(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Pulse / Rush Medical College yearbook"

'■.: ;i;iiili<Pi!!: 



.i;! " ■ :: : 





I 













■■BBk 






IBfll" ^W 













Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/pulserushmedical1895rush 




moM CASKS 
ROTUND THE 
MELLOW BMW" 
Of PABST 

SPRINGS PERFK.T 
TO THE LIGHT 
[OR NATURE SURE 
ANDSriLNCELRUE 
(ONSPIRL-TO BREW IT RIGHT 



"Convalescent patient?" 

"Yes, nearly died." 

" Long sickness?" 

" Six weeks." 

"Quick recovery?" 

" No, can't get strong." 

"You can help him." 

" How?" 

"Prescribe BEST tonic." 

"What's that?" 

" Pabst Malt Extract." 

"Any good?" 

"Nothing like it." 

" How do you know?" 

" I've prescribed it " 

" Think I ought to?" 

"Why, man, it's exactly, precisely, un- 
deniably, indisputably, unquestionably, 
decidedly, conclusively, incontrovertibly 
what you should prescribe." 



SUPRIML AWARD 
WORLDS FAIR 



ESTABLISHED 1865 
¥¥¥* 



f\e<lica\ BooKs 



BY MAIL OR EXPRESS. 



EDWARD SPEARMAN 

Medical apd Deptal 
Boo^-Seller 



S. E. Corner Congress and Honore Streets 



... CHICAGO 






CARRIES at all times the best assorted stock 
of medical works in the city. Latest editions 
only. All new works received as soon as published. 
Special attention given to mail orders. 20 per cent, 
discount from publishers' list prices, except those 
marked net. 

Catalogues of Medical, Surgical, Dental and Vet- 
erinary books sent free on application. 

Any desired information in regard to new works 
cheerfully given. 



A FULL LINE OF 

Dissecting Instruments, Aprons and Sleeves, 
Mounting Outfits, Microscopic Material, fountain Pens, 
Note BooKs, etc., Always in StocK 



ADDRESS 



EDWARD SPE0KM0N 



S. E. CORNER CONGRESS AND HONORE STS. 
.. .. CHICAGO 



Correspondence Solicited 



. . . ESTABLISHED 1874 . . . 



f^edical BooKs 

BY MAIL OR EXPRESS. 

We make a specialty of supplying any Medical Book, no matter by whom 
published or where advertised, and when possible at the most liberal 
discounts from the regular prices. 

CORRESPONDENCE INVITED 

Dealing Exclusively 
... in Medical Books 

Our long experience, together with extensive Bibliographical lists, enables us to give 
such information concerning books, date of publication, size and number of pages, 
etc., as will enable our patrons to select intelligently a book on a given subject. 

If you are practicing a speciality, we will notify you of the publication of new 
books bearing upon the subject. 

CATALOGUES FREE 

ENGLISH, FRENCH AND GERMAN BOOKS Imported to order at reasonable 
Prices. It will pay you to give us a trial. Latest Edition and Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

THE W. T. KEENER CO. 

flDeoical publishers, Booksellers ano Importers 

96 Washington Street, CHICAGO. 
West Side Store, N. W. Cor. Congress and Honore Sts. 






IRusb flfoebical College 

flftcCucal Department lake fforcst llnivereitg 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

... Jfacult? ... 

De Laskie Miller, A. M., M. D., Ph. D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Children. 
Ephraim Ingals, M. D. 

Emeritus Professor of Materia Medica and Medical Jurisprudence. 
Daniel T. Nelson, A. M., M. D. 

Emeritus Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

* ¥ ¥ 

Edward L. Holmes, M. D., LL. D., President, 

Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear. 
Henry M. Lyman, A. M., M. D., Treasurer, 

Professor of the Principles and Practice of Medicine. 
James H. Etheridge, A. M., M. D., Secretary, 

Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Walter S. Haines, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Chemistry, Pharmacy and Toxicology. 
James Neyins Hyde, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 
Norman Bridge, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Diagnosis. 
Arthur Dean Bevan, M. D. 

Professor of Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. 
Nicholas Senn, M. D., Ph.D., LL. D. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 
E. Fletcher Ingals, A. M., M. D., Registrar, 

Professor of Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest. 
Daniel R. Brower, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, Materia Medica and Therapeutics 
John B. Hamilton, M. D., LL. D. 

Professor of Principles of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 
John M. Dobson, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Physiology. 

J. H. ETHERIDGE, M. D., Secretary, 

31 washington street, 

Chicago. 

ii 



******* A ** AAAA **** AA **** AA *** A * A ** AA ** AA *** A * A * A <*** 




1Rusb /IfeeMcal College 



THE curriculum of this school of medicine requires a proper preliminary 
education and three years of study in college, devoted to laboratory, 
didactic and clinical instruction, to recitations and to manual training 
in the use of instruments and appliances. Students beginning the study of 
medicine in the fall of 1894, and thereafter, will be required to take four years 
of study in the college. 

Instruction is given in two capacious, well-lighted edifices. The new 
building contains five large laboratories, in which are conducted the practical 
laboratory courses in Anatomy, Physiology and Histology, Chemistry, Materia 
Medico., Pathology and Bacteriology. 

The old building is devoted to instruction by clinics, didactic lectures, and 
by numerous important practical courses in manual training in manipulations 
and in the use of the instruments employed in medicine, surgery, obstetrics 
and the specialties. 

Manual training in all departments of medicine is a special feature of the 
instruction in this college. Systematic recitations, conducted in five commo- 
dious recitation rooms, are regarded as a most important means of teaching. 

With over seventy professors and instructors, and with ample room and 
appliances, this school is able to furnish its classes with the most approved 
systematic education in medicine. 

Physicians and medical students are invited to visit the laboratories and 
to inspect the educational appliances of this school. 

For further information and for announcements, apply to the College 
Clerk, or to the Secretary, 

J. H. ETHERIDGE, M. *D. 

31 Washington Street, Chicago. 



Sbarp & ©mttb 

Manufacturers of 

Superior Surgeons' INSTRUMENTS and Appliances, ARTIFICIAL 



LIMBS, ELASTIC STOCKINGS, ETC. 




Dr. Nicholas Serin's Aseptic Pocket Operating Case. 

All Instruments and Case Aseptic. 
Contents: 



i Silver Combination Catheter. 

i Needle-holder and Artery Forceps 

combined, 
i Senn's Blunt Retractor. 
I " Sharp 

1 Foreign Body Hook and Curette. 

2 Pair Senn's Haemostatic Forceps. 
i " " Dissecting " 
i " " Mouse Tooth " 
I " Straight Scissors. 
I Aneurism Needle, solid handle, 
i Tenaculum, " " 
I Curved Blunt Bistoury, solid handle. Silk Ligature. 

In Metal Aseptic Case. Price, complete, $2 



i Curved Sharp Bistoury, solid handle. 

I Straight " " " 

i Tenotome, solid handle. 

I Scalpel, " 

i Metacarpal Saw, solid handle. 

1 Senn's Double End Curette. 

2 " Spiral Porcelain Head Bullet 
Probes. 

1 Grooved Director and Tongue Tie. 

2 Langenbeck's Clamps. 
I Metal Box for Needles. 
i dozen Assorted Needles. 



73 RANDOLPH STREET, 

NOTICE : The Prize of Pocket Case and Instru 
Sharp & Smith. — Editors of Pulse. 



CHICAGO. 



ents mentioned on page 99, was kind 



CHAS.TRUAX,GREENE&CO. 

a 

Physicians' 



Supplies 

Surgical 

Ik Instruments 




DR. N. SENN'S POCKET OPERATING CASE-Price $25.00. 



WE aim to supply the busy 
practitioner with every 
requirement necessary to 
his practice. 

Our new 1,500 page price 
list sent free upon applica- 
tion, costing you express 
charges only 35c. 



CHAS. TRUAX. 
GREENE & CO. 



75 and 77 Wabash Ave. 
... CHICAGO 




DR. JOHN B. HAMILTON'S POCKET CASE-Price S15.00. 



Physicians' Supplies, Surgical Instruments 
Invalid Furniture, Rolling Chairs 
Deformity Apparatus, Crutches, Trusses 

In fact every Requirement Necessary to the Physician or Patient 



CHAS.TRUAX,GREENE&CO. 

75 and 77 Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO. 



/Ilbonavcb 



Monarch in Name 
Style 
Quality 
Appearance 



Iking of Bicycles 



FIT FOR A KING 
OR OUEEN, 



LIGHT, GRACEFUL, SPEEDY, STRONG, 
BEAUTIFULLY FINISHED, 
EXQUISITELY DESIGNED. 




ffom flfcobels -— $85.00 anb $100.00 

Send for Catalogue. 



/IBonarcb C^cle Co., Chicago, IflL 



Factory and Main Office: Lake and Halsted Sts. 
Retail Salesroom: 280 Wabash Ave. 



Thorsen _^^ Co "ffu, .• 

. /-• j CPftOF/SS Athletic 

and Cassady O^^ Outfitters 

. . . COItlpany 14 , & 143 Wabash Ave., CHICAGO 




y Sole Selling Agents *> 

"THORSEN" & "VICTOR" 

ATHLETIC 
. . GOODS 



VICTOR 

League Ball 
Tennis Ball 
Golf Supplies 
Foot Ball Goods 
Etc. 





We want your College Busi- 
ness and will allow liberal dis- 
count on Athletic Goods. 

Ask for Catalogue " K. ". 



SOLE AGENTS 



IDtctor Bicycle 




THORSEN 

Sweaters 
Bicycle Suits 
Base Ball Suits 
Lawn Tennis Outfits 
Athletic Foot Wear 




Cbis Crat>c flfiatft on athletic ffiooos 




Signifies the 1b;,ibc»t Quality Obtainable 



* E. H. SARGENT & CO. * 

106 & 108 Wabash Ave. 

CHICAGO 

offer a complete line of 

Oeliable ^ urg ical I nstruments, 

at favorable prices 



UTJTJTJTJTJTJTJUTJlJTJTJTXLrLr 

Surgical Knives of 
our own make, hand 
forged and finely fin- 
ished. 



Compressed air 
outfits complete. 



Hand and Buggy 
Cases of best 
quality. 

rUTJTJTJTJTJTjn rUTJTXLTLTLTLn 




ITUTJTTlJTriJUTJTrL njTJTJ'LrLr 

Fraser's, Wyeth's 
and other Tablets, 
Triturates, Pills, 
etc. 

Elastic Hosiery, 
Dressings, 
Hedical Batteries, 

and 
Invalid Furniture. 

Herck's and 

Schering's Pure 
Chemicals and 
New Remedies. 

rLTUTJTJTJTJTJI n rUT-rLTLTLrLn. 



.Sole Agents for... 



ZEISS MICROSCOPES AND ACCESSORIES 

Bacteriological Apparatus and Haterials. 
WRITE FOR CIRCULAR. 



Vlll 



XLhc 
pulse 

¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 

IRusb 

/Hbebical 

College 

¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 

Ipublisbeb 
Ennuall^ 

TLhc 

Sopbomove 

Class 

¥¥¥¥¥ 

IDolume 
XTwo 

¥¥¥¥¥ 

1895 




Benjamin IRusb 




£bis book 

is reverently oeoicateo 

to tbe memory 

of 

E>t\ UBenjamin IRusb 

PHYSICIAN, PATRIOT. GENTLEMAN. 

MEMBER OP THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS, 

SIGNER OE TEE DECLARATION OE INDEPENDENCE. 

SURGEON -GENERAL OE TEE REVOLUTIONARY ARMY, 

TREASURER OE THE /HINT OE TEE UNITED STATES, 

POUNDER OE TEE EIRST EREE DISPENSARY. 

AN ENERGETIC INVESTIGATOR, 

A PROLIEIC WRITER, A CAREPUL TEACHER, 

A LOVING EATHER, A SINCERE ER1END, 

TEE SYDENHAM OE AMERICA, 

...bs„. 

— Gbe JEoitors. 




TLhc Class of '96 

Presents this volume to the great Rash family 

as its contribution 

to the College literature, 

If it calls forth pleasant reminiscences 

of College days to those who have gone 

into the world from the College, and 

if it be an inspiration 

to those who now constitute our student body, 

. our purpose will have been 

attained, 

-THE EDITORS, 




EMtors of tbe pulse 




Samuel Omar Duncan, A. B. 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF. 



William Duncan MacNary, A. B. 



Ezra Read Larned, 



ASSISTANT EDITOR AND TREASURER. 



SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER. 



Charles Louis Hobbs, 



Frank Wright Bullen, 



EDITOR OF LOCALS, ETC. 



George Thomas Carson, 



CHAIRMAN. 



3cn\. IRusfo 

a Biography 



■f^ik 



"zA sacred halo surrounds this name, 

as imperishable as the pages of history." 

i N the day before Christmas, one hundred and fifty years ago, in 

Jtt , Ah' the hamlel oi Byberry, near Philadelphia, there came into 

'^ \ fir '' ns ""'''' a baby boy whose entrance was not heralded by 

salvos of cannon nor thanksgivings in churches, but whose 
'^M/i . . . , 

' exit sixty-eight years later caused more widespread grief 

than that of any other person, excepting possibly the Father of his Country. 
Benjamin Rush, as might readily be supposed from his own life, was de- 
scended from ancestors whose individuality and independence of thought and 
action demanded attention from those amongst whom they lived. 

His grandfather, a gunsmith by trade, was a captain of cavalry in Oliver 
Cromwell's army, and served with distinction; but later, being displeased with 
the restoration of the monarchy, which he had helped to overthrow, and hav- 
ing become allied with the society of Friends, on the emigration of their great 
leader, William Penn, he followed, or rather went with him, and settled near 
Philadelphia, where later the subject of our sketch was born. 

Very early in life, Rush must have given evidence of his desire for know- 
ledge, and was fortunate in possessing a mother of discernment and force of 
character, for when he was six years old, his father, a highly respected farmer, 
died, and the farm on which they lived not being sufficiently remunerative, it 
was sold and the mother moved into Philadelphia, where her sole aim was the 



care and education of her son. For three years she taught him herself, but 
his abilities demanding more than his mother could give, young Benjamin at 
nine years of age was sent to his uncle in Maryland, and for five years his 
education was superintended with great care, and he showed far more than an 
ordinary bright intellect. At the age of fourteen, Rush entered upon a two 
years' course of study in Princeton College, where he graduated with the 
degree of B. A. He then commenced the study of medicine, having as a pre- 
ceptor Dr. Redman, of Philadelphia, and here Rush studied so hard and con- 
stantly that he is said to have taken only tzvo days vacation during the six 
years he was studying the works of Hippocrates, Sydenham and Boerhaave. 

At this time Dr. Shippen began the first course of lectures on medicine 
ever delivered in the colonies, and young Rush attended these lectures in 
addition to his other work. 

At length, having completed his apprenticeship, and in fact having 
acquired all his teachers were able to impart, and thirsting for more knowl- 
edge, like the true student he was, Rush went to Scotland and entered the 
Medical College of Edinburgh, which was then the most celebrated school in 
all Europe, having among its professors such famous men as Cullen, Black, 
Gregory and Munro, all of whom were Rush's teachers. In two years he 
obtained his degree of M. D., his thesis, " De coctione ciborum," written in the 
most elegant Latin, arousing widespread and very favorable comment. Still 
not satisfied, the young doctor studied in the hospitals of London and Paris 
something over a year before he turned homeward. 

Back in Philadelphia, he found his fame as a student had been before him, 
and honors came thick and fast. His former teacher, Dr. Shippen, with Drs. 
Bond, Kuhn and Morgan, were just starting a medical college, and Dr. Rush, 
at 26 years of age, was at once elected Professor of Chemistry. 

In 1789 he was elected Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine, and 
in 1791 Professor of Institutes of Medicine and of Clinical Practice. In 1806 
these chairs were combined, and Dr. Rush ably discharged the increased duties 
until his death. 

Almost as soon as Rush landed on his return from Europe, he took prom- 
inent part in politics, and became a warm friend of Benj. Franklin. 

In 1774, with James Pemberton, Dr. Rush started the first Anti-Slavery 



Society in America and was its first secretary; he was a member of the famous 
Continental Congress of 1776, and not only strongly advocated, but signed the 
glorious Declaration of Independence. 

In 1777 Dr. Rush was Surgeon and Physician-General of the Revolutionary 
Army, and was the trusted friend of the immortal George Washington; but 
being unable to stop the frauds that were being perpetrated upon the soldiers 
in the hospital stores, he resigned his post. 

His duties were not so arduous but that the Constitution of Pennsylvania 
was materially changed, owing to a series of letters he wrote at this time. 

Dr. Rush was a member of the convention which drafted the Federal Con- 
stitution, and after the political crisis of 1787 he gave up his public life entirely 
and turned his energies to the practice of his profession. 

During this time Dr. Rush's pen had not been idle, and he became a pro- 
lific contributor to medical literature, his writings being on a great variety of 
subjects, including, "Language," "Study of Latin," "The Moral Faculty," 
" Capital Punishment," " Medicine among the Indians," " Maple Sugar," " The 
Blackness of the Negro," "Tobacco Smoking," "Cause of Animal Life," 
"Spirit Drinking," and a greater list of more strictly professional topics. 

His last work was an elaborate work on "The Diseases of the Mind." 
Epidemics, and particularly yellow fever, occupied a great deal of his thoughts, 
and his best work is thought to have been done in regard to these subjects. 

In 1793, during the terrible epidemic of yellow fever in Philadelphia, Dr. 
Rush's energy was tremendous, visiting, it is said, 120 patients daily, and by 
his bold method of blood-letting, is said to have saved the lives of over 6,000 
patients. As might be supposed, Dr. Rush's fame became as great as his 
energy was untiring, and his house was continually crowded with clients from 
all parts of the country. 

Dr. Rush was above the middle stature, slender and well formed, his 
mouth and chin good, his nose aquiline, his eyes blue, and his forehead high 
and prominent. His powerful intellect and high thoughts were indicated by 
his commanding and prepossessing features. His character was pure, his 
heart overflowing with kindness. It is said he often gave to charity more than 
his income. His habits were temperate, his dress neat, his manner courteous 
and modest, his conversation entertaining. 



Dr. Rush was married in January, 1776, to a daughter of Judge Stockton, 
of New Jersey, by whom he had thirteen children, one of whom became Sec- 
retary of the Treasury. 

Dr. Rush was taken sick with typhus fever, and after an illness of five 
days' duration, he died on April 19, 1813, in the 68th year of his age. 

The announcement of his death created great sorrow. Funeral services 
were preached in all parts of the country and multitudes followed him to his 
grave. 

In the service of his country and in- the practice of his profession, Dr. 
Rush reaped the full measure of glory. 



"Ibe was a man vvbcse liberal mino 
TKHisbeo general gooo to all manluno, 
Wbo wben bis frieno, by fortune's wouno, 
Jfell tumbling beaolong to tbe grouno, 
Goulo meet bim witb a warm embrace, 
Hno wipe tbe tears from off bis face." 



Ezra Read Larned. 




IDantel Brainatb, fli>.ID, 



jfounoer ano 
JFtrst prestoent of 
TRusb flDeotcal College. 



H 



SDaniel JBralnarb 

©tocjrapbical Sfcetcb 





N the 15th of May, 181 2, there was born a boy in Oneida 
County, New York, who was destined to become a great 
factor in the medical education of the West. His parents 
were well educated and devoted all their energies to the 
betterment of their son. His name was Daniel Brainard. From 
childhood he was devoted to his studies, and received a good 
common school and academic education, which laid the foundation 
for that exact and careful investigation which characterized his after 
life. Having chosen the medical profession as his life's work, he 
began his medical studies at Whitesboro, New York, where he read 
for two years under a preceptor. He then attended a medical 
college in New York city one year, and the next year was gradu- 
ated from Jefferson Medical College, in 1834. 

The two years following his graduation he was engaged in 
teaching and did not practice his profession to any extent. He 
delivered a series of lectures on Anatomy and Physiology before 
the members of the Oneida Institute. He also devoted some time 
to the study of Latin and French, becoming a proficient scholar in 
each, which was a great help to him when he went abroad to study. 

15 



In the Spring of 1836 he commenced practice in Whitesboro, New 
York. Soon tiring of the East, he came to Chicago in the Fall of 
the same year. His medical career in Chicago was begun by 
hanging his shingle on the door of the law office of his friend, the 
Hon. J. D. Caton. The first year of his practice was confined to 
the poorest classes, but he never refused a call, although there was 
no likelihood of a monetary remuneration. He waited patiently for 
an opportunity to place himself among a better class of patients, 
and at last it came, when he successfully performed a hip-joint 
amputation; proving the necessity for it by first amputating the limb 
below the trochanters, and finding the products of degeneration in 
the medullary canal, his counselors having taken the ground that the 
hip-joint amputation was not necessary. This operation gave him a 
reputation, as it was among the first ever performed in this country. 

In 1839 he visited Paris, and for two years availed himself ot 
the great advantages offered there for medical research and clinical 
observation. On his return he delivered a course of lectures on 
anatomy in the University of St. Louis, and in 1842 he was elected 
to the chair of Anatomy in that university. 

Shortly after this he perfected his plans for the founding of 
Rush Medical College, and on December 3d, 1843, before twenty- 
two students, he delivered his introductory lecture, and from this 
humble beginning has grown the largest and most proficient medical 
college in this country. 

In 1852 he again visited Paris, and at this time he obtained 
the rarely-granted permission to prosecute his researches on the 
subject of poisoned wounds by the aid of experiments on the reptiles 

16 



in the Jardin des Plantes ; and was elected an honorary member of 
the Sociele" de Chirurgie of Paris, and of the Medical Society of 
the Canton of Geneva. 

In May of 1854, the American Medical Association offered a 
prize for the best essay on some medical subject of interest, which 
he won with his essay on the treatment of ununited fractures and 
deformities. 

During the administration of Pierce he was appointed surgeon 
to the Marine Hospital, of Chicago, which position he held until his 
death. In 1847 the first general hospital in Chicago was erected 
through the instrumentality of Dr. Brainard. It was a two-story 
structure, containing two hundred beds. 

In the Fall of 1866, during an epidemic of cholera in the city, 
Dr. Brainard contracted the dread disease, and in the space of a 
few short hours had passed away. In him Rush lost one of her 
mightiest workers. As a man, he was tall, vigorous in frame, with 
keen, penetrating eyes and a kindly expression. To a great many 
he appeared cold and reticent at times, and many thought him hard- 
hearted ; but this rapidly wore away when you became acquainted 
with the man. He was kind to the poor, hated dishonesty, and 
above all things despised a man who, after having graduated, would 
quit study and never make an effort to rise above the ordinary 
routine of his every-day work. He was particularly friendly to the 
students of his classes, and many a one has been thus helped on 
to success by his kind words and deeds of assistance. 

As a scholar he was thorough, painstaking and exact. He 
was a master of many of the collateral branches of science. He was 

17 



a botanist and a geologist ; he also excelled in literature, and his 
contributions to medical periodicals are, many of them, masterpieces 
of terse, vigorous and lucid expression. 

As a surgeon, he did not hesitate to perform all the great 
operations of his day. While he was a bold operator, he was cautious, 
and always refused to operate where he was not justified in so doing. 

He was not a specialist, and his work embraced the whole 
broad domain of surgery. He had not only a Chicago, but an 
American, not only an American, but a foreign reputation ; and he 
took rank with such men as Parker, Post and Gross. Should some 
chronicler gather up the names of the most distinguished surgeons, 
the name of Brainard would be found the peer of Astley Cooper, 
Hunter and the elder and younger Larreys. 

It was said in his funeral oration: "The profession which he 
adorned will miss his voice. The college of his love will sorrow 
over its bereavement ; and we stand silent and humbled when we 
think that he who had met and conquered death so many times for 
others, who was so fully armed with every weapon which could 
ward off from man the arrows of the destroyer, to whom so many 
grateful hearts among poor and rich turn as their preserver from a 
premature grave, should be forced to throw down his arms, and in 
a few swift hours bend his neck to the blow of resistless death." 



18 



"fln labors great, in Rnowlebge beep, 
Ibis work well bone — let Brainaro sleep; 
Erect bis tomb barb bv. tbe lake, 
Mbere waves on waves resounbing break, 
Hnb cbant upon tbe sbellv. sbore 
Ibis requiem forever more." 



Samuel O. Duncan. 



19 




CHICAGO'S LATIN QUARTER. 







Chicago's Xatin Quarter 

HIS name is very appropriately applied to that part of 
Chicago immediately surrounding the Cook County 
Hospital, and it is there that the embryonic "Doc." 
flourishes in all his glory. 
This district contains many fine buildings, the more important 
of which our artist has attempted to illustrate on the opposite 
page. While it resembles in many respects the Ouartier Latin 
of Paris, it is morally far superior to that famous hot-bed of learn- 
ing ; the Chicago grisette being too expensive a luxury for the 
average student of medicine. Those few of romantic temperament 
are wont to stroll down Madison street, where the deficiency is 
not so noticeable. 

Our enterprising manager has discovered (and intends to make 
use of his discovery when the next Larned degeneration has become 
more evident) that here, within the radius of a few blocks, a boy 
or girl intended for a medical career may receive their entire edu- 
cation. Commencing at the Marquette school, the child has instilled 
into him the fundamental principles of learning (and deviltry), and 
then enters the West Division High School, where he becomes 
slightly conversant with the sciences (and the girls). He is now 
ready to begin his medical studies and matriculates at Rush ; or, if 
a girl, at the College of Physicians and Surgeons ; or, if a lad of 



ordinary promise, he might branch off to dentistry and enter the 
Chicago College of Dental Surgery. After graduation, he is eligible 
to the position of interne in Cook County or Presbyterian Hospitals. 
"Many are called (or, at least, think they are), but few are chosen." 
If he wishes to perfect himself in any special line of work, he may 
take a course in the Post-Graduate College. 

The more prominent institutions comprising the "quarter" are : 

Cook Count? Ibospital 

fIDarquette Scbool 

West division 1bigb Scbool 

IRusb flDeoical College 

IRusb laboratory Builoing 

Cbicago College of Dental Surgery 

fl>ost*(Braouate flDeoical College 

Presbyterian Ibospital 

Women's flDeoical College 

Bennett flDeoical College 

College of pb^sicians ano Surgeons 

llllinois Craining Scbool IRurses' Ibome 

Cbicago Ibomceopatbic flDeoical College 

Ibospital for Women ano Cbiloren 

Detention Ibospital (insane). 




Hbe 

3facult£ 

of 

1Rueb 

/Iftebieal 

College 



23 




De Laskie Miller, A. M., M. D., Ph. D. 

Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Children. 





Ephraim Ingals, M. D. 

itus Professor of Materia Medica 
Medical Jurisprudence. 



Daniel T. Nelson, A. M., M. D. 

Lmeritus Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 



24 




Edward L. Holmes, M. D., LL. D. 

President of the Faculty, 
Professor of Diseases of the Eya and Ear. 



?5 




.**. i r *v 





Henry M. Lyman, A. M„ M. D. 

Treasurer of the Faculty, 

Professor of the Principles and Practice ( 

Medicine. 



James H. Etheridge, A. M., M. D. 

Secretary of the Faculty. 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 



' "^ > 





Walter S. Haines, A. M„ M. D. 

iessor of Chemistry, Pharmacy and Toxicology. 



James Nevin Hyde, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Skin and Venereal Diseases. 



26 





Norman Bridge, A. M., M. D. 



Arthur Dean Bevan, M. 1). 

Professor of Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgica 





Nicholas Senn, M. D., LL. D., Ph. D. 



E. Fletcher Ingals, A. M., M. U. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery and of Registrar of the Faculty, 

Clinical Surgery. Professor of Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest. 



27 



.^*!S^ ; 





Daniel R. Brower, M. D. 

Professor of Mental Diseases, Materia Medica 

and Therapeutics. 



John* B. Hamilton, M. D., LL. D. 






John M. Dodson, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Physiology. 



Sanger Brown, M. D. 

Professor of Hygiene and Medical Jurisprudence. 



28 





Truman W. Brophy, M. D., D. D. S. 

Professor of Dental Pathology and Surgery. 



W. T. Belfield, M. D. 

Dfessor of Bacteriology and Lecturer on Surgery. 





Alfred C. Cotton, A. M., M. D. 

Professor of Diseases of Children. 



D. W. Graham, A. M., M. D. 

Clinical Professor of Surgery. 



2 9 








Harold N. Moyer, M. D. 

Adjunct Professor of Medicine and Chief Assistant 
lo the Neurological Clinic. 



Henry P. Merriman, A. M„ M. D. 
Adjunct Professor of Gynecology. 





James B. Herrick, A. B., M. D. 

Adjunct Professor of Medicine. 



. H. Salisbury, A. M„ M. D. 

Adjunct Professor of Medicine. 



30 





John A. Robison, M. D. 

Adjunct Professor of Medicine. 



H. B. Steh.man, A. M., M. D. 
Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 





A. I. Bouffleuk, B. S., M. D. 

Lecturer on Pathulogy. 



A. E. Kauffman, M. D. 

Lecturer on Chemistry. 



31 



Wfi 



Instructors 
ant> 

assistants 

to 

tbe 

3facult£ 



32 



TLhc Instructor's Hssociation 

.... OF ... . 

IRusb flftebical College 



The Instructors of the College, feeling that abler efforts could be made as 
a body than as single individuals, have formed an Association, and have elected 
the following officers: 

President, ' John Edwin Rhodes, M. D. 

Vice-President, D. D. Bishop, M. D. 

Secy and Treasurer, Samuel C. Beach, M. D. 

i Harold N. Mover, M. D., Chairman. 
John Edwin Rhodes, M. D. 
D. D. Bishop, M. D. 

The following Constitution was adopted: 

1Hame 

The Association shall be called Instructor's Association of Rush Medical College. 

Objects 

The improvement of instruction by the co-operation of its members, and the discussion 
of methods of teaching. 

To bring about a closer relationship between the Executive Faculty and the teaching 
force of the College. 

To stimulate interest in the work of the College, and incite to the highest proficiency 
in individual work. 

/iDembersbip 

Membership of this Association shall include all instructors and teachers of Rush 
Medical College not on the Executive Faculty. 

3>ues 

There shall be no dues, all incidental expenses being met by special provision by the 
Association, on recommendation of the Executive Committee. 

/Meetings 

Meetings shall be held in the Laboratory Building of Rush Medical College when 
called by the Executive Committee, unless otherwise provided for by the Association. 

©fficers 

The officers of the Association shall be a President, Vice-President, Secretary- and 
Treasurer, and an Executive Committee of three. These shall be elected yearly, and shall 
hold their offices for one year. 





Wm. B. Marcusson, A. M., M. D. 

Chief Assistant to Clinic of the Professor of Pr 

ciples of Surgery. 



Albert J. Ochsner, B. S., M. D., F. R. M. S. 

Assistant to the Chair of the Practice of Surgery. 





Cassius D. Westcott, M. D. 

Instructor in Diseases of the Eye and Ea 



John Edwin Rhodes, A. M., M. D. 

Lecturer on Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest. 





Frank Webster Jay, M. D. 

Instructor in Surgery. 



Emanuel J. Senn, M. D. 

Instructor in Surgery. 





Frederic S. Coolidge, A. B., M. D. 

Instructor in Pathology and Principles of Surgery. 



Henry B. Favill, M. D. 

Instructor in Medicine. 





J. C. Gill, M. D. 

Instructor in Materia Medii 



J. W. O'N'EILL. M. D. 
Instructor in Surgery. 





A. M. Corwin, A. M., M. I). 

Demonstrator of Physical Diagnosis. 



•AiiuEL C. Beach, M. D. 





J. A. Patton, B. S., M. D. 

Demonstrator of Materia Mcdica and Instructor 
in Chemistry. 



Wm. R. Parkes, M. D. 



l Anatomy 



pies of Surgery, 





Lawrence H. Prince, M. D. 

Instructor in Gynecology and Obstetrics. 



Harvey A. Tyler, M. D. 

Instructor in Gynecology. 





Ignatz Lange, M. D. 

Assistant to the Clinic for Diseases of Childr 



E. R. LeCount, M. D. 

structor in Medicine and Anatomy, and Demon- 
strator of Histology and Pathology. 





G. W. Hall, M. D. 
Instructor in Materia Medic 



Malcolm Gunn, M. D. 

Instructor in Pathology and Principles of Surgery. 



3S 





C. J. Whalen, M. D. 

i Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest. 



D. D. Bishop, M. D. 

Instructor in Microscopy and Curator of the 





F. H. Montgomery, M. D. 



Dermatological Cli 



George H. Weaver, M. D. 
Instructor in Bacteriology. 



39 





Charles A. Parker, M. D. 
Assistant in Anatomy. 



Alfred Hinde, M. D. 



Instructor 
g. Ophthalr 



eases of the Eye and Ear, s 
st to the Neurological Clini 





E. Friend, M. D. 

Instructor in Dermatology. 



B. Brindley Eads, M. D. 

Instructor in Physiology. 



40 





Robert Wallace Hardon, M. D. 

Instructor in Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest 



Frank A. Stahl, M. D. 

Demonstrator of Obstetrics. 




C. A. Wade, M. D. 

Assistant to the Clinic for Diseases of Children. 



4' 




4^ 



Zhc Clinics. 



AFTER the medical student has completed his elementary and labo- 
ratory work, he is introduced to disease at the bedside of the 
patient — the clinic. 
A clinic means instruction given at the bedside, or in our more 
modern methods, means the stud}' of disease as illustrated by cases 
in the amphitheatre. The value of clinical instruction can hardly be exag- 
gerated. It far overshadows didactic lectures, and in some institutions has 
entirely supplanted them. At Rush the value of limited didactic work is still 
recognized. It affords the instructor an opportunity of giving a syllabus of 
his subject; but clinical work is given the more prominent position. Lasting 
impressions of great value to the young graduate are photographed on his 
mind at the clinic. 

It is at the clinic that he see's and learns to interpret the gait of locomotor 
ataxia, the gestures of chorea, the cachexia of carcinoma, the deformity of 
Colles' fracture, the emphysematous chest with its labored breathing, the pallor 
of chlorosis, the puffy eyelid of the nephritic. It is in the clinic that he sees 
practiced the art of medicine, the exhaustive cross-examination of the patient, 
the searching investigation, the judicial diagnosis, the scientific treatment, the 
skilled handling of instruments. The clinic is the stage upon which he sees 
performed the part which he hopes to play in his life's work. The importance 
of a medical school can be best judged by its clinics. At Rush the amount 
of clinical material afforded by the Central Free Dispensary, by the Presby- 
terian Hospital and by the college clinics is greater than can be utilized. 

The largest surgical clinic in the world, both in point of attendance and 
number of cases operated upon, can be seen at Rush. The immediate connec- 
tion with the Presbyterian Hospital makes it possible to present all classes of 
cases in the large amphitheatre of the college, which has a seating capacity 
of five hundred. 

The gynecological clinics, the medical clinics, and clinics in special 
branches — eye and ear, chest and throat, skin and venereal, and diseases of 
children — afford unsurpassed opportunities for the stud} - of disease both to 
the student and post-graduate. 

The Pulse presents this year photographs of the clinics of Professors 
Senn, Etheridge, Bridgfe and Hamilton. 



43 




IProt Senn'e Surgical Clinic 

HE clinic conducted on Tuesday afternoon from two to 
four, and upon Thursday from two to six, is the greatest 
surgical clinic in the world. 

Its preeminence lies, first, in Dr. Senn as an accu- 
rate diagnostician and conscientious though brilliant 
operator; second, in Professor Senn as a profound 
scholar, a careful pathologist, an enthusiastic and orig- 
inal investigator and voluminous author; third, in his 
power not only of comprehending the whole realm of medicine and surgery, 
and of retaining it at his instant command, but of possessing a practical insight 
into the wants of students, and the ability to drive home the. essentials with a 
rare forcefulness of manner and directness and fluency of speech; fourth, the 
superiority of the clinic is also dependent upon the great amount and variety 
of its clinical material, with every attendant advantage of one of the best of 
modern hospitals and a large supply of out-patients. Few are the surgical 
lesions, even of rare interest, that are not exhibited from this inexhaustible 
clinical reservoir. 

The excellence of the clinic is much enhanced by the efficiency of the 
corps of assistant physicians and nurses, who perform their several duties with 
precision. 

The preparation and aseptic manipulation of sponges, drainage tubes and 
other paraphernalia; the very admirable handling and care of all instruments; 
all these procedures move like clock-work, the mainspring and regulator of 
which are in one individual at the center of activity. 

Cleanliness, in the strict modern sense, the watchword in this arena, is a 
lesson never to be forgotten by those who observe the method by which it is 
attained, and the clinical results which are its just reward. 

The first hour is usually devoted to the presentation of the patients 
operated upon during the previous week or so. This is a most valuable sequel 
to the preceding clinic, and is a practical demonstration of results. 

The so-called consulting staff of students, appointed from the senior class 
to exhibit certain patients before the class, is at first thought to be sincerely 
pitied, as its members pass one by one under the combined gaze of some 
fourteen hundred eyes and the fire of Dr. Senn's rigid cross-examination; 
but the immense opportunity which it affords the Professor of impressing 
important facts is only equaled by the certainty that no student who has 
undergone the ordeal will ever forget the points brought out. 

Finally, a feature worthy of special mention is the running description, 
precise and deliberate, of every step in each operation, be it ever so intricate 
or serious. Though there is ample opportunity to see what is done, one has 
only to listen and to jot down the man)' practical points in pathology, diag- 
nosis, prognosis or operative procedure which are the fruit of indefatigable 
labor, long experience and mature thought. 

Dk. A. M. Corwin. 

45 




Uhc Gynecological Clinic 

HIS clinic was inaugurated by Dr. Etheridge in 
1889, when he was elected to the chair of 
Gynecology, and since that time has formed a 
distinctive feature of the teaching in that great 
branch ot healing. Properly speaking, it is a 
Gynecological Surgical Clinic, and in it every 
year are performed almost every surgical procedure for the relief 
of diseases peculiar to woman. A prominent feature of the clinic is 
the large number of laparotomies, which is the largest of any clinic 
in America, comprising every operation on the uterus and append- 
ages from Caesarian section to simple hysterorraphy. Scarcely a 
clinic goes by without an abdominal section, and several clinics 
have seen three, while on occasions the time has been too short 
to operate on the waiting fourth. 

Lacerated perinei and cervices, carcinomata, fistula?, prolapsus 
uteri, endometritis, metritis, receive their proper operative treatment, 
and many minor operations are demonstrated, the knowledge of which 
is indispensable to the general practitioner. 

Not only the operations, but the antiseptic preparations, are 
thoroughly and exhaustively discussed, the history of each case pre- 
sented, and all the technique of dressing, the treatment of post- 
operation complications and sequela?, the removal of sutures, and 
subsequent precautionary measures are described and explained. 

Dr. L. C. Weeks. 

47 



SDr. Hamilton's Surgical Clinic 

T.HOROUGH aseptic operations, rapidity of manipulation, and true 
conservatism, are the characteristic features of this clinic. 
Prof. Brainard, who held the chair of Surgery from 1843 *° 
1867, was the father of the Saturday clinic. It was cradled in 
his office, where all the operations of the session of '43-' 44 were 
performed. 

It is interesting to note how small were the beginnings of this the oldest 
surgical institution in the city. 

The third annual announcement of the college, with evident pride, pub- 
lishes the fact that during the preceding session thirteen operations had been 
performed in the clinic, i. e., Removal of Tumors, 3; Removal of Nasal' 
Polypus, 1; Operation for Strabismus, 4; Blepharoplasty, 1; Obstruction of 
Lachrymal Duct, 1; Tonsilectomy, 1. 

After the death of Prof. Brainard in 1867, Prof. Moses Gunn was called to 
fill the vacant chair, and to this great surgeon is due the honor of having given 
the clinic a national reputation; of having made it an institution which drew 
its clientele from all parts of the country. Those who once saw him will never 
forget his appearance; a large man, with keen blue eyes and white flowing 
hair, an imposing figure indeed as he entered the arena exactly at two o'clock, 
(we used to call him the minute gun on account of his promptness,) followed by 
his corps of assistants, and with a rapidity and dexterity unequaled performed 
operation after operation. 

His death in 18S7, of a disease which he had himself so often relieved, 
was a blow from which Old Rush could hardly have rallied, had she not had 
among her sons Dr. Charles T. Parkes, Professor of Anatomy. 

Under the management of Prof. Parkes the clientele became so large that 
Saturday afternoon was too short, and first Tuesday and finally Thursday 
afternoons were set aside to accommodate the large amount of material which 
poured in from all parts of the United States. 

After the sudden death of Prof. Parkes in 1891, the Saturday clinic was 
left without a head, and the Faculty naturally turned to Surgeon-General John 
B. Hamilton, an alumni of Rush, a man not only of American but international 
reputation, who has been repeatedly recognized for distinguished public ser- 
vices rendered; a man whose personality is such as to gain the confidence 
of all his colleagues, and whose reputation is such as to assure the per- 
manence and development of the Saturday clinic. 

Nine hundred and sixty-four surgical cases were operated on in this clinic 
from June, 1891, to April, 1894. 

Wm. B. Marcusson, A. M., M. D., 
Cliief Assistant to the Saturday Clinic. 

49 



Qhe /IfceMcal Clinic 



¥¥¥¥¥¥ 

THE illustration furnishes sufficient evidence of the observance at 
Rush of two great principles necessary to a correct understanding 
of medicine: that theory should be practically applied, and that 
such appliance should be at the hands of consummate ability. 
The bi-weekly clinic in medicine, presided over by the eminent Professors 
Norman Bridge, A. M., M. D., and Henry M. Lyman, A. M., M. D., both 
of whom are leaders in their profession and of universally recognized ability, 
provide the student with the best possible advantages in practical medicine. 

Then, too, the personal attention that is paid each student in these clinics 
is of no mere consideration. Here he begins his practice, and is placed on his 
own resources in the responsibility of diagnosing and stating the treatment of 
cases given to his charge, all of which is subject to the corrections of his 
fellow class-mates and the prudent criticism of his instructors. 

Being conscious of this position, he is taxed to his utmost to be above 
suspicion from his class, and exempt from the exceptions of his professors. 

This method of instruction furnishes a drill in which not only quick accu- 
racy is acquired, but the aptitude of imparting one's own thoughts to others 
in a clear, concise and acceptable way. 

The reputation of this clinic furnishes it with an exhaustless supply of 
patients, many of whom are of a superior and private class from the Presby- 
terian Hospital, while others are from the Free Dispensary, all of whom gather 
without number within " Old Rush," whose walls were reared and " Dedicated 
to the quest of knowledge that will relieve suffering and prolong life." 

Ernest P. Jenks. 



51 




52 



lprot (Sunn's Surgical Clinic 



I KNEW Dr. Gunn's clinic when it was in the transition period from the 
septic to the aseptic condition. Carbolic acid was being used freely. 
You could tell a clinic assistant, for his hands were shriveled up from five 
per cent, and he smelled of iodoform. " I don't know much about the 
truth or falsity of the statements concerning bacteria," Dr. Gunn would 
say; " but I do know that if I wash my hands and wash my patient and 
my instruments, and use carbolic acid and iodoform, I can accomplish results 
that I never dreamed of fifteen years ago." 

The clinic was chiefly the ambulatory clinic. The Presbyterian Hospital 
was beginning to furnish a case or two occasionally, and we began to have a 
foretaste of what we saw realized later in the hospital surgical clinic, of the 
gigantic proportions it assumed under Prof. Parkes and his successors. 

The best clinical surgical teaching ever done in Rush College is being done 
to-day. But the practical value of the clinical cases we saw in Dr. Gunn's clinic 
is not to be underestimated. To see the case come before the Professor and the 
class, new to both; to hear him extract the history in his quick, energetic way, 
make his diagnosis, and give advice as to treatment; to see the patient put to 
sleep, the operation performed, the patient recover from the anaesthesia, all 
perhaps in the course of thirty or forty minutes, was a lesson in rapid practical 
surgery not to be forgotten. 

Dr. Gunn was always on time. Only once do I remember his being late. 
We assistants looked at our watches in astonishment, for it was two minutes 
past two. Just then we heard a blowing and puffing in the hall, and Dr. Gunn, 
with a very red face, rushed by us into the arena, the while cursing the swing 
bridges over the Chicago river that had detained him. He was gruff and 
touchy all that clinic hour. He couldn't bear to be a single minute late. 

To his assistants Dr. Gunn was ever courteous and kind if they did their 
duty. Any neglect was promptly reprimanded. He was rapid as an operator. 
He liked to have a patient stand an operation without anaesthesia. When such 
an operation was to be done, the assistants knew that things must go without a 
hitch. It meant as rapid an operation as Moses Gunn could perform, so as to 
save the patient as much suffering as possible. Woe to the man who was not 
ready when the forceps or scissors or ligature was called for. " — — ," said 
he to one of the assistants, " don't ever hand me as dull a knife again; I could 
ride from here to Boston and back again on that knife without a saddle." The 
assistant never gave him a dull knife again. 

The clinics in those days varied in size. On a rainy day scarcely a patient; 
on a fair day, an overflowing clinic. When the last patient had gone, whether 
the clinic had lasted ten minutes or two hours, Dr. Gunn always turned to the 
class and said, " That is all for to-day, gentlemen." 

Those of us who were under Moses Gunn, and particularly those who had 
the privilege of assisting him in his clinical work, feel that we owe a great deal 
to him, for he taught us sound surgical knowledge, sound practical surgery. 
He taught us the value of clean-cut rapid work, the value of time in an operation. 
He taught us, in addition, the value of promptness, of courtly bearing, of 
honorable treatment of professional brethren, the value of positiveness of 
opinion, of honest confession of ignorance, of manly conduct in all things. 

Dr. J. H. Herrick. 
53 



.IHlIMIiiaiMlL 




ITT f fTTT i TTC* "UP, ~'~ n ~ I ' nTn ' "H^L'-T^ r rrrrrj^TT "i-jppt 'iT'TS' 777 f 
R9 ffrm |AB0RATORY"CMEM15TRY?i hyi !H\ J 




<£?1 



'TTV'TT riTTlVil I I" I II "fi'l LVrrHTi -) *r\j j 

LABORATORY ° F BACTERIOLOGY! 

IIH(WIIII®flllllllllSfllllHHl 



laboratory of Chemistry pharmacy 
anb XToyicolOQ\> 

THE Chemical Laboratory occupies the whole of the third floor of 
the new building (100x45 feet), and has accommodations for 
almost two hundred students. 
Since it is the outcome of much experience, careful investi- 
gation and planning on the part of Prof. Haines, one would 
I naturally expect to find it a model laboratory, and such it is 

acknowledged to be by those best fitted to judge. 

The ceiling is high, and desks and other woodwork are of pine with hard 
oil finish; this, combined with an abundance of light from windows opening 
north, south and east, make even- one of the 192 desks a desirable place to 
work. 

Aside from the main laboratory, Prof. Haines has two rooms in the south- 
east corner fitted up for his own private use, and it is there he carries on his 
various investigations. 

Taken altogether, the Chemical Laboratory, although not the most expen- 
sive, is one of the most complete and convenient that can be found anywhere 
in the country. 



Bacteriological laboratory 

The room devoted to this department is 42x27 feet in size and well 
lighted. There are private desks and lockers for fifty men to work in one 
class. In a smaller room are similar desks where ten students pursuing special 
work can be accommodated. The laboratory is well supplied with all necessary 
apparatus, including sterilizers, incubators, oil immersion objectives, etc. Each 
student is supplied with the outfit required for the work of the course. 

The aim in the course work is to give such knowledge that the student 
may prosecute the study further at his leisure, but more especially that he may 
be able to apply this knowledge into the various branches of pathology and 
practical medicine. This may be accomplished if he obtains a clear idea of 
bacteria as causes of disease, and the measures to be employed in prophylactic 
and curative efforts. 

The work is not simply demonstrations, but each step is carried out by the 
individual students. Considerable time is spent on technique, on preparation 
of various nutrient media, principles of sterilization, staining processes, prep- 
aration of plates and rolls, etc. A thorough systematic study of a few bacteria 
is made, notes and drawings being prepared on the same. Of the pathogenic 
bacteria only the most common are studied, and preferably those whose recog- 
nition is of practical value in diagnosis, 2. e., bacillus tuberculosis, gonoccus, 
bacillus diphtheriae. The bacillus of typhoid fever is compared with the colon 
bacillus, and the spirillum of Asiatic cholera with those resembling it. 

The bacillus diphtherias is studied on various media for its varying morphol- 
ogy, and the diagnosis by the use of Loeffler's blood serum mixture is demon- 
strated. 

The class works six hours a week for six weeks. The laboratory is in 
charge of Geo. H. Weaver, M. D., assisted by W. C. P. Witte and J. H. 
Nichols. 

55 



f \ if 1 



f\ 







s f *\Ilboratory^Materia Medica & *\ 



Histological anb pathological 
Xaboraton? 

The classes in Histology devote the first few weeks to the study of fresh teased tissues, 
as well as some of the commoner foreign substances occasionally found in specimens, as wool 
and cotton fibres. 

When familiarity with the microscope has been attained, and a knowledge of elementary 
tissues, as fibrous tissues, bone, cartilage, blood, etc., the study of more complex structures is 
undertaken. 

Each member of the class mounts fifty specimens. These have been stained in bulk and 
cut in paraffine. 

Many of these sections are from injected unstained tissues, and are utilized to teach the 
vessel distribution. In some double injection has been done, whereby arteries appear red 
and veins blue. 

These sections cover all the important organs and structures, and many of those of less 
importance. 

Instruction is so arranged that it shall go hand in hand with lectures on Physiology. In 
this method function and minute anatomy are obtained together. 

The size of the classes (forty to sixty) has so far prohibited further instruction in technique, 
but each class is shown apparatus and the methods used in the preparation of specimens. 

The course lasts throughout the year, each class working two hours a week. 

Drawing, while requested, is not made a special feature of the work. It is valuable to 
impress the mental picture obtained. 

Especial stress is laid upon landmarks of different tissues, so that proficiency in the iden- 
tification of tissues can be obtained. 

All Freshmen are urgently requested to take the course in Histology the first year, as the 
early knowledge of minute anatomy is a valuable basis to many other branches of medicine. 

The work in microscopical Pathology, like that in Histology, extends throughout the 
year. 

Fifty sections from tissues that were imbedded unstained in celloiden are stained by each 
member of the classes and mounted. The method of staining is the double Hematoxylin 
and Eosin, with acid alcohol to destain. 

The first of these specimens are used to teach general pathology, a thorough systema- 
tized knowledge of this being the one object kept in view throughout the course. The latter 
part of the course comprises: (1) Examination of sections from special lesions that bear 
upon internal medicine, i. e., typhoid ulcer, unresolved pneumonia, etc. (2) The microscopical 
study of tumors, many varieties being examined. (3) Microscopical urinalysis taken in con- 
nection with the study of morbid Histology of the kidney. 

No one is supposed to take Pathology unless well grounded in Histology. 

The laboratories are in charge of E. R. Le Count, M. D., and D. D. Bishop, M. D. 
assisted by J. C. Van Neys, '97; A. Brennecke, '96; T. H. Page, 97; C. H. Williams, '97; 
J. D. Freeman, 97, and Dr. J. C. Williams. 



/Ifeateria /IfteMca Xaborator^ 

The Materia Medica Laboratory was fully equipped by the college authorities for the 
session of 1894-95, and thereby one more step in teaching by means of practical work was 
taken by "old Rush." 

There is desk room for sixty students, giving each a separate set of the apparatus neces- 
sary for the work to be done. 

A scale-table containing twenty prescription balances, each furnished with a set of dry 
and metric weights, has also been provided. 

Each member of the Freshman class works in the laboratory two hours per week through- 
out the term. The works consists of handling the prepared and crude drugs, thereby famil- 
iarizing the student with their physical properties; making some of the simpler pharmaceutical 
preparations; writing prescriptions, thus giving practice in the proper form of a prescription, 
the official names and their proper abbreviations, incompatibilities of all kinds, compounding 
prescriptions of all classes. 

The laboratory instructors are T. A. Patton, B. S., M. D., as demonstrator, assisted by 
S. C. Beach, M. D.; J. C. Gill, M.D.; E. B. Hutchinson, M. D.; Wm. R. Parkes; M. D'., 
G. W. Hall, M. D.; 'and C. A. Wade, M. D. 

57 



Zhe 



dissecting 



1Room 



anrnro* . 

^~~P~ ■ \~~^ HE dissecting room at Rush College is one of the largest and 
^— m -^m best equipped in the country; the only one which can com- 
^~~ Jl Z^m P are with it is the dissecting room of the medical department 
^^L __S of Columbia University. 

w^llllllvS^ The room, forty-five by one hundred feet, is on the top 

floor of the new laboratory building; is entirely cut off 
from the rest of the building, and is reached only by an open air iron balcony. 
The room is lighted from above. In connection with the main room are 
several" smaller rooms for operative surgery on the cadaver, demonstrating, 
and cloak room and lavatory. The floor is asphalt, so laid as to provide 
for drainage. The dissecting tables are made of iron with glass top, an 
innovation which has proven a great success. While the room is large enough to 
permit of having fifty tables in service, as a rule, not more than forty are 
used. The walls are covered with anatomical charts, a large number being 
in oil. The room is in charge of Prof. Bevan, and the demonstrators of 
anatomy, Drs. Parker, Shaw, Le Count and Weeks; it is open from i to 5. 
In connection with the anatomical department, and in the rear of the laboratory 
building, is a modern refrigerating plant and preparing room. In the good 
old days when it was necessary to "obtain" cadavers, when the dissecting 
was done by gas or candle-light, when the subject was so illy preserved 
that bad tobacco in an old pipe was a perfume, it was indeed an initiation 
when the student saw for the first time the dissecting room. Although a 
wise anatomical act, day-light dissections, refrigerated and well injected 
material, have robbed the dissecting of much of its old impressiveness, it 
still remains the student's initiation into the mysteries of medicine. 



59 



1Rusb /Ifoebieal College 



Hlumni iptn 




BeOicateO 
to 
tbe QJuest of IfcnowleOge tbat may? IRclieve Suffering 
ant> prolong Xife. 

¥¥¥¥¥¥ 

Wxxx ZlDeOtcina: <IarOinales==1Ratio et ©bservatto. 

¥¥¥¥¥¥ 

o iArpos <j>iaoso$os isoeEos 



60 



College Colors 



Ruby, Orange and Black. 



College pin 

TIlnfcerciraCHiatc 




College 1MI 

R-U-S-H ! Rah, Rah ! Rah, Rah ! 

R-U-S-H ! Rah, Rah ! Rah, Rah 

Roo ! Rah ! Roo ! Rah ! 

Regular ! Regular ! 

Rah ! Rah ! Rah ! 



61 



Class Mottoes 

1844 Unus et Primus. 

1845 I Obey. 

1846 Healing Art Divine. 

1847 Medico Ignorantia Scelus. 

1848 Fidelity. 

1849 I CH Dien. 

1850 SUAVITEK ET FORTITER. 

185 i Courage and Diligence. 

1852 VlRTUTE ET LABORE. 

1853 Ut Prosim. 

1854 Tenax Propositi. 

1855 For the Healing of the Nations. 

1856 Fideli Certa Merges. 
1S57 Rectitude. 

1858 Fide et Labore. 

1S59 Where Suffering Calls. 

i860 Esto Probus et Verus. 

1861 Work Wins Worth. 

1862 Noblesse Oblige. 

1863 Salus Populi Suprema Lex. 

1864 Steadfast. 
1S65 ANAPFZESftE 

1 866 Be Men. 

1867 Qui Educat Sustinet. 

1868 Seek the Truth. 



64 



Class /Iftottoes 



1869 Faber quisque su^e Fortune. 

1870 Crescat Proficiat. 

1 87 1 DlLIGENTIA OPPORTUNITATEM FaCIT. 

1872 Carpe Diem (The Fire Class). 
1873 

1874 

1875 Ne Tentes aut Perpice. 

1876 

1877 Nunquam Retrorsum. 

1878 Respect the Old — Inspect the New. 

1879 Non Ministrari sed Ministrare. 

1880 Patior ut Potiar. 

1 88 1 Floreat qui Laborat. 

1882 Spectemur Agiendo. 

1883 R ES EST Sacra Miser. 

1884 Quo Miseria Ducit. 

1885 Fiat Lux. 

1886 ZNTEITE — EIPNOETE. 

1887 Scientia Ratio. 

1888 Semper Paratus. 

1889 I Will. 

1890 Quod Boxum est Tenete. 

1891 Nil Sine Labore. 

1892 Non Finitum sed Inceptum 

1893 Aliis Inseryiendo Consumor. 

1894 Scientia et Humanitate. 

1895 Q UI N0N Proficit Deficit. 



65 



IRu Sigma IRu 

( flDeoical Scbool ) 

Founded at University of Michigan, 1882 



Colors 

Garnet and White 



... Chapter IRoll... 

Alpha — University of Michigan 

Beta — Detroit College of Medicine 

Epsilon — University of Minnesota 

Zeta — Northwestern University 

Eta — College of Physicians and Surgeons 
Theta — University of Cincinnati 
Iota — Columbia University 

Kappa — Rush Medical College 



6/ 



IRu Sigma INu 

ftappa Chapter 

Founded at Rush Medical College, March 12, iSqj 



4* 

jfratres in ^facilitate 

Arthur Dean Bevan, M. D. John Milton Dodson, A. M., M. D. 

James H. Etheridge, A. M., M. D. Henry Baird Favill, B. L., M. D. 
James Nevins Hyde, A. M., M. D. Nicholas Senn, M. D., Ph. D., LL. D. 



jfratrcs in IDirbe 



Emanuel John Senx, AI. D. 
William St. John Downey, M. D. 



Rudolph Wieser Holmes, M. D. 
Edmond Church Ingals, M. D. 



jfratres in fl>atria 



D. Edmund Smith, M. D., '94 



Harry French Thompson, M. D. 



jfratres in Collegio 



'95 



Philip P. Schuyler Doane. 
Paul Allen Fox. 
Arthur Tenxey Holbrook. 
Fredrick. Arthur Jefferson. 
Malcolm Donald MacNab. 
Rollaxd Louis Parmeter. 
Walter Emmett Jackson. 

Charles Herbert Parrs. 
Claude Howard Searle. 
Ellsworth Daggett Whiting. 



'07 



'96 



William Duncan MacNary. 
Frank Gregory Connell. 
Charles Louis Hobbs. 
Ezra Read Larxed. 
Edward Burton MacDowell. 
William Hay MacLaix. 



Pliny Henry Perkins. 
Arthur Edgar Price. 
Frank Favill Bowman. 



69 




;o 



Undent ©rber of Hnanias 



©fficere 



Grand High Tapeworm, 
Chief Diaphoretic, 
Tax-Collec tor-si tting-at-the-gate, 
Accoucheur of the Papyrus, - 
Most Reverend Drool, 
Star of Peace, - 
Chaperon of the Harem, - 
Keeper of the Potential Virus, 
Keeper of the Holy Vessel, 
Chief Prevaricator, 
Sapphira, his wife, 
Royal Apiarist, 



¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ 

/IDembers Class of '95 



W. C. Clarke. 

E. W. Baum. 
T. Z. Ball. 
T. R. Welch. 

J. J. Fitzgerald. 
W. J. McGrath. 

F. D. HOLLENBECK. 

J. R. Wagner. 
J. C. Griffith. 
R. W. Craig. 
E. S. Hooper. 
A. C Norton. 



E. S. Allen. 
O. S. Ormsby. 

U. S. MULLINS. 



John Lang. 
W. H. Lewis. 
F. K. Burr. 



C A. Allenberger. 
D. M. Otis. 
T. G. Torpey. 



F. W. BULLEN. 

J. R. Bryant. 



¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ 

/IDembers Class of '96 

S. O. Duncan. 
* * * * 

Emeritus /IDembers 



L. J. Daniels. 
W. G. Law. 



O. B. Bock. 
F. J. Laibe. 

N. H. Thompson. 

E. WlNDMUELLER. 

J. A. Pendergast. 
A. F. Young. 



A. C. Cotton, M. D. 
J. H. Wilson, M. D. 



E. K. Morris. 
G. M. Stephens. 

F. W. Miller. 
W. K. Keith. 
B. S. Hunt. 

R. F. Watts. 

¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ 

Ibonorar? /IDembers 

E. Everson, M. D. 
J. L. Morris, M. D. 

F. Tice, M. D. 



C. D. Center. 
G. L. Chapman. 
C. Collins. 
J. H. Close. 
E. R. King. 
L. B. Russell. 



F. W. Jay, M. D. 
H. O. Bates, M. D. 
A. M. Coru'in, M. D. 



71 



Hncient ©roer of Bnanias 



THIS fraternity first made its appearance at Rush in the term of 
93 and 94- 
Its object is for the betterment of its members socially and 
scientifically, thus paving the way to future professional success. 
The work of the order proved so markedly beneficial to its members as 
students and afterward as practitioners, that it was considered a good thing to 
perpetuate, and so it has become one of the permanent organizations of the 
college. 

That all assertions are false until proven true, and that falsity is the bane 
of life, constitutes the working field of the association. Acting upon this 
principle socially, fraternally, scientifically and intellectually, its members have 
acquired methods of investigation and an independent individuality which 
should lead to the highest attainments in the science of medicine. 

Within the lodge-room of the A. O. A. scientific truths are unfolded, 
medical teachings subjected to the search-light of reason, pathological mani- 
festations interpreted and the phenomena of life judiciously considered. 

The sessions are characterized by instructive discourse, equity and recrea- 
tion: 

" Every moment alters what is done, 
And innovates some act till then unknown." 

Progression, independence, knowledge and truth are the cardinal virtues 



73 



of the organization. Among the qualifications required for membership in 
this fraternity are good moral character, common sense, two courses of lectures 
of eight months each, and the ability to think and act for yourself. 

The officers are twelve in number, and are elected according to their pro- 
ficiency in special branches of medicine as required in the performance of the 
duties of the different offices. 






74 



College fraternity flfcen in IRusb 



Ash, Jno. C, 
Ball, T. Z., 
Bowman, F. F., 
Beebe, Spencer D. 



Illinois VVesleyan University. 

Wabash College. 

University of Wisconsin. 

University of Wisconsin. 



Bettelheim, Bernard F., University of Wooster. 



Center, C. D., 
Coe, W. B., 
Crowder, J. R., 
Duncan, Samuel O., 
English, E. C, 
Freeman, J. D., 
Fullenwider, R. C, 
Hathway, E. P., 



Knox College. 

Buchtel College. 

Purdue University. 

Franklin College. 

Illinois Wesleyan University. 

University of Wisconsin. 

Wesleyan University. 

University of Michigan. 



Holbrook, Arthur T., University of Wisconsin. 



Hutchins, W. V., 
Jackson, Walter E., 
Kinyon, E. L., 
Parmeter, R. L., 
Peirson, Homer F., 
Price, Arthur E., 
Schreiter, J. B., 
Searle, C. H., 
Smith, Chauncy P., 



Wabash College. 
William Jewell College. 
Syracuse University. 
Albion College. 
University of Minnesota. 
Northwestern University. 
University of Wisconsin. 

Cornell University, 

Iowa State University. 

Templeton, C. A., Northwestern University, Dental Dept, Delta Sigma Delta 

Whiting, Ellsworth D., Yale University. Zeta Psi 

75 



Phi Delta Theta 

Phi Delta Theta 

Chi Psi 

Delta Upsilon 

Beta Theta Pi 

Beta Theta Pi 

Phi Delta Theta 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Phi Delta Theta 

Phi Delta Theta 

Chi Psi 

Phi Delta Theta 

Sigma Phi 

Chi Psi 

Phi Kappa Psi 

Phi Gamma Delta 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 

Delta Tau Delta 

Psi Upsilon 

Sigma Chi 

Sigma Chi 

Kappa Alpha 

Phi Delta Theta 




76 



m* 3K* 5£* mJ^m 5RWJB J^AjB 36 36 36 



Htbletic association 

of 

IRusb flfcebical Colleoe 



Founded December, 1894. 

* * * ¥ 



©fficers 



Pkof. Arthur Dean Bevan, M. D. 

J. R. Wagner, '95, 
Frank J. Gould, 

R. C. Fullenwider; '96, 



President 
Vice-President 
Permanent Treasurer 
Secretary 



Committees 
* * * * 



Class of '95 

1st Div. 2d Div. 3d Div. 

Doane Fitzgerald Moore 

Otis 



4th Div. 
Wagner 



Coe 



Class of '96 

Fullenwider Metzger 

Frost 



Wallace 



Bowman 



Class of '97 

Lesan Skinner 

Sager 



Randall 



1Rusb foot Ball XLcam 



Season of 1894 




Phillip P. S. Doane 
Manager 



P. D. Westnedge 


C. H. Searle 


Captain 


Coach 


McNary 


. . Left End 


FuLLENWIDER, 


Left Tackle 


Skinner, | 
Johnson, \ 


Left Guard 


Duncan, 


Center 


Smolt, 


. Right Guard 


Westnedge, 


Right Tackle 


Moore, ) 
Jackson, \ 


Right End 


Loomis, 


... . Quarter Back 


Libby, . 


Left Half Back 


Wagner, . 


. Right Half Back 


Sager, ) 
Jf.wett, \ 


Full Back 




* * * 




Substitutes 


Meloy .... Whitehill 


.... Coe .... Barrett .... Somers 



79 



1Rusb jfoot Ball ^eam 



Season of IS94 



¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ 



DATE OPPONENTS 

Sept. 22. West Division High School, 

Sept. 29. Prairie Club, Oak Park, 111., - 

Oct. 13. University of Chicago, 

Oct. 20. Chicago Athletic Association, - 

Oct. 27. Beloit College, at Beloit, Wis., . - 

Nov. 3. Lake Forest University, 

Nov. 22. Notre Dame University, at South Bend, lnd., 6 to 

Nov. 25. Iowa College, at Grinnell, Iowa, - - - 6 to 

Nov. 29. Monmouth College, at Monmouth, 111., - 18 to 



RUSH 




OPPONENTS 


4^ 


to 





12 


to 





6 


to 


16 


6 


to 


12 


12 


to 


22 


34 


to 


6 


6 


to 


6 



Total Points made by Rush, - 142 
Total Points made by Opponents, 96 




81 



1Rusb Base Ball XLcam 



Season 1894 



¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ 



Edward F. Schultz, 
Robert C. Fullenwider, 
Fred. Honnald, 



Captain 

Manager 

Scorer 



Seam 



Andrews, | 
Herrmann, \ 



McNary, 
Duncan, 

Andrews, 
Schultz, . 
Blake, 
Smith, 

Wallace, 
Beebe, 



. Pitchers 



Catcher 
First Base 
Second Base 
. Third Base 
Left Field 
Center Field 
Right Field 
Shortstop 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Frost 



Substitutes 
Richardson .... Sheldon .... Bryant 



Base Ball 



Season of 189-t 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE TEAM 

VERSUS 

March 24. Chicago Dental College, 

April 7. Northwestern University, 

April 12. Lake Forest University, 

April 14. Northwestern University, 

April 21. University' of Chicago, - 

April 28. University of Chicago, 

May 15. University of Wisconsin, 

Oct. 23. Chicago Dental College, - 

Oct. 27. Chicago Dental College, 



Rush won, 39 to 7 

lost, 6 to 9 

" won, 17 to I 

" won, 4 to I 

lost, 11 to 14 

won, 16 to 1 

lost, 18 to 22 

" won, 4 to 2 

won, 7 to 4 



Total Number of Runs by Rush, - 122 
Total Number of Runs by Opponents 61 




86 



1Rusb Bicycle Club 



©fficers. 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 
Bugler 

Color Bearer 



T. F. Butzow 
F. F. Bowman 
B. D. Black 
C. H. Searle 
L. C. Weeks 



Sec. and Treas., F. S. Crocker 



flDembers. 



Dr. L. C. Weeks 
G. W. Shirk 
M. Lyon 
R. G. Scott 
P. P. French 
G. W. Nott 
C. N. Proctor 

B. D. Black 
T. F. Butzow 

E. Greenebaum 

F. S. Crocker 
J. R. Crowder 
W. L. Kreidler 
F. L. Strauss 
A. M. Dwight 

C. H. Searle 
L. W. Burtch 
C. H. Parks 
C. D. Stone 

S. W. Matthei 



H. B. Bartholomew 
H. B. Hogeboom 
W. C. Rucker 
F. F. Bowman 
W. D. Brode 
Fred Barrett 
J. D. McKelvev 
M. A. Austin 
H. O. Caswell 

F. E. Bigelow 
Dr. D. D. Bishop 

G. F. Berger 

Miss E. M. McIsaac 

J. C. CULBERTSON 

M. M. Loomis 
P. H. Perkins 
G. H. Page 
S. O. Duncan 
J. C. Griffith 
F. E. Wallace 



87 






Donors, 
Etc. 



dooh Count? duis Class 



* * ¥ ¥ ¥ 



A. E. Bertling 
W. D. Calvin 
R. W. Craig 
S. E. Donlon 
P. A. Fox 
F. R. Frazier 

A. T. HOLBROOK 

E. S. Harper 
H. S. Judd 

F. W. Kettelstrings 
O. S. Ormsby 

F. I. Packard 
H. Raasach 
W. S. Ryan 
W. D. Sheldon 
A. M. Sherman 
C. P. Smith 
S. L. Smith 
W. VV. Spargo 
C. M. Swale 
A. A. Sweet 
E. W. Zook 



89 




go 



Zbe Benjamin IRnsb flDebal 



¥¥¥¥¥¥ 



A gold medal of the value of fifty dollars is given by the Faculty at 
each Commencement to that member of the graduating class, taking no 
other prize, who passes the highest examination in every department of 
medicine represented that year in the examination for the degree, and since 
its institution has been awarded to : 



IS92 

Dr. A. F. Sippy 

IS93 

Dr. Fdward H. Tinen 

1894 

Dr. Lawrence Ryan 

and a duplicate to 

Dr. William J. Butler 



91 



TLbe Daniel Btatnarb flfcebal 






A gold medal is annually given by the Faculty to that student, taking 
no other prize, who shall make and present to the College Museum the 
best accepted dissection in Surgical Anatomy, and has been awarded to: 



IS93 

Dr. Otto B. Bock 

1894 

Dr. Frank Byrnes 



93 




94 



3. m ffveet- flfcebal 




HE FREER prizes were founded in the year 1894 by the generosity 
of Mr. Nathan M. Freer, of the Board of Trustees of the Col- 
lege, as a memorial of the late Dr. J. W. Freer, once a member 
of the Faculty, and of Mr. L. C. P. Freer, who was for a long 
period of his life a member of the Board of Trustees. 

The prizes are secured by the income from two thousand dollars, 
and are offered each year to the senior and junior classes of the 
College respectively. The first prize in the Senior class is a medal of the 
value of thirty dollars, with a finely executed head of Dr. J. W. Freer on 
the obverse. The inscription on the reverse reads: " Ob animum studiis rei 
medicce exercendis deditissimum," with a space in the centre for the name of 
the recipient. The second prize is twenty dollars in money. The subjects 
for competition are .annually announced soon after the close of the Christmas 
holidays, and are not connected with the subjects on which the class is 
examined for graduation. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

The Recipients of these Prizes have been: 

1894 

C. D. Center — First Prize 
A. F. Stewart — Second Prize 



1895 

A. T. Holbrook — First Prize 
S. Zeltner — Second Prize 



95 




9 6 



XTbe X, <L IP. freer /Iftebal 






HE first prize for the Junior Class is a medal of the value of 
thirty dollars, with the head of Mr. L. C. P. Freer on the 
obverse, the inscription and arrangement of the reverse being 
the same as that of the first prize offered the Senior class. 
The second of the Junior prizes is twenty dollars given in money, 
j fe j yg The subjects of the Freer prizes are offered in successive 

L^j- , ] "jjj years by the several chairs represented in the Faculty, and in 
the order of the seniority of these chairs, and on subjects taught by each 
Professor. The Senior prizes are offered and awarded by Professors lectur- 
ing before that class, and on subjects taught by them, and the Junior prizes 
in course by the several Professors engaged in the instruction of that class. 



¥ ¥ ¥ 

The Recipients of these Prizes have been: 

1894 

T. R. Welch — First Prize 

K. B. Bartholomew — Second Prize 

1895 

To be announced 



97 



Ibospital appointments 

1895 



JPresb^terian 

A. T. HOLBROOK 

O. S. Ormsby 

H. S. JuDD 

P. P. S. DOANE 



Cooft Counts 

R. W. Craig 

S. E. Donlon 

W. De W. Sheldon 

E. S. Hooper 
C P. Smith 
W. W. Spargo 
H. R. Hammond 

St. 3Lufce 

F. D. HOLLENBECK 

St. Sosepb 

Joseph George 

St. EIf3abetb 

A. F. Kramps 
A. Thometz 

IRorwegfan 

N. C. Meling 



98 



Hwarb of pulse fl>ri3es 



fl>oeme 

The First Prize of " McClelland's Regional Anatomy," in two^volumes, 

was awarded to " Her Majesty," by 

Arthur Tenney Holbrook, '95. 

The Second Prize of " set of Pulse Clinic Photographs," 

was awarded to " How to Make a Pulse," by 

Walter Colby Rucker, '97. 

The Third Prize of "Two Copies of The Pulse," 

was awarded to "Anatomy in Rhyme," by 

George L. McDermott, '96. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Ibumorous Sfcetcb 

The Prize of " Pocket Case and Instruments," 

was awarded to "The Regular School vs. Homoeopathy," by 

Arthur Tenney Holbrook, '95. 

* ¥ ¥ 

©riginal illustration 

The Prize of "set of Pulse Clinic Photographs," 
was awarded to 
C. H. Beyer, '95. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

IRoast, 3orc or (Brine 

The Prize of "set of Pulse Clinic Photographs," 

was awarded to "The House that Jack Built," by 

Arthur Tenney Holbrook, '95. 

99 



.A <&? K 




¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥•9;$ cai^^X *J*¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 
¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 



Ubc 



4* 



XLcvm 
of 
'94 
ano 

'95 









Is't: . .«V.^ ft ;* 









^#» | 






flt>f* f 



Class of '95 

¥¥¥¥¥¥ 
ffl>OttO 

Qui Non Proficit, Deficit 



©fficers 



Fred. Drury Hollenbeck, 

Thos. Raymond Welch, 
Alva C. Norton, 
William Clarence Clarke, 
Horatio Nelson Boshell, 
Joseph Ralph Wagner, 
Robert Wallace Craig, . 
Warren D. Calvin, 
Frederick A. Jefferson, . 
Robert C. Robe, 
Thos. I. Packard, 
Frank Huizenga, 
Harley A. Zinser, 



President 

ist Vice-President 

2d Vice-President 

Rec. Secretary 

Cor. Secretary 

Treasurer 

Valedictorian 

Historian 

Poet 

Chaplain 

Essayist 

Chorister 

Sergeant-at-Arms 



Executive Committee 

William J. McGrath, 

John Lang 
Daniel M. Orris 
David Meiklejohn 
Oliver S. Ormsby 



Chairman 




»f* *t* »b 



Ibistoi^ 




HAT HISTORY repeats itself is very liable to be verified 
when three histories of the Class of '95 are called for within 
fourteen months. 

But the "Pulse Board" say that they must have something 
from us or they will write us up themselves, and you know that 
it would not be well to allow ourselves to be written up by such 
partial individuals. 

The innovations made by our class during the first two years have 
l_) already been chronicled in a previous history. The innovation of greatest 
2 magnitude was the publishing of the Pulse, volume one, which has since 
been voted a success by Faculty, students and alumni. 

The road was new and untrodden, and while our Board labored 
earnestly and put out a book which was a measure to their ability, cir- 
cumstances considered, still we shall take pleasure in congratulating the 
present Board upon presenting a still better volume, which we believe 
they will do. 

The remainder of the last year passed very rapidly and pleasantly. 
The thirteen examinations at the end of the term seemed like a Pike's 
Peak while approaching them, but as we drew nearer they dwindled down 
and most of the class passed over them safely; some, however, were the 
victims of the unlucky thirteen, and have sought easier fields of conquest, 
where "snap" examinations predominate. 

Finally, it came to pass that after having toiled two long years in the 
realm of established facts and present theories, and having reviewed the 
remains of many exploded theories, we were permitted to enter the field 
of application — "special courses." Our ranks have not thinned, but instead 



104 



have become more thronged, students from other institutions having come 
to join us and enjoy Rush's superior clinics, and secure a diploma from 
a school of honor. 

As a class we have given up rushing in the halls, shouting, "scrapping" 
and indulging in any of the unnecessary "boistrosities." We have been 
informed that such things have a bad influence upon patients, and then 
when we behold and hear the under-classmen, we see as we were seen 
and can scarcely realize that we were ever so rude. We rejoice that the 
change has come. 

Still, when war is inevitable, we can send to the front a goodly number 
of volunteers who are willing to sacrifice their own garments, or the lives 
of their opponents, for the sake of maintaining a principle. Speaking of 
exploded theories and war, recalls to mind the day when the Class of '96 
attempted to sit in the front row, believing themselves to be the equal of 
their elders. Of course it was but a theory, it exploded and went up, as 
did they to "the perch," where they have since peaceably remained. They 
are to be congratulated, however, upon learning a lesson so quickly, and we 
trust they will find in the Class of '97 as apt pupils as they themselves 
have been. 

We have a first grade Cook County class, and we expect to see them 
obtain a goodly number of the available positions. 

Our class election elicited some interest. Sweet, the Populist, made 
an historic speech, in which he attempted to show the folly of partisan- 
ship and precinct caucusing, but his sentiments were not heeded by the 
overwhelming opposition, and he sank "truth-crushed-to-earth" like. Not- 
withstanding the fact that the class were informed by Arthur Tenney, just 
preceding the election for valedictorian, that H-o-l-b-r-o-o-k spelled Hol- 
brook, the vote spelled C-R-A-I-G in upper-case letters. Craig coming 
from Kansas, ( the state that has produced a Mrs. Lease, a St. John, Simp- 
son and Peffer), could but be a star politician. 

Members of '95 have assisted in winning athletic fame for Rush on 
the diamond and the gridiron; others have assisted in a very creditable 
way in making the students' concerts a decided success. The principal 
innovation of this year is the adoption of Cap and Gown, a move in the 
right direction, and one in which the class were almost a unit. Ours will 
be the largest class ever graduated from Rush, and the time is near at 
hand when our pleasant associations here must practically be ended; still 
it will always be a pleasure, by the aid of memory, to re-live the days 
spent at "good old Rush." 

I05 



Class of '96 



4* 



©fficere 



S. A. Edmonds, 
S. D. Beebe, 

H. W. CULBERTSON, 

F. A. Guthrie, 
C. L. Hobbs, 
F. N. Brett, 
W, F. Brode, 
F. G. Conneix, 
M. D. Bates, 



President 
First Vice-President 
Second Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer 
Chaplain 
Historian 
Sergeant-at-Arms 



107 



Class of '96 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Ibistor^ 




■ ! f\^] is- \ fE, the Class of '96, have passed 

?'+-''" .;.v.-v-. -^^,- \/\/ over half of that long and nar- 

^^^^ VV b 

i „$'' row pathway leading to the much 

a 1 " 

t . ' I sought for degree of " M. D." This is 

*....'.V.tV.'.',.V. a mere statement of a fact, and it re- 

^ ._.^_ , A ,,„,„,„ nn"" V mains the duty of the historian to tell 

sl=i<i=s£i£§i§^ "(!£| ■!i^^ J "'^ if °f ^' ie manner in which it has been done. 

Now, if this were an ordinary class, 
it would be a comparatively easy mat- 
ter; but to relate the many victories, advancements and the results attained 
by the present " Middle Class" would require volumes, so, therefore, only a 
few of the notable events of our existence thus far will be recounted. 

Before the advent of the Class of '96, athletics at Rush were never a 
success; but in the Spring of 1894 they were given a great boom by the 
so-called " D. J.'s," who, with the aid of one or two upper class men, 
organized a base ball team that met with such great success that we need 
say no more of it. 

That this seed took root was plainly shown in the following Fall, when 
a foot ball team of no mean ability was put in the field, upon which we 
were very well represented. Then came in the natural order of sequence 
the organization of a College Athletic Association, comprising both Faculty, 
alumni and students. 

We would not have you think, however, that the bringing of athletic 
sports to the front was our only virtue. No, no. In the free dispensary 
clinics, where the true and earnest student is to be found every afternoon, 
there we were also, and in a remarkably short space of time our few 
shining lights, such as Hemingway, Weisskopf and Donahue, soon gained 

108 



positions of trust and honor as assistants in the various branches in which 
they shall some day set the medical world on fire. 

After the vacation we again assembled in the upper lecture room, as 
we had done once before; but, alas! we were greatly changed. We had 
received a new name: collectively, the " Middle Class;" each separately and 
distinct individual, a " Middler." As to the true significance of that word, 
only a " D. J." can tell. Many were missing, never to return, having gone 
to other institutions of knowledge, or perhaps had ceased the study of 
medicine entirely, for reasons best known to themselves. These places, 
however, were nearly all filled by new members from neighboring colleges, 
and our most worthy Senior class was quite generous in helping us replete 
our numbers. 

Then, too, when taken as a whole, we were different in other ways. The 
"freshness" and "greenness," which was such a prominent feature in our 
make-up a year previous, was now conspicuous for its absence, (even " Tillie " 
Schramm was quiet, at least quieter). Possibly our change in this may be 
accounted for by the fact that, when contrasted with the same properties of 
the present Freshman class, we had faded into insignificance. 

We here diverge to mention the attack of diabetes mellitus with which 
Green suffered during his laboratory work in urinalysis. Though severe 
while it lasted, we rejoice in saying that its duration was short and his 
recovery soon complete. 

Now appears an epoch in the history of the class and college. Through 
the energies of Mr. J. B. Schreiter, the adoption of a college button, such as 
a student of Rush need not be ashamed to wear when among other college 
men; and the issuing by Mr. F. C. Honnold of a college directory, which 
fills a long-felt want in the every-day life of the student body. 

We have had our quota of " pushes and scraps" with both the gay and 
frivolous freshmen, and the sedate (?) and dignified (?) seniors, and (as is 
customary with every class) claim as many victories; none, however, so 
signal as that memorable one upstairs, in which the seniors found it necessary 
to seek a Faculty dispensation before they could safely and peaceably occupy 
the front rows and eye the "leather manikin." 

Possibly it would be more in place to speak of whisker-growing in 
connection with seniors; but as some of us seem to have taken work in that 

109 



course this year, and as " whiskers, perhaps, even more than knowledge are 
essential to the young doctor," we deem it no more than right to at least 
mention the work done by some of our members. Wilson carries off all 
honors by being the proud and only (much to the credit of the class) pos- 
sessor of a " billy " goatee. Richardson is doing nicely, having passed from 
mustache to side whiskers (two styles), and is now cultivating a full beard. 
We wish him success. Dudley's mustache, minute, fuzzy and microscopic, 
is just about the same. We admire his patience. "Ex-Prexy" Eckard 
seems to have flunked, and has had them cut off (much to the relief of 
everyone). 

In our class can be found all kinds, as to nationalities, colors, peculiar- 
ities, etc., etc., (sex omitted); showing such striking comparisons as Convery 
and Dvorak; Jacque and Yonan; H. S. Smith and A. L. Smith; Daniels 
and Hutchins; Dyas and Davidson; and Eddleman, who is a staunch prohibi- 
tionist, and is therefore opposed to all forms of levity, having once heard 
that laughter was intoxicating, and Bading, who is— well, who is not a 
prohibitionist. 

This might be carried on indefinitely, and then we would tell no more 
than half of this great and glorious " Class of '96." 

If this seems short, bear in mind that the Pulse of 1895, as issued 
by us this year, will stand, if not as a history, as a monument to us for 
years and years to come. 

" Praise from a friend, or censure from a foe, 
Are lost on hearers that our merits know." 










M 






' 


' 


linP^WL^H MtLtwuS Iv,j9 


^mv r a '^I^H ' 


s 


t i% .,v>-«i*,,- > ^v f v- .. , |4 ..; 


• 1 - 


" IJbIk 










» 


R 




V J ^ 


1 


*«U. '> *„* <*>• ^jE 

j|M Ipf . «-vtt> ■•' .. U^ ; #'■■■■■ % 








j% m ; ' 


i -• ' J 






-, 


if ^ 

1 1 

i ■ 




' A 1 






t 






■ \ 








Class of '97 



4* 



©fficevs 



James E. Luckey, 

Frederick E. Bigelow, 
Giles S. Hall, . 
John Martin, . 

Ellsworth D. Whiting, 
Frank F. Bowman, 
Edmund F. Burton, 
Edward Johnson, 
George W. Shirk, 



President 
Vice-Pres. Section A 
Vice-Pres. Section B 
. Vice-Pres. Section C 
Vice-Pres. Section D 
. Sec'y and Treas. 
Rec. Secretary 
Historian 
. Chorister 



Class Distort of '91 



TO one who was present at the first assemblage of the class, and 
who has since occupied his seat as a member thereof, the recol- 
lection of our first meeting must needs provoke a smile — yes, a 
smile of wild chaotic glee. That first meeting portended not at 
all of what we were to be. It was with solemn step and sober mien we 
entered the lecture room on that eventful day, and dropping into the first 
seat which offered itself awaited, Micawber-like, for "something to turn up." 
An unwonted solemnity pervaded the room — a solemnity broken only by 
the swing of the door, followed by the craning of many necks to inspect 
the new arrival. With the advent of the Professor, a still more oppressive 
silence reigned. How we hung on his every word ! — hung as we never hope 
to hang again. We fain would have taken notes on the part of his hair or 
the cut of his whiskerettes, so great our thirst for medic lore. But now, alas! 
how changed. 

For some time we were at a loss to know whom w : e were. Some said 
we were Juniors; others said we were Freshmen; others, and the great 
majority, called us " D. J's," if you know what that means. But we did not 
worry long as to our identity, call us what you like. What matters a 
name ? Certain it is, Rush would not survive many seasons without her 
"D. J." class. Behold in us the fountain head, the sine qua ?ion. Handle us 
gingerly, Mr. Faculty. This side up with care. 



114 



Days and weeks rolled round, our verdancy vanished with that of the 
autumn leaves; our first man had been "passed" to the Perch amid dia- 
bolical shrieks, and we soon, like Alexander, wept for new and foreign 
worlds to conquer. There seemed a superfluity of animal spirits awaiting 
but the occasion to vent its furor. The occasion came at last. The Mid- 
dlers, gloating in the realization that they were no longer " D. J's," sauntered 
one day into our lecture, where, seated high upon the Perch, they settled 
themselves to beguile the time. But the time needed no beguiling; a whisper, 
a perceptible commotion, a rush, a scramble, exit Middlers P. D. O. It 
has not been our fortune to thus form the acquaintance of the pedantic 
Seniors, but "while there's life there's hope." 

But as to the constituency of '97 — a superb mosaic indeed. There are 
long men and short men, heavy men and feather-weights; men with whiskers, 
men with none, (not their fault, they try hard enough); men with mus- 
taches and men with countenances unsullied by such appendages; men of luxu- 
riant epicranial growths, and those with bald and barren pates (causes ob- 
scure, to say the least); married men and those in single blessedness. 
Yes — when will wonders end ? — we have a real live " Fcetus." 

Our class has entered into all the departments of life at Rush with a 
pleasing zeal and vim. The gridiron has already bespoken the quality of 
our men, the strongest and sturdiest of this year's team. Soon after the 
opening of the session a class organization was perfected. The major part 
of the year has been spent in acquainting ourselves with each other, in 
learning ourselves individually and collectively. Some have shown marked 
ability as class leaders, others again as business men; some have arisen 
pre-eminent as students, others as drones. " Pickun no fightun ! " behold 
herein the essence of our religion; we would live in peace with all men; 
but woe betide the Middler's Hyperion locks or the Senior's polished tile, 
if this truce be not honored; it were better for them that said locks had 
been cropped in infancy and that said tile had perished in embryo. 

The history of the Freshman class is brief, but no briefer indeed than 
its life. No sooner had we congregated than the annals and archives of 
years gone by shook their dust-begrimed and time-worn parchments, and 

115 



shoved along to make room for '97. Then and there our History began. 
Tell us, O Muse, when and where shall it end ? The History of this year 
must be prophetic. What we achieve, what we accomplish, is but a prophecy 
of what we shall achieve and shall accomplish hereafter. We are truly 
grateful to Old Rush for the superior advantages we enjoy and are to 
enjoy. We hope to demonstrate to her that such increased facilities tend 
but to extend her fame and augment her influence. 




116 




Hbe jfresbmen 



Block — "Rich on poker chips." 

Becker — "The hairs of thy head are all numbered." 

Drozidowitz — "A pronounced prodigy with an unpronounceable name." 

Battermax 1 " I do declare that red is the most beautiful color in all the 

Alderson ) world." 

Auxer — "Oh, Hell! What have we here?" 

Bielmeyer — "Huge, wallowing, unwieldy in his gait" (and withal a smil- 
ing Papa). 

Adams — "But what is this? What thing of sea or land?" 

Banks — "Be wise with speed; a fool at forty is a fool indeed." 

Daidge, (reciting) — "The shoulder has adduction, abduction and deduction!' 

Bowman — "A singer of feline sweetness." 

Barrett — "I am not shaped for sportive tricks." 

Donaldson — "Lean he was as is a rake: 

He was not right fat, I undertake." 

Curry — "His ears laugh as his mouth goes by." 

Biglowe — "The seals of office glitter in his eyes." 

Derwent, (reciting) — "The upper extremity is the head." 

Demaree — "Each individual hair did stand on end like the quills of a 
fretful porcupine." 

Burton — "Beauty and brains go not together." 

117 



Clayton — "Go ask of nature what you are and what she meant to make 
you." 

Bowe — "Thy guessing brings thee naught" (0). 

Brugge — "He's merry like a cock as thinks the sun arose a purpose to 
hear him crow." 

Brown — "Happy as a cannibal am I, or as five thousand swine." 

Hunt — "So sweet and voluble in his discourse." 

Fisher — "His golden curls were hanging down his neck." 

Greenie — "He squanders his time in riotous (?) living." 

Gordon — "Of fools the world has such a store, 
That he who would not see an ass, 
Must bide at home and bolt his door, 
And break his looking-glass." 

Longbrake — "Who plucked the feathers of this rare bird?" 

Kreuzer — "Large foot-prints on the sands of time will I leave." 

Findley — "But i' faith, I should have been a woman by right." 

Luckey — "Say, fellows, let me tell you a story." 

Hughes — " For who is he whose face is but enriched with one appearing 
hair." 

Losey — "Now let's to billiards." 

Girard — "He will lie, sir, with such volubility that you would think Truth 
were a fool." 

Hall — " Bashfulness is an ornament to youth." 
Ellis — Wanted — Another case of Budweiser. 
Grove — "Rich on poker chips." 

Habhegger ) 

I — "What's in a name?" 

HOGEBOON ) 

Lesau — "Heard from Paw. The red heifer has got a calf and 'taters 
turned aout purty well." 

"It is said that "Castor Oil" Hill never 'works'." 

Klein is hunting for an Anticus Posticus ligament of the knee joint. 

Price — Ah, his love for a second-hand smoke. 

J. Martin — An orator indeed. 

Meloy — That pretty curly hair. 

nS 



J. Mann — Didn't you know he was married? 

Reinhart — Has no need of a bald-headed wig. 

Phillips — We know you can yell. 

Pickett — So you would like a mustache. 

Perkins — Whiskers, call them that if you want to. 

Meacham — The Duke de la Racine. 

Manning — Authority on anatomy. 

Porterfield — Knows a lot, but can't think of it. 

McDermott — Traded his whiskers for specs. 

Reese — "Just exactly" in it. 

McKee — Has a "nipple." 

Dr. S. — Where is the distinguishing line between arteries and capillaries? 
Nickleson — Where the arteries leave off and the capillaries begin. 



Did you describe "Korysmis?" wise Matthei asked 

With the look of a genuine nibs; 
But then recollect he has broken his neck 

Just "between the third and fourth ribs." 



On the perch they love to sit, 
Smoking pipe and cigarette; 
But in the first and foremost rov 
When we shoot our class photo. 




119 




■Qlsc ever? man after bis Desert, 
HnD who shall 'seape a grtnDing V* 



Sbaftespeate. 



Bribes 



Offered to Pulse Editors, with a view to Obtaining Immunity from 
the Attacks of the Roasting Editor. 

Cruse — Ten of Fred. Wolf's poql checks. 

McLain — Gets roasted every day, and being hardened, don't care. 

¥ 
Lewis — Don't roast the '94 Pulse and I'll tell you how much we made out of it. 



Honnold — One yard of college ribbon, two of last year's score-cards, and 
ten students' directories. 



Libbv — Don't say anything about my legs in the football photo and I'll buy 
three copies of the Pulse. 



Jackson — I don't care what else you say, if you don't mention my fine head 
of hair. 



MacNab — I know a peach of a joke on "tin-horn Holly;" you can have it if 
you'll let me alone. 



3>ictionan> 



PONY 00 

Po-ny. A beast of burden used by 
students when traveling in unex- 
plored lands. 

Flunk. The process of changing from 
a three to a four year course. 

Pro-sect-or. A student whose busi- 
ness it is to cut off nerves after the 
Prof, has dissected them. 

Ass=ist=ant Dem-on-stra-tor. An ass 

who tells you the inferior mesenteric 
is the spermatic. 

Hos=pi-tal=i=ty. Passing up D. J.'s 
when they get into front seats. 

Supe. Mop carrier — "Mister Bates." 

Sen=ior. A man who rides a pony in 
the race for a sheepskin. 

Jun-ior. A man who knows it all, 
and desires to teach the Faculty. 



PASSING UP 

Four-Year=Man. One who can't get 
through in three. 

Val-e=dic=to-ri=an. A wind instru- 
ment belonging to the graduating 
class. 

Quiz. An instrument of torture which 
young doctors delight in using on 
their betters. 

Buck. To gorge the mind after a long 
period of fasting. 

Fac=ul=ty. A troublesome clique who 
interfere with students' enterprises. 

Touch=down. That which happens 
when MacNab strokes his upper lip. 

Haz-ing. Exchange of politeness be- 
tween classes. 

Soph=o-more. A wise man ; one of 
nature's noblemen. 

Pass-ing up. A technical term fre- 
quently used in college. 



ITnterestinG Hnnouncemente tbat 

bave Hppeareb buring 

the li)eav 

Diapedesis: The corpuscle is out. 



Kewanee Moore leads the Y. M. C. A. this 
evening. Miss Kate Crowly will sing. Every- 
body come. 

Lady in hall wishes to see Mr. Heise. Pay 
her what you owe her, Heise. You can't ex- 
pect her to wash those socks of yours for 
nothing. 

Prof. Bevan: You are requested to call at 
my office at 9 p. m. this evening, and state rea- 
son why your name appears on my list. 

Henry M. Lyman. 

Caddy of "Old Crow" and box of stogies in 
office for G. W. Smith. Sent c. o. d. 



H. A. Berry: Dear Pete — Please call as 
soon as possible. Don't forget the number. 

Babe Marie. 

All going home by Foote & Walker's express. 
Please hand names to Diabetes Green for re- 
duced rates on shoes. 

A. Krause will be "at home" to his friends at 
his residence, cor. Wood and Harrison, on New 
Year's eve. Pretzels and beer served at six. 

Lost, strayed, or stolen — My pony on dental 
pathology. Will set 'em up, and ask no ques- 
tions, if returned before examination. 

Jack Rhoden. 



Class Hrms 




jFreebmen 



The arms denote the well known wise 
looks with the real ability. 

Crest: That which a Freshman looks 
like. 

The motto refers to the typical Fresh- 
man's manner. 



Sophomore 

Arms: Quarterly, 1st and 4th, a well 
developed brain; 2d and 3d, a large 
book of learning, denoting the acknowl- 
edged possessions of all Sophomores. 

Crest: Scroll, bearing "260" on its 
face, in recognition of the number of 
men in the class. 

Motto: Denoting the well known 
gentle manner of the Rush Sophs. 




124 



Class Hrms 




Juniors 



Crest, Arms and Motto are all said 
to refer to the presence (?) of this 
class of students in Rush. 



Seniors 



Arms: The quarters depict about all 
a Senior has after graduation, except a 
headache. 

Crest: Seniors all have cards. 

Motto: Denoting what a Senior first 
thinks of. 




I2 5 



Analysis of F. Wolf's Mountain Dew : 

Water . 

Chloride of Lime 
Oil of Mustard . 
Hydro-Sulphuric Acid 
Fats (Sperm Oil, etc.) 
Alcohol 
Impurities 



¥ ¥ ¥ 

The Ward MacAllister of College — "P" Fox. 

" Now, Mr. Doane, we will suppose that you 
have a young woman in charge." We cannot 
understand why an instructor should make any 
suppositions when facts are so evident. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 



Chicago, III. 
Dear "Conny" — Please meet me at the 
flower stand; will wear a white sailor hat and 
brown cape. 

Yours affectionately, 

Gladys K. 

Dr. B. — "Mr. McNary." 

From perch — " Foot ball player, Professor." 

Dr. B. — " All right, we will mark him F. B." 



* * ¥ 



It has been suggested that Porter draw a red 
chalk mark to indicate line of parting his hair. 

"The Heavenly Twins" — Kitson and Slusser. 

Brown, '96, is so popular with the ladies that 
they cannot wait for him to eat his meals, but 
call for him early. Dyspepsia will get you, 
Willie. 

126 



Mr. Lyon has been trying hard, for some time, to raise a mustache, but with 
doubtful success. His lady friends have long since advised him to amputate 
it; but, with a determination worthy of a better cause, he announces that it 
will have to " fight it out on this Lyon (line) if it takes all summer." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Non paratus Larned dixit. 
As he sat with a doleful look. 
All right, Patton respondit 
Et nihil scripsit in his book. 

Prof. Salisbury — Describe the stage of in- 
vasion in measles? 

Kanaga — Doctor, I never had the measles. 
Prof. S — I am very sorry indeed. 



* * * 



A certain division were recently advised, 
" Puncture the uvula and let the oedema flow 
out." 

Quiz M. — " Mr. Ochsner, what passes 
through the stomata?" 

Ochsner — Why, the white leucocytes. 



* ¥ ¥ 



One of our favorite professors was recently 
accosted in the following manner by a D. J.: 

"What is our lesson in anatomy?" 

Prof. — " I do not know, I am sorry to say." 

Student — "Aren't you in my division?" 



127 



Y\0\3$£ 



B\Jlk' 






--x« 



[ p j \\lj \j tli e in e dic vifck f jo wittf lock; 
VHo alv^y; ; 2>t in, tli e orc^ e ;tr<- bo* 
In tk e k,ouj e H»t li^ck built. 



*V 



Nod; 




L»ft 




>• >-r 9 Ll( e (\ow°rj [' ono e dii oi/y 
na o>v e to 4-n ufk e r "H tt| e ;)y, 
Jfli; tfl e dic wit« tk e Cry ; ».ntl\ e uM lock? 

wl\o alwi-y^ /at up front irt a box 
111 tk e l\ov} e til at lAck built. 

; tli e not e tk. e tWic «.l;o f e R t 
» tt\ a. tip th a.t int\oc e ntly \^ e ftt 
To tk. e u;l\ e r vl\0 ^itlk e d tli e ot n e r e y e 
And took tl\ e f\ov*r) b\*.t k*d v e ll rtiok 
Brok e n tlt e m e dic ^itk luz'/ lock) 
Vko Cn.oj e tk e front clidir of a box 
In t<k e kou/ e tkat Jack built. 



s xpr*;;ion of /pj d e licrh.t/ 
At tk e mud who daitc e d in pink ;ilk fci^n,fci 
To wlloin tk e r°}'f and l\ot e v e r e ;e^t 
for wlt'ck. porpo> e ^ow e fifty c e nt; */ e r e ;p e i\t 
On tll e u;k, e r in fcll e li°P e ; Hit n e could r e ly 
Oil ki; bakin o tli e flo%> e r; k e kad to buy 

Ihi; qf ir\ai\ w/itk >x/on,d e rfo/l I ock^ 
Vno bl e w kim; e lf for an. orck. e /tra box 

In tli e k.ou; e tljat Jack built. 



id Ui 



117 i; vka-t th e m e di'c cjofc 
A t«rn'Li e roa/t /or 70 nic e a plot 
And aft e r In/ clappi'Tip ^itn. ?uc)\ d e !ipi|t 
At tJ|« baH-oir! tliat c5aUrcUy v?\\t 
for ^ko; e ro; e ; n e Ui ?p e nt 
four plorik^ to ;ay nau£n,t of t\\ e tip tk>t 
To fclje u;(^e r K//|0 */mk e d hi^ furtk e r e y e 
A h tcok tk e fifty T4 tk e r ;ly. 
from tk e /Ud* n t witk tk e foot tall lock) 
yko -hov ivoid; t/( at orck e ;tra bos JL.i' 

In feJi« U?- M J*ck U.ft. * 

See page 99. 



vni 



>1 



Dr. Kauffman — "Mr. Price, what does the 
prefix " Hydro" mean when applied to an acid ?" 

Price, '97, (glibly) — " It means the acid con- 
tains Hydrogen." 

¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Graham, (in clinic) — "I presume the class 
will be interested to know that the man on 
whom the hysterectomy was done two weeks 
ago died from the shock." 

(There was no doubt of the class's interest in the 
announcement.) 



¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 



H Colleoe XTraaeb^ 



Again they charged the solid front of the enemy and again were re- 
pulsed; but amidst the struggling mass of bleeding humanity was one whose 
fighting days were o'er. His life blood was ebbing fast. The dying hero 
faltered; he took his comrade's hand and said, "Tell that dirty coward at 
left guard that I can lick the " but Fullenwider had croaked. 




129 




$ \t^s 5<tf"v\\ ^twcji ^ \56\>o caw jW 



130 



Dr. Etheridge, ( reading note from some 
senior) — "Well, well ! who could have written 
this, 'Does the seniors have to take obstet- 
rics?' They does ! .'" 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Brown — "Mr. Baum, what are the six 
principal methods of physical examination?" 

Baum, (glibly) — "Inspection, palpitation, 
auscultation, precussion, menstruation ! ! " 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Senn — "Well, what does McBurney's 
point mean? " 

Harding, '95 — " Appendicitis !! " 



* ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Jay — "As this is a new class, I will ask 
some gentleman to state how your names run, 
so that I may put them in my book." 

Senior — " From O to Zip ! ! " 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Senn — "What is this condition called? 
Heinan, '95 — " Crypity orchidism !" 



H (Scot) ^Diagnosis 




Doctor — Well, T young man, you look completely used up. You look as 
though you had been having a time with the boys last night. 

Smith — I was. Mv wife had twins last night. 



Stranger — "Why, I didn't know Herbert 
Kelsey had left the stage for the medical pro- 
fession." 

Student — "That is Dr. Stehman, not Kelsey." 

Dr. Patton — "Mr. B., how much tartar 
emetic is there in Spr. Squill cp. ? " 

Banks — " I don't pretend to be an authority 
on that." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Hall — " Mr. Stone, where is the fora- 
men ovale situated ?" 

Stone, '96 or '97 — " Between the cardiac mur- 
murs !! " 

Dr. La Count — "Mr. Weiskopf, how large 
is a bacillus typhosis?" 

Weiskopf — "About the size of the end of 
my thumb !!" 



* * ¥ 



Local aspirant for Pulse honors — "Mr. 
Larned, can you use any blank verse in the 
Pulse this year?" 

Larned — "No, we don't want any of your 
verse !" 



L33 



/IfceiMcal ZTerms Illustrate*) 




'VIS-A-TERGO. 




"BUCKING HARD AT HIS ANATOMY." 
134 



/Iftebical TIerms Ifllustrateb 




"A TRAINED NUKSE. 




'LOCUS MINOKIS RESISTEXTI.E. 



135 



Dr. Moyek — "What would be your treat- 
ment for erysipelas?" 

Brode — "I would look after the health of 
the patient." 

Dr. Peirce — " On what position of the brain 
does the inferior longitudinal sinus lie?" 
Convery — "The corpus spongeosum." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Eads — "Describe the circle of Willis, 
Mr. Tope." 

Tope — "Why — er — I had that in my head 
last night, Doctor, but it has slipped out some- 
how." 

Quiz-Master — "What is a cystencephalus? " 
De Jay — " A monster with a cystic brain." 
Quiz-Master — "Did you ever see one, Mr. 
De Jay?" 

De Jay — " Well, Doctor, I've seen Huizinga." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Moyer" — ",1s] there anything charac- 
teristic about the appearance of a syphilitic in- 
fant when born? " 

Eckard — "The teeth are usually indented." 

Dr. Moyer — "Mr. Arndt." 

Mr. Arndt, (faintly) — "Here." 

Dr. Moyer — " Does the temperature rise 

or fall during a chill?" 
Mr. Arndt—" It falls." 
It fell to zero just then and " Dutch " was 

seen to shiver. 



1.16 



Prof. Brower, in explaining to the class how 
easily pepsin, ingluvin and the other digest- 
ants decompose, said that " ingluvin is some- 
times a foul (fowl) product." — C. E. K. 



¥¥ ¥ 



Students on consulting staff, in summing up 
all symptoms of disease elicited from patient, 
stated that patient once had a chill. At this 
juncture the patient smiles and Dr. S. asks 
when this chill occurred. The patient answers, 
"48 years ago." Laughter from the benches. 



* * * 



A young lady from boarding school mani- 
fested very much surprise recently when in- 
formed by a certain Freshman that they very 
seldom met the Seniors, and asked, " Why, 
do you not all meet together for chapel ex- 
ercises ? " 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

DEDICATED TO FOUR ASSISTANTS IN ARENA. 

Four little uniformed girls, 

And each of them with the blues; 

For too long have they tarried, 

Their chance to get married, 

And now they are too old to refuse. 

* * * 



Dr. Weeks — " How is the primary cerebral 
vesicles divided ? " 

Bird — " Into four parts: the fore-brain, mid- 
brain, hind-brain and — mem-brain." 

137 



Dr. Jay — "Mr. Tansey, how are hip-joint 
diseases divided ? " 

Mr. Tansey — "Into three classes." 

Dr. Jay— "What are they?" 

Mr. Tansey — " First, second and third !" 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Parker — " Mr. Greer, what is that por- 
tion of the brain called which extends over 
the corpus cellosum ? " 

Greer — "I don't " 

Fish, (sotto voce) — "Labia cer " 

Greer — "Oh yes, the labia majora ! ! 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. B. — " Mr. Jewel, this is not a serious 
affection, is it ? " 
J. — " No indeed." 

Dr. B. — "Well we will go to the next." 
J. — " Yes indeed. " 

Dr. B. — " We take up pneumonia, don't we ?" 
J. — " Yes indeed." 

Dr. B. — "Have you prepared this?" 
J. — "Yes indeed." 

Dr. B. — " When does the fever come on? " 
]. — "Oh. it comes on." 
Dr. B. — "When?" 
J. — "Oh, in the disease." 
Dr. B. — " Early?" 
J. — " Yes indeed." 
Dr. B. — "How high does it go?" 
J. — "Oh, pretty high sometimes." 
Dr. B. — "Do you know just how high?" 
J. — "Yes indeed, pretty high." 
Dr. B. — "Well that will do." 
]. — " Yes indeed." 

138 




'39 



"SbortE" dope's 

XlXTlbishers 



* » » 



I. 

The recent craze a beard to raise, 
Has seized slim "Shorty " Tope ; 

So now upon his cheeks appear 
The sandy hairs that look so queer. 



II. 

Like wheat upheaved, its roots exposed. 

Its fibres bleached and sere, 
So on his face, his mug to grace, 

The wilted hairs appear. 



III. 



Though "tubercular" now they may look, 
Though the hairs are scattered and few, 

Though the microbes have gnawed off the roots, 
With care they may yet pull through. 



IV. 



Though the hue is not ideal, 
Still, " Shorty," do not despair ; 

Dark dye will that conceal, 
And stimulate the hair. 



* * ¥ 



Dr. B. — "Mr. Hathaway, what makes 
good lotion for this affected skin." 

H. — " Iodoform is always a srood lotion." 



140 



Zhc TlXHeaklv flbbagoqjte 



Published in the Interests of Suffering Humanity and Freddie Honnold. 



Vol. I. 



CHICAGO, ILL., FEB. 29, 191; 



No. 8. 



£be Meafcl? phagocyte 



Editor-in-Chief, A. Tenpenny Holbrook 
Veterinary Department, - T. Desdemona 
Sporting " Sam Kusso Hissorm 

Religious " Jack Rhodent 

Business Manager, Freddie Honnold 
Devil, ------- J. H. Salisbury 



EDitorial. 



HOW TO ACQUIRE A LUCRATIVE PRACTICE. 

The following advice is the result 
of years of experience and observa- 
tion on the part of the editor: 



Begin during your first year of 
reading by copying, from your pre- 
ceptors, the knowing and mysterious 
air habitual to all doctors. You will 
probably lose during your first few 
weeks at college, but can easily pick 
it up again when you become a sen- 
ior. While at college, devote your 
time to acquiring a distinguished and 
dignified appearance (a la Heming- 
way). Also familiarize yourself with 
the intricate workings of that instru- 
ment vulgarly known as a pony. As 
graduation approaches, provideyour- 
self with a pull which will place you 
in some good hospital, and while 



141 



THE WEAKLY PHAGOCYTE. 



there, devote your energies to inspir- 
ing awe within the minds of patients, 
nurses and lower classmen. Noth- 
ing, so far known, has been able to 
inspire awe in the deeply convoluted 
brain of a senior. 

Marry a hen-medic, of ordinary 
ability, for advice and reference. 
When you start, start with a rush, 
and on all occasions impress on the 
people the idea that you were not 
made of common clay (AC.,(Si O s ) 8 ) 
but of the rarer metals. If the fore- 
going advice is carefully followed, 
you will find that patients will be 
more plentiful to you than zeros to 
Donohue. 

¥ ¥ 

The children all cry for it, 
Their mothers would die for it. 
Burns' Tascoria is a boon to all. 
Price 25c. a bottle. 



personals. 



Dr. Hemingway, the celebrated 
gynecology specialist, has recently 
announced to the medical fraternity, 
that he has been able to plainly dis- 
tinguish the fcetal heart beat as early 
as the twelfth week of intra-uterine 

life. 

¥ ¥ 

At a recent meeting of the Centrif- 
ugal Medical Society, the name of 
Dr. Grenier, formerly of Rush, '96, 
was presented for membership, but 
was rejected. The reason given was 
that he was what might be called "a 
medical mugwump." 

¥ ¥ 
W. D. Brode, A. M., M. D., D. D., 
has resigned his position as professor 
of psychology at the Ladies' Hom- 
oeopathic College of this city, to be- 
come a missionary doctor in Western 
China. The magnanimity and self- 
sacrifice of Dr. Brode is wonderful. 



142 



THE WEAKLY PHAGOCYTE. 



The many friends of John Outhet 
were pained to hear that he was seen 
in the bald-headed row at Sam T. 
Jack's theatre, as he was known to be 
a highly respected citizen and pillar 
of the church. Mr. Outhet says he 
was laboring under an attack of men- 
tal aberration, brought on by over- 
work and stud\'. The sterling char- 
acter of Mr. Outhet precludes all 
possibilities of his having entered 
such a place while in his right mind. 

* ¥ 

NEW REMEDIES SENT US FOR TRIAL. 

Tr. Ferridi et chloridi, 

By B. A. Arnold, M. D. 
Ext. Galls, 

By M. A. Weiskopf, M. D. 
Ext. Damiana et Cantharides, 

By G. W. Smith, M. D. 
Extract of Female Fern, 

By R. E. Davis, M. D. 
Liq. Iodoformi Exsicaltus, 

By E. M. Eckard, A. M., M. D. 



Sportino. 



Rush Medic, 2; Chicago, o. 

The sturdy doctors from Rush de- 
feated the Chicago League team yes- 
terday by a score of 2 to 0. This 
team is now conceded to be the 
strongest team, amateur or profes- 
sional, in the west. The features of 
yesterday's game were the terrific 
batting of Schultze Edwards and the 
phenomenal twirling and all around 
playing of Andrew Jay. 

¥ ¥ 

For Baldness, use Beyer's Restor- 
ative. To be taken internally and 
eternally. Its continued use has been 
known to grow whiskers on the moon. 

Call or address, 

C. H. Beyer, 17 S. Green st. 



143 



There was a little medic 

Lived in this vale of tears, 
He rode a " horse " and ne'er got caught 

For very many years. 
But Kaufman saw that " pony," 

Just as you might expect, 
And called that man right " off the perch," 

"And he got it in the neck." 



V V V 



There was a man in section C, 

Whose wits were very^bright; 
He used to "bone" anatomy, 

Till far into the night. 
He got a mark of 98, 

In Osteology; 
He kicked and fussed and fumed around 

Till he could hardly see. 
He took his paper to be changed. 

When, strangest to relate, 
Dr. Shaw, when he looked it over, 

Only gave him 88. 



144 



Moffatt — "Mr. Gould, give me a ticket for 
Laryngoscope and Ophthalmoscope, please." 

Bartholomew, (in Senn's clinic) — "This 
patient dumb a tree." 

Dr. Browek — "What are your initials?" 
O'Connor — "I told you once there was only 
one of that name." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Prof. Salisbury — "Will the patient always 
ask for a drink?" 

Kenaga, (confidentially) — "Yes, if he can 
speak English." 

Harding, '95, (in arena) — "Family history 
good; two brothers living and well; his sister 
not so well, she is married to a doctor!" 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Jay — "Mr. Walters, who instituted the 
so-called bloodless method of amputation?" 

Walters, (thoughtfully) — "Let me see. 
Oh! yes. Bismarck! and — " 

(Class laughed.) 

Walters — "Well, I heard the name some- 
where." 

Dr. Jay — "Yes, in a certain Randolph street 
restaurant." 



145 



New Medic — "Who is that sweet looking 
man, with the pretty whiskers, in Dr. Senn's 
clinic?" 

Student — "That? Why, don't you know 
Moffatt?" 

Lecturer, (to medical student) — "This sub- 
ject's right leg is longer than his left, which 
causes him to limp. Now, what would you do 
in such a case?" 

Student — "Limp, too, I guess." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Senn — "How would you differentiate 
between an ovarian cyst and pregnancy?" 
Kerr — "By history of exposure." 

Swan wrote on the board the following: 
"Dr. Jay Andrews will meet his quiz class 
next hour, having returned from his visit." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dr. Moyer — "Now make an emulsion of 
iodoform." 

Eckardt, '96 — "Shall I make a wet or dry 
solution, doctor?" 

Question — "If you had an inflamed kidney 
would you give 'dig?'" 

Prof. — "I suppose the gentleman means if 
the patient had an inflamed kidney." 



146 



Malaise — "The feeling which came over 
Arndt when he sat in the front row and Prof. 
Bevan commenced to quiz." 

Phlebitis — "Latin for flea bites." 

Antimony — "A diseased condition which 
prevails in the free dispensary and to an 
alarming extent amontr the students." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Hamlet — (Bading's translations) — "Zwei 
beer, oder zwei beer nicht." 



Convery is the owner of a modest piece of 
jewelry, for it covers its face with its hands 
and runs down its own works. 



* * ¥ 



While returning to the college last fall, one 
of our students in a moment of mental ab- 
straction purchased a sleeper ticket; but, to 
quote his own words, " Sure and oi was so 
unused to such luxyury that oi could no 
slape a-tall, a-tall." 



* * * 



Dk. Weeks — "What structure forms the 
roof of the lateral ventricles?" 

Crowley — " The, ah ! ! 

Arndt, (in a large whisper) — " The corpus 
callosum." 

Crowley — "Oh! yes, yes." 

Dr. Weeks — "What is the structure of the 
cornea, Mr. Bird?" 

Bird — "Why, it's a kind of an opaque, 
transparent membrane." 

147 



Dr. Le Count — " How are teeth developed, 
Mr. Stone?" 

Stone — "Well, first there is sort of aboil 
appears, and then there is some epithelium 
grows up from Meckel's ganglion and forms 
the teeth." 

Fish, (taking history in free dispensary): 

" Ever been here before?" 

"What is your name?" 

"Where were you born?" 

"Married or single?" 

" Male or female? " 



* * * 



The Senior war cry — " Teacher, I want un- 
seat." 

Sophomore's definition for a Senior in two 
letters — C. D. (seedy). 



¥ » » 



ODE TO WILSON. 

This reverend brother, like a goat, 
Did wear a tail upon his throat, 
And set in such a curious frame, 
As if t'were wrought in filigrane; 
Cut so even, as if't had been 
Drawn with a pen upon his chin. 

Found — Dissecting case containing a pack 
of cards (5 aces), a plug of Piper Heidsieck, 
one scalpel (broken handle), and a hyoid 
bone, marked S. O. D. on cover. 

Adol'ph. 

148 



physical Signs, When jfounb 



For Corwin's Class in Physical Diagnosis. 

Barrel-shaped chest — Orth, '96. 

Pigeon breast — Schrieter, '96. 

Great effusion — Ludwig, '95. Non-inflammatory. 

Great anxiety — Payne, '95. 

Friction fremitus — Sophs, vs. Seniors. Very, distinct. 

Succussion sounds — Westerschulte, '95. 

Rronchorrhea — Arndt, '96. Constant. 

Dullness — Donahue, '97. 

Flatness — Todd, 97. 

Tympanitic resonance — Andrews, '99. 

Amphoric resonance — Carson, '96. At foot-ball games. 

Cracked-pot resonance — Krause, '95. Head. 

Puerile respiration — Daniels, '96. Searle, '97. 

Atalectasis — Harding, '96. Congenita/. 

Feeble respiration — Vaupell, '96. Mahoney, '97. Before recitation. 

Suppressed respiration — Brett, '96. After recitation. 

Prolonged interval — Griffin, '96. When reciting. 

Cog-wheel respiration — Pegram, '96. Since Ingals' exam. 

Bronchial (broncho-like) rales — Welch, '95. 

S — norous rales — Dyas, '96. During lectures. 

Crib-itant rales — Frost, '96. Pegram, '96. Diagnosed by Dr. Beach. 

Moist mucous rales — Snodgrass, '97. 

Moist tobacco rales — Miller, '94. Convert, 96. 

Dry tobacco rales — Spargo, '95. 

Any old rales — Bading, '96. 

Gurgles — Bau.m, '95. Yates, '97. Etiology, beer. 

Metallic tinkling — Arndt, '96. .Wood, '97. Negative sign. 

Friction sounds — Groves, '97. Prognosis unfavorable. 

F^xaggerated bronchial whisper — Sheldon, '95. After reading California 

returns. 
Cavernous whisper — Kemp, '96. Denotes cavity somewhere. 
/Egophony — Wilson, '96. 
Congenital heart murmurs — Stone, '99. 
Dilatation — Zinser, '95. 
Hypertrophy — Tope, '96. 
Hypertrophy with dilatation — Duncan, '96. 
Fcetal heart sounds — Carter, '97. 



149 



XTbe passing Sbow 



THE Co-Eds. gave a benefit concert at the upper amphitheater, 
in which an assembly of several hundred women, with here and 
there an equally entertained man, warmly applauded the per- 
formers. The proceeds went to buy an overcoat for Mr. A. W. 
Montgomery, a worthy member of the middle class. The 
artists were, Miss Kate Crowley, Miss Effie Wallace, Miss Tillie 
Schram, Miss Marie P. O'Convery, Miss Aggie Seager, Miss Georgia 
Snodgrass, Miss Noble B. Fullenwider, Miss Otill Arxdt, Frauleix 
BAding and Mme. Dannielts. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

The Programme was as follows: 

i. Impersonations of Shylock, . . . Shakespeare. 

Miss Tillie Schram. 

2. SOLO — Sweet Marie, .... Mackie. 

Miss Marie P. O'Convery. 

3. SOLO — You can't play in our back-yard, . . . Petrie. 

Miss Effie Wallace. 

4. RECITATION — Oh, Mrs. Flannigan, what d'ye mean by that? 

Miss Aggie Seager. 

5. SOLO — Girl wanted, ..... 1492. 

Miss Georgia Snodgrass. 

6. Selection from " The. Grand Duchess." 

Miss Otell Arndt. 

7. SOLO — I'm Mammas Little Girl, . . Petrie. 

Miss Noble B. Fullenwider. 

8. LECTURE — Our Girls need not Marry unless they want to. 

Miss Kate Crowley. 

9. Selection from " Frau, Frau," .... 

Fraulein Bading. 

10. SOLO — Role d'Equipage, .... 

Mme. Dannielts. 

Especially engaged for this performance after having sung 375. nights 
at the Fred. Wolf Beer Garden. 

LSO 



•Roll Call 



Section "H," flDeofcfne 



(Delinquents accounted for by the Tammany [back row] gang.) 



Instructor — "Gentlemen, I notice that this little book I have here records 
not only the intellectual, but also the physical, condition of the class." 
Proceeds to call the roll. 

*"01d Hundred" Angus. 
Here. 

"Ducth" Arndt. 

T. — In jail. 

Prof. Jay Andrews. 
T.— Sick. 

I. — What is the difficulty? 
T. — Nervous exhaustion. 

"Daisy" Bell. 

Present. 

"High T." Beebe. 

T. — Just called out by lady. 

B. Flat Brode. 

T. — Gone to conference. 

"Papa" Brett. 

T. — Wife's sick. 

I. — Indeed! 

T. — Yes, sick of Brett. 



*For various reasons the full na 



; given, although the Doctor usually 
151 



Y. M. C. A. Brewer-y. 
Here. 

"Primer-Class Willie" Bird. 
Here. 

Mister Bates. 

T. — He just received a telegram, telling him to come home im- 
mediately. 

Spencerian Ballance. 

T. — Gone to Louisville. 

Rev. Bading. 

T.— Sick. 

I. — What are some of his symptoms? 
T. — Headache and tired feeling. 

I, — Gentlemen, this is a well pronounced case of typhoid. We 
will place him on a milk diet and surprise his stomach. 

McAllister Bloke. 

T. — He is sick — of medicine. 

Rooster Brown. 

T. — He got a check from home yesterday, and don't feel well 
this morning. 

"One-a-Month" Burns. 

T. — He don't hear you, Doctor. He's reading a letter from his 
girl. 

" P. Jackson" Berry. 

T. — He is making a call — on Hyman. 

"Sing Ling" Barstow. 

T. — Gathering laundry. 

"Piper Heidsieck" Bryant. 

T. — Got tuberculosis. 

I.— Is that right? 

T. — Yes, sir. He's a beer consumptive. 

Bill Nye Cunningham. 
Here. 

Farmer Connell. 

T. — Gone to — Wauwatosa. 

"Fire Escape" Cowles. 

T. — Gone to get married. 

I. — Indeed! We will place him on an albuminous diet, with cold 
baths every time his temperature rises above 102.2 F. 

'52 



Virides Conroy. 

T.— Sick. 

I.— What is the trouble? 

T. — Got wheels in his optic radiation. 

Katie Crowley. 

I'm heah, Doctah, but I've not got accustomed to the atmos- 
pheah yet. 

Sport Conaway. 

T.— Sick. 

I. — What is the matter with him? 

T. — He's got paralysis of the optic nerve, I think. 

Skinny Duncan. 

T.— Sick. 

I. — What's the diagnosis? 

T. — Too much malt extract. 

Surgeon Donahue. 
T.— D. J. 

"Tammany" Daniels. 
Heah, Doctor. 

P. and S. Dwight. 

T. — He couldn't come, Doctor. Somebody stole his pony. 

"Old Dry Solution" Eckard. 

T. — He is getting his teeth filled — with boarding-house hash. 

"Old Melancholy" Engalls. 
T. — Coming. 
I. — All right. We will mark him C. 

"Gentleman Jack" Frost. 
T. — Comatose. 

Hippocrates Fullenwider. 
T.— Football. 

"Filaria" Fitzpatrick. 

T. — Senior. 
"Omega" First. 

Here. 

I. — Well. "The first shall be last, and the last shall be first." 
So, Mr, First, what is the lesson this morning? 



153 



Zhe IRegular School vs. 1bomoeopatb\> 

(Prize Humorous Sketch.) 

It happened in one of those numerous student boarding houses on 
Hermitage avenue, and will go down as the classical joke of the year for 
the "Ouartier Latin." Three "homeops" and three Rush men roomed in 
this joint, and that fact insures that those tobacco-smoked walls have often 
heard the questions of "similia" and "rationalism" hotly discussed. It was 
during one of these discussions that a '95 Rush man contemptuously took 
up the newly filled medicine chest of one of the "homeops," and after 
removing the " Merry-Christmas-to-\Yillie-from-Papa" card on it, announced 
that he was "a bit hungry and thirsty, and had a good mind to eat the 
contents of the case." "You wouldn't dare to drink a half of that littlest 
vial of Belladonna," ventured Willie. "Oh, yes, I would," remarked Rush 
'95. "Get on to this," as he measured off half and downed it. "For 
Heaven's sake! stop! You'll die!" came en chorus from the "homeops." 
"Why, that's a pudding," put in another Rush man. "I'll eat every pill 
there for a nickel." The homeops were about recovered from their shock, 
and thought that "he had established a tolerance," but that "it was very 
dangerous." "Well, come," repeated the Rush man, "what'll you bet I 
can't eat every pill there, and drink every vial in one dose?" "Any- 
thing you like, you blamed guy. Here now, shut up or match this ten 
dollars." Now this happened at the beginning of the month, and mirac- 
ulously for a Rush man, the tenner was produced, and the book-keeper, 
who roomed down stairs, was called up to hold the stakes and "see the 
fun." "He'll be sick before he s^ets the first down," exclaimed the excited 



J 54 



homeop. "Why, really, you mustn't do it. Honestly, they will kill 
you. Hold on, for goodness sakes! Don't drink that. My God, man, 
that is poison! Hold him, fellows, don't let him do — ." "Say, buckle 
up, you sugar-pill, you'll spoil my digestion. Down goes the Gelsemium, 
fifth potential." "This is awful! My Heavens, boys, he'll die!" "Leave 
him alone, you geese, that's the easiest ten he ever earned." "We must 
give him an emetic. Don't let him kill himself. Don't be fools." "Say, 
but that arsenic is good; wish there was more of it." "Never mind, boys, 
he'll probably vomit it all up. But you're out ten dollars." "Oh, I don't 
care about that, but he'll surely die. Professor Milk said twenty drops 
of that arsenic was toxic." "Ah! the last bottle; powder, too. Podophyl- 
lin. Well, here's to my liver, long may it wave." And the jumble of 
remarks stopped, as three pale faces and three red faces turned to the 
stakeholder and watched him give twenty dollars to one of the red faces. 
"Good night, fellows," said the red faces, "we've enjoyed ourselves 
very much. Wish you had had enough to go 'round." And they took 
the stakeholder out with them. While they were on their way to the 
nearest restaurant, the)' stopped at a drug store and paid a bill that read: 



^AvvS/OwCVO., \&AK/. V^ V3§0. 



Iv ^ V . ^e. Z t>„ Dv. 



oo 



MORTAR PESTLE. 



JwO'V. 



OS- 



*/VvV V v 0- ' Jw'vv ^ O wv ^aVV£/ 






Lo 



Editors of The Pulse: 

Gentlemen — The above is based upon truth, and the details alone are fiction. Mr. W, 
H. Lewis of the senior class was one of the chief actors. 

Very respectfully, 

"TWELVE." 



155 



Dk. B. — "Air. McKelvey, what would you suggest for a dusting powder in 
this case?" 

McK. — "Well, I think that vaseline and boric acid, half and half, would 
be good." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Dk. B. — "Mr. MacDonald, if you have fever, how do you find the patient?" 
MacD. — "With a higher temperature." 
Dr. B. — "Yes; but the general condition?" 
MacD. — "Oh, of course. Yes; that is, feverish." 

Dr. B. — "Certainly. But I mean do we have convulsions or not? Is the 
skin moist or dry? Is the patient constipated? How is his breathing?" 
MacD. — "Yes, sir. It is." 
Dr. B.— "What is?" 
MacD. — "What you said. His — his breathing." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



Prof. A., (to patient in clinic) — "Do you eat much red meat — beefsteak, 
mutton chops and such?" 

Patient — " Naw." 

Prof. A., (to class) — "You see, gentlemen, patients like this often learn 
what food is good for them, just as this man abstains instinctively from beef- 
steak." 

Patient — "Yes, I knowed it was good fer me, but I ain't got the price of 
beefsteak." 






, 5 6 



Uhc " practical Courses" 



¥ ¥ ¥ ¥ 

SO do the "Practical Courses" properly one must provide him- 
self with a very indulgent, patient father, plenty of cuss- 
words and an abundance of wastable time. If you play 
a stiff game of poker you can dispense with the indulgent 
father. Having paid the mild forty-dollar ante, you are 
allowed to draw five cards. Familiarize yourself with the 
fact, that "these cards are not certificates of work done, but 
must be exchanged, etc.," and then have a folding-bed put up near the black- 
board at the college entrance. Go to bed and watch the black-board for 
notices. 

For example: If you hold ticket for "Class 5, 
in Bunionoloey," and the notice reads: 




the Practical Course 



CLASS 


5, 


BUNIONOLOGY, 




AT 


2 P. M. 

STALENWIN. 



you can go out and read the newspaper until a quarter before three, when 
it is well to take your bunionoscope and go to the class-room. It is highly 
improbable that the instructor will be there that early, but if he is, perspire 
freely, puff hard, and tell him you came over as rapidly as possible from 
the class in the "Practical Course in Superfluous Hairology." Then after 
letting the instructor see you look through the bunionoscope a couple of 
times, get some friend to answer for you at roll-call and go and play 
billiards. 

The chief benefits of the "Practical Courses" are: 

( 1 ) The ready excuse they give for absence from 
the regular and impractical courses; and 

(2) The efficient explanation to your father as to 
the speedy disappearance of the last draft. 

They are also a beautiful charity to the corporation of Rush Medical 

College. 

"TWELVE." 



157 



Competitive ©rawing 




Submitted by C. H. Beyer, '95. 



153 



Competitive ©rawing 




Submitted by G. L. McDermott, '97. 



160 




i6i 



1ber /Ifcajest^ 




ITTING on the benches, 

Clinics slightly slow, 
Tired of operation, 

Glances sort of go 
Wandering to the table, 

Over on the side — 
Pleasant occupation, 

Watchim 



Forget about incisions, 

Sepsis and the rest, 
Tension sutures, drainage, 

Sarcoma, cancer-nest; 
But looking to the westward, 

Leads one to decide, 
'There are others" in the clinic, 

For instance, — 

We have famous surgeons, 

Equal seldom seen; 
But ruler of the instruments 

Easily the queen. 
Hard to solve the problem: 

To properly divide 
Your attention in the clinic, 

'Twixt the case and — 



I 62 



1bow to /Iftafce a fliuise 



AWARDED SECOND PRIZE. 



M 




^^ OR the help of our Freshmen, now jnst beginning 

To think about Corpuscles, Pulses and such, 
And who doubtless think we are quite wonderful, spinning 

Such beautiful rhymes that they surely can't touch; 
We'll give a prescription simply infallible, 

One that's been proved and is never amiss — 
One that we think you will find quite invaluable, 

'Tis for the making of Pulses like this. 



Ijl a large kettle with plenty of room in it, 

Pour in of water one quart and no more; 
On a slow fire set, while you're stewing it, 

Into it these rare ingredients pour: 
One pint of politics, strong, highly flavored, 

Bottled by Parmeter, Calvin & Co.; 
Three or four kodaks, they're always much favored 

At rows and at clinics and many a show; 
One box of poetry (see that it's very new), 

Chopped fine and sprinkled with unsparing hand, 
Six dozen jokes, each one humorous, short and true, 

Filled with a wit that not one can withstand. 
Let each fraternity its special flavor add, 

Giving it zest and variety too; 
Then at last for a final rich savor, add 

One pinch of literature, one will quite do. 
So after mixing and stirring and tasting, 

And being quite careful to skim off the scum, 
You will find, if your work has been without hasting, 

A Pulse most sublime is the residuum. 



163 



Hnatom^ in IRb^me 



'•-•>'/ : '-'/'% J Jj'>%'- J y(X^'.' 






m. 



w?'\ ,„,„., 







AWARDED THIRD I J RIZE. 

HEN the Anatomy of the Anatomist was anatomized t'was found 

That the Ulna Meta carpal near the Radialis ground; 
That old Ole craiwn bordered on the Humerus alone, 

So they said it was no wonder that it was a funny bone. 
The Clavicle and Scapula the Humerus did support, 

The Sternum from between the Ribs was kind of holding fort 
The Frontal and Occipital were reaching far and wide, 

And the Parietal and Temporal had joined them in the side. 
The Petrous point went inward and contained the inner Ear, 

The Orbits they looked outward to take in things far and near, 
The Upper and the Lower Jaw they helped to make the Face ; 

The Sphenoid and the Ethmoid too, the}' both had found a place. 
The Turbinated, Nasal and the Palate came in time, 

And the Lachrymal and Malar were included in the rhyme. 
The Hyoid kind of ruled the Tongue, and said, now I suppose 

The Vomer was intended for to divide the Nose. 
And the Processes and Tubercles were scattered here and there, 

And the Fossa made depressions for to catch you unaware. 
And then the Spinal Column was full of Vertebra:, 

And the Sacrum helped to form behind the Pelvic Cavity. 
The Coccyx helped a little on the Posterior wall; 

But the Os Inominata was at the bottom of it all. 
The Femur and the Tibia were trying to make ends meet, 

And then they found the Fibula pointing towards the Feet; 
The Tibia that did the shitudng and had stood most of the brunt. 

Thought it funny the Patella had kept so near the front. 
The little Metatarsal bones they keep so near the land, 

The reason why they give is, because the}- understand. 



164 



tfov tbe fliulse 



i 



A POEM BY OSCAR, WILDE .MARY PLAYED THE FLUTE. 

T was utter, quite too utter-deep to see; 
Rich an' rosy-rare, a medder an' a lea; 
An' the colors they was applicated free — 
For the dingle-burrs was mingled, 
An' the tunes was all attingled, 
For the style kerslap it went permisc'usly. 



Oh, the ardor interlarded in the lines ! 
Superlunar, incandescent nix it shines ! 
While the baying bowls about her the portals whines 

An' such swell accumulations, 

Triple X brand figurations, 
An' a Duke an' Dukess on the remains dines. 



Yes, the wine, an' wit, an' women went quite how ; 

An' the spreezy spray dashed clear up o'er the bow 

For the Jersey maiden milked the Jersey cow; 
Still the good ol' ship o' state 
With them drinks was quite elate, 

An' I'm thinkin' you're a thinkin' of she now. 



'65 



"®U> ICom" 



Grim Death with his sickle mows them down, 

For they are the wages of sin, 
And the grave looks on with an ominous frown, 

As Old Tom gently gathers them in. 



Old Death selects flowers, leaves nothing but weeds, 

Shining marks he desires to win; 
Either flowers or marks suffice for the needs 

Of Old Tom and he gathers them in. 



Some of their souls soar far, far away, 

They go to join those of their kin, 
But the material stuff that was destined for clay, 

Why, Old Tom he gathers it in. 




On the hooks in the box, in silent repose, 
Away from the world's strife and din, 

They silently swing from their anchylosed toes, 
For Old Tom has gathered them in. 



The "material" is dank and oozy with dew, 
Yet each on his face bears a grin 

Of content, as if he felt honored and knew 
That Old Tom had gathered him in. 



Some day we must all be rounded up 
By our friend, The Wages of Sin, 

And when we've drunk of his fatal cup, 
May Old Tom kindly gather us in. 



For Old Tom is so gentle and kindly and true, 
And to all such a good friend has been, 

That like the " material" I'd grin if I knew 
That Old Tom was to gather me in. 



I67 



Xlbe IRew Casablanca 



A hen-medic stood on icy skates, 
But then she could not go; 

She was afraid to attempt the fate, 
Because she wabbled so. 




She called aloud, " Say ! Wagner, say 
Do come; help me along;" 

But Wagner went the other way, 
Because his feet went wrong'. 



Then came a crash like thunder sound, 
The "hen," Oh! where was she? 

Ask of the giddy Wagner 'round, 
Who viewed her hosiery. 



* * * 



flfc^ Beating Ibeart 



'Twas not a maiden's lovely eyes, 

'Twas not her winning smile so sweet; 

Nor yet her soft, melodious voice — 
These did not cause mv heart to beat. 



The time was half-past three one afternoon, 
The arena, Dr. Senn's clinic, the place; 

My heart beat, well — because, you see, 
I could not diagnose the case. 



"Ube /Kills of tbe "Woes" grino Slowlg, 
Hno tbe\? grino ejreeeoing small." 



Bone, and boneing, and bone; 
Think, and thinking, and think; 
Growl, despairing, and groan; 
Swear, and yawning, and blink. 

Up in the morning at 5 ; 

Grind all the forenoon like sin; 

Wonders why he is alive; 

"Why don't earth cave, let me in?' 

Blinkety-blinkety Phys. ! 
Brickety-brackety Chem.! ! 
Hangety-hing the whole biz ! ! ! 
Blimety-blamety-blem ! ! ! ! 



But at last the grinding grind is done. 
All too soon the skinny sheepskin's won, 
" Chronic cases " raise a shouting shout, 
For the M. D. doctor is turned out. 




N days of old 

When Seniors were bold 
And Middlers held their sway, 
A Professor bold 
With specs of gold 
Sang merrily this lay: 

"I hold the chair 

" Superintendent too, I swear, 

" In Rush so gay, 

" That all do say, 

" That none with me compare. 

" So what care I, 

" Though students sigh, 

" I'll have my way or die." 



So this brave Knight, 

With whiskers white, 

Went boldly to the fray. 
'Tell me your name;" 
' Next man the same," 

So plainly did he say — 
' Meet me to-night at seven, 

I'll stop this passing up, by heaven! 

Said he, retreating to the door, 

Mid hisses, groans and roar 
' What care I 

Though students sigh, 

I'll live for Rush or die! ! " 



170 



Zo Westerscbulte 



B 



* * i» 



OYIBUS kissibus 

Sweet girliorum; 
Girlibus likibus, 
Wanti someorum. 

Inibus lapibus 
Sit girliorum ; 

Thenibus boyibus 
Kissi someorum. 

Papibus seeibus 
Slap girliorum; 

Kickibus boyibus 
Outi doororum. 

Thenibus boyibus 
Limp homeorum; 

Girlibus cryibus, 
Kissi nomoreum. 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



A girl in white is a pretty sight, 

And so is a bottle of Sec, 
A dish of ice cream with your midsummer dream, 

Or clams from the Little Neck. 



A poem is good if the end comes soon, 

And of moral is not bereft; 
And get right advice, if you get it at all, 

But if you can't get the right, don't get left. 



171 





w^e\\. >^y ti»\ty\wiiv\<ie rsii-cLe.WYVX'aYd.. 1° n<S- ».-*v\\sty y\n arf ic--rn&z.? 
Cls udj- 1 i K = - c»H=>i-,f l;«c»j- sKaJ°»^s-. t ?nl<v yxl d[e.tK ,! az-ure-sKi<?.s 

C>°ff -Kvi- t rt e(|<><w , Ae<f>-av\ji- (><?i-fect; 1° ■»» M v°u^d -Admit in 6. 'r.j-'S . 

Jujt-4 fs «.t^!?rr 1 5.i;o.r5hiiii- w\»-th&"t tr^ e -f (.'? rut- !• «1 ust" (>av ■ 
/Ml. tK e tir J i?.S-tuKsl.t^-ir-tu^slsts.?U-tl 1 ?.-/.°*.nfK'<-ts''Sd. low; 
All't!iS-Aj,*i|-«fc8*s.-s sd°w ? .rea i -a"d.tl,«.-s«o« / . i B5 iu trfu|. 5^*,* 

/All- w,>(- d rtj^s were dr'dwi of ■ <5 1 • T-y- ,a U m y- H\?.u ^hts *-«r e -tl\u n K."in- j?.Y , 

//Sw. rfr-im-ClrS-KiS ScarrScl >^yf°.r e A^ocL-,l'. .w«<l^Y- stite.lf«tM^f°r^. 

-L^Ky 5W3T\J>S-arf n\^dr?r»\-|>«lt»f?S 1 S^-«''5- »»«?*/•* sl*£ty st°jw\ 
C=>^«S J-vslc'-,!.^.^ bsUsw-,Y«.U ,^1, b.erc.v,^- cl«iv t» wn.?«-«I E.t 4 r,a ' 

VC/h-^- f*f fs.n-t* >« Y t h e roo n r'-"^ jty?« <**«\t-y*.*U-Vtt-tjj tf« 

A, I Jo'X'If T J - lT,r Y kustfd ,t>iHru,|>t- bustM el° y °u \'l y t 

*My accent must have kyphosis, for at middle point 'tis bent; 
Could not help it, gentle reader, for my ac(center) is lent. 
Tho' the words are weak and wobbly, tho' the sentiment is sad, 
Still the pictures, done by " Reddy," are not very, very bad. 




flbreceptors 



RECEPTORS, they arc whiskered things 

Which, long before the flood, 
Attended Rush, wore angel-wings, 

Invariably stood 
The first or second in the class, 

Gave Valedictories, too; 
Such things as theaters they would pass, 

They'd never smoke or chew. 

They all tell tales of such a kind; 

But some day when you see 
Your old preceptor's claim, you'll find 

Their statements don't agree. 
He'll tell how they flunked Prexy's chair, 

And of their scrapes and sprees — 
Ah, they had sowed their oats, that pair, 

And near lost their degrees. 

So you can wink the other eye 

And call your Doctor down, 
And ask him how much " paint " to buy 

To " do " this wicked town. 

And when certificates you file, 

You'll find you've not been fooled, 

For your preceptor's flattering style 
Will settle Mr. Gould. 



Benjamin IRusb 

" Patriot and Physician " he is named. 
How well those titles seem to link! No clash 
Is felt to speak of one who thus is famed. 
We picture him a man of thought — no rash, 
Impetuous adventurer; but one 
Who long had studied life, and in whose breast 
The love of liberty was strong. A son 
Of Freedom — called to lead the rest. 



TLhe /Ifceoic's IDooboo 




I.-B. 3. 

J. to Rush College came, 
Without his pa's advice ; 
Of course he saw Chicago, 
For his father had the price ; 
But when examination came, 
He didn't know a thing. 
The Professor he took him by the arm, 
And in his ear did sing: 
" Do, do, my D. J. do. do; 
It's clear that you're a hoodoo. 
You've fooled away your eight long mor 
And now I'll tell you what you do. 
Do, do, my D. J. do, do. 
Come back again next year, 
And if you're pa still has the price, 
You'll surely find us here." 



n. — /IDiooler 

A Middler with a pony sat 

And copied every line; 

Of course he thought it pretty smooth 

To have it down so fine; 

But when he got his paper back, 

He didn't beam with pride; 

For written in plain English there, 

This note he found inside: 

" Do, do, my Middler, do, do, 

You see we're on to you, do; 

You thought yourself right in it. 

But your pony was a hoodoo, you do; 

Do, do, my Middler, do, do; 

You see you're not the hero, 

So just to play this on the square, 

We'll mark you now a zero." 



in. — Senior 

A Senior let his whiskers grow, 

And said just one more time 

And I will be a brilliant star, 

Placed in this world to shine; 

But when the term was nearly done, 

He got a note one day, 

'Twas signed by the Professor, 

And this to him did say: 

" Do, do, my Senior, do, do, 

Your whiskers are a hoodoo; 

You better take and air your face, 

It might help your gray matter to do ; 

Do, do, my Senior, do, do ; 

Once more is the proper caper. 

And then you're sure to finish, if 

You write the proper paper." 



IV. — jfinale 

You Medics are a queer old crew, 

You have such funny ways; 

The Seniors hate the Middlers, 

And the Middlers the D. J.'s ; 

But it won't make much difference 

When it comes to cure a case, 

Whether you have whiskers 

Or just a clean smooth face: but, 

" Do, do, my Medics, do, do. 

The world is far from true do; 

So don't go out and starve to death, 

But do others or they'll you do; 

Do, do, my Medics, do, 

Say nothing but saw wood, 

And when you " do " a patient, 

Don't forget to do him good." 



174 



Just Xifce Dim 

And now the wily Doctor, 
Instead of taking his ease, 
Is sitting up both night and day, 
To invent some new disease. 



Ibarb Xucfc 



A Middler had a little book, 

Its leaves were white as snow. 

He wrote his answers in it, 

So he'd be sure and know; 

He took the book to school with him, 

To help in the exam., 

But a spotter stood behind him 

And it wasn't worth a d ! 



1/5 




2)eatb's 
IMsit 



Death came to me the other night, 
And knelt upon my bed; 

His icy breath was on my cheek, 
His eyes fixed on my head. 

A stethoscope from space he drew, 
And placed upon my chest, 

Various adventitious sounds he heard, 
Which added to his zest. 

Broncho-vesicular sounds were there, 
In spots, rales, high pitched, moist. 

My pulse he felt, and then my head, 
Indeed he seemed rejoiced. 

Calmly I lay, nor felt afraid 

What Death would diagnose, 

For while it makes me shudder now, 
I then was comatose. 

'I will claim you soon," said he, 

"Nor have I long to wait, 
'For having chronic pneumonia, 

"Death will be your fate." 

'Your prognosis, Death," I said, 

"Would make the bravest tremble; 

'But I have reason, sir, to doubt, 
"The truth of your ensemble. 

'Oh no! bold Reaper, you have said 
"Some words for which you'll blush; 

'Perhaps you do not know, kind sir, 
"That I'm from Grand Old Rush." 



176 



I 



HAD a patient t'other da}', 
I mean the patient's wife, 
She said he acted crazy way, 
And mumbled 'bout his life. 

He talked so funny, so she said, 
And wanted things so queer, 

That she was having quite a dread 
Which most became a fear, 

That her dear man was quite unwel 
And from the cares of life, 

Together with some other things, 
Was having "change of life." 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



pbonatton. 

The pharynx being lifted up, 

The larynx with a slam 

Will jerk the note 

Out of your throat 

With the aid of the diaphragm. 



'77 



College Hlpbabet 



I'm asked to write an Alphabet, to put down on paper 
Some jokes, some quips, some gags, some rot in poetry 

to " kape her" 
From growing dull or heavy, for the student's mind is 

wearied, 
And with grinding in a beaten path, his convolutions serried 
Have convoluted for so long, his ideas are all buried.* 




But A must stand for animal — each 

one of us is one, 
And some are animaler than the other 
one has done. 




Is the Beautiful Beyond — the Happy 

Hunting ground. 
Where Horses, Homes, Happiness and 

sreat fat fees are found. 




Stands for " Crawl," which some must 

do before the Facultee, 
When looking for a " stand in," or a 

rake off if a " V." 



*So are mine. 



I 7 8 




Stands, collective or alone, for expres- 
sions of much force, 

Used just before and after the exams, 
of the whole course. 




Starts the name of Error, the microbe 

which infests 
Your first few years of practice, though 

you do your level best. 




Stands for Funny Fellow, the Pulse is 
full of him; 

But in my own opinion, Fm in the swift- 
est swim. 




Is for Gall, Get there and Grind, the 

elements united, 
With which, well used, your fondest 

hopes will never once be blighted. 



179 




Surely stands for Ha! Ha! a wild, de- 
moniac yell, 

Tossed on the breeze by class-mates, 
when vou recite unwell. 




Is the fellow, present now, who will go 

home some day, 
To strut about his native town, with 

cane and plug hat gay. 




Is for Junior, dear " D. J.!" the memo- 
ries sweetly cling. 

Of passings up from the front row, and 
being spanked en siving. 




Means Karyokinesis, common fate of 

all, 
To be, to am, to was, our cells grow up, 

divide and fall. 



1 80 




The Laboratory fills the next, the finest 

in the west, 
Of buildings, teachers, students, stiffs, 

old Rush will have the best. 




Always stands for Medicine, a region 

much explored, 
And it's contrary to ethics for you new 

facts to hoard. 




Means the ninety and nine, who get 

passed as of old, 
And one is out on the hills away, for 

the Profs, have plucked him cold. 




Is the orphan you will meet full oft 

in coming years, 
Cheer up the broken hearted, in sad 

eyes dry the tears. 




Stands for Pluck, and "Hush! Hush! 

Hush!" this is our bogie man, 
Be careful, you incredulous, they'll 

catch you if they can. 




While O, the dearest of them all, 
for Queen of Hearts must stand, 

Each Medic has the sweetest one in 
all our pleasant land. 




Stands for but one word with us — 
The glorious name of Rush; 

Onward, upward, broader, deeper, her 
achievements ever push. 




Is for "Short," a wee microbe, but 

numerous as blazes, 
Infects your purse and then your dad 

raises Cain much more than praises. 




Is the starter out for Tough, the proper 

name of some, 
But now the Com. on Ways and Means 

weed out those who are bum. 



Shows the union of the parts, that vast 

articulation 
Of Rush's sons, whose brains and hearts 

join in one great congregation. 



Then V and W, and X and Y and Z re- 
main; 

But surely, gentle reader, with the 
writer you will shout, 

How long, O tiresome alphabet! how 
long will you hold out''' 

For Pegasus now is knee-sprung, his 
eyes sunk in their sockets; 

His spirits, soaring once so high, now 
fall like sticks from rockets. 

But this is plain, I'm sure, my dear, so 
I need not explain. 




jfebruarie 14, '95 



'AINT VALENTINE 

Has set apart this da}', 
That maids as well as men may speak 

The words they want to say; 
And so I choose this proper time, 

And send this billet-doux, 
That you may have a chance to dream 

How much I think of you. 

I love to see your manly form 

Come hurrying home from college; 
I love to think how full your head 

Will some day be of knowledge; 
I love to hear, if truth be told, 

Your merry sleigh-bells jingle; 
But most I love to think of when 

The world will read your shingle. 

Then I'll come to you, 

And be your very own; 
I'll keep your silver door-plate bright 

And tend your telephone. 
For you I'll learn to cook all things, 

From lemon-ice to mush ; 
May heaven hasten on the day 

You'll graduate from Rush. 



184 





¥ ¥ ¥ 



ZTbe /Ifceerscbaum Club 

In Executive Session 

* ¥ ¥ 



'To soothe the dreamer's every care, 
To glow and burn and fill the air 
With thy curling perfume rare; 
As thou charmest gloom away, 
With the dreamer rest for aye, 
Friend of youth and manhood ripe, 
All hail to thee, thou meerschaum pipe! 



i8< 




Zo the Rix of "Willow, Git- Willow" 



N the perch in the college a little D. J. 
Sat crying and weeping and crying, 
'And I said, " Little D. J., Oh, why do you sit 
A crying and weeping and crying? 
Is it exams, by Dodson," I soothingly cried, 
" Or have you at ponying lately been spied? " 

With a shake of his wee little head he replied, 
" It's Lyman, it's Lyman, it's Lyman." 

" He caught us, poor D. J.'s, a raising a fight, 
This man Lyman, this Lyman, this Lyman, 
And he told me to call at his office to-night, 
This Lyman, this Lyman, this Lyman. 
Oh, what shall I do?" he cried in despair, 
And wildly he clutched at his curly black hair; 
But said I with a wink and right knowing air, 

" It's a bluff of this Lyman, this Lyman." 



¥ ¥ 



I 



Iff IF Mere JJ)ou 

F you were I, if I were you, 
If each were other of the two, 
If, that's to say if " if " came true, 
What good we both would surely do! 

I'd put to rout your every wrong, 
Though every is a mighty throng, 
While you, I s'pose, would do likewise, 
And all my errors minimize. 

'Tis thus we think, 'tis thus we say, 
'Tis thus we preach and prate and pray, 
Whene'er we see another slip 
On anatomy, or on medicine trip; 
And yet I think if " if " came true, 
Things would go as now they do, 
If each were other of the two, 
If you were I, if I were you. 

186 



& /Hasten? 

There's something that seems very strange, 

It is a mystery to me, 
Why every student, Sunday nights, 

Is studying anatomy. 
If on Monday morning you ask him 

A question in chemistry, 
You will surely receive the answer: 

"I'm not prepared, you see, 
Last night I was very busy 

Studying my anatomy." 



If you ask that very fellow, 

To be truthful and tell you straight, 
What happened to him last evening, 

That caused him to be out so late; 
At first he will not answer you. 

But will stammer and hesitate, 
And then, in a very poor way, 

Will lay the blame on his room-mate; 
But his fellow-roomer will tell you, 

"They both left their room before eight. 



Now we, who are not studying 

Anatomy., can only surmise 
What becomes of these young doctors 

Between eight at night and sunrise. 
It is not to be wondered at, 

We assure you, it's no surprise, 
That all are "excused" on Monday; 

Quiz-masters, no doubt, realize, 
In this case like many others, 

It is folh r to be too wise. 



But where those fellows do study 

On Sunday eves, I cannot see, 
Unless they devote their evenings 

To practical anatomy. 
If this is the fact, and I think 

That undoubtedly it must be, 
Then they are in some lamp-lighted 

Parlor, holding upon their knee, 
Not "Gray's," not "Holden's," nor "Quain's,' 

But their best girl's anatomy. 

i $ 7 



'"Rush" ant> She 1Rusb" 



w 



P from the boarding-house at break of day, 
Six hundred students wended their way; 
O'er to the college in crowds they went, 
Each on his own particular work intent. 

Some to the " Lab." do bend their steps; 

While to the " Quiz " to save their reps., 

The various sections were quizzed by the master, 

Though certain of the class generally query the asker. 

The latter queer the Prof, as if they knew 
The lesson assigned the whole way through; 
When, to tell the truth, they'd been on a skate 
The night before, and to save their fate 

And their questionable grades from a horrible zero, 
They talk to the Prof, as only a hero, 
A man full of wind, or one full of gall, 
By daring their many mistakes to recall, 

After the master had ordered him down, 

With many a look and many a frown; 

But still he keeps on, vainly trying to tell 

Of something you know he knows nothing very well. 

Still others to the lectures climb the stairs, 
And for the " Exam." to allay their fears, 
Take copious notes of all 'tis said, 
Which in the text books can plainly be read. 

While most to the lessons do give their attention, 
A few do give their minds to invention 
Of something for pleasure, for profit or fun; 
Thus in various ways the'ir minds do run. 

But after the " Lab.," the " Quiz," or the Lecture, 
Comes that of which only the mind can conjecture, 
When two grades meet and one is a bar 
To the passage of the other; from near and far 

Can be heard, " Down the D. J.' " " Pass him along! " 
" Out with the Middlers!" and to this song 
Men are dragged away, pulled away, jumped, 
But all in good humor, and thoroughly thumped. 

Seats are broken and crushed as if they were glass, 
While the men are in that struggling mass, 
Striving their principles to maintain, 
And always one side striving in vain. 

Crash go windows, should they happen near by; 
" A. ' D. J.' fell down stairs!" some one will cry; 
And fierce the " IX J.'s " will jam and push, 
To maintain their footing in " The Rush." 

But hark! some one whispered a wonderful " nomen ;" 
'Twas Lyman, Dodson or Etheridge coming. 
A scattering, a scramble, a run for a seat, 
And any one that perchance you should meet, 

Is either an angel or a divinity " stude," 

Who'd be perfectly shocked at half so rude 

A thing as a " Medical Rush," at " Rush Medical." 

" How am I? " " Thank you, I'm very well." 



1S8 



Xtfe at 1Rusb 



I. As "Freshmen" first we came to Rush, 

Our heads were swelled, our pockets flush; 
But when we're there a year or more, 
We lose conceit and dimes galore. 

II. We learn quite soon we have to work, 
And never ought our duty shirk, 
For if we do, we know full well 
Exam, or Quiz will surely tell. 



III. The D. J. green, with open mouth, 
And eyes focused to spear, 
Attends the minor clinics all 
To gaze and peek and peer. 



IV. And if perchance he gets a "sit, 
Or towels he may hold, 
Then all important he becomes 
As Vanderbilt or Gould. 

V. The Sophomores, a jovial class, 
Are now well organized; 
So when they meet a D. J. mob, 
The latter are capsized. 



VI. The Seniors, grave in port and mien, 
Have learned "to look wise;" 
Exemplary now they have become, 
They foolish things despise. 



VII. Hurrah for Rush, the college so grand, 

Whose fame extends throughout the land; 
To her teachers all we're loyal and true, 
For her we'll speak all our lives through. 

VIII. For she's our Alma Mater dear, 
Her precepts all we do revere; 
Her teachers all have sages been 
Since first her history did begin. 

Nemo. 



iSq 



XLhc doctor's Xife 



The doctor has a busy life, 

If he would gain some fame; 

From morn till eve he toils each day 
To try to earn a name. 



Quite often, too, he runs great risk 
When pestilence stalks around, 

And Death meets him on every side; 
But at his post he's found, 



For Duty is his watchword e'er, 
He must its calls obey, 

And hasten to each suffering one 
His anguish to allay. 



Sublime and great his mission: 
The relief of human woes. 

If always he his duty does, 

He's blessed where'er he goes. 



His information should be broad, 
His knowledge most profound; 

His culture should be very high, 
His tactics shrewd and sound. 

A love for his profession should 
Prevail within his mind; 

For if he lack this quality 
He's sure to lag behind. 

And in the race for prominence 
He'll be far in the rear, 

While he whose soul is in his L work 
Will at the goal be near. 



190 



IReminiscences from a ID. J.'s 
Career. 



S 



CHON drei monat he's been freshman 
Alle while so schwere studiert, 
Yeden Suntag, gets a jag on 

Every quiz-room schemer probiert. 

" Lieber vater, Schick me money 

Verm du willst, one hundred more," 

" Ach, mein Gott ! ! ! Fier hundert dollar: 
Nie gehert like dass before." 

In der class he says, " Ich weis nicht," 
Mit ein gentle sheep-like look. 
' Alle recht," der Prof, makes autwort, 
Schreibt ein goose egg in his book. 

Nimt sein paper von Herr Dodson, 

Wird ihn helfen if he can, 
Auf sein waugen — consternation, 

" Let him take some other man." 

" Look not over," sagt der Kaufman, 
" Auf die bletter of your freund, 
If its wrong du hast verloren, 
Dumme asel — see the point? 

" Yeder must on foot hintreten 

Von examination salle, 

Hast dem povv eingeritten, 

He 's confiscated, dass ist all." 

Aber still, to be a D. J., 

Dass thut mann sein kopf inflate, 
Es kann sein ein wise decision, 

Wenn Ich bleib mit ninety-eight. 



Hn Hppeal for Co*Ebucation. 

The old " Hen Meds.," a forlorn crew, 
With faces long and prospects blue, 
In vain have tried the boys to dupe, 
Till now their lips begin to droop. 

In vain they drill o'er bones and drugs, 
In place of sewing home-made rugs; 
In vain they hoard up treasures and pelf, 
Despite all this they're left on the shelf. 

Fair, beauteous forms they once possessed, 
But as these fade they're not caressed. 
Why not then have co-education, 
Since early marriage is their salvation? 

I 9 I 



/B>£ Crown 




O- N I GHT, 'mongst scattered books and close-lined leaves 
Torn lecture notes, thumbed Lymans galore, 
A pair of foils, and photographs, and sheaves, 
Of cricket bats, and gloves besmirched with gore, 
I hold my sway, and mightily I reign; 
Though men have called me servile, drudge and slave, 
Bowing to learning, bound by wisdom's chain 
To sheep-skinned potentates, my lieges grave. 



The erstwhile powers of day now bend to me; 

My Gray is blythe fancy, sweet, inert; 

My empire is beside a fairy sea 

By gnomes and sprites and eldritch vassals kept. 

The past is all my own, the future years 

Beneath my laws lose all their mystery; 

The hills are made of hearts, the deep of fears; 

Its bounds are now and all eternity. 



Can Rome's patrician with the laurel twined; 

Or Papal seer, with mitre richly wrought, 

Or iron band, to Lombard power kind, 

E'er buy the wealth my covenant has bought ? 

Devoid of care and cleansed of all life's shine, 

A balm to all vicissitude and pain, 

It stealeth through the midnight like the chime 

That wakes our merry spring-tide to refrain. 



Above my head, as creeps this dusky hour, 
My crown sways as in runic rythm wrapt, 
Like down of buds, or essence of a flower. 
From wind to wind in endless order lapped. 
The world has faded while this subtle thrall 
Winds upward 'neath the gursile flame too ripe; 
'Tis thus my crown hath borne itself, it's all 
From out the crimson centre of my pipe. 



192 




i9: 



College anniversaries 



Germ '93*'94 



OPENING EXERCISES 

DOCTORATE SERMON 

CLASS DAY EXERCISES 

ANNUAL MEETING ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 

ANNUAL BANQUET ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



September 26, 1894 

May 20, 1894 

May 21, 1894 

May 23, 1894 

May 23, 1S94 

May 23, 1894 




194 



* 



********* 

y v wip w^ w wvvy W "< CJBS >? y WWW* V* 1 WW WW* 1 




Class 2)a£ Ej erciees 



College Amphitheater, May 21, '94 



1. PRAYER ...... A. T. Corliss 

.2. SONG ...... Class Quartette 

3. CLASS HISTORY ..... J. Ross 

,, nrAT C/ ", T ^ \ Oh, Italy, Thou Cherished Land, | ■»«■ T „ 

4. VOCAL SOLO - Vtt 4.1 r» <. Afii »> r Mrs. Ida Hemmi 
H j ( hom the Opera "Atilla ) ) 

( Professors De Laskie Miller's and J 

5. PRESENTATION 1 Ephraim Ingals' Portraits to College [ E. H. Ochsner 

f in behalf of the Class. \ 



ACCEPTANCE OF SAME 

6. CLASS PROPHECY 

7. SONG .... 

8. PRESENTATION CLASS TABLET 
ACCEPTANCE OF SAME 

.9. SONG .... 



Profs. Lyman and Hamilton 

F. VV. Miller 

Class Quartette 

E. H. Ochsner 

Prof. E. L. Holmes 

Class Quartette 



195 




3fift£=first annual Commencement 

Central Music Hall, Wednesday, May 23, 1894. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

©roer of jgyercises 

GRAND MARCH— "Libert)- Bell," - - Sousa 

PRAYER, - - Rev. Dr. Thomas D. Wallace 

MUSIC — Idyll, "Fruhling im Madchenherzen," - - Burold 

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY, J. H. Etheridge, M. D. 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES, - John M. Coulter, LL. D. 

MUSIC — La Czarina, "Mazurka Russe," Ganne 

VALEDICTORY, - F. E. Andre, M. D. 
PRESENTATION OF PRIZES. 

THE DOCTORATE ADDRESS, - E. L, Holmes, M. D., LL. D., Pres. 

MUSIC — Tarantella, "Forosetta," - Aniiti 

BENEDICTION, - Rey. Dr. Thomas D. Wallace 

MUSIC — Promenade, "Soldier's Joy," - - FaJirbach 



W»1^»^^£ 




jf\resentation of profs, IDeXasfcie flIMller's 
"^ anb Epbraim Urinals' portraits to Col* 
lege, in bebalf of tbe Class of '94 on class ba\> 

E. H. OCHSNF.R. 

TO-DAY is a happy and memorial day for our class. Class day in 
most universities and colleges is the day of days during the com- 
mencement season, and we too are trying to make it interesting and 
enjoyable to all who may attend. To-day will be memorable prin- 
cipally because we are about to establish a precedent which we 
hope will often be followed in the future, which will undoubtedly give pleasure 
to many and add interest and enthusiasm to the class day exercises. 

In private as well as public life we are only too prone to cringe and crawl at 
the feet of those who are in power, even though they be entirely unworthy of 
•our homage, and often only too slow in paying tribute to the truly worthy until it 
is too late. We of the Class of '94 have never bowed our heads or bent our 
knees to any one, no matter how influential, unless he was fully deserving of our 
highest regards, and yet as a class we are among the first to honor as best we 
■can some of those who are especially worthy of our admiration and esteem. 

Through the kindness of two of our professors it has been made possible 
for our class to present to the college portraits of two of the most noted and 
highly esteemed members of our Faculty. We have often regretted during our 
■course that we could not see these men more frequently, receive from their own 
lips more of their vast store of knowledge, and yet we are glad to know that it 
is possible for them to spend the afternoon and evening of their most useful 
lives in well deserved leisure and repose. 

It is our wish that these portraits may ever remain in these halls, that 
future students sitting on these benches may often look up at their kindly faces, 
and by so doing be aroused to think nobly and act bravely. Nature is a won- 
derful artist, and each kind and good deed done has helped to mould the lines 
which express firmness of purpose, serenity of mind and nobility of heart. 

It is my great privilege to present to the Faculty and Trustees of Rush 
Medical College, in behalf of the Class of '94, these beautiful portraits of 
Professors De Laskie Miller and Ephraim Ingals. 

Prof. Henry M. Lyman accepted the portrait of Prof. Ingals on behalf 
of the Faculty, and Prof. John B. Hamilton accepted that of Prof. Miller. 

197 



Prof. Lyman said: 

Mr. President, Gentlemen of the Trustees, Faculty and Students of Rush Medical 
College : 

In the palmy days of ancient Greece, when Pericles and Phidias, and 
/Eschylus and Sophocles, and Socrates and Plato were making Athens glorious 
with everything that renders a city great and magnificent, if some vaporing 
young blade in a fit of enthusiasm was extolling the present at the expense of 
the past, it was usual for the wise old men to wag their heads and to say, " Yes, 
but there were great men before Agamemnon." 

So when you feel impressed with the present dignity of your alma mater,, 
and grow warm with zeal as you behold Professor Senn, or Professor Hamil- 
ton, or Professor Etheridge wading through seas of blood to glory and fame, 
remember that " there were great men before Agamemnon." 

We are especially favored on this occasion by the fact that we have with 
us two honored representatives of that former generation, and that you can for 
yourselves trace the accuracy of the likeness in their counterfeit presentments, 
the portraits now presented to the college. It is because these men have lived 
and labored, it is because they devoted their lives to the work of medical 
teaching, that Rush Medical College is to-day what she is — one of the greatest 
medical colleges in the United States of America. " There were great men 
before Agamemnon." 

From this pleasing incident, moreover, I gather comfort for the future. 
Sometinifu I 3ay to myself, "What will we do when President Holmes goes 
the way of all flesh, and we have his faithful supervision no more? What will 
become of the college when Dr. Hyde and Dr. Bevan and the rest of us have to 
lay down the scalpel and the stethoscope? " But an instant of reflection reas- 
sures me, and I believe that as there were great men before Agamemnon, so 
there will be great men after him. Some one will be always found ready to lift 
up the banner of progress and to bear it triumphantly onward forever. Yes^ 
there were great men before Agamemnon, and after him there will be great 
men still so long as time shall endure. 

Dr. Hamilton said: 

We accept from the original himself, at your hands, this faithful representa- 
tion of an ideal teacher, an accomplished obstetrician, a scholar, a sagacious 
counselor and a patriotic citizen. Prof. De Laskie Miller has been identified 
with Rush Medical College almost from its beginning, and although still vigor- 
ous in mind and body, he has been actively associated with every movement 
which step by step has placed this college in the advance rank of American 
educational institutions. His early career as a medical journalist, and his 
Presidency of the Section on Obstetrics of the International Medical Congress 
at Washington, extended a knowledge of his worth and ability beyond the con- 
fines of his city to other lands: for at the close of that now historic Congress, 
he had acquired friends and admirers almost to the ends of the earth. I need 
scarcely speak in his presence, of his long and faithful service as a professor in 



this college; hundreds of Alumni have heard his voice, and, thanks to the 
instruction those Alumni received, thousands of American citizens that other- 
wise might have blighted as mere experimental suggestions, were born to the 
glory of God and the increase of the population of the Republic. We need not 
enlarge on this topic; we need only say that in the presentation of this picture, 
the generous donor has added another jewel to the Rush Medical College col- 
lection. We read in northern mythology of the Walhalla, that the building 
itself, whose dome was so high that its summit could scarcely be seen, was as 
marvelous as the heroes whose virtues it was built to commemorate; that its 
location was in the midst of the grove " Mansur," where all the trees bore leaves 
of gold. In time this will become our Walhalla, although we lay no stress on 
architectural display as did those who designed that famous structure. In years 
to come, Alumni visiting Rush Memorial Hall of the future may truthfully say 
of this picture, as of the " animated bust" and "storied urn" of song: 



" Bright Fancy, hovering o'er, 
Scatters from her pictured urn 
Thoughts that breathe and words that burn." 




199 



Class Dteton? '94 



Delivered on Class Day, May 2ist. 



Mr. President, Fellow Class-mates, Professors, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

College life, with its ever-changing cycle of classes, its myriads of suc- 
cesses and failures, its triumphs and disappointments, its pleasures and 
drudgery, has forced three classes from Rush's threshold since we became her 
children, and but a few days remain until the class of '94 will be launched upon 
life's battle-field to join our alma mater's working children of the world. A 
few reminiscences of the past, a few facts to be ever remembered, a few 
words of sadness to record the lives of those who have passed on before, a 
few items jotted from each mile-stone of the short medical highway which we 
have traveled, a few pages to be filed away among the archives of Rush Medi- 
cal College literature, and the historian of the class of '94 will have fulfilled 
his mission. 

As medical students for decades had read in the office of a "regular" phy- 
sician for a year previous to reveling in the medical atmosphere which 
engulfs a medical college, so we like our predecessors delved deeply into 
anatomy, physiology, chemistry and materia medica for the required twelve 
months. But as we were then widely separated, and as many of us had years 
before developed the idea of becoming physicians, and had studied in literary 
colleges preparatory to our medical education, the medical life of these stu- 
dents may be said to date far beyond the four years required for graduation, 
so we will begin the history proper with the gathering of the class three 
years ago. 

In the autumn of 1891 we shook the parental dust from our feet, grasped 
the hands of our relatives and friends in a last good-by, boarded the train, and 
soon reached the city where all was new, the only familiar object being the 
sun, and he in all his wisdom and brightness deceived us by habitually setting 
in the north. We demonstrated our enthusiasm by calling the college clerk 
up at midnight to receive our fees. We called at the Cook County Hospital 
for lodgings, thinking it was a hotel, but the watchman kindly informed us 
that they were all sick abed and we could not be accommodated. The follow- 
ing day we secured a room, and after asking every senior if he had a room- 
mate, we accidentally ran across a partner in misery and then secured a room- 
mate. The college clerk secured our money, we secured our seat (which a 
senior usurped the following day). We secured a meal ticket at a restaurant, 
we secured a note book as large as a family Bible, and thus began the life of a 
medical student in earnest. 

We were all present to hear the opening address. We came early, and after 
we had listened to the piercing yells and war-whoops of the seniors for a short 



time, we expected to see the college course opened with a scalpel in true 
medical style, and feared that a junior might be selected as a sacrifice. Finally 
the Faculty marched in and all the noise soon died away, and we listened with 
wonder to the sound advice delivered in polysyllabic words by the lecturer. 
That night we returned to our room, feeling that the medical atmosphere was 
very noisy, and that reveling in those long words would be a duty rather than 
a pleasure. We spent half of the night looking through our new dictionary 
for one of those words, but failed to find it. The next morning we arrived at 
the college early, and with our ticket in our hand we marched directly past the 
janitor without showing him our ticket or giving him a tip, which we learned 
afterward was a very difficult accomplishment. It was about this period of 
our medical course that we assumed the title of D. J., which tradition tells us 
signifies sacrilegiously that we were juniors. Before the end of our first week 
came we were surprised to learn that we were expected to know so much 
about the four principal branches, and that our previous year's reading amounted 
to so little. 

From the very first lecture we became very much in love with our pro- 
fessors, and each man conceived the idea to work a " pull " if an opportunity 
offered, the result being that each "pull" had, at least, a score of faithful 
workers. This admiration for our professors was the cause of one of them 
resigning his position in our faculty at the early part of our course. We would 
not now find fault or reprove our class-mates for things done when we were 
not versed in the code; but we do think many of those expressions of admira- 
tion were too forcible, and the lecturer, of course, failed in health and was com- 
pelled to give up the work. These expressions of admiration came down to 
him in showers of notes, and it occasionally took him all the following night to 
read them, thus impairing his health so he could not withstand the hearty 
reception with which the students were wont to greet him as he entered the 
lecture room. We did little else to distinguish ourselves during the first year. 
Of course we formed the acquaintance of Lamb and McLain; asked a druggist 
for Virginia Prunes in connection with our study of materia medica; dissected 
with a broadax, worked in the dispensary, exploded half the chemicals in the 
laboratory, and in fact covered ourselves with glory and nitric acid. Individ- 
ually some members of the class need more than passing comment for the 
work which they did in bringing the class into prominence. "Tensor Tarsi" 
established the fact that a muscle was much longer than was formerly sup- 
posed. " Here Sah" answered to his name so promptly that he became a shin- 
ing light, even if he did at first try to make us believe that he was a senior. 
■" Frog-eater" distinguished himself over on Milwaukee avenue. The profess- 
ors finally learned to pronounce Warnshui's name, Wilbur moved because the 
landlady refused to call him doctor, and Artie borrowed two dollars of a 
senior. The exceeding brilliancy of these and a few other members of our 
class made it necessary for the professors who lectured exclusively to us to 
wear smoked glasses. 

The first meeting of our class was a very sad one indeed, for we had 
scarcely become familiar with the halls and rooms of the college until it was 
announced that one of our number had passed to his heavenly reward, and we 
were called together to draft resolutions in remembrance of Henry Field. 
The class had no other meetings during the first year and no organization of 
the class was deemed necessary. Finally, the examinations came and we were 
reminded that we had reached the first mile-stone on the road of medical 
science, and we were now to be examined to determine how much we had 
gleaned by the roadside. 

During our first vacation we were startled to hear the sad news that one 
■of our beloved professors had closed his lips forever, that another brilliant 



star in the firmament of Rush had fallen, and that upon our return to college 
we would miss the thoughtful, careful lectures of Prof. Knox. Very soon 
after the opening of our second term we learned that not only a professor but 
one of our own number was missing and had answered the summons of the 
Maker of Peace. We learned that James Gagnon had succumbed to typhoid 
fever, and the class was again called together in remembrance of one of her 
members. 

The class of '94 now looked forward to prosperity and advancement, and 
concluded that in order to work in harmony a class organization must be ef- 
fected, so C. D. Center was elected president; F. E. Shaykett, vice-president;, 
and H. F. Thompson, secretary. The meetings of the class during this year 
were few and not important, as very little business came before the class, and 
the orators of the class did not develop until the last year. In the class room 
we seemed to outclass our predecessors who had traveled the road before and 
should have discovered what we so easily demonstrated. A new tumor which 
was called a " neurolgia " was found by one of our class; we saw a glass eye 
which could see; we conducted a skin clinic in the dispensary; we worked all 
the available " pulls;" we fainted in the maternity; we bribed the janitor and. 
secured a good cadaver; we passed the juniors up; in fact, we had a fine time. 
Early in this year we were gratified to hear that among our sedate, hard-work- 
ing class were accomplished dancers, and that in conjunction with other medi- 
cal colleges in the city we were to have a ball, where all cares and trials would 
be banished by pleasure, and where the image of the glaring eyes and ghastly 
grin of a cadaver would be replaced by feminine beauties enshrouded in love- 
liness and fashion. We waited patiently until we heard the first strains of 
the orchestra and the delicate patter of the dancers' feet before we believed 
the medical students could have so nice a ball as was predicted. The ball was- 
a success, and when the prizes were awarded we noticed the same ardent 
spirit manifested by our class-mates which had characterized their work in 
arranging for the ball. The superiority of the class had been noticed on sev- 
eral occasions, but being very modest we never appeared in public until at the 
commencement exercises of the class of '93, when one of our members, Mr. O. 
B. Bock, received the Daniel Brainard gold medal for the best dissection. 

This class being enthusiastic over literary work, not only furnished two 
editors of The Corpuscle, one member of the editing board of the Lake Forest 
College annual in 1892, but it was this class which conceived the idea and 
began the work of publishing an annual for Rush. Our annual was dropped 
for lack of time and support from the other classes, but the work was not aban- 
doned, for the succeeding class began the work in time and in earnest, and 
having the support of the whole school, produced a book of which every man 
connected with Rush feels proud. The following class has also taken up the 
work of , editing a similar book next year, so that in succeeding years we may 
expect to have a publication which will represent Rush in all of her varied 
phases. The annual like The Corpuscle was the first publication of its kind pro- 
duced in America by medical students. 

The end of the second year soon came, and it was here that so many of 
our fellow students concluded that it was a long narrow road that led to a Rush 
diploma, and that it did not take so much " pluck " to secure a diploma in an 
adjoining city, so a special train was secured for the land of moonshiners and 
fast horses. We also lost several members at the end of the year who feared 
that the medical profession with a large practice would be too trying on their 
constitutions, and that the farm promised a more quiet, luxuriant life. 

The next year promised more for our class than the previous one, for this 
was the year of the great Exposition. Many of our class secured positions as 
guides and guards at the Fair, and besides sleeping in water soaked bunks. 



wrapped in worse soaked blankets, they kept their friends from the rural dis- 
tricts off the grass, from killing the foreigners on the Midway, and from being 
buncoed out of their return tickets. During this vacation several of the boys 
sold Bibles to the people of Iowa and Nebraska, one became a Pinkerton detect- 
ive and came very near arresting a real burglar, a few got married, while others 
only rested and waited for the last term. 

The beginning of the senior year was ominous for the class of '94. The 
new building'was soon to be completed and the best facilities for instruction 
were to be used, the recitation system in divided classes was new, and the class 
soon saw the superiority of this plan over all others. New special courses 
were added, and improved methods were added to nearly every practical 
course; plenty of room was now secured for all the different classes. The 
only thing lacking was time, and the Faculty then made the spring term corn- 
pulsatory, thus making one continuous term of study eight months in length. 
The seniors concluded to have an election after the term had fairly opened 
and all the members had returned from their vacation. In about ten days of 
adjourned meetings, postponements and lobbyings all the offices were filled. 
The wire workers got together, and after the chief mogul and lesser lights had 
made a slate and whipped the rabble into line, it looked like folly to hold an 
election, but the mogul and his clan did not want to fill the offices and they 
were eagerly seized by those on the outside. The result of the balloting, 
oratory and perspiration was as follows : E. H. Ochsner, President; J. B. 
Canavan, Vice-President; H. M. Hayes, Secretary; E. B. McAllister, Treas- 
urer; T. E. Andre, Valedictorian; A. T. Corliss, Chaplain; John Ross, His- 
torian; F. W. Miller, Prophet; J. V. Russell, Chorister; O. B. Bock, Sergeant- 
at-arms, and E. P. Lierle, E. L. Wyckoff, B. N. Clark, W. E. Nichols, and 
C. H. Manning members of the Executive Committee. 

During this year we have had a great many new ideas advanced by our 
class. Especially in the arena where each one was desirous of displaying his 
various accomplishments were these new opinions often introduced. A sliver 
as large as a tree was spoken of by an embryo surgeon; tuberculosis of the 
lung was found as pus in the left axilla; absence of hairs in the eye-lashes was 
a prominent symptom in a certain case; immobilization by a plaster of paris 
splint was recommended for treating an anchylosed joint ; tracheotomy has been 
recently performed on the oesophagus in operative surgery; ligation of the 
oesophagus was classed as a capital operation by one of our number; warts, 
corns and bunions were considered formidable affections; a new dance was 
learned on the midway and reproduced in the arena; twenty-two set of whisk- 
ers were raised, each set being valued at fifteen hundred dollars; a visit was 
made to the insane asylum at Dunning, where osculation and dancing were 
freely indulged in; one student is puzzled about feeding a patient through an 
intubation tube. When an actor called out, "Is there a medical man in the 
house ?" one of our men was there. One of our men spelled skin with two N's 
and now wishes he had written hide. We have wandered about unconsciously 
for a month and finally came to our senses in a hospital, and the surgery of the 
marriage covenant has been ably discussed by one of our class-mates. 

In the Cook County Hospital examinations our class has maintained the 
high reputation of the college by furnishing four of the eight internes. In 
other hospitals where pulls were not considered our class secured many posi- 
tions. The Faculty offered two prizes exclusively to seniors for the best theses 
upon diphtheria. The first was awarded to Mr. C. D. Center and the second 
to Mr. A. T. Stewart. In the competition for the Daniel Brainard gold medal we 
again showed our superiority as dissectors, for the first two places were secured 
by Mr. F. W. Byrnes and Mr. G. C. Waiss respectively. 

The most attractive features of our senior year was our class meetings, of 

203 



■which we had many. We will append an account of one meeting: The pres- 
ident was in the chair. " Rain-in-the-face," with a blood-curdling whoop, moves 
that the class roll be put on the invitations, seconded by "Sharp and Smith." 
The president puts the motion and 137 of the 138 present arises to speak and 
■each one speaks. "Tarsi" being deaf sits still. "Warhorse" objects, for no 
■one can pronounce his name if it were all over the invitations. "Mrs. Gan- 
non's " anchylosed face will not move and she sits down. " Tensor" wants Mrs. 
G. to speak; " Sliver" objects; Kirby begins to study; Trueman lashes his arms, 
roars, perspires, and hurling a threat at the opposite side, wants to wager his 
chances for getting plucked that he will never have his name on the invitation. 
~"The-young-man-afraid-of-the-professors" wants anything but a position at the 
stockyards. " Riordan" says, " Vy are ve all here togedder anyhow?" "Whisk- 
ers" wants to be heard; "Shorty" wants to read a committee report; " Chrys- 
alobin " asks the president to call him Doctor. The "Boodler" calls for 
business. "Papa" says this is worse than a whole nursery of babies. Artie 
requests the loan of two dollars. "Cope" pulls his whiskers; "Lottie" sings 
Ta-ra-ra; the president calls for silence and says not more than 117 would be 
allowed to talk at once, for that annoyed him. "Flagpole" calls for blood; 
" Delia" objects; " Lord Fauntleroy" wants silence so he can sleep; Jewell tells 
a. story; "No. 15" takes his seat; "Mrs. Lease" still speaks loudly; "Jerry 
Baldy" pulls his back hair; "Windy" dances his favorite ballet; "Medical 
Man" arrests " Frogeater," and the meeting adjourns with 123 men talking. 
These items were partly taken from the secretary's report and are substantially 
correct. 

College life with its pleasures and happy surroundings has many dark 
places, and three times in our course we were reminded that life at most is 
short. Only a few months ago we were apprised that Mr. E. L. Wyckoff was 
dangerously sick in the Presbyterian Hospital. Day after day when inquiry 
was made at his room the nurse or attending physician could give us no hope 
that he was growing better. Finally it was announced that his mother had 
arrived to see him, and only a few hours later that he was dead. No one not 
in contact with the class can imagine our sadness when we held a meeting that 
bright morning and made arrangements to pay the last tribute of respect to the 
life of our fellow class-mate, which had so suddenly gone out just in the morn- 
ing of his usefulness, and in the prime and vigor of life. He was honored by 
receiving a position as class officer, respected by all of his class for his frankness 
and liberality. Mr. Behle was sent to accompany the remains to his home at 
Rock Rapids, Iowa, resolutions of condolence were drafted, and the class did 
all in their power to console the sorrowful friends and relatives. 

As we leave Rush our life study has only begun. We have laid only the 
foundation for a medical education; we must continue to study if we expect to 
keep pace with the rapid advances in medicine. We ask your best wishes for 
•our future success, and promise to strive faithfully to maintain the high repu- 
tation of Rush, and to hold sacred the dignity of our chosen profession, ever 
looking upward to our motto, " Scientia et Humanitas." 

John Ross. 




204 



£&t&££&£&£&t£^&&$&&& 



Class propbec^ 



Delivered on Class Day, May 21, 1894. 

Mr. President, Honorable Faculty, liss- mates, Ladies and Gentlemen: 

Now it came to pass as I tarried with my books that the hour did arrive- 
in which I must of necessity hie me to my couch. 

That meal which the landlady extolled in words such as arc becoming" 
only to landladies did gnaw and even tear away at my vitals. 

In sooth it was of that baser sort that incites a feeble stomach to rise and 
mutiny. 

It was well-nigh the hour when the church-yards yawn and solid girls do 
likewise. 

Then I replaced my books upon their shelves, and taking off my garments 
did retire — my head all filled with epiblastic tumors, my stomach with things 
much worse. 

Verily, I was weighed down and sorely grieved, for slumber visited not 
mine eyelids, neither did sweet Morpheus come my way. 

At length, after much tossing and weariness, I slumbered ; but my 
slumbers were not such as a babe sleepeth, for gruesome things did haunt me 
— thoughts weird and ghastly chased each other across my wearied brain, 
scorpions did rend my flesh, and slimy serpents with forked tongues did crawl 
upon me and make me to writhe. 

Now it came to pass as I wrestled with these things unnatural and uncanny 
that at length I found myself in a forest dark and thick. 

I know not how I got there, nor yet where it was. It mattered little. No 
sound to break the silence so oppressive save the occasional hoot of a distant 
owl and the sighing of the wind in its course through the tree-tops. 

Yea, verily, it was dark — so dark, in fact, that e'en one of Pharaoh's own 
body guards might well have lost his way. 

And as I sat and did commune with myself — lo, there did appear a small 
uncertain light shining through the underbushes, and when I did behold it I 
straightway took heart, and smiting my thigh with my palm said, " By the 
sword of the prophet, this is my deliverance ;" and as I thus did commune with 
myself, the light e'en so drew near unto me, and as it came still closer I saw 



205 



that it was a torch of pine knot that a form all bent and tottering carried in his 
withered hand. 

He was old, yea, very old ; his hoary locks did fall in great abundance 
from his temples, now so hollow, until anastomosing with a beard, still more 
white, almost concealed his face. 

He came upon me. He must have known of my presence, for there was no 
surprise when he beheld me. 

Now it came to pass that as he gazed upon me he did draw himself up to 
the full stature of manhood, and placing his thumbs in the axillary spaces of 
his toga, viewed me in the most oppressive way, and having gazed did shake 
his head and say in tones most sarcastic : " So you indeed are he whom the 
class of '94 hast sent to me that their future might be revealed. It behooves 
me to say that I am in truth surprised and disappointed. Suffer me, I pray 
thee, to see thy credentials." Thereupon with trembling I did hand him a 
letter that our worthy president had given unto me as I set forth upon my 
journey. He read it in silence and having finished it said, " Very well. First 
I will tell you who I am. My name is Future. The past I know not of. The 
present lasteth but a moment. While I, Future, contain all the probabilities 
and possibilities of the destinies of men. I live only in the things that are to 
come. This portion of the earth and the fullness thereof is mine, and in it are 
all these things contained you shall to-night, if eyes and ears you use, a lesson 
learn that will abide within your memory so long as the Nile runneth to the 
sea and the soil of the Sahara is athirst. Follow me and e'en these things 
shall be shown unto you," and girding up his loins he led the way. And it 
came to pass after we had journeyed over fallen trees and briers that did 
scratch and e'en forsooth tear my raiment, that we at length did come before 
a cavern large and still and even blacker than the Stygian darkness round 
about us, set between two boulders, large and awful in their greatness. Bats 
.and winged animals, the like of which I ne'er had seen, did fly against the light 
and made it to flicker e'en more than before. 

I was in sooth sore stricken arid sick at heart, and methought: "Verily, I 
have bitten off more than I can chew, and peradventure some accident will be- 
iall me. Suffer me, I pray thee, to depart and forbid me not." But he only 
laughed and mocked my cowardice. Seeing that it availed me naught, I 
straightway took my hypodermic out and did inject a sixtieth of strychnine 
into my arm e'en unto the deeper tissues. He then moved calmly forward — 
I followed, but not with eagerness. On and on and still downward we did go 
towards the very center of the earth. 

The air coming from Plutos' sulphurous realm was thick and stifling, but 
that strychnia was getting in its work, and nothing daunted I followed. 

At length we suddenly stopped, a large rock did block our way. He 
made a few passes strange and Hermannlike, and the gigantic boulder was 
rolled away, and there before me did appear a sight that only Dante and myself 
have ever seen. 

A caldron huge and dirty sputtered and tried to boil over a sickly fire. I 
.stepped forward and peered in, and there in shapeless confusion did I see bits 

206 



of matriculation and general tickets for Rush and those odious sealed 
envelopes. I added a tsar or two to the boil and hurried after the old man, 
who was restlessly awaiting me. But another rock, still greater than the one 
before we stood. 

The old gentleman, sticking his torch in a crevice of the rock and turning 
to me, said, " Behold this adamantine rock. Behind it is concealed the future 
■of your das;. To thee alone it shall be revealed if you but write the things 
just as you see them, and then if your class-mates fain would let their angry 
passions rise, reason with them saying, 'Keep your tunics on, for whom the 
Faculty destroy they first make mad.' " Now he did make the passage as before 
and the massive rock parted, and as I gazed with exophthalmic eyes through 
the fissure that was made, I saw even these things that I now give unto you. 

Now it came to pass as I gazed through the crevice that there did appear 
before mine eyes a sign-board fifteen cubits wide and thirty cubits long, and 
written thereon with a red pigment were these words that all might read, 
j 'Chas. D. Center, Manicure and Chiropodist," and as I gazed upon this sign 
behold there did appear this man, and lifting up his voice said unto me: " Lo, 
these many years have I toiled and tried to be professional, but my purse waxed 
not fat, neither did anything stick to my ribs; but now I have changed, and 
.shekels in great abundance are mine and likewise houses and lands." 

The next scene that appeared was at a patient's bedside, and there I did 
behold one Keith (commonly known as Stock Yards Willie). A large rope 
lie held in his nerveless fingers. On his face were signs of supreme agony. 
The patient was growing paler and paler, she was evidently bleeding to death 
and Keith seemed powerless to prevent it. I ventured to ask him why he tarried 
thus, and he said in tones so weak as to be scarcely understood, " Forsooth, I 
have forgotten where the post-partum artery doth reside, for I fain would tie it; 
but now, alas, she hath perished and I alone am the cause of it." I was about 
to ask him if he remembered of having ever heard while at Rush of compress- 
ing the aorta. But another slide was now put in. 

This one was down in Posey county, where the paw-paws grow and the 
grasshopper becomes a burden. It was a typical farm-yard scene such as 
Eggleston describes, and seated in the midst thereof and on an averted basket 
was Noah Thompson, apparently happy and contented. He was busily 
engaged in trying to find out how much back salary was due him from the Big 
4 railroad, and would occasionally take time enough to look up and rebuke one 
of the many small dirty-faced children that were playing around, that re- 
sembled him considerably and were very prone to do evil. 

How changed, thought I, and yet another beautiful example of the eternal 
fitness of things. I could not help but shed a tear, for he was once my room- 
mate, and as I gazed with tear-stained eyes on the picture now fast disappear- 
ing, behold there came to view a scene of different nature. 

It was on the north side. There was a mammoth building with a sign- 
board of large dimensions which read, " Windmueller & Bock's Summer 
Garden. Performance now going on." I, of course, stepped inside. The 
iirst one I met was Emil. His body large and encumbered with flesh, his face 

207 



like unto a full moon. He took me into the concert hall, and there I saw a 
large multitude of our class-mates seated in small groups around the tables, and 
drinking a peculiar liquid of an amber hue, on the top of which a white foam 
like unto that made by barbers. While listening in horror at their jabberings 
and comments on the merits of each respective star as he appeared, one Von 
Bismarck stepped upon the stage. After the applause had died out he took 
a cough drop and sang with wonderful pathos and feeling that beautiful ballad, 
written by himself, entitled, " I am the man who won the Brainard prize." 
The emphasis on the /was particularly noticeable. 

We then did go outside into the barroom. Emil said there is another of 
our class-mates here perhaps you would like to see him, and taking me to the 
box-office I saw W. L. Thompson selling seats. Windy said, "You see he was 
such a good man with seats that we could not get along without him." 

He then showed me some large oil paintings of his friends. One par- 
ticularly do I remember, it was that of Eades. All it needed was a wind 
machine fastened to it to make it as natural as life. "This," he said, "I value 
most highly, for he was my dearest friend." 

We now went outside the building and Emil called my attention to two 
old men sitting on the pavement asking alms of passersby. " Do you see 
those fellows there?" said he, "They are Best and Baker. They exhausted 
all of their nerve while at Rush and have been total wrecks ever since." 
Methought, "The mills of the gods grind slowly, but they grind exceedingly 
fine." 

I bade Windmueller a hasty adieu and started down the street, and as I 
strolled along whom should I meet but our own sweet Tarsi. He said in tones 
convincing that he now did hold a chair in Rush. I plucked my button from 
my coat and cast it from me ; but when he told me that this chair he fain did 
hold was in the coal department, I did compose myself, for Rush was saved and 
we might again rejoice. Now it came to pass as I talked with Tarsi that 
sweet strains of Wagnerian music did fall upon my ear, and as I listened, behold 
the vibrations did increase, until at length there did come upon the scene one 
DeVere, the mighty man from Montana, his whiskers being tossed by the 
festive breeze, that seemingly did enjoy its gambols with his hirsutes. At last 
methought those whiskers are of some avail. 

The next I saw was our most worthy Ex-Com., and even now I did perceive 
that they had on a beautiful and picturesque jag, and when I did inquire the 
cause of this undue hilarity, one Nichols, nicknamed the Short, then did say, 
" E'en so, we got our names on the invitations and now we do rejoice." 

There now did appear a store on Clark street, and over the entrance thereto 
hung three golden balls, and still above these were the words, Collins & 
Downey, Loan Brokers." 

Then did I see Weston (that pretty creature not made for profane hands 
to touch) lecturing at the Woman's Medical College. He was telling the 
young creatures where the duct of the spleen did empty, whereupon one 
ancient maid did swoon and faint away, and was regaled to the outer air until 
she did revive. 

208 



The next I saw was in a Sunday school. And there before the young 
innocents stood Skinner, telling them the beautiful story of Ananias and 
Sapphira ; while Morris played the organ and King passed the hat. I also 
noticed Allen, Hickman and Hammond teaching classes. I suppose "there was 
a method in their madness." 

After Supt. Skinner had finished his story, and the moist eyes had been 
dried and the sobs had died out, he said : " Now, children, I want to show you 
what drink will do for men, so that you seeing may take warning from their 
dreadful example.'' He thereupon led forth Mammon and Peters, both 
looking like the pictures one sees in the W. C. T. U. papers, and both alike 
ready for drunkards' graves. It was indeed a sad sight to behold, and while 
they stood before the audience, Mammon was trying to kill a couple of snakes 
he saw crawl out of Peters' shoe. Supt. Skinner then said, "Children, no 
words are necessary. It speaks for itself. Now let us rise and sing in closing 
the first and last stanzas of that beautiful hymn by Bro. Truman entitled, ' Let 
not your angry passions rise.' " 

The next scene was quite different in its character. A penitentiary, and 
there behind the bars in clothes that would make a tennis blazer blush for 
shame, were Hunt and Russell. Their beautiful whiskers all shaved off, their 
hair likewise, and it was very evident that getting their daylight in little 
square chunks did not agree with them. I only had a word with them, for 
the}' were hurried off to their work — Hunt to painting wheelbarrows and 
Russell to the laundry. I inquired of Warden Elkington what they were in 
for, and he told me in that same wise way that Russell had been caught stealing 
from his own trunk and Hunt was in for bigamy. 

The next I saw was Copeland. He had a large basket in his hand, and 
when I asked him what he did with it, he told me that he had a job carrying 
microbes from the dispensary upstairs on clinic days, and on the other days he 
carried them down again. 

I next saw Rowe, the man with the anchylosed face. He told me that he 
and Ganson were divorced, 'for whenever they worked the Faculty, Ganson 
always got the biggest slice. 

I looked at my watch and found that if I wanted to be in time for the 
lecture I must hurry back. I started and stumbled over a large stone. I 
awoke. I found myself on the floor. I had fallen from bed. 

F. W. Miller. 




209 




. - -■■. ^-,--tite^|jw.::^pr^r.^ | - -jj--. -=-ijj-. <i «^. j^- a«-J|p-i b^ j mJBJ iff ft 



College anniversaries 

fterm of '94 ano '95 

OPENING EXERCISES . . . September 25, 1894 

DOCTORATE SERMON . . . Sunday, May 19, 1895 

CLASS DAY EXERCISES) 

SPECIAL CLINICS \ May 2 °' I§95 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES . . May 22, 1895 

ANNUAL MEETING OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION . May 22, 1895 

ANNUAL BANQUET OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION . May 22, 1S95 



©pening Ejercises 



Serm Of '94*'95 



College Amphitheater, September 25, 1894. 



¥ ¥ ¥ 



programme 



OPENING REMARKS 

PRAYER 

INAUGURAL ADDRESS 

ADDRESS 



Pres. E. L. Holmes 

Rev. Dr. Withrow 

Prof. Arthur Dean Bevan, M. D. 

Dr. J. M. Coulter 



Benebiction 



'■■';.'-y*':-i;*vv<":V'": 










ZIbe Stub£ of /ITSebicine 

Opening Address of Session of '94-95, delivered by 

Hrtbur Dean Bevan, flD. ®. 

Sept. 25TH, '94, in College Amphitheater. 

TO-NIGHT marks for us the beginning of a new year's work in the 
study of medicine. It is my pleasing duty to welcome back to the 
Alma Mater the old students, and to extend to the new matriculates 
the hand of fellowship of the great science to which they have 
chosen to consecrate their lives. In the opening address customary 
at these formal exercises let me discuss briefly with you the study of Medicine 
under these heads: Medicine a Science, American Medical Schools, The 
Equipment of a Medical School, The Equipment of a Medical Student, Under- 
graduate Work and Post-graduate Work. 

MEDICINE A SCIENCE. 

I congratulate the student who to-day begins his medical studies, for medi- 
cine has assumed the dignity of a science. The sciences of Anatomy, Physi- 
ology, Chemistry, Pathology, Bacteriology and Materia Medica form the firm 
foundation of Medicine, and upon these sciences the practice of Medicine and 
Surgery and Obstetrics are built. The intelligent world recognizes that there 
can be but one science of medicine, and as a result the old medical dogmas 
have been cast aside and find no place except in the masquerade of the 
ignorant and the charlatan. Modern Medicine is a science and can have no 
nationality. The English, the German, the French, the Italian, the American 
schools of medicine are practically identical, all are working for a common 
object, all employ the same methods. Each nation adds its share to the com- 
mon store of medical knowledge. Within a few years the French have given 
to the world the foundations of Bacteriology. The Germans have made 
Pathology a science and have added to almost even- department of medicine. 
The English have furnished the greatest discovery of the century in antiseptic 
surgery. America can be proud of its contributions, anaesthetics and abdomi- 
nal surgery. 



Medical journalism, international congresses, the increasing number of men 
who have access to English, French and German medical literature, the 
increasing number of men who spend their wander jahr in the universities of 
other countries, have aided greatly in giving medicine an international charac- 
ter. This international character of the science and art of medicine makes it 
necessary for all countries to employ the same methods in the teaching of 
medicine. This we find to be now approximately the case. 

This has not always been so. 

AMERICAN SCHOOLS. 

For very definite and uncontrollable reasons America for many years lagged 
behind both in the practice and in the teaching of Medicine. Our democratic 
form of government, the newness of the country, the rapid increase in material 
wealth and its blind pursuit, were not suited to the foundation of great scien- 
tific institutions nor to the production of a class of men to be satisfied with a 
plodding and illy paid scientific career. This condition has fortunately 
changed. With the maturing of large communities has come a recognition for 
art and science, and this recognition has given birth to the institutions and the 
men who have placed American Medicine and our best American Medical 
schools in a position where they are not excelled by those of any country in 
the world. 

A medical student can obtain as thorough a training in the large educa- 
tional centers of this country as he can in London or Berlin, Paris or Vienna. 
In original research work, the highest aim of a university, we are still behind, 
but in this, too, we are making rapid progress. 

On the continent and in Great Britain the standard of the medical schools 
is uniform. In America there is a regretable lack of a uniform standard, and 
there are still many schools of a low grade, but the tendency is toward such 
rapid improvement that we are warranted in feeling enthusiastic for the future 
of American medicine. The American Medical College Association is doing 
much to bring about the desired uniformity. Possibly no community in this 
country could furnish a better example of the development of fifty years in the 
teaching of medicine than does Chicago. 

Fifty years ago the one medical college in Chicago consisted of a single 
room and four instructors; there was no hospital, no dispensary; there were no 
laboratories; the course required was two terms of sixteen weeks each. 
Improvements were gradually and continuously made until the two years were 
lengthened to four, the term of sixteen weeks to eight months. A large dis- 
pensary and a large hospital have become a part of the college, complete 
laboratories have been built and equipped, the teaching force of four men has 
grown to sixty. The history of medical schools in the other large centres of 
the United States has been almost a repetition of the same story. 

During this period of evolution American schools could be and they were 
criticised by the British and continental schools for their lack of facilities and 
their low standard. These critics did not understand the conditions and diffi- 
culties with which American medicine had to contend. 

2r 3 



If they had they would have seen that these pioneers in medical teaching 
were accomplishing their work in the only way that it could be accomplished, 
and that they were deserving of all praise; they would have recognized the 
necessary steps in the evolution that would place American schools on a parity 
with their own. There is still much to be accomplished, much to be desired. 
In the future development of medicine America must be an important factor. 

THE EQUIPMENT OF A MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

A medical college should be in a large centre of population from which it 
can draw clinical material. It should have closely associated with it a large 
hospital and dispensary. It must have access to a large supply of pathological 
material. It must have fully equipped college and laboratory facilities. It 
must have sufficient revenue and endowment to enable it to command the best 
talent for its teaching force. The future American medical school will form a 
part of a large end well endowed university. 

THE EQUIPMENT OF THE STUDENT. 

It is desirable that men who begin the study of medicine should have a 
technical preparatory education. Such education should include a limited 
amount of Latin and Greek, and a thorough course in the natural sciences and 
modern languages. Such a technical education is of great value to a medical 
student. However, it is a fact that many of the men who have made great 
names for themselves have lacked this early training. 

UNDERGRADUATE MEDICAL WORK. 

The function of a medical school is limited to the training of men in those 
subjects and in such a way that they may become practicing physicians and 
surgeons. A medical school cannot make experts of its students in the sciences 
which are studied. To be an expert chemist or an expert pathologist means a 
life's work. These sciences are to be studied with the idea that the student 
must obtain from them those facts which will be of service to him in his practi- 
cal work. The medical course should cover four years. 

The first year is devoted to Anatomy, Physiology, Chemistry and Materia 
Medica. These subjects are to be taught by lectures, recitations and practical 
laboratory and dissecting-room work. The introduction of compulsory recita- 
tion work is to be regarded as a great improvement. In Germany a medical 
student has very little compulsory work; he takes out the required number of 
courses and is expected at the end of his time to have passed the required 
examination. This system produces, as one of Germany's great pathological 
teachers has said, two classes of students, very good and very poor students- 
The ambitious men take advantage of all opportunities offered, the lazy men 
do little or no work. Compulsory work does not affect the high grade men in 
a class, but it does produce a better general average. 

The practical work consists of dissections in Anatomy, microscopical work 
in Histology, laboratory work in Physiology, in Chemistry and in Materia 
Medica, and lastly we must mention the lectures, which are a systematic 

214 



presentation of each subject by the professor in charge. Formerly the 
teaching of medicine consisted almost entirely of didactic lectures; these now 
divide the field with recitations and laboratory work. Didactic lectures have 
their own peculiar place in the teaching of medicine which they will always 
retain. Their object is to place before the student a systematic review of a 
subject, to explain intricate and emphasize important points, to give the student 
an idea of what he must know, so that he can more intelligently do his recita- 
tion and laboratory work. 

The second year completes the study of Anatomy, Physiology. Chemistry 
and Materia Medica, and takes up also the study of Pathology and Bacteriology- 
The first two years are devoted exclusively to the study of the sciences upon 
which medicine is founded. These sciences teach the structure of the human 
body, its functions and its chemistry. They teach the gross and microscopical 
appearance of diseased tissues. They teach the source and chemistry and 
preparation of the materials used in medicine. 

The third and fourth years of a medical course are devoted to the study of 
the practical branches — Medicine, Surgery and Obstetrics; and the special 
branches which have grown out of these, as Gynaecology, Eye and Ear, Diseases 
of the Skin, Nose and Throat, etc. These subjects are studied by lectures and 
recitations, the practical work being in the form of clinics and the manual 
training school courses, in bandaging, in the use of the ophthalmoscope and 
stethoscope and laryngoscope, course in operative surgery on the cadaver, and 
obstetrical courses on the phantom. In his college course a student reviews 
the sciences upon which medicine is based. He reviews the practical branches 
of medicine. His hand and eye and ear take their first lessons in the art of 
medicine. 

Still with all this knowledge and training his own, he must recognize that 
he has but commenced the study of medicine. 

POST-GRADUATE WORK. 

After graduation the aim of the medical student should be to obtain a 
hospital appointment. A year or two in a hospital under a good staff, with the 
opportunity of putting to practical use the knowledge which he has acquired, 
the opportunities of working under good men, seeing their successes and mis- 
takes, is worth many times the same amount of time spent in private practice. 
To obtain such a position is worth almost any saciifice. 

The young medical man should regard his entering into practice as the 
beginning of post-graduate work. In it he must acquire greater facility in the 
means of diagnosis. He must acquire greater dexterity in the use of instru- 
ments. He must acquire from results confidence in himself and the methods he 
employs. He must keep up with the knowledge of his day by following the 
medical literature; by bringing himself in contact with the leaders in medicine, 
and familiarizing himself with their work. He should be ambitious to master 
the modern languages and gain access to their literature. He should be 
ambitious to see the work done in other countries, which will give him confi- 
dence in that done in his own. He must be ever guided by the sense that it is 

215 



his duty to give to his patients the benefit of the best knowledge and the best 
skill that his generation affords. No man whose ambition is to make money 
should choose a medical career. What is he to look forward to? If he is 
successful he will earn a living; he may amass a competency. If he acquires a 
love for scientific work, he will find that his work is a constant source of interest 
and pleasure, His professional career gives him a wide horizon. It brings 
him in contact with every phase of life; his is the opportunity of doing much 
good. In front of him are great undiscovered truths of science. It may be 
his to give some great boon to humanity and leave, like Jenner and Lister, 
Morton and Simpson, an indelible impress on the history of the world. In the 
human tragedy the physician plays an important part. 

In Greece, more than two thousand years ago, a young man began his 
medical studies under a great physician and repeated after his preceptor this 
oath: "I swear by Apollo, the physician, and /Esculapius and Health and 
Allheal, and all the gods and goddesses that, according to my ability and judg- 
ment, I will keep this oath and stipulation — to reckon him who taught me this 
art equally dear to me as my parents, to share my substance with him, and 
relieve his necessities if required; to look upon his offspring in the same 
footing as my own brothers, and to teach them this art, if they wish to learn 
it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture and every other 
mode of instruction, I will impart a knowledge of this art to my own sons, 
and to those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath 
according to the law of medicine, but to none others. I will follow that system 
of regimen which, according to my ability and judgment, I consider for the 
benefit of my patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischiev- 
ous. I will give no deadly medicine to any one if asked, nor suggest any such 
counsels and in like manner I will not give to a woman the means to produce 
abortion. With purity and with holiness I will pass my life and practice my 
art. I will not cut persons laboring under stone, but will leave this to be done 
by men who are practitioners of this work. Into whatever houses I enter I will 
go into them for the benefit of the sick, and will abstain from every voluntary 
act of mischief and corruption. Whatever, in connection with my professional 
practice or not, I see or hear in the life of men which ought not to be spoken 
of abroad, I will not divulge, as reckoning that all such should be kept secret. 
While I continue to keep this oath unviolated, may it be granted to me to 
enjoy life and the practice of the art, respected by all men in all times! But 
should I trespass and violate this oath may the reverse be my lot." 

To-night, like that young Greek, you begin your medical studies under the 
guidance of your Alma Mater. It is her wish that ere you cross the threshold 
of her door you pause and read, " Medicine is for him and for him only who 
masters its science and its art and employs them for the good of mankind." 



|% 



16 



<3rabuatiiiG Class of 1894. 



©fficers of tbe Class. 



F. E. Andre, Valedictorian. E. H. Ochsner, President. J. V. CANAVAN, Vice-President. 

H. M. Hayes, Secretary. E. B. McAllister, Treasurer. John Ross, Historian. 

F. W. Miller, Prophet. A. T. Corliss, Chaplain. J. V. Russell, Chorister. 

O. B. Bock, Sergeant-at-Anns. 

Executive Committee: F. P. Lierle; W. E. Nichols; B. N. Clark; E. L. Wyckoff; C. H. Manning. 



Alien, Frank Harvey 

Anders'-n, Wilbur 

Andre, Frank Edgar 

Asquith, Arthur Clyde 

Bacon, Henry Leander 

Baker, George Washington, Jr. 

Barothy, Arpad Moeller 

Beaconi, Daniel F. 

Bedard, Ulric Antonio 
}Behle, Augustus C. 

Beise, Charles James 

Best, lames Archibald 

Blanchard, Milton E. M. D. 
tBock. Otto Bismarck, Ph. G. 

Braucht, Frederick E. 

Brown. Almon L„ B. S. 

Buck, Ralph Emerson 

Bullen, Simeon John Robert, M.D. 

Bishop, Joseph Alonzo 
**Butler, William Joseph 

Byrnes, Frank 

Canavan, James Vincent 

Camfield, Bradford Allen, M. D. 

Cavanaugh, Richard Edward 
ttCenter, Charles Dewey 

Chapman, Campbell McGavern 

Chapman, George Lincoln 

Chapman, Robert Richard 

Clark, Burton Nelson 

Class, William John 

Close, Joseph Hooker 

Cook, John Henry, B. L. 

Cook, 'William H. 

Collins, Charles 

Copeland, Cecil Clare 

Corliss, Allen Timothy 

Dale, George L. A., B. S. 

Day, Francis Root, M. D. 

DeFries, John Christian 

DeVere, Joseph Goodman, B. A. 

Dewire, Milton V. 

Downey. William St. John 

Doxev, Loren Bisco 

Doyle, Guy P. 

Drake. Frank Irwin, B. L. 

Eade, Thomas M. 

Elkinton, Charles Holden 

Evans, Edward Purdon 

Fenelon, William James 

Finney, John. M. D. 

Folev, Fred Charles 

Frankhauser, Silas B. 

Ganson, Lee, Ph. G. 

Germain, Georee Henry 

Grote. Henry Wallace, Ph. G. 

Grothan, Ole, M. D. 



Haecker, Lewis E. 
Hamilton, Isaiah E., M. D. 
Hammond, Herbert Kollin, B. S. 
Harvey, William David 
Hayes, Daniel Joseph 
Hayes, Harry Marion 
Head, Merton Lawrence 
SHelvie, Charles Amiddes, B. S. 
Hemmi, Stephen A., M. D. 
Hess. Calvin Frederick 
Heydenreich, Max, Ph. G. 
Hickman. Allen Ray 
Hill, Erasmus Manford 
Hill, Harry Campbell 
Hill, John Hickman 
Howard, Harvey 
Hunt, Bader Sheridan 
Hunter, Charles W. 
Hutter, Vincent, M. D. 
Ingalls, Edmond Church 
Jaynes, Edwin Thompson, B. A. 
Keith, Wilford Kennedy 
Kelly, Joseph W„ A. B. 
King, Elliott R. 
King. Walter Stansby 
Kittilsen, Albeit Nicholaus, Ph.B. 
Koon, Thomas Mart 
Laibe. Frank J. 
Lee, William H., M. D. 
Lierle, Fred Perkins 
Loope, Truman Elbert Jr., B. S. 
Lukemeyer, Louis Charles 
Malster, Robert Mahaffey 
Mammen. Goke Henry 
Manning, Charles H. 
Mason. John Benedict, D. D. S. 
McAllister, Edwin Boyd 
McClellan, William Stewart, B. S. 
McCreight, Marlin Samuel, Ph.G. 
Miller, Francis Wallace 
Misick, OelS.. M.D. 
Montgomery, Edward Stanford 
Moore, Charles Richard 
Morris, Edward Kirbv 
Mueller, George. Ph. G. 
Nason, John Blaisdell 
Nichols, Forrest Clifford 
Nichols, George Clarence 
Nichols, William Edward 
Niven. John S. 
Nolan, William Norbert 
Ochsner. Edward H., B. S. 
Peters, Ralph Moore 
Peters, Warren Tecumseh 
Prendergast, Joseph 



Reagles, Robert 

Rettig. Frederick August 

Reynolds, Peter lames, B. S. 

Rife, Clinton Francis 

Riordan, James C. 

Ross, John. B. S. 

Rowe, Jesse Ph. G. 

Russell, lames V. 

Russell, Lemuel Baxley, Ph. B. 
**Ryan, Lawrence 

Sawyers, Clyde E., B. S. 

Schierding. William Philip 

Schultze. Moritz 

Shaykett, Frank Edward 

Simecek, Joseph 

Skinner, George Coleman 

Smith, D. Edmund, B. A. 

Sterns, Willis Leroy 

Sterrett, William Stokes 

Stevens, George Michael 
ttStewart, Alexander F"raser 

Stone, Charles Albert 

Strong, Henry Clement, D. D. S. 

Stulik. Charles 

Surenson, Marshall 

Sutcliff, William T. 

Swantek. Charles M. 

Swezey. Frank Arthur 

Swennes. Ole Samuel, A. B. 

Taylor, John Lincoln, Ph. G. 

Thompson, Harry F. 

Thompson, Noah Howard 

Thompson, William Lincoln, B.S. 
*Tibby, Thomas Gordon 

Tice, Frederick 

Tompach, Emil Leonard 

Trueman, George A. 

Vasumpaur. Joseph, Ph. G. 

VonRehm, Edmund C. 

Waiss, George Christian 

Walker. Robert John 

Ward, Nathaniel Parker 

Warnshuis, Edward John Henry- 
Webb, Edward L., M. D. 

Weston, Frank Reuel 

Whitney, Charles R„ B. S. 

Wiedemann, Frank Edward 

Willett, Harry Cushman 

Williams, lohn Charles 

Windmueller, Emil 

Wipf. Andreas Albert 
|| Wyckoff, Edwin Lewis 

Voting, Albert Frederick 



^Students who received the Certificate of Honor, for attendance upon four full courses in this institution. 
**Awarded the Benjamin Rush Prize for the highest examinations in every department of medicine. 

tAwarded the Daniel Brainard Prizes for the best dissection in Surgical Anatomy. 

tAwarded the De Laskie Miller Prize for the best examination in Obstetrics. 
^Awarded the ist Freer Prize to Seniors, for the best thesis on Diphtheria. 
T+Awarded the 2nd Freer Prize to Seniors, for a thesis on Diphtheria. 

^Awarded the 3rd Freer Prize to Seniors, for a thesis on Diphtheria. 

Mr. T. R. Welch, and Mr. H. B. Bartholomew ol the Middle Class, received the ist and 2nd Freer Prize, for 
the best examination in Obstetrics. 

WDeceased . 

217 



Htbletic association Benefit 

Entertainment given by the Students in the 
Amphitheater, December 7, 1894 

¥¥¥¥¥¥ 

programme 



Mandolin Club, 
Recitation, 

Cornet Solo, 

Solo, 

Reading, 



E. A. Weimer. 
Dr. S. C. Beech. 
W. A. Metzger. 



Miss Alice Mary Skinner. 
Duet — Violin and Piano, . 



D. S. Skinner. 
D. L. Humfrevtlle. 



Middle Class Quartette, 

S. D. Beebe. 



College Songs, 



W. D. Brode. 

A. T. HOLBROOK 

flntermiaaion. 



M. C. Johnson. 
A. L. Smith. 



Selected. 
" Casey at the Bat." 

Selected. 

" You." 

" Sisterly Scheme." 

Husarenritt. 

Selected. 

Selected. 



Mandolin Club, 


Selected. 


Piano Solo, 




Sonata 

R. J. TlVNEN. 


Reading, 




" My Rival.' 
Zelda Paldi. Accompanist, Nan Paldi. 


Recitation, 




" Tradin' Joe.' 
W. Colby Rucker. 


Solo, 




Selected. 
G. \V. Shirk. 


Reading, 




" Mrs. McDuffy at Base Ball' 
Miss Alice Mary Skinner. 


Middle Class 


Quartette, . . . Selected 



218 




*§* *§* tjf (g 

jftrst Hnnual Gbarit^ 36all 

Benefit for the Central Free Dispensary. 

programme 

OVERTURE, --.-.- Orchestra. 

"SAILOR'S DREAM," - - - - Rush Quartette. 

THE " RUSH " OF TO-DAY, - Prof. Arthur Dean Bevan. 

VIOLIN SOLO— Selected, - - - - F. E. Tromley. 

Miss Lulu Rowe, Accompanist. 
THE DOCTOR IN LAW, - Judge M. V. Gannon. 

PIANO SOLO— Selected, - - - Harry Detweiller. 

THE DOCTOR SOCIALLY, - - Prof. James H. Etheridge. 

VOCAL SOLO-" Infelice," - - - Verdi. 

Mr. Arthur Atkinson. 

¥¥¥¥ 

Committees 

rush medical college. 

arrangements 
G. N. Ryan, '95. 

IReception 

VV. H. Lewis, '95. F. E. Wallace, '96. 

Chas. Bolsta, '95. E. M. Eckard, '96. 

J. E. Luckey, '97. 

G. S. Hall, '97. 

CHICAGO COLLEGE DENTAL SURGERY. 

Fay Solliday. '95. H. J. Goslee, '95. 

219 






/Iftemorial Ejercises 



"Clnveilincj of a Bronse Bas=TRelief 
1Tn flDemorv? of 

Dr. James 5u\>bam IRnoy 

(Professor of ©bstetrics 



Exercises held in the College Amphitheater, 
December 5, 1S94. 



INVOCATION 

THE COLLEGE HYMN 

PRESENTATION OF TABLET 

ACCEPTANCE 

MEMORIAL ADDRESS . 

"THE PSALM OF LIFE" 

BENEDICTION . 



Rev. Dr. Withrow 

Rush Quartette 

Dr. Holmes 

(In behalf of Mrs. Knox) 

Dr. Etheridge 

Tn behalf of the Trustees and Faculty 

Rev. Dr. Withrow 

Rush Quartette and Audience 

Rev. Dr. Withrow 



Sophomore (Quartette 




Merlin C. Johnson, - - First Tenor. 

Spencer D. Beebe, - - Second Tenor. 

Andrew L. Smith, - - - First Bass. 

William D. Brode, - - Second Bass. 







*$? 



♦fOusb flDebical College Branch of the 
H)oung fIDen's Christian Hssociation 



/IliOttO: — "A sound mind in a sound body, dominated 
by a sound will" 




HE beautiful home for young men, the West Side Building, 

located at 542 Monroe Street, near Ashland, is open all day 

and evening as a rendezvous for medical students. The pleasant 

parlors, game rooms, well stocked reading room, bath rooms, 

bowling alleys, bicycle storage, and gymnasium combine to 

make it so indeed. An attractive meeting on Sundays at 

four o'clock is a profitable feature also. The special student's 

gymnasium class under a competent leader is in successful 

operation. But the game of basket ball is what eclipses all else in genuine 

pleasurable interest, as well as the physical development that necessarily 

follows. 

The work in the college consists of a " Fall Campaign," which is 
designed to help new students in getting located; also the carrying of a 
weekly meeting for students, and conducted by students, Professors and 
leading Pastors of the neighborhood. This work is in charge of an organ- 
ization committee which consists this year of the following officers: 

E. J. Witt, Chairman. 

W. D. Brode, Vice-Chairman. 

M. T. Brewer, Secretary. 

Dr. John Edwin Rhodes is chairman of the Inter-Collegiate Depart- 
ment, which embraces all the leading professional schools of the city. 



Hn flfoemortam 



C. H. PIERCE, M. U., 
Assistant in Anatomy, 
Died, November 9, 1894. 



JACOB S. HENKINS, 
Class of '95, 
Died, March 6, 1895. 



DAVID P. HAUSER, 

Class of '96, 

Died, March 4, 1895. 



Corpuscle 



Coitorial Committee 




E. I). Whiting. J. E. Luckev. 

E. M. Eckard. W. D. Calvin. F. C. Honnold. 



224 



XLhc Corpuscle 

RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE, CHICAGO, ILL. 
Medical Department Lake Forest University. 



Vol. 4. FEBRUARY, 1895. No - 6 - 



EDITORIAL COMMITTEE. 

W. D. CALVIN, '95, President. 
F. C. HONNOLD, '96, Secretary. E. M. ECKARD, '96, Treasurer. 

E. D. WHITING, '97. J. E. LUCKEY, '97. 

Communications relative to advertisements and subscriptions (subscription price g'-oo 
per annum), should be addressed to the publishers. Remittances should be made by money 
order, draft or registered letter, payable to " The Corpuscle," and addressed to Messrs. 
Calvin & Honnold, 731 Jackson Boulevard. 

Ruby Red and Black: Colors of Lake Forest University. Orange: Color of Rush 

Medical College. 



EDITORIAL. 




Prominent among the interesting mementos that adorn the north wall 
of the college amphitheater is an attractive and unique frescoed design 
whose suggestiveness might escape the casual observer; carefully regarded, 
however, it is of unusual interest. It was painted shortly after the enlarge- 
ment of the present clinical arena, but attracted little or no attention, ex- 
cept as a decoration, the fitness of which was neither criticised nor praised. 



'■25 



Gberapentic Xectnre Botes 

Prof. D. R. Brower. 

Pharmaceutical Preparations classified according to therapeutic uses. 
Group I. — Systematic Medicine. 
Class i. — Medicines acting on the body at large by their 

ffacnltp motes 

Various matters demanding his attention have delayed the anticipated 
departure of Prof. Haines until the present time. He hopes, however, to be 
able to leave for the West at an early date, and while away will, we understand, 
be engaged in the preparation of " An American Text Book of Medical 
Jurisprudence and Toxicology," of the American Text Book series that are 
published by W. B. Saunders, of Philadelphia. 

Hlumni Department 

John M. Dodson, A. M., M. D., Editor. 

Membership in the Alumni Association of Rush Medical College is obtain- 
able at any time by graduates of the College, providing they are in good stand- 
ing in the profession and shall pay the annual dues, $1.00. This fee includes 
a subscription to The Corpuscle for the current year. This journal is the offi- 
cial organ of the Association. 

Dues and all communications relating to the Association should be sent to 
John Edwin Rhodes, M. D., Sec'y and Treas., 34 Washington St., Chicago. 

College Anniversaries — Doctorate Sermon, Sunday, May 19, 1895. 

Special Clinics and Class-Day Exercises, Monday, May 20, 1895. 

Special Clinics and Scientific Meeting of the Association — 9 a. m., 10 a. m., 
2 p. m.; Theater Party, 7 p. m., Tuesday, May 21, 1895. 

Business Meeting of the Alumni Association — Commencement Exercises 
and Alumni Banquet, 11 a. m., 2 p. m., and 7 p. m., Wednesday, May 22, 1895. 

'53 — We learn from Dr. C. D. Wescott that Dr. Wm. Curless, a student 
of Rush in 1847 anc ^ again in 1853, has been for 

Htbletic Department 

It is certainly high time that the Rush talent in base-ball should be gath- 
ered and sorted preparatory to the organization and training which a success- 
ful campaign the coming year will demand. 

Reports are reaching us daily of various former adversaries who are 
already diligently disposing of all useless avoirdupois. 

Gbe Corpuscle 

PSEUDOPODIA — A WARNING. 

A man is going about the country, says a neighborhood paper, claiming 
to be John the Baptist. He has dark hair and chin whiskers and looks like a 
farmer. The editor goes on in a friendly adjuration: "We desire to warn 
our readers if he 



XTbe Corpuscle 




HE many incidents connected with the early life of The 
Corpuscle have already been enumerated in detail by 
Dr. Chas. Center in the Pulse of last year; but for the 
benefit of the hundreds of new students who have since 
chosen Rush to be their alma mater, a few of the early 
-: incidents will be repeated. 

3- To Dr. E. S. Goodhue, '92, now located at River- 

\ side, Cal., is given the honor of being the person to 

furnish the idea of publishing a medical college journal, and 
to edit and publish the first copy of The Corpuscle, Novem- 
ber 1, 1890 — the first publication of its kind in the United States. 
Dr. G. in his salutatory editorial said: " It is called The Corpuscle 
because we expect it to circulate throughout the college system, and have a 
part to do in helping to build up and strengthen the organization which it per- 
vades. It will be the students' organ, since everything has an organ, and not 
an official publication, although it goes out with the approval and assistance 
of our Faculty. I expect to see half a dozen medical college journals within 
half a year after the appearance of The Corpuscle." 

The first issue, a twelve-page edition, abounded in original notes and short 
newsy articles concerning the college and students, and judging from an 
announcement on one of the last pages, "that there will probably be a second 
issue in April, 1891," we infer that it was not the intention at that time, or at 
least not thought possible, to publish a monthly journal. The second edition 
appeared July 1, 1891, edited and managed by eleven editors. It soon became 
manifest, however, that so large a representation was detrimental, therefore 
the Board was reduced to five and the business management was placed in the 
hands of W.J. Anderson, who either directly or indirectly managed this depart- 
ment until July, 1894. The demands for enlargement and improvement could 
not be satisfactorily complied with by one whose only interest in the journal 
was a monetary interest, and an unsuccessful effort was made in 1S93 to place 
the management with those who were otherwise interested in the paper and 
school. This change was finally successfully made, and since September, 1894, 
the management has been with representatives of the Board. 

The Faculty have become supporters of the medium by way of furnishing 
articles and clinical reports for its columns. 

The alumni have adopted it as their official organ. 



227 



The students find in its columns an ever open opportunity to express 
the nselves, on the condition that such expressions be signed. 

More than a half dozen student journals have been started since 1891, and 
their fates have varied, some having survived, while others, for various reasons, 
have already become a part of the past. While in the beginning the journal was 
strictly a student's paper, circumstances have demanded that this idea be mod- 
ified, inasmuch as so large a number of the alumni have manifested so pro- 
nounced an interest, therefore enlargements have from time to time been made, 
so that at the present fifty-six instead of twelve pages are found within its 
covers. To be sure this shows a growth which has, however, been made with 
greater difficulty than it seems ought to have been experienced. 

There surely can be no better field for a medical publication than exists 
here at Rush, with her large and influential Faculty, her 800 students and 6,000 
alumni. Upon such a staunch institutional foundation, the journal of Rush 
Medical College, filled with clinical reports of her superior amphitheater 
clinics, timely articles written by her most able instructors, special interesting 
cases reported by members of her numerous alumni, and a more liberal contri- 
bution of notes by the students, can be made second to none other of the land. 
No existing special department need in any way be neglected, but all can be 
emphasized and improved; some, however, more emphatically correspondingly 
than others, and when circumstances demand new departments, space can be 
given as it has been to the well conducted alumni and athletic departments. 

It is very evident that a very large percentage of the existing medical 
journals are published and pushed by a collection of men as a personal adver- 
tisement, or by some corporation to get their goods before the medical world, 
and consequently lack dignity and tone in appearance, with a wrong aim; such 
it does not seem ought to be the foundation upon which any medical journal 
should rest; but instead of that there should be a common tie that would hold 
together a sufficient goodly number of individuals and supporters, contributors 
and readers of a journal published for their especial interests and enjoyment. 
Such a foundation it seems belongs to The Corpuscle, and by real experience 
have the many obstacles of the past been removed, so that the present is but 
thj door or epoch to a hopeful future. 

W. D. Calvin. 



228 



H>seu6opo6ta 



Selections 

Jfrom 

'Gbe 

Corpuscle" 

<Xbe 

College 

HDontbl\>. 



229 



H IPlea 



2ln impromptu sent to prot. Cotton, 
just bctorc eramlnat ion. 




T makes us or it mars us: think on that 
And fix most kind thy resolution." 
All are would-be doctors, doctor, 

Every mother's son; 
All have studied physic, too, 

In earnest or in fun. 
Some are only boys, doctor, 

With all the marks of youth, 
With faces smooth and noisy pranks, 

And confidence forsooth. 
Some are turning gray, doctor, 
With fleece as white as snow, 
While some have lost all trace of hair 
Whereon it used to grow. 
Some are housed in rooms, doctor, 

The sight of which would wake 
Your tender sympathetic sense, 

For very pity's sake. 
And if you saw the food, doctor. 

Or tasted it to see, 
On what your students oft are fed, 

Melted your heart would be; 
For they have hash and hash, doctor 

And hash and hash and hash, 
Until their exclamations reach 

The verge of something rash; 

And though all pious Medics, doc, 

'Tis more than they can bear 



To find hard gristle in the hash, 
And butter mixed with hair. 



Then some are fairly wed, doctor, 

And stand as best they may, 
The double lectures which they must 

Take notes on every day. 
And don't you pity those, doctor, 

Who, single, hourly pine 
For sweets they know not of, but which 

Intoxicate like wine! 
Ah! some are homely and some fair.doctor, 

Some jolly and some sad; 
And some are very, very good, 

And some are very bad; 
But all are anxious now, doctor, 

If you will bid them go, 
To leave these learned halls in peace, 
And practice what they know. 
For 'tis the wish of all, doctor, 

To gain a normal growth 
In body and in pocket-book, 

In either or in both. 
So bend your heart in love, doctor, 

Full mindful of our lot; 
Remember our cerebral lobes 

Have learned much and forgot; 
And we shall give you cheer, doctor, 

When we are doctors, too, 
And all the world will never know 
How much we ever knew. 



230 



XTbe anatomist's ©be to bis %ox>e 



a 



X 



X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


XXXXXXXXXX 



PRELUDE. 
XXXXXXXXXX 
X X 

g HE expression of love from her eyes so keen, 
1 I As they beam on another in a far distant land, 

a pleasure to feel — it can never be seen, 
Save you walk with my love, heart in heart, hand in hand. 



I list while thy heart and ascending aorta, 
Their volumes of valvular harmony pour, 

And my soul from this vascular music has caught a 
New life from this dry anatomical lore. 

Those beautiful orbs they are haunting me still, 

As they roll 'neath the palpebral, dimly translucent, 

Obeying in silence the magical will 
Of thy oculo-motor, pathetic abducent. 

Oh! thy cornea, love, has a radiant light, 

As the sparkle that laughs in the icicle's gleam, 

And thy crystalline lens, like a diamond bright, 
Through the quivering frame of thine iris is seen. 

Thou has stolen the charm from my studio dim, 

And I turn from dissections embittered with wrath; 

Thou has stepped betwixt me and my skeleton grim; 
Oh, Lady, fair Lady, why cross'd thou my path? 



It is a happy suggestion of Prof. C.'s that 
some of the boys who are afraid to attempt a 
recitation " have their backbones laundered." 



Said Cotton to a freshman, as he roused him with a start, 
"Can you tell us the effect of digitalis on the heart?" 

The startled freshman quick replied, " It quickeneth the beat.' 
"But how?" He could not answer and sadly took his seat. 

For illustration, take a mule who's always loath to start, 
Then ply the whip — the effect is like the drugs upon the heart. 
What is it works this wondrous change and brings him to a run? 
'Tis merely that you stimulate his " motor ganglion." 

23 1 




"Ibeart Failure'* 



huffled along the scaffold walk, 

Nor heeded the dizzy height, 
Then having dumped his mortar out, 

He turned and passed to the right. 
He stumbled — grasped to save himself, 

His downward course to check; 
He dropped about a hundred feet, 

And lit upon his neck. 

Did he die? 

Yes. 

Dislocated neck? 

No. Heart failure. 

He skated on the river's ice, 

The night was crisp and clear; 
The city being so close at hand, 

There were no wolves to fear. 
On, on he sped with lightning speed, 

The town more distant grew, 
A hole — a splash — a gurgle, and 

He disappeared from view. 

Did he die? 

Yes. 

Drowned? 

No. Heart failure. 

He loved his Nell for many years, 

He loved her hard and well, 
But never had the courage his 

Affection strange to tell. 
He nerved himself at last one night, 

As by her side he sat; 
He only got as far as " Nell," 

Then asked, "Where was I at?" 



Paralyzed? 

No. Heart failure. 






They were sitting in the carriage, 
Waiting for their chaperone — 
"Oh, give me just one little kiss 
While waiting here alone." 



'No, Charles, that goes for tapping 

Or pressing trousers straight, 
But we draw the line distinctly 
At these 'kisses while you wait." 



shoes. 



232 



Stages 



As a surgeon's clerk I find, 

That they underrate my mind, 
Though I show my dressers what they make mistakes in; 

So my ardor soon expires, 

And I seek the smoke-room fires, 
Unless we get the very best of "takes-in." 

When Medicine is my quest, 

And the mysteries of the chest, 
To reach a right conclusion oft is trying; 

But if not certain quite, 

Of a diagnosis right, 
Perhaps am aided by the patient kindly dying. 

Now my forte will always be 

In the art of Surgery, 
Of my skill in that there can be no denying. 

First I use my eyes with care, 

Then my fingers bring to bear, 
Last my tongue, for fear the patient may be lying. 

At length a longed degree, 

Entitles to a fee, 
Though a practice takes for most a deal of making; 

Still if knowledge is my friend, 

'Twill be all right in the end; 
But if not, 'twill be a long-continued "take-in." 



Pegram says his coat has acquired a peculiar 
odor for which he cannot account. He isn't 
sure but some of those little dark animals may 
have taken a shot at him. 

Freshman Banks, (after Prof. B. had cor- 
rectly stated the explanation) — "Just what I 
meant, Professor, but I couldn't say it." — (10)? 



Professor Haines was absent from the city 
for some days in giving expert testimony in the 
'Graves murder trial in Denver, Col. A few days 
after his return he announced to the class that 
he must go away again on account of another 
trial at Cleveland. He explained that he could 
not tell when he would return, for "in law, as 
in love, courting was so uncertain." 



•'33 



2)oing tbe Best tbat 1[t can 



up on the Perch, with wits all asearch, 

Sits the emptiest head of the class; 
His thoughts may be few, for the subject is new, 
And Dame Nature has placed his gray matter askew. 
Of grit he has much, of culture but few; 

But let him alone as you pass, 
He's doing the best that he can. 

Down a side street is a small cottage neat, 
A widow and young children three, 

Who are making their bread and shelter o'er head 

By starving some students and calling them fed; 

But pay up your board bill and don't try to dead- 
Head your way through the world, for you see 

She's doing the best that she can. 

And so let it be, whenever you see 

An article doing its best, 
Whether snake, brake or cancer, boil, ague or man, sir, 
A saint with a halo, an opera dancer, 
With very few garments perhaps to enhance her, 

Let it quietly stay with the rest, 
If it's doinsr the best that it can. — "Nanny." 




Dr. Linnell — What two kinds of matter do 
we have in the cord? 

McKenna, '95— Gray matter and Dura-Mater. 



The Nu Sigma Nu members held an initiation 
and spread one evening recently. From appear- 
ances next day, we judge that the goat came 
out ahead. 



Montgomery — Have you been vaccinated, madame? 

Madame — I have, sir. 

Mont. — Let me see the scar. 

Mad. (who is large and fleshy) — I can't roll up my sleeve. 

Mont. — Well, you will have to take off your dress. 

Mad.— (Hesitating.) 

Mont. — Oh, you needn't mind me, I am a married man. 

Mad. — If you weren't married, I wouldn't mind showing you. 

Exit Montgomery. 

Place, 12th street; time, summer vacation. 



234 



Dr. Jay, who so bravely charged the raging 
feline at one of Prof. Senn's clinics, and tri- 
umphantly brought it back to the operating ta- 
ble, was observed to shed tears when the poor 
animal's abdomen was ripped open (scientific- 
ally and for the benefit of science, oi course), 
and mournfully observed to his friend Dr. Shaw, 

"That only goes to show ," but tears 

choked his further utterance. 



Have you observed Blanchard's whiskers? 
He cut them off. He sawed them off. He 
pulled them off. She chewed them off. He 
singed them off. He swore them off. And 
still his whiskers grew. 

Prof. Cotton aptly explains the action of 
quinine on the white blood corpuscles in the 
following terse expression: Quinine arrests the 
amceboid motion of the lumbering leuccocytes 
loafing around the red blood corpuscles. 



O. M.— "What is the effect of too much 
food?" 

Henderson — "Distention of the abdomen, 
sir." 

Instructor — " What would be the effect of 
attempting to pass too large a dilator to over- 
come stricture of esophagus?" 

Student — " Vomiting." 

Instructor — " No, that is not quite right." 

Coachus: "Death," "Funeral," "Post Mortem," 
" Malpractice suit," " Shoving clouds,'' " A va- 
cant chair," " Expert testimony." 



"And my diagnosis is tuberculosis." — Bren- 
ner. 

Dr. Mellish. — " Mr. Hobbs, describe the hip 
joint." 

Freshman H. — " I didn't study any further 
than the left hand." 

Dr. M. — " Describe the shoulder, then." 

F. H. — " I began at the elbow, doctor." 



Patient — " Would whisky dome any harm ?' ' 
Doctor — " I think it would." 
Patient — "That is fortunate; whisky is 
high these hard times." 



FROM THE BENCHES. 

It was a wee little baby, but it was a pretty 
baby. You could see that as the inhaling frame 
was lifted from time to time for more chloro- 
form; and perhaps that was why the fellows 
stopped passing notes and whispering, and 
moved up forward in their seats so they could 
see better. We watched every little step in 
the operation, and we saw almost as quickly as 
the assistant that the babe had stopped breath- 
ing. We almost stopped breathing, too, and 
the tick of the clock and the rustle in the arena, 
as they lifted the little body, whose spark of 
life had almost ceased to glow, were the only 
noises you could hear. How intensely we 
watched every movement as they worked to 
bring back the glow and fan it to a flame. See, 
wasn't that a breath? No — yes — surely it was — 
yes — yes, baby is breathing again, and see its 
face looks better. 

Yes, now the surgeon smiles. . . . How gladly 
we saw that, and we all took a deep breath and 
smiled, and some made the motion of a silent 
applause, and some closed their eyes and said 
their thanks. ... It seemed as though The 
Great Physician had been for a moment in our 
midst. 



Student — " How can you determine the ul- 
ceration of Peyer's patches in typhoid fever?" 
Professor — " By post-mortem." 

O. M. — " How many sides has the heart?" 
" D. J." — "Two. The outside and the in- 
side." 



2 36 



If you wish to see a good joke, turn to page 
659 of Lyman's " Practice," and read the 
seventh line from the bottom. Perhaps the 
Professor himself has never noticed it. 

They say, with faith all may be saved, 

But we can see no hope 
For the man in the dissecting room 

Who stole the toilet soap. 



The young man with the ticket in his hand 
hunting his seat has been here this year as 
usual. 

Dr. B. is rather hard on himself. In class re- 
cently he made these two remarks: "Some- 
time ago a gentleman came to my office who 
was looking for the biggest quack in Chicago," 

and " When I was a young man 

I spent eight or nine years in an insane asy- 
lum." 



No more we gamble for what's left 

Of our dissected stiffs; 
No more we scent our boarding house 

With " dried cadaver" whiffs; 
No more we boil or bury them, 

For with emphatic tones 
The demonstrator has announced, 

"The college keeps the bones." 



The new and improved methods in foot-ball 
and in surgery go forward hand in hand. 

We heard one of the D. J.'s explaining that 
the building of the College of P. and S. was 
the Phosphorus and Sulphur college. So much 
for D. J. chemistry. 






Stra^ Bite 

jfrom 
IDeve an6 



238 



Hppenbicitis 




AVE you got the new disorder? 
If you haven't, 'tis in order 

To succumb to it at once without delay. 
It is called appendicitis, 
Very different from gastritis, 

Or the common trash diseases of the day. 



It creates a happy frolic, 
Something like a Winter colic, 

That has often jarred our inner organs some. 
Only wrestles with the wealthy, 
And otherwise most healthy — 

Having got it then, you're nigh to kingdom come. 



Midway down in your intestine, 
Its interstices infestin', 

Is a little alley, blind and dark as night, 
Leading off simply nowhere, 
Catching all stray things that go there, 

As a pocket it is clearly out of sight. 



It is prone to stop and grapple 
With the seed of grape or apple, 

Or a soldier button swallowed with vour pie; 
Having levied on these chattels, 
Then begin internal battles, 

That are apt to end in mansions in the sky. 



Once located, never doubt it, 
You would never be without it; 

It's a fad among society that's gay; 
Old heart failure and paresis 
Have decamped and gone to pieces, 

And dyspepsia has fallen by the way. 



Then stand back there, diabetes, 
For here comes appendicitis, 

With a brood of minor troubles on the wing; 
So, vermiform, here's hoping 
You'll withstand all drastic doping, 

And earn the appellation, "Uncrowned King!' 



A recent applicant before the Medical Examining 
Board of Texas was asked: 

" What is histology?" 

" Histology is the history of medicine." 

"What system of medicine do you practice?" 

" The Vanderbilt and St. Louis systems, and some- 
times the homeopathic system." 

" What is the homeopathic system, as you call it?" 

" Sweatin' the patient." 

He got his diploma. 




2 39 



In tbe dfoeoical College 




Lots of lungs and livers, 

Heaps ot heads and hearts, 
Decaying human members 

In several sundry parts. 
Heavens! let me quickly 

Give my cigar a whiff! 
Bless me, this is pleasant, 

Slicing up a stiff! 
Dissecting room in college, 

Eighteen flights of stairs; 
Seventy fiendish medics 

Working all in pairs. 
Oversleeves and apron, 

Carbolic acid, grease, 
Little knives and tweezers, 

A pipe or so apiece. 



Now everything is ready, 

Fun will soon begin; 
Here on the slab before us 

Lies what a maid has been. 
But she's no longer pretty — 

Her teeth have fallen out, 
Leaving thus the matter of 

Her age somewhat in doubt. 
Her face has lost the freshness 

Of maidenhood and youth; 
Her skin is not quite "pearlv," 

To tell the "naked" truth; 
Her form is not exactly 

What might be called divine, 
And to raptures o'er her bosom 

No poet would incline. 
Now our gaze is fastened 

Upon her skulless head, 
And we are moved to wonder 

How long she has been dead. 



Now a blooming medic 

With scalpel and a hook, 
Commences while another 

Reads to him from a book. 
Cuts the epidermis, 

Takes a careful look, 
Other medic quickly 

Names it from the book. 
Slices out a muscle, 

Fishes out a vein, 
Finds a piece of tendon, 

Applies a Latin name. 
Lignum vita; major, 

Tyrannis semper sic, 
Non compos mentis minor, 

Habeas corpus hie, 
Prehensile os femoris, 

Posterior conjunct, 
Ad libitum superbus, 

Anterior defunct. 



Sure no right minded mortal 

Would ever dare surmise 
He'd have so much of Latin 

Left in him when he dies. 
No wonder that the maiden 

Made up her mind to die, 
If I thought I had all those things 

Great Caesar! so would I. 
'Tis well the soul's immortal 

And leaves this house of clay, 
For wouldn't it be pleasant 

To hear some medic say, 
As he takes a pair of tweezers 

And holds it up to view, 
"We may observe quite plainly 

The soul is split in two; 
Our friend here who possessed it 

Was a mugwump, we can bet, 
Or perhaps was fond of smoking 

The cubeb cigarette?" 



No, some few things are sacred 

From investigation's gaze; 
They may slice and slash our carcass, 

But our soul they cannot phase. 
Oh! bless the blooming medics, 

They will cure us of our ills, 
They'll fill us full of physic, 

They'll fill us full of pills; 
They'll saw our little legs off, 

They'll bandage up our head; 
They'll cure us while we're living, 

They'll carve us when we're dead. 

Lots of lungs and livers, 

Heaps of heads and hearts, 
Decaying human members, 

In several sundry parts. 
Heavens! let me quickly 

Give my cigar a whiff! 
Bless me, this is pleasant 

Slicing up a stiff! 




240 



Uhc /IfoeMcs ©team 



A plexus to complex the wise 
Rose o'er my dreamy vision; 

Its ears and nose and ghastly eyes 
Leered on me in derision; 

In cold fear trembling, then I cried: 
" Say, Ghoul, what is your mission? ' 
•'Fission,'' 1 it said. 



Then bones and muscles, veins and glands 

Came trooping in confusion, 
With cells and strong elastic bands 

To strengthen the illusion; 
So, faltering, I murmured. " Friend, 

Whence all this crepitation? " 
"Depuration," it cried. 



" You are a protophyte, and ought 

To die of inflammation; 
Your blood turn serum, and your lips 

Unite by granulation; 
Your bones necrose, you manikin." 

At which I sobbed, " O foramen! " 
" Coagulum,& clot," it said. 

" Dear Prof., I hope I've passed yourtchair 
I ventured in dejection; 

" Debilitants were given, and care 
Was used against infection"— 

When quick, hiematherosis came, 
And o'er my sense parapsis, 
" Relapses," he said. 

And suddenly I turned to gas 

Beneath a strong compression; 
"Combustion," said he o'er the glass, 

" I'll treat upon this session." 
Whereat occurred a thumping noise, 

A sonorous fremitus. 

"Bronchitis" I heard. 

Now was I free and to me came 

Bouquets, congratulations; 
Upon my brow a wreath of fame 

Evolved by strange mutations; 
My scroll I carried in one hand, a silk hat in the other, 

When wide I woke to hear Moyer say: 
" This ends our little quiz to-day." 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

B Xesson tn Chemistry 

(To Prof. Haines.) By ax Atom. 

Of good our ills are made, and surely will 
Prove good to us, if only we 
Dissolve them with our Alchemy: 

For nothing harmful is to him who knows 
How to resolve the woe and pain 
Back to their elements again. 

The lack within us lies, and all is good 
That comes to good men everywhere, 
Through water, fire, or earth or air. 

241 



TLhc Presbyterian hospital 




VIEW SHOWING CONGRESS STKKKT FRONT AND ENTRANCE. 



242 



Httenbing Staff 



IPbvsicians 

H. M. Lyman, M. D. John A. Robison, M. D. 

Norman Bridge, M. D. 

assistant ipbvsician 

J. B. Herrick, M. D. 

Surgeons 

D. W. Graham, M. D. Nicholas Senn, M. D. 

J. B. Hamilton, M. D. Arthur D. Bevan, M. U. 

Gynecologists 

James H. Etheridge, M. D. Daniel T. Nelson, M. D. 

Henry P. Merriman, M. D. H. B. Stehman, M. D. 

fl>b\?sicians for diseases of Gbtloren ano Hccoucbeurs 

De Laskie Miller, M. D. A. C. Cotton, M. D. 

dermatologists 

J. Nevins Hyde, M. D. R. D. MacArthur, M, D. 

©culists ano Burists 

E. L. Holmes, M. D. Lyman Ware, M. D. 

pbvsicians for XCbroat diseases 

John A. Robison, M. D. E. Fletcher Ingals, M. D. 



>43 




244 







g(c)\ F the private Hospitals in the city, this 

I e) I one is among the largest. During 

the past three years it has received 

and treated over two thousand patients annually. 

Its patronage is not limited to the city or 
the state ; but at times has had representa- 
tives from ten different states, and even to-day 
one can find within its walls, citizens from Ohio, 
Montana, Texas and Minnesota, as well as 
from the intermediate states. This, however, 
is not its boast, for with its staff as a 
guarantee, the limit of its patronage would 
always be determined by its capacity ; but to 
do the greatest amount of good to the greatest 
number, to relieve the suffering of the dis- 
tressed, to mitigate the pangs of the poor, 
and to lend a helping hand to the worthy, is 
its principal mission. 

Up to this time the desire of the manage- 
ment has in this respect been very far from 
being gratified. The Hospital in no sense 



? 45 



AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 






fc2@SK?5A^}w7 



desired to deprive die profession of any re- 
sources that justly belong to it ; but in the 
community there abounds such a mass of men, 
women and children, who are unable to em- 
ploy efficient medical services, and who cannot 
carry out such details that will accomplish 
practical results, that medical advice is prac- 
tically useless, so that it is more especially 
such that it would seek to care for in as great 
a number as possible. 

Its work in caring for this particular class 
is limited only by its resources, and these 
resources are of three kinds. In the first place, 
its endowment fund, which is made up of 
donations by individuals which has been in- 
vested in productive real estate, the assessed 
value of which is twice the amount of the loan. 
Secondly, from donations which go directly to 
the support of beds. These are annual receipts 
given to maintain one bed for twelve months. 
Then comes miscellaneous donations of money 
and useful articles. 



247 



***************** A********************************* 




There seems to be an impression among 
some people that when a bed is endowed, 
that it is not a free bed, and that an institu- 
tion that has seventy endowed beds and 
has them occupied by seventy free patients, 
it is not to that extent a free hospital. 
They consider that credit should be given to 
a hospital as a charity only when it gives 
freely that which it never received. 

But the merest tyro can see at once that 
as an individual cannot bestow that which he 
does not possess, no more can a hospital 
dispense charity unless it shall have previously 
received something to dispense. 

So that this brings out the true position of 
a free hospital, viz. : that it is the channel 
through which flow the gifts of generous heart- 
ed men and women ; and the only difference 
between a public and a private charity is, that 
the support of the former is involuntary, while 
that of the latter is voluntary. 



249 




25° 



*A************A**AA**A**A*A*****<4*A*A******A******* 




The Presbyterian Hospital began its existence 
with but several free beds, but by the end of 
ten years it had seventy, and there is every 
reason to hope that by the time it arrives at 
its majority its charity work will represent 
two hundred or more beds, with an expendi- 
ture of nearly one hundred thousand dollars 
annually. 

The general average time which patients 
spend in a hospital is about twenty-five days, 
so that in the same ratio there would be given 
about seventy-three thousand days of care 
extended to twenty-eight hundred patients. 
As said before, this is what the Board are 
aiming and working for, and the sooner the 
day arrives the better it will be for the community, 
the profession and the medical students. Until 
that day comes it must be content with smaller 
things, and earnestly strive by painstaking 
care and fair dealing to so impress those who 
desire to help their fellow man, that it is worthy 
of their confidence and may be safely trusted. 



2 5 J 



Xafce Jforest XHnipereit^ 




John M. Coulter, A. M., Ph. I)., LL. D. 
President of the University. 



252 



Xahe jforest College 




HE courses of study and the methods of Lake Forest College 
are those most approved in modern colleges. Large priv- 
ilege of election is offered, so that the greatest variety of 
individual tastes and needs are met. No prescribed courses 
are outlined, but several years of work are offered in each 
subject, of which the student may take much or little. 
Certain requirements are made as to the number of different groups from 
which selection of work is made of those who are candidates for the grad- 
uating degree of B. A., but special students are permitted to take what- 
ever subjects they are prepared for. Few subjects, long continued, is felt 
to be the proper educational method, as opposed to a large number of 
subjects taken in hasty and elementary fashion. With this belief, most 
of the departments will give no credit in any subject for less than a year 
of daily work. The subjects that can at present be obtained in this 
extended way are: Greek, Latin, German, French, English, Philology, 
English Literature, Biblical Literature, Philosophy, Political History, Social 
Science, Economics, Mathematics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Physics, Zoology, 
Botany and Geology. 

The scientific laboratories are thoroughly equipped for work in a way 
that should .appeal to any medical preparatory student who is ambitious 
to take part in the advancement of his science. The best apparatus and 
material, and the most advanced methods, enable the student to enter the 
great field of modern investigation. 

Lake Forest College is now paying a good deal of attention to the 
proper preparation of students for the medical colleges, and outlines courses 
of greater or less length that have this purpose in view. In consequence 



253 



of this a large number of students have taken advantage of the oppor- 
tunity, and are laying such a foundation for subsequent medical study 
as will make them very strong medical students. 

As manj- of the students of Rush know, the student life of Lake 
Forest is largely the dormitory life, as the town does not provide student 
accommodations. These dormitories are now becoming overcrowded, and 
if proper buildings can be secured, the college attendance will soon show 
a much better proportion to that of the professional schools. At present 
the college work is done in three buildings, besides which there is an 
excellent gymnasium, and houses for college clubs, Professors' residences, etc. 

Besides the college, the Lake Forest plant has two preparatory schools — 
Lake Forest Academy and Ferry Hall Seminary — each one with its own 
buildings and Faculty. 

It is a matter for regret that the undergraduate departments are so 
distant from the professional schools, for it prevents that all-around uni- 
versity spirit which is so desirable. Could the whole university come 
together on some common ground all of the departments would be stimu- 
lated. However, professional schools and undergraduate schools are all 
in the places best suited to their work, and a university sentiment must 
be sacrificed to department needs. 

The reputation of Rush stands high at Lake Forest College, whose 
graduates will be found more and more continuing their studies in our 
own medical school. 

Johx M. Coulter. 




254 



Btumni 
Besociation 

IRusb 

flfoeotcal 
College 



2 55 



Officers 





A. L. Wright, M. D., '74, 
President. 



W. J. McLean, M. D., ' 

First Vice-President. 





C. D. Wescott, M. D., 'S3, 
Second Vice-President. 



Jno. Edwin Rhodes, M. D., '86, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 



2^6 



Hlumni association 



r— /HE Annual Reunion of the Alumni Association of Rush Medical 
College was held on Monday, May 2 1st, Tuesday, May 22d, and 
Wednesday, May 23d, 1894. A new departure in the annual gath- 
ering was inaugurated at this time. Heretofore meetings had been 
held at various places in the city, but last year the meetings were all held at 
the College buildings. These meetings were exceedingly interesting and of 
unusual value. Large numbers of the Alumni were present from the various 
States and participated in the exercises. 

At ten o'clock, on May 21st, the exercises were opened by a clinic on 
Internal Medicine given by Prof. Lyman. At 1:30 p. m. there was a clinic on 
Diseases of the Chest, Throat and Nose, by Prof. Ingals. At 2:30 p. M. a clinic 
on Skin and Venereal Disease, by Prof. Hyde. At 4:00 p. m. the regular Class 
Day Exercises of the class of 1894 w^ere held in the Amphitheater of the 
College. On Tuesday, May 22d, after an informal reunion of the Alumni at 
the College building, a clinic on general medicine was given by Prof. Bridge 
at 9:30. Then from 1 1 :00 o'clock until 2:00 p. m. a reception was tendered to 
the Alumni in the Laboratory building. Students were at work on subjects of 
special interest to practitioners of medicine in the laboratories of Practical 
Anatomy, Chemistry, Histology, Pathology, Bacteriology and Experimental 
Physiology. A light lunch was served on the lower floor of the building. At 
2:00 o'clock the Alumni and friends repaired to the Amphitheater of the College, 
where a surgical clinic was given by Prof. Senn. These clinics have been fully 
reported in The Corpuscle at various times during the past year. At 4:00 
o'clock a Scientific meeting was held in the College Amphitheater, and the fol- 
lowing programme was carried out. These papers also have appeared in full 
in The Corpuscle: 

First, "The Future Requirements of Medical Education," by Dr. Perry 
H. Millard, St. Paul, Minn. Second, " Exhibition of Splint for Treatment of 
Ordinary Fracture of Leg or Ankle," by Dr. Wm. Meacher, Portage, Wis. 
Third, " Vaginal Tamponade," by Dr. O. B. Will, Peoria, 111. Fourth, " Nature 
the Best Obstetrician," by Dr. Jno. G. Meacham, Jr., Racine, Wis. Fifth, 
"Modern Transfusion," by Dr. L. L. MacArthur, Chicago, 111. 

In the evening arrangements had been made to attend Hooley's Theatre 
in a body to see the corned) 7 of " Charley's Aunt." This was one of the most 
enjoyable features of Commencement time, and the whole lower floor of the 
theatre was occupied by the Alumni and their friends. 

On Wednesday, at 9:00 o'clock, there was a Gynecological Clinic, given 
by Prof. Etheridge, in the upper Amphitheater, and here, at 1:00 p. m., was 
held the annual business meeting of the Association. This meeting was called 
to order by Dr. A. L. Wright, class of '74, Carroll, Iowa, 1st Vice-President of 
the Association. The Secretary and Treasurer, Dr. John Edwin Rhodes, then 
read his annual report, from which we make extracts as follows: Attention 
was called to the fact from the membership in 1892, there was an increase in 

257 



the total membership of 511 for 1893-94. The funds at the beginning of the 
year were $21.03, the amount turned over by the former treasurer. After unusual 
expenditures at the end of the year, there was a balance on hand at the time 
of the meeting of $313.03. 

It became necessary during the year to entirely reconstruct the list of the 
Alumni. During the year circulars were mailed to those of the Alumni whose 
addresses could be obtained, calling their attention to the Association, and 
asking them to become members of it. The return of many of these letters 
enabled the Secretary to so reconstruct the list that at the present time it is as 
nearly accurate as it is possible to make it. Upward of ten thousand circular 
letters were mailed to the Alumni during the year, and a large number of copies 
of The Corpuscle. It was suggested by the Secretary that some Alumnus in 
the city be appointed to have charge of the Alumni department of the Journal. 
This was subsequently done by the selection of Prof. Jno. M. Dodson. This 
department has been one of the most interesting in the Journal. The Faculty, 
during the year, contributed in no small degree to the successful efforts of the 
Secretary in arousing the interest of the Alumni in a revival of the Association. 
The history. of the Association had never been written up, and it was with diffi- 
culty that data were found for the construction of such a history. However, 
from such data as could be obtained, it was written up by the Secretary and 
appeared in the Pulse of last year. 

Dr. A. I. Bouffleur, class '87, the Committee on Necrology, made a report 
from which we extract the following: 

S>r. 3obn 1benn> fll>urpb\>. 

In the death of Dr. Murphy, Rush Medical College lost one of its oldest 
and most loyal Alumni, and the medical profession one of its most distinguished 
members. 

His life was an exemplification of the motto, "Work wins Worth," and it 
was by hard, steady application to duty that this man reached the very leader- 
ship of the profession in the great Northwest. 

Dr. Murphy was born in New Jersey in 1826, reared in Illinois, and gradu- 
ated from Rush College with the class of 1850. 

Immediately after graduating he located in the vicinity of St. Paul, with 
whose growth and development into greatness he kept good pace until the 
infirmities of age began to be manifested. 

Dr. Murphy had been a sufferer from diabetes for a number of years, and 
during the last six months of his life had suffered a great deal from numerous 
carbuncles about the head. Operations for their removal proved of but tem- 
porary relief, and on January 31st he succumbed to the disease. 

Of late years it has been customary for his friends to refer to the deceased 
as the " Grand Old Man." He was a man on all occasions. At college, at the 
bedside, on the battlefield, in legislative halls, as a surgeon, in domestic 
and social duties, he was ever known as a man — the same large-hearted, jovial, 
charitable man. 

258 



Dr. Murphy achieved the greatest success as a surgeon. He was of the 
old school, so called — a surgeon such as was made by the teachings of a 
Brainard and of a Gunn, and a surgeon who had to grapple with the disease 
unassisted by modern aids of diagnosis and therapeutics; a surgeon who of 
necessity considered little of the so-called purely practical side of the question. 

He was an honored member of many associations and societies, and had 
but recently been president of the National Association of Railway Surgeons. 

Those of you who are just entering the medical profession can find much in 
such lives as his to encourage and guide you in attaining the greatest of suc- 
cess in the medical profession. 

This association should be, and I believe it is, proud of the record which 
this distinguished alumnus has left behind. 

(A more detailed report appeared in the March Corpuscle.) 

2>r. mm. HD. Ibawortb. 

Through the courtesy of Dr. Chas. F. Wright, we are informed that on 
April 15th, 1894, Dr. Haworth died at the Wellington Hotel, Chicago, of 
embolism of the heart. He was born in Decatur, 111., and attended college at 
Andover, Mass., and studied medicine at the University of Michigan, at Belle- 
vue, and Rush Medical College, graduating from the latter with the class of '91. 

He had a great liking for mechanical work and had secured several 
valuable patents before studying medicine. 

He was but 27 years of age, and he pursued everything with the enthusi- 
asm and intensity of a well equipped youthful mind. He was an industrious 
and earnest student and an enthusiastic practitioner, and had he lived would 
undoubtedly have achieved success in the practice of his chosen specialty, 
Dermatology. 

While upon the threshold of our Commencement reunion, we are sad- 
dened by the death of another distinguished alumnus of this city. 

2>r. HM^mmon Sanfcforfc Ibapce. 

Dr. Hayes was born in Ohio, and died at his residence, No. 159 East 46th 
Street, Chicago, May 14th, 1894, at the age of 43 years. 

His death was due to a complication of la grippe, pleurisy, etc., from 
which he had suffered for over four months. 

Dr. Hayes graduated from the West Division High School in 1869, and 
from Rush Medical College in 1872. For five years immediately following 
his graduation he served as assistant to Dr. Lyman, then occupying a chair of 
Chemistry and Physics. From 1877 to 1883 he filled the chair of Chemistry 
in the Woman's Medical College, and from 1880 to 1884 held the same posi- 
tion in the Chicago College of Pharmacy. 

During later years he has devoted a great deal of time and energy to 
electro-therapeutics, and was professor thereof in the Chicago Policlinic at the 
time of his death. He was also Medical Examiner for the National Union and 
Medical Examiner-in-Chief of the Royal League. 

259 



Dr. Hayes contributed liberally to medical literature, and principally in 
the shape of small monographs upon topics pertaining to chemistry and elec- 
tro-therapeutics. He was a member of the American Medical Association, 
Illinois State Medical Society, Sons of the American Revolution, and of the 
American Society of Therapeutics. 

He has been identified with charitable and religious work in this city for 
many years. Dr. Hayes leaves a wife and three children. 

The death of these men serves to remind us that as there was a beginning, 
so there must be an ending, and no man knoweth the length of his stay 
amongst us. 

The Committee on Nomination, consisting of a representative from each 
of the classes present, reported the following list of officers for 1894-5, and 
they were unanimously elected: 

President, ------ A. L. Wright, Class of '74, - - Carroll, la. 

First Vice-President, - - W. J. McLean, Class of '69, - - - Fayette, la. 

Second Vice-President, - C. D. Wescott, Class of '83, - - Chicago, 111. 

Secretary and Treasurer - Jno. Edwin Rhodes, Class of '86, - Chicago, 111. 

Necrologist, ----- A. I. Bouffleur, Class of 'Sj, - - Chicago, 111. 

An appropriation was made by the Association of $20.00 for the purchase 
of two class tablets. This left at this time but seven tablets to be provided 
for to complete the number in the Amphitheater in the college. 

A motion was made by Dr. Washburne, of Indiana, to continue The Cor- 
puscle as the organ of the Association. Dr. Wescott made a motion that a 
vote of thanks be given to the Secretary for his efforts in behalf of the Asso- 
ciation during the year. Dr. Bouffleur moved that the sum of S25.00 be 
appropriated from the funds of the Association for the publishers of The 
Corpuscle. The Association then adjourned. 

After the adjournment of the Association the Alumni assembled at 
Central Music Hall to listen to the Annual Commencement Exercises of 
Rush Medical College. In the evening a banquet was given at the Grand 
Pacific, and the following programme was carried out; Second Vice-President, 
W. W. Torrence, M. D., '80, presiding: 

Music, -- _.-... 

Russell Quartette. 
Our Work and Mission — "The Heavenly Twins." - - Madame Grand 

W. W. Torrence, M. D. 
The University — " Our Mutual Friend," - Dickens 

President J. M. Coulter. 
Music, --------- 

Russell Quartette. 
When Doctors Agree — "A Foreign Conclusion," - Howells 

Rev. A. K. Parker, D. D. 
Medical Experts — "All Sorts and Conditions of Men," - - Bcsant 

Wm. S Forrest, Esq. 
Music, - - .._.-- 

Russell Quartette. 
What Shall We Do With It?—" His Level Best," - E. E. Hale 

E. K. Morris, M. D., '94. 
Music, - - ''Good Old Rush." 

260 



JrN? vTW Sts* v'Ttf m^. vT» »rN* v'Mh 



Btumnt 



IRusb 

flfeebical 

Colleoe 



261 





Frederick Shi.monek, M. D. 

Class of 1873, . 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



D. M. Cool, M. D. 

Class of '61, 
Chicago, Ills. 





K. W. Leland, B. S., M. D. 
Class of '02, 
Utica, Ills. 



James G. Connor, M. D. 

Class of r 67, 
Ionia, Mich. 



262 




R. H. Bartlett, M. D. 

Class of '79. 
Chicago, Ills. 




W. T. Bishop, M. D. 

Class of '79, 

Hakrisburg, Pa. 





J. A. Scroggs, M. D. 
Class of '74, 
Keokuk. Ia. 



Hon. Jerome F. Pease, M. D., Ph. G. 

Class of '93, 
Big Rapids, Mich. 



26 3 




A. L. Cory, M. D. 

Class of '82, 
Chicago, Ills. 



^ 




J. N. Black, M, D. 

Class of '83, 
Clayton, Ills. 




E. L. ANNIS, M. D. 
Class ol '8i, 
La Porte, Ind. 




H. C. WORTHINGTON, M. D. 

Class of '87, 

Oak Park, Ills. 



264 




/^ 




W. H. Veatcle, M. D. 

Class of '67, 
Carthage, Ills. 



Chas. E. Booth, M. D. 

Class of '72, 
Lowmoor, Va. 





Herbert Warren Lane, M. D. 

Class of '88, 

Ellsworth, Wis. 



Chas. J. Lewis, M. D. 
Class of '6;, 
Chicago, Ills. 



265 





P. Daugherty, M. D. 

Class of '86, 
Junction City, Kas. 



Ezra T. Goble, M. D. 

Class of '74, 
Earlville, Ills. 




Emv. Luehr, M. D. 

Class of '92, 

Chicago, Ills. 




J. C. Wright, M. D. 

Class of '82, 
Excelsior, Wis. 



266 





John Newton Venard, M. D. 

Class of '73. 
Ness City. Kas. 



Clem D. McCoy, M. D., A. M. 

Class of '90, 
Kenton, 0. 




Homer Clark Rawson, M. D. 

Class of '55, 
Corning, Ia. 




Allen Abel Rawson, M. I). 

Class of '55, 
Corning, Ia. 



267 





Fernand Henrotin, M. D. 

Class of '6S, 

Chicago, Ills. 



Edw. N. Wilson, M. I). 

Class of '87, 
Portland, Or. 




R. C. Black, M. D. 

Class of '58, 

Gainesville, Tex. 




William Tracy. M. I). 

Class of "77. 

Helena, Mont. 




T. G. Tibby, M. I). 

Class of '94, 
Paxton, Ills. 




Wm. J. ASDALE, M. D. 

Class of "66, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 





J. W. Chamberlain, M. D. 

Class of '82, 
St. Paul, Minn. 



J. M. West, M. D. 

Class of '64, 
Red Bluff, Cal. 




Henry Hannum, M. D. 

Class of 'Si, 
Bayfield, Wis. 




A. E. Baldwin, M. D., D. D. S., LL. 

Class of '7S, 
Chicago, Ills. 





C. I). Camp, M. 1). 

Class of '79, 

Chicago, Ills. 



B. J. Bill, M. I). 

Class of '7.7, 

Genes Junction, Wis. 




St $H 




T. J. Dunn, M. D. 

Class of 'bi, 
Elliottstown, Ills. 




G. F. Butler, Ph. C, M. D. 

Class of '89, 
Chicago, »lls. 




B. A. Camfield, M. D. 
Class of '94, 
Chicago, Ills. 



271 



8% 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL 
CATALOGUE 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

(Medical Department Lake Forest University) 




CONTAINING THE NAMES OF THE 

TRUSTEES, PRESIDENTS, INSTRUCTORS 
AND ALUMNI 



From 1843 to 1895^ 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Was chartered by a special act of the Legislature of the State of Illinois, 
February, 1837. It has graduated more than four thousand physicians. 

This Seventeenth Triennial Catalogue contains the names of all its trustees, 
presidents, professors, assistant and adjunct professors, lecturers, quiz masters 
and demonstrators who have been connected with it since the date of its 
charter. Opposite the names appear the various titles borne and the length 
of service each has rendered. This Catalogue contains also the names of its 
alumni, together with the course of lectures at which they were graduated, 
and the consecutive number receiving the degree at each commencement. 

The first course of lectures was delivered in the second story of a frame 
building on Clark street, opposite the present location of the Sherman House, 
in the city of Chicago. The building next occupied was on the corner of 
Indiana and Dearborn streets, in the north division of the city. In the 
course of fifteen years of residence in that division, three different buildings 
were occupied, each successively larger than its predecessor. 

The great fire of 1871 destroyed the College, with all of its appliances for 
instruction. Subsequently, from 1871 to 1875, a temporary and rudimentary 
structure was occupied at the corner of Arnold and Eighteenth streets, on the 
same lot with the Cook County Hospital. Thence a removal was made to the 
edifice familiar to the greater number of its alumni, on the corner of Wood 
and Harrison streets. In 1887 the college became the medical department of 
the Lake Forest University. To-day this institution occupies two large 
buildings, each live stories in height. One is the original structure built in 
this locality in 1874-5; on the opposite side of Harrison street is the Labor- 
atory, with a frontage of one hundred feet on a lot one hundred and thirty-six 
feet in width. 

This Laboratory furnishes every facility for practical instruction in 
anatomy, in histology and pathology, in bacteriology, in chemistry, and in 
materia medica. It contains several recitation rooms, in which are daily in- 
structed by quizzes and recitations six hundred students. 

The present classes number eight hundred and forty-eight matriculates, 
the largest number collected in any Medical School in this country for the 
session of 1894-5. The clinics are held in the upper lecture room. In them 
every type and variation of medical and surgical disease is exhibited, and all 
the minor and capital operations of surgery are performed every week 
throughout the year. 

On the north wall of the upper lecture room are displayed the bronze 
busts and oil portraits of all the Presidents of the College and of deceased 
members of the Faculty. A series of tablets of the different classes, from 
1843 to the present date, surrounds these works of art, each tablet presenting 
a class motto in imperishable brass. 

Adjacent to the main building is the Presbyterian Hospital, with a capac- 
ity of over two hundred beds. 

The connection between the upper amphitheater of the College and the 
hospital is such that the patients are readily transferred for diagnosis or op- 
erative treatment from one building to the other. The Faculty of the College, 
almost without exception, constitutes the staff of the hospital. 

274 



TRUSTEES 



Allen, J. Adams, M.D , 1871-1890. 

Bishop, A. E., 1876-1881. . 

Blaney, James Van Zandt, M.D., 1843-1871. 

Bogue, Geo. M., Esq., 1890. 

Brainard, Daniel, M.D.,. 1843-1866. 

Bridge, Norman, M. D., 1891— still holds the position. 

Butterfield, Hon. Justin, 1843-1857. 

Byford, Win. H., 1887-1890. 

Collins, James H., Esq., 1843-1854. 

Caton, Hon. John D„ 1843-1844. 

Dickey, Hon. Hugh T., 1843-1876. 

Evans, John, M.D., 1857-1863. 

Etheridge, James H., M.D., 1876— still holds the position. 

Freer, Joseph \V., M.D., 1863-1877. Treasurer of the Board, 1872-1877. 

Freer, Hon. L. C. Payne, 1865-1892. President of the Board. 

Freer, Nathan M., Esq., 1893 -still holds the position. 

Goodrich, Hon. Grant, 1843-1892. Secretary of the Board, 1843-1892. 

Gage, John, 1843-1844. 

Gage, Lyman J., Esq., 1891— still holds the position. 

Gunn, Moses, M.D., 1871-1887. Treasurer of the Board, 1877-1887. 

Haines, Walter S., M. D., 1888— still holds the position. 

Holmes, Edward L., M.D., 1871 — still holds the position. 

Hamill, Robert C, M.D., 1876-1886. 

Haines, Hon. John C, 1877— still holds the position. 

Hyde, James Nevins, M. D., 1889— still holds the position. 

Ingals, Ephraim, M.D., 1863— still holds the position. 

Ingals, E. Fletcher, M. D., 1891— still holds the position. 

Judd, Hon. Norman B., 1843-1876. 

Kinzie, Hon. John H., 1843-1865. 

Kimberly, E. S., M.D., 1845-1871. 

Knox, J. Suydarn, M. D., 1890-1892. 

Lyman, Henry M.; M.D., 1871 — still holds the position. Assistant Secretary of the 

Board, 1876— still holds the position. 
Miller, DeLaskie, M.D., 1871 — still holds the position. 
Newberry, Walter L., Esq., 1843-1869. 

Ogden, Hon. Wm. B., 1843-1876. President of the Board, 1843-1872. 
Parkes, Charles T., M.D., 1881-1891. 
Eea, Robert L., M.D., 1871-1875. 

Boss, Joseph P., M.D., 1871-1890. Vice-President of the Board, 1882-1890. 
Rumsey, Hon. Geo. M., 1872-1880. 
Senn, Nicholas, M. D„ 1893— still holds the position. 
Smith, Thos. W., Esq., 1843-1844. 

Skinner, Hon. Mark, 1843-1872. Treasurer of the Board, 1843-1872. 
Snow, George W., Esq., 1843-1871. 
Taylor, E. D., Esq., 1843-1844. 
Whitman, Rev. S. S., 1813-1844. 
Wadsworth, Julius, 1843-1847. 



SEVENTEENTH TEIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



COLLEGE PRESIDENTS 



Daniel Brainard, M.D., 1843-1866. 

James Van Zandt Blaney, A.M., M.D., 1866-1871. 

Joseph Warren Freer, M.D., 1871-1877. 

J. Adams Allen, A.M., LL.D., M.D., 1877-1890. 

Edward Lorenzo Holmes, A.M., M.D., LL. D., 1890— still holds the position. 



>;6 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



COLLEGE FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Adams, Orion J. H., M.D., 

Lecturer on Therapeutics, Spring Course, 1873-1874. 

Adolphus, Philip, M.D., 

Lecturer on Obstetrics, Spring Course, 1873. Lecturer on Clinical Gynaecology, 
Spring Course, 1875. Clinical Adjunct to the Chair of Gynaecology, 1875-1894. 
Clinical Professor of Gynaecology, 1894— still holds the position. 

Allen, J. Adams, A.M., LL.D., M.D., 

Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine, 1859-1890. President 1877-1890. 

Allport, W. W., D.D.S., M.D., 

Emeritus Professor of Dental Pathology and Surgery, 1883-1887. 

Amerman, George K., M.D., 

Lecturer on Clinical Surgery, Spring Course, 1860. Quiz Master on Surgery 
Winter Sessions, 1860-1863. 

Andrews, Edmund, A.M., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1855-1856. 

Beach, Samuel G, M.D., 

Instructor in Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest and in Materia Medica 
1894 — still holds the position. 

Belfield, William Thomas, M.D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Physiology, 1878. Demonstrator of Physiology, 1879- 
1882. Lecturer on Physiology, Spring Course, 1882. Lecturer on Physiology and 
Pathology, Spring Course, 1883. Lecturer on Surgery, Spring Course, 1884. 
Professor of Bacteriology, 1891 — still holds the position. 

Bevan, Arthur Dean, M.D., 

Professor of Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical, 1888— still holds the position. 

Bishop, D. D., M.D., 

Instructor in Microscopy and Curator of the Museum, 1893— still holds the posi- 
tion. 

Blaney, James Van Zandt, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy, 1843-1845. Professor of Chemistry, 1845- 
1871. Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, 1871-1873. Lecturer on Animal Chemis- 
try and Physiology, Spring Course, 1847. President of the Faculty, 1866-1871. 

Booue, Koswell G, M.D., 

Professor of Clinical Surgery, 1877-1879. 

Boone, Levi D., M.D., 
Curator, 1846-1819. 

Bouchard, W. L., M.D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1893-1894. 

Bouffleur, Albert I., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Surgical Operations and Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 
1889-1891. Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1891-1892. Lecturer on Ana- 
tomy, 1892— still holds the position. 



277 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



Brainard, Daniel, M.D., 

Professor of Anatomy and Surgery, 1843-1846. Professor of Surgery, 1846-1866. 
Lecturer on Surgery, Auscultation and Percussion, Spring Course, 1847. Presi- 
dent of the Faculty, 1843-1866. 

Bridge, Norman, A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Theory and Practice of Medicine, Spring Course, 1873-188*2. Pro- 
fessor of Hygiene and Adjunct Professor of the Principles and Practice of 
Medicine, 1882-1886. Professor of Pathology and Adjunct Professor of the 
Principles and Practice of Medicine, 1886-1889. Professor of Clinical Medicine and 
Physical Diagnosis, 1889 — still holds the position. 

Brinckerhoff, J., M.D., 
Curator, 1846-1849. 

Brophy, Truman William, D.D.S., M.D., 

Professor of Dental Surgery and Pathology, 1882 — still holds the position. 

Brower, Daniel Roberts, M.D., 

Lecturer on Theory and Practice of Medicine, Spring Course, 1883-] 889. Professor 
of Mental Diseases, and Lecturer on the Practice of Medicine, 1889-1891. Pro- 
fessor of Mental Diseases, Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 1891 — still holds the 
position. 

Brown, Sanger, M.D., 

Professor of Hygiene and Medical Jurisprudence, 1891 — still holds the position. 

Butler, G. F., M.D., 

Lecturer on Medical Pharmacy, 1890-1893. Lecturer on Medical Pharmacy and 
Demonstrator of Materia Medica, 1893. 

Byford, Wm. Heath, A.M., M.D., LL. D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, 1857-1859. Lect- 
urer on Gynaecology and Diseases of Children, Spring Course, 1859. Professor of 
Gynecology, 1879-1890. 

Byford, Henry T., M.D., 

Lecturer on Diseases of Women and Children, 1888. 

Carr, E. S., M.D., 

Acting Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy, 1863-1865. 

Carr, L. W., M.D., 

Assistant to the Professor of Chemistry, 1871-1872. 

Case, Lafayette Wallace, M.D., 

Lecturer on Chemistry, Spring Course, 1875-1876. Lecturer on Dermatology 
and Syphilis, Spring Course, 1877-1881. Lecturer on Dermatology, Spring Course 
1882-1885. 

Cessna, C. E., M.D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Clinical Medicine, 1890-1891. 

Chesbrough, H. F., M.D., 

Lecturer on Clinical Medicine, Spring Course, 1868-1871. 

Churchill, Frank S., A.B., M.D., 

Clinical Assistant to the Chair of Diseases of Children, 1893-1894. Assistant and 
Pathologist to the Clinic for Diseases of Children, 1894— still holds the position. 

Clark, D. G., M.D., 

Curator, 1846-1849. 

Cleveland, George W., M.D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Medicine, 1892-1893. 

Corwin, A. M., A.M., M.D., 

Instructor in Physical Diagnosis, 1891 — still holds the position. 



278 



BUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



Cotton, Alfred Cleveland, M.D., 

Demonstrator of Materia Medica, Spring Course, 1881-1882. Lecturer on Thera- 
peutics, Spring Course, 1883-1889. Adjunct Professor of Therapeutics, 1889-1893. 
Clinical Professor of Diseases of Children and Adjunct Professor of Materia 
Medica and Therapeutics, 1890-1891. Professor of Diseases of Children, 1894 — 
still holds the position. 

Coolidge, Frederic S., A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Orthopaedic Surgery, 1891-1894. Instructor in Pathology and 
Principles of Surgery, 1894— still holds the position. 

Danforth, Isaac Newton, A.M., M.D., 

Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Course, 1868. Instructor in Toxicology and 
Medical Jurisprudence, Spring Course, 1869. Lecturer on General Pathology, 
Spring Course, 1870-1881. Curator of the Museum, 1873. Professor. of Pathologi- 
ical Histology and Lecturer on Renal Diseases, 1881-1882. 

Davis, Edward Parker, A.B., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Physiology and Prosector to the Chair of Surgery, 1883. Lect- 
urer on Physiology and Histology, Spring Course, 1884-1887. 

Davis, Nathan S., M.D . 

Professor of Physiology and Pathology, 1849-1850. Professor of Pathology 
and Clinical Medicine, 1850-1851. Professor of Theoryand Practice of Medicine, 
1851-1859. Lecturer on Clinical Medicine, Spring Course, 1859. 

Dodson, John M., A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Anatomy and Demonstrator, 1889-1893. Professor of Physiology 
and Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1893-1891. Professor of Physiology, 1894— still 
holds the position. 

Dyer, C. V., M. D., 

Curator, 1846-1849. 

Eads, B. Brindley, M.D., 

Instructor in Physiology and Assistant in Anatomy, 1894. 

Eakle, Charles Warrington, M. D., 

Adjunct Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Children. Professor of Ob- 
stetrics, 1892. 

Eckart, Robert P., M.D., 

Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1894— still hold s the'posit ion. ™ - 

Etheridge, James Henry, A.M., M.l >., 

Lecturer on Materia Medica and Therapeutics, Spring Course, 1869-1870. Q Lect- 
urer ou Theory and Practice of Medicine, Spring Course, 1871-1872. Lecturer on 
Obstetrics, Spring Course, 1874. Lecturer on Gynecology, Spring Course, 1879, 
1882, 1883. Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics, and Medical Juris- 
prudence, 1871-1890. Professor of Gynecology, Materia Medica^Therapeutics, 
and Medical Jurisprudence, 1890-1891. Professor of Gynecology, 1890-1892. 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1892 — still holds the position. Assistant 
Secretary, 1872-1877. Secretary, 1877— still holds the position. 

Evans, John, M.D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, 1845-1857. 

Everett, Oliver, M.D., 
Curator, 1846-1849. 

Favill, Henry B., A.B., M.D., 

Instructor in Medicine, 1894— still holds the position. 

Fenger, Christian, M.D., 

Lecturer on Pathological Anatomy, 1879. 



79 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



Fenn, Curtis Treat, M.D., 

Lecturer on Obstetrics, Spring Course, 1868-1874. 

FiTcn, G. N., M.D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, 1844-1845. Pro- 
fessor of Theory and Practice of Medicine, 1845-1849. 

Fitch, Thomas Davis, M.D., 

Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1877-1879. 

Flint, Austin, M.D., 

Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine, 1844-1845. 

Freer, Joseph Warren, M.D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1850-1855. Professor of Anatomy, 1855-1859. Pro- 
fessor of Microscopical Anatomy and Surgical Anatomy, 1859-1860. Professor of 
Military Surgery and Surgical Anatomy, 1860-1861. Professor of Physiology and 
Surgical Pathology, 1861-1864. Professor of Physiology and Histology, 1864-1877. 
Lecturer on Anatomy, Spring Course, 1859. President of the Faculty, 1871-1877. 

Freer, Archibald, M.D., 

Demonstrator of Physiology, 1892-1894. 

Friend, E., M.D., 

Instructor in Dermatology, 1894— still holds the position. 

Goodhue, J. C, M.D., 
Curator, 1846-1847. 

Graham, David Wilson, A.M., M.D., 

Assistant in Clinical Surgery, 1878-1883. Clinical Professor of Surgery, 1891 — 
still holds the position. 

Gray, E. A., M.D., 

Clinical Assistant in the Department of the Nose, Throat and Chest, 1891-1893. 

Gunn, Moses, A.M., LL.D., M.D., 

Professor of the Principles and Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, 1866- 
1887, Treasurer, 1871-1887. 

Haines, Walter S., A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, 1876-1885. Professor of Chemistry, Phar- 
macy and Toxicology, 1885— still holds the position. 

Hamilton, John B., M.D., LL.D., 

Professor of Principles of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, 1891— still holds the 
position. 

Hardon, Kobert Wallace, 

Instructor in Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest, 1894 — still holds the posi- 
tion. 

IIarroun, AVilliam S., M.D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Clinical Medicine, 1877-1882. 

Haskill, Geo., M.D., 

Curator, 1846-1849. 

Hay, Walter, M.D., 

Lecturer on Diseases of the Brain and Nervous System. Spring Course, 1873- 
1876. 

Hayes, Plymmon Sandford, M.D., 

Lecturer on Chemical Physics, Spring Course, 1873-1877. 

Hektoen, Ludavig, M.D., 

Lecturer on Pathological Anatomy and Histology and Curator of the Museum, 
1890-1891. Professor of Morbid Anatomy, and Director of the Laboratories of 
Normal and Pathological Histology, Bacteriology and Hygiene, 1895— still holds 
the position. 



280 



EUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



Hemenway, Henry B., M.D., 

Instructor in Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest, 1893-1894. 

Herrick, J. B., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1846-1850. 

Herrick, "Wm. B., M.D., 

Lecturer on Anatomy, 1814-1845. Professor of Anatomy, 1845-1855. Professor 
of Physiology and Histology, 1855-1857. 

Herrick, James B., A.M., M.D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1889-1890. Lecturer on Materia Medica 
and Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1890-1891. Adjunct Professor of 
Medicine, 1891 — still holds the position. 

Hinde, Alfred, M.D., 

Ophthalmologist to the Neurological Clinic, 1887. Instructor in the Diseases 
of the Eye and Ear, 1894 — still holds the positions. 

Hollister, John H., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1856-1857. 

Holmes, Edward Lorenzo, M.D., LL. D., 

Lecturer on Ophthalmology, Spring Course, 1859-1863. Lecturer on Ophthal- 
mology and Otology, Winter Course, 1863-1869. Professor of Ophthalmology and 
Otology, 1869— still holds the position. President of the Faculty, 1890— still 
holds the position. 

Holmes, Samuel Judd, M.D., 

Lecturer on Morbid Anatomy, Spring Course, 1883. Lecturer on Pathological 
Anatomy and Pathological Histology, Spring Course, 1884-1889. 

Hooper, Henry H., M.D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1877. 

Hudson, A. S., M.D., 

Professor of Physiology and Histology, 1859-1861. 

Hulett, George, M.D., 
Curator, 1816-1849. 

Hunt, William Carlton, M.D., 

Lecturer on Genito-Urinary Organs, Spring Course, 1860-1863. Demonstrator 
of Histology and Instructor in the use of the Microscope, 1861-1868. 

Hyde, James Neyins, A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Syphilis and Dermatology, Spring Course, 1873-1876. Lecturer on 
Dermatology and Syphilis, Winter Session, 1878-1879. Professor of Skin and 
Venereal Diseases, 1879— still holds the position. 

Ingals, Ephraim, M.D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Medical Jurisprudence, 1859-1871. Emeritus 
Professor of Materia Medica and Medical Jurisprudence, 1871— still holds the 
position. 

Ingals, E. Fletcher, A.M., M.D., 

Assistant to the Professor of Materia Medica, 1871-1873. Lecturer on Diseases 
of the Chest and Physical Diagnosis, Spring Course, 1874-1883. Professor of 
Laryngology, 1883-1890. Professor of Laryngology and Practice of Medicine, 1890- 
1893. Professor of Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest, 1893— still holds the 
position. Registrar, 1891— still holds the position. 

Jackson, Abraham Reeves, A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Gynaecology and Diseases of Children, Spring Course, 1873-1879. 

Johnson, Hosmer A., A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Medical Jurisprudence, 1855-1857. Professor 
of Physiology and Histology, 1857-1859. 



28l 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



Jones, H. Webster, A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Obstetrics, Spring Course, 1860. 

Kauffman, A. E., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry, 1885-1888. Lecturer on and Demonstrator of Chem- 
istry, 1888-1893. Lecturer on Chemistry, 1894-1895. 

Kimberly, E. S., M.D., 
Curator, 1846-1819. 

Knox, J. Suydam, A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Materia Medica, Spring Course, 1876-1881. Adjunct Professor of 
Diseases of Children and Lecturer on Therapeutics, Spring Course, 1882. Ad- 
junct Professor of Diseases of Children and Lecturer on Obstetrics, Spring 
Course, 1883-1887. Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Children. 1887- 
1892. 

Kramer, Wm. E., B.S., M.D., 

Instructor in Surgery, 1894— still holds the position. 

Lackey, Robert M., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1866-1867. 

Lacy, Wm. A., A.M., 

Professor of Physiology, 1891-1892. 

La Count, E. R., M.D., 

Instructor in Microscopy, 1893-1894. Instructor in Medicine and Anatomy, and 
Demonstrator of Histology and Pathology, 1894— still holds the position. 

Lange, Ignatz, M.D., 

Clinical Assistant to the Chair of Diseases of Children, 1889— still holds the 
position. 

Lewitt, William, M.D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1866-1868. 

Linnell, B. M., B.A., M.D., 

Instructor in Physiology, 1893— still holds the position. 

Little, William, M.D., 

Curator of the Museum and Prosector to the Chair of Surgery, 1868-1870. 

Lyman, Henry Munson, A.M., M.D., 

Quiz Master, AVinter Session, 1865-1866. Lecturer on Physiology, Spring Course, 
1866-1869. Professor of Chemistry and Pharmacy, 1871-1877. Professor of Phy- 
siology and Diseases of the Nervous System, 1877-1890. Professor of the Prin- 
ciples and Practice of Medicine, 1890— still holds the position. Treasurer, 1891 — 
still holds the position. 

Lyman, William C, M.D., 

Lecturer on Diseases of Chest and Surgery, Spring Course, 1868. 

Lynn, I. P., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1863-1866. 

Maksh, W. R., M.D., 

Lecturer on the Principles and Practice of Medicine, Spring Course, 1868-1870. 

Maynard, Wm. J., A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Skin and Venereal Diseases, 1887-1888. 

Mc Arthur, Lewis Linn, M.D., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry, 1880. 

McConnell, George, M.D., 

Assistant in Anatomy, 1893-1894. 

McGrew, F. A., M.D., 

Instructor in Physiology, 1893. 

282 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



McLean, John, M.D., 

Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine, 1843-1844. Professor of Materia 
Medica and Medical Jurisprudence, 1844-1855. 

Marcusson, Wm. B., A.M., M.D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Principles of Surgery, 1892-1894. Chief Assistant to 
the Clinic of the Professor of the Principles of Surgery, 1894 — still holds the 
position. 

Mariner, G. A., M.D., 

Lecturer on Chemistry, Spring Course, 1860. 

Maxwell, P., M.D., 

Curator, 1846-1849. 

Mercer, Frederick W., M.D., 

Lecturer on Insanity, Spring Course, 1883. 

Merriman, Henry P., A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Gynecology, Spring Course, 1884-1889. Adjunct Professor of 
Gynaecology, 1889— still holds the position. 

Miller, DeLaskie, M.D., Ph.D., 

Professor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, 1859-1879. Pro- 
fessor of Obstetrics and Diseases of Children, 1879-1889. Emeritus Professor of 
Obstetrics, 1889— still holds the position. 

MOLONT, R. S., M.D., 

Prosector to the Chair of Surgery, 1856-1857. 

Montgomery, F. H., M.D., 

Chief Assistant to the Dermatological Clinic, and Instructor in Dermatology and 
Genito-Urinary Diseases, 1890— still holds the position. 

Morgan, William Harrison, M.D., 

Clinical Assistant to the Chair of Diseases of Children, 1882-1889. 

Morse, D. A., M.D., 

Lecturer on Legal Medicine and Insanity, 1870-1871. 

Moyer, Harold N., M.D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Diseases of the Nervous System, 1886-1887. Lecturer 
on Physiology and Histology, 1887-1890. Professor of Physiology, 1890-1891. 
Adjunct Professor of Medicine and Chief Assistant to the Neurological Clinic, 
1891— still holds the position. 

Murdoch, Ezekiel P., A.M., M.D., 

Curator of the Museum, 1880-1882. 

Murphy, John B., M.D., 

Lecturer on Surgery, 1889-1893. 

Nelson, Daniel Thurber, A.M., M.D., 

Clinical Adjunct to the Chair of Gynecology, 1880. Adjunct Professor of Gyne- 
cology, 1881-1888. Clinical Professor of Gynecology, 1888-1892. Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Gynecology, 1892— still holds the position. 

Ochsner, Albert J., B.S., M. D., 

Demonstrator of Physiology and Pathology, 1886-1889. Chief Assistant to the 
Surgical Clinic and Demonstrator of Physiology and Pathology, 1889-1891. 
Demonstrator of Pathology and Assistant to the Chair of Practice of Surgery, 
1891 — still holds the position. 

Ohls, Henry G., A.B., M.D., 

Instructor in Chemistry, 1894. 

Oliver, Oliver Cromwell, M.D., 

Curator of the Museum and Director of the Histological Laboratory, 1877-1880. 



28- 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



Olney, T. A., M.D., 

Instructor in Physiology, 1893-1894. 
O'Xeill, J. W., M.D., 

Instructor in Surgery, 1894— still holds the position. 
Oviatt, U. W., M.D., 

Instructor in Surgery, 1894— still holds the position. 
Owens, John Edwin, M.D., 

Lecturer on the Surgical Diseases of the Urinary Organs, 1867-1871. Lecturer of 

Surgery, Spring Course, 1871-1882. Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, 1879- 

1882. 
Park, Roswell, A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Surgery, Spring Course, 1883. 
Parker, Charles A., M.D., 

Assistant in Anatomy, 1893— still holds the position. 
Parkes, Wi. R„ Ph.M., M.D., 

Instructor in Pathology and Principles of Surgery and Assistant in Anatomy, 

1894— still holds the position. 
Parkes, Charles Theodore, M.D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1868-1875. Lecturer on Clinical Medicine, Spring 

Course, 1868. Lecturer on Anatomy, Spring Course, 1868-1875. Professor of 

Anatomy, 1875-1887. Professor of the Principles and Practice of Surgery and 

Clinical Surgery, 1887-1891. 
Patton, J. A., B.S., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Materia Medica and Instructor in Chemistry, 1894— still holds 

the position. 
Perkins, C. P., M.D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1887-1890. 
Pierce, C. H., M.D., 

Assistant in Anatomy, 1894. 
Powell, Edwin, A.M., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1858-1863. Lecturer on Surgical Anatomy, Spring 

Course, 1860. Professor of Military Surgery and Surgical Anatomy, 1863-1877. 
Prince, Lawrence H., M.D., 

Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 1894 — still holds the position. 
Rauch, John H., 

Professor of Materia Medica and Medical Jurisprudence, 1857-1859. Lecturer on 

Physiology and Botany, Spring Course, 1859. 
Raymond, James H., M.D., 

Instructor in Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest, 1894. 
Rea, R. L., M.D., 

Professor of Anatomy, 1859-1875. 
Rhodes, J. Edwin, A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Diseases of the Chest, 1891-1894. Lecturer on Laryngology and 

Diseases of the Chest, 1894 -still holds the position. 
Robison, John A., A.M., M.D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Clinical Medicine, 1881. Demonstrator of Materia 

Medica, Spring Course, 1882-1883. Lecturer on Materia Medica. 1883-1889. 

Instructor in Auscultation and Percussion, 1889-1891. Adjunct Professor of 

Medicine, 1893— still holds the position. 
Robinson, W. F., B.S., M.D., 

Assistant to the Dermatologieal Clinic, 1894— still holds the position. 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



Roler, Edward 0. F., A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Gynecology and Diseases of Children, Spring Course, 1860. Assist- 
ant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1860-1861. Lecturer on Anatomy, Spring Course, 

1861. 
Ross, Joseph Presley, A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Clinical Medicine, Spring Course, 1860. Lecturer on Clinical Medi- 
cine, 1862-1864. Professor of Clinical Medicine and Diseases of the Chest, 1868- 

1890. 
Salisbury, Jerome Henry', A.M., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry, 1879. Adjunct Professor of Medicine, 1891— still 

holds the position. 
Sawyer, Edward Warren, A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Obstetrics, Spring Course, 1875-1883. 
Senn, Nicholas, M.D., Ph.D., LL. D., 

Professor of the Principles of Surgery and of Surgical Pathology, 1888-1890. 

Professor of Practice of Surgery and of Clinical Surgery, 1890— still holds the 

position. 
Senn, Emanuel J., M.D., 

Instructor in Pathology and Principles of Surgery, 1894— still holds the position. 
Shaw, Thomas Jefferson, M.D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1882 — still holds the position. Clinical 

Assistant to the Chair of Gynaecology, 1881-1893. 
Shaw, D. Lee, M.D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1893-1894. Assistant in Anatomy and 

Instructor in Physiology, 1894 — still holds the position. 
Sherman, Frederick Emerson, M.D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1878-1889. 
Sippy, A. F., M.D., 

Instructor in Chemistry, 1894— still holds the position. 
Slaymaker, S. H., M.D., 

Instructor in Physiology, 1893-1894. 
Spencer, Thomas, M.D., 

Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine, 18 19-1850. Emeritus Professor 

of Theory and Practice of Medicine, 1850-1857. 
Stahl, Frank A., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Obstetrics, 1889— still holds the position. 
Stehman, Henry B., A.M., M.D., 

Instructor in Physical Diagnosis, 1891-1893. Clinical Professor of Obstetrics, 

1893— still holds the position. 
Stone, Willis C, M.D., 

Clinical Assistant to the Chair of Gynecology, 1890-1894. 
Strong, Albert Bliss, A.M., M.D., 

Lecturer on Therapeutics, Spring Course, 1875. Demonstrator of Anatomy, 

1875-1894— still holds the position. Lecturer on Anatomy, Spring Course, 1876 — 

still holds the position. Assistant to the Chair of Clinical Surgery, 1879-1888. 
Sutherland, John, M.D., 

Assistant in Anatomy, 1893. 
Sutton, R. Stansbury, M.A., M.D., 

Lecturer on Gynaecology, Spring Course, 1880-1881. 
Synon, George G, M.D., 

Assistant to the Chair of Clinical Medicine, 1890-1893. 



?85 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



Talbott, Eugene Solomon, D.D.S., M.D., 

Lecturer on Dental Anatomy and Physiology, Spring Course, 1883-1887. Lect- 
urer on Dental Pathology and Surgery, 1887 — still holds the position. 

Taylor, William Henry, A.B., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry, 1881-1881. 

Thayer, S. B., M.D, 

Curator, 1846-18-19. 

Tinen, Edward H., M.D., 

Instructor in Chemistry, 1891— still holds the position. 

Tuthill, T. T., M.D., Clinical Assistant in the Department of the Nose, Throat and 
Chest, 1891-1893. Clinical Assistant to the Chair of Laryngology and Diseases 
of the Chest, 1893— still holds the position. 

Tyler, Harvey A., M. D., 

Instructor in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1894 — still holds the position. 

Venn, Charles Henry, M.D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1877-1880. 

Wade, Charles A., M.D., 

Assistant to Clinic for Diseases of Children, 1894 — still holds the position. 

Wadsworth, Francis Libby, M.D., 

Lecturer on Physiology and Histology, Spring Course, 1870-1880. Adjunct Pro- 
fessor of Physiology, 1880-1881. 

Weaver, Geo. H, M D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy and Instructor in Laryngology and 
Diseases of the Chest, 1892-1894. Instructor in Bacteriology, 1894 — still holds 
the position. 

Weber, Samuel L., M.D., 

Lecturer on Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 1892 — still holds the position. 

Weeks, L. C, M.D., 

Assistant in Anatomy, 1894 — still holds the position. 

Wescott, Cassius D., M.D., 

Demonstrator of Chemistry, 1883-1884. Instructor in Diseases of the Eye and 
Ear, 1893— still holds the position. 

Weston, Edward B., M.D., 

Lecturer on Obstetrics and Diseases of Children, 1889-1891. 

Whalen, C. J., M.D., 

Clinical Assistant in the Department of Nose, Throat and Chest, 1891-1893. Chief 
Assistant to the Clinic for Diseases of the Nose, Throat and Chest, 1893-1894. 
Instructor in Laryngology and Diseases of the Chest, 1894 — still holds the posi- 
tion. 

Whitney, Eugene Walter, A.M., M.D., 

Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1878-1882. Demonstrator of Surgery, 
Spring Course, 1882-1883. Lecturer on Surgery, Spring Course, 1884-1888. Lect- 
urer on Surgery and Demonstrator of Anatomy, 1888-1889. 



286 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 
RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



or: 



4 

15 
76 
97 
175 
176 
246 
324 
368 
450 
451 
483 
484 
555 
556 
557 
590 
648 
649 
650 
651 
730 
731 
732 
733 
838 
839 
840 
841 
842 
933 
934 
1008 
1009 
1136 
1137 
1252 
1253 
1254 
1255 
1256 
1388 
1479 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Ames, Alfred E 

* Andrews, Ehvood 

Armstrong, Alfred W . . . 

Anderson, J. L 

Adams, Henry D 

Albin, George W 

* Avery, Win. M 

Archer, Meredith C 

Adair, A. W 

Armstrong, L. Grant. . . . 

Ayres, E. H 

Adams, Orson Barnes 

Angear, John J . M .' 

Ames, Albert A 

Allen, Charles E 

Armstrong, Stephen G.. . 

Andrews, Gordon 

Adkins, Frank B 

Akely, Harrison 

Allen, Orlenzer 

Avery, Samuel J 

Adair, W. R 

*Adams, J. Madison C 

Allen, Henry 

Allen, R. M..-. 

Allen, Ethan P 

Annis, T. E 

Ayres, S. B s. 

Allen, C. Isham 

Asdale, Wrn. J 

Ames, Curtis B 

Ager, Upton A 

Aster, Francis G 

Armstrong, James B 

Austin, William H 

* Adams, James M 

Adair, Lyman J 

Aydelott, William R 

Aurner, George H 

Adams, Thomas J 

Acres, George T 

Anderson Edward V. . . . 

* Adams. Orion John Hall 



1844-45 
1845-46 
1848-49 
1849-50 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1853-54 
1855-56 
1856-57 
1858-59 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1861-62 
1861-62 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1870-71 
1871-72 



1480 
1558 
1559 
1621 
1623 
1624 
1701 
1702 
1781 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
2094 
2095 
2096 
2217 
2218 
2219 
2365 
2366 
2367 
2368 
2369 
2370 
2540 
2542 
2543 
2544 
2545 
2546 
2547 
2548 
2549 
2727 
2728 
2729 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



*Artz, William Franklin 

* Alf ord, Sanf ord Urville 

*Ashbaugh, John Isaac 

Adolphus, Philip, M. D., Hon.j 

Allen, Charles L., M. D., Hon.-|\ 

Allen, William Andrew 

Adams, William Thomas 

Ashbaugh, Theoph. Lambert.. 

Andrews, Wells, Jr 

Atwood, Eugene Sullivan 

Austin, Silas Addison % 

Aiken, Charles Rucker§ 

Ashbaugh, Abraham 

Arthur, Macauley 

Andrews, John Wesley 

Arnold, Edward Dudley 

Alf ord, James Simpson 

Anderson, Jeremiah Allen 

Ahrams, James Henry 

Amy, Chauncey Willard 

Anderson, Marion J 

Arnold, Erastus Yoemans 

Armstrong, Johnson 

Allen, George Frank 

Ackley, Winfleld, M. D. f 

Adams, James William 

Albers, Henry Arthur, B. S. | . 

Anderson, Samuel T 

Annis, Eber Lander % 

Anthony, Frank * 

*Arburn, Joel Hume 

*Allport, W. W., M. D., Hon. j. . 

Abbott, Alfred Joseph 

Acker, Ellis 

Adams, Charles F 

A tl.ims, John Milton 

Amos, Andrew Raymond 

Anderson, Albert A 

Andre, Thomas J 

Arnold, Marcellus Orando 

Abbott. Francis Eddy 

Adair, John Hunter 

Adams, John Quincy 



1871-72 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1776-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 



* Deceased. f Degree received before graduating, 
t Assistant Surgeon U. S. Marine Hospital, San Francisco. 
§ County Physician, San Joaquin County, California. Secretary i 
T| U. S. Pension Examiner. Coroner La Porte County, Indiana. , 



■ San Joaquin County Medical Society. 



>8 7 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



2730 

2731 

2732 

2733 

2734 

2909 

2910 

2911 

2912 

2913 

2914 

3077 

3078 

3079 

3080 

3230 

3^31 

3232 

3233 

3391 

3392 

3393 

3394 

3395 

3396 

3524 

3664 

3665 

3802 

3803 

3963 

3964 

3965 

3966 

3967 

4144 

4145 

4146 

4285 

4286 

4440 

4441 

4442 

4443 

1 

16 

26 

27 

28 

29 

96 

98 

99 

100 

141 

177 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Alex, Christopher Andreas,ph.o.t 

Allen, Aleri Downey 

Ambrose, Josiah Little 

Ashby, Atehie Almond 

Auld, James, M. D 

Adams, Wilson Wesley 

Abraxas, Daniel Orville 

Albright, Robt. Samuel 

Anderson, Elmer Ellsworth 

Anthony, Henry Giles 

Avery, Milo 

Acker, Calvis S 

Aley, Hector Sinclare 

Allen, Arthur West 

Atkinson, Foster L 

Allen, Abram Orrinzer 

Allison, William Russell 

Anderson, John Victor 

Arbuckle, Alphonso Taft 

Agnew, Thomas Jefferson 

Allen, Charles James 

Allen, Orville Reid 

Anderson, Per Emil Torgny 

Anthony, John Albro 

Armstrong, Charles Allen 

Anthony, Julius P., M. D. Hon. . 

Albright, Charles Edgar 

Atwood, Irenreus J., A. B 

Anderson, Horace Griffin, Jr 

Armstrong, Frank N 

Albers, Herman Harvey, B. S. . . 

Aikman, Edgar A 

Atkinson, Harry Frets: 

Atkinson, Irad Wm. H 

Atwood, J. Burrows 

Ackley, Samuel Breck 

Anderson, August 

Andrews, John 

Anderson, Gustave E. F., D. D. S. 

Andrews, James A 

Allen, Frank Harvey 

Anderson, Wilbur 

Andre, Frank Edgar 

Asquith, Arthur Clyde 

*Butterneld, Wm 

*Bird, J. Herman 

Balsh.H. .T.E 

Barry, S. A 

Bradway, J. R 

*Blunt, Joseph 

Buell, Jas. H., M. D. Hon. f 

*Blood, Cyrus G 

*Brown, Clay 

Brown, Henry T 

Brown, Thomas D 

Blades, Franklin 



1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1881-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
189U-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1843-44 
1845-46 
1846^7 
1846-47 
1846-47 
1846-47 
1848-49 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1851-52 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Buckley, Benj. T 

Bodenstab, George A. 

Bentley, G. Judson. . . 

Bennett, Robt, F 

Brenneman, J. A 

Boomer, Albert 

Brenton, Washington 

Byrns, George A 

*Barbre, Jesse 

*Bicknell, Lewis C 

Barlow, J. Milton 

Bowers, Daniel 

*Buffum, Almon C 

Boothe, Edwin W 

*Bowen, J. Sumner 

Bounel, M. H 

Bennett. D. C 

Brown, L. B 

*Brookhart, Lewis 

Black, R. C 

Bristow, Benj. W 

*Blackman, A. M 

Billington, John T .. . 

Bartels, Frederick 

Baker, John B 

Barry, Edward L. H. . 

Bunce, Charles 

Barndt, Allen S 

Brown, William C 

Buck, Sidney S 

Bradshaw, Benj. H... 
*Blood, Henry S 

Beggs, George W 

Bartlett, Aurelius T.. 

Bennett, Leonard L . . 

Brown, James 

Boyles, Elijah W.I.... 

Barnett, Charles F.... 

*Bliss, ElaL 

♦Bishop, E 

Byers, Frederick W . . 

Babcock, Charles M . . 

Babcock, Lyman F. . . 

Bacon, A. J 

^Barclay, S. R 

Beasley, G. Frank 

*Bibb, Geo. R 

Bradburg. William T. 

Bucher. Charles A 

*Byrn, Spencer 

Baird, W. C 

Baker, Braxton 

Ball, Zopher 

Becker, John 

Baker, Newton 

Blackall, C. R 



* Deceased. f Degree received before graduating. 
J Member Board Examining Surgeons, Flora, III. "U 



lining Surgeon, Clay City, III. 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Bond, E.J 

Bosley, D. W 

Bowman, W. E 

Boardman, James G 

Brown, J. W 

Bright, W. H 

Blanchard, J. G 

Brunk, C. II 

Baker, Martin, M.D.,ad eundemt 

Brown, Luther, Jr 

Brown, George W 

Bove, T. Newton 

Berry, Edward E 

Brown, J. J., M. D. ad eundemt- 

'Buckmaster, Win, H 

Brown, Charles C 

Bradshaw, Horatio 1ST 

Brackenridge, Kobt. J 

Bachelle, Gideon V 

Bosco, Otto 

Brown, Benj. F . 

Barnwell, James H 

Brownlee, Hugh 

Barr, James 

Bosworth, A. W 

Barnett, James K 

Baker, James H 

Babcock, Amos 

Barger, Kobt. N 

Babcock, Dan'l C.,M.D. ad eund.f 
Bailey.Win. N., M.D.adeundemf 

*Bobbs, J. S., M. D. Hon/f 

Baldwin, Marcellus O 

Broughton, Russell 

Brady, Thompson R 

Bradley. Frank L 

Bacon, John W 

Bardwell, Hiram H 

Birney, Samuel H 

Brookings, David J 

Briggs, Robert 

Burton, William M 

Brown, Simon P 

Brown, Robt. H 

Bracket, Arthur B 

Bailey, Gallaudet 

Baker, James 

Baker, D. Bryan : 

Barnes, Charles A 

Bicknell, Fred T 

Bond, L. Lafayette 

Best, John Ellison 

Bridgman, Gilbert E 

Bloomingstone, John 

Brown, Cyril P 

Ballou, Albert D 



1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 



1266 
1267 
1268 
1269 
1389 
1390 
1391 
1392 
1393 
1394 
1395 
1396 
1473 
1478 
1481 
1482 
1483 
1560 
1561 
1562 
1563 
1564 
1565 
1625 
1626 
1627 
1628 
1699 
1703 
1704 
1705 
1706 
1707 
1708 
1782 
1783 
1784 
1785 
1786 
1787 
1788 
1864 
1865 
1666 
1867 
1668 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1965 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Burns, William J 

Bennett, David O 

Blakeslee, Thomas 

*Boyd, William M 

♦Baxter, William W. 

Blackmail, Wm. E 

Bailey, Income G. O 

Bachman, Henry S 

Bragg, Thomas H 

Buchan, Alfred L 

Brandon, George W 

Bartholow, James M 

*Baker, Wm. S., M.D. ad eundemt 

Bass, Zacheus, M. D., Hon.t . . . 
*Bartholow, Emory Coke 

Booth, Charles Irwin 

Burbank, Charles Henry 

Bedford, Franklin 

Battin, William Henry 

Barclay, John Marshall 

Bostwick, Henry Clay 

Browning, J. Boardman 

Birney, Clarius Confucius 

Bennett, Sanf ord Filmore 

Bertram,- Victor Arthur 

Burroughs, Charles Le Roy 

Byrne, John Henrv 

Bluthardt, T. J., M. D. Hon.t-. 

Baugh, Samuel Leonard 

Bell, Samuel Henry 

Berry, James Gordon 

Bill, Albert Henry 

Binnie, John 

Blue, -John Blackford 

Banton, Benson 

Bishop, Ira 

Bo wen, David Hampton 

Braun, Louis 

Buchanan, Chas. Henry 

Bullock, Frank W 

Buttler, Robt., William 

Brown, George Edward 

Bridges, Vernon Roe 

Belfleld, William Thomas 

Boals, William Hardin 

Barney, George Henry 

Burnh'am, William Allds 

Bird, Herbert Roderick 

Bryan, John Charles 

Baird, Thomas Davis 

Bean, Benj. Hurst 

Brattain, Benj. Franklin 

Baldwin, Aristides Edwin 

Bowman, Andrew Washington 

Bumham, Alonzo Festus 

Burlingame, John Henderson. 



1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1872-73 

1673-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1874- 

1874- 

1874- 

1874-7 

1874-7 

1874- 

1875- 



1875- 



1875-76 

1875- 

1875-76 

1875- 

1876-' 

1876- 

1876- 

1876- 

1876-' 

1S76-' 

1876-' 

1876-' 

1876-' 

1876-' 

1877-' 

1877-' 

1877-' 

1877-' 

1877-' 



: Deceased. +Deg 



ved before graduating 1 . 



2S9 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



1970 
1971 

1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1988 
2090 
2093 
2097 
2098 
2099 
2100 
2101 
2102 
2103 
2104 
2105 
2106 
2107 
2108 
2109 
2220 
2221 
2222 
2223 
2224 
2225 
2226 
2227 
2228 
2229 
2230 
2371 
2372 
2373 
2374 
2375 
2376 
2377 
2378 
2379 
23S0 
23S1 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Boyd, Robt. Dempsey 

Browne, Alfred Marshman 

Brown, Commodore Perry 

Bergen, Geo. Matthews, A. B.f . 
Burton, Daniel Francis, B. S.f- • 

♦Barry, John Samuel 

Butz', John Edmund Preble 

Bennett, Edwin George 

Brainerd, Henry Green 

Burhans, Orvis Mann 

Boardman, Edwin Orlando 

Boganan, San, A. B/f 

Bates, Frederick II 

Bellus, George Wesley 

Billiard, Francis Bascom 

Bond, Arthur Grant 

Bridge, Norman, M.D., adeundt 

Burgess, John, M.I)., Hon.| 

Bailey, Samuel 

Battles, Clarence Perley 

Bartlett, Rufus Henry 

Bartlett, Edwin Julius, A. M.J.. 

Baker, Robt. Wesley 

Benson, Orson Dorcelia 

Benner, Stillman Marion 

Bill, Benj. Jephthah 

Bishop, William T 

Bowman, Adelbert Henry 

Brengle, William Burgess 

Bradshaw, John F 

Burchard, Charles T 

Brophy, Truman W., D. D. S.|. . 

Bowman, Samuel Cleland 

Bagley, John Anthony 

Bass. Luther George, 'B. A.f 

Battles, Raymond Willis 

Butterfield, Franklin A 

Bradley, George Frederick 

Brown, Frank Preston 

Bronish, Ignatius 

Boon, Robt. Leonard 

Burdick, Fernando Wood 

Barnett, John Robert 

Batchelder, Franklin P 

Bates, Charles Wright 

Beckwith, Richard C 

Bedford, James Rosser 

Benedict, Albert Venesse 

Bennett, Josiah Jacob ..;....... 

Biddle, Thomas Coke 

Birkhoff, David 

Black, Edwin Thomas 

Blood, Alfred 



1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 M _ 

1879-80 ,2744 

1879-80; 12745 

1879-80! 12746 

1879-80 1 !?"47 

1879-80 2748 

1879-80 II 2749 

1880-81 "2750 

1880-81 ,,2751 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 



2382 
2383 
2384 
2385 
2386 
2387 
2388 
2389 
23'. «) 
2391 
2550 
2551 
2552 
2553 
2554 
2555 
2556 
2557 
2558 
2559 
2560 
2561 
2562 
2563 
2564 
2565 
2566 
2735 
2736 
2737 
2738 
2739 
2740 
2741 
2742 
2743 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



1880-8C2921 
1880 81 2922 



2915 
2916 
2917 
2918 
2919 
2920 



Bloodgood, Charles, B. S.f 

Bigelow, Isaac Stover 

Bodenschatz, John Charles 

Boorse, Lorenzo 

Boyd, Charles Albert 

Boyd, James Keeley 

Bronson, George Washington.. . 

Brown, William Henry 

Brown, William Moultrie 

Burns, Robert 

Baker, William Allen 

Ballard, Henry Francis 

Bascom, Frank S 

Bailsman, Andrew B 

Bennett, Edwin Richardson 

Besharian, John II 

Bigelow, John Frost 

Birney, Homer James Clark 

Bowers, Walter Crooks§ 

Bransom, Willard Stewart 

Bridges, James B 

Brounrigg, William J 

Bryan, Albert Terry 

Bryan, William Stranton 

♦Burns, Richard R 

Burres, William Franklin 

Burroughs, Orrin Frank, Jr 

Bacon, Charles Theodore 

♦Barnes, Calvin O, Jr 

Barnes, Crittenden Edgar, A. M.| 

Beck, Hans Max 

Bevan, Arthur Dean 1j 

Billingsley, James Strong 

Birney, Frank Lansing 

Black', Joseph Nance 

Bowers, Charles Edward 

Brooks, Alfred Leroy 

Brosius, Frampton Cove 

Brown, Allen Douglas 

Brundage, Moses Simmens 

Buchanan, Robt. Elgon 

Burke, Richard Henry 

Burlingame, Lyman R 

Bullard, Ernest Luther 

Burnside, Irvin Trail 

Barnett, George Gilbert 

Beatty, Theodore Bruce || .... 

Blair, John Marquis 

Bloomfleld, Robert Goodman. 

Boas, Edmund Aaron, B. A. t 

Bogue, Charles Virgil 

Bolles, David William 

Brink, Wilbur 



* Deceased, f Degree n 
t Professor of Chemistry in 1 
§ Health Officer, Smith Co., K 
nining Surgeons, Smith Co., Kn 
II Rush Medical College. 
]| Health Commissioner, 1892. 



ed before graduating. 

■artmouth College 

wan. Member Republics 



Valley and Kansas State Medical Society. President Board of U. S. 



29O 



BUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Brittin, Albert Leslie 

Broughton, Frank, M. A. f 

♦Bunker, William Burton , . 

Buland, George Leonard 

Butterfield, Everett Henry 

Byall, Howard Malcolm 

Bacon, Russell Stewart 

Bailey, Edward, A. B.f 

Bancroft, Henry Valentine 

Bartells, Henry Wm. Fred 

Barthel, Oscar Henry 

Bingam, Earl 

Blakeley, G8orge Arthur 

Blank, Henry. 

Bliss, Edwin Clarence, A. B. ■)■. . 

Bond, Joseph Franklin 

Booth, Frank Hulburt. 

Bricker, Boyd Nelson 

Bueehner.William L.,M.D.Hon.| 

Bailey, Oscar Clyde 

Bantley, Bartholomew, Ph. G.j. 

Bean, Daniel Hurd , 

Beard, Thomas Edward 

Bearers, Seth Douglas 

Bell, James Johnston, B. S. t • • ■ 

Bennett, Lewis Fish 

Bentley, Frederick David 

Birney, Bascom Hugh 

Bogen, Herbert Edward 

Bower, William Clinton 

Bowers, Lewis Campbell 

Bowman, Lincoln Mock 

Bowman, William Edward 

Brackett, John Wallace.. 

Bradley, James Bray 

Brown, Joel Carlton , 

Bruner, Charles Keepers 

Burke, Thomas • 

Baker, Amos Longfellow 

Bellwood, Harvey H 

Benson, Roger Paul . . , 

Boone, Joseph Jackson ..... 

Boorman, Curtis Asher, B. L. t- 

Borland, Leonard Clifford 

Bouffleur, Albert I., B. S. f 

Bourschiedt, Frank Charles 

Brown, Henry Calvin 

Burke, James 

Burrows, Thomas Wilson. ...... 

Butler, Rufus Emery 

Barnes, Allen C ; . . . 

Barnes, Cole Edgar 

Beeson, Job Strother . 

Benz, Henry Andrew 

Best, Elmer Howard 

Birdsall, George Asa 



883-84 
883-84 
883-84 
883-84 
883-84 
883-84 
884-85 
884-85 
884-35 
884-85 



884-85 
884-85 



1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 



1 

1885-86 

1885-86 

1885-88 

1886-87 

1886-87 

1886-87 

1886-87 

1886-87 

1886-87 



1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-87 



3534 
3535 
3536 
3537 
3538 
3539 
3666 
3667 
3668 
3669 
3670 
3671 
S672 
8673 
3674 
3675 
3676 
3677 
3678 
3679 
3680 
3681 
3682 
3683 
3684 
3804 
3805 
3806 
3807 
3808 
3809 
3810 
3811 
3812 
813 
3814 
3815 
3GS8 
3969 
3970 
3971 
3972 
3973 
;974 
3975 
3976 
3977 
3978 
3979 
3980 
4147 
4148 
414E 
4150 
4151 
4152 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Blim, Charles '.'..'. . .... .". ... 

Bluthardt, Oscar Robt . . . ! 

Boswell, Davis 

Bowlby, George Balfour 

Brasington, E. Custeen, M. D. t 

Brown, Martin Millard 

Baer, Almerin Webster, Ph. G.| 

Baird, Thomas James 

Barnard, Hayden Suffield 

Baughman, John Allen, M. S.|. 

Beebe, Carl M 

Bergen, Lloyd Moss 

Bergeron, Joseph Zepher, M.A.f 

Best, David Bigger 

Bessette, Felix Simeon Joseph 
Blanchard, Charles Willard . . . 

Bowen, Charles Francis 

Bower, John Hugo 

Boyd, John Frank, M. A.f 

Bressler, Frank Benj 

Brown, John Thomas 

Bryan, Clarence Henry 

Bundy, William Frank ....... 

Bush, Ira Charles 

Butler, George Frank 

Ballard, Charles Nelson 

Beadles, Charles Henry 

Beckwith, James Gushing 

Boone, Malcolm Benton 

Borst, Leon Gilford 

Bradley, William John 

Branman, Michael P 

Brennerman, Wm. Elmer 

Brock, John Edgar 

Brown, Frederick Irwine . . 

Buffum, Frank Putnam j..... 

Burney, Gerald Roseau 

Balhatchet, Thomas, B. S/f..-. 

Beard, John Clark 

Beebe, Loran Whittemore. . . . . 

Beech, George De Loss 

Berger, Henry Charles 

Bohart, William Henry 

Bothwell, Roy Sunderland.M.D.f 

Boyd, Charles.D... 

Brown, Walter John 

Bulson, Albert Eugene, Jr., B.S.t 
Burdick, Alfred Stephen, A.B.t- 

Butler, Andrew Jackson, Jr 

Brown, Fletcher Emory, C.E.|. . 

Banker, Frank Marvin 

Barr, William Allen . . .' 

Beach, Samuel Gushing 

Bishop, Dennis Dennett 

Blocki, Anton Frederick 

Bostwick, John Martin ...;'..'... 



1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 



1888-89 
1888-89 



1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 



1 

3888-89 

1838-89 

888-89 

888-89 

1889-90 

889-90 

8S9-90 

889-90 

889-90 

889-90 

889-90 

889-90 

1889-90 

1389-90 

1889-90 

1889-90 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1880-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

18S0-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 



291 



SEVENTEENTH TKIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



lis 
III 

4153 
4154 
4155 
4156 
4157 
4158 
4159 
4160 
4161 
4162 
4287 
4288 
4289 
4290 
4291 
4292 
4293 
4294 
4295 
4296 
4297 
4298 
4299 
4300 
4301 
4302 
4303 
4304 
4444 
4445 
4446 
4447 
4448 
4449 
4450 
4451 
4452 
4453 
4454 
4455 
4456 
4457 
4458 
4159 
4460 
46 
47 
48 
49 
77 
78 
79 
101 
139 



NAMES OF GRADUATE!?. 



Bouchard, Wm. Leon 

Bozarth, John Richard 

Bradley, Wm. Edwin, B. S.| . . . • 

Breeding, Walter Raleigh 

Braun, Otto 

Browing, Harry De Forest 

Brown, Manuel De Forest 

Brydges, James Charles 

Buck, Samuel Corey, A. M.f 

Butterfleld, Thomas Wilson 

Bramford. Elmer E., M. D.f. . . . 

Barr, Elmer Ellsworth 

Bartz, Nicholas B., Ph. G.f 

Bayley; Emery Herbert, B. L.|. 

Beal, Albert Raymond 

Bell, Frederick Albert 

Bell, William Henry '. . . 

Bennett, William C, B. S.f 

Bennitt, Carl. 

Berger, Victor B., A. M.| 

Bessesen, Alfred Nicholas 

Bidgood, Henry Raby 

Borland, Matthew Wilson, M.D.j 

Boyer, Jephtha Silas 

Brown, Warren Graham 

Burdick, Archie Edward 

Burgess, Thomas' 

Bussey, George Newton, Ph. G.t 

Bacon, Henry Leander 

Baker, George Washington, Jr 

Barothy, Arpad Moeller ... 

Beacom, Daniel F 

Bedard, Ulric Antonio 

Behle, Agustus C 

Beise, Charles James 

Best, James Archibald 

Blanchard, Milton, E., M. D.-f . 
Boch, Otto Bismarck, Ph. G.|-. 

Braucht, Frederick E 

Brown Almon L., B. S/f 

Buck, Ralph Emerson 

Bullen.Simeon John Hobt.,M.D."f 

Bishop, Joseph Alonzo 

Butler, William Joseph 

Byrnes, Frank 

Cameron, Daniel M 

Chamberlain, Wm 

♦Clark. Joseph A 

♦Crawford, Alexander B 

Cavarly, Wm. W 

Clark, Asa 

*Cutler, Harvey 

Coleman. Wm. F.J 

♦Cooper, E. S., M. D., Hon.f . 



1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-91 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1847-48 
1847-48 
1847^48 
1847-48 
1848-49 
1848-49 
1848-49 
1849-50 
1849-50 



142 
143 
144 

145 
146 
147 
148 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
249 
250 
286 
287 
288 
289 
290 
291 
292 
329 
330 
331 
332 
333 
334 
372 
415 
416 
454 
455 
456 
489 
525 
526 
563 
564 
565 
595 
596 
661 
662 
663 
664 
748 
749 
750 
751 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Coolidge, F. W 

Constant, J. H 

Crowder, Wm. Milton.. . 

Craig, S. L 

♦Coleman, O. D 

Chittock, Gordon 

Crawford, George S 

Craig, Wm.D 

Crouse, F. Marion.- 

Chadwick, Alexander B. 

♦Cole, Theodore G 

♦Collins, James A 

Colton, D. Alphonso 

Corkins,-P. G.§ 

Curless, Wm, 

Chapman, O. D 

Cunningham, J. P 

Collver, John W 

Cornett, Charles C 

Clapp, Horace 0.7 

♦Chadwick, Michael R. . . 
♦Crombie, Thaddeus M . . 

♦Cooper, Berry W 

♦Coon, Hiram L 

Clark. Salmon S 

Conley, Jason N 

Carley, David W 

♦Clawges, John W. F 

♦Carey, Anizi B 

♦Grain, A. Jackson 

♦Crain, James L 

Constant, Francis M 

Cravens, Jas. Franklin . 

Clark, Freeman 

♦Corcoran, P. G 

Cook, John A 

Corey, George W 

Conklin, J. R 

Carnahan, Hiram 

♦Clark, Elijah A... k 

Cool, Daniel Maxon 

Cuthbert, Wm. L 

Conley, J. Griffin 

Carter, Wm. D 

Cunninghom, James 

♦Chase, Philo W 

Cass, Frank D 

Cassal, F. Marion 

Chamberlin, Ellston 

Coakley, James. E 

Carlisle. C. H. If...'. ... 

Catlin, E. P 

Chamberlain, W. E 

♦Chesbrough, II. R 



* Deceased. t" Decree leeeived before graduating. 
± Druggist and Practicing. 

§ Eepiesent&ttve for two years from Adams County, 111. 
■j Homceopathist. 



292 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



752 
753 
754 
755 
756 
757 
758 
847 
848 
849 
850 
851 
852 
853 
854 
855 
856 
941 
942 
943 
1005 
1007 
1018 
1019 
1020 
1021 
1022 
1023 
1024 
1126 
1153 
1154 
1155 
1156 
1157 
1158 
1159 
1160 
1161 
1162 
1163 
1247 
1270 
1271 
1272 
1273 
1274 
1275 
1276 
1397 
1398 
1399 
1400 
1401 
1402 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Cole, Frederick 

Cole, Samuel, Jr 

*Clark, H.N 

Congdon, J. L 

Cooper, J 

*Cotton, John 

dishing, Clinton 

Clarke, George A 

Cravens, Samuel C 

♦Crawford, J. N 

Cozad, James 

Craig, John W 

Carscadden, Richard 

Crowder, Robt. H 

Comstock, James A 

Chamberlin, George M 

Carter, William J , 

Clarke, Wesley 

Crouse, Jerome H 

Connor, J. Gilbert 

Cachot, Max. A., M.D. ad eund.j 

Carr, Ezra S,, M. D., Hon.f 

Christie, Wm. H 

Craig, Pascal L 

Cassidy, John 

Chase, Henry A 

Cook, James M 

Carter, J. A ". 

Coffin, F. Wallace 

Cowden, John W., M.D. ad eund.f 

Cameron, John J 

Chenowith, Cassidy 

Cunkle, Israel 

Crossgrove, Thomas 

Cloyd, John P. 

Church, Nelson Horatio 

Covalt, Amos A 

Cochran, Wm. G.f 

Cameron, James G 

Carleman, Mauritz 

Congar, Oliver H 

Clark, John S., M. D., ad eund.t 

Crowder. Wm. L 

Carver, Wilson C 

Curtner, Paul II 

Coates, Thomas 

Cassels, James McNab 

Case, Lafayette W 

♦Crist, Howard C 

Clarke, Elbert W 

Chapman, Edward J 

Conan, Fran k E 

Craig, Norman S 

Cornell, Corwin W-; 

Collins, Daniel B.§ 



1864-65 
1864-65 
1864^65 
1861-65 
1864-65 
1864-05 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1867-68 
3867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1837-68 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1888-69 
1868-69 
1S68-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



1403 
1404 
1484 
1485 
1486 
1487 
1488 
1489 
1490 
1566 
1567 
1568 
1569 
1622 
1629 
1630 
1631 
1632 
1633 
1634 
1635 
1636 
1700 
1709 
1710 
1711 
1712 
1713 
1714 
1715 
1716 
1717 
1718 
1789 
1790 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
2110 



Copp, Ben j . D 

Crumpton, Hezekiah J 

Canfield, F. Antis 

Chapin, Hiram Stillman 

Chenowith, Albert 

Clayberg, Sylvester S 

Corey, Charles Theodore 

Crane, Oliver Philip 

Cunningham, Theo. Nathaniel. 

Cristler, Jno. Henry 

Carey, Charles Harte 

Crommett, Erie Benton 

Corbett, Francis Bowers 

Catlin, Thomas G., M. D., Hon.t 
♦Carr, Oscar Nathan 

Catlin, Theodore Jefferson . . 

Chapman, George Henry 

Chase, Frank Wilbur, A. B.f . 

Connett, Ira Bradwell 

Cook, James Wells 

Conan, James Edwin 

Crowder, Henry 

Collins, E. B., M. D., Hon.f . . 

Cadwallader, Isaac Henry 

Caldwell, Wm. Burr 

Campbell, Neil D 

Carpenter, Edwin Alphonso.. 

Cassingham, Marshall 

Chapman, George 

Clarke, Renaldo De Melville.. 

Clarke, Henry Augustine 

Cornwall, Thomas Henry. . w . . 

Craig, Joseph II .... ; 7 . 

Cook, William Harris 

Conibear, Wm. Henry 

Clendening, John Wesley 

Cussens, James St. Clair C. . . 

Cottington, Robert 

Gromett, Charles A 

Clingen, Charles Edward 

Crawford, Andrew M 

Caldwell,Charles P..M.D., ad eu.f 

Caldwell, Charles Edwin 

♦Cutler, Irving Le Roy 

Conan, Wm. Joseph 

Cunningham, Geo. Patrick. . . 

Currens, John Randolph 

Carlton, Lewis Wm , 

Cotton, Alfred Cleveland. . . . 

Culver, Jacob 

Craig, Augustus Lessure 

Crain, Fred Warren . . . : 

Christancy, Victor Hugo 

Camp, James Leeworthy, Jr. 
Caldwell, Martin 



1870-71 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1872-73 

1872-73 

1872-73 

1872-73 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874-75- 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1877-7S 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1878-79 



* Deceased, t Degree received before graduating. 

t President California State Board of Health. Lieutenant Colonel and Surgeon 1st Briga 

S President State Lunacy Com. 



, California Natii 



29; 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



2111 
2112 
2113 
2114 
2115 
2116 
2117 
2118 
2119 
2120 
2231 
2232 
2233 
2234 
2235 
2236 
2237 
2238 
2239 
2240 
2241 
2242 
2243 
2244 
2245 
2246 
2392 
2393 
2394 
2395 
2396 
2397 
2398 
2567 
2568 
2569 
2570 
2571 
2572 
2573 
2574 
2575 
2576 
2577 
2578 
2579 
2580 
2581 
2582 
2583 
2584 
2585 
2586 
2587 
2588 
2753 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Camp, Charles David 

Cavaney, James 

Chittenden, Geo. Gillette 

Cole, Wm. Wallace, A. B.J . . . 

Core, Albert Ste wart 

Creighton, Charles John 

Crane, Willis Edward 

Crosse, Theodore Parker 

Cummings, Stephen 

Cyrier, Charles Eusteche 

Cazier, Marion 

Clay, Willis 

Campbell, David Gray ....... 

Carter, Charles Henry ....... 

Collins, James Sylvester 

Carpenter, Geo. Thomas, D.D.S.f 

CuJiy, John Francis 

Conway, Patrick Wm 

Coolidge, James , 

Cameron, John F 

Cutler, Charlss Wm., B. S.'f 

Conrath, Francis, Ph. G.f . . . 

Campbell, James Wm 

Camerer, John Douglas. ........ 

Capps, John Cicero 

Clark, James Calvin 

Campbell, Laurence Wilber,.... 

Clark, Thomas Chalmers. ... 

Claypool, Robt. Wilson. ........ 

Connell, Michael Edward. . . 

Coop, Wm. Alfred Henderson. . 
Cornish, Jas. Valantine. ........ 

Cutter, Cyrus Henry. ... .... 

Calkins, Julian Hale, R S.| 

Campbell, John, M. D 

Carpenter, Chas. Raymond, 3. S., 
Carpenter, Marcellus C, Ph. Gi".. 

Carver, Joseph Beggs 

Cary, Frank 

Catherwood, Thomas Lowry.. . . 

Chamberlin, Jehiel Weston 

Chamberl in, William Arthur. . . 
Chase, Charles Sumner, B. ti:[. . 

Christie, George Ralph 

Clacuis, Charles Erich, Ph. G"f.. . 

Clark, Lemon Willard 

Clarke, Ward Green 

Confer, Francis Marion 

Conkey, Charles Do Witt 

Cory, Aibert 

Coulter, Frank Edwin 

Crandell, Frederick Lowell 

Crozier, James, B. A.| 

Currie, Charles Edwin 

Cushman, Edwin Walter 

Cain, John 



1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-30 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1873-80 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1880-81 



1880-31 
1880-81 



1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 



1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1882^3 



2754 
2755 
2756 
2757 
2758 
2759 
2760 
2761 
2762 
2763 
2764 
2765 
2766 
2767 
2768 
2769 
2770 
2771 
2772 
2773 
2774 
2775 
2776 
2929 
2930 
2931 
2932 
2933 
2934 
£935 
2936 
2937 
2938 
2939 
30 
11 
12 
2943 
2944 
S0O3 
3094 
1095 
3096 
3097 
3098 
3099 
3100 
3101 
3102 
3103 
3229 
3253 
3254 
3255 
3256 
3257 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Camerer, Geo. Victor 

Carey, Warren v 

Carter, Charles David 

Case, Edward Newell 

Chambers, Charles Lord, A. B.-f . 

Chapin, Alonzo Russell 

Coble, Albert H 

Coon, Geo. Morton, A. B.| 

Cole, Adelbert Jerome 

Coller, Lyman Tanner 

Collins, John Maurice 

Connor, Henry John, M. A.t 

Comstock, Isaac MeC 

Connolly, Wm 

Clancy, Cornelius Bailey 

Clark, James Henry 

Claussen, Julius Edward H 

Claybaugh, Joseph Parfit 

Claybaugh, Wmr Wilberforce. . . 

Ciouser, John 

Clow, George B., M. D. t 

Crawford, Alexander 

Cummings. Orlando .W 

Carjtright, Orlo Solomon 

Capwell, Daniel Howard 

Cargen, W illiam. 

Carr, Franklin Langworthy 

Carson, Clayton Wilford 

Chenowef h, Charlie B 

Clark, Charles E 

Clark, Charles Leslie 

Clark, James Thomas 

Clark, Leman Gibbs, A. B. f 

Cochran, Charles 

Colby, Benj. Dorr 

Coleman, James Edmund 

*Comstock, Rice Payne 

Cook, George Manfred 

Crcsswhite, James Henry 

Campbell, Wm. Scott 

Champion, Joseph Van Meter. . . 

Chapin, Staley Nichols 

Cessna, Charles Edgar 

Clark, Walter A 

Clarke, James Newton 

Colton, Wm. Walter 

Conley, Thomas Jefferson 

Core, Charles B., M. D. t 

Crofton, Frank E 

Cullimore, Grant 

Cushing, George H., M. D. Hon. t 

Chandler, Ralph 

Churchill, Chas Hiram 

Clark, Charles Edwin J 

Cody, Josiah Millard 

Cody, Walter Tate 



Tear of 
Gradua- 



1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-53 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1881-85 
18S4-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 



294 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Courtney, Joseph Seth 

Cox, Albert Jeffrey 

Cantwell, Wm. Hamilton 

Carr, Edgar David 

Caruthers, Warner Hunter 

Chamberlin, Barney Hicks 

Chandler, Augustus Wellington 

Clark, Root. Byron 

Cooke, John Masson 

Collins, Daniel Bernardino 

Conley, Patrick Henry 

Covey, John Ellsworth 

Crocker, Malcolm Montgomery, 

Cullen, Frank Connor 

Cuolahan, Archibald 

Cantrell, Thomas D 

Carman, Frank W 

Carr, Andrew ~ 

Casey, Joseph Montgomery 

Canble, Willis Benton 

Carett, Robt. Wm 

Challoner, Robt 

Chance, Norman Webb 

Cherrie, Martin Breckenridge. . . 

Collins, Wm. P., B. S. t 

Conaway, John B 

Corley, Charles Joseph 

Case, Thomas Jefferson 

Cecil, Jeff. Milton 

Chancellor, Samuel R 

Chandler, Samuel Wilson 

Clapp, Chambers Brown, Ph. G.+ 
Clark, Calvin Charles, M. A. f • ■ 

Cole, Elmer J 

Collier, Lewis Bramwell 

Coltrin, Francis Delano 

Congdou, Willis Rollins 

Coolley , Elmer Burt 

Cosby, Hiram Lewis 

Cottle, Cassius Clay 

Cox, Stephen W 

Cremer, Cornelius Hubert 

Crowell, Frank Greenleaf 

Cunningham, Albert Stevens. . . 

Carr, Charles W 

Carson, Andros 

Carson, Geo. A 

Chaplin, Cassius Marion 

Cody, Elijah T 

Collins. Clinton De Witt 

Comerfonl, Wm 

Connelly, James Wilson 

Cooke, Clinton Tyng 

Corwin, Arthur Miles, B. A.|. • ■ 

Couper, Edward Alexander 

Crawhall, Geo. A'/ilbur 



1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
188S-S9 
1S88-K9 
18NS 89 
isss s.i 
1888-89 
1888 89 

18N8-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1NN8 89 
l^ss 89 
isss 89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



1889-90 

1889-90 ' 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90] 
1889-90 



:«2S 

3829 
3830 
3981 
3982 
3983 
3984 
3985 
3986 
3987 
3988 
3989 
3990 
3991 
:(992 
3993 
3994 
3995 
4145 
4163 
4164 
4165 
4166 
4167 
4168 
4169 
4170 
4305 
4306 
4307 
130S 
4309 
4310 
4311 
4312 
4313 
4314 
4315 
4316 
4461 
4462 
4463 
4464 
4465 
4466 
4467 
4468 
4469 
4470 
4471 
4472 
4473 
4474 
4475 
50 
,49 



Croker, James Norman 

Cronkhite, Christopher C 

Culhane, Thomas Henry 

Callahan, John Lawrence 

Caples, Byron McBride, M. D.t.. 

Cartright, Harry Barlow 

Chamberlain, Geo. Lafayette. . . 

Chapin, Charles Edward 

Chase, Harry Alonzo, Jr 

Clarke, Edward Francis 

Coe, Pliny Watson 

Coleman, Harry Lovejoy 

Collins, Melvin 

Colony, Fred Elmer 

Crain, Francis Marion, M. D.f. . 

Cronk, Fremont 

Crowell, John Charles 

Cunningham. Jno. Rich., Ph. G.t 
Czemy, Prof. Vincenz, M. D.t. . 

Cartwell, Wm. Herbert 

Chapman, Francis Miltcn 

Chappell, Ora Addison, D.D.S.t 

Cheaney, Wm. James 

Cilley, Herbert Harrison 

Corliss, John Harry 

Cory, Alphonzo L., M.D.t . . 

Crane, Francis Marion 

Cameron, William C, B. S.t 

Campbell. Isaac Richard 

Carlyle, William Logan 

Casebeer, ItUimer Maxwell 

Chandler, Fremont Elmer, B.S.| 

Chvatal, James Ferdinand 

Clard, John Peter 

Cluts, Abram C 

Comer, John J 

Creel, Thomas Jefferson, B.C. St 
Cremer, Mathias Hubert, M.D.t 

Crowe, Joseph James 

Canavan, James Vincent. . . . 
Camfield, Bradford Allen, M.D.t 
Cavanaugh, Richard Edward.. 

Center, Charles Dewey 

Chapman, Campbell McGavern 

Chapman, George Lincoln 

Chapman, Robert Richard 

Clark, Burton Nelson 

Class, William John 

Close, Joseph Hooker 

Cook, John Henry, I?. L.f 

Cook, William H 

Collins, Charles 

Copeland, Cecil Clare 

Corliss, Allen Timothy 

Darnall, Milton D 

Donaldson, Henry Chapman . . . 



1889-90 

1889-90 

1889-90 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 «* 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1847-48 

1850-51 



295 



SEVENTEENTH TKIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



186 De Armand, Alexander 

187 Davis, Win. H 

219 Drake, Elijah II J, 

220 *Davis, Hosea 

221 Dwight, A. L 

251 *Davis, Charles W 

252 Davis, Isaac N 

293 *Davis, Mordecai 

294 *DuBois, Darwin 

335 Demming, John E 

336 Daniels, Hamilton C 

373 Dunn, L. H 

374 *Dever, Thomas B 

417 Davis, S. B 

418 Durham, Benj 

448 Davis, Solomon, M.D., Hon/f . 

457 *Douthitt, N. M 

458 Dickenson, E. C 

490 Durham, Henry 

491 Dunn, B. Irvin 

492 Dancer, John 

527 Dunn, Thomas J 

528 *De Forest, Edward C 

566 Dunn, Samuel M 

567 Drake, Thomas G 

597 Dean, John W 

598 Dunkel, Win. B 

599 Dilly, Charles F 

665 *Dayton, Ephraim 

666 *Dora, James W 

667 Dora, T. Beauchamp 

759 Dowler, M. Morton, Jr 

760 Darrah, A. J 

761 Davison, S. A 

762 Dodd, S. W 

763 Douglass, A. C 

835 Dubler, W. II., M. D., ad eund.|. 

836 Denny, D. W. C, M.D., ad eund.f 

857 *Davis, James C 

858 Denny, Franklin M 

859 Dietrich, T. A 

944 Davis, Andrew P 

945 Dunne, Wm. P 

946 Dougan, Wm. T 

1025 Draper, John B 

1026 Drake, Nelson A 

1027 Davidson, David L 

1164 David, Joseph W 

1165 Danforth. Wm. A 

1166 Dunlap, William 

1167 Donnelly, Michael 

1168 David, Cyrenus 

1277 Donnelly, Michael J 

1278 Durant. S. W 

1279 Davis, Samuel T 



1851-52 
1851-52 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1858-59 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1860-61 
1860-61 
1861-62 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



12*0 

1281 

1282 

12*3 

1284 

1285 

1384 

1 105 

lion 

lii)7 

1408 

1409 

1491 

1492 

1493 

1494 

1495 

15701 

1571 

1637 

163* 

1719 

1720 

1791 

1792 

1**5 

1*86 

1994 

1995 

1996 

1997 

199* 

1999 

2000 

2121 

2122 

2123 

2124 

2125 

2126 

2127 

212* 

2129 

2247 

224* 

2249 

2250 

2251 

2399 

2400 

2401 

2402 

2403 

2404 

25*9 



Dunning, Isaac R 

Dann, Edward F 

Dakin, Daniel L 

Dod, John W 

Dosch, Jacob R 

Duffield, Hamilton P 

Dodge, David, M. D., ad eund. 

Dawson, Jesse W 

Dewitt, R. Ralph 

Donovan, Andrew C 

Dye, Albert A 

Douglass, David T 

Darr, David Byron 

De Witt, Thomas Byron 

Dorchester, John Charles 

Dunn, John Wm 

Dunning, Lehman Herbert... 

Dodge, Cass Mason 

Duftin, Wm. Lorelle 

Denke, Frederick Wm 

Dundas, Robt. Ford 

Drennan, David Alexander... 

Dudley, Edward Henry 

Doolittle, Wm. Herbert 

Dunn, James 

Darroch, Daniel Chambers §.. 

Dixon Levi 

'Dawley, George 

Darrow, Edward McLaren. . . , 

Dinsdale, James, A. B.t 

Dewey, James J 

'De Puy, Ozias , 

Dempsey, Cyrus Felix 

Daniels, Wm. Nehemiati 

Dawssn, John Oscar 

Davies, Edward Gomer 

Devlin, James Blany 

Dicken, Constantine Lomax . 

Dinnen, James Michael 

Dosh, George Waritte 

^Donaldson, Cyrus 

Du Bois, Julian A 

Dumont, Thaddeus Augustus 

Droyer, Wm. George 

Dicus, Joseph F 

Disbrow, Ernest David 

Davis, Herbert Wm 

Dripps, Calvin Todd, A. M.|. 
Dahlberg, Alfred, Ph. G.f .. . . 

Dawley, George Taylor 

Dimmiett. Frank Vv 

Duffln. Charles Willis 

Duncan. Wm. Edward 

Dunn. Thomas Jefferson 

Damerell, Kobt 



* Deceased. + Decree received befo 

X Hormeopathist. 

§ ilemiitr Stat*? Legislature In 1886. 



296 



KUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Darling, John Bowman 

Darnall, Charles Fremont 

Davis, Edward Parker, A. B.|. • • 

Davis, Maze Smith 

Dodson, John Milton, A. B. t- • • 

Dowing. Joseph Henry 

Daum, John Jacob 

Davidson, James Edward 

Dennett, Alonzo Gustin, B. S.f ■ 

Dennis, Charles Warren 

Dixon, Charles L 

Dornbusch, Henry Wm 

Dott, Robt. Thomas 

Dunn, John Benjamin 

Darrow, Daniel Cady 

Daugherty, Wm. Watson 

Day, Willis W 

Debey, Gerardus Bernardus 

DeBely, Albert 

Dewey, Al vin Piatt 

Downer, Charles Lodwick 

Davisson, Wm. Thomas 

Dawson, Joseph 

Deacon, George 

Dewey, Frank Jones 

Dodds, Wm. Ezekiel 

Downing, Wm. Launcelot 

Drennen, Charles Travis 

Dryer, Dwight Welcome, M. A.| 

Dunn, Eii Hamlin 

Dunn, Frederick 

Dwinnell, George W 

Dougherty, Philander 

Davis, Joseph Job 

Disen, Charles Frederick 

Downing, Wm. Lincoln, M. A.|. 

Drake, James Ferguson 

Dudley, Elwin, A. B.| 

Dale, Harvey B., Jr 

Davis, Wm. John 

Dixon, Myrwood TimberlakeJ. . 

Dow, Ernest Linwood 

Dunham, Frank, A. M.t 

Deaborn, Henry Jonathan 

Defrees, Henry Jefferson 

De Lose, Herbert 

Derham, James Edmund 

Detweiler, Edwin Shadinger 

Dolph, Cassius 

Doolittle, John C 

Doty, Charles W 

Dove, Joseph D. F 

Daniels, Jared Waldo 

Davis, James Eldridge 

De Bey, Henry Bernardus 

De Stafno, Joseph, B. S.| 



881-82 
881-82 

881-82 
881-82 
881-82 
881-82 
882 -S3 
882-83 
882-83 
882-X3 
882-83 
XX2->S3 
SS2-83 
882-83 
883-84 
8*3-84 
8X3-84 
883-84 
883-84 
883-84 
8X3-84 
884-85 
8X4 -So 
884-85 
884-85 
884-85 
8X4-85 
884-85 
884-85 
884-85 
884-85 
884-85 
8X5- xr, 
8X5-86 
XX'5-81', 
885-86 
885-80 
885-80 
886-87 
880-87 
886-87 
8X0-X7 
880-87 
887-88 
887-SX 
887-88 
887-88 
887-88 
887-88 
887-88 
887-88 
887-88 
8X8-89 
888-89 
888-89 
888-89 



37UO 

3707 

3708 

3831 

3832 

3833 

3834 

3835 

3836 

3837 

3838 

3839 

3840 

3990 

3997 

3998 

3999 

4171 

4172 

4173 

4174 

4317 

4318 

4319 

4320 

4321 

4322 

4323 

4476 

4477 

4478 

4479 

4480 

4481 

4482 

4483 

4484 

30 

222 

253 

254 

295 

337 

338 

419 

420 

493 

494 

529 

530 

000 

001 

600 

669 

670 

764 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Dixon, Thomas 

Donaldson, Earl 

Downs, James Edmund 

Dales, John Alexander, Ph. G.|. 

Davesson, Robt. Rutledge 

Deaborn, Charles Bartlett 

Dick, John Kilborn 

Dicus, George Allen, B. S.f 

Dodge, Harold Earl * 

Drake, Thomas Anderson 

Drennan, Darius Day 

Dudley, Wm. Edmunds 

Dun class, Robt. Chester 

Detweiler, John Frets, A. B.-f . . . 

Dockery, Michael F 

Driscoll, John Joseph 

Dunn, Benton Brengleman 

De Trana, Jos. Massimo, A. M.| 

Dillon, Thomas Cantrill, D.D.S.f 

Dostal, Joseph Wm., D. D. S.f.. . 

Dugdale, Richard Benson 

Davis, Jenkin William 

Dickerson, Wilmer Lambert 

Drisdale, Wm. Elizabeth, B. S.t. 

Dolamore, Joseph Francis 

Dowell, James A., M. D.| 

Droll, Walter Martin 

Dunton, Oscar Howard, M. E.f. 

Dale, George L. A., B. S.| 

Day, Francis Root, M. D.j 

De Fries, John Christian 

De Vere, Jos. Goodman, B. A.|- 

Dewire, Milton V 

Downey, William St. John 

Doxey, Lorin Biseo 

Doyle, Guy P 

Drake, Frank 1 rwin, B. L.f 

Elgin, M. B 

Earll, Robt, AV 

Edwards, Joseph W 

Elliott, Joseph N. B 

Evans, James 

Eaton, Roswell 

Everhard, John J 

*Earl, J. B 

Ellenwood, C. N 

Elliott, Rufus M 

Ennis, John E 

Eaton, Morton M 

♦Egbert, George 

Elder, Charles S 

Emmons, Francis A 

*Ells, Franklin 

Egbert, J. Wesley 

English, F. Edwin 

Ehle, A. S 



1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-50 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-82 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1846-47 
1852-53 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1854-55 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1800-61 
1860-61 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1864-65 



297 



SEVENTEENTH TEIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



S £5 
ozo 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Eidson, Andrew J 

Elder, Samuel S '.... 

Eversole, Joseph B 

Egbert, Jerome B 

Edmiston, John A 

Estabrook, Leonard W 

Eaton, Wm 

Edgar, Charles A 

Elder, Thomas A 

Elkins, George W 

Evarts, Orpheus, M. D., Hon.|- ■ 

Edwards, Arthur W 

Etheridge, James H 

Elliott, Erancis Marion 

* Everett, Oliver, M. D., Hon/f.. . 
*Eaton, Richard J 

Everett, Milton H 

Eiehelberger, Wm. C 

Edgar, Robt. S 

Evans, Perry M 

Egbert, Rinaldo E 

Eastman, Wm 

*Everett, Wm. L 

Eastman, Cyrus Mcnroe 

Edgerton, W. Wilberforce 

Edmiston, David Wallace 

Enfield, Marshall 

Evans, Jesse Walter 

Eaton, Leonidas Hamlin ....... 

Edgar, David Wm 

Ervey, Andrew Judson 

Egan, Charles J 

Egan, Wm. Clarence 

Edwards, Frank Wallace 

Eskridge, Joseph Hoffman 

Evans, Wm. Morris 

Everett, J ame3 Marcus 

Epley, Frank Wm 

Eldridge, Frank Paris 

Eberlein, Karl Fred'ck Wilhelm 

English, James Plaster 

Earles, Wm. Henry 

Everhard, Wm. Harter 

Edmiston, Aaron Welch 

Edison, Henry Alonzo 

Ellis, Wm. Henry § 

Eagan, Daniel 

Eggers, J ohn Thaddeus 

Emmerson, Enard Linsey 

Enright, Michael 

Earl, David Gardner, M.S.f 

Edmunds, Ira Leslie 

Edwards, George Potter 

Eldred, Wm. Henry 

Evans, John M., Jr 



1864-65 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 



2785 
2786 
2952 
'."..'59 
3115 
3116 
3117 
3118 
326!! 
3267 
3268 
3427 
3128 
3561 
3562 
3709 
3710 
3841 
3842 
38-3 
3844 
38-^5 
4000 
4001 
4002 
4003 
4004 
4175 
4176 
4177 
4178 
4179 
4180 
4181 
4324 
4325 
4485 
4486 
4487 



Emmons, John Weston 

English, John Eugene 

Emanuel, Gerry Elbridge 

Eskey, Franklin Watson 

Ellis, James Decatur 

Engstadt, John Evan 

Esch, Samuel Henry 

Ewing, Wm. Brown, A. B/f 

Eberlein, Frederick Walter.B.S.f 

Egbert, James 

Evans, Charles Willis 

Ekern, Andrew 

Everhard, Frank Aaron 

Ehle, Hiram Barber 

Emerson, Wm. Jesse 

Edwards, Adelbert, i.L D.t 

Elliott, Arastus Vernon 

Edgcomb, Thomas Jefferson 

Ehlers. Paul Franz Ferdinand. . 

Eiles, Frank Stanley, D.D.S.f- • ■ 

Eisenstadt, Solomon. B. S. t 

Enders, Magnus 

Earel, Albert Marion 

Engsberg, Wm. August, Ph. G.| 

Enslee, Charles Louis 

Esser, Wm 

Evans, Milton Harvey ,Jr., M.D.t 

Eckart, Robt. Pickham 

Eddy, Warner Leanning 

Ellenson, Eugene P 

Emmons, Wm. Henry 

Emrich, Edward Linwood 

Enos, Emmet Frank 

Espey, Charles Wm 

Eastman, John Russell 

Edwards, Sherman 

Eade, Thomas M 

Elkinton, Charles Holden 

Evans, Edward Purclin 

*Fosdick, Wm 

♦Freer, Joseph W 

Favor, Kimball ,. 

French, Edward J * 

*Fisk, Kezekiah 

Fish, Melancthon W 

Fitch, Thomas D 

Ford, James 

Fisher, T. D 

Frizell.John H 

*Felker, John B 

Fritts, Thomas J 

Farrington, James B 

Ferris, Uriah B 

Fish, Stephen N 

Fares, J. B 



1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1883-84 

1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 

18S7-S8 

1888-89 

1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1844-15 
1848-49 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1854-55 
1856-57 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1863-64 



* Deceased, t Degree received before graduating. 

% Member Racine Board of U. S. Penslon'Examliilng Surgeons and Its President. U. 3. Ponslon Surgeon. Physician to Racine 
Asylum for Insane 

§ Secretary, U. S. Pension Examining Surgeons. 



298 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



767 

768 
769 
770 
771 
863 
864 
865 
950 
1030 
1031 
1032 
1033 
1034 
1035 
1036 
1172 
1173 
1174 
1175 
1176 
1246 
1291 
1292 
1293 
1294 
1295 
1296 
1297 
1413 
1414 
1415 
1416 
1498 
1499 
1500 
1642 
1643 
1723 
1724 
1725 
1726 
1727 
1795 
1796 
1890 
1891 
1892 
2002 
2003 
2004 
2005 
2006 
2132 
2133 



Ferguson, Samuel T 

Ferrin, S. G 

Folger, Henry A 

Ford, O. D 

Foster, J. H 

Fowler, Henry R 

Fitch, J. C 

Ford, Chester S 

Fenn, Curtis Treat 

Foster, John T 

Frank, John G 

Freeland, Benj. H 

Finley, David M 

Fifield, Frank 

Flinn, Wm.... . 

Fern, Wm. J 

'Firkins, John W 

Friermood, Ezra KI 

Fricke, Gustav H . 

Fulton, Lee W 

Fy If e, James R 

Front, Dallas G. M 

Ford, Abel, Jr 

Fenwick, Wm. E 

Fletcher, Edward R 

Focht, George S 

Fen ton, S. Campbell 

Fox, AVm 

Farley, Benjamin F 

Frost, George W. 

Furnas, John M. 

French, Marsina H 

Ford, Thomas D 

Fairman, Eli Wesley 

Fleming, John McLean. . , 

Freeland, S. Cuthbertso.: 

Franks, Wm. Henry .-. 

French, Wm. Harrison 

Farrow, George Wyatt 

Focht, Luther Melancthon 

Fredericks, Louis Henry A 

Fritcher, Henry 

Fullenwider, Marcus L., A. B. f 

Florentin, Frank B 

France, Cyrus W 

Freck, Wm. Robert 

Farnsworth, Dexter Boyl-on... 

Fisher, John Welton 

Ford, Lyman Washington 

Forhan, Thomas Joseph 

Furber, Wm. Warren 

Fieldhouse, James 

Ferris, Charles Leonard, A. B.|- 
Farnsworth, Herman Ephraim. 
Fogg, Charles Elwin, A. B. |.. • 



1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 



1868-69 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876- 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1878-79 



2134 

2135 

136 

2257 
2258 
2259 
2260 
2409 
2410 
2411 
2412 
2413 
2414 
2415 
2601 
2602 
2603 
2604 
2605 
2606 
2607 
2608 
2609 
2723 
2787 
2788 
2789 
2790 
2954 
3119 
3120 
3121 
3122 
3123 
3269 
3270 
3271 
3272 
3273 
3429 
3430 
3431 
3432 
3433 
3434 
3435 
3436 
3563 
3711 
3712 
3713 
3714 
3715 
3716 
3717 



Fleischer, Henry Jacob 

Francis, Thomas Benton 

Freer, Otto Tiger 

Farley, Herf ord E 

Fitzgerald, Francis Wm., Ph. G| 

Fischer, Edward, A. B. t 

Farr, Albert Lawrence 

Finley, Joseph J 

Fishel, John 

Fitz, Edward Southworth.A.M.-f 

Fountain, James Henry. . .. 

Frost, Charles H 

Frissel, Charles H 

Fusselman, John Hushton 

Farnum, Frank Haywood 

Fegers, Robert Hubert 

Fehrenbach, Albert 

Fisher, Waldo, B.S. f 

Fitzgibbon, Thomas 

Fox, Abraham Lincoln ..... 

Frost, Fred R 

Fuchs, Albert Felix 

Funk, Zalman Edgar 

Fothergm,J.M.,M.R.C.P.L Hon.f 

Favill, Henry Baird, A. B. | 

Felton, Horace Wilcos 

Flett, Henry Seward '. 

Forrest, Benjamin Franklin. . . . 

Freer, Paul Caspar § 

Fairbanks, Charles Stratton B. . 

Feller, Charles Edward 

Fitch, Walter May 

France, John Mill 

Freeman, Arthur Bigelow 

Fallows, Wm 

Farley, Isaac Perry 

Finnegan, Charles Joseph 

Fisk, Charles Wilbur, M. A. |. . . 

Fitzgerald, Frank 

Falge, Lev/is, B. S. f 

Farley, Wm. Kindol 

Fell, Elmer Ezra 

Ford, James Franklin 

Formaneck, Fred 

Frary, Louis Alliston 

Frink, Charles Walter 

Fuller, Wm 

Fell, Joshua Harlan 

Fenelon, John Henry. 

Fisher, James Coleman 

Fitzgibbon, Garrett 

Fitzmaurice, James W 

Flood, John . : 

Freeborn, John Abraham 

Furman, Fred Wilheim August, 



1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-S0 
1880-81 
1880-8). 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82- 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
5881-82 
1881-82 
1881-8S 
1881-82. 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-S3 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85- 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 



1888-89 



' Deceased. + Degree received before graduating. 
: President Board of Examining' Surgeons. 
i Professor of General Chemistry. 



299 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOG CE 



S5 = 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



HI 
C ■.'. i- 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



3800 

3846 

3847 

3848 

3849 

3850 

3851 

3852 

3853 

3854 

4005 

4006 

4007 

4008 

4009 

4010 

4011 

4012 

4013 

4014 

4015 

4016 

4182 

4183 

4184 

4326 

4327 

4328 

4329 

4488 

4489 

4490 

4491 

6 

31 

32 

51 

45 

81 

104 

188 

189 

190 

223 

224 

297 

298 

299 

300 

301 

339 

340 

341 

342 

343 

344 



Ferrier, David, Prof. Hon. f 

Fairchilcl, Lewis Addison 

Ferguson, Alphions Marion 

Ferguson, Harry Milton 

Fernald, Wm. Jenkins 

Fletwood, Gustave 

Foley, John Christopher 

Fox, Philip Reginald 

Friend, Emanuel 

Fuller, Edward Martin 

Frankloner, Wm., A.B., S.A.C.j 

Feld, Carl Root., LL. B. t 

Felenlee, Samuel Theodore 

Felter, Eward, Ph. G. t 

Fenelon, Charles Davis, B. S. t- 

Fithian, Paul Hays, M. D. |.. . . 

Fitzgerald, J. Geraldine, M. A. | 

Fleck, Horace Greeley. 

Foeltzer, Louis Carl John. ...... 

Freer, Archibald E., B. S. t 

Frink, Oscar George 

Furlong, John C 

Fisher, Emerson Webster 

Franklin, John Herbert 

Frederick, Louis James 

Fox, Ed ward L 

Frazer, William G 

French, Oscar Witters 

Fulton, William Andrew 

Fenelon, William James 

Finney, John, M. D. t 

Foley, Fred Charles 

Frankhauser, Silas B 

Garvin, Isaac Watts 

♦Gilbert, A. V 

Gilbert, Edward A 

Golliday, UriP.J 

*Grimes, Samuel, M.D. Hon.| 

Garrett, Charles C 

♦Gregory, John 

Garrison, John 

Gordfrey, Walter R 

Gilhert, Stephen C 

Gregory. James C 

Gerard, M. F 

*Gorham, Charles 

*Goklsburg, George T 

Grove, James F 

Gould, Vernon 

Goodbrake, Christopher 

Gaylord, Edwin 

Graham, James P 

Green, Wm. F 

Green, James W 

Gordon, Wm. A 

Griffith, Samuel 



1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1844-45 
1846-47 
1846-47 
1847-48 
1846-47 
1848-49 
1849-50 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1855-56 



376 

377 

421 

422 

497 

531 

601 

605 

672 

673 

674 

675 

676 

729 

772 

773 

774 

866 

867 

868 

869 

870 

871 

872 

883 

951 

1037 

103S 

1039 

1040 

1041 

1177 

1178 

1179 

1180 

1181 

1182 

1298 

1299 

1300 

1301 

1302 

1303 

1304 

1305 

1306 

1385 

1417 

1418 

1419 

1420 

1421 

1422 

1423 

1424 

1425 



*Graham, T. A 

*Gray, La Fayette H 

Green, J. K 

*Gray, J. D 

Golliday, A. M 

Graham, Wm. B 

Gregory, Wm. M 

Guthrie, Harrison H 

Gaylord, Horace 

Glassner, E. T 

Goldsburg, J. A 

Goodwin, Lewis H 

Gulick, J. J i 

Grayston, Fred. S. C, M.D.,ad. e.t, 

Golloway, Samuel I 

Godfrey, H. T.... I 

Gaskill, Romanta • . . j 

Gueren, John 

Goodell, W. L...\ 

Graham, W. D 

Grover, John N 

Gill, C. Judson 

Go wen, James E 

*Goodell, W. S 

Groesbeck, John W., Jr 

Gaudy, James Luther 

Gibbs, John A. M 

Goodner, Lyman T 

Goodell, John H 

Griswold, John B 

Gemmell, Henry C 

Gordon, Wm. A 

Gard, Oliver 

Galer, Joseph B 

Gregory, Job L 

Goodale, Charles W 

Groesbeck, James E 

Given, O. G 

Guernsey, Augustus H 

Green, John 

Green, George 

Goldsberry, Strader S 

Gould, Samuel W -. 

Goe, John W 

Gift'ord, Joseph C 

Gephart, Jesse T. B 

Guines, J. F., M.D., ad eundem | 

Garten, Melchert II 

Guibor, Charles H 

Given, Henry A .... ' 

Caler, Jared Y 

Grigg, Robt. C 

Greenwell, Samuel A 

Goli; Gustav G 

Geiger, Wm. R 

Gilluly, Thomas ' 



1856-57 

1856-57 

1857-58 

1857-58 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1862-63 

1862-63 

1863-64 

1863-64 

1863-64 

1863-64 

1863-64 

1863-64 

1864-65 

1864-65 

1864-65 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1868-69 

1868-69 

1868-69 

1868-69 

1868-69 

1868-69 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 



eel before graduating. 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Galer, George Blake 

Gardiner, John Hurley 

Gardner, John 

Garvin, Eugene Sherman 

Gernon, John Hall 

Grass, John 

Gillum, Ira Hamilton 

Goble, Ezra T 

Going, Zewas Harmon 

Greaves, George Washington. . . 

Grimes, Win. Samuel 

Griffin, Luther Moody 

Gammon, George Washington. . 

Gardiner, John R 

Griffin, Byron Wilson 

Gurnea, George Washington 

Gay, George Frederick 

Graham, William Martin 

Garrey, John Eugene 

Godfrey, Byron Benjamin 

Glennan, Michael Augustine 

Goldspohn, Albert, B. S. t 

Gable, Wm. Henry Harrison 

Gill, Benjamin Marvin 

Grant, Orris Wm 

Graham, Thomas Baldwin 

Gudden, Bernard Charles 

Gardiner, J. H., M. D., Hon. f , . 

Gibbs, Morris 

Grose, George Henry 

Goodspeed, John Colton 

Gordon, Charles Wesley, M. D. | 

Godfrey, Joseph 

Goodwin, Myron Page 

Greig, Wm 

Graham, Wm. Frank, B. S. t 

Golden, Levi Atchley 

Green, Wm. T 

Garwood, Alonzo 

Graham, Aleri Roger 

Greene, Willis Newland 

Ginn, Adam 

Grium, John Franklin 

Guthrie, Wm. Elton 

Gallagher, Charles A 

Gaudey, Thomas Richard. . . 

Griffith, Ben Barrett 

Gardner, John Lincoln 

Giles, Alexander Porter 

Gifford, Henry Balis 

Gill, Wm. Wesley 

Good, Charles Hamlin 

Goodsmith, Wm. Perley 

Gregory, Lyman Trumbull.. 

Gunn, Hugh Francis 

Gunther, Wm. Henry 



1871-72 
1871-72 

1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 



2955 
2956 
2957 
3124 
3125 
3126 
3274 
3275 
3276 
3277 
3278 
3299 
3280 
3281 
3389 
3437 
3438 
3439 
3440 
3441 
3442 
3527 
3564 
3565 
3566 
3567 
3568 
3569 
3570 
3718 
3719 
3720 
3721 
3722 
3855 
3856 
3857 
3858 
3859 
3860 
3861 
3862 
3863 
3864 
4017 
4818 
4019 
4020 
4021 
4022 
4185 
4186 
4187 
4188 
4189 
4190 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Gilchrist, Wm. Thomas 

Gill, Charles Albert 

Graves, Arthur Edgar 

Gillespie, James McKee 

Gobar, Frank Joseph 

Grassick, James 

Gaines, Edward Elsworth 

Gamble, Wm. Emmett 

Gill, Joseph Francis 

Giljohann, Carl Theodore Emil. 

Glass, Milless Minor 

Greenfield, Charles Edward 

Gregory, James Jay 

Guy, John Milton, A. B. t 

Grant, J. A.Staniland,M.D.Hon.i 

Glassock, Samuel Sampson 

Gloppestad, Ole Abelson 

Graham, Samuel Albert.. 

Gray, Ethan Allen 

Greedy, Francis Augustus 

Grime, Henry Teeter 

Gray, Wm. Babbington 

Garber, Frank Webster, B. S. !•■ 

Gaston, James Bigham. 

Geltch, Ernst August 

Goddard, James Bell 

Goit, Edward Grant 

Goodner, Ralph Allison 

Grant, George Herbert .• 

Garabedian, Minas G 

Gernon, Talbot Charles 

Green, John Wm 

Greenspahn, Solomon 

Guild, Charles Willis 

Gavin, Edward Ford 

Germain, Frank Bartlett 

Gill, James Cornelius 

Gillin, Charles Wesley 

Gillingham, Wm. Pomeroy 

Godfrey, Alfred Charles 

Graham, Dales Young 

Grasser, Wm. George 

Groelle, Charles Fred 

Gunn, Malcolm 

Given, Sam uel Wesley 

Gobar, George Giles 

Gordon, Frank Henry 

Graham, Jacob DeWitt C. E.. . . 

Gregory, Wm. Grant 

Grim, Ulysses Joshua 

Gage, Will Vernon 

Galloway, Charles 

Gammon, Edwin Wilder 

Gerdes, Otto Henry, A. B.j 

Glaser, George Martin, A. B.j. . 
Glynn, James Michael 



1883-84 
188:3-84 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-8S 
1887-88 
1888-89 
1888-89 
.1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-9) 
1.S90-91 
1890-91 
189C-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 



id before praduatii 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



4191 
4192 
4193 
4194 
4330 
4331 
4332 
4333 
4334 
4335 
433G 
4337 
4492 
4493 
4494 
4495 
7 

17 
18 
19 
33 
34 
52 
53 
54 
55 
82 
83 
95 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
150 
151 
191 
192 
193 
194 
225 
226 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
302 
303 
304 
305 
306 
345 
346 
366 
378 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Golden, Charles Herbert, B.S.|. . 

Godenow, Normaii Halkier 

Goodhue,' Edward Solon, B. S.f. 

Gunther, Emil 

Gahagan, Henry J 

Garrison, William L., M.D.t 

Greenan, Joseph Frank 

Gilmore, Arthur Hale 

Gnagi, William B 

Grant, William Lewis 

Gray, Philip Mosher 

Grimm, Peter George 

Ganson, Lee, Ph. G.j 

Germain, George Henry .... 

Grote, Henry Wallace, Ph. G.f. • 

Grothan, Ole, M.D.t 

*Herrick, Josiah B 

Hayes, Daniel K 

Higby, James M 

Holden, Newton P 

Howes, H. 1' 

Hageman, Frederick C 

Hawley, Reuben S 

Hobbs, Jas. C. JI 

Hough, Erastus G 

Huey, George J 

Harlan, Israel G., Dentist! 

*Huggans, George M 

*Hall, Thomas, M. D., Hon.t 

' Haren, Samuel Rush 

* Hamilton, Isaiah F 

*Higgins. George W 

Hoyt, Orson C 

Hull, Alexander 

Hinsey, Joseph C 

Hull, Charles J 

Hunt, Wm. C 

Hurlburt, Vincent L 

Hooten, Marsena M 

*Hobbie, Wm. M 

Henry, Robt. F 

*Harriman, S. B 

Hillis, Wm. A 

*Hale, Roscoe L 

*Hamilton, John F 

Hallock, Richard S 

Hopkins, Edward 

Hanna, Thomas B 

Hoyt, Freeborn F 

Hutchinson, Alonzo L 

Horton, Elisha G 

Heller, Wm. H 

Higgins, I.N 

Hilt, Robert S 

*Henderson, Jos., M.D.. ad eund.t 

Higinbotham, Samuel 



1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-^3 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1 392-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
18S2-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1844-45 
1844^5 
1844-45 
1844-45 



1846-47 
1847-48 
1847^8 
1847-48 
1847-48 
1848-49 
1848-49 
1848-49 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1856-57 



379 
380 
381 
382 
383 
423 
442 
460 
461 
462 
481 
498 
499 
532 
533 
534 
02 
03 
569 
570 
571 
572 
606 
607 
608 
677 
878 
679 
775 
776 
777 
778 
779 
780 
781 
782 
783 
874 
875 
876 
877 
878 
879 
880 
881 
929 
952 
953 
954 
955 
956 
957 
958 
1042 
1043 
1044 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Hall, W.M 

Hill, Charles...., 

Hammell, Charles 

Hubbard, E.F 

Hughes, A., M.D.t 

Harl, W. B 

Heavenridge, Allen 

*Hull, Richard 

Hopwood, Wm. C 

Harris, Blixton 

Harper, J. Drake, M.D., ad eund.t 

Hatch, Jethro A 

*Holmead, Leigh R 

Herrick, Henry J 

Hanson, Zenas P 

Henton, Clinton D 

*Hamil!,Robt. C, M. D., Hon.t.. • 

Hoffman, Theodore, M.D., Hon.t 

Huggins, A. Z 

Howser, Jacob H 

Hayden, Riley B 

Hagey, Jacob M 

Hopkins, Myron 

Herman, Pryer I 

Heidemau. George F 

Hiatt, J. Milton 

Hill, Robt. Louis 

Hollingsworth, H. C 

Hale, J. Thomas 

Harrah, J. M 

Hance, Thomas C 

Herndon, A. P 

Hess, Wm. H 

Hess, Smith H 

Herdman, J. W . - 

Hiett, Francis M 

Horton, H. Edward 

Holmes, Julius C 

Harris, Wm. J 

Harper, Wm 

Herrick, Wm. S 

Higgins, Carter B 

Henry, Abijah F 

Hayward, J. M 

Hoffman, Fred W 

Hay, Albert H., M. D., ad eund.t 

Ho'bson, Edward B 

Hughes, John 

Hathaway, Wm. Baker 

Hensley, John AV 

Hawley, Samuel 

Hewett, Semun R 

Humes, John P 

Hicks, Samuel R 

Holland, Abrogene 

Heywood, Cyrus E 



1856-57 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1858-57 
1856-57 
1S57-58 
J 857-58 
IicS-59 
2S5.B-59 
3S58-59 
1S58-59 
385i)-60 
1859-60 
1850-61 
loSO-61 
1860-61 
1850-61 
18S0-61 
3831-62 
1861-62 

:l---62 

2, '-62 
1 852-63 
2852-83 
1832-63 
1863-64 
1833-64 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1834-65 
3864-85 
1864-65 
1864-85 
3864-65 
•884-65 
38S4-85 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1835-66 
'i 865-66 
1866-66 
1865-66 
1836-67 
1863-67 
1888-37 
1883-67 
1853-67 
1833-67 
1886-67 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 



[ Deceased. 1' Degn 



ved before graduating. 



302 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 






1045 
1046 
1047 
1048 
1049 
1050 
1127 
1130 
1183 
1184 
1185 
1186 
1187 
1188 
1189 
1307 
1308 
1309 
1310 
1311 
1312 
1313 
1426 
1427 
1428 
1429 
1430 
1431 
1432 
1433 
1434 
1477 
1506 
1507 
1508 
1509 
1510 
1576 
1577 
1578 
1579 
1580 
1581 
1649 
1650 
1651 
1652 
1653 
1729 
1730 
1731 
1732 
1733 
1734 
1800 
1801 



NAMES OF GRADUATES, 



Henrotin, Fernand . . .'. .'.'. ?...:'. 

*Hurst, Merritt : ;"; '. 

Hagey, Wm. II. H., :.:... 

Holmes, Byron 

Hirscli, Christian B ...... ..... . . 

Haggard, J. Robt .-.' 

Hain, W. F..M.D., ad eundem |. 
Hard, Abram, M. D., ad eund.|. . 

Hoffman, Julius F. C . . . 

Hamilton, John B. 

Hill, Herbert S.... ..;... 

Hoover, Wm. C 

Hilbert, Melancthon . : ...'.:. 

Hogeboom, Charles E. .'.... 

Holgate, James R..'. ...1 

Henry, Wm ........'.: 

Helms, Benjamin R 

Hudson, George W. . . . , 

Harvey, Wm : . : . 

Hageman, Frederick C. 

Hale, Marcus M _. '.". 

Holman, Thomas A.'. 

Hurst, Stith T......: ; 

Harcourt, Wm. L. . . .'. 

Hannaford, Jos. N 

Hays, John L. . : . . :. . .• ...... 

Hail, Benjamin R -. . .-": ...... 

Hagerty, Joseph L..7 - 

Hudson, Charles A. : - 

Hutchins, James V. . .'. :.':'. '.". . . 

Harris, Joseph H.. - 

Hess, Thomas, M., M. D., Hon.|. 

Hall, Robt. Samuel ': 

Haves, Plymmon Sanford 

Hill, Wm. Henry 

Hilsabeck, Wm. Franklin . : 

Huddleston, R. Harrison. 

Hiddeson, Charles von 

Horton, Wm. Albert. ........... 

Hamilton, Charles Henry. ...... 

Hurt, Wm. Johnson 

Hynds, Andrew Jackson 

Hess, Frederick Andrew ...... 

Hathorne, John Edgar 

Herrington, Truman Augustus. 

Hendryx, Wilbur Alson 

Hill, Gershom Hyde 

Hormel, Lewis Cass 

Hall, Thomas Edmund . . .-. 

Harrington, Henry Leonard 

Harris, Harvey Lindsey 

Healev, Rverson George . . . .' 

Hoyt, "Robert Willis 

Hutchinson, Wm '. ■ 

Hagenbuch. Allen Wesley 

Hamilton, Royal Gray. 



1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-«8 
1867-68 
1867-68 
18*17-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1870-71 
187U-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1S75-76 
1875-76 



1802 
1803 
1804 
'805 
1806 
1807 
1808 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
2011 
2012 
2013 
2014 
2015 
2016 
2017 
2018 
2019 
2020 
2041 
2142 
2143 
2144 
2145 
2146 
2147 
2270 
2271 
2272 
2273 
2274 
2275 
2276 
2277 
2278 
2279 
2280 
2281 
22S2 
2423 
2424 
2425 
2426 
2427 
2428 
2429 
2430 
2431 
2432 
2433 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Harman, James Monroe — . .'. . 
Harvey, Gustavus French. . — 

Heron, John Henry 

Hobbs, Noah Reynolds ■ — 

Holmes, Samuel Jucld 

Hutchinson, Robert ;...... 

Hvoslef, Johan Christian... — 

Harland, Wm. Orlando 

Hunter, Edwin William 

Hayes, Charles Addison 

Hewit, Hamilton North.; ; — 

Ham, Sylvester Clay 

Hamilton, Newell Hiram. . ; — 
Heller, Joseph Mosher. . . . : — 

Hestwood, Virgil Eusebius 

Hicks, Levi Nevada 

Hobart, Jefferson Roger. .-.'. 

Hall, William Edward 

Hall, Joseph H 

Hurd, Herbert Halsey, A. B . . . . 
Hathaway, Lawrence Bryant. . . 

Hardman, Charles • 

1 1 hide, Alfred 

Hayman, Lucius Henry 

Hewitt, Henry Miller 

Hyde, James Nevins, M.D.,ade.t. 
Hawkins, Addison ............. 

Hills, Edward Leander. ....:... 

Hitchcock, Wm. Wesley 

Holmes, Charles Henry ..:.-....' 
Holroyd, Ehvyn Ashwbrth. .. .'. 

Huntsinger, Harry Pettit 

Harwood, Wm. Elvis ...... 

Hawley, Win. Arthur .'■ — 

Hildreth, Mortimer Lambert'.-. .. 

Hill, Herbert Dainy — 

Howe, Win. Franklin ....". 

Holt, Warner '. — 

Hammond, Sam'l Ferdinand 

Ilanna, Isaac Wm ; — 

Hiester, Alvin Coles .- 

Hill, Wm. Clark ....,."... 

Hand, Furman Springer 

Haven, Joseph , 

Iluggins, J. Nathaniel Henry. . 

Haas, Arthur L 

Hammon, Glenn Milton 

Hammun, Henry, M. A.t. . . 

Harrison, George Wood 

Hart, Bushrod Williams . . . : 

Hathaway. Albert 

Hawkins," Vincent John 

Hinsdale,' Frank Louis 

Holmes, Samuel Asbury 

Hornbeek, Nathn'l Bruyn, A.M.f 
Huff, John Wm 



1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1880-S1 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
ISSO^il 
1880-81 



: Deceased. ; fDegree received before graduat 



SEVENTEENTH TKIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



2434 
2435 
2613 
2614 
2615 
2616 
2617 
2618 
2619 
2620 
2621 
2622 
2623 
2624 
281)0 
2801 
2802 
2803 
2804 
2805 
2806 
2807 
2808 
280'J 
2810 
2958 
2959 
2990 
2961 
2962 
2963 
2964 
2965 
2966 
2967 
2968 
2869 
2970 
2971 
2972 
2973 
2974 
3127 
3128 
3129 
3130 
3131 
3132 
3133 
3134 
3135 
3136 
3137 
3138 
3139 
3140 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Hunt,. Fred Steele f. .'. . 

Hunt, Stephen, A. B.| 

Hall, Edward I - 

Hall, Randolph Nathaniel 

Ham, Win. Emmet 

Hammes, Ernest Wolfgang 

Hapeman, Harry . . ."' 

Harris; Malcolm Laselle"?. ."":. . 
Haquenbourg, Julian Erastus. . 

Hofstetter, George, A. B.|. . 

Houek, Ross Montgomery.*. 

Howard, Win. Aldrich T. "!?? 

Hover, Gustave Charles .".*.* 

Hyde, Albert Frederick. TfT. . . .'. 
Haight, Win, Douglas . . :':«. ..... 

Hall, Philip Louis . . 

Hall, Wm. Wesley.: ...v '. 

Hatlield.Corne's Ludlum.Ph.M.t 

Haven, Otis Erastus, A?M.f 

Hanorthy Wm. Walker 

Helm, Scott 

Hench, John Bull.„ 

Ilendershott, Willie" Waldo 

Hoyt, Lester Mason , 

Humbert, George Clinton 

Hall, Thomas Henrv 

Ilamil, Charles, M. A.f .......... 

Hamilton, Wm. Wilsor. 

Hammond, Jabez Dean 

Haner, True Delos : 

Hanscom, Walter Clarence 1 

Harris, John Wesley, B. D.f 

Hawk, Wm. Calvin,' M. D.| 

Head, Gustavus Philemon 

Hendryx, Matthew Q., A. B.t. . . 

Henry, Charles Willis 

Hoag, Edward John 

Holland, Edward Alexander 

Hoover, Edwin Kuhn 

Holt, John Franklin .' 

Hulburt,- Frank David 

Hutton, Ernst Le Roy 

Hadley, Wm. Clark 

Hanson, Wilber Fisk 

Hartman, Frederick Steele 

Havfkins, Robert, M. S.t 

Hawley, Clark Wilder .-. 

Head, Louis Rollin, A. B.f 

Henry, Charles Wilbur 

Hensiiall, Edgar Owens 

Hill, John Edward 

Hof'toe, Ole Tollefson 

Hoit, Edward Everett 

Holyoke, Edgar Loomis, B. S. f. 
Holyoke, Robt. Ames, V. S. f- • • 
Hopkins, Hiram 



1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881^82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
ISM s-2 
18S2-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1SS2-S3 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1SS3 81 
18S3 84 
1883 85 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-81 
1883-84 
1883-81 
1883-64 
1883-84 
1883-81 
1883-84 
1883-84 
18S3-84 
iss:j si 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1881-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 



3141 
3142 
3143 
3145 

3146 
3282 
3283 
32s t 
3285 
32S6 
32S7 
3288 
3289 
3290 
3291 
3292 
3293 
3294 
3295 
33S7 
3388 
3443 
3441 
3445 
3416 
3117 
3148 
3449 
3450 
3151 
3152 
3571 
3572 
3573 
3574 
3575 
3576 
3577 
3578 
3579 
3580 
3581 
3582 
35S3 
3584 
3723 
3724 
3725 
3726 
3727 
372S 
3729 
3730 
3731 
3865 
386.6 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Horel, Francis R '..'.'. 

Howland, Benton M.. .* 

Hubbard, Wm. Elmer 

Hunt, George 'Cuyler 

Hutchins, Wm. Adelbert. 

Haering, Otto Ernest 

Hale, N orman Tot 

Harris, George' Washington 

Harris, Wm. Crawford. . .'. . .". . . .' 

Hatterman, Carl, Ph.G. \:.~?. . . . 

Hay man, Wm. Henry. ..... .T. . . 

Hay ward, Charles Evershed.?. . . 
Hayman; Libni Benjamin.. :. . . . 

lliggins, Arthur 'Eugene. ,"';T.T.*. 
Hilts, Mark Brownson .TCS'^.'tT. 
Hodgson, Albert James. I^TTTT: . 
Hooker, Charles Ira.^r.rr.n'r.r. 
HostetteiyAllen Harrison VT.". . . 
Howland,. Edward Demonte.". . . 
Hanria; W. McMiune,- M.D.Hon.t 
Hoeber; (iustav.'M.'D;; Hon.j 
Hall, Charles Walter?. ;r^T. . . 
Hall, Frank Leonidas.T^.T. 
Hamill,. John Ransom r.T.f. .. 
Harrison, Samuel Ingelby.';.. 
Heil, Henry Dinkel.. ..':'.'?. .. 

Henderson, Howard E., r B. C. E "f 

Hensley, Herman Justice 

Hinman, Fred Leffenwill 

Ilolden, Franklin 

Hoffman, Melvin . 

Ilalloran, Florence John 

Hamill, Edwin 

Haniia; Harry Howard 

Hanson, Frank 

Harnes, Henry 

Heidner, Gustav Adolph. 

Herrick, James Bryan, A. B. "f 

Herrmann, Arthur John 

Hill, Thomas Caldwell 

Hoover, Walter Kail 

Houtz, Wm. Cyrus 

Howard, Edmund James 

Huberti, Joseph 

Hughes, Albert L 

'Hamilton, Abraham Lincoln.. 

Harris, Oscar Vernon ! 

Hartung, Christian J 

Harvey, James Robert 

Hayes, Patrick Byrne 

Hewitt, Augustus E 

1 lolden, Edward Boss. 

Hook, Elisha Israel. . . .' 

Hall, Solomon L : 

Haley, Richard 

Hall, Harvey Ellsworth ; 



1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1684-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
18S8-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 



+ Degree received before graduating. 

I Professor of Nervous System and Profess. 



Practical Chemistry. College of Physi. 



I aud Surgeons. 



304 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Ilaning, Wm. Gutch, M. D. f.... 

Hanson, Ralph 

Harkman, Grove 

Hassett, James Jerome 

Ilawley, Alanson Webster 

Heinzmann, Charles Benjamin.. 
Ileysett, Robert Edward kelson 

Hill, Green Ewing 

Horton, Fred 

Howard, Henry Wm 

Haf ner, Wm. James 

Hall, Charles Chilton, Ph. B. t ■ • 

Harpster, John Wm 

Hart, Henry P 

Harvey, Don Stewart 

Hauek.Samuel Light, B.S.jPh.G.f 

Haughey, John Ewing 

Hauks, John DeWitt 

Herman, George K., Ph. G. | 

Hiller, Frank Baker 

Howe, Clarence Fred, M. D. f- • • 

Hull, Harry Douglas, B. S. t 

Hutchinson, Edward Buel, B.S.f 

Hamilton, Royal Graves . < 

Harrell, Wm. Davis 

Hartman, Wm. Weaver, A. B. | 

Hatlield, George Eber 

Haworth, Wm. Mahlon 

Healey, Henry Herbert 

Hewitt, Leland Grant 

Hill, Hermon Canaday 

Holford, Ubert Lee 

Hunter, James Edward 

Ilutchins, Sylvester Edgar 

Hall, George Washington, B.S.|. 

Hector, William S.,M. D.| 

Hejinan, Aram Garabed 

Herzog, Harry Hawthorn, B. S.t 

Higgins, James Daniel 

Hitch, Walter N 

Hittner, Henry M 

Holmes, A. G. Huizinga 

Holmes, Rudolph Wieser, B. S.|. 

Hosmer, Charles S 

House, Arthur Norton 

Hoxie,D wight Gilbert 

Hutchinson, Murray W 

Haeker, Lewis E 

Hamilton, Isaiah E., M. D.-f . 
Hammond, Herbert Rollin,B.S.t 

Harvey, William David 

Hayes, Daniel Joseph 

Hayes, Harry Marion 

Head, Merton Lawrence 

Helvic, Charles Amiddes, B. S.f. 
Hemmi, Stephen A., M. D.| 



1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91- 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 



4505 
4506 

4507 

4508 

4509 

4510 

4511 

4512 

4513 

4514 

35 

110 

500 

501 

609 

882 

1435 

2021 

2022 

2283 

2625 

2811 

2975 

3146 

3585 

3586 

3587 

3588 

4415 

56 

152 

195 

196 

199 

227 

228 

307 

425 

610 

680 

681 

682 

683 

684 

784 

785 

786 

959 

1051 

1190 

1191 

1436 

1437 

1476 

1511 

1620 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Hess, Calvin Frederick 

Heydenreieh, Max, Ph. G.|-- ■ 

Hickman, Allen Ray 

Hill, Erasmus Manford 

Hill, Harry Campbell 

Hill, John Hickman 

Howard, Harvey 

Hunt, Bader Sheridan 

Hunter, Charles W 

Hutter, Vincent, M. D.| 

Ingals, Ephraim 

Ives, Franklin B 

*Isaac, Miltou A 

Irwin, Wm 

Irwin, Samuel G 

Irwin, E. Howard 

Ingals, Ephraim Fletcher 

Irwin, Judson De Forest 

Isherwood, Hortenses Lowry 

Inks, John Alexander 

Irwin, Luther Martin 

Isherwood, Thomas Green. . . 

Inglis, George 

Ide, Spencer 

lies, Urban Grant 

Ingalls, Francis Marion 

Innes, James Harvey 

Irwin, George Howard 

Ingalls, Edmund Church 

Jones, Ambrose 

Johnson, Amos M 

Johnson, Hosmer A 

Jones, H iram C 

Johnson, Orvis S 

Jenks, Oliver S 

James, J. A 

*Jenks, Charles W 

"Jennings. T. C 

Jones, Daniel C 

Jordan Frank A 

Jones, Edwin L 

*Jones, Augustus P. C 

Johnson, I. C 

Jennings, George N 

James, George \V 

Jones, Merritt S 

Johnston, David R 

Jones, John M 

Johnson, Walter L 

Johnson, Wm. C 

Jenkins, John M 

Jones, Henry 

Jones, Joseph Evans 

Jewitt, Dan. L,M.D.,ad euudemt 

Jenks, Samuel Michael 

Jackson, A. Reeves, M. D.,Hon.t 



1846-47 
1849-50 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1862-63 
1865-66 
1870-71 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1879-80 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1893-94 
1847-18 
1850-51 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1854-55 
1857-58 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1871-72 
1872-73 



* Deceased, t Degree receiver! before graduating. 



3°5 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



1779 
1809 
1810 
1811 
1812 
1904 
1905 
1906 
2023 
2148 
2149 
2284 
2285 
2286 
2287 
2288 
2436 
2437 
2438 
2439 
2440 
2441 
2541 
2626 
2627 
2628 
2629 
2630 
2812 
2813 
2976 
3076 
3147 
3148 
3296 
3297 
3298 
3453 
3589 
359U 
3591 
3732 
3877 
3878 
3879 
3880 
3881 
4036 
4037 
4038 
4039 
4040 
4206 
4207 
4351 
4352 
4353 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Johnston, John Cain,M. D., ad.t 

Jeffries, Oliver Perry H 

Jones, Frank Sebia 

Jones, Henry Walbank 

Johnson, Joseph Palmer 

* Jackson, Lyman Drake , 

Jennings, Wm. Henry , 

Joralemon, Jacob C. 

Johnson, Austin H 

Johnson, Henry Porter 

Jordan, Francis Marion 

Johnson, Wm , 

Johnson, Claes Wm 

Jiska, Frank Joseph 

James, Addison Coffea 

Jackson, George Edwin 

Jacobs, Stephen "Wesley 

Jay, Palmer C 

Jenkins, Hugh 

Jones, Bernard Walter 

Jones, John Clark 

Jones, Samuel S 

Jacobson, S. D., M. D.,Hon.f . . 

James, Samuel Catlett 

Johnson, Frank Moises 

Johnson, Wm. Sidney 

Jones, Adna Balche 

Jones, Norman L 

Jones, Edward Howard 

Jones, Bobt. Wm 

Juell, Nils Roth Heyerdahl. . . . 
Justice, A. L., M. D., Hon.t--- 

Johnson, Finley P 

Jurss, George Joachim 

Jennings, Morgan Kiddie, A. M.t 

Jewell, Harrison Eddy 

Jones, Frederick AVeller, B. A.f, 

Johnson, Edward Grant 

Jesperson, Thomas 

Jones, Richard R 

Jurgens, Ludwig Wilhelm 

Johnston, Edmund Burke 

Jacobs, John Martin 

Jay, Frank Webster 

Jones, Asa Norman 

Jones, David Newton, M. D.|.. • 

Jones, Josiah 

Jameson, Thomas H 

Johnson, Abraham Lincoln 

Johnson, Adolph P 

Joyce, Roht. Stephen, M. S.| 

Junge, John Henry 

Jensen, Johan L 

Johnson, Charles B 

James, Walter Scott 

Jett, George Abraham 

Joiner, George Bertham, A. B.|. 



Year of 
Gradua- 



1874-75 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1-884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 i 
1890-911 
1890-91 | 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 i 
1892-93: 
1892-93! 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



4516 Jaynes, Edwin Thompson, B.A.f 

8 King, Almon W 

36 *Kirnan, Philip 

57 *Knott, Christopher W 

81 *Kimberly, Hon. E. S 

111 Klepper, Thomas G 

112 Klepper, M. Tevis 

153 Kennedy.V.P 

197 Knapp, Abram H 

263 King, Anderson W 

308 Kennedy, Leroy H 

347 Kittell, George W 

384 Kreider, Henry W 

349 : Kyner, David T 

384 > Kimber, A. L 

426, Keith, B. F 

427 j Keegan, Charles J 

463 Kreider, Wm. L 

502 Kirkpatrick, Daniel 

535 Keith, Ezekiel 

536 Keables, John T 

537 Keegan, Enoch W 

538 Kimball, Abner D 

611 Keyser, Hiram M 

612 Kendall, Charles B 

613 Kelly, James , 

685 Kelly, John J 

686 Keeley, Leslie E , 

687 Kelso, Robt. S 

688 Kerrell, John R 

689 Kinnar, A. H 

690 Kords,L. J.M 

787 Kerr, Charles 

788 Keiper, G.F 

789 Kelsev, W. G 

790 Kite.johnL 

791 Kuster, Charles E 

883 King, Wm. H 

960 Kellogg, H iram D 

961 Kierneif, Benj. F 

1052 Kimball, Thomas C 

1192 i*Kierland, Peter E 

1193 I Klinberg, Andres 

1194 I Knowles, Joseph 

1195; Kilgore, Jahiel C 

1314 I Kelley, Bishop B 

1315 i Kitch'ingman, Adrian A 

1438 I Kelley, Thomas 

1439 Knapp, Charles D 

1474 *Knight, Amos, M. D., adeund.f, 
1512 Kendall, Edmund Janvier 

1582 King, Charles Frederick 

1583 Kittell, Ernst Albert 

1584 Kittrung, Joshua Adams 

1735 Kauffman, Jacob Snyder 

1813 Kalckhoff , Alphonse F 

1814 Kershaw, Andrew 



; Deceased, f Degn 



ved before graduating. 



;o6 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



Ill 



1907 
1908 
2024 
2025 
2026 
2150 
2151 
2289 
2290 
2291 
2442 
2443 
2444 
2445 
2446 
2447 
2448 
2449 
2450 
2451 
2452 
2453 
2454 
2631 
2632 
2633 
2634 
2635 
2636 
2725 
2814 
2815 
2816 
2817 
2818 
2977 
2978 
2979 
2980 
3149 
3150 
3151 
3152 
3153 
3154 
3155 
3156 
3299 
3300 
3301 
3302 
3303 
3304 
3305 
3306 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Koch, Charles Ludvvig 

Kerber, Henry Charles 

Kelly, Elijah Stephens J 

King, Wm. Henry Kane 

Kemper. Philip Annis 

Kilner, Samuel L 

Krusemarck, Charles 

Kernahan, George 

Kidney, Joshua Moffitt 

'Kendall, Herbert 

Raster, John Penny 

Keefer, John Franklin. A. B.t 
Keller, Thomas Franklin. B. b.t 

Kennedy, Wm 

Kerr, Robt. Andrew 

King, Clifford Henry 

King, Valentine R.§ 

Kirk, Thades 

Knappenberger, Henry, B. S.f- 
Knowles, Gilbert Lafayette B.S.t 

Kriebs, Frank Joseph 

Krost, Joseph 

Kruell, Frederick John, Ph. G.+ . 

Keller, George Mead 

Kellmer, George Max, Ph. G t 

Kemper, Wm. George 

Knickerbocker, George Elmer 

Knox, Charles Russell 

Kutnewsky, John Knox 

Knox, Prof. J. S., M. D.,ad eundj 

Keenan, George, Jr 

Kenner, Charles Andrew 

Kindermann, Alexander 

Knowles, Frank Wesley 

Knox, Clark Spencer . ." 

Karn, Jacob, Ph. G.f 

Kent, Thaddeus Burritt 

Knight, Henry Lambert 

Kratzsch, Arno Wiegand 

Kauffman, Adam Emory 

Keener, AVm. Noah 

Kennicott, Guy Wm 

Kessell, George^ A. B.t 

Keyes, Edward Danforth 

Kirkpatrick, Milo 

Kitto, Robt. Andrew 

Klippel, Clemens 

Keeley, Milton Ross 

Kemble, Victor Samuel 

Kendall, John Turner 

Kermott, Edward Plews 

Korssell, Claus Ferd. Peterson. . 

Krumme, Simon Alexander 

Kutchin, Horace Lester, M. D.t- 
Kutchin, Victor 



1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
18S5-86 



3454 

3455 

3456 

3592 

3593 

3733 

3734 

3735 

3736 

3737 

3738 

3739 

3882 

3883 

3S84 

3885 

4041 

4042 

4043 

4044 

4045 

4208 

4209 

4210 

4211 

4212 

4354 

4355 

4356 

4357 

4517 

4518 

4519 

4520 

4521 

4522 

9 

37 

38 

39 

58 

59 

84 

85 

154 

155 

156 

198 

200 

201 

264 

350 

351 

352 

353 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Kalmerton, Robt. E. ...... .'. — 

Kellogg, Robt. Ossian, Ph. B.|. . 

Kleene, Frederick, Ph. G.f 

Kirkpatrick, John West 

Kratochoil, George 

Kahn, Solomon Lee 

Karreman, Adrian Reginald. . . . 

Kellogg, Elias Wells, B. S.j 

Kester, John Wm 

Kline, Edwin, M.S.t 

Krolen, Eugene, A. B.t 

Kuhlman, Charles G., Ph. G.t.. . 

Kaufman, Heman Benno.B.A.f 

Keables, Haller Francis 

Kelley, Edward James 

Kniseley, Will Dale 

Kerrick, Henry Clay, M. D.t- • 

Knapp, Alfred Averill 

Kramer, Wm. Ernst, B. S.t 

Krohn, Henry Walter 

Kunz, Sylvan 

Kelly, Daniel M 

Kelly, Patrick Henry 

Kelso, Reese Davis 

Kimball, Glen Dale 

Keneiick, Michael J 

Knapp, Leander Pitt 

Keegan, Morton Brainard 

Kelly, Charles Joseph, M. D.t. . 

Kolar, Edward P", 

Keith, Wilfred Kennedy 

Kelly, Joseph W\, A. B.t 

King, Elliott R 

King, Walter Stansby 

Kittilsen, A. Nicholaus, Ph. B.t 

Koon, Thomas Mart 

*Long, Edwin R., Lieut 

Lake, Leonard L 

Leary, J. C 

Lovell, Lafayette W 

Lovejoy, J. Collins 

Lof tin, Sample 

Lake, Calvin B 

*Lamb, Robt. Pennell 

Latimer, L. D 

Loomis, Theophilus S 

Luther, H iram E 

*Lynn, Isaiah P 

*Light, EzraM 

Lindsfelt, A. F. St. Sure 

*Lynch, John W 

Leeds, Lucien L 

Lewis, Benjamin S 

La Count, David 

Lodge, Alexander 



1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1844-45 
1846-47 
1846-47 
1846-47 
1847-48 
1847-48 
1848-49 
1848-49 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1853-54 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1855-56 



* Deceased. f Degree received before graduating 

X Health Commissioner. 

§ President, l". S. Examining Board Pensions. Phys 



307 



SEVENTEENTH TEIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



367 

385 
386 
410 
449 
464 
465 
466 
503 
539 
573 
574 
614 
615 
616 
691 
692 
G93 
694 
695 
^792 
793 
794 
795 
796 
797 
798 
884 
885 
886 
887 
930 
962 
963 
964 
1053 
1054 
1055 
1056 
1057 
1128 
1196 
1197 
1198 
1199 
1200 
12004 
1316 
1317 
1318 
1319 
1320 
1321 
,1322 
1323 
1324 



Latta, M. M., M. D., Hont 

Lowrie, John C 

Lake, John Jasper 

Long, Wm., M, D., Hont 

Lake, Waldow W., M. D., Hont 

Lawrence, John W 

Lyford, Wru. Haines 

Lake, Lafayette 

Luce, Hiram C 

Lackey, Robt. M 

Loomis, Clark E 

Lanning, I. Meek 

Lynn, Edward E 

Little, Charles F 

Lamb, G. Allen 

Larimer, Bartlett 

Lester, Gilbert BJ 

Linn, Timothy T 

Lowell, Lorenzo Dow 

Lyons, J . Ellis 

Lamson, C. E 

Leal, J. H 

Lee, Josiah 

Lewis, C. J 

Lueck, A. W 

Lucas, Carl J 

Lyons, W. B 

Langfitt, George W 

Lyons, G. E 

Loope, Truman Ellis 

Lange, Peter T 

Leonard, W. T., M. D., ad eund.t 

Lamson. Justin Worthing. . . 

Latlen, Wm. A 

Langritt, Wm. J 

Livesay, Thomas N 

Little, Gershon J. H 

*Lathrop, Edmund L 

Looney, Wm. A 

La Count, Louis B 

Little, Wm., M. D., ad eundemt 

Linde, Frederick 11 

Leavitt, Justin J 

Lindsay, Hugh E 

Lee, George VV., Jr 

Logan, Augustus R 

Leonard, Raymond L 

Littlefleld, Horace R 

Liljencrantz, Augustus 

Lewis, Ledyard Verdine 

Leal, Clark 

La Rue, Benjamin 

Lester, John M 

Lewis, Frank L 

Law, Allen Robt 

Laurason, Lawrence A 



1855-56 

1856-57 

1856-57 

1856-57 

1857-58 

1858-59 

1858-59 

1858-59 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1861-62 

1861-62 

1862-63 

1862-63 

1862-63 

1863-64 

1863-64 

1863-64 

1863-64 

1863-64 

1864-65 

1864-65 

1864-65 

1864-65 

1864-65 

1864-65 

1864-65 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1865-66 

1866-67 

1866-67 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1866-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1868-69 

1868-69 

1868-69 

1168-69 

1868-09 

1808-09 

1809-70 

1809-70 

1869-70 

1809-70 

1869-70 

1809-70 

1809-70 

1809-70 

1809-70 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



1325 
1440 
1441 
1442 
1443 
1444 
1513 
1585 
1580 
1587 
1588 
1054 
1655 
1650 
1657 
1658 
1659 
1736 
1737 
1738 
1739 
1740 
1741 
1815 
1816 
1817 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
2027 
2028 
2U92 
2152 
2153 
2154 
2155 
2150 
2292 
2293 
2294 
2295 
2296 
2297 
2455 
2450 
2-157 
2458 
2459 
2400 



Lee, Stephen W 

Lincoln, Joseph C 

Lark, Thomas P 

Leavitt, Philander II 

Le Grange, Robt 

Leonard, Wm. T 

Lasher, George 

Luken, Martin Henry 

Lewis, Frank Edward 

Loofbourow, Nathan Allen — 

Little, George Bailey 

Lane, John Wesley 

Leigh, Abraham 

Lewis, Wm. Russell 

Livingston, Robt. A 

Lord, Frank Howard 

Lytle, Henry Smith 

Laclcl, George Dutton 

Landis, Edmund Matthew 

Lawry, Olin Joseph 

Lewis, Wallace Frederick 

Lockwood, Edward II anson — 

Losey, Henry Baldwin 

Lancaster, Alfred Moses 

Larabee, Wm. Marcellus 

Lightfoot. Frank 

Luhman, Frederick Simon 

Lewis, Edwin J 

Lane, Leslie Coulter 

La Grange, John Wesley 

Lawless. James 

Lowry, John Hinton 

Latta, Elmer Fremont 

Luscher, Charles Adolph 

Lindboe, Ottul Klaramus 

Lynn, Wm. Herbert 

Logan, John Augustus 

Long, Charles Melville 

Loring, D. J., M. D., Hont 

Lagorio, Antonio 

Lanyon, Wm. Henry 

Lester, Fred Willard 

Lonsdale, James 

Lord, James Ancel 

Lewis, Wm. Henry 

Lyman, Wm. Bardwell 

Lyman, John Van Reed 

Lacey, Seth Ward 

Lisman, Wm. Albert 

Lewis, Clinton Huntington,B.S.+ 

La Barriere, Paul Eugene 

Lamb, Jonathan Erskine 

Leach, Philip 

Le Foigee, Walter Litster 

Lester, Wm. Arthur 

Lezott, George Danna 



1869-70 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1870-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
18S0-81 



iveii before graduating. 
65. Surgeon U. S. Volu 



30S 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Line, Thomas Henry % 

Lombard, Charles Sumner 

Long-, John Michael 

Love, Ephraim Waldo 

Leech, Monroe S 

Leonard, Ralph 

Lincoln, Win. Henry 

Long, Jesse 

Lord, John Prentiss 

Love, John Edward 

Limd, George Jesse 

La Grange, Orian Demand 

Lashier, Bion Willis 

Leavens, Dolenna Carlos 

Leigh, Clarence Wilbur 

Lewis, James Monroe 

Lewis, James Young 

Lull, Richard Holmes 

Lynde, A. Blanchard, Ph. G.|. 
Lakin, Alvin Marion, Ph. M.| 

Latta, Samuel Eikenborg 

Leason, Park Benjamin 

Leigh, Ebberly J., A. B.| 

Lewis, Wm. Francis 

Littlefield, Samuel Milton 

Loney, John Tullis 

Lucke, Robt. Sidney 

Lusk, Charles Francis 

Lynch, Patrick Henry S 

Lytle, James Reed 

La Due, Burdett Elmerin 

Leahy, John 

Lindley, Clarence Theodore. . . 
Loutzenheiser, Lot Alonzo . . . 
Lydston, James Allen, Ph. G.t 

Lyon, Lasell W 

Loring, Samuel Crayton 

Lyon, Thomas Bronell, M. A.t 

Leslie, Ira Hersia 

Lytle, Elmer Ellsworth 

Lane, Herbert Warren 

Lange, Ignatz 

Larson, Carl Frithiof 

Lee, Maskel 

Loughride, Victor Edmund.. . 

Lovell, Frank Blair 

Lambert, John Rodney 

Lane, Wm. Henry 

Locke, Robt. Douthitt 

Lolland, Wm. Alfred 

Looze, John Joseph 

Lowell, Adelbert De Loss 

Lyman, Francis Anderson 

Liesman, Bismarck 

Livingston, Hugh 

Loof bourrow, Thaddeus L — 



1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1881-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1*85-815 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-S8 
1888-89 
1888-8*.) 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 



38*9 

3890 

4046 

4047 

4048 

4049 

4050 

4051 

4213 

4214 

4215 

4216 

4217 

4218 

4219 

4358 

4359 

4360 

4361 

4362 

4363 

4361 

4523 

4524 

4525 

4526 

4527 

3 

10 

20 

25 

40 

60 

61 

62 

86 

87 

88 

113 

114 

115 

116 

157 

158 

159 

160 

161 

173 

174 

202 

203 

229 

230 

231 

265 

266 



Lowrie, Walter Newell 

Lueck, George Wm 

Langan, Joseph Clement 

Lapsley, Robt. McKee, M. D.|. 

Lattan, Louis Frank, D. D. S.~f. 

Lemon, Charles Henry, B. D.|. 

Lillie, Park A., B. S/f 

Loomis, Frank E 

Larkin, Frederick Ashbell.M.D.t 

Le Count, Edwin Raymond 

Lepere, Matthew, B. S.| 

Leland, Kimball W.,M.D.|.... 

Lewin, Wm. A 

Lindsey, Cliff 

Luehr, Edward 

La Force, Burdete D., Ph. G.t-. • 

Leahy, Bartholomew John 

Lee, Gisle Martin 

Leslie, Win. H 

Linnell, Bird McPherson, 13. A.j 

Long, Harry Huesten 

Lord, Richard 

Laibe, Frank J 

Lee, William II 

Lierle, Fred Perkins 

Loope, Truman Elbert, Jr.,B.S.t 

Lukemeyer, Louis Charles 

McLean, John, M. D., Ilon.f.... 

*Munroe, Stephen, Jr 

*Maleolm, Alexander B 

*Montgomery,Wm.G . ,M.D.Hon.| 

McGirr, J. E 

*Matthews, Wm 

*Moor, Thomas C 

McNutt, J. II 

Maxon, Orrin T 

*MeKay, Peter B 

*Meek, Edwin G 

Macon, J. C ' 

Miles, Manly, Jr 

Moore. Risd'on C 

*McArthur, Alonzo L 

Mease, L. A 

Mason, S. R 

Merrick, George C 

Morris, Richard 

Murphy, John II 

Mead, Thompson, M. D., Hon.f. 

McMechan, Jas. G., M. D., Ilon.t 

Marshall. Hugh 

Martin, Lewis B 

Miller, Warren 

Marks, Solon 

Moffett, James B 

Manson, Win 

Morey, Harvey C 



1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1843-44 
1844-45 
1845-46 
1845-46 
1846-47 
1847-18 
1847-48 
1847-48 
1848-49 
1848-19 
1818-19 
1819-50 
1819-50 
1819-50 
1849-50 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1853-54 
1853-54 



* Deceased. T Device received befure frraduating. 

J Secretary (Aurora. Hamilton Co., Neb.) U. S. Eoarti Te 



309 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



267 

268 
269 
270 
309 
310 
311 
; 354 
355 
356 
387 
388 
389 
390 
428 
429 
430 
467 
468 
469 
482 
505 
506 
540 
54.1 
542 
543 
544 
575 
576 
577 
578 
617 
618 
619 
620 
621 
622 
623 
624 
696 
697 
698 
699 
700 
701 
702 
705 
799 
800 
801 
,802 
803 
888 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Mann, Henry W 

Morrison, J. 13 

Mc Arthur, R. M 

May field, John T 

"McHugh, John 

McCarthy, James C 

McMurty, James C 

Marshall, D. McM 

McGee, Thomas C 

'Madden, Zephaniah H 

Miller, Joseph -Thomas 

Maney, James Francis 

Mc Afterty, Ethan 

McCleeny, James . . '. 

May, Willis L.. 

Miller, A. J .- 

'Montgomery, D. J! 

McGee, Richard 

Mason, F 

McNair, Samuel 

Mitchell, S. M., M. D., Hon,| 

Mc Alpin, Percy 

Matthei, Philip 

Mc Master, Z. James 

May field, James M 

Maynard, Henry H.J 

McVey, Richard E 

Murphy, John 

Monroe, George L 

Meacher, AVm 

McKnight, Wm 

Millard, Fordyce R 

Muncey, James 

McFarland, George C 

Mahler, Frank C 

McNeil, James H 

Montgomery, Thomas J 

McLean, John 

Marston, Samuel L 

McCoy, Pitt Y 

McGlumphy, S. B 

Maedonald, Peter S 

Mendenhall, Samuel 

Mix, Henry A 

Munger, Martin E 

Munroe, James A 

Moses, Jabez II 

Marion, Francis 

Mahan, Isaac L 

Meachem, J. G., Jr 

Morrow, L. B 

Morse, Wm. A 

Maxon, G. D 

Magelssen. Jacob W 

Morgan, James J 



1853-54 
1853-54 

1853-54 
1853-54 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1858-59 
1858-59 
1858-59 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1860-61 
1860-61 

1860-61 
1860-61 
1850-61 
18131-62 
1861-62 
1861-62 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 



891 
892 
893 
894 
895 
896 
897 
965 
966 
967 
968 
969 
970 
971 
972 
973 
974 
1004 
1058 
1059 
1060 
1061 
1062 
1063 
1064 
1065 
1066 
1067 
1068 
1069 
1070 
1071 
1072 
1073 
1074 
1075 
1076 
1201 
1202 
1203 
1204 
1205 
1206 
1207 
1208 
1209 
1210 
1211 
1212 
1248 
1249 
1326 
1327 
1328 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



nind-t 



McMasters, James ~\Y... 
Meachem, A. Wilbur. . . . 
Munsell, John Gallield. . . 

Murray, W. W 

Maxwall, S. C 

Moorehouse, Wm. D 

Morse, E. A 

'McDowell, John R 

Morrall, Albert 

Marshall, Nicholas R. . . . 

Mayo, Joseph K 

Miller, George E 

Morey, Joseph W 

Moore, Wm. H. C 

Mitten, Allen P 

Merrick, Jerome C 

Massman, John 

Morse, Frederick D 

Murphy, James, M. D., ad 

McKinney, John G 

Miller, Abraham 

Miller, Benjamin C 

Muth, Charles 

Martin, Leonidas B 

McClure, James 

Moore, Americus V 

McCrea, Samuel P 

McCoughey, Thomas C 

Moore, John B 

Maynard, Wm. J 

Murphy, Thomas C 

McGuire, Francis 

McCollum. Charles A 

McKune, Albert B 

Mayo, Edward L., Jr 

Moffit, James 

McCullock, Albert is P 

McMalian, Wm. R 

Molitpr, Nikolaus 

Morris, Joel W 

Moore, Russell L 

McClure, Stephen P 

Miller, Adam E 

Miller, Andrew J 

McGinness, John 

Morgan, John C 

McLean, James Wharton 

McClellan, Samuel 

Moffatt, James S 

Monroe, Wm 

Matthews, Fred L. M. D., ad e.f. 
Mclnness, Thos. P., M. D., ad e.t 

Mendenhall, Wm. O'Neal 

Mulvane, Phineas I 

McLean, Wm. L 



1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1 866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1067-68 
1067-68 
1867-68 
1867 -Ii5 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-6S 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 



* Deceased, f Deg 
i Surgeon of Vohm 
'Southern California. 



)d before grailu 



3io 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES, 



Tear OF '1 
Gradua- 



Morehouse, H. Walter 

Moore, Wm. J 

Moore, Andrew J 

Morris, Julius A 

Morey, George P 

Monast, Pierre L 

Matthews, James A 

Miller, Samuel 

Morse, Simon P 

McFarland, D. H 

Miller, Benjamin P 

Modesitt, Albert B 

Marvin, Henry M 

Manning, Charles D 

McFarland, T. Fletcher 

McFarland, Andrew, M.D.,Hon.t 

Macklin, George M 

Minnick, Erasmus G 

Montgomery, Wm. T 

MeGarey, Ennis N 

Miller, James N 

Mitchell, Robt, J 

McElroy, Patrick Henry 

Masterson. John A 

McPherson, John A 

MoBride, Sherwell Kier 

McCandless, Wm. Leslie 

McFarland, Andrew 

McKinnie, Patt. Leonard 

McMorris, James 

*McPherson, Mason Crarey . . . . 

Magoon, Darwin Earll 

Mansfelde, A. Siedschlag von. . 

Mead, Wm. Briscoe J 

Merritt, Geo. Frederick 

Mackey, Horatio Nelson 

Messner, Lewis Curtis.. 

Millard. Perry Henry 

Miller, Wm. Keller 

Moor, Otis 

Myers, Columbus 

Mendelhall, Pleasant Winston 

McCullock, George 

McLean, Morris Galusha 

McKenzie, Herbert Marcus. . . . 

McClelland, Robt. Edward 

McCoy, Addison Webster 

McCune, James Harold 

McElroy, Jas. Gallagher 

Martin, Oliver Harrison 

Mercer, Samuel Warren 

Miller, George Henry 

Miles, Frank Lawrence 

Mitchell, Theophilus Wells. . . . 



1869-70 
18(39-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 



1670 
1671 
1672 

111742 
1743 
I 1 1744 
,1745 
i ! 1746 
11747 
1 1748 
[ : 1749 
N 1750 
11751 
||1818 
1819 
1820 
1821 
1822 
1S23 
1824 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
2()29 
2030 
2031 
2032 
2033 
2034 
2035 
2036 
2037 
2038 
2039 
2040 
2157 
2158 
2159 
2160 
2161 
2162 
2163 
2164 
2165 
2166 



Moore, Ellis Crosby 

Morgan, Will Harrison 

Murphy, Lea 

McCleery, Thomas Cook 

McDonnell, Charles Angus 

McFadden, James Johnson 

McKinney, Geo. Washington.. 

Mande ville, John D 

Man tor, Childs' 

Marr, Delos Danforth 

Michaels, Thomas Munson 

Monical, Frank Helton 

Mulliken, Wm. Walter 

McFarland, Wm. M 

McClure, Finla 

Mclnty re, J arnes D 

May, Jacob 

Meade, James Allen 

Meyer, Johan Herman Wm. . 

Meyer, Wm. Walker 

Milton, Edward Willison 

Moore, Francis Marion 

Morey, Christopher Dean 

McDougle, James 

McMahan, Jos. Constantine. . . 
McCluggage, John Randolph.. 

Morse/Theodore Warner 

Morton, John Wellington 

Mason, Freeman C 

Malone, Thomas Coleman 

Miller, Hosea Fountain 

Matlies, Jesse Marion 

Murphy, John Redtield 

*Murphy, Wm. Thomas 

Morse, Ashbel Henry 

McHugh, Uriah Clay 

Miller, Samuel Ross 

Mailer, Andrew Caldwell 

McCoy, Hiram Foster 

Miller, Samuel Borland 

Metzradt, Hans von 

McClelland, Robt. Alexander. 

Mills, Aaron 

Major, Elverton E 

McDonald, Edward 

Marshall, George Lemuel 

Matthews, Allen Aleyn 

Meacham, Edgar Jehial 

Meyer, Wni 

McComb, Charles Frederick . . . 

McCaw. Hugh E 

McCausland, John Wilkinson. 
McClintock, John Calhoun.§.. 
McGavern, Charles Wm 



1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 



* Deceased, t Degree received before graduating. 

X Secretary Board of Education Post Master. President Board of Education. Surgeon B. & M. R. R. County Physician and 
Health Officer. 

§ Prof, of Principles and Practice of Surgery in Kansas Medical College, President of Topeka Board of Health. President of 
Topeka Academy of Medicine and Surgery. 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Gradua- 
tion. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Gradua- 
tion. 



2167 
2168 
2169 
2170 
2171 
2172 
2173 
2174 
2175 
2298 
2299 
2300 
2301 
2302 
2303 
2304 
2305 
2306 
2307 
2308 
2309 
2310 
2311 
2312 
2313 
2314 
2315 
2465 
2466 
2467 
2468 
2469 
2470 
2471 
2472 
2473 
2474 
2475 
2476 
2477 
2478 
2479 
2480 
2481 
2482 
2483 
2484 
2485 
2644 
2645 
2646 
2647 
2648 
2649 
2650 
2651 



Miller, Carroll Everkard 

Michel et, Wm. Emil Julian 

Mitchell, Albert Roscoe 

Moran, John Vincent 

Moore, Daniel Grove 

Moyer, Harold Nicholas 

Murphy, Timothy Douglas 

Murphy, John Benjamin 

Muenich, Joseph Aloysius 

Mogstad, Peter Thames, A. M.j. 
McKitterick, Nathaniel Massie.. . 

McCosh, George Bessore 

Mason, Walter Scott 

McGrath, Michael H 

Moore, Melvin Lazelle 

Murray, Julian Edwin 

Miller,' Robert Edward 

Harmon, John Hale, A. M.f 

Moore, French . 

Meacher, Byron Coleman 

Murdock, Ezekiel P., A. M/f . . . . 

Murray, Lucien Edward 

Moore, Willis Fremont 

Mc Arthur, Lewis Linn 

Mulringer, John Leonard,Ph.G.| 
Martin, Marshall Thomas. .... 
McCormick, Joseph C, M.D.|. 

Martin, J. Lester, S.B.j 

Marshall, Charles Pope 

Matthei, Alexander 

Maurer, Albert A 

Mead, Leonard Charles 

Meek, John Washington 

Mc Bride, Cornelius Miller 

McCleary, Horace 

McComlj, Henry Robt 

McEwan, Samuel Wilson 

Mcllvaine, Thos.McGuffin,A.M.f 

McKay, Wm. T 

McLean, Wm. Thomas 

McNeel, Frank Haverstrite 

Miller, Charles Monroe 

Mitchell, Arthur Imlay 

Morrison, J. Henry 

Milton, Charles Albert 

Moslander, Franklin Van Dyke.. 
Mullowney, Matthew Walter.. . . 

Murdock, Horace Greeley 

Maher, Jeremiah 

Marsh, Jefferson Eugene 

Martin, David T 

Marten, Miltsy Cephas 

Mascheck, Frank Joseph 

McAuliffe, Edwin Louis 

McFall, Howard M 

McGovern, Wm. P 



1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-8.0 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-X1 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 



2652 
2653 

2054 
2655 
2656 
2657 
2658 
2659 
2660 
2661 
2662 
2827 
2828 
2829 
2830 
2831 
2X32 
2X33 
2834 
2X35 
2S36 
2*37 
2*38 
2X39 
2X40 
2841 
2X12 
2X43 
2X44 
2X45 
2X46 
2X47 
2848 
29'. "2 
2993 
2994 
2995 
2996 
2997 
299X 
2999 
3000 
3001 
3002 
3003 
3004 
3(105 
3006 
3007 
301 VX 
3009 
3010 
3011 
3012 
3013 
3014 



McKenna, Michael Joseph . . . 

McKebbon, John James 

McPherson, Charles Walter. . . 
Millen, Samuel Rutherford. . . 

Mitchell, Edward Leyi 

Mitter, Robert 

Moffit, Fred Wilbur 

Moran, Michael Connor.. .... 

Mosher, Arthur Hall 

Mueller, Herman Wm 

Myers, Wm. Henry 

Manley, Adelmorn Brookins. 

Matson, Neal Cameron 

Maxwell, Charles Herbert 

Mayfleld, Reuben Newton, M.D.| 

McClanhan, Wm. Steele 

McCleary, David Andrew 

McClure, George Henry 

McConnell, George Hunt 

McDonald, Edward Martin . . . 

McGinnesS, James W 

McGuffin, Wm. Rice 

Mclndoe, Thomas Beatty 

McMahon, John Page, A. M.|. 
Mc Williams, John James. . .: . 
Meek, Joseph Allen, A. B.|. . . 

Merrill, Harry Weston 

Miller, John Knox 

Mills, George Mortimer 

Moliter, Edward 

Moore, George Earle 

Mott, John William 

Mulligan, Edward Wright 

Maenamara, John G -. 

Mammen, Ernest 

Mathews, David AV 

Mathis, Caleb Eugene 

Matins, Elbert Nelson 

McArthur,DanielSeymour,B.L.j 

McClelland, Silas Edward 

McClintock, Wm. Alexander.. . . 

McClure, Lester John 

McCutcheon, Wm. Robt 

McGuire, Clarence Alonzo 

McKean, Alexander. A. M."f 

Mease, Dupuyster Chauliac L... 

Melvin, Ransom Dunn 

Mighell, Norman Edwin 

Miller, Benjamin Canon 

Miller, James Theodore 

Miller, James AVeston 

Miller, AVm. Markle 

Monroe, Wilbert Henry 

Morris, Ewing A r an Barian 

Morton, Frederick Howard 

Mueller, Otto, A. JB.j 



1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
188-J-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1S83-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-S4 
1883-S4 
1SS3-S4 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
18S3-84 
1883-84 
18S3-84 



f Degree received before graduating. 



312 



BUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Gratlua 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Murfin, Warren Wesley 

Marcusson, Wm. Beringer, A.B.j 

Martin, J. V 

Meehan, Martin Grace 

Meengs, Dick Reynolds 

Martin, Aoncil Erelon 

Merryman, George Edgar 

Mc Adams, Jame E., B. S.| 

McCabe, Michael Frank 

McCreight, Samuel L., B. S.|. .. 

McDill, John Rich 

McGinley, James Benjamin 

McKay, James 

McTaggart, Thos. Alexander. . . 

Moulton, George Albert 

Murphy, James Harrison 

Mahon, Lowell Thomas 

Marion, George Louis 

Marriett, Woodman Robt 

Martin, Thomas Anthony 

McClarey, Charles Elmer 

McCutctieon, Charles 

McDaniel, Thomas Jefferson . . . 

McDowell, John Archibald 

McKee, James Anderson 

McPherson, Pearson 

McHoy, James H 

Mellish, Ernest Johnson 

Milneo, George Stott 

Minaghan, Robt. Emmett 

Mitchell, Walter Porter 

Moore, Landon Clay 

Moran, Dennis David 

May, Frank Ezra 

Meyer, Edward 

McDill, David 

McLean, John D 

Mills, Wm. Francis 

Moller, Adolph 

Morrill, Seth Thomas 

Morrison, John, A. M.j 

Morse, Isaac Cade 

Morton, James Solomon 

Murphy, Franklin Jay . . . 1 

Magee, Jas. Park, M. D.,Hon.-f . . 

Marston, Ernest Linwood 

Martin, Wm. Brown 

Martin, Wm. Giles 

Mattox, Wm. R 

Maxwell, George Bancroft 

May, James Wallace 

McClelland, Clarence Beman.. . 

McCorkle, George Earl 

McGauvan, Michael Sheridan. .. 

McGrath, John Joseph 

Meath, Augustus Hilary 



1883-84 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1SS5-S6 
18*5 si! 
1885-sii 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
18S5-86 

lSSt'i- sT 

1886-87 

1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886 ST 
18S6-S7 
1SS6 ST 
1SST-8S 
INST ss 
1SK7-SS 

IssT ns 
lssT ss 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 



3611 
3612 
3613 
3614 
3615 
3747 
3748 
3749 
3750 
3751 
3752 
3753 
3754 
3755 
3756 
3757 
3891 
3892 
3893 
3894 
3895 
3S96 
3897 
3898 
3S99 
3900 
3901 
3902 
3903 
3904 
3905 
3906 
3962 
4052 
4053 
4U54 
4055 
4056 
4057 
4058 
4059 
4060 
4061 
4062 
41 '63 
4064 
4065 
4066 
4067 
4068 
4069 
4070 
4220 
4221 
42°2 
4223 



Moeller, John 

Montgomery, Frank Hugh 

Moore, Charles Fred 

Munger, Clifton Deo 

Murphy, Edward Augustus 

Manchester, Llewellyn Claude. . 
Meriwether, Alfred Preston — 
McBride.Franklin Elmore, B.A.t 

McCann, Francis Patrick 

McLanahan, Albert Clarence. . . 

McKenney, George Mix 

McKittrick, Peter 

McNiel, James Stuart X 

Milligan, James Warren, A. M.j 

Minahan, John Roger 

Mishoff, Ivan Dimiter, A. M.f. ■ 

Manion, Patrick Henry 

Mason, Frank Grant, Ph. G.j. . . 

Maxwell, John Boel, B. S.| 

McCann, Daniel Bradford 

McCool, Wm. Emery 

McCoy, Clem Dennfa, A. M.|. • • 

McCurdy, Lawson Leander 

Mcintosh, Carlton Wintrode.. . . 

McKenney, George P 

McLaughiin, Edward 

McMillan, John, B. A.| 

Merrill, Chester Wm 

Moflatt, Henry Leander 

Monroe, Zera Wilson 

Moorehead, Edward Louis 

Murphy, Henry Thomas 

Miller. Wm. Payne 

Marbourg, John George, Ph. G.| 

Martin, Charles Edward 

McCallister, George Homer 

McCormick, Henry Garnsey 

McCurdy, James George 

McGregor. John Donald 

McGuire, Carlton Monroe 

Mclthenny, Robt. Alexander — 
McKnight, George Campbell. . . 

Meengs, Peter Cornelius 

Mezger, Louis K, M. D."f 

Miller. Charles Clay 

Minahan, Wm. Edward 

Mittan, Frank J 

Molitor, Nicholas 

Morgan, Wm. Gue 

Morning, James Frank 

Muelchi, Wm. H 

Murrav, Michael Francis 

MacXeal. Arthur, A. B.t 

Markham, Homer Everett 

Martin, Albert Rauken 

Mauk, Edwin B., M. D.f 



1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-8i9 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 



SEVENTEENTH TEIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES OF GRADUATES 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



4224 

4225 

4226 

4227 

4228 

4229 

4230 

4231 

4232 

4233 

4234 

4365 

4366 

4367 

4368 

4369 

4370 

4371 

4372 

4373 

4374 

4528 

4529 

4530 

4531 

4532 

4533 

4534 

4535 

4536 

4537 

4538 

4539 

4540 

11 

63 

64 

271 

357 

411 

625 

626 

703 

704 

804 

805 

898 

975 

976 

1077 

1213 

1214 

1344 

1454 

1455 

1529 



Medill, Joseph N., V. S.f 

Meyer, Robt. U. J., M. D.t 

McCalman, Ira Judson 

McConkey, Wilbur Fish 

McConnell, Nelson Gilbert 

McNair, Oliver Hazard Perry.. . 

Miller, Allen Francisco 

Miller, Philip 

Miller, Thomas 

Moeller, Thor Olsen Engh 

Monroe, James 

Marston, Charles Lemuel 

McCoy, Emmett Edwin 

McGraw, Frederick A., A. B.f. . 

McKee, Albert Blakeman 

McKenzie, George 

Meacham, George T 

Miller, Thomas 

Morgan, Elmer E 

Moreley, Frank Ellsworth 

Morris* John Little 

Malster, Robert Mahaffey 

Manimen, Goke Henry 

Manning, Charles H 

Mason, John Benedict, D. D. S.t 

McAllister, Edwin Boyd 

McCellan, William Stewart, B.S.t 
MeCreight.MarlinSamuel.Ph.G.t 

Miller, Francis "Wallace 

Misick, Oel S., M. D.t 

Montgomery, Edward Sanf ord . 

Moore, Charles Richard 

Morris, Edward Kirby 

Mueller, George, Ph. G.t 

Needham, Orwell 

'Newton, John P 

'Nutt, John 

Xiglas, John N 

Neal, Benjamin G 

'Noble, H., M.D., Hon.| 

Nichols, Elmer 

Noyes, J. Copp 

Nelson, Eugene L 

Nelson, Alexander P 

Newell, Wm.M 

Nesmeth, N. W 

Nichols, Horace 

Newton, Alexander B 

Newell, Henby B 

Newkirk, Garrett 

Nichols, Wm. F 

Northrup, Lorenzo 

Noyes, George B 

Nicoson, David C 

Newall, George E 

Norris, Amos Lorin 



1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1844-45 

1847-48 

1847-48 

1853-54 

1855-56 

1856-57 ■ 

1862-63 j 

1862-63 i 

1863-64 j 

1863-64 

1864-65! 

1864-65 

1865-661 

1866-67 j 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1868-69 ! 

1868-691 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1871-72 



1530 
1752 
1828 
1928 
1929 
1930 
2041 
2176 
2316 
2317 
2318 
2319 
2486 
2487 
2663 
2664 
2665 
2850 
2851 
2852 
2853 
3016 
3017 
3179 
3180 
3326 
3327 
3328 
3470 
3471 
3616 
3617 
3758 
3759 
3907 
3908 
3909 
4071 
4072 
4073 
4074 
4235 
4236 
4237 
4238 
4375 
4376 
4377 
4378 
4541 
4542 
4543 
4544 
4545 
4546 
12 



Norris, John Wm 

Nowlen, James Albert 

Nance, Hiram Irving 

Nettler, Wm 

Northcott, Edwin McLean . . . 

Nitzsche, Frederick Robt 

Nolan, Emanuel Cross 

Newton, John Tenbrook 

Nichols, John Crittenden 

Neill, John Wm 

Nitz, Charles Frederick 

Newkirk, Adamson Bentley. 

Neilson, Walter Hopper 

Nickolls, George Washington.. . 

Newcomb, Wm. Kendall 

H Noble, Albert Goodsell 

North, Edward Payson 

Nelson, Gerhard Thorp 

Newhall, Wm. Melvin 

Nichols, George Bradford, A.M.t 

Nihart, George Washington 

Nelson, Wni. Deaderick 

Norton, Garrett Amos % 

Novak, Frank Joseph 

Nuzum, Thomas Walter 

Nevins, John 

Newman, Harmer M 

Noble, Joseph Boardman, B. S.t 

Niven, James K 

Nolan, Wm. Joseph, A. M.f... 

Nelson, Herbert Harrison 

Noble, Wm. Lincoln, B. S.t.. 

Norden, Henry Aaron 

Nourse, Robert Lee 

Neil, Will T 

Neier, Oliver Clay 

Norton. Marcus Eugene, D.D.S.t 

Nanerth, John Henry 

Neal. Frederick Wm 

Neenan, Wm. Michael, M. D.t- •• 

Newell, Isaac Otis 

Nason, Wm. Albert, M. D.t 

Nate, Raymond Jesse 

Newell, Amos Jesse. A. M.f 

Noster, Alfred H., Ph. G.t 

Naffz, Edwin, B. S.t 

Nelson, Harry E 

Nettleton, James Huckstep 

Newmen, Wm. Herrick, A. M.f 

Nason. John Blaisdell 

Nichols, Forest Clifford 

Nichols, George Clarence 

Nichols. William Edward 

Niven, John S 

Nolan, Wm. Norbert 

*Oatman, Ira E 



1871-72 

1874-75 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1879-30 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882^3 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1884-85 

1884-85 

1885-86 

1885-86 

1885-86 

1886-87 

1886-87 

1887-88 

1887-88 

1888-89 

1888-89 

1889-90 

1889-90 

1889-90 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1890-91 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94' 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1841-15 



H4 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE 



= 1 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



65 Otis.OrvinC 

66 *Osborne, J. George 

117 Oatman, Wm. C 

431 O'Connor, John McM 

432 Ormsby, O. B 

507 Osborn, Wni. F 

545 Orven, Samuel C 

627 O'Brien, Cornelius 

628 Ogle, Jacob W 

705 O'Brien.J.N 

806 Otto, Joseph 

977 *Odell, San ford T 

1078 O'Reiley, John R 

1215 O'Brien, John Emmet 

1345 Ormsby, Oliver C 

1531 Owen, Abram 

1593 Orear, James Harvey 

1594 Oliver, Oliver Cromwell 

1829 O'Brien, Floyd 

1830 O'Clery, Michael Salty 

1831 Orr, Smith 

1960 Otto, Julius, M. D., ad eundem j 

2042 O'Connor, John Crysler 

2089 Owens, John E., M. D., ad eund.t 

2177 O'Keefe, John Francis 

2178 O'Connor, John Walter 

2179 Orton, Harlow N 

2320 Oliver, Nelson Eugene 

2321 O'Brien, Daniel Samuel 

2322 O'Doherty, Daniel 

2488 O'Connell, James Morgan 

2489 Ogden, Henry 

2490 Olds, Benjamin Ranselaer... 

2854 Orr, Edwin Dearth, B. S.f 

2855 O'Shea, David 

3018 Oughton, Charles Martin .... 

3181 O'Brien, James Smith 

3182 O'Ferrall, Robt. Lackey 

3329 Ochsner, Albert J., B. S.f . . . . 

3330 Olson, Ole Hansteen 

3331 O'Malley, Thomas Francis. . . 

3332 O viatt, Albert Earle 

3472 Ohls, Henry Gainsey, Ph. B.f 

3473 Oswald, Julius Wm 

3618 O'Malley, Michael Paul 

3619 Owsley, Frederick Diller 

3760 Oshay, Frank J 

3761 Otto, Edward 

3762 Owen, Wm. Edward 

3910 O'Brien , James Michael 

3911 O'Brien, Thomas 

3912 Orth, Wm. Sheriff, B. S.f 

3913 Osborn, Charles 

3914 Overfield, Walter Willard .... 

4075 O'Hara, Warren Joseph 

4239 Odendahl, Frederick H., M. D.t 



1847-48 

1849-50 

1857-58 

1857-58 

1859-60 

1860-61 

1862-63 

1862-63 

1863-64 

1864-65 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1868-69 

1869-70 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1872-73 

1875-76 

1875-76 

1875-76 

1876-77 

1877-78 

1877 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1883-84 

1884-85 

1884-85 

1885-86 

1885-86 

1885-86 

1885-86 

1886-87 

1886-87 

1887-88 

1887-88 

1888-89 



1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1891-92 



4240 
4241 

4242 
4379 
4380 
4381 
4547 
41 
42 
67 
89 
90 
118 
119 
120 
121 
162 
163 
204 
232 
233 
234 
312 
35* 
391 
392 
393 
394 
433 
434 
435 
47(1 
471 
546 
547 
579 
629 
630 
631 
706 
707 
708 
S07 
808 
809 
M0 
810 
899 
932 
978 
979 
1006 
1079 
1080 

1IIS1 
1082 



Olney, Thomas Albert 

O'Malley, Joseph Francis, M.A.j 

O'Neil, John W 

Oatman, Victor 

Ocasek, Charles J 

O'Donnell, William Allen 

Ochsner, Edward H., B. S.|... 

Peck, David J 

*Pierce, Wesley 

Pearson, Jonathan 

Paramore, Gideon C 

*Patterson, James C 

Parkhurst, Silas S 

Paugh, Wm. J 

Perry, Wm. W 

Phipps, John M 

Porter, J. Pumroy 

Pomroy, Lewis C 

Parker, M. G 

Parker, Henry 

Phillips, John 

Proctor, James M 

Pierce, Ross W 

Philips, Wm. H 

Paul, J. B 

Powell, Edwin 

Philips, Josiah L 

*Pearson, N. O , 

Pearman, J. T 

Potter, J. L 

Pashley, J. S , 

Pierce, J. R 

Peters, Wm. Earl 

Pierce, Allen M 

Passage, Henry V 

Patton, Wm. Rush 

Phillips, Wesley 

Pierce, Byron G : 

Piatt, Wm. C 

Palmer, Roswell R 

Peebles, G. Hial 

Price, Edward H 

Penfield, Wm. P 

Powell, John M 

Prentiss, Joseph L 

Powell, John M 

Priest, G. W 

Paddock, S. F 

Paoli.Gerhard Chris.,M.D.,Hon.t 

Palmer, Henry K 

Porter, Wm 

^Prince, David, M. D., Hon.f 

Parks, Charles T 

Pitts, Wm. S 

Prescott. Joel 

Peters, John H 



1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1846-47 
1846-47 
1847-48 
1848-49 
1848^9 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1851-52 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1854-55 
1855-56 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1858-59 
1858-59 
1860-61 
1860-61 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 



ved before graduating. 



3i5 



SEVENTEENTH TKIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Gradua- 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



1083 
1084 
1085 
1086 
1216 
1217 
1346 
1347 
1348 
1349 
1350 
1351 
1352 
1353 
1383 
1456 
1457 
1532 
1533 
1534 
1535 
1536 
1595 
1673 
1674 
1675 
1676 
1677 
1678 
1753 
1754 
1755 
1756 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 
1931 
1932 
2043 
2044 
2045 
2046 
1 2047 
2048 
2049 
2050 
2051 
2180 
2181 
2323 
2324 



Payne, Bennett A 

Pankhurst, James 

1'age, Wm. R 

Pardue.E.H 

♦Patterson, Almon 

Parker, Thomas W 

Place, Milo 

Page, Lewis C 

Palmer, AVrn. H 

Piekins, Francis M 

Phillips, Benjamin T 

Pnrviance, Robt. O 

Panter, Judson C 

Porter, Wm. B 

Plnmmer.Richard H.,M.D.,ad e.| 

Peck, A. Palmer. J 

Pritchard, John F 

Patrick, Zora Elon 

Phillips, Charles AVm 

Plackett, Richard 

Pratt, Homer Hamilton 

Pratt, Horace James 

Pearson, Dolphin Walter 

Parkin, Ralph 

Parsons, George Weston 

Parsons, AVm 

Payne, Frank Howard 

Plumb, Weston Theodore 

Pnrdy, Kossuth Fillmore § 

Parkes, John Phineas 

Pehrsoon, John 

Pope, Frank John 

Putney, Wm. Gardner 

Parks, Brodie AVatson 

Patrick, Campbell Wm 

Perkins, Augustine 

Pettibone, Henry 

Pierce, Willis F 

Plero, George Franklin 

Plecker, James Henry 

Peters, George H 

Patterson, Fred AVm 

Porter,EpaphroditusJehosaphat 

Pratt, Howard, Lewis 

Pritchett, Gilbert La Fayette. . . 

Phillips, James Henry 

Park, Henry Hull 

Pettijohn, Abra Claudius 

Porter, Dennis AVilson 

Porter, AValter Howard 

Parker, AVm. Enos 

Paschall, Emery Allen 

Pritchard, Harry 

Palmer, Charles JN elson 



1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 



2325 
2326 
2327 
2328 
2329 
2330 
2491 
2492 
2493 
2494 
2195 
2496 
2497 
2666 
2667 
2668 
266'.l 
2670 
2724 
2856 
2857 
2858 
2859 
2860 
2861 
2862 
3019 
3020 
3021 
3U22 
3023 
3024 
3183 
3184 
3185 
3186 
3187 
3188 
3189 
3190 
3191 
3192 
3193 
3194 
3227 
3333 
3334 
3335 
3336 
3337 
3338 
3474 
3475 
3476 



Parks, Charles David 

Pyke, Albert David 

Pinch, Francis Isaac 

Perry, Eugene Beauharnaise.. . 
Paul, James Franklin, M. D/t. 

Phelps, John Hurlburt 

Painter, Wm 

Pearce, AVm. James 

Philip, AVm. Herries Madden. . 

Pickering, Reuben Allen 

Pontius, Lorin North 

Porter, Joseph Lawson 

Preston, Walton Henry 

Peaslee, AVm. Crawford 

Pettyjohn, Elmore Sloan 

Powell, John Walrath 

Provins, Clark Breading 

Puchner, Edward 

Paladin o, Prof. Giovanni \ 

Park, Augustus Vitelius 

Parker, AVm. Edward 

Patera, Frank Joseph 

Pearson, Andrew 

Peck, Walter Wm 

Pendleton, Frederic Milford.. . 

Phelps, Oscar Warren 

Palmer, Philip Coffman 

Patterson, AVm. Turner 

Paul, Edward Wm 

Peters, Richard Alexander 

Pettit, James Wiley, M. D.|.... 

Potter, Maro Thompson 

Palmer, Albert E 

Pearman, James Ora, B. S.t . . • 

Pf eif er, Charles Wm 

Phelps, Robt. McEwan, B. S.|. . 

Piggins, Harry S 

Pittman, Wm. E 

Port, Frank AVellington 

Powers, Joseph W 

Prince, Lawrence Hort 

Prochazka, Emil 

Purslow, Sarchfield Emmet.. . 

Putman, Tilf ord Lynn 

Phelps, Calvin M., M. D., Hon.t 

Parker, Thomas 

Parkhurst, Lincoln P 

Perkins, Charles Forrest 

Peterson, AVm. Albin 

Prestley, James P 

Pruyn, Charles Putnam, D.D.S.t 

Parkinson, George Henry 

Perrin, George Franklin 

Phipps, Luther H., M. D.|. . . 



* Deceased. f Degree received before graduating. 
^ Surgeon at Williams Hospital at Pang Chuang, China. 
§ Prof, of Principles and Practice of Surgery in Wichita Medical College 
IT University of Naples, Italy. 



n6 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



1 ^1 

a- 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



3477 

3478 
3479 
3620 
3621 
3622 
3623 
3624 
3625 
•3663 
3763 
3764 
3765 
3766 
3767 
3915 
3916 
3917- 
3918 
3919 
3920 
3921 
4076 
4077 
4078 
4079 
4080 
4081 
4082 
4083 
4085 
4243 
-4244 
'4245 
4246 
4247 
4285 
4382 
4383 
4384 
4385 
4386 
4387 
4388 
4389 
•4390 
4391 
4392 
4548 
4549 
4550 
811 
900 
1087 
1354 
1933 
2052 



Pickard, Joseph Coleman 

Pinckard, Cyrus Gibson 

Prichard, George Wni 

Perekhan, John Said 

Peterson, Theodore John 

Phillips, Carl Fremont 

Phillips, George Samuel 

Pitman, Samuel M 

Power, Howard Lincoln 

Pleschner, Hans, M. D., Hon.|. 

Payne, Wm. Scott, M. A.| 

Pease, Chester Isaac 

Phinney, Julian E ' 

Puffer, John Dickenson 

Putnam, Wm. Eugene 

Patrick, Nathan Edward 

Patton, Jacob Allen, B.S.t 

Peck, George Wm 

Phillips, Cornelius John 

Pirtla, George Wylie 

Port, Richard Herbert 

Porter, Henry Clay 

Parker, Charles Aubrey 

Peairs, George Metzgar 

Pearson, Oscar Grant, A. B."f.- . 
Peck, Adelbert Henry, D.D.S.t. 
Pfaff, Joseph Gregory, D. D. S.t 
Pigall, Joseph Smith, Ph. G.t. . 

Plumb, James N orris 

Pugh, Charles Edward 

Purtell, Edward James 

Palmer, Walter Aaron 

Perry, Fred James, M. D.| 

Pierce, Clement Harrison 

Putman, Wm. Tecumseh 

Poole, John Gay 

Park, Prof. Roswell, Hon .f ' 

Parker, Charles Wickman.M.D.f 1 

Parker, Wm. Ross, Ph. B.f | 

Patterson, David Hugh, M. D.f. 

Pease, Jerome F., Ph. G. t 

Pfeifer, John P., M. D. f 

Pickering, Charles R., B. S.f . . . . 
Poser, Edward M., Ph. G.f. . . . 

Prescott, Elmer Ellsworth 

Prestley, Frank Eugene 

Price, Cyrus Edgar 

Prouty, Wm. A 

Peters, Ralph Moore 

Peters, Warren Tecumseh 

Prendergast, Joseph 

Quinlan. Charles H 

Quales, X. T 

Quivey, Wm 

Quire, Charles E 

Quirk, Wm. F 

Quinn, Edward 



1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 

1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1888-89 
1888-89 



1888-89 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1867-68 
1809-70 
1876-77 
1877-78 



2331 
2332 
3025 
3626 
4085 
4086 
4248 
4249 
13 
21 
22 
68 
91 
122 
123 
164 
172 
205 
206 
235 
272 
273 
313 
314 
315 
323 
359 
360 
361 
436 
437 
472 
508 
509 
548 
549 
580 
581 
582 
632 
633 
634 
635 
709 
812 
813 
814 
901 
902 
903 
904 
931 
980 
981 
982 
983 
984 



Quigley, Will Aerious 

Quinn, John Hiram 

Quivey, Wm. Leander 

Quirk, John Joseph 

Quan, Jacob, B. A.| 

Quirk, James Peter 

Quinn, Frank A., A. M.t 

Quire, Frank Edward 

Ritchey, Samuel W 

*Robb, Cicero 

*Rosenkrans, Halsey 

*Reynolds, Albert J 

*Richings, Charles H 

*Ransom, Giles P 

♦Rogers, David 

Reynolds, B. O 

Russell, J. S., M. D., ad eundemt 

Reeder, J. Harrison 

♦Rogers, Dudley 

Ross, II. W 

Robbins, Myron W 

Root, Simeon P 

Rice, Isaac 

Russell, Hugh 

Rawson, Allen A 

Rawson, Homer C 

♦Robson, John R 

Ragon, Bailey 

Ronold, Francis 

*Ross, B. F 

Rockwell, Wm. H 

Roler, E. O. F 

Ray, Robert B 

Richards, George W 

Reece, Madison 

Russell, E. Fred 

Richardson, Holland W 

Russell, Wm. R 

Richmond, Charles M 

Rankin, John M 

Ransom, James J 

Rogers, Lemuel H 

Robinson, Fernando C 

Richardson, Charles M -. 

Redmon, Lafayette 

Rodman, A. J 

Reed, C. B 

Richards, Rolla T 

*Reed, James J 

Rice, Charles E 

Rutledge, Wm. D 

Rabe, W. Louis, M. D., adeund.t 

Ray, George W 

Rockwood, Charles A 

Randall, Dolphus S 

Robinson, Jefferson 

Robinson, Stephen E 



1879-80 
1879-80 
1883-84 
1887-88 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1844-45 
1845-46 
1845-46 
1847-48 
1848-49 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1852-53 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1860-61 
1860-61 
1861-62 
1861-62 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 



■ Deceased, "^t Degree received before graduating. 



3i7 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Year of 
Gradua- 
tion. 



^ z. c 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



r 

1866-67 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1867-b8 

1867-68 

1867-68 

1868-69 

1868-69 

1868-69 

1868-69 !233 

1868-69 12338 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1869-70 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1870-71 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1871-72 

1872-73 

1872-73 

1872-73 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1873-74 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1874-75 

1875-76 

1875-76 

1875-76 

1875-76 

1875-76 

1875-76 



985 
1088 
1089 
1090 
1091 
1092 
1093 
1094 
1095 
1096 
1097 
1218 
1219 
1220 
1221 
1222 
1355 
1356 
1357 
1358 
1458 
1459 
1460 
1538 
1539 
1540 
1596 
1597 
1598 
1679 
1680 
1681 
1682 
1683 1 
1697 
1757 
1758 
1759 
1760 
1838 
1839 
1840 
1841 
1842 
1813 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1959 
2053 
2054 
2055 
2056 
2057 



Root, Dan S 

Rood, Joseph B 

Rundlett, J . Rodney 

Rienholdt, Wilhelru 

Rowley, Antpnius A 

Robertson, William S 

Ross, Justin 

Rowley, Wm. S 

Riddler, John G 

Richmond, Corydon 

Reed, Royal 

Ralph, John B 

Rickey, Robt. N 

Ristine, Harley G 

Roberts, George W 

Rose, Vincent H 

Randolph, Walter F 

Reeder, James W 

Reynolds, James C 

Russell, Charles W 

Rat lift, Lewis L 

Roome. Charles D 

Roe. Albert J 

Roberts, George Frank 

Ross, David Lancaster 

Russell, Dennis Lincoln 

Rusk, Willard Walter 

Reynolds. George Warren 

Riddle, Hamilton Rush 

: Reed, Frank Allen 

Rickey, Addison Winfleld 

Robison, Laurel Elmer 

Rofe, AVm. Scott 

Rownd, Frank Lafayette 

Rogers, P. P., M. D., Hon.| 

Reyner, Franklin 

Reynolds, Walter Forward 

Riley, George H 

Ryan, Amnon James 

Ramsey , George W., B. S.| 

Reedy, Win. Henry 

Reynolds, Frank Stewart 

Rogers, Leonard P 

Rood, Charles Austin , 

N Ryburn, John Stewart 

Rathbun, Frank Darlington . . . 

^Rose, Hugh Alexander 

Rogers, Joseph Bently 

Russell, John Allen 

Royal, Albert Bird 

Reat, James Lee 

Reynolds, Jas. D.,M.D.,ad eun.f 

Rathbun, Isaac Hale 

Rathbun, Addison Milton 

Rakenius, Hermann 

Reed, Charles Corneau 

Reid, Duncan, Ph. B.f 



20581 
20591 
2060 
2061 ; 
2062 
2182 
2183 
2184 
2185 
2186' 
2333 
2334 
2335 
2336 



2361 
2498 
2499 
2500 
2501 
2502 
2503 
2504 
2505 
2671 
2672 
2673 
2674 
2675 
2676 
2677 
2863 
2864 
2865 
2866 
2867 



1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 



2*69 
2870 
3026 
3027 

3(128 
3029 
3195 



3196 
3197 
3339 
3340 
3341 
3342 
3343 
3344 
3345 
3346 
3347 
3480 



Robinson, Andrew Jackson 

Rogers, Talcott Austin 

Reynolds, Emery Eugene 

Ryon, George 

Rounseville, Albert Parker 

Rice, John Thompson 

Robbins, Charles Winter 

Rogers, Charles Alex.,M.D.|... 

Ross, Joseph Louis 

Rush, Moses Archie, B. S.f 

Reineking, Herman 

Rubelmann, George Jacob 

Reynolds, Monroe Griffith 

Robison, John A., A. B/f 

Roe, Emery Waland 

Ritter, John 

Russell, T. P., M. D., Hon.f. ... 

Randall, Robt. Alexander 

Riggs, Jesse Thomas 

Roberts, Walter Clarence 

Rodgers, Alonzo Ezekiel ... 

Roller, Louis Alfred 

Ross, Charles Fremont 

Ross, Tuthill King 

Russell, Samuel 

Reed, \Vm. Allen 

Richardson, David Hobart 

Robinson, Fred Byron, B.S.j... 

Robinson, Thomas Corwin 

Roskoten, Oliver James 

Rounds, Victor Fremont 

Rowe, Wm. Henry 

Randall, Benjamin Monroe. . . . 

Read, Hiram Martin 

Redlich, Henry, Ph. G-t 

Reynolds, Wm. Wilson 

Rhodes, Edson 

Rosenberry, Abraham Bertolet 

Ross, Wm. Lytle 

Rowles.John Alonzo, A. B.t 

Ramsey, Austin Charles L. . . . 

Reynolds, Frank Robert 

Rixa, Alexander 

Rollins, George Edward 

Reeves, Wm. Clarence 

Regan, Edwin Washington. . . . 

Renle, John, Ph. G.t 

Ralston, AVm. Wilson 

Rhodes, John Edwin, A. M.t . . . 

Rice, Henry N 

Ritchie, George Alexander 

Robey, Marion La Fayette. . . . 
Rodgers, James Farnsworth . . . 
Rounheld, Fred'kP. Otto.Ph.G.t 

Rutledge, James Albert 

Ryan, Edward Patrick 

Randall, Henry Raymond.. . 



1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1860-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1SS1-82- 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1SS2-S3 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1SS2-S3 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1881-85 
1881-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 



* Deceased. t Degree received before graduating. 



;i3 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 




Bay, Lorenzo Dickson 

Heed, Charles Bert 

Hehieking, John 

Bice, Newton James 

Bichter, Conrad 

Bobertson, Loii Clark 

Boos, Adolph 

Bothman, Lewis 

Bueb. Henry John, Ph. Gr.f.. . 

ltalphs, Theodore 

Rawlins, John Aaron 

Reece, James Nelson 

Beynish, David James, 15. S/j" 
Rick, Joseph Bartholomew. . 

Binsr, John 

Richardson, John Franklin. 

Bice, Eri Perry 

Boark, John Paul 

Robinson, Herbert Abraham.. . . 

Bohr, Frederick Win 

Bamsdell, Deyo Leslie 

Banniger, Guido 

Roberts, John Adam 

Russell, Dennis Pane, Ph. G.j. .. 

Ruthenberg, Erich Benno 

Raizon, James, Ph. G.| 

Rawers, Henry George 

Beichert, J. Eugene 

Bernhardt, Ernest Gottholt 

Beynolds, James E., B.S., M.D.t. 

Bhoades, Lyman James 

Bibenach, George A 

Bippey, John Henry 

Rock, John Nichols 

Bockey, Albert Eugene, M.D.f.. 

Bohrdanz, Bobt. Wm 

Boss, Charles 

Rowley, Jesse Campbell 

Rowley. W infield Scott, M. D.t.. 

Ream, Fred Kent, D. D. S.+ 

Reed, Morey L., M. D.| 

Bees, George Marshall 

Rennoe, Callie A 

Renwick, George Robson 

Bobertson, John Banks 

Rogers, Buell Sumner 

Rutherford. John. V. S.f 

Raymond. James Harvey 

Reagan, Theodore 

Bezanka, George W 

Riley, Robert Ellsworth, Ph. G.+ 

Bobertson. Alonzo Edson 

Robinson. "William Francis,B.S.t 

Reagles. Robert 

Rettig. Frederick August 

Reynolds. Peter James, B. S.t.. ■ 
Rife, Clinton Francis 



1880-87 

18*6-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1SS6-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1888-8:1 
1888-89 
1888-89 
18S8-MI 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-9U 
188y-90 
189U-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



4555 
4556 
4557 
455S 
4559 
4560 
14 
23 
43 
44 
69 
7U 
71 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
165 
166 
236 
237 
238 
239 
274 
275 
276 
277 
316 
362 
395 
396 
397 
438 
439 
440 
441 
442 
473 
474 
510 
511 
512 
550 
583 
636 
637 
638 
639 
640 
641 
710 
711 
712 
713 
714 
715 



Riordan, James C 

Ross, John, B. S.| 

Bowe, Jesse, Ph. G.f 

Russell, J ames V 

Russell, Lemuel Baxley, Ph. 1 

Byan, Lawrence 

Sherman, Nehemiah 

Scott, Bobert 

Saunders, James F 

Snyder Isaac 

Sedgwick, VVestel W 

Sweetland, Warren M 

Stone, Reuben 1! 

*Snelling, Josiah B , 

*Spaulding, John \V 

*Stephens, Benj. G 

*Stephenson, Benj. F 

Stewart, Edwin 

Spottswood, E. T 

Svveney, Wm. Wilson 

"Starr, John F 

*Steele, Henry S 

♦Stanley, Josiah 

*Smith, Hiram 

Sears, Beuben 

Swisher. Wm. B 

*Slack, George W 

Seller, Thomas P 

Sudduth, James M 

Smith, Lee 

Shreeves, Thomas J 

Smith, Lafayette H 

Spickler, David Hewitt 

*s]ack, Josiah 

*Somers, Winston 

Snow, C. V 

Smedley. L. D 

Swafford, Benjamin F 

*Steele. E. A 

Slingsby, P. R 

Sheldon. Samuel A 

Smith, C. il 

*Spain, James F 

Stull, Theodore W 

Stephenson, Robt. E 

Skaggs, Lewis H 

Saucerman, John W 

Small, Abram L 

Smith, W. H 

Segworth, H. W 

Scott, William 

Shaffer, Philip 

Schuchard, George W 

Smith. Wm. A 

Still, J. M 

Stillman, J. Dwight 

Swift, John M 



1893-94 
1893-94 
1S93-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1844-45 
1845-46 
1846-47 
1846-47 
1817-48 
1847-48 
1847-48 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1854-55 
1855-56 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1858-59 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1860-61 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
186,3-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 



:: I'eot'.-i.-el. f Deg 



ved before graduating. 



3i9 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



815 
816 
817 
818 
819 
820 
821 
822 
823 
905 
906 
907 
908 
909 
910 
911 
912 
986 
987 
988 
989 
990 
991 
992 
993 
1098 
1099 
1100 
1101 
1102 
1103 
1104 
1105 
1106 
1107 
1108 
1223 
1224 
1225 
1226 
1227 
1228 
1229 
1230 
1231 
1232 
1359 
1JJ60 
1361 
1362 
1363 
1364 
1365 
1366 
1367 
1368 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Shurtleff, Flavel 1864- 

Shepherd, J. L 1864- 

Sherman, Emery, Jr 1864- 

Sniith, Asbury £ 1864- 

Smith, W. H. H 1864- 

Stalil, M. S 1864- 

Stevenson, G. A. J 1864- 

Stratton, D. Hedriek 1864- 

Suiythe, Gonzalo Cordova 1864- 

-Sinitli, E. Maiden 1865- 

Sigworth, M. P 1885- 

Scott, Win. D 1865- 

Scaeppers, D. O 1865- 

Smith, M. F 1865- 

Sulcer, Abram A 1865- 

Sutton, James E 1865- 

Steadman, Charles E 1865- 

Schwan, T. William 1866- 

Stewart, T. Xewton 1866- 

Spooner, Irving R 1866- 

Simpson, John 1866- 

Sellards, David T 1866- 

Strother, Lyman T 1866- 

Secord, James K 1866- 

Sweetland, Xelson L 1866- 

Stelle, Harrison 1866- 

Sharon, Ebert S 1886- 

Spittler, Daniel. .., 1868- 

Scovill, Josiah T 1866- 

Shiption, John W 1866- 

Smith, DeWitt Clinton. 1866- 

Scanland, S. E 1866- 

Seawright, John P j 1866- 

Seeley, Oscar F 1866- 

Shrouts, John F 1866- 

Segur, 1 )ana B 1866 



Smith, Sylvester S 1868- 

Stevvart,'Ceorge W 1868- 

Stannard, Frank D 1868- 

*Schrock, Wm.H 1868 

Shepherd, Alonzo B 1868 

Stevens, Byron N 1868- 

Sovereign, Fred F 1868- 

Sprague, Joshua B 1868- 

Sprague, Charles C ' 1868-69 

Spaulding, Thomas B 1868-69 

Snider, John Wiley 1869-70 

Stewart, Wm. IT . .*. 1869-70 i 

Standlev, Zachary T 1869-70 

Smith, Wm. M. 1869-70 

Sprague, Theophilus i 1869-70 

Stetson, James B 1869-70 

Soule, Henry C ! 1869-70 

Secrest. Conrad 1869-70 

Smith, II. Watson ! 1869-70 

Stewart, John II I 1869-70 



1369 
1370 
1371 
1386 
1461 
1462 
1463 
1464 
1475 
1541 
1542 
1543 
1544 
1545 
1546 
1547 
1548 
1557 
1599 
1600 
1601 
1602 
1603 
1604 
1605 
1606 
1607 
1608 
1609 
1610 
1684 
16S5 
1686 
1687 
1761 
1762 
1763 
1764 
1765 
1766 
1767 
1780 
1844 
69 1M5 
1816 
1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1941) 
1941 
1942 
1943 
11944 



NAMES OK GRADUATES. 



Snyder, Lewis A 

Scott, John T 

Smith, Jacob D 

Stoskof , Louis, M. D., ad eund. t 

Sparks, J. Wilson 

Schlosser, Alfred G. K 

Stebbin, Preston 

Stanton, J. Oliver 

*Schooley, Malilon H.L.,M.D.,ad+ 

Smith, Cyrus 

Smith, Eugene Jackson 

Smith, John Isaac 

Smith, John Alexander 

Smith Oliver Perry 

Standiford, AVm. Francis 

Standlev, James Wallace 

Strong, Albert Bliss 

Schmidt, Ernest, M. D. ad eund.t 

Sloan, Milton Granville 

Sherman, Frederick Emerson.. . 

Shimonek, Frederick 

*Schaef er, Frederick John 

*Smith, Carter Hutchinson 

Stone, John Jerome 

Swaine, George Daniel 

Smith, Everett Russell 

Starr, John Newland 

Slemmons, Daniel Mcintosh 

Stabeck, Kittle T 

Shoemaker, Milton 

Scroggs, Joseph Augustus 

Shumway, Edgar Barber 

Small, Archie Robertson 

Steen, Arthur Henry, Jr 

Schreiber, Gustavus Frank 

Scott, Charles 

Sedgwick, David Ernest 

Seeley, Lewis Cass 

Spear, John Wesley 

Squire, Wm. AVhee'ler 

Steele, Andrew Theodore 

Smith, Prof. Albert, M.D., Hont. 

Skinner, Chauncey M 

Smith, Calvin Knox 

Smith, Eugene 

Smith, Eugene Riley 

Smith, Thomas Albert 

Snyder, Edgar 

Strickler, Benjamin Elias 

Sturges, John Albert, M. D.t.. . . 

Scott, Milo Wakely 

Smith, Horace Woodbridge 

*Stuart, Farquhar 

She.rrick, Oliver Thomas 

Shanahan. Thomas. Patrick 

Sansoni, Joseph Emmet 



1869- - 





1869-" 





1869- 





1869-' 





1870-' 


1 


1870-' 


1 


1870-' 


1 


1870-' 


1 


1870-' 


1 


1871-' 


2 


1871-' 


'2 


1871-' 


'2 


1871- 


"2 


1871-' 


'2 


1871- 


'2 


1871- 


2 


1871- 


'2 


1871- 


"2 


1872- 


3 


1872- 


"3 


1872- 


"3 


1872- 


"8 


1872- 


3 


1872- 


3 


1872- 


3 


1872- 


'3 


1872- 


'3 


1872- 


"3 


1872- 


ra 


1872- 


"3 


1873- 


4 


1873-' 


4 


1873- 


4 


1873- 


4 


1874- 


D 


1874-' 


5 


1874-' 


n 


1874-' 


5 


1874-' 


5 


1874-' 





1S74-' 


n 


1874-' 


a 


1875-' 


6 


1875-' 


6 


1S75-' 


6 


1S75-" 


fi 


1875-" 


6 


1875-" 


6 


1875-' 


6 


1875-' 


6 


1876-' 


7 


1876-' 


7 


18 76-' 


7 


I876-" 


7 


1 876-' 


7 


1877-' 


8 



* Deceased. f Deg 
J Secretary of Ohio 



BUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



II 



2064 

2065 

2066 

2067 

2068 

2069 

2070 

2071 

2072 

2073 

2074 

2075 

2187 

2188 

2189 

2190 

2191 

2192 

2193 

2194 

2195 

2196 

2197 

2198 

2199 

2200 

2201 

220.5 

2339 

2340 

2341 

2342 

2343 

2344 

2345 

2346 

2347 

2348 

2349 

2350 

2351 

2506 

2507 

2508 

2509 

2510 

2511 

2512 

2513 

2514 

2515 

2516 

2517 

2518 

2519 

2520 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Sage, John 15 

Sether, Christian 

Shaw, James Emmet 

*Stretch, Ethan MeAl'erty 

Smolt, Charles Frederick, B.S.'f. 

btuart, George 

Sexton, Albert Germain 

Sherwin, Frank Oliver 

Smith, Wm. Lloyd 

Salisbury, Jerome Henry, A. B.t. 

Scott, James Edwin 

Stiver, Wm. Bike 

Sager, Rockwood 

Sawyer, Ora Owen, B. S.| 

Shinn, Wm. Raymond 

Sheridan, John Campbell 

Shimonek, Anton 

Smith, Courtney L 

Smith, George Lewis 

Smith, Wm. T. Freelinguysen.. . 

Smith, Wm. Peter 

Smiley, Francis Marion 

Sprague, Thomas Jefferson, Jr.. 

Stanton, Theodore Barker 

Strausser, Simon 

Stockman, Ct/>rge Charles, B.S."f. 

Stipp, James Harrison 

Stuart, Charles, M. D.| 

Stadler, Charles Lester 

Smith, Frank Buchanan 

Shunk, Philip D 

Smith, Allen Vinton 

Sugg, John Fitz Herbert 

Synon, George Cassius, B. S.t-- 

Sammons, E. Hudson 

Shaw, Thomas Jefferson 

Somers, George Charles 

Scott, Walter Henderson 

Southard, Eugene Colvin 

Scholl, Albert John 

Smead, Carroll Cassius 

Sattler, Philip 

Saucerman, Martin 

Schaller, George John 

Schwartz, Edwin 

Searles, Frank L 

Seinple, Wm. Finley 

Sensenich, Aaron S 

Shaw, Alfred Jackson 

Shepherd, Carleton Sprague... 

Sherman, John Jethro 

Shipman, Charles Goodrich — 
Simison, John Franklin, A. B.f. 

Smethers, Wm. Henry 

Smith, Elmore Oscar 

Steel, Wm. Wakefield 



1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1877-78 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1878-79 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1879-80 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



2521 

2522 

2523 

2678 

2679 

2680 

26S1 

2682 

2683 

2684 

2685 

2686 

2687 

2688 

2689 

2690 

2691 

2692 

2693 

2694 

26,95 

2696 

2871 

2872 

2873 

2874 

2875 

2876 

2877 

2878 

2879 

2880 

2881 

2882 

2883 

2884 

2885 

2886 

2887 

2888 

3030 

3031 

3032 

3033 

3034 

3035 

3036 

3037 

3038 

3039 

3040 

3041 

3042 

3043 

3044 

3045 



Stewart, David T., M. S.t 

Stoelting, Charles Wm 

Sweney, Clarence Frank, B. S.t 

Sarles, Wilbur Thompson 

Schmitz, John, M. A.t 

Scollard, Wm. Edward 

Sears, Harry B 

Seeber, Frank Dockstader 

Shaw, Siremba, A. B.t 

Sheetz, Charles Rollin 

Shipley, John Lowry 

Slaman, Adolph 

Smith, Charles Adna 

Smith, Francis Salmeron 

Snyder, John Franklin 

Stever, Frederick George 

Stillians, Wm. Clark 

Stoddard. Albert George 

Sturgis, Louis Thompson 

Suloff, Samuel Anghey 

Sutherland, James Lue 

Synon, Wm. Arthur 

Sawbridge, Edward 

Schmeling, Max 

Schoen, August Ferdinand 

Scott, Charles Montgomery 

Scott, DeWitt Clinton 

Scott, Thomas Anderson 

Selby, Roiia Watson 

Shaver, George David 

Shaw, Myron Alexander 

Shotwell, Charles Benjamin 

Sieber, Francis Adam Paul 

Smith, Lester Cameron 

Smith, Mark Barton 

Stack, Stephen Sylvester 

Stahl, Edward Lee 

Stauft'er, Horace Raymond 

Stauffer, Joseph Edwin, M. D.t. 

Stewart, Frank W 

Salisbury, Francis Robert, B.S.| 

Sanders, Charles Willard 

Senier, Frederick S..M.A.,P.A.t 
Scaife, Henry Wilkinson, M.A.t 

Schifferle, Edward 

Schlamer, Henry Newton 

Schmetz, Thomas Nelson 

Shaley, Frederick Wm., A. B.t 

Simms, Stephen Beecher 

Slemmons, Wm. Thomas 

Smith, Charles Spencer 

Smith, Edwin Lorenzo 

Smith, Wm. Henry F 

Snyder, Alfred Fuller 

Spencer, George Franklin, Jr. 
Starkel, Charles Henry .. 



1880-81 

1880-81 

1880-81 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1882-83 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 

1883-84 



* Deceased. + Deg 



nved before graduating. 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



3046 
3U47 
3048 
3049 
3198 
3199 
3200 
3201 
3202 
3203 
3204 
3205 
3206 
3207 
320S 
3209 
3210 
3348 
3349 
3350 
3351 
3352 
3353 
3354 
3355 
3356 
3357 
3386 
3490 
3491 
3492 
3493 
3494 
3495 
3496 
3497 
3498 
3499 
3526 
3634 
3635 
3636 
3637 
3638 
3639 
3640 
3641 
3642 
3643 
3644 
3645 
3646 
3647 
3648 
3772 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Steele, Joseph Turner, M. D.f- 

Stewart, John Cohade 

Stone, Willis Claude 

Strode, Wm. Smith, M. A.|... 

Sayle, Robt. George 

Schaper, Charles 

Schiit'bauer, Robt 

Skinkle, John Newton Dexter 

Schurtz, Clyde D 

Sharp, Charles Arthur 

Sheldon, Horace Ward, A. M.| 

Sherry, John Francis 

Smith, Ambrose Everett, B.S.t 

Smith, Charles Newton 

Smith, Webster Coleman 

Stall, John Jacob, B. S.p 

Swank, Leroy 

Saylor, Alfred L.J 

Schmidt, Rudolph Henry 

Schmitz, Wm. Charles 

Shaw, L. Lloyd 

Shibley , John 

Slack, John W 

Staley, Franklin Henry§ 

Stealy, Allison R 

Stephani, Alfred Henry, B. S.t 

Stoops, Perry Houston 

Sheffield, Daniel A., M. D., Hon.t 

Salisbury, Wm. W 

Sawyers, Sylvester Harlan 

Scollard, John Tarleton 

Scott, Wm. Francis 

Sigworth, Dwight L 

Snow, Harry Edgar, A. B. f 

Snow, Melville Cox 

Stahl, Frank August 

Steenburg, Edmund Arthur 

Steffins, Ignatius David 

Stevens, W. A., M. D., Hon.t. . . . 

Saint Cyr, Emilien Dehaye 

Saltra, Ole Magneson 

Schoenneshoefer, Wm 

Shubert, John Joseph 

Schwandt, Emil Julius 

Seehuns, Ole Martin 

Shambaugh, Levi D 

Sherwood, Francis Roberts 

Sims, Luther Monroe... 

Smith, James Marion, M. D. |. . . 

Smyth, Joseph P 

Stafford, Edward A., A. B.j 

Steele, Corwin James 

Stockwell, John Samuel 

^Strickland. Charles Orlando.B.S.t 
Sanders, John Franklin 



1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 



C ■?. S 



3773 
3774 

3775 
3776 
3777 
3778 
3779 
3780 
3781 
3782 
3783 
3799 
3927 
3928 
3929 
3931) 
3931 
3932 
3933 
3934 
3935 
3936 
3937 
3938 
4101 
4102 
4103 
4104 
4105 
4106 
4107 
4108 
4109 
4110 
4111 
4112 
4113 
4114 
4115 
4116 
4117 
4118 
4119 
4120 
4121 
4122 
4258 
4259 
4261) 
4261 
4262 
4263 
4264 
4265 
4266 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Sherman, Wm. Palmer 

Somes, Joseph Francis 

Snee, Harry Boyd 

Spears, Tunis Robert 

Spining, Charles Lynn 

Stafford, Thomas John 

Stamm, John Charles Anthony. 

Stevenson, George Aitkin 

Stiver, Roland James 

Streeter, Merton Reynolds 

Sutherland John 

Schede, Max, M. D., Hon. t 

Schulz, Ferd. Martin, Ph. G.f. ■ ■ 
Sherman, John Henry, Ph. G.f-- 

Shillito, Frederick, M. D/f 

Silliman, Herbert H., D.D.S/f. . . 

Sippy, Bertram Welton 

Smith, Charles Mortimer 

Sorensen, James Soren 

Stafford, Richard Henry 

Stannard, Frank Drake 

Stevenson, David Wm 

Stone, Ira Gordon 

Swank, Clyde Ware, B. S.f 

Sampson, Frank Ernest 

Sarkisian, Hartune G 

Sayre, Salmon Burdette, M. D.+ . 

Scanlan, Peter Lawrence 

Schmitz, Peter 

Schreuder, Theodore Hagbarth. 

Scott, Charles Clifton 

Shaw, Don Lee 

Shelley, Jacob Froster 

Shreck, John Addison 

Shrodes, George Hamilton 

Skinner, Wm. Wesley 

Smith, Edgar Dennis, Ph. G.f.. . 

Smoot, John Wm 

Snyder, John Calvan 

Squire, Lucius Melander, B. S.|. 

Stafford, Arnold Carroll 

Stewart, Charles Walker 

Stidham, Lewis Wilber, B.S.t. . • 

Stueber, Louis Joseph 

Sullivan, John Walter 

Swenson, Carl Gustaf 

Salvage, Frederick Elisher 

Sandner, Adolph 

Schaper., Herman 

Schiltz, Nicholas Cornelius 

Scott, Wm. Fred 

Seastrand, Axel Elof 

Simmons, Geo. H., L.M., M.D.t.. 

Simpson, Eugene Grant 

Sippy, Asher~Francello 



1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 



c Deceased. f Degree received before graduating'. 

: Surgeon General, Oregon National Guard. 

j .Superintendent County Board of Health, Hamilton Co 



dssioner of Ins: 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



4267 

4268 

4269 

4270 

4271 

4272 

4273 

4274 

4399 

4400 

4401 

4402 

4403 

4404 

4405 

4406 

4407 

4408 

4409 

4561 

4562 

4563 

4564 

4565 

4566 

4567 

4568 

4569 

4570 

4571 

4572 

4573 

4574 

4575 

4576 

4577 

4578 

4579 

72 

129 

130 

131 

167 

168 

207 

317 

398 

399 

475 

513 

514 

515 

551 

552 

584 



Skinner, George Alfred 

Slaymaker, Samuel Robt., B.A.|. 

Smith, Dickerson Alphonse 

Spaulding, Charles Howard 

Stanton, John H 

Stonebraker, Petie Orren 

St. Peter, Moses 

Suleeba, Thomas S 

Sartell, Erasmus Newton, J3. S.f. 

Sayler, Lubin Winfred 

Schembs, Frank H., Ph. G.f 

Selby, Fred Sumner 

Senn, Emanuel John 

Shepard, John Leslie, Jr., B. L.| 

Shurtz, Straut Watson 

Starrett, Elmer Chas., M.S.,M.D.t 

Stroburg, John A 

St. Sure, William O., Ph. G.,f. • • 
Stockert, Charles Fred'k, Ph. G.t 

Sawyers, Clyde E., B. S.| 

Schierding, William Philip 

Schultze, Moritz 

Shaykett, Frank Edward 

Simecek, Joseph 

Skinner, George Coleman 

Smith, D. Edmund, B. A.f 

Sterns, "Willis Leroy 

Sterrett, William Stokes 

Stevens, George Michael 

Stewart, Alexander Frazer 

Stone, Charles Albert 

Strong, Henry Clement, D.D.S.t 

Stulik, Charles 

Surenson, Marshall 

Sutcliff, Wm. T 

Swantek, Charles M 

Swezey, Frank Arthur 

Swennes, Ole Samuel, A. B.f. 

Tucker, James P 

*Thayer, Isaac E 

Todd, John M 

Tuttle, Henry D. C 

Trowbridge, Silas T 

Thome, Arthur M 

Tompkins, Leander D 

Trabue, John W 

Tyler, John H 

*Terrell, J.P 

Taylor, A. B 

Thomas, Edward 

Thompson, James 

Thompson, Vincent S 

Talbot, Edward P 

Tompkins, Charles B 

Ten Broeck, Samuel B 



1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1891-92 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1892-93 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1893-94 

1817-48 

1849-50 

1849-50 

1849-50 

1850-51 

1850-51 

1851-52 

1854-55 

1856-57 

1856-57 

1858-59 

1859-60 

1859-60 

1859-60 

1860-61 

18R0-61 

1861-62 



585 
604 
642 
643 
716 
717 
824 
825 
913 
914 
915 
916 
917 
994 
995 
996 
997 
998 
1109 
1110 
1111 
1112 
1113 
1133 
1233 
1234 
1235 
1250 
1372 
1373 
1374 
1375 
1465 
1466 
1467 
1549 
1550 
1551 
1552 
1611 
1612 
1613 
1688 
1768 
1769 
1770 
1771 
1772 
1852 
1853 
1945 
1916 
1947 
1948 
1949 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Torey, J. Allen 

Taggart, C. J., M. D., Hon.t . . . 

Tompkins, Wm. H 

Tombs, Pembroke R 

Thayer, John W 

Tevis, Joel T. J 

Tronsdale, J. L 

Trueworthy, John W 

True, Charles 

Teal, Norman 

Taggart, J. H 

Tombreken, Henry 

Troy, S. S 

Thompson, Samuel 

Taylor, John J 

Trout, Alexander W 

Tatman, John C 

Tennery, Thomas J 

Thrall, Chas. B 

Thrane, Arthur 

Taylor, George O 

Tattle, John E 

Towne, L. E 

'Ten Brock, John, M. D., Hon.f. . 

Tucker, Albert R 

Thompson, Sylvester 

Tweddale, James 

Tobey, Bobt., M. D., ad eundenrp 

Tyner, Samuel L 

Tope, John W 

Todd, William 

Thompson, J. Austin 

Turner, E. Le Roy 

Thomas, Leverett W 

Taylor, Isaac H 

Taylor, E wing King, McAdoo.. . 

^Tibo, George Haynes 

Thompson, Smith Chapman 

Truax, John Gilbert 

Thompson, John Schnee 

Turner, Reuben Notley 

Thomas, Henry John 

Thorn, Daniel Morrison Benonia 

Taylor, Alexander Douglass 

Thomas, George Thurston 

Thompson, Jared Hall 

Trimmer, John Wm 

Turner, Frederick 

Thieman, August Theodore 

Tillotson, George King 

Tibbits, Myron Arthur 

Taylor, James Lewis 

Thompson, Merritt Walter 

TenBrook, Wm. Hall 

Treacy , Wm . § 



1861-62 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1864-64 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1869-70 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1874-75 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 



* l>euea*ert. + Decree received before graduating. 

i Methodist Clergyman. 

§ Pres. of Montana State Medical Society. Pres. of U. S. Pension Examining Board. 



Surgeon >". P. R. R. and Great Northern R. R. 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



2076 
2203 
2352 
2353 
2354 
2355 
2524 
2525 
2526 
2527 
2528 
2697 
2698 
2699 
2700 
2701 
2702 
2703 
2704 
2705 
2889 
2890 
2891 
2892 
3050 
3051 
3052 
3053 
3054 
3055 
3056 
3211 
3212 
3213 
3214 
3358 
3359 
3360 
3361 
3362 
3363 
3364 
3365 
3366 
3390 
3500 
3501 
3502 
3503 
3504 
3505 
3649 
3650 
3651 
3652 
3653 



NAMES OF GBADUATES. 



Thayer, Carnie Casander, B.D.|. 

Thornton, John H 

Talbot, Eugene S., D. D. S.| 

Turner, George Lytle 

Torrence, Wm. Wilson.} 

Tanner, Ely Judson 

Tabor, Fred S 

Taylor, Floriman James 

Taylor, Wm. Henry, A. B.f 

Tucker, George Walter 

Tyler, DeWitt Clinton 

Tapper, John George 

Taylor, Harvey Scott 

Teal, George Abraham 

Thomas, Homer Merrick 

Thometz, John James, A. B.t-- ■ 
Thompson, Geo. Warren, M. D.| 

Todd, Wilbert Amasa 

Trowbridge, John B., B.C.E.t. . . 
Turvill, Wm. Daniel, A. B.f. . . . 

Talbott, Charles Worth 

Taylor, James Hickman 

Thomas, Austin Hulbert 

Thompson, Perry Commodore. . 

Tasker, Charles Henry 

Terrill, Homer Atwood 

Thiele, Henry Chas., A. B.| 

Thompson, Thomas Willard 

Thorn, John Charles Tremont. . 

Troupe, Amos W., B. S.f 

Tutliill, Jerome Jackson 

Tilmont, Alexander Paul 

Turney, John Parrish 

Tuthill, Daniel Harmon Strong. 

Tyler, Franklin Pierce 

Tea, Roger Sherman, A. B.f 

Terry, Percy E 

Thayer, Henry W., A. B.| 

Thomas, Alonzo S 

Thompson, Walter Nixon 

Tiedeman, Elmer John 

Tinsman, Lewis Lawrence 

Tracy, John Smith, B. S/f 

Trovillion, Edward Boicourt.. . . 
Tuke, Daniel Hack, M.D.,IIon.-f\ 

Tefft, Leslie Eugene 

Thomas, Wm. Burton 

Throckmorton, George King... 

Toms, Frank Dell 

Tope, Wm. Arthur 

Travis, Arthur Levant 

Taylor, Fred Latham 

Taylor, John Dan 

Thomas. Charles Derastus 

Titus, Wm. Henry 

Trask, Howard Payson 



1877-78 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 



37.S4 
3785 
3786 
3939 
4123 
4124 
4275 
4276 
4277 
4278 
4410 
4411 
44 If 
4413 
4414 
4415 
4580 
4581 
45S2 
4583 
4584 
4585 
4586 
4587 
400 
476 
516 
999 
1236 
3057 
3215 
3940 
4416 
4417 
169 
208 
318 
319 
320 
401 
826 
827 
918 
1000 
1C01 
1002 
1131 
1553 
1854 
1950 
1951 
2204 
2356 
2357 
2529 
2530 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Traverse, Alfred Wilbur 

Tyler, Harvey Ainsworth 

Tyler, Wm. Ryan 

Taylor, Edward Alexander 

Thexton, Louis 

Tull, Frank Edward 

Thompson. Ora Lincoln, M.D.|. 

Tillier, Sigurd, A.B., D.V.S.t.. 

Trook, Edwin Membrance 

Trux, Lewis Becknell 

Taylor, John D., M.D/f 

Thayer, Edward J 

Tinen, Edward Harpld 

Trade, Francis Mitchell 

Turner, Frank 

Tuttle, Schuyler Simpson 

Taylor, John Lincoln, Ph.G.| . . 

Thompson, Harry F 

Thompson, Noah Howard 

Thompson, "Wm. Lincoln, B.S.| 

Tibby, Thomas Gordon 

Tice, Frederick 

Tompach, Emil Leonard 

Truman, George A ... 

Urmston, Stephen L 

Underwood, Myron 

*Underwood, J. S 

Upton, Henry B 

Underwood, Wm. L 

Uhls, Lyman L 

Umberhine, Charles Dexter. . . . 

Utley, John Darwin 

Ullerick, Charles Ambrose 

Unseth, Mangus Andrew, A.B.f 

Van Doren, Cornelius R 

Van Fossen, Ezra 

* Van Meter, Henry 

Van Nuys, Wm 

*Van Winkle, Hiram J 

Vermillion, Wm. F 

Van Buren, Henry 

VanZant, G. W 

Van Vorhis, F. J 

Veatch, W. Hendrix 

Van Buren, Evart, Jr 

Van Cowan, Joseph 

Van Dyke, Joseph, M.D., Hon.f. 

Valiquet, T. Louis Archibald. . . 

Venn, Charles Henry 

Van Pelt, Ryan T 

Voorus, Clark Wesley 

Verity, Wm. Porter 

Van Dyke, Milton 

Vilas, Walter Nathaniel ,. 

Vandervort. Franklin Cady 

Vincent, Wm. Alonzo ' 



1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1856-57 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1866-67 
1868-69 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1889-90 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1850-51 
1851-52 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1854-55 
1856-57 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1867-68 
1871-72 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1878-79 
1879-80 
1879^80 
1880-81 
1S80-81 



i Teheran, Ten 



3 2 4 



BUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



2706 

2707 

28'J3 

2894 

281)5 

3216 

3367 

3506 

3507 

3508 

3525 

3654 

3941 

4125 

4126 

4127 

4279 

4418 

4419 

4588 

4589 

3 

24 

73 

74 

75 

92 

93 

94 

132 

133 

134 

135 

136 

137 

140 

170 

171 

209 

210 

240 

241 

242 

243 

278 

279 

280 

281 

321 

322 

363 

364 

365 

402 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Von Schrader, Charles 

Toorhis, Charles Harrah 

Van Patten, Edwin Hugh,Ph.M.| 

Van Valkenberg, Edward P., Jr. 

Van Zandt, Garret, B.S.t 

Van Werden, Wm 

Van Metre, Edward Joseph 

Van Beeck, Henry Gregory Chas 

Vance, Frederick Elmer 

Venn, Clement 

Van Horn, A. K., M. IX, Hon.t. 

Vaughan, Phillips Carey 

Vroom, John Nicholl, M. D.t- • ■ 

Van Dnzen, Erancis Henrv 

Vernay, Charles Edw., D.D.S/f. . 

Vreeland, Henry Edgar 

Vesterborg, Peder II 

Van Derslice, James Warren.. . . 

Voorheis, Charles Henry 

Vasumpaur, Joseph, Ph. G.| 

Vonrehm, Edmund C 

Whipple, T. P., M. D., Hon. f- ■• . 

Welch, Wm. W 

Ware, Charles 

Warner, C. (I 

Warren, Luke W 

W arren, John H 

Weeks, Jerome E 

Wells, Wm. H 

*Walker, James P 

* Wasson, Harmon 

Wheeler, George S 

Whitmire, Zechania H 

Wilkins, Thomas 

Woodbury Wm. W. R $ 

Whitmire. J.S.,M.D.,ad eundem+ 

Wright, Edwin 

Walker, John 

Willard, Edwin R 

Woodworth, John 1) 

Wheaton, J. B 

Whittlesey, S. H 

Wilson, R. Q 

Whitinger, Daniel 

j Watson, Charles D 

Watson, Wm 

Wood.Enos P 

Whitmire, David 

Wiley, Martin 

Wenger, Elias 

Williamson, Joseph M 

Wardner, Horace. A. M.t. . . . 

Wenton, Robert § 

Wilson, Benjamin 



1881-82 
1881-82 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1891-92 
1892-P3 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1843-44 
1815-16 
1847-48 
1847-48 
1847-48 
1848^9 
1848-49 
1848-49 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1849-50 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1851-52 
1851-52 
1852-53 
18>2-53 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1853-54 
1 S54-55 
1854-55 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1855-56 
1856-57 



403 
4U4 
405 
406 
407 
408 
443 
444 
445 
446 
477 
478 
479 
480 
517 
518 
553 
554 
586 
587 
588 
589 
644 
645 
646 
718 
719 
720 
721 
722 
723 
724 
725 
726 
728 
828 
829 
830 
831 
832 
837 
919 
920 
921 
922 
923 
924 
925 
926 
927 
1114 
1115 
1116 
1117 



NAMES OF GRADUATES 



White, Benjamin F 

Wardner, P. J 

Wilkinson, George W 

Wilcox, Edward A 

Woodward, Benjamin 

White, Francis AV 

Wright, Owen 

Webster, J. R 

Wilson, J. B 

Winston, Thomas 

Welling, E. Livingston 

* Williams, R. F 

Wiley, J. H 

Williams, J. F .. .' 

Wiles, Wm. V 

: Wheeler, Calvin. Hon.t 

Washburn, Israel B 

Walker, O. G 

Whipple, Alfred H 

Wren, D. Bishop 

Ward, John A 

Winston, Egbert II 

Williams, John L 

Wilson, Wm. T 

'Williams, James A 

Waterhouse, Marvin 

West, John M 

Welsh, Wm. F 

Williams, J. A 

Watkins, James M 

Winch, G. D 

Wilson, Samuel 

White, Charles A 

Wood, Orlando S 

White Chas., M.D., ad eundemt. 

Wild, Theodore 

Wilson, Joseph II 

Withers, Horatio 15 

Worsley, George 

Wright, O. P. B 

Wright, N. D.. M.D. ad eundemt 

Wilson, John T 

Walston. Robt, L 

Winzenreid, Charles J 

Wolfe, L. O. P 

Watson, Francis W 

Wilson, George A 

Wetmore, R. B 

Witherspoone, M. V. B.t 

Willing, A.J 

Wood, W. Alf onzo 

Woods, D. Lindley 

Wheeler, Matthias S 

Wakely, Thomas Audley 



1 856-5-? 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1856-57 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1858-59 
1858-59 
1858-59 
1858-59 
1859-60 
1859-60 
1860-61 
1860-61 
1861-62 
1861-62 
1861-62 
1861-62 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1863-64 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1861-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1865-66 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-68 
1867-6& 



t Degn 



ved before graduating. 



* Deceased. 

t Druggist. 

§ Surgeon 12th Illinois Infantry in 1861. Surgeon U. S. Volunteers. 1862. Member Illinois State Board _>t Health anil President 
two years. Superintendent Illinois Southern Hospital for Insane. Demonstrator of Anatomy in Chicago Medical College. Chief 
Medical Officer at St. Mary's Infirmary at Cairo, Illinois. Pension Examine 1 at Cairo. 



325 



40 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



1118 
1119 
1120 
1121 
1122 
1123 
1134 
1237 
1238 
1239 
1240 
1241 
1242 
1243 
1244 
1245 
1376 
1377 
1378 
1379 
1380 
1381 
1382 
1468 
1469 
1470 
1471 
1554 
1555 
1556 
1614 
1615 
1616 
1617 
1618 
1619 
1689 
1690 
1691 
1692 
1693 
1694 
1696 
1698 
1773 
1774 
1775 
1776 
1777 
1778 
1855 
1856 
1952 
1953 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Wheaton, Charles A 

Wigginton, Richard M 

Wycoff, Hiram G 

Winslow, Rush 

Wakefield, James I 

Warworth, Henry Joseph . . . 
Woodward, J. J..M.D., Hon.f 

Wirt, Wm. H 

Walker, Geo. H 

White, Solon C 

Will, Otto B 

Webster, Basil M 

Williamson, George 

Williamson, John 

Wadsworth, Frank S 

Whitley, John L 

Waldon, Delinso A 

Webster, John C 

Waite, John C , 

Woodworth, Leonard P 

Wilcox, Charles A 

Wilgus, Albert 

Weed, Gideon A 

Williams, W. W 

White, Charles A 

White, John A 

Wood, Fred B 

Way, Spencer Joseph 

Wells, Robert Williamson 

Wiggins, Orville Briggs 

Walker, John Godfrey 

Walker, John Tilgham 

Wellner, George Christian J. . . 

Weston, Edward Burbank 

Winter, Henry Abbott 

Wood, Marshall William 

Wait, Edson Reuben 

Walker, Lewis Franklin 

Wernham, Spencer Cone 

Whitley. James Delaforet 

Wiley, Thomas Royston 

Wright, Arthur Lee 

Wiley, Constantine 

Wilcox, E. A., M. D., Hoivj-. . . 

Watson, William Harrah 

Weidner, Samuel S 

Wheeland, Grier William 

Wheeler, Arthur LeRoy 

Wilkie, Frederick John 

Williams, Lucas Richard 

Warren, Clark Rienzi 

Williams, Robert R 

Willis, Charles Myron 

Wells, Clarence Scott 



1867 
1867 
1867 
1867 
1867 
1867 
1867 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1869 
1869- 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1870- 
1870- 
1870 
1870 
1871 
1871- 
1871 
1872 
1872- 
1872 
1872- 
1872- 
1872- 
1873- 
1873- 
1873- 
1873- 
1873- 
1873- 
1873- 
1873- 
1874- 
1874- 
1874- 
1874- 
1874- 
1874- 
1875- 
1875- 
1876- 
1876- 



1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
2077 
2078 
2079 
2080 
2081 
2(182 
2083 
2084 
20X5 
2086 
2087 
2205 
2206 
2207 
2208 
2209 
2210 
2211 
2212 
2213 
2358 
2359 
2360 
2361 
2362 
2363 
2531 
2532 
2533 
2534 
2535 
2536 
2537 
2538 
2539 
2708 
2709 
2710 
2711 
2712 
2713 
2714 
2715 
2716 
2717 
2718 
19 
2726 
2896 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Wylie, Winf red 

Washburne, William Henry 

Whitmire, Joel Wallace 

Williamson, Robert Henry 

Wilson, William Dean 

Webb, Benjamin Oliver 

Wheelright, William Simmons.. 

Wheeler, Edward New by 

Wear, Isaac Newton 

Watson, Collin Christopher 

Weens, Elwood 

Woodbridge, Windsor Pelton. . . 
Wadhams, Frederick Eugene.. . 

Whitney, Eugene Wolcott 

Wolfe, Albert Polk 

Walker, William Philander 

Wakefield, Solon Roberson 

Wallace, James 

Weir, Francis AlbinJ 

Wellcome, Florado H eraser 

Werner, Frederick Chas, Ph. G.| 

Wilson, Herman L., M. D.t 

Worthington, David Henry 

Woodard, Frank Reuben 

Wright, Charles Douglas 

Woodcock, Albert John 

Worley, Henry V 

Woods, Peter N., M. D.| 

Waters, Lisle Cummin 

Wall, Harmon Jackson 

Waggoner, Don Morrison 

Webb, Theron Ellis 

West. Benj. Franklin 

Wheeler, Wm. George 

Whitley, Frank Edmund, B.S.f. 

Whitney, Walter Eugene 

Winters, Harrison Allison 

Wolter, Herman Alvin 

Woodbridge, Ward 

Wahl, George Franklin 

Walker, Wm. Abel, B. A.| 

Waugh, Thomas 

Webster, Monroe W., B. S.| 

Wernigk, Reinhard 

Wickersham, Lewis Llewellyn. . 

Wilcox, George Gordon 

Williamson, Peter Elmore 

Wilson, James Meredith, Ph.B.t 

Wilson, John 

Winslow, Charles Edward 

Wright, Francis Dirvage 

Wright, John Calvin. . .". 

Waller, John Duke 

Waynick, Ira Watt 



1876-77 
1876-77 



1876-' 
1876-' 



187 

1877-7 
77- 



1878- ' 
1878-' 
1878-' 
1878-' 
1878-' 
1878- 1 
1878-' 
1878-' 



1879-80 
1879-80 
79-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 
1879-80 



1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
-81 

18S0- 

1880-S1 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1881-82 

1882-83 

1882-83 



t Degree received before graduating 

j Secretary Board of Examining- Surgeons, Wabasha, Minn. Health Officer, "Wabasha, Minn. First Assistant Surgeon, 3rd Teg 
Miii^.. National Guard. County Physician, Wabasha County, Minn. 

§ President Yellow Medicine Co. Bank, Granite Falls. Vice-President Citizens State Bank, Montevideo. Minn. President State 
Bank, Appleton, Minn. 



;26 



RUSH MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Webb, Dyer Drayton 

Wescott, Cassius Douglas 

White, James Edgar 

Whiting, Marcus 

Whitney, Jay Philon 

Wiley, Frank Sabin 

Williams, George Stevens 

Williams, John 

Wintermute, James Stinson. . . 

Wood, John Borden 

Woods, Harry Eugene, A. B.t 
Wardner, Morton Smith, A. M.|. 

Walker, Charles Ira 

Walker, John Warren 

Warner, Abraham Lincoln 

Was, Edward 

Watson, Edward 

Watt, Benjamin Nichols 

Webb, Wilbur 8 

AVeiper, Henry Bernhardt 

Weld, Frederick Jesse 

West, Paul 

AVesterby, Benedict Jones 

AVhiteside, John Wyman 

Williams, Henry Percy, 15. A.f.. 
Weinermark, Arvid H., Ph. G-t 

Winer, John King 

Walker, Charles Edward 

Walker, Samuel Alfred 

Waterhouse, Charles Herbert... 

Waterous, Harry Willard 

Whitmire, Clarence L., B. S.|. • • 

Willey, Ansel Fayette 

Wilson, Horace Lyman 

Wright, Frank Romaine 

AValdsehmidt, Chas. H., Ph. G.|. 

Walker, Winfield Scott 

Welch, Wm. Edward 

Wells, George M., M.D.ft 

Wells, George Revelo 

Wernich, Paul Albert 

Wheel wright, Daniel Winfield.. 
Whiteiield, George W., D.D.S.t-. 

Whitsler, Will Henry 

Wilcox, Frederick Wallace 

Williams, Wm. Harrison 

Williamson, Fines Arthur 

Witherstine, Horace H 

Wright, Charles Lindsey 

Wyant, Otis Blair 

Walsh, John Edward 

Walsh, Thomas Gregory 

Ward, Charles VVm 

Warne, Rodell Curtis 

Was, Louis 

Waterman, Wallace Marsh 



1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-82 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1883-81 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1883-84 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884^5 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-8fi 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-36 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 



3515 

3516 

3517 

3518 

3519 

352U 

3521 

3522 

3655 

3656 

3657 

365y 

3659 

3660 

37S7 

37SS 

3TSU 

37'JU 

37111 

3792 

3793 

3794 

3795 

3796 

379 

3798 

3801 

3942 

3943 

3944 

3945 

3946 

3947 

3948 

3949 

3950 

3951 

3952 

3953 

3954 

3955 

3956 

3957 

395X 

3959 

3960 

4128 

4129 

4130 

4131 

4132 

4133 

4134 

4135 

4136 

4137 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Webster, Ardell Henry 

Welty, Barney 

Wickham, Iiobt 

Williams, Wm. Johnston 

Wilson, Edward Newton 

AVindett, Robt. Alfred 

Worthington, Harry C 

Wright, Charles Lytton 

Werner, Henry 

Wieland, Frank W 

"Wilcox, Collin Henley 

Wiley, Frank Angelo 

Wittman, Adolph Reinhardt. . . 

Wittwer, Hermann Robt 

Wadsworth, Henry P.,D.D.S.t. 

Walker, Hugh Thomas 

Wall, George 

Watson, James Robt 

Weaver, George Howett 

AVentworth, AVill AV., A. B.|. . . . 
AVernicke, Oscar G., Ph. G/f... 

AVest, Edward Albert 

AVilcox, W m. Le Roy 

AVilliams, AVm. E 

AVinn, Chester Arthur 

AVoods, Royal 

AVilliams, Lewis Benj 

AValker, Frederick Wm 

AValsh, Matthew AA T elby 

AVells, AVinfield Scott 

AVest, Stephen Gano, Jr 

AVhalin, Oscar D., Ph. G.| 

AVTiite, Anthony, M.D.f 

Whitmire, AVm. Lincoln 

AA'hitmire, Zachariah L., B.S.t • 

AVick, AVm. John 

AVidener. AVilliam Elmer 

AVilcox, Franklin Trumbull 

AVilson, David Dill 

AVilson, Lorenzo Shepherd 

AVinship, John Lorimer 

AAlsteim, Joseph Leopold 

AVolf e, Joseph Greenberry 

AVood, Nathan News, M. D.f . . . 

AVooding, Benj. Franklin 

AVright, Arthur Octavius, Ph.G.t 

AVade, Charles Albert 

AValsh, Edward Joseph, M. D.|. 

AVarloe, Thomas, A. B.f 

AVebster, Fred Elmer 

Weinlander, John 

AVells, Jacob AVilliam 

AVeston, Burton French 

AVhalin, Chas. Joseph, M.'A.f.. . 

AVhitney, AVilliam E 

AVilber, Charles AVesley 



1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1888-^9 
1888-89 
1888-89 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 
1890-91 



t Degree received before graduating. 
$ Assistant Surgeon, U. S. Army. 



3*7 



SEVENTEENTH TRIENNIAL CATALOGUE 



4138 
4280 
4281 
4282 
4283 
4420 
4421 
4422 
4423 
4424 
4425 
4426 
4427 
4428 
4429 
4430 
4431 
4432 
4433 
4434 
4435 
4436 
4437 
4590 
4591 
4592 
4593 
4594 
4595 
4596 
4597 
4598 
4599 
4600 
4601 
4602 
211 



NAMES OF GRADUATES. 



Wiser, Frank Clayton 

Walters, Cassius M. Clay 

Warder, William Henry 

Weeks, Leonard Case 

Winnaid, Norton E., M.S..M.D.J 

Wallace, James D 

Walston, Edwin Brainard 

Wanner, William B 

Ward,JohnM 

Watson, Frederick John, A. B.| 

Watts, Roderic F., B. L.| 

Weaver, Benjamin Franklin.. 

Weil, Albert, Ph. G.| 

Whise, Melchior, M. D.f 

Wiborg, Hans Bastian, D. D. S.t 

Wikoff, Clarence P., Ph. G.f. . . 

Williams, Thomas John 

Wilson, James A. H., B. S.f. ■ • 

Winhigler, Edward Sutherland 

Wisner, Charles Field 

AVoltze, John, Ph. G.f 

Wormley, Guy Juclson 

AVrigkt, Oscar Kiley 

AVaiss, George Christian 

Walker, Robert John 

AVard, Nathaniel Parker 

AVarnskius, Edw r ard John II . . . 

AVebb, Edward L., M. D.| 

AVeston, Frank Reuel 

Whitney, Charles R„ B. S.f. . . . 

AViedemann, Frank Edward . . . 

Willet, Harry Cushman 

AVilliams, John Charles 

AA r indmueller, Emil 

AVipf , Andreas Albert 

*AA r yckoff, Edwin Lewis 

*Youmans, Jeremiah 



1890-91 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1891-92 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1892-93 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1893-94 
1851-52 



£° i 






~ i z 




Year of 


o£z 


NAMES OF GRADUATES. 


Gradua- 


244 


Young, Arthur 


1852-53 


245 


Young, Win. M 


1852-53 


282 




1853-54 


409 


*York, J. AV..M.D., adeundem.t 


1856-57 


447 


York, Eli 


1857-58 


727 


Yerkes, Titus P 


1863-64 


833 




1864-65 


1124 


Yount, Thomas J 


1867-68 


1472 


Y oung, Ephraim B 


1870-71 


1695 


*Young, Bvrd Sidney 


1873-74 


1857 


Young, John Brand 


1875-76 


2088 




1877-78 


2214 


Youngstedt, .Magnus 


1878-79 


2720 


Young, Orson Yanness 


1881-82 


2721 


Younglove, Frank AA'ard 


1881-82 


3074 


Young, Douglas Burtis 


1883-84 


3225 


Yaeger, George Augustus 


1881-85 


3226 


Yorke, Frederick Henry J 


1884-85 


3383 


Youngquist, Orrin Godfrey 


1885-86 


3661 


Yates, George Frederick 


18S7-88 


36,62 


Yohe, Alfred Franklin 


1887-88 


3961 


Youmans, Laurel Elmer, Ph.G.t 


1889-90 


4139 


Yockey, Av"m. Martin 


1890-91 


4140 


Youmans, Frederick AA r m 


1890-91 


4141 




1890-91 


4«S4 


Youngquist, Otis E 


1891-92 


4438 


Yount, Joseph Sterling 


1892-93 


4603 


Young, Albert Frederick 


1893-94 


138 




1849-50 


647 


Zahn, John 


1862-63 


1958 


Zuppann, Charles 


1876-77 


2722 


Ziegler, Edward John 


1881-82 


3075 


Zeein, Thomas, M. A.t 


1883-84 


3384 


Zilman. Augustus AVm 


1885-86 


3385 
4142 




1885-86 




1890-91 


4439 




1892-93 



* Deceased. t Decree received before graduating. 
± Assistant State Zoologist, U. of Minn. 
£ Kuilroad Contractor. 



!28 



Members '95 



Abbott, E. H Elgin, 111. 

Adkinson, R. C Jefferson, [a. 

Allen, E. S Omro, Wis. 

Allenburger, C. A. . . . Friend, Neb. 

Ammerman, D. A Reed City, Mich. 

AMMESON, P. B La Crosse, Wis. 

Arnold, B. A Chicago, 111. 

Arnold, W. D Chicago, 111. 

Anderson, E. M Fergus Falls, Minn. 

Arent, A Ft. Dodge, la. 

Ball, T. Z Waveland, Ind. 

Bartholomew, H. B. . . Clark, Penn. 

Baum.E. W Phcenix, Ariz. 

Beaghler, P. C Middlepoint, O. 

Bellinger, W. H Momence, 111. 

Bellwood, W. S. .... Abingdon, 111. 

Berkley, A. L Newman, 111. 

Bertling, A. E La Crosse, Wis. 

Bettelheim, B. T. ... Brookfield, Mo. 

Beyer, C. H Milwaukee, Wis. 

Blanchard, A. C Mazomanie, Wis. 

Bolsta, C Ortonville, Minn. 

Boon, W. M Chetopo, Kas. 

Boshell, H. N Melvin, 111. 

Bowers, G. W Oshkosh, Wis. 

Brauer, R. S San Francisco, Cal. 

Brunner, F. T Quincy, 111. 

Burr, F. K Iowa City, la. 

Calvin, W. D Bryan, O. 

Carney', C. E Logansport, Ind. 

Carpenter, W. E Baileyville, 111. 

Cavanaugh, D. C Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Clarke, W. C Momence, 111. 

Cole, L. S Monmouth, 111. 

Coyle, J. D Trenton, Mo. 

Craig, R. W Wichita, Kas. 

Crosby, W. S Mt. Grove, Mo. 

Crowe, T. S London, Eng. 

Cruse, Edw Iron Mt., Mich. 

Czolbe, E. H Chicago, 111. 

Daly, J. N Nora, 111. 

Dedlow, P Chicago, 111. 

Dennison, A. E Kankakee, 111. 

Desmond, T. F Ackley, la. 

De Vries, J. D Dreuthe, Mich. 

3 2 9 



^be flbvesb^terian Dospital 
of tbe Git£ of Chicago 



Cor. Wood and Congress Streets 




. . Httenbing Staff . . 

Physicians. 

H. M. LYMAN, M. D. JOHN A. ROBISON, M. D. NORMAN BRIDGE, M. D. 

Assistant Physician. 

J. B. HERRICK, M. D. 

Surgeons. 

D. VV. GRAHAM, M. D. NICHOLAS SENN, M. D. 

J. B. HAMILTON, M. D. ARTHUR T. BEVAN, M. D. 

Gynecologists. 

JAMES H. ETHERIDGE, M. D. DANIEL T. NELSON, M. D. 

HENRY P. MERRIMAN, M. D. H. B. STEHMAN, M. D. 

Physicians for Diseases of Children and Accoucheurs. 

DE LASKIE MILLER, M. D. A. C. COTTON, M. D. 

Dermatologists. 

J. NEVINS HYDE, M. D. R. D. MACARTHUR, M. D. 

Oculists and Aurists. 

E. L. HOLMES, M. D. LYMAN WARE, M. D. 

Physicians for Throat Diseases. 

JOHN A. ROBISON, M. D. E. FLETCHER INGALS, M. D. 



For information respecting the admission of patients, etc., address 



lb. 3S. Stebman, flD. H>. 

Medical Superintendent. 



330 



Doane, P. P. S Oak Park, 111. 

Doherty, W. T Belleville, Kas. 

Dolman. J. W Topeka, Kas. 

Donlon, S. E Elkader, la. 

Durkee, R. W Muscatine, la. 

Dwyer, H. R West Union, la. 

Earel, J. W Abingdon, 111. 

Eckhardt, P Edgington, 111. 

Engels, E. C Chicago, 111. 

English, E. C Danville, 111. 

Englund, H. J Cambridge, Minn. 

Ezekiel, S. V Asia Minor. 

Field, A. E Piano, 111. 

Fitzgerrald, J. J Oconomowoc, Wis. 

Fleck, J. L Brodhead, Wis. 

Fleet, C Somers, Wis. 

Fox, P. A Stoughton, Wis. 

Frazier, F. R Alva, Oklahoma Ter 

Freyberg, F. W Green Bush, Wis. 

Fuldner, L Milwaukee, Wis. 

Fuqua, J. W Onarga, 111. 

George, Jos Oroomiah, Persia. 

Gilmore, G. H Weeping Water, Neb 

Goldsbury, P. W Minneapolis, Minn. 

Gray, H. H Chicago, 111. 

Gray, R. E Garden City, Kas. 

Grounerud, A Beaver Falls, Minn. 

GROUNERUD, P Beaver Falls, Minn. 

Gsell, J. T Olathe, Kas. 

Guergiz, S. K Oroomiah, Persia. 

Haines, J. H Grinnell, la. 

Hamilton, J. M Richland Center, Wis. 

Hansen, H. A Fulton, 111. 

Harding, J. C Hudson, Wis. 

Harrison, A. M Hervins Prairie, III. 

Hatheway, E. P Ottawa, 111. 

Hayman, C. S Boscobel, Wis. 

Heckman, I.J Chicago, 111. 

Heinen, J. P Ambia, Ind. 

Henkins, J. S* Putnam, 111. 

Henley, L. C Mattoon, 111. 

Hensel, E. A Alexandria, Minn. 

Hess, J. M Hellick, 111. 

Hetherington, J. E. . . St. Johns, New Brunswick. 

Hill, H. B Bloomingdale, Ind. 

Honan, J. N Delphi, Ind. 

HOOD, E. M Mason City, 111. 

Hooper, E. S Darlington, Wis. 

Hollenbeck, F. D. ... Sheldon, la. 

Holbrook, A. T Milwaukee, Wis. 

Houston, F. R Centralia, Wis. 

Huizenga, F Rock Valley, la. 

* Deceased. 

331 



Zhe fl>ost>(5rabuate flfcefcical School 
of Chicago- 

A school for practitioners of medicine and surgery. Teaching exclusively clinical. 
Abundance of material. Large hospital in school building. 

faculty: 

General Medicine — Profs. Robert H. Babcock, J. A. Robison, H. H. W. Gentiles, 

W. F. Waugh, Charles W. Purdy, Frank X. Walls. 
Surgery — Profs. Weller Van Hook, J. B. Murphy, D. A. K. Steele, L. L. McArthur, 

W. P. Verity, Hugh Ferguson, Carl Beck. 
Orthopedic Surgery — Prof. Frederic S. Coolidge. 
Gynecology — Profs. H. T. Byford, H. P. Xewman, Fred Byron Robinson, Albert 

Goldspohn, Marie J. Mergler, Franklin H. Martin. 
Stomach and Intestines — Prof/Fenton B. Turck. 
Obstetrics — Prof. W. W. Jaggard. 

Eye — Profs. W. F. Coleman, Boerne Bettman, Casey A. Wood, Frances Dickinson. 
Ear — Profs. Xorval H. Pierce, Seth Scott Bishop. 

Nose and Throat — Profs. T. Melville Hardie, F. D. Owsley, George Morgenthau. 
Nervous Diseases — Profs. D. R. Brower,, Sanger Brown, Sydney Kuh, Richard 

Dewey. 
Genito-Urinarv — Prof. D.J. Hayes, of Milwaukee, Wis. 
Diseases of Rectum — Prof. Joseph B. Bacon. 
Diseases of Children — Profs. Rosa Engelmann, J. C. Cook. 
Pathology — Prof. W. E. Coates Jr. 
Skin and Venereal Diseases — Prof. W. L. Baum. 
Urinary Analysis — Prof. Arthur R. Tallcott.- 

Send for latest Bulletin of Information to FRANKLIN H. MARTIN, M. D., SeC. 

819 W. HARRISON ST. 



McKAY LIVERY COMPANY 

OGDEN AVE. and ROBEY ST. 
TELEPHONE, WEST 758. 




Carriages 
Broughams 
Coupes aub 
Xigbt Xiver^ 



¥ ¥ 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO BOARDERS. 

PROMPT ATTENTION DAY OR NIGHT. 
SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 

332 



Hutchings, W. V Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Hyslop, F. R Chester, Minn. 

Jack, J. B Peru, Neb. 

Jahn, C. H Thiensville, Wis. 

Jefferson, F. A Madison, Wis. 

Kaadt, P. L Clinton, la. 

Kettelstrings, F. W. . Oak Park, 111. 

King, E. A Fairchild, Wis. 

King, C. W Springfield, 111. 

Kinyon, E. L Chicago, 111. 

Kitson, F. S North Manchester, Ind. 

Kohler, J. L Dwight, 111. 

Kramps, A. E. F Belgrade, Minn. 

Krause, A Moscow, Russia, 

Lane, A Chicago, 111. 

Lang, J Spokane, Wash. 

Leaming, L Romney, Ind. 

Layton, O. M Chicago, 111. 

Lewis, H. L Oxford, Kas. 

Lewis, W. H Bloomington, Wis. 

Lind, E. F Chicago, 111. 

Lumley, Robt Chicago, 111. 

Macdonald, J. H Chicago, III. 

Malingren, C. V Ishpeming, Mich. 

Martin, J. V Melmore, O. 

Martin, R. S San Francisco, Cal. 

Mayerowitz, L Chicago, 111. 

McBride, W. F Dayton, Ind. 

McCaughan, T. E. ... Olathe. Kas. 

McDaniel, J. W Plymouth, 111. 

McEntire, E. J Reynolds, III. 

McGrath, W. J Argyle, Wis. 

McKelvey, J. D Alexis, 111. 

McKenny, D. W Madison, Wis. 

McKinney, J. A Barry, 111. 

McLain, W. H Wheeling, W. Va. 

McNab, M. D Chicago, 111. 

Meiklejohn, D. V. . . .. Waupun, Wis. 

Meling, W. C Chicago, 111. 

Menefee, W. N State Line City, Ind. 

Minnick, E. M Kewanee, 111. 

Montgomery, C. L. . . . Grove City, 111. 

Moore, C. E Waveland, Ind. 

Moore, N. M Chicago, 111. 

Moorhead, J. J Terre Haute, Ind. 

Mukhitarian, A Asia Minor. 

Mulford, E. R Chicago, 111. 

Mullins, N. S Atlantic, la. 

Murphy', C. C Portage, Wis. 

Norton, A. C Blair, Neb. 

Noies, G. K Milwaukee, Wis. 

Opitz, R. B Chicago, 111. 



prominent * » 
ptypsicians * 



prescribe it for 



RHEUMATISM 

RHEUMATIC GOUT 

NEURALGIA 

INDIGESTION 

LITHIC and URIC ACID 

DIATHESIS 



Call and test it free of charge 
The strongest natural Lithia 
Water known: 14.18 grains 
in each Gallon . . — • — % 



©eneva Xitbia /HMneral Mater 



DEPOT $2 RANDOLPH STREET 



Telephone Main 566 



Celepbene ixxcst 205 



S. A. MOFFETT CO. 

Livery 

and Boarding 

Stables 

160=164 Ogden Avenue, 
CHICAGO. 



Finest line of Carriages and Broughams on 
the West side, with Full Liveried Drivers. 

The very best facilities for Horse Boarding 
at moderate charges. 



...Telephone West 114... 

S. A. MOFFETT 

IfuneraL.. 
^Director 
Embalmer 



anfc 



625-627 West Lake Street, 

(CORNER PAULINA ST.) 

■< CHICAGO. 

Largest Establishment on the West Side. 

PERSONAL ATTENTION DAY AND 
. . .NIGHT. . . 



334 



Ormsby, O. S Logan, Utah. 

Ottis, D. M Humphrey, Neb. 

Packard, T. S Benzonia, Mich. 

Parmeter, R. L Albion, Mich. 

Parrish, M. P Fairmount, 111. 

Pattee, J. J Lowell, Ind. 

Pattengill, M Oconee, 111. 

Peck, E. B Wall Lake, la. 

Peirson, H. F Grand Meadow, Minn. 

Pfister, R. H Milwaukee, Wis. 

Philles, L. F Wayne, Neb. 

Pierce, F. S Utica, Mich. 

Pollock, M. D Rocky Ford, Colo. 

Pollock, R. M Rocky Ford, Colo. 

Porter, J. E Brookville, 111. 

Prencel, J. E Chicago, 111. 

Price, W. J Peoria, 111. 

Quinn, W. E Milwaukee, Wis. 

Quirk, F. J Chicago, 111. 

Raasoch, H Chicago, 111. 

Replogle, H. M Centerville, la. 

Reynolds, W. T Nelson, Neb. 

Riley, J. A Chicago, 111. 

Robe, R. C Chicago, 111. 

Robertson, E Ft. Dodge, la. 

Robinson, W. B Chicago, 111. 

Rogers, A. W Chicago, 111. 

Rohrabaugh, E. E. . . . Delphi, Ind. 

Roseberry, E. C Stella, Mo. 

Ryan, G. N Colfax, la. 

Ryan, W. S Chillicothe, Mo. 

Sargent, C. E Seyborn, Wis. 

Schoen, W. P Milwaukee, Wis. 

Scheiber, G.'S Watertown, Wis. 

Scobey, A. W Kankakee, 111. 

Seiffert, J. H Chicago, 111. 

Shallenberger, W. E. . Canton, 111. 

Shelden, W. D Reedsburg, Wis. 

Sherman, A. M Grinnell, la. 

Shippey, O. P Plymouth, 111. 

Slusser, F. B Minden, Neb. 

Smith, C. H Abingdon, 111. 

Smith, C. P Carroll, la. 

Smith, G. W Wheeling, W. Va. 

Smith, D. L Chicago, 111. 

Spargo, W. W Wheeling, W. Va. 

Sparling, F. G Pilot Mound, Manitoba. 

Steele, G. A Wheaton, 111. 

Stephenson, W. L. . . . Brodhead, Wis. 

Stewart, R Chicago, 111. 

Straub, CO Milwaukee, Wis. 

Swale, CM Oshkosh, Wis. 

Sweet, A. A Chicago, 111. 

335 



RHEUMATISM AND BRIGHTS DISEASE | 

^r ii} tl?e /T\edieal profession say! J 




*&-%*^&*&^t&^*&^*&^*&^jt&^jt^&»^ijt&^»&^A&^*&^SA 



CONSERVATIVE MEN 

e /T\edieal profession say! J 
'for |jtl?ia effeet 5 C ^M^ 



w: 



OZONATE UTHI A WATER 




Wif 



FOR SALE BY DRUGGISTS GENERALLY~j fy^S T)0 6C|Ual, 2\)d \ tS U^Z G3Q b^ 

c-j continued indefinitely without produeir/q5 ^astrie 

disturbai^s, altr/ou^r; eael? Quart: Bottle qoi}- }jr 
*f ta!p5 7 ^rai95 °f LlTHIA OZONATE" ^J^V 

~ii~"""-ir ^~i£I""~ 1 PRESCRIBE IT IN URIC ACID 
7-M->^. ^, '^:;, ___ DIATHESIS AND BE CONVINCED. 



SCHILLER, The FLORIST, 

899 West Madison Street 

Telephone West 624- and 73<> West MadlSOn Street, and W Honori nC °' n 



€S rPjfil N lSft€D y^ 




FUNERAL WORK, WEDDING AND PARTY DECORATIONS. 

Other Floral work artistically arranged on short notice and at lowest rates. American 
3eauty and other long stem cut flowers our specialty. 

336 



Swift, B. F Chicago, 111. 

Tansey, E. E Chicago, 111. 

Tarlvsan, A. B Norfolk, Neb. 

Taylor, J. F Bloomington, Wis. 

Thometz, A. M Chicago, 111. 

Tirnen, R. J Mattoon, 111. 

Torpey, T. G Waterloo, Wis. 

Triplett, C. E Morocco, hid. 

Turck, J. C Chicago, 111. 

Urquhart, J. H Ironwood, Mich. 

Van Cleave, E. S. ... Rockville, Ind. 

Wagner, J. R Newman, 111. 

Walters, G. A Watseka, 111. 

Weaver, W. G Waterville, Kas. 

Weiner, E. A Pekin, 111. 

Welch, T. R Nendah, Wis. 

Wendt, C. L Canton, S. Dak. 

Westerschulte, F. . . . Chicago, 111. 

Whitson, J. S Jonesboro, Ind. 

Wood. F. B Muskegon, Mich. 

Zeltner, L. S Chicago, 111. 

Zinser, H. S Washington, 111. 

Zook, E. W Peoria, 111. 



33/ 



flADSEN's Institute 



TELEPHONE MAIN 2109. 




ROOMS 825 TO 831 
SCHILLER BUILDING 



Correction of all Physical Deformities 
Physical Culture for Ladies, 
Gentlemen and Children ] 

Special attention given to treatment of 
the Chest 




SWEDISH MOVEMENTS MASSAGE. 




Dr. J. FEHR'S 

Compound . Talcum . Baby 
...Powder... 

THE "HYGIENIC DERMAL POWDER," FOR 
INFANTS AND ADULTS. 

Originally investigated and its therapeutic properties dis- 
covered in the year 1868, by Dr. Fehr, and introduced to the 
Medical and the Pharmaceutical Professions in 1873. 

Composition : — Silicate of Magnesia with Carbolic and 
Salicylic Acids. 

Properties : — Antiseptic, Antizymotic and Disinfectant. 

Useful as a general sprinkling powder, with positive Hygienic, 
Prophylactic and Therapeutic Propeities. 

GOOD IN ALL AFFECTIONS OF THE SKIN. 

Per Box, Plain, 25 Cts. = - Perfumed, 50 Cts. 

Per Doz., Plain, $1.75 - - Perfumed, $3.50 

Sold by the Drug trade generally. 

The Hanufacturer, Julius Fehr, M. D. 

ANCIENT PHARHACIST, - HOBOKEN, N. J. 

Only advertised in Medical and Pharmaceutical prints. 



338 



/Members 96 



Andrews, J. A Des Moines, la. 

Angus, D. A Pardeeville, Wis. 

Arndt, O. H Sheboygan, Wis. 

Bading, G. A Milwaukee, Wis. 

BALLANCE, J. H. W. . . . New Burnside, 111. 

Barstow, L. R Ouincy, 111. 

Bates, M. D. ...... Chicago, III. 

Bechman, C. R Fountain City, Wis.. 

Beebe, S. D Sparta, Wis. 

Bell, E. S Chicago, III. 

Beny, H. A Itasca, Texas. 

Bird, M. D Sun Prairie, Wis. 

Blake, I. W Viroqua, Wis. 

Boatner, H Paris, Mo. 

Bourn, J. J Modale, la. 

Brennecke, H. A Watertown, Wis. 

Brett, F. N Green Bay, Wis. 

Brewer, M. T New York, la. 

Bridge, M. L Mentone, Ind, 

Brode, W. D Mendota. 111. 

Brown, W. L Centerville, la. 

Bryant, J. R Omro, Wis. 

Bullen, F. W ■ Mason, Mich. 

Burns, R. J Rockford, 111. 

Caldwell, J. R West Liberty, W. Va. 

Carmen, E. F Chicago, 111. 

Carson, G. T Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Coe, W. B Omaha, Neb. 

Conaway, A. C New Sharon, la. 

Connell, F. G Wauwatosa, Wis. 

Conroy, T. F Milwaukee, Wis. 

Convery, P Temple Hill, la. 

Cool, H. A Chicago, 111. 

Corr, J. T Chicago, III. 

Cowles, G. H Elkhorn, Wis. 

Cox, J. E Belle Plain, la. 

Crowley, W. H Potsdam, N. Y. 

Culbertson, N. W. . . . Wooster, Ohio. 

Cunningham, M. A. . . . Monroe, Wis. 

Daniels, L. J Milwaukee, Wis. 

Davidson, F. S Chicago, 111. 

Davis, R. E Waukesha, Wis. 

Denaut, J. L Brock\-ille, Ont. 

Donohue, F Chicago, 111. 

Dooley, A. J Marion, Ind. 

339 



Chicago College of SDental Surgery 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT OF LAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY. 




THE COLLEGE BUILDING, 

SOUTHEAST CORNER WOOD AND HARRISON STREETS. 

Annua] Winter Course of Instruction will begin about October ist, 1895, and end about April ist, 1S96. 
full Winter courses of lectures are required before graduation. Graduates of reputable pharma- 



ceutical and undergraduates of medical colleges are admitted to the second y 
didates lor graduation after taking two winter courses of lectures. 



, and can become can- 



separate fees for Chemical or Histological Laboratory work, dissecting and final examina- 

Fees for the Annual Spring and Summer Course. 



This amount will be deducted from the fees of the next following winter session. 
Instruments and appliances for clinical department will cost from S25 to S40. 

Board, including light and fuel, can be obtained at a convenient distance from the college at from 
$4 to S6 a week. 

Graduates of the College are requested to notify the Dean of any changes in their residences. 

A fee of $5 must be deposited to cover chemicals and breakage in the Chemical Laboratory. 

Letters of inquiry should be addressed to 

DR. TRUMAN W. BROPHY, Dean, 

126 State Street, Chicago, 111. 



340 



Dudley, J. H Albert Lea, Minn. 

Dunnaway, I. H Monroe, Wis. 

Duncan, S. O Franklin, Ind. 

Dvorak, W.J Chicago, 111. 

Dwight, A. M Chicago, 111. 

Dyas, W. M Arlington Heights, 111. 

Eckard, E. M Topeka, 111. 

Eddelman, J. F Sardinia, Ind. 

Eddy, A. H Seward, 111. 

Edmonds, S. A Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Engals, N. R Stratford, Ont. 

Fish, CM Bath, Penn. 

Fitzpatrick, N. P. ... Somerset, Ky. 

Freeman, J. D Madison, Wis. 

Friedel, Max Chicago, 111. 

Frost, W. F Plattsburg, Mo. 

Fullenwider, R. C. . . Chicago. 111. 

Gem.mtll, H. C Markle, Ind. 

Gillespie, T. W Kilbourn City, Wis. 

Goold, B. R Morris, 111. 

Gould, G. S New Sharon, la. 

Grassan, A Colona, 111. 

Grawn, F. A Sparta, Mich. 

Greene, R. H La Grande, Or. 

Greenfield, J Chicago, 111. 

Greer, J Chicago, 111. 

Gregory, J. H Cave-in-Rock, III. 

Griffith, J. C Bushnell, 111. 

Griffin, M. A Chicago, 111. 

Hansen, G. H Chicago, 111. 

Harding, O. A Chicago, III. 

Harris, R. E Chicago, 111. 

Harrison, F. C. . . . . . Perry, III. 

Harvey, J,. .A. „■ . Morgan Park, 111. 

*Hauser, D. P Lincoln, 111. 

Hawley, E. H Gratiot, Wis. 

Heise, W. F. C Alma, Wis. 

Hemingway, C. E. ... Oak Park, 111. 

Henderson, E. E St. Joseph, Mo. 

Henderson, H. C. ... Greenfield, 111. 

Herrmann, F. ] Logansport, Ind. 

Higgins, J. I Chicago, 111. 

Hill, T. F Middletown, 111. 

Hissom, S. K Wittins, Ohio. 

Hobbs, C. L Chicago, 111. 

Hogan, D. D Avena, Wis. 

Honnold, F. C Maryville, Mo. 

Hubenthal. J. C. .... Waukesha, Wis. 

Hunter, W. H Chicago, 111. 

Hutchins, O. S Independence, Wis. 

Huxhold, A. F Chicago, 111. 



341 



NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Woman's Medical School 

[woman's medical college of Chicago]. 
333 TO 339 SOUTH LINCOLN STREET, CH1CAOO. 

Thorough and Practical * Hospital Advantages 

Instruction in Every founded 1870. Unsurpassed. 

Department =3. Excellent Laboratories. 

FOR ANNOUNCEMENT AND OTHER INFORMATION, ADDRESS THE SECRETARY, 

MARIE J. HERGLER, M. D., 

337 S. Lincoln St., CHICAGO. 



POSTLEWAIT 

HIGH CLASS 

THn6ertakmc$ 



CITY AND ALL SUBURBS. 



TELEPHONE WEST 209. 



310 OGDEN AVENUE, CHICAGO. 




Chicago Pasteur 
..Institute.. 



FOR THE PREVENTIVE TREATMENT OF 
HYDROPHOBIA. 



. • • Office ■ • ■ 

65 Randolph Street, 

CHICAGO. 



A. Lagorio, M. I). 

Rush '79,— Director. 



342 



Jacque, J. L Chicago, 111. 

Johnston, M. C Aberdeen, S. D. 

Kaser, W. E Sparta, Wis. 

Kemp, C. H Glenwood, 111. 

Kenega, A. S Kankakee, 111. 

Kerr, A. A Chicago, 111. 

Killion, T. A El Dorado, 111. 

King, M. O Rochester, Ind. 

Klinscorostrom, E.Y. . Chicago, 111. 

Kreitzer, A.J Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 

Kreml, C. E Chicago, 111. 

Larned, E. R Chicago, 111. 

Larsen, L. A Chicago, 111. 

Law, W. G Chippewa Falls, Wis. 

Leckrone, I. W Silver Lake, Ind. 

Leresche, E. P Chicago, 111. 

Lewit, U. S Cassville, Wis. 

Lyon, M Toulon, 111. 

McDowell, G. A Chicago, 111. 

McLeish, A. A Portage, Wis. 

McNary, W. D Milwaukee, Wis. 

Marshall, J. R Monmouth, 111. 

Meeker, L. A Napoleon, O. 

Meili, M Alma. Wis. 

Melerian, H Parkville, Mo. 

Mershimer, W. C Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Metzger, W. A Chicago, 111. 

Miller, A. L Sparta, Wis. 

Miller, E. A Gervais, Or. 

Miller, L Dexter, 111. 

Montgomery, A. W. . . . Stella, Neb. 

Newton, H. O Nebraska, O. 

Nichols, J. H., Jr Mt. Vernon, O. 

Nolt, G. W Lodi, Wis. 

Ochsner, E. E Waumanda, Wis. 

O'Connor, T. G Blockton, la. 

O'Connor, T. W Denver, Colo. 

O'Harro, A Chicago, 111. 

Oliver. A. J Ruthven, la. 

Orth, D. A Milwaukee, Wis. 

Osgood, C. F Gilead, Mo. 

Palmer, W. A Glenville, Minn. 

Pegram, E. C Carrollton, 111. 

Pike, W. A Ottawa. 111. 

Patrick, S. H Redfield, S. D. 

Rees, H Chicago, 111. 

Relihan, D. W Smith Centre, Kas. 

Rhoden, J. C Omaha, Neb. 

Richardson, W. E. . . . Elgin. Minn. 

Robertson, E Chicago, 111. 

Robinson, L. A Glenwood Springs, Colo. 

Rogers, C. C Minonk, 111. 

343 



E. H. COLEGROVE & CO. 

Medical Booksellers, Publishers and Importers 

52 Randolph Street, 

«*fc» -CHICAGO. 



NOTICE . 

The copy of " .McClelland's Regional Anatomy" given as first prize for Original Poem 
was kindly donated by E. H. Colegrove & Co. Editors of Pulse. 

344 



Roth, J. H Chicago, 111. 

Rouleau, G. L Manteno, 111. 

Rustad, E. D Houston, Minn. 

Sceleth, C. E Chicago. 111. 

Schmidt, H. G. G Chicago. 111. 

Schottler, G. J Rockfield, Wis. 

Schram, A. W Milwaukee, Wis. 

Schreiter, J. B Darlington, Wis. 

Schumacher, D. A. . . . Chicago, 111. 

Seager, H. W Des Moines, la. 

Smith, A. L Oberlin, O. 

Smith, H. S Fairfield, la. 

Snodgrass, W. C Kenton, O. 

Spicer, C. R New City, 111. 

Stalker, H. A Aurora, S. D. 

Stone, CD Chicago, 111. 

Strong, B. F Harvard, Kas. 

Sugg, H. R Clinton, la. 

Taylor, G. G Elkhart, 111. 

Thompson, W Darlington, Wis. 

Tope, G. B Chicago, 111. 

Townsend, Del Peru, Neb. 

Van Diest, G. A Luctor, Kas. 

Vaupell, G. H Chicago, 111. 

Wallace. F. E Monmouth. 111. 

Walsh, E. C Richland Center, Wis 

Wanicek, E. M Chicago, 111. 

Warren, F. R Chicago, 111. 

Waters, W. T Center, Mo. 

Weisskopf, MA Chicago, 111. 

Whammond, A. A. ... Chicago, 111. 

Willhite, O. C Grant City, Mo. 

Wilson, A. S Chicago, 111. 

Winterbotham, J. H. . . Selma, Kas. 

Wilt, E F Chicago, 111. 

Witte, W. C. F Milwaukee, Wis. 

Wood, E. S. . 1 Leavenworth, Kas. 

Young, J. M Ooroomiah, Persia. 

Young, H. O. B Rosecrans, 111. 



545 



CUT IN THE LATEST OF STYLES * ^ MADE BY THE BEST OF WORKMEN 

ONLY THE FINEST CLOTH AND TRIMMINGS USED 

/lfo£ Evening 2)ress Suits 

ARE UNEQUALED, — AT S50 TO $75 
TUXEDO COATS, — $20 TO S30 




TA.ILOR FOR YOUNG M&N 

129-131 LA SALLE STREET 

346 



Members '97 



Alderson, J. C Wausaw, Wis. 

Aldrich, F Shenandoah, la. 

Alquire, A Grand Forks, N. Dak. 

Armer, J. F Shell Rock, la. 

Austin, M. A Union City, Ind. 

Baldwin, F. R Peoria, 111. 

Banks, H. W Marquette, Mich. 

Barnett, M. E Oshkosh, Wis. 

Barrett, Fred., Jr. . . . Tower, Minn. 

Barto, J. H Waverley, 111. 

Becker, E. C Riverside, 111. 

Beller, O. B Vinton, la. 

Berger, G. F Milwaukee, Wis. 

Blair, P. B Winona, Minn. 

Bigelow, T. E Chicago, 111. 

Bond.G.W Wheaton, 111. 

BOSSINGHAM, G. A. . . . Oregon, Wis. 

Bowe, Edw Jacksonville, 111. 

Brandon, F. H Nashville, Tenn. 

Brimi, C. L Eau Claire, Wis. 

Brodrick, F. W Lafayette, Ind. 

Brown, A. E Marquette, Mich. 

Brown, F. O Lewis, la. 

Bruggs, H. J Chicago, 111. 

Brustad, L. A Park River, N. Dak. 

Burnside, C. S Mt. Victory, O. 

Burtch, L. W Morrison, 111. 

Burton, E. F Oak Park, 111. 

Butterman, W. F. . . . Chicago, 111. 

Butzow, A. M Chicago, 111. 

Butzow, T. F Chicago, 111. 

Byrne, W. D Chicago, 111. 

Caron, W. G Chicago, 111. 

Carter, V. G Franklin, Ind. 

Caswell, H. O Ft. Atkinson, Wis. 

Cheshire, M.U Anamosa, la. 

Clark, F. C St. Charles, Minn. 

Clark, J. F Van Wert, O. 

Clayton, C. F Chicago, 111. 

Cottrell, D Chicago, 111. 

Cox, F. P Kenney, 111. 

Craig, G. G., Jr Rock Island, 111. 

Crocker, F. S Chicago, 111. 

Crocker, G. L Springfield, 111. 

Croddy, C. F Eldon, la. 

Crowder, T. R Sullivan, Ind. 








MICROSCOPES 
OBJECTIVES and 
ACCESSORIES 

MICROTOMES 

BACTERIOLOGICAL 

GLASSWARE 

STERILIZERS 
INCUBATORS 



HAEMOMETERS 

(FLEISCHL) 



HAEMACYTOMETERS 

(thoma) 



HAEMOGLOBINOMETERS 

(GOWERS) 



HAEMACYTOMETERS 

GOWERS) 



...oj-[igh Grade Microscopes •••• 

FROM THE WELL KNOWN MAKERS 

CARL REICHERT, Vienna. BAUSCH & LOMB OPT. CO., New York. 

Chemical Apparatus — strictly C. P. Chemicals. 

Standard Apparatus for urine analysis. 

Einhorn's Fermentation Saccharometers. 

Esbach's Albumenometers. Doremus' Ureometers. 

Urinometers with correction Scale. 

Polariscopes for Sugar determination, etc., etc. 

Richards & Co., Limited, 

108 Lake Street, CHICAGO. 41 Barclay Street, NEW YORK. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



348 



Cunningham, J. G . . . . Graceville, Minn. 

Curry, Wm Nebraska City, Neb. 

Daly, F. P Reidsburg, Wis. 

Demaree, T. E Rossville, 111. 

Denant, M. S Brockville, Ont. 

Derwent, R. E Marshalltown, la. 

Devine, Claud Oregon, Wis. 

Doidge, R. E Perry, la. 

Donaldson, G. T Menasho, Wis. 

Doyle, L. M El Paso, 111. 

Drozdowitz, Theo. . . Chicago, 111. 

Duguid, J. O Scotland, S. Dak. 

Ellis, J. W Chicago, 111. 

Fellman, G. H Oak Park, 111. 

Findley, S. E Independence, Mo. 

First, F. H Alton, 111. 

Fish, F. F Waterloo, Ind. 

Fisher, M. O Chicago, 111. 

Folsom, W. H Burnett, Wis. 

French, P. P Staceyville, la. 

Freidberg, S. A Leavenworth, Kas. 

Ganshell, C. N Quincy, 111. 

Gill, John G Chicago, 111. 

Girard, A. D Helena, Mont. 

Gordon, L. E Chicago, 111. 

Gorman, T. C Anamosa, la. 

Gregory, W. W Stevens Point, Wis. 

Greenebaum, E. C. . . . Chicago, 111. 

Gresans, H. C Chicago, 111. 

Grove, W. W Ligonier, Penn. 

Groves, Roy G Williamsville, 111. 

Hall, G. S Los Angeles, Cal. 

Hamilton, A. G. L. . . . Chicago, 111. 

Hanawalt, C. G Mazon, 111. 

Hansen, O. L Chicago, 111. 

Hanson, K Sauk Center, Minn. 

Hanstein, H. H Chicago, 111. 

Hardon, CD Chicago. 111. 

Hartman, F. T Anamosa, la. 

Hatch, W. G Kilbourn City, Wis. 

Hathegger, Chas. J. . . Watertown, Wis. 

Hill, H. A Augusta, Kas. 

Hogeboom, R. H Topeka, Kas. 

Holman, Fred New Trier, Minn. 

Holmes, W. F Chicago, 111. 

Hughes, G. L Omro, Wis. 

Hunt, Rodney, Oak Park, 111. 

Jacobs, W. F Burlington, Wis. 

Johnston, E. A. . . . . . Champaign, III. 

Johnston, J. E Marion, Ind. 

Judd, C. E Evanston, 111. 

Kaser, W. E Sparta, Wis. 

349 





• THE • 

" ROOSTERS HARTLEY 

is still at 309 West Madison St. 
AND DON'T YOU FORGET IT. 

* ¥ 
Why pay fancy prices when you can get 
PHOTOS as fine as the finest at our studio for 

TWO DOLLARS 
PER DOZEN* • • 

CLASS GROUPS A SPECIALTY. 



The Illustrations in this annual were reproduced 
from Photographs taken by our special Artist. 
Open Sundays. Come and see us. We will 
treat you right. 



35o 



Kearney, J. M Chicago, 111, 

Kirwan, E. J Manitowoc, Wis. 

Kistles, F. V Chicago, 111. 

Klein, Henry, Chicago, 111. 

Krauser, F. A Chicago, 111. 

Kyvig, K. A Chicago, 111. 

Lehaus, J. W Dunlap, la. 

Lesan, C. T Mt. Ayr, la. 

Libby, E., M. D Chicago. 111. 

Lins, F. J Damascus, 111. 

Lobb, J. E Eau Claire, Wis. 

Longbrake, G. A Galesburg, 111. 

LOOMIS, M. M Wyoming, la. 

Locey, C. L Indianapolis, Ind. 

Luckey, J. E Rock Island, 111. 

Maber, H. G Shawano, Wis. 

McCarty, C. E Dodge City, Kas. 

McCreight, A. H Viola, 111. 

McDermott, G. L. ... Neenah, Wis. 
McEachern, W. A. . . . West Superior, Wis. 

McEnery, J. C Chicago, 111. 

McEwen, E. L De Kalb, 111. 

McGovern, J. H Robinson, III. 

McKee, C. W Apollo, la. 

McMurray, E. R Francesville, Ind. 

Mahoney, J. E Ridgeway, Wis. 

Marer, L. E Van Meter, la. 

Maley, W. X Galesburg, 111. 

Mann, John, Madison, Wis. 

Manning, H. W Emporia, Kas. 

Martin, E. W Rockford, la. 

Martin, John Chicago, 111. 

Martinson, H. M. . . . Lake Park, Minn. 
Matthei, L. W., Jr. . . . Chicago, 111. 

Maxfield, W. A Coopersville, Mich. 

Melry, W. W Chicago, 111. 

Miller, B. F Wellington, 111. 

Miller, C. A Loda, Wis. 

Miller, Geo. H Crystal Lake, 111. 

Mills, N. P Chicago, 111. 

Moe, A. J Three Lakes, Wis. 

Montgomery, A. B. . . . Reynolds, 111. 

Moran, J. E Braidwood, 111. 

Morley, G. A Necedah, Wis. 

Murnan, H. A Lewis, la. 

Murray, W. R Marquette, Mich. 

Murphy, E. S Ohio, III. 

Olsen, A. H Chicago, 111. 

Nash, A. R St. Croix Falls, Wis. 

Nicholson, W. G Hayton, Wis. 

Nywall, A. G Lindsborg, Kas. 

Page, T. H Jefseyville, 111. 

Parks, A. L Leland, 111. 

35' 



$ -*cT<C**/-^ *-~^f~CT**/3) *";,«* -TXT*/ ,i> **.,** ^iTT^t/^) r..«V*V8*»^s 9 









Xafce jForest College 




HIS is one of the six departments of Lake Forest 
University, and is located at Lake Forest, 111., a suburb 
of Chicago. At the same place are Lake Forest 
Academy, (a preparatory school for boys), and Ferry 
Hall Seminary, (a school for young ladies). 
The College now offers three years of work in each of the fol- 
lowing subjects: Greek, Latin, French, German, English, Philology, 
English Literature, Biblical Literature, Political History, Social 
Science, Economics, Philosophy, Mathematics, Astronomy, Physics, 
Chemistry, Zoology, Botany, Geology. 

From these subjects a four years' course is made up if a grad- 
uating degree is desired; but students are admitted to do special 
work for any shorter period, provided they show themselves pre- 
pared to do the work of their choice. A special Medical prepara- 
tory course is also provided. 

During [895 a summer session of eight weeks will be held. 
For fuller information or catalogue, address 

John M. Coulter, President, 

Lake Forest, III. 



352 



Parks, C. H Chicago, 111. 

Patterson, H. A Joliet, 111. 

Perkins, P. H Denver, Colo. 

Peterson, S. G Chicago, 111. 

Phillips, A. D Metropolis, 111. 

Phillips, J. T Independence, Mo. 

Pickett, L. E Gait, Mo. 

Porter, R. S Chicago, 111. 

Porter, W. G Wheaton, 111. 

Porterfield, J. D. . . . Cape Girardeau, Mo. 

Proctor, CM Wallace, III. 

Randall, Edwin Logansport, Ind. 

Reese, Wm Chicago, 111. 

Reibe, C. W Chicago, 111. 

Rice, D. S De Pere, Wis. 

Rice, R. H De Pere, Wis. 

Rollins, F. H Caledonia, Minn. 

Russell, R Viola, 111. 

Sager, G. W Chicago, 111. 

Sanders, L. D Paducah, Ky. 

Schjelderup, N. H. . . . Norway. 

Schmauss, L. F West Duluth, Minn. 

Schmidt, Ben. H Davenport, la. 

Schweer, T. J Beardstown, 111. 

Scott, R. G Sandwich, 111. 

Searle, C. H Chicago, 111. 

Semple, A. M Poynette, Wis. 

Shirk, G. W Red Oak, la. 

Shubert, O. F South Chicago, 111. 

Shultze, Wm Princeton, Kas. 

Shurtz, R. E Chicago, 111. 

Skinner, F. S Cedar Rapids, la. 

S.molt, A. E Paw Paw, 111. 

Somers, P. E Rapid City, S. Dak. 

Stevens, F. W Bloomington, 111. 

Stewart, M. R. . . . . Ogden, Utah. 

Stokes, Wm Atlanta. Ind. 

Strye, J. P Hillsboro, Kas. 

Strauss, F. L Titusville, Pa. 

Strohm, E. H Marshall, 111. 

Strong, A. W Ft. Atkinson, Wis. 

Sullivan, F. J Chicago, 111, 

Thompson, Theo Prairie Home, 111. 

Tolls, L. W Marquette, Mich. 

Townsend, O. S Plattsville, la. 

Trumbauer, J. D De Kalb, 111. 

Van Nuys, J. C Thorntown, Ind. 

Van Sands, R., Jr Chicago, 111. 

Vaughn, W. D Chicago, 111. 

Vaupel, H. N Ashton, 111. 

Wadey, Ben Esmond, 111. 

Walsh, T. J Chicago, 111. 

Wardle, H. W Poynette, Wis. 

353 



Warren, C. L Perry, la. 

Watson, R. E Coopersville, Mich. 

Webb, E. P Beaver Dam, Wis. 

Wells, W. H Paris, 111. 

Welsh, J. A Beatrice, Neb. 

Welsh, J. D Perry, Neb. 

Westnedge, R. B Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Whitehill, N. M State Center, la. 

Whiting, E. D Aurora, 111. 

Williams, E. H North Argyle, N. Y. 

Wood, F. H Franklin, Ind. 

Wood, F. J Huron, S. D. 

Yates, J. C Peoria, 111. 

Yorty, A. J Brandon, Wis. 

Zareiiba, H. T Riverside, 111. 



TLhc (Lbicago 

/BMlwaufcee & £ .. 
St. Paul 1R?. 



V 



. . RUNS • ■ 

Electric Lighted and Steam Heated Yesti- 
buled Trains, between Chicago, Milwau- 
kee, St. Paul and Minneapolis, daily. 

Through Parlor Cars on day trains between 
Chicago, St. Paul and Minneapolis. 

Electric Lighted and Steam Heated Vesti- 
buled Trains between Chicago and Omaha 
and Sioux City, daily. 

Only two hours from Chicago to Milwaukee; 
Seven fast trains, each way, daily, with 
Parlor Car Service. 

Solid trains between Chicago and principal 
points in Northern Wisconsin and the 
Peninsula of Michigan. 

Through Trains with Palace Sleeping Cars, 
Free Chair Cars and Coaches between 
Chicago and points in Iowa, Minnesota, 
Southern and Central Dakota. 

The finest Dining Cars in the World. 

The best Sleeping Cars. Electric Reading 
Lamps in Berths. 

The best and latest type of private Com- 
partment Cars, Free Reclining Chair Cars 
and buffet Library Smoking Cars. 

6,155 miles of road in Illinois, Wisconsin, 
Northern Michigan, Iowa, Minnesota, 
Missouri, South Dakota and North Dakota 

Everything First-Class. 

First-Class People patronize First-Class 
Lines. 

Ticket Agents everywhere sell tickets over 
the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul R'y, 
or address Geo H. Heafford, General 
Passenger Agent, Chicago, 111. 



556 






^^HE Hospital Quiz Class, from the class of '96, has 
^^ been organized, and contains among others the fol- 
lowing men. The list is not complete, as some names 
will, no doubt, be adJed later. 



Beebe, S. D. Harvey, J. A. 

Brennecke, H. *Hauser, D. P. 

Bullen, F. W. HlSSOM, S. K. 

Carson, G. T. Hobbs, C. L. 

CONNELL, F. G. HONNOLD, F. C. 

DOOLEV, A. J. HUTCHINS, O. S. 

Dudley, J. H. Johnson, M. C. 
Duncan, S. O. 



Dvorak, W. 
Eckard, E. M. 
Guthrie, F. A. 



Law, G. W. 
Leresche, E. P. 
Lewis, U. S. 
Lyon, M. 



Harrison, F. Lyon, E. A. 

MacXary, W. D. 
Montgomery, A. W. 

Schotler, G. J. 
Skinner, J. E. 
Smith, H. L. 

Townsend, A. W. 

Walter, W. F. 
Wilhite, O. C. 
Wilson, A. S. 

WlTTE, W. C. F. 

Wood, E. S. 






J. D. ncClelland & Co. 



[)rapers • and • ' failors 



Foreign and Domestic Woolens 



557 West nadison Street, 



CHICAGO. 




353 



. . . ESTABLISHED 1876 



BOf^N, THE TAILOR 

S. BODENHEIMER, Mgr. 



45 South Clark Street^^ CHICAGO 

Opposite Sherman House 






POPULAR PRICES 




Fit and workmanship guaranteed. 
Heasures always on file. 



Suits from $15.00 up. 
Pants from 4.00 up. 




******* 



Special Discount of 10% to 5tudepts 



359 



IXttbat the ©octet ©rbereb 



IF 



You have a dark brown taste in your mouth in the morning 
You have that tired feeling 
You have that full feeling after eating 
Your liver gets up on its high heels and backs up on you 
Your hands clutch convulsively and your step is unsteady 
Your mouth waters when you look out and see a Bicycle 
gliding swiftly by. Dear Friend, if any of these symp- 
toms reveal themselves to you ! 



^ 



■^& 




YOU 



Should ride a Bicycle 
Should ride a Good Bicycle 
Should ride a High Grade Bicycle 

Should not forget before you buy to call on 



* <L D. TOlbipplc * 



The Bicycleman, who has the wheels that can't be beat 
for beauty, strength and latest improved, at lowest 

prices and the best of wheels; see for yourself, for you'll 
never regret for such a bargain you'll never expect. 
Special prices to Medical Students. 



C. H. WHIPPLE, 



Bicycles and Sundries. 



134 Ogden Ave., near Ashland Blvd., CHICAGO. 



;6o 



Sterner Special^ 



$& A Strictly High Grade Hodem 
Bicycle. v All 1895 improvements. 
Guaranteed for One Year. 




STERNER SPECIAL, 21 Lbs. $75.00 

Sold on the instalment plan or for cash. Sole West Side agents for Stearns Bicycles, 
Remington Bicycles, Lovell Diamond Bicycles and Madison Bicycles. Bicycles for Rent, 
Bicycles Repaired. Biggest Stock Sundries on the West Side. 

STERNER CYCLE CO., 597 W. Hadison St. 



FRANK WAVVAK, 



flfte rcbant ^ Tailor 



239 WOOD ST. 

Cor. OGDEN AVE. 
REMOVED FROM 
801 Twelfth St. 



WE GUARANTEE A FIRST-CLASS FIT AND LOWEST PRICES 
• ■ -TO RUSH STUDENTS- ■ ■ 



',6 1 



mmmmtnmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 
rmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm?? 



The Fowler 

m WITH ITS TRUSS FRAME 

IS THE HIGHEST OF 

lbk}h (3rabe Btcvcks 



Agents /<^=55?^\P^ J\^- — Cash or In= 

Wanted // /V\\ f//\ ^N\ stallments 



& 




THE FOWLER is the most highly 
finished Bicycle in the world 

RETAIL STORE 
123 DEARBORN STREET 

Hill Cycle Manufacturing Co. 

148 W. Washington St. 



;62 



Very Pleasant 



DOCTORS TAKE IT THEMSELVES and 
RECOMMEND IT TO THEIR PATIENTS and FRIENDS 



The 

Chicago 
Great Western 
Railway 

A FAVORITE 

AMONG STUDENTS TO 

ST. PAUL, MINNEAPOLIS 

AND THE NORTHWEST. 

DUBUQUE, DE5 MOINES 
ST. JOSEPH, KANSAS CITY 

AND THE SOUTHWEST. 




C. D. DUNANN 

City Passenger and Ticket Agent 

■ 15 Adams Street 

. .. CHICAGO 



Dr. Dadirrian's 
Matzoon w* 

(Or Fermented Milk Food) 

Made from pure sterilized cow's 
milk. A nutrient beverage for 
Delicate Stomachs, Dyspepsia, 
Fevers, nervous exhaustion, etc. 
Contains twice the nourishment 
found in Kumyss. 

Avoid Imitations 

Always Specify 

"Dr. Dadirrian's Matzoon" 



M. G. DADIRRIAN, M. D. 

3830 Langley Avenue, 
CHICAGO. 

NEW YORK OFFICE, 73 Lexington Ave. 



FOR SALE BY LEADING DRUGGISTS 



Sho'thand Reports of Clinical and Didactic Lectures, Society 
Meetings, etc. Typewritten Transcripts Promptly 
Furnished. Manuscripts Typewritten for the 
Medical Press or for Private Purposes. 
Abstracts made of Current Medi- 
cal Literature for Authors. 



William Whitford 

flDec-ieal 
Stenographer 

OFFICE 
1405 Columbus Memorial Building 

CHICAGO 



OFFICIAL STENOGRAPHER FOR 
lerican Association of Obstetricians and Gyne 
Southern Su-gical and Gynecological Associ; 
Illinois State Medical Society 
Illinois State Dental Society 
Kentucky Stale Medical Society 
I Georgia State Medical Society 



36- 




[DR. HINKLE.J 

Each containing Cascarin; Aloin, 
aa 1-4 gr.; Podophyllin, 1-6 gr.; 
Ext.Belladon., 1— gr.: Strychnine 
l-6Ugr.; Gingerine, 1-S gr. 

Dose— 1 to 2 pills. This pill 
affords a brisk and easy cathartic, 
efficient and easy in action and 
usually not attended with unplea- 
sant pains in the bowels. It acts 
mildly upon the liver [Podophyl- 
lin], increases Peristalsis [Bella- 
donna], while the carminative 
effect of the Gingerine aids in 
! desired result, thus securing the most 
:nt and pleasant cathartic in use. 
-SO cents per 100, sent by mail. 
PIL. CHALYBEATE. Per 100. 40c. 

(WILLIAM R. WARNER & CO.l 
Carbonate of Protoxide of Iron. 3 gr. Dose 1 to 3 pills 

Wm. R. Warner & Co.'s Ferruginous Pills. 
Ferri Sulph., Fe S0 4 Ferri Carb., Fe C0 3 

Potas. Carb. K 2 C0 3 Potass. Sulph., K 2 S0 4 

PIL. CHALYBEATE C0MP. Per 100. 55c. 

(WILLIAM R. WARNER & CO.) 
Same as Pil. Chalybeate, with % grain Ext. Nux 
Vomica added to each pill to increase the tonic effect. 
Dose, 1 to 3 pills. 

PIL. SUMBUL COHP. Per 100, $1.00. 

(WILLIAM R. WARNER & CO.) 

(Dr. Goodell) 

K Ext. Sumbul, 1 gr. Ferri Sulph. Ext., 1 gr. 

Asafcetida, 2 gr. Ac. Arsenious. 1-40 gr. 

"I use this pill for nervous and hysterical women 

who need building up." 

This pill is used with advantage in neurasthenia 
conditions in conjunction with Warner & Co.'s Bromo 
Soda, one or two pills taken three times a day. 

WM. Ft. WARNER &. CO. 
1228 Marke t St., Philadelphia, pa. 

RUPTURE CURED K^Ls. 

NO DETENTION FROM BUSINESS 



L. MANASSE, Optician, 

CHICAGO. 



88 nadison Street 
Tribune Bldg.. 




The O. E. Miller Co. 

...Chicago Office... 

Suites 1105=1106 nasonic Temple, 

PHYSICIANS CORDIALLY INVITED TO INVESTIGATE. 



Importer and Manufacturer of 
Optical, Mathematical and 
Meteorological Instruments, 
Magic Lanterns. &c. &c. 

Microscopes of 
Standard 
makes at lowest 



scopic 




Cbas.lR. XowCo. 

74 Washington St. 

CHICAGO. 

• Hrt Stationers • 



Engraved work a specialty. 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS. 

WEDDING AND 

RECEPTION INVITATIONS. 

BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL 

AND VISITING CARDS. 

DIE STAMPING and ILLUMINATING. 



We carry the most complete line of fine 
Correspondence paper in the city. 



Would call attention to the present year Com- 
mencement Invitations and the Nu Sigma 
Nu Banquet Menus. 



564 



Ogden Avenue Tailoring Co. 

K. J. BONDERSON, 
Proprietor. 

/Iftercbant 
XIailor 



Cleaning, Dyeing and Repairing 
A Specialty. 

& 

SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 
COME AND SEE ME. 

<*• 

... 452 

OQDEN AVENUE, 

... CHICAGO 



r- — -. V15IT OUR 
NEW LABORATORY 

And See ... 
How We Make 

Standard 

Pharmaceutical 

Preparations 



Send us Your 
Permanent Address for 
Our Mailing List 



TheSEARLE&HERETHCO. 

73 and 75 Wells Street, 

Cor. of Illinois St. 
CHICAGO. 



z 3 



c 5 
o « 

a £ 




Gus 

THE SQUARE HATTER 

197 and 199 
W. Madison Street 

& 

Come and See Me. 
Our $2.50 and $3.00 a Dandy. 

# 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO 
STUDENTS. 



365 



naker of Gentlemen's fine Shirts, etc. 



Full line of everything for Hen's wear. 



Should be seen to be appreciated. 
Popular Prices. 



<L 3B. TCboafcs, 



and 



Hen's Furnisher 
Shirt flaker 



52 Adams Street and 
310 Wabash Avenue, 

Auditorium Bldg. 



Chicago. 



...Telephone West 190. 



College 
Pharmacy 



STUDENTS' 
HEADQUARTERS 



FRANK E. FISK, Ph. G., 

■ ■ PROPRIETOR- ■ 

750 West Harrison Street, 

Cor. Hermitage Avenue, 
CHICAGO. 



We cater to Students' Patronage, and are 
prepared to offer you unusual inducements, 
and believing that our past efforts have been 
appreciated, we take pleasure in again 
extending to the " Boys of Rush" a cordial 
invitation to make "College Pharmacy" 
.their headquarters. 




366 



3% fl>. Don Xacfcum & Buo. 



"YALE" CHAIR 

PERFECTION .TABLE 

PERFECTION CABINET 

4U4fc SURGICAL 

Easy Monthly Payments 
Liberal Cash Discounts 

Second Hand Chairs and Tables 
taken in exchange and for sale 

CHEAP 



G^o^oxP 



CHAIRS 



GOULD DENTAL CHAIR 
CHICAGO CABINET 

GOULD DENTAL ENGINE 

GYNAECOLOGICAL 

609 Masonic Temple 
CHICAGO. 




* * * FOR YOUR # # * 



MEDICAL BOOKS 

Students- Supplies anb Stationery 



. . . F. W. KING'S . . 



North West Cor. Wood and Congress Streets 

(one block north of college) 

A FULL LINE OF CIGARS AND TOBACCOS 

LAUNDRY OFFICE . . . 



367 



W. R. CHESNUTT Higb Grade 

Tailoring 



iigt 



Tail©rio ( 



L - 456 

W. Madison Street 

CHICAGO .. .. 



*£> 



SUITS 

OVERCOATS 
TROUSERS 
TO ORDER 



WE POSITIVELY SAVE YOU FIFTY CENTS ON 

EVERY DOLLAR. FIT, QUALITY AND 

WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED 

Nos. 155, 157, 159 
W. Madisorj Street 
Chicago ... 

Ideal Tailors 



Special Attention and 
Rates to Students 



^ 



find Uncalled for 
Clothing Exchange 



ESTABLISHED 1888 



Harry W. Stupner, 

Tailor 



Corr) 



\\^,t @f PWl WEAR 



Perfect Fit anl 
Fiist-class Work Guaranteed 



549'j W. Madison Street, near Laflin, 
CHICAGO. 



I do all kinds of repairing. Give me a trial. 
SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS. 



THE ARTISTIC 
CUTTER ar>d TAILOR 

207 

OGDEN AVENUE, CHICAGO 

TAILOR FOR CLASS OF '96 



j68 



COR SALE— in Chicago, good 
practice — with good perma- 
nent appointments (surgical). To 
young man who can do ordinary 
surgery, it is a capital opportu- 
nity; satisfactory reasons. 
Address 
For Sale, care of Pulse, 

Rush Med. Coll. 



AND UPWARDS. 

WARDS. 

D SUIT AT $25 00. 



E. LANDOIM, 

TAILOR • 



1 12 Ogden Ave. 



R. E. HASKETT. 



I. R. HASKETT. 



HASKETT & CO. 

Dry Goods, 

484, 486 and 488 Hadison Street, 

CHICAGO. 



H. F. HALLE, 

Florist and 

.... Decorator, 




548 W. nadison Street. 



CHICAGO. 



WM. D. ALQEO, 

..nanufacturer of.. 

"THE SOLACE" 5c. Cigar 



TOBACCO, PIPES, &C. 



445 Ogden Ave. 



w. h. blacks-tone. Out Best M. D. Sign free 

w. f. kellv. to Honor man. 

Sign 24x8 or 18x6, $2.50. 



WEST SIDE 5IGN COMPANY, 

941 West Madison Street, 

Telephone West 19s.... Chicago. 

F. WAIBEL, 
•jfasbionable {Tailor* 

270 Ogden Avenue, 

Chicago. 



Students' Graduation Suits 
from S20.00 and up. 



569 



^Lawrence • IRcetaurant 



OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



523 W. MADISON STREET 

CHICAGO 
M. Lawrence & Co., Proprietors. 

. . JBarber . . 

390 WEST MADISON STREET 

CHICAGO 

*** 

Imported and Domestic Cigars 

FIRST CLASS LAUNDRY 

HOTEL ASHLAND . . . 



A. J. Ardper 

<? — -f> 

-$? . . Toosorial Parlor . • °^- 

<k ^ <£> 

130 Ogden avenue 

CHICAGO 

Ladies' Hair Cutting and 
. . . Shampooing — _____/ 



place 



* * * The Picture Taker # * * 



337 
West Madison Street CHICAGO 



HENRY SENK, 
. . Palace Barber Shop . . 

Chicago 

482 WEST MADISON STREET 

FOSS BLOCK 

ATTENTION, PHYSICIANS . . . 

The Pulsimeter and 
. . . Respiration Watch 

This Watch bearing a new and ingenious 
device for registering the Pulse and Respiration 
rate quickly and accurately without the patient's 
knowledge, and without removing Watch from 
the pocket. 

PHYSICIANS AND STUDENTS INVITED TO 
CALL AND INSPECT IT 

B. REDEPENNING, Patentee & Sole rian'fr. 

726 W. MADISON ST., CHICAGO. 




<&-Ujv}F3l\ElL^. 



3/0 



TO 








BEST LINE 

CHICAGO OR ST. LOUIS 



TO 



DENVER 

ST. PAUL 

MINNEAPOLIS 



37 1 



Gbe jfasbionable 1Rovelt\> 



>nr 



Ulster pp ®r C@at 



EACH - - • 
PER HALF DOZ. 



$1.00 
5.50 



We guarantee to the purchasers of our shirts 
their particular excellence of tit and design and 
high character of the material and workman- 
ship. If imperfect in any of these particulars, 
fhey may be returned to us. 

We also guarantee to our customers the 
quality and value of all goods sold by US to be 
as represented. 

Carr 6- Corr>pany 

319 W. MADISON ST. 
Shirt flakers and Gentlemen Furnishers 



J. C. BORWELL, 

HOTTER 

¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥ 

Exchange Building 

87 EAST MONROE STREET 

CHICAGO. 

Discount to Students. 



FRANK & KRATZMJELLER 

Practical Makers, also Importers of 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

Guaranteed, Aseptible and Selected 
Instruments only. 

56 Dearborn Street, Near Randolph 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Tail©! 3 



FSRST-CLnSS V0RK ® 
\©DElRATK PRICES 



Wo #^a^iif ©n Street 

cHica^© 



sb Stadwta 



ZTbe Xon&on 



STEAM DYE WORKS. 

GENTS' CLOTHES 

CLEANED, DYED AND REPAIRED 

EQUAL TO NEW 

WORKS, 592 MADISON STREET 
CHICAGO 

A. KAUFMAN, PROPRIETOR 



37- 



MONTHLY PAYMENTS ™"%™ M i" A,N CASH DISCOUNTS 



A. C. CLARK & CO. 



DEALERS IN 



Surgical ^hairs and fables. 

Second-Hand Chairs of all makes for Sale Cheap. 
Improved Surgical Tables. 

1022 MASONIC TEMPLE 

CHICAGO 



GENERAL AGENTS 

New Harvard Surgical Chair. 
Harvard Physicians' Cabinets. 




A. GEHRMANN, M. D., Bacteriologist. JOHN A. WESENER, Ph. G., 1W. D., Chemist. 

LUDWIG HEKTOEN, M. D., Pathologist. 

W. A. EVANS, M. D., Pathologist. WM. M. HARSHA, M. D., Secretary. 



Colurpbus t\edicdi\ 
Laboratory 

COUUA\BUS A\E7AORIAL BUILDING 



*$»> "sv <*$& '»$& •*$& ■*$& 4v 



5uite 1403, 103 State Street, 
.. .. CHICAGO 



The Columbus Medical Laboratory was organized with a view of aiding physicians in diagnosis 
by every technical method of accepted value. The standard is maintained by equip- 
ment, experiment and study. Advance topics in diagnosis, pathology and treatment 
are considered. A fee table embracing the following subjects has been arranged: 

Chemical and microscopical examinations of urine, gastric juice, blood and cystic fluids. 
Microscopical examinations of sputum or pus for tubercle bacillus, pneumococcus, gon- 
ococcus or other pathogenic bacteria. Bacteriological diagnosis of diphtheria, cholera, 
typhoid, anthrax, tetanus and glanders. Microscopical examination and diagnosis of 
pathological tissue from surgical cases or post-mortems. Investigation of sanitary 
and medico-legal questions. 

373 



. . IRombi Camera . . 

IT IS NOT A TOY, BUT A SUCCESS 

w-. $3.50 — » 




Makes a picture square, round or fancy shape. Takes 25 pictures in one loading, snap shot or 
time exposure. The size of the Camera is 1^x2 inches; weight 4 ounces; carry in your pocket. 
All metal; silver bronze finish. The KOMBI, complete, $3.50. Strip of film (25 exposures), 20 
cents extra. Cost of developing roll of film, 15 cents; cost for printing, t cent for each picture. 
Any boy or girl can use it. Every instrument guaranteed. If not for sale by your dealer, sent 
post-paid at above price. 

Send for Illustrated booklet, "All About the Kombi." 



( London, 36 Oxford St., W. 
) Berlin, to Taubenstrasse, W. 



ALFRED C. KEMPER, 

132 & 134 Lake St., CHICAGO. 



374 



Why w M , "Hand=rie=Downs?" 



Wear 

ALL-WOOL BUSINESS SUITS, . 
IMPORTED CLAY WORSTED DRESS SUITS, 
HARRIS CASSIMERE PANTS, . 
KERSEY OR MELTON OVERCOATS, 

MADE TO ORDER 



S12. 88 
14. 5 9 



HENRY COHN,^ h e e s t L l?d d i ng TAILOR 

133 W. MADISON STREET, 

Between Desplaines and Union. 



Ten per cent. Discount to Students. 



Get your Pants pressed and creased free, 
by the College Boys' Tailor 



A. MEYER 

Jasbionable flfoevcbant bailor 

219 and 333 West Madison Street 

CHICAGO 



First=class k \vorkmanship and fit^guaranteed 

375 



xr-fe;-,