(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Pulse"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/pulse198614lsum 





r 








trEPrtriuvn w irn 



nzszE3tx^nnjiPinzD 



|: iHOj^aMLJteincHrs 




m 
rut 



cm 



■POJ 
711111ft 



jt 



rennju 



JjETDOL 




run a o 




JEL 



-M"-4Hai- ir iff- T f nr F 



fUr-Hi^TT II In \l IkP 



i firiir an c « a 3 a i» 




. 





.frflSv 



FDR EVERYTHING 



Cast your mind back to that first, fresh fall when you 
started medical school. Your heart was full of dreams 
of the future, and words from upperclassmen 
seemed veritable pearls of wisdom, yet despite the 
length of each day, the years have gone by so fast - 
now its you advising a new group of eager students. 
We mark time by tests taken, subjects passed and 
rotations completed. When we speak it's always 
about school, grades, the hospital, patients - this has 
become our life. And when we have time off we try to 
cram it full of the things we sacrificed for school but 
we always return anticipating something new and 
fine. For everything there is a season. Now is our 
season to learn. 




2 • Opening 




I ' ' 



The well-worn, hallowed halls of 
the medical school convey learn- 
ing, but soon you realize that 
there exist many different types 
of education. Not only do you 
learn anatomy, microbiology, 
medicine and Comp Care, but 
you also learn about your peers 
and their unique experiences. At 
every step new and different ele- 
ments cross your path, momen- 
tarily clouding your vision only to 
reveal nobel truths and even 
greater clarity and brilliance. 




THERE IS A SEASON 



Opening • 3 



A TIME TO BE BORN 



Lulled into a false sense of security the first two 
years, students can easily remain unaware of the 
realities on the "other side of the doors." But the 
seeds are planted in the spring of sophomore year, 
when, for the first time, (and with a great deal of 
trepidation) the white coats come out. Learning to 
do a history and physical inspires in you the awe for 
your predecessors, who had the utmost knowledge 
of the human body without the benefits of contem- 
porary scientific developments. 



■■yiL 





4 • Opening 




Your wonderment persists throughout your junior 
year, as you examine children and expectant 
mothers and see the resilience of youth emerge 
triumphant. Yet your dreams are tainted with that 
first splatter of blood, that traumatic emergency 
room accident victim, and the elderly patient 
whose hold on life is so tenuous as to be readily 
ripped from our determined, yet impotent grasp. 



\ 



> - 





Opening • 5 



A TIME TO LAUGH 



There is an inherent joy in working with people, as 
the unexpected surprise can make you see things 
trom a different point of view. The clowning antics of 
your classmates both in and out of school keep you 
young at heart, irrepressible in will. Your patients, 
too, will bring you warmth and insight if you let them. 
Believe it or not, the faculty can be human too - listen 
to them, learn their strengths and weaknesses. You'll 
experience the exhilaration that comes from being 
alive, being well, and enabling others to live their 
fullest. 







9 






















• 




-** ^ 




lv J 


SIIki &. w^* UK 


St? 






6 • Opening 












» HAfS 

r »<••'* TTKA1 



mMtC 

JEWMIM 






Yet the laughter is not gratis, nor is it 
guaranteed - hysterics often mask a 
bleaker situation. Your time is replete with 
work that is tedious, your tasks impossi- 
ble and your obstacles insurmountable. 
Frequently your best efforts are thwarted 
by circumstances beyond your control. 
At these times it is only natural to suc- 
cumb to your struggle and mourn, either 
silently or violently, with tears of frustra- 
tion. 














W 







•,"^v'-* 




v- 








v 



■"V 





n 



A TIME TO CRY . 



Opening • 7 



A TIME TO KILL 



It takes a certain amount of gall to be a 
medical student, manifested usually by an 
inflated ego. Confidence and guts may 
get you through difficult circumstances, 
but be wary of letting your ego lead you 
astray. After seeing how subtle differ- 
ences in dosage or variations in treatment 
can hasten the end of a life, your image of 
your power becomes an horrific one. The 
ultimate futility is seen in terminal pain 
and freak accidents outside of human 
control or any metaphysical reason. With 
each loss you witness, another spark of 
innocence is lost to oblivion. 



I iif 






8 • Opening 




What drives you to return to this? Is it some 
masochistic pleasure in twenty hour days, or 
the smell of death? The perversity is re- 
solved when you solve a difficult problem, 
ease pain, or give solace. The complex heal- 
ing process involves much more than labora- 
tory values. The true elements are caring, 
consideration, and the gentle hand of time. 




A TIME TO HEAL 



Opening • 9 



A TIME TD PLANT 



They told you the hardest part of medical school was 
getting in. Wrongo. They never told you about 
memorizing (briefly) the entire anatomy of the human 
body and all of biotrivia. They never told you how to 
do an LP on a live human, or how to remember the 
differential diagnosis of nausea, vomiting and mal- 
aise. Information overload is the name of the game 
here, bub. Self education is the solution. Learn to 
learn. Stick with the basic seeds and let the rest grow 
up around it. 






10 • Opening 





The struggle to harvest an M.D. is a diffi- 
cult one. You must fight against a chang- 
ing medical education, human nature, 
and the relentless passage of time. Often 
the obstacles make you throw up your 
hands in despair. Yet if you weather the 
storms and recognize the downpour for 
what it is - a necessary purification - the 
roots of your knowledge, with the nourish- 
ment of experience, will yield fruit. 





A TIME TO REAP 



Opening • 1 1 



A TIME TO BREAK DOWN 



There were days freshman year when awakening for 
an 8:00 class was an impossibility. There were week- 
ends sophomore year spent studying for a continual 
onslaught of tests. By junior year you give up sleep 
not only for 5:30 rounds, but also sacrifice week- 
ends, nights, holidays. Senior year may be less in- 
tense, or at least, less novel, but the pressures of 
choosing a specialty, hoping to match, and having 
no idea where you will be for the next five years can 
only take their toll. There is little solace in looking 
ahead; it appears the residents are even less their 
own masters. The long haul seems interminable. 









12 • Opening 





You will notice through all the confusion 
that you begin to keep a clear head. Fam- 
ily and friends comment on your calm de- 
meanor. You learn to handle four to five 
hours of sleep a night and even be coher- 
ent the next day. You begin to remember 
your patients and keep their meds 
straight without flashing notecards. You 
brave late hours, early mornings, and ad- 
verse circumstances not merely because 
you have to, but because you want to 
participate. 





A TIME TO BUILD UP 



Opening • 13 



A TIME TO KEEP SILENT 



There is a quiet code involved in the making of a doctor, 
a time-worn rite of passage through anatomy, physiol- 
ogy, pharmacology, and medicine. Due in part to tradi- 
tion and in part to sheer inertia, medical education has 
stayed the same for many decades. Part of this tradition 
involves a veritable oath of silence from the student, 
who, as dictated, should use only his eyes, ears and 
brain to learn the sacred medical sciences. Lectures 
and tests perpetuate this format while the student strug- 
gles under the load of tutelage. 




14 • Opening 




There arrives a magical moment, however, 
when the melding of thought and action must 
occur. At this time the student is suddenly en- 
couraged, even harassed, into the position of 
authority to which he is accustomed merely to 
follow. He is uncertain, he stutters and flails. 
Yet a slight turn of the kaleidoscope grants 
another view of the gawky, white-coated one: 
the apprentice begins to awaken from his silent 
slumber. And with this transformation, the 
voice of a doctor slips hoarsely from his throat. 








AND A TIME TO SPEAK. 



Opening • 15 



SPECIAL TIMES 




REGISTRATION 




August 22, 1985 was a milestone for the Class of 1989 and a big check for the rest 
of the LSUMC student doctors. In a gesture reminiscent of college days, we docilely 
stood in line to sign over $2700 and another year of study hours. For the upper- 
classmen, registration was a collage of happy "How was your summer?" reunions 
and speculation about the months ahead. The freshmen began perfecting memori- 
zation techniques as they, in a flurry of introductions, met freshmen faculty and 
ninety-nine new peers, June 3, 1986, here we come. 









■amm. 



A 



i 













18 • Special Times 




REGISTRATION PARTY 



Red beans and rice, good music, and lots 
of old and new friends - LSUMC definitely 
knew how to herald another year bringing 
us closer to an elusive degree. Spirits 
were high and conversations were filled 
with summer stories, legends of gross 
anatomy, and countless introductions. 
Thus began the 1985-86 school year on a 
warm August night in the school court- 
yard - back to the books, everyone! 







^^ ^*S ~ 1 _•-.- 



I 




Registration, Registration Party • 19 




OYSTERS AND BOILED 




Aw Natly, yew done missed da pahty of da decade! All da big 
time chow hounds wus dere. Man, da Tobasco wus splashin all 
ova da place. Yew'd a taut dey wus vacum cleanuhs dey was 
suckin up dem ersters so fast. An da fresh hot cheese bread, 
man alive! An dose berled shrimp wus anuf to make ya slap yer 
mudda. Urn, urn, urn, dat wus some good time! An listen ta dis; I 
hoid dat Don's house stunk like an ole pile a erster shells fer a 
whole week afta dat! Man! 







20 • Special Times 



SHRIMP PARTY 








Oyster And Boiled Shrimp Party • 21 



"nrzjipz'c^ 





What good is a new Student Union 
without TGIF's, for that matter what 
good are Friday's without TGIF's? 
Although they didn't get into full 
swing until after the Union opened, 
there was a TGIF almost every other 
Friday in the spring. While it is ru- 
mored that some people only come 
for the beer, we also had plenty of 
soft drinks, popcorn, and the latest 
and greatest movies. And, at some 
of the parties we even had FOOD, 
mountains of it. We quickly learned, 
however, to never underestimate 
the hunger of a poor, starving Medi- 
cal Student (and their wives, kids, 
neighbors, dogs, grandmothers, 
etc.) I guess there will always be 
cries for more of a good thing (espe- 
cially when it's free) but everyone 
sure enjoyed "partying down" in 
their own Union rather than the omi- 
nous Testing and Evaluation Center. 






■ r 



M 



I 






i 



22 * Special Times 



1 






1 «/• 



4% 






TGfF's • 23 



FOOTBALL 




The LSUMC Intramural Football League 
for 1986 was a great success, as a record 
number of medical school teams partici- 
pated from each class. The most suc- 
cessful team was Wrath of Buckwheat, 
who captured the title over The DOA's. 
Although unconfirmed, it was reported 
that these supposedly outstanding 
young scholars did "The Super 
Bowl Shuffle" after the game. 





. 





94 • Rrxvrfal Times 










ftffl 




HI 







r f r 



Football • 25 



pa II |K| R| ippFT 




Fall semester sprang to life with the annual Allied Health Professions "Back-to- 
School Bash", featuring an all-you-can-eat Cajun buffet at Cafe' Shreveport. Bever- 
ages and merriment flowed non-stop as Allied Health faculty, students and their 
guests munched and mingled. A highlight of the evening was the official presenta- 
tion of the newly elected Allied Health Student Government Association officers: 
President, David Gibson (Cardiopulmonary Science); Vice-President, Janet Solo- 
mon (Physical Therapy); Secretary, Camille Sagrera (Occupational Therapy); Trea- 
surer, Deborah Barker (Cardiopulmonary Science); and Activities Director, Debra 
McHalffey (Physical Therapy). A gift was presented to Ann-Marie LeBlanc, Director 
of Student Affairs, in appreciation from the students. 




5* *m 






l l '^ff^ : 




26 * Special Times 









Cajun Buffet • 27 



I I A I I r"1\ A/C^C^fS, I D ADTV 

l/-\l I I IVVClII \l I /-APi I 




"Things that go 'bump' in the 
night" - if these ghouls and goblins 
seem familiar, that's because these 
beasties are your own classmates. 
The bewitching hour found them 
sipping the mystical brews of Bud- 
weiser and wishing they could join 
the younger trick-or-treaters comb- 
ing the streets. Spirited away from 
the wards into the misty Halloween 
night, this gruesome gang proved 
once again that any excuse for a 
party is good enough. 








28 • Special Times 



CASINO PARTY 



The date was October 19, 1985, and once again gambling for 
high stakes invaded Shreveport. The setting was The Sheraton at 
Pierremont and as the sun set, students, faculty, and friends gath- 
ered for an evening of gambling, dancing, and reveling. Everyone 
seemed to enjoy the sounds of 'Non-Stop' - as there was dancing 
well into the next morning. Millions of dollars were won and lost, 
dozens of prizes were raffled away, and as the night ended, people 
left having once again experienced Las Vegas for a night. 







Halloween Party, Casino Party • 29 



I IntZV tzr^l IM 




"Shreveport? Shreveport? That's somewhere down south, isn't it?", 
your patient asks, as you sit shooting the bull in your plush office, in 
another state, in another time. "I didn't know it was big enough to have a 
university or a medical school." 

"Yeah, it was growing in those days, before the oil bust. New buildings 
27 stories high, great interstate plans, new bridges across the lake, fine 
new lake front homes." 

"Sounds like quite the place to be, 
everything new." "Oh yes, even 
new hospitals. They always seemed 
to be building something, though I 
don't know if it all ever got finished. 
There were also some neat old 
things too, like the River Rose pad- 
dle boat. Also great places to party 
such as Humpfrees and Jodie's 
Place, both in old, fixed up build- 
ings. If you were into exercise, as we 
all were in those days, there was the 
Y - talk about old, they said the pool 
was sixty years old, the water cer- 
tainly seemed it!!" 

"That's old!" 

"Hey, let me show you some of 
those places . . . 








FILM FlSimi 
DOCTOR ZHIYAGO 

FRgxBf Juir i» ream 




1 1 tl 




NTERS SF M CO 



Shreveport • 31 



CI IRI^D I l\/l/\tD r"^/\r~i I i 




For whatever reason they came, all seemed to have a 
good time at the Annual Christmas Party held De- 
cember 20. Students, faculty, and staff gathered at the 
LeBossier to celebrate — and celebrate they did. Food 
and spirits were consumed in record amounts, as revel- 
ers danced to the sounds of 'Piranha*. All in all it was an 
excellent way to start off the holiday season. 







32 • Special Times 










Christmas Party ♦ 33 



k /\r~ m \r mm *is r 11 MAI 



— 



" 




\\i JLi 




The Third Annual Mock Trial was held on February 
5, 1986. The Sophomore jury listened to allegations 
of malpractice against a surgeon, and to the expert 
testimony given both for and against him. After the 
testimony, Judge Fred Sexton, Louisiana Court of 
Appeal, polled the jury. Alas, the doctor was found 
liable on one of the two claims of malpractice 
brought against him! 





- 





.•. 






34 • Special Times 




EAPI M I EZf |D| IK/I 



• 




The Annual Student Research Fo- 
rum was held on March 5, and six- 
teen students made presentations 
covering a wide range of topics. Dr. 
O'Callaghan gave an invited lecture 
emphasizing the essential role of re- 
search in all levels of medical and 
graduate study. 

In a close finish, Kenneth Pender- 
grast (sponsored by Dr. Beal, 
Anatomy) won first place among 
the medical students, and Janice 
Matthews-Greer (sponsored by Dr. 
Gilleland, Microbiology) took first 
among the graduate students. Each 
will receive $300 cash prize at the 
Annual Awards Convocation. 

More than work, the Forum repre- 
sents an opportunity, and the high 
quality of this year's papers should 
encourage others to present next 
year. Presenters, sponsors and 
those who attended came away sat- 
isfied, and looking forward to next 
year. 



• 




i 



*m 



f 

p 






Mock Trial, Research Forum • 35 



STUDY TIMES 




Some students tuck themselves away in a forgotten corner of the library, studying 
until the fifteen minute warning every night. Some of us reluctantly drag Guyton's 
Physiology along to the pool, hoping to discern the intricacies of neurophysiology 
while soaking up the rays. Other dedicated gunners burn the midnight oil with 
Cecil's Textbook of Medicine at their desks. Oh, and let's not forget the optimist 
who tries to study in bed, only to awaken six hours later with the sad revelation that 
pulmonary medicine can't be learned by osmosis. Fortunately for our future careers, 
these earnest attempts to master 
our coursework do indeed succeed: 
before we know it, we're first year 
residents. 






36 • Special Times 







Study Times • 37 



WATER POLO 




- . 



The 1985 Intramural Water Polo 
League was once again dominated 
by the Seamen and the Tubes. After 
both teams won their league, the 
Tubes were forced to forfeit in the 
semifinals because of unnecessary 
roughness. The Seamen, on the oth- 
er hand, breezed through the play- 
offs and went on to win the cham- 
pionship. The strength of the Sea- 
men lay with the outstanding ability 
of the females. The girls, scoring all 
the points were: Mimi Close, Sarah 
Fontenot, Dana Chastain, Lindy 
Burt, and Carol Poole. They would 
like to thank the questionable stron- 
ger sex for showing up. 
















if*? 




I 




2* — 








E 




W'*.>**«y*% 









N 













38 • Special Times 






Water Polo ♦ 39 








The 1986 LSUMC Intramural Basketball League once again pro- 
vided an excellent alternative to studying. Sudden Impact proved to 
be the class act of the Medical School, as these sophomores won 
both the Medical School Tournament and the LSU-S Intramural 
League. Class bragging rights, however, go to Rath of Buckwheat. 
The Freshmen provided a lot of excitement and competitiveness, to 
the league, while the Junior, Senior, and housestaff teams proved that 
getting older definitely doesn't mean getting better. 

























40 • Special Times 





— ' 



\ 



JS3 



!> 



I _* 




J? 



5 ' 



»1 




n 




L-* ; 1 




t A >jii 




?* ' 




^ 


w J 1 


1 




%. y- 




**■»■ 







-. ^ir, 






eU - 






«i 




r C 



*■* 4S 



* . 



Basketball • 41 



GULF 





The annual LSUMC-S Four-Man 
Scramble was held this fall at Hun- 
tington Park Golf Course. Between 
drinking beer, eating sandwiches, 
and racing golf carts, this year's 
tournament was almost a complete 
success-until somebody had the 
harebrained idea to actually play 
the game. What a bummer! Any- 
way, undaunted by inclement 
weather and unfavorable course 
conditions, the team of Mike 
Broyles, John Cook, Jim Jeffery, 
and Bo Johnson took a brief sojourn 
from their busy schedule on the pro 
tour to claim the championship with 
a blistering back nine following an 
inauspicious start. Next year, yooz 
turkeys gotta play blindfolded, or 
even worse . . . without beer. 




%*'. 






42 • Special Times 




Tennis anyone? The annual LSU Medical School 
Tennis Tournament was held in November with a 
record number of entries. The men's doubles division 
had some long, drawn out matches which showed 
the endurance of medical students developed 
through grueling hours of studying. Bobby Casanova 
and Mark Posner won the men's division by defeat- 
ing Tommy Fontenot and Mike 
Cochran in the finals. The mixed 
doubles division was won by 
Charles Sherrod and Mimi Close. 
They were victorious over Dr. Graf- 
ton and Maurice Wilkins, 7-6, 6-4. 
The women's division was won by 
Mimi Close and Lindy Burt who 
were given quite a challenge be- 
cause they only had one opposing 
duo. The tournament was great fun 
for everyone who participated, even 
the poor losers. Better luck next 
year! 



Tp |\J |\J I CJ 







z 



Golf, Tennis • 43 



CADAVER BALL 




■manna 



"Ya'll, I'm not drunk ... but 
where's my date?" (Margaret Mor- 
esi) "Yes officer, we're waiting for a 
key to the Student Union!" (David 
Rozas at 2:00 am) "No Vicki, you 
asked mel" (Jimmy Haley) 

These are just a couple of the 
quotes overheard on that fateful 
night on March 1, 1986. The event 
was none other than the annual Ca- 
daver Ball. (Rumor has it, the most 
extraordinary of its kind in recent 
years.) The music was provided by 
"Loose Talk" and according to Dr. 
Beal, several cases of VII ,h cranial 
nerve lesions were reported. 

A group of clever MSI's worked dili- 
gently that Saturday afternoon to 
provide a unique decor. In fact, 
LSUMC police are still trying to lo- 
cate one silver gross anatomy gur- 
ney complete with two party trays of 
untouched finger sandwiches. Addi- 



tional refreshments were served by 
surgically masked bartenders which 
consisted of 100 proof embalming 
fluid (to help party goers maintain a 
state of "intoxicus continuum") and 
popcorn appropriately placed in au- 
thentic silver "fat buckets." 






44 • Special Times 








WELCOME TO 





Cadaver Ball • 45 



AWAY FROM SCHOOL 



_ 




But what about when it's all over? 
During the week, it means time (but 
not nearly enough) to stretch out 
(even for a few minutes), take your 
mind off things. Then there's the 
long haul through the evening to 
catch up, organize, maybe even get 
ahead. Sometimes there's even 
time for the family (for those so 
blessed). 

How many of us live for the week- 
end? Maybe a chance to go home, 
if no tests loom ahead, but more 
likely just a trip to Humpfrees or 
something along that line. TGIF's 
are nice, but packed (patience pays 
off). Just how many medical stu- 
dents can you cram into Cadillac? 

Perhaps the most constructive 
part about the weekend is the quiet 
time, if you can find it. There's 
something wholesome and refresh- 
ing about putting the work away for 
a while, ignoring the telephone, and 
simply letting everything go - as long 
as you don't get carried away, of 
course. After all, somebody has to 
study that stuff - why not you? 





«lftr ,. . _. ' HI 






46 • Special Times 






\ 





1 



Away From School • 47 



SOFTBALL 





Blue sky, green grass, and whizzing white softballs. 
Those are a few of the wonders of spring. This spring 
brought the med students out in full force as teams 
too numerous to name competed in the annual LSU-S 
Softball season. Hundreds of aspiring sports super 
stars were given yet another good excuse to avoid 
studying. And so they did. 




at 




. 





48 ♦ Specal Times 





■HMMMMIMHMMM^MI 



_ 






^m 




9 


.j 


► 




f : ■ • ■ ~ 


7 


r- " -. '■■•■■ - 






|f|l|Pi^^^^^^fcp^^B 


:■;:;:;:-. 




"-'/'.''•. 



Softball • 49 



r^oi \rzi PAIR 





Tuesday, March 11 was no ordinary day. Sure it started out like any other 
Tuesday. Ed Askew arising for the first day of classes for that week, Tom Montgom- 
ery making plans for April 1 (that's three weeks), and Chuck Joyce listening to his 
Rush tape, but it was different. It was time for the 1986 Drug Fair. 

Shameless medical students ravaged the exhibit thinking it was either Halloween 
as they tried to fill their bags, or Easter as they stuffed cardboard boxes in the style 
of Peter Cottontail. 

Yes, there were freebies, but 
more importantly many of the area 
drug reps turned out to give us the 
ultimate in pharmacology lectures 
(meaning that there was no exam at 
the end). The sophomores were 
elated to find out that they actually 
remembered some drugs, and even 
what a few of them could be used 
for. The upperclassmen seemed to 
be truly inquisitive and all appeared 
pleased with the information they 
had shared and received from the 
discussions with the reps. Once 
again armed with new birth date cal- 
culators, pen lights, ECG rulers, and 
various drug dosage calculators, the 
brave Juniors and Seniors headed 
back to "the wards." 




I 




•Sis I J&$& 





50 • Special Times 









Drug Fair • 51 



TIGER TROT 




With spring in full swing, the runners among us prepared for the 
annual Tiger Trot. This year a record turnout for an event that 
continues to grow in popularity. 5K and 10K races were held, with 
stiff competition coming from local running clubs. Many came not 
to race, however, but just to get some good exercise and to enjoy 
the outdoors. After the run the Square was the place to be as the 
Tiger Trot party kicked off with good music and plenty to eat and 
drink. 







52 • Special Times 






0-25-5D 







j 







• 




Tiger Trot • 53 




™^^^™ 


• 





CRAWFISH BOIL 




Love dem dads! Who doesn't? One event that is always popular in Spring is 
the crawfish boil, where anyone can become cajun for a day. Champion 
Lake was the site again for a day of outdoor fun, music, and devouring 
mass quantities of those hot and spicy mudbugs. The Untouchables enter- 
tained, as intense volleyball contests were taking place. Others enjoyed 
mixing with friends. Full, and content at the end of the day, we left with 
eager anticipation of next year's crawfish boil, 










54 ♦ Special Times 



' 









Crawfish Boil ♦ 55 



MATCH DAY 




Ah God! Had I but studied, In the days of my foolish youth. 

- Francois Villon 

Match Day - an event that has little meaning to the freshmen, holds more anxiety 
for seniors than any class exam. For this day is not the final day of the year, but it is 
surely the most decisive. During the year, seniors have been living out of suitcases 
like traveling salespersons, selling themselves at numerous interviews. Had they 
studied enough, were they competi- 
tive enough? 

Though Match Day is an extraor- 
dinary experience, it is not always a 
happy one. For some, their hopes of 
matching at a particular program 
were dashed by a premature phone 
call. Others opened their envelopes 
to find a program that was not their 
first choice. Finally, there were at 
the majority, who shouted in exhila- 
ration or smiled with pleasure at 
their new journeys of life as a physi- 
cian. 






56 • Special Times 



iy a /Y"T"P"*^| I f~l/YN^ i \ ai ) 'T"\ /r 




Cost of Living 

You leave, I stay 

The years swiftly pass away 

When memories return. 

B.T.B.K. 

Relief and celebration similar to that 
of past post-exam parties were the 
sentiments of those who went to 
Humpfrees for the Match Day party. 
Seniors ate, drank and danced with 
friends or spouses in jubilation over 
their success at Match Day. As we 
looked at the posters on the wall 
containing each senior's name and 
the program they matched at, we 
felt the sentiments of four memora- 
ble short years. Many seniors began 
slowly realizing the future implica- 
tions of such a momentous day felt 
the parting farewells of graduation 
still two months away. 








■ps r 






H^ -m W 






Ry^/ m 




IS 










\ 



Match Day & Party • 57 






I i 



EW STUDENT UNION 




They told Orville and Wilbur it would never fly, they said man will never land on the 
moon and they said the Student Union would never open in our lifetime. Once again 
they were wrong. It may have been a long time coming but the LSU-Shreveport 
Student Union opened up this winter shortly after everyone returned from Christmas 
vacation. A new stereo, VCR, microwave, and television were added to the things 
recovered (in pieces) from the old 
Union. It is now open every week- 
day and available on weekends. I 
think I speak for those involved that 
it is the gratification of seeing every- 
one having a good time there that 
makes it worthwhile. A special 
thanks goes to Charlotte Singleton 
who put up with all the red tape, 
confusion, and headaches that went 
into opening the Union. Maybe one 
day, while they are saying it will nev- 
er happen, some LSUMC student 
will discover the cure for the com- 
mon cold while sipping a cold one at 
the "New" Student Union. 








KS'^tKr 





"New" Student Union • 59 





These are the faces of your medical school years: bittersweet memories of 
classmates, professors, patients, and ward attendings. Think of your freshman year, 
and see the faces of four good buddies huddled over the anatomy tables as Joe 
Penny lurked nearby. Remember the sophomore blitz of exams, and see Dr. 
O'Callaghan playing the role of influenza HA and NA peplomers. Muse over clinical 
diagnosis and recall the first patient you ever saw with congestive heart failure - a 
sweet old lady who, like you, couldn't believe you were old enough to wield a 
stethoscope. 








60 • Special Times 







... W-* - r | xt 


H 


Mil 






^^K^ 


fef 









Pi -^ " A 




^ 


^ 


'a 






Faces • 61 



ALLIED HEALTH 




You work hard - you live fast. After a heavy day of studying, healing or scutting, 
Allied Health students let off steam in different ways. For some it's drinking and 
eating, for others it's drinking and dancing, and for most it's just plain drinking. Or 
maybe you prefer a quiet night of meditation, or exercise, or time with your loved 
ones. You can rest assured however you spend it that it's QUALITY time, time you 
live to the fullest, every minute of it. Yes, you experience every second of it until you 
fall asleep in your beer. 







62 • Special Times 








Allied Health • 63 



CAMARADERIE 




Medical school conjures up images of long hours, tons of 
tests, weekends spent studying and nights on call. Funny how 
after so many hours in the hospital you begin to resemble 
your patients, and you take your doctor's habitus with you 
everywhere, even to parties. What is seldom mentioned but 
tacitly understood is the sense of camaraderie, both solemn 
and crazy, that is engendered by shared insights. Your friend- 
ships give you the strength and the 
freedom to enjoy the many facets of 
your four years here. 





»ni- 



aft 



k 








64 • Special Times 




w 









fUHSiJI 





Camaraderie • 65 



GRADUATON 




Nothing in life is more wonderful than faith- 

the one great moving force which we can 

neither weigh in the balance, nor test in the crucible. 



Sir William Osier 



After a decisive Match Day, the 
completion of final exams, the up- 
coming licensing examinations, and 
the beginning of residency training, 
Graduation Day may seem anticli- 
matic. But as we proceed to receive 
our diplomas, one cannot but feel 
the exhilaration and sense of 
achievement that shrouds us like 
our heavy graduation gowns. The 
faith and confidence which has seen 
us through four challenging years 
now are ready to face new circum- 
stances. Once again in our life, as 
family and friends watch, we set 
upon the stage to begin a new life. 
Will we have that 3:00 a.m. on call 
strength, will we make fine physi- 
cians? Faith in ourselves in what we 
believe in may well be our only sol- 
ace for the ineveitable failures and 
successes that our futures hold. 






66 • Special Times 








Graduation • 67 



FRESHMEN 




1985 saw a freshman class as diversified as any. All 
types of ages and backgrounds came together with 
feelings both of enthusiasm and of apprehension. 
School started quickly, and by day one the now familiar 
feeling of "being behind" took hold. Within two weeks 
nearly the entire class had taken "the caffeine plunge." 
Our quest for knowledge was equaled only by our quest 
for Diet Pepsi and Community Coffee. Many of us 
passed the first few months in a semi-conscious state, 
wondering just what we had gotten ourselves into and 
asking each other, "Are we having fun yet?" But, as 
often happens when people are thrown together under 
difficult circumstances, the class started to come to- 
gether and many good friendships developed. 



70 • Classes 





Freshmen • 71 



FRESHMEN 




Breaks from all the madness were far and few between, 
but the most was made of them. Fun was had at the 
Casino and Christmas parties, as well as at the post- 
test White House parties. The year saw trips to Dallas, 
New Orleans, Florida, and Colorado, and also saw the 
emergence of such previously hidden personalities as 
Woody, Stachebo, Rambo, Pee Wee, Cooney, Synbad, 
and The Wad. School continued to get more difficult, 
and it did not help matters any by realizing that we were 
actually paying money for this treatment. Through the 
fog of Dr. Penny's pipe and over the mountain of Bio- 
chemistry and Neuroanatomy notes we began to realize 
that we were finally on our way. 




72 • Classes 




Freshmen • 73 



FRESHMEN 




^*^- *-**<** 




Gary Paul Anzalone 

Northeast Louisiana University 

Jeanne Frances Attrep 

Louisiana Tech University 

William N. Ball, Jr. 

LSU-Shreveport 

Gray W. Barrow 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Stacey Monica Bastian 

Xavier University 



Marcia Grace Bates 

LSU-Shreveport 

Richard Roy Battey 

Urtiv. of HawaihManoa 

Stephen Michael Beene 

Univ. of Southern Arkansas 

William Scot Bell 

Mississippi State Univ. 

Robert Neil Blanchard 

Louisiarta Tech University 



74 • Classes 











^j" 


^mr 


/ * 


A 


j 




f!l 








1 ,■ 


t 






James Jeffery Blount. Ill 

Southeastern Louisiana Univ. 

Marcia Lynn Bowers 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Edward Lewis Brewer, 

Univ. of f*Jebraska-Ltncolo 

Toby Daniel Broussard 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Gregory James Brown 

Centenary College 



II 



William S. Bundrick, Jr. 

Louisiana Tech University 

Eric Scott Burt 

Northwestern State University 

William B. Calhoun 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Edward W. Carriere, Jr. 

Louisiana Tech University 

Mark E. Clawson 

LSU-Shreveport 



Freshmen • 75 




FRESHMEN 







Susan Elaine Cocke 

Duke University 

Paul Gustave Cole 

Univ. of Southwestern LA 

Stephen Paul Courtney 

Northeast Louisiana University 

Hai Van Dang 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Thomas C. Dansby, Jr. 

Northeast Louisiana University 



Byron Curtis Dickerson 

Louisiana Tech University 

Alan Kendall Duncan 

LSU-Shreveport 

Gregory Duplechain 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Timothy Scott Fournet 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Charles James Fox, III 

Spring HiH CoHege 








76 • Classes 






/ tl 






John Ashley Fritchie 

LSO-Ejaton Rouge 

Josephine M. Futrell, Ph.D. 

Urtv. of Arkansas Medical School 

John Allen Gaines 

Univ. of New Orleans 

Michael Jose Garcia 

LSU-Baton Rouge * 

William Gene Gates 

Northeast Louisiana University 






y> 





Janine Lee Goldstein 

LSU-Shreveport 

Linda Ann Goodrum 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Ripley Hayes Green 

Southern Methodist Univ. 

Patricia Renae Griffin 

LSU-Shreveport 

James Patrick Haley 

LSU-Baton Rouge 




Freshmen • 77 



FRESHMEN 



Douglas Smith Harrison 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

William G. Hathaway, 



McNeese 



Jack W. Heidenreich 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

David Smith Hewitt 

Stephen F. Austin 

Rita Yanez Horton 

LSU-Shreveport 




Kathleen B. Hudson 

Northeast State University 

James Clement Jeffery 

Louisiana Tech University 

Brian Bishop Johnson 

Louisiana Tech University 

Peter Jay Johnson 

Centenary Cotege 

Kathryn Kay Kennedy 

Northeast State University 



Prabhakar P. Kesava 

LSU-Shreveport 

Timothy Charles Keys 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Marcellus E. LeHaye 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Peter Sam Latino, II! 

Univ. ot New Orleans 

Ladislas Lazaro, IV 

LSU- Eunice 




78 • Classes 




Melissa Love Lynn 

Northeast Louisiana University 



Brent Louis Mazoch 

LSU-Baton Rouge 



David Charles McAlpine 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

John David McCain 

Northeast Louisiana University 

Michael Allen McKay 

LSU-Baton Rouge 











*' * 




% 




f^^l* - 



j 5 



J 



Rand Sebastian Metoyer 

Xavter University 

Michael Wallace Miguez 

Northeast Louisiana University 

Brent Louis Millet 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

J. Margaret Mores! 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Robert Joseph Morris 

LSU-Shreveport 







— 



William Arthur Morris 

John Brown University 

Ross Barton Nelson, lit 

VandertjSt University 

Dorothy Claire Orphe 

LSU-Shreveport 

Allan Thomas Parr, Jr. 

Louisiana College 

Anna Lori Perry 

Louisiana College 



Freshmen • 79 




John Andrew Peterson 

Harvard University 

David Noel Pippins 

Northeast Louisiana University 

Vicki Jennifer Porter 

LSU-Shreveport 

David Thomas Price 

Northeast Louisiana University 

Howard James Raphael 

Xavier University 



Fred Lee Reed, Jr. 

Grambling State University 

Todd Mitchell Rice 

LSU-Shreveporr 

Randall Raymond Robbins 

Univ. of New Orleans 

Robin Falkensttne Rogers 

LSU-Shrevepo 

Patricia Jackson Roland 

LSU-Baton Rouge 



i / 



80 • Classes 









r 



- ^ 



— r 

v 



<• 




David Rodney Rozas 



LSU-Baton Rouge 



Al Joseph Rozas, 

LSU-Baton Rouge 



Pamela Sunday Saha 

Stanford University 

Stephen Jacob Schorr 

LSU-Baton Rouge 

Bryan Garrett Sibley 

LSU-Shreveport 

Suzanne D. Slayton 

Louisiana Tech University 








George Butcher Sonnier 

LSLMJaton Rouge 

Christopher C. Spencer 

LSU-8aton Rouge 

David Collins Stout 

Univ. Of Mississippi 

Danny Jay Strange 

McNeese State University 

James Patrick Takara 

LSU-Shreveport 







Pete Joseph Trinca 

Univ. of Arkansas 

Gregory Nolan Vickers 

Texas A&M 

Courtney Michael Villavasso 

Xavter University 

Carole Patrice Wiggins 

Louisiana College 

Deborah Kay Williams 

LSU-Baton Rouge 



Freshmen • 81 



SOPHOMORES 




Ours became known as the class without a personality. 
Where it began, no one knows. (Probably with some vin- 
dictive professor who fell to his demise in a less than 
inspiring lecture). Once on the faculty grapevine, our class 
was watching instructors sweat as they lectured, praying 
under their breath for just one person to laugh at their next 
joke. Much to their disapproval, we held out until 10 min- 
utes before the hour and then came alive with the chant of 
"BREAK! BREAK!" The faculty of LSUMC will always 
remember the class of 1988 as an amorphous entity. But, 
we, the students of the class of 1988, know the truth. We 
take pride in our class and its personality. 





82 • Classes 






Sophomores • 83 




SOPHOMORES 





i 



ffc^W PATH «l S*pk- 3 







— * 



84 • Classes 





***»~. 




r^*W% 



, * v - » . 





Sophomores • 85 



SOPHOMORES 




Mitra Marie Ahrabi 

LSU Baton' Rouge 

Ronald Granville Angus, Jr. 

LSU Shreveport 

Edward Askew 

LSU Baton Rouge 

A. Michael Aura 

LSU Salon Rouge 

# .|>usan Melinda Bankston 

LSU Baton Rouge 








Rayland Kevin Beurlot 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Leslie A. Blake 

Princeton University 

Jill Maria Bordelon 

Jtorthwestern State Univ. 

Ann Felice Boudreaux 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Eli Lenoir Brown 

Tutane University 




86 • Classes 









Colleen Kay Calhoun 

Louisiana College 

John Bradford Carlln 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

David Ringwalt Carver 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Robert T. Casanaova, Jr. 

LSU Baton Rouge 

P. Thomas Causey, Jr. 

Louisiana Tech University 











Harold G. Clausen, Jr. 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Nancy E. Clearkin 

LSU Shreveport 

David Stephen Dawes 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Paula Ann Dean 

McNeese State University 

John Anthony Demopulos 

Baylor University 




Sophomores • 87 



James Brian Deville 

Northeast Louisiana Univ, 

Kerwin John Fontenot 

University of Houston 



Susan Futayyeh 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

Thomas Robert Gates 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 




SOPHOMORES 




Christopher A. Gayle 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Raymond D. Germany, Jr. 

Louisiana Tech University 

John Kent Granger 

McNeese State University 

Gregory Roper Green, III 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Robert D. Greenberg 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 







Deborah Linn Harrell 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Robert Dean Haskins, Jr. 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Melanie Jean Helms 

LSU Shreveport 

Stephan Hall Hennigan 

LSU Shreveport 

Gregory M. Hoffpauir 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 






88 • Classes 








V** 



Robert Cary Holladay 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Janie Holt 

Centenary College 

Steven Edward Holt 

Centenary Cortege 

Lisa Llewellyn Jones 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Charles Bryant Joyce, Jr. 



Northeast Louisiana Univ. 










Sue Joan Jue 

Louisiana Tech University 

Robin E. Kilpatrick 

Miss, St. Univ. tor Women 

Ellen Mary Lancon 

Univ. o* Southwestern LA 

Charles Houston Lawler 

LSU Shreveport 

Dung Nguyen Le 

Northeast Louisiana Univ 



Sophomores • 89 



SOPHOMORES 




Morgan Packard Lorio 

LSU Eunice 

Robert F. Marshall 

McNeese State University 

Anthony Duane McBride 

LSU Shreveport 

Christoper M. McGanless 

University of the South 

Catrell Jose McCulloch 

Tulane University 




James Barry McGee, Jr. 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Mark Alan Medlin* 

Texas Tech University 

Thomas J. Montgomery 

Univ. of Southwestern LA 

William Hall Morrison 

LSU Shreveport 

Lawrence Edward Mosley 

LSU Shreveport 






90 • Classes 




Kevin William Murphy 

Centenary College 



C. Christopher Musgrove, II 

LSU Shreveport 



Steven Craig North 

Northeast Louisiana Univ 

Reynard C. Odenheimer 

Univ ot Southwestern LA 

Robert Edward Oliver 

LSU Baton Rouge 









la* .| 












Thomas Ervin O'Mara, Jr. 

Centenary College 

Joseph Peter Orsulak 

LSU Shreveport 

Abhinand V. Peddada 

Louisiana College 

Jeffrey Guy Penfield 

LSU Shreveport 

Fred Harper Petty 

Northeast Louisiana Univ, 




mm 













John Bartels Pope 

McNeese State University 

Leticia Ann Poret 

Louisiana Tech University 

Neill Chandler Porter 

Northeast Louisiana Univ, 

Mark Peal Posner 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Allen Harold Redding 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 



SOPHOMORES 



Vernon Keith Rhynes 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Michael Wayne Roppolo 

LSU Shreveport 



Cheryl T. Russell 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Robert Carleton Russell 

LSU Shreveport 

Lyndall Pennison Saadat 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 




Darrell Bridges Sandifer 

Baytor University 

Hani David Sanusi 

Louisiana Tech University 

John Samuel Sardisco 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Gregory Scott Seal 

LSU Shreveport 

Milton Moore Slocum 

LSU Shreveport 



Anita Marie Smith 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Jeffrey Otto Smith* 

Louisiana College 

Curtis Justin Solar 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Christopher R. Swayze 

Louisiana Tech University 

Joseph Mark Tarpley 

Northeast Louisiana Untv, 




92 • Classes 




I** 



Jf^00~ ^ 







«*1 



4^7i 




r 











I ! 



I 




* 



Kelly Ann Turk 

Centenary College 

Frederic E. VanBastelaer 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Hilary Stephen Watson 

Centenary College 

Robert Brian Wells 

Colorado State Univ. 

Randall Glen White 

LSU Shreveport 






' 



Norman Boyd Williams 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Fred Spencer Willis, Jr. 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Paul Stuart Wilson 

Southern Methodist Univ. 

Terry Winkler 

Louisiana Tech University 

Stephen Scott Wyble 

LSU Baton Rouge 



Sophomores • 93 



JUNIORS 




I guess, no I'm sure, that this has been a year of 
completely unique experiences for everyone in the 
class. Still there are some common happenings we all 
walked through. The most vivid in my mind are the 
extremes - the sheer terror and the absolute delight, the 
first night on night labor when my patient delivered in 
bed with the umbilical cord wrapped tightly around the 
baby's neck. The day in Comp Care Clinic I let a young 
lady first hear her baby's heart beating. These are some 
of the things the Junior year is about but also it was the 
year when all the glitter faded. This year we lived the 
hours of a doctor for the first time. 




94 • Classes 






Juniors • 95 



JUNIORS 




We saw how angry and uncooperative patients 
can be and how complete you must live the good 
moments - the bad often lay in the next room. At 
times it was a very frustrating year - we were told 
we're part of the team but very rarely got to play. 
In the end the only way anyone will ever know this 
year is to live it - it can't be told. All in all I must 
admit that it has been the worst, the best, the 
most of any year so far. I wouldn't trade my worst 
day this year for any best day of the first two. 



m 




«■ 



96 • Classes 





c 



s»«5^fc 




Juniors • 97 



JUNIORS 




Consider a common situation in which the junior 
finds himself. He shows up on Monday 'morning, 
bright and early, ready to attack a new clinical ser- 
vice. Of course, he does not know where the facili- 
ties on this floor are, but this is no cause for concern. 
He is assigned to specific patients and is expected 
to know the details of their illnesses within minutes. 
This is no great task. The real challenge is to consid- 
er himself a genuine member of the health care 
team, sharing the responsibility for the care of his 
patients. Indeed, the junior year is when the "they" 
of medicine becomes the "we!" No longer do 
"they" order chest x-rays and urinalyses; now, we 
order them. 




Michael Yousif Abbo 

Emory University 

James Anthony Ardoin 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Thomas Clayton Arnold 

Louisiana College 

John Gordon Bordelon 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Martin Craig Bozeman 

LSU Shfeveport 



Nita Gail Bratton 

LSU Shreveport 

Joseph Eugene Brierre 

Univ. of Southwestern LA 

James Gerard Brooks, Jr. 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Lynda Lee Burt 

Louisiana Tech Urtiv. 

John Mac Chandler 

Louisiana Tech Univ. 



98 • Classes 








Curtis C. Chastain, II 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Benjamin 8. Close 

LSU Baton Rouge 

James Michael Cochran 

McNeese State University 

Nathan Earl Crone 

LSU Shreveport 

Steven Scott Davis 

U.S, Military AcaderYiy 








Bryan Keith Demarie 

LSU Baton Rouge 

David F. Dies 

Louisiana Tech University 

Richard Wilson Fincher 

Louisiana Tech University 

Larry Lucas Flake 

LSU Baton Rouge 

David Fontaine 

Nichotls State University 



Juniors • 99 






JUNIORS 



Daniel Thomas Fontenot 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Clement Wade Fox 



Southern Methodist Univ. 



Janie Blake Fox 

LSU Shreveport 

John Anderson Freeman 

Centenary College 









Thomas Gray Gaddis 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

Laurie Robin Grier 

LSU Shreveport 

Richard Madison Harrell 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

Robert Kevin Hatchett 

LSU Shreveport 

Harry Robert Hawthorne 

Louisiana Coiiege 



= 




| F^iPlI 






M. Susan Kennison 
Henderson 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

Henry Joseph Hollier 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Traci Lynne Ivey 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

* Dwayne Keller 

Xavier University 

Albert Glen Kerr 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 




- 1 



100 • Classes 




I 















* 


TT-'. 






John Thomas Knight 

Centenary College 

Gary Jules Kohler 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

Kathleen Marie Lacour 

LSI) Baton Rouge 

Maureen Louise Lacour 

LSI) Baton Rouge 

Thomas Alcade Lacour, Jr. 

LSU Baton Rouge 



Randy J. Lamartiniere 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Ann Risinger Landry 

Louisiana Tech University 

Robert Harrison Landry 

LSU Shreveport 

Ted Alan Lennard 

Louisiana Tech University 

James Whitfield Logan 

Louisiana Tech University 



Juniors • 101 



JUNIORS 




Mary Agnes Lowery 

LSU Shreveport 

William Elwyn Lyles 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

Gary Paul Manuel 

McNeese Siaie University 

Gary Lane Matthews 

LSU Soreveport 

Melanie Danielle Mattson 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 











Edward John Mayeaux, Jr. 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Keith Ray Mayfield 

LSU Shreveport 

Michael Patrick McCarthy 

LSU Baton Rouge 

William Anthony McGee 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

John Jay McLean 

LSU Baton Rouge 



_— 







102 • Classes 



\lw 



' I 




David Wayne McManus 

Univ of Southwestern LA 



Joseph W. Milner, Jr. 

Baylor University 



Robert Gene Moore 

Louisiana Tech University 

Donald Glenn Moses 

Louisiana Tech University 

Emily Hummer Naus 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 




HB HI 
HP 












Brent Gerard Nick 

University of New Orleans 

Katherine I. Ochsner 

Tulane Universify 

Kenneth Scott Parks 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Jeffrey Victor Paul 

Louisiana College 

Kenneth Roy Pendergrast 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 



c= 



Blake C. Poleynard 

Baylor UnivefSify 

Carol Ann Poole 

Centenary College 

Mary Cecilia Portis 

Jackson State University 

William Bates Regan 

LSU Baton Rouge 

John Martin Roberts 

LSU Baton Rouge 



Juniors • 103 



JUNIORS 



Francis X. Robichaux 

LSU Baton Rouge 



Carey William Robinson 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

Daniel Richard Roubein 

LSU Shreveport 



Michael Gerard Rukavina 

Univ. of Notre Dame 

David Paul Sampognaro 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

Felicia Denise Sankey 

Centenary College 

Charles Fox Sherrod, 111 

Louisiana Tech University 

Brian Reynolds Sinclair 

Centenary College 





Dean Eldon Smith 

LSU Shreveport 

James Frederick Smith 

Louisiana Tech University 

Jeffrey Keith Smith 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Margaret Ann Springer 

Univ. of New Orleans 

Sharon Marie Stein 

LSU Baton Rouge 





104 • Classes 




— 









f 



hr 





Howard Mark Stelly 

Northeast Louisiana Univ. 

David Elmer Thomas 

LSU Batcxi Rouge 

Steven Bernard Vidrine 

LSU Baton Rouge 

David Joseph Vining 

Tulane University 

Mark Steven Wallace 

LSU Shreveporf * 







Mark Matthew Wilson 

Louisiana Tech University 

Cheynita D. Woodson 

Xavier University 

Christine M. Zaffater 

LSU Baton Rouge 

Donna Marie Zappi 

Univ. of Southwestern LA 

Scott David Zentner 

Texas A&M University 



Juniors • 105 



SENIORS 




John Burdrick & Suzanne Snow 



As freshmen, it was the daily onslaught of notes, notes, and more notes; the 
countless tests of our sophomore year that eventually yielded to fantasies of our 
junior year and the donning of the symbolic white coat; the blood cultures, 
disimpactions, and redundant trips to the lab that quickly turned our junior 
idealism and white coats to the dingy, stained attire fitting of this beast of burden; 
but we made it. 

What a difference a year can make. The scrubs and "white" coat have been 
replaced by tie and clean shirt. It's difficult to remember my last call night and 
even harder, one that was interrupted with calls or pages. Yet, with the intrigue of 
watching my classmates choose their careers and the building excitement as 
Match Day approaches, there grows a seed of apprehension. In a few short 
months I'm going to be a doctor and responsible for real lives. Hell, I feel like I 
don't know anything. Yet, I realize this fear is natural and that I'll make it. 







Denise & Terri 




Cookie, Bryant & Kelli 




106 • Classes 



SENIOR FAMILY 
ALBUM 



Regina & Maims 




Robert Fortier-Benson 




Dan, Terri, Sarah, Katie 



Mitch, Jimmy, Warren, Richard 




Seniors & SFA • 107 




Michael Thomas Acurio. M.D. 

Medical University-Charleston. SC 
Orthopaedics 

Car! Eugene Adkins, M.D. 

Parkland Memorial Hospiial-Daflas. TX 

Anesthesiology 

Richard Nevtn Akins, M.D. 

Universtty Hospital- tdtle Rock, AR 
Psychiatry 

James Kirk Aymond, M.D. 

Duke Universtty Med. Ctr.-NC 
Orthopaedics 

Albert Brent Bankston, M.D. 

University Ctt South Alabama-Mobile. At 
Orthopaedics 







Tildon Kurt Belgard, M.D. 

University Hospital-Little Rock. AR 

Anesthesiology 

Blaine M. Borders, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Surgery 

Walter Edward Bounds, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Internal Medicine 

Richard Kent Broussard, M.D. 

tSU-Shreveport 
Internal Medicine 

John Bennett Bundrick, M.D. 

Mayo <3rad. School of Med. -Rochester. MN 
Internal Medicine 







108 • Classes 




Melanie Joyce Buttross, M.D. 

Roanoke Memorial Hospital-VA 
Transitional 



Anne Oenise Carter, M.D. 

St Vincent's Med. Ctr -Jacksonville. FL 
Family Practice 



Thomas Brian Caskey, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Internal Medicine 

F. Xavier Castellanos, M.D. 

Chandler Med. Ctr -Lexington. KY 
Psychiatry 

Basil D. Catsikis, M.D. 

Geismger Med. Ctr. -Danville, PA 
Diagnostic Radiology 







Julia Braddock Davis, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Pediatrics 

Paul Michael Davis, M.D. 

Ochsner Found -New Orleans, LA 
Surgery 

Terri Lyn Davis, M.D. 

Tuscaloosa Fam. Prac,-AL 

Family Practice 

Patricia Denley, M.D. 

Ochsner Found-New Orleans, LA 
Pediatrics 

Denise Yvette Duhon, M.D. 

Baylor Coll Affit. -Houston, TX 
internal Medicine 







Kerry Ivan Edwards, M.D. 

Shands Hosp & U. of Florida-Gainesville, FL 
Internal Medicine 

David Richard Fakier, M.D. 

Yale Affll. Hosp -Norwalk. CT 
Diagnostic Radiology 

Patric Wesley Ferguson, M.D. 

Methodist Hosp. -Memphis. TN 
Transitional 

Michael A. Finan, M.D. 

U. of South Florida Afftf Hosp.-Tarnpa, FL 
OB/Gyn 

Eudice Eugene Fontenot, M.D. 

LSU-ShrevepOrl 
Pediatrics 



Seniors & SFA • 109 



SENIORS 



Thomas Glenn Fontenot, M.D. 

Df Walter Moss Reg -Lake Charles. LA 
Family Practice 

Juliana Melody Fort, M.D. 

Tulane U Attil Hosps -New Orleans. LA 
Psychiatry 



Robert L. Fortier-Bensen, M.D. 

Univ of South Alabama-Mobile. AL 

Anesthesiology 

John Whithurst Gallaspy, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
OB'Gyn 

Bryant Gerard George, M.D. 

Tulane U Affit Hosps -New Orleans. LA 
Surgery Pre. 



Jim & 

Jamie 

Aymond 

& Honey 





Warren John Green, M.D. 

Baptist Memorial-Memphis. TN 
Transitional 

Paula Easley Gregory, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
OB/Qyrt 

John Philip Harris, M.D. 

Univ Medical Ctr -Lafayette. LA 
Internal Medicine 

Maurice A. Hawley, III, M.D. 

Baptist Memorial-Memphis, TN 

Internal Medicine 

Mitchell Jude Hebert, M.D. 

Jacksonville Health Ed. Program-FL 
■internal Medicine 





Johnny Ray Henley, M.D. 

. LSU-Shreveport 
Internal Medicine 

John C. Holloway, M.D. 

St. Paul's Med. Ctr -Dallas. TX 
Anesthesiology 

W. Richardson Holloway, M.D. 

Univ of Missouri-Columbia. MO 
Urology 

Timothy Wilbert Howes, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Urology 

John Vernon trie, M.D. 

Annistori Fam Prac -Anniston. AL 
Family Practice 





110 • Classes 



Maurice & Mary Hawley 






Martin Lewis Johnson, M.D. 

Wttford Hall. USAF M.C.-San Antonio. TX 
internal Medicine 

S. Michael Jones, M.D. 

University Hospital-Liitie Rock. AR 

Internal Medicine 

Susan Anne Kellerman, M.D. 

Univ. of Texas Med Branch-Galveston, TX 
internal Medicine 

Kevin Meers Kennedy, M.D. 

tSU-Shrevepoft 

Transitional 

Robert Wilson Kennedy, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveporf 
Internal Medicine 





Carolyn P. Kergosien, M.D. 

Research. Driscoil Child Hosp.-Corpus 

Christ!. TX 

Pediatrics 

William Ellis Kergosien, M.D. 

Memorial Med. Ctr -Corpus Christi, TX 
Family Practice 

Euil Eugene Luther, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Internal Medicine 

Donald Gene Mack, Jr., M.D. 

University Hospltal-Litite Rock. AR 

Pediatrics 

Sheila Ann Maddox, M.D. 

E.A Conway Mem, Hosp.-Morroe. LA 
Transitional 



Seniors & SFA • 11 1 




Mark & Ginger Oliver 



Donald Gerard Majeste, M.D. 

LSU-New Orleans 
Diagnostic Radiology 

Barry Andrew Martin, M.D. 

Medical University-Charleston, SC 
Family Practice 

Spyrie Dean Mays, M.D. 

Case Western Univ. Hosp. -Cleveland, OH 

Surg. Pre- 

William M. McBride, III, M.D. 

Med, Cent East-Birmingham. AL 
family Practice 

Maims T. McFarland, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Family Practice 







David Loflin McKeilar, M.D. 

Texas Med Branch-Galveston. TX 
Anesthesiology 

George Tipton McKnight, M.D. 

Earl K. Long Mem. Hosp.-Baton Rouge, LA 

Transitional 

Daniel Joseph McLaury, M.D. 

University o< Louisville, KY 
OB/Gyn 

Pamela Kay McPherson, M.D. 

Half Inslitute/Univ. of SC-Columbia. SC 
Psychiatry 

J. Christopher Meriwether, M.D. 

Uritv. of San Antonio Teach. Hosp.-TX 
Pediatrics 







1 12 • Classes 







Rachel Wells Miles, M.O. 

Tuiane University Affil. Hosps.-N.O . LA 
OB/Gyn 

Douglas M. Montgomery, M.O. 

Ochsner Found-New Orleans, LA 
OB/Gyn 

James Selser Morris, M.O. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Internal Medicine 

Scott Kimberly Nelson, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Transitional 

Patricia B. Nicol, M.D. 

U. of Okla, Tutsa Med. Coll, Affil 
Pediatrics 



1% * " 



j+ 







Max Kennon Odom, II, M.D. 

Bapltst Medical Center-Birmingham. AL 
Internal Medicine 

Mark Francis Olivier, M.D. 

Dr. Walter O. Moss-Lake Charles. LA 
Family Practice 

Cora Eileen Orphe, M.D. 

St. Louis Child. Hosp.-MO 
Pediatrics 

Albert Craig Pearce, M.O. 

University of South Alabama-Mobile, AL 
Internal Medicine 

Karen Adeline Purdy, M.O. 

Univ TN Affil. Hosps.-Memphis, TN 
Family Practice 



Seniors & SFA • 113 



Stewart Thwaite Ramey, M.D. 

Earl K Long Mem. Hosp.-Baton Rouge. LA 

Pediatrics 



Philip Ray Renfroe, M.D. 

Medical Center-Columbus, GA 
Family Practice 



Joel Lamar Rigby, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Transitional 

Bruce Lawrence Roach, M.D, 

Dr. Walter O. Moss Reg-Lake Charles, LA 
Family Practice 




Jack, Debra, Wendy & Willie 





SENIORS 



Lynda Rice Roberts, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 

Family Practice 

Sheryt Lynn Rowland, M.D, 

Univ. Hospiiai-Littte Rock. AR 
Med-Peds. 

David Alan Scott, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 

Internal Medicine 

Denise Carla Sharbono, M.D. 

E.A. Conway- Mem. Hosp.-Morwoe, LA 
transitional 

Johnny Lee Simpson, M.D. 

Tulane Univ. Affif. Hosps.-New Orleans, LA 

Psychiatry 



* 







James Garland Smith, Jr., M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Internal Medicine 

Jerry Neal Smith, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 

Transitional 

Michael Jesse Snyder, M.D. 

WtiSiam Beaumont Army M.C.-B Paso. TX 

Surgery 

Mark Anthony St. Cyr, M.D. 

University Me<± Ctr.-Lsfayeite. LA 
Transitional 

Michael Oliver Stuart, M.D. 

Ear! K Long Mem. Hosp.-Baton Rouge, LA 
Internal Medicine 






114* Classes 





Connie M. Templet, M.D, 

Medical College of Georgia- A ugusta. GA 

Internal Medicine 

Michael D. Verzwyvelt, M.D. 

Richland Mem. Hosp. -Columbia, SC 
Emer. Medicine 

Lori Elizabeth Vidrine, M.D. 

Jacksonville Health Educ. Pfog.-FL 
Internal Medicine 

Jerry Wade White, M.D. 

Portsmouth Naval Reg. Med. C»r.~ 

Portsmouth. VA 

Pediatrics 

Sherman Scott Wiggins, M.D. 

Univ. ot Alabama Med, Ctr. -Birmingham, AL 
internal Medicine 





C 



William Mitchell Wilder, M.D. 

Baptist Memorial-Memphis. TN 
internal Medicine-Pte. 

Robert Gillespie Wilkins, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Internal Medicine 

David C. Williamson, M.D. 

Univ. of Texas SW Affil Hosps.-Dallas. Tx 
Anesthesiology 

Mary Ellen Wommack, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Transitional 

Chris Owen Woodard, M.D. 

LSU-Shreveport 
Internal Medicine 



Seniors & SFA • 115 




m. 

Max 






Justin. Denise, Jason Sharbono 



Tommy, Val, & Brad 



1 16 • Classes 



Laura, 

Bates, 

& David 





Doc's Hound, Carol & John 



Susan & Friends 





Lori Vidrine & Mickey 



Seniors & SFA • 1 17 






Mark & Kim Crump 



Kimberly & John Harris 



118 • Classes 




Jan & Gene Mack 









Jennifer, Paula, Greg Rembert 



Seniors & SFA • 119 





Bill & Carolyn Kergosien 



120 • Classes 




Kerry, Anita, Lauren & Brook Edwards 




F. Xavier Castellanos 



Senior & SFA • 121 




Brent, Kelli, Keller, Jo Jo 




Cora Orphe 



122 • Classes 




■■ 




Craig & Jennifer Pearce & Rusty 



. . 




Ellen Wommack 



Paul Davis 



= 



Seniors & SFA • 123 



ALLIED HEALTH 



The School of Allied Health Professions at LSUMC in Shreveport 
consists of six departments: The Children's Center, The Depart- 
ment of Cardiopulmonary Science, The Department of Commu- 
nication Disorders, The Department of Medical Technology, The 
Department of Occupational Therapy, and The Department of 
Physical Therapy. 

These departments offer the students specialized technical 
training in five of the fastest growing health care careers avail- 
able today. 

Students gain experiences as a part of a team medical profes- 
sionals offering specific services and skill in total patient care 
such as assessment, diagnostic procedures, and the planning 
and implementation of treatment programs. 



Jennifer Bilbro 





Occupational 
Therapy 



Carol Coleman 

Melanie Dauterive 

Elizabeth Green 

Jocelyn Mayfield 

Ramona Miley 




WBSL 


■ «s 






- 


JT 




S" 


"\ 






■l 


m 


'•^1 





Charlene Owens 

Denise Oxenreiter 

Bridgett Pelts 

Alicia Sagrera 

Pamela Salley 






— I 




124 • Classes 



— 




Medical Technology 




n 



*>! 


* 
IK 


W\ 


&f 


„^J> i 


i 


*p 









Cheryl Becnel 



Sio Chiu 



>, 




► 




r 



Q 




—m 



Laura Donald 
Fatemeh Fallahdoost 
Janice Fong 
Wanda Greenhouse 
Gayle LeJeune 






Leslie Moore 
James Neil 
Donna Simpson 
John Treloar 
Deneen Veal 



Allied Health • 125 




Amrni Guess 

Jody Hardison 

Felice Harris 

Stephanie LaBorde 

Debra McHalffey 




Danny Midyett 

Florence Randall 

Leslie Taft 

Daniel Wood 

Dianne Zappt 





126 • Classes 



Cardiopulmonary Science-JR's 




Timothy Angely 



Denise Atkins 














< ] 


W w^* ^■JB 


■^m 


r 







Deborah Barker 
Steven Boyd 
Ltnette Davis 
Mary Daley 
Jack Edwards 



Sheri Finch 
Michael Houston 
Jerry Sayers 
Todd Simons 
Leslie Strong 



Allied Health • 127 



Cardiopulmonary 
ience- 
r's 



Patric Aubin 
Kathy Boggs 



Margaret Clawson 

Carolyn Ducote 

David Gibson 




Physical Therapy - Juniors 



Cindy Bigner 

Oionne Clause 

Lori Constantine 

Lois Cooper 

Sharon Dunn 



Ronel Estrada 

Wendy Fulton 

Sibyl Glover 

Charles Jackson 

Jennifer Kennard 




128 • Classes 




Cardiopulmonary Science 

'"Vs 



Mark Greaves 



Patricia Hester 
Jonathan Holt 
Anne Parks 



Physical Therapy - Juniors 




m 




r 











Lisa Ledet 
Stan Powell 
Julie Robichaud 
Virginia Scales 
Debra Sibley 



Janet Solomon 
Joan Theils 
Deann Toncre 
Cynthia Walz 
Regina Zimmerman 



Allied Health • 129 



Communication 
Disorders 



Stacy Beighley 



Sherry Blackwood 



Debra Bolton 
Laurie Clanton 
Andree Caplis 




Ninette Diilard 

Sarah Fontenot 

Lisa Friday 

Robin Johnson 

Denise Mason 










m 




1 A - v ^H 

1 *" ' mm 


i 


ii 


/ 1 




Barbara McGee 

Missy Mullin 

Ann Parsells 

Donna Terry 

Cathy Walker 



1 








130 • Classes 








Imeh Affiah 
Joseph Albert 
David Carlton 



Cheryl Curd 



Elizabeth Jankus 












Abbie Kemper 
Shu Jan Lee 
Janice Matthews-Greer 
Billy McCann 
Mary Oliver 



Jan Richardson 
Donald Stafford 
Balaji Tamarappoo 
Ann Watson 
Venkata Yalamanchili 





Graduate Students • 131 



FACULTY 




ADMINISTRATION 




Edwin Edwards 

Governor 




Dick Chandler 

Director of Purchasing 



James P. Ganley, M.O., Ph.H. 

Clinical Affairs 




Perry G. Rigby, M.D. 

Chancellor 




Judy Austin 

Associate Registrar 




Jean Saunders, Ph.D. 

Educational Development 




Ike Muslow, M.D. 

Vice-Chancellor 




Robert R. Graves 

Assistant to the Dean 




A. J. Varner 

Asst. Hospital Administrator 




Darryl M. Williams, M.D. 

Acting Dean 




L. Calhoun Allen, Jr. 

Plans & Programs 




Harold White 

Business Affairs 




William T. McElroy, Jr., Ph.D. 

Admissions 




Nancy Rodwell 

Student Financial Aid 




Carol Paquette 

Director of Budgets 




134 • Faculty 




John H. Allen, Ph.D. 

Student Affairs 




Gary Harkey 

Director of Accounting 




Darryl M. Williams, M.D. 

Academic Affairs 




Gene L. Hammet 

Hospital Administration 




Dennis A. Pernotto, Ph.D. 

Medical Communications 




Elaine T. King 

Information Services 




Joe Miciotto 

Hospital Administrator 





1 



Leonard I. Goldman, M.D. 

Medical Education 




R. W. Saved 






Samuel E. Shomer 


Physical Plant 






Academic Administratior 


H^K^ "1 


W+ih 


rw 




WjA-js y\ 


^ ^ 


JjP 


W 






K^*^ i^^H 



BIOMETRY 




Lee Bairnslather 

Department of Biometry 




rjKM 


M 




Faculty • 135 



INTERNAL MEDICINE 




Marion 0. Hargrove 

Chairman 



Timothy Byrnes 

Univ. of Maryland 



Henry G. Hanley 

Yale University 



Kenneth Abreo 

Bombay University, India 



Bruce Baethge 

Southwestern-Dallas 




Tien Chen 

Chung Shan M.C, 



George A. DeVault 

LSUMC-Sfireveport 




Amtn Haq 

Liaquat M.C. Pakistan 



J. Stephen Kitpatrick 

LSU-New Orleans 



Michael Bowen 

Univ of S. Carolina 






Ronald S. George 

Tulane University 




Gary T, Kinasewitz 

Wayne State University 





136 • Faculty 




Internal Medicine • 137 



E.N.T. 





Frederick J. Stacker, Jr., M.D. Linda Gage-White, M.D., Ph.D. 

Chairman U of Miami School ot Medicine 



^*i 





Walter C. Otto, Ph.D. 

Audiologist 



Jack W. Pou, M.D. 

Tulane University 





William W. Shockley, M.D. 

U of Indiana School of Medicine 



ANATOMY 






Richard E. Hibbs 

Head 



Gary T. Bazer 

LSUMC-Shrevepori 



John A. Beat 

University ot Cincinnati 






Robert C. Clawson 

Loyola University 



David L. DeSha 

Tulane University 



David S. Knight 

Tulane University 





Robert D. Specian 

Tulane University 




138 • Faculty 





Faculty • 139 



ORTHOPAEDICS 



i r,, r| 






^ 





James A. Albright, M.D. 

Chairman 



E. Michael Keating, M.D. 

LSUMC-Shreveport 



Andrew A. Marino, Ph.D 

Syracuse University 






Richard E. McCall, M.D. 

Tulane University 



Subrata Saha, Ph.D 

Stanford University 



Melanie Sanders, M.D. 

LSUMC-Shreveport 




— 



OB-GYN 





Horace E. Thompson, M.D. 

Chairman 



Rose BrouilleHe, M.D. 

LSUMC-Shreveport 





Peter S. Kapernick, M.D. 

University of Oregon 



Warren N. Otterson, M.D. 

University of Wisconsin 



f 







V.t. r,» 




Daniel A. Rightmire, M.D. 

Northwestern U, Chicago 



Rodney Wise, M.D. 

LSUMC-Shreveport 





V E*. ff 




mm 
mm 

mm 



140 • Faculty 



WLi 





Salley E. Cook, R.N. 

University of Mississippi 



Dale R Dunnihoo, M.D., Ph.D. 

Washington University 





John B. Mailhes, Ph.D. 

University of Tennessee 




ANESTHESIOLOGY 




4orman H. Bia»a, M. 

Chairman 



sienee Desmarattes, 

U. of Haiti School of Medicine 




Bobby D. Nos»man, M.D. 

LSUMC-Shreveport 

V -> 



Daniel T. Sanders, M.D. 

LSUMC-New Orleans 



Persis K. Shroff, M.D. 

Grant Medical CoJIege-U. 
of Bombay 



Jonathan H. Skerman, D.Sc. 

Boston U. School of Dentistry 




Dakasha B. Turakhia, M.D. 

Grant M.G.U. of Bombay 



Joe N. Rom, M.S. RRT 

Texas A&M 




Faculty • 141 



PATHOLOGY 



I 

Albert G. Smith, M.D. 

Head 






* 



PL i$$ 







\ 




George Acton, M.D. 

Tulane University 



Pari* Conatantinidea, 
M.D., Ph.D. 

University of Vienna 



Marjorie Fowler, M.D. 

LSUMC-New Orleans 








Herb Goad, M.S. 

Central Michigan 
University 



Enrique Gonzalez, M.D. 

Javeriana U., Colombia 



Warren D. Grafton, M.D 

LSUMC-New Orleans 



R. Leroy Little, M.D. 

LSUMC-New Orleans 






PI 






I 

- 




I 



4 



Z.D. Meachum, Ph.D. 

LSU-Baton Rouge 



Raghunath P. Miara, 
M.D., Ph.D. 

Calcutta University 



Irwan Daniel Sanusi, M.D. 

Airlangga U.. Indonesia 






* MP 




142 • Faculty 



RADIOLOGY 




Ronald L- Eisenberg, M.D. 

Head 







Federico Ampil, M.D. 

University of Santo Tomas 



Feraydoon S. Bahrassa, M.D. 

University ot Tehran 




Vishan Giyanani, M.D. 

Bombay University 





Linda A. Nail, M.D. 

University ot Arkansas 




Gunnar Cadarbom, M.D. 

University of Goteborg, 
Sweden 




Garoga R. Grimes, M.D. 

Temple University 




Justin J. Wolfaon, M.D. 

University of Nebraska 




^ m 



Ratna Datta, Ph.D. 

University of Caluttta 




Herbert S. Husband*, M.D. 

University of West Indies 




Mary J. Wood, M.D. 

University of Arkansas 




Amil J. Gerlock, M.D. 

Medical College of Virginia 




Pater Meyers, M.D. 

Tulane University 








Faculty • 143 



PEDIATRICS 




Robert McVi« 

Marquette School ot 
Medicine 



Arun K. Pramaniic 

Medical College of India 



Nell Ryan 

Univ. of Misa&sippi 




144 • Faculty 




Maria Zapata 

National Univ. of Mexico 



BIOCHEMISTRY 




* 






^ tV« 



I 




Richard Courtney 

Head 



Michael N. Blackburn 

Univ. of California- 
Riverside 





Sidney R. Grimee, Jr. 

University of N. Carolina 




F. Scott Kennedy 

Univ. of Illinois-Urbana 





Ralph J. Henderson, Jr. 

Univ. of Texas-Galveston 




Guilford G. Rudolph 

University of Utah 

I I Ml II 




John M. Smith 

Purdue University 



Robert L. Smith 

Univ. of Tennessee 




Pediatrics, Biochemistry • 145 



SURGERY 




John C. McDonald 

Chairman 




Don Morris 

University of Texas-Austin 




Julio Swain 

Baylor University 




Edward Benzol 

Medical College of 
Wisconsin 




Travis J. PhHer 

LSUMC-Shreveport 





S. J. Danna 

Tulane University 




Michael Rohr 

Tulane University 




Jamos S. Wade 



Gary Weiss 

LSUMC-Shreveport 





Edwin Deitch 

University of Maryland 



Frank Gelder 

Ohio State University 



w 

mm 


ja^^^^M^KHK 




**V V.. Nk 


%1 








Leonard eoldman 

Vice- Chairman 




Mahadev Souri 

Government M.C. India 





146 • Faculty 




Louise Jacobbi 



FAMILY MEDICINE 




Arthur T. Fort 

Chairman 



Michael A. Crouch 

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia 



Michael B. Harper 

LSUMC-Snreveport 



Ruby Jean Hunter 

Univ. of Arkansas 




Faculty • 147 



NEUROLOGY 





Larry J. Embree, M.D. 

Head 



Andrew L. Chesson, M.D. 

Univ. of Texas-Galveston 





Gwendolyn R. Hogan, M.D. 

University of Virginia 



Pieter Kark, M.D. 

Harvard Medical School 




ALLIED HEALTH 




Ann-Marie LeBlanc 

Director, Student Affairs 





Mary Pannbaker, Ph.D. 

Communication Disorders 




nmMi 



Ann Smith 

Medical Technology 





Tim Wheelahan 

Physical Therapy 



Richard Whitehead 

Cardiopulmonary Science 



I 




148 • Faculty 




Michael Cook, Ed D 

Children's Center 




Helen Prize 

Physical Therapy 




Frances Whitten 

Children's Center 




Jerry Garner 

Cardiopulmonary Science 




Gordon Schuckers, Ph.D. 

Asst. Dean. Allied Health 





Brenda Geter 

Administrative Assistant 




Paulette Springer 

Physical Therapy 







Deborah Koshansky, Ph.D. 

Children's Center 



Joe McCulloch, Ph.D. 

Dept Head P.T. 



Wes McWhorter 

Physical Therapy 




Dennis Wissing 

Cardiopulmonary Science 



Gay Wolcott 

Communication Disorders 




Faculty • 149 



i n if""n nrzv 




PSYCHIATRY 






John Straumanis 

Chairman 



John H. Allen 

Pennsylvania State Univ 



John T. Brauchi 

University of Oklahoma 






D. R. Cherek 

University of Minnesota 



Steven I. Dworkin 

University of Florida 



Jeffrey Knight 

West Virginia University 






Ronald G. Nathan 

University of Houston 



Frances E. Nixon 

LSUMC-New Orleans 



C. Simon Sebastian 

St. John's Medical 
College-India 



150 • Faculty 





James E. Smith 

University of Minnesota 



Joel Steinberg 

University of Illinois 




OPHTHALMOLOGY 




■w*^ tr* v 






James P. Ganley 

Chairman 




Salim I. Butrus 

Fellow 



John W. Henderson 

Chief. V.A. 




Geoffrey W. Garrett 

Instructor 



A 



/ .- 



l£« 



IJk 




Marlyn Langford 

Assistant Professor 




Urology, Psychiatry, Ophthalmology • 151 




LIBRARY 




Mayo Drake 

Librarian 




Marilyn Miller 

University of Pittsburgh 





Pamela Ashley 

LSU-Baton Route 




Walter Morton 

University of Texas 




Elaine Jones 

LSU-Baton Rouge 




Elizabeth Peatross 

Louisiana Tech University 




Marilyn Rogers 

LSU-Baton Rouge 




152 • Faculty 




Virginia Lash 

LSU-Baton Rouge 




Marianne Puckett 

LSU-Baton Rouge 




Billy Triplet! 

LSU-Baton Rouge 



PHARMACOLOGY 



iCSt 



in 

Helmut M. Redetzki, M.D. 

University of Hamburg 
Head 




4(*%! "»'- f3 



J 



John J. Stewart, Ph.D. 

University of Wisconsin 




Richard D. Brown, Ph.D. 

LSUMC-New Orleans 




«*W|# 



m 




i _ 

John T. Wilson, M.D. 

Tutane University 




Barbara R. Manno, Ph.D. 

Indiana University 




Kenneth E. McMartin, Ph.D. 

University of Iowa 




Charles 0. Wood, Ph.D. 

U. of North Carolina 




/ -' 



Joseph E. Manno, Ph.D. 

Indiana University 






J; J»*y rr ■ 

:-0 



Elizabeth L. Pruden, Ph.D. 

Indiana University 




«si 



•*^SSJ# 




Faculty • 153 



ORGANIZATIONS 




■ 

< 

■ 

o 

■ 

< 




Alpha Omega Alpha is the only national medical 
honor society in the world. The purpose ot this 
organization is to recognize and perpetuate excel- 
lence in the medical profession. The society key is 
designed after the Manubrium Sterni, and the let- 
ters AOA represent not only the name of the soci- 
ety, but the essential words in its motto in Greek: 
"Worthy to serve the suffering." 

Election to Alpha Omega Alpha is a distinction 
that accompanies a physician through his or her 
career. Members can be elected as students, 
graduates, or faculty, or on an honorary basis 
because of distinguished achievement in any field 
of medicine. Criteria for election include scholastic 
excellence, integrity, compassion, and capacity 
for leadership. The students elected are persons 
who, in the judgment of the local chapter, have 
shown promise of becoming leaders in their pro- 
fession. Election is limited to those candidates 
whose scholastic qualifications have placed them 
in the upper 25% of their class. The total number 
elected shall not exceed one-sixth of the total 
number of that class expected to graduate. 









156 • Organizations 







A.O.A. • 157 



3 

cri 

CD 



Baptist Student Union 

The logo of the Baptist Student Union shows 
arrows which point in toward the center and out 
from the center. This symbolism expresses the 
overall purpose of BSU as a ministry which 
relates both to the inner growth of a person and 
the growth which comes through reaching out 
to others. Based on a holistic understanding of 
people, BSU seeks to facilitate this growth 
through the students' participation in a variety 
of events. 

BSU sponsors numerous social events 
throughout the year; hayrides, cookouts, sea- 
sonal parties, midnight bowling, and a yearly 
snow skiing trip highlight the social events. On 
a more serious side, BSU also endeavors to 
facilitate the student's spiritual growth through 
the weekly luncheons as well as our special 
conference on medical ethics. Held once a 
month, this event helps the student integrate 
theology, medicine, and ethics as they seek to 
present a meaningful Christian witness to their 
patients and colleagues. 








Christian Medical Society 

The Christian Medical Society offers an 
opportunity for medical students and 
allied health professionals to enrich their 
medical art through the influence of 
Christ. Believing that Christianity applies 
to every area of life — including one's 
occupation — CMS purpose is to follow 
the Great Physician in meeting emotional, 
spiritual, and physical needs in our prac- 
tice of medicine. Since our genesis two 
years ago, CMS has strived together with 
B.S.U. to address vital medical issues. To 
enhance our understanding of these is- 
sues, CMS has been privileged to bring 
several inspiring speakers to our school. 
In addition, we have had panel discus- 
sions on such topics as abortion and the 
transitions one faces in medical school. 
We gather weekly to discuss medical eth- 
ics, review articles, read Bible passages 
and pray. 






4 I 14 





LU J 

>D 

hZ 
33 

LUU 

X 

LU 




Executive Council 

The preamble of the Student Government Constitution 
states that "we the students of LSUMC-S, in order to 
promote the ideals of our profession; to provide repre- 
sentation and protection of the rights and privileges of 
our members; and to provide the opportunity for partici- 
pation in social, athletic, educational, and service pro- 
grams; do hereby establish and adopt this constitu- 
tion." The executor of this constitution is known as the 
Executive Council. In keeping with these established 
ideals, the Executive Council branches out into the fol- 
lowing areas: 

1. Social - all work and no play is not the council's motto as LSUMC-S students enjoyed 
such events as Casino Party, Christmas Dance and Crawfish Boil. 1985 - the year the 
Student Union was reopened. 

2 Athletic - med students toned up their bodies as well as their minds with a coed weight 
room, intramural sports, various sports tournaments and the Tiger Trot. 

3. Education - LSUMC-S was represented at the national meetings of the American 
Medical Association and the General Professional Education of Physicians (GPEP) 
Report. 

4. Service - students charitably donated their blood for the Blood Drive and their time for 
Freshman /Sophomore and Freshman /Junior Days. 










American Medical Association - 
M.S.S. 

The Medical Student Section (MSS) is the 
branch of the A.M. A. which addresses 
the concerns and problems of medical 
students on a national level. 

The MSS develops leadership in students 
by offering speakers and seminars to sup- 
plement the students' education, as well 
as offer opportunities to meet medical 
leaders in the local medical community. 

The voice of medical students in contin- 
ually growing stronger, due to the efforts 
of active MSS members. This years dele- 
gation to the A.M. A. convention intro- 
duced a resolution to the A.M. A. House of 
Delegates which asked the A.M. A. to de- 
fine a handicapped physician/medical 
student and to appoint a committee to 
investigate the needs of handicapped 
physicians and medical students. 

















Executive Council, A.M.A.-M.S.S. • 161 




Amidst the whirlwind of economic and politi- 
cal forces which are changing the face of 
modern medicine, one thing stands clear. 
Although medicine will certainly be different 
in the future, the need for a caring, compre- 
hensively trained, personal physician who 
provides continuity of care with compassion 
will be even greater. 

It is the purpose of the Family Medicine In- 
terest Group to make students aware that 
Family Practice is a viable option in this time 
of change. We attempt to bring a kaleido- 
scope of speakers onto campus monthly 
that they may share with students from their 
expertise. We work closely with our own 
Family Practice department to expand the 
availability of learning experiences open to 
students. And last, but not least, we share a 
camaraderie with others who are also con- 
cerned that in this technological age we not 
lose sight of the history of medicine as an art 
as well as a science. 





.^^B^ 







J 




162 • Organizations 



The LSU Medical Student Wives Club provides 
the opportunity for lifelong friendships. The 
club is not only a social club, but also a service 
club which contributes to the Shreveport-Bos- 
sier community through many service projects. 
The Wives Club offers a variety of activities 
each year to promote friendship for all medical 
student wives. The activities this year have in- 
cluded: 



-Welcoming Party 
-Panel Discussions 
-Christmas Party 
-Style Show 
-VCR "Movie Nights" 



-Thanksgiving 

Progressive Dinner 
-Bake Sales 
-Luncheons 
-Family Pizza Night 
-Service Protects 



The 1985-86 officers included: President-Mimi 
Close, Vice-President-Cheryl Kohler, Secre- 
tary-Lisa Acurio, Treasurer-Kim Crump, Sr. 
Respresentative-Debbie White, Jr. Representa- 
tive-Dana Chastain, Soph. Representative-Amy 
Porter, Freshman Representative-Yvette Gar- 
cia, Service Chairman-Dee Nick, Social Chair- 
man-Sarah Fontenot, Publicity Chairman-Linda 
Pope, and Liaison Officer-Sheryl Gates. 




i 








Family Medicine, Wives Club • 163 



Ill 

CD 
Q. 
< 
Z 
>- 




The Synapse 

This year the Synapse got some new blood - it was no longer an 
autobiographical account of Leslie Blake's (MSN) tortured jour- 
ney through the Hades that is medical school. No, we also 
witnessed Ed Carriere's (MSI) ironic observations of freshman 
year, with occasional lapses of taste, and the hilarious irrever- 
ence of Tom Gaddis' Advice from Doc. We also ventured into 
the soulful world of poetry by "Dr. Fred" (Brent Nick MSIII) and 
the ubiquitous Ed Carriere. William Carlos Williams would be 
proud. 

And in the face of all this esoteric artsy-fartsy madness, we also 
BROUGHT YOU THE NEWS. School news, sports news, S'port 
news, medical news, movie and restaurant reviews, interviews 
and other irregular features abounded. I mean, we tried, despite 
our prohibitive schedules. Most interesting this year was the 
persistent, plaintive student voice protesting the outdated prac- 
tices of medical education and clamoring for GPEP changes. 
We hope we've succeeded in doing more than just irritating you- 
all. 

Many thanks to all those who contributed, encouraged and 
enjoyed, and special gratitude for the Executive Council's gen- 
erosity. 



■!_ 



it *^^~h4k 





Yes, you might say we're a rare breed, maybe 
even, unfortunately, an elite bunch ... the PULSE 
STAFF. These are the introspective folks who go 
beyond the role of students to preserve the 
memories of our LSUMC medical education. 
We're the camera flash in CPR class, the midnight 
typewriter setting the school year to print. Led by 
determined editor Keith Smith, we are the small 
group of medical, graduate and allied health stu- 
dents who labored to create this yearbook. We 
present to you our tribute to the lessons, patients, 
and friends of 1986. 




hi 

CD 

J 

n 



n 







Synapse, Pulse « 165 



SPONSORS 



Dr. Ralph B. 



Armstrong 
John A. Beal 
N. J. Bender 



Dr. and Mrs. 

Dr. and Mrs. 

Ed Benzel 

H. Whitney Boggs, Jr., M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Borders 

Drs. Breffeilh, Texada, Rucker and 

Drummond 
Dr. and Mrs. R. Don Brown 
Drs. Brown and Schwendimann 
Dr. and Mrs. Andrew L. Chesson 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Clawson 
J. S. Coussons, M.D. 
R. Denman Crow, M.D. 
David and Margaret DeSha 
Mr. Mayo Drake 
Dr. Michael Eliis 
Dr. Roan Flenniken and Dr. Donna 

Rushing 
Marjorie R. Fowler, M.D. 
William Wade Fox, M.D. 
Geoffrey West Garrett, M.D. 
Ronald B. George, M.D. 
Dr. and Mrs. L. Goldman 
Dr. and Mrs. Donald K. Haynes 
Ralph J. Henderson, Jr., Ph.D. 
Dr. and Mrs. John J. Herbst 
Elaine R. High, M.D. 
Dr. and Mrs. Sam S. Holladay 
Dr. Bernard Kalstone 



SPONSORS 

Dr. and Mrs. F. Scott Kennedy 
Robert T. Lafargue, M.D., David 
M. Caskey, Jr., M.D., and 
Sanders F. Hearne, M.D. 
Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence E. 
L'Herisson 

and Mrs. Joseph E. Manno 
Daniel H. Mattson 
George R. Meneely 
Robert J. Miciotto 
R. P. Misra 

D.D.S. 



Dr 

Dr. and Mrs 

Dr. and Mrs 

Dr. and Mrs 

Dr. and Mrs 

W. Michael Monsour 

W. A. McBride, M.D., F.A.P.A. 

Fran Nixon, M.D. 

Dr. Barron J. O'Neal 

Dr. and Mrs. Fred L. Price 

C. Pratap Reddy, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Perry G. Rigby 

Ralph H. Riggs, M.D. 

Milton 1. Rosenzweig 

Eugene C. St. Martin, M.D. 

Drs. Marina and Daniel Sanusi 

Joseph Sarpy, Jr., M.D. 

Drs. William and Linda Shockley 

John and Ruby Stewart 

Herbert D. Tucker, M.D. 

Dennis D. Venable, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Clarence H. Webb 

Gary N. Weiss, M.D. 

Bruce and Susan Williams 

Winder-Turk-Jones Dermatology 






BENEFACTORS 


Dr. 


and Mrs. 


R. W. Baucum, Jr. 


Dr. 


Robert P 


. Bays and Dr. Arthur 




A. Herold, Jr. 


Dr. 


and Mrs. 


Joseph A. Bocchini, 




Jr. 


■■:■ ; J - ■ :. : : . ,. : - ^ ■:■ ■ ,;:-.;. 


Wil 


liam J. DeFee, III, M.D. 


Warren D. Grafton, M.D. 


Gary J. Levy 


, M.D. 


Dr. 


and Mrs. 


Donald G. Mack 


Dr. 


and Mrs. 


Manohar R. 




Manchandla 


Dr. 


and Mrs. 


Andrew J. Mullen 


Dr. 


and Mrs. 


C. H. McCuller 


Dr. 


and Mrs. 


R. W. Sharp 


Larry E. Slay 


, M.D. 


Dr. 


and Mrs. 


Albert G. Smith 


Dr. 


and Mrs. 


Donald R. Smith 



ENDOWMENTS 

James R. Bergeron, M.D. 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold R. Bicknell, 

Sr. 
Clif Dopson, M.D. 
Department of Ophthalmology 
Edwin C. Simonton, M.D. 
Dr. and Mrs. Ben B. Singletary 
Department of Surgery 
William M. Wilder, M.D., Thomas 

V. Allen, M.D., and Dale P. 

McGinty, M.D. 



To Our Contributors and 

Advertisers 
We Express Our Sincerest 

Gratitude. 
Thank You for Your Loyal 

Support. 
The Pulse Staff. 



OUR FRIENDS 




167 



Best Wishes 




P.O. Box 27 

2002 Line Avenue 

Shreveport, LA. 71161 

318-424-8186 



168 • Our Friends 



At First 

National Bank 

Ifou're First 




Please visit one 
of our 14 branch 
locations. . . 




NATIONAL 

BANK 

Ol SHRKYKPOR] 



Member FDIC 



Or, one of our 21 

convenient automated 

teller machines. 



^^^M 







Compliments of 

BOBBY L. GREENE 
PLUMBING CHEATING CO., 

INC 

2630 Midway 

Shreveporr, Louisiana 

Ph. 631-0235 



CLASS 
B MMUTE 




ft » /7 

IT'S A GOOD TIME 
FOR THE GREAT TASTE 




Our Friends • 169 



LuChem 



Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 



Manufacture and marketing 
of quality prescription drugs 
for the Sunbelt section of the 
United States. 



INJECTABLES 



LIQUIDS 



CAPSULES 



SUSPENSIONS 



CREAMS 



TABLETS 

(Compressed, 
Film & Sugar Coated) 



LuChem Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 
Shreveport, Louisiana 71106 




Leon's 

Hickory Smoked Hams & Turkeys 

Pit Barbecue 

Sandwiches & Po-boys 



Catering Available 

303 East Kings Hwy. 4723 Monkhouse Dr. 

868-3237 635-5700 

Shreveport, LA 



■■■ 





m 



I 



■ * .i. ■> 



• 



«4-i% 







■ 



vLtfm* 



/ 



#fe 



JOHHNYi 



PIZZA HOUSE, INC; 



Seven Locations To Serve You 
-FREE DELIVERY- 



170 • Our Friends 




committed 

to 

serving 

the citizens 

and healthcare 

professionals 

of Shreveport/Bossier 




ELLS 



ORTHOTICS • PROSTHETICS 



SHREVEPORT 



ALEXANDRIA 



MONROE 



Boots Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 





Our Friends • 171 




Congratulations 
1986 Graduates. 



LJ Woman's Breast Center 

745 Olive Street at Line Avenue • 226-0123 



Best Wishes From 




WILLIS-KNIGHTON 
MEDICAL CENTER 



2600 Greenwood Road 
Shreveport, Louisiana 71103 



Sp 



SOUTH PARK 
HOSPITAL 

2510 Flournoy-Lucas Road, 
Shreveport, Louisiana 71118 



44 



People Caring For People 



** 



172 • Our Friends 



WHILE YOU'RE BUSY 

TAKING CARE OF PATIENTS, 

WHO TAKES CARE OF YOU? 

WE DO. 



Louisiana Medical Mutual Insurance Company 

(LAMMICO) 

is proud to announce the formation of 

Louisiana Physicians Insurance Agency, Inc. 

(A wholly owned subsidiary of LAMMICO) 

to more fully address the insurance needs of Louisiana physicians. 

Products and services which are offered include: 

• Premises/operations liability 
insurance including medical 
office property 

• Disability income insurance 

• Term and whole life insurance 

• Accident and health insurance 

• Individual financial consulting 
and estate planning 



In providing the above at competitive rates, The Agency represents only the most reputable 
companies. Furthermore, The Agency's policies and programs have been developed with a view 
to meeting the particular requirements of physicians and their employees. 

For additional information, please contact 
The Agency's Manager 

• Louisiana Physicians Insurance Agency, Inc. • 

(A wholly owned subsidiary of LAIY1MICO) 

• 433 Metairie Road, Suite 602 • 

• Metairie, Louisiana 70005 • 

• (504)837-3257 • 1-800-331-5777 • 



Our Friends • 173 




Best Wishes 
For Your Continued Success 



Radiology Imaging Associates 

(Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology) 



Walworth E. Burge, M.D. 

and 

Benjamin Vickers, M.D. 

Managing Partners 



Thomas A. Grant, M.D. R. Michael Walker, M.D. 

Associates 



174 • Our Friends 



CONGRATULATIONS 
SENIORS 

FROM THE 

SHREVEPORT 

BOSSIER 

NEW CAR 

DEALERS' 

ASSOCIATION 



Bill Hanna 

Subaru /AMC/ Jeep /Renault 
Bill Hanna Ford 
Bob Post Chrysler-Plymouth 
Shreveport Lincoln-Mercury 
Courtesy Chevrolet 
Holmes Pontiac 
Motfitt 

Volkswagen /Porsche /Audi /Mazda 
Powell Buick 
Red River Chevrolet 
Rountree Olds/Cadillac/lsuzu 
Tait's Shreveport Dodge 
Winningham Datsun/Volvo 
Wray Ford 
Yokem Toyota 




We work harder to 
make banking easier* 



BUDDY and 
Telephone BUDDY 

What's more convenient than 
banking 24 hours from LBT's 
BUDDY automatic tellers? 
Telephone BUDDY, 
the electronic 
banking system 
that lets you bank 
from any touch- 
tone phone, 
anywhere 

Discount Brokerage 
Service 

Make your own investment de 
cisions and save up to 70% and 
more of a full-service broker's 
commission LBT offers a full range 
of investment and trust options with 
in the convenience of your bank 




Low Cost Checking 

LBT's checking fees are 

among the lowest around, 

unless you're under 26, a 

medical student, or over 

60. In that case, it's free! 

Convenient 
Locations 

With recent 
major invest- 
ments in 
new bran- 
ches, LBT 
is putting 
its money 
where its cus- 
tomers are LBT's 
branch personnel 
are waiting to make 
your banking easier - 
all over town! 



> 




Timely Transactions 

Any transaction made by 6 00 p.m 
at LBT is entered that day! At LBT, 
banker's hours are your hours 



LOUISIANA BANK 
& TRUST COMPANY 



MENSEM »0/C 



Shreveport, LA 318 222 2121 



ATTENTION PHYSICIANS 




The opportunity to locate in a full-service facility with the latest in diagnostic resources awaits you at 
Doctors' Hospital. Doctors' has been providing health care to the community for over seventy-five years. 

We take pride in offering the following services to the area: 
Anesthesiology, Dentistry, Emergency Medicine, Family Practice, Hematology, Cardiology, 
Rheumatology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Proctology, Surgery, Neurology, Plastic Surgery, Pediatrics, 
Pathology, Ophthalmology, Internal Medicine, Orthopedics, and Urology. 

For information Contact: 

Charles E. Boyd 

Managing Director 

Doctors' Hospital 

1130 Louisiana Avenue, Shreveport. Louisiana 

(318) 227-1211 



DOCTORS' HOSPITAL-SHREVEPORT, LA. 
Featuring 24 Hour Emergency Services 
through Doctors' Hospital Immediate Care 
Emergency Center. 



"Doctors' Is A Division of Universal Health 
Services, Incorporated". 

"In Partnership With Our Physicians" 



Our Friends • 175 



MM 



MAJORS 

STACKS UP 

BEST 






Ell! 116 



MAJORS 
MftJMlS SCIENTIFIC SUBSCRIPTIONS 

A D'vs-on o' Maio's Scientific Boons lie 

Dallas 1851 Diplomat 75 18 1 -9074 214-247-2929 (collect) 
1-800-527- !492 (outside TXl 1-800-442-5086 (TX only) 
New Orleans 1909 Bienville 701 19 504-486-5956 (collect) 
Houston 6612 South Main 77010 71 1-526-5757 l< ollect) 
Atlanta 1770-A Zip Industrial Blvd 10?54 
404-768-4956 Icollectl 1-800-241-6551 (outside GAl 




Pioneer 
Bank 

& TRUST COMPANY 

Member FDIC 




176 • Our Friends 




MEDICAL 
PROFESSIONALS 




ROFESSIONAL 

CARE*** 



At Commercial National Bank, you have a team of profes- 
sionals who are familiar with your unique financial needs — 
from your med school years through retirement. 



Financing Your Professional Practice 

CNB's new business loans, with favorable bank rates and 
generous repayment terms, are designed to help make your 
getting started a little easier. 

Once your practice is established, CNB's professionals will be 
there to help you grow with individually-designed financing for 
expanded facilities or equipment, a new partnership or even a 
new professional building. 



COMMERCIAL 

NATIONAL BANK 

SHREVEP. ORT, LOUISIANA 

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



THE CAPITAL OF THE ARK-LATEX 



Our Friends • 177 




178 • Our Friends 




Our Friends • 179 




Physicians 
Prescription 
Services, Inc. 



A CEIITIFIED HOME HEALTH ACENCV 

AT PHYSICIANS PRESCRIPTION SERVICES 
WE PROVIDE MEDICAL CARE WITH 

A PERSONAL TOUCH 

IN THE PRIVACY, COMFORT. AND SECURITY 
OF THE PATIENTS HOME 

24 HOUR ANSWERING SERVICE 

SERVING CADDO, BOSSIER. 

WEBSTER. BIENVILLE, 4^4-Q^4fl 

RED RIVER AND DESOTO PARISHES ^^^ >^w»-»V 





■ Skilled Nursing Care 

■ Physical Therapy 

■ Speech Therapy 

■ Home Health Aide Care 

7 DAYS A WEEK 

142 OLIVE - SHREVEPORT. LA 



^3j(C^^^ 3ta/ ^Bott/atta^tde^ 






"The Bakery" 

CATERING AND SPECIAL ORDERS 



Phone: 869-3841 
755 Gladstone (rear) 
Shreveport. La. 71104 



e wou 




DISTRIBUTORS OF 

SURGICAL - LABORATORY - X-RAY EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES 

TO PHYSICIANS - CLINICS - HOSPITALS - INDUSTRY 



id iine to 



gain uour respect 
Unrougn Service and integrity. 



1520 WEST DALZELL 
PH. 221 4235 



180 • Our Friends 



«IH 



»*- 



INGS ARE CHANGING IN THE MEDICAL FIELD. 



But at Bossier Medical Center, there's one thing that will never change 
— our support for the physician. We know our success is linked with the 
physician's success. That's why more and more physicians recognize the 
advantages of associating with Bossier Medical Center: 

■ Two decades of dedication to developing quality health care services. 

■ State-of-the-art equipment. 

■ Support in specialty fields. 

■ Well-trained, caring professional staff. 

■ Easy access to administration. 

■ A genuine interest in your needs. 

■ Bossier's growing population and sound economy. 



If you're investigating practice opportunities, you should talk with hospital 
management and medical staff members about your future at Bossier 
Medical Center. Call us at 227-6113 to schedule a meeting. 



BOSSIER 



MEDICAL 



CENTER 



Compliments 

of 

THE 

SHREVEPORT 

MEDICAL 

SOCIETY 







Our Friends • 181 




182 • Our Friends 




Our Friends • 183 



The 1986 PULSE is dedicated to those students who have generously taken time out of already busy schedules to participate 
in those extracurricular activities that benefit the entire student body. 

It is these people who make LSU Medical School more than just an academic experience. 



EXECUTIVE 
COUNCIL 



SENIOR CLASS 



JUNIOR CLASS 



SOPHOMORE 
CLASS 






FRESHMAN 



ORGANIZATIONS 

PULSE 

SYNAPSE 



President 
Ray Germany 
Vice-President 
Tom Gaddis 
Secretary 
Maureen Lacour 
Treasurer 
Mark Posner 



President 
Rick Holloway 
Vice-President 
W. Jack Corley 
Secretary 
Denise Carter 
Treasurer 
John Holloway 

President 
Dan Roubein 
Vice-President 
Thomas Lacour 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Ann Risinger 

President 

Mark Medlin 

Vice-President 

Nancy Clearkin 

Secretary 

Paula Dean 

Treasurer 

Ann Felice Boudreaux 

President 
Margaret Moresi 
Vice-President 
Pete Latino 
Secretary 
Jimmy Haley 
Treasurer 
Patti Roland 

Jim Aymond 
Terry Winkler 

Keith Smith 
Carol Poole 

Leslie Blake 
Xavier Castellanos 
Robert Fortier-Bensen 
Tom Gaddis 
Bobby Greenberg 



Clay Flowers 
Diane Zappi 
David R. Gibson 
John trie 

Xavier Castellanos 
Tommy Causey 
J. B. McGee 
Harold Clausen 
Mike McCarthy 

Philip R. Renfroe 
Tildon M. Belgard 
Johnny L. Simpson 
Cora E. Orphe 



Melanie Mattson 
Joey Milner 
John Chandler 
Jimmy Brooks 
Christine Zaffater 



Joe Orsulak 
Leslie Blake 
Tommy Causey 
Steve Wyble 
Debbie Harrell 



Greg Brown 
Ed Carriere 
Suzanne Slayton 
Dorothy Orphe 
Bryan Sibley 
Michael McKay 



Tommy Causey 
Randy White 

Sharon Stein 
Jon Davis 

J. B. McGee 
Cheryl Russell 
Robert Russell 
Brent Nick 



Susan Bankston 
Susan Futayyeh 
Chris Gayle 
Bobby Greenberg 
Henry Hollier 
Nancy Clearkin 
Kurt Olinde 
Bryan Demarie 



Karen Purdy 
Lori Vidrine 
Pat Denley 



Randy L. Lamartiniere 
Gene Brierre 
Richard Harrell 
Francis Robichaux 
Scott Parks 



Duane McBride 
Kevin Murphy 
Randy White 
David Carver 
Tom Montgomery 



Debbie Williams 
Ross Nelson 
Gray Barrow 
Don Langenbeck 
William "Bo" Calhoun 



Robert Marshall 
Mimi Close 

Tom Gaddis 
Jan Richardson 

David Dawes 
Ed Carriere 
Terry Winkler 
Duane McBride 






' 



The members of the Pulse staff would also like to thank Charlotte Singleton. She was always there, she always knew what to 
do and did it, she always helped - even when she was busy, and she always had some of those little orange slice candies in a 
jar on her desk. Thanks Charlotte, we love you. 



184 • Dedication 



LSUMC Library - Shreveport 




3 1949 001 343 87 1 





Archives 1986 c.4 
Pulse 




DEMCO