter and Paul (German), Spruce and 
St. John: Rev Francis Lehmer, O.M.C., rector; 
Rev. Charles A. Oppenheim, O.M.C., asst., 402 
Division. 7, 8%, io 1 ? a.m., 2> 4 , 3 1 M 

St. Edmunds, Gibbsboro ; St. Rose of Lima, 
Haddon Heights, and St. Lawrence, Laurel 
Springs: Rev. J. ML O'Leary. 

St. Joseph's, Cramer Hill : Rev. Ambrose 
A. Rheiner. O.M.C. 7, io 1 , a.m., 3 p.m. 

St. Mary (Gloucester City): Rev. Thomas J 
McCormack, rector ; Rev. J. Kelly, asst., 426 
Monmouth. 7. 9, i.'j a.m . 3 1 .-.. -j 1 2 P.M. 

St. Patrick. Woodbury : Rev, Michael Dolan. 

Swedesboro : R^v. Walter F. Leahy. 



SALVATION ARMY. 

Atlantic Coast, Cliief Division (comprising ' 
Pennsylvania. Southern New Jersey. Dela- 
ware, Maryland, West Virginia. District of 
Columbia and Virginia): Brgadier William 
Evans, Chief Divisional Officer; Staff Captain 
George Wood, General Secretary; Adjutant 
William Harris, Secretary for Junior Work. 
Divisional Headquarters, fifth floor V. M. C. 
A. building, Fifteenth and Chestnut streets. 
Corps No. 1. — Frankford av. ab. Lehigh av.: 

Capt. Winterbottom and Lieut. Bohel, 2015 Silver. 
Corps No. 2. — Cor.N. Eighth and Vine: Ensign 

and Mrs. Casler, Lieut. Hawk, 804 Buttonwood. 
Corps No. j. — Main st., Manayunk : Ens'gn 

and Mrs. Tennant, 125 Green Fane. 

Corps No. 4. — Eleventh ab. Girard av. : Capt. 

Campbell and Cadet Lewis, 903 Alder. 

Corps No. J. — Main st. ab. Penn, Germantnwn : 

Ensign and -Mrs. Webb, 128 W. Penn. 



Corps No. b. — 4035 Lancaster av., West Phila- 
delphia : Ensign Shano, Capt. Morrison and 
Cadets (Women's Training Garrison), 4025 Fair- 
mount av. 

Corps No. 7. — Falls of Schuylkill : Capt. Wen- 
lock and Liiut. McLean, 121 Eveline. 

Corps No. 6'. — Cor. Paul and Unity, Frank- 
ford : Capt. Mace, Lieut. Douglas, Cadet Evans, 
4610 Lesher. 

Corps No. q. — Broad st. ab. Columbia av.: 
Adjutant and Sirs. Kernohan, 1831 Wellington. 

Corps No. 10. — Germantown av. bcl Tioga: 
Capt. Clifford and Lieut. Caskie, 3414 Mather. 

Corps No. 11 . — Cor. S. Seventeenth and Fede- 
ral : Staff Captain and Mrs. Howells, 1143 S. 
Nineteenth. 

Corps No. 1 j. — N. Fourth st. bel. Giraid av. 
(German): Capt. Koenig and Lieut. Halzappel, 
1 168 N. Fourth. 

Corps No. 13. — S. Broad bel. McKean : En- 
sign and Mrs. Jackson, 2013 S. Ninth. 

Corps No. 14. — Cor. Frankford av. and Allen : 
Capt. Johnson and Lieut. Wilkins, 947 Frank- 
foul av. 

Corps No., /j. — Cor. Kensington and Fillmore: 
Capt. and Mrs. Lew's, 2005 Ktns'ngton av. 

Corps No. rO. — Cor. Twenty-first and Point 
Breeze av.: Capt. Carlson and Lieut. Schultz, 
2059 Dickinson. 

Corps No. /J. — Front and Tasker : Capt. I'r- 
quhart and Lieut. Turner, 41 Tasker. 

Corps No. />.— Thirtieth and Fontaine, nr. 
Ridge av. : Ensign Simms and Lieut. Simms, 
1945 Stanley. 

Corps No. /o. — N. Sixth and Venango: Ln- 
eign Gaee and Lieut. Morgan, 704 Atlantic. 

I >'/.? No. 20. — Twenty-third and Jefferson : 
Ensign Dorn, Capt. Norlin, Lieut. Hails, 2505 
Stuart. 

Corps No. ?/. — Paschalville : Capt. and Mrs. 
Richards. 

SLIM POSTS. 

No. 1. — Second bel. Gaskill: Capt. Winfield, 
Lieuts. Steiferand Bartlett. 115 Bainbridge. 

No. 2. — 629 Barclay : Capt. Purdy and Lieut. 
Anderson, 705 Carver. 

RESCUE HOME FOR FALLEN WOMEN. 

611 N. Forty-third: Capt. Thompson and 
Lieut. Lundbcrg in charge. 

CAMDEN. 

Cor. West and Line : Capt. Conlin, 927 St* 
Johns. 

Salvation Army Barracks, Fourth and Line : 

- . II A.M., 8 P.M. 

SPIRITUAL ASSOCIATIONS. 

First Assembly Hall, 1325 Columbia av. 
1 he Philadelphia Spiritualist Society, Handel 
and Haydn Hall, N. E. cor. Eighth and Spring 
(.arden: President, Thomas M. Loche, 605 N. 
Seventh; Secretary, Charles G. Frorer ; Treas- 
urer, Mrs. Thomas M. Loche; Historian, Mary 
R. Galloway. 2% and 7^2 P-M. 



UNDENOMINATIONAL MISSIONS. 

Beach Street Mission, Hanover and Beach : 
Rev. J Maris Taylor, supt., 11 16 Palmer. 10J4 
am, 3V2 and 8 p.m. ; daily, 8 p.m. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



35 



Bedford Street Mission, 619 Alaska : Rev. 
James P. Hall, 537 Pine. Gymnasium, reading 
room and free baths, every day except Sunday. 
Services Wednesday and Sunday, 3 p.m. 

Bethel (Heavenly Recruits), Twelfth and 
Thompson: Rev. I. Frank Haas, 1208 Thomp- 
son ; T. B. Hartman, asst., 313 N. Fifth, \o x / 2 
a.m., 3 and 8 p.m. 

Christian Chapel, Twenty-seventh ab. York : 
O. R. Palmer, 2333 N. Thirty-first. 11 a.m., 
8 p.m. 

Christian Workers, Adrian and Thompson : 
Rev. James MacKinney, 3130 Salmon; Rev. 
Alkanas Markley, 1916 Willard av., asst. \oV 2 
a.m., 4 and 8 p.m. Sundays; 8 p.m. Tuesdays, 
Thurdays and Fridays. 

Church of Christ, 709 N. Forty-sixth : Rev. 
Nathan J. Mitchell, 4026 Westminster av.; S. O. 
Vandersloot, 829 Hutton ; Frederick J. Todd, 
659 N. Forty-sixth ; W. S. Sutherland, 4153 
Eaglesfield, evangelists, io'i a.m., 2% and 8 

P.M. 

Church of Christ Mission, Vine and Haver- 
ford : Fred. J. Todd, 659 N. Forty-sixth. 4 p.m. 

Church of Christ (Elmwood), Eighty-fifth and 
Island road: William S. Bateman, 1133 Snyder 
av. \o x / 2 a.m., 2Y2 and -jY 2 p.m.; Wednesdays, 
8 p.m. 

Germantown Door or Hope (Home for the 
Reformation of Fallen Women), 139 Queen, Ger- 
mantown : Mrs. Harry Taylor, 3200 Engleside 
place, president and treas.; Mrs. S. B. M. Burr, 
superintendent. 

Meadow Mission, Tenth and Moyamensing 
av.: John A. Neff, superintendent, 1040 S. Fifth. 
10^ a.m., "]V 2 p.m.; Thursdays, 7' 2 p.m. 

Union Highway Mission, Oxford ab. Ridge 
av.: Rev. Frederick Reel, 1718 Taney. 9%, 10^ 
a.m.; 2^{, 3 I 4, 7 and 8 p.m.; Tuesdays and 
Thursdays, 8 p.m.; Saturdays, 3 p.m. 

M inster St. Neighborhood Guild, 620 Minster : 
Chas. S. Daniel, 618 Minster. Sundays, 7 p.m. 

Sunday Breakfast Association, Twelfth ab. 
Vine : Louis U. Bean, president, 2030 Vine ; Dr. 
A. H. Henderson, treas., 1320 Vine. Sundays, 
8 l / 2 a.m. (November to April), 7^ p.m. every 
Sunday; Mondays and Fridays, 8 p.m. 



UNITARIAN. 

First, Chestnut and Aspen, ab. Twenty-first : 
Rev. Joseph May, LL. D., 2033 Sansom. 11 a.m. 

Germantown, Greene and Chelten av. : Rev. 
James C. Hodgins, 318 Earlham Terrace, Ger- 
mantown. II A.M. 

Spring Garden, cor. Broad and Brandy wine : 
Rev. Frederic A. Hinckley, 870 N. Twenty- 
second. \o]/ 2 a.m. ; October to April, 7^ p.m. 



UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST. 

Conference District, East Pennsylvania Con- 
ference. 

Mount Pisgah, E. Cambria and Kipp : Rev. 
H. C. Phillips, 2833 N. Front, ioj^ a.m., j 1 / 2 
p.m. Sundays; 8 p.m. Fridays. 

St. Paul's, Edgemont and Westmoreland : in 
care of D. D. Lowery, P. E., and Rev. H. C. 
Phillips, 2833 N. Front. 10^ a.m., -] x / 2 p.m. 
Sundays ; 8 p.m. Thursdays. 



UNITED EVANGELICAL CHURCH. 

^ Presiding Elder of Reading District, Rev. C. 
C. Haman, Reading, Pa. 



^ Bethel, Twelfth ab. Lehigh av.: Rev. S. S. 
Chubb, 2523 N. Twelfth. ioj4 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Christ, Twelfth and Oxford : Rev. John W. 
Hoover, 1622 Willington. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Trinity, temporary place of worship, Main ab. 
Herman, Germantown : Rev. A. J. Brunner, 71 
Herman. ioJ^ a.m., 7% p.m.; Wednesdays, 8 

P.M. 



UNITED PRESBYTERIAN. 

The Board of Foreign Missions of the United 
Presbyterian Church of North America : Rev. 
M. G. Kyle, D. D.. President; Rev. W. W. 
Barr, D. D., Cor. Secretary, 1425 Christian; 
Robert L. Latimer, Esq., Treasurer, 21 N. 
Front. Stated meetings of the Board on the 
second Monday of each month, at 2 p.m. 

The Board of Ministerial Relief of the United 
Presbyterian Church of North America: J. D. 
Ferguson, Esq., 14 S. Water, Secretary; John 
Walker, 1508 Christian, Treasurer. , 

First. S. W. cor. Broad and Lombard: Rev. W. 
J. B. Edgar, 1516 Christian. io' ? a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Second, Race bel. Sixteenth : Rev. C. S. Cle- 
land, 802 N. Seventeenth. io'/£ a.m., 8 p.m. 

Third. Front and Jefferson : Rev. S. G. Fitz- 
gerald. 2010 N. Eighth, ioj^ a.m., %y 2 p.m. 

Fourth, N. E. cor. Nineteenth and Fitzwater. 
Rev. J. C. Scouler, 1010 S. Twenty-fifth. \o x / 2 

A.M.. 7' 4 P.M. 

Fifth, Twentieth and Buttonwood. \o x / 2 a.m., 
7% p.m. 

Seventh, S. E. cor. Orthodox and Leiper : 
Rev. M. G. Kyle, D. D., 1203 Arrot. 10% a.m., 

7S P.M. 

Eighth, N. E. cor. Fifteenth and Christian : 
Rev. J. H. Webster, 1412 Christian; Rev. W. 
W. Barr, D. D., pastor emeritus, 1425 Christian. 
\O x / 2 a.m., 8 P.M. 

Ninth, S. W. cor. Susquehanna av. and Han- 
cock : Rev. James Crowe, 2249 N. Second. 10^ 
a.m., 3% p.m. ; second Sunday in the month, 7^ 

P.M. 

North, Master ab. Fifteenth : Rev. W. M. An- 
derson, 1516 Willington. 10^ A.M., 7% P.M. 

Tenth, S. W. cor. Thirty-eighth and Hamilton : 
Rev. John Teas, D. D., 3806 Hamilton, ioj^ 
a.m., -jY x P.M. 

Twelfth, S. E. cor. Somerset and Garnet : Rev. 
James Price, 107 E. Lehigh av. \o\/ 2 a.m., 3% 

P.M. 

Dales Memorial, Thirty-first ab. Montgomery 
av. : Rev. J. M. Welch. »%, 7 % p.m. 

Fairhill, Roth's Hall, 2807 N. Fifth : Rev. E. 
M. McFadden, 3059 N. Fourth. xo]/ 2 a.m., 
7}4 P-M. 

West, S. E. cor. Forty-third and Aspen : Rev. 
Frank Getty, 705 N. Forty-fourth. 10^ a.m., 
7K P.M. 

Wharton Square, Twenty-third and Whar- 
ton : Rev. J. P. Sharp, Ph. !>., 1418 S. Twenty- 
third. lO l / 2 A.M., 7% P.M. 



UNIVERSALIST. 

Church of the Messiah, Broad and Montgomery 
av. : Rev. Edwin C. Sweetser, D. D., 1814 Park 
av. io l / 2 A.M., 7>i p.m. 

Church of the Restoration, Master and Seven- 
teenth : Rev. Frederick A. Bisbee, B. D., 1628 
Master. io}£ a.m., 7^ p.m. 



36 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES 

[NOTE.— All lists of public officers have been corrected to December i, 1896.] 

AFTER MARCH 4, 1897. 

President. — William McKinley, of Ohio. 
Vice-President. — Garret A. Hobart, of New Jersey. 

UNTIL MARCH 4, 1897. 

President. — Grover Cleveland, of New York. 
Vice-President. — Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois. 

CABINET. 



Secretary of State. — Richard Olney, of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Secretary of Treasury. — John G. Carlisle, of 
Kentucky. 

Secretary of War. — DANIEL S. Lamont, of 
New York. 

Secretary of Navy. — Hilary A. Herbert, of 
Alabama. 



Secretary of Interior. — David R. Francis, of 

Missouri. 

Postmaster -General. — William L. Wilson, of 
West Yirginia. 

Attorney-Genera/. — Judson Harmon, of Ohio. 

Secretary of Agriculture. — J. Sterling Mor- 
ton, of Nebraska. 



ASSISTANT SECRETARIES 

State Department. 

Assistant Secretary, William W. Rockhill ; 

Second Assistant Secretary . Alvey A. Adee ; 

Third Assistant St\ retarv, William W. Baldwin. 

Chief Clerk, E. I. Reni'ck. 

Treasury Department. 

Assistant Secretaries, Wm. E. Curtis, C. S. 
Hamlin, Si:ott Wike. 

Chief Clerk, Logan Carlisle. 

Comptroller, Robert B. Bowler ; Assistant, 
E. A. Bowers. 

Register, J. Faunt Tillman; Assistant, John 
B. Brawley. 

Auditor for Treasury Department, Ernest 
P. Baldwin; Deputy. Robert M. Cousar. 

Auditor for War Department, T. Stobo Far- 
row; Deputy, John C. Edwards. 

Auditor for Interior Department, Samuel 
Blackwell ; Deputy. Geo. W. >anderlin. 

Auditor for Navy Department, Wm. H. 
Pugh ; Deputy, Elliott N. Bowman. 

Auditor for State and other Departments, 
Thomas Holcomb ; Deputy. James J. Willie. 

Auditor for Post Office Department , George 
A. Howard; Deputy, Wm. G. Crawford. 

Treasurer of United States, Daniel X. Mor- 
gan ; Assistant, James F. Meline. 

Comptroller of Currency, James H. Eckles ; 
Deputy, G. T. Coffin. 

Commissioner of Internal Rer'enue, William 
S. Forman ; Deputy, George W. Wilson. 

Director of the Mint, R. E. Preston. 

Supervising Architect, Wm. M. Aiken. 

Bureau of Engraznng and Printing : Chief, 
Claude M. Johnson. 

Secret Service : Chief, Wm. P. Hazen. 

Bureau of Statistics : Chief, Worthington C. 
Ford. 

Life-Saving Service : General Superintend- 
ent, Sumner I. Kimnall. 

Commissioner of Nazngation, E. T. Chamber- 
lain ; Deputy, F. W. Knowlton. 

Chairman Lighthouse Board, Rear Admiral 
John G. Walker, U. S. N. 

Superintendent Coast and Geodetic Survey, 
W. W. Duffield. 

Marine Hospital Service : Supervising Sur- 
geon-General, Dr. W. Wyman. 

Superintendent of Immigration, Herman 
Stump. 

Steamboat Inspection: Supervising Inspector- 
General, Jas. A. Dumont. 



Doe. 

the Army, 



AND CHIEFS OF BUREAUS. 
War Department. 

Assistant Secretary, Joseph B. 

Chief Clerk, John Tweedale. 

Major-General Commanding 
Nelson A. Miles. 

Adjutant-General, Geo. D. Ruggles. 

Inspector-General, J. C. Breckenridge. 

Ouartein/aster- (General, Charles G. Sawtelle. 

Commissary- General, Michael R. Morgan. 

Surgeon-General , Geo. M. Sternberg. 

Paymaster-General, T. H. Stanton. 

Chief of Engineers, Wm. P. Craighill. 

Chief of Ordnance, D. W. Flagler. 

fudge Advocate-General. G. N. I.ieber. 

Chief Signal Officer, A. W. Greely. 
Record and Pension Office. 

Chief, Col. F. C. Ainsworth, U. S. A. 
Board of Publication Records of the Re- 
bellion. 

Maj. George W. Davis, U. S. A., Leslie J. 
Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley. 

Navy Department. 

Assistant Secretary, Wm. McAdoo. 

Chief Clerk, Benjamin Micou. 

Bureau of ( hdnance: Chief, W. T. Sampson. 

Bureau of Equipment : Chief, French C. 
Chadwick. 

Bureau of Navigation : Chief, Francis M. 
Ramsey. 

Hydrographer, C. D. Sigsbee. 

Bureau of Yards and Docks : Chief, E. 0. 
Matthews. 

Bureau of Supplies and Accounts : Chief, 
Edwin Stewart. 

Bureau of Steam Engineering: Chief, George 
W. Melville. 

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery : Chief, J. 
Rufus Tryon. 

Bureau of Construction and Repair : Chief, 
Philip Hichborn. 

fudge Advocate-General , Samuel C. Lemly. 

Superintendent of Nautical Almanac, Simon 
Newcomb. 

Naval Observatory : Superintendent, R..L. 
Fithian. 

Commandant Marine Corps,Cha.s. Heywood. 
Interior Department. 

First Assistant Secretary, William H. Sims; 
Second Assistant , John M. Reynolds. 

Chief Clerk, Emmett Womack. 

Commissioner of Land Office, Silas W. 
Lamoreux ; Assistant , Emery L. Best. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



37 



Commissioner of Pensions, D. I. Murphy; 
First Deputy, N. J. T. Dana; Second Deputy, 
Henry C. Bell. 

Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Daniel M. 
Browning; Assistant, Thomas P. Smith. 

Commissioner of Patents , John S. Seymour. 

Commissioner of Railroads , Wade Hampton. 

Commissioner of Education, Wm. T. Harris. 

Director Geological Survey, C. D. Walcott. 
Post Office Department. 

Chief Clerk, Blain W. Taylor. 

First Assistant Postmaster-General , Frank 
H. Jones; Chief Clerk, W. H. Lamar. 

Superintendent Money- Order System, Edward 
M. Gadsden. 

Superintendent Dead-Letter Office, Bernard 
Goode. 

Second Assistant Postmaster - General, 
Charles Neilson ; Chief Clerk, George F. Stone. 

Superintendent Railway Mail Service, James 
E. White. 

Superintendent Foreign Mails, N. M. Brooks. 

Third Assistant Postmaster-General , Kerr 
Craige ; Chief Clerk, Madison Davis. 

Fourth Assistant Postmaster-General, Rob- 
ert A. Maxwell ; Chief Clerk, Geo. V. Chapin. 
Department of Justice. 

Chief Clerk, Cecil Clay. 

Solicitor-General , Holmes Conrad. 



Assistant Attorney-Generals , Isaac H. Lion- 
berger (Interior Dept.)", Edward B. Whitney, 
Joshua E. Dodge, John L. Thomas (Post-office 
Dept. i. 

Solicitor of the Treasury, Felix A. Reeve. 

Department of Agriculture. 
Assistant Secretary, Charles W. Dabney, Jr. 
Chief Clerk, D. MacCuaig. 
Weather Bureau : Chief, Willis H. Moore. 
Bureau of Animal Industries: Chief, D. E. 
Salmon. 

Department of Labor. 
Commissioner, Carroll D. Wright ; 
Clerk, Oren W. Weaver. 

Civil Service Commission. 
John R. Proctor, President; Wm. G. 
John B. Harlow. 

Chief Examiner , John T. Doyle. 

Government Printing Office. 
Public Printer, Thos. C. Benedict. 

Bureau of American Republics. 
Director, Clinton Furbish. 

Inter-State Commerce Commission. 
Commissioners, Wm. R. Morrison, Wheelock 
G. Veazey, Martin A. Knapp. 
Secretary, Edward A. Moseley. 



Chief 



Rice, 



FIFTY-FOURTH CONGRESS. 
Expires March 4, 1897. — For list of members see Almanac for 1896. 

FIFTY-FIFTH CONGRESS. 

Expires March 4, 1899. 
SENATE. 
President. — Garret A. Hobart, of New Jersey. 
Rep. (in Roman), 46; Dem. (in Italics), 34; Pop. and Silverites (in Small Caps), 10. 



Term expires. 

ALABAMA. 

901 fohn T. Morgan. 
903 E. W. Pettus. 

ARKANSAS. 

901 James H. Berry. 
903 A Democrat. 

CALIFORNIA. 

899 Stephen M. White. 
903 A Republican. 

COLORADO. 

901 Edward O. Wolcott. 
903 A Democrat. 

CONNECTICUT. 

899 Joseph R. Hawley. 
903 A Republican. 

DELAWARE. 

899 George Gray. 
901 A Democrat. 

FLORIDA. 

899 Samuel Pasco. 
903 A Democrat. 

GEORGIA. 

901 Augustus 0. Bacon. 
903 Alex. S. Clay. 

IDAHO. 

901 George L. Shoup. 

903 A SlLVERITE. 
ILLINOIS. 

901 Shelby M. Cullom. 
903 A Republican. 



Term 


expires. 




INDIANA. 


1899 


Da7'id Turpie. 


*9°3 


A Republican. 




IOWA. 


1901 


Tohn H. Gear. 


1903 


William B. Allison. 




KANSAS. 


1901 


Lucien Baker. 


1903 


A Populist. 



KENTUCKY. 

1901 William Lindsay. 
1903 A Republican. 

LOUISIANA. 

1901 Donelson Caffery. 
10 D 3 John McEnery. 

MAINE. 

1899 Eugene Hale. 
1901 William P. Frye. 

MARYLAND. 

1899 Arthur P. Gorman. 
1903 George L. Wellington. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1899 Henry C. Lodge. 
1903 George F. Hoar. 

MICHIGAN. 

1899 Julius C. Burrows. 
1901 James McMillan. 

MINNESOTA. 

1899 Cushman K. Davis. 
1901 Knute Nelson. 



Term expires. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

899 James Z. George. 
901 Edw. C. Walthall. 

MISSOURI. 

899 Francis M. Cockrell. 
903 A Democrat. 

MONTANA. 

899 Lee Mantle. 

901 Thomas H. Carter. 

NEBRASKA. 

899 William V. Allen. 
901 John M. Thurston. 

NEVADA. 

899 William M. Stewart. 
903 A Populist. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

901 William E. Chandler. 
903 Jacob H. Gallinger. 

NEW JERSEY. 

899 James Smith, Jr. 
901 William J. Sewell. 

NEW YORK. 

899 Edward Murphy ', Jr. 

903 A Republican. 

north carolina. 
901 Makion Butler. 
903 A Populist. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

899 William N. Roach. 
903 A Republican. 



3§ 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Term expires. 

OHIO. 

1899 John Sherman. 
1903 Joseph B. Foraker. 

OREGON. 

1901 George W. McBride. 
1903 A Republican. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

1899 Matthew S. Quay. 
1903 A Republican. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1899 N. W. Aldrich. 
1901 George P. Wetmore. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1901 Benjamin R. Tillman. 
1903 John G. Evans. 



Term expires. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

1901 R. F. Pettigrew. 
1903 A Populist. 

TENNESSEE. 

1899 William B. Bate. 
1901 Isham G. Harris. 

TEXAS. 

Roger Q. Mills. 
Horace Chilton. 



1899 
1901 

1899 
1903 

1899 
1903 



UTAH. 

Frank J. Cannon. 
A Silverite. 

VERMONT. 

Redfield Proctor. 
Justin S. Morrill. 



Term expires. 

VIRGINIA. 

1899 John W. Daniel. 
1901 T. S. Martin. 

WASHINGTON. 

1899 John L. Wilson. 
1903 A Silverite. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

1899 Charles J. Faulkner. 
1901 Stephen B. Elkins. 

WISCONSIN. 

1899 John L. Mitchell. 
1903 A Republican. 

WYOMING. 

1899 Clarence D. Clark. 
1901 Francis E. Warren. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



Rep. (in Roman), 206; Dem. (in Italics), 133 ; Populist and Silverites (in Small Caps), 17 ; 

Vacancy, 1. 



Dist. 

ALABAMA. 

i G. W. Taylor, 

2 Jesse F. Stalling*. 

3 Henry D. Clayton, 

4 T. S. Plowman, 

5 Willis Brewer, 

6 J. H. Bankhead, 

7 M. W. Howard, 

8 Joseph Wheeler, 

9 O. W. Underwood. 

ARKANSAS. 

1 P.D.McCullochJr 

2 John S. Little, 

3 Thos. C. McRae, 

4 William L. Terry, 

5 H. A. Dinsmore, 

6 H. S. Brundridge. 

CALIFORNIA. 

1 John A. Barham, 

2 Marion De I'ries, 

3 Samuel G. Hilborn, 

4 Eugene F. Loud, 

5 James G. Maguire, 

6 C. A. Barlow, 

7 G. H. Castle. 

COLORADO. 

1 J. F. Shafroth, 

2 John C. Bell. 

CONNECTICUT. 

1 E. Stevens Henry, 

2 N. D. Sperry, 

3 Charles A. Russell 

4 E.J. Hill. 

DELAWARE. 

L. Irznng Handy. 

FLORIDA. 

1 S. M. Sparkman, 

2 R. W. Davis. 

GEORGIA. 

i Rufus E. Lester, 

2 James M. Griggs, 

3 E. B. Lewis, 

4 W. C. Adamson, 

5 L. F. Livingston, 



Dist. 

6 Chas. L. Bar tie tt, 

7 John W. Maddox, 

8 //'. M. Howard, 

9 Far is h C. Tate, 

10 W. H. Fleming, 

11 W. G. Brantley. 

IDAHO. 

James Gunn. 

ILLINOIS. 

1 James R. Mann, 

2 William Lorimer, 

3 Hugh R. Belknap, 

4 D. W. Mills, 

5 George E. White, 

6 Edward D. Cooke, 

7 George E. Foss, 

8 Albert J. Hopkins, 

9 Robert R. Hitt, 

10 George W. Prince, 

11 Walter Reeves, 

12 Joseph G. Cannon, 

13 Vespasian Warner, 

14 Joseph V. Graff, 

15 B. F. Marsh, 

16 //". H. Hinrichsen, 

17 J. A. Connolly, 

18 Thomas M.Jett, 

19 Andrew J . Hunter, 

20 James R. Campbell, 

21 Jehu Baker, 

22 George W. Smith. 

INDIANA. 

1 J. A. Hemenway, 

2 Robert Miers, 

3 W. L. Zenor, 

4 U'. S. Hoi man, 

5 George W. Farris, 

6 Henry U. Johnson, 

7 Jesse Overstreet, 

8 Charles I. Henry, 

9 Charles B. Landis, 

10 E. D. Crumpacker, 

11 George W. Steele, 

12 James M. Robinson, 

13 L. W. Royse. 



Dist. 

IOWA. 

1 Samuel M. Clark, 

2 George M. Curtis, 

3 D. B. Henderson, 

4 Thos. Updegraff, 

5 Robert G. Cousins, 

6 John F. Lacey, 

7 J. A. T.Hull, 

8 Win. P. Hepburn, 

9 A. L. Hager, 

10 J. P. Dolliver, 

11 George D. Perkins. 

KANSAS. 
AT LARGE. 

J. D. Botkin. 

1 Case Broderick, 

2 N. S. Peters, 

3 E. R. Ridgley, 

4 Charles Curtis, 

5 W. D. Vincent, 

6 N. B. McCokmick, 

7 Jerry Simpson. 

kentucky. 

1 Chas. K. Wheeler, 

2 John D. Clardy, 
t, John S. Rhea, 

4 David H. Smith, 

5 Walter Evans, 

6 Albert S. Berry, 

7 Evan A. Settle, 

8 George M. Davison, 

9 Samuel J. Pugh, 

10 T. }'. Fitzpatrick, 

11 David G. Colson. 

LOUISIANA. 

1 Adolph Meyer, 

2 Robert C. Davey, 

3 Robert Broussard, 

4 H. W. Ogden, 

5 S. J . Baird, 

6 S. M. Robertson. 

MAINE. 

1 Thomas B. Reed, 

2 Nelson Dingley, 

3 Seth L. Milliken, 

4 Chas. A. Boutelle. 



Dist. 

MARYLAND. 

1 Dr. Isaac A. Barber, 

2 Wm. B. Baker, 

3 Dr. Wm. S. Booze, 

4 Wm. W. Mclntire, 

5 Sidney E. Mudd, 

6 John McDonald. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1 Ashley B. Wright, 

2 Fred. H. Gillett, 

3 Joseph H. Walker, 

4 Geo. W. Weymouth, 

5 William S. Knox, 

6 William H. Moody, 

7 William E. Barrett, 

8 Samuel W. McCall, 
gjohn F. Fitzgerald, 

10 S. J. Barrows, 

11 Charles F. Sprague, 

12 W. C. Lovering, 

13 John Simpkins. 

MICHIGAN. 

1 John B. Corliss, 

2 George Spalding, 

3 Albert M. 'Todd, 

4 E. L. Hamilton, 

5 Wm. Alden Smith, 

6 Samuel W. Smith, 

7 Horace G. Snover, 

8 Ferdinand Br ucher 

9 Roswell P. Bishop, 

10 R. O. Crump, 

11 Wm. S. Mesick. 

12 Carlos D. Sheldon. 

MINNESOTA. 

1 James A. Tawney, 

2 James T.McCleary, 

3 Joel P. Heatwole, 

4 F. C. Stevens, 

5 Loren Fletcher, 

6 Page Morris, 

7 Frank M. Eddy. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1 John M. Allen, 

2 W. V. Sullivan, 

3 Thos. C. Catchings , 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



39 



Dist. 

4 A. F. Fox, 
$ John S. Williams , 

6 C. W. F. Love, 

7 Patrick Henry. 

MISSOURI. 

i Vacancy, 

2 Robert N. Bodine, 

3 Alex. M. Dockery, 

4 Chas. F. Cochran, 

5 Wm. S. Cowherd, 

6 D. A. DeArmonda, 
•j James A. Cooney, 

8 R. P. Bland. 

9 Champ Clark, 

io Richard Bartholdt, 
ii Charles F. Joy, 

12 Charles E. Pearce, 

13 Edward Robb, 

14 W. D. Vandiver , 

15 M. E. Benton. 

MONTANA. 

C. S. Haktman. 

NEBRASKA. 

i Jesse B. Strode, 

2 David H. Mercer, 

3 Samuel Maxwell, 

4 ll'm. L. Stark, 
SJ- D. Sutherland, 
6 Wm. L. Green. 

NEVADA. 

F. G. Newlands. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1 Cyrus A. Sulloway, 

2 Frank G. Clarke. 

NEW JERSEY. 

1 H. C. Loudenslager, 

2 John J. Gardner, 

3 Benj. F. Howell, 

4 Mahlon Pitney, 

5 James F. Stewart, 

6 Richard W. Parker, 

7 Thos. McEwan, Jr. 

8 Charles N. Fowler. 

NEW YORK. 

1 Joseph M. Beiford, 

2 D. JM. Hurley, 

3 Francis H. Wilson, 

4 Israel F. Fisher, 

5 Charles G. Bennett, 

6 James R. Howe, 

j J. G. H. Vehslage, 

8 J. Murray Mitchell, 

9 Thoma sJ. Bradley, 

10 Amos J. Cummings, 

11 IVm. Sulzer, 

12 Geo. B. McClellan, 

13 R. C. Shannon, 

14 L. E. Quigg, 

15 Philip B. Low, 



Dist. 

16 William L. Ward, 

17 B. B. Odell, 

18 John H. Ketcham, 

19 A. V. B. Cochrane, 

20 G. N. Southwick, 

21 David T. Wilbur, 

22 Lucien L. Littauer, 

23 W. T. Foote, 

24 Chas. A. Chickering, 

25 James S. Sherman, 

26 George W. Ray, 

27 James J. Belden, 

28 Sereno E. Payne, 

29 Charles W. Gillett, 

30 J. W. Wadsworth, 

31 Henry C. Brewster, 

32 R. B. Mahany, 

33 D. S. Alexander, 

34 Warren B. Hooker. 
north carolina. 

1 Harry Skinner, 

2 George H. White, 

3 John E. Fowler, 

4 Wm. F. Stroud, 

5 W. IV. Kitchin, 

6 Rev.C. H. Martin, 

7 A. Shuford, 

8 R. Z. Linney, 

9 Richmond Pearson. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

M. N. Johnson. 

OHIO. 

1 Wm. B. Shattuc, 

2 Jacob H. Bromwell, 

3 John L. Brenner, 

4 Geo. A. Marshall, 

5 David Meekison, 

6 Seth Brown, 

7 Walter L. Weaver, 

8 Archibald Lybrand, 

9 Jas. H. Southard, 

10 Lucien J. Fenton, 

11 Chas. H. Grosvenor, 

12 J. J. Lentz, 

13 James A. Norton, 

14 Winfield S. Kerr, 

15 H. C. Van Voorhis, 

16 Lorenzo Danford, 

17 J. A. McDowell, 

18 Robert W. Taylor, 

19 S. A. Northway, 

20 Clifton B. Beach, 

21 T. E. Burton. 

OREGON. 

1 Thomas H. Tongue, 

2 Wm. R. Ellis. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
AT LARGE. 

Galusha A. Grow, 
S. A. Davenport. 



Dist. 

1 Henry H. Bingham, 

2 Robert Adams, Jr., 

3 William McAleer, 

4 Jas. Rankin Young, 

5 A. C. Harmer, 

6 Thomas S. Butler, 

7 Irving P. Wanger, 

8 Wm.S.Kirkpatrick, 

9 Dan. Ermentrout, 

10 Marriott Brosius, 

11 Wm. Connell, 

12 Morgan B.Williams, 

13 Charles N. Brumm, 

14 M. E. Olmstead, 

15 James H. Codding, 

16 Horace B. Packer, 

17 Monroe H. Kulp, 

18 Thad. M. Mahon, 

19 G.J. Benner, 

20 Josiah D. Hicks, 

21 E. E. Robbins, 

22 John Dalzell, 

23 William A. Stone, 

24 Ernest F. Atcheson, 

25 James J. Davidson, 

26 J. C. Sturtevant, 

27 Charles W. Stone, 

28 Wm. C. Arnold. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1 Melville Bull, 

2 Adin B. Capron. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1 Wm. Elliott, 

2 W Jasper Talbert, 

3 Asbury C. Latimer, 

4 Stanyarne Wilson, 

5 Thomas J. Strait, 

6 John L. McLaurin, 

7 J. Wm. Stokes. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 
AT LARGE. 

John E. Kelley, 
Freem'n Knowles. 
tennessee. 

1 W. P. Brownlow, 

2 Henry R. Gibson, 

3 John A. Moon, 

4 Benton McMillin, 
5J.D. Richardson, 

6 J. W. Gaines, 

7 A'icholas N. Cox, 

8 T. W. Sims, 

9 Rice A . Pierce, 
10 E. W. Car mack. 

TEXAS. 

1 Thomas H. Ball, 

2 Samuel B. Cooper, 

3 R. C.DeGrafTenreid 



Dist. 

4 John W. Crawford, 

5 Joseph W. Bailey, 

6 R. E. Burke, 

7 R. L. Henry, 

8 S. W. T. Lanham, 

9 Joseph D. Sayers, 

10 R. B. Hawle'y. 

11 Rudolph Kleburg, 

12 J. L. SI ay den, 

13 John H. Stevens. 

UTAH. 

William H. King. 

VERMONT. 

1 H. Henry Powers, 

2 William W. Grout. 

VIRGINIA. 

1 Wm. A. Jones, 

2 Wm. A. Young, 

3 John B. Lamb, 

4 Sydney P. Epes. 

5 Claude A . Siva nson, 

6 Peter J. Otey, 
1 J antes Hay, 

8 J. F. Rixey, 

9 James A. Walker, 
10 Jacob Yost. 

WASHINGTON. 
AT LARGE. 

// ". C. Jones, 
Hamilton Lewis. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

1 B. B. Dovener, 

2 A. G. Dayton, 

3 Charles P. Dorr, 

4 Warren Miller. 

WISCONSIN. 

1 Henry A. Cooper, 

2 Edw. Sauerhering, 

3 J. W. Babcock, 

4 Theobold Otjen, 

5 S. S. Barney, 

6 J. H. Davidson, 

7 Michael Griffin, 

8 Edward S. Minor, 

9 Alexander .Stewart, 
10 John J. Jenkins. 

WYOMING. 

John £. Osborne. 



TERRITORIAL 

DELEGATES. 

ARIZONA. 

A fa reus A. Smith. 

NEW MEXICO. 

H. B. Ferguson. 

OKLAHOMA. 

Rev. T. V. Callahan. 



SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 
Chief justice— Melville W. Fuller, of Illinois. Age 62. Appointed 1888 

Associate fustices. 

AGE. APP 



Stephen J. Field, of California 
John M. Harlan, of Kentucky 
Horace Gray, of Massachusetts 
David J. Brewer, of Kansas. . 

Reporter—}. C. Bancroft Davis, 
McKenney ; appointed 1880. Marshal 



79 


1863 


62 


1877 


67 


1881 


59 


1889 



AGE. 



Henry B. Brown, of Michigan. . . 59 
George Shiras, Jr., of Penna. . . .63 
Edward D. White, of Louisiana . . 50 
Rufus W. Peckham, of New York . 58 
of Massachusetts; appointed 1883. Clerk. — James 
— J. M. Wright, of Kentucky; appointed 1888. 



APP. 

1890 
1892 
1894 
1895 
H. 



4Q 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



GOVERNMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA, 1896. 



Governor. — Daniel H. Hastings. 

Private Secretary.— -Lewis E. Beitler. 

Staff of Commander-in-Chief. — Brigadier- 
General Thomas J. Stewart, Adjutant-General, 
Harrisburg, Pa.; Lieutenant-Colonel Wilbur Fisk 
Reeder, Assistant Adjutant-General. Bellefonte, 
Pa.; Colonel Edward Morrell, Inspector-Gen- 
eral, 505 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.; Colonel 
B. Frank Eshleman, Judge Advocate-General, 
Lancaster, Pa.; Colonel Albert J. Logan. Quar- 
termaster-General, Pittsburg, Pa.; Lieutenant- 
Colonel Thomas Potter, Jr., Assistant Quarter- 
master-General, 522 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Colonel Ezra H. Ripple, Commissary General, 
Scranton, Pa.; Lieutenant-Colonel Lloyd B. 
Huff, Assistant Commissary-General, Greens- 
burg, Pa.; Colonel Louis W. Reed. Surgeon- 
General, Norristown, Pa.; Colonel Asher Miner, 
General Inspector of Rifle Practice, Wilkes- 
Barre. Pa.; Colonel Thomas J. Hudson, Chief 
of Art llery, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Lieutenant-Governor. — Walter Lyon. 

Secretary of the Commonwealth. — Frank 
Reeder. Deputy Secretary, James E. Barnett. 
Chief Clerk, Wilson M. ( learhart. 

Attorney-General. — Henry C. McCormick. 
Deputy Attorney-General. — John P. Elkin. 

Auditor-General. — Amos H. Mylin. Deputy 
Auditor-General, Sam Matt. Fridy. Chief 
Clerk, P. D. Bricker. Corporation Deputy, 
John A. Glenn. 

Secretary of Internal Affairs. — James W. 
Latta. Deputy Secretary of Internal Affairs, 
Isaac B. Brown. 

State Treasurer. — Benjamin J. Haywood. 
Cashier, H. C. Greenewalt. Assistant Cashier, 
T. Stewart Pearce. 

Chief of Bureau of Industrial Statistics. — 
James M. Clark. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. — Na- 
than C. Schaeffer. Deputy Superintendents of 
Public Instruction, Henry Houck and John Q. 
Stewart. 

Adjutant-General. — Thomas J. Stewart. 
Chief Clerk, George C. Kelly. 

Insurance Commissioner. — James H. Lam- 
bert. Deputy Insurance Commissioner, Sam- 
uel W. McCulloch. 

Commissioner of Banking. — B. F. Gilkeson. 
Deputy Commissioner of Banking, John W. 
Morrison. 

Secretary of Agriculture. — Thomas J. Edge. 
Deputy Secretary of Agriculture, John Ham- 
ilton. 

Dairy and Food Commissioner. — Levi Wells. 

Economic Zoologist. — Dr. B. H. Warren. 

Commissioner of Forestry. — Dr. J. T. Roth- 
rock. 

State Veterinarian. — Dr. Leonard Pearson. 

State Librarian. — William H. Egle. First 
Assistant State Librarian , Howard B. Harts- 
wick. Second Assistant State Librarian, 
Thomas O'Reilly. 

Factory Inspector. — James Campbell. 

Superintendent of Public Grounds and 
Buildings. — John C. Delaney. 

Superintendent of Public Printing and 
Binding. — Thomas Robinson. 

Chief Clerk of Soldiers' Orphans' Schools 
Commission. — Joseph Pomeroy. 

State Printer. — Clarence M. Busch. 



Major-General Commanding the National 
Guard. — George R. Snowden. Brigadiers. — 1. 
John W. Schall, Philadelphia ; 2. John A. Wiley, 
Franklin, Venango co.; 3. J. P. S. Gobin, Leb- 
anon. 

State Board of Health.—}. H. McClelland. 
Pittsburg ; George G. Groff , Lewisburg ; Dr. 
Pemberton Dudley, Philada., Pres.; Richard Y. 
Cook, Philada. ; John Fulton, Johnstown ; S. T. 
Davis, Lancaster. Secretary, Dr. Benj. Lee, 
Philada. 

Pharmaceutical Examining Board. — F. A. 
Boericke, Philada., Pres. ; Charles T. George, 
Harrisburg, Secretary; Edward A. Cornell, 
Williamsport, Treas.; Lewis Emanuel, Pitts- 
burg ; Henry C. Porter. Towanda. 

Commissioners of Public Charities. — Mahlon 
H. Dickinson, of Philada., President; J. W. C. 
O'Neal, of Adams ; H. M. Boies, of Scranton ; 
Isaac Johnson, of Media ; George W. Starr, 
of Erie; Francis J. Torrance, of Allegheny ; 
\V. B. Gill, of Philada.; Dr. G. I. McLeod, of 
Philada.; Chas. Miller, of Franklin; Geo. W. 
Ryan, of Shamokin. General Agent and Sec, 
Cadwalader Biddle, of Philada. 

Board of Pardons. — Walter Lyon, Lieuten- 
ant-Governor ; Frank Reeder, Secretary of the 
Commonwealth ; H. C. McCormick, Attorney- 
General ; James W. Latta, Secretary of Internal 
Affairs; Lewis E. Beitler, Recorder ; Wilson M. 
Gearhart. Secretary. 

Commissioners of Fisheries. — Henry C. De- 
muth, Lancaster; James A. Dale, York, Treas.; 
D. P. Corwin, Pittsburg, Sec; S. B. Stillwell, 
Scranton, Pres.; L. Streuber, Erie; James W. 
Correll, Easton. 

SUPREME COURT OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

City Hall, Fourth Floor, South Front, Room 454. 

Chief Justice. — James P. Sterrett. 

Associate fustices. — Henry Green, Henry W. 
Williams, J. Brewster McCollum, James T. Mit- 
chell, John Dean, D. Newlin Fell. 

Prothotwtary. — Eastern Dist., C. S. Greene, 
Philada. ; Middle Dist., Wm. Pearson, Harris- 
burg; Western Dist., George Pearson, Pittsburg. 

Reporter. — Wilson C. Kress, Lock Haven. 

SUPERIOR COURT. 

City Hall, Fourth Floor, South Front, Room 454. 

Preside fit fudge. — Charles E. Rice. 

Associate fudges. — Edwin N. Willard, John 
J. Wickham, James A. Beaver, Howard J. 
Reeder, George B. Orlady, Peter P. Smith. 

PENNSYLVANIA LEGISLATURE, 1897-99. 
Senate. 

[Republicans (in Roman), 44 ; Democrats (in 
Italics), 6.] 
President of the Senate. — Walter Lyon, 

Lieutenant-Governor. 
Chief Clerk.— Edward W. Smiley. 



Dist. PHILADELPHIA. 

i George A. Vare. 

2 Ellwood Becker, 

3 F. A. Osbourn, 

4 C. Wesley Thomas, 

5 Charles L. Brawn, 

6 Boies Penrose, 

7 John C. Grady, 

8 Jacob Crouse. 



Dist. DELAWARE. 

9 William C. Sproul, 

BUCKS. 

10 Henry G. Moyer. 

BERKS. 

11 W. Oscar Miller. 

MONTGOMERY. 

12 Henry D. Saylor. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



4* 



Dist. LANCASTER. 

13 Milton Eby, 

14 C. C. Kauffman. 

DAUPHIN. 

15 S. J. McCarroll. 

LEHIGH. 

16 Henry G. Stiles. 

LEBANON. 

17 J. P. S. Gobin. 

NORTHAMPTON. 

18 Henry D. Heller. 

CHESTER. 

19 William P. Snyder. 

LACKAWANNA, PART 
OF LUZERNE. 

20 James C. Vaughan. 

PART OF LUZERNE. 

21 William J. Scott. 

MONROE, PIKE AND 
CARBON. 

22 Lafayette Rowland 

BRADFORD AND 
WYOMING. 

23 B. B. Mitchell. 

LYCOMING, MONTOUR, 

SULLIVAN AND 

COLUMBIA. 

24 J. Henry Cochran. 

TIOGA, POTTER AND 
MC KEAN. 

25 Walter T. Merrick. 

SUSQUEHANNA AND 

WAYNE. 

26 E. B. Hardenbergh 

UNION, SNYDER AND 
NORTHUMBERLAND 

27 Edwin M. Hummel. 

YORK. 

28 Harvey W. Haines. 

SCHUYLKILL. 

29 Samuel A. Losch. 

30 John J. Coyle. 

PERRY, MIFFLIN AND 
JUNIATA. 

31 William Hertzler. 



CUMBERLAND AND 
Dist. ADAMS. 

32 Alfred W. Milleisen. 

FRANKLIN AND 
HUNTINGDON. 

33 H. Clay Chisholm. 

CLINTON, CLEARFIELD 
AND CENTRE. 

34 M. L. McQuown. 

BLAIR AND CAMBRIA. 

35 Jacob C. Stineman. 

SOMERSET, BEDFORD 
AND FULTON. 

36 N. B. Critchfield. 

INDIANA AND 
JEFFERSON. 

37 James G. Mitchell. 

CAMERON, ELK, CLAR- 
ION AND FOREST. 

38 William H. Hyde. 

WESTMORELAND. 

39 John H. Brown. 

FAYETTE AND GREENE 

40 Daniel S. Walton. 

BUTLER AND ARM- 
STRONG. 

41 Wm. B. Meredith. 

ALLEGHENY. 

42 Arthur Kennedy, 

43 C. L. Magee, 

44 William Flinn. 

45 John W. Crawford. 

BEAVER AND WASH- 
INGTON. 

46 Samuel P. White. 

LAWRENCE AND 
MERCER. 

47 Wm. M. Brown. 

WARREN AND VE- 
NANGO. 

48 Charles M. Shortt. 

ERIE. 

49 Perry H. Gibson. 

CRAWFORD. 

50 Wm. H. Andrews. 



House of Representatives. 

[Republicans (in Roman), 171; Democrats 
(in Italics), 33.] 

Dist. ADAMS. 

John R. Bittenger, 
William H. Tipton. 

ALLEGHENY'. 

i Charles A. Muehl- 
brffnner, 
Charles W. Simon, 

2 Wm. J. McDonald, 
Wm. T. Marshall, 

3 Wm.W. McElhany, 
Andrew J. Pitcairn, 

4 Thomas M.Brophy, 

5 Geo. L. McFarlane, 
George M. Hosak, 
Charles S. Black, 
Charles J. Pedder, 



Dist. 

6 James McB. Robb, 
R. McWhinney, 

7 Thomas J. Ford, 
Jchn I. Shaw, 

8 Thomas Tillbrook. 

ARMSTRONG. 

George W. McNees, 
W. Fred Turner. 

BEAVER. 

Ira F. Mansfield, 
Andr. J. Lawrence. 

BEDFORD. 

William C. Smith, 
S. M. Williams. 



Dist. BERKS. 

1 Edward M. Luden, 
David West, 

2 Cyrus J. Rhode, 
Jacob H. Weible, 

Charles B. Spatz. 

BLAIR. 

Matth. M. Morrow, 
Geo. M. Patterson. 

BRADFORD. 

Louis Piollet, 
Rob't S. Edmiston, 
Lawr'ce T. Manley. 

BUCKS. 

Henry S. Funk, 
Hampton W. Rice, 
James Patterson. 

BUTLER. 

James N. Moore, 
John Dindinger. 

CAMBRIA. 

Saml. D. Patterson, 
William P. Reese. 

CAMERON. 

Sylvester S. Smith. 

CARBON. 

Jerry N. Winter. 

CENTRE. 

James Schofield, 
R. McKay Foster. 

CHESTER. 

Daniel F. Moore, 
John H. Marshall, 
Plummer E.Jefferis, 
Thomas J. Philips. 

CLARION. 

John A. F. Hoy, 
John Mong. 

CLEARFIELD. 

Frank G. Harris, 
Joseph Alexander. 

CLINTON. 

Jas. W. Fredericks. 

COLUMBIA. 

William T. Creasy, 
I I'm. Chrisman. 

CRAWFORD. 

Philip M. Cut shall, 

Ch. A. Stranahan, 
Judson B. Phelps. 

CUMBERLAND. 

Filmore Maust, 
Harry Manning. 

DAUPHIN. 

1 George Kunkel, 

2 John M. Heagy, 
W. H. Clay Keen, 
Edward S. Keiper. 

DELAWARE. 

Ward R. Bliss, 
Thomas H. Garvin, 
Richard J. Baldwin. 

ELK. 

George R. Dixon. 



Dist. ERIE. 

1 Edward P. Gould, 

2 John D. Bentley, 
George A. Evans. 

FAYETTE. 

Clark T. Baldwin, 
George Hopwood, 
Geo. W. Campbell. 

FOREST. 

Jacob E. Weak. 

FRANKLIN. 

William W. Britton, 
James W. Carson. 

FULTON. 

P. McCauley Cook. 

GREENE. 

J. A. Maple. 

HUNTINGDON. 

P. M. Lytle, 
John S. Barr. 

INDIANA. 

John McGaughey, 
John W. Morrow. 

JEFFERSON. 

William 0. Smith. 

JUNIATA. 

Jeremiah N. Kella r 

LACKAWANNA. 

i John R. Farr, 

2 Alex. T. Connell, 

3 Nathan C. Mackey, 

4 John F. Reynolds. 

LANCASTER. 

1 Frank B. McClain, 

2 Milton Heidelbaugh 
Hiram Peoples, 

3 Aug. G. Seyfert, 
John S. Wilson, 
Quinton 0. Reitzel. 

LAWRENCE. 

Algernon L. Martin, 
Robert A. Todd. 

LEBANON. 

George W. Ellis, 
Philip H. Reinhard. 

LEHIGH. 

Michael J. Lennon, 
Milton J. Kramlich 
Alvin J. Kern, 

LUZERNE. 

1 Jacob Roberts, Jr., 

2 E. A. Coray, Jr., 

3 Clarence B. Miller, 

4 Thomas M. Powell, 

5 John J. Morahan, 

6 Ellsworth L. Reilly. 

LYCOMING. 

James B. Coryell, 
John W. King, 
John C. Wilson. 

MC KEAN. 

Rich. A. Dempsey 
Herman H. North.' 



42 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Dist. MERCER. 

James D. Emery, 
John M. Martin, 
John C. Bell. 

MIFFLIN. 

Gruber H. Bell. 

MONROE. 

Frank E. Place. 

MONTGOMERY. 

Thomas H. Barker, 
HoraceW.Eshbach, 
Henry W. Kratz, 
Jason Sexton, 
William Teas. 

MONTOUR. 

Lloyd W. W'elliver. 

NORTHAMPTON. 

Webster C. Weiss, 
Charles F. ChicUey, 
// illiam //. Leh. 

NORTHUMBERLAND. 

George W. Rhoads, 
William L. Nesbit. 

PERRY. 

J. Harper Seidel. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

i Edwin H. Vare, 
Charles Deputy. 

2 David H. Conrade, 

3 Robert L. Roberts, 

4 David Singer, 

5 John R. Lloyd. 

6 Jimes MeConnell, 

7 Henrv K. Boyer, 

8 John'.M. Scott, 

9 Court. K. Bolles, 
io Augustus S.Roberts 

Chas. E. Voorhees, 
ii Henry Gransback, 

12 Wm. T. Zehnder, 

13 H. Thos. Dunlap, 

14 William M. Kidd, 

15 Walton Pennewill, 
Ziba T. Moore, 

16 William F. Stewart, 
Elias Abrams, 

17 Louis Bier, 

18 James Clarency, 
Walter Stradling, 
Charles Shane, 

19 William H. Keyser, 
John H. Riebel, 

20 Milton W. Kerkes- 

lager, 

21 John F. Keator, 

22 Franklin Reed, 

23 Mahlon L. Savage, 

24 Ebenezer Adams, 
Charles B. Noblit, 

25 Robert Smith, 
John A. Gilmore, 



Dist. 

26 Samuel Crothers, 

27 Charles W. Boger, 
George Sterr, Jr., 

28 Adam C. Ackerman, 
George W.Williams. 

PIKE. 

Fred. A. Kessler. 

POTTER. 

J. Walter Wells. 

SCHUYLKILL. 

i Evan A. Griffith, 

2 Frank J. Kehler, 

3 John D. Kershner, 

4 A. C. Shrink, 
Seth Orme, 
Earl Witman. 

SNYDER. 

Chas. W. Hermann. 

SOMERSET. 

William H. Miller. 
William H. Sanner. 

SULLIVAN. 

Bishop W.Jennings. 

SUSQUEHANNA. 

{ames W. Adams, 
,inus W. Moore. 

TIOGA. 

Robert K.. Y"iing. 
Frederick B. Smith. 

UNION. 

Benjamin K. Focht. 

VENANGO. 

Thomas McGough, 
Peter M. Speer. 

WARREN. 

E. W. Par>hall, 

WASHINGTON. 

John C. French, 
James G. Sloan, 
David M. Pry. 

WAYNE. 

Harry B. Ely. 
N. F. L'nderwood. 

WESTMORELAND. 

B. 0. Reefer, 
James C. Campbell, 
Amos Trout, 
Jas. B. Hammond. 

WYOMING. 

Stanley R. Brungess 

YORK. 

William H. Long, 

Reuben R. Kayler, 

James C. Graham, 

Charles M. Kerr. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



Citif Treasurer. — Richard G. Oellers : 
room 143, City Hall ; Chief Clerk, J. Hampton 
Moore. 

Cittf Solicitor. — John L. Kinsey : room 
476, City Hall ; First Assistant, James Alcorn ; 
Chief Clerk, Thomas S. Stout. 

Receiver of Taxes. — William J. Roney : 
room 102, City Hall ; Chief Clerk, James F. 
Morrison; Assistant Chief Clerk. John L. Bow- 
ers ; Deputy Receiver , Walter L.Ward ; Cashier, 
L. H. Raser ; Chief Deputy Collector of Delin- 
quent Taxes, James McCormick. 



IMmior. — Charles F. Warwick: room 214, 
City Hall ; Secretary, John R. McCarthy ; Chief 
Clerk, Harry C. Gill ; Contract and License 
Clerk, Joseph F. Jones. 



City Councils. 
Meet in City Hall, fourth floor. 
Select Council. 
President. — James L. Miles. 
Clerk. — Joseph H. Paist. 
Assistant Clerk. — Henry W. Robertson. 
Sergeant-at-Arms. — James Franklin. 



2 

3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
8 



Wards. 
1 P. A. McClain. 
Joseph L. Nobre.* 
Harrv Hunter. 
Wm. Mc Mullen* 
Jas. B. Anderson. 
Vacancy. 
S. F. Houseman. 
C. Y. Audenreid.* 
R. R. Bringhurst.* 
F. A. Ballinger. 

{os. H. Klemmer.* 
.ouis J. Walker. 
James L. Miles.* 
W. ( ',. Rutherford. 
Vacancy. 
Henry Clay. 
Chas. Kitchenman. 
William Rowen. 



Wards. 

20 John Stackhouse. 

21 Joseph M. Adams. 

22 Geo. B. Edwards. 

23 J. Emory Byram. 

24 A. H. Mad Kven. 

25 Wilbur F. Short.* 

26 James A. Briggs. 

27 E. W. Patton. 
Samuel P. Town.* 
A. Raymond Raff . 
William McCoach.* 
W. 1). Upperman. 
F. M. Harris. 
Samuel Lamond. 

34 Henry Brooks. 

35 loseph H. Brown.* 

36 Hugh Black. 

37 John Dougherty. 



28 
29 

30 

3 1 
32 
33 



9 

I ■ 

I I 
12 

»3 
M 
15 
16 

17 
18 
19 Thomas J. Rose. 

Rep. (Rom.), 33 ; Dem. (Italic), 2. 
Common Council. 
President. — Wencel Hartman. 
Clerk. — George W. Rochersperger. 
First Ass't Clerk. — William Bartley. 
Ass' t Clerks. — Gavin Neilson,W.H.Felton. 
Clerk to Finance Committee. — W. H. Baker. 
Sergeant-at-Arms . — Charles B. Hall. 
Wards. 
i Judson C. Keith.* 



Robert Denny.* 
Wm. L. Connell.* 
Harrv Y. Shugart. 
J. R.'C. McAllister. 
James M. Haslett. 
Gustave Hahn. 
S. Creadick, M. D. 
C. F. Iseminger. 
John Dick. Jr.* 
Wm. A. Wilson.* 
Hiram Bowman.* 
Lewis Kinsley. 
Jas. M. Simpkins.* 
Henry S. Martin. 
Wm. Van Osten* 
Charles Seger.* 
J. S. Hammond.* 
A. F. Stevens, Jr.* 
Chris. J. Perry.* 



9 
10 



11 

i- 



Wards. 
8 Wencel Hartman. 
David S. B. Chew. 
Chas. Roberts. 
Wm. H. Garrett.* 
B. L. Smedley.* 
George McCurdy. 
Edwin E. Smith. 
Henry Erdin.* 

13 James C. Collins. 
E. H. Hults* 

14 John T. Stanffer. 
Charles J. Dittes.* 
A. Levering.* 
H. W. Lambirth.* 
Joseph F. Swope.* 
William G. Huey. 
George Thomas. 
H. L. Montgomery. 
Theodore Borden. 



15 



The terms of those marked with * expire in April, 1897, 
and their successors are to be elected in February, 1897. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



43 



Wards. 

16 5". S. Lozuenstein * 
Chas.J. Hauger* 

17 Jacob Roth.* 
August Hohl. 

18 Agnew McBride.* 
Richard T. Irwin.* 
John Z. Tintsman.* 
M. W. Bougher.* 

19 Thomas Firth.* 
G.E.Schlegelmilch.* 
A. B. Saybolt* 
Edward Buchholz. * 
R. W.B.Cornelius.* 
John Doak, Jr.* 
W. Harris Seltzer.* 

20 Chas. K. Smith.* 
George W. Conard.* 
M. M. Caverow.* 
Thomas' J. Morton.* 
George Hawkes. 
Geo. W. Kucker. 

21 Wm. F. Dixon.* 
Josiah Linton.* 
H. M. Levering.* 

22 Thomas Meehan.* 
Jacob J. Seeds.* 
John W. Davidson.* 
Samuel Goodman. 
George W. Boyer. 
Wilson H. Brown. 

23 Jas. Wolstencroft. 
Robert T. Corson. 
J. H. Morrison. 

24 Gus. R. Schaeffer. 
William Griffiths.* 
William W. Allen. 
A. M. DeHaven. 
Frank Stevens. 
Henry Z. Ziegler* 
W. R. Knight, Jr. 
F. C. Simon.* 
R. E. Tongue.* 
J. H. Woodhead.* 
Ezekiel Gordon.* 
E. A. Anderson. 
S. C. Aiman.* 
T. Hunter, M.D.* 
J. D. Blackwood. 



25 



26 



Wards. 

27 Chas. E. Connell.* 
J. Warner Goheen.* 
Basil H. Brown. 
Charles M. Swain.* 

28 Hiram A. Miller. 
George J. Jewell.* 
Frederick Stehle.* 
B. A. Hertsch.* 
John Hamilton.* 
Lewis B. Mathias. 
John E. Warren. 

29 C. M. Hunsicker.* 
Jos. Martin. M.D.* 
W. R. Batt, M.D. 
Geo. W. Edmonds. 
Daniel H. Buck. 
Anton F. Miller. 
William Todd.* 

30 John Irvine. 
Wm. J. Pollock.* 
Wm. H. Wilson.* 

31 Robt. S. Leithead.* 
John Pallatt.* 
Lalen C. Krisher. 
E. W. Richards. 

32 Fred.L.Breitinger.* 
John P. Buckley.* 
Geo. W. Brunnell.* 
T. G. Lovegrove.* 
Winfield S.Thomas. 

33 R. C. Horr.* 

A. T. Wadsworth. * 
Charles H. Sayre. 
Thos. Wagner, Jr. 
John H. Magee.* 

34 Robert Harvey. 
Chas. C. Warwick. 
James E. Grist. 

35 Peter E. Costello.* 
John Sibbald.* 

36 James Bawn.* 
Samuel K. Stinger.* 
A. R. H. Morrow.* 
John J. Orr. 

37 John H. B. Amick.* 
Ezekiel C. Evans.* 



Rep. (Roman), 127; Dem. {Italic), 6. 



Department of Public Safety. 

Room 217, City Hall. 

Director. — Frank M. Riter. 
Secretary. — James Hoyt. 
Bookkeeper. — Hiram Horter, Jr. 
Messenger. — Robert P. Crouse. 

Bureau of Police. 
Room 227, City Hall. 

Superintendent of Police. — Captain R. J. 
Linden. 

Chief Clerk. — William Culbertson. 

Clerks. — B. F. Shantz, George L. Rubicam, 
Charles Henry. 

Fire Marshal. — James S. Thompson. 

Magistrates at Central Station, City Hall. — 
Thomas W. South, J. M. R. Jermon, 

Clerk at Central Station. — John B. Moffitt. 



Captains of Police. 

Room 629, City Hall. 
First Division. — Charles B. Edgar. 
Second Division. — Edward W. Malin. 
Third Division. — Henry M. Quirk. 
Fourth Division. — Thomas Brown. 
Fifth Division. — George W. Thompson. 

Captain of Detectives. — Peter Miller. 

Electrical Bureau. 

Room 626, City Hall. 
Chief— David R. Walker. 
Clerk. — John S. Wetter. 

Fire Bureau. 
Office, S. W. cor. Race and Juniper streets. 
Chief Engineer. — James C. Baxter, Jr. 
Secretary. — William C. Zane. 

Board of Fire Escapes. 
Office, S. W. cor. Race and Juniper streets. 
Composed of Building Inspectors, Chief En- 
gineer of Fire Bureau and Fire Marshal. Presi- 
dent, James S. Thompson ; Secretary, Wm. C. 
Zane. 

Bureau of Boiler Inspectors. 

Room 317, City Hall. 
Chief. — John Overn. 
Chief Clerk.— Frank W. Getz. 

Bureau of Building Inspection. 
Room 313, City Hall. 

William C. Haddock (Chief) ; Inspectors. — 
Fred. G. Mylertz, John H. Kessler, John Mec- 
leary, Paul J. Essick, Jr., James Zimmerman, 
Charles D. Supplee, Harman M. Boorse, Samuel 
H. Collom, Robert C. Hill, Geo. W. Payne, 
Edward H. Hannum, Thos. R. Allen, Geo. W. 
Bourne. 

Chief Clerk. — John Macleary. 

Deputy Chief. — William J. Gillingham. 

Elevator Inspectors. — Henrick V. Loss, Lin- 
coln Van Gilder. 

Structural Engineer. — Amos W. Barnes. 

Record Clerk. — Horace L. Davenport. 

Permit Clerk. — William Butler. 

Stenographer and Typezuriter. — J. W. 
Scheerer. 

Messenger. — Charles E. Whiteside. 

Solicitor. — Norris S. Barratt, Ass't City Sol. 

Bureau of City Property. 
Room 130, City Hall. 
Superintendent . — A. S. Eisenhower. 
Chief Clerk— Isaac B. Elliott. 

Bureau of Health. 
Room 610. City Hall. 

Board of Health.— Wm. H. Ford, M. D,( Presi- 
dent pro tern.), A. A. Hirst (Secretary), Albert H. 
Dingee, J. Lewis Good, P. D. Keyser, M. D. 

Health Officer.— Theo. B. Stulb. 

Clerk to Health Officer. — Thos. Sailor. 

Port Physician.— -Walter D. Green, M.D. 

Chief Clerk. — John J. McCay. 

Medical Inspector. — Dr. J. H. Taylor. 

Assistant Medical Inspectors. — William M. 
Angney, 519 Spruce street; Alex. Cooke But- 
cher, 3442 Chestnut street; J. Aubrey Davis. 
527 S. Forty-second street ; George E. Stubbs, 
N. E. cor. Seventeenth and Jefferson streets; 



44 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Frederick J. Haerer, 1134 N. Third street ; Green 
R. Hulshizer, 225 Brown street; Charles W. 
Karsner, 1409 S. Sixteenth street ; Edward H. I 
Kase, 1323 Girard avenue ; Howard B. Martin, I 
1724 Green street; Charles P. Mercer, 2554 X. 
Eighth street; O. H. Paxon, 123 X T . Sixteenth 
street; William T. Robinson, 1621 N. Sixteenth 
street; Giovani Trojano, 773 S. Tenth street; 
Francis C. Van Gasken, 617 St. Mary street; 
Lewis C. Wessels, 1918 N. Twenty-second street. 

Chief Inspector of Nuisances. — Charles F. 
Kennedy. 

Chief Registration Clerk. — J. V. P. Turner. 

Chief Inspector of House Drainage. — George 
S. Hughes. 

Chief Inspector of Milk. — William J. Byrnes. 

Chief Disinfector .— -Dr. W. W. Meyers. 

Municipal Hospital. 

Physician in charge.— W . M. Welch, M. D., 

821 N. Broad street. 
Resident Physician. — R. W. Bemis. 
Steward. — Ledner J. Gouffe. 

Vaccine Physicians. 

1st Dist. — First Ward.— J. S. Gillespie, 2038 
S. Thirteenth street. 

2d Dist. — Second and Third Wards. — W. S. 
M. Field, 1210 S. Fourth street. 

3d Dist. — Twenty-sixth and Thirty-sixth 
Wards. — G. A. Knowles, 2211 Federal street. 

4th Dist. — Fourth and Thirtieth Wards. — H. 
B. Baxter, 1422 Christian street. 

5th Dist— Fifth and Sixth Wards.— L. H. 
Horter, 1106 Snyder avenue. 

6th Dist. — Seventh and Eighth Wards. — E. H. 
Green, 302 S. Tenth street. 

7th Dist. — Xinth and Tenth Wards. — John C. 
Da Costa, 1633 Arch street. 

8th Dist. — Eleventh, Twelfth, and Thirteenth 
Wards.— P. X. K. Schwenk, 810 X. Seventh 
street. 

9th Dist. — Fourteenth and Fifteenth Wards. — 
Clarence P. Franklin, 1633 Fairmount avenue. 

10th Dist. — Sixteenth, Seventeenth, and Twen- 
tieth Wards. — S. X. Troth, 1339 X'. Seventh street. 

nth Dist. — Twenty-ninth Ward. — L. C. Peter, 
2132 Oxford street. 

12th Dist. — Xineteenth Ward. — J. A. Krug, 
2437 X. Fifth street. 

13th Dist. — Eighteenth and Thirty-first Wards. 
— David Henry. 1921 E. Dauphin street. 

14th Dist. — Thirty-third and Thirty-seventh 
Wards. — Robert Rodgers, 2903 X. Fifth street. 

15th Dist. — Twenty-fifth Ward. — S. Lewis 
Summers, 2006 Orleans street. 

16th Dist. — Thirty-second Ward. — Laura S. 
Chapin, 1630 Diamond street. 

17th Dist. — Twenty-eighth Ward. — J. A. 
Camp, 1921 Susquehanna avenue. 

18th Dist. — Twenty-second Ward. — A. M. 
Davis, 6008 Main street, Germantown. 

19th Dist. — Twenty-first Ward. — Ross K. 
Bunting, 4301 Ridge avenue, Manayunk. 

20th Dist. — Twenty-third and Thirty-fifth 
Wards. — Thomas C. Price, Bridesburg. 

21st Dist. — Twenty-fourth Ward. — W. C. Bar- 
rett, 3939 Powelton avenue. 

22d Dist. — Twenty-Seventh Ward. — Jos. R. 
Bryan, X. E. cor. Forty-second and Chestnut sts. 

23d Dist. — Thirty-fourth Ward. — Charles H. 
Harvey, 4821 Lancaster avenue. 



Department of Public Works. 

Room 212, City Hall. 

Director. — Thomas M. Thompson. 

Assistant to the Director. — Harry W. Quick. 

Chief Clerk.— Willis Sheble. 

Bureau of Highways. 
Room 230, City Hall. 

Chief — Thos. L. Hicks. 

Assistants. — 1st Dist. Samuel J. Shannon. 2d. 
William Godfrey. 3d. Thomas F. Durham. 4th. 
Matthew Patton. 5th. George W. Fox. 6th. 
William A. Frederick. 7th. William B. Scott. 
8th. W. H. Brooks. 9th. Richard B. Williams. 
10th. John E. Manship. 

Superintendent of Bridges. — C. A. Trik. 

Chief Clerk. — M. M. Coppuck. 

Bureau of Street Cleaning. 

Room 238, City Hall. 

Chief. — Sylvester H. Martin. 

Board of Highway Supervisors. 
Room 232, City Hall. 
Thos. M. Thompson (President), Thos. L. 
Hicks, George S. Webster, John C. Trautwine, 
Jr., David R. Walker, William K. Park, A. S. 
Eisenhower. 
Secretary. — M. M. Coppuck. 

Bureau of Water. 
Office N. E. cor. Juniper and Filbert streets. 
Chief. — John C. Trautwine, Jr. 
Assistant Engineers. — Allen J. Fuller, Wm. 
Whitby. 
Superintendent General. — Frank L. Hand. 
Chief Clerk. — J. T. Hickman. 

Bureau of Surveys. 
Room 418. City Hall. 

Chief Engineer and Surz>eyor. — George S. 
Webster. 

Principal Assist. Engineer. — Geo. E. Dates- 
man. 

Assistant Engineers. — Gustavus K. More- 
head, Geo. S. Connor, Hugo Trik, B. H. Halde- 
man, R. I. D. Ashbridge, Samuel J. Wagner, 
Charles Ott, Xorman L. Stamm, D. Jones Lucas, 
William H. Millard. 

Assistant Engineer in Charge of Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue Subway. — Samuel J. Wagner. 

Recording Clerk. — Edward H. Thompson. 

Sewer Registrar. — William Calvert. 

Board of Surveyors. — 1st. Dist. Thomas Daly. 
2d. Charles W. Close. 3d. Wm. C. Cranmer. 
4th. Frits Bloch. 5th. Walter Brinton. 6th. 
Joseph Mercer. 7th. Wm. K. Carlile. 8th. C. A. 
Sundstrom. 9th. Joseph C. Wagner. 10th. John 
H. Webster. Jr. nth. Joseph Johnson. 12th. 
J. Harry Gillingham. 13th. Herbert M. Fuller. 

Registrar. — John W. Frazier. 

Bureau of Gas. 

Office, X. E. cor. Juniper and Filbert streets. 

Chief— Wm. K. Park. 

Assistant to Chief and General Storekeeper. 
— A. J. McCleary. 

Bookkeeper and Controller. — Thos. L.George. 

Superintendent of Distribution. — Joseph P. 
Boon. 

Chief Clerk.— William H. Leeds. 

Paymaster and Engineer s Clerk. — Rudolph 
McGirr. 

Registrar and Chief Meter Inspector. — Jacob 
Lang. 

General Clerk. — James McConnell. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



45 



Bureau of Lighting. 
Office, Twenty-second and Market streets. 
Chief. — John J. Kirk. 
Clerk. — John R. Morris. 

Bureau of City Ice Boats. 

Room 213, City Hall. 

Superintendent. — H. E. Melville. 

City Morgue. 

1307 Wood street. 
Superintendent. — Thomas Robinson. 
Assistant. — Benjamin Robinson. 

Department of Charities and Correction. 

Office, Harmony and Hudson streets. 

Directors. — William H. Lambert (President), 
William D. Gardner (Treasurer), John Shallcross, 
Alfred Moore, James W. Walk, M. D. 

Bureau of Charities. 
Office, 42 N. Seventh street. 
Almshouse, W. side of Schuylkill, bel. Pine. 
Secretary. — Robert C. Floyd. 
Out-door Agent.— A. D. W. Caldwell. 
Almshouse Superintendent. — Chas. Lawrence. 
Chief Resident Physician. — D. E. Hughes, 
M. D. 
House Agent. — Oliver P. Bohler. 

Bureau of Correction. 
Office, Hudson and Harmony streets. 
House of Correction, near Holmesburg. 
Secretary. — Edwin Palmer. 
House of Correction Supt. — Edwin A. Merrick. 
Master Warden. — Robert McBride. . 
Resident Physicians. — Geo. Robinson, M. D., 
H. A. P. Neal, M. D. _ 

Boards, Commissions, Inspectors, Mana- 
gers, etc., not under Departments of 
Safety, Works, or Charities. 

Civil Service Board. 
Room 875, City Hall. 
(Composed of the Mayor and Heads of Depart- 
ments. ) 
Secretary. — Harry L. Neal. 

Commissioners of Sinking Funds. 
Room 146, City Hall. 
The Mayor and Controller, ex-officio, and 
Louis Wagner. 

Clerk.— William H. Winter. 

Board of Public Education. 
Office, 713 Filbert street. 

President. — Vacancy. 

President pro tern. — Simon Gratz. 

Secretary. — Henry W. Halliwell. 

Assistant Secretary.— Andrew F. Hammond. 

Clerks. — Albert B. Beale, Lucien E. Drake, 
William Dick, Edward Merchant, Henry Moore, 
John D. Harden, Thomas A. Hughes. 

Superintendent of Schools. — Edward Brooks. 

Assistants. — Andrew J. Morrison, James F. C. 
Sickle, Lydia A. Kirby, Edgar A. Singer, C. 
Henry Kain, Mary Wright. 

Architect and Supervisor of School Buildings. 
— Joseph D. Austin. 

Assistant Architects and Inspectors. — Joseph 
W. Anschutz, James Gaw, J. H. Cook, Lewis P. 
Hoopes. 

Inspector of Heaters. — John D. Cassell. 



Section. 

1 Philip Hortz. 

2 A. D. Harrington. 

3 Joseph D. Murphy. 

4 Wm. J. Manning. 

5 John M. Campbell. 

6 John P. Gloninger. 

7 Anna Hallowell. 

8 Simon Gratz. 

9 Thos. G. Morton, 

M. D. 

10 Thos. A. Robinson. 

11 Wm. H. R. Lukens. 

12 Thomas A. Grace. 

13 Martin H.Williams, 

M. D. 

14 AndrewM.Spangler. 

15 Henry R.Edmunds. 

16 Vacancy. 

17 James Hughes. 

18 Alex. Adaire. 



Section. 

19 M.J. Wilson, M. D. 

20 Thos. E. Merchant. 

21 Rudolph S. Walton. 

22 Chas. E. Morgan,Jr. 

23 R. L. Wright. 

, 24 Edward Lewis. 

25 T. W. Marchment. 

26 Paul Kavanagh. 

27 Samuel B. Huey. 

28 Charles F. Abbot. 

29 Mary E. Mumford. 

30 Wm. J. Pollock. 

31 William Mclntyre. 

32 Harvey H.Hubbert. 

33 William Wrigley. 

34 Joseph R. Rhoads. 

35 Thomas Shallcross. 

36 George Haig. 

37 C. H. Vanfleet. 



Board of Revision of Taxes. 
Room 113, City Hall. 
Simon Gratz, Rinaldo A. Lukens, Isaac H. 
Shields. 

Chief Clerk. — James W. Sayre. 

Assessors of Real and Personal Estate 
for Taxes. 

1st Dist. — 1st Ward and that part of 26th Ward 
east of Broad street. — A. List, P. Monroe. 

2d Dist.— 30th and 36th Ward and that part of 
26th Ward west of Broad street. — Louis Bregy, 
Albert H. Harris. 

3d Dist. — 2d, 3d and 4th Wards. — Joseph L. 
Nobre, James J. King. 

4th Dist. — 5th and 6th Wards. — J. Wesley 
Durham, Wm. McMullen. 

5th Dist.— 7th and 8th Wards. — Jos. B. Barry, 
Thos. W. Marchment. 

6th Dist.— 9th and 10th Wards.— John. G. 
Adair, Cor. Haggerty. 

7th. Dist. — 13th and 14th Wards and that part 
of 20th Ward south of Master street. — Peter 
Bobb, F. P. Haggerty. 

8th Dist. — 15th Ward and that part of 29th 
Ward south of Master street. — J. E. Ritchie, 
Howard Josephs. 

9th Dist. — nth, 12th, 16th and 17th Wards. — 
H. N. Stokley, George R. Berrell. 

10th Dist.— 18th Ward and part of 31st Ward 
east of Frankford av. — J. W. Kerr, J. Gormley. 

nth Dist. — Partof 2othand32d Wards, and 37th 
Ward ; north side of Master street, east side of 
Broad street, west side of Sixth street, and Ger- 
mantownav. — William McMurray.JamesO'Hara. 

12th Dist. — Parts of 28th, 29th and 32d Wards; 
north side of Master street, south side of Cum- 
berland street, west side of Broad street to 
Schuylkill River.— A. M. Maggi, J.V. McManus. 

13th Dist. — 19th Ward and part of 31st Ward 
west of Frankford av. — John T. Finletter, B. F. 
Gaskill. 

14th Dist. — 25th Ward. — Henry Smith, John 
O'Donnell. 

15th Dist.— 33d Ward.— W. T. Seal, W. H. 
Wright. 

16th Dist. — 23d and 35th Wards. — William H. 
Rushworth, Edward H. Flood. 

17th Dist. — That part of 22d Ward west of 
Stenton av. — Fountain Ward, P. F. Gallagher. 



4 6 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



18th Dist. — 21st Ward and that part of 28th j 
Ward north of Cumberland, west of Broad street 
and Germantown av. — Josephus Yeakel, D. Frank 
Collins. 

19th Dist. — That part of 22d Ward east of Sten- 
ton av. — John S. Warner, Thos. K. Arnold. 

20th Dist. — 24th Ward and that part of 27th 
Ward south of Market street, east of 46th street, 
north of Baltimore av. to Woodland av. and N. 
W. of Woodland av. to Market street. — Frank L. 
Irwin, Albert A. Dunton. 

21st Dist. — 34th Ward and that part of 27th 
Ward south of Market street, west of 46th street 
and north of Baltimore av. — Adam Everly, John 
Boyle. 

22d Dist. — That part of 27th Ward south of 
Baltimore av. to Woodland av., thence S. E. of 
Woodland av. to Market street, thence east to 
Schuylkill River.— William H. Allison, F. P. 
Leech. 

Inspectors of the County Prison. 
Office at the Prison, Passyunk Road. 

Herbert D. Welsh (President), Edward Hut- 
chinson (Secretary), Charles Hill (Treasurer), 
Charles H. Banes, Robert D. Barclay, Robert 
R. Corson, Ralph F. Cullinan, Robert W. Dow- 
ning, William B. Hackenberg, George W. Hall, 
Charles Hill, Emlen Hutchinson, Justus C. Straw- 
bridge. 

Superintendent . — Vacancy. 

Clerk.— R. C. Motherwell. Jr. 

Physician. — Dr. Benj. F. Butcher. 

Inspectors of the Eastern Penitentiary. 

Fairmount avenue W. of Corinthian avenue. 

Andrew J. Maloney (President), Gen. Isaac J. 
Wistar (Secretary). Henry Z. Ziegler (Treas- 
urer), Conrad B. Day, Col. James C. Biddle. 

Warden. — Michael J. Cassidy. 

Resident Physician. — John Bacon. 

Clerk. — D. W. Bussinger. 

Moral Instructor. — Rev. Joseph Welch. 

Directors of City Trusts. 
Office, 120 S. Third street. 

Louis Wagner (President), Joseph L. Caven 
(Vice-President), John H. Michener. Edward S. 
Buckley, Benj. B. Comegys. John K. Cuming, 
William L. Elkins, John M. Campbell, Alex- 
ander Biddle. John H. Converse, Dallas San- 
ders. Ex-ojficio. — Charles F.Warwick, James 
L. Miles. Wencel Hartman. 

Secretary. — F. M. Highley. 

Girard Estate. 
Office, 120 S. Third street. 
Superintendent. — George E. Kirkpatrick. 
Girard College. 
Girard and Corinthian avenues. 
President.— A. H. Fetterolf. LL. D., Ph.D. 
I 'ice-President. — Winthrop D. Sheldon. 

Minor Trusts. 
Office, 120 S. Third street. 
Superintendent. — George E. Kirkpatrick. 

House of Refuge. 
Boys' Department. Glen Mills, Pa. 
Girls' Department, 22d and Poplar sts., Philada. 
President. — George M. Troutman. 
Vice-Presidents. — James V. Watson, Joseph 
G. Rosengarten. 

Treasurer. — Thomas A. Robinson. 



Secretary. — Richard A. Lewis. 

Jfanagers. — Crawford Arnold, John J. Henry, 
Thomas E. Baird, Francis W. Lewis, M.D., 
Morris Earle, William H. Vogdes, William C. 
Smyth, James Dougherty, Amos Bonsall, Dr. 
Isaac Massey (West Chester), Robert T. Corn- 
well (West Chester, Pa.), George Watson, 
Thomas L. Gillespie, Richard A. Lewis, Charles 
Richardson, Henry Cope. Joseph W. Hawley 
I Media, Pa.), Henry H. Collins. Alfred C. Har- 
rison, Joseph G. Rosengarten, N. Dubois Miller, 
William H. Staake, John H. Watt, Monroe 
Smith, J. Dundas Lippincott. 

Counselors. — George W. Biddle, John G. 
Johnson. 

Solicitor. — N. Dubois Miller. 

Consulting Physician. — Dr. Isaac Massey 
(West Chester). 

Superintendent. — F. H. Nibecker. 

Matron. — Elizabeth Davison. 

Superintendent Girls' Department. — W. A. 
Campbell. 

Physician. — Clara Marshall, M. D. 

Board of Port Wardens. 

Office, Bourse Building, Rooms 350 and 351. 

Joel Cook (Pres't). William R. Tucker, Samuel 
Disston, Henry V. Massey, W. L. Martin, H. C. 
Long, Jacob V. Foreman, Fred. H. Hess, Alex. 
C. Fergusson, Murrell Dobbins, Charles H. 
Large, Frank M. Chandler, S. S. Talbot, Geo. 
W. Ledlie, Lewis W. Moore, Thomas M. Ham- 
mett, John Fountain (Chester), Charles E. Scott 
(Bristol). 

Master Warden. — Christian K. Ross. 

Secretary of the Board. — George F. Sproule. 

Vessel Clerk. — Lewis W. Wertz. 

Harbor Master's Office. 
S. E. cor. Dock and Walnut streets. 
Harbor Master.— Jos. H. Klemmer. 
Chief Deputy— W illiam G. Rutherford. 

Harbor Commissioners. 
Office. Board of Trade Room, Bourse Building. 

Charles Piatt (President), Win. R. Tucker 
(Secretary), Geo. S. Webster, Joel Cook, Edwin 
S. Cramp, William D. Winsor, C. A. Griscom. 

Consulting Engineer. — Major C. W. Ray- 
mond, U. S. A. 

Directors of the Pennsylvania 

Nautical School. 
Office, 16 North Delaware Avenue. 
Charles Lawrence (Pres.), Joel Cook, Richard 
G. Oellers, Thomas Potter, George A. Cotton, 
Benjamin P. Obdyke. 

Secretary. — Frank S. Lawrence. 

Nautical School Ship, U. S. Ship Saratoga. 
Superintendent. — Command C.T. Hutchins. 
U. S. N. 

Commissioners of Fairmount Park. 
Room 127, City Hall. 

James McManes (President). David W. Sel- 
lers (Vice-President), Wm. M. Singerly (Treas- 
urer), A. J. Cassatt, Wm. S. Stokley, S. Gustine 
Thompson, A. Loudon Snowden, Chas. \\ . 
Henry. P. A. B. Widener, John G. Johnson. 
Ex-officio.— Chas. F. Warwick. Jas. L. Miles. 
Wencel Hartman, John C. Trautwine, Jr., Geo. 
S. Webster, A. S. Eisenhower. 

Secretary. — Thomas S. Martin. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



47 



Chief Engineer and Superintendent. — Rus- 
sell Thayer. 

Solicitor. — Samuel C. Perkins. 

Commissioners of Public Buildings. 
Room 453, City Hall. 

Samuel C. Perkins (President), Mahlon H. 
Dickinson, John S. Stevens, Richard Peltz, Wm. 
S. Stokley, Franklin M. Harris, Thomas E. Gas- 
kill, Wm. Brice, Isaac S. Cassin, Wm. H. 
Wright. Ex-officio. — Chas. F. Warwick, James 
L. Miles, Wencel Hartman. 

Secretary. — William B. Land. 

Architect. — W. Bleddyn Powell. 

Superintendent. — L. D. C. Tyler. 

County Officers. 

Sheriff. — Alexander Crow, Jr. ; office, room 
467, City Hall. 

Jlecorder of Deeds. — William M. Geary; 
room 154, City Hall. 

Jteyister of Wills and Cleric of the Or- 
phans' Court. — Elias P. Smithers ; room 162, 
City Hall. 

Deputy Register. — Charles Irwin. 

State Appraiser. — G. W. Greger. 

District Attorney. — Geo. S. Graham; room 
654, City Hall. 

Assistants. — Thomas W. Barlow. S. A. Boyle, 
W. W. Ker, Thos. D. Finletter. 

Indictment Clerk. — Peter H. Evans. 

Clerks. — James Uber Clark and Lewis B. Fife. 

Detectives. — Chas. F. Myers and Geo. Painter. 

Clerk of Quarter Sessions. — William B. 
Ahem ; room 685, City Hall. 

Deputy. — Richard Peltz. 

Court Clerks. — A. Wilson Henszey, Charles 
H. Good. 

Coroner. — Samuel H. Ashbridge ; office, 632 
Chestnut street. 

Deputy. — Thomas Dugan. 
Clerk. — A. L. English. 

County Commissioners. — Jacob Wilde- 
more, Jos. G. Richmond, Thomas J. Ryan; 
room 136, City Hall. 

Chief Clerk. — Joseph H. Winters. 

Controller. — John M. Walton; room 146, 

City Hall. 

Clerk. — L. R. Fortescue. 

Appraisers of Mercantile Taxes. — Jas. 
Hollis, Amos M. Slack, William J. Pollock, 
Joseph P. Green, John T. Strickland. 

Courts. 
Common Pleas Courts. 
No. 1. 
City Hall, Second Floor, South Front, 
Rooms A and B (246 and 243). 
President Judge. — Craig Biddle. 
Associate Judges. — F. Amadee Bregy, A. M. 
Beitler. 

No. 2. 

City Hall, Second Floor, South Front, 
Rooms C and D (254 and 253). 

President Judge. — Vacancy. 
Associate Judges. — Samuel W. Pennypacker, 
Mayer Sulzberger. 



No. 3. 
City Hall, Second Floor, West Front, 
Rooms E and F (275 and 285). 
President Judge. — Thomas K. Finletter. 
Associate Judges. — James Gay Gordon,Charles 
B. McMichael. 

No. 4. 
City Hall, Fourth Floor, South Front, 
Rooms G and H (446 and 443). 
President Judge. — Michael Arnold. 
Associate Judges . — Robt. N.Willson, vacancy. 

Prothonotary. 
City Hall, Second Floor, West Front, Room 268. 
Prothonotary. — M. Russell Thayer. 
Deputy Prothonotary . — Charles B. Roberts. 
Chief Clerk. — James W. Fletcher. 

Criminal Courts. 

The Judges of the Common Pleas Courts are 
also Judges of the Courts of Oyer and Terminer, 
General Jail Delivery and Quarter Sessions of 
the Peace. 

District Attorney's Office. 
City Hall, Sixth Floor, South Corridor, Room 654. 

District Attorney. — Geo. S. Graham. 
Orphans' Court. 
City Hall, Fourth Floor, East Corridor. 

President Judge. — W T m. B. Hanna. 

Associate Judges . — William N. Ashman, Clem- 
ent B. Penrose, Joseph C. Ferguson. 

Clerk. — Elias P. Smithers. 

First Assistant Clerk. — A. J. Fortin. 

Marriage License Clerk. — James S. Bird. 

Room No. 415. — Recording clerks, attorneys 
and general public. No. 417. — Clerk's main 
office. No. 419. — Record room. No. 421. — Mar- 
riage License office. No. 426. — President Judge 
Hanna's Court-room. No. 425. — Judge Ash- 
man's Court-room. No. 432. — Judge Penrose's 
Court-room. No. 436. — Judge Ferguson's Court- 
room. 

Magistrates' Courts, Police District 
Stations. 

No. 1. — James Hagan, 1351 Passyunk av. 

No. 2. — Robt. E. Henderson, 700 S. Broad st. 
Siation (1st Dist. ), Fitzwater below Twentieth. 

No. 3. — Ambrose P. Pullinger, Moyamensing 
av. and Marriott. 

No. 4. — Frank H. Smith, 728 Passyunk av. 
Station (2d Dist.), Second above Christian. 

No. 5. — Frank S. Harrison, 121 S. Seventh st. 
Station (3d Dist.), Union below Fourth. 

No. 6. — James A. Carr, 36 S. Fifth st. Station 
(4th Dist.), Fifth above Race. 

No. 7. — J. M. R. Jermon, 418 S. Eleventh st. 
Station (19th Dist.), Lombard below Eighth. 

No. 8. — Edward A. Devlin. 713 Sansom st. 
Station (5th Dist.), Fifteenth below Walnut. 

No. 9. — John B. Lukens, 23 N. Juniper st. 
Station (30th Dist.), Front and Westmoreland. 

No. 9. — William Eisenbrown, 30 S. Broad st. 
Stations (27th Dist.), Tacony and (15th Dist.) 
Frankford. 

No. 10. — Thomas W. South, 114 N. Twelfth st. 
Station (6th Dist.), Eleventh above Race. 

No. 11. — Albert H. Ladner, N. W. cor. Fifth 
and Green sts. Station (7th Dist.), Fairmount 
av. and Minster. 

No. 12.— M. F. Wilhere, 832 Callowhill st. 
Station (8th Dist.), Buttonwood above Tenth. 



48 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



No 13. — Thomas W. Cunningham, 302 N. 
Broad st. Stations (9th Dist. ), Twenty-third 
and Brown and (20th Dist.) Filbert above Fif- 
teenth. 

No. 14. — Cornelius M. Smith, 411 Girard av. 
Station ( 10th Dist.), Front above Master. 

No. 15. — Richard C. Lloyd, 244 E. Girard av. 
Station (nth JJist.), Girard av. above Mont- 
gomery. 

No. 16. — Robert Gillespie, 2203 N. Second st. 
Station (18th Dist.), Fourth and York. 

No. 1 7. — Wm. S . Kochersperger , 2044 Frankford 
av. Station (26th Dist.), Trenton av. and Dau- 
phin. 

No. 18. — John M. O'Brien, 1235 Girard av. 
Station (12th Dist. I, Tenth and Thompson. 

No. 19. — James E. Romig, 1242 N. Nineteenth 
St. Stations (28th Dist.), Twentieth and Berks, 
and (23d Dist.) Jefferson above Twentieth. 

No. 20. — James F. Xeall. 2526 N. Tenth st. 
Station (22a Dist.), Park and Lehigh avenues. 

No. 21. — 

No. 22. — Charles P. Donnelly, 4 E. Chelten av., 
Germantown. Station ( 14th Dist.), Germantown. 

No. 23. — Peter J. Hughes, 4091 Lancaster av. 
Stations (29th Dist. ), Sixty-first and Haverford 
av. and (16th Dist.) Thirty-ninth and Lan- 
caster av. 

No. 24. — George W. Evans, 35 S. Thirty-third 
st. Station (21st Dist.), Thirty-seventh and 
Woodland av. 

No. 25. — Charles Fulmer, 1501 S. Sixth st. 
Station (,25th Dist. | . Moyamensing av. below 
Dickinson. 

Xo. 26. — John Slevin, 1219 S. Eighteenth st. 
Station (17th Dist.). Twentieth below Federal. 

No. 27. — Horatio B. Hackett. 3086 Frankford 
av. Station 1 24th 1 >ist. | . Belgrade and Clearfield. 

No. 28. — Hampton M. Thomas, 4438 Main st., 
Manayunk. Station (13th Dist.), Main and 
Jackson, Manayunk. 

State Inspector of Oils. 
Office, 306 Stock Exchange Place. 
Inspector. — Thomas J. Powers. 
Deputies. — James A. Briggs, P. Lane, Jr. 

State Quarantine Board. 

Office, Rooms 264 and 266, Bullitt Building. 

Richard A. Cleeman, M. D.. President ; Benj. 
Lee, M. D.. Secretary; Thomas Winsmore, 
Henry C. Boennins;. M. D., Ernest Laplace, M. 
D., Henry M. DuBois, Theodore P.. Stulb. 

(J it a ra u tine Pliysicia n. — H . C . Boenning , 
M. D. 

Assistant Quarantine Physicians. — J. M. B. 
Ward, M. D., Alfred M. Seymour, M. D. 

Clerk. — Carrie M. Prentiss. 



U. S. OFFICERS IN PHILADELPHIA. 
Courts. 
Circuit Court of Appeals. 
Post Office Building, Ninth and Chestnut sts. 
Justice. — George Shiras. Jr. 
Judges. — Marcus W. Acheson, Geo. M. Dallas. 
Clerk. — William V. Williamson. 
Deputy Clerk.— Wm. H. Merrick. 

Circuit Court. 
Justice. — George Shiras. Jr. 
Judges. — Marcus W. Acheson, Geo. M. Dallas, 
William Butler. 



Clerk. — Samuel Bell. 

Deputy Clerk. — John A. Merrick. 
Jury Commissioner .— James S. Biddle. 

[Under the Act of March 3, 1891, the District 
Judges within the Circuit are competent to sit in 
this court in case a full court cannot be made up 
by the attendance of the Associate Justice of the 
Supreme Court and the Circuit Judges.] 

District Court. 
Judge. — William Butler. 
U. S. District Attorney. — James M. Beck. 
Assistants to the District Attorney. — Francis 
Fisher Kane, Michael J. McCullen. 
Clerk. — Charles S. Lincoln. 
U. S. Marshal. — James B. Reilley. 
Jury Commissioner. — Charles W. Henry. 

Commissioners. 

[With powers of commitment for offences 
against United States laws.] 

Samuel Bell, Henry R. Edmunds, W. W. 
Craig, John K. Valentine, John F. Lewis. 

Custom House. 
Chestnut street below Fifth. 

Collector. — John R. Read. 

Secretary. — George J. Brennan. 

Special Deputy and Auditor. — F. J. Crilly. 

Deputy Collector. — S. C. Kirk. 

Surveyor. — P. Gray Meek. 

Deputy Surveyors. — H. J. McAteer, M. Cas- 
sidy. 

Naval Officer. — J. Marshall Wright. 

Deputy. — Charles J. Young. 

i '. S. Appraiser. — R. Loper Baird. 

Asst. Appraiser. — S. G. Young. 

Inspector of Drugs. — Louis A. Kelly, M. D. 

Inspector 0/ Hulls. — Harrison Thompson. 

Inspector of Boilers 0/ Steam Vessels. — Chris- 
topher Vert. 

Shipping Commissioner. — James J. King. 

U. S. Revenue Cutter " Hamilton." 
Address, care of Custom House. 
Captain. — S. E. Maguire. 
First Lieutenant. — Vacant. 
Second Lieutenant. — P. H. Uberroth. 
Chief Engineer. — Daniel F. Kelley. 
First Assistant. — D. F. Bowen. 
Pilot.—}. Cottrell. 

U. S. Revenue Cutter " Washington." 
Station, Pier 3, South Wharves. 
Address, care of Custom House. 

First Lieutenant {Commanding). — Lt. O. S. 
Willey. 

Post-Office. 

U. S. Building, Ninth and Chestnut streets. 

Postmaster. — Wm. Wilkins Carr. 

Assistant Postmaster. — Joseph C. Boggs. 

Cashier. — Richard S. Edwards. 

Assistant Cashier. — James Mitchell. 

Supt. Money-Order Division. — John B. 
Comber. 

Supt. Mailing Division. — Edw.W. Alexander. 

Supt. Delivery Division. — James O'Sullivan. 

Supt. Registry Division. — Lehman P. Ash- 
mead. 

Supt. Box Division. — James Freeborn. 

Supt. Stamp Division. — J. J. Vogel. 

Supt. General Delivery Division. — George W. 
Davis. 

Inspector of Stations. — Frank J. Tobey. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



49 



B. 

E 

F. 
G. 
H. 
I.- 
L. 
M. 
N. 
Z. 
R. 
W 
U. 
X. 
A. 
P. 



S.- 

o, 
c. 
Q- 

K. 
D 



Letter-Carrier Stations. 

—West Philadelphia, Thirty-eighth st. below 
Market. 

—Port Richmond, Frankford av. and Clemen- 
tine St. 

—Frankford, 4414 Frankford av. 

— Germantown, Germantown and Chelten avs. 

— Chestnut Hill, Main st. and Bethlehem Pike. 

-Manayunk, Main st. 

— Tacony, Longshore st. near Edmund st. 

— Holmesburg, 8046 Frankford av. 

— Torresdale. Pennsylvania Railroad Station. 

-Falls, 3300 P- idge av. 

— Nicetown, 3635 Germantown av. 

— West Park, 501 1 Lancaster av. 

— Paschalville, 7028 Woodland av. 

— Bridesburg. 474.1 Richmond st. 

—Eighteenth and Chestnut, 1723 Chestnut st. 

— Passyunk, N. W. cor. Ninth and Washing- 
ton av. 

-Fairmount, Twenty-first st. bel. Fairmount 
av. 

-Spring Garden, S. W. cor. Sixth st. and 
Fairmount av. 

—Eighth Street, Eighth st. bel. Columbia av. 

—Columbia, 1917 Columbia av. 

— Fairhill, 2713 N. Fifth st. 

— Kensington, Sepviva and Xorris sts. 

— Southwest, N. E. cor. Eighteenth and Chris- 

tian sts. 



Sub-Stations (Receivi 



1. 

2. 

3- 
4- 
5- 
6, 

7- 
8. 

9- 
10. 

11. 

12. 

i3- 



24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 
28, 
29. 



-1500 N. Second st. 
-4217 Lancaster av. 
-2801 Girard av. 
-1020 S. Second st. 
-1610 Federal st. 
-3101 Powelton av. 
-1039 N. Third st. 
-1103 Ridge av. 
-1645 N. Broad st. 
-2002 Tioga st., 

Tioga. 
-7155 Germantown 

av. 
-4900 Woodland av. 
-Cor. Sixth and 

Diamond sts. 



14 
16 



17 

10 



19 
20 
21 

22 

2 3 

36 



Sub-Stations {Branch 

-Oak Lane. 

-Lindley. 

-Pittville. 

-Sandiford. 

-Bustleton. 

-Somerton. 



3° 

31 
3= 
33 
34 
35- 



ng St a '.ions') . 

Cor. Seventh and 

Snyder av. 
—Palmer st. and 

Girard av. 
— Cor. 'I wenty-ninth 

& Diamond sts. 
— 2S30 Richmond st. 
— Lpsal Station, P. 

R. R. 
— By berry. 
— Bourse Building. 
— Cor. Broad st. and 

Allegheny av. 
— Andora. 
— Roxborough. 
— Wanamaker's. 

Post Offices). 

— Oxford Church. 
— Crescentville. 
— Milestown. 
— Fern Rock. 
— Lawndale, 
— Logan. 



Mint. 

N. W. cor. Chestnut and Juniper streets. 

Superintendent . — Herman Kretz. 
Chief Clerk. — George R.Snowden. 
Chief Coiner. — W. E. Morgan. 
Assayer. — Jacob B. Eckfeldt. 
Melter and 'Refiner.— -Dr. D. K. Tuttle. 
Assistant Coiner. — Robert Clark. 
Engraver. — Charles E. Barber. 
Cashier. — Joseph D. Murphy. 

Sub-Treasury. 

Custom House Building, Chestnut street. 

Assistant Treasurer. — William H. Bigler. 
Chief Clerk and Cashier. — Barnet Earley. 



Internal Revenue. 
Post Office Building. Rooms 3 to 10, 2d Floor. 
First District. — Philadelphia, Bucks, Mont- 
gomery, Chester, Delaware, Lehigh, Berks and 
Schuylkill counties. 

Collector — William H. Doyle. 
Chief Deputy. — Francis B. Bracken. 

Navy Yard, League Island. 

Commandant. — Commodore J. A. Howell, U. 
S.N. 

Captain of the Yard, and Head of Yards 
and Docks Department. — Commander G. E. 
Wingate,U. S. N.; Assistants to Captain of Yard, 
Boatswain D. Ward, U. S. N., and Sailmaktr 
J. C. Herbert, U. S. N. 

Yards and Docks Department. — Civil Engi- 
neer C. C. Wolcott, U. S. N. 

Equipment Department. — Commander G. E. 
Wingate, U. S. N. 

Ordnance Department. — Commander E. 
Longnecker, U. S. N., and Acting Gunner F. T. 
Applegate, U. S. N. 

General Storekeeper's Department. — Pay 
Director J. A. Smith, U. S. N.; Boatswain D. 
Ward.U. S. N.; Sailmaker J. C. Herbert, U. S. 
X., and Sailmaker F. Watson, U. S. N. 

Construction and Repair Department. — 
Naval Constructor J. Feaster, U. S. N., and 
Carpenter S. C. Brearley, U. S. N. 

Steam E>igineering Department. — Chief En- 
gineer A. H. Able, U. S. N. 

Paymaster of the Yard. — Past Assistant Pay- 
master F. T. Arms, U. S. N. ; Pay Clerk E. M. 
Crary. 

Medical Department. — Surgeon W. H. 
Rush, U. S. N.; Apothecary D. W. Ross. 

Commandant' s Secretary. — W. J. Manning. 

U. S. Receiving-ship "Richmond." — Captain, 
C. M. Chester, U. S. N., Commanding; Lieu- 
tenant Commander C. A. Adams, U. S. N., 
Executive Officer; Ensign H. S. Ritter, U. S. 
N.; P. A. Surgeon. L. W. Atlee, U. S. N.; Pay- 
master, R. T. N. Ball, U. S. N.; Chief Engineer, 
A. C. Engard, U. S. N.; Chaplain, R. R. Hoes. 
U. S. N.; Mates, W. Boyd, L. M. Melcher and 
C. H. Thome, U. S. N.; Pay Clerk, G. A. White. 

Marine Barracks. — Captain C. F. Williams, 
U. S. M. Cm commanding. Captain B. R. Rus- 
sell, U. S. M. C; Captain P. St. C. Murphy, U. 
S. M. C; 1st Lieutenant F. J. Moses. U. S. M. C; 
1st Lieutenant T. C. Prince, U. S. M. C. 

Officers on Duty at Messrs. Cramp & Sons'. 

Construction Department. — Naval Con- 
structor J. H. Linnard, U. S. N., Superintend- 
ing Constructor; Naval Constructor J. F. Hans- 
com,U. S. N.; Asst. Constructors J. G.Tawresey, 
U. S. N., H. G. Smith, U. S. N. ; Carpenter 
W. A. Barry, U. S. N. 

Engineer Department . — Chief Engineer W. 
W. Dungan, U. S. N.,in charge; Chief Engineer 
J. D. Ford, U. S. N.; Past Asst. Engineers 
J. M. Pickrell and W. C. Herbert, U. S. N. 

Equipfnent Department — Lieutenant Lucien 
Flynne. U. S. N.; Boatswain W. L. Hill,U. S. N., 
and Sailmaker W. Cuddy, U. S. N. 

Ordnance Department. — Lieutenant J. G. 
Doyle, U. S. N. 

U. S. Navy Pay-Office. 

Post Office Building, Rooms 20 and 21. 
Pay Director. — Rufus Palks. 
Chief Clerk. — Abram Reynard. 



5° 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



U. S. Naval Home. 
Gray's Ferry road. 
Governor. — Captain John C. Watson, U. S. N. 
Executive Officer. — Commander Chas. M. 
Thomas, U. S. N. 

Paymaster. — Arthur Peterson, U. S. N. 
Chaplain.— Frank B. Rose, U. S. N. 
Clerk to Goz>ernor. — John B. Sartori. 

U. S. Naval Hospital. 
Gray's Ferry road. 
Medical Director. — G. A. Cooke. 
Assistants. — Past Assistant Surgeon Oliver 
Diehl, U. S. N., Assistant Surgeon Lewis Morris, 
U. S. N. 

Branch Hydrographic Office, U. S. N. 

Office, Philadelphia Bourse. 
Officer in Charge. — Vacant. 

Office of Lighthouse Inspector. 

Fourth District. 
Post Office Building, Fourth Floor. 
Inspector. — Commander C. J. Train, U. S. N. 
Chief Clerk. — J. Parsons Smith. 

U. S. Lighthouse Engineers. 
Post Office Building. Fourth Floor. 
Engineer. — Major W. H. Bixby. 
Assistant Engineer. — H. Bamber. 

Quartermaster's Department, Marine 

Corps. 

Office, noo S. Broad street. 

Asst. Quartermaster. — Capt. R. S. Collum. 

Chief Clerk. — Daniel Kirby. 

Marine Hospital Service. 
410 Chestnut street. 
P. A. Surgeons. — G. T. Vaughan, M. D., and 
C. P. Wertenbaker. 

ActingAssistant Surgeon. — H. J. Dean,M. D 

Quarantine and Immigration Service. 
Surgeon. — G. T. Vaughn, M. D. 

Army Staff Officers. 
Office, S. E. corner Fifteenth and Arch streets. 

Deputy Quartermaster-General. — Lieut. - 
Col. John V. Furey ; Major and Quartermaster, 
C. A. H. McCauley. 

Medical Department. — R. G. Ebert, Assist- 
ant Surgeon ; office, 1312 Filbert st. 

United States Engineer Office. 
Fifteenth and Arch streets. 
Officer in Charge. — Major C. W. Raymond, 
Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. 

Assistant Officer. — Second Lieutenant Spen- 
cer Cosby, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. 
Chief Clerk. — Stephen Lynch. 
Assistant Engineers. — Thos. M. Farrell, D. 
Guy Anderson. 

Examining Board of Naval Engineers. 

Post Office Building, Room 5, Fourth Floor. 

Chief Engineer John A. Scot, President ; Chief 
Engineer S. L. P. Ayres, Chief Engineer Wm. 
S. Smith. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 
Post Office Building, Fourth Floor 

Local Forecast Officer in Charge. — L. M. Dey. 

Observers. — C. J. Doherty and R. S. Cooper. 

Assistant. — Howard Freas. 



Frankford Arsenal, Bridesburg. 
Commandant. — Lieut. -Col. J. P. Farley. 
Assistants. — Major J. Pitman, Lieut. Beverly 
W. Dunn, Lieut. Colden L'H. Ruggles. 

Schuylkill Arsenal. 
Commandant . — Major Charles W. Williams, 
Quartermaster. Captain G. S. Bingham, As- 
sistant Quartermaster. 

Station for Enlistment of Infantry, Caval- 
ry, Artillery and all Branches 
of the Army. 
Juniper and Filbert streets. 
Capt. A. C. Markley. 
Surgeon. — R. G. Ebert. 

Seamen, Firemen and Boys' Rendezvous 
for Enlistment. 
Navy Yard, League Island. 
U. S. S. Richmond.— Capt. G. H. Wadleigh, 
commanding. 

Pension Office. 
Post Office Building, Rooms 14 to 19 and 31 to 35. 
Agent. — General St. Clair A. Mulholland. 
Chief Clerk.— H. V. Sickel. 
Special Examiners. — Edward B. McGetrick, 
Patrick Phalen, Mark J. Maloney, James J. 
Reilly, Ralph Jefferson. 

Pension Boards, Examining Surgeons. 

First Board— Robert B. Cruice, M. D. (Pre- 
sident), Samuel L. Rea, M. D. (Secretary), 
Justus Sinexon, M. D. Mondays, Wednesdays 
and Fridays. 10 a.m. 

Second Board. — John J. Healy ( President ) , S. 
Thompson Banes, M. D., Henry Morris, M. D. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. 

Third Board— Michael O'Hara. M. D. ( Pre- 
sident), Napoleon Hickman, M. D., Robert 
Kilduff, M. D. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri- 
days, 10 A.M. 

Fourth Board. — Joseph McFadden, M. D. 
(President), D. J. Loughlin, M. D., E. Stanley 
Perkins, M. D. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Satur- 
days, 10 A.M. 

U. S. Bank Examiner. 
Post Office Building, Room 30. 
Examiner. — William H. Hardt. 

U. S. Inspectors of Steam Vessels. 
Post Office Building, Fourth Floor. 
Local Inspector of Hulls. — H. A. Thompson. 
Local Inspector of Boilers. — Christopher Vert. 



FOREIGN CONSULS, VICE-CONSULS, 
ETC., AT. PHILADELPHIA. 

Argentine Republic, Wm. P. Wilson, consul, 
S. E. cor. Fourth and Willings alley. 

Austria-Hungary, Alfred J. Ostheimer, ccnsul, 
831 Arch; Arnold Katz, vice-consul, 128 Walnut. 

Belgium, C.W. Bergner, consul; Paul Wibaux, 
chancelier. 424 Walnut. 

Brazil, John Mason, Jr., consul, 319 Walnut. 

Chile, Edward Shippen, consul, 532 Walnut. 

Corea, vacant. 

Denmark, J. N. Wallem, vice-consul, 122 S. 
Second. 

Ecuador. E. Shippen, consul, 532 Walnut. 

France, Edward Pesoli, consul; Henr'. Orlandi, 
chance'.or, acting vice-consul, 524 Walnut. 

German Empire, C. H. Meyer, consul ; Fred- 
erick Delvigne, vice-consul, 227 Chestnut. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



51 



Great Britain, Robert Charles Clipperton, con- 
sul; Charles Clipperton, vice-consul, 708 Locust. 

Greece, S. Edwin Megargee, consul, 502 
Walnut. 

Hawaii, Dr. R. H. Davis, consul, 120 N. 
Seventh. 

Haiti, vacant. 

Honduras, Solomon Foster, Jr., consul, Potts- 
ville, Pa. 

Italy, Cav'r Guilio M. Lecca, consul, 259 S. 
Fourth. 

Liberia, Thomas J. Hunt, consul, 623 Walnut. 

Mexico, E. Sulikinski, vice-consul, 430 Spruce. 

Netherlands, Arnold Katz, vice-consul, 128 
Walnut. 

Nicaragua, Henry C. Potter, consul, 40 S. 
Delaware av. 

Norway, J. N. Wallem, vice-consul, 122 S. 
Second. 

Portugal, John Mason, Jr., consul, 319 Walnut. 

Russia, Wm. R. Tucker, vice-consul, Bourse 
Building. 

Spain, Jose Congosto, consul. 222 S. Third. 

St. Domingo, Thomas B. Wanamaker, consul, 
Thirteenth and Chestnut. 

Sweden, J. M. Wallem, vice-consul, 122 S. 
Second. 

Switzerland, Rudolph Koradi, consul, 314 York 
av.; Werner Itschner, vice-consul, 712 Market. 

Turkey, vacant. 

L T ruguay, Eduardo Fornias, consul, 1229 
Spruce. 

Venezuela, Don Louis Forsyth. 

Costa Rica, Gustavo Weiderlein. 

Constilar Association. — Edw. Shippen, Presi- 
dent, 532 Walnut; Arnold Katz, Secretary, 128 
Walnut. 

CAMDEN CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Mayor. — John Leighton Westcott. 
Recorder. — Benjamin M. Braker. 
City Counsel. — J. Willard Morgan. 
City Comptroller. — Samuel T. Hufty. 
City Treasurer. — Geo. G. Felton. 
Commissioner 0/ Streets. — John Blowe. 
Chief Engineer 0/ Water. — Wm. W. Mines. 
City Surveyor. — Levi E. Farnham. 
Receiver of Taxes. — Frank H. Burdsall. 
City Clerk. — Thad. P. Varney. 
Building Inspector. — William H. Cole. 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. — Geo. 
Kruck. 

Fire Department. 

Chief Engineer. — Samuel S. Elfreth. 

Assistant Chief Engineer, Samuel S. Buzine ; 
Foreman, No. 1 Engine, Jno. C. Stockton ; 
Foreman, No. 2 Engine, Henry C. Grosscup ; 
Foreman, No. 3 Engine, William Deno ; Fore- 
man, No. 4 Engine, A. S. Middleton ; Fore- 
man Chemical Engine, John Toy. 

Board of Health. 

Appointed by the Mayor for four years, sub- 
ject to the confirmation of City Council. 

Members. — George F. Hammond (term ex- 
pires June, 1897). Allen C. Wood (term ex- 
pires June, 1897). Charles Watson (term ex- 
pires June, 1898). Sylvan G. Bushey, M. D. 
(term expires June, 1899). Joel W. Fithian, M.D. 
(term expires June, 1900). M. F. Middleton, M. 



D. (term expires June, 1900). William S. Mos- 
lander, M. D. (term expires June, 1899). 

Standing Committees of Board of Health. — 
Sanitary, M. F. Middleton, M.D.,S. G. Bushey, 
M. D., Geo. F. Hammond ; Law and Ordi- 
nance, S. G. Bushey, M. D., J. \V. Fithian, 
M.D., Allen C. Wood; Finance, Allen C. Wood, 
J. W. Fithian, M. D., Wm. S. Moslander, M. 
D.; Conference, J. W. Fithian, M. D., Wm. S. 
Moslander. M. D., Geo. F. Hammond; Print- 
ing and Supplies, Geo. F. Hammond, Allen C. 
Wood, S. G. Bushey, M. D. 

Officers for ensuing year. — President, Chas. 
Watson; Secretary, Eugene B. Roberts; Solici- 
tor, J. Willard Morgan; Treasurer, M. F. 
Ivins. 

Inspectors. — Health Inspector, John F. Lea- 
vitt, M. D. ; Plumbing Inspector, Henry B. 
Francis ; Asst. Inspector, Eugene B. Roberts ; 
Nuisance Inspector, Joseph A. Starr; Meat 
Inspector, Wm. B. E. Miller, V. S. 

Plumbing Examining Board. — Geo. F. Ham- 
mond, J. W. Fithian, M. D., Allen C. Wood.M. 
F. Middleton, M. D.; H. B. Francis, Plumbing 
Inspector. 

Building Inspection Department. 

Building Commission. — H. C. Sharp (chair- 
man), Edwin S. Mills, Daniel L. Lamb, Richard 
R. Miller, Aaron S. Helms. 

Building Inspector, William H. Cole. 

Department of City Assessors. 

Members of the Board. — President, Chris. J. 
Mines, Jr., Jesse Pratt, Robert M. Hillman, 
Samuel A. Wentz, Daniel B. Murphy. 

Clerk. — James McCormick. 

Tax Department. 

Receiver of Taxes. — Frank H. Burdsall. 
Chief Clerk. — Frank S. Jones. 

Board of Excise Commissioners. 

Members. — President, Arthur Bedell, Louis 
Stehr, Aug. H. F. Schultz, S. Bryan Smith, Wm. 
H. Cooper. 

Clerk, ex-officio. — Thaddeus P. Varney. 

Solicitor, ex-officio. — J. Willard Morgan. 

Inspector. — Charles H. Price. 

Department of Streets and Sewers. 

Chas. B. Sayrs (chairman), William H. Tice, 
Edwin Mills, Harry C. Sharp, George B. Taylor. 
Commissioner of Streets. — John Blowe. 
Clerk. — Bowman H. Shivers. 
Inspector of Sewers. — John Kenney. 

Department of Surveys. 

City Engineer and Surveyor. — Levi E. Farn- 
ham. 

First Assistant Surveyor. — Wm. P. Osier. 
Second Assistant Surveyor. — Earl W. Bemis. 

Department of 'Water. 

Superintendent. — William W. Mines. 
Clerk, — Frank S. Fithian. 
Assistant Clerk. — Ulie G. Lee. 
Inspector. — Charles Hillaker. 



I 



52 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Department of Police. 
Chief of Police.— Samuel Dodd. 
Lieutenant, 1st District. — H. Frank Pettit. 
Lieutenant, 2d District. — John Foster. 
The department is composed of the above 
officers and fifty-nine police officers. 



CAMDEN COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Sheriff. — David Baird (term expires Nov., 
1899). 

Register of Deeds. — Jacob Sickler (term ex- 
pires Nov., 1900). 

County Clerk. — Robert L. Barber (term ex- 
pires Feb., 1901 ). 

Surrogate. — George S. West (term expires 
Nov., 1897). 

Officers and Members of Camden City 
Council. 
From May, 1896, to May, 1897. 
President. — Charles H. Ellis, Jr. 
Clerk. — Thaddeus P. Varney. 
Assistant Clerk. — Wm. T. G. Young, Jr. 
Messenger. — John Risley McCabe. 

Wards. 

1 \Vm. H. Tice. 



Jesse C. Bond. 

2 Harry Humphreys, 
Lou's Mnhrman. 

3 John S. Roberts, 
"Harry C. Sharp. 

4 Chas. C. Southard, 
William Z. Gibson. 

5 Bjn Lawton, 
Daniel L. Lamb. 



Wards. 

6 Charles H. Ellis, Jr., 
Alfred B. Figner. 

7 Charles P. Sayrs. 
Frederick W. George. 

8 Edwin S. Mills, 
James 0. Smith. 

9 Aaron S. Helms, 
George B. Taylor. 

At large, 
R. R. Miller. 



THE VOTE OF PENNSYLVANIA 

According to the official returns of the late 
election filed with the State Department at Har- 
risburg, McKinley and Hobart I Rep.), polled 
726.998 votes; Bryan and Sewall ( Dem.) 422,- 
054- Levering and Johnson (Pro.), 19,274; Bryan 
and Watson (Peo.), 6103; Bryan and Sewall 
(Free Silver), 5073; Palmer and Buckner (Jef- 
fersonian), 11,000; McKinley and Hobart (Mc- 
Kinley-Citizens"), 1302; Matchett and Maguire 
(Sooalist-Labor), 1683 ; Bentley and Southgate 
(National), 870. 

The Electoral Tickets of the Democratic, Peo- 
ple's and Free Silver parties contained the names 
of the same candidates, although the space above 
the names of the Electors in the Democratic and 
Free Silver columns contained the words "Bryan 
and Sewall." while the space above the People's 
Electors contained the words " Bryan and Wat- 
son." In the counties of Berks, Bradford. Bucks, 
Crawford, Forest, Lancaster. Mercer. Montgom- 
ery, Northampton, Philadelphia and Warren.no 
returns were made out for the Electors of the 
People's and Free Silver parties, such votes as 
were cast for these being added by the election 
officers or by the Court to the Democratic candi- 
dates. Allegheny, Clinton and Greene returned 
no vote for the Free Silver Electors. No votes 
were returned for the Jeffersonian Electors in 
Forest and Lebanon counties, and. presump- 
tively, none were cast, as these Electors were 
running on a separate ticket. The McKinley 
Citizens' ticket, which was put on the ballot in 
order to enable the Crow Republicans in Phila- 
delphia to vote a full ticket by making one cross- 



mark, appeared on the ballot in every precinct 
throughout the State, and votes are returned for 
that ticket by every county excepting eleven, in- 
cluding Philadelphia,- where the votes cast for 
McKinley and Hobart on that ticket were added 
to those polled for the regular Republican ticket. 
Luzerne county returned 119 votes for the Mc- 
Kinley-Citizens. which is the largest return made 
for that ticket by any one county. 

Adding to the Republican Electors the votes 
returned for the McKinley-Citizens' ticket, makes 
the total vote for McKinley and Hobart 728,300. 
Adding to the Democratic Electors the votes re- 
turned for the People's and Free Silver tickets, 
makes their vote 433,230, which is Bryan's vote 
for Pennsylvania. Included in this, however, 
are 6103 votes for Bryan and Watson, which, 
substracted from Bryan's vote, gives 427,127, 
which is Sewall'svote. The total vote cast was 
1,194,357, and McKinley and Hobart's majority 
over all is 262.243. McKinley and Hobart's plu- 
rality over Bryan and Sewall is 301,173. Mc- 
Kinley's plurality over Bryan, however, is 295,- 
070, as Bryan got 6103 votes on the Bryan and 
Watson ticket ; and Hobart's plurality over 
Sewall is 301,173. Therefore, while McKinley 
and Hobart as a combination carried Pennsyl- 
vania by more than 300,000 plurality, McKinley, 
himself, fell short of that plurality. 

If the precinct election officers throughout the 
State had been careful to separate their returns 
as to tickets, and the Courts had not lumped the 
votes cast for candidates on more than one 
ticket, it would have been possible to tell just 
how many votes the Electors on the various tick- 
ets received. But as some of the division returns 
made this discrimination and some did not, and 
as some of the counties made this discrimination 
and others did not, it is impossible to say just 
how many persons voted for the Electoral tickets 
of the Democratic, People's and Free Silver 
parties, or how many Republicans in Philadel- 
phia voted for the Electors on the McKinley- 
Citizens' ticket. In other words, we know the 
aggregate votes for the candidates, but we can- 
not accurately estimate the value of the factors 
composing the sum. So far as the People's party 
is concerned, however, we are afforded a clue. 
The Democratic nominees for Congressmen-at- 
Large were DeWitt C. DeWitt and Jerome T. 
Ailman. The People's party nominees were Ail- 
man and John P. Correll. The returns filed at 
the State Department are as follows : DeWitt 
( Dem.), 412,051 ; Ailman (Dem.), 414,659 ; De- 
Witt (Free Silver), 1749; Ailman 'Free Silver), 
1742; Ailman (People's), 181 7; Correll (People's), 
7482. De Witt's total is 413,800; Ailman's is 
418,218 ; Correll's is 7482 ; and Ailman, who was 
on both tickets, has 4418 votes more than De- 
Witt, his running mate on the Democratic ticket. 
The greatest show of strength made by the 
Populists was less than 7500. 

In 1892, in Pennsylvania. Harrison (Rep.), for 
President, had 516,011 ; Cleveland (Dem.), 452,- 
264; Bidwell (Pro.), 25.123 ; Weaver ( People's). 
8714, and Wing (Soc. -Labor), 898. The total 
vote was 1,003,010 ; Harrison's majority, 29,012 ; 
Harrison's plurality over Cleveland, 63,747. 



The American flag ordered by the War De- 
partment has six rows of stars — eight stars in the 
first, fourth and sixth rows, and seven in each of 
! the other three rows. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



53 



RATES OF POSTAGE. 



Letters within U. S. 



Letters to any part. 
City drop letters . 



Per oz. 



2 cts. 
2 cts. 



Postal cards to any part i ct. each. 



Registered letters, proper postage and 

Immediate-delivery letters, besides 

regular postage, special stamp 



8 cts. 



io cts. 



Postage on Second-class Matter — which 
embraces newspapers, magazines, and periodicals 
published not less than four times a year — one 
cent, prepaid, per pound or fraction thereof, when 
mailed by publisher or news-agent to regular 
subscribers. Second-class matter mailed by other 
persons than publishers or news-agents becomes 
special matter, specially entitled to pass through 
the mails at one cent for each four ounces or 
fraction thereof. 

Postage on Third-class Matter — Books, 
pamphlets, circulars, and other matter wholly in 
print, such as hand-bills, posters, maps, plans or 
charts, music, photographs, lithographs, corrected 
proof-sheets and manuscripts accompanying the 
same, tags and labels, seed-cuttings, bulbs, roots, 
etc. — one cent, prepaid by stamp, for every two 
ounces or fraction thereof. 

Packages of transient printed matter are limited 
to four pounds each, unless in the case where a 
single volume of a book shall exceed that weight. 
The sender may write his name and address on 
the wrapper, preceded by the word " from," and 
may mark a passage of the text, or write on a 
fly-leaf a simple inscription or dedication. Pack- 
ages must be wrapped with open sides or ends. 

Postage on Fourth-class Matter — Mer- 
chandise, blank cards and bills, patterns, enve- 
lopes with or without printing, blanks of any 
kind, original paintings in oil or water-colors, 
blotters with or without printing, letter-heads, 
models, ores, metals, and all mailable matter not 
embraced in the foregoing classes — one cent, pre- 
paid by stamp, for each ounce or fraction thereof. 
Liquids (except poisons, explosive, inflammable 
or offensive articles), in packages properly se- 
cured, may be transported. The limit of weight 
is four pounds. 

FEES CHARGED FOR DOMESTIC 
MONEY ORDERS. 

For orders for sums not exceeding $2.50, 3 
cents ; over $2.50 and not exceeding $5, 5 cents ; 
over $5 and not exceeding $10, 8 cents ; over #10 
and not exceeding $20, 10 cents ; over $20 and 
not exceeding $30, 12 cents ; over 530 and not 
exceeding $40, 15 cents ; over #40 and not ex- 
ceeding $50, 18 cents ; over $50 and not exceed- 
ing $60, 20 cents ; over $60 and not exceeding 
$75> 2 5 cents ; over $75 and not exceeding $100, 
30 cents. 

Money Orders to Foreign Countries. — Great 
Britain and Ireland, France, German Empire, 
Canada, Belgium, Italy, Switzerland, Portugal, 
Algeria, Jamaica, Windward Islands, Sandwich 
Islands, Victoria, Tasmania, Queensland, Cape 
Colony, Japan, Hong Kong, New Zealand, New 
South Wales, Leeward Islands, Bahama Islands, 
and Sweden, not over $10, 10 cents ; not over 
$20, 20 cents ; not over $30, 30 cents ; not over 
#40, 40 cents ; not over #50, 50 cents ; not over $60, 



60 cents ; not over $70, 70 cents ; not over $So, 
80 cents ; not over $90, 90 cents ; not over $100, 
$1 ; Canada, not over $100, $1 ; Germany, not 
over $97, $1. 

FOREIGN POSTAGE. 

From the United States to all following coun- 
tries and places, which are in the Universal Postal 
Union, the postage on letters is five (5) cents 
for each half ounce or fraction thereof ( prepay- 
ment optional), two cents for each postal card, 
reply postal card four cents, and one cent for 
each two ounces newspapers : Argentine Re- 
public, Australia. Austria and Hungary, Belgium, 
Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cape Colon)', Ceylon, 
China via Hong-Kong, Chile, Cuba, Denmark 
and Danish colonies, Ecuador. Egypt, Falkland 
Islands, France and French colonies, Germany, 
Great Britain and British West Indies, Greece, 
Greenland, Guatemala, Haiti, Holland or Nether- 
lands and Netherlands colonies, Honduras, Hong 
Kong, India (British), Ireland, Italy, Japan, Li- 
beria, Luxembourg, Malacca, Mauritius, Monte- 
negro, Natal, Newfoundland, Norway, Paraguay. 
Patagonia, Penang, Persia, Peru, Portugal and 
Portuguese colonies, Roumania, Russia, St. Bar- 
tholomew, Salvador, Servia, Siam, Singapore, 
Spain and Spanish colonies. Straits Settlements, 
Sweden. Switzerland, Transvaal, Trinidad, Tur- 
key, United States of Colombia, Uruguay, Vene- 
zuela. 

Canada. — Same as in United States. 

Mexico. — Same as U. S. Merchandise must 
be sent by parcel post. 

Bahamas, Barbadoes, British Guiana, 
Honduras (British), Jamaica, U. S. of Colom- 
bia, Hawaiian Is., Newfoundland, Leeward 
Is., Salvador, Costa Rica, the Danish West 
Indies, Windward Is., and Mexico. — Mer- 
chandise may be sent by parcel post, 12 cents a 
pound or fraction thereof. Limit of weight,, 11 
pounds. 

Letters, postal cards, printed matter of all 
kinds, commercial documents and samples of 
merchandise, are transmissible in Postal Union 
mails. The following are considered as printed 
matter, viz.: Newspapers and periodical works, 
books stitched or bound, pamphlets, sheets of 
music, visiting cards, address cards, proofs of 
printing, with or without the manuscript relating 
thereto, engravings, photographs, drawings, 
plans, geographical maps, catalogues, prospect- 
uses, announcements and notices of various kinds, 
whether printed, engraved, lithographed or auto- 
graphed. 

Address cards and all printed matter present- 
ing the form and consistency of an unfolded 
card may be forwarded without band, envelope, 
fastening or fold. The maximum weight of 
printed matter is fixed at 2 kilograms (4lbs.6oz.). 
Postage on printed matter, one cent for each 2 oz. 



The germ theory of disease as a result of 
scientific microscopy is now pretty well estab- 
lished. The important fact is that the seeds of 
various diseases after being cultivated through 
one or more generations give rise to germs that 
no longer produce the disease, but render the 
body incapable of having it. The serum treat- 
ment of diphtheria is one of the results of the 
germ theory, but is not so well studied as to 
make it in any case a sure cure. 



54 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



IMPROVEMENT OF PHILADELPHIA 

HARBOR AND THE CHANNEL OF 

THE DELAWARE RIVER. 

The improvement of Philadelphia harbor was 
one of the most extensive public works ever 
undertaken by the National Government. It in- 
volved an estimated expenditure of $3, 500.000, 
and the excavation of about 21,500,000 cubic 
yards of material. The work was practically 
completed at the close of the working season ot 
1896, and by the end of the season of 1897 it is 
expected that the present project will be finished, 
giving a channel at least one thousand feet 
wide and twenty-six feet deep at low tide, along 
the entire Philadelphia front, between Fisher's 
Point at the upper end of the harbor and Kaighn's 
Point at the lower end. Over the remainder of 
the width of the river there will be a depth of at 
least twelve feet at low water. The improvement 
consisted in the removal of Smith's and Windmill 
Islands, lying between Philadelphia and Camden, 
and a part of Petty Island, with the shoals adja- 
cent to all three. 

Work was commenced in the spring of 1891, 
but the firm to whom the contract was awarded 
failed to make the progress demanded by the 
contract, and in December, 1892, it was annulled. 
A delay of several months resulted, but in June, 
1893, a new contract was made with the Ameri- 
can Dredging Company. Up to the close of the 
season of 1896 a total of more than 18,000,000 
cubic yards of material had been removed. Of 
that amount about 3,500,000 cubic yards were 
deposited on League Island, raising one hundred 
and forty-seven acres of Government land above 
high tide and making it available for the purposes 
of the Navy Yard. More than 2,500,000 cubic 
yards have been placed on the low land of Petty 
Island, and most of the remainder was deposited 
in shoal places in the river, selected as dumping 
grounds, where it will not damage the channel. 

The channel improvements contemplated the 
advance of the piers and bulkheads on both sides 
of the river, at the expense of the city and of in- 
dividual property owners, and this virtual recon- 
struction of the Philadelphia water front has 
been in progress since 1894, providing piers such 
as are required by the largest types of modern 
steamships. The advance of the bulkhead will 
permit the widening of Delaware avenue, the 
street running along the river front, to a width of 
one hundred and fifty feet, which is about three 
times its present width. On December 1, 1896, 
fifteen new piers had been built or were under 
construction — fine structures of sufficient length 
for the longest steamers, with ample docks and 
facilities for the handling of freight. 

In the work of improvement, the share of the 
city of Philadelphia is that of widening Delaware 
avenue, constructing the new bulkhead and ex- 
tending certain piers owned by the city. This 
work, in the territory bounded by Vine and South 
streets, has been authorized; plans are being pre- 
pared, and it is expected that operations will 
commence in the spring of 1897. A loan of 
$1,500,000 has been authorized for the work, but 
the cost of the construction of the new bulkhead 
between Vine and South streets will be defrayed 
by the accumulations of a fund of $500,000 
created by the will of Stephen Girard for the im- 
provement of the water front of the city The 
sum of $650,000 is now available from that fund. 



Improvements in the channel of the Schuylkill 
river have been in progress, under the super- 
vision of the National Government, for several 
years. There was, at' the close of the season of 
1896, a low-tide depth of twenty feet in the 
middle of the channel across the bar at the mouth 
of the river. In the river proper, the low water 
depths range from thirty feet in the lower reaches, 
to fourteen feet near Chestnut street bridge. 
During 1895 and 1896, the city of Philadelphia 
expended a total of $130,000 on the improvement 
of the channel of the Schuylkill river. The 
efforts of the United States Engineers are now 
concentrated on plans for securing and maintain- 
ing a channel twenty-four feet deep over the bar 
at the mouth of the river. 

In some respects the improvement of the chan- 
nel of the Delaware river is of more importance 
than the improvement of Philadelphia harbor, 
fi >r without a channel from the sea sufficiently 
deep the largest vessels could not reach the city. 
Up to 1885 no systematic improvement had been 
undertaken, but the improvements now in pro- 
gress are in accordance with recommendations 
made by a Board of United States Engineers in 
1885. The work has not progressed as rapidly as 
desirable on account of meagre appropriations, but 
since 1885 a total of $974,000 has been expended 
on the present project. The city has appro- 
priated during the last two years an aggregate 
of $685,000 for the improvement of the Delaware 
river, $185,000 of which was available during 1896, 
and is being expended in the deepening of the 
channel at Schooner Ledge, below Chester. The 
Legislature of Pennsylvania has not yet seen the 
advantage of aiding the Federal Government in 
the work of improving the Delaware river, though 
it is the highway to the sea from what is practi- 
cally the only seaport of the State. 

The channel of the Delaware river has been 
greatly improved during the last few years, and 
it is expected in two years more that the shoals 
will be so far removed that vessels of the largest 
tonnage will be able to navigate the river practi- 
cally without difficulty. This project provides 
for a channel, where shoal places exist, six hun- 
dred feet wide and twenty-six feet deep at low 
water. Shoals existed before the improvements 
began at six places, aggregating a distance of 
twenty miles of the sixty-one miles between 
Philadelphia and deep water in Delaware bay, 
where there was less than twenty-six feet of water 
at low tide. Improvements have been executed 
in the order considered of the most immediate 
benefit to navigation, and have included every 
shoal place but the two nearest the bay, Dan 
Baker Shoal and Duck Creek Flats, which have 
depths respectively of 21.8 feet and 23.5 feet at 
low tide. Dredging was in progress at Cherry 
Island Flats, near Wilmington, up to the ap- 
proach of severe winter weather, the channel at 
that locality having shoaled with very soft mud 
to a minimum depth of about eighteen and one- 
half feet before the work began. Excepting at 
that point, where the soft mud does not greatly 
interfere with navigation, the least depths in the 
channel, at low water, are at Dan Baker Shoal 
and Duck Creek Flats. The deepest draft ves- 
sels have no difficulty in crossing these, or the 
other shoal places, at high water ; but that 
frequently involves delay, and what is de- 
sired is that vessels may cross at any stage of 
the tide. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



55 



THE SHRIEVALTY CAMPAIGN. 

The result of the election for Sheriff of Phila- 
delphia in i8c,6 was a great surprise to the poli- 
ticians, and the events leading up to it deserve 
to be chronicled. Long before the delegate 
elections of the Republican party were held 
Alexander Crow, Jr., of the Fifteenth ward, 
announced himself as a candidate for the 
nomination. Mr. Crow is a large manufac- 
turer. For years he had taken ah active 
part in politics, but was never a candidate 
for office. He became, however, a leader of 
his ward, but was too independent (not being 
dependent upon politics) to suit the "bosses." 
He was, moreover, opposed in his own ward to 
Mayor Warwick, and as a natural consequence 
was supported by the enemies of the city ad- 
ministration — the faction led in the interest of 
Quay by Messrs. Penrose and Durham. Mr. 
Crow was thus identified with that faction, al- 
though not its tool or agent. David Martin, the 
head of the other faction known as the " Com- 
bine," announced no candidate against Crow 
until after the delegates had been chosen and 
had assembled in convention ; but his supporters 
all .turned in for the nomination of James L. 
Miles, President of Select Council. Mr. Miles 
was, as a matter of course, duly nominated. 
He is said to have been forced upon Martin, but 
could scarcely have been objectionable to the 
latter, as he had been to Martin a very service- 
able and faithful henchman. For that reason a 
strong protest was made against Miles as a can- 
didate. It became so strong that Mr. Crow was 
nominated in a great town-meeting held at the 
Academy of Music after 40,000 voters had 
signed an appeal to him to become a candidate. 
No such popular uprising had ever before been 
seen. The Democrats nominated Magistrate 
Eisenbrown, but the latter declined in favor of 
Crow, who was subsequently made the Demo- 
cratic nominee. Foreseeing defeat for Miles, 
the party managers persuaded a number of 
prominent Republicans to send a note to Messrs. 
Miles and Crow requesting both to withdraw in 
the interest of party harmony. Mr. Miles de- 
clined the nomination, but Mr. Crow remained 
a candidate. The committee of citizens who 
had requested them to withdraw named half-a- 
dozen prominent men as suitable candidates. 
All of them refused to stand, and the recalled 
Republican convention nominated Samuel H. 
Ashbridge, Coroner, a man popular in his party 
and of good reputation. Thus the choice was 
narrowed down to Ashbridge or Crow, both 
stalwart Republican politicians, the former being 
the regular candidate of the Republican party 
controlled by the " Combine," the latter the can- 
didate of a great public gathering, indorsed by 
the Democrats and supported by the Republi- 
can faction opposed to the " Combine " as 
represented by Martin. The election resulted 
in tiie selection of Mr. Crow by more than 18,000 
majority against a party majority of 112,000. 

It is proposed to drain the Pontine marshes of 
Italy. This will open about 250,000 acres of rich 
land to cultivation. The marshes have hitherto 
been a hiding place for thieves and full of poison- 
ous malaria. 

In the Society of the War of 1812 there are thirty- 
three veterans whose average age is ninety-nine 
years. Fourteen of them are over one hundred. 



THE VENEZUELA QUESTION. 

The long pending dispute respecting the Vene- 
zuela boundary was brought to a focus by the 
appointment of an American Commission to re- 
port upon the subject. The Government of the 
United States having been informed that the dis- 
pute had reached an acute stage, President Cleve- 
land announced in his message to Congress that a 
definite statement of the interest and policy c f the 
United States as regards the controversy seemeJ 
to be required both on its own account and in 
view of its relations with the friendly Powers di- 
rectly concerned. The Government had accord- 
ingly sent to London a communication to the 
British Government reaffirming the Monroe Doc- 
trine, and asking that the dispute respecting the 
boundary line between British Guiana and Vene- 
zuela be submitted to arbitration. The princip'e 
on which this request was made was, that if 
Great Britain should merely take possession by 
force or otherwise of territory belonging to her, 
she would not be violating the Monroe Doctrine, 
which is opposed to the extension of European 
power on the American continent ; but that if 
she was extending her dominion, then the United 
States would be bound to protest against such 
enlargement of Great Britain's American posses- 
sions. Great Britain was asked to submit the 
whole question to arbitration to settle this pri- 
mary question. Lord Salisbury in his reply de- 
nied that the United States had any practieal 
concern in the boundary dispute, and absolutely 
refused to submit the case to arbitration. Presi- 
dent Cleveland, in a special message to Congress, 
answered Lord Salisbury, and recommended Con- 
gress to provide for the appointment of a Com- 
mission to examine the whole question. The 
message concluded with this significant passage : 

" In making these recommendations 1 am hilly 
alive to the full responsibility incurred and keenly 
realize all the consequences that may follow. 1 
am nevertheless firm in my conviction that while 
it is a grievous thing to contemplate the two Eng- 
lish speaking peoples of the world as being other- 
wise than friendly competitors in the onward 
march to civilization, and strenuous and worthy 
rivals in all the arts of peace, there is no calamity 
which a great nation can invite which equals that 
which follows a supine submission to wrong and 
injustice, and the consequent loss of national self 
respect and honor, beneath which is shielded and 
defended a people's safety and greatness." 

Congress promptly authorized the appoint- 
ment of a Commission, and made an appropria- 
tion for its expenses. The President appointed 
Judge David J. Brewer, of the United States 
Supreme Court ; Judge Richard H. Alvey, of 
the Appellate Court of the District of Columbia ; 
the Hon. Andrew D. White, of the State of New 
York; President Daniel C. Gilman.of the Johns 
Hopkins University, Baltimore, and Mr. Fred- 
erick R. Condert, of the New York Bar. Lord 
Salisbury was finally brought to a realization of 
the importance of this movement, and the British 
as well as the Venezuelan case was formally 
presented to the Commission. Before the Com- 
mission had completed its labors Lord Salisbury 
had agreed to the terms of arbitration proposed 
by Secretary Olney, and in view of this virtual 
settlement of the dispute, the Commission deter- 
mined to withhold its report Virtually the same 
case will be presented to the arbitrators as was 
considered by the Commission. 



56 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



FIRST SESSION FIFTY-FOURTH 
CONGRESS. 

Congress met December 2, 1895. Hon. Thomas 
B. Reed, Representative of Maine, was elected 
Speaker of the House. With the exception of 
the prompt passage of the bill creating the Vene- 
zuelan Commission, referred to elsewhere. Con- 
gress did nothing of importance. The House 
passed several bills for the relief of the Treasury-, 
but they were killed by the Silver Senators, who 
refused to permit any financial or taritf legisla- 
tion without a proviso for the free coinage of 
silver at 16 to 1. Among the bills that passed 
the House, but not the Senate, was one authoriz- 
ing a popular loan to be issued in small amounts; 
one for the retirement of United States Treasury 
notes; the Dingley tariff bill, to secure an in- 
crease of revenue by a horizontal increase of 
duties; a bill authorizing the Secretary of the 
Treasury to issue a limited amount of certificates 
of indebtedness to meet deficiencies in the rev- 
enues; a bill to improve the administration 
methods of the custom laws ; a bankruptcy bill ; 
a bill restricting immigration ; and a Labor Com- 
mission bill — all of which failed to pass the Sen- 
ate. The appropriation bills, the filled cheeso 
bill, a bill prohibiting prize fighting in the Ter- 
ritories, another regulating divorces in the Ter- 
ritories, and one making it a crime to throw or 
fire missiles into a train, represent the chief pub- 
lic measures passed by Congress and approved 
by the President. 

The House deserves special credit for having 
rejected Senate bills providing for the free coinage 
of silver and the dangerous anti-bond bill. 

A bill was passed and approved by the Presi- 
dent authorizing and encouraging the holding of 
a Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition 
at Omaha, Nebraska, in 1898. 

The appropriations made during the session 
amounted to $515,759,820. 



THE REBELLION IN CUBA. 

The Cuban rebellion continued throughout 
the year without any decisive results except 
enormous losses to the people of Cuba and to 
the Spanish Government. The latter continued 
to pour troops into the disturbed island, not- 
withstanding the difficulties she met with in 
negotiating loans ; but the military forces accom- 
plished little in the way of subduing the rebels, 
who maintained a guerrilla-like warfare, avoid- 
ing general engagements. The Spanish soldiers 
suffered greatly from disease, small-pox and 
yellow fever both becoming epidemic, but the 
extent of their losses could not be ascertained. 
It is estimated that at least 200,000 men have 
been under arms in Cuba during the year, the 
rebels having about 60,000 and the Spaniards 
twice the number ; yet the casualties in battle 
have been few in spite of the exaggerated stories 
sent out on the one hand by the rebel sympa- 
thizers and on the other hand by the Govern- 
ment officials or under their censorship. Reli- 
able intelligence is scarcely obtainable, but a few 
facts have been clearly established. The rebels 
are in possession of a large part of the island, 
but have no government in form to be recog- 
nized. The Spanish troops have all they can do 
to maintain possession of the garrison towns. 

The last rebellion in Spain lasted for ten years, 
from 1868 to 1878, and during that time Spain 



had on the island 166,228 troops of all arms, but 
they were not all in the field at one time. The 
largest force in any one year was about 80,000. 
There were about 17,000 Spanish soldiers in 
Cuba at the opening of the present rebellion, 
February 24, 1895. More than 78,000 soldiers 
were sent there during 1895, and 10,000 soldiers 
were organized in Cuba, making altogether 106,- 
479, exclusive of losses, at the end of the year. 
Forty thousand more weie sent out early in 
1896, and in September another contingent of 
40,000 began to arrive, so that the effective force 
employed (exclusive of losses) was 186,000 men. 
The deaths during the ten years of war from 
1868 to 1878 averaged about 15 per cent, per an- 
num, of which one-half were from disease. It is 
said that the death rate has been much less during 
the present rebellion, which is not improbable, 
but it is likely to be considerable during the 
epidemic of small-pox and yellow fever. The 
losses due to the rebellion have been enormous. 
The rebels have burned plantations, and General 
WeyLer has prohibited exportation* the pro- 
ceeds of which are likely to be of service to the 
rebels. The result is almost a suspension of 
trade in a prolific island, which in years of 
peace produces one hundred million dollars 
worth of sugar and tobacco alone. 

The rebels hope to involve the United States 
in the conflict, but the Government has been 
scrupulous in efforts to avoid a conflict with 
Spain. Frequent arrests have been made of fili- 
bu ters, but the rebels seem to have little diffi- 
cui.y in landing troops and munitions of war in 
CuLa if they succeed in getting them out of 
Unit d States ports. General Weyler has caused 
the execution of many men charged with being 
spies or with aiding and abetting the rebels. 
The Lnited States has interfered to save the 
lives of some Americans and secure for them a 
civil trial, and, notwithstanding the strong feel- 
ing against the United States exhibited by 
Spanish mobs, the Government has promptly 
acceded to the reasonable demands of the 
United States. The outlook is for a continu- 
ance of the war on the same lines as heretofore, 
for Genera. Weyler has failed to make any 
progress in the suppression of the rebellion, and 
the rebels themselves are committed to a con- 
tinuance of the struggle, as they can hope for 
no clemency. Spain is so crippled, financially, 
by the strugg; * that if it should continue much 
longer she would probably be obliged to grant 
Cuba indepen lence or sell the island. The 
Cuban grievar ces are that swarms of office- 
holders are sent to the island from Spain to rule 
and rob them. Seventy-five per cent, of the 
offices in Cuba, including all the important ones, 
are held by Spaiiards, who take turns in fleec- 
ing a country in which they have no permanent 
interest. They carry enormous sums of money 
away from Cuba, and keep the island poor not- 
withstanding its natural richness. The island is 
also overrun by cheap Spanish labor, young 
men who seek by service in the militia of Cuba 
to escape conscription at home. The island is 
very heavily taxed and made the prey of mono- 
polies. A census ot the island of Cuba shows 
that two-thirds of the inhabitants are classed as 
white, but it is added that a man must be very 
black to be admittedly colored. The whites, 
according to this census, are in the majority in 
each of the six provinces. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



57 



ARCTIC EXPEDITIONS OF 1896. 



The year 1896 was a notable one in the history 
of Arctic research. At the close of 1895 there 
were two great expeditions in the northern ice 
fields — one was that headed by Dr. Frithjof 
Nansen, which left Christiania, Norway, with 
the specially constructed steam vessel Fram, June 
24, 1893, and the other commanded by F. G. 
Jackson, which left England a year later. Dr. 
Nansen's intention was to discover, if possible, 
the North Pole, by throwing his vessel in the 
pack ice above the Kara Sea, on the theory that 
this ice would drift him across the North Pole to 
the east coast of Greenland. Mr. Jackson, 
whose expedition received its financial support 
from A. C. Harnesworth, a young Englishman, 
had the same object in view as Dr. Nansen, but 
he hoped to achieve it by way of Franz Josef 
Land, making his journey by easy stages, estab- 
lishing at different points supply stations. In 
the summer of 1896 S. A. Andree, a Dane, 
started for Spitzbergen with the idea of discover- 
ing the North Pole by the aid of a specially con- 
structed balloon. This air-ship had a contrivance 
for directing its course, composed of a rudder 
sail secured to the apex of the balloon and to the 
car by a rope, so that it could move freely, and 
a guide rope, which could be adjusted to differ- 
ent positions for 180 degrees of the circumference 
of the ring which was secured to the car. In 
July, 1896, Lieutenant Robert E. Peary sailed 
north to Cape York on the steamer Kite, with a 
small party, to get a great meteorite which he 
had discovered in his last expedition, and for 
scientific research. He had been gone but a 
few weeks when the steamer Windward, of the 
Jackson-Harnesworth expedition, returned to 
civilization with Dr. Nansen on board, and a 
few weeks later the Fram, Dr. Nansen's vessel, 
with all its occupants well, returned safely. Dr. 
Nansen's voyage proved to have been one of the 
most remarkable in the annals of Arctic voyages. 
As he intended, he threw the Fram into the pack 
ice moving northward, and drifted toward the 
Pole, constantly making discoveries valuable to 
science. On January 5 the vessel reached 82 
degrees 24 minutes north — the farthest north 
latitude then reached by man. A few days 
later, finding that no further progress north was 
made, Dr. Nansen and Lieutenant Johansen left 
the ship and with sledges and dogs started north- 
ward over the unknown polar basin. On April 
7 they reached the unparalleled record of 86 de- 
grees 14 minutes north. The dogs were now in 
bad condition and the provisions running low, 
whereupon Dr. Nansen and companions started 
southward toward Franz Josef Land. Looking 
northward in all directions from the farthest point 
north there was no land visible anywhere. From 
horizon to horizon there was nothing but a vast 
frozen sea. On August 6, at 81 degrees 38 min- 
utes north, they reached the first land — a group 
of islands. On the 26th they reached what after- 
ward proved to be Franz Josef Land. Here they 
wintered, and, as it subsequently transpired, not 
far from one of Jackson's stations. Early in the 
spring Dr. Nansen and Mr. Jackson met in an 
unexpected and dramatic manner. Dr. Nansen 
excelled the performance of all previous explorers 
by nearly two hundred miles, and about that 
distance more would have brought him to the 
North Pole. 



Mr. Jackson still remains in Franz Josef Land. 
His report, forwarded to England by the Wind- 
ward, shows that he has made many discoveries 
of scientific importance, among them the correct 
delineation of the coast line of the region he is in. 
He expected to push toward the Pole later in the 
season. 

Mr. Andree's scheme failed for the year of 1896 
on account of unfavorable winds and the rapid 
approach of winter. 

Lieutenant Peary failed to bring back the me- 
teorite he had discovered at Cape York, but by 
his voyage he added somewhat to the scientific 
knowledge of the region. He reported that an 
epidemic had destroyed about one-third the en- 
tire population of the native Eskimos of North 
Greenland. 

Early in the year, Eivind Astrup, the young 
Norwegian who became famous through accom- 
panying Lieutenant Peaiy in his first journey 
over the ice cap of North Greenland to Inde- 
pendence Bay, was found dead in the mountains 
of Norway. He had gone on a trip during 
Christmas week, 1895, and failed to return. His 
frozen body was found a week or ten days later. 



CHANGES IN THE JUDICIARY. 

An unusally large number of changes were 
made in the local judiciary during the year. Va- 
cancies were caused by the death of Joseph Alli- 
son, President Judge of Court of Common Pleas 
No. 1 ; by the death of Henry Reed, Associate 
Judge of Court of Common Pleas No. 3, by 
the resignation of M. Russell Thayer. President 
Judge of Court of Common Pleas No. 4, who, 
upon his retirement, was appointed Prothonotary , 
to succeed the late William B. Mann, and by the 
resignation of Judge Hare of Common Pleas 
No. 2. Abraham M. Beitler, Director of Public 
Safety, was appointed to succeed Judge Allison, 
and was elected to succeed himself in November. 
Charles B. McMichael was appointed to suc- 
ceed Judge Reed, and was also elected in No- 
vember. Judge Gordon, of Common Pleas No. 
4, was re-elected — the three Judges, Beitler, 
Gordon and McMichael, receiving the support 
of all parties and re-elected by unanimous vote. 
The two vacancies had not been filled on De- 
cember, 1st. 



The people of Brazil have decided to build a 
new Capitol. The site chosen is on a plateau of 
the Perineos Mountains, 3500 feet above the sea 
level, free from fever, and having a climate like 
that of the south of France in the summer season. 



The " Sheridan Road," built by a few citizens 
of Chicago, is now a complete success, and 
doubtless the finest boulevard in the world. It 
provides 250 miles of smooth carriage road, ex- 
tending through the most interesting country 
around Chicago. 

The addition of some of the various motors to 
road carriages is attracting a good deal of atten- 
tion, and has been in a marked degree successful. 
Several such carriages are in use, and the Patent 
Office is overloaded with inventions for the pur- 
pose of supplying mankind with easier means of 
" running to and fro." 



58 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



LOCAL CHRONOLOGY. 

. [From December i, 1895, to December 1, 1896.] 

1895. — December 2. John G. Johnson, Esq., 
was appointed a member of the Park Commis- 
sion by the Board of Judges, to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of John R. Fell. 

December 3. On the recommendation of the 
experts, the Fairmount Park Commission 
awarded the piizes for the four best plans for an 
art museum, to be erected on Lemon Hill. The 
first prize, $6;oo. was given to Henry Bacon and 
James Brite, of New York. 

December 4. The Pepper Laboratory of Clini- 
cal Medicine, the gift of Dr. William Pepper, 
was formally opened and presented to the Trus- 
tees of the University of Pennsylvania. Ad- 
dresses were made by Dr. J. S. Billings, Dr. \V. 
H. Welch, of Johns Hopkins University, and 
Provost Harrison. 

December 5. A mass meeting in the A< 1- 
demy of Music adopted a protest against the 
increase of street railway fares through the abo- 
lition of free transfers by the Union Traction 
Company. Addresses were delivered by ex- 
Governor Pattison, Hon. Charles Emory Smith, 
the Rev. Drs. Wayland, Baker, Krauskopf and 
others. Chairman Martindale was instructed to 
appoint a committee to wait on the Traction 
Company and urge an immediate restoration of 
the old system of fares. 

December 6. The Woodland Avenue Public 
School, Forty-sixth street and Woodland avenue, 
was accepted by the Board of Education. 

December 9. The Pennsylvania Forestry 
Association held its tenth annual meeting and re- 
elected John Birkinbine, President, and Dr. John 
T. Rothrock, Secretary. 

December to. The oil-storage plant of the 
Crew-Levick Company, at Swanson and Jackson 
streets, was destroyed by fire, and thousands of 
gallons of oil were burned. The loss was esti- 
mated at from $50,000 to $75,000. 

December 11. The committee appointed in 
accordance with the resolution adopted at a 
mass meeting to protest against the abolishment 
of free transfers, had a conference with Presi- 
dent Welsh, of the Union Traction Company, 
who was non-committal on the question of fares, 
but stated that his Company intends to do the 
best it can for the city, the people and those who 
have invested their money. 

— Twenty-five graduates of the Training 
School for Nurses of the Woman's Medical Col- 
lege were given diplomas. 

December 13. The John H. Taggart Public 
School, Fifth and Porter streets, was formally 
opened. Mayor Warwick and Col. A. Louden 
Snowdcn were among the speakers. 

December 16. John Robinson, aged twenty- 
six years, shot his wife, Yiola May Eckert, aged 
twenty four years, at Third and Chestnut streets, 
and, believing that he had killed her, he shot him- 
self and fell lifeless by her side. The woman re- 
covered. 

December 17-. The strike declared against the 
Union Traction Company by the Amalgamated 
Association of Street Railway Employees was 
inaugurated. Cars were run during the morning 
on most of the Company's lines, especially the 
lines of the People's Division, where almost the 
regular service was maintained. Disorder and 
rioting began early in the morning, and was con- 



tinued until late in the afternoon. Motormen 
were pulled from their cars, windows broken and 
cars disabled, Mayor Warwick issued a proc- 
lamation requesting citizens to observe peace and 
order, and in the evening quiet was restored by 
no attempt being made to run cars. 

December 18. Judges Pennypacker and Sulz- 
berger delivered a decree ousting Andrew J. 
De Camp from his seat in Common Council from 
the Twenty-ninth Ward. De Camp had not 
filed an answer to rule, issued November 16th, 
requiring him to show cause why he should not 
be ousted, owing to his connection with an elec- 
tric light company having a contract with the 
city. The decree was subsequently sustained 
by the Supreme Court. 

— The strcet-car-strike situation was consider- 
ably improved, though there were numerous out- 
breaks of mob violence. A few cars were run on 
nearly all the Union Traction Company's lines 
at intervals during the day. 

December 19. United States Marshal Coles- 
berry swore in about twenty deputy marshals to 
secure the unimpeded running of trolley mail cars. 
Second Assistant Postmaster General Neilson 
came to the city, and after an examination of the 
service and consultation by telephone with the 
Attorney-General of the L T nited States, obtained 
authority to have the deputies appointed. 

December 21. Two passenger trains running 
in opposite directions on a single track on the 
Frankford branch of the Reading Railroad col- 
lided near Orthodox street. Daniel Hart, seventy 
years old, and George Antlerson, aged sixteen, 
passengers on the train from Frankford, were 
killed, and nine others were injured. 

December 23. The fifteenth annual dinner of 
the New England Society of Pennsylvania was 
held. President John H. Converse was toast- 
master, and among the speakers were Major 
General Miles, U. S. A.; Judge Howland, of 
New York, and Rev. Drs. Wayland and McCook. 

— The strike of street-car motormen and con- 
ductors ended, the strikers returning to work. 
The trouble was adjusted by General Manager 
Beetem and a commiittee of the employees, and 
their agreement was ratified at a mass meeting of 
the striking employees. 

December 25. There was a tie-up on the 
Girard avenue line of the Union Traction Com- 
pany, because the employees who had been on 
strike claimed that in starting the cars early in 
the morning preference was given by the Com- 
pany to men who came here from e>ther cities to 
take the strikers' places, A committee of dis- 
satisfied employees was sent to the Company's 
office at Eighth and Dauphin streets, and, after 
a conference with officials, the trouble was ad- 
justed and cars began running regularly again 
early in the afternoon. Several cars in charge of 
non-union men were attacked by rioters, and one 
motorman and one conductor were wounded and 
several cars were wrecked. Ten men, charged 
with inciting to riot, were arrested near Second 
street and Girard avenue during the afternoon. 

December 26. A violent wind storm, accom- 
panied by heavy rain, prevailed for nbout one 
hour. A falling chimney crashed through the 
roof of the Mariners' Presbyterian Church, Front 
and Spruce streets, and caused a panic among 
the congregation, but no one was seriously in- 
jured. Two houses at Fifteenth and Norris 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



59 



streets were unroofed, and electric light wires 
were blown down in many parts of the city. 

— A bronze tablet inscribed " Joseph Jefferson, 
the actor, was born here 20th Feb., 1829. Here's 
your good health and your family's ; may you all 
live long and prosper," was placed on the house 
at the southwest corner of Sixth and Spruce 
streets. 

December 27. During a drunken quarrel, 
Ellen Green, twenty-nine years old, was murdered 
at 2924 Leithgow street, by her husband, Charles 
F. Green. 

December 30. The Philadelphia Bourse was 
formally opened with a banquet, at which five 
hundred persons, representing nearly every line 
of trade and manufacture, were present. Ad- 
dresses were made by President Bartol, United 
States Senator Hawley, Congressman Adams, 
C. Stuart Patterson and Charles Heber Clark 

December 31. The Bourse was dedicated. 
Addresses were delivered Dy Mayor Warwick, 
Cyrus Borgner, Chairman of the Building Com- 
mittee ; President George E. Bartol, Dr. Wil- 
liam Pepper and John F. Lewis. 

— Dr. Samuel G. Dixon was elected President 
of the Academy of Natural Sciences. He re- 
ceived 161 votes, while 105 were cast for Dr. 
Daniel G. Brinton for the same office. 

1896. — January 1. Thomas Gould, colored, 
aged twenty-five years, was shot through the 
heart and instantly killed by William N. Robin- 
son in South Camden. The shooting was the 
result of jealousy. 

January 2. Houston Hall, the new club house 
for students of the University of Pennsylvania, 
was opened with informal exercises. 

January 4. The handsome club house of the 
Merion Cricket Club at Haverford, with all its 
contents, was destroyed by fire of unknown 
origin. The Casino building, adjoining, was also 
burned. The loss was estimated at $75,000, 
nearly covered by insurance. 

January 7. Mary Lewis Smith, whose will 
was probated, devised in trust to the Fidelity 
Trust Company $10,000 and her residence, 2025 
Spruce street, subject to a life tenancy by her 
sisters, for establishing a summer home in mem- 
ory of her son, Lewis Wain Smith, for such poor 
white working boys of Philadelphia as may be 
selected by her executors, in which to pass their 
vacation in the country. 

January 8. At the Jackson Day dinner of the 
Young Men's Democratic Association, Vice- 
President Stevenson was the guest of honor. 
Among the speakers were the Secretary of the 
Interior Hoke Smith, Senator Faulkner, of West 
Virginia, Democratic State Chairman Robert E. 
Wright, Emanuel Furth and Deputy Commis- 
sioner of Pensions H. C. Bell. David W. Sellers 
presided. 

— Judge Butler dismissed the exceptions to 
and confirmed the report of the Master in the 
suit of the Central Transportation Company 
against the Pullman Palace Car Company. An 
award was made of $2,552,000 and eleven years' 
interest in favor of the Central Company and 
against the Pullman Company. An appeal was 
taken. 

January 16. A purse of $18,000 was presented 
by some of her friends to Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, 
on her seventy-fifth birthday. She is to receive 
the interest on the sum and after her death the 
principal will be devoted to establishing " Eliza- 



beth Duane Gillespie " scholarships in the School 
of Industrial Art. 

— At the fifth annual meeting of the Trades 
League, President William W. Foulkrod and 
nearly all the members of the Board of Directors 
were re-elected. The membership now comprises 
about two thousand individuals and firms. 

January 20. Common Council refused to sus- 
tain the Conference Committee which recom- 
mended that it concur in the action of Select 
Council in increasing the item for electric lighting 
from $751,000 to $800,000. Common Council's 
action defeated the entire appropriation to the 
Department of Public Safety for 1896. 

— The Republican City Committee was or- 
ganized. All the candidates on the Combine 
slate, headed by Sheriff Clement, the Chairman, 
were elected by a vote of 23 to 10 cast for the 
Anti-Combine ticket, which bore the name of 
Alexander Crow, Jr., for Chairman. 

— The Anti-Saloon League of Philadelphia 
was formed at a meeting attended by twenty 
clergymen. 

— The Board of Directors of the Union Trac- 
tion Company considered the report of the Citi- 
zens' Committee which investigated the griev- 
ances of the street railway men, and President J. 
Lowber Welsh sent a letter to Bishop Whitaker, 
in which he said : " The Company will cheer- 
fully do all in its power to carry out the recommen- 
dations, which are entirely in accord with its 
policy." 

January 21. The Annual Charity Ball took 
place at the Academy of Music, realizing over 
$10,000, which was divided between the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania Students' Aid Fund, the 
Southeastern Dispensary and Hospital for Wom- 
en and Children, the Western Temporary Home, 
and the House of St. Michael and All Angels. 

January 28. Aaron Mininger, aged fifty-nine 
years, died of typhoid pneumonia, which disease 
caused the death of Anna Bell, his niece, aged 
forty-one years, on January 26; of Sarah Bell, 
her mother, aged sixty-one years, on January 
25, and of John Bell, her son, aged forty-five 
years, on January 24. All lived in the same 
house in Germantown. 

January 30. The third floor of 132 South 
Third street was discovered to be ablaze, and a 
fireman found the charred body of Dr. Alfred L. 
Kennedy, formerly a widely-known physician 
and scientist, who occupied the apartments. It 
is supposed the fire was caused by an explosion 
of chemicals with which the Doctor was experi- 
menting. He was in his seventy-eighth year. 

February 1. The Liberty Bell reached Phila- 
delphia from Atlanta, and was escorted to the 
State House by a procession, which included 
several commands of the National Guard, police, 
firemen and various organizations. In the even- 
ing a dinner was given in honor of the Mayor 
and other prominent citizens of Atlanta who ac- 
companied the bell home. 

February 2. A fire in the Haseltine building, 
on Chestnut street, above Broad, destroyed the 
structure as well as that of the American Baptist 
Publication Society adjoining. The rear of the 
Hotel Lafayette and the dry goods store of 
Homer, Le Boutillier & Co., and the Wistar man- 
sion were also damaged. The total loss was 
nearly $1,500,000. A number of firemen were 
injured. 



6o 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



February 3. A Seventeenth street car collided 
with an Arch street car, and Motorman Edward 
Hanimell. of the Seventeenth street car. was 
killed by the shock. The conductor and a pas- 
senger were slightly injured. 

— The Charles H. Jarvis Memorial Library of 
Music, in the 1 >re.\el Institute, was opened to 
the public, when a concert was given by the 
Manuscript Society, and addresses were made by 
George C. Thomas and Professor Hugh A. 
Clark. 

February 5. Josiah Richelderfer and his house- 
keeper, Annie Tate, became ill fn>m the eft 
of poison, which a young man, who gave the 
name of George Barton, ami was employed as a 
salesman, was suspected "t having put in their 
food. The woman died, but Richelderfer re 
ered to find his safe robbed and Barton missing. 

February 6. The storm which passed over the 
city did more damage than any since the flood of 
May. 1804. The total rainfall was 3.86 inches, 
and the barometer fell lower than had ever before 
been noted at the Weather Bureau < mice. The 
high wind- made the tides extraordinarily high, 
and these meeting the floods of storm water. 
caused extensive overflows. The Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad Station and the gas works were 

tl led, and the Wissahickon 1 reek carried av 

two bridges. Nearly all the Delaware river fer- 
ries were obliged to stop running for several 
hours, and considerable damage was d( ne by the 
flooding of the piers and stores on Delaware 
avenue. 

February 13. At the annual meeting of the 
Associated Alumni of the Central High School, 
I rovernor Pattison was re-elected President. 

February 15. Abraham M. Beitler was com- 
missioned a Judg mmon I it No. 
1. and Representative Frank M . Riter was ap- 
pointed to succeed him as Director of I'ublic 
Safety. 

February 18. Devlin. Republican, and Wil- 
here. Democrat, elected Magistrates under the 
Minority Representative Law. Kinsey elected 
City Solicitor. 

February 19. There was an immense gathering 
of Lutherans at the memorial service in the 
Academy of Music in commemoration of the 
three-hundred-and-fiftieth anniversay 1 4 the death 
of Martin Luther. The singing was by a choir 
of one hundred and fifty voices, and addresses 
were made by W. H. Staake. Esq., the Revs \. 
Spaeth. D.D., C. S. Albert. D.D., and H. E. | 
Jacobs. D.D. 

February 20. The four-story building. 30 South 
Second street, owned and occupied by A. J. 
Widener. lamps, china and glassware, was de- 
Btroyed by fire. Mr. Widener estimated his loss 
at jj.50.000, on which there was about £40,000 in- 
surance. 

February 22. Governor Hastings presided at | 
a celebration in honor of Washington's birthday 
under the auspices of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. Hampton L. Carson delivered the ora- 
tion. 

February 25. Captain J. H. S. Wtborg and 
Mates Jens P. Petersen and Hans Johansen. of 
the Danish steamer Horsa, were placed on trial 
in the L'nited States District Court, charged with 
violating the neutrality laws in carrying a filibus- 
tering expedition to Cuba. Captain Wiborg was 
convicted and imprisoned ; the mates were ac- 
quitted. 



February 27. In caucus the Republican mem- 
bers of the new Select Council resolved, by a vote 
of 18 to 16, to support James L. Miles for Presi- 
dent. The vote stood 1*7 to 17 for three ballots, 
and Mr. Dougherty, of the Thirty-seventh ward, 
broke the tie. Mr. Adams, a Clay supporter, 
said he was offered $5000 for his vote, and that 
he intended to ask for an investigation, but noth- 
ing came of it. 

March 3. A complimentary dinner was given 
to Judge Thayer at the Lawyers' Club. Ad- 
dresses were delivered by ex-Judge Brewster, 
Justice Mitchell, Judges Orlady, Sulzberger and 
Ashman, Henry M. Dechert and James M. Beck. 

March 4. Col. M. Richards Muckle was 
elected President of the Pennsylvania Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, to suc- 
ceed Robert W. Ryerss, deceased. 

— The Pennsylvania Society of Colonial Dames 
gave a party in the Old Senate Chamber of Inde- 
pendence Hall, to celebrate the restoration of the 
room and the one-hundred-and-third anniversary 
of the second inauguration of George Washing- 
ton. Dr. S. Wier Mitchell made the dedicatory 
address, and Judge Pennypacker and Mayor 
Warwick spoke. 

March 5. Charles B. McMichael was appointed 
.overnor Hastings to the seat in Common 
Pleas Court. No. 3, made vacant by the death of 
Judge Reed. 

March 6. Mrs. Alice Smith, thirty-nine years 
old, died of burns received on February 22, when, 
it is alleged, her husband, Robert Smith, threw a 
burning rag over her, setting fire to her clothing. 

Man h 7. Seventy-seven pilgrims sailed on the 
steamer Waesland to join the colony in Jeru- 
salem known as the "Americans." 

— In a fight at Twenty-third and Lombard 
streets, George Queen, colored, stabbed four 
white men. John O'Brien, Joseph Sweeney, 
Charles Fisher and Thomas Reaney. O'Brien 
died before he could be taken to a hospital. 
Queen was subsequently acquitted on the ground 

If-defense. 

March 9. The first train crossed the new 
bridge over the Delaware river. It carried Presi- 
dent Roberts and many other officials of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad. 

March II. A fire in the basement of Crew, 
Levick & Co.'s lubricating oil warehouse, 113 
Arch street, caused a total loss of about $120,000. 
( )f this amount, L. Bomberger & Co., tobacco 
merchants, m Arch street, $50,000, and Julius 
Yetterlein is: Co., also tobacco dealers, 115 Arch 
street, nearly $70,000, their stocks being greatly 
damaged by water and smoke. 

March 12. The Home of Delight, or club 
house for the poor, was formally opened at 426 
Pine street, with addresses by Mayor Warwick, 
Rabbi Levi, the founder; Rudolph Blankenburg, 
the Rev. Henry Berkow itz and others. 

March 14. Judge Thayer suspended William 
A. Shoemaker from his office of attorney for one 
year. Shoemaker was one of the attorneys of 
Holmes, the murderer, and, arguing for a new 
trial, presented a fraudulent affidavit, as after- 
discovered evidence, and made a false statement 
to the Court. 

March 18. The Atlanta, a passenger and 
freight steamship for the Southern Railway Com- 
pany, was launched at Cramps' shipyard. 

March 21. The Germanic Library, collected 
by the late Professor Reinhold Bechstein, was 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



61 



opened in the University of Pennsylvania, ad- 
dresses being made by Provost Harrison, Joseph 
G. Rosengarten, George F. Baer, of Reading; 
Rev. Dr. A. Spaeth, Dr. Gottlieb Kellner and Dr. 
M. D. Learned. 

— The Second Regiment took possession of its 
new drill hall at Broad and Diamond streets, 
after a street parade, in which it was joined by 
the First and Third Regiments, and several 
bodies of veterans. At the dedicatory exercises 
speeches were made by Governor Hastings, 
Mayor Warwick, Major General Snowden, Col- 
onels J., Biddle Porter and Alfred J. Sellers. 

March 23. The seven-story gas-fixture and 
art-metal factory and warerooms of the Thackara 
Manufacturing Company, 1524 and 1526 Chest- 
nut street, were destroyed by fire, causing a loss 
estimated at $150,000 to $200,000, covered by 
insurance. 

March 24. The annual election of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company resulted in the 
choice of all the old members of the Board of 
Directors for another term. 

— Samuel P. Langdon, forty-five years old, 
a coal operator, and President of the United 
Collieries, and the Altoona and Phillipsburg 
Connecting Railway, was arrested, charged with 
the murder of Annie McGrath, nineteen years 
old. They lived on Girard avenue, west of 
Twenty-ninth street, and the woman was found 
dead in bed on March 23, a few hours after Lang- 
don left the house. There were no marks of vio- 1 
lence on her person. The cause of death was not 
ascertained, and Langdon was discharged. 

March 28. The battle-ship Iowa was launched 
at Cramps' shipyards. Vice-President Steven- 
son, Secretary of the Navy Herbert and other 
distinguished men came from Washington to wit- 
ness the launch. 

March 30. At a special meeting of the Manu- 
facturers' Club, a resolution offered by Rudolph 
Blankenburg was adopted by an overwhelming 
majority of the five hundred members present. 
It denounced as false the report that Philadel- 
phia manufacturers were willing to barter with 
the silver Senators fur the free coinage of silver 
in exchange for additional protection, and de- 
clared that the club was unalterably opposed to 
the free coinage of silver by the United States 
alone. Substitute resolutions favoring silver, and 
offered by Wharton Barker, Richard Campion, 
James Dobson and Edward R. Wood, were re- 
jected. 

— Commander and Mrs. Ballington Booth, at \ 
a largely attended meeting in the Academy of [ 
Music, inaugurated the work of their new organ- 
ization, The Volunteers. 

March 31. Ira Gibson, a florist and truck 
farmer, residing near Woodbury, shot and killed 
Sallie March, proprietor of a farmers' hotel, near 
Second and South streets, and then fired a bullet 
into his own head, inflicting a mortal wound. 

April 1. According to statistics prepared by 
the Board of Revision of Taxes, Philadelphia 
has 263,249 buildings, of which 240,635 are dwell- 
ings. 

April 4. The License Court granted retail 
liquor licenses to only four of the 847 new appli- 
cants. 

April 6. City Councils organized. James L. 
Miles was re-elected President of the Select 
Branch and Wencel Hartman President of the 



Common Chamber. No committees were an- 
nounced. 

April 8. Mrs. Cornelia Morse, wife of Edwin 
F. Morse, President of the Morse Elevator 
Works, was struck by a runaway team, while 
riding a bicycle on Girard avenue, above Broad 
street, and was killed almost instantly. 

— Trustees of the Jefferson Medical College 
bought the northwest corner of Tenth and Wal- 
nut streets. 118 feet 6 inches on Walnut street by 
107 feet 5 inches on Tenth street to Medical street, 
and will erect thereon commodious hospital build- 
ings. 

April 11. Senator Thurston, of Nebraska, was 
the chief speaker at a mass meeting at the Acade- 
my of Music in favor of making McKinley the 
Republican nominee for President. Martin St. 
Leger, President of the Workingmen's Tariff 
League, presided. 

April 13. The Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of its in- 
corporation. President George B. Roberts, the 
Vice Presidents and the Directors gave recep- 
tions to the operating officers of the Company's 
system and to the stockholders and invited 
guests. Addresses were delivered in the Acade- 
my of Music to the officers and guests of the 
Company by President Roberts, who presided, 
and by Governor Hastings, representing the 
State; Mayor Warwick, representing the city; 
City Attorney Clarence Burleigh, representing 
the city of Pittsburg; J. Twing Brooks. Second 
Vice President of the Pennsylvania Company, 
and Joseph H. Choate, representing the city and 
State of New York. Reminiscences of the found- 
ing of the Company, written by Frederick Fraley, 
were read. 

April 15. William Kane, known to the police 
and his associates as "Broken Nose" Kane, 
was fatally stabbed with a kitchen knife by his 
wife, Lizzie, in their lodging house, on Lombard 
street, near Sixth. The woman, who claims that 
her husband ran against the knife which she had 
held up to defend herself against his attempted 
assault, was arrested. 

April 18. The old passenger station of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, at Thirty- 
second and Market streets, was destroyed by 
fire, causing a loss of nearly half a million dol- 
lars, of which more than $300,000 was oh rolling 
stock. Assistant Chief Engineer William Staiger 
and Hugh McGranigan, a tillennan of Truck F, 
were killed, and a dozen firemen were injured by 
falling walls. 

April 20. While returning from a fishing trip 
on the steam yacht " Gertrude C," Thomas 
Schools, aged thirty-three years, and Joseph 
Frisch, aged twenty-eight years, fell overboard 
and were drowned in the Delaware river, near 
Pennsgrove. 

April 21. To save his house from threatened 
destruction by fire from a telephone wire, which 
had become crossed with an electric light or trol- 
ley wire, and was emitting sparks, Linford L. 
Biles, aged sixty-four years, went up on the roof, 
and, accidentally getting in contact with the wire, 
was instantly killed. A son, who went in search 
of hint, was severely shocked and burned by the 
current. 

April 23. The three-hundred-and-thirty-second 
anniversary of Shakespeare's birthday was ob- 
served at the Edwin Forrest Home with a recep- 
tion given by the Board of Trustees and an en- 



62 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



tertainment, in which many members of the dra- 
matic profession now in the city participated. 
Joseph Jefferson, the veteran actor, made an ad- 
dress. 

April 25. A number of non-union motormen 
were driven from their cars near the Belmont 
avenue depot. Motorman D. J. Keenan had his 
nose and three ribs fractured. His alleged assail- 
ants were arrested. Two motormen were also 
taken into custody for beating a Ridge avenue 
line conductor. 

April 27. The birthday of General Grant was 
celebrated with a dinner at the Union League, at 
which covers were laid for three hundred guests. 
Colonel Frederick Dent Grant, eldest son of the 
hero of Appomattox, was the guest of honor. 
George S. Graham presided, and the speakers 
included Mayor Warwick, General D. McM. 
Gregg, Andrew D. White, President Patton, of 
Princeton University ; General M. C. Butler, of 
South Carolina ; Representatives Boutelle, of 
Maine ; Cousins, of Iowa ; Grosvenor, of Ohio, 
and Dalzell, of Pennsylvania. 

April 28. A committee representing the dis- 
satisfied employees of the Union Traction Com- 
pany presented their alleged grievances to Presi- 
dent Welsh and the Executive Committee of the 
Board of Directors of the Company. After a 
conference behind closed doors, lasting several 
hours, President Welsh announced that all the 
demands of the committee had been refused. 
An attempt was made to organize another strike, 
but it failed. 

April 29. Jephtha D. Howe, the St. Louis at- 
torney, charged with conspiring with H. H. 
Holmes to defraud the Fidelity Mutual Life As- 
sociation of $10,000 upon a policy of insurance 
upon the life of Benjamin F. Pitezel, was acquit- 
ted. District Attorney Graham said: "This 
prosecution must fail for want of evidence, and 
it becomes my duty to abandon the case." 

May 1. Judge Acheson, of the United States 
Circuit Court, signed a decree for the sale of the 
property of the Philadelphia and Reading Rail- 
road Company under the Company's general 
mortgage, unless arrearages of interest should 
be paid in twenty days. 

.May 5. At the forty-eighth annual commence- 
ment of the Hahnemann Medical College, diplo- 
plomas were given to seventy-five graduates. 

May 7. Herman W. Mudgett, alias H. H. 
Holmes, was hanged in the County Prison for 
the murder of Benjamin F. Pitezel. On the 
scaffold he declared he had not killed Pitezel nor 
any of the Pitezel children, and that the extent 
of his wrongdoing in the taking of human life 
was the killing of two women whose deaths re- 
sulted from criminal operations. 

May 10. The James C. Smith Memorial Home 
for sick and convalescent white women, at Oak- 
bourne, Chester county, bequeathed by the late 
Mrs. J. C. Smith to .the Philadelphia Protestant 
Episcopal City Mission, was dedicated, Arch- 
deacon Brady making the address. 

May 11. A gift of $200,000 from the estate of 
Joseph Jeanes,"to assist in the establishment 
and maintenance of boarding homes for the aged 
and infirm among Friends," was announced at 
the opening session of the Friends' Yearly 
Meeting. 

May 12. The corner-stone of the new clinical 
amphitheatre of the Medico-Chirurgical Hospital 
and College was laid by the officers of the Ma- 



sonic Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. Addresses 
were delivered by Governor Hastings and Mayor 
Warwick. 

May 13. Sixty-one students graduated at the 
fifteenth annual commencement of the Medico- 
Chirurgical College. President C. William Berg- 
ner conferred the degrees and Dr. L. Webster 
Fox made an address to the students. 

May 14. Thomas McKean, of the Class of '62, 
University of Pennsylvania, subscribed $100,003 
to the University, conditioned upon the raising 
of $1,000,000 within a specified time. Provost 
Harrison has undertaken this effort. 

May 16. Alfred C. Harrison contributed 
$100,000 to the University of Pennsylvania, 
$50,000 of which is to promote the advanced 
work of the University. 

May 18. By the explosion of benzine, with 
which the contents of the parlor of 2013 North 
Twelfth street had been sprinkled, preparatory 
to the departure of the family for the summer, 
Rosie Griggs was fatally burned and the house 
destroyed. The explosion is ascribed to spon- 
taneous combustion. 

— The Pennsylvania Heat, Light and Power 
Company accepted the offer of the Electric Trust 
to sell its preferred and common stock, thus ob- 
taining control of all the principal electric light- 
ing plants in the city, and becoming the largest 
electric lighting corporation in the United States. 

May 19. Diplomas were awarded to nineteen 
graduates of the Training School for Nurses con- 
nected with the Philadelphia Hospital. 

— The Liquor License Court granted licenses 
to Jeremiah G. Donoghue, William Boyle, Den- 
nis Murphy. Valentine Liebig and John D. Mar- 
tin, retail dealers, Rafaello Martino, bottler, and 
Jacob Hornung, brewer, all of whom had been 
refused renewals at the regular sitting of the 
Court. Edward J. Brophy, Walter Campbell, 
Michael J. Mallon and Solomon Wolf, whose 
saloons were closed by the Court one year ago, 
were also given licenses. The Joseph Kohnle 
Brewing Company was granted a license for 1715 
Buttonwood street. 

May 27. Alphonso F. Cutaiar, Jr., was placed 
on trial on the charge of causing the death of 
Johanna Logue, wife of the notorious "Jimmy " 
Logue, on February 22, 1879. I Q ms opening ad- 
dress the District Attorney announced that the 
Commonwealth would press for a verdict of mur- 
der of the first degree, which was rendered. 

May 30. The Garfield Monument, in Fair- 
mount Park, was unveiled with impressive cere- 
monies. 

June 1. Yang Yu, Chinese Minister to the 
United States, visited Cramps' shipyard, and 
attended a dinner given in his honor by Chinese 
merchants. 

— At the graduating exercises of the Philadel- 
phia Training School for Kindergartners di- 
plomas were awarded to sixty-two pupils. 

— The British Consul took from the steamship 
Bermuda the British registry, and the vessel was 
left without the right to hoist the flag of any 
nation. 

June 3. The thirty-sixth annual session of the 
United States Brewers' Association began at the 
Bourse. President C. William Bergner, of the 
local association, who welcomed the visitors, said 
that the total product had increased from 8,500,- 
000 barrels in 1876 to 36,000,000 barrels in 1896. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



63 



June 4. The sanitarium at Red Bank was 
opened for the season, and the Simon Muhr 
Memorial Building was formally transferred to 
the corporation. 

June 7. The new Methodist Episcopal Church 
of St. Luke, at Broad and Jackson streets, was 
dedicated by Bishop Foss. 

June 8. Judge Acheson decided that the city 
was entitled to a balance of $18,000, placed in the 
Keystone National Bank for safe keeping by the 
then City Treasurer, John Bardsley, late in the 
diy, before the bank was closed by the Comp- 
troller of the Currency. 

June 9. The one-hundred-and-fortieth annual 
Commencement of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania was held in the Academy of Music, Pro- 
vost Harrison conferring the degrees and honors. 
The valedictory was delivered by Robert Burns 
Wallace. 

June 10. The first annual dinner of the Gen- 
eral Alumni Society of the University ot Penn- 
sylvania was held in the library. Among the 
speakers were the President, Dr. William Pepper, 
Provost Harrison, Robert Davidson, who grad- 
uated in 1826 ; Dr. G. P. Fisher, of Yale ; 
Judge Thayer and District Attorney Graham. 

June 11. At the Academy of Mu>ic, Provost 
Harrison conferred degrees upon nearly two 
hundred graduates of the Medical, Dental and 
Veterinary departments of the University of 
Pennsylvania. The Philomathean Society held 
its eighty-third annual commencement. 

June 12. Ex-City Treasurer Michellon, of 
Camden, against whom the Grand Jury found 
thirteen bills of indictment on charges of embez- 
zlement and malfeasance in office, failed to find 
ba 1, surrendered himself to the Sheriff, and was 
committed to the county jail. He was subse- 
quently convicted on several of the charges. 

June 14. Mrs. Hannah Richter, Mrs. Kate 
McCue and John Brewer were drowned by the 
upsetting of a rowboat in the Delaware river, 
off Gloucester City. 

June 15. Flag Day was observed with inter- 
esting exercises in many of the public schools. 

June 16. At the commencement of the Boys' 
Central High School diplomas were presented to 
tighty-two graduates by President Thompson, 
and the alumni prizes were awarded by Dr. S. 
Sol's Cohen. 

June 17. Diplomas were awarded to four 
hundred and seventy-six graduates of the Girls' 
High School by Principal Wright at the annual 
commencement held in the Academy of Music. 

June 19. John Cadwalader was elected Presi- 
dent General of the General Society of the War 
of 1812, which held its first biennial session. 

June 21. Archbishop Ryan laid the corner- 
stone of the new Catholic Protectory for Boys at 
Fatland, Montgomery county, in the presence of 
about 25,000 people. 

June 23. Judge Yerkes overruled the mot'on 
for a new trial in the case of Alphonso F. Cu- 
taiar, Jr., convicted of murder of the first degree 
in causing the death of Johanna Logue, wife of 
Jimmy Logue, the notorious thief. Cutaiar was 
then sentenced to be hanged. 

June 24. Certificates of proficiency in the use 
of tools were presented to fifty-five pupils at the 
closing exercises of the Master Builders' Mechan- 
ical Trades School. 

June 25. Attorney General Harmon, on the 
recommendation of United States District At- 



torney Beck, appointed as the First Assistant to 
the latter Francis Fisher Kane, and as Second 
Assistant, Michael F. McCullen. 

June 27. James B. Gentry was fcund guilty 
of murder of the first degree in killing Margaret 
W. Drysdale, known on the stage as Madge 
Yorke. 

June 30. Of 2234 applicants, 21 14 successfully 
passed examinations for admittance to the High 
and Manual Training Schools. 

July 1. The twelve-story building of the 
Fidelity Mutual Life Association, on Broad street, 
above Arch, was dedicated with interesting exer- 
cises. Among the speakers weie : Levi G. Fouse, 
President and founder of the Association ; Mayor 
Warwick, ex-Governor Pattison, Secretary W. 
S. Campbell, George D. Eldridge, of New York ; 
the Rev. Dr. R. H. Fulton and Col. Bosbyshell. 

— " The Society of Mayflower Descendants in 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania," organized 
and elected Charlemange Tower, Jr., Governor. 

July 2. Common Council, by a vote of 93 to 29, 
or four more than the requisite two-thirds, passed 
the bill to create'a loan of $8,000,000 for perma- 
nent improvements. 

July 3. Judge Yerkes overruled the motion 
for a new trial in the case of James B. Gentry, 
convicted of the murder of Margaret W. Drys- 
dale, and sentenced him to be hanged. An ap- 
peal was taken. 

— Samuel Dickson announced his resignation 
as a Presidential Elector on the Democratic ticket, 
and his inability to accept the Democratic plat- 
form. His resignation was followed by others. 

July 4. During a quarrel at 1325 Mt. Holly 
street, James Loudon, colored, twenty-eight years 
old, was shot and killed by Jacob Chase, aged 
twenty-three years, also colored, who escaped. 
Both men were employed in a brickyard. 

July 7. Capt. J. H. Wiborg, of the Danish 
steamer Horsa,was re-committed to the Eastern 
Penitentiary to serve his term of imprisonment 
for engaging in a filibustering expedition to 
Cuba. 

July 16. The New Hope Accommodation and 
a train of empty passenger coaches returning 
from Deer Park collided on the Noitheast Penn 
branch of the Reading Railroad, a few hundred 
yards north of Willow Grove. Half a dozen 
men were injured, none of them dangerously, 
and both locomotives were badly wrecked. 

July 17. Select Council passed the $8,000,000 
loan bill by a vote of 35 to 5. Later in the day 
the Mayor gave his official approval of the 
measure. 

July 18. Fifty or more prominent Democrats 
met in the office of John C. Bullitt and adopted 
resolutions declaring the Chicago platform neither 
honest nor patriotic, and, therefore, not Demo- 
cratic. 

July 22. The fourth annual convention of the 
United States League of Local Building and 
Loan Associations was opened. Mayor Warwick 
delivered an address of welcome, and President 
Julius Stem, of Chicago, submitted his annual 
report. Michael J. Brown, of Philadelphia, was 
elected President. 

July 23. A committee of Sound-money Demo- 
crats issued an address to the Democracy of 
the State advocating the holding of a new State 
convention. 

— The Compagnie General Transatlantique 
deeded to establish a line of steamers between 



6 4 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Philadelphia and Marseilles, France, beginning 
with September. 

July 24. George McGowan and Bernard Gil- 
pin were appointed Receivers for the Lincoln 
Park and Steamboat Consolidated Company. 

July 30. William Draper Lewis was chosen 
Dean of the Department of Law at the L^niver- 
sity of Pennsylvania, to succeed C. Stuart Patter- 
son, resigned. 

August 1. In accordance with the decree for 
the foreclosure sale the Receivers of the Reading 
Railroad filed in the United States Circuit Court 
a statement of the assets and liabilities of the 
Company. 

August 3. William H. Thompson, who has 
several aliases, was held in $7500 bail to answer 
the charge of robbing Oscar Moore and wife, 
patients in St. Joseph's Hospital, of jewelry, 
money, etc., to the value of $30,000. He subse- 
quently pleaded guilty and was sentenced to the 
Penitentiary. 

August 5. The Mutual Automatic Telephone 
scandal was before the Senatorial Investigating 
Committee. Julian C. Gale testified that at the 
direction of David Martin he had divided six 
thousand shares of the Company's stock into 
small blocks, and that they were given by John 
C. Persch and himself to Martin. George Persch, 
another witness, corroborated Gale's evidence re- 
garding the stock issue. 

August 9. Thirty-three deaths were reported 
in two days as a result of the excessive heat. 
The maximum temperature, 96.2 degrees, was 
record* d at 4.30 o'clock in the afternoon of this 
day. There were many prostrations, some fatal. 

August 10. Rose Breininger, twenty-seven 
years; Rosie Breininger, twenty-two years; 
Amelie Holeman, twenty-six years ; John Trens- 
ler, twenty-five years, and Charles Meincke, sev- 
enteen years, were drowned in the Delaware 
river under the new railroad bridge at Brides- 
burg. They had been in a rowboat, and. it is 
believed, were swept overboard by a violent 
wind storm. 

August 11. Seventeen deaths and more than 
one hundred cases of prostration were reported 
as resulting from the heat. 

August 12. Because he was refused the aid of 
counsel, David Martin declined to testify before 
the Senatorial Investigating Committee. The 
Committee thereupon issued a subpoena on Mr. 
Martin to appear later. 

— Twenty-five names were added to the num- 
ber of heat fatalities and one hundred and nine 
more cases of exhaustion were reported. The 
maximum temperature was 97 degrees. 

August 16. During the week ending August 
15 one hundred and seventy-three persons died 
from the effects of the heat. 

August 24. Lieutenant Albert C. Allison, of 
the Manayunk Police Station, was discharged 
from the force for alleged neglect of duty in fail- 
ing to report and suppress " speak-easies," 
which, during his absence from the city, were 
raided by a squad under command of Superin- 
tendent Linden. 

August 25. Fire of unknown origin destroyed 
the rear portion, with chancel and organ, of St. 
Andrew's Protestant Episcopal Church, Thirty- 
sixth and Baring streets. The loss was estimated 
at $25,000. 

— The State Convention of Sound-money 
Democrats was held in Musical Fund Hall. 



The State organization was named the Jefferson- 
ian Part}', and delegates were elected to the Na- 
tional Convention and Electors chosen. 

August 31. Several thousand persons attended 
the opening of the two-days' festival of the 
Bayerische Yolksfest Verein, which was attended 
by several kindred societies. 

September 3. Viceroy Li Hung Chang, the 
Special Ambassador of the Emperor of China, 
spent six hours in Philadelphia. He was met at 
Germantown junction by the Mayor and a re- 
ception committee, composed of public officials, 
prominent citizens and staff officers of the Na- 
tional Guard of Pennsylvania. He was escorted 
down Broad and Chestnut streets, with the City 
Troop as a guard of honor, the procession being 
viewed by crowds that lined the streets on both 
sides solidly from the starting point to Sixth and 
Chestnut streets. In Independence Hall the 
Mayor delivered an address of welcome, to 
which the Viceroy made a speech in reply. The 
\ iceroy dined at the Hotel Walton, received calls 
there from prominent citizens and a number of 
the Chinese residents, and paid a visit to Mrs. 
John Russell Young. After a reception at the 
Union League, where a luncheon was also given 
to the members of his suite, Li Hung Chang and 
his party left for Washington. 

September 4, The Board of Pardons, at Har- 
risburg. recommended that John Bardsley be 
pardoned. 

September 8. In his annual report to the 
Board of Education, Superintendent Brooks 
urged the changing and lengthening of the course 
of study in the Central High School, so that in 
fact, as well as in name.it may become the " Col- 
lege of Philadelphia." Councils subsequently 
adopted resolutions opposing the change of name. 

September 9. J. George Persch, a star witness 
before the Senate Investigating Committee in 
connection with the Mutual Automatic Tele- 
phone Company, was arrested on a charge of 
conspiracy, preferred by Frank Kreis, a saloon 
keeper. 

September n. Water was turned into the 
southern section of the Queen Lane Reservoir, 
which had been relined. 

September 15. A reception was given Lord 
Chief Justice Russell, of England, by the Board 
of Directors of the Pennsylvania Railroad. 

September 19. Occupants of a house on Baker 
street, above Sixth, which was raided as a ''speak 
easy," fired twenty or twenty-five shots at the 
police, and assailed them with bricks and other 
missiles from the stairway and roof. A bullet 
aimed at the police, it is supposed, struck and 
killed Michael Pizzi, whose body was found on 
the roof. Several policemen were wounded with 
bricks, and a citizen was cut on the breast and 
head with a knife, while another received a slight 
bullet wound. Eight men were captured and 
committed to prison to await the action of the 
Coroner. The Court declared afterwards that 
the raid was illegal, having been made on Sun- 
day, and that the occupants of the house were 
justified in resisting arrest. 

September 21. Governor Hastings signed the 
pardon of John Bardsley. It was said that Bards- 
ley suffered a stroke of paralysis a few days be- 
fore, and this hastened the Governor's action. 

September 22. William J. Bryan, the Demo- 
cratic nominee for President, addressed an audi- 
ence which crowded the Academy of Music to 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



65 



the doors. Many thousands of people were un- 
able to obtain admission to the Academy. 

September 23. The property of the Philadel- 
phia and Reading Railroad Company and the 
Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Com- 
pany was sold at auction under the decree of the 
United States Circuit Court in the foreclosure 
suit brought by the trustees of the general mort- 
gage bonds. The total of the bids was $20,500,000. 
The properties were purchased for the reorganiza- 
tion managers, represented by J. P. Morgan & 
Co., of New York, who were the only bidders. 

September 27. During a quarrel in a lodging 
house at Front street and Fairmount avenue, 
John L. Griblin, it is charged, cut his wife's 
throat. She died while being removed to a hos- 
pital. Griblin was arrested. 

September 28. At a citizens' mass meeting, in 
the Academy of Music, Alexander Crow, jr., 
was nominated as an independent candidate for 
Sheriff. 

September 29. Magistrate Eisenbrown de- 
clined the Democratic nomination for Sheriff, and 
recommended that the party organization place 
on its ticket the name of Alexander Crow, Jr., 
the Independent Republican nominee for the 
office. 

September 30. The Democratic City Com- 
mittee unanimously nominated for Sheriff Alex- 
ander Crow, Jr., the Independent Republican 
candidate. 

October 5. The celebration of the one-hun- 
dred-and-nineteenth anniversary of the battle of 
Germantown, under the auspices of the Business 
Men's Association of that suburb, began with a 
sham battle in Vernon Park, in which the parti- 
cipants were members of patriotic orders. There 
was a display of fireworks, and a general illu- 
mination and decoration of stores and residences. 

October 7. James L. Miles withdrew as a 
candidate for Sheriff on the Republican ticket. 

October 10. Samuel H. Ashbridge was nom- 
inated for Sheriff by the Republican Convention, 
to succeed James L. Miles, resigned. 

October 26. In the suit of William Newbold 
Ely, Treasurer of the Girard Life Insurance, 
Annuity and Trust Company, against the Press 
Company, Limited, to recover damages for a 
libelous article published in the Press, a jury in 
the Common Pleas awarded Mr. Ely $18,000. 

October 28. Prince Louis of Savoy gave a 
supper and dance to about one hundred and fifty 
ladies and gentlemen, in return for his hospitable 
treatment in Philadelphia. 

October 30. The Gustavus S. Benson com- 
bined grammar, secondary and primary school 
building, at Twenty-seventh and Wharton streets, 
was formally dedicated. It contains twenty-one 
divisions and cost $81,302. 

November 6. The Archaeological Department 
of the University Museum was opened for the 
season with a reception, at which Dr. Wilhelm 
Doerpfeld, the eminent German scientist, was the 
guest of honor. 

November 9. William B. Goukler, better known 
as William Mays, aged twenty-e*ight years, and 
his wife, Maggie, aged twenty-one years, were 
found at their home with their throats cut, the 
woman being dead and the husband breathing 
his last. It is believed that Mays, being angered 
by her refusal to give him money and also being 
in a jealous mood, cut his wife's throat, and seve- 



ral hours later, after taking poison, cut his own 
throat. 

November 10. The Fairmount Park trolley 
road was formally opened, a party of three hun- 
dred guests being taken over the completed por- 
tion of the line in the West Park. 

November 11. Charles McConnell, judge, and 
Richard Hughes and James Cahill, inspectors, 
pleaded guilty to making a false return of votes 
cast in the Twelfth division of the Fourth ward at 
the election held in November, 1895. They were 
each sentenced to six months' imprisonment, and 
disfranchised for four years. 

November 13. The battle-ship Iowa returned 
from her builders' trial trip. In a two-hours' burst 
of speed the vessel averaged 16.27 knots an hour, 
and in other respects the runs were satislactory. 

— A dinner was given in honor of Professor 
Hermann von Hilprecht. the eminent archaeolo- 
gist, who had just returned from the East. 

November 14. The annual parade of the police 
and firemen was reviewed by Director Riter and 
other officials of this and neighboring cities. 

November 16. The managers of the Episco- 
pal Hospital received from the children of the 
late George L. Harrison an addition to the en- 
dowment fund of" the George L. Harrison Me- 
morial House " of $150,000. 

November 17. Ihe Philadelphia and Reading 
Railway Company, the successor of the Phila- 
delphia and Reading Railroad Company, organ- 
ized with Joseph S. Harris as President, and 
these Directors: George F. Baer, of Reading; 
Charles H. Coster and Francis Lynde Stetson, 
of New York ; Thomas McKean, George C. 
Thomas and J. Lowber Welsh. 

November 18. The Board of Directors of the 
newly-organized Reading Railway Company 
elected 1 heodore Voorhees, First Vice-President ; 
W. A. Church, Treasurer; J. D. Campbell, Gene- 
ral Solicitor, and Daniel Jones, Comptroller. 

November 21. The newspaper men of Phila- 
delphia gave a dinner to their fellow-woiker, 
James Rankin Young, Congressman-elect. 

November 24. D. W. Dickson was elected 
President of the Philadelphia Traction Company 
in place of P. A. B. Widentr, who declined a 
re-election. 

November 25. A sub-committee of Councils' 
Committee on City Property agreed to recom- 
mend a plot of fifty-four acres in the Twenty- 
fifth ward, fronting on the Delaware river, north 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad's new bridge, as a 
site for a municipal hospital. The price asked 
for the property is $200,000. 

November 26. Prince Louis of Savoy opened 
the Meschianza Ball at Horticultural Hall, which 
was attended by many society people. 

November 27. Fully five hundred delegates 
attended the opening of the tenth annual con- 
vention of the Association of Colleges and Pre- 
paratory Schools of the Middle States and Mary- 
land, at the University of Pennsylvania. 

— President Isaac A. Sheppard sent to the 
Board of Judges his resignation as a member of 
the Board of Education. 

November 30. Before Judge McMichael was 
begun the trial of the suit brought by Filbert, Por- 
ter & Co. against the city to recover $122,000, 
with interest from January 21, 1895, that sum 
being ten per cent, of the total cost ot the Queen 
Lane Reservoir retained by the defendant under 
the contract pending the acceptance of the work. 



66 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



GENERAL CHRONOLOGY. 

[From December i, 1895, to December 1, 1896.] 

1895. — December 2. The sessions of the Fifty- 
fourth Congress we're begun. 

December 4. A thousand pounds of nitro- 
glycerine exploded in the magazine of the Humes 
Torpedo Company, near Butler, Pa., and two 
men were blown to atoms. The magazine build- 
ing was utterly demolished. 

December 15. Miss Helen Culver, of Chicago, 
gave $1,000,000 to the University of Chicago, 
" to be devoted to the increase and spread of 
knowledge within the field uf biological science." 

December 18.. By the bursting of a steam 
pipe in the engine room of the American Line 
steamer St. Paul, at her dock in the North 
river, at New York, five men were killed and 
five or six were terribly scalded. Of the latter 
four died later in the day. 

December 27. Twenty-three persons were 
crushed or trampled to death in a panic at Front 
Street Theatre, in Baltimore, and several other.-. 
were injured, surae of them fatally. The panic 
was started by a cry of " lire " in the audience, 
caused by a leak in a gas pipe. There was a 
wild scramble for the doors, the men in the rear 
of the crowd climbing over the heads of those 
in front in their struggle to get out. 

December 31. (Jueen Victoria appointed Al- 
fred Austin, 1'oet Laureate. The office had been 
vacant since the death of Lord Tennyson, in 
October, 1892. Sir Frederick Leighton and Mr. 
Henry Hucks Gibb were elevated to the peerage. 

1896. — January 4. The President issued a 
proclamation declaring the admission of Utah 
as a State into the Union. The officers of the 
new State were installed, and its Legislature 
met in called session on January 5. 

January 5. The ceremony of conferring the 
beretta upon Cardinal Satolli was performed by 
Cardinal Gibbons in the Cathedral at Baltimore. 

January o. Earthquakes in the Khalkhal 
district, Persia, resulted in the loss of 1100 lives. 

January 18. General Weyler succeeded Gen- 
eral Campos in the conduct of the war in Cuba. 

January 22. A fast passenger train on the 
Pan Handle Road was wrecked near South 
Charleston, Ohio, by the explosion of the loco- 
motive boiler. The engineer and fireman were 
killed, and six persons were injured. 

January 25. The American liner St. Paul ran 
ashore off Long Branch while a dense fog pre- 
vailed. All the passengers were safely landed. 

February 4. The American Line steamer St. 
Paul, which had gone aground off Long Branch 
on the morning of January 25, was floated with- 
out injury by the Merritt Wrecking Co. 

February 5. Bids for the $ioo,coo,ooo of four 
per cent, bonds were opened at the Treasury 
Department. There were nearly 4700 distinct 
offers, aggregating nearly 5700,000,000. Two or 
three were bogus, but the entire bid reached over 
$500,000,000. The prices ranged from par to 
120. J. P. Morgan & Co. were awarded more 
than one-third of the whole issue. 

February 11. " Bart" Shea was executed by 
electricity at the prison in Dannemora, N. Y., 
for the murder of Robert Ross in Troy on elec- 
tion day. He left a letter asserting his inno- 
cence. John B. McGough still adheres to his 
story that it was he who fired the fatal shot, and 
that Shea was innocent. 



February 14. Governor Morton signed the 
bill ceding to the United States jurisdiction over 
the Palisades of the Hudson for their occupation 
as a Military and National Park. 

February 29. The steamer Ailsa, while at 
anchor off Fort Hamilton, N. Y., was run into 
and sunk by the French steamer La Bourgogne. 
The captain, passengers and part of the crew 
of the Ailsa took to the rigging and were rescued 
by the tug Harold. The French steamer, it is 
said, offered no assistance, and members of the 
crew of the Ailsa took the only available life- 
boat. 

— The steamship New York, of the American 
Line, ran aground during a heavy fog midway 
between Sandy Hook Point and Staten Island. 
The passengers and mail were transferred and 
landed at New York. On the following day, 
with the assistance of six tugs and an unusually 
high tide, the vessel was floated uninjured. 

March 3. Details were received in Rome of 
the defeat of the Italian forces in Abyssinia by 
King Menelek's army on Sunday, March 1. The 
Italian losses are placed at three thousand killed. 
No mention is made in the reports of the number 
wounded. The Italians also lost sixty guns and 
all their provisions. The Italian Government 
called out all the reserves of 1872, and rein- 
forcements were sent to Massowah at once. 

March 16. The Czar conferred upon King 
Menelek, of Abyssinia, the Grand Cordon of St. 
George, the highest military decoration in the 
gift of the Russian Emperor. 

March 18. The Larlin and Rand Powder 
Works, at Ripton, N. Y., were completely 
wrecked by the explosion of 30,000 pounds of 
powder. Five men, employees of the company, 
were instantly killed. 

March 23. An explosion of gas in the Ber- 
wind-White mine at Dubois, Pa., resulted in the 
death of thirteen or fourteen miners, and two 
men were killed by an explosion at the Adrian 
mines, eight miles south of that place. 

April 6. Ex-President Harrison and Mrs. 
Mary Scott-Lord Dimmick were married in St. 
Thomas' Protestant Episcopal Church, in New 
York, between five and six o'clock. After the 
ceremony they started for Indianapolis, where 
the honeymoon was spent. 

April 25. A fire at Cripple Creek, Colorado, 
destroyed four blocks in the business portion of 
the town. The loss was estimated at $1,000,000, 
the insurance at $250,000. On April 29 a second 
incendiary fire destroyed $2,000,000 worth of 
property. Fifteen or twenty persons lost their 
lives ajid one thousand were left homeless. 

April 28. The Old Dominion Line steamer 
Wyanoke, while leaving her dock at Newport 
News, Yirginia. fouled the cruiser Columbia, 
which was lying out in the stream at anchor, and 
sunk under her forefoot. The crew and pas- 
sengers were all saved and taken ashore. 

May 1. The Shah of Persia assassinated by 
Mollor Rega, who was hanged for the crime on 
August 12. 

May 3. Muzafer-ed-din, the second son of 
the late Shah of Persia, was enthroned at Tabriz, 
the capital of the province over which he has 
been acting as Governor. 

May 8. At Rome. New York, the jury in the 
case of John Watson Hildreth, one of the boys 
who wrecked a New York Central express train, 
returned a verdict of murder in the second de- 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



67 



gree. The prisoner was sentenced to Auburn 
Prison for life. 

May 11. The steamer Harry Brown was 
blown up by the explosion of her boilers in the 
Mississippi river, fifty miles below Vicksburg. 
Eleven persons were killed, and six others who 
were injured were taken to Vicksburg. 

May 12. The statue of General Winfield 
Scott Hancock was unveiled in Washington. 
The President presided at the ceremonies and 
made an address, and the oration was delivered 
by Senator Palmer, of Illinois. 

May 15. A tornado struck Sherman, Texas, 
killing 105 people and leaving 700 destitute. 

May 23. The New York firm of theatrical 
managers, Abbey, SchoefTel and Grau, made an 
assignment to Louis James Phelps, of New 
York, and Arnold A. Rand, of Boston. The 
indebtedness was estimated at $302,000, and the 
assets at from $125,000 to $175,000. 

May 24. A cyclone swept across Polk county 
and into the eastern edge of Jasper county, Iowa. 
Twenty persons are known to have been killed, 
and as many more seriously injured. The path 
of the storm was nearly twenty miles long, and 
forty to eighty rods wide, and everything in its 
way was destroyed. At some places the people 
had timely warning, and were able to seek safety 
in caves and cellars. 

May 25. The towns of Ortonville and Thomas, 
in Michigan, were visited by a cyclone and par- 
tially destroyed. So far as known sixteen lives 
were lost. At Mount Clemens fifty houses were 
destroyed and six persons killed. 

May 26. Nicholas II, Emperor of Russia, was 
crowned in the Cathedral of the Assumption, in 
the Kremlin, at Moscow. 

May 27. A tornado which struck St. Louis 
and East St. Louis caused terrible destruction. 
There was great loss of life, and much of the 
property which escaped the whirling winds was 
later destroyed by flood and fire. The east ap- 
proach to the Eads bridge was destroyed and one 
of the spans blown away. 

May 30. The number of persons killed by the 
stampede of the great multitude of people on the 
Hodynsky Plains, at Moscow, on May 26, is 
officially stated to be 1138. No mention is made 
of the injured. It was during the progress of the 
great free feast given at the expense of the Czar 
to whoever desired to partake. 

June 15. A man giving his name as Clarke 
and his age at thirty years went into the New 
Amsterdam Bank, in New York, and demanded 
$6000 from President Wyckoff. Upon being re- 
fused he fatally shot Mr. Wyckoff, and then shot 
himself. 

June 17. The British steamer Drummond 
Castle sunk off the coast of Brittany, France. 
There were 247 persons on board, and their fate 
is unknown. Only three are known to have 
been saved. 

— The northern part of Japan ravaged by 
earthquakes and a tidal wave. The town of 
Kamaishi was destroyed and one thousand per- 
sons were killed. 

June 21. An express train on the Camden 
and Atlantic Railroad struck a wagon at Abse- 
con, killing George Huber, and his son Fred. 
Huber, of Germania, Harry Gessinger, of Phila- 
delphia, and probably fatally injuring Joseph 
Sahl, a member of the Atlantic county Board cf 
Freeholders. 



June 28. A series of explosions culminating in 
a terrible fall of rock occurred in the Twin Shaft 
colliery of the Newton Coal Mining Company, 
at Pittston, Pa., whereby sixty miners lost their 
lives. 

July 2. The corner-stone of the Jefferson 
Davis Monument, in Richmond, Va., was laid. 

July 15. The Duke of Orleans, son of the 
late Count of Paris, was formally betrothed to 
the Archduchess Marie Dorothea Amelia, 
daughter of the Archduke Joseph, of Austria. 

July 22. Princess Maud of Wales and Prince 
Charles of Denmark were married in the Chapel 
Royal, Buckingham Palace, London. The 
Queen, with her children and their families, was 
present. The Archbishop of Canterbury offi- 
ciated. 

July 30. The 5.40 P. M. express train on the 
Reading Railroad to Atlantic City crashed into 
an excursion train on the West Jersey Railroad 
on the meadows just outside of Atlantic City. 
Forty-four persons were killed and about seventy 
injured. 

August 3. Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jr., and Miss 
Grace Wilson were married. 

August 4. Moore Brothers, a firm of Chicago 
bankers, failed for a vast sum in consequence of 
speculative deals in Diamond Match and New 
York Biscuit stocks. The holdings of the firm 
in these stocks it was estimated amounted to 
$10,000,000. In consequence of the failure, the 
Chicago Stock Exchange closed indefinitely. 

August 7. The Coroner's jury investigating 
the railroad disaster at Atlantic City, in which 
forty-four persons lost their lives, returned three 
verdicts. The jury found Fair, the dead en- 
gineer, blamable for the accident in not giving 
heed in time to the semaphore signals and not 
having his train under proper control when ap- 
proaching the crossing. Towerman Hauser was 
also censured for giving the excursion train the 
right of way over a fast express. 

August 12. The meeting to formally notify 
Messrs. Bryan and Sewall of their nomination by 
the Democratic Party for President and Vice- 
President respectively, was held at Madison 
Square Garden. About twelve thousand persons 
were present. Mr. Bryan's speech was declared 
a failure, and people began leaving within fifteen 
minutes after he had begun speaking. The night 
was excessively warm. 

— Herr Lilienthal, the inventor of a famous 
flying machine, was killed by a fall from his ma- 
chine at Berlin. 

August 20. Dr. Nansen's Arctic exploring 
steamer Fram arrived safely at Skjervoe, a fish- 
ing post near the North Cape, Norway. 

August 25. The marriage of Miss Gertrude 
Vanderbilt, daughter of Mr. Cornelius Vander- 
bilt, to Mr. Harry Payne Whitney, was cele- 
brated at " The Breakers," her father's Newport 
residence. 

August 27. Said Khalid, the usurping Sultan 
of Zanzibar, having refused to surrender, the 
British warships bombarded and captured his 
palace. Said Khalid took refuge at the German 
Consulate. The steamer Glasgow, which was 
owned by the late Sultan and carried a number 
of guns, was sunk by the British warships. 

— In tha official trial of the cruiser Brooklyn, 
off the Massachusetts coast, the vessel developed 

I an average speed of 21.92 knots per hour. She 
I earned a premium of $350,000 for her builders. 



68 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



August 28. Li Hung Chang, Viceroy of China, 
arrived in New York on the steamship St. Louis. 
The steamer passed the double column of the 
warships of Admiral Bunce's fleet, and the flag- 
ship New York saluted. The guns of the other 
warships remained silent. Earl Li was received 
by Major General Thomas Ruger, Commander 
of the Department of the East, as the personal 
representative of President Cleveland, and was 
escorted to the Waldorf Hotel by the Sixth 
United States Cavalry. 

August 20. Li Hung Chang was received by 
President Cleveland at the residence of former 
Secretary of the Navy William C. Whitney. The 
meeting was of an informal character. 

August 31. A number of Americans at Hass- 
kein, Turkey, were attacked by Turks cm the 
30th, and their Armenian servants killed. A 
detachment of British marines in Constantinople 
clubbed and beat back a Turkish mob who were 
maltreating a number of Armenians in the streets. 
To a complaint from the Porte, the British Charge 
d'Aflfairs replied that the marines had a perfect 
right to protect the Armenians if the Turkish 
troops did not see fit to do so. 

September 1. Ten thousand employees under 
the War Department were classified in the civil 
service, in accordance with the order of Presi- 
dent Cleveland of May 6, which extended the 
operations of the law to practically all Govern- 
ment employees. 

September 3. The Sound-money Democratic 
Convention, at Indianapolis, nominated Senator 
John M. Palmer, of Illinois, for President and 
General Simon B. Buckner, of Kentucky, for 
Vice-President. The platform adopted denounces 
the free coinage of silver, and demands the main- 
tenance of the gold standard. 

— The northern provinces of Japan were 
again visited, on August 3, by an earthquake and 
storm, by which thousands of lives were lost. It 
was estimated that the death-roll would foot up 
as great as that of the tidal wave in June, when 
35,000 lives were lost. 

September 4. Dr. Thomas Gallagher, who had 
been released from an English prison after an in- 
carceration of thirteen years as a political offender, 
arrived in New York on the steamer St. Paul. 
Relatives and friends on a special boat went to 
Quarantine to take him off the steamer, prepara- 
tions having been made for a general jollification. 
This was given up. owing to the Doctor's mental 
condition. He was taken to a sanitarium. 

September 17. A wind and hail storm of un- 
usual severity swept over Eastern Pennsylvania 
and did heavy damage. About Hatfield, Mont- 
gomery county, the loss was estimated at $50,000. 
The storm also entered New Jersey at Burling- 
ton, and did much damage. 

September 21. Oliver W. Winthrop, convicted 
of abducting and robbing James Campbell, the 
Hawaiian millionaire, was sentenced to imprison- j 
ment for life in San Francisco. 

September 22. The Czar and Czarina of Rus- 
sia reached Scotland on a visit to Queen Victoria 
at Balmoral Castle. 

September 23. Queen Victoria was congratu- 
lated upon having occupied the throne longer 
than any other British sovereign. In accordance 
with the desire of the Queen the occasion will 
not be celebrated officially until 1897, when her 
Majesty will have completed the sixtieth year of 
her reign. 



September 30. A great hurricane from the 
West Indies swept up the Atlantic Coast, through 
Brunswick, Ga., to Savannah, where the damage 
exceeded $1,000,000; thence into South Caro- 
ina and along the coast to Virginia to the na- 
tional capital, where it uprooted trees, damaged 
Government buildings, destroyed the President's 
country house.Woodley, overturned church steep- 
les and created general havoc. Thence the 
hurricane plunged through Maryland and into 
Pennsylvania. The Columbia bridge over the 
Susquehanna river was destroyed and many lives 
were lost. The storm expended itself in New 
York State. Total loss of life estimated at four 
hundred ; loss to property estimated at $6,800,000. 

October 6. The Czar and Czarina arrived in 
Paris, and were greeted and cheered by a multi- 
tude of people. 

October 7. Lord Roseberry decided to resign 
the leadership of the Liberal party, owing to the 
antagonism of his opinions on the Eastern ques- 
tion with those of the mass of the Liberal party. 

October 12. The great West Indian hurricane 
raged with great severity along the entire New 
Jersey, Long Island and New England coasts. 
Train ser\ ice to the various points on the New 
Jersey shore was entirely cut off and great dam- 
age was reported. On the Long Island coast 
many buildings were washed away. The wind 
reached a maximum velocity of eighty miles an 
hour. 

October 19. The entire business portion of 
Enfield, Mass., comprising the property of twelve 
business firms, was burned. 

October 26. Li Hung Chang appointed Chi- 
nese Minister of Foreign Affairs. 

October 29. By an explosion of gas in the 
mine of the Lehigh and Wilkesbarre Coal Com- 
pany, at Wilkesbarre, six men lost their lives, 
two of them being members of the rescuing 
party, who were suffocated while attempting to 
reach the bodies of their comrades. 

November 6. Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Castle 
were placed on trial in London on charges of 
shoplifting. A verdict of not guilty was rendered 
as to Mr. Castle, but Mrs. Castle was found 
guilty on all the seven indictments and sentenced 
to three months' imprisonment. On November 
10 she was pardoned on account of her mental 
condition. 

November 9. The battle-ship Texas was sunk 
in the mud alongside one of the docks at the 
Brooklyn Navy Yard. The accident was caused 
by the breaking of part of the main injection 
valve. 

November 14. It is announced that a treaty 
of peace has been signed between Abyssinia and 
Italy. The new convention recognizes the com- 
plete independence of Ethiopia. KingMenelek 
declares free all the Italians taken prisoners 
during the recent campaign. 

November 16. The new store of John Wana- 
maker, formerly A. T. Stewart & Co., opened in 
New York. 

November 27. General Hereaux re-elected 
President of Santo Domingo. 

— President Cleveland purchased the residence 
of Mrs. Slidell, on Bayard avenue, Princeton, 
and, after his retirement from office, will, it is 
said, make that town his permanent home. The 
price paid for the property was between $30,000 
and $40,000. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



69 



RELIGIOUS CHRONOLOGY. 

[December, 1895, to December 1, 1896.] 

1895. — December 1. Dedication of the en- 
larged edifice of the Diamond Street Baptist 
Church. 

— Fiftieth anniversary of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church of the Redemption. 

— Dedication of Salem Memorial Chapel of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church of the Covenant. 

December 3. Twenty-fifth anniversary of 
Bethany Baptist Church, Fox Chase. 

December 5. Installation of the Rev. Ralph 
L. E. Graham as pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church, Chestnut Hill. 

December 11. Twenty-fifth anniversary of 
the occupancy of the present edifice by the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church of the Holy Apostles. 

December 15. Dedication of the new chapel 
of Siloam Methodist Episcopal Church, Seven- 
tieth street and Woodland avenue. 

December 18. Twenty-fifth anniversary of 
the Woman's Christian Association. 

1896. — January 5. Fortieth anniversary of the 
dedication of Blockley Baptist Church, West 
Philadelphia. 

January 12. Dwight L. Moody opens a series 
of revivals in Grace Baptist Temple. 

— Dedication of the enlarged chapel of the 
Harper Memorial Presbyterian Church. 

— Dedication of the chapel of the Milestown 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

January 20. Opening of the Diocesan Library 
and Reading Room in the Church House,Twelfth 
and Walnut streets. 

January 26. Dedication of St. Gabriel's Ro- 
man Catholic Church. 

February 2. Dedication of the new West 
Park Presbyterian Church, Fifty-fourth street 
and Lansdowne avenue. 

February 6. Opening of the new house of the 
American Catholic Historical Society, Spruce 
street above Seventh. 

February 9. Opening of the new chapel of the 
Summit Presbyterian Church, Germantown 

February 10. Installation of the Rev. J. Wil- 
bur Chapman, D. D., Charles A. Dickey, D. D., 
George Van Deurs, and J. C. Thompson, D. D., 
as pastors of Bethany Presbyterian Church. 

February 16. Dedication of the new Chelten 
Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church. 

February 19. Three-hundred-and-fiftieth an- 
niversary at the Academy of Music of the death 
of Martin Luther. 

February 28. Forty-fifth anniversary of the 
Rev. Dr. Morais assuming charge of the Mickve 
Israel Congregation. 

March 1. Twenty-fifth anniversary of St. 
Michael's German Lutheran Church. 

March 22. Dedication of the Providence 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

March 31. Installation of the Rev. Clinton 
B. Adams as pastor of the Park Congregational 
Church. 

April 3. Twenty-fifth anniversary of the or- 
dination of the Rev. John J. Ward, rector of the 
Roman Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart. 

April 6. Twenty-fifth anniversary of the ordi- 
nation of the Rev. Lawrence J. Wall, rector of 
St. Dominic's Roman Catholic Church. 

April 7. Fiftieth anniversary of the ordination 
of the Rev. Hippolytus S. Cache, S. J. 



April 8. Fortieth anniversary of St. Stephen's 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Germantown. 

April 26. Seventy-fifth anniversary of Trinity 
Protestant Episcopal Church, Southwark. 

April 29. Twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church of St. James the 
Less, Falls of Schuylkill. 

May 3. Fifty-eighth anniversary of the conse- 
cration of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, 
and the one-hundred-and-sixty-third anniversary 
of the dedication of the original church of the 
parish. 

— Twenty-fifth anniversary of the Germantown 
Young Men's Christian Association, 

May 6. Corner-stone laid of the new Taber- 
nacle Baptist Church, Chestnut street above 
Fortieth. 

May 10. One-hundred-and-fiftieth anniversary 
of the founding of the Spruce Street Baptist 
Church. 

— Corner-stone laid of the new building of 
the Mount Zion African Baptist Church, Ger- 
mantown. 

May 12. Celebration of the centennial of the 
First Unitarian Church, Chestnut street above 
Twenty-first. 

— Installation of the Rev. H. G. Furbay, Ph. 
D., as pastor of the Oxford Presbyterian Church, 
Broad and Oxford streets. 

May 14. Installation of the Rev. Francis A. 
Horton, D. D., as pastor of the Temple Presby- 
terian Church. 

— Installation of the Rev. Corydon C. Tyler, 
as pastor of Trinity Presbyterian Church, Chest- 
nut Hill. 

— Corner-stone laid of the Tioga Reformed 
Church, Park avenue and Westmoreland street. 

— Twenty-fifth anniversary of Our Mother of 
Sorrows Total Abstinence Beneficial Society. 

— Sixtieth anniversary of Trinity Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, Germantown. 

May 17. Dedication of the basement of St. 
Bonaventure's Roman Catholic Church. 

May 23. Corner-stone laid of the Albert 
Barnes Memorial Building, an addition to the 
First Presbyterian Church. 

May 28. The Rev. C. J. Vandegrift ap- 
pointed rector of St. Edward's Roman Catholic 
Church. 

May 31. Centennial of the organization of the 
First Methodist Episcopal Class Meeting, cele- 
brated in the First Church, Germantown. 

— Twenty-fifth anniversary of Central Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, Roxborough. 

— Dedication of the chapel known as the 
Presbyterian House of Peace, Tioga. 

June 2. Installation of the Rev. F. A. Hinck- 
ley as pastor of the Spring Garden Unitarian 
Church. 

June 4. Corner-stone laid of the first Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, Germantown. 

June 7. Dedication of the new edifice of St. 
Luke's Methodist Episcopal Church, Broad and 
Jackson streets. 

June 8. Organization of the South Broad 
Street Presbyterian Church. 

June 14. Dedication of the new Methodist 
Episcopal Church, Fox Chase. 

June 17. Ordination of the Rev. J. Alexander 
Clyde by a council of Baptist churches. 

June 21. Corner-stone laid of the new Catho- 
lic Protectory for Boys, at Fatland, Montgomery 
county. 



7o 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



— Twenty-fifth anniversary of the consecra- 
tion of Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church, 
Chestnut Hill. 

June 23. Benediction of the rectory of St. 
Paul's Protestant Episcopal Church, Kensington 
avenue and Butler street. 

June 28. Dedication of the Kensington Con- 
Church, Indiana avenue and C 



gregational 
street. 

June 29. 
House of 



Corner-stone laid of the Parish 
St. Mark's Protestant Episcopal 
Church, Frankford. 

July 6. The name of the Rev. A. T. Pierson, 
D. D., erased from the roll of the Presbytery of 
Philadelphia. 

July 19. Corner-stone laid of the Third Ger- 
man Baptist Church. 

July 27. Corner-stone laid of the East Park 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

August 18. Thirteen members of the Sister- 
hood of St. Francis celebrate the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of taking vows at the Convent of 
Our Lady of Angels, Glen Riddle. 

August 23. At St. Joseph's Convent, Chest- 
nut Hill, seventeen sisters make final profession, 
and eighteen novices take their first vows. 

August 28. The Rev. W. F. Clark. S.J., 
appointed rector of the Roman Catholic Church 
of the Gesu. 

August 31. Dedication of St. Katharine's 
Roman Catholic Church, Wayne. 

September 6. Celebration of the centennial 
of the founding of St. Augustine's Roman Catho- 
lic Church. 

Corner-stone laid of the new edifice of St. 
Michael's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Ger- 
mantown. 

September 13. Corner-stone laid of the 11 w 
edifice of St. Dominic's Roman Catholic Church, 
Holmesburg. 

— Dedication of Bethesda Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

— Re-opening of the Fourth Reformed Church, 
Manayunk. 

— Twenty-fifth anniversary of the Rev. Dr. 
P. H. Dippel as a minister celebrated at Zion 
Reformed Church. 

September 15. Dedication of St. Andrew's 
Brotherhood House. Twentieth and Race streets. 

September 20. Formal opening of the new 
chapd and Sunday-school building of Olivet 
Presbyterian Church, Twenty-second and Mount 
Vernon streets. 

— Dedicati on of the Tioga Reformed Church. 

— Thirtieth anniversary of the Second Baptist 
Church, Germantown. 

September 27. Unveiling of a Reredos, the 
gift of a member of St. Timothy's Protestant 
Episcopal Church, Roxborough. 

September 30. Dedication of the restored edi- 
fice of the Presbyterian Church, Abington. 

October 4. Dedication of the new edifice of 
the Roman Catholic Church of the Nativity. 

— Dedication of St. Andrew's Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, Fifth and Watkins streets. 

October 21. Sixteenth Council of the Synod 
of New York and Philadelphia meets in the 
Reformed Episcopal Church of our Redeemer. 

October 23. Organization of the East Park 
Presbyterian Church. 

October 24. Corner-stone laid of the Wither- 
spoon Building of the Presbyterian Board of 
Publication, Walnut and Juniper streets. 



October 25. Reopening service of the Memo- 
rial Presbyterian Church. 

— Fiftieth anniversary of the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church of the Messiah, Port Richmond. 

— Fortieth anniversary of Scott Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

— Twenty-fifth anniversary of the pastorate 
of the Rev. Loyal V. Graham, D. D., at the 
Olivet Presbyterian Church. 

October 27. Installation of the Rev. David 
J. Beale, D. D.. as pastor of the First Presbyte- 
rian Church, Northern Liberties, Buttonwood 
street above Fifth. 

October 28. Illumination ot the Cathedral of 
St. Peter and St. Paul with electric light. 

October 29. Installation of the Rev. U. F. 
Smiley as pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church, Holmesburg. 

— Reopening of the Temple Presbyterian 
Church after the completion of improvements 
and the introduction of electric light. 

November 1. Dedication of St. Margaret's 
Home, Germantown. 

November 5. Annual Convention of the 
Daughters of the King in the Protestant Epis- 
copal Church of the Incarnation. 

— Ordination and installation of the Rev. H. 
C. Willoughby as pastor of the Talmage Memo- 
rial Reformed Church. 

November 9. Opening of the Mission School 
and Reading Room for the Chinese under the 
auspices of the Christian League. 

November 10. Installation of the Rev. C. M. 
Alford as pastor of the Westminster Presbyterian 
Church. 

November 15. Dedication of the new edifice 
of St. Stephen's Roman Catholic Church, Broad 
and Butler streets. 

November 17. Blessing of the Virginia Norris 
Harrison Memorial School-house of the Home of 
the Merciful Saviour. 

November 22. Reopening of the new Roman 
Catholic Chapel of the Immaculate Conception, 
connected with St. Vincent's Seminary, German- 
town. 

— Dedication of a Memorial Tablet to the 
Rev. Stewart Stone at the Protestant Episcopal 
Memorial Church of the Holy Comforter. 

— Dedication of the East Park Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

— Twenty-fifth anniversary of St. Paul's Ger- 
man Independent Lutheran Church. 

November 24. Installation of the Rev. John 
Graham as pastor of the East Park Presbyterian 
Church. . . 

November 29. Rev. B. L. Agnew, D. D., 
resigns the pastorate of Bethlehem Presbyterian 
Church to accept the Secretaryship of the Board 
of Ministerial Relief. 

November 30. Dedication of the Providence 
Coffee House and Reading Room, 1812 South 
street. 

It is said that a steamer will leave England 
with a cable which is to be laid in the Amazon 
river from Para to Manao. 



In the Abbey of Cwm Hir, supposed to be the 
resting-place of the last native Prince of Wales, 
an ivy stem, three inches in diameter, is found to 
have raised a stone column, and to have pushed 
it two and one-half inches away from the wall to 
which it belongs. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



7i 



LOCAL NECROLOGY. 
[From December 1, 1895, to December 1, 1896.] 

Allison, Hon. Joseph, President Judge of 
Court of Common Pleas, No. 1, aged 77, Feb- 
ruary 8. 

Audenried, William G., President of the Phila- 
delphia Milling Company, etc., aged 63, July 28. 

Bahl, C. H., well-known physician, June 14. 

Barclay, Clement Biddle, philanthropist, aged 
76. August 10. 

Bartley, Joshua C, Mechanical Engineer 
Water Bureau, aged 77, July 22. 

Bayersdorfer, Moses M., Vice-President Citi- 
zens' Trust Company, aged 71, November 22. 

Becker, William P , ex-Select Councilman, 
aged 71, August n. 

Bell, Samuel Wilson, Vice-President of Farm- 
ers' and Mechanics' National Bank, aged 69, 
March 29. 

Bergdoll, Louis, Jr., President of Bergdoll 
Brewing Company, aged 40, at Ridley Park, 
September 9. 

Blenkinsop, The Rev. Peter, Jr., aged 78, 
October 23. 

Bourke, John Gregory, Captain U. S. A., aged 

50, June 8. 

Bower, Henry A., druggist, aged 80, April 28. 

Boyd, Augustus, a retired iron manufacturer 
and banker, aged 70, October 6. 

Brennan, Rev. Daniel A., Rector of the Ro- 
man Catholic Church of the Assumption, aged 

51, July 13. 

Brown, Rev. Charles, oldest Presbyterian 
minister in Philadelphia, aged 91, February 14. 

Chandler, William A., M. D., aged 63, Dec- 
ember 19. 

Clouds, John, Alderman of the District of 
Kensington from 1840 to 1870, aged 90, Novem- 
ber 29. 

Cope, Josephine Porter, widow of Caleb Cope, 
aged 61, March 8. 

Darby, H. Albert, a tenor of wide repute, 
aged 41, April 25. 

Deacon, Charles R., Press Agent of the Read- 
ing Railroad, aged 54, May 10. 

Doyle, James B., President of the Northwest- 
ern National Bank, aged 59, at Atlantic City, 
September 15. 

Earley, Edward S., undertaker, aged 74, at 
Asbury Park, N. J., July 19. 

Earnshaw, Alfred, President of the Earn Line 
Steamship Company, aged 52, July 24. 

Fernon, Thomas S., first President of North 
Penn Railroad, aged 79, June 10. 

Fitler, Alfred, one of the oldest conveyancers 
in the city, aged 77, March 19. 

Fitler, Edwin H., ex-Mayor, at Torresdale, 
aged 71, May 31. 

Ford, Henry C, President of the Pennsylvania 
Fish Commission, aged 60, August 17. 

Fox, George S., banker, aged 65, June 7. 

Freeman, James A., Councilman, aged 75, 
April 8. 

Freeman, Walter, Pennsylvania Railroad offi- 
cial, aged 71, June 12. 

Friedlaender, Robert, publisher of the Abend- 
Post, aged 64, September 13. 

Gates, Jabez, President of Mutual Fire Insu- 
rance Company, of Germantown, aged 72, No- 
vember 13. 

Gehr, Rev. Nicholas, D. D., pastor of Zion 
Reformed Church, aged 79, March 3. 



Gibbons, Michael, builder, aged 73, June 16. 

Gile, George W., Colonel U. S. A., aged 66, 
February 26. 

Gimbel. Adam, merchant, aged 87, June 28. 

Grew, Mary, prominent Abolitionist, aged 83, 
October 11. 

Haevernick, Prof. August, musician and 
teacher, aged 67, in Baltimore, August 6. 

Hart, Samuel, ex-Select Councilman and 
prominent builder, aged 61, January 7. 

Hazlehurst, Henry, lawyer,aged 45, January n. 

Homer, Benjamin, retired merchant, aged 71, 
July 31. 

Houston, William C, ex-President Union 
League, aged 79, at Atlantic City, April 19, 

Keely, Robert Neff, credited with making the 
first photograph taken in this city, aged 68, 
February 8. 

Kenton, James, ex-Councilman Fifth ward, 
aged 60, August 10. 

Knight, Thomas C, Chairman Philadelphia 
Stock Exchange, aged 67, May 13. 

Lambdin, George Cochran, widely-known art- 
ist, aged 66, January 28. 

Lewis, William Henry, firm of John B. Ellison 
& Sons', aged 60, September 27. 

Lippincott, Joshua W., firm of Lippincott, 

iohnson & Co., cloth merchants, aged 56, at 
farragansett Pier, August 17. 

MacKinney, James G., Common Councilman, 
aged 43, July 7. 

McAdam, Dr. Alexander, member of the 
Board of Education, September 10. 

McConnell, William Wirt, ex-member of the 
Legislature, aged 62, December 26. 

McManemin, John C, ex-City Commissioner, 
aged 56, at Atlantic City, July 9. 

Mallet, Provost Grayson, M. D., Surgeon in 
U. S. Army during Mexican War, aged 73, May 1. 

Mann, Col. William B., prothonotary, aged 80, 
October 17. 

Martin, Rev. Isaac, M. D., Assistant Rector 
Old Swedes Protestant Episcopal Church, aged 
70, September 6. 

Matsinger, Adam, retired manufacturer, aged 
88. January 20. 

Mercer, Capt. Samuel, U. S. N., aged 59, 
July 22. 

Merrill, Lewis, Major General U. S. A., aged 
62, February 27. 

Metz, Robert Porter, manufacturer, aged 79, 
January 23. 

Miller, Charles F., murder detective, of the 
firm of Miller & Sharkey, aged 66, April 29. 

Mohr, Herman, composer, aged 64, May 25. 

Morgan, William, first President Mechanics' 
Fire Insurance Company, aged 78, October 14. 

Nisbet, Michael, Grand Secretary of Grand 
Lodge of Masons, Pennsylvania, aged 67, May 7. 

Northrop, George, member of the Bar for fifty 
years, aged 75, June 1. 

Pedrick, Washington F., Secretary of Geneva 
Arbitration, French Claims Commission, etc., 
aged 50, August 10. 

Peirce, Dr. Thomas May, founder and prin- 
cipal of the Peirce College of Business, aged 49, 
May 16. 

Perkins , Howard , Superintendent of the County 
Pr'son, aged 62, November 24. 

Pfaff, Augustus, Assistant Grand Secretary of 
the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, I. O. O. F., 
aged 67, July 3. 



72 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Piper, Dr. William A. , physician, former mem- 
ber Board of Health, aged 77, July 6. 

Posey, Dr. David R., well-known physician, 
at Jersey City, aged 67, February 3. 

Raue, Dr. Charles G., Homoeopathic physi- 
cian, one of the founders of the Hahnemann 
College, aged 76, August 21. 

Reed. Henry, Associate Judge Court Common 
Pleas, No. 3, at New York, aged 50, February 23. 

Reilly. William M., General, Inspector of 
County Prison, aged 74, February 29. 

Reynolds, Rowell S., Captain in Fifth New 
Jersey Volunteers, aged 72, July 2. 

Richards, Dr., William W. L., well-known 
physician, aged 74, January 15. 

Richardson, Joseph H., President of the 
Lumberman's Exchange, aged 53, August 3. 

Ring, Harry B., ex-Assemblyman, aged 45, 
November 12. 

Roberts, Owen, operative builder, aged 68, 
April 21. 

Rorke, James, retired builder, September 9. 

Roth, Jacob, organist and teacher of German, 
aged 59, July 3. 

Schaeffer, Charles William. D. D., LL. D.,for 
more than thirty years a Professor in the Luthe- 
ran Theological Seminary, aged 83, March 15. 

Scott, John, General Solicitor Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company, aged 72, November 30. 

Scott, Robert, retired florist, aged 78, July 22. 

Smethurst, John, painter and former member 
of Councils, December 29. 

Smith, Russell, scenic artist, aged 84, Novem- 
ber 8. 

Sterling, Dr. John, aged 65, April 6. 

Stevenson, John, aged 105, at Old Man's 
Home, July 19. 

Stewardson, John, architect, drowned while 
skating on Schuylkill, aged 38, January 6. 

Stokes, Lisle, conveyancer, aged 51, Feb'y 13. 

Styer, Dr. Charles, physician, aged 56, July 7. 

Swindells, Rev. William H., D. D., editor 
Philadelphia Methodist, aged 54, at Ocean 
Grove, September 9. 

Thackara, Benjamin, Sr., founder of the 
Thackara Manufacturing Company, aged 77. 
September 15. 

Toland, Rev. E. H., missionary, aged 72, No- 
vember 18. 

Tomlinson, Jose R., commission merchant, 
aged 66, January 22. 

Townsend, Joseph B., lawyer, aged 75, Octo- 
ber 11. 

Van Horn, Charles, one of the City Commis- 
sioners who signed the Consolidation Act, in 
1854, aged 76, October 5. 

Van Leer, Joseph W., livery stable proprietor, 
aged 77, May 25. 

Vaux, Mary Wain, widow of ex-Mayor Richard 
Vaux, aged 81, December 31. 

Walker, Mahlon M., Homoeopathic physician, 
aged 61, April 1. 

Wallis, William H., a veteran actor who was a 
member of the stock companies of the Arch and 
Walnut Street Theatres, aged 70, October 28. 

Warburton, Charles E., proprietor of the 
Evening Telegraph, aged 60, at Atlantic City, 
September 2. 

Widener, Mrs. H. Josephine, wife of P. A. B. 
Widener, aged 60, at Bar Harbor, August 1. 

Whitaker, Thomas Duke, first President of 
Philadelphia and Bustleton Railroad, March 7. 



Williamson, T. Roney, architect, aged 44, 
September 15. 

Wilson, John A., architect, aged 59, January 19. 

Wister, Dr. Jones, at Branchtown, aged 71, 
February 24. 

Young, Emerson K... former pastor of Grace 
Methodist Episcopal Church, at Saranac Lake, 
N. Y., aged 54, November 29. 



of 



GENERAL NECROLOGY. 

[From December 1, 1895, to December 1, 1896.] 

Angeline. the daughter of Chief Seattle, after 
whom Seattle, Washington, was named, died in 
that city May 31. She was one of the most noted 
celebrities on the North Pacific coast. In the 
early fifties Angeline, at the peril of her own life, 
apprised the population of Seattle of an intended 
massacre, thus saving three or four hundred lives. 

Astrup, Eyoind, Norwegian explorer, perished 
while on a hunting expedition, January 20. 

Baker, L. B.. Lieut, in D. C. Cavalry, famous 
as the man who captured J. Wilkes Booth, at 
Lansing, Mich, May 24. 

Battenberg, Prince Henry of, on board British 
cruiser Blonde, aged 38, January 20. 

Bowen. Henry C editor and proprietor of The 
Independent, aged S5, at New York, February 24. 

Bowman, Arthur I., first Governor of West 
Virginia, at Parkersburg, W. Va., April 19. 

Bristow, Hon. Benjamin H., ex-Secretary 
the Treasury, aged 64, June 22. 

Bunner, H. C, editor of Puck, aged 41, at 
Nutly, N. J., May 11. 

Cleveland, Right Rev. Dr. Arthur Bishop, 
Protestant Episcopal Church, Diocese of West- 
ern New York, aged 78, at Clifton Springs, N. Y., 
July 20. 

Corson, Hiram, oldest medical practitioner in 
Montgomery county, aged 92, at Plymouth Meet- 
ing, Pa., March 4. 

Count Taafe, formerly Prime Minister of Aus- 
tria, at Elischau, Bohemia. December 1. 

Crouch, Prof. Frederick William, composer of 
" Kathleen Mavourneen," etc , aged 88, at Port- 
land, Maine, August 18. 

Dodge, Mary Abigail (Gail Hamilton), aged 
about 60, at Wendham, Mass., August 17. 

Ewing, Thomas, General U. S. A., died of in- 
juries received by being struck by cable car in 
New York, aged 69, January 21. 

Ferris, George W. G., inventor and builder of 
the Ferris Wheel at the World's Fair, at Pitts- 
burg, November 22. 

Field, Kate, aged 56, at Honolulu, May 19. 

Fowler, Prof. Lorenzo Niles, phrenologist, aged 
86, at New York, September 2. 

Fyffe, Joseph, Rear Admiral U. S. N., at 
Pierce, Neb., February 25. 

Garrett, Robert, ex- President of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad, aged 49, at Deer Park, Md., 
July 29. 

Gibson, William Hamilton, author and artist, 
aged 46, at Washington, Conn., July 17. 

Gillam, Bernard, the famous cartoonist, aged 
38, at Canajoharie, N. Y., January 19. 

Gillam, Sewell, manager art department ana 
judge, at Mt. Vernon, N. Y., September 5, 

Goode, George Brown, Assistant Secretary of 
the Smithsonian Institute and author on icthyo- 
logical subjects, at Lamir Heights, Washington, 
1 D. C, September 6. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



73 



Gould, Benjamin A., astronomer, in Boston, 
November 26 

Greenhalge, Frederick T., Governor of Massa- 
chusetts, aged 54, at Lowell, Mass., March 5. 

Harris, Sir Augustus, London, June 22. 

Harper, Joseph Wesley, ex-member of pub- 
lishing firm of Harper & Brothers, at New York, 
July 21. 

Hirsch, Baron Maurice De, financier and phil- 
anthropist, aged 68, at Pressburg, Hungary, 
April 20. 

Kenrick, Peter Richard, ex-Archbishop of St. 
Louis, Mo., aged 90, March 4. 

Lawton, General A. R., ex-Minister to Vienna, 
78 years, at Clifton Springs, N, Y., July 2. 

Lewis, James, actor, aged 56, at West Hamp- 
ton, L. I., September 10. 

Mayo, Frank, actor, aged 57, near Denver, 
June 8. 

McGurk, Rev. Edward, ex- President Holy 
Cross College, aged 55, at Fair Haven, Mass., 
July 3. 

M. Challemel-Lacour, Minister of Foreign 
Affairs in the Cabinet of Jules Ferry, aged 75, at 
Paris, October 26. 

Meignan, Cardinal, Archbishop of Tours, aged 
79, January 20. 

Murray, Eli H., ex-Governor of Utah, at Bow- 
ling Green, Ky., November 18. 

Nasrid Deen, Shah of Persia, assassinated near 
Teheran by a revolutionary fanatic, May 1. 

Nelson, Thomas H., ex-Minister to Chile, aged 
76, at Terre Haute, Ind., March 14. 

North, John Thomas, the nitrate king, aged 
54, at London, Eng., May 5. 

Nye, Edgar Wilson, the well-known humorist, 
aged 46, near Ashville, N. C, February 22. 

Payne, Henry B., ex-United States Senator, 
aged 86, at Cleveland, Ohio, September 9. 

Pratt, Enoch, banker and philanthropist, aged 
88, at Baltimore, September 17. 

Right Hon. and Most Rev. Edward White 
Benson, D. D., Archbishop of Canterbury, aged 
67, at Hawarden. October 11. 

Runyon, Hon. Theodore, American Ambassa- 
dor to Berlin, aged 74, January 26. 

Russell, William E., thirty-third Governor of 
Massachusetts, age 39, suddenly, near Little 
Pabos, Quebec. 

Say, Jean Baptiste Leon, celebrated French 
statesman, aged 70, at Paris, April 21. 

Seay, Thomas, ex-Governor of Alabama, at 
Greensboro, Ala., March 30. 

Sigfried, Joshua K., General, aged 64, at Potts- 
ville, July 19. 

Smith, William Henry, General Manager West- 
ern Associated Press, aged 66, at Lake Forest, 
111., July 27. 

Steinway, William, piano manufacturer, aged 
60, at New York, November 30. 

Stowe, Harriet Beecher, author, aged 84, at 
Hartford, Conn., July 1. 

Thurman, Allen G., statesman, aged 82, at 
Columbus, Ohio, December 12. 

Trumbull, Lyman, ex-United States Senator, 
aged 83, at Chicago, June 25. 

Williams, Joseph H., ex-Governor of Maine, 
July 19- 

The Siberian railway, when completed, will 
be nearly five thousand miles long. Already 
about seventeen hundred miles have been com- 
pleted. 



THE INVASION OF THE TRANSVAAL 

The abortive raid of Dr. Jameson into the 
Transvaal was one of the sensational events of 
the year. Dr. Jameson, acting as administrator 
of the great new protectorate of South Africa 
known as Rhodesia (after Cecil J. Rhodes), 
crossed the border into the Transvaal, or South 
African Republic, with a mounted force of foo 
men. The Dutch yeomanry engaged with the 
invaders, and after heavy fighting Jameson was 
obliged to surrender. The British colony is 
ruled politically by the South African Chartered 
Company, of which Cecil Rhodes, who was 
also Prime Minister of Cape Colony, is manager. 
Dr. Jameson was his administrative agent. 
The Transvaal, or South African Republic, is 
occupied by Boers, or Dutch farmers, who have 
established for themselves absolute independ- 
ence, except that under an agreement, made in 
1884, the relations of the Dutch Republic with 
foreign countries is to be in conformity with the 
will of Great Britain. The Republic is ruled by 
President Paul Kruger, a man of great force, 
whose sterling honesty has proved more than a 
match for Chamberlain's diplomacy. The dis- 
covery of gold in the Transvaal led to the 
British invasion. Thousands of adventurers, 
chiefly from England, flocked to the country of 
the Boers in search of gold. They are known as 
Uitlanders, or foreigners, and though they out- 
number the Boers four to one are not allowed 
to take part in the government unless they be- 
come naturalized. The Englishmen and other 
foreigners sought to retain their home citizen- 
ship and at the same time exercise the right of 
suffrage in the land of the Boers. Cecil Rhodes 
appears to have sent an armed force to the bor- 
der to protect the Uitlanders in case of neces- 
sity, and then the Uitlanders called for help, 
whereupon Dr. Jameson moved towards Johan- 
nesberg, as before related. The invasion was 
promptly disavowed by the Home Office. Dr. 
Jameson was superseded, Mr. Rhodes resigned 
as Prime Minister of Cape Colony, and subse- 
quently President Kruger gave up Dr. Jameson 
and his companions, who were taken to England 
for trial. One event of the flurry that aroused 
a great deal of feeling was the sending by Em- 
peror William, of Germany, of a congratulatory 
telegram to President Kruger. Great Britain 
actually prepared for war, but nothing came of 
the incident. The Uitlanders are increasing in 
numbers so much faster than the Boers that ul- 
timately they will no doubt get control of the 
brave little Dutch Republic. For the present, 
however. President Kruger has maintained the 
independence of the Republic. Severe sentences 
were passed upon Uitlanders — American and 
English — convicted of conspiring against the 
Republic, but the sentences were afterwards 
commuted. President Kruger about the same 
time published documentary evidence showing 
that Cecil Rhodes and others were engaged in 
an attempt to overthrow the Transvaal govern- 
ment. 



Mr. P. B. Delany, at a lecture given in New 
York, sent a message over a telegraph wire at 
the rate of over seventeen hundred words a min- 
ute. This feat is performed by first perforating 
a continuous tape, from which the signals are 
transmitted at unlimited speed. 



74 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



PENNSYLVANIA'S VOTE. 
Official Returns of the Elections of 1896, with the Presidential Vote of 1892. 



Presidential Electors. 



Counties. 



c 

** 'J 



Adams 

Allegheny 

Armstrong. ... 

Beaver 

Bedford 

Berks 

Blair 

Bradford 

Bucks 

Butier 

Cambria 

Cameron 

Carbon 

Centre 

Chester 

Clarion 

Clearfield 

Clinton 

Columbia 

Crawford 

Cumberland 

Dauphin 

Delaware 

Elk 

Erie 

Fayette 

Forest 

Franklin 

Fulton... 

Greene 

Huntingdon 

Indiana 

Jefferson 

Juniata 

Lackawanna.... 

Lancaster 

Lawrence 

Lebanon 

Lehigh 

Luzerne 

Lycoming 

McKean 

Mercer 

Mifflin 

Monroe 

Montgomery.... 

Montour 

Northampton . . . 
Northumberland 

Perry 

Philadelphia.... 

Pike 

Potter 

Schuylkill 

Snyder 

Somerset 

Sullivan 

Susquehanna.... 

Tioga 

Union 

Venango 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne . . 

Westmoreland . . 

Wyoming 

York 



Totals 

Pluralities. 



3.884 
45.788 

4.709 

4.890 

4.301 

10,077 

7.407 
8,132 
8,230 

5.019 
6.020 
829 
3.179 
3.6o8 
10,982 

2.543 
4.765 
2,572 

2.336 

7.152 
4.52° 
11,010 
9,272 
1.438 
8,918 

6.*59 

93* 

5.725 

918 

2,126 

3.994 

4.559 

4,100 

1,621 

10,729 

20,126 

4.385 

5.403 

7,089 

14,118 

5.736 

3.594 

5.874 

2.175 

1,020 

13.591 
1,108 

6,892 

6,170 

3,120 

116,685 

477 

2.315 

11,426 

2,307 

4,670 

873 
4.531 
6,706 
2,308 

4.^99 
3.838 
8,060 
2,690 
10,840 
2,029 
9,052 



516,011 
452,064 



o 1 " 



63.947 



3.716 

30,867 

3.512 

3,822 

3.684 

18,602 

5.265 

4,080 

8,390 

4,161 

6,259 

701 

3.541 
4.624 
7.850 
3.746 
6,108 

3.07S 
4.929 
6,166 
5.446 
7.520 
5.520 
2,126 

7.539 

7,508 

663 

4.05 
1,210 

3.977 
2.675 
2.134 
3.251 
1,695 
10,351 
10,326 

2.339 
3.409 
9.699 

15.734 
7.532 
2.843 
4,931 
2,029 
3.078 

13,621 

1.877 

10,320 

6,942 

2,705 
84,470 
1,150 
1,699 
13.677 
1.5" 
2,262 
1,266 

3.3=3 
2,921 
1,569 
3,288 

2,735 
6,847 
2,915 

10,747 
1,905 

12,822 



452,064 






56 
.158 
199 
322 
104 
248 
309 
527 
257 
636 



43 
"3 
3 I( > 
901 

153 
646 
183 
35i 
729 
282 
596 
462 
80 
702 

393 
io3 

X83 
20 
127 
150 
308 
416 
85 
999 
683 

449 

3d 

213 

1,299 

899 

464 

637 

153 

48 

447 

5 1 

312 

536 

151 
1,309 

23 
135 
290 

30 
206 

82 
55i 
347 

95 
596 
457 
555 
433 
4i5 
126 

403 



c d. 



25,011 



4,l67 
76,691 

6,309 
6,8l6 
4980 

t4,3 l8 

10,365 

9,422 

9.798 
6,807 
8,838 
925 
4.S H 
4.870 

: . 

3.325 
7-359 
3.486 
3.266 

7.851 

6,164 

14.6/9 

13.952 

2.80-2 

".755 
9.218 

1.224 
6,726 
1,080 

8,438 

4,956 
5.803 
5.479 
2.057 
18,654 

24,337 

6.184 
7,268 
9.497 

22,599 
8.045 
5,046 
7,262 
2,662 
I.4!I 

17.329 
1,381 
9,-62 
8,620 
3.526 
176,462 
775 
3.255 

16,985 

2,564 
5,861 
1,206 

5.275 
7,892 

2.573 
5. no 
4.846 

10,764 
3.708 

14,899 
2,370 

12,223 



e • 

r-. a 



*Q 



3.767 
28.7S2 

3.738 
3.908 
3.554 
13.099 
4.694 
4.388 
6,685 

4-947 
6,660 

556 
3-543 
4,4 
5.904 
3.952 
6,152 
3. r ti 
4,808 

8.383 
5.147 
6,366 

4.071 
2,664 
8.556 
8.157 
805 
4,335 
1,228 
4,102 



be 
c 

V c. 



930 
168 

202 

73 

233 

385 
381 

197 

285 

211 

41 
127 

251 
368 
204 

555 
158 
418 
285 

324 
466 
184 

87 
336 
355 

85 
158 

24 
61 



726,998 



2.157 


ISO 


2,102 


186 


3.402 


407 


1.794 


44 


11,645 


806 


8,145 


579 


2,691 


285 


2.751 


213 


9.318 


206 


16,367 


810 


7,128 


1. 031 


2.777 


308 


5,500 


270 


2,022 


118 


2,8ll 


133 


9.985 


333 


I.694 


58 


IO,032 


326 


7.159 


574 


2,423 


ic6 


63.323 


993 


I,o8o 


11 


1,958 


118 


14,552 


244 


1,286 


32 


2,234 


147 


1.247 


92 


3.292 


386 


2,111 


258 


1,105 


114 


5.192 


53i 


3.048 


312 


7,126 


348 


2,408 




10,529 


357 


1,885 


"3 


12,911 


375 


422,054 


19.274 






98 

452 

22 

37 

47 

416 

167 
58 

312 
26 
81 

9 
130 

93 

248 
20 

91 
104 

77 

50 

102 

263 
184 

44 

193 

60 



42 
97 
27 
35 
35 
112 
498 
13 



325 
304 
167 

55 
3i 
76 
79 
606 

56 
3*o 
120 

54 
3."S 

25 

28 

359 
23 
14 
29 
36 
72 
54 
32 
32 
83 
21 
90 
17 
365 
11,000 



Congressmen-at-Large. 






4,084 

73.463 
6,243 

6,691 

4,894 
13.790 

10,070 

9,185 
9.683 

6,646 

8.553 
864 

4.220 

4.782 
13.929 
3.256 
7.197 
3.326 
3.121 

7.759 
5.816 

14,363 

»3.477 

2,623 
11.523 
9.156 
1,180 
6,650 

1,050 

2.335 
4.843 

5.754 
5.345 
1.939 

17.883 

24,180 
6.083 
7,120 
9.252 

21,952 
7,681 
4.827 
7.243 
2.583 
1,329 

16,917 
1.299 
9,701 
; ".4 : 7 
3.441 
175,052 

705 
3.203 

16,514 
2.542 
5.757 
1. 115 
5.272 
7.788 
2,498 
5- "4 
4.685 

10,295 
3.395 

14.753 
2,374 

11,966 

710,716 



Q 



4,068 

74,005 

6,225 

6,681 

4,886 

13.714 

9.991 

9.048 

9.655 

6,610 

8,501 

845 

4.185 

4.736 

13,000 

3.226 

7.159 
3.289 

3. 10 3 

7.733 

5.769 

14,322 

I3.4I5 

2,612 

11,601 

9. '47 
1,169 
6,638 
1.043 
2,315 
4,802 

5.709 

5.331 

1.927 

17,614 

24.165 
6,073 
7,087 
9,180 

21,810 
7,640 
4,818 
7.210 

2,529 
1,297 
16.886 
1,277 
9.632 
8,406 

3.425 

174.492 

670 

3,201 

16,199 
2,527 
5.75° 
1.075 
5.225 
7.760 
2,478 
5.C92 
4.670 

10,241 
3.346 

14,694 
2,324 

11,931 






708,101 



3.759 
28,304 

3.645 
3.871 
3.501 
17,466 
4.705 
4.148 
6.785 
4.895 
6.587 
542 
3.317 
4.553 
5.947 
3.971 
6.155 
2,872 

4.697 
6,872 

5.165 
6,210 

3.871 
2.715 
8,615 
8,093 
700 

4.337 
1,219 

3.995 
2,202 

2,034 

3.332 

1.753 

10,825 

7.994 
2,645 
2,675 
9.312 

16,734 
7.118 
2,694 
5.058 
2,045 
2.690 
9.891 
1,610 
9,682 

7.159 
2.354 

61,079 
1,065 
1,907 

14,152 
1,268 
2,223 
1.158 
3.356 
2,168 

1.075 
4.035 
2,646 

6.937 
2,435 

10,492 
1,887 

12,841 



412,051 



IS 

3.730 
28,549 

3.635 
4,113 
3.498 
17.567 
4,657 
3.874 
6.705 
4.827 
6,606 
542 
3.295 
4.538 
5.89s 
5.^4 
6,205 
2,862 

4.671 
8,167 

5.144 
6,136 
3.842 

2.715 

9,068 

§,091 

722 

4.327 
1,216 
3.982 
2,207 
2,569 

3.314 
1,770 
10,678 
8,029 
2,786 
2,684 
9.293 
16,733 
7,096 
2,670 

5.291 
2,039 
2.675 
9,896 
1,608 
9,699 
7.053 
2,349 
60,454 
1,047 

1.939 
14,011 
1,268 
2,231 
1.135 
3.499 
2.649 
1,074 
4,206 
2,832 
7,007 
2,422 
10,478 
1,866 
12,824 

416,476 



The McKinley Citizens' ticket received 1302 votes; the Socialist Labor 1683, and the National 870. The Free 
Silver Party's vote was for Bryan and Sewall, making the total vote for Bryan and Sewall 427,127. The McKinley 
Citizens' vote was for McKinley and Hobart, making the total vote for those candidates 728,300, and giving the 
Republican candidates a plurality of 301,173. Bryan and Watson received 6103 votes. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



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PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



PHILADELPHIA CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICTS, NOV. 3, 1896. 

First District. 

Bingham, James, Jenkins. 

Wards. (Rep.) (Dem.) (Pro.) 

1 9129 47 8 3 52 

2 2841 1791 14 

7 5334 8 97 *5 

26 5700 2428 36 

30 4474 x 776 14 

36 4988 2287 19 

Totals 33466 13962 150 

Plurality 19504 

Second District. 

Adams, Mullins, Cooper, 

Wards. (Rep.) (Dem.) (Pro.) 

8 3056 597 I2 

9 x 433 39o 13 

10 3876 1120 36 

13 3°93 8l 4 16 

14 333° II 9 I 2 5 

20 7417 1984 46 

Totals 22205 6096 148 

Plurality 16109 

Third District. 

Halterman, McAleer, Hudson, 

Wards. (Rep.) (Dem.) (F. Sil.) 

3 !4 8 2 982 339 

4 881 2419 222 

5 IQ 53 2 543 2I 7 

6 627 1101 131 

11 822 1056 157 

12 1501 958 197 

16 1540 11S6 328 

17 l6 5° x 4 10 473 

Totals 9556 "655 2064 

Plurality 2099 

Fourth District. 

Young, Cunning- Eavenson, 

Wards. (Rep.) ham, (Dem.) (Pro.) 

15 7529 2538 52 

21 4846 1385 28 

24 7997 2 5 2 ° 83 

27 6235 JI 97 56 

28 9093 2533 98 

29 8946 2560 75 

3 2 7364 1176 64 

34 3 8 9 8 1595 61 

37 3 2 39 ™3 2 23 

Totals 59147 16536 540 

Plurality 42611 

Fifth District. 

Harmer, Wright, Christian, 

Wards. (Rep.) (Dem.) (Pro.) 

18 4996 1747 30 

19 8981 2633 55 

22 8473 1705 67 

23 43 21 9*4 69 

2 5 5937 2745 23 

3 1 5 026 1443 22 

33 6869 2586 50 

35 2750 711 21 

Totals 47953 M484 337 

Plurality 33469 



VOTE OF PHILADELPHIA. 
Official Return of Votes Cast at the Elec- 
tion on February 18, 1896. 



CITY SOLICITOR 



Wards. 



MAGISTRATES. 






a 

2 



3- 
4- 
5- 
6.. 

7- 

8.. 

9- 

10., 

11.. 
12. 

13. 
14. 

15. 

16. 

17- 
18. 

10. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

2 3- 
24. 

2 5- 

26. 

27 

28. 

29. 

3°- 

3 1 - 

3 2 - 

33- 

34- 

35- 

36. 

37- 



Total.. 
Plural . 



6886 
.2407 
1419 
1 160 
2238 
692 
3902 
2283 
1003 

2 739 
1140 

J 33° 
241 1 
2181 
5475 
I5i5 
J 73 6 

4754 
7187 

5615 

347 1 
6088 

3i 7 8 
5569 
4847 

4546 
373 8 
5407 
6 55 2 
3i44 
5168 

45*7 
5440 

3°37 
1640 

45i8 

2 5°5 



3q 



379° 
1557 
1016 

1572 
978 
694 
788 
408 
250 

593 
595 
660 

543 
704 

1997 

807 

1353 
1345 
1386 
1904 
1178 
2266 
721 
2059 
1927 
1607 

8 43 
1843 
2441 
1289 

979 

989 

1987 
1261 

54° 
1456 
1023 



Q 



4) 

u 



i3 J 439 ! 47442 
83997 ! 



6677 

2315 
1366 
1123 
2212 
618 
3708 

21 53 
922 

2589 
1047 
i3°4 
1957 
2055 

4959 
1457 
1667 
4691 
7079 

5 2 4° 
235 1 

5365 
3108 

497 1 
4792 

4261 

359° 
5i5 2 
5320 
3 c 9 i 
5090 

355 1 
53 7 6 
2861 
1603 

4475 
2462 



-o o 
v - 



CJ c 



3694 

1553 

959 
1568 

955 

737 
687 

349 
2 37 
57o 
657 
647 
740 
689 
1946 
715 

1359 
1311 

1454 
1850 
1489 
2199 
686 

i9 8 3 
i9°5 
1533 
75i 
1794 

2 3 8 3 
1265 

963 
924 
1964 
1251 
54i 
I43 8 
1002 



2 3 

9 

6 

4 

13 

10 

16 
11 

5 
17 

3 
2 

25 

14 

63 

5 

6 

5 2 
42 

53 

53 



170 

34 

I3 1 
28 

35 

17 
271 
280 

84 
i3 8 

19 

41 
224 

155 
3 8 9 
4 2 
35 
54 
87 
380 

737 



607 696 



18 
89 
10 



43 
567 
3 1 
34 3 co 
74 141 
123 169 
92 1177 
22! 62 



17 
8 5 
47 
46 

27 
12 



122558 46741 1210 



36 
907 
48 
147 
15 
41 
46 



7747 



As two Magistrates were to be chosen, Dev- 
lin, R., and Wilhere, D., were both elected. 
Carr, Pro., received 1016 votes, and Farrow, 
Peo., 267, for City Solicitor. Lutz, Peo., re- 
ceived 443 for Magistrate. 



An observatory has been successfully com- 
pleted on the summit of Mont Blanc at the 
height of 15,780 feet. Instead of being movable, 
like an ordinary telescope, the telescope on Mont 
Blanc is fixed in the direction of the polar star. 
A movable mirror is made to reflect any object 
desired down the tube to the eye-piece for the 
study of the observer. 

An ice bicycle has been invented and patented 
by two men in Chicago. The inventors claim 
to have made a mile in one minute and twenty 
seconds on the ice. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



11 



ELECTORAL AND POPULAR VOTE OF 1892 AND 1896. 



STATES. 



ELECTORAL VOTE. 



1892. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire..., 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



c 
o . 

°E u 

St* 



_ 




t3 




a 


• 


cd 


fcs 


■,) 


(U 


t 


- 



r o 



u 

V - 

> a 
rt O 

1) CL 



J 3 



15 
9 
9 



3 
8 



Plurality. 



11! 
8 

"(6 
3 
4 

13 

24 
15 



13 

8 

"8 

... 
5 

9 
17 



10 

36 
11 

1 



10 



22 


1 


3 


... 


3 2 


... 


4 






9 


4 






12 


... 


!5 


4 


12 


4 


"6 


... 


12 


3 


... 


145 


277 




132 



22 



1896. 



2<2 



24 
is 
13 

12 



15 
14 

9 






4 
10 

36 

... 

3 

2 3 
4 

3 2 
4 



4 

6 

12 



276 
105 



11 



4 

13 

3 



10 
1 
8 



9 

17 

3 

8 

3 



POPULAR VOTE. 



9 

4 

12 

15 
3 



171 



1892. 



c . 

4) u 



138,138 

87,834 
118,151 



82,595 

18,578 

36,134 

129,361 

2 

426,294 

262,817 

196,458 



175,461 

87,622 

48,044 

113,866 

176,813 

202,296 

100,579 

40,237 

268,039 

17,581 

24,943 

7*4 

42,081 

171,042 

654,908 

i33, 98 



404,113 

14,243 

452,264 

24,336 

54,698 

8,907 

136,477 
239,148 



16,325 

163,977 

29,844 

84,435 

177,355 



c 
§ a. 

5* 



K 



9- I 97 

46,974: 

118,027 

38,620 

77,025 
18,077 
I 

48,305 

8,599 

399,288! 

253,929 
219,688 

156,134 

i35,44i 

25,332 

62,871 

92,736 
202,814 
222,708 
122,736 
1,406 
226,824 

18,851 

87,213 
2,811 

45,658 
156,068 

609,459 
100,565 

!7,5i9 
405,187 
35,oo2 
516,011 
26,975 
!3,384 
34,825 
99,973 
77.475 



37,99 2 

H3, 2 55 

36,460 

80,252 

170,791 

8,454 



V 

> a 
ri o 



85,181 
",831 

25,3" 

53,584 

805 

13 

4,793 

42,939 

10,520 

20,685 

22,208 

20,568 

163,111 

23,500 

1,232 

2,381 

796 

3,210 

19,829 

29,279 
10,256 

41,183 

7,334 
82,256 

7,264 
292 

969 
16,429 

44, 73 2 
17,667 
14,818 
35,8i3 

8,714 
228 

2,410 
26,382 
23,622 
99. e 3 8 



43 
12,274 

i9, 54 
4,166 

9,909 
7,722 



5,553,8085,180,911' 1,035,572 
37 2 ,997i 



1896. 



a a 
' 3 



X. 



131,219 
110,103 
142,926 
161,269 

56,740; 
16,671; 
30,160 

94, 2 32 ! 

23,192 

466,703 

305,771 
223,741 
171,614 
217,890 
77,o96| 
32,217! 
104,745 
102,655 

237,251 

139,626 

63,253 
363,750 

4i,275 

115,625 

8,348 

21,096 

133,675 

543,839 
174,488 

18,175 
474,882 

46,739 
422,054 

14,459 
58,801 

45, 2 75 
163,651 
368,289 

64,851 

9,789 

155,988, 

5i,647; 
90,000 

165,528 
10,389 






Pm o 
O 



54,737 

37,5i2 
146,216 

26,271 
110,297 

20,367 

11,389 
60,091 

6,324 
607,1301 

323,719' 
289,293! 

i59,345| 

218,171 J 

22,012 1 

80,421 

136,9781 
267,787! 

293,327! 
i93,5oi; 

3,849! 

304,500 ! 
10,100 

102,565 

1,937 

55,671 

221,367 

795,27 J 
155,222 

23,325 

525,99! 

48,711 
726,998 

37,437 
9,3 J 3 

45,no ( 

148,773 
162,506 

13,461' 

49,456 

i35,36i 

39,122; 
102,000 

268,135: 
10,073 ! 



6,460,677 7,061,142 
600,465 



6,464 



4,336 
967 

1,778 
2,708 

6,39° 
2,145 

4,5i9 
1,209 

5, "4 
1,810 
1,864 

2,507 
n,5io 

6,93° 
3,202 

1,021 

5,ooo 

2,797 



6,373 
18,829 



i,857 

977 

11,000 

1,166 

824 

2,500 

i,95i 

5030 

1,266 

2,216 

i45o 

4,455 



131,165 



In some ot the States Bryan and Watson received many votes. They have been added to the 
vote for Bryan and Sewell in the above table, so that the vote for Bryan represents the combined 
vote of Democrats and Middle-of-the Road Populists. In Texas the Bryan and Sewall vote was 
288,323; the Bryan and Watson, 79,966 ; total, 368,289 ; and the vote for McKinley, 162,506. In 
the Populist States of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming women voted, almost if not quite doubling the 
majority for Bryan in those States The total Prohibition vote is estimated to have been between 
80,000 and 100,000, being highest in Pennsylvania. The Socialist vote was insignificant — being 
smaller than in 1892. Bryan gained 16 per cent, on Cleveland's vote in 1892 ; but McKinley gained 
36 per cent, on the vote for Harrison in the same year. The vote was even more decisive than may 
appear on casual inspection. If every close State had gone for Bryan, McKinley would have 
been elected with four electoral votes to spare. 



78 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



STATE AND TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENTS IN 1897. 
[Republicans in Roman ; Democrats in Italic ; Populists in Small Caps.] 



States and Territories. 



Capitals. 



Alabama Montgomery... 

Alaska Ter Sitka 

Arizona Ter Phoenix 

Arkansas Little Rock 

California Sacramento 

Colorado 1 >enver 

Connecticut Hartford 

Delaware Dover 

Florida Tallahassee 

*Georgia Atlanta 

Idaho Boise City 

Illinois Springfield 

Indiana Indianapolis ... 

Iowa Des Moines.... 

Kansas Topeka 

Kentucky Frankfort 

Louisiana Baton Rouge... 

Maine Vugusta 

Maryland \n nap' lis 

* Massachusetts Boston 

Michigan Lansing 

Minnesota St. Paul 

Mississippi Jackson 

Missouri Jefferson City.. 

Montana Helena 

Nebraska Lincoln 

ada Carson City.... 

N. Hampshire Concord 

♦New Jersey Trenton 

N. Mexico Ter Santa Fe 

♦New York Vlbany 

North Carolina Raleigh 

North Dakota Bismarck 

Ohio Columbus 

Oklahoma Ter Guthrie 

( Oregon Salem 

Pennsylvania rlarrisbure 

♦Rhode Island N'wp't&Prov. 

S. Carolina Columbia 

South Dakota Pierre 

Tennessee Nashville 

Texas Austin 

*L'tah Salt Lake City 

Vermont Montpelier 

Virginia Richmond 

♦Washington < Olympic 

West Virginia Charleston 

Wisconsin Madison 

Wyoming Cheyenne 



Governors. 



Length 
of Term. 



Jos. F. Joh nston... 
James Sheakley... 
Benj.J. Franklin 
Panic I W.Jones .. 
James H. Bud J... 

Alva Adams 

Lorin A. Cooke I 

Ebe J I'. Tun>wll...\ 
II'. D. Bloxham... 
II'. J". Atkinson... 
F. Steunenburg....\ 
John R. Tanner ... 
James A. Mount... 
Francis M. 1 >rake.. 
John W. Liuuv .. 
Wm.O. Bradley... 
Murphy J. Foster 
Llewellyn Powers.' 
Lloyd Lowndes.... 

Roger Wolcott 

Hazen S. Pingree.. 
David M. Clough.. 
A.J. McLaurin... 

vens 

Robbri Smith.... 

\. HOLCOMB 

Reinh'ld Sadler 
< leo. A. Ramsdell. 
John W. I riiggs.... 
Il'm. J >:ion 
Frank S. Black 

ii I L. Russell.. 

F. A. Briggs 

S. Bushnell ... 
// 'm. C. Renfr 

Wm. P. Lord 

1 >. H. Hastings 

C. N\ arren Lippitt. 
/r. //. Ellerbee.... 
Andrew F. Lee... 
Robert L. Taylor. 

C. A. Culberson 

Heber M. Wills 

[osiab Grout 

C. T. O'Ferrall... 
John R. Rogers.. 
\W.A.McCorkle~ 
!W. H.Upham ... 
W. A. Richards.... 



2 yrs. 

4 " 

4 " 

2 " 

4 " 

2 " 

2 " 

4 " 

4 " 

2 " 

2 " 

4 " 

4 " 

2 " 

2 " 

4 " 

4 " 

2 " 

4 " 

1 " 

2 " 
2 '• 

4 " 

4 " 

4 " 

2 " 

4 " 

2 " 

3 " 

4 " 
2 " 

4 " 

2 " 

2 " 

4 " 

4 " 

4 " 

1 " 

2 " 
2 " 
2 " 

5 " 
5 " 
2 " 

4 " 

4 " 

4 '* 

2 " 

4 " 



Term Ei- 
pires. 



Legislature 
Meets. 



Neit State 
Election. 



Dec. 

,Nov. 
Mar. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
fDec. 
May 
1 ice. 
Jan. 
"Ian. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
June 
Jan. 
Jan. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Mar. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

May 

Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Ian. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Mar. 
June 
Dec. 



1898 Nov. 

18971 

1900! 

1899 Jan. 
1899 Jan. 
1899 Jan. 
1899 Jan. 
1901 Jan. 
1901 April 

1898 Oct. 

1899 Jan. 
1901 Jan. 
iqoi I an. 

1898 Jan. 

1899 Jan. 

1899 Jan. 

1900 May 
1898 Jan. 
1900 Jan. 
1898 Jan. 

1898 Jan. 

1899 Jan. 

1900 Jan. 

1901 Jan. 
1899 Jan. 
1899 Jan. 
1899 Jan. 
1899 Jan. 
1899 Jan. 

1897 

1898 Jan. 
1901 Jan. 

1897 Jan. 

1898 Jan. 



i Jan. 

1899 Jan. 



1897 
1898 
1899 
1899 
1902 
1901 J 



May 

Nov. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 



1898 
1898 
1901 _ 
1 - Jan. 
1897 Jan. 



an. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Jan. 



1898 Aug. 1897 



1898 



Jan. 



897 Sept. 

898 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897 Oct. 
897 Oct. 
897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 

897 Nov. 

898 Nov. 

897 Nov. 

898 Nov. 
898 April 

897 Sept. 

898 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 

897 Nov. 

898 Nov. 

897 Nov. 

898 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 



897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
89b Nov. 



897 June 
897 Nov. 
897 April 
897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897 Aug. 
897 Nov. 

897 Nov. 

898 Sept. 
897 Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897. Nov. 
897 Nov. 
897IN0V. 



1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1900 
1900 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1898 
1897 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1899 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1897 



1898 
1898 
1898 
1897 



1898 
1897 
1897 

1897 
1898 
1898 
1901 
1900 
1898 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1898 
1898 



In States marked w ith an asterisk the Legislatures meet annually; in the other States, biennially. 
t After June, 1897, Fdward Schofield will be Governor of Wisconsin; after March, G. W. Atkin- 
son will be Governor of West Virginia. 



Governor-General . — The Rt. Hon. the Earl of 
Aberdeen. 

Lieutenant Governors. 
Ontario. — Hon. Geo. A. Kirkpatrick. 
Quebec. — Hon. J. E. Chapleau. 
Nova Scotia. — Hon. M. B. Daly. 
New Brunswick. — Hon. John James Fraser. 
Prince Edward Island. — Hon. G. W. Howlan. 



DOMINION OF CANADA. 

Manitoba. — Hon. L. C. Patterson. 

Northwest P)ovinces. — Hon.C. H. Mackintosh. 

British Columbia. — Hon. Edgar Dewdney. 

Not in Dominion. 

Governor of Newfoundland— Sir Herbert H. 

Murray. K. L. K. B. 
Governor and Commander-in-ChieJ of the 

Bermudas. — Lieut. - General Thomas Casey 

Lyons, C. B. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



79 



THE PHILADELPHIA COMMERCIAL 
MUSEUM. 

The Philadelphia Commercial Museum. No. 
233 South Fourth street, is a department of the 
Philadelphia Museums, established by ordinance 
of Councils June, 1894. It is governed by a Board 
of Trustees, whose membership includes the 
Governor of Pennsylvania, the Mayor of Phila- 
delphia, several State and city officials, and four- 
teen leading citizens of Philadelphia. The Mu- 
seum is also under the general supervision of an 
Advisory Board composed of official delegates 
appointed by the representative commercial 
bodies of the Latin-American and other countries, 
or directly by their various governments. 

The Museum comprises collections of natural 
products from all countries of the world such as 
have already entered our markets, or may be 
made available for them, aiso all goods manu- 
factured abroad for markets in which American 
manufacturers should compete. 

The objects of the institution are generally to 
bring before American manufacturers the re- 
sources of the world and to extend the sale of 
their finished products. 

The most important parts of the exhibits from 
Mexico, Central and South America, Australia, 
South Africa, and many Asiatic countries, at the 
World's Columbian Exposition, were at its close 
brought to Philadelphia. Similar products have 
been secured from many other countries. These 
collections are constantly being extended and 
renewed. 

One department of the Museum is devoted to 
an exhibit of the raw products of the world. 
These represent almost every available source of 
supply on which our manufacturers may profit- 
ably draw. They are accompanied by all ob- 
tainable data concerning their commercial value. 
For instance, textile manufacturers here find 
samples of wool, silk, cotton, vegetable fibres, 
etc., from every foreign country, comprising the 
most varied and complete collection of its kind 
in existence. In the same way are displayed 
thousands of samples of wood, embracing the 
woods of the world, in sufficient size and quan- 
tity to judge of their value in American indus- 
tries. The collections of hides, skins, leather, 
tanning materials, dye stuffs, oils, medicinal drugs 
and herbs, minerals, etc., are very complete, and 
enable the dealers in these products to keep fully 
posted upon all possible sources of supply. 

The scientific and experimental department 
has been organized in order to make a careful 
study of the scientific and economic value of all 
products collected. Careful examinations and 
tests are made and new articles are subjected to 
investigation for the purpose of determining their 
practical value. 

Another department of the Museum is devoted 
to the exhibit of foreign manufactures. This ex- 
hibit comprises samples of merchandise now being 
sold in foreign countries, especially in the mar- 
kets of Latin-American, Australian, South African 
and other foreign countries. The object is to 
show the American manufacturer what his com- 
petitor is doing in the foreign trade of other 
countries. Each sample is accompanied by full 
information concerning the weight, width, length, 
pattern and manufacturer's prices and discounts. 
With this information the American manufactu- 
rer is put in a position to judge of any market as 



I 



to whether it would be advisable for him to at- 
tempt to claim a share of the trade. The exhibits 
in this department cover a large number of in- 
dustries. 

In the library of the Museum are kept on file 
many hundred publications on trade, commerce 
and finance, including every important journal 
in the world. Business directories and books of 
reference in all languages are kept on file. Statis- 
tical publications, consular reports and official 
government reports are being received from all 
countries. By an elaborate system of indexing 
this mass of information is made readily avail- 
able for American business men. 

An important work of the Museum is carried 
on through its Bureau of Information. It is the 
work of this Bureau to gather detailed informa- 
tion concerning the state of trade in every market 
in the world. 

The Museum has also many foreign correspon- 
dents and delegates. Similar reports are being 
received from a large number of local Chambers 
of Commerce in many foreign countries. 

The Museum is open to the public every week- 
day. 

ELECTIONS IN 1897. 

In 1897 general elections will be held in Phila- 
delphia as follows : 

For city and ward officers on Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 16th. To be chosen: Magistrates, members 
of Select and Common Councils, School Direct- 
ors and Constables. 

Last day for payment of taxes, January 16th. 

Last day for naturalization, January- 16th. 

For State and county officers on Tuesday, No- 
vember 2d. To be chosen : State Treasurer, 
Auditor General, City Treasurer, Register of 
Wills, Judges of Common Pleas No. 1, No. 2 and 
No. 4; Judge of Orphans' Court. 

Last day for payment of taxes, October 2d. 

Last day for naturalization, October 2d. 
Qualifications of Electors. 

Residence. — A voter must have resided in the 
State one year, and in the election district or 
division for at least two months, before the elec- 
tion. Where a citizen previously a resident has 
removed and returned, he must have resided in 
the State six months before the election. 

Taxes. — No citizen can vote who is over twen- 
ty-two years old without having previously paid 
a State and county tax within two years, assessed 
at least two months before the election, and paid, 
at the latest, one month before the election. 

Age. — livery male citizen between twenty-one 
and twenty-two years of age, having the proper 
qualifications of residence, native birth, or claim- 
ing the naturalization of his father during his 
minority, may vote without being assessed. 

Natural/zed citizens may vote if they have 
the qualifications of residence in the State and 
district and payment of taxes, and have been 
naturalized one month before the election. 

Proof of Right to Vote. — If the name is not 
on the registry of voters, the person claiming 
must make affidavit of his claims, and prove his 
right by at least one qualified voter of the district 
or division. Proof of payment of taxes is made 
by producing the tax-receipt or by affidavit that 
it has been lost, destroyed or never received. A 
naturalized citizen must produce his naturaliza- 
tion papers, unless he has been for five consecu- 
tive years a voter in the district. 



8o 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



SPORTING RECORDS OF 1896. 



FOOT-BAf L. 

For the third successive yt ir the college foot- 
ball season of 1896 closed without the question 
of the championship being decided, because, as 
in previous years, all the claimants for the title 
did not meet in open competition for it as re- 
quired by the rule governing championships. 
Princeton, however, made the best record of any 
of the big colleges, the only thing to mar an other- 
wise absolutely clean record being a tie game she 
played with Lafayette early in the season, in 
which neither side scored. The only blot on 
Pennsylvania's record is a defeat administered to 
her by Lafayette, also early in the season. While 
later in the season Lafayette would have been 
outclassed by both Princeton and Pennsylvania, 
had the latter played the Eastonians again, the 
records must nevertheless stand as made, and as 
the blot on Princeton's record is a tie game, and 
that on Pennsylvania's a defeat, the Tigers have 
a slightly better record than the Quakers, because 
a defeat counts for more than a tie game. But 
for these Lafayette games, which were mere ac- 
cidents, both Princeton and Pennsylvania would 
have clean records of victories. Harvard has 
four defeats charged against her ; and while Yale 
has only one, she escaped two — one at the hands 
of the Indians and the other from the Elizabeth 
Athletic Club through the incompetent or unfair 
refereeing of Mr. Hickok, a Yale man, which 
stands out to her discredit. While Yale's record 
is better than Harvard's, the latter, in the opinion 
of most critics, finished the season with a stronger 
team than the former had. Harvard was most 
unfortunnte in having from three to six of her 
regular men laid up with injuries all the time 
until the last game of the season, when for the 
only time she was able to have out her full 
strength. Cornell went through identically the 
same experience. Harvard's defeats by the 
Graduates and Boston A. A. teams were sus- 
tained when she played teams made up mostly 
of substitute players. The scores of the " Big 
Four " for the season are appended : 

Sept. 26 — Pennsylvania 24; Frank'n & M'll. o 

Sept. 30 — Pennsylvania 32; Gettysburg o 

Oct. 3 — Pennsylvania 40 ; 

7 — Pennsylvania 8; 

10— Pennsylvania 18 ; 

14 — Pennsylvania 20 ; 

17 — Pennsylvania 34; 

22 — Pennsylvania 14 ; 

24 — Pennsylvania 4 ; 

28 — Pennsylvania 16 ; 

3 — Pennsylvania 30; 

7 — Pennsylvania 21; 



Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 14 — Pennsylvania 

Nov. 16 — Pennsylvania 

Nov. 21 — Pennsylvania 

Nov. 26 — Pennsylvania 



27. 
32 
8; 

32; 



Totals 360 

Oct. 3 — Princeton 44; 

Oct. 7 — Princeton o; 

Oct. 10 — Princeton 16; 

Oct. 14 — Princeton 26; 

Oct. 17 — Princeton n; 

Oct. 22 — Princeton 48; 

Oct. 24 — Princeton 39; 



Bucknell o 

Annapolis o 

Dartmouth o 

U. of Virginia... o 

Lehigh o 

Amherst o 

Lafayette 6 

Brown o 

Dickinson 2 

Indians o 

State College o 

Graduates 6 

Harvard 6 

Cornell 10 

3° 

Rutgers .". o 

Lafayette o 

Lehigh o 

Indians 6 

West Point o 

U. of Virginia... o 

State College o 



Oct. 26 — Princeton 46; 

Oct. 31 — Princeton...... 37; 

Nov. 7 — Princeton 12; 

Nov. 21 — Princeton 24; 

. Totals 303 

Oct. 4 — Harvard 6 

Oct. 7 — Harvard 34 

Oct. 10 — Harvard 18 

Oct. 14 — Harvard 28 

Oct. 17 — Harvard 12 

Oct. 24 — Harvard 13 

Oct. 28 — Harvard 5 

Oct. 31 — Harvard 4 

Nov. 7 — Harvard o 

Nov. 14 — Harvard 6 

Nov. 21 — Harvard 6 

Totals 132 

Sept. 26 — Yale 6 

Sept. 30 — Yale 12 



Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 



7 — Yale 1 

10 — Yale 12 

14 — Yale 22 



17 — Yale 42 

22 — Yale ifi 

24 — Yale 12 

28 — Yale 12 

31 — Yale 16 

3 — Yale 10 

7— Yale 18 

Nov. 14 — Yale 16 

Nov. 21 — Yale 6 



Lawrenceville ... o 

Cornell o 

Harvard o 

Yale 6 

12 

Williams o 

Trinity o 

Newton A. A o 

Wesleyan o 

Brown o 

Cornell 4 

Graduates 8 

Indians o 

Princeton 12 

Boston A. A 8 

Pennsylvania 8 

40 

Trinity o 

Amherst o 

Brown o 

Orange A. C o 

Williams o 

Dartmouth o 

Wesleyan o 

Indians 6 

Elizabeth A. C. 6 

West Point 2 

Boston A. A o 

Brown 6 

N. Jersey A. C. o 
Princeton 24 



Totals 218 44 

The annual game between Haverford and 
Swarthmore was played on the latter's grounds 
on November 18, and resulted in a victory for 
Haverford — 42 to 6. 

The annual game between Lehigh and Lafay- 
ette was not played because the former protested 
four of the latter's players on the ground of pro- 
fessionalism. Lafayette would not play without 
the four players that were protested, hence 
there was no game. 

Dartmouth won the championship of the New 
England Intercollegiate Association. 

In the Philadelphia Interacademic Associa- 
tion Cheltenham won first place ; Penn Charter, 
second; and Germantown Academy, third. 

LAWN TENNIS. 
Winners of 1896 Championships. 

UNITED STATES. 

Men's Singles.— R. D. Wrenn. 
Men's Doubles .— C. B. and S. R. Neel. 
Ladies' Singles. — Miss Bessie E. Moore. 
Ladies' Doubles. — Miss Bessie E. Moore and 

Miss J. P. Atkinson. 
Mixed Doubles. — Miss J. P. Atkinson and E. 

P. Fischer. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Men's Singles. — M. D. Smith. 

Men's Doubles— M. D. Smith and C. Tete, Jr. 

PHILADELPHIA AND DISTRICT. 

Men's Singles. — Robert N. Willson, Jr. 

WINNER OF THE GEORGE W. CHILDS CUP. 

Miss Jean Clark, of Bryn Mawr College. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



81 



BASE-BALL. 



Clubs. 



o 

tuo p 
rt -° 
u , «i 



Baltimore .. 
Cleveland- 
Cincinnati. 

Boston 

Chicago.... 
Pittsburg .. 
New York. 
Philad'a ... 
Brooklyn .. 
Wash'gton 
St. Louis... 
Louisville.. 



v ro 

6 PS 

S > 



310 
5 



7 9 



2* 

be -~ 

1) 

z 



eg 
id 



J* c bfi.2 ^ 



2* 

3 2 

Pl, pq 



»i 1— I 
cd 



X 



12 

6 

8 
7 10 

4 
6 



O 



a 
<u 
u 

U 
V 

PL, 



9 
712 

7 8 

8! 9 

6 8 

6| 9 



Lost 39'48;5o 5757 63167 68 73 739093 



18! 90.698 

7 8o ! .625 

8 77 .606 

8 74-565 

9 71-555 
10, 66.512 

8 
5 



64 .489 
62 .481 
58.443 

58,-443 
40.308 
38 .290 



At the close of the season the Baltimore and 
Cleveland played a series for the Temple Cup, 
and the champions won all four of the games 
played. Cleveland's pitchers were weakened by 
the hard campaign the last half of the season, 
besides which Cuppy had a finger broken and 
Tebeau was injured, therefore the Forest City 
players were in no condition to do themselves 
justice. 

Batting Averages. 

The batsmen in the National League securing 
averages of .300 and over in 1896 are as follows, 
the figures given being official : 



Name. 



W 



c3 
O 



S3 
I 



pq ew 



u » 



pq 
S-i p_, 



Burkett, Cleveland. .133 

Jennings, Balt're 129 

Delahanty, Phila 122 

Keeler, Baltimore ...127 
Kelley, Baltimore. ...130 
Stenzel, Pittsburg.... 112 
Hamilton, Boston ...131 

Dahlen, Chicago 125 

Clements, Phila 50 

Tiernan, New York.. 133 
E. E. Smith, Pitts ..120 
McGraw, Baltimore 19 
Dem'n'ville, Wash ..130 

Robinson, Balti 66 

Stivetts, Boston 59 

Van Haltren, N. Y...133 

Jones, Brooklyn 102 

McCreary, Louisv'e no 
Childs, Cleveland ...132 
Holliday, Cincinnati 22 
Burke, Cincinnati ...122 

Tenney, Boston 86 

Dovle, Baltimore. ...118 
McKean, Clevel'd...i33 

Anson, Chicago 106 

Long, Boston 119 

Everett, Chicago 131 

Lange, Chicago 123 

Grady, Phila 62 

Donnelly. Baltim'e..io4 



J 59 
125 

: 3 J 



131 



154 

*47 

104 

*53 
*37 
34 
132 
118 

19 
93 
43 
44 
138 
82 

87 
109 

15 
120 

65 
"5 
100 

72 
108 
130 
114 

48 

69 



240 
208 
199 
214 
191 
171 
190 
172 

66 
190 
170 

26 

183 
86 

78 
199 
141 
i55 
i75 

26 
178 
118 
168 
190 

*35 
170 
191 

156 
78 

I3 1 



410 
397 
394 
39 2 
37o 
366 

3 6 3 
362 
362 
361 
358 
356 
355 
354 
353 
353 
353 
35i 
348 
346 
34 2 
342 
342 
335 
335 
334 
333 
333 
333 
33° 



5 

11 

4 
*3 

5 
6 
6 

27 



3 1 

72 

3 1 
23 



56 

93 

59 
6 2 

5 34 

6 31 
o 13 

16 29 
4 11 



4 
4 
6 

9 



5 
42 
29 
32 



13 21 

1 1 



9 
21 

9 
12 

5 
12 40 



57 
18 

7i 
13 

28 



7 

6 



54 

99 
o 9 

20 30 



Name. j | gS fc J g - 

U pq PQ Ph cq ot 

Brouthers 57 41 72 .330 1 6 

Lajoie, Phila 39 37 57 .328 2 6 

Clarke, Louisville ...131 93 169 .327 7 31 

McGuire, Wash 95 59 124 .325 6 n 

Joyce, W. & N. Y... 129 125 154 .323 2 47 

Lowe, Boston 73 59 99 .323 6 14 

Hallman, Phila 120 83 150 .318 18 16 

Miller, Cincinnati ...125 91 160 .318 18 75 

Donovan, Pittsb 129 no 180 .316 5 49 

Selbach, Wash 121 100 151 .316 8 46 

Kissenger, St. L 22 7 23 .315 2 1 

Griffin, Brooklyn ...122 102 155 .315 6 27 

McGann, Boston .... 42 24 53 .315 o 2 

Davis, N. Y 124 98 155 .315 6 45 

Ryan, Chicago 127 83 153 .312 10 34 

Anderson, Brookl'n.104 69 135 .312 1 40 

W. Clark, N.Y 65 38 73 .307 2 5 

Burrell, Brooklyn ... 58 19 63 .307 4 1 

Lyons, Pittsburg. ..116 77 134 .306 n 13 

Thompson, Phila. ...119 103 158 .305 3 n 

Duffy, Boston 131 93 161 .304 20 43 

Tucker,- Boston 122 74 144 .304 8 4 

Young, Cleveland.... 48 33 54 .304 2 1 

Pickering, Louisv'e. 45 28 50 .303 1 15 

Hoffer, Baltimore ... 35 23 38 .301 3 10 

Cooley, St. L., Phil. 104 91 138 .301 14 23 

Collins, Boston 83 52 91 .300 8 10 

Connor, Cleveland.. 60 38 73 .300 7 16 

The averages of the other Philadelphia players 
are : Boyle, .288 ; Hulen, .268 ; Cross, .261 ; 
Mertes, .248 ; Nash, .242 ; Orth, .238 ; Carsey, 
.222, and Taylor, .192. The other Philadelphia 
players not having played in fifteen games, re- 
ceived no average. 

Fielding Averages. 

Only the players taking part in fifteen^or more 
games are given averages in the appended list: 

First Basemen. 

Name. g. p.o. a, e. p.c. 

Lajoie, Philadelphia.... 39 360 n 3 .992 

Lachance, Brooklyn 89 953 40 13 .987 

Tebeau, Cleveland 122 1341 79 19 .987 

Tucker, Boston 122 1213 72 19 .985 

Connor, St. Louis 126 1223 86 17 .985 

Beckley, Pitts. & N. Y. 95 941 51 16 .984 

Brouthers, Phila 57 570 23 10 .983 

Clark, New York 65 634 27 12 .983 

Anson, Chicago 96 886 53 7 .982 

Anderson, Brooklyn 38 420 20 8 .982 

Vaughn, Cincinnati 56 586 33 n .982 

Ewing, Cincinnati 67 669 49 14 .981 

Mack, Pittsburg 25 240 18 8 .981 

Cassidy, Louisville 38 345 17 7 .981 

Cartwright, Wash 131 1248 72 30 .977 

Decker, Chicago 36 349 24 9 .976 

Doyle, Baltimore 118 1157 43 33 .973 

Rogers, Louis. & Was. 60 590 37 20 .969 

Delahanty, Phila 21 213 11 7 .969 

Hassamer, Louisville.... 26 256 28 10 .966 

Davis, Pitts. & N. Y... 58 553 27 19 .965 

Second Basemen. 

McPhee, Cincinnati 116 299 358 12 .982 

Lowe, Boston 73 188 284 16 .967 

Bierbauer, Pittsburg 57 138 204 12 .966 

Quinn.St. Louis & Bal... 54 no 196 12 .962 

Schoch, Brooklyn 63 109 181 13 .957 

Reitz, Baltimore 116 251 324 26 .956 



82 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Name. g. p.o. 

Hallman, Philad'lphia...i20 312 

Johnson, Louisville 24 58 

Pfeffer, N. Y. & Chic... 99 239 

0' Brien, Louis. & Was...i 18 281 

Childs, Cleveland 132 369 

Truby, Chicago & Pitts 35 q6 

Gleason, New York 130 331 

Padden. Pittsburg 60 176 

Daly, Brooklyn 64 175 

Miller, Louisville 21 32 

Crooks, Louis. & Was... 55 168 

Dowd, St. Louis 77 182 

McGann, Boston 42 87 

Joyce, Washington 32 83 

Third Basemen. 

Cross, Philadelphia 63 69 

Irwin, Cincinnati 127 191 

McGarr, Cleveland ill 132 

Davis, New York 73 115 

Nash, Philadelphia 64 88 

Shindle, Brooklyn 131 143 

Clingman, Louisville 120 193 

Collins, Boston 78 135 

Everett, Chicago 99 151 

Donnelly, Baltimore 104 140 

Joyce, N, V. & Wash ... 97 129 

Lyons, Pittsburg 116 167 

Rogers, Louis. & Wash. 32 28 

Myers, St. Louis 122 169 

Smith. Washington 34 32 

McCormick. Chicago.... 35 34 

Farrell, N. Y. & Wash... 21 23 

McGraw, Baltimore 18 22 

Delahanty, Cleveland ... 16 18 

Harrington, Boston 48 55 

Short Stops. 

Dolan, Louisville 44 99 

Cross, Philadelphia 36 84 

G. Davis, New York 45 109 

Connau$hton, N. Y 53 92 

Smith. Cincinnati 119 206 

Jennings, Baltimore 129 380 

Ely, Pittsburg 126 254 

Corcoran, Brooklyn 132 321 

McKean. Cleveland 133 220 

Dahlen, Chicago 125 315 

Long, Boston 119 312 

Demontreville. Wash. ...130 300 

Cross, St. Louis 124 396 

Hulen, Philadelphia 73 153 

Fuller, New York 17 41 

Eustace, Louisville 22 46 

Shannon, Louisville 29 60 

Outfielders. 

Keeler, Baltimore 127 229 

Brodie, Baltimore 32 321 

Thompson, Phila .119 235 

Tiernan,. New York 133 211 

Griffin, Brooklyn 122 315 

Parrott, St. Louis 112 278 

Dowd, St. Louis '. 48 116 

Sullivan, Phila. & St. L. 90 176 

Duffy, Boston 120 250 

Kelley, Baltimore 130 278 

McAleer, Cleveland 116 275 

Selbach, Washington 121 307 

Hoy, Cincinnati 121 307 

Delahanty, Phila 100 269 

E. E. Smith, Pittsburg. ..120 297 

Donovan, Pittsburg 129 222 

Blake, Cleveland 102 185 



p.c. 



354 


35 


•950 


°3 


7 


•945 


31b 


33 


• 944 


304 


4i 


.940 


496 


57 


•93« 


97 


13 


•932 


39 2 


57 


•9 2 7 


147 


25 


.922 


186 


3i 


.921 


49 


7 


.920 


105 


3° 


•9»7 


219 


37 


•9*5 


109 


22 


.899 


79 


21 


.885 


*35 


13 


•945 


260 


33 


.932 ! 


213 


29 


.922 


169 


24 


.922 ! 


i.S3 


21 


.919 


261 


36 


.918 


278 


42 


.918 


208 


32 


•915 


i-3 


34 


.908 


218 


20 


.902 


210 


4i 


.892 


200 


46 


.886 


72 


14 


.877 


238 


58 


.874 


77 


17 


.865 | 


77 


21 


.840 


29 


10 


•838 


38 


12 


•833 


3 1 


10 


.830 


95 


35 


.810 


157 


16 


.941 


131 


14 


•939 


i43 


17 


•93^ | 


198 


22 


.929 1 


112 


49 


.926 


476 


68 


.926 


43° 


57 


•923 


477 


68 


.921 


398 


5« 


.914 


4^3 


75 


.912 


416 


75 


.906 


475 


92 


.892 


395 


84 


.891 


202 


47 


•883 


65 


15 


.876 


68 


24 


.826 


76 


80 


.819 


22 


7 


•973 


20 


10 


.971 


28 


8 


.970 


6 


8 


.964 


7 


*3 


.961 


21 


12 


.961 


4 


5 


.960 


9 


8 


.958 


17 


12 


•957 


22 


*3 


•955 


!9 


15 


•95i 


14 


17 


•949 


14 


17 


•949 


16 


16 


•947 


11 


17 


•9:7 


3° 


14 


•947 


17 


12 


•944 



Name. G. P.O. A. e. p.c. 

Van Haltren, N.Y 132 271 24 18 .942 

Brown, Washington 113 256 8 17 .939 

Tenney, Boston .- 60 81 96 .937 

Hamilton, Boston 131 27S 8 19 .937 

Turner, Phila. & St. L... 59 81 8 6 .936 

Burke, Cincinnati 122 287 14 21 .934 

Douglas, St. Louis 74 no 13 9 .932 

Anderson, Brooklyn 66 118 12 10 .928 

Stenzel, Pittsburg 112 245 13 20 .928 

Lange, Chicago 122 311 13 25 .928 

Cooley, Phila. 8: St. L...104 222 28 20 .926 

Burkett, Cleveland 133 271 15 23 .925 

Ryan, Chicago 127 207 26 20 .921 

Holliday, Cincinnati 15 33 13 -9*9 

Jones, Brooklyn 102 171 9 16 .918 

Bannon, Boston 74 131 13 13 .917 

Decker, Chicago 70 132 10 13 .916 

Pickering, Louisville 45 97 8 10 .913 

Davis, N. Y. & Pitts. ... 49 99 4 10 .911 

Miller, Cincinnati 125 203 21 23 .907 

Clarke, Louisville 131 276 17 31 .904 

McCreary, Louisville no 174 24 21 .904 

Everett, Chicago 32 57 3 7 -895 

Connaughton, N. Y 30 45 46 .891 

Stafford, New York 52 79 10 n .890 

Flynn, Chicago 29 66 7 9 -890 

Dexler. Louisville 44 87 9 12 .888 

McFarland, Louisville... 24 46 7 7 -883 

Lush, Washington 89 136 22 21 .882 

Abbey, Washington 75 105 10 16 .878 

Mertes, Philadelphia .... 35 83 3 13 .868 

Shearon, Cleveland 15 19 04 .826 

Holmes, Louisville 33 43 7 13 .793 

Catchers. 

Name. g. p.o. a. e. p.b. p.c. 

Ganzel, Boston 40 138 47 2 5 .968 

Vaughn, Cincinnati.. 57 166 57 9 2 .951 

Boyle, Philadelphia .. 28 75 21 2 3 .950 

Sugden, Pittsburg.... 65 258 68 15 6 .939 

Peitz, Cincinnati 67 197 46 7 10 .934 

Kittridge, Chicago ... 61 253 63 16 7 .932 

Clements, Phila 50 147 50 7 8 .929 

O'Connor, Clevel'd... 37 107 31 6 5 .928 

Zimmer, Cleveland... 89 339 80 n 25 .925 

Merritt, Pittsburg.... 60 238 78 19 8 .921 

Robinson, Baltim're. 66 260 46 14 13 .919 

McFarland, St. L 80 274 123 16 19 .919 

McGuire, Wash 95 350 88 31 n .912 

Grimm, Brooklyn 76 240 84 25 10 .907 

Grady, Philadelphia. 56 166 64 13 n .905 

Clark, Baltimore 64 197 51 14 12 .903 

Farrell, N.Y. & W... 51 158 57 13 11 .899 

Burrell. Brooklyn 58 172 46 19 6 .897 

Miller, Louisville 46 137 49 16 8 .894 

Donahue, Chicago... 54 241 56 21 14 .894 

Wilson, New York... 67 260 73 14 26 .892 

Murphy, St. Louis ... 48 176 49 19 8 .892 

Warner, L. & N. Y.. 48 193 55 20 12 .885 

Tenney, Boston 26 100 31 10 7 .885 

Zearfoss, New York. 16 53 14 6 3 .881 

Bergen, Boston 62 209 70 24 16 .874 

Dexter, Louisville 54 177 61 23 16 .859 

McCauley, Wash 21 72 25 8 9 .851 

CRICKET. 

Following are the records made by the Phila- 
delphia clubs in the Halifax Cup competition 
during the season of 1896 : 

Result of the Games. 
Merion, 156; Tioga, 57. Merion won by 99 
runs. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



83 



Germantown, 95 ; Philadelphia, 92. German- 
town won by 3 runs. 

Merion, 125 ; Belmont, 115. Merion won by 10 
runs. 

Philadelphia, 246; Tioga, 191. Philadelphia 
won by 55 runs. 

Tioga, 173 ; Germantown, no. Tioga won by 
63 runs. 

Belmont, 174; Philadelphia, 87. Belmont won 
by 87 runs. 

Germantown, 206 ; Belmont, 122. German- 
town won by 84 runs. 

Merion, 325 ; Philadelphia, 151. Merion won 
by 1 74 runs. 

Belmont, 184 (4 wickets); Tioga, 183. Bel- 
mont won by 6 wickets. 

Germantown, 217 (1 wicket); Merion, 67. 
Germantown won by 9 wickets and 150 runs. 

Belmont, 125 ; Germantown, 80. Belmont 
won by 45 runs. 

Merion, 277; Philadelphia, 64. Merion won 
by 213 runs. 

Belmont, 239 ; Merion, 67. Belmont won by 
172 runs. 

Philadelphia, 240; Tioga, 133. Philadelphia 
won by 107 runs. 

Belmont, 126; Tioga, 70. Belmont won by 56 
runs. 

Germantown, 311 ; Merion, 76. Germantown 
won by 135 runs. 

Merion, 117; Tioga, 100. Merion won by 17 
runs. 

Belmont, 256; Philadelphia, 47. Belmont won 
by 209 runs. 

Germantown, 190 ; Tioga, 37. Germantown 
won by 153 runs. 

Germantown, in (1 wicket): Philadelphia, 73. 
Germantown won by 9 wickets and 38 runs. 

Below will be found the complete club and in- 
dividual averages for the season, and a record of 
how the points were won and lost by each of the 
contesting clubs. Summary : 



Clubs. 



Germantown. 

Belmont 

Merion 

Philadelphia., 
Tioga , 



c 
o 

J 

V i V 



2 
9 -3 



v 



onSh 



Games lost 2 



1 2 
— ! 1 
1 — 



:/. 



H 'J 



7 20 



Standing of the Clubs. 

Won. Lost. P.C. 

Germantown 6 

Belmont 6 

Merion 5 

Philadelphia 2 

Tioga 1 

Club Batting Averages 
Runs. 

Germantown 1320 

Belmont 1341 

Merion 1310 

Philadelphia 1000 

Tioga 944 



2 


•750 


2 


•75o 


3 


.625 


6 


.250 


7 


•125 


iES. 

ckets. 


Aver. 


62 


21.29 


74 


18.12 


80 


16.37 


80 


12.50 


80 


11.80 



Club Bowling Averages. 

Wickets. Runs. Aver. 

Germantown 80 865 10.81 

Belmont 80 865 10.81 

Merion 71 1254 17.66 

Tioga 74 1369 18.50 

Philadelphia 71 1562 22.00 

Comparative Analysis. 

Following are the batting averages of all play- 
ers making a percentage of 14.00 and over : 

I. R. H. A. 

W. W. Noble 6 310 127 62.00 

G. S. Patterson 8 300 65 50.00 

J. H. Brockie 1 39 39 39.00 

H. L. Clark 8 231 100 28.87 

C. Coates, Jr 5 143 92 28.60 

J.B.Thayer 8 196 134 28.00 

L. Biddle 5 127 76 25.40 

F. H. Bates 8 170 70 24.28 

J. B. King 8 166 71 23.71 

E. M. Cregar 8 163 57 23.28 

N. Etting 6 133 86 22.16 

W. Brockie 3 65 42 21.66 

F. H. Bohlen 4 86 37 21.50 

F. L. Altemus 8 127 34 21.16 

H. Windsor 1 21 21 21.00 

J. W. Muir 8 160 60 20.00 

W. F. Wingate 6 80 21 20.00 

R. D. Brown 1 20 20 20.00 

H. I. Brown 6 98 41 19.60 

H. P. Baily 6 117 48 19.50 

G.G.Brooke 8 136 37 18.00 

W. N. Morice 7 104 37 17.33 

H.H.Brown 7 82 33 16.40 

H. C. Thayer 8 130 69 16.25 

A. M. Wood 8 121 41 15.12 

H. C. Townsend 8 117 31 14.67 

G. C. Guest 3 44 36 14.67 

J. W. Sharp 8 100 29 14.28 

T.W.Fleming 1 14 14 14.00 

J. H. Morice 2 14 14 14.00 

Bowling Averages. 

b. r. m. w. A. 

J.B.King 832. 321 45 36 8.91 

J. W. Muir 440 158 21 17 9.29 

W. F. Wingate 30 28 1 3 9 33 

E. W. Clark, Jr 811 324 39 34 9.52 

H.I.Brown 250 128 5 12 10.66 

H. P. Baily 632 278 22 26 10.69 

C. Coates, Jr 12 12 o 1 12.00 

C. T. Cowperthwait 138 74 5 6 12.33 

G.S.Patterson 766 284 29 23 12.34 

L. Biddle 336 164 9 13 12.61 

E. M. Cregar 453 195 22 15 13.00 

C. M. Harris 60 26 2 2 13.00 

P. H. Clark 216 82 10 6 13.66 

F. H. Bates 681 350 20 25 14.00 

W. T. G. Bristol 266 131 5 9 14.55 

W.N. Morice 660 268 23 18 14.88 

Childs Cup Contest — Batting. 

Inn. Runs. Hig't. Aver. 

W. W. Noble (G.) 6 310 127* 62.00 

H. L. Clark (P.) 8 231 100 28.87 

C. Coates, Jr. (B.) s 143 92 28.60 

J. B. Thayer (M.) 8 196 134 28.00 

F. H. Bates (T.) 8 170 70* 24.28 

*Not out. 



84 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



.uns. 


Wick. 


Aver. 


321 


36 


8.91 


324 


34 


9-52 


278 


26 


10.69 


164 


13 


12.61 


350 


25 


14.00 



Childs Cup Contest — Bowling. 
Balls. 
J. B. King(B.) 832 

E. W. Clark, Jr. (G.)..8n 

H. P. Ba:ly (M.J 632 

L. Biddle;P.) 336 

F. H. Bates (T) 681 

International Matches. 

The results of the four international matches 
played in which Philadelphia took part in 1896, 
and which wereall played in Philadelphia, follow: 

All Canada, 204; All Philadelphia, 164. All 
Canada won by 40 runs. 

Australians, 372 ; Gentlemen of Philadelphia, 
249. Australians won by 123 runs. First match. 

Australians, 422; Gentlemen of Philadelphia, 
351. Australians won by an inning and 71 runs. 
Second match. 

Australians, 222 ; Gentlemen of Philadelphia, 
282. Gentlemen of Philadelphia won by an in- 
ning and 60 runs. 

AQUATIC. 
Childs Cup Races. 

Conditions: over a course i 1 ; miles straight- 
away. Won in 1879 by University of Pennsyl- 
vania ; 1880, Columbia College ; 1881, Princeton 
University; 1882, University of Pennsylvania; 
1883, University of Pennsylvania ; 1884, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania ; 1885, Cornell University; 
1886, University of Pennsylvania ; 1887. Cornell 
University (by forfeit ); 1889, Cornell University ; 
1890, 1891, 1892, 1893. 18 . U1895 and 1896, claimed 
by University of Pennsylvania, no other com- 
petitor appearing. 

Shakpless Cup Races. 

Conditions: eight-oared shells, over National 
Course, i r 2 miles straightaway. Won in 1884 by 
Columbia Boat Club. Washington ; 1885. Fair- 
mount Rowing Association. Phila. ; 1886, Malta 
Boat Club, Phila.; 1887, Malta Boat Club. Phila.; 
1888, College Boat Club. Phila.; 1889, Cornell 
University ; 1890. College Boat Club. Phila. ; 
1891. College Boat Club. Phila. ; 1892. New York 
Athletic Club; 1893. Malta Boat Club. Phila.; 
1894, Triton Boat Club, Newark. N. J. ; i 
Triton Boat Club, Newark, N. J ; 1896, Balti- 
more Athletic Club, Baltimore, Md. 

People's Amateur Regatta. 
[Held July 4 over the National Course. For 
records of previous years, see Ledger Almanac 
for 1896.] 

Junior Single Shells. m. s. 

1893 — Robert P. Ryan, Gray's Ferry 

R. A '. 10 5 

1894 — Charles Coupe, Gray's Ferry 

R. A 12 5 

1895 — John O. Exley, Gray's Ferry 

R. A 10 51 

1896 — James Patrick, Newark Row- 
ing Club 11 09 

Senior Single Shells. 

1893 — Edwin Hedley, Passaic B. C 9 39 

1894 — Edwin Hedley, Vesper B. C 10 30 2-5 

1895— W. S. McDowell, Delaware 

B. C 10 00 

1896 — Fred. Cresser, Vesper B. C 10 34 

Double-scull Shells. 
1893 — George W.Van Vliet, George W. 

Megowen, Vesper B. C r. o. 



1894— George W. Van Vliet, Frank R. 

Baltz, Vesper B. C 10 12 2-5 

1895 — George W. Van Vliet, J. B. Ju- 
venal, Penna. B. C 9 19 

1896 — Fred. Cresser, Edward Marsh, 

Vesper B. C No time taken 

Junior Double-scull Shells. 
1894 — Frank Lawrence, Charles P. 

Lawrence, Vesper B. C 9 42 

1895 — No contest. 

1896 — Theo. Burke, Alex. V. Dunbar, 

Crescent B. C 10 12 

Pair-oared Shells. 
1893 — Paul E. Huneker, Harry P. Bur- 

chell. Iona B. C 9 483-4 

1894 — George W. Van Vliet, Frank R. 

Baltz, Vesper B. C 11 521-2 

1895 — A. J. Ingraham, C. B. Dix, 

Penna. B. C 10 14 

1896— W. J. Ingraham, C. B. Dix, 

Pennsylvania B. C 10 56 3-4 

Four-oared Shells, Downing Cup. 

1893— Pennsylvania Barge Club... No time taken. 

1894 — New York Athletic Club 9 32 

1 -Crescent Boat Club 9 27 

18^6 — Institute B. C, Newark, N. J... 9 23 

Junior Eight-cared Shells. 

1893— Passaic B. C, Newark 8 12 1-4 

1894— Fairmount K. A 8 16 

1S9S— Montrose Boat Club 8 50 

1896 — Fairmount Rowing Asso. No time taken 

Junior Four-oared Gigs. 

1895 — Gray's Ferry R. A 10 00 

1896 — Newark Rowing Club 10 13 2-5 

Schuylkill Navy Regatta. 
The regattas of this organization were inaug- 
urated on a small scale in 1859. The following 
table gives the winners for the last three years. 
Conditions : mile and a half straightaway : 

Junior Single Shells. tit. s. 

1892— E. C. Taylor, Philadelphia B. C. 9 57 
1893 — C. B. Dix, Pennsylvania Barge 

Club 9 341-4 

1S94— C. G. Phillips. Jr.. Malta P.. C... 9 49 3"5 

1895 — Edward Marsh, Malta B. C 9 57 

♦1896 — Gustav Roehn, Vesper B. C... 6 47 

Seniar Single Sculls. 

1892 — Edwin Hedley. Vesper B. C 9 57 

1893 — George W. YanVliet.Vesper B.C. 9 53 

1894— Edwin Hedley. Vesper B. C 9 34 1-2 

1895 — Frederick Cresser, Vesper B. C. 9 29 
^1896 — J B. Juvenal, Pennsylvania B. 

C No time taken 

Senior Double-scull Shells. 

1892 — J. Y. Parke, E. Hedley, Vesper 

B. C 8 45 1-2 

1893 — George W. Van Vliet, George W. 

Megowen. Vesper B. C r. o. 

1894 — George W. Van Vliet, Frank R. 

Baltz, Vesper B. C 9 3 

1895— George W. Van Vliet, J. B. Ju- 
venal Penna. B. C No time taken 

*i896 — Fred. Cresser, Edward Marsh, 

Vesper B. C 5 36 

Pair-oared Shells. 
1892— P. E. Huneker, S. D. Hecht, 

Iona B. C 9 14 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



85 



3 2 i-5 



40 



o. 
4i 



37 



50 
6 



1893 — George W.Van Vliet, George W. 

Megowen, Vesper B. C 9 

1894— George W. Van Vliet, Frank R. 

Baltz, Vesper B. C 9 45 3-5 

1895 — George W. Van Vliet, Percy J. 

Wall, Penna. B. C 9 

1896 — No contest. 

Four-oared Shells. 

1892 — Pennsylvania B. C r. 

1893 — Crescent B. C 

1894 — Pennsylvania B. C No time taken 

1895 — No contest. 

*i896 — Pennsylvania B. C 5 

Junior Four-oared Gigs. 

1892— Iona B. C 8 

1893 — Pennsylvania Barge Club 9 

1894 — Crescent B. C 9 7 

1895 — Pennsylvania Barge Club b 56 

*i8 9 6^-Malta B. C 6 00 

Eight-oared Shells. 

1892 — College B. C 7 50 

1893 — Malta B. C 9 383-4 

1894 — Vesper B. C 8 182-5 

1895 — Pennsylvania Barge Club 8 11 

*i89G — Pennsylvania Barge Club 5 11 

*One mile straightaway. 

Oxford vs. Cambridge. 
Fifty-two races have been rowed between 
these institutions in the past sixty-six years, of 
which Oxford has won 29, Cambridge 22 and 
one, in 1877, resulted in a dead heat. The record 
of the last ten years has been : 



YEAR. 



1887... 
1888... 
1889... 

1890... 

1891... 

1892... 

1893... 

1804... 

1895... 

1896.... 





DISTANCE 


WINNER. 








M. 


YDS. 


Cambridge 


4 


44O 


Cambridge 


4 


44O 


Cambridge 


4 


44O 


Oxford 


4 


440 


Oxford 


4 


44O 


Oxford 


4 


44O 


Oxford 


4 


44O 


Oxford 


4 


44O 


Oxford 


4 


44O 


Oxford 


4 


440 



TIME. 
M. S. 



20.52 
20.48 
2O.I4 
22. 3 
22. O 
19.21 
18.47 
2I.39 
20.50 
20.I0 



WON BY 

3 lengths. 
6 lengths. 
3 lengths. 
1 length. 
y x length. 
2^ lengths. 
2^4 lengths. 
2 l /2 lengths. 
2^ lengths. 
\i length. 



YACHTING. 

[For record of Yachting, see Almanac for 1896.] 



ATHLETIC. 
American Amateur Records of Running, 
Walking, Jumping.Weight-Throwing, etc. 

20-yard run, 2 4-5 seconds, E. B. Bloss, Rox- 
bury, February 22, 1892. 

40-yard run, 4 3-5 seconds, E. B. Bloss, Bos- 
ton, February 13, 1892. 

50-yard run. 5 3-5 seconds, B. J. Wefers, New 
York, September 26, 1896. 

75-yard run, 7 3-5 seconds, Luther H. Carey, 
Princeton, May 9, 1891. 

100-yard run. 9 4-5 seconds, John Owens, Jr., 
Washington, October n, 1890; John V. Crum, 
Chicago, June 16, 1895, and Bernard J. Wefers, 
New York, Sept. 21, 1895. 

120-yard run, n 4-5 seconds, B. J. Wefers, New 
York, September 26, 1896. 

120-yard run, over 10 hurdles 3 feet 6 inches 
high, 15 2-5 seconds, Stephen Chase, New York, 
September 28, 1895. 



150-yard run, 14 4-5 seconds, C. H. Sherrill, 
New York, May 17, 1890, and John Owens, Jr., 
twice, Detroit, September 13, 1890. 

200-yard run, 20 seconds, Wendell Baker, New 
York, November 8, 1890. 

220-yard run, 21 3-5 seconds, Harry Jewett, 
Montreal, September 24, 1892, and Bernard J. 
Wefers, New York, September 21, 1895. 

220-yard run, over 10 hurdles 2 feet 6 inches 
high, 24 3-5 seconds, J. L. Bremer, Jr., New 
York, May 25, 1893. 

250-yard run, 25 4-5 seconds, C. H. Sherrill, 
New Haven, Conn., June 15, 1888. 

300-yard run, 30 3-5 seconds, Bernard J. Wefers, 
New York, September 26, 1896. 

400-yard run, 43 seconds, W. C. Downes, Bos- 
ton, July 9, 1890. 

440-yard run, straightaway, 47^ seconds,Wen- 
dell Baker, Boston. July 1, 1886. 

440-yard run, around a circular path, 48^ sec- 
onds, L. E. Myers, Philadelphia, October 15, 
1881. 

440-yard run, over 10 hurdles 2 feet 6 inches 
high, 56 2-5 seconds, Jerome Buck, New York, 
September 19, 1896. 

880-yard run. 1 minute 53 2-5 seconds, Chas. J. 
Kilpatrick, New York, September 21, 1895. 

i-mile run, 4 minutes 15 3-5 seconds, Thomas 
P. Conneff, New York, August 28, 1895. 

2-mile run, 9 minutes 32 3-5 seconds, W. D. 
Day, New York, May 17, 1890. 

3-mile run, 14 minutes 39 seconds, W. D. Day, 
Bergen Point, May 30, 1890. 

4-mile run, 20 minutes 15 4-5 seconds, W. D. 
Day, New York, November 16, 1889. 

5-mile run, 25 minutes 23 3-5 seconds, E. C. 
Carter, New York, September 17, 1887. 

10-mile run, 52 minutes 38 2-5 seconds, W. D. 
Day, West New Brighton, S. I., October 26, 1889. 

%-mile walk, 1 minute 23 seconds, H. L. Cur- 
tis, New York, September 19, 1891. 

i-mile walk. 6 minutes 29 3-5 seconds, F. P. 
Murray, New Vurk, October 27, 1883. 

3-mile walk, 21 minutes 9 1-5 seconds, F. P. 
Murray, New York, November 6, 1883. 

Running broad jump, 23 feet 6]/ 2 inches, C. S. 
Reber, Detroit, July 4, 1891. 

Standing broad jump, 10 feet 9% inches, A. 
P. Schwaner, New York, October 8, 1892. 

Three standing jumps, 34 feet 4% inches, M. 
W. Ford, New York, April 10, 1885. 

Running hop, step, and jump, 48 feet 6 inches, 
E. B. Bloss, Chicago, September 16, 1893. 

Running two hops and jump, 49 feet )A inch, 
J. B. Connelly, New York. September 19, 1896. 

Running high jump, 6 feet 5^8 inches, M. F. 
Sweeney, New York, September 21, 1895. 

Pole-vaulting, for height. 11 feet 5% inches, W. 
S. Rodenbaugh, Philadelphia, September 19,1892. 

Pole-vaulting, for distance, 27 feet 5 inches, A. 
H. Green, Chicago, September 16, 1893. 

Throwing 16-pound hammer, 145 feet y x inch, 
J. S. Mitchell, Travers Island, October 8, 1892. 

Putting 16-pound shot, 47 feet, George R. Gray, 
Chicago, September 16, 1893. 

Throwing 56-pound weight, for distance, 35 
feet 10 inches, J. S. Mitchell, New York, Sep- 
tember 22, 1894. 

Throwing 56-pound weight, for height. 15 feet 
4% inches, J. S. Mitchell, Chicago, September 
16, 1893. 

Throwing the discus, 111 feet 8 inches, Rich- 
ard Sheldon, New York, September 19, 1869. 



86 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



BICYCLING. 

The following table includes only those records 
which have been presented to the Racing Board 
of the League of American Wheelmen accom- 
panied by the proper vouchers, and have been 
officially accepted as being authentic or have 
been submitted, accompanied by the necessary 
vouchers, and are only awaiting formal accept- 
ance by the Board : 

Amateur Records. 

Flying Start — Unpaced Against Time. 

y mile, 25 1-5 sec; y, mile. 33 3-5 sec. A. B. 

Simmons, Deming, N. M.. May 26, 1896. 
y mile, 59 sec. H. C. Clark, Denver, Colo., 

Nov. 20, 1895. 
y z miles, 1.26 1-5 sec. J. D. Park, Denver, Colo., 

Nov. 20, 1894. 
Y± miles, 1.37 sec. F. B. Stone, Springfield, 

Mass., Uct. 20, 1894. 

1 mile, 2.05 1-5 sec. H. C. Clark, Denver, Colo., 

Oct. 17, 1895. 

2 miles, 4.38 3-5 sec. H. C. Clark, Denver, Colo., 

Nov. 11, 1895. 

3 miles, 7.03 sec; 4 miles, 9.31 2-5 sec 0. B. 

Hackcnberger, Denver, Colo., Dec. 13, 1895. 

5 miles, 11.56 4-5 sec. O. B. Hackenberger, 

Denver, Colo., Dec. 13, 1895. 
10 miies, 25.26 4-5 sec A. F. Senn, Utica, N.Y., 

Oct. 20, 1894. 
25 miles, 1.05.30 sec. A. F. Senn, Utica, N. Y., 

Oct. 23, 1894. 
50 miles, 2.29.00 4-5 sec Wm. Becker, Fieeport, 

111., Uct. 17, 1895. 

Flying Start — Paced Against Time. 

y mile, 24 2-5 sec J. L. Johnson, Waltham, 
Mas-., Oct. 31, 1893. 

1/3 mile, 31 1-5 sec; } 2 mile. 53 sec. A.W.Por- 
ter, Waltham, Mass., Nov. 2, 1894. 

2 / 2 mile, 1. 14 1-5 sec; \ mile, 1.22 4-5 sec Amos 
B. Hughes, Denver, Colo., May 23, 1896. 

1 mile, 1.47 1-5 sec. Amos B. Hughes, Denver, 

Colo., June 19, 1896. 

2 miles. 3.56 3-5 sec. Amos B. Hughes, Denver, 

Colo., May 23, 1896. 

3 miles, 6.08 sec; 4 miles, 8.16 sec; smiles, 10.21 

sec. B.B. Stevens, Philadelphia,Nov. 16, 1895. 

6 miles, 13.14 1-2 sec; 7 miles, 15.25 1-2 sec; 8 

miles, 17.42 sec. ; 9 miles, 19.53 sec Geo. 
W. Adams, Jacksonville, Fla., July 17, 1896. 
10 miles. 22.13 sec - W. B. Douglass, Philadel- 
phia, Oct. 29, 1896. 

Standing Start — Unpaced Against Time. 
y mile, 28 1-5 sec. H. Davidson, Waltham, Mass. 
y 3 mile, 42 sec. F. L. Eberhart, Salina, Kan., 

Nov. 5, 1895. 
y 2 mile, 1.03 2-5 sec F. Jenny, Aug. 18, 1894. 
Y± mile, 1. 14 2-5 sec Frank L. Eberhart, Salina, 

Kan., Nov. 5, 1895. 

1 mile, 2.19 4-5 sec. J. D. Park, Denver, Colo., 

Nov. 26, 1894. 

2 miles, 4.46 1-5 sec; 3 miles, 7.15 sec; 4 miles, 

9.47 sec. ; 5 miles, 12.12 sec Harry C. 

Clark, Denver, Colo., Nov. 21, 1895. 
Standing Start — Paced Against Time. 
y mile, 28 sec. J. S. Johnson, Oct. 31, 1893. 
y mile, 39 3-5 sec. J. S. Johnson. Oct. 24, 1893. 
y 2 mile, 59 sec. A. W. Porter, Waltham, Oct. 

20, 1894. 
y$ mile, 1. 18 2-5 sec; $/ r mile, 1.28 3-5 sec; 

1 mile, 1.58 1-5 sec. A. W. Porter, Waltham, 

Nov, 2, 1894. 



2 miles, 4.28 3-5 sec. W. W. Windle, Sept. 30, 

1893. 

3 miles, 6.43 sec. W. W. Windle, Oct. 17, 1893. 

4 miles, 8.43 sec. F. J. Titus, Springfield, Sept. 

7' l8 93- 

5 miles, 10.07 2-5 sec. C. W. Miller, Louisville, 

Ky., Nov. 7, 1895. 

6 miles, 13.43 1-5 ; 7 miles, 16.05 J -5 : 8 miles, 

18.26 1-5 ; 9 miles, 20.46 3-5 ; 10 miles, 23.04 
2-5; 11 miles, 25.26; 12 miles, 27.43 2-5; 13 
miles, 30.03 1.5; 14 miles, 32.19; 15 miles, 
34.37; 16 miles, 36.54 ; 17 miles, 39.19 ; 18 
miles, 41.31 1-5; 19 miles, 43.30 1-5; 20 
miles, 46.07; 21 miles, 48.27; 22 miles, 50.46 
2-5 ; 23 miles, 53.04 1-5 ; 24 miles, 55.22 1-5 ; 
25 miles, 5 7.40 3-5 ; 26 miles, 59.52 1-5. All 
by L. S. Meintjes, Sept. 14, 1893. 
27 miles, 1. 11. 48 1-5; 28 miles, 1. 14. 24 4-5; 29 miles', 
1. 17.02 4-5; 30 miles, 1. 19. 41 4-5; 31 miles, 
1. 22. 18; 32 miles, 1.24.53 ; 33 miles,'? .27.34 
2-5 ; 34 miles, 1.30.23 4-5 ; 35 miles, 1.33.04; 
36 miles, I.35-39 4-5; 37 miles, 1.38.233-5; 
38 miles, 1. 41.07 3-5; 39 miles, 1.43.433-5; 
40 miles, 1.46.27 3-5; 41 miles 1.49.08; 42 
miles, 1. 51. 49; 43 miles, 1.54.27 2-5; 44 
miles, 1.57.06; 45 miles, 1.59.383-5 ; 46 miles, 
2.02.10; 47 miles, 2.04.46 2-5; 48 miles, 
2.07.262-5; 49 miles, 2. 10-01 2-5; 50 miles, 
z- I2 -45 3-5; 5 1 miles, 2.15.27 3-5; 52 miles, 
2. 18. 12 1-5; 53 miles, 2.21.02 2-5; 54 miles, 
2.23.59; 55 miles, 2. 26. 44; 56 miles, 2. 29. 26; 57 
miles, 2.32.08 3-5 ; 58 miles, 2.35.00 ; 59 miles, 
2.37.48 2-5 ; 60 miles, 2.40.34 4-5 ; 61 miles, 
2.43.47; 62 miles, 2.46.20; 63 miles, 2.49.17 
1-5; 64 miles, 2.52.21 1-5; 65 miles, 2.55.12 
3-5 ; 66 miles, 2.57.56 3-5; 67 miles, 3.00.44 
3-5; 68 miles, 3.03.56 1-5 ; 69 miles, 3.06.47 
4-5; 70 miles, 3.09.04 3-5 ; 71 miles, 3.12.32 
1-5; 72 miles, 3. is. 22 1-5 ; 73 miles, 3. 18. 23^; 
74 miles, 3.21.324-5; 75 miles, 3.24.374-5; 
76 miles, 3.27.32 1-5; 77 miles, 3.30.25 1-5; 
78 miles, 333.32 1-5; 79 miles, 3.36.26 3-5; 
80 miles, 3.30.21 3-5; 81 miles, 3.42.13 3-5; 
82 miles, 3.45-03 3-5.' 83 miles, 3-47-53 4-5.* 
84 miles, 3.51.08 4-5; 85 miles, 3.51.98 2-5; 
86 miles, 3.54.02 1-5; 87 miles, 3.59-5° 3"5; 
88 miles, 4.02.45 3-5; S9 miles, 4.05.42 3-5; 
90 miles, 4.08.37; 91 miles, 4. 11. 30; 92 
miles, 4.14.35; 93 miles, 4.17.28; 94 miles, 
4.20.21 ; 95 miles, 4.23.21 ; 96 miles, 4.26.18; 
97 miles, 4.29.06 4-5; 98 miles, 4.32.06 1-5; 
100 miles, 4.37.56 4-5. All by A. G. Hard- 
ing, St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 24, 1894. 

Standing Start — Competition. 

y mile, 29 3-5 sec. G. F. Royce, Paterson, N. 

J-, July 4, 1894. 
y 3 mile, 43 sec. Geo. Packer, Jr., Denver, Col., 

July 13, 1895. 
14 mile, 1.01 sec. F. M. Byrne, San Jose, Cal., 

Sept. 9, 1895. 
% mile, 1.25 1-5 sec. F. A. MacFarland, San 

Jose, Cal., July 4, 1895. 

1 mile, 2.00 2-5 sec F. F. Desmond, Jr., Den- 

ver, Col., Aug. 8, 1896. 

2 miles, 4.25 1-5 sec Otto Maya, Latrobe, Pa., 

July 20, 1895. 

3 miles, 7.05 3-5 sec. G. A. Maxwell, St. Louis, 

Mo., Oct. 24, 1894. 

4 miles, 9.42 2-5 sec. A. A. Hansen, Minneapo- 

lis, Minn., Aug. 15, 1895. 

5 miles, 11.49 I_ 5 sec > J- C. Mitchell, Louisville, 

Ky., Sept. 14, 1895. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



87 



6 miles, 14.36 ; 7 miles, 17.00 ; 8 miles, 19.29 1-5 ; 
9 miles, 22.00; 10 miles, 24-16 2-5; 11 miles, 
26.43 x "5 •' I2 m il es , 29,10 2-5; 13 miles, 
31.27 1-5; 14 miles, 33.49 4-5; 15 miles, 
36.11 2-5 ; 16 miles, 38.35 1-5 ; 17 miles, 40.54 
2-5 ; 18 miles, 43.22 1-5 ; 19 miles, 45.49 ; 20 
miles, 48.08 1-5 ; 21 miles, 50.39 2-5 ; 22 miles, 
53-03 4-5; 23 miles, 55.30; 24 miles, 57.95 
3-5; 25 miles, 1.00.30 1-5; 26 miles, 1.02.54 
2-5; 27 miles, 1.05.22 4-5; 2S miles, 1.07.45 
1-5; 29 miles, 1. 10.08; 30 miles, 1.12.34 1-5; 
31 miles, 1. 15.04 2-5 ; 32 miles, 1.17.26 1-5; 
33 miles, 1. 19. 42 3-5; 34 miles, 1.22. 13 2-5; 
35 miles, 1.24.34 4-5; 36 miles, 1.27. 15 1-5; 
37 miles, 1.29.492-5; 38 miles, 1.32.35 1-5; 
39 miles, 1.35.08 3-5 ; 40 miles, 1.37.34 2-5 ; 
41 miles, 1.40.24 1-5; 42 miles, 1.43.07; 43 
miles, 1.45.542-5; 44 miles, 1.48.47 1-5 ; 45 
miles, 1. 51. 40; 46 miles, 1.54.30 2-5 ; 47 miles, 
1.57.26 3-5; 48 miles, 2.00.20; 49 miles, 
2.03.291-5; 50 miles, 2.03.291-5; 51 miles, 
2.09.322-5; 52 miles, 2.12.37 1-5 ; 53 miles, 
2.15.44; 54 miles, 2.18.50 3-5; 55 miles, 
2.22.00; 56 miles, 2.25.15 1-5; 57 miles, 
2.28.502-5; 58 miles, 2.32.47 1-5; 59 miles, 
2. 36. 11 ; 60 miles, 2.39.01. All by A. A. 
Hansen, Oct. 15, 1895. 

Hour Records— Standing Start — Paced 
Against Time. 

2 hours, 45 miles, 1530 yards. L. S. Meintjes, 

Springfield, Sept. 14, 1893. 
6 hours, 107 miles. A. A. Hansen, Minneapolis, 

Sept. 21, 1894. 
12 hours, 203 miles, 140 yards; 18 hours, 292 miles, 

440 yards. F. E. Spooner, Chicago, July 

8-9, 1893. 
24 hours, 381 miles, 1187 yards. Louis Ginn, 

Cleveland, Oct. 15-16, 1894. 

Tandem — Flying Start— Paced Against 
Time. 
y mile, 25 4-5 sec; j4 mile, 34 2-5 sec; % mile, 
52 1-2 sec; 1 mile, 1.52 3-5 sec. Haggarty 
and Williams, Waltham, Nov. 2, 1894. 

Tandem — Standing Start — Unpaced 
Against Time. 
1 mile, 2.05 sec. ; 2 miles, 4.18 sec. Henshaw 
and Hedstrom, Paterson, N. J., July 4, 1896. 

Tandem — Flying Start — Unpaced Against 
Time. 

y K mile, 26 1-5 sec. Devlin and Hansen, River- 
side, R. I., Aug. 1, 1896. 

x / 3 mile, 35 sec. ; % mile, 56 sec. ; % mile, 1.17. 
Davisworth and Mitchell, Louisville, Ky., 
July 4, 1896. 

1 mile, 2.03. Benson and Downing, San Jose, 

Cal., Oct. 23, 1895. 

3 miles, 6.49 2-5 ; 4 miles, 9.10 3-5 ; 5 miles, 

11.27 3 _ 5- Hill and Gardiner, Philadelphia, 
Nov. 17, 1896. 

Tandem — Standing Start — Competition. 

2 miles, 4.38 1-4 sec. Walton and Wallin, Erie, 

Pa., May 30, 1896. 

Professional Records. 
Flying Start — Unpaced Against Time. 

% mile, 28 2-5 sec. Otto Ziegler, Jr., Laredo, 

Mex., June 8, 1896. 
l /$ mile, 34 1-5 sec. W. W. Hamilton, Coronado, 

Cal., March 2, 1896. 



1 mile, 1.59 1-5 sec. C. R. Coulter, Denver, 

Col., Oct. 2, 1896. 

2 miles, 4.27; 3 miles. 6.52; 4 miles, 9.17; 5 

miles, 11.42. All by Henry Bradis, Mem- 
phis, Tenn., Nov. 22, 1896. 

6 miles, 14.25 ; 7 miles, 16.50 ; 8 miles, 19.15 2-5 ; 
9 miles, 21.42 3-5; 10 miles, 24.10; 11 miles, 
26.38; 12 miles, 29.08 2-5; 13 miles, 31.38; 
14 miles, 34.07 ; 15 miles, 36.36 1-5 ; 16 miles, 
39.07; 17 miles, 41.38; 18 miles, 44.11; 19 
miles, 46.44 3-5; 20 miles, 49.20; 21 miles, 
5J-35 4-5; 22 miles, 54.31 2-5; 23 miles, 
57.10 2-5; 24 miles, 59.54; 25 miles, 1.02.37 
2-5. All by A. F. Senn, Louisville, Ky., 
Nov. 18, 1S95. 

30 miles. 1. 19. 59 ; ;5 miles, 1.33.24 ; 40 miles, 
1.47.25 ; 45 miles, 2.01.46; 50 miles, 2.16.03. 
All by John Lr.nson, Memphis, Tenn., Nov. 
17, 1896. 

Flying Start — Paced Against Time. 

\l mile, 20 2-5 sec. ; y 3 mile, 27 4-5 sec. ; y 2 
mile, 44 1-5 sec. J. S. Johnson, Nash- 
ville, Tenn., Oct. 29, 1896. 

% mile. 58 3-5 sec. W. W. Hamilton, Coron- 
ado, Cal., March 2, 1896. 

y± mile, 1. 10 sec. J. S. Johnson, New Orleans, 
Nov. ri, 1896. 

1 mile, 1.39. W . W. Hamilton, Coronada, Cal., 

March 27, 1896. 

2 miles, 3.33 2-5; 3 miles, 5.22 ; 4 miles, 7.15; 5 

miles, 9.07 4-5 ; 6 miles, 11.00 1-5 ; 7 miles, 
12.53 3"5 I 8 miles, 14.463-5; 9 miles, 16.40 
2-5; 10 miles, 18.33 I_ 5- -A-ll by J. S. Mich- 
ael, New Orleans, Nov. 10, 1896. 

11 miles, 22.00 ; 12 miles, 24.02 ; 13 miles, 26.03 '• 
14 miles, 28.05 ; 15 miles, 30.06 1-5 ; 16 miles, 
32.10; 17 miles, 34.14; 18 miles, 36.16; 19 
miles, 38.18 ; 20 miles, 40.21 ; 21 miles, 42.21 ; 
22 miles, 44.22 ; 23 miles, 46.25 2-5 ; 24 miles, 
48.24; 25 miles, 50.30; 26 miles, 52.31; 27 
miles, 54.32 ; 28 miles, 56.35 2-5 ; 29 miles, 
58.36. All by J. S. Michael, Memphis, 
Tenn., Nov. 22, 1896. 

1 hour record, 29 miles 1293 yards. J. S. Mich- 
ael, Memphis, Tenn., Nov. 22, 1896. 

30 miles, 1.08. 31 ; 35 miles, 1.19.55 ; 40 miles, 
1. 31.08 ; 45 miles, 1.42. 12 ; 50 miles, 1.53. 18 ; 
55 miles, 2.04.45 ; 60 miles, 2. 16. 12 ; 65 miles, 
2.27.41; 70 miles, 2.39.21 1-5; 75 miles, 
2.51.20; 80 miles, 3.03.12 1-5; 85 miles, 
3.15.33; 90 miles, 3.27.40; 95 miles, 3.39.41 
3-5; 100 miles, 3.52.14 1-5 ; 105 miles, 4.09.29 
2-5 : 106 miles, 4.12.04. All by Frank Wal- 
ler, Memphis, Tenn., Nov. 19, 1S96. 

Standing Start Competition. 

y mile, 45 sec. F. E. Schepki, Santa Monica, 
Cal., February 22, 1896. 

y 2 mile, 1. 00 4-5 sec. Otto Ziegler, New Orleans, 
June 13, 1896. 

% mile, 1.25 sec. Thomas Cooper, Cincinnati, 
May 10, 1896. 

1 mile, 2.10 4-5 sec. Arthur Gardiner, New Or- 
leans, June 13, 1896. 

Tandem — Flying Start — Paced Against 
Time. 
1 mile, 1.50 1-5 sec. Crooks and Weinig, Louis- 
ville, Ky., October 25, 1895. 

Tandem — Flying Start — Unpaced Against 
Time. 

y mile, 22 3-5 sec. Phillips and Wing, New Or- 
leans, October 29, 1896. 



88 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



% mile, 32 2-5 sec. Weinig and Steenson, New 

Orleans, October 29, 1896. 
l / 2 mile, 51 1-5 sec. Phillips and Brandis, New 

Orleans, October 29, 1896. 
Y± mile, 1.25 3-5 sec. Evans and Hatton, San 

Jose, Cal., May 28, 1896. 

1 mile, 1.54 2-5 sec. Evans and Hatton, San 

Jose, Cal., May 29, 1896. 

2 miles, 4.04 2-5 sec; 3 miles, 6.17 1-5 sec. 

Evans and Hatton, San Jose, Cal., May 26, 

1896. 
4 miles, 8.26 sec. ; 5 miles, 10.53 3-5 sec. 

Evans and Hatton, San Jose, Cal., May 28, 

1896. 
10 miles, 22.17 sec - Evans and Hatton, San Jose, 

Cal., May 29, 1896. 

Triplet — Flying Start — Unpaced Against 
Time. 

y mile, 25 3-5 sec. Phillips, Brades and Myer, 

New Orleans, November 6, 1896. 
x /z mile, 48 2-5 sec. Phillips, Brades and Myer, 

New Orleans, October 29, 1896. 
% mile, 1. 19 sec; 1 mile, 1.49 sec. Phillips, 

Brades and Myer, New Orleans, November 

6, 1896. 

THE TURF. 

The records that have not been excelled will 
be found in the Ledger Almanac for 1896. 
The new records are as follows : 

Trotting Four-in-Hand. 

1 mile, 2.30, Damana, Bellenut, Maud V. and 
Nutspia, Washington Park, Chicago, July 4, 
1896. 

Pacing Records. 

1 mile, by a gelding, 2.01 y, against time, Robert 
J., Terre Haute, Ind., Sept. 14, 1894. Time 
of quarters, 30%, 30, 29^, 31%, showing the 
middle half mile to have been paced in 59^ 
seconds. In a race by a gelding, 2.02 </£, 
Robert J., Indianapolis, Ind.. Sept. 6, 1894. 
By a stallion, against time, 2.00';., John R. 
Gentry, Rigly Park, Portland, Maine. Sept. 
24, 1896. On September 27, at Sioux City, John 
R. Gentry paced the last quarter of a mile in 
28^ seconds. By a mare, 2.06^, Lottie Lor- 
raine. Pearl C. Columbus, O. , Aug. 4, 1896. 
Fastest two consecutive heats, 2.03^, 2.01 ' 2 , 
James R. Gentry, Glen Falls, Sept. id, 1896. 
Fastest three consecutive heats, 2.02 ';>, 2.03 l 2 , 
2. 03%, Star Pointer, Mystic Park, Medford, 
Mass., Sept. 18, 1896. 



CHESS. 

In no year was so much interest shown in chess, 
and so many international contests held, as in 
1896. The St. Petersburg Chess Club arranged 
a tournament between the prize winners at Hast- 
ings, but as Tarrasch was unable to compete a 
quadrangular tourney took place, in which Pills- 
bury, Lasker, Steinitz and Tschigorin took part. 
Following this Steinitz met and defeated Sniffers 
by the score of 8 to 6, three games being drawn. 

The German Ochach Bund selected Nurem- 
berg as the place for the next tournament, but 
the local chess club took charge of it and ar- 
ranged an international contest, which was prob- 
ably the best ever held. As at St. Petersburg, 
Lasker was again successful, and besides win- 
ning $750, also captured the silver cup and plate 
offered by the Prince Regent. 



Following the tournament at Nuremberg a 
contest of international importance was held at 
Budapest, as an attraction to the Millennial 
Festivals held in that city. The Emperor-King 
had offered a silver statuette valued at $800 as a 
trophy, and so sharply contested were the games 
that the outcome was a tie between Tschigorin 
and Charonsek, with a score of 8% games each. 
The American, Pillsbury, finished third. In 
playing off the tie, Tschigorin won with three 
games to Charonsek's one. 

Pillsbury, who last year won first honors at 
the Hastings tournament, where he made the 
splendid score of i6y to 4^, was not quite so 
successful this year, yet he proved to be one of 
America's leading experts. At St. Petersburg he 
succeeded in defeating Lasker and Tschigorin, 
his not being placed better than third being due 
to the defeat he suffered from the veteran Steinitz. 

At Nuremberg he defeated Lasker, Steinitz, 
Tschigorin and Tarrasch, but he lost to Black- 
burne, Marocry. Sniffers and Walbrodt, thus 
being tied with Tarrasch, with whom he divided 
third and fourth prizes. 

The international match played by cable be- 
tween America and England resulted in a vic- 
tory for this country. The Brooklyn Chess Club, 
which managed the affair, thus holds the George 
Newness Cup for the ensuing year. The results 
of the games were as follows : 

AMERICA. ENGLAND. 

Pillsbury o Blackburne 1 

Showalter 1 Buru o 

Iiurrille 1 Bird o 

Barry 1 Tinsley o 

Hymes % Locock % 

Hodges V 2 Mills y 2 

Delmar y 2 Atkins y 2 

D. G. Baird o Jackson 1 

Total 4$ Total 3^ 

Showalter won the championship of the United 
States by defeating Lipschutz, in a series of 
games, by 7 to 4. He also successfully defended 
his title in a match with Emil Kemeny, the score 
being : Showalter 7 ; Kemeny, 4 ; drawn, 4. 
Barry also challenged him, but he won by the 
score of 7 to 2, five games being drawn. 

Mordecai Morgan won the George W. Childs 
and Dr. Frazier cups, which are annually com- 
peted for by Philadelphia amateurs. 

In the New York State Chess Association 
tournament, held at Ontario Beach, N. Y., S. 
Warren Bampton, of Philadelphia, won first 
prize, and E. S. Maguire, also of this city, won 
the solving contest at the same tourney. 

WHIST. 

The sixth annual congress of the American 
Whist League was held at the Oriental Hotel, 
Manhattan Beach, N. Y., June 22-27, 1896. The 
trophies offered were won as follows ; 

Hamilton Trophy — The Hamilton Club of 
Philadelphia. 

A. W. L. Challenge Trophy— The Whist Club 
of New York. 

Minneapolis Trophy — The Baltimore Whist 
Club. 

Brooklyn Trophy — The New England Whist 
Association. 

The A. W. L. Challenge Trophy becomes the 
property of the club first winning it twenty times. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



89 



HOUSEHOLD SUGGESTIONS. 

Noise and Naps. — It is a mistake to try to 
accustom a young baby to noise ; manage so as 
to have a quiet place for him while he takes his 
naps, and they will be of long duration. Never 
rock a baby. There is nothing in the motion 
that will add to his comfort or happiness, while 
it certainly will detract from yours when you find 
that, after a time, he will positively refuse to go 
to sleep without the accustomed rocking. 

Simple Cosmetics. — With many French and 
German ladies the cucumber is a sovereign cos- 
metic. They buy cold cream, beat it in a plate 
until soft, and drop in the juice of a boiled cucum- 
ber. Milk is a very valuable cosmetic, and may 
be used freely to bathe the face in. Lanoline 
cream, which is considered excellent as an emol- 
lient for the skin, may be made as follows : Ob- 
tain half a pint of Lanoline and half a pint of 
pure oil of sweet almonds. Then, putting a table- 
spoonful on a china plate, add an equal quantity 
of almond oil ; mix thoroughly, and add from 
half a teaspoonful to a teaspoonful of tincture of 
benzoin, until the paste drips from the knife — a 
steel case-knife is best for the mixing process — in 
about the consistency of very thick cream. All 
three of these ingredients are absolutely harm- 
less. It should be rubbed in at night. 

Earache. — The following cure may be tried 
in cases of severe earache when ordinary reme- 
dies have failed. Get two ounces of dried arnica 
flowers, and put them into two small bags. Put 
half a pint of whisky into a small saucepan on 
the stove, and when it is heated dip one of the 
bags into it, and apply to the ear of the sufferer. 
As soon as one bag begins to cool, and the steam 
stops coming from it, change it for the other bag 
which is heating in the whisky. 

Brooms. — If brooms are wetted in boiling 
suds once a week they will become very tough, 
will not cut the carpet, will last longer, and sweep 
like new brooms. 

Screws. — If a screw be soaped before it is put 
into wood it is much easier to put in. The appli- 
cation of a red-hot iron to the head of a rusty 
screw will enable one to remove it easily, if the 
screw-driver is used before the screw has had 
time to cool. 

Washing Paint. — If, when washing paint, 
you would use a little powdered whiting on your 
wet cloth, you would find all dirt and grease dis- 
appear at once without injuring the most deli- 
cate paint. 

To Remove Stains from the Hands. — 

Ink-stains, dye-stains, etc., can be immediately 
removed by dipping the finger in water (warm 
water is best), and then rubbing on the stain a 
small portion of oxalic acid powder and cream- 
of-tartar, mixed together in equal quantities, and 
kept in a box. When the stain disappears, wash 
the hands 'with fine soap or almond cream. A 
small box of this stain-powder should be kept 
always in the washstand drawer, unless there are 
small children in the family, in which case it 
should be put out of their reach, as it is a poison 
if swallowed. 

Cooking Odors. — A tin cup filled with vine- 
gar, and placed on the back of the stove, will pre- 
vent the spread of cooking odors throughout the 
house. 



To Preserve and Clean Linoleum and 
Kindred Floor-cloths. — When first laid,sponge 
over with ale or beer, and wipe dry. This should 
be done six alternate days, to fill in the pores. 
Clean with warm water once a week (no soap or 
soda), and when dry sponge with ale as above. 
This method is especially needed after ceilings 
have been cleaned and whitened when floor- 
cloths are laid, and the white dust trodden in. 
The ale brings back tone and color immediately, 
after first cleaning with warm water. Linoleum is 
also preserved by washing once a week with milk. 

How to Preserve Clothes Pins. — Clothes 
pins boiled a few minutes and quickly dried, once 
or twice a month, become more flexible and dura- 
ble. Clothes lines will last longer, and keep in 
better order, if treated in the same way. 

How to Clean Looking-Glasses. — Sweep 
away the dirt with a soft brush or silk handker- 
chief. Then sponge with a little spirit of wine to 
remove all dust ; and dust with the finest whit- 
ing, or blue powder; then rub it off quickly with 
a cloth, and polish lightly with a silk handker- 
chief. Clean the gilt frame with a little cotton- 
wool. 

Paper Bags. — It is well that housewives 
should know that paper bags are made of a com- 
pound of rags, lime, glue and similar substances, 
mixed with chemicals and acids. When dry 
these can do no harm ; but if allowed to become 
damp, a paper bag is unfit to touch articles of 
food. Never, therefore, keep food that is of a 
damp or juicy nature in a paper bag. 

To Peel Tomatoes. — A better way to peel 
ripe tomatoes than that commonly used is to 
put them into a frying-basket, and plunge the 
basket for a second into boiling water, to loosen 
the skins. This is particularly the best way 
whei one is preparing a quantity of tomatoes, 
and wishes to keep them all firm and hard. If 
the boiling water is poured over them in a pan, 
the tomatoes at the bottom are quite sure to be- 
come soft before they are peeled. 

To Sweeten Butter. — If you have butter 
that is not quite sweet, put it in an enameled 
saucepan with a little salt and a tiny piece of 
soda, place over the fire and bring to a boil. 
Turn it into a stone jar and set it in a cool place. 
The butter will be found perfectly sweet and not 
too salt for cooking. The impurities will settle 
at the bottom of the jar. 

The Uses of a Raw Potato. — To clean 
gilt frames, cut a raw potato in two, rub the 
frames with it, and polish them thoroughly with 
a soft, clean duster. Raw potato, with a little 
bathbrick, will remove stains from steel knives 
and forks, and stains can also be taken out of 
tinware and brass in the same way. 

Flowers for the Sick.— When choosing 
flowers for the sick be sure they are perfectly 
fresh. Do not send too many, but make it up in 
frequency and variety, and avoid those that are 
very fragrant. 

How to Make Cold Cream. — Take half a 
pound of the best lard, and a little essence of 
lemon. Put these in a bowl and pour boiling 
water upcn them, then set aside, and when cold 
pour off the water. Twice repeat this process of 
scalding, then beat to a soft cream with a fork. 
Put it in jars, and it is ready for use. 



9 o 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



HOUSEHOLD INSECTS. 

The United States Government has come to 
the relief of good housekeepers by publishing a 
pamphlet telling them all about " Household In- 
sects," their life history, their habits, and, what is 
of special importance, how to get rid of them. 
The pamphlet is " Bulletin No. 4, New Series, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Division of En- 
tomology." We have space here only to tell of 
some of the remedies officially recommended. 

MOSQUITOES. 

The place of honor in the pamphlet is given to 
the mosquito, of which twenty different species 
are described. They inhabit all parts of the 
United States. Of the remedies for mosquitoes, 
"present and accounted for," thorough screen- 
ing of houses and mosquito bars about the beds 
are declared best, with the burning of pyrethrum 
powder and the catching of mosquitoes on the 
ceilings with kerosene in cups next best. But 
the most satisfactory of all remedies are to be I 
found in the destruction of the larvae or the aboli- 1 
tion of the breeding places. Mosquitoes breed 
in still water. The breeding places should be 
drained, or small fish introduced into them, or 
the water (if in a tank) should be agitated me- 
chanically, or the surface of ponds, tanks, etc., 
should be covered with a thin film of kerosene. 
All of these remedies have been proved to be 
effective. The kerosene treatment appears to be 
very efficient, killing the female mosquitoes before 
their eggs are laid, as well as the larvae and pupae. 

FLEAS. 

The flea which commonly overruns houses is 
the flea of the dog or cat. Flea larvae will not 
develop where they are disturbed. Frequent 
sweeping of rooms prevents their development, 
and they usually overrun houses only when the 
latter are closed or neglected. The adult flea is 
too frisky to be easily overcome even by govern- 
ment experts, but benzine is sometimes effective. 
Uncle Sam tried a piece of raw beef in the centre 
of a piece of sticky fly paper without the slightest 
success, notwithstanding newspaper recommen- \ 
dations ; but he gives qualified approval to a ' 
plan tried by Prof. Gage, of Cornell, who tied 
fly paper, sticky-side out, about the legs of the | 
janitor of the college, and required him to walk 
up and down the floor of the infested room. The 
unsuspicious fleas jumped for his ankles, as is 
their custom, and got stuck there. 

BED BUGS. 

With an apology for mentioning such a dis- 
gusting human parasite, the bed bug is intro- 
duced. Notwithstanding his bad reputation the 
bed bug appears to be of an ancient family, and 
by reason of his association with man for several 
thousands of years has developed a wonderful 
degree of intelligence which enables him to play 
hide and seek with great success. According to 
the Government report, the bed bug, on account 
of its habits of concealment, is usually beyond the 
reach of powders. Benzine or kerosene intro- 
duced into all crevices with small brushes or 
feathers, or by the aid of syringes, will usually 
exterminate them. Corrosive sublimate and tur- 
pentine may be used in the same way. Hot 
water is also effective. Eternal cleanliness is the 
price of freedom from bed bugs ; but even this 
does not always suffice, as they are liable to be 



introduced into the best households by travelers, 
or to escape thereto from a careless neighbor's 
domicile. Fumigation with brimstone is an effec- 
tive remedy. All metals liable to be affected by 
the fumes are to be removed from the room, every 
aperture, even the keyhole, is to be stopped up, 
and four ounces of brimstone in a dish, put in a 
larger vessel, set on fire. The room should be 
left closed for four or five hours and then aired. 
The common house cockroaches and little red 
ants are deadly enemies of bed bugs — but these, 
if regarded as remedies, are about as bad as the 
disease. 

CENTIPEDES AND CRICKETS. 

The house centipede can be kept in order by 
the free use of pyrethrum powder about water 
pipes and in storerooms. The centipede is really 
useful in keeping a check upon other household 
pests, but is nevertheless unpopular. 

The house cricket, for which some people have 
a sentimental regard, is sometimes very destruc- 
tive of woolen clothing, especially if it be damp. 
The Government observers noting the fondness 
of crickets for liquids, and having regard for the 
sentimental consideration it inspires, suggests a 
pleasant remedy. A vessel containing beer is to 
be provided, into which the intoxicated crickets 
will fall and drown themselves, being first ren- 
dered " dead to the world." 

ROACHES. 

The Government has not met with much success 
in dealing with roaches, as they generally refuse 
to take poison. If a room can be made nearly air- 
tight the roach nuisance can be abated by the 
use of poisonous gases, notably bisulphide of car- 
bon. Traps are also used successfully. The 
simplest of these is a deep jar partly filled with 
stale beer, against which a few sticks are placed 
bent over so that they project into the jar for a 
few inches. The roaches in search of beer mount 
the sticks and fall into the jar. A remedy tried 
by Edison is not mentioned in the pamphlet. 
Edison relates that his telegraph office was over- 
run by roaches, and that his first invention was 
an arrangement of wires just far enough apart to 
be spanned by a roach. When the latter touched 
both wires he short-circuited a batter)' and was 
killed by the shock. 

ANTS. 

If the nests of ants can be discovered they 
can be exterminated by pouring into each of a 
number of openings an ounce or two of bisul- 
phide of carbon, and then closing the holes. If 
they are to be destroyed in the house they should 
be attracted to small bits of sponge moistened 
with sweetened water. The sponges can be col- 
lected frequently, and the ants in them killed by 
immersion in hot water. 

MITES. 

Nothing but the utmost cleanliness will prevent 
the appearance of mites in cheese*and ham. 
When a pantry is infested it should be cleaned, 
fumigated with sulphur and washed with kero- 
sene emulsion. 

These are the remedies for household pests 
officially indorsed. That they " meet a long -felt 
want" may be judged from the fact that the 
Department of Agriculture receives from five 
hundred to six hundred letters a month, a very 
considerable number of which relate to these 
insect pests. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



95 



DIPLOMATIC INTERCOURSE, i8g7. 
=** 



Countries. 



United States Ministers Abroad. App. Foreign Ministers to the United States. App. 



Argentine Rep 

Austria-Hungary ... 

Belgium 

Bolivia 

Brazil 

Central America 

Costa Rica 

Nicaragua 

Salvador 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Chile 

China 

Colombia 

Denmark 

Ecuador 

*France 

*Germany 

*Great Britain 

Greece 

Hawaiian Islands .. 

Haiti 

*Italy 

Japan 

Korea 

Liberia: 

Mexico 

Netherlands 

Paraguay 

Persia 

Peru 

Portugal 

Roumania 

Russia 

Santo Domingo 

Servia 

Siam 

Spain 

Sweden & Norway 

Switzerland 

Turkey 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 



William I. Buchanan. 

Bartlett Tripp 

James S. Ewing , 

Thomas Moonlight.... 
Thomas L. Thompson.. 



'1894 Dr. Martin Garcia Meron 1896 

1893 Mr. Ladislaus H. von Hengervar... 1894 

1893MR. Alfred le Ghait 1889 

,1894 
1893SENHOR Salvador de Mendonca 1891 



•Lewis Baker. 



\ Macgrane Coxe 

Edward H. Strobel 

Charles Denby 

Luther F. McKinney 

John E. Risley 

James D. Tillman 

James B. Eustis 

Edwin F. Uhl 

Thomas F. Bayard 

Eben Alexander 

Albert S. Willis 

Henry M. Smythe 

Wayne MacVeagh 

Edwin Dun 

JohnM. B. Sill 

William H. Heard 

Matt. W. Ransom 

William E. Quinby 

Granville Stuakt 

Alexander Macdonald 

James A. McKenzie 

George W. Carruth 

Eben Alexander 

Clifton R. Breckinridge. 

Henry M. Smythe 

Eben Alexander 

John Barrett 

Hannis Taylor 

Thomas B. Ferguson 

John L. Peak 

Alexander W. Terrell .. 

Granville Stuart 

Allen Thomas 



\ Senor Don Joaquin Bernardo Calvo. 
1893 Dr. Don Horacio Guzman 



1896 Senor Don Antonio Lazo Arriaga. 

1894 
1885 
1893 



10 9i 
189^ 

1893 
1896 

i893 
1893 

1803 

1893 

1894 

i893 

1894 

1895 

'895 

1893 
1894 

1893 
1893 

1893 
1893 
1894 

x8 9 3 
1893 

1894 

1893 
1894 

1895 
1894 
1894 
1895 



1893 
1893 

1893 

Senor Don Domingo Gana ^893 

Mr. Yang Yu 1893 

Senor Don Jose Marcelino Hurtado 1887 

Mr. Constantin Brun 1895 

Senor Don Luis Felipe Carbo 1896 

Mr. J. Patenotre T893 

Baron Max von Thielmann 1895 

Sir Julian Pauncefote j 1893 

Francis M. Hatch 1895 

Mr. J. N. Leger 1896 

Baron de Fava ^893 

Mr. Toru Hoshi 1896 

Mr. Chin Pom Ye 1896 



Senor Don Matias Romero . 
Mr. G. de Weckherlin 



1882 
1884 



Viscount de Santo Thryso 1896 

Mr. E. de Kotzebue : 1896 

Senor Don Alejandro Wos y Gil 1894 



Senor Don Enrique Dupry de Lome 

Mr. A. Grip 

Mr. J. B. Pioda 

Moustapha Bey 



Senor Jose Andrade. 



1895 
1889 

1895 
1896 

I§9J 



Ambassadors, Envoys Extraordinary and Ministers Plenipotentiary in small caps ; Ministers 
Resident in Roman; Charges d' Affaires in Italics. 

*The Ministers to and from these countries hold the rank of Ambassador. 



Arctic Expeditions of 1896... 57 
Astronomical Information ... 3 

Bond Issues 13 

Calendar, Jewish, 1897 5 

Calendars by months 3 _I 4 

Calendar for 1897 1 

Canada, Dominion of 78 

Changes in the Judiciary 57 

Chronology, General 66-68 

Chronology* Local 58-65 

Chronology, Religious 69, 70 

Churches and Religious Ser- 
vices in Philadelphia and 

Camden ^-Z'S 

Congress, Fifty-fourth 56 

Congress, United States. ..37-39 
Consuls at Philadelphia.. ..50-51 

Diplomatic Intercourse 95 

Eclipses in 1897 4 

Elections in 1897 79 



CONTENTS. 

Electoral and Popular Vote.. 77 

Ephemeris 7 

Feasts, Fasts, etc., 1897 4 

Game Laws in Pennsylvania 8 
Game Laws in New Jersey.. 9 
Government of the U. S....36, 37 
Government, Pennsylv'a... 40-42 
Government, Philadelp'a... 42-48 

Government, Camden 51,52 

Governments, State and Ter. 78 

Household Insects 90 

Household Suggestions 89 

Improvement of Philadelphia 

Harbor, &c 54 

Ledger Branch Offices 2 

Legal Holidays in Pennsyl- 
vania and New Jersey 6 

Legislature, Pennsylvania. 40-42 

Necrology, General 7 2- 73 

Necrology, Local 71-72 



Nominating Conven's of 1896 11 
Pennsylvania's Vote, 1896... 74 
Philadelphia's Cong'l Vote... 79 
Philadelphia's Vote, 1896.. 75, 76 

Pitezel Murder Case 14 

Planets, Position of, 1897 6 

Postage, Rates of 53 

Qualifications of Electors.... 79 

Roentgen's Rays 10 

Sporting Records of 1896.. 80-88 

Supreme Court, U. S 39 

The Eastern Question 12 

Thelnvasion oftheTransvaal 73 
The Philadelphia and Com- 
mercial Museum 79 

The Rebellion in Cuba 56 

The Shrievalty Campaign... 55 

The Venezuela Question 55 

The Vote of Pennsylvania .. 52 
U. S. Officers at Philad a.48-50 



PUBLIC LEDGER CALENDAR 


FOR 1898. 


1. 


s. 


M. 


T. 


W. 


i 

T. 


F. 


S. 


n. 


S. 


HI. 


! T. 


W. 


It. 


F. 


S. 


Jan. 










.... 




1 

8 


July 












1 

8 


2 
9 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




9 


10 


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12 


13 


14 


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10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


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16 


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21 


'?>> 

-w -» 




17 


18 


19 


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21 


22 


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23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


Feb, 


30 


31 












k> 


31 

• • • • 














1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 


4 


•> 


6 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


Mar. 


27 


28 












Sept, 


28 


29 


30 


31 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


1 


2 


3 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


April 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






Oct. 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


• • • • 












1 


2 














1 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


l/UU 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


Mav 
















Nov. 


30 


31 












1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


j 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


i 

i 

i 


13 


14! 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


i 


20 


21 


22! 


23 


24 


25 


26 


June 


29 


30 


31 










Dec. 


27 


28 


29 


30 








1 

8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


1 

8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


5 


6 


7 


4 


5 


6 


7 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




11 


12! 


1314 


15! 


16 


17 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25. 




18 


19 


2021 


22i 


23 


24 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




....{ 


: 


25 


26 


27 1 


28: 


29 30 


31 



PUBLIC LEDGER BRANCH OFFICES FOR RECEIVING ADVERTISEMENTS. 

FREE MESSENGERS AND FREE BOXES. 

For the convenience of Ledger advertisers, Branch Offices of the Ledger have been estab- 
lished in all parts of the city and Camden, where "Marriages" and " Deaths," "Wants," and 
other small advertisements will be received at regular rates, the same as at the Main Office, Sixth and 
Chestnut streets. Subscriptions to the Ledger also received. Boxes for answers to advertisements 
FREE at all Ledger Offices. The Branch Offices follow : 



CENTRAL. 

1413 Chestnut St., A. D. T. Co. 

1411 Chestnut St., W. U. T. Co. 

1403 Filbert St., Charles Leedom. 

1223 Market St., A. D. T. Co. 

106 S. Eighth St., A. D. T. Co. 

49 S. Third St., A. D. T. Co. 

Cor. Eighteenth and Market sts., Campbell & Bro. 

Cor. Eighth and Wood sts., A. D. T. Co. 

S. W. Cor. Tenth and Chestnut sts., W. U. T. Co. 

307 Walnut St., W. U. T. Co. 

Bullitt Building, Fourth ab. Walnut sts.. W. U. T. Co. 

S. W. Cor. Front and Chestnut sts., W. U. T. Co. 

Front and Vine sts., W. U. T. Co. 

334 N. Third St., W. U. T. Co. 

Dock st. Market, W. U. T. Co. 

807 Vine St., W. U. T. Co. 

529 Arch St., W. U. T. Co. 

2002 Market St., W. U. T. Co. 

Twentieth and Ann, bel. Locust St., W. U. T. Co. 

Third and Chestnut sts., W. U. T. Co. 

Windsor Hotel, A. D. T. Co. 

Betz Building, A. D. T. Co. 

1031 Chestnut St., A. D. T. Co. 

Fifteenth and Market sts., A. D. T. Co. 

Twentieth and Cherry sts., Charles Leedom. 

S. W. Cor. Twelfth and Race sts., J. D. McFerren. 

UP-TOWN. 

S. E. Cor. Seventh and Oxford sts., J. H. Stermer. 

N. E. Cor. Seventeenth and York sts., F. M. Apple. 

Cor. Eighteenth and Vine sts., Dr. P. Fitch. 

Cor. Thirtieth and Diamond sts., H. C. Comp & Co. 

Cor. Front and Norrissts., J. B. Reynolds. 

Cor. Fifth and Susquehanna av., Win. Sutton. 

Cor. Richmond and Somerset sts., Edward W. Sharp. 

2457 Kensington ave., F. A. Lewis. 

2508 Kensington ave., near Cumberland, A. D. T. Co. 

N. E. Cor. Second and Poplar sts., A. D. T. Co. 

Cor. Frankford av. and Jefferson sts.C. H. Dwyer, M.D. 

1630 N. Second St., Postal Tel. Cable Co. 

Cor. Fifth and Cumberland sts., J. H. Vogelbach. 

2602 Germantown ave., E. E. Wilson & Co. 

Cor. Fourth St. and Girard ave., C. G. Ivins. 

Cor. Ninth and Spring Garden sts., F. S. McCartney. 

Cor. Twelfth and Columbia ave., J. R. Elfreth. 

1415 Columbia ave., A. D. T. Co. 

635 N. Broad St., A. D. T. Co. 

Nineteenth st. and Fairmount ave., A. F. Merrell & Co. 

1023 Callowhill St., A. D. T. Co. 

Cor. Ridge ave. and Oxford St., H. F. Rhoads. 

Cor. E. Girard ave. and Palmer st., Wm. H. Faunce. 

854 N. Tenth St., H. C. C. Maisch. 

2621 Girard ave., John M. Ruegenberg. 

Cor^ Twenty- first and Norris sts., A. Kennedy. 

N. 2. Cor. Broad and Cumberland sts., Stuart & Davies. 

Cor. Columbia ave. and Twenty-sixth St., Eberly Bros. 

Cor. Twentieth and Columbia av., Wm. J. Pechin. 

2235 Columbia av., Steltz & Co. 

2230 N. Front st., George B. Evans. 

Cor. Fifth and Glenwood ave., J. Howard Evans, M.D. 

Broad and Girard ave., W. H. Laubach, Jr. 

S. E. Cor. Twentieth and Diamond, J. Long. 

Thirteenth and Diamond sts., Ira Park Amick. 

Seventh and Diamond sts., H. C. Haring. 

S. E. Cor. Third and George sts., H. Edward Wendell. 

220 Vine St., E. Jungmann. 

Eighth and Green sts., D. L. Stackhouse. 

N. E. Cor. Sixth and Green sts., E. Jungmann. 

S. W. Cor. Fourth and Noble sts;, E. Jungmann. 

Ridge av., No. 2000, Heintzelman's* Pharmacy. 

1207 N. Second st., W. U. T. Co. 

1921 N. Second St., W. U. T. Co. 

Cor. Nineteenth and Hamilton sts., W. U. T. Co. 

1913 Ridge ave., W. U. T. Co. 

Broad and Montgomery ave., W. U. T. Co. 

937 N. Ninth St., A. D. T. Co. 

Twenty-third and Ridge av., A. D. T. Co. 



DOWN-TOWN. 

Twentieth and Dickinson sts., McFadden's Pharmacy. 

Cor. Passyunk ave. and Moore St., E. D. McNair & Bro. 

Cor. Twelfth and Christian sts., F. G. Reniig. 

Cor. Twentieth and Locust sts., A. D. T. Co. 

Christian and Twenty-fifth sts., W. L. Matthews. 

Cor. Twentieth and South sts., Charles W. Watson 

Cor. Eighth and Federal sts., S. W. Gadd. 

Cor. Second and Catharine sts., L. A. Dix. 

Cor. Third and Chestnut sts., A. D. T. Co. 

Cor. Sixteenth and Tasker sts., John P. Frey. 

N. E. Cor. Sixth and Dickinson sts., George D. Blomer. 

1514 S. Tenth St., J. P. Frey. 

1114 S. Fifth St., W. U. T. Co. 

1402 Washington ave., W. U. T. Co. 

N.W. Cor. Twenty-third and Washington av. , A. D.T.Co. 

WEST PHILADELPHIA. 

Cor. Thirty-third and Chestnut sts., Charles P. Kirby. 

Cor. Forty-ninth and Woodland ave., George E. Daliis. 

Fifty-first and Willow av., Chas. G. Miller. 

3962 Market St., A. D. T. Co. 

4043 and 4045 Market st., Wm. J. Jenks. 

Cor. Lancaster ave. and Fortieth St., J. R. Sniyser. 

929 N. Forty-first St., W. A. Rumsey. 

3042 Chestnut St., A. D. T. Co. 

Lancaster av. and Fortieth St., A. D. T. Co. 

Cor. Thirty-second and Powelton ave., K. McFadden. 

Thirtieth and Chestnut sts.. W. U. T. Co. 

3806 Market St., W. U. T. Co. 

Cor. Lancaster and Westminster aves., Henry Mueller. 

Cor. Lancaster and Girard aves., E. A. Perrenot. 

3629 Haverford av., Izard's Pharmacy. 

RISING SUN. 

3412 Germantown ave., Max Sonntag. 

TIOGA. 

Twentieth and Tioga sts., E. E. Wilson & Co. 

GERMANTOWN. 

Association Hal), 5021 Main st., B. B. Lister. 

Cor. E. Chelten ave. and Chew st., Alfred H. Bolton 

8 AV. Chelten ave., W. U. T. Co. 

5139 Germantown av., W. H. Galbraith. 

CHESTNUT HILL. 

Main st. opp. Bethlehem Pike, H. G. Shinn. 

WISSAHICKON. 

Ridge ave., W. W. Kneeshaw. 

MANAYUNK. 

Cor. Main and Cotton sts., Harry H. Anderson 

FRANKFORD. 

4339 Frankford ave., W. U. T. Co. 

Lit's Central Pharmacy, Frankford av. ar.d isener> St. 

DARBY. 

Cor. Main and Ninth sts., Harlan Cloud 

TACONY. 

Opposite the Bank, F. W. Jordan. 

WEST CHESTER. 

Chester County Democrat, George R G'.ss. 

NEW JERSEY.— CAMDEN. 

Cor. Fifth and Federal sts.. G. M. tJeiinger. 

311 Federal St., Postal Te). Cajle Co. 

Cor. Third st. and Kaighn's ave., P. J. Haines. 

ATLANTIC CITY. 

Atlantic Review Office, Atlantic ave., John G. Shrevt 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 

Morning News Office, 511 Market st. 

IN NEW YORK 

advertisements for the LEDGER will be received by cil 
offices of the American District Telegraph Company at 
the regular rates of the LEDGER up to 8 P.M., and tele- 
graphed to the paper free of charge. 



Advertisements to be inserted in the Ledger should be left at the Branch Offices by 7 p.m. 
Every office of the American District Telegraph Company is included in the above list. 
These offices are open day and night. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



First Month.] 








JAN 


UARY. 








[1898. 








MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




ti 


-^ 


-M 


d. k. m. d. h. nt. 




s 



s 

-a 


1 


O Full Moon 7 7 24 p.m. % New Moon 22 2 24 A.M. 






C Last Quarter... 14 10 44 a.m. D First Quarter. ..29 9 32 a.m. 


Phenomena. 




*H 




• 




o 
1^ 


O 




THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 






1=1 


01 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 

1 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths 


Sets 


Rises. Souths 


Sets. 


to 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. $ \i 


C Apo., 4<3. nh. a.m. 








A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


-J! 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


•^ 


C Per., 2od. jh. a.m. 








A.»z. 


m. s. 


h.m. 


h. m. 


A. »z. 


h. m. 


or. i 


h. tn. 


h. m. 


h. in. 


h. m. 


*-5 


d Apo.,32d. 3I1. a.m. 


I 


I 


s 


7 22 


4 1 


4 40 


12 


7 53 


1 42 


9 


8 30 


8 48 


2 53 


3 34 


5.8 


0.00 9 in Q 


2 


2 


s 


7 22 


4 29 


4 47 


43 


8 9 


2 43 


10 


9 19 


9 39 


3 42 


4 2b 


5.8 


11. 18 A.M. 9 S. 


3 


3 


M 


7 22 


4 57 


4 48 


1 18 


8 57 


3 43 


11 


10 8 


10 29 


4 38 


5 17 


5.8 


II. 12 A.M. (f S. 


4 


4 


Tu 


7 22 


5 24 


4 49 


2 


9 4b 


4 4i 


12 


10 55 


11 19 


5 15 


6 4 5-9 


3.58 p.m. 9 sets. 


5 


5 


W 


7 22 


5 5i 


4 50 


2 48 


10 37 


5 35 


13 


« 39 


... 


6 5 


b 50 


b.o 


I.OI P.M. (3 ^ d 


b 


b 


Th 


7 22 


b 17 


4 5i 


3 43 


11 28 


b 24 


14 


4 


23 


b 49 


7 34 


b.i 


; 3.44 p.m. cf sets. 


7 


7 


F 


7 22 


6 43 


4 52 


4 4i 


A.M. 


7 8 


15 


47 


1 b 


7 3o 


8 13 


b.i 


(I eclip. Vis. at Phila. 


8 


8 


S 


7 21 


7 « 


4 53 


5 43 


O 17 


7 45 


ib 


1 30 


1 48 


8 12 


8 54 


b.2 


iod. 4.00 A.M. rf $ 9 


9 


9 


s 


7 21 


7 33 


4 54 


6 4 b 


1 5 


8 17 


*z 


2 13 


2 29 


8 5i 


9 33 6.2 


5.20 A.M. % S. 


IO 


10 


M 


7 21 


7 57 


4 55 


7 49 


1 5i 


8 4b 


18 


2 5b 


3 11 


9 3i 


10 12 b.2 


II. 19 A.M. $ S. 


ii 


11 


l'u 


7 21 


8 20 


4 50 


8 52 


2 35 


9 " 


19 


3 4o 


3 54 


10 13 


10 55 b.2 


8.00 p.m. §gr. H. L.N. 


12 


12 


W 


7 21 


8 43 


4 50 


9 56 


3 19 


9 35 


20 


4 25 


4 39 


11 


11 35 16.0 


13d. 5.00 A.M. f5 $ cf 


13 


13 


Ih 


7 21 


9 


4 57 


11 2 


4 3 


9 59 


21 


5 12 


5 28 


11 50 


... 5-8 


9.05 A.M. T^ S. 


14 


14 


E i 


7 20 


9 28 


4 5« 


A.M. 


4 48 


10 25 


22 


b 2 


b 18 


8 


6 5.9 


0.22 P.M. (5 1| (J 


■5 


I 5 


» 


7 20 


9 49 


4 59 


O IO 


5 36 


10 54 


23 


6 55 


7 13 


1 10 


1 52 b.o 


4.14 a.m. >2 rises. 


ib 


ib 


y ! 


7 19 


10 9 


5 


I 22 


b 28 


11 2b 


24 


7 5o 


8 10 


2 3 


2 58 b.o 


5.53 a.m. $ rises. 


17 


t-1 


M 


7 19 


10 29 


5 * 


2 3 b 


7 25 


° I 


25 


8 50 


9 12 


3 4 


4 5 


b.o 


0.00 p.m. $ stationary 


18 


18 


lu 


7 19 


10 48 


5 2 


3 5o 


8 2b 


58 


2b 


9 5i 


10 15 


4 5 


5 9 


b.o 


1.29 p.m. c5 h <( 


19 


19 


vv 


7 18 


11 b 


5 3 


I ° 


9 30 


2 1 


2 l 


10 48 


11 19 


5 6 


b 9 b.i 


IO.32 A.M. c3 $ d 


20 


20 


Ih 


7 i»! 


11 24 


5 4 


6 


10 35 


3 3 


28 


11 4b 


... 


6 5 


7 4i 6.2 


8.45 P.M. 5 Cf <[ 


21 


21 


f : 


7 17 


11 41 


5 


6 49 


11 37 


4 31 


29 


18 


42 


7 2 


7 5b b.2 


eclipsed. In vis. in Phila. 


22 


22 


s 


7 x 6 


" 57 


5 7 


7 29 


34 


5 48 





1 16 


1 37 


7 59 


8 44i 6.3 


10.31 p.m. Sirius S. 


23 


23 


s 


7 J 5 


12 12 


5 « 


8 2 


1 28 


7 2 


1 


2 9 


2 29 


8 52 


9 3i' 6 - 2 


7.18 p.m. 7 ^c set. 


2 4 


24 


M 


7 M 


12 2b 


5 9 


8 30 


2 17 


« 13 


2 


2 59 


3 19 


9 44 


10 19 6.2 


9.00 p.m. 1/ stationary. 


2 5 


25 


Tu 7 14 


12 40 


5 " 


8 55 


3 3 


9 22 


3 


3 49 


4 9 


10 3b 


11 5! b.o 


12.17 p -m. occ. 77 Tauri. 


2 b 


2t) 


W 7 13 


12 53 


5 12 


9 21 


3 48 


10 2b 


4 


4 39 


4 56 


11 29 


11 49 5.8 


10.28 A.M. $ S. 


27 


2 Z 


Th 7 12 


J 3 5 


5 13 


9 46 


4 3 2 


11 29 


5 


5 2b 


5 43 


3 


- 5-8 


11.5b a.m. 9 S. 


28 


28 


F 


7 12 


13 ib 


5 14 


10 13 


5 17 


A.M. 


b 


b 14 


b 28 


3b 


1 12 5.8 


29d. 9 a.m. § gr. el. W. 


29 


29 


S 


7 " 


13 27 


5 15 


10 43 


3 


O 31 


7 


7 1 


7 17 


1 25 


2 5 


5-7 


4.4b p.m. 9 sets. 


30 


3° 


s 


7 10.13 3° 


5 17 


11 7 


51 


I 32 


8, 


7 5o 


8 5 


2 13 


3 


5-7 


10.54 P.M. ProcyonS. 


3 1 3i 


M 17 10 13 45 


5 i» 


" 57' 


7 4Qi 


2 41 


9 


8 39 


8 58 


3 4 


3 58 5-6 


5.14 a m. ProcyonSets. 



ASTRONOMICAL 

Chronological Cycles. 

Dominical Letter B 

Epact 7 

Lunar Cycle, or Golden Number 18 

Solar Cycle 3 

Roman Indiction 11 

Julian Period bbn 

Signs of the Planets. 
The Sun. 




C 

? 



The Moon. 

Mercury. 

Venus. 



© or 5 The Earth. 

Signs of the 

IP Aries. 
B Taurus. 
□ Gemini. 
G Cancer, 
a Leo. 
HP Virgo. 



cf Mars. 

11 Jupiter. 

?2 Saturn. 

(^ or }£L Uranus. 

t^ Neptune. 

Zodiac. 

^i Libra. 
In, Scorpio. 
f Sagittarius. 
]fr Capricornus. 
:£. Aquarius. 
>^ Pisces. 



INFORMATION, Etc. 

Aspects. 

(3 Conjunction, having the same") Longitude or 
n Quadrature, differing 90 in > Right As- 
§ Opposition, differing 180 inj cension. 

Abbreviations. 
Q Ascending node. | ° Degrees. 
13 Descending node. 



N. North. S. South. 
E. East. W. West. 



' Minutes of arc. 
h. Hours. 
;;/. Minutes of time. 
j. Seconds of time. 



JANUARY. 

Mercury ( $ ) visible before sunrise, Jan- 
uary ib. 

Mars ( cf ) very near the Moon ( d ) January 
20, 8 P.M. 

Venus (9) near the Moon (C) January 21, 4 

P.M. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Second Month.] 



FEBRUARY. 



[1898. 









MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




. 




.M 


d. h. m. 


d. h. m. 




«s 





CD 


O Full Moon 6 1 24 p.m. 


% New Moon 20 2 40 p.m. 




V* 




>- 


d Last Quarter ...13 7 35 p.m. 


]) First Quarter. ..28 6 13 a.m. 

• 


Phenomena. 





THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 











Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises Souths Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 




High Tide. 


Low Tide. |$^ 


([ Per., i6d. 2h. a.m. 








A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


-a) I 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


p.m. -a^ 


CApo.,28d. oh. a.m. 








h.tn. 


m. s. 


h.m. 


h. m. 


k. m. 


h. m. 


rf. 


h. tn. 


A. w. 


h. m. 


h. «. Sr-5 




Tfi 


1 


Tu 


7 9 


13 53 5 19 


42 


8 30 


3 2 7 IO 


9 26 


9 49 


3 55 


4 44 5- 6 I 


7.09 A.M. (5 S? d 


33 


2 


W 


7 8 


14 ° 5 21 


1 34 


9 21 


4 *9" 


10 15 


10 40 


4 45 


5 34 5-6 1 


IO.32 A.M. § S. 


34 


1 


Th 


7 7 


14 6 5 22 


2 31 


10 11 


5 4 I2 | 


11 2 


11 30 


5 34 


6 20 5.7 


4d.7.oo a.m. § in ^3 


3S 


4 


F 


7 6 


14 11 5 23 


3 3 2 


11 


5 44 13 


11 50 




6 20' 


7 4 5.8, 


8.00 a.m. 9 in Aphel. 


36 


5 


S 


7 4 


14 16 5 24 


4 35 


11 47 


6 18 14 


16 


36 


7 <> 


7 45 5-9 1 


10.43 P- M - occ.O 2 Cancri. 


37 


6 


s 


7 3 


14 20 5 26 


5 39 


A.M. 


6 48 


T 5 


1 2 


1 23 


7 46 


8 25 6.0 ! 


3.24 p.m. $ sets. 


38 


7'M 


7 2 


14 22 5 27 


6 43 


O 32 


7 15 


16 


1 46 


2 4 


8 29 


9 4 6.1 


0.08 p.m. 5 s. 


39 


8 Tu 


7 1 


14 25 5 28! 


7 48 


I I 7 


7 40 


17 


2 30 


2 47 


9 « 


9 44 6.1 


i 5. 11 p.m. 9 sets. 


40 


9 


w 


7 


14 265 29! 


8 54 


2 2 


a 5 


18 


3 16 


3 34 


9 57 


10 24 6.1 


IO.48 A.M. cf S. 


4 1 


IO 


Th 6 59 


14 27 5 30 


10 1 


2 47 


8 30 


19 


4 4 


4 19 


10 44 


11 7 6.0 


5.15 A.M. <S% 4. 


42 


« 


F 


6 58 


14 26 5 31 


11 11 


3 34 


8 58 


20 


4 47 


5 6 


11 35 


11 52 6.1 


i.oo a.m. r5 Ocf close 


43 


12 


s 


6 56 


14 25 5 32 


A.M. 


4 24 


9 30 211 


5 38 


5 57 


8 


... |6.ij 


; 3.33 P.M. (f Sets. 


44 


13 


s 


6 5574 24 5 33 


O 25 


5 19 


10 6 22 


6 31 


6 52 


45 


1 35 ft-i | 


i4d. 10.24 a.m. diftQ 


45 


14 


M 


6 54 14 21 5 35: 


1 37 


6 17 10 52 23 


7 28 


7 5i 


1 41 


2 47 6.0 1 


0.00 p.m $ in Aph. 


46 


IS 


Tu .6 5314 18 5 3 6 ; 


2 46 


7 18 


11 48 24 


8 29 


8 55 


2 45 


3 506-0! 


5.00 p.m. (3 90 Sup. 


47 


16 


W j6 52^4 15 5 37; 


3 48 


8 20 


54 


25 1 


9 29 


10 1 


3 5o 


4 5i 6-o j 


7.43 p.m. 7 * S. 


48 


17 


Th 6 50 14 10 5 38 


4 41 


9 21 


2 7 


26 


10 32 


n 5 


4 54 


5 48 6.0 I 


IO.58 A.M. $ S. 


49 


iS 


F 


6 49 *4 5 5 39 


5 23 


10 20 


3 23 


27 


11 31 


... 


5 54 


6 41 6.1 1 


9.43 A.M. (3 cf d 


50 


J 9 


S 


6 48 13 59 5 40 ( 


5 59 


11 14 


4 38 


28 


4 


28 


6 50 


7 31 6 - 2 


• 6.09 a.m. $ rises. 


5i 


20 


s 


6 47 13 52 5 41 


6 29 


4 


5 5o 


29 


59 


1 22 


7 43 


8 18 6.2! 


8.16 A.M. r*! 9 C 


52 


21 


M 


6 46 13 45 5 42 


6 56 


52 


ft 59 


O 


1 50 


2 10 


8 34 


9 36-21 


0.21 p.m. 9 S. 


53 


22 


Tu 


6 44 13 3 8 5 44 


7 21 


1 38 


8 6 


« 


2 37 


2 57 


9 2 4 


9 47 6- 1 


5.48 p.m. 9 sets. 


54 


23 


W 


6 43 


13 29 5 45 


7 47 


2 24 


9 11 


2 


3 23 


3 4i 


10 12 


10 30 6.1 


IO.36 A.M. 0* S. 


55 


24 


Th 


6 42 


13 20 5 46 


8 14 


3 9 


TO 15 


3 


4 7 


4 25 


11 


11 14 6.1 


3.22 p.m. cf sets. 


56 


25 


*" 


6 40 


13 10 5 47 


8 42 


3 55 


II 18 


4 


4 5 1 


5 8 11 48 


11 59 6.1 


2.10 a.m. % S. 


57 


26 


s 


6 38 


13 5 48 


9 15 


4 43 


A.M. 


5 


5 35 


5 5o 12 36 


... 1 6.0 


8.05 a.m. % sets. 


58 


27 


s 


6 36 


12 49 5 49 


9 52 


5 32 


O 19 


6 


6 21 


6 35 


47 


1 27 5-8 


6.06 A.M. +1 S. 


59 


28 


M 


6 34 


12 38 


5 50 


10 36 


6 22 


I I 7 


7 1 


7 8 


7 22 


1 36 


2 20 5.7 


29d. 2.40 A.M. (5 W C 



FEBRUARY. 

Mercury ($) and Mars (cf) very near each 
other February 11. 

Mars (cf ) near the Moon ( C ) February 18. 



ECLIPSES IN 1898. 

In the year 1898 there will be six Eclipses — 
three of the Sun and three of the Moon. 

First : A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, visible 
at Philadelphia. This Eclipse will be visible 
from 6 p.m., January 7, to 10 p.m., January 7. 
About one-seventh of the Moon's diameter, will 
be obscured. 

Second : A Total Eclipse of the Sun, invisible 
at Philadelphia. This Eclipse will be visible 
over most of the Eastern Continent and a large 
part of the Indian Ocean, January 22, 1898. 

Third : A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, invisible 
at Philadelphia. Generally visible in Europe, 
Asia and Africa. Nearly the whole of the Moon 
will be obscured, and the Eclipse will extend 
over about five hours, beginning about 7 p.m., 
Greenwich Mean Time, July 3, 1898. 

Fourth : An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, invis- 
ible at Philadelphia. This Eclipse will be visible 
July 18, 1898, and will be almost entirely confined 
to the South Pacific Ocean. 

Fifth : A Partial Eclipse of the Sun, invisible 
at Philadelphia. A very small part of the Sun 



will be eclipsed December 13, about noon, Green- 
wich Time. 

Sixth : A Total Eclipse of the Moon, visible 
at Philadelphia, lasting in all its phases over six 
hours. It will begin December 28, between 1 
and 2 A.M., and end about 8 a.m., December 28, 
1898. The shadow of the Earth will a good 
deal more than cover the Moon. 



Fixed and Movable Feasts, Fasts, etc., 1898. 

Epiphany Jan. 6 

Septuagesima Sunday Feb. 6 

Valentine's Day Feb. 14 

Shrove Tuesday " 22 

Ash Wednesday " 23 

St. Patrick's Day Mar. 17 

Palm Sunday Apr. 3 

Maundy Thursday . " 7 

Good Friday " 8 

Easter Sunday " 10 

Ascension Day May 19 

Whitsunday May 29 

Trinity Sunday June 5 

St. John the Baptist's Day " 24 

All Saints' Day Nov. 1 

All Souls' Day " 2 

Advent Sunday " 27 

Christmas Day Dec. 25 

St. John the Evangelist's Day " 27 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Third Month.] 








MARCH. 








[i8g8. 








MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 








M 


d. h. tn. 


d. h. tn. 




a 



O 


O Full Moon 8 4 29 a.m. 


% New Moon 22 3 37 a.m. 






O 


d Last Quarter ...15 2 48 a.m. 


D First Quarter ...30 2 40 a.m. 


Phenomena. 


o 


THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 




& 


£ 


1=1 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 

1 






Rises 


Souths Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


bo 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


1* 


d Per., 14c!. 9I1. a.m. 








A.M. 


P.M. P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


-* 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


■^ 


dApo.,28d. 8h. p.m. 








h.tn. 


tn. s.h.tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. m. 


«r. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


*« 




60 


1 


Tu 


6 33 


12 26 5 51 


II 24 


7 13 


2 IO 


9 


7 55 


8 14 


2 23 


3 12 


5-5 


2d. 7.00 a.m. n h © 


61 


2 


W 


6 32 


12 14 5 53 


20 


8 3 


2 59 


10 


8 44 


9 7 


3 16 


4 6 


5-4 


11.30 a.m. $ S. 


62 


3 


Th 


6 30 


12 1 5 54 


I 19 


8 52 


3 4o 


11 


9 35 


10 1 


4 10 


4 57 


5-4 


j 6.16 a.m. $ rises. 


63 


4 


F 


6 29 


" 48 5 55 


2 21 


9 39 


4 16 


12 


10 26 


10 54 


5 


5 44 


5-4 


0.29 p.m. 9 S. 


64 


5 


S 


6 27 


11 34'5 56 


3 24 


10 26 


4 48 


13 


11 16 


11 45 


5 50 


6 30 


5-5 


6.13 p.m. 9 sets - 


65 


6 


s 


6 26 


11 20 5 57 


4 29 


11 11 


5 17 


14 


12 6 


... 


6 36 


7 12 


5-7 


10.26 a.m. j" S. 


66 


7 


M 


6 24 


11 5 5 58 


5 34 


11 56 


5 43 


15 


33 


55 


7 21 


7 53 


5-8' 


5.20 a.m. cf rises. 


67 


8 


Tu 


6 23 


10 5o 5 59 


6 41 


A.M. 


6 8 


16 


1 20 


1 39 


8 7 


8 34 


5-9 


1. 19 A.M. 1| S. 


68 


9 


W 


6 21 


10 34 6 


7 49 


O 42 


6 33 


17 


2 4 


2 25 


8 52 


9 i5 


5-9 


7.40 A.M. <$ % C 


69 


10 


Th 


6 20 


10 19 6 1 


9 1 


1 3° 


7 1 


18 


2 49 


3 10 


9 39 


9 56 6.1 


! 7.17 P.M. 1\ sets. 


70 


11 


F 


6 18 


10 3 6 3 


10 14 


2 20 


7 32 


19 


3 36 


3 57 


10 28 


10 40 6.2 


5.20 A.M. fj S. 


7 1 


12 


S 


6 16 


9 46 6 4 


11 29 


3 14 


8 7 


20 


4 24 


4 46 


11 22 


11 29 6.2 


I 0.30 a.m. >j rises. 


7 2 


13 


s 


6 15 


9 30 6 5 


A.M. 


4 12 


8 50 


21 


5 15 


5 38 


20 


• ••• 


6.2 


13d. 4.00 P.M. (51JI C 


73 


14 


M 


6 13 


9 13; 6 6 


O 38 


5 12 


9 44 


22 


6 10 


6 35 


25 


1 21 


6.1 


4.39 A.M.rfi S. 


74 


15 


Tu 


6 12 


8 56|6 7 


I 42 


6 14 


10 47 


23 


7 9 


7 38 


1 27 


2 27 


6.0 


l6d.1IA.M.<f<) §0Sup. 


75 


16 


W 


6 10 


8 386 8 


2 36 


7 14 


11 56 


24 


8 10 


8 44 


2 32 


3 3° 


5-9 


5.34 P.M. tJ7 S. 


76 


17 


Th 


6 8 


8 2i!6 9 


3 21 


8 12 


1 9 


25 


9 i4 


9 5o 


3 38 


4 30 


5.8 


12.53 P - M - W sets. 


77 


18 


F 


6 7 


8 36 10 


3 58 


9 6 


2 22 


26 


10 16 10 50 


4 41 


5 24 


5-9 


6.55 p.m. Sirius S. 


78 


19 


S 


6 5 


7 46 6 11 


4 18 


9 46 


3 23 


2 Z 


11 17 11 47 


5 40 


6 16 6.0 


2od. 9 a.m. Spring ccm. 


79 


20 


s 


6 4 


7 28 6 12 


4 57 


10 44 


4 42 


28! 


12 11 




6 34 


7 4 6.0 


7 41 p.m Procyon S. 


80 


21 


M 


6 2 


7 i° 6 13 


5 3° 


11 30 


5 4i 


29 


! 37 


1 


7 25 


7 49 6 - x 


2.00 a.m. J7 stationary. 


81 


22 


Tu 


6 


6 51:6 14 


5 47 


15 


6 54 





1 25 


1 48 


8 14 


8 33 6-i 


8.57 A.M. (5 § <[ 


82 


23 


W 


5 59 


6 33 6 *5 


6 13 


1 1 


7 59 


I 


2 10 


2 31 


9 


9 16 6.3 


5.01 p. m. Capella S". 


83 


24 


Th 


5 57 


6 15 6 16 


6 42 


1 47 


9 2 


2 


2 54 


3 12 


9 46 


9 59 6 -4 


0.36 p.m. $ S. 


84 


25 


F 


5 56 


5 57 6 17 


7 13 


2 35 


i° 5 


3 


3 36 


3 55 


10 30 10 40 6.4 


6.06 p.m. occ. e Arietis. 


85 


26 


S 


5 54 


5 386 i8| 


7 49 


3 24 


11 4 


4 


4 18 


4 34 


11 15 11 21 6.3 


4.08 p.m. occ. 27Tauri. 


86 


27 


s 


5 53 


5 20 6 19 


8 30 


4 14 


A.M. 


5 


5 


5 17 


12 0! ... ! 6.1 


7.13 p.m. 5 sets. 


87 


28 


M 


5. 5i 


5 2 6 20 


9 i7 


5 4 


O O 


6 


5 4i 


5 59 


6 ! 48 5.9 


0.44 p.m. 9 s. 


88 


2 9 


Tu 


5 49 


4 43 6 2i 


10 9 


5 54 


O 50 


7 


6 25 


6 45 


54 1 36 


5-7 


7.08 p.m. 9 sets - 


89 


30 


W 


5 47 


4 25 6 22 


11 7 


6 43 


1 35 


8 


7 n 


7 36 


1 42 2 28 


5-5 


IO.05 A.M. cf S. 


90 


31 


Th 


5 45 ! 4 76 S3 


6 


7 31 


2 13 


9 


8 


8 29 


2 36 3 21 


5-4 


4.35 a.m. cf rises. 



MARCH. 

Jupiter (1|) near the Moon ( <[ ) March 9, p.m. 
Saturn (Tj ) near the Moon ( ([ ) March 13. 
Mars (o*)..near the Moon ( <J ) March 19, p.m. 
Mercury ( § ) and Venus ( 9 ) near each other 
March 25, p.m, 



REW CALENDAR FOR 1898. 

— Shebat 1, New Moon. 

— Shebat 15, Chamisha Assar. 

— Adar 1, New Moon.* 

— Adar 13, Fast of Esther. 

— Adar 14, Purim. 

— Nissan 1, New Moon. 

— Nissan 15, First day of Passover. 

— Nissan 16, Second day of Passover. 

— Nissan 21, Seventh day of Passover. 

— Nissan 22, Eighth day of Passover. 

— Iyar 1, New Moon.* 

— Iyar 18, Lag B'Omer. 

— Sivan i, New Moon. 

— Sivan 6, First day of Shabuoth. 

— Sivan 7, Second day of Shabuoth. 



HEB 


(5658) 


Jan. 


12 ■ 


a 


26.- 


Feb. 


II. 


*. 


2 3- 




24. 


Mch. 


12. 


a 


26. 








27. 


Apr. 


i.- 








2. 








11.- 


M 


28. 


May 


10. 


tt 


15- 


r< 


16. 



June 9. 

" 25. 
July 8. 

" 16. 

" 22. 

Aug. 7. 

(5659) 

Sept. 5. — 



— Tamuz 1, New Moon.* 

— Tamuz 15, Fast of Tamuz. 

— Ab 1, New Moon. 

— Ab 9, Fast of Ab. (Anniversary of 

the Destruction of the Temple.) 
— Ab 15, Chamisha Assar. 
— Elul i. New Moon.* 



5- 

6. 

7- 

14- 

19. 

20. 



" 25. 
" 26 

" 27. 
Oct. 5. 
Nov. 3.' 

" 27, 
Dec. 3. 

" 12. 



-Tishri 1, First day of New Year. 

-Tishri 2, Second day of New Year. 

-Tishri 3, Fast of Gedaliah. 

-Tishri 10, Day of Atonement. 

-Tishri 15, First day of Feast of Tab- 
ernacles. 

-Tishri 16, Second day of Feast of 
Tabernacles. 

-Tishri 21, Hosha'nah Rabbah. 

-Tishri 22, Sh'mini Atzereth. 

-Tishri 23, Simchath Torah. 

-Cheshvan 1, New Moon.* 

-Kislev 1, New Moon. 

-Kislev 25, Chanukah. 

-Tebeth 1, New Moon.* 

-Tebeth 10, Fast of Tebeth. 



* The day before is the last day of the preceding month and the first day of the New Moon. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Fourth Month.] 



APRIL. 



[1898. 



Spa ► 



MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 

d. h. >n. d. 

O Full Moon 6 4 20 p.m. | £ New Moon 20 



d Last Quarter. ..13 9 28 a, 



M. 



D First Quarter. ..28 



h. tri. 
5 21 P.M. 
9 5 A.M. 






^ I THE SUN, 
«={ Philadelphia. 



THE MOON, 
Philadelphia. 



91 

92 

93 
94; 

95 ; 
96! 

97 
98 

99 9 

100 10 

101 11 

102 12 

103 13 

104 14 

105 15 

106 16 

107 17 

108 18 

109 19 
no 20 

111 21 

112 22 

I«5 23 
114 24 

"5 25 

116 26 

117 27 

118 28 

119 29 

120 30 



Rises 

A.M. 
h.tn. 

F 5 44 
S |5 42 
S 5 41 
M 5 39 
Tu 5 38 
W 5 36 
Th 5 35 



Souths 

P.M. 
m. s. 

48 



F 
S 

s 

M 5 28 
Tu 5 27 



5 33 
5 3 1 

5 29 



W 

Th 

F 

S 

s 

M 

Tus 
W 5 15 

Th 5 14 

F 5 
S 5 
S 5 
M 5 
Tu 5 
W 5 

Th 5 
F 5 

s Is 



5 25 
5 24 

5 22| 

5 21 

5 19 

5 18 

16 



12 

5 



30 
13 

55 

37 
20 
2 
45 6 
29 6 

12 6 
566 
40 6 
25 6 
10 6 
m. 6 
19:6 
34 6 
47 6 

1 6 

13 6 
266 
386 

49 6 

06 

n 6 

21 

3° 
39 
48 
56 



Sets 

P.M. 

m. 

24 

25 
26 



Rises. 

P.M. 



27 
28 

29 
30 

31 
32 

33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 

39 
40 

4i 
42 
43 

44 
45 
46 

47 
48 
49 
50 
5i 
52 
53 



I 


8 


2 


12 


3 


16 


4 


12 


5 


3i 


6 


42 


7 


57 


9 


12 


10 


26 


n 


34 



Souths Sets. 



P.M. 

h. m. 

8X7; 

2 

47 



A.M. 

h. in. 



9 

9 

10 23 

11 21 

A.M. 



A.M. 

I 32i 

2o| 

59 
3 1 
59 
24 
49 
15 
42 

13 
47 
26 
n 
2 



o 

1 
2 
3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

7 

8 41 

9 26 
10 11 

10 5 6 l 
n 41 

o 28 



8 57 

9 55 
10 56 
n 26 

o 59 



3 

41 
7 
9 
7 
2 

53 



46 

15 

42 

8 

23 

1 

3i 

5 
47 
39 



8 40 

9 49 



1 1 
o 
1 
2 
3 
4 



16 
6 
57 
47 
36 
24 
10 

54 
38 



M 
24 
32 
38 

43 

5 47 

6 50 

7 52 

8 53 

9 5o 

10 43 

11 29 

A.M. 
O 9 

44 

1 14 
1 42 



be 

~x 

d.\ 

10 

11 

12 

13 
14 
15 
16 

17 
18' 

19 

20 [ 

21 

22 

23 

24 

26 

27 
28 
29 

1 
2 
3 

i 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10! I 



THE TIDES, 
Philadelphia. 



High 

A.M. 

h. m. 

8 54 

9 48 
10 41 

" 34 1 



50 

30 

24 

11 

2 

56 

5i 
51 
5a 



Tide. 

P.M. 
h. m. 

9 2 5 

10 20 

11 12 

25 

1 14 

2 1 



Low Tide. 



A.M 



8 57 

9 59 
10 55 
11 

o 
o 

I 

2 



48 
12 

59 , 
40 

22 

\ 

44 

25 

4 

46 

32 
21 



8 32 

9 34 
10 31 

n 23 



m. 
30 

36 

iS 

8 

57 

45 

8 34 

9 2 4 
10 

n 

o 
o 

I 

2 

3 
4 
5 



p. 
h. 
4 
5 
5 
6 

7 

3 
8 

9 

15 10 
10 11 

81 . 

13 1 
16 



M. 

m. 

14 
3 
50 
36 
19 
4 
46 

3 1 

2C 
!3 



36 

20 

*l 

47 
22 

3 
44 
26 
12 

o 
55 



8 14 8 49 



20 
26 

26 

22 

15 

4 

5i 

33 

20 

2 

44 

20 

10 

13 

o 

52 

--° 



"5* 

s« 

5-3 
5-3 
5-4 
5-5 
5-6 
5-8 
6.0 
6.2 

6-3 
6-3 
6.2 
6.0 

5-9 



4 

57 
46 

33 
19 
8 5 

8 46J6.5 

9 25I6.5 
6 6.4 

6-3 
6.1 
6.0 
56j 5-8 
45 5-6 
37i 5-4 
28 5-3 



Phenomena. 



C Per., 90!. sh. p.m. 
C Apo.,25d. 2h. p.m. 



46 
3°i 



1. 00 
7.46 
0.48 
7.21 
10.36 
9-58 

7-33 
1. 11 

5." 
0.12 
11.44 
8.17 
8.02 

7-47 
3-30 
7-52 
8.32 
1 0.00 

I 9-44 

9.00 

10.12 

3-55 

10.02 

j 3.00 

3-58 

11.49 

1 2.15 

7.06 

7.07 

4.00 



P.M. 

P.M. 

P.M. 

P M. 

P.M. 

A.M, 

P.M. 

P.M. 

A.M. 

P.M. 

P.M. 

P.M. 

P.M. 

P.M 

P.M. 

P.M. 

A.M. 

P M. 

A.M, 

P.M. 

P.M. 

A.M. 

P.M. 

A.M. 

P.M. 

P.M. 

A.M. 

A.M. 

P.M*. 

P.M. 



§ sets. 
?S. 
9 sets. 

cf s. 

Sirius S. 
§ S. 
occ. a Scorpii. 

6h€ 

occ. a Sagitt. 
§ sets. 
Procyon S. 

9S. 

Capella S. 
9 sets. 

6 cf « 

d s. 

5 stationary. 

6H 

cf rises. 
% S. 

9 in a 
1\. rises. 

Arcturus S. 

l 2 sets, 
occ. £ Leonis. 
cf in Perihel. 



APRIL. 

Jupiter (1|) a few degrees from the Moon 
( C ) April 5, p.m. 

Saturn (Ij) a few degrees from the Moon 
( C ) April 10, a.m. 

Mercury ( $ ) greatest elongation east April 
10, P.M. 

Mars (o*) a few degrees from the Moon (d ) 
April 17, a.m. 

Mercury ( $ ) and Venus (9) three degrees 
apart April 18, a.m. 

Mercury ( $ ) near the Moon ( (T ) April 21. 



THE PLANETS IN i8g8. 

Mercury ( $) will have its greatest elongation 
west, and be visible before sunrise January 28, 
May 27, and September 21, and will have its 
greatest elongation east, visible before sunset, 
April 10, August 8, and December 3. 

Venus ( 9 ) will be Morning Star during the 
first part of the year, setting before the Sun. 
After March 1 it will set after the Sun and be 
Evening Star until the end of November. Will 
be most brilliant in the last of October.. 

Mars (cf) rises about 5 a.m. in March and 
rises earlier every night until it comes to the 



meridian about 2 a.m., December 30. It will be 
mainly visible in the early morning throughout 
the year. 

Jupiter (1|) will be visible in the evening 
until October, when it will be visible only in the 
morning, coming to the meridian about 8 a.m. 
in December. 

Saturn (>j) will be visible in the evening from 
June until September, when it will set about 9 
p.m. Visible in the morning the rest of the year. 



There has been a dispute for years as to 
whether the bite of the Gila Monster is poison- 
ous or not. Prof. Van Denburg in a lecture 
before the Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, 
stated that the saliva of the lower jaw is poison- 
ous and not that of the upper jaw. While one 
would produce death, the other was harmless; 
and this difference would account for the various 
accounts of the nature of the bite. 



Hajak, of Vienna, says that smokers are less 
liable to diseases of the throat than non-smokers, 
and Schiff says that smoking should be forbidden 
in bacteriological laboratories because it hinders 
the development of bacteria. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Fifth M 


r onth.] 










MAY 


• 








[1898. 








MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




%z 




M 


d. h. m. 


a?. A. w. 






s 

-a 

O 


-a 

C4-I 

O 


O Full Moon 6 1 33 a.m. 


§ New Moon ., .20 758 A.M. 






d Last Quarter ...12 4 36 P.M. 


]) First Quarter. ..28 14 p.m. 


Phenomena. 


o 


THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 








c4 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


be 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 




C Per., 7d. 3h. p.m. 








A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


■< ' 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 




dApo.,22d. 3h. a.m. 








h.m. 


m. s. 


h.m. 


h. m. 


h. tn. 


h. m. 


d.\ 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. tn. 


45 .J 




121 


I 


s 


5 


3 4 


6 54 


2 3 


8 23 


2 8 


11 


9 10 


9 45 


3 49 


4 20 


5-3 


II.50 A.M. § S. 


122 


2 


M 


4 59 


3 " 


6 55 


3 9 


9 °9 


2 33 


12 


10 5 


10 37 


4 46 


5 1° 


5-2 


3.50 A.M. J % d 


123 


3 


Tu 


4 58 


3 J 7 


6 56 


4 18 


9 57 


2 58 


13 


11 1 


11 29 


5 4i 


5 56 


5-2 


6.31 p.m. $ sets. 


I24 


4 


W 


4 57 


3 2 3 


6 57 


5 12 


10 50 


3 2 7 


14 


11 55 


... 


6 34 


6 44 


5-7 


1.45 p.m. 9 S. 


125 


5 


Th 


4 56 


3 2 9 


6 58 


6 48 


11 47 


3 59 


15 


19 


46 


7 27 


7 31 


5-9 


8.35 p.m. 9 sets. 


126 


6 


F 


4 54 


3 34 


6 59 


8 5 


A.M. 


4 39 


16 


1 10 


1 38 


8 18 


8 19 


6.1 


5.08 A.M. J 1? d 


I27 


7 


S 


4 53 


3 38 


7 ° 


9 18 


O 48 


5 27 


I7i 


2 


2 31 


9 11 


9 9 


6.2 


6.31 p.m. c5 h d 


128 


8 


s 


4 52 


3 42 


7 1 


10 22 


1 53 


6 26 


18 


2 51 


3 23 


10 3 


10 2 


6-3 


9.23 A.M. 0* S. 


I29 


9 


M 


4 5 1 


3 45 


7 2 


11 15 


2 57 


7 35 


19 


3 43 


4 14 


10 59 


10 59 


6.2 


3.13 A.M. 0* rises. 


I30 


10 


Tu 


4 5° 


3 47 


7 3 


11 58 


3 59 


8 49 


20 


4 38 


5 11 


11 53 


... 


6.1 


8.50 p.m. T| S. 


131 


11 


W 


4 49 


3 49 


7 4 


A.M. 


4 57 


10 3 


21 


5 34 


6 11 





50 


5-9 


2.43 a.m. % rises. 


132 


12 


Th 


4 48 


3 5o 


7 5 


33 


5 50 


11 16 


22 


6 32 


7 13 


1 4 


1 46 


5-8 


1. 12 p.m. Tj S. 


133 


x 3 


F 


4 47 


3 5i 


7 6 


1 3 


6 39 


25 


23 


7 35 


8 14 


2 5 


2 41 


5-7 


0.00 p.m. $ inAphel. 


J 34 


!4 


S 


4 46 


3 5i 


7 7 


1 29 


7 25 


1 3i 


24 


8 36 


9 11 


3 7 


3 35 


5-5 


6.07 a.m. Yi sets. 


135 


15 


s 


4 45 


3 5i 


7 8 


1 53 


8 10 


2 36 


25 


9 34 


10 4 


4 6 


4 26 


5-8 


0.20 a.m. y S. 


136 


16 


M 


4 45 


3 5° 


7 9 


2 18 


8 54 


3 4o 


26 


10 29 


10 56 


5 


5 16 


6.0 


8.12 P.M. (5 O* d 


137 


17 


Tu 


4 44 


3 48 


7 10 


2 45 


9 38 


4 42 


27 


11 20 


11 44 


5 52 


6 3 


6-3 


2.49 p.m. Sirius S. 


138 


18 


W 


4 43 


3 46 


7 " 


3 i5 


10 24 


5 43 


28 


6 


... 


6 41 


6 49 


6.4 


3.41 p.m. (5 d 


139 


19 


Th 


4 42 


3 44 


7 12 


3 47 


11 12 


6 44 


29 


28 


51 


7 28 


7 31 


6.4 


3.31 p.m. ProcyonS. 


140 20 


F 


4 4i 


3 4o 


7 12 


4 2 4 


1 


7 43 


3° 


1 10 


1 34 


8 11 


8 14 


6.5 


11.45 a.m. 7 ^f. S. 


141 21 


S 


4 40 


3 3 6 


7 13 


5 I 


51 


8 37 


1 


1 52 


2 16 


8 54 


8 56 


6.4 


4.29 A.M. (5 W d 


142 22 


s 


4 39 


3 3 2 


7 14 


5 56 


1 41 


9 25 


2 


2 32 


2 54 


9 35 


9 3 6 


6.4 


0.44 p.m. (5 9 d close. 


143 2 3 


M 


4 39 


3 27 


7 *5 


6 50 


2 31 


10 7 


3 


3 12 


3 35 


10 14 


10 16 


6-3 


II.3I A.M. $ S. 


14424 


Tu 


4 38 


3 22 


7 16 


7 47 


3 19 i° 43 


4 


3 52 


4 16 


10 55 


10 55 


6.2 


IO.20 A.M. § S. 


145 25 


W 


4 37 


3 16 


7 16 


8 46 


4 5 11 15 


5 


4 3i 


4 59 


11 37 


11 3 6 


6.0 


3.43 a.m. $ rises. 


146 26 


Th 


4 37 


3 IO 


7 17 


9 46 


4 50 11 44 


6 


5 16 


5 44 


20 


*- 


5-9 


1.45 p.m. 9 s. 


14727 


F 


4 36 


3 3 


7 18 


10 46 


5 33 A.M. 


7 


5 58 


6 32 


23 


1 5 


5-7 


9.00 a.m. $ gr. el. W. 


148 28 


S 


4 3 6 


2 56 


7 18 


11 48 


6 16 


9 


8 


6 46 


7 22 


1 i5 


1 52 


5-5 


7.18 P.M. 9 set S. 


149 29 


s 


4 35 


2 48 


7 19, 


51 


7 


34 


9 


7 38 


8 16 


2 12 


2 43 


5-4 


3od. 11.46 A.M. c5^d 


15030 


M 


4 35 


2 40 


7 20 


1 58 


7 46 


58 


10 


8 24 


9 10 


3 15 


3 37 


5-6 


8.58 A.M. 0* s. 


151 31 


Tu 


4 34 


2 32 


7 21! 


3 8 


8 35 


1 24 


11 


9 3i 


10 5 


4 17 


4 3° 5-7: 


2.27 a.m. (f rises. 



MAY. 

Jupiter (1|) a few degrees from the Moon 
(C ) May 2, a.m. 

Saturn (T^) a few degrees from the Moon 
(C ) May 7, p.m. 

Mars ( <j") a few degrees from the Moon ( (J ) 
May 16, p.m 

Mercury ( $ ) greatest elongation west May 
27, a.m. Visible after sunset. 



THE EPHEMERIS. 

The Ephemeris for the present year gives, as 
heretofore, the day of the year, the day of the 
month, and day of the week in civil time, ac- 
cording to which the day begins at midnight. 
Next are given the time of sunrise, the time 
before or after noon at which the sun's center 
souths, and the time of sunset. The times of 
sunrise and sunset are in each case for the upper 
limb or edge of the sun, corrected for refraction. 
They are more accurate than usually found in 
popular almanacs, and will give the time with 
sufficient accuracy for ordinary purposes. A sur- 
\ veyor's level will give the horizon where the up- 
| per edge of the sun should be at the time given 
in the almanac. If the telescope of the leveling 



instrument inverts, the upper edge will, of course, 
be apparently the lower one. Next are given 
the times of rising, southing and setting of the 
moon's center, and also its age, or the number of 
days elapsed sinc° new moon. Then follow the 
times of high and low water for Philadelphia 
(Walnut street wharf being the point at which 
the times are taken), which are now both derived 
from the elaborate tables of the U. S. Coast Sur- 
vey. Lastly is given a collection of interesting 
astronomical phenomena for the year. The local 
and standard times of Philadelphia are practi- 
cally the same in all cases except in the column 
of sun " souths." In this case 38 seconds should 
be subtracted from the time a.m. and 38 seconds 
added to the time p.m. where the nearest second 
is required in standard time. 



Since i860 the sidewalks of Prague and other 
cities of Bohemia have been made in a mosaic 
of light and dark limestone which are considered 
to have a pleasing appearance. 



The authorities of Glasgow, Scotland, have 
decided to use the overhead trolley system, after 
thorough investigation. 



8 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Sixth Month.] 



JUNE. 



[1898. 











MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




.: 




M 




d. h. tn. 


*r*. h. tn. 






a 




<D 

<D 

-a 



O Full Moon 4 9 11 a.m. 


New Moon 18 11 19 p.m. 






• 
-*» 

O 


d Last Quarter ...11 1 4 A.M. 


D First Quarter. ..26 11 54 p.m. 


Phenomena. 


E 


THE STJN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 






ad 




Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


<o 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


tLS 


d Per.,, 4d. nh. a.m. 








A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


-a! 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


•^ 


dApo.,i9d. 9I1. a.m. 








h.tn. 


tn. s. 


A.m. 


h. tn. 


A. w. 


h. tn. 


d. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


** 




IS2 


I 


w 


4 34 


2 23 


7 22 


4 21 


9 2 9 


1 53 


12 


IO 29 


11 


5 ib 


5 20 


5-9 


10.22 A.M. $ S. 


ISS 


2 


Th 


4 34 


2 13 


7 22 


5 33 


10 28 


2 29 


13 


II 25 


11 54 


6 14 


6 13 


b.o 


9.00 p.m. $ gr. H. L.S. 


IS4 


3 


F 


4 33 


2 4 


7 23 


6 53 


11 31 


3 12 


14 


12 21 


... 


7 10 


7 6 


b.i 


1.57 p.m. 3 W c 


ISS 


4 


S 


4 33 


1 54 


7 24 


8 4 


A.M. 


4 7 


x 5 


O 48 


1 16 


8 5 


7 59 


b.2 


6.30 a.m. £ rises. 


i S 6 


SS 


4 33 


1 43 


7 25 


9 4 


O 38 


5 12 


ib 


I 40 


2 10 


8 59 


8 55 


b.2 


1.59 p.m. 9 S. 


157 


6M 


4 32 


1 33 


7 26 


9 53 


1 43 


6 27 17 


2 34 


3 5 


9 5° 


9 49 


b.2 


9.32 P.M. ? se ts. 


IS8 


7 Tu|!4 32 


1 22 


7 26 


10 82 


2 45 


7 44 


18 


3 2 9 


4 1 10 41 


10 46 


b.2 


8.49 A.M. <-f S. 


i.W 


8 W 4 32 


1 10 


7 27 


11 4 


3 42 


9 


19 


4 22 


4 58 


11 34 


11 48 


b.o 


2. 11 a.m. tf rises. 


160 


9 Th 4 3 2 


59 


7 27 


11 32 


4 34 


10 13 


20 


5 18 


5 5^ 


12 26 


... 


5-9 


3.04 A.M. 7 ^c rises 


161 


10 F 


4 3i 


47 


7 2b 


11 58 


5 22 


11 22 21 


6,16 


6 52 


45 


2 19 


5-7 


; 0.05 a.m. Sirius S. 


162 


11 


S 


'4 31 


35 


7 28 


A.M. 


6 8 


29 22 


7 16 


7 48 


1 46 


2 11 


5-b 


[ 6.44 P.M. 1| S. 


163 


12 


s 


4 3i 


23 


7 29 


O 23 


6 53 


1 33 23 


8 13 


8 42 


2 44 


3 4 


5-7 


2.00 A.M. cf W 


.64 


IS 


M 


4 3i 


10 


7 29 


O 49 


7 37 


2 35 24 


9 4 


9 35 


3 4i 


3 54 


5-9 


0.49 a.m. % sets. 


16s 


M 


Tu 4 31 


P.M. 


7 30 


I 17 


8 22 


3 37 2 5 


9 56 


10 25 


4 35 


4 44 


b.o 


6.31 p.m. <3 d a 


166 


IS 


W 


4 3i 


O 15 


7 3° 


I 48 


9 9 


4 38 26 


10 48 


11 14 


5 26 


5 3 2 


6.2 


IO.48 P.M. \l S. 


167 


16 


Th 


4 3i 


O 28 


7 3° 


2 24 


9 57 


5 37 


27 


11 35 


11 58 


6 15 


6 19 


6-3 


1 3.41 p.m. T2 rises. 


168 


17 


F 


4 3i 


O 41 


7 3" 


3 6 


10 47 


6 32 


28 


12 22 


... 


7 1 


7 4 


6-3 


4.46 p.m. <j $ d 


i6q 


18 


S 


4 3i 


54 


7 3i 


3 52 


11 37 


7 22 


29 


41 


1 6 


7 46 


7 49 


6-3 


; O.34 P.M. (5 $ d 


170 


IQ 


s 


4 3i 


1 7 


7 3i 


4 45 


27 


8 6 





1 22 


1 46 


8 20 


8 28 


6-3 


I 9.48 P.M. }$ S. 


171 


20 


M 


4 3i 


1 20 


7 3 1 


5 4i 


1 16 


8 44 


1 


2 4 


2 27 


9 8 


9 « 


6-3 


5.00 a.m. Summer com. 


172 


21 


Tu 


4 3i 


1 33 


7 3i 


6 39 


2 3 


9 18 


2 


I 2 43 


3 « 


9 47 


9 45 


6-3 


i 9.00 p.m. $ in Q 


173 


22 


W 


4 3 2 


1 46 


7 3i 


7 39 


2 47 


9 47 


3 


3 2i 


3 5° 


10 26 


10 28 


b.2 


7.00 p.m. 3 $ W near- 


174 


2,3 


Th 


4 32 


1 59 


7 3i 


8 39 


3 3i 


10 13 


4 


4 2 


4 32 


11 5 


11 10 


b.i 


1 2.39 a.m. lp rises. 


I7S 


24 


f 


4 32 


2 12 


7 32 


9 39 


4 13 IO 37 


5 


4 45 


5 17 


11 46 


11 5i 


b.o 


II.36 A.M. § S. 


176 


2S 


s 


4 33 


2 25 


7 32 


10 40 


4 56 11 1 


6 


5 29 


6 4 


12 29 




IS-* 


11.00 a.m. § inPerihel. 


177 


26 


s 


4 33 


2 38 


7 32 


11*4 

Yj 


5 39 11 25 


7 


6 18 


6 54 


41 


1 14 


5-8 


1 9.55 p-m. 8 TJ d 


178 


27 


M 


4 33 


2 50 


7 32 


6 26 11 52 


8 


7 I 2 


7 46 


1 41 


2 4 


5-8 


7.25 p.m. 5 sets. 


170 


28 


Tu 


4 33 


3 2 


7 32 


2 


7 16 A.M. 


9 


8 4 


8 40 


2 45 


2 56 5-8 


1 2.25 P.M. 9 S. 


180 


,2Q 


W 


4 34 


3 14 


7 32 


3 13 


8 10 23 10 


9 


9 39 


3 5i 


3 54 5-9 


2.00 A.M. (5 00 Sup. 


181 


13° 


Th 


4 34 


3 26 7 32 


4 30 


9 10 1 2 11 


10 


10 361 4 54 


4 55 6.0 


: 8.55 p.M.occ.A 2 Scorpii 



JUNE. I 

Saturn ( T? ) near the Moon ( d ) June 3, a.m. 

Mars (o* ) a f ew degrees from the Moon ( d ) 
June 14, p.m. 

Mercury ($) four degrees from the Moon 
(d ) June 17, p.m. 

Summer commences June 20, a.m. 

Jupiter ("ty) a few degrees from the Moon 
(d ) June 26, p.m. 

Elephants are remarkably useful in the lumber 
yards of Burmah. They are taught to receive 
the rafts of immense logs that come down the 
Jorawaddy, lift them out of the water, and pile 
them up in their places in the lumber yard. 
They also take the logs up and place them at 
the saw, and take the boards away and pile 
them up when finished. ■ 



Mr. Percival Lowell, in Arizona, is believed 
to have obtained more distinct views of the disk of 
Venus, than have ever been had before. He 
finds that Venus keeps the same side always 
towards the Sun Its rotation on its axis is made 
in the same time that its revolution around the 
Sun is made. 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS. 

IN PENNSYLVANIA. 

New Year's Day Jan. 1. 

Lincoln's Birthday Feb. 12. 

Election Day Feb. 15.* 

Washington's Birthday Feb. 22. 

Good Friday April 8. 

Memorial D?v May 30. 

Independence Day July 4- 

Labor Day Sept. 5.f 

Election Day Nov. 8.f| 

Thanksgiving Day Nov. 24. g 

Christmas Day Dec. 25. 

All Saturdays after 12 o'clock noon are half 
holidays. 

♦Third Tuesday in February (in 1898, Febru- 
ary 15)- 

fFirst Monday in September (in 1898, Septem- 
ber 5). 

•[-{•First Tuesday after first Monday (in 1898, 
November 8). 

^Designated by President or Governor, usu- 
ally the last Thursday of November (z. e., in 1898, 
November 24). 

When a holiday falls on a Sunday it is to be 
observed the following Monday. 

The list of legal holidays in New Jersey does 
not include Good Friday nor Lincoln's birthday. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Seventh Month.] 



JULY. 



[i8g8. 









182 

183 

184 

185 

186 
187 
188 
189 

190 9 

191 10 

192 11 

193 12 

194 13 

i95 14 

196 15 

197 16 

198 17 

199 18 

200 19 

201 20 

202 21 

203 22 
20423 

205 24 

206 25 

207 26 

208 27 

209 28 

210 29 

211 30 

212 31 






MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 
d. h. m. 

O Full Moon 3 4 12 p.m. I # New Moon. 

d Last Quarter. ..10 11 42 a.m. 



h. m. 
2 47 P.M. 



D First Quarter. ..26 8 39 a.m. 



THE SUN, 
Philadelphia. 



THE MOON, 
Philadelphia. 



F 

S 

s 

M 



Rises 

A.M.! 
h.m. t 

35| 
35 
36 



Souths Sets 

P.M. P.M. 



I 

2 

3 

4 

5 Tu 4 37 

6 

7 



36 



W 
Th 
F 

S 

s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 

s 

M 
Tu 
W 
Th 

F 

S 

s 

M 



Tu 4 
W 4 

Th4 
F 4 

S 4 

S l 4 



3 7 
33 
33 

39 

40 

4i 

4i 

42: 

43 ' 

44 

45 

45 

46 

47 
48 

49 

49! 
5o 

5i 

52' 
52 ' 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 



s. h.m. 
38 7 32 
49 7 32 

o 7 32 
11 7 32 
21 7 

3i 7 
4i 7 



3i 
3i 
3i 



Rises. Souths 

I P.M. J P.M. 
h. m. h. m. 
\ 5 4o,ip 15; 

6 45 ii 21 

7 40J A.M. 



be 



50 7 3o 



59 
7 



30 
3o' 



16 7 3oj 
23 7 29! 
30 7 28 
37 7 28 
44 7 27, 
49 7 
55 7 
59 7 



8 25 

9 1 
9 32 

10 o 

10 25! 

10 51 J 

11 19 
11 50 

A.M. 

o 24 



2 7 
26 
26 
4 7 25 
7 7 24 



10 7 
13 7 

15 

16 



7 

7 

17 7 20 
17 7 19 

7 

7 

7 
7 



8 44 
34 



40 10 24 
35 11 13 



3 2 
32 
32 
33 



8 34 

9 36 

10 40 

11 47 



16 
15 

14 



19 
18, 

16 f 



87 151 



6 

3 

*g 

27 
25 10 

15 11 



Sets. 

A.M. 
h. tn.'d. 

46 12 

48;i3 
59 14 
16,15 
35i6 
5217 
6 18 

15 19 
22 20 

27 21 
29 22 

31 23 
31 24 
2725 

19 26 

4 27 
45 28 

20 29 

5 1 ! » 
18 



THE TIDES, 
Philadelphia. 



High 

A.M.: 
h. m. 
o 
o 

29 

24 

19 
11 

4 
58 
50 
4i 
3 2 | 
27! 
9 22 
10 14 



11 
12 

o 
1 
2 
3 
4 
4 
5 
6 

7 
8 



Tide. 

P.M. 
h. m. 
11 32 



30 
56 
24 

53 
40 
A.M. 

32 

1 35 12 

2 48 13 



7 
8 

9 

10 

11 



4 
50 
10 

52 
34 



1 
56 
5i 
45 
39 
32 

25 
16 
8 
9 o 
9 5o 

10 39 

11 25 
- i 

35 

1 19 



Low Tide. 


A.M. P.M. 


h. m. 


h. tn. 


6 54 


5 5i 

6 48 


7 5o 

8 41 


7 44 

8 40 



Phenomena. 



9 33 

10 21 

11 10 

12 o 

24' 

1 20 



9 36 

10 31 

11 27 



16 
58 
40 
20 

4 
50 

6 41 

7 36 

8 34 

9 39 

10 44 

11 47 



8 15 

9 15 

10 16 

11 15! 



16 

11 

6 

59 
48 
34 

19 
8 1 

8 40 

9 18 
9 56 

10 34 

11 13 

11 52 

o 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 



18 
18 
21 
30 

36 
40 

36 



5° 

39 
29 

21 

*3 

2 

5° 

36 

20 

1 

8 41 

9 20 
10 1 

10 41 

11 27 

-38 

27 
26 

3 1 

34 
35 
35 



3: -5 
6.1 
6.1 
6.2 
6.2 
6.2 
6.2 
6.0 

5-9 
5-7 
5-7 
5-8 
5-8 

5-9 
6.0 

6.0 

6.0 

6.0 

6.1 

6.2 

6.2 

6.2 

6.1 

6.1 

6.0 

6.0 

6.0 

5-9 i 

6.0 

6.0 

6.0 

6.0 



Per., 3d. 
Apo.,i6d. 
Per.,3id. 
.10 p.m. $ 
.46 p.m. $ 

29 p.m. 9 
41 p.m. 9 

.50 A.M. 
.13 A.M. 



9h. A.M. 
ih. p.m. 

5h. P.M. 

s. 

sets. 

S. 
sets. 

o*S. 
0* rises. 



15 a.m. Sirius S. 
.18 a.m. ProcyonS. 
.36 a.m. Arcturus S, 

34 p.m. 9 S. 
.29 p.m. 9 sets. 

.IO A.M. o" S. 

•45 p.m. 3 O* <r 

.02 a.m. (f rises. 

31 P.M. 3 W d 
.38 P.M. % S. 

.39 p.m. 11 sets. 
eclipsed. Invis. at Phila. 
.27 p.m. Yi S. 
.29 p.m. occ. oLeonis. 
.26 p.m. J^ rises. 
.34 p.m. § S. 

.53 A.M. (5 1/ (J 

.27 p.m. $ sets. 
07 p.m. Antares S. 
.00 a.m. (5 $aLeonis. 
48 a.m. c5 r{I d 

14 p.m. 3 h <I 

00 a.m. $ in y 
46 p.m. 5 S. 
24 p.m. sets. 



JULY. 

Moon (<[ ) eclipsed. Invisible at Philadelphia, 

July 3- 

Mars (c?) near the Moon (C ) July 13, p.m. 
Neptune (ty) near the Moon ( C ) July 15, 

P.M. 

Sun (0) eclipsed. Invisible at Philadelphia. 
July 18. 

Mercury ( § ) four degrees north of the 
Moon ( C. ) July 20, p.m. 

Mercury ( $ ) and a Leonis appear in con- 
tact July 27, a.m. 

THE KLONDYKE GOLD FIELDS. 

In the summer of 1896 information reached 
the United States of a discovery of a great gold 
field on the branches of the Yukon River. The 
territory was at first supposed to be in Alaska, 
but later information showed it to be just over j 
the border in the Northwest Territory under the 
dominion of Canada. The discovery was made 
by American prospectors from Alaska in the 
summer of 1896, but the Arctic winter shut off 
communication with the outside world, and 
nearly a year had elapsed before the adven- : 
turers of the United States heard of it. Great ' 



excitement followed ; but the difficulties of get- 
ting to the scene of the discoveries— the Klon- 
dyke region — and the certain hardships that 
would be encountered near the Arctic circle, pre- 
vented such a rush as would have followed the 
announcement of a similar find in a more hospit- 
able country. Almost fabulous stories of for- 
tunes made in a month were told, and do not 
seem to have been greatly exaggerated. As 
many people as could get transportation started 
for the gold fields — between 5000 and 10,000 — 
and many more prepared to start in the spring 
of 1898. Many speculative companies were also 
formed in the East, ostensibly to develop the 
gold fields. The region is reached by steamers 
up the Yukon River, or overland via Chilcoot 
Pass from Sitka — a difficult and dangerous route. 
All provisions have to be transported, as the 
country is extremely inhospitable. The center 
and capital of the Klondyke region is Dawson 
City, nineteen hundred miles from St. Michael's, 
at the mouth of the Yukon River. 



One of the amusements of the Tennessee Cen- 
tennial Exposition was a giant see-saw, the cars of 
which were lifted alternately to a height of 150 
feet above the ground. 



IO 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Eighth 


Month.] 






AUGUST. 








[1898. 










MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




. 


-a 


M 




d. h. tn. 


rf. h. m. 




3 





« 
t* 




O Full Moon 1 11 28 p.m. 








M 


d Last Quarter ... 9 1 13 a.m. 


J) First Quarter ...24 3 32 p.m. 


Phenomena. 




-a 
*^ 

O 









O Full Moon 31 7 51 a.m. 




© 


THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 






C3 




Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths Sets . Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 




High Tide. ! 


Low Tide. 


^ 


d Per., i2d. oh. a.m. 








A.M. 


P.M. Ip.M.'l P.M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


-* 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M.I 


P.M. 


-sfs 


d Apo.,28d. 8h. p.m. 








h.m. 


tn. s. h.m. h. m. 


h. 7)t. 


h. m. 


d. 


h. m. 


h. *».' 


h. m.\ 


A. 7)1. 


*■£ 




213 


I 


M 


4 58 


6 5 7 14 


6 55 


... 


4 6 


I4| 


14 


45 


7 3°; 


7 32 


b.i 


I.48 P.M. $ S. 


214 


2 


Tu 


4 59 


6 1 7 13 


7 29 


♦0 5 


5 24 


15! 


I 10 


1 4i 


8 20 


8 27 


0.2 


8.19 p.m. § sets. 


2IS 


3 


W 


5 


5 567 12 


8 


1 


6 41 


10 


2 4 


2 34 


9 9 


9 20 


b.2 


2.43 P.M. $ S. 


2l6 


4 


Th 


5 I 


5 50; 7 «| 


8 26 


1 5i 


7 52 


17 


2 5° 


3 26 


9 54 


10 12 


b.2 


! 8.58 p.m. <j? sets. 


217 


5 


F 


S 2 


5 44 7 10, 


8 52 


2 39 


9 4 


18 


3 47 


4 15 


10 41 11 5 


b.o 


| 7.44 A.M. 0* S. 


218 


6 


S 


5 3 


5 38 7 9 


9 20 


3 27 


10 12 


19 


4 35 


5 2 


11 27 11 58 


5-9 


0.22 a.m. (f rises. 


2IQ 


7 


s 


5 4 


5 317 8|| 9 50 


4 13 


11 17 


20 


5 23 


5 5i 


16 


... 


5-9 


j 3.23 p.m. 1| S. [ietis. 


220 


8 


M 


5 5 


5 23 7 7 10 24 


5 1 


21 


21 


6 10 


6 40 


51 


1 7 


5-8 


9d. 0.45 a.m. oce. e Ar- 


221 


9 


Tu 


5 6 


5 I5J7 5' 11 2 


5 49 


1 22 


22 


7 


7 3° 


1 44 


1 54 


5-7 


8 00 p.m. T^ stationary 


222 


10 


W 


5 7 


567 4J,ii 45 


6 39 


2 20 


23 


7 5° 


8 20 


2 40 


2 45 


5-7 


i 9.09 p.m. 1[ sets. 


22 3 


11 


Th 


5 « 


4 57J7 21 a.m. 


7 29 


3 13 


2 4 


8 42 


9 « 


3 34 


3 39 


5-7 


0.11 p.m. d d a 


224 


12 


F 


5 9 


4 47 7 1 


34 


8 19 


4 2 


25 


9 35 


10 


4 26 


4 30 


5-b 


! 6.51 p.m. Tj S. 


22S 


13 


S 


5 i° 


4 36 7 1 28 


9 « 


4 44 


2b 


10 27 


10 49 


5 10 


5 20 


5-7 


| 5.OO A.M. $ hi 13 


226 


14 


s 


5 " 


4 25 6 58 2 25 


9 56 


5 21 


27 


11 17 


11 36 


6 3 


6 8 


5-8 


11.37 P - M - h sets. 


227 


*5 


M 


S " 


4 146 57i| 3 24 


10 43 


5 53 


28 


5 


... 


b 49 


6 52 


5-8 


6.06 p.m. rfl S. 


228 


16 


Tu 


5 13 


4 2 6 56 4 24 


11 28 


6 21 


29 


21 


49 


7 3° 


7 35 


5-8 


10.58 p.m. r£l sets. 


229 


J 7 


W 


s 14 


3 49 6 54: 5 25 


11 


6 47 


O 


1 6 


1 3i 


8 9 


8 16 


b.o 


7.53 a.m. y s. 


2 SO 


l8 


Th 


s is 


3 36 6 531 6 27 


54 


7 12 


I 


1 49 


2 15 


8 48 


8 57 


b.o 


i.co p.m. <3 ? % near. 


23I 


19 


V 


5 i5 


3 23 6 52' 7 29 


1 37 


7 3 6 


2 


2 30 


2 57 


9 2 5 


9 38 


b.i 


0.15 a.m. y rises. 


2^2 


20 


s 


5 16 


3 9 6 5o 8 33 


2 21 


8 1 


3 


3 I 2 


3 39 


10 3 


10 20 


b.i 


n.39 P - M - 6 ^ G 


233 


21 


s 


5 17 


2 54 6 49 | 9 39 


3 8 


8 29 


4 


3 57 


4 24 


10 41 


11 10 


6.1 


7.00 a.m. ^ stationary. 


234 


22 


M 


S 18 


2 39 6 47 10 47 


3 57 


9 


5 


4 40 


5 10 


11 21 


... 


b 1 


O.OO A.M. D y 


235 


2.1 


Tu 


=5 19 


2 24 6 461 j 11 57 


4 5i 


9 39 


6 i 


5 28 


6 1 


1 


9 


b.i 


6.28 a.m. Sirius S. 


236 


24 


W 


S 20 


2 8 6 44 1 07 


5 48 


10 26 


7 


6 20 


6 55 


1 1 


1 4 


b.o 


I.23 P.M. <3 V <i 


237 


25 


Th 


5 21 


1 51 6 43 2 14 


6 48 


11 23 


81 


7 18 


7 54 


2 6 


2 9 


5-9 


1.24 a.m. Sirius r.ses. 


238 


26 


F 


5 22 


1 35 6 41 1! 3 14 


7 50 


A.M. 


9 


8 19 


8 57 


3 I 2 


3 15 


5-9 


7.48 a.m. 7 ^< rise. 


239 


27 


S 


5 23 


1 18 6 40 


4 5 


8 51 


O 29 


10! 


9 25 


9 59 


4 19 


4 22 


5-9 


3.56 p.m. Antares S. 


240 


28 


s 


5 2 4 


1 06 38! 


4 49 


9 5o 


1 43 


11 


10 32 


11 


5 20 


5 24 


5-9 


: 3.00 P.M. □ T| 


241 


29 


M 


5 25 


4 2 6 37! | 5 25 


10 45 


2 59 


12 


11 34 


.. 


6 15 


6 22 


b.o 


9.39 p.m. in tares sets. 


242 


3° 


Tu 


5 26 


24 6 35 


5 56 


11 38 


4 15 


x 3, 





31 


7 b 


7 18 


b.o 


8.24 p.m. occ. Aquarii 


243 


31 


W 


5 27 


5 6 341 


6 25 


A.M. 


5 29 


14 


1 55 


1 23 


7 55 


8 11 


6.1 


i 1.00 p.m. d m £1 



Vis- 



AUGUST. 

Mercury ( $ ) greatest elongation east, 
ible after sunset, August 8. 

Mars (c? ) near the Moon (d) August 11. 

Venus ( °) and Jupiter (1|) near each other 
August 18, P.M. 

Mercury ( $ ) near the Moon ( d ) August 18. 



THE MONETARY COMMISSION. 

On April 12th, President McKinley appointed 
Senator Wolcott, ex- Vice- President Stevenson, 
and Colonel Charles J. Paine, all bimetallists, 
as delegates to an international monetary confer- 
ence. They promptly proceeded to Europe in 
order to conduct negotiations for the calling of a 
monetary conference which would agree on a 
programme greatly increasing the monetary use 
of silver. Their reception in Europe was very 
encouraging, but France would only consent to 
an opening of the question on condition that Eng- 
land should enter into the agreement. 

In response to the appeal of our Commission- 
ers, the Governor of the Bank of England an- 
nounced at the semi-annual meeting of the Board 
of Governors of the Bank, on September ibth, 



that in the event of France opening its mints to 
the free coinage of silver, and the price of silver 
being satisfactory, then the Bank of England was 
willing to hold its legal limit of silver in reserve, 
viz. : one-fifth of the bullion held against its note 
issue. This half promise seemed to encourage 
our Commissioners, but on October 2cth they 
received their reply from the British Government. 
Lord Salisbury said then, officially, that the Gov- 
ernment was not able to reopen the Indian mints 
to silver at present, and that therefore they could 
not see the desirability of an International Mone- 
tary Conference. The American Ambassador at 
Berlin says that Germany's action toward bimet- 
allism depends upon England's. The action 
taken by Great Britain practically destroys all 
hope of an International Monetary Conference, 
at least for some time to come. 



An electrical tramway seventy-five miles in 
length is nearly completed in Mexico. It extends 
between Mexico, Cordova and Jalata. 



The export of butter from the United States to 
Europe has risen from 9,000,000 to about 22,000,- 
000 pounds in one year. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



ii 



Ninth Month.] 








SEPTEMBER 


• 






[1898. 








MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




%^ 




"»" 


d. h. tn. 


d. h. tn. 




e<3 

9 


« 








C Last Quarter... 7 5 50 p.m. D First Quarter. ..22 9 39 p.m. 




>-• 



>-> 


§ New Moon 15 7 10 p.m. 




Phenomena. 


o 


THE SUN, | THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 








(=4 


Philadelphia. Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


1 




Rises 


Souths 


Sets ; Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


© ! 

be 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


t* 


C Apo., 9d. 4h. p.m. 








A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. P.M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


■"i ! 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


<0 ^> 


C Per., 24c!. i2h. m. 








h.m. 


tn. s. 


h.m. h. tn. 


k. tn. 


h. tn. 


rf. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


h. tn. 


StJ-8 




244 


I 


Th 


5 28 


14 


6 32: 6 52 


27 


6 40 


15 


1 49 


2 12 


8 40 


9 2 


6.0 


O.23 P.M. § S. 


245 


2 


F 


5 29 


33 


6 31! ] 7 20 


1 16 


7 5o 


16 


! 2 36 


3 1 


9 25 


9 52 


6.1 


6.30 p.m. $ sets. 


246 


3 


S 


5 30 


52 


6 29 7 50 


2 4 


8 59 


17 


3 22 


3 46 


10 9 


10 40 


6.2 


! 2.45 p.m. 9 s. 


247 


4 


s 


5 3i 


1 12 


6 27I 1 8 23 


2 52 


10 4 


18, 


4 6 


4 3i 


10 54 


11 30 


6.2 


8.06 p.m. 9 sets. 


248 


5 


M 


5 32 


1 32 


6 26' 9 


3 41 


11 8 


z 9: 


4 52 


5 18 


11 40 


... 


6.1 


\ 0.00 p.m. 3 $ Inf. 


249 


6 


Tu 


5 33 


1 52 


6 24 9 41 


4 3i 


8 


20 


5 36 


6 2 


20 


o"*28 


5-9 


7.06 A.M. 0* S. 


25O 


7 


W 


5 34 


2 12 


6 23:10 38 


5 21 

J". 


1 5 


2l| 


1 6 21 


6 50 


I IO 


I 17 


5-7 


2.34 p.m. J 1 sets. 


251 


8 


Th 


5 34 


2 32 


6 21] 11 20 


1 55 


22 ' 


7 12 


7 39 


2 4 


2 9 


5-6 


j 0.57 p.m. rfWfi 


252 


9 


F 


5 35 


2 53 


6 19 A.M. 


2 40 


23 


8 2 


8 30 


2 57 


3 2 


5-5 


I.36 P.M. lj[ S. 


253 


10 


s 


5 36 


3 x 4 


6 18 1 15 


7 5i 


3 *9 


24 


8 56 


9 20 


3 5o 


3 58 


5-4 


7.53 p.m. 1| sets. 


254 


11 


s 


5 37 


3 35 


6 16I 1 14 


8 38 


3 53 


25; 


9 5» 


10 10 


4 4o 


4 49 


5-4 


4.57 p.m. ^ S. 


255 


12 


M 


5 38 


3 56 


6 15 


2 14 


9 23 


4 23 


26 


10 42 


11 


5 29 


5 38 


5-4 


9.45 p.m. Vi sets. 


256 


13 


Tu 


5 39 


4 17 


6 J 3 


3 15 


10 7 


4 5° 


27 1 


11 30 


11 49 


6 13 


6 24 


5-6 


1. 00 a.m. $ stationary. 


257 


J 4 


W 


5 4o 


4 38 


6 12 4 16 


10 51 


5 15 


28 


17 


... 


6 55 


7 8 


5-6 


4.OI P.M. (^ $ C 


258 15 


Th 


5 4i 


4 59 


6 ioji 5 19 


11 34 


5 4° 


29 


35 


1 


7 36 


7 50 


5-7 


4.13 P.M. r}I S. 


259 l6 


F 


5 42 


5 20 


6 8j| 6 23 


19 


6 5 


1 


1 20 


1 44 


8 14 


8 33 


5-9 


II.OO A.M. 0^0 


260 17 


S 


5 43 


5 4 1 


6 6 7 29 


1 5 


6 32 


2 


2 4 


2 26 


8 52 


9 16 


6.1 


i. 00 p.m 9 in Aph- 


26l 


18 


s 


5 44 


6 2 


6 5 8 38 


1 54 


7 3 


3 


2 47 


3 " 


9 3i 


10 3 


6-3 


8.52 p.m. r|I sets. 


262 


19 


M 


5 45 


6 23 


6 3 9 48 


2 47 


7 4° 


4 


1 3 3 1 


3 57 


10 12 


10 54 


6.3 


1.38 P.M. (3 ? d 


263 


20 


Tu 


5 46 


6 44 


6 2 10 58 


3 43 


8 24 


5 


4 17 


4 46 


10 57 


11 48 


6.3 


7.49 p.m. rf y c 


264 


21 


W 


5 47 


7 5 


6006 


4 43 


9 18 


6 


; 5 8 


5 39 


11 49 




6.2 


j 1. 00 p.m. $ gr. el. W. 


265 


22 


Th 


5 48 


7 26 


5 58 | 1 7 


5 43 


10 21 


7 


' 6 2 


6 35 


47 


50 


6.0 


7.00 p.m. Autumn com. 


266 23 


F 


5 49 


7 47 


5 57 2 


° 43 


11 30 


8 


7 3 


7 37 


-x 5o 


1 56 


5-9 


3 29 a.m. 7 >jc S. 


267 24 


S 


5 5o 


8 8 


5 55 ' 2 45 


7 4i 


A.M. 


9 


8 9 


8 39 


2 55 


3 4 


5-8 


1 4.53 a.m. CapellaS. 


268 25 


s 


5 5i 


8 28 


5 53 3 22 


8 36 


O 44 


10 


9 15 


9 42 


3 59 


4 9 


5-8 


4.03 p.m. Antares S. 


269 26 


M 


5 52 


8 48 


5 5i 3 55 


9 28 


1 57 


11 


10 19 


10 46 


4 55 


5 11 


5-8 


10.54 a.m. $ S. 


270 27 


Tu 


5 53 


9 9 


5 50 4 24 10 17 


3 IO 


12 


[11 16 


11 44 


5 5o 


6 9 


5-9 


2.00 p.M.ty stationary. 


271 28 W 


5 53 


9 29 


5 48 4 51 11 5 


4 21 


13 


' O IO 


... 


6 39 


7 2 


5-8 


29d.i.23A.M.occ.l9Pis. 


272 29 Th 


5 54 


9 48 


5 47 5 19 " 53 


5 3° 


14 


37 


1 


7 25 


7 52 


6.1 


5.19 A.M. § rises. 


273 3° F 


5 55 


IO 85 45 5 48 A.M. 


6 38 


15 


1 1 25 


1 48 


8 10 


8 41 


6-3 


2.43 p.m. $ S. 



SEPTEMBER. 

Mars (cf) near the Moon (d) September 
9, a.m. 

Mercury .( $ ) near the Moon ( d ) September 
14, P.M. 

Venus ($) near the Moon (C) September 
19, P.M. 

Mercury (§) greatest elongation west. Vis- 
ible before sunrise, September 19. 



PRESIDENT DIAZ OF MEXICO. 

President Porfirio Diaz, who has given Mexico 
the most stable and in other respects the best 
government that country has ever known, has 
entered upon his fifth term, which will not ex- 
pire until the autumn of 1900. He has been 
President continuously since 1884, and also 
served from 1876 to 1880. It is alleged by his 
enemies that he is a mere dictator ; that elections 
are not free ; but it is quite certain that no un- 
usual restraints are put upon the newspapers 
expressing these opinions. Diaz, on the other 
hand, appears to be extremely popular. An 
attempt to assassinate him in the fall of 1897 
was followed by the lynching of his assailant. 
Diaz has expelled the religious orders from 



Mexico, although nine-tenths of the people are 
Roman Catholics, and he has converted many 
of the buildings formerly belonging to the church 
into public schools, where the English language 
is taught. The next generation will be better 
fitted than any which has preceded it for self- 
government. The entire nation is now governed 
by law, bandits have disappeared, and there 
are few States in the Union where better order 
is maintained. Under Diaz, moreover, there 
has been a great diversification of the industries, 
and there is altogether a very bright prospect 
before Mexico under the administration of Presi- 
dent Diaz. 

The Electrical Review says that there is more 
money invested in electrical industry in this 
country than in all the rest of the globe. Not 
less than $1,750,000,000 is invested in that indus- 
try in the United States. 



Some Brazilian beetles have mandibles strong 
enough' to cut metal. A few specimens placed 
in a glass jar having a pewter cover had in forty- 
eight hours cut holes large enough to put their 
heads through. 



12 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Tenth Month.] 








OCTOBER. 






[1898. 








MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 




. 


-a 


^4 


d. h. m. d. h. in. 






a 



■33 

-a 
-*» 

O 
>-> 


C Last Quarter... 715 p.m. D First Quarter. ..22 4 9 a.m. 






S 

a 
-a 




% New Moon 15 7 37 a.m. i Q Full Moon 29 7 18 a.m. 


Phenomena. 


o 


THE SUN, 1 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 




(4 


ri 
O 




Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths 


Sets 


Rises. 


Souths 


Sets. 


CD 

be 


High Tide. 


Low Tide. 




d Apo., 7d. oh. m. 








A.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


A.M. 


-J! 


A.M. P.M. 


A.M. P.M. 




d Per., igd. 9b.. p.m. 








h.rn. 


m. s. 


h.in. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h. in. 


d. 


h. m. h. nt. 


h. m. ft. m. 


S*-S 




274 


I 


s 


5 56 


IO 27 


5 43 


1 6 20 


42 


7 45 


16 


2 11 2 32 


8 54 9 28 


6.4 


11.05 A.M. $ S. 


275 


2 


s 


5 57 


10 46 


5 42 


6 56 


1 31 


8 51 


17 


2 55 3 16 


9 37 10 15 6.4 


5.00 a.m. $ gr.H.L. N. 


276 


3 


M 


5 58 


" 5 


5 4o 


1 7 36 


2 21 


9 53 


18 


3 39 3 59 


10 21 11 6.3 


j 5.21 A.M. 5 rises. 


277 


4 


Tu 


5 59 


11 23 


5 39 


8 21 


*3 12 


10 52 


*9 


4 20 4 42 


11 6 11 46 6.2 


2.42 P.M. $ S. 


278 


5 


W 


6 


11 4i 5 37 


9 " 


4 3 


11 46 


20 


5 2 5 26 


11 51 - t 5.9 j 


9. 11 p.m. 3 w c 


279 


6 


Th 


6 1 


11 58 5 36 


10 6 


4 54 


34 


21 


j 5 48 6 11 


34 4i 5-7 


7.15 p.m. $ sets. 


280 


7 


F 


6 2 


12 16 


5 34 


" 3 


5 43 


1 15 


22 


6 36 6 57 


1 22 1 31 5.5 


O.I2 A.M. 3 0* d 


28l 


8S 


6 3 


12 32 


5 32 


A.M. 


6 31 


1 5i 


23 


7 24 7 46 


2 13 2 24 5.3 


6.17 A.M. 0* S. 


282 


9 s 


6 4 


12 48 5 30 


O 2 


7 16 


2 22 24 


8 17 8 37 


'3 5 3 19 5-2 1 


13.00 a.m. $ gr. H. LS. 


283 


10 M 


6 5 


13 4 5 29 


59 


8 1 


2 52 25 


9 11 9 29 


3 57 4 12 


5-2 1 


1. 13 a.m. (f rises. 


284 II 


Tu 


6 6 


13 19 5 27 


2 2 


8 44 


3 16 26 


10 3 10 22 


4 45 5 4 


5-3; 


II.52 A.M. If S. 


285 12 


W 


6 7 


13 34 5 26 


i 3 4 


9 2 7 


3 4i 27 


10 53 11 12 


5 31 5 53 


5-4 


6.03 a.m. If rises. 


286 13 


Th 


6 8 


13 48 5 24 


1 4 8 


10 12 


4 6 28 


11 40 


6 15 6 40 


5-5 i 


, 6.00 A.M. (5 "U 


287 14 F 


6 9 


14 2 5 23 


5 13 


10 58 


4 33 29 


1 27 


6 58 7 25 


5-8 


6.42 A.M. (5 § d 


288 15 S 


6 10 


14 *5 5 21 


6 22 


11 47 


5 3 3° 


50 1 13 


7 40 8 12 


6.0 1 


11.00 a.m. 3 $ "H- close. 


289 16 S 


6 11 


14 2 7 5 20 


7 33 


39 


5 39 


I 


1 36 2 


8 20 9 


6.2 


2.50 P.M. Vi S. 


290 17 M 


6 13 


14 39 5 18 


8 46 


1 36 


6 21 


2 


i 2 22 2 46 


9 2 9 50 


6-3 


I.OO P.M. n O* O 


291 18 Tu 


6 14 


14 5i 5 17 


9 56 


2 36 


7 13 


3 


31° 3 35 


9 50 10 40 


6-3 


! 1.31 p.m. c3 9 d 


292 19 \V 


6 15 


15 1 5 15 


11 1 


3 37 


8 14 


4 


i 4 4 26 


10 40 11 36 


6.3 


7.41 p.m. \~i sets. 


293 20 Th 


6 16 


15 12 5 14 


11 57 


4 38 


9 2 3 


5 


4 52 5 19 


11 37 ... 


6.1 


1 2.01 P.M. rfl S. 


294 21 F 


6 17 


15 21 5 12 


; 45 


5 3 6 


10 35 


6 


5 50 6 19 


35 40 


5-9 


8.00 A.M. 3 9 h 


295 22 S 


6 18 15 30 s 11 


! 1 22 


6 31 


11 48 


7 


6 S3 7 20 


1 34 1 45 


5-8 | 


6.46 p. m. rjl sets. 


296 23 S 


6 19 15 38 5 9 


1 56 


7 23 


A.M. 


8 


7 57 8 22 


2 35 2 51 


5-71 


II.57 A.M. § S. 


297 24 M 


6 20 15 46 5 8 


2 25 


8 12 


59 


9 


9 9 27 


3 34 3 56 


5-7 


; 0.23 a.m. occ, k. Aquarii 


298 25 Tu 


6 21 15 52 5 6 


2 53 


9 


2 9 IO 


10 10 26 


4 29 4 56 


5-7 


j 5.00 A.M. C "1 13 


299 26 W 


6 23 15 58 5 5 


3 20 


9 46 


3 17 11 


10 56 11 21 


5 20 s 50 


5-8 


11.00 a.m. 5 gr. Bril. 


300 27 Th 


6 24 16 45 4 


3 48 10 34 


4 2 4 12 


11 47 ... 


6 9 6 42 


6.1 


5.15 p.m. § sets. 


301 [28 F 


6 25 16 85 3 


4 19 11 22 


5 3° 13 


12 35 


6 55 7 31 


6.4 


2.20 p.m. 9 s. 


302 29 S 


6 26 16 12 5 2 


4 53 a.m. 


6 35 14 


1 1 20 


7 40 8 18 


6-5 


6.40 p.m. 9 sets - 


303 30 s 


6 27 16 15 5 


5 31 12 


7 3 8 i5 


1 44 2 4 


8 25 9 4 


6-5 1 


5.32 A M. c? S. 


304 


31 


M 


6 29 


16 18 


4 59 


6 15 


1 2 


8 39 


161 


2 27 2 47 


9 8 9 48 


6.5! 


0.52 p.m. (f sets. 



OCTOBER. 

Mars (J") near the Moon ( C ) October 8, a.m. 
Mercury ($) very near Jupiter (If) Octo- 
ber 16, A.M. 

Venus (9) near tne Moon (d ) October 18, 

P.M. 

Venus ( 9 ) brightest. Visible in daylight, 
October 27. 

THE NEW TARIFF. 

Work on the new Tariff bill was begun imme- 
diately after the assembling of Congress in De- 
cember, 1896. It was therefore in an advanced 
stage of preparation when Congress assembled 
in special session, March 15, 1897. After the 
Dingley bill, as it was called, had passed the 
House the Senate Finance Committee amended 
it materially, but ultimately the Senate accepted 
the greater part of the Dingley bill. Finally a 
committee ot conference made radical changes, 
and the bill as finally passed was in important 
features a new measure. Compared with the 
previous law it is a radically protective measure. 
The duties have been generally increased, and 
hides and wool have been taken from the free 
list. The tax on hides is only 15 per cent, ad 



valorem ; that on wool is highly protective to 
the wool growers, but wool dealers and manu- 
facturers managed to import a year's supply 
while the tariffwas under discussion. The most 
important schedule was the tariff on sugar, which 
was ultimately fixed in the interest of the Sugar 
Trust at a higher rate than was allowed by 
Dingley, but at a less rate than was proposed by 
the Senate committee, which guarded the inter- 
ests of the Trust. A slight change in the method 
of computing the tax made in conference com- 
mittee is estimated to have been worth $1,000,000 
to the Sugar Trust. The passage of the bill on 
July 24 and the adjournment of Congress were 
followed at once by a revival of business. 



The human heart is a force pump six inches 
in length and four inches in diameter. It beats 
seventy times a minute, and all the blood in the 
body, which is about thirty pounds, passes 
through it in about three minutes. 



Foreign matches are likely to be supplied in 
future from Japan instead of Sweden. It is 
said that after supplying the home market Japan 
will be able to send 2,500,000,000 to the rest of 
the world. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



13 



Eleventh Month.] 






NOVEMBER. 








[1898. 




. 




MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 






-a 


*S4 


d. h. m. d. h. nt. 






3 




3 

O 


d Last Quarter ... 6 9 28 a.m. D First Quarter. ..20 5 p.m. 




*-> 


3 

O 


% New Moon 13 7 20 p.m. . O Full Moon 27 11 39 p.m. 


Phenomena. 


O 


THE SUN, 


THE MOON, 


THE TIDES, 










Philadelphia. 


Philadelphia. 




Philadelphia. 






Rises 


Souths' Sets 


Rises. Souths 


Sets. 




High Tide. 


Low Tide. 


1* 


C Apo., 4d. 8h. a.m. 








A.M. 


A.M. P.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


A.M. ■"* 


A.M. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


P.M. 


IS 


Q Per., iod. 3h. p.m. 








h.m. 


nt. s. h.in. 


h. nt. 


h. nt. 


h. m. d. 


h. nt. 


h. m. 


h. nt. 


A. »«. 


^■5 




305 


I 


Tu 


6 30 


16 19 4 58 


7 3 


1 54 


9 35 17 


3 9 


3 29 


9 5i 


10 31 


6.4 


4.42 a.m. <m? & 


306 


2 


W 


6 31 


16 20 4 57 


7 56 


2 45 


10 26 18 


3 5i 


4 10 


10 34 


11 15 


6.2 


O.16 P.M. § S. 


3°7 


3 


Th 


6 32 


16 20 4 56 


8 52 


3 35 


11 10 19 


4 3i 


4 5i 


11 19 


11 58 


6.0 


5.13 p.m. $ sets. 


308 


4 


F 


6 33 


16 19 4 55 


' 9 5° 


4 23 


11 48 20 


5 16 


5 33 


4 




5-8 


10.00 a.m. § in iphel. 


3°9 


5 


S 


6 34 


16 174 54 


10 49 


5 10 


21 21 


6 


6 18 


43 


52 


5-5] 


2.00 p.m. 9 S. 


310 


6 


s 


6 35 


16 14 4 53 


11 48 5 54 


50 22 


6 49 


7 5 


1 30 


1 42 


5-4 


0.20 a.m. occ. <s> Leonis. 


3 11 


7 


M 


6 36 


16 11 4 52 


A.M. 


6 37 


1 16 23 


7 39 


7 54 


2 19 


2 37 


5-2 


6.18 p.m. 9 sets - 


312 


8 


Tu 


6 37 


16 6 4 51 


1 9 


7 19 


1 41 24 


8 30 


8 48 


3 8 


3 32 


5-2 


5.IO A.M. <$ S. 


3 X 3 


9 


\V 


6 39 


16 1 4 50 


1 50 


8 3 


2 5 25 


9 24 9 4i 


3 59 


4 26 


5-2 


! 0.28 a.m. cT rises. 


3 J 4 


10 


Th 


6 40 


i5 55 4 49 


2 54 


8 47 


2 31 26 


10 15 


10 36 


4 46 


5 20 5.4 


5.00 a.m. 9 stationary. 


3i5 


ri 


F 


6 41 


15 48 4 49 


4 1 


9 35 


3 27 


11 5 


11 28 


5 34 


6 12 5.6 


10.00 p.m. (5 § rjl 


316 


12 


S 


6 42 


15 40 4 48 


5 11 


10 26 


3 33 28 


11 56 




6 20 


7 4 5-9 


IO.I2 a.m. 1/. S. 


317 


J 3 


s 


6 44 


i5 32 4 47 


6 25 


11 22 


4 13 2 9 


19 


44 


7 6 


7 54 6.1 


j 4.38 a.m. 1/ rises. 


3i8 


14 


M 


6 45 


15 22 4 46 


: 7 38 


22 


520 


1 9 


1 34 


7 53 


8 45 6.2 


9.57 p.m. (5 $ (I near. 


3i9 


15 


Tu 


6 46 


i5 12 4 45 


8 46 


1 25 


631 


2 


2 24 


8 41 


9 36 


6.3 


0.07 p.m. (3 9 a 


320 


16 


W 


6 47 


15 1 4 44 


9 49 


2 28 


7 i°i 2 


2 50 


3 i5 


9 32 


10 29 


6.3 


; 1.02 P.M. 1^ S. 


321 


17 


Th 


6 48 


14 59 4 43 


10 40 


3 29 


8 2 4 | 3 


3 44 


4 8 


10 29 


11 23 


6.2 


5.50 p.m. fj sets. 


322 


18 


F 


6 49 


14 36 4 43 


11 23 


4 27 


9 38 4 


4 4i 


5 4 


11 27 


... 


6.0 


1.00 p.m. (5 $ ^ 


3 2 3 


J 9 


S 


6 50 


14 224 421 


I" 58 


5 20 10 51 


5 


5 4o 


6 2 


18 


30 


5-8 


3.00 A.M. rf j ? 


3 2 4 


20 


s 


651 


14 84 41 


29 


6 IO A.M. 


6 


1 6 4o 


7 3 


1 15 


1 34 


5-7 


0.08 p.m. r]J S. 


325 


21 


M 


6 52 


i3 52 4 4i 


56 


6 58 1 7 


! 7 4i 


8 5 


2 10 


2 37 5- 6 


4.56 p.m. rfl sets. 


326 


22 


Tu 


6 53 


13 36 4 40 


1 23 


7 44 


198 


8 40 


9 5 


3 6 


3 38 5-5 


11.33 p - M - 7 ^ sets. 


327 


23 


W 


6 55 


13 20 4 40 


1 5o 


8 30 


2 16 9 


9 37 i° 1 


3 59 


4 35 


5-8. 


3.00 a.m. c5 9 h 


328 


24 


Th 


6 56 


13 2 4 39 


2 19 


9 i7 


3 20 10 


10 29 10 56 


4 50 


5 29 


6.0 


I.07 P.M. $ S. 


329 


25 


F 


6 57 


12 44 4 38 


1 2 51 10 5 


4 25 11 


In 20 11 45 


5 39 


6 19 


6.2 


8.00 p.m. § gr. H.L.S. 


330 


26 


S 


6 58 


12 25 4 37 


3 28 10 55 


5 29 I2j 


7 


... 


6 26 


7 7 


6.4 


5.39 p.m. § sets. 


33i 


27 


s 


6 59 


12 5 4 37 


4 10 11 46 


6 29 13 


32 


52 


7 13 


7 54 


6-5 


0.15 p.m. 9 S. 


332 


28 


M 


7 


11 45 4 37 


4 56 


A.M. 


7 27 14 1 


1 18 


1 36 


7 57 


8 38 


6-5 


10.59 a - m - 6W a 


333 29 


Tu 7 1 


11 23 4 37 


5 48 


O 38 


8 19 15 


2 


2 18 


8 40 


9 23 


6-5 


4.37 p.m. 9 sets. 


334 


3° 


W 


7 2 


11 2 4 36; 


| 6 42 1 28 9 5 16 


2 41 


2 59 


9 23 


10 2 


6.4 


4.05 a.m. c? S. 



NOVEMBER. 

Mercury ( § ) near the Moon ( d ) Nov. 14, p.m. 
Venus ( 9 ) near the Moon ( ([ ) Nov. 15, p.m. 
Mercury ($) and Venus (9) near 
other November 20. 



each 



AMENDING NEW JERSEY'S CONSTI- 
TUTION. 

At a special election, held in New Jersey on 
Tuesday, September 28th, three amendments to 
the Constitution of the State were submitted to 
the people. These amendments had been passed 
by two successive Legislatures as required by 
law, and the ballot provided for each voter to 
pass on the separate amendments. The total 
vote was very light, and the official returns were 
very much delayed. However, two of the three 
were adopted, the one to fail being the one which 
provided for partial woman suffrage. 

The first amendment is directed against lot- 
teries and gambling on race tracks, but is so 
broad that it will put a check upon many minor 
forms of gambling. Its text is as follows : 

" Amend Paragraph 2 of Section VII of Article 
IV so as to read as follows : 

"2. No lottery shall be authorized by the Legis- 
lature or otherwise in this State, and no ticket in 



any lottery shall be bought or sold within this 
State, nor shall pool-selling, book-making or 
gambling of any kind be authorized or allowed 
within this State, nor shall any gambling device, 
practice or game of chance now prohibited by 
law be legalized, or the remedy, penalty or pun- 
ishment now provided therefor be in any way 
diminished." This was carried by a majority 
of 802. 

The second amendment relates to appoint- 
ments to office, and is intended to put a check 
upon the Governor's power to appoint during the 
recess of the Legislature persons who have been 
nominated by the Senate. Practically it is of 
little effect. 

As 961 rejected ballots were cast, there is some 
doubt as to the fate of the anti-gambling amend- 
ment, Senator Edwards contesting the election 
on the ground that these ballots were irregularly 
rejected. They were rejected because they were 
marked with colored ink or pencils. The general 
election law requires that ballots shall be marked 
with black ink or black pencils. The special 
law under which this election was held does not 
specify the color of the markings, but the ballots 
marked with red or blue pencils were, neverthe- 
less, rejected, and their rejection changed the 
result of the election. 



H 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Twelfth Month.] 



DECEMBER. 



[1898. 



CI 

2 






335 
33 6 
337 
338 
339 
34° 
34i 
342 
343 



5 

-a 






MOON'S PHASES, Philadelphia. 

a?, h. m. d. h. m. ■ 

<[ Last Quarter ... 6 5 6 a.m. | D First Quarter. ..19 10 21 a.m. 
% New Moon 13 6 43 a.m. Q Full Moon 27 6 39 p.m. 



1 Th 

2 F 

3 
4 S 
5M 
6|Tu 

7 W 
8Th 



THE SUN, 
Philadelphia. 



Rises 

A.M. 

h.m. 



344 I0 j s 

345 

346 



nlS 

12 M 

34713TU 
348 1 14 ;W 

349 !l 5jTh 

350 16 F 

35i 17 s 

352 18 S 

353 J 9 M 

354 20 Tu 

355 21 W 

356 22 Th 

357, 2 3 F 

358 24 S 

359 2 5 S 

360 26 M 

361 27 Tu 
362 1 28 W 

363 29 Th 

364 30 F 

365 3 1 S 



Souths Sets 

P.M. 
h.m. 

36 



A.M. 
m. s. 
10 39 
10 16 

9 52 
9 28 

9 3 
8 37 
8 11 



45 
18 

5i 
23 

54 
26 

57 

28 

59 
29 

59 

3° 

o 

3° 
o 
o 30 

P.M. 

o 30 
o 

I 
I 

2 
2 

3 



59 

29 

58 

27 
56 



36j 

36 

35 

35 

35 

35 

35 

35 

36 

3^ 

36 

36 

37 
37 
37 
37 
38 
38 
39 
39 
40 

40 

4i 
41 
42 

43 
43 

43 
44 
45 



THE MOON, 
Philadelphia. 



Rises. 

P.M. 

h. m. 

7 4° 

8 39 

9 37 

10 37 

11 36 

A.M. 

37 



8 29 

9 J 7 
9 57 

10 30 

10 59 

11 27 

11 54 
o 22 
o 

I 

2 
2 

3 

4 
5 



53 
28 

7 

52 
42 
36 

33 

6 31 

7 29 

8 28 



Souths 

A.M. 

h. m. 

2 17 

4 

49 
32 

14 
56 
38 

7 23 

8 11 

4 

1 

4 
8 

*3 

14 
12 

5 
54 

42 

28 

7 15 

8 3 

8 52 

9 42 

10 33 

11 23 

A.M. 

13 

1 o 

1 46 

2 29 



Sets. 

A.M. 
h. m. 

9 47 
10 20 

10 51 

11 17 



42 

6 
30 

57 

2 l 

47 
42 

47 

1 

19 

8 35 

8 49 

11 o 

A.M. 
O 8 



J 3 
17 
22 
22 
21 

14 
2 



44 
8 21 

8 52 

9 21 



» 

be 

«* 

a. 

17 

18 

19 
20 
21 
22 

23 

24 

25 
26 

27! 

28' 
29 

« 
2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 

XOJ 
III 

xa| 

13 

14 
15 
16 

17 

18 



THE TIDES, 
Philadelphia. 



High 

A.M. 
h. m. 

3 22 

4 5 

4 46 

5 3° 

6 16 

7 5 

7 56 

8 48 

9 39 
10 33 
11 

o 
o 

I 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 



26 
20 
46 
40 

35 
3 1 

2S 

25 
22 

7 19 

8 14 



9 
10 



10 51 

39 

4 

50 
34 
15 
56 
36 



11 

o 
o 

I 

2 
2 



Tide. 

P.M. 

h. m. 



39 
18 

59 
42 

3° 

16 

8 

2 

59 

10 551 

11 5°i 



Low 

A.M. 
h. m. 
10 4 

10 46 

11 28 



12 

5 



1 
2 
3 
3 
4 
5 

6 42 

7 40 

8 36 

9 3i 

10 25 

11 16 



6 

49 

34 
20 
10 
o 
54 
44 
38 

7 3o 

8 25 



Tide, k^ 

P.M. ■g'S 
I A. m.\^-% 

10 43! 6.2 

11 25! 6.0 

... 5.9 

J 3;5-7 

1 



Phenomena. 



d Apo., 2d. 3I1. A.M. 

d Per., i4d. 8h. a.m. 
([Apo.,29d. ih. p.m. 
1.20 p.m. § 



o 9 20 

53 i° 17 
48;" 

44; © 
o 
1 
2 

3 
4 

5 
5 
6 

7 



I 



24 
8 

49 
29 
10 9 

49 i° 



16 
16 
5i 
42 
36 
27 
20 
9 
59 
45 
30 



8 15 

8 57 

36 

16 



5-5 
54 ! 5-4 l 
5ij 5-4 I 
50! 5-5 
505-7! 
47 5-8 
44 6.0 

7 38 6.1 

8 31 6.2 

9 23 6.2 ' 

10 15 6.2 

11 7 6.1 [ 
11 58 6.1 j 

... 5.8 
17 5-6 
I6J5-6 1 
15 5-7 
10 5-9 
4 6.0 

55 6-2 
43 6.3 
29 6.3 
8 13 6.3 

8 55 6.3 

9 34 6.3 
10 12, 6.2 
10 51] 6.1 



9 



5.49 P.M. 

4. CO P.M. 
4.20 P.M. 
II. 18 A.M. 
2.00 P.M. (5 
3.54 P.M. $ 

: 3.36 A.M. 

I.03 A.M. 



S. 

sets. 

gr. El. E. 

™Q 
S. 

h 

sets. 
dTS. 

1. 00 p.M.cf stationary. 

4.00 a.m. 5 stationary, 
©Eclipsed. Invis.atPhila. 
i4d. 8.05 a.m. <5 d 

8.00 p.m. § in Q, [close. 
10.26 a.m. c? sets. 

8.23 a.m. If 1 S. 

1.43 p.m. 11 sets. 
11.09 a.m. ^2 S. 

3.51 p.m. lj sets. 

6.00 p.m. 9 stationary. 
I 2.00 p.m. Winter com. 
10.06 a.m. Ifl S. 
11.33 p.m § S. 



3.14 P.M 
9.45 A.M 
4.05 P.M 



§ sets. 
$S. 



([Eclipsed. Yis. at Phila. 
2.40 p.m. $ sets. 

9.40 a.m. 5, cf a 

I.58 A.M. (-? S. 

3.00 a.m. $ stationary. 



DECEMBER. 

Mercury ( § ) greatest elongation east Decem- 
ber 3. p.m. Visible after sunset. 

Sun (0) eclipsed December 12. Invisible at 
Philadelphia. 

Mercury ($) very near the Moon ( C. ) De- 
cember 14, A.M. 

Winter commences December 21, p.m. 

Moon (([) eclipsed December 27. Visible. 



ASSASSINATION OF PREMIER CAN- 
OVAS, OF SPAIN. 

On Sunday, August 8th, Senor Canovas del 
Castillo, Prime Minister of Spain, was shot and 
killed by an Italian anarchist named Angiollio. 
The assassination took place at Santa Agueda, a 
small watering resort, where the Premier was 
sojourning during the parliamentary vacation. 
The object of the murderer is not fully known, 
but it is supposed that it was of purely individual 
origin. 

Senor Canovas had been Spain's foremost 
statesman for many years, and was the prime 
factor in securing to the present reigning family 
its position in Spain. The Queen Regent, imme- 
diately upon receipt of the news of the death of 



the Prime Minister, designated General Marcelo 
Azcarraga, the Minister of War, as the head of 
the Cabinet. The Ministry as so constituted 
lasted throughout the summer, but it was recog- 
nized as being only a temporary arrangement. 
It was apparent that General Azcarraga could 
not unite the Conservatives, and on September 
29th the Cabinet resigned. On October 4th, 
Senor Sagasta, the Liberal leader, formed a Lib- 
eral Cabinet. The new Prime Minister announced 
as his policy great activity against the Cuban 
insurgents, reforms and the introduction of home 
rule in Cuba, and the recall of General Weyler. 
On October 31 General Blanco arrived at Ha- 
vana and assumed command as Captain Gen- 
eral. General Weyler sailed the same day for 
Spain, but was delayed by an accident to the 
machinery of his vessel. 



Aluminum cannot be engraved in its ordi- 
nary condition, but if moistened with a mixture 
of rum and olive oil all difficulty disappears. 



Bamboo and bamboo wares are important ar- 
ticles of export from Japan. The larger part of 
the export goes to England. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



15 



CHURCHES AND RELIGIOUS SER- 
VICES IN PHILADELPHIA. 

[Corrected to November 8, 1897.] 

When not otherwise stated, the hours of service 
are — xo Y / 2 morning and 7^ evening. 

The Public Ledger, on Saturday of each week, 
contains a summary of the Religious News of the 
week, embracing important facts relating to all de- 
nominations, Selections of Religious Thought and 
a department devoted to Sunday-school Lessons. 

On Saturdays the Ledger contains advertise- 
ments of the Religious Services of the principal 
churches. 

BAPTIST. 

American Baptist Publication Society, 1420 

Chestnut. 
Baptist Home, Seventeenth and Norris : Mrs. 

Levi Knowles, President, 126 N. Eighteenth ; 

Mrs. Charles H. Banes, Treasurer, 2021 Spring 

Garden ; Mrs. E. B. Palmer, Cor. Secretary ; 

Mrs. J. G. Walker, Recording Secretary. 
Baptist Orphanage, Angora, Philadelphia : Mrs. 

B. Griffith, President of the Board of Managers, 
2038 Chestnut; Miss Ida E. Paul, Cor. Sec, 
6769 Main, Germantown; Mrs. H. N. Story, 
Treasurer, 1533 Poplar. 

Baptist Training School for Christian Work, 762 
S. Tenth ; Mrs. John Miller, President, Roselle, 
N. J. ; Mrs. B. MacMackin, Cor. Sec. Board 
of Trustees, Fifty-eighth and Baltimore a v. ; 
Mrs. Emma M. Dennithorne, Treasurer, 762 
S. Tenth. 

Philadelphia Editor of the Examiner, New 
York, Rev. H. L. Wayland, D. D., 511 South 
Forty-second. 

Officers in American Baptist Publication So- 
ciety Building. 

Rev. A. J. Rowland, D.D.. General Secretary and 
Asst. Treasurer; Rev. R. G. Seymour, D. D., 
Bible and Missionary Secretary ; Rev. O. F. 
Flippo, D. D., District Secretary Publication 
Society; Rev. Philip L. Jones, D. D., Book 
Editor; Rev. C. R. Blackall, D. D., Office 
Editor of Periodicals ; M. Strien, Business 
Manager ; Rev. Frank S. Dobbins, District 
Secretary American Baptist Missionary Union; 
Rev. E. B. Palmer, D. D., District Secretary 
Home Mission Society ; Rev. W. H. Conard, 
D. D., Cor. Sec. Pennsylvania State Mission 
Society; Rev. G. M. Spratt, D. D., Cor. Sec. 
Education Society, 2025 Brandy wine; Rev. 
Leroy Stephens, D. D., Financial Agent Edu- 
cation Society, Lewisburg. Baptist City Mis- 
sion : B. F. Dennisson, President, Rev. B. 
MacMackin, General Secretary. American 
Baptist Historical Society : President, Rev. 
Lemuel Moss, D. D., 3114 Berks; Secretary, 
Rev. B. MacMackin ; Treasurer, H. E. Lin- 
coln. Woman's Foreign Missionary Society of 
Pennsylvania: President, Mrs. F. W. Tustin; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Charles H. Banes ; Cor. Sec, 
Mrs. M. R. Trevor; Rec Sec, Mrs. S. M. 
Miller; General Secretary, Mrs. H. N. Jones. 

. Woman's Home Mission Union of Philadelphia 
and Vicinity: President, Mrs. J. G. Walker; 
Treasurer, Miss M. A. I. Hart; Cor. Sec, Mrs. 

C. H. Woolston; Rec. Sec, Mrs. C. W. Ray. 

Alleghany Avenue, Frankford and Alleghany 
avs. : Rev. J. G. Booker, 1840 E. Alleghany av. 
io l / 2 a.m., jy 2 p.m. 



Alpha Mission, 2433 Mascher : Edward G. 
Wentzell, supt., 2508 Fairhill. 10% a.m., 4 p.m. 

Angora, Fifty-ninth and Baltimore av. : Ray- 
mond W. Davis. 

Baltimore Avenue, Baltimore av. and Fifty- 
second : Rev. Joseph A. Bennett, 1013 S. Fifty- 
first. 10% a.m., 8 P.M. 

Belmont Avenue, Belmont and Westminster 
avs. : Rev. A. F. Williamson, 4229 Otter, ioj^ 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Bethany, Fox Chase : Rev. John E. Craig, 
Angora. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Bethel (German), Susquehanna av. and Law- 
rence : Rev. John Linker, Torresdale. 

Bethesda, Fifth and Venango: Rev. Albert L. 
Miller, 806 W. Somerset, ioj^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Bethlehem, Eighteenth and York : Rev. F. W. 
Farr, 1516 Lehigh av. 

Bethsaida (colored), Twentieth and Tasker : 
Rev. J. B. Randolph, 2013 Fernon. 

Blockley. Fifty-third ab. Haverford : Rev. 
Sumner W. Stevens, 5513 Hunter's av. 10% 
a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Broad Street, S. E. cor. Broad and Brown : 
Rev. Henry Boas Rankin, 1513 Brown. 10^4 

A.M., ■]% P.M. 

Byberry Chapel, Byberry: M. G. Bailey. 
Calvary, Fifth bel. Carpenter : Rev. W. J. 
Cambron, D. D., 1341 S. Fifth, ioj^ A. m., 7^ 

P.M. 

Cherry Street (colored), Cherry bel. Eleventh: 
Rev. W. A. Creditt. 11 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Chester Avenue, Chester av. and Forty-sixth : 
Rev. W. H. R. Corlies, Forty-fourth and Osage 



av. ioy 2 a.m., 7% P.M. 



and Bethlehem 
10% a.m., 7% 



Pike: 
p.m. : 



Chestnut Hill, Main 
Rev. R. M. Hunsicker 
summer, 8 P.M. 

Covenant, Fourth ab. Columbia av. : Rev. 
I. W. Goodhue, 1835 Franklin. 

Christ Mission, Front and Snyder av. : supt., 
J. W. Snow, 2019 S. Seventh. 

Diamond Street, Thirty-first and Diamond : 
Rev. Charles Warwick, 1949 N. Thirty-first. 
xo l / 2 A.M., i l / 2 P.M. 

East, Hanover and Girard av. : Rev. C. H. 
Woolston, 427 Richmond. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

East Side, Woodbine av. and Boyer, German- 
town : A. G. Patton, superintendent, East 
Coulter. 

Ebenezer (colored), Mt. Vernon bel. Broad: 
Rev. Alexander Childs, 1819 Addison, n a.m., 
8 p.m. 

Eleventh, N. W. cor. Twenty-first and Dia- 
mond. io)/ 2 a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Epiphany, cor. Chestnut and Thirty-sixth : 
Rev. Wayland Hoyt, D. D., 3604 Chestnut. 
10^ a.m., i l / 2 p.m. ; April to October, 7^ p.m. 

Fairhill, Lehigh av. bel. Sixth : Rev. C. E. 
McClellan, 2815 N. Sixth. ioJ£ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Falls of Schuylkill, Queen ab. Ridge av. 

Fifth, Eighteenth and Spring Garden : Rev. 
W. T. Chase, D. D., 2117 Green. io%- a.m. 

-] l / 2 P.M. 

Fiftieth, Seventh and Susquehanna av. : Rev. 



\o]/ 2 A.M., 



Charles H. Thomas, 2121 N. Seventh 
7 l / 2 P.M. 

First. N.W. cor. Broad and Arch : Rev 
B. Tupper, D. D., 202 S. Thirty-ninth ; 
George Dana Boardman, D. D., LL. D. 
orary pastor, 1023 Farragut Terrace. to 1 / 2 a.m., 
lYt, P.M. 



Ken- 
Rev. 

hon- 



16 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



First Swedish, St. George's Hall, Thirteenth 
and Arch : Rev. S. Svenson, 1524 McKean. 

First German, Sixth ab. Poplar : Rev. L. C. 
Knuth, 2131 N. Ninth. 

First, Germantown, Price nr. Main : Rev. 
Charles Colman, 206 Price. io 1 ^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Second, Germantown, Main cor. Upsal : io 1 ^ 
A.M., 7% p.m.; summer, 8 p.m. 

Third, Germantown, cor. Wister and Wake- 
field : Rev. Ransom Harvey, 18 Mechlin. 10% 
a.m., 7% P-M. 

Fourth, cor. Fifth and Buttonwood : Rev. John 

B. G. Pidge, D. D., 505 Green. io^ a.m., 7 l / 2 

P.M. 

Frankford, cor. Paul and Unity : Rev. G. J. 
Burchett, Ph. D., 1510 Harrison. io 1 ^ a.m., 7 l / 2 

P.M. 

Frankford Avenue, cor. Frankford av. and 
Aramingo : Rev. Charles F. Winbigler, 2752 
Frankfordav. ioJ^a.m.. 7'^ p.m.; summer, 8p.m. 

Gethsemane, Columbia av. and Fighteenth. 

Grace, Broad and Berks: Rev. Russell H. 
Conwell, D. D., 2020 N. Broad ; Rev. George A. 
Peltz, D. D., asst., 1821 N. Twenty-second, io 1 2 
a.m., 734 P.M. 

Haddington, Fifty-eighth and Race : Rev. 
N. H. Hester. 

Haines Street, Germantown : Robert Coulter, 
supt., 5013 Hancock. 

Hebron, Vine and Fifty-sixth : Rev. Homer A. 
King, Haverford av. and Fifty-third. io'/ 2 a.m., 

Holmesburg, Holmesburg : Rev. S. P. Davis, 
Holmesburg. io}j a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Holy Trinity, Bainbridgeab. Eighteenth 
G. L. P. Taliaferro, 1641 Fitzwater. \o l / 2 
iVi P.M. 

* House of Prayer, 2109 Columbia av. : 
Robert Harkinson. 

Immanuel, Twenty-third and Summer, Mission 
of First Church : Rev. Thomas A. LK>yd, 3931 
Aspen. 10 ' 2 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Lehigh Avenue, Lehigh av. and Twelfth : Rev. 
Raymond M. West, 2634 Jessup. 10^2 a.m., 
8 p.m. 

Lower Dublin, Bustleton : Rev. Thomas P. 
Holloway, Bustleton. 

Lower Dublin Mission, Sandiford, Bustleton 
pike. 

Macedonia (colored), Paschal: Rev. J. T. 
Johnson, 73 North, Paschal. 

Manatawna, Upper Roxborough : Rev. J. 
Alexander Clyde. io}£ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Manayunk, Green lane bel. Silverwood: Rev. 

C. E. Cordo, Green lane bel. Silverwood. 10^ 
a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Mantua, Fortieth and Fairmount av. : Rev. J. 
G. Walker, D. D., 649 N. Fortieth. \o\ 2 a.m., 
7% p.m.; summer, 8 P.M. 

Mantua Church Mission, Fortieth and Girard 
av. : supt., G. W. Harlan, 3902 Brown. 

Mariners' Bethel, Front bel. Christian, Mission 
of Snyder av. Church, Rev. G. W. SheiD, 2314 
N. Eighth. 

Memorial, N. E. cor. Broad and Master, io 1 ^ 
a.m., 7^2 pm. 

Messiah, Dauphin west of Amber : Rev. George 
Boddis, 2330 Coral. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Monumental (colored), Forty-first and Lud- 
low : Rev. Alexander Gordon, 4064 Haverford 
av. io l £ a.m., jY x p.m. 

• Not a recognized Baptist Church. 



Rev. 

A.M., 

Rev. 



Mount Vernon, Umbria ab. Hermitage, Man- 
ayunk ; Rev. William L. Haines, 144 Hermitage, 
Manayunk. 

Mount Zion, Germantown (colored): Rev. 
Morton Winston, 164 Queen. 

New Tabernacle, Chestnut ab. Fortieth: Rev. 
George E. Rees, D. D., 41 16 Baltimore av. io$£ 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Nicetown, Germantown av. and Brunner : Rev. 
Charles A. Soars, 3619 N. Fifteenth. io l / 2 a.m., 
7^ p.m. 

North, Twenty-third and Oxford: Rev. W. 
Ward Willis, 1934 N. Twenty-fourth. *ai% a.m. 
7 l / 2 p.m.; April to October, 8 p.m. 

North Frankford, Frankford av. nr. Harrison. 



Rev. R. B. McDanel, Oak Lane. 

P.M. 

Sixth and Federal : Rev. B. F. 
D., 1139 Wharton. io'4 a.m., 



Oak Lane : 

IO^ A.M., 7 l / 2 

Olivet, cor. 
Liepsner, Ph. 

7% P.M. 

Passyunk, Passyunk west of Broad : Rev. H. 
B. Harper, 1124 McKean. 10% A.M., 7% p.m. 

Pilgrim, Twenty-third and Christian : Rev. 
Henry Parrish, D. D., F. R. H. S., M. D., 628 
S. Nineteenth. 10^ a.m., 7 l / 2 p. m. 

Point Breeze Avenue Mission, Twenty-second 
and Point Breeze av. : Rev. F. J. Jones, 4835 
Walton av. 

Powelton Avenue, Powelton av. ab. Thirty- 
sixth : Rev. W. T. Harris, 4840 Mulberry, F rank- 
ford. 

Providence (colored), 4030 Lancaster av.: Rev. 
W. H. Davenport, 119 S. Thirty-seventh. io l / 2 

A.M., 7 r 4 P.M. 

Richmond, Neff and Clifton : Rev. Thomas 
L. Lewis, 2549 Neff. 10^ A.M., 7% p.m. 

Roxborough, Ridge av. nr. Lyceum av. : Rev. 
James W. Willmarth. D. D., LL.D., 4401 Ridge 
av. 10J2 a.m., 7^2 P.M. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

St. Paul (colored), Eighth bel. Girard av.: 
Rev. E. W. Johnson, 1528 Walter. 

Second, Seventh bel. Girard av. : Rev. John 
Gordon, D. D., 3319 N. Twenty-first. 10^ 

A.M., 7 l/ 2 P.M. 

Second (colored) (Frankford), Mulberry nr. 
Meddow : Rev. J. A. Sumlar. 10^ a.m., 8 p.m. 

Second (German), Hancock ab. Dauphin: Rev. 
William Kuhn, Hancock ab. Dauphin. 

Second, Nicetown ( colored ), Germantown av., 
Nicetown : Rev. J. H. Gordon, 4451 Green, Ger- 
mantown. 

Shiloh (colored), Lombard ab. Eleventh : Rev. 
Wm. H. Phillips, D. D., 1124 Carpenter. \o)/ 2 
a.m., 7V2 P.M. 

Snyder Avenue, Seventh and Snyder av : Rev. 
J. Wesley Sullivan, 708 Snyder av. 10% a.m., 
7 l / 2 P.M. 

South Broad Street, S. W. cor. Broad and 
Reed : Rev. G. W. Folwell, 1339 Reed, io*4. 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Southeast, Moore bel. Second : Rev. Percival 
H. Lynch, 3133 Mantua av. 10%. A.M., 7^ P.M 

Spring Garden, Nineteenth and Master: Rev. 
Robert M. Green, 1844 Master, 10% a.m., 7% 
p.m. ; April to October, 8 p.m. 

Spruce Street, Spruce bel. Fifth : Rev. A. 
Lincoln Moore, D. D., 902 Reed, io 1 ^ a.m., 

7Kp-M 

Tabernacle, Germantown (colored). Coulter: 
Rev. James D. Brooks. Penn and Baird. 

Tacony. cor. Washington and Hagerman : 
Rev. Enoch Fullaway, 127 Page, Phila. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



17 



Temple, N.W. cor. Tioga and Twenty-second: 



Rev. P. H. Goldsmith, 2227 Venango 

A.M., 7% P.M. 

Tenth, Eighth ab. Green : 
dell, D. D., 821 N. Seventh, 
summer, 8 p.m. 

Third, Broad and Ritner 
bers, 2309 S. Sixteenth. io*4 a.m.. 8 p.m. 



10 



Rev. John W. Wed- 

iYa, p m - ; 



1oy 2 A.M 



Rev. Adam Cham- 



CATHOLIC APOSTOLIC CHURCH. 

Catholic Apostolic Church, 218 N. Thirteenth : 
0. M. Van Arsdale, 809 N. Thirty-ninth. 10 a.m., 
A l A p.m. 

CHURCH OF GOD. 

Church of God, Germantown av. and Berks : 
Rev. W. N. Yates, 917 Huntingdon, xo]/ 2 a.m., 



Thirty-fourth Street, Thirty-fourth and Haver- yi^ p.m.; summer, 8 p.m 



ford: Rev. J.W. Riddle, 525 N. Thirty-fourth. 



Sixth : Rev. G. 



T.O l / 2 A.M., jY A P.M. 

Third German, Dickinson ab. 
Knobloch, 807 Morris. 

Tioga, Broad bel. Tioga : Rev. Rutger Dox, 
Sixteenth and Westmoreland. 

Trinity, Poplar ab. Twenty-seventh: Rev. H. 
R. Myers, 816 N. Twenty-eighth. 10^ a.m., 7% 
p.m.; summer, 8 p.m. 

Union (colored), Twelfth bel. Bainbridge: Rev. 
J. L. Barksdale, 716 S. Seventeenth. ioy 2 a.m., 
7^ p.m. 

White Hall, Tacony bel. Bridge: Rev. \V 

D. Thatcher, 5326 Tacony. ioj4 a.m., 7% p.m. 
Wissahickon, Terrace ab. Dawson : Rev. H. 

P. Aston, Kalos. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. ; April to 
October, 7^ p.m. 

Woodlawn Av. Mission, Sixty-second and 
Woodland av. 

Wyoming Mission, Second ab. Wyoming av. : 
Rev. James French, 2151 N. Ninth; Rev. 
John A. Hookway, asst., Louden nr. Old Sec- 
ond, Olney. 8 p. m. 

Zion (colored), Thirteenth ab. Wallace: Rev. 

E. W. Moore, 1131 Ogden. 

CAMDEN AND VICINITY. 

Baptist City Mission : Rev. A. G. Lawson, 
President. 

Bethany, North Cramer Hill: Rev. George A. 
Sowell. 

Emmanuel, Fourth and Mount Vernon : Rev. 
John Snape. 

First, Cramer Hill, cor. Cooper av. and Master : 
J .W. Beavan. 

First, Fourth bel. Market : Rev. John W. 
Lyell, 419 Linden, ioj/o a.m., 7J4 p.m.; summer, 
7% P.M. 

First, Gloucester City : Rev. G. W. Lambourn, 
Gloucester City. 1054 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Liberty Park Chapel : Rev. John Lewis. 

Linden, Ninth and Linden: Rev. W. G. Rus- 
sell, 935 Cooper. 

North, Fourth and Linden : Rev. Albert G. 
Lawson, D. D., 428 Linden. 

Tabernacle, Broadway bel. Spruce : Rev. > 
Matthew M. Finch, 570 Berkley. 

Third, Broadway ab. Vanhook : Rev. George 
Hine. 

Trinity, Fifth ab. Market : Rev. Clarence 
A. Adams, D. D.. pastor. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Rosedale, Burlington road ab. Cove road: Rev. 
C. M. Read. 

Seventh, Kaighn's av. : Rev. William Troy. 

Wynn Memorial Chapel, mission First Church, 
Spruce nr. Eighth : Rev. Geo. W. Hatch, 571 
Pine. 

Haddonfield, First Church: Rev. H. A. 
Griesemer. 

BIBLE CHRISTIANS. 

Christ Church, Park av. bel. Berks : Rev. 
Henry S. Clubb, 1023 Foulkrod, Station F. 10^* 
A.M 



CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN. 

First, Dauphin ab. Broad : Rev. T. T. Myers, 
2414 N. Seventeenth. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Germantown, Germantown av. ab. Sharpnack : 
Rev. George N. Falkenstein, 6611 Germantown 
av. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

The Br^hren Church, Tenth bel. Dauphin : 
Elder, Rev. Isaac D. Bowman, 819 W. Cumber- 
land ; J. M. Bowman, 819 W. Cumberland, asst. 
\o l / 2 a.m., 7% p.m. 

CONGREGATIONAL 

Philadelphia Conference of Congregational 
Churches: Moderator, Rev. Chas. H. Richards, 
D. D., 2033 Green ; Scribe, John Edmunds, 
1828 Mount Vernon. Meets February, June 
and November. 

Philadelphia Association of Congregational Min- 
isters : Moderator, Rev. T. W. Jones, D. D., 
511 Woodland Terrace; Secretary, Rev. 
Moseley H. Williams, 1122 Chestnut. Meets 
March, June, September and December. 

Congregational Home Missionary Society, Mid- 
dle District: supt., Rev. T. W. Jones, D. D., 
511 Woodland Terrace. 

Congregational Church Building Society : State 
Secretary, Rev. Charles H. Richards, D. D. 

Central, Eighteenth and Green: Rev. Charles 
H. Richards, D. D., 2033 Green. ioj^ a.m., 
l l A p-m. 

First, Germantown, cor. Seymour and Lynch : 
Rev. Dwight E. Marvin, 5336 Wayne av., Ger- 
mantown. IO% A.M., 8 P.M. 

Kensington, cor. C and Indiana av. : Rev. 
Neils N. Bormose, 3037 C. ioj^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Norwegian, Front and Union : 4 p.m.; Wednes- 
day, 8 P.M. 

Park, Thirty-second and Montgomery av. : 
Rev. Clinton B. Adams, 3012 Diamond. xo x / 2 
a.m., 7^ p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Pilgrim, Marlborough and Belgrade : Rev. 
Harry W. Myers. 

Snyder Avenue, Third and Snyder av. : Rev. 
Franklin E. Wieder, 431 Snyder av. 10^ a.m., 
7^ p.m. 

Swedish Assembly of Brethren, 304 N. Broad : 
Rev. A. P. Ljungberg, 833 N. Twenty-seventh. 
10^ A.M., 7 l /t p.m. 

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST. 
First Church, cor. Berks and Mervine : Rev. 
Allan B. Philputt, 1846 N. Twelfth. 10^ a.m., 

■Z l / 2 , 8 P.M. 

First Church Mission, Front and Silver, Ken- 
sington : Caspar C. Garrigues, 2716 A. \o]/ 2 

A.M., 2 l / 2 , 8 P.M. 

Third Church, Lancaster av. and Aspen : Rev. 
Wallace C. Payne, 854 N. Forty-second. io l / 2 
A.M., 8 P.M. 

Philadelphia Conference of Christian Churches: 
President, Rev. Joseph Taylor, 1616 Oxiord; Sec- 
retary. Rev. E. E. Mitchell, 2041 Brandy wine. 



i8 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



ETHICAL CULTURE. 

Society for Ethical Culture, New Century Hall, 
124 S. Twelfth : S. Burns Weston, director, 1305 
Arch. Lectures, 11 a.m.; children's ethical 
classes, 9^ a.m., at Society rooms, 1305 Arch. 

EVANGELICAL ASSOCIATION. 

Bishop, Rev. J. J. Escher, Chicago. 

Rev. J. Steltzer, 2349 Woodstock, Presiding 
Elder, Philadelphia District, Atlantic Conference. 
German. 

Rev. W. A. Leopold, Allentown, Presiding 
Elder, Philadelphia District, East Pennsylvania 
Conference. English. 

Emanuel, Fourth bel. Poplar: Rev. J. G. 
Scharf, 864 N. Sixth. 10^ A.M., 73-2 p.m. German. 

Ninth Street Church, Ninth nr. York : Rev. 
William Frank Kline. A. B., 527 W. Dauphin. 
ioy 2 a.m., 7^4 p.m. English. 

Salem, Ninth bel. Morris : Rev. C. C. Weber, 
1 718 S. Ninth. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. German. 

Sixth, cor. Fifth and Indiana av. : H. P. Boll, 
2946 Fairhill. 10^ a.m.. j 1 / 2 p.m. German. 

St. John, cor. Sixth and Dauphin : Rev. J. 
Philip Schnatz, 574 W. Dauphin. ioj£ a.m., -]]/ 2 
p.m. German. 

St. Paul, Germantown av. ab. Butler: Rev. J. 
H Fenner. 3821 Germantown av. io}4 a.m., j 1 / 2 
p.m. German. 

Zion, Thompson nr. Ash : Rev. H. F. Boll, 
2946 Fairhill. 3 P.M. German. 

Zion, Rittenhouse ab. Adams, Germantown: 
Rev. Adam Reanick, 112 Rittenhouse. 11 
a.m., 8 p.m. English. 

CAMDEN. 

Zion, Camden, cor. Berkley and William : 
Rev. Henry Heme. ioj£ a.m., 7^ p.m. 



FRIENDS (Orthodox). 

Philadelphia Monthly Meeting, S. E. cor. 
Fourth and Arch and S. W. cor. Washington 
Square, or Orange ab. Seventh. — Ministers : 
Joseph S. Elkinton, 325 Pine ; Ruth S. Abbott, 
1823 Filbert; Edwin P. Sellew, Lansdowne ; 
and Joseph Elkinton, Media, Delaware co. Ser- 
vices : Arch st. House, 10 a.m. on Fifth days; 
Orange st. House, First days, 10 a.m., 3^ p.m. 

Forty-second and Powelton av.. West Phila- 
delphia : First day only, 10^ a.m. Ministers : 
Hannah Arnett, 752 N. Forty-third ; Rebecca 
Ann Cooper, 117 Claymont. 

Northern District, Sixth and Noble : First day, | 
10 A.M. ; Third day, 10 A.M. ; winter, 3 p.m. ; 
summer, 4 p.m., except middle of Sixth to mid- 
dle of Ninth month. Ministers : Rebecca Ann 
Cooper, 117 Claymont; Abigail Vail, Media, Pa.; 
Benjamin Vail, Media, Pa. 

Germantown, Main and Coulter : First day, io*4 
a.m.; weekdays, 10 A..M.; 7% P.M. winter. Min- 
isters : William Kite, 7 W. Coulter; Samuel Mor- 
ris, Olney, Philadelphia; Samuel Emlen, Coulter 
nr. Green; Elizabeth Allen, 3216 N. Sixteenth. 

Western District, Twelfth bel. Market : First 
day and Fourth day, 10^2 a.m. ; First day, 7% 
p.m., except middle of Sixth to middle of Ninth 
month. Ministers : John H. Dillingham, 140 
N. Sixteenth; Hannah Arnett, 752 N. Forty- 
third; Arabella E. Winn, Narbeth, Pa. 

Frankford Meeting, Orthodox and Penn : First 
day, 10 a.m. Minister: David Heston, Leiper^ 
and Oxford rd., Frankford. 



FRIENDS. 

Byberry, Thirty-fifth Ward: First and Fifth 
days, 10 a.m. Watson Tomlinson, Ellen Croas- 
dale Tomlinson, and Nathaniel Richardson, By- 
berry. 

Fair Hill, Tenth and Cambria : First day, 3^ 
p.m. ; First-day school, 2 p.m. 

Frankford, Unity and Wain: \oV 2 a.m.; First 
day school, g% a.m. 

Girard av. and Seventeenth : First and Third 
days, 10% a.m. (Latter omitted Seventh and 
Eighth months.) Margaret P. Howard, 1708 
Race; Isaac H. Hillborn, 1305 Somerset; Han- 
nah W.Linton, 1835 Park av. First-day school, 
9 A.M. 

Green and Fourth : First and Fifth days, 10^ 
A.M. Rachel N. Mather. 1737 N. Fifteenth; 
Edwin L. Pierce, Moorestown, N. J. ; Anna 
Smith, 2445 Oxford. 

Race st. Meeting, Race ab. Fifteenth : First 
and Fourth days, io^ a.m. First-day school 
and conference after meeting. Samuel S. Ash, 
1 71 7 Vine; Phoebe W. Foulke, Matilda E. Janney, 
1515 Centennial av. 

School st., Germantown: First and Fourth 
days, 10^ a.m. Lydia H. Price, 6107 Hancock. 
First-day school, 9 a.m. 

Spruce, cor. Ninth : First and Fifth days. io}4 
a.m.i Meetings suspended Sixth, Seventh, Eighth 
and Ninth months. ) 

West Philadelphia, Thirty-fifth and Lancaster 
av. : First day in summer, io 1 ^ a.m. ; n a.m., 
rest of year. First day school, q\/ 2 a.m., 
Anne S. Clothier, 3221 Hamilton ; Harriet E. 
Kirk, 3523 Powelton av. ; Samuel Jones, 1343 
S. Forty-sixth. 

United First-day evening meetings at 7^ p.m. 
In First, Fourth, Ninth and Twelfth months, at 
Race ab. Fifteenth ; in Second, Fifth and Tenth 
months, at Fourth and Green ; in Third, Sixth. 
and Eleventh months, at northwest corner of 
Seventeenth and Girard av., excepting First 
month 30, Fifth month 29, Tenth month 30, when 
the meeting will be at Thirty-fifth and Lancaster 
av., and Fifth month 8, a meeting at all four 
houses. 

FRIENDS (Professing Original Principles) 

Olive ab. Eleventh : First and Fourth days, 10 
a.m. Minister : Joseph E. Maule, 805 Windsor 
Square. 

JEWISH. 

Adath Jeshurun, Seventh ab. Columbia av. : 
Rev. Henry Iliowizi, rabbi, 2127 Gratz ; Rev. A. 
Gross, reader, 1914 Mervine. Friday, 8 p.m. ; 
Saturday, 10 a.m. 

Beth Elohim, Sixteenth and Columbia av.: 
Mr. Jacob Rubel, 1620 N. Broad. 

Beth Israel, Eighth ab. Master: Rev. Dr. J. 
B. Grossman, 1942 N. Sixth. Friday, in winter, 
8 p.m.; summer, before sunset; Saturday, 9% 
a.m. summer; 10 a.m. winter. 

B'nai Abraham, Lombard ab. Fifth : Rev. B. 
Lewinthal, Eighth ab. South ; Rev. Marcus 
Greenblatt, reader. 

B'nai Jacob, Lombard ab. Fourth : Rev. Mor- 
decai Schatz, reader. Daily : morning at 6, eve- 
ning at dusk ; Saturday and holy days : morning 
at 8, evening at dusk. 

Emmath Israel — Oheb Shalom, Fifth and Gas- 
kill : Rev. Dr. Moses Weinberger, 1017 S. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



19 



Third ; Rev. M. Garfunkel, reader, 424 Gaskill. 
Saturday, 8 to 11 a.m., 4 to 6 p.m. 

Jewish Foster Home Synagogue, Mill, Ger- 
mantown : Rev. S. M. Fleischman, residence in 
building. 

Jewish Hospital Synagogue, Olney road nr. 
York pike : Rev. Moses Cohen and Rev. L. Saen- 
ger, residence in building. Saturdays and holy 
days, 9 to n a.m., 4 to 4^ p.m. 

Keneseth Israel. Broad ab. Columbia av. : Rev. 
Dr. Joseph Krauskopf, 104 E. Upsal, German- 
town ; Rev. J. Leonard Levy,asso. rabbi, 1828 N. 
Sixteenth; Rev: William Armhold, reader, 1723 
N. Sixteenth. Saturday, 10% a.m. ; Sunday, 
10% A.M. 

Mickve Israel, Seventh ab. Arch : Rev. S. 
Morais, LL.D., 546 N. Fifth. Saturday, 9 a.m., 
and about sunset Friday, Saturday and other 
evenings. 

Rodeph Shalom, Broad and Mount Vernon : 
Rev. M. Jastrow, Ph. D., rabbi emeritus, Upsal, 
Germantown ; Rev. Dr. Henry Berkowitz, 1539 
N. Thirty-third; Rev. Wm. Loewenberg, reader, 
1421 N. Seventh; L. Schlesinger, assistant reader 
and superintendent, 1331 N. Sixth. Friday, 8 p.m.; 
in summer, before sunset; Saturday, 10 A.M. 

Sons of Halberstam, New Market ab. Poplar. 



LATTER-DAY SAINTS. 

(Anti-Polygamous.) 

Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ, Hun- 
tingdon Hall, cor. Fifth and Huntingdon : Rev. 
A. H. Parsons, 31 12 Weymouth ; Rev. Hosea H. 
Bacon, 315 East G. 11 a.m., 7% p.m. 



LUTHERAN. 

Board of Foreign Missions of the General Council : 
President, Rev. H. Grahn, D. D. ; English Sec- 
retary, Rev. J. L. Sibole ; German Secretary, 
Rev. E. H. Pohle; Cor. Sec, Rev. William 
Ashmead Schaeffer, D. D., Station G, Phila. ; 
Treasurer, William H. Staake, Esq., Franklin 
Building, Twelfth ab. Walnut. Meets in Lu- 
theran Publication Rooms, 1204 Walnut, on the 
fourth Monday of each month, at 2^ P.M. 

Committee of the General Council on Home 
Missions. 

English. — Board of Home Missions of General 
Council: Chairman, Rev. J. A. Seiss, D. D., 
LL.D., 1338 Spring Garden; Secretary, Rev. 
Samuel Laird, D. D., 1314 Spring Garden. 

Theological Seminary, Mount Airy, Philada. — 
Faculty: Rev. H: E.Jacobs, D.D., LL.D., Mt. 
Airy ; Rev. A. Spaeth. D.D., LL.D., Mt. Airy ; 
Rev. Jacob Fry, D. D., Mt. Airy; Rev. George 
F. Spieker, D. D. ; Rev. T. W. Kretschmann, 
Ph. D., Chestnut Hill. 

Treasurer of Theological Seminary. — Rev. 
Samuel Laird, D. D. 

Superintendent of Missions in the Ministerium 
of Pennsylvania. — Rev. W. Ashmead Schaef- 
fer. 

Orphans' Home and Asylum for the Aged and 
Infirm, 5580 Germantown av., Germantown : 
President, Henry Lehman, 525 Arch ; Secre- 
tary, Rev. C. J. Hirzel, 1800 N. Twenty-fourth ; 
Treasurer, Christian Sautter, 1419 Locust ; 
Superintendent, Rev. George P. Mueller ; So- 
licitor, William H. Staake, Esq., Franklin 
Building, Twelfth ab. Walnut. 



Sunday-School Association of the German Lu- 
theran Congregations of Philadelphia : Presi- 
dent, Rev. F. Wischan; Secretary, J. Roth; 
Treasurer, T. Ludwig. 

Lutheran Mission and Church Extension So- 
ciety : President, Rev. Joseph A. Seiss, D. D., 
LL. D ; Treasurer, E. Augustus Miller, EsqJ, 
502 Walnut ; Secretary ,William H. Staake, Esq. 

Rev. J. K. Plitt, 48 N. Thirty-sixth, Treasurer 
of Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Rev. T. L. Seip, D. D., Allentown, President of 
the Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Penn- 
sylvania and adjacent States. 

William H. Staake, Esq., Treasurer of General 
Council, Franklin Building, Twelfth ab. Wal- 
nut. 

The Luthera7i , 1204 Walnut. — Rev. G. F. Kro- 
tel, D. D., LL.D., editor-in-chief; Rev. G. W. 
Sandt, managing editor; Charles B. Opp, 
business manager. 

The Lutheran Book Store, 117 N. Sixth. 



C. 



Cresson 
Kercher. 
C. E. Krauth, 



Falls of 



ENGLISH (GENERAL COUNCIL). 

Advent, Fifth ab. Cumberland : Rev. J. F 
Fluck, 2439 N. Seventh. io]4 a.m., j% p.m. 

Ascension, Mount Airy: Rev. J. Fry, D. D., 
Mount Airy. 

Atonement, E. Montgomery av. bet. Frankford 
av. and Tulip: Rev.W. L. Stough, 2011 Memphis. 

Bethlehem, Thirtieth and Diamond: Rev. 
George C. Loos, Mount Airy. 

Christ, Main bel. Graver's Lane, Chestnut Hill : 
Rev. T. W. Kretschmann, Ph. D., Southampton 
av. 10^ a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Epiphany, Green lane and Silverwood, Man- 
ayunk: Rev. C. P. Weiskotten. 

Holy Communion, S. W. cor. Broad and Arch : 
Rev. Joseph A. Seiss, D. D., LL. D., 1338 
Spring Garden ; Rev. J. Q. McAtee, 1714 S. Fif- 
teenth, assistant. 11 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Incarnation. Forty-sixth and Kingsessing av. : 
Rev. N. H. Melhorn, 4722 Kingsessing av. 10^4 
a.m., iY 2 P.M. 

Nativity, Eighteenth bel. Tioga : Rev. U. S. 
G. Bertolet, 1524 Ontario. 

Redeemer, Queen bel. 
Schuylkill : Rev. George A 

Salem, Frankford : Rev 
Wakeling. 

St. James, Nineteenth and Reed : Rev. Frank 
E. Whitmore, Chestnut Hill. 

-St. John, Race bel. Sixth : Rev. Edward E. 
Sibole, D. D., 703 Marshall. 10^ a.m., 3^ p.m. 

St. Luke, S. W. cor. Seventh and Montgomery : 
Rev. J. L. Sibole, 1724 Marshall. 

St. Mark, Spring Garden ab. Thirteenth : Rev. 
Samuel Laird, D. D., 1314 Spring Garden. 10% 
a.m., 7^ p.m. 

St. Michael, Main and Church, Germantown : 
Rev. S. A. Ziegenfuss, D.D., 6671 Germantown 
av. io 1 ^ a.m., 734 P.M. 

St. Paul, Twenty-second ab. Columbia av. : 
Rev. C. J. Hirzel, 1800 N. Twenty-fourth. 

St. Peter, Reed E. of Ninth : Rev. E. R. Cassa- 
day, 1605 S. Broad. io l / 2 a.m., iY^ p.m. 

St. Stephen, Powelton av. E. of Fortieth : Rev. 
George Drach, 327 N. Fortieth. 

The Apostles, Sixteenth and Susquehanna av. 

Transfiguration, Lehigh and Germantown avs.: 
Rev. H. Branson Richards, 2038 N. Eleventh. 

Trinity, Eighteenth and Wolf: Rev. S. A. K. 
Francis, 1431 S. Tenth. io?4 A.M., 7^ P.M. 



1635 



20 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



CAMDEN. 

Epiphany, N. E. cor. Seventh and Market : 
Rev. Clarence K. Binder, 503 Linden. 10^ 
A.M., lYz p.m. ; latter service, May to September, 

8 P.M. 

Trinity (German), Stevens nr. Broadway: 
Rev. H. Offermann, 446 Stevens. 

GERMAN (GENERAL COUNCIL). 

Bethanien. Roxborough : Rev. Adolph Hell- 
wege, cor. Martin and Pechin, Roxborough. 
IoJ/4 a.m.. 8 P.M. 

Christ, Twenty-sixth bel. Columbia av. : Rev. 
Otto Kleine, 1609 N. Twenty-sixth. 10^ A.M., 

7% P - M - 

Emanuel's, cor. Fourth and Carpenter : Rev. 
H. A. Behrens, 1009 S. Fourth, io"^ A.M., 7^ 

P.M. 

Holy Cross, Ninth and Lehigh av. ; Rev. Wald 
R. M. Oeser, Ninth and Lehigh av. io}£ a.m., 
iVz P.M. 

Immanuel, cor. Tackawanna and Plum, Frank- 
ford : Rev. Paul Schneider, to a.m., y l 2 P.M. 

St. James, cor. Third and Columbia av. : Rev. 
F. W. Weiskotten, 2126 Hancock. 10^ A.M., 
and from October to June, 7V2 P.M. 

St. Johannis, Fifteenth bel. Poplar: Rev. A. 
Spaeth, D. D.. LL.D.. Mt. Airy ; Rev. George C. 
Eisenhardt. asst., 1220 N. Sixteenth. 10% a.m., 
7% P.M. ; last Sunday in month, 3 p.m. 

St. Marcus, Dauphin nr. Twenty-eighth: Rev. 
Henry D. E. Siebot, 2408 Ridge av. 

St. Michael, Cumberland and Trenton av. ; 
Rev. Aug. Fischer, 2126 E. Cumberland. 10^ 

A.M., J l / 2 P.M. 

St. Paul, N. E. cor. St. John and Brown : Rev. 
F. Wischan, 726 N. Seventh. io' 4 a.m., ij4 P.M. 

St. Peter, Forty-second and Parrish : Rev. E. 
Herman Pohle, 860 Brooklyn. 

St. Thomas, cor. Herman and Morton, Ger- 
mantown : Rev. F.Jelden,cor. High and Morton, 
Germantown. 

Trinity, Sixteenth ab. Tioga : Rev. A. Linsz, 
1412 Tioga. 

Zion, Franklin ab. Race : Rev. J. E. Nidecker, 
228 Franklin, io 1 ^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Mary J. Drexel Home and Philadelphia Moth- 
er-House of Deaconesses, 2100 S. College av. : 
Rev. C. Goedel, rector. Regular services at 
the chapel, Girard av. nr. Twenty-second, ioj^ 
a.m. — 

general synod. 
Lutheran Observer, 1328 Chestnut. — Rev. F. W. 

Conrad, D. D., LL. D., editor, 1720 Master; 

Prof. V. L. Conrad, D. D.. 1710 Jefferson, and 

Rev. Sylvanus Stall, D. D., Bala, associate 

editors ; A. D. Chiquoine, business manager. 
Publication Society, 42 N. Ninth. — President, 

Rev. Wm. M. Baum, D. D.; Superintendent, 

H. S. Boner. 
Lutheran Mission Society of the Philadelphia 

Conference of the East Pennsylvania Synod. — 

President, Theophilus H. Smith, 123 N. Front ; 

Secretary, William Mader, Ledger Building; 

Treasurer, Henry S. Boner, 42 N. Ninth. 

Board 0/ Directors 0/ the Pastors' Fund of 
the General Synod. 

President, Rev. Wm. M. Baum, D. D.,63oN. 
Broad ; Secretary, William J. Miller, 509 Mar- 
ket ; Treasurer, Rev. Luther E. Albert, D. D., 
cor. Main and Queen, Germantown. 



All Saints, Nineteenth and Cayuga : Rev. Wil- 
liam Kelly, 1824 Cayuga. 

Bethany, S. W. cor. Twenty-fifth and Mont- 
gomery av. : Rev. S. G. Shannon, 2623 Mont- 
gomery av. 

Calvary, S. W. cor. Forty-first and Mantua : 
Rev. E. C. Morrell, 5147 Master; Rev. S. A. 
Holman, D. D., pastor emeritus, 505 N. Fortieth. 

Grace, Thirty-fifth and Spring Garden : Rev. 
J. H. Main, Thirty-eighth and Haverford. 10 1 / 2 
a.m., 8 p.m. 

Messiah, Sixteenth and Jefferson : Rev. Milton 
H. Valentine, 1545 Centennial av. 

St. Andrew, N. E. cor. Fifth and Watkins: 
Rev. David Earhart, pastor emeritus, 1733 Vine. 
10^ a.m., 7^ P.M. 

St. Matthew, N. W. cor. Broad and Mount 
Vernon : Rev. William M. Baum, D. D., 630 N. 
Broad. 

The Reformation, Broad bel. Ontario : Rev. 
Henry C. Shindle, 1647 Dover. 

Trinity, cor. Main and Queen, Germantown : 
Rev. Luther E.Albert, D. D.,Main and Queen, 
Germantown ; Rev. John T. Huddle, asst., 10^ 
a.m., 7^ p.m. — 

DANISH. 

St. John's, Fifth and Cumberland : Rev. 
Christian C. Mengers, 3049 Rorer. Sundays, 4 
P.M. ; Thursdays, 8 p.m. 

INDEPENDENT LUTHERAN. 

German Independent Lutheran. St. Paul's, cor. 
Fourth and Canal : Rev. G. J. Miiller, 1144 N. 
Fourth, io 1 ^ a.m., iYz "P.M. 

NORWEGIAN. 

Norwegian services for sailors, 767 S. Second : 
Rev. C. 0. Rosing, Chadwick St. ioj^ a.m. 

SWEDISH. 

Gustavus Adolphus Church, services in Holy 
Communion Church, Broad and Arch: Rev. C. 
A. Blomgren, Ph. D., 1614 Fairmount av. Sun- 
days, 4PM.; Thursdays, 8 p m. 

Zion. Ninth bel. Buttonwood : Rev. Carl H. 
Blomgren, Ph. D., 1738 Beacon. 

German (Missouri) synod. 

St. John. Wharton bel. Sixth : Rev. Olaf 
Schroeder, 524 Wharton. 10^ a.m., 7V2 p.m. 

St. Matthew, Eighth and Cambria: Rev. Chr. 
Merkel, 2913 N. Eighth. 10^ a.m., 7^ P.M. 



MENNONITE. 

First, Diamond nr. Fifth : Rev. N. B. Grubb, 
2118 Marshall. German, io 1 ^ a.m.; English, 
7^ p.m. Last Sunday of each month all ser- 
vices in English. 

Mission of the First Church, Marshall bel. 
Indiana av. : Rev. N. B. Grubb, 21 18 Mar- 
shall. English, 2^2 P-M. 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL. 

BISHOP. 

Rev. Cyrus D. Foss, D. D., LL. D., 2043 Arch. 

PRESIDING ELDERS. 

North District. — Rev. Joseph R. Taylor Gray, 

D. D., Chester, Pa. 
Northwest District. — Rev. W. L. McDowell, 

D. D., 2134 N. Twelfth. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



21 



South District. — Rev. F. B. Lynch, D. D., 2127 
N. Thirteenth. 

West District. — Rev. J. S. Hughes, D. D., 3425 
N. Nineteenth. 

Philadelphia District, East German Conference. 
— Rev. Charles Reuss, Newark, N. J; 

Philadelphia District, Delaware Conference (col- 
ored). — Rev. H. A. Monroe, D. D., 1516 
Stiles. 

AGENTS, SECRETARIES. ETC. 

Board of Church Extension, 1026 Arch : Bishop 
Cyrus D. Foss, D.D., LL.D., President ; Rev. 
A. J. Kynett, D. D., LL.D., 1728 Spring 
Garden, and Rev. W. A. Spencer, D. D., 1633 
N. Fifteenth, Corresponding Secretaries ; Rev. 
Manley S. Hard, D. D., Kingston, Pa., As- J 
sistant Corresponding Secretary; Rev. J. S. J. ! 
McConnell, D. D., 1333 E. Susquehanna av., : 
Recording Secretary ; James Long, 1529 
Girard av., Treasurer. 

Rev. S. W. Thomas, D. D., Editor Philadelphia 
Methodist , Agent and Corresponding Secretary 
of Tract Society, 1018 Arch. 

Rev. C. M. Boswell, Corresponding Secretary 
City Missionary and Church Extension Society, 
1018 Arch. 

Rev. Thomas Kirkpatrick, Chaplain House of 
Correction, 1661 Harrison, Frankford. 

Rev. E. I. D. Pepper, D. D., Editor Christian 
Standard and International Holiness Jour- 
nal, q-zi Arch. 

Rev. G. W. Maclaughlin, D. D., Correspond- 
ing Secretary Pennsylvania Seamen's Friend 
Society; office, 422 S. Front; 4122 Poweltonav. j 

Rev. James Morrow, D. D., General Secretary 
Pennsylvania Bible Society, 701 Walnut and 
130 Harvey, Germantown. 

Rev. J. S. J. McConnell, D. D., General Agent, 
Preachers' Aid Society, 1018 Arch. 

Rev. T. A. Fernley, D. D., Corresponding Sec- 
retary Philadelphia Sabbath Association, 1224 
Chestnut ; residence, 1924 Camac. 

CHURCH SOCIETIES — TIMES OF MEETING. 

Board of Church Extension : second Wednesday 
in each month, 1026 Arch, 3^ p.m. 

Philadelphia City Missionary and Church Ex- 
tension Society : third Monday in March, 
June, September and December, 1018 Arch, 8 
p.m. Executive Committee, third Monday in 
each month. 3% p.m. 

Philadelphia Conference Tract Society : first 
Monday in each month, 1018 Arch. 3 p.m. 

Philadelphia Conference Missionary Society : 
third Tuesday February, May and October, 
1018 Arch. 7J4 P-M. 

Philadelphia Conference Education Society : sec- 
ond Monday March, May, September and De- 
cember, 1018 Arch. 3 p.m. 

Historical Society of Philadelphia Conference : 
second Monday of each month, 1018 Arch. 

lV-2. P.M. 

Ministerial Institute, 1018 Arch : second Tues- 
day after first Monday in each month. 9^ 
a.m., 1% P.M. 

Philadelphia Camp-meeting and Excursion Asso- 
ciation : Rev. J. S. J. McConnell, D. D., Presi- 
dent ; B. M. Simpson, Treasurer, 1018 Arch. 
Last Monday of each quarter. 2^ p.m. 

Local Preachers' Association : first Wednesday 
in each month, 1018 Arch. 7% p.m. 



Preachers' Aid Society, Philadelphia Confer- 
ence ; office, 1018 Arch : meets annually at the 
seat of the Conference. 

Ladies' Home Missionary Society, 1018 Arch : 
fourth Wednesday. 

Ladies' Foreign Missionary Society, 1018 Arch : 
first Wednesday. 10 a.m. 

Methodist Home, cor. Thirteenth and Lehigh av.: 
President, Mrs. Matthew Simpson ; Rec. Sec, 
Mrs. M. W. Salter, 2016 Mount Vernon; Cor. 
Sec, Mrs. Theodore Stevens; Treasurer, Mrs. 
M. E. Senderling, 1934 N. Sixth; Matron, 
Mrs. Cheesebrough. 

Methodist Orphanage, Monument nr. Belmont 
av., West Philadelphia : President, Mrs. Mat- 
thew Simpson, 1334 Arch; Rec. Sec, Mrs. C. 
F. Bonsall, 927 Spruce ; Treasurer, Mrs. J. 
Parker, Jr., 1919 Dauphin. 

Methodist Episcopal Church Hospital, Broad 
and Wolf: President, James Gillender ; Treas- 
' urer, John Gillespie; Corresponding Secretary, 
Rev. J. A. Lippincott, D. D., 1401 N. Six- 
teenth. 

Rev. W. C. Webb, D. D., General Secretary 
Evangelical Alliance, Oak Lane. 

Simpson Grove Camp Meeting and Excursion 
Association, 1018 Arch : Rev. J. W. Sayers, 
President; Rev. J. W. Harkins, Secretary; 
quarterly. 

[The Conference meets in March, and at that 
time many of the appointments of preachers 
are changed.] 

Alliance Mission, Ninth and Moyamensing av. 

Arch Street, S. E. cor. Broad and Arch : Rev. 

W. W. Ramsay, D. D., no N. Seventeenth. 

IO% A.M., 8 P.M. 

Asbury, Chestnut ab. Thirty-third : Rev. 
Henry Frankland, 3449 Chestnut. \o l / 2 A.M., 
lYz p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Bainbridge Street (colored), Bainbridge bel. 
Twelfth : Rev. I. O'Connell, 742 Florida. 10^ 

A.M., 7^ P. M. 

Bethany, Eleventh and Mifflin : Rev. F. E. 
GraefT, 1624 S. Thirteenth, io 1 ^ a.m., 8 p.m. 

Bethesda, Venango E. of Richmond : Rev. 
D. A. Keys, 2834 E. Venango. 

Blue Bell (Mission of First Church), Wissa- 
hickon av. ab. W. Walnut lane, Germantown : 
Rev. C. S. Albany, 4441 Magnet, Manayunk. 
2^, 8 p.m. 

Bridesburg, Kirkbride ab. Thompson, Brides- 
burg : Rev. G. W. Dungan, 2715 Kirkbride. 
ro^ a.m., 8 p.m. 

Broad Street, Broad and Christian : Rev. S. A. 
Heilner, D. D., 1410 Christian. 

Bustleton, Bustleton turnpike : Rev. L. B. 
Brown, Bustleton. 

Calvary, -Forty-eighth and Baltimore av. : Rev. 
Herbert W. Westwood, 1932 N. Sixth. 

Centennary, cor. Forty-first and Spring Gar- 
den: Rev. J. G. Bickerton, 426 N. Forty-first. 

Central Frankford, cor. Orthodox and Frank- 
lin: Rev. Alpha G. Kynett, r 511 Orthodox, Frank- 
ford. 

Central Roxborough, Green Lane : Rev. Ravil 
Smith, 476 Green Lane, Roxborough. 

Chelten Avenue, Chelten and Stenton, Ger- 
mantown : Rev. A. D. Shields, 445 E. Chelten 
av., Germantown. 10^ a.m., j% p.m. 

Chestnut Hill, Main nr. Chestnut av. : Rev. 
J. J. Timanus, nr. church. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 



22 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Christ, Thirty-eighth and Hamilton : Rev. 
W. Downey, Ph. D., 3507 Hamilton. ioV 2 a.m.. 

Christian Street, Christian ab. 1 wenty-fourth : 
Rev. S. G. Grove, 2426 Christian. 

Clearview, Seventy-fifth and Buist av. : Rev. 
W. P. Ellingsworth, 2451 N. Fifteenth. 

Columbia Avenue, Twenty-fifth and Columbia 
av.: Rev. \V. S. Pugh, 2441 Columbia av. 

Cookman, N. W. cor. Twelfth and Lehigh av. : 
Rev. T. M. Jackson, 2608 N. Twdfth. \o\/ 2 

A.M., 7% P.M. 

Covenant, S. W. cor. Eighteenth and Spruce: 
Rev. J. D. Martin, D. D., 1906 Arch, io 1 ^ a.m., 

7% P.M. 

Cumberland Street, cor. E. Cumberland and 
Coral : Rev. C. E. Adamson, Ph. D., 2020 E. 
York. September to June, io'^ a.m., 7% p.m. ; 
July and August, 8 p.m. 

East Alleghany Avenue, Alleghany nr. Frank- 
ford av. : Rev. William B. Chalfant, 2022 Madi- 
son av. 

East Montgomery Avenue, cor. Frankford and 
Montgomery avs. : Rev. J. G. Wilson, 1745 
Frankford av. XO% A.M., 7^ P.M. 

Fast Park, Columbia av. and Natron. i, W. of 
Thirty-second: Rev. John Fdwards, 3212 
Columbia av. 

Ebenezer, Christian bel. Fourth : Rev. R. D. 
Nay lor, 1607 S. Fifth. 

Ebenezer, Manayunk : Rev. William Powick, 
168 Gay, Manayunk. 

Fden, Lehigh av. and I,awrence : Rev. A. 
(Jakes, 2605 N. Fifth. io' 2 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Eighteenth Street, Eighteenth and Wharton : 
Rev. W. D. Jones, 1241 S. Fifteenth, io 1 ^ a.m., 

7K P.*. , , 

Eleventh Street, Eleventh ab. Washington av. : 
Rev. C. V. Futcher.Seventy-third and Gray's av. 

Elmwood. Eighty-fifth and Island road : Rev. 
William S. Bateman, 1133 Snyderav. ioj^ A.M., 
z l A, iVz P-M. ; Wednesdays, 8 p.m. 

Emmanuel, Twenty-fifth and Brown : Rev. B. 
T. Callen, 2506 Brown. \o\ 2 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Emmanuel, Roxborough, Gates and Silver- 
wood : Rev. E. A. Bawden, Delmar st., Rox- 
borough. io 1 ^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Epworth, Fifty-sixth and Race: Rev. J. H. 
Hartman, 5408 Wyalusing av. 

Erie Avenue, Fifth and Erie av. : Rev. M. 
Graves, 506 Frie av. 

Ethel Memorial, Penn and Morris, German- 
town : Rev. N. D. McComas, 3439 N. Sixteenth. 

Fairhill, Fifth and Clearfield: Rev. T. W. 
McKinney, 2961 N. Sixth. 

Falls of Schuylkill, Queen lane and Krail, Falls 
of Schuylkill : Rev. R. A. Mcllwain, 171 Queen 
lane. 

Fifteenth Street, Fifteenth and Clearfield : Rev. 
G.W. Henson, 1323 Clearfield, \o x 2 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Fifth Street, Fifth bel. Green : Rev. A. L. 
Skilton, 2002 N. Twenty-second. 

First Germantown, Germantown av. and High, 
Germantown : Rev. Frank A. Parkin, 58 Haines. 
10 4 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Fitzwater Street, Fitzwater ab. Nineteenth : 
Rev. G. J. Burns, 1908 Fitzwater. 10% A.M., 

7'K PM - 

Fletcher, Forty-fourth and M aster, Hestonville : 
Rev. Howard T. Quigg, 1421 N. Fifty-fourth. 

Fortieth Street, Fortieth ab. Walnut : Rev. S. 
H. Hoover, D. D., 4018 Baring. October to 
May, \o\/ 2 a.m., 7 l / 2 p.m. ; rest of the year, 8 p.m. 



Forty-third Street, Forty-third and Aspen : 
Rev. William Bamford, 4305 Aspen. 

Frankford (colored): Rev. T. M. Hubbard. 

Frankford Avenue, Frankford av. and Foulk- 
rod : Rev. F. G. Coxson, 1707 Harrison. 

Front Street, Front and Laurel : Rev. Wilmer 
Coffman, 1013 N. Front. 

Germantown (colored): Rev. W. C. Dickerson. 

Girard Avenue (German), Girard av. ab. 
Twelfth : Rev. H. H. Heck, 1125 Girard av. 

Grace, N. W. cor. Broad and Master: Rev. 
Wallace MacMullen, D. D., 1402 N. Fifteenth. 
io 1 ^ a.m., 7%. P.M. 

Green Street, Green ab. Tenth : Rev. Jacob 
Todd, D. D., 1003 Green; Rev. George H. 
Lorah, 1323 Green, io}^ a.m., 8 p.m 

Hancock Street, Hancock ab. Girard av. : Rev. 
J. W. Harkins, 1227 Hancock. 10% a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

Haven (colored), Twenty-sixth ab. Jefferson: 
Rev. A. F. Ennals, 1228 S. Eleventh. io l / 2 A.M., 
7V2 p.m. 

Holmesburg. Frankford av., Holmesburg: 
Rev. G. G Rakestraw, 8024 Frankford Ave. 

Huntingdon Street, Huntingdon ab. Twenty- 
fourth : Rev. A. E. Cooper, 2602 W. Lehigh av. 

Institutional Hall. N. E. cor. Second and Bain- 
bridge : Rev. C. M. Boswell and Deaconess 
Josephine Corbin, 1018 Arch. 

Italian Mission, 731 S. Ninth : Rev. T. D. 
Malan, Ph. D., 721 S. Ninth. 

Janes (colored), Haines ab. Cedar, German- 
town: Rev. W. C. Dickerson, Hancock. 10% 
A.M., 7' 2 p.m. 

Kensington. Marlborough and Richmond: 
Rev. E. C. Griffiths, 1117 Shackamaxon. iol£ 
a.m., 7jk£ p.m. 

Mariners' Bethel, Washington av. bel. Third : 
Rev. C. W. Bickley, D. D., 225 Washington av. 

Memorial, Eighth and Cumberland : Rev. E. E. 
Burriss, 2434 Marshall. 

SJessiah, Moyamensing av. and Morris: Rev. 
J. Dungan. 236 Morris. 10% A.M., 7^ p.m. 

Milestown, Old York rd. bel. City line: Rev. 
George E. Kleinhenn, Oak lane. io54 a.m., 7% 

P.M. 

Mission Workers' League, 242 N. Eighth: 
Rev. C. M. Boswell and Rev. A. L. Skilton, 
1018 Arch. 

Mount Carmel, Germantown av. ab. Broad : 
Rev. F. C. Thomas, 3822 N. Fifteenth. 

Mount Pleasant Avenue, Germantown : Rev. 
S. C. Carter, Mount Airy. io l / 2 a.m., 7%. P.M. 

Mount Zion, Manayunk, Green Lane and St. 
David's, Manayunk: Rev. W. C. Best, D. D., 
155 Green Lane. 

Nineteenth Street, Nineteenth and Poplar : 
Rev. Virgil E. Rorer, 1912 Poplar. xo l / 2 a.m., 
7 x / 2 p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Norris Square, Mascher ab. Susquehanna av. : 
Rev. Thomas Kelly, D. D.,2039 E. York. io\/ 2 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Orthodox Street, Frankford, Orthodox 
Tacony : Rev. G. A. Wolfe, 1 715 Tioga, 
ter, \oV 2 a.m., 7 p.m.; summer, 7^ p.m. 

Park Avenue, Park av. and Norris 
Richard Harcourt, D. D., 1938 Park av. 

Paschalville, Woodland av. and Seventieth 
Rev. J. T. Swindells. 

Pitman, Twenty-third and Lombard : Rev 
Thomas W. Davis, 2224 Lombard. \o x / 2 a.m. 

7K P-M- 



and 
Win- 
Rev. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



23 



. Port Richmond, Neff and Thompson : Rev. 
F. A. Gilbert, 2726 Ann. \oY 2 a.m., 7% p.m. 

Providence, Front and Alleghany av. : Rev. 
J. T. Wright, 1213 N. Eleventh. 

Ridge Avenue, Roxborough, cor. Ridge and 
Shawmont avs. : Rev. G. S. Broadbent, Rox- 
borough. 10% a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Rehoboth, Paul St., Frankford : Rev. Amos 
Johnson, 4231 Paul. 

Sanctuary, Twenty-eighth and Thompson : 
Rev. James Sampson, 1939 Mount Vernon. 

Sarah D. Cooper Memorial, Sixty-third and 
Girard av. : Rev. T. M. Griffith, D. D., 432 N. 
Sixty-third. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m.; summer, 8 p.m. 

Scott, Eighth bel. Dickinson: Rev.W. A. Fer- 
guson, 1527 S. Eighth. 10% a.m., j)/ 2 p.m. Oc- 
tober to May; 8 p.m. May to October. 

Seventh Street, Seventh and Norris : Rev. J. R. 
Westwood, D.D., 1932" N. Sixth. jo l / 2 a.m., 7^ 
p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Siloam, E. Susquehanna av. ab. Thompson : 
Rev. J. S. J. McConnell, D. D., 1333 E. Susque- 
hanna av. 10^ a.m., 7K P.M. 

Simpson Memorial, Kensington av. ab. Cam- 
bria : Rev. J. Bawden, 632 E. Indiana av. ioJ4 
a.m., j l / 2 P.M. 

Snyder Avenue (Tasker), Fifth and Snyder 
av. : Rev. A. F. Taylor, 706 Snyder av. 

Somerton, Somerton, Thirty-fifth ward : Rev. 
J. M. Wheeler, Somerton. io$£ a.m., 7^4 p.m. 

Spring Garden Street, Twentieth and Spring 
Garden : Rev. George Elliott, D. D., 2023 Wal- 
lace. io l / 2 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

St. George's, Fourth bel. Vine : Rev. J. H. 
Wood, 324 New. io^£ a.m., 7% p.m. 



Olney : Rev. W. H. 
Garbutt 



St. James, Tabor St., 
Smith, Tabor St., Olney. 

St. John's, Third bel. George: Rev 
Reed, 989 N. Fifth. 

St. Luke's, S. E. cor. Broad and Jackson : Rev. 

C. W. Straw, 1410 Jackson. 

St. Matthew's, Fifty-third and Chestnut : Rev. 

D. S. Sherry, 111 S. Forty-third. 

St. Paul's, Catharine ab. Sixth : Rev. I. M. 
Foster, D. D., 623 Catharine. 

St. Stephen's, Germantown, Germantown av. 
bel. Manheim : Rev. W. W. Cookman, 5213 Ger- 
mantown av. 

Summerfield, 2221 E. Dauphin : Rev. R. Tur- 
ner, 2223 E. Dauphin. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Tabernacle, Eleventh bel. Oxford : Rev. G. 
Bickley Burns, Ph. D., 1332 N. Twelfth. 

Tacony, Tacony : Rev. J. W. Rudolph, 3424 
Washington av., Tacony. 

Thirteenth Street, Thirteenth bel. Vine : Rev. 
S. M. Vernon, D. D., 252 N. Thirteenth. io'X 



m., 7% p.m. 



Tioga, N. W. cor. Tioga and Eighteenth : Rev. 
S. W. Gehrett, D. D., 3418 N. Nineteenth. 

Trinity, Fifteenth and Mount Vernon. 

Twelfth Street, Twelfth cor. Odgen : Rev. C. 
Lee Gaul, 847 N. Eleventh. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Twentieth Street, Twentieth cor. Jefferson : 
Rev. J. W. Sayers, T509 N. Twentieth. io'4 
a.m., 7% p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Twenty-ninth Street, Twenty-ninth and York : 
Rev. J. B. Graff, 2338 N. Twenty-ninth. 

Twenty-second Street, Twenty-second and 
Moore: Rev. George B. Burnwood, 1526 S. 
Twenty-second. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Union, Diamond ab. Twentieth: Rev. T. B. 
Neely, D. D., LL.D., 2017 Diamond. ioJ^ a.m., 
7 l / 2 P.M. 



Waterloo Street (colored), Waterloo ab. West- 
moreland : Rev. E. O. Parker. io]/ 2 a.m., 8 

P.M. 

Wayne Junction, 4334 Germantown av. : Rev. 
C. M. Boswell and Rev. J. W. Boughton, 1018 
Arch. 

Wesley, Sepviva ab. Huntingdon : Rev. E. W. 
Stillman, 2205 E. Cumberland. 10% a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

West End, Pine and Sixty-first : Rev. Harrison 
A. Greaves, 6046 South. ioJ£ A.M., 8 p.m. 

West York Street, Seventeenth and York : 
Rev. J. F. Crouch, 2344 N. Seventeenth. io l / 2 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Wharton Street, Wharton bel. Fourth : Rev. 
C. M. Simpson, 319 Reed. 

Wissahickon, Terrace and Harvey, Wissa- 
hickon : Rev. T. T. Mutchler, M^D., 158 Harvey, 
10^ a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Wissinoming, Wissinoming : Rev. A. H. 
Leo, Wissinoming. 

Woodland Avenue, Woodland av. and Fiftieth : 
Rev. John Stringer, 1413 S. Fiftieth. 

York Street (German), E. York nr. Frankford 
av. : Rev. Henry Weber, 2210 E. Dauphin. 

Zoar (colored). Melon ab. Twelfth: Rev. J. 
A. Richardson, 1123 Ogden. 



CAMDEN AND VICINITY. 

Presiding Elder, Rev. D. B. Harris, 414 
Chambers av. 

Bethany, Tenth and Cooper: Rev. S. M. 
Nichols, 121 N. Tenth. 

Bethel, Cramer Hill : Rev. J. B. Whitton. 

Broadway, Broadway and Berkley : Rev. J. 
W. Marshall, D. D., 507 Broadway. 

Centenary, Fifth and Cooper: Rev. H. R. 
Robinson, 430 Linden. 

Collingswood : Rev. J. B. Westcott. 

Delair: Rev. S. F. Gaskill. 

Dudley, Westfield av. : Rev. J. F. Garrison, 
Cramer Hill. 

Eighth Street, cor. Eighth and Walnut : Rev. 
W. S. Mitchell, 735 Walnut. 

First, Sixth and Stevens : Rev. John Handley, 
D. D., 309 S. Sixth. 

First Gloucester, S. E. cor. Monmouth and 
Willow: Rev. D. W. C. Mclntire, 218 Mon- 
mouth. Winter, 10% A.M., 7 p.m. ; summer, 7^ 

P.M. 

Haddonfield : Rev. Charles S. Lawrence. 

Kaighn's Avenue : Rev. J. L. Surtees. 

Pensauken, Church and Pennsylvania av. : 
Rev. E. J. Kulp, Pensauken. io l/ 2 a.m.. 8 p.m. 

St. George's, Cramer Hill: Rev. J. Manlove 
Smith. 

State Street, Sixth and State : Rev. E. C. 
Sunfield, 527 York. 

Tabernacle, Third and Pearl : Rev. E. Hewitt, 
D. D., 508 N. Third. 

Trinity, Broadway and Emerald : Rev. J. A. 
Lumley, 1828 Broadway. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Trinity, Merchantville : Rev. A. E. Ballard, 
D. D., Merchantville. 

Union, Fifth and Mount Vernon: Rev. J. 
Morgan Read, 1034 S. Fifth. 

Wesley M. E. Church, Cramer Hill : Rev. 
George D. Thompson, pastor. 

Wiley, Third and Beckett : Rev. William A. 
Massey, 635 S. Third, Camden. 

Woodbury : Rev. Peter Provost. 



24 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL. 

African Methodist Episcopal Book Concern, 631 
Pine: Rev. T. W. Henderson, D. D.. business 
manager, 1831 Carpenter; office of The Chris- 
tian Recorder, 631 Pine. Rev. H. T. Johnson, 
editor; office of The Quarterly A. M. E. 
Church Review, 631 Pine. H. T. Keating, 
managing editor; Bishop. Rt. Rev. A. (".rant, 
905 Belmont av. ; Secretary Church Extension 
Board, Rev.C. T. Shaffer, "D. D, 1821 Camac. 
Presiding Elder. Rev. John C. Brock, 539 E. 
Miner, West Chester. Pa. 



a. 

Bethel, cor. Centre and Morton, Germantown : 
sv. N. I». Temple, 120 West Duval, German- 



Allen Chapel, Lombard ab. Nineteenth: Rev. 
J. M. Palmer, 1938 Lombard. 10^ A.M., 7% 

1 M 

Bethel 
Re 
town. io' : a.m., y ] : P.M. 

I'.ethel. Sixth bcl. Pine: Rev. L. J. Coppin. 
5, Iwelfth. iu 1 : a.m.. ;'j P.M. 

Campbell. ( Kford nr. Paul, Frankford : Rev. 
J. P.. Stansberry, 1661 Oxford. i: ! j am., j% 
1 M 

Disney Mission, Waterloo ab. Westmoreland: 
Rev. G.'W. Gibbs, Frankford. ioG a.m.,8'p.m. 

Emmanuel. Twenty-fourth and York: Rev 
Chas. E. Herbert, 2541 N. Twenty-fourth. 

Morris Brown Mission, Ridge av. and Twenty- 
fifth : Rev. Christopher Joi . 5. Iwelfth. 

Mt. Son (Darby Miss nth and Centre. 

Darby: Rev. W.' H. Hoxter. io< 4 a.m. 
p.m. 

Mount Pisgah, Locust ab. Fortieth: Rev. F. 
T. M. Webster, 3S59 Atlanta. io' : a.m.. i% p.m. 

Murray Chapel, Clifton bel. South : Rev. J. E. 
W. II re, 2341 N. Twenty-fourth, io'j a m., 

M. 

Payne Mission, Twentieth and Siegel : B. A 
Baird, 1508 Lombard. 

Snorter's Chapel and St. James' Mission. Mor- 
ton and Norwood, Delaware county: Rev. C. 
W. Satchell, 320 Dugan. to% a.m.. j% p.m. 

St. John. Sev enty - seco nd and Greenway av. : 
Rev. C. W. Satchell. ^an. 

Tioga Mission, Tioga Hall, Twentieth and 
Tioga: 7 1 -? p.m. Sundays: 7 p.m. Thursdays. 

Union. Sixteenth bel. Fairmount av. : Rev. 
Geo. 1 . Watkins. 653 N. Sixteenth. io' 2 a.m., 

Zion Chapel, Seventh bel. Dickinson: Rev. 
Theo. Gould, 1810 Dickinson, io^ A.M., j]4 

P.M. 



H. 



CAMDEN. 

Presiding Elder, Rev. W 
Stevens. 

Macedonia. Third and Spruce: Rev 
Ashley, pastor. Third and Spruce sts. 

Little Bethel, Centreville : Rev. W. B. Heath 



AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL. 

Z\ 

Mount Zion, Fifty-fifth ab. Market : Rev. 
Frisby Gibson, 1514 Burton; Rev. J. M. Rob- 
son, asst., 736 Lex. 10V5 a.m., j% p.m. 

CAMDEN. 

Zion. Sycamore and Ann : Rev. J. A. D. 
Davenport. 



CONGREGATIONAL METHODISTS. 

The Conference territory embraces the States of 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware : Rev 
; T. B. Miller, D. D., President; Rev. A. W. 
Bowers, Vice-President ; Rev. D. 1. Cheneh, 
Secretary. 

Emmanuel, Moyamensing av. and Sartain, 
nr. Twelfth: Rev. Dr. Miller, pastor, 1132 Rit- 
ner; Rev. D. I. Cheney. 1902 S. Seventh, and 
Rev. Thos. Armour, 440 N. Seventh, assts. 



Yeocum, 417 
H. C. 



FREE METHODIST. 

Philadelphia District, Rev. A. C. Miller, Pre- 
siding Elder, Phillipsburg, New Jersey. 

First. 2227 Master: Rev. Thomas W. Scull, 
1833 Judson. 10 1 ; am.. 714 p.m. 

West Philadelphia Mission, Lancaster av. and 
Baring : Rev. Chester Sanford, 2133 Ridge av. 
\.m., 3 p.m. 

METHODIST PROTESTANT. 

St. Luke's. Erie av. east of Broad : Rev. J. 
B. Jones. 1325 Erie, io 1 ^ a.m.. 8 p.m. 

St. Matthew (African Union), Fifty-eighth 
and Vine : Rev. Alexander Woodards. 104 Jun- 
iata, W. Philada.: Rev. Caleb Gray, asst., fifty- 
seventh and Chelsea, W. Philada. 

CAMDEN. 

Memorial, Liberty ab. Third : Rev. Howard 
Blackwood. 

Calvary, Cramer Hill : Rev. Joshua Tushing- 
ham. 

MORAVIAN CHURCH. 

its of Church Educational Institutions, Fran- 
cis Jordan & Sons, 111 N. Front. 
First, Fairmount av. bel. Seventeenth : Rev. 
Charles Nagel, 629 N. Twentieth. 10 ' 2 a.m., 

P.M. 

ond. S. E. cor. Franklin and Thompson: 
Rev. Edward S. Wolle, 1238 Franklin, io 1 ^ 
a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Third. Kensington av. bel. Venango: Rev. F. 
□wood Raub, 3328 K. io' 2 a.m., jV x p.m. 

Fifth, Germantown av. ab. Dauphin: Rev. 
Charles H.Sperling, 632 York. \o l /t a.m., 7^ p.m. 



NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH (SWEDEN- 
BORGIAN). 

First, cor. Chestnut and Twenty-second : Rev. 
William L. Worcester, 3502 Hamilton. 11 a.m., 

4 P.M. 

Frankford, New Church Society, Paul and 
Unity : Rev. Louis Rich, 4616 Penn. 104 a.m., 

PRESBYTERIAN. 

Stated Clerk of the General Assembly, Rev. W. 
H. Roberts, D. D.. LL. D., Witherspoon 
Building, 1319 Walnut. 

The Trustees of the General Assembly of the 
Presbyterian Church in the L'nited States of 
America : George Junkin, Esq., LL. D., Presi- 
dent : Samuel C. Perkins, Esq., LL. D., Vice- 
President ; Rev. Joseph Beggs, D. D., Cor. 
Secretary ; F. K. Hippie, Treasurer; Jacob 
Wilson, Rec. Secretary, 1319 Walnut, Phila- 
delphia. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



25 



Presbyterian Board of Publication and Sabbath- 
School Work, 1319 Walnut : President, Hon. 
Robert N. Willson ; Vice-President, Rev. Wil- 
liam Brenton Greene, Jr., D. D. ; Secretary, 
Rev. Elijah R. Craven, D. D. ; Sabbath-school 
and Missionary Superintendent, Rev. James A. 
Worden, D. D. ; Rev. Edward T. Bromfield, 
D. D., Field and Statistical Correspondence; 
Editorial Superintendent, Rev. James R. Mil- 
ler, D. D. ; Business Superintendent, John H. 
Scribner ; Manufacture, Henry F. Scheetz ; 
Recording Clerk, Rev. Willard M.Rice, D.D.; 
Treasurer, Rev. C. T. McMullin. 

Presbyterian Historical Society, 1319 Walnut : 
Rev. William C. Cattell, D. D., LL. D., Presi- 
dent; Rev. William L. Ledwith, D. D., Libra- 
rian ; Rev. James Price, Recording Secretary ; 
Rev. S. T. Lowrie, D. I)., Corresponding Sec- 
retary ; De B. K. Ludwig, Ph. D., Treasurer, 
3739 Walnut. 

Presbyterian Board of Relief for Disabled Min- 
isters and the Widows and Orphans of De- 
ceased Ministers: George Junkin, President; 

A. Charles Barclay, Vice-President ; Rev. 

B. L. Agnew, D. D., Corresponding Secretary, 
1319 Walnut ; Rev. William W. Heberton, 
Treasurer and Recording Secretary, 1319 Wal- 
nut. 

Board of Education : Rev. George D. Baker, D. 
D., President ; Rev. James M. Crowell, D. D., 
Vice-President; Rev. E. B. Hodge, D. D., 
Corresponding Secretary, 1319 Walnut; Jacob 
Wilson, Treasurer and Recording Secretary. 

Committee on Church Extension, Property and 
Charters, Presbytery of Philadelphia, Trustees 
of Presbytery of Philadelphia: Rev. J. S. 
Macintosh, D. D., General Secretary, 1319 
Walnut and X. E. cor. Locust and Magnolia 
av., Germantown ; R. H. Hinckley, Record- 
ing Secretary ; George Griffiths, Treasurer, 515 
Locust. 

Women's Foreign Missionary Society, 1319 Wal- 
nut: President, Mrs. Charles P. Turner; Sec- 
retary, Mrs. J. R. Miller; Treasurer, Mrs. 
Julia M. Fishburn. 

Women's Home Missionary Societies of the Phi- 
ladelphia Presbyteries, 1319 Walnut, Phila- 
delphia Presbytery : President, Mrs. Charles 
Mrs. A. M. Robinson; 
Miss Abby E. Thomas. 
Presbytery : President, 
Treasurer, Miss M. V. 
Bockius; General Secretary, MissM. E. Boyer. 

Chaplain Public Institutions : Rev. Andrew Mc- 
Elwain, D. D., Ridley Park. 

Chaplain Presbyterian Hospital, Thirty -ninth 
and Powelton av. : Rev. Henry L. Rex. 

Ann Carmichael ( Memorial ) , Fifth and Erie av : 
Rev. William MacFarland, Fifth and Erie av. 

Arch Street, cor. Eighteenth and Arch : Rev. 
Mervin J. Eckels, D. D., 134 N. Twenty-first. 
10% a.m., 8 P.M. 

Atonement, Wharton ab. Broad: Rev. Edward 
B. Bruen, 1531 Chestnut. 

Beacon, Cumberland and Cedar: Rev. Wel- 
lington E. Loucks, 2742 Frankford av. io 1 ^ 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Berean (colored), South College av. ab. Nine- 
teenth : Rev. Matthew Anderson, 1926 S. College 
av. io 1 ^ a.m., j l / 2 p.m. 



Hodge ; Treasurer, 
Assistant Treasurer, 
Philadelphia North 
Mrs. W. P. White; 



Bethany, Twenty-second and Bainbridge : Rev. 
J. Wilbur Chapman, D. D. ; Rev. Charles A. 
Dickey, D. D., 2211 St. James; Rev. George 
Van Deurs, 3932 Sansom; Rev. J. C. Thomp- 
son, D. D., 4103 Leidy av. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Bethesda, cor. Frankford av. and Vienna : Rev. 
George Dugan, 2314 E. Dauphin, io 1 /^ a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

Bethlehem, N. E. cor. Broad and Diamond : 
zoy 2 A.M., j% P.M. 

Calvary, Locust ab. Fifteenth : Rev. John 
Sparhawk Jones, D. D., 1814 Pine. 11 a.m., 

8 P.M. 

Carmel (German), cor. Nineteenth and Sus- 
quehanna av. : Rev. Augustus Busch, 2208 N. 
Nineteenth, io}/ 2 a.m., -] x / 2 p.m. 

Central, Broad ab. Fairmount av. : Rev. John 
H. Munro, D. D., 714 N. Broad, io 1 /, a.m., 
jY k p.m. 

Chambers — \\ ylie Memorial, cor. Broad and 
Sansom: Rev. Thomas A. Hoyt, D. D., 2113 
Chestnut; Rev. T. W. J. Wylie, D. D., pastor 
emeritus, 1824 Wylie. io l / 2 a.m., 2V2 *•>■. . 

Clinton Street Immanuel, cor. Tenth and Clin- 
ton. 

Cohocksink, Columbia av. and Franklin : Rev. 
William Greenough, D. D., 1712 Franklin, io 1 ^ 
A. M., 7^ P.M. 

Corinthian Avenue (German). Corinthian av. 
bel. Poplar: Rev. John P. H. Schweitzer, 867 
Corinthian av. 

Covenant, Twenty-second ab. Vine : Rev. 
William Sterrett, D. D., 2133 Vine, io 1 ^ a.m., 

4 P.M. 

Disston Memorial, Tacony : Rev. David 
Wills, D. D., Tacony. 10% a.m., jV a p.m. 

East Park, Thirty-second ab. Montgomery 
av. : Rev. John Graham, 3227 Montgomery av. 

I0J-2 A.M., 7% P.M. 

Emmanuel, cor. Girard av. and Forty -second : 
Rev. David Garrett Smith, 806 N. Forty-first. 11 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Evangel, Eighteenth and Tasker : Rev. Mat- 
thew J. Hyndman, 1627 S. Thirteenth, io 1 ^ 
A.M., 7^ P.M. 

Falls of Schuylkill, Ridge av. bel. School 
Lane : Rev. Sherman H. Doyle, 3520 Ridge av.; 
Rev. Joseph Beggs, D. D., pastor emeritus, Ger- 
mantown. ioy 2 a.m., 7% p.m. " 

First (Washington Square), cor. Seventh and 
Locust : Rev. George D. Baker, D. D., 906 
Pine; Rev. S. R. Queen, asst., 1407 Locust. 
io 1 ^ a.m., jYx p.m. 

First African, S. E. cor. Seventeenth and Fitz- 
water : Rev. W. A. Lynch, 1633 Carpenter. 10^ 
a.m., 7?4 pm. 

First Bridesburg, Church st. : Rev. J. P. W. 
Blattenberger, D. D., 2766 Church. 10% a.m. ; 
winter, 7 1 : p.m. ; summer. 8 p.m. 

First, Chestnut Hill, cor. Rex and Main : Rev. 
Ralph L. E. Graham. 11 a.m., 8 p.m. 

First Germantown, W. Chelten av. nr. Main : 
Rev. Charles R. Erdman, 233 Harvey, German- 
town, n a.m., 8 p.m. 

First Holmesburg, Holmesburg av. and Deca- 
tur : Rev. U. F. Smiley, io 1 ^ a.m., j 1 / 2 p.m.; 
summer, 8 p.m. 

First Kensington. Girard av. ab. Hanover: 
Rev. J. Hervey Beale, 1323 N. Sixth, io 1 ^ a.m., 

iVz P-M. 

First Manayunk. cor. Dupont and High : Rev. 
Charles E. Burns, Sunnicliffe, Manayunk. 10% 
a.m.. 7J4 p.m. 



First, Northern Liberties, Buttonwood bel. 
Sixth: Rev. David J. Beale, D. D., 821 Frank- 
lin. IO^ A.M., J l / 2 P.M. 

Fourth, Forty-seventh and Kingsessing av. : 
Rev. J. K. Baillie, D. D., 4222 Regent Square. 
10% a.m., 8 P.M. 

Fox Chase : Rev. W. H. Pumphrey, Ph. D., 
Fox Chase. 

Frankford, cor. Main and Church : Rev J. B. 
Laird, 4315 Frankford av. ; Rev. Thomas 
Murphy, D. D., pastor emeritus. 10^ A.M., 

7% PM - 

Gaston, S. W. cor. Eleventh and Lehigh av. : 

Rev. Andrew Todd Taylor, 2602 N. Eleventh. 

Gethsemane Chapel, Twenty-eighth and Por- 
ter: Mission of Bethany Church. 2%, 7 x / 2 f.M. 

Grace, Twenty-second and Federal : Rev. An- 
drew Culver, pastor emeritus, 743 S. Twenty- 
second. 10J4 a.m., 7 l /2 p.m.; summer, 8 p.m. 

Green Hill, Girard av. ab. Sixteenth : Rev. 
Martin D. Hardin, 874 N. Twenty-third. ioJ4 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Greenway, Fifty-eighth and Woodland av. : 
Rev. F. E. Thomas, Fifty-eighth bel. Elmwood 
av. IO 1 /^ A.M., 8 P.M. 

( ireenwich Street, Greenwich and Tasker, E. 
of Moyamensing av. : Rev. William Hutton, D. 
D., 1627 S. Thirteenth. io*4 A.M., 7'4 p.m. 

Harper Memorial, Twenty-ninth and Susque- 
hanna av. : Rev. Herman C. Fox, D. D., 2907 
Columbia av. 10" _• a.m., 7 3 i p.m. 

Hebron Memorial, Twenty-fifth and Thomp- 
son: Rev. Robert Graham, D. P., 2417 N. Col- 
lege av. ioJ4 a.m., 7% p.m.; May to October, 

8 P.M. 

Hermon, Frankford and Harrison, Frankford: 
Rev. Alexander Henry, 4835 Frankford av. 10% 

A.M., ~ l 2 I'M. 

Hollond Memorial, S. E. cor. Broad and Fed- 
eral. 10^ a.m., 7J2 PM - ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Hope, Thirty-third and Wharton: Rev. J. 
Gray Bolton, D.D., 1906 Pine. 10^ A.M., 7^ P.M. 

Lawndale, Lawndale : Rev. John H. Boggs, 
D. D., Levick St., Lawndale. 10^ a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

Leverington, cor. Ridge and Leverington avs. : 
Rev. James W. Kirk, 462 Lyceumav. io 1 /^ a.m., 
7 x / 2 P.M. 

Lombard Street Central (colored), Lombard 
bel. Ninth: Rev. John B. Reeve, D. P., 1511 
Lombard. 10^ a.m., t|£ p.m. 

Macalester ( Memorial ), Torresdale : Rev. Ger- 
shon H. Nimmo, Torresdale. 11 a.m., 3% p.m. 

McDowell Memorial, Twenty-first and Co- 
lombia av. : Rev. John Loughran Scott, D. D., 
1626 N. Broad. io l/ 2 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Mariners', Front ab. Pine : Rev. Henry F. Lee, 
631 Spruce. 10V2 a.m., 7^ p.m. ; winter, 7% 
p.m. ; Scandinavian service, 3*2 p.m. 

Market Square, Main ab. Mill, Germantown : 
Rev. T. McBride Nichols, Market square. 10^ 

A.M., 8 P.M. 

Mechanicsville Chapel : Rev. G. H. Nimmo, 
Torresdale. 

Memorial, Nineteenth and Montgomery av. : 
Rev. Samuel A. Mutchmore, D. D., S. E. cor. 
Nineteenth and Montgomery av. ; Rev. D. S. 
Clark, associate, 1730 N. Sixteenth. 10^ a.m., 

4 P.M. 

Memorial Collegiate Chapel, Nineteenth and 
York: Rev. S. A. Mutchmore, D. D. 8 p.m. 

Mizpah Eighth and Wolfe : Rev. A. S. Sharp- 
less, 2008 S. Tenth. 



Mount Airy, Germantown and Mount Pleasant 
avs.: Rev. John Calhoun. 11 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Ninth, Sixteenth and Sansom : Rev. William 
P. Fulton, 208 S. Thirty-seventh. 10% a.m., 8 
p.m. ; summer, 4 p.m. 

North, Sixth ab. Green: Rev. George Stanley 
Burnfield, B.D., 495 N. Fourth. io l / 2 a.m., 7% 
p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

North Broad Street, Broad and Green : Rev. 
Charles Wadsworth, Jr., D. D., 1515 Wallace. 
io^a.m., 8 P.M. 

Northminster, Thirty-fifth and Baring. 10^ 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

North Tenth Street, Tenth bel. Girard av. : 
Rev. A. L. Lathem, 1206 N. Twelfth, ioj^ 
a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Oak Lane : Rev. A. E. Stewart. 

Olivet, Twenty-second and Mount Vernon : 
Rev. Loyal Y. Graham, D. D., 2024 Mt. Vernon. 
IO 1 /^ a.m., 7.% p.m. 

Overbrook. n a.m., 8 p.m. 

Oxford, Broad and Oxford, ioj^ a.m., 7% 
p.m. ; May to October, 8 p.m. 

Patterson Memorial, Sixty-third and Vine : 
Rev. George B. Bell, 101 N. Sixty-third, ioj^ 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Peace (German), cor. Tenth and Snyder av. : 
Rev. Charles Vuilleumier, 933 McKean. 

Princeton, cor. Saunders and Powelton avs. : 
Rev. J. Addison Henry, D. D., 3814 Powelton 
av. io'/£ a.m., 8 P.M. 

Puritan, Second ab. Lehigh av. 

Redeemer, Penn, Wister and Chew, German- 
town : Rev. William H. Davis, 448 E. Chelten 
av. n a.m., 8 p.m. 

Richmond, Richmond nr. Ann : Rev. D. B. 
Rogers, 3012 Richmond. jo]4 a.m., 7% p.m.; 
summer, 8 p.m. 

Roxborough, cor. Ridge and Port Royal avs. 

Scots, Broad and Castle av. 

St. Mary Street Mission, 627 St. Mary. 

Second, Twenty-first and Walnut : Rev. 
Charles Wood, 1). D., Overbrook. n a.m., 
8 p.m. 

Second Germantown, Tulpehocken and Greene : 
Rev. C. P. H. Nason, 6123 Greene. 10^ a.m., 
8 p.m. 

Second Street Mission, Second bel. Norris: Rev. 
William Greenough, D. D., 1712 Franklin. 2^, 
8 P.M. 

Somerville Mission, Somerville : 11 a.m., 8 

P.M. 

South Broad Street, Broad bel. Ritner: Rev. 
Charles W. Nevin, 1822 S. Broad 

South, Third bel. Federal : Rev. D. Stuart 
Moore, D.D., 306 Redwood. 10]^ a.m., 7^ p.m. ; 
summer, 8 p.m. 

Southwestern, N. E. cor. Twentieth and Fitz- 
water : Rev. J. L. Weaver, 723 S. Twentieth, 
ioj^ a.m., 7^. p.m. 

Summit Church, Frank and Greene, German- 
town, under care of Second Church, German- 
town : Rev. Francis Palmer, Frank and Sherman. 
10% a.m., 8 P.M. 

Susquehanna Avenue, Susquehanna av. and 
Marshall: Rev. R. T. Jones, D. D., 2560 N. 
Eighth, io 1 /^ a.m., 7 l / 2 p.m. 

Tabernacle, Thirty-seventh and Chestnut : 
Rev. Henry C. McCook, D. D., The Manse, 
3700 Chestnut. io l / 2 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Tabor, Eighteenth and Christian : Rev. Willis 



B. Skillman, 1808 Christian. 
p.m. 



I0'4 A.M., 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



27 



Temple, N. E. cor. Franklin and Thompson : 
Rev. Francis A. Horton, D. D., 1705 Oxford. 
10J4 a.m., 7^ p. m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Tennent Memorial, Fifty-second and Filbert : 
Rev. I. Beatty Howell. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Tenth, cor. Spruce and Seventeenth : Rev. 
Marcus A. Brownson, D. D., 218 S. Twentieth. 
11 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Third (Old Pine Street), Pine ab. Fourth : 
Rev. Hughes 0. Gibbons, D.D., 323 Pine. 10^ 
a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Tioga, Tioga bel. Sixteenth : Rev. William L. 
Ledwith, D. D., 1531 Tioga. 10% a.m., 7^ 
p.m. 

Trinity, Frankford av. and Cambria: Rev. 
Andrew J. Sullivan, D. D., 2025 Stella av. 
10^ A.M., "j l / 2 p.m. 

Trinity, Chestnut Hill : Rev. C. C. Tyler. 11 

A.M., 8 P.M. 

Union. Sixty-sixth and Woodland av. : Rev. 
Alexander Waddell, 1916 Christian. 10% a.m., 

4 P.M. 

Union Mission Chapel , River road, Shawniont : 
David Bentley, superintendent, 1440 N. Thir- 
teenth. 

Union Tabernacle, York and Coral : Rev. 
Robert Hunter, D. D., 2828 Frankford av. io!/ 2 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

Wakefield, Main bel. Fisher's lane, German- 
town : Rev. Thomas G. F. Hill, 23 Fisher's lane. 
10% a.m., 8 P.M. 

Walnut Street, Walnut west of Thirty-ninth : 
Rev. Stephen W. Dana, D. D., 3955 Walnut; 
Rev. S. Ward Righter, asst., 3741 Spruce. 10% 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Waterloo Street Mission. Waterloo bel. Lehigh 
av. : Rev. F. M. Earle, 2614 N. Seventh. 

West Green Street, cor. Nineteenth and Green : 
Rev. W. E. Marden, 527 N. Eighteenth, io 1 ^ 
a.m., 7 l / 2 P.M. 

West Hope, Aspen ab. Fortieth : Rev. W. H. 
McCaughey, D. D., 754 Preston. eo$£ a.m. 

7^ P.M. 

Westminster, Broad and Fitzwater: Rev. 
Charles M. Alford, 1337 Reed. io*^ A.M., 7% 

P.M. 

West Park, Fifty-fourth and Lansdowne av. : 
Rev. J. Henry Sharpe, D. D., 4006 Pine, io^j 
A.M., j l / 2 P.M. 

West Side, Germantown, Winona and Pulaski: 
Rev. W. Porter Lee, 334 School lane. 11 a.m., 

8 P.M. 

West Tioga, 2129 Westmoreland : Rev. A. 
Kennedy Caswell, 2005 Westmoreland. 

Wharton Street, Ninth and Wharton : Rev. 
Frederick W. Johnson, 827 Wharton. iol4 a.m., 

8 P.M. 

Wissahickon, Ridge and Manayunkavs. : Rev. 
D. H. Martin, Wissahickon. 

Wissinoming, Wissinoming : Rev. George H. 
Broening. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 

Woodland, S. E. cor. Forty-second and Pine : 
Rev. James Stuart Dickson, 212 S. Forty-first. 
io 1 ^ a.m., 8 P.M. 

Zion (German 1 ), Twenty-eighth and Mount 
Pleasant: Rev. C. Theodore Albrecht, 1254 N. 
Twenty-eighth. 

CAMDEN AND VICINITY. 

Calvary, Second and Pearl : Rev. A. W. 
Spooner, 414 N. Second. 1054 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Central Chapel, Eleventh and Cooper. Sun- 
day-school. 



First, cor. Fifth and Penn : Rev. W. Dayton 
Roberts. 

First, Gloucester City, cor. Monmouth and 
Burlington: Rev. Henry Reeves, Ph. D. 

Liberty Park (German), Liberty Park: Rev. 
Charles Schneegass. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Second, Fourth and Benson : Rev. James C. 
Russell, 426 Benson. 

Haddonfield : Rev. W. W. Casselberry. 

Merchantville : Rev. I. Mench Chambers. 

Blackwood : Rev. Frederick R. Brace, Ph. D. 

Woodbury : Rev. Edward Dillon. 

Calvary Chapel, Seventh and Woodland av. : 
T. H. Davidson, supt. 



PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL. 

Bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania : Rt. Rev. 
Ozi William Whitaker. D. D., 4027 Walnut 
office, Church House, Twelfth and Walnut 
Rev.Winfield S. Baer, Secretary of the Bishop 
office, Church House, Twelfth and Walnut. 

Ven. Cyrus T. Brady. Archdeacon of the Dio- 
cese, 4439 Spruce, office Church House, Twelfth 
and Walnut ; Treasurer of Episcopal and 
Convention Fund, Benjamin G. Godfrey, 
Church House, Twelfth and Walnut. 

CONVOCATIONS. 

Germantown. — Rev. J. De W. Perry, D. D., 
Dean; Rev. Joseph Wood. Jr., Secretary. 

Northeast, Philadelphia. — Rev. H. Richard Har- 
ris, D. D., Dean; Rev. Llewellyn N. Caley, 
Secretary, 622 N. Eleventh. 

Northwest, Philadelphia. — Rev. Benjamin Wat- 
son, D. D., President; Rev. H. M. G. Huff, 
Secretary. 

Southeast, Philadelphia. — Rev. Leverett Brad- 
ley, Dean; Rev. H. L. Duhring, Secretary, 
411 Spruce. 

Southwest, Philadelphia. — Rev. W. N. Mc- 
Vickar, D. D., President ; Rev. John S. Bun- 
ting, Secretary, 2107 Chestnut. 

West Philadelphia. — Rev. C. A. Maison, D. D., 
Dean; Rev. S. Lord Giiberson, Secretary, 
6901 Woodland av. 

OFFICERS OF CHURCH INSTITUTIONS IN PHILA- 
DELPHIA. 

Secretary of Standing Committee : W. W. Fra- 
zier, 400 Chestnut. 

Secretary of Hospital of the Protestant Episco- 
pal Church, of Trustees of Protestant Episco- 
pal Church in Diocese, and of the Trustees and 
Overseers of the Divinity School : Rev. Win- 
field S. Baer, Church House, Twelfth and 
Walnut. 

Treasurer of Christmas Fund : George Harrison 
Fisher, 308 Walnut. 

Secretary of the Board of Missions of the Dio- 
cese of Pennsylvania : Rev. T.William David- 
son, Norwood, Pa. 

Treasurer of Board of Missions : Rowland Evans, 
225 S Sixth. 

Treasurer of Hospital of Protestant Episcopal 
Church : William W. Frazier, 400 Chestnut. 

Secretary of the Bishop White Prayer-Book So- 
ciety : R. Francis Wood, 108 S. Fourth; Treas- 
urer, William B. Whitney, 714 Reading Ter- 
minal, Twelfth and Market. 

Treasurer of Corporation for Relief of Widows 
and Children of Deceased Clergymen : W. W. 
Montgomery, 133 S. Twelfth. 



28 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Registrar of the Diocese: Rev. S. F. Hotchkin, 
Church House, Twelfth and Walnut. 

Treasurer of Clergy Daughters' Fund : Charles 
W. Cushman, 224 Walnut. 

Treasurer of Evangelical Educational Society : 
Alfred Lee; General Secretary, Rev. R. C. 
Matlack, D. D., 1224 Chestnut. 

Treasurer of Society for the Advancement of 
Christianity in Pennsylvania : George W. Hun- 
ter, 219 S. Third; Corresponding Secretary, 
Rev. John K. Murphy, D. D., High st., Ger- 
mantown. 

Sunday-School Association of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in Diocese of Pennsylvania : 
President, Rt. Rev. Ozi William Whitaker, 
D. D. ; Vice-Presidents, George C. Thomas, 
Orlando Crease ; Recording Secretary, Ewing 
L.Miller; Corresponding Secretary, Rev. H. 
L. Duhring, 411 Spruce ; Treasurer, Washing- 
ton J. Peale, Drexel Building. 

Protestant Episcopal City Mission : President, 
Rt. Rev. Ozi William Whitaker, D.D.; Treas- 
urer, Efhngham Perot, 401 Market ; Superin- 
tendent, Rev. H. L. Duhring, Central Office, 
411 Spruce; Secretary, James C. Sellers, 511 
Franklin Building; Secretary to Superinten- 
dent, Rev. T. J. Taylor, 411 Spruce. 

Missionaries to Public Institutions : Rev. Thomas 
L. Franklin, D. D., 2316 Parrish ; Rev. William 
S. Heaton, Missionary to Almshouse, 2526 N. 
Sixth ; Rev. John G. Furey, Missionary to 
Homes, etc., 36 Seymour, Germantown ; Rev. 
G. A. Latimer, 4131 Westminster av.; and Rev. 
W. S. Neill, 2038 Christian. 

Permanent Court for the Trial of Clergymen : 
Rev. J. N. Blanchard, D. D., Rev. W. N. Mc- 
Vickar, D. D., Rev. R. S. Eastman, Rev. W. 
B. Bodine, D. D., Rev. T. S. Rumney, D. D., 
Rev. T. A. Tidball, D. D., Rev. R. W. Micou, 
Rev. J. K. Murphy, D. D., Rev. Daniel M. 
Bates, Rev. Simeon C. Hill. 

Divinity School, Fiftieth and Woodland : Rev. 
Edward T. Bartlett, D. D., Dean; Rev. E. P. 
Gould, S. T. D., Rev. Fleming James, D. D., 
Rev. L. W. Batten, Ph. D., Rev. R. W. Micou, 
Rev. L. M. Robinson, A. B., Rev. John Fulton, 
D. D., LL. D. 

Advent, York and Buttonwood : Rev. John P. 
Tyler, 517 York av. 10^ a.m., jV 2 p.m. 

Advocate (Memorial), Eighteenth and Dia- ' 
mond: Rev. W. W. Silvester, S. T. D., 2120 j 
N. Eighteenth ; Rev. Alsop Leffingwell, 2046 
Gratz. ioy 2 a.m., 734 p.m. 

All Saints, Twelfth and Fitzwater : Rev. Rob- 
ert McKay, D. D., Twelfth and Fitzwater; 
Rev. H. L. Duhring, rector emeritus. 

All Saints, Torresdale, Bristol turnpike, n. 
Stevenson's Lane : Rev. Rush S. Eastman, Tor- ! 
resdale. io l / 2 a.m. ; services Chapel of the Re- 
deemer, Andalusia, 3 y 2 p.m. 

All Souls (for the Deaf), Franklin ab. Green: 
Rev. J. M. Koehler, 4625 Whittier, Germantown. 
October to July, 2% p.m. ; July to October, \o x / 2 

A.M. 

Annunciation, Twelfth and Diamond : Rev. 
Daniel I. Odell, 2112 N. Twelfth; Rev. Albert 
Daniels Willson, asst., 2112 N. Twelfth. j%, 
10, xo l / 2 a.m., 8 P.M. 

Ascension, Broad bel. South : Rev. G.Woolsey 
Hodge, 334 S. Thirteenth ; Rev. Louis A. Lam- 
phor, asst., 1229 Locust. 7*4, xoV 2 , ii l / 2 a.m., 

2^, jYi P.M. 



Atonement, Seventeenth and Summer : Rev 
Benj. Watson, D. D., rector emeritus, 126 S. 
Eighteenth. 

Beloved Disciple, Columbia av. ab. Twentieth : 
Rev. George R. Savage, 1619 Oxford. 8, 10% 
a.m., -jY a p.m. 

Burd Orphan Asylum Chapel, Market W. of 
Sixty-third: Rev. S. E. Snively, M. D., Burd 
Asylum. io*4 a.m., 4 p.m. 

Calvary, Manheim and Pulaski av., German- 
town : Rev. James DeWolfe Perry, D. D., Man- 
heim st. ; Rev. James Odgers Mcllhenney, Ger- 
mantown, asst. 11 a.m., 4 p.m.; summer, 5 p.m. 

Calvary Monumental, Forty-first ab. Brown: 
Rev. Jesse Higgins, 4018 Aspen. 7, ioy 2 a.m., 
7.40 P.M. 

Christ, Second ab. Market : Rev. C. Ellis Ste- 
vens, LL. D., D. C. L., 2217 Spruce; Rev. Ed- 
ward Riggs, 1538 Pine, Rev. Francis C. Stein- 
metz, 2434 Columbia av., assts. 11 a.m., 4 p.m. 

Christ Church Chapel, Pine bel. Twentieth : 
Rev. Edward Riggs, 1538 Pine. 11 a.m., 4 p.m. 

Christ Ch. Hospital Chapel, Midvale and Bel- 
mont av. Rev. Gideon J. Burton, 4003 Chest- 
nut, ioj^ A.M., 2 l / 2 P.M. 

Christ, cor. Sixth and Venango : Rev. Thomas 
J. Taylor, A. M., 3114 N. Fifteenth ; Rev. H. C. 
Mayer, 223 S. Forty-second, associate. 

Christ, Germantown, Tulpehocken cor. Adams: 
Rev. John B. Falkner, D. D., 36 W. Tulpe- 
hocken; Rev. Charles H. Arndt, 6406 German- 
town av., asst. 11 a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Church Home for Children Chapel, Angora : 
10^ a.m., 4 and s p.m. according to season. 

Covenant, Twenty-seventh and Girard av. : 
Rev. J. J. Joyce Moore, 2828 Girard av. ; Rev. 
E. G. Hawkes, M. D., asst. 

Crucifixion (colored), Bainbridge ab. Eighth: 
Rev. Henry L. Phillips, 707 Florida. 10% a.m., 

8 P.M. 

Educational Home Chapel, Forty-ninth and 
Greenway av. : 10% a.m., 7 p.m. 

Elmwood Mission, Eighty-ninth and Vance. 

Emmanuel, Marlborough ab. E. Girard av. : 
Rev. Dudley D. Smith, 1847 Frankford av. 10% 
a.m., 7% P - M - 

Emmanuel, Frankford av. and Hickory, 
Holmesburg : Rev. Arnold H. Hord, Holmes- 
burg; Rev. D. C. Millett, D. Director emeritus. 
ioy 2 a.m. ; also 7% p.m. from Easter to Christ- 
mas. 

Emmanuello (Italian Mission), 1024 Christian: 
Rev. Michele Zara, 756 S. Tenth. 

Epiphany, Chestnut ab. Eighteenth : Rev. T. 
A. Tidball, D. D., 2206 Trinity Place; Rev. O. 
S. Michael, asst., 3642 N. Broad. 11 a.m., 4 p.m. 

Epiphany Chapel, cor. Twenty-third and 
Cherry : Rev. O. S. Michael. 

Evangelists, Catharine ab. Seventh : Rev. 
Henry R. Percival, D. D., 1110 Spruce; Rev. 
Charles W. Robinson, B. D., priest in charge, 
1517 Mifflin. 7^,10^, 11 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Gloria Dei (Old Swedes'), Swanson bel. Chris- 
tian : Rev. Snyder B. Simes, 916 Swanson. 

Good Shepherd, Cumberland E. of Frankford 
av. : Rev. J. A. Goodfellow, 2745 Frankford av. 
8, 10% a.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. ; winter, 7 l / 2 p.m. 

Grace, Twelfth and Cherry : Rev. H. Richard 
Harris, D. D., 140 N. Twenty-first; Rev. C. K. 
Penny, 1130 Spruce, asst. 11 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Grace Church Chapel, Girard and Leidy avs., 
nr. Fortieth : Rev. C. E. Spalding, 428 S. Forty- 
second. IO^ A.M., 7% P - M - 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



29 



Grace, Mount Airy : Rev. Simeon C. Hill, The 
Rectory, Gowen av., Mount Airy. 10% a.m., 4 
p.m. ; June to September, 5 p.m. 

Holy Apostles, cor. Twenty-first and Christian: 
Rev. Henry S. Getz, 3210 Powelton av. ; Rev. 
John S. Bunting, 2107 Chestnut, Rev. William 
S. Neill, 2038 Christian, assistants ; Rev. C. D. 
Cooper, D. D., rector emeritus, 2026 Spruce. 
\o x / 2 a.m., 7^ p.m. ; Wednesday, 8 p.m. 

Holy Comforter, Forty-eighth and Haverford 
av. : Rev. William F. C. Morsell, 319 Earlham, 
Germantown. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Holy Comforter Memorial, Nineteenth and 
Titan: Rev. W. H. Graff, 1619 Christian; 
Rev. G. Wharton McMullen, asst. 7, 10, ro l / 2 
a.m., iYx p.m. 

Holy Communion (Memorial) Chapel, Twenty- 
seventh and Wharton: Rev. Henry S. Getz, 
3210 Powelton av. ; Rev. W. F. Ayer, 2337 
Wharton. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Holy Innocents, Washington and Wissinom- 
ing, Tacony : Rev. L. R. F. Davis, 7016 Key- 
stone, Tacony. 8, 10.40 a.m., 7% p.m. 

Holy Spirit, Eleventh and Snyder av. : Rev. 
Samuel H. Boyer, 1919 S. Broad. 11 a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

Holy Trinity, Nineteenth and Walnut : Rev. 
William N. McVickar, D. D., 1904 Walnut; 
Rev. L. B. Edwards, Rev. James F. Bullitt, 
125 S. Twenty-second, assistants. Winter, 11 
a.m., 4 p.m. ; summer, 5 p.m. 

Holy Trinity (Memorial) Chapel, Twenty-sec- 
ond and Spruce : Rev. Robert A. Mayo, 230 S. 
Twentieth; Rev. R. M. Beach, asst. 11 a.m., 
8 p.m. 

Home of the Merciful Saviour. Forty-fourth 
and Baltimore av.: Rev. Robert F. Innes, 3819 
Walnut. 11 a.m., 4% p.m. ; Thursday, 11 a.m. ; 
daily, 4% p.m. 

Hospital of Protestant Episcopal Church 
Chapel, Front and Lehigh av.: Rev. W. W. 
Taylor. 9 a.m., 3% p.m. 

Hospital Mission Chapel, E. Huntingdon and 
Filmore : Rev. John P. Bagley, 156 E. Hunting- 
don. 10^2 a.m., 2, -]Y 2 P.M. 

House of Prayer, Branchtown, Twenty-sec- 
ond ward : Rev. George Bringhurst, Locust av., 
Germantown. 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Incarnation, cor. Broad and Jefferson : Rev. 
Joseph D. Newlin, D. D., 532 Marshall; Rev. 
Kenneth S. Guthrie, Ph. D., 1203 N. Forty-first, 
Rev. A. A. Rickert, 1402 Bouvier, assts. 

Mediator, Nineteenth and Lombard : Rev. 
Samuel E. Appleton, D. D., 1804 Delancey; 
Rev. Charles E. Milnor, 120 N. Seventeenth, 
asst. 11 a.m., 7% P.M. 

Messiah, N. E. cor. Broad and Federal : Rev. 
S. R. Colladay, 1163 S. Broad. 7%, 10% a.m., 

lYl P.M. 

Messiah, Thompson and E. Huntingdon : 
Rev. C. L. Fulforth, 2640 E. Huntingdon. 8, 
10% a.m., -]Y 2 P.M. 

Nativity, Eleventh and Mount Vernon : Rev. 
Llewellyn N. Caley, 622 N. Eleventh. 10^ a.m., 
7^ P.M. 

Prince of Peace, Mission of Holy Trinity 
Church, Twenty-second and Morris : Rev. W. 
N. McVickar, D. D. 

Redeemer (Seamen's Mission), S. W. cor. 
Front and Queen: Rev. Francis M. Burch, pec- 
tor; Rev. E. W. Greene, minister in charge, 1258 
S. Fifty-eighth. 10^ a.m., 7% p.m. 



Redemption, Twenty-second and Callowhill : 
Rev. Thomas R. List, 400 N. Twenty-second. 

Resurrection, Broad and Tioga : Rev. Joseph 
R. Moore, Broad and Tioga. 

St. Alban, Ridge and Fairthorne avs., Roxbor- 
ough : Rev. Charles S. Lyons, Fairthorne and 
Ridge avs. 

St. Alban, Olney : Rev. Samuel Upjohn, 
D. D., 148 Coulter, Germantown. 

St. Ambrose, Second bel. Ontario : Rev, 
Thomas J. Taylor, 3114 N. Fifteenth, Rev. H. 

C. Mayer, 233 S. Forty-second. 

St. Andrew, Eighth ab. Spruce: Rev. Wilbur 
F. Paddock, D. D., 3911 Locust; Rev. John G. 
Bawn, 3247 Sansom, asst. 11 a.m., 4 p.m.; sum- 
mer, 5 p.m. ; December to April, 7% p.m. 

St. Andrew, S. W. cor. Thirty-sixth and Bar- 
ing: Rev. Charles M. Armstrong, 3606 Spring 
Garden. 7^, 10% A.m., 8 p.m. 

St. Asaph, Bala : Rev. Charles S. Olmsted, 

D. D. 11 a.m., 4^ P.M. 

St. Barnabas, Sixty-fifth and Girard av. : Rev. 
Samuel P. Kelly, 501 N. Sixty-fifth. 10% A.M., 
7^ P.M. 

St. Barnabas, Third and Dauphin : Rev. J. R. 
L. Nisbett, 169 W. Susquehanna ave. 

St. Clement, Twentieth and Cherry: Rev. 
George H. Moffett; Rev. W. C Clapp, Rev. C. C. 
Quinn, Rev. Erskine Wright, assistants, 2026 
Cherry. Holy Communion, Sundays at 7, 8, 
914 and 11 a.m., and daily at 7 a.m., and on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays and all saints' days at 
9% A.M. 

St. David, Dupont opposite Wabash av., Mana- 
yunk: Rev. Francis A. D. Launt, 154 Church; 
Rev. J. W. Kaye, asst., 2820 N. Broad. 10% 

A.M., 7% P.M. 

St. Elisabeth, Sixteenth and Mifflin': Rev. 
William McGarvey ; Rev. Maurice L. Cowl, 
Rev. William L. Hayward, Rev. Frederick D. 
Lobdell, Rev. Thomas Bingham, Rev. H. W. 
Blackman, Rev. J. M. Raker, Rev. W* S. Trow- 
bridge, Rev. Alonzo P. Curtis, Rev. Herbert 
Parrish, assts., 1517 Mifflin. j l / 2 , 9, 10% a.m., 
7% p.m. ; week days, 7 a.m. 

St. Faith, Sixth and Bristol : Rev. Thomas J. 
Taylor, 31 14 N. Fifteenth. 

St. George, Sixty-first and Hazel av. 

St. George's Chapel, cor. E. Venango and 
Edgemont : Rev. John Totty, 3553 Janney. 

St. James, cor. Twenty -second and Walnut: 
Rev. Joseph N. Blanchard, D. D., 2208 Walnut; 
Rev. Horace A. Walton, Rev. Walter Lowrie, 
assistants, Morton Guild House, 2210 Sansom. 8, 
10^ a.m., 4, 8 P.M. 

St. James, Fifty-second bel. Master: Rev. H. 
B. Martin, M. D., 1488 N. Fifty-fifth. 7^, 10^ 

A.M., J l / 2 P.M. 

St. James, Kingses-sing, Sixty-ninth and Wood- 
land av. : Rev. S. Lord Gilberson, 6901 Wood- 
land av. 10% A.M., ji/i P.M. 

St. James the Less, Clearfield and Nicetown 
lane. Falls of Schuylkill : Rev. Robert Ritchie, 
nr. church. 10% a.m., 4 p.m. 

St. John's, Brown bel. Third : Rev. R. Heber 
Barnes, 600 N. Thirty-second. 

St. John the Baptist, Main and Mehl, German- 
town : Rev. Henry R. Gummey, 163 W. Penn- 
7%, gy 2 , ioy 2 a.m., 3, 7^ P.M. 

St. John Chrysostom, Twenty-eighth and 
Susquehanna av. : Rev. Joseph Sherlock, B. D., 
2157 N. Twenty-eighth. 7, 10% a.m., 7% p.m. 



3° 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



St. John the Divine, Twenty-second and 
Huntingdon : Rev. W. W. Silvester, S. T. D., 
2120 N. Eighteenth. 

St. John the Evangelist, Third and Reed : 
Rev. John Moncure, 1423 S. Sixth. 10% A.M., 
7 l /2 p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

St. John's Free Church, Cemetery av. and 
Emerald ; Rev. R. H. Wright, 3104 Frankford av. 

St. Jude, Franklin ab. Brown : Rev. Charles 
Logan, 816 Franklin. 10% A.M., 8 p.m. 

St. Luke, Thirteenth bel. Spruce: Rev. Lev- 
erett Bradley, 1217 Spruce ; Rev. William Bower, 
asst., 405 S. Thirteenth. 11 A.M., 4 p.m. ; No- 
vember to April, 8 p.m. 

St. Luke, Main and Coulter, Germantown : 
Rev. Samuel Upjohn, D. D., 148 W. Coulter; 
Rev. G. H. Dennison, asst. 

St. Luke the Beloved Physician (Memorial), 
Bustleton : Rev. Samuel F. Hotchkin, nr. church. 

St. Mark, Locust ab. Sixteenth : Rev. Alfred 
G. Mortimer, D. D., rector; Rev. N. D. Van 
Syckel, B. D., Rev. S. C. Hughson, Rev. W. 
K. Damuth, assistants, 1625 Locust. 7, 8, 10%, 
11^ a.m., 3, i,y 2 p.m.; Advent and Lent, 8 
p.m. 

St. Mark's, Frankford, Frankford av. nr. Unity: 
Rev. John B. Harding, 4647 Penn. 7, 9, 10^ 
a.m., i l / 2 P.M. 

St. -Martin-in-the-Fields, Willow Grove av. and 
St. Martin's Lane, Wissahickon Heights : Rev. 
Jacob Le Roy, St. Martin's lane, Wissahickon 
Heights. Matins, second and fourth Sundays, 
10% a.m. ; other Sundays, 11 a.m. ; holy com- 
munion, second and fourth Sundays, n a.m.; 
other Sundays, 8 a.m. Even song, 4^ p.m. 

St. Martin's, Oak lane : Rev. Walter Jordan, 
Oak Lane. 

St. Mary, . Locust ab. Thirty-ninth : Rev. 
Thomas C. Yarnall, D. D., 3914 Locust; Rev. 
John Dows Hills, associate rector, 4317 Sansom. 
l l /2, 10% a.m., 4 p.m. ; summer, 5 p.m. 

St. Mary's Chapel, Mission of St. Mark's, 
Bainbridge ab. Eighteenth : Rev. S. C. Hugh- 
son, 1625 Locust. 

St. Matthew, Girard av. and Eighteenth : Rev. 
Robert W. Forsyth, 1731 Girard av. ; Rev. J. 
P. Hubbard, rector emeritus. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

St. Matthias, Nineteenth and Wallace : Rev. 
Henry Anstice, D. D.. 1917 Wallace. io l / 2 
a.m., 7^ P.M. 

St. Michael, High nr. Morton, Germantown : 
Rev. John K. Murphy, D. D., nr. church; Rev. 
William Ely, 141 School lane, Rev. A. W. Wilde, 
assts. 8, 10% a.m., \y 2 p.m.; summer, 5 p.m. 

St. Michael and All-Angels' Chapel, Forty- 
third and Wallace: Rev. Alden Welling, 612 N. 
Forty-third. 

St. Nathaniel's Mission, Allegheny av. and E : 
Rev. John P. Bagley. 

St. Paul, Third bel. Walnut: Rev. William 
McGarvey ; Rev. Alonzo P. Curtis, Rev. Freder- 
ick D. Lobdell, assts., 1517 Mifflin. j~%, ™y 2 

A.M., 7^ P.M. 

St. Paul's Chapel, Forty-seventh and Kingsess- 
ing av. : Rev. I. Newton Stanger, D. D., min- 
ister in charge, Forty-seventh and Kingsessing 
av. -]Y 2y roy 2 a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. Paul, Chestnut Hill : Rev. J. Andrews Har- 
ris, S. T. D., nr. church; Rev. J. T. Mitchell, 
S. T. B. , asst. 8, ioJ4 a.m., 4 p.m.; summer, 5 p.m. 

St. Paul's Memorial of William Welsh, Ken- 
sington av. and Butler: Rev. Edwin J. Humes, 
3825 Kensington av. 



St. Peter, Third and Pine: Rev. Richard H. 
Nelson, 717 Pine; Rev. Charles P. B. Jefferys, Jr.; 
Ph. B., 232 S. Fourth, Rev. J. Alan Montgomery, 
Rev. Bernard Schulte, assts., St. Peter's House, 
100 Pine. October to May, 11 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

St. Peter, cor. Wayne and Harvey, German- 
town : Rev. Theodore S. Rumney, D. D., cor. 
Wayne and Harvey; Rev. J. M. Hayman, 43 
Harvey, asst. 7%, 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. ; June to 
October, 8 p.m. 

St. Philip, Forty-second and Baltimore av. : 
Rev. William H. Falkner, 428 S. Forty-second. 
io l / 2 A.M., 7^ P-M. 

St. Sauveur (French), Twenty-second and De- 
lancey Place : Rev. C. F. B. Miel, D.D., Wayne, 
Pa. 11 a.m., 4 P.M. 

St. Simeon, Lehigh av. and Ninth : Rev. 
Edgar Cope, 2430 N. Broad ; Rev. F. A. Mac- 
Millen, asst. 8, io l / 2 a.m., 7^ p.m. 

St. Stephen, Tenth ab. Chestnut : Rev. Elwood 
Worcester, Ph. D., 1318 Locust; Rev. J. L. 
Miller, parish house, Rev. S. E. Snively, M. D., 
Burd Orphan Asylum, assistants. 11 a.m., 4 
p.m.; summer, 5 p.m.; prayer, daily, 12 m. 

St. Stephen, Terrace and Hermit, Manayunk : 
Rev. Elliston J. Perot, 3749 Manayunk av. 
7, 10^ a.m., jY 2 p.m. 

St. Thomas (colored), Twelfth bel. Walnut: 
Rev. E. G. Knight, minister in charge, 151 5 N. 
Twelfth. 8, 11 a.m., 8 p.m. 

St. Timothy, Reed bel. Eighth : Rev. W. W. 
Mix, 1544 S. Thirteenth. 

St. Timothy, Ridge av. nr. Shur's lane, Rox- 
borough : Rev. R. E. Dennison, rector; Rev. 
Franz M. W. Schneeweiss, asst. 7, 9, 10^ a.m., 
4 p.m. 

The Saviour, Thirty-eighth above Chestnut : 
Rev. William B. Bodine, D. D., 4025 Walnut; 
Rev. Henry J. Beagen, 4423 Sansom, Rev. 
Julius G. Bierck, 220 S. Forty-third, assts. 11 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

Transfiguration, Thirty-fourth and Woodland 
av : Rev. William H. Bown, 3218 Powelton av. 

Trinity, Southwark, Catharine ab. Second : 
Rev. Horace F. Fuller, 220 German. 

Trinity Chapel, Crescentville : Rev. Linus 
Parsons Bissell. Winter, 3^ p.m.; summer, 4 p.m. 

Trinity, Oxford rd. nr. Second street turnpike : 
Rev. Linus Parsons Bissell. 10 a.m. 

Trinity Mission, Rockledge, Pa. 

Zion, cor. Eighth and Columbia av. : Rev. C. 
Campbell Walker, 1707 N. Eighth. 10^ a.m.. 
734 P-M. 

CAMDEN AND VICINITY. 

Ascension, Sussex and Ridgway, Gloucester 
City: Rev. A. E. Todrig. io 1 ^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Christ, Riverton : Rev. R. Bowden Shepherd. 

Christ, Woodbury : Rev. A. L. Urban. 

Grace, Haddonfield : Rev. Owen J. Davies, 
rector; Rev. Gustavus M. Murray, rector emeri- 
tus. 

Grace, Merchantville : Rev. R. G. Moses. 

Our Saviour, Broadway and Viola : Rev. E. R. 
Baxter, Ferry av. and Fillmore. 10^ a.m., 7% 
p.m. 

St. Augustine Chapel (colored), 744 Chestnut : 
Rev. Mr. Henderson, io 3 ^ A.M., iY 2 , 7% p.m. 

St. James' Chapel, Front and North : Rev. 
Howard Stoy, 525 Linden. toV 2 a.m. 

St. John's, Broadway and Royden : Rev. Gil- 
bert R. Underhill. 7%, xo l / 2 a.m., 7^ P.M. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



31 



St. Paul, Market ab. Fourth : Rev. R. A. 
Roderich ; Rev. Howard Stoy, asst., 525 Linden. 

1%, I0]4 A.M., 2 l / 2 , 7% P.M. 

St. Paul's Chapel, Cooper ab. Eleventh : Rev. 
Howard Stoy, 525 Linden. 7^ p.m. 

St. Peter's, Clarksboro : Rev. Jesse Y. Burk. 

St. Wilfrid, Cramer Hill : Rev. Roland Ring- 
wait, Cramer Hill. 7 l / 2 , 10^ a.m., 4%, 7^ p.m. 

Trinity, Moorestown : Rev. J. F. Fenton, Ph. 
D., in charge. 

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA. 

(dutch reformed.) 

First, cor. Fifteenth and Dauphin : Rev. Peter 
H. Milliken, Ph. D., 1433 Poplar. 10^ a.m., 
7^4 p.m.; Wednesday, 8 p.m.; C. E., Friday, 8 

P.M. 

Second, Seventh ab. Brown : Rev. Elijah W. 
Greene, 531 N. Seventh. 10^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Fourth, Cotton and Cresson, Manayunk : Rev. 
P. J. Kain, 145 Grape. %6% a.m., 7% p.m. 

Fifth, Susquehanna av. nr. Cedar : Rev. C. 
F. C. Suckow, 2223 E. Susquehanna. 10% 
a.m., 8 P.M. 

South Philadelphia, Nineteenth and Mifflin : 
Rev. Charles S. Wyckoff, 1725 Mifflin. 10% 
A.M., 7% P.M. 

Talmage Memorial, Pechin and Rector, Rox- 
borough : Rev. Henry C. Willoughby, 387 Con- 
arroe nr. Mitchell, Roxborough. ioj/£ a.m., 
l l A p-m. 

REFORMED (GERMAN) CHURCH IN 

THE UNITED STATES. 

English. 

Reformed Church Publication House, 1025 Arch. 

Bethany Tabernacle, Twentieth and Dauphin : 
Rev. Henry A. Bomberger, 2300 N. Twentieth. 

IO% A.M., 8 P.M. 

Bethel, Twenty-first and Tasker : Rev. Wilson 
Delaney, 1605 S. Twenty-second. 10% a.m., 
8 p.m. 

Calvary, Twenty-ninth and Lehigh av. : Rev. 
A. Noll. 2714 Lehigh av. xq 1 / 2 a.m., 7 x / 2 p.m. 



Rev. James 



Christ, Green bel. Sixteenth 
Crawford, D. D., 1714 Mount Vernon, io** 
a.m., 7% P.M. 

First, Tenth and Wallace: Rev. John H. 
Sechler, D. D., 708 N. Sixteenth. 10% a.m., 7^ 

P.M. 

Grace, Eleventh and W. Huntingdon : Rev. 
A. S. Bromer, 614 Diamond. 

Heidelberg, Nineteenth and Oxford : Rev. R. 
C. Zartman, D. D., 1629 N. Nineteenth. 10^ 
A.m., 7% P.M. 

St. John, Fortieth and Spring Garden : Rev. 
Henry H. Apple, 4117 Powelton ave. 

Messiah, Ninth and Snyder av. : Rev. C. B. 
Alspach, 1233 Jackson. 10% A m., 7% p.m. 

Tioga : Rev. E. W. Middleton, 1529 Westmore- 
land. IO% A.M., 7% P.M. 

Trinity, Seventh bel. Oxford; Rev. C. H. 
Coon, 1541 N. Seventh, ioj^ a.m. 



iVa. p.m. 



German. 

Bethlehem, Norris and Blair : Rev. F. W. 
Kratz, 1650 Vienna. io l / 2 a.m., 7 l / 2 p.m. 

Emanuel, Thirty-eighth and Baring : Rev. E. 
A. Hofer, 413 N. Thirty-eighth. \o% a.m., 7^ 
p.m. 



Emanuel, Bridesburg : Rev. John B. Forster, 
2631 Weiser. 10 a.m., 7^ p#i. 

Salem, Fairmount av. bel. Fourth : Rev. F. W. 
Berlemann, D. D., 341 Fairmount av. ioi<( a.m., 
7)4. p.m. 

St. John, Frankford and Ontario : Rev. John 
Voegelin, 3391 Frankford av. 

St. Lucas, Twenty-sixth bel. Girard av. : Rev. 
M. F. Dumstrey, 921 N. Twenty-sixth. 

St. Mark, Fifth ab. Huntingdon : Rev. G. A. 
Scheer, 2404 N. "Sixth. io l / 2 a.m., 7% p.m. 

St. Matthew, Fifth ab. Venango : Rev. U. O. 
Silvius, 3725 N. Fifth. 

St. Paulus, Wharton ab. Eighteenth : Rev. 
Philip Vollmer, Ph. D., 1315 S. Cleveland. 10^ 
a.m., 7^ P.M. 

Zion, Sixth ab. Girard av. : Rev. P. H. Dip- 
pel, Ph. D., 1230 N. Sixth. 10%! a.m., 7 l / 2 

P.M. 

REFORMED EPISCOPAL. 

Bishop of the Synod of New York and Philadel- 
phia : Rev. William R. Nicholson, D. D. ; 
office, 2106 Chestnut. 

Trustees of the Theological Seminary : Bishops 
James A. Latane, D. D. (President), William 
R. Nicholson, D. D.; Revs. H. S. Hoffman, 
D. D., and W. T. Sabine, D. D. ; William A. 
Staunton (Treasurer), 35 S. Second; Rev. Wil- 
liam Tracy, D. D., 4301 Walnut, Philadelphia; 
J. Warner Hare and E. G. Keith, Chicago, 
111., and Charles H. Morton, Aldine Hotel. 

Treasurer of the General Council of the Reformed 
Episcopal Church, John Heins, 508 Walnut. 

Treasurer of New York and Philadelphia Synod, 
Joseph Barton, 1715 Jefferson. 

Faculty of Theological Seminary, Forty-third and 
Chestnut : Bishop William R. Nicholson, D.D., 
dean; Rev. J. Howard-Smith, D. D.. 4400 
Chestnut ; Rev. James William Fairley, Forty- 
third and Ludlow; Josiah H. Penniman, Ph. 
D., 4315 Sansom. 

Office of the Episcopal Recorder, 718 Sansom. 

Reformed Episcopal Publication Society, 1512 
Chestnut: Rev. William Tracy, D. D. t Presi- 
dent, 4403 Walnut ; Rev. Forrest E. Dager, D. 
D., Secretary; Rev. William A. Freemantle, 
Treasurer. 

Church Extension, Trustees of Synod of New 
York and Philadelphia: Bishop William R. 
Nicholson, D. D., President ; Rev. H. S. Hoff- 
man, D. D., 131 7 N. Broad, Secretary ; Charles 
H. Morton, Treasurer; Rev. J. Howard- 
Smith, D. D., 4400 Chestnut ; W. W. Latrope, 
Scranton, Pa. 

Atonement, Wayne and Chelten av., German- 
town: Rev. D. M. Stearns, 138 W. Chelten av. 

loY 2 A.M., 7^4 P.M. 

Christ Memorial, N. E. cor. Chestnut and 
Forty-third : Rev. William Tracy, D. D., 4301 
Walnut. zoV 2 A.M., 7^ p.m. 

Emmanuel, E. York and Sepviva : Rev. For- 
rest E. Dager, D. D., 2316 E. Dauphin. io l / 2 
A.M., 7% p.m. ; summer, 8 p.m. 

Grace Chapel, Falls of Schuylkill : Rev. Alex- 
ander Sloan, 3430 Ridge av. 10% a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Intercession, Twenty-ninth and Fletcher : Rev. 
J. Howard-Smith, D. D., 4400 Chestnut. 10% 

A.M., 7% P.M. 

Our Redeemer, Sixteenth and Oxford : Rev. 
H. S. Hoffman, D. D., 1317 N. Broad. 10% 

A.M., 7^4 P.M. 



32 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Reconciliaton, S. E. cor. Thirteenth and Tas- 
ker: Rev. F. H. Reynolds, 1633 S. Thirteenth. 
10^ a.m., 7% P.M. 

St. Luke's, cor. Penn and Orthodox, Frank- 
ford : Rev. W. A. Freemantle, M. A., 4917 Frank- 
lin, ic^ a.m., 7% P.M. 

St. Paul's, Chestnut ab. Twenty-first: Bishop 
W. R. Nicholson, D. D., 2106 Chestnut. 10^ 
a.m., 4 p.m. 

REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN (General 

Synod). 

Theological Seminary, Twentieth and Vine — 
Professors : Rev. David Steele, D. D., Sys- 
tematic Theology; Rev. M. Gailey, Hebrew 
and Church History ; Rev. James Y. Boice, 
Greek, Homilitics and Pastoral Theology. 

Treasurer of Trustees of Theological Seminary 
and Church Extension Board, Samuel T. Kerr, 
Pier 31, North Wharves. 

First, cor. Nineteenth and Federal : Rev. James 
Y. Boice, 2213 Spring Garden. 10% A.M., 4 p.m.; 
last Sunday in month, 7^ p.m. 

Second, cor. Twentieth and Vine : Rev. Wm. 
Wylie, 827 Windsor Square. 10^ a.m., 4P.M. 

Third, Oxford and Hancock : Rev. Matthew 
Gailey, 1513 Franklin. 10% a.m., 3^ p.m. 

Fourth, Nineteenth and Catharine : Rev. David 
Steele, D. D., 2102 Spring Garden. io^£ A.M., 
3 J 4 p.m. ; summer, 4 p.m. 

Fifth, Front ab. York: Rev. W. H. Gailey, 
2420 N. Sixth. 10^ A.M., 3 l / 2 p.m.; first Sun- 
day in month, 7^ p.m. 

Sixth, Front ab. Somerset : 10% a.m., 7-% p.m. 



REFORMED PRESBYTERIAN (Synod). 

First Church of the Covenanters, Seventeenth 
and Bainbridge : Rev. T. P. Stevenson, D. D. 
xo l / 2 A.M., 3% P.M. 

Second, Seventeenth bel. Race : Rev. J. C. 
McFeeters, 1511 Christian. 10^ A.M., 3^ p.m. 

Third, Deal east of Frankford av. : Rev. R. C. 
Montgomery, 129 W. Susquehanna av. xo l / 2 a.m., 
3% p.m. 

Mission of the Covenant to Israel, 735 Lom- 
bard : Rev. Moses Greenberg, missionary, ioj^ 
a.m., 8 p.m. 

ROMAN CATHOLIC. 

Archdiocese of Philadelphia : Archbishop, Most 
Rev. Patrick John Ryan, D. D., LL.D. 
Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia, Rt. Rev. E 
F. Prendergast, D. D., 1429 N. Eleventh 
Vicars-General, Rt. Rev. E. F. Prendergast 
D. D., Rt. Rev. Mgr. Nicholas Cantwell 
Chancellor and Secretary, Rev. James F. 
Loughlin, D. D. ; Archiepiscopal residence, 
Eighteenth and Summer. 

American Catholic Historical Society, 715 
Spruce: President, Rev. Hugh T. Henry; 
Vice-President, Walter George Smith ; Cor- 
responding Secretary, Rev. Herman J. Heu- 
ser; Recording Secretary, Francis A. Cunning- 
ham ; Treasurer, Ignatius J. Dohan, 1200 
Chestnut. 

Colleges and Seminaries. 

St. Joseph's College, Seventeenth and Stiles: 
President, Rev. William F. Clark, S. J. 
Augustinian College of St. Thomas of Villa- 



nova, Villanova, Del. co., Pa. : Very Rev. L. A. 
Delury, O. S. A., President. 

La Salle College, 1240 N. Broad: Brother Isi- 
dore, F. S. C, President. 

Roman Catholic High School, N. E. cor. 
Broad and Vine : Rev. Nevin F. Fisher, rector. 

Theological Seminary of St. Charles Borromeo, 
Overbrook, Pa. : Very Rev. John E. Fitzmaurice, 
D. D., rector. 

Augustinian Monastery of St. Thomas of Vil- 
lanova, Villanova. Del. co., Pa. : Rev. F. M. 
Sheeran, S. T. B., O. S. A., prior. 

St. Vincent's Seminary, Germantown : Very 
Rev. James McGill, C. M., president. 

[Many of the parishes have parochial schools 
connected with them.] 

Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul, Eighteenth 
op. Logan Square : Most Rev. P.J. Ryan, D. D., 
LL.D., Archbishop; Rev. James F. Loughlin, 

D. D., chancellor; Rev. Joseph F. O'Keefe, 
rector; Rev. John J. Rogers, Rev. James C. 
Monahan, Rev. J. F. McQuade, assistants, 225 
N. Eighteenth. 6, 7^, 9, ioj^ a.m.; vespers, 

3Y2 P-M. 

All Saints' Chapel, Blockley Almhouse : Rev. 

E. V. McElhone, 3627 Walnut. 8]/ 2 , 9% a.m., 

2 P.M. 

All Saints, Bridesburg, cor. Thompson and 
Buckius : Rev. Ernest Deham, 2651 Buckius. 
iy 2 and 10 a.m., 3 l / 2 p.m. 

Annunciation of the B. V. M., cor. Tenth and 
Dickinson: Rev Patrick J. Dailey, D. Direc- 
tor; Rev. Francis A. Kelly, Rev. Henry J. Mc- 
Pake, assistants, 1511 S. Tenth. 6, "j]/ 2 , 9, 10% 
a.m. ; vespers, jY 2 p.m. 

Assumption of the B. V. M., Spring Garden 
bel. Twelfth : Rev. Richard F. Hanagan, rec- 
tor; Rev. John J. Hickey, Rev. P. J. Harkins, 
assistants, 1121 Spring Garden. 6, 7%, 9, xo)/ 2 
a.m. ; vespers, 2% P.M. 

Epiphany, Eleventh and Jackson : Rev. James 
Nash, rector; Rev. P. J. Hannigan, Rev. 
Joseph V. Sweeney, assistants, 1121 Jackson. 
6, 7 A, 9, 10% a.m.; vespers, 7^ p.m. 

Gesu, Eighteenth and Stiles : Rev. William F. 
Clark, S. J., rector; Rev. James A. Doonan, 
S. J., Rev. William P. Brett, S. J., Rev. James 
J. Brie, S. J., Rev. H. L. Gache, S. J., Rev. 
John J. Jansen, S. J., Rev. D. C. Daly, S. J., 
Rev. Aloysius Rocoffort, S. J., Rev. William F. 
Gunn, S. J., Rev. Michael P. Hill, S. J., Rev. 
Michael J. Byrnes, S. J., Rev. John A. Buck- 
ley, S. J., Rev. John Condon, S. J., Rev. Ed- 
ward Corbett, S. J., Rev. Joseph Hann, S. J., 
Rev. Francis Lenahan, S. J., assistants, Eigh- 
teenth and Stiles. 5%, 6%, 7 ]/ 2 , %%, 9 y 2 , 10^ 
a.m. ; vespers, 7^ p.m. 

Holy Cross, Mount Airy av., Mount Airy: 
Rev. John J. Elcock, rector ; Rev. P. F. Wha- 
len, assistant, nr. church. 7, 10^ a.m., 4 p.m. 

Holy Family, Hermitage, Manayunk : Rev. 
Michael C. McEnroe, rector ; Rev. Joseph E. 
Murphy, assistant, 242 Hermitage. 7, 9, 10^ 
a.m., -3,y 2 p.m. 

Holy Trinity (German), N. W. cor. Sixth and 
Spruce: Rev. E. O. Hiltermann, rector, Rev. 
Gustave Strauss, asst., 617 Spruce. 7%, 10 a.m.; 
vespers, 3^ P-M. 

Immaculate Conception, Front and Canal : 
Rev. James F. Shields, rector; Rev. John J. 
Toomey, Rev. James A. Dalton, assts., 1020 N. 
Front. 6, 7%, 9, xo Y / 2 A.m. ; vespers, -jY 2 P..M. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



33 



Immaculate Conception Chapel, Germantown: 
in charge of the priests of St. Vincent De Paul's. 

Immaculate Heart of Mary Chapel ( Little Sis- 
ters of the Poor) , Eighteenth ab. Jefferson : Rev. 
J. A. Jansen, S. J., Eighteenth and Stiles. 6 
a.m., 4 p.m. ; week days, 6 a.m. 

Maternity of the B. V. M., Bustleton : Rev. 
Charles P. Riegel, Cheltenham, io a.m. 

Nativity of the B. V. M., Alleghany av. and 
Belgrade, Port Richmond: Rev. Francis J. 
Quinn, rector; Rev. Philip R. McDevitt, Rev. 
James P. Parker, assts., Alleghany av. and Bel- 
grade. 6, -] l /2, 9, i°Y> a.m., -]Y X p.m. 

Our Lady Help of Christians, Alleghany av. 
and Gaul : Rev. George J. Wolf, rector, Rev. 
Joseph A. Assmann, asst., nr. church. 8, t.o 1 / 2 
a.m.; vespers, 3 p.m. 

Our Lady of Lourdes, Sixty-third and Lan- 
caster av. : Rev. James A. Mullin, rector, Sixty- 
third and Lancaster av. 

Our Lady of Mercy, cor. Susquehanna av. 
and Broad: Rev. Gerald P. Coghlan, rector; 
Rev. John C. Carey, Rev. Thomas F. Moore, 
assts., 2141 N. Broad. 6 l / 2 , 8, 9, io l / 2 a.m., 7% 

P.M. 

Our Lady of Mount Carmel, N. E. cor. Third 
and Wolf: Rev. B. F. Gallagher, rector; Rev. 
James A. Armstrong, asst. 

Our Lady of the Rosary, Sixty-third and 
Callowhill : Rev. John F. Lynch, rector; Rev. 
John B. McGinley, D. D., asst., 345 N. Sixty- 
third. 7%, 9, 1054 a.m.; vespers, 3% p.m. 

Our Mother of Consolation, Chestnut "av. nr. 
Main, Chestnut Hill : Rev. T. F. Herlihy, 0. S 
A., rector; Rev. James E. Vaughan, 0. S. A., 
asst., nr. church. 8, zo% a.m., 4 p.m.; extra 
mass, ty 2 a.m., June, July, August and Sep- 
tember. Clergymen from here officiate at St. 
Joseph's Convent Chapel. 

Our Mother of Sorrows. Lancaster av. and 
Forty-eighth, Hestonville : Rev. John W. Shan- 
ahan, rector; Rev. P. F. McNulty, Rev. Joseph 
J. C. Hannigan, assts., nr. church. 6, 7, 8, 9, 
10% a.m.; vespers, 3*4 p.m. 

Presentation, Cheltenham : Rev. Charles P. 
Riegel, Cheltenham. 8 a.m. 

Sacred Heart of Jesus, Third bel. Reed : Rev. 
John J. Ward, rector; Rev. Anthony J. Zeller, 
Rev. Francis J. Brady, assts., 1404 S. Third. 6, 
7Y 2 , 9, 10^ A.M. ; vespers, 7% p.m. _ 

St. Agatha, Thirty-eighth and Spring Garden : 
Rev. Daniel O'Connor, rector ; Rev. Joseph F. 
Nagle, Rev. Bernard J. McGinnis, Rev. Michael 
J. McCabe, assts., 3813 Spring Garden. 6, 7, 8, 
gY, xoY 2 a.m. ; vespers, 3^ p.m. 

St. Aloysius, Twenty-sixth and Tasker : Rev. 
Wm. A. Wachter, rector, 2522 Dickinson. 

St. Alphonsus, S. W. cor. Fourth and Reed: 
Rev. Henry Stommel, P. R.. rector ; Rev. Ber- 
nard Philipps, asst., 1400 S. Fourth. 7, 8%, 10 
A.M.; vespers, 3, j l / 2 p.m. 

St. Ann, Lehigh av. and Memphis : Rev. 
Thomas J. Barry, P. R., rector; Rev. David P. 
Egan, Rev. Daniel A. Morrissey, Rev. Thomas 
F. Ryan, assts., 2328 E. Lehigh av. 5%, 6^, 
8,9, 10% a.m.; vespers, 3% p.m. 

St. Anthony, Lithuanian, Fifth bel. Carpenter: 
Rev. Joseph Kaulakis, 1029 S. Fifth. 

St. Anthony of Padua, Gray's Ferry rd. and 
Fitzwater: Rev. William P. Masterson, rector; 
Rev. Francis J. McArdle, Rev. Daniel I. Mc- 
Glinchey, assts., 2321 Fitzwater. 6, -] l / 2 , 9, 10^ 
A.m.,' 7% p.m. 



St. Augustine, Fourth bel. Vine : Rev. N. J. 
Murphy, O. S. A., rector; Very Rev. J. D. 
Waldron, O. S. A. ; Rev. E. A. Dailey, 0. S. 
A., Rev. P. J. Gilmore, O. S. A., Rev. D. J. 
Sullivan, O. S. A., Rev. Charles H. Cullinane, 
Rev. John H. Dever, 0. S. A., assts., 243 Crown. 
6, 8, g l / 2 , ioy 2 a.m. ; vespers, % l / 2 p.m. 

St. Bonaventure, Ninth and Cambria : Rev. 
Hubert Hammeke, rector; Rev. Theodore Ham- 
meke, asst., 2831 Hutchinson. 6, 7,9, 10% a.m., 

2, 7J4 P.M. 

St. Bonifacius, Diamond and Norris Square : 
Rev. John A. Frederick, C. SS. R., rector; Rev. 
Lawrence Werner, C. SS. R., Rev. William 
Wolsfeld, C. SS. R., Rev. Conrad Rebhan, C. SS. 
R., Rev. John Dlag, C. SS. R., Rev. Conrad 
Kraus, C. SS. R., Rev. Theodore George, C. SS. 
R., assts. 144 Diamond. 5%, 7%, 9, 10^ a.m., 

3, 7 P.M. 

St. Bridget, Stanton, Falls of Schuylkill : Rev. 
William Walsh, rector; Rev. William Barring- 
ton, asst., 161 Stanton. 6^, 8%, 10% a.m. ; 
vespers, 3^ p.m. 

St. Charles Borromeo, Twentieth and Chris- 
tian: Rev. James P. Sinnott, rector; Rev. Thos. 

F. Quinn, Rev. James T. Higgins, Rev. James 
J. MacAran, assts., 902 S. Twentieth. 6, 7%, 
8^, 9, g}( and 10% a.m. ; vespers, 7% p.m. 

St. Clement, Seventy-first and Woodland av. : 
Rev. Francis P. Dougherty, rector; Rev. Cor- 
nelius J. O'Neill, Rev. Maurice A. Walsh, assts., 
Seventy-first and Woodland av. 8, 10J4 a.m., 
3 l / 2 P.M. 

St. Columba, Twenty-fourth and Lehigh av. : 
Rev. Walter P. Gough, rector; Rev. Peter 
Mundy, Rev. John J. Clarke, assts., Twenty- 
fourth and Showaker. 

St. Dominic, Holmesburg : Rev. Lawrence J. 
Wall, rector; Rev. Richard F. Cowley, asst., 
Holmesburg. -] l / 2 , 9, 10% a.m., 3% p.m. 

St. Edward the Confessor, Eighth and York : 
Rev. Chas. J. Vandegrift, rector; Rev. Michael 

G. Scully, Rev. William A. Motley, assts., 2417 N. 
Eighth. dy 2 , 8, 9, 10, 11 a.m. ; vespers, 7% p.m. 

St. Elizabeth, S. E. cor. Twenty-third and 
Berks: Rev. Bernard Dornhege, rector; Rev. 
Thomas S. McCarty, Rev. Thomas J. Sullivan, 
assts., 1845 N. Twenty-third. & l / 2 , 8, 9^, 10^ 
a.m. ; vespers, 7% p.m. 

St. Francis de Sales, Forty-seventh and Spring- 
field av. : Rev. Joseph H. O'Neill, rector; Rev. 
Michael F. Rooney, Rev. Jas. J. Carton, assts., 
4625 Springfield av. 7, 9/4 a.m. 

St. Francis Xavier, Twenty-fourth and Green : 
Rev. Michael J. Gleeson, rector; Rev. Francis 
L. Carr, Rev. Edward J.. Keelan, assts., 2321 
Green. 6, 7, 8%, 9, 10% a.m. 

St. Gabriel, Thirtieth and Reed : Rev. P. 
J. Mellon, rector; Rev. Michael J. Brady, asst., 
2926 Wharton 

St. Gregory, Fifty -second and Lancaster av. : 
Rev. B. A. Conway, rector. 

St. Ignatius, Forty-third and Wallace : Rev. 
Joseph J. Nerz, 644 N. Forty-third. 

St. James, Thirty-eighth and Chestnut : Rev. 
P. J. Garvey, D. D., rector; Rev. P. F. 
Burke, Rev. Thomas J. Larkins, Rev. Thomas 
J. Farrelly, assts., 3722 Chestnut. 8,9, g l / 2 , 10% 
a.m. ; vespers, \ l / 2 p.m. 

St. Joachim, Pine St., Frankford : Rev. Fran- 
cis P. Fitzmaurice, rector; Rev. J. E. Cavan- 
augh, Rev. Joseph L. Kirlin, assts., 27 Pine. 7, 

9, IO^ A.M., -]Y 2 P.M. 



34 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



St. John the Baptist, Rector and Cresson, 
Manayunk : Rev. James A. Brehony, rector; 
Rev. Eugene Murphy, Rev. James H. O'Neill, 
assts., 146 Rector. 6, 7, 2>y 2 , g l / 2 , io l /t a.m.; 
vespers, 3% p.m. 

St. John Cantius (Polish), Bridesburg : Rev. 
Marianus Kopytkiewicz, rector, Thompson and 
Orthodox. 

St. John the Evangelist, Thirteenth ab. Chest- 
nut : Rev. P. R. O'Reilly, P. R., rector; Rev. 
Wm. C. Currie, Rev. Francis X. Wastl, Rev. 
Nevin F. Fisher, assts., Thirteenth ab. Chestnut. 
12%, 6, 8, io}4 A.M.; vespers, 4 p.m. 

St. Joseph, Willing's alley bel. Fourth : Rev. 
John Scully, S. J., Superior; Rev. P. A.Jordan, 

5. J., Rev. John B. Nagle, S. J., Rev. Thomas 
M. Sheerin, S. J., Rev. James R. Gray, S. J., 
assts., 317 Willing's alley. Daily services, $y 2 , 
6> 6 l / 2 , 7 a.m.; Wednesday and Friday, also at 
8^ a.m.; Sunday and Tuesday, 7% p.m. ; Sun- 
day-school, 2 P.M. 

St. Laurentius (Polish), Memphis and Vienna : 
8, 10^ a.m., 5 p.m. ; daily, 7J4 a.m. 

St. Leo.Tacony : Rev. Hubert P.McPhilomy, 
rector. Tulip and Unruh. 8, io l / 2 a.m., i l / 2 p.m. 

St. Louis (German), Twenty-eighth and Mas- 
ter: Rev. Bernard Korves, rector ; Rev. Charles 
A. Abt, asst., 1428 N. Twenty-eighth. 

St. Malachy, Eleventh ab. Master : Rt. Rev. 

E. F. Prendergast, D. D., V. G., rector; Rev. 
Michael J. Crane, Rev. Fenton J. Fitzpatrick, 
Rev. Francis J. Sheehan, assts, 1429 N. Eleventh. 

6, 7, 9, ioJ£ a.m. ; vespers, ■$% p.m. 

St. Mary, Fourth ab. Spruce: Rev. Daniel I. 
McDermott, rector; Rev. Joseph C. Kelly, 
Rev. John J. Duffy, assts., 252 S. Fourth. 6, 6 l / 2 , 
%y 2 , \oV 2 a.m., 2 l A p.m. 

St. Mary of the Assumption, Conarroe, Man- 
ayunk : Rev. Francis J. Martersteck, rector; 
Rev. Henry Gantert, asst., 176 Conarroe. 7, &%, 
io}/ 2 A.M. ; vespers, 3^ p.m. 

St. Mary Magdalen de Pazzi ( Italian ), Marriott 
ab. Seventh : Rev. Antonio Isoleri, rector ; Rev. 
Matthew Vachero, asst., 710 Marriott. 6 l / 2 , 8, 

IO% A.M., 3^ P.M. 

St. Michael, Second and Master : Rev. James 
J. Fitzmaurice, P. R., rector; Rev. A. D. Filan, 
Rev. Charles J. Mullin, Rev. John O'Neill, 
assts., 1445 N. Second. 6, 7,8,9, 10^ a.m., 7% 

P.M. 

St. Monica, Seventeenth and Ritner : Rev. 
Owen P. McManus, rector; Rev. Patrick J. Mc- 
Mahon, asst., 2422 S. Seventeenth. 

St. Patrick, Twentieth and Locust : Rev. 

William Kieran, D. D., P. R., rector; Rev. 

John P. Connell, Rev. Denis J. Broughal, Rev. 

James P.Turner, assts., 242 S. Twentieth. 6, 7, 

8, 8^,9, roy 2 A.M., 3 y 2 P.M. 

St. Paul, Christian ab. Ninth: Rev. M. C. 
Donovan, rector; Rev. J. D. Nevin, Rev. John 

F. Kernan, assts., 808 Lebanon. 6, 7, 8, 9, ioj^ 
a.m., 3 y 2 P.M., 

St. Paul'sChapel, Christian ab. Eighth. 8,9 a.m. 

St. Peter, Fifth and Girard av. ; Rev. Fidelis 
Speidel, C. SS. R., rector ; Rev. John B. Hespe- 
lein, C. SS. R. , Rev. S. J. Breihof, C. SS. R., Rev. 
Pancratius Schmidt, C. SS. R., Rev. James 
Kessler, C. SS. R., Rev. Henry Borgmann, 
C. SS. R., Rev. Joseph Lauer, C. SS. R., Rev. 
John Englert, C. SS. R., assts., 1019 N. Fifth. 
Masses on Sundays, 5^,6^, j l / 2 , 8%, 10 a.m. ; 
vespers, 3 p.m. ; sermon and benediction with bl. 
sacr., 7 p.m. Confessions heard every Friday 



and Saturday, in the afternoon and evening, in 
German, English and French. 

St. Peter Claver, for colored people, Twelfth 
and Lombard: Rev. James Nolan, C. S. Sp., 
rector, 502 S. Twelfth. 8, 10% A.M., "] l / 2 p.m. 

St. Philip de Neri, Queen ab. Second : Rt. 
Rev. Mgr. Nicholas Cantwell, V. G., rector 
emeritus ; Rev. James F. Trainer, acting rec- 
tor ; Rev. Michael A. Bradley, Rev. James J. 
Smith, assts., 228 Queen. 6, 8, 9, xo l / 2 a.m. ; 
vespers, 3 l 4 p.m. 

St. Raphael, Eighty-fifth and Tinicum av. : 
attended from St. Clement's. 

St. Stanislaus (Polish), German bel. Third: 
Rev. Miecislaus Kopytkiewicz, rector, 227 Ger- 
man. 

St. Stephen, Broad and Butler, Nicetown: Rev. 
William A. McLoughlin, rector; Rev. Michael 
J. Kane. Rev. John J. Greensill, assts., nr. 
church. 7, 9, 10^2 a.m., 2, 7^ p.m. 

St. Teresa, Broad and Catharine : Rev. Hugh 
Lane, P. R., rector; Rev. John T. Crowley, Rev. 
P. J. Flaherty. Rev. Charles A. McFadden, Rev. 
Joseph V. O'Connor, assts., 1337 Catharine. 6%, 
8, 9, 10^ a.m.; vespers, jy 2 p.m. 

St. Thomas Aquinas, Eighteenth and Morris : 
Rev. M. J. Lawler, rector; Rev. P. J. Tierney, 
Rev. John F. Graham, Rev. Francis P. Coyle, 
assts., 1618 S. Seventeenth. 6, 7, 8, 9^, 10^ 
a.m., -jy 2 p.m. 

St. Veronica, Sixth and Tioga : Rev. John J. 
Donnelly, rector ; Rev. J.J. Rooney, asst., 635 
Venango. "] l / 2 , 9, ioy 2 a.m., 2, 3^ p.m. 

St. Vincent de Paul, Price St., Germantown : 
Rev. George V. McKinney, C. M., rector; Rev. 
Sylvester V. Haire, C. M., Rev. William Mc- 
Cormick, CM.., Rev. Andrew C. Murphy, C.M., 
Rev. Thomas M. O'Donoghue, C. M., Rev. 
Dennis J. Downing, C. M., Rev. Herman B. 
Menniges, CM., Rev. Richard H. Albert, CM., 
assts., adjoining church. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 a.m.; 
vespers, 4 p.m. 

St. Vincent's, Tacony : Rev. J. G. Freude, St. 
Vincent's Orphan Asylum. iy 2 , 9^ a.m., iy 2 

P.M. 

Syrian Mission, St. Paul's School Hall, 920 
Christian : Rev. J. Yasbek. 

United Greek Church of the Holy Spirit, 1923 
W. Passyunk av. : Rev. John Hreber, rector. 

Visitation, B. V. M., Lehigh av. and Leamy : 
Rev. Alexander A. Gallagher, rector ; Rev. 
James C McLoughlin, Rev. John J. Walsh, 
Rev. Simon J. Carr, assts., Lehigh av. and 
Leamy, 6^,8,9,10^2 a.m.; vespers, 3^ p.m. 

CAMDEN AND VICINITY. 

Immaculate Conception, cor. Seventh and 
Market : Very Rev. B. J. Mulligan, rector; Rev. 
James Hendricks, Rev. J. A. Caulfield, assts., 
042 Market. 7, 9, 10% a.m. ; Sunday school at 
2 p.m. ; vespers, 7^ p.m. 

Our Lady of Good Counsel, Moorestown : 
Rev. J. W. Murphy. 

Sacred Heart, Broadway and Ferry av.: Rev. 
M. E. Brie, Broadway and Ferry av. 8, ioj^ 

A.M., 3% P.M. 

Saints Peter and Paul (German), Spruce and 
St. John: Rev. Otto Rechtenwald, O.M.C, rec- 
tor; Rev. Father Quido, O.M.C, asst., 402 
Division. 7, %%, 10% a.m., 2%, 3 p. M. 

St. Edmunds, Gibbsboro ; St. Rose of Lima, 
Haddon Heights, and St. Lawrence, Laurel, 
Springs: Rev. J. M. O'Leary. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



35 



St. Joseph's, Cramer Hill : Rev. A. A. 
Hirschmeyer, O.M.C. 8 and 10 a.m. 

St. Mary (Gloucester City): Rev. Thomas J. 
McCormack, rector; Rev. Peter Hart, asst., 
426 Monmouth. 7, 9, 10^ a.m., 3%, 7^ p.m. 

St. Patrick, Woodbury : Rev. Michael Dolan. 

Swedesboro : Rev. Walter F. Leahy. 



SALVATION ARMY. 

Atlantic Coast, Chief Division (comprising 
Pennsylvania, Southern New Jersey): Major 
Adam Gifford, Chief Divisional Officer; Staff 
Captain George Wood, General Secretary ; 
Adjutant Kimball, Secretary for Junior Work. 
Divisional Headquarters, N. W. cor. Broad 
and Spruce sts. 

• Corps No. 1. — Frankford av. ab. Lehigh av.: 
Ensign Casler, 2015 Silver. 

Corps No. 2. — Cor. N. Eighth and Vine: Capt. 
Roberts, 1017 Ogden. 

Corps No. 3. — Main, Manayunk : Capt. Wil- 
liams, 222 Wendover. 

Corps No. 4. — Germantown av. ab. Somerset: 
Adjutant Escott, 2344 Bouvier. 

Corps No. 3. — Main bel. Chelten, German- 
town : Capt. Coup, 44 Coulter. 

Corps No. 6. — 4035 Lancaster av., West Phila- 
delphia : Ensign Winfield, 4025 Fairmount av. 

Corps No. 7. — Sixteenth and Parrish : Capt. 
Douglas, 1017 Ogden. 

Corps No. 8. — Cor. Paul and Unity, Frank- 
ford : Ensign Hull, 1643 Orthodox. 

Corps No. q. — Broad ab. Columbia av.: Capt. 
Alcook, 1803 Willington. 

Corps No. 11. — Cor. Broad and Spruce sts. : 
Staff Captain and Mrs. Howells, 1146 S. Fif- 
teenth. 

Corps No. 12. — 1124 N. Third st. : Adjutant ' 
Jalger, 1124 N. Third. 

Corps No. 13. — Sixteenth and Snyder: Ensign 
and Mrs. Jackson, 2343 S. Sixteenth. 

Corps No. 14. — Richmond st. near Susque- 
hanna: Capt. Mace, 1118 Collar. 

Corps No. 13. — Cor. Kensington" and A st. : 
Capt. and Mrs. Lewis, Kensington av. 

Corps No. ib. — Cor. Twenty-first and Point 
Breeze av. : Capt. Swan, 2059 Dickinson. 

Corps No. 17. — Front and Tasker : Ensign 
Williams, 41 Tasker. 

Corps No. 18, — Thirtieth and Fontaine, nr. 
Ridge av. : Capt. Dionysius, 2304 N. Thirtieth. 

Corps No. 20. — Twenty-first and Ridge : Capt. 
Macdonald, 2505 Stuart. 



SLUM POSTS. 

No. 1. — Second bel. Gaskill: Capt. Larsen.212 
Gaskill. 

No. 2. — Seventh ab. Pine : Capt. Van Why, 
705 Carver. 

RESCUE HOME FOR FALLEN WOMEN. 

611 N. Forty-third : Ensign Thompson in 
charge. 

CAMDEN. 

Salvation Army Barracks, Fourth and Line : 
7 X A, 11 a.m., 8 P.M. 



SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTS. 

Han, 1722 N. Broad : Rev. E. A. Merrell, 
1724 N. Fifteenth. Saturday, 11 a. m. 



SPIRITUAL ASSOCIATIONS. 

First Assembly Hall, 1325 Columbia av. 

The Philadelphia Spiritualist Society, Handel 
and Haydn Hall, N. E. cor. Eighth and Spring 
Garden : President, Thomas M. Loche, 605 
N. Seventh ; First Vice-President, Samuel 
Wheeler, Seventeenth and Ingersoll ; Second 
Vice-President, Charles Hammer, 922 N. 
Eleventh. 2% and 7% p.m. 



UNDENOMINATIONAL MISSIONS. 

Beach Street Mission, Hanover and Beach : 
Rev. J. Maris Taylor, supt., 1116 Palmer. 10% 
a.m., 3^ and 8 p.m. ; daily, 8 p.m. 

Bedford Street Mission, 619 Kater: Rev. 
James P. Hall, 521 Spruce. Gymnasium, reading 
room and free baths, every day except Sunday. 
Services Wednesday and Sunday, 3 and 8 p.m. 

Christian Chapel, Thomas' Hall, Thirty-first 
and Ridge av. : O. R. Palmer, 2333 N. Thirty- 
first. 11 a.m., 8 P.M. 

Christian Workers, Waterloo bel. Lehigh av. : 
Rev. James MacKinney, 3130 Salmon ; Rev. 
Alkanas Markley, 1916 Willard av., asst. 8 
p.m. Sundays and Thurdays. 

Church of Christ, 709 N. Forty-sixth: Fred- 
erick J. Todd, 659 N. Forty-sixth; W. Suth- 
erland, 4151 Eaglesfield, evangelists, io 1 ^ a.m., 
2^ and i l / 2 p.m. 

Germantown Door of Hope (Home for the 
Reformation of Fallen Women), 139 Queen, Ger- 
mantown : Mrs. Harry Taylor, 3200 Engleside 
place, president and treas. ; Mrs. E. Howard, 
superintendent. Services, Fridays, 4 p.m. 

Highway Mission, Tabernacle, Oxford ab. 
Ridge av. : Rev. Frederick Reel, 1718 Bailey. 
ioy 2 a.m., 3% and 8 p.m.; Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days, 8 P.M. 

Holiness Christian Church, Twelfth bel. 
Thompson : Jonas Trumbaur, elder (tempo- 
rary), 1600 Sydenham ; Thomas B. Hartman, 
asst., 313 N. Fifth, io 1 /^ a.m., 7^ p.m. 

Meadow Mission, Tenth and Montgomery 
av. : Rev. Elisha F. Fales, 3200 Columbia av. 
ioj^ A.M., 7% P.M.; Thursdays, 7% p.m. 

Neighborhood Guild, 620 Addison : Rev. 
Chas. S. Daniel, 618 Addison. Sundays, 7 p.m. 

Sunday Breakfast Association, Twelfth bel. 
Vine : Lewis U. Bean, president, 2030 Vine ; Dr. 
A. H. Henderson, treas., 1635 Columbia av. 
Sundays, 8% a.m. (November to April), 7 l / 2 p.m. 
every Sunday; Mondays and Fridays, 8*p.m. 

CAMDEN. 

Christ's Free Church, Third ab. Liberty: Rev. 
George A. Pettit. 

UNITARIAN. 

First, Chestnut and Aspen, ab. Twenty-first : 
Rev. Joseph May, LL. D., 2033 Sansom. 11 a.m. 

Second Unitarian Society of Germantown, 
Greene and Chelten av. : Rev. James C. Hod- 
gins, 319 Earlham Terrace, Germantown. n 
A.m. ; once monthly, 4 p.m. 

Spring Garden, Girard av. ab. Fifteenth : Rev. 
Frederic A. Hinckley, 870 N. Twenty-second. 



36 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



September ist to June 30, 11 A.m. ; during win- 
ter months, j% P » M - 

UNITED BRETHREN IN CHRIST. 

Conference District, East Pennsylvania Con- 
ference. 

Mount Pisgah, E. Cambria and Kipp : Rev. 
H. C. Phillips, 2833 N. Front. Sundays, 10^ 
a.m., iYz p.m. ; Fridays, 8 p.m.. 

St. Paul's, Edg.emont and Westmoreland : in 
care of D. D. Lowery, P. E., and Rev. H. C. 
Phillips, 2833 N. Front. Sundays, 10% a.m., 
"j l /2 p.m.; Thursdays, 8 p.m. 

West Philadelphia, 4059 Egglesfield : H. C. 
Phillips, 2833 N. Front. 7^ p.m. 

Central, 1223 North Thirteenth : H. C. Phil- 
lips, 2833 N. Front. Sundays, j l / 2 P-M. ; Thurs- 
days, 8 p.m. 

UNITED CHRISTIAN CRUSADERS. 

The Central Battalion comprises Pennsyl- 
vania, New Jersey, New York, Delaware, Mary- 
land, District of Columbia, and Virginia; Chief 
of Staff, Colonel Somers ; General Secretary, 
Adjutant Smith ; Assistant Chief of Staff, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Henry ; Battalion Headquarters, 
Forty-first and Market. 

Post No. r. — Fairhill Hall, Fifth and Lehigh av. 

Post No. 2. — Co-operative Hall, 1825 Poplar. 

Post No. 3. — Darby. 



UNITED EVANGELICAL CHURCH. 

Presiding Elder of Reading District, Rev. C. 
C. Haman, Reading, Pa. 

Bethel, Twelfth ab. Lehigh av.: Rev. S. S. 
Chubb, 2918 N. Twelfth. io 1 h a.m., 7*4 p.m. 

Christ, Twelfth and Oxford": Rev. J. H. Shi- 
rey, 1622 Willington. io}4 a.m., 1- x p.m. 

Trinity, Hancock and Duval, Germantown : 
Rev. A. J. Brunner, 71 Herman. io' 2 am., 7^ 
p.m.; Wednesdays, 8 p.m. 



UNITED PRESBYTERIAN. 

The Board of Foreign Missions of the United 

Presbyterian Church of North America : Rev. 

M. G. Kyle, D. D., President; Rev. \V. W. 

Barr, D. D., Cor. Secretary, 1425 Christian; 

Robert L. Latimer, Esq., Treasurer, 21 N. 

Front. Stated meetings of the Board on the 

second Monday of each month, at 2 p.m. 
The Board of Ministerial Relief of the United 

Presbyterian Church of North America : Rev. 

W. J. B. Edgar, President; J. D. Ferguson, 

Esq., 14 S. Water, Secretary; James Walker, 

1508 Christian, Treasurer. 

First, S. W. cor. Broad and Lombard: Rev. W. 
J. B. Edgar, 1516 Christian, io 1 ^ A.M., 7^ p.m. 

Second, Race bel. Sixteenth : Rev. C. S. Cle- 
land, 802 N. Seventeenth. 10$^ a.m., 8 p.m. 

Third, Front ab. Jefferson : Rev. S. G. Fitz- 
gerald, 2010 N. Eighth. io !/ 2 a.m., 8 p.m. 

Fourth, N. E. cor. Nineteenth and Fitzwater: 
Rev. J. C. Scouler, 904 S. Nineteenth. 10^ 
a.m., iy x P.M. 

Fifth, Twentieth and Buttonwood : Rev. J. G. 
C. Webster, 1432 Christian. ioJ£ a.m., 2^ p.m. 

Seventh, S. E. cor. Orthodox and Leiper, 
Frankford : Rev. M. G. Kyle, D. D., 1203 Arrot. 

\O l / 2 A.M., 73 4 P.M. 



Eighth, N. E. cor. Fifteenth and Christian : 
Rev. J. H. Webster, 1432 Christian ; Rev. W. 
W. Barr, D. D., pastor emeritus, 1425 Christian. 
10^ a.m., 8 P.M. 

Ninth, S. W. cor. Susquehanna av. and Han- 
cock : Rev. James Crowe, 2249 N. Second., io 1 ^ 
a.m., 3 1 ; p.m. ; second Sunday in the month, 734 

P.M. 

North, Master ab. Fifteenth : Rev. W. M. An- 
derson, 1516 Willington. 10^ a.m., 734 p.m. 

Tenth, S. W. cor. Thirty-eighth and Hamilton : 
Rev. John Teas, D. D., 3806 Hamilton. 10^ 

A.M., 7 ; 4 P.M. 

Somerset and Garnet : Rev. 
Lehigh av. 10% a.m., 3% 



Twelfth, S. E. cor 
James Price, 107 E 

P.M. 

Dales Memorial, 
and Cumberland : 



N. W. cor. Thirty-second 
Rev. W. S. Nevin, 3407 
Ridge av. io L : a.m., j^i p.m. 

Fairhill, 3402 Mascher: Rev. James N. Knipe, 
3305 N. Sixth, io 1 ; a.m., 7% p.m. 

West, S. E. cor. Forty-third and Aspen : Rev. 

Frank Getty, 705 N. Forty-fourth. io 1 ^ A.M., 

p.m. 

NVharton Square, N.W. cor. Twenty-third and 

Wharton: Rev. J. P. Sharp, Ph.D., 1416 S. 

Twenty-third. io" 4 a.m., 8 P.M. 



INIVERSALIST. 

Church of the Messiah, Broad and Montgomery 
av. : Rev. Edwin C. Sweetser, 1848 Park av. 

lo\ A.M.. 7?4 P.M. 

Church of the Restoration, Master and Seven- 
teenth : Rev. Frederick A. Bisbee, D. D., 1628 
Master. 10% a.m., j% p.m. 



THE FORECLOSURE OF THE UNION 
PACIFIC RAILROAD. 

When the second mortgage bonds of the 
Union Pacific Railroad began to mature during 
President Cleveland's administration, proceed- 
ings were begun in conjunction with a reorgani- 
zation committee of the Union Pacific Railroad 
to foreclose the mortgage. The agreement 

, made guaranteed to the United States a bid of 

I over $45,000,000 over and above the amount 
of the first mortgage. This bid included the 
sinking fund held in the United States Treas- 
ury. It was found, however, that the Govern- 
ment lien did not cover several important prop- 

' erties, and when the new Administration came 
into office it considered the propriety of an 
appeal, and papers were prepared for such action. 
Upon hearing of this, the reorganization com- 
mittee increased the guarantee bid to $50,000,000. 
The sale took place November 1, the road be- 
ing knocked down to the reorganization com- 
mittee for $39,883,281.89 and certain bonds for 
513,645.250.89— a total of $53,528,532.78. To this 
is to be added $4,537,927 cash in the sinking 
fund, making a grand total of $58,066,459.78 
with which to meet the Government claim. Ac- 
cording to the estimate of the Treasury officials 
the Government claim will be met in full. The 
Treasury is to be reimbursed for $27,236,512 
principal outstanding and for $30,000,000 balance 
due on interest paid by the Government under 

i its guarantee. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



37 



GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

[NOTE.— All lists of public officers have been corrected to November 20, 1897.] 

President. — William McKinley, of Ohio. 
Vice-President. — Garret A. Hobart, of New Jersey. 

CABINET. 

Secretary of State. — John Sherman, of Ohio. Secretary of the Interior. — Cornelius N. 
Secretary of the Treasury.— Lyman G. Gage, Bliss, of New York. 

of Illinois. Postmaster-General. — James Aleert Gary, of 

SeCr ^Z,f^ g 7^^ A " X ™ Al - H-gSt**-*-. McKB»,, of Ca.i. 

Secretary of the Navy.— John Davis Long, ' Secretary of Agriculture.— James Wilson, of 
of Massachusetts. Iowa. 



ASSISTANT SECRETARIES 

State Department. 

Assistant Secretary, William R. Day. 
Second Assistant Secretary, Alvey A. Adee. 
Third Assistant Secretary, Thomas Wilbur 
Cridler. 

Chief Clerk, William H. Michael. 

Treasury Department. 

Assistant Secretaries, O. L. Spalding, Wil- 
liam B. Howel!, Frank A. Vanderlip. 

Chief Clerk, Theo. F. Swayze. 

Comptroller, R. J. Tracewell. 

Register, J. Fount Tillman. 

Auditor for Treasury Department, W. E. 
Andrews ; Deputy, Edward McKetterick. 

Auditor for War Department, William W. 
Brown ; Deputy, Daniel H. Grosvenor. 

Auditor for Interior Department, William 
Youngblood ; Deputy, Robert S. Person. 

Auditor for Navy Department, Frank H. 
Morris; Deputy, John M. Ewing. 

Auditor for State and other Departments, 
Ernest G. Timme ; Deputy, G. W. Esterly. 

Auditor for Post Office Department, Henry 
A. Castle ; Deputy, A. L. Lawshe. 

Treasurer of United States, Ellis H. Roberts; 
Assistant. James F. Meline. 

Coniptroller of Currency, James H. Eckles ; 
Deputy, George M. Coffin. 

Commissioner of Internal Revenue, W. S. 
Forman ; Deputy, George W. Wilson. 

Director of the Mint, R. E. Preston. 

Supervising Architect, James K. Taylor. 

Bureau of Engraving and Printing ; Chief, 
Claude M. Johnson. 

Secret Service : Chief, Wm. P. Hazen. 

Bureau of Statistics : Chief, Wonhington C. 
Ford. 

Life -Saving Service : General Superintend- 
ent, Sumner I. Kimball. 

Commissioner of Navigation, Eugene Tyler 
Chamberlain ; Deputy, Thomas B. Sanders. 

Chairman Lighthouse Board, Captain W. S 
Schley, U. S. N. 

Superintendent Coast and Geodetic Survey, 
Henry S. Pritchett. 

Marine Hospital Service: Supervising Sur- 
geon-General, Walter Wyman. 

Commissioner General of Immigration,!: .V . I 
Powderly, 

Steamboat Inspection: Supervising Inspector- ' 
General, James A. Dumont. 



AND CHIEFS OF BUREAUS. 
War Department. 
Assistant Secretary, George D. Meiklejohn. 
Chief Clerk, John Tweedale. 
Major-General Commanding the Army, 
Nelson A. Miles. 

Adjutant-General, Samuel Breck. 
Inspector-General , Joseph C. Breckenridge. 
Quartermaster-General, George H. Weeks. 
Commissary-General, William "H. Bell. 
Surgeon-General , George M. Sternberg. 
Paymaster-General, T. H. Stanton. 
Chief of Engineers, John M. Wilson. 
Chief of Ordnance, D. W. Flagler. 
Judge Advocate-General, G. N. Lieber. 
Chief Signal Of/Icer, A. W. Greely. 

Record and Pension Office. 

Chief, Col. F. C. Ainsworth, U. S. A. 
Board of Publication Recokds of the Re- 
bellion. 

Maj. George W. Davis, U. S. A., Leslie J. 
Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley. 

Navy Department. 

Assistant Secretary, Theodore Roosevelt. 

Chief Clerk, B. F. Peters. 

Bureau of Ordnance: Chief, Charles O'Neil. 

Bureau of Equipment : Chief Royal B. 
Bradford. 

Bureau of Navigation : Chief, A. S. Crownin- 
shield. 

Hydrographer, Joseph E. Craig. 

Bureau of Yards and Docks : Chief, E. 0. 
Matthews. 

Bureau of Supplies and Accounts: Chief, 
Edwin Stewart. 

Bureau of Steam Engineering: Chief, George 
W. Melville. 

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery : Chief 
William K. Van Reypen. 

Bureau of Construction and Repair : Chief, 
Philip Hichborn. 

Judge Advocate-General , Samuel C. Lemly. 

Superintendent of Nautical Almanac, W. W. 
Hendrickson. 

Naval Observatory: Superintendent, C. H. 
Davis. 

Cotnmandant Marine Corps.Chas. Heywood. 
Interior Department. 

First Assistant Secretary, Thomas Ryan. 

Assistant Secretary, Webster Davis. 

Chief Clerk, Edward M. Dawson. 

Commissioner of Land Office, Binger Her- 
mann ; Assistant, Frank W. Mondel. 



38 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Commissioner of Pensions, H. Clay Evans; 
First Deputy, James L. Davenport; Second 
Deputy, Leverett M. Kelley. 

Commissioner of Indian Affairs, William A. 
Jones; Assistant, A. C. Touner. 

Commissioner of Patents, Benj. Butterworth. | 

Commissioner of Railroads, Jas. Longstreet. 

Commissioner of Education, Wm. T. Harris. 

Director Geological Survey , C. D. Walcott. 
Post Office Department. 

Chief Clerk, Blain W. Taylor. 

First Assistant Postmaster-General, Perry 
S. Heath ; Chief Clerk, E. C. Fowler. 

Superintendent Money-Order System, James 
P. Metcalf. 

Superintendent Dead-Letter Office, David P. 
Leibhardt. 

Second Assistant Postmaster-General , W. S. 
Shallenberger; Chief Clerk, George F. Stone. 

Superintendent Railway Mail Service, James 
E. White. 

Superintendent Foreign Mails, N. M. Brooks. 

Third Assistant Postmaster-General , John 
A. Merritt ; Chief Clerk, Madison Davis. 

Fourth Assistant Postmaster-General , Jos. 
L. Bristow ; Chief Clerk, Pierson H. Bristow. 
Department of Justice. 

Chief Clerk, Cecil Clay. 

Solicitor-General , John K. Richards. 



Assistant Attorney - Generals, Henry M. 
Hoyt, James Edmund Boyd, Louis A. Pradt, 
John G. Thompson, Willis Van Devanter ( Dept. 
of the Interior), James N. Tyner (Post-office 
Dept.). 

Solicitor of the Treasury, Geo. M. Thomas. 

Department of Agriculture. 
Assistant Secretary, Joseph H. Brigham. 
Chief Clerk, Andrew Geddes. 
Weather Bureau : Chief, Willis L. Moore. 
Bureau of Animal Industries : Chief, D. E. 
Salmon. 

Department of Labor. 
Commissioner, Carroll D. Wright. 

Civil Service Commission. 
John R. Proctor, President; Wm. G. Rice, 
John B. Harlow. 

Chief 'Examiner, A. R. Serven. 

Government Printing Office. 
Public Printer, F. W. Palmer. 

Bureau of American Republics. 
Director, Joseph P. Smith. 

Intek-State Commerce Commission. 
Commissioners, William R. Morrison, Martin 
A. Knapp, J. C. Clements, James D. Yeomans, 
Charles A. Prouty. 
Secretary, Edward A. Moseley. 



FIFTY-FIFTH CONGRESS. 

Expires March 4, 1899. 
SENATE. 
President. — Garret A. Hobart, of New Jersey. 
President Pro ton. — William P. Frye, of Maine. 
Secretary — William R. Cox, of North Carolina. 

Rep. (in Roman), 46; Dem. (in Italics), 34; Pop. and Silverites (in Small Caps), 9; vacant, 1. 



Term expires. 

ALABAMA. 

901 fohn T. Morgan. 
903 E. W. Pettus. 

ARKANSAS. 

901 fames H. Berry. 
903 fames K. font's. 

CALIFORNIA. 

899 Stephen M. White. 
903 George C. Perkins. 

COLORADO. 

901 Edward O. Wolcott. 
903 Henry M. Teller. 

CONNECTICUT. 

899 Joseph R. Hawley. 
903 Orville H. Piatt. 

DELAWARE. 

899 George Gray. 

901 Richard R. Kenney. 

FLORIDA. 

899 Samuel Pasco. 

903 Stephen R. Mallory. 

GEORGIA. 

901 Augustus 0. Bacon. 
903 Alex. S. Clay. 

IDAHO. 

901 George L. Shoup. 
903 Henry Heitfeld. 

illinois. 
901 Shelby M. Cullom. 
903 William E. Mason. 



Term expires. 

INDIANA. 

1899 David Turpie. 

1903 Charles W. Fairbanks. 

IOWA. 

1901 John H. Gear. 
1903 William B. Allison. 

KANSAS. 

1901 Lucien Baker. 

1903 William A. Harris. 

KENTUCKY. 

1901 William Lindsay. 
1903 William J. Deboe. 

LOUISIANA. 

1901 Donelson Caffery. 
1903 Samuel D. McEnery. 

MAINE. 

1899 Eugene Hale. 
1901 William P. Frye. 

MARYLAND. 

1899 Arthur P. Gorman. 
1903 George L. Wellington. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1899 Henry C. Lodge. 
1901 George F. Hoar. 

MICHIGAN. 

1899 Julius C. Burrows. 
1901 James McMillan. 

MINNESOTA. 

1899 Cushman K. Davis. 
1901 Knute Nelson. 

* Appointed by the Governor. 



Term expires. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1901 Edw. C. Walthall. 
1899 * Fernando D. Money. 

MISSOURI. 

1899 Francis M. Cockrell. 
1903 George G. Vest. 

MONTANA. 

1899 Lee Mantle. 

1901 Thomas H. Carter. 

NEBRASKA. 

1899 William V. Allen. 
1901 John M. Thurston. 

NEVADA. 

1899 William M. Stewart. 
1903 John P. Jones. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1901 William E. Chandler. 
1903 Jacob H. Gal linger. 

NEW JERSEY. 

1899 fames Smith, Jr . 
1901 William J. Sewell. 

NEW YORK. 

1899 Edward Murphy, fr. 
1903 Thomas C. Piatt. 
north carolina. 
1901 Marion Butler. 
1903 Jeter C. Pritchard. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

1899 William N. Roach. 
1903 Henry C. Hansbrough. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



39 



Term expires. 


-*- 
Term expires. 


Term expires. 


OHIO. 


SOUTH DAKOTA. 


VIRGINIA. 


1899 *Mark A. Hanna. 
1903 Joseph B. Foraker. 


1901 R. F. PetLgrew. 
1933 James H. Kyle. 


1899 John W. Daniel. 
1901 T. S. Martin. 


OREGON. 


TENNESSEE. 


WASHINGTON. 


1901 George W. McBride. 
1903 Vacant. 


1899 William B. Bate. 
1901 * T. B. Turley. 


1899 John L. Wilson. 
1903 George Turner. 


PENNSYLVANIA. 


TEXAS. 


WEST VIRGINIA. 


1899 Matthew S. Quay. 
1903 Boies Penrose. 


1899 Roger Q. Mills. 
1901 Horace Chilton. 


1899 Charles J. Faulkner. 
1901 Stephen B. Elkins. 


RHODE ISLAND. 


UTAH. 


WISCONSIN. 


1899 N. W. Aldrich. 
1901 George P. Wetmore. 


1899 Frank J. Cannon. 
1903 Joseph L. Rawlins. 


1899 John L. Mitchell. 
1903 John C. Spooner. 


SOUTH CAROLINA. 


VERMONT. 


WYOMING. 


1901 Benjamin R. Tillman. 
1903 *John L. McLaurin. 


1899 Redfield Proctor. 
1903 Justin S. Morrill. 


1899 Clarence D. Clark. 
1901 Francis E. Warren. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Speaker. — Thomas B. Reed, ot Maine. 

Clerk — Alexander McDowell, of Pennsylvama. 
Rep. (in Roman), 201; Dem. (in Italics), 125; Pop. and Silverites (in Small Caps), 30; Vacancy, 1. 
Dist. Dist. Dist. Dist. 



ALABAMA. 

i G. If*'. Taylor, 

2 Jesse F. Stallings, 

3 Henry D. Clayton, 

4 T. S. Plowman, 

5 Willis Brewer, 

6 J. H Bankhcad, 

7 M. W. Howard, 

8 Joseph Wheeler, 

9 O. W. Underwood. 

ARKANSAS. 

1 P. D. McCullochJr 
ijohn S. Little, 

3 Thos. C. McRae, 

4 William L. Terry, 

5 H. A. Dinsmore, 

6 //. S. Brundridge. 

CALIFORNIA. 

1 John A. Barham, 

2 Marion De Vries, 

3 Samuel G. Hilborn, 

4 Eugene F. Loud, 

5 James G. Maguire, 

6 C. A. Barlow, 

7 G. H. Castle. 

COLORADO. 

1 J. F. Shafroth, 

2 John C. Bell. 

CONNECTICUT. 

1 E. Stevens Henry, 

2 N. D. Sperry, 

3 Charles A. Russell, 
4E. J. Hill. 

DELAWARE. 

L. Irving Handy. 

FLORIDA. 

1 S. M. Sparkman, 

2 R. W. Davis. 

GEORGIA. 

i Rufus E. Lester, 

2 James M. Griggs, 

3 E. B. Lewis, 

4 W. C. Adamson, 

5 L. F. Livingston, 



6 Chas. L. Bartlett, 
1 John W. Maddox, 

8 W. M. Howard, 

9 Parish C. Tate, 
10 //'. II. Fleming, 
n //■'". G. Brantley. 

IDAHO. 

James Gunn. 

ILLINOIS. 

1 James R. Mann, 

2 William Lorimer, 

3 Hugh R. Belknap, 

4 D. W. Mills. 

5 George E. White, 

6 Vacant. 

7 George E. Foss, 

8 Albert J. Hopkins, 

9 Robert R. Hitt, 

10 George W. Prince, 

11 Walter Reeves, 

12 Joseph G. Cannon, 

13 Vespasian Warner, 

14 Joseph V. Graff, 

15 B. F. Marsh, 

16 W. H. Hinrichsen, 

17 J. A. Connolly, 

18 Thomas M.Jett, 

19 Andrew J. Hunter, 

20 James R. Campbell, 

21 Jehu Baker, 

22 George W. Smith. 

INDIANA. 

1 J. A. Hemenway, 

2 Robert Miers, 

3 W. L. Zcnor, 

4 F. M. Griffith, _ 

5 George W. Farris, 

6 Henry U. Johnson, 

7 Jesse Overstreet, 

8 Charles I. Henry, 

9 Charles B. Landis, 

10 E. D. Crumpacker, 

11 George W. Steele, 

12 James AT. Robinson, 

13 L. W. Royse. 

* Appointed by 



IOWA. 

1 Samuel M. Clark, 

2 George M. Curtis, 

3 D. B. Henderson, 

4 Thos. Updegraff, 

5 Robert G. Cousins, 

6 John F. Lacey, 

7 J. A. T.Hull, 

8 Wm. P. Hepburn, 

9 A. L. Hager, 

10 J. P. Dolliver, 

11 George D. Perkins. 

KANSAS. 
AT LARGE. 
J. D. BOTKIN, 

1 Case Broderick, 

2 A^. S. Peters, 

3 E. R. R'DGLEY, 

4 Charles Curtis, 

5 W. D. Vincent, 

6 N. B. McCormick, 

7 Jerry Simpson. 

kentucky. 

1 Chas. K. H^fieeler, 

2 John D. Clardy, 

3 John S. Rhea, 

4 David H. Smith, 

5 Walter Evans, 

6 Albert S. Berry, 

7 Evan A. Settle, 

8 George M. Davison, 

9 Samuel J. Pugh, 

10 T. Y. Fitzpatrick, 

11 David G. Colson. 

LOUISIANA. 

1 Adolph Meyer, 

2 Robert C. Davey, 
^3 Robert Broussard, 

4 H W. Ogden, 

5 6". T. Baird, 

6 S. M. Robertson. 

MAINE. 

1 Thomas B. Reed, 

2 Nelson Dingley, 

3 E. C. Burleigh, 

4 Chas. A. Boutelle. 
the Governor. 



MARYLAND. 

1 Dr. Isaac A. Barber, 

2 Wm. B. Baker, 

3 Dr. Wm. S. Booze, 

4 Wm. W. Mclntire, 

5 Sidney E. Mudd, 

6 John McDonald. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1 Geo. P. Lawrence, 

2 Fred. H. Gillett, 

3 Joseph H. Walker, 

4 Geo. W. Weymouth, 

5 William S. Knox, 

6 William H. Moody, 

7 William E. Barrett, 

8 Samuel W. McCall, 
gjohn F. Fitzgerald, 

10 S. J. Barrows, 

11 Charles F. Sprague, 

12 W. C. Lovering, 

13 John Simpkins. 

MICHIGAN. 

1 John B. Corliss, 

2 George Spalding, 

3 Albert M. Todd, 

4 E. L. Hamilton, 

5 Wm. Alden Smith, 

6 Samuel W. Smith, 

7 Horace G. Snover, 

8 Ferdinand Brucher 

9 Roswell P. Bishop, 

10 R. 0. Crump, 

11 Wm. S. Mesick. 

12 Carlos D. Sheldon. 

MINNESOTA. 

1 James A. Tawney, 

2 James T.McCleary, 

3 Joel P. Heatwole, 

4 F. C. Stevens, 

5 Loren Fletcher, 

6 Page Morris. 

7 Frank M. Eddy. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1 John M. Allen, 

2 W. V. Sullivan, 

3 Thos. C. Catc kings , 



40 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Dist. 

4 A . F. Fox, 

5 John S. Williams, 

6 C. W. F. Love, 

7 Patrick Henry. 

MISSOURI. 

i James T. Lloyd, 

2 Robert N. Bodine, 

3 Alex. M. Dockery, 

4 Chas. F. Cochran, 

5 Wm. S. Cowherd, 

6 D. A. DeArmonda, 
j James A. Cooney, 

8 R. P. Bland, 

9 Champ Clark, 

io Richard Bartholdt, 
ii Charles F. Joy, 

12 Charles E. Pearce, 

13 Edward Rood, 

14 IV. D. Vdndiver, 

15 M. E. Benton. 

MONTANA. 

C. S. Hartman. 

NEBRASKA. 

i Jesse P>. Strode, 

2 David H. Mercer, 

3 Samuel Maxwell, 

4 Wm. L. Stark. 

5 J. D. Sutherland, 

6 Wm. L. Green. 

NEVADA. 

F. G. Newlands. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1 Cyrus A. Sulloway, 

2 Frank G. Clarke. 

NEW JERSEY. 

1 H. C. Loudenslager, 

2 John J. Gardner, 

3 Benj. F. Howell, 

4 Mahlon Pitney, 

5 James F. Stewart, 

6 Richard W. Parker, 

7 Thos. McEwan, Jr.. 

8 Charles N. Fowler. 

NEW YORK. 

1 Joseph M. Beiiord, 

2 D. M. Hurley, 

3 E. H. Driggs, 

4 Israel F. Fisher, 

5 Charles G. Bennett, 

6 James R. Howe, 

7 J. G. H. Vehslage, 

8 J. Murray Mitchell, 

9 Thomas J. Bradley, 
10 Amos J. Cummings, 
n Wm. Sulzer, 

12 Geo. B. McClellan, 

13 R. C. Shannon, 

14 L. E. Quigg, 

15 Philip B. Low, 



Dist. 

16 William L. Ward, 

17 B. B. Odell, 

18 John H. Ketcham, 

19 A. V. B. Cochrane, 

20 G. N. Southwick, 

21 David T. Wilbur, 

22 Lucien L. Littauer, 

23 W. T. Foote, 

24 Chas. A. Chickering, 

25 James S. Sherman, 

26 George W. Ray, 

27 James J. Belden, 

28 Sereno E. Payne, 

29 Charles W. Gillett, 

30 J. W. Wadsworth, 

31 Henry C. Brewster, 

32 R. B. Mahany, 

33 D. S. Alexander, 

34 Warren B. Hooker. 
north carolina. 

1 Harry Skinner, 

2 George H. White, 

3 John E. Fowler, 

4 Wm. F. Stroud, 

5 //'. //'. Kiickin, 

6 Rev.C. H. Martin, 

7 A. Shuford, 

8 R. Z. Linnc-y, 

9 Richmond Pearson. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

M. N. Johnson. 

OHIO. 

1 Wm. B. Shattuc, 

2 Jacob H. Bromwell, 
•yjohn L. Brenner, 

4 G. A. Marshall, 

5 David Meekison, 

6 Seth Brown. 

7 Walter L. Weaver, 

8 Archibald Lybrand, 

9 Jas. H. Southard, 

10 Lucien J. Fenton, 

11 Chas. H. Grosvenor, 

12 J. J. Lentz, 

13 James . I. Norton, 

14 Winfield S. Kerr, 

15 H. C. Van Voorhis, 

16 Lorenzo Danford, 
177. A. McDowell, 

18 Robert W. Taylor, 

19 S. A. Northway, 

20 Clifton B. Beach, 

21 T. E. Burton. 

OREGON. 

1 Thomas H. Tongue, 

2 Wm. R. Ellis. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
AT LARGE. 

Galusha A. Grow, 
S. A. Davenport. 



Dist. 

1 Henry H. Bingham, 

2 Robert Adams, Jr., 

3 Will lata McAleer, 

4 Jas. Rankin Young, 

5 A. C. Harmer, 

6 Thomas S. Butler, 

7 Irving P. Wanger, 

8 Wm.S.Kirkpatrick, 

9 Dan. Ermentrout, 

10 Marriott Brosius, 

11 Wm. Connell, 

12 Morgan B.Williams, 

13 Charles N. Brumm, 

14 M. E. Olmstead, 

15 James H. Codding, 

16 Horace B. Packer, 

17 Monroe H. Kulp, 

18 Thad. M. Mahon, 

19 G.J. Benner, 

20 Josiah D. Hicks, 

21 E. E. Robbins, 

22 John Dalzell, 

: William A. Stone, 

24 Ernest F. Atcheson, 

25 James J. Davidson, 

26 J. C. Sturtevant, 

27 Charles W. Stone, 

28 Wm. C. Arnold. 

RHODE ISLAM). 

1 .Melville Bull, 

2 Adin B. Capron. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1 Wm. Elliott, 

2 // ". Jasper Talbert, 

3 Aslury C. Latimer, 

4 Stanyarne Wilson, 

5 Thomas J. Strait, 

6 James Norton, 

7 J. Wm. Stokes. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 
AT LARGE. 

John E. Kelley, 
Freem'n Know les. 

tennessee. 

1 W. P. Brownlow, 

2 Henry R. Gibson, 

3 John A. Moon, 

4 Benton Mc Mill in, 
SJ- D. Richardson, 

6 J. W Gaines, 

7 Nicholas N. Cox, 

8 T. W. Sims, 

9 Rice A. Pierce, 
10 E. IV. Car mack. 

TEXAS. 

1 Thomas H. Ball, 

2 Samuel B. Cooper. 

3 R. C.DeGraJfenreid 



Dist. 

4 John W. Crawjord, 

5 Joseph W. Bailey, 
6R.E. Burke, 

7 R. L. Henry, 

8 6". W. T. Lanham, 

9 Joseph D. Sayers, 

10 R. B. Hawley, 

11 Rudolph Kiel it rg, 

12 J. L. Slayden, 

J 3 John H. Stevens. 

UTAH. 

William H. King. 

VERMONT. 

1 H. Henry Powers, 

2 William W. Grout. 

VIRGINIA. 

1 Wm. A.Jones, 

2 Wm. A. Voting, 

3 John B. Lamb, 

4 Sydney J\ Epes, 

5 CI a ndc A . Swa nson, 

6 Peter J. Otey, 

7 /a tins I lav, 
SJ. F. Rixey, 

9 James A. Walker, 
10 Jacob Yost. 

WASHINGTON. 
AT LA1U.E. 

W. C. Jones, 
Hamilton Lewis. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

i B. B. Dovener, 

2 A. G. Dayton, 

3 Charles P. Dorr, 

4 Warren Miller. 

WISCONSIN. 

1 Henry A. Cooper, 

2 Edw. Sauerhering, 

3 J. W. Baboock, 

4 Theobold Otjen, 

5 S. S. Barney, 

6 J. H. Davidson, 

7 Michael Griffin, 

8 Edward S. Minor, 

9 Alexander Stewart, 
10 John J. Jenkins. 

WYOMING. 

John E. Osbomc. 



TERRITORIAL 

DELEGATES. 

ARIZONA. 

Marcus A. St tilth. 

NEW MEXICO. 

//. B. Ferguson. 

OKLAHOMA. 

Rev. T.Y. Callahan. 



SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 
Chief Justice.— Melville W. Fuller, of Illinois. Age 63. Appointed \i 

Associate Justices. 



AGE 

63 



John M. Harlan, of Kentucky 
Horace Gray, of Massachusetts . . 68 
David J. Brewer, of Kansas. ... 60 
Henry B. Brown, of Michigan. . . 60 
Reporter — J. C. Bancroft Davis, 
McKenney ; appointed 1880. Marshal 



APP. 

1877 
1881 
1889 
1890 



George Shiras, Jr., of Penna. . . 

Edward D. White, of Louisiana . 

Rufus W. Peckham, of New York 

Vacancy. 

of Massachusetts; appointed 1883. Clerk.— James H 
—J. M. Wright, of Kentucky ; appointed 1888. 



age. 
.64 
. 5i 
•59 



APP. 
1892 
1894 
l8 9 S 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



41 



GOVERNMENT OF PENNSYLVANIA, 1897. 



Governor. — Daniel H. Hastings. 

Private Secretary. — Lewis E. Beitler. 

Staff 0/ Commander-in-Chief. — Brigadier- 
General Thomas J. Stewart, Adjutant-General, 
Harrisburg, Pa.; Lieutenant-Colonel Wilbur Fisk 
Reeder, Assistant Adjutant-General, Beilefonte, 
Pa.; Colonel Edward Morrell, Inspector-Gen- 
eral, 505 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa.; Colonel 
B. Frank Eshleman, Judge Advocate-General, 
Lancaster, Pa.; Colonel Albert J. Logan, Quar- 
termaster-General, Pittsburg, Pa.; Lieutenant- 
Colonel Thomas Potter, Jr., Assistant Quarter- 
master-General, 522 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Colonel Ezra H. Ripple, Commissary-General, 
Scranton. Pa.; Lieutenant-Colonel Lloyd B. 
Huff, Assistant Commissary-General, Greens- 
burg, Pa.; Colonel Louis W. Reed. Surgeon- 
General, Norristown, Pa.; Colonel Asher Miner, 
General Inspector of Rifle Practice, Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa.; Colonel Thomas J. Hudson, Chief 
of Artillery, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Lieutenant-Governor . — Walter Lyon. 

Secretary of the Commonwealth. — Frank 
Reeder. Deputy Secretary, James E. Barnett. 
Chief Clerk, Wilson M. Gearhart. 

Attorney-General. — Henry C. McCormick. 
Deputy Attorney-General. — John P. Elkin. 

Auditor-General. — Levi G. McCauley. 

Secretary of Internal Affairs. — James W. 
Latta. Deputy Secretary of Internal Affairs, 
Isaac B. Brown. 

State Treasurer. — James S. Beacom. 

Chief of Bureau of Industrial Statistics. — 
James M. Clark. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. — Na- 
than C. Schaeffer. Deputy Superintendents of 
Public Instruction, Henry Houck and John Q. 
Stewart. 

Adjutant-General. — Thomas J. Stewart. 
Chief Clerk, George C. Kelly. 

Insurance Commissioner. — James H. Lam- 
bert. Deputy Insurance Commissioner, Sam- 
uel W. McCulloch. 

Commissioner of Banking. — B. F. Gilkeson. 
Deputy Commissioner of Banking, John W. 
Morrison. 

Secretary of Agriculture. — Thomas J. Edge. 
Deputy Secretary of Agriculture, John Ham- 
ilton. 

Dairy and Food Commissioner. — Levi Wells. 

Economic Zoologist. — Dr. B. H. Warren. 

Commissioner of Forestry. — Dr. J. T. Roth- 
rock. 

State Veterinarian. — Dr. Leonard Pearson. 

State Librarian. — William H. Egle. First 
Assistant State Librarian, Howard B. Harts- 
wick. Second Assistant State Librarian, 
Thomas O'Reilly. 

Factory Inspector. — James Campbell. 

Superintendent of Public Grounds and 
Buildings. — John C. Delaney. 

Superintendent of Public Printing and 
Binding. — Thomas Robinson. 

Chief Clerk of Soldiers' Orphans' Schools 
Commission. — Joseph Pomeroy. 

State Printer. — Clarence M. Busch. 

Major-General Commanding the National 
Guard. — George R. Snowden. Brigadiers. — 1. 
John W. Schall, Philadelphia ; 2. John A. Wiley, 



Franklin, Venango co.; 3. J. P. S. Gobin, Leb- 
anon. 

State Board of Health.—}. H. McClelland, 
Pittsburg; George G. Groff, Lewisburg , Dr. 
Pemberton Dudley. Philada., Pres.; Richard Y. 
Cook, Philada. ; John Fulton, Johnstown ; S. T. 
Davis, Lancaster. Secretary, Dr. Beni. Lee 
Philada. 

Pharmaceutical Examining Board. — F. A. 
Boericke, Philada., Pres. ; Charles T. George, 
Harrisburg, Secretary ; Edward A. Cornell, 
Williamsport, Treas.; Lewis Emanuel, Pitts- 
burg ; Henry C. Porter, Towanda. 

Commissioners of Public. Charities. — Mahlon 
H. Dickinson, of Philada., President; J. W C. 
O'Neal, of Adams ; H. M. Boies, of Scranton ; 
Isaac Johnson, of Media; George W. Starr, 
of Erie ; Francis J. Torrance, of Allegheny 
W. B. Gill, of Philada.; Dr. G. I. McLeod, of 
Philada.; Chas. Miller, of Franklin; Geo. W. 
Ryan, of Shamokin. General Agent and Sec, 
Cadwalader Biddle, of Philada. 

Board of Pardons. — Walter Lyon, Lieuten- 
ant-Governor ; Frank Reeder, Secretary of the 
Commonwealth ; H. C. McCormick, Attorney- 
General ; James W. Latta. Secretary of Internal 
Affairs ; Lewis E. Beitler, Recorder; Wilson M. 
Gearhart, Secretary. 

Commissioners of Fisheries. — Henry C. De- 
muth, Lancaster; James A. Dale. York, Treas.; 
D. P. Corwin, Pittsburg, Sec; S. B. Stillwell, 
Scranton, Pres.; L. Streuber, Erie; James W. 
Correll, Easton. 

SUPREME COURT OF PENNSYLVANIA. 
City Hall, Fourth Floor, South Front, Room 454. 

Chief Justice. — James P. Sterrett. 

Associate Justices. — Henry Green, Henry W. 
Williams, J. Brewster McCollum, James T. Mit- 
chell, John Dean, D. Newlin Fell. 

Prothonotary. — Eastern Dist., C. S. Greene, 
Philada.; Middle Dist., Wm. Pearson, Harris- 
burg; Western Dist., George Pearson, Pittsburg. 

Reporter. — Wilson C. Kress, Lock Haven. 

SUPERIOR COURT. 

City Hall, Fourth Floor, South Front, Room 454. 

President Judge. — Charles E. Rice. 

Associate Judges. — Edwin N. Wil'ard, John 
J. Wickham, James A. Beaver, Howard J. 
Reeder, George B. Orlady, Peter P. Smith. 



PENNSYLVANIA LEGISLATURE, 1897-99. 
Senate. 

[Republicans (in Roman), 44 ; Democrats (in 
Italics), 6.] 
President of the Senate. — Walter Lyon, 

Lieutenant-Governor. 
Chief Clerk. — Edward W. Smiley. 



Dist. PHILADELPHIA. 

i George A. Vare. 

2 Ellwood Becker, 

3 F. A. Osbourn, 

4 C. Wesley Thomas, 

5 Charles L. Brawn, 

6 Boies Penrose, 

7 John C. Grady, 

8 Jacob Crouse. 



Dist. DELAWARE. 

9 William C. Sproul, 

BUCKS. 

10 Henry G. Moyer. 

BERKS. 

n IV. Oscar Miller. 

MONTGOMERY. 

12 Henry D. Saylor. 



4 2 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Dist. LANCASTER. 

13 Milton Eby, 

14 C. C. Kauffman. 

DAUPHIN. 

ic S. J. McCarroll. 

LEHIGH. 

16 Henry G. Stiles. 

LEBANON. 

17 J. P. S. Gobin. 

NORTHAMPTON. 

18 Henry D. Heller. 

CHESTER. 

19 William P. Snyder. 

LACKAWANNA, PART 
OF LUZERNE. 

20 James C. Vaughan. 

PART OF LUZERNE. 

21 William J. Scott. 

MONROE, PIKE AND 
CARBON. 

22 Lafayette Rowland 

BRADFORD AND 
WYOMING. 

23 B. B. Mitchell. 

LYCOMING, MONTOUR, 

SULLIVAN AND 

COLUMBIA. 

24 J. Henry Cochran. 

TIOGA, POTTER AND 
MC KEAN. 

25 Walter T. Merrick. 

SUSQUEHANNA AND 
WAYNE. 

26 E. B. Hardenbergh 

UNION, SNYDER AND 
NORTHUMBERLAND 

27 Edwin M. Hummel. 

YORK. 

28 Harvey W. Haines. 

SCHUYLKILL. 

29 Samuel A. Losch. 

30 John J. Coyle. 

PERRY, MIFFLIN AND 
JUNIATA. 

31 William Hertzler. 



CUMBERLAND AND 
Dist. ADAMS. 

32 Alfred W. Milleisen. 

FRANKLIN AND 
HUNTINGDON. 

33 H. Clay Chisholm. 

CLINTON, CLEARFIELD 
AND CENTRE. 

34 M. L. McQuown. 

BLAIR AND CAMBRIA. 

35 Jacob C. Stineman. 

SOMERSET, BEDFORD 
AND FULTON. 

36 N. B. Critchfield. 

INDIANA AND 
JEFFERSON. 

37 James G. Mitchell. 

CAMERON, ELK, CLAR- 
ION AND FOREST. 

38 William H. Hyde. 

WESTMORELAND. 

39 John H. Brown. 

FAYETTE AND GREENE 

40 Daniel S. Walton. 

BUTLER AND ARM- 
STRONG. 

41 Wm. B. Meredith. 

ALLEGHENY. 

42 Arthur Kennedy, 

43 C. L. Magee, 

44 William Flinn. 

45 John W. Crawford. 

BEAVER AND WASH- 
INGTON. 

46 Samuel P. White. 

LAWRENCE AND 
MERCER. 

47 Wm. M. Brown. 

WARREN AND VE- 
NANGO. 

48 Charles M. Shortt. 

ERIE. 

49 Perry H. Gibson. 

CRAWFORD. 

50 Wm. H. Andrews. 



House of Representatives. 

[Republicans (in Roman), 171; Democrats 
(in Italics), 33.] 



Dist. ADAMS. 

John R. Bittenger, 
William H. Tipton. 

ALLEGHENY. 

i Charles A. Muehl- 
bronner. 
Charles W. Simon, 

2 Wm. J. McDonald, 
Wm. T. Marshall, 

3 Wm.W. McElhany, 
Andrew J. Pitcairn, 

4 Thomas M. Brophy, 

5 Geo. L. McFarlane, 
George M. Hosak, 
Charles S. Black, 
Charles J. Pedder, 



Dist. 

6 James McB. Robb, 
R. McWhinney, 

7 Thomas J. Ford, 
John I. Shaw, 

8 Thomas Tillbrook. 

ARMSTRONG. 

George W. McNees, 
W. Fred Turner. 

BEAVER. 

Ira F. Mansfield, 
Andr. J. Lawrence. 

BEDFORD. 

William C. Smith, 
S. M^Williams. 



Dist. BERKS. 

i Edward M. Luden, 
David West, 

2 Cyrus J. Rhode, 
Jacob H. Weible, 
Charles B. Spatz. 

BLAIR. 

Matth. M. Morrow, 
Geo. M. Patterson. 

BRADFORD. 

Louis Piollet, 
Rob't S. Edmiston, 
Lawr'ce T. Manley. 

BUCKS. 

Henry S. Funk, 
Hampton W. Rice, 
James Patterson. 

BUTLER. 

James N. Moore, 
John Dindinger. 

CAMBRIA. 

Saml. D. Patterson, 
William P. Reese. 

CAMERON. 

Sylvester S. Smith. 

CARBON. 

Jerry N. Weiler. 

CENTRE. 

James Schofield, 
R. McKay Foster. 

CHESTER. 

Daniel F. Moore, 
John H. Marshall, 
Plummer E.Jefferis, 
Thomas J. Philips. 

CLARION. 

John A. F. Hoy, 
John Mong. 

CLEARFIELD. 

Frank G. Harris, 
Joseph Alexander. 

CLINTON. 

Jas. W. Fredericks. 

COLUMBIA. 

William T. Creasy, 
Wm. Chrisman. 

CRAWFORD. 

Philip M. Cut shall, 
Ch. A. Stranahan, 
Judson B. Phelps. 

CUMBERLAND. 

Filmore Maust, 
Harry Manning. 

dauphin. 

1 George Kunkel, 

2 John M. Heagy, 
W. H. Clay Keen, 
Edward S. Keiper. 

DELAWARE. 

Ward R. Bliss, 
Thomas H. Garvin, 
Richard J. Baldwin. 

ELK. 

George R. Dixon. 



Dist. ERIE. 

1 Edward P. Gould, 

2 John D. Bentley, 
George A. Evans. 

FAYETTE. 

Clark T. Baldwin, 
George Hopwood, 
Geo. W. Campbell. 

FOREST. 

Jacob E. Wenk. 

FRANKLIN. 

William W. Britton, 
James W. Carson. 

FULTON. 

P. McCauley Cook. 

GREENE. 

J. A. Maple. 

HUNTINGDON. 

P. M. Lytle, 
John S. Barr. 

INDIANA. 

John McGaughey, 
John W. Morrow. 

JEFFERSON. 

William O. Smith. 

JUNIATA. 

Jeremiah N.Kellar 

LACKAWANNA. 

John R. Farr, 
Alex. T. Connell, 
Nathan C. Mackey, 
John F. Reynolds. 

LANCASTER. 

Frank B. McClain, 
Milton Heidelbaugh 
Hiram Peop es, 
Aug. G. Seyfert, 
John S. Wilson, 
Quinton O. Reitzel. 

LAWRENCE. 

Algernon L. Martin, 
Robert A. Todd. 

LEBANON. 

George W. Ellis, 
Philip H. Reinhard. 

LEHIGH. 

Michael J . Lennon, 
Milton J. Kramlich 
Alvin J. Kern, 

LUZERNE. 

Jacob Roberts, Jr., 
E. A. Coray, Jr., 
Clarence B. Miller, 
Thomas M. Powell, 

5 John J. Morahan, 

6 Ellsworth L. Reilly. 

LYCOMING. 

James B. Coryell, 
John W. King, 
John C. Wilson. 

MC KEAN. 

Rich. A. Dempsey, 
Herman H. North. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



43 



Dist. MERCER. 

James D. Emery, 
John M. Martin, 
John C. Bell. 

MIFFLIN. 

Gruber H. Bell. 

MONROE. 

Frank E. Place. 

MONTGOMERY. 

Thomas H. Barker, 
Horace W.Eshbach, 
Henry W. Kratz, 
Jason Sexton, 
William Teas. 

MONTOUR. 

Lloyd W. Welliver. 

. NORTHAMPTON. 

Webster C. Weiss, 
Charles F. Chidsey, 
William H. Leh. 

NORTHUMBERLAND. 

George W. Rhoads, 
William L. Nesbit. 

PERRY. 

J. Harper Seidel. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

i Edwin H. Vare, 
Charles Deputy, 
David H. Conrade, 
Robert L. Roberts, 
David Singer, 
John R. Lloyd, 
James McCoiinell, 
Henry K. Boyer, 
John M. Scott, 
Court. K. Bolles, 
Augustus S.Roberts 
Chas. E. Voorhees, 
Henry Gransback, 
Wm. T. Zehnder, 
H. Thos. Dunlap, 
William M. Kidd, 
Walton Pennewill, 
Ziba T. Moore, 
William F. Stewart, 
Elias Abrams, 
Louis Bier, 
James Clarency, 
Walter Stradling, 
Charles Shane, 
William H. Keyser, 
John H. Riebel, 
Milton W. Kerkes- 
lager, 
John F. Keator, 
Franklin Reed, 
Mahlon L. Savage, 
Ebenezer Adams, 
Charles B. Noblit, 
Robert Smith, 
John A. Gilmore, 



2 

3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
io 

ii 

12 

J 3 

14 
15 

16 



T 7 

18 



*9 
20 

21 
22 

2 3 

24 

25 



Dist. 

26 Samuel Crothers, 

27 Charles W. Boger, 
George Sterr, Jr., 

28 Adam C.Ackerman, 
George W.Williams. 

PIKE. 

Fred. A. Kessler. 

POTTER. 

J.Walter Wells. 

SCHUYLKILL. 

i Evan A. Griffith, 

2 Frank J. Kehler, 

3 John D. Kershner, 

4 A. C. Shrink, 
Seth Orme, 
Earl Witman. 

SNYDER 

Chas. W. Hermann. 

SOMERSET. 

William H. Miller, 
William H. Sanner. 

SULLIVAN. 

Bishop W.Jennings. 

SUSQUEHANNA. 

James W. Adams, 
Linus W. Moore. 

TIOGA. 

Robert K. Young, 
Frederick B. Smith. 

UNION 

Benjamin K. Focht. 

VENANGO. 

Thomas McGough, 
Peter M. Speer. 

WARREN. 

E. W. Parshall, 

WASHINGTON. 

John C. French, 
James G. Sloan, 
David M. Pry. 

WAYNE. 

Harry B. Ely, 
N. F. Underwood. 

WESTMORELAND. 

B. O. Keefer, 
James C. Campbell, 
Amos Trout, 
Jas. B. Hammond. 

WYOMING. 

Stanley R. Brungess 

YORK. 

William H. Long, 

Reuben R. Kayler, 

James C. Graha?n, 

Charles M. Kerr. 



-Clayton McMichael : 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



City Treasurer.- 

room 143, City Hall. 

City Solicitor.— John L. Kinsey : room 
476, City Hall ; First Assistant, James Alcorn ; 
Chief Clerk, Thomas S. Stout. 

Receiver of Taxes. — William J. Roney : 
room 102, City Hall ; Chief Clerk, James F. 
Morrison; Assistant Chief Clerk, John L. Bow- 
ers ; Deputy Receiver, Walter L.Ward ; Cashier, 
L. H. Raser; Chief Deputy Collector of Delin- 
quent Taxes, James McCormick. 

City Councils. 
Meet in City Hall, fourth floor. 
Select Council. 
President. — James L. Miles. 
Clerk. — Joseph H. Paist. 
Assistant Clerk. — Henry W. Robertson. 
Sergeant-at-A rms. — James Franklin. 



Wards. 

1 P. A. McClain.* 

2 Joseph L. Nobre. 

3 Harry Hunter. 

4 Wm. Mc Mullen. 

5 Jas. B. Anderson. 

6 fames Nolan. 

7 S. F. Houseman. 

8 G. W. Sunderland. 

9 R. R. Bringhurst. 

10 F. A. Ballinger.* 

11 Jos. H. Klemmer. 

12 Louis J. Walker.* 

13 James L. Miles. 
W. G. Rutherford.* 
Wm. G. Huey. 
Henry Clay.* 
Chas. Kitchenman.* 
William Rowen. 



Wards. 

20 John Stackhouse. 

21 Joseph M. Adams.* 

22 Geo. B. Edwards. 

23 J. Emory Byram.* 

24 A. H. MacOwen. 

25 Wilbur F. Short. 

26 James A. Briggs.* 

27 E. W. Patton. 

28 Lucas G. Fourier. 

29 A. Raymond Raff . 

30 William McCoach. 

31 W. D. Upper man. 

32 F. M. Harris.* 

33 Samuel Lamond.* 

34 Henry Brooks. 

35 Joseph H. Brown.- 

36 Hugh Black. 

37 John Dougherty. 

38 H. W. Sherlock. 



Mayor. — Charles F. Warwick : room 202, 
City Hall ; Secretary , John K. McCarthy ; Chief 
Clerk, Harry C. Gill ; Contract and License 
Clerk, Joseph F. Jones. 



Thomas J. Rose.* 

Rep. (Rom.), 35 ; Dem. {Italic), 3. 
Common Council. 
President. — Wencel Hartman. 
Clerk. — George W. Kochersperger. 
First Ass't Clerk. — William Bartley. 
Ass' t Clerks. — GavinNeilson,W.H.Felton. 
Clerk to Finance Committee . — W. H. Baker. 
Sergeant-at-Arms . — Charles B. Hall. 

Wards. 

8 Wencel Hartman.* 
David S. B. Chew. 

9 Chas. Roberts.* 

10 Wm.. H. Garrett. 
B. L. Smedley. 
George McCurdy * 

11 Edwin E. Smith.* 

12 Henry Erdin. 

13 James C. Collins.* 
E. H. Hults. 

14 John T. Stauflfer. 
W. J. Scott, M. D. 
A. Abrahams. 

15 H. L. Montgomery. 
George Thomas.* 
Theodore Borden.* 
M. B. Parker. 
G. G. Mercer. 
Charles Ouram. 
Vacancy. 



Wards. . 

1 Harry Y. Shugart.* 
J. R.C. McAllister.* 
James M. Haslett.* 
Gustave Hahn.* 
S. Creadick, M.D.* 
Frank I. Mitchell. 
John C. Steger. 
C. M. Leonard 

2 C. F. Iseminger* 
John F. Slater. 
A. W. Falbey. 

3 C. S. Means, M. 

4 Lewis Kinsley.* 
Harry Quinn. 

5 Henry S. Martin.* 
C. D. B. Balbirnie. 

6 Wm. Van Osten. 

7 Charles Seger. 
J. S. Hammond. 
A. F. Stevens, Jr. 
Chris. J. Perry. 



D. 



The terms of those marked with * expire in April, 1898, 
and their successors are to be elected in February, 1898. 



44 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Wards. 

16 Samuel B. Gilpin. 

17 August Hohl.* 
George Q. Spiel. 

18 Richard T. Irwin. 
Isaac D. Hetzell. 
M. W. Bougher. 
Wm. H. Mingle. 

19 Thomas Firth. 
Edward Buchholz. 
R.W.B. Cornelius. 
John Doak, Jr. 
W. Harris Seltzer. 
Joseph A. Eslen. 
Elmer S. Little. 

20 Chas. K. Smith. 
T.J.Morton, M.D. 
George W. Conrad. 
M. M. Caverow. 
George Hawkes.* 
Geo. W. Kucker.* 

21 Wm. F. Dixon. 
Josiah Linton. 
H. M. Levering. 

22 Thomas Meehan. 
Jacob J. Seeds. 
JohnW. Davidson. 
Samuel Goodman.* 
George W. Boyer.* 
Wilson H. Brown.* 
Jas. Wolstencroft.* 
Robert T. Corson.* 
J. H. Morrison.* 
Wm. W. Allen.* 
A. M. DeHaven* 
Frank Stevens. * 
Frank Richards. 

J. F. Neill. 
John Lang. 

25 W. R. Knight, Jr.* 
J. H. Woodhead. 
R. E. Tongue. 
Ezekiel Gordon. 
Wm. T. Birch. 

26 E. A. Anderson.* 
J. D. Blackwood* 
Samuel Moore. 
R. C. Mecredy. 
J. C. H. Ivins. 



2 3 



24 



Wards. 

27 Chas. E. Connell. 
J. Warner Goheen. 
Charles M. Swain. 
Basil H. Brown.* 

28 Hiram A. Miller.* 
Lewis B. Mathias.* 
John E. Warren.* 
Amos S. Blake. 

29 W. R. Ban, M.D.* 
Geo. W. Edmonds.* 
Daniel H. Buck.* 
Anton F. Miller.* 
Walter Graham. 

G. H. Wagner. 

D. O. Boorse. 

30 John Irvine.* 
Frank McCullough. 
Wm. H. Funston. 

31 Robt. S. Leithead. 
John Pallatt. 
Lalen C. Krisher.* 

E. W. Richards* 
3^ Fred.L.Breitinger. 

John P. Buckley. 
T. G. Lovegrove. 
W. S. Thomas.* 
W. N. Stevenson. 

33 Charles H. Sayre.* 
A. T. Wadsworth. 
Thos. Wagner, Jr. 
Geo. T. Thackara. 
Stanley G. Miller. 

F. Baumgaertel. 

34 Robert Harvey.* 
Chas. C. Warwick.* 
Wm. H. Pavit. 

35 Peter E. Costello. 
Chas. B. Barton. 



36 Samuel K. Stinger. 
A. R. H. Morrow. 
John J. Orr.* 
Thos. J. Henry. 

37 John H. B. Amick. 
John D. Heins. 

38 John Barrows. 
Geo. H. Kittams. 
James Thompson. 

Rep. (Roman), 128 ; Dem. {Italic), 7. 



Department of Public Safety. 
Room 217, City Hall. 
Director. — Frank M. Riter. 
Secretary. — James Hoyt. 
Bookkeeper. — Hiram Horter, Jr, 
Messenger. — Robert .P Crouse. 

Bureau of Police. 
Room 227, City Hall. 

Superintendent of Police. — Captain R. J. 
Linden. 

Chief Clerk. — William Culbertson. 

Clerks. — B. F. Shantz. George L. Rubicam, 
Charles Henry, Samuel W. Roop. 

Messenger. — William J. Foster. 

Fire Marshal. — James S. Thompson. 

Magistrates at Ce?itral Station, City Hall. — 
Thomas W. South, J. M. R. Jermon. 

Clerk at Central Station. — John B. Moffitt. 

Police and Fire Surgeon. — Dr. Thomas H. 
Andrews. 



Captains of Police. 

Room 629, City Hall. 
First Division. — Charles B. Edgar. 
Second Division. — Edward W. Malin. 
Third Division. — Henry M. Quirk. 
Fourth Division. — Thomas Brown. 
Fifth Division. — George W. Thompson. 

Captain of Detectives. — Peter Miller. 

Electrical Bureau. 

Room 626, City Hall. 
Chief.— David R. Walker. 
Clerk. — John S. Wetter. 

Fire Bureau. 
Office, S. W. cor. Race and Juniper streets. 
Chief Engineer.— James C. Baxter, Jr. 
Secretary. — William C. Zane. 

Board of Fire Escapes. 
Office, S. W. cor. Race and Juniper streets. 
Composed of Building Inspectors, Chief En- 
gineer of Fire Bureau and Fire Marshal. Presi- 
dent, James S. Thompson ; Secretary, Wm. C. 
Zane. 

Bureau of Boiler Inspectors. 

Rooms 301-305, City Hall. 
Chief. — John Overn. 
Chief Clerk. — Frank W. Getz. 

Bureau of Building Inspection. 
Room 313, City Hall. 

William C. Haddock, Chief; William J. Gil- 
lingham, Deputy Chief; John Mecleary, Chief 
Clerk. Inspectors.— Fred. G. Myhlertz, John H. 
Kessler, Paul J. Essick, Jr., Wm. G. Button, 
Charles D. Supplee, Harman M. Boorse. Samuel 
H. Collom, Robert C. Hill, Geo. W. Payne, 
Edward H. Hannum, Thos. R. Allen, Geo. W. 
Bourne. 

Elei<ator inspectors. — Henrik V. Loss, Lin- 
coln Van Gilder. 

Structural Engineers. — Amos W. Barnes and 
Edwin Clark. 

Record Clerk. — Horace L. Davenport. 

Permit Clerk. — William Nickell. 

Stenographer and Typeivriter. — J. W. 
Scheerer. 

Messenger. — Charles E. Whiteside. 

Solicitor. — Norris S. Barratt, Ass't City Sol. 

Bureau of City Property. 
Room 130, City Hall. 
Superintendent. — A. S. Eisenhower. 
Chief Clerk. — Isaac B. Elliot. 

• 

Bureau of Health. 
Room 610, City Hall. 

Board of Health. — Anthony A. Hirst (Presi- 
dent pro tern.), J. Lewis Good (Secretary), Albert 
H. Dingee. 

Health Officer.— Theo. B. Stulb. 

Clerk to Health Officer. — Thos. Sailor. 

Port Physician.— Walter D. Green, M. D. 

Chief Clerk. — John J. McCay. 

Medical Inspector. — Dr. J. H. Taylor. 

Assistant Medical Inspectors. — William M. 
Angney, 519 Spruce street ; Alex. Cooke But- 
cher, 3442 Chestnut street; J. Aubrey Davis, 
527 S. Forty-second street ; George E. Stubbs, 
N. E. cor. Seventeenth and Jefferson streets; 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



45 



Frederick J. Haerer, 1134 N. Third street ; Green 
R. Hulshizer, 225 Brown street; Charles W. 
Karsner, 1409 S. Sixteenth street; Edward H. 
Kase, 1323 Girard avenue; Howard B. Martin, 
1724 Green street; Charles P. Mercer, 2554 N. 
Eighth street; O. H. Paxon, 123 N. Sixteenth 
street; William T. Robinson, 1621 N. Sixteenth 
street; Giovani Trojano, 773 S. Tenth street; 
Francis C. Van Gasken, 617 St. Mary street; 
Lewis C. Wessels, 1918 N. Twenty-second street. 

Chief Inspector of Nuisances. — Charles F. 
Kennedy. 

Chief Registration Clerk.—}. V. P. Turner. 

Chief Inspector of House Drainage. — George 
S. Hughes. 

Chief Inspector of Milk.— William J. Byrnes. 

Chief Disinfector. —Dr. W. W. Meyers. 

Municipal Hospital. 

Physician in charge. — W. M. Welch, M. D., 

821 N. Broad street. 
Resident Physician. — M. P. Warmuth. 
Steward. — Vacancy. 

Vaccine Physicians. 

1st Dist. — First Ward. — J. S. Gillespie, 203S 
S. Thirteenth street. 

2d Dist. — Second and Third Wards. — W. S. 
M. Field, 1210 S. Fourth street. 

3d Dist. — Twenty-sixth and Thirty-sixth 
Wards. — G. A. Knowles, 2211 Federal street. 

4th Dist. — Fourth and Thirtieth Wards. — H. 
B. Baxter, 1422 Christian street. 

5th Dist.— Fifth and Sixth Wards.— L. H. 
Horter, 1106 Snyder avenue. 

6th Dist. — Seventh and Eighth Wards. — E. H. 
Green, 302 S. Tenth street. 

7th Dist. — Ninth and Tenth Wards. — M. 
O'Harra, Jr., 125 N. Seventeenth street. 

8th Dist. — Eleventh, Twelfth, and Thirteenth 
Wards. — J. A. Fischer, 319 Green street. 

9th Dist. — Fourteenth and Fifteenth Wards. — 
Clarence P. Franklin, 1633 Fairmount avenue. 

10th Dist. — Sixteenth, Seventeenth, and Twen- 
tieth Wards. — Francis O'Gross, 1506 N. Seventh 
street. 

nth Dist. — Twenty-ninth Ward. — L. C. Peter, 
2132 Oxford street. 

12th Dist. — Nineteenth Ward. — J. A. Krug, 
2437 N. Fifth street. 

13th Dist. — Eighteenth and Thirty-first Wards. 
— David Henry, 1921 E. Dauphin street. 

14th Dist. — Thirty-third and Thirty-seventh 
Wards. — Robert Rodgers, 2903 N. Fifth street. 

15th Dist. — Twenty-fifth Ward. — S Lewis 
Summers, 2006 Orleans street. 

16th Dist. — Thirty-second Ward. — Laura S. 
Chapin, 1630 Diamond street. 

17th Dist. — Twenty-eighth Ward. — J. A. 
Camp, 1921 Susquehanna avenue. 

18th Dist. — Twenty-second Ward. — A M. 
Davis, 6008 Main street, Germantown. 

19th Dist. — Twenty-first Ward. — Ross K. 
Bunting, 4301 Ridge avenue, Manayunk. 

20th Dist. — Twenty-third and Thirty-fifth 
Wards. — Thomas C. Price, Bridesburg. 

21st Dist. — Twenty-fourth Ward. — W. C. Bar- 
rett, 3939 Powelton avenue. 

22d Dist. — Twenty-Seventh Ward. — Jos R. 
Bryan, N. E. cor. Forty-second and Chestnut sts. 
23d Dist. — Thirty-fourth Ward. — Charles H. 
Harvey, 4821 Lancaster avenue. 



Department of Public Works. 

Rooms 210-218, City Hall. 

Director. — Thomas M. Thompson. 

Assistant to the Director. — Harry W. Quick. 

Chief Clerk.— Willis Sheble. 

Bureau of Highways. 
Room 232, City Hall. 

Acting Chief. — Wm. H. Brooks. 

Assistants. — 1st Dist. William Godfrey. 2d. 
Samuel J. Shannon. 3d. Thomas F. Durham. 
4th. George W. Fox. 5th. Vacant. 6th. Wm. 
B.Scott. 7th. Wm. R. Ash. 8th. Vacant. 9th. 
Jno. E. Manship. 10th. Jno. L. Flood, nth. 
William A. Frederick. 12th. Matthew Patton. 
13th. R. B. Williams. 

Superintendent of Bridges. — C. A. Trik. 

Chief Clerk. — M. M. Coppuck. 

Bureau of Street Cleaning. 

Room 238, City Hall. 

Chief. — Sylvester H. Martin. 

Clerk.— William H. McCoy. 

Board of Highway Supervisors. 

Room 232, City Hall. 

Director of the Department of Public Works 

(President), Chiefs of the Bureaus of Highways, 

Subways, Water, Gas, Electrical and City 

Property. 

' Principal Draftsman. — Jules T. Jollivet. 
Secretary. — M. M. Coppuck. 

Bureau of Water. 
Office N. E. cor. Juniper and Filbert streets. 
Chief. — John C. Trautwine, Jr. 
Assistant Engineers. — Allen J. Fuller, Wm. 
Whitby. 

Superintendent General. — Frank L. Hand. 
Chief Clerk. — J. T. Hickman. 

Bureau of Surveys. 
Room 418, City Hail. 

Chief Engineer and Surveyor. — George S. 
Webster. 

Principal Assist. Engineer. — Geo. E. Dates- 
man. 

Assistant Engineers. — Gustavus K. More- 
head, Geo. S. Connor, Hugo Trik, B. H. Halde- 
man, R. I. D. Ashbridge, Samuel J. Wagner, 
Charles Ott, Norman L. Stamm, D. Jones Lucas, 
William H. Millard, Chas. M. Mills. 

Assistant Engineer in Charge of Pennsyl- 
vania Avenue Subway. — Samuel T. Wagnei. 

Recording Clerk. — Edward H. Thompson. 

Sewer Registrar. — William Calvert. 

Board of Surveyors . — 1st Dist. Thomas Daly 
2d. Charles W. Close. 3d. Wm. C. Cranmer, 
4th. Frits Bloch. 5th. Walter Brinton. 6th. 
Joseph Mercer. 7th. Wm. K. Carlile 8th. C. A. 
Sundstrom. 9th. Joseph C. Wagner. 10th John 
H. Webster, Jr. nth Joseph Johnson. 12th. 
J. Harvey Gillingham. 13th. Herbert M. Fuller. 

Registrar. — John W. Frazier. 

Bureau of Gas. 

Office, N. E. cor. Juniper and Filbert streets. 

Chief— Wm. K. Park. 

Assistant to Chief and General Storekeeper. 
— A. J. McCleary. 

Bookkeeper and Controller . — Thos. L.George. 

Superintendent of Distribution.— Joseph P. 
Boon. 

Chief Clerk.— William H. Leeds. 

Paymaster and Engineer s Clerk. — Rudolph 
McGirr. 



46 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Registrar and Chief Meter Inspector. — James 
McConnell. 

General Clerk. — John McCormick. 

Bureau of Lighting. 
Office, Twenty-second and Market streets. 

Chief. — John J. Kirk. 
Clerk. — John R. Morris. 

Bureau of City Ice Boats. 

Room 216, City Hall. 

Superintendent. — H. E. Melville. 

City Morgue. 
1307 Wood street. 

Superintendent . — Thomas Robinson. 
Assistant. — Benjamin Robinson. 

Department of Charities and Correction. 
Office, 395 A, City Hall. 
Directors. — William H. Lambert (President), 
William D. Gardner ( Treasurer) , Henry B. Gross, 
Alfred Moore, Jos. H. Mann. 

Bureau of Charities. 
Office, 42 N. Seventh street. 
Almshouse, W. side of Schuylkill, bel. Pine. 
Secretary. — Robert C. Floyd. 
Out-door Agent— A. D. W. Caldwell. 
Almshouse Superintendent. — Chas. Lawrence. 
Chief Resident Physician. — D. E. Hughes, 
M. D. 
House Agent. — Oliver P. Bohler. 

Bureau of Correction. 
Office, 395 A, City Hall. 
House of Correction, near Holmesburg. 
Secretary. — Edwin Palmer. 
House of Correction Supt. — Edwin A. Merrick. 
Master Warden. — Robert Mc Bride. 
Resident Physicians. — Geo. Robinson, M. D., 
H. A. P. Neal, M. D. _ 

Boards, Commissions, Inspectors, Mana- 
gers, etc., not under Departments of 
Safety, Works, or Charities. 
Civil Service Board. 
Room 875, City Hall. 

(Composed of the Mayor and Heads of Depart- 
ments. ) 
Secretary. — Harry L. Neall. 

Commissioners of Sinking Funds. 
Room 146, City Hall. 

The Mayor and Controller, ex-officio, and 
Louis Wagner. 

Clerk.— William H. Winter. 

Board of Public Education. 
Office, 713 Filbert street. 

President. — Simon Gratz. 

Vice-President. — Samuel B. Huey. 

Secretary. — Henry W. Halliwell. 

Assistant Secretary. — Andrew F. Hammond. 

Warrant Clerk. — William Dick. 

Assis't Warrant Clerk. —Edward Merchant. 

Clerks. — Albert B. Beale, Lucien E. Drake, 
Henry Moore, John D. Hardin, Thomas A. 
Hughes. 

Stenographer. — Lena A. Humphries. 
Messenger. — William S. Ruff. 



Superintendent's Department. 

Superintendent of Schools. — Dr. Edward 
Brooks. 

Assistant Superintendents. — Andrew J. Mor- 
rison, James F. C. Sickle, Lydia A. Kirby, Edgar 
A. Singer, C. Henry Kain, Mary Wright. 

Director of Drawing. — William A. Mason. 

Director of Music. — Enoch W. Pearson. 

Director of Kindergartens. — Anna W. Wil- 
liams. 

Clerk. — Addie S. Hover. 

Librarian. — Lillian I. Rhoades. 

Architect's Department. 

Architect and Supervisor of Buildings. — 
Joseph W. Anschutz. 

Assistant Architects a?id Inspectors. — James 
Gaw, J. Horace Cook, Lewis P. Hoopes, Daniel 
S. Beale. 

Inspector of Heaters. — John D. Cassell. 

Members of the Board. 
Section. 1 Section. 

1 Philip Hortz. : 19 M. J. Wilson, M. D. 

2 A. D. Harrington. 20 Thos. E. Merchant. 



3 Joseph D. Murphy. 

4 Wm. J. Manning. 

5 John M. Campbell. 

6 John P. Gloninger. 

7 Anna Hallowell. 

8 Simon Gratz. 

9 Thos. G. Morton, 

M. D. 
10 Thos. A. Robinson. 
n Wm. H. R. Lukens. 

12 Thomas A. Grace. 

13 Martin H.Williams, 

M. D. 

14 Vacancy. 

15 Henry R.Edmunds. 

16 Thos. G. Barrett. 

17 James Hughes. 

18 Alex. Adaire. 



21 Rudolph S. Walton. 

22 Chas. E. Morgan,Jr. 

23 R. L. Wright. 

24 Edward Lewis. 

25 T. W. Marchment. 

26 Paul Kavanagh. 

27 Samuel B. Huey. 

28 John Oughton. 

29 Mary E. Mumford. 

30 Wm. J. Pollock. 

31 William Mclntyre. 

32 Harvey H.Hubbert. 

33 William Wrigley. 

34 Joseph R. Rhoads. 

35 Thomas Shallcross. 

36 George Haig. 

37 C. H. Vanfleet. 

38 William Steele. 



Board of Revision of Taxes. 
Room 180, West, City Hall. 

Simon Gratz (President), Rinaldo A. Lukens, 
Isaac H. Shields (Secretary). 

Chief Clerk.— James W. Sayre. 
Assessors of Real and Personal Estate 
for Taxes. 

1st Dist. — 1st Ward. — Albert List, Peter Mon- 
roe. 

2d Dist. — 26th Ward and that part of 30th 
Ward east of Twenty-first street. — Louis Bregy, 
Albert H. Harris. 

3d Dist. — 2d, 3d and 4th Wards. — Joseph L. 
Nobre, James J. King. 

4th Dist. — 5th, 6th, nth and 12th Wards. — J. 
Wesley Durham, Wm. McMullen. 

5th Dist. — 7th and 8th Wards. — Jos. B. Barry, 
Thos. W. Marchment. 

6th Dist. — 9th, 10th and 14th Wards. — John G. 
Adair, Cor. Haggerty. 

7th. Dist. — 13th, 16th and 17th Wards and that 
part of 20th Ward south of Master street. — Peter 
B. Bobb, F. P. Haggerty. 

8th Dist. — 15th Ward and that part of 29th 
Ward south of Master street. — Jas. E. Ritchie, 
Howard Josephs. 

9th Dist. — 36th Ward and that part of 30th 
Ward west of Twenty-first street. — H. N. Stok- 
ley, John Dunn. 



ioth Dist. — 18th Ward and that part of 31st 
Ward east of Frankford av.— Joseph W. Kerr, 
John Gormly. 

nth Dist. — Parts of 20th, 326. and 37th Wards, 
north side of Master street, east side of Broad 
street, south side of Lehigh av.,west side of Ger- 
mantown av. to Sixth street, west side of Sixth 
street. — Adam Everly, James O'Hara. 

12th Dist. — Parts of 29th and 32d Wards, north 
side of Master street, south side of Susquehanna 
av., west side of Broad street to the Schuylkill 
River. — A. M. Maggi, John V. McManus. 

13th Dist. — 19th Ward and part of 31st Ward 
west of Frankford av. — John T. Finletter, B. F. 
Gaskill. 

14th Dist. — That part of 25th Ward south of 
Wheatsheaf Lane. — Henry Smith, John O'Don- 
nell. 

15th Dist. — That part of 33d Ward east of 
Fifth street. — Benjamin S. C. Thomas, Wm. H. 
Wright. 

16th Dist.— 35th Ward.— William H. Rush- 
worth, Albert J. Bloom. 

17th Dist. — That part of 22d Ward south of 
Upsal street and west of Stenton av. — Fountain 
Ward, Wm. H. Murphy. 

18th Dist. — 21st Ward and that part of 22d 
Ward north of Upsal street and west of Stenton 
av. — E. K. Thomas, John W. Boileau, Jr. 

19th Dist. — That part of 22d Ward east of Sten- 
ton av. — John S. Warner, Thos. K. Arnold. 

20th Dist. — 24th Ward. — Frank L. Irwin, John 
Brady. 

21st Dist. — 34th Ward. — Charles E. Connell, 
John Boyle. 

22d Dist. — That part of 27th Ward south of 
Baltimore av. and north line of Woodland Ceme- 
tery. — William H. Allison, Frank P. Leech. 

23d Dist. — That part of 27th Ward north of 
Baltimore av. and north line of Woodland Ceme- 
tery. — Jacob R.Whittaker, Albert A. Dutton. 

24th Dist. — 28th and 38th Wards. — Josephus 
Yeakel, D. Frank Collins. 

25th Dist. — 23d Ward and that part of 25th 
Ward north of Wheatsheaf Lane and east of 
Frankford av. — William McMurry, Edward H. 
Flood. 

26th Dist. — That part of 33d Ward west of 
Fifth street and that part of 37th Ward north of 
Lehigh av. — William T. Seal, H. Gilbert Cas- 
sidy. 

Inspectors of the County Prison. 
Office at the Prison, Passyunk Road. 

Richard D. Barclay (President), Emlen Hut- 
chinson (Secretary), Charles Hill (Treasurer), 
Robert R. Corson, Ralph F. Cullinan, Samuel H. 
Cramp, Robert W. Downing, William B. Hack- 
enburg, George W. Hall, W. F. Snyder, Justus 
C. Strawbridge. 

General Superintendent . — R. C. Motherwell, 
Jr. 

HOLMESBURG PRISjON. 

Deputy Superintendent. — Charles A. Abel. 
Bookkeeper. — H. H. Stewart. 
Physician. — Dr. B. F. Pennebaker. 
Supt. of Mfg. — Thomas K. Bowman. 

MOYAMENSING PRISON. 

Deputy Superintendent. — A. P. Richardson. 
Chief Clerk. — Frederick A, Cooke. 
Physicians. — Dr. B. F. Butcher, Dr. Frank 
A. Shark and Dr. Mary T. Wilson. 
Matron. — Anna B. Harshaw. 



Inspectors of the Eastern Penitentiary. 

Fairmount avenue W. of Corinthian avenue. 

Andrew J. Maloney ( President), Gen. Isaac J. 
Wistar (Secretary), Henry Z. Ziegler (Treas- 
urer), Conrad B. Day, Col. James C. Biddle. 

Warden. — Michael J. Cassidy. 

Residetit Physician. — H. M. Goodrich. 

Clerk. — D. W. Bussinger. 

Moral Instructor. — Rev. Joseph Welch. 

Directors of City Trusts. 
Office, 120 S. Third street. 

Louis Wagner (President), Joseph L. Caven 
(Vice-President), John H. Michener, Edward S. 
Buckley, Benj. B. Comegys, John K. Cuming, 
William L. Elkins, John M. Campbell, Alex- 
ander Biddle, John H. Converse, Dallas San- 
ders, Edwin S. Stuart. E.v-officio. — Charles F. 
Warwick, James L. Miles, Wencel Hartman. 

Secretary. — F. M. Highley. 

Girard Estate. 
Office, 120 S. Third street. 
Superintendent . — George E. Kirkpatrick. 
Girard College. 
Girard and Corinthian avenues. 
President.— A. H. Fetterolf, LL. D., Ph.D. 
Vice-President . — Winthrop D. Sheldon, A.M. 

Minor Trusts. 
Office, 120 S. Th' v d street. 
Superintendent. — George E. Kirkpatrick. 

House of Refuge. 

Boys' Department, Glen Mills, Pa. 

Girls' Department, 22d and Poplar sts., Philada. 

President. — George M. Troutman. 

Vice-Presidents . — James V. Watson, Joseph 
G. Rosengarten. 

Treasurer. — Thomas A. Robinson. 

Secretary. — Richard A. Lewis. 

Managers. — Crawford Arnold, John J. Henry, 
Thomas E. Baird, Francis W. Lewis, M.D., 
Morris Earle, William H. Vogdes, William C. 
Smyth, James Dougherty, Amos Bonsall, Dr. 
Isaac Massey (West Chester), Robert T. Corn- 
well (West Chester, Pa.), George Watson, 
Thomas L. Gillespie, Richard A. Lewis, Charles 
Richardson, Henry Cope, Joseph W. Hawley 
(Media, Pa.), Henry H. Collins, Alfred C. Har- 
rison, Joseph G. Rosengarten, N. Dubois Miller, 
William H. Staake, John H. Watt, Monroe 
Smith, J. Dundas Lippincott. 

Counselors. — John G. Johnson, Vacancy. 

Solicitor. — N. Dubois Miller. 

Consulting Physician. — Dr. Isaac Massey 
(West Chester). 

Superintendent. — F. H. Nibecker. 

Matron. — Elizabeth Davison. 

Superintendent Girls' Department. — W. A. 
Campbell. 

Physician. — Clara Marshall, M. D. 

Board of Port Wardens. 

Office, Bourse Building, Rooms 350 and 351. 

Joel Cook (Pres't), Samuel Disston, Henry V. 
Massey, W. L. Martin, H. C. Long, Jacob V. 
Foreman, Fred. H. Hess, Alex. C. Fergusson, 
Murrell Dobbins, Charles H. Large, Frank M. 
Chandler, Geo. W. Ledlie, Lewis W. Moore, 
Thomas M. Hammett, J. J. Stoer, Geo. Egolf, 
John Fountain (Chester), Charles E. Scott 
(Bristol). 



48 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Master Warden. — William R. Tucker. 
Secretary of the Board.— George F. Sproule. 
Vessel Clerk. — Lewis W. Wertz. 

Harbor Master's Office. 
S. E. cor. Dock and Walnut streets. 
Harbor Master. — Jos. H. Klemmer. 
Chief Deputy. — \Y illiam G. Rutherford. 

Harbor Commissioners. 
Office, Board of Trade Room, Bourse Building. 

Charles Piatt (President), Wm. R. Tucker 
(Secretary), Geo. S. Webster, Joel Cook, Edwin 
S. Cramp, William D". Winsor, C. A. Griscom. 

Consulting- Engineer. — Major C. W. Ray- 
mond, U. S. A. 

Directors of the Pennsylvania 

Nautical School. 
Office, 16 North Delaware Avenue. 
Charles Lawrence (Pres.), Joel Cook, Richard 
G. Oellers, Thomas Potter, George A. Cotton, 
Benjamin P. Obdyke. 

Secretary. — Frank S. Lawrence. 
Nautical School Ship, U. S. Ship Saratoga. 
Superintendent . — Commander C. T. Hutchins, 
U. S. N. 

Commissioners of Fairmount Park. 
Room 127, City Hall. 
James McManes (President), David W. Sel- 
lers (Vice-President), Wm. M. Singerly (Treas- 
urer), A. J. Cassatt, Wm. S. Stokley, S. Gustine 
Thompson, A. Loudon Snowden, Chas. W. 
Henry, P. A. B. Widener, John G. Johnson. 
Ex-officio. — Chas. F. Warwick, Jas. L. Miles, 
Wencel Hartman, John C. Trautwine, Jr., Geo. 
S. Webster, A. S. Eisenhower. 
Secretary. — Thomas S. Martin. 
Chief Engineer and Superintendent. — Rus- 
sell Thayer. 

Solicitor. — Samuel C. Perkins. 

Commissioners of Public Buildings. 
Room 453, City Hall. 

Samuel C. Perkins (President), Mahlon H. 
Dickinson, John S. Stevens, Richard Peltz, Wm. 
S. Stokley, Franklin M. Harris, Thomas E. Gas- 
kill, Wm. Brice, Chas. Seger, Wm. H. Wright. 
Ex-officio. — Chas. F. Warwick, James L. Miles, 
Wencel Hartman.. 

Secretary. — William B. Land. 

Architect .— W '. Bleddyn Powell. 

Superintendent . — L. D. C. Tyler. 

Solicitor — Henry J. Scott. 

County Officers. 

Sheriff. — Alexander Crow, Jr. ; office, room 
467, City Hall. 

Chief Deputy. — Walton Penne will . 

Recorder of Deeds. — William M. Geary; 
room 154, City Hall. 

Register of Wills and Clerk of the Or- 
phans' Court. — Horatio B. Hackett; room 
162, City Hall. 

Deputy Register. — Charles Irwin. 

State Appraiser. — G. W. Conrad. 

District Attorney. — Geo. S. Graham; room 
654, City Hall. 

Assistants. — Thomas W. Barlow, S. A. Boyle, 
Thos. D. Finletter, Ziba T. Moore. 

Indictment Clerk. — Peter H. Evans. 

Clerks. — James Uber Clark and Lewis B. Fife. 

Detectives. — Chas. F. Myers and Geo. Painter. 



Clerh of Quarter Sessions. — William B. 
Ahern ; room 685, City Hall. 

Deputy. — Richard Peltz. 

Court Clerks. — A. Wilson Henszey, Charles 
H. Good. 

Coroner. — Samuel H. Ashbridge ; office, 632 
Chestnut street. 

Deputy. — Thomas Dugan. 
Clerk. — A. L. English. 

County Commissioners. — Jacob Wilde- 
more, Jos. G. Richmond, Thomas J. Ryan ; 
room 136, City Hall. 

Chief Clerk. — Joseph H. Winters. 

Controller. — John M. Walton; room 146, 
City Hall. 

Clerk. — L. R. Fortescue. 

Appraisers of Mercantile Taxes. — Jas. 
Hollis, Amos M. Slack, William J. Pollock, 
Joseph P. Green, John T. Strickland. 

Courts. 
Common Pleas Courts. 
No. 1. 
City Hall, Second Floor, South Front, 
Rooms A and B (246 and 243). 
President fudge. — Craig Biddle. 
Associate Judges. — F. Amadee Bregy, A. M. 
Beitler. 

No. 2. 

City Hall, Second Floor, South Front, 

Rooms C and D (254 and 253). 

President Judge. — Samuel W. Pennypacker, 

Associate Judges. — Mayer Sulzberger, W. W. 

Wiltbank. 

No. 3. 
City Hall, Second Floor, West Front, 
Rooms E and F (275 and 285). 
President Judge. — Thomas K. Finletter. 
Associate Judges. — James Gay Gordon,Charles 
B. McMichael. 

No. 4. 
City Hall, Fourth Floor, South Front, 
Rooms G and H (446 and 443). 
President Judge. — Michael Arnold. 
Associate Judges. — Robt. N. Willson, C. Y. 
Audenried. 

Prothonotary. 
City Hall, Second Floor, West Front, Room 268. 
Prothonotary. — M. Russell Thayer. 
Deputy Prothonotary. — Charles B. Roberts. 
Chief Clerk. — James W. Fletcher. 

Criminal Courts. 
The Judges of the Common Pleas Courts are 
also Judges of the Courts of Oyer and Terminer, 
General Jail Delivery and Quarter Sessions of 
the Peace. 

District Attorney's Office. 
City Hall, Sixth Floor, South Corridor, Room 654. 
District Attorney. — Geo. S. Graham. 

Orphans' Court. 
City Hall, Fourth Floor, East Corridor. 
President Judge . — Wm. B. Hanna. 
Associate Judges. — William N. Ashman, Clem- 
ent B. Penrose, Joseph C. Ferguson. 
Clerk. — Elias P. Smithers. 
First Assistant Clerk. — A. J. Fortin. 
Marriage License Clerk. — James S. Bird. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



49 



Room No. 415. — Recording clerks, attorneys 
and general public. No. 417. — Clerk's main 
office. No. 419. — Reccrdroom. No. 421. — Mar- 
riage License office. No. 426. — President Judge 
Hanna's Court-room. No. 425. — Judge Ash- 
man's Court-room. No. 432. — Judge Penrose's 
Court-room. No. 436. — Judge Ferguson's Court- 
room. 

Magistrates' Courts, Police L -strict 
Stations. 

No. 1. — Vacancy. 

No. 2. — Robert J. Moore, 700 S. Broad st. 
Station (1st Dist.), Fitzwater below Twentieth. 

No. 3. — Amb. P. Pullinger, 912 S. Eighth st. 

No. 4.— Frank H. Smith, 728 Passyunk av. 
Station (2d Dist.), Second above Christian. 

No. 5. — Frank S. Harrison, 121 S. Seventh st. 
Station (3d Dist.), Union below Fourth. 

No. 6.— John H. Keenan, 36 S. Fifth st. Sta- 
tion (4th Dist.), Fifth above Race. 

No. 7. — J. M. R. Jermon, 418 S. Eleventh st. 
Station (19th Dist.), Lombard below Eighth. 

No. 8. — Edward A. Devlin. 713 Sansom st. 
Station (5th Dist.), Fifteenth below Walnut. 

No. 9. — John B. Lukens, 23 N. Juniper st. 
Station (30th Dist.), Front and Westmoreland. 

No. 9. — William Eisenbrown, 30 S. Broad st. 
Stations (27th Dist.), Tacony and (15th Dist.) 
Frankford. 

No. 10. — Thomas W. South, 114 N. Twelfth st. 
station (6th, Dist.), Eleventh above Race. 

No. 11. — Albert H. Ladner, N. W. cor. Fifth 
and Green sts. Station (7th Dist.), Fairmount 
av. and Minster. 

No. 12.— M. F. Wilhere, 832 Callowhill st. 
Station (8th Dist.), Buttonwood above Tenth. 

No 13. — Thomas W. Cunningham, 302 N. 
Broad st. Stations (9th Dist. ), Twenty-third 
and Brown and (20th Dist.) Fifteenth below 
Vine. 

No. 14. — Cornelius M. Smith. 1335 N. Second 
St. Station (10th Dist.), Front above Master. 

No. 15. — Richard C. Lloyd, 244 E. Girard av. 
Station (nth Dist.), Girard av. above Mont- 
gomery. 

No. 16. — Robert Gillespie, 2203 N. Second st. 
Station (18th Dist.), Fourth and York. 

No. 17. — Wm. S. Kochersperger, 2146 E. Sus- 
quehanna av. Station (26th Dist.), Trenton av. 
and Dauphin. 

No. 18. — John M. O'Brien, 1235 Girard av. 
Station (12th Dist.), Tenth and Thompson. 

No. 19. — James E. Romig, 1226 N. Nineteenth 
st. Stations (28th Dist.), Twentieth and Berks, 
and (23d Dist.) Jefferson above Twentieth. 
: No. 20. — James F. Neall, 2526 N. Tenth st. 
Station (228 Dist.), Park and Lehigh avenues. 

No. 21. — Vacancy. 

No. 22. — Charles P. Donnelly, 4 E. Chelten av., 
Germantown. Station (14th Dist.), Germantown. 

No. 23. — Peter J. Hughes, 4091 Lancaster av. 
Stations (29th Dist.), Sixty-first and Haverford 
av. and (16th Dist.) Thirty-ninth and Lan- 
caster av. 

No. 24. — George W. Evans, 35 S. Thirty-third 
st. Station (21st Dist.), Thirty-seventh and 
Woodland av. 

No. 25. — David S. Scott, 1512 Moyamensing 
av. Station (25th Dist.), Moyamensing av. be- 
low Dickinson. 

No. 26. — Robt. E. Henderson, 1406 Federal st. 
Station (17th Dist.), Twentieth below Federal. 



No. 27. — Vacancy. 

No. 28. — Hampton S. Thomas, 4438 Main st., 
Manayunk. Station (13th Dist.), Main and 
Jackson, Manayunk. 

State Inspector of Oils. 
Office, 311 City Hall. 
Inspector. — Thomas J. Powers. 
Deputies. — James A. Briggs, P. Lane, Jr. 

State Quarantine Board. 
'Office, Rooms 264 and 266, Bullitt Building. 

Richard A. Cleeman. M. D., President; Benj. 
Lee, M. D., Secretary ; Thomas Winsmore, 
Henry C. Boenning, M. D., Ernest Laplace, M. 
D., Henry M. DuBois, Theodore B. Stulb. 

Quarantine Physician. — H. C. Boenning, 
MD. 

Assistant Quarantine Physicians. — J. M. B. 
Ward, M. D., J. R. Caldwell, M. D. 

Clerk. — Carrie M. Prentiss. 



U. S. OFFICERS IN PHILADELPHIA. 

Courts. 
Circuit Court of Appeals. 
Post Office Building, Ninth and Chestnut sts. 
Justice. — George Shiras, Jr. 
Judges. — Marcus W. Acheson, Geo. M.Dallas. 
Clerk. — William V. Williamson. 
Deputy Clerk.— Vim. H. Merrick. 

Circuit Court. 
Justice .—George Shiras, Jr. 
Judges. — Marcus W. Acheson, Geo. M. Dallas, 
William Butler. 

Clerk. — Samuel Bell. 
Deputy Clerk. — John A. Merrick. 
Jttry Commissioner . — James S. Biddle. 
[Under the Act of March 3, 1891, the District 
Judges within the Circuit are competent to sit in 
this court in case a full court cannot be made up 
by the attendance of the Associate Justice of the 
Supreme Court and the Circuit Judges.] 

District Court. 
Judge. — William Butler. 
U. S. District Attorney. — James M. Beck. 
Assistants to the District Attorney . — Francis 
Fisher Kane, Michael J. McCullen. 
Clerk. — Cbarles S. Lincoln. 
U. S. Marshal. — James B. Reilley. 
Jury Commissioner. — Charles W. Henry. 

United States Commissioners. 

[With powers of commitment for offences 
against United States laws.] 

Samuel Bell, Henry R. Edmunds, W. W. 
Craig, John K. Valentine, John F. Lewis, 
Charles P. Clarke. 

Custom House. 
Chestnut street below Fifth. 
Collector. — John R. Read. 
Secretary. — George J. Brennan. 
Special Deputy and Auditor. — F. J. Crilly. 
Deputy Collector. — S. C. Kirk. 
Surveyor. — P. Gray Meek. 
Deputy Surveyor. — H. J. McAteer. 
Superintendent. — M. Cassidy. 
Naval Officer. — J. Marshall Wright. 
Deputy. — Charles J. Young. 
U. S. Appraiser. — Linn Hartranft. 
Asst. Appraisers. — Michael J. Brown, Fred. 
T. Vincent. 



5° 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Inspector of Drugs. — Louis A. Kelly, M. D. 
Inspector of Hulls. — Harrison Thompson. 
Inspector of Boilers of Steam Vessels. — Chris- 
topher Vert. 

Skipping Commissioner. — James J. King. 

U. S. Revenue Cutter " Hamilton." 
Address, care of Custom House. 

Captain.—}. C. Mitchell. 

First Lieutenant. — Chas. C. Fengar. 

Second Lieutenant.—]. G. Ballinger. • 

Chief Engineer. — J. A. Severns. 

First Assistant.—]. D. Newton. 

U. S. Revenue Cutter " Washington." 
Station, Pier 3, South Wharves. 
Address, care of Custom House. 
First Lieutenant {Commanding). — Lt. O. S. 
Willey. 

Post-Office. 
U. S. Building, Ninth and Chestnut streets. 

Postmaster. — Thos. L. Hicks. 

Assistant Post?naster. — Harry C. Ransley. 

Cashier. — Charles W. Zieber. 

Assistant Cashier. — James Mitchell. 

Supt. Money-Order Division. — John B. 
Comber. 

Supt. Mailing Division. — Edw. W. Alexander. 

Supt. Delivery Division. — James O'Sullivan. 

Supt. Registry Division. — Lehman P. Ash- 
mead. 

Supt. Box Division. — James Freeborn. 

Supt. Stamp Division. — J. J. Vogel. 

Supt. General Delivery Division. — George W. 
Davis. 

Inspector of Stations. — Frank J. Tobey. 

Letter-Carrier Stations. 

B. — West Philadelphia, Thirty-eighth st. below 
Market. 

E. — Port Richmond, Frankford av. and Clemen- 
tine St. 

F. — Frankford, Frankford av. and Orthodox st. 

G. — Germantown, Germantown and Chelten avs. 

H. — Chestnut Hill, Main st. and Bethlehem Pike. 

I. — Manayunk, 4448 Main st. 

L. — Tacony, Longshore st. near Edmund st. 

M. — Holmesburg, 8046 Frankford av. 

N. — Torresdale, Pennsylvania Railroad Station. 

Z. — Falls, 4124 Ridge av. 

R. — Nicetown, 3635 Germantown av. 

W. — West Park, 5011 Lancaster av. 

U. — Paschalville, 7028 Woodland av. 

X. — Bridesburg, 4817 E. Thompson st. 

A. — Eighteenth and Chestnut, 1723 Chestnut st. 

P. — Passyunk, N. W. cor. Ninth and Washing- 
ton av. 

J.— Fairmount, 635 N. Nineteenth st. 

S. — Spring Garden, S. W. cor. Sixth st. and 
Fairmount av. 

C. — Eighth Street, Eighth st. bel. Columbia av. 

O. — Columbia, 1925 Columbia av. 

Q. — Fairhill, 2713 N. Fifth st. 

K. — Kensington, Sepviva and Norris sts. 

D. — Southwest, N. E. cor. Eighteenth and Chris- 
tian sts. 

Suh-Stations {Receiving Stations) . 
1. — 1500 N. Second st. 5. — 1610 Federal st. 



9 
10 

11 

12 

J 3 

14 
15 
16 



-1323 Columbia av. 
— 2002 Tioga St., 

Tioga. 
— 7155 Germantown 

av. 
— 4900 Woodland a v. 
— Cor. Sixth and 

Diamond sts. 
— Cor. Seventh and 

Snyder av. 
— Palm..r st. and 

Girtird av. 
— Cor. Twenty -ninth 

& Diamond sts. 



17. — 2804 Richmond st.- 
18.— Upsal Station, P. 

R. R— Vacant. 
19. — Byberry. 
20. — Bourse Building. 
21. — Cor. Broad st. and 

Allegheny av. 
22. — Andora. 
23. — Roxborbugh . 
36.— Wanamaker's. 
37. — Woodland av. and 

Spruce st. 
38. — 1550 S. Fifteenth 
"st. 



Sub-Stations {Branch Post Offices). 



24. — Oak Lane 
25. — Lindley. 
26.-rPittville. 
27. — Sandiford. 
28. — Bustleton. 
29. — Somerton. 



2. — 4217 Lancaster av. 
3. — 2801 Poplar st. 
4. — 1020 S. Second st. 



6. — 3101 Powelton av. 
7. — 1039 N. Third st. 
8. — 1103 Ridge av. 



30. — Oxford Church. 
31 — Crescentville. 
32. — Milestown. 
33. — Fern Rock. 
34. — Lawndale. 
35.— Logan. 

Mint. 
N. W. cor. Chestnut and Juniper streets. 

Superintendent. — Herman Kretz. 
Chief Clerk. — George R. Snowden. 
Clidef Coiner. — W. E. Morgan. 
Assay er. — Jacob B. Eckfeldt. 
Melter and Refner.—Dr. D. K. Tuttle. 
Assistant Coiner. — Robert Clark. 
Engraver. — Charles E. Barber. 
Cashier. — Joseph D. Murphy. 

Sub-Treasury. 
Custom House Building, Chestnut street. 
Assistant Treasurer. — William H. Bigler. 
Chief Clerk and Cashier. — Barnet Earley. 

Internal Revenue. 
Post Office Building, Rooms 3 to 10, 2d Floor. 
First District. — Philadelphia, Bucks, Mont- 
gomery, Chester, Delaware, Lehigh, Berks and 
Schuylkill counties. 

Collector — Penrose A. McClain. 
Chief Deputy.— William J. Milligan. 

Navy Yard, League Island. 

Commandant. — Commodore J. A. Howell, U. 
S. N. 

Captain of the Yard, and Head of Yards 
and Docks Department. — Commander E. S. 
Houston,U.S. N.; Assistants to Captain of Yard, 
Lieutenant W. L. Burdick and Boatswain M. 
Nogan, U. S. N. 

Yards and Docks Department. — Civil Engi- 
neer C. C. Wolcott, U. S. N., and Civil Engi- 
neer A. J. Menocal, U. S. N. 

Equipment Department. — Lieutenant W. L. 
Burdick, U. S. N. ; also Recorder Board Labor 
Employment. 

Ordnance Department. — Commander E. 
Longnecker, U. S. N., and Acting Gunner Geo. 
Cross and Gunner C. H. Venable (Ft. Mifflin). 

General Storekeeper' s Department. — Pay 
Director J. A. Smith, U. S. N.; Sailmakers J. C. 
Herbert, U. S. N., and F. Watson, U. S. N. 

Construction and Repair Department . — 
Naval Constructor J. F. Hanscom, U. S. N., and 
Carpenter S. C. Brearley, U. S. N. 

Steam Engineering Department. — Chief En- 
gineer L. W. Robinson, U. S. N. 

Pay Department — Paymaster J. B. Redfield, 
U. S. N.; Pay Clerk T. G. Hansche. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



51 



Medical Department. — Surgeon W. H. 
Rush, U. S. N.; Apothecary D. W. Ross. 

Commandant' s Secretary. — W. J. Manning. 

U. S. Receiving-ship "Richmond." — Captain, 
F. M. Shepard, U. S. N., commanding; Lieu- 
tenant Commander, W. P. Day, U. S. N., 
Executive Officer; Lieutenant, W. R. Rooney, 
U. S. N. ; Second Lieutenant, L. J. McGill, 
U. S. M. C; Chaplain, T. A. Gill, U. S. N.; 
Chief Engineer, A. C. Engard, U. S. N.; Acting 
Boatswain, P. Deery, U. S. N.; Mates, W. 
Boyd, C. H. Thorne, L. M. McMelcher and W. 
Johnson, U. S. N. 

Marine Barracks. — Major H. A. Bartlett, 
U. S. M. C, commanding. Captain B. R. Rus- 
sell, U. S. M. C; First Lieutenant F. J. Moses, 
U. S. M. C; Second Lieutenant, J. E. Mahoney, 
U. S. M. C; Surgeon, D. O. Lewis, U. S. N. 
Marine Rendezvous. 

U*. S. Steamship Minneapolis. — Captain J. 
H. Sands, U. S. N., commanding; Lieutenant 
Commander E. W. Sturdy, U. S. N., Executive 
Officer; Lieutenant J. A. Bell, U. S. N.; Sur- 
geon, N. F. Drake, U. S. N.; Chaplain, W. F. 
Morrison, U. S. N.; Chief Engineer, W. W. 
Windsor, U. S. N.; Boatswain, J. Sutton, U. S. 
N.; Acting Carpenter, J. A. O'Connor, U. S. N. 

U. S Steamship Columbia. — Captain J. H. 
Sands, U. S.N., commanding; Lieutenant, W. 
J. Maxwell. U. S. N.; Ensign, J. R. P. Pringle, 
U. S. N.; Chief Engineer, W. S. Moore, U. S. 
N.; Boatswain, H.Sweeney, U. S. N.; Gunner, 
T. M. Johnson, U. S. N.; Carpenter, J. D. 
Griffen, U. S. N. 
Officers on Duty at Messrs. Cramp & Sons'. 

Construction Department. — Naval Con- 
structor J. H. Linnard, U. S. N., Superintend- 
ing Constructor ; Naval Constructor, J. G.Taw- 
resey, U. S. N.; Asst. Constructor, H. G. Smith, 
U. S. N. ; Carpenters, W. A. Barry, U. S. N., 
and E. W. Smith. 

Engineer Departme?it. — Chief Engineer W. 
W. Dungan, U. S. N., in charge; Past Asst. En- 
gineer J. H. Rowen. 

Equipment Department. — Sailmaker W. Cud- 
dy, U. S. N. 

Ordnance Department. — Commander Horace 
Elmer, U. S. N. 

U. S. Navy Pay-Office. 

Post Office Building, Rooms 20 and 21. 
Pay Director. — Rufus Palks. 
Chief Clerk. — Abram Reynard. 

U. S. Naval Home. 
Gray's Ferry road. 

Governor . — Captain John C. Watson, U. S. N. 
Executive Officer. — Commander St. James 
H. Sears, U. S. N. 
Pay Inspector.— W. W. Woodhull, U. S. N. 
Chaplain— Frank B. Rose, U. S. N. 
Clerk to Governor. — John B. Sartori. 

U. S. Naval Hospital. 

Gray's Ferry road. 

Medical Director— G. H. Cooke. 

Assistants. — Past Assistant Surgeon L. W. 
Atlee. U. S. N.; Assistant Surgeon L. W. Spart- 
ley, U. S. N. 

Marine Hospital Service. 

410 Chestnut street. 
P. A. Surgeons. — Fairfax Irwin, M. D., and 
H. S. Cummings, M. D. 



Quartermaster's Department, Marine 
Corps. 

Office, 1 100 S. Broad street. 

Asst. Quartermaster . — Capt. T. C. Prince. 
Chief Clerk. — Daniel Kirby. 

Quarantine and Immigration Service. 
Surgeon. — Dr. Fairfax Irwin. 

Army Staff Officers. 
Office, S. E. corner Fifteenth and Arch streets. 

Deputy Quartermaster-General. — Lieut. - 
Col. John V. Furey. 

Major and Quartermaster. — C. A. H. 
McCauley. 

Medical Department. — Capt. W. H. Arthur, 
M.D., attending surgeon; office, 226 S. Thirty- 
eighth street. 

United States Engineers' Office. 
Fifteenth and Arch streets. 

Officer in Charge. — Major C. W. Raymond, 
Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. 

Assistant Officers. — First Lieutenant Spencer 
Casby, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A. ; Second 
Lieutenant Sherwood A. Cheney, Corps of En- 
gineers, U. S. A. 

Chief Clerk. — Stephen Lynch. 

Assistant Engineers. — Thos. M. Farrell, E. 
D. Thompson, D. Guy Anderson. 

Superintendent. — F. C. Warner. 

Examining Board of Naval Engineers. 

Post Office Building, Room 5, Fourth Floor. 

Chief Engineer S. L. P. Ayres, President ; 
Chief Engineer John A. Scot, Chief Engineer 
Wm. S. Smith. 

Frankford Arsenal, Bridesburg. 

Commandant. — Col. J. M. Whittemore. 

Assistants. — Major J. Pitman, Lieut. B. W. 
Dunn, Lieut. C. L'H. Ruggles. 

Under Instruction. — Lieut. George D. Guyer, 
Sixteenth Infantry. 

Schuylkill Arsenal. 
Commandant. — Major F. F. Hathaway. 
Quartermaster. Captain G. S. Bingham, As- 
sistant Quartermaster. 

Station for Enlistment of Infantry, Caval- 
ry, Artillery and all Branches 
of the Army. 

Juniper and Filbert streets. 

Captain. — D. J. Craigie. 
Surgeon. — W. H. Arthur. 

Seamen, Firemen and Boys' Rendezvous 
for Enlistment. 

Navy Yard, League Island. 

U. S. S. Richmond. — Capt. F. M. Shepard, 
commanding. 

Pension Office. 

Post Office Building, Rooms 13 to 18 and 31 to 35. 

Agent. — General St. Clair A. Mulholland. 

Chief Clerk.— -H. V. Sickel. 

Special Examiners. — Room 27: Fred. C. 
Peck, Noah W. Halley, Rodney Chipp, J. E. S. 
Cony and Ralph Jefferson. 



52 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Pension Boards, Examining Surgeons. 

First Board. — Room 24 : Robert B. Cruice, 
M. D. (President), J. P. Patterson (Secretary), 
W. A. Hutt. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri- 
days, 10 A.M. 

Second Board. — John J. Healy ( President), S. 
Thompson Banes, St. D., Samuel Starr. Tues- 
days, Thursdays and Saturdays, 10 A.M. 

Third Board.— Michael O'Hara, M. D. (Pre- 
sident), Napoleon Hickman, M. D., Robert 
Kilduff, M. D. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri- 
days, 10 A.M. 

Fourth Board. — Joseph McFadden, M. D. 
(President), D. J. Loughlin, M. I)., E. Stanley 
Perkins, M. D. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Satur- 
days, 10 A.M. 

U. S. Weather Bureau. 

Post Office Building, Fourth Floor. 

Local Forecast Officer in Charge. — L. M. Dey. 
U. S. Observer in Charge 0/ State Weather 
Service. — T. F. Townsend. 

Observers. — C. J. Doherty and R. S. Cooper. 
Assistant. — Howard Freas. 

U. S. Bank Examiner. 
Post Office Building, Room 30. 
Examiner. — William H. Hardt. 

U. S. Inspectors of Steam Vessels. 

Post Office Building, Fourth Floor. 

Local Inspector 0/ Hulls. — H. A. Thompson. 
Local Inspector of Boilers— ChristopherVert. 
Assistant Boiler Inspector. — R. A. Sargeant. 

Branch Hydrographic Office, U. S. N. 

Office, Philadelphia Bourse. 

Officer in Charge. — Lieutenant W. A. Gill, 
U. S. A. 

Office of Lighthouse Inspector. 

Fourth District. 

Post Office Building, Fourth Floor. 

Inspector. — Commander C. J. Train, U. S. N. 
Chief Clerk. — J. Parsons Smith. 

U. S. Lighthouse Engineers. 

Post Office Building, Fourth Floor. 

Engineer.— Lieut. -Col. W. A. Jones. 
Assistant Engineer. — H. Bamber. 



FOREIGN CONSULS, VICE-CONSULS, 
ETC., AT PHILADELPHIA. 

Argentine Republic, Wm. P. Wilson, consul, 
233 S. Fourth. 

Austria-Hungary, Alfred J. Ostheimer, consul, 
900 Chestnut; Arnold Katz and Jacob Wein, 
vice-consuls, 128 Walnut. 

Belgium, C.W. Bergner, consul; Paul Wibaux, 
chancellor, 424 Walnut. 

Brazil, John Mason, Jr., consul, 319 Walnut. 

Chile, Edward Shippen, consul, 532 Walnut. 

Costa Rica, Gustavo Neiderlein, consul, 233 
S. Fourth. 

Denmark, J. N. Wallem, vice-consul, 122 S. 
Second. 

Ecuador, Edw. Shippen, consul, 532 Walnut. 

France, Edouard Pesoli, consul, 524 Walnut. 

German Empire, C. H. Meyer, consul; Fred- 
erick Delvigne, vice-consul, 227 Chestnut. 

Great Britain, Robert Charles Clipperton, con- 
sul; Charles Clipperton, vice-consul, 708 Locust. 

Greece, S. Edwin Megargee, consul, 502 
Walnut. 

• Guatamala, Samuel Welsh, consul, room 117, 
Drexel building. 

Hawaii, Dr. R. H. Davis,,consul,254 S. Fourth. 

Italy, Cav'r Giulio M. Lecca, consul, 259 S. 
Fourth. 

Japan, Alfred J. Ostheimer, consul, 900 Chest- 
nut. 

Liberia, Thomas J. Hunt, consul, 623 Walnut. 

Mexico, E. Subkurski, vice-consul, 430 Spruce. 

Major Republics of Central America, includ- 
ing Salvador, Nicaragua and Honduras, Samuel 
Welsh, consul-general, 117 Drexel building. 

Netherlands, Arnold Katz, vice-consul, 128 
Walnut. 

Norway) J. N. Wallem, vice-consul, 122 S. 
Second. 

Portugal, John Mason. Jr. .consul, 319 Walnut. 

Russia, William R. Tucker, vice-consul, 248 
Bourse building. 

Spain, Dr. Joaquin Torroja, consul ; Dr. 
Rafael de Casares, vice-consul, 222 S. Third. 

St. Domingo, Thomas B. Wanamaker, consul, 
Thirteenth and Market. 

Sweden, J. N. Wallem, vice-consul, 122 S. 
Second. 

Switzerland, Rudolph Koradi, consul, 3i4York 
av.; Werner Itschner, vice-consul, 712 Market. 

Uruguay, EduardoFornias, consul, 1229 Spruce. 

Consular Association. — Edw. Shippen, Dean, 
532 Walnut ; Arnold Katz, Secretary, 128 
Walnut. 



STATE OF NEW JERSEY. 



Governor — John W. Griggs. Term expires 
third Monday in January, 1899. 

Secretary of State — George Wurts. 

Assistant Secretary of State — Alexander H. 
Rickey. 

Treasurer— George B. Swain. 

Comptroller — William S. Hancock. 

Chief Clerk, Comptroller's Department — 
F. S. McNeely. 

A ttorney-General— Samuel H. Grey. 

Clerk in Chancery — Lewis A. Thompson. 

Law Reporter — G. D. W. Vroom. 

Clerk of Supreme Court — Wm. H. Riker, Jr. 

Chancery Reporter — S. M. Dickinson. 



Major- General — Joseph W. Plume. 

Adjutant-General — William S. Stryker. 

Deputy Adjutant-General — Henry P. Per- 
rine. 

Quartermaster-General — R. A. Donnelly. 

Inspector- General of Rifle Practice — B. W. 
Spencer. 

Commissioner of Public Roads — Henry I. 
Budd. 

Chancellor — Alexander T. McGill. 

I 'ice-Chancellors — Henry C. Pitney, John R. 
Emery. Alfred Reed, Frederic W. Stevens, Mar- 
tin P. Grey. 

Chief Justice — W 7 m. J. Magie. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



53 



Justices of Supreme Court — Gilbert S. Col" 
lins, Bennet Van Syckel, David A. Depue, Jona- 
than Dixon, Charles G. Garrison, Job H. Lip" 
pincott, Wm. S. Gummere, George C. Ludlow 

Judges of Court of Errors — James H. Nixon, 
Chas. E. Hendrickson, W. H. Vredenburgb. John 
S. Barkalow, John W. Bogert, Gottfried Krueger. 

Circuit Court Judges — Francis Child, Richard 
T. Miller, Henry M. Nevins. 

Librarian — Morris R. Hamilton. 

Superintendent Public Instruction — Charles 
J. Baxter. 

Superintendent School Census — LloydWilbur. 

State Geologist — John C. Smock. 

Dairy Commissioner — George W. McGuire. 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance — 
William Bettle. 

Chief of Bureau of Statistics — Charles H. 
Simmerman. 

Inspector of Factories and Workshops — John 
C. Ward. 

Secretary State Board of Health — Henry 
Mitchell. 

Custodian of the State House and Public 
Grounds— John H. Bonnell. 

United States Senators — James Smith, Jr., 
William J. Sewell. 

Representatives in Fifty-fourth Congress — 
First district, Henry C. Loudenslager ; Second 
district, John J. Gardner; Third district, Benja- 
min F. Howell ; Fourth district, Mahlon Pitney; 
Fifth district, J. Fleming Stewart ; Sixth district, 
R. Wayne Parker; Seventh district, Thomas 
McEwan, Jr. ; Eighth district, Charles Newell 
Fowler. 

State Board of Education — B. V. Thomas, 
G. A. Frey, J. B. Woodward, S. R. Morse, T. 
F. Appleby, S. C. Larison, S. Pierson, Francis 
Scott, J. P. Cooper, J. M. Seymour, J. L. Hays, 
Evan T. Steadman, B. H. Campbell, James 
Owen, Samuel St. John McCutcheon, Otto 
Crouse. 

State Board of Assessors — Bird W. Spencer, 
Stephen J. Meeker, Robert S. Green. Secretary, 
Irvine E. Maguire. 

Managers of State Hospitals — Romeo F. 
Chobert, Patrick Farrelly, James M. Buckley, 
George Richards, Henry S. Little, Garret D. W. 
Vroom, John C. Eisele, John Taylor. Charles 
H. Green, Secretary. 

Riparian Commissioners — Governor, Miles 
Ross, Willard C. Fisk, William Cloke, John I. 
Holt. J. C. Payne, Secretary. 

Fish and Game Commissioners — Parker W. 
Page, George Pfeiffer, Jr., Howard P. Frothing- 
ham. 

State Board of Agriculture — Hon. D. D. 
Denise, President ; E. B. Voorhees, Vice-Presi- 
dent ; Wm. R. Ward, Treasurer; F. Dye, Sec- 
retary. 

Cotirt of Pardons — Governor, Chancellor and 
Lay Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals, 
Clerk, Secretary of State. 

Commissioners of Pilotage — Henry W. Miller. 
Henry C. Gulick, Mark Townsend, Daniel C. 
Chase, Elias A. Newell, John R. Dewar. 

State Board of Health — Laban Dennis, Cor- 
nelius Shepherd, Edward R. O'Reilly, Cyrus F. 
Brackett, Albert R. Leeds, John A. Githens, 
Franklin Gauntt. 

State Board of Taxation — Charles C. Black, 
Albert H. Slape, Henry J. West, Carl Lentz. 
Secretary, Thomas B. Usher. 



State Board of Arbitration — Samuel S. Sher- 
wood, William M. Doughty, Charles A. Huston, 
Joseph L. Moore, James Martin. 

Officers of State Prison — Keeper, Samuel S. 
Moore; Supervisor, E. J. Anderson ; Inspectors, 
M. E. Staples, William H. Brown, Samuel F. 
Stanger, Wm. H. Carter, Wells Lawrence, E. 
H. Holcombe. 

New Jersey Legislature. 

THE SENATE. 

[Republicans (in Roman), 14; Democrats (in 
Italics) , 7. J 

Counties. Senators. Term expires. 

Atlantic Samuel D.Hoffman 1899 

Bergen Wm. M. Johnson 1S99 

Burlington Howard E. Packer 1901 

Camden Herbert W. Johnson 1900 

Cape May Robert E. Hand... 1901 

Cumberland Edward C. Stokes x ^99 

Essex Geo. W. Ketcham 1900 

Gloucester Solomon H. Stanger 1900 

Hudson William D. Daly *899 

Hunterdon .John R. Foster 1901 

Mercer William H. Skirm 1899 

Middlesex .James H. Van Clecf. 1901 

Monmouth Charles A. Francis 1900 

Morris John B. Vreeland 1899 

Ocean Robert B. Engle T ^99 

Passaic Christian Braun 1901 

Salem Richard C. Miller 1900 

Somerset Charles A. Reed 1900 

Sussex Lewis J. Martin 1901 

Union Foster M. Voorhees 1900 

Warren Isaac Barber 1900 



THE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLV. 



ATLANTIC. 

Leonard H. Ashley. 

BERGEN. 

Abram C. Holdrum, 
John M. Bell. 

BURLINGTON. 

Joel Horner, 
Charles Wright. 

CAMDEN. 

Wm. J. Bradley, 
John H. McMurray, 
Edgar J. Coles. 

CAPE MAY. 

Eugene C. Cole. 

CUMBERLAND. 

James J. Hunt, 
Wilson L. Shropshire. 

ESSEX. 

Jacob Rau, Jr., 
Edwin F. Steddig, 
Joseph B. Johnson, 
Geo. W. W. Porter, 
Albert T. Guenther, 
Alvin C. Ebie, 
Carl V. Baumann, 
Oliver B. Dawson, 
Wm. C. Schmidt, 
Peter B. Fairchild, 
Charles W. Powers. 



GLOUCESTER. 

David O. Watkins. 

HUDSON. 

J.imesJ. Murphy, 
Adolph Jl alter, Jr., 
James' P. Hall, 
Fergus T. Kelaher, 

Timothy J. Carroll, 
Allan Benny, 
John J. Marnell, 
Ho7-ace L. Allen, 
Michael J. Bruder, 

Charles T. Bauer, 
Alexander Simpson. 

HUNTERDON. 

David H. Laiushe, 
George F. Martens. 

MERCER. . 

John B. Yard, 
Frank M. Weller, 
Henry J. Nicklin. 

MIDDLESEX. 

Adam R. Eckert, 
Jos. H. Ridgeway, 
John J. Quaide. 

MONMOUTH. 

Joseph L. Butcher, 
Joseph C. Heyer, 
Drum'nd D. Woolley 



54 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



MORRIS. 

Jacob W. Welsh, 
George E. Poole. 

OCEAN. 

Roderick A. Clark. 

PASSAIC. 

Wood McKee, 
Henry W. Gledhill, 
John W. Sturr, 
John Donahue. 

SALEM. 

Joseph B. Crispen. 



SOMERSET. 

P. V. D. Van Doren. 

SUSSEX. 

Elvin L. Smith. 

UNION. 

George A. Squires, 
Robert G. Houston, 
Roger F. Murray. 

WARREN. 

William K. Bowers, 
A. L. Flummerfelt. 



CAMDEN CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Mayor. — John Leighton Westcott. 
Recorder. — Benjamin M. Braker. 
City Counsel. — J. Willard Morgan. 
City Comptroller. — Samuel Hufty. 
City Treasurer. — Geo. G. Felton. 
Commissioner of Streets. — John Blowe. 
Chief Engineer of Water. — F. Walter Toms. 
City Surveyor . — Levi E. Farnham. 
Receiver of Taxes. — Frank H. Burdsall. 
City Clerk— Thad. P. Varney. 
B:iilding Inspector. — William H. Cole. 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. — Geo. 
Kruck. 

Fire Department. 

Chief Engineer. — Samuel S. Elfreth. 

Assistant Chief Engineer, Samuel S. Buzine ; 
Foreman, Xo. I Engine, Jno. C. Stockton; 
Foreman, Xo. 2 Engine, Henry C. Grosscup ; 
Foremati, Xo. j Engine, William Deno ; Fore- 
man, Xo. 4 Engine, A. S. Middleton ; Fore- 
man Chemical Engine, John Toy. 

Board of Health. 

Dr. J. W. Fithian. Dr. S. G. Bushy. Dr. W. 
S. Moslander. Dr. M. F. Middleton, Dr. A. E. 
Street. Charles Watson, Reuben H. Gaskill. 

Standing Committees of Board of Health. — 
Sanitary, Dr. J. W. Fithian, Dr. S. G. Bushy, 
Dr. A. E Street ; Law and Ordinance, Dr. 
S. G. Bushy. Dr. M. F. Middleton, Dr. A. E. 
Street; Finance, Reuben H. Gaskill, Dr. W. S. 
Moslander, Dr. S. G. Bushy; Conference, Dr. 
W. S. Moslander, Dr. J. W. Fithian, Dr. M. 
F. Middleton; Printing and Supplies, Dr. A. 
E. Street. R. H. Gaskill. Dr. W. S. Moslander. 

Officers for ensuing year . — President, Chas. 
Watson ; Secretary, Eugene B. Roberts ; Solici- 
tor, J. Willard Morgan; Treasurer, M. F. 
Ivins. 

Inspectors. — Health Inspector, John F. Lea- 
vitt, M. D. ; Plumbing Inspector, Henry B. 
Francis; Xuisance Inspector, Joseph A. Starr; 
Meat Inspector, Dr. J. C. George. 

Plumbers' Examining Board. — Dr. M. F. 
Middleton. R. H. Gaskill. Dr. A. E. Street, Dr. 
W. S. Moslander and H. B. Francis. 

Building Inspection Department. 
Building Commission. — D. L. Lamb (chair- 
man), Richard R. Miller, Cooper B. Hatch, 
H. C. Sharp, Charles C. Southard. 

Tax Department. 
Receiver of Taxes. — Frank H. Burdsall. 
Chief Clerk. — Frank S. Jones. 



Department of City Assessors. 

Members of the Board. — Preside?it, Chris. J. 
Mines, Jr., Jesse. Pratt, Robert M. Hillman, 
Samuel A. Wentz, Daniel B. Murphy. 

Clerk. — James McCormick. 

Board of Excise Commissioners. 

Members. — President, Arthur Bedell. Louis 
Stehr, Aug. H. F. Schultz, S. Bryan Smith, Wm. 
H. Cooper. 

Clerk, ex-officio. — Thaddeus P. Varney. 

Solicitor, ex-officio. — J. Willard Morgan. 

Inspector. — Charles H. Price. 

Department of Streets and Sewers. 

H. C. Sharp (chairman), Edward S. Mills, A. 
B. Figner, D. L. Lamb. W. Z. Gibson. 
Commissioner of Streets. — John Blowe. 
Clerk. — Bowman H. Shivers. 
Inspector of Sewers. — John P. Kenney. 

Department of Surveys. 

City Engineer and Surveyor. — Levi E. Farn- 
ham. 

First Assistant Surveyor. — W. P. Osier. 
Second Assistant Surveyor.— W . D. Sayrs. 

Department of Water. 

Superintendent. — F. Walter Toms. 
Clerk. — Frank S. Fithian. 
Assistant Clerk. — Ulie G. Lee. 
Inspector. — Charles P. Hilliker. 

Department of Police. 
Chief of Police. — Samuel Dodd. 
Lieutenant , 1st District. — H. Frank Fettit. 
Lieutenant, 2d District. — John Foster. 
The department is composed of the above 
officers and fifty-nine police officers. 



CAMDEN COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Sheriff. — David Baird (term expires Nov., 
1899). 

Register of Deeds. — Jacob- Sickler (term ex- 
pires Nov., 1900). 

County Clerk. — Robert L. Barber (term ex- 
pires Feb., 1901). 

Surrogate. — George S. West (term expires 
Nov., 1902). 

Officers and Members of Camden City 
Council. 
From May, 1897, to May, 1898. 
President.— Charles P. Sayrs. 
Clerk.— Thaddeus P. Varney. 
Assistant Clerk.— Wm.. T. G. Young, Jr. 
Messenger. — John Risley McCabe. 
Wards. i Wards. 



1 Jesse C. Bond, 

Wm. K. Burrough. 

2 Louis Mohrman. 
Cooper B. Hatch. 

3 Harry C. Sharp, 
John S. Roberts. 

4 William Z. Gibson, 
Chas. C. Southard. 

5 Daniel Lamb, 
Charles E. Day. 



6 Alfred B. Figner, 
Charles H. Ellis, Jr. 

7 Frederick W . George, 
Charles P. Sayrs. 

8 James 0. Smith, 
Edwin S. Mills. 

9 George B. Taylor, 
John Bodine. 

At large, 
R. R. Miller. 



GOVERNMENT 

Governor. — Ebe W. Tunnell, D. 
Secretary of State. — James H. Hughes, D. 
Attorney General. — Robert C.White, D. 
Deputy Attorney Gen I. — P. L.Cooper, Jr., D. 
Insurance Commissioner- —Dr. E. Fowler, D. 
State Auditor. — Dr. B. L. Lewis, D. 
State Treasurer. — Willie M. Ross, D. 
Chancellor. — John R. Nicholson, D. 
Chief Justice. — Charles B. Lore, D. 

Associate Judges. 
Judge -at- Large. — Ignatius C. Grubb, D. 
New Castle Co. — William C. Spruance, R. 
Kent. — James Pennewill, R. 
Sussex. — William H. Boyce, D. 
Court Stenographer. — Edward C. Hardesty. 

Delaware Legislature. 
SENATE. 
[Democrats (in Italics), 5; Republicans (in 
Roman), 4.] 

New Castle County. 
John Pyle (4 years), Wilmington ; Robert J. 
Handy (2 years), Holly Oak; Samuel Alrichs (2 
years), Glasgow. 

Kent County. 
Samuel R. Meredith (4 years), Willow Grove ; 
John W. Fennimore (2 years), Leipsic ; Heze- 
kiah Harrington (2 years), Harrington. 
Sussex County. 
William T. Moore (4 years), Bethel ; John 
M. C. Moore (2 years), Laurel ; George F. Pierce 
(2 years) , Milford. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

[Democrats (in Italics) , 20 ; Republicans (in 
Roman), 1.] 

New Castle County. 

W. W. Cheairs, Delaware City ; Robert Mc- 
Cullough, Centreville ; Charles G. Dempsey, 
Pleasant Hill; David K. Donaldson, Newark; 
// 'illiam B. McCoy, New Castle ; James T. Tay- 
lor, Townsend ; John F. Eliason, Middletown. 
Kent County. 

Benjamin A. Hazell, Smyrna; William R. 
Da?u's, Clayton ; Robert H. Wilson, Dover ; 
Leander S. Hopkins, Frederica ; Charles M. 
Adams, Adamsville ; James R. Martin, Mil- 
ford ; Joseph H. Hopkins, Dover. 
Sussex County. 

Mattford Short, Georgetown ; John Thomp- 
son, Milton ; Isaac N. Whitney, Bridgeville ; 
Elisha C Dukes, Millville ; Emory B. Riggin, 
Lowree ; Asbury Smith, Milford ; Thomas John- 
son, Harbeson. 

On joint ballot Democrats, 25 ; Republicans, 5. 

County Treasurers. 
New Castle. — Horace G. Retlew, R. 
Kent. — J. M. Arthurs, D. 
Sussex. — N. R. Messick, R. 
Comptroller for New Castle County. — 
George D. Kelley, R. 

Sheriffs. 
New Castle. — William R. Flinn, A. 
Kent.— S. Luthur Shaw, R. 
Sussex.— John H. Johnson, R. and U. R. 

Coroners. 
New Castle.— James T. Wright, R. 
Kent.— W. D. Walls, R. 
Sussex.— W. H. Johnson, R. 



OF DELAWARE. 

Clerks of the Peace. 
New Castle. — Jefferson B. Foard D 
Kent.— W. M. Dickson, D. 
Sussex. — John B. Dorman, D. 
Prothonotaries. 
New Castle. — Victor B. Woolley, D 
Kent. — William T. Hudson, D. 
Sussex. — J. C. Adams, D. 

Recorders of Deeds. 
New Castle. — C. C. Montgomery, D 
Kent. — James Lord, D. 
Sussex. — J. B. Hems, D. 

Registers of Wills. 
New Castle. — Calvin A. Crossan, 
Kent, — Charles J. Harrington, D. 
Sussex. — W. F. Causey, D. 

Registers in Chancery. 
New Castle. — Colen Ferguson, D 
Kent. — James Smith,/?. 
Sussex. —James McGlothen, D. 



P. 



CITY OF WILMINGTON. 

Mayor. — Henry C. McLear, R. 

City Treasurer. — William H. Curry, R. 

City Auditor. — Isaac C. Pyle, D. 

City Solicitor. — Henry C. Conrad, R. 

Asst. City Solicitor. — Medford H. Cahoon, R. 

President of Council. — C. M. Leitch, /?. 

Councilmen. — George O'Neill, D. ; Michael 
F. Cannon, D. ; Dennis F. Leary, D. ; James 
Kane, D. ; James W. Robertson, R. ; George M. 
Fisher, R. ; Henry W. Zebley, R. ; James H. 
Morris, R. ; Caleb S. Watson, R. ; John E. 
Healey, D. ; Henry R. Smith, D. ; James 15. 
Oberly, D. Democrats, 7; Republicans, 5. 

Clerk of Council. — William P. Morrison, D. 

Building Inspector. — Lewis T. Grubb, R. 

Bailiff.— -John J. Ryan, D. 

Tax Collectors.— Thomas F. Lewis, A'. ; Eu- 
gene M. Sayers, D. 

Police Department. 

Police Commissioners. — President , John \V. 
Lawson, D. ; A. J. Hart, D. ; Wm. M. Pyle, R.; 
Secretary and Chief of Police, John F. Dolan, D. 

Fire Department. 

Chief Engineer. — Charles H. Welde. 
Assistants. — Michael F. Skelly, Jas. F.Welch. 

Street and Sewer Department. 
Board of Directors.— President , William A. 
Pratt, D. ; A. S. Webster, D. ; William Simmons, 
R. ; Secretary, Harvey J. Wiley, R. ; Engineer 
in Charge of Sewers, 1 . Chalkley Hatton, R. ; 
City Engineer, James Wilson, R. ; Plumbing 
Inspector, Edward F. Kane, D. 

Water Department. 
Commissioners. — President, William T. Por- 
ter, D. ; Washington Hastings, R. ; Afred Betts, 
R. ; Secretary , John S. Grohe, D. ; Chief En- 
gineer , James A. Bond, R. 

Board of Education. 

President. — Charles Baird. 

Secretary and Treasurer. — B. F. Bartram. 

Superintendent of Schools. — David Harlan. 

Board of Health. 
President.— Dr. J. P. Pyle, D. 
Secretary and Registrar of Deaths, Births 
and Marriages. — Charles T. ZenWeges, D. 



56 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



RATES OF POSTAGE. 



Letters within U. S. 



Per oz. 



Letters to any part 2 cts. 

City drop letters 2 cts. 

Postal cards to any part 1 ct. each. 

Registered letters, proper postage and 8 cts. 
Immediate-delivery letters, besides 

regular postage, special stamp | 10 cts. 

Postage on Second-class Matter — which 
embraces newspapers, magazines, and periodicals 
published not less than four times a year — one 
cent, prepaid, per pound or fraction thereof, when 
mailed by publisher or news-agent to regular 
subscribers. Second-class matter mailed by other 
persons than publishers or news-agents becomes 
special matter, specially entitled to pass through 
the mails at one cent for each four ounces or 
fraction thereof. 

Postage on Third-class Matter — Books, 
pamphlets, circulars, and other matter wholly in 
print, such as hand-bills, posters, maps, plans or 
charts, music, photographs, lithographs, corrected 
proof-sheets and manuscripts accompanying the 
same, tags and labels, seed-cuttings, bulbs, roots, 
etc. — one cent, prepaid by stamp, for every two 
ounces or fraction thereof. 

Packages of transient printed matter are limited 
to four pounds each, unless in the case where a 
single volume of a book shall exceed that weight. 
The sender may write his name and address on 
the wrapper, preceded by the word " from," and 
may mark a passage of the text, or write on a 
fly-leaf a simple inscription or dedication. Pack- 
ages must be wrapped with open sides or ends. 

Postage on Fourth-class Matter — Mer- 
chandise, blank cards and bills, patterns, enve- 
lopes with or without printing, blanks of any 
kind, original paintings in oil or water-colors, 
blotters with or without printing, letter-heads, 
models, ores, metals, and all mailable matter not 
embraced in the foregoing classes — one cent, pre- 
paid by stamp, for each ou?ice or fraction thereof. 
Liquids (except poisons, explosive, inflammable 
or offensive articles 1 ), in packages properly se- 
cured, may be transported. The limit of weight 
is four pounds. 

FEES CHARGED FOR DOMESTIC 
MONEY ORDERS. 

For orders for sums not exceeding $2.50, 3 
cents ; over $2.50 and not exceeding $5, 5 cents ; 
over $5 and not exceeding £10, 8 cents ; over #10 
and not exceeding $20, IO cents ■ over £ 2 o and 
not exceeding $30, 12 cents ; over $30 and not 
exceeding $40, 15 cents ; over $40 and not ex- 
ceeding £50, 18 cents ; over $50 and not exceed- 
ing $60, 20 cents ; over $60 and not exceeding 
$75. 2 5 cents; over $75 and not exceeding $100, 
30 cents. 

Money Orders to Foreign Countries. — Great 
Britain and Ireland, France, German Empire, 
Canada, Belgium, Italy, Switzerland, Portugal, 
Algeria, Jamaica, Windward Islands, Sandwich 
Islands, Victoria, Tasmania, Queensland, Cape 
Colony, Japan, Hong Kong, New Zealand, New 
South Wales, Leeward Islands, Bahama Islands, 
and Sweden, not over #10, 10 cents ; not over 
$20, 20 cents ; not over $30, 30 cents ; not over 
$40, 40 cents ; not over $50, 50 cents ; not over $60, 



60 cents ; not over $70, 70 cents ; not over $80, 
80 cents ; not over $90, 90 cents ; not over $100, 
$1 ; Canada, not over $100, $1 ; Germany, not 

over $97, $1. 

FOREIGN POSTAGE. 

From the United States to all following coun- 
tries and places, which are in the Universal Postal 
Union, the postage on letters is five (5) cents 
for each half ounce or fraction thereof ( prepay- 
ment optional), two cents for each postal card, 
reply postal card four cents, and one cent for 
each two ounces newspapers : Argentine Re- 
public, Australia, Austria and Hungary, Belgium, 
Bolivia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cape Colony, Ceylon, 
China via Hong-Kong, Chile, Cuba, Denmark 
and Danish colonies, Ecuador, Egypt, Falkland 
Islands, France and French colonies, Germany, 
Great Britain and British West Indies, Greece, 
Greenland, Guatemala, Haiti, Holland or Nether- 
lands and Netherlands colonies, Honduras, Hong 
Kong, India (British). Ireland, Italy, Japan, Li- 
beria, Luxembourg, Malacca, Mauritius, Monte- 
negro, Natal. Newfoundland, Norway, Paraguay, 
Patagonia, Penang, Persia, Peru, Portugal and 
Portuguese colonies, Roumania, Russia, St Bar- 
tholomew, Salvador, Servia, Siam, Singapore, 
"Spain and Spanish colonies, Straits Settlements, 
Sweden, Switzerland, Transvaal, Trinidad, Tur- 
key, United States of Colombia, Uruguay, Vene- 
zuela. 

Canada. — Same as in United States. 

Mexico. — Same as U. S. Merchandise must 
be sent by parcel post. 

Bahamas, Barbadoes, British Guiana, 
Honduras ( British), Jamaica, U. S. of Colom- 
bia, Hawaiian Is., Newfoundland, Leeward 
Is., Salvador, Costa Rica, the Danish West 
Indies, Windward Is., and Mexico — Mer- 
chandise may be sent by parcel post, 12 cents a 
pound or fraction thereof. Limit of weight, 11 
pounds. 

Letters, postal cards, printed matter of all 
kinds, commercial documents and samples of 
merchandise, are transmissible in Postal Union 
mails. The following are considered as printed 
matter, viz.: Newspapers and periodical works, 
books stitched or bound, pamphlets, sheets of 
music, visiting cards, address cards, proofs of 
printing, with or without the manuscript relating 
thereto, engravings, photographs, drawings, 
plans, geographical maps, catalogues, prospect- 
uses, announcements and notices of various kinds, 
whether printed, engraved, lithographed or auto- 
graphed. 

Address cards and all printed matter present- 
ing the form and consistency of an unfolded 
card may be forwarded without band, envelope, 
fastening or fold. The maximum weight of 
printed matter is fixed at 2 kilograms (4 lbs. 6oz.). 
Postage on printed matter, one cent for each 2 oz. 



M. Moisseau has discovered a compound of 
carbon and boron which is said to be harder 
than the diamond. It is obtained by heating 
boracic acid and carbon up to a temperature of 
5000° Fahrenheit. 



A block of granite weighing 1200 tons, used, 
for the statue of Peter the Great, at St. Peters- 
burg, was moved four miles by land and thirteen 
miles by water. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



57 



GAME AND FISH LAWS. 



Synopsis of the Open Seasons and Regulations in Four States. 



PENNSYLVANIA: 

According to the game laws in Pennsylvania, 
enacted June 4, 1897, it is unlawful — 

To shoot or hunt on Sunday. Penalty, $25. 
To shoot insectivorous and song birds. Pen- 
alty, $25. 

To destroy eggs or nests of any species of 
birds. Penalty, $50. (Persons of fifteen years 
and upward may obtain a certificate granting 
the right to shoot birds and collect eggs for sci- 
entific purposes by making proper application 
to the Game Commission and paying the fees 
provided by law.) 

To catch or kill any Mongolian or Chinese 
pheasant until 1902. Penalty, $25. 

To kill a deer in the water or to hunt deer, elk 
or fawn with a dog or dogs. Penalty, $100. 
(Any dog found running a deer may legally be 
shot on sight.) 

To sell game shot in the State : Penalty, deer, 
$100; birds, $25. 

For any person or railroad company to carry 
any game killed in this State beyond the limits 
thereof. Penalty, $100. 

For one person to kill more than ten pheasants, 
or more than fifteen quail, or more than ten wood- 
cock, or more than two turkeys in one day, or to 
kill in one season more than two deer. Penalty, 
not less than $50 nor more than $100. 
To hunt with ferrets. Penalty, $25. 
To kill any game birds or mammals in any 
manner save than by shooting them with a gun. 
Penalty, #50. 

With respect to fishing in Pennsylvania, it is 
unlawful — 

To fish on Sunday. Penalty, $25. 
To fish with any device except rod, hook and 
line. Penalty, Sioo. This does not apply to gill 
and seine net fishing for shad, herring and stur- 
geon in season ; provided the nets for shad have 
meshes not less than four inches in width, or two 
inches from knot to knot, and the meshes of nets 
for herring be not less than two and one-fourth 
inches in width, or one and one-eighth inches 
from knot to knot, and the meshes of nets for 
sturgeon be not less than ten inches wide ; nor 
does this forbid the use of eel pots. 

To use dynamite or explosives of any kind, or 
any poisonous substances, for the purpose of 
catching fish. Penalty, $50 and imprisonment 
not less than thirty days. 

To catch trout by any means other than rod, 
hook and line. Penalty, $25. 

To catch and kill any species of fish out of sea- 
son or have the same in possession. Penalty, $>io 
for each fish. 

To trespass with intent to fish on any lands on 
which there are ponds or streams used or im- 
proved for the propagation of fish. Penalty, $100. 
To catch fish by drawing off or diverting water 
from its natural bed. Penalty, $50. 

To catch black, yellow or green bass of a size 
less than six inches. Penalty, Jio for each fish. 
The minimum size in the Delaware river, nine 
inches. 

To catch trout less than five inches. Penalty, 
$20. 



To catch shad or herring in season from sunset 
Saturdays until midnight Sundays. Penalty, $100 
and imprisonment not less than thirty days. 

To catch wall-eyed pike, commonly known as 
Susquehanna salmon, less than six inches in 
length ; nine inches in the Delaware river. Pen- 
alty, $10 for each fish. 

To catch rock bass less than five inches in 
length. Penalty, $10 for each fish. 

To catch or kill any Penobscot salmon in the 
Delaware river of a less weight than three pounds. 
Penalty, $20 for each fish. 

For any sheriff to refuse to destroy fish baskets 
and similar devices. Penalty, not less than $100 
nor more than $iooo. 

Note. — In all cases where a person refuses to 
pay a fine imposed for violations of the fish laws, 
said person shall be confined in the county jail 
one day for each dollar of fine unpaid. 

THE OPEN SEASON. 

[In force January 1, 1898.] 



OPEN SEASON. 

Sept. 1 to Dec. 1. 



ANIMALS AND BIRDS. 

Rail and reed birds . 
Quail or Virginia partridge, ~ 

wild turkey, ruffed 

grouse, commonly called 

pheasant; pinnated 

grouse, commonly called 

prairie chicken .... 

Upland or grass plover . . 

Wild fowl Sept. 1 to May 

, 1T , , "I July and from 

Woodcock J q^ / 5 tQ p ec _ 

Elk, wild deer or antelope 
Gray, black or fox squirrel 
Hare, commonly, called 
rabbit 



Oct. 15 to Dec. 15. 



. July 15 to Jan. 1. 
1. 

Nov. 1 to Dec. 1. 
Oct. 15 to Dec. 15. 



1 Nov. 



'dJApr' 



1 to Dec. 


15- 


1 to Aug. 
1 to Oct. 


1. 


15 to July 


15- 



FISH. 

Salmon (Penobscot) .... Mar. 

Lake irout Jan. 

Speckled, California anc 
brown trout ... 

[Pike County claims open season for trout 

from May I to August l.\ 

Black, rock, calico bass . . . May 31 to Jan. 1. 

In addition, the Fish Commissioners have the 
power to name a close season for any desirable 
food fish not provided for by legislative enact- 
ment. 

NEW JERSEY. 

In New Jersey it is unlawful — 
To take or to attempt to take any game except 
by the use of guns held at arms' length. Fine, 

$5°- 

To take or to attempt to take any fish in any 

manner excepting with hook and line, excepting 
spearing of eels, suckers and carp; taking min- 
nows for bait with a seine not more than twenty- 
five feet long, and taking eels with pots or baskets 
or weirs between the fifteenth of September and the 
first of November, and excepting also, but only 
as to the tributaries of the Delaware above Tren- 
ton Falls and the streams flowing into such tribu- 
taries, the taking of catfish and eels with eel 



58 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



weirs and baskets and set lines between the 
fifteenth of August and the first of November. 
Fine, $50. 

To have trapped game in possession. Fine, $20. 

To hunt on Sunday or carry firearms in the 
fields or woods on Sunday. Fine, $20. 

To pollute streams or use medicated bait or 
explosives of any kind for the taking of fish. 
Fine, $100 to $500. 

To draw off waters to take fish. Fine, from 
$25 to $250. 

To use set lines in waters inhabited by pick- 
erel, bass, perch or trout. Fine, $25. 

To permit the erection or maintenance of un- 
lawful contrivances for taking game and fish ; 
applies to lessees or tenants of lands. Fine, £25. 

To capture, kill, injure or to have in possession 
any birds excepting English sparrows, cranes, 
hawks, crows, ravens, crow blackbirds, king- 
fishers and red-winged blackbirds. Fine, $20. 

To hunt geese, ducks or any web-footed wild 
fowl, except between one hour before sunrise 
and one hour after sunset. Fine, $25. 

To catch or keep trout less than six inches in 
length, or black bass less than nine inches in 
length. Fine, $20. 

To hunt on posted land. Fine, not less than $10. 

Dealers have thirty days after the close of the 
season in which to dispose of game. 

THE OPEN SEASON. 

[In force January 1, 1898.] 
All dates inclusive. 

ANIMALS AND BIRDS. OPEN SEASON. 

Hare, rabbit and quail . . . Nov. 10 to Dec. 31. 

Woodcock jjuly, Oct., Nov., 

j and to Dec. 10. 

Gray, English or Wilson ) .. , . ., c , 
snipe . J March, April, Sept. 

Partridge, grouse and ~) Q N 
pheasant— E ur o p e an y "• .. V» 
and domestic . .... J to Dec - IO ' 

Reed, rail and marsh hen . . September. 

Gray, black and fox ) Sept., Nov. 10, 
squirrels j to Dec. 10. 

Grass or upland plover | A L 

and dove ....... j A "g"st, Sept. 

Deer Oct. 25 to Nov. 5. 

Geese, duck and other ) c at 

web-footed wild fowl . . j Se P l - 3° to May 1. 

FISH. 

Brook trout April 1 to July 15. 

Black bass May 30 to Dec. 1. 

Pickerel May 1 to Feb. 20 

Pike and pickerel June 1 to Jan. 31. 

Shad and herring Jan. 1 to June 20. 

Wall-eyed pike or Sus- ) , T -,-, 

quehanna salmon . . . j May 30 to Dec. 31. 



DELAWARE. 

Non-residents of Delaware must procure a 
license to gun in the State from the Delaware 
Game Protective Association. All necessary 
information on this point can be secured from 
William Baxter, Wilmington, Delaware, Presi- 
dent of the Association. 

It is unlawful to take, hunt, kill, or destroy, 
sell, or expose for sale, or have in possession 
after the same has been killed, any quail, part- 
ridge, pheasant or rabbit, except between the 



fifteenth day of November and the thirty-first 
day of December in each year. 

It is unlawful to hunt at night, or by traps or 
snare, any partridge, grouse, woodcock, or quail. 

It is unlawful to gun for wild ducks, geese, or 
swans, with any kind of a gun except the ordi- 
nary weapon which is fired from the shoulder. 

It is unlawful to kill any ducks with the aid of 
any artificial lights or lanterns. 

It is unlawful for any person to kill upon lands 
not owned by himself, any robin, bluebird, mar- 
tin, swallow, mocking bird, thrush, wake-up, 
woodpecker, wren, whippoorwill, cat bird, 
night hawk, oriole, red bird, yellow bird, hum- 
ming bird, ground robin, skylark, flicker or sap- 
sucker. 

It is unlawful to hunt or gun on Sunday. 

It is unlawful to ship game outside of the State 
for sale unless a special license of $500 is paid ; 
but a person who kills game may take it out of 
the State, by going before a notary public and 
making an affidavit that the game has been 
killed lawfully. v 

It is unlawful to shoot partridges, grouse, 
quail, woodcock, rabbit, or hare, while there is 
snow on the ground.* 

There are numerous fish laws, but they relate 
almost exclusively to commercial fishing, and not 
to the angler. 

OPEN SEASONS FOR GAME. 

Partridge, quail, rabbit ] x T . 7-. 

u t Nov. 15 to Dec. 31. 

or hare j J ° 

Woodcock July 1 st to Sept. 15. 

Brandt or duck, except) ,-. . . A ., . 
1 ,' v > Oct. 1st to April isth. 

summer duck . . . . j y ° 

Wild geese Oct. 1st to April 15th. 

The open seasons are between the above dates. 

*NOTE. — This law is held by the lower courts to be 
enforceable, notwithstanding the snow-fall be in the open 
season; but the question is under consideration by the 
Supreme Court at this time, December 1st, 1897. 



MARYLAND. 

It is impossible to give in a brief space all the 
laws which relate to game and fish in Maryland, 
because there are special acts for nearly every 
county in the State. Even the few laws which 
are enacted for the whole State are not operative 
in counties where there are conflicting ones. The 
few general game laws follow : 

CLOSE SEASON. 

Partridges Dec. 24 to Nov. 1. 

Woodcock Dec. 24 to June 15. 

Pheasant Dec. 24 to Aug. 15. 

Rabbits Dec. 24 to Nov. 1. 

Trout. 

General , . . Aug. 15 to April 1. 

Queen Anne and Kent j A A n 

counties ) » J ^ 

Baltimore county July 1st to March 1. 

(Minimum size, six inches.) 

Frederick county Sept. 1 to Feb. 1. 

Garrett county Aug. 1 to April 1. 

Prince George county . . . Aug. 15 to May 15. 
Washington county .... Sept. 1 to March 31. 

(Minimum size, eight inches.) 
Tributaries of Potomac river : 
Black bass, green bass, pike") 

or pickerel, pike-perch or > April 15 to June z. 

Susquehanna salmon . . J 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



59 



LOCAL CHRONOLOGY. 

[From December i, 1896, to December 1, 1897. J 

1896. — December 1. Judge Gordon, with the 
assistance of a commission composed of eminent 
physicians, reported the result of an investigation 
of the mental condition of a prisoner in the East- 
ern Penitentiary, whom they found insane. 

— Hon. J. I. Clark Hare, President Judge of 
Court of Common Pleas No. 1, resigned after 
forty-five years of service on the Bench. 

— The cruiser Brooklyn went into commission 
at League Island. 

December 4. Dr. William H. Furness, 3d, 
returned, after more than a year's absence, from 
the Eastern Archipelago, where he had been I 
making collections for the Museum of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, principally in Bornea. 
He penetrated countries never visited before and 
brought back valuable information. 

December 7. Governor Hastings filled the 
vacancies in the Common Pleas Courts by ap- 
pointing William W. Wiltbank to succeed Judge 
Hare, in Court No. 2, and Select Councilman 
Charles Y. Audenried to succeed Judge Thayer, 
in Court No. 4. 

December 9. The fiftieth anniversary of the 
entrance of Colonel A. K. McClure into journal- 
ism was celebrated at a dinner which was at- 
tended by many prominent men. 

December 10. Common Council passed and 
Select Council concurred in the bill recommended 
by Director Riter, that all riders and drivers, in- 
cluding wheelmen, must keep to the right of the 
road. 

December 11. Henry McMillan's box factory, 
at Frankford avenue and Harrison street, was 
almost destroyed by fire. Several adjoining 
properties were slightly damaged by the flames. 
The loss was estimated at from $15,000 to $18,000. 

December 12. In the suit of Filbert, Porter & 
Co., for the recovery of the balance retained by 
the city out of the contract price for the con- 
struction of the Queen Lane Reservoir, the jury 
returned a verdict in favor of the plaintiffs for 
the full amount of their claim with interest, $137,- 
070.92. 

December 16. In the suit of the United States 
against Oliver C. Bosbyshell and his sureties to 
recover the value of a portion of the bullion ab- 
stracted from a vault by Weigh Clerk Cochran 
while Mr. Bosbyshell was Superintendent of the 
Mint, Judge Acheson, in the United States Cir- 
cuit Court of Appeals, filed an opinion sustaining 
the Circuit Court, which awarded the United 
States $14,412.17. 

December 19 William Wallen, 25 years old, 
cut the throat of John King, aged 21 years, and 
King died in a few minutes. 

— The revenue cutter Hugh McCullough was 
launched at Cramps' shipyard. 

December 22. Louis H. Goldsoll, proprietor 
of establishments on Chestnut street and Eighth 
street, which he called " diamond palaces," 
where he sold imitation diamonds, pleaded guilty 
to setting up an illegal lottery. Judge Yerkes 
sentenced Goldsoll to pay a fine of $500 and 
costs, and undergo ten days' imprisonment. 

December 28. The Commissioners appointed 
by Judge Gordon to investigate *.he mental con- 
dition of certain prisoners confined in the Eastern 
Penitentiary filed their report, stating they had 
examined eight convicts and found five to be 



insane, two of doubtful mental condition and one 
not insane. They advised the removal of six of 
them to a hospital for the insane. 

— While coasting on Crawford street, Falls of 
Schuylkill, three children collided with a trolley 
car, and one of them, Caroline Strenger, aged n 
years, was killed. The others were painfully cut 
and bruised. 

December 29. More than sixty Judges, and a 
still greater number of the members of the exam- 
ining boards of bar associations, attended the 
meeting held under the auspices of the Pennsyl- 
vania Bar Association to discuss means of ele- 
vating the standard of the legal profession in the 
State. 

— Joseph Meckenrieder, 16 years old, touched 
the handle of a fire-alarm box, which was emit- 
ting sparks, at Second and Callowhill streets, 
and was shocked to death. Chief Walker said 
the current came from a trolley wire. 

December 30. Alfred F. Von Neida was found 
guilty of murder of the first degree in killing his 
wife, Charlotte, on May 26, 1896. 

— Two hundred and thirty-three convicts were 
removed from Moyamensing Prison to the new 
County Prison at flolmesburg. 

December 31. Effingham B. Morris, Presi- 
dent of the Girard Life Insurance, Annuity and 
Trust Company, was elected a Director of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad in place of Henry D. 
Welsh, deceased. 

1897. — January 1. Nelson F. Evans, a Direc- 
tor of the defunct Spring Garden National Bank, 
who was convicted four years ago of complicity 
in the wrecking of the institution and sentenced 
to seven years' imprisonment, was pardoned by 
President Cleveland and released from prison. 

— Frederick Fraley was re-elected President 
of the American Philosophical Society. 

January 4. The Supreme Court reversed the 
judgment of Common Pleas Court No. 3 in the 
libel suit of ex-Mayor Smith against the Times 
Publishing Company, wherein the ex-Mayor re- 
covered a verdict of $45,000 damages, and 
awarded a new trial. 

— The Board of Education reorganized and 
elected Simon Gratz President and Samuel B. 
Huey Vice President, 

— James V. Watson was re-elected President 
of the Clearing House Association of Philadel- 
phia Banks. 

January 6. The College of Physicians re- 
elected Dr. J. M. Da Costa President. 

January 7. President Cleveland pardoned 
Ephraim Young, a Director of the Spring Gar- 
den Bank, who was serving a term of five years' 
imprisonment, having been convicted of aiding 
and abetting the Cashier and President in misap- 
plying the funds of the institution. 

January 9. The Pennsylvania Fish Protective 
Association, at its annual meeting, elected Edwin 
Hagert President. 

— At the third annual meeting of the Civic 
Club, Mrs. Cornelius Stevenson was re-elected 
President. 

January 10. J. Washington Logue was re- 
elected President of the Archdiocesan Catholic 
Total-Abstinence Union at its twenty-fourth an- 
nual meeting. 

— Mrs. Julia G. Arnold, President of the Jew- 
ish Maternity Association, was elected for an- 
other term at the twenty-third annual meeting. 



6o 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



January 12. Robert H. Lamborn, in his will, 
which was admitted to probate, left his estate of 
$200,000 and upwards in trust, to be invested in 
first mortgage railroad bonds and given to the 
Academy of Natural Sciences for biological and 
anthropological researches, the income only to 
be used. 

January 13. The corner-stone of the new 
building of the Philadelphia Dental College, at 
Eighteenth and Buttonwood streets, was laid by 
the officers of the Grand Lodge of Masons. 

January 14. A. J. Loos was elected President 
of the Oil Trade Association at its annual meet- 
ing. 

January 15. The Pennsylvania Society of the 
Founders and Patriots of America was organ- 
ized. 

January 18. The Republican City Committee 
reorganized and elected all the old officers except 
Second Vice President John S. Warner, whose 
successor is City Commissioner Richmond. 

— The Philadelphia Shipping Company com- 
pleted arrangements for the establishing of lines 
of freight steamers between Philadelphia and 
Glasgow and Philadelphia and Rotterdam, the 
first vessels to sail in February. 

— The hearing of testimony in the case of 
Samuel E. Hudson, contesting the election of 
William McAleer to Congress from the Third 
District, began. 

January 19. At their annual meeting the 
stockholders of the Lehigh Valley Railroad Com- 
pany elected Elisha P. Wilbur President. 

January 20. At the annual meeting of the 
Franklin Institute John Birkenbine was chosen 
President to succeed Joseph M. Wilson, who de- 
clined a re-election. 

January 21. The Trades League held its an- 
nual meeting and re-elected William W. Foulk- 
rod President. 

— Samuel Disston was elected President of 
the Hardware Merchants' and Manufacturers' 
Association. 

— General Louis Wagner was elected Presi- 
dent of the German Society. 

January 22. Ex-City Treasurer John Bards- 
ley confessed judgment in favor of the city for 
$1,203,697.37, on which payments are acknowl- 
edged aggregating $339,028.87. 

January 23. The Society of the Sons of St. 
George re-elected William H. Lucas President. 

— The Netherlander's Society held its annual 
meeting and elected Isaac R. Pennypacker 
President. 

January 25. At the annual meeting of the 
Board of Trade Frederick Fraley was re-elected 
President. 

January 26. Fire which was discovered in the 
basement of the grocery store of Hanscom Broth- 
ers, destroyed nearly all the buildings in the 
block bounded by Market, Filbert, Juniper and 
Thirteenth streets, including those occupied by 
Hirsch & Brother, Blum Brothers, Hanscom 
Brothers and S. W. Dennett. The clock tower 
of John Wanamaker's store was burned, and 
only the most strenuous efforts of the firemen 
saved the building from destruction. The estab- 
lishment of the Dunlap Printing Company sus- 
tained about $50,000 damage. The losses aggre- 
gated nearly $1,125,000, and in most cases were 
covered by insurance. 

— Fire in the upholstery department of John 



& James Dobson's carpet warehouse caused 
about $50,000 damage. 

January 28. The Pennsylvania Association of 
War Veterans' Clubs completed its organization. 
Colonel R. B. Beath was elected President, and 
William J. Ray, Secretary. 

January 30. The cruiser Brooklyn, while pro- 
ceeding down the river, struck on Schooner 
Ledge and sustained serious damage to her bot- 
tom. 

February 1. Edward H.Coates was re-elected 
President of the Academy of the Fine Arts,which 
has completed its ninetieth year. 

February 3. The Board of Directors of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company elected First 
Vice President Frank Thomson President, to 
succeed the late George B. Roberts. 

February 4. The breaking of a water pipe in 
Lit Brothers' store damaged goods to the extent 
of $15,000. 

— The Board of Trustees of the Jefferson 
Medical College elected James F. Townsend a 
Trustee to succeed his father, and chose Dr. H. 
F. Harris Bacteriologist to the Jefferson Hos- 
pital. 

February 11. For taking about two-fifths of 
the land of the Fairmount Ice Company at 
Twenty-fourth and Green streets, to widen Penn- 
sylvania avenue, which necessitated the tearing 
down and reconstruction of the buildings, suit 
was brought against the city, and by instruction 
of the Court a verdict was rendered in favor of 
the ice company for $87,500. 

February 12. A fire in the meat and provision 
warehouse of Swift & Co., Ninth street and Gi- 
rard avenue, caused a loss of about $45,000, of 
which amount $25,000 was sustained by F. Gute- 
kunst, who occupied the third floor as an elec- 
trotyping and photo-engraving establishment. 

February 16. John D. Hart, of the steamship 
Laurada, was placed on trial in the United States 
District Court, charged with setting on foot a 
Cuban filibustering expedition. 

February 18. Common Council passed the bill 
to increase the pay of the officers and employes 
of the Bureau of Police, as recommended by the 
Finance Committee. 

February 19. The City Solicitor gave an opin- 
ion that the Twenty-ninth Sectional School Board 
has the legal right to transfer children from one 
school to another in its section. 

February 22. The celebration of Washing- 
ton's Birthday by the University of Pennsylvania 
was attended by a large audience, in which were 
the presidents of colleges in various parts of the • 
State. 

— A recount of the votes cast in the Thirty- 
third Ward at the recent election showed that 
Woodason, the Republican and McKinley Citi- 
zens' candidate for Common Council, and Steiger- 
wald, the Democratic and Anti-Combine candi- 
date, had received the same number of votes, 
3820, and therefore the Court could not grant 
either a certificate of election. 

February 23. John D. Hart was found guilty 
of the charge of aiding a military expedition on 
board the steamer Laurada to reach Cuba. 
Pending the disposition of a motion for a new 
trial the defendant was placed under $7000 bail. 

— Joseph F. Mintzer, aged 38 years, a painter, 
was instantly killed by a fall from a scaffold at 
the City Hall. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



61 



February 25. Pasquale Daddario was found 
guilty of murder of the first degree in causing the 
death of Modestino Moffo, aged 3 years, on 
January 25. 

March 1. The License Court was formally 
opened, with Judges Sulzberger and McMichael 
on the Bench. 

March 3. The large power house of the Union 
Traction Company, at Thirteenth and Mount 
Vernon streets, was destroyed by a fire that was 
started, it is thought, by the chain of a traveling 
crane touching the armature of a generator. The 
roar of steam escaping from a bursted supply- 
pipe caused a stampede of spectators and fright- 
ened the horses attached to a chemical engine, 
which knocked down and fatally injured Aug. A. 
Binder, aged 30 years, and William P. Brown, 
aged 26 years. A score of people were injured. 
About a dozen lines of street cars were blocked 
for almost four hours. The loss on buildings and 
machinery was estimated at $400,000. 

March 6. In the annual debate between stu- 
dents of the University of Pennsylvania and Cor- 
nell University, the decision was in favor of the 
latter, who argued the negative side of the sub- 
ject : " Resolved, That the United States and 
the several States should establish Courts of Com- 
pulsory Adjustment of Disputes between em- 
ployes and private corporations which possess 
franchises of a public nature." 

March 8. The Northwest Public School build- 
ing, on Race street, below Fifteenth, was badly 
damaged by fire, the loss being estimated at from 
$10,000 to $15,000. 

March 10. The Colonial Dames celebrated in 
the old Senate Chamber the 114th anniversary of 
the First Assembly of the Province of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

March 12. United States Senator Penrose was 
given a dinner by the Directors of the Union 
League and afterwards tendered a reception, 
which was attended by many prominent citizens. 

March 13. The public school at Nineteenth 
and Addison streets was named the " Alice Lip- 
*pincott School," in honor of the late Mrs. J. 
Dundas Lippincott. 

March 15. It was testified before the Police 
Court of Inquiry that, of the more than $1800 
raised among patrolmen to advance the passage 
through Councils of the bill to increase the pay 
of policemen, $200 was paid to Common Coun- 
cilman Robert Harvey, of the Thirty-fourth 
Ward, " as compensation for his loss of time 
and his expenses in visiting Councilmen," and 
that $100 was contributed to the Thirty-fourth 
. Ward Republican Club. Each of the fifteen 
members of the " Executive Committee " of 
policemen admitted that he had spent some of 
the money allotted to him in treating friends of 
Councilmen or other persons who could help the 
bill along. The Court of Inquiry found all 
guilty, and Director Riter, after imposing fines 
upon nine, recommended that the Mayor dis- 
charge the remaining six, whom he deemed 
more guilty. 

— Robert Welsh, 18 years old, pleaded guilty 
to murder of the second degree in killing his 
father, Ralph Welsh, near the Penrose Ferry 
Bridge, in December last. Judge Yerkes com- 
mitted the youth to the Huntington Reforma- 
tory. 

March 16. Common Councilman Charles 
Seger was elected by the Public Buildings Com- 



mission to fill the vacancy in its membership 
caused by the death of Isaac S. Cassin. 

— Allen B. Rorke was awarded contracts by 
the Public Buildings Commission at his bid of 
$227,166, the bid of Charles McCaul on the same 
items being $109,674.07. 

— Acting upon the recommendation of Direc- 
tor Riter, Mayor Warwick dismissed from the 
force six policemen and approved the imposition 
of fines upon nine others found guilty of using 
improper means to advance the bill to increase 
the pay of employes of the Bureau of Police. 

March 17. While his wife was absent, Fred- 
erick Franks, aged 36 years, locked all the doors 
of his house and shot his son, aged 9 years, and 
his daughter, aged 5 years, killing the former, 
and then committed suicide. 

March 19. The Coroner's jury found Maud 
Granger responsible for the violent death of her 
adopted two-months-old child, and committed 
the woman to await the action of the Grand 
Jury. She was subsequently convicted and sent 
to the Penitentiary. 

— Samuel C. Perry was committed without 
bail to await the action of the Coroner, in the 
case of Edward J. Gibbons, who died of a blow 
received in a pugilistic contest with Perry at a 
clubhouse on Vine street, above Broad. 

March 20. Charles Keilnecker, aged 46 years, 
died of injuries sustained in a boxing bout with 
Frank Connolly, at Fourth and Oxford streets. 

March 22. A verdict of u death from injuries 
received at the hands of Samuel C. Perry during 
a sparring contest" was returned by the Cor- 
oner's jury in the case of Edward J. Gibbons. 
Perry was committed to await the action of the 
Grand Jury. 

— Frank Connelly, who was arrested on the 
charge of causing the death of Christian Kiel- 
necker, in a contest with gloves in a blacksmith 
shop, was discharged, the Coroner's jury finding 
that death was caused by the breaking of an 
abscess of the brain, hastened by a fall. 

— The stockholders of the Land Title and 
Trust Company voted to increase the capital 
stock from $1,000,000 to $2,000,000, and ap- 
proved the proposition of the Board of Directors 
to purchase the property at the southwest corner 
of Broad and Chestnut streets, upon which to 
erect a fifteen-story office building. 

— The breweries of John Roehm. Spaeth, 
Krautter & Hess, Welde & Thomas Company, 
Excelsior Company, John C. Miller & Sons, and 
the Mutual Company, consolidated, under the 
title of the Consumers' Company, with a capital 
of more than $5,000,000. 

March 23. By a collision with the tugboat 
Asa W. Hughes, the tugboat Fidget was sunk in 
the Delaware river, opposite Gloucester. The 
crew of the Fidget was saved. 

March 25. Select Council concurred in the 
bill to authorize the construction of a new bridge 
at Gray's Ferry. 

March 30. Judge Biddle refused a new trial 
in the case of Pasquale Daddario, convicted of 
the brutal murder of little Modestino Moffo, and 
sentenced Daddario to be hanged. 

April 1. Both brancnes of Councils adopted 
a resolution instructing the Director of Public 
Works to advertise for bids and award contracts 
for supplying water gas by responsible parties in 
this city, said gas to be of 24-candle power, at a 
price not to exceed 37 cents per 1000 cubic feet. 



62 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



— Joseph Derbyshire's cotton and woolen waste 
establishment, 2043 to 2049 Trenton avenue, was 
destroyed by fire. Several dwellings in the 
neighborhood were also damaged. Mr. Derby- 
shire's loss amounted to $10,000, on which there 
was no insurance. Other losses foot up to $5000 
or $6000. 

April 3. Forty-nine graduates of the William- 
son Free School were given diplomas at the an- 
nual commencement. Hon. John Wanamaker 
made an address. 

April 4. James Harding, aged about 55 years, 
a shoe manufacturer, was found dead, and a 
woman companion in an unconscious condition, 
from the effects of illuminating gas in a house at 
Bankson and Melon streets. 

April 5. Both branches of City Councils or- 
ganized for 1897-98 by re-electing all the former 
officers. 

April 7. The Wholesale Grocers' Association, 
of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware, 
elected B. W. Andrews President ; Francis B. 
Reeves, Treasurer; and John R. Poore, Secre- 
tary. 

April 8. The new building of the Appren- 
tices' Library Company, at Broad and Brandy- 
wine streets, was thrown open for public inspec- 
tion. 

April 9. Mrs. Ellen H. Gross, who was in- 
jured while riding in a car of the Hestonville, 
Mantua and Fairmount Passenger Railroad 
Company, was awarded $12,000 damages by a 
jury in the Common Pleas Court. A verdict for 
$3000 was rendered in favor of her husband, 
Samuel F. Gross, who sued the Company to re- 
cover damages for the loss of her services and 
society. 

April 10. The battle-ship Iowa returned to 
Cramps' shipyard from her official trial trip. 

April 12. City Commissioner Ryan was elected 
Chairman of the Democratic City Committee by 
a vote of 19 to 17. 

April 13, The Board of Education elected 
Enoch W. Pearson, of Nashua, New Hamp- 
shire, to the new position of Supervisor of 
Music, at a yearly salary of $2500. 

April 14. Charlemagne Tower, Jr., received his 
commission as United States Minister -to Austria. 

April 19. Eighty -two delegates, representing 
twenty States and the District of Columbia, at- 
tended the Convention of the Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. 

April 20. Before Judge Gordon and the April 
Grand Jury, in Quarter Sessions Court No. 1, 
the Commission appointed to examine into the 
treatment of insane prisoners in the Eastern 
Penitentiary of Pennsylvania, testified to some 
shocking practices in the cases of two convicts, 
who were brought into court and stripped in the 
presence of the Grand Jury, to show the results 
of injuries received in the institution. 

April 21. Mrs. Hester Wolf, aged 75 years, 
and Emma Muschbeck, aged 13 years, were 
found suffocated by illuminating gas, which was 
flowing from a bracket in the room of the former. 

— The celebration of the twenty-fifth episco- 
pal anniversary of Archbishop Ryan included a 
Solemn Pontifical Mass, of which he was the 
celebrant, Archbishop Hennessy, of Dubuque, 
Iowa, preaching the sermon ; the presentation 
of congratulatory addresses on behalf of the 
clergy and the laity, a reply from the Archbishop, 
a dinner to the visiting prelates and priests, and 



a parade on Broad street of the male members 
of the different parishes, accompanied by a num- 
ber of Union veterans. 

April 22. At the annual meeting of the Zoo- 
logical Society it was reported that 628 animals 
were purchased, bred in the Gardens or presented 
to the city in the last year. The total income 
was $36,620.61 and the expenditures $40,336.55. 

— William D. Vollmer, better known as Billy 
Vernon, died in the Presbyterian Hospital with- 
out having regained consciousness from the time 
he fell senseless to the floor of the Olympic Ath- 
letic Association rooms, at Athens, Delaware 
county, Tuesday night, during a boxing bout 
with Leslie Pearce, who was arrested. Vollmer's 
death was caused by hemorrhage of the brain. 

April 23. The Walter Garrett Memorial 
Building, containing clinical and operating hall 
and the reception and children's wards, at the 
Pennsylvania Hospital, was formally opened for 
inspection. 

— In the suit of the Fourth Street National 
Bank against the Receiver of the Keystone Na- 
tional Bank, to recover in full a $25,000 advance, 
made to the Keystone Bank the day before its 
failure to make good its balance at the Clearing 
House, the United States Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals decided in favor of the plaintiff. 

— In the suit of the city against the Western 
Union Telegraph Company to recover $6135.50, 
license charges for maintaining poles and wires 
in 1889 and 1890, a verdict for the defendant was 
rendered. 

April 26. Justice of the Peace Sloan, of 
Media, expressed the opinion that boxing was a 
" legitimate profession," and discharged Leslie 
Pearce and the Managers of the Olympic Ath- 
letic Club, who were arrested after the boxing 
bout in their clubhouse which preceded the death 
of William D. Vollmer, otherwise " Billy Ver- 
non, the Haverstraw brickmaker," one of the 
participants. 

April 27. The City Treasurer received from 
the State a warrant for $131,244.69, the balance 
of the $1,097,244.69 due the city on account o£ 
the school fund for 1896. 

April 28. The Third Triennial Convention of 
Working Women's Clubs began its session in the 
New Century Drawing Room. More than too 
delegates representing seven States attended. 

April 29. Frank Hartzell, aged 30 years, fired 
three shots at his wife, Sophie, aged 23 years, 
and then fired one bullet into his own breast and 
died several minutes later. Mrs. Hartzell re- 
covered. 

May 1. Judge Biddle decided that the loans 
of $8,000,000 and $3,000,000, recently authorized 
by Councils, are not in excess of the power of the 
city to borrow without a vote of the electors. . 
David Pepper and others, who had filed a bill in 
equity, asking for an injunction to restrain the 
city from issuing"; the loans, appealed to the Su- 
preme Court, which reversed the decision. 

May 3. The Philadelphia and Reading Rail- 
way, the Philadelphia and Reading Terminal, 
and thirteen other companies, forming part of the 
Reading Railway system, held their annual elec- 
tions. Each elected Joseph S. Harris, Presi- 
dent ; W. A. Church, Treasurer, and W. R. 
Taylor, Secretary. 

May 5. The French frigate Fulton arrived 
from New York to remain until after the unveil- 
ing of the Washington Monument. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



— The Grand Jury found a true bill of indict- 
ment against Samuel C. Perry, charged with 
manslaughter in causing the death of Edward J. 
Gibbons during a boxing bout. 

May 6. A rowboat containing seven men cap- 
sized by the reversing of the propeller of the tug 
which had it in tow, and John S. Hughes, of Red 
Bank, and Joseph Dobson, of Woodbury, were 
drowned in the Schuylkill river near Penrose 
Ferry bridge. 

— Lincoln Park on the Delaware was sold at 
auction to E. D. Savage, of New York, for $4400, 
subject to incumbrances aggregating $119,500. 

— A fire, which started in the drying room of 
John Dobson' s cloth mills, Manayunk, caused a 
loss of $10,000. 

May 8. W. Walter Lipp, aged 42, a master 
upholsterer, collided with a carriage on Wissa- 
hickon drive while riding a bicycle and sus- 
tained injuries which caused his death. 

May 12. The Flower Astronomical Observa- 
tory of the University of Pennsylvania, on the 
West Chester turnpike, was formally dedicated 
in the presence of a large gathering. 

May 13. Representatives of all the rolling 
mills in the United States making steel or iron 
beams met and agreed to make no further effort 
to maintain a standard price, and to make the 
market an open one. This action is regarded as 
equivalent to dissolving the " beam pool " which 
was formed fourteen months ago. 

May 15. President McKinley unveiled the 
Washington Monument in the presence of a vast 
assemblage, and the remainder of the official pro- 
gramme was carried out in a highly successful 
manner. In the military demonstration more 
than 11,000 men participated, and the cycling 
parade was regarded as one of the most imposing 
pageants of its kind ever witnessed in this coun- 
try. The Presidential party started f or Wash- 
ington in the afternoon, being unable to attend 
the dinner of the Society of the Cincinnati. 

— A steam launch carrying sixteen persons was 
carried over the dam at Fairmount and Mrs. Ed- 
win Ewen, Jessie Davis, aged 10 years, and 
Eleanor Davis, aged 8 years, were drowned. 

May 17. At the tenth annual meeting of the 
Manufacturers' Club John H. Converse was re- 
elected President. Charles Heber Clark retired 
from the office of Secretary. 

May 20. The bronze statue to Stephen Girard 
on the plaza west of the City Hall was unveiled 
with impressive ceremonies. James M. Beck 
delivered the orati»n. Addresses were delivered 
by Mayor Warwick and Governor Hastings. 

May 21. The bodies of Eleanor and Jessie 
Davis, the children who were drowned by the 
steam launch David W. Sellers going over the 
dam at Fairmount, were recovered near South 
street wharf. 

May 24. President McKinley pardoned Harry 
W. Kennedy, who in 1891 was sentenced to im- 
prisonment for ten years in the Eastern Peniten- 
tiary for his connection with irregularities in the 
management of the Spring Garden Bank. 

May 25. The Master Builders' Exchange 
adopted the report of the Board of Directors re- 
fusing to co-operate in efforts to induce the Legis- 
lature to abolish the Public Buildings Commis- 
sion. 

— Justice Williams, of the Supreme Court, in 
an opinion declared that " the same rules as to 
speed that may be applied to ordinary vehicles 



propelled by horses are not applicable to street 
cars.* 

May 27. The Supreme Court decided that the 
city must pay Filbert, Porter & Co., contractors 
for the Queen Lane Reservoir, $122,795, the 10 
per cent, reserved by the city of the contract 
price for construction. 

May 28. The Paoli express train, which left 
the Broad Street Station at 5.09 p.m., was de- 
railed at Fifty-ninth street. George Taylor, the 
engineer, and Martin Furlong, the fireman, were 
killed. The passengers escaped uninjured. A 
broken switch-bar under the frog, it is said, was 
the cause of the accident. 

May 29. Memorial Day was generally ob- 
served by the cessation of business and the 
decoration of soldiers' graves in the various 
cemeteries. 

June 1. The Reading Company, which con- 
trols all the allied interests of the old Philadel- 
phia and Reading Railroad system, held its first 
annual meeting and elected nine directors. The 
Board organized by electing Joseph H. Harris, 
President; W. R. Taylor, Vice-President; W. A. 
Church, Treasurer, and W. G. Brown, Secretary. 

— The semi-centennial meeting of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association was opened in the 
Academy of Music. Mayor Warwick delivered 
the address of welcome, to which Dr. Nicholas 
Senn, of Chicago, President of the Association, 
responded. 

— The formal opening of the Commercial 
Museums was largely attended by delegates from 
business organizations in all the leading cities of 
the United States and many of the cities of Cen- 
tral and South American countries. Mayor War- 
wick made an address of welcome, and was fol- 
lowed by President Pepper, of the Board of Trus- 
tees ; Henry W. Peabody, of Boston, President 
of the Advisory Board ; Professors Wilson and 
Green, of the Museums; Delegates Hitchings 
and Mendez, from Brazil ; De Murguenda, from 
Uruguay ; Fernandez, from Costa Rica ; Perez, 
from Mexico ; Rogers, from. Chile ; Mejia, from 
Salvador, and Delfino, from Venezuela. 

June 2. The second day of the semi-centen- 
nial celebration of the American Medical Asso- 
ciation was made notable by the visit of Presi- 
dent McKinley, who delivered an address of 
congratulation to the members at the general 
morning session, in the Academy of Music. At 
the same meeting Governor Hastings made a 
speech. 

— President McKinley, Attorney General Mc- 
Kenna, Secretary of Agriculture Wilson, and a 
party including'Congressmen and Foreign Minis- 
ters, visited the Commercial Museums, and later 
at the Academy of Music the President formally 
declared the Museums open as a national insti- 
tution. His speech was followed by those of 
Senor Calvo, Minister from Costa Rica ; Senor 
Romero, Minister from Mexico, and others. At 
a banquet at the Bourse, the President again 
spoke, and others responding to toasts were the 
Brazilian, Argentine and Chinese Ministers, Gov- 
ernor Hastings, Theodore C. Search, Hon. Rich- 
ard Olney and Congressman Dalzell. 

June 4. President Judge Hanna, of the Or- 
phans' Court, in an adjudication of the account 
of the executor of the estate of George Blight, 
deceased, decided the new direct inheritance tax 
to be levied upon personal property above the 
value of $5000 to be unconstitutional. 



6 4 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



— The Advisory Board of the Commercial 
Museums elected Robert Bleakley, of New Or- 
leans, President, and three Vice-Presidents from 
the United States and one from each of three 
South American Republics. A number of dele- 
gates gave their views as to the best means of 
improving trade between this and other coun- 
tries, and the meeting finally adjourned. 

June 6. Colonel Joseph M. Bennett gave a 
tract of eight acres near the Gentlemen's Driv- 
ing Park to the Methodist Episcopal Home for 
the Aged. 

June 7. At the annual meeting of the Board 
of Port Wardens Joel Cook was re-elected Presi- 
dent. 

June 8. The Land Title and Trust Company 
awarded the contract for the erection of its new 
16-story building on the southwest corner of 
Broad and Chestnut streets, to be completed May 
1, 1898, to Charles McCaul. 

— The Board of Education elected William 
Drown Rorer Principal of the High School for 
Girls at a salary of $4000 a year. 

June 9. At the annual commencement of the 
University of Pennsylvania Provost Harrison 
conferred degrees on 453 graduates, of whom 147 
are Medical Doctors, 98 Doctors of Dental Sur- 
gery, 74 Bachelors of Laws, 56 Bachelors of 
Science, 23 Doctors of Philosophy, 17 Doctors 
of Veterinary Medicine, 17 Bachelors of Art, and 
12 Bachelors of Music. Certificates were awarded 
to 32 students. The honorary degree Doctor of 
Laws was conferred on Hon. Wayne MacVeagh, 
who delivered the oration. The degree Doctor 
of Science was conferred on Professors Henry 
Morton and Benjamin West Frazier. 

— The Board of City Trusts appropriated 
$650,000 toward the cost of widening Delaware 
avenue. 

June 11. Achillo Genna, 27 years old, was 
killed and three other men were injured by the 
fall of a heavy bucket in an excavation for the 
Reading subway, at Fifteenth and Callowhill 
streets. 

— Judge Penrose decided that the Direct In- 
heritance Tax law is unconstitutional. 

June 12. The delegates to the Universal Pos- 
tal Congress stopped less than six hours in this 
city on their way to Washington, during which 
time they[ visited the Post Office, Independence 
Hall (where they were welcomed by Governor 
Hastings) , League Island and Cramps' shipyard, 
and were entertained at luncheon in the Bourse, 
where addresses were made by Hon. John Wana- 
maker. General George S. Batcheller, Sir Spencer 
Walpole and M. Ansault. 

— The steamboat John Ericsson, built for the 
Baltimore and Philadelphia Steamboat Com- 
pany, was launced from Neafie & Levy's ship- 
yard. 

June 15. The new battleship Iowa was trans- 
ferred by her builders, the Cramp Company, to 
the Government, and was moved down the river 
to League Island. 

June 17. By a vote of 81 to 21, Common Coun- 
cil passed the bill to lease Dock street wharf to 
the Pennsylvania Railroad Company for twenty- 
five years from December 31, 1898, at $5000 a 
year, and, by a vote of 70 to 30, passed the 
amended bill regulating street-car licenses, one 
clause of which provides for the temporary li- 
censes at the rate of 25 cents a day for each car 
used when travel is extraordinarily heavy. 



June 18. The lifeless body of Mrs. Mary 
Rodgers, aged 45 years, who had been reported 
to the police as missing since the 9th instant, was 
found under the cellar-stairs of her residence, 816 
Capital street, near Twentieth and Brown streets. 
It was stated that more that $60 in money and a 
gold watch and chain had been taken from a bu- 
reau. The police failed to arrest Charles Adams, 
aged 21 years, a nephew of Mrs. Rodgers, who 
lived with her, and who disappeared after the 
murder. 

— Robert Solly, aged 32 years, went to the 
home of his father-in-law, at Fifth street and 
Wyoming avenue, where his wife and 22-month- 
old son resided, and, calling the latter out to the 
roadway, shot and killed him. The father then 
fired a bullet into his own temple and dropped 
dead. 

Juns 21. The National Saengerfest of the 
Northeastern Ssengerbund opened in the new 
Sanger Hall, in the presence of 10,000 people. 
Mayor Warwick delivered an address of wel- 
come, to which Major Carl Lentz, of Newark, 
N. J., President of the Northeastern Saenger- 
bund, responded. A concert concluded the day's 
programme. 

June 22. Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee 
was celebrated in St. George's Hall by the So- 
ciety of the Sons of St. George and the Albion 
Society. Addresses were delivered by the Rev. 
H. Richard Harris, William H. Lucas and 
William Waterall, and an original poem was read 
by H. Hanby Hay. 

June 24. More than 10,000 German singers 
paraded and upwards of 50,000 people attended 
the Samgerfest picnic. The Mozart bust, the 
first prize for federated societies of the first class, 
was won by Brooklyn. Hudson county, New 
Jersey, was awarded the first prize of the second 
class. The single society first prize in the first 
class was won by the Arion, of Newark, N. J. ; 
in the second class by the Harmonie, of Baltimore, 
and in the third class by the Delaware Saenger- 
bund, of Wilmington. 

June 25. Mayor Warwick awarded the $650,- 
000 loan to Townsend, W T helen & Co. and Ed- 
ward F. Jones & Co., who had made a joint bid 
at the uniform premium of 103.706 per series and 
at 3^-per-cent. interest. 

July 1. Mayor Warwick sent to Select Coun- 
cil messages vetoing the bill to lease Dock street 
wharf to the Pennsylvania Railroad Company 
for twenty-five jears, at $5000 a year, and the 
ordinance to strike Dock street pier from the list 
of projected Delaware avenue improvements. 

July 3. Nicolo Bartillolle,32 years o!d,stabbed 
Antonio Diodato, aged 40 years, on a lot at 
Seventh and Carpenter streets, inflicting fatal 
wounds. 

July 5. There was a general and "old-fash- 
ioned" observance of Independence Day, the 
chief celebration being held in Independence 
Square, under the auspices of the Society of the 
War of 1 812, at which the orator was Hon. 
Thomas F. Bayard, who was preceded by Mayor 
Warwick and John Cadwalader. In Fairmount 
Park there were military manoeuvres by the First 
Brigade, a balloon ascension and fireworks. 
There were also public pyrotechnic displays in 
various parts of the city. 

■ — While James Seebeth, 65 years old, was 
dozing on a chair in front of the club house of 
the William Penn Volunteer Hose Company, a 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



65 



cannon cracker in his coat pocket was ignited 
and exploded, causing injuries which proved 
fatal. 

July 8. An official inspection of bakeshops, to 
ascertain their sanitary condition, was begun by 
Factory Inspector Campbell and deputies. 

July 13. The Board of Directors of the Le- 
high Valley Railroad Company accepted the 
resignation of President Elisha P. Wilbur and 
elected Alfred Walter to succeed him. 

July 14. While attempting to. stop a pair of j 
runaway horses, at Ridge avenue and Button- 
wood street, Dennis J. Cooney was knocked 
down and fatally injured. 

July 15. Governor Hastings appointed Wil- 
liam R. Tucker, Secretary of the Board of Trade, 
as Master Port Warden, to succeed the late 
Christian K. Ross. 

July 16. The Philadelphia tugboat A. R. 
Gray was burned to the water's edge off Anda- 
lusia while coming to this port from New York 
by way of the Raritan canal. 

July 18. Daniel Carron. 24 years old, was 
kicked off a moving freight train, near Over- 
brook, by Richard Wilson, whom Carron and 
some companions, it is alleged, were attempting 
to rob. Carron died soon after. Wilson was ar- 
rested. 

July 20. The Supreme Court decided m favor 
of the city a suit brought against it in 1875 by 
the Ridge Avenue Passenger Railway Company 
to recover $100,000. This sum was claimed by 
the Company for damages sustained in four years 
while the city was grading Ridge avenue from 
the Wissahickon creek four miles eastward. It 
was alleged that travel was retarded, and, on 
some days, cars could not run at all. 

July 22. A violent wind-storm, attended with 
rain and hail, caused considerable damage to 
property in the city and suburbs, houses being 
unroofed, chimneys demolished, crops of fruits 
and vegetables destroyed, and trees and electric 
light and telegraph poles blown down. Several 
persons were shocked by the electric current, but 
no fatality was reported. 

— The Superior Court reversed the decision 
of the Liquor License Court, and awarded a re- 
tail license to Jeremiah G. Donoghue, of Eighth 
and Vine streets. President Judge Rice dis- 
sented. 

July 24. Frederick W. Blentzle, aged 51 
years, while turning on electric lights in his 
brother's saloon, rested one hand upon a steam 
radiator, and, touching an exposed wire in the 
switchboard with the other, was instantly killed. 

July 26. Hop Yen Lee, a leper, who had been 
in the Municipal Hospital seven years, died. 

July 27. Pasquale Daddario was hanged for 
the murder of Modestino Moffo, aged 3 years. 

July 20. The partial eclipse of the sun was 
observed through smoked glass by many inter- 
ested spectators. At the Central High School 
Observatory, and the Flower Observatory of the 
University of Pennsylvania, the phenomenon 
was observed, but nothing of unusual scientific 
value was noted. 

. July 30. James Meehan, aged 19 years, while 
riding a bicycle on Springfield avenue, lost con- 
trol of his wheel and, descending a steep hill, was 
hurled over the stone wall of the bridge crossing 
Wissahickon creek, in which he was drowned. 

August 2. The Philadelphia schooner A. D. 
Lamson was sunk off Cape Henry in a collision 



with the British steamer Rappahannock, which 
rescued her crew and landed them at Norfolk. 

August 3. The ninth annual Convention of 
the American Boiler Manufacturers opened at 
the Engineers' Club, Vice-President Henry J. 
Hartley presiding. 

August 4. During a fire at the Jayne Chemi- 
cal Works, Frankford, two employes and thir- 
teen firemen were burned, some of them seri- 
ously. Several explosions of highly inflammable 
oils made the work among the flames exceedingly 
hazardous. The loss did not exceed $10,000. 

— Charles V. Dietz, aged 41 years, shot and 
killed Kate Scollin, aged 35 yeais, and then com- 
mitted suicide by snooting, in Wunderlee's candy 
factory, 119 Pegg street, where they were both 
employed. 

August 7. Last day of the Eighteenth L. A. W. 
National Meet. A record-breaking crowd was 
in attendance at Willow Grove Park. Exciting 
racing and close finishes characterized the last 
day of the meet. Several world's records were 
supplanted. 

August 10 Chang Yen Hoon, Special Am- 
bassador of the Emperor of China at the Jubilee 
of Queen Victoria, accompanied by his secretary 
and seven members of his suite, visited Cramps' 
shipyard. 

August 13. The first of the merchants' excur- 
sions arranged by the Trades League arrived 
from points in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, West Vir- 
ginia, and Kentucky. It consisted of about 4000 
people, nearly half of whom stopped in Philadel- 
phia, the remainder going on to seashore points. 
A large number of the excursionists were buyers, 
many of whom visited the large wholesale houses. 

August 16. William C. Wilson, aged about 60 
years, proprietor of Wilson's Circulating Library, 
n 1 7 Walnut street was brutally murdered on 
the first floor of his library between 6 and 7 p. M. 
His head was beaten into a jelly. No clue to 
the murderer was discovered. 

August 23. William Rooney, 28 years old, 
shot and killed Alphonso L. Picard, aged 25 
years, and shot and seriously wounded Miss 
Verrona B. Sellheim, aged 20 years, who was 
with Picard, at Franklin street and Girard ave- 
nue. 

August 27. The Coroner's jury found that 
Major William C. Wilson came to his death from 
hemorrhage and shock, caused by blows admin- 
istered by a person or persons unknown. Marion 
Stuyvesant, the bookseller's porter, was com- 
mitted to prison by the Coroner to await the ac- 
tion of the Grand Jury, though no testimony was 
adduced to show that Stuyvesant had any knowl- 
edge of the crime, and he was subsequently dis- 
charged, the Grand Jury ignoring the indictment 
against him. 

August 30. The second Convention of the 
Grand Council of the Young Men's Institute, 
Pennsylvania Jurisdiction, was opened in Odd 
Fellows' Temple, after the delegates had at- 
tended Mass at the Church of Our Lady of 
Mercy, at which the sermon was preached by 
the E ev. George W. Kelley, of Pittsburg. 

September 4. Funeral of Mrs. John Drew, at 
St. Stephen's Protestant Episcopal Church. 

September 6. Labor Day celebrated with a 
largely attended demonstration under the auspi- 
ces of the United Labor League, the chief speaker 
being ex-Governor Altgeld, of Illinois. The Ger- 
man trades also had a street parade. 



66 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



— The Polish societies of Philadelphia pre- 
sented oil portraits of Generals Pulaski and Kos- 
ciusko to the city. 

— Warehouses Nos.128, 130, 132 and 134 North 
Delaware avenue and Nos. 121, 123, 125 and 127 
North Water street destroyed by fire. Many 
firemen overcome by smoke and several injured, 
but none dangerously. The total loss estimated 
at $250,000, fully covered by insurance. 

September 9. The Committee on Plans and 
Improvements of the Fairmount Park Commis- 
sion approved plans for a children's playhouse 
at Fountain Hill, the cost to be met by the trus- 
tees of the estate of the late Richard Smith. 

September 10. The thermometer on the roof 
of the Post Office Building indicated 96 degrees 
at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, the highest tempera- 
ture thus far recorded in 1897. A number of cases 
of heat prostration were reported. 

— David Martin was offered the appointment 
of the Secretaryship of the Commonwealth, and 
accepted. 

September 14. William W. Porter, of Phila- 
delphia, was appointed to the Bench of the Su- 
perior Court to succeed Judge Willard, resigned, 
and accepted the place. 

— The Great Council of the Improved Order 
of Red Men opened its jubilee session with 131 
delegates, who were welcomed to the city by 
Mayor Warwick. A net increase of 7000 mem- 
bers during the last year was reported by the 
Great Incohonee. 

September 15. At the annual meeting of the 
stockholders of the Union Traction Company, 
A. J. Cassatt, who was chosen a member of the 
Board of Directors one week ago, declined a re- 
election, and all the members of the old Board 
were unanimously re-elected, Vice-President and 
General Manager John B. Parsons succeeding 
Mr. Cassatt. 

September 19. During a fire at the home of 
his son-in-law, Joseph M. Rogers, Professor 
Jacob H. Sides, aged 73 years, Supervising Prin- 
cipal of the E. Spencer Miller Grammar School, 
was fatally burned. 

September 20. The Association of Presidents 
and Secretaries of Local School Boards was or- 
ganized by the election of officers, Frederick J. 
Shoyer, of the Nineteenth Section, being chosen 
President. 

— The Board of Directors of the Union Trac- 
tion Company reorganized and re-elected John 
Lowber Welsh President and John B. Parsons 
Vice-President and General Manager. 

— A. Lincoln Landis, of the firm of Mayer, 
Landis & Co., file manufacturers at Twentieth 
street and Alleghany avenue, was committed in 
default of $3000 bail to answer the charge of 
starting a fire which almost destroyed their plant. 
The loss is estimated at $20,000. 

— The sixtieth anniversary of the laying of the 
corner-stone of the Boys' High School was cele- 
brated at the school. Addresses were delivered 
by Dr. Robert Ellis Thompson and Professor 
Zephaniah Hopper, who was a member of the 
first graduating class. 

September 21. At the first public meeting of 
the sub-committee of the Joint Committee on Fi- 
nance and Gas of Councils, a communication was 
received from the City Solicitor expressing the 
opinion that the city has the right to lease the 
Gas Works if authorized by ordinance. 



September 23. Common Council agreed to 
submit to the vote of the people at the November 
election the proposition to increase the city debt 
by $12,000,000. 

September 24. Select Council concurred in the 
Common Council bill to create a loan of $12,- 
200,000, subject to the approval of the people at 
the November election. 

September 27. Thomas L. Hicks was sworn 
in as Postmaster by Judge Beitler. He sent to 
Director Thompson his resignation as Chief of 
the Bureau of Highways. 

September 28. The City Troop returned from 
Hazleton, all the men being reported in good 
health. 

September 29. The Spring Garden Institute 
purchased with $20,000 — the gift of " A. T. J.," 
executrix of the estate of Samuel Jeanes — the 
property on Spring Garden street east of and 
adjoining the Institute. 

September 30. Postmaster Hicks received his 
commission and assumed charge of the Post 
Office at midnight. 

October 1. The Grand Jury failed to find an 
indictment against Marion A. Stuyvesant, who 
was held under suspicion of being implicated in 
the murder of Major Wilson, and he was dis- 
charged from Moyamensing Prison. 

October 2. Fire damaged the tanning and fin- 
ishing works of the Quaker City Morocco Com- 
pany, at Second and Oxford streets, to the ex- 
tent of $80,000. 

October 4. William W. Porter took the oath 
of office as Associate Judge of the Superior 
Court. 

October 5. The nail works of Philips, Town- 
send & Co., on Glenwood avenue, sustained 
$30,000 damage by fire. 

October 8. John Dunn, the Democratic leader 
of the Thirty-eighth Ward, was appointed a Real 
Estate Assessor, to succeed George R. Berrill, 
deceased. 

— The coke-hauling privileges enjoyed by Se- 
lect Councilman Hugh Black, at the Point Breeze 
and Market Street Gas Works, were withdrawn, 
and Mr. Black retired from the business. This 
was brought about by Mr. Black's opposition to 
the lease of the Gas Works. 

October 12. By a vote of 21 to 14, the Board 
of Education defeated a motion to suspend the 
rule reserving to graduates of the School of Peda- 
gogy the teacherships in the eleventh and twelfth 
grades in boys' grammar grades whenever vacan- 
cies occur. 

— Alexander Jackson and Charles Taylor, who 
were painting the girders at the Market street 
bridge over the Schuylkill river, were shocked 
by coming in contact with an electric-light wire. 
Taylor was thrown into the river, but was saved 
from drowning. Both men were terribly burned. 

October 15. The D. Hayes Agnew wing to 
the hospital of the University of Pennsylvania 
was formally dedicated. 

October 16. During a quarrel, Francisco An- 
tola, aged 36 years, was shot and killed by Leo- 
pold Orlando, aged 26 years, who was arrested. 

October 17. Within two minutes and twenty- 
eight seconds the old iron span of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad bridge, over the Schuylkill river 
in Fairmount Park, was removed from its place, 
and a new and heavier steel truss was put in. 
Within twelve minutes from the time the last 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



67 



train passed over the old, the first train crossed 
on the new structure. 

October 18. Common Council, at a special 
meeting, defeated the Select Council resolution 
in favor of submitting the question of leasing the 
Gas Works to a vote of the people, the vote being 
54 yeas and 64 nays. 

— The work of widening Delaware avenue, 
and building the new bulkhead along the Dela- 
ware river front, was begun below the Chestnut 
street wharf. 

October 20. At the thirteenth annual meeting 
of the Commandery-in-Chief of the Military Order 
of the Loyal Legion of the United States, Rear- 
Admiral Bancroft Gherardi, U. S. N., was 
elected Commander-in-Chief. 

Lieutenant-Colonel William Evans and wife, 
and other officers of the Salvation Army, who 
had been transferred to the Pacific Coast, were 
given a farewell at Association Hall. 

October 21. Councils' Committee on Finance 
and Gas, in joint session, agreed to the preamble 
of the ordinance authorizing the lease of the Gas 
Works to the United Gas Improvement Com- 
pany. The vote was: Yeas, 32; nays, 12. 

October 22. George W. Jackson, who was 
associated with Governor Hastings in the bank- 
ing business at Bellefonte, died at the University 
Hospital, aged sixty years. He was the first 
graduate of Girard College. 

October 23 The steamer Miami, which is to 
ply between Miami, Florida, and the Bahamas, 
was launched at Cramps' shipyard. 

October 25. By a vote of 34 to 12 City Coun- 
cils' Joint Committees on Finance and Gas re- 
solved to recommend the passage of the ordi- 
nance providing for the lease of the Gas Works to 
the United Gas Improvement Company. 

October 26. The twenty-fifth annual meeting 
of the American Public Health Association 
opened at the Hotel Walton. 

October 27. The opening session of the meet- 
ing of the New England Cotton Manufacturers' 
Association was held in the Textile School of the 
Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial 
Art, where the members were welcomed to the 
city by Mayor Warwick. In the evening a 
" smoker " was held at the Manufacturers' Club. 

October 28. The License Court granted forty- 
nine applications for transfers of liquor licenses 
and refused six. 

— Councils' Committee on Street Railways re- 
ported favorably an ordinance authorizing the 
construction by the Union Traction Company 
of a temporary trolley road on Broad, from Por- 
ter street to the League Island Navy Yard. 

— Secretary Long, of the Navy Department, 
arrived from Washington, and was entertained 
at the Union League. 

October 29. The contract for the playhouse 
to be erected on the children's playground, near 
the Diamond street entrance to Fairmount Park, 
as provided for in the will of the late Richard 
Smith, was awarded to Lewis Havens, whose 
bid was $48,000. 

— The Compulsory Education Committee of 
the Board of Education elected thirty attendance 
officers — twenty-five men and five women — sub- 
ject to confirmation by the Board. 

— The American Public Health Association 
adjourned, after electing Dr. Charles A. Linds- 
ley, of New Haven, president, and adopting 



resolutions petitioning Congress to establish a 
National Department of Health. 

— At the graduating exercises of the Pennsyl- 
vania Hospital Training School for Nurses dip- 
lomas were awarded to seventeen young women. 

— Secretary of the Navy Long visited League 
Island and inspected the yard and its equipment. 
" The opportunities for making a great fresh- 
water basin at the Navy Yard," the Secretary 
said, "have impressed me, and I regard the 
subject as an important one. I think a basin 
could be constructed here large enough to hold 
the navies of the world." 

— Dr. Nansen, the Arctic explorer, made a 
communication to the American Philosophical 
Society, giving a preliminary report of the scien- 
tific features of his recent explorations in the 
polar regions. In the evening Dr. Nansen lec- 
tured at the Academy of Music, and subse- 
quently was given a reception at Horticultural 
Hall. 

October 30. A number of citizens filed a bill 
in the Common Pleas Court praying that Mayor 
Warwick be restrained from signing and the 
United Gas Improvement Company from be- 
coming a party to the lease of the Gas Works. 

— The north basin of the Queen Lane Reser- 
voir, which had been relined with asphalt, again 
leaked freely. 

— Twenty-three of the thirty-seven Russian 
Jews who went to California last spring under 
the leadership of Ephraim Deinard, with the 
intent of founding a colony in Salimas Valley, 
returned to Philadelphia, the cost of their trans- 
portation having been defrayed by co-religion- 
ists in San Francisco. 

November 1. The quarters of the Depart- 
ment of Charities and Correction removed from 
Harmony and Hudson streets to the third floor 
of the City Hall. 

— A fire, which caused considerable damage, 
started in the cellar of the building at 731 Arch 
street, occupied by Schaetzle & Co. and J. & L. 
Baxter, both manufacturers arjd dealers in milli- 
nery goods. 

November 3 . Steps were taken to have the courts 
pass upon the legality of the $12,200,000 loan. 

November. 5. Common Council, under the 
operation of a call for " the previous question," 
cut off all debate and opportunity to present 
amendments to the bill to lease the Gas Works to 
the United Gas Improvement Company, and 
adopted the section containing the contract by 
a vote of 79 to 51. 

November 6. The application for an injunc- 
tion to prevent the consummation of the lease of 
the Gas Works to the United Gas Improvement 
Company was withdrawn by counsel for the 
petitioners, who had based their complaint on 
information contained in an old charter of the 
United Gas Improvement Company, instead of 
the amended one. 

— Eugene J. Lindsay, an exemption clerk in 
the office of the Prothonotary of the Court of 
Common Pleas, and Richard W. Merrick and 
John A. Merrick, father and son, both deputy 
clerks of the United States Circuit Court, were 
held in $2500 bail each, on the charge of selling, 
and conspiring to sell, bogus certificates of nat- 
uralization. 

— In the annual parade of the police and fire- 
men 1 100 policemen and 200 firemen partici- 
pated. 



68 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



November 8. Without permitting even the 
reading of a number of amendments offered by 
the opponents of the measure, Common Council 
passed the bill to authorize the lease of the Gas 
Works to the United Gas Improvement Com- 
pany, the vote being 78 to 52. 

November 9. Select Council, by a vote of 25 
to 13, passed, without amendment, the bill au- 
thorizing the lease of the Gas Works to the 
United Gas Improvement Company. Immedi- 
ately after the passage of the ordinance counsel 
for Joel J. Baily, Henry C. Lea, Theodore 
Wernwag, Francis B. Reeves, Philip J. Ritter 
and Jacob A. Datz filed a bill in equity, asking 
the Court to declare the lease and ordinance null 
and void, and to enjoin the Mayor, Director 
Thompson and Controller Walton from making, 
executing, or delivering the contract and lease to 
the United Gas Improvement Company. 

— Eugene J. Lindsay, Exemplification Clerk 
in the office of the Prothonotary of the Common 
Pleas ; Richard W. Merrick and John A. Mer- 
rick, his son, deputy clerks in the office of the 
Clerk of the United States District Court, were 
each held in $5000 bail for trial on the charge of 
fraudulently issuing naturalization papers. 

— The Board of Education adopted the report 
of its committee to investigate charges of short- 
weight deliveries of coal to the schools, which 
recommended that five weighers employed by 
the Board be discharged ; that the testimony 
taken be given to the District Attorney, and that 
the three companies which supplied the coal be 
communicated with as to the allowances to be 
made for the deficiency in the quantities put into 
the cellars. 

— The Board of Directors of the National 
Bank of the Republic, finding that its business 
could no longer be carried on with profit to the 
stockholders, decided to consolidate with the 
Fourth Street National Bank. 

November 10. The dead body of Rev. Henry 
J. McPake, an assistant priest at the Roman 
Catholic Church of the Annunciation, was found 
in an area in the rear of the Convent attached to 
St. Paul's Church, on Christian street, between 
Ninth and Tenth. His watch was missing, and 
there was a bruise on the right temple and an- 
other across the nose, but a Coroner's physician 
ascribed the death to uremic poison, the result 
of a recent attack of typhoid fever. The Cor- 
oner's jury afterwards found a verdict to this 
effect. 

November n. Thomas Coles, judge, and 
Edward Houseman and Theodore Wood, in- 
spectors, at the Republican primary election 
last January, in the Ninth Division of the Sev- 
enth Ward, were convicted of violating the 
party rules in not giving a certificate to a duly 
elected delegate or candidate. Each was sen- 
tenced to pay a fine of $100 and costs, which 
was paid by Select Councilman Houseman. 

November 12. Mayor Warwick signed the 
ordinance leasing the Gas Works to the United 
Gas Improvement Company, and made public a 
statement giving his reasons therefor. 

November 14. The Cramp Shipbuilding Com- 
pany was awarded the contract for building four 
steamships, each 290 feet in length, for a syndi- 
cate, which will charter them to the Boston 
Fruit Company to be run in the West India 
trade. 



— A site for a private hospital for the treat- 
ment of contagious diseases was purchased at 
Twenty-second street and Lehigh avenue, oppo- 
site the Municipal Hospital. 

November 15. A meeting in the interest of 
the proposed Health Protective Hospital, whose 
object is the treatment of patients suffering from 
contagious diseases, was held in the Mayor's 
office. Subsequently the corporators met and 
adopted a constitution. 

— John B. Firestone, formerly Teller of the 
Dillsburg National Bank, pleaded guilty, in the 
United States District Court to the embezzlement 
of about $13,500 from the bank, and was sen- 
tenced to five years in the Eastern Penitentiary. 

— Argument in the quo warranto proceedings 
to unseat Select Councilman Henry Clay was 
begun before Attorney General McCormick. 

November 16. Frank McCann, for voting 
illegally in the Thirty-third Division of the Fif- 
teenth Ward last February, was sentenced to 
two months' imprisonment. Charles Corcoran, 
convicted of aiding and procuring the casting of 
the illegal vote, was sentenced to two months' 
imprisonment. 

— By authorizing the payment of a balance 
of $8609.55 on the interest account the Public 
Buildings Commission settled all claims of the 
Tacony Iron and Metal Company, and termi- 
nated the contract for the erection of the City 
Hall tower. 

— Residents of the Twenty-second and Thirty- 
third Wards petitioned the Court to establish a 
new boundary line between the wards. It was 
claimed that lines marking the present boundary 
for a distance of a mile, the greater part of which 
was formed by the Wingohocking creek and its 
tributaries, have been obliterated by the con- 
struction of sewers and the opening of new 
streets. 

— The steamer Belgenland, which arrived 
from Liverpool, had on board five of the crew of 
the wrecked schooner Theodore Dean, which 
were taken from a small boat the day previous. 
Captain J. F. Hodgson, of the schooner, was 
swept overboard before the others were rescued. 
The Belgenland also towed to the Breakwater 
the schooner Willie Maxwell, which she had 
sighted about 300 miles from the Delaware 
Capes. 

— The Grand Jury brought into the United 
States District Court true bills of indictment in 
the fraudulent naturalization cases against John 
A. Merrick, Richard W. Merrick, Eugene J. 
Lindsay, Henry Casper, Benjamin E. Haslam, 
and Charles Goldstein. 

— Levi Potter, colored, aged th'rty-seven 
years, was fatally shocked by an electric-light 
current passing through the metal rod of his 
umbrella, with which he had touched an arc 
lamp while looking into a show window on 
South street, above Seventh. 

November 17. The discharge of sewage into 
the Fairmount pool on November 16 was caused 
by a too liberal flushing of the intercepting sewer, 
which collects the sewage from Manayunk and 
vicinity and empties it into the river below Fair- 
mount dam. The sewer was not broken, as 
many supposed. 

— About fifty prominent citizens, including 
Republicans and Democrats, held a preliminary 
meeting in furtherance of a movement for the 
election of a non-partisan Mayor. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



69 



November 18. The new building of the Ken- 
sington Hospital for Women, on Diamond street, 
opposite Norris Square, was formally opened. 

— A fire in S. Pach & Sons' bedding and mat- 
tress factory, at 137 and 139 North Second street, 
caused damage to building and stock estimated 
at $25,000. 

— De Wilton Laws, colored, pleaded guilty to 
the charge of making a false and fraudulent 
return of the votes cast at the November election 
in the Fourteenth Division of the Fifth Ward, at 
which he was inspector, and was sentenced to 
pay $500 fine, undergo an imprisonment of nine 
months, and be disfranchised seven years. 

— Counsel for Thomas L. Hicks, Thomas 
Martindale, and Finley Acker, as citizens, tax- 
payers, and consumers of gas, began proceedings 
in equity against the city and the United Gas Im- 
provement Company to prevent the consumma- 
tion of the gas lease. A bill in equity was filed on 
behalf of William J. Arkell, George W. Krouse, 
Willard Brown, A. G. Paine, and Leroy W. 
Baldwin, a syndicate of capitalists, who say they 
propose to form the Consolidated Gas Company 
of Philadelphia, as well as other citizens, in 
which the Court was asked to prevent the lease 
of the Gas Works to the United Gas Improve- 
ment Company. 

November 19. The members of the Electrical 
Workers' Local Union, No. 1, struck for a day 
of nine hours and a minimum wage rate of $2.50 
for skilled workmen and $1.75 for helpers. 

November 20. The schoolship Saratoga re- 
turned after a summer cruise of four months. 

November 22. At the annual meeting of the 
Society of Mayflower Descendants in the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania, Hon. Charlemagne 
Tower, Jr., was re-elected President. An ad- 
dress on the recovery and bringing to this coun- 
try of the log of the Mayflower was delivered 
by Hon. Thomas F. Bayard. 

— John B. Meixell, formerly cashier of the 
South Bethlehem National Bank, and Willis E. 
Hock, who was teller in the same bank, pleaded 
guilty to embezzling about $20,000 f the bank's 
funds, and were sentenced to six years and six 
months each in the Eastern Penitentiary. 

November 23. Additional bills in equity were 
filed against the city, Mayor Warwick, Director 
Thompson, the United Gas Improvement Com- 
pany and the Equitable Illuminating Gas Com- 
pany, to prevent the consummation of the gas 
lease. Both bills were filed by the Twenty- 
seventh Ward Gas Fuel Company. 

— The Board of Education instructed its Sec- 
retary to change the phraseology of the adver- 
tisement for proposals for supplying the paper 
needed in the schools next year. A comparison 
of prices showed that New York pays consider- 
ably less than Philadelphia for such supplies. 

November 24. At a dinner given by Peter A. 
B. Widener, Dr. William Pepper announced 
that Mr. Widener had decided to present, as a 
memorial to his deceased wife, his handsome resi- 
dence, at the northwest corner of Broad street 
and Girard avenue, to the Free Library of Phila- 
delphia, as an integral part of the Free Library 
system, under the name of the Josephine Wi- 
dener Memorial Branch. Mr. Widener will 
place in the art gallery " a full collection of 
choice American art." Dr. Pepper said the 
total value of the gift would equal about 
$1,000,000. 



— Thomas McKean subscribed $ioo,coo 
toward the fund for the erection near the cam- 
pus of a Law School building for the University 
of Pennsylvania, the total cost of which is be 
about $300,000. The reading-room will be 
named after Mr. McKean's great-grandfather. 

— At a Thanksgiving service in the Princeton 
Presbyterian Church to present the needs of the 
Presbyterian Hospital a communication was 
read from the proprietors of the Baldwin Loco- 
motive Works, adding $25,000 to the endow- 
ment fund of the Cathcart Home, connected 
with the hospital, which was founded by their 
late partner, William C. Stroud. 

— Governor Hastings appointed James E. 
Gorman, who was the Democratic candidate for 
Register of Wills, to succeed the late James 
Hagan as Magistrate. 

November 25. The new annex to the Wistar 
Institute of Anatomy and Biology at the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, the gift of General Isaac 
J. Wistar, completed. 

November 26. A demurrer and answer were 
filed in the equity proceeding begun by Joel J. 
Baily, Henry C. Lea, Theodore Wernwag, 
Francis B. Reeves, Philip J. Ritter and Jacob 
A. Datz against the city, the Mayor, the Director 
of Public Works and the City Controller to re- 
strain the city from consummating the lease of 
the Gas Works to the United Gas Improvement 
Company. 

— George Helmuth, Charles Wagner and 
Frederick McNevison, who had pleaded guilty 
to making a false return of the votes cast in the 
Third Division of the Second Ward at the re- 
cent election, were each sentenced by Judge 
Bregy to pay a fine of $500, be imprisoned for 
nine months, be disfranchised for four years, and 
be disqualified from holding office for seven 
years. 

November 28. Apt Brothers' dry goods store, 
39 and 41 North Eighth street, was almost de- 
stroyed by fire. The firm estimated the value 
of its stock at $75,000, on which there was an 
insurance of more than $50,000. Adjoining 
properties were damaged by water. Three fire- 
men were injured, but none dangerously. 

November 29. An American flag was pre- 
sented to the Boys' High School by the National 
Society of the American Institute of Civics, 
which had received it from Mrs. William J. Car- 
ter. Addresses were made by Colonel H. H. 
Adams, of New York; Major General Nelson 
A. Miles, U. S. A. ; General R. B. Beath and 
Superintendent Brooks. 

November 30. Judge Arnold delivered an 
opinion in which he decided that the Court had 
no authority to grant the injunction to restrain 
the carrying out of the lease of the Gas Works. 
Mayor Warwick then executed the lease author- 
ized by Councils. The United Gas Improvement 
Company took possession of the Works the next 
morning. 

— Governor Hastings appointed David T. 
Hart, of the Thirty-third Ward, to the office of 
Magistrate, to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of Horatio B. Hackett, recently 
elected Register of Wills 

— The trial of William Rooney for the murder 
of Alphonso L. Picard concluded. The next day 
the jury returned a verdict of murder in the 
second degree, and Rooney was sentenced to 
twenty years in the Penitentiary. 



■ 



' ■ 



7o 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



RELIGIOUS CHRONOLOGY. 

[From December, 1896, to December 1, 1897.] 
1896. — December 5. Corner-stone laid of 

Christ Protestant Episcopal Church, Sixth and 

Venango streets. 

December 13. Dedication of Albert Barnes 

Memorial Building. Seventh and Spruce streets, 

Sunday-school annex to First Presbyterian 

Church. 

— Re-opening of remodeled edifice of Mount 
Zion Methodist Episcopal Church, Manayunk. 

December 25. Roman Catholic Chapel of Our 
Lady of Mount Carmel, Third and Wolf streets, 
opened for service. 

1897. — January 14. Formal opening of the en- 
larged building of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Branch Young Men's Christian Association, 
Forty-first street and Westminster avenue. 

January 24. Dedication of the enlarged syna- 
gogue of the congregation Kesher Israel, Lom- 
bard street, above Fourth. 

January 25. Consecration of the H. H. Hous- 
ton Memorial Chancel, erected in St. Peter's 
Protestant Episcopal Church, Germantown. 

January 31. Re-dedication of the enlarged 
edifice of the Clearview Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

February 12. Consecration of All-Hallows 
Protestant Episcopal Church, Wyncote. 

February 14. Consecration at Christ Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church, by Bishop Coleman, of 
an altar presented by Mrs. A. J. Cassatt, in 
memory of her father, the Rev. Henry Y. Buch- 
anan, D. D. 

February 24. Consecration of the Very Rev. 
E. F. Prendergast as Bishop of Scillio and Aux- 
iliary Bishop of the Roman Catholic Archdio- 
cese of Philadelphia. 

February 28. Dedication by Bishop Prender- 
gast of the Roman Catholic Chapel of Our Lady 
of Mount Carmel, Third and Wolf streets. 

March 1. Formal opening of the Reading 
Railway Department of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, 1013 Green street. 

March 10. Dedication of the New Tabernacle 
Baptist Church, Chestnut street, above Fortieth. 

March 27. Corner-stone laid of the Wharton 
Square United Presbyterian Church, Twenty- 
third and Wharton streets. 

March 30. Dedication of the new edifice of 
the Spring Garden Unitarian Church, Girard 
avenue, above Fifteenth. 

April 20. Commencement of the celebration 
of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the consecra- 
tion of Archbishop Ryan. 

May 2. Fiftieth anniversary of Ebenezer 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Manayunk. 

May 6. Fiftieth anniversary of the establish- 
ment of the Sisters of St. Joseph in Philadelphia. 

May 16. Semi-Centennial of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church of the Crucifixion. 

— Consolidation of the Chambers and Wylie 
Memorial Presbyterian Churches under the name 
of the Chambers-Wylie Memorial Presbyterian 
Church . 

— Dedication of the new edifice of St. Mich- 
ael's Evangelical Lutheran Church, German- 
town. 

— Dedication of the new edifice of the Church 
of the Brethren, Germantown. 

May ?o. Twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
Mantua Baptist Church, West Philadelphia. 



June 6. Corner-stone laid of the new edifice 
of the Roman Catholic Church of the Holy 
Family, Manayunk. 

— Corner-stone laid of the new edifice of Trin- 
ity United Evangelical Church, Germantown. 

June 12. Corner-stone laid of St. Elizabeth's 
Protestant Episcopal Church, Sixteenth and 
Mifflin streets. 

June 20. Dedication of the new edifice of St. 
Dominic's Roman Catholic Church, Holmes- 
burg. 

— Dedication of the Wharton Square United 
Presbyterian Church, Twenty-third and Whar- 
ton streets. 

June 28. Corner-stone laid of St. Mary's 
Chapel, Bainbridge street above Eighteenth, a 
mission for colored people, in charge of St. 
Mark's Protestant Episcopal Church. 

— Consolidation of the Arch Street and the 
West Arch Street Presbyterian Churches under 
the name of the Arch Street Presbyterian Church. 

July 6. Ground broken for the Sunday-school 
building of the United Presbyterian Dales Me- 
morial Mission, Thirty-second and Cumberland 
streets. 

July 10. Corner-stone laid of the new Chapel 
of the East Park Presbyterian Church, Thirty- 
second street, above Montgomery avenue. 

July 17. Corner-stone laid of Eden Methodist 
Episcopal Church, Lehigh avenue, below Fifth. 

August 14. Corner-stone laid of St. Nathan- 
iel's Protestant Episcopal Mission Parish build- 
ing, Alleghany avenue and E street. 

August 15. Semi-Centennial Anniversary of 
Ridge Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, 
Roxborough. 

September 8. Corner-stone laid of the new 
parish house of St. Mary's Protestant Episcopal 
Church, West Philadelphia. 

September 18. Comer-stone laid of St. Al- 
ban's Protestant Episcopal Church, Olney. 

September 19. Corner-stone laid of the new 
front wall of the Zoar Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

September 20. Corner-stone laid of the new 
edifice of the Forty-tnird Street Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

September 26. Celebration of the one-hun- 
dred-and-fiftieth anniversary of the organization 
of the Reformed Church in the United States. 

— Dedication of the new edifice of Trinity 
Evangelical Li.theran Church, Germantown. 

October 3. Consecration of St. Paul's Eng- 
lish Lutheran Church. 

October n. Consecration of the George W. 
South Protestant Episcopal Memorial Church of 
the Advocate, Eighteenth and Diamond streets. 

October 14. Dedication of the additions to 
the Methodist Episcopal Orphanage. 

October 16. Corner-stone laid of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church of the Holy Spirit. 

Octobei 24. Dedication of the East Park 
Presbyterian Church. 

— Celebration of the Twenty-fifth anniversary 
of Fortieth Street Methodibt Episcopal Church. 

October 26. Dedication of the Chapel of the 
Home of the Good Shepherd, Germantown. 

— Corner-stone laid of the new edifice of the 
Frankford Baptist Church. 

October 31. Dedication of the Dales Me- 
morial United Presbyterian Church. 

November 18. Corner-stone laid of the new 
edifice of the Baltimore Avenue Baptist Church. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



71 



LOCAL NECROLOGY. 

[From December 1. 1896, to December 1, 1897.] 

Abbott, Charles F., member of the Board of 
Education, aged 75, January 15. 

Alexander, James H., job printer, aged 67, 
July 17. _ 

Allen, Captain Julius B., insurance broker and 
primary organizer of Baxter's Zouaves, aged 66, 

July 15- 

Allen, George W., of Croft & Allen, confec- 
tioners, aged 70, October 15, at Bryn Mawr. 

Baker, William Spohn, Collector of Washing- 
toniana, aged 74, September 8. 

Banes, Colonel Charles H., President of the 
Market Street National Bank, aged 65, Janu- 
ary- 15. 

Bastert, George, instructor of instrumental 
music at Girard College, aged 78, September 14. 

Beaver, Jerome A.; retired builder and former 
member of Common Council, aged 63, March 19. 

Bement, William B., well known manufac- 
turer, head of Bement, Milee & Co., aged 81, 
October 6. 

Berrell, George R., real estate assessor and 
Democratic politician, aged 75, September 26. 

Biddle, Arthur, lawyer, aged 44, at Atlantic 
City, March 8. 

Biddle, George W., distinguished lawyer, aged 
79, April 29. 

Blynn, Michael, hat manufactu»er and former 
member of Common Council and Board of Edu- 
cation, April 22. 

Boraef, L. Shuster, wholesale butcher, aged 78, 
at Sharon Hill, December 10. 

Boyd, S. Frederick, for seventeen years com- 
piler and publisher of " Boyd's Business Direc- 
tory," aged 42, November 10. 

Bumm, Henry, ex-City Treasurer, aged 70, 
June 19. 

Buoy, Rev. Charles W., D. D., Pastor of 
Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, Novem- 
ber 1. 

Butler, William H., ex-Alderman, aged 81, 
August 27. 

Carr, James A., Magistrate, aged 39, Janu- 
ary 3- . 

Cassin, Isaac S., civil engineer and member of 
Public Buildings Commission, aged 71, March 7. 

Cassin, William L., former member of the 
State House of Representatives.aged 47, April 33. 

Clark, Gideon, Brevet Brigadier General and 
former Register of Wills, aged 75, May 24. 

Clay, Richard Wells, President of Solicitors' 
Loan and Trust Company, aged 50, March 6. 

Cope, Edward Drinker, Ph. D., Professor in 
the University of Pennsylvania, aged 57 April 12. 

Craige, Seth, riding master, aged 74, October 9. 

Cross, Michael H., musical director, church 
organist and composer, September 26. 

Crouch, George W., harness manufacturer and 
Common Councilman, aged 56, December 18. 

Delavau, Joseph, the first Coroner ot Phila- 
delphia after consolidation, aged 80, April 22. 

Deperven, Henry, undertaker, aged 93, Feb- 
ruary 16. 

Dieck, Herman, City Editor of the Philadel- 
phia Demokrat, aged 59, March 15. 

Drake, Colonel Alexander E., retired officer 
of the United States Army, aged 79, March 13. 

Dulles, Mrs. Margaret Welsh, sister to late 
John Welsh, ex-U. S. Minister to England, aged 
101, November 10. 



Embry, Bishop James C, of the African 
Methodist Episcopal Church, aged 63, August n. 

Ford, Dr. William H., President of the Board 
of Health, aged 58, at Belmar, N. J. , October 18. 

Forney, Elizabeth Matilda, widow of Col. 
John Forney, aged 77. 

Fortner, Ichabod, ex-Representative, aged 64, 
April 26. 

Fraley, Mrs. Jane Chapman Cresson, wife of 
Frederick Fraley, aged 86, March 1. 

Fulton, Robert H., D.D., pastor qf the North- 
minster Presbyterian Church, aged 54, July 12. 

Gallagher, Patrick F., Real Estate Assessor, 
aged 62, January 11. 

Garsed, Richard, manufacturer of cotton 
goods and first President of the Frankford and 
Southwark Railway Company, aged 73, July 27. 

Gilmere, Jobn, employe in the Gas Bureau, 
aged 97, July 20. 

Gonzaga, Mother Mary, of St. Joseph's Or- 
phan Asylum, aged 86, October 8. 

Gorges, Dr. William, dentist, aged 78, Sep- 
tember 26. 

Greger, Gilbert W., State Appraiser in office of 
Register of Wills and a former member of Com- 
mon Council, aged 70, February 17. 

Gregory, Henry Duval, LL.D., former Vice 
President of Girard College, aged 78, Febru- 
ary 14. 

Griscom, William Woodworth, electrical en- 
gineer, at Georgian Bay, Ontario, aged 46, Sep- 
tember 24. 

Grist, James Edward, Common Councilman, 
aged 32, May 23. 

Gross, Dr. Henry S., well-known physician, 
aged 57, February 21. 

Hagan, James, Magistrate, aged 60, October 14. 

Hancock, Clinton G., General Passenger Agent 
of the Philadelphia and Reading Railway, aged 
52, December 20. 

Harmer, John W., son of Congressman Har- 
mer and former Paying Teller in office of City 
Treasurer, aged 49, February 2. 

Harris, Washington, gas meter manufacturer, 
aged 84, July 10. 

Hartshorne, Dr. Henry, distinguished physi- 
cian and author, aged 74, at Tokio, Japan, Feb- 
ruary 10. 

Herkness, B. Leander, retired business man, 
aged 76, July 5. 

Horn, Dr. George H., Secretary and Librarian 
of "American Philosophical Society," aged 58, 
November 25. 

Jenks, Barton H., manufacturer, December 15, 
at Mount Washington, near Baltimore. 

Johnson, Charles Eneu, manufacturer of print- 
ing ink, aged 69, October 7. 

Jones, A. Ellwood, ex-Select Councilman, aged 
51, March 15. 

Kendall, Otis Howard, formerly an Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics at the University of 
Pennsylvania, aged 45, April 15. 

Kensil, Major Clarence T., of the First Regi- 
ment, N. G. P., aged 38, August 23. 

Keyser, Dr. Peter D., eminent physician and 
member of the Board of Health, aged 62, March 9. 

Knauff, Henry, oldest organ builder in the 
country, aged 89, November 1. 

Lea, Matthew Carey, writer on pbysics, aged 
76, March 15. 

MacKellar, William B., Philadelphia Manager 
of the American Type Founders' Co., aged 53, 
at St. David's, Delaware county, June 25. 



jMMayaiawM^^afciti'fc MBrni'f =*A 



-> , . ^ - 



72 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



McCalla, Edwin, wool merchant, aged 91, Oc- 
tober 15. 

McCauley, Rev. Alexander G., D. D., asso- 
ciate pastor of Union Presbyterian Tabernacle, 
aged 73, June 24. 

McDowell, William L., President of the Lei- 
brant & McDowell Stove Co., aged 73, Febru- 
ary 24. 

McLaughlin, Frank, publisher of the Times, 
aged 69, July 14. 

McMichael, Rev. William W., member of the 
Philadelphia Methodist Episcopal Conference, 
aged 88, May 12. 

Marshall, Robert Wilson, of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad, aged 73, at Chambersburg, August 21. 

Matsinger, Maurice H., structural iron manu- 
facturer, aged 65, May 31. 

Matthews, Edward, former Select Councilman 
and Real Estate Assessor, aged 74, July 17. 

Meade, Colonel George G., a son of General 
George Gordon Meade, aged 54, February 2. 

Meredith, Morris, well known Philadelphian, 
aged 85, at Beverly, N. J., March 9. 

Merklee, Charles K., builder and ex-Common 
Councilman, aged 71, September 24. 

Morais, Rev. Sabato, D. D., LL. D., Minis- 
ter of the Mickve Israel Congregation, aged 75, 
November 11. 

Murphy, Rev. John M., rector of St. Anne's 
Roman Catholic parish at Holly Beach, aged 45, 
March 25. 

Omer, Peter H., member of the crew of the 
turret Monitor, aged 62, January 23. 

Ott, Richard B.,a tipstaff in the Quarter Ses- 
sions Court, aged 71, August 1. 

Pancoast, Dr. William H., surgeon, aged 62, 
January 5. 

Parrish, Charles, President of the Hazzard 
Wire Rope Works and Parrish Coal Co., and 
Director in the Lehigh and Wilkesbarre Coal 
Co., and of the Central Railroad of New Jersey, 
aged 71, December 27. 

Paul , James W. , prominent member of the Phil- 
adelphia Bar, aged 81, August 23, at Villanova. 

Poor, Rev. Daniel W., Corresponding Secre- 
tary of the Presbyterian Board of Education, 
aged 79, at Newark, N. J., October 11. 

Porter, William A., ex-Fire Commissioner, 
aged 57, February 11. 

Potter, Mrs. Jane Vanuxem, wife of Hon. 
William Potter. ex-Minister to Italy, January 17. 

Rebmann, Godfrey, well known iron founder, 
aged 61, March 20. 

Riehl, John S., ex-Representative, aged 70, 
February 12. 

Rittenhouse, John S., ex-Gas Trustee, aged 
66, August 14. 

Ritter, George W., undertaker, served in the 
Mexican and Civil Wars, aged 77, October 8. 

Roberts, Dr. Spencer, dentist, aged 83, at 
Glen Ridge, N. J., September 14. 

Roberts, George B., President of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company, aged 64, January 30. 

Robinson, Moncure, died on steamer Finance 
on a voyage from New York to Colon, Colom- 
bia — an enthusiastic horseman and railroad man 
— aged 42, December 12. 

Robinson, Rev. James, M. D., pastor of the 
Fourth Presbyterian Church and practicing phy- 
sician, aged 51, December 13. 

Roche, Dr. Martin, President of Pennsylvania 
College of Pharmacy and the PolytechnicUniver- 
sity, aged 71, November 16. 



Ross, Christian K., the father of Charlie Ross 
and Master Warden of the Port of Philadelphia, 
aged 74, June 21. 

Salter, Robert fi., Cashier of the Sixth Na- 
tional Bank, aged 80, May 9. 

Sartain, John, celebrated artist-engraver, aged 
89, October 24. 

Schaefer. Gustave R., lawyer and former mem- 
ber of Common Council, aged 38, June 25. 

Scott, Rev. P. Cameron, founder and director 
of the African Inland Mission at Nzawi, East 
Africa, December 4. 

Shields, Rev. James F., rector of the Church 
of the Immaculate Conception, November 21. 

Shoemaker, Robert, wholesale druggist, aged 
80, December 17. 

Sides, Jacob H., Principal of the E. Spencer 
Miller School, aged 72, September 23. 

Singerly, Mrs. Katherine S., widow of Joseph 
Singerly and mother of William M. Singerly, 
aged 83, August 11. 

Smith, Colonel C. Ross, union veteran and for 
twelve years Secretary of the Commercial Ex- 
change, aged 69, November 9. 

Smith, William S., Chief Engineer U. S. N., 
aged 61, February 7. 

Spangler, Andrew M., journalist and member 
of Board of Education, aged 79, November 2 

Speakman, Thomas Say, widely-known in- 
ventor, aged 80, February 18. 

Stamm, William S., Chief Engineer U. S, N., 
aged 71, June 27. 

Stone, Frederick D., Chairman of the H's- 
torical Society of Pennsylvania, aged 56, Au- 
gust 12. 

Stone, James N., former President of the Phila- 
delphia County Insurance Company, aged 81, 
March 30. 

Stuart, George, Professor of Latin and Litera- 
ture in Boys' High School, aged 65, March 16. 

Stumpf. Max, editor of the Son tags Journal, 
aged 42, February 28. 

Toner, Monsignor, P. J., Catholic priest, aged 
60, September 11. 

Traguair, James, merchant and formerly Presi- 
dent of the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, aged 88, December 12. 

Urban, Jacob, resident of the Lutheran Home 
for the Aged, aged 102 years, 10 months and 10 
days, June 15. 

Van Dusen, Joseph B , of Van Dusen Bro. & 
Co., coal shippers, aged 82, May 2. 

Wallace, David, President of the Manayunk 
National Bank — at different times he served in the 
State House of Representatives, Board of Educa- 
tion and Common Council — aged 75, Julv 18. 

Walsh, Philip J. Jr., son of late Philip J. 
Walsh, aged 27, October 31. 

Welden, Rev. Christian F., D. D., pastor em- 
eritus of St. Peter's German Lutheran Church, 
aged 85, October 2. 

Welsh, Henry D., director of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad and business man, aged 72, December 
19, at Wissahickon Heights. 

Wharton, John, member of State House of 
Representatives, aged 74, December 10. 

Whitecar, Rev Charles Pitman, Methodist 
clergyman, aged 69, October 9. 

Woods, Rev. Dr. Byron A., pastor of Gethse- 
mane Baptist Church, aged 46, at Hamilton, 
N. Y., September 3. 

Wormley, Theodore G., professor, chemist 
and toxicologist, aged 71, January 3. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



73 



GENERAL CHRONOLOGY. 

[From December i, 1896, to December 1, 1897.] 

1896. — December 1. General Porfirio Diaz 
inaugurated President of Mexico for the fifth 
time. 

December 23. President Cleveland recognizes 
the Greater Republic of Central America, con- 
sisting of Honduras, Nicaragua and Salvador. 

1897. — January n. General arbitration treaty 
between Great Britain and the United States 
signed by representatives of the two Powers. It 
was subsequently rejected by the Senate by a 
vote of 43 for to 26 against. 

February 2. State Capitol at Harrisburg de- 
stroyed by fire ; the most valuable of the public 
records were saved. Loss, $1,000,000. 

February 4. The Queen Regent of Spain signs 
a decree for Cuban reforms. 

February 11. Greece announces her intention 
to interfere by force in Crete. Turkey appeals to 
the Powers. 

March 2. Diplomatic relations between Eng- 
land and Venezuela renewed. 

March 4. William McKinley inaugurated as 
President of the United States and Garret A. 
Hobart as Vice-President. 

March 7. Terrible storm on the Atlantic coast. 
The steamship Ville de St. Nazaire, of the French 
line, founders off Cape Hatteras, and all but four 
of the eighty-two persons on board perish. 

March 9. Messrs. J. P. Morgan & Co. secure 
control of the Lehigh Valley Railroad. 

March 10. A decree issued for the abolition 
of slavery in the Niger country to go into effect 
on the anniversary of the completion of the 
sixtieth year of Queen Victoria's reign. 

March n. Japan adopts the gold standard. 

April 6. The Sultan of Zanzibar issues a de- 
cree abolishing slavery. 

April 7. Congress appropriates $2,000,000 for 
the relief of sufferers by great floods in the Mis- 
sissippi Valley, covering 16,000 square miles of 
territory. 

April 9. Peru suspends silver coinage and pro- 
hibits the importation of silver coins. 

April 27. President McKinley, his Cabinet, 
and many other distinguished persons, attend 
the imposing ceremonies connected with the dedi- 
cation of the tomb of General Grant at River- 
side, New York City. 

May 1. Twenty-six Anarchists sentenced to 
death in Barcelona for committing a bomb out- 
rage in June, 1896. 

— The Tennessee Centennial Exposition suc- 
cessfully opened. 

May 4. At a fire in a Parisian Charity Bazaar 
more than 150 persons perished. 

May 5. Governor Black signs the charter of 
Greater New York. 

May 17. The Senate unanimously passed a 
resolution appropriating $50,000 for the aid of 
suffering Americans in Cuba. The House con- 
curred May 20, and the money was put at the 
disposals of American consuls. 

— Elverton R. Chapman, convicted of con- 
tempt in the Senate sugar trust investigation, is 
sent to the District of Columbia jail. 

May 24. Demolition of the old "Tombs" 
prison in New York begun. 

May 27. Henry O. Havemeyer acquitted of con- 
tempt of the Senate committee investigating the 
sugar scandal. John E. Searles also acquitted. 



June 4. A negro prisoner lynched at Urbana, 
Ohio. Several members of the mob killed or 
wounded by the militia supporting the sheriff. 

June 14. Final ratifications of the boundary 
arbitration treaty between Great Britain and 
Venezuela exchanged at Washington. 

June 16. A treaty for the annexation of the 
republic of Hawaii to the United States signed 
at Washington and sent to the Senate by Presi- 
dent McKinley. Action was deferred until the 
regular session. 

June 20. Tehuantepec, Mexico, destroyed by 
an earthquake. 

June 22. Celebration of Queen Victoria's Dia- 
mond Jubilee throughout the British Empire. 

June 24. A treaty for the provisional union 
of the Central American republics signed. 

July 22. Rear Admiral John G. Walker, U. 
S. N. ; Captain Oberlin M. Carter, Corps of En- 
gineers U. S. A., and Professor Lewis M. Houpt, 
of Pennsylvania, appointed members of the Nic- 
aragua Canal Commision. 

July 24. The new Tariff law goes into effect. 

August 6. An explosion in a cartridge depot 
at Rustchuck, Bulgaria, kills 130 persons, mostly 
children, and injures 170 others. 

August 9. The Canadian Government decides 
to appoint an administrator for the Yukon gold 
region, to reduce from 500 feet to 100 feet the 
width of claims running along a stream, and to 
establish a court for the administration of civil 
and criminal justice in the gold district. 

August 15. Prince Henri of Orleans and the 
Count of Turin fight a duel with swords at Paris 
on account of Prince Henri's criticism of Italian 
soldiers. The Prince is wounded, but not seri- 
ously. 

August 18. Cash wheat passes the dollar mark 
in New York. 

August 19. The business of Steinway & Sons, 
piano manufacturers, sold to an English syndi- 
cate for $5,000,000. 

August 20. Cash wheat reaches $t.o6 in New 
York City; September wheat passes the dollar 
mark : wheat is sold for $1 in Minneapolis. 

August 25. President Borda, of Uruguay, as- 
sassinated in Montevideo. 

August 28. The horse Star Pointer paces a 
mile in 1.59%! at Readville, Mass., breaking the 
world's record. 

September 2. Gen. Ignacio Andrade elected 
President of Venezuela. 

September 6. The existence of yellow fever 
in Ocean Springs, Miss., and New Orleans, La., 
officially announced. The disease spread through 
the South and greatly interfered with business, 
but was of a mild type. 

September 10. In a railroad collision near 
Newcastle, Colorado, about thirty persons were 
killed. 

— Deputy sheriffs fire into a crowd of striking 
miners at Lattimer, Pa., killing more than twenty 
and wounding forty others. 

September n. Martial law declared in and 
about Hazleton, Pa., but no outbreak occuired. 

— Costa Rica adopts the gold standard. 
September 16. Attempted assassination of 

President Diaz, of Mexico. His assailant 
lynched. 

September 18. Preliminary treaty of peace 
between Turkey and Greece signed. 

September 24. Great Britain notifies the 
United States that she declines to be a party to 



■— ■■ 



74 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



the proposed seals-fisheries conference in Wash- 
ington if Japan and Russia participate. A sep- 
arate conference was arranged between Great 
Britain, Canada, and the United States. 

— Ex-Chief of Police Velasquez, of the City 
of Mexico, awaiting trial for the murder of Ar- 
royo, the assailant of President Diaz, committed 
suicide. 

September 26. The North German Lloyd 
steamship Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse completed 
the run from Southampton to New York in 5 
days, 22 hours, 35 minutes. 

October 2. Senor Sagasta summoned to form 
a new Spanish Ministry. 

< )ctober 6. Evangelina Cosio y Cisneros, the 
Cuban girl imprisoned in Havana on the charge 
of conspiracy, escaped by the aid of a newspaper 
reporter. She was adopted by Mrs. John -A. 
Logan. 

October 7. The Swiss General Council passed 
a bill providing for the purchase of five lines of 
railroad by the Government for 32,000,000. 

October 9. General Weyler recalled from 
Cuba and General Ramos Blanco appointed to 
take his place. 

October 13. Professor Maertens, distinguished 
Russian jurist, selected as umpire of the Anglo- 
Venezuelan Arbitration Commission. 

October 20. The reply of the British Gov- 
ernment to the proposals of the American Bi- 
metallic Commission sent to Ambassador Hay 
by Lord Salisbury. The Premier says the gov- 
ernment of Great Britain is not able to reopen 
the India mints at present. 

October 21. The President offered the con- 
sulate at Matanzas, Cuba, to State Senator Say- 
lor, of Montgomery County, Pa., and he ac- 
cepted the office. 

October 23. The International Fur Seal Con- 
ference met and organized in Washington, D. 
C, ex-Secretary of State Foster being elected 
chairman. Japan, Russia and the United States 
were represented by delegates. 

October 24. A Buffalo express train, east 
bound, on the New York Central Railroad, 
plunged into the Hudson River, ihree miles 
below Garrisons, at dawn, owing, it is supposed, 
to the widening of the tracks and the collapse 
of the retaining wall. The engine and six cars 
were submerged, and nineteen of the sleeping 
passengers were drowned without hope of 
escape. 

October 25. The hurricane from the South 
was the cause of exceptionally high tides, the 
loss of life and heavy destruction to shipping 
along the Atlantic coast from Hatteras to Far 
Rockaway Beach. But three vessels entered 
New York harbor and none came up Delaware 
Bay beyond the Breakwater. Railroad traffic 
to the lower Jersey seacoast resorts greatly in- 
terrupted, there being no train service to Atlan- 
tic City or the Five- and Seven-Mile Beaches. 

October 27. The deadlock in the Austrian 
Reichsrath, owing to the German obstruction, 
created a critical situation, and in some quar- 
ters a suspension of the Austrian Constitution 
is believed possible. In the Lower House of 
the Hungarian Parliament Premier Banffy said 
that should the " Austrian constitutional sys- 
tem break down — which God forbid — the Hun- 
garian Government would be obliged to act 
independently regarding the joint questions of 
the customs and commercial treaty between 



Austria and Hungary and of the charter and 
privileges of the Austro-Hungarian banks." It 
is believed that this statement points to the 
possibility of an Absolutist government in 
Austria. 

October 28. Baron Von Bulow, recently Ger- 
man Ambassador at Rome, appointed Minister 
for Foreign Affairs. 

— A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Grover 
Cleveland, at Princeton. 

— The Grand Jury at Wilkesbarre returned 
fifty-five indictments against Sheriff Martin and 
his deputies, charging them with murder and 
felonious wounding in the shooting of miners at 
Lattimer. 

October 29. Henry George, the candidate of 
the Thomas Jefferson Democracy for Mayor of 
Greater New York, died at the Union Square 
Hotel, New York, where he had been stopping 
during the campaign. He spoke at four places 
the night before, and retired worn out, but not 
showing any signs of collapse. During the night 
he was stricken with apoplexy, and soon passed 
into unconsciousness and death. His son, Henry 
George, Jr., was nominated by the Jefferson 
Democracy to take hi* father's place on the 
ticket. 

— Coroner Lippincott, of Camden, held an 
inquest in the case of Mrs. Emma Zane, one of 
the women murdered in that city on October 12. 
The jury returned a verdict that she came to her 
death at the hands of a person or persons un- 
known to the jury. Eli Shaw, the grandson, 
accused of the murder, was held to await the 
action of the Grand Jury. 

— Sempagha Pass was captured by the British 
forces under General Sir William Lockhart. 

October 31. The body of Henry George lay 
in state in the Grand Central Palace, in New 
York, and was viewed by thousands of people. 
Other thousands were unable to get into the 
building. 

November 1. The new Congressional Library 
at Washington was opened to the public. There 
were no ceremonies of any kind. 

— Final services over the body of Henry 
George were held at the home at Fort Hamilton. 
Interment was made at Greenwood Cemetery. 

— The Union Pacific Railroad was sold in 
Omaha, Neb., to the Reorganization Committee 
for $57,564,932.76. 

— The British forces captured Arhanga Pass. 
Only slight opposition was offered by the tribes- 
men. 

— The experts representing the United States, 
Great Britain and Canada had their first meet- 
ing at the State Department to consider the seal 
question. 

November 2. The Union Pacific first mort- 
gage, by which the construction bonds were se- 
cured, was sold by the Master in Chancery, at 
Omaha, to the Reorganization Committee for 
$50,637,475. There was but one bid. 

November 3. The five Powers of the Latin 
Union signed a convention to increase the number 
of small silver coins by a franc per head of their 
population, using the existing 5-franc pieces to 
supply the necessary silver. 

November 5. An attempt was made to assas- 
sinate President Moraes, of Brazil. The Presi- 
dent's brother was severely wounded while 
shielding the Chief Executive from a soldier's 
dagger. General Bethencourt, Minister of War, 




who was of the President's party, was shot and 
killed. 

November 8. The Emperor of China and the 
Board of Revenue approved a memorial pre- 
sented in favor of establishing a gold standard 
and prohibiting the export of gold. 

— The Georgia House of Representatives, by 
a vote of 91 to 3, passed a bill prohibiting match 
or prize games of football, or games of football 
where admission fees are charged. 

November 10. Mrs. Augusta Nack appeared 
as a witness for the State in the trial of Martin 
Thorn, at Long Island City, for the murder of 
William Guldensuppe. She testified that she 
lured Guldensuppe to Woodside Cottage, where 
he was killed by Thorn. 

— The Supreme Court at Pittsburg, dismissed 
the bills in equity filed by the architects whose 
designs were rejected by the State Capitol Com- 
mission, thus defeating the efforts to set aside 
the Commission's award. 

November 15. — The dedication of the Penn- 
sylvania monuments on the battle-field of Chat- 
tanooga took place, the chief ceremony being 
held at Orchard Knob. 

— M. Scheurer-Kestner, one of the Vice-Presi- 
dents of the French Senate, asserts that oh 
October 30 he presented to the French Minister 
of War, General Bellot, documents proving the 
innocence of Alfred Dreyfus, the former captain 
of artillery, now undergoing sentence of impris- 
onment for life for selling important French mili- 
tary plans to agents of a foreign Power. 

— Marines landed from the German cruiser 
division at Kiaochan Bay, China, nearest port 
to Yen-Chu-Fu, where the German missionaries 
were recently murdered, to force the Chinese 
Government to completely satisfy the demands of 
Germany. They assaulted and captured the fort. 

— The Turkish Government agreed to dismiss 
the officials responsible for the recent indignities 
offered to the Austrian merchant, Brazzafoli, and 
to salute the Austrian flag. 

November 16. — The seal experts made a unani- 
mous report, and the diplomatic representatives 
reached an understanding by which they hope 
at a later date to bring about a settlement of all 
the questions. No final action was taken as to 
the suspension of pelagic sealing. 

November 18. The Committee on Organiza- 
tion of the Citizens' Union of New York decided 
to continue the organization as a permanent 
political force in the city. The enrolled mem- 
bership of the Union is 32,661. The expendi- 
tures during the recent campaign were $33,472. 

November 19. A fire in London destroyed 
nearly one hundred and fifty warehouses. The 
loss exceeded $25,000,000. For four hours and 
a half the flames had their own way, and it was 
only after more than a hundred engines had 
worked an hour that the fire was gotten under 
control. 

— The Czar approved the appointment of 
Professor F. de Martens, of the Ministry for 
Foreign Affairs, as aibitrator in the Anglo- Ven- 
ezuelan boundary dispute. 

November 21. A fire in Melbourne, Austra- 
lia, destroyed a number of business houses and 
caused a loss estimated at $5,000,000. 

November 22. The Chief Justice of the United 
States Court of Claims confirmed the report of 
the referee in the case of the Western Union 
Telegraph Company against the United States, 



and entered judgment in favor of the Company 
for $258,869. The case arose out of a dispute 
between the Government and the Company, Mr. 
Wanamaker, the then Postmaster-General, 
making a sweeping reduction in Government 
rates, notwithstanding the Telegraph Company's 
protests. 

— The five* members of the Competitor expe- 
dition, recently released from imprisonment in 
the Cabanas, at Havana, arrived at New York. 

November 23. General Weyler arrived at 
Barcelona, and it is said was acclaimed by about 
20,000 people. The official report of his landing 
differs from the independent reports saying that 
the crowd was small ; that little enthusiasm was 
manifested ; that there were no delegations of 
students or politicians, and that no windows 
were decorated. 

November 24. There was a disgraceful scene 
in the lower House of the Austrian Reichsrath. 
Deputies engaged in a fist fight. One was stab- 
bed in the hand ; another had his collar-bone 
broken ; a third received a severe scalp wound. 
Herr Wolff declared that he would bring his re- 
volver to the next sitting. 

November 25. The nag of Austria was duly 
[ saluted at Mersina by Turkish guns, with all the 
I ceremonial demanded by the Government of 
Austria. 

November 27. The revenue cutter Bear sailed 
from Seattle for Alaska to rescue the ice-bound 
whalers in the Arctic Ocean. 

— Emperor Franeis-Joseph returned to Vienna 
from Wallsee. He was informed that the city 
was on the brink of revolution. Troops stood in 
readiness all night, the palace being strongly 
guarded. 

November 28. Members of the Austrian Min- 
istry resigned. Emperor Francis-Joseph in- 
trusted Baron Gautsch with the task of forming 
a new Cabinet. The Emperor adjourned the 
Reichsrath until further orders. 

November 29. A gale which swept the Eng- 
lish coasts was one of the worst in recent years. 
Many lives were lost and a large number of 
vessels foundered, in most cases, it is feared, 
with all on board. Scarcely a coast town es- 
caped without damage. Phenomenally high 
tides reported in many localities, several town- 
ships being partly submerged. 

— The steamer Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, 
which left New York November 23, arrived at 
Southampton, breaking the record for the high- 
est average speGd across the ocean, her speed 
per hour averaging 22.35 knots. The distance 
covered was 3065 knots, and the passage lasted 
137 hours, 8 Hiinutes, or 5 days, 17 hours, 8 
minutes, from which must be deducted twenty- 
five minutes in standing by a burning ship. 

— The second trial of Adolph L. Luetgert, for 
the murder of his wifs, was begun in Chicago. 

November 30. Hayti sent a reply to Ger- 
many's demand in the Lueder case, expressing a 
willingness to negotiate a settlement of the entire 
case at Berlin, thus removing it from the hands 
of the objectionable German official now in 
Hayti. 

— Martin Thorn was found guilty of -murder 
in the first degree at Long Island City. A motion 
for a new trial was denied, and he was" sentenced 
to be electrocuted. On being returned to his cell 
Thorn admitted that he killed Guldensuppe and 
cut up the body. 



76 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



GENERAL NECROLOGY. 

[From December i, 1896, to December 1, 1897.] 

Adams, William T. ("Oliver Optic"), aged 75, 
March 27. 

Barnato, Barney, South African speculator, 
June 14. 

Beasley, Mercer, Chief Justice of New Jersey, 
aged 82, February 19. 

Beecher, Mrs. Henry Ward, aged 85, March 8. 

Boycott, Captain, of County Mayo, Ireland, 
originator of the Boycott, aged 55, June 20. 

Brooke, Charles W., criminal lawyer of New 
York, aged 60, February 7. 

Cameron, Angus, ex-U. S. Senator from Wis- 
consin, aged 71, March 30. 

Canovas del Castillo, Premier of Spain, aged 
69, assassinated August 8. 

Clark, Alvan Graham, maker of telescope 
lenses and astronomer, June 9. 

Coke, Richard, ex-U. S. Senator from Texas, 
aged 68, May 14. 

Dana, Charles Anderson, editor of the Neiv 
York Sun, aged 78, October 17. 

De Trobriand, Philip Regis D. deK., General 
in the Union army, aged 81, July 15. 

Dixon, Nathan Fellows, ex-United States 
Senator, aged 50, at Westerly, R. I., November 8. 

Dolph, Joseph N., ex-U. S. Senator from Ore- 
gon, aged 61, March 10. 

Doolittle, James Rood, ex-U. S. Senator from 
Wisconsin, aged 82, July 27. 

Dow, Neal, prohibitionist, of Maine, aged 93, 
October 2. 

Dresler, Dr. Henry, Emeritus Professor of 
Latin and Greek in Columbia University, aged 
79, at New York, November 30. 

Drew, Mrs. John, distinguished actress, aged 
77, August 31. 

Earle, Joseph H., U. S. Senator from South 
Carolina, May 20. 

Fellows, John R., District Attorney of New 
York, aged 64, December 7. 

Francis, John M., ex-Minister of the United 
States to Austria, Greece and Portugal, aged 74, 
June 18. 

George, Henry, author of single-tax theory, 
etc.. and candidate for Mayor of Greater New 
York, at New York, October 29. 

George, James Z., U. S. Senator from Missis- 
sippi, aged 71, August 14. 

Gilbert, Sir John, President of the Royal 
(English) Society of Painters in Water Colors, 
aged 80, October 6. 

Gravele, Jean Francois, known as "Blondin, 
the tight-rope walker," aged 74, February 22. 

Greatorex, Eliza, American artist, February 9. 

Harris, Isham Green, ex-U. S. Senator from 
Tennessee, aged 79, July 8. 

Haskell, James R., colonel and inventor of 
multi-charge gun, aged 65, August 15. 

Havemeyer, Theodore A., sugar refiner, aged 
58, April 26. 

Hermann, Alexander, magician, aged 52, De- 
cember 17 

Holden, Sir Isaac, English inventor, aged 90, 
August i2. 

Holman, William Steele, ex-Representative 
from Indiana, aged 74, April 22. 

Houghton, Rev. Dr. George H., rector of the 
Church of the Transfiguration l" The Little 
Church Around the Corner"), aged 77, at New 
York, November 17. 



Hungerford. Mrs. Margaret Hamilton, novel- 
ist, " the Duchess," January 23. 

Ingelow, Jean, distinguished novelist and poet, 
aged 77, July 19. 

Jones, Charles W., ex-United States Senator 
from Florida, aged 63, October 12. 

Kilgore, Constantine Buckley, former repre- 
sentative in Congress from Texas, aged 62, Sep- 
tember 23. 

King, Horatio, ex-Postmaster-General, aged 
86, May 20. 

Kneipp, Father Sebastian, originator of a water 
cure, aged 76, June 17. 

Langston, John M., ex-Congressman (colored), 
formerly U. S. Minister to Hayti, at Washing- 
ton, November 14. 

Lee, Samuel Phillips, Rear Admiral U. S. N., 
retired, aged 85, June 5. 

Maretzek, Max, musician and operatic mana- 
ger, aged 76, May 14. 

McMillan, Samuel J. R., ex-United States 
Senator from Minnesota, aged 71, October 3. 

McPherson, John Roderick, ex-United States 
Senator from New Jersey, aged 64, October 8. 

Meade. Richard W., Rear Admiral U. S. N., 
retired, aged 59, May 4. 

Meilhac, Henri, French dramatic author, aged 
65, July 6. 

Mundella, Anthony J., member of British Par- 
liament, " the seamen's friend," aged 72, July 21. 

Oliphant, Margaret, author, aged 69, June 25. 

Paddock, Algernon Sydney, ex-United States 
Senator from Nebraska, aged 67, October 17. 

Peyton, Jesse E., " the father of centennials," 
aged 81, April 28. 

Picknell, William Lamb, American artist, aged 
44, August 8. 

Pitman, Sir Isaac, inventor of a system of 
stenography, aged 84, January 22. 

Ponder, James, ex-Governor of Delaware, at 
Milton, Delaware, November 5. 

Pullman, George M., palace car manufacturer, 
aged 66, October 19. 

Read, Gen. John Meredith, American diplo- 
matist, aged 60, December 27. 

Robeson, George Maxwell, Secretary of the 
Navy under President Grant, aged 68, Septem- 
ber 27. 

Robertson, Thomas James, ex-States United 
Senator of South Carolina, aged 74, October 13. 

Salvini, Alexander, actor, aged 35, Decem- 
ber 15. 

Seebach, Marie, eminent German actress, aged 
63, August 2. 

Shelby, Gen. J. O., Confederate officer, Feb- 
ruary 13. 

Truesdell, Hon. Harry C, Chief Justice of 
Arizona, at Minneapolis, October 28. 

Tucker, John Randolph, Virginia lawyer, aged 
73, February 13. 

Voorhees, Daniel W., ex-U. S. Senator from 
Indiana, aged 70, April 10. 

Walker, Gen. Francis A., President of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, aged 56, 
January 5. 

Willis, Albert Sydney, U. S. Minister to 
Hawaii, aged 55, January 6. 

Wingate, George E., Commander U. S. N., 
aged 60, June 8. 

Wise, Gen. Peyton, of Virginia, March 29. 

Worden, John Lorrimer, Rear Admiral 
U. S. N., retired, commander of the Monitor in 
its fight with the Merrimac, aged 79, October 18. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



77 



ELECTORAL AND POPULAR VOTE OF 1892 AND 1896. 



ELECTORAL VOTE. 



STATES 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida .... 

Georgia.... 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana.... 

Iowa 

Kansas.... 
Kentucky 
Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri... 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New York 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 
South Carolina 
South Dakota, 
Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming, 



Plurality 




POPULAR VOTE. 



1892. 



C . 

A B 





138,138 

87,834 

118,151 



82,595 
i8, 57 s 

36,134 
129,361 
2 
426,294 
262,817 
196,458 



175,461 

87,622 

48,044 

113,866 

176,813 

202,296 

100,579 

40,237 

268,039 

17,581 

24,943 

7 J 4 

42,081 

171,042 

654,908 
I33, 9 8 



404,"3 

14,243 

452,264 

24,336 

54,698 

8,907 

136,477 
239,148 



16,325 

163,977 

29,844 

84,435 

!77,355 



5,553,8o8 
372,997 



d^ 1 



ffi 



9,197 

46,974 

118,027 

38,620 
77,025 
18,077 



48,305 

8,599 
399,288 

253,9 2 9 
219,688 

156,134 

i35,44i 

25,332 

62,871 

92,736 
202,814 
222,708 
122,736 
1,406 
226,824 

18,851 

87,213 
2,811 

45,658 
156,068 

609,459 
100,565 

I7,5i9 
405,187 
35,oo2 
516,011 
26,975 
13,384 
34,825 

99,973 
77.475 



37,992 

H3, 2 55 

36,460 

80,252 

170,791 

8,454 



u 

V . 

> a 

rt o 



85,181 
II,8 3 I 

25,3" 

53.584 

805 

13 

4,793 
42,939 
10,520 
20,685 
22,208 
20,568 
163,111 
23,500 
1,232 

2,381 

796 

3,210 

19,829 

29,279 
10,256 

41,183 

7,334 
82,256 

7,264 
292 

969 

16,429 

44,732 
17,667 
14,818 
35,8i3 

8,7i4 
228 

2,410 
26,382 
23,622 
99.638 



43 
12,274 

I9.054 
4,166 

9,909 
7,722 



5,180,911 1,035,572 



1896. 






pq 



i3 I - 2I 9 
110,103 
142,926 
161,269 

56,740. 

16,671 

30,160 

94, 2 32 

23,192 

466,703 

305,771 
223,741 
171,614 
217,890 

77,096 

32,217 

104,745 

102,655 

237, 2 5i 
139,626 

63,253 
363,750 

4i,275 

115,625 

8,348 

21,096 

133,675 

543,839 
174,488 

18,175 
474,882 

46,739 
427,127 

14,459 
58,801 

45,275 
163,651 
368,289 

64,851 

9,789 

155,988 

51,647 

90,000 

165,528 

10,389 



ti 

"5 d 

*X 



I 



54,737 

37,5i2j 
146,216 

26,271 
110,297 

20,367 

",3 8 9 
00,091 

6,3 2 4 
607,130 

323, 7*9 
289,293 

159.345 
218,171 
22,012 
80,421 
136,978 
267,787 

293,3 2 7 
193,501 

3,849 

304,500 

10,100 

102,565 

1,937 

55,67i 

221,367 

795,27! 
155,222 

23,325 

525,99! 

48,711 
728,300 

37,437 

9,3*3 
45,no 

148,773 
162,506 

13,461 

49,456 
135,361 

39,122 
102,000 
268,135 

10,073 



6,465,750 7,062,444 
596/94 



-I 

v V 

"3 2 

Ph o 

O 



6,464 



4,336 

967 

1,778 

2,708 

6,39° 
2,145 

4,5i9 
1,209 

5, "4 
1,810 

1,864 

2,507 
11,510 

6,93° 
3,202 

1,021 

5,ooo 

2,797 



6,373 
18,829 



i,857 

977 
11,000 

1,166 

824 

2,500 

i,95i 
5030 

1,266 

2,216 

1450 

4,455 



131,165 



In some of the States Bryan and Watson received many votes. They have been added to the 
vote for Bryan and Sewall in the above table, so that the vote for Bryan represents the combined 
vote of Democrats and Middle-of-the Road Populists. In Texas the Bryan and Sewall vote was 
288,323; the Bryan and Watson, 79,966; total, 368,289; and the vote for McKinley, 162,506. In 
the Populist States of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming women voted, almost if not quite doubling the 
majority for Bryan in those States. The total Prohibition vote is estimated to have been between 
80,000 and 100,000, being highest in Pennsylvania. The Socialist vote was insignificant — being 
smaller than in 1892. Bryan gained 16 per cent, on Cleveland's vote in 1892 ; but McKinley gained 
36 per cent, on the vote for Harrison in the same year. The vote was even more decisive than may 
appear on casual inspection. If every close State had gone for Bryan, McKinley would have 
been elected with four electoral votes to spare. 



78 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



PENNSYLVANIA'S VOTE. 

Official Returns of the Election November 2, 1897. 



Counties. 



Adams 

Alleghany 

Armstrong 

Beaver 

Bedford 

Berks 

Blair 

Bradford 

Bucks 

Butler 

Cambria 

Cameron 

Carbon 

Centre 

Chester 

Clarion 

Clearfield 

Clinton 

Columbia 

Crawford 

Cumberland 

Dauphin 

Delaware 

Elk 

Erie 

Fayette 

Forest 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Greene 

Huntingdon 

Indiana 

Jefferson , 

Juniata , 

Lackawanna 

Lancaster 

Lawrence , 

Lebanon 

Lehigh 

Luzerne 

Lycoming 

McKean 

Mercer 

Mifflin 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Montour 

Northampton 

Northumberland. 

Perry 

Philadelphia 

Pike.. 

Potter 

Schuylkill 

Snyder 

Somerset 

Sullivan 

Susquehanna 

Tioga 

Union 

Venango 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

Westmoreland . . 

Wyoming 

York 



Totals. 



Auditor-General. 



Pluralities 144,311 



v 



3 . 

« a. 

U v 

uff! 



2,660 
32,205 
4,170 
4.073 
3.094 
5.339 
5,118 

3.574 
6,499 
3.004 
6,442 
502 
2.635 
2.576 
6,493 
1,819 

4.444 
1,681 
1,976 
6.553 
4.394 
7.671 
6.137 
1.553 
7. 191 
7,620 

495 

3o43 

630 

i,oi6 

2,688 

3.513 

2,946 

1,210 

12,465 

10.357 

3,161 

3,861 

6,230 

13,287 

2,932 

3.628 

4,089 

1,415 

860 

9,061 

873 
5.676 

4.570 

2,219 

116,171 

231 

1,829 

10,290 

1,620 

2,949 
718 

3.176 
3.229 
1.349 
2.573 
3.H7 
6,829 
1,292 
9.370 
1,101 
6,630 



412,652 
268,341 






2,469 
n.552 
2,893 
2.395 
2,176 

9.421 

3.069 
1,469 
5,016 

2.145 
6,142 

316 
3,202 

2,515 
2,602 

2,793 
4,235 
1,664 
3,272 
6,593 
3,970 
3,583 
1,640 
2,527 
6,026 
6,863 

270 
2,48s 

656 
2,167 

1.304 
1,202 
1,869 
1,150 

11,914 
3,690 
1,361 
1,710 
7,973 

13,442 

3.853 
2,138 

2.659 
1,023 

1,674 
6,807 

1,295 
6,684 

3,807 

1,611 

39.552 

509 

1.475 

n,o63 

661 

1,174 

827 

2,555 
9'5 
57i 
820 

1,838 

4,516 
734 

7.570 
846 

8,918 



v 

2d 

re <w 



211 

1,138 

195 

302 

247 
689 

2,133 

743 
359 
294 
842 

121 

530 
671 

1,059 
235 

1,935 
734 
934 
484 

1,127 

4,093 
627 

227 

645 

478 

=51 

655 

64 

54 

1,115 

485 
816 
652 

3,319 

1,178 

469 

1,029 

533 

2,320 

2,978 

1,155 

485 

299 

171 

1,339 
288 
823 

2,017 
500 

6,447 
105 
230 

1,017 
216 
218 
150 

563 
740 

372 
938 
709 
407 

550 

700 

330 

1,141 



268,341 58,876 



en 



8 

1,148 

21 

17 

9 
117 

72 

24 

28 

13 
99 

1 

27 

3 

13 

5 
1 01 

13 
10 
11 
12 
15 
15 
8 

44 
29 
1 
2 
I 
2 
8 

30 

11 

1 

12s 

26 

11 

7 

41 

169 

182 

17 

29 

1 

4 
70 



34 

348 

I 

1,506 

9 

9 

130 

1 

9 



10 
8 

4 
8 

7 

56 

14 

252 

2 
36 



X*" 



3 

5i 

6 

4 
7 
6 
2 
12 

5 

80 
6 

1 
7 



29 
5 
9 
2 

3 
46 

2 

4 
49 

2 

23 
10 

2 
I 



2 
7 
7 

105 
2 
4 
9 



7 
3 
3 
1 

40 
9 

19 



4 
19 
14 

6 

19 

1 

9 
21 



3 

60 

7 
6 

17 
9 
15 
20 
12 

3 

1 



5,048 ! 842 



State Treasurer. 



E~ 

o a 
% « 



2,380 
27,036 
4,026 
3,851 
2,837 
4,992 
3,429 
3,439 
6,224 
2,851 
5.223 
469 
2,464 
2,204 
5,561 
1.743 
3.674 
1.272 
1,664 
6,474 
3.503 
6,107 

5.495 
1,388 
7,118 
7.468 

427 
3,074 

576 
1,007 
2,016 
3,269 
2,623 

939 
11,813 

9.707 
2,980 
3.203 
6,090 
11,190 
2,245 

3. no 

3.835 

1,086 

851 

8,039 

652 
5.381 
3.537 

1,801 

108,000 

224 

1,793 
9,251 

1,474 
2,873 
669 
3,087 
2,907 
1,152 
2,413 
3,048 
6,576 
1,212 
8,876 
1,005 
5-545 



372,448 
242,731 
129,717 



c . 

O OJ 



2,296 
10,124 
2.821 
2,303 
2,050 
9,187 
2,118 

1.347 
4,910 
2,066 

5.734 
272 
2,984 
2,110 
2,187 
2,766 
3.011 
1. 173 
2,850 
6.542 
2,380 

2,139 
1,466 
2,442 
5.913 
6,696 
222 

1,973 
612 

2,148 
710 

1,189 

1,594 

711 

11,628 

3,4" 
1,279 

1,273 

7,812 

12,512 

2,391 
1,820 

2.571 
674 

1.633 

6.354 

901 

6,421 

2,406 
1,008 

37.047 

503 

i,4i5 

10,340 

504 
1,104 

769 
2,068 

75o 

261 
1,661 
1,630 
4,372 

676 
7,266 

750 
8,475 



242.73 1 



*~ 



t/2 



679 

1,393 

338 

393 

640 

1,329 

4,937 

987 

686 

389 
2,542 

214 
1,005 
1.469 
2,407 

323 
4,210 
1,708 
1,805 

603 
3,707 

7.239 
1,421 
487 
850 
784 
385 
1,677 
167 
101 

2,479 
722 

1,453 

1,404 

4.758 

2,136 

686 

2.293 
818 

5.663 
5.203 
2,114 

669 
r,oo2 

261 

2,737 
998 

1.392 

4,470 

1,569 

15,708 

117 

348 

3,044 

558 

363 

268 

702 

1,267 

928 

i,i79 

1,202 

648 

713 
1,196 

543 
2,483 



118,969 



E_! 

o 1 



5 

1,403 

19 

31 

7 
101 

S3 
32 

25 
14 
94 

2 
20 

2 
23 

4 
82 

8 

8 
15 
13 
14 
23 
18 

5i 

34 

1 

2 

2 

4 

3 

19 

8 

1 

120 

19 

15 

11 

48 

180 

136 

24 

33 

2 

26 

70 



33 
326 



1,498 

9 
6 

134 



11 

1 
12 

7 

1 

12 

12 

65 
10 

163 

3 

2£ 

5.152 



E.d 

in 55 

in 



1 

42 
6 
1 
2 
1 
3 
9 
3 
133 
4 
1 
2 



16 
4 
3 

1 
2 

28 
1 
4 

30 
2 

22 
8 



14 

5 

*5 



2 
4 
3 
3 

18 
1 
6 

11 



5 

4 

93 

2 

4 
6 



2 

27 

4 



18 
11 
12 

7 
12 



623 



a 
o 
1/) '-. 

E c 
c« 

P 



15 

8,022 

146 

300 

16 

57 

30 

34 

130 

93 

117 
2 
7 

19 
97 
3 2 
21 

3 

1 

122 

11 

51 

135 

20 

80 

98 

3 
18 

5 
8 

9 
90 

35 
12 

59 

24 

191 

5 

55 
89 

37 

32 

209 

11 

14 

231 

4 

43 

23 

5 

3,«8 



2 

38 

9 

24 

4 

7 

31 

2 

130 

62 

227 

6 

350 



254 



15.135 



The chief contest was for the office of State Treasurer, and notwithstanding the great Republican plurality, 
Beacom, the Republican candidate, was in a minority of 10,162. Swallow, the Prohibition candidate, carried ten 
counties and was second in ten others, beating the Republicans in one and the Democrats in nine. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



79 






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(Ind.) 



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Bregy. 



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Wiltbank. 



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No. 






8o 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



VOTE OF PHILADELPHIA. 

Official Return. February 16, i8g7. 



•a 



MAGISTRATES. 



I.. 
2.. 

3- 
4- 

5- 
6.. 

7- 
8.. 

9- 
io.. 

ii.. 

12.. 

i3- 
14- 
15- 
16.. 
17.. 
18.. 
19.. 
20.. 
21.. 
22.. 

23" 
24" 

25 . 
26.. 

27" 

28.. 
29.. 
30.. 

3 1 - 
3 2 - 
33- 
34- 
35- 
36.. 

37- 

38.. 



v 



6855 

2175 
1284 
1177 
1829 

544 
3606 

1859 
1010 
2712 
1 301 

1387 
2681 
2367 
6242 
1777 
1807 
3388 

6315 
4658 
3222 

4933 
1942 

4068 
4605 
373o 
3412 
2674 
4602 
3084 
4726 
3623 
4242 
2338 
J 753 
3495 
2070 

2975 



c 







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in 
>- . 


4-> 


V 


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C 
(1 


00 


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« 






p 



6831 

2153 
1277 

1647 

1 761 

516 

2982 

i860 

957 
2 795 
1268 
1376 
2673 
2358 
6261 

i75o 

1740 

3355 
6270 
4644 

3 2I 4 
4967 

1957 
4045 

4452 
3722 
3412 
2671 
4560 
3°54 
4393 
3612 

4237 
2337 
*725 
3492 
2076 
2987 



6865 
2163 
1274 
1279 

1757 
652 

3589 
1890 

966 
2722 
1278 

1377 
2672 

3378 
6267 
1888 
2166 

335i 

6312 

4671 

3207 

5 IJ 4 

1949! 

4059 

4457 

3735 

34i8 

2678' 

4587! 
3°77 

44 22 , 
3622: 

4267 

2335 
1724 
3486 
2073 
2984 



6902 
2164 

1275 
2271 
1811 

538 
3696 
1900 

979 
2711 
1281 

1375 
2680 

2379 
6257 

1745 
1794 
3320 
6264 
4637 
3 J 94 
4952 
1956 
4029 

443 1 
3745 
3415 
2668 

4554 
3121 

4385 
3607 
4206 

2334 
1720 

3485 
2059 
2983 



Total. 116460 1115287 116696(1168134347843634 



2619 

1064 

940 

1780 

479 
723 
654 
355 
178 

53i 

394 

776 

820 

772 

I59 6 

835 

1389 

1703 

1522 

1515 

973 

1594 

392 

4029 

2461 

2144 

629 

964 

1848 

1062 

818 

73° 

3°99 

852 

481 

1684 

814 

895 



a 
id 

- — 
v 



2663 
1082 

993 

1893 

512 

787 
1326 

369 
216 

529 
383 
764 
809 

755 

1574 

778 

1339 
1660 

i3!3 

1463 

967 

1268 

375 

1389 

2388 

2171 

641 

939 

1854 

1490 

792 

699 

2750 

837 
467 

1774 
781 

844 



The Prohibitionists polled 1570 votes ; the 
Nationalists, 560. 

PRESIDENTIAL SUCCESSION. 

In case of removal, death, resignation or in- 
ability of both the President and Vice-President 
of the United States, the Secretary of State, or 
if there be none, or in case of his removal, death, 
resignation or inability, then the Secretary of the 
Treasury, or if there be none, or in case of his 
removal, death, resignation or inability, then the 
Secretary of War, or if there be none, or in case 
of his removal, death, resignation or inability, 
then the Attorney-General, or if there be none, 
or in case of his removal, death, resignation or 
inability, then the Postmaster-General, or if there 
be none, or in case of his removal, death, resig- 
nation or inability, then the Secretary of the 
Navy, or if there be none, or in case of his re- 
moval, death, resignation or inability, then the 



Secretary of the Interior shall act as President 
until the disability of the President or Vice- 
President is removed or a President shall be 
elected: provided, that whenever the powers and 
duties of the office of President of the United 
States shall devolve upon any of the persons 
named herein, if Congress be not then in session, 
or if it would not meet in accordance with law 
within twenty days thereafter, it shall be the 
duty of the person upon whom said powers and 
duties shall devolve to issue a proclamation con- 
vening Congress in extraordinary session, giving 
twenty days' notice of the time of meeting. 

These provisions of the law shall only be held 
to describe and apply to such officers as shall 
have been appointed by the advice and consent 
of the Senate to the offices therein named, and 
such as are eligible to the office of President 
under the Constitution, and not under impeach- 
ment by the House of Representatives of the 
United States at the time the powers and duties 
of the office shall devolve upon them respect- 
ively. 

ELECTIONS IN 1898. 

In 1898 general elections will be held in Phila- 
delphia as follows : 

For city and ward officers on Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 15th. To be chosen: Receiver of Taxes, 
Magistrates, members of Select and Common 
Councils, School Directors and Constables. 

Last day for payment of taxes, January 15th. 

Last day for naturalization, January 15th. 

For State and county officers on Tuesday, No- 
vember 8th. To be chosen : Governor, Lieu- 
tenant Governor, Secretary of Internal Affairs, 
Judge of the Supreme Court, two Judges of the 
Orphans' Court, Recorder of Deeds, District 
Attorney, Controller, Clerk of the Court of Quar- 
ter Sessions, and Coroner. 

Last day for payment of taxes, October 8th. 

Last day for naturalization, October 8th. 
Qualifications of Electors. 

Residence. — A voter must have resided in the 
State one year, and in the election district or 
division for at least two months, before the elec- 
tion. Where a citizen previously a resident has 
removed and returned, he must have resided in 
the State six months before the election. 

Taxes. — No citizen can vote who is over twen- 
ty-two years old without having previously paid 
a State and county tax within two years, assessed 
at least two months before the election, and paid, 
at the latest, one month before the election. 

Age. — Every male citizen between twenty-one 
and twenty-two years of age, having the proper 
qualifications of residence, native birth, or claim- 
ing the naturalization of his father during his 
minority, may vote without being assessed. 

Naturalized citizens may vote if they have 
the qualifications of residence in the State and 
district and payment of taxes, and have been 
naturalized one month before the election. 

Proof of Right to Vote. — If the name is not 
on the registry of voters, the person claiming 
must make affidavit of his claims, and prove his 
right by at least one qualified voter of the district 
or division. Proof of payment of taxes is made 
by producing the tax-receipt or by affidavit that 
it has been lost, destroyed or never received. A 
naturalized citizen must produce his naturaliza- 
tion papers, unless he has been for five consecu- 
tive years a voter in the district. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



81 



FIFTY-FOURTH CONGRESS-SECOND 
SESSION. 

The Fifty-fourth Congress met for its second 
session, December 7th, 1896, but accomplished 
little. The result of the Presidential election 
was known, and the Democrats were incensed 
against the Administration. The Republicans 
were powerless in the House and the Silver men 
ruled the Senate, and both were opposed to the 
President and had the support of many Demo- 
crats. Scarcely anything was accomplished. 
The Senate debated various Cuban resolutions 
without action as well as a Nicaragua canal bill, 
which was withdrawn February 10th, and the 
arbitration treaty with Great Britain, which was 
allowed to go over to the next Congress. Both 
houses passed a bill restricting immigration by 
establishing an educational test, but it was ve- 
toed by President Cleveland. The House passed 
it over the veto, but the Senate failed to act. A 
bankruptcy bill was also discussed without re- 
sult. The total appropriations of the session as 
passed by Congress amounted to $527,591,823. 
The Indian, Agricultural, Sundry Civil and Gen- 
eral Deficiency bills failed to become laws. The 
Government's income during the administration 
of President Cleveland was about $450,000,000 
per annum and the expenses $500,000,000, mak- 
ing the shortage for four years $200,000,000, 
which was paid out of the proceeds from the sale 
of bonds from which $300,000,000 was realized. 
The bends were sold at about 7 per cent, pre- 
mium, and soon had a much higher market value. 

FIFTY-FIFTH CONGRESS. — EXTRA 
SESSION. 

The Fifty-fifth Congress assembled in extra- 
ordinary session March 15, in pursuance of a 
call issued by President McKinley urging the 
passage of a tariff bill to provide needed reve- 
nue. In the House, Speaker Reed and the other 
officers were re-elected. The Ways and Means, 
Mileage and Rules Committees were appointed, 
but the Speaker withheld the appointment of 
other committees until the close of the session. 
The Senate confirmed appointments made by 
the President, passed the Morgan resolutions 
recognizing Cuban belligerency, the Free-Home- 
stead bill, and the Nelson Bankruptcy bill. The 
appropriation bills which failed in the preceding 
Congress were passed by both Houses with an 
amendment suspending President Cleveland's 
forest reserve orders. An appropriation of 
$200,000 was made for the relief of sufferers by 
floods in the Mississippi valley, and another of 
$50,000 for the relief of distressed Americans in 
Cuba. The Tariff bill occupied the time of the 
House, which finally adopted the conference re- 
port by a vote of 185 to 118. The Senate 
adopted the same report by a vote of 40 to 30 on 
July 24th, and President McKinley immediately 
signed the bill, Congress adjourning on the same 
day. The Senate after a long discussion of the 
treaty providing for arbitration with Great 
Britain rejected it by a vote of 43 for to 26 
against — which being less than the required two- 
thirds, the treaty fell. 

Experiments in Germany and France show 
that alcohol can never be used, economically, as 
a substitute for petroleum spirits in small motors. 
The cost of work being nearly two to one in favor 
of petroleum spirits. 



GREATER NEW YORK. 

Greater New York will include quite a score 
of cities, towns and villages, ranging in popula- 
tion from a few hundreds to 2,000,000 each. Its 
population will be 3,300,000 or more on an area 
of 360 square miles. It will be second in size to 
greater London among the world's cities. This 
brings Paris into the third place. And it must 
be remembered that London was a city nearly 
two thousand years before the first white man 
set foot on Manhattan Island. New York would 
furnish space for one hundred and thirty-two 
such cities, and yet there are in it as many people 
as were in all the thirteen colonies when they de- 
clared their independence. The population of 
Greater New York, lined up shoulder to shoulder, 
would extend from New York to St. Louis, a 
thousand miles across the country, and if they 
were marched by two abreast, day and night, it 
would take three weeks before the last pair had 
passed the observer. The railroad lines within 
the borders of the city would reach from New 
York to Omaha, and the elevated lines alone 
would make a double- track connection with New 
Haven, Conn. The street lines have a capital 
of $95,000,000, and their 5000 cars make a yearly 
aggregate run of 85 ,000,000 'miles, which would 
about bridge the distance from the earth to the 
sun. They carry 480,000,000 passengers a year 
and an average of 1,300,000 a day. The steam 
roads entering the national center send cut 1000 
passenger trains every twenty'-four hours, and 
about 500,000 passengers on the average enter or 
leave the city on these roads every day r . The 
clearing-house shows checks and drafts to the 
amount of £69,000,000 a day, about half larger 
than the combined bank clearings of all the other 
cities in the nation. 

In 1626 the Dutch purchased Manhattan 
Island for $24. The surrounding country was 
not then considered worth buying. To-day the 
value of the land and buildings of the enlarged 
city is not less than $4,500,000,000. This is an 
average of $125,000 an acre and 50 cents a square 
foot for the entire 360 square miles. But there 
are sections down on lower Broadway and on 
Wall street that could not be bought for less than 
a thousand times that price. A workingman 
would need to spend the wages of twenty y T ears for 
a plot large enough to give him a decent burial. 

There was, of course, great interest taken in 
the election of the first Mayor of this great city, 
who would be in effect a dictator elected by the 
people. The Citizens' Union, organized for the 
purpose, nominated Seth B. Low for Mayor, the 
intention being to have him indorsed by the Re- 
publicans. Boss Piatt, however, would have 
nothing to do with Low and nominated Gen. 
Benj. F. Tracy as the Republican candidate. 
Tammany (Croker) nominated Judge Robert A. 
Van Wyck, but a large party ot Democrats put 
Henry George in the field as a Bryan Democrat, 
opposed to Boss rule. Just before the election 
Henry George dted suddenly and his son was 
nominated in his place, but failed to poll even a 
tithe of the votes pledged to his lather. The result 
was the election of Croker's man — Van Wyck, 
the vote being : Van Wyck, 228,686 ; Low, 148,- 
480; Tracy, 101,623 ; George, 19,827. Tammany 
elected 26 Councilmen, the Citizens' Union 2. 
The Board of Aldermen will stand : Tammany 
48, Republicans 2, Citizens' Union 2, Republicans 
and Citizens' Union 8. 



82 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



THE ARBITRATION TREATY. 

When the Venezuelan incident was arousing 
both this country and England, Mr. Bayard, 
Ambassadorof the United States to Great Britain, 
officially suggested to Lord Salisbury, Prime 
Minister of England, that he empower the Brit- 
ish Ambassador at Washington to enter into cor- 
respondence with the Secretary of State in order 
to reach a well-defined agreement between the 
two countries as a basis of negotiation to consti- 
tute a tribunal for the arbitration of the Vene- 
zuelan boundary dispute. Acting under this 
suggestion, on March 5, 1896, Sir Julian Paunce- 
fote suggested the heads of a treaty of arbitra- 
tion between the United States and Great Britain, 
which, however, contained no reference to the 
Venezuelan dispute. Owing to the firm stand 
of the United States, and the appointment by 
President Cleveland of a Venezuelan Commis- 
sion, Great Britain finally decided to submit the 
dispute with Venezuela to arbitration. The 
original treaty as suggested by Sir Pauncefote 
was arranged, and on January 11, 1897, the 
treaty was signed at Washington by Sir Julian 
Pauncefote for Great Britain and Richard Olney 
for the United States. The treaty was then sub- 
mitted to the Senate of the United States for 
confirmation by President Cleveland on the same 
day. 

It was referred to the Committee on Foreign 
Relations, which was composed of Senators Sher- 
man, chairman, Davis, Frye, Lodge, Cullom 
and Cameron, Republicans, and Gray, Morgan, 
Mills, Turpie and Daniel, Democrats. This 
committee reported the treaty to the Senate on 
February 1 considerably amended. The Senate 
began discussion of the treaty on February 9 in 
executive session. 

The treaty in its general outlines may be 
summed up as follows : It provides for the arbi- 
tration of all differences between the contracting 
parties which have not been settled by diplo- 
matic negotiations. Matters involving claims 
of less than $500,000 are to be settled by an 
arbitration board composed of " a jurist of re- 
pute " selected by each of the contracting par- 
ties and an umpire selected by these two jurists. 
If these two fail to agree within two months 
upon an umpire, then the Supreme Court of the 
United States and the Judiciary Committee of 
the Privy Council of Great Britain shall choose 
one, or, in the event of this failing, the umpire 
shall be appointed by the King of Sweden and 
Norway. The award of this board on cases in- 
volving less than $500,000 is to be final. 

In matters involving larger pecuniary claims, 
and all other matters except disputes in regard 
to the settlement of territorial claims, the matter 
is to go to a board as above constituted. If the 
award of this board of arbitrators is made by 
unanimous vote the award is to be final. If not 
unanimous, then either nation may within six 
months demand a review of the case. In that 
event a new tribunal is to be established, con- 
sisting of five jurists of repute, two of which 
shall be selected by the contracting parties, 
while the fifth, who is to act as umpire, is to 
be chosen by the other four. In case these four 
cannot decide on an umpire that position is 
filled by the same procedure as in the board 
spoken of above. The award of a majority of 
this board is to be final. 



Matters involving territorial claims are to be 
referred to a tribunal of six members. Three of 
these are to be named from the members of the 
United States Supreme Court, or justices of the 
Circuit Court, by the President, and three by 
the Queen from the judges of the British Supreme 
Court of Judicature or members of the Judi- 
ciary Committee of the Privy Council. An 
award made by a unanimous vote or a majority 
of five to one is to be final. If made by a 
smaller majority, either Power may within three 
months protest the award, in which case it is 
not valid. The treaty provides that in such a 
case there shall be no recourse to hostile meas- 
ures of' any description until the mediation of 
one or more friendly Powers has been invited by 
one or both of the contracting parties. 

When President McKinley was inaugurated 
the treaty, which was in the hands of the old 
Senate, had to go again to the Committee on 
Foreign Relations of the new Senate, of which 
Senator Davis was chairman. The treaty was 
promptly reported back, and debate on the 
treaty was begun on March 18. The amend- 
ments which had been made by the committee 
in the original treaty did not affect its scope, 
but only its administrative details. The princi- 
pal changes were that the Senate must approve 
of the submission of any particular question to 
arbitration by the President ; in designating arbi- 
trators, the President is not limited to the mem- 
bership of the Supreme Court, but may select 
other jurists of repute ; and, finally, the name 
of King Oscar, of Sweden and Norway, was 
omitted, leaving the question of naming an um- 
pire to be settled when the occasion should arise. 

It was soon seen that the Senate as a whole 
was unfavorably disposed towards the treaty. 
Although many amendments were made in the 
treaty in order to overcome the objections of 
the opposition, yet the treaty failed of approval. 
The question came to a vote on May 5, and the 
treaty was defeated by a vote of forty-three yeas 
to twenty-six nays, failing to get to a two-thirds 
vote in its favor. While a majority of those 
favorable were Republicans, yet the division 
was sectional. The Senators from the South 
and West opposed the treaty. The general 
feeling among the opponents of the treaty was 
that there was no necessity for it; that in case 
of dispute it would be easy to provide a special 
tribunal for its settlement. As far as the treaty 
implied an alliance of Great Britain and the 
United States, it was rather distasteful than 
otherwise to the members of the Senate. 



A monument to Shabbona, Chief of the Pot- 
tawatomies and friend of the white pioneers of 
the Illinois River Valley, is to be erected in 
Evergreen Cemetery, Morris, 111. 



The quantities of food yearly exported from 
the United States are sufficient to feed 30,000,000 
persons in Europe, from which it appears that 
American farms raise food for 100,000,000 of 
people yearly. The Western prairies are capa- 
ble of carrying double the present number of 
live stock, and of producing ten times as much 
grain as they do, so that, for at least a century 
to come, there is every probability that the ex- 
portation of food will increase with population. 
The same is true as regards cotton, the crop 
having risen 125 per cant, in twenty years. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



83 



IMPROVEMENT OF PHILADEL- 
PHIA'S WATERWAYS. 

The deepening of the channel of the Delaware 
river between Philadelphia and deep water in 
Delaware bay, and the improvement of the har- 
bor of Philadelphia, progressed at a very rapid 
rate during the working season of 1897, under 
the direction of Major C. W. Raymond, United 
States Engineer in charge. Altogether the 
amount of material dredged during the season, 
under contracts with the National Government, 
was about 7,150,000 cubic yards. In some 
months the material removed from the channel 
aggregated the large quantity of 1,000,000 cubic 
yards. At the close of the season, although the 
different projects were not entirely complete, a 
channel depth had been secured which, it is 
confidently believed, will hereafter do away with 
the complaints in the past of a difficult entrance 
to the port of Philadelphia. Deep draft vessels 
can now go to sea without being delayed waiting 
for high water in order to cross any of the shoals. 

Except at two places near the city, a channel 
with a depth of at least 26 feet at low tide has 
been secured, and there was a minimum depth 
at the two places excepted, Schooner Ledge and 
Mifflin Bar, on December 1, of 23% to 24 feet at 
mean low water. With the rise of tide of six 
feet there is sufficient water at these two places 
at high tide for vessels of the deepest draft, 
and at all other shoals there is 32 feet of water at 
high tide. During the present year (1898) it is 
expected that the project for a channel 600 feet 
wide and 26 feet deep at low tide will be com- 
pleted in every part. 

A survey for a channel 30 feet deep at low 
water, as directed by Congress, was made during 
1897. Upon the data secured an estimate of the 
cost of securing a channel of that depth will be 
made and sent to Congress through the Secretary 
of War. 

Improvement of Philadelphia Harbor. 

The end of the working season of 1897, at the 
latter part of December, saw the completion of 
the project for the improvement of Philadelphia 
harbor. This improvement was one of the most 
extensive public works ever undertaken by the 
National Government. It has resulted in the re- 
moval of Smith's and Windmill Islands, lying 
between Philadelphia and Camden, and a part 
of Petty Island, with the shoals adjacent to all 
three. There is now a channel 1000 feet wide 
and at least 26 feet deep at low tide along the 
Philadelphia water front, between the Delaware 
river bridge, at Bridesburg,and Kaighn's Point, a 
distance of 6^ miles, and the other parts of the 
channel have a least depth of 12 feet at low tide. 

Work was commenced in the spring of 1891, 
but owing to the necessity of annulling the first 
contract on account of the contractor not com- 
plying with its conditions, a delay of about a 
year ensued. In June, 1893, a new contract was 
made with the American Dredging Company. 
The amount of material removed was about 
21,500,000 cubic yards, at a cost of $3,635,000. 
About 3,500,000 cubic yards of material were 
placed on League Island and 3.300,000 on Petty 
Island, raising 374 acres of land, formerly below 
low water and protected from overflow by dykes, 
to above high-water mark. Nearly 133 acres of 
land formerly above low water were removed. 
The area of League Island raised above high tide 



is 147 acres, which is now available for the pur- 
poses of the Navy Yard. 

The reconstruction of the Philadelphia water 
front, a contemporaneous work with the channel 
improvement, has been in progress since 1894, 
and up to December 1, 1897, fifteen new piers 
had been constructed, providing facilities for the 
largest modern steamships. The widening of 
Delaware avenue, the street running along the 
river front, by the city, by extending the bulk- 
ward into the river, was commenced in October, 
1897. The work is to be undertaken at the pres- 
ent time between Vine and South streets, a dis- 
tance of one mile, and it will result in a street 
along the water front 150 feet wide, greatly 
relieving the congested traffic of the present 
narrow thoroughfare. 

Delaware River. 

During the season of 1897 the Federal Govern- 
ment removed about 4,000,000 cubic yards of 
material from the shoal places in the Delaware 
river. This work has provided a channel 400 to 
600 feet wide, with a least depth of 26 feet, 
through Duck Creek Flats and Dan Baker Shoal, 
which lie at the head of the bay and were the 
worst shoals in the river. At Cherry Island 
Flats, near Wilmington, a channel 300 feet wide 
and 26 feet deep was dredged. 

The National Government confined its work 
during 1897 to the localities named, the city 
undertaking to deepen the channel across the 
remaining shoals between Philadelphia and 
Cherry Island Flats. Under the city contract 
for the removal of the Rock Shoal at Schooner 
Ledge, below Chester, there had been removed 
to the end of the year about 20,000 cubic yards 
of material, out of an estimated total of 27,800 
cubic yards to be removed. A large portion of 
the channel at this point has been dredged to 
the full depth of 26 feet at low water, and the 
work will be completed during 1898. 

Under contract with the city, dredging was 
begun on the shoal known as the Middle Ground, 
off Greenwich Point, at the lower part of the 
harbor. The same contract includes the deep- 
ening of the channel at Mifflin Bar, which is 
less than 26 feet. The estimated amount of 
material to be removed from the two localities 
named is 1,600,000 cubic yards, and up to the 
end of the season about 475,000 cubic yards had 
been removed from the Middle Ground Shoal. 
During 1898 this work will be completed and the 
channel over Mifflin Bar deepened to its full 
width. 

Schuylkill River. 

Grain and petroleum exports form a large part 
of the aggregate exports of the port of Philadel- 
phia. The petroleum is shipped exclusively 
from the Schuylkill river, and much of the grain 
is loaded at wharves along the same stream. 
Under contract with the National Government, 
nearly 63,000 cubic yards of material were re- 
moved from the bar at the mouth of the Schuyl- 
kill river during the early part of 1897, providing 
a channel across the bar no to 175 feet wide and 
24 to 27 feet deep at low water. 

Under contract with the city between 16,000 
and 18,000 cubic yards were removed from the 
channel of the Schuylkill river, above Penrose 
Ferry Bridge, during the season, in the work of 
securing a channel 22 feet deep at low water. 
It is expected to complete the deepening of the 



8 4 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Schuylkill channel under the city contracts dur- 
ing the early part of 1898. 

Delaware Breakwater. 

By the end of 1897 the work of closing the 
"Gap" between the Delaware Breakwater 
proper and the ice breaker was completed by 
the depositing of 30,000 tons of stone. The 
"Gap" had been previously filled to the level 
of low tide, but last season's work brought the 
structure to the level of the older parts of the 
work, making the Breakwater continuous, and 
providing an anchorage secure from storms for 
vessels of ordinary draft. 

New Harbor of Refuge, Delaware Bay. 

The construction of the breakwater for the 
new Harbor of Refuge adjacent to the " The 
Shears " Shoal, near the mouth of Delaware Bay, 
was commenced by the National Government in 
the early part of May, 1897. During the season 
more than 135,000 tons of stone were deposited 
over a length of 2800 feet, 1850 feet of which 
was brought to a level of about three feet above 
low water. 

This work is intended as a Harbor of Refuge for 
vessels of the deepest draft and is to be com- 
pleted within five years. It will cost not more 
than $2,350,000. The Harbor will furnish safe 
anchorage for more than 1000 vessels at once. 
It is located about 2^ miles north of the old 
Breakwater, and is 3 miles from shore. The site 
of the new Harbor of Refuge is about equidistant 
from New York, Philadelphia, and the capes of 
Chesapeake Bay (the ocean entrance to the ports 
of Baltimore, Norfolk and Newport News), and 
is an especially convenient port of call for the 
entire commerce of the North Atlantic Coast. It 
is now, to a considerable extent, used by large 
vessels awaiting orders to ports for discharge or 
loading, although the anchorage is exposed and 
dangerous. 

THE REBELLION IN CUBA. 

The rebellion in Cuba, while productive of 
many political changes, was not materially 
advanced during 1897. The Spanish still hold 
most of the larger towns, and all of the sea- 
coast ports. The remainder of the island is 
either under the control of the Cubans, or sub- 
ject to their raids. The Spanish policy has been 
one of concentration, and as a result, the towns 
are crowded with refugees. The country has 
been devastated by both armies, so that subsist- 
ence is very difficult to obtain. 

In December, 1896, General Antonio Maceo, 
the brilliant Cuban cavalry leader, was betrayed 
into an ambush and shot to death with some 
members of his staff. His betrayer was pro- 
moted, and shown great official honors. Although 
the Spaniards were greatly elated over Maceo's 
assassination, yet its effect was to really 
strengthen the patriots' cause. In the early part 
of 1897, General Weyler took the field to 
"pacify" the province of Pinar del Rio; but 
although a large display of force was made, the 
situation in that province seems to have remained 
unchanged. 

The rainy season brought the Spanish cam- 
paign to a close in April, and it was seen that 
General Wejler's work was a complete failure. 
The reports of the United States Consuls in Cuba 
to the Secretary of State showed that great des- 
titution existed among a large number of Ameri- 



can citizens on the island. President McKinley, 
on May 17th, sent a special message to Congress 
recommending that an appropriation of $50,000 
be made in order to relieve the urgent distress of 
our fellow-countrymen. The Senate immedi- 
ately passed a bill in response to this message, 
and although there was a disposition shown in 
the House of Representatives to seize upon this 
opportunity to grant Cuba belligerent rights, yet 
on May 20th the bill passed the House and was 
approved. 

The policy of the new Administration was soon 
seen to be the same as that of the Cleveland 
Administration, a strict neutrality, and a tender 
of our good offices to Spain in order to settle the 
rebellion. Congress was content to allow the 
President time to get settled in office before 
taking any steps in the matter. 

On September 5th, the town of Victoria de 
Las Tunas, of the Province of Santiago de Cuba, 
was captured by the insurgents. This was an 
important victory, as the town was of great 
strategical importance. Shortly after this oc- 
currence our new Minister to Spain, General 
Woodford, presented his credentials, and was 
cordially received. It is understood that he pre- 
sented to Spain the good offices of the United 
States, and that it was also shown to the Spanish 
authorities that the United States would in a 
short time insist that hostilities should cease. 
President McKinley decided about this time not 
to remove Consul General Lee from his position 
at Havana. 

As a result of the strained relations between 
Spain and the United States, rumors arose that 
Japan and Spain had formed an alliance against 
this country. These were promptly put to rest 
by the denials of Japan's foremost statesmen. 

On August 8th, Canovas, the Prime Minister 
of Spain, was assassinated, but this deed was 
not in any way connected with the Cuban 
troubles. It had no effect on the Cuban situation 
at that time, for the old Cabinet, under General 
Azcarraga as Premier was continued in office. On 
September 29th the old Cabinet resigned, and a 
new one was formed with Senor Sagasta at its 
head. The policy of the new Cabinet was a 
vigorous prosecution of the war in Cuba, the 
adoption of home rule for that island, and the 
recall of General Weyler. On October 8th, the 
order of recall was issued, and General Blanco, 
of Arenas, was appointed Governor-General of 
Cuba in Weyler's place. It was arranged that 
eight thousand new troops should accompany 
General Blanco to Cuba. 

During the year many troops were sent to 
Cuba by Spain, but the mortality was very high, 
and their efficiency was greatly reduced. Ac- 
cording to a recent dispatch from General Wey- 
ler, the pay of the soldiers was six months in 
arrears. When the news was received in Ha- 
vana of the proposed recall of General Weyler, 
an anti-American demonstration was arranged, 
at which General Weyler made a speech de- 
nouncing the United States for its interference in 
Spanish affairs. Arrangements were made for a 
larger demonstration on Weyler's embarkation 
for Spain, but it was forbidden by the Spanish 
Government. 

General Blanco, the new Governor-General of 
Cuba, has been in command of the Spanish army 
in the Phillipines, and his reputation there for 
cruelty is probably little less than that of Weyler. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



85 



THE GRjECO-TURKISH WAR. 

The island of Crete had been for a long time in 
a state of semi-suppressed rebellion, caused by 
the oppression of Christians by the Turks. The 
revolt was greatly increased during the early 
part of 1897 by serious outrages committed by 
the Turkish soldiery and police. Greece, which 
is closely connected with Crete geographically, 
as well as by common racial ties, became aroused 
over this treatment, and popular sentiment grew 
so strong that King George was forced to inter- 
fere. In pursuance of this policy, a fleet of 
Greek torpedo boats, under the command of 
Prince George, was sent to the support of the 
Cretans on February 10, and the following day 
Greece announced her intention of intervening 
by force in Crete. 

Turkey immediately protested to the Powers, 
and declared that Greece would be attacked in 
Thessaly if the Powers did not repress the 
Greeks. However, the Greek army reserves 
were called out, and a large body of troops, 
under command of Colonel Vassos, was em- 
barked. This body took possession of the island 
February 15, and, aiding the bands of insurgent 
Christian Cretans, soon had the island under 
their control. Local governments were organ- 
ized, and everything progressed favorably. 

In order to preserve the peace of Europe, the 
concert of the Powers notified Greece to evacuate 
Crete, and to withdraw the fleet. To the first 
of these demands Greece would not consent, as 
it would leave the Christian Cretans victims to 
the Turks, but was willing to withdraw its fleet. 
The Powers then landed troops in Crete, took 
possession of the island, and on February 21 a 
fleet of warships belonging to the Powers shelled 
a Cretan insurgent camp near Canea. 

The formal reply of Greece to the Powers was 
given March 8, and contained a refusal to with- 
draw troops from Crete. The Powers then de- 
clared a blockade of Crete against Greece on 
March 21, so that all Greek support would be 
cut off from Colonel Vassos and the insurgents. 
The Powers had been collecting in Crete a force 
composed of troops from the European armies, 
in order to preserve peace on the island until the 
dispute should be settled. The blockade of the 
island was rigorously enforced, one unarmed 
Greek transport being sunk by an Austrian 
warship. 

As the trouble in Crete grew serious, both 
Greece and Turkey began massing troops on the 
Thessalian frontier. Here the situation became 
very strained, assaults being made by bodies of 
Greek irregulars upon the Turkish troops about 
April 9. The Turkish Government protested to 
the Powers, and finally, on April 17 and 18, 
open war was declared to exist between the two 
countries, and diplomatic relations were severed. 
The Turkish troops were under the command of 
Edhem Pasha, while the command of the Greek 
troops was given to Crown Prince Constantine. 

At the beginning of the war the Greeks were 
uniformly successful, and even advanced beyond 
the northwestern boundary, but this fortunate 
beginning was not to last. On April 20 the 
Turks gained possession of the heights com- 
manding the route to Larissa, and after some 
spirited fighting all of the strategic points on the 
Thessalian frontier were in the hands of the 
Turks by April 24. Though successful in the 



east, the Turks could not prevent Greek ad- 
vances into Epirus on the western frontier. 

From this time on the Greeks steadily re- 
treated towards Athens, making a spirited stand 
at Velestina, where the Turks were repulsed 
three times. But the Greeks were forced back, 
and finally, the first week in May, Greece made 
an appeal to the Powers for mediation. Turkey 
would not agree, and Edhem Pasha still kept 
hammering away. On May 17 the Turks drove 
the Greeks from Domokos, and occupied it. 
Two days later, under the solicitation of the 
Czar of Russia, the Sultan agreed to an armis- 
tice. Later a sea armistice was arranged, and 
also a more lasting arrangement for a cessation 
of hostilities. 

The brief war showed conclusively the su- 
periority of the Turkish army organization. The 
Turks outnumbered the Greeks, but were always 
on the offensive after the first few days of the 
war. The Grecian army did not appear to be 
properly led or properly organized. There is no 
doubt of the bravery of the troops on both sides, 
but the Greeks suffered from the lack of a com- 
petent leader. King George counted too strongly 
upon being supported by the Christian nations 
of Europe to which he is bound by religious and 
family ties. One surprising feature of the war 
was the lack of support given to the army by the 
Greek fleet, and its general uselessness. The 
advantages arising from the superiority of the 
Greek fleet seemed to be totally unappreciated. 

Popular feeling at Athens was very bitter 
against King George after the disastrous failure 
of the war, and the Ministry, headed by M. 
Delyannis, was obliged to resign in order to 
quiet the populace. The Sultan agreed to treat 
with the Powers in arranging the treaty of peace 
with Greece, but persisted in occupying Thes- 
saly. Colonel Vassos had evacuated Crete, as 
one of the conditions of the armistice which the 
Powers had proposed, but which had not been 
accepted until after the battle of Domokos. 

The negotiations for a treaty of peace, which 
were carried on under the auspices of the great 
Powers, were not very successful. The Sultan 
put off any settlement, and the Powers dis- 
agreed very much. Finally a preliminary treaty 
was signed September 18 at Constantinople. 



Broad street is the longest street in Philadel- 
phia. It runs from League Island to Montgom- 
ery county line, and is 11.63 miles long. 

The annual report of the Commissioner of 
Pensions for 1897 shows that there were added 
to the rolls during the year the names of 50,101 
new pensioners, and there were restored to the 
rolls 3971 pensioners who had been previously 
dropped. The whole number of pensioners on 
the rolls June 30, 1897, was 976,014. The amount 
disbursed was $139,949,717.35. This exceeds the 
amount disbursed during the fiscal year 1896 by 
the sum of $1,584,480.18. 

Postmaster-General Gary in his first an- 
nual report recommends the establishment of 
postal savings banks and the curtailment of mat- 
ter now sent through the mails at second-class 
rates. This branch of the service was carried 
at a loss of $26,000,000. The receipts of the 
Department were $82,665,462 and the expendi- 
tures $94,077,242. 



86 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



POLAR EXPEDITIONS OF THE YEAR. 

There was no abatement in Polar work dur- 
ing 1897. The revival of this feature of geo- 
graphical exploration by Lieutenant R. E. Peary 
in 1891, and his practical demonstration that by 
the employment of the latest modern inventions, 
both in equipments and foods, the Arctics were 
robbed of most of their terrors, gave encourage- 
ment to those who hesitated to enter this field of 
exploration through the recollections of the hor- 
rors of the Greely expedition to Lady Franklin 
Bay in 1882. 

The year 1897 was particularly noteworthy 
with respect to Polar work by the return of the 
Jackson-Harmsworth expedition from Franz 
Josef Land; the successful voyage of Lieutenant 
Robert E. Peary to Whale Sound to carry out 
his preliminary plans for the discovery of the 
North Pole ; the start of Andree in a balloon 
from Danes Island, in an endeavor to solve the 
Polar mystery, and the sailing of the Gerlache 
expedition to the Antarctics. 

The Jackson-Harmsworth expedition was of 
great importance from a geographical stand- 
point, and had it not been overshadowed by the 
sensational feat of Dr. Nansen would have at- 
tracted far greater public attention. This expe- 
dition was supported by Alfred C. Harmsworth, 
proprietor of the London Daily Mail, and com- 
manded by Frederick G. Jackson, a young 
Englishman. He and his party sailed for Franz 
Josef Land July 12, 1894, and returned September 
8, 1897. The results of Jackson's work were 
astounding ; they completely altered the map of 
a large portion of the Arctic regions in that they 
showed that Gillis Land and Oscar Land do not 
exist, and rendered doubtful whether there is 
such a country as Petermann Land. They also 
showed that Franz Josef Land does not extend 
beyond 82 degrees, as was popularly supposed. 
Mr. Jackson also reported the presence of an 
open sea to the north of Franz Josef Land. A 
dramatic incident of Jackson's sojourn in the 
north was his unexpected meeting with Dr. Nan- 
sen as the latter was returning from the Polar 
circle. 

Early in the year Lieutenant Robert E. Peary 
obtained a five years' leave of absence to carry 
out plans which he announced for the discovery 
of the North Pole. These plans were in effect 
to take a ship to Whale Sound, on the borders 
of Inglefield Gulf, in North Greenland, and es- 
tablish there a base of supplies. This done, 
families of Eskimos are to be taken on board and 
a passage forced through Smith's Straits and 
Kane Basin to Sherard-Osborne Fjord, not far 
below the supposed southern boundary line of 
Greenland. At this point Lieutenant Peary is 
to unload the remainder of the supplies and, dis- 
embarking with the Eskimos, send the ship 
home. As soon as the ice is strong enough to 
render sledging practicable, a journey is to be 
undertaken by easy stages northward as far as 
possible, and there establish a settlement in 
which Mr. Peary will live with and somewhat 
after the manner of the natives until a favorable 
opportunity presents itself for making a dash to 
the Pole. As this may not be until two or three 
years have passed, a relief ship is to be sent 
north annually with supplies. 

During the summer Lieutenant Peary made a 
preliminary voyage to Whale Sound to enlist the 



support of the Eskimos. He returned in the 
autumn with the announcement of success, and 
brought with him also a family of Eskimos and 
the famous meteorite of Cape York. 

The Gerlache Expedition for the Antarctics 
sailed from Antwerp in August. It was com- 
manded by Captain Adrien de Gerlache, and 
numbers among its members Dr. Frederick A. 
Cook, of Brooklyn, a member of the Peary 
Expedition of 1892, and commander of two ex- 
cursions to Greenland. The Gerlache Expedition 
has Graham Land, on the Antarctic Circle, south 
of Terra del Fuego, as its objective point. At 
this place exploration southwardly is to be begun. 
In March the vessel is to go to Melbourne to 
replenish the store of food. On the return of the 
ship the party expects to visit Victoria Land, and 
take observations for the South Magnetic Pole. 
The expedition is under the auspices of the 
British Association for the Advancement of 
Science. 

What was, perhaps, the most sensational Polar 
event of the year was the venture made by Herr 
Andree from Danes Island in a balloon. The 
ascent was made in July and the airship soon 
disappeared in the northeast, and since then 
nothing has been heard of the occupants. There 
were a number of sensational rumors started, 
but all were known to be untrue with the excep- 
tion of one made public in October to the effect 
that a balloon was seen floating in the sea north 
of Spitzbergen. This report bore the impress of 
truth, and as the balloon was supposed to be 
that of Andree, a steamer was fitted out, under 
instructions of King Oscar, and sent from Trom- 
soe Island in search of it and the former occu- 
pants. Captain Sverdrup also announced his 
intention of using the Fram, Nansen's famous 
ship, in the same search, but he had not departed 
by December 1st. The first mentioned relief 
expedition made a careful search above Spitz- 
bergen, but failed to find any trace of the missing 
aeronaut and party, and winter setting in, it was 
forced to return to Norway, where it arrived on 
November 21st. 

Two sub-Arctic expeditions, one commanded 
by Prince Luigi, of Italy, and the other by 
Henry G. Bryant, of Philadelphia, sought to 
ascend Mt. St. Elias, Alaska, during the sum- 
mer. The first named succeeded in the under- 
taking. 

Japanese postmen, whose routes carry them 
into the country, use bicycles. Their wheels are 
made by local manufacturers, who have appro- 
priated improvements from both British and 
American patents. 

It is generally thought that the practice of 
having bonfires on e'ection day was first sug- 
gested by the fact that it used to be the custom 
in England to build bonfires on Guy Fawkes 
Day, November 5. In Bristol, R. I., it is still 
the custom to have bonfires on that day. 

The wolf is likely before many years to be 
extinct in France. The premiums paid by the 
State for its destruction are steadily decreasirg. 
In 1883, when premiums were introduced, 1316 
wolves were killed. In 1884 there were 1035 ; in 
1885 there were 900 ; in 1890 the number was 
461. This was reduced to 323 in 1892, to 261 in 
1893, 245 in 1894, 249 in 1895, and 171 in 1896. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



87 



LEASE OF THE GAS WORKS. 

On November 30, 1897, Mayor Warwick signed 
the lease of the City's Gas Works to the United 
Gas Improvement Company, and at midnight the 
Company took possession. The terms of the 
{ease were thus described by the Sub-Committee 
of the Committees on Finance and Gas : 

First — To run thirty years, with a ten-year 
option on the part of the city to terminate the 
contract upon payment to the lessee of the 
amounts actually expended in improvements, 
modern machinery, new mains, reconstructed 
buildings, etc., with six per cent, interest. 

Second — The lessee is to purchase from the 
city the stock and materials on hand at the be- 
ginning of the lease, under an appraisement to 
be made by the Director of Public Works. It is 
estimated that this, with other capital now 
locked up in the gas business, will bring about 
$1,000,000 to the city treasury. 

Third — Expenditure by the lessee, within three 
years, of not less than $5,000,000 in putting the 
plant and its distributing system in condition for 
prompt and efficient service. This rehabilitation 
is imperative, according to the Director of Pub- 
lic Works. 

Fourth — Expenditure of $10,030,000 additional 
— careful expert inquiry declaring this amount 
to be necessary — in improvements and exten- 
sions during balance of lease — an aggregate of 
at least $15,000,000, and as much more as may be 
required for the purposes stated. 

Fifth — The annual filing of an itemized state- 
ment of expenditures on improvements, during 
the first ten years, so that the city can at any 
time realize definitely the amount so to be in- 
vested if it should desire to terminate the lease. 

Sixth — The city is to receive, for its own use, 
without charge, all the gas required for lighting 
the public buildings and the streets ; with refer- 
ence to the latter, provision being made for the 
addition of 300 lamps yearly, as Councils may 
direct, the lessee to care for, light and extinguish 
the lamps. This, it is estimated, will be equal 
to a financial return of over $20,000,000. No 
payments are to be made by the municipality 
at any time or for any purpose during the lease. 

Seventh — The quality of the gas is guaran- 
teed not less than twenty-two candle power, 
with efficient service and uniform pressure in all 
parts of the city ; daily tests to be made at the 
expense of the lessee. 

Eighth — An inspector of meters, with assist- 
ants, to be appointed by the Mayor, is to super- 
vise the tests and protect the rights of consumers, 
the latter being privileged at any time to demand 
the testing of meters, in order to ascertain if 
bills rendered are correct. The lessee is to pay 
$10,000 a year toward the expenses of the in- 
spector and his assistants, or $300,000 during the 
lease. 

Ninth — Extensions of mains are to be made 
where one consumer for every 100 feet required 
agrees to take gas for one year at the rates in 
force. Services are to be run to inside of con- 
sumer's property line without charge. No charge 
for meters. Non-payment of bills by one occu- 
pant of a property will not prevent the service of 
gas to another who is not indebted to the lessee. 

Tenth — An agreed-upon schedule and plan of 
regulation of the price of gas by City Councils 
is provided, regardless of profit or loss to the 



lessee, authorizing periodical reductions in the 
rate from $1 to 75 cents. This provision leaves 
the regulation of the price of gas in the hands 
of the direct representatives of the people. The 
city can elect whether the consumers of gas shall 
be directly benefited through a reduction of 
rates, or whether the money thus paid shall go to 
public improvements of a general character. 

Eleventh — Strict regulations are provided for 
the government of the lessee in connection with 
opening the streets and the laying of pipes. 

Twelfth — Indemnification of the city against 
damage, through accidents due to carelessness 
of gas works employes, in the streets or else- 
where. The lessee is to pay for all city water 
used in the conduct of the works. 

Thirteenth — Insurance on the works is to be 
maintained at not less than the amount now 
carried by the city. 

Fourteenth — The United Gas Improvement 
Company is made directly responsible for all 
work of improvement upon the streets, or in 
connection with the plant, and for the faithful 
performance of all the terms of the lease. 

Fifteenth — A bond in the sum of $1,000,000 
for the faithful performance of all the terms of 
the lease. In addition to the bond all the assets 
of the Company, with a capital of $11,500,000, 
would be subject to the city's claim for damages, 
wherever situated or employed. 

Sixteenth — Annual cash payments to the city, 
which, it is estimated, will amount in thirty years 
to #3°,7 2 5,ooo.* 

Seventeenth — The plant in all its departments 
is to be put and maintained in the highest state 
of efficiency, and this, together with the plant of 
the Philadelphia Gas Improvement Company, in 
a like state of efficiency, turned over to the city, at 
the expiration of the lease, thoroughly modern- 
ized, without the city's payment of a dollar. 

* This estimate is based upon the maintenance 
of the price of gas at $i.co per thousand cubic 
feet. Any reduction below that price will be at 
the expense of the city, as the lessee is author- 
ized to retain a fixed amount of the sums paid 
for gas, according to the following schedule : 

The United Gas Improvement Company, its 
successors or assigns, shall pay to the city of 
Philadelphia in each year during the continuance 
of this agreement as follows, viz. : 

Upon all gas sold prior to January 1, 1908, all 
sums received by them in excess of ninety (90) 
cents per thousand cubic feet. 

Upon all gas sold after December 31, 1907, and 
prior to January 1, 1913, all sums so received in 
excess of eighty-five (85) cents per thousand 
cubic feet. 

Upon all gas sold after December 31, 1912, and 
prior to January 1, 1918.aH sums so received in ex- 
cess of eighty (80) cents per thousand cubic feet. 

Upon all gas sold after December 31, 191 7, and 
prior to January 1, 1928, all sums so received in 
excess of seventy-five (75) cents per thousand 
cubic feet. 

At the meeting of Councils succeeding the exe- 
cution of the lease Mr. Edmonds introduced an 
ordinance providing for a reduction of the price 
of gas to 90 cents per thousand cubic feet. On 
account of litigation pending on the subject of 
the lease, on December 3, 1897, the Committee on 
Gas postponed consideration of Mr. Edmonds' 
ordinance. 



88 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



SPORTING RECORDS OF 1897. 



FOOT-BALL. 

While there is no actual champion in college 
foot-ball, because the title is not being annually 
competed for in open competition, the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania will be recognized as such 
by all fair-minded people, since her team was the 
only one to go through the season of 1897 with- 
out being defeated or played to a stand-still in a 
drawn battle. Not only is Pennsylvania the 
only college to have a clean record of victories, 
but she earned her right to first place by deci- 
sively beating Harvard after the Crimson had 
played a tie game with Yale, and the latter had 
in turn defeated Princeton. The appended rec- 
ords show Pennsylvania to be first, Harvard 
and Yale tied for second place, and Princeton 
fourth. Harvard will be awarded second place 
and Yale third by all impartial critics on the 
strength of comparative scores, and because of 
the fact that they are cognizant that the Crim- 
son really had the stronger team of the two; 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 



18 — Pennsylvania 50; 
22 — Pennsylvania 17; 
25 — Pennsylvania 33 ; 
29 — Pennsylvania 18 ; 

2 — Pennsylvania 33 ; 

6 — Pennsylvania 57 ; 

9 — Pennsylvania 58; 
13 — Pennsylvania 42 ; 
16 — Pennsylvania 34; 
20 — Pennsylvania 24 ; 
23 — Pennsylvania 46 ; 
30 — Pennsylvania 40 ; 

6 — Pennsylvania 20 ; 
13 — Pennsylvania 22 ; 
20 — Pennsylvania 15 ; 
25 — Pennsylvania 4 ; 



Muncy H. Sc o 

Bucknell o 

Fr. & Marshall., o 
Wash.&Jeffsn.. 4 

Bucknell o 

Gettysburg o 

Lehigh o 

U. of Virginia... o 

Dartmouth o 

State College.... o 

Lafayette o 

Brown o 

Indians 10 

Wesley an o 

Harvard 6 

Cornell o 



Totals 513 Total 20 

HARVARD. 

Oct. 2 — Harvard 20 

Oct. 6 — Harvard 24 

Oct. 9 — Harvard 13 

Oct. 13 — Harvard 38 

Oct. 16 — Harvard 10 

Oct. 20 — Harvard 24 

Oct. 23 — Harvard 18 

Oct. 30 — Harvard 24 

Nov. 3 — Harvard 34 

Nov. 13 — Harvard o 

Nov. 20 — Harvard 6 



Williams o 

Bowdoin o 

Dartmouth.. o 

Amherst o 

West Point o 

Newton A. A o 

Brown o 

Cornell 5 

Wesleyan o 

Yale o 

Pennsylvania.. ..15 



Totals 211 Total 20 



YALE. 



Sept. 29- 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 



-Yale. 
-Yale., 



, 10 

2 — 1 ale 30 

6— Yale 18 

9 — Yale 32 

16 — Yale 10 

20 — Yale 18 

Oct. 23 — Yale , 24 

Oct. 30 — Yale 6 

Nov. 6 — Yale 16 

Nov. 13 — Yale o 

Nov. 20 — Yale 6 



Trinity o 

Wesleyan o 

Amherst o 

Williams o 

Newton A. A... o 

Brown 14 

Indians 9 

West Point 6 

Chicago A. A.... 6 

Harvard o 

Princeton o 



PRINCETON. 



Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 



2 — Princeton 43 

6 — Princeton 53 

9 — Princeton 28 

13 — Princeton 34 

16 — Princeton 18 

20 — Princeton 54 

23 — Princeton 10 

27 — Princeton 12 

30 — Princeton 30 

6 — Princeton 57 

20 — Princeton o 



Lehigh o 

Rutgers o 

Naval Cadets... o 

State College o 

Indians o 

Fr. & Marshall., o 

Cornell o 

Elizabeth A. C. o 

Dartmouth o 

Lafayette o 

Yale 6 



Totals 339 Totak 6 



Sept 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 30 
Nov. 6 
Nov. 13 
Nov. 25 



25- 
2- 

9" 
16- 

23- 



COKNELL. 

-Cornell 6; 

-Cornell 16; 

-Cornell 15 ; 

-Cornell 4; 

-Cornell o; 

-Cornell 5; 

-Cornell 45 ; 

-Cornell 42; 

-Cornell o; 



Colgate o 

Syracuse o 

Tufts o 

Lafayette 4 

Princeton 10 

Harvard 24 

State College o 

Williams o 

Pennsylvania ... 4 



Total 113 Total 42 



LAFAYETTE. 

Sept. 27 — Lafayette 14 

Sept. 28 — Lafayette 26 

Oct. 2 — Lafayette 24 

Oct. 6 — Lafayette.... % 8 

Oct. 9 — Lafayette 64 

Oct. 16 — Lafayette 4 

Oct. 23 — Lafayette o 

Oct. 30 — Lafayette 34 

Nov. 6 — Lafayette o 

Nov. 13 — Lafayette 19 

Nov. 20 — Lafayette 41 

Nov. 25 — Lafayette 22 



Total 256 

LEHIGH. 

Oct. 2 — Lehigh o; 

Oct. 9 — Lehigh o; 

Oct. 16 — Lehigh 5; 

Oct. 20 — Lehigh 5 ; 

Oct. 23 — Lehigh 20; 

Oct. 30 — Lehigh o; 

Nov. 6 — Lehigh 6; 

Nov. 13 — Lehigh 42; 

Nov. 20 — Lehigh 6; 

Nov. 25 — Lehigh o; 



Bloomsb'g ML. o 

Wyoming Sem. o 

State College... o 

Fr. & Marshall o 

Temp. A. C... o 

Cornell 4 

Pennsylvania... 46 

Lehigh o 

Princeton 57 

Dickinson o 

Wesleyan 6 

Lehigh o 

Total 113 



Princeton 43 

Pennsylvania... 58 

Williams o 

Dickinson o 

Bucknell 28 

Lafayette 34 

West Point 48 

U.CityofN.Y. o 
Naval Cadets.. 28 
Lafayette 22 



Totals 170 Total 35 



Total 84 Total 261 

The Central High School won the champion- 
ship of the Philadelphia Inter-Scholastic Asso- 
ciation and also defeated the Inter-Academic 
champions for the championship of Philadelphia. 
In the Inter-Academic Association, Penn Charter 
and Germantown Academy tied for first place. 
Penn Charter challenged Germantown Academy 
to play off the tie, but the latter declined the 
challenge. 

YACHTING. 

[For record of Yachting, see Almanac for 1896.] 



^— ^» -.-,-■- -r^-^^-^.^^^.^^^^-^. . -L. 



(-■Tll-l i a riJ 



^^vam^^. 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



89 



BASE-BALL. 



Clubs. 


Boston 
Baltimore 
New York 


Cincinnati 
Cleveland 
Brooklyn 


c 
c 

— ■ 

fat 

c 

0! 
(fl 


Pittsburg 
Chicago 
Philadelphia 
Louisville 


(A 

'3 


C/3 


a 



01 

U 

c 
a 
O 


4-» 

C 
u 

u 

M 
4) 
PL, 


Baltimore .. 
New York. 
Cincinnati. 
Cleveland.. 
Brooklyn .. 
Wash'gton 
Pittsburg .. 
Chicago.... 
Philad'a ... 
Louisville.. 
St. Louis... 


6 
4 
3 
5 
3 
5 
2 

4 
2 

O 
2 


6 

7 

6 

4 

\ 

3 
3 

2 
1 
2 


8 

5 

7 

3 
3 
3 
3 
5 
5 
6 



9 
6 

5 

■5 
I 

7 
5 
4 
3 
1 


7 
7 
9 
7 

7 

4 
3 
7 

1 


! 

5 

5 
5 

6 
6 

7 

5 


7 
9 
9 
8 

8 
7 

"5 
7 

4 
4 
3 


10 

9 
8 

5 

6 

7 
7 

"0 
5 
4 
4 


8 
9 

8 
6 

5 
6 

7 
6 

4 


10 9 

10 10 
76 

8l 9 

9 1 5 

6 I 5 
8 8 

7 8 
5 6 

•- 9 

3- 
4| 3 


IO 
IO 
12 

II 
II 

7 

9 
8 

8 

8 

8 


93 -7°5 
90.692 

83.634 
76.576 
69.527 
6i'.462 
611.462 
6o'.458 
59 -447 
55-417 
52.400 

29 .221 

1 


Lost 


39 


40 


4 S 


50 


62 


7i 


7! 


71 


73 


77 


78 


102 







The post season's series for the Temple Cup 
was won by Baltimore. 

Batting Averages. 

The batsmen of the National League securing 
averages of .300 and over in 1897 are as follows, 
the figures given being official : 



Name. 1 

Keeler, Baltimore ...128 

Clarke, Louisville 129 

Kelley, Baltimore.... 129 

Stivetts, Boston 49 

Burkett, Cleveland. .128 
Delahanty, Phila....i29 

Lajoie, Phila 126 

Stahl, Boston ,...111 

Davis, N. Y 131 

Doyle, Baltimore 114 

Jennings, Balt're 115 

Lange, Chicago 117 

Stenzel, Baltimore.... 131 
Dem'n'ville, Wash ..132 
Rothfus, Pittsburg... 31 
Orth, Philadelphia... 42 

Collins, Boston 133 

Wagner, Louisville.. 61 
Hamilton, Boston ...125 

Duffy, Boston 134 

Wallace, Cleveland 131 

McGuire, Wash 82 

Childs, Cleveland ...115 

Mercer, Wa- h 42 

Van Haltren, N. Y...131 
Anderson, Brookl'n.116 
Tiernan, New York.. 129 
Sockalexis, Clevel'd 66 
Thornton, Chicago.. 71 
Tucker, Bos. &W... 98 
Holliday, Cincinnati 53 

Long, Boston 106 

Cooley, Philada 131 

Douglas, St. Louis.. .127 

Farrell, Wash 65 

Donovan, Pittsb 120 

McGraw, Baltimoreios 





CO 


^ 


W 


pa 




•■— ■ 


c 




a 


£5 


ca 







*© 


£C 


pa 


£ 


CO 


CO 


147 


248 


•432 


12 


63 


122 


213 


.406 




60 


"3 


196 


•389 


9 


50 


43 


76 


388 


1 


2 


128 


199 


383 


10 


27 


no 


200 


377 


5 


28 


107 


198 


363 


5 


22 


in 


168 


359 


S 


14 


114 


188 


358 


5 


64 


93 


165 . 


356 


2 


62 


131 


154 


353 


17 


bo 


119 


170 


352 


9 


83 


"3 


189 


35i 


3 


77 


92 


197 


349 


14 


33 


19 


39 


348 


1 


3 


2b 


5i 


347 


2 


7 


102 


183 


346 


8 


16 


38 


83 


344 


5 


22 


153 


174 


344 


4 


70 


131 


189 


34i 


13 


45 


99 


177 


339 


14 


17 


52 


in . 


338 


1 


11 


105 


149 


336 


17 


25 


22 


45 


333 


4 


7 


122 


190 


33 2 


fa 


45 


93 


162 


33 2 


n 


42 


123 


177 


33i 


1 


34 


43 


93 


33i 


4 


17 


40 


85 


3?9 


4 


14 


52 


122 


3 2 9 


3 


18 


49 


62 


328 


2 


4 


88 


148 


327 


17 


26 


124 


185 


327 


10 


30 


77 


171 


327 


3 


12 


40 


84 


3 2 7 


5 


8 


«3 


155 


326 


9 


39 


89 


127 


326 


8 


42 



Name. 



a 



w 



PS 



pa 
a 



pa 



Tenny. Boston 131 

Beckley, N.Y.&Cin.n 4 

Bowerman, Bait 33 

Jones, -Brooklyn 135 

Griffin, Brooklyn ...134 

Selbach, Wash 126 

Miller, Cincinnati ...119 
Klobedanz, Boston.. 38 

Gettman, Wash 37 

Lowe, Boston 121 

Zimmer, Cleveland.. 81 

Everett, Chicago 90 

Robinson, Bait 47 

Hoffmeister, Pitts... 47 

Smith, Pittsburg 122 

Gleason, New York 134 
Wilson, New York.. 44 
Schriver, Cincinnati 52 
Leahy, Wash.&Pitt. 43 

Allen, Boston 33 

Davis, Pittsburg 107 

Ryan, Chicago 135 

A. Smith, Brooklyn. 61 
LaChance, Brook'n.125 
Callahan. Chicago... 90 
McPhee, Cincinnati 80 

Decker, Chicago 109 

Vaughn, Cincinnati. 50 
Joyce, New York... no 
Werden, Louisville. .132 

Anson, Chicago 112 

Hartman. St. Louis. 126 



125 184 

84 142 

17 41 

!33 178 

137 170 

114 154 

83 

27 

29 



!39 
43 
46 

87 157 
52 93 



63 
25 
33 



119 

57 
59 



101 145 
88 173 



29 
26 
23 
31 



49 

54 

45 

38 

69 132 

106 160 

36 72 

86 161 

57 io 9 
45 85 
71 130 

21 59 
no 121 

76 153 

66 128 

67 157 



325 
325 

323 
322 
320 
3i7 
317 
316 

3i5 
3i4 
3i4 
3i4 
313 
312 
3" 
3" 
3io 
310 
310 

309 
309 
3°9 

3=9 
308 
308 
3 n 7 
307 
305 
305 
303 
302 
301 



27 38 

4 22 

1 3 

13 62 

12 23 

6 58 



21 

3 

1 

13 

5 

11 

1 
1 
6 

5 
o 

4 

1 

3 



32 

1 

8 
18 

7 
27 

o 

4 
28 

4° 
7 
3 
9 
3 



10 23 

10 35 

6 14 

8 30 

8 13 
16 10 

9 12 



4 
5 
5 

9 
4 



4 
30 
16 
16 
18 



The averages of the other Philadelphia players 
are: Geier, .285 ; Dowd, .284 ; McFarland, .267; 
Cross, .261; Boyle, .259 ; Nash and Gillen, .258 ; 
Taylor, .252 ; Shugart, .251 ; Clements, .239 ; 
Fifield, .234, and Wheeler, .203. The other 
Philadelphia players not having played in fifteen 
championship games, received no average. 

Fielding Averages. 

Only the players taking part in fifteen or more 
championship games are given averages in the 
appended list: 

First Basemen. 

Name. g. 

Tebeau, Cleveland 91 

Douglass, St. Louis 17 

Vaughn, Cincinnati 35 

Decker, Chicago 38 

Tenny, Boston 128 

Clark, New York no 

Boyle, Philadelphia 25 

Anson, Chicago .101 

Lyons, Pittsburg 34 

Werden. Louisville 134 

Lajoie, Philadelphia. ...106 

Connor, St. Louis 22 

O'Connor, Cleveland... 33 
Tucker, Bos. & Wash.. 98 
LaChance, Brooklyn... 125 

Rothfuss, Pittsburg 30 

Doyle, Baltimore 114 

O'Brien, Baltimore 25 

Beckley. Cin. & N. Y...114 
Grady, Phila. & St. L.... 84 

Davis, Pittsburg 62 

Cartwright, Wash 33 



P.O. 


A. 


E. 


P.C. 


912 


42 


5 


•994 


146 


7 


1 


•993 


342 


17 


4 


•989 


338 


28 


5 


.988 


1239 


79 


16 


.988 


1065 


66 


15 


.987 


217 


6 


3 


.987 


940 


23 


13 


.987 


326 


17 


5 


•985 


1339 


121 


23 


•985 


1070 


37 


18 


.984 


237 


11 


4 


.984 


340 


9 


6 


•983 


904 


46 


17 


.982 


1280 


62 


2b 


.981 


231 


11 


5 


•979 


1 102 


75 


25 


•979 


203 


9 


5 


•977 


994 


58 


23 


•977 


805 


50 


22 


•975 


564 


27 


20 


.967 


291 


52 


11 


.966 



9 o 



PUBLIC LEDGER ALMANAC. 



Second Basemen. 

Name. g. p.o. a. 

McPhee, Cincinnati 80 205 269 

Cross, Philadelphia 41 71 125 

Reitz, Baltimore 127 282 448 

Smith, Louisville 21 47 59 

Tebeau, Cleveland 17 34 53 

Corcoran, Cincinnati... 44 125 143 

Geier, Philadelphia 37 89 120 

Lowe, Boston 121 272 404 

Demontreville, Wash... 31 80 98 

Childs, Cleveland 114 322 386 

Connor, Chicago 77 179 295 

Padden, Pittsburg 135 372 399 

Hallman, Phila.&St.L.no 283 337 

Schoch, Brooklyn 65 185 232 

O'Brien, Washington... 84 221 250 

Houseman, St. Louis... 36 93 117 

Gleason, New York 131 306 403 

Callahan. Chicago 30 68 96 

Rogers, Louisville 37 83 122 

Canavan, Brooklyn 63 154 165 

Dolan, Brooklyn 18 43 68 

Dowd, St. L. & Phila.. 23 57 72 

Pfeffer, Chicago 32 72 94 

Johnson, Louisville 33 72 93 

Third Basemen. 

Quinn, Baltimore 34 40 82 

Clingman, Louisville... 115 175 275 

Irwin, Cincinnati 134 189 231 

Wallace, Cleveland 130 194 255 

Collins, Boston 133 213 303 

Nash, Philadelphia 77 115 145 

Riley, Washington 101 147 228 

Donnelly, Pitts. &N.Y. 66 70 121 

Shindle, Brooklyn 134 179 248 

McGraw, Baltimore 105 116 182 

Cross, Philadelphia 44 65 87 

Everett, Chicago 83. 125 146 

McCormick, Chicago... 53 56 118 

Hartman, St. Louis r2§ 162 253 

Davis, Pittsburg 32 55 59 

Joyce, New York 108 167 200 

Wrigley, Washington... 29 37 67 

Hoffmeister, Pittsburg. 47 50 68 

Short Stops. 

Quinn, Baltimore 21 61 58 

Jennings, Baltimore 115 336 417 

Davis, New York 131 346 436 

Dahlen, Chicago 75 215 297 

Ely, Pittsburg 133 306 460 

McKean, Cleveland 127 231 381 

Corcoran, Cincinnati... 64 164 211 

Cross, St. Louis 130 330 514 

G. Smith, Brooklyn 113 216 399 

Allen, Boston 32 80 115 

Nash, Philadelphia 19 51 51 

Long, Boston 106 276 347 

McCormick, Chicago.™ 45 no 152 

Ritchie, Cincinnati 69 146 204 

Gillen, Philadelphia 69 131 198 

Demontreville, Wash.. .101 262 359 

Wrigley, Washington... 31 70 112 

Stafford, Louis. & N.Y. 109 210 364 

Shugart, Philadelphia.. 40 103 130 

Dolan, Louisville 18 40 50 

Callahan, Chicago 16 24 54 

Outfielders. 

Nance, Louisville 34 60 8 

Blake, Cleveland 31 86 3 

Brodie, Pittsburg 100 216 n 



p.c. 



*7 


■9 6 5 


7 


•9 6 5 


27 


.964 


4 


•9 6 3 


4 


.956 


12 


•955 


10 


•954 


33 


•953 


10 


•947 


42 


•944 


29 


•942 


47 


.942 


39 


.941 


27 


•939 


33 


•935 


ib 


.929 


56 


.927 


14 


.921 


18 


.919 


33 


.906 


12 


.902 


15 


.895 


21 


.888 


22 


.882 


6 


•952 


24 


■949 


27 


•939 


31 


•935 


38 


•93i 


23 


.919 


35 


.914 


19 


.909 


45 


.905 


36 


.892 


19 


.888 


37 


.879 


26 


.870 


64 


.866 


18 


.863 


60 


.861 


18 


.852 


28 


.808 


4 


.967 


54 


•933 


57 


•932 


39 


.929