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Full text of "Public schools of Wilson County, North Carolina"

3 73.756+3 

Wk 77S r 

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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF WILSON COUNTY, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Charles Lee Coon 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 



http://www.archive.org/details/publicschoolsofwOOcoon 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



OF 



WILSON COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 



TEN YEARS 

1913-1914 

TO 

19234924 



PUBLISHED BY THE 
BOARD OF EDUCATION OF WILSON COUNTY 
A 1924 



BARRETT'S PRINTING HOUSE, WILSON 



MEMBERS BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1913-14 TO 1923-24 

1. Those who have served during any part of the past ten years : 

Nathan Bass, chairman, July 1, 1913, to December 4, 1919. 

R. T. Barnes, July 1, 1913, to February 2, 1914. 

C. E. Brame, February 2, 1914, to April 7, 1919 (succeeding R. T. Barnes), 

B. J. Thompson, July 1, 1913, to November 3, 1919. 

N. L. Barnes, April 7, 1919, to November 6, 1922 (succeeding C. E. Brame) 

J. H. Thompson, November 3, 1919 (succeeding B. J. Thompson). 

R. L. Barnes, November 6, 1922 (succeeding N. L. Barnes). 

E. J. Barnes, chairman, December 4, 1919, to February 6, 1922 (succeeding 
Nathan Bass). 

Doane Herring, chairman, February 6, 1922 (succeeding E. J. Barnes). 

John B. Eason, April 2, 1923. 

William H. Dixon, April 2, 1923. 

2. Present members of the Board of Education: 

Doane Herring, chairman; J. H. Thompson, R. L. Barnes, J. B. Eason 
and W. H. Dixon. 






iawn 



Raleigh 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OF 

WILSON COUNTY 

North Carolina 



BY 

CHARLES L. COON 

Superintendent of Schools 



TEN YEARS 
1913-1914 TO 1923-1924 



Prof. C. L. Coon was elected to succeed E. J. Barnes as superintendent, his 
tin of office to commence first Monday in October, 1913." — From Minutes 
I ird of Education, August 25, 1913. 



North Carolina 

Board of Education of Wilson County 

September. 1924 



. 



SOME SIGNIFICANT FACTS 



Items 



1. Value of property for taxation 

2. Value school property 

White 

Colored 

3. Paid all teachers 

White 

Colored 

4. Yearly salary of teachers 

White 

Colored. 

5. Number of teachers 

White 

Colored 

6. Census, 6-21 

White 

Colored 

7. School enrollment 

White 

Colored 

8. White enrollment, grades 7-11 

9. Number white children attending 

100 days and more ._ 

10. Over-age pupils in the grades (white) 

11. Average daily attendance.. 

White 

C ol ored 

12. Standard high schools 

13. School trucks 

14. Pupils carried by trucks 



S16.000.000 

128,500 

102,000 

26,500 

42,163 

33,369 

8.794 

281 

318 

195 

150 

[05 

45 

10,753 

5,785 

4,968 

7,291 

4,076 

3,221 

427 



1,195 (29%) 
2,610 (64%) 
4,428 
2,621 
1.807 

1 







$46,927,490 

1,492,330 

1,371,180 

121,150 

245,857 

212,510 

33,347 

839 

1,031 

383 

293 

206 

87 

14,675 

3,145 

6,620 

11,676 

6,850 

4,826 

1.221 



4,567 (68%) 
3,515 (53%) 
7,597 
4,775 
2,822 
5 

66 
2,200 



10 Years' Gain 



30,927,490 
1,363,830 
1,269,180 
94,650 
203,694 
179,141 
24,553 
558 
713 
188 
1 13 
101 
42 
4,012 (37%) 
2,360 (41%) 
1,652 (33%) 
4,385 (60%) 
2,774 (68%) 
1,605 (50%) 
794 

3,372 

11% decrease 

3,169 (72%) 

2,154 (82%) 

1,015 (56%) 

4 

66 
2,200 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

I. County-wide School Tax Election, 1918 5 

II. Bonds Voted for School Buildings, 1913-14 to 1923-24 8 

III. State Loans for School Buildings 9 

IV. A Short History of the Town of Wilson Schools 10 

V. Facts About School Consolidation, 1917-24 11 

VI. Teachers' Salaries, 1913-14 and 1923-24 14 

VII. School Expenditures, 1923-24 15 

VIII. School Taxes Levied for 1924-25 16 

IX. School Property, 1913-14 and 1923-24 17 

X. School Buildings, 1913-14 and 1923-24 22 

XL Comparison School Attendance. 1913-14 and 1923-24 56 

XII. Comparison White Enrollment by Grades, 1913-14 and 1923-24 57 

XIII. Grade Enrollment and Over-age Pupils, 1913-14 and 1923-24 5S 

XIV. Increase in Days Attendance, White Children, 1913-14 and 1923-24. 73 
XV. Grade Enrollment and Over-age Pupils, Colored Schools, 1923-24.. 77 

XVI. Scholarship of White Teachers, 1923-24 and 1924-25 80 

XVII. Elementary Daily Programs of School Work, 1924-25 82 

XVIII. Suggestions and Directions for Principals and Teachers, 1924-25.. 85 

XIX. Wilson County and City Teachers, 1924-25 (White) 94 

XX. Types of Teacher.s Not Wanted- 9S 

XXI. Total Teachers' Salary Budget, 1924-25 100 

XXII. Trucks — Cost of Operation, 1923-24 100 



PREFACE 

The facts set forth in this report show that the schools of Wilson 
County have made considerable progress during the past ten years. 

"We now have five standard high schools in the county — Wilson, 
Stantonsbnrg, Black Creek, Kock Ridge, and Elm City. By the end 
of 1024-25 we shall add Lucama and Gardner's to the list of standard 
high schools for white children and the Wilson Colored School to the 
list of standard high schools for colored children. We have good school 
buildings for all the white children, except at Town Creek. 

We still have the task of equipping all the elementary schools with 
such teaching equipment in the matter of libraries, maps, globes, and 
apparatus as will put them in the Standard Elementary School Class 
as defined by the 'N. C. State Department of Education. 

We still have the task before us of unifying and standardizing the 
instruction given in all our schools. We must have more and better 
supervision of the work done in the schools. 

We still have the task of making broader our courses of study and of 
extending the benefits of the schools to the adult population of the 
county. 

There is no reason why our school buildings cannot be made the 
centers for many forms of extension teaching and community better- 
ment. 

We still have the task of increasing the daily attendance of the chil- 
dren and of eliminating the over-age pupils in the grades. Possibly the 
most expensive item of our school expense is irregular attendance. 

We still have the task of providing suitable school buildings for the 
colored children in many parts of the county. 

Finally, let me express my thanks and grateful appreciation to all the 

people of the county who have had a part in making possible the school 

progress set forth in this report. In the name of the children and their 

welt are, I make bold to ask the continued cooperation and support of 

every citizen who loves his county and its future, to the end that our 

schools may become entirely worthy of the great task committed to them. 

Charles L. Coo^ ? 

Superintendent of Schools. 
November 1, 1924. 



I. COUNTY-WIDE SCHOOL TAX ELECTION, 1918 

The following is a brief history of the county-wide school tax election 
held on January 18, 1918: 

1. A STATEMENT ABOUT OUR SCHOOLS 

To the People of Wilson County: 

The general county school tax is sufficient to run our public schools 4y 2 
months and pay most of the white teachers only $40 per month. A few white 
teachers who are principals of two-teacher schools are paid $45 a month for 
this short term. The State supplemented our school term only 10 days last 
year. It is impossible to get good teachers at such salaries for 5 months in 
12 months. One of two things can he done : 

1. The County Board of Education can increase the salaries of teachers out 
of the general school fund now provided, which will mean that the county 
school term will have to lie reduced to less than 4 months. Then the county 
board will he forced to ask for a special county tax levy to run the schools 
four months as the State Constitution requires. If that were done, the 18 
districts which are now levying a special school tax and which have school 
terms of 7 to 9 months will have to pay their part of this special county tax, 
made necessary by the fact that there are 30 other districts in the county 
which are not now making any effort to help themselves to have better schools 
by increased school taxation. 

2. The other thing the County Board of Education can do is to submit to 
the people of the whole county the question of levying a special school tax of 
not more than 30 cents on the $100 worth of property in all the school districts, 
which is the same tax our 18 local tax districts now pay to supplement their 
part of the general county school fund. If such a special tax were voted. 
then every school district in Wilson County would have at least a seven 
months school term and no district would pay more school tax than is now 
paid by Evansdale. Parker's, or any other local tax district we now have. 

The County Board of education, therefore, intends to appeal to the people 
of the county to vote the special school tax mentioned above. It will be well 
in this connection for all to remember four things : 

1. All legal voters of the county will be entitled to register and vote whether 
they live in any one of the present local tax districts or not. The public 
schools are a county interest and every voter may have a voice in making 
those schools better, not only in his own district but in every other district. 

2. If the people of the county fail to approve the proposed local tax for all 
our 48 school districts, then the IS local tax districts now in existence remain 
as they are. 

3. If those who now live in our IS local tax districts are indifferent to this 
question and fail to vote for this county local tax. then we see no way by 
which we can avoid raising the meager short term teachers' salaries now 
paid, and that will make an increased county tax levy for schools an absolute 
necessity. Surely it is not fair to ask the IS districts now helping themselves 
to raise their school taxes unless they say by their votes they desire that done. 

4. Many of the schoolhouses of the county are as poor and as devoid of good 
furniture and equipment as they well can be. The school law makes it obliga- 
tory that every district bear at least one-half the expense of building and 
repairing its own schoolhouse. Without a district local tax, most of our 
schoolhouses must remain poor and there is no help for it except to decrease 
the present short school term. 



6 The Public Schools of Wilson County 

In conclusion, we are certain that the school affairs of this county have 
been managed with intelligence and economy. But the general school funds 
have remained about the same for the last 4 or 5 years. During that time the 
cost of everything has greatly increased. We simply cannot longer conduct 
the schools on the money we have without reducing the term and thus making 
a special tax a certainty, unless the people will adopt the local tax measure 
now proposed. We confidently believe the people of the county will stand 
behind the plan proposed to better the children's schools. We are. therefore, 
asking every citizen of the county to aid in this vital cause. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. J. Barnes, 

B. J. Thompson, 

C. E. Beame, 
County Board of Education. 

2. NOTICE OF SPECIAL ELECTION 

State of North Carolina — Wilson County. 
To the Board of County Commissioners: 

According to the provisions of chapter 71 of the Public Laws of 1911, we, 
the undersigned members of the County Board of Education, hereby petition 
that you order an election to be held in Wilson County to ascertain the will of 
the people whether there shall lie levied and collected a special school tax of not 
more than thirty cents on each $100 worth of taxable property and of not more 
than ninety cents on each taxable poll to supplement the general school fund 
of Wilson County. 

This the 5th clay of November. 1917. 

( Signed ) E. J. Barnes, 
C. E. Brame, 
B. J. Thompson, 
County Board of Education. 

On the above petition the board of county commissioners took the following 
action : 

1. That the petition be granted and that the election asked for is hereby 
ordered to be held on Friday. January is. 1918; that there be a new registra- 
tion of voters: and that the registration books he opened on Monday, December 
10, 1917, and close on Friday, January 11. 1918, at sunset. 

2. That the following registrars and judges of election are hereby appointed 
for this election : 

(a) For Black Creek Township: Wade R. Brooks, registrar, and J. S. 
Tomlinson and F. M. Yelverton. Voting place : Black Creek. 

(b) For Cross Roads Township: Joseph Bass, registrar, and I. H. Davis 
and Nathan Bass. Voting place: Lucama. 

(c) For Gardner's Township: W. B. Forbes, registrar, and Paul Thomas 
and William Barnes. Voting place: Wilbanks. 

(d) For Old Fields Township: R. L. Barnes, registrar, and H. R. Wilkin- 
son and J. S. Bailey. Voting place: Township voting place. 

(e) For Saratoga Township: J. A. McKeel, registrar, and W. D. Owens and 
John B. Ea son. Voting place : Saratoga. 

(f) For Spring Hill Township: S. C. Barnes, registrar, and J. R. Narron 
and Wiley R. Barnes. Voting place: Township voting place. 

(g) For Stantonsburg Township: R. ('. Bailey, registrar, and John C. 
Stanton and J. L. Turner. Voting place: Stantonsburg. 

(h) Taylor's Township: John S. Thompson, registrar, and W. D. Dew and 
A. M. Thompson. Voting place: New Hope Schoolhouse. 



The Public Schools of "Wilson County 7 

(i) Toisnot Township: Clyde Hedgepeth, registrar, and Zeb Dawes and 
R. A. Winstead. Voting place : Elm City. 

(j) Wilson Township: J. A. Clark, registrar, and C. P. Farmer and James 
W. Uzzell. Voting place : Comity courthouse. 

3. That those who vote for the tax proposed shall vote a ballot on which is 
printed or written the words "For Special Tax - ' ; and those who vote against 
the tax proposed shall vote a ballot on which is printed or written the words 
"Against Special Tax.*' 

4. That advertisement of this election be made by the clerk of this board for 
30 days by notice posted at the courthouse door and in at least one public 
place in each township and for four weeks in a newspaper published in Wilson 
County. 

By order of the commissioners. John R. Dildy, Clerk. 

This 6th day of December. 1917. 

3. RESULT COUNTY-WIDE LOCAL TAX ELECTION 

The election yesterday for a county-wide local tax of not more than 30 cents 
on each $100 worth of property for each school district was carried by a hand- 
some majority. . . . The following are the official returns by townships : 

Name Registered For Against 

Wilson 307 26S 39 

Black Creek 125 

Stantonsburg 103 

Gardners 91 

Toisnot 1S5 

Saratoga 58 

Taylor's 4S 

Spring Hill 61 

Old Fields 233 

Cross Roads 71 

Total 1.2S2 SG6 416 

Every voter registered and not voting is counted against the measure. Only 
a small number of opponents went to the polls and cast their ballots against 
this salutary measure. — Wilson Daily Times, January 19, 1918. 



95 


30 


99 


4 


40 


51 


110 


7.-, 


22 


36 


34 


14 


51 


10 


104 


129 


43 


28 



II. BONDS VOTED FOR SCHOOL BUILDINGS, 
1913-14 TO 1923-24 

The following bond issues for school buildings have been voted during 
the past 10 years : 

1. Town of Wilson — 

a. On May 24. 1013. $30,000: votes for, 240; votes against. 0. 

b. On April 10. 1017. $150.000 : votes for. 273 ; votes against. : registra- 

tion. 364. 
e. On May 7. 1021. $300.000 : votes for. 645 : votes against. 15 : registra- 
tion. 863. 

d. On May 27. 1024. $35,000 ; votes for. 472 ; votes against. 1 ; registra- 

tion. 613. 

e. Total school bonds voted by the town of Wilson during the past 10 

years. $515,000. 

2. Wilson County — 

(1) Old Fields Township: 

a. Rock Ridge, on September 22. 1017. $5.000 ; votes for. 41 ; votes 

against, 2: registration. 47. 

b. The whole township, on December 30. 1921. $145,000; votes for. 

150: votes against. 70: registration. 282. 

c. Total for township. $150,000. 

(2) Stantonsburg: 

a. On February 15. 1010. $15,000: votes for. 71: votes against. 1; 

registration. 79. 

b. On December 31. 1021. $25,000: votes for. 00: votes against. 6; 

registration, 128. 

c. Total for the district. $40,000. 

(3) Black Creek Township: 

a. On July 5. 1010, $25,000; votes for. 177: votes against. 0; 

registration, 253. 
1). On July 12. 1921. $60.000 ; votes for. 114: votes against. 13; 

registration. 177. 
c. Total for the township, $S5.000. 

(4) Elm City: On July 16. 1021. $75,000; votes for. 140; votes against. 

6. registration. 185. 

(5) Spring Hill Township: On September 26. 1921, $35,000; votes for. 

108; votes against. 65; registration, 101. 

(6) Taylors Township: On September 3. 1921. $25,000; votes for. 30; 

votes against. 8; registration. 45. 

(7) Saratoga Township: On September 27. 1021. $25,000: votes for. 45: 

votes against. 1 : registration. 55. 

(8) Cross Roads Township: On August 21. 1923. $75,000: votes for, 

150; votes against. 8: registration. 203. 

3. Summary of bonds — 

a. Wilson $515,000 

b. Old Fields 150,000 

c. Stantonslmrg 40.000 

d. Black Creek 85.000 

e. Elm City 75.000 

f. Spring Hill 35.000 

g. Taylor's 25.000 

h. Saratoga 25.000 

i. Cross Roads 75,000 

Total $1,025,000 



III. STATE LOANS FOR SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

From Literary Fund : 

a. August 10. 1919 $35,000 

b. July 1, 1920 - - 35,000 

c. July 1. 1921 - 35.000 

From Special Building Fund : 

a. September 15. 1922 $50,000 

b. March 1. 1923 45.000 

c. December 1. 1924 70,000 

Total State Loans $270,000 



IV. A SHORT HISTORY TOWN OF WILSON SCHOOLS 

At a mass meeting of the citizens of Wilson, held during the week of 
July 8, 1881, a committee of five were appointed to recommend trustees 
and to take such steps as might be necessary to establish a graded school 
for white children. At a meeting held on July 15, 1881, the following 
persons were elected trustees : T. J. Hadley, president ; M. Rountree, 
treasurer; M. T. Move, secretary, K. H. Winstead, F. W. Barnes, R. J. 
Taylor, G. W. Blount, H. C. Moss, G. D. Green, and Warren Woodard. 
This committee proceeded to raise the necessary funds by private sub- 
scription to conduct the school for one year. The Wilson Advance of 
August 26, 1881, announced the following teachers for the session 1881- 
1882; J. L. Tomlinson, superintendent, J. F. Bruton, Mrs. E. W. Adams, 
Mrs. W. F. Mercer, and Miss M. A. Hearne, assistants. It was also 
announced that the school would open on September 5, 1881, in the 
Wilson Collegiate Seminary building, the site of the present residence of 
Mr. J. T. Wiggins. 

On September 2, 1881, the books to be used in the school during 1881- 
1882 were announced as follows: Xew American Spellers, Appleton's 
Readers, jNTew American Arithmetics, Mitchell's Xew Geographies, Reed 
».\: Kellogg's Grammars, Moore's School History of jSTorth Carolina, 
Goodrich's Primary History F. S., Barnes' F. S. History, Spencerian 
System of Penmanship, and Worchester's School Dictionaries. 

On September 23, 1881, the enrollment was 250 pupils. In October, 
1881, George M. Lindsay, of Rocky Mount, was added to the teaching 
force. The total expenses of the first year's operations of the school were 
$4,651. 

During the year 1S83, the idea of conducting the school by private 
donations was abandoned and a special school tax was voted; the taxes 
of white property owners going to the white school and the taxes of 
colored property owners going to the colored school. This race division 
of the school taxes was declared unconstitutional by our State Supreme 
Court at the September, 1886, term. The Wilson Graded School closed 
its 1886-87 term in May, 1887, and the graded school idea was aban- 
doned for four years because the majority of the people of this com- 
munity were then opposed to public schools for negro children at public 
expense. But in 1891 the people reversed themselves and voted to estab- 
lish schools for white and negro children by public taxation. 

SUPERINTENDENTS, 1881-1924 

Julius L. Tomlinson 1SS1-18S3 

John F. Bruton 1SS3-18S4 

Eugene C. Branson 1884-1886 

Collier Cobb (acting) 1SS6 

Philander P. Claxton 1SS6-1887 

School discontinued 1887-1891 

Julius I. Foust 1891-1894 

George W. Connor 1894-1896 

Ernest P. Mangum 1896-1905 

Gray R. King 1905-1907 

Charles L. Coon 1907- 



V. FACTS ABOUT SCHOOL CONSOLIDATION, 1917-24 

The following maps graphically set forth the progress made during 
the past seven years in school consolidation. In 1917 only the Wilson 
town high school offered a standard high school course. The other four 
high schools were not standard schools. This year we have Black Creek, 
Elm City, Stantonsburg, Bock Eidge, and Wilson on the list of standard 
high schools. By the end of 1924-25 we shall add Lucama and Gardner's 
to the list. 



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VI. TEACHERS' SALARIES, 1913-14 AND 1923-24 



Year 


White 


Colored 


Total 


Number of 
Teachers 


Average 
Yearly Salary 




White 


< 'ulored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


I. Wilson— 

1913-14 

1923-24 


<1° 722 
75,536 
62,814 
493% 

20,647 
136,974 
116,327 
567% 

33,369 
212.510 
179,141 
536% 


? 4,705 
12,474 
7,769 
165% 

4,089 
20,874 
16, 785 
410', 

8.794 
33,347 
24,553 
290' ; 


$17,427 
88,010 
70,583 
405% 

24,736 
157,848 
133,112 
538'; 

42,163 
245,857 
203,694 
483% 


22 
56 
34 
154',, 

83 
150 
67 
80% 

105 
206 
101 
96% 


15 

23 

8 

53% 

30 
64 
34 
113% 

45 
87 
42 
93% 


37 
79 
42 
113% 

113 
214 
101 
89' , 

150 
293 
143 
95% 


? 578 
1,349 

771 

133% 

248 
913 
665 
268% 

318 
1,031 
713 
224%, 


S 313 
542 


Increase . 

Per cent increase. 

II. Country — 

1913-14 


229 
73% 

136 
326 
190 


Per cent increase. . .. 
III. County— 

1913-14 

1923-24 


140% 

195 
383 


Increase . _ .. 

Percent increase 


188 
06% 



VII. SCHOOL 


EXPENDITURES, 1923-24 




Items 


Country 


Wilson 
(Township) 


Elm City 

(Toisnot 

Township) 


Lucama 

(Cross 

Roads Tw.) 


County 


I. Teaching and Supervision: 

1. White elementary teachers. 

White high school teachers . 

2. Colored elementary teachers 


$ 81.422 
20,204 
14,839 


$ 48,800 
25,086 
12,474 


$ 11,012 
5,130 
3.968 


? 7,874 
2,822 
2,067 


S 149,108 
53,242 
33,348 




2,400 

1,321 

188 


1,650 


2,400 


2,200 


8,650 




1,321 










188 












Totals .- 


120,374 


88,010 


22,510 


14,963 


245,857 






II. Administration: 


130 

3,225 

992 








130 


2 Clerical 








3,225 






63 




1,055 












4,347 




63 




4,410 










III. Operation and Maintenance: 


12,845 

2,627 

2,550 

5,939 

33,975 

387 

61 

164 

869 


11,111 

1,302 

472 


1 , 498 
516 
417 


498 
70 
98 


25,952 




4,515 




3.537 




5,939 




1,185 
422 
201 
105 
124 


2,793 
89 


2,360 
66 


40,313 




964 




262 




52 
159 


30 


321 




1,182 








59,417 


14,922 


5,524 


3,122 


82,985 








IV. Outlays: 

1. New buildings (W.)__ 

2. Repairs (W.) __ _ 


24,397 

2,963 

2,630 

283 

1,000 

388 

158 




390 

1,465 

3,733 

16 




24,787 


1,091 

1,514 

26 


399 
81 


5,918 


3. Furniture (W.) 


7,958 
325 






1,000 


6. Repairs (C.) 


150 
2,870 


312 


4 


854 




3,028 










9. Other outlays _ ______ 


25 








25 










Totals 


31,814 


5,651 


5,916 


484 


43,895 






V. Borrowed Money Repaid: 


35,558 
55,918 
3,000 








35,558 










55,918 










3,000 




400 


372 




772 












91,476 


400 


372 




95,248 










310,458 


108,983 


34,385 


18,569 


472,395 







VIII. SCHOOL TAXES LEVIED FOR 1924-25 



Townships 


Valuation 


Property 
Tax 


Dog Tax 


Poll Tax 


Total 

School 

Tax 




825,199,327 


S 226,794 
25,311 
20.741 
19,573 
27.410 
10.577 
37,764 
19,347 
17.575 
17,256 


S 7! 
318 
217 
339 
465 
171 
391 
368 
328 
208 


S 3,864 
675 
618 
660 
1,012 
390 
999 
652 
588 
429 


$ 231 4-18 


Black Creek 


2,812,331 
2,304,567 

2,174,888 
3,04.5,. ".30 
1,175,222 
4,190,001 
2,149,633 
1,952,736 
1,917,249 


211.301 


Cross Roads. . _ .. ._. 


21.576 
20,572 


Old Fields... 


28,887 


Tavlors... _ __.__. .... 


11,138 
39,154 


Gardners. . ._ _ . _ . 

Saratoga. . _. . 

Stantonsburc 


20,367 
18,491 
17.893 


Totals . 


46,927,490 


422.347 


3,595 


9,888 


435,830 







IX. SCHOOL PROPERTY, 1913-14 AND 1923-24 



1. Aggregate Value White and Colored School Property, 1913-14 and 

1023-24 





Sites, 
Acres 


Value 
Sites 


School 
Rooms 


Value 
Houses 


Total 


County, 1923-24: 

White 

Colored .. . 


20 

28 

48 

53 

27 

80 


105 
42 


S 64,950 
11,550 


229 
64 


$ 1,306,230 
109,600 


? 1,371,180 
121,150 


Totals 


147 


76,500 


293 


1,415,830 


1,492,330 


County, 1913-14: 
White 




12,000 
5,000 


113 

48 


90.000 
21,500 


102,000 






26,500 












17,000 

52,950 
6,550 


161 


111,500 


128,500 








10 Years' Increase: 

White . ... 




116 
16 


1,216,230 
88,100 


1,269,180 






94,650 










Totals 




59,500 


132 


1,304,330 


1,363,830 











2. Summary 


White School Property, 


1924 




Townships and 
Number Buildings 


Sites, 
Acres 


Value 
Sites 


School 
Rooms 


Value 
Houses 


Total 


1. Black Creek 


_. 1 


8 
8 
5 

24 
6 
7 

10 

10 
20 


8 2,400 
2,600 
1,800 
4,050 
3,500 
1,800 
2,600 
3,600 
4,200 
38,400 


18 
20 
10 
30 
8 
8 

17 
21 
20 
71 


S 120,300 
97,400 
72,900 

215,150 
44,500 
47,200 

102,400 

107,180 
93,200 

405,000 


S 122,700 




9 


100,000 


3. Gardners 

4. Old Fields 


1 

-. 4 


74,700 
220,200 


5. Saratoga.. 

6. Tavlors.. . ._ 

7. Spring Hill 


1 

1 

9 


48,000 
49,000 
105,000 


8. Stantonsburg 

9. Toisnot 

10. Wilson 


2 

2 

.. 4 


110,780 

97,400 

443,400 








Totals 


20 


105 


64,950 


229 


1,306,230 


1,371,180 



3. Summary 


Colored School Property, 


1924 




Townships and 
Number Buildings 


Sites, 
Acres 


Value 
Sites 


School 
Rooms 


Value 
Houses 


Total 


1. Wilson.. 

2. Toisnot 


5 

4 

.. 3 


10 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 


S 7,150 
600 
400 
300 
500 
400 
400 
400 
1,000 
400 


28 
8 
5 
3 
4 
7 
4 
4 


S 89,100 
5,100 
3,700 
1,000 
800 
5,600 
2,800 
1,200 


S 96.250 
5,700 
4,100 


4. Gardners 

5. Old Fields 


4 

9 


1,300 
1,300 


6. Spring Hill... 


. 3 


6,000 


7. Taylors. 

8. Black Creek 


2 
.. 4 


3,200 
1,600 


9. Stantonsburg . 

10. Saratoga . 



1 


1,000 


1 


300 


700 


Totals. . .. ... 


28 


42 


11,550 


64 


109,600 


121,150 



18 The Public Schools of Wilson County 

4. Details Value of White School Property, 1024 



Township and Srhool 


Site and 
Value 


Size and 

Value 

Teachers' 

Home 


Size and 
Value 

School- 
house 


Value 

School 
Plant 


Compl 


led 


1. Cross Roads: 


(i acn s 

S 2,0011 

2 acn - 
8 600 


10 rooms 
8 3.000 
5 rooms 
8 4,000 


16 rooms 
? 71.000 
4 rooms 
S 19,400 




1924 
1924 




b. Scotts... . 


8 


7i'i,ooo 






8 


21.000 




Totals 


S am s 
8 2,600 


15 rooms 
? 7.000 


20 rooms 
8 90,400 










s 


100,000 




2. Black Creek 


S acres 
S 2,400 


10 r us 

S 16.000 


IS r< ii ims 
8 104.300 




1921 






S 


122. Too 






5 acn s 
8 1 , 800 


10 rooms 

8 12.000 


16 rooms 
S 60,900 




1920 






8 


74.700 




4. Old Fields: 
a. Rock Ridge 


9 acres 

S 1 . .100 
5 ai n - 

S l.ioo 
5 aeri s 

S 750 
5 acri s 

S 700 


15 rooms 
S 12,000 

5 rooms. . 
S 6,000 

5 rooms 
S 6,000 

5 rooms 
6.000 


16 rooms 
8 87.450 

6 rooms 
8 32. win 

6 roi ims 

S 32 900 

ims 

8 32,900 




1923 
1923 
1923 
1923 

1923 






8 


100,950 






s 


40,000 




d. Bullocks. 


s 


3 1,650 






s 


39,600 




Totals 


2 1 : 1 1 ■ 1 1 - 

8 4,050 


.'ill rooms 
s 30,000 


34 rooms 
S 186,150 








8 


220.200 






acres 
S 3,500 


5 rooms 

S 6.000 


S rooms 
8 38,500 




1922 






8 


IS. 0110 






7 acres 
S 1,800 


5 rooms 
S 6.1 


8 rooms 
8 41,200 




1922 






8 


19,000 




7. Spring Hill: 


5 acri s 
§ 1,500 

5 acn s 
8 1,100 


6 rooms 
S 5.500 
5 rooms 

s 6.000 


9 rooms 
- 50,200 

8 rooms 
8 40.700 




1921 
1922 




b. St. Marys 


s 


57,200 






8 


47. SOU 




Totals,... 


10 acn s 
8 2,600 


11 rooms 
> 11,500 


17 rooms 
$ 00,900 








8 


105.000 




S. Stantonsburg: 


."> acre - 
S 3,000 

2 acres 
8 600 


lo ri ioms 

S 12.00(1 


17 rooms 
S 8! ,780 
4 rooms 
S 5,400 




1920 am 
1919 






8 


101,780 


1923 






S 


6,000 










Totals 


7 acres 
s 3,600 


lo rooms 
3 U 000 


21 roi ous 
S 95. ISO 








s 


110,780 





The Public Schools of Wilson County 19 

Details Value of White School Property, 1924 — Continued 



Township and School 


Site and 
Value 


Size and 
Value 

Teachers' 
Home 


Size and 
Value 

School- 
house 


Value 
School 
Plant 


Completed 


9. Toisnot: 

1. Elm City 


6 acres 
S 3,600 
4 acres 

% aoo 




16 rooms 

$ 87,200 
4 rooms 
$ 6,000 








% 90,800 


1922 






% 6,600 


1922 


Totals..., 


10 acres 

S 4,200 




20 rooms 
S 93,200 








S 97,400 




10. Wilson: 


6 acres 
$ 12,000 

3 acres 
S 2,400 

5 acres 

$ 3.000 

6 acres 

S 21,000 


10 rooms 
S 16,000 


18 rooms 
S 40,000 
12 rooms 
S 30,000 
11 rooms 
S 40,000 
30 rooms 
$ 279,000 








$ 68,000 


1902 and 1920 






% 32,400 


1914 












S 43,000 


1917 and 1924 




S 300,000 


1923 










$ 38,400 


10 rooms 
S 16,000 


71 rooms 
S 389,000 








S 443,400 







5. Value Colored School Property, 19 


24 




Townsh 


p and Schools 


Site and 
Value 


Size and 
Value 

School- 
house 


Value 
School 
Plant 


Year 
Completed 


1. Wilson: 

a. Old School 




2 acres 
S 1,500 
5 acres 

S 5,250 
2 acres 

S 300 
1 acre 

% 100 


12 rooms 
S 30,500 
10 rooms 
$ 49.000 

5 rooms 
S 9,000 

1 room 
S 600 






b. New School. . 


I 32,000 


1906 and 1924 




$ 54,2.50 


1924 


d. Lanes 




S 9,300 


1920 




S 700 






5 










Totals 


10 acres 
$ 7,150 


28 rooms 

S 89,100 








S 96,2.50 




2. Toisnot: 

a. Elm City .. 


1 acre 
S 300 

1 acre 
S 100 

1 acre 
S 100 

1 acre 
% 100 


5 rooms 
S 4,000 

1 room 
$ 300 

1 room 
S 400 

1 room 
S 400 








S 4,300 


1919 




% 400 




d. Pases.. 


% 500 






4 


S 500 




Totals 


4 acres 

$ 600 


8 rooms 

S 5,100 








$ 5,700 















20 The Public 

Value Colored 



Schools of Wilson County 
School Property, 1924 — Continued 



Township and Schools 


Site and 
Value 


Size and 
Value 
School- 
house 


Value 
School 
Plant 


Year 
Completed 


3. Cross Roads: 


2 acres 
S 200 

1 acre 
S 100 

1 acre 
S 100 


3 rooms 
% 3,000 

1 room 
$ 400 

1 room 
S 300 








$ 3,200 


1918 




$ 500 






S 400 






4 acres 

S 400 


5 rooms 
S 3,700 






$ 4,100 




4. Gardners: 


1 acre 
S 100 

1 acre 
$ 100 

1 acre 
S 100 


1 room 
S 200 

1 room 
S 200 

1 room 
% 400 






b Wilbanks - 


$ 300 






S 300 






$ 500 


no house 














3 acres 
S 300 


3 rooms 
S 1,000 






S 1,300 




5. Old Fields: 








no house 




1 acre 

$ 100 

2 acres 

S 400 


2 rooms 
S 500 

2 rooms 
$ 300 








I 600 






$ 700 




Totals - -- - 2 


3 acres 
S 500 


4 rooms 
S 800 






S 1,300 




6. Spring Hill: 


1 acre 
S 200 

1 acre 
S 100 

1 acre 
$ 100 


1 room 
S 600 

3 rooms 
S 2,500 

3 rooms 
$ 2,500 








% 800 


1917 




S 2,600 


1917 




S 2,600 


1917 


Totals 3 


3 acres 
$ 400 


7 rooms 
$ 5,600 






$ 6,000 




7. Taylors: 








no house 




1 acre 

i 100 

2 acres 

$ 300 


1 room 
S 300 

3 rooms 
$ 2,500 








S 400 






$ 2.800 


1919 


Totals 2 


3 acres 

S 400 


4 rooms 
S 2,800 






$ 3,200 


| 













The Public Schools of "Wilson County 
Value Colored School Property, 1924 — Continued. 



21 



Township and Schools 


Site and 
Value 


Size and 
Value 

School- 
house 


Value 
[School 
^ Plant 


Year 
Completed 


8. Black Creek: 


1 acre 
S 100 

1 acre 
S 100 

1 acre 
t 100 

1 acre 
$ 100 


1 room 
S 400 

1 room 
S 300 

1 room 
[% 200 

1 room 
S 300 








$ 500 






S 400 






$ 300 






% 400 




Totals 4 


4 acres 
S 400 


4 rooms 
S 1,200 








$ 1,600 




9. Stantonsburg: 


2 acres 
$ 400 

2 acres 
$ 600 












$ 400 


no house 












$ 600 


no house 








Totals 2 


4 acres 
S 1,000 












$ 1,000 










10. Saratoga: 


2 acres 
S 200 

2 acres 
$ 200 












$ 200 


no house 




1 room 

$ 300 




c. Bethel 


$ 500 


no house 












Totals 3 


4 acres 
I 400 


1 room 

$ 300 








$ 700 





X. SCHOOL BUILDINGS, 1913-14 AND 1923-24 

1. BLACK CREEK (OLD) 




Black Creek 




Ferrell 




TOMLINSON'S 

Note. — Pittman's and Minshew's were one-room schools. 



2. CROSS ROADS (OLD) 





Upper Black Creek 




LUCAMA 

Note. — Barnes was a two-room school ; Mumford's was a one-room school 
which has been combined with Scotts. 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 27 



CROSS ROADS (NEW) 

(a) Lucama : An addition of 10 rooms to the old building is being added. 
The completed building will have 16 rooms, an assembly hall, office, library, 
etc. This building will have steam heat, lights, and water. It will be modern 
in all respects. This addition will cost $65,000. 

(b) Scott's: A new primary school with four modern classrooms, an assem- 
bly hall, and quarters for teachers, all under one roof, is being erected. This 
building will have steam heat, lights, water. This building will cost $25,000. 



3. GARDNER'S (OLD) 




Thomas 




Woodard 



Note. — Pender's was a one-room school ; Thome's was a one-room school 
of the Thomas type; Holdon's was a two-room school like New Hope; 
Baker's was a one-room school of the Thomas type ; Wilbanks was a one- 
room school like Woodard's. 



4. OLD FIELDS (OLD) 




BOYKIN'S 




Rock Hill 




'•■""T?^ .. i^5^; 



BOSWELL'S 




Rock Ridge 




Wells - 




Pleasant Grove 



Neverson 



Note. — Sims was a one-room school of the Neverson type. Lodge was a two-room school of the 
type of Boykins. 




I 



5. SARATOGA TOWNSHIP (OLD) 




Saratoga 




Burruss 




Eagles 



6. SPRING HILL. (OLD) 




St. Mary's 




JOHNSON'S 




Rexfrows 




KlRUY'S 




BUCKHOKX 




WARD'S 




REVEI/L'S 



7. STANTONSBURG (NEW) 




EYAXSDALE 



8. TAYLOR'S (OLD) 




Page 




New Hope 

Note. — Home's was a one-room school. 



9. TOISNOT (OLD) 




Elji City 




TURNER'S 




Rosebud 




Town Creek 



Note. — Oak Grove same as Turner's ; 
Parker's same as Town Creek. 



Page's same as Town Creek ; 




LAMM'S 




LANE'S 



Note. — These were abolished in 1918. Two similar schools (Mill and 
Daniel) were abolished in 1916. 



XL COMPARISON SCHOOL ATTENDANCE, 1913-14 
AND 1923-24 



1. Country 



Items 



1923-24 



10 Years' 
Gain 



Gain, Per 
Cent in 
10 Years 



1. Census, 6-21 

White 

Colored 

2. Enrollment 

White. 

Colored .. 

3. Average daily attendance 

White 

Colored 



7,642 
4,360 
3,282 
5,445 
3,082 
2,363 
3,205 
1,926 
1,279 



10,307 
5,956 
4,351 
8,601 
5,000 
3,601 
5,369 
3,303 
2,066 



2,665 
1,596 
1,069 
3,156 
1,918 
1,238 
2,164 
1,377 



2. Wilson 



1. Census, 6-21 

White 

Colored 

2. Enrollment 

White... 

Colored.. 

3. Average daily attendance 

White 

Colored 




3. County 



1. Census, 6-21 

White... 

Colored 

2. Enrollment 

White 

Colored 

3. Average daily attendance 

White 

Colored 




4,012 
2,360 
1,652 
4,385 
2,774 
1,605 
3,16!) 
2,154 
1,015 



XII. COMPARISON WHITE ENROLLMENT BY GRADES, 
1913-14 AND 1923-24 



Townships and Years 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


Total 


1. Wilson: 

1923-24 


327 

238 

89 

68 
51 
17 

72 
75 
*3 

87 
98 
*11 

127 
166 
*39 

282 
241 
41 

130 
94 
36 

141 

131 

10 

215 

137 
78 

170 
141 
29 


258 
136 
122 

35 
20 
15 

04 
36 

28 

55 
35 
20 

77 
47 
30 

144 
114 
30 

70 

28 
42 

84 
29 
55 

98 
49 
49 

84 
62 
22 


241 
106 
135 

34 
18 
16 

50 
40 
10 

39 
43 
*4 

80 
64 
16 

121 
91 
30 

55 
34 
11 

42 
9 
33 

66 
43 
23 

91 
61 
30 


223 
100 
123 

32 
19 
13 

44 
25 
19 

53 
29 
24 

58 
60 

*2 

126 

116 

10 

54 
39 
15 

81 
50 
31 

47 
30 

95 
61 
34 


187 
71 
116 

24 
14 
20 

45 
25 
20 

36 
13 
23 

66 
42 
21 

100 
35 
65 

47 

6 

41 

35 

34 

1 

58 
28 
30 

58 
58 


173 
115 

58 

21 
5 

16 

31 
10 
21 

35 
20 
15 

51 
38 
13 

83 
50 
33 

23 
14 
9 

39 
29 
10 

41 
26 
15 

64 
33 
31 


146 
91 
55 

19 
21 

*2 

25 
14 
11 

36 


118 
46 

11 


79 
32 

47 

6 


61 
33 
28 


37 
10 
27 


1,850 


1913-14 


978 




872 


2. Taylors: 
1923-24 


250 


1913-14 






148 




11 

27 
15 
12 

12 


6 

19 
3 
16 

4 






102 


8. Stantonsburg: 

1923-24 


20 


6 


403 


1913-14 


243 




20 
4 


6 
4 


160 


4. Gardners: 

1923-24 


365 


1913-14 


238 


Increase 

5. Cross Roads: 

1923-24 


36 

34 
13 

21 

57 
15 
42 

17 

11 
6 

24 
9 
15 

31 

4 
27 

44 
26 
18 


12 

23 
15 
8 

43 
20 
23 

8 


4 

15 

10 
5 

44 

5 

39 

7 


4 

12 
7 
5 

25 


4 

4 
3 

12 


127 
550 


1913-14 


466 


Increase 

6. Old Fields: 

1923-24 

1913-14 


84 

1,037 
687 


Increase . .. 

7. Saratoga: 

1923-24 


25 
4 


12 


350 
415 


1913-14 


226 


Increase 

8. Black Creek: 

1923-24 


8 

24 
4 
20 

18 


7 
20 


4 
9 


8 


189 
507 


1913-14 


295 


Increase 

9. Spring Hill: 
1923-24 


20 
14 


9 


8 


212 
618 


1913-14 






334 




18 

36 
10 
26 


14 

25 
4 
21 






284 


10. Toisnot: 

1923-24 


16 
5 
11 


10 
10 


693 


1913-14 


461 


Increase.. 


232 


County: 
1923-24 


1,619 

1,372 

247 

18 


969 

556 

413 

74 


819 

509 

310 

61 


843 

546 

297 

54 


656 
326 
330 
101 


561 

340 

221 

65 


433 
204 
229 
112 


320 
110 
210 
191 


233 

54 

179 

332 


151 
45 
106 
236 


84 

14 

70 

500 


6,688 


1913-14 


4,076 




2,612 


Per cent increase. 


64 



•Decrease. 



XIII. GRADE ENROLLMENT AND OVER-AGE PUPILS, 
WHITE SCHOOLS, 1913-14 AND 1923-24 



1. Summary Normal and Over-Age in the Grades, 1913-14 and 1923-24 



Schools 


Number 

Normal 

Age, 

1913-14 


Number 
Over 
Age, 
1913-14 


Number 

Normal 

Age, 

1923-24 


Number 
Over 
Age, 
1923-24 


Enrolled, 
1913-14 


Enrolled, 
1923-24 


10 Years' 
Increase 
Enroll- 
ment 


Saratoga — 

Spring Hill 


59 

26. i f ; 
99 

29 .2% 
36 

23.6% 
185 

26 .9 C ; 

120 

26 .0% 

92 

31.1';. 

75 

33 .2% 

93 

38 .2% 
123 

26.4% 
584 

59.7% 


167 

73.11', 
235 

70 .S% 
112 

76 .4% 
511-' 

73. 1% 
341 

74.0% 

203 

68 .9% 
163 

66 .8% 
150 

61 .8 r ( 
343 

73.6% 
394 

40 .3% 


139 

33.6% 
219 

35.4% 

87 

34 .8% 
422 

40.7% 
349 

50 .3% 
208 

41.09! 
153 

41.8% 
200 

49 .0% 
250 

io. jo 
1,140 

61. 4% 


276 
66.4' ; 

399 

64.6% 
163 

65 .2% 
615 

59 .3% 
344 

49 .7% 
299 

59.03 
212 

58.2% 
203 

50 .4% 
300 

54.5% 
704 

38.6% 


226 
334 
148 
687 
461 
295 
238 
243 
466 
978 


415 
618 
250 

1,037 
693 
507 
365 
403 
550 

1,850 


189 
284 


Taylors 


102 


Toisnot . 


350 
232 




212 




127 




100 




84 




872 








1,466 
35 .9% 


2,010 
04.1% 


3,173 
47.4% 


3,515 
52.6% 


4,076 


t6, 688 


2,612 




64 .3% 



*Sharpsburg omitted; no data, 1913-14. tl62 Sharpsburg omitted, 1923-24. 



The Public Schools of "Wilson County 



59 



2. Wilson Township, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6.... 


163 
92 

33 

16 
10 
9 
2 
2 


10 
98 

58 
41 
21 
11 
11 
5 
3 




















173 


7 


6 

78 

67 

37 

29 

12 

6 

5 

1 


















196 


8 


5 
67 
73 
34 

23 
12 

7 
2 
















174 


9 


4 
60 

50 

25 

27 

11 

4 

3 

1 

1 

1 














195 


10 


9 

29 
41 

29 
33 
^2 
4 
4 
2 












210 


11 


16 
45 
38 
23 
16 
5 

1 










178 


12 










159 


13 


6 

44 
28 
20 
11 
6 
2 
1 


2 

18 
26 

20 
5 
6 
2 






127 


14 






144 


15 




2 
21 

20 
13 
4 
1 


4 
14 

9 
5 
5 


101 


16 






77 


17 










57 


18 










37 


19 










15 


20 










7 


21 and over 














































327 


258 


241 


223 


187 


173 


146 


118 


79 


61 


37 


1 850 






Normal age and 
under, . _ _ 

Over age. 


255 
72 


166 
92 


151 
90 


145 
78 


114 
73 


79 
94 


99 
47 


50 

68 


46 
33 


23 
38 


18 
19 


1,146 

or 61.4% 

704 

or 3S .6% 



3. Wilson Township, 1913-14 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


Total 


6 


77 
77 

44 
11 
12 
10 


5 
42 

40 

18 
19 
4 
o 
4 
2 




















82 
122 




3 

26 
20 
34 
14 
3 
6 


















8 


5 

28 
28 
17 
14 
6 
2 
















115 


9 


6 
19 

28 

14 
2 
2 














83 


10 


8 
15 
30 
19 
20 

6 
10 

5 

2 












1 Q 


11 


6 

23 
20 
17 
10 

4 
3 


1 
2 

13 
15 

7 
5 
3 








95 


12 








95 


13 


5 
11 
7 

5 
4 


1 

4 

10 
12 

5 

1 


7 
3 


76 
73 
40 
39 
28 
9 


14 




15 




16 












17 












18 












19 
















20 














1 










1 




























238 
























Totals . 


136 


106 


100 


71 


115 


91 


46 


32 


33 


10 


978 




Normal age and 
under-. __- - 

Over age 


54 

81 


87 
49 


49 
57 


51 
49 


53 
18 


53 

62 


49 
42 


31 

15 


23 
9 


27 
6 


7 
3 


584 
or 59.7% 

394 
or 10.3% 



(.so 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



3. Taylor's Township, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


17 
16 
11 
12 
5 
3 
1 
3 






















17 




8 
12 
6 

2 
6 

1 


o 
4 
5 
8 
4 
2 
5 


















26 


8 


















27 


9 


2 

6 

'.) 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 
















25 


10 


1 
3 
2 
9 
5 
3 
1 


1 












23 


11 












25 


12 


1 

6 
6 

4 
1 

_> 


2 

2 
5 
1 

5 
1 

2 










13 


13 










29 


14. 


4 

3 
2 

1 
1 








°3 


15 






4 


1 






14 


16-.. 










14 


17... 








1 

1 
2 






3 


18 
















6 


19... 
















3 


20 




































1 




1 






2 






















Totals 


68 


35 


34 


32 


21 


21 


19 


11 


6 






250 










Normal age and 


33 
35 


20 
15 


11 
23 


8 
24 


4 
20 


2 

I 1 ' 


4 
15 


4 

7 


1 
5 






87 








or 34 .8% 
163 








or 65 .2% 



4. Taylor's Township, 1913-14 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


in 


11 


i\ 


12 
10 

11 
6 
2 

1 
2 






















12 


7 


3 

2 

4 
2 

4 

1 
1 
1 


1 


















11 


8 


















14 


9 


2 

4 
2 
3 
2 
2 

2 


















10 


10 


3 

4 
5 
4 

1 


1 

1 
5 
1 
4 
2 














14 


11 














14 


12 


2 
2 

1 


1 

2 
5 
7 
4 
2 










16 


13 










16 


14 










18 


15 












13 


16 












8 


17 








2 


18 
























19 


























20 














































































Totals 


51 


20 


18 


19 


14 


5 


21 










148 














Normal ago and 


22 
29 


3 

17 


3 
15 


3 

16 


2 
12 


5 


3 

18 










36 












or 23 .6% 
112 












or 76.4% 



Public Schools of Wilson County 



61 



5. Stantonsburg Township, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


26 
21 

12 
5 
4 
3 

1 


1 
23 
15 

7 
8 
2 

1 




















27 


7. . 




















44 


8 


8 
13 

10 

5 
3 
3 

1 


4 
6 
10 

8 
4 
5 
4 
2 
1 
















39 


9 . 


1 
9 
11 

5 

7 
9 
2 

1 














32 


10 


3 

6 

5 
5 
5 
3 
1 
2 
1 


1 










41 


11 










40 


12... 


2 

6 
6 
4 
3 
3 


1 
6 
8 

3 

5 
3 
1 








26 


13... 








33 


14 




3 

6 
3 

4 
3 






38 


15 






1 

5 
8 
2 
2 
1 
1 


2 

2 

1 

1 


24 


16. . 






22 


17... 








22 


18 










9 


19 












3 


20 


















2 






















1 
























Totals 


72 


64 


50 


44 


45 


31 


25 


27 


19 


20 


6 


403 


Normal age and 
under.. 

Over age. _. 


47 
25 


39 
25 


21 
29 


20 
24 


21 
24 


9 

22 


9 
16 


15 
12 


9 
10 


6 
14 


4 


200 
or 49 .6% 

20a 

or 50 .4% 



6. Stantonsburg School, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


19 

18 
9 

4 
3 






















19 




15 
7 

5 
3 

5 
2 




















33 


8 


8 
7 

8 
5 
3 
2 
3 
1 


4 
5 

8 

5 
4 
4 
3 
















28 


9.. 


1 
7 
8 
1 
5 
6 
2 















9<> 


10 


3 

5 

4 
5 
3 

1 
1 
2 


1 










30 


11 










26 


12 


1 


2 

5 

5 
2 

3 
3 


1 
6 
7 
3 
5 
3 
1 








19 


13 








26 


14 






3 
6 
3 

4 
3 






32 


15 






1 

5 
8 
2 
2 
1 
1 


2 
2 

1 

1 
6 


°0 


16 






19 


17 










1 


9 2 


18.. ._ 










9 


19 












2 


20 




















2 






















1 
























Totals 


54 


37 


37 


35 


31 


24 


21 


26 


19 


20 


310 


Normal age and 


37 
17 


22 
15 


15 

22 


17 
18 


16 
15 


8 
16 


8 
13 


14 
12 


9 
10 


6 
14 


4 
2 


156 


Over age 


or 50 .3% 

154 

or 49.7% 



(32 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



7. Evansdale School, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


7 
3 

3 
1 
1 
3 


1 
8 
S 

4 
3 




















8 






















11 


8 




















H 


9 


6 

2 
o 
2 
1 


1 

2 
3 

1 
1 
















10 


10 


2 
3 

4 
2 
3 














11 


11 














14 


12 


1 

1 

2 
2 














13 




1 


1 

1 

2 










1 


14 




1 








6 


15 














4 


16— 








1 












3 


17 




















18 


























19 












1 












1 


20 












































































Totals 


18 


27 


13 


9 


14 


7 


4 


1 








93 












Normal ago and 


10 
S 


17 
10 


6 


3 
6 


5 

9 


1 

G 


1 
3 


1 








44 


Over age . 








or 47 .3% 
49 












or 52.7% 



8. Stantonsburg Township, 1913-14 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


0... 


29 
13 
11 

8 
5 

3 

4 
2 


1 
5 
5 
5 

2 
1 
4 
3 
1 
2 
















30 




3 
4 
8 

8 
4 
5 
1 
3 
1 
2 
















21 


8— 


2 
4 
3 
3 

4 
4 
2 

1 
2 


2 
1 
4 
2 
3 
4 
6 
1 
1 












22 


9 












24 


10 


1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 










29 


11 












15 


12 _._. 


2 

2 
4 
2 
1 
2 










19 


13 _._. 










20 


14 


3 

5 
5 

1 








24 


15 










14 


16 




1 






14 


17 








5 


18 _. 






1 












1 


19... 








1 




1 


1 


1 

1 






4 


20 














1 




















































Totals 


75 


36 


40 


25 


25 


10 


14 


15 


3 






243 










Normal age and 


42 
33 


11 
25 


15 
25 


6 

19 


9 
16 


3 

7 


4 
10 


3 

12 








93 




3 






or 38 .2% 
150 








or 61 .8% 



The Public Schools of "Wilson County 



03 



9. Gardner's, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 





Grades 


Total 


Age 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


38 
20 
13 
4 
6 
3 
2 


1 
8 

25 
8 
2 
4 

6 




















39 


7 




















28 


8 


8 
7 

10 
6 
5 
1 
2 


1 
2 

10 
15 
12 
5 
4 
3 
1 
















47 


9 


3 
9 

4 
8 
4 
4 
3 
1 


1 
1 
1 

4 

8 
3 
6 
6 

3 












22 


10 












32 














38 


12 


2 

7 
9 
4 
6 
5 
2 
1 










29 


13 


1 

2 

1 

4 
o 

1 








36 


14 










24 


15 




1 


2 

1 
1 






21 


16 








21 


17 


1 






1 
3 


2 


13 


18 








11 


19 












1 


20 




















1 
1 


1 


















1 






2 
























Totals 


87 


55 


39 


53 


36 


35 


36 


12 


4 


4 


4 


365 






Normal age and 


58 
29 


34 

21 


15 
24 


13 

40 


12 
24 


7 
28 


9 


3 

9 


2 
2 






153 




4 


4 


or 41 .8% 
212 




or 58 .2% 



10. Gardner's, 1913-14 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6.. 


24 
22 
18 
12 

8 
7 
4 
1 
1 
1 


1 
4 
9 

9 
3 

3 
3 

2 

1 




















25 


7... 




















26 


8... 


4 
4 

9 
8 
4 
9 
1 
3 
1 


















31 


9 


















26 


10 


3 

7 
2 
8 
1 
3 
3 
2 


1 
1 

3 
2 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 














24 


11.. 


1 
1 












24 


12... 












16 


13... 












23 


14 


1 
6 
2 

3 

1 
3 

2 












7 


15 












16 


16.. 












6 


17 
















6 


18 


















2 


19 




















4 


20 




















2 






















































98 


35 


43 


29 


13 


20 












238 
















Normal age and 


46 
52 


14 
21 


8 
35 


3 
26 


2 
11 


2 
18 












75 














or 33.2% 
163 














or 66 .8% 



64 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



11. Cross Roads, 1923-24 (Lucama and Scott's) 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


50 
28 

18 
13 

6 
3 
1 

1 






















50 




21 
15 

13 
9 
4 
4 

11 


3 
21 
15 

20 
10 
4 


















52 


8 .. 


3 

6 

20 

7 
6 
2 

3 

2 
















57 


9 
















47 


10 


10 
10 
10 

10 
10 
5 
5 
3 

2 














66 


11 


4 
11 

6 
11 
10 
5 
1 
2 

1 


1 
4 
10 
5 
6 
1 
1 

4 
1 
1 










42 


12 










43 


13 


1 

4 
8 
3 
2 

3 

2 








52 


14 


4 
3 
3 
2 
2 
1 


3 




36 


15 






36 


16 








2 

5 
1 
1 


2 
2 

o 

1 


23 


17 








12 


18 








1 
1 


15 


19 








10 


20 








4 












1 


5 


















Totals .- 


127 


77 


80 


58 


66 


51 


34 


23 


15 


12 


7 


550 






Normal ago and 
under _ ._ 

Over age 


78 
49 


36 
41 


39 
41 


29 
29 


20 
46 


15 

36 


15 
19 


5 
18 


4 
11 


5 


4 
3 


250 
or 45 .5% 

300 
or 54.5% 



12. Cross Roads, 1913-14 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 . 


47 
30 

31 

25 
9 
9 
6 
5 
2 
1 
1 






















47 




1 

6 

9 
11 
5 

1 




















31 


8 


9 

10 

10 

4 
6 
5 
5 
5 
1 


















46 


9 


2 

8 
12 
9 
5 

5 
2 
2 
5 
1 
2 
















46 


10 


1 

2 

12 

4 
8 
3 

3 
1 

1 














39 


11 














35 


12 














33 


13 


1 

6 
5 
14 
9 
2 
1 


3 
2 

5 
2 

1 


2 
3 

2 

3 

2 
3 








38 


14 








30 


15 


1 

4 

2 

3 






30 


16... 


4 
1 

2 


1 

2 
1 


38 


17— 


22 


18 






20 


19 






1 
1 


7 


20 












4 
















































Totals 


166 


47 


64 


60 


42 


38 


13 


15 


10 


7 


4 


466 


Normal age and 


89 


7 
40 


19 
45 


10 
50 


3 

39 






5 
10 


1 
9 


7 


1 
3 


123 


Over age 


38 


13 


or 26 A% 

343 

or 73 .6% 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



65 



13. Old Fields Township, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


101 

72 

38 
32 
18 
9 
3 
4 
1 
3 






















101 


7 


35 
33 

19 
15 
8 
2 
9 
1 


30 

28 
16 

8 
3 
1 


















114 


8 


o 
14 
23 

24 
27 

9 
16 

2 

5 
4 
















103 


9 


2 

14 
16 

14 
20 
16 
8 
6 
3 
1 


1 
1 
6 

15 
8 
18 
15 
10 

2 












99 


10 












91 


11 












97 


12 


1 
11 

11 

15 

9 

6 

3 

1 










76 


13 










57 


14 


6 

12 
10 
6 
5 
2 
2 








78 


15 


1 

4 
9 
9 
6 
9 
6 






57 


16 


2 

3 

6 
5 
8 
1 


1 

3 
4 
1 
3 


47 


17 






1 


39 


18 


1 




28 


19 








19 


20 












21 
















10 






















Totals. 


282 


144 


121 


126 


100 


83 


57 


43 


44 


25 


12 


1,037 


Normal age and 


173 

109 


68 
76 


65 
56 


39 

87 


32 
68 


23 

60 


12 
45 


6 
37 


1 
43 


2 
23 


1 
11 


422 




or 40 .7% 
615 




or 59 .3% 



14. Old Fields Township, 1913-14 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


59 
62 

37 

36 

19 

16 

3 

5 

1 

2 

1 


1 
6 
18 

18 
25 
16 
11 
3 
9 
5 
2 




















60 






















68 


8 


8 
11 

13 
16 
16 
6 

11 
1 
6 
3 


















63 


9 


3 
10 

13 

20 

22 

19 

13 

4 

6 

5 

1 
















68 


10 
















67 


11 


3 
11 

8 
5 
5 
3 


1 
1 

2 

8 
14 
13 
5 
4 
2 












62 


12 


2 










56 


13 










49 


14 


2 

1 

2 
1 


2 

5 
9 
2 
1 
1 








65 


15. 


1 






43 


16 






37 


17 


2 






30 


18 










12 


19 














4 


20 








2 






3 


















































Totals 


241 


114 


91 


110 


35 


50 


15 


20 


5 






687 










Normal age and 


121 
120 


25 
89 


19 


13 
103 


35 


2 
48 


2 
13 


2 
18 


1 

4 






185 








or 26 .9% 

502 








or 73.1% 



G6 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



15. Lamm's, 1923-24 (Old Fields) 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


22 
23 
6 
9 

4 

1 
1 






















22 




7 

8 

8 
3 
3 

1 




















30 


8 


6 

7 
5 

1 

1 


3 
7 
6 

11 

1 
6 
1 
















23 


9 


3 

4 
3 
3 
4 
2 


1 












32 


10 












21 


11 


2 

4 

o 

7 
2 
1 












29 


12 












10 


13 












13 


14 












13 


15 














4 


16 




















1 


17 
























18 


























19 


























20 














































































Totals 


68 


30 


27 


35 


19 


19 












198 
















Normal age and 


47 
21 


15 

15 


13 
14 


16 
19 


12 


12 












105 














or 53 .0% 
93 














or 47 .0% 



16. Bullock's, 1923-21 (Old Fields) 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


23 
20 

8 
10 
5 
o 

1 
1 






















23 


7 


5 
6 
5 
5 
3 
3 


1 
5 
3 

2 


















26 


8 


















19 


9 


4 
3 

5 
3 
3 

2 


1 
2 
3 

4 
6 

1 
2 

1 














23 


10 


1 
1 

4 












18 


11 












21 


12 












17 


13 












12 


14 


3 














6 


15 


1 


4 
1 












7 


16 






4 

1 












6 


17 


















3 


18 


1 
















1 


19 










1 












1 














































































Total 


72 


30 


20 


25 


20 


16 












183 
















Normal age and 


43 
29 


11 
19 


9 
11 


7 
18 


6 
14 


6 
10 












82 


Over age 












or 44 .8% 
101 












or 55.2% 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



67 



17. Sims, 1923-24 (Old Fields) 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


27 
13 

10 
5 
6 
3 






















27 


7 


12 
7 

4 
1 
5 

2 

5 
1 




















25 


8 


5 
10 

9 
2 
6 
2 


6 
7 

8 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 
















24 


9. _ 
















25 


10 


6 
3 

3 
6 
7 
3 
5 
1 
1 














29 


11 


1 

2 

1 
6 
3 
2 
4 












21 


12 












21 


13 


1 
1 












12 


14 












24 


15 












8 


16 














8 


17 


















6 


18 


















1 


19 










1 












1 


20. 












































































Totals 


66 


37 


34 


40 


35 


20 












232 
















Normal age and 
under... 


40 
26 


19 
18 


15 
19 


15 
25 


9 
26 


3 












101 




17 












or 43 .5% 
131 














or 56 .5% 



18. Rock Ridge, 1923-21 (Old Fields) 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


29 
16 

14 
8 
3 
2 
1 
1 






















29 




11 
10 
5 

10 
6 
3 
2 


1 
9 
9 

3 

2 
1 


















28 


8 


















33 


9 


1 
5 

6 
5 
3 
3 
1 


1 
3 
6 
4 
5 
4 
1 
1 
1 














24 


10 














28 


11. 


2 

5 
3 
5 
6 
5 
2 












29 


12 


1 

11 

11 
15 
9 
6 
3 










22 


13 










27 


14 


6 

12 
10 
6 
5 
2 
2 








30 


15 


2 




1 

4 
9 
9 
6 
9 
6 






38 


16. 






2 

3 
6 
5 
8 
1 


1 

3 
4 
1 
3 


32 


17 






1 


2 


30 


18 






26 


19 














17 


20 














1 


21 
















10 






















Totals 


76 


47 


40 


26 


26 


28 


57 


43 


44 


25 


12 


424 


Normal age and 


45 
31 


21 
26 


19 
21 


6 
20 


10 
16 


21 


12 

45 


6 
37 


1 
43 


2 
23 


1 
11 


130 




or 30.7% 
294 




or 69 .3% 



OS 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



19. Saratoga Township, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


"> 


6 


7 


S 


9 


10 


11 


6 


30 
37 

23 
17 
15 
3 

9 
2 






















30 




7 

14 
14 
12 

9 

1 
3 
3 


1 
3 

12 
16 

4 
3 

1 


















45 


8 


















40 


9 


2 

6 
5 

8 
9 

12 
4 

1 


3 
6 
5 

6 
5 
6 
5 
6 
1 














48 


10 


1 












56 


11 












29 


l 9 


2 

3 
1 

5 
1 
o 

1 


2 
2 

8 
3 

2 










34 


13 


1 

2 

2 

1 
1 
1 








27 


14 


1 

1 

1 
1 
1 






36 


15 - 




2 




27 


16 




23 


17 


1 






1 




7 


18 






6 


19 






1 




1 




4 


20 








2 






3 


















































Total 


130 


70 


55 


54 


47 


23 


17 


8 


7 


4 




415 






Normal age and 


67 
63 


21 
49 


16 
39 


8 
46 


14 
33 


3 

20 


4 
13 


3 
5 


1 
6 


o 
2 


or 66 


139 




or 33.6% 
276 




•4% 



20. Saratoga, 1913-14 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


g 


26 
13 
15 

13 
11 
5 
6 
4 


1 
3 

1 
4 
3 
3 
5 
3 
1 
3 
1 




















27 






















16 


8 


2 
7 

5 

5 

4 
2 

1 


1 
2 
2 
5 
5 
8 
6 
2 

4 
3 
1 
















19 


9 
















26 


10 
















21 


11 
















20 


l 9 






1 










22 


13 














19 


14 




3 

1 
2 
2 
3 

1 
2 


3 

1 










16 


15 


1 










10 












8 


17 




2 
2 










8 


18 






1 










8 
















1 


20 










1 


2 










5 
















































Totals 


94 


28 


34 


39 


6 


14 


11 










226 














Normal age and 


39 
55 


5 
23 


9 
25 


5 

31 






1 

10 










59 




6 


11 










or 26.1% 
167 












or 73 .9% 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



69 



21. Black deck, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


42 
41 

15 
6 
4 
1 
3 






















42 




6 

20 

8 
22 
12 
8 
4 
3 

1 




















47 


8 


5 
14 

6 
3 
4 

2 
1 


1 
12 
16 

19 
13 
5 
8 
4 
2 
1 
















53 


9 
















49 


10_ 


3 
9 

8 
4 
5 
4 

2 






1 
1 
2 
2 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 
1 








55 


11 


4 
7 

5 
6 
5 
5 
4 
3 


6 

5 
3 
4 
2 
4 








55 


12_ 








48 


13 








32 


14 


1 
2 

5 
6 
3 
3 






29 


15 


1 
1 


2 
1 

1 

4 

1 




28 


16 .. 


22 


17 


23 


18 




17 


19 












6 


20 
















1 




















































Totals 


141 


84 


42 


81 


35 


39 


24 


24 


20 


9 


8 


507 


Normal age and 


83 
58 


26 
58 


19 
23 


29 
52 


12 
23 


11 

28 


11 
13 


9 
15 


3 

17 


3 
6 


2 
6 


208 


Over age 


or 41 .0% 

299 

or 59 .0% 



22. Black Creek, 1913-14 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6... 


28 

25 

24 

12 

13 

11 

8 

5 

3 






















28 




4 
4 

9 
4 
3 
3 

1 

1 


2 

2 

2 
1 


1 

3 

2 

11 

7 

i 
5 
1 

2 
















30 


8 
















33 


9... __ 
















23 


10 


1 

4 
3 

6 
3 
6 
5 
3 
1 














29 


11... _ 


2 
3 

5 
2 
4 
5 
4 
4 












29 














26 


13 












24 


14 


2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 


2 








18 


15 








20 


16 


1 


1 
1 








14 


17 




1 

1 








12 


18 


1 










8 


19 










1 


20 












































































Totals 


131 


29 


9 


50 


34 


29 


9 


4 








295 












Normal age and 


53 

78 


8 
21 


2 


17 
33 


5 
29 


5 
24 


9 


o 
2 








92 










or 31.1% 
203 










or 68 .9% 



70 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



23. Spring Hill Township, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


69 

58 
33 
21 
13 
10 
5 
4 
2 


1 

6 

20 

21 

19 

17 

5 

1 

3 

4 

1 




















70 


7 




















64 


8 


2 
16 

9 

20 
3 
6 
9 
1 


3 
8 
8 

13 
14 
14 

8 
5 
3 

1 
















58 


9 
















66 


10 -. 


2 
11 

8 
11 
10 
11 
3 
2 














51 


11 


2 
9 

11 
8 
4 
5 

2 












73 


12 


1 
1 

9 
10 

2 










45 


13 










48 


14 


1 

3 

4 
3 

4 
2 
1 


1 






51 


15 






38 


16 




4 
2 
5 






27 


17 








12 














9 






















2 


20 














1 


2 






4 
















































Totals 


215 


98 


66 


77 


58 


41 


31 


18 


14 






618 










Normal age and 


127 
88 


27 
71 


IS 
48 


19 

58 


13 
45 


11 

30 


2 
29 


1 

17 


1 
13 






219 








or 35.4% 
399 








or 64 .6% 



24. Spring Hill Township, 1913-14 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 





Grades 


Total 


Age 


1 


2 


3 


J 


5 


<i 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 




30 
33 

19 
14 
14 
12 
4 

3 
1 






















30 


7 


4 
8 
10 
10 
4 
5 
4 
o 

1 
1 




















37 




2 

4 
5 
10 
3 
8 
5 
3 
3 


2 
5 
6 
10 
10 

3 

5 

1 
1 
















31 


















33 




1 

1 

3 
4 
8 
5 
5 
1 














36 
















37 




3 

1 
6 
3 
6 
1 
4 
1 
1 












28 














26 




1 
1 
1 
1 










28 












19 












IS 














4 






































1 
























1 






















































137 


49 


43 


47 


28 


26 


4 










334 














Normal age and 


63 
74 


12 
37 





13 

31 


26 


3 

23 












99 




4 










or 29 .2% 
235 












or 70 .8% 



The Public Schools of "Wilson County 



71 



25. St. Mary's, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


42 
37 

25 
15 
11 
10 
5 
3 
1 






















42 


7 


4 
15 

10 
10 
12 
4 
1 
3 
4 
1 




















41 


8... 


2 

7 
5 
8 
1 
3 
5 


3 

7 
6 
6 
13 
5 
3 
















45 


9 
















39 


10 


2 
7 

7 
9 
7 
4 
2 
2 














34 


11 


2 
6 
5 

5 
3 

4 












45 


12 












36 


13 












26 


14 












24 


15 . 












11 


16 


















7 


17 






1 












3 


18 






















19 


























20 














































































Totals 


149 


64 


31 


44 


40 


25 












353 
















Normal age and 


79 
70 


19 
45 


9 
22 


16 
28 


9 
31 


8 
17 












140 














or 39.6% 
213 














or 60.4% 



26. Buckhorn, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


27 
21 

8 
6 
2 


1 
2 
5 
11 
9 
5 
1 




















28 


7 




















23 


8 




















13 


9 


9 

4 
12 

3 

4 
1 


1 

2 

1 
9 
5 
5 
3 
















27 


10 
















17 


11 


4 
1 

2 

3 
1 














28 


12 




3 

6 
3 
1 
1 
2 


1 

1 
9 
10 

2 










9 


13 


1 
1 










22 


14 


1 

3 
4 
3 
4 

1 


1 






27 


15 






27 


16 _ 






4 
2 
5 






20 


17 












9 


18 
















9 


19 . 




















2 


20 














1 


2 






4 
















































Totals 


66 


34 


35 


33 


IS 


16 


31 


18 


14 






265 










Normal age and 


47 
19 


8 
26 


9 
26 


3 
30 


4 
14 


3 
13 


29 


1 
17 


1 
13 






78 








or 29 .0% 
187 






or 71 .0% 



72 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



27. Toisnot Township, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


68 
51 

30 
13 

1 






















68 




20 
23 
15 

9 
8 
3 
5 


2 
21 
18 

14 
16 
10 
5 

2 
1 


1 

6 

14 

19 

17 
11 
12 
5 
5 
4 
















74 


8 
















80 


9 


4 
13 

9 

10 
10 

2 

3 














64 


10 


5 

10 
13 

11 
10 
5 
5 
4 












67 


11 


1 
4 
5 

12 

11 

6 

3 

1 

1 










62 


12 










51 


13 




5 
9 

5 
6 

3 

1 








53 


14 




5 
7 

4 
4 
2 
2 


3 
4 
3 

4 
1 

1 


3 

3 

1 
1 

1 
1 


53 


15 .-_ 




1 


42 


16 _- 




35 


17 






25 


18 












8 


19 








1 




1 


6 


20 








3 


















1 


2 






















Totals 


170 


84 


91 


95 


58 


64 


44 


30 


25 


16 


10 


693 


Normal age and 


119 
51 


43 
41 


41 
50 


40 
55 


20 
32 


28 
36 


10 
34 


14 


12 
13 


10 
6 


6 
4 


349 


Over age 


or 50 .3% 

344 

or 49.7% 



28. Toisnot, 191:5-14 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


31 
23 

23 
21 
12 

14 
8 
6 
1 
2 






















31 


7 


2 
9 

12 
8 

11 
6 

12 
1 
1 




















25 


8 - -- 


2 
11 

16 
13 
9 
6 

2 

1 
1 


















34 


9 


















44 


10 


8 
16 
12 

11 

3 

8 

1 
















44 


11 


11 

13 
14 

6 

4 
2 

1 














65 


12 


6 

6 
3 
4 
3 
6 

1 


3 

2 
5 
4 
5 

5 










57 


13 


3 

4 

1 








60 


14 


1 

1 

1 

1 






23 


15 


1 

2 
1 
1 




27 


16 


25 


17 






17 


18 






6 


19 














1 


20 






















2 




















































Totals 


141 


62 


61 


61 


58 


33 


26 


10 


4 


5 




461 






Normal age and 


54 

87 


11 

51 


13 

48 


8 
53 


11 
47 


6 


5 

21 


3 


2 


3 
2 




120 




or 26.0% 
341 




or 74 .0% 



XIV. INCREASE IN DAYS ATTENDANCE, WHITE 
CHILDREN, 1913-14 AND 1923-24 



1. Summary Increase in Days Attendance, White Children, 1913-14 

and 1923-24 



Schools 


Number 
Attending 

100 Days 

and More, 

1913-14 


Number 
Attending 

100 Days 

and More, 

1923-24 


10 Years' 
Increase 
Number 
Attending 
100 Days 


Number 

Attending 

Less than 

100 Davs, 

1913-14 


Number 
Attending 
Less than 
100 Days, 
1923-24 


Decrease 
Number 


Black Creek.. 


17 

5.8% 
134 
28 .8% 

2 

0.97 
76 
11.3% 


337 

66 .57 
366 

68 .37 
242 

66 .3% 
678 

65 .47 
335 

54 .3% 
299 

74.1% 
232 

56 .0% 
441 

63.7<r c 
165 

66 .0% 
1,472 

79 .67c 


320 
232 
240 
602 
335 
179 
214 
339 
148 
763 


278 
94 .2% 

332 

71 .27 
236 

99.1% 
611 

88.77 
334 

100 .07 
123 

50.67 
208 

91 .57 
359 

77.97 
131 

88 .57 
269 

27.57 


170 

33 .57 
184 

33 .47 
123 

33.77 
359 

34 .67 
283 

45 .77 
104 

25 .9% 
183 

44 .07 
252 

36.37 

85 

34 .07 
378 

20.4 


108 




148 




113 


Old Fields 


252 


Spring Hill 


51 




120 

49 .47 

18 

8.57 
102 

22.1% 

17 

11.5% 
709 

72 .5 , c 


19 




25 




107 




46 




109 




increase 




1,195 

29 .37 


4,567 
68 .27 


3,372 


2,881 
71 .77 


2,121 
31.87 


754 







74 



The Public Schools of "Wilson County 



2. Black Creek Township, 
1913- 14 and 1923-24 

Increase in Days in Attendance 



Attendance 


1913- 
14 


1923- 

24 


In- 
crease 


From 180 to 200 days 








170 to 180 days 








160 to 170 days 




6 


6 


150 to 160 days 




128 


128 


140 to 150 days .. 




73 


73 


130 to 140 days 


1 


48 


47 


120 to 130 days 


7 


30 


23 


110 to 120 days 


5 


33 


28 


100 to 110 days 


4 


19 


15 






90 to 100 days. 


26 


26 




80 to 90 days 


25 


26 


1 


70 to 80 days. 


44 


13 


•31 


60 to 70 days 


33 


13 


*20 


50 to 60 days 


38 


21 


•17 


Less than 50 days. 


112 


71 


*41 


Enrollment.. . 


295 


507 




Attending 100 days and more 


17 


337 


320 


Attending less than 100 days. 


278 


170 


*108 


Per cent attending less than 








100 days .. 


94.2 


33.5 


*60.7 







3. Cross Roads Township, 
1913-14 and 1923-24 

Increase in Days in Attendance 



Attendance 


1913- 
14 


1923- 

24 


In- 
crease 


From 180 to 200 days 








170 to 180 days.. 








160 to 170 days 








150 to 160 days 


23 

21 
21 
25 
21 
23 


78 
74 
74 
65 
50 
25 




140 to 150 days 


53 


130 to 140 days 


53 


120 to 130 days 


40 


110 to 120 days 


29 


100 to 110 days 


2 


90 to 100 days 

80 to 90 days. 

70 to 80 days 

60 to 70 days 


37 
36 
67 
57 
39 
96 


20 
26 
24 
20 
22 
72 


•17 

no 

*43 
*37 




*17 


Less than 50 days .. 


•24 




466 


550 








Attending 100 days and more 
Attending less than 100 days. 
Per cent attending less than 
100 days 


134 
332 

71.2 


366 
184 

33.4 


232 
*148 

*37.8 







4. Gardner's Township, 
1913-14 and 1923-24 

Increase in Days in Attendance 



Attendance 



From 180 to 200 days. 
170 to 180 days. 
160 to 170 days. 
150 to 160 days. 
140 to 150 days. 
130 to 140 days. 
120 to 130 days- 
110 to 120 days. 
100 to 110 days. 

90 to 100 days. 
80 to 90 days.. 
70 to 80 days.. 
60 to 70 days.. 
50 to 60 days.. 
Less than 50 days 

Enrollment. 



Attending 100 days and more 
Attending less than 100 days 
Per cent attending less than 
100 days 



1913- 
14 



238 



236 

99.1 



1923- 
21 



132 

40 
28 
21 
10 

11 



242 
123 



In- 
crease 



132 

40 
28 
21 
10 

9 



•11 

*16 
*18 
•15 
*19 
*33 



240 
•113 



5. Old Fields Township, 
1913-14 and 1923-24 

Inckease in Days in Attendance 



Attendance 


1913- 
14 


1923- 
24 


In- 
crease 


From 180 to 200 days 








170 to 180 days 








160 to 170 days 




10 

192 
150 
122 
86 
69 
49 


10 


150 to 160 days 

140 to 150 days... 

130 to 140 days 


7 
10 

9 

23 
20 


185 
140 
115 


120 to 130 days 


77 


110 to 120 days 


46 


100 to 110 days.. 


29 






90 to 100 days 

80 to 90 days 

70 to 80 days 

60 to 70 days 

50 to 60 days 

Less than 50 days 


111 
81 

102 
70 
56 

191 


50 
49 
38 
36 
41 
145 


*61 

*31 
*64 
*34 
*15 
*46 




687 


1,037 


350 






Attending 100 days and more 

Attending less than 100 days. 

Per cent attending less than 

100 days 


76 
611 

88.7 


678 
359 

34.6 


602 
*252 

*54.1 







•Decrease. 



The Public Schools of "Wilson County 



75 



6. Saratoga Township, 
1913-14 

Increase in Days in Attendance 



7. Spring Hill Township, 
1913-14 and 1923-24 

Increase in Days in Attendance 



Attendance 


1913- 
14 


1923- 
24 


In- 
crease 


From 180 to 200 days 


3 
3 




*3 


170 to 180 days.. 


*3 


160 to 170 days 




150 to 160 days. 


1 

1 


60 
34 
42 
41 
28 
27 


59 


140 to 150 days 


33 


130 to 140 days 


42 


120 to 130 days.. 

110 to 120 days 


2 
3 
5 


39 

25 


100 to 110 days 


22 






90 to 100 days _ 

80 to 90 days 

70 to 80 days 


16 
20 
19 
24 
19 
110 


36 
34 
14 
19 
19 
61 


20 
14 


60 to 70 days... 


*5 


50 to 60 days 


49 








226 


415 


189 






Attending 100 days and more 
Attending less than 100 days. 
Per cent attending less than 
100 days... 


18 
208 

91.5 


232 
183 

44.0 


214 
*25 

*47.5 







Attendance 


1913- 

14 


1923- 
24 


In- 
crease 


From 180 to 200 days 








170 to 180 days 








160 to 170 days 








150 to 160 days 




65 
62 
57 
63 
46 
42 


65 


140 to 150 days 




62 


130 to 140 days 




57 


120 to 130 davs 




63 


110 to 120 davs 




46 


100 to 110 days 




42 








90 to 100 days 

80 to 90 davs 

70 to 80 days 

60 to 70 days 


48 
51 
28 
28 
23 
156 


32 
30 
37 
42 
43 
99 


*16 

*21 
9 
14 


50 to 60 days 


20 


Less than 50 days 


*51 








334 


618 


284 






Attending 100 days and more 

Attending less than 100 days^ 

Per cent attending less than 

100 davs 


334 

100 


335 
283 

45.7 


335 
*51 

54 3* 







8. Stantonsburg Township, 
1913-14 and 1923-24 

Increase in Days in Attendance 



9. Taylor's Township, 
1913-14 and 1923-24 

Increase in Days in Attendance 



Attendance 


1913- 
14 


1923- 
24 


In- 
crease 


From 180 to 200 days.. 








170 to 180 days 








160 to 170 days 




3 
166 
57 
23 
28 

8 
14 


3 


150 to 160 davs.. 


33 
24 
14 
23 
15 
11 


133 


140 to 150 days.. 

130 to 140 days 


33 

*9 


120 to 130 days.. 

110 to 120 days 


5 


100 to 110 days. 


3 






90 to 100 days 


18 
9 
17 

15 

57 


26 
13 
12 
10 
10 
33 


8 


80 to 90 days 


4 


70 to 80 days 

60 to 70 davs 


*5 
3 


50 to 60 days 






*24 








243 


403 


160 






Attending 100 days and more 

Attending less than 100 days. 

Per cent attending less than 

100 days 


120 
123 

50.6 


299 
104 

25.9 


179 
*19 

*24.7 



*Decrease. 



Attendance 


1913- 
14 


1923- 
24 


In- 
crease 


From 180 to 200 days 








170 to 180 days 








160 to 170 days 








150 to 160 days 




54 
38 
22 
23 
15 
13 


54 


140 to 150 days 




38 


130 to 140 days 




22 


120 to 130 days 




9 £ 


110 to 120 days... 


6 
11 


g 


100 to 110 days.... 


r 2 






90 to 100 days 


11 
11 

21 
10 
10 
68 


10 
11 
15 
4 
11 
34 


*1 


70 to 80 davs 


*6 


60 to 70 days.. 




50 to 60 days. 

Less than 50 days 


1 

*34 




148 


250 








Attending 100 days and more 
Attending less than 100 days. 
Per cent attending less than 
100 days.... 


17 
131 

88.5 


165 
85 

34.0 


148 
*4& 







TG 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



10. Toisnot Township, 
1913-14 and 1923-24 

Increase in Days in Attendance 



11. AVilson Township, 
1913-14 and 1923-24 

Increase in Days in Attendance 



Attendance 


1913- 
14 


1923- 
24 


In- 
crease 


From 180 to 200 days 




8 
111 
63 
66 
57 
51 
31 
25 
29 


8 


170 to 180 days __ 

160 to 170 davs 


10 
15 

20 
16 
9 
10 
10 
12 


101 
48 


150 to 160 davs 


46 


140 to 150 days 


41 


130 to 140 davs 


42 


120 to 130 days 


21 


110 to 120 davs 


15 


100 to 110 davs 


17 






90 to 100 days . . 


63 
48 
54 
43 
41 
110 


30 
44 
34 
19 
26 
99 


*33 


80 to 90 days 


*4 


70 to 80 days 


*20 
*24 


50 to 60 davs 


*15 




*11 








461 


693 


232 






Attending 100 days and more 
Attending less than 100 days. 
Per cent attending less than 
100 days 


102 
359 

77.9 


441 
252 

36.3 


339 
*107 

*41.6 









Attendance 


1913- 
14 


1923- 
24 


In- 
crease 


From 180 to 200 days 




149 
711 
232 
108 
80 
57 
48 
54 
33 


149 


170 to 180 days _. 


251 

196 
120 
49 
22 
26 
20 
25 


400 


100 to 170 days 


36 


150 to 160 days,. 


*12 


140 to 150 days 


31 


130 to 140 days 

120 to 130 days 

110 to 120 davs _ 

100 to 110 davs 


35 

22 

34 

8 






90 to 100 days 


35 
45 
36 

29 
102 


58 
49 
44 
37 
42 
148 


23 


80 to 90 davs 


4 


70 to 80 davs 


8 


60 to 70 days 

50 to 60 days... 


15 
13 

*46 








978 


1,850 


872 






Attending 100 days and more 

Attending less than 100 days. 

Per cent attending less than 

100 days 


709 
269 

27 .5 


1,472 
378 

20.4 


763 
109 

*7.1 







•Decrease. 



XV. GRADE ENROLLMENT AND OVER-AGE PUPILS, 
COLORED SCHOOLS, 1923-24 



1. Wilson County Colored Schools, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6. 


324 
296 

290 

243 

199 

108 

112 

53 

42 

13 

6 

3 


8 
32 

62 
85 
88 
66 
54 
36 
24 
6 




















326. 


7... 




















304 


8 


9 

28 

37 

54 

55 

76 

43 

21 

20 

4 

4 

1 

1 


1 
4 
12 

19 
34 
52 
42 
38 
35 
19 
11 
o 
















332 


9. 
















337 


10 


3 

8 
9 

21 

33 

42 

29 

13 

4 

3 

2 














336 


11 


1 

4 

11 

22 

32 

20 

8 

6 

5 












278 


12 












280 


13. . 


1 

4 
1 
6 
9 
8 
5 
3 










257 


14 


1 








9J2 


15 








161 


16 










134 


17. . 










70 


18. 










35 


19 




3 










20 


20 












11 












































Totals . 


1,689 


468 


353 


269 


167 


109 


37 


1 








3,093 












Normal age 


620 
1,069 


42 
426 


37 
316 


17 
252 


11 
156 


5 
104 


1 
36 


1 








734 








or 23.7% 
2,359 












or 76 .3% 



78 



The Public Schools of "Wilson County 



2. Town of Wilson Colored Schools, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


131 
109 
111 

76 
56 
41 
20 
13 
9 
2 






















131 




6 
27 

35 
35 
37 
32 
24 
14 
4 
1 

1 


1 

2 
12 

24 
31 
29 
21 
13 

3 
1 


















116 


8.... 


















140 


9 


2 
12 

8 
10 
15 
14 

6 


1 
5 
8 

4 

13 
22 
17 
4 
5 














126 


10 


1 
4 
6 
3 
14 
8 
1 












134 


11 _ 


1 
1 
3 

14 
10 
10 

3 










127 


12 










100 


13.. _ 


1 
1 

4 
o 

4 
9 
1 
1 








96 


14 .. 


2 
4 

2 

5 
1 
3 






92 


15 


2 

1 
1 


3 

3 
1 


70 


16. 


31 


17 




31 


18.. 




21 


19. 










1 


9 


20 












1 




















































Totals 


568 


218 


144 


69 


79 


40 


56 


23 


17 


4 


7 


1,225 






Normal age 

Over age 


240 
328 


33 

185 


15 

129 


14 

55 


14 
65 


7 
33 


5 

51 


21 


6 
11 


3 
1 


3 

4 


342 

or 27 .9% 

883 

or 72.1% 



3. Lueama Colored School, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


25 
21 
11 

12 
9 
5 
1 
2 
1 






















25 
























21 


8 


1 

3 
9 
5 
4 
2 

1 




















12 


9 


1 

1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 


















15 


10 


















13 


11 


















15 


12 


3 

5 
4 
4 
2 
2 


2 
1 
2 

3 
1 














11 


13 














8 


14 














11 


15 


1 
1 

1 
1 












8 


16 




1 

1 

2 










9 


17 




1 












7 


18 












5 


19 
















3 


20 










1 




























































Totals 


87 


28 


11 


20 


9 


4 


4 










163 
















46 
41 


1 

27 


1 

10 


















48 




20 


9 


4 


4 










or 29 .4% 
115 












or 70 .6% 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



79 



4. Sharpsburg Colored School, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


10 
15 

8 
3 

2 
3 

1 






















10 




1 

2 






















8 




















10 


9__ 




















3 


10 


3 
3 


2 

1 
2 
2 


















9 


11 


1 
1 
1 

2 


















12 
















13 


13 
















4 


14. 


3 

1 














8 


15 
















1 


16 ___ 
























17 


























18 


























19 


























20 














































































Totals 


49 


16 


7 


5 


4 














81 


















Normal age 


25 
24 


3 
13 




















28 


Over age 


7 


5 


4 














or 34.5% 
53 
















or 65 .5% 



5. Elm City Colored School, 1923-24 

Enrollment by Age and Grade 



Age 


Grades 


Total 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


6 


14 
30 

19 
9 

21 
12 
6 
4 
3 
2 






















14 


7 


3 
13 

5 
5 
4 
4 
5 
5 
1 




















33 


8 




















32 


9 


4 

10 
5 
6 
6 

10 
4 
2 


2 

5 
1 
2 

3 
3 
5 
2 
















20 


10 
















41 


11 


3 

4 
1 


2 
1 

2 

4 
2 
1 












27 


12.. 












19 


13... 












24 


14 


3 










28 


15 










15 


16 


5 
1 










10 


17 














1 


18... 
























19 


























20 


























21 and over. 





















































Totals. ._ 


120 


45 


47 


23 


8 


12 


9 








264 














Normal age 


44 
76 


16 
29 


4 
43 


16 


3 

5 


3 
9 












77 


Over age 


9 










or 29.1% 
187 












or 70.9% 



XVI. SCHOLARSHIP OF WHITE TEACHERS 



1. Summary and Comparison, 1923-24 and 1924-25 



Classes of Certificates 


1923-24 


1924-25 


Gain 


1. High School A 


46 
11 

7 


61 
10 
6 
















Total A 


64 


77 


13 


4. High School B 


6 
20 
25 


7 
29 
27 




5. Grammar Grade B__ ___ 












Total B 


51 


63 


12 








9 
17 
16 


10 
11 
18 




8. Grammar Grade C_ . ___ 












Total C 


42 


39 


*3 








20 
2 


20 

18 

1 








12. Below Elementary B __ __ 








Total 


49 


39 


*10 








206 


218 


12 






Average scholarship: 


605.0 
730 .9 


650 .0 
731.7 


45.0 


2. Wilson 


0.8 







*Decrease. 

Note. — In 1923-24, the scholarship of teachers outside Wilson town ranked fourth in North Caro- 
lina. The teachers of Wilson town ranked seventh in scholarship among the 24 towns having 40 or 
more teachers. It is possible to attain only a score of 800. 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



31 



2. Schools and Scholarship 


of 


Teachers, 


19 


24-25 






A 

Certificates 


B 

Certificates 


C 

Certificates 


Ele 


nentary 


Total 
Teachers 


Scholar- 
ship 
Score 


Schools 


02 

W 


O 



a 

Ah 


02 


O 

o 


>> 

a 


02 


o 
O 


>> 

a 

a 

Ph 


< 


ffl 


is 
o 

(-1 


I. Country: 


3 

4 
3 
1 
5 
2 
6 






1 


2 


2 





2 


1 
1 

1 
2 

1 


1 

1 
2 
2 


2 
3 

1 




12 
10 
7 
9 

13 
4 
16 
6 
6 
6 
17 
11 
15 
4 
4 
14 
4 


633.3 


2. New Hope 






640.0 












1 

1 

2 


642.8 


4. St. Marys. 








2 
1 


1 
3 


1 

1 
1 


633.3 


5. Stantonsburg.- 


— - 


1 


— - 






707.6 






700.0 


7. Rock Ridge 




1 


2 


1 

3 
2 
1 
3 
3 
1 


1 


2 


1 

2 


---- 


681.3 




600.0 














1 


2 
1 
1 

2 


1 

1 

2 
1 
3 
2 
2 


616.6 


10. Sims . . . 














3 
1 

1 
1 


.... 


516.6 


11. Black Creek. .. . 


6 
1 

6 








4 
1 

2 


1 
1 


1 
1 


700.0 




1 




1 


618.1 


13. Elm City 


686.6 


14. Town Creek. 






475.0 






1 














1 


600.0 




5 






3 


2 
1 


1 




1 


1 


678.5 


17 Scotts . 




1 


1 






625.0 




















Total country 


42 


2 


3 


5 


22 


17 


6 


9 


13 


20 


18 


1 


158 


650.0 


II. Wilson Town: 
18 High School 


15 


6 

2 





2 


4 
1 

2 


5 

2 

3 


3 
1 












20 
19 
12 
9 


760.0 




1 
1 


3 

2 








710.5 




4 


1 


— - 








725.0 


21. Winstead 








722.2 
















Total Wilson 


19 
61 


8 
10 


3 




2 


7 


10 


4 


2 


5 








60 


731.7 












Total county 


7 


29 


27 


10 


11 


18 


20 


18 


1 


218 


672.5 


Total number each class.. 


77 
35% 


63 
29^ 


39 
18°; 




39 
18% 


218 
100% 































XVII. ELEMENTARY DAILY PROGRAMS OF SCHOOL 

WORK 



1. PROGRAM FIRST GRADE 

Period Daily Weekly Subject 

9:00- 9:15 15 minutes 75 minutes Religion (Bible) 

9:15-10:35 SO minutes 400 minutes Reading — i Classes 

10:35-10:50 15 minutes* 75 minutes* Recess* 

10 :50-ll :30 40 minutes 200 minutes Phonics and Spelling 

11:30-12:10 40 minutes 200 minutes Writing— 2 Classes" 

12:10-12:40 30 minutes* 150 minutes* Lunch* [Classes 

12:40- 1:10 30 minutes 150 minutes Hand Work and Drawing — 2 

1:10- 1:50 40 minutes 200 minutes Language — 2 Classes 

1 :50- 2 :20 30 minutes 150 minutes Arithmetic — 2 Classes 

2 :20- 2 :30 10 minutes* 50 minutes* Recess* 

2 :30- 3 :10 40 minutes 200 minutes Individual Help 

3 :10- 3 :30 20 minutes 100 minutes Health or Music 

3:30- 3:50 20 minutes 100 minutes Supervised Play (Phys. Ed.) 

Teaching Time 355 minutes 1.775 minutes 

The period "Individual Help" is for the assignment and study of lessons, 
helping backward pupils, instruction in manners, general work. etc. Please 
see that you supervise all the play of all your pupils ; that you look out for 
physical defects and try your best to remedy them. The school nurse and the 
health officer can help you. The Sunday school and church can greatly aid 
you to promote moral health. 



2. PROGRAM SECOND GRADE 

Period Daily Weekly Subject 

9:00- 9:15 15 minutes 75 minutes Religion (Bible) 

9 :15-10 :35 SO minutes 400 minutes Reading— ^t Classes 

10:35-10:50 15 minutes* 75 minutes* Recess* 

10 :50-ll :30 40 minutes 200 minutes Phonics and Spelling 

11:30-12:10 40 minutes 200 minutes Writing— 2 Classes 

12:10-12:40 30 minutes* 150 minutes* Lunch* [Classes 

12 :40- 1 :10 30 minutes 150 minutes Hand Work and Drawing — 2 

1 :10- 1 :50 40 minutes 200 minutes Language — 2 Classes 

1 :50- 2 :20 30 minutes 150 minutes Arithmetic — 2 Classes 

2:20- 2:30 10 minutes* 50 minutes* Recess* 

2:30- 3:10 40 minutes 200 minutes Individual Help 

3:10-3:30 20 minutes 100 minutes Health or Music 

3:30- 3:50 20 minutes 100 minutes Supervised Play (Phys. Ed.) 

Teaching Time 355 minutes 1,775 minutes 

The period "Individual Help" is for the assignment and study of lessons, 
helping backward pupils, instruction in manners, general work, etc. Please 
see that you supervise all the play of your pupils ; that you look out for 
physical defects as well as moral defects, and try your best to remedy them. 

*Recess periods may be varied to suit conditions. 



The Public Schools of "Wilson County 



83 



The school nurse and the health officer can help you. The Sunday school and 
church can greatly aid you to promote moral health. 

S. PROGRAM THIRD GRADE 

Period Daily Weekly Subject 

9:00- 9:15 15 minutes 75 minutes Religion (Bible) 

9:15-10:15 60 minutes 300 minutes Reading — 2 or 3 Classes 

10:15-10:35 20 minutes 100 minutes Phonics and Spelling 

10:35-10:50 15 minutes* 75 minutes* Recess* 

10:50-11:10 20 minutes 100 minutes Geography — 1 Class 

11 :10-11 :50 40 minutes 200 minutes Writing— 2 Classes 

11:50-12:10 20 minutes 100 minutes Hand Work and Drawing— 1 

12 :10-12 :40 30 minutes* 150 minutes* Lunch* [Class 

12 :40- 1 :20 40 minutes 200 minutes Language — 2 Classes 

1:20- 2:20 60 minutes 300 minutes Arithmetic— 2 Classes 

2 :20- 2 :30 10 minutes* 50 minutes* Recess* 

2 :30- 3 :10 40 minutes 200 minutes Individual Help 

3 :10- 3 :30 20 minutes 100 minutes Health or Music 

3:30- 3:50 20 minutes 100 minutes Supervised Play (Phys. Ed.) 

Teaching Time 355 minutes 1,775 minutes 

The period "Individual Help'' is for the assignment of lessons, helping back- 
ward pupils, instruction in manners, general work, study of lessons, etc. Please 
see that you supervise all the play of your pupils ; that you look out for 
physical defects, and try your best to remedy them. The school nurse and the 
health officer can help you. The Sunday school and church can greatly aid 
you to promote moral health. 



4. PROGRAM FOURTH GRADE 

Period Daily Weekly Subject 

9:00- 9:15 15 minutes 75 minutes Religion (Bible) 

9 :15-10 :15 60 minutes 300 minutes Reading — 2 Classes 

10 :15-10 :35 20 minutes 100 minutes Phonics and Spelling 

10 :35-10 :50 15 minutes* 75 minutes* Recess* 

10 :50-ll :20 30 minutes 150 minutes Geography or History 

11 :20-ll :50 30 minutes 150 minutes Writing — 2 Classes 

11 :50-12 :10 20 minutes 100 minutes Hand Work and Drawing 

12:10-12:40 30 minutes* 150 minutes* Lunch* 

12 :40- 1 :20 40 minutes 200 minutes Language 

1:20- 2:20 60 minutes 300 minutes Arithmetic 

2 :20- 2 :30 10 minutes* 50 minutes* Recess* 

2:30- 2:50 20 minutes 100 minutes Health or Music 

2 :50- 3 :30 40 minutes 200 minutes Individual Help 

3:30- 3:50 20 minutes 100 minutes Supervised Play (Phys. Ed.) 

Teaching Time 355 minutes 1,775 minutes 

The period "Individual Help'' is for the assignment of lessons, helping back- 
ward pupils, instruction in manners, general work, study of lessons, etc. Please 
see that you supervise all the play of your pupils ; that you look out for 
physical defects, as well as moral defects, and try your best to remedy them. 
The school nurse and the health officer can help you. The Sunday school and 
the church can greatly aid you to promote moral health. 

*Recess periods may be varied to suit conditions. 



84 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 



5. PROGRAM FIFTH GRADE 

Period Daily Weekly Subject 

9:00- 9:15 15 minutes 75 minutes Religion (Bible) 

9:15-10:05 50 minutes 250 minutes Reading 

10:05-10:35 30 minutes 150 minutes Spelling or Hand Work 

10 :35-10 :50 15 minutes* 75 minutes* Recess* 

10 :50-ll :25 35 minutes 175 minutes Geography or History 

11 :25-12 :10 45 minutes 225 minutes Drawing or Writing 

12:10-12:40 30 minutes* 150 minutes* Lunch* 

12:40- 1:20 40 minutes 175 minutes Language 

1 :20- 2 :20 60 minutes 300 minutes Arithmetic 

2:20- 2:30 10 minutes* 50 minutes* Recess* 

2 :30- 2 :50 20 minutes 100 minutes Health or Music 

2 :50- 3 :30 40 minutes 200 minutes Individual Help 

3:30- 3:50 20 minutes 100 minutes Supervised Play (Phys. Ed.) 

Teaching Time 355 minutes 1,775 minutes 

The period "Individual Help" is for the assignment of lessons, helping back- 
ward pupils, instruction in manners, general work, study of lessons, etc. The 
period for drawing and writing may be arranged by the teachers so as to 
promote the best teaching of each subject. Please see that you supervise all 
the play of your pupils ; that you look out for physical as well as moral 
defects, and try to remedy them. The school nurse and health officer can help 
you. The Sunday school and church can greatly aid you to promote moral 
health. 

6. PROGRAM SIXTH GRADE 

Period Da Hi/ Weekly Subject 

9:00- 9:15 15 minutes 75 minutes Religion (Bible) 

9:15- 9:50 40 minutes 200 minutes Reading 

9:50-10:35 40 minutes 200 minutes Language 

10:35-10:50 15 minutes* 75 minutes* Recess* 

10 :50-ll :35 45 minutes 225 minutes Geography or History 

11:35-12:10 40 minutes 200 minutes Drawing or Writing 

12:10-12:40 30 minutes* 150 minutes* Lunch* 

12 :40- 1 :30 50 minutes 250 minutes Arithmetic 

1 :30- 2 :20 50 minutes 250 minutes Individual Help 

2 :20- 2 :30 10 minutes* 50 minutes* Recess* 

2:30- 3:00 30 minutes 150 minutes Health or Music 

3 :00- 3 :30 30 minutes 150 minutes Spelling or Hand Work 

3:30- 3:50 20 minutes 100 minutes Supervised Play (Phys. Ed.) 

Teaching Time 355 minutes 1,775 minutes 



The period "Individual Help" is for the assignment of lessons, helping back- 
ward pupils, instruction in manners, general work, study of lessons, etc. The 
period for drawing and writing may be arranged by the teacher so as to 
promote the best teaching of each subject. Please see that you supervise all 
the play of your pupils ; that you look out for the physical as well as the moral 
defects of your pupils, and try to remedy them. The school nurse and the 
health officer can aid you. The Sunday school and the church can aid you to 
promote moral health. 

*Recess periods may be varied to suit conditions. 



XVIII. SUGGESTIONS AND DIRECTIONS FOR PRINCIPALS 
AND TEACHERS, 1924-25 

It is very necessary that all principals and teachers observe the following 
directions, which should be carefully read and considered at the first teachers' 
meeting, held on Saturday before the opening day of the schools: 

1. INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT FINANCIAL MATTERS 

1. The salaries of the truck drivers fixed by the Board of Education is as 
follows : For one short route, $5 ; for two short routes, $7.50 ; for one long 
route, $7.50 ; for two long routes, $10. 

2. The room rent fixed for teachers' homes by the Board of Education is as 
follows : $6 for Black Creek and Gardner's ; $5 for Stantonsburg, Saratoga, 
St. Mary's, Buckhorn, Sims. Bullock's. Lamm's, New Hope, and Rock Ridge. 
Principals will collect the rent each month and turn it over to the superin- 
tendent of schools within ten days after the close of each school month. 

3. The checks for teachers' salaries and orders for other school expenses will 
be made out by principals as follows : For Toisnot Township. P. T. Fugate, 
Elm City; for Gardner's, J. B. Eagles, R. 5. Wilson; for Stantonsburg, J. T. 
Graham, Stantonsburg ; for Saratoga. R. D. Gray, R. 2, Stantonsburg ; for 
Black Creek, F. E. Howard. Black Creek ; for Cross Roads, John A. Moore, 
Lucama ; for Spring Hill. Paul Ricks, R. 3, Kenly : for Old Fields, George A. 
Short, R. 2, Wilson ; for Taylor's, Miss Eliza Parker, R. 1. Wilson. 

4. The above principals will make three pay-roll sheets : one for salaries of 
teachers ; one for truck drivers and janitors ; one for all other expenses. 

N. B. Separate bills and order for supplies for the light plants must be 
submitted, as this must be kept as a separate account. A bill must accompany 
every order. 

5. The principals at Evansdale, St. Mary's. Town Creek. Scott's, Sims, Bul- 
lock's, and Lamm's will submit their reports by Saturday noon after the close 
of the school month to the proper principals in order that checks and orders 
may be made out promptly. The principals who attend to the making out of 
checks and orders will send them in to the superintendent of schools, with 
proper pay-rolls, bills, etc.. by Wednesday night after the close of the school 
month, in order that the teachers' checks may be approved and proper county 
checks written for the orders sent in. The office of the superintendent of 
schools will then undertake to have all checks ready and in the hands of the 
proper principals by Saturday morning after the close of the current school 
month. 

If the principals will carry out the above instructions, they will greatly 
facilitate the business side of the conduct of the schools. This office cannot be 
prompt, unless you act promptly. 

2. SOME GENERAL SUGGESTIONS FOR THE CARE OF SCHOOL 
PROPERTY AND GROUNDS 

1. Let us try during this year to get all the school grounds beautified — get 
some grass on the front yards, some trees and shrubbery planted where they 
should be planted and the playgrounds put in proper shape. 

2. Then let us try to get enough interest aroused during the year to enable 
us to take care of the grounds, light plants, etc., during the vacation. The 
interest of the committee and other citizens, the interest of the women and 
children of the community can be enlisted. 



86 The Public Schools of Wilson County 

3. At your first teachers' meeting plan to take up and carry on a program 
this year to put some good pictures on the walls of the building. 

4. Principals should see that the janitor closes and locks the building at the 
end of each day ; see that all toilet fixtures and other fixtures are securely 
closed to conserve the water pressure, thus saving needless expense of pump- 
ing water ; see that no lights are turned on to burn during the night, etc. 

5. Principals will remind teachers not to permit curtains to be drawn down 
over open windows, to be lashed by the wind or wet by rain. The children 
ought not to be permitted to adjust curtains and windows, except at the 
direction of the teacher or the principal. 

6. Principals and teachers should train all pupils to clean their shoes before 
entering the building. The children must be taught this habit of cleanliness ; 
one or two injunctions are not enough to form this habit. It will take the 
constant attention of teachers for a considerable time. 

7. Principals and teachers must see to it that children do not litter up the 
rooms, the halls, and the grounds with waste paper. It is the sorriest kind 
of attitude to assume that some one else will clean up the dirt and litter due 
to your thoughtlessness. Let us instill, then, by constant teaching habits of 
neatness and cleanliness. 

S. It is not enough that children be taught to keep the grounds and the 
building clean. "We must teach them to keep their bodies and clothes clean 
by the use of plenty of water and soap. Let teachers and principals have 
private conferences with all children who come to school without proper 
attention to cleanliness. A few words kindly spoken in private will usually 
result in greater attention to cleanliness. Then, teachers should see that 
children do not handle their books with soiled hands. We have made provi- 
sion in every building for washing hands. 

9. The appearance of the children's books is a good indication of the effi- 
ciency of a teacher. Principals and teachers can well afford to teach all 
pupils good habits in the care of books and other tools of learning. Torn 
and soiled books are unsightly and detract from the appearance of the school- 
room. Books cost much money and their proper care is a matter of thrift 
which no school can safely neglect to teach. 

10. Oftentimes at the end of the school year many books can be found left 
in the desks and lying around the building. It is an easy matter to have 
children take all their books home at the end of the term or when they with- 
draw from school. This is another matter of cleanliness and thrift which 
sadly needs attention by many schools. Let us see that we do not fail in this 
particular. 

11. Principals and teachers must exercise constant care to see that children 
do not leave hats, coats, overshoes, umbrellas, and other property in the school 
building over night. And there should be constant care to see that all kinds 
of things do not collect in the school rooms, in the halls, and in the closets, and 
thus become sources of filth and ugliness. We badly need a course in teaching 
children and teachers to see dirt and will its removal ! 

12. I shall confidently expect every principal and every teacher to do his 
best to carry out the above suggestions. It is a tragedy to spend time teach- 
ing hygiene out of a book, amid filthy and dirty surroundings, to boys and 
girls who sadly need a bath and who have not learned to keep themselves 
clean and their surroundings clean. 

3. SOME DEFINITE RULES FOR THE CARE OF THE BUILDING AND 
CONDUCT OF PUPILS 

a. Every pupil and every teacher shall go to his own room on arrival at 
the school building in the morning and begin the day's work. 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 87 

(This means to do away with playing around the building before school 
hours, with loitering in the halls and in the toilets, visiting around the build- 
ing, etc.. etc. It simply means what it says. This is the orderly, common 
sense, business-like thing to do. Teachers and pupils can thus use the best 
part of the day to do something worth while, rather than to aid in messing 
up the buildings and the toilets, as well as promoting general noise making 
and disorder. The halls and the schoolrooms are not for play, or for noise, 
or for general disorder, but for work and training in habits of good order 
and cleanliness.) 

b. The principal and the teachers will work out a schedule for the use of 
the fountains and the toilets, either before or after recess periods, also imme- 
diately before and immediately after school, under the supervision of a teacher 
and the janitor or the supervision of two or more teachers. (This means, for 
example, that you could water and send all first-grade pupils who need to go 
to the toilets just before school, just before recesses, and last thing in after- 
noon. No other than first graders are in the toilets or getting water at the 
times scheduled for first graders to get water and to go to the toilets. In 
short, each group or grade will use the toilets and the fountains at certain 
definite times during the day. All who must use the toilets during school 
hours should secure permission from the principal, so that he may know who 
and how many pupils are out of the rooms at any one time. We must abolish 
the indiscriminate excusing of pupils from their rooms during school hours. 
By making and enforcing such a rule, you will eliminate the necessity of the 
constant stream of children going to the toilets all during school hours. 
Rarely will a pupil need to be excused during the time he should be studying 
or reciting his lessons. Such a rule and plan will enable you to supervise 
the conduct of all pupils in the toilets and in other parts of the building. 
Only by some such plan can you hope to keep your building and the toilets 
clean and wholesome. Of course, you will not permit more children to go to 
the toilets at one time than the capacity of the toilets.) 

c. No pupil should be permitted to enter the building during any recess 
period. (If the weather is inclement, do not send pupils out of doors at recess 
periods. But when pupils are sent out at recess time they should stay out. 
Running in and out of the building, playing up and down the halls, and the 
like are not the marks of an orderly school. You can never keep your build- 
ing or the toilets clean as long as you do not make the rule above suggested. 
Above all. do not dismiss pupils in bad weather to collect in the halls and to go 
indiscriminately to the toilets, etc.. etc. But use the plan suggested above.) 

d. Every pupil shall clean his shoes on entering the school building. (Teach- 
ers could practice this rule themselves and get their pupils to practice it, much 
to the promotion of the cleanliness and better appearance of our school build- 
ings. We can't get pupils to respect a place in which this rule is not enforced.) 

e. On rainy days and on other days, when children cannot use the play- 
ground, the recess time should be shortened. (But it should never be under- 
stood that the children are to be dismissed on such days to run up and down 
the halls, and the like. If you have in force the rule about going to the toilets, 
then your children will eat their lunch in their rooms on bad days where no 
lunch room is provided, and not leave their own rooms. On such days, of 
course, the windows of the schoolrooms should be raised and some physical 
exercises, led by the teacher, should be a part of all recess periods.) 

f. Children who wait on a truck after school should be left in direct charge 
of a teacher, either in a schoolroom or on the playgrounds. (Such pupils 
should be lined up in proper order and put on the truck. They should never 
be permitted to run in disorder to get on the truck. We must have no more 
accidents due to failure in this respect on the part of principal and teachers.) 



88 The Public Schools of Wilson County 

g. Children must not be left at recess periods in the rooms or on the grounds 
without the supervision of some teacher. (The practice in vogue in some 
schools of all teachers leaving the building and the grounds at lunch time 
should be changed. A schedule of yard and house duty for teachers should 
be made out by the principal and his teachers, so that there may be oversight 
of pupils at all recess times.) 

4. SUGGESTIONS FOR KEEPING SCHOOL RECORDS 

1. Registers : 

a. The principal should see that each register sheet is properly made out; 

that every detail is entered properly. He must take time to check 
every page of every register. This means to see : 

(a) That the pupil's real name is properly entered; not his nick- 

name or pet name, etc. 

(b) That the work done this year is entered fully and accurately 

as to textbooks and pages covered. 

(c) That all conditions are properly recorded, which means to indi- 

cate exactly what must yet be done to gain promotion. 

(d) That the summary sheet is made out accurately, both as to 

children 7-14 and all pupils. 

b. See that promotions during the year are properly accounted for in your 

records. Duplicate enrollment is to be avoided and a register sheet 
for work done in each grade is to be filed. Each pupil promoted 
during the year will have two register sheets — one for work done and 
time spent in the lower grade and one for work done and time spent 
in the higher grade. 

c. Promotions from sixth grade must be very carefully done. Be sure all 

sixth-grade pupils are really prepared for Junior High School work 
before promotion. 

d. Principals should see at the end of the first month that the register is 

being kept as indicated on front cover page. 

2. Permanent Record Envelopes : 

a. After the principal checks each register at the end of the year, have 

teachers tear out register sheets and place them in the permanent 
record envelopes and properly fill out the face of those envelopes. 

b. See that you file together all active permanent record envelopes by 

grades, so that we shall have these for the opening of school next 
fall in usable form. 

c. See that you file in alphabetical order all permanent inactive records, 

so that they can be consulted easily. Do not file active and inactive 
records together. 

3. The School Census : 

a. See that you have a census card for all persons 6-21 living in your 

township or district at the end of the school year. This list includes 
pupils away at other schools, married persons under 21, etc. 

b. Separate all inactive census cards from the active cards. Make up a 

summary card for each township. 

c. Have some pupils make a copy of all your additional active census 

cards for the Wilson office. 

d. Turn into the Wilson office all inactive census cards or make duplicates 

and turn in the duplicates ; keep an active census file in your office 
at all times. The inactive file will be in the Wilson office. Tou may 
keep a duplicate inactive file in your office if you desire to do so. 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 89 

e. Please remember to do the following things in keeping your census : 

(a) Fill out this year a new census card for every pupil not in your 

school last year. 

(b) The pupils can tell you or their teachers of every person not in 

school between the ages of 6-21. They can and will gladly help 
you to get a census card filled out for all such persons. Re- 
member that marriage does not increase or diminish the age of 
anybody. If a married person is not over 21, he or she is to be 
in your school census. In carrying out this plan, it will be 
necessary that principals, teachers, and pupils have this census 
matter constantly in mind. This plan will not work, if it is 
delayed till the last few weeks of the school term. 

(c) The pupils can tell you of the death of any person 6-21. or tell 

you to what school in the county pupils move, so that you may 
make proper entry on such persons' census cards. If a child 
moves out of this county, find out to what county he goes, so 
that I may notify the proper superintendent in order that such 
children may be looked after and not escape the compulsory 
law, if they are subject to the same. Principals should send 
the census cards of all persons who die or remove to another 
district or out of this county to the county superintendent of 
schools at once, indicating on each card the proper facts. Only 
in this way will we be able to keep our census usable and 
up-to-date. The children who are going to move will gladly 
inform teachers of all the facts, if teachers will only take a bit 
of trouble to find out. But if you wait till the end of the school 
year, the facts cannot be had oftentimes. 

(d) In townships in which more than one school is situated, there must 

be cooperation between each principal. This cooperation should 
consist principally in dividing the township so that each prin- 
cipal may know for what part of the township he is to be held 
responsible. If the children of a part of one township attend 
school in another township, the census cards of all such section 
and pupils should l)c filed and kept oy the school such pupils 
attend. 

(e) Sometimes a child becomes six years old during the school term 

and does not enter school. All such children must be listed in 
the census of the district as soon as practicable after their sixth 
birthday. 

(f) Do not fail to make out a withdrawal card for every pupil who 

leaves school permanently, or who moves to another school, or 
who moves out of the county. And do not fail to send promptly 
those withdratcal cards to the Wilson office. Only by the 
prompt attention of principal and teachers in reporting the 
withdrawals of pupils will we be able to secure the proper 
enforcement of the school attendance laws. 

N. B. Especial care must be taken that your age records are consistent this 
year with last year. You should carefully check your census and other 
records to find any variations as to the ages of pupils given this year with 
previous years. You must eliminate all such variations and not turn in the 
census card of any pupil with his age on the census card one thin? and another 
on the enrollment card, etc. 



90 The Public Schools of Wilson County 

4. Enrollment Cards : 

a. Turn into the Wilson office a duplicate enrollment card for each pupil 

who enters your school this year, not later than 15 days after enroll- 
ment. 

b. This will furnish us a means of checking enrollment against the census, 

as well as to enable us to eliminate duplicate enrollment from our 
final yearly enrollment figures. 

5. Property Inventory : 

a. Add items to inventory of school property in teachers' homes, school- 

rooms, etc.. added this year. 

b. Use the inventory forms on file in your office which contain the inven- 

tory of all property at the end of last year. Do not duplicate these; 
only add new items. 

6. Records of Teachers : 

a. The principal should have a complete record of all his teachers. 

b. This record should include: 

(1) Name and home address. 

(2) Kind of certificate, class, date of expiration. 

(3) Grade or subjects taught this year. 

(4) Experience (a) in this school; (b) in other schools. 

(5) Education and professional training. 

(6) Salary this year. 

c. Principals will find the application blank a convenient form for keeping 

the above information as to teachers. 

7. Records — truck di"ivers and truck routes, with daily schedules : 

a. The principal's office should have a record of the names of the truck 

drivers and their salaries. 

b. The principal's office should also have a record of the different truck 

routes and the daily schedule of each truck. 

5. SUGGESTIONS AS TO JANITORS, TRUCKS, ETC. 

a. Each principal should have a clear understanding with the janitor as to 
his duties. He should not tolerate teachers or pupils giving orders to the 
janitor. All orders to the janitor must be given by the principal in person or 
in writing, and by no one else. Do not send word to the janitor by pupils, 
requesting him to do something. Send for him and tell him yourself what you 
wish done. 

b. See that the janitor stays in the boys' toilet at least a part of every recess 
period, until your school is well organized. Some woman teacher should also- 
remain in the girls toilet a part of every recess until your school is in good 
order. 

c. It would be well to appoint a house committee of boys and girls to see that 
good order is kept in the toilets and around the grounds, and the building; 
that no damage is done to the building or to any of the property of the school. 

d. You should have frequent meetings with your truck drivers. You should 
by all means work out at once for each driver a daily schedule, which should 
be reduced to writing, the principal keeping a copy and the driver a copy. This 
schedule should indicate the time the driver is to leave home and the time he 
is to arrive at school, as well as the time he is expected to arrive at important 
points on the route, both on the way to school and on the way home. In doing 
this you will need the constant help of your school committee, who know all 
the roads of the district. 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 91 

e. The route each driver makes should be entered in a book which you 
should keep for that purpose, as well as to enter each driver's daily schedule. 
All changes in routes and schedules should be made only after consultation with 
the chairman or some member of the committee. As soon as possible, all such 
changes should be reported to the full committee for final approval. 

f. You must not fail to insist on children walking who live loithin one and 
one-half miles of the school. And do not permit a truck route to be estab- 
lished over a bad road. Children must expect to walk out to convenient 
places to meet the trucks, rather than to have the trucks go to every child's 
home. 

g. You should constantly warn drivers to stop at railroad crossings, not to- 
drive faster than 12 miles an hour, not to use the trucks for any purpose 
except to carry children to and from school, and to report any misconduct on 
the trucks. Drivers must not smoke or use bad language, nor must they 
permit the pupils to do so. If a driver smokes or uses bad language, or uses 
his truck for improper purposes, or permits such violations of the truck rules, 
or permits pupils to fight to and from school, or drives too fast, you must 
dismiss him at once. We must not tolerate any of these things. Let your 
drivers understand that you will dismiss them, not for the second or third 
such offense, but for the very first offense. 

h. The principal must constantly warn the janitor not to let the ashes collect 
in the ash box of the boiler or to permit litter in and around the boiler room. 

6. SUGGESTIONS AS TO THE CONDUCT OF TEACHERS' HOMES 

a. At the first teachers' meeting on Saturday before school begins, make 
some good and necessary rules for the conduct of the teachers' home. These 
rules should provide for a rising hour, a going to bed hour, the hours for meals, 
the times visitors may be received in the home, the conditions under which 
teachers may leave the home at night or day in the company of young men, 
etc. If teachers ride around at night with men without chaperones. if they 
receive visitors all during the week, if they keep late hours, if they hold 
dances and card parties in the home, or attend such parties elsewhere, you 
may expect adverse criticism. The home should be conducted as a good, 
decent home ought to be conducted. Due regard must be paid to public 
opinion which usually condemns card playing and dancing by teachers. Your 
home should be a model home. 

b. I suggest that the going to bed hour be not later than 10:30 p. in., and 
that Saturdays and Sundays are often enough to have men callers in the home. 
If we have any teachers who refuse to cooperate with the principal in making 
and observing proper rules for the good conduct of the home and the principal 
fails to report them to me at once, then I shall consider that the principal has 
failed to perform the most important duty our school system and good order 
impose on him. Frankly I shall do my utmost to rid the school system of such 
offending teachers, and also of principals who will wink at or condone mis- 
conduct because they have not the moral courage to stand up for the practice 
of good conduct and of high ideals on the part of those who teach the children 
of the future. We simply can't afford to stand for anything which will bring 
disrepute on the homes which ought to be models for the future home makers 
of the county. 

7. SUGGESTIONS AS TO THE CONDUCT OF PUPIDS 

Principals and teachers can destroy their usefulness in a very short time by 
permitting the children to do as they please. Here are some things which 
ought not to be tolerated in any school : 

a. Vile and filthy language. 

b. Fighting and disorder on the grounds or on the way to and from school. 



92 The Public Schools of "Wilson County 

c. Failure to have all pupils go quietly to their rooms on arrival in the 
morning. 

d. Failure to have pupils go out of and come into the building in good order. 

e. Dirty and filthy toilet rooms and a dirty sehoolhouse and dirty pupils. 

f. Ill-kept school grounds. 

g. Teachers falling in love with pupils. 

h. Permitting a few disorderly and immoral boys who will not reform to 
remain in school. 

i. Running in and out of the building at recess periods. 

j. Loud and noisy conduct in the halls during class changes and while going 
in and out of the building. 

k. Failure to demand obedience at all times and failure to secure willing co- 
operation from the pupils in establishing an orderly school community. 

1. Failure to maintain high standards of scholarship. 

8. OTHER REGULATIONS 

(1) Every teacher must make an earnest effort to keep well and physically 
fit for work each clay. No substitute teacher can be employed, except on the 
approval of the principal. All substitute teachers' employment and the number 
of days employed and the names of the teachers for whom employed must be 
reported promptly to the superintendent of schools. 

(2) Substitute teachers must be paid by those regular teachers for whom 
they do substitute work, not to exceed two-thirds of the regular teacher's daily 
salary. 

(3) Teachers will not be excused from school duty for any cause, except 
for personal illness or serious illness or death in the teacher's immediate family. 

(4) All teachers must follow a daily program of work which shall never 
be less than six hours per day. Daily programs suited for each grade and 
approved by the superintendent of schools shall be followed by all teachers. 

(5) Variation from the daily program will not be tolerated, except such 
variation has the approval of the principal. Our schools must do honest and 
efficient work. They cannot do that kind of work, if teachers do not strictly 
adhere to a daily schedule which provides a time and a place for all subjects. 

(6) Principals must not give permission for teachers to vary the daily 
program of school work, except in rare instances. All outside matters which 
demand such variation should first have the approval of the superintendent 
of schools. 

(7) Each principal should make out a daily schedule of his activities. A 
place on that schedule must be assigned to the supervision of the classroom 
teachers' work. This daily schedule should be sent to the superintendent of 
schools for his approval and suggestions. 

(S) All teachers are expected to cooperate to increase the number of books 
in the school library, to cooperate to secure current professional periodicals 
for their own use and other periodicals for the use of their pupils, and to 
cooperate to the end that all our schools be placed as soon as possible on the 
North Carolina list of standard high or standard elementary schools. 

(9) We shall expect every teacher heartily to cooperate with her principal 
and with the superintendent of schools to improve the efficiency of the teaching 
done in every school. 

(10) You will observe the following rules as to first-grade pupils: 

a. Children who will become six years old by November 1st will be admitted 
to first grade at the beginning of the school term. 

b. All pupils who intend to enter the first grade this school year must do so 
during the first two weeks of the fall term. 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 93 

c. After the first two weeks of the fall term have passed no more first-grade 
pupils will be admitted this year, unless such pupils can enter a class or a 
section of the grade already formed. 

d. Pupils who enter the first grade at the fall term opening must attend with 
such regularity as to keep up with the class or section to which they are 
assigned. If pupils fall behind their class or section, due to Inattendance, then 
they are to be excluded from school for the remainder of the year. No new 
class or classes are to be formed for such delinquent children. 

e. It is the intent and purpose of this rule to enable teachers to organize 
their first-grade classes during the first two weeks of the school term, and then 
to keep those classes so organized for the year as will enable teachers to do 
effective first-grade work. 

N. B. Please keep this copy of suggestions and regulations for reference. 
We shall expect you to make an honest effort to carry out all these suggestions. 

9. AYILSOX COUNTY FORMS 

1. Application to Teach. 

2. Teacher's Contract. 

3. Inquiry Blank (qualifications of teachers). 

4. Principal's Truck Report. 

5. Truck Driver's Report. 

6. Teacher's Monthly Report. 

7. Elementary School Register. 

S. North Carolina High School Register. 
9. Supplies Used. 

10. Truck Supervisor's Report. 

11. Unsatisfactory Card. 

12. Conduct Card. 

13. Pupil's Report Card. 

14. Enrollment Card. 

15. Withdrawal Card. 

16. Individual Census Card. 

17. Yearly Promotion Card. 
IS. Elementary Book List. 

19. High School Book List. 

20. Principal's Summary of Attendance. 

21. Envelop for Individual Pupil's Record. 

22. Inventory School Property. 

23. Inventory Property Teachers' Home. 

24. High School Schedule Card. 

25. High School Pupil's Information Card. 

26. Pay-roll Blanks. 

27. Orders Teacher's Salary (Books). 

28. Orders District Expense (Books). 



XIX. WILSON COUNTY AND CITY TEACHERS, 1924-25* 

Name Home Address Teaching Address 

1. Wilson High School, Wilson, N. C. 

J. Shepard Bryan Wilson Wilson 

Rennie Peel Clarksville, Va 407 Kenan 

Mrs. C. L. Coon Wilson 109 Rountree 

Louise Mayes Portsmouth, Va 113 Rountree 

Merle Hendricks Pickens, S. C 107 N. Pine 

Eulalie Cox Wilson Park Ave. 

Eva Lucas Lucama Lucarna 

Ruth Brown Laurens, S. C 110 W. Nash 

Mrs. C. L. Blackburn Wilson.. 40S Hill 

Leah Townsend Florence, S. C Vance and Bragg 

Roger McGirt Maxton 301 W. Nash 

Bernice White Winston 311 W. Vance 

Martha W. Powell Tarboro 113 Rountree 

Grace Lucas Lucama Lucama 

Elizabeth Rogers Wilson Wilson 

Joseph T. Underwood Smithfield, Va Anderson St. 

Helen Whelchel Douglas, Ga 107 N. Pine 

Eleanor D. Rhoads Oakville, Ky 113 Rountree 

L. H. Rockhill Lebanon, Ohio 301 W. Nash 

Effie A. Hilt Battle Creek, Mich Kenan and Bruton 

"2. Maplewood School, Wilson, N. C. 

Beulali Keel Farmville 410 Vance 

Ruby Lacy Charlottesville, Va 300 W. Gold 

Ella Doswell New Canton, Va 103 N. Rountree 

Ruth Lowder Rutherford College 300 W. Gold 

Eula M. Edgerton Wilson 1011 W. Kenan 

Eunice Vause Mount Olive 300 W. Gold 

EvaRoyall Wilson 305 W. Vance 

Carolvn Mercer Wilson 104 N. Pine 

Nell Pappendick Elizabeth City 300 W. Gold 

Annie L. Carter Halifax, Va 300 W. Gold 

Mrs. Amy Mayo Wilson 605 W. Lee 

Irvie Frazier Durham 311 Vance 

Margaret Hearne Wilson 305 W. Vance 

Kathleen Vaughn Ahoskie . 311 W. Vance 

Julia Cornell Georgetown, S. C 311 W. Vance 

Florence Skillman Warrenton 300 W. Gold 

Barta Worrell Richmond, Va 300 W. Gold 

Lorrie M. Walker Bedford, Va 107 N. Pine 

Irma Carraway Wilson 207 N. Pine 

"3. Kenan Street School, Wilson, N. C. 

Edwina Lovelace Wilson 105 S. Pine 

Blanche Wells Elm Citv 108 N. Pine 

Julia Vann Woodland 309 W. Vance 

Martha Stevens Roberts Wilson 305 W. Green 

Edla McKenzie Marshallville, Ga 110 W. Nash 

Lizzie L. Walden Soperton, Ga 110 W. Nash 

Bessie Bovlston Allendale, S. C 110 W. Nash 

Helen Butler Guide 203 W. Nash 

Marie Bowie Hartwell, Ga 203 W. Nash 

Ethel Bynum Farmville 110 W. Nash 

Flora Christine McNair Hartsville, S. C 110 W. Nash 

Ruth Alford Wilson 1004 W. Lee 



•Principals' names appear first under the name of the school. 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 95 

Name Home Address Teaching Address 

4. Winstead School, Wilson, N. C. 

Clee Winstead R. 2, Wilson R. 2, Wilson 

Louise Brooks Drake's Branch, Va Vance St. 

Lou Ellen Dupree Farmville Lee St. 

Mrs. Ida C. Sinclair Hampton, Va R. 2, Wilson 

Martha Pitts Summerton, S. C Pine and Green 

Elsie Morgan Benson Pine and Green 

Zell Winstead R. 2, Wilson R. 2, Wilson 

Grace Chambers Dinwiddie, Va Gold and Hill 

Fannie Lee Carter Edgefield, S. C Vance St. 

5. Elm City School, Elm City, N. C. 

P. T. Fugate Elm City Elm City 

Robert L. Andrews R. 5, Durham Elm City 

Dixon Barrett Morehead City Elm City 

Lutie Stephenson Gumberry Elm City 

J. S. Whiteside Edgemoor, S. C Elm City 

William H. Ragsdale 7 Middlebrook, Knoxville, 

Tenn Elm City 

Lucy O. Wilson Orrville, Ala Elm City 

Susie M. Dixon Hookerton Elm City 

Mrs. Annie M. Cheatham Gatesville Elm City 

Lorena Early Ahoskie Elm City 

Margaret Homewood R. 1, Burlington Elm City 

Mary Condon Stantonsburg Elm City 

Irene Norris Warrenton, Ga Elm City 

Nannie B. Satterfiekl Durham Elm City 

6. Town Creek School, Elm City, N. C. 

Mamie Lassiter George Elm City 

Emma Lassiter George Elm City 

Minnie Thorne Elm City Elm City 

Lucy Edwards Elm City Elm City 

7. Sharpsburg School, Sharpsburg, X. C. 

Mrs. Edith Barrington Wilson Sharpsburg 

Winnie Taylor R. 5, Wilson Sharpsburg 

Willo Sitterson Plymouth Sharpsburg 

Annie K. Oakley College Park, Ga Sharpsburg 

8. Black Creek School, Black Creek, N. C. 

F. E. Howard Black Creek Black Creek 

Alberta Lamm Lucarna Black Creek 

Lossie Tomlinson Black Creek Black Creek 

Sadie Green Pantego Black Creek 

Erma Coleman Fairfax, S. C Black Creek 

Blanche Bazanos Milledgeville, Ga Black Creek 

Pattie V. Battle Pee Dee Black Creek 

Sarah Pearson Black Creek Black Creek 

Grace Boykin Wilson Black Creek 

Amelia Ballou Wilson Black Creek 

Alice Stevens Americus, Ga Black Creek 

Bettie Tyler Roxobel Black Creek 

Alma Worthington Winterville Black Creek 

Rosa Stevens Americus, Ga Black Creek 

Willie Matthews Nashville Black Creek 

Edna Long Seaboard Black Creek 

Mary G. Duncan Horse Shoe Black Creek 



96 The Public Schools of Wilson County 

Name Home Address Teaching Address 

9. Stantonsburg School, Stantonsburg, X. C 

J. T. Graham Jonesville, Va Stantonsburg 

Allie L. Hill Timmonsville, S. C Stantonsburg 

Imogene Barrett Stantonsburg Stantonsburg 

Elizabeth Calvert 105 Polk St., Raleigh Stantonsburg 

El va J. Rosser Jonesboro Stantonsburg 

Mrs. Annie L. Westbrook Stantonsburg Stantonsburg 

Mary Wooten Stantonsburg Stantonsburg 

Attie Bray Hertford Stantonsburg 

Katie Yates Apex Stantonsburg 

Katie Whitley Enfield Stantonsburg 

Louise C. Godwin Smithfield, Va Stantonsburg 

A. Gay Gilliam Cumberland, Va Stantonsburg 

Annie J. Eley Courtland, Va Stantonsburg 

10. Evaxsdale School, R. G, Wilson, X. C. 

J. L. Hester R. 1, Roxboro R. 6, Wilson 

Blanche Hester R. 1, Roxboro R. 6, Wilson 

Mary M. Paylor R. 3, Roxboro R. 6, Wilson 

Gara Wilkerson R. 3, Kenly R. 6, Wilson 

11. Saratoga School, R. 2, Stantonsburg, X. C. 

R. D. Gray R. 2, Stantonsburg R. 2, Stantonsburg 

Augusta E. Woodward R. 2, Cary R. 2, Stantonsburg 

Mrs. Eloise T. Owens Walstonburg R. 2, Stantonsburg 

Evelyn McGirt Maxton R. 2, Stantonsburg 

Maude Douglas Camilla, Ga R. 2, Stantonsburg 

Mrs. Hazel Gardner R. 2, Stantonsburg R. 2, Stantonsburg 

Mamie Mercer Black Creek R. 2, Stantonsburg 

Annie M. Thompson Stantonsburg R. 2, Stantonsburg 

EdnaG. Taylor R. 1, Wilson R. 2, Stantonsburg 

Mrs. Gladys Speight Walstonburg R. 2, Stantonsburg 

Mrs. R. D. Gray R. 2, Stantonsburg 



12. Gardners School, R. 5, Wilson, X. C. 

J. B. Eagles Walstonburg R. 5, W 

Mrs. J. B. Eagles Walstonburg R. 5, W 

Inez Saunders AVilson R. 5, W 

Ruth A. Harrell Moyock R. 5, W 

May Langley Lamm Wilson R. 5, W 

Maroda Farabow Oxford R. 5, W 

Essie Cunningham Franklin R. 5, W 

Cora J. Fowler Tabor R. 5, W 

Bessie Bottoms Margarettsville R. 5, W 

Mildred Thomas Elm City R. 5, W 

Flora Morris Spindale R. 5 r W 

Bettie Webb R. 5, Wilson R. 5, W 



Ison 
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lson 
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lson 
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13. New Hope School, R. 1, Wilson, X. C. 

Eliza Parker Garner R. 1, Wilson 

Beulah Brake R. 5, Rocky Mount R. 1, Wilson 

Annie L. Phillips Lumberton R. 1, Wilson 

Julia M. Taylor R. 1, Wilson R, 1, Wilson 

Alice Grice Wilson R. 1, Wilson 

Mary V. O'Briant R. 2, Elm City R. 1, Wilson 

Ruth Grice Wilson R. 1, Wilson 

Amanda Ross Washington R. 1, Wilson 

Anne Dalrymple Jonesboro R. 1, Wilson 

Rachel Wooten Stantonsburg R. 1 , Wilson 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 97 

Name Home Address Teaching Address 

14. Lamms School, R. 3, Wilson, N. C. 

Mary E. Outlaw Seven Springs R. 3, Wilson 

Mellie R. Davenport Conetoe R. 3, Wilson 

Madge Porter Severn — R. 3, Wilson 

Lucy V. Outlaw Seven Springs R. 3, Wilson 

Emma Dunn Wise R. 3, Wilson 

Daisy Simpson R. 3. Wilson R. 3, Wilson 

15. Bullocks School, Sims, N. C. 

Bessie Freeman Cliff side Sims 

Annie Frazier Hazelhurst, Ga Sims 

Gladys Phillips Lucama Sims 

Mary Wilkerson Roxboro Sims 

Agnes Credle Swan Quarter Sims 

Myrtie E. Morse Holliston, Mass Sims 

16. Sims School, Sims, N. C. 

Rachel Savers Draper, Va Sims 

Gertrude Melvin Stedman Sims 

Fannie Perrv R. 2, Wilson Sims 

Rosa Pridgen Elm City Sims 

Marietta Neece Climax Sims 

Louise McCain Waxhaw Sims 

17. Rock Ridge School, R. 2, Wilson, N. C 

George A. Short R. 2, Wilson R. 2, Wilson 

Vanner Neece Climax R. 2, Wilson 

Elizabeth Earp Selma R. 2, Wilson 

Mary L. Holmes Springwood, Va R. 2. Wilson 

Mrs.' Elizabeth Move Wilson R. 2, Wilson 

Agnes B. Jones Richmond, Va R. 2. Wilson 

Nona Briggs Mars Hill R. 2, Wilson 

Blanche Moore Prentiss R. 2, Wilson 

Fannie G. Lucas R. 2, Wilson 

Eugenia Brett Ahoskie R. 2, Wilson 

Georgia Tomlinson Black Creek R. 2, Wilson 

Louise Winchester Summerneld R. 2, Wilson 

Ethel Bradshaw Carrsville, Va R. 2, Wilson 

Sybil Brown Wilson R. 2, Wilson 

Ellen Barefoot Wilson R. 2, Wilson 

Jeanie Odom Bennettsville, S. C R. 2, Wilson 

18. Buckhorn School, R. 3, Kenly N. C. 

Paul T. Ricks Pantego R. 3, Kenly 

Mrs. Paul T. Ricks Pantego R. 3. Kenly 

Delia M. Winstead Whitakers R 3, Kenly 

May S. Perkinson Wise R. 3, Kenly 

Mary Lamm Lucama R. 3, Kenly 

Aldine Pleasants Burnsville R. 3, Kenly 

Eva Daughtry Newton Grove R. 3, Kenly 

19. St. Marys School, R. 1, Lucama, N. C. 

Annie S. Johnson Lumber Bridge R. 1, Lucama 

Eva Wike Hicldenite R. 1, Lucama 

Geneva Exum Greenville R. 1, Lucama 

Ruth McCain Waxhaw R. 1, Lucama 

Bruce Exum Greenville R. 1, Lucama 

Grace Kemp Alapaha, Ga R. 1, Lucama 

Virginia Barnes R. 3, Kenly R. 1, Lucama 

Estelle Lamm Lucama R. 1, Lucama 

Mata Mitchell Oxford R. 1, Lucama 



98 The Public Schools of Wilson County 

Name Home Address Teaching Address 

20 Lucama School, Lucama, N. C. 

John A. Moore Lucama Lucama 

Nona Rush High Rock Lucama 

Ruth Berry Elloree, S. C Lucama 

Ellen Grimes Elko, S. C Lucama 

Mabel Motes Leah, Ga Lucama 

W. B. Barnes Lucama Lucama 

Mabel Wooten Stantonsburg Lucama 

Miriam G. Haden Crozet, Va Lucama 

Osceola T. Crew Pleasant Hill Lucama 

Myrtle Walton Washington, Ga Lucama 

Grace Barnes Lewiston Lucama 

Annie B. McFadven Raeford Lucama 

Virginia Forbes Wilson Lucama 

Ina Bowden Calypso Lucama 

21. Scotts School, R. 3, Lucama, X. C. 

H. T. Wright Box 574, Wilson R. 3, Lucama 

Pearl Neal Lucama R. 3, Lucama 

Annie L. Brown Swan Quarter R. 3, Lucama 

Mrs. Annie Dulin Selma R. 3, Lucama 



XX. TYPES OF TEACHERS NOT WANTED 



1. INQUIRY BLANK 

WILSON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
Wilson. N. C. 

, 1924. 

M 



Dear : 

1. M of - 

has given me your name as one who can tell me of her ability as a teacher, etc. 

2. Some Wilson teachers, 1923-24, have failed for the following reasons : 
(a) lack of knowledge of subject-matter and inability to manage children ; (b) 
attention to card playing, dancing and other society interests to the neglect of 
their school work; (c) on account of falling in love with high school pupils; 
(d) on account of keeping the company of sorry men; (e) on account of night 
riding without a chaperone ; (f) on account of attendance on rotten vaudeville 
and sorry moving picture shows; (g) on account of entertaining company until 
late hours at night, making good school work next day impossible; (h) on 
account of failure to take any vital interest in church and Sunday School work 
and other community activities. 



The Public Schools of Wilson County 99 

3. If you think this applicant will and can avoid all the ahove sources of 
failure, I shall appreciate your saying so. If you think there is doubt about 
her having enough good sense to avoid these sources of failure, I shall appre- 
ciate your frankness. We are after teachers who are in earnest about doing 
what they are paid to do. We prefer that all other kinds go elsewhere. 

4. Answer : 



5. Reply sent to Supt. C. L. Coon, Wilson. N. C, on day of 

, 1924. 



2. FORM OF CONTRACT 

WILSON CITY AND COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Teacher's Contract 

I hereby accept a position as teacher in the Wilson 

Public Schools for the year 192 and 192 at a salary of $ 

for the school year of months. My N. C. Certificate is Number 

Class I have had years teaching 

experience. My N. C. Certificate expires July 1. 192 I further agree that 

I will take a vital interest in church and Sunday School work and other com- 
munity activities ; that I will not entertain company until late hours at night 
and thus render my school work next day inefficient ; that I will not attend 
sorry moving picture and vaudeville shows ; that I will not fall in love or 
become familiar with high school pupils ; that I will not attend card and 
dancing parties ; that I will not fail to use good sense and discretion in the 
company I keep ; that I will use my best endeavors during the year to improve 
my work as a teacher ; and that I will do nothing to bring disrepute on the 
home in which I live or to cause right thinking people to speak disparagingly 
of me and of my work. 

This day of , 192 

Signed 

Home Address 

Conditions : 

1. School: 

2. Grade of Work 

3. Salary to be paid in installments at end of each 

month, term to begin day of , 192 

Signed 

Superintendent of Schools, Wilson, N. C. 

N. B. Return this signed with your certificate to Supt. C. L. Coon, Wilson, 
N. C. If you were a teacher in Wilson County last year, you need not send 
your certificate, unless its grade or class has been changed recently. 



XXL TOTAL TEACHERS' SALARY BUDGET, 1924-25 



Townsnips 


Wnite 


Colored 


Total 


Number 

White 
Teachers 


Number 
Colored 
Teachers 


1. Wilson . ___ __ 

2. Black Creek.. 


86.208 
17,080 
15.980 
10,410 
30,764 

9,880 
11.660 
18,000 

8,660 
19, 732 


15,757 
1.965 
2,172 
1.860 
2,160 
1,410 
2.040 
2,451 
1,950 
4,105 


101,965 
19,045 
18,152 

12,276 
32,924 
1 1 , 290 
17.300 
20,451 
10.610 
23,837 


60 
17 
18 
12 
34 
11 
16 
17 
10 
19 


28 
6 


3. Cross Roads . 


6 
6 


5. Old Fields 


7 


6. Saratoga _. _ . 


5 

7 


8. Stantonsburg .._ ... _ _ 

9. Taylors— 


6 
6 


10. Toisnot 


11 






Totals 


231,380 


36,470 


267,850 


214 


88 














4 


1 













TRUCKS — COST OF OPERATION, 1923-24 



Items 
3 Trucks) 



66 Trucks 
8 Months 



66 Trucks 
1 Month 



1 Truck 
1 Month 



1 Truck 
1 Day 



Mileage 

Pupils carried 

Gasoline (gallons)- 

Gasoline value 

Oil (quarts) 

Oil (cost) 

Repairs (value) 

Cases trouble 

Repairs (labor). ... 
Drivers (salary). ._ 
Total cost- __ 



178,461.0 
334,995.2 
30,320.4 
6,180.24 
11,478.72 
1,825.296 
7.407.312 
982.432 
4,360.224 
4,259.376 



2i.o:;'i.iihi 



308.0 
124.4 
790 .8 
772 .53 
434.84 
228.162 
925.914 
122.804 
545 .028 
532 .422 
003 .858 



338 

053 

57 

II 

21 

3 

14 

1 



16.9 

32.67 
2.87 
.585 
1.087 
0.173 
0.7014 
.0847 
0.4129 
.40335 
2 .27505 



Explanation's: 

1. The above figures include cost of two new trucks. 

2. These figures show that it cost {11.15 to transport one pupil for 8 months, or a little more than 

$1.39 per month, which is nearly 7 cents per school day. 



North Carolina Staid 
Raleigh 



SCHOOL BUDGET AND TAX RATE, 1924-25 

1. Total valuation, 1924 $46,927,490 

2. Total school tax rate : 90c. on $100. 

3. Total school budget $482,123 

4. Rates for specific purposes: 

a. For salaries, six months 40c. 

b. For loans and bonds 25c. 

c. For operation, six months 9c - 

d. For term extension 16c. 

Total six months rate 74c. 

Special tax rate 16c. 

Total 90c - 

5. Sources : 

a. Property $422,347 

b. Dogs 3 ' 595 

c. Polls 9 ' 888 

d. Other sources - 46,293 

Total -.- $482,123 



SCHOOL COMMITTEEMEN, 1924-25 

1. Black Creek Township — J. S. Tomlinson, chairman ; L. D. Tomlinson, G. J. 

Evans, Elisha Bass, W. H. Bass. Address of all : Black Creek, N. C. 

2. Cross Roads Township — Dr. I. W. Lamm, chairman; W. H. Tomlinson, 

W. T. Bass, S. E. High, Mallie Raper. Address of all : Lucama, N. C. 

3. Gardner's Township — R. H. Thomas, chairman ; Mrs. W. B. Forbes, T. J. 

Wiggins, S. P. Thomas ; one vacancy. Address of all : R. 1, Elm City, 

N. C. 

4. Old Fields Township — W. C. Boyette, chairman, R. 3, Wilson; R. T. 

Barnes, R. 3, Kenly; D. A. Fulghum, R. 1, Sims; Dr. T. G. Bradshaw, 
R. 2, Wilson ; J. S. Bailey, Sims. 

5. Saratoga Township — Joe Craft, chairman; John R. Eagles, J. W. Bass, 

Dr. C. S. Eagles, A. W. Etheridge. Address: Walstonburg. 

6. Stantonsburg Township — A. S. Wooten, chairman ; W. L. Shelton, Dr. S. H. 

Crocker, Dr. H. H. Powell, R. M. Whitley. Address of all: Stantons- 
burg. 

7. Spring Hill Township — C. O. Hinnant, chairman, R. 3, Kenly; J. H. Ren- 

frow, Jr., R. 3, Kenly; W. F. Watson, Lucama; Albert Watson, R. 3, 
Kenly; one vacancy. 

8. Taylor's Township — J. S. Thompson, chairman, R. 1, Wilson; Mrs. George 

R. Dew, R. 1, Wilson; George M. Edwards, R. 1, Wilson; W. D. Dew, 
R. 3, Wilson ; R. T. Taylor, R. 1, Wilson. 

9. Toisnot Township — W. M. Wells, chairman; J. D. Bryant, T. S., Hedge- 

peth, B. A. Harrelson, J. W. Cox, J. W. Winstead, E. R. Brinkley, John 
L. Bailey, Karl Bailey, Dr. B. F. Barnes. Address of all: Elm City, 
N. C. 

10. Wilson Township — S. W. Richardson, chairman; Graham Woodard, F. M. 
Miller, Dr. J. R. Edmundson, Mrs. W. A. Finch, Mrs. A. A. Bayse; one 
vacancy. Address of all : Wilson, N. C. 



GC 379.75643 C775p 

c. 2 

Coon, Charles Lee, 1868- 

Public schools of Wilson County, North C 



3 3091 00203 2944 



DATE DUE 


















































































































































GAYLORD 






PRINTED IN US. A. 



Kjaulord 

PAMPHLET BINDER~ 

. Syracuse, N. Y. 
StocKfon, Calif. 



379.75643 

C775P 

c.2 



Coon 



Public schools of Wilson county, North 
Carolina