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'ERJODICAL DEPARTMENT 



^'HRIODICAL DEPARTMENT 




VOL. XXXVIII, NO. I. SAN FRANCISCO, f EBRUARY 6, 1897. $1.50 PER YEAR 



INCORPORATED 



CI 



Apollinaris m^ 

THE QUEEN OF TABLE WATERS." 



^«#.HC»SCC 



ltJ:ul-OUi OK THP] i^C^^DEMIK \J\£. MEDECINE OE FIli\.lSrCE 

The results of the recent investigations in Paris and the report of the Acadennie 
de Medecine of France have placed Apollinaris Water at the HEAD of ALL the 
waters examined for PURITY and FREEDOM from disease germs. 



Received the HIGHEST AWARD at the WORLD'S FAIR and at the 
ANTWERP EXHIBITION. 

JOHN GAFFREY, 47 First street, San Francisco (Representing CHARLES GRAEF k CO., New York) 




■>■ ■ -.t .V ,>. 



UlaC^c oi>cv rtiKC (SoS, near, S Vim I'foi'l U\v^|■or^ \\\ l- 






■i 



e^ 



W\\\ vou Ivv il aiu Nvurss^lf 



OLD TOM ENGLAN D I 
GILBEYS CASTLE 

OLD TOM GIN 



CROWN DISTILLERIES COMPAM 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




EVERY BOTTLE GUARANTEED 



CTKg5- NOBLE 






^ 



BOURBON AND RYE 

VnZHISKIES 

CROWN DISTILLERIES COMPANY 

100-102 Front St., San Francisco 



TO 



FOR& W\ne SSoofe ®Y\^orK° ar^c^ <J\rt'\!^t\c ^06 printing go 

r^ f^^ [^ WOOD CO. '^14-316 BATTERY ST., S. F. 



WHERE NOTHING BUT FIRST-CLASS WORK IS EXECUTED- 



ACHILLE STAR ACE 



76 PEARL STREET, NEW YORK. 



Sole A-jgent in the: TUnlted. Sta.tes for 



GUISEPPE SCALA, Lacryma Christi, Capri, Etc., NAPLES. 
L. LABOREL MELINI, Chianti Wine, FLORENCE. 



Direct R-eceiver Of 



CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES 



^ opytAff 
VVIRE WOUND 



!^Z:^:^9JM 



lV//?e WnAPFEO HOSE 




RUBBER LINED 

GOTTOHJSE 

R. H. PEASE, 

f'icr-ih^rHiilvnt and Matittft^r, 



r<?5-^5> 



(' 



GOLD SEAL RUBBLR GOODS. 
j^:r:hi the best. 




SUCTION HOSE 

SEND FOR PRICES. 

573 to 579 Market Street, 

A.4.\ FUANCISCO. 

73 and 75 First Street, 

rOKlLAXV, OK. 




giebe Bros. & Plagemann 

WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS 

0. K. Rosedale Bourbon and Rye Whiskies 
^^' "" Celebrated Belle of Bourbon 

Southeast Cor. Sacramento and Sansome Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 






f/ceifie WiJME /JMD SflF^IT [REVIEW. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



( Al.IFOKXIA \VINF.S AM) BKANDIKS. 



MINERAL \\Ali;i;s. 



('ivliforiua Wino Association. 

Carpy. V. fi Ci) 

('Iiaiii-ii(> vS; Hon 

I'.iscn Vinoyanl (\)nipan3' 

(iiindhu'li. J. & Co 

(Juasti & I5("rnaiHl 

1 1 a rasz t liv . A rpad 

Italian-Swiss Colony 

Koiilor vt \'an Hcrjjon 

Koiilor iSl Kroiiiiiif; 

KoU) & Dt-nliaril 

I.acliinan vS; Jacobi 

1-aclinian Co., S 

Mann, C. M 

Napa ^'a]l('y Wine Co 

National Wine .Vssouiation.... 

Smith, Jnlins P 

Staraoe, Acliille 

\'ina I>istilifrv 

West, Geo. v^ Son 

Wet niore-Howen Company 



. LM 
. -Jl 
. (i 

. fi 

30 
. 4 
. G 
. 2!> 
. 21 
. 21 
. 5 
. 28 
. L'l 
C. 



34 



DISTILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Crown Distilleries Company 2 

Curley, E. J. & Co ." 5 

Guckenlieinier, A. & Bros 27 

Leading Distillers' Cards 34 

Lew, Ja.s. & Bro 30 

.Mayhew, H. B. & Co 4 

.Meiuecke. Charles & Co 25 

Monarch, R 26 

A. Senior & Son 1 



FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

Chapman, W. B 20 

Finke's Widow, A 28 

HellmannBros& Co 19 

Lachman, S. Co 21 

.Maeondrav Bros. & Lockard 5 

Ros.Hi, D. "P 28 

Sherwooil & Sherwood 17 

Woltr. Wm. & Co IS 



IMPORTERS. 

Cliapman. W. B 20 

Helhnann Bros. & Co 13 

Macondray Bros. & Lockard 30 

Sherwood & Sherwood 16 

Starace, Achille... . 2 

I'avlor. W. A. & Co 32 

Woltr. Wm. & Co 18 



FRUIT BRANDY DISTILLERS. 

Walden & Co 4 

SAN FRANCISCO WHOLESA LF. LKilOIt DEALERS. 

Koll. & D.-nhard h 

Moore, llnnt iS: Co .30 

Martin, F. it Co 4 

Natier, .\lfs iSt Brnne 4 

Siebe Bros. & Plap>niann 2 

Spruance, Stanley \ Co 4 

IMPOHTFI) LlvANDY. 

E. Remy Martin & Co., Hellman Bros. v"t Co.. .Vgents 13 

CaflVey, John (Representing Charle.s (inief & Co.) 12 



A|iollinaris C^ompany, Ltd. 
William WollV .V Co 



1 
26 



SYRUPS, CORDLVLS, BITTERS, PRUNE JUICE, ETC. 

Frlenhach, Martin 17 

Koll. & D.'nhard .5 

Rudkin, Wm. II 28 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Bifc Four Railway Routes 34 

BonestelUS; Co., Pajier Dealei-s 26 

Korlx'l, F. vSc Bros . Redwood Tanks 28 

(ioodyear Rnhher Co... 2 

Henderson, Wm. G 30 

Hercides Gas laitrine Works, Gas and Distillate Engines 15 

Loma Prieta LnmherCo 28 

Monon Route, lOOO Mile Tickets 34 

O'Brien, James, Saloon 4 

Sanders & Co., Co[)persmiths 4 

Wandelt, Sanuu-l, Cooj.er and Tank Builder 26 

Wayland & Co., Wine Fininfjs 14 

Zellerbach it Sons, Paper 28 



Cresta Blanca 

SOUVEMI-R VINTAGES. 

GOLD MEDAL, PARIS EXPOSITION, 1889. 

Location of Vineyard: Livermore, Alameda Co., Cal. 
Fac-Klmilv of Liibel on Genuine CreMta lilnniii ^Vlncs. 



Cresta Blanca Souvenir Vintaoes 

SAUTERNE-SOUVENIR 



G to MiaiL p*«it LxrOBiT 




yV^ /*»» tt'i^-tJo* 



'tt- g tAm0* CPo.] 



#^^«W#«'M 



CRESTA BLANCA. 



San fmncisco Depot 



MO MONTGOMCdT ST. 



TiK'fil- Wlnos are ftcrved lo the giiefllB of all Ihe leadlnt Hotels and 
noftaiirants mi the Pacific Coaat. 
For |>rlr('-ltt*» npl'ly tn 

U/EJ/HOI^E-BOU/Efl QO. 

140 MONTGOMRY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
BOTTLING CELLARS. CORNER LARKIN and McALLISTER STS. 



Su-bscribe for the 



'pacific TJO"^'^^ ^'^"^ ^y:r:t ^cvicic 



ONE DOLLAR AND A HALF PER YEAR. 



AOVeitTISIftO RATES ON APPLICATION. 



f/fSlKie WI^'E /tjMic) t;j if^lT f^EVlEW. 





^^pORTEHS&WHOLES/qtf 

.[&yQUORM[RCI 





323-325 Maket St., S, F, 



D. V. B. JIF.XAKIi;. 



E. MARTIN &, CO., 

iMrOHTEllS AND WTIOLES.U.E 

IxlQVOH mERCHflriTS, 

411 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

SOLE AGENTS FOE 

J. F. CUTTER AND ARGONAUT OLD BOURBONS. 



CllA.-?. W FORE. 



J"J1.N M'Kl'ANt K. 



Spruance, Stanley & Co. 

raroHTKus A\D ,Tor;p.n:s of fixe 

WtisEies, Wjiies aiiil Lipis. 

Sole agents for the Celebrated African Stomach Bitters 

lie Front "^tkfft. S\> ri:Av>'i. '\\i. 



i\TEi{\.\L wmm. kl\) m\m liiiiiiviJis, 

THE EXPORTATION OF GRAPE BRANDY, WHISKY AND SPIRITS FROM 
BONO OR \NITH PRIVILEGE OF DRAWBACK. SPECIALTIES 

Dealers in U. 8. Standard Hjdnimeler;' and Extra Stems, Prime's Watita};f 

Riids. Die Wliicls and Gauging rode. Also Distillers', Rectihurs. 

Wholesale Li<|U(>r Dealui-s and Brewers' Books. 



OFFICE. 424 BATTERY STREET, 

F=. O "Box 2409. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 

TelepJ-iorae; ©4©. 



OHT.WT TO DISTILLEIIS .\M) WINE M.lKEliS 




Tlii- I.. ii-ieseiitA our lalt*»l Im- 
jtroved i'oitl> ouh Stilt \^llictllla^ 
hecn iterfcvleil after ye&rs of exporimeul , 
niul Iai;;e expense. 

This Still has tfie inlftintane 
over ntt nthci'H, aB it is economical, 
easily operated and separateti the alde- 
liydc and other infeiior uiU and makes a 
pure and lii^'li cla<o brandy, and veilucvs 
the cost fullij iiliu'tif per cent, in 
I: bor and fuel It retjiilresi very little or 
hj water and ufili/.eBall lieat tieretofore 
wasted. 

We refer lu Gko. Wmt A Son, Stock 
tun; John Whbelek. St. Helena. 



ALL KIND OF COPPER WORK DON? AT SHORT NOTICE. 

SANDERS I CO. 



4'Jl *NI> 4J:< .Mi.-^sioN St. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Pat'd Sept. 2H, isai. 



OLIVINA VINEYARD. 

The OLIVINA Comprises 600 Acres of Hill 

Side Vineyard, Located in the 

Livermore Valley. 

f,.'/^!ii"4^. DRY, DELICATE, WELL MATURED TABLE WINES 
-^'-i'W'^ A SPECIALTY. 

'^^^^^ # "^ SEMt lOK SAMPLE ORDEK. 

^i roiiiti:sirosiiKscK Sin kitiii F.y Tiik Groweh, 

JULIUS PAUL SMITH, LIVERMORE, CAL. 




N Y Orncc, 65 



to 67 DuANC StrcET. 



t J >iiN j;i;knaud. 



Secondo Ouasti. 



- : - Groivers and DMUers of • l - 

California WIHES aoH BiPIES 

Winery at G^iasti & y.''i-mn</.- Sjmr, Bttwecn West 
Glendale and Tropica, Oil. 



b^F^GE PRODUeEF^S Of SWEET WINES. 

1/iiii. I /;i<<'. ' '"'• •>'<' mill lliitiirilii Sis., I.OS .lnjiflrs, inl. 



WALDEN 6l CO., 

Geyser Peak Vineyards and Brandy Distillery, 

GF.YSHR\1I.I.I'.. SO NO. MA CO,. CAL, 

Walden Cognac, ManzanitaSherry,<Slc. 

ULD Brandy in Cases, Brandied Fruits. 

\ r OF.N rofiNAC In niHili' alter itic I'rcncli liirmuin, from iii'U'iti.l U^'f\\ Krnii.-s. Iin« lic'cn Hicci'usfiill.v Inlroilnrc.l, ard 
riy HI. Id In Ih.' |irlni't|inl ninrkclH.il Kiimin', In i'i>m|>i'llllun wllli rri'neli Cognac, ilffielal licnnan and KnKllvli 
■ i.ron.inn.'rd It llif i.iir.-Hl Itrnn.l.v whli'li .'(.nirw to (ti.'lr mnrkcl*. 

■ ' Itilly Hiillalilr for III.' druK trado'aiul nitieri., whi.ri' nurltv 1.. di'tiiand.'.!. While abroa.l these gnodH micresstnlly 
l.u.vlriK rnin.'ilutleitnn the Kroni'h, Ihr American Imycr lian thi' Hilvanlauc In |.rlc , liolween the Internal lleveiuio IB..i 
I li<-re an.l the Cni.toiii« dntics on forelKn l.rundlcH. HamplcH will be ncnt on a]tplU'atlon. 




TRADE-MARK 



l'.iu..steiMi C)fli( 



'2'.) l»f.irl Street, X.'w ^^.rlx. 




f^eifie WIJME /rJMB Sflf^lT f^EVIEwv 



KOLB & DENH ARD 



OLD NONPAREIL 

BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES. 
CALIFORNIA 

WINES and BRANDIES. 

OFFICE AND VAULTS 

450-!*2C Mo\ni(>Mt:i{y sr., s.i.v fiiawisco. 

Telephone No. SOW. 




IMPORTERS AND SOLE AGENTS 
PACiriC COAST FOR 

CRYSTAL 

Belfast Ginger Ale 









PiSTILLERs 

4^1ou^on^n^:Kye. 



Iand Made_ • • 
* * v5ourA\a5h Whiskey. 

Je55an7ir7eCo. 




These MltlsU-lctt arc tiiaJc In the Famous " ItT.l'K aJt.lSS TtEOloy" 8o 
juailij crlrliraieu as lUe home of the flncxt M'hiskirs lit Ihr World, and 
u-hirti hare bfcii jir Ihe last Ccnliiry, rrrnpiilzeil as siirh. iilrliifi Ihc char- 
acter and hlfth sliiiidino lo KICSTl't'K V M'/Z/.S/i //;.S iililtli .'/iri; iinu- i-iijinj. 



^ 



T.HESE TAMOUS WHISKIES CAN BE HAD IN LOTS TO SUIT THE TRADE FROM 

HELL/v\A/N/N BROS. & CO., 52:5 p-RO/NT STREiET. SA/N p-RArJeiSeO. 



[\othing Too barge or Too Small! 



WE PRINT EVERYTHING 



IF YOU are in need of PRINTING give us a call We make a specialty 
of fine Printing, Engraving, Lithographing, Photo-Engraving and, also 
original designs for labels of every description. 



R. M. WOOD CO. 



M i-:n<; 



I i A 'IV K u V strp:kt 

TELEPHONE MAIN "^"Q 



f/eifie WIJME /JND Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



1894 Tr5.n:j]y[p=H:jPi.isrT jPLGjPtiisr less 
EUROPEAN QUALITY RECOGNITION 



BELGIUM 



FRANCE 



FRANCE 



FRANCE 







CALIFORNIA 



Awarded 37 Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals ! 

THE HARASZTHY CHAMPAGNES 

liKU'l' I)WV i:X I KA DWY 

530 WASHINGTON STREET 




C. M. MANN 



Successor to I. DE TURK 



W 



iTLCS an( 



BRANDY, 
PORT, 

SHERRY, 

ANGELICA, 

MUSCAT 

TOKAY, 

MADEIRA, 

MALAGA. 



SAUTERNE, 

GUTEDEL, 

RIESLING, 

BURGUNDY, 

CABERNET, 

ZINFANDEL, 

XX CLARET, 



IRELAND 




SAN FRANCISCO 



VINEYARDS: 
Sonoma County, Cal. | 

OFFICE AND CELLARS! 

216-218-220 Sacramento and 221 Goniipercial Stroct, San Francisco, Cal. 




T|HE jilSHEST AWAR9 f ARIS EXPOSITIOJM 




1889. 



GObID ^E13AL. 



Elstablistied. 

Ciuer/r\ore l/alley, <$al, 

18SS. 



">< 




6\^ 



■•PP 



,xiO^^ 



t^ 



.-^ 






^' 



A. e. GHADGHE, Proprietor. 

Ol-l-KEA.SVl'l I'OT, 17 FlKST.><T. 8an Fhancisco 



CHAUCHE &. BON, Successor to A. G. CHAUCHE 

S.iic (;cmT:ii .\i;iMi|i; for tin' ^f"^^T-l^)^c;E 'Vinks, 










TV, 



,).-t.I f-Kn;. 



jpyitritn'irrf 



Gold Medal for Sherries and Sweet Wines. Dublin Exposition 1592. 

EISE]M VIIMEYARD CO. 



-rKlNHHK 1 7v'( )n I 'CEKS ( V-- 



SWEET WINES. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND SAMPLES. 



oFFict:. 

12 STEVENSON ST., S. F. 




[INCORPORATED.] 



VOL. XXXVUI, No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 6, 1897. 






$1.50 PER YEAR 



Issued Semi- Monthly. 



WOOD A SCOTT. 



I'l I! USHERS. 



WINFICLD SCOTT. COITOn 
R M WOOD, M«NAOCR 

316 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 
TELEPHONB NO. 709. CABLE ADDRESS "fIELDMIN." SAN FRANCISCO 



The rAClFlC UI.VA; .I.VW .S/'/K/l' l{f:Vir.n is ll,e oitlii pniin- <>j- 
llM rtntis Wfst of fhicntjo. It ctrrtitatrs ainoiiif the Whnlrsute nud 
llflall Mine (ni<( S/ilrll Dealers of the l'(iei/l<' (oasl. the llhie Milk- 
ers timl lif-ffMfii/ IHstillers of i'atifornia, the Wine a ml llriiiuli/ huy~ 
ers, and the Iniporters. histlUers and tjobbers of the United States. 



All < IIKCKS. nil tFTS. MO\Er ORVEKS, ETC., should he 
made pa liable to noOU <£■ SCOTT. 

Subsii iplicin per year— in adTance, postage paid: 

Kor the United Stales, Mexico ami Canada II 50 

For Eiiroj^an countries 2 50 

Single copies 10 

Entered at ttie San Francibco Post Olllce as second-class matter. 



J^O-EITOY: 



EASTERN BRANCH OFFICE: 
\V. .\. GEFT, Miinager; Koom 32, No. 78 I'art Place, New York City. 



Property for Sale. 



FOR S.VLK, in a foa.st county, splendid viii<\vai-d and i-ancli 
pfDjiL-rty of 410 acre.s, 14t) acres of which i.s in fiill-l)fariii<; vines. 
No phylloxera, and the propertj' i.s so located that, witii ordinary 
care, the insect will not reach it. Property is well improved, 
having 1 brick distillery, 2 brick cellars, 2 adobe cellars, and 
plenty of oak and reilwuod cooperage. Stock of wine on hand 
averages "."i.UdO gallons, which goes with the place. IJesides the 
vineyard, there is 100 acres of bottom land for liaj', 100 acres of 
pasture, adapted for hay. and 70 acres of wooded pasture which 
can be set to vines. 

.\si(le from the vineyard, the ranch is well stocked, and has 
ample and substantial buildings. 

This one of the choicest properties iu California. The dry 
wines from the vineyard have a sph-ndid reputation, and there is 
a steady established trade for them. .Satisfactory reasons for 
selling, and the place will be sold cheap. 

For further particulars .address \Vinfii;i,i> Scott, care of Ta- 
cilic Willi- and .Spirit Review, or aj)ply at Room 2, sevciitii lloor 
Mills Building, from 9 to 10 A. m. 

Vineyard for Sale at a Bargain, to Close an Estate. 

TIIIKTV .VCRlvS choice foreign wine grapes, with winery 
(.■{."),0(l(i gallons, tiiii^ oak casks) and distillery complete. .Address 
(i. !>.. Pacific Wine and Spirit Review, Sail Francisco, Cal. 

W.KN'TKD — Situation wante(I by a married man : age, 4ii. 
Twelve years experience on a viin-j-ard in wine making. Rest 
references. .Vddre.ss J. M., this olVice. 



MARKET -REVIEW. 



/^ALIFORNl.V WINKS.— The market maintains its healthy 
^^ tone. X'alues arc well inaintaine(l. and. notwithstanding 
the oil' season, shipments, by sea in particular, were very good 
iluring the month of Jauuarj'. The aggregate was over a half 
million of gallons and more than two thousand cases. Nearly all 
of the latter da.ss of goods went to Central America, while in 
bulk wines, Japan and China came forward with an increased 
demand, involving -17,000 gallons. Rail shipments are not j'et 
reported, but, on account of the cold weather in the East, it is 
not to be presumed that they have been up to the average. Job- 
bers feel (piite well salislicd with the situation, and confidently 
look I'or the arrival of a healthy lot of Spring orders, beginning 
next niontii. We are pleased to be able to state that our advices 
from Kastern markets as to present business and future prospects 
warrant such au estimate of the outlook. 

The fact that the coming Congress is to pass a new tariff 
law, and that the duty on domestic wines is to be considered iis 
to change or no change, is ciiusing considerable discussion, not 
only in California, but the East. Elsewhere in this Journal will 
be found our views on the subject, and the reasons for our con- 
clusions. The conditions are plain enough, and we see no rea- 
sonable ground upon which to base a plea for a higher tariff. In 
the article referred to the subject is placed •' wide open "* for dis- 
cussion, and we hope tho.se who are interested and have ideas to 
put forth, will bring them forward at au early date. It is a 
serious question, and one that demands grave consideration before 
the matter is finally determined. If such consideration is given, 
we are confident that the majority sentiment will be in favor of 
the present rale. Do nol lail to read the article referred to. 

On account of natural conditions, sweets are holding up well 
and may be relied upon to do so indefinitely. Receipts of wines 
from interior collars during the past month were larger than was 
expccteil, the total being in excess of the quantity shipped out iu 
the same month of I MM;. 

Late advices from New York are as follows : •' The demand 
for dry wines has somewhat improved during the past two 
weeks, which does not mean, however, that the market can be 
called very active. Several outside lots have been disposwl of at 
prices below the market, principally owing to the i|uality, which 
was not up to the st^indard. The tendency of the market is up- 
ward. In sweet wines the demand has also improved a little. 
The dealei-s do not expi-cl any break in the sweet-wine eombiiia- 
tloii since it has become known that the (|uaiitity on hand is a 
very limited one. It is estimated that the vintage of 1J<!»6 sweet 
wines will not exceed .'i,7r)0,0(K) gallons, which is hardly enough 
for orilinary re(|uiremenls." 

The exports of California wines by sea in January, 1897, 
were as follows : 



8 



pyveifie wijme /r^JQ spiF^iT review 



To — Cases. 

New York 1 

Central America 1,951 

Mexico 53 

Hawaii 31 

British Cohinibia 

Japan and China 35 

Great liritain 

(ierniany 

Otlier Ilnropean 

Taliiti 

All other foreign 50 



Gallons. 

443,005 

.36.715 

T-',M!U 

5,815 

GUI 

4,(i'_'ll 

47,300 



Value. 

S1S4.4,S0 

'_M,3'_".l 

4,SM0 

3, COO 

244 

2,1.52 

l(i,5iS4 



740 



623 



Total for October 2,121 



551,898 8236.881 

/J>ALIFORNI.V BKANDY. — The movement is extremely 
C ^ slow, and there are no indications of an immediate clinnge. 
The onlv fealnre of the market is the export of 1 100 half-harrels 
of very old goods, regarded as the finest in the State. On acconnt 
of their age and qnality, tiiese goods will doubtless find a ready 
sale in foreign markets. 

The exports of California biandy by sea in January. 18'.i7, 

were as follows : 

rpo Cases. Gallons. \ alue. 

Domestic Ea.stern ports 1 !),458 8 9,485 

Great Britain 25 20 

Germany ■-.".V. 

All other foreign 129 134 /96 



Total 130 



9,(;i' 



810,301 



»* '^HISKIES.— Trade is fair, and witli some houses good. 
^^ Jobbers of established brands report their country trade 
in a noticeably better condition. Customers are gradually in- 
creasing their orders for current demands, and at the same time, 
are. for the first time in several years, reducing their indebted- 
ness. These are encouraging signs, and are regarded by the 
trade as the forerunners ol a good business year. 

With collections growing easier, and ample crops promised, 
there seems to be no reason why this State should not advance 
again to her natural prosperity. Receipts of goods dui'ing Janu- 
ary were of nominal volume. 

A despatch from Washington dated the 2d instant says. 
" The Senate committee on Finance to-day decided to report 
favorably on the so-called bottling bill. This bill was desiied by 
distillers and opposed Ijy l)ottlers. The report was not unani- 
mous, and may be opposed by some members of the committee in 
the Senate. The bill provides for bottling spirits in bond." 

The receipts of Amiu-ican whiskies at San Francisco by 
sea and rail in January, 1897, were as follows: 

Cases. Bbls. Hf-bbls. Kegs. 

By sea from Atlantic ports 730 

" Re-imported 215 

By rail overland 563 1,270 59 5 



Total. 



663 



2,215 59 5 

The receipts of alcohol by rail in January were 6(i l)arrcls 

and 15 drums; of spirits, 1362 barrels. 

Tlie imports of foreign whiskies in .lanuary were 170 cases, 

25 octaves and 1 cask. 

The exports of .\merican whisky by sea to foieign ports 

were 877 cases and 9.50 gallons, valued at $7,876. 

/MI'OKTATIONS. — Tiiere isnotiiing particular to note in this 
line. Business still drags provokingiy, but it is miii^h bet- 
ter than it was some months ago. Klsewlu're will be found tim 
exports of beers to Central America, a feature wliich will here- 
after appear in the Rkvikw. It will be found that our neighboi's 
down thai way have a good appetite for malt beverages as well 
as others. 

The principal imjiortations at San I'"raiicisco in .lanuary, 
1897, were as follows : 

Champagne— 050 cases. 



Still Wine -.■. 9 quarters, 70 octaves, 1 cask and 1 

barrel. 

Brandy — 150 cji-sps ; also, from overland. 16 kegs. 

Gin and Geneva — 975 ca.ses ; al.so from overland, 90 cases, 
30 barrels and 115 kegs. 

Mineral Water — 41 cases and 50 barrels. 

Rum — 25 cases, 15 octaves; also, from overlaml and via 
Cape IForn, 28 I arrels and 22 half-barrels. 

Chartreuse — 25 cases. 

I'ndesignated Spirits — 1.50 cases. 

rudi'signated Liqueurs — 42 cases. 

Foreign Beer (by sea) — 306 cases. 

P'oreign .Me (by sea) — 25 barrels. 

Foreign .Stout (by sea) — 100 cases. 

Bulk Beer (from overland)— 322 barrels, 164 half-barrels. 2.56 
qtiarter-barrels and 100 kegs. 

Bottled Beer (from overland)— 686 cases, 297 casks, 2.35 
barrels. 

Ginger .'Vie — 140 barrels. 

Pi'une Juice — 20 barrels. 

Cider (by sea from .Atlantic ports) — 30 cases. 

RV.FM KXPORTS. 

The total exports of Beer from San Francisco to foreign 
ports in Janiuiry were as follows : 

Boftled^l.750 cases, 125 casks, 116 barrels, 4 packages. 

Bulk — 100 half-barrels, 45 third-barrels, 50 quarter-barrels, 
145 sixth-barrels and 75 kegs. 



T-RADE O/N THE COAST. 



Regarding trade on the I'acific Coast, Messrs. Sherwood & 
Sherwood contributed the following to a recent number of J/iV/a'« 
Criterion : 

" In reply to your communication relative to the conditions 
atlecting the wliolesale market on the Pacific Coast, and 
the prospects here, many in the trade .seem to think that the 
future has bettei' things in store than have been doled out for the 
past few years. Possibly the wish is father to the tliougiit. 
Howevei', the facts that now the banks and capitalists are no 
longer hoarding against a financial storm, and that capital will 
now venture forth again in the developnjcnt of the far West, give 
the trade that feeling of confidence, which it has so long lacked. 
We naturally look with some anxiety to the inevitable tinkei'ing 
with the tarifl' and with the internal revenue. We feel that 
when the necessary revenue of the government is liei-eafter pro- 
vided for against all contingencies, the political parties should 
agree not to disturb the frame woi'kof the Government revenues 
for j)eriods of from eight to twelve years. Real prosperity can- 
not i-eturn so long as there is constant uncertainty as to the gov- 
ernment's attitude toward its citizens' various commercial, in- 
dustrial, mining and agricultural pursuits.'" 



The State Supreme Court has decided that the acts of a 
bank cashier without the sanction of the board of directors, 
although with their knowledge, is binding on the corporation. 
F. Chevalier & Co., of this city, contracted to purchase a (|\iaii- 
tity of wine in Na])a county belonging to Dowdell & Son, upon 
which the Bank of St. Helena had a mortgage. The cashier of 
the bank, acting for the institution, ])resented an agreement that 
the price for the wine shipped to Chevalier & Co. shoidd be i)aid 
to the bank ; the mortgage was assigned to Charles Carpy, who 
objected to the wine being shipped from Napa county. The lower 
court found|^hat the shipment shoultl be stopped, and gave a 
decree of foreclosure to the plaintilV. The Supreme Court re- 
versed the judgment of the lower court upon the ground that as 
the president and four of the directors knew of the transaction 
with Chevalier & Co. they virtually countenanced the agreement. 

I. W. Kingman, who re])rc8ented T. II. Sherley. & Co., of 
Louisville, for many years, lias become Pacific Coast representa- 
tive of the Cook & ''ernheiuH'r Company of New York. This 
(N)inpany controls the " < >lil Valley " lirand.and are the principal 
holders of" Ilannisvilh; ■' and " Mt. N'ernon '' ryes. Mi-. King- 
man will handle all tlie goods of the C'ompany. and in hini the 
lioii.se has certaiiilv received an accession of streugih. 



f/reifie WIJNE j'k^iD Sflf^lT PREVIEW. 



TARIFF O/N WI/NES. 



A Discussion of the Proposed Fifty Gents Duly on Dry Wines. 



ll Ix'iiifj ilctiiiiti'ly si'ttk'd tliiit tliorc will he an i-xtivi ncssimi 
of (\>ii';r<'ss iiniiunliatcly iil'lcr tlic inaufjuratioii of Majiir 
McKinley i»s I'residt'iit on the 4tli of noxt month, ii (juestion of 
j;rav»' iniportnnri' is prcsentoil to tlie ('alifornid wino producers 
as to what sliall he asked from the framers of the new tarilV law 
in the way of protection for wines and hrandii's 

At first sijjiit it would seem that it would he wise to ask for 
an inereaee of duty. We understand there was a " Tarifl" Con- 
feriMiee " at the Ohanihcr of Coninieree rooms in San Franeiseo, 
not lonj; since, where representatives of the fruit, luiulter, wine, 
mining and other interests of the State assemhled, and, after 
tleliheration. dele>;ated (!en. N. P. Chipman to write a ]>amphlet 
on the taritV iiueslion, with ar{;umeiits proposed hy the f^entle- 
men then present. Andrea ,Sbarhoi-o, secretary of the Italian- 
Swiss Colony, we are informed, made the principal stalemeat for 
the wine makers. Hi' wanted the duty on dry wines — i.e., 
wines up to 14 per cent, of alcohol — raised to .5(1 cents per fjal- 
lon, the present (igure being ;!i) cents ; the duty on hraiidy he 
wanted raised to $2. .50 per gallon. We understand that hacking 
Mr. ."^harhoro's demand is a commercial organization, the Cali- 
fornia \\'ine Makei's' Corporation. We presume that (ieneral 
Cliipiuau, who knows little or nothing about the wine business 
though a recognized horticidtural authority, will urge this 
increase of duty as to dry wines sim|)ly because Mr. Sbarboro 
and the Corporation advocate it; he would think otherwise were 
he to know the inside history of the present tarilV schedule, with 
agreements made when it was drawn up. and with the certainty 
that fraudulent wines will be made in Kastcrn Ijrick vineyards 
the moment that the Corporation succeeds in its elfort to pul<lry 
wines above 25 cents per gallon from first hands. 

We preface the argument that is to follow with the state- 
ment that one of the publisliers of the P.\ciFrc Wi.ne .\xi> Si'iKir 
Revikw is a straight out, gold standard, high protectionist Re- 
publican, and that the other publisher is a Silver Republican and 
high protectionist. This we wi.sh distinctly uuderstood, so that 
when this matter is read, no " free-trader '' jibe w'ill apply in 
either case. 

We believe that the demand of the California Wine Makers' 
Corporation — or the leaders thereof — for a higher duty on im- 
ported dry wines, is impolitic, unwise, uncalled lor. and certain 
to involve the members thereof in a contest in Washington 
which will prove- costly in purse and useless as far as actual re- 
sults are concerned. We believe it for the following reasons : 

1. The present duty of thirty cents per gallon alVords sulli- 
cient protection. 

-. Long before .30 eent« per gallon is realized for new dry 
wines in California, the manufacture of spurious wines in the 
Kiist will have rc-comnienced. 

:!. We want no atilicially produced high prices for wines in 
order to stimulate vineyard planting to abnormal proportions. 

4. It invites reprisals from the Wine and .Spirit Traders' 
Society : reprisals in the form of an internal revenue tax on wine. 

5. It is in violation of the spirit of an agreement ma<le by 
the late Col. Charles McK. Lei>ser, of Jiotiforr.^. I'rcsidiwit of the 
Wine and .Spirit Traders' Society, and Mr. Charles A. Wetinore, 
made at the tinii' the Wil.son-tJorman law was being frann'd — 
an agreement that Mr. Frederick .lacobi. of I..acliman iV .Jac(tbi, 
who recently appeared before the House Ways and Means com- 
mittee, urging a .jo-ceiit duty, was and is perfectly well aware <pf. 

These topics we shall handle separately. 

"1. The |iresent duty of 3<t cents afl'ords siiflicient pro- 
tection." 

When the McKinley law was in force the duty on all gra<les 
i>f wine was .5l> cents a gallon. That was from l.S!M)till l.y.l4. 



.\t that time new wine in California could be bought for 7 to in 
cents per gallon. The tarilV hail nothing to do with the price of 
lh(^ domestic product ; it simply kept cheaj) foreign wines out of 
this country. If .'")il cents per gallon would not raise the price of 
wine then, how will it raise it now '! And it is a fact that under 
the Wilson-Gorman law. with its 30-cent tarilV, the price of now 
wine has ris(>n — not on account of the tarilV at all, but because 
the crops of the last two seasons have been short and organiza- 
tion of growers has accentuated the law of demand and 8U|>ply. 
We maintain that a larilV of .')() cents per gallon will not afford 
one whit more of protection than will the present .'iO-cent rate. 

Suppose, however, for argument, that the price of wine from 
first hands will be pushed up. say, to .30 or ^Ft cents, or more, by 
the duty, or by an organization like the California Wine Makers' 
Corpor-ation. What will be the ultimate result to the producers? 
Most certainly it will stimulate a tremendous [ilanting of now 
vineyards, owing to an era of boom prices. A fresh crop of 
vineyardists will rush in, there will be an era of over-i)lanting, 
and the business will be done to death. We have had one expe- 
rience of that sort in this State already; we don't want 
another. The raisin men have had their experience, and so 
have other lines of industry. As it is, the wine men have the 
most [irolitable branch of agriculture in the State. At 20 cents 
per gallon for iu>w wine they can make a good profit. Do they 
want to sj)oil it all by an excess of zeal ? 

'• 2. Long before .30 cents per gallon is realized for new 
dry wines in California, the manufacture of spurious wines in 
the East will have re-commenced." 

This is simply a matter of arithmetic. At the day of writ- 
ing — .January 28th, 1S',)7 — the price of spirits in Chicago and 
New York was 81.18 per proof gallon, tax-paid. One proof 
gallon of s])irits wmII provide " material " for about 4A gal- 
lons of spurious wine. That is to say, the spirits will cost 2(!4 
cents per gallon of '• wine." Jut let the California Wine 
Makers' Corporation, or Congress, or any body else try to send 
the price of wine above what the brick vineyardists can turn it 
out for, laid down in New York, Chicago or New Orleans, and 
they will find the cheap markets flooded with the stuff. It is no use 
hedging about this point. The manufacture cannot be stopped 
under existing laws, and California protlucers had plenty of com- 
petition of this sort when prices were up before, in 1S80 to 1885. 
Those in charge of the Wine Makers' Corporation, Mr. Wheeler 
in particular, know all about this and the efl"ort to pass a National 
Pure Wine Law in 1S".»5 and ISOO. Now that the Corporation 
has abandoned its purely commercial policy, and seeks to influ- 
ence legislation, it would be advisable for it. and Mr. Wheeler, 
and Mr. Sbarboro to take up the proposed National Pure Wine 
Law, as written then and as side-tracked in Congre.s-s, rather than 
involve part of the industry in a struggle with the Wine and 
S|)irit Traders' Society which will cost them a pretty penny in 
money, and probably something in prestige before it is ended, 
and all lor a bootless purpose? • 

''3. We want no artificially produced high prices for wines 
in order to stimulate vineyard planting to abnornuvl ]>roportions.'' 

There is an old adage to the elVeet that "a burnt child 
dreads the fire." There is another to the elVect that " fools rash 
in where angels fear to tread." .Vdmitting that all the sanguine 
hopi'S and plans of the.se gentlemen as to prices come true, what 
then';" Certainly a period of vineyard planting that will end 
in a craz(> and a smash. .\ll of the old-timers who have been 
through the dejiression of 1886-1894 will plant some, but there 
will be another feverish period of vineyard planting and winerv 
bnililing, the like of which the State has not experienced. There 
will be a "boom," in other words, which will eventually fall as 
Hat as the raisin boom is to-ilay. Kverybody who has a spani 
dollar will rush in pell mell as before, and the end will be inevi- 
table stagnation. 

•' 4. It invites repiisals from the Wine and Spirit Traders' 



10 



PAGIfie WIJME /(NiD SPIF^IT REVIEW 



Society ; reprisals in the form of au internal revenue tax on 
wine." 

That undoulitodlv puts still anotlx'r aspect on the (lucstion. 
Ever since Schedule H of (he AVilsou-Gornian law went into 
ffl'eet — and it is a purely in'otcclivc sclicdulc — the California 
wine people have been at peace with this society, which is com- 
posed of the leading iniportei-sof the United States and many of 
the principal dealers. \Vc have been one with them on (pies- 
tions of tarill' law and interpi-etations thereof. We have not 
been bothered or harassed by them. But now comes an implic<l 
threat in correspondence which we hold, that if California pro- 
ducers insist on an increa.se in tariff their society will insist on 
an internal revenue tax on natural domestic wines. 

This is a phase of the question which the tarifi' convention 
and carpenters did not think about. It confronts the wine men, 
however, as an actuality. .-Vnd tlie imposition of an internal 
revenue tax on wine is not a new idea in W ashington. It was 
seriously considered by the Congress which adopted the Wilson- 
Gorman law. We only escaped by showing that the quantity of 
wine made was so small - say 30.000,01)0 gallons — in the fuited 
States that a tax equivalent to the beer tax of 3 cent.s per gallon 
would only raise a revenue of $900,000 annually, or not enough 
to pay costs of collection. A tax of 10 or 20 cents per gallon 
could easily be proposed bj' an active, energetic -lobbyist in 
Washington, and this is the time when schemes to raise the 
revenue are regarded with favor at the Capital. If the united 
power of the brewers of the United States — a thousandfold 
greater than that of a hiindful of California wine men — will 
scarcely suffice to prevent an iucrea.so of SI per barrel in the tax 
on beer, or 3 cents per gallon, where will Ciilifornia stand with a 
jwwerful Xew York oiganization in the wine trade clamoring for 
au internal revenue tax on wine? 

We do not believe that California wine makers and grape 
growers realize what au internal revenue tax on native wines 
would signify to them. We know that our distillers and sweet 
wine makers think thej' are very closely watched by the Internal 
Revenue officers, but they don't know what interference on the 
part of the Government rciiUy means. Tliey need a few lessons 
in Kentucky, where (iovernment espionage has a greater signifi- 
cance than the visit of an occasional ganger. If we get au in- 
ternal revenue tax on wine, three-fourths of the wine makers 
who are in business to-day will be driven out. The business will 
be centralized to a degree not now believed possible. Wine 
making will cea.se to be a poi)nlar calling in the sense of the 
numbers now engaged in it. In other words, its element of 
strength in dealing with the questions of the day all'ccting the 
business in general, will be destroyed. And finally, how do our 
wine makers like the prospect of paying internal revenue tax on 
their product when a spurious wine manufacturer can get spirits 
directly from the still for SI. 18 per proof gallon, or 2()j cents for 
enough spirits for a gallon of fraudulent wine? 

• "5. It is in violation of the spirit of an agreement made 
by the late Col. Charles McK. Leoser, of Boiifoi-r^, President of 
the Wine an<l Spirit Traders' Society, and Mr. Charles A. Wet- 
more, made at the time the Wilson-tiorman law was being 
framed — an agreement that Mr. Frederick Jacobi, who recently 
appeared before the House Ways and Means committee urging a 
50-ceiit duty, was and is pitrfectly well aware of" 

Colonel Leoser is now dead, but we feel perfectly at liberty 
in telling the story of Schedule II of the tarill law now in oper- 
ation. When the Wilson-Gornnin law was being frami'd, it was 

(liscovi-reil that so interested parlies — importei-s, no doubt — 

had slippiMl in a tariff rate on wines of 50 centos per gallon, pro- 
vulcd tliat In no case nliouUltlie tariff no collected exceed 100 per cent, ad 
valorem . 

Immediately there was a gathering of the mcrchanis in San 
I'Vancisco. A goodly i»ro|i<irti()n of them w<Me scai-ed out of 
their wits, for a 100 jier cent, ad valorem larilf meant that l''i-ench 



wines of the vintage of 1893 could be laid down in New York 
and New Oi-leans at a lower price than the then prevailing price 
for the domestic wines. Kuin stared the industry in the face. 
In the emergency it was agreed that Mr. C. A. Wefmore should 
go on to Washington and see what could be done — the same 
Mr. Wetmore, by the way, who has obtained at Washington 
every substantial good the industry has ever received from the 
National Government. He went to Washington and ascertained 
that a delegation of importers were clamoring for the ad valo- 
rem system. The ad valorem idea was popular then, too, and 
100 per cent, sounded large. Within a few days he had met 
Colonel Leoser and the proper parties in the National Capital- 
Colonel Leoser told him that there was a tremendous pressure 
for lower duties and for the ad valorem system, and th.Tt some 
compromise must be ma<le. To avoid the ad valorem system it 
became necessary for Mr. Wetmore to show that importers of 
wine would get ahrohol in wine at a less price than the tax on 
domestic spirits. He brought this to the attention of the Inter- 
nal Revenue authorities to show them how importers could get 
cheap alcohol, and that clenched the matter. This was all done 
before the internal revenue tax on spirits w.as raised from 90 
cents to SI. 10 per proof gallon, and at the time it wa-s thought 
that the tax would be 81.00 per proof gallon, or say 2 cents per 
alcoholic degree. Jlr. Wetmore and Colonel Leosei- then agreed, 
lirst, that there sliould be an arbitrary line of 14 per cent, of 
alcohol drawn between di y and fortified wines. 

" Well, make the tariff '_* cents per degree Twice 14 is 28 
— say .'iO cents per gallon," said Colonel Leoser. 

" Agreed," .said AVetmore. 

"On fortified wines draw the line at 24 per cent of alcohol. 
Twice 24 is 48 ; make the fortified wine tariff 50 cents," said the 
Colonel. 

Again Mr, Wetmore agreed. 

" And the ad valorem theory goes out.'' 

" Certainly." 

That is substantially the manner of agreement. Mr. .Jacobi 
went over to Washington from New York, and knew of what 
was l)eing done. It was also mutuallj- agreed and understood 
that 30 and 50 cents duty on the two classes of wine was ample 
protection (and so it was and is), and that the Wine and Si)irit 
Traders' Society and the California producers would both be 
satisfied. On that basis we have lived in amity and mutual 
under.'^tanding. The importers had it in their [lower to smother 
us, and they forebore. We need no further protection than we 
are now getting, and to attempt to force them to pay higher 
taxes will certaiidy invite a war in which California will get 
none the best of it. 

To illustrate how the Society feels, here is a (juotatiou from 
a letter they sent to the Ways and Means committee of the 
Hou.so on January 4th : 

•• The argument of Mr. Jacobi, rc)irescnling the California 
wine [iroducers, contains manj' statements that are, to say the 
least, misleading. We believe the pn'sent rates of duties on 
wines to be fair, and to give am|)le protection to the domestic 
producer. In fact, iMr. ,Jacol)i practically admits Ibis after the 
close of his argument. The class of wines coining in under the 
30 cents per gallon duty are offset by cheap American wines 
which are sold for h'ss than .'iO cents. * * * The invoice 
value of wine ini|)orted at 30 cents |)er gallon duly averages (55 
cents, and that over 14 ))er cent, alcoholic strength averages 73 
cents per gallon. The fact that ' inferior goods find a market 
because they bear a foreign stamp ' is largely taken advantage of 
by many dealers in domestic wines to dispose of them under 
foi-cign names, thus resorting to the un-.\mei-ican device of not 
sailing under their own colors.'' 

Not only this, but here is a (juotalioM I'roni a menilieicir the 
Wini> and .Spirit Ti'aders' Society : 

•• I was at the heai-ing before tlu^ Ways an<l Means Commit- 
l('e of the 2Sth ult., and listened to the hai'angue of Mr. .lacobi 
with amazement," etc. 

To add to this, here is an article wiitlen li\ Mr. \\'elmore 



pAGIpie WljME /cNB Sflf^ir F^EVIEW 



11 



liiinscir in rt'niiiil to llir xludiilc in llic Wilsoii-GoniKiii Inw : 
'■ Tlic pross n'pui'ts of Mi-. .Incolii'.s ;iif;imit'iil ilo not tjivc ii 
cli-ar iilcii of tlic situation. Tlic present tarill' on wines is 'M) 
cents per •jiiilon for proiliicts eonliiinin;; not nioit" tliiin II per 
cent, of aleoliol and od eeiils on all over 14 per eent. anil not e\- 
eeeilin-; "Jl per eent. .Ml ovi"r -4 per cent, are treated as spirits. 
Spirits of all kinds $1 .Sil per proof j^'allon. The MeKinley tarilV, 
wliieli liad heen in operation only a few years, raised the duties 
withont any desire expri'ssed on the part of California interests. 
They hail heen lH cents on still wines of all kiinls not exeeedinf» 
'_'4 per eent. ami $'J for spirits. It was a surprise to our people 
when the wine duty was raisetl to 'tO cents and spirits to §'.' ."lO, 
and our hest infiirnied men thought that thi> ehanf^e woidd do 
more harm than f^ood and invite reprisals whenever the friends 
of lower taritVs nii<;ht he in power. During the operation of tiiis 
taritV both wines and hrandies fell in value to the lowest prices 
ever known. The piesent tarilV — 30 cents on dry natural wines 
and ."lO cents on fortilied. such as ports and sherries— averages 
the same as the old 40-cent rate, hut is more scientific as it aims 
to lax imported wines according to alcoholic >trenf;lh at ahoul 
the same rate as the internal revenue tax on spirits. It is, in 
lad. a rate of 150 to 'JOO per cent, on the cost price of wines to 
the wholesale merchants. I'.ven now, with hetter prices for 
wines, merchants cm and do delivci- their <;oods in New York 
for less than the duly, havinj; the full cost price and expenses on 
foreign wines as the mar-jin of protection. From the protective 
stand-point, our wines have now a larijcr measure of |irotcction 
than any other product I can think of. llifiher duties would he 
unjust and oppressive, and would not raise the price to our pro- 
ducers. The cost of artilicial wines is the rc^;ulator which for- 
bids much advance lieyond present prices. The Wine Tj-ust also 
is an obstacle to any further material advance. I am in favor of 
a stron<j pi'otective tarilV, with at least incidental revenue, and 
should prefer to say a tarill' for revenue with incidental protec- 
tion : but a prohibitive tariff is tyrannical, and fosters shoddy of 
all kinds by reniovitiff from competition superior articles, which 
serve to stimulate proilucers to improve in (|uality. The fine 
wines of foreign countries are not in competition with our prod- 
ucts ; they command prices and customers of their own, and 
their presence is the only incentive left to en<M)urMj;i^ higluM- 
grades in our own wineries. The light Afoselles and Mcdocsand 
the natural sherries of Spain do not compete with us, as we have 
no substitutes for them. It would simply lie arbitrary punishment 
inllicled on people of good ta.ste, who serve to elevate the tone 
of our market, to raise the tariti' now without any benefit to 
our producers. I?ut there are stionger reasons why our industry 
should not support this demand of Mr. .lacobi. In the (irst 
place, we are 'u honor bound to keep faith with the represetita 
lives of the importing interests, who, v.iien Iher political fi lends 
were in power, voluntaiily agreed to a rate of duty which we 
claimed at the time wa,s fair to all and satisfactory to ns. If our 
people l>i-eak faith now they invite reprisals of many kinds, and 
prevent the possibility of any future understandings. Our mer- 
chants should not forget that there is a strong feeling in many 
Slates in favor of an internal revenue ta.x on wine, many think- 
ing it unfair to lax beer and spirits and not wine. My advice lo 
our producers is to let well enough alone: keep faith with <mii' 
present friends, and guard what we have gained by armed ueu- 
trality when politicians wish to make cat's-paws of us. It conies 
in especial bad grace for Mr. .lacobi to take the front in this de- 
mand, as he look part in ratifying the agreement made with the 
Wine and Spirit Traders' .Society of New York, when the pi-esent 
duly wa~ mutually adopted. Now that the native itroducers 
think they have the advantage, they should remember what was 
done when the boot was on the other leg. My opinion has been 
asked by the New York society, and I have unhesitatingly given 
it as I do now, and I should be willing to appear again in Wash- 
ington to defend the Just and jileasant relations that have been 
established." 

To show the feeling in the Kast in relation to this matter, 
we re-print below an article from the Cltirni/n Cinninirrinl Jniiniiil. 
This paper is published suspiciously close to the headi|inirlers of 
the .\inerican .Spirits Mannfaeturing Company, an organization 
not at all likely lo be unfriendly toward an internal revenue ta.x 
on \\ ine : 

'■ HKVKM K IllsrHI.MIN.\ riO.V. 

■ The ICine and Spirit Gazette, iu its last i.ssue, calls attention 
to the fai't that distilled spirits pay a higher tax in proportion to 
the alcohol they contain than does beer, and that domestic wine 
pays no tax at all. It argues that while brandy, rum, gin and 



whisky have lo pay 81 lo foi- every gallon of proof spirit thev 
contain, beer pays only $\ per .'{| gallon bairel, wilhoul any ref- 
erence to its alcoholic strenglh. It claims that as bi'cr contains 
from 6 to It) per cent, of alcohol, at the lowest per cenlage of (! 
per cent, a .'il gallon bari'cl would contain 1 .Xl! gallons of (proof ) 
alcohol, which at Silo per gallon, sanu' :is foj- distilled spirits, 
would show that beer in all fairness should pay a lax ofS'J.Ot in- 
stead of oidy 81 per barrel. .\s to wines, it says : ' The propor- 
tion of alcohol varies from T..'!.'t percent, in some Chablis branilH 
lo ■J.'). I 7 in cerlain brands of sherries, ^'et these wines, when of 
domestic production, pay no tax on the spirit they contain,' and 
asks, ' Can anybody give a reason for this di.screpancy '.' ' 

"The reason why a discrimiiialion is made In favor of fer- 
mented beverages as against distilled spirits is doubtless for the 
purpose of encouraging the use of the milder inloxicanis There 
is also the well-established fact that the same amount of alcohol 
drunk in naturally-fermented wine or beer does not have the 
same intoxicating effect as it has when drunk in the form of 
branily, gin or whisky, 

" W<^ agree with our contemporary, however, in thinking 
that there is an unjust discrimination in favor of both wine and 
beer; in the casi^ of wine the discrimination is not onlv unjust 
and unfair, but outrageous as against both beer and distilled 
spirits. Why. indeed, should drunken stuff, such as so-called 
wim' is, containing, as above stated. 'J.5. 17 per cent, of alcohol, 
not be taxed, the same as any other spirits, for at least 15 per 
cent, of lh(> alcohol which it contains is distilled sjiiril of the 
woi-st kind added to it free of tax, as allowed Ijy the law of l.SiMI? 

'• In the interests of the public revenue and of moralilv and 
tempcrpnce — wm- don't i\iean total abstinence, but in the interests 
of lem|)eraiice, real tempi'i'ane<^ — ami in the interests of wine- 
makers and brewers themselves, there should be a uniform tax 
on all fermented beverages, and the tax should be graduated in 
proportion to the alcohol they contain —wine, beer, cider, etc., 
all alike. The present tax on beer seems to suppose that the 
average beer only contains 3 per cent, of alcohol. Perhaps that 
is about the correct estimate if the alcohol were reckoned as ab- 
solute, hut tax is paid on proof-spirit, which is about half-and- 
half water and alcohol. \ good beer not only can be, but Is, 
made containing not more than /i per cent, proof spirit. In 
fad. such beiM- is the best beer. The .same may be said of wine 
and c-ider. 

" If the revisers of the tariff, then, when they conio to re- 
adjust the internal revenue, will make the tax on all fi-rmented 
beverages a uniform rate of 5 cents per gallon when they contain 
no more than 5 jier cent, of proof alcohol, thus bringing mild 
lager beer to, say, SI. 50 a barrel and strong beers and ales lo .?3 
a barrel, and insl(>ad of encouraging the adulteration of wim- by 
allowing mare brandy to be added to it free of tax, would repeal 
that law and make it a punishable olTense for any manufacturer 
of wine, beer or cider to add distilled ah'ohol or any other poison 
to such beverages, they will not only add millions to the public 
revenue, but at the same time do away with a vast amount of 
drunkenn(!ss and encourage a legitimate and profitable industry 
by placing it on the safe foundation of national utility.'' 



The Slate Supreme Court has upheld the provisions of the 
Colusa county lii|Uoi' license, which fixes a charge of ?I(I0 a year 
upon all iclail lii|Uor dealers. B. Seube kept a saloon in the 
county, and was ai'rested for not paying a license for the .sale of 
lii|uors: he was found guilty and sentenced to pay a fine. Ha- 
beas corpus proceedings were brought in the Supreme Court, the 
poi il raised being that the ordinance made an olVense of each 
sale of li<|Uors. The Supreme Court holds that this construction 
cannot be ap|>lied. and that (me sale nnikes the di>finclioii of r«'- 
tail dealer and that subseiiuenl sales were only cumulative. The 
prisoner wius remandi-d. 

The Supi'eme Court of Massaeliuselts held, in the recent 
c<lse of Decie vs. Brown, that the Stale statute limiting lii|mir 
licenses to one for every loOOof the population is conslilutional. 
The petitioner claimeil that this statute of ISSS was nncon.-titu- 
lional because it in effect gives to the proprietors of licensed 
places uneipuil advantages and pecidiarand exclusive privileges, 
and so conllids with Article (i of Part I of ihe Stale I 'onslilu- 
tution. and with Section 1 of .\rlicle 14 of Ihe amendments to 
the I'nited States Conslilulion, but the court, in di'iiying the 
petition, said that il was too late to ((uestion the validity of such 
statutes. 



I 



12 



f>/teifl(2 WIJME /VJMD Spif^lT f^EVIEW. 



/ 



"APENTA" 

IMPORTANT. 

Our attention has been called to circnlars issued bj' Andreas Saxlehner and his attorneys, 
warning the Trade against handling imitations of the label and name under which Hun\adi Janos 
Aperient Water is sold. 

We gladly direct attention to the fact tliat the "APENTA" Natural Aperient Water drawn from 
Springs at Bnda Pest is sold under a label and name radically dissimilar from those tised for Hunyadi 
Janos Water or for an}^ other Mineral Water- 

The exploitation of the Springs from which "APENTA" Natural Aperient Water is drawn has 
been organized by the Royal Hungarian Chemical Institute (Ministry of Agriculture), Buda Pest, and 
the bottling of the Water is, and will remain, subject to direct and independent scientific supervision. The 
Medical Profession and the Public are thus afforded a guarant}' of that constancy in strength and com- 
position which renders "APENTA" Natural Aperient Water superior to anj? of the numerous Aperient 
Waters which for many j^ears have been sold in this country under the generic term " Hunyadi." 

We are advised by eminent Counsel that, the label under which the "APENTA'' 
Natural Aperient Water is sold is lawful in every particular, and we are prepared 
to fully protect the trade in the use of same. 

Charles Graef & Co. 
^oE:tTTs iF'oi?. THE APOLLIN/\RIS COMPANY LIMITED, London, 

Sole Exporters of "APENTA" Natural Aperient Water. 



U. S. eO/NSULA-R -REPO-RTS. 



In rciali()ii to tlie Swiss vintage of ]89(j I'onsul Kidfjcly 
writes iis follows from Geneva, Oct. 'J6, 181)(5 : 

In viii'w of the fact that it has been pul)lisli(il in lln' I'niU'd 
Slr.tcs and elsewhere that the vintage of 1S!)0 in I'reuch .Switzer- 
land has heen largcdy destroyed hy the contiinied and excessive 
rains, I have the honor to report that, afler an investigation of 
the matter, I find that the vintage is mncii superior to the gene- 
ral expectation and understanding. Since the early part of April 
rain has falleT) almost daily in Switzerland, In May. .June, Jidy 
and August, there were in all, in I'"rench Switzerland, |)erliaps 
not more than fifteen days of bright, sunny weather, and Sep- 
tember and October have kept up almost the same record of 
cea.seless rain aii<l wind. Local records fail to show' any similar 
visitation of bad weather. It will, therefore, in view of these 
conditions, interest grape growers in tlie T'nited States to know 
that the vines have not only not been ruined, but have sull'ercd 
littli! from mildew, an<l that the crop of grapes, as well as the 
vintage, will be up to the average in all the large vvine-produciug 
cantons of Frencii Switzerland, viz., the cantons of Geneva, 
N'aud. Valais an<l Miviehatel. This is due to t le fact that the 
ravages of the mildew wcr.i combatted by the " sulfatage " of 
of Iht; vinew, that is to say, by sprinkling the vines with a solu" 
tion of paste eoinposed of llowei-s of sulphur, l|uick-limc and 
sulphuric acid.* This means was rendei'cd obligatory by law, 
an<l wiiH every way HU(;ceHsfid. The phylloxera has also made 
its appear:niee, but is progre.ssing slowly, on account of the uu- 

II.. .\. : I i)m|M>ii|iluii of the iircpnriitlon nbiiTu rcfurrccl to Itae follows: 
Four liiiiulri'il k'uiiiii of Hour of Hiiiphiir nnd 175 (jramn of r|iilcli-llmu iirv IhiIIciI to- 
Krtlirr for mi tiuiir In 4 lllcra of |iiiii- nntcr, niul t licit Ivit to ni'tllc. Tlii'ii to tliln 
solution l> adik-il a mlxtiiri.' of 'iW)v:rnm> of milpliiiiic ni'lil nnd 4 or h lllcra of nnler: 
'I'lil« mixtnrv mum Ik- niadL' In I he o|>i'n nir, nnd l« llion oni'O o^nln put Into 250 
litrnt of wnlrr, nflfr wlilt-li If Ih rfndy lor unc In lliu form >if n inllkv lii|iild. 



favorable condition of the soil as well as because of the energetic 
measures taken to combat it, and there is little to be feared from 
it now. Toward the end of August and in the earlv part of 
September an entirely new disease made its appearance in manj' 
of the great vineyards (if the canton of Vand. This disease is 
similar to the black rot, and has been given the name of " brown 
rot." Its appearance is attributed to the wet season, and it has 
not yet wrought serious damage. I present these facts as evi- 
dence that a good cro]) of gra]ies and an excellent vintage may 
be produced even in the very wettest season, which has not 
heretofore been the experience of grape growers in Switzerland. 
Swi.ss champagne, which is nia<le almost exclusively in the can- 
ton of Neuchatel. has recently begun to lind a large market in 
Isngland, Tlie vintage this season will be unite up to the aver- 
age, in spite ol' I lie weather. 

Consul (iermaiu, of Zniich, in relation to the profits from 
the Swiss alcohol monopoly, informs the department, Xoveuiber 
10th, ISOfl, that the budget for tlie Swiss alcohol traffic sub- 
mitted to tin? .Swiss Federal .\ssenibly by the federal council 
shows estimated total receipts of SL'.."il(i,(iOlt : expenditures, 
81,322, 40") ; an excess of $1,1!)3,600. and a disposable profit of 
Sl.OTD.OOO. This profit— about :!n.4 cents jier capita of the 
population, is divisilile among the various cantons. 

Tlie Irljana Manufacturing Company, of If liana, Steuben 
county, New ^'ol■k, is .sending out a lithogi-iplu'd calendar for 
ISit". The lithograph shows bo.tles ol their •(ii-een Scjil " 
sparkling wine, niceli' grouped with grapes, etc. The calendar 
is one of the most altiactive which has reached Ibis ollice. 

The great San .loacpiin \'allcy Sujiply (.lompany, of Kands- 
liurg, has put up a good building .">i) x (iO iin ISnttc avenue. I,os 
Angeles, and jiut in a line stock of liipiors and wines as a whole- 
sale house. W. II. llevi"r is manager. 



P;6c(Blfie WljSIE 7»rJMD SflF^IT f^EVlEW 



13 



Qorrcsvcndcncc, 

Toi.KiK), Oliiii. .luiuiiiry -". 1^".'". 

Til the Editor of llif I'acljir MViic xik/ .SyiiViV /iVriVic ; DkakSiu — 
In your issm- of .lanuarv Stii you liavc :iii article lu-adi'il " That 
l!ig Oak Tank." in wliicli yon spi-ak of tin- ininicnsc tank which 
tho California Wine Associalion is huihlin^. anil in closinj; the 
artii-lf you say : " Next to this, llio grcati'sl of oak wine tanks, 
couK's tlu' oiu" at ToU'tlo. Ohio, which Inihls r)4,(H)() irallons." 

IVnnit us to correct the last <|U'-te(l st>i\ti'nce somewhat. 
Ours is not an oak Tank, hut a Cad-, which, us you arc aware, 
arc two vi'ry ililVerent objects. A large tank, with its straight 
slaves, is coin|iaratively easy to huihl for any good carpenter, 
while it re»|nires the highest talent of a master cooper to con- 
struct a perfect and light cask of 20,000 gallons or more capacity, 
and there are but few coopers competent enough to undertake 
the construction of such a huge cask. Ours holds .'?(),'i()() gal- 
lons ; its diameter is 20 feet, its staves are "Jl feet long by (> inches 
Ihick. and it reipiired o years for a Ihorongh seasoning of the 
timber. 

Therefore, admitting your claim that Califnrnia possesses 
the largest oak wine TmiL-. we still claim to have in our cellars 
the largest wine Cod — holding ."{0,000 gallons — in actual use 
in the world, not excepting the Heidelbei'g cask, which, although 
considerably larger in dimensions than ours, is not and has not 
been in condition to be used for a great many years past — in 
fact it has been lillcd but once since it was built. 

Yours respectfully. Lknk "Wink Comi-.vnv. 

MESS'RS. WALKERS' -REPLg. 

.\u allcgalinii made in the American pri'ss thai Canada levies 
a heavy di.^^ci-imination against American spirits has brought a 
reply from Messrs. Hiram Walker «!t Sons, of Walkervillc, which 
sets the iiuestion right by adducing some information which may 
be of geuci-al interest. It was staled that the duty on spirits 
imi>orted into Canada is 82.25 per gallon and 30 [ler cent, ad 
valorem, and further, that the ad valorem duty is waived in 
favor of France. Spain and Germany. It seems that there is no 
ad valorem duty whatever, and the Canadian gallon is the im- 
perial measure (one-lifth larger than the wine gallon in use in 
the United States), and the duty of §2.25 per gallon is based 
upon proof strength by the standard in use in Canada, which is 
about i:! per cent liigher than the American standard. .\ pro- 
portionate reduction is made upon any lesser strength down to 
15 degrees under proof, and inasuinch as few if any .Vnierican 
whiskies, when put upon the market for consumption, are above 
.Vnierican proof, and most of them are somewhat below, this 
reduction applies — Mtda'». 

P. I)n|iont is agitating the formation of a company at Mer- 
ced to be known as the P. Diipont Distilling Company, which 
will mannfa<-lnre liipiors from all kinds of fruits. Mr. ])u|iont 
is a chemist of ability, and his proposition secuis to be feasible 
and niiiloubledly profitable. 

The (inndlach'Hundschu Wine Company has bought the 
wines of C. II. Wente & Co., of Liverinore, amonntiiig to about 
100,000 gallons, chiefly red wines. Another .-iale of importniiee 
in the Liverinore N'alley is that of the cellar of Mr. .Vllsehnl, of 
the Vicuna Viiievard, lo the California Wine .Vssocialion. 



William WoKI \ Co. are actively engaged in the promotion 
of the sale of Moct vSt Chundou champagnes, of whii'h ihey are 
now Pacific Coast .\geuts. They arc nici'ling with success, and 
during the month ol .laiiuary leci'ivcd in various shipmenlH the 
healthy total of I.'IIM) eases. 

Werner W. Meiike, who conducts a large winery on the .\la- 
iiieda, near Sania Clara, made a voluntary assignmi iil, on the 
20tli lilt., loSiicrilV Lyndon, for the benelit of hi- creiliiors. The 
property turned over to the SherilV consists of several acri's of 
land and a H iiiery and stock of wines, valued at about Sl'i.OOO. 
Mis indebtednc.-s will reac^h nearly j^lO.OOO. of which oiilv a small 
ainonni is secured. The principal creditors are : First National 
Hank of San Jose, $5,000 ; California Cream <'f Tartar Works, 
San Jose, 82,5 1 !l ; Sanders & Co., San Francisco, 82,1 1!» ; .\ng. 
IVtzhold, San FiMUci.sc), $2,310 ; II. Meiike, Germany, $l2,tl5(i. 
Fxce-sive interest paynniils and over-inve.stmeiifsare the causes 
of the failure. 

(Jeorge Schoncwald, who now owns one of (!apt. Thomas 
.\msbnry's places on Inglewood avenue, near Zinfandel station, 
is preparing to plant ten acres with resistant vines. He has sent 
to France f(U- a (piantily of vines known as Knpestris St. George, 
and which is reported as not only having withstood the ravages 
of vine pests, but as being a vigorous grower. .Some twenty 
years ago a French vineyardi.-^t sent to this country for a ipian- 
fity of Kupeslris seed. Out of the vini-s that came up were a 
nnmltcr apparently dilVerent from others, and iiiiich more rapid 
growers. These he propagated and soon had a vineyard set en- 
tirely out to these healthy vines, which he gave the name of Rn- 
pestris .St. (ieorge. Mr. .Schonewald sent 875 in a letter, instruct- 
ing the gentleman to .send as many as he could atlbrd to for that 
amount. If they arrive in good condition he will plant them in 
nursery and propagate them for cuttings ; if not, he e.vpects to 
replant witii Lenoir. .Mr. Sclionewalil is of the opinion that 
much of the dillicnlty encountered in lliis section with r< sistant 
stock has arisen from replanting iu the same holes from which 
the dead vines were taken. He says experience with fruit trees 
has proven conclusively that they will not do well when planted 
in old holes. He also lays much of the trouble to poor cultiva- 
tion of the soil, and says in his vineyard he will dig deep and 
large holes, in which he will place a (piantity of gooil fertilizer 
before planting, and will then use a long cutting. In this way, 
and by thorough cultivation, he hopes to establish a thrifty vine- 
yard, and one which will .soon come into bearing. 



k 



.Mr. Harry P. Poiilin bun just returned from the Ivistern 
route of the Kisen Vineyard Company, having been reealleil to 
take up the city route, which the late (Jeorge W. Cninbers han- 
dled .so succe.*sfnlly for the past eight years. The Ki;vii:w knows 
that Harry is a successful salesman, and extends its 1m>,s| ttishi- 
to him and the com|iauy he reproenls. 



[iyJM WNi>ir»]ninJ[»:Miu:«iflini:*iniiJ:»:iiitiii*iWii^«iMrii»}ti]iuwruni:»in)niwntiii:tfnirf.t ^^ 



|\6U5HED 





I E.RemyMartin&C? i 

COGNAC 

\ FRANCE 

AGENTS IN SAN FRANCISCD.Cal 



525 FRONT STREET 



»lruiiirt:iiltJ)r81ltfi»iaf/na»>MI»i*IW!i'SWnim»^^ 




14 



p/rSlfie WljviE /r^D Sflf^lT PREVIEW. 



lluKhKArx 



N >1 i...- 

OOTKMtKltti AM) 
MKl.lluritNE 



Brewers. Wine Merchants. Distillers 

\ ^ I 

MINERAL WATER MAKERS, 
REQUISITES. 

U K WORKS LONDON. ENGLAND 



WAYLAND & CO, 

15-25 WHITEHALL STREET 

NEW YORK 



To Wine GrowerSi Distillers, Etc. 

Gentl emen : 

We beg to advise having opened 
branch as above for the sale of our Wine 
Finings, Capillaire, Spirit Coloring Es- 
sences, e tc ■ 

Our business throughout Europe has been 
built by Wine Growers and Distillers 
recommending one another. 

We ask a trial order, this will prove 
for EFFICACY, PURITY and ECONOMY we are 
unrival 1 ed • 

Yours truly, 

W. A. WAYLAND & CO. 

Ax7jPLliri_jPs.3SrD'S 

V\£INE FININGS 

GUABASTKKD FliEE FROM 

TANNIN, SALICYLIC AND ANILINE 

Ketiuire no prepanition, are always re.idy to use, clarify tlie choicest 

ilescriptions, as also those of low alcoholic strength, in no way 

impair the wine; ONCK BKll.I.IANT ALWAYS BRILLIANT. 

Siiicf moving to 214 Sansoine street, Liebinan & Water.s are 
steaililv developing an excellent family and jobbing bu.siness. 
They are in one of the best locations in San Francisco for busi- 
ue.-s. anil are to be congratulated on their removal to tlie lu-art 
of the bu.siness center of the city. 

Mr. J. E. Mayliew, of the well-known brokerage lirm of 
Mavliew & Co., left for the East on the Sunset Limited on the 
2d inst. Mr. Mayhew has an important business matter to at- 
tend to. lie goes for the purpose of liandling probably tlie 
largest shipment of old brandy, with return of revenue taxes, ever 
made from this country, being 1100 half barrels. Tlie goods are 
the famous " N'aglee " brand. The revenue drawback approxi- 
mate.4 820,000, the securing of which is a part of Mr. Mayhew's 
duty. Mr. Mayhew has our best wishes for a pleasant and suc- 
cessful Journey. 

Tlic famous il. II. Shufeldt Distillery, at Chicago, has been 
abandoned by the American Spirit Company, tiic successor to 
the old Spirit Trust. Tbe disposition of the buildings has not 
been decided. The clo.sing of the distillery is duo to the efl'orts 
of the new company to concentrate its work at Peoria. The 
Shufeldt plant has a capacity of ;!000 l)ushels of grain a day. 
Alfred S. Austrian, of the firm of Moran, Kraus & Mayer, attor- 
ney for llie .\miMi<Mn Spirits Company, while evading the qucs- 
tion of Ihe p'Min.ineiil closing of lln^ distillery, said : " A plant 
of :{()i)lt bushels ciipacily costs almost as much to operate as a 
plant of lU.OOO bushels capa<'ity, and we have plants at Peoria 
eapable of Inking up the work of the Shufeldt distillery." Na- 
Ihaii IJijur, of New ^'ork. (he general counsel for the .\iiierii-an 
.Spirits Company, said the abandonment of Ihe Shufeldt distil- 
lery wnultl lie in accord with good busineHS principles of concen- 
tration, and Peoria could handle the work of the company. 



Leon Cerf, the wholesaler of Ventura, has opened a retail 
house in Kandsburg, on the Desert, which he has placed in con- 
trol of Hilly lialcli, an ohl Santa Harliara lioy. Mr. Cerf says 
tilings ;ire booming in the camp. 

'I'lie 111 III ol' Weil liros. & Sons, one of the oldest and best 
kimwii on ilie streiM, lias been reorganized. Leopold Weil has 
relired IVoni lui-iiiess on account of ill IhmIiIi. The firm now 
consists of William Weil and Alexander W. Weil, and the style 
of llie liriii name will be as heretofore. 



Dr. Mathe, of Forestville, was in Santa Rosa recently, on his 
return from San Francisc >. While there he sold .32.000 gallons 
of red wines, of Ihe vintage of l.SSXi, for 20 cents per gallon, de- 
livered in San Francisco. These wines were principally made 
from F"rencli varieties of grapes, and they are of superior qual- 
il\ , as the wines oi' this county usually are. Some time ago Dr. 
Mathe sold 2.'/,000 gallons of wine to Korbel liros — Santa Rosa 
Iirpidiliraii. 



Messrs. M. Ilahii it Co., New York, importers and proprie- 
tors of Turkish Prune Juice, are forging ahead to the goal of 
success as infallibly as the needle to the magnet. Desjiite the 
fa(^t that last year was generally unsatisfactory, they are one of 
the few who can look back with gratification at the steady prog- 
ress made during lSi)6. Both Mr. Ilalin and Mr. Struve are 
young men of unbounded energy, push and perseverance, and in 
all regards up to the times. — Mida's. 



In the matter of the suit of Leet & Lang against the Kern 
County Board of Supervisors, being an appeal from a judgment 
of mandate and an order denying a new trial, the State Supreme 
Court has ordered that the appeal be dismissed for two reasons : 
" As was said in the case of The San Diego School District vs. 
the Supervisors of Sau Diego County, which was iu all essentials 
similar to this, ' The defendant voluntarily coiii]ilied with the 
iiiaiiilate of the court, and its judgment was thereiiiion satislied 
and its force exhausted, .\fter it had tlnis been satislied. there 
was nothing in the judgment which the cmirt had rendered of 
which tile defendant could complain, or about which it could say 
that it was aggrieved.' .Vnd, secondly, as (he license issued 
October, 189.5, more than one year since, we maj' well suppose 
that it has served ilspurpo.se, and that all rights thereunder have 
ceased to exist." 



FOR S.\LE — Brewery, Distillery, Soda Works, Buildings and 
Lots in Ensenada, Lower California ; business without com- 
petition ; in full working order; Si). 000 — could not be du- 
plicated for three times that amount. 

Summary — Four town lots. ."J.'iS feet frontage in heart of the 
city. Fire-proof building, corrugated iron, 40x50; annex, cor- 
rugated iron, 14 x IS. Dwelling house (4 rooms, furniture, etc.;) 
barn and stable. Fine beer garden, well ornamentd with trees 
the only one in town, for picnic purpo.ses. Wind mill, iron tur- 
bine. 10 buckets; galvanized water pipes through buildings and 
grounds ; galvanized iron tank, (UKKI gallons. Hoiler and steam 
generator, 12-h. power. Brass steam pump. Copper still recti- 
lier, 1() compartiiieiil column : copper still rectifier for pomace or 
mescal ; 1 small still, (irape crusher ; press hand pump, tanks; 
tools; Fairbanks scale, 2000 lbs. Complete mailing department, 
roller for malt ; beer kettle heated by steam ; zinc cooler, reser- 
voir tanks, barrels, etc. Complete soda-bottling works appara- 
tus. Slnuig horse and harness, new delivery wagon. to]i-board 
buggy, etc. Only two men needed to run this plant — one for 
inside work and the ollirr for oiil>ide. 

Expenses are very small and prolits very large. .\ny enter- 
prising parly with a small capital ciiinot fail to make money in 
a short time. For luii In-r particulars address" Itri'wery,'" care 
Ukvikw ollici'. 



f/Veifie WIJME /rJND SflF^IT (REVIEW 



15 



Imports and Exports 

DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



EXPORTS OF WINE.' 



TO NEW YORK— Pkr Ship Francrs, January 16, 1897. 



DKSTIMATIOH. 



New York . 



ItoStiiU . 



SillPPEKS 



C. Schilling * Co 

Lncbman <!E Javubi 

Oiil Wine A^FOolatlou. 
Itnlinn-SwUs Colony.. 



r.M'KAIIES. 



aALLONS 



200 bnrrcls . . , 
IT5(> bliU ) 
III puns. ( ° 
27->0 bnrreltt. , 

I 203 barrels. 



Told amount . 



9,T73 

|10j.I4£ 

122,500 

10,150 



247,.MM 



VAt.DE. 

52,571 

61,250 

5.075 



»12S,782 



TO CHINA AND JAPAN— P«i! Str. Coptic, January 16, 1897. 



Kobe 

Foofliow ., 
Na^iisaki . ., 
Vokolmnia 

K.ilir 

HiMisknni:. 
Viiktibama 



W J Scbarib 

Cal Wine Association. 



Langfeldt & Co, I'l'd . 



.15 barrels, 2 kegs. . 
.12 casks 

.'» barrels 

20 barrels 

I barrel 

to barrels 

.,4 barrels 



Total amount. 



ISO 
122 
2.')0 
1,000 
50 
500 
20t 

2.556 



TO MEXICO— Pkb Str. City of Sydrey, Januarj 18, 1897. 






1 ktB 

2 barrels 

S bbls I bf-bbl . . . 
lObf-barrels 




20 

io.-> 

176 

208 

509 


t 11 


M an/an illo 'Italian-Swiss Colony. . . 

.\capnloo ... . *' 


09 
69 


I'onala ' 

Total amount 


91 
«240 



TO MEXICO— PEK S. S. ORIZABA, Januaiy 25, 1896. 



Guavmns H Levv ^t Co 

Santa Rnsalia F Saiit'ellier 

Hermosillo Oundlacb-15 Wine Co. 



Ensenada Ilaliaii-Swiss Colony. 

(fuaymas 

Altata 

Tepia j 

Coiorndi. ** 

G nay mas |ji Frapoiii ife Co 

En.^enada Cal Wine Association 

Mazatlan '* 

Guaymas " 

Altata 

I.a Paz Gundlach-Bnn. 



.Ma7.atlah " 

Guavmas C 8cliillin<? i^ Co 



4 bbls and 68 kegs 
8 cases 



905 



I barrel 

1 bf-barrel 

2 '>bls and 55 kegs 

2 bbls and 30 kegs 

1 kep I 

3 keus ! 

6 bbls, 2 bf-bbls ) { 
(i4kegs S 

2 barrels, 1 keg. . . 

Obarrels.l iif-bbi!] 
33 kei;*, 2 bf-csks.j 

3 casks 

Wine Co 1 bf-barrel, 8 kegs' 

4 barricas 

Ikcg 

1 barrel 

6 cases 



Tiiial amount 26 cases and . 



51 
28 
568 
424 
21 
30 

1,020 

122 
449 
336 
39.1 
180 
140 
336 
15 
58 



5,073 



t 381 

82 
54 
38 
14 
191 
163 
12 
10 

377 

57 

144 

129 

172 

t>5 

70 

131 

10 

21 

16 



TO SAN JOSE DE GUATEMALA— Per S. S. Babroooota, Jan. 28, 1897. 



San J de Guatemala.. ;C Schilling & Co 

** Cai Wine A^sociation 

C Schilling & Co .... 

Schwartz A Co 



Stevens, .\rnhtild * Co. 
Graddiiii \- Chiiicco. . . . 
Wclmore-IIowenCo 



8 barrels, 30 kegs . 

57 cabc.'* 

H barrels, 10 kegs. 

6 bf-liarrels 

100 ca^es 

90 cases 

4 barrels, 6 bf-b. ) 

10 kegs j 

2 hf barrels 

10 cases 

.'>0 cases 

."lO bbls. .50 kegs. . . 

2.>0 cases 

16 bbls, 10 kegs.... 



»ia 



500 
16:! 



475 
54 



Total amount 5.57 cased. 



3.1129 
' 411 
5.458 



» 307 

3H 
250 

s5 
2.50 
270 

isa 

IS 
60 



91 W 
139 

(».;s4 



TO OENTIIAL A.MI II' 



Ml. CITY CI 



Ci'ilnh II 1' iiipolli .V Co 2 kegs 

San J de Guatemala . siovcnn, Arnliuld iC ■ o.;4 barrels, 10 ki-gs 



I'baniperlcu. 

( )C0H 



U Frapolll ><: Cm 
J (tunillufb «V Ci 



Champerlco. 



La l.lberlad 

CiirhUu 

San J de (tiiaten)iil:i 



IH hi li,in._-l!..., 
:: ki-i;-.. 1 bt-k 

.M Mann . . 1 10 rufCH 

Ill keg. 

" linildiiil <.t Cioeca 10 barrels. . 

llalian-Hwlsr. Colony, .,|l barrel 

I " ilUcasea.. . 

I.M Armer A Ci 2 barrel* 

On Val \' I'airiill, 3 cases 

Ocos I.achman A: Jacolii 211 canes 

Acajntla •• 1 lif Imrrcl.... 

I.a i.ibertad liaruch it On. . rrels 

San Juan uel Sur.. .. Wctniure-Dnwcii i •<. 



120 

830 



278 
05 



200 
4Utl 

5;i 



10.5 



Corlnto . 



Acajntla 

La Libertad . 



Amapala 

San .1 de Guatemala.. 



La Vnion 

San Juan del 8ur. . 



f32l 
|o2 

■Afi 
378 

IS 
162 

77 

TiTiii ^°^'"'°- 



San J de Guatemala.. 
La I'nion 



Pnntas Aienas. 

Amapala 

Acajntla 



1(1 



nets, 8. hf I 
keg« 5 



G Scbilling tNi Co 



1,460 
8uO 



16 bf-bbls 52 kegi 
36 cases 

s octaves 219 

I bf-bbl and 1 kg. M 

I' "' luvct 105 

-1 I --'s I 372 

-■I ■ :.^es 

10 I. bis, ;«) kegs. '.':;ii 

17 barrels >'.i: 

3 octaves , M 

Cal Wine Association... 195 cases | 

!27 barrels, 7 bf-b ) ' , ,„, 

'6kegs \' '•585 

133 cases 

3 barrels. 32 bJ-b( ' 

■13,', kegs V 

.51) cases 

6 cases 

''•', liarrels, 1 hf-b, ( i ,,,,1 

i'Jkegs ....5 >»* 

|.58 bf-barrcls ] l,510l 

{34 cases | I 

'5 barrels ; 2.5(j! 



♦ 12 

185 

.100 

120 

51 

97 

357 

212 

K!l 

»u 

350 

170 

129 

16 

30 

.50 

17 

61 

14 

.'M2 

211 

84.S 

459 
184 
1118 

!A 

87 
205 

70 
372 
342 

64 
550 

815 

671 

1,602 

22.5 
22 

116 

800 
1.S8 
96 



Total amount 820 ca.'-es and. 



14.633 {10 660 



TO MEXICO Per Stb. COLON -Jakpaey 28 


1897. 






103, 


9 41 






38 


Manzanillo Cal Wine Association. . 1 Ijarrel, 2 bf-bbls. 


105! 


50 


Total amount 12 cases and 


208' 


»124 



TO CKNTItAL AMEIUCA— Pkk Stb. COLON —January 28, 1897. 



.Vcajulla Inglcnook Vineyard 20 barrels 

La Liber I ad Haas Dros 2 cases 

" jC M Mann 15 barrels 

'* I " 8 cases 

Champcneo ! •' 50 cases 

Acapulco Lacbman it Jacobi 5 barrels 

Corinto Wet more-Bo wen Co lirj cases 

I " 12 bands. 15 hf 

" ' and 20 kegs 

Cal Wine Associalioii ..5 barrels, 2o kegs 

" jlllO cases 

Gundlach. Blind W C'o.. 2 cases 

\'i^ barrels, 10 kegs 

|ooK',.jjB 

C .■^cliillinc A Co. _- 



1,036, 

""782 



251 



Acajntla. . ., 

La Libertad 
Corinio 



^'-'"^^ Chain iHirico 



:.( 



1.256 
5001 



1.850' 
500| 

3U| 



FS Koidl. 



I l.arrels, 15 kegs.[ 
12 case? 



850 



«4U 

24 
273 

34 
165 

84 
481 

690 

275 
450 

16 
80S 
2.S0 

21 
156 
175 

45 



Total atnoiinl 328 cases and. 



6.555 W.444 



TO NEW YOKK VIA PAXAMA-Per Stb COLON .lanuarT 2«. 



Brooklyn... 
New 5'ork . . 



Fall liivcr, Mass.. 

Lewiston. .Me 

New York 

Rutland. Vt 



Cal Wine Association . 



M Scalcna 

Lenormand Bros 



Lacbman «t Jacobi. . 
SletHon Reiiner D Ci 



New 5'oik 

Baltimore. Md 



V I'bcvalicr .V Co 
liiliullni-b-Hitnd 
Ueringer Bros . 



:jOO barrels 
700 barrels 

10 barrels 

3 barrels 

8 barrels 

'i7'i barrels . 

3 kegs, I barrel. 

I lase 

12.5 barrels 

W Co. 2.1II barrels 

■-• l';irr.-lri 



1: 



Total amount 1 case and. 



I.V1 
411 
203 

65 

375 
U3S 
101 



1S97. 

« 4.12.5 

11.096 

119 

76 

180 

5,842 

100 

8,167 

4,005 

05 



89.789 197.775 




HERCULES GAS, GASOLINE AND DISTILLATE ENGINES. 

The Best to Buy ans) Cheapest to Operate. 

For Pumping, Hoisting, MiHing and all Stationary Purposes. 
ENGINES AND PUMPS COMBINED FOR RACKING, A SPECIALTY. 

Over 500 HERCULES ENGINES in Use by Coast Wineries ancj Vineyards. "JH^ 

HERCULES GAS ENGINE WORKS. 




k 



Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded. 

SPECIAL ENGINES FOR WINE PRESSES. ETC. 

«-;;, ; .• ;.. i- .:=. , 1 ,i.... , •. 1 H P TO 200 H. p. 

LARUEST OAS E.V«I.\E Ilo;:/, s l\ I II I ti t:sT. 



2', H. P..SI8S00 

Diicounl (ir r.i.h 

OFFICE. 405-407 SANSOME STREET , SAN FRANCISCO, 

WORKS. 216, 217. 219. 221,223. 226. 227. 229. 231 BAT STREET, 'l CALIFORNIA. 



16 



f/<(?lfie WI^■E /fJMD SflF^IT [REVIEW. 



vAMA) PER CITY OF SYDNEY. Jan. 18. 1S97. 



Neu' York . ' :>l WiiiL- AMOclai ion. 

liiiuikhn " 

\Vii>lnii;;l.'il, II. »'.... I' M S .S C 

Xfw V..ik M H UlKh 

KvlU-rvUle. r» |l'«i Tiaus Co 



4.').% hnrrels 

2011 barreU 

4 barivls 

2 barrels 

125 barrels 

3bbl2lif-bbl3k.. 



Tnlal amount . 



2.'.750 ) 

lO.UOO )' 

200 

98 

6.448 

237 


3U.7SS i 



$a,o»(i 

50 

40 

1,773 

120 

$11,013 



TO CHINA AND JAPAN— Pbb Stb. City op Hio dk Jankiro, Jan. 23. 



18»7. 



ij^Tbe . Cal Wine Aesoclation. . . 2 bar-^ls. 
Sli;in'li;ii ' " 10 barrels 

V.Vl'uuV.i'i'ii'.. lanKfeUlt & Co, I'lM.. 

I :H'liiiinn .V Jni'obi 

Tienlsln. . ' ^^^■llilli'll: «V Co 

Y.ikubamii . . . J < ' Amilung 

,lialn & Cents 



2 barrels . 

a cases. 

o lif-barrels. ... 

4 casks 

6 barrel 

10 cases 

Ikeg... .. 



il amount IC cases and 



100 
50U 
100 

82 
212 
308 



il 

1,307 



* 42 

100 

;w 

24 
31 
W 
lO'J 

42 



$530 



TO HONOLULU— Pkb Str. Adsibalia, January 26, 1897. 



Hnniilulu 



Enterprise B Co 6 eases. 

Risdcn 1 Works 1 4 cases 

J C Nobmauu 15 cases 

lUbarrels... 

j250 kegs . . . , 
Cal Wnie Association.. . 75 kegs . 



F. Cavagnaro 

Williams, D * Co 



1 barrel . 
9 qrs . . . 
I case... 
1 cask... 



Tot.'il amouul 1.*) fat^cs and. 



2,050' 

375 
50 

28* 



30) 
2 ~'M 



t 37 

80 
60 

1,054 

196 

15 

G(K) 

54 



$2,096 



MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN WINE SHIPMENTS. 



From January 15th to January 31, 1897. 



Walla Walla. 
Garden City., 
C/Jir. . 



DESTINATION. 



Victoria 

Santa Itosalia ... 



. . San Bias 

Tepic 

City of I'ucbla New Westminster 



SHIPPBRB. 



PACKAQES. 



Pacific Transfer Co. 1 keg 

E Ci Lyons XCu... 2 casks 

F Sanlcllier 100 bris, 111 

" 115 cases 

Cal Wine Ass'n . . . . |20 kegs 

B Frapolli & Co ... 10 kegs 

Pacific Transfer Co.|2 bf-barrcls. 



Tolal amount 15 tnpc? and . 



10 

120 

5,162 



400 
183 
56 

5.931 



$ 



8 
48 
1.508 
60 
75 
110 
30 



?1,8.S9 



BEER IMPORTS BY RAIL. 



From January I5tli 10 January 31. 1897. 







COPYRIGHTED. 












BOTTLED. 1 




D0LK. 




Casce. 


Casks. Barrels. 


Barrels. 


K bbis 


K-bbls 


Kegs. 


W Ifnctkn it Co 




25. 


35 
55 
52 
60 






100 


Hoval Ea^U' Dist Co... 


6,5 


17 





84 
30 


160 










C A Zinkand 

J r» Spriikels & Br Co. 
E G Lyons it Co 


1 

80 
470 

616 










42 


v'b 

25 
145 
















202 


114 






TotaK 


160 


100 



EXPORTS OF WHISKY BY SEA. 
Prom JaniNii \ i.i'ii i 



VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 

Yokohama ... 


SHIPPERS. 

Crown Dist Co 


PACKAGEH. 


OALLONB 

- 


VAL CE. 


Coptic 


28 cases , . . 




$ 2:i7 


•» 


Shanghai 


ri barrels . .. 


iio 


159 


City of Sydney 


Cham pel ico 


Cast Ic Bros '24 cases 

Spruance, S A: Co. , 6 cases .... 
\Vm Widff A: Co . . ."io cases . . . 





144 

90 
2.38 


.. 


San J dc G 


Carroll it Carroll.. 
Koihschiid A Bros. 


10 cases . , . 




85 




.50 cases .... 




.500 






1 keg 


io 


15 


" 


Corinto 


WilmerdingL Co. . 6 cases 





57 


• ' 


San J del Sur.... 


10 cafes 




95 




CorinU) 


Wc!more-B Co ... ,8 cases 

124 cases 




45 
115 




Cliamperico 


Crown Dist Co.... ].iO cases 




450 




Oc s 


ll4 cases.... 




l.U 




San J del Sur. . . . 


' * 4 cases . . . 




72 


" 


Panama 


99 cases 




999 


Cil\ of l!io .. 


Nagasaki 


Meverfeld. M A: Co 2 barrels . . . 


104 


74 


>i 


Yokohama 


.. 






•j.> 


'. 


Crown Dist Co 


14 cases . . . 




isT 


Orizaba 


Jlazallan 


•» 


3 cases , 




21 


•* 


Ensenada 




1 bai-rt-l 


I.I 


|:42 


*' 


Mazatlall 


10 case- . . . 




90 


" 


Ensenada 


Hellman Bros iV Co 1 octave 


3U 


22 




La Paz 


N Vanliergen & Co 1 barrel ... 


41 


&5 




Guavmas 


Wm Wolff A Co ... ' 15 cases .... 




117 




iMazalian 


" 8 cases 




60 




La Paz 


" 10 cases. . . . 





75 


.\uslraria 


Honolulu 


J 1> Sjircckcls it Br 101 cases ... 




3.50 


.. 


San J de 


Williams, Dit Co.. 
Wm Wolff it Co... 


UK» cases . . . 




400 


Barraconla. .. 


I barrel.... 


32 


45 


" 




Spruance, Sit Co. . 1 barrel 


S3 


57 


** 




Win Wolir & Co ... 6 cases 




28 


it 




Crown Dist Co 


72 cases .... 




870 




2hf-barrels. 


55 


70 


Colon 


Champerico 


Gundlacli-B W Co.. 


Ikeg 


5 


20 


1. 




Wetmore-B Co ... 






70 




amount 732 cases 


and 








Total 


495 


$0,18:) 



WHISKY AND SPIRIT IMPORTS BY RAIL. 
From January 15th to January 31, 1897. 



COPYRIGIITKP. 



CONSIGNEES. 


.■SPIRITS. 


WHISKY. 


ALC'L 


GI 


N. 


Barrels 

65 

542 

70 

65 

130 


Cases. 


Bbls. 


>^-bbl. 


Kegs. 


Bbls. 


Bbl. 


Cases. 


Louis Taussig & Co.. . . 
Bode it Haslelt '. 






5 






Slli 
57 










Crown Distilleries Co.. 




5 


"io 





... . 






75 








William Wolff it Co ... 












.J Fark-v 


2.5 
50 
















Chiis-ly it Wise 














I.augley it Michaels... 











l-v . 















2 


1 






C H Oilman it Co .. . . 


1 ; 






40 


J L Nickel it Co 






9 
10 


I 











Dallcmand & Co 











1 


W r Fuller it Co. * 










L Sicbenbauer 


3 


3 
1 


s 








.1 H Milchell, Oakland 


. . 






.M Mason 








J J Ilanitin, Oakland . . 


::::::: '12 

2 








W Kaffcto 








1 1 




ST2 










I 1 


Total 

* 15 drums Alcohol. 


272 


4S9 


4 


5 


16 


5 


40 



SHERWOOD ^ SHERWOOD, 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

Slocks III' oiii' ,\;;cin V (iiiods fur sail' in luiiiil ami iluty [laid at 

212-214 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 24 N. FRONT STREET PORTLAND, OR. 

216 N. MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



"Kcysioiii' lUoHogrniii IThc" and *'<0(6 SnrnJoga" — The Finest Eastern Ryes, 



MOBT & OllANDON CHAMPAGNE 



B. A 

} 



ESOHKNAUER & GO'S CLARETS and SAUTERNES. 
A. HOUTMAN A COS HOLLAND GIN. 
LAWSON'S LIQUEUR SCOTCH WHLSKEY, 
Bass Ale in Wood, GLENI IVKT SCOTCH WHLSKEY in Wood, 
rter (GUINNESS JOULE'S STONE ALE in Hhds, and Hf-Hlids. 

MEiNHOLUS ANCHOR BRAND NEW YORK CIDER, 
HENK WAUKESHA Mineral Walsr 



-I P.rts, 

'.irk Scotch, 



brew). 



MACKENZIE & GO'S SMnish Sberries and Pons 

E. A J. BURKES NONPAREIL OLD TOM GIN. 

BURKE'S I1ENNE,SSY BRANDY iuid DRY GIN 

SCIILITZ MILWAUKEE BEER the "Pilsoner" and LIkIii Spar, ling 

aLs-i SCHLITZ in W,«d, 
ROSS' BELFAST GINGER ALE. CLUB SODA, ETC. 
"CLUB COCKrAII.S ' EVANS HUDSON ALE 



ItoSSXAH, Gr.HSTI.KY it Co.. rilll.AIIKI.I'IIIA. I'tKI; WniBKIKH:— "MA8<0T." "HOIIIN Moon," "O. p. S." ANP •Pbivatk Stock." 

rhifMl (iiiii.tllnii Itiir }yiilHl:ry Ulitilrrhiim .I- Ilorfs. l.'I'il. Vnvnixtn, fiiniiila). llitlHril I'lulrr tlovrrmiiriil '•ti))rrvlsli)it 
lil.-nwnt I l.l> tMi:illit\ l\ lllsh II.S r,iill»lr IS.-inlnni. Sinlnii '.M. '.sti. ■Mil. HI): IIi>ihi\i Itiii: n. I. r.: Siiiln,ililll . II II M<l!,tiiirr: 



llrl-n<ilillir: M. I Uoiio r. /i ; hlllluil. ll llfli: Mill ll iinil : Mull llll/l n: I lilll.illli:il.-: I 

AI*o Agents For NAPA VAI LEY WINE COS WINES AND BRANDIES IN CASES. 



lii-rrit iinti ittlirr sta mhlril hrinulH. 
California Winei and Brandies in Wood 



P/teipie WIJME /cJMD SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO DOMESTIC PORTS BY SEA. 





From JaniiRry ISIh to Juniwr; 31, IttUT. 


OALI.ONK 




VISSKL. 


nUTINATION. 


SIIICPCK8. PAUKAOKK. 


VAI.III. 


Francli 

CIljolSviliu-v 

T..tiil 


Nuw York 

SfllfrvUlc. I'n. : 

tiniMtnt I t iisrs iti 


I.iK'hmnii i\c Jacob! 350 pktfe.. . 
r»l \V Anpiulnlliin.. 5 barn-Is... 
rn*iHr Trans Co. . . 1 cape 


U.IVO 

•J. 1 IS 


7 



IMPORTS OF WINES AND LIQUORS BY SEA. 



FBOM EUKOPE VIA I'ANA.MA— I'KK SiK. SAN .losK, .Inn. 30, 18l»7 



PArKAOKlS ,t t'ONTKNTS. 



(' Ch.'inul 25 cases I'liartreuse OolOberi;. Bowtn A Co . . 

E I'lan A Co l cask Sherry Hellmari Bros & Co 

O Arnie 13 cases Wine Isantu Cinullu 

Fratelli Ocrtelll lOcaccsWinc |A!;u8lln» Motroiil A Co. . 



COKSIUNItCK. 



FR03X BRITISH COLUMBIA-PSfi S. 8. CiTY of Pdbbla, Jan 25, 1896. 



CPRKOo I 2 cases Whisky. 



I Wm Oerstle. 



FBOM NEW YORK— Pkb Ship W. F. Babcock. Jan. 28, 1897. 



Lire Oak Dist Co 

C r Moorman i.t Co. . 

Llllentlial Ot Co 

Jesse .Moore Hunt Co 
.MeiiiholJ i^ Heineman. 
I)e.'»rl»,>rn ^V: I'o 



... 4.S barrels Whisky. 

. . . 2(10 bbla Whisky . . 

. . . 7U barrels Whisky. 

. . 83 barrels Whisky. 

. . . 30 cases Cider 

.. .1 barrel Whisky. .. 



Order 

A P H.itnlini; A Co 

t'rown Dislilieries Co... 
Jesse Moftre Hunt Co. . 
Sherwood A Slierwood. 
Vai Schmidt 



FBOM 


VICTORI.A— Pke S. 8. 


Walla Walla, January 31, 1897. 






incurs .\ i' llutnlint; & Co 








IMPORTS BY 


RAIL IN BOND. 



From January 15th to January 31, 1*97. 



PACKAGES * CONTESTS. 



'2ilO capes Champagne. .. 



CONDIUNEES. 



OH MA Co. 



EXPORTS OF MISCELLANEOUS LIQUORS BY SEA. 



From January 15lh to January 31, 1897. 



VfiSSRL. 


DESTISATION. 


SHIFPBKS. PACKAGES. 


GALLONS 


VALl'K 


Coptic 


Yokohama 

Honolulu 

Corinto 

Shanghai 

F.dsenada 

Honolulu 

San J de Ouat'la. 

Honolnlu 

Panama 


Mattoon A Dan^Va lease ale... 




» 8 

248 


William Wolff A Co lOcs champ 
Weiniore-BowenCo I ce bitters. 
Chas MeineokeACo h cs " 

A Viiinier 27csabs'lbe 

F De Barv A Co. . . 20 cs champ 
J D Spreckels A Br 3 cs 

Crown Dist Co 10 cs bittere 

J D Spreekcls A Br W cs gin . . . 

Wni Wolff A Co... Ics Cordials 

" 1 cs liijuors. 

1 cs bitters. 




City of .Svdnev 
Citv of Kio..'. 

Orizal'a 

Australia 

•• 




12 
84 
68 
249 
55 
80 


Barracouts. . . 




1.54 
27 






16 
10 


,t 




12 
125 


Austr.lia 


Wms DA Co ai cs rum . . 






30 cs spirits 

PM SSCo 5i.k!;cbam. 

Welmore-Bowen Co 1 cs bitters. 

elt" 






Colon 




65 
6 




Corinto 

amount 186 cases 




Total 




$1,519 









BEER EXPORTS TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 
From January lal to January 15, I.S'JT 



VK>.8III. 



Coptic. 



niKTINATION. 



milPPIIIln 



Honolulu .. 
Yokohama. 
Cltyol Sydiiej Corinto. ... 

*' San .1 de (luul'la. 

»* Salt J del Sur. . . . 

" lOorliito 

*' iHan Johc ilu (r, . . 



lO AOSCo . 

Enlcrpnsc li i 

llulfBliillr Cm 



Enterprise Itr Co 
S F Breweries. I.td 



Orizaba . 



Australia. 



La LIberlad... . 
Ohnmpurlco. .. 

Corinto 

Ocos . 

.San J del Sur. . . 
|La Mbertnd... 
Ban J del Sur. . . 
JAmapala .... 

Ouaymas 

Corinto 

Hcrmoslllo 

Ma>:atlan 

iNemas Pietias , 
Santa Rosalia . 

Ouaymas 

Colorado 

Lb Paz 

Ilorensilns .... 

Ca t lo ren 

Hoiuilulu 



Du Vai A Carroll .. 

Itai'tK'h A Co 

Wetlnore-Ii Co . . 
CSchillinL;A Co... 

. Burnell A Co 

[S F Breweries, Ltd, 



■.'II ."i-l.^ I...ll|r',l 
..!■, ,■;,.,.- I,.. Ml. '.I 



■Jl iluir. Im.MU.I . 

Illenskr. bullied 
70 cnses bottleil 
155 ruses iKJttleil 
8 cases bottled. . 
20 eases hot I led . 

10 barrels.. 

20 eases 



B.irracoiita. .. 



Colon 



San Jose de O. 



La Libertad. 
Acajutla . .. . 
Champerico. 
Mazatlan ... 
Acapulco. . . 
Champerico.. 
Corinto 



iEnterprise Br Co. 



Buffalo Br Co . . 

E G LvonsCo 

J D Spreckels BrCo 

C Scbillint; A Co... 
1 Royal EaKle DistCo 



Buffslo Br Co 

C Sehillinu A Co . 
Anheuser B Co .. . 



,S F Breweries, Ltd. 



\C Schillinir A Co... 
' Vetmore-Bowcn Co 



4 eases 

1 barrel liotlled.. 
15 <-ases liottled. . . 
:tO eases t>ntlU'd. . . 
eases bottled. . , 
20 eases hot I ted. . . 
20 eases l>ottled. . . 
Ill eases tioliud... 
10 eases l)i>tlled. . . 

5 (asks liollled . . . 
7 eases hot t led ... . 
15 i'Nses l)otl led . . . 
70 sixths bulk . . .. 

Kill hts oulk 

4.S thirds bulk 

.'jO sixths liulk 

40 casks bottled .. 
7.'f ke^s bulk 

2 eases 

KO barrels Ijottled. 
HO,|r-bbls bulk ... 
.'ill eases bottled . . . 
»l casks bill tied . 
70 cases bottled . . 
10 cases bottled. .. 

|50 cases bottled. . . 
.500 eases bottled.. 
25 barrels bottled. 
|40 cases liottled. . . 
|S0 cases bottled... 
llO cases bottled. . . 

25 eases liottled. . . 

195 cases b'ttlcd.. 
'4 pkgs bottled 



17 



,w;i 
:io5 

III 
75 
90 
80 
30 
20 
10 
7(! 
142 

so 
Hill 
40 
50 
45 
31 
74 
I (Ml 



450 

131 

12 

1,28(1 

IKO 
:lllO 
:tS2 

51 
270 
2,500 
250 
200 
115 

60 

90 
0(i2 

25 



Total Bottled— lt>55 cases, 125 casks, 116 barrels. 4 jiaekages }.$tl,9li 

Ti.t.il Bulk -100 bf-liarrrif, 4.'i thiid-bbls. .50 c|r-litils, 120 sixths, 75 keirs.. ! 

EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 

From Januaiy 15th to January 31, 1897. 



DESTINATION. 



Citv of Sydney Amapala 

" t^irinto 

San .1 del Sur 

Orizaba (iiiaymas . . ._. 

Baracoiita iSan J de Guat'la. 

Australia Honolulu 



SIIIPPBB8. 



PACKA0E8. 



C Schlllinc A Co. . . 4 kei^s. . 

Wetmorc-Bowen Co I kce 

1 hf-barrel. 
B Frapolll A Co. . . 2 hf-bbis . . . 

Crown Diit Co 28 cases. ...I 

Wms D A Co 100 cases...' 



Total amount 12S cases and. 



« 50 

12 

Ml 

54 
170 
475 

*7'ts 



THE PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 

Reduced from $3 per year to 

-ONE-DOLLAR-AND-A-HALF- 




MARTIN ERLENBACH 

PACiriC COAST AGENT 

404 Sacramento St.. San Francisco, Cal 



"PERFECTION" 

THE STANDARD 

TURKISH PRUNE JUICE 

Is warranted a I't'ltl': FI;tlT F.XTItACT, whose component parts 
arc I.O porfeclly lilended Ihiil its action, used as proportioned, on 
every descrlpllou of spirit*, such as IIHANDY, KIM, CIN and par- 
Ilcularly WIII-iKKV. Is truly wonderful. 11 FINKS, I'IKIFIKS, 
MKI.t.llW.'^nlld ollierwlsi'iiKNKKAI.I.Y IM PIIUVKS 10 a feniarkabic 
deitrie. 

••rKltFKCTION" TFRKI9II PRF.NK JfICK l> an arltrle which 
cannot t>e Judged by Its tame or bomiuei, li must be Idended wlih the 
spirits in wood to prove Its value. Samplea and Inforiiiallon rcKard- 
InR profioriton to use, etc., will gladly be lurnlsheil by either our 
Agent oronrselvea. 

The advantage of giving immature spirits, IN A 
VERY SHORT TIME, the character of age, and 
thereby greatly increasing their value, is obvious. 




M. HAHN &. CO. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

125 Water Street, New York 



18 



PAeipie WIJ^E /fJ^D SflF^IT F^EVlEW. 



WINE AND BRANDY OVERLAND, 

During the Month of November, 1896, Showing Destination and Points of Shipment. 
Ouillliil from the Jmie of January 21, for lack o/ o/incc. These figures are included in the totals published that day.) 

[OFFICIAL FIGURES.] 





l!li 


lNi>l. 


WISE. [ 


FROH 


BRAXOr. 


WINE. 


TO 


Caees. 


Gallons. 


Cases. 


Gallons. 


Cases. 


Gallons. 

2 ,251 
15 


Cases. 


Gallons. 








14 
31 

320 

30 

91 

120 

28 

8 

16 

7 

9 

324 

9 

7 


5,788 

1,150 

263.562 

417 

4.492 

164 

145 

29 

40 


San Fram-isco 


187 


1,570 
14 


439,414 


Other New En^'and points. 


1 


57 

33,933 

18 

343 


Oakland - 


2()4 






•17 






Liverinore 


8 


39 
137 


IS 
11 


8,300 


Pliilnili'lithia 




San Jusc 

Warm SprniKS 

IrviTP'ton 


i(i,i;o6 






60 


OtluT Pennsylvania points. 
Baltimore 


2 
1 




276 




Mdnnlain View 






6 
4 
3 

i 

i 


2,991 




' Santa Clara 






302 




. . . . 


& 


ljO& Gatos 






2,541 
















13 


511 


348,599 
5,468 


Stockton 






5,803 


Olht-r Louisiana iS: Migs.pte 


Oakdale 












1 Sierra Vista 




10,400 
4,170 
2,400 


29,705 








no 

10,22!< 

10 

51 

3,200 

2,506 

2,949 

2,684 

63 


Fresno 




3,462 


Other Ala. and Florida pts. 




10 


4 












,5,710 




1 


2 

sT 

o 

79 

134 

1 

2 


Maltenioro 








11,475 






70 

24 

213 

168 


Sacramento 


2 


228 
,:0 


82 
2 


18,571 






1 Napa 


3,505 






OakTille 




61..504 




1 


Rutherford 








4. 870 


Ark. and Olilahonia points. 










li,820 


St. Helena 




2,011 




U 542 









3,419 
lU 

16,825 






3,124 


Other Ky. and Tenn. poinU 







3 
19 

5 
23 

4 

145 

9 

1 
4 
1 

12 
31 

5 


Corclcli.'i 






1 


10,090 




2,248 


Ehnirr. 






IS 






Shellville .Junction 






1 


56 








OS 

15 

55,10S 1 

45 

2,366 

110 

22 

(S 

19,900 

2,191 

22 


El Verano ,'. .'. . .". 






14 








Santa Rosa . ...-.-:-.'..•.■.•.-. .-. .: 








2,784 




87 


11.464 


San Rafael 








183 










3 


11,224 






459 


Korbels 




2,582 


5,147 






Ilealdsbnrg 




50 




1 


79 

649 

189 

10 

48 

65 

5,034 


Asti 

Cloverdale 


4 


1.205 


233 



31,730 




40 






Auburn ... 








15 




8 


Latrobe 








49 




Plaeerville 








79 






Elk Grove 




43 










80 


92 

2,089 

50 

5S 

16U 

385 

71 

13,426 

12.4U2 

9,071 

4,9:)2 

5,818 

5,880 

13,332 

10 


lone 






217 




IS 


Marvsville 






1 


41 




Vina 




11 094 
1,226 


12,580 








8 

7 

35 

7 
187 
75 
84 
67 
136 
1 
5 




5 


31,458 




1 
3 


61 

323 

5 

1,675 

547 

1,265 

294 

2.015 

32 




20 


Other Neb. and Kansas pts. 








1 
13 

1 


43 240 


Sunny Slope 




25 


■\475 




21 

3 

7 

11 

59 

6 


San Bernartlino 




21,935 


Oilier Colorado polnte 








28 


SanI a Barbara 








72 




Wintlirop 








83 


Montana and Idaho points. 










48 


1 Wilminytou 


... . 




_. 


10 




Anaheim 








30 








Santa Ana 




23 


1 


20 










Hollister 














^loulerey 





















Antioch 








































Milton 




















Huhach Switch 




















.Minium 
















Mala;^a 

Total 




1 














1 




Tolal 


2nn 


fiI,S69 


' 2.2SS 


819.671 


200 


61.869 


' 2,28S 


819,674 



WlbblAM WObFF & CO. 

Importers and General Agents 



327-329 Market Street 



MIt. .1. A. GIl.KA. Ileiii.iN. (iilka Kuninicl I'l: Eekau. 
MlCSSltS. IDOLPHO WOLFE'.S SON & CO., 

SrniKi>.\M. Aiomalbine Schnapps. 
.MKS.SllS. HEAD lillOS., I.osuoN, The "Iloc's Head" 

Botttinr: of Ouinnecs' Stout and Bass' Ale. 
llAlil'llOI.o.MAY BItEWINO CO., RociiksTkii. N. Y., 

Ktiifkerlinckcr Beer. 
MKSSItS. UDIIOS FltEKES, BoicnKAi'X, Clarets and 

Sautel nci'. 
.MESSliS. DEI.N'HAltl) .V; CO., Coiilkntz, Rhine and 

.Mipselle Wines. 
.MR V. CHAl'VENET. NuiTs, CoTK D'On, Unrpundy 

Wines 
MESSlis .MORGAN BROS.. Pi'kkto i>k .Santa 

M AUIA. SlitTf ies. 
WIliUW IIARMil.NY, Pnertodc Santa Marin, SherrUv. 

Ilr-liniioi Irtl .tnirrltiiii tHi(til<trti. — 'i»\ Eicelslor ; Hpr, '89 Belle of Nelpon , Sprlni; UOdld Grand Kad; 
Staple brands. Lowest market ((Uotallont furninhed on applleatlou. to the wh 



.MESSRS. MOET .t CHANDON. Epkhnay. Cliam- 
piitne. White Seal (Grande Cuvie), Brnt Impiriol. 

.|OH.\N.MS I,i>. JoiiANMx. Kill): of Natural Table 
Wn'.r,-. 

.Mlv-^^lis lANTUELL A COCHRANE, Bklkaht, 
(iln.'ci Ale. 

MESSIIS .1. .V F. MARTELL, Cognac — Marlell 

n<-< ■!■ 

MESH I WALKER .V: SONS, LTn,\VAi.KKic 

V!i I'uMiiiliftu Club WhUkv. 

.MES.-' •■ W ISSUER A CO., 'EiilNiiiiltuii. 
H. 

THE I IsTIEI.ERS CO., Ltd., ( Wm. ,Iame- 

i. .V Cm jiiihlln, Iilhli WhUkv. 

::; -U.S. JOhN DkKI.'VI'ER A SON, Rottkhiiam. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



THE ROYAE WINE CO., OpoCTO, Port Wines. 
MESSRS VZAGriRRE .V: CO., Rki-s, Tnrrnpina 

WinC!*. 
THE ROVAE IIVNGARIAN GOVERNMENT WINE 

CELLARS. BinAi'KsT. HunL'arlan Wines 
PSCIIORR AND OTHER GER.MAN BEEItS. 
.MR TIIEO. LAri'E. Nki'i>iktkm>ohk, Aroniatbpie 

Hitlers. 
MIt. MARNIEIt LAI'OSTOLLE, Skink et Oisk, 

I'ltASiK. Grand .Marnier. 
MESSliS. E. ( ISENIER FII.S AINE .t CO , Pakis, 

Cordials 
ANDItEAS SAXLEHNER. DfnAPKST, HuuyadI ,1 nos 

Natural .\perlent Water. 
MIt. .lOllANX MARIA FARINA, Coi.ntjNK. Geicenuc 

ber deni .Iiu-ll(*hsplat7., Colojjne, Eaii de Coloj;ne * 

Hume; Maylleld: O F. C; Ghlckcncock and other 
ilesale trade only. 



f/ceifie WIJME /cJSID Sflf^lT f^EVIEW, 



19 



THEO GIE-R COMPA/Ng. 

It is (loiil)triil if any linn uti tiie Piicilic Slupo has luxl a 
more rapid riso in iiiospcrity and in sul>slantial Imsincris ^aiiis 
tiian the 'rin'odi>ri' (iicr I'onniany, ot"t)aklanil. Tlu' new whole- 
sale, jobbing and Taniily dvpartniunts of tliis Company are now 
fully fitted out for business, and a most handsomely ajipoiiited 
business house it is. 

It is located in a splendid new structure fronting on 14th 
street, immediately opposite the I'ublic Library, and between 
Clay and Washington streets. The main store has a frontage of 
r>0 feet, and it extends back l.'!7 feet, being well liglite<l from 
front and rear. On this lloor is a handsome display of the l)ot- 
tlcil wines and li«iuors carried by the Company, a rectifying 
room and a bottling room. The main olVices of the Company are 
in the rear, and are giv»>n ample light by a skylight. The re- 
mainder of this lloor is given over to the storage of wine and 
whisky. 

The basement is of the same area as the first lloor, has an 
artificial stone lloor, and is devote<l to storage and to the opera- 
tions incident to the proper handling of wines. 

Xo pains or expense have been spared in the arrangement of 
the establishment for the transa<'lion of business. The facilities, 
as compared with the old cellar at Sth and Broadway, are vastly 
improved. The storage capacity of the Company's cellars has 
been more than doubled, to say nothing of the greater ease in 
receiving and shipping wines. Tlie Company will retain its old 
quarters at i'15 Washington street for the present, this being 
given over to the retail trade. 

The Company has the advantage also of being vineyard [iro- 
prietors. About two years ago Mr. Gier came into possession of 
the Dos Mesas property, about three and a half miles soutli of 
Livermore, in the foothills of the Coast Kange, and in the most 
noted Sauterne and claret producing district in California. The 
jiroperty was re-christened " Giersberger," and extensive im- 
provements made. A cellar was erected, and, although the vine- 
yard was one of seventy acres, it was found that it produced a 
very small proportion of the wine needed by the Company. For 
two years pa.st. therefore, the Company has been a heav^- pur- 
chaser of grapes and wine in the I.ivermore Valley and other 
sections. Their trade now extenils well over the State north of 
Tehachipi, and they have the cream of the family trade of Oak- 
laud, Alameda and Alameda county generally. 



Messrs. F. Chevalier & Co., Chateau Chevalier Vineyai'ds 
and Winery, at Napa county, Cal., w ith oflices at San F'raneisco 
and branch oflice at Portland, Ore., have of late entered this 
market with ther product^s, which on all sides are acknowledged 
to be of the very lirst class. As they are growers themselves, 
they can alTord to otler their fine wines and brandies at very 
reivsonable figures and terms. — .SV. Lmii.^ Cor. Boiilm-ff. 



SWEET WI/NE ASSOeiATIOM. 

The Sweet Wine Association has secured the transfers of 
wine of Hiilpslantially all of tln'ir members, and is prepared to 
conduct its alVairs much the ,Haiiii! a.s last year. An advance in 
prices will certainly be made. The Association has control of 
the wine of all the large manufacturers except fieorge II. Miilter, 
of .Malleinioro. There are not nearly so many persons and firms 
interested in its management and alVairs as after the season of 
l.SU'), however, for the reason that many wine makers who 
turned out sweet wine in lSii.")-'.»(') did not make a (Iroj) in Ih'.Mi- 
'.17. They expected, and probably may get better prices propor- 
tionately for dry wine, to which they turned their attention. 



C. .M. .Mann is still increasing his already well-established 
Central .\merican trade. Ilis last shipment down there aggre- 
gated ."500 cases. This volume of trade taken with his domestic 
orders, keeps his bottling department running at full capacity. 

Lang Brothers have sold their wholesale and family store at 
San Rafael, Cal,, to Frey & Levy, who will retain all the agen- 
cies of the old owners. San Rafael all'ords a good stand for a 
nice business, and the Review wishes the new firm success. 

WI/NE A/ND BRA/NDg -RECEIPTS. 



January 2 

" 4 



Wine. 

... 36,800 

46,800 

5 .38,600 

6 18,.500 

7 33..350 

8 47,160 

9 8,800 

11 57,500 

12 57,300 

13 47,!I00 

14 27,500 

15 38,250 

16 46,027 

18 32,800 

19 42,100 

20 36.850 

21 39,100 

22 .34,750 

23 25,800 

25 27,600 

26 33,700 

27 40,000 

28 45,400 

29 43,300 

30 31,700 



Brandy. 
2,000 
5,900 
2,450 
700 
8,200 



Total for .Tanuarv 

Total for .January 1896. 
Total for .liinuarv ]S!)5. 



9.36,587 
1,044,080 

S1I7,.^'{4 



8,100 
1,400 

i,6o6 

4,240 



2,400 
2,000 
1,000 



3'.l,3!)0 
6,()00 

(;o,.">!io 



RICHARD HELLMJINN 



U. 0. HELLMANN 



HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 



IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
525 Front Street - » - - San Francisco 



Cal. 



.PACIFIC CO.VST AGENTS FOR. 



KRUG & CO., REIMS, PRIVATE CUVEE CHAMPAGNE 



i. PERRIER riLS Sl CO., Ciuloas s Marse, 

ADRIEN A riLS, EjierMy 

rORKKSTSR A CO., Xera da U FronUn 

GARVBY 4 CO - 

OTfiXX. CRAiip & rORRBSTBR. Oiwrto, ' 

BUNK8NHEYM & NOLET, Rntaijam, 

H. LSCHiT, R. PHILIPPE & CHBSSE, Nanto, 



ChiiBfiagiit 

CbAmpa^e 

Sherriu 

Shtrhes 

P^rt WiiiM 

Union 6m 

Sirdiiia 



DUBLl.N DLSTlLLElUj- CO., Lid, Dublin, 
E. REHY MARTIN i CO., Roiullac, 
P. FR.APIN .V- CO.. S«pinxac 
ENGRAND FRERES, Ang^ale^l^ 

PAHERSON & HIBBERT, London, | 



Baa' and Ooinea' 
Stonl 



L bURLACHER. Bm(;«n - - Rhint Wint 

H. UNDERBER6— ALBRECHT, Rbeinberg a Niedcrrhein 

Boontkamp Bilt«n 

CHAa DAT & CO.. Undon, ] 0^. B"^ 

J. B. HBRRIFF 4 CO., Glasgow. jalT^ 



ALL GOODS IS VMTEO STATES HOSUKD lyAKF.HOVSK 



AMERICAN WHISKIE.S— "BLUE GRASS" AND "B0ONi:\S KNOLL' 



20 



f/cClfie WIJ^E /xJnjB Sflf^lT I^EVIEW. 



PERSECUTION, NOT PROSECUTION. 

There is no class of men wlio are so bitterly persecuted by 
those who desire to regenerate mankind as the men who sell in- 
toxicants. Whenever a saloon-keeper violates a law he is held 
up as a menace to the community and one who should be in- 
veifjhed aj^ainst and fjiven no mercy. Even when the violation 
of the law is merely a technical one, the wheels of the law are set 
in movement against him. and lio is relentlessly pursued, aud 
there is no Nemesis wanting to haunt him by day and terrorize 
him l)y night. Every etVort is made to make him feel that he is 
a Pariah, and outside the pale of consideration of any one who 
is not engaged in the selling of liquor. 

Now this baiting and harassing of the licpior .seller is mani- 
festly unfair. The sale of liquor is licensed, and the dispen.ser 
of intoxicants pays more towards the city coffers than any other 
man in any other business. So long as the liquor seller obeys 
the mandate of the law he should have as much regard as any 
other man. That intoxicants conduce to baleful results all ad- 
mit. So does the sale of firearms aud poi.sou when purchased 
with suicidal or murderous intent. More people have been killed 
and injured by the la.-;t named agencies, as shown by the statis- 
tics of the National Medical Association, than through intoxi- 
cants. But that is no reason why the sale of poisons and lire- 
arms should be prohibited. 

Man has consumed intoxicants from the beginning. Sump- 
tuary laws don't wean him from the desire for them, and prohi- 
bition is futile aud provocative of more vicious results than corn- 
comparative liberality and freedom. It is curious that in such a 
State as California, which derives one of its greatest revenues 
from the manufacture aud sale of wine, there should be such an 
inordinate prejudice against the saloon-keeper. If the saloon- 
keeper violates the law he should be prosecuted. However, he 
should not be harassed and annoyed «hen he is trying to obey 
the laws, and moreover he should not bo persecuted when he 



does infringe the laws. The same even-handed justice that is 
meted out to other violators of the law should be accorded him. 

If .societies and organizations would bend their energies to 
the punishment of other and greater criminals with as much 
zeal as they do towards the punishment of the saloon-keeper, a 
community would be singularly free from depredations aud in- 
fractions of the law. The constant hue and cry against the sa- 
loon-keeper for the purpo.se of kecpiug the police on his track 
has the result of immunity to greater transgressors. The regu- 
lation of the saloon-kcep_i'r is in the hands of the police. It has 
been shown in this city that the police are watchful in this mat- 
ter, and it is a difficult task for an unworthy fellow to secure a 
license to sell liquor. The proceedings of the Police Commis- 
sioners show the espionage that is kej)t over the saloon-keepers 
by the police, and the recommendation of the chief of police has 
had the ell'ect of establishing a better .system in the traffic of 
liquor by limiting it to men who have some character aud 
stability. 

The ti-oubic in the past has been that too great a stress has 
been placed on the infractions of the law by the saloon-keeper 
aud too little attention given by these same reformers to other 
and more serious offenders. It may be laid down as a general 
proposition that the majority of the saloonkeepers desire to 
keep within the law. Many of them have thousands of dollars 
invested in their business, and thej' realize that constant infrac- 
tions of the law means a revocation of their privilege to do 
business. It is business expediency, if nothing else, that compels 
them to obey the spirit as well as the letter of the law. The 
respectable men of the saloon business have formed an organiza- 
tion whose object it is to weed out the disreputable and uncon- 
scionable dealers. This organization has done much toward the 
elevation of the business — much more than all the agitators 
have accomplished. It is about time to call a halt lo unreason- 
ing pcr.'recution and deal with the traffic the same as with other 
kinds of business. — /.o.< Amjch'-i Phoenix. 



COMTBS SL COS 

OF^IGlHAli 

PLYMOUTH GIN 

An English Double Distilled Unsweetened Gin, a ^ 
delicious compromise between Holland 

and Old Tom Gins. 



itisTKinrTiNO ..\r;EXT fok tiii: iwcific C().\st. 

W, B, CHAPMAN, 123 California Street, San Francisco. 



f/reifie WII^E /rJ^D SflF^IT F^EVIEW 



21 



Owners and Handlers of its own Brands 
and Also the Weil-Known .... 




Brands of ^^^^^ 

) NAPA VALLEY WINE CO. 
KOHLER & VAN BERGEN 
KOHLER & FROHLING 
^ . m B. DREYFUS & CO. 
^ * S. LACHMAN CO. 

C. CARRY & CO. 

7}f^ 





SECOP mil FOLSOPl STS. \ i<^ 



San Francisco, \ \J'^ 

California \ ^^^ 

% 

New York Office: \ y^ 

No. 45 ''I'nD^iY . O 



AUQU8T 10, 18C-i- 



^ 



22 



f/^eifie WIJME AJ^D SflF^lT f^EVIEW. 



l/NTEMPE-RA/NCE OF "REVIVALS. SIG/NCR -ROSATTI GOES ^EAST. 



"Stimiihuits produce temporary insanity. Wliisky, cocaine 
and alcohol bring temporary insanity, and so does a revival of 
religion, one of those revivals in which men lose all their reason 
and self-control. This is simply a form of drunkenness no more 
worthy of respect than the drunkenness which lies in gutters." 
—David Stark Jordan, PresidciU of StunJ'urtl riiiiwrsilii. 

OAKLA/ND DAFT AGAI/^. 

Oakland has gone daft again on the license iiucstiou. If the 
vote of tlie Council can mean anything, theiiuestiou of " license " 
or " no license " will be submitted to the vote of the people at 
the coming election. 

The Councilnien who voted for so submitting the (luesliun. 
are Buckland, Dow, Manuel, Marshall, Towle and Matt. 

Against Hartman, KaulVman and Watkinsoii. 

Absent— Bas.sctt and Brosnahan. 

The vote was one fully to be expected. The t'ouncilmen? 
with few exceptions, want to dodge the issue and to avoid their 
plain duty under the law. Tliey had no right and have no right 
to adopt the ropulistic referendum, and we trust that they will 
be enjoined fi-om shirking the ijuestiou. 

ADDRESS TO SONOMA WINE MAKERS. 



The following letter has been sent out by the Sonoma County 
Wine Makers' Association to the wine makers of that county : 

Dear Sir — At a meeting held in San Francisco, Nov. 18th 
IS'.X), the wine makers of Sonoma county who are members of the 
California M'ine Makers' Corporation organized an association of 
the Wine Makers of Sonoma County. 15. W. Paxton was elected 
president. P. C. Kossi vice-president and W. J. I lolchkiss secre- 
tary, and the principal place of business named as Uealdsburg. 

The objecis of the association are to work for the advance- 
ment of the viticultural interests of Sonomacounty, and to nioie 
closely bind together the wine makers and strengthen the hands 
of the California Wine Makers' Corporation. 

It is strongly urged upon the members of the Corporation 
that they use their best efl'orts with any wine maker who is not a 
memberof the Corporation to induce him to join our association, 
as the success of the wine makers of California depends entirely on 
their unity of action and the absence of dissensions among them. 

It is a matter of pride among the wine makers of Sonoma 
county that they transfer a higher pei-oentage of their wines to 
the Corporati<3n than the wine makers of any other county in the 
State, and we hope that all the wine makers will assist us in 
making this showing. Any suggestion tiiat any wine maker has 
to make for the good of his brother wine makers would be 
gladly received if addressed to the Secretary, W. .1. Hotchki.ss, 
Healdsburg, CalifornlM. 



Signor Guido Rossati, who has been in the State for the i)ast 
two months in the interest of the Italian (iovernment, investiga- 
ting the viticultural industry in all its branches, has gone East 
by way of Southern California, lie expects to be in New York, 
where he is permanently stationed, about February ].5th. and, 
after resting about a month, he will l>egin work ui)on an exhaus- 
tive report, whieli will be published by the Government. 

"This being my liist tri|) to California,'' he said just prior to 
leaving, '• 1 was naturally much interested, and learned much of 
the people, the country and its products. I cannot go without 
thanking' all for their hospitality to me. I have visited the 
Napa, Sonoma, Santa Clara and Livermore Valleys, have been 
at Natoma and Vina, have been some time around Stockton, and 
now will linish by spending .some time around Fresno and 
SoutluMii Calilbrnia. The capabilities of the State in the direc- 
tion of viticultural developnu'ut, I believe have only begun of 
recognition. Mticulture has been pursued .so short a time that 
it is natural that knowledge as to the best vineyard sections are 
only beginning to be known. It is a pleasure for me to see so 
many of my countrymen taking an active part in tlie develop- 
ment of this State. 

" The report which I shall make will be divided into three 
parts : 

'• 1st. \'iticulture, in which I shall give ])articular attention 
to grape-growing in all its phases, particularly covering the dif- 
ferences between methods here and in Italy. 

'' 2d. Wine-making, in which chapter I shall devote special 
attention to labor-saving machinery, which here has its highest 
development. It is surprising to note iiow much is done here by 
means of steam or other power, which at home is done by hand. 

" .3d. The wine-merchants and trade." 

Signor Kossati's Keport of course will be published in 
Italian, but it will be translated into English for the benefit of 
those not familiar with the foreign language. 



Uenry \'an Bergen, treasurer of the Calili>inia Wine Asso- 
ciation, will start for Germany about the last of this nuinth. He 
will sp(>n<l nearlj- all his projected vacation at Carlsbad, where 
hi' will rejoin his father, who is already at that lanious fiermiin 
watering j)lace. 

Pi(U-re Du Mont, the proprietor of the wholesale and retail 
wine store at .301 Fourth street, died on the 30th ult. His 
funeral took place on the 2d inst.. services being held in the 
French church and in Druids' Hall. Mr. DuMimt was born in 
France, but had been in the wine b\isiuess in Calil'uiiiia for many 
years. Hi' li'avi's a widow and two children. 




Ell PINAli VINEYARD 



EST.\r.l.l>llKi> l.sf)2 



Largest Producers of 

PURE SWEET WIN 



IN JVMPIRIC^ 



Geo. West & Son 

5T0CKT0N, QflL, U. 5. f\. 



f/cSlfie WIJMt /rJMD S^lf^lT F^EVIEW. 



23 



SWEET WINE PRODUCTION. 

Official Figures for First and Fouith Districts of California. 

(liEi'AriTii.ATioN L'ntii. Di;t:iCMiii;it 1, is'.n;.) 

W'iiu' (i;ils. 

Port I'loduivil l,;!7l,:ii;o.7s 

Slicrrv rroiliU't'il Sl3r),(iS7.,S7 

Anj;i'lic;i I'l-Diliu'ctl .'51 1 ."il .").!)(! 

Musc:iti-1 riixliii'i'd HM.dO'.I.U) 

Miila;;;! rroducfd 'J.'Jflll.l I 

Kroiiti<;ii:in I'rodiii'i'd !),0'2<).()7 

'I'okay I'r-ddiK'cil , 074. ;{4 

Total to Dewnibor 1st 2,7U,Sfi7.2.T 



SWEET Wl/NE p-RODUeTIO/N. 

Official Figures for ttje First District of Galifornia. 



SWEET Wl/NE PRODUeTlO/N, 



Official Figures for the Fourth District of California. 



i>KCKMi!i;i{, 1896. 

Vkga. 
Hnindy withdrawn froin distillery lor lor- 

tiiication 747 

Hraiuly withdrawn IVdiii special bonded 

warehouse for fortilication 9 

Brandy actually used for I'ortilicatioii SIS 

Port produced 

Sherry produced 

Musciltel produced 

.\ngelica proiluced 

Total 



Tax Gals. 



DECEMliKR, 18!»C. 



PkgS. 

104,!)] 4. SO Brandy withdrawn from distillery for for- 
tilication .548 

!i"_'4.S0 Brandy wiliidrawn from sj)ecial liouded 

1IS,S18.70 warehouse for f\>rtificatiou 1 

Wine Gali5. Brandy actually used for fortilication !)".»li 

<»3,(iS;?..->.5 

147.'2'.i!>.22 Port produced 

17I..S0.5.78 .Sherry produced 

74,774.(50 Muscatel produced 



487,011.3.15 



Total. 



Tax Clals. 

4.5,9.39.80 

2.3.90 

« 1.0 10. 10 

Wine Cal.s. 

119..5.3:!.7(5 

14S,.S27.S:{ 

7.01 ().G7 

27.5,378.26 



RECAPITULATION TO JANUARY isT, 1897. 

Wine Gals. 

Port Produced 1,5,84,578.79 

Sherry Produced 1,121 si 4.92 

Angelica Produced 3S().320.5(; 

!Musca tel Produced 372.33 1 .55 

Malaga Produced 2,209.11 

Frontiguan Produced 9,Ol'().07 

Tokay Produced 974.34 



Total to January 1, 1897 : 3,477,.309.34 



B-RA/NDg PRCDUeTIO/N. 

First District. 
I)K(i:mi!i:h, I mm;. 

Tax (ials. 

Produced and bonded 03,190.90 

Received from distilleries in Fourth District, Cal- 
ifornia 20.409.20 

Received from S|)ecial bonded warehouses, Fourth 

Di.strict. ('alif()rnia 1,861.70 

Transferred from distilleries to special bonded ware- 
houses. Kastern Districts 17.481.90 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special 

bonded warehouse, lOastern Districts 21.8,55.10 

Tax-paid 20.479. CO 

Witbilrawn for export 207.10 

Remaining in bond December 31.1.806 .595.191.::0 



BRA/NDg p-RODUeTIO/N. 

Fourth District. 
iieckmi!1;k, ISOf). 

Ta.x Gals. 

Produced and bonded 40,012.00 

Transferi-ed from distilleries to special bonded ware- 
house. First District of California 27.124.20 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded ware- 
house Ivisteru Districts 2.5.56.00 

Transferred from special bonded warehou.se to special 

lioiidi'd ware-house. Eastern Districts 13,020.50 

A\'illidia\\ n for export 27.00 

Tax-paid 5,0O7..5O 

Remaining in special bonded warehouse Dec. 31 474,280.70 

Total remaining in State. Dec. 31, l,S96 1.069.478.00 

WlNF.M.MvElv and Distiller, :in years of age. holding 
highest references for 12 yeai-s' services in leading establish 
ments, open for engagement. .Vddrc.ss '• S. S.," this oflice. 

(iK( »\\I';KS who wish to sell good California wines for cash 
on delivery, at moderate prices, to Kasti^rn buj'er, please corre- 
spond with ■• B.," care editor this paper. 

RESISTANT VINES— Fresh Riparia and Lenoircuttiiif,'« 

for sale at reasonable rates. Address RiK)m 50, 330 Pine street, 
San Francisco. 



TO Wl/NE /V\E/N. 



For S.M.E— (tni' half interest or the wlmle of the right to 
a wine faucet, recently patented, which enables wine men to 
keep dry wines on tap in o-gallon demijohns, pure and whole- 
some, without manipulation. It is simple and thoroughly elVect- 
ive, and is a result that has long been sought, as it will enable 
retailers to carry small ipiantities of dry wines " on tap " with- 
out spoiling. For particulars, addre.sa il, this oflice. 



24 



fAeipie wi|ME A^'l^ spif^iT f^eview 



WHO AUTHOHIZED gOU ? 

'• Authorized oflicial organ of the Hotel. Wiiio, Jjiquor, ilrew- 
ing, Tobaocoand Kindred Industries on the Paeific Coast." — .\n- 
nouncement of t lie Califnriila Ilotd and Wine Gmctle. 

Who •' authorized " vou as to the "wine," "liquor" and 
" brewing " industries? 

\Vc don't care about the " iiotel " and •' tobacco." I'erluips 
you are entitled to this hotel endorsement, but when the tobacco 
line is considered, where does the Grocer and Counirij Merchant 
come in V 

As to the " wine " authorization, have you the endorsement 
from the California Wine Makers' Corporation, the California 
Wine As.sociation. or the College of Practical ^'iticulture '.' 'S'ou 
have not. No one has. 

As to the liquor endor.-^ement, have you the authority from 
the California Protective Association to use its name? You 
have not. And aside from you, where do the P.\cific Wine 
AND Spirit Kevikw, the Saloon Man\ Jonrnal, the Liquor Deakr 
of Los Angeles, and the Phoenix come in. not mentioning Mr- 
Garland's hybrid paper, the Wholesalers ami Jiclallers' licview. 

As for the Hrewcr.s' Protective As.sociation, thej' have en- 
dorsed nobody and no papei'. 

Pull in your horns neighbor. You have no endorsements 
and vou need none. 



GE/NE-RAL BO/NDED WAREHOUSE. 

According to reports that have been received from the East, 
there is everj' probability that the General Bonded Warehouse 
for the storage of whisky an<l other spirits, and which was estab- 
lished in this city in compliance with the provisions of the Wil- 
son Bill, will be ordered abandoned by the Internal Revenue 
Department, The change, it is added, may be expected to come 
about at any time witliin the next ninety days. 

We understand that the Department makes the claim that 
the permission to establish and maintain such warehouses is 
wholly optional with the revenue authorities; and that the riglit 
to deprive tlie warehousemen of the privilege to do business, is 
theirs as well. It is nothing un\isual for the Executive Depart- 
ment of this Governmeut to claim, and, if unopposed, to retain 
constantly augmenting power. The action of the Department 
in this particular is nothing unusual, in consequence. 

Of course there are divergent opinions on the warehouse and 
the expediency of its maintenance. Those who sell whisky direct 
out of bond, and who have comparatively' small expenses, are in 
arms against the action of the Department. While not as 
numerous as the opponents of the warehouse, they are, as a rule, 
much more active, and will give the matter their most vigorous 
attention. To them, they say, the order of the department sim- 
ply means an order to cease doing business, except in re-injported 
goods. These people are both angry and determined, and they 
cut no inconsiderable figure in the trade of the State, 

On the other hand, there are the rectifiers. They all liave 
large investments in appliances and in stock, they employ a rel- 
atively large number of men, and they complain of the tight 
competition to which the existence of the warehouse subjects 
them. Tliey are one and all against it, feeling that theii- future 
depends in no small degree upon the discontinuance of the ware- 
house. So that with these two clashing interests, the situation 
is an interesting onr-, and before the end comes there will cer- 
tainly be a hot struggle between them. 

On the ."id inst. Asssemblyman Emmons introduced a bill at 
Sacramento to abolish the corner grocery. It prohibits the 
granting of licenses for the sale of liquors in any less quantity 
than a (|uart in any room where any other kind of goods are .sold 
exce|)t cigars and lobacce. The bill, of course, 18 intended as a 
first class " le^-|iiiller." 



J/^otes and J^eTconals, 

11, 11. Shnfeldl, the Cliicago distiller who retired from Imsi- 
Jiess, .some years ago, when his business was absorl)ed by the 1). 
and C. F. Co., is on the Coast for his health. 

Theodore Gier, the Oakland wholesaler, has been in Marys- 
ville during the past week, attending the convention of Turners, 
he being a promimnt member of the society in Oakland. 



Jii<llc;i's Wine and Spirit Circular, of Loudon, published in its 
issue of January 2, 1897, a large and well-executed view of Cob- 
lentz, Germany, one of the centers of the Rhine wine trade. 



The wedding of Isadore W. Cahen. of Louis Caheu & Son. 
and Miss Bertha Hart, was celebrated in San Jo.se on the IVtli 
ult. The good wishes of all in the trade go out to Mr. and Mrs. 
Cahen for a long and happy life. 

C. N. Pickett has received 50,000 cuttings this week from 
(jlen Ellen, Sonoma county, which he will set out in his vine- 
yard in the end of the valley this year. lie will receive another 
consignment of 10,000 shortly. -Calintogian. 



Henry Laudsberger, of Landsberger & Son, lately achieved 
the feat of eating oue (juail a day for thirty consecutive days, on 
a wager. The scene of action was Jule's Yitii'ultural Restaur- 
ant, and great was the jubilaliou over the success of the attempt. 



James E. Pepper & Co., of Lexington, Ky., have made ar- 
rangements with Mr. T. C. Barnes to lepresent them on the road. 
Mr. Barnes belongs to the "old guai'd," and his past has proved 
him to be one of the most successful salesmen in our line, — Mida'g. 

.\s assignee for James E. Pepper, the Security Trust and 
Safetj' Vault Company, of Lexington, Ky., has sold the distiller's 
celebrated stock farm, " Meadowthorpe.'' Mrs. James E. Pep- 
per was the purchaser, at $38,050, the amount of the first mort- 
gage on it. 

Arpad Haraszthy is doing a steady Imsiness in the new 
brands of champagne which he is placing on the market. The 
old " Eclipse " brand still remains in vogue, but the later lots of 
" Haraszthy Sec " and •' Ilarasi^thj' Brut " are meeting with 
much appreciation from connoisseurs. 



J. Wegner, the well-known wine grower of Glen Ellen, has 
sold his cellar of fine wines to Ijachman & Jacobi, of San Fran- 
cisco, The puncheons are now being shipped to that city on the 
cars of the Sonthein Pacific railroad. A good figure was ob- 
tained for the wine, which is of line bouquet. — Sonoma Tribune. 



Jesse M. Levy & Co. are giving u|) their oiiices at 500 Mar- 
ket street, and are removing them to the basement underneath at 
.'■)01-.506 ^larket. which they have occupied for .some years. The 
first floor will now be occupied exclusively by their retail de- 
partment, a sidc-lioard and bar having been installed some 
weeks ago. 

A. P. llotaliiig, of .\. I'. Ilotaling & Co., has let contracts 
f'oi- the transforming of his office on Paeific avenue, near the 
court-house. Santa Cruz, into a large hotel. It will cover an 
area of Hl'J by 12S feet, and be three stories high. There will 
b(( 100 rooms, and everything will be e(iuipped in the latest 
manner. 

The Ki:vii'.\\ desires to thank Messrs. ,\. Overboil vS; Co.. of 
Pittsburg, Pa., foi- their annual renu'inbrance of ••Overboil" ]\yv. 
sent through tiie Coast agents, .lones, Mundy A' Co. '• Over- 
liolt " has a steady sale in this •• Market of little rye," a large 
proi)ortion of all ryes use<l here for blending or sold as straight 
goods having origin in that distillery on llw Monougahela. 



f/rSlfie WIJ^E /^JSIB Sflf^lT f^EVIEW 



25 



TliP Li'iiilo-Levy C\)inpauy, of Sun Kninuisi-o, liius been iii- 
oorponitod. Tlio ("onipany will take nvcr the wliolesule li(|iior 
Imsiiii'Ms of Li'Milo i"s; Co.. of 'I'liinl street, this eity. The eii|iit;il 
stock is $"_'r),(10(>, ami the iiieoi'|ioi'atoi's are Leon I.einle, .Jenny 
Levy, (iustav Loeli, Morris Sehnenhol/. and Mux Soinnier. 

Sherwood & Sherwood are preimi-inj; a ni'w trade-mark laliel 
to plaee on the whiskys partienlarly handled by them. It eon- 
sists of a ^jraeefnl n\ono>;rani aiul a hriel" warninj.;. This lirni is 
handlin<; a new line of goods in the pi-odiicl of the i eanliiMi 
\'ineyard, of Sixnla Clara. These consist of a selected Sauterne 
very tine Claret. They are very lastefnlly put np. 

rreseni indications point to the possibility of .Sontli hakota's 
going into the linnor bnsiness on the South Carolina plan. It is 
given out that the anti-liccnso forces have a<lopted this [ilan as 
the one most probable to succeed against tiieir opponents, and Sen- 
ator (ireely, it is understood, is to submit a bill covering provis- 
ions which will be satisfactory to the oitponents of the saloon. 
The bill is expected to eradicate some of the faulty features of 
the South Carolina law, though tlie measure is far from satisfac- 
tory to the •' temperance " element. 

One-half of the General \aglee brandy has been shipped 
East en route to Europe. This brandy bi'longcd to the estatt" of 
General Naglee, who made part of it in IStJ!), and was the jiro])- 
erty of his daughter, Mrs. Robbins. The shipment was from 
San Jose, and consisted of seven car-loads. There were 970 
packages, averaging forty gallons. It is probably the most valu- 
able shipment of brand}- ever made from California. Recently 
the Government gave permission tow-ithdraw it from the original 
packages of 201)0 gallons each, in which form it could not bo 
sold, and put it up in 30. 40 and 4.5 gallon packages, replacing 
the original stamps as attestation of its age. The owner of the 
brandy will get from the Oovernniciit a rel)ato of about 830,000 
on the taxes paid. 



South Carolina Law Scotched. 



On .lanuary ISth tlie Supreme Court of tlie United .States 
decided the section of the .South Carolina ilispensary law, which 
pi'ovides for the iuHpeelion of liipuirs ini|»)rled into the State, to 
l)e in contravention M' the Constitution of the Cnili'd .States. 
The opinion, which had beei\ prepared by .lustice Shiras, was 
stated very brielly by Chief .Justice I''ullci-. 

'I'he decision was founded upon the imscs iil' .J. M. Scott and 
I{. .M. Gardner vs. .James I)onald. in error to the Circnit Court 
of the Inited States for the l>istrict of South Carolina. Tin; 
opinion deals with two phases of the case as presented. The 
first of these was the jurisdiction of the Circuit Court and the 
second the constitutionality of the act itself It was held that 
there was n(> doubt on the point of jurisdiction, while the law 
itself was overturned on the theory that it discriminated against 
the <-iti/.ens of other Slates in favor of those of South Carolina, 
and is in contravention of the right of citizens of tin- various 
.States to free intercourse and commerce with those of other 
States. 

The Court based its opinion upon thi' fact that the tratVic in 
intoxicating lii|Uors is not absolutely i)rohibited, but is monopo- 
lized by the State itself through the agency of a Slate Cominis- 
sionir. The Chief Justice declared that the law did not <;onform 
to the re(|uirement8 of the AV'ilson bill for the regulation of inter- 
state commei-ce in li<|uors between Slates. 

Justice Brown delivered a dissenting opinion, saying that he 
was unable to see wherein the lawconllicts with the Constitution. 

The decision leaves very little of the South Carolina law 
worth nu'ntion. Originally it was intended to create a State mo- 
nopoly ol' the licpior business, and on the wave of the agitation 
which followed Governor Tillman rode into the United .States 
Senate. Hefore the law had been interpreted by the courts the 
militia had to be called out to uphold what was afterward In-hl 
to be unlawful. The Intei'state Commerce act, as above, tore a 
laige hole in the act, and as long as that law exists liquors in 
plenty can be shipped into the State. It wouhl seem that the 
law has ingloriously failed and with it the lirstelVort to establish 
an un-American State monopoly. State monopolies are only 
good for countries like Spain, which lias eoinered the tobacco 
business, for instance. 




To the Trade and the Puhlic 



The 



"R. B. HAYDEN" 




Old Style Hand-Made Sour Mash Whisky Distilled by 

'OFFICE, LOUISVILLE, KY.) 

G-K-EEISTEFilElPS., ISTELSON CO., PCY. 

Is the only whisky of this name ever made in Nelson County. Ky. tin ordering R. R. llayden from your dealer see that you 
get the Whisky that is distillccl by the (Jrcenbrier I)islillery Company. 

J5AlU•STO^\^, KV., November I, l.S'.fJ. 
Greenlirier Distillery Co. — fientlenien : In response to your inipiiry I have to say that your distillery is operated on the old- 
fasbitmi'd hand made sour mash plan, and is one of the verj- few distilleri<!s in the State that adheres to the old style methods that 
have made Kentucky sour mash distillei i(-s famous, ^'our house and its methods cannot be improved on. 

Respectfully yours. JNO. R. WEI.T-EK, 

Di.-t. I»cp. Collector Int. Rev., Nelson Co.. Ky. 

The Fincut Sour Mull Wliliky mndeln Mcla<>ii Co., Kvulucky. Chnrlcs Molnccl(i.'.S:Cn., AKCOt«,B.F. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 




SOLE AGENTS 



314 SACRAMENTO STREET 




26 



f/c&lfie WIJslE /.JME) Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



BRIEF MOTES. 

Percy Moore, son of the late George H. Moore, was married 
in Louisville to Miss Mary Sliallcross on the SiHli \ilt. The Ri:- 
viKw wishes Mr. ami Mrs. Moore a liapjiy married life. 

Mr. Loeb. who was formerly connected with M. Eugene Jac- 
quet. has been aiipointed agent for Chiea<;o for Laehman it Ja- 
cob!, for their California wines and liramlies, of whieh he will no 
doubt make a >'uee.ss. — Jiiiiiiorl'n. 

The Gundlaeh-Uundselui Wine Company shippiMl a (|uantity 
of grape cuttings to Central America on tht> steamer Uarraeonta 
on the "JOtli ult. The vines will be used for experimental pur- 
poses in Guatemala. 

The Wiiif anil Spirit Age. of Baltimore, and tlie Ejci.^e iVeici, 
of Philadelphia, have consolidated, and the new journal result- 
ing is called " The 'Wine, S[iirit and Brew Reporter." It is 
issued twice each mouth by the Liberty Publishing Comiiany, 
315 Marshall street, Philadelphia, Pa., and is full of news per- 
taining to the trade. 

Arrangements have been made bj' the John W. Cope Co., of 
Stockton, with Henry Campe & Co., as sole distributors for their 
Mt. Shasta Kidney and Liver Cure and Cope's Tonic Hitters for 
the Pacific Coast." Henry Campe & Co. are also distributors for 
the Leland Stanford Vina Brandies. The John W. Cope Co. 
will move their manufacturing plant from Stockton to San I''ran- 
cisco very shortly. 

William Smadeke, the wholesaler, whose place of business for 
years has been at Eighth and Mission streets, died from a stroke 
of paralysis while on his way home on the evening of the 2()th 
ult. Deceased was a native of Hanover, and was born lifty-four 
j'ears ago. He came to California about thirty years ago, and 
has been prominent in the liquor business ever since. He leaves 
a widow and three children. The funeral took place from Cali- 
fornia Hall ou the 24tli ult. 

On the 29th ult. the following transfers of wine by Sonoma 
county dealers to the California Wine Makers' Corporation, of 
San Francisco, were recorded at the County Recorder's OlVice of 
Sonoma county: A. H. E. Macartney, 10,000 gallons ; E.G. 
Furber, 24,000 gallons; McCoy & Hotchkiss, 5('>,000 gallons ; P. 
& G. Simi, 1.50,000 gallons ; Miller & Hotchkiss. :i.50,000 gallons, 
and Martfn Feusier & Co., 179,000 gallons, making the total of 
the transfer 709,000 gallons. 

Henry Campe & Co., the well-known wholesalers, have 
bought the entire stock and good will of Woltcrs Bros. & Co., 
together with brands, etc. The old store of Woltcrs Bros iS: Co., 
at 120 Front street, has been closed, and Mr. (ieorge Woltcrs has 
taken an office with Messrs. Campe & Co., at Sacramento and 
PVont streets, where he will remain for some months to conic, 
until the accounts of the firm ai-e finally scttleil. Wolters Bros. 
& Co. have desired to retire since the death of Mr. Henry Wol- 
tcrs, late last year. 

T-RADE ei-ReULA-RS. 



From L. Gandolfi & Co. 



New Youk, January 1. 1S'.)7. 

Deak Slit : The following is a list of our importations and 
receipts of goods for the fortnight ending December .31, 18'JC: 

Ptfr " Ems,'" Dec. 19, 50 ca.ses salt anchovies in oil, 10 cases 
Roman cheese, and '.i'2 ca.ses tunny (ish in oil, "Chiappe" brand. 

Pit " Alsatia." Dec. 2(ith, (VJ cases Muscat and Tokay wines, 
" Giacobini '' brand. 

Per '• Kai.ser Wilhelm," Dec. 30Hi, 30 cases salt anchovies, 
" Cliia|)pe " brand, and 920 boxes Genoa maciironi, ■ I'lDfiinio " 
brand. 

i:i7-420-4-il Went Broadway. L. Gandoi.i i ^i Co. 

From Henry Campe & Co. 



San Fkancisco, January .'iO. 1S97. 
We take pleasure in announcing that we have, by purchase. 
HlK^ieeded to the business of the well-known firm of Wolters 
Bros, it Co., Wholesale l>i(|uor Dealers, and will luinceforth be 
])lea.Hed to meet Ihi-ir many patrons, at our establishment, to 
which we have transferred their stock of merchandise, etc. 

Vours very res|)eclfully, 
221-223-225 Front Street. Hknkv CamIi; iSc Co. 



(( 



oJk.TJTionsri 

Decisions have lieen rendered in my favor by the Hungarian 
Minister of Coinnierce in August and October, 1896, in conse- 
quence of which the trade marks of the following aperient 
waters, viz : 

"APENTA," "UJ HUNYADI," 
HUNYADI MATYAS, 
LAJOS, 
LASZLO, Etc., Etc. 

liave been cancelled, all being imitations of my "HUNYADI 
JANOS" trade mark. No other water exccjit mv lU'NYADI 
J.VNOS is allowed to use the name "HUNYADI,"' this name 
being nij' exclusive trade mark making apart of the name of my 

HUNYADI JANOS 

NATURAL HUNCAIUAN APEKIK.NT WATER. 

The Trade is hereby cautioned not to handle waters bearing 
any of the above nicntioiinl names, a> 1 sljall huld :ill parties 

selling siidi waters responsible in damages and protect my 
trade-mark-rights to the fullest extent, by action against all 
infringers. 

ANDREAS SAXLEHNER 



Buda Pest 



l_o ndon 



N e w York 



Pacific Coast Agent for HUNYADI ,IAN0S ^^- WOLFF & CO 



327-9 Market St., S.F. 



TRADE MARKS. 

WM. G. HENDERSON, Patent Attorney and Solicitor. 

\ovrls Bldg., 3th & F St*., Near V. S. Patent office. Rooms 20 to 23 
P. 0. Box 122. WASHrSQTONf D. C, 

Seventeen yearfi' experien«'e, includinj; service in 'Examining; Corps, U. S. Patent 
Ollice. American and Foreign Patents procured. Caveats filed. Rejected applica- 
tions revived. Opinions jjiveu as to scope and validity of patents. Infringement 
suits prop.eculed and defended. TRADE-MAHKS, LABELS AND COPYRIGHTS 
rej;istered. 

5^" Copy of any printed patent, trade-mark or label furnished for 25 cents. 
Correspondence invited. ITaiid-bonk on Patents furnislu'd FREE on application. 



THE - DIVIDEND, 

5 LeldesdortT Street. 
JAMES O'llUIKX. I'liip, trior. 

Importor of FINEST WINES, LIQUORS. 

Irish and Scotcll Wliisliii'B, naei"' Ale ami 
GuinneBb Sloti'. 

Moore, Hant & Co'a Whi-skies a Specialty. 



BONESTELL i CO. 

liK.M.KEiS IN 

PAPER. 

— A sptH-ijilty made of 

FOURDENIER TISSUE 

~ \ M' — 

STRIPPED MANILA 

F">i « i-iri'iii^; l»i>ttlee. 
tni * 403 Sansirnf SL S.>in Fratcisoo. 



ESTABLISHED t8S3. 



SAMUEL WANDELT, 



STEAM AND HAND- 



til. U.S. iir, \(titrn riintn sr.. itnooKLrx. y. r. 

WineanOLipiBaifeisaijUTanKs 

A. Specialty. 

I am now prepared to make and fiirnisli tlie larcest, as well an tlic Bmalledl 
article In my line of Cociperajic. E!«tlmatcs ^iven with promi>tneMR. All work war- 
ranted to l>c tinlflicd In wnikmanllke manner and equal to any tn the market. 



f/eifie WIJ^JE /fJMB Sfll^lT [REVIEW 



27 



Prices Current. 



These are the lont' |>rU-e». The rMe nf 
disootint on piirchaHt'S of a iMii^idiTable 
quantity, cnii Ite learufd by nppl>'i'fC *** 
the aiients or ili-aUn?. We urm-ntly ri*- 
quest ilettlerf. a^i'tUc ami pruJuiers to 
notify u» when a olian^e oceurti In tht- 
prioe'» current of the goods they handle. 



California Wines & Brandies 



[The Prk'W" Riven arc for <|imii8»n<l pliits. 

ftiit up in cases of twelve and twenty- 
our bottles.] 



C. CAUPY A CO. 
5U-S1T Sai'ramento street, Snn Franoieco 

La Lonia, Oraml Meduc t 7.00 t S.OO 

Burijnnilv 5.00 «.00 

ZtufanUei 8.50 4.50 

Sauterne 5.00 6.00 

Bleslinir 4.00 5.00 

8weet Muscatel, 1882 9.00 10.00 

Sherry, l*i3 9.00 10.00 

Port.lS.S2 8.00 9.00 

Cal. Rochelle Brandy 12.00 l.S.OO 



MONT UOCGE WINES. 

A. G. Chauche Livcrmoie. 
Office and Depot, 615-617 Front St., S. F. 

Qunrls 

Burgundy * U.OO 

Chablis 9.00 

Claret, Retourd'Europe 9.00 

Juranijon, Favorite wine of 

Henri IV, King of France 8.00 

Haut Sautcrnes 7.00 

Sauterncs 6.00 

Light Sauternes 5.00 

Claret Grand Vin 6.00 

Table Claret 4.00 

Zinfandel .S.OO 

$1.00 additional for pints. Red and 
white wiucs in bulk at all prices. 



J. OU.NDLACH .t CO., 
Cor. Second ><: Market Sis. San Francisco. 

I'RU'KH I'KH OAHR. 
QI'AKTH. PINTS. 

Tranilncr, S'J ( s.ixi ( (Voo 

(iulcdcl. S2 6.00 7.(HI 

llurt'iindy, 84 6.00 7.00 

Zlnfnndcl 8;i 5.(H) B.OO 

INOLENOOK WINES. 

Ageniv. 101 Front street, San Frunclsco. 
Table Clarel blended from 

clit>ico foreign gra[>es, 

vintage 1890 |:|..V1 

ZInlandel 4.50 

E.tlra Taldc Claret, Medoc 

type red label, 1S,S9 5.50 

Burgundy, ISS.S. Reserve 

Slocli 7.(K) 8.00 

Sauterne dry, Sauylg'u Vert '8ft 5.50 

Gulcdel.Chasselas Vert, 1889 i.hO 

Hock, Rhenish type '• 6.00 

Burger, Chablis type " 5.50 

Hiesling, Johannielterg type 

1SS>( 0.50 

Pints of ttvo dozentl per case additional. 
None genuine except bearing seal or cork 
brand oTtlie pioprietor. 

KOHLER A FUOHLINO. 
601 Folsom Street, San Francisco. 

Riesling t 4.00 I 4.50 

Hock :<..50 4.00 

Gutedel 4.50 5.00 

Saulcrne 4.50 5.00 

Zinfandel 3.75 4.25 

Zinfnndcl, old 4.50 5.00 

Buigundy 4.00 4..W 

Superior Port 10.00 

Sherry 7.50 

Angelica 6.00 

Muscatel 6.00 

Madeira H.OO 

Malaga 6.00 

Branily 10.00 

KOLB & DENHARD, 

420-420 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Per Case. 

Hock $;i.00 

Riesling o.W 

Guledc'l 4.00 

Saulerne 4.00 

Saulcrne, 1SS5 5.00 



Claret 


2.50 


Zinfandel... 


8.00 


Oabci net 


!I50 


Burgundy 


4.00 


l'ort,lS.M 


7.(H) 


^ Port, 1SS7 


5.50 


1 Sherry 


5.IHI 


Cognac, INS5 


10.00 


8. LACHMAN * CO., 




4.V< Brannan streol, Han Fraud 


KCO 


Old Port $7.00 


fl.OO 


Zinfandel .S.50 


4.00 


Riesling 4.50 


5.00 


Madeira* 8.00 




Malaga 8.00 




Cognac 14.00 




C. M. MANN, 




(Successor to I. Db Tiikk.) 




Olllcc ami Cellars 216-'.'1S 220 Sn< laincnio 


St., and 221 Conunerclal st. S. Francisco. 


Cognac Brandy, XXXX., (Quartn). 


.»lll.00 


•• XX 


. 9.00 




. 5.50 


Trousseau Port, No. 1 


. 400 


Dry Sherry. Private Stock 


. 5 50 


" Sui>erior 


. 4.110 


Angelica. Old Selected Slock 


. 4.00 


MuKcalelie " " " 


. 4.00 


Malaga '* " *• 


. 4.00 


Madeira •• " 


. 4.00 


Tokay, beet. Old Selected Stock... 


. 6.00 


Tokay, " " •• . . 


. 4..')0 


Hant Sauterne *' "... 


. 5.00 


Riesling, " " "... 


. S50 


Guledi-I, " " "... 


. .■i.,',0 


Hock " "... 


. S.OO 


Cabernet, "Grand Vin" " ... 


. .5.00 


Burgundy " " "... 
Zinfandel Claret, Selected Claret. . . 


. 4. 50 


. S.50 


XX Claret, " "... 


. .S..50 


, Claret, " "... 


. 2.75 



NAPA VALLEY WINE COMPANY. 

Second and Folsom St., San Francisco. 

Siii!RWoon A SiiKRWoon, Agents. 

212-214 .Market slreel, San Francisco. 

Hock, green label * 3.00 t 4.00 

Hock, black label 3..50 4..W 

Gutedel 4.00 5.00 

Riesling 4.50 S.'iO 

Cabernet 4.50 5.50 



lluigundy 4.00 5.0U 

/.inlandel 8.50 4.50 

Clarel, black label 8.00 4. 01) 

("Inrel. red label 2.75 8.70 

Private HI. lek Hock 5.00 O.Oq 

El Cerrllo.,.. 000 lO.oti 

•' •• Haulcrne 8.00 9.00 

" '• Clarel li.lMt 6 00 

" " Burgundy.... 7.00 H.IN) 

VIneCllfl . .. 12.00 111. 00 

Sherry 4.50 

Port 4., VI 

Angelica 4. .VI 

Tokay 4.5(1 

Muscatel 4.,V) 

Madeira 4.5tl 

Brandy Crown • 10.00 

" " " • « 12.00 

• * 1500 

••••.... 18.00 

1, J. IIOSF. A CO., LTD, San Gabriel, Cal. 

Port, 1S73, 1 doj!. (|l». incase »l5.0ii 

" 1S7(>, " " " P.'.OO 

" 1«H2, 9.00 

" 18HI!, 7.50 

Sherry, 18.82, 1 doz qts. In caae 0.00 

lH.SIi, •• " 7.50 

Angelica, l'iS2, I doz. (|ts. In case.. 9.00 

Angelica, IKsft, 1 doz. qts. in case... t7.30 

Muscatel, I8s2, 1 dor. qts. In case. . . 9.00 

1880, " " "... 7.50 

Tokay, ls,s2, 1 doz. qts. in case 9 00 

•• ■ tSHi;, " •' " 7.50 

JIadeira, 18S2. 1 doz. (||8. In case.... 9.00 

1880, 7.50 

Brandy, 1881, " " " .... 15.00 

1880, " " " .... 10.00 

Zinfandel, 1890, 1 doz. qts. in case.. 4.00 

" 2 " pts. " .. 5.00 

Burger, 1890, 1 doz (|ls. in case 4.00 

" 2 " pts. " .VOO 

All the foregoing yiiilages are true lo 
name and age, as indicated on label. We 
guarantee Ihcabsoiutc purity of every bot- 
tle of wine and brandy put up by us. 

"CRESTA BLANCA." 

WETMORE-BOWEN COMPANY. 

'tf o ntgomery street, San Francisco. 

WIIITF. WI.NKS. 

Saulcrne Soiiyeiiir $6.00 17.00 

Ilaut Saulerne Souvenir 9 1)0 10.00 

Clialeau V.iuem Sonyenlr... II (K) 12.00 




Hipesr Score of ({wards. wirt|]l]edal and Diplomi. 

THE 5tA)iUl^lti> OF l>ti\Fe(fiOi<< Al)50lUTtLV pui^e: 
DisrikLCo Bv 

A. GUCKENHEIMER & BROS. 



PITTSBUROH. 



U. S. A 



I jg-i»m'i jt 




y^^^^^SERY^^^^ 




DfST/Ltro tfr 



PENNA. DISTILLING CO. 



BUTLCR CO. PENNA. 



Cold style monongahela pye whiskey^ 



uiorrj///a//?ir/ :yu^J^ 




<nww/;prif 



k 



c^>y/j////y//,(ja< 






^i 



1 



28 



fycGlfie WljME jOrj^E) Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 




'""""""^■WlhS'riDKlN. 



F. KORBEL & BROS. 



lA WIL.l.tAM STREET, NEW YORK. 



723 Bryant Street San Francisco GENUINE XX BEADING OIL XX 

neduced To $T.r,0 JVr (UtUiin. 

Or at NORTH FORK MILL ""'""' '"'- ""' '" '""'""""' ""'" "" 

REDINGTON 4. CO. 23-27-29 second st., sx/v francisco 
Humboldt County - California 



Tissue Paper 

Mai^ila Paper 



ESTABLISHED 



A. Finke's 



Label Paper 



PAPER OF ALL KLNDS 



A.Zellerbach & Sons ^°^-^^"^°"'«i^«lx5 



Lachman L Jacobi 



DEALERS IN- 



California Wines aiiil BianHies, 

BRYANT AND SECOND STREETS. SAN FRANCISCO. 



Eastern Agents 

EDINGER BROS. & JACOBI, 

Cor. Dover & Pearl Sts., Brooklyn Bridge Stove No 2, N. Y 



rioducer.-> of 

CALll^'ORMA 



ABSOLUTELY PURE 




18 64 



Widow 



office: [^ 

809 MONTGOMERY ST., ^^'^^r'^^, 

San Francisco. 

Telephone. Black (SI. 



First Premium 

I.IWAGNES. 



<;oLD Seal, 

Carte Blanche, 

Nonpareil. 



.,,,r.Mf i jr^First Premiums for Beet 
Y/IPU .1 California CliampaciH'sawarded 
FRANCISCO^^ l,v ,!,„ Slat f Fairs, ISTO-y,' and 
u lii-ix'ver exliiluted. 



|.Of/lA PPl^TA uUlVlp^p CO. 

— SUCCF.SSOllS TO- 

■V^TJ^TSOn^^ILLE IMI. &c L. CO. 

Have CoiiPlantly on Hand a Full Supply 
f)f iIk' F'ollowini: Si/.t'S nf 



2x2--4 Feet Long, 2x2--5 Feet Long, 

2x2--6 Feet Long. 

H7iJc'7i u-lll be sold at reasonable rales. 



LOMA PRIETA LUMBER CO. 

Loma Prieta. ..... Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 




FERRO-QUINT^ 

A Wonderful Tonic and Strengthener 

AN ANTIDOTE AQAINST 

ANEMIA, CHLOROSIS. MUSCULAR DEBILITY, NAUSEA. HEAD. 

ACHE, PALPITATION OF THE HEART. PHTHISIS. SCROFULA, 

CHRONX BRONCHITIS, GENERAL DH8ILITY. LASSITUDE 

and other diseases caused by n disordered system. 

Eapeciall) Recommended as a preventative against FEVERS 
in tropical climates. 

ADDRESS 

D. P. ROSSI 

1400 Dupont St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

( ir to nii.v » )miIi-m,iIi> f,r ('ritniiil*>Nliili Imimmi' In DilN Cllv. 



XKCE, ONL-y genuine: 

Monfe ©rl^to 

CHAMPAGNE 



EXTRA DRY 




^m^ 



D. P. ROSS 

'Daqlianii. II tli.i an I Sin Francises 

1400 DUPONT ST 

Solo Agent for V\e United Stntoi and Cnnada 

N. R —Tills nrninl \n ono nf the It^ftd'nir -v ^t 

I litiinitiiKitffl ii^t'tl at I III' UovhI t'oiirm tif IihIv, \.Vi' 
(•I'rnuiiiy, Kiiirlaii'l: !*> Nin-rliilly liwinrnnl 1»v IK'I- 
iiiitnlon. .N'l'w Vi>rk: rHlno*- Motol. Del Mnnu-, MHl<<nn 
It<»ri', MiiNnti llfrllO, MiiWnii TnrlonI, INKHllr pnj;. 
I'ainpIV, MitrlliiitU'.-, ui ll:e C mmen-lal Mnlrl. H. V. 



I^Aeipie WIJME AjMicD SpiI^IT l^EVIHW 



29 



WK 1 >:( 1 I 1 < V I NOOMPANY. 
HO Moiit;;oiner,v Ati-cct, Sun Frniicittcn. 

KEI> WINE8. 

Tabic il'hole Souvenir .I.SO (IM 

SI Jnlli'n Smiv.-nlr 7 IH) H UO 

MniKiiux SiinviMiir Slid UUO 

!.<< vnniTIIIN TO AUOVK 

Zlnfnnili'l 4.00 5.00 

ItiirL'unilv 000 7.00 

Kkwlini; ! 5.00 O.OO 

EI. riNAL. 

Port, vintage ISIK) 5.50 

Toil, " 1SS.S 6.50 

Poll. •• issf, 8.00 

OUl Troii»,iean I'ort 12.00 

Slu'rrv, Vintage l^<a0 5.50 

SluTiV, •• l!«,s 6 50 

SliiTrj. •• Id^tt 8 00 .... 

Slicrrv. .\muulllladoType.. lU.Oi) 

MuBiatcl 5.50 

AiiK.-llia 5.50 

Kroiitii^nnii D.OO 

Hraiulv. isao 11. 0(^ 

Itramlv, 1SS.S i:i..M 

Ilran.lv, lS.sa 16.00 

llraiul.v, ISTli l!0.00 

WILLIAM WOLFF A CO., 
^X) .Marki'l sln-ct. San Franiisco. 

MAUI.EE BKAM>V llOTTLKl) AT Ill.STILI.KRY. 
CASE liOODS. 

Whit,. Lnlii'lQ. C, not niiili-r 25 vrs. .1^0.00 

llliu* Label, 15, lu>t iMuler 15 vrs . . . . 15.00 

Iti.l Label, O. N.. iiol iiiiiler io yre . 12.00 

Trade discounts aeeording Io i|uantity. 

nri.K. 

(In packaires of 2') gallons eacb.) 

Per K"'- 

For ages IS72-1S76 M.OO 

1ST7-18.S2 ».50 

ISSS-lS-iJ 3.25 

Bitters. 

D. p. ROSSI, 
.v. E. Cor. Dupont and Green Sts., S. F. 

FEKKU QDINA BITTERS. 

12 quart.i to ease flO.OO 

WILLIAM WOLFF A CO., 
32U Market street. Sail Franeiseo. 

AROMATIQDB. 

Per cafe of 12 quarts $12.00 

Imported Wines, 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 
123 California street, San Francisco. 

RED WINES. 

(Barton it Oueslier, Bordeaux.) 

Quarts. IMnts. 

Floirac I 7.50 * s.,50 

Chatcan LaeroLr.. S.OO 'J.OO 

Pauillac, 1S'<T 8.50 9.50 

ISsl .• 00 10 00 

St. Julien 18S7 9.(10 10 00 

St. Eslepbe 1>«7 9.00 10.00 



Clialeau du Oallan, IKSl 


10.50 





l.'*78 




I2..VI 


le Puin, 1S7S 


11..V) 


12..V) 


Ponlel ('ami, 1HS7 


i:t..'iO 


14. .'lO 


dial. Ilevehevelle, LIN? 


10.00 




1.1S1 




17.(10 


Cliateaii Laii^oa 


18.(10 




1.S7S 


21.00 


22.00 


1874 


24.. 'lO 


2.5.50 


Chat Brown Caiiteniie, Ks7. 


2:i.00 


24,00 


'• Leoville, 1H.S7 


2t..'.0 


25.50 


IS7S 




2.'i..'.0 


Larose, 1.S74 


24.. W 


2'i..'iO 


I.ahlo. 1S74 


29.00 


.3().lk( 


" Mnli;au.x, 1.S74 


29.00 


30.00 


(11. Cuvillier A (rere, li 


ordeaux.) 


PaulUae, ISSU 


9.00 


10.00 


St. Kmilioii Superieur 


lO.IHI 




Chat, Clieviil lilaiic, 1S.S9 ... 


14 IKI 




Chalean Leoville. IHSy 


l(!..'ill 




Chateau llalaillev 1S.S1 


17.50 


IS. .50 


Chnl, Kirwall, ls7-i 




22.00 


Chat. La|ioii)te Poiiit-rol, '7^ 




22.00 


Chat Ponlel Caiiet, 1874."... 


23.00 




" Heveheville. 1874 




25.00 


Chat. Lanise, 1S70 


24.011 




Chateau Talhol d'Aux, 1875 


24.00 


25.00 


Chateau Leoville. |sTS 




25.50 


Chat. Cos d'Eflournel, 1878 


28.00 




( I)u Vivier & Co., Bordeaux. 




St. Mare 


t 7.00 


$8.00 


Ponlel Canet 


11.00 


12 0(1 


WHITE WINES 




(Barton & Gnestier, Bordeaux 


.) 


Saulernes 1S78 


9.25 


U).25 


Vin de Graves, 1878 


10..')0 


11.. 'lO 


Bai-sac, 1.S7S 


u.no 


12.(10 


Haul Snuleriies, 1SS7 


17.50 


18.50 


Haul Saulernes. 1874 


18..')0 


19.50 


Chateau Yi|uem, 1884 


30 .IO 


31.50 


Chateau Yi|uem, 1S74 


36.00 




(H. Cuvillier iV fiere, Bordeaux.) 


Ckaleau Giraud. 1SS4 


28.00 


29 00 


La Tour Blanelie'84 


28.00 


29.00 


(Du Vivier & Co., Bordeaux. 




Graves premieres 


»9.00 


*10.00 


CAI-IFORNIAN— RED WINES. 




(A. Duval). 






Burgundv. 1889 


5.00 


6.00 


Cabernet SauviKuon, 1890... 


5.00 


6.00 


CALIFOUNIA— WHITE 


WINES 




(A. Duval). 






Ricslinu, 1S89 


4.50 


5..V) 


Chablis, 1.8.88 


5.00 


6.00 


Sauterue, 1889 


5.00 


G.OO 


Creme de Sauterne, 1889, 








7.50 

INES. 


8 50 


IirRdPNDIES— RED W 




(Bouchard pere & tils, Beaunet'ole 


D'Or.) 


.Macon, 18S4 


11.00 


12.00 


Pommard. 1884 


15..W 


16..50 


Closde Vougeot, 1.887 (Mono- 






pole) 


>5..'i0 


26.i0 


Chamberlin 18.84 


26.00 


27.00 


(Bouchard pere A tils, Beaune, Cote 


D'Or) 


Chablit, 1884 


13.50 


14.50 


HOCKS. 






(S. Friedborig, Mavence.) 




Laubenhcimer, 18S9 


« O.W 


?10..50 



Llebeiitiaunillch, 1S,8U, " 8p. 

lecleil Grapes" 17.00 18.00 

llaiuni baler, 1>W4 21,00 22.00 

lloi'hbeliuer Horn Dechancy, 

18*1 32..'iO 23,10 

Llcbrranmlleh, 1876, "Kslrik 

Qtnilllv" 30.00 81,00 

StelnberKcr Cabinet, 1876... 32 IK) 3.3.00 

(Prluee Mellenili'h'n IXale,) 
Schloss .loliaiinlnlMMger, '1)8 .fi|5 III) f 1(1.00 

SIIEHRIES. 

(Sandeman, Buck it Co.. .lerez. 

Mallei-e I 'loss |8()() 

Pemartin Brut '^O.tMl 

Itmbrella 21.00 

Ainoullllado 'Jo. IK) 

(K. .1 lion ell, London.) 
Solera F.»|ieclal 13..'>0 

MAIIKIIIA 

(IC. J. Howell. Loudon) 
Ye Old Style, I'uro F.speclnl 1.5,.'.il 

01, l> I'OIJNACS 

(11 Cuvillier .t Frerc.) 
Fine Chninpngne "itescrve" 

1870 3(1.00 

(Sazcruc de Foi'kc it Fits ) 
Very Old Cognac, 1805 45 CD 

UIN. 

Coales it Co's Original Ply- 
mouth (I'lisweeteued). . 10. .'id 

KCOTCH whisky. 

(Peter Dausoii, I'>ufriown.) 

Dawfon's 'Perfection" 12 50 

"Special " 14 .'iO 

'• "F.xira Special" IB..')!) 

"Perfection," 24 

llasks 14.00 

Dawson's " Perfection," 48 
half-llasks 16.00 

CHAMTAONK. 

Perricr-Joiict, Finest Extra 

(jualily 'Special" 33.50 35.50 

Perricr-Joucl. Finest Extra 

Qu.nlilv, "liiut" 34 00 36.00 

Half Pints"" Special," $42 00 per case of 
48 bottles. 

L. GANDOLFI it CO.. 

427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prices f. o. b. New York.) 

Fill. Gancia it Co., Canelii (Astl.) 

Barbera, in cases of 12 bottles 5,50 

Baidlo, " "12 " 7.(10 

Gallinara, " " 12 " 6.50 

Xebbifdo, red, sparkling, in cases of 

12 bottles 8.50 

Braclietto, red, sparkling, in eases of 

12 bottles 8.50 

Giignolino. in cases of 12 bottles ... 0.5O 

Pinls$l per case moie. 
C. it F. GiacobinI, .\ltomonIe. Calabria. 

(Fancy wines tor altar and medical use.) 
Moscato Calabria, in cases 12 bottles; 7,00 
Lacrvma Chrisli, " 12 " 7.00 

Tokav, " 12 " 7.00 

Malvasia, " 12 " 7 00 



Count E. Dl Mirafion 
Barolo, In eaaet of 12 bottles, Ish, , , 

flllANTI WINE. -IN KI.ANKK. 

.1. L. Itulllno, Floroneo. 
Per ease of 2 dozen ijuarla , 



4 " pliils 

WHITE AND IIEI) STII.I/. 

Pamiiiale Scala, Naples. 
LaeryniB Chrlstl, per case of 12 bot- 
tles 

Moscato di HIracuBS, iwr caac of I'i 

bottles 

Falerno, red, per case of 12 biitVltMi 
('aprl, •' "la •• 

Phils, 75 cent* per case mure. 

SrARKlI.Nfi WINKS. 

Pasipiale Seala, .Sapbs. 

Lacryma Chrisli, i|UarlB 

" idiils 

Fill. Gancia .t Co , Canelll (Aall 
.Moscato, while, in cases of 12 i|imrls 

24 pliiis 
Passaretta, Hhlle, " 12i|iiarts 

24 pints 



II..50 
13,00 



7 '25 

7.0(1 
7,00 
6,50 



17,50 
18,50 

) 

14,00 

I5.(NI 

I3,(NI 

I4IKI 



hi:ll.mann Biios, .t co., 

.525 Front street, San Francisco. 

HHERRIEK. 

Forrester A Co., Jerez, in 

wood, pel gallon t 1.50 $.5.00 

Forrester it Co., Jerez, per 

ease 12.00 16,00 

Garvey it Co., Jerez, in 

wood, per gallon 1.75 5.00 

PORTS. 

Ollley, $1.7S to $5.00 

Ollley, per ease $12.00 

CHABLES MEINECKE a CO. 

314 Sacramento street. San Francisco. 
A. de Lu7.e it Fils, Bordeaux 

Clarets, per case $N.0O to $28.00 

A. de Luze A Mis. Bordeaux 

Saulernes, per case 1'2.00 to 26.00 

C.Marey it LigerBelair, Nulls 

Burgundies, white and 

red, per case 15.C0 to 23.00 

D, M. Feuerheeid. Jr.,itCo., 

Oporto, Port wines 

per case 15,00 to 20,00 

D. M. Feuerheerd. Jr.ACo., 

Oporto, Port Wines, 

ill w Odd per gal 2.00 to 5.50 

Duff Gordon A Co.. Sherries 

in wood per pal 2 00 to 5.50 

Lacave it Co., Sherries Crown 

Brand In K 1.40 to 1.75 

South Side Madeira 2,00 to 2.50 

St, Croix Hum, L. B 5.50 

Arrack "Hoyal" Batavia 5.00 to 6.00 

Boord it S(Mi. Loudon Dock 

Sherry, jwr case 12.00 to 15.00 

G. M. PabstmaunSohn, Mainz 

ULine Wines iier case.. 8,50 to 28 00 
Schulz it Wagner, F raiikfurt 

o M Rhine wines per caaelLOO to 14.00 




P. C. ROSSI, 



PRCSIDtNT 



-SWISS 



A. SBARBORO 



A5TI, SONOMA CO., CAL 

PRODUCERS OF FINE 



coco 



SCCRCTAHV 



Ny 



CALIFORNIA WINES and BRANDIES 

MONTECRISTO CHAMPAGNES 

.. I.- I. _ 



(Natcrai i,v I'licMisriii i\ r.irni.r 



I'liuiK-MAiiK l;i:.a.sii:iif;ii ( Iitohhh Srii, ISflo. 



Grand Diploma of Honor Qol<d Medal Dublin Ireland -ihoo 

Highest Award Genoa. Italy, 1892 Gold Medal Col u m blar^ Exo^n 1 hb^ 

Gold Medal California Midwinter Fair, 1 8 9 4 ' ^ "®^ 

MAIN OFFICE, 524 MONTGOMERY STREET - - SAN FRANCISCO 
DEPOT AND CELLARS, 109 BATTERY STREET BETWEEN CALIFORNIA AND PINE STREETS 

Qr>ir) M^dal Turin, 1884 ^t Hlgheet Award Chicago 1894 

L, GANDOLFI & CO., Eastern Agents n..,.r. ^Z^sZ^o .«oovc^ 



30 



f/ceifie WIJSIE /cJNB SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



CHARLES BUNOSCHU President 



CARL GUNDLACH. ViccPresiilcnl 




HENRY GUNOLACH. Secretary 



GUNDLACH-BUNDSCHU WINE COMPANY 

ucce.ssor.s to J. O LJ>J JJI^^Gtl & CO. 

Vineyard Proprietors and Shippers of 

Califbi'iiiii Wines and Rmiifa, 

I'lllll'lilllTllliS RHINE FARM, SIlMlllA, tAL. 

And BACCHUS WINE VAULTS, 438-442 Bryant St., S. F. 



San^rancisco- •/jewYork^ 



Sa n Vrti iirtsro Office^ 
S. E. COR, M.iniiKT 4i- SECOW STS. 



\ew York Branch 

S. E. Cor. WATTS & WASHINGTON STS. 



liouis Hoederei CMape 

Highest Grade in the World! 

Used by All the Laading Clubs 
Hotels and Restaurants . . . 

For sale by All First-Class 
Grocers and Wine Merchants. 




tiii;i:k kinds, .\i.l oi'- equal excellence 

BKCIT (GoMSc-ai) 

All Extra Dr}^ Wine 

GRA/ND VIM SEC {Brown Sea/) 

The Perfection of a Dry Wine I 

CARTE BLA/NCHE {White Seal) 

A Rich ^\■ine 



Macondray Bros. & Lockard, 



124 SANSOME STREET 

Polo Agents for the Pacific Coast. 



SllKKLKY MOOHE, Vu K TkEs't 



ruoB. KlKKPATBlCK, 1 KKSIUE.M , ^^^ ^^^ _^^|^^ .^—^— ,^ SllKKLKY MoOHE, \rK rKfS 

Sas Fkancisco, Cal. .-^ ^^^. f "X I^ J I \ I J A -w- Louisville, Kv. 

^T^ DIF^EeT f f^OJ^ bOUISVIbbE, KY. ^^-^f^> 



p/^/noiJs 

pEEI^CESS U/I^ISH[IES. 







Cii/^I^flflSEF.D 



■ )(;< < 



These Wnskios have a. reputation sec ond to none on the Taciio Coast. Tiie^ have heen given years of triai 
by the best class of trade and consumers and are pronounced without a peer. When given a trial they speak for 
themselves. For sale in quantities to suit in Imisuille or San Francisco hy 



JESSE MOORE, -H U /N T CO., 



LOUVILLSIE .KENTUCKY 



404 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



f/r(5IflG WI/^E /JMD SflF^IT PREVIEW. 



31 



HHEItWODI) A SIlKliWODD, 
ar,>-',M4 Msrkt'l slrocl. Smi KiBiKiMu. 

KSOHIMAUKH A CO.. nORDKAUX. 

MtMUii- $ 7 IHI 

MiTlnd'or 7.S0 

Iloulllai' 8.00 

ItolSi'iil S.OO 

SI, JulU'ii Kiiperiur W) 

WhiteSfal 10.00 

rimlot C«iiet 11.50 

i.k Hone la.oo 

Ool.l Seal IS.M 

(liBves 8.5t) 

S»uleriiei O.iO 

Mai'kriir.le'B Porln »iul Slier- 

rifO In woiiil pfr i;«lli>ll I.7.'ito4.50 
MAi-kenztoV roiie Mid Slier- 

ik-n In lamil 10.00 U> 14.0<) 

Iliinl, KtH»iK', Tt'ftjjiie A Go's 

r»rt« ill o«9f« 13.00 to 19.00 



ACIIILLE STARACE. 
70 Pf«rl strt'i't. New Vnrk. 

ITALIAN WINK8. 
RRD WINES. 

(Ohmcppe Sc«la, Naples.) 

I.acrvnia Ckriati, 12 <\l» $ 0.50 jht case 

Falcf no, " 7.50 

Capri. '• .... 6.50 

Capri, 24 pl« 7..50percH8i' 

Moscato di SIrai-uea, 12 i)(8. 9.00 
Vi-suviuB wine In barrels of 

about 00 Kftlloiift 1.05 per t;al 

WlllTK WINIS. 

I.aeryma CliristI, 12 qts f 7..W per case 

Faleriio " 7 ,W 

Capri. " .... 6.50 

Capri, 24pt8.... 7.50 

SPARKLING W1SK8. 

Lacrvma Clinsti, 12 i|l8 tl9.00 per casr 

•• "• 24 pt9... . 20 50 

(L Labiirel Melini, Florenie) 
Cliiaiiti Wine in liasks uittioiit oil 

Cases of 2 doz. qts tl2 .50 per easi 

4 •• pts 14 50 

W. A. TAYLOR A CO. 
Jerez de la Fronteia. 

SHERRIES. 

Per Gal. 
No. 1 P Table, full bodied ) ,. .„ 

1 VP Table, very pale ) ' *'•''" 

2 P Full and round I , -„ 

2 VP Verv Pale. liKbt, Hue { • ''" 

3 P Full body, soli, rieb i , ^,. 

3 VP Ver.v pale, liijbt. full ( • ■ "'' 

4 P Full body, old, mellow ) ., ,, 

4 VP Very pale, delicate, dry ( ' "' ' 

5 P Full body, ricb, fruity ) q ,„ 

5 VP Pale, old', fine ' S' -"'" 

6 P Eitra full and fruity ) „ -. 

6 VP Very tiue and mellow i "' ""''* 

7 Amo AMONTILLADO, old and 

nutty 2.N5 

» CLO CLOROSA, mellow soft . . 3 25 
9 lie.! Superb old Desert Wine, . . 3.33 

10 A.MONTILLADO Solera, yery 

old and null y 4.40 

11 giEEN VICTORIA Graud old 

wine 5.65 

SPECIAL WISES. 

Velvet A Clean, sound wine 1.25 

B Full body and ricb 1.50 

Special N Solt, full and Hue 1.60 

W Dark, full body 1.75 

IJ (Mean and sound — Fine... 1.80 

Seco Fine, old and dry $1.85 

O S Fine, ricb and fruity 3.45 

N Superb table 3.10 

Corona Delicious and delicate 3.25 

Special S Grand old wine 4.00 

Nectar— Fiiio, N. P. V 4.65 

RHINE AND MOSELLl WINES. 

Witbelm Panizza, Mayeuee. 

Per Case. 

LauI.enI.eimer f8,0o 

Diedisbeimer 8.50 

Nlesleiner 10.25 

H.Mkheimer U 50 

I.lebfraumilch 13.25 

Fotler Je^uitKarten 13.75 

Rudesbeimer 14.00 

Ebacber 14.75 

OeHenheimer 17.25 

Marcobrunnor . 17.50 

lUunI baler 19.00 

Oeisenheim Rothbcrg 21.00 

Neisteimer Rehbacb 21.50 

Rudeshcimer Berg 23.00 

Bulk wines at f. o. b. prices. 

PORTS. 

Silva A Cosens, 

Per Oal. 

T— Tawnev 11.90 

R -Extra full body and rid 2.115 

V T— Very tawney 2.25 

V O T— Very old tawney 2,;ii 

T P— Eilra tawner. delicate 3.50 

T P O— Tawney, eitra old .S.IO 



lUlANCO— Wbile-Flno Wblte Port, 3.25 
JEWKI.— A Specialty, old and nivl- 

low 8.50 

S O-Siiperlorold 3.NS 

EMPKUOU -30 years In wood,Krand 

old wine 4.75 

M C R-lS27"Cbolce»l royal 6,35 

Direct stiipplni; orders solicited on the 
loost fayorablc Icrinn. 

TAKKAliONA WINKS, 

Joso lloule, Tatrn^tiitla. 

iirs. A oris, per dal. 

• Fine clear and smooth $1.15 

ROVAL PlMtE JIUOE— Full body 

and ricb 1.25 

TAWNEY POUT-Llitlit color, soft 

and old 1.25 

These wines have none of the object- 
ionable astrin;;ency so cominoii in wines 
of this class, ami are absolutely ]>ure. 

WILLIAM WOLFF A CO., 

S29 .Market street, San Fraiieiseo. 

(Dubos Frercs, Bol'ileaux.) 

Cliircls incnsks of r.O;;iils,$95,i)il lo flBO.OO 

(F. Chauveuet. Nulls, Cote d'Or.) 
Bur);;undv wines in cases. fUl.bO to $52,00 

(Deliibard A Co,, Coblcn/..) 
Ilock and Moselle wines. . . .fs.(H) to $:I2.00 

{Mori^an liios., Porl St. Mary.) 
Ports and .Sherries in wood, 

per gall. .11 $2,uil l.i $5,110 

Port and .sherries In cases, 

per case $10.00 to $18.00 

(Mackenzie A Co., Jerez.) 
Ports and Sherries in wood 

from $1.75 lo $4..50 

American Whiskies. 

L. GANDOLFI A CO., 

427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Piicct f. o. b. New York.) 

• Good Luck Monogram, per ease $ 9.00 



Liberal discount to the jobbing trade. 



H. O. B. jugs 9,00 

O. F. ju(f» 10,,50 

African Hlomach Bitters, ca. 7,5U 

HIEBE IlltOH. A I-LAOEMAN. 

322 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

O K Extra $.'1.50 lo $0,00 

O K Rosedale 2.50 lo 3.00 

Ilyain 2.75 

n..lden Pearl 2.25 

Marshall 2.25 

Ohl Family Bourbon 1.75 

Old Bourbon 1.50 

SHERWOOD A SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market street, Snii Francisco. 
Carlisle In bbls. Ke-imporled 

Spring 'N9 per gal $2.50 

Carlisle in bbls. Ile-lmported 

Spring 'SO, per gal 3.25 

Keysl.iue Monogram Rye in 

cases, per case 14,25 

Old Saratoga, in cases, per 

case 15.25 

Mascot Bourbon in bbls per 

gal 2.25 

Robin Hood Bourbon In bbls 

per gal 2.50 

Sherwood Prhalo Slock in 

bbls, per gal 3.00 

O. P, S. Slierwood in bbls, 

per gal 3,25 

Old Saratoga, In bbls per gal 4.00 

WILLIAM WOLFF A CO. 

329 Market street, San Francisco. 

Carlisle re-imported. Spring '90 $2.40 

It. It. Ilavden A Co.'s Old Grand 

Dad, Spring '90 2.25 

MayHcld, Spring '89 265 

Atlierton, Spring '90 2.35 

Anderson Co., Spring '91 1.85 

Hume, Spring '89 2.45 



10-00! Imported Champagnes. 



HELLM.\NN BROS. A CO., 
525 Front street, Sau Francisco. 

Blue Grass, per gallon $2.00 to $:150 

Boone's Kuoll, " 2.40 to 4.50 

KOLB A DENHARD, 

4'20-42fl Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Per gal Per cs. 

Nonpareil $:t..'J0 $7.50 

Nonpareil A 4.00 9.00 

Nonpareil A A 5.00 1'2.00 

Canteen 3.50 8.00 

CaoteenOPS 5.00 11.00 

CHARLES MEINECKE A CO., 

314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

(Charles Meinecke A Co., Continued) 

John Gibson Son A Co $2.00 to $4.0 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 

I'23 California street, San Francisco. 

Perrier JoucI ACo."Sptcial"$:«..50 $:15.,50 

Heseiye Dry 3-1, (K) ;«5,00 

Peirier Jouet A Co. Brut.... 34.00 30.00 
Half pts "Special" $42 in cs of 48 bottles. 



MOORE, HUNT A CO., 
404 Front street, San Francisco. 

PerGallo» 
Extra Pony in bbls or H-bbIs $6.00 to $S.O 
A A •■ •• pf 4.00 

B •• " " 3.5 

C ..... ;(.o 

Rye In bbls and K-l'I'ls f''"'" -''O 'o 5.0 

A A in cases 110 

C in eases ^.5 

NABER. ALPS A BRUNE, 

3'2:i and 325 Market street, San Francisco 

Phil-nix Old Bourbon, Al. , $2,75 

Old Sfk 3.110 

" A I, 90 pf 2.50 

" OK lOiPpf 3,,'i(l 

•' P..n\, Priv St'k 4, (HI 

Club House li.Mirl.oli, Old. , 4.50 6. 110 

Gold Medal Bourbon, Imi pf 2..'>0 

Union Club " " 2,25 

Suiierior Whisky 1.75 

BB Whisky 1.50 

Lmt'oRS — In cases. 

Per Case 

Phirnix Bourbon OK, in ,5s <10..50 

Al, " 7.50 

Al,24pl8 8.00 

Al,48Slil 9.00 

Rock and Rye Whisky in .'» 7.50 

Rum Punch Extract, in .'«. 8.00 

Blackberry Brandy, In ,'ib. 7..50 

SPRIANCE, STANLEY A Co., 
410 Front street. San Francisco. 

Keuluckv Favorite $ 3.00 

Extra Kentucky favorite,,, :',.50 

O. P. T -.50 

O K. Old Slock ''.'lO 

Harries' Old Bourlwm 2.00 

Kentucky Favorite, in cases 



HELLMANN BROS A CO., 
525 Front street, San Francisco. 

Krug A Co. "Private Cuvce" 

per case $;M.00 $;t6,00 

Josepli Perrier fils A Co 

per basket 19,00 20,00 

Adrlen A his. [wr basket,. . . 17.00 18.00 

MACONDRAY BROS. A LOCKARD. 
Agents 
124 Sansome street. San Francisco. 
Louis Roederer, Carte 

Blanche $:i4.00 $:16.00 

Louis Roederer, Grand Vin 

Sec 34.00 36.00 

Louis ..aederer, Brut M.OO 36.00 



I CHARLES MEINECKE A CO. 

I 314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

DEITTZ * OIl.nEKMANN, AY., CIIAMPAONE. 

Oolil Lack Sec. per case $;i2.00 $1(4.00 

Gold Lack Sec. 6 Magnums 

per case 31.00 

Cabinet Green Seal, per bskt 2.5.50 

DItPANLOVP A CO., REIMS. 

Carte Braiiche, per case 21.00 



27.00 
2-2.00 



D. P ROSSI, 
N. E. Cor Dupont and Green Sts., S. F. 
Monte Cristo, 12 qnaits lo case $12.00 

24 pints '■ .... 13.00 
Special discount for iiuaiititiea. 

SHERWOOD A SHERWOOD, 

212-214 Market street, San Francisco. 
Moet A Chandon, While Seal 32.00 34.00 
Brut Impcr'l :15.00 37,00 

W, A, TAYLOR A CO., 
39 Broadway, New York. 

SPAKKMIIO SAllHrR, 

Ackerman-Lanccnce, Saumiir, France. 

Dry Royal $2100 $2:1.00 

Briit •■ 2100 '2:1.00 



WILLIAM WOLFF A CO. 
j 329 Msfkel street, San Francisco 

I QUARTS, PINTS 

I While Seal (Grande Cuvoe)^ .34,00 .'16,011 
8..50 Brut Imjierlal 38.00 40,00 



Imported Brandies. 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 

123 California street, San Franeisco, 
(H. Cuvillier A frere Cognac.) 

Fine Champagne, "Reserve,' 

1870 |;uo.l 

OrandeFlne Champagne 1800 :mi.00 



Quarts. 



L, OANDOLFI A CO., 
427^;il West Broadway, New York. 
(Prices I. o, b. New York ) 
••• Albert Dubois 4 Co., Cognac, 

12quarl9 $11,75 

•*• Rnpparl A Co,. 12 i|uartB 19,50 

ITALIAN —KRATELLI BRANCA, MILAN, 

Cognac Fine Champagne, Croix 

Rouge, per case 10,00 

HELLMANN BROS. A CO., 

525 Front street, San Francisco. 

E. Remy Martin A Co., Cognac. 

Cognac ill 0( laves per gal. . 5 50 6,50 

lu cases, see special advcrllsemenl 

P. Frapln A Co,, Cognac, 

Cognac in oclaycs,i.cr gal.. 5 65 0,50 

Planal A Co., Cognac. 
Cognac in octaves, per gal. S.25 



K. KKMY MARTIN A CO.. Cognac. 

HELLMANN BROS. * CO.. AOENTS. 

525 Front Street. San Francisco. 

Eau-de-Vic vlcille $15 00 

17.00 

19.00 

Fine cliampagne ».. 20.00 

Grande champagne viellle 22!(I0 

extra. 25.00 

" V O. P. IS58 30.00 

" 8. O. P. 1847 35 00 



V. S. O. P.. l.s.'H 50.00 

In octaves $4.70 to 6.25 



CHARLES MEINECKE A CO.. 
314 Sacramento street. San Francisco. 
Champ Vineyard Proprs. Co.. 
Bontelleau A Co. man- 
agers Cognac in Octaves 

P<T gal $5.-25 lo $8.50 

The Vineyard Proprs. Co. 
BoutelleauA Co. mana- 
gers Reserve Vintages. 11.00 lo 14.00 



W. A. TAYLOR A CO.. 
39 Broadway, New York, 

COGNAC BRANDIES. 
RODYER, GUILLET A CO., COGNAC. 

Vintage. (Jr. Casks, iicr gal. 

1886 !..|4.a5 

1884 540 

1875 6.5S 

1869 740 

1840 ia.25 

VSO 1750 

Octaves, 5 cents per gallon extra. 

CASES, 

Cases * 14 50 

•• 18.20 

•" 17.80 

19.50 

WILLIAM WOLFF A CO., 

329 Market street, San Francisco. 

Martcll's Biandy, • per case $15.00 

• 17.00 

19,00 

VO •• 26.00 

VSO •- 32.00 

• WSOP •• 50.00 

In oclavis 5.00 lo 9,25 



Imported Whiskies. 

W. B. CHAPMAN 
I'.'S California street, San Francisco. 

SCOTlll WIIISKT 

Dawson's •- I'crfc. Ii..n " $I'2.5II 

Old Highland '-Extra Spec- 
ial" '...-13 

Old Highland "Special Lhi-' 

iicuer" in 00 



00 



HELLMANN BROS. A CO. 
525 Front street. San Franeltco. 
J, B. Shrrriff .t Co,, Lochln- 
dae Islay, Scotch whisky 
in wiMid, per gallon, . . . 3,gL 



32 



f/reifie WIJ\£ Jk^Q Sflf^iT t^EVIEW. 



W. A. TAYLOR S CO. 

39 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



I^Ein?.ESEl^TinsrC3-: 



GONZALEZ. BYASS & CO., - - SHERRIES 


JOSE BOULE, 


TARRAGONAS 


SUVA & COSENS - - - - PORTS 


A, BRONDUM & SON, 


ACQUAVIT 


BLANDY BROS. & CO,, - - MADEIRAS 


ROUYER, GUILLET & CO,, 


. BRANDIES 


ACKERMAN-LAURNACE, - SPARKLING SAUMUR 


JOHN JAMESON & SON, Ltd., 


IRISH WHISKY 


WILHELM PANIZZA, - - RHINE WINES 


THE ARDBEG DISTILLERY CO., 


SCOTCH WHISKY 


MARTINI & ROSSI, - - - VERMOUTH 


CHAS. TANQUERAY & CO., 


OLD TOM GIN 


1, & V, FLORIO, - . - _ MARSALAS 


MAGNUM BRAND, 


JAMAICA RUM 


PETER F, HEERING, - - CHERRY CORDIAL 


MAGNUM BRAND, - - 


ST. CROIX RUMS 


REiN & CO,. ----- MALAGAS 


MAGNUM BRAND, 


HOLLAND GIN 


• ORDERS SOLICITED FC 


)R DIRECT SHIPMENTS. 




SPECAL INDUCEMENTS 


IN TERMS, PRICES, 


ETC. 



SPECIALTIES 



John Jameson & Son, Limited 

FAMOUS 

IRISH WHISKY 

In all lauds it is recognized as being 

WITHOUT AN EQUAL! 

Sells in l)iililin, at auction, for nearly <loul<lc the [)ric(! of 
any other Irisli whisky. 

CHAS. TANQUERAY & CO. 

Old Tom Unsweetened Qin 

Tlie highest tyjio of English Gius. Fast becoming 
]((i|)ular in the East. 

Will Sell Themselves! 



SCOTCH WHISKY 

"GOLF CLUB"* "PIBROCH" 

These two whiskies are the finest types of Scotch 

Whi.sky to be found anywhere. Won in their 

class in coniiietition against the best known 

bi-anils in the luarket. 



(( 



RED LION" 



JAMAICA RUMS 



An exceedingly fine, t)l<l London Dock Cased Rura. 



If You Want the Best, Try It! 



SOLE AGENTS W. fl. TAYLOF^ & CO., 39 BROADWAY, N. Y. 



f/cSlfie WIJME /jNtD SpiPIT "^EVIF'A 



nEi.i.MAXx mtos. a co., 

.VJ5 Frttnl (ilri'«t, Sun I''riiiu<l6L>o. 
J. I!. KliiTilir.itCi),, I.iii'lilii- 
ilfti* Iflfty, Sctilfli wliisky 
|K'r rase Itl.lMl 

Uul>lill HiKlUllTH Cll.. I.ltl., 

l)ul>l)ii, Irli'li whl^k.v, 
in woud, |H*r ffnlWtn. . . , 4..')U 

Diililin l>ii>lilli'n> C»., Ltd , 
l)iit>liii, Irliili wklaky, 
IH.TCMC liAKI 

CHAItLES MEINECKE .t CO.. 
SU Siurami'iilo slrifl.Saii FrmuUeii. 
ll.n>iil .V: Son. I.omloii Kiiu'»l 

Ii isli Mull WliUkcv. . . . »l-'..'iO 

ll.>y«l llillilil Si-.it.li Wliifkv. IL'.SU 
Jftl'iii Uiiiiitinv. IrtliiV Mull 

Sii.lih Whisky.". KI.M 

SIIKIIWOOD A SHEUWOOI). 

'J1J-:.'14 MniKi'l slrtvl, S«ii I'lmuiwo. 

Uiirkc's • • • Irisli, inees I'i.OO 

........ .. 1400 

•• Onniklrk SioH-li " \i.-i!i 

•■ ViiiTijrai Si'Otili " 1S.50 

Lawf^itu'e Litiueur •' *' 1-1.50 

fniii V»r. " •• 13.00 

MiKi'11/.ie s OiiMilivi-t • • • 

Siotili, i>iT case 12.50 

Bu.<lu'li'* Cliit> Iribli, ill wood 

IH.TgaUuu 4.5U 

W. .\.T.\YLOIl A CO., 

3U Broadway, Xew York. 

Tlie Aiiiln'g Distillery Co., Inlav. 

Qrs. Oils. 

NV-w Si.SS f:{.'JO 

Oiif Year 4.20 4.25 

Two Years 4.55 4.60 

Tliicc Years 4.U5 5.00 

CASKS. 

• one doz. bot. $11.00 

• • • 1.1.00 

• • • • 20.00 

JOHN JAMESON ,.V SONS, Ul'HLIN. 

Ijrs. Ocls. 

New $4.00 f».05 

One Year 4.40 4.45 

Two Years 4.70 4.75 

Three Years 5 0."i 5.10 

Four Years 5.45 5.50 

• .V.l doz bot. $12.00 

• • • 14.50 

• • • • 24.00 

WILLIAM WOLFF * CO., 

S2y Market street, San Franeisco. 

Canadian Club per ease $15.00 

IKISII UIIISKIK^. 

fWin. Jameson >V Co.. Dublin ) 

(irei'ii Diamond, per case 10..50 

Gold Diamond ■■ 11. .W 

TLree Diamond " I4..'i0 

In octaves, jn-ovif 122. per ^al 4.00 

SIOTCII UlfLSKIES. 

(.Vjiilrew Cslier A Co.) 

Old Vat.ed Ulenlivet. per case 12.00 

Special Itcserve, per case IS 50 

'* The Very Finest,'* per case 30.00 

In oclaves, proof HI, per gal 4.'o 

Domestic Champagnes. 

A. KI.NKES WIDOW, 

600 Mont^oniery street, San Francisco. 

Price..* <»n application. 

Liberal tliscount to the trade. 

FKASH .t CO. 

'17, 8U, and 'Jl Hudson Street, New Y'ork. 

Ini|>erlal Cul)cruet, i|uarts $7.00 

" pint* 8.00 

.\ discouul to llie trade. 

AIIPAD H All AS/THY. 

San Francisco, California. 

TIIKEC NEW BBAND8. 

•■ Haraszlhy Sec " $1(1 50 $1'J 110 

•■Ilaraszthi Dry" b'l.'iO IH.oii 



■■ llarustlliv llrul " 1 1 Ml 17. il" 

Kcllpsc Kxiiu Dry ll.'iu 17.00 

Tuoycins imlinnltennenlullon Inboiilc. 

Trade discounts mailed on iipplicallon. 

ITAI.IAX-SWl.SS Cnl.d.W. 

L. (iandolii ,\: Co., I'loprlctois. 

427H.'il West Broadway, New York. 

Monlecrislo, extra dry, iNiluially 

ferinenled, In ciwa oi 1.' .(uarls. .$12,00 
.Moniccrlsto, extra diy, iialnndly 

termenlcd. In eaces ot 24 pints U.OO 

Liberal discount to the trade. 



PAUL MASSON, 

San Jose, Calltoriila. 
Less than 5 cases. 

Premiere Cuvee, Dry flil.oo $IS,0U 

" " Special Hi, 00 IS. 00 

Special discount for >|uantillen ol 5 
cases ov inuru. 

A. WEHNEII it Co., 

52 Warren street, New York. 

Extra Dry $ 7.11(1 » .s ( 



.; j.ui,,. ,...., i., ,, ,.. 

lAI.N Itovnl ilalatia dill In 

cases of l.'i lar};u black 

bottles iH-r L-ase... 2«'l..'iO 

In cases of 15 larKv 

white liotlles |>er case 21.50 

i Klrsehwiiwer, .Macholl Frervs 

Itavarian ltli;hlniid, per 

' ease 20.00 

Swan Clin in Ih I'liskn ^75 

Double Eniflc i;iii ill X casks. 3.(10 

John Ibiinsay Islay Scotch 

Whisky in Vi, casks. .. . 4.75 

Iloord's Pineapple liiand Ja* 

inaica Uuiiis in i^ casks. .5.25 to C 50 



W. A. TAYLOIl .t CO. 
:>'J Ilioailway, New York. 

.VAIINUM IIUANb, JAMAII'A Itt^M. 

Qrs. 
A — Full body $:i.«0 



Syrups, Cordials, Etc. 

KOI. I! A DEXIIAllD. 
422 Moiiii;omciy street, San Fruiicisco. 

Hock Caiuly Syruii 75e. jiur ^al 

Itnspberry Syrup 7.5c. •' 

Orgeat Syrup 75c. '• 



Imported Goods. 

(51ISCELLANE0D8.) 

W. IJ' CUAP.MAN, 

12:i California street, .San Francisco. 

Plymouth Gin (unsweetened) $10..5U 

L. GANDOLFI it CO., 

427-431 West Broad w.y. New York 

(Prices f. o. b. New Y'ork ) 

Flli Mancabelli. Brescia. 

Aiicsone, cases of 12 bottles, per ease $11.50 

FEKSKT OR liLANCA IIITTKRS. 

Flli. Branca it Co., Milan. 
25 case lots and above, qls U 00 

10 ;: ii'.25 

5 II. ,50 

Single case, qts 12.00 

Case of 24 idnt bottles 10 50 

HELLJIANN BUGS, .t CO., 

,525 Front street, San Francisco, 

Blaukenheym it Nolet. 

Dnion Gin a.OO 

Vangliaii Jones 

Old Tom Gin, in cases H.OO 

Orange Bitters " 1L50 

Patterson it Hibbert. 
Bass' Stout, per double doz 3.00 

Guinness' Stout, " •• 3.50 

H. Underberir-Albiccht. 
Boonekamp of .Mang Bitters, 12.75 to 13.75 

J. B. Sbcrriff it Co. 
Jamaica Bum in j^s aud ^s 

per gallon 4.30 to 5.10 

Tarragona Port in }i casks 

per uallon 1.25 

.Adrien M. Warde's Italia de 

Pisco, per case 30,00 

Sariiincs, brand "Philippe it Canaiid." 

KOLB & DEXIIABD, 
420 Slontgomery street, San Francisco. 
Birch's Crystal Belfast Ginger Ale — 

Lots .if 5 barrels $12.75 

I barrel 13..50 

Net cash. 

CHAHLES MEINECKE it CO,, 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

(BOORD * son's, LONIinN.) 

Old Tom Gin. per case $11.00 

Pale Orange Bitters, per ease 11.50 

Ginger Brandy Mi|ueiM " 12. IK) 



4.30 
505 

:i.io 



B— llich, fat and old. 
C— Superline, extra. . 

MAGNUM 

aiNs. 

CIIAS. TANQIKHAY it CO., LONDON. 

Bulk. 

Old Tom Gill, iiiiarter casks .$:t 

Old Tom Gin. octaves. . 3 

Cases, one dozen each . n. 



SHEBWUOD iV .^lll■.li\\|)llU 

212-214 Market street Sun Francisco. 

Per Case 
A. Iloiitman it Co.'s Gin, 

large black bottles $21.50 

A. Iloulman it Co.'s Gin, 

inedinni black bottles. 18.50 

A. Iloutman it Co.'s Gin, 

small black tjottlcs V.UO 

A. Houtman it Co.'s Gill 

laigc Willie bottles 2'2.50 

A. Iloulman it Co.'s Gin, me- 
dium while bottles 10.50 

A. Ilontman it Co 's Gin 

finall while bottles U.5U 

A llontinaii it Co.'s Gin. 

oclaves per gallon 3.55 

Bass' Ale in wood, lilids $50.00 

Joules Stone Ale in wood, 

hhds 50.00 

Boss Ginger Ale. per barrel.. 15.00 

' Soda Water, per case 7 00 

" Tonic Water, " 7.00 

" Potasll Waler, " 7.00 

•' Raspberry Vinegar G to 

gal, per case 7.00 

" Itaspberry Vinegar 8 lo 

gal, per case 6.00 

" Lime Juice Cordial 6 to 

gal, per case 6.00 

•' Lime Juice Cordial 8 lo 

gal, per case 4.50 

" Lime Fruit Juice G to 

gal, per case .4.60 

" Lime Fruit Jiiiee 8 to 

gal, per case 3.,50 

•' Orange Bitters, per case. 8.00 

Burke's Bass' .Ale, pints, per 

bblofsdoz 16.00 

Burke's (luinncss Stout, pts 

perbblofSdoz 16.00 

Burke's Jamaica Hum per cs. 12..50 

" Old Tom Gin •' 10.75 

'• Dry Gin " 10.75 

" Heiinessy Brandy, per 

case 16.00 

Port Wine, Oato br'd 

per case 10.00 

Flelscliman's ItoyaltyGlu, 10 

gal packages, per gal. . . . 2.25 

Fleischman's Itovaliv Gin, 15 

gal pad, .1 .... 2.22h 

Fleiscbmaii n, 2o 

gal pad, 2.20 

Flclschman',- l:u\:ili\ (iin,.')0 

gal pacKfigcs. per iral.. . . 2.15 

Meinliold's Anchor Brand 

Cider, per case, i|Uarls.... 3.25 

Mcinhidd's Anchor Biaud 

Cider, per case, pints I (Ki 



33 



UII.I.IAM «cil.l I ,V CO.. 
:12'J .Market street, Sun Francisco 
J. de Kiiyper it Soiii. liln, large hot »20.1;U 

med. ■• 16.(0 

" " "iiiall u.tW 

Caiitrell it Co.'hiaiic p. ' ,, 

Ale pel barrel of h 15 IM) 

Wollc's Si hicdam Schi, , ,. ■ 

'lunrts tf.5o 

Wolfe a Schiedam Sckiiap|>a par cast) 

l'l"l» lO.fiO 

Beiiedictiiiu, l>cr ease, iiuarts 20,00 

,„ ". " pints 21.50 

rheii. Lappc s Genuine Aroinalli|uc 

pi-'i' ease la.uu 

Gllka Kiimniel per ease 12.50 

Dog's Head Brand of Buss' Ale— 
Per case N doz. pints, glass. Head 

Bros., London ', 14.00 

Per case 4 doz i|uarls, flnss 13,00 

Dog's Head llranil ot Guinness' Htont — 

Per case N doz. pints, glass 14.00 

" 4 •• .(uarts, '■ 1240 

Old Tom Gin, Sutton CaideuiKCo. 10.00 
Cicme de Meiithe, E, Ciisenier His 

Aiiie it Co laoo 

Pousse Cafe, E. Ciisciiicr, Aliie it Co. 15..50 
Maraschino. Ilomaiio Vlaliov, Zara.. 15. ,50 

Balavja Anack, 12 .|uarl bottles 12.00 

.lamana ruin in octaves, proof 116, 

Peruulloi 4^u 

Kirschwasser, Macholl Bros., Munich IH.OO 
Xordhausei Kornbranntvvein, cases 12 jugs 

Bed label . . , '.Jo.ou 

Black label 16.00 

Cherries ill MuiasiliiiTo, I2i|uarts... lo!oO 
French Vermouth Xolllv Pratt it Co. 6.75 

Grand .Marnier, 12 bottles, large 20.00 

24 •• small.... 21.50 
J. H.Schrocdcr's Cocktail Biiters,24 

pints 12.00 

Chianti, GiorgloGlglioll. Leghorn, Italy— 

<|iiarl8 10.00 

pints U.OO 

Mineral Water. 

JOHN CAFPIIEY, (representing CHA8. 
OIIAEF it CO., Xkw Yo«K) 
47 First street, San Frnncisco. 

APEXTA HINGAlilAX BlTTEIi 
WATEB, 

ex San Franeisco Warehouse. 

5 CASE LOTS. 

Case of .50 glass bolt les . $ 7.50 

100 glass quarter bottles. .. 7.50 
Payable 5 months from date of invoice. 
Subject to a rebate of 50 cents per case 

on certain conditions ; particulars on 

apiiiicalion. 

APOLMXAUIS NATURAL MINERAL 

WATEIJ. 

ex San Francisco Warehouse, Ibcaselols. 

Case of 50 gluss quarts Apollinaris$ 7,00 

100 •' pints AiHiliinaris 10.50 

100 '• "splits" — half-pts 

— Apollinaris 8.00 

Payable 30 days from date of invoice. 

Subject to a retiatc of 50 cents |)er case 

on certain conditions; particulars on 

a|>plication. 

FBIEDIllCHSHALL APERIENT 
WATER, 

ex San Franeisco Waiehousc, 
Per case of 5U bottles (5 case lotsXIOUO 

WILLIAM WOLFF A CO. 
320 Market street, .San Francisco. 

JOIIANNIS MINKIIAL WATER, ZOLLIIAUB, 
OKRM.4NY. 

TEN 1'ASK.S OK MOIIR. 

Case of 50 quarts $ 6 25 

1011 pints o!75 

100 splits 7.50 

ONE CASK. 

Case of .50 i|uarts t 7. "25 

■• lOOpints 10.75 

" 100 spills 8.25 

(Terms— Net SO days ) 
HllKYAPI JtNos, 

Case of 50 iKitlles, per case $I1.0() 

5iascf ond over, pcrcBsc ^"■% 



FOR FINE PRINTING GO TO 



R, fl. WOOD CO. 



314-316 IJ.VTTKKV STKKKT 



GOOD WORK. ^ MODERATE PRICES. 



34 



//ceifie WIJME /fJ^B Sflf^lT f^EVIEW 



I_,E]_/^IDi:tTC3- IDISTII_jI_,EI^S. 



ADDRESS, INSURANCE. { BRAND. 


ADDRESS, INSURANCE. BRAND. 


Boui?.Bonsrs. 


GREEM;i;il.i; Dl.sT'Y CO. i ^ , ■ 
GreenLrier. D. No. 239 Greenbrier, 


BELLE of ANDERSON DG CO. 

Add: S. J. Grconbanin, Louisville. 

Rate, 1 .25. 


Belle of Anderson, 
Gleuarme, 

Ji'.ssainine, 
Arlington. 


Add: M'ni. Collins & Co., Louisville. -o -a tt i 

Rate 1.35. | ^- ^- ^^y^®"- 


ANDIORSON & NELSON DIST'S CO., Anderson, 

Louisville. „ . 
Add: Anderson & Nelson Distill.TJesCo nelson. 
Rate S5c. Louisville. | Buchanan. 


MELLWOOD DIST'Y CO.. D No. 34. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Rate, 85c. 


IVTellwood, 
DuiilDee. 


R. F. BALKE & CO. D. No. 12.' " O. ^W. R." 

Louisville, Ky. Old Wa.terniill. 
Rate 85c. | liunnyinede. 


E.\RLY THfES DIST'Y CO. ; Early Times, 
Early Timi's, Ky. D. No 7 a ^ m ii 
6 M. E. of Himlstown. " Kates 1.25 ^- ^- ^'*"' 
Add: B. 11. Hurt, Louisville. Jack Beam. 


OLD KENTUCKY DISTILLERY, 

D. Mi'Hflit-ndorf. 

205 W. Main St., Louisville, Ky. 

Insurauce: 85c., 81.00 and 81.25. 


Kentucky Dew. 


0. F. C. DISTILLERY D. No. 113 

Frankfort. 


0. F. C, 
Carlisle. 




Add: Geo. T. Stagg Co., Fraukfort. 
Rate 85c. 


I^YTHS. 


SUNNY BK(M)K and 

WILLOW CKKEK DIST'G CO'S 
Distilleries, Louisville, Kv. 
Contracting Offices, 128-130 Franklin .St. 

Chicago, 111. 
ROSENFIKLD BROS & CO., Proprietors. 


'Willo\v Creek, 
Sunny Brook. 


SUSQUEHANNA DIST'G CO., 

Milton. 
Add: Jas. Levy & Bro., Cincinnati. 
Rates, 85c & 1.25. 


Susquehanna. 


Rates, 85c. and 81. Nos. 5 and 2!), . 


NORMANDY DIST'G CO.. -,^-r 


J. B. WATHEN & CO. J. B. Wathen & Bro. 
Louisville, 
Rate 85c. Kentucky Criterion. 


Louisville, Ky. Normandv, 

1*. 0. Box 2354, -D T • 

Rate 85 c. | Rubioon, 


OLD TIMES DIST'Y CO., 

Distillery No. 1. Louisville. 

Rates, $1.00 & 81.25. 


Old Times. 


A. OVERHOLT & CO., 
Add: A. Overholt & Co., Pittsburg, Pa. Overholt. 
Rate, 80c. | 


OLD KENTUCKY DIST'Y CO., 
Louisville, Ky. 
Rates, $1 and 81.25. 


Kentucky Comfort 

and 

Gladstone. 


J. B. WATHEN & CO. 

Louisville, 
Rate 85c. 


Lackawanna Rye. 


E. J. CURLEY & CO. D. No. 3 & 15 

Camp Nelson 
Kates: "B," "D," "'E" 1.25. "F," 3.50 


Blue Grass, 
Boone's Knoll. 


ANDERSON & NELSON DIS'G CO. 

Louisville. 

Add: Ander-son & Nelson Distiller's Co 

Rate 8,5c. T-oiiisvillc. 


Nelson. 




Best Line 

TO 

Indianapolis, 
Cincinnati 

AND THE - 

South. 

CITY TICKET OFFICE: 
232 Clark SxHtET, - Chicago 



Louisville, St. Louis & Texas Railway 

' BEECHWOOD ROUTE." 

Consign your shipments from Louisville and interior 

Kentucky points, care of the Louisville, St. Louis & Texas 

Railway, which is a direct line to Pacific Coast points and 
same will receive prompt attention. 

For rates and other information address the undersigned 

L. S. Parsons, J. K. McCracken, H. C. Mordue, 
Traffic Man'g, Gen. Man'g, Asst. Gen. Fr\ Agt 

Louisville, Ky. Louisville, Ky. Louisville, Ky. 



f/ceifie WiJ^^E /JMD Sfll^lT PREVIEW. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

Calironiiii Wine Association "21 

Caipy. ('. it Co 21 

t'liauciic it Hon 

KisiMi N'incyartl (\)nipany l> 

(Jiin.liacli. J. & Co 30 

(iiiasti «Si Uoriiard 4 

llaras/.tiiy, Arpail 

Italian-Swiss Colony '-".• 

Kolilcr it Van Hcrgen 21 

KohltT it Kroiiiiiif; 21 

Koll> it Donliartl 5 

Lai-liinan it Jaoobi 28 

Laclinian Co., S 21 

Mann. C. M (5 

Napa Vail.-y Wine Co 21 

National Wine Association 22 

Smith, Julius P 4 

Staracc, Achille 2 

Vina Distillery 34 

West, Geo. it Son 22 

Wot more- Boweu Company 3 



DISTILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Crown Distilleries Company 2 

Curley, E. J. & Co 5 

Guckenlu'imer, A. & Bros 27 

I^ailiufi; Distillers' Cards 34 

.*vv, Jas. it Bro 31! 

-layhew. H. B. & Co 4 

Meinecke. Charles it Co 26 

Monarch. R 2(> 

A. Senior & Son 1 



FOREIGN AND DOMEvSTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

Chapman, "\V. B 20 

Finke's Widow, A 2S 

Hellmann Bros & Co l'.» 

Lachman. S. Co 21 

Macondrav Bros. & Lockard 6 

Rossi. D. "P 28 

Sherwood & Sherwood 17 

Wolfl; Wm. &Co IS 



IMPORTERS. 

Chapman, W. B 20 

Hellmann Bros. & Co 13 

Macondray Bros. & Lockard 30 

Sherwood it Sherwood 10 

Starace. Achille 2 

Tavlor. W. A. & Co 32 

Wolfl', Win. & Co 18 



FRUIT BRANDY DISTILLERS. 
Walden & Co 4 

SAN FRANCISCO WHOLESALE LIQl'OR DEALERS. 



MINERAL WATERS. 

Apollinaris Company, litd 1 

Williiini WoKV it tU) 2<1 

SYRUPS, CORDIAT^S, BI'lTERS, PRUNE JUICE, ETC. 

Erlenliaeh, Martin 17 

Koll) it Deiiliard 5 

Rudkin, Wm. 1£ 28 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Bi>; Four Railwaj' Routes 34 

Bonestell it Co., Pa])er Dealers 26 

Korhel, F. & Bros , Redwood Tanks 28 

Goodyear Ruhber Co.... 2 

Henderson, Wm. G 30 

Hercules Gas En};ine Works, (Jas and l)istillate Engines 15 

Loew's System Filter 11 

Lonia Prieta LuniherCo 28 

Monon Route, IdOO Mile Tickets 34 

O'Brien, Janu's, Saloon 4 

Sanders it Co., Coppersmiths 4 

Waiidelt, Samuel, Cooi>er an<l Tank Builder 26 

Wayland it Co., Wine l^'inin-rs 14 

Zellerbacli & Sons, Paper 28 



Crcsta Blanca 

SOUVE/NI-R VI/NTAGES. 

GOLD MEDAL, PARIS EXPOSITION, 1889. 

Location of Vineyard! Livermore, Alameda Co., Ca'. 
Fa<'-slmile of Label on Genuine <^'esta Ultnica JVinett. 



Cresta Blanca Souvenir Vintages 

SAUTERNE-SOUVENIR 




•/*"".'' 



CRESTA BLANCA. 



^^... 






SAN F^NCitco Depot 140 MOHTOoysRv St. | 



Thcfic WtnoH are st-rred to the guests of all the leading Hotels and 
Re»tanrantrt on the TaclHc Coa«t. 
For prioo-list apply to 

U/EJ/T\OI^E-BOU/Efl QO. 

140 MONTGOMRY STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
BOTTLING CELLARS. CORNER LARKIN and MCALLISTER STS 



Kolb & Denhard o 

Moore, Hunt it Co 30 

Martin, E. it Co 4 

Naher, .\lfs it Brune 4 

Sielje Bros. & Plagemann 



Siibseribe; for tJne 



spruauce, Stanley it Co 4 ^acifio (jQinc and ^Tivit p^cvicxD 



LMPORTED BR.\NDY. 

E. Remy Jlartin it Co., Hellman Bros. & Co., Agents 13 

Caffrey, John (Representing Charles Uraef & Co.) 1- 



ONE DOLLAR AND A HALF PER YEAR. 



MovenTiaiNO rates on application. 



f/ceiFie WIJ^E /rJN0 Sflh^lT F^EVIEW. 









323-325 Market St,. S, F, 



D. T. B. Iir.NAIIIE. 



E. MARTIN & CO., 

IirPOHTERS AXD WHOLES.VLE 

lilQUOf^ mERCHflflTS, 

411 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

SOLE AOEXTS FOR 

J. F. CUTTER AND ARGONAUT OLD BOURBONS. 



CHAS. W. POKE. 



JOHN firKUAN( K. 



Spruance, Stanley & Co. 

IJtrOIiTEIiS AND JOBBEItS OF FIXE 

wpes, Wiiies aii^ Lipis. 

Sole agents for the Celebrated African Stomach Bitters 

iK Fkost RrnEET, • S,\n Frantisi o, Cai,. 



IM'EIINAL REVENUE AND mm BROKERS, 

THE EXPORTATION OF QRAPE BRANDY, WHISKY AND SPIRITS FROM 
BOND OR WITH PRIVILEGE OF DRAWBACK, SPECIALTIES 

DealurB in V. 8. Stamlanl Hydromelurs and Extra Stems. Prime's Wantage 

Rode, Die Wlieels and Gaufiiw^ rode. AIbd Dis-tilicrs', liectihers, 

Wliclesaie I,i'|iior Dealers and Brewers' liindie. 

OFFICE, 424 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANGISGO. 

F. O. :Box 240B. Telephone 343. 



'ORT.INT TO DISTILLERS AND WINE .\1A1\ERS 




Tlii- «.. itiit'sentB <iur laiefit /iit- 
prttved Conli ohm StfU which has 
ht'un perfuctiid after yt-arrt of expurimetit, 
ftiul lar^e fxpfiise. 

This St til has thi- atlva ntttfie 
over all others, as it is economical, 
easily operated and Reparatee the alde- 
liyde and other inferior oilg and makes a 
pure and hi^h class brandy, and reduce** 
the cost fnllxj ninety per cent, in 
titbor and fuel. It reqnires very little or 
n.^ water and utilizes all heat herelofoie 
wasted. 

We refer lo Gko. West tSc Hon, Stuck 
ton; John Whrelbb. St. Helena. 



ALL KIND OF COPPER WORK DONE AT SHORT NOTICE. 

SANDERS &L CO. 



Ni> 4:j;i Mission St. 



S.\N FK ANCTH 



Pat'ii Hkpt. *jy, isyi. 



OLIVINA VINEYARD. 

rt? Tb8 OLIVINA Gompriscs 600 Acres of Hill 

Cjl^X'^a^ Side Vineyard, Located \n m 

■^'/r^St(t'H'LL:'^Ci^ Livermore Valley. 

'"'**^Mfe'^^i^'*'^' '"^^' D^I^"^^'^^' '^^^^ MATURED TABLE WINES 






A SPECIALTY. 
SEMt FOR SAMPLK ORBKK. 

^ CoHRESrONDKNCK Scilll ITKn I!y Tiif. Ghowkii, 

JULIUS PAUL SMITH, LIVERMORE, CAL. 

N Y. Office, 65 and 67 Duane Street. 



.IitHN llERNAUn. 



Second© Gl'asti. 



Quasti <Sl ^ornardf 



Groovers and Di.<t!ners of - 



Gallforp WIHES U BWPIES 



Winery at Ghiasti & Bernard's Spur, Between West 
Glendale and Tropico, Cal. 



b7»rl^GE PRODUGEF^S Of SWEET WINES. 

Mail* OJJirc. <i>r. .'id and .tfaxnrda .Sts.. f.os .l}nirlts, <al. 



WALDEN & CO., 

Geyser Peak Vineyards and Brandy Distillery, 

GEYSERVJLLE, SONOMA CO., CAL. 

Walden Cognac, ManzanitaSherry,&c. 

Old Brandy in Cases, Brandied Fruits. 

WAI.DKN ('Or;NA<; 1h mndf after the French formiilii, from «elcclcd fresh Rrapefi, has boon BneooKRfuIIy Inlrodnocd, and 
l** now rcKulHrly Hold In the prlncl|iHl marketHor Knro|»e, in eompetlllon with Krcnch <'"Biiac. Otiictal (iernian and KnKliih 
■ licmlNtH tinve prnnimnred || (he puri'itt Hrandy which c<uneH (o their nnirket>. 

It In eniMMldUy Miiiiible for the druK trade'nud uiherN. where i)urlty Ih ileiriiunled. While abrouil ihe.HO gondfl Hncrossriilly 
• 'ornpele. pHyiiiK tame (liiilv^ UN the Kreneh, the Anierienn luiyer lian the ndvrintHuo in prle -, Ih'Iwclmi the Internal Kevcnno tax 
HHM-fiNcd here and the (JuRtoniii ilutlen on forelKii hrundlcB. SanipleH wtll he hcnt on iip|dteailon. 




TRADE-MARK Eastcm Ollice, 



29 1-^earl Street, New Yorlv. 




f^eifie WipjE ;<VJ^D Sflf^lT I^EVIEW. 



KOLB & DENH ARD 



OLD NONPAREIL 

BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES. 
CALIFORNIA 

WINES and BRANDIES, 

OFFICE AND VAULTS 

i30-iS6 3IO\Tli<>Mt:iiy ST.. S.l.V FRANCISCO. 

TiLEPHOM No. 5096. 




IMPORTERS AND SOLE AGENTS 
PACIFIC COAST FOR 

BURGH'S 

CRYSTAL 

Belfast Ginger Ale 







Blue GRASS ^ 

^jBOURpO 




>^sfiii»» 



Hand:Made_ • • 
;SourMash Whiskey. 

Je55an7ipe Co. 






<^^ 



;^<7^ '9 



.Vtl^^ 



BOURBON^:^^ 



E.J 



CURLEY 

ESSAM 



&.C0. 



E CO. 



KENTUCKY. 



..^. 



T}tese misktes avo made In tlio Famous " Bl.l't. GRASS REGIOX" 
JusiUi celcbraled as the home of the flnrst Whiskies hi the llorfj, and 
vhleh have been ] or the last Century, recognUed as suth, ijlvlng the ehar- 
acter and hirih stnndhifi to Ki:\Tl'<liy 1I7/;sK;/;.S \rlilrli .'/iry iiinr rii./oi/. 



THESE TAMOUS WHISKIES CAN BE HAD IN LOTS TO SUIT THE TRADE FROM 

HELL/V\A/NM BROS. & CO., 52:5 p-RO/NT STREET. SA/N FRA/NCISCO. 



I^othing Too Large or Too Small I 



WE PRINT EVERYTHING 



IF YOU are In need of PRINTING give us a call. We nnake a specialty 
of fine Printing, Engraving, Lithographing, Photo-Engraving and, also 
original designs for labels of every description. 



R. M. WOOD CO. 



: 5 1 I 3 1 r; 1 i A T T T: Tf ^^ RTTHnKT 

TELEPHONE MAIN ^"° 



f^SIfie WIJNE /JNiD SflF^IT F^EVIEW 



BELGIUM 



1SS4 XK.IUI^F'HIjPlISIX jf>!.GjP>LXl^ iBes 

EUROPEAN QUALITY RECOGNITION 

FRANCE 



FRANCE 



FRANCE 







CALIFORNIA 



Awarded 37 Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals ! 

THE HARASZTHY CHAMPAGNES 

I3Kl"r DRV KXTKA I)KV 

530 WASHINGTON STREET 



IRELAND 




SAN FRANCISCO 




C. M. MANN 

Successor to I. DE TURK 

"i^incs and ^randJQS 



BRANDY, 
PORT, 

SHERRY, 

ANGELICA, 

MUSCAT 

TOKAY, 

MADEIRA, 

MALAGA. 



SAUTERNE, 

GUTEDEL, 

RIESLING, 

BURGUNDY, 

CABERNET, 

ZINFANDEL, 

XX CLARET, 



VINEYARDS: 
Sonoma County, Cal. 

OFFICE AND CELLARS! 

216-218-220 Sacramento and 221 Gommercial Street, San Francisco, Cal 




T|HE JHISHEST AWARD f ARIS EXPOSITIOJM 



1889. 



GObD JVIEDAL. 



Estabilished. 

Ciuer/T\ore l/alley, ^ai. 

ISSS. 




>v3^^^, 



p^^\.>^ 



A. G. GHAUCHE. Proprietor. 

Offue AM) Dki'ot, 17 FiKBT^T. San Fkancisco 



CHAUCHE & BON, Successor to A. G. CHAUCHE. 

Sole Geueral A(;eiHs for the MouHT-RouoE 'Vines. 




Gold Medal for Sherries and Sweet Wines. DTJpTin Exposition 1S92. 

EISEl^l VII^EYARD CO 



-I'JOMiliR PROnrCI-RS OF 



SWEET\/\/INES. 

Ill IK i:. 

SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND SAMPLES. 12 STEVENSON ST., S. F 




PTRIWV! 



[INCORPORATED.] 



VOL. XXXVllI, No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 22, 1897. 




U RTn); 



$1.50 PER YEAR 



Issued Semi- Monthly. 



WOOD & SCOTT. 



PUBLISHERS. 



WINFIELO SCOTT, EDITOR 
R. M WOOD, MlNACtR 

316 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
TELEPHONE NO. 709. CABLE ADDRESS " FIELOWIN." SAN FRANCISCO 



The I'iClFIr H/YF .1 Y/> Sl'lUir KKI'/KII /.s- llir nnhi /xiyxr o/ 
Us class M'rst of Chirtiffo. It rirculutrs tnntnitf the il'linlrsalr ami 
ICrtall Mdir iiiicJ Si>iril Ih'alrrs <>/' the I'aei/lv (itast. tlie Uine Mak- 
ers aati ISratuhj IHstillers lij' I'aliJ'nrnia. the M'ine a ml Uraiuhi hntj- 
ers, ami titr hnfutrters. Distillers atitl Jobbers of the Vaited States. 



All CIltUKS. DHAFTS, .UOXEY ORDERS, 
matle patinble to WOOD tV SCOTT. 



KTC. 



sttoald be 



Subscription pvr year— in advance, postage paid: 

For the United Slates, Mexico and Canada $1 50 

For EuR>|ieau countries 2 50 

Single copies 10 

Entered at tlie San Francisco Post OIHce as second-class matter. 



-A-O-Eisroir: 



EASTERN BRANCH OFFICE! 
W. .\. GEFT, Manager; Room 32, No. 78 Park Place, New York City. 



Property for Sale. 



FOR SALE, in a coast county, splendid vineyard and laiuli 
property of 410 acres, 140 acres of which is iu full-bearing vines. 
No phylloxera, and tlie propertj' is so located that, witli ordinary 
care, the insect will not reach it. Property is well improved, 
having 1 brick distiller}-, 2 brick cellars, 2 adobe cellars, and 
plent}- of oak and redwood cooperage. Stock of wine on hand 
averages ".t.OOO gallons, which goes with the place. Besides the 
vineyaril. there is 100 acres of bottom land for hay, 100 acres of 
pasture, adaptt-d for hay. and 70 acres of wooded pasture which 
can be set to vines. 

Aside from the vineyard, the randi is well stocked, and lias 
ample and substantial buildings. 

This one of tin- fhoicest jiroiierties in ralifornia. The dry 
wines from the vineyard have a splendid reputation, and there is 
a steady estiiblished trade for them. Satisfactory reasons for 
selling, and the place will be sold cheap. 

For further particulars addre.ss Wi.nfiei.u Scott, Cixre of Pa- 
cific Wine and .Spirit Review, or applj' at Room 2, seventh floor 
Mills Building, from 1) to 10 .\. m. 

Vineyard for Sale at a Bargain, to Close an Estate. 

TinUrV AC'UKS choice fon-ign wine grapes, with winery 
(."{."j.OOO gallons, fine nak ca.sks) and distillery complete. Address 
G. L., Pacific Wine and .Spirit Review. San Francisco, Cal. 

WAXTED — Situation wanted by a marrie<l mau ; age, 40. 
Twelve years experii-uce on a vineyard iu wine making. IJcst 
refi-r.-nces. Address .T M.. this olTiee. 



MARKET -REVIEW. 



/^ALlFolvl.V WINES.— There is notliing of particular inter- 
^^ est to bo noted with reference to the wine busine.ss* during 
the i)ast half month. Considering the conditions, trade has 
held up in good sliajx' since the first of the year, the shipments 
by lail, particularly, having been larger than are expected at this 
season, While there was a marked falling off in ca.se goods, the 
bulk shipments aggregated nearly seven hundred thousand gal- 
lons. Of this (luantity one half went to New Orleans. As an 
indication of the development of a demand for better grades of 
wines, it is noted that the Southern ports took nearly as many 
eases last month as New York. Chicago made a poor showing, 
while Jlontana and Idaho have a good record, especially for 
wines in glass. 

The ([uestion of tariff is now occupying the attention of 
wine men, and out of the discussion now going on the concen- 
sus of opinion will bo gathered to enlighten the law-makers at 
Washington. Elsewhere in this issue will he found the views of 
some of the leading wine makers of the State on the subject, in 
reply to an article which appeared in the Review of Feb. 8th. 

Exports to Central America during the fortnight were of 
good volume, aggregating over eleven hundred cases and 15,000 
gallons. Our Southern friends are indeed proving steady and 
desirable customers. 

Late advices from New York are as follows : " During the 
last two weeks the demand for wines has been exceedingly qtiiet. 
Prices have not changcil, but there is a general feeling abroad 
that if auj' one wanted to buy a large quantity they could get a 
considerable concession from the prices asketl. There are but 
few outside lots on the market, which are not important enough 
to cut anj' figure." 

The total exports of California wines by sea and rail in 
January, 1897, were as follows : 

Cases. Gallons. 

By sea 2,121 ool.S'JS 

By rail overland 1,515 698,324 



Value. 

82.-?0,881 

285,.389 



Total 3,63C 1,250,222 8516,270 

/©ALIFORNIA BR.\NDY.— The movement of brandy by sea 
^^ during the half month was nothing, but rail shipments in 
Janmiry were large, the total being about 00,000 gallons. If 
this rate coidd be maintained, the brandy men would wear a 
much bettor face than at present. However, we do not look for 
a marked di'uiand until there shall have been a material reduction 
in tin? supply of goods suitable for consumption. 

The total exports of California brandy by sea and rail 
in .January, 1S97, were as follows: 

Cases. Gallons. Value. 

My sea 1.30 9,017 810,301 

Bv rail overland 115 59.920 91,030 



Total 



245 



09,537 



«101,331 



8 



f/reifie \N\^E /vJMD SflF^IT f^EVIEW 



*y *^IIISKIES. — Jobbers are not jubilating over present con- 
^^y ilitions, but at the same time they are much more com- 
fortable than they have been for several years past. Except for 
old established brands, the demand is slugfiish, and there is no 
probability that there will be any radical change for the better 
for some time to come. The improvement is slow, but it appears 
to be sure, and that is all that cau be reasonably expected in 
these times. During the half month the spirit men were excep- 
tionally active, their imports aggregating twenty-three hundred 
and tifly barrels. At the same time the whiskj' imports b}' rail 
were nine hundred and eleven barrels, with no receipts by sea 
noted. 

A dispatch from Ciuciuuati dated the 15th instant says : " It 
is announced that all the leading Kentucky distillers will keep 
their plants dosed this year. During the next regular session of 
Congress an etVort will be made to reduce the whisky tax from 
«1.10 to 90 cents." 

A dispatch from Louisville dated Februarj' 12th .says: " A 
secret meeting of distillers from all over the State was held in 
this city late last night for the purpose of forming a whisky trust 
of all Kentucky distillers. Their object is to control the output 
and the price of Kentucky whisk}'. In pursuance to a circular 
sent out a few days ago l)y Col. Thomas II. Sherle}', of the New 
Hope Distilling Company, the meeting began last night in the 
offices of the New Hope Distillerj', at First and Main streets. 
Every effort was made to keep the proceedings of the meetings 
secret, but it was learned that the meeting was preliminary to a 
general meeting of all the distillers of the State at an early date. 
The present movement has a wide scope, and promoters hope to 
be able to prove to the distillers all over the State that the pro- 
posed trust would be greatly to the benefit of all. The promoters 
say it can be proved that the whisky trade of Kentucky, espe- 
cially the distilling portion of it, ought to be more closely allied 
and more harmoniously united." 

/MPORTATIOXS.— The imports in the half month have been 
nothing. Business is quiet, but at the same time far better 
than for a long time. This line of trade is holding its own with 
others, in good form, and, considering the industrial conditions, 
has no reasonable cause for complaint. 

AUCTIO/N \N E/NIGLA/ND. 



OPE/NI/NG OF A WI/NE WAH. 



On Thursday, January 28th, Messrs. Southard & Co., of 2, 
St. Dunstan's Hill, E. C, liOndon, disposed of by public auction, 
within the London Commercial Sale Rooms, Mincing-laue, E. C, 
the following California properties : 

33 barrels California brandy, vintage 1895, ex "Beechbank" 
from San Francisco. Entered 5th January, 1S97, at 3s. (72c). 

15 barrels brandy, vintage of liSl»4, shipped by the Natoma 
Vineyard Co. Ex " steamer " and Liverpool. Entered March 
2, 1890 — "Eagle Natorna Cognac "; sold at 3 s. d. (84 cents.) 

20 barrels same ship and entry, " * * * Xatoma Cognac," 3 
B. 6 d. (84 cents). 

36 barrels California Port wine, vintage of 1804, shipped by 
the Natoma Vineyard Co. of San Francisco ex Hindoo from New 
York, entered June 12, 1S9G ; 1 s. duty. ; sold at 2 s. to 2 s. 1 d. 
per gallon (48 to 50 cents). 

25 barrels " Burgundy" wine, ex Manitoba from New York. 
Entered December 18, 1890. Shipjied by the i)rodu('ers from 
Valley View vineyard ; " Cloverleaf Burgundy "; 1 s. duty ; sold 
28. 5d. r58 cents). 

25 barrels " Cloverleaf Claret," same ship, etc., 28. 2d (52c) 

26 bblB "Cloverleaf l{iesling," same, 2s.5d. to 2s.Cd (58 to COc). 
25 bbls "Cloverleaf Gutedel," same ship, etc., same price. 



Tlie exhibit of the San Francisco Breweries, L't'd, designed 
for the Central American Exhibit, went forward by the steamer 
San Jose on the 15th inst. The inventory was valued at 12,728. 



Unless all signs fail, there are apt to be some radical changes 
in the methods and scope of business of the California Wine 
Makers' Corporation before many months go by. There is every 
evidence of changes at hand if present conditions continue for 
any length of time. 

There has been an uiicliTi'urrcnt of feeling between the lead- 
ing shippers of the city and the Corporation that dates back for 
months, and with some shippers even to the time that the Cor- 
poration nuide its first sale to Lachman & Jacobi and to the 
Wine Association. The trouble with the Wine Association, re- 
ferred to elsewhere, is of more recent date, and it has found its 
first expression in the recent suit for over 830,000 by the Corpo- 
ration against the Association, which will certainly give rise to 
counter suits by the Association against the Corporation. 

There is, too, not a little personal feeling mixed up in the 
battle which it seems certain has opened. That this fight will 
be to the bitter end is also reasonably certain. 

The (piestions at issue may as well be handled without minc- 
ing, now that a peaceable settlement of dill'ereuces is apparently 
out of the question. 

The first complaint that we heard against the Corporation, 
the organization of wliicli W'e favored, came when the first lot of 
wine was sold to the California Wine Association and to Lach- 
man & Jacobi. For years prior to the formation of the Corpo- 
ration the wine makers persistently charged some of the dealers 
with crowding them to the wall in order to get along in their own 
fierce fights. Lachman & Jacobi came in for plenty of abuse ; 
so did B. Dreyfus & Co., the S. Lachman Co., and in less 
measure C. Carpj- & Co. Houses not largely concerned in 
the New Orleans market, like Gundlach & Co. and C. Schil- 
ling & Co., were looked to to take up the better grade of 
wines. Theu the Association was formed, taking in sub- 
stantially all the houses against which the wine growers had 
fought and grumbled except Lachman & Jacobi. When the 
Corporation made its first sale, concessions were allowed the Cal- 
ifornia Wine Association and Lachman & Jacobi, in matters of 
price, which were not given to Gundlach & Co. and C. Schilling 
& Co. To saj' that these houses felt the discrimination is put- 
ting it mildly. Take Mr. Schilling as an example. He had held 
up to his prices with a persistency that was worthy of a soldier 
in battle. " My lowest price is 25 cents for New Orleans delive- 
ry " was his final answer in days when Carpy, and Chaix, and 
Wheeler, and Garnier, and Lachman «S: Jacobi were smashing 
things around the 11-cent mark. Theu when the Corporation 
discriminated against him and his people the wound cut deep. 
He had stood by good prices, had sold good wines, and he felt, 
and justly, that he should be treated as well as liachmau & Ja- 
cobi, even if ho didn't sell the (juautity of wine annually that 
they did. Mr. Bundschu felt the same waj'. The Corporation 
defended its action by saying that concessions had to be made to 
the large buyers — and the concessions were made to the very 
houses, or their successors, that the growers have been shouting 
" wine .sharks " at for j'ears. Consistency is more or less of a 
jewel. We do not blame Mr. Schilling and Mr. Bundschu for 
having had no particular love for the institution at 3 California 
street. 

Another cause of trouble has been the course of Mr. Wheeler, 
the Secretary and Manager of the Corporation. It is needless 
to saj', in the beginning, that Mr. Wheeler is about as shrewd a 
manipulator ys lliere is in the wine business to-day in California. 
He wdulil Clinic piclty close lo making money at anything if 
everybody in the samti line was losing. Now Mr. Wheeler has 
been for years shipping wine from his .N'apa Valley i)lace to the 
Eastern markets. Two or three years ago he and his friends 
Brun & Chaix, at Oakville, would " give the others a whirl," so 
to speak, at Now Orleans. They succeeded, as did others, in 



p>/reifie WIJME /r]M9 SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 



Iioltliiifi; ttuMr own. Now of lato ■.Mr. WIuh'Ut has been mixed 
up in New Orleans figlits to a eonsidenvMe ilegreo. We are not 
advised as to wlietlier he use<l Napa X'alley wines or a eheaper 
material IVoni Xatoina in the latest hattle fay the N'ew Orleans 
trade, Imt in any event he was out with a hammer for prices, 
making the other shippers meet liis views ua to values. At the 
same time he was. and still is, a leading spirit in a eonihination 
to compel other shippers to buy wine from the Corporation at a 
minimum price of 20 cents per f;allon. This may or may not be 
good business policy. Kor Mr. Wheeler's personal account it is ; 
from the stand-point of the Corporation's best iutirests we tiiiuk 
it is not. We do not see how Me.ssi-s. Hendel, Kossi, Paxton, 
Slonteleagre and the other members of the Hoard of Directors 
of the Corporation can or could expect the shippers to pay ?0 
cents for new wines whilst their colleai;iii'. >[r. Wlieelcr, was 
hammeriu'; down prices to a level that niMde such triinsactions 
an impossibility. The answer maj- now be tiiat the Ni'w(»rleans 
situation has chau>;ed to-day — that the prices are regulated by 
agreement. To this we answer that we have heard of " New 
Orleans agreements " before. We have no contidence in thorn, 
them, as a rule. They are usually as ephemeral as air when it 
suits somebody's interest to indulge in private rebates and other 
devious methods. Only at this moment reports are iu the air to 
the ertect that somebody — individual, firm, or corporation, name 
not specified — is privately getting the better of the " agree- 
ment " bj- giving an uuder-gauge of about H gallons per barrel 
— in other words about 40 cents per barrel. That of itself is 
enough to precipitate a war if somebody else, not now in tlio 
New Orleans combine, don't start open rate-cutting on Iiis own 
account. 

Another circumstance pointing to future changes is the fact 
that the Corporation is not selling its "UC wines, while outside 
wine makers are rapidly unloading. Since the vintage was over 
many large sales have been consummated, and we are informed 
that there is still something like 1,500,000 gallons of " outside " 
dry wine on the market, and is offering for prices that will aver- 
age 17 cents, ca.sh. The Corporation has between .5,000,000 and 
(),000,000 gallons unsold, and this the shippers saj- they will not 
buy at 20 cents, on the ground that they cannot afford to give it 
and still meet competition. They also claim to be empty stocked 
for the present. Who will hold out the longer'.' In this con- 
nection there are reports that the Corporation intends establish- 
ing a warehouse in San Francisco in which wines can be stored 
and cared for, and that money will be advanced on such wines 
as are so stored. The statement is made that the cost of storage 
and care cjm be reduced to less than oue cent per gallon annu- 
ally. The officers of the Corporation state that they have this 
project under consideration, and may move very soon if condi- 
tions require. 

Still another phase of the situation is that the very validity 
of the Corporation is to be attacked. The contention is that it 
is an illegal body, organized in violation of the statutes of the 
State iigainst the formation of Trusts. The State law on this 
point is very clear, but the Corporation's directors have un- 
doubte<Uy consulted with Mr. D. M. Deluias and other attorneys 
on this point. Manager Wheeler naively says that while the 
common idea of a trust is that it is formed to raise prices to 
consumers, the Corporation is formed for protection to producers. 
The Wine Makers' Corporation certainly claims much if not all 
of the credit of the advance in the price of wines in the last two 
years, though there are others who ascribe it largely to reduced 
crops. These are some of the leading conditions which appa- 
rently presage early and important changes in the wine situalion. 
There other umh-rcurrents of feeling and fact which are aiding 
in wiilening the breach now existing between the Corporation 
and shippers, but they may for the time being be disregarded. 
What the final outcome will be time only will tell. 



GENERAL BONDED WAREHOUSE SITUATION. 

Tlie latast reports from Washington are to the ell'ecl that 
the Internal Revenue Department continues lirm in it8 deter- 
mination to abolish the general bonded warehouse in this citv 
Certain it is, too, that the Dei>artment will not do ho without 
the friends of the warehouseTallying to its support. Tlie waro- 
hou.so plan has its friends in San Fi-anci.sco -and strong ones at 
that. If the warehouse goes, they and the trade they have built 
up will sulVer severely, and the rectifiers, to whose interest it in 
to have it closed, will gain iu like proportion. The whole ques- 
tion as to the continuance or discontinuance rests on the inter- 
pretation of the act of 1S94 under which it was established, and 
in particular as to whether it is oj)tional or not with the Com- 
missioner to establish or abolish. That official naturally claims 
that he has the power. In that respect he is not unlike r)tlier 
oflicials of the remarkable Cli^veland administration. For in- 
stance, like that petty Treasury ollicial, who sought to thwart 
the will of Congress by refusing to pay the sugar bounty, or the 
Hon. J. Sterling Morton, who was brought up with a short turn 
for refusing .seed distribution. 

The whole truth about this General lionded Warehouse 
matter may as well be told. It is wholly a matter of self-inter- 
est with each and every man concerned as to whether he favors 
or opposes the warehouse a matter of the pocket, and the good 
of the service has nothing to do with it. The rectifiers and 
large wholesalers are against it. They are at large local ex- 
pense in rents, interest, taxes and what not, and, naturally, 
when they sell single stamp goods, they don't want some other 
fellow who pays a ten-dollar-a-nu)nth rent, and has his certificates 
in his pocket, to come around underselling him with straight 
goods in bond. This is particularly obnoxious, becau.se the rec- 
tifier has been in the habit of carrying liuancially the very same 
saloon men who may buy " straights." and eventually get into 
financial diflicullies by so doing, the straigiit whisky vendor 
wanting his coin in sixty days. 

Tlie oflice and warehouse wholesaler wants the warehouse 
for precisely the .same reasons that the rectifier don't want it. 

The local Internal Revenue oflicials want it because it en- 
ables them to make what they call a "good showing" in 
collections. 

Incidentally, both sides to the controver.sy cannot but agree 
that the system has not had a fair trial here". The warehouse 
has been shamefully neglected in the way of providing gaugers. 
The government is at fault for this. Considering the jiast his- 
tory of the warehouse and the difficulty of withdrawing goods, 
the intention of the Revenue Department to force withdrawals of 
all goods in the warehouse within three months is absurd. One 
joker suggests that three years would be nearer the time. And 
we would like to know by what authority the Internal Revenue 
Coinmi.ssioner can force tax payment of goods before the stat- 
utory eight years is up'.' 

Finally, the friends of the warehouse need expect little favor 
of the incoming administration. Illinois and Ohio will have 
much to say as to the management of the Internal Revciuu! 
Department, and Illinois and Ohio do not regard the sale of 
straight whiskies with a lenient eye. RIended goods carrying 
plenty of spirits suit tiieir purposes better. 



GCIATEMALA/N EXHIBIT. 

Governor I'.udd having signed tlii'bill providing lor an appro- 
priation for the (iuateiiialau exhibit, there is no doubt that the 
di.splays made by California will be something excellent. All 
of the wine exhibitors have sent their exhibits away, and we ex- 
pect to hear of awards within the course of a few months. 



Sherley Moore, Vice-PreBident of the Jesse Moore-Hunt ('o., 
is here from Louisville on a business trip. 



Jones, Mundy & Co. will shortly remove from their present 
oflices, at It) Front street, to the premises at 120 Front street, 
which until recently were occupied by Wolters Rros. & Co. The 
offices at It) Front street are on the second floor, but the entire 
first floor at I'.'o Front street is being refitted for the use of the 
firm. A new floor has been laid, an entire new front put in, and 
the store room transformed into a complete suite of offices. The 
firm will move in as soon as the alterations are completed. 



f/reifie WIJME /(]MD SflF^IT f^EVItW 



WI/NE WA-R O/N. 



War liiis brokoii out in deiiil earnest in llie California wiiu^ 
trade. Maker is arrayed against dealer in the courts, and au ele- 
ment of olVended personal dignity gives added vindictiveuess to 
the struggle which has begun. 

Trouble has been brewing for months over the price to be 
paid for ordinary red dry wines of the vintage of 1800, and the 
accu.satious of attempted cornering on the one side and of under- 
buying on the other have been exchanged. Open hostilities, 
however, broke out on the 10th inst, when the California Wine 
Makers' Corporation brought suit against the California Wine 
Association for 8:!0,0r.l."_'-i, claimed a.s a l>alance due on the de- 
livery of wines in IS'JO, with interest for four months, amounting 
to about $800. Notice of this action was promptly served on 
the Wine A.ssociation, which, through its President, Percy T. 
Morgan, will be responded to by a suit for danuiges against the 
Wine Makers Corporation for violation of contract in not deliv- 
ering wines as agreed to, -selling, instead, to rival dealers. The 
amount foi- which the suit is brought is large, but as compared 
with the tran.sactions between the now warring sellers and buy- 
ers is as a gallon to a hogshead, they amounting to §400,000 or 
$500,000 annually during the last two years. 

•' We have never been treated by any of our customers as 
the Wine Association has treated us," said Manager Wheeler, of 
the Wine ^Makers' Corporation. " The others have always paid 
for the wine delivered, and so did tlie association last year, leav- 
ing a small balance unadjusted. The money has been owed to 
us since the middle of last Xovember, but, though it is based on 
the written memoranda of the Associaiiou of deliveries, and live 
committees have been .sent to it to obtain a .settlement, we have 
been unable to get a cent. Mr. Morgan has, in addition, ac- 
knowledged the indebtedness, but has refu.sed to pay the interest. 
The only pretext for this was a demand for an itemized bill run- 
ning back two years, when the deliveries of 18ii5 were .settled, 
all except a few dollars on the As.sociation's own memoranda. 
When our last committee, consisting of D. M. Delmas, proposed 
to meet Mr. Moi;gan, at lunch, he was rudely refused l)y that 
officer, who told him he would have to go to the Association's 
office. I doift know the real cause of this persistent refusal to 
pay this just debt. It may be that the Association is short, or 
perhaps it hoped to cripjjle tlie Corporation, treating it as the 
dealers treated the individual wine makers in the past. We had 
promised to pay our members in December, and if our financial 
condition had not been excellent, so that we were able to do so, 
the chances are that many of them would have refused to make 
tranfers of the vintage of 189(>. It that event the dealers would 
have picked up the product at thc^r own figures. As it is, the 
Corporation has already 6,000.000 gallons tranferred.'' 

" The war has begun," declared President Morgan, of the 
Wine .\ssociation, "and will be carried out to the bitter end." 
He read letters from his Association in which a demand was 
made for a bill from the Corporation for the two years of their 
dealings. " We wanted a final account, and no coming back on 
us for other claims," continued the representative of the dealers. 
'•To our lettei-8 we have never received a written reply. Instead, 
committees from the Corporation waited upon me. To one of 
these, consisting of Messrs. Ro.ssi, Delmas and Paxton, I offered 
to pay a check for the balance claimed, if the Corporation would 
furnish an itemized bill of deliveries, and let other dill'erences be 
settled by arbitration, as provided in our agreement. 

'• This woidd have been au easy matter, as the Corporation 
had all our receijits of delivery. But this suggestion was not 
iiccepted. Next, I received a communication from Mr. Delmas, 
saying that he had been named a committee to consult with me, 
and naming his law office as the place of meeting. It strikes 
me that the proper jdace for a committee appointed to call on a 
business liouse is at the office of that house, and not at tin- place 
selected by the delegate. I so informed Mr. Delmas by telt^- 
jihone. and in reply was told by some oiw in the ollici' that my 
attitude would be reganled as a cessation of friendly relations. 
and other i)roceedings would be taken. 

"The ni'xt thing I knew was the service on me of this suit. 
The intimation that the Association is trying to cripple the Cor- 
]>oration is childiMh. Would we have advanced the purchasing 
l)rice of wine from 8 to 12A ceut.s in 18!>."i, and from I2A to ir> 
cents in 18'JG if this had been so? The As.sociatioii has a larg(! 



supply of winc' cm hand, and any depreciation of the price would 
be a depreciation of the value of t\u'. stock. Our a<lvices from 
the Ilast are that consunu-rs will not stand the advance of ."> cents 
demanded by the makers. Kvcti at present prices California 
wines have been driven out of Louisville and iire being undersold 
by the Ohio product in St. Louis, as these letters will show. 

'• We shall bring suit against the ('alifornia Wine Makers' 
Corporation for damages for violation of contract in not deliver- 
ing the amount of wine agreed upon. There will be uo com- 



promise 



,. " 



JUDGE LORIGAN ON PFEFFER'S 'CABERNET." 



Mention was made in the Rf;viEw of January '_'!. ISiiT of a 
decision by ,Tudge Lorigan of San Jose, by which the so-called 
" Pfetler's Cabernet " was declared to be a "Cabernet" within 
the same meaning of the Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet 
Franc; and of the further fact that a judgment was recorded in 
favor of Charles H. Kyland, of San Jose, and against R. Heney, 
Jr., for SI 068.35 on account of this classification. Judge Lori- 
gan"s views on this unheard of and absurd clas.sification of 
" Pfefler's Cabernet," is as follows : 

" The contract does not provide for the delivery of any par- 
ticular variety of the Cabernet grape. It calls for Cabernet 
grapes generally. As there were diflferent varieties in plaintiiFs 
vineyard, if defendant wished to purchase a particular variety, 
it was his business to limit the contract to that variety. As he 
did not, he must pay for all the grapes which were delivered of 
a known Cabernet variety, whether they were Cabernet Sauvig- 
non, Cabernet Franc or Pfell'er's Cabernet.'' 

That of itself is enough to amuse anyone i^imiliar with the 
ampelography of the vine. The so-called " Pfefler's Cabernet " 
has no more right to be called a Cabernet than has the Zinfandel. 
In order to learn its history we consulted Mr. C. A. Wetmore, 
who said recently : 

" I don't care particularly to mix up in this question. The 
whole thing is a swindle from beginning to end anyhow, and to 
tell the exact truth ai)out it, might invite an unnecessary wran- 
gle. The ' Pfell'er Cabernet " as a Cabernet is a fraud to begin 
with. It was not, is not a:)d never will be a • Cabernet.' 

" To be brief, I first met with the wine from this grape about 
1880. Capt. St. Hubert, who was then in San Jose, showed it to 
me. The wine was considerably above the average, and I hunted 
up its history. The vine, as 1 was told, was originally in the 
collection of the Jesuit College at Santa Clara. Mr. Pfefl'er, so I 
was told, got it from there. Foi want of a better name it was 
c:illed • Pfefl'er's Pnrgundy.' I do not know that it has been 
j)roperly identified as yet. Mr. II. W. Crabb believes he has 
identified it as the Robin Noir, and 1 understand the College of 
Agricultui'c at Berkeley has adopted this name, but I am not yet 
convinced that this is the right one. For me, at least, it 
still remains in the unidentified class together with ' Crabb's 
Burgundy ' and ' West's Prolific' 

■'To return to its history, however. Along about 18.S4, 
Prof. Ililgard was running over the State at the expen.se of the 
Yiticultural Commission. He went to Natoma among other 
places, and saw, I suppose for the first time in his life, the Cab- 
ernet Franc. Afterward he rushed down to the Santa Clara Val- 
ley one day, and claimed to have ideutilieil the Pfell'er variety as 
the Cabernet Franc. lie must have been mislead becau.sc the 
berry was small and the bunch long, lie don't claim it now, 
however, as you see, for ' PfelVer's Burgundy' is 'Robin Noir' 
with him.' 

"N\'ell, in the meantime J. 1!. ,1. Portal, fornu'riy of San 
Jose, had |ir(>|)agalcd the vari<'ty (piite freely. Cabernet Sauvig- 
non cuttings were selling at ■?'J.'"> |i('r thousand along about 188.'5 
and I8S4. and Portal wanted to sell his ciitliiigs of I'I'ell'er's Bur- 
gundy at that comfortable price. Arme(l with llilgard's • iden- 
tification ' he came up to one of our viticultural conventions 
about 1884, and wanted the Convention ami the State \iticul- 
tnral Commission to declare the variety a Cabernet. I fought it 
olVand beat it. Porter went back to San Jo.se, however, sold all 
the cuttings he could of ' I'fetVer's Cabernet ' on the strength of 
Hilgard's word, and immediately thereaflcr thi> Commission an<l 
I becanu' the subjects of endless attack and unlimited abuse from 
the San Jose Ilciald. We got it in sea.son and out of season, and 
from all I could ever h'arn, because we would not sanction a 



fyveifie wijme /jmid sfiF^ir f^eview. 



11 



fraiul. I never knew liow I'ar riVlViT wms (.•oiiccriK-il in the wliolo 
mat tor. if at all. 

"Mr. Honrv i;ui lliank llil;,'ai(l Inr lliis $1000 Ju(l};iuent 
a);:iinst him. liilj;ai'(l and llilj^'anl alone is rt'.-*iionsil)lc foi- it 
orijiinally. lluuifjli I'orlal liflpfil it alunj,' wry iniitcrially. 

•• 1 ilon't know iiuw far Jn(lj;o Lorij^an's lU'cisiiin is ;;oii(l 
law. That is imt for ine to say, for no ono can loll what (acts 
were iircsontctl to him. and he had to jndp> solely hy facts ad- 
dnced in the conr.se of the trial. His decision, however, don't 
make ' rfeOer's Bnrgundy ' a peer of the Cahcrnet tjivuvi^non and 
Cahernet Franc." 

('apt. St. Ihdiert scouts the idea of calling the variety a 
Cahernet. " No more a Cahernet than it is a /.infandcl." said 
he, "and all the decisions of the courts won't chanjjc its cliarac- 
tor. I am sorry that Mr. Henry has a judf;nient ajjainst him on 
iiccount of this foolish nomenclature. I'lell'er's Hur^rundy was 
what it used to be called when I was in the Santa Clara \'alh'V." 



P-ROF. -HUSMAM/N'S DEFE/NSE. 

Professor (ieorge Uusmaun, who writes the \iticultural 
Depaitmeut in the California Fruit Groiccr, has rather mildly come 
to the defense of Prof. Hilgard of the College of Agriculture at 
Berkeley, glossing over his errors, and ovider.tly trusting in 
Pioviilenee that the young men at Berkeley will do better than 
the hcail of the Hepartment has done. 

Prof. Husnn\nu must surely understand that we have noth- 
ing whatever against imparting viticultural information at the 
I'niversity : the contrary is true. What we object to is that the 
character of the information sent out and the methods of work 
havebeen for years several points below par. Like Prof. Husniaun> 
we have no desire to " re-open old .sores," but if that course be- 
come necessary, we shall take that ''Viticultural Report" of 
1802 and cover this State with a careful analysis of it, that will 
drive Mr. Flilgard to closer cover than he now is. There is some 
meaty material in that report, which has never been properly 
exploited. 

One thing we wish Prof. Husmauu would ihorouglily under- 
stand — that is that Charles A. Wctniore and Clarence J. Wet- 
more have no interest whatever in the P.vciiic Wi.ne .\.\d Spirit 
Kkview. For both of these gentlemen, personally, we have high 
regard. We say frankly that we believe Charles X. Wetmore 
has done more for the viticultural development of this State than 
any three men in it. Some there are who do not like his aggres- 
sive manner, his positiveness and other traits, but right down in 
his heart he is dear, grand and trut. He needs neither apologist 
nor defender ; he is am|)ly alile to stand his own ground. For 
the animus of Prof. Unsmau's attack on C. .1. Wetmore. we are 
at a loss to account. Be this as it may, we want Prof. Husmann 
to fully understan<l that the Review's policy is its own. Hs 
ideas have been strongly disparaged by C. A. Wetmore on more 
than one occasion, leading to positive de<'larations pro and con 
between him and us, but those who know him cannot ([ueslion 
his honesty ofpurpo.se or his personal loss financially whilst de- 
voting his talents t" the good of the State. 



A PLEASA/NT "REMI/N ISCE/NeE. 

liie New York coirespondent of the Chicago Crili-rioii writes: 
It is a number of years ago when I found my.self with two days 
to spend in Dublin. A friend, by letter of introduction, called 
for nie at the Gresliam on Sackville street (my fiend died at 
the head of his company in Kgypt), and showed me Dublin — 
lirst the Castle, then the Phoeni.v anil St. Patrick's, also the 
banks of the Noble LilVey. The latter, by the way. was a great 
di.sappoiutment to me. In our walk after our mess dinner, we 
pa.ssed through a curious old street, when my fi-iend paused in 
front of an ancient building and pointed to a sign, which reail 
" K. & .1. Burke. " I a.sked, " What street is this'!"' He replied 
"Bachelor's Walk." "Funny name," I said. "I have great 
respect for those people," said the Captain. " We got their bot- 
tle of bittt-rs and (Juinne.ss' always in good shape in India, where 
I was four years ago, and just the same two years ago when I 
was statione<l in Canada, ami I can tell yon that a cool bottle of 
Bass at TilVen was a luxury, ami we always had a plea.sant smile 
for E. & J. Burke and llie cat on the label." — Loiulmi Traihf 
Hecicxc. 



SUNDAY CLOSING IN OAKLAND. 

The Sunday closing (|iU'stion thai the O.ikland City Council 
voted to submit to the peo])le of Oakland is proving a great em- 
barrassment to the politicians. It is said that an elVorl will be 
made by the I.inuor Dealers' Association to have the obnoxious 
measure renu>ved fr'om the ballot. 

The etl'ort to induce the Council to have the i|ueslion sub- 
mitted to tlin people was a laborious ta.sk, and even the narrow 
majority of one oidy was secured. The |)roposition is to have 
the saloons clo.^ed from Saturday night until Mondav morning. 

The California Protective .Vssociation ami the Oakland 
I. ii|Uor Dealers' .Association imnicdiately cond>im'd to make a 
light. An injunction suit will he brought asking that the C^ity 
Clerk be restrained from |)lacing the |>rop()sitiou upon the munic- 
ipal ballot. The suit will be prepared by George \V. Baker, who 
is the attorney of the (California Protective Association. The 
contention will be that this question goes beyond the power of 
the city to submit to the people. 

The temperance and cliuich people of Oakland were prepar- 
ing for a general campaign in favor of the •Sunday-dosing (pies- 
tion. The Rev. Rolieit F. Covle. of the First Presbyli'rian 
Church, was lookeil to as the leader in this movement. 

None of the nomini'es are anxious to face the Sunday-closing 
i|uestion, for it is dangerous in either direction. No matter 
what stand they take they ofl'end some one. and most of them 
would like to see the proposition wiped oil' the ballot. 

The Council linally decided on the 17th inst. not to submit 
Sunday-closing, but to substitute the (juestion "of license" or 
'■ no licouse." This will be resisted in the Courts, as stateil above . 



The oflice of I. W. Kingman, Coast representative of the 
Cook & Bernheinier Company, of New York, will be located at 
47 First street, in the building occupied by Searlo & Holt, the 
warehousemen. The goods sold by him will be delivered direct 
from the warehouse. He already has on the way three car- 
loads of bulk goods and a car-load of bottled whiskies. 

Loews System Filter 

FOR 

WINES. BEER. CIDER, LIQUORS. CORDIALS. WATER, ETC. 



Durable I 




Willi- hiiiler.s ami •iriiwers, Hreweri* anil i i 

nee lilter in operation At I'ncilic Coast .\geni-y. 

7 FIRST ST., S. E. Cor. Market, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



12 



f/ceifie WljslE /c^D Spli^l f^EVlEW. 



"APENTA" 



IMPORTANT. 



Our alteiuiuii has been called lo circulars issued by Audreas Saxleliuer aud his attorucj'S, 
warning the Trade against handling imitations of the label and name under which Hunyadi Janos 
Aperient Water is sold. 

We gladly direct attention to the fact that the "APENTA" Natural Aperient Water drawn from 
Springs at Buda Pest is sold under a label and name radically dissimilar from those used for Hxinyadi 
Janos Water or for an}- other Mineral Water- 

The exploitation of the Springs from which " APENTA " Natural Aperient Water is drawn has 
been organized by the Royal Hungarian Chemical Institute (Ministry of Agriculture), Buda Pest, and 
the bottling of the Water is, and will remain, subject to direct aud independent scientific supervision. The 
Medical Profession and the Public are thus afforded a guaraut}- of that constancy in strength and com- 
position which renders "APENTA" Natural Aperient Water superior to any of the numerous Aperient 
Waters which for many years have been sold in this countrj- under the generic term " Hunyadi." 

We are advised by eminent Counsel thai the label under which the 'APENTA" 
Natural Aperient Water is sold is lawful in every particular, and we are prepared 
to fully protect the trade in the use of same. 

Charles Graef & Co. 



jLC3-EisrTS :h'o:r the 



APOLUMRIS COMPm LIMITED, London, 



Sole Exporters of "APENTA" Natural Aperient Water. 



Percy Moore, of Louisville, Ky., and sou of tlie late Geo. 
H. Moore, who.se marriage wa.s auiiounced in the last issue of the 
Review, is visiting the Coast with his bride. 



Fred Staude, of AVichman, Lutgen & Co., is one of the local 
Cuban committee which is devising ways and means to raise 
funds for the prosecution of tiie Cuban revolution. 



H. W. Crabb, of Oakville, Napa county, having plowed up 
his race-track and infield and set the land out iu resistant viTies, 
has sent liis line lot of Whippleton, San Diego, Grandissimo and 
Dictatus colts to pasture on anotlier farm he leased further up 
the vallej'. 

At the Bradlcy-Mai-tin dress ball, surpassing anytliing of 
the kind before attcnipti'd in this country, tlie cost of wliich was 
not less than 8300,000, competition among tlie champagne im- 
porters was so strong that is was decided to submit to the most 
noted epicures of the " four hundred " unmarked samples of all 
the leading champagnes, aud thus it came aliout that tho.se who, 
by their taste and experience, are tlie (lualified judges of that 
wliich is best, selected the brand of Moet & Chandon, which was 
the only champagne served at this event. — San Franciico Chronicle. 



"(Quantity large, quality poor," is the description of the 
Rhine vintage for 189() sent to the Ihiited States State Depart- 
ment by Consul Barlow at Mayence. In many districts the deal- 
ei'H had gri-at difficulty in getting casks enough to hold the 
piixluct, but the desirable eliaractcrislics of the wine is decidedly 
inferior to that of other years. The IS'.Ki wine, it is predicted, 
will bo very light aud very cheap, and a great deal of sugar will 
have to be used to make it palatable. A general estimate of the 
Rhine wine crop in recent years, iu millions of gallons, is as fol- 
Iowh: 181)(>, l;iO; 1K»5, l;j!) ; 18!)4, 74, anil iu l.S'.t.'S, 100. 



F. O. Boyd & Co., of New York, who are well known to 
the California trade, have become sole agents for '" Melhvood," 
" Runnj'mede," " Normaudy," and " Old Watermill," the brands 
of the Melhvood Distillery Company, of I^ouisville. 

The CaUstoijian says that J. Schram & Son, of St. Helena, in- 
tend to set out thirty acres of new vineyard in Knight's Valley 
in the near future. This is some miles from the present well- 
known country seat, Schramsberg. 

The handsome new cafe being fitted in the Royal Eagle Dis- 
tilleries building, on Powell and Ellis streets. San Francisco, will 
be conducted by Herbert, Loiiderleiter and Von Rossum. Mr. 
Von Rossum has been connected with the Cafe Zinkand since it 
opened, and is a most genial gentleman and pains-taking caterer. 



Uncle George Bromley, the Bohemian aud raconteur, whose 
reputation as " one of the boys " still lives in spite of his eighty 
years, tells a good story as to how be has sustained life iu the last 
ten years. " Boys," he said, '' I am nearly eighty. For three 
generations I have seen men grow up and get old. To tell you 
the truth, I owe much of my life in the last ten years to ' Jesse 
Moore ' whisky." 

From and after April 1st Dallemand & Co. intend, if thei 
present plans are perfected, to give up their present stores at 
21.5-'J17 California street. The lirm has occupied the entire 
building at this place for many years, but in the future the in- 
tention is to remove to separate offices, carrying their slock in 
wareliou.se. All of the blending of the " Cream Rye " and tiieir 
other lirands will be done at the Chicago house, on Lake street. 
.Mr. Dallemand is now in Chicago.' but on his return final 
arrangements will be made to this elVect. In the mean time the 
lirm i-i redueiiig their Moor stoi'ks here and making preparations 
for removal. 



f/ceifie WIJME /cJME) Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



13 



J)[q\JO ^otK Qovrcs-pondancQ. 

New Yokk, February 12, 1897. 

Tlio wino ami spiiit trade in this part of the world contin- 
ues dull, and shows no improvement, so far this year, in the 
conditions ruliii}:; before the holidays. One di,sturbin{; factor is 
the uncertainty rcffarding the action of Congress toward passing 
a new tariff bill, lint, after all, that is only a small nnitter, the 
real i-easou being hard times, which are existing everywhere and 
from which every industry is suflering severely, the liquor trade 
no worse than any other. In this State the unceitainty regard- 
ing the action of the Legislature, which is considering the 
Raines Bill with intent to amend it, has a bad effect on trade 
here, as, until that question is .settled, the retailers will continue 
to follow a con.servativc course in the matter of purchasing goods 
and confine their operations to the narrowest possible limits, 
and are buying for actual, immediate needs only. 

The whisky trade is exceedingly dull, and, while holders of 
stocks think the very bottom of low prices have been reached 
and are holding their goods with considerable contidenco, they 
are doing no business, a condition that applies equally well to 
both Kentucky bourbons and Eastern r^es. 

The California wine market is very quiet. Some business is 
being done, but at prices which do not leave a margin of profit. 
AVe heard of one sale during the past fortnight amounting to 
some 130,000 worth of goods to one concern, comprising clarets 
and hocks at 28 cents and sweet wines at 36 cents. There is a 
little disposition to cut prices to etlect sales, as there are several 
lots of sweet wines here that are otfered as low as 40 cents, and 
■Any of the large handlers will make concessions to large buyers 
rather than lose a sale. 

The California brandy market is also very quiet, with but 
little doing, and stocks are urgently offered at very low prices in 
the ert'ort to induce trade. 

Messrs. Walden & Co., the well-known brandy distillers, 
with offices at 29 Pearl street, who were burned out the latter 
part of last month, with a loss of something over $20,000, have 
established otlices at 41 Beaver street, and are again in a position 
to supplj' customers with the famous product of their Geyser 
Peak Vineyards. Franklin Walden, who conducted an import- 
ing wine business at the same number, is now at 2 A, Piatt 
street, and ready to fill orders. 

Mr. Carl Lenk. President of the Lenk Wine Company, of 
Toledo, O., was a visitor to New York last week. 

The Mellwood Distillery has appointed Messrs. F. O. Boyd 
&Co., of this city, as their sole agents for New York City and 
vicinity for its celebrated brands of Kentucky whiskies. 

The permit for the Special Internal Revenue U. 8. Bonded 
Warehouse in this city formerly conducfed by J. D. W. Sherman 
has been turned over to the Brooklj'n Wharf and Storage Com- 
pany, and a warehouse will be located at Imlay and Commerce 
streets, and will store nothing but brandy, with a capacity of 
10,000 barrels. 

The case against Jacob and Julius Librowicz, formerly of tlie 
Kantoi-owicz Co., who were indicted and held in 8500 bonds 
each for dealing in spurious li(iuors, was called before Judge l''itz- 
gerald, of the General Sessions Court, on January 2Sth, and, as 
they failed ,to respond, their bail was declared forfei>,ed. The 
case against the Wine and Spirit Company on same charge is 
awaiting action. The Wine and Spirit Traders' Society are also 
after Budde i.t Westerman, of this city, with a sharp stick, for 
having sold imitations of labels, and complete outfits of corks, 
bottles, cases, etc., of well known bran<ls of[ foreign and domes- 
tic brandies, liqueurs, etc. Let the good work go on. In their 
efforts the Society has the good wislies of every legitimate dealer 
in the country. 

There is a measure before the Legislature of this State which 



provides that all fermented licjuors known as beiu-, ale or porter 
in th(! manufacture of which pure barley malt, pure hops or 
jiuni extract of hops, pure yeast and pure water is used, and in 
which nothing else, of whatsoever kind, name or natiinf is used 
and whi<'h has been bri'wed at least three months, shall bo desig- 
nated as " Standard," and all those not coming up to that classi- 
fication as to materials usetl, ago, etc., shall be designated as 
" Liferior." It is said that the measure has the support of the 
New York Sat(^ Brewing and Maltsters' As.sociation. It is a 
good measure, if the Legislature provides for its enforcement. 

According to the daily press of this city, a champagne im- 
porting house here has secured the services of a real simon-pure 
m'?mber of Chicago's "200," in the person of a son of (ieo. M. 
Pullman, the Palace-car Magnate, to boom its partiriilar brand 
of champagne among the chappies. 

Messrs. John F. Pogue and Thomas S. Jones, Kentucky 
distillers, were in the city last week, calling on the trade. 

J. D. W. Sherman is actively pushing the famous rum made 
by the Mes.srs. Chapin & Trull, of Boston, for which he is the 
Greater New York agent. W. A. Gpift. 

Robert J. Ilalle has bought a controlling interest in the 
Western Broker, which for years was conducted by Alfred Sander- 
sou, lately deceased. Mr. Ilalhi has had wid(! experience in 
conducting a retail liquor trade journal, his paper. Fair Play, 
being well known. He has our best wishss for success in the 
wholesale field. 

Wilhelm Veith, who is well and favorably known to many 
of the winemakers of the State, and who has been in Erope for 
some months past, is contributing a series of articles on Califor- 
nia Viticulture and Viniculture to the Allgemeine Weln-Zeituiig, of 
Vienua, Austria. Mr. Veith expects to remain abroad for some 
months j'et. 

Mr. William Wolfit' is here from San Francisco, paying his 
local agents, Flint & Wise, a visit. This great impoi'ting house 
of William WolU' & Co. has made a most important change in its 
champagne business in giving up the agency for Pommery Sec 
and taking that of Moet & Chandon. This was done after a 
visit to Europe by Mr. William Wolff in person, who made a care- 
ful study of the champagne business, and selected tliis as in his 
opinion the best brand. The Moet & Chandon " Grande Cuvee " 
wine is unsurpassed. Since this change was made the house has 
sold in San Francisco and all over the coast astonishing quan- 
tities of these fine wines. — Los Angeles Commercial Bulletin. 




COGNAC 

(FRANCE:) 




AGENTS IN SAN FRANCISCD.Cal. 
|^Eec/r^/^flf( 31^05. 9 qo., 



See Qiiolfttidiis on p ;il . 



525 FRONT STREET, 



aiiiii»WBJW^»jiJirit»jhiriWtJjrir.iwwji 



14 



f/teifie WlJ^E ;«cr^D Sfll^lT {REVIEW. 



Hamiu'ik; 

BORIiBAl'X 

(.'AlilZ 

I.ISUUN 



Naplks 

(lOTKNIlKRli ANI> 

MK,,„o.BK« WAYLAND & CO, 



MR, BUCKLAND'S SERIOUS AFFLICTION. 



Brewers, Wine Merchants, Distillers 

MINERAL WATER MAKERS, 
REQUISITES. 

U K WORKS LONDON. ENGLAND 



15-25 Whitehall STREET 
NEW YORK 



To Wine Growers, Distillers, Etc. 
Gentl emen : 

We beg to advise having opened 
branch as above for the sale of our Wine 
Finings, Capillalre, Spirit Coloring Es- 
sences, etc ■ 

Our business throughout Europe has been 
built by Wine Growers and Distillers 
recommending one another- 

We ask a trial order, this will prove 
for EFFICACY, PURITY and ECONOMY we are 
unrival 1 ed . 

Yours truly, 

W. A. WAYLAND & CO. 

Ax7 jPl ^T L jPs. ISl D ' S 

iA^INE FININGS 

liUAli.VSTEEU FKKE KHii.M 

TANNIN, SALICYLIC AND ANILINE 

Kequire no preparation, are always ready to use, clarify the clioiiest 

descriptions, as also those of low alcoholic strength, in no way 

impair the wine; ONCIC BKILLI.VNT ALWAYS^ BRILLIANT. 

1>. K. l.ilifiithal, jiresident of the Crown Distilleries Com- 
pany, has returned from his month's business trip East. 

It is reported that B. K. Bloeh & Co are about to wind up 
the business of their house in Sacramento and concentrate their 
stock at the parent house in Salt Lake City. They have main- 
tained the Sacramento brancli some four or five years. 

W. A. Taylor & Co., of New York, are sending the trade 
their latest illustrated pamphlet calling attention to the Dry 
Koyal Sparkling Saumur made by Ackerman-Laurance. Tliis 
wiue is rapidly working itself into favor in the United States, 
and justly so. 

The St. Hubert Vineyard Company, of -- 1 Bush street, has 
accepted the San Francisco agency of the dry wines made by 
Justinian Caire on Santa Cruz Island. Mr. Caire is the owner 
of this magnificent domain off the coast of Santa Barbara coun- 
ty, and it is particularly well situated for the production of dry 
wines. His vineyard embraces upwards of one hundred acres. 

M. V. Monarch, president of the well-known M. V. Monarch 
Company, Owensboro, Ky., was in town during the fortnight, 
visiting his numerous customers and at the same time enjoying 
an outing. He was accomj>anied l)y his daughter, and was feel- 
ing in line fettle. The only complaint we have to make against 
Mr. Monarch is that he has " mowed " his beautiful whiskers, and 
is not at present the patriarchal Monarch we knew before. Mr. 
Monarch went south, ac(;ompanied t)}' his racilic Coast agent, 
.Sam McCartney, and will spend some time in Los Angeles. 

August Van Bergen, One of the best known retail licjuor 
dealer.H in San Francisco, died on tin; 4th inst. For many years 
Mr. \'an Bergen had been a sull'erer from asthma, and this com- 
plaint finally caused his death. Mr. Van Bergen was a native 
of (iermany, and was H'J years of age. For about .'!0 years lie 
has conducted his buKJiiess on Sansome, between Claj- and ("om- 
nier<'ial. anci in all that time Ik! did a class of business second to 
none. He was a member of the Masinis, of the < )dd ('"ellows, and 
of till' Chosen Friends, and among all classes of citizens he 
commanded confidence and respect. He loft ii widow and three 
children. 



Many of the ohler vineyardists and wine merchants of tliis 
State will renu'mber Mr. Charles R. Biickland. who conducted 
the •San Franc!i<cn MerchanI, the foreiunner of tiie Kkvikw, about 
ten years ago. Mr. Bucklaud has been editor of the American 
Ecoiiomiitt, the organ of the American Protective Tarifl' League, 
for sonu^ years past, and during the last political campaign his I 
energies were taxed to the utmost in the prc|)aration of protect- 
ive tarilV literature, a large iiroportion of tiial issued by the Re- 
publican National Commitlec l»eing due to his labors of the last 
two years. Mr. liuckiaiid is resiiling at Rockviile Center, Long 
l>lan(l. although doing business in New York. The Observer, of 
Kockville Center, of recent date, says; 

" Mr. Charles R. Bucklaud will move to New York next 
week for a tempf)raiv residence {luring speci.il treatment by Dr. 
Meiners for lieait trouble. Mr. Uiickland has been in the doc- 
tor's hands since March, and the extreme pressure of editorial 
v.ork during the Presidential campaign has so aggravatt-d his 
complaint that he lias been under nitro-glyeerine remedies for 
seveial weeks past."' 

His illness, however, has its compensation in i>art, perha|is, 
ill the following letter received by him immediately after election: 

Canton, Ohio, Nov. 5, 189G. 

Mr. CliTrles R. Biirkhiud, Editor American EconomUt — Mv Dk.\k 
Mr. BiJcKLAND : A few days ago I received a letter from you. 
which I read with interest and pleasure, and I take occasion to 
express my deeu sense of my obligation to you. as the editor of 
the Economist. Your work has certainlj' been very etl'ective in , 
giving the people tarilf facts in a popular form. With best ' 
wishes, believe me, Yours very truly. 

(Signed) W. McKinlkv. 

Mr. Bucklaud is still verj' ill, and he maj- come to the Paci- 
fic Coast eventuallj' for recreation. 

A SPLE/NDI-D SHOWI/NG. j 



Since a-suming the agency at the beginning of the year of 
Moet & Chandon White Seal (Grande Cnvee), Messrs. \Villiani 
Wolir & Co. have imported KiOO cases — in view of the dull sea- 
son, a remarkable sum of which the agents, as well as shippers, 
may well be proud, and which goes to show that Californians 
al.so know a good thing when they can get it. 



At Cloverdale, the exhibits of the fifth annual citrusTair 
are vt^y striking, and especially so in the lines of fruits, olives, 
nuts and ilried fruit. The wine exliil)it is large large and attract- 
ive, the producers exerting themselves to secure pretty and 
striking etl'ects. The principal wine exhibitors are the Parker 
Vineyard Company (managed by tiilbert and .lohn Winter), F. I 
Albertz. the Cloverdale Wine Company and the Italian-Swiss 
Colony. 

Martin Frlenbach has l)een visiting Los Angeles in the past 
fortnight in the interest of the agencies carried by him 

FOR SALK — Brewery. Distillery. Soda W(irk>. lluildiiigs and 
Lots in Enseiiada, Lower California : business willunit com- 
petition ; in full working order; S!).()00 — could not be du- 
plicated for three times that amount. 

iSiiiniiuirii — Four town lots, li.'i.'J feet frontage in heart of the 
city. Fire-proof building, corrugated iron, 40x50; annex, cor- 
rugated iron, 14 X IS. Dwelling hou.se (4 rooms, furniture, etc.;) 
barn and stable. Fine beer garden, well ornanu'uted with trees ; 
the only one in town, for picnic ])urposes. Wind mill, iron tur- 
bine, 10 Imekets : galvanized water pipes through buildings aiul 
grounds ; galvanized iron tank, liOOO gallons. Boiler and steam 
generator. I'J-h. power. Brass .steam pump. Copper still recti- 
fier, Hi compartnuiut column ; copper still rectifier for pomac(" or 
mescal; 1 small still. Crape crusiier ; press hand pump, tanks; 
tools: I''airbanks .scale, "JOOO lbs. t'omi)lete malting de|iartnu'nt, 
I'oller for malt ; beer kettle lieated by steam ; zinc cooler, re.ser- 
voii- tanks, barrels, etc. Complete soda-bottling works apjiara- 
tiis. Strong hor.se and harness, new delivery wagon, top-board 
bugg}', etc. Only .two nu'n needed to run this plant — one for 
inside work and the other for outside. 

Fxpenses are veiy small and profits very large. Any enter- 
prising |>arly with a small <'apital cinnot fail to nuike money in 
a shoi't time, l-'or fuiilur parlirulars iidihcss " Brewery," care 
Rkvikw ofiice. 



f/ceifie WIJME /cJSID SflF^IT I^EVIEW. 



15 



ALCOHOL FQ-R THE WORLD. 



ir tlic ;iiiiliitioiis plans of S. M. Rice, of Cliii'iigo, iiic i-calizcil. 
till' AiiuMUMii Spirits Manufacturing Company, of wliicli he is 
president, will soon look horns with the alcohol prodncirs of 
Europe. 

President Rice is after the alcohol producers of (Jernuiny, 
and Rounnuiia. For years American uiaiuifacturers of spirits 
have been nnahle to compete with them in markets cousumiug 
more than 100.000,000 gallons of spirit.s a year, owing to the 
technical restrictions of the United States revenue laws. The 
mere substitution of tank cars for barrels in shipping spirits to 
the seaboard will enable American distillers to compete in for- 
eign markets and incidentally furnish an outlet for nearly 
20,000.000 bushels of coru every year. It has been estimated 
that the removal of that volume of grain from a surplus that is 
steadily increasing would raise the price of corn four or live 
cents a bushel. It is now selling at prices ranging from eight to 
twelve cents a bushel on the farm. 

'■ All we ask," said Colonel Rice, '• is a chance to forward 
alcohol to the seaboard in tank cars. There it will be transferred 
to tank steamers, just as petroleum is now handled. The pres- 
ent revenue laws require all distillers to immediately put alco- 
hol in barrels and store the product in Government warehou.ses. 
The single item of cooperage makes it impossible for American 
distillers to compete with European distillers. The selling price 
of a barrel of alcohol to-day is about S5.45, of which S4 repre- 
sents the value of the alcohol and SI. 45 the barrel. It is obvi- 
ous that we cannot hope to get control of the foreign markets as 
long as we are forced to pay SI. 45 for every package containing 
goods valued at S4. 

" The plan we are working on is to have the revenue laws 
so modified that distillers will be allowed to store alcohol in huge 
tanks under Government control, draw the spirits out into tank 
cars under Government supervision, and forward the goods in 
these cars in bond to the seaboard. That would enable us to en- 
tirely eliminate an enormous expenditure for barrels and the 
freight thei-eon. and immediately put us on a basis where compe- 
tition with the European producers would be possible." 



The Young Woman's Christian Temperance Union has sent 
to the Executive Committee of the National Republican party 
the following appeal : '' The Young Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union stands for the principle of individual total absti- 
nence and national sobriety. It believes that serving wines or 
liquoi's of any kind at the inaugural ball has in the past been 
productive of evil, and has degraded what might otherwise have 
been an imposing ceremonial. The society, therefore, comes be- 
fore you with its large representation of young men and women, 
most earnestly requesting that President-elect McKinley may be 
ushered into his solemn office by a sober people, without a taint 
of dishonor attaching to any of the civic functions relating to 
the great occa-sion. Believing we shall thus be helping to attain 
' that righteousness which exalteth a nation,' we remain yours 
for the patriotism which guards public morals and the integrity 
of the home.'" 



Imports and Exports 

DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



EXPORTS OF WINE. 



TO .JAPAN AND CHINA— Pei: Stk. Galilee, February 2. 1897. 



DESTINATION. 


SHIPPEB8 

Molinsi^ KnlttMihacli. . . 


PACKAQES. 


GALLONS 

"i.w 


VALTJI. 


Hi,>i;o 


8 cases 


f 40 
T,2 




l.niiKfcldt .V: C.i, I.'fd.. 

" 
Cal Wine Association.. . 

'J'illman it Bendel 

Soutliein Pacific Co 

U cases and 


3 Ijairels 




'S cases 


Vi 


N'.nijns.iki 

New ChmatiK 

Yokdlinm.i 


2 barrels 

I bf-barrel 

30 barrels. 


!0« 

2f. 

1,406 

1,68T 


58 

12 

GOO 


Tdlal amount 




»774 



TO HAWAII— Peb Schr. Aloha, February 2, 1897. 



Honolulu I Williams, D it Co 17 cases 

" Eisen Vineyard Co 225 kegs 

C .Schilling it Co 100 kefjs, 33 octs.. 

" Cal Wine Association... 200 kej;8, 1 bf-cask 
•' Lacbmaa it Jucobi 100 kegs 



Total amount 17 cases. 



1,500 
1,400 
1,03:5' 
1,035. 



t 68 
78^ 
527 
361 
490 



4,9741 $2,242 



TO TAHITI— Pee Bkt. City of Papeete. February 2, 1897. 


Tahiti iBEAnger 1 bbl 2 bf-bbls ... 

" iLacbman & Jacobi 1 barrel 


105 
51 

4.210 

4,366 


» 46 

20 


Cal Wine Association... 80 bbls, 2 hf-bbls 


1,271 
$1,337 




TO MEXICO Peb Str. NEWPORT— February 8, 1897. 



Mazatlan iGundlach-B Wine Co... 

Acapuk'o Iltalian-Swiss Colony... . 

" iStevens, Arnbold it Co. 



10 barrels 
25 cases . . 
2 barrels . 
2 barrels . , 



518 



105 
11)4 



Total amount 25 cases and . 



727 



$145 

106 

32 

75 



$358 



TO NEW YORK VIA PANAMA— Per Stb. NEWPORT January 8, 1897. 



Brideeiiort Conn ISt. Gecrge V. Co '. 

Sbenanduali I'a I " 

New Yoik Cal Wine Association. . 

" L.icbraan it Jacobi. . , . 

AUentown. Pa Pac Transfer Co 

New York Beriugcr Bros 

!m Bacelli 



2.1 cases 

3 barrels 

o30 barrels 

233 barrels 

3 barrels, 1 ke^. . . 
7 ban-els, 2 kegs. . 
10 barrels ~. . . 



Total amount 25 cases and. 



154 
26.500 
11.951 
160 
375 
480 

39,620 



$ 100 

00 

8,005 

3,314 

70 

272 

144 

$12,025 



TO .JAPAN ATD CHINA— Peb CITY OF PEKING, Feb'y 13, 1897. 



Hongkong... 

Newchwang . 



Yokohama 

Total amouut 21 eases and 



Cal Wine Association... |10 barrels 

E Oarnier it Co 2 bbls. 3 kegs. 

,9 cases 

I.angfeUlt it Co. I'tVl ...,1 hf-barrel ... 
Macondray Bros tt Ii...'12 cases 



510 
140 



27 
877 



I 



$191 

100 

13 
40 



$344 



TO CENTRAL . AMERICA— PRE Stb. SAN JOSE, February 15. 1887. 



San J de Guatemala. 



Cbamperico 

Total amount 294 ca.scs ami 



It'lian-Sniss Colony... |20 barrels 

M Mann il22 casee 

" 5 barrels, 10 kegs. 
Gundlach-Bund. W Co. 70 cases 

'* 102 cases 

Stevens, Arnbold it Co. 20 kegs 



1,046 



310 



200, 



$ 350 

435 
116 
227 
280 
160 



1,556 $1,518 




helIcules gas, gasoline and distillate engines. 

The Best to Buy and Cheapest to Operate. 

For Pumping, Hoisting, Milling and all Stationary Purposes. 

ENGINES AND PUMPS COMBINED FOR RACKING, A SPECIALTY. 

Over 500 HERCULES ENGINES in Use by Coast Wineries and Vineyards. 

Satisf;c;i;nG:,ranteed or Money Refunded. HERCULES GAS ENGINE WORKS. 



SPECIAL ENGINES FOR WINE PRESSES. ETC. 

Write (or llUutrmwl ratftldBue. .'. 1 H. P. TO 200 H. P. 

LAKOEST GAS ESGINE »OI{KS 1\ Till: Mi:ST. 




2S H. P.. $185 00 
Discount for Cash 



OFFICE, 405-407 SANSOME STREET. 



) SAN FRANCISCO, 



W0RKS.2IB. 217,2)9.221.223. 225. 227. 229. 231 BAr STREET ^ CALIFORNIA. 



16 



f/Veifie WIJME /rJMD SflF^IT f^EVlEW. 



TO CENTRAL AMERICA— P«B Stb. NEWPOKT — Februirj 8, 1897. 



San J du Qiialemala. 

tt 
PuDtae Aienat 



Wctmoro-Bowcn Co. . . 



St George Vioeyard Co. 
Ilalian-liuiss Caloiiy... 



Acajiilla 

San J de Oualemala 

La Lilibflad 

San J lie Guatemala. 



Ai'ajulla 

Champtrko 

San J de Guatemala. 
Ociif 



San J de Guatemala. 

Cliam[H.TU'o 

San .1 de Guatemala. 

Clmnipei ifo 

San J de Guatemala.. 
Punla Arenas 



B Frapolli A Co 

Napa \- Sonoma WineCo 
C M Mann 



Oco8 



Cliamperico. 
La Liltertad . 
Panama 



H Levy A Co 

Baruch A Co 

GundlBcb-Bun. Wine Co 



Castle Bros 

C ScbiUini; A Co. 



Crown DUtillcrieeCo. 
Cal Wine Assoelatiun 



20 cases 

1 barrel, 6 bf-bs ) 
and G kegs. . . . y 

lb barrels 

20 hf-banels 

20 barrels 

10 kegs 

24 barrels 

20 liarreU 

20 cases 

<i koKB 

li kegs 

100 cases 

SO kegs 

7 barrels 

4 barrels 

50 cases 

21 cases 

U9 cases 

in kega 

5 barrels 

22.^) cases 

30 barrels 15 Uf-1) ) 

lakegs 5 

24 kegs 

27 cases 

50 cases 

2 barrels, 55 hf-bbl 
5 barrels, 1 bf-b, ) 



64 casks . 



Total amount 872 cases and. 



2841 

714 

557! 
1.052 

100 
1,257 
1.032 



167 
120 



200 
207 
207 



180 
162 



2,050j 
240, 



1,570 

4,142 



9 70 

243 

262 
168 
352 
44 
51, < 
392 

yi 

107 

115 

400 

loo 

88 

87 

155 

50 

1,194 

103 

liK) 

'J 10 

1,187 

UG 
122 
150 
700 

1,406 



14,241> 19,315 



TO HAWAII— Pek Bakk't 8. G. Wildbb, Eebruarf 15, 1897. 



Honolulu. 



Williams, D & Co 120 cases . 

J C Nobmann 8 cases . . . 

Italian-Swiss Colony... 'M barrels 
Cal Wine Association. 



18 barrels, 3 bf. 
|2 rsks, 5 lif-csks 
[225 kegs 



Tdlril anicuiit US cases and. 




480 
36 

750 

980 



$2.24G 



MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN WINE SHIPMENTS. 



From February Ist to February 15, 1897. 



DESTINATIOI). 



Gaelic 

J D Sprcckels 
Walla Walla.. 
Honowai 



Santiago 

Hawaiianleles 
City of Peking 

Dmatllla 

City of Puebla 



Sandak'n.Borneo C Scbllling & Co.. . 

" iJasFinlayson 

Mabakone ]Cal Wine Ass'n 

Wellington Italian-Swiss Co'ny 

Tonga Islands... I Lenonnand Bros. . 
Sydney Wetmore-IiowenCo 

W Rosenberg 

Hllo M O Simas & Co . . 

Cal Wine Ass'n .... 

Mobns A Kaltenb'b 

Wctmore-IJowen Co 



Vancouver, B. f 
I Colombo, Cey 
} Ion Islands.. 
Vancouver 



Vancouver . 



PACKAGES. 



1 barrel 

— pkgs. . . 

30 kegs 

1 barrel 

7 lif-barrels. 



Italian-Sw I'olony. 

A Repsold <fe Co . . . 
Berges & Dom'coni 



2 cases 

1 case 

5 lihls 1 keg 
1 bf-ck I keg 

3 bf-barrelfl. 
8 barrels. . . . 

1 case 

2 bbls 2 keg? 
10 cases.. 
2 barrels. , 
I barrel.., 



Total amount 14 cases and . 



52 
340 
150 

52 
199 



240 
48 
8 

412 



124 



104 

52 



S'J 

125 

10" 

18 

92 

10 

7 

117 

24 

61 

260 

5 

.112 

fiS 
19 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 



From February Ist to February 15, 1897. 



VKSSKL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


PACKAOE8. 


GALLONS 


VALtJE 




Sydney 


W Rosenberg 

Crown Diit Co 

J r Nobmann 


lease 

3 cases 

4 cases 

11 cases 




t 9 


Newport 

8G Wilder... 


San J de Ouat'la. 
Puntas Arenas... 
Honolulu 


21 
20 
92 


Total 


nniount 19 cases . 




i »142 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO DOMESTIC PORTS BY SEA. 

From February Ist to Februaiy 15, 1S97. 



TE88BL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 

HcrinL'er liros .... 


PACKAGES. 


GALLONIi 


VALDE. 


Newport New York 


1 l,f-l..-irr.'l.. 


27 


j;68 



BEER EXPORTS TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 



From Fubruary let to February l.'>, IHyT 



VE88KL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


PACKAGES. 


VALDE. 


Aloha 


Honolulu 


Williams, D Jt Co.. 


70 casks bottled... 
40 boxes lioltled ... 


« 022 




't 


" 




'• 


Buffalo I)r Co 


75 ca.sks hot I led 


600 




" 


HilberlBros . . . . 


10 casks bottled 


102 


C*y of Papeete 


Tahiti 


S F Breweries, Ltd. 


4 casks bottled 


.36 




J Peiiet & Co 


2 casks bolt led 


17 


Monowoi 






4U cases bottled 

1 case bottled 


250 




S P C 


4 


Newport 


Ocos 


S F Breweries, Ltd. 


10 cases bottled 

34 casks bottled 


40 




.105 


«t 


Puntas Arenas.. . 


" 


4 cases 


20 


*' 


Ban J de Gual'la. 


" 


HO cases bottled 


360 


" 


Cbamperico 


" 


100 cases bottled 


370 


" 


Acajutla 


" 


11 casks bottled 


100 


** 


San J de Gual'la. 


C ScliiUing .t Co . . 


77 cases bottled. ... : 


aso 


City of Peking 


Sliangbac 


Anheiiser B I'o . . . . 


100 cases bottled 


GOO 


San JoBc 


San J de Oual'lu. 


S F Breweries, Lid. 


32 casks bolt led \ 

27 cases bottled. . . . t 


:i9S 




" 


" 



Total — SOS casks 439 cases 



..40 boxes — bottled. 



^.104 



EXPORTS OF MISCELLANEOUS LIQUORS BY SEA. 



From February Isl to February 15, 1897 



l,860| ?1.0.M 



VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


P'K'S AKD CONTENTS. 


VALUE 


Gaelic 

Aloba 

Walla Walla. . 

Monowai 

Ncwpitrt 


Sbaiighai 

Yokohama 

Honolulu 

Nanaimo 

Sydney 

Ocos 


S Foster & Co 

O.t SSCo 

Williams, D&Co.. 

H H Veuve 

Berti>n it I.epori. . . 

W Rosenberg 

A Vignier 

Crown DistCo 

Si)rnance S & Co. . 
.1 C Nobman 

Williaiiis, l> ,t Co.. 

•tc 


10 cases bitters 

5 cases cimmiiagne. . . 

70 cases spit its 

25 cases champagne. . 
1 cafe bitters 

1 case clinnipagne. . . . 
12 cases veitnonth . . . 

2 barrel? anisndo 

I barrel gin 

7 cases lic|ueurs 

i cases bitters 

749 cases spirits 


t 70 

85 

301 

166 

4 

16 

42 

192 


San Jose 

S G Wilder... 

Total 


San .1 de Ouat'la. 
Honolulu 

amount 882 cases 


78 

88 

■25 

3,()(H) 

$4,070 




RWOOD 




SHERWOOD, 



IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

Stocks of oiii- .\o|.iicy (iooils for salo in 1)()ih1 and duly |)aid at 

212-214 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 24 N. FRONT STREET PORTLAND, OR. 

216 N. MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



:p.a.oii^ig aoj^sT j^g-ehstts for. 

"Kcusloue Jllouogmin Kijc" and "<^Ift Snrniogn" — The Finest Eastern Ryes. 



MOBT ,t CHANDON CHAMl'AiiNK 

HONT ROOPg TKAGB .V- Hi i v .-i Porta, 

g. A J. BURKE'S XXX Irish and Garnkirk Soolth, 

BiSS RATCLll'K & URETTON, Limited— Bass Al« in Wood, 

I A- J. BURKEIi Ba.«' Ale and Dublin Porter (GUINNBSS 

EXTRA FOREKJN STOUT, the AdmI brewi. 
rLBlSCHMANSS RuYALTY GIN. 



ESCHENAUER & GO'S CLARETS and SAUTERNES, 
A. HOUTMAN .V COS HOLLAND GIN. 
LAWSON'S LIQUEUR SCOTCH WHISKEY, 
GLENIIVET SCOTCH WHISKEY in Wood, 
JOULE'S STONE ALE in Hhds. and Hf-llhds. 
MEINHOLD'S ANCHOR BRAND NEW YORK CIDER, 
HENK WAUKESHA Mineral Water 



MACKENZIE & CCS Spanish Sherrifs and Ports 

E. & J. BURKE'S NONPAREIL OLD TOM GIN. 

BURKES HENNESSY BRANDY .and DRY GIN 

SCHLITZ MILWAUKEE BEER the "Pilsener" and Light SMrklinK 

also SCHLITZ in Wood, 
ROSS' BELFAST GINGER ALE. CLUB SODA, ETC. 
"CLUB COCKTAILS,' EVANS HUDSON ALB 



Roskkam, Gkkkti.kv ,^; Co.. rMii.AiiKi.fiiiA, Vvny. Whiskikp: — "M ahc«(T." "Hoiun lloon," ••(). l\ S." ani> "Tkivatk Stock." 

Ftncitl f'ttntidlttn ICyr Wltlnkry f f.'»i/f*r/m»i li- U'orts, I.'t'tl. Toronin, ('a7ttitla). Ilotttrd Vttdev Unvrvnmvtil SuprrvlHlon, 

Itl.-mi'iHI I i:it .tMi:itH.t\ WIIISH Ii:s tnrllHlr Itourliini, .V;ir/iif) •■SI. '.%«. '.s.'*, '««.■ Ilorxr]! Iliir: I). /'. <'..- Sprl nulill I . If // Mrllrnyrr: 

llfrmltfiltr: M. V. Mmtttrih: ht-nttirku <'hth: Mflltfootl: Malltnul^/; ('hh-h-rnrtu-K-: f.'. i '. lirrri/ ami othrr sitl tulii ril hritttdM. 
Also AganU For NAPA VALLEY WINE GO'S WINES .AND BRANDIES IN CASES. California Winas and Brandiaa In Wood 



P/teiFie WIJME /rfJD Sflf^IT PREVIEW, 



17 



EXPORTS OF WHISKY BY SEA 
From February Ut to February IS, 18OT. 



WHISKY AND SPIRIT IMPORTS BY RAIL. 



Prom February lat to February IS, 1897. 



VESSKL. 


l>E^TI^•.^Tlo.•^. 


SlIlll'KKS. 


PAIK.XOKS. 


OAI.I.ON8 


VAUIK. 








» 43 

26b 

27 

184 

44 

120 


Newnort 


Ttnitas Arenas. . . 

OciS 

I'bamperico .... 
San Jose tie . . . 
Ocos 


\\ ilmerdin^-L Co.. 
\Vm Wolff >V:Co... 

Caslie Bros 

Cri>wn Dist Co.. . . 

E Martin* Co 

Crown Diet Co 

Dallemand A Co... 

J C Nobman 

Spruance, S& Co. . 
Crown Dist Co 

and ■...., 


27 cases 

1 barrel.... 

.■iket's 

4 cases . . . 

14 cases 

1 barrel 

50 cases . . . 


36 

iU 

55 


" 


San J de Q 

Cliamperico 

Yokohama 

Honp Kong: 

San J de Guat'i* 
•' 

Honolulu 


216 
4.')0 


City ofPekint: 
San Juse. . . , 






:n 


1 bf-barrcl.. 
20 cases . . . 


28 


11(1 

120 




20 cases .... 




220 


" 


2hf-barrel8. 
50 cases . . . 


52 


170 
375 


SO Wilder... 

;; 






42 
300 

92 
290 


50 coses 

S hf-l>bls . . . 


9fi 


" 


5 barrels . . . 


23;i 


;W5 


Total amount 283 cases 


550 


»:i,481 



IMPORTS BY RAIL IN BOND. 



From February Ut to February 15, U97. 



SIIIPPEBS. 



PACKAGES A CONTENTS. 



10 octaveB Gia. 







OOPYBIOIITKD. 










COHSiaNKEB. 


AlC'L 


SPIRITS. 


WHISK V. 


UIN. 


Bbls. 


Barrels 

485 
7« 

730 


Cases. 


Bbls. 


K-bbl. 


Kegs. 


Bbl. 


Cases. 


Bode * Haslet t 






31V 
65 


50 








Crown Distilleries Co.. 


10 

■■"is 




.... 




E I, Hueler.' 












65 
195 
180 















William Wolff & Co ... 
















L Ciihen .\: Son 

F T Co 







■ ■ ■ 52 
65 
217 
20 
75 
70 










J Sroufc ife Co 
















S McCartney 
















Christy A Wise 






175 










Kotli A Co 












C W. Crain 






















60 










P Connolly 






12 
1 
2 
2 

1 
2 
1 
1 
5 
1 










C Keenan 


























2 






J L Nickel A Co 












1) Hcissin),' 
















P F Dugan 
















F Pezzoii 
















Downiiit; Bros 
















Carroll & Carroll 
















S Randall 


















2,3.50 












Total 


23 


2351 '.111 


5'J 


ol 1 



L A Co. 



BEER IMPORTS BY RAIL. 



2 casks Wine W W ,\: Co . 



IMPORTS OF WINES AND LIQUORS BY SEA. 


FROM KUKOPE VIA PANAMA— Pee Stb. City ok Paba, Feb. 13, 1897. 


SHIPPBES. 


packages a CONTENTS. 


COtlSIGNKKS. 


John Perceval & Son 


Ihbd Ale 


W Loaiza A Co . . 









From February Ist to February 15, 1897. 



COPTBIGHTED. 



WI/NE A/ND B-RA/NDg -RECEIPTS. 



February 1 36.100 



3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 



Total for Februarj-, to 16th 

Total for same time, 189B 



Wine. 


Brandy. 


36.100 




64 ,.500 


800 


33,200 




8,400 





29.300 




39,700 




21,600 




39,600 




45,000 




60,700 




25,800 




59,700 




24,100 




•187.700 


800 


710,.360 


1 1 ,020 



CONSIGNEES. 


BOTTLED. 


BULK. 


Cases. 



40 


Casks. 


Barrels. 


Barrels. 


M bbls 


■i-bbls 


Kegs. 


Williams, DimondA Co 


82 


70 










Royal Eafjle Dist Co... 
W Bogen & Co 


40 
45 


30 
155 


40 


40 


Hilbert Bros 




120 






C A Zinkand 






60 


20 


12 




E G Lyons <fc Co 


425 




65 
212 




Sberwook & Shcwood 


9 


















Total 


474 


202 


347 


145 


205 52, 40 



jCr FINE JPRINTING 



GO TO 



On the 15th inst the G. G. White Conipanj-, of Paris, Ky., 
shipped ten barrels of ten-year-old whisky to Carson, Nev., to 
wet the whistles of the sports at the Corbett-Fitzsimmons fight. 



R. M. \A/ooD Co. 



314-316 BATTE-Rg STREET 



SAN FR.VXCISCO 



PRUNEX JUICE 

^ Re6_(s\TtRtD 

\M.HAHN&CV 

'^ NEW YORK 




MARTIN ERLENBACH 

PACIFIC COAST AGENT 

404 Sacramento St., San Francisco, Cal 



"PERFECTION" 

THE STANDARD) 

TURKISH PRUNE JUICE 

Is warranted a PURE FRIIT KXTUACT, wbosc component pans 
are so perfectly blended that its acllon, nsed as proportioned, on 
every descrljillon of splrlu*, such as DKANDV, Ul'M, GIN and par- 
ticularly WIIISKKV, is truly wonderful. It FINKS, Pt'RlFIES, 
MKI.I.OWSand otherwise GENERALLY l.M PROVES to a remarkable 
degree. 

"PERFECTION" TURKISH PRUNE JUICE is an article which 
cannot be judged by Its taste or t>ouquet. It must be t)lended with the 
spirits in wood to prove lis value. Samples and information regard- 
ing proportion to use, etc., will gladly be furnished by either our 
Agent or ourselves. 

The advantage of giving immature spirits, IN A 
VERY SHORT TIME, the character of age, and 
thereby greatly increasing their value, I* obvious. 



'k\<>^KWi^ 



PRUNE^-iiUICE 

\M.HAHN&CV 

'^ NEW YORK 

•t>io • cto; 



M. HAHN &. CO. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS 

125 Water Street, New York 



18 



PAeifie wijsiE /fjvie Sfif^iT f^eview. 



WINE AND BRANDY OVERLAND, 

During the Month of January, 1897, Showing Destination and Points of Shipment. 

[OFFICIAL FIGURES.] 



TO 


BRASDI. 


WINE. 1 


\ BRANDT, 


WISE. 


Cases. 


Gallons. 


Cases. 


Gallons. 


J Cases. 


Gallons. 


Cases. 


Gallons. 










2.874 
3,782 


San Francisco ; 94 


10,123 
82 


1,240 
4 
2 

2 


413,707 








64 


20 
2 


Oakland - 


262 






198 






8,7S6 
32,290 








3,310 




1 


179 
23 
66 
14 
21 
6 
13 


204,978 

17,828 

2,209 

197 

6:! 

27 
39 
44 






100 




Livcrmore 






9,418 






229 


San Jose 1 1 

Santa Clara ' 


23,527 


2 


14,104 


rinsbun^ 

Otlier Pennsylvania points. 

Wniiliin-rliin I) C, 


1 
.... 


3.52 




Irvini;t()n 






154 




Mountain View 






49 


Oilier .M.l.Va. and Del. iUb. 


1 




MorL'anHill 






•;,540 




Hullistcr 






97 








3 

158 

4 

1 

7 

67 

54 

2 

45 

. 5 


Los Gates 






204 






i36 


346,409 

97 

3.050 

2,552 

9,098 

2,018 

2,504 

887 

205 

27 


Stockton 




10 


7,108 


OtluT Louisiauaifc Miss, pte 




Bnhach Switch 




2,405 












11.790 


Other Ala. and Florida pts. 




io 

50 
20 






£ 


1% 


Maltcmoro , 


io ' 50 
8,730 
2,5.50 


18,5:« 






Caliva ! 








Fowler ' 










10 
42 


liarton's Spur 




3,170 


Ark. and Oklahoma points. 


........ 


Sacramento 20 


521 
25 


65 
2 
6 


4,017 


Napa 


240 


Oilier Ky. and Tenn. iwlnts 






11 
1 

10 
6 
109 
1 
4 


Oakville 


C:i,149 




852 


7,560 
110 
91 
38,199 
68 
20 
27 

176 i 
6,729 ! 
2,559 1 


Rut herford ' 




2,.')90 






Zinfandel 






21,031 








St. Helena 






2,725 


Cliioajro 


22 


14.482 


Krng 






1.50 


Barro 


25 




2,985 






. . 


l^ark Mead 


45 








CaIi8tOi,^a 

Cordelia ..' 






102 






37 
161 
236 


15 
7 

2 

7 

ii 

4 

8 

18 

1 
S3 
4t 
58 
97 
373 
5 


2,693 












2:i7 






Santa Rosa 




\ 
4 
19 


5,374 






Sonoma 




50 








37 

29 

16.5 

1,065 

29S 

1,6.W 
197 
147 

8,158 

737 

5,132 

8,4RS 

6,:«o 

7,452 






99 






24 

153 

1,895 


Asti 

Ukiah 


25 


27,670 






134 


St I'aul 




(Colfax 






49 






Towles 


. 2,550 








. 


72 

1,071 

65 

46 

479 

607 

200 

399 

2,554 




29 






Elk (Jrove 


39 






Otber Neb. and Ksnsae ptB. 


8 




3,'207 


Vina 


3,225 
1.82? 


i 

148 


24.340 






Los Angeles 


20,205 


Oilier Colorado points 


50 

2 

12 

24 




8,045 






136 


SiiitA Fi' District 


Colton 




3 


no, 130 


Montana and Idaho points. 
Mexico 


Santa Barbara 




190 


AVintlirop. . 




148 


Santa Ana 




44 




1 






1,025 


6,645 












5,010 










Monterey 
















Antioch 


































Milton 








IVoria 


















Warm Springs 


















Santa Ci nz 










1 






Oakdale 


































t 















Total 


115 


59,920 


1,51.') 


(VJS,;iJ4 


Tut.il U.'i 


59.11-VI 1.51,'i 


(i9S,:i-j4 



WlbblAM WOhFF & CO. 

Importers and General Agents 



327-329 Market Street 



MESSRS. MOET .fc CIIANDON, Epeiinay, Clinm- 

ij»i;iie. Wlilte Seal ((iraiide Cuv'e), lirul Im|nri«l. 

JOmANNIS Lis Joiun.mh. Kliif: of Naturnl Talile 

MKHhK.S. C.KNTIIELL A COCHU.ANE, Bki.fakt, 

Oini;er Ale. 
ME.SSIIS. J. A F. MAUTELL, Cognac — Martell 

llraiidy. 
IIESHI18 IIIIIAM WALKElt .V SONS. I.TIi, Wai.kkk- 

VII. l.K, CaiuiiU. I'liriftdian Cliili Whhky. 
MKssi~ vviMiKW IHllEll A CO., EiiIKiiuiioii, 

THE 1 I STII.r.EUS CO.. Ltd., (Wm. Jame- 

son .V ' ■• i'liOlln. Irlnli Wlilaky. 

JIEHHllS. .lOHN HkKUVI'EK .V 80.V, Hottkukam. 
Oln. 



MU. J. A. Gll.KA, llKiti.is. Gilkii Kummel A Ei-kan. 
.MKSSliS. IDOLrHi) WOLKE'S son i\: CO., 

SflllKliAM. ,-\roniiilique Scliiiupps. 
MKSSUS liKAl) HUOS., i.oNiiMN, The •Dojj's Head" 

Bniilini.' of (riiiiiiieiiH' .Stout and ]lnt«e' .\le. 
liAlirilOI. (I.MAY liltEWINU CO., Hociikstkh, N. Y., 

KnickiTlMMkcr Hi-er. 
.MKSSHS. DUllOS KltlCltES, HoitiiiiAU.x, Clarets and 

Sauteiliet%. 
MESSKS. DKINIIAUD .\: CO., roiil.KNT/., lililne niiil 

.M<>»elle Wines. 
.Mil I'. CHAUVENET. NiiiTS, CoTK D'On, liurcundy 

Wines. 
MESSltS .MOIUiAN IIKOS.. PtiKHTo UK Santa 

Ma III A, Slieriki*. 
WIDOW HAUMONY, Puerto dc Santa Maria, Sherries 



San Francisco, Cal 



Tin; liOYAL WINE CO.. OiM.BTO. Port Wines. 
MESSliS VZAmiltlir. .V: CO.. lUrs, Tarragona 

THE liOYAL ItrNGAHIAN OOVEKN.MENT WINE 

CEIJ.AH.S Ui:PAi>K»iT. HunL'arian Wines 
P.srilOltR ANli OTIIEK GEUMAN BEEIIS. 
Mli TIIEO. IvAl'PE. NKIiIiiETKNDonp, Aromatlque 

liillers. 
Ml! .MAKNIEII I.APOSTOIJ.E, .•^kink kt Oise. 

I-'kvnck. Ifraiul .MariTii-r. 
MI.,<SI!S. P.. ( ISENlKK FILS AINE A CO., Pauis, 

Cordials 
ANDREAS SAKEEHNEU, Bl'PAPHST.Ilunyadl .Inos 

Nallirnl Aperient Water. 
MH. .loIIANN MAUIA FAUINA. Coi.ikink. GeL'eniie 

her deni Jiieliclispliit/,. Culopne, Eau de Cologne." 



Ite-imi>urlcil 



tmirlraii H'liMilrM. ~'>«\ Eieelslor; Bpr. '8a Belle of Nelfon , Siiriiit 90 Old Grand Dad; Hume; Mavtield: O F. C; Chlckcncock and oilier 
Staple lirands. Lowest market (|UotatioiiB furnished on a|iplieatiou, to the wholesale trade mil)'. 



f/rSIfie WIJME >\JVJE) Sflf^lT I^EVIEW 



VITieULTU-RAL eO/NVE/MTIO/N, 



The n'ci|»i-Ofity treivlj- proposed hctwoen tlu' Uiiiti'd States 
;ui<l FraiK'i" liatl tho t'll'i'ct of hi-inginn; togetliur aliout (ifty of tlio 
wine men of the Statu on tlie Ititli iiist., at a in(>i'tiiig li»>l(l at tlic 
Ciiaiiiher of Comiiierct'. 

Till' wine iiK'ii think that tho treaty, if carried into elloct, 
would <;reatly injure tlie wine industry of this State, and they 
eoiisidered it neeessary to fornmlale a plan of action to protect 
their interests. Arpad llaras/lhy presideil at tlie nieetiii^r. and 
W'inlleld Scott was chosen to act an secretary. 

The tarilV question, as it related to wine production, was an 
important ([uestiou con'ronting us, said the clniirnian, instating 
the object of the meeting, and ho tliought it would be advisable 
lo discuss that as well as the proposed treaty. 

.7. J. Jacobi informed the meeting that he had received a 
eomninnication from Congressman liOiul stating that the commit- 
tee on AVays and Means had as yet considered nothing pertaiu- 
ing to the wiue question but the tarifl' as laid down in the old 
AIcKinley bill. He recommended, as a precautionary measure, 
that the State Legislature use itsinllueuce on l)ehalf of the wiue 
men, and that a committee be choseu from the body assembled 
to further look after their interests at AVashington. Full power 
to act should be given it, and a fund raised to defray all expenses 
incurred. 

The idea was favorably received by Mr. Jacobi's associates. 
Chairman llaraszthy suggested that the committee consist of live 
nu'u. Some debate followed this, a number thinking live too 
many, but that number was finally agreed upon. The chairman 
announced that he would make kuown his appointments at a 
later date. 

A long argument on the taritV question occupied the atten- 
tion of the body, the present and the McKinley tarifls both 
having their advocates. 

Charles A. Wetmore, who considered the reciprocitj' ques- 
tion a scare, wauted to stand by the New York agreement. 

Mr. Jacobi took the opposite stand, considering the Wilson 
bill a compromise. 

John Swett favored the present tarifl". 

A. Sbarboro favoreil 50 cents duty on dry wines. 

Mr. Paxton, of Sonoma, said that the people in his vicinitj^ 
all favored high tarilT, and expected it when the McKinley ad- 
ministration was begun. 

Charles Bnudschu then oftered the following resolnti on bear- 
ing on the subject, which was adopted . 

In view of the fact that, in our opinion, the older wines are 
suflVring under the present tariff, the committee should caruestly 
advocate a judicious increase of the present schedule of our wine 
taritr. 

Mr. Haraszthy has named Messrs. Charles Bundschu (chair- 
nu»n), Percy T. Morgan, II. W. Crabb, John Swett and P. C. 
Rossi as the committee on Tariff and Reciprocitj' measures. 

The dangers of reciprocity are ablj' shown by Mr. Charles 
E. Boweu in a communication to the Paiiiic Wtnf, wn Spihit 
Review : 

The question of reciprocity with France and Gernuuiy as 
to wines and possibly brandies is one of the most important that 
has been brought to the attention of viticnlturists and wine mer- 
chants since the California wine industry a.ssumed any commercial 
proportions A careful eanva.ss among the wine nu^rchants of 
San Francisco and of those wine makers of the interior of the 
State who have visited the city within the past ten days convinces 
me that an organized etlbrt should be made at once to stave oft' 
any movement looking towards reciprocity with the countries 
named. Many of the merchants and growers evince-a genuine 
alarm at the situation which has recently developed, and .justly 
so, it seems to me. 

The present movement looking towards reciprocity had its 
origin with the leading packers and meat shi|>pi'rs of Chicago. 
For a number of year.s it has been their aim to shii> their meats 



and provision.-, i,, (,,.iiii;iny ni ipariiruiar, anil, to h'.ss degree to 
France, under more favorable trade conditions than now e.x'ist 
\\ ith this end in view, they are working to have recit.rocal m- 
ducements ..llered to the (Jcriiian and French fiovernments •uid 
have selected wnie as one of the articles which tho.se con n't rics 
.an ship lo the Fnited States at reduced rales of duty <,r nom^ at 
all. Tiiese m.eat men liave an enormous inlluence, both in Wash- 
ington and out, and as tlie trade of Germany and France in their 
hues can be built ui. to millions of dollars annually in value 
they will naliually exert .ill their inlluence lo Mitain their ends' 

I do not believe that tho majoritv of California wine .rrowers 
realize what reciprocity with (ierinanv and France woiihl mean 
to them. For many years they have made little or nothing from 
the products of their vineyards. It is only within the last two 
years that vineyard property has become of any commercial 
value as an investment, and now it is proposed tooiien our Amer- 
ican wine markets to Frencli and German pioducts for the benefit 
of a few Chicago millionaire butchers and pork-packers I 

Some years ago, when new wines were selling at the vine- 
yards of this State at from seven to eight cents jier gallon, and 
theie was a general ovei -supply of wines, an experimental ship- 
ment of ten carloads of wine was made to Cette, in F'rancc. The 
wine was selected solely because it was high in aclohol and big- 
bodied, and was to be lused in blending with the lighter French 
growths. Even at the low price of seven or eight cents per gal- 
lon to the producer, it was found that the trade eonld not be 
made to pay the shipper, as cheap Spanish and Algerian wines 
(red wines for blending) could be bought at a less figure than the 
California wines laid down in Fiance. 

This condition still exists in France to-day. I f|uote from 
LeMoniteur Vinkole of January 22. 1897, giving the following 
market report of blending wines at Bercy, tho great entrepot fof- 
wine of Paris. This market report is as follows : 

" Buyers are few. Some speculators are oflering at this time 
Algerian wines at 21 francs and even 20 francs per hectoliter 
without much success. However stocks are low, and it w^ill soon 
become necessary to replenish them. At this moment wines may 
be quoted as follows : 

" Aramon 24 to 29 francs per hectoliter 

Minervois 27 to 32 francs per hectoliter 

Montague 27 to 32 francs per hectoliter 

Rou.ssilon 25 to .So franas per hectoliter 

Algerian 20 to 27 francs per hectoliter 

Basse-Bourgogne 25 to 30 francs per hectoliter 

Touraine 25 to 30 francs per hectoliter 

Cher 27 to 32 francs per hectoliter." 

California wine.,, if sold in France, would come in direct 
competition with the heavy Algerian and Spanish wines. Esti- 
mating the franc at ISi cents and the hectoliter at 2(i;\ American 
gallons, we would thus get nearly 14 cents per American gallon 
for onr wines laid down in Bercy, this being the same price as 
now quoted for Algerian wines. Practically the same price 
would rule at Cette, Marseilles Bordeaux and other wine-blending 
centers of France. 

To arrive at a proper estimate of the price which would be 
realized at the California vineyards, v.e would have to deduct at 
least 4 cents per gallon for cooperage, 3 cents at a low estimate, 
for freight, and other charges, for insurance, commissions, etc. 
All things considered, we would be lucky if under the blessings 
of reciprocity we obtained six cents a gallon for our new wines, 
and all to suit the wishes of a clique of Chicago millionaires. 
Our xincyardists and wine makers are now holding out for 20 
cents per ;galIon. How do they like the prospects under reci- 
procity ? 

This is but half of the story. Our wine shipments to the 
Eastern States in 1S9(; were about 15,000,000 gallons, Tlie total 
value of onr wine and brandy shipments was clo.se to S.'!,00i>,000. 
In the same year the imports of French and German wines in 
bulk at Xew York were as follows, according to Bonjoii's Wine it 
Spirit Circular : 

Bordeaux and Burgundy 274.150 gallons 

Cette (French) 21 .5(i5 gallons 

German and Hungarian ()S1,1,S0 gallons 

This takes no account of the wines imported in ca.ses. 

If French and German wines were admitted into theliiited 
States without the payment of duty (for this is what reciprocity 
means), we would at once lo.<e our large markets in New. York 
and New Orleans, to say nolhing of other cities, on account of 
the cheap ]>rice fit which French and German wines were sold and 
on acccount of the existing prejudice against domestic wines and 



f/ceifie WIJME /cJ^D SflF^IT f^EVlEW. 



favor of til.- iiiipoite.l. We would heooiuo reduced to the ne- 
v.-isity of euiniM-liii;; in tlie foreign inarkels for the sale of our 
wines as blending material, exaetly as the Spaniards and Algeri- 
ans are doing to-duv. In other words, our inilnstry. inst.ad <>f 



111 
cessi 



IV I'll 



lieiug fairly prolitahle, as it is to-day, would he simp 

This is the situation eonfrontiuf ">s. 

What is to he done? 

That was diseussed at the convention held oi. last luesday. 
In past yt. .'S matters of National legislation were attended to 
by the late Vilienltural Commission, but it is no more. Gov. 
Budd, in his desire to abolish " useless eomiiiissions,' succeeded 
in having it done away with, after compromising with its mem- 
berg, although he afterward signed bills creating more commis- 
sions, as witness the State Bureau of Highways and the Code 
Coinuiission. J.iberal-miiided men in the industry, liowever, 
have seen to it that an industry which represents S(J(),UUO,000 in 
capital shall not be jeopardized" in Washington. They recognize 
that their business, although considered legitimate in California, 
is condemned by public sentiment in some other States, and for 
this reason thev will have more ditViulty in securing justice than 
the fruit, wooland other agricultural callings of the State. It 
behooves every vigneiou to interest himself in this movement, 
and to use hisiiillueuce and contribute his share toward having 
proper representation at the National capital. 

The time is short. The Ways and Means Committee of the 
House of Repre.senUUivcs is meeting daily for the purpose of pre- 
paring a tarilV and revenue bill to be introduced at the special 
session of Congress, which, if repori be correct, will convene on 
March 15. 

We ought to be represented in Washington now, and I trust 
that we will be before it is too late. I'.very merchant and grower 
is interested iu this matter, and I hope that before ten days pass 
by the wine industry will have such represeiiUition as its impor- 
tance deserves.— Charles E. Bowen. 



Oakvii.le, Cal., February 15, 1897. 
To (he Editor of the Pacific Wine and Spirit Review : Dear Sir — 
In your last issue I notice the statement that the present duty of 
.30 cents on wine is suflicieut protection. Let us see: The pro- 
ducer here can only obtain 18 cents, wholesale, for his wines, 
which is barely sufficient to meet his expenses and pay the inter- 
est on his mortgage. Now the merchant's expense in maturing, 
handling and finishing ready for market is ."J cents, freight oc, 
package 5c, brokerage 2^c and S^c for the investnieut — a total 
of .'57 cents in New York aud 39ic at other points. This is so 
near the price of imported wines, and especially of the com- 
pounds which the French Government sanctions the mauufaelure 
and sale of under the name of wine for exportation, that the 
price cannot be advanced under any circumstances. Again, uu- 
der the .50-cent duty we could obtain for our liuest wines 50 cents, 
which it is presumed were used for foreign goods, but under the 
present duty the same quality of w ines cannot be sold for more 
than 40 cents in New York. In a very few years the vineyards 
will be destroyed by the phylloxera. In the mean time, there 
will be less home competition, and by the aid of a 50-ceut duty 
the producer would be enabled to obtain 25 cents for his wines, 
reduce his mortgage, and rehabilitate his vineyard. He would 
be stimulated to plaiit the best varieties, to obtain a reputation 
aud get prices for his line wines that would compensate him for 
bis trouble ; whereas, that market now being closed against him, 
he only cares to plant the coar.sest grapes to get the greatest 
(luanlity, regardless of (piality. Thirty cents duty is not sulli- 
cieiit protection now, and the wine mi-rchantsas well as the pro- 
dui-ers, having alreaily instructed their representatives that ihey 
desired a restoration of the McKiiiley duties on wines and 
Hpiiils, cannot stultify themselves by ulleriiig to accept anything 
else under present circumstances. If at any time tiiere slioiilil 
be competition from the Kastern fabricator, it will be tiie duty of 
the National Wine Growers' Association, in combination with 
all other societies and lussociations interested, to secure a Na- 
tional pure wine law. Thei-o is no danger of any greiit boom in 
vine planting, on account of the expense in planting resistant 
viue.H aii<! the length of time reipiired to bring them into bearing. 
Neither is there any danger of Congress entering into any recip- 
ro<-al relations with France or uiiy other country thai Wiuild 
utterly destroy an industry that has been growilig for lifty years, 
givcj* employineut to from .seventy to eighty thousand peoj)le. 



with an invested capital of as many millions — an industry that 
is more or less fostered by every (Jhristiau wine-growing country 
in the world. Reciprocity means the free exchange ot our prod- 
ucts for the [iroducts of another country which we cannot pro- 
duce — otherwise itcaunot be termed reciprocity. 

We recognize and fully appreciate the cordial aud friendly 
spirit extended by the New York Wine and Spirit Traders Soci- 
ety to our represenlalivc. Mr. C. A. Wetiuore, at the time of re- 
vising the taiiir on wines, but nevertheless the tarilf is only a 
party measure and all agreements made thereon are onlj' for the 
timebeing. When the wine industry was threatened with de- 
struction, whatever agreement it entered into through its repre- 
sentative's were by way of defense, and l)eing under restraint ami 
duress, the friends of the industry had to accej)! whatever terms 
the opposition chose to offer, and bide their time, knowing that, 
under these conditions they were not bound, either legally or 
morally, to respect them, only during the term of the dominant 
party. Every other industry whatever sent its representatives 
to accept the best terms they could obtain. If the wine indus- 
trv was bound for all time, so must others have been, and there 
could be no such thing as a revision of the tarilV. 

H. W. Ckabb. 

San Jose, Cal., February 12, 1897. 

To the Editor of the Pacific Wine and Spirit Review — Sir : The 
article iu your paper of the 5th iustaut I have read with inter- 
est. As to the duty on imported dry wines, it is about correct ; 
1 am well satisfied with the 30 cents duty. The latter part of 
that article, speaking of the tax on beer as unjust and letting 
wine go free, is where I difler, for reasons which I will mention. 

First The making of wine and raising of grapes is a new 
and will be an important iudustry. 

Second — The material wine is made of is not a useful food 
for man and beast, whereas it is estimated that near one-fourth 
of the grain raised iu the Uuited States is made into beer and 
spirits. 

As to the consumption of wine and beer, please call at any 
bar or saloon at any and all of our large cities, and have a chat 
with the bar-tender. He will tell you that lie sells a hundred 
gallons of beer to one of wiae. Now, say beer contains 8 per 
ceut. of alcohol aud wine 10 per cent., which is a fair average, 
we see that the beer sold contains about 80 times more alcohol 
than the wine sold. Again, two men go to a saloon for a drink. 
One takes a schooner of beer, of nearly a (juart ; the other takes 
wine. He does not get more than one-eighth the amount the beer 
drinker does. Again, it takes so much beer to get a man drunk 
that he stays drunk for a week ; so I don't consider claret a 
saloon drink, as it is mostly used in the family aud at restaurants 
at meals. 

If 1 could have my say I would abolish all internal taxes, 
as taxing a product that is raised in the Uuited States is not 
democratic. The higher wliisky or brandy is, the more adulter- 
ation is produced. Before the war we could get good, straight 
ii(luor, l)Ut not so now. For SlOOour Government will sell any 
one a comiKiunder's license, and you can now get a barrel of 
whisky marked "Old Bourbon'' lor ?l.'-'5, tax-paid. We can 
imagine what kind of stiitf this is to put down a human throat. 
Y'ours, respectfully, .1. C. MEKiriiiiw. 

Capt. Merithew is mistaken in thinking that we advocate 
an internal revenue tax on wine; nothing could be farther from 
the fact. The idea, however, is advanced from New York as a 
means of reprisal, and the article from the Chicago Commercial 
Juiirtud, to which Capt. Merithew alludes, is iniblished very close 
to Spirit Trust headquarters -too close for disinterested opinion, 
perhaps. 

Iliiiifiirl'f Washington correspondent says: " The Ways and 
.Means Committee — or, rather, the Republican majority of that 
committ«e — has been very busy since the bust report was made 
in these columns. The wine and spirit schedule has been con- 
siden-d, as well as the agricultural schedule, which contains the 
provisions relating to barley, malt and ho])s. It can be stated 

with considerable assurance at this ti that the Wilson bill 

rates on wines and spirits will be retiiined iu the new taritl' law. 
Of course, all provisions lixeil upon at this time are tentative in 
character, and liable to change. It is pretty well understood, 
however, that there will be no radical change in the wine and 
spirit schedule." 



f/ceifie WIJ^E /cJ^D Sflf^lT I^EVIEW. 



19 



WINE MEN ARE OUT OF THE WOODS, 



Till' l:iif;rsl vinlM<;o tn'cr [iniilucfcl in ('aliforniii, iiicludiiif; 
sweet ;iii(l div wines, anionnted to neaiiy 'J.'{,00(),00() finllons. the 
sweet wines lieinjj 'JO per eeiit. of lliis ero[>. Since this vintage 
noliil>le reiluetions liave heen made in tlie yiehl i)f all the eoiin- 
ties l)y vaiions <lisoases, piiMei[>aily the phyHoxera and tiie .so- 
called .Vnaheiin disea.se. while hut lew additional vineyai'<ls have 
come into hearing to make u|) for the loss. It niay, tlwrefore. he 
safely prophesii'd that the most favoiahle si'ason possil)le lu'.xt 
yoarcoidd not yield over a total of 15.(l(i(».l)li() gallons. Deduct 
:!,00(),Oll() gallons as the likely yield of sweets in a favorahle 
season, and we have the possihio dry-wine crop of ISil7. 

The rei|nirements of the market is now, as shown hy the 
I a.-~t year's exports, over Ki.dOO.iMU) gallons, hesides the ("oast 
trade, which consumes (i.dOtl.dOO. galllons, making a total of 
'JU'.OOO.OOO gallons re(|uired to supply the demand. 

This shortage cannot he made up, as fornwily. hy imitations, 
as the high tax on spirits precludes a possihilily of making a 
wine sullicieiitly strong in aleoliol ; hesides which, the wine 
drinkers of .Vmerica are now eduealod to detect the real from 
the sophisticated article. Fortitied ft-nit juices, which formerly 
contrihuted to the cheap imitation wines, are no longer admitted 
at a low duty, hut must be i>ai<i for. for the alcohol contained in 
them. Eastern wines are still " fo.xy." and do not satisfy the 
tastes of those educated to drink wines ol luiropean types, 
which I'alifornia alone, of the I'uited Slates, can produce. 

We, therefore, liave every reason to believe that I he limited 
holdings of the wines now in the hands of dealers and growers 
will be eagerly sought for at prices which will warrant the gi'ow- 
ers in replanting their vineyards. 

The past two years have cleaned out all country cellais. 
leaving only the "VU! wines iu stock, of which there remains about 
11,000,000 gallons, all in first IkukIs. Tiie ra])id advance iu the 
price of wines during the past two jears has enabled most of the 
growers and wine makers to pay oU' their debts, and as the price 
of grapes paid for the last vintage averaged S20 per ton, there 
seems to be nothing to induce the producer to part with any of 
his product at a sacrifice. 

The organization of growers, namely, the California Wine 
Makers" Corporation, lias accumulated a large eaiiital from wdiich 
advances are made to needy wine makers, and there seems no 
likelihood that low prices can prevail in l<Si)7. even though the 
dealers shotdd attempt to force down prices. There is in deal- 
ers' hands in San Francisco about i>.000.00() galhms of what 
may be termed •• finished wines,'"-- not sutllcient for the demand. 

Uidike other farm products, gi'ain and other annual crops, 
which get to market immediately after they arc harvesteil. wine 
does not reach the constimer for some years, therefore the dry 
wine shoitage of the last two years (10.000.000 gallons in IS'.l,") 
and 1 l.r)00.0(lO"gallons in I.MIO) will be felt strongly during the 
coming year, as the present stock is far from suflicient. .As 
shown in the first part of this article, the shortage must continiu; 
to increa.se and prices advance, which leads to the conclusion, 
most of all desired, that California grape growers will be strongly 
induced to replant their vineyards on resistant stocks only which 
will be grafted with those types which for the past twenty years 
have educated the California viticulturists to recognize as pro- 
ducing the highest quality consistent with a fair yield |ier acre. 

Our lirst |)lantings were of the Mission, Malvoisie, Zinfan- 



dcl and Uurger, while the varieties employed for future grafting 
will he the Cabernet, Mondense, Syrah and JJouschets, for reds, 
in the hay counties, Malaro and Carignaii for tht! interior, with 
Folle HIanche, Riesling. .Santcrnes and Chasselas for white wines. 

Thus will nature accomplish a marked improvement in the 
([uality of oni- goods, an<l. as the lire devastates a city, removing 
its iid'erior buildings, which then give place to more permanent 
struelnres. this industry will arise from the ashes in a manner to 
do ere(llt to the (Jolden State. 

N'ineyardisls whosi^ wineries are built near railroads in tin; 
valleys, now seek tln^ higher, gravelly lands, more suitable to 
the growing of line types, and localities more exem])t fr'om frost. 
Thus the heavy bottom lands, which one of the early wine 
dealcis of San Francisco characteri/ed as being 'only fit for 
beets " are again planted with garden truck and the vineyards arc; 
relegated to the parts where only rocks and sunshine are found, 
but which go to make the best wine. 

The additions to the vineyard area during the s|)ring of l.S!)7 
will be scattered and small — i)ossihly 5000 acres. 'l"hose planted 
to resistant stocks must grow three years before grafting. Three 
years more will elapse before the product reaches the market in 
any form. This product will remain in dealers" hand another 
two years, and will put the product of the ''.)7 plantations into 
lito."). So it will be with the [ilanting of future years, while for- 
merly, before the advent of the phylloxera, crops were gathered 
four years after the planting of the vines. The danger of over- 
l>roductiou is therefore removed, and a greater stability is given 
to the wiiu! industry. A blessing has come in disguise to Cali- 
fornia wine makers by nature having curtailed the |)roduction, 
and a protective harrier has been erected around the future vine- 
yards (if the Slate, which insures to posterity in this industry a 
certain freedom from depressed pi ices growing out of over-pro- 
duction and the long suH'erings of our vineyardi.sts during the 
six years preceding 1S!I5. California has produced the most i>ro- 
lilie vineyards of the world, hut there has been a noticeable fall- 
ing olT in the yield of all our lands after the eighth year of cul- 
tivation. Some peculiarity of climate or soil has stimulated 
early production to a wonderful extent, but even the Fresno 
vineyards now .show signs of early decay. 

Sweet wines, which, if abundant, might he referrnented and 
donbled in value, in cheap claret, cannot be longer resorted to, 
as the supply has also fallen o(T The port wine, for which the 
market has rapidly extended of late, will be a little over 1.000,000 
gallons for ISiUi, while that of 1,S9.5 was double this amount. 
Therefore, j)lanting and grafting in the Fresno vineyards will 
again occur, (ireat care should be taken to keep the phylloxera 
out of the new Fresno vineyards, most commonly introduced by 
rooted vines and new stocks. 

.No product of California, except it be a gold mine, enjoys 
the distinction of furnishing as good security to-day as the wine 
induslrv. Interest on loans has been reduced and the value of 
vineyard lands improved. Those engaged in this branch of 
farming are now commonly called '■ lucky wine men." 

To produce a half a crop for four times the money in 1S!)7 
will be the notable improvement of the wine business iu Califor- 
nia over its stagnant condition of five years ago. Prices and 
profits warrant every |)08sible care to the vine. Improved qual- 
ity of wine will improve the price still further, and a reasonable 
yield wilt, in 1897, ]>lace this industry among the most prosperous 
of the State — John H. Wheei.kr. in Examiner. 



nH'IlAllli 1IKI,I,.M.\NN 



II (i. HEI.I.MANN" 



HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 



IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
525 Front Street - - - _ gan Francisco 



Cal. 



.r.ACIFlC CO.\ST AOENTS FOR. 



KRUG & CO., REIMS, PRIVATE CUVEE CHAMPAGNE 



;. PERaiER PILS & CO.. Chalons s Manie, Champ.igne 

ADRIEN & FILS, Ep«rnay - - Champ.if;ne 

FORRE.NTER & CX, Xerra de la Frontera Sherries 

G.\RVEY & CO., - - - Sherries 

OFFLEY, TRAMP & FORRESTER. UK.no, P.,n Wines 

BLANKENUEYM & NOLET, RoUerdam, Union Gin 

H. LECHAT. R. PHILIPPE & CHESSE, Kantes, Sardines 



DUBLIN DISTILLERS' CO., L'l'd, Dublin, 

E. REMY MARTIN & CO., RouUlac, 

F. FRAPIN .t CO., Segonzac, 
ENGRAND FRERES, Angouleme, 

PATTERSON & H1B3ERT, London, 



Irish Whisky 
Cognacs 



Bass' and Guiness' 
Sicul 



L. DURLACHER, Bingen - - Rhine Wine 

H. UNDERBERG— ALBRECHT, Rheinberg a Niederrhein 

Boonekamp Bitters 

CHAS. DAY & CO., Undon, \oZjlmn 

J. B. HERRIFF & CO., Glasgow. | ^^ *^'„t^, 



ALL <H>iH>S IS VMTEn STATES BOXI'Elt H Ml f:HOVSE. 

AMERICAN WHISKIES— ■• BLUE GRASS" AND "BOONE'S KNOLL" 



20 



f/cClfie WIJSIE /tJMB Sflf^lT f^EVIEW 



TRADE eiRCULA-RS. 



From L. Gandolfi & Co. 



Nkw Youk. Jrtiiiiury H>, 1897. 

Dkar Sir : Tli»> followiii!; is a list of our imporlations ami 
receipts of gootls for tlie fortniglit eiuling January 15, ISltT: 

Per ''Sunset Route," January 2d, ;U barrels Califoruia ver- 
mouth. " P. C. Rossi & t'o.'s " brand. 

IVr " Olynipia," January 4tli. 838 boxes Naples macaroni, 
■■ .Vcanfora " brand. 

Per " Ri'uce." January 4th, 200 barrels Tipo t'liianti Wine, 
•' Italian-Swiss Colony " brand. 

Per •• Werra," January 13th, 200 cases Fernet Branca : 5 
ca-ses Lucca olive oil. •• Krancesconi " brand ; 100 bags Italian 
rice, '• G. 15. Profunio " brand. 

L27-Jf29-JfSl We»t Broadtmy. L. G.\.ni)oi,ki & Co. 



agri-eable liqururs in use, and it is also favorably accepted by 
the ladies, being at the same time the sportsman's vade mecum 
It ought not to lie niis.sed at luncheon or supper along with the 
cheese, and constitutes a relVesliiiig and healthy beverage mixed 
with spring or aeratecl w;iters. 

Show cards supplcil un M|iplicali<>n. carriage jiaid. Orders 
solicited b}' W. A. T.wi.ok & Co., Sale AoiiitK. 

•i9 Broadway, New York. 



From Nicholas Rath & Co., New York. 



Prom W. A. Taylor & Co. 



New Yokk, February 10, 1897. 

To the Trade : We bcg to call attention to the goods manu- 
ufactured by Peter F. Ileering, Copenhagen, purveyor by special 
appointments to the Danish and Russian Courts and also to the 
Prince of \\'ales. Prize medals at Loudon in 18()2, Copenhagen 
in '72, Vienna in '73, Philadelphia in '76, Paris in '78, London 
and New Orleans in "84 and Copenhagen in "88. 

The Heering Cherry ISrandy or Cherry Cordial, labeled 
" Kirsebicr Liquer " can now be procured as follows : In cases 
of 12 bottles, §13 ; 24 half-bottles, S14 — less 10%' in 5-caselots ; 
or in lots of 25 cases and upward. 25 s. sterling per case for bot- 
tles, and 27 s. for half-bottles f. o. b. at Copenhagen. 

The special appointment of these goods for use in the courts 
named and the prize medals, together with the fact that Peter F. 
Heering's Kirseba-r Li(iueur is in continued and great demand, 
fully testifies as to its superiority as an unrivalled specialty. 

It may be safely pronounced one of the most delicate and 



Dear Sir — We beg again to ilirfct yoni' attention to the im- 
portant reduction which we have made in the price of the origi- 
nal and genuine prune Juice, it b'-ing now 81.75 per gallon, with 
a special allowance of ten cents when 200 gallons and over is 
ordered at one time, instead of 82 per gallon as heretofore. 

The high quality of the article which made it famous when 
first introduced, nearly thirty years since, is strictly maintained. 

" Prune .Juice " witii us is merely a technical name for the 
finest and rieliest kind of hli'nding wine fermented from the 
highest grade of strii'lly impoited fruit. We jiroduce a wine, 
dark and heavy bodieil, used for mellowing and maturing whis- 
kies and brandies ; also, a very pale and delicate wine, white 
enough to use in gin if necessary. This latter is preferred by 
some of the most eminent blenders for using in whisky, particu- 
larly as it cannot be inii :iled liy those who make so called prune 
juice by steeping ciieap ( alifornia fruit iu spirit and adding glu- 
cose or other sweet stull' for the purpose of giving it " body." 
These concoctions, needless to say. are dark — in fact black would 
b«> a better description — and while lliey sweeten whisky at an 
enormous cost in the riduetion of pioof they not seldom render 
it cloudy and unsalable; hence, while such products are called 
cheap, they in reality cost more tiian I he genuine goods. If un- 
acquainted with our article, kindly ask us to send you samples 
before ordering " the same " or "just as good " wliich maybe 
olfered bj'.some person who wishes to trade on our reputatiim. 
Yours faithfully, Nicholas R.ath & Co. 



COHTBS 5t GO'S 

PLYMOUTH GIN 

An English Double Distilled Unsweetened Gin, a 
delicious compromise between Holland 

and Old Tom Gins. 



i»isii;imri\(; .\(;i;ni' i'ok iiii: r.vciiic ('oAsr. 

W, B. CHAPMAN, 123 California Street San Francisco. 



f;»eifie wifjE frfia sfii^iT i^eview 



21 



Owners and Handlers of its own Brands 
and Also the Weil-Known .... 




Brands of 

m ^ NAPA VALLEY WINE CO. 

KOHLER & VAN BERGEN 
KOHLER &, FROHLING 
^B. DREYFUS &, CO. 
V^\ S. LACHMAN CO. 

C. CARRY & CO. 



SECOUD i$ FBLSOPl STS. 'xV 




San Francisco, 



I NCORPORATEIO. 



California 




New York O 



1.45 



AUGUST 10. 18©-4.. 




22 



f/reifie WIJ^JE /rJsIB Sflf^lT f^EVIEW 



PATE/NTS, T-RADE-MAHKS, ETC. 



Tlio (i.li..winL: il^l 111 ri.ciii palt'iile Hiid tr»cli--miirkii of Intcictt lo our patrons 
i» re|Kirlini by \Vm. G. IlKM<KitMON. «oliritor of Amiiicnn uiid fori'l^ni patinls and 
lr»de-m«rkB, Korris linildhiK. 501 F slriTl, Wasliinuloii, D. C. A copy of any of 
llie rnltvd Slalea )<alvntt< will be furniebed by bim for 25 ccnU. 

IssuK OF Dkcemueb 15. 1896. 
573,354 — Faucet bung and llusbini; key fi>r fame, Dillon Beebc, Newark, X. J. 
572,951— Bottle-stopper. Alfred L. Uernardiii, Evansviilc. Ind. 
57X,2oa— Bottle. Alouio P. Biivcn, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

573,21'.'— Bottle stopper, Henry Friedman, New York, and II. M. Koolbel. Brook- 
lyn. New York. 
STS.SX}— Bunjibole protector and Innneleombincd. Albc-rt Krinimel. Detroit. Mich 
573.0»J— Device for elosln;; bt>tllei. Johann Macek. BadaPestb. Au»tria-Hunj;ary. 
."iTS.aail-Bottle stopper. Frederick C. Koc kwell. Hartford, t'onn. 
573.;i0l and 57:i.SCO— Bottle stopper. Jobn Scbumaclier. CbicaKO, 111. 
573.l)«l— Non-retillaliie bnllle. K. T. and .T, V. Van Strum. Minneapolis. Minn. 
573.426— Vent attacbment for corking; machines. William O. Viller. Milwaukee, \Vi8, 
373,3r.»— Bottle or jny, LeUoy C. Wel^sler. t S. Navy. 
573.172 — Beer drawing apparatus, Jobn B. YonuK, Sau Jose. Cal. 

THAnE-M.^KKS. 

29.30S— Medicinal Wine. Allen H. Still. New York. Essential Feature— Tlie word 
••Volcol." 

29,312— Natural mineral water. The .\csculap Bitter Water Company. Limited, Lon- 
don, En^'land, and Buda-Pesih. Anstrla-Hungary. Essential Feature-- 
tbe head of .\c6culapius and the word '• Aceculap." 

29.3i:i— Ale, Thomas McMulUn & Co., New York City. Essential Feature— The 
word "Peacock," or the word •' Peacocke," or the piclnrc of a peacock. 



l88t'E OP DxcEMnER 29, 1896. 
574. 2US— Bottle. Geori;e \V. Bennett. Pittsliurt;. Pa. 
.'i74.iu:i— Xon-re(illahle bottle. Francis I,. Cook« S|)rincheld. .Mass. 
.^TSiSS.'!— Bo.tlc washer. John I.. Kihn and \V. T. Reed, Hamilton, Ohio. 
,')74,l.')5— Bottle washer, James F. l.ceper. I.cwiston. Pa. 
574,150— Device lor supplyini,; sails for soda fountains, Fisher H. I.ippincott, Ph'.la- 

dclphia. Pa. 
573,990— Tap busbinj; John .Vohn. Detroit Mich. 
574,111— Process of and apparatu6f<H-i)nrifyin;;. rcclif>iny and deodorizing alcoholic 

or other ll(|uids, Marshall Prldliam, Philadelphia. Pa. 
574.01.S—Bottle stopper. Frederick B. Thatcher. Pawtucket. B. I. 
574. ISl — (~^ask pitching; apparatus, Jacob F. Thcurer and O. Mueller, Milwaukee. 

Wisconsin. 
573.949- Non-retillable bottle, John WoodrnfT, Wise, West Va. 



Issue of December 22, 1896. 
578.700— Bottle. F H. Bullmau. Cleveland. Ohio. 

573.4.">;-i— Tiltinj; appliance for soda fountain jars, C. H. DulHeld. riiiladclpliia. Pa. 
573,500 — Xon-ietillabic bollle, A. G. Canada, Memphis, Tenn. 
574,77:i — Bottle and stopper. L. J. A. Fernandes. New York City. 
573,775— Ant i-retillinj; bottle, Thomas Folks, New York City. 
573,588 and 573.SS9 [2 patents]— Bottle stopper and fastener, Charles K. Fuchs, Wa- 

lerbury. Conn. 
573,818— Pitching apparatus — Maximilian Guetbler, Baltimore. Md. 
573.007- Bottle labeling machine. Paul Kohl and H. Paulus, St. Louis, Mo. 
578,519— Bottle closure, Wilton P. Hayes. Terre Haute, Ind. 
.57;{.093— Jar closure. Frank .\ Palmer. Brooklyn. N. Y. 
57:1,792— Apparatus for tilling and corking bottles, John C. Pennington. Paterson, 

New Jersey. 
573,484 — Bottle, Moritz Boscnstock, New York City. 
57:j.0;4— Bung. Henry Rosenthal. New York City. 

573,490 — Valve stopper for bottles, Joseph W. Simons, Port Chester, N. Y, 
573,49.5— Bottle, Robert E. Thurmau, Victoria, Canada. 
.573,557— BottI"!, J. Van Name, Mariner's Harbor, N Y. 

design. 
26.429— Bottle, Horace D. Williams, Poplar Bluflf, Mo. 

TRADE-MARKS. 

29,331- Wines and Lh|UOrs, Louis Schelter, New York City. Essential Feature— 
The words "Brunswick & Co." and the figure of a shield bearing a horse 
rampant, and surmounted by an imperial crown 

29,332— Whiskey, the Mcll«ood Distillery Company, Louisville, Ky. Essential Feat- 
ure — The words "Riinnymede Club." 

29.333 — Whiskey, theMellwood Distillery Company, Louisville. Ky. Essential Feat. 
nre— The words "Dundee Club " 

29.331 — Whiskey. theMellwood Dislillery Company, Louisville, Ky. Essential Feat- 
ure — The word?* " N'ormandv Club."' 



TKADE-MAUKS. 

'29,367 — Powder for carbonating litiuids, Cliurcb & Dwiglit Co.. New York City. 
Essential Feature — A representation of a star or the w-ord *' Star." 

29.;W8— Ale. Thomas McMullen * Co., New York City. E'?seutial Feature— A reprc- 
senlation of a heraldic device consisting of a scroll supporting a shield 
surmounted by a crown and flanked at one side by a representation of a 
lion rampant and on the other side by the representation of a unicorn, 
witli the fac-sirarle signature of "Thomas McMullen A Co." oblit|Ueiy 
across it. 

29.309— Gin, Rum and Whisky. Clarence M. Roof, New York City. Essential Feat- 
ure^ .\ representation of a hotel sign upon which ai)peais the representa- 
tion of a white deer or hart. 

29,370- Whiskj-, Clarence ^ Roof. New York City. Essential Feature— The words 
'■Glen l.onach." 

■20.371— Whisky. Cloreiice M. Roof, New York City. Essential Feature— The word 
" Tobcrcurry." 

29,372— Whisky, The Anderson and Nelson Distilleries Company, Louisville, Ky. 
Essential Feature — A representation of a Maltese orTcmplar Cross. 

29,373— Whisky, The Audersiin and Nelson Distilleries Company, Louisville, Ky 
Estantial Feature — A representation of a Maltese or Templar Cross and a 
panel below the same ;ind bearing the word "Anderson" in wliite letters, 
the cross and i)anel appearing in red and eacli having a border in gold. 

29,375— Sugar Syrups. J. D. Hage i: Co., New York City. Essential Feature— Tlie 
word ' Silver." 

29,376.— Sugar Syrups, J. D. Hage A Co., New York City 
word "Royal." 

29,377 — Sugar Syrups. J. D. Hage it Co., New York City, 
word "Lily." 

29.378— Sugar Syrups, J. I). Hage it Co., N;w York City 
word "Imperial." 



Essential Feature— The 
Essential Feature— The 
Essential Feature — The 



TO WI/NE ME/N. 



FOE S.\LE— OiK'half iiitefest or the wliole of tlic ri;jlit to 
a wine faucet, fcceiitly i>at('nt('(l. wliicli (Miables wine im'ii to 
keep (ify wines on tap in .'j-galloii ileinijulins. pni-e and whole- 
some, without iiianipiilation. Il is simple and tliofotiohly eli'ect- 
ive, and is a I'esull that has long l)een sought, as it will eiiahle 
retailei's to carrj' small ijuautities of dry wines " on tap " with- 
out spoiling. For particulars, address Q, this ofiSoe. 

WINEM.\KER and Distiller, .'^O years of age, holding 
highest references for 12 yeai-s" services iu leading estahlisli 
raents, open for eugagemeut. Address '• S. S.," this office. 

GKOWKKS who wish to sell good California wines for cash 
on delivery, iit moderate prices, to Eastern hnyer, please coi re- 
s|)oiiil with " B.." care editor this paper. 



Ell PINAli VINEYARD 



H^ 


"afaairfa^a 




m ■ 


-M 


... 



ECTAr.l.lSllKD 1S,')2 

Largest Producers of 

PURE SWEET WINES 



IN i^MlCRlCUV 



Geo. West & Son 

5T0CKT0N, CflL, U. 5. A. 



f/reifie WIJME /rJSID RPIF^IT [REVIEW 



23 



MARKET HI/NTS FROM ABROAD. 



I liiul a lucky day yesterday, wlien, wilhoiit llic sliglitost 
aiitii'ii)ati(>n, there otleivd itself wliat I was wishing long ago — a 
f;o()(l and fuiinj; opportunity to nnoslciitatiously I'un a tilt for 
California wines before an appreciative and attentive audience. 
And this is how it canio about : As usual. I attended the weekly 
nieetini; of that distinf;uisbed body known as the " Club of .\g- 
riculturi.-its and Foresteis," eouiposeil of men whose interests lay 
in these two branches, either as owners or renters of estates or 
(iflieials of such, as scientists, or as niannfacturers. merchants or 
— last, but not least — as editors of pr(>fe.s,>^ional papers. Like 
alwavs on such occasions, there was a lecture held by one of the 
members on the actual and possible utilization of Austrian 
wat<-rs for fislieries. This, of course, has nothing to do with Cal- 
ifornia wines, and they would never have come into discussion 
had the lecturer not referred to the liiglily-developed lish indus- 
try in America, to the manner in which it is fostered by the 
(ioveiiuncnt. and to the satisfactory residts thus obtained, which 
llnd tlicii- protitable expression in an increased export of its 
products, which also liud their way to Europe and successfully 
compete there. Hardly had he finished w hen another gentleman 
aro.se — the editor of the Wein Zeitun<j — and demonstrated how 
agreeable this competition is for the " consumer " heie, I'clating. 
as an example that, thauks to it onlj', he can afford to occasion- 
ally satisfy his refined appetite for " oysters " with .such from 
New York or Boston, and thanks to it he buys at present apples 
imported from America " better and cheaper than the home 
grown apples." So far. of course. I had nothing to saj', but when 
he started, as a sort of consolation, to assure the audience that, 
however manifold the prodin;ts may be with which America can 
• successful!}" compete in Europe, there is certainlj' nothing to be 
) feareil from American wiues in general, and such from California 
; especially, I could not remain silent with good conscience, and 
' asked for permission to speak, wlien, with simple facts about the 
improvements which have taken place in California viticulture 
and wine making, and about the increased exports to England 
and Gernniny, I successfully dispr-oved the erroneous opinion of 
the speaker mentioned so far that he at last admitted the possi- 
bility of California pi'oducing sweet wines with such merits that 
they might suit the taste of Europeans, but stubbornly denied 
this with regard to dry wiues, on account of the prevailing 
■■ serai-tropical climate," which '■ lacks one of the essential con- 
ditions for the ])r()ductiou of fine mild and smooth wines." It 
looked like " sounding the retr-eat," however, when he finally 
added that "California may not need to look for a market in 
Europe, after all, for it.s wines, as, in spite of the wide-spi-ead 
temperance tendency, and in spite of the pronounced pi-eference 
for • whiskv,' wine-drinking will become so popular in America 
that all the California wine can be easily disposed of at home." 
Inciderrtal r-emarks like this one — and fi-om such a source, 
one who is supposed to be well informed about the wines of the 
world —show what perverted ideas still prevail regar-dirrg Cali- 
fornia's viticulture, how little the merits of its wines ar-e known 
even among those who ar-e supposed to know, and are apt to do 
great harm. I felt sorr-y that I did not have a few bottles of dry 
and sweet wines at band, which, better than words, would have 
convinced the audience of the correctness of my ;us.sertioirs, and 
of the fact that excellent products can also be and are made in 
California which bear any comparison — and fr-orn this feeling of 
sorrow the idea arose, which I submit herewith to your r-eaders 
for consideration and support. 

It would indeed be a matter of trifling expense to the indi- 
vidual and still one of the best advertising instruments, if some 
of those who are interested in spreadirrg the fame of California 
wines would go to work together-, and send a sample case or two 
of the BEST California wines to the above mentioned club. Every 
season — which generally lasts till the middle of April — there is 



one evening set apart fni- tlii^ tasting of the various wines pre- 
.seirted to the club, arrd the taslirrg i-esirlts arr^ pirblished in the 
most pr-ornirrerri pr-ofcssiiirial papers, which Irrril a wide circula- 
tion. If nothing else >h(iiil(l lie allainril thus but to have Cali- 
fornia wines nrade krrown arrd have a lair- jiidgrirent (lassed on 
them, the pirrpos<i of tln^ shipmeirt would lie fiillilled already ; 
Imt il is (jirite possible that mor-e interest would be ai-oirsed in 
them, leading to more satisl'actor-y results. 

.Should this suggestioir find appr-oval arrd be carried out, I 
would with pleasirr-e intr-odiree the shipnn-nt with the proper 
wor-ds, anil incidentally call attention to anythiirg that the re- 
siM'ctive donors especially want be mentioned, and, in case I 
should rrot be here arry nrore at the time of the arrival of the 
pi-oposed shipnrent, a frierrd of mine and irrenrber of the clidj will 
gladly take tin- task unto him, and will i-ead to the audience 
what I write. 

l-"rom personal observation during the time I arrr here now I 
carrnot see any reason — if rreed should be — why California 
wines shoirld not be able to successfully compete in Europe at 
large, and especially here. In the first place, I consider this 
((uite possbhi with sweet wines, not on account of their quality, 
but on account of their prices here, which would warrant a 
profit. They are very little produced, or rather " manfactured -' 
here, with the help of raisins from Greece, by far the larger 
(juantity being irrrported from .Spain and Italy, and .sold at prices 
that make them a costly delicacy, yearned for by many but en- 
joyed by few only. In one of the " bodegas " — this the name 
of sample-rooms which a concern for the sale of LSpanish wines 
has in almost all the lar-ger cities of Eur-ope now — I have 
myself paid 30 to -10 cents for a small glass of sherry, and it 
was not of the best after all. Taking this into consideration, I 
have no doubt that sheri-y w-ould stand a good chance to succeed 
here, as it is well liked and hard to get at a reasonable rate. 
The same is the case with good Port, and as to Muscat wiue and 
Muscat brandy, a gentleman well posted about wines, to whom 
I spoke of the large quantities of the latter produced in Califor- 
nia, asked with surprise why they have not been introduced here 
yet, where the Muscat flavor is so much liked, while the grapes 
don't attain, in this hardy climate, to that pronounced flavor 
which is char-acteristic to them in California. 

With the now prevailing better prices, it is obvious that 
new virreyards will arise and increased production will follow. 
At the same time, China is going to raise its own wines, as the 
recently announced engagemerrt of an Austrian by the Chinese 
government for- the pur-pose of establishing vineyards clearly 
shows, and this will in time to come reduce the exports to that 
countr-y. Italy's gover-nment is placing its wiues before the 
world by establisliiirg governmental wine depots evervwhere, 
Spain has its agencies all over the continerrt, and so it remains 
for California yet to follow a sirrrilar plan, and provide in tirrre a 
rrew outlet for its " sorrow-breakei's," 

Vienna, December lii, 1896. 



W. A. Veitu, 



In relation the supply of Champagne irr Europe, the New 
Vor-k Timci of a recent date explains that for- .soirre time past the 
large demand for vintage wines has had the efl'ect of gradually 
creating a great .scarcity and increasing the value of good brands 
of celebrated years to such an extent that now onl\' the connois- 
seur indulges in a selection of the superior vintage years of 1874 
1S8U, 1SS4 and 1S89, paying fancy prices for the same. Pre-em- 
inent amongst these are the wines shipped by the famous house 
of Moet & Chandon, conceded to bo the oldest and lai-gest vine- 
yard owners and shippers of champagne in the world — their 
brand is highly appreciated and very lar-gely consumed in all the 
prominent cities of Europe, especially in London, where it is the 
leader and in gi-eat favor at the court ; their brand of " White 
Seal, Grande Cuvee," is a great favorite, and of late years has 
largely Increased in sales and popularity. The Pacific coast 
demand for these select brands of wines is now supplied 'oy Wm. 
W.illT & Co., .■?'_'7-.'?20 Market street. 



24 



f/ceifie WIJSIE /rJ\IE> Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



LONGEVITY OE LIQUOR MERCHANTS. 

Ill accordance with its usual custom, liidkii't Wine and Spirit 
Ciretilar, of Loiuioii, publisliett in the issue of January 12th tiic 
record of the death of ninely-four liquor nu'rchants in En<;lanil. 
etc., iu tlie year 1.S9<!. Tiu- table as jtulili.sheil alVoi'ds {^rouiiil foi- 
some strikinjr statistics as lo the lonj^evity tif li(iuoi- nuTcliants 
as a class. The record of IS'.iri was first published in the r.\ciKU' 
Wine and Spikit Rkvikw, aud was subsequently copied all over 
the United States. The record for 1896 is as follows : 

Number of deatlis reported 94 

(Jombinetl ages of all reported r)894 j'ears. 

Average age at death O'i.T •' 

Time of death. Number. 

From 20 to 20 years 2 

'• 30 to 39 years 4 

" 40 to 49 years 14 

" 50 to 59 years 15 

•' i;0 to ti9 years 20 

•' 70 to 79 years 23 

" 80 to 89 years 9 

Over 90 years 1 

Totall 94 

.Vs the average age at which teetotallers die is 51 years, 
whereas an intemperate drinker's average, as proved by the sta- 
tistics of the Britisli Mi^iieal ."Society is 50 years, the average age 
of the moderate drinkers, as exemplified by the records of tiie 
time of death of wine merchants, is not surprising. It would 
not be amiss for the life insurance companies aud for the Amer- 
ican societies whi<!h exclude wine merchants because of their 
calling, to take counsel of these figures. 



THE WINE PRODUCTION OF THE WORLD. 

To the Munitt-iir \'inicnle we are annually iudel)te(l for cer- 
tain statistics, which show, approximately, what the yield of 
every important wine-producing district was during the preced- 
ing year. These do not always exactly tally with the figures 
from various other authoritative sources, but are, in our opinion, 
sufficiently accurate for the pur()()ses of comparison. From the 
following table the yields of the various countries can be seen at 
a glance : 

Hectoliters. 

France 44,650,153 

Algeria 4,050,000 

Tunis 95,200 

Italy 21.573,000 

Spain 18,830,000 

Portugal 3,280,000 

The Azores, Canary Islands and Madeira 320,000 

Au.stria 2,5(J0,000 

Hungary 1,050,000 

(Jermany 3,110.000 

Rus.'^ia 2,900,000 

Switzerland 1.500,000 

Turkey and Cyprus 3,050,000 

Greece 2.150,000 

Bulgaria 1,3(! ',000 

Servia 1.100,000 

Roumania 7,500,000 

United States 680.000 

Mexico 70,000 

Argentine Republic 1,590,000 

Chili 1.730,000 

Brazil 475,000 

Cape of Good Hope 90,000 

Persia 32,000 

Australia 180,000 

CorsicJl 280,000 

C<iiiiparing the above with the corresponding figures for 
1895, we find that last year witnessed a (-onHidci-able improve- 
ment in Fraii(!e, Algeria, i'ortugal and Rnuniania, whilst tin' ri'- 
verse wsi-M the CJi-se with Italy, Sjiain and (iermany. It must not 
Im- IomI sight of. however, that this advance refers to (|uaiitil y only. 



JYoto2 and ^erscnals. 

The Hrownstone Wine Company has nicely fitted up its new 
store at 3.'{I I-;ilis .--treel, and a s]>ecialty will be made of the 
family trade. 

\\'illi:uii WiillV&Co. have published their price list for 1897^ 
including the prices for all theii- well known imported lines. 
The list includes eight pages, and (luotations are given in all 
respects to suit llie times. 

Ci. 1-. llergert. who for some time past has represented the 
Fleming Uye whisky on this ("oast, has given up this and all 
other agencies held by liiiii. Mud has gone to Kaiid>liurg. where 
he will engage in business. 

There has been introduced into the Legislature of the State 
of Washington a bill to establish the South Carolina system in 
that State. The l(ill is ojiposed by the Seattle Pust-Intelligenen- 
and other leading jcnirnals of the State. 

We regret lo announce the dt'at h of Charles Cyrus Armi- 
tage, of the linn of I'.arlnw & Armitage, of Sydney, N. S. W.. 
and one of the founders of the Aiiftralidn VlgniTon and Barluw A- 
ArmitKfir'.-i Wine and Spirit Circular, which occurred at Sydney on 
the 4th lilt. 

Henjaniin .Vrnhold, of Stevens, Arnhold & Co., has gone 
Fast on a three months' tour. He in tends to visit New York, 
Chicago, New Orleans, St. Louis and other leading centers of 

distrilnitioii for California wiin-, with the object of thoroughly 
studying trade conditions, 

Gaddini & Ciocca, whose wholesale store is located at 004 
Broadwaj', are having a good run of business, parlicularly in 
the family and restaurant trade. They make California wines 
and lirandies a specialty, and are doing a comfortable business 
in these and other liquors. 

The film of .\. Van Bergen & Co. has been organized to 
conduct the retail business owned by the late August Van Hei- 
geu. Richard Uhte. who has been with Mr. Van Bergen for 
years, has bought a half interest in the place, and will hereafier 
conduct it, the widow of Mr. \:\\\ Bergen relaining a half 
interest. 

F. Madlener, one of the leading California wine dealers of 
Chicago, died at his home recentlj'. lie was born in Boston in 
1830, went to Chicago in 1850. and has lived there constantly 
ever since. He served as juror at the l^xposilion of 1893, and 
was one of the best know n and re.spected nu'rchants of the Lake 
City. He leave a widow, a son and a daughter. 

James P. Pierce, formerly of Santa Clara, father of R, T. 
Pierce and a well known vineyardist and cellar owner, died at 
his home in Alameda on the Otii iiist., after a long illness. Mr. 
Pierce wasseventy-two years of age, and for thirty years he was 
one of the leading spirits in the development ol' the .'^anta Clara 
N'allev. Ill' left a widow, two sons and I'om- danghlei-s. 

The Supreme C<uirt of tJeoigia held, in the i-eeent case o 
Chapman .vs. The Stale, that a medicinal prtparation capable of 
being used as a beverage, and which contains such a percentage 
of alcohol that if ilrunk to excess it will produce intoxication, is 
within the meaning of an act which prohibits the sale of " spir- 
ituous, malt, or intoxicating liciuors," without taking out a spe- 
cial license, and Ibis is true evi'u though the same may contain 
certain other elenu'iits which, either separately or iu eonjunelion 
with alcohol, possesses useful medicinal properties, ami that the 
sale of such a preparation without the presciibed licen.se is un- 
lawful. wh(lher thi' vendor iu making the sah> intended tli.it it 
should be used as a medicine or otherwise, anil without refereiK'c 
to the purpose for which it was bought by the purchaser. 



f/feifie WIJSIE /rJvJD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW 



25 



l> I >. IVivissoii, llic viiu'vardist of Sonoiiin, lias secured a 
iiioiistei- jieliliou askiii;; liis appoiiitnuMit to tlie olliee of lisli ami 
^aiiie warden of Soiioiua eouiity. Tlu' ap|)oiiiliiicnt is made l)y 
the Supervisors. Most of the hankers and other wealthy men of 
ilie county have asked that the olliee he created and that Mr. 
Duvisson be api)ointed to lill llie phiee. We aro sure no hettei- 
lUMii couid lie selected lo look after the j;ame interests ol the 
county. 

On the southeast corner of Sausoino and .Sacramento streets 
is seen tlie old and lionored .sign of Siehe Bros. & Phigeniann, 
wine and li(|uor merchants. The premises are the largest of the 
city, taking in two thirds of the frontage oil the east side of San- 
sonie street, between Sacramento and llalleck streets, aud run- 
riiig west to a gi'eater depth on Sacramento, embracing the stores 
322-332 Sausome street. This great space is necessary because 
the lirm carries such an immense stock. The house is known 
throughout the trade for tin? line (juality of its goods. Standard 
brands only are kept on hand. The choicest wines over pro- 
duced, aud the highest chuss of whisky aud otlier liquors ever 
made are to be found in the barrels and caks stored iu tliis capa- 
cious establishnuMit. It may be incidentally remarked that this 
lirrii has tlie sole agency for the celebrated '' Belle of Bourbon " 
sour mash, in cases, and ow'uership of the '• O. K." Rosedale. 
The name and reputation of the lirm are world wiiie. as the 
concern is a heavy importer, and its business character is of the 
pnre-<t. It lias a large local custom, and does quite an extensive 
shipping business all along the coast, both north aud south, be- 
sides tilling liberal orders for the I'acilic islands aud the .Austra- 
lian colonies. John D. Siebe, one of the partners, is the City 
and County Assessor of .San Francisco, which shows the confi- 
dence and esteem in which he is held by his fellow citizens. The 
same high regard is held for Fi-ederick C. Siebe aud J. Fi-ederick 
Plagemanu, the two other members of the firm, by regular cus- 
tomers aud all who have ever had (h-aliiigs with the house. — San 
Francincu liipaif. 



POMO/NA LICE/NSE STRIFE. 

.Again another of oni- biennial city elections is before us. 
I'nless some plan is made and carried into eU'ect to avoid it, the 
whole city will be under excitement aud strife, and, as in former 
years, much ill feeling aud bitterness will follow aud biisineHs 
will sutler with the couteutiou, thus working an injury to all 
coucerued. The main issue will be the saloon (juestioii, the 
peopl(^ being nearly ei|ually divided for and against license. 

The present system leaves the (|ueslion of saloon li(U'nses to 
the Board of TrustcH's, a majority of whom controls it. Hence 
the strife over the election of trustees. To avoid this it seems 
feasible to adopt a jilaii by which the wishes of tlie electors may 
be ascertained aud determined, the voters taking the entire re- 
s|ionsibility. This can be done by a direct vote — Yes, or No — 
on the (juestion, '■ Shall two .saloons be granted licenses at $1000 
each per annum ? " 

To some this plan may seem to have legal objet^lions, but if 
all are agreed that the vote on the qm-stion shall be so settled it 
will 1)(^ an easy matter to provide for its being carried into effect. 
-Ml that is needed is for the tlireo hold-over Trustees, Messrs. 
Waters, Raynes and Ijandon, aud all the candidates running for 
the places held by Messrs. Hibbard and Hutchinson, to pledge 
themselves to carry out the determination of the voters as ex- 
pressed by a majority. 

This plan, if adopted, would make the issue direct and 
plain ; no schemes could be maile to d(!ceive the voters, as all 
there is to <h) is to vote " Yes," if they desire saloons, and " No,'' 
if against them. All litigation as to the election of candidates 
would probably end, aud the Board of Trustees, being free from 
this vexed question, could give their entire attention to the real 
wants aud interests of the people, which every good citizen de- 
sires. — Clayton, iu Pomona Beacon. 



Take the Pacific Wink and Spirit Review — 81. .50 a year. 




To the Trade and the Public: 



The 



"R. B. HAYDEN" 




Old Style Hand-Made Sour Mash Wliisky Distilled by 
(OFFICE, LOUISVILLE, KY.) 

gp2.eih:is[:br.ier., isrSLSOisr co., pcy. 

Is the only \\hi^ky of this name ev( r made in Nelson County. Ky. du ordering R. B. Ilaydeu from your dealer see that you 
get the ^\'bi.-.ky that is distilh d liy llie (In'eubrier Distillery Company. 

BARDSTOWN, KY., November 1, 1892. 
Greenbrier Distillery Co. — Gentlemen : In response to your inipiiry 1 have to .say that your distillery is operated on the old- 
fashioned baud made .sour mash jilan, and is one of the very few distilleries in the State that adheres to the old style methods that 
have made Kentucky sour mash distilleiies famous. Your house and its methotls cannot be improved on. 

Respectfully yours, J NO. H. WELLER, 

Dist. Dep. Collector Int. Kev., Nelson Co., Ky. 

''I{, B. Ihujdcnr 

The Finest Sour Maah Whisky made in Nvlsun <Jo., Kentucky. Cbtirlus Meineckc tb Co.. Agents, S.F. 




CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS 314 SACRAMENTO STREET 




26 



ja/>ceifie Wl_f^£ /I^B Sflf^lT f^LVIEW. 



NATIONAL IMPORTS AND EXPORTS, 

A Comparatiit Sialemetil for November, JS95, and A'oivmbcr, 1S'J6. 



IM TOUTS. 



Nov., ISiO. 



Nov., ISWi 



Quantity Value IQuantll}' Vsluu 



.Malt LivHok*. fn>lluui>' 
111 biiiilvi or jufpi... 
Ill oilier t'uverliiKS. 



ITO.aOS 
lOT.CU 



Total . 



•jTii.saa 



SI'IKITO, UisTILLKii (proof KaHoK^ ' 

Of ilomCTlle manufacture, returned (uub- 

jccl to Inlcrual revenue tax) 

Brandv 

All oilier 



Tolal...,. 



flOO.STn 



\b%Mi 



10C,4.->8 1G<,44I 

•Zi.bMt (1II,I5» 

HI.TIU IIM.l^ 

831,7S5| !ftH,774 



SPiKiTs (nol of dometlic manufacture) im- 
ported from— (proof KaUons)- 

I'uited Kin|;dom 

Beltfium 

France 

Germany 

Italy ...'....'. 

N'eliierlaiuU 

Oilier EuroiH.- | 

Brilisli Xorlli America 

West Indies 

China 

Other Asia and Oceanic* 

Oilier counl ries 



108 »(H 
7j,(W; 



Ittii.UMU 



87,(MI 
2.J, l.ia 
II6,U7» 



i'il,.Vil! 

•1.7-W, 
•.'4.500 

S,41'J 

2,085 
24„VJC' 

4,TJ7| 

.S,4'i4' 

8.S75 

2,0U5 

478 



Total lCi.277 



WINK!. : 

Champagne and other spaiUliu):, dozen 

Slill »illc6, ca.<ks, caiiiMis. 

Still wines, in other coverings, dozen — 



:K,UI0 

;.-'4,tKi 

42,:ilS 



Total. 



Wi-NKS imported from Onited Kingdom. 

— From France 

Germany ' 

Italy 

Oilier Europe 

Other counl ries 



Total. 



CU,oy(ti 
5,200 

70.702, 
a.352 
8,738 

13,'1'J 
7,272 

3<J,4I1 

8,481 

2,443! 

500 

357 1 



tioa,7£> 

22,001 



120,423 



73,012 
04,TCS 
I3»,ii5 



228,271 



51,0>'3 
ti4;i 

27,007 
8,535 
2.322 

16,576 
1,744 

16,510 
2,495 
5,436 
3,8117 
1,163 



230,333 141,230 



505.086' 
240,702! 
200,312 



28.070 

2:i2,6:J8 

IM.OaO 



272,045 



l>4,2ll 
471 

75,015 
7,380 
3,394 
8,184 
1,685 

27.679 

6 103 

1,107 

9(i:i 

2,712 

190,003 



445,932 
149,019 
12S.7U9 



947.0001. 

27,031 . 
5j1,466 . 
215,080 . 

40,192 . 

I0.,I87 . 

8.044 . 

947.000 



72:^,750 

9..S09 

504,257 

143,185 

18,942 

44,892 

S,!65 

723,750 



EXP0KT8 



.Malt Li<iroR« : 

In hollies, dozen 

Not in bolllef, Kalloiis. 



Nov., 1895. 



Nov., 1896. 



Quanlity 



34.007 
22,012 



Total. 



Spirits, cistillkd (proof gallons): 

Alcohol, including pure, neutral or co- 
logne spirits .■ 

Brandy 

■turn 

Whisky — 

Bourbon 

Rve 

All other 



Total. 



Wink: 

In bottles, dozen 

Not in bolllen. gallons. 



T.iliil. 



20,431 

8.607 

99,637 

6,701 

1,4^9 

35,228 

I67,(l.-i3 



Value. Quantity Value 



$46 104] 
4.959 



36,007 »39,995 
29,701 7.026 



51,063 . 



2,?59 4(!,85.') 

3,372 421 

189,000- 45,338 



10,949 
8,704 
14,340 



5,595' 

2.126 

81,938 



I73,6U 132.273 



1,981, 7,817: 716 

94.343, 44,985, IOI,3Ufl 



52,802] . 



47,021 



11,092 

435 

01,957 

9, .3.14 

2,410 

15,211 

101,059 



2,920 
47,947 



.'10,873 



EXl'OKTS OK FOIIEIGN LIQUORS. 



.Malt Li4D0I» (gallons): 
In holtlvo or jugs.... 
In other coTeiings. ., 



Total . 



Si'iiiiTH, iiiHTiLLKti ( prool gallons): 
Of <|Miiri'>il<.' manufacture, returned (sub- 

ji' I t'l internal revenue lax) 

Brandy 

All ot her 



Total . 



Nov.. 1895. 



Quantity Value 



40 



WiRKi: 

Htr 

hi I 



Idling, dozen..! 



46 



181 

678 

1,397 

2.'256 



78 
1,K.V1 

4:w 



»i3 



42 



Nov., 1896 



Quantity Value 



1,051 



$ 91i5 



1,051 



935 



170 






943 
1,980 


118 
8,882 


105 
5.325 


3,093 


4,000 


5,430 


l,.''i4n 
1.316 
2,362 


203 
579 

?70 


2,019 
;ioi 

T.M 


.'i.2.'4 







l;l>IST.\ .N 1 \ I N IvS— Fn-Hli 
for Mile ill ri'U.'wiiiulilf nitcH. .Vdilrc 
S:iii Kniiic.'iHoo. 



Kipiiriii and Lenoir cuttings 
MH Unoiii 5(1, .'l.'lo Pino Htrei't, 



Decisions h.ivc Iiclmi rendered in my favor liv the Hunfiarian 
Minister of ('otnmerce in Autrust and Octolier, 1896, in conse- 
quence of whith tlie trade marks of the folhiwinj.' ajierient 
waters, viz : 

"APENTA," "UJ HUNYADI," 
HUNYADI MATYAS, 
LAJOS, 
LASZLO, Etc, Etc. 

have been cancelled, all beinjr iniitations of inv "HUNYADI 
JANOS" trade mark. No other water except my HUNYADI 
JANOS is allowed to use the name ''HUNYADI," tliis name 
beiuj; my exelu.sive trade mark making apart of the name of my 

HUNYADI JANOS 

NATURAL HUNciAKlAN Al'KKlKNT WATER. 
Tlie Trade is hereby cautioned not to handle waters bearing 
any of tlie above meiitiiiiinl n:uiirs, .i^ 1 <li:ill hnld all ]p:irtieH 

sellinf: such waters responsible in damages and protect my 
trade-mark-rights to the fullest extent, by action against all 
infringers. 

ANDREAS SAXLEHNER 



Buda Pest 



. o n d o n 



N < J \\/ York 



Pacific Coast Agent for HUNYADI JANOS ^^- WOLFF k CO 



327-9 Market St.. S.F. 



TRADE MARKS. 

WM. G. HENDERSON, Patent Attorney and Solicitor. 

Xovrla Itldi)., nth .C F StH., Near U. S. I'litriil »tjicr. Uinnnx -JO to -J.i 
P. 0. Box 122. WASHIXOTOX, D. C. 

Seventeen years' experience, including service in Examining Corps, U. 8. Patent 
Ollice. American and Foreign Patents procured. Cnvcals tiled. Rejected applica- 
tions revived. Opinions given as to scope and validity of patents. Infringement 
suits pioEeculed and defended. TIUDE-M.\liKS, LABELS AND COPYRIGHTS 
registered. 

t^^ Copy of any printed patent, trade-mark or label furnished for 25 cents. 
CorrcspoiulciK'u invited. Hand-book on ralcnls fiirnislicd FREE on ajiplication. 



THE - DIVIDEND, ^o-^^stell 4 co. 

' I'KAI.KHS IN 

5 Leidesdorff Street, i^ y» |^ ^ W^ 

JAMES O'liUtEy, Pi-oprlelfii: 

Importer of FINEST WINES, UQUORS, 



Irie.li and Scotch Whiskies. Bass' Ale and 
Gnlnnesb Stout. 

Uoore, Hunt & Co's Whiskies a S[ieciaUy. 



A specialty made of 

FOURDENIER TISSUE 
STRIPPED MAN I LA 

1 For iviBpping l.ollU'p. 

1 401 & 403 Sansomt St. San FraLCiMO. 



ESTABLISHED 1363. 



SAMUEL WANDELT, 



STEAM AND HAND- 



O O O IP E le, .i^. C3- IB 

til. li.i, ii.'t MHirii riiiitii >/•.. r.iiDohi.yi. \. r. 

WinnndLipiBafielsanilTanKs 

jft. Specialty. 

I am now pri'|ihrrd to make and furnish the laigcsl, ns ucll as the smallest 
article In my line of Coopirnge. Estimates given «llh promptness. All work war- 
ranted to be tinifhcd In wurkmanllkr manner and ei|ual to any in the market. 



fjO^eifie WIJME /rJMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



27 



Prices Current. 



These «re the long prices. The rate nf 
discount on purclmscs of n consiilcrablc 
quanlilv, can be learned by aiiplvin); to 
the aiienis or dealei-s. We' nr>;enlly re- 
Hiiest dcaierf. ai;enls and producers to 
notify us wlien a clian^e occurs in tiie 
prices current of the j;oods they tinndle. 



California Wines &. Brandies 



[The Prices K>T«<i*re for quarts and pints. 
put up in eases of twelve anti twenty- 
tour bottles. 1 



0. CAHPY A CO. 
511-517 Sacramento street, San Francisco 

I.« Loma, Grand Medoc. . . .1 7.00 i S.OO 

Hureundv 5.00 6.00 

Ziniandei 3.50 4.50 

Santerne 5.00 fi.lH) 

Itieslini; 4.00 5.00 

Sweet Muscatel, 1882 'J. 00 10.00 

Sherrv, 1882. 9.00 10.00 

Port,"lSS2 8.00 9.00 

Cal. Rochelle Brandy 12.00 13.00 



MONT KOl'GE WINES. 

A. O. Chaiiche Livermoie. 
Office and Depot, 615-617 Front St., S. F. 

Quarts 

Buri;undy * 9.00 

Chablis 9.00 

Claret, Relourd'Europe 9.00 

Juraniion, Favorite wine of 

Henri IV, Kin^ of France S.OO 

Haut Sauterues 7.00 

Sauternes 6.00 

Lijjht Sauternes 5.00 

Claret Grand Vin 6.00 

Tabic Claret 4.00 

Zinfandel .S.OO 

$1.00 additional for jduts. itcd and 
white wines in bulli at all prit-es. 



J. GUNDI.ACII .V CO., 
Cor. SecouiU*: Marlicl Sts. San Francisco. | 
I'RicKa Pkk cask. I 

QIIAHTS. PINTS. ] 

Tramlner, 82 » 5.00 » rt.OO 

Guledel. sa B.OO 7.(K( ! 

liurcuudv, 84 O.OO 7.00 1 

Zinfandei 8;5 5.00 6.00 

INOLENOOK WINES. 
Aj;ency, lOI Front street, San FraiiciBCO. 
Table Claret blended from 

choice forciiju gra|)e8, 

vinlaKc 1,S90 |3.,W 

Zinfandel 4.50 

Extra T.-ihle Claret, Medoe 

type red label, 1889 5.50 

Burj;uiuly, 1888, Ileserve 

Stock 7.00 8.00 

Santerne drv,SauTig'nVert '80 5.50 

Oulcdel.Chasselns Vert, 1889 4.50 

Hocii, Khcnish type " 6.00 

Hurler, Chablis type ■' 5.50 

IticslinR, Johauuisber^ Ivpe 

1888 ", . . 6.50 

Pints of two dti/.enf 1 per case additional. 
None ijemiine except bearing seal or cork 
brand of the pioprietor. 

KOHLER & FROHLING. 
601 Folsom Street, San Francisco. 

Riesling * 4.00 t 4.50 

Hock 3.50 4.00 

Gutedel 4.,50 5.00 

Sauterne 4.,'jO 5.00 

Zinfandel 3.75 4.25 

Zinfandel. old 4.50 5.00 

Buigundv 4.00 4.50 

Superior Port 10.00 

Sherry 7.50 

Anyefica 0.00 

.Muscatel 6.00 

.Madeira BOO 

.Malaga B.OO 

Brandy 10.00 



KOLB & DENHARD, 
420-42G Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Per Case. 

Hock *;j.oo 

Riesling o.50 

Gutedel 4.00 

Sauterne 4.00 

Sauterne, 1885 5.00 



Claret 2..') 

Zinfandel li.o" 

Cabernet 3 .50 

Burgundy 4.00 

Port.lS84 7.00 

Port, 1887 5..')0 

Sherry 5.00 

Cognac, 1885 lO.tMi 

S. LACHMAN A CO., 
4.53 Braunan street, San Francisco 

Old Port »7.00 f^.00 

Zinfandel 3.50 4.00 

Uiesling 4.."iO 5.00 

Madeiras 8.00 . . 

Malaga 8.00 

Cognac 14.00 

C. M MANX, 

(Successor to I, Dk Turk.) 
Onice and Cellars 216--.'ls-220 Sacramento 
St.. and 221 Commercial st. S Francisco. 
Cognac Brandy. XXXX., ((Jnarts ). .fln.OO 

XX 9.00 

Tentuiier Port 5.50 

Trousseau Port, No. 1 4 00 

Dry Sherry, Private Stock 5 ,50 

" Supei-ior ..... . , ... 4.00 

Angelica, Old Selected Stock 4 00 

Mu.^calelle •' " " 4.00 

Malaga " •' " 4 00 

Madeira " •■ 4.00 

Tokay, best, Old Selected Slock.... 6.00 

Tokay, •■ " "... 4..'i0 

Hant Sauterne " " 5.00 

Riesling. " " *' 3 50 

Guledel, ■• •• ■'■.... S.'iO 

Hock ■• •• .... 3.00 

Cabernet, '* Grand Vin " *' 5.00 

Burgundy " " " 4.50 

Zinfandel Claret, Selected Claret 3..50 

XX Claret, " " .... S.ijo 

Claret, ' " .... 2.75 

NAPA VALLEY WINE COMPANY. 

Second and Folsom St., San Francisco. 

Sherwooii a Sherwoob, .\gents. 

212-214 Market street. Sail Francisco. 

Hock, green label ? 3.00 » 4.00 

Hock, black label 3.50 4..')0 

Qutedei 4.00 5.00 

Riesling 4..=i0 5..50 

Cabernet 4..)ii 3.5il 



Bureundy 4.00 

Ziiilaiidel 8.50 

Claret, black label 3.0U 



Claret, red label 2.75 

Private Stock Hoek 5.00 

ElCerrlto.,.. 9.00 

Haulenie 8.00 

Claret 5.00 

Burgundy 7.00 

Vine Cliff.... 12.00 

Sherry 4.50 

Port 4,.50 

Angelica 4.50 

Tokay 4.,50 

Muscatel 4.5U 



Madeira. 
Brandy Crown 



4.50 

10.00 

12.00 
15 00 
18.00 



I. J ROSE & CO., LTD, Ban tiabriel, Cal. 

Port, 1873, 1 do/,. i|ts. In case $15. On 

•■ 1870, lii.oo 

■' 1«82, ■• " '• 9.00 

•■ 188(1, 7.50 

Sherry, 1882, 1 lUiz qts. in ease 9.00 

•• ■ 1881'., •' •• 7.50 

Angelica, 1882, 1 do/., qts. in ease. . 9.00 
Angelica. 1886. 1 do/.. ()ts. in ease... $7.50 
Muscatel, ISN2, I do/,, (its. in case... 9.00 

1880. 7.50 

Tokay, 1882, 1 doz. iits. in case 9 00 

1886, " •• '• 7.50 

.Madeira, 1882. I do/.. ([Is. in case 9.00 

1886, 7.50 

Brandy. 1881, •• " •• .... 15.00 

1886. " •• •• .... 10.00 

Zinfandel, 1890, 1 doz qle. in case.. 4.00 

•' 2 •• pts. •• .. 5.00 

Burger, l.VJO. 1 doz qls. in case 4.00 

2 " pts. •• 5.00 

All the foregoing vintages are true to 
name and age, as indicated on label. We 
guarantee thcabsolute pnrityof every bot- 
tle of wine and brandy put up by us. 

■•CRESTA BLANCA." 
WETMORE-BOWEN COMPANY. 
I ,1 > iitgomery street. Sail Francisco. 

WHITE WINES. 

Sauterne Souvenir $ 6.00 t 7.00 

Haiit Sauierne Souvenir 9 00 10 HO 

Chateau Yquem Souvenir... II 00 13.00 




HigHesfScfK of ({wards. wiHilHedal and Oiplomi. , ; 

THE 5t»liDA»li> OF *>li{fH,1lOH<. AiJJOlUTtLV PUJ^El 

DlSTIkLCO BY ' 

A. GUCKENHEIMER & BROS« 



PITTSBURGH, 



U. S. A. 



4mn/<i!i;i»: 




OlSTILLCa B) 



PENNA. DISTILLING CO. 



BUTLCR CO. PENNA. 



Cold style monongahela rye whiskey) 




7M^/t^yn/l€l//2i 




^^^ 







28 



f/teifie WIJvJE /JMD Spif^lT 'REVIEW 




"""""^""^'wiLS'riDRIN 



F. KORBEL & BROS, 



5 



74 WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK. 



723 Bryant Street S.n Fr.nci.co G E N U I N E XX BEADING OIL XX 

lleducril To $7.rtO l-i-r (Utllnn. 
! OoihIm I'or Sale t» t'alll'nrnla only by 

Or at NORTH FORK MILL 

REDINGTON 4. CO. 23-^7-29 second st., %an rRANCisco 
Humboldt County - California 



Tissue Paper 

Mav^ila Paper 

Label Paper 

rAI'F.R OP ALL KlXnS 



ESTABLISHED 



A. Finke's 



A.Zellerbach&Sons 



Cor. Sansomc & Gonrimercial Sts. 



SAN IK.VNCISOO 



I'i'iiilurir.i (if 

CALIF(I11M.\ 

ABSOLUTELY PURE 




18 64 



Widow, 



Lachman &l Jacobi 



DEALERS IN- 



California Wines and BranQies. 

BRYANT AND SECOND STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Eastern Agents 



EDINGER BROS. & JACOBI, 

Cor. Dovpr & Pearl Sts., Brooklyn Bridge Store No 2, N. Y 



OFFICK; 

809 MONTGOMERY ST., 

San Francisco. 

Telephnne. Black (Bl. 



First Premium 

iHAIlIMGNES. 



■'■' Gold Seal, 

Carte Blanche, 

ivy.y^-J -^-i,^ NOXPAKKIL. 

, fi, ITifFirst Premiums for Bcel 

' ■ ■ - Cahtonila ClinmjmirneFawardvd 

Jl*fiiRA.MisCO^^ l,j. ,1,^. Stale Fairs'. 1870-'J-.' and 
wiiercver t'xliii'ited. 



UOf/lA PPl^TA uUlVlp^p CO. 

-sr(x:i':ss(jKs tu- 
■^ATJ^TSOIsr^ILLE! 1^. & L. OO. 

riaveCoiislanlly on Hand a Full Supjily 
..f lliu FidliiHinu' Sizes of 

2x2--4 Feet Long, 2x2--5 Feet Long, 

2x2--6 Feet Long. 

H7if(7i will he sold at reasoiiahle riiteM, 



LOMA PRIETA LUMBER CO. 



Loma Prieta. 



Santa Cruz Co., Cat. 




FERRO-QUINA BITTERS 

A Wonderful Tonic and Strengthener 

AN ANTIDOTE AQAINST 

ANEMIA, CHLOROSIS, MUSCULAR DEBILITY, NAUSEA, HEAD. 

ACHE. PALf'lIAIIOS OF IHE HEART. PHTHISIS. SCROFULA, 

CHR0N:C B;tONCHITIS, general debility. LASSITUDE 

and other diieatet cauicd by a ditorderod tyiteni. 

Etpecially Recommimded at a preventative against FEVERS 
in tropical climatel, 

ADDRcaa 

D. p. ROSSI 
1400 Dupont St., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

- I.K AtiKNT roll I". ..*, AHU l"AN\l.\ 

> If \'i nil) wliuleMlv or i-oinmlMlon liouae lu llili City. 




XME OISlL^^r GENUINE 

CHAMPAGNE 



D. P. ROSSI 

Uoqtiani . It:ili.i antl San Fr.inctico 

1400 DUPONT ST. 

Sole A|))>nt for \hv Unilt-d Stntoi ant) Cana 



X^ 



EXTRA DRY 



ILK'.I^TKHKI') 



\. n ThU ItrHnil U one of Iho londlnK 
i'ltntn|tRKii*'i HmmI iit the ItoyHl CotirlN uf Mnly. 
tHTinntiy, KimlKihl ; Im NtH'tMitlly ln<|nrH4><l liv |tiM 
iiiiinlc.t. S.'w Vork: rnU*'*- Ildid. |)rt MoiKi*, Mitlnoii 
I'ur.-. Mnl«inii Ulrlip. MiiUoM Torltuil. r.Mn|l.> ]*n\: 
« iitiijtl'-, Miirtliivllt'M, itt Uic C iiimeri'lal llnii'l, H. I 




PASIfie WIJ^E /rj^K) SpiF^IT l^EVIEW 



29 



WETMOUE-liOWEN COMPANY. 
140 MoiitftonnTV stiwl, San Fraiicisci). 

RED WINE8. 

Tabic d'liote Simvciiir S.SO 6 M) 

St. Jiilii'ii Souvenir 7 UO sou 

Maiuaux Scuivenir S.iiO tf.ilO 

IN ADI>1TU>N TO ABOVK 

Zlnfaiulel 4.00 5.011 

Buru'iiiuly 6.00 7 00 

llii-sling 5.00 fl.OO 

KL PINAL. 

Port, Vintage ISOO 5.50 

Port, •• 18SS 6.50 .. . 

Poit. " ISSO 8.00 

Old Trousseau Port 12.00 

Sbcrrv. ViDlage ISUO 5.50 

SherrV, " IS-ss 6 50 

Sherry. " 1S»6 8 00 

Sherrv. .\niuntillado Type.. lO.Oil 

MuBi.nlel 5.50 .... 

AnKclUa 5.50 

Fronlignan 9.00 

Brandy, 1«)0 11.00 

Brandv.18.S8 1S.50 

Brandy, 1886 16.00 

Brandy, 1S76 M.OO 

WILLIAM WOLFF * CO.. 
'.i'20 iMarket street. San Franeiseo. 

NAULEE BRAMIY HOTTI.KIl AT DlSTtLLERY. 

CASK t;oous. 
White Lal)elQ. C not under 25 yre.. $20.00 

Blue Label, Ui. not under 15 yrs 15.00 

Red Label. O. X , not under 10 yrs . 12.00 
Trade discounts aeeording to quantity 

DULK. 

(In packages of 23 gallons each.) 

Per j;!il. 

For ages 1872-1876 *4.U<) 

1877-1882 S.M 

1883-1884 3.25 

Bitters. 

D. P. ROSSI, 
X. E. Cor. Dupont and Green Sis., S. F. 

FERUO QUINA BITTEKS. 

12 quarts to case $10.00 

WILLIAM WOLFF * CO., 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

AROMATIyUE. 

Per case of 12 quarts $12.00 



Chateau du Uailnn, 1881 


10..50 





1878 




12.50 


le I'ain, 1S78. 


11.50 


12..W 


Ponlet Canel, 1SS7 


1S.50 


14.50 


Chat. Bcychevelle, 1887 


16.00 




1881 




17.00 


Chateau Langoa 


18.00 




187S 


21.00 


22.00 


1874 


24.. ')0 


25..')0 


t'htti Brown Cantenac, 1887. 


23.00 


24.00 


Leoville. 1887 


24.50 


25.50 


1.S7S 




25.50 


Larose, 1874 


24., W 


•Si.M 


Latile, 1S74 


20.00 


:i(I.Oii 


.Maii;anx, 1874 


20.00 


30.110 


(II. Cuvillier .\: frere, R 


oi-deaux.) 


Pauillac. 188'J 


0.00 


10.(10 


St. Emilion Snperleur 


10.00 




dial. Cheval Blane, 1.SS0... 


14 00 




Chateau LeoviUe, 1S.SU 


\R.M 




Cbaleun linlnillev 1881 


17.50 


18. .50 


Chat. Kirvmn, 1S7S 




22.00 


Chat. Lapointe I'omerol, '7S 




22.00 


Chat. Poiilet Canet, 1874 


28.00 




•• Bevchcville, 1874 




25.00 


Cliat. Larose, 1S70 


24.0(1 




Cbalean Talbot d'Aux, 1875 


24.00 


25.00 


Chateau Leoville, ISTS 




25.50 


Chat. Cob d'Estouruel, 1878 


28.00 




(Du Vivier & Co., Boi 


deanx.) 




St. Marc 


$ 7 00 


$ 8.00 


Pontet Cauet 


11 00 


12.00 


WHITE WINES 






(Barton * Guestier, Bi 


rdeaux.) 


Sauternes 1878 


0.25 


10 25 


Vin de Graves, 1878 


U-.W 



Imported Wines. 

W. B. CHAl'.MAN, 
123 California street. San Francisco. 

RED WINKS. 

(Barlon .t Guestier, Bordeaux.) 

Quarts. Pint.**. 

Floirac t 7..50 * s..w 

Chateau Lacroix 8.00 9.00 

Pauillac, 1887 8.50 0.50 

1881 9 00 10 00 

St. Julien 1887 9.00 10 00 

St Eslephe 1887 9.00 10 00 



Barsac, 1S78 11.00 12.00 

Haul Siutcrncs, 18.87 17.50 18,50 

Haul Sauteines, 1874 18..50 VJ.M 

Chateau Y.|Ucni, 1884 30 .50 31.50 

Chateau Y(|iiem. 1S74 36.110 

(H. Cuvillier A frere, Bordeaux.) 

Chateau Giraud, 1S84 28.00 29 00 

La Tour Blanche'84 28.00 20.00 
(Du Vivier A Co., Bordeaux.) 

Graves premieres $9.00 $10.00 

CALIFORNIAN — RED WINES. 

(A. Duval). 

Burgundy. 1889 5.00 6.00 

Cabernet' Sauvignon, 1890... 5.00 6.00 

CALIFORNIA— WHITE WISES 

(A. Duval). 

Riesling, 18.S9 4.. 50 r>.M 

Cbablis, 1S.S8 5.00 C.OO 

Sauterne, ISSO 5.00 6.00 

Creme de Sauterne. 1SS9, 

(private stock) 7.50 8.50 

BURGUNDIES— RED WINES. 

(Bouchard pere & tils. Beaune Cote D'Or.) 

Macon, 1884 11.00 12.00 

Pommard, 1884 15.50 16..50 

Closde Vougeot, 1887 (Mono- 
pole) 25.50 26.-10 

Chambertin 18S4 26.00 27.00 

(Bouchard pere A fils, Beaune. Cote D'Or) 

Chablis, 18.84 i;i..50 14.50 

HOCKS. 

(S. Fricdborig. Mayence.) 

Laubenheimer, 1SS9 ? 9..50 $10.,50 



Llebenfrauinllch. 18.S9, "Se- . I 

leclcd Grapes" 17.00 18.00 

Raiienl baler, 1HS4 21.00 22.00 

Ilocbbcimer Doin Decliancy, 

1SS4 22..'jO 23.50 

Llebfraumilcli, 1876, "Extra 

IJuality" 30.00 31. (K) 

StelnbergerCabliicI, 1876.... 32.00 33.IM) 
(Prince Mel Ici nidi's Estalc.) 

ScliloBB .loliannii-bcrger, '08 .$45,00 $t«.0() 

HIIKKRIKK. 

(Sandemau, Buck Ot Co.. .lerez. 

.MalU•^e Cross IS 00 

Pemarlin Brut 20.00 

Umbrella 21.00 

AmoMlillado 'ii.oo 

(E. .1 lIoHcIl, Loudon.) 
Solera Especial 13.50 

MADEIRA 

(E. J. Howi-ll, Lond.ui) 
Xe Old Style, Puro Especial 15.50 

OLD COC.NACS. 

(H Cuvillier & Freie.) 
Fine Champagne " UcBcrve" 

1S70 ai.oo 

(Sazerac de Forge & Fils ) 
Very Old Cognac, 1S03 45 00 

OIN. 

Coales & Go's Original Ply- 

moutli (UnsNvcclcned). . 10. .50 

SCOTCH WHI.SKY. 

(Peter Dawson, DutFtown.) 

Dawson's 'Perfection" 12 50 

"Special" 14 30 

"Extra Kpccial" 16.50 
.. "Perfection," 24 

llasks 14.00 

Dawson's " Perfection," 48 
half-llasks 16.00 

CHAMPAGNE. 

I'crrier-Jonct. Finest Extra 

(Quality "Special" 3:i.50 3.5..50 

Pcrrier-Jouct. Finest Extra 

Qualily. " ISrul " 34 00 36.00 

Half Pints " y|)ecial," $42 00 per case of 
48 bottles. 



Count E. l)i Miialiore. 
Barolo, in cases of 12 bottles, 1887.. 

CIIIANTI WINE.- IN FLAHKB. 

J. L. Rulllno, Florence. 

Per case of 2 dozen <|uarts 

" 4 " pints 

WHITE AND RED STILL. 

Pasqualc Scala, Naples. 
Lacryma Christl, per case of 12 bot- 



7..50 



U..50 
13(10 



ties . 



L. GANDOLFI & CO.. 

427-431 West Broadway, New York 

(Prices f. o. b. New York.) 

Fill. Gancia & Co., Canelli (Asti.) 

Barbera, in cases of 12 bottles 3.50 

Barolo. " "12 " 7.00 

Gattiuara, " "12 " 6.50 

Nebbiolo, red, sparkling, in cases of 

12 bottles 8.50 

Brachetto, red, sparkling, in cases of 

12 bottles 8.50 

Giignolino. in cases of 12 bottles . .. 6.50 

Pints $1 per case more. 
C. A F. Giacobiiii, Altomonte, Calabria. 

(Fancy wines tor altar and medical use.) 
Moscato Calabria, in cases 12 bottles, 7.00 
Lacryma Christl, " 12 " 7.00 

Tokay, " 12 •' 7.00 

Malvasia, " 12 " 7 00 



Mtiscato di Siracusa, per case of 12 

bollles 

Falcnio, red, per case of 12 bottles 
(^apii, " " 12 

Pints, 75 cents per case more. 

SPARKLINC WINES. 

Pasqualc Scala, .Naples. 

Lacryma CItrisli, (|uartB 

•* '* |>iiit8 

Fill. Gancia A Co , Canelli (Asti, 
Moscato, white, in cases of 12 quarts 

24 pints 
Passarelta, white, *' 12 quarts 

" " •' 24 pints 



7 25 

ron 

7.00 
6.50 



17.50 

18.50 

) 

14.00 

15.011 

13.(K) 

14.00 



HELLMANN BROS, it CO., 
.325 Front street, San Francisco. 

SHERRIES 

Forrester A Co., Jerez, in 

wood, per gallon $ 1.50 $5.00 

Forrester A Co., Jerez, per 

case 12.00 16.00 

Garvey A Co., Jerez, in 

wood, jier gallon 1.75 5.00 

PORTS. 

Olllev $1.75 to $5.00 

Offley. per case $12.00 

CHARLES MEINECKE A CO. 
314 Sacramento street. San Francisco. 
A. de Luzc A Fils. Bordeaux 

Clarets, per case $8.00 to $'28.00 

A. de Luze A Fils, Bordeaux 

Sauternes, per case 12.00 to 20.00 

C.Marey A Liger Belair,Nuit8 

Burgundies, white and 

red, jier case 15.00 to 23.00 

D. M. Feuerheeid,Jr.,ACo., 

Oporto. Port wines 

per case 15.00 to 20.00 

D. M. Fenerheerd, Jr.,ACo., 

Oporto, Port Wines, 

in wood per gal '2.00 to 5.50 

Duff Gordon A Co.. Sherries 

in wood per gal 2 00 to 5.50 

Lacavc A Co., Sherries Crown 

Brand in >^ 1.40 to 1.7% 

South Side Madeira 2.00 to 2.50 

St. Croix Rum. L. B 5.50 

Arrack 'Royal" Batavia 5.00 to 6.00 

Boord A Son, London Dock 

Sliciry, per case 12.00 to 15.00 

G. M. Pabst'mannSohn, Mainz 

Rhine Wines per case.. 8.50 to 28 00 
Schulz A Wagner, Frankfurt 

o M Rhine w ines percasell.OO to 14.00 




P. C. ROSSI 

President 



,-r^u/^N 



-SWISS 



A. SBARBORO 



ASTI, SONOMA CO., CAL 



PRODUCERS OF FINE 



coto 



SCCRtTARV 



Ny 



CALIFORNIA WINES and BRANDIES 

MONTECRISTO CHAMPAGNES 

(NATt:iiAi.Lv Kkhmk.ntki, I.N lU.m.Ks.) Tu A i.K-,1 A KK I;k.,isikiu:„ t >( t. .i.kk Stii , 1895. 

Grand Diploma of Honor Gold Medal Dub>lln Ireland 1892 

Highest Award Genoa, Italy, 1892 Gold Medal Columbian Elx'o'n 1893 

Gold Medal California Midwinter Fair 1894 ' 

MAIN OFFICE, 524 MONTGOMERY STREET - - SAN FRANCISCO 
DEPOT AND CELLARS, 109 BATTERY STREET BETWEEN CALIFORNIA AND PINE STREETS 



Gold Medal "Turin, 1 88-4- 



HIgheet Award Chicago, 1894 



L. GANDOLFI & CO., Eastern Agents 



IMI'i>l!TKl<--i ilK - 

ITALIAN WINES AND PRODUCE 

42-7-431 "WEST BK.OjPs-ID\X/-iPs.Y, ISlE:\x7""5irOK.K: 



30 



P/rGlfie WljME /rfJD SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



CHARLES BUNDSCHU. PrnldMit 



CARL GUNOLACH. Vice-Prcsidenl 




HENRY CUNDUCH. SecrelarY 






GUNDLACH-BUNDSCHU WINE COMPANY 

Successors to J. (i l N I )|>^VCiI i\: i iJ. 

Vineyard Proprietors and Siiippers of 



J r. 



-•■#> 




«/_. 




S/\N pRANCISCO- -/^JEWYoRK? 

lioois Hoeneier 

Highest Grade in the World! 

Used by All the Leading Clubs 
Hotels and Restaurants . . . 

For sjile by All Fir.st-Class 
Grocers ainl Wine Merciiants, 



taliforiiiii Wines and Brandies, 

I'lierwiUHK RHINE FARM, suMWi (\i 

And BACCHUS WINE VAULTS. 438-442 Bryant St., S. F. 



Sail rranrisfii OJJirr, 

s. i: <<n:. M.ii:iii:r ,\:- SECoxit STS. 



S. E. Ccr. WAITS & WASHINGTON SIS 




TIIUKIC KINDS, AM, OI' KijrAI. KXCKI.I.KNCK 

BRUT {Gold Seal) 

An Extra Dry Wiuc 

GRA/ND VIM SEC ( nnni'?i Seal) 

The Perfection of a Dr\- Wine ! 

CARTE BLA/NCHE k While Seal) 

A Riuli W'lne 



Macondray Bros. & Lockard, 



124 SANSOME STREET 

Si lie At;ents for the Pacific Coast. 



» TUOS. KlKKPATHlCK, PkESIDKNT 



"UOS. KlKKPATHlCK, I'KESIDKNT ^^ .^^^ ~—^—. SlIKRLEY MOORK, VICE I'BE.s' 

San Fka.scibco, Cal. -^ W^\, M^\ \ J 1 ^ 1 J A -te- Louisville, Kv. 

^S^ Dlf^ECT f f^OjVl bOUISVIbbE, KY. ^^<r^> 



PEEI^CESS U/l;)iSl\IES. 



■» > J c < * 




CiJfil^fif^SEED 



^^'"'^ ■ - •■ '■'■^'^ .o^pnr^f-n T^ong on f/ig Pac/fc Coasi, TAey have been given years 0/ 'trmi 

btjtheher f trade. _ \ounced wifhnnt a peer. When given a friil the^ speak for 

■ ale in qnan- .ait in Imisville or San Frannisno hj/ 



JESSE MOORE. -H U /N T CO.. 



LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 



404 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



f/reifie WiJME Aj^D Sflf^lT f^EVIEW 



8HF.UW00D A SHKinvoOD, 

:il:i-214 MnrktM street. San Frftucibco 

KsriiKMADKK <t >ro.. nnKKRAtlX. 

Qiiiu- 

Mwliic t ^ 

Moi'iiitror 7 

lioulllac S. 

Itoil Seal S 

St, Jiilien superior U 

While Seal III. 

I'oiitet Cauet 11 

La itose I'i 

Oolil Seal i:i 

Graves S 

Sauterned y 

Maekenzie's Ports and Sher- 
ries In wooil per i^ftUon 1.7510 4, 
Maekeiizio's Ports and Sher- 
ries in eases 10.0(1 to 14, 

Hunt, lloope, Teaijne A Co's 

Ports in eases 13.00 to lU 



ACHILLE STARACE. 
76 Pearl street. New York. 

ITALIAN WINKS. 
RED WINE.S. 

(Giuseppe Seala. Naples.; 
I.aervmn Christi. 12 qts. . . .$ fi.50 per ease 

Falerno, " 7.50 

Capri. ■• .... 6.50 

Capri, 24 pts 7..50 per case 

Moscato di Siraeusa. 12 qtB. 9.00 
Vesuvius wine in barrels of 

about no <:alIons 1.05 per i^nl 

WHITE WINES. 

Laerynia Chnsti, 12 qts.. ..$ 7.50 per ease 

Falerno •' 7 50 

Capri, *' 6.50 ** 

Capri, 24 pts.... 7.50 

SPARKLING WINES. 

Laeryma Christ), 12 qts fl9.U0 per east 

24 pts.... 20 50 
(L. Laborel Melini. Florence) 
Cliinnti Wine in Hasks without oil 

Cases of 2 doz. iits J12.50 per case 

" 4 '■ pts 14 50 



W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 
Jerez de la Frontera, 

SHERRIES. 



.Vo. 



Per Gal. 
{ .,?1.40 



1.711 



i.sri 



.15 



2.50 



2.«5 
3 25 

3.a5 



1 P Table, full bodied 

1 VP Tahle, very pale 

2 P Full and round ( 

2 VP Very Pale, lijclit, line ( • 

3 P Full body, soft, rich j 

3 VP Very pale, li!;ht. full \ ' ■ 

4 P Fuli body, old, mellow ) 

4 VP Very pale, delicate, dry ) ' 

5 P Full body, rich, fruitv i 

5 VP Pale, old. fine " ? •• 

6 P Extra full and fruity ) 

6 VP Verv tine and mellow ( ** 

7 Amo AMONTILLADO, old and 

nutty .■ 

8 CLO CLOHOSA, mellow soft. 

9 Rex Superb old Desert Wine . 
10 A.MONTtLLADO Solera, very 

tild and nuttv 4 40 

U QUEEN VICTORIA Grand old 

wine 5 Bd 

SPECIAL WINES. 

Velvet \ Clean, sound wine 1.25 

B Full bodv and rich 1.50 

Special N Soft, full aud fine 1 BO 

W Dark, full body 1.75 

B Clean aud sound — Fine... 1.80 

Fine, old and dry $1.85 

Fine, rich aud fruity 3.45 

Superb table 3.10 

Delicious aud delicate 3.25 

S Grand old wine 4.00 

-Fino. N. P. tJ 4.65 

RHINE AND MOSELLE WINES. 

Wilhelra Panizza, Mayence. 

Per Case, j 

Laiihenheimer #8.00 

Diedisheimer 8..50 

Niesleiner 10.25 

Hoekheimer 11 50 

Liebfraumilch 13.25 

Foster Jesnitnarten 13.75 

Rudesheimer 14.00 

Ebachcr 14^75 

Geaenheimer 17.25 

.Marcobruiiner 17.50 

Ra nut hater. 19.00 

Geisenheim Rothberg 21.00 

Neisleimer Rehbach 21.50 

Rudcsheimer Berj; 23.00 I 

Bulk wines at f. o. b. prices. 

PORTS. I 

Silva &. Cosena. 

Per Gal. 

T— Tawney tl.90 ! 

R — Extra full bodv ami rich, 2 05! 

V T— Very tawneV :i.25 

V T— \eryoid tawney 2..'J5 

T P— Extra tawney, delicate 2 50 

T P O— Tawney, eilra old 3.10 



Scco 
O 8 
C N 
Corona 
Special 
Neetar- 



HllANCO -White-Fine While Port, 3.2'> 
JEWKI.— A Si>eclally, old and mel- 
low S.,VI 

S ()— Superior old S,85 

EMPKliOlt— 30year8 in wood, b'rnnd 

old wine 4.7,'> 

M C R-1,S27— Choicest royal B.a'i 

Direcl shlppini; orders solicited on the 
most favorat)le terms. 

TARKAliONA WINKS. 

Jose Boule, Tairagoiiia, 

qrs. i\: octs. per Gal. 

• Fine clear and smooth $1,15 

ROYAL PURE JUICE-Fiill body 

and rich 1.25 

TAW.NFY PORT-Lltflit color, soft 

and old 1.25 

These wines have none of the object- 
ionable astrin^eney so common in wines 
of this class, ami are absolutely pure. 



WILLIAM WOLFF A CO.. 

.S2U iMnrket street, San Francisco. 

(Diibits Freres, Bordeaux.) 

Clarets in casks o( liOi;:ils.$95.UU 10 .<U5().0II 

(F. Chauvenet. Nulls, Cote d'Or.) 

Burgundy wines in cases, fill. 00 to $52.00 

(Deinhard \- Co., Coblcnz.) 

Hock and Moselle wines fi.iio in $32.00 

(Morgan Bros., Port St. Mary.) 
Ports aud .Sherries in wood, 

per gallon $2.00 In $5.00 

Port and Sherries In cases. 

per case $10.00 to $18.00 

(Mackenzie ife Co., Jerez.) 
Pons and Sherries in wood 

from $1.75 to $4..50 

American Whiskies. 

L GANDOLFI * CO., 

427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prieee f o. b. New York.) 

* Good Luck Jlonogram, per case $ 9.00 

« '• " 10.00 

Liberal diecount to the jobbing trade. 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO., 

525 Front sireet, San Francisco. 

Blue Grass, per gallon $2.00 to $3.50 



Br)one'fl Knoll, 



2.40 to 4.50 



KOLB & DENHARD, 
420-426 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

Per gal Per cs. 

Nonpareil $3.,50 $7.50 

Nonpareil A 4.00 9.00 

Nonpareil A A 5.00 12.00 

Canteeu 3.50 8.00 

Canteen O P S 5.00 11.00 



CHARLES MEINECKE A CO., 

314 Sacramento street, San Frtincisco. 

(Charles Meinecke it Co , Couliuuedl 

John Gibson Son * Co $2.00 to $4.0 



MOORE, HUNT & CO., 
404 Front street, San Francisco. 

Per Gallon 
Extra Pony in bbls or M-''bls $6.00 to $S.O 
A A •• •• pf 4.00 

B " " •• 3.5 

C ..... 30 

Rye In bbls aud J^-bbls from '' 50 to 5.0 

A A in cases 11.0 

C in cases , 8. 5 



NABER, ALF8 & BRUNE. 

323 and 325 Market street, San Francisco 

PhiKiiix Old Bourbon, .-Vl.. $2.75 

" Old St'k 3.00 

" Al, 90 pf 2..i0 

' OK,100pf 3.,50 

" P.m^,Priv St'k 4.00 

Club House Bourbon, Old. . . 4.,50 6.00 

Gold Meda! Bourbon, 100 p( 2..50 

Union Club •• - 2,25 I 

Superior Whisky 1.75 I 

BB Whisky 1..50 

Liquors— In cases. 

Per Case 

Phienix Bourbon OK, in ,58 ■• ,0„50 

Al, •• 7,.50 

Al,24 pis 8.00 

Al,48>4pl 9.00 

Rock and Rye Whisky in .5s 7.,50 

Rum Punch"Eitract,"in .56. 8.00 

Blackberry Brandy, in 58. 7. .50 i 

8PRUANCE, STANLEY * Co., j 

410 Front street, San Francisco. | 

Kentucky Favorite $ 3.00 1 

Extra Kentucky favorite... 3..50 

O. P. T 2. ,50 I 

O K. Old Stock .5.00 

Harries' Old Bourbon 2.00 I 

Kentucky Favorite, in cases 8. ,50 



H. O. B. jugs 9,00 

0. P.Ojngs 10..50 

African Stomach Billera, e». 7.50 

SIEBK BU08. it I'LAGICMAN. 
.322 Snns(jine street, San Frniiclsco. 

K Extra $3..50 to $6.00 

OK Rosedale 2.50 lo 3.00 

Ilvaln 2.75 

G(dden Pearl 2.25 

.Marshall 2.'25 

Old Family Bourbon 1.75 

Old Bourbon 1..50 



SHERWOOD A HHEItWOOD, 
212-214 Market street. San Francisco. 
Carlisle in bbls. lte-im]iorted 

Spring 'sy per gal $'^. 

(larlisle in bbls. Rc-imported 

Spring '.SO. per gal 3. 

Keystone Monogram Rye in 

eases, i>er case. ... 14. 

OUl Saratoga, in cases, per 

case 15. 

Mascot Bourbon in bbls per 

gal 2. 

Rohiu Hood Bourbon in bbls 

per gal 2, 

Sherwood Private Stock in 

bbls, per gal 3. 

0. P. S. Sherwood in bbls, 

per gal 3, 

Old Saratoga, in bbls per gal 4. 



WILLIAM WOLFF it CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

Carlisle re-imported. Spring '90 $2.40 

R. IJ. Havden A Co.'s Old Grand 

Dad, Spring '90 2.25 

Mayfield, Spring '89 2.65 

Athertou, Spring '90 2.35 

Anderson Co.. Spring '91 . 1.85 

Hume, Spring '89 2.45 



Imported Champagnes. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California street, San Francisco. 
Perrier Jouet &Co."Sptcial"$33.,50 $35..50 

Reserve Dry 34.00 .36.00 

Perrier Jouel & Co. Brut,.. . 34.00 36.00 
Halt pts "Special" $42 in cs of 48 bottles. 

HELLMANN BROS, & CO., 
hit) Front street, San Francisco. 

Krug &, Co. "Private Cuvee" 

per case $34.00 $36.00 

Joseph Perrier fils A Co 

per basket 19.00 20.00 

Adrien A fils, per basket.. . . 17.00 18.00 

MACONDRAY BROS. & LOCKARD, 
Agents 

124 Sansome street, San Francisco. 
Louis Roederer, Carte 

Blanche $34,00 $:J6.00 

Louis Roederer, Grand Vin 

Sec 34.00 36.00 

Louis .. aederer. Brut 34.00 36.00 



CHARLES MEINECKE A CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

DEUTZ )t UILnERMANN, AY.. CHAMPAGNE. 

Gold Lack Sec. [ler case $32.00 $34.00 

Gold Lack Sec. 6 Magnums 

per case 31.00 

Cabinet Green Seal, per bskt 2.5..50 27.00 

DCPANLOUP A CO.. REIMS. 

Carte Blanche, per case 21.00 22.00 



D. P ROSSI, 
N. E. Cor Dupoiit and Green Sis., g, F. 
Monic Cristo, 12 quarts to case $12.00 

24 pints " 13.00 

Special discount for quantities. 

SHERWOOD A SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market street. San Francisco 
Moet A Chandon, White Seal 32,110 34.00 
Brut Imper'l 35.00 37.00 



W. A. TAYLOR A CO., 
39 Broadway, New York. 

SPARKLINli SAlIMUIi. 

Ackerman-Laurence, Saumtir, France. 

Dry Royal $2100 $2;i.00 

Brut •• 21,00 23.00 



WILLIAM WOLFF A CO. 
329 Market sireet, San Francisco 

QUARTS. PINTS 

While Seal (Grande Cuvee)J .34,00 Mi.lK) 
Brul Imperial 3.8,00 40.00 



31 



Imported Brandies. 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 

1'23 California street, San Francisco. 

(H, Cuvillier A freie Cognac.) 

Quarts, 
tine Champagne, "Reserve," 

„ •«<'•,• i;i2oo 

Grande Fine Champagne, 1860 36.00 



L. GANDOLFI A CO., 
427-431 West Broadway, Now York. 
(Prices f. o. b. New York ) 
••• Albert Dubois &Co., Cognac, 

..,,'- 'I "•■"■•" $11.75 

•"' Rupi>art A Co.. 12.|u«rlB 10.50 

ITALIAN — KRATELLI BRANCA. MILAN 

Cognac Fine Champagne, Croix 

Rouge, per case lo.uo 



HELLMANN BROS. A CO.. 

.525 Front street. San Francisco. 

E. Remy Martin A Co., Cognac. 

Cognac in Octaves per gal.. 5.50 6..50 

In eases, see special advertisement 

P. Frapin A Co., Cognac. 

Cognac iu octaves, per gal.. 5,05 6.50 

Planal A Co., Cognac. 
Cognac in octaves, per gal. 5.25 



E. REMY MARTIN A CO., Cognac. 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO., AGENTS. 

525 Front Street, San Francisco. 

Eau-de-Vie vieillc $15 oo 

■ 17!00 

„. ; 19.00 

rine chami>agne 20 00 

Grande champagne vieille 22!oO 

" " extra. '25 00 

" V O. P. 18.58 30.00 

" S. O. P. 1847 35.00 



V.S. 0. P., 1834 50.0,; 

In octaves $4,70 lo 6.25 

CHARLES MEINECKE A CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
Champ Vineyard Proprs. Co.. 
Boutelleau it Co. man- 
agers Coguac in Octaves 

per sal $5.^.^ to$8.50 

The Vineyard Proprs. Co. 
Boutelleau A Co. mana- 
gers Reserve Vintages. 11.00 to 14.00 



W. A. TAYLOR A CO., 
39 Broadway, New York. 

COGNAC BRANDIES. 
ROLYER, GUILLET A CO., COGNAC 

Vintage. Qr. Casks, per gal. 

"W6 $4.8.5 

1884 540 

18'5 6.55 

1869 7.40 

18M 12,25 

VSO 1750 

Octaves. 5 cents per gallon extra. 
CASES. 

Cases • 14 50 

** 10,20 

•• **• 17.80 

" **•• 19..50 



WILLIAM WOLFF A CO., 

329 Market sireet, San Francisco. 

Martell's Brandy, • per case $15.00 

" " 17.00 

... „ lypo 

VO •• 26.00 

VSO " 32,00 

• W80P •• 50.00 

in octaves 5.00 lo 25 



Imported Whiskies. 

W, B, CHAPMAN 
1'23 California street, San Francisco. 

SCOTCH WHISKY, 

Dawson's " Perfection " $12.5li 

Old Highland " Extra Spec- 
ial " •13,00 

Old Higliland " Special LIq-" 

iioiier" in 00 . ... 






HELLMANN BROS. A CO, 

,5'25 Front street. San Francisco, 
J. B, Sherriff A Co., Lochin- 
dae Islay, Scotch whisky 
ill wood, per gallon S.8t 



32 



iT^eifie W1J\£ /fJMD SflF^lT f^EVlEW. 



W. A. TAYLOR S CO. 

39 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



I^EFI?.ESEISrTin^C3-: 



GONZALEZ. BYASS & CO., 
SUVA & COSENS - 
BLANDY BROS, & CO,, 
ACKERMAN-LAURNACE, 
WILHELM PANIZZA, 
MARTINI &i ROSSI, 
I, & V, FLORIO. - - 
PETER F, HEERING, - 
REIN & CO., - - - 



SHERRIES 

PORTS 

MADEIRAS 

SPARKLING SAUMUR 

RHINE WINES 

VERMOUTH 

- MARSALAS 

CHERRY CORDIAL 

MALAGAS 



JOSE BOULE, 
A, BRONDUM & SON, 
ROUYER, GUILLET &i CO,, 
JOHN JAMESON & SON, Ltd., 
THE ARDBEG DISTILLERY CO., 
CHAS, TANQUERAY & CO,, 
MAGNUM BRAND. 
MAGNUM BRAND, 
MAGNUM BRAND, 



TARRAGONAS 

ACQUAVIT 

- BRANDIES 

IRISH WHISKY 

SCOTCH WHISKY 
OLD TOM GIN 
JAMAICA RUM 

ST. CROIX RUMS 
HOLLAND GIN 



ORDERS SOLICITED FOR DIRECT SHIPMENTS. 



SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS IN TERMS, PRICES, ETC. 



SPECIALTIES 



John Jameson & Son, Limited 

FAMOUS 

IRISH WHISKY 

In all lands it is recognized as being 

WITHOUT AN EQUAL! 

Sells iu Dublin, at auction, for nearly douMi' llic prioc of 
any oilier Irish wliisky. 

CHAS. TANQUERAY & CO. 

Old Jm (Jnsweetened Qin 

The liigheHt typo of KngliHli (Jins. Fast becoming 
|)r>piilar in the KaHt. 

Will Sell Themselves! 



SCOTCH WHISKY 

"GOLF CLUB" "PIBROCH" 

These two whiskies are tlic finest types of Scotch 

Whisky to be found anywliere. Won in their 

class in competition against the best known 

brands iu the market. 



(( 



RED LION" 



JAMAICA RUMS 



An exceedingly fine, old I.omlon l)ock Cased I{\ini. 



If You Want the Best, Try It! 



SOLE AGENTS W. A. TAYLOR 8t CO., 39 BROADWAY. N. Y. 



f/rSlfie Wi;^E /cjvlB Sflf^lT f^EVIEW 



33 



IIELLM.VNN BItOS. .t CO., 

.V,'.') From stiTL'l, Sail l'"raiul6i'o. 
J. H. Shell itr.t Co., Lochiii- 

(lac Islay, Scotch whisky 

ptT rase rjiio 

DiiMin IVislilUrs Co., Mil., 

Dublin, Irish wliisivy, 

in wood, per ;;alloti. . . . 4..*iO 

Pulilin inslilli-is Co., I.lil , 

Diililin, Irish whisliy, 

per case IJ.OO 

CHARLES MEINECKE A CO., 
SH Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
Booril .^ Son. London Finest 

Irish Malt Wliiskev. . . . tU'..V) 

Royal Hiihia Scotch Whisky. l'^..^ 

John Ramsav, Islav Malt 

Scotch "Whisky." i:i.50 

SHERWOOD A SHERWOOD. 

21'J-iH Market street, San Francisco. 

Burke's • * • Irish, cases 12.00 

........ .. 1400 

•■ Oarnkirk Scotch " 12.M 

" Viceregal Scotch " 13.50 

Lawson's Liqueur ** '* l-S.SO 

ram Var, " ■ 12.00 

McKen/.ies Gleulivet • • • 

Scotch, per case 12.50 

Bushell's Club Irish, in wood 

pcrgallon ■*.50 

W. A. TAYLOR <t CO.. 

39 Broadway, Xew York. 

The Ardbeg Distillery Co., Islav. 

Qrs. Octs. 

New |3.ai *3.90 

One Year 4.20 4.25 

Two Years 4.55 4.60 

Tbiee Yeare 4.95 5.00 

CASES. 

* one doz. bot. ?11.00 

• • • 13.00 

« • • * 20.00 

JOHN JAMESON i^ SONS, DUBLIN. 

Qrs. Octs. 

New f4.00 ?4.l)5 

One Year 4.40 4.45 

Two Years 4.70 4 75 

Three Years 5.05 5.10 

Four Years 5.45 5.50 

• ...1 dor bot. ?12.00 

• • • 14.50 

• • • • 24.00 



WILLIAM WOLFF * CO., 

329 Market street, San Francisco. 

Canadian Club per case J15.00 

IBISH WHISKIES. 

fWm. Jameson tV: Co., Dublin ) 

Green Diamond, per case 10.50 

Ookl Hi:imond " 11.50 

Three Diamond '• 14.,W 

In octaves, proof 122, per sal 4.00 

SCOTCH WHISKIES. 

(Andrew Usher A Co.) 

Old Vat.ed Glcnlivet, per case 12.00 

Special Reserve, per case 13 50 

" The Very Finest," per case 30.00 

In octaves, proof 111, per gal 4.25 

Domestic Champagnes. 

A. FINKES WIDOW, 

S09 Montgomery street. San Francisco. 

Prices on application. 

Liberal discount to the trade. 

FRASH it CO. 
87, 89. and 91 Hudson Street, New York. 

Imperial Cabernet, quarts ?7.00 

" " pints 

A discount to the trade. 



8.0O 



ARPAD HARASZTHY. 
San Francisco, California. 

THREE .NEW BRANDS 

• Harasjthy .Sec" JIO iO ?I9 IIO 

• Haraszlli'v Dry " 15..)il l-<.ll() 



•Haiaszlliv Itrnt " 14.50 17.0" 

Eclipse Extra Dry 14.50 17.00 

Twi>ycjirs' natural fcrinciitatioii inbottle. 

Trade discoiinis niailcd on jipplicalion. 

ITAI.I.VX-SWISS CdHiNV. 

L. liandolH iV Co., Proprietors, 

427-431 West Broad "ay. New York. 

Monlccristii. extra tirv. nuturnlly 

fcnncnleil, in cases of 12 »niarts. .$12,011 
Montccri^to. extra div, naliirally 
ferinenttd, in caecs vi 24 pints.... 14.00 
Liberal discount to the trade. 



Jamaica Rnni, Old 



12.00 to 14, (XI 



PAUL MASSON, 

San Jose, California. 

Less than 5 cases. 

Premiere Ciivee, Dry $16.00 118.00 

Special.... 16.00 18.00 
Special discount for quantities of 5 
cases or more. 

A. WERNER & Co., 

52 Warren street. New York. 

Extra Dry t 7.00 * 8.00 



Syrups, Cordials, Etc. 

KOLB * DENHARD, 
422 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

Rock Candy Syrup 75c. per gal 

Raspberry Syrup 75c. " 

Orgeat Syrup 75c. " 

Imported Goods. 

(MISCELLANEOUS.) 

W. B CHAPMAN, 

12:j California street, San Francisco. 

Plymouth Gin (unsweetened) flO.,'jO 

L. GANDOLFI A CO., 

427-431 West Broadway, New York 

(Prices f. o. b. New i'ork ) 

FUi Mancahelli, Brescia. 

Anesone, cases of 12 bottles, per case $11.50 

FERNET OR BLANCA BITTERS. 

FUi. Branca A Co., Milan. 

25 case lots and above, qts 11.00 

10 " " " " 11.25 

5 11.50 

Single case, qts 12.00 

Case of 24 piut bottles 10.50 



HELLMANN BROS. & CO., 

525 Front street, San Francisco. 

Blankenheym & Nolet. 

Union Gin 2.60 

Vaughan Jones 

Old Tom Gill, in cases 11.00 

Orange Bitters " U.50 

Patterson & Hibberl. 
Bass' Stout, per double doz 3.00 

Guinness' Stout, " " 3.50 

H. Underberg-.A.lbieclit. 
Boonekamp of Maag Bitters, 12.75 to 13.75 

J. B. Sherriff A Co. 
Jamaica Rum in ^'s and %i 

per gallon 4.30 to 5.10 

Tarragona Port in 3^ casks 

per gallon 1.25 

.\drien M. Warde's Italia de 

Pisco, per case 30.00 

Sardines, brand "Philippe & Canaud." 



IAIN Royal iiutavia Gin in 

coses vif 15 large black 

bottles per tase 23.50 

111 cases of 15 large 

wllilc Ijottlea per case 24.50 

Kirschwasscr. Machoil Freres 

Bavarian Highland, per 

case 20.no 

Swan Gin in K casks 3 75 

Double Eagle Gin In j^ casks. 3.60 

John Ramsav Islay Scotch 

Whisky' In >J casks.... 4.75 

Boord's Pineapple brand Ja- 
maica Rums In ^ casks.5.25 to 6.50 



W. A. TAYLOR it CO. 
39 Broadway, New York. 

MACiNUM IIRANI), JAMAICA RUM. 

Qrs. Oc 

A— Full body *:i.90 »3. 

B— Rich, fat and old 4.30 4. 

C~SuperHne, extra 5.05 5. 

MAGNU.M 3.10 3. 

GINS. 
ClIAS. TANQUERAY & CO., LONDON. 

Bulk. 

Old Tom Gin, (piarter casks $:J. 

Old Tom Gin, octaves 3. 

Cases, one dozen each 8. 



30 



KOLB & DENHARD, 
426 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 
Birch's Crystal Belfast Ginger Ale — 

Lots lif 5 barrels $12.75 

1 barrel 13.50 

Net cash. 

CHARLES MEINECKE A CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

(BOOBD A son's, LONDO.N.) 

Old Tom Gin. |M;r case Jll.OO 

Pale Orange Bitters, per case ll..')0 

Ginger Brandy. I, iqucui " !,''"i 



SHERWOOD A SHERWOOD. 

212-214 Market street San Francisco. 

Per Case 
A. Houtman & Co.'s Gin, 

large black bottles $21.50 

A. Houtman A Co.'s Gin, 

medium black bottles. 18.50 

A. Houtman A Co.'s Gin, 

small black bottles 9.u0 

A. Houtman & Co.'s Gin 

large white bottles 22.50 

A. Houtman & Co.'s Gin, me- 
dium white bottles 19.,50 

A. Houtman ,t Co 's Gin 

small white bottles 9.50 

A. Houtman A Co.'s Gin, 

octaves per gallon 3.,55 

Bass' Ale in wood, lilids $50.00 

Joules Stone Ale in wood, 

bhds 50.00 

Ross Ginger Ale. per barrel.. 15.00 

' Soda Water, per case 7.00 

" Tonic Water, " 7.00 

" Potash Waler, " 7.00 

'' Raspberry Vinegar 6 to 

gal, per case 7.00 

" Raspberry Vinegar 8 to 

gal, per case 6.00 

" Lime Juice Cordial 6 to 

gal, per case 6.00 

•' Lime Juice Cordial 8 to 

gal, per case 4.50 

" Lime Fruit Juice 6 to 

gal, per case 4.60 

" Lime Fruit Juice 8 to 

gal, per case 3.50 

" Orange Bitters, per case. 8.00 

Burke's Bass' Ale, pints, per 

bblofl^doz 16.00 

Burke's Guinness' Stout, pts 

perbblofSdoz Ifi.OO 

Burke's Jamaica Rum per cs. 12.50 

Old Tom Gin " 10.75 

'• Dry Gin " 10.75 

" Hennessy Brandy, per 

case 16.00 

Port Wine, Gato br'd 

per case 10.00 

Fleischman'b Royalty Gin, 10 

gal packages, per gal. . . . 2.25 

Fleischman's Royalty Gin, 15 

gal packages, per gal 2.22)^ 

Fleischman's Royalty Gin, 20 

gal packages, per gal 2.20 

Fleischman's Royalty Gin, 50 

gal jiackages, per gal ^ 2.15 

Meinhold's Ani'hor Brand* 

Ciller, per case, quarts... . 3.25 

Mcinliold's .\in-hor Biand 

I'idcr. per i-.isc, pints 4.011 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO.. 

.'129 .Market street, San Francisco. 

J. de Kuyper .t Sous Gin, large hot $20.00 

med. " 16.00 

" " small 9.00 

Cantrell A Cochrane Belfast Ginger 

Ale per barrel of 10 dozen 15.00 

Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps per case 

O'larts 9.50 

Wolfe's .Schiedam .Schnapps jicr case 

Pl"l» 10.50 

Benedictine, per case, quarts 20.00 

" pints 21.50 

Theo. Lappe s Genuine Aioroatlque 

Iier case ij.oo 

Gilka Kummcl per case 12.50 

Dog's Head Brand of Bass' Alo— 
Per case 8 doz. pints, glass. Read 

Bros., London 14.60 

Per case 4 doz. (|iiarls, class 13.00 

Dog's Head Brand of Ouiniiess' Stout— 

Per case 8 doz. pints, glass 14.00 

4 " quarts, '• 12 40 

Old Tom Gill, Sutton Garden ACo. 10.00 
Creme de Menlbe, E. Cusenier fils 

Aine & Co ifi oo 

Pousse Cafe, E. Cusenier. Aine A Co. 15.50 
Maraschino. Romano Vlahov, Zara. . 15..'>0 

Batavia Arrack, 12 quart bottles 12.00 

.Jamaica rum in octaves, proof 116, 

pcrgallon 4 5(j 

Kirschwasscr. Machoil Bros., Munich 18.00 
Nordhausci Kornbranntwein, eases 12jugs 

H'-J laliel aO.OO 

Black label ifl.oo 

(,'hcrries in Maraschino, 12quarl8... 10.00 
French Vermouth Noilly Pratt A Co. 6.75 

Grand Marnier, 12 bottles, large 20.00 

24 " small.... 21.50 
J. H.Schrocder's Cocktail Biiters, 24 

„ pin's 12.00 

Chianti, Giorgio Giglioli, Leghorn, Italy— 

qiiaits lu.oO 

pints 11.00 

♦ » 

Mineral Water. 

JOHN CAFFUEY, (m presenting CHAS. 
GRAEF A CO., New York) 
47 First street, San Francisco. 
APENTA HUNGARIAN BITTER 
WATER, 

ex San Francisco Warehouse. 

5 CASE LOTS. 

Case of 50 glass bottles $ 7..50 

" 100 glass quarter bottles... 7.50 

Payable 6 months from date of invoice. 

Subject to a rebate of 50 cents per case 
on certain conditions ; particulars on 
application. 

APOLLINARIS NATURAL MINERAL 

WATER. 

ex .San Francisco Warehouse, 10 case lots. 

Case of .50 glass quarts Apollinaris$ 7.00 

100 •' pints Apollinaris 10.50 

100 •• "splits" — half-pts 

—Apollinaris 8.00 

Payable 30 days from date of invoice. 

Subject to a rebate of 50 cents per case 

on certain conditions; particulars on 

application. 

FRIEDRICHSHALL APERIENT 
WATER, 

ex San Francisco Warehouse, 
Per case of 50 bottles (5 case Iot6)$l0 00 

WILLIAM WOLFF A CO. 
329 JIarket street, San Francisco. 

JOIIANNIS MINERAL WATER, ZoLLHAUB, 

GERM.ANY. 

TEN CASES OR MORE. 

Case of 50 quarts $ 6.25 

100 pints 9.75 

100 splits 7.50 

ONE CASE. 

Case of .50 quarts $ 7.25 

" 100 pints 10.75 

" lOOsplits 8.25 

(Terms— Net .10 days ) 

IIUNYADI J\NOS. 

Case of .50 bottles, per cnse $1 l.i) 

5casct" and over, pcnase ... .... ln.o 



FOR FINP: rRINTINO 00 TO 



R. M. WOOD CO. 



:;ii-.;i(; r..\TTKKv .-^tkhet 



GOOD WORK. )K MODERATE PRICES. 



34 



j^/ceifie WIJNL /cJMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



XjE.A.IDIIsrO IDZSTII_.I_.EI?.S 



ADDRESS. INSURANCE. 



BRAND. 



BOTJK/BOISrS. 



HKLLK of ANDERSON D'G CO. 

.•Villi: S. J. (irifiilMumi, Louisville. 
Kate, 1 .•_'.->. 


Bello of Anderson, 
(ilciiarme, 
Jossjiininc, 
Arliiigtou. 



mi:llw()od dist'y oo.. d No. 34. 

LouiBville, Ky. 
Kate, Sr>c. 



Moll wood, 
1 )uiiUee. 



EARLY TIMES DIST'Y CO. 

Early Tinie.s. Ky. D. No 7 
6 M. E. of [{arilstowii. Rates ].2f) 
Add: U. H. Hurt, Louisville. 



Early Times, 
A. G. Nail, 
.lack Ri'ain. 



O. F. C. DISTILLERY D. No. 113 
Frankfort. 
.\<ld: Ceo. T. Stagg Co., Frankfort. 
Rate 85c. 



O. F. C, 

Carlisle. 



SUNNY BROOK and 

WILLOW (KI'.KK DIST'G GO'S 

nistilleiies, Louisvillo, Kv. 
Contracting Olliies, 128-130 Franklin St. 

Cbii-aKO, 111. 
ROSKM-IKl.I) BKO.S & CO., Proprietors. 
Rates, 85c. and 81. Nos. 5 and 297. 



"Willow Creek, 
Sunny Brook. 



J. B. WATHEN & CO. 

Louisville, 
Rate 8.5c. 



J. B. Wathen & Bro. 
Kentucky Criterion. 



OLD TBIES DIST'Y CO., 

Distillerj' No; 1. Louisville. 

Rates, 81.00 & $1.25. 

OLIi KENTUCKY DIST'Y CO., 
Louisville, Ky. 
Rates, 81 and 81.25. 



Old Times. 



Kcntuckj' Comfort 

and 

Gladstone. 



E. J. CURLEY & CO. D. No. 3 & 15 

Camp Nelson 
Rates: "B," "D," "E" 1.25. "F," 3.50 



Blue Grass, 
Boone's Knoll. 



ADDRESS, INSURANCE. 



BRAND. 



GREENBRIER DIST'Y CO. i 
Greenbrier. D. No. 239 ' 

Add: Mill. Collins & Co., Louisville. 
Rate 1.35. 

.V.NDl.l^^ON & NELSON DIST'S CO... 

Louisville. j 

Add: Anderson & Nelson Distilleries Co 

Rate S5c. Louisville. i 



Greenbrier, 
R. B. Hay den. 

Anderson, 

Nelson, 
Buchanan. 



R. F. BALKE & CO. D. Nn. 12 

Louisville. Kv. 
Rate 85c. 



01<1 W:it(M-iiiill. 
Jbiunnymede. 



OT.D KEXTICKY DISTILLERY,! 

I). Mcscluiulorf, I 

205 W. Mail. St., Louisville, Ky. 
Insurance: 85e., 81.00 and 81.25. 



Kentucky Dew. 



I?/ YES. 



SUSQUEHANNA DIST'G CO., 

Milton 
.•\d(l: Jas. Levy & Bro., Cincinnati. 
Rates, 85c & 1.25. 



Susquehanna. 



NORMANDY DIST'G CO., 

Louisville, Ky. 
P. O. Bo.\ 2354, 

Rate 85 c. 

A. OVERHOLT & CO., 

Add: A. Overholt & Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Rate, 80c. 



ISTorinaiidv 
Rubicon, 

Overholt. 



.1. P.. WATHEN & CO. 

Louisville, 
Rate 85c. 



Lackawanna Rye. 



ANDERSON & NELSON DIS'G CO. 

Louisville. 

Add: Anderson & Nelson Distiller's Co 

Kate 85c. Louisville. 



Nelson. 




Best Line 

TO 

Indianapolis, 
Cincinnati 

AND THE 

South. 

CITY TICKET OFFICE: 
232 Clark SmttT, Chicago 



Louisville, St. Louis & Texas Railway 

'beechwood route." 

Consign your shipments from Louisville and Interior 

Kentucky points, care of the Louisville, St. Louis &. Texas 

Railway, which is a direct line to Pacific Coast points and 
same will receive prompt attention. 

For rates and other information address the undersigned 

L. S. Parsons, J. K. McCracken, H. C. Mordu*, 
Traffic Man'g, Gen. Man'g, Asst. Gen. F-'r\ Ag( 

Louisville, Ky. Louisville, Ky. Louisville, Ky. 



j^/cSlfie WlJ^E /fJ^D Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

Page. 

Calilbrnia Wine Association 21 

Carpy, C. & Co 21 

Cliaiiche & Bon 6 

Eiscn Vineyard Company 6 

Guncllach, J. lS: Co 30 

Guasti & Bernard 4 

Harasztliy, Arpad 6 

Italian-Swiss Colony 29 

Kohler & \'an Bergen 21 

Kohler .S: Frohling 21 

Kolb & Denhard . 5 

Lachman & Jacobi 28 

Laclinian Co., S 21 

Mann, C. M 6 

Napa \"alley Wine Co 21 

National Wine Association 22 

Smith, Julius P 4 

Starace, Achille 2 

\'ina Distillery 34 

West, Geo. & Son 22 

Wetmore-Bowen Company 3 

DISTILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Crown Distilleries Company 2 

Curley E. J . & Co 5 

Guckenheimer, A. & Bros 27 



Leading Distillers' Cards. 



54 



Levy, Jas. & Bro 36 

Mayhew, H. B. & Co 4 

Meinecke, Charles & Co 25 

Monarch, R 26 

A. Senior & Son i 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

Chapman, W. B 20 

Finke's Widow, A 28 

Hellman Bros. & Co 19 

Lachman, S. Co • 21 

Macondray Bros. & Lockard 5 

Rossi, D. P 28 

Sherwood & Sherwood 17 

Wolff, Wm. & Co. .- 18 

IMPORTERS. 

Chapman, W. B 20 

Hellman Bros. & Co '. 13 

Macondray Bros. & Lockard 30 

Sherwood & Sherwood 16 

Starace, Achille 2 

Taylor, W. A. & Co 32 

Wdff, Wm. & Co ; . 18 

FRUIT BRANDY DISTILLERS. 

Walden & Co 4 

S. F. WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 

Kolb & Denhard 5 

Moore, Hunt & Co 30 

Martin, E. & Co 4 

Naber, Alls & Brune 4 

Siebc Bros. & Plagemann 2 

Spruance, Stanley ii Co 4 



IMP0RT1:D BRANDY. 

E. Remy Martin & Co., Hellman, Bros. & Co., Agts. 13 

Caffrey, John (representing Charles Graef & Co.). . 12 

MINERAL WATERS. 

Apollinaris Company, Ltd i 

Woin; William & Co 26 

SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS, PRUNE JUICE. 

Erlenbach, Martin . . . . 17 

Kolb <!<: Denhard 5 

Rudkin, Wm. II .7. /*: 28 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Big Four Railway Routes 34 

Bonestell <& Co., Paper Dealers 26 

Korbel, ¥. & Bros., Redwood Tanks 28 

Goodyear Rubber Co 2 

Henderson, Wm. G 30 

Hercules Gas Engine Works, Gas and Distillate 

Engines 15 

Loew's System Filter 11 

Loma Prieta Lumber Co 28 

Monon Route, 1000-Mile Tickets 34 

O'Brien, James, Saloon 4 

Sanders & Co., Coppersmiths 4 

Wandelt, Samuel, Cooper and Tank Builder 26. 

Wayland &; Co., Wine Finings 14 

Zellerbach & Sons, Paper 28 



Cresta Blanca 

SOUVENIR VINTftSES. 

Gold Medal, Paris Exposition. 1889. 

LOCATION OF VINEYARD: LIVERMORE, ALAMEDA CO , CAU 
J-'ac-Simile of LnbH on Oenuine Cresta Blaura Wines. 



CfiEBTA Blanc* Souvenir Vintages 

S A U T E R N E-S O U V E N I R 



Gold Meoj^ Panis Expcsitiqi 




CRESTA BLANCA. 



San Fbancisco Depot 



UO MoNTaouERv St. 



These Wines are served to the Guests of all the leading Hotels and 
Restaurants on the Pacific Coast. 

For price-list apply to 

WETOIORE-BOWEN (0. 

140 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

BOnLING CELLASS. CORNER LARKIN AND MCALLISTER STS 



f/^eifie WIJ^E /^JMD Sflf^lT PREVIEW. 





M[R " 




Vjy,6t«TyO»J^ 




s 




323-325 Market St., S. F. 



D. T. B. iir.NAi.n:. 

E. MARTIN & CO., 

IMIMiinTUS AND \YnOLESALE 

liIQUOR mERCHflflTS, 

A11 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

SOLE AGENTS FOU 

J. F. CUTTER AND ARGONAUT OLD BOURBONS. 



CIIA.-^. W. FORE. 



J'lJJN SI'KVA.Nt K. 



Spruance, Stanley & Co. 

IMPOltTEKS AND JOIiBERS OF FIXE 

Wpes, Wiiies Lipois. . 

Sole agents for the Celebrated African Stomach Bitters. 

410 Front Stkeet, - - Ran Francisco, Cm,. 



UnPORTmiT TO DI8T1LLEBS P WIjIE PKEBS. 

This cut represents our latest Im- 
proved Contiiinons Still which has 
been perfccletl ;illLr years of experi- 
ment and large expense. 

Thin Slill has the adTUiitatre orer. 
nil others, as it is economical, easily 
operated and separates the aldehyde 
and other inferior oils and makes a 
pure and hi^;h-rlass brandy; and re- 
duces the cost fully ninety per cent, 
in labor and fuel. It re<iuires verv 
little or no water and utilizes all heat 
heretofore wasted. 

We re(er to Geo. West & Son 
Stockton; John WiiHELiK, St. Helen.. 

Ill USDS CP COPPFK WORI MHI II SHORT KOIICB. 

SANDERS & GO 

421 and 423 MISSION STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
Pat'o Si-:!'T. 29, 1S91. 

OLIVINI VINEYARD. 

The OLIVINfl comprises 600 Acres of Hill 
Side Vineyard, Located in the 

Livermore Valley. 

DRY, DELICATE. WELL MATURED TABLE 
WINES A SPECIALTY. 

gEND FOR gHMPLE ORDER, 

Correspondence Solicited by the Grower. 
JULIUS PAUL SMITH, LIVERMORE, CAL. 

N.Y. Of'ICC. 65 and 67 DUANiST. cit; 





JuiiM Bl£^^ARD. 



.SECONDO Gl'ASTI. 



3 

Growers and DistUlerg of 



Quasti <^ ^ornardf 



lUTEBIIflL lEVEPE FIID COSTOPIS BBOKERS. CaiifOIOJa WINES M BWIIES 

the: EXFOhTATION OF GRAPE BRANDY. WHISKY AND ' ' ' * 



THE EXPORTATION OF GRAPE BRANDY, WHISKY AND 

SPrRITS FROM BOND OR WITH PRIVILEGE OF 

DRAWBACK, SPECIALTIES, 



Dealers in U.S. .Standard Hydrometers and Extra Stems, Prime's Wantage 

Rods, Die Wheels and Gauging rods. Also Distillers', Rectifiers, 

Wholesale Liquor Dealers and Brewers' Books. 



Winery at (ruasti & ]iirnard'.< Spur, Between West 
Glendale and Tropko, Cal. 



OFFICE, m BATTERY STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



p. O Box 2409. 



Telephone 646. 



b/cf^GE PRODUeEf^S Of SWEET WINES. 

.W(i(ii O/Jlte. Cor. :id (ind Alameda Sis.. Los Augrlrs. i„l. 



WALDEN &, CO. 

er Peak Vineyards and Brandy Distillery 



Geys 




TRADt-M aRK 



GEYSERVILLE, SONOMA CO., CAL. 

Walden Cognac, Manzanita Sherry, &c. 

OLD BRANDY IN CASES. BRANDIED FRUITS. 

WALDEN COGNAC is made alter the Krench loinmla, Imm selected Irish j;r.ipes, has been siiccess 
fully inlrodiired and is now r.■^;ularlv sold in the princip.d m.iikets of Europe, in .onipeiuion with 1- rem li 
Cognac. OlTicial German and English chemists have pionounccd it the purest Brandy which comes to their 

It is especially .tuilable for the drug trade and others, where purity is demanded. While abroad these 
goods successfully compete, pavini: the same duties as the Krench. the American buyer has the advantage in 
price, between the Internal Revenue t.ix assessed here and the Customs duties on foreign Brandies. 

SAMI'I KS WII.I. BK SKNT ON APIM.TCATION 

EASTERN OFFICE, liO F'EARI. STREET, NEW VORK. 




f;^eifie WipJE /cJ^D Sfll^lT REVIEW. 



KOLB & DENH ARD 



OLD NONPAREIL 

BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES. 



CALIFORNIA 

WINES and BRANDIES. 

OFFICE AND VAULTS 

iS0-iS6 ilOyTCOMEUr ST.. SA\ ntAXVlSCO. 

TELEriioxK No. 5096. 




IMPORTERS AND SOLE AGENTS 
PACIFIC COAST FOR 

BI RC H'S 

CRYSTAL 

Belfast Ginger Ale 




T7if.se niilskles arc made in the Famous •' ni.VE OTl.lSS liFGIOy" so 
Jumly celcbrateu as the home nf the Jlnest M'hiakles In the M'orld, and 
lehich have been j or the laat Century, recognized as such, giving the char^ 
acter and high standing to KESTVCKY WlflSKIKS which they now enjoy. 



THESE TAMOUS WHISKIES CAN BE HAD IN LOTS TO SUIT THE TRADE FROM 

HELL/v\A/N/N BROS. & CO., 525 p-RO/NT ST-REET. SA/N FHA/NeiSeO 



SUBSCRIBE FOR THE 

PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 

$l.SO Per Year. 



f/rSIfie WIJME /rJMB Sf»II^IT f^EVIEW. 



189-4 



TRIUTVYPHT^MT HGHIN 



1B95 



EUROPEAM QUALITY RECOGNITION 



BELGIUM 



FRANCE 



FRANCE 



FRANCE 



IRELAND 








Awarded 37 Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals ! 

THE HARASZTHY CHAMPAGNES 



CALIFORNIA 



UKLrr I)KV KXTK.V DKV 

530 WASHINGTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 




C. M. MANN 

Successor to I. DE TURK- 

Wines and Brandies, 



BRANDY 
PORT 
SHERRY 
ANGELICA 
MUSCAT 

TOKAY 

MADEIRA 

MALAGA 



SAUTERNE 

CUTEDEL 

RIESLING 

BURGUNDY 

CABERNET 

ZINFANDEL 

XX CLARET 



VINEYARDS : 



Sonoma County, Cal. 



OFFICE AND CELLARS: 



816-218-220 Sacramento and 221 Commercial Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




TjHE JHIGHEST AWARE) fARIS EXPOSITIOJM 




1889. 



GObD JVIEDAL. 



E.sta.bl isPizd. 

Ciuerf[\ore l/alley, <$dl 
isas. 




^> 



b^ 



■^9: 



,0^^ 



^' 



,T^' 



.^ 



-i 



^^■,^- 



A. G. CHAUGHE. Proprietor. 

Office and Depot .IiFibst St., San Francisco 



CHAUGHE &, BON, Successor to A. G. CHAUCHE 

Sole Gem-rnl ARcnls for tlic MontT-nouoE ^'INES. 




VINtVAMO Ar f MC»NO to CAU. 

eso Aritcs 



6oU Medal for Cherries and Sweet Wines, Dublin £zp}8ition, 1892. 

EISEH VINEYARD CO. 



-PIONEER PROnrCERS OE- 



■*'S ^^ ^ '^ W^ I N E S 1^ 



Send for Prico List 
and Samples. . , 



OfTicc, 12 Stevoiisoii Street. S- F. 








VOL. XXXVIII, No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, MARCH 8, i897. 



$1.50 PER YEAR 



Issued Semi-Monthly. 

ll^OOD & SCOTT, - - PUBLISHERS. 

WrNFIELD SCOTT. EOITOB 
R. M. WOOD. Manuccr 

402 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
TKI.EfUOSF.yO. 709 CAJILE ADDRESS "Fl ELDniX." SA?f HCAXCISCO 

The PACIFIC WIXE AXD SI'IRIT REVIEW is the otili/ 
paper of its clitss irest of ChU-ago. It eircuhites titnong the 
Wholesale and Retail Wine and Sjtirit Dealers of the I'acijic 
CiKttt, the Wine Mal^era and liratidij IHtlUlers of Califorititi, 
the Wine and lirandij biii/ers, and the Importers, Distillers and 
Jobbers of the United StaifS. 



All CHECKS, DRAFTS, MONEY ORDERS, ETC., should 
be ma I e pa liable to WOOD <& SCOTT. 



Subscriptions per ye.ir— in advance, postage paid. 

For the United States, Mexico and Canada $1 50 

For European countries 2 50 

Single cup.cs 10 

Entered at the San Francisco Post Office as second-class matter, 

AGENCY : 

EASTERN BRANCH OFFICE: 
W. A. GEFT, Manager, Room 32, Ko. 78 Park Place, New York Cily. 



PROPERTY FOR SALE, 



FOR SALE, in a coast county, splendid vineyard and 
ranch property of 410 acres, 140 acres of which are in full- 
l)earin}i vines. No phylloxera, and the property is so located 
that, witli ordinary care, the insect will not reach it. Prop- 
erty is well improved, having 1 lirick distillery, 2 hrick cel- 
lars, 2 adobe cellars, and plenty of oak and redwood cooperage. 
Stock of wine on hand averages 7."),000 gallons, which goes 
with the place. Besides the vineyard, there is lUO acres of 
bottom land for hay, 100 acres of pasture, adapted for hay; 
and 70 acres of wooded pasture which can be set to vines. 

Aside from the vineyard, the ranch is well stocked, and 
has ample and substantial buildings. 

This is one of the choicest properties in California. Tiie 
dry wines from the vineyard have a splendid reputation, and 
there is a steady established trade for them. Satisfactory 
reasons for selling, and the place will be sold cheap. 

For further particulars address Winfield Soott, care of 
Pacitic Wine and Spirit Review, or ajijily at Room 2, seventh 
floor, Mills Building, from 9 to I'l a. m. 

Vineyard for Sale at a Bargain, to Close an Estate 

TIIIRT^' A(.'ItK.S choice foreign wine grapes, witli winery 
(35,0(10 gallons, tine oak cask.s) and distillery complclo. Ad- 
dress G. L., Pacific Wine and Spirit Review, San Francisco, 
C\\\. 



WANTED — .Situation — wanted by a married man: age, 
111. Twelve years' experience on a vinej'ard in wine making. 
Best references. Address .1. M., this office. 



MARKET REVIEW. 



CALIFORNIA WINES.— More interest attaches at the 
Ijri'sent moment to the struggle that is now on between 
the California Wine Association and the Wine Makers' 
Corporation than to any ordinary business that may be going 
on. The Corporation is as good as committed to the propo- 
sition to establish a warehou.se in San Francisco for the stor- 
age of wines, and, as noted elsewhere, the Corporation will 
soon have a meeting to look over the situation. 

Orders for spring business are coming in rapidly and are 
being filled as fast as jjossible. The outlook for heavy ex- 
ports is very fair, considering the general condition of business 
in the country. 

Late advices from New York are as follows : " The market 
continues dull for both sweet and dry wines, and is also dull 
for brandies. Nobody is inclined to buy anything that is not 
absolutely needed, so that purchases continue to be only for 
small quantities. Some growers in California estimate the 
last vintage at not over 10,000,000 gallons, and they hope 
that, with but a little improvement in the general condition 
of trade, the prices will advance. 

The exports of California wine by sea in February, 1897, 
were as follows : 

Gases. 

To New York 34 

Central America 1,728 



Mexico 

Hawaii 

Japan and China. 
British America. . 

Great Britain 

Germany 

Other European. . 

Tahiti 

All other Foreign. 

Total bvSea 



.5G 

2().-) 

34 

16 



Gallons. 


^'alue. 


185,312 


?72,321 


24,117 


17,343 


G,28(> 


3,091 


22,774 


10,981 


G,;550 


2,44f 


944 


517 


G,000 


1,800 



■Id 



4,4(50 
1,159 

257,411 



1,3G3 
G99 

§110,570 



«ALIF()RXAI BRANDY.— No change is to be noticed in 
general market conditions. The old goods are neg- 
lected. Holders of lirandy generally are awaiting with 
.some interest the promulgation of the new regulations regard- 
ing bottling in bonti. 

The exports of California brandy by sea in February, 1897, 
was as follows : 

Ca.ses. Gallons. 

To Domestic Eastern Ports 79 

(ireat Britain 

(Jermany 

All other Foreign ;!() 19G 



\'alue 
gHl" 

470 



Total 



311 



$611 



k 



8 



f/ceifie wijME /cjNie sfif^ii f^eview. 



«' 



fmSKIKS. — Deuiaiul ratliei" poor, business prospects 
better, sums up the situation as to wliiskics. Dealers 
generally are looking lor better times when the new 
crop of grain now growing comes in, say in June, July and 
August. There is every reason to look for a better trade 
within the next few months. 

A dispateh from Chicago, dated March 5th, say- ; 'During 
the first days of last week the ollices of Moran, Kraus it Mayer 
were swarming with men actively engaged in the whisky 
busine.ss. 'There's nothing going on. We're just going 
through routine allaii-s,' was all the answer that an outsider 
could get. Sam Rice, president of the American Spirits 
Manufacturing Company, and Jako Woolncr and Joscjih 
Greenhut were there: so was Wilson of the Wilson Distillery, 
and so were several Kentucky whisky manufacturers. The 
explanation of the gathering was finally obtained this morn- 
ing I'rom a Louisville manufacturer who is a guest at the 
Midiigan-avcnuc Hotel. A big company of all the makers 
of Bourbon whisky is forming, and will very likely be in 
operation within a month. The plan of organization has 
been consummated and will receive the signatures of the 
organizei-s within a fortnight. The organization includes 115 
distilleries. The company will be capitalized to the amount 
of $30,000,000. Securities will Ijo divided as follows : First 
mortgage bonds, §10.000,000; preferred stock, §5,000,000; 
common stock, §15,000,000. The final meeting will lie held 
hi Louisville. Four riiiladelphia capitalists are in the enter- 
prise, and these were represented by II. J. M. Cardeza, while 
Nathan Bijur cared for the interests of the New Yorkers. The 
securities of tlie new company, which, it is expected, will rival 
the famous defunct '■ whisky trust," will be listed on the New 
York Stock Exchange." 

The receipts of American wliiskies at San Francisco in 
February were as follows : 

Cases. Barrels, i -barrels. Kegs» 
By Sea from Atlantic Ports — — — — 

By Sea, Re- Imported 

Bv Rail Overland 



BEER EXPORTS. 



Total. 



;?-25 



;525 



lfi22 



15X2 



87 



17 



17 



■ The receipts of alcohol in February, by rail, were 

barrels; of spirits, 2455 barrels. 

The receipts of foreign whiskies were 500 cases. 

The exports of American whiskies by sea to foraign ports 
were 664 cases and 1,435 gallons, valued at §7,854. 



IMPORTATIONS. 



J jUSINESS is slack, and, pending tarifT change.s, bids fair 

9% to remain so. 

5^ The principal im[)ortations in February were as 

follows; 

Champagne — 484 cases. 

Still Wines — 355 cases, G caisks, 2 lialf casks, quarter 
casks, 20 octaves, 1 barrel, and 2 packages. 

Brandy — 61 cases, 5 casks, 10 octaves, and 6 packages. 

din and Geneva — 925 cases, 90 casks, and 20 octaves; also 
l)y rail overland 2 barrels and 10 kegs. 

\'ernionth — 1,>*17 cases. 

Miii<'ral Water — 1,36H cases, and 1 barrel. 

Bitters — 291 cases. 

Absinthe— 35 cases. 

Kirscli — 10 cases. 

Curacoa — 11 cases. 

Mara.M-hino — -1 cjise. 

Rum — 5 casks. 

Undesignated Iviqueurs — 176 cases and 4 barrels. 

Ale — 1 hogshead. 

Bulk Beer (from overland) — 335 barrels, 305 half bai 
92 quarter barrels, and lOO kegs 

Bottled Beer (from overland)~174 rases, 282 cask.s, 4.'!' 
barrels. 



rels 



r 



ilK i'X|i<irts of beer from San Francisco in Fclu'uary wiri 
as follows : 
4^ Bottled— 1,439 cases, 500 casks, 100 barnls, and 115 

boxes. 

Hulk — 100 lialf barrels, 50 quarter barrels, 50 sixth barrel-, 
and 75 kegs. 

Total \"aUu— §13,360. 

BOTTLING IN BOND PERMITTED. 



One of the last acts of Ex-1'resident Cleveland was llic 
signing of the act by which distilled spirits of American manu- 1 
facture may l>e bottled in bond for domestic consumj)fion 
under practically the same conditions as the Canadians now 
work. 

We have already published the text of tlie Evans law j 
providing for sucli Iwttling, in the form in which it passed 
the House of Representatives. When it reached the Senate it 
was taken in hand by Senator Aldrich, who offered some few , 
changes in the interest of the owner of spirits who miglit not ■ 
be a distiller. 

Senator Aldrich's material amendments are eftected in 
the first thirty-eight lines of the bill, which are given below, 
the aiuendnients being indicated by quotation marks: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled. 
That, whenever any distilled spirits deposited in the ware- 
house of a distillery having a surveyed daily capacity of not 
less than twenty bushels of grain, which cajiacity, or not 
less than twenty bushels thereof, is commonly used by 
the distiller, have been duly entered for withdrawal upon 
payment of tax, or for export in bond, and have been gauged 
and the required marks, brands and tax-paid stamps or 
export stamps, as the case may be, have been afiixed to the 
jiackage or packages containing tlie same, the distiller '' or 
owner" of said distilled spirits, if he has declared his purpose 
so to do in the entry for withdrawal, " which entry for bottling 
purposes may be made by the owner as well as the distiller," 
may remove such spirits to a separate portion of said ware- 
house, whicli shall be set apart and used exclusively for that 
]iurpose, and there, under the supervision of a United States 
storekeeper, or storekeejier and ganger, in charge of such 
warehouse, niay immediately draw off such spirits, bottle, 
pack and case the same ; provided. That for convenience in 
such process any number of packages of spirits of the same 
kind, difi'ering only in proof, " but produced at the same dis- 
tillery by the same distiller," may be mingled together in a 
cistern jirovided for tliat purpose, etc. 

It will be ol)servcd l)y that no amendments were made 
so as to pi'rmit ])lendiMg of dillerent ages of fruit bramlies 
prior to bottling. The regulations to govern the ap])lication 
of the law to tlie bottling of fruit brandies will be practically 
" commission made law." 

This act will certainly decrease the trade of the wholesale 
liquor dealers' and rectiliei-s' lirands in favor of tlio goods of 
the distiller. The fact that the latter can have a stri|) stamp 
issued by this (iovernmeiit and similar to that of the Canadian 
stamps insuring jnirity of bottling, must act in aid of distillery 
bottling. Old-established and first-class blends, however, 
need have no fear. 

As for the l)randy men, the law is not satisfactory. Still it 
is a beginning. Carried out to the letter it will aid only a few 
of tiie larger distillers. Nevcrtliele.ss, we look uixai it as a 
beginning of a time when the brandy business of this State 
will not bo needlessly harrassed and circumscribed by govern- 
mental red tape, and when wo will have the same rights as 
the French brandy houses in the way of blending, coloring 
and reducing. Tlia ( 'alifornians must now work themselves , 
to get what lliey want in tlie shape of amendments. 



f/r(BIfie WIJSi£ j/k^Q Sflf^lT J^EVIEW. 9 

DEVELOPHENT OF BRITISH TRADE. The putiliou was sot in mution a few .lays ago, ami is 

now to be sent to Governor Bvuld. 

One of the most surprising I'eatures of the Califmnia wine President Edolf, in discvissiug the purpose for which the 

trade for 1S06 is the rapid development of the British market, petition was ])repared, said : " The liquor men of San Fiaii- 

Time was, and hut a lew years ago, when (ireat Britain would eiseo do not like the attack whieh tlu'ir hill for a change of 

take hut a few tluiusand gallons of our wine annually. Since vemie has sullered. The hill was suhniitted hy the liquor 

the linn of Urierson, Oldham t^ Co. took hold of the California dealers, and the licjuor dealers only. It has alisolutely nothing 

product, others have gone into the same field, and there is in common with Alvinza Hayward or his Hale & Norcross 

every indication of a substantial increase from year to year, interests, and it is purely a bill intended to secure to us 

Not many outside of the trade would thiuk that the total a privilege we have been made to feel the need of 

c|uantity of California wine now shipped direct to Croat " As president of the protective association I can state, 

Hritaiu is approxinuitely a quarter of a million gallons an- and hear out the claim with proof, that we sought only to have 

nually. The exact figures are as follows : the lull passed in order that fair tiials in the courts of this 

Cases. P)ulk (iallons. State might bo secured to us — something we have not enjoyed 

By sea direct 81 120,087 for a long time. During the four years in which I have been 

By rail (England) 16 110,G23 president of the association wo have carried 1,0G8 cases into 

Bv rail (Scotland) 13,745 court, and in most instances have been made to hear the 

odium of some prejudice from the bench. 

Total 97 249,455 " The prevailing sentiment against the liquor men has 

This does not include the shipments of wine from New ;l]"^°^^ '"i^^^*: it impossible for us to secure any kind of justice. 

York or New Orleans, which are not hilled through direct .V"" "", " '^^""'^'f ^^'.''-"'^ '^^^'^ '°"ff ^"^ persistently been 

from California points. Apropos of the total quantitv, to- *''''"s^ ''"^'^ *° ^^^ ^^3' b'ased judges have driven the liquor 

gether with comparison of imports of Australian and Cape men to desperation and Bill 27.3 is a measure aimed to make 

Colony wines, the following extract from indlcuS Wine and Possible a hght in the courts by our members which would be 

Spirit Circular, of London, will prove interesting : ^'-'^^^^'-^'^ "P"" , testimony and facts, instead of being marked 

" A step in advance has been made in the case of Aus- ^"'^ . ^^"'"''f '^o^''^ «""P'y because liquor dealers appear as 
tralian wines, which from <il2,797 in 1895, rose last vear to P^":*'^^ *° \^^^ proceedings We are seeking a chance to get 
697,740 gallons. Apart from the qualitv of the wines" them- Jf V"""- J^ 'I'''"' "^^"^ have never had any rights in this 
selves, there has been an exceptional amount of hard work ^^"t^^' P'\ o»e occasion in T>akc county we went before a 
brought to bear in bringing them so successfully before the J^^ge who had personally subscribed |15 to a Woman s Chris- 
English trade and consumers, and we sincerely congratulate ^''^'^ J^"^P':.''''^"^« V'""" f^"^- solicited to aid in our opposition, 
all those concerned upon the results which thev have , , ^) % ^«""'^ ^'"^* "" change of venue would be all that 
achieved. Madeira, on the other hand, has failed to quite S?^^^^^ ^«Ip i"^, °^^\ ""{ °"i' <['lemma. I had our attorney, 
hold its own, the (luantitv received being only 65,178, as ^/"""S® J^' ^^^^^r look up the statutes of other States, and 
compared with 95,671 gallons, a matter for regret, seeing the ^"®'; ?^f^^^^ consideration I authorized him to go before the 
excellent qualitv which the island now produces. South Legislature with a hill which shouhl gain for us the privilege 
Africa has further fallen off from 12,090 gallons in 1895, to ^^ g°"^g to fi'.«l .^istice it it was not to be had m the counties 
9,956 gallons in 1896, and it would seem that this once im- ^'^'^'"^ our suits were filed I sent our attorney, Mr Baker, to 
portant industry is almost dving out, so far as this country is Sacramento to put through the bill for us. He acted upon my 
concerned. The remaining' sub-division, ' Wines from Other suggestions. There was no money spent in the matter above 
Countries' [other than France, Germanv, Spain, Italv, etc.], the compensation ordinarily allowed him for such services, and 
of which we take California to be the principal source of sup- It^^''^ ^'f^ "« possible connection in the matter with Hayward. 
plv, is to the good, the totals for last year and its predecessor ^he bill is ours, sinip ly and solely, 
being, respectivelv, 447,669 gallons and 318,455 gallons." ,, J, ^''^^ P^*'ti°'' ^ have now in readiness will be sent to 

The H7ne Trade Review, of London, of the loth of the Governor. We shall simply ask in all due respect to he- 
January, gives the following review of the California wine understood. A\ e have no fear of a veto then, 
trade in England in 1896 : 

" As there are no special statistics published even in re- J^ ^ SHAW ON RESISTANTS 

gard to the imports of California wines, it is impossible to 

arrive at anything like the exact position of the trade. Judg- james A. Shaw of Kenwood, has written to the Sonoma 

ing by what one sees in the country as well as in London, Democrat a protest against the " Advice to ^'ineyardists," bv 

however, there can be very little doubt that these wines are p. c. Rossi of the Italian-Swiss Colonv. Mr. Rossi thought 

making steady progress in the favor of consumers. The trade that it was better to plant vinifera than resistant vines in 

has been worked with intelligence and enterprise, especially North Sonoma, at least until the actual appearance of phyllox- 

by the firm associated with the ' Big Tree ' brand, and, as the ^^n. Of this advice Mr Shaw savs ■ 

wines possess considerable merit, the improvement in demand '" Such advice is "more mis"leliding to outsiders and does 

IS not a matter for surprise. From time to time parcels ol moi-o damage than can be imagined, especially when over 

sweet wines are consigned to this country tor realization under .^ signature of a man in a position to know, but who evidentlv 

the hammer, but very little ot the dry wine which may be does not know. He is very much mistaken about the phvl- 

said to be the characteristic wine of California is offered in i^xera and the rapidity with which it is destroying all viiies 

this way, and we hope, for the sake of the trade, thai; this jn Sonoma county not on resistant roots. His advice to plant 

state of things will continue. It has been abundantly proved yinifera under existing conditions is absolutelv cruel. It is 

that the consignment system brings no profit to the shij-per, courting ilisaster and ruin to plant anv but resistant vines in 

and, while it damages rather than benefits his interests, it Sonoma couutv. It is greatlv to be liopcd that no one will 

interferes with the development of the trade through the follow the advice of Mr. Rossi. I have been through the mill 

regular channels. \ j^j^j ^r^y fggi too bitterly about it. It cost me thousands upon 

thousands of dollars, and I have yet to see daylight. If I can 

SENATE BILL NO. 273. be instrumental in steering vineyardists from the certain ruin 

that would follow Mr. Rossi's advice, I would gladly do it. I 

The wholesale liquor dealers of San Francisco want saw my own magnificent vinifera vineyards melt before the 

Assembly Bill No. 273 signed by the Governor. President J. phylloxera as a dry pasture before a prairie fire. I send you 

P. Edolf of the California Protective Association has prepared this as an unselfish and earnost appeal to grape growers to 

a petition to that effect, and it boars the signature of plant only resi.stant stock, Mr. Rossi's advice to tlie contrary 

nearly every wholesale house in this city. notwithstanding. 



10 



f/(5lfie WII^E /r|^D SflF<.IT f^EVIEW. 



PROGRESS OF THE WINE FIGHT. 



The California Wine Makere' Corporation has issued tlio 
following plan for selling the wines of the members thereof: 

KEC.ULATIONS GOVERNIXG TIIK SALIC OF WINKS I)Y THE CALI- 
FOKXIA WINK MAKEKS' CORPOKATION. 

The California Wine Association having broken its con- 
tract for the purcbixse of our wines, particularly in refusing to 
pay for the wines sold and delivered to it by this Corporation 
after each monthly delivery as in the contract provided, this 
Cor|ionition is no longer bound by said contract. 

The restrictions imposed by the same — so troublesome 
and unsatisfactory to most of our members — being now re- 
moved, the Corporation wines will henceforth be oH'ered to all 
resi>onsible buyers alike. 

The following system of conducting sales has been 
adopted by the Board of Directors, after a careful study of all 
our rciiuirements as evidenced by the experience of the past 
two years. In devising this scheme, the interests of all 
classes have l^een carefully considered, both severally and 
collectively. Important among these considerations are the 
following : 

Every reasonable inducement should be furnished the 
member to withhold his wine from hasty sale, whereby any 
sacrifice in value may result. 

Every cellar of wine withheld from early or forced sale 
secures a better price and more ready siilo for those which, 
owing to crowded cellar room, limited tankage or poor keep- 
ing facilities, must have early delivery. 

By inducing a spirit of retention and indifference as to 
whose wine goes first, we obviate tlie possibility of crowding 
the market to our detriment. 

Until the Corporation is provided with storage facilities 
in San Francisco (a step now seriously contemplated) only 
those members possessing well-built cellars in favorable local- 
ities, whose wines are strong and superior in quality, can 
afford to demand a iiigher price to compensate for long keep- 
ing and attendant risks. This natural advantage rightly 
belongs to this class, and cannot fairly be demanded or ex- 
pected by those who must and always do sell early. 

The market, so far as the wines controlled by the Cor- 
poration are concerned, belongs to all alike, and to perfect 
and carry out the true and equal benefits of co-operation, as 
j)rovidcil for in the original agreement, the deliveries of wines 
and jiayments therefor should be distributed ]iroportionatcly 
througliout the sea.son and among all members who have 
wine for .sale at ordinary prices. 

With these and other minor considerations in view, tlie 
folldwing rules and regulations have been promulgated which 
will secure the highest po.ssible average price, at the same 
meeting and following any possible fluctuations of the market 
induced by frosts or other natural causes: 

I. 

Wines, when ready for sale, should be transferred to the 
Sale Column by the member, and the Cori)oration notified of 
the price demanded : not in any ca.se to be less than 17Ac ]>er 
gallon, and as near '2(tc (the price set by the Corporation) as 
the qtiality .seems to warrant. 

Thus each member makes his own price, which may be 
changed within these limits from time to time on reasonalde 
notice, provided flie wine lie not already sold by the Corpora- 
tion. 

II. 

All wines transferred to the Sale Coiuiiiu with price I'U; 
to 2<ic inclusive shall ]>articipate in the pro rata iiaymonts of 
dislributions from all wines soM, or to he sold by the Corpo- 
ration. ('. f., all jiayinents up to l"ic receivetl for such wines 
shall be distributed aiiHMig those whose wines have ))assed to 
the Sale Column — in proporlic)n to tlie gallonage offered for 
Bale. All thai pait of the selling jirico over 17ic shall be 
paid ilircfl to tlie member as j»remium. 



Notice of sale sh 
gether with shipping 



III. 

Any member may select or find a buyer for his wine, 
who shall deal direct with the Corporation ; or the member 
may express his i>reference for any buyer, in the absence of 
which the Corporation will offer the wine at the price fixed 
by the maker to all buyers alike. For this purpose, a list of 
all offers will be regularly published and furnished to the 
principal buyers from time to time. 

IV. 
If more than one buyer bids for the same wine, the 
maker shall choose between them. 

V. 

all be immediately given the maker, to- 
instructioiis and particulars of sale. 

VI. 

"Wines of the Sale Column may be passed to the Reserve 
or Mitlidrawn from sale at any time by the maker restoring 
to the Corjjoration all j)ayments made, with interest thereon, 
provided it be on satisfactory as.sui-ances that such change is 
made with a view to keej>ing the wine, and not for the pur- 
pose of making a private sale. 

VII. 

All wines transferred "For Sale" remaining unsold in 
September shall be experted by the Corporation and the price 
adjusted to secure sale — this to prevent the indefinite with- 
holding otjwine at an unreasonable price. 

VIII. 

The terms of sale will be uniform and the same as hi i 
tofore, namely, on the basis of four months from date of siii 
All wines to be sold for jTonipt delivery only, and paid tor. 
cash after each monthly delivery, less :j of 1 per cent \'vv 
montli from date of sale. 

IX. 

On all wines sold a deduction of ]c per gallon shall be 
made from the payments to cover Corporation expenses as 
heretofore, there being no further stock subscription or other 
expenses. 

X, 

Wines calling for more than '20e per gallon will be offered 
in a separate schedule, or otherwise provided for later on, 

CALIFORNIA WINE MAKERS' CORPORATION. 
Feb. 25, l,S!t7. 



TRYING TO REDUCE THE TAX. 



The meeting of distillers and a few wholesale dealei"s — a 
very few of tliom were invited — which was held at Cincinnati' 
on the Itith ult., was called in the interest of organizing to 
petition Congress, at its next session, to reduce the onerous, 
tax on siiirits of §1.10 to seventy cents per gallon. From re- 
ports received the meeting was well attended, as many as 
t\venty States were represented. It was unanimously resolved, 
that the tax was too high and was greatly detrimental to the; 
business, and that seventy cents jier gallon tax should be the 
highest limit. The shortening of the present bonded period 
was not looked upon with favor. As an argument for th« 
reduction of tax, it was ])ointed out the fact that while undei 
the ninety cent tax 8()(! illicit distilleries were seized in one 
year, the fact w.'is tliat under the jiresent §1.10 tux the ' 
number of illicit distilleries seized during the fiscal year of 
IHiXi numl)ereil 1,905 — an enormous increase, which covered 
a large amount of revenue lost to the (lovernnient. The 
honest distiller as well as the jobber lose largely by this illii i 
traflic, which would be lessened very consideral)ly by the 
reduction of the tax. A p<iint was brought ovit that the 
(iovermnent olfering S]tirils seized in localities where illict 
distilling was going on, coulil not obtain the amount of 
the fax for the spirits, showing conclusively that the artiel' 
could he purchased for less than the fax. — lioiiforls. 



PAeiFI?. WIIME TOrjME) SflRIT F^EVlEW. 



11 



WINE MAKERS' CORPORATION. 



A gourral intHdii^ of the sliaivlioMors of the California 
^\"iuolllakel•s' ('oi[ioratioi( is to 1)C liold in tliis city on Maivli 
lllth. It will be calloil in answer to a rc'(]uost from the 
Santa t'hira connty organization to obtain an ox|ircs.sion of 
oi>iniou on tlio following resolution adopteil by the latter bmly 
roeently : 

" Resolved by the wincniakers of Santa Clara county, in 
nieetinsj; assembled at Wesl.side, that we reallirni the resolu- 
tion of the nieetiiijj; held in San Jose in November last, and 
at the ijeneral stoekhoKlers' nieetinj;' of the members of the 
California Wiuemakers' Corporation, that the jiriec of sound 
merchantable wine shall bo 20 cents per gallon, and not a 
cent less.'' 

Tiie ne.xt important move on the part of the eor- 
poratiou toward the niaintenaneo of. prices will bo the 
establishment of a storage house of l.OOOJOOO gallons capacity 
in this city to wliieh members who have imj)roper on insuf- 
lieent cellarage may send their stock before the hot weather 
comes on or their space is required for the ensuing vintage. 
A committee for this purpose will be appointed by President 
Bendel in a few days, and no time will be lost in the selection 
of a site and a building. 



LOUIS TAUSSIG & CO. WIN. 



A case just decided in .Judge Dangerfield's court, in this 
city, has furnished an interesting subject for those who Iiandle 
bonded goods. 

Some time ago Louis Taussig & Co. sued Bode & 
Ilaslett to recover damages tor leakage in a consignment of 
liquor stored in the defendant's warehouse. The jury in the 
case has uow decided in favor of the plaintifls and awarded 
them the entire amount of damages asked, $434.50, togethei- 
with costs. 

The most important point involved is that the result of 
the suit establishes a precedent which many local ilealers in 
similar goods have hoped for for many years. 

Although the warehousemen attempted to put up a 
-Tong defense to prove that they were not, under their 
- irage contract, responsible for the leakage from the casks, 
the evidence adduced showed plainly that the leakage was no 
ordinary one, and that the defendants luul not used due care 
to prevent a loss. 

The casks had not been stored over sixty days, yet in 
that time two of them had been almost emjitied, a fact to 
which Attorneys Reinstein <fc Eisner, for the jilaiutifis, called 
attention to sliow the carelessness of the defendants. The 
jury, it seems, took the same view of the matter and promi)tly 
decided in favor of Taussig & Co., as stated above. 

ALCOHOL FOR JAPAN. 



A most unusual shipment of alcoliol was made to Japan 
-n the steamer Doric, wliicli sailed ou the 23rd ult. The lot 
cousisied of lOo barrels, which came as through freight on 
the Southern Pacitic, and was exported in the name of tiiat 
company. 

Ordinarily it might be expected that such a large .ship- 
ment Would indicate that a large market for American alcoliol 
might be opened in the Japanese empire, l>ut investigation in 
San Francisco would seem to jjrove the contrary. **'_' 

Japan is supidied with alcohol principally by (iernianyi 
the spirit being potato or beet. It is .sold for silver liv weight 
— not ([uantity — and the liounty paid by Germany i.ssuchas 
to put tierman producers on a very favorable footing. The 
experiment of sliij)ping to Japan was tried by a San Fran- 
cisco house some time ago, when sixty barrels were sent on 
consignment, but the German competition was too strong— 
'prices could not be met, and the venture was abandoned. 



TROUBLED OAKLAND. 



.M the time tin' Review went to press the battle between 
the liquor men and their c)p[)onents was in full swing. No 
forecast of the result could be taken. Certain it is that in 
eliminating the Sunday closing question liie issue has been 
sharply drawn. 

Siiould the question go against tin' liquor trade the de- 
cision is not by any means final. The vote at worst is but 
advisory to the council. It does not enact any prohibitory 
law. When the new council meets it must deal with the 
question of revenue, tor the closing of the saloons means a 
reduction of $80,000 annually to the city revenue and bank- 
ruptcy to the city. 



AS TO "PFEFFER'S CABERNET.' 



Mention was made in the last issue of the Rkview in 
regard to. the identification of " Pfeft'er's Burgundy" as the 
Robin Noir by Mr. II. W. Crabb of Oakvillo. Inasmuch as 
Mr. Richard Honey, Jr., of Mountain Mew, has been mulcted 
to the amount of over $1,000 by the wrong nomenclature of 
this variety, Mr. Crabb's experience becomes of immediate 
interest. 

"Of course I first knew of this vine asPfeffer's Burgundy," 
he said recently,"" arid as I was experimenting with all the 
varieties I could obtain I naturally secured this one. Some 
time afterward I was struck by tlie resemblance of the variety 
with the Robin Noir. I sent to France for some cuttings of 
this variety, planted them, and when the vine grew and bore 
fruit there was no difficulty in identifying the variety. The 
'Pfef^er Cabernet,' so called, is not, needless to saj', a cabernet 
at all, but is the ' Rol)in Noir.' '' 



fOR 

WINES,SEER, CIDER, LIQUORS,CORDIALS,WATER,&c. 




wine Dealers and Growers, Brewers and I.iiinor Merrlianls are invited to 
see filter in operation at Pacific Coast Agency 

7 FIRST ST., S. E. Cor. Market. SAN FRANCISCO, CAI, 



12 



f/reifie WlJME /\]^9 Sflf^lT f^EVItW 



The Prices to RETAILRRS 

are as follows : 

$8. --case of 50 glass bottles. 
$8. --case of 100 glass bottles. 




SEE that the Labels 

bear the well-known 

RED DIAMOND MARK 

of the AI'OLLINARIS COMPANY. LIMITED. 



SOLE EXPORTERS 

THE APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LD., LONDON. 



JOHN CAFFREY, 21 ^uttei' ^Weet, gan ffsncisco, l^epPe^Biitins CHi^l^LEg (jRi^EF \ CO, jleW ht\. 



An Anti-Saloon League is being worked up in Clayton, 
Contra Costa county. 



Weil Bros. & Sons have jiartially re-modeled and re- 
arranged their offices at their store, 13 Front street. 



Ivolh it Deuhard have removed their telephone room in 
their establishment at 42-2 Montgomery street, to make room 
for a larger stock of bottled wines. 



J. C. Wilson, formerly of Kentucky, has Ijoughl into 
liquor store of Armstrong it McDonald of Santa Rosa, 
McDonald retiring from the lirm. 



the 
Mr. 



Justinian Caire, the well-known Market street hardware 
dealer, who owns Santa Cruz Island, oil' the Coast of Santa 
J5arbara county, is setting out about 200 acres of vines in 
addition to the vineyanl of 100 acres already in existence on 
the island. 



Jl. 11. llartman, of the Department of C. Carpy & Co., 
California Wine A.ssociation, lo.st his splendid ma.stitr, 
lioderick Dhu, during the fortnight. The dog jwisoner is 
abroad in the land, :iiid .Mr. Hartman's dog fell a victim. It 
is to be lioi)cd that some clue to the identity of the scoundrel 
can be oljtjiined. 

('. .M. Poston, wJio. lor souif time ha- rt'prescnted the 
Karly Times 1 Ustillery Company on this coast, has accepted the 
coa.'^t agency for T. II. Siierley it Co., and will devote his 
entire lime to selling '•]■]. L. Slilcs' and " New Ih^pe." Mr. 
I'oslon ha- a wide aeriuuinlance in thi.s Held, and will do well 
witli Mr. Sl]i rl. v's Knni.I- 



Rudolph Spreckels, the San Francisco capitalist, has 
bought the splendid Sobre Vista property of Colonel Geo. T. 
nooi)er, located in the Sonoma Valley. Coloner Hooper has 
spent many years of his life and a large sum of money in 
creating this magnificent country seat, and Mr. Spreckels is to 
be congratulated on his purchase as he has obtaine<l a fine 
country home. The price paid is $75,000. 



The representatives of .1. it F. Martell, distillers of the 
famous Frencli brandy of that name, have caused the ariest 
in (Chicago of the members of the firm of Siegel, Cooper it 
Co. — department store — and their as.sociates, on the charge of 
violating the trade mark law with reference to the above- 
mentioned brand. Tiie goods are alleged to have been 
purchased from a bank for one-third of the amount loaned 
upon them, and sold as geimine. The members ol' the lirm 
say tiiere is notiiing in the ciiarges, while the general agents 
of Martell it Co. say they are preparing to prosecute other 
l)arties in other parts of the country on similar charges. 

FOR SALE— One-half iuterest or the whole of the riglu 
to a wine faucet, recently patented, which enables wine men 
to keep dry wines on tap in 'i-gallon demijohns, pure and 
wholesome, without manipulation, It is simple and thor- 
oughly effective, and is a result that has long been sought. ;i- 
it will enable retailers to carry small cjuantities of dry wim - 
"on tap" williout sjioiling. For jiartieulars address (i. llii- 
olliec. 

UIXEMAKFR antl I »istill.r, .'id years of age. Iioldin- 
highest references for 12 years' services in leading establish- 
ments, open for engagement. Address "S. S.," this office. 

(iUOWEHS who wisii to sell good California wines i. i 
ca.sh on delivery, at moderate prices, to Eastern buyer, plea- 
correspond witli '•]{.' care editor this paper. 



P;<teiFIS WIJME /rJME) SflF^IT PREVIEW. 



13 



SANTA CLARA WINEMAKERS. 



A large mooting of tlic \\'iiU'-M;ikors' Assoeialidii ol' 
Santa Clam county was held at West Side Hall recently. .1. 
E. Crossley presided and I'eter Ball ollii-iated as secretary. 

Tiie olrject of tlie meeting was tu consider the uriee to be 
asked by wine-makers for merchantable wine ilnring the 
coming year. Several members of the corporation, it was 
stated, had shown a disposition to weaken on the price of last 
year's product, and unity of action regarding the price to be 
asked was desired. 

Colonel II. Hendel. President of the California Wine- 
Makers' Corporation, who was present, made a stirring speech 
in favor of standing Hrmly by the 20-cent-per-gallon schedule, 
as formerly determined upon, lie (jnoted statistics to show 
that the consumption of wine during the past year was three 
or four million gallons more than tlie production last season, 
and there was no reason why a fair price for wine .should not 
be secured if the producers remained linn in asking the 
stipulated price. As the result of Colonel Jiendel's address, 
the following was unanimously adopted : 

Jlegolved, By the wine-makers of Santa Clara county, in 
meeting assembled at West Side, that we realhrm the resolu- 
tion of the meeting held in San .lose in November last, and 
at the general stockholders' meeting of the members of the 
California Wine-Makers' Corj)oration that the price of sound 
merchantable wine shall be 20 cents jier gallon and not a cent 
less ; and furtiier 

Rcsohed, That the President of the Wiue-Makers' Cor- 
poration. Colonel H. Bondel, now here present, be respectfully 
requested to call a stockholders' meeting for next week in San 
Francisco to obtain a general exj^ression of the opinion upon 
the subject of the foregoing resolutions. 

Colonel Bendel stated that he would call a meeting of the 
Wine-Makers' Corporation of the State, to be held in the 
Chamber of Commerce building March ITtli. 



THE RUn MONOPOLY IN COSTA RICA. 



A report has been received at the British Foreign Oitice 
from Mr. P. ( J. Harrison, her Majesty's Consul at San -lose, 
stating that the Constituttonal Congress of Costa Rica, by 
decrees, dated respectively August 12 and 25, has abolished 
the Government monopoly of rum. The decrees provide 
that, for a term of at least ten j-ears from its publication, the 
monopoly of the manufacture of rum {aguardifute) is abol- 
ished, anil that the distillation of that and similar spirits is 
lawful throughout the Republic, subject to certain regula- 
tions, of which the fallowing are the most important: No still 
to be erected of less capacity than 100 litres per hour with the 
corresponding ajjparatus for rectifying the spirit. The license 
to distill will be S;30(in per annum, payable quarterly or half- 
yearly, as the executive may decide. The duty on the liiiuor 
distilled must not exceed .?1 nor be lest than "o cents per litre 
of rum (agvardinife) of 21 degrees or less. Li(iuor of greater 
strength and alcohol will pay duty on the above-mentioned 
base, in proportion to the strength at which it is distilled. 
The distiller will have to deposit in the Treasury, in advance, 
the amount of iluty equal to fifteen days' distillation, the 
capacity of the still being the basis by which the amount of 
liquor to be paiil on will be determined. A drawback equiva- 
lent to the duty paid will be allowed on all rum exported. 
Machinery for distilling and rectifying the spirit will be sub- 
ject to an import duty of 2 cents per kilog. The decree 
•further removes the prohibition on the importation of alcohol 
and rum, and fixes the import duty on these articles at §2.4(1 
per kilog. of 40 degrees strength. Liquors of greater or less 
strength will pay in projiortion. The executive is empowered 
to guarantee to the distilleries, by contract, the right to distill 
for ten years, also to diminish in proportion, as the produc- 
tien of tlie private stills increases, the output of the national 
distillery, closing it altogether a.s s:)on as the supply of the 
private concerns is sufficient for the needs of the country. 



CORRESPONDENCE. 

Wines. 
San Fkancisco, Feb. 22, l.S!i7. 
Editor Pacific Wine and Sjilrit l\cviciv : 

Sir : — The way things look now, it is safe to })rodict that 
prices will rule low, at least little hope to the contrary can be 
entertained unless the unexpected happens. 

.\t the ajiproach of the time when the probabilities of the 
next crop can be discussed, a slight change may intervene, if 
its outlook should not be encouraging and prices may be 
benefited therefrom, but if the opposite takes jilace and the 
expectation of a large crop can be entertained at the time, it 
is not altogether improbable that the now prevailing prices 
will be carried into the next .season. 

The condition of the market is lamentable, for the reason 
that strife will make it so. Between dealers and makers the 
widest differences of opinion exist. Makers claim that the 
cost of grapes does not allow them to meet the prices dealers 
are oflering, and the latter are persistent in saying that the 
returns they can get for the w'ine do not warrant them to 
make higher bids. 

It will take years to come to regulate all this. 

^lakers, it must be observed, stand between the grape 
growers and the wine dealers, to buy grapes they must 
necessarily see w'hether they can afford to allow growers the 
prices they are asking, and it would seem an inspired policy 
for them to sound the wine market before j)urchasing the 
grapes, if this is neglected they may find themselves out of 
their pockets. To the thinking mind it is a plain problem to 
solve. 

The good which was expected to come from a well 
organized body — the Corporation — has not materialized. The 
intricate question before it, to establish the price, has suffered 
mi.shandling at their own hands, in trying to put the prrice 
too high. To force the market without its sustainancc cannot 
bring results. A failure in executive matters is worse than 
the relinquishment of a venture of unpromising features. 
Facts speak, and so in this case. Disinterested in their own 
behalf as the leaders must be accepted to be, it is a .strange 
sight that with their i|ualifications they should have been 
mi.sjudging the market, as to overrate it. Neither would it 
seem that their work is complete unless they take matters in 
hand in the future as to the price of grapes, and give in this 
respect their valuable advice to the wine makers at large and 
its members in particular. What is needed is regulation ; as 
it is, a chaotic state of atl'airs is alhwed to exist, there is more 



JriiJiJr»Miin» Mf«jjM&*kti>n»MnlI»lrinJ>IJiJ>>nin^^^^ 



^c,^^BUSHED z;.^^ 




E.Remy Martin &0 

COGNAC 

1 FRANCE) 



AGENTS IN SAN FRANCISCD.Cai 

SeeQuoUtioneonpSl. 625 FRONT STREET. 



Wiiiiii<»lti in h»lrOni(»jiaigIil/uivi«Jwl«teWiill»f«w<»lwiMl^fgiOT»li>iwiwWT<iwril»U 



14 



jo/reifie WI^E /rJ^D SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



VnZAYLAND St CO. 



U. K. WORKS, 

LONDON, ENG. 



15-25 WHITEHALL STREET, 

NEW YORK 



To Wine Growers, Distillers, Eic. 
Gen tl eraen: 

We beg to advise having opened 
branch in New York as above, for the sale 
of our Wine Finings, Capillaire, Spirit 
Colorings, Essences, Preservatives, etc. 

May we ask a trial order, that you 
may prove the EFFICACY, PURITY and ECONOMY 
of our Materials? 

Yours truly, 

W. A. WAYLAND & CO. 

WAYLAND'S WINE FININGS, 

GUARANTEED FREE FROM 

TA.NMIN. SA.UICYHC and ANILINE. 

liei]uire no preparalioa, are always ready lo use, clarify the choicest descrip- 
tions of wines, als) those of low alcoholic strenglli. IN NO WAY 
IMPAIR THE WINK. ONCE liKlMJANT, 

1'krmani-:n-ti,y brilliant. 

misconception than conception, and the system of buying 
grapes and marketing wines on the part of tlie wine makers 
needs to be looked into with a view to improve and bring it 
to a healtliy and steadfast condition. 

Price is not everytiiing, other matters leading to it must 
be well looke 1 after. First of all it should rest on a .sound 
basis, from which it cannot be dislodged, when actually propo- 
gated. 

Profit must be realized unless dissatisfaction follows, and 
misrule comes next. Wine making is only one link to the 
wine industry, and the others need equal caretaking. Growers 
must come in for their share in the profits for tlieir labors and 
investments. But these combined profits mu.st be legitimate, 
that in turning the wines over to the dealer there must be 
still a margin to make it an object to them to invest capital 
freely. 

The wheel is then set moving. 

If wine makers simply unite under a leadership, ex- 
pecting from it to bull the market, they may as well 
scliool tliemselves to find out their position; the "hoax will 
dawn upon them as the price of their short-tightness. 

Charles T. Calame. 



St. Louis, Feb. 17th, lsii7. 
Edilur Pacific Wine and Spirit Review. 

Sir : — Your article " Tariff on Wines," iiubli.sbed in your 
issue of the Gth inst., expresses an opinion just contrarv to 
what we should liave expected. We tliink that you do' en- 
tirely wrong in advocating a ;JU to 5Uc. duty on foreign wines 
and objecting to a higher tariff. Your principal argument 
that a higher tariff on wines will start what you call the brick 
vineyard.-, of tiie East is out of place. It is a secondary con- 
sideration fur whieh s|)ecial legislation will |)rovide. We bolt! 
tiiat tho tariff on foreign wines .should in- raised to about ^l.W) 
per gallon, or such amount as is necessary to raise the price 
of foreign wines now .sold at 10c. per glass over the bar, to 
16c. per gloss. Then our better grades of American winos 
will find a market over our bars at 10c. per glass. When 
tins i.s done then we will be fittingly |irotecto.i and not l)efore. 

There are no fine wines maije in tliis country to-day. 
Wliy? Canl we j>roduce them? We cerlainlv can. but we 



cannot sell them. We do not claim that we can produce 
wines equal to fine foreign wines, but we can produce wines 
that are equal, if not superior, to that grade of foreign wines 
mostly imported at i>re.sent. Put we cannot sell our good 
winos. Tile import stamji is not on them, and the American 
wants somotning tiuU is iinporlcil. Furthermore, this country', 
although i)roilucing very httle wine at present, can produce 
more than enough wine for its own use ; therefore imported 
wines are a luxury for the rich, and as such should jiay a 
heavy duty. 

\\'e l)elieve that the large majority of tlie wine growers of 
this country share our view. 

Yours truly, 

Gast Wine Company, 

per Alex. Gast, Sec. 



PRICE LISTS DISCONTINUED. 



Cincinnati, Ohio, Feb. 2r)th, 1897. 



To the Trade : 



Through the efforts of the Kentucky Distillers' .-Vissocia- 
tionaud llie National A.ssociation of Wholesale Lifjuor Dealers 
of America an agreement has been secured from tlie ^\■hi.«key 
Commission Merchants and Whiskey Brokers of the I'nited 
.States to susi)end the i)ublication of price lists. The full text 
of the agreement will be found in all trade i)ai>ers, and the 
attention of the trade is particularly called to Section '1 of this 
agreement, which reads as follows : 

That Wliiskey Commission Merchants and Whiskey 
Brokers, Dealers and Distillers shall have the right to quote, 
or inquire for, by manifolded or jtrinted circular not exceed- 
ing three brands or ages of whiskey under one cover or on one 
card, but al! shall have the right to quote or inquire for as 
many goods as they may desire, provided it be by hand or , 
typewritten letter, sent in sealed envelope. | 

The cordial co-operation of tho trade is requested in ob- I 
.serving this article in order to secure the benefits which it is ' 
generally recognized will result from this agreement. 

Edward Senior, Chairman. 

You are hereby notified that the agreement to abolish l\< 
publication of whiskey pi ice lists has been signed l>y all tl 
principal wholesale commission merchants and \vliiskL\ 
brokers of the United States, as follows: 

Cincinnati, Ohio. — The J. W. Biles Conqiany, A\'illiam > 
Biles & Co., II. W. Voss & Co., the National Distributing L' . 
M. Dernham & Son, M. Derner & Co., Leon Block, J. ShieM- 
ct Co., Jos. S. Wacbtel. 

Louisville, Kv. — Nathan F. Block it Son, H. Tamplet & I 
Co., Frank T. Greer, T. II. Sberley & Co., W. A. Watts, Fn >1 
K. Walker, George C. Buclianan, N. A. Frankel it C".. 
Nevi-lle Bullitt, T. M. Gilmore & Co. j 

Chicago, Ills, — Jose|>ii W'olf Co., William .Miila, Israel 
Altnuin and J. J. Epstein. 

St. Louis, Mo .lobn D. Ilinde it Co., F. W. Matbia-. 

('has. Stiesmeier, T. S. Teuscher Co. 

New York City.— Julius Marcus, W. 15. Greenbaum, T. P 
Parmele. 

Boston, Mass. -F. H. Dane & Co., David S. Gushing, B. 
J. Remich. 

Philadelphia, Pa. — Robert F. Walsh, L. L. Ilyneman, K 
W . Beming, Charles Berger, Wm. Price it Co. 

Baltimore, .Md. — lolin T. Boyle, Wm. Rogers & Son. 

.Menqiliis, Tenn. — .Sam .S. Fin-lein it Co. 

The committee appointed to obtain the a3.sent and signa- 
tures to this agreement of tiie Wliiskey Commission Mercbani- 
and Whiskey Brokers of the United States docs therefoiv 
declare it in f(jrce and binding upon all jmrties thereto, aiiil 
notice to ibis oU'eel has been to-day mailed to all the signers 
thereto. Tiie agreement shall take effect on llie second Sun- 
day following this date, namely, Sunday, Manb I'ltb, is!i7. 

Edward Senior, Cliainnan. 



i 



fjOceifie WIJME /fJMB SPIRIT REVIEW. 



15 



NONALCOHO[,lC IJQUORS IN SWITZERLAND 



Two concerns, one in tliis city and the other in Berne, have 
opened factories lor the nianulacture and sale of unfcrmented, non- 
alcoholic fruit and grape wines. Both houses are now in jhe 
market with this year's product, offering; it in large as well as in 
small quantities to the public. Persons taking an interest in the 
production ol this nonintoxicating liquor have requested an opinion 
from the manager of the Swiss agricultural experimental station, 
located at Waedensweil, in this canton. In order to reach every- 
body Professor .Mueller-Thurgan, the superintendent of the station, 
has addressed a communication to the public through the press, a 
translatian of which follows: 

In view of the fact that a great number of people, outside of 
the ranks of total abstinence and temperance societies, are desirous 
ot obtaining a beverage tree from alcohol in place of alcoiiolic wines- 
and my opinion having been asked on the subject, I now beg leave 
to state, for the benefit of whom it may concern, that it has been es, 
tablished beyond any doubt that fermented cider and wines can be 
replaced by fruit and grape juices entirely free of alcohol and of good 
palatable and keeping qualities. 

The experimental station has made it a study to discover a pro- 
cess by which fruit and grape juices could be produced without the 
aid ot fermentation, would keep any desired length of time, taste 
well, contain no alcohol whatever, and replace fermented wines and 
ciders. There are, of course, several methods to obtain this result, 
but one only has proven practical in our tests. It is well known that 
fermentation of fruits and grapes is caused by certain microbes 
(microscopic fungus) whicii exist already in the fruit before the 
crushing process and rapidly increases thereafter. It is also well 
known that by fermentation the sugar is decomposed and one of the 
products of its decomposition is alcohol. If, therefore, the microbes 
are killed in time, the fermentation is prevented, the sugar will not 
decompose, and no alcohol will be produced. 

The sterilization of fruit and grape juice, that is, the annihila- 
tion of the microbes which cause fermentation, must, of course, be 
attended to before the latter have time to produce alcohol, which, 
in warm weather, occurs a few hours at>er the juice is extracted. 
Further, care must be taken that no other fermentation organisms 
contained in the air find their way into the juice, and if the process 
has been carefully observed, no alcohol will form and such juices 
will keep for years thereafter. In order to prevent the nonfermented 
wines from getting a cooked flavor, the heating process must be 
moderate. Minute examinations have shown that it suffices to heat 
the juice to a degree of 60° C. for fifteen minutes, in order to kill 
the microbes contained therein. In orderto obviate failure, it would 
be well to push the Jieating a few degrees higher and increase the 
time somewhat (say three minutes), not forgetting, however, the 
liquor itself must reach the above-indicated temperature. The juice 
can be clarified, and is then ready for consumption. 

It may be stated here that these nonfermented wines cannot in 
anyway be compared with fermented wine, or with any other non- 
alcoholic beverages. The nonfermented wines contain a consider- 
able quantity of nourishment. Not only do they contain more 
albumen, but also a considerable quantity of saccharine (i liter of 
non-fermented grape juice, for instance, contains 150 to 200 grams 
of sugar) and just the kind of sugar most beneficial to the human 
body. These beverages are consequently not only fable luxuries, 
but also a food product, and their manufacture enables us to keep in 
their natural state the juices of fruits and grapes, so important and 
useful to our health, and to have them at our disposition the year 
round. EUGENE GERMAIN. 

Consul. 

Zurich, October 14, i8g6. 



Imports and Exports 

DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



EXPORTS OF WINE. 



TO NEW YORK— Fbr Stk. CITY OF PARA, February 83, 1807. 



DESTINATION. 



SllirPERS. 



New York UcriiiKcr liros . 



1 Iwrrcl,'.! hf. 



Boston 

Fort Monroe. 
York, Pa .. 



H.irrisburK, V'.\. 
New York 



Lnchinnn ^c facohi i;*42 barrels. 

iOadck-ni & Ciocco ITi barrels 

Cal Wine .-Association fi.').") barrels 

|1". Chevalier & Co HO barrels 

I.enotmandBro5 !l barrel 

Stetson, Render D. Co ■« cases 

3 barrels, 3 hf . . 

2 kcRS 

Senses 

I iKirrel, 8 hf . 

22.'i (>arrels 



17,17;l 

27,11.'* 

4,121) 

61 



Gundlach-Bund. W. Co. 



■J7» 
1 1 .lUM 



$ 76 

4,e»J 

Ml 
7,(!34 

»s 
as 

103 

'J 

185 
3,4M 



I'otal amount 9 cases and. 



Ii2,059 J18,i;'.l 



ro CENTRAL AMERICA— Per Str. CITY Ol' P.\R,\, l--ebruar>- 23, 1897. 



Champerico F. S. Kordt ly kegs 

San J de Guatemala. .. <C. M. Mann 80 cases 

Amapala Cal. Wine Association 26 kegs 

Piintas .Arenas ; " • ftO cases 

La I'nion i " 2 cask« 

l.al,ibertad " 14 barrels, 1 half . . 

San J del Sur IC. Carpy & Co 16 cases 

" Wetniore-Bowen Co 14 barrels 

Amapola ■' 12 cases 

Corinto " Shalfbbls 

La I'nion , . . " 23 cases 

ISbarrels 

" 9 half. Si kegs . . . 

El Trinnilu " lOcases.. 

" " IGljarrels 

13 half, 22 kegs.... 

Champerico I.achman & Jacobi 8 cases 

Ocos " 12cases 

Cotinto iGundlach-B. Wine Co 4 barrels, 5 kegs.. 

San J de Guatemala... " 05 cases 

Corinto Castle Bros '20 kegs 

II. I-rapolli &Co '\ half 

San J del Sur c. Schilling & Co 20 barrels 

La Libertad " .'J casks 

Amapala ] " 12 kegs 

San J dc Guatemala " 240cases 

Champeurico " akegs 

Ocos I " llScases 

La Union I '* '!)8cases 

" I " ,4 barrels, 5 half. .. 

112 kegs 



210i 



120 
805 



207 



&3I 
677 



254 



20)1 

28 

1,049 

301 

144 



70 



Total— 662 cases. . 



8,320' 



TO MEXICO— Per Str. CITY OF PARA. Febraary 28. 1897. 



Manxanillo 



San Benito. 



li. FrapolU & Co 4 barrels, 2 half... . . 

Cal. Wine Association {3 half 

I " 30 barrels, 10 kegs. 

; Napa Sc S. Wine Co 6 half barrels 

" W. A. Schult2& Sons 20 kegs 

Tonala Stevens, .^rnhold & Co 6 half barrels 

San Benito 'F. S. Kordt.... 10 cases 

% " I " lOkegs 



Total amount 10 cases and. 




100' 



TO JAPAN AND CHINA— PER Str. DORIC, February 2:t, 1897. 



TO HAWAII -Per Str. .WSTRALI-X, Icbruary 23, 169?. 



Honolum Gundlacb-Bund. W. Co 62 kegs, 2 half . 

" Italian-Swiss Colony 12 barrels. 

•■ IBT- 



M. G. Simas.. 



.ISO kegs.. 



<I9 

626 
376 



163 
300 
240 
165 

90 
411 

79 
120 

82 

76 
129 



1\\ 
601 
3i5 

33 

3t 
124 
255 
108 

16 
44'i 
160 

73 
780 

60 

74 
116 



So.SlO 



$108 

33 

622 

eu 

124 
60 
32 
41 



991! $1,019 







lOcasks 


1,000 
600 

1,760 
1L4! 


J170 
375 




Cal. Wine Association 
















2 barrels, 1 keg 


41 

G 




2 cases and 










Total amount 


3.986: 


$1.S37 



;i96 

273 
232 




^ HERCULES GAS, GASOLINE AND DISTILLATE ENGINES. 

^\*^Ja The Best to Buy and the Cheapest to Operate. 

vK T For Pumping, Hoisting, Milling and all Stationary Purposes. 

0\, ' ENGINES AND PUMPS COMBINED FOR RACKING. A SPECIALTY. 
"? .^v^ Over 500 HERCULES ENGINES in Use by Coast Wineries and Vineyards. 

HERCULES GAS ENGINE WORKS. 



Satist-ottoa Gaarantced or Moucy Rcfnnded. 

SPECIAL ENGINES FOR WINE PRESSES. ETC . 

Write for \^:.^^.\■ ,\r.\ ^ .:V .;iic 1 H. P. TJ 200 H. 

LIICUEST <l IS A'.Vf;/.VK HOUKH /.v Tilt: Mf.sr. 




Z< HP. S1S6 00 
DUcoun t,'rCa>h 



OFFICE. 405 407 SANSOME STREET. 

WORKS, 2IS. 217. 219. 221. 223 225, 227 229. 231 BAY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, 
CALIFORNIA. 



iG 



f/ceifie WI|^E /tJMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



II AWAU-PB« B«10 W. G. IRWIX, Fcbruarv »». IfJ' 



, S'cvrn*. ArahoW *fe Co 95 ctt-fe* 

Cntwti l)i4tiUcrics Co I barrr! 

Cnl Wine Aisocialion 24 cfi<e» 

'• |-i4 linnrls 

" l3hnU barrel*.. 

11,'ikcKs 

IJ. C. Nobinan WiMrrcIs 

170 kegs 



M 



S.WI 



T.'t.il .tiiiiMiiil 130 i-fiscs niii1. 



10,740 

OSSE, Febnuiry 23, 18V7. 



Unltimore.. 

Ilo»(oii 

t,vnn 



I . I. Mm, Ml .\ i.iit'M i.^iabnnrU. 

C"nl Winr Asstviiition Ml barrrls. . . . 

. Il:ili.in SvviNS CuU'iiy '»0 liarrcls 

'J5 iKirrcis 

ao barrels 



74,883 
4(KI0 

l,3i0, 
1,0001 



400 
38 
90 

3,S98 

l.OiXl 

{6 0>3 



«:i7,44: 
u.ooo 

1,'JW 

too 



IUI,A.1:i <4l,M7 



I... 

M^.j; -: 

Kii^cUjila 

Ij riz 

(•uavinax 



OuaMii:i>. . . . 

AlUta 

Cuaynias 

Sanu Rosalia. 

Cuavnii!^ 



Maratlan . . 
Hii&cnada. 



ME.\ICO— Pbr Stb. ORIZABA, February 26, 1887. 

V ' wine .AasociAtion :rt) kegs | a00| 

1 cask 108 

4 casks, 4 barrels. .. I 448] 

2 barrels, 1 keg 114 

. . F. Ruther St Co » cases 

. I. Gutic 3 barrels, 2 half..... ( ,„ 

I ken 1 

RoscnblattCo a barrels 101 

D. FrapolliKCo 2barrels.2J ktRS...! N3 

" lease j 

Cundlach-Bund. W. Co Skcgs 

" 16 cases. 

6kegs ' 

" 10 cases 

Italian Swiss Colonv 1 Iwrrcl, 1 half 7U 

i barrels, 37 kegs..., 470 

■• 3 kegs SO 

. Pascal D. & Co ■. I cask 

.'P. Santellier I barrel | 

" 2 case4 i 

. Crown Distilleries Co .^barrels S77 

H Levi .S: Co 4 barrels, 19 pkgs. . . Ktl 

5 barrels I 366 

"barrels 360 



86 
164 

35 
6 



61 

108 
6 

40 
106 

62 
lOS 

48 
166 

24 

16 

10 

1 

113 

169 

76 
112 



MISCELLANEOUS WINE EXPORTS. 

From February 16th to Sttll, 1897. 



Norma 

WalU Walla. 

City of Para. . 
Doric 



.Albert Meyer. 
Vmatilta 



DBST1.NAT10N. 



SHIPPERS. 



PACKAGES. .GALLONS. 



Coti«ui-lo M.'ihukona. . 



Tahiti Lachmau & Jacobi ..! *i barrels | 

Vancouver C. M. Mann a barrels 

" llalinn-Swiss Colony cases 

London Cal Wine.A.s-socialion 120 barrels. . . 

CalcutU Otis, McAllister & Co. 3 barrels 

*' " I c.ise 

Kahului Cal. Wine .Association 101 kgs, '.^csk 

Wellint;ton Italian-Swiss Colony 1 bbl , 1 keg. . . 

Victoria " ,2 barrels 

\'ancoiiver Cal.Wine Association, B barrels 



103 
09 



;,ooo 

166 



129 kcKS. 



1041 
260| 
146- 



26 
36 

18 

1 800 

196 

6 

461 

»0 

29 

180 

78 



Total amount 7 cases and. 



52.7.1^ 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO DOMESTIC PORTS. 



From February Itib to 28lh, 1897. 



DESTINATION. 



SIIIPPRRS. 



City of Para ...JFirt Monroe, \'a. . .'I.enorinand Hros.. 

" Harri*bur({, Pa Istetson-Kcniier Il.Co. 



PACKAGKS. lOALLONIi. VALt'l 



I half barrel. 
1 half barrel. 



46 

28 



1 .'t;il .liiioiillt. 



EXPORTS OF WHISKY. 



From February 16th t3 >8lh, 18*7. 



VI.:.SSEL, 



DESTINATION. 



SHIPPERS. 



PACKAGES. GALLON . VALUK. 



Helene Honolulu Chas Hessler 

City of Para Ocos HrannM.-bwt-iKcr.'^Co. 

" San Denito Dieckmaii *S: Co 

" iManzaiiillo Ca! Wine .\ssocialion 

" 'Chaniperico J. K. Swavne 

" lOcos !I. Caniixr ft Co 

" jSan J del Sur Crown Distilleries Co. 

" Cbaniperico " 

'* iSan llenito *' 

" Amapala Wctinore-Bowcn Co. . 

" '• Rheinstroin liros 

" Tonala Carroll .t Carroll 

.\ustralia Honolulu Crown DislitlericsCo 

" " Spruance. S. it Co 

" " Wilmerding, I,. Co... 

W. G. Irwiu... " Crown Di-itillericsCo 

Orizaba La Paz , Wm. VoKTii Co 

" Guaymas •' 

•' " .Crown Distilleries Co. 



I'niatilla. 



.iVictoria ISwayne & Hoy.t. 



6 cases 

1 keg 

10 cases 

1 keg 

6 barrels 

3 kegs 

Ikeg 

6 cises 

84 cases 

4 cases 

1 case 

1 barrel 

C barrels 

1 half bbl.... 
66 cases 

1 barrel 

100 cases 

2 cases 

15 cases 

4bbls.,3half 

76cases 

36 cases 



6 
179 



>0, 



290; 
28 



261 



J 34 

96 

47 
71 
262 
06 
26 
63 

8:8 

40 
6 

r>8 
306 

21 
386 

46 
'.100 

10 

300 
676 
2110 



'I'otal riinoinit ^Sl c-Kt-s nil 


1 


^-■ 


■'.'■3 


EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO FOREIGN 


PORTS. 




From February 16th to 28th, 1897. 



VESSEL, 



City of Para.. 



Orizaba... 



DESTINATION. 



Manxanillo 

Corinlo 

San J de Guat'la., 
Guaymas 



PACRAGBS. GALLONS. 



Cal. Wiiie .^ssocialioll,1 keg 

Wettiiorc-Uoweii Co.. 1 keg 



Oundlach-H.WineCo. 
Italian-Swiss Colony. 
Crown DistiltcriesCo. 



1 case 

•' »i«-"gs 

10 cases 

abbl., 1 half. 



< 13 

38 
10 

103 
4b 

129 



Total amount 11 cases and 



SHERWOOD SHERWOOD, 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

Stocks of our Agency Goods for sale ia bond and duty paid at 
212-214 MARKET STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 24 N FRONT STREET, PORTLAND, OR. 

216 N. MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS FOR 

"Kcysioitc HUouoQrniu iliic'' aud "<DIC» Snrsnloga" —The Fiuest Eastern Rye. 

MOFCT >\: l'll.\.NlJi).N l 'liamput,'!!.-. I',.SI H l';.\.\ UI-.K .V I'U'S CUin'ts ami Saiiloriios. .M.\( 'KI^N/l K A: l.'n's Spanish She lictiaml I'im 

HU.NT UO(Jl'K TK.VGH Jt CO. Caseii Portb. \. HOUT.M.VN \- CO's Holland tUii. K .t .1. Hl'KlCl': S Xoni.aroil OIil Tom (Un. 

!•;. A: J. UUUKK'.S III Iriik iDd Oirnkirk Swuk. L.WV.SON'.S Li<iiiour Si;(>t<!h Whisky. HUUKKS llfiniossT Mi'iindy and Dfv *iiii. 

H.\,SS UATCLIFl-' 6i, GUETTON, Ltd.— Ba»s fiLICNLlVI'Vl' .Scotch Whisky in Wood. SCHLITZ .MilHavikl'o Boor th.> • Tilsoiioi" and 

Al<' in W.intl. .lOUI.IO'.S Stono Ale in llhds. and llfUhds. I.iirlit Simi-kUnc. also Sohlil/, in Wood. 

E. Jc I '."' Hi .uJ Bubliii P«rur (onUSBSS .MKINIIOr.O'S .\ni-hoi' Brand Now York Cidor ROSS' Uclfasl Cingi-r Alo, t'ltil) Soda. etc. 

«: t=«t br.w). IIKNK WATKIOSIIA Miiiurnl Wator. 'GLUU COCKTAILS." EVANS Hudson .\ • 

n.El.^< M ...v:- . -, icoYALTY GIN. 

KOH-.KAM, GERsTLtY ic Co., PIIILADF.I.PIIIA, TURE WllISKIES— "MASCOT," "ROBIN HOOD," "O. P. S." AND 'TrIVATK StOCK." 

t'hir^t ('iinnilliin Hup W/i/.h/.;/ idoilrrhiiin ,V Wortu, IJ'tl. Toronto. Ciiiiitihi), liolHeil fiulrr Oorerniiiriit Siiiwrrisioii. 
m: IMl'Oll I lit I Ui:/:iCA.\ irHISIili:.S-(;irliHlr Itnitrhou, Sitfimj 'SI, •Sii. ■s;>. •.'/«; l{orsrii ICi/,-: O. /•'. C: Si„-iii<iliill 
H'. II. Mrllriiiim lleri)iit(i(ie ; M. ('. Miiiiiin'i ; liviitiifUfl Cliih; MrUwiioil \ Miilliiitilij \ Chirlcenrork \ !■'. V. Jtrrrii 
tififl otiirr Httitiiliinl InunittH. 
ALSO AGENTS FOR NAPA VALLCY WINE CO'S WINES AND BRANDIES IN CASES. CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES IN WOOD. 



f/ceifH:i 



W»jNE 



/rJMD Sflf^lT (REVIEW. 



IT 



EXPORTS OF MISCELLANEOUS LIQUORS. 



From February 15th to aSth, 18U7. 



l-K(i.M ANTWKKI'— Pkh Hr. Siiip ST. MiKKKN, I-ebruury 2ft. 1807. 



VESSEX.. 



DESTINATION. 



City ul Pnm ... Ocos 

" t niiitnin ... . 

" Chnmpertco 

Horic Yokohnma . 

Australia Honolulu... 

W.O. Irwin 

Oricaba Guaymas... 

Vmatilla Victoria 

I'otal t".2 i-ascs, ftc 



SIIiri>KKS. 



I'ACKAC.ICS AND 
CONTENTS. 



F. S. Kordt 

I*ac. Mails. S. Co.... 

K. S. Kordt 

Southern I'abific Co. 

F. l)c Hary «: Co 

WilnicrditiR L. Co.. . 
Chas. Attrinccke *S: Co. 

K G. Lyons Co 



5 cases rum 

6 cases runi 

lOcasci liquors 

VXf barrels alcohol 

30 cases champagne. . . 
16 half tMirrels alcohol. 
10 cases champaf^nc. . . 

1 case bitters 

10 cases vermouth 



17 
94 

60 

8,l»00 

219 

;ti7 

75 
13 
46 



$y.7i'j 



EXPORTS OF BEER. 



From Kebruary 15th to 28th, 1897. 



Jas. I>e Fremery.. 



Oakland 

Citv of Para.. 



.Australia 



W. G. Irwin.. 
Orizaba 



UESTIN.^TION. 



rACKAr.t:s an'I> 

CDNTKNTS. 



San J de Guat'la.. 

Acajutia 

Tonala 

^an Benito 

Corinto 



Ocos 

Managua 

Leon 

Tonala 

Ocos 

San J de Guat'la.. 

.^cajutla 

San Benito 

;-an J de Guat'la.. 

Champrico 

Corinto 

Acajutia. 

La Lit>ertad 

ban Benito 



La Union... 
San Benito.. 
Honolulu. . . 



Guavnias . 
La Paz.... 



Mazatlan. 



S. F. Breweries... 

E. G. L>-onsCo 

Sherwood & Sherwd 

Buffalo BrewiuR Co., 

Enterprise Brew. Co. 

Royal E. Dist. Co 

Anhcuser-Brew. Co.. 



S. F. Breweries, Ltd. 



C. Shilling & Co.. 



Buffalo Brewing Co,. 
Enterprise Brew. Co. 



S. F. Breweries, Ltd. 
Roval Eagle Dist Co 
S. F. Breweries, Ltd., 



New Orleans Br. Ass. 



I'M cases bottled . . 
30 casks •■ 
Wbbl. " ... 
20bbl. 
65 cases " 
m casks *' 
a casks "* 
SOcasks " 

15 casks " 
65 boxes " 
'j!i cases " 
100 cases " 
200 cases " 
30bbl. " ... 
100 cases " 

26 cases 

60 cases " 

'JO cases ■' 

37 cases " . . 

IB casks " 

iO cases " 

20 casks " 

leases " 

^0 cases *' 

75keRS bulk 

lOOhfbbl " 

eOSrdbbl *' 

50 6lh bbl " 

30 cases bottled . . . 

76 casks 

120 cases boltUd.. 

16 cases " 
10 casks •* 
150 cases " 



9 130 
300 
600 
160 



18 

76 
146 
291 

aoo 

400 

3,000 

aoo 

600 
130 
317 
106 
1D3 
135 
105 
196 
10 
108 
131 

626 



540 
67 
90 

780 



.t'.fU casts mineral water order maiked (P). 

. 4cask.s wine A. Vignier 

. 2 half casks of wine *' 

. Upacka^cs wine " 

.UO cases bitters " 

. 'lO octaves wine " 

. llcasts li(|ueurs '• 

. 1,316 cases vermouth " 

. 16 cases brandy 1 •• 

. 10 cases absinthe 

. 10 cases kirsch 

. 6 c.tses mineral water... 

. 50 cases lioucurs 

. 160 cases (jeneva 

.117 cases tvinc 

. 16 cases mineral water. 
. C9i cases mineral water, 

. 26 cases absinthe 

. 10 cases curocca 

. 60 cases amer picon 

. 26 cases biaiidy 

. 10 octaves Geneva 

.;113 cases mineral water. 

. 35 cases gin 

casks Geneva 

70 cases wine.... 

160 cases mineral water, 

70 octaves brandy 

130 cases mineral water. 

40 casks Geneva 



Chas. Gracf^t Co 

Pascal Dubedat & Co. 



Royal Eagle Dist. Co. 
Wm. Wolff & Co.. 



|V 

Chas. Meinecke&Co., 

Goldberg. Dowen & Co ., 
Eisner «i Mendelson Co.. 

W. R. Graced Co 

Tillman & Bendel 

order marked S & B . . . . 



FROM EAST VIA VANCOUVER— Per Str. City of Puebla, February 26, 1897. 



Canadian Pac. R. R. Co | 6C0cs, whisky | Wm. Wolff &Co., 

FROM ANTWERP-PicK IJR. SHIP Balasore, February 27, 1897. 



76 cases mineral water 

6 casks rum 

Ill cases liqueurs 

500 cases vermouth 

90 cases wine 

24 cases wine 

60 cases wine 

15 cases brandy 

5 casks brandy 

6 cases mineral water 

160 cases mineral water 

210 cases bitters 

630 cases gin 

103 cases gin 



Chas. Gracf & Co.. 
A. Vignier 



Pascal Dubedat & Co. . . . 
Chas. Meineckc & Co.. 
Hellmann Bros. & Co.. 
Bolton, Bell & Co 



W. Loaiza «: Co 

Eisner & Mendelson Co.. 

Lu\'ties Bros 

Order 



IMPORTS PER RAIL IN 


BOND. 








Goldberg, Bowen & Co 

Wm W*olff& Co 













Tolal-l.OOO cases. .'62 casks. .100 barrels. ,76 boxes bottled. .100 half 
barrels. .50 third barrels. .50 si.\th barrels. .75 ke^s in bulk. . 



?9,256 





IMPORTS OF WINES AND LIQUORS BY SEA. 


FROM \TCTORL\— Per Str. Umatilla, February 21, 1897. 


SHIPPERS. 


PACKAGE AND CONTENTS. 


CONSIGNEES. 




4bbls. liquors H.Waldeck 


FROM NEW YORK VIA PANAMA-Per Str. ACAPULCO. February 24, 1897. 


. , . 1 


1 bbl mineral water 1 <'lJj> OalclnnH 






^'■^^ 



WHISKY AND SPIRIT IMPORTS BY RAIL. 

From February 23th to l^th, 19'.. 7. 
COPYRIGHTED. 



FROM EUROPE. 



St. Narde de la 
J. Dupont 


Q 




il bbl. wine 


Order mkd R. M. M., Monterey 






.-Vrmy and Nav 


yC. 


Soc.... 




( Surgeon Green, R. N-, Ksqui- 
1 malt B C 






• < 




II 


• • 




,1 


• • 




,1 


• • 




„ 






., 




9 c<. champagne 







SPIRITS 


ALCOHL 




WHISKY 




GIN. 




Bbls. 


Bbls. 


Cases. 


Bbls 


% Bbls. 


Kegs. : Bbls. 


Kegs. 








IS 




1 




Bode & Haslett 


60 
46 













William Wolff & Co 


20 
195 






1 

















Livingston & Co i 




7) 
85 

ro 
11 

10 








Jesse Moore, Hunt & Co. 














Naber, Alfs, Brune 














O.F. T Co 








13 
10 


' 




Crown Distilleries Co... 








10 
G 














* 


























2 


10 








GO 
26 
6 


" 








Rosenblatt Co 
















Albright Bros ... 






G 

1 
3 
1 










J. H. Mitchell 














J. L. Nickel 








a 






























1 
















1 








H. Lamt 








1 














1 
1 




L Gcndotti 




















1 
















lO.". 


215 


w 


711 


58 


15 


3 


10 






pruneX juice 

rccisXtkrco 

vM.HAHTV&C^^ 

^ NEW YORK ' 



k t 



PERFECTION" 



(THE STANDARD! 

TURKISH PRUNE JUICE 

Is wnrranted a PfRI-; rkflT lv\Vk.\CT, wh..ve mnumntnt pans ore 
SO i>erlectly blended that it?* action, used as proporlione<l, on every 
description of spirits, such as BRANDY, RL*M, GIN and particularly 
WHISKY, i.s truly wonderful. It I-INK-, Pl'RIKIi:S, MELLOWS 
and otherwise GKN'KR.VLI.Y JMrROVKS ton remarkable degree. 

"I'KRI-KCTION' TIRKISH PRrXK Jl'ICF. is an article which can- 
not be judged by itn taste or l>ouqiict. il niu»;t be blended with the 
spirits in wood to prove its value. Samples and information regarding 
proportion to use, etc., will Ih: gladly furnished by either our Agent or 
ourselves. 






PRliNEYguiCE 

\M.HAHN&CV 

NEW YORK 



MARTIN ERLENBACH, 

PACIFIC COAST AGENT 

404 Sacramento St , San Francisco, 



Cal. 



The advantage of giving Immature spirits. 
IN A VERY SHORT TIME, the character oi 
age, and thereby greatly increasing their 
value, is obvious. 



M. HAHN & CO,, 

• on MANUrACTURtn* 

125 Water Street, New York. 



18 



fycGlflG WI|^E /cJMD Sfll^lT J^EVIEW. 



BEER IMPORTS BY RAIL. 

I I. Ill lil.ni.ity 1 '111 1" -Mh. 1 - ■: 
COrVRlGIITKD. 



C 

W ■ 
Slur 
L\iUcc 



iHxi fi Sherwood. 
tot of Port. 



„.,rr,.„ 




Hr 


.K. 










-J 




Kein. 






m 
GO 
U 




:;::::|:::::::. 


i:::::::: 

■•a"' 










60 










'•" 










I'M 


ion 


40 


60 



SWEKT WINE PRODUCTIOiN 
1896-1897. 

];i-:c.\riTi'i..\TioN to .ianiai 

Port jtroduced . 

.Sherry prodiiceil. . 

Anj;i'licii i>roiliicocl. 

Muscatel proJiK'od . 

Malaga produced. . 

Fruntignan produced . 

Tokay produced 



5EA50N OF 



1>T. lSt)7. 

W'iiic gallons. 

l..')S4,.^78.7;) 

. 1,1 '21, SI 4.92 

. 38(),;}20.oG 

. . . ;172.3:5 1.5.5 

2,26!l.]l 

i'.(i20.n7 

. 974 34 



Total toManuary 1, l.S!i7. 



:J,477,309.34 



FIR.ST DISTRICT, Jaxiaky 1.H97. 

Pkgs. 
Brandy withdrawn from distillery 

for fortitication. 4.50 

Brandy withdra-ffu from special 

warehouse for fortification . . .57 

Brandy used for fortification. ... 99(1 

Port proiluced ... 

Sherry i>roducetl . . 

Muscat produced. . 
Angelica produced 

. 1 

FOURTH DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA, .1 

Pkgs. 
Brandy witlidrawn from distillery for for- 
tification -''3 

Brandy witlidrawn from special bonded 

warehouse for fortification 101 

Brandy used for fortification 307 

Port produced 

Siierry produced . . 



Tax (l;\U. 

(iO,707. 4 

4,G73. 3 
91,7.51. 3 
Wine Oals. 
. 29,739.49 
. 173,290.86 
.l(;i!,7(i6..57 
. 24,992.74 



VN.. 1897. 
Tax Gals. 

22,2(0.4 

8,0.58.3 

2.5,(i.5.5.4 

Wine (ials. 

8,700.20 

ll:',.9.". I IS 



RECAPITUL.VnON TO FKBRLARY 1, 1«97. 



Port produi-ed 

Sherry jiroduced . . 
Angelica produced . 
Muscatel produced . . 

Malaga produce<l 

Frontignan producetl. . 
Tokay produced. . . 

T<ital for Season to February 1. lJ-97. 



Wine Gals. 

. I.(i2:!,(il8.48 

l,4(»9,(H;fi.26 

411,313.30 

.539,(198.12 

2.2(;9.11 

9.(120.07 

974..34 

3,994,759.08 



BRANDY PRODUCTION 



FolKTll DI.STIMCT oF CALIFORNIA, .Ian., 1897. 

Tax CJals. 

Proiluci'd and lioiideil 20.5.54.2 

Transferred from di.st. to S. P.. W. in 1st Di.st., Cal. 24,7.54.1 
" " " " Eastern Dists.. 2,556.9 

" S. B. W. to S. B. W., 1st Dist., Cal 

East. Dists.. 16,2.59.9 

Exj)orted 

Tax.i)aid 1,684.7 

Remaining in bond .laii. 31, 1897 . 486,725.9 

FIRST DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA, Jan, \sU7. 

Produced and bonded 6(1,435.3 

Received from dists. in Fourth District, Cal 24,754.1 

" S. B. W., Fourth District, Cal 

Transferred from dists. to S. B. W., Eastern Distcts. 41,492.2 

" .s. B. W. to S. B. W., East. Distcts. 2.888.6 

Tax-pai<l 19,203.2 

Exj)orted 81.2 

Remaining in bond .Ian. 31. 1S97 651,356.3 



Grand total in State Jan. 31, 1897 1,138,082.2 



WINE AND BRANDY RECEIPTS 

Wine. 

Feb. 16 47,400 

" 17 32,000 

"18 44,750 

" 19 46,8.50 

" 20 . . 63,4.50 

" 23 . . 54.090 

"24 82,200 



Brandy. 
2()0 



26 . 



37,300 
(') 1.900 
11.000 



WlhhlAIVI WOLFF & CO. 

Importers and General Agents, 



327-329 Market Street, 



San Francisco, Cal 



— KCENTS FOR- 



Ml ChmnlMlKnc. MKS'-KS riiil.rilii W.H.I l. r. mi.N Ji Co, ^..lUKi.AU, Tin; KOY.M, WIM-: i<i , oi^.RTii, I'orl \Vlnc«. 

Ariilimtii|ll- S.liimi>I)». MINSKS, YZ.M'.rlKKI! .S; CO . kl !». TorrnKiilin \Viitc«. 

1 i.iblc Wnlcr«. MILSSKS KK.Kli IIKOS . l.osiiiis, The "Hoi[!i Hcod" Hot- |||1-: KilYM. Ill N ;.\m AN f.t IVIIKNMKNT WINl-: CEI.. 

ftli^-^K-. t_i,ini.i.i, ,-i ...Tviiu \.^r., iii.i.i-AHT, CIllKt-r tlliik' "t <'"l'>»t'*'*' StQUl mid Ilnnn" Air. I, \HS. llri.\i-i nt. lluiiKnri.iti Wine... 

Ale. IIAKI PIOI.ilMAV IIKKWINI". CO.. KiiCIII»TK«, N. % ., rscllOKK AND IITIIKK C.l-KMAN IIKKKS 

MI^-SMS I IK 1' MAUT|.:l.l., CoKUnc-MTirlcIl llrnnil)'. Kni.k. iI«h Ucr llcer. MRTlti:<> I.Al'l'i:. Nnt.ii ri vi.om , An.mnli(|in: llilct 

V ,,.1, , •., >t I, 1. , ./ ... siiNS, 1,11, ,\v*LKlikVILLIi, MlvSSKs. Dl'llOS I'KKKl'US, UoUDliAlx. CInrcK and Sou- ^,K MAKNIKR I. M'OSTOI.l.i:. Si IM: it iiisi:. ^l^.^^ 

U-rncH 1 .. ., r.rimtl Miirnlcr 

CO. ItOINIiVHi;!!, ScoUh MKSSKS nKINIIARn It C0..C0IILIU1T«, KhilieilDdMoKllc MKSSUS !■: crSHNII-R.rll.SAINi: ,•* CO IV»Kls. Cordi:. V 

Wliir. ANDKI. VSSAXI.KIINKK. llri>Ai'i:sT.liun>iidi JalioD Noi' .< 
•I, l.ro.. (Wm. JnniciOD MR. l'CilACVi:xl%T, Nitm, Cotk IVOR, niintuiirty \\ iiir». A|k-i1i iil Wal. t. 

MK..VSRS MORI'.AN IIROS . I'lKKT.i Iil; SANr* MAKIA, MR. joll \NN MARIA FARINA. C.ilrMlNI, OcKCIlurlir .: 
'IN*. R.iTTlutl.AM. r.lii Sh.Trtr... JiK-hc)iv|>lnlr., CuU.iinc, Knil dr Colognr. 

■Ik j «. oll.lv A, lliJii-ij.. ..ilk.i Kiiiiiinrl «i l-.tWrni. WIIMHV IIARMONV, I urrto dc Snnlo Mutil, Shcrric*. 

K,.ii„i>i>,lr,1 linrriraii W'/iin/. <*•*.— '80 ExreW. r; Spr. "Sil Itollc of Ni-lunn; !<|>rinR '90 Old (irurd Dnd; 1 runic; Mayliold; O. F. C. ; Oiickorcock and 
ollior Hljplo brand*. Lowest niiirkel ijuotBtior* furninlicd ou upiilicalion, to (lie wlmli^ilc Irndo only. 



f/ceifie wi;^E /cf^D sfif^iT i^eview. 



19 



BRANDY SHIPHENTS IN 1896. 



The total shipments of brandy from Clmrente, La Palice, 
Cognac and Uochofort-sur-Mer in ]S<)7 wore -4,093,964 gal- 
lons. Among tho largo .shippors wore: 

Jas. Hennessey & Co G.lOJl.'l gallons. 

Martoll & Co 4i;},r).51 " 

Jules Robin & Co 2G4,:5:57 

Roiivor, Guillot iV: Co 227.7 10 " 

IJisqnit, Diibouclie & Co 194,0.".!t 

Otard, Dupuv ct Co Io.s,();i0 •' 

Piuet, Castillon & Co 117,r)44 •• 

Th. nine i*c Co 112,707 " 

Other houses liaving a trade on tlie Pacific Coast and 
shipiMiig loss than 100,000 gallons were: 

Courvoisier & Curlier freres. . . .74,254 gallons. 

Boutolloau & Co 58,438 " 

E. Reiny Martin it Co 33,714 

L. Ducasse it Co 8,336 

.1. Dupont it Co 7.476 

TRADE CIRCULARS. 

Fkom L. Gaxdoi-fi & Co. 

New York, Eebruarv 20, 1897. 
To the Trade : 

Please take notice that the following is tho list of our 
importations for the fortniglit ending February 15, 1897 : 

PerS. S. Fulda — 50 cases Anosoni, Mancabelli brand ; 25 
cases Anesoni, Ferrari brand : 100 Tubs, Gorgonzola, Polenghi 
brand. 

Per S. S. Italia — 933 boxes Jfacaroni, Dello Joyo brand ; 
831 boxes Macaroni, Acanfora brand. 

Per Sunset Route — 80 barrels Wine, Italian Swiss 
Colony. 

Per S. S. New York — 22 cases La Kederale, Dubois 
^ brand. 

! Per S. S. Columbia — 225 cases Fernet BraTica : 6 cases 

extract of Tamarind, Branca brand : 100 bags Italian Rice. 

Yours, 

L. Gandolfi & Co. 



From R. F. Balke & Co., Distillers. 

" Normandy" Superior Pure Rye. 

No. of barrels made in — 



I 



1889 168 1893. 

1890 866 1894. 

1891 1,000 1895. 

1802 1,372 1896. 



2,755 
1,470 
1,927 
1,840 



Total . .'. . .11,488 



No. of barrels romaining in warolmuse Feb. 1, 1897 — 

1891 1!»2 1895 1,927 

1893 2,14U 1896 ],,sl7 

1894 1,411 

Total ... 7,497 



I'UOM CllAS. MlCINKt'KK & Co. 

It is not generally known that pure gin is the only 
alcoholic beverage witli groat medicinal qualities. Such, 
however, is tho case; and tho direct advantages resulting 
from its intelligent use are many. It is always nsed witli 
unmistakably good results in serious kidney troubles, especi- 
all)- Bright's disease. It has tho double advantage of direct 
action upon tlie kidneys, and at the same time aflording the 
invalid a proper stimulant. In Disinanorea (|)ainfnl men- 
struation) it is indeed a God Send, as it invariably relieves 
tlie suli'cring of that unhappy ordeal. It is a matter of 
curious and suggestive interest to know that in Holland 
kidney diseases do not exist among tho.se who drink gin. 
You will ob.serve that we said at the outset Pure Gin. Pure 
Gin — that is Posthoorn Gin — is made from .select juniper 
berries and the best quality of grains. It is distilled by tlie 
well known maker of tho famous Bohlen (iin after tho same 
formula and process, which is a guarantee of its purity and 
quality. Tliorefore ask for Posthoorn Gin and take no other. 



From Jones, Mundy & Co. 

Tlio undersigned hereby advise their customers and 

friends that lliey have removed to 120 Front street, between 

Pine and California streets, where they will be pleased to 

renew and continue tlie cordial business relations of the past. 

Sincerely yours, 

Jones, Mundy & Co. 



From \V. A. Waylaxd it Co., 
15 to 25 Whitehall Street, 

New York, February 25, 1897. 
Gentlemen : 

Having opened a liranch in the United States, we beg to 
refer you to our address as above. Wine Finings : — We 
clarify the tnilk of the Australian and California Wine im- 
ported into (Jreat Britain. Our Continental branches cover a 
large trade in Europe. Our finings fine the choicest descrij)- 
tions of wine, as well as those of low alcoholic strength, 
witliout deteriorating or impairing tlie wine in any sha[)e or 
way. 

We guarantee them free from salicylic, anilines, tannic or 
from any properties possible to injure the wine. They require 
no preparation by the users. One pint poured into 65 
gallons is suflicient. They are alvays ready for immediate 
use. 



RICHARD HELL.MANN 



H. G. HEl.LMANX 



HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 

IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
525 FRONT 5TREET, - - - SAN FRANCISCO, C/\L. 



. . PACIFIC COAST AGENTS FOR 



KRUG & CO., REIMS, PRIVATE CUVEE CHAMPAGNE 



J. PEURIEK FILS i\: CO., Chalons s Marno. Ch.inii.agne 

ADRIEN i FIL.S, Ipernay — — t'hiniiiagne 

FORRESTER & CO., Xerez de )a Frontera Slierricj 

OARVEY A; CO.. _ _ _ Sherries 

t>FFLEV. CHAMP & F()KRF>TEK. Oporlo, Port Wines 

BL.\XKENIIKV.M & NDLKT, Kotterdam, Union Gin 
H. I.ECHAT. H. I'Hll.iri'K.V IMEESK, Nanlt-s. S.rdnes 

DUBt-lN IH^THJ.ERS' CO., l.iM.. Dublin, lri«h Whisky 

K KKMY .MARTIN & CO., Rouillic, — Cognacs 

P. P R .\ I> I N i CO. , Segonzac, - — 



— Cognacs 

Bisti' and Gainess' 

Stout 



EXGRAND FRERES, Aiigouleme, 
PATTERSON' & HIBBERT, London, | 

L. DURL.VCIIER, liiiigen — — Rhine 'Wine 

H. UNDERBERG,— ALBRECIIT, Rheinbcrg & Niederrhein 

Boonekamp Bitters 
CH AS. DAY & CO., London, Old Tom Gin. OmnRe Hitlers 

J. R. HERRIFF & CO., GlB-g)w, Scotch Whisky, Jamaica Rums 



ALL GOODS IX VXITKD STATES BOXDED WAREIIOVSE. 

AMERICAN WHISKIES— "BLUE GRASS" AND "BOONE'S KNOLL" 



20 



J^/ceifie WiJME /cJSlE) Sflf^\T I^EVIEW. 



As analytical chemists we have wines sent to lis tliat 
have become ojiatiue; we frequently find the cause to be lining 
with white of ejrj;. Our experience is. a small portion of the 
albumen is; dissolved in the wine ; when the wine is placed in 
the cellars of private families (exposed to varying tempera- 
tures) the albumen is thrown out of solution, cuusing a 
cloudiness; complaints often result, and dill'ercnt brands are 
substituted, whereas it is no fault of the wine, merely the 
finings. With our finings the wine once brilliant is always 
brilliant, and in much less time than with any other lijiings ; 
in this respect we claim you will, on a test, prove them a 
great improvement on filters. 

Our Eurojiean business has been built by the trade re- 
commending us among themselves, and we have many k'tters 
from wine-growers ami merchants stating " they do so because 
they have proved our linings to be the most reliable of any, 
although thay have tried all kinds." We make special 
articles in quantities to suit e.xact requirements and charge 
commercial not fancy prices. We trust by adojiting similar 
methods to make our new venture in this country mutually 
advantjigeous. 

We are not believers in talk. Before placing your 
orders, kindly favor us with a trial : this will say more than 
volumes from ourselves and prove that our finings, flavorings, 
preservatives, acid neutralizers, spirit colorings, etc., are not 
to be beaten in eflicacy, purity or economy. 

Yours truly, 

W. A. AVayland & Co. 



From H. H. Shufeldt & Co. 
To the Trade : 

We take plesisure in announcing to you the re-cngage- 
ment of Mr. Thomas F. Cunningham (our former representa- 
tive), to lake charge of our interests in the South an<l West. 

We would ask for Mr. Cunningham a renewal of past 
courtesies and a continuation of the many favors which it has 
been our pleasure to receive at your hands. 



Believing that our mutual interests will be served by 
this connection, and assuring you of our further close atteu 
tion to your valued commands, we are. 

Yours very truly, 

H. H. .Shufeldt & Co., 

Thomas Lynch, Sujit. 



Foil SALE — Brewery, Distillery, Soda Works, Buildings 
and Lot.s in Ensenada, Lower California; business with- 
out competition: in full working order; $0,000 — could not 
be duplicated for three times that amount. 
Summary — Four town lots, 333 feet frontage in heart of 
the city. Fire-proof building, corrugated iron, 40 x oO; annex, 
corrugated iron, 14 x 18. Dwelling house (4 rooms, furniture, 
etc.;) barn and stable. Fine beer garden, well ornamented 
witli trees; tde only one in town, for picnic purposes. Wind 
mill, iron turbine, 10 buckets: galvanized water pii>es. through 
buildings and grounds ; galvanized iron tank, 0000 gallons. 
Boiler and steam generaior, 12-h. power. Brass steam pump: 
Copper still rectifier, 16 compartment column; copper still rec- 
tifier for pomace or mescal; Ismail still. (!rape crusher, 
press hand pump, tanks; tools; Fairbanks scale 2000 lbs: 
Complete malting departmeut, roller for malt ; beer kettle 
heated by steam; zinc cooler: reservoir tanks, barrels, etc. 
Complete soda-bottling works apparatus. Strong horse and 
harness, now delivery wagon, top-board buggy, etc. Only two 
men needed to run this plant — one for inside work and the 
other for outside. 

Expenses are very small and i)rofits very large. Any en- 
terpaising party with a small capital cannot fail to make 
money in a short time. For furtlier particulars address 
"lirewerv." care Kkvikw office. 



DAWSON'S 




"EERFECTION 



tt 




OLD 





In Cases Only. 



SOLE AGENT FOR PACIFIC COAST 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 123 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



f/teifie W\fiE /J^B SP|[^|T F^EVIEW 



21 




Owners and Handlers of its own Brands 
and Also the Weil-Known .... 
Brands of^^~*^^ 






M ain OFFICES : 



^ NAPA VALLEY WINE CO. 
KOHLER & VAN BERGEN 
KOHLER & FROHLING 
'^^B. DREYFUS & CO. 

S. LACHMAN CO. 

C. CARRY & CO. 



^ 




SECOUD m FOLSOPI STS. \^ 



San Francisco, \ \3^ 

California \ \3^^ 

% 

New York Office: \ y^ 

jjQ 45 nnnnnwDY J O 



INCORPORATED 






AUQUST 10. te&A. 



^ 



2-2 



PAeipie WIJ^E /ND Sflf^IT F^EVIEW. 



RECENT TREASURY DECISIONS. 



CircuUir 471 — I'aijiiunt of the Tar on, or ItoniUmj of Fruit 

Brandy. 

TllEASl'RY DkPARTMEST, ^ 

OlFICK or I 

TnK C'mmmismunkh of Ixtkknai, Ki;vKNrE, I 

Washington, D. C, Jan. 30, 1897. J 

Section 2 ol" the .Vet of Afarcli 3. 1877 (19 Stat. 393), as 
amemleil by tlie Act of Oct. 18, 1888 (25 .Slat. oGO), and the 
Act of June 3, 189G (Cliap. 309, o4th Cong., 1st Sess.), pro- 
vides tliat every distiller of brandy from grapes, apples, 
peaches, [tears, pineapples, oranges, apricots, berries or jirunes, 
upon rendering liis innntlily return of materia! use<l and 
spirits produced by iiini, .shall iinniediijtcly pay the tax ujion 
such spirits, or may, upon compliance with certain require- 
ments specified in said section, cause the spirit.-* to be removed 
in bon«i to a sjiecial bonded warehouse. (See Regulation, 
Series 7, No. 7 and No. 5, Revised and Supplements.) 

Hereafter, in case the distiller at the time (on or before 
the 10th day of the month following tlii' ruontli in which the 
brandy is produced) of rendering his monthly return Form 15 
does not pay the ta.x on the brandy nor remove the same for 
deposit in a special bonded warehouse as provided bj' law, he 
is delinquent, and the collector of the district in which his 
distillery is located will report him to the Commissioner of 
Internal Revenue for as-sessment within ninety days from such 
10th of the month. 

The time limit of ninety days is deemed sufficient to 
cover all delays likeh' to occur in determining the taxable 
quantity. If any indication of fraud is apparent the tax 
should certainly be reported for assessment at an earlier date. 

Upon receipt of the assessment list, the collector will 
immediately demand tlie payment of the tax, using Form 17, 
revised in April, 1895, or subsequi^ntly, for this purpose, and 
upon the neglect or refu-sal of payment by the distiller, .shall 
proceed to collect the same by distraint. 

See Section 3253, R. S., a'nd Section 8 of the Act of March 
3, 1877. 

So much of the Regulations of this office, Series 7, No. 7, 
and Series 7, No. 5, and Supplements, as are inconsistent with 
this circular are hereby amended. 

G. W. \\ILS0N, 

Acting Commissioner. 
Approved, 

W. E. ClKTIS, 

Acting Secretary. 



PATENTS, TRADE-MARKS, ETC. 

The followin); list of riccal pateiiU iiml trade-markb of inlcre.-'l to oiir patrons 
is rcporteJ by \V.M. U. IIknukiison, solicitor of .Vniiriciin and foreign patents 
and Iradi-inark.i, Norris lliiilding, .'lOl K f?lrcct, \Va->liington, 1), C. A copy cf 
any of the L'nited States patents will be furnished by him for 2j cents. 

Issue of Feubuaky 9, 1897. 

670,805— Hottle, K/.ra ('anipl)ell, Dayton, Wash. 

u7t>,9titj — .Mold for bottle 8t»p|>ers, Jaiue* liickling and T. Slatter, London, 

Knt;l;ind. 
.">76,GII — Ta|i or liiins-hole bii-ihins, KJvvard C. Post, .Monroe, Mich. 
.'J7ti,'.l|:i — Nori-relillable Imttle, Jo-ieph Strelcli, Kast Orange, N. J. 
576,631 — Malting machine, James A. Tilden, Hyde Park, Mass. 

Trake-Marks. 

29,566 — Beer and Porter, The Goebel Hrewing Company, Detroit, Mich. Essen- 
tial feature — .\n oblong rectangular ground or panel, an inscribed 
rhomboid, and the name '(ioebel's" j)rinted or stamped on the 
rhomboid. 

29,557 — Mall Extract, Bernlieim Brothers, Louisville, Ky. Essential feature — 
The word " Shaw's." 

29,56S — Malt Extract, Val Ulalz Brewing Corapany, Milwaukee, Wis. iCssen- 
tial featiirt — The word " .Malt-Vivine." 

Issue ok Feuruarv 26, 1898. 

577,13'.l — Bottle stopper, .\nthonv Ibert. Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
.'■>77, 053— Bottle, James W. Mob'n, I'liiladelpbia, I'a. 
577,OU-l — Non-relillable bottle, Harry Wissner, Pittsburg, Fa. 

Issue of February 23, 1897. 
577,640^-Seal attachment for bottles, Herman Bokelmann, Newark, N. J. 
577,415 — Bottle, Elijah IC. Hrowii, Cripple Creek, Colo. 

577,728 — Device for drawing steam beer, Kusebe Demers, San Francisco, Cal. 
577,426 — .Ante-refillable bottle, (iarrill J. Franken, Schenectady, N. Y. 
577,790— Non-relillable bottle, James D. Shoots, Horseheads, N. Y. 
577,.'i90 — Bottle, .\lfred Turner, Horlcm's, Pa. 
577,546 — Bottle stopper, .lulius II. Wittekind, Roslindale, Mass. 
577,63'1— Bottle, Warwick Winston, Shanghai, China. 



Tkade-Makks. 
Macon, 



Ua. Essential feature -The 



29,599 — Beer, Acme Brewing Company, 

words " Acme Budwe'ser. " 

29,598 — Claret Wine, John M. Vergnole, New Orleans, La. Essential feature — 

The words *' Domaine de la Palme." 

29,600 — Lafjer Beer, .August II. ZieL'ler. Nevv York, .V. Y. Essential feature — 

The words " Munchner Kindl." 



Hey, Grauerbolz & Co. 

Importers and Wiioi.kale Dealers in 

WINES & LIQUORS. 



-SOLE AGENT.S FOR- 



Daup Crockett UlDiskp. 

BE SURE YOU ARE RIGHT, THEN GO AHEAD. 



Subscribe for Pacific Wink ani> .-^iiimt IJkvikw, S1..-)0 vear NO. 2i5 Sacramento street, san -"rancisco, cAl 




EL PINAL VINEYARD 



EST.VBLISIIED 1S.V2. 
Largest Producers of 

PURE SWEET WINES 

IN AIVIKRICA. 



Geo. West 5c Son 

5TOCKTON, CAL., U. 5. A. 



f/eifie WIJ^E /JSID Sfif^lT f^EVIEW. 



t23 



NOTICE OF REMOVAL. 



Please tako notice thai the Inisiiioss ollici' of tlii' Pacii'ic 
Wine axd ISpiniT Kkviicw has bueii ivinovcd t'roinJUtJ Bat- 
tery Street, San Francisco, to 402 Front Street, Rooms .s luul 0. 
This issue of tlie Rkview is out several days late, owini;; to 
till' fact tiiat tlie entire paper, advertisements and all, had to 
be re-set, conseciuont upon tlie sale of tlie plant of tlie K. M. 
Wood (^0., jol) printers. 

Tlianking you for past favors and patronage, and trusting 
to deserve the continuance of the same, we are, 

N'erv trulv vours, 

WOOD ct SCOTT, 
Publishers P.vcii'ic Wink and Spirit R^;vIE\v. 



CONSULAR REPORTS. 



SHERRY VINTAGE OF 1896. 

The wine crop in tiie siicrry districts of tiiis section of Spain 
(Cadi/) is about the averajje in quantity of recent years, though 
one or two districts report a falhng ofT even from the vintage of last 
year, which was a short one. There is reason to beHeve, however, 
that this reported decrease is somewhat exaggerated. Although 
the time has not yet arrived for testing the young wines, it is the 
general expectation that they will prove to be of superior quaHty, 
owing to the unusually favorable weather conditions under which 
llie grape crop has been produced and harvested. 

The olives ol the cro[) of 1896 were mostly of large and medium 
sizes; the fruit was generally much larger than that of 1S95. The 
olives of 1895 were largely of medium and small sizes. About one- 
third of the crop, it is estimated, was injured by too much rain, 
much of it becoming worm-eaten. The larger the yield, the smaller 
the general size of the iVuit. 

SAMUEL B. CALDWELL, 

Consular Agent. 

Seville, June ig, iSg6. 



TREATMENT OF VINE DISEASES IN ITALY. 



I send herewith a translation of a publication by the chief of 
the royal Italian e.xperimenial cellars and vineyards of Noto, Italy, 
recommending a treatment for combating the chlorosis (green sick- 
ness) or giallume (turning yellow) of the grapevines. It may be 
possible that this remedy is already known and practiced by our 
viticulturists, but I thought it would do no harm to bring it to their 
notice. LOUIS H. BRUHL, 

Catania, November ig, iSgd. Consul. 



[Translation.] 

Practical Instructions for Combating the Chlorosis ( Green Sickness) 

or Giallume ( Turning Yellow) of the Grapevine, 

The director of the royal Italian experimental cellars and vine- 
yards of Noto, Italy, publishes, under date of October 30, 1S96, the 
ioUowing: 

To cure the American vines, be they grafted or upon their own 
roots, of the chlorosis or the yellow sickness, the viticulturists are 
advised to follow the treatment proposed by Dr. Rasseguiar, of 
France, which has also by us been found from experiment to be 
beneficial and economical. 

Here is, in short, how it is necessary to proceed: Twenty-four 
hours previous, prepare the solution of sulphate of iron, in a recep- 
tacle of wood, iron, or earthenware, using 400 to 500 grains of the 
sulphate of iron lor every liter of water. It is best to put the sul- 
phate in a bag or small basket, leaving it suspended in the water 
until completely dissolved. This done, proceed with the application 
of the remedy. A laborer, who may be a boy or even a woman, 
provided with a bucket, with handle, containing; the liquid, follows 
the pruners, wetting by mea s of a brush dipped into the solution 
all the surface of the cuts, and where possible, the entire stump. 
Every time the brush is dipped into the liucket, it is necessary to 
carefully stir the liquid, so that the iron salts, which has a tendency 
to settle, is uniformly distributed. 

Conditions required tor the success of the cure are: 

It is necessary — 

(1) That the treatment is made in time. In Sicily, the season 
most opportune, according to our experience, is during the first fif- 
teen days of November. The treatments made much later give 
results for the most part incomplete or inappreciable. 

(2) That the stage of the disease be not excessively advanced, 
in which case the vines are already anfem.c (bloodless) and nearly 
dead. 



(3) That the nature of the calcareous land, in which the cure is 
to be applied, be not of a nature decidedly productive of chlorosis. 

(4) That the pruning and immediate brushing be done in dry, 
but not cold, weather, because the low temperature diminishes the 
absorption of the sulphate of iron solution. 

If, within twenty-four hours after the treaiment, a rain should 
come up, it is necessary to repeat the brushing over. 

In performing the operation, it is recommended to the viticul- 
turists to leave some rows untouched, in order to belter observe 
afterwards in the spriiig the effect of the treatment, which should be 
repeated several years in succession, even if the result in consequence 
of the first be complete. 

Noto, October jo, i8(j6. 



TRADE NOTES AND PERSONALS. 



A. P. Hotaling, Jr., has been quite ill for the past few days. 

Dave Johnson, representing Jas. Levy & Bro. is visiting the 
coast in the interest of the house. 

Ph. Raphael has been appointed salesman for the Italian-Swiss 
Agricultural Colony, with headquarters in Chicago. 

The liquor and grocery house of Klauber & Levi of San 
Diego, has been succeeded in business by the Klauber & Wanj»en- 
heim Company. 

Percy T. Morgan, President and Manager of the California 
Wine Association, is among the recent visitors to Los Angeles, 
whither he went on business. 



Charlie Roth, of Roth & Halle, Cincinnati, is with us once 
again extolling the virtues of Spring Hill and John Cochrane,;as 
well as other brands carried by the firm. 

Sam Johnson, of Rheinstrom, Bettman, Johnson & Co,, Cin- 
cinnati, is among the recent visitors to the coast trade. Mr. John- 
son comes about every six months, and always goes away with a 
comfortably filled order book. 



Adol[)hus Busch of the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Co. of St. 
Louis, is expected to arrive on the coast within the next few days. 
He will look the trade over thoroughly while here, but he will also 
spend some time in the pleasure points in California. 



Dallemand & Co. will shortly remove into offices in the Heller 
Building at 212 Sansome street. The firm is concentrating its 
blending and bottling departments in Chicago, but in the future the 
stock carried on the Pacific Coast will be carried in warehouse. 



W. A. Taylor & Co. of New York are distributing a brochure 
entitled, "Honest facts about Madeira Wines." The history of 
wine-making in Madeira is given at length. The firm is agent for 
Blandy Bros. & Co. of Funchal, who have been shipping Madeiras 

since 181 1. 



The following wine transfers have been recorded at the County 
Recorder's office at Santa Rosa to the California Wine Makers' 
Cor|)oration : J. Chauvet, 12,000 gallons red wine and 43.000 gal- 
lons wfiite wine : total, 55,000 ; Guy E. Grosse, 3,000 gallons red 
wine, 3,000 gallons white wine ; total, 8,000. 

J. R. Haker, who represented the Gundlach Bundsehu Wine 
Co. on the road in the east after the Midwinter Fair closed, has 
accepted control of the city department of the Ben Lomond Wine 
Co, and the St. George Vineyard of P'resno. His headquarters are 
with the St. George Vineyard Co., at 123 Market street. 



Jacob Cohen, who represents the National Wholesale Liquor 
Dealers' Association, of which E. L. Snyder of P. W. Engs & 
Co. is Presinent, is visiting the coast in the interest of the organiza- 
tion. Mr. Cohen succeeded in getting mnny new members in this 
city, Los Angeles, San Diego, Stockton and Sacramento. 



Thos. Keating is boasting about a three-year-old trotter by 
Diablo 2.09'4, out of a mare by Gen. Benton, that he is handling at 
Pleasanton. He says: " She is better than Ottinger, and I like her 
better than any trotter I ever pulleil a line over." This "phenom" 
belongs to Louis Crellin of the Ruby Hill Vineyard, Pleasanton. 

The Welmerding-Loewe Co. sustained quite a severe loss by 
smoke and water on the ist inst.. in consequence of a fire in the 
store-room adjoining their establishment at 216 California street. It 
was fortunate for the Com|)any that the hue broke out in the day- 
time. A night fire would certainly have entailed a still greater loss. 



24 



PAGipie WlfvJE ANE> Spii^lT PREVIEW. 



James H. Holland, ihe well-known broker, who is among the 
candidates for the position of Collector of Internal Revenue for 
this district, was among the visitors to Washington during the in- 
auguration of McKinley. 

1. Lavenlhal, of the firm of Lavenlhal & Sons, I.os Angeles, 
is in the East on a trip combining business with pleasure. He will 
make quite an extensive visit to Kentucky, and will ship back sev- 
eral carloads of fine whisky. 

James Hackett, o( the Greenbrier Distilling Company of Louis- 
ville, is among the ncent visitors to ihe coast. He is here in the 
interests of "R. B. Hayden" and "Greenbrier," distilled by his 
company, and represented in San Francisco by Charles Meinecke 
& Co. 

Mr. I. T. Williams, ol the firm of Taylor & Williams, is push- 
ing ■• Yellowstone" to the front in a way that is commendable and 
characteristic of the enterprise and energy of this well-known firm. 
The brand has become a popular favorite with all consumers of fine 
whisky. It is the very best, and Mr. Williams thinks the best is 
none too good for his friends and customers. — Jlinc and Spirit 
Bulletin. 

Braunschweiger & Co. will soon send forward their exhibit to 
the Central American Exposition. The exhibit occupies a floor 
space of 200 square feet, enclosed by a substantial railing. I'our 
gaily decorated pyramids of casks rise from each corner of the 
space, and in the rear is a large display ol the ditTerent brands of 
goods handled by the firm. The exhibit is certainly a very credit- 
able one. 

To satisfy the demands of Mrs. O'Brien, widow of the late J* 
H. O'Brien, the wholesale liquor business of the firm of W. M- 
Watson & Co. of Oakland was sold at auction on the iSth ult. It 
was brought by the firm of Watson & Co. incorporated, for S52,- 
025. The sale was attended by a large number of liquor men, and 
a number of large houses in San Francisco were represented. The 
bidding began at $20,000, and went spiritedly up to the point 
where the business was sold. 

A most important movement has been inaugurated in Boston 
that may prove ol great benefit to all who are engaged in the liquor 
business, whether wholesaling, jobbing, manufacturing or retailing. 
This is an organization known as the Brewers and Distillers' Mer- 
cantile agency, with offices in New York and Boston. The purpose 
of this agency compares with the scope of the agencies known as 
Dun's and Bradstreet's, and purpose to give the financial rating of 
every liquor dealer in the United Stales. 

According to Prof. Guide Rossati, the viticultural agent of the 
Italian Government, the future of Californian wines is, indeed, 
bright. A little more care as to cellarage, more attention to quality 
in preference to quantity, the education ol the American in the use 
of native wines, the use ol hillside instead of bottom lands for the 
growth of the grape, are some of the points to which the California 
wine grower should turn his attention. These would add both to 
the quality of the wines and to his net x^czi^Xs.—Bonforts. 

Paul Trommlitz, of the Italian-Swiss Agricultural Colony, was 
in the city recently. Although bu.siness was not as brisk as might 
be desired, quite a number of new names are apjiearing on the 
books of this company. And Mr. Trommlitz says, once a buyer 
always a buyer, when it applies to " The Colony's" goods. The 
Colony has recently been quite fortunate in .securing the services of 
that successfiil and well-seasoned salesman, Ph. Raphael, as a re- 
presentative, with headquarters in Chicago. — /?(?;// tfr/jr Chicago Cor. 

.Messrs. E. & J. Burke, New York, must feel justly proud of 
the enormous importations of their fine old Irish Whisky, as it is a 
well-known fact that the firm of Edward & John Hiirke (Limited) 
are the largest shii)pers ol case whiskies from the |)ort of Dublin. 
The particular attention ol the trade is also drawn to their fine grade 
of Scotch Malt and Nonpareil Gin, which is bottled under the gov- 
ernment supervision at their bontled warehouses in the United 
Kingdom. Sherwood & Sherwood are the Pacific Coast repre- 
sentatives o this great house. 

At the meeting of the Town Council of Los Gatos, held on the 
and inst., the ordinance regulating the sale of liquors in quantities 
greater than one iiuart was placed jn passage. The ordinance pro- 
vides that deah-rs m the above quantity shall have a license for three 
months at the rate of $25 ])er quarter. The ordinance in regard to 
selling liquors ami inloxicanLs at retail was also placetl on its pass- 
ngc. This ordinance provides that ictail licpior dealers can dispense 



their commodities to the general public with putting up half the 
present rate, $50 per quarter, $100 being the former rate. Both were 
passed. 

The exhibit of F. Albertz of the Moulton Hill Vineyard at the 
recent expedition at Cloverdale fully deserves a separate notice. It 
is a reproduction of the " Tun of Heidelberg." It is sixteen feet 
high and about twenty feet in diameter. It rests upon a circle of 
lull casks of wine upon which a frame shaped as a tun and covered 
with bunting stands. The interior, quite a room, is shelved and 
filled with labeled bottles of every variety of wines very artistically 
dls])layed. The freize around the upper rim of the interior is made 
of crossed olive branches, producing a beautiful etlect. The ex- 
hibit shows Mr. Albcrlz to be not only a rustler, but a man of great 
taste and executive ability. — Reveille. 



Waldeck-Germain Wine Company, incorporated, is the title 
given to a new firm recently opened at 328 South Spring street, Los 
Angeles. The firm openes up with Mr. J. E. Waldeck as president 
and Mr. Edward Germain as manager, and with these well-known 
jjentlemen at its head, should soon become one of the leading 
liquor stores of Southern California, if not of the Pacific Coast. In 
connection with a regular and lull stock of wines, brandies, etc., 
they are sole agents for the well-known Henry Laub & Co., Ken- 
tucky whiskies, and will always have the famous .Sunshine, Planta- 
tion Rye and Glen Lily brands on hand. The family trade will be 
supplied in the best manner possible, and a specialty will be made 
of eastern shipments. 

Laurie Bunten, of Hellman Bros. & Co., the tall .Scotchman 
whose inches make him almost a giant, but who is nevertheless 
known as "Baby Bunting," is the author of a bon mot much 
quoted within club circles. A canvasser for the Examiner urged 
Mr. Bunten to subscribe for the Monarch of the Fakers, but found 
his intended victim obdurate. 

" Do you take any dally jiapcr? " asked the solicitor. 

'" Oh, yes, I get the Glasgoif Herald," replied the gentleman 
from the land o' cakes. 

" But that is fourteen days old when yo 1 receive it. Now, the 
Exami7ier will give you the news right up to date." 

"Ah, yes ; that may be," said Mr. Bunten, sententiously. 
" But, you see," he added with marked emphasis, " the Glasgow 
])aper is reliable." 

Mr. Francis Draz, of Messrs. Chas. Graef & Co., recently re- 
turned from California, where he has been spending several weeks- 
On his way back home he stopped at Los Angeles, El Paso, Galves. 
ton. New Orleans, Memjihis and Cincinnati. He is enjoying 
magnificent health, and feels renewed energy for the spring 
campaign. Mr. Draz's special object in visiting California was for 
the purpose of arranging with Mr. John Caffrey to represent the 
wine department of his firm on the Pacific Coast. Mr. Cafirey for 
a number of years was the Boston agent for Apollinaris, and a few 
months ago went to California as the represenlative ol that well- 
known water. He has made a great number of friends for both his 
house and himself during his stay in California, and now that he is 
the accrediteii agent for all the specialties of Messrs. Charles Graef 
tS: Co., including the famous Poffiniery, his business will be an im- 
portant one in that section of the country. Mr. CalVrey has offices 
at 2 1 Sutter street, San Francisco. — lionforts. 



Emanuel Meyer, importer of liquors, doing business under the 
firm name of Em. Meyer & Co., 303 Sutter street, has made an 
assignment to Ami Yignier for the benefit of his creditors. Stag- 
nation in business and the failure to collect outstanding accounts are 
given as the causes of impelling Meyer to make the assignment. 
He owes Mr. Vigner $7,2(X>, Daniel Meyer and the Anglo-Cali- 
forniaii Bank about ^4 500 each and William WollfiS: Co. $2,200. 
Besides these amounts Meyer owes about 15,000 more to over 
twenty dilierent creditors. 

His assets are v.ilued at an amount c<|ual to his liabilities, but 
are subject to shrinkage. Meyer succeeded Prosper May iS: Co., 
the oldest liquor house in San h'rancisco, and was jirosperous un- 
til recent years. He was in business on Pine street for some time, 
moving to 1610 Market street about Kwn years ago. He had a three 
years' lease on the premises at an outrageously high rent, which 
started him into finaiici.il illlTirulties. After the lease expired he 
moved to 303 Sutler slreel. The creditors held a meeting on the 
i8th ult. in the office of Attorney A. Ruef, and .ippoinled the fol- 
lowing a committee to arrange a satisfactory settlemcnl, which may 
enable Meyer lo continue his business: Daniel Meyer, J. H. 
Wheeler aiid J. H. Caflrey. 



f;Oceifie WI|slE /cJMB Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



25 



A NEW CAFE. 



The new Pabst Cafe, at the corner of Powell and Ellis streets, 
conducted by Herbert, Sonderlcitcr iS: Rossum, was opened on tiie 
3d inst. In many respects this is the finest cafe in San Francisco- 
It is located in the new building of the Royal Distilleries Com- 
pany. The entrance to the ladies', or family, cafe on the Powell- 
street side is in itself a study, with its marble steps antl electric 
studded balusters, but the interior is a dazzling effect of warm 
colors, brilliant-hued landscapes and beautiful frescoes in the latest 
style of the art. The interior finish is in birdseye maple and the 
floors of a beautilul inlaid wood. The experienced caterers, Her- 
bert, Sonderleiler >.S: Rossum, will here gratify every wish that the 
epicurean taste could make. In the basement, underneath the 
ladies' cafe, is the banquet hall, such a one as is found in German 
palaces. Ponderous columns support the ceiling, the surmounting 
cap of each bearing the coat of arms of one of the great nations oj 
the world. Where the cornice meets the old German style again 
becomes marked, as proverbs in all languages admonish the merry- 
maker of the short period of life and its necessities for happiness 
while here, as he sips the delicious Cresta Blanca and other popular 
wines, or quaffs the Pabst beer, which has no equal in any land un- 
der the sun. Surrounding the banquet room are a number of 
exquisite small dining-rooms. It must be remembered that these 
are exclusively for family use, and no undesirable element will ever 
be admitted. The baaroom is finished in German style of the six- 
teenth century, and with its beautilul paintings by the eminent local 
artist, E. A. Otto, artistic marble sidings andelaborate inside work 
is a startling and beautiful exposition of the triumphs of German 
architectural work. The kitchens are complete with modern 
utensils and ranges. The whole enterprise is due to the untiring 
energies of the Royal Eagle Distilleries Company, the Pacific Coast 
agents for the famous Pabst Brewing Company, whose great brew- 
eries are located at Milwaukee, Wis. The enterprise is a credit and 
ornament to the locality and to the city, and will doubtless set the 
pace tor high-class catering. No expense has been spared in 
artistic production to make it the finest cafe in America. 



AIDING THE UNEMPLOYED. 



California Wine Association, by Percy T. Morgan J550.00 

Lachnian iS: Jacobi 50.00 

Crown Distilleries Co., per E. R. Lilienthal 50 00 

Gunillach-Bundschu Wine Company, per Charles Bundscliu, 

President 25.00 

Italian-Swiss Agricultural Colony, per A. Sbarboro, Secre- 
tary 25.00 

William Wolff & Co 25 .00 

Livingston & Co 2500 

C Schilling & Co 25.00 

That is the result of the first day's work of the Canvassing 
Committee now working among the liquor houses soliciting sub- 
scriptions for work on the new boulevard south of the Park. In- 
cidentally there are several thousand unemployed men to be given 
work. The list will undoubtedly be considerably extended. Isn't 
't time that the churches be heard from ? 



Subscribe for tbe 



Pacific Wine and Spirit (aview. 



$1.50 PER YBAR 




To the Trade and the Public 



-"R. B. HAYDEN" 

Old Style Hand-Made Sour Mash Whisky Distflled by 

GREENBRISR DISTILLERY CO. 




OFFICE. LOUISVILLE, KY. 



KY. 



GRBEMBRIER, NELSOIS CO, 

Is the only whisky of this name ever made in Nelson Ciiiinfy, Ky. On ordering R. B. Hayden from your dealer see that you get the 
Whisky that is distilled by the Greenbrier Distillerv Company 

BARDSTOWN, KY., November i. 1S92. 
Greenbrier Distillery Co. — Gentlemen: In response to your inquiry I have to say that your distillery is operated on the old fashioned 
hand made sour mash plan, and is one of the very few distilleries in the State that adheres to the old style methods that have made 
Kentucky sour mash distilleries famous. Your house and its methods cannot be improved on. 

Respectfully yours, INO. B. WELLER, 

Dist Dep. Collector Int. Rev., Nelson Co.. Ky. 

The Finest Soar Mash Whisky made in Ni1s.mi Co., Kcntuck;. Chnrlcs McincckediCo., Agcnts,S.F. 




CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 



SOLE AGENTS 



314 SACRAMENTO STREET 




26 



f/cGlfie WIJNIE /cJMD SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



NATIONAL IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 



IWELVE M0SIH6 ENDING OECEMBEH- 



IM PORTS. 



1895. 



Quantities. I Values. 



I89B. 



I 



Quantitlei. 



835.713 
298,347 



Malt liqnors, g.illons: ; ' 

in biiiilcs or JURS I 1,052,987 I 

In other coverings 2. 1S8.031 

Total J, 24 1 ,018 

Spirits, distilled 1 proof Kallunsi: 
0( doniesiir nuinuCr, returned 
(subject to In. Rev. taut).. 

Brandy 

All other 

Total 

Spirits (not of domestic man-. 
ufacture) (proof gallons), im- 
ported from— 1 

United Kingdom j 

Belgium I 

France I 

Germany 

Italv ! 

Ne.lierlands 1 

Other Kurope , 

British North America. . 

West Indies 

China 

Other Asia and Oceanica 

Other countries 

Total 



1,013,520 ! 894,884 
6s> 71.^ 2,047,8s8 

1 ,6bS. 2.^3 2.941.752 



761,478 1,011,071 

776,930 228,126 

J.xHi 084 1 . 200 1 60 



2.922.492 



2,J39.3.57 



862,183 

577.395 

',439,578 



929.744 

619.943 

1,412^245 

2.961.932 



446,959 


541.926 


41,262 


43,921 


313.761 


857,716 


86,242 


76,441 


■5.895 


26,524 


242,100 


110,142 


41.94' 


64.127 


164,402 


3'3 8i4 


40,034 


91,014 


110,324 


26,184 


33,270 1 


6,404 


4,332 1 


3,801 



1.530,422 2. 161.014 



562,376 
32.031 

730,797 
73,788 

31,985 
101.561 

45011 

308,757 

96,427 

22,374 

8,392 

18,689 

1,438,386 2.032,188 



422.706 

31.029 
261,800 

93.296 
10.524 

21.3.815 
28.569 

172,198 
38,658 
99.493 
34.357 
12,841 



CAUTION! 

Decisions have been rendered in my favor oy the Hungarian 
Minister of Commerce in August and October, 1S96. in conse- 
quence of wiiich the trade marks of the following aj)crient waters, 
viz: 

■■APENTA." "UJ HUNYADl," 
HUNYADI MATY AS, 

LAJOS. 

LASZLO. Etc., Etc. 

have been cancelled, all being imitations ot my "HUXYADI 
JANOS" trade m.iik. No other water except my HUNYADl 
JANOS is allowed to use the name "HUNYADl," this name being 
my exclusive trade mark making a part of the name of my 

HUNYADl JANOS 

NATURAL HUNGARIAN APERIENT WATER 

The Tr.tde is hereby cautioned not to handle waters bearing 
any of the above mentioned names, a^ I .sliall hdld all parties selling 
such waters responsible in daniages and ptottct my irade- 
inark-riKhts to the fullest extent, by action BRainsf all 



Wines: 

I Ch.inipagne, and other spark- 
ling doz. 

Still Wines — 

In casks galls 

In other coverings.. doz. 
Total 



Wines, imported from — 

United Kingdom. 

France 

Germany 

Italy ..." 

Other Europe 

Other countries 

Total 



249.535 

2,938,052 
310.653 



3,674,739 232,662 



2,034.385 
1.512.935 


2,472,227 
282.143 


7.222 059 






339,400 

4,324.253 

1,363.047 

280.314 

994,576 

32,469 
















3.429.531 

1,703.094 
1.350,538 



6,483,163 



7,222,059 1 



209,488 
4,062,139 
1,189,124 

238,229 

754. S55 
39.328 



6.483.163 



EXPORTS. 



Malt Liquors: 

la bottles doz. 

Not in bottles gals. 

Total 



485.251 

255.384 



568,746 493.327 
63.403 ! 325..308 



Spirits, distilled fproof gallons): 

Alcoliol, including pure, 

neutral or cologne spirits. 

Brandy 

Rum 

WlllSKV— 

Bourbon 

Rye 

Allother 

Total 

Wine: 

In bottles doz. 

Not in bottles galls. 

Total 



633,149 



635,585 

58,960 

931. Soo 

104,614 

15.799 

!37,J14 

1^884.^73 ; 

15.756 
1,340,379 



162,769 

54,008 

1,244,519 



336.310 

60,711 

783,843 



133,153 307.266 
34 624 ; 23.715 
66/587 ' 489.09 1 



571,937 

75.947 



647,884 



1.695.460 i 1 099,936 



64,230 
568,029 



632, '59 



15.254 
'■427.713 I 



86,648 

56,172 

1,060,674 

297.044 

38,353 

71 1 1 , r S6 



61,017 
653038 
714,055 



KXI'OklS OK lORKKiN llOlOk.S. 



Malt Liquors (gallons): 


5.599 

52 

5.651 

940 
74,855 
34..33S 


6..382 
193 


5.140 
69 


In other coverings 1 157 


Total 1 7 871 


6.S7S 


5. 209 




Spirits Distilled (proof gallons^: 
(Jf domestic m.infr, returned 
4subiecl to In. Rev. lax). . 978 


5,6&S 

8,976 

43.405 

58,069 

14.198 

i 

31 iSi 

1 '•!'. 


S.74S 
19.3'2 
52,337 


All other 37,344 


Total 49865 


IIO.I.V3 


77407 


Wines: Champ.igne and other ~ 
sjKirklii.g doz. 2,718 

Si •■• s— 

galls 26,379 

li. . ■!../ «>ii 

Total 


. *^-762 

13.736 

11. 1'"' 

■ , 1 


194.624 
18,I32 

1 1. t;.) 



infringers. 



ANDREAS SAXLEHNER, 



Hudda l^'est 



London 



XfW "^'ork 



Pacific Coast flgenls for HUNYflDI JHNOS WM. WOLFF & CO 



327 9 Market St . S F. 



TRADE MARKS. 

WM. G . HENDERSON, Patent Attorney and Solicitor. 

NORRIS BLDG., 5th and F Sts., Near U S. Patent Office, Rooms 20 to 23 
P. G. I^ox 122. jyASHiyGTOX, 1>. c. 

Seventeen ye.irs' cxIJericnce. including service in ExamininR Corp*. I'. S. Patent Office 
American and Foreign Patents procured. Caveats filed. Rejected applications revived 
Opinions given as to .scope and validity of patents. Infringement suits prosecuted and de 
fended. TRADKM.^RKS, LABKLS AND COPYRIGHTS registered. 

*3rCopy of any printed patent, trade-tnarlc or label furnished for 26 cents. Correspond 
encc invited, lland-hooli on Patents furnished FREE on application. 



THE- DIVIDEND ^°J!f!ritif° 

.'. l.,.lcl,.!,(l()rlT .Stn..-!. ' PJ A PJ C E3 

JAMlCSO'IilUEX, Pionrir'or. ' 

Importer of riNEST WINES, LIQUOR.? FOURDENIER TISSUE 

Irish and Scotch Whiskies, 
Bass' Ale and Guioness' Stout. 

Moore, noDi & Go's Whiskies a Specialty. 



STRIPPED MANILA 

For wrapping bottles. 

401 k 403 Sansome Street, S. F. 



ESTABL'SHED 1853. 



SAMUEL WANDELT, 

Sri AM AM) IIAMI 

COO P 1^: R AO B 

i;t.r,:{,r,.-, yon ill i iim i> s r.. itHooui,) \. v. r. 

Wme and Liquoi^ ^m?,\$ and Taijl^^ 

-A. Spoclalty. 

I am now prrpnred to mnlcennd furnish (lie largest, as well as the smatlrvt artUl. ' 
line »( C .o|.etaKr. I%«tlllia(es giTrn with promptness, .Ml work warmnted to Iw hi. 



KI-.-.IM/\M \1NKS — Iri-sli Ki|mii.i nii.l l.eiinir . linings I., r s.il, at ••I>"1 '"»"•■'■•""■'«'>" "'•""'■r and equal to any In the market, 
reasonable rates. \.Mr, ., Room 50, au I'iin; street, S.iii Ir.iiuisn). 



f/r(5Ifie WIJME /rJMkJ Sfif^IT F^EVIEW. 



27 



PRICES CURHjNL 

These are the long prices. The 
rate of discount on purchases of a 
considerable quality can be learned 
bv applyinj; to the agent or dealers. 
We urgently request dealers, agents 
and producers to notify us when a 
change occurs in the prices current ol 
the gooils they liandle. 

California Wines and Brandies. 

[The Prices given are for quarts and 
pints, put up in cases of twelve 
and twenty-lour bottles.] 

C. C.\RPV & CO. 
5ii-5i7Sacraniei.toSt.,San Francisco 

La Loma, Grand ^'edocf 7.00 f 8.00 

Burgundy 5.00 6.00 

Zinlandel 3..S0 4.50 

Sauterne 5.00 6.00 

Riesling 400 5.00 

Sweet Muscatel, 18S2.. 9.00 10.00 

Sherry, 1882 9.00 10.00 

Port, 1 882 S.oo 9.00 

Cal. Roclielle Brandy. . 12.00 13.00 

MONT ROIGE WINES. 

Chauche \- Bon, Livermore, 

Officeand Depot, 13-15 First St., S. F. 

Burgundy Quarts $ 9 00 

Chablis 9.00 

Claret, Retour d'Eu- 

rope 9.00 

Jurancon, Favorite wine 

of Henry IV, King of 

France .". 9.00 

Haut Sauternes 7.00 

Sautemes 6.00 

Light Sauternes 5.00 

Claret Grand Vin 6.00 

Table Claret 4.00 

Zinfandel 300 

Jt.oo additional for pints. Red and 
white wines in bulk at all prices. 

GUNDI.ACH BU.MDSCHU WINE 

CO. 
Cor. Second and Market Sts., S. F. 
Prices Per Case. iiu.\rts. pints. 
Traniiner, 82 $500 f 6.00 



IGutedel, 8a 6joa 

' Burgundy, 84 6.00 

Zinfandel, 83 5.00 



7.00 

7.00 
6 00 



, I.SGLKNOOK WINES. 

Agency, Stanford and Townsend Sts., 
I San Francisco. 

Table Claret, Klemled 
I from choice foreien 

grapes, vintage 1890.. 

Zinfandel 

E.xtra Table Claret, Me- 

doc type, red label, 

1S89 

Burgundy, 1888, reserve 

stock 7.00 

Sauterne, dry, Sauvig'n 

Vert, '85 

Gutedel,ChasselasVert, 

1 18.S9 

Hock, Rhenish tjpe, 

■ 18S9 

Burger, Chablis type, 

1SS9 

Riesling, Johannisberg 

type, iS.SS 

Pints of 2 dozen Ji per case additional 

None genuine unless bearing seal 
or cork brand of the proprietor. 



f.V.SO 
4-50 



550 
S.OO 
550 

4-50 
6.00 

5- 50 
6.50 



Gutedel 

Saulerne 

Sauterne, 1885. 

Claret 

Zinfandel 

Cabernet 

Hurgundv ... . 

Port, 1SS4 

Port, 1SS7 

Sherry 

Cognac, 1885.. 



4.00 
4.00 

500 
2.50 
3.00 
350 
4.00 
7.00 
Soo 
500 
to.oo 



S. LACHMAN CO. 
453 Brannaa street, San Francisco. 

'Old Port $7.00 I 8.00 

Zinfandel 3.50 

Riesling 4.50 

Madeira 8.00 

Malaga 8.00 

.Cognac 14.00 



4.00 
5.00 



KOHI.ER & FROHLING. 

601 Folsoin Street, San Francisco. 

Riesling $400 $4.50 



Hock 3.50 

Gutedel 4.50 

Sauterne 4.50 

Zinfandel 3.75 

Zinfandel, old 4.50 

Burgundy 4.00 

Superior Port 10.00 

Sherry 7.50 

I Angelica 6.00 

1 Muscatel 6.00 

'Madeira 6.00 

Malaga 600 

Brandy 10.00 



4 00 
5.00 
5.00 
4-25 
5.00 
4-5° 



1 KOLB & DENHARD. 

,42o-425Montgomery St., San Franc'o 
Per Case 

Hock I3.0 

Riesling 3. 5', 



C. M. MANN. 
(Successor to 1. Dk Turk.) 
Officeand cellars, 216-218-220 Sacra- 
mento St. and 221 Commercial St., 
San Francisco. 
Cognac Brandy, XXXX(quarts)|io.oo 

XX 900 

Tienturier Port 5.50 

Trousseau Port, No. i 4.00 

Dry Sherry, private stock 5.50 

" '' superior 4.00 

Angelica, old selected stock. . . 4.00 

Muscatel " " "... 4.00 

.Malaga " " "... 4.00 

jMadeira " '• ... 4.00 

Tokay, best old selected stock. 6.00 

JTokay, " " " 4,50 

I Haut Sauterne, " " . 5.00 

Riesling, old " " . 3.50 

Gutedel, " " " . 3.50 

Hock, " " . 3.00 

Cabernet, "Grand Vin" " . 5.00 

Burgundy " '' " . 4. so 

Zinfandel,Claret,seIected Claret 3.50 

XX Claret " " 3.50 

Claret, " " 2.75 

NAPA VALLEY WINE CO. 

Second and Folsom Sts., S. Francisco 

Sherwood & Shkrwood, Agents. 

212-214 Market Street, San Francisco- 



Hock, green label | 3.00 

Hock, black label 3.50 

Gutedel 4.00 

Riesling 4.50 

Cabernet 4.50 

Burgundy 4.00 

Claret, black label 3.50 

Claret, red label 2.75 

Private Stock Hock. . . 5.00 

" " ElCerrilo 9 co 

" " Sauterne. 8.00 

'• " Claret... 5.00 

" " Burgun'v 7.00 

" VineCliff 12.00 

Sherry 4.50 

Port 4.50 

Angelica 4.50 

Tokay 4.50 

Muscatel 4.50 

Madeira 4.50 

Brandy Crown* 10.00 

" •■ » » 12.00 

"***... 15.00 

•'**•». 18.00 



I 4.00 

4-50 
S-oo 
5- 50 
S.50 
5.C0 
4.00 
370 
6.00 
10.00 
9.00 
6.00 
800 
13.00 



L.J. 
Port, 



ROSE & CO., Lim , San Gabri- 
el, Cal. 
I doz. qts. in case. $15.00 
■' " " .. 12.00 



1873. 
" 1876 

" 1882 

" 1886 " " " .. 

Sherry, 18S2, i doz, qts. in case 

18S6 
Angelica,iS82, i doz. qts.in case 

1886 " " 
Muscatel,i882 " " 

Toka\', 1882, I doz. qts. in case. 
.. - ,8gg_ .. 

Madeira, 18S2, i doz. qts. in case 

" 1888, 
Brandy, i5' 
Zinfandel, 1890,1 doz. qts. in case 

" " 2 " pts. " 

Burger, 1890, i doz. qts. in case 
" '■ 2 " pts. " 

All the foregoing vintages are frue 
to name and age, as indicated on la- 
bel. We guarantee the absolute pur- 
ity of every bottle of wine and brandy 
put up by us. 



9.00 
7.50 
9-03 

7- 50 
9.00 

7.50 
7 50 
9.00 

7-5° 
9.00 

7-50 
15.00 
4.00 
S-oo 
4.00 
S.oo 




4 Columbian Ejtpo^^^. 



^ Hi^nesr Score o^ ({wards, wirti jljedal and Oipiomi. 

friE StAliDARO OF l>Ci<rc(fiOrf< AtSJoiUTtLV POi^e: 



OlSTItLCO BV 



A. GUCKENHEIMER & BROS. 



PITTSBURGH. 




o/sriLLra ar 



PENNA. DISTILLING CO. 



BUTLER CO. PENNA. 



COLD_^STYLE MQNONGAHELA RYE WHISKEY^ 




2q 



fyteifie wi;^e /tj^e sfii^iT f^EviEw. 




WILLIAIVI H. RUDKIN, 



F. KORBEL & BROS. 

7-'5 l;K^A^I MUfcl-l. ^\N I'KANI-IMO 



74 WILLIAM STREET. NEW YORK. 

GENUINE XX BEADING OIL XX 

lieducrd To $7..'jO JVr Oatltni. 

Or at NORTH FORK MILL '•""<'••' '"'• ■'"•"■ '" "'"/•"'•"'« »"'t/ ^v 

„ ,,^ . REDINGTON 4. CO. 23-21-29 second st.. %an francisco 
Humboldt County, California. 



Tissue Paper 

JVIanila Paper 

Liabel Paper 






OP ALL KINDS. 



A. Zellerbach&Sons, 



Cor. sansome i Comnierciai sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



ESTABLISHED 

A. Finke's 

Productn of 

CALiFoeum 

ABSOLUTELY PURE 

orri'-r- 

809 mOHTGOmERY ST.. 

San Francisco. 

Teltplione, PlacK 631. 




1864 



Widow. 



First Premittm 

CHUMPUNES, 

GOLirSKAh. 

Carte Blanchk, 

Nonpareil 



I^* First Premiums for Bait 
California Champagnes award- 
ed by the State Fairs, 1870-92 
ami wherever evhihited. 



Lachman & Jacobi low fBiETa wber go. 



DEALERS IN- 



iloroia Wines aiid Brandies, 

BRYANT ANO SECONa STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO. 




Eastern Agents 



SCtX'lvSSoKS 'Jil- 

Have Constantly on Hand a Full Supply 
of the Folloiwng Sizes of 

GRAPB STAKES. 

2x2—4 feet Long. 2x2—5 Feet Long 

2n2-6 Feet Long. 
Wliif'i will In: srtUl itl rpatnniiUlc nitc^. 



EDINGER BROS. & JACOBI, 

Cor. Dover & Pearl St«., Brooklyn Bridge Sto»e No 2, N. Y 




FERRO-QUINA BITTERS 

A Wonderful Tonic and Strengfhener 

AN ANTIDOTE AGAINST 

ANEMIA, CHLOROSIS. MUSCULAR DEBILITY. NAUSEA. HEAD. 

ACHE. PALPITATION OF THE HEART. PHTHISIS, SCROFULA, 

CHRONIC BRONCHITIS, GENERAL DEBILITY, LASSITUDE 

and other diieatet caused by a disordered system. 

Ctpeclally Recommended at a preventative against FEVERS 
In tropical cllmatei. 

AODRCSa 

D. p. ROSSI 
I40O Dupont St., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

>li\.y. AoK.ST 1-011 I . .S. AND I ANAPA. 

Or any wliolemilc or commiiwion hoiiae in ihia City. 



LOVI4 PRIETA LUM3ER CO. 

Loma Prieta, .... Santa Cruz Co , Cal 



Monfe ®ri/^to 

CHAMPAGNE 

EXTRA DRV 




:i^i^ 



D. P. ROSSI 

iDogliani . Italin and San Fr.mctica 

1400 DUPONT ST. 

Sole Ag^nl lor the United Stiloi and Canada 

V. n -Thin Urniirl In r>iip nf (lir l.'ft.llnc 
('hnin)ini{iit'a U"<-*1 iit tli<' KoyHl Coiirio nf Itnly. 
(icrniAtiv, Kiik'lAixl : 1»> hImtIhIIv IndnrNot) liy I't'l- 
inonlPo.'Si'w York: I'Blnrr llotol, DrI M«nii'. Mrthon 
I>or4^. Million KIrhc, MHlnon Tortonl, rnoilli* Hot;. 
Campl'ii. MKrtlii(*IU*ti, nt the CainiDon'lul Mnicl. H. 1' 



f/ceifie Wlj^E /cJMD SflF^IT [REVIEW 



29 



•CREblA BLANCA." 

W'tv M 1 )R i: - lio w t N Ci.>M r.\ N V . 

140 Montgomery St , San Francisco 

WHITE WINES. 



I'auillac, 1S87 S.50 

" 1 88 1 9.00 

St. lulieii 1887 9.00 

Saiiterne Souvenir $ 6.00 f 7.00 ^^V ';'^<^-l'';^' !?'7,------ 9°" 

* „.„ Lliateaii dii (jallan 1881 lo.co 

1878 

" le Pain, 1878.... 11.50 

WETMORE-BOWEN COMPANY. Pontet Canct, 18S7 13.50 

140 Monlgomerv street, San Kranclsco <-"l_'a'- Brychevelle, 1887 16.00 



Haut Saiiterne Souvenir 
Chateau Ycjuem Souv'r 



9.00 
II 00 



10 00 
I J 00 



8.00 
9.00 

5.00 

6. 



RKD WINKS. 

Table il'hate Souvenir.. J5 50 

St. lulien Souvenir 7.00 

Margau.x Souvenir S.oo 

IN AUUrriON TO AllOVE 

Zinfandel 4 00 

Burgundy 6.00 

Riesling 5.00 

El. riSAL. 

Port, Vintage 1S90 5.50 

Port, •' 18S8 6.50 

Port, " i8S6 8.00 

Old Trousseau Port 1 2.00 

Sherry, Vintage 1S90 5.50 

Sherry, " iSSS 6.50 

Sherry, " 18S6.... 8.00 

Sherry, amontillado type looo 

Muicatel 5 50 

Angelica 5.50 

Frontignan 9.00 .... 

Brandy, 1890 11 .00 

Brandy, 18S8 13 5° 

^Brandy, 1SS6 .16.00 

'Brandy, 1876 20.' :o 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

NAC.LEE IIR.VNDV llOTTLED .\T DISTIL- 
LERY. CASE GOODS. 

White Label O.C. not un'r25yrs|20.oo 
Blue Label, i"!, not under 15 yrs 15.00 
Red Label, O.N'., not un'r loyrs 1200 
Trade discounts according to quality. 

HULK. 

(In packages ol 25 gallons each.1 

Per gal. 

For ages 1872-1S76 }aoo 

i877-iS,S2 3--SO 

1883-1SS4 325 

Bitters. 



1881 



*6 so Chateau Langoa 18.00 



950 
10.00 
10.00 
10.00 

12.50 
12.50 
14.50 

17.00 



22. on 
25-50 



24.00 
25- 5'- 
2550 
25.50 
30.00 
30.00 



D. P. ROSSI, 
N.E.Cor.Dupont and Green sts., SF. 

FERRO nUlNA BITTERS. 

'12 quarts to case |io.oo 

WILLIAM WOLFF .v CO., 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

.\ROMATlnUE. 

Per case of 12 quarts I12.00 

Imported Wines. 

W. B. CHAP.M.'VN'. 
123 California street, San Francis co. 

RED WINES. 

(Barton & Guestier, Bordeaux.) 

Qts. Pints. 

Floirac $ 7.50 $ 8 50 

Chateau Lacroijc 8.00 900 



1878.. 21.00 

^.. "„ "^ '^74 ■ 2450 

Chat Brown Cantenac, 

18S7 23.00 

7.00 Chat Leoville, 1887 2450 

6.C0 ' " '878 

" I-;irose, 1874 24.50 

" Lafile, 1874 29.00 

" Margaux, 1S74... 29.00 
(II. Cuvillier^ frere, Bordeaux.) 

Pauillar, 1889 9,00 10.00 

St. iMnilion Superieiir. . 10.00 

Chat. Cluval Blanc 1SS9 14.00 

Chateau Leoville, 1SS9. 1650 

Chateau Batailey, 18S1 . 17.50 1S.50 

Chat. Kirwan, 1878 22.00 

Chat. Lapointe Pomerol 

1S7S 22.00 

Chat. Pontet Canet, '74 23.00 

" Beycheville, 1874 25.00 

" Larose, 1870 24.00 

" Talbot d'Aux, '75 24 00 25.00 

" Leoville, 1878 25.50 

" Cosd'Estourmel '78 2S.00 
I)u Vivier iV Co., Bordeaux.) 

St. Marc $ 7.00 $ 8.00 

Pontet Canet 11.00 12.00 

WHITE WINES. 

(liarton A: Guestier, IJordeaux.) 

^auternes 1S78 9.25 

Vin de Graves, 1S7S . . . 10.50 

Barsac, 1S78 ii.oo 

Haut Sauternes 18S7.. 17.50 
Haut Sauternes 1874.. 18.50 
Chateau V<)uem 1884.. 30.50 

Chateau Vquem 1874.. 36.00 

(H. Cuvillier \ frere, Bordeaux.) 
Chateau Giraud, 1S84. 2S.00 29.00 
' L'Tour nianche'S4 28.00 29.00 
(Du Vivier >V Co., Bordeaux.) 



18.00 
22.00 



23- 50 



31.00 



3300 



Graves premieres 9.00 

CALIFORNIAN— RED WINES. 

(A. Duval) 

ISurgundy, 1889 5.00 

Cabernet Sauvignon, '90 5.00 

CALIFORNIA— WHITE WINES. 

(A. Duval) 

Riesling 18S9 4.50 

Chablis 18SS 5.00 

Sauterne 1S89 5.00 

Creme de .Sauterne, 'Sg 

(private stock) 7.50 

BURGUNDIES — RED WINES. 



^los de Vougeot, 1887 

Monopole) 15-50 

Chambertin, 18S4 2600 27.00 

(Bouchard Pere & Fils, Beaune, 

Cote D'Or.) 
Chablis, 1884 13.50 14.50 

HOCKS. 

(S. Friedborig, Mayence.) 

l.aubenlieiiner, 1S89. ■$ 9.50 I10.50 

I.iebfraumilch, 1889, Se- 
lected Grapes"... 17.00 

Rauenlhaler, 1884 21.00 

llochheimer Doni De- 

chaiiey, iS8j 22.50 

Liebfraumilch, 1876, 

'Extra Ouality".. 30.00 

Stcinberger Cabinet, 

1S76 32.00 

(Prince .Mt-tternich's Estate) 

Schloss Johannisberger, 

'68 $4500 546.00 

SHERRIES. 

(Sandeman, Buck & Co., Jerez.) 

.Maltese Cross 18. 00 

Pi-Miarlin Brut 20.00 

" Umbrella 21.00 

Amontillado. 23.00 
(E. J. Howell, London.) 
Solera Especial 13-50 

MADEIRA. 

(E. J. Howell, London.) 
Ye Old Style, Puro Es- 
pecial 15.50 

OLD COGNACS. 

(H. Cuvillier & Frere) 
Fine Champagne, "Re- 
serve," 1870 36.00 

(Sazerac de Forge & Fils.) 
Very Old Cognac, 1805. 45.00 

GIN. 

Coates & Co's Original 
Plymouth(unsweet- 
ened) 10.50 

SCOTCH WHISKY. 

(Peter Dawson, HuHtown.) 
Dawson's "Perfection". 12.50 
" "Special". . . 1450 
" "Extra Spe- 
cial" 16.50 

Dawson's "Perfection." 

24 flasks 14.00 

Dawson's "Perfeccion," 

half tlasks 16.00 

CHAMPAGNE. 

Perrier-Jouet, Finest 
Extra Q u a I i I y 

•'Special" 33.50 

Perrier-Jouet, Finest 
Extra yuality, 

■'Brut" 3400 

6.00 Half Pints, "Special 
6.00 



,« ,„'iGattinara in case ol 12 bottles 
2«>So 1 Nei,i,iolo 



6.50 



10.25 
11.50 
12.00 
18.50 
19.50 
3>-5o 



red, sparkling, in 

cases of 12 bottles 8.50 

Brachetto, red, sparkling, in 

cases of 12 hollies 8.50 

Grignolino, in cases of 12 bottls 8.50 

Pints }i per case more. 
C. & F. Giocobiiii, Allomonte, Cal- 
abria. 
Fancy wines for altar and medical use 
Moscalo Calabria, in c'ses 12 btls 7.00 
Lacryma Christi, " 12 " 7.00 
Tokay, " 12 " 7.00 

Malvasia, " 12 " 700 

Count E. Di Mirafiore. 
Barolo,incases'of 12 bottles, 1887. 7.51 

CHIANTI WINI. — IN FLASKS. 

]. L. Rudino, Florence. 

Per case of 2 dozen i|uarts 11.50 

4 " pints 1300 

WHITE AND RKD STILL. 
Pasquale Scala, Naples. 
Laciyma Cliristi, per case of 12 

bottles 7.25 

Moscato di Siracusa, per case of 

12 bottles 7.00 

Falerno, red, per case of 12 bot- 
tles 7.00 

Capri, per case of 12 bottles. . . 6.50 
Pints 75 cents per case more. 

SI'ARKLING WINES. ^ 

Pasquale Scala, Naples. 
Lacryma, Chrisii, quarts 1750 

" " pints 18.50 

Filli. GanciaA Co., Canelli (Asti.) 
Moscato, white, in cases of 12 

quarts 14.00 

Moscato, white, in cases ol 24 

pints 15.CO 

Passaretta, white, in cases of 12 

quarts 13.00 

Passaretta, white, in cases of 24 

pints 14.C0 



6.00 
6.00 



550 



35-50 



36 00 



HELLM.A.NN BROS. & CO., 
52,s Front street. San Francisco. 

SHERRIES. 

Forrester & Co., Jerez, 

in wood, per gallon. $ 1.50 

Forrester & Co., Jerez, 

per case 12.00 

Garvey & Co., Jerez, in 

wood, per gallon.. . 1.75 

PORTS. 

Offley I1.75 to J5.C0 

Offley, per case #12.00 



J5-00 

16.00 

5.00 



42.00 per c se 
of 4S bottles 



(Bouchard pere & fils, Beaune Cote 
D' Or.) 

Macon 18S4 11.00 

Pommard i5-5o 



8.50 L. GANDOLFI & CO., 

427-431 VV^est Broadway, New York. 



(Prices f. o. b. New York.) 
Filli, Gancia .S: Co., Canelli (Asti.) 
12.00 Barbera, in cases of 12 bottles. . 550 
16.50 Barolo, " " 12 " 7.00 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

314 Sacramento street, San Francisco 

A. de Luze & Fils, Bordeaux Clarets, 
percase f8.oo to I28.00 

A.de Luze&Fils, Bordeaux Sauternes, 
per case 1 2.00 to 26.00 

C. Marey & Liger Belair Nuits Bur- 
gundies, white and red, per case 
15.00 to 23.00 




P. C. ROSSI, 

President 



SWISS 



A. SBARBORO, 

Secrctarv 



^^ 



.p,V*»*"'^* CO/ - 

A*^ ASTI, SONOHA CO.. CAL. ^K^A^ 



PRODUCERS OF FINE 



CAI^IFORNIA WINES and BRANDOS 



-.\.\D- 



moHTECRiSTO cHflfnPflcriES 



ri{AI)P>.MAKK REi;I.-;TF.RKU Oi'TdHF.R 8Tn. 189-^. 
Cold 31<-«lsil I>iil>lin. Ii-<-l:iii<i. If-«1>-.^ 

<i<ti<i >i<>(iiii ('oiiiiiiikisiii ii:x|>'ii, iMi>:t 

>li<l'\-» iiiloi- ITuii-, !>*!» I 

MAIN OFFICE, 524 MONTGOMERY STREET - - SAN FRANCISCO 
DEPOT AND CELLARS. 109 BATTERY STREET BETWEEN CALIFORNIA AND PINE STREETS 



'Naturally I'l iimkntkh in Bottles.) 
<ii-:iii(l I>i|>l<>iii:i ol'IIoiioi- 
llitrli«-xt yV>vni-<l <i<-iio:i. Italy. IJ-tOVJ 

<i<>l«l >I<mI:iI C'jilil'or iiiji 



(ioUl 3I«-«lul Till-ill. 

L. GANDOLFI &, 

■42'7'-^31 



C. KOSSI 



VERMOLTTH 

FIi;;li<>Mt A-\VJii*<l Cliit-ajjo, 1894 



-IMPORTERS OK- 



CO., Eastern Agents italian \vine:3 and producb 



30 



f/^eifie WIJME /^JVJD Sflf^lT I^EVIEW. 



CHARLES BUND'iCHU. PrFS'dcnl 



CARL CUNDLACH. VICE Prclident 



HENRY CUNDLACH. Secr«tw)r 




\cii-BU.Ni)sciiu wine; company 

ess«)i>^ to J. (3i:Xl)LACM .^- <.:(). 
Vineyard Proprietors and Shippers of 

California Wiiii^s and liraiiilies, 

rwil'lillTdlis RHINE FARM, »"0\l.i, CAL 

And BACCHUS WINE VAULTS, 438-44.2 Bryant St., S. F. 



SAN fRANCisco- -/JEW York- 



.Soil J'nt llfiS4'n ojjii-r, 
S. K. coll, MARKl.T A SKCOSU STS. 



\ew York Itraurh 
S E Cor WAnS & WASHINGTON STS. 



Itouis Hoenerei GMagne 

Highest Grade in the World! 

Used by All the Leading Clubs 
Hotels and Restaurants . . . 

For sale by All Firat-Class 
Grocers and Wine Merchants. 




THKEE KINDS, ALL (;F EyL'AL KXCELLENCE 

BRUT {(-rold Seal) 

An Mxtni Dry Wine 

GRAND VI/S 5EC K'^^yown Seal) 

The Perfection of a Dry Wine 

CARTE BLANCHE [^Vhitc Seal) 

.\ Rich Wine 



Macondray Bros. & Lockard, 



124 SANSOME STREET 

Sulo .X^'cnt.s for the Pacific Coast. 



ThOS. KiRKl'ATKICK, PrESIUK.M' 

San Fk.vncisco, Cal. 



J> 



^ 



^^ 




SllKKLtV MooKli, VlCE-1'RES'T 
LOUISVILLB, KV. 



Dlf^ECT fF^OJ\/I loOUISVIbloE, KY. 



^1' 



P/1/T)0iJS 
pEEI^eESS U/l^iSf^IES. 



* > • >< • < * 




**%, 



¥^ 



^^ 



'^ 



CiJ/^I^/^fl5EED 



♦ > (.>< • 



\ 



These Wluskies ha,ve & reputat: . ' "^ • --don the Pacifio Coast 'Theff baue been given years of tmi 
ly the best class of trade and consumers and are pronounced without a peer. When given a trial they speak for 
olves. ^ For sale in quantities to suit in Louisville or San Francisco by 

jEsse TVTooRe. hunt co.. 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 404 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



1 



f/ceifie WIJ^E /cJMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW, 



ai 



1). M. Feiierheed, Jr., 

A: Co., Oporto, I'ort 

Wines, in wood, 

per Kallon 2.00 to 

DuH Gordon S: Co., 

Sherries, in weed, 

per gallon 2.00 to 

Lacave & Co ..Slierrie.s, 

Crown liraiul. in 's. 1.40 to 
South .Side Madeira. , . 2.00 to 
St. Croi.x Kiim, LB... 5.50 
Arrack '•Koyi.l" Ba- 

tavia 5.00 to 

Hoortl Cv: Son, London 

Dock Sherry, per 

case ti.oo to 

(."r.ALrahstniann Sohn, 

Mainz Rhine 

Wints, per case. .. 8.50 to 
Schuiz & Wagner, 

Frankturt o M 

Rhine Wines, per 

case 11.00 to 



Fine, old and dry 1.85 I IKS.sr; MooKK HINT CO. 

Fine, rich and Iruity... 3.45 1 4o4 Front Strt'ii, .>.in Francisco. 

Supeili Table -i.io i^-^ P'V inlililsor ;,-bl)ls.j;6.ooto«8.oo 

- ■ •* AA " ■■pf.'^ 

B 

<■ i< II 



SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market St., San Francisco. 

ESCHENAl'ER & CO , BORDl-AUX. 

Quarts 

Medoc 

Merin d'or 
Bouillac... 
Red Seal 



Si CO 
O S 

C N 
5-5° Corona Delicious and ilelicate. 3.25 

Soecial S Griind old wine 4.00 

Nectar— Fino, N. P. U 4.65 

5'50 KIirNE AND MOSELLE WINES. 

Wilhelm I'anizza, Mayence. 
■•75 Per Case. 

230 I.aubenheimer ; $ S.oo 

Deidestieinier 8 50 

Xiersteiner 10.25 

°°^ Hochheimer 11.50 

Liebfraumilch 13.25 

Foster Jesuitgarten '3.75 

iS-co Rudesheinier 14 00 

Ebacher 14 75 

Geisenheimer 17.25 

2S.00 Marcobrunner 1750 

Rauenthaler 19.00 

'Geisenheim Rothberg 21.00 

N'eisteimer Rehbach 21.50 

14.00 Rmlesheimer Berg 2300 

Bulk wines at f. o. b. prices. 

PORTS. 

Silva & Cosens. Per Gal. 

T — Tawney $'90 

R — Extra full body and rich. . . 2.05 

V T — Very tawney 2.25 , 

8.00 V O T— Very old tawney 2.35 

8.00 T P — Extra tawney, delicate 



A A in rases. 
C in cases 



MACON DRAY BROS. & LOCK- 
ARD, Agents. 
124 Sansonie street, San Francisco. 
4.oo;I.ouis Rdederer, Carle 

r .. 1.11 3-5"l iil-'uche ..... fo4.cof36.oo 

'- . ^' 300 Louis Rocderer, Grand 

Rye in bbis and >i-bl)ls,f3.50 to I5.00 \'in Sec 34.00 36.00 

11.00 Louis Roederer, Brut.. 34.00 36.00 

■^° CHARLES^MEINECKE & CO. 

NABER, ALFS & BRU.NE. 314 Sacramento street, San Francisco 

323 and 325 Market St., S.m Francisco DEUrz S: GELUHkMANN, a\., ciiam- 

f2.7S pagne. 

3.00 Gold Lack Sec, per 

2.50 case jf32.oo j;34.oo 

3.50 Gold Lack Sec. 6 Mag- 

400 nums, per case 31.00 

6.00 Cabinet Green Seal,per . 

basket 25.50 27.00 

2.50 DUPANLOUP & CO., REIMS. 

Carte Blanche, per case {21.00 $22.00 



f 7.00 
7- SO 



Phoenix Old Bourbon, .\ 1 

" " old .st'k 

'' " " Ai,9opf 

OK,iooi>f 

" " I'ony, pri. sik 

Club House Bourbon, old .$4.50 
Gold Medal Bourbon, 100 

Pf 

Union Club Bourbon, 100 

^Pf 1.25 

Superior Whisky 1.75 

" BB U'hisky 1.50 

LiguoRs — In Cases. 

Per Case. 

Phoenix Bourbon OK, in 5s . . f 10.50 

" Ai, " .... 7.50 

Ai, 24 pts 8.00 

" " Ai, 48,'. pts.. 9.00 

Rock and Rye Whisky in 5s. . . 7.50 



D. P. RO.SSI. 

N. E. Cor. Dupont and Green sls.,SF 

Monte Cristo, 12 quarts to case.$i2.oo 

" " 24 pints " 13 00 

Special discount for quantities. 

W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 
39 Broadway, New York. 

SPARKLING SAU.MUR. 



c. I I- c----: ^"° l^-'^''i^»'-->*'«^y. delicate.... 2.50 Rum Punch Extr.-ict in 5s.. . • . . 8.S0 Ackerman-Laurence, Saumur, France 

Wh/t^'seai'."'^::':^;::; l'^ BRA^wTo-wl^ile-Fine white ^■'° '^-'^'^-^V Brandyi^5s '■^'l^^^^?^^:::: ,y ;:; ; ' '^^''^ ^^^-oo 



11.50 



Pontel Canet 

La Rose 

Gold Seal 

Graves 

Sauternes 

Mackenzie's Ports and 

Sherries in wood, per 

gallon 

Mackenzie's Ports and 

Sherries in cases 10.00 to I4.(X) 

Hunt, Roope, Teague & 

Co.'s Ports in cases ..13.0010 19.00 

ACHILLE STARACE. 
76 Pearl Street, Xew York. 

ITALIAN WINES.— RED WINES. 

(Giuseppe Scala, Naples.) 
LacrymaChristi,i2qts.| 6.30 per case 
Falerno, " 7.50 " 

Capri, " 6.50 " 

Capri, 24 pts. 7.50 " 

Moscati di Siracusa, 12 

qts.. 9.00 " 

Vesuvius wines in bar- 
rels of about 60 gals. 1.05 per gal 

WHITE WINES. 

Lacryma Christi, 12 qts. I7. 50 per case 
Falerno, " 7.50 " 

Capri, " 7.50 " 

Capri, 24 pts. 7.50 " 

SPARKLlNi: WINES. 



Port. 



3-25 i 



..._, . ., SPRUANCE, STANLEY & CO. 

12.00 JEWEL— A specialty, old and t 410 Front street, San Francisco. 

13.50: mellow 3.50 Kentucky Favorite $ 3.00 

8.50 SO— Superior old 3.85 Extra Kentucky Favorite 3.50 

g.joiEMPEROR— 30 years in wood, O. P. S 2.50 

I grand old wine 4-75 O K Old Stock 5.00 

jM CR — 1827— Choicest Royal. . 6.35 Harries' Old Bourbon 2.00 

1.75 to 4.50 Direct shipping orders solicited on Kentucky Favorite, in cases 8.50 



the most favorable terms 

TARRAGONA WINES. 
Jose Boule, Tarragona. 

Qrs. & octs. per gal. 
' Fine, clear and smooth. .. .*i. 15 
ROYAL PURE JUICE — Full 

body and r ch i-2s 

TAWNEY PORT— Light color, 

soft and old 1.25 

These wines have none of the ob- 
jectionable astringency so common Marshall 
in wines of this class, and are abso- 914 family Bourbpn 
lutely pure. 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market Street) San Francisco. 

(Dubos Freres, Bordeaux.) 
Clarets in casks of 60 

gals .. 195.00 to $160.00 

(F. Chauvenet, Nuils. Cote dOr.) 
Burgundy wines in 

cases ; 

(Deiiihard & Co., Coblenz 



LacrymaChristi, 12 qts.f19.co per case Hock and .Moselle 



"24 pts. 20.50 ' 
(L. I.aborel .Melini, Florence.) 

Chianti U ine in flasks without oil. 

Cases of 2 doz. qts. ...f 12.50 per case 
" 4 " pts... 14.50 per case 

W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 
Jerez de la Frontera. 

SHERRIES. Per Gal. 

No I P Table, lull bodied ) , 
iVP Table, very pale (' ■■*i-40 , 

2 P Full and round \ 

2VP Very pale, light, fine / " ''7° ! 

3 P Full body, solt, rich 
3VP Very pale, light, full 



wines fS.oo to ^32.00 

(Morgan Bros., Port. St. Mary.) 
Ports and Sherries in 



H. O. B. jugs 9.00 

O. F. C. jugs 10.50 

African Stomach Bitters, cases. 7.50 

SIEBE BROS cV PLACEMAN. 

322 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

O K Extra f3-5o to j;6.oo 

K Rosedale 2.50 to 3.00 

llvai.i 2.75 

Golden Pearl 2.25 

2.25 

1-75 
Old Bourbon j.50 

1 SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market street, San Francisco 
Carlisle in bbls. Reimported 

Spring, '89, per gal $ 2.50 

Carlisle in bbls. Reimported 

Spring, '86, per gal 3.25 

Keystone Monogram Rye in 

cases, per case 14.15 

'?^^i'°, *p°° Old Saratoga in cases, per case 15.25 
Mascot Bourbon in bbls per gal 2.25 
Robin Hood Bourbon in bbls. 



23.00 

WILLLIAM WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

Quarts. Pints. 
White Seal (Grand Cu- 

vte) I3400 

Brut Imperial 38.00 



I3600 
40.00 



Imported Brandies. 



W. p.. CHAPMAN. 
123 California street, San Francisco. 
(H. Cuvillier .and Frere Cognac.) 
Quarts. 
Fine Champagne, "Reserve," 

1870 $32.00 

Grand Fine Champagne, i860.. 3600 

L. GANDOLFI & CO. 
427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prices (. o. b. New York.) 
*»* Albert Dubois & Co., 

Cognac, 12 quarts $12.75 

*** Rupparl & Co., 12 quarts. 70.50 

ITALIAN— FRATELLI BRANCA, MILAN. 

Cognac Fine Champagne, Croix 
Rouge, per case f 10.00 



per gal 2.50 

>herwOcd Private Stock in 



. ,, » . , bbls, per gal 3,00 

*°°'':i'f ^?u ".°"=-.'/ •.:'^-'° '° J5°o O. P. S. Sherwood in bbis, per 



Ports and Sherrries 

cases, per case 

(Mackenzie & Co., Jerez. 
Ports and Sherries in 

wood, from |i-75 to $4.50 



in I „jj| 

'°;°°_'o iS.oo Old Saratoga 'in' bbls, 'per gal '. '. 4".co 



HELL.MAXN BROS. & Co. 

525 P'ront street, San p'rarcisco. 

E. Remy Martin & Co , Cognac. 

Co;nac in octaves per gal. $5.50 $6.50 

In cases, see special advertisement. 

P. Frapin & Co., Cognac. 

Cognac in octave-; per gal. $5. 65 $6.50 

Planat & Co., Cognac. 
Cognac in octaves per gal. $5.25 



American Whiskies. 



E. REMY MARTIN &CO., Cognac. 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO., AGENTS. 

525 Front street, San Francisco. 

f'S-oo 



'}•• 



185 



L. GANDOLFI & CO. 
427-431 West Broadway, New York. 
4 P F'l body,old7mellow\ (Prices f. o. b. New York.) 

4VP Very pale.delic'e,dry ) "" ^''5 *Good Luck Monogram, per case $9.00 
' P C..11 K"'i,. rich, fruity \ ** ." " " " " 10.00 

. 5 en Liberal discount to the jobbing 
trade. 



WILLIAM WOLFF .S: CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco 
Carlisle reimporte.l Spring, > $2.50 Eau-dJ-Vi'e'Weiire 
R. B. Hayden ..S: Co. s Old 1 ■• 

Grand Dad, Spring, '90 2.25 1 << 

M.iyfield, Spring, '89 2.65 Fine Champagne'.'. ■.■.'.'. 

Atlurton, Spring, '90. 2.35 GrandeChampagne vie- 

■ "■ ille 



Anderson Co., Spring, '9' 1.85 

Hume, Spring, '89 2.45 



5 PFull'bod> 
SVP Pale, old. 



fine 



) 



2.50 



6 P Extra Full and fruity 1 
6VP Verv fine and mellow j '" ^"75 

7 Amo .■\.MONTILL.'\DO,old 

and luiiv 2.85 

8 CLO OLOROSA, mellow, 

soft 3.25 

9 Rex Superb old Dessert 



HELLMANN BITOS. & CO. 

525 Front Street, San Francisco. 

Blue Grass, per gallon.. $2.00 to $3 50 

Boone's Knoll, per ".. . 2.4010 4.50 



... KOLB & DENBARD, 

o AMl?N'riL'LA'l')'6"s'o're'r'a; ^'^S 420.426 Montgomery St S. Francisco 

very old and nutty 4-40 Monoareil t^c^. -V^^ 

i.QUEENVICrORIA,grand '] Non^a'n'A'.'.'.'.'.'. .'i ! •.'.■. '4';^ t^ 



Imported Champagnes. 

W. B. ClIAl'.MAN. 
123 California street, San Francisco. 
Perrier Jouet & Co. 

"Speii.al" $33.50 $35.50 

Perrier, Reserve Dry.. 34.00 36.00 
Perrier, Jouet & Co. 

Brut 3400 36.00 

Half pts "Special" $42 in cases of 48 

bottles. 



Grande Champagne, e.x- 

tra 

Grande Champagne, V 

O P 1858 

Grande Champagne, S 

' O P1S4S 

Grand Cliampagne, V 

SO P, 1834 

In octaves $ 4.70 to 



1700 
19.00 
20.00 

22. 00 

25.00 

30.00 

3500 

50.00 
6.25 



"I'' *'""-' 5-65 Nonp,areil AA j.oo 

SPKCIAL WINES. Canteen 1 to 

^''•''?:'^'^ Clean, sound wine . . $1.25 Canteen OPS.'.';; ■.■.'.'.'. ibo 

B Full body and rich 1.50 __^_!^ •" 

Special N Soft, full and fine 1.60 CHARLES MEINECKE & 

•' W Soil, full body 1.75 ,?'4 S.acramento St., Sai Francisco. Adrien & fil.= 

B Clean and sound-Fino 180 John Gibson Son & Co. $2.00 to $4.00 ket 



5.00; HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 
12.00' 525 Front street, San Francisco. 
8.00 Krug & Co. "Private 

11.00 Cuvee" per case $34.00 $36.00 

Joseph Perrier fils & 

CO. Co., per basket 19.00 20.00 

per bas- 

17.00 18.00 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco 
jChamp Vineyard Pro- 
prs. Co , Boutelleaii 
& Co. managers Cog- 
nac in Octaves per 

gal $ 5.25 to 8.50 

The Vineyard Proprs. 
Co. Boutelleau & 
Co., managers Re- 
serve Vintages $11.001014.00 



32 



f^ceifie WIJ^E /JMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



W. A.TAYLOR & CO 

39 BROADWAY, NEW YORL 



GONZALEZ, BYASS & CO.. 
SILVA&COSENS, 
BLANDY BROS. & CO. 
ACKERMAN-LAURANGE, 
WILHELM PANIZZA, 
MARTINI & ROSSI, - 
I & V. FLORID, - 
PETER F. HEERING. - 
REIN & CO., - 



REPRESENTING 



Sherries 

Ports 

Madeiras 

Sparkling Saumur 

Rhine Wines 

Vermouth 

Marsalas 

Cherry Cordial 

Malagas 



JOSE BOULE, 


Tarragonas 


A. BRONOUM & SON, 


Acqiiavit 


ROUYER, GUIILET & CO., 


Brandies. 


JOHN JAMESON & SON, Ltd. 


Irish Whisky 


THE AROBEG DISTILLERY CO., 


Scotch Whisky 


CHAS. TANQUERY & CO., 


Old Tom Gin 


MAGNUM BRAND, - - - 


Jamaica Rum 


MAGNUM BRAND, - - 


St. Croix Rums 


MAGNUM BRAND, 


Holland Gin 



ORDERS SOLICITED FOR DIRECT SHIPMENTS. 

SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS IN TERMS, PRICES, ETC. 



S R E C I 

John Jameson &, Son, Limited 

FAMOUS 

IRISH WHISKY 

In nil lanfls it is reeognized as being 

WITHOUT AN EQUAL! 

Sells in Diililin, at aiictiun. Cor iicuilx' iloiililc tin- jirice 
of any otlicr Irish whisky 

CHAS. TANQUERAY &. CO. 
OLD TOn^Dd UNSWEETENED 61N 

The highest type of Engli.'<h (iins. l'a.«t becoming 
po]iular in the East. 

WILL SELL THEMSELVES. 



SCOTCH WHISKY 



a 



GOLF CLUB" 'PIBROCH 



»5 



These two Whiskies are the finest types of Scotch 
Whisky to he. fouml anywhere. Won in their 
class in competition against the best known 
brands in the market. 



(( 



RED LION" 4 

JAMAICA RUMS 

An exceedingly fine, old Lontlon Dock Cased Rum 
IF YOU WANT THE BEST, TRY IT. 



SOLE AGENTS W. A. TAYLiOF} & CO. 39 BROADWAY, N. Y. 



f^eifie^ WIJME /rJMB SflF^IT t^EVlEW. 



33 



W. A. TAVLOR &Co.. 

39 Broadway, New York. 

<.t)c;NAc iiKANnnis. 

ROUVKR, OUILLET & CO., COilNAC. 

Xinlage. Qi. Casks per gal. 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 

329 Market street, San Francisco. 

Canadian Cliil> per case....|i5.oo 

IKISM WKISKIbS. 

(Wm. Jameson iS: Co., Dublin) 



iSSb $ 4 ^5 Green Diamond, per case 10-50 

1SS4 5.40. tlold Diamond " 

1S75 6.5s' rhrtre Diamond " 

iS6g 7.40 In octaves, proof 122, per gal 



1S40 1 2- 251 

VSO 17.50 

Octaves, 5 cents per gal e.xtra 

C.\SKS. 

Cases * 1450 

*» 16.20' 

" *** 17. «o' 

" ***• J9 50 



.11.50 
.1450 

. 4.00 



SCOTCH WlllSKEKS. 

(Andrew I'sher ^ Co.) 
t>Kl Vatted tllenlivet, per case. . 12.00 

Special Reserve, per case 1350 

"The Very I'lnest," per case.. .3000 
In octaves, proof 1 1 1, per gal 4.25 



Domestic Champagnes. 



WILLIAM WOl.FF & CO. A. MNKKS WIDOW. 

329 M.irket street, San Francisco. | 809 Montgomery street, San Francisco 
Marteli's Brandy, '' per case J15.00 Prices on application. 

" ** " 17.00 Liberal Discount to the trade. 

" " *** " 19.00 

VO " 26.00 FRASH & CO. 

■• " VSO " 32.00 87, S9 & 91 Hudson street. New York. 

" " VSOP " 50.00 Imperial Cabernet, quarts I7.00 

" " in octaves 5.00109.25 " ,. " pnits ... « "" 

A discount to the trade. 



8.00 



Imported Whiskies. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, 
123 Calit'ornia street, San Francisco. 

SCOTCH WHISKY. 

Dawson's " Periection" $12.50. . . 

(^Id Highland " Extra Spe- 
cial" 13.00. .. 

Old Highland " Special Liq- 
ueur" 16.00... 



ARPAD HARASZTHY. 
San Francisco, California. 

THKkE NEW BRANDS. 

"Haraszthy Sec" J16.50 I19.00 

"Haraszthy Dry'' 15.50 18.00 

"Haraszthy Brut " 14.50 17. co 

Eclipse E.xtra Dry 14.50 17.00 

Two year's natural fermentation in 

bottle. 
Trade discounts mailed on application 



Tarragona Port in '/i casks 

per gallon 1.25 

Adrien M. Warde's Italia de 

Pisco, per case 30.00 

Sardines, brand "Philippe & Canaud" 

KOLB & DIINHARD, 
426 MonlgomeryslreL't.San Francisco 
Birch'sCc ystal BcH.islCiinger Ale- 
Lots of 5 barrels $1275 

I barrel '3-5o 

Net cash. 

CHARLES MEINECKE .S: CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

(BOORD & SONS, LONDON.) 

Old Tom (iin, per case $11.00 

I'ale Orange Butt rs, per ease. . 1150 
Ginger Brandy, Liqueur "... 12.00 
lamaica Rum, Old prcase 12.00 to 14.00 
IAIN Royal Batavia Gin in 
casos of 15 large black 

bottles per case 23-50 

in cases of 15 large 
white bottles per case 24.50 
K i r s c h w a s s e r, Maoholl 
Freres Bavarian High- 
land, per case 20.00 

Swan Gin in Js casks 3.75 

Double Eagle Gin in ^s csks 3.60 

lohn Ramsay Islay Scotch 

Whisky in 3 s ca-iks 4 75 

Boord's Pineapple brand Ja- 
maica Rums in ;s casks5.25to 6.50 



HELLMAN BROS. & CO. 
525 Front street, San Francisco. 
I J. B. Sheritf it Co., Lochindale 
Islay, Scotch whisky in wood, 
per gallon $3 So 

HELLMANX BROS. & CO. 
525 Front street, San Francisco. 

J. B. Sherriff & Co. Lochin- 
dale Islay, Scotch whis- 
ky per case 12.00 

Dublin Distillers Co. Ltd., 
Dublin, Irish whisky, 
in wood, per gallon... 4.50 

Dublin Distillers Co- Ltd., 
Dublin, Irish whisky, 
per case.../ 12.00 

CHARLES MEI.NECKE & CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
Boord & Son, London Finest 

Irish .Malt Whiskey 120) 

Royal Hghld Scotch \»hi.,iky 12.50 
John Ramsay, Islay Malt 

Scotch Whisky 13.50 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market street, San Francisco. 
Burke's * ♦ » Irish, cases 12.00 

» " » « » » " '< 14.00 

" Gamkirk Scotch " 12.25 

" Viceregal Scotch " i3-5o 

Lawson's Liquer " " 1350 

Uam Var, " " 12.00 

McKenzie's Glenlivet * * * 

Scotch, per case 12.50 

Bushell's Club Irish, in wood 

per gallon 4.50 

W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 
39 Broadway, New York. 
The Ardbeg Distillery Co., Islay. 

Qrs. Ocls 

New $385 $3.90 

One Year 420 4.25 

Two Years 4.55 4.60 

Three Years 4 95 5.00 

CASES. 

* one doz. bot. $11.00 

•• ♦ 13.00 



ITALIAN-SWISS COLONY. 
L. Gandolli & Co., Proprietors. 
427-431 West Broadway, New York. 
Montecristo, extra dry, naturally 

fermented, in cases of 12 ([ts .$12 00 
Montecristo.extra dry, naturally 
fermented, in cises of 24 pts. 14.00 
Liberal discount to the trade. 

PAUL MASSON, 
San Jose, Calilornia. 
Less than 5 cases. 
Premiere Cuvee, Dry. . f 16.00 $iS.oo 
'' " Special 16.00 iS.oo 

Special discount for quantities of 5 
cases or more. 

A. WERNER & CO. 

52 Warren street, New York. 

Extra Dry $ 7.00 | 8.00 

Syrups, Cordials, Etc. 

KOLB & DENHARD, 
421 Montgomery street, San Francisco 

Rock Candy Syrup 75c. per gal. 

Raspberry- Syrup 75c. " 

Oigeat Syrup 75c. " 



JOHN JAMESON & SONS, DUBLIN. 

Qrs. Ocls. 

New $400 $4.05 

One Year 4.40 4-45 

Two Years 4.70 4.75 

Three Years 5.05 5.10 

Four Years 5.45 550 

CASES. 

• I doz bot. $12.00 

' • * 14-50 

' * • 24.00 



Imported Goods. 

(MISCELLANEOUS.) 

W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California street, San Francisco. 

Plymouth Gin (unsweetened) $15.00 

L. GANDOLFI & CO., 

427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prices f. o. b. New York) 

Fill Mancabelli, Brescia. 

.•\nesone,casesof 12 bots, prcasef 11.50 

I-'ERNKT OR HLANCA BITTERS. 

Uli. Branca & Co., Mil.in. 

25 case lots and above, qts 11.00 

10 11-25 

5 1150 

Single case, qts 1 2.00 

Case of 24 pints bottles 1050 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO., 

525 Front street, San Francisco. 

Blankenheym & Nolet. 

Union Gin 2.60 

' Vaughan Jones 

Old Tom Gin, in cases. . 11.00 

Orange Bitters " 11.50 

Patterson & Hibbert 
Bass' Stout, per double doz 3.00 

Guinness' Stout, " " 3.50 

H. Underberg-AIbrecht. 
Boonekampol Maag Bit 'rs 12. 75 to i ^.75 

J. B. Sheriitf&Co. 
Jamaica Rum in X* ai'dj^s 

per gallon 4.30105.10 



W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 
39 Broadway, New York. 

MAGNUM BRAND, JAMAICA RUM. 

Qrs. Octs. 

A— Full body $3.90 $3.95 

B— Rich, fat and old 430 4-35 

C — Superfine, extra 5.05 5.05 

MAGNUM 310 3.50 

GINS. 
CHAS. TAXQUERAY & CO., LONDON. 

Bulk. 

Old Tom Gin, quarter casks $3.25 

Old Tom Gin octaves 3.30 

Cases, one dozen each S.75 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market street, San Francisco. 
Per case 
A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

large black bottles. . $21.50 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

medium black bottles 18.50 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

small black bottles. . 9.00 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

large white bottles.. 22.50 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

medium whitebot ties 1950 

A. Houtman &Co's Gin, 

small white bottles.. 9.50 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

octaves per gallon. . . 3.55 

Bass' Ale in wood, hhds. 50.00 

JoulesStone Ale in wood, 

hhds 50.00 

Ross Ginger Ale, per bbl 15. 00 

■' Soda Water, per case 7.00 

" Tonic Water, " 7.00 

" Potash Water, " 700 

" Raspberry Vinegar6 to 

gal. per case 7.00 

" Raspberry Vinegar Sto 

gal. per ca*^e 6*00 

" Lime Juice Cordial 6to 

gal per ca'^e 6.00 

" LimeJuiceCordial Sto 

gal. per case 4.50 

" Lime Fruit Juice 6 to 

gal. per case 4.60 

" Lime Fruit Juice 8 to 

gal. per case 3.50 

" Orange Bitters, per case 8.00 

Burke's Bass' Ale pints, per 

bbl of 8 doz 16.00 

Burke's Guinness' .Stout, 

pts, per bbl of 8 doz.. 16.00 

Burke's JamaicaRum percs 12.50 

" Old r.im Gin " 10.75 

" Dry Gin " 10.75 

" Hennessy Brandy, 

per case 1 6.00 

" Port Wine, Gato br'd 

per case 10.00 

Flcischnan's Royalty Gin, 

10 gal. pkages, per gal 2.25 

Fleischman's Royally Gin, 

15 gal. pkages, per gal 2.22,"2 



Fleischman's Royally Gin, 

. 20 gal. pk.iges, per (jal 2.20 

Fleischman's Royally Gin, 

50 gal. pkges, per gal. 2.15 

Meinhold's Anchor Brand 

Cider, per case, (juarls 3.25 

Meinhold's Anchor Brand 

Cider, ptr rase, pints. 4.00 

WILLIAM WOLFF it CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 
J.cleKuyper&SonsGin,large bot 20.CO 
" " med. " " i6.oo 

" " small 9 00 

Cantrell & Cochrane BeKasi Gin- 
ger Ale per barrel of 10 doz. 15.00 
Wolle's Schiedam Schnapps per 

case, quarts 9.50 

Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps per 

case, pints 10.50 

Benedictine, per case, quarts . . .20.00 

" " pints 21.50 

Tlieo. Lappe's Genuine Aroma- 

lique per case 12. 00 

Gilka Knnimel per case 12.50 

Dog's Head Brand of Bass' Ale 
Per case S doz. pints, glass. 

Read Bros. , London 14.60 

Per case 4 doz quarts, glass - 13.00 
Dog's Head Brand of Guinness' 

Stout, per cs.8 doz pts, glass 14.00 
Per case, 4 doz quarts " 12.40 
OldTom Gin, Sutton, Garden & Ccio.oo 
Creme de Menthe, E. Cusenier 

fils Aine & Co 16.00 

PousseCafe, E.Cusenier, AineC0.15.50 
Maraschino, Romano ViahovZara 15. 50 
Balavia Arrack, 12 (juart bottles 12.00 
Jamaica Rum in octaves, proof 

116, per gallon 4-50 

Kir.^^chwasser, Macholl Bros., . . 18.00 
.Nordhauser Kornbrannlwein cases 12 

jugs, Red label 20.00 

Black label 16.00 

Cherries in Maraschino. 12 qts. . 10.00 
French Vermouth. Noil lyPrat&Co 6.75 
Grand Marnier, 12 bottles, large 20.00 
i " " 24 " small 21.50 

[. H.Schroeder'sCocktail Bitters 

24 pints 12.00 

Chianti, Giorgi GiglioU, Leghorn 

Italy— quarts 10.00 

pints 1 1 .00 



Mineral Water. 



JOHN CAFFREY, (representing 
CHAS. GRAEF & CO., New York) 

47 First street, San Francisco. 
APENTA HUNGARIAN BITTER 
WATER, 
ex San Francisco Warehouse. 

5 CASE LOTS. 

Case of 50 glass bottles $ 7.50 

" looglassquarlerbottles 7.50 
Payable 6 months from date ot invoice. 
Subject to a. rebate of 50 cents per 
case on certain conditions ; particu- 
lars on application. 
APQLLINARIS NATURAL MIN- 
ERAL WATER, 
ex San Francisco Wareh'se, 10 cs lots. 
Case of soglass qtsApoUinaris 7.50 
" 100 " pts " 10.50 

•' 100 " "splits" — hlf-pts 

— ApoUinaris 8.00 

Payable 30 days from dale of invoice. 

Subject to a rebate of 50 cents per case 

on certain conditions ; particulars 

on application. 

FREDRICHSHALL APERIENT 

WATER. 

ex San Francisco Warehouse. 

Per case of 50 bottles (5 case lots) 10.00 



WILLIAM WOI.LF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

JOHANNIS MINERAL WATER, ZOLLHAVS 

GERMASV. 

TEN CASES OR MORE. 

Case of 50 quarts $ 6. 25 

" 100 pints 9.75 

" 100 splits 7.50 

ONE CASE. 

Case of 50 quarts 7.25 

'! ICO pints 10.7s 

'■ 100 splits 8.25 

(Terms — Net 30 days) 

HUNVADI JANOS. 

Case of 50 bottles, per case $11 00 

5 cases and over, per case 10.00 



34 f/eifie wifjE /(j^D spiF^iT review. 

LEADING DISTILLERS. 



ADDRESS, INSURANCE 



BRAND. 



BOURBOINS. 



BELLI? of ANDKHSON I>'U CO. 
AJtl: S. Grecnbnvim, Louisville. 
Rnle 1.25 



BiUe of Amlersoii, 

(ilciiariiic, 

Jessumine, 

.Arlington. 



MELLWOOD DIS'Y CO. D. No. 34 
Louisville, Ky. 
Rjite 85c. 



EARLY TIMES DIST'Y CO. 
Early Times, Ky. D. No. 7 
5 M. E. of Bardstown. Rates, 1.'25 
Add : B. H. Hurt, Louisville 



Mel wood 
Dun Dee. 



Early Times, 
A. (1. Nail, 
•lack Beam, 



0. F. C. DISTILLERY. D. No. 1 1.1 

Frankfort 
Add : Geo. T. Stagg Co., Frankfort 

Rate 8.5c. 



O. F. C, 
Carlisle. 



SUNNY BROOK and 

WILLOW CREEK DIST'G CO'S 
Distilleries, Lcuisville, Ky. 
Contract'g Offices, 128-30 Franklin st. 

Chicago, 111. 
ROSEN FEED BROS. & CO., i.rop'rs 
Rates, 85c. and 81 Nos. 5 and 297 



J. B. AVATHEN & CO. 

Loui.sville 
Rate 85c. 



Willow Creek. 
Sunnv Jkook. 



J. B AValthen & Bro., 

Ktutuckv Criterion. 



OLD TIMES DIST'Y CO., 

Distillery No. 1 Louisville 

Rates SLOO and ?1.25 



Old Times. 



OLD KENTUCKY DIST'Y CO., | Kentucky Comfort 
Loui.'^villi', Ky. and 

Rates, $1.00 and $1.25 I Gladstone. 



E .1. CCRLEY & CO., D. No. 3 & l5 

Camp Nelson 
Ral.^; "B." 'D.-'-'E" L2.-. "F." n..50 



Blue Grass, 
Boone's Knoll. 



ADDRESS, INSURANCE. 



GKKExr.Kii:]; disty cu. 

GnenKricr D. No. 329 

Add Win. CollinsA Co., Louisville. 

Rate 1.35. 



BRAND. 

Greenbrier, 
U. 15. Harden. 



ANDERSON & NEL.SO\ DIST'S 

(,'o., Louisville. 
Add ; Anderson it Nelson Distil- 
leries Co. Rate 85c. Louisville. 



Anderson, 

Nelson, 
Buchanan. 



R. F. BALKE iV: CO. D. No. 12. 

Louisville. Ky. 
Rate 85c. 






" G. W^ S." 

C^lrl W'atermill 
l-^uii ji\'mecle. 



OLD KENTUCKY DISTILLERY, 

D. Mesehcndorf, 

205 W. Main St., Louisville, Ky. 

Insurance: 8.5c., ?1. 00 and $1.25. 



Keiituckv Dew. 



RVES. 



SUSQUEHANNA DIST'G CO., 

Milton. 
Add : .las. Levy & Bro., Cincinnati. 
Rates 85c & 1.25. 



Susqvielianna. 



NORMANDY DIST'G Co., 

Louisville, Kv- 
r. O. Box 235-1. 

Rate 85c. 



Normandy, 
Rtabicon. 



A. OVERHOLT & CO., 
Add : A. Overholt & Co., Pitt.sburg. 
Pa. Rate 80c. 


Uverlioh. 


J. B. WATIIEN & CO., 
Louisville. 
Rate 85c. 


Lackawanna Rye. 



ANDERSON & NELSON DIST'G 

Co., Louisville. 
iVdd : Ander.son it Nelson Distiller's 
Co. Rate 85c. Louisville. 



Nelson. 




Best Line 

Indianapolis, 
Cincinnati 

AND THE 

South. 

CITY TICKET OFFICE: 
232 Clark SmttT, Chic»qo 



Louisvillei St. Louis & Texas Railway 



BEECHWOOD ROUTE." 



Consign your shipments from Louisville and 
interior Kentucky points, care of the Louisville, 
St. Louis & Texas Railway, which is a direct 
line to Pacific Coast points and same will re- 
ceive prompt attention. | 

For rates and other information, address 
the undersigned : 
L. S. Parsons, J K. McCracken, H C. Mordue. 

Traffic Man'K. Con Man'R, Asst. Con Frt. Agt. 

Louisville. Ky. Loulsvlllo. Ky. Louisville. Ky. 



f^e\f\Q WIJME /^JMD Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



3 



CLASSIFIED INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CAl.ll'ORNIA \VINi:S AND BRANDIES. 

Page. 

California Wine Association 21 

Carpy, C. & Co :: i 

Cliaii'che & Bon 6 

Eisen Vineyard Company 6 

Gundlach, J. c\: Co 30 

Giiasti & Bernard 4 

1 laras/thy, Arpad 6 

Ilali.m-Swiss Colony .... 29 

Kohler & \'an Bergen 21 

Kohler v^ Frohling 21 

Kolb & Denhard , 5 

Lachman & Jacobi 28 

Lachman Co., S 21 

Mann, C. M 6 

Napa \'alley Wine Co 21 

National Wine Association 22 

Smith, Julius P 4 

Staract', Achille 2 

\'ina Distillery 34 

West, Geo. & Son 22 

Wetmore-Bowen Company 3 

DISTILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Crown Distilleries Company 2 

Curley E. J. & Co 5 

Guckenheimer, A. & Bros 27 

Leading Distillers' Cards 34 

Levy, Jas. & Bro 36 

Mayhew, H. B. & Co 4 

Meinecke, Charles & Co 25 

Monarch, R 26 

A. Senior & Son i 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

Chapman, W. B 20 

Finke's Widow, A 28 

Hellman Bros. & Co 19 

Lachman, S. Co • 21 

Macondrav Bros. <;^ Lockard .... 5 

Rossi, D. 'P 28 

Sherwood & Sherwood 17 

Wultt", Wm. & Co 18 

IMPORTERS. 

Chapman, W. B 20 

Hellman Bros. & Co 13 

Macondray Bros. & Lockard 30 

Sherwood & Sherwood 16 

Starace, .\chille 2 

Tavlor, W. A. & Co 32 

Wolff, Wm. & Co iS 

1-RUIT BRANDY DISTILLERS. 
Walden & Co 4 

S. F. WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 
Kolb & Denhard :; 



IMPORTED BR\M)\'. 

E. Remy Martin <;i Co., Hellman, Bros. & Co., Agts. i 3 

Caffrey, John (representing Charles Graef & Co.). . 12 

MINERAL WATERS. 

Apollinaris Company, Ltd i 

Wolff, William & Co 26 

SYRUPS, CORDIALS, P.ITTERS, PRUNE JUICE, 

Erlcnbach, Martin 17 

Kolb & Denhard 5 

Rudkin, Wm. H 28 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Big Four Railway Routes ... 34 

Bonestell & Co., Paper Dealers 26 

Korbel, F. & Bros., Redwood Tanks 28 

Goodyear Rubijer Co 2 

Henderson, Wm. G 30 

Hercules Gas Engine Works, Gas and Distillate 

Engines 15 

Loew's System Filter 11 

Loma Prieta Lumber Co 28 

Monon Route, 1000-Mile Tickets 34 

O'Brien, James, .Saloon 4 

Sanders & Co., Coppersmiths 4 

W^andelt, Samuel, Cooper and Tank Builder 26 

Wayland & Co., Wine Finings 14 

Zellerbach & Sons, Paper 28 



Cresta Blanea 

SOUVENIR VINTAGES. 

Gold Medal, Paris Exposition. 1889 

LOCATION OF VINEYARD: LIVERMORE, ALAMEDA CO , CAL. 

Jfae-Similr of Lnbrl nn Oeuuiiie Creala Klanca ffilira 



Moore, Hunt & Co 30 

Martin, E. <S: Co 4 

Naber, Alfs & Brune 4 

Siebe Bros. & Plagemann 2 

S[>ruance, Stanley ^ Co 4 



Cresta Blanca Sduvemh Vintages 

S A U T E R N E-S O U V E N I R 



G0L3 McO^ PAHia Exposition 1889 




CRESTA BLANCA. 



San FiUNCisco Oepoi 



^rj -^.^oi-ft-cti 



140 Mohtgohedv St. 



These Wines are served to the Guests of all the leading Hotels and 
Restaur.ints on the Pacific Coast, 

For price-list apply to 

WETOIORE-BOWEN (0. 



140 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

BOnilNG CELLARS. CORNER LARKIN AND McALLISTER SIS 



CAL. 



f/reifie WIfJE AhID SPIRIT F^EVIEW. 





[&llQUORMiE " 

AGENTS ''O'^ ■-•/ 




323-325 Market St., S. F. 



D. T. B. IIENAltU:. 



E. MARTIN & CO., 

IlirOliTEKS AXD WHOLESALE 

LiIQlJOH mEHCHflKTS, 

411 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



iPOIITHIIT TO DISTILLERS m WINE miERS. 

I liis cut II prcsciils our l;il<-.t Ini- 
proved Coiitiiiuoas Stili which lias 
been pt-rfeiied adtr years of experi- 
ment and large expense. 

Thin Still ha-i the adTantiifro OTfr. 
nil otiHTS. :is it is eCDiiomical, easily 
operated and separates the aldchydt 
and ether iiilerior oils and makes a 
pure and liiL;h-rlass brandy; and re- 
dn<es the cost folly ninety per eent. 
in labor and fuel. It requires ven 
littk- iir no w.'ter and utilizes all heat 
htrelolore wasted. 

■ We reler to Gfo. Whst & Son 
Stotkton; JoH.s \\ iiEELtK, St. Helen 

111 iiRDS or oopprR voRt dose it sboei iotici. 

SANDERS & CO 

421 and 423 MISSION STRE'.T, SAN FRANCISCD 




Pat'd Si 1-t. 2q. iRqi. 



■ SOLE AOEXTS FOU - 



J. F. CUTTER AND ARGONAUT OLD BOURBONS. 



CIIA^ W. FORE. 



joiix sria'ANiK. 



Spruance, Stanley & Co. 

iMPOitTEiiS .^XD ,ioi;iiri;s or ri\E 

Wpes, Wines anil Lipois. , 

Sole agents for the Celebrated African Stomach Bitters. 
41C Front Street, - - San Fkancisco, Cal. 



OLIVINAVINEYARD. 

The OLIVIfJfl eomprises 600 Acres of Hill 

Side Vineyard, Located in tt.e 

Livermore Valley. 

DRY, DELICATE. WELL MATURED TABLE 
WINES A SPECIALTY. 

gEND FOR gSMPLB ORDER, 

Correspondence Solicited by the Grower. 
JULIUS PAUL SMITH, LIVERMORE. CAL. 

N.Y. OF-icE. 65ASD67 DuA'-jStf cIT, 




J 11 N ]ii*:f;N.\K['. 



Secom»o Gr a.-ti. 



jf- B- J)?ayAati) ,^ ^0. 



: - frrotccrs and Di■■<till^•r.^ of - i • 



"li.,!H«ia.!!"lH? taillOFiila Wi)lES ai BWIES 



THE EXHOFTATONOFGRAFE BRANDY, WHISKY AND 

SPIRITS FROM aOND OR WITH PRIVILEGE OF 

DRAWBACK, SPECIALTIES, 



Dealers inU S. Standard Hydrometers and Extra Stems, Prime's Wantage 

Rods, Die Wheels and Gauging rods. Also Distillers', Rectifiers, 

Whiilcsalf l,i(|\ior 1 le.ilers and Brewers' Rooks. 



OFFICE, 424 BATTERY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



P O. Box 2409 



Telepho.ie 646. 



Winery at Guasti <fc Bertmrd's Spur, Bctweai Wejit 
Glendale and Tropica, Cal. 

bTOcf^GE PRODUeEF^S Of SWEET WINES. 

Miiiii (tl)ice. ('<»: :id and Alaiititlii Sis.. /.«.< Aiiiirlrs, (iil. 



WALDEN 6l CO. 

Geyser Peak Vineyards and Brandy Distillery 

GF.YSr.Rl IIJ.I-\ SONOMA CO.. CAL. 

Walden Cognac, Manzanita Sherry, &c. 

OLD BRANDY IN CASES, BRANDIED FRUITS. 

WALDEN COGNAC is 111. 1 if altir the 1- k-ik h foriniila. fr..iii seln Ird fii-.l) j;r.ipes, has been succe^s 
fully introduced, .ind is now ri>;ularly sold in the princip.il in.iikels o( Kurope, in competition with French 
Cognac. OITicial German and I'.nglish chemists have piommnced it the purest Hrandv which conies to their 
markets. . •, , 

It is especially suitable for the drug trade and others, where purity is demanded. ^\ hile abroad these 
goods successfully compete, payin- the same duties as the French, the American buyer has the advantage in 
price, between the Internal Revenue l.ix assessed here and the Customs <'uties on foreign Brandies. 

SAMri F.S WILL BK SI'NT ON AI>1'l,l<ATIf>N 

EASTERN OFFICE, 120 F'EARI. ST K I-:i-:T. XKW ^•OKl<;. 





TRADE-M SRK 



f/eifie wij^E /r^ie sfif^iT r^evie'a* 



KOLB & DENH ARD 

Vi/L.Ly IN v/ i\l r /\ ri t. B L ./. \k importers and sole agents 

PACIFIC COAST FOR 

BI RC H'S 

CRYSTAL 

Belfast Ginger Ale 



BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES. 



CALIFORNIA 

WINES and BRANDIES. 

OFFICE AND VAULTS 

420-4S6 MOSTaOMKltV ST., S.iV FRANCISCO. 

Telephoxe No. 5096. 





^mp^B, 





^^p^ 




giSTILLERs 

BlueGSass 



Hand Made_ • • 
♦ SourMash Whiskey. 

Jes5anf7ipeCo. 



\ S These Mlitskles arc made in the Famoiia " BLVE GJLISS JlEGIoy" so 

• A Jiis'ty crlrhrated afi the home of the finest Whiskies in the fVorld, and 

/O^ lehielt hare Iteen )or the last Centurtj. rernfint::ed an siirfi. tjivtnti the ehav- 

•w I . fcijf (Icter and Iilgli standitig to KK\TL'<'KY ^\'llISKHCS trliirlt !tiey nnir enjotf. 



THESE TAMOUS WHISKIES CAN BE HAD IN LOTS TO SUIT THE TRADE FROM 

HELLMA/N/N BROS. a. CO., 5^5 p-RO/NT STREET. SA/N FRA/NClSeO. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR THE 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 

$l.SO Per Year. 



6 



f/veifie wijME ANI9 spif^iT preview. 

1B95 



159^ TRIUTV^PHT^tNT T^GTHIM 

EUROPEAM QUALITY RECOGiSITIOM 



BELGIUM 



KF-!ANCE 



FRANCE 



FRANCE 





IRELAND 






Awarded 37 Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals ! 

THE HARASZTHY CHAMPAGNES 



CALIFORNIA 



isKi'i" lll^;^■ i-:x PKA mkv 

530 WASHINGTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 




C. M. MANN 

Successor to I. DE TURK- 

Wines and Brandies, 



BRANDY 


SAUTERNE 


PORT 


GUTEDEL 


SHERRY 


RIESLING 


ANGELICA 


BURGUNDY 


MUSCAT 


CABERNET 


TOKAY 


ZINFANDEL 


MADEIRA 


XX CLARET 


MALAGA 




VINEYARDS: 



Sonoma County, Cal. 

OFFICE AND CELLARS: 

216-218-220 Sacramento and 221 Commercial Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




TJHE JiJCBHEST AWARD f ARIS EXPOSITlOJsi 




1889. 



GObD JVIEDAL. 



ELstatjlistisd. 

Ciucr/Tiore l/alley, ^ai. 



ises. 



,.r-^ 



^' 



b\^ 



-^.-■pP, 



,v3^^. 



tfi 



.^ 






.^' 



v«*- 



A. G. CHAUGHE, Proprietor. 

Office and Iiitot .ITFihst St., Pnn FiaiicM. 



CHAUCHC &. BON, Successor to A. G. CHAUCHE. 

S,.|f (li-iiiMal .\i;cii1s for thi- Mni->-T-l!m-c:K n lNK.-<. 



^i^^2i^juw>-» ■^^^ 




VI Nl YAMl 



iT'lritHiMlIM l«|- II ■! 



650 Acnes 



Gold Medal for Sherries and Sweet Wines, Dublin Exposition, 1892. 

EISEr4 VINEYARD CO. 



-PIONF.RR PROnrCERS OF- 



^\ 



g \i\L E^E T ^ I N^^i^ 



Send for Price List 
and Samples. . , 



Office, 12 Stevensou Street. S- F. 







VOL. XXXVllI, 



$1.50 PER YEAR 



Issued Semi-Monthly. 
noon df SCOTT, . - publishers 

WfNFIELD SCOTT, Editor 
R. M. WOOD. Manaccr 

402 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
TELEVUOSK XO. 709 CABLE ADUKESS -FI EI.DniX," SAJf fRAAdSCO 



The PACIFIC WIXEAXI) Sl'miT REVIEW is the oiili/ 
paper of its class West of Chicago. It circulates ainoity tlic 
Wholesale and Retail Wine and Sitirit l}ealers of the Paci/if 
CiHtst, the Wine MaUera and Jirandij JHtlillers of California, 
the Wine and lirandij hni/ers, aiui the Importers, Uistillers and 
Jobbers of the L'niletl St<ties. 



All CHECKS. DRAFTS, MOSEY ORDERS, ETC.. should 
be male payable to WOOD it SCOTT. 



f-ubscriptions per year— in advance, postage paid. 

For the United .States, Mexico and Canada |l 50 

For Kiiropean countries 2 50 

Single cop c5 10 

Entered at the San Frani'isco Post Office as second-class matter. 

AGENCY : 

EASTERN BRANCH OFFICE: 
W. A. GEFT, Manager, Room 32, No. 78 Park Place, New York Ciiv. 



PROPERTY FOR SALE, 



FOR SALE, in a coast county, splendid vineyard and 
ranch property of 410 acres, 140 acres of which are in full- 
hearing vines. No phylloxera, and the property is so located 
that, with ordinary care, the insect will not reach it. Prop- 
erty is well improved, having 1 brick distillery, 2 brick cel- 
lars, 2 adobe cellars, and plenty of oak and redwood cooperage. 
Stock of wine on hand averages 7-5,000 gallons, which goes 
with the place. Besides the vineyard, there is 100 acres of 
bottom land for hay, lOO acres of pasture, adapted for hay: 
and 70 acres of wooded pasture which can be set to vines. 

Aside from the vineyard, tlie ranch is well stocked, and 
has ample and substantial buildings. 

This is one of the choicest properties in California. Tiie 
dry wines from the vineyard have a splendid reputation, and 
there is a steady establi.-ihed trade for them. Satisfactory 
reasons for selling, and the place will Vic sold cheap. 

For further particulars address Winfield Scott, care of 
Pacific Wine and Spirit Review, or apply at Room 2, seventh 
floor. Mills Building, from 9 to 10 a. m. 

Vineyard for Sale at a Bargain, to Close an Estate 

THIRTY ACRES choice foreign wine grapes, witii winery 
(35,000 gallons, tine oak casks) and distillery complete. Ad- 
dress G. L., Pacific Wine and Spirit Review, San Francisco, 
Cal. 



WANTED — Situation — wanted by a married man; age, 
40. Twelve years' experience on a vineyard in wine making. 
Best references. Address J. M., this office. 



NOTICE OF REMOVAL. 



Please take notice that the business otlice of the Paciitc 
Wine and Spirit Review has been removed from 316 Bat- 
tery Street, San Francisco, to 402 Front Street, Rooms 8 and 9. 

This i.ssue of the Review is out several days late, owing to 
the fact that the entire paper, advertisements and all, had to 
be re-set, consequent upon the sale of the plant of the R. ^^. 
Wood Co., job printers. 

Thanking you for jjast favors and patronage, and trusting 
to deserve the continuance of the same, we are, 

Very truly yours, WOOD & SCOTT, 
Publishers Pacific Wine and Spirit Review. 



MARKET REVIEW 



CALIFORNIA WINES.— In the face of general business 
stagnation East and on the Pacific Coast, it is remark- 
able that shipments of wine are as large as they are. 
Merchants and growers as a rule are watching the tariff 
legislation at Wasliington more closely than they are business 
conditions. The announcement of Chairman Dingley of the 
Hou.se Ways and Means Committee that reciprocal arrrange- 
ments may be opened with France and other European coun- 
tries is a damper to all business transactions. 

The di'manil for wine is not what tlie shipper and mer- 
chants expect at this season and a dull season is looked for. 
Late advices from New York are as follows: There is no 
impi'ovement reported in the demand for California wines for 
either the sweet or dry varieties. A few outside lots have been 
.sold during the past two weeks at a small concession from the 
regular prices, the owner seemingly having no difhculty in 
in disposing of them. 

The exports of California wine by sea and rail in Feb- 
ruarj', 1897, were as follows: 

Cases. Gallons. Value. 

Bv Sea 2.140 2.57,411 §110,570 

Bv Rail overland 1,079 584,212 240,400 



Total 3,819 841,623 §3.50,970 

CALIFORNIA BRANDIES.— Business continues slack. 
There is no improvement in price and no reason to 
look for any. The stock remaining in bond in the 
state is smaller than it has been for years being only slightly 
above 1,100.000 gallons but this gives no belief among pro- 
ducers that any substantial advance may be expected. 

Tiie total exports of California brandies by sea in Febru- 
ary were as follows: 

Cases. Gallons. Value. 
By Sea 30 275 $611 

By Rail overland 120 2.^ 028 43,242 



Total 150 28,303 §43.8.53 

''XPORT WHISKIES IN BOND— Saa Francisco. 

Tiie stock of export whiskies in bond in San Francisco, 
on February 28, 1897 was 170,471 gallons. 



8 



f>Jk(B\f\(B WIJME /rIND Sflf^lT f^EVIEVV. 



i 



[lIISKIES. — Aside from the fact that the volume of bus- 
iness is not up to the average of tixe pust four years 

'tliiTc is not mucii to report. Dealers pfencrally are 
watc'liiiig tlie tarill'and revenue I'ill now to be lon.-iidercd in 
AVasiiington . Some of the more sanguine members of tlie 
trade think that Congress may reduce the tax to say ?1 per 
gallon, and in their prayerful moods tliey think that !MI cents 
and a year bonded period would be about tlie thing. Most of 
the dealers believe however that it is useless toexjicct any fa- 
vors in the way of national legislation at this time. 



^'Mmirr.VTloNS.— Importations during the past fortui 
sJ liave Ijeen liglit but many im])orters are drawing hea\ 
^on stocks in bond exiiecting an advance in dulv licfore lo 



^on siocKs HI Lionel expectmg 

The dciiiiind is onlv lair for this lino of 



gilt 

vily 

lontr. 



-ds. 



RESULT IN OAKLAND. 



O.V (I.OSINC. S.VLOOXS. 

Xo 5,12.-) 

Yes 3,744 

Council stands S friendly, 3 unfriendly. 

That is the result of the Oakland contest at the polls on 
the Sth inst. 

It is needless at tliis time to dwell upon the details of tiie 
campaign which lias jiassed into history and will soon be for- 
gotten. Two or three salient features deserve notice and re- 
membrance. 

First of these is that the liquor men, well organiz.ed 
under tiie direction of .T. P. Edoffand Theodore (Jicr, made a 
thorougii but quiet fight preceding and during the election. 
Tlie advantages of making a quiet tight were never better 
illustrated. The preachers and the women had the talking 
field to themselves and they improved their opportunity to 
the utmost. " Tiiey could not lose," they said. "They would 
sweep the city." But when the votes were counted it was 
found that the sober and really temperate people of the city 
decided that they did not want taxes increased 20 per cent; 
that they did not want 200 empty stores in addition to what 
they now have, or 600 men added to the unemployed, or 3000 
people deprived of a means of earning an honest livelihood. 

Another feature that deserves remembrance by the liquor 
men is that the Oakland Trihvuc has its price, ^\'e know 
the figure. It was not paid by the liquor men and the Tribune 
favored the other side. The presumption is that the church 
people hired the services of this journalistic drab. Mr. W. E. 
Dargie is the power which directs the policy of the Trihune. 
He will be remembered appropriately by whoso business he 
would ilestroy. 

The Oakland Times was unreservedly anti-saloon. 
Whether from motives of policy, financial or otherwise, we are 
unable to say. Bitter and uncalled for arguments against 
the liquor trade were made in its columns. The men whose 
business the Times wanted to blot out should remember the 
Timeii. 

About as conservative and honest an expression of opin- 
ion as was expressed in the campaign came from the /v/i- 
i/uirer of March 9th, after the result of the election was 
known, as follows: 

THK VOTE ox THE SALOONS. 

The proposition to close the saloons, which was sub- 
mitted to the voters of Oakland at yesterday's election and 
which enthusiastic temperance advocates and even many 
siircwd politi<ianssaid would l>e carried, has l«cn defeated by 
a very cmpiiatie majority. With it has gone down lo defeat 
a considerable part of the KepuMican ticket, and although 
tiiere were other causes at work to edict the rout of the jnirty, 
the moMt potent influence of all appears to have been the 
nnti-^alooii fiv'ht. Temporarily at least, thesaloonsof Oak- 
land have gained a very dieiiled victory. 

It is six years since last the saloons were a direct i.ssue in 
n municipal election in Oakland. In iHiil there was an or- 
gaiiixed local option campaign, conducted, like this one, by the 



religious organizations, although the issue was submitted upon 
a <liirerent basis. In lS!tl the advocates of temiieraiice su])- 
ported the candidates who would agree lo jiledge themselves 
to close the saloons if the people should declare for it; thi- 
year the test was made by taking an advi.sory vote, although 
candidates also came in as a .secondary issue. In both elect- 
ions the result was the same; In 1H91 the candidates sup- 
ported by the local optionists were buried out of sight and thi- 
year the proposal to close the saloons was voted down over- 
whelmingly. 

What conclusion is to be drawn from the outcome oi 
of these two campaigns? We think the moral is jilain. ami 
that il is that the citizen's of Oakland are not in favor of radi- 
cal action in the direction of prohibition or .saloon closing. In 
favor of the denomination of the saloon in politics our citizens 
certainly are not: neither arc they disposed lo be tolerant of 
of disorderly saloons; they do not want an unlimited number 
of saloons; and they prefer to have them kej>t out of t!ie resi- 
dence districts. But it does not follow that they favor the im- 
mediate abolishment of all saloons; on the contrary they ap- 
pear to resent that proposition and to vote it down as often a- 
as submitted. 

We have a very good license law, and people have given 
every sign of being in favor of its rigid enforcement. They 
sustain Councilmen in revoking the licenses of saloons run in 
a disorderly manner, and also in refusing to grant licenses to 
saloons which liquor dealers jiropose to plant in residence dis- 
taicts against the protestof property owners. But they are not 
in fixvor of i)rohibition, because they do not regard that policy 
a practical one in a community like ours- The? Enquire)- is 
not sur]irised by the vote of yesterday It has believed all 
along tliat while the voters were in favor of a continuance of 
the recent jiolicy, and even of further advancement along tin 
same lines, they were not ready for closing the saloons alln- 
gether. They are in favor of going ahead one step at a time 
Had the Sunday closing proposition been submitted, as wa^ 
originally projiosed, it might have been approved, although 
tiiat is not certain: Sunday clo.sing has been voted down in 
recent years in Alameda and in San Jose, two towns a good 
deal like Oakland. 

From the election of yesterday temperance a<lvocates 
should learn a lesson, but there is no rea.son for discourage- 
ment. The moral seems to be that effective temperance work 
in Oakland must be done along conservative lines, and that 
anyone who it too iinpatit^nt to work according to these 
methods is simply an impraiticable. 



ALAMEDA NEXT 



Inasmuch as so many of the camlidates for municipn! 
offices to be voted for on April 12th at Alameda are on all 
three tickets in the field, much interest will he detracted from 
the light, so far as the personality of the candidates is cfni- 
corned. Hut there will be no lack of interest in the canii)aigii, 
and it promises to center largely, as in the Oakland election 
just held, on the saloon question. The saloon men recognize 
the fact, and have already sent out circulars calling a meeting, 
at which they will organize so as to do battle with the Anti- 
Saloon League, which is in the lieM ready to fight for pre- 
cinct ]>roliil>ilion. The i|iiestion of prohibition will not he 
submitted on the jiroposition to close all the saloons, but to 
have the saloons closed in any precinct which may .so elect, 
thus leaving them to run in precincts where the voters in 
favor of so doing are in the majority. 

This |)roposition .seems to meet with more popular ap- 
]iroval than would one to summarily close all the saloons in 
the city, provided a majority be oiilaiiied in support of such a 
movement. An examination of the licenses that have been 
issued shows that there are just twenty-three places 
licensed to sell liquor in .\lameda, or on an average of 
ahiiut one to each 7(10 of population. There are thirteen pre- 
cincts in .\lameda, ami of the.se three have no saloons at all 
one has six, one live, four two each ami the other three oie 
each. The saloon men claim that in no place in the State is 



i^'/VCSifie Wl^£ A|MD SpiRiT f^EVIEW, 



their business conducted in more orderly fnsliion than hero. 
Tliere is not a (iisit'j>utablc retort in the city; the corner gro- 
cery bar is absolutely unknown, anil tiie uniiesiral)le fcaturt's 
(if tiie occupation are reduced to a niiiiinium. 

But the ligiit will be a warm one, ami the Auti-ISaloon 
heague is conlident of carrying a goodly tliare of all the pre- 
eincts. 



BREAKING OUT AGAIN 



The fruit distillers of all the states ought to get together 
pui! have the tax lowereil on grape, peach and applebrandies, 
in order to meet the reduction that is certain to be placed on 
whiskies. If the Kentucky and Tennessee distilleries close up, 
which they declare they will do if the tax is not reduced, the 
government will have hard work to get money enough to pay 
interest upon the jniblic debt' — Phocntj:. 

This is simply a case of a retail liquor journal l>reaking 
out again and ]iro])osing lines of policy it does not understand. 

It certainly takes a large amount of assurance to say that 
a reduction is "certain to be placed" in the tax on distilled 
spirits. We do not believe it, much as we should like to see 
the old rate of 90 cents once more jirevail. We think that 
the demand for revenue on the part of the govennment is so 
pressing that the distillers will be fortunate if they secure a 
reduction to §1. The statement that " if the Kentucky and 
Tennessee distilleries close up, which they declare they will do 
if the tax is not reduced " is amusing. The whiskey trade of 
this country would be better off if the closing agreement now 
in force is applied to everybody. The Government wont in- 
terfere, Mr. Phoenix, as long as the stock of whiskey in bond 
remains and as long as the spirit distilleries in Peoria, Pekin, 
( Uuaha and Minneapolis keep running. We don't look with 
any favor on that plan of getting any special consideration for 
brandy in the way of tax exemption. The Phoenix may not 
know it but the brandy distillers of this state are marvellously 
live from harassments by the government; they are treated 
like princes when compared with the grain distillers. What 
the brandy men need is not tax reduction but a change 
in the Revenue laws which will permit them to blend their 
goods in bond, not only one man's distillation but any man's 
brandies. This must be given to brandy distillers and ship- 
per if they are ever to be able to blend to type as do the French 
brand V houses. 



I have been employed during the la.st five years (state 
names and aiUlress of employers or occupation during the past 
five years) 

I have resided in Los Angeles. . . .years and. . . .niontlis. 

I have never been convicted of any crime. 

I am . .married. 

I have never paid or promised to pay anything to secure 
a license, nor have I ever employed any one to assist me in 
securing this license. This application is made by mc with 
full understanding that any license granted to me may bo re- 
voked at the discretion of the board of police commissioners. 

(Sign your full name here.) 



This must be subscriljed and sworn to before the clerk of 
the board, and tiien comes the petition of property owners in 
form as Ibllows: 

State of California,) ss. 

City of Los Angeles) 

The undtTsigneil. residents and freeholders in the block 
in which the saloon is proposed to be conducted, and carried 
on — being two thirds of the whole number thereof — (and if 
two thirds do not sign then this request is not effective) res- 
pectfully represent individually and each for himself, states 
that he knows the applicant above mentioned and is qualified 
to speak intelligently in relation to his character and habits 

and states and represents that the said is a man 

of good moral character, correct and orderly in his deportment 

that he has never seen the said drunk, or known 

or heard of his having been drunk, nor of his having been 
guilty of any criminal or disorderly conduct or act, and we 
pray that a license be issued to him as per the foregoing 
application. 

This is a step toward eliminating the objectionable class 
of retailers, as such it should have endorsement if properly 
applied. 



TALK OF A DISTILLERY. 



During the past few days there has lieen considerable 
quiet talk on the street as to a plan to erect a spirit distillery 
in the city. Rumor had it that the spirit house was a cer- 
tainty, but it does not appear that the matter has gone that 
far by any means. 

The truth is that a Cincinnati capitalist was a visitor in 

San Francisco during the past month and that while he 

PURIFYING THE RETAILERS. looked into the proposition, it was not the only reason for his 

coming to the Coast. While here he studied the market and 

The new blank forms of application to the board of police its needs very closely, having in view the establishment of a 
commissioners of Los Angeles for liquor licenses are ready and distillery with a capacity of 2,000 bushels daily provided his 
willhereafter be used. The forms were drawn by Mr. Forman, report was favorable. He secured all the needful data as to 
and the requirements are the most stringent ever adopted. If cost of site, materials, etc., an<l left for the Fast some ten 
they are lived uji to it will take an exceptionally good man to days ago, not stating whether his report would be favorable 
get a license, and any man who has himself ever drank liquor or unfavorable. 

is practically barred. All statements must be sworn to, both Those who are most conversant with the spirit situa- 

by the applicant and the signers of his petition, and it must tion think that his report will be unfavorable. A spirit 
be stated specifically under oath that the applicant has never house with a capacity of 2,000 bushels would more than sup- 
paid or promised to pay anything to secure a license, nor that ply the wants of the Coast dealers, and it is questionalde 
he has ever employed any one to assist him in getting the li- wliether a Coast distillery could get all of the business. .Still 
cense. This last will be especially felt by agents controlling those who know of the movement tliat has been on foot are 
property in blocks whete it is proposed to establish saloons, awaiting definite information from the East with some 
who have for years been holding up the liquor men and eagerness, 
adding to their own revenues bv demanding monev before 
they would sign the petition. Following is the application HE DIDN'T flEAN JIH BUDD. 

that must be made by the would-be saloon keeper. 

.\pplication to the Hoard of Police Commissioner for a " Governor Budd is a good jumper, but not a good race 

Liquor License. horse," said IMmond yesterday. "He is surly and will not 

I hereby make application for a permit for stand the whip. He always runs with his head high in the 

license for the Siile at retail of malt, spirituous, vinous and air, and if he is touched with the whip he puts back his ears 

mixed liquors, in the city of Ix)s Angeles, at No on and stops. — Interview with Harry Dimond in San Francisco 

street, city of Los Angeles. CIn-ouiclc. March 9th. 

I reside at No. . . .on. . . .street, city of Los Angeles. Harry Dimond is not a disgruntled Democratic friend 

I was lx>rn an the .... day of the month of. ...A. D. IS of Governor .1. H. Budd. who has been thrown down for 

. . . .at. . . . office; he is merely a race horse owner who thinks he has not 

My occupation has been that of had a square deal at the Ingleside and Oakland race tracks. 



:10 



f/»ejfie WIJME /rJND SflF^IT F^EVIEW, 



Dll I LRENTIN bNGLAM). 



Aniou{,'st the leading events of tlie week lias l>ocn the 
seventieth nnniversarv festival of the Licensed Victuallers' 
Asvluni, which took jilace on Feliruary 2")th. at the Hotel 
Cecil, under the distinguished presidency of His Royal High- 
ness the Duke of York, who was supjioited on tho occasion by 
the Duke of Teck, the Maniuis of Ailesbury, Lord Burton, 
Lord Glenesk, the Hon. (i. Allsoj>p, the Hon. A. Percy Allsoji]), 
the Hon. E. Hubbard, Koar-Aduiiral Sir Frcdk. Bedford, 
Major-General Sir Francis W. de Winton, Sir .1. Whittaker 
Ellis, Bart.. Mr. Hamar A. Bass, Mr. H. M. Stanley, and 
others. Tiiere was an inlluencial and rei)resentative gathering 
of the trade, the wholesale section being rei«resented by many 
of its leading members. His Royal Highness made a forcible 
and telling speech in favor of one of the most deserving char- 
itable institutions of the trade, and in the course of the evening 
the Secretary announced a list of subscriptions and donations 
amounting to the aggregate to the handsome sum of .(;l(?,:U)(i. 
Needless to add, the )nrnu of the banquet was of the sumptuous 
character distinguishing tho Hotel Cecil management: the 
sparkling vines used ou the occasion were those of Moot & 
Chnndon, 1889 vintage, and Irroy's Carte d'Or, 1889 vin- 
tage. — LoiK^on Wine and Spirit GazcKc. 

And what a howl there would be in the United States if 
the President and other distinguished public oflicials were to 
preside at a liquor dealer's banquet. They do things difitr- 
ently in England, the wine and liquor trade being among the 
most honored of anv. 



AUCTION IN ENGLAND. 



At the auction sale of Southard & Co. of St. Dunstan's 
Hill E. C. London, held on February 2.-)th. the following lots 
of California wine and brandy were sold at auction. 

WINK. 

40 barrels Port, Natoma Vineyard Co , entered June 12, 
1896, subject to 1 shilling duty, 2' shillings to 2 shilling 1 
pence per gallon, (48 to oO cents.) 

BRANIlY. 

15 barrels " Eagle Natoma Cognac ", shipped by Natoma 
Vineyard Co. vintage of 1894, entered March 2nd 189(5, 3 
shillings G pence jier gallon, ()S4 cents). 

:V2 barrels California brandy vintage 1892, ex Beechbank 
from San Francisco, entered January 22nd. 1897, 2 shillings 
1 1 pence to 3 shillings per gallon. (70 to 72 cents). 



TRUTH ABOUT POOR LICENSE HOLDERS. 



That plucky little Owensboro, Ky., sheet, the Eccniiyj 
Neivs, goes at the subject of licenses in a way which proves its 
claim to being "An Original Journal." Among other good 
things it says: 

* * * It is very true the little dealers are few in point 
of numbers, but they aie an exceedingly popular claiss of law- 
abiding citizens, and have many true friends wiio think 
destroying their business through high license is both un- 
necessary and unjust. 

* * * The Ncu'H is unalterably opposed to mon- 
ojfolies of any kind. And what is high license but a mon- 
opoly '.' 

*# « * The A'lYiiMijr /"«/>mi<ioji comes spraddling along 

and savs that not a "single reason can be advanced why we 
should" not have high license." Oh, no, of course not ! No 
reason whv high license would not cause at least 25 of our 
li, '.rs, who have tlieir money invested in fixtures and 

)i(, . , to break up and leave town. No rea.son why 50 

barteiKkr.-, and 50 niggers that rastle with the spit boxes 
won't be out of a job'.' No reason why four beer Joints will 
have a regular Mark llanna consolidated monopoly trust for 
the next three years? No rea.son at all why the poor man 
cannot run his bu.-<ine.ss same as the rich man if he keeps an 
orderly house'.' And arc not there many of the "little 



feller's" saloons where disorder of im kind occui-s or is toler- 
ated? Of course, no reason can be advanced, whv certainlv 
not ! 



BOTTLING IN BOND. 



Since the last issue of the Rkvikw went to press, tlw 
full text of the law providing for the bottling of distilled 
spirits in bond has Vteen received. Tlie law is as follows : 

lie il enacted by the Senate and Jfoiixe of lUprencntatircx < 
the United Stalex of America in Congress n.s.«f»//6/f(/. That when- 
ever any distilled spirits deposited in the warehou.se of a di^- 
tillery having a surveyed daily capacity of not less than 
twenty bushels of grain, which capacity or not less than 
twenty bushels thereof is commonly used by the distiller, have 
been duly entered for withdrawal ui)on jiayment of tax, or for 
export in bond, and have been gauged and tlie rei|uired 
marks, brands and taxpaiil stamps or export stamjis, as thi 
case may bo, have been allixed to the package or package^ 
containing the same, the distiller or otrae?' of said distillid 
spirits, if he has declared liis purpose so to do in the entry for 
withdrawal, lehich entry for hottliny pnrpoxcs viay be made by 
the owner as well ns tlie dixtiUcr, may remove such spirits to a 
separate portion of said warehouse which shall be set apart 
and used exclusively for tliat purpose, and there, under the 
supervision of a United States storekeeper, or storekeeper and 
gauger, in charge of such warehouse, may immediately draw 
off such spirits, bottle, pack and case the same: J'roridnt. 
That for convenience in such process any number of package- 
of spirits of the same kind, dilfering only in proof, but ]ir"- 
duced at tliesavic distillery by the same disitlkr, may be mingled 
together in a cistern provided for that purpose, but nothing 
herein shall authorize or permit any mingling of diii'ercnt 
products, or of the same products of diderent distilling sea- 
sons, or the addition or the subtraction of any substance or 
material or the ajiplication of any method or proee.>;s to alter 
or change in any way the original condition or cliaracter ■ 
the product excejit as herein authorized ; nor shall there !• 
at the same time in the bottling room of any bonded war' 
house any spirits entered for withdrawal upon payment of tin 
tax and any sj)irits entered for export: j'rovided, also, Thiit 
under such I'cgulations and limitations as tlie Commission' i 
of Internal Revenue, witli the ajijjroval of the Secretary ■ 
the Treasury, may prescribe, the provisions of this Act may 
be made to apply to the bottling and casing of fruit brandy 
in special bonded warehouses. 

Every bottle when filled shall have aflixed thereto aii'l 
passing over the mouth of the same such suitable adhesiv' 
engraved strip stam]> as may l)e prescribed, as herein provided, 
and .shall be packed into cases to contain six bottles or mul- 
tiples thereof, and in the aggregate not le.^s than two nor mon 
than five gallons in each case, which .shall be immediately re- 
moved from the distillery premises. Each of such cases shall 
have afHxed thereto a stamp denoting the nuinber of gallon- 
theroin contained, such stamp to be allixed to the case Info i 
its removal from the warehou.se, and such stamps shall have a 
cash value of ten cents each, and shall be charged at that 
rate to the collectors to whom issued, and .shall be paid for at 
that rate by tho distiller or owner using the same. 

And there shall bo jilainly burned on the side of each cast , 
to bo known as the (iovornment side, the proof of the sjiirils. 
tho registered distillery number, the State and dislrii't in which 
the distillery is located, the real name of the actual bona Jiili 
distiller, the year and tlistilling sea.son, whether spring or fall, 
of original inspection or entry into bond, and the date oi 
bottling, and the same wording shall be jdaced ujion the ail- 
hesive engraved strip stamji over the mouth of the bottle. // 
bcin'i understood that tlie xprinp season shall include the month 
from .January to Jidy. and the fall season the vionlhs of July / 
January. 

Ami no trade-marks shall be iml ii](on any bottle unle.-- 
tlie real name of tho actual bona fide distiller shall also lu 
placed conspicuously on saitl bottle. 



PAeipie WI|ME /^Jv]0 SPIRIT F^EVlEW. 



11 



8kc\ 2. Tiiat the Conmiissionor of Internal Revenue, 
with the approval of tho Secretan' of the Treasury, may, by 
reguhitions, prescribe tho mode of separatini; and .securing the 
additional wai-ehouse, or portion of the wareliouse hereinbefore 
required to be set apart, the manner in wiiieh tlie bu-^iness of 
bottling spirits in bond shall he carried on, tiie notices, bonds, 
and returns to be given and accounts and records to be kept 
by the persons conducting such business, the mode and time 
of inspection of such spirits, the accounts and records to be 
kept and returns made by the Oovernment ofUcers, and all 
sueli other matters and things as, in his discretion, he may 
deem requisite for a secure and orderly supervision of said 
business ; and he may also, with the approval of the Secre- 
tary of tho Treasury, prescribe and issue the stamps re- 
quired. 

The distiller may, in tho presence of the United States 
stonLrcper or storc/cecptr and f/HUf/rr, remove, by straining 
through cloth, felt, or other like material, any charcoal, sedi- 
ment, or other like substance found therein, and mai/ irhcncrcr 
necessary reduce such spirits as are withdrawn for bottling ^jhc- 
poscs by the addition of pure water only to one hundred per 
centum proof for spirits for domestic use, or to not less than eighiy 
per centum proof for spirits for iwport purpoi^es, under such rules 
and regulations as may be prescribed by the Commissioner of 
Internal Revenue with the approval of the Secretary of the 
Treasury ; and no spirits shall be withdrawn for bottling un- 
der this Act until after the period shall have expired within 
whicli a distiller may request a regauge of distilled spirits as 
provided in section fifty of the Act of August twenty-eighth, 
eighteen hundred and ninety-four. 

Sec. 3. That all distilled spirits intended for export 
under the provisions of this Act sliall be inspected, bottled, 
cased, weighed, marked, labeled, stamped, or sealed in such 
manner and at such time as the Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue may prescribe : and the said Commissioner, with the 
approval of the Secretary of the Treasury, may jirovide such 
regulations for the transportation, entry, reinspection, and 
lading of such spirits for export as may from time to time be 
deemed necessary : and all provisions of existing law relating 
to the exportation of distilled spirits in bond, so far as applic- 
able, and all penalties therein imposed, are hereby extended 
and made applicable to distilled spirits bottled for export 
under the provisions of this Act, but no drawbacks sliall be 
allowed or paid upon any spirits bottled under this Act. 

Sec. 4. That where, upon inspection at the bonded 
warehouse in which the spirits are bottled as aforesaid, the 
<iuantity so bottled and cased for export is less than the 
quantity actually contained in the distiller's original casks or 
packages at the time of withdrawal for that purpose, the tax 
on the loss or deficiency so ascertained shall be i>aid before the 
removal of the spirits from such warehouse, and the tax so 
paid shall be receipted and act'onnted for Ijy the collector in 
such manner as the Commi.ssioner of Internal Revenue may 
prescribe. 

Sec. 5. That where, upon reinspection at the port of 
entry, any case containing or purporting to contain distilled 
spirits for export is found to have been opened or tampered 
with, or where any mark, brand, stamp, label, or seal placed 
thereon or upon any bottle contained tiierein has been re- 
moved, changed, or wilfully defaced, or where, upon such rein- 
spection, any loss or discrepancy is found to exist as to the 
conteiits of any case so entered for export, the tax on tho 
spirits contained in each such case at tiie time of its removal 
from warehouse shall be colleete<l and jtaid. 

Sec. <j. That any person who sliall re-use any stamp 
provided under this Act after the same shall have been once 
affixed to a bottle as provided herein, or who shall re-use a 
bottle for the purpose of containing distilled spirits which has 
once been tilled and stamped under the provisions of this Act 
without removing and destroying the stamp .so previously 
afKxed to such bottle, or who shall, contrary to the provisions 
of this Act or of tho regulations i.ssued thereunder, remove or 
cause to be removed from any bonded warehouse any distilled 
spirits inspected or bottled under the provisions of this Act, 
or who shall bottle or case any such spirits in violation of this 



Act or of any regulation issued thereunder, or who shall, 
during the tran.sportation and before the exportation of any 
such spirits, open or cause to be opened any case or bottle con- 
taining such spirits, or who shall wilfully remove, change or 
deface any stamp, brand, label, or seal aflixcd to any such 
case or to any bottle contained therein, shall for each such 
oll'cnse be fined not less than one hundred nor muw than one 
thousand dollars, and be imprisoned not more than two years, 
in the discretion of the court, and such spirits shall be forfeited 
to the United States. 

Sec. 7. That every person who, with intent to defraud, 
falsely makes, forges, alters, or counterfeits any stamp made 
or u.sed under any provision of this Act, or who uses, sells or 
has in his poss(;ssion any such forged, altered or counterfeited 
stamp, or any plate or die used or which may be used in the 
manufacture thereof, or who shall make, use, sell, or have in 
his possession any paper in imitation of the paper used in the 
manufacture of any stamjp required by this Act, .shall on con- 
viction be punished by a line not exceeding one thou.sand 
dollars and by imiirisonmeiit at hard labor not exceeding 
five years. 

Sec. 8. That nothing in this Act shall be construed to 
exempt spirits bottled under the provisions of this Act from 
the operation of chapter seven hundred and twenty-eight of 
the public laws of the Fifty-first Congress, approved August 
eighth, eighteen hundred and ninety. 

Pas.sed the House of Representatives May 18, 1896. 

Attest : ■ A. McDowell, 

Clerk. 

Passed the Senate Feb. 25. 

Signed by President Cleveland MarchjS, 1897. 



W. E. Brodersen, the bookkeeper of ^\'ichman, Lutgen 
& Co., is laid up at the German Hospital recovering from a 
surgical operation performed at that institution about ten 
days ago. 



-FOK- 



WINES,BEER, CIDER, LIQUORS,CORDIALS,WATER,&c. 



Knralilf ! 







Wine Dealers and Growers, Brewers and Liquor Mercliants are invited to 

see filter in operation at I'acitic Coast Agency 

7 FIRST ST., S. E. Cor. Market, SAN FR.iNClSCO, CAl. 



^2 P/rSlfie WlJvJE 7<\!M0 Splf^lT f^EVItW 

The Prices to RETAILILRS 

are as follows : 



$8. 
$8. 



-case of 50 glass bottles, 
-case of 100 glass bottles. 




SEE tliai the Labels 

l)ear the well-known 

RED DIAMOND MARK 

of the APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LIMITED. 



SOLE EXPORTERS 

THE APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LD., LONDON. 



JOHN CAFFREY, 21 giitbei^ ^tm^, ^an Francisco, I^eerBgEnting CHi^l^LEg (JRi\EF \ GO, fleW Vorl;. 



DECIDED TO HOLD OUT. 



The winemakers of the State have resolved not to allow 
their productions to be soD at prices fixed by the Wine 
Association. Twenty cents a gallon is the price asked, unless 
it be shown that the wine is of inferior (juality. 

At a meeting of the California Winemakers' Corporation, 
held March 12th in the rooms of the Chamber of Commerce, 
President Herman Bendcl occupied the chair. Over 150 
members were present. 

The object of the meeting was explained to be the con- 
sideration of the suit now pending against the California Wine 
Association for a sum of 830,1 lOl) claimed to be due the cor- 
poration for wines delivered, and non-compliance with a con- 
tract. Manager Wheeler explained the difKculties encoun- 
tered to obtain a settlement with the Association, which, he 
said, had not only disclaimed the debt, but set up a counter 
claim of ?171,000 for non-fulfillment of contract. 
Mr. Sitarboro oll'ered the following resolution: 
Whereas, The California Wine Association has refused 
it) jniy to the California Winemakers' Association a just claim 
of over $:JO,00(t, thus compelling the corporation to commence 
suit for the collection fif their just claim; be it 

Jiembrd, 'I'hat the action of the board of directors of the 
California Winemakers' Corporation in commencing suit 
against the California Wine A.ssociation is iiereby ajiproved, 
and that they are requested to |)rosecute said suit to a suc- 
c ■ssfiilend. 

The speaker urged the winemakers not to be discouraged, 
aa tlie flisjiules beliveen the as.9ociatioii and the corporation 
had strengthened their pr>sition. .Manager Wli<(ler allirmed 
tliis Htatcment, declaring that since the litigation five new 
members had been gained and over a million gallons of wine 
had been placed in liic hands of the corporati(jn. Mr. Sbar- 
bora's resolution was adopted by a unanimous vote. 



.V motion to permit the directors to terminate the con- 
tract witli the Wine .Association was agreed to. 

The question of prices of wine of the 189G crop was then 
considered. D. M. Delmas spoke upon the past work of the 
corporation, and urged a strong continuance of the union. He 
reminded members how the dealers had forced down i)rices as 
low as 8 and even O cents a gallon. The energetic etibrts of 
President Bendel and P. C. Rossi had resulted, he said, in a 
raise of prices, and the lowest price so far obtained this year 
had been 17i cents a gallon. Standing together and allowing 
the directors of the corporation to handle the sales, 20 cents a 
gallon, he thought, should be realized. 

Resolutions were adopted authorizing the directors to li.\ 
20 cents a gallon as a standard price, with authority to devi- 
ate from tliat figure in cases where the wine was of iuferi>i 
grade. 

The directors were also authorized to expend $10,000 for 
suitalile buildings in this city to store such wines as it may 1 
desirable to keep on hand. 

An indorsement was given to a proposition relative to 
the restoration of the Mi-Kinley tariff on foreign wines, and 
opposing any reciprocity treaty with France or tiermany. 

\ meeting of the board of directors of the Califoriii:i 
Winc-^^akers' Corporation was held March loth. President 
Bendel was directed to a[>point a committee to examine into 
the various storage at'conimodations olfered to the board, and 
to further report on the cooperage retjuireil by those members 
whose 't)G wine needs early shipment. 

The recommendations of the stockholders' meeting, lixing 
tlii^ jiriee of standard wine at 20 cents a gallon, and reijuiring 
all sales to be made through the corporation, were adopted. 
In accordance with this action the circular recently issued will 
be modified to declare that all wines shall be otlereil at 20 
cents jnininunn, the only exception being the showing by 
members of the corporation to the satisfaction of the board > i 
directors that there arc valid reasons for reducing the prii . 
such as marketl inferiority or the necessity of inunedia: 
delivery. 



PTOrSIFie WIjME /rJMD SflF^IT 



PREVIEW. 



18 



DANGER OF RECIPROCITY. 



Tlie new Dingley Tarifl Bill was introduceil in the House of 
Representatives at Washington on the 19th inst. 

In presenting it Mr. Dingley made the following statement in 
connection with Reciprocity with France, Italy, Spain and Ger- 
many : 

"The President is authorized to negotiate with the countries 
exporting argols, chicle, champagne, brandy, sugar, wines, mineral 
waters, paintings and statuary and silk laces with a view to secure 
reciprocal and equivalent concessions in favor of the products or 
manufactures of the United States. It is believed that this e.\ten- 
sion of the reciprocity policy of the tarifi of 1S90, strengthend by 
the tenders of Icwer duties as a concession in return for equivalent 
concession will result in even more commercial advantages than 
those that were received under the Act of 1S90." 

California needs a representative in Washington to-day. 

Messrs. Edward FrowenteUl and Fred. Jacobi have done much, 
but reiutbrcements are wanted. 

We all know the danger of such "reciprocity." It means 
destruction to tiie wine business of this State. 

The situation is so grave that the merchants, the corporations 
aud the growers would at once make up a fund to send a rei)re- 
sentative to the National Capital. 

Outside of this schedule H of the Bill, reads: 

"Schedule H — Spirits of wine and other beverages, brandy and 
other spirits manufactured or distilled from grains or other materials, 
and not S|)ecially provided for in this act, $2.50 per proof gallon. 

" Each and every gauge or wine gallon of measurement shall 
be counted as at least one proof gallon, and standard for determin- 
ing proof of brandy and other spirits or liquors of any kind 
imported shall be same as that which is defined in the laws relating 
to internal revenue, but any brandy or other spirituous licjuors 
imported in casks of less capacity than fourteen gallons shall be 
forfeited to the United States. Provided, that it shall be lawful for 
the Secretary of the Treasur)-, in his discretion, to authorize the 
ascertainment of the proof of wines, cordials or other liquors, by 
distillation or otherwise, in cases where it is impracticable to ascer- 
tain such proof by the means prescribed by the existing law or 
regulations. 

" On all compounds or preparations of which distilled spirits 
are a component part of the chief value, not specifically provided 
for in this act, there shall be levied a duty not less than that imposed 
upon distilled spirits. 

"Cordials, liquors, arrack, absinthe, kirschwasser, ratafia and 
other spirituous beverages, and bitters of all kinds containing 
spirits and not specially provided for in this act, $2.50 per proof 
gallon. 

" No lower rate or amount of duty shall be levied, collected 
and paid on brandy, spirits and other spirituous beverages than 
that fi.xed by law for the description of first proof: but it shall be 
increased in proportion for any greater strength than the strength 
of first proof, and all imitations of brandy or spirits or wines, 
imported by any names whatever, shall be subject to the highest 
rate of duty provided for the genume articles respectively intended 
to be represented, and in no case less than $2.50 per gallon. 

Champagne and all other sparkling wines, in bottles containing 
each not more than one quart and more than one pint, $8 per dozen ; 
containing not more than one pint each and more than one-half 
pint, S4 per dozen ; containing one-half pint each or less, $2 jier 
dozen; in bottles or other vessels containing more than one quart 
eaeh, in addition to S8 per dozen bottles, on the quantity in e.xcess 
of one quart at the rate of $2.50 per gallon. 

" Still wines, including ginger wine or ginger cordial and ver- 
mouth, in casks, 50 cents per gallon; in bottles or jugs, per case of 
one dozen bottles or jugs, containing each not more than one quart 
and more than one pint, or twenty-four bottles or jugs containing 
each not more than one pint, Si.6o per case; and any excess beyond 
these (juantities found in such bottles or jugs shall be subject to a 
duty of 50 cents per pint or a fraction thereof, but no separate or 
additional duty shall be assessed on bottles or jugs ; provided that 
any wines, gfnger, cordials or vermouth imported containing more 
than 24 per cent, of alcohol shall be forfeited to the United States, 
and provided, further, that there shall be no constructive or other 
allowance for breakage, leakage or damage on wines, liquors, cor- 
dials or distilled spirits. 

" Wines, cordials, brandy and other spirituous liquors imported 
in bottles or jugs shall be packed in packages containing not less 
than one dozen bottles or jugs in each package, and all such bottles 
or jugs shall pay an additional duly of 3 cents lor each bottle or 
jug, unless specially provided for in this act. 

"Cherry juice and prune juice, or prune wine, and other fruit 
juices not specially provided for in this act, containing not more 
than iS per cent, of alcohol, 60 cents per gallon; if containing more 
than IS per cent, of alcohol, §2 50 per proof gallon." 



There is also some chance that '• currants " (Zante and other) 
which are really dried grapes, will be made dutiable at 2^^ cents 
per pound, the same as raisins. 

THE MAIL BOYS. 



This is no pun. The mail boys " have came, have saw," have 
conquered ; and under the fatherly care of Superintendent Flint of 
the Railway Mail Service, have not missed the real good things of 
the town. Among their pleasant experiences was an introduction 
to the famous "bonanzas" made by Kolb & Denhard. They 
made a raid on the house one hundred and fifty strong, bent upon 
trying the groat and seductive California beverage. Their charge 
was successful, for when they left there was nothing but " dead 
soldiers" on the field of battle. It was a novel sight, and cer- 
tainly a high compliment to Messrs. Kolb & Denhard, as their's was 
the only house that received the honor of a visit from the delega- 
tion. What those bonanzas did to the boys when they went to the 
evening meeting need not be stated in detail. It is sufficient to 
say that the result was all that could be expected, and many of 
them returned the next day to the scene of their conquest and tried 
to find out what had happened. On Saturday night the boys were 
the guests of Mr. K. A. Kolb at the Olympic Club. 



DEATH OF JOHN RENZ. 



.Jolin Rcnz, the bitters manufacturer, who was one of the 
Ijcst known German residents of San Francisco, died on tlie 
14th inst. 

Mr. Renz was a native of Wurtemburg, Germany, and 
was in his 6Gtli year when ho died. For years he was in 
business at 31o Commercial street, and did a prosperous 
business, but witiiin the past few montlis he moved liis estab- 
Hshment to Market street, neai Frankhn. He accumulated a 
comfortable fortune by his efforts. 

The funeral took place on the ITtli inst., and was lield 
under direction of Hermann Lodge, No. r27, F. aud A. M., of 
which the deceased was a member. 

Mr. Renz left a widow, a married daughter and three 
sons, the latter having been associated with him in business. 



FOR SALE — One-half interest or the whole of the right 
to a wine faucet, recently patented, which enables wine men 
to keep dry wines on tap in 5-galloii demijohns, pure and 
wholesome, without manipulation, It is simple and thor- 
oughly effective, and is a result that has long been sought, as 
it will enable retailers to carry small quantities of dry wines 
"on tap'' without spoiling. For particulars address Q, this 
ofhce. 



WIXEMAKER and Distiller, :M) years of age, liohling 
highest references for 12 years' services in leading establish- 
ments, open for engagement. Address "S. 8.," this ofHce. 

GROWERS who wish to sell good California wines for 
cash on,delivery, at moderate prices, to Eastern buyer, please 
correspond with "B.' care editor this paper. 

^ESTABLISHED ,^^^ 

1^^^^, E.RemyMartin&C^I 

.r , ^^ ^ COGMAC b 

If A>^^^^*-*\^ FRANCE ^ 

•v^ ^ Agents in San Francisco, Cal. p5 

HELLMANN BROS. &, CO. 



Seeii'"'-'' ■;:■.. •;! 525 FRONT STR EET, l'^ 



14 



f/reifie WIJNJE /rpJD SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



iAZAYLAND St CO. 



U. K. WORKS, 

LONDON, ENG. 



15-25 WHITEHALL STREET, 

NEW YORK 



To Wine Growers, Distillers, Etc. 
Genii eraen : 

We beg to advise having opened 
branch in New York as above, for the sale 
of our Wine Finings, CapUlaire, Spirit 
Colorings, Essences, Preservatives, etc. 

May we ask a trial order, that you 
may prove the EFFICACY, PURITY and ECONOMY 
of our Materials? 

Yours truly, 

W. A. WAYLAND & CO. 



WAYLAND'S WINE FININGS, 

GUARANTEED FREE FROM 

Tv\NNlX, fciA.l.lCVLlC and -VNILINE. 
Keqaire no preparation, are always ready lo use. clarify the choicest descrip- 
tions of wines, als) those of low alcoholic strength. IN NO WAY 
JMPAIK THE WINK. ONCE URILIJAXT, 
PERMANENTLY BRILLIANT. 



MEMORIAL 



Of California \'inegko\veiw and Winemakers Ox 

Tariff LEiiisLATiON. 

Tlie Committee on Tariff Lcgklaiion, appointed at the Viti- 
culiural Convention, held at the San Franei^co Chamber of Com- 
merce, on February lO, 1807, beg leave to submit the following : 

1. While it would appear that tlie pre.sent market value 
of ordinary, unfinished California wines would hardly neces- 
sitate an increase of the existing taritl schedule of thirty cents 
per gallon for dry wines and fifty cents per gallon on alco- 
liolic wine^<, it has been shown and must be conceded, that this 
provision does not alford an adequate jirotection for our Aiiicr- 
ican wine interests against .serious ingrcssions on tiie part of 
our experienced and powerful European competitors. The 
provi-sions are uiKjucstionably discriminating in favor of Eu- 
ropean wines. Our American — especially our California wine 
industry is comparatively young and in'its infant state of de- 
velopment; although many millions of capital arc invested, 
representing tJixablc jiropcrty that did not exist thirty years 
ago. Still, in our tjuarter of a century of exi)crinient;ii labor, 
embittered by disai)i)ointments and strife of keenest ct)Uipeti- 
tion, we have not reached far beyond the first stages of devel- 
opment. In conscfiuence thereof, our ordinary wines are not 
as yet yielding remunerative i>rices for our growers, and leave 
no legitimate profit to the shippers and handlers of these 
wines. (Jut large investments in vineyards, collars, ware- 
houses, cooj>erage, distiillerios, etc., are suil'ering from inade- 
quate and uncertain returns. An equitable or reasonable 
tariff schedule would stimulate the grower to pay better atten- 
tion to the development of liner grades; it would enable him 
to continue his t4<lious and expensive experiments as to .-^oil 
and varietie.s, and would encourage the replanting of fav<ireil 
vinoyanl .sections lately destroyed by phylloxera and uiljir 
discuses or by neglect of cultivation. 

2. The pre-seut schedule ft<lmits dry wines up lo 1 1 de- 
Urces of alcoholic strength at .30 cents per gallon. Natural 
table wine, a.x |)roduced by American growers, onlv shows an 
average Hlrength of 1 U degrees, while reliable statistics on 
natural dry wines in Kuroi)0 indicate considerablv les.s. Tliore- 



I' ii . a 14 per cent, imported dry wine is not a natural j)ro- 
diKt, and may be stretched, by the addition of water in this 
country, to J li per cent., and and .still remain merchantable 
Hence, the proportionate duty on this class of wine is only 2.') 
cents jHT gallon, and not ."JO cents. On alcohulir wines — jiort, 
sherry, etc., the siiecilic duty is oO cents per gallon for wine- 
up to 'lii per cent, alcoholic strength. The general trade ac- 
cepts that 19 jx^r cent, is a merchantable standard for such 
fortified wines. Admitting tliiit a '24 per cent, imported winr 
may be thus reduced U> ID per cent., the actual duty on this 
class of wines is only about 40 cents per gallon, and not -'lO 
cents. The Government admits, tinder these liberal regula- 
tions, an amount of aleohol free of duty, that in any other form 
would 1)0 subject to $1.S0 per jiroof gallon. (Fifty degrees 
ab.solute). A specific duty on wine, therefore, with a mini- 
mum rate, should not be less than the alcoholic contents 
thereof, stipulated as maximum, would have to pay under the 
scliedulo of .spirituous liquors. Thus, a 14 j)er cent, dry wiiie 
(or under), would, at the present taiitf of ^l.sQ for si)irits, yield 
oO cents, aiiil a 24 per cent, fortilied wine (or under) 6(j cents 
per gallon as a sjtecific duty. Our tarilf laws might nithor 
favor the importation of natural wines in glas.s, aad should 
discourage shipments of fortified concoctions useii for blend- 
ing and stretching in this country. 

^. It is generally admitted that the standard of ptii- 
chasiiig power of money in Europe widely dilfers from that in 
the United States. Commodities and luxuries are considera- 
ble cheaper there than they are here. France, Germany. 
England (the latter not a wine producing country, but a for- 
midable consumer) exact a minimum sjiecilie tarilf of about 
25 cents per gallon on bulk wines, and more on wines in 
cases. Considering the standard of money values — necessi- 
ties and labor being corresi)ondingly lower in Europe — our 
tarilf on wine does not appear to be proportionately equal to 
the general tariff on wines in European countries. The dif- 
ference in value should be taken in consideration in the 
United States, where a propoitionately higher protection 
would simply support our higher standard of labor. Twenty 
five cents buys a good deal more in Europe than it does in 
the United States: lience we argue that duties on wines are 
comparatively higher there than here. 

4. We call attention to the fact that while our ordinary 
grades are not exactly stimulated under a low tariff system, 
our finer grades of mtitured old wines are actually placeil at 
a disadvantage under our present regulations. European 
wines can be landed in trade centres of the United States and 
jirofitiibly sold at 70-75 cents (if stretched as indicateil above 
to 11 J pit' cent, for 60 cents jier gallon), while our selected 
Califoniiii vintages, carefully handled and well matured, uilli 
ejpenxive eooperage imported from the Kaxicrn Stales, and higher 
freight to our trade center.^ than icines /shipped from Europe are 
unable to compete with these prices. They are unable to com- 
pete hy reason of mercantile impossibility, and also by rea.'^oii 
of prejudice and preference given fo European wines by bulk 
consumers, who ate principally Europeans and easily inclined 
to discriminate tigainst American wines. 

5. In view of all this we submit that a specific duty of 
^0 cents for dry and 50 cents for fortilied wines is an inade- 
quate i>rotection for our homo product. It will not stiinulati' 
better results in viticulture, it will not stimulate the praise- 
worthy aspiration of producing higher grades of wines 
that estidilisho<l the protitidilo reputtitions of European wine 
countiies and will keep our young industry struggling for- 
ever to gain national recognition. If our finer varieties ar<' 
not recognized and sustained by reasonable ]irotoclioii, whore 
cost of jiroiluelion and yielil iiiiikes them worth twice iis mtich 
iis ordinary wines, the .Americiin vintner will be eompelled to 
cheek his praiseworthy ambition for high-gra<le wines, and 
and will bo doomed lo jiroduco ordinary grape juice, while 
our wine drinkers will sujiport the label with the earmark ol 
l--uropean i,-ountries and will a.«sist in reducing the surjilus of 
other wine coinitriesto the detriment, loss and humiliation of 
(jur own. 

(j. We need and desire no prohibitive tarilf protection 



f/cSlfie WiJME /rJND SflR_IT PREVIEW. 



15 



as class legislation, but we consider it sound national ecou- 
oniy to place American wines on a eonipetitivo level with ICu- 
roiiean products. Wlmsoever cliooses to discriminate ajraiiist 
us is tree to do so ; at the same time he can well ali'oid to pav 
a lejjitimate dilt'erence tor the support of tlio governnient (if 
our country. This generally comes from the purses of I lie 
rich and well to do, while the great rank and file of our wine 
consumers are unpiejudiced supporters of our home indus- 
tries. 

". We trust to the wisdom and fair-minded considera- 
tion of our government, that it may prevent the ajiplication 
of the principles of reciprocity against the great interests of our 
fruit products, Iveciprocity, in fact, has never been intended 
to apply to products that can be grown on American soil. To 
further open our markets to Kurojiean wines under a plea of 
reciprocity or under any otiier pretext would be a serious blow 
to our industry and a most singular violation of the protective 
programme of the present administration. 

While attention may be paid to the extention of recipro- 
city principles, President McKinley declares in liis inaugural 
address: ••That the end in view shaulil aliciv/s be the opening up 
of new markets for tlie products of our country by granting con- 
cessions to the products of other lands that wc need and cannot 
produce ourselves and which do not involve any loss of labor to 
to our own people." 

The intelligent interpretation of the principles of judici- 
ous reciprocity should fully insure us against measures detri- 
mental to our American wine industry. 

Submitted by Charles Bundschu 
Approved by H. W. Ckai-.b, Chairman 

" JonX SWETT 

" Percy T. Morgan 
" P. C. Rossi 

Committee. 
Akfad Hakaszthv, President N'iticultural College. 
WiSFiELD Scott, Secretary. 
San Francisco, March 8, 1897' 



JOHANNIS. 



We cannot recall a brand which paved its way more 
rapidly into general popularity than Johannis Natural Etl'er- 
vescent Mineral Water. It was the only water at the inaug- 
uration ball and festivals, and was in fact the only beverage 
that was printed on the menu. All the banquets and festi- 
vals in New York city this winter have had Johannis exclu- 
sively, but the inauguration being an event of national im- 
portance crowns the .Johannis as the king of mineral waters 
and is the highest tribute to its merits. — Mida's Criterion. 



BUDD TURNED ON FRENCH. 



Governor Budd has soured on Henry French the Arch- 
Prohibitionist of San Jose and has turned him out of the 
Normal School Directorate. Mr. French made a hopeless race 
for Governor at the time Budd was running and solicited 
votes for him. Hence the removal. 



Imports and Exports 

DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



EXPORTS OF WINE. 



TO NEW YORK— Via Panama— Pek St«. S. S. ACAPULCO, March 1, 1897. 



DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


Packaobs. 


GALLONS. 


VALUE. 


Jncksonville, Fla 


St. George v. Co 


Ibiirrcl, 8hf 

(i barrels, 1 lif 

8 barrel. I lif 

•J66 barrels 


272 
82* 
41^ 

13,0/! 
Wi 

10,600 
62 
621 
166 


( 186 

81 




A. Cuneo 


IW 

4,178 

28 




Cal Wine .Association 

UerinKer Bros 




New York 


lilO barrels 


2,'J24 






40 


t'liioiiville. N. Y 




liO 








43 










25.8fi2 


$7,783 









TO CENTRAI, AMERICA-Pbr Str. SAN BLAS, March 10, 1897. 





Wet more-Bo wen Co 

Giindlnrh-n Wine Co 




»2V 
2<8 
1S« 


139 


Sail Jose de Guatemala 


!f barrels, 5 halt 


San J de Guatemala Oown iii*;tiilprip«j Cn 




30 




UraunschwfiKer&Co 

C Schilling & Co . 







46 


Puutas Arenas 


20 half barrels 


636 


314 




Italian-Swiss Colony 

Cal. Wine Association 

T. I.. Koster 


86 


" 


1 half barrel 


27 
103 
103 


9 
86 


San J de Guatemala.. . . 




17 




11 


Total— 20 cases 








1,796 


$1,023 





TO 


JAPAN AND CHINA— Per S. 


S. CHINA, March i 


1897 














5Sl 

760 


t 46 

69 


Kobe 


Cal. Wine Association 








240 










40 








257 


87 




alam 


I - ^ 






Tot 


ount 


n cases and 




1,412 


$481 



TO NEW YORK— Via PANAMA— Per S. S. SAN BLAS, March 10, 1897. 



New York. 


I.achman & Jacobi 

Cal. Wme Association. .. 

|F. Chevalier& Co 




12,904 
8,760 
4.280 
2,611 


$3,708 

2,408 

1,683 

763 






Cleveland 


70 barrels, 30 half. . . 










Total, 10 cases and. 










28,609 


$8,602 



TO CENTRAI, AMERICA— Per S. S. ACAPULCO. March 1, 18S7. 



Champerico 

San J de Guatamala.. 

La Libertad 

Acajutla 

La Libertad 

San J de Guatamala.. 



La Libertad 

Coriuto 

Panama 

San J de Guatamala.. 



C. M. Mann 

I>- Mencariui 

Baruch .S: Co 

Lachman & Jacobi. 



Gaddeni'& Ciocco 

Gundlach-Bund. W. Co 



Cal. Wine Assn. 



Corinto . 



Champerrico 

La Libertad 

San J de Guatamala-. 
Corinto 



La Libertad 

San J de Guatamala. 



C. Schilling 14 Co. 



Wetinore, Bowen Co. . 



01 kegs 

24 barrels 

16 barrels 

8half bbls 

4 barrels 

20 barrels, 10 kegs.. 

66 cases 

10 half bbls 

4 faair,3 kegs 

101 casks 

:10 cases 

2 barrels 

24 cases 

.'>7 half, 21 kegs 

29 barrels 

20 cases 

10 bbls, 8 hi, 30 kegs 

M cases 

2 barrels, 10 kegs.... 

40 cases 

28 barrels. 21 kegs.. 
20 kegs 



768 
321 
409 



378 

140 

6,140 



1,700 
1,626 



Total— 194 cases. 



1,742 
20O 



17,175 



29J 

304 

306 

98 

137 

381 

303 

83 

86 

1,860 

8« 

60 

84 

789 

610 

6S 

402 

72 

102 

ll'l 

1,06J 

106 

$7,218 





TO TAHITI- Pee Brig Galilee, March I, 1897. 






Papeete 


I. K. Thayer 


2 barrels 

UK) bbls.. Shf bbls .. 


107 
GDI 






2,100 


« 


Samuel Hros. & Co 

B. E. Ayer 










•< 






27 












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iG 



f/r(Blfie WipjE /^J\D Sflf^lT f^EVlEVv 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO DOMESTIC PORTS. 
Pioni March lia to IHIi, \mi. 



FROM NEW YORK VIA PANAMA-Peh StU. SaN BI.AS. Mareh ttb, !«»;. 



slllPPIUiS. 

Aoapi.Uo J«ck«on»III^Hiirr.lstCt«ti«rc«i!T7 



PACKACI ^ 

llhair barref. 





1 ..--"'_ 


no 



6 barrels wiue from Kurope. lOrdcrmark'** <|^^ 

5 bam-Is prune juice jnank of California 

M i-.-iMs wine H. S<iiuUrlcilfr 

2fi cases Itrnndy I^usis Taus<«iK & Co. . 

17 caM-H wiiic R. l-a»trucho 

4 barrrU wine. . " 

leases li(]uor!i I-*, ft Heller 



EXPORTS OF MISCELLANEOUS LIQUORS. 



EXPORTS OF WHISKY. 



From March Ist U) ISlh. S897. 



From March I si to I8th. 1897. 



DESTINATION. 



Acapuico . 



Cot into 

iPMnama ... 

>-'■" I '!-Guat'lB.. 

■ TJCO 

I ma 

^ Wii 



WilracrdinK. I.. Co 
Crown DiHtillcricsCo 



•' ShnnKhnc. 

Alnmedfl Sydney. ... 

Manillas Panama 

-an J d<r Guat'la.. . HraunschwticfrvS:Co 

Wni. Wolff S: Co 

Iji I.ibcilad Spruance. S,&Co.... 



PACKAGKS. 


GALLONS. 


VKLUB. 


2cnS'S 

Wcasrs 

?4 casts 




8 2i 
2211 
2V8 

B77 


Jy cn<M;s 




2K4 


15 cases 

a bands 

.?b;irrfls 

100 cases 


iii 

111 


ir.6 
SOI 
ICl 
900 






299 


lao cas-s 

1 barrels 


»'< 


976 
2SI 



Tola! amount <?9 cases and 



apulco . 



China.... 

S.'in Illas . 



DKSTIKATION. 



SIIII-PKBS. 



I-ACKAGBS AITD 
CONTKNTS. 



Paoama Pac. Mails. S. Co C cases chainpaenc . 

" I " cases Kin 

Snn Jile(^>untntnnla Crownl>istilleriesCo. 1 half tkarre! rum.. . 

Yokahnnia Pac. Mail S S. Co .. 4 cases champagne. 

I<iuiqui, Chile Khcinstrom llroa.... lease litjuors 



Tola! 17 cases, etc 



?J 
lis 
40 
M 

10 



EXPORTS OF BEER. 



From March 1st to isth, 1897. 



*4.354 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO FOREIGN PORTS. 



Prom MarchMst to Ifith, 1897. 



Acapulco . 



DESTINATION. 


SmpPEKS. 


PACKAGES. 


GALLONS. 


VALVI:. 


San JdcGuat'Ia... 

Total - 2 cases 


GuodlachB. W. Co.. 




20 







•■JO 



VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SBIPPKHS. 


PACKACIfS AND 
CONTENTS. 


VALITE. 


Galilee 


Tahiti 

San Jose de Guat.. 

Champerico 

Acajutla 


B. E. Aycr . ; 


I I)bl bottled 


«,V: 


Acapulco 




W casks bottled 

160 boxes " 

20 ", " 

10 casks " 1 

6 casks " ( 

fi casks " 

GO sixths bulk 

15 cases bottled 


S. K. Breweries Ud.. 

Buffalo B. Co 

S. F. Breweries, Ltd.. 

Wetmore Bowen Co.. 
Buffalo Brewing Co... 
S. F. Breweries 

Allen it I.^wis 


lo:; 
lUl 


Alameda 


I^aUbertad 

Sydney 

Apia 

.San Jose de Guat.. 

I^ Ubertad 

Pnntas Arenas 

Khului 


110 


San Bias 


5 cases bottled 

14 •• '■ 

30 " " 

ficasks " 


40 




"S 

l:'.r. 


Lurline 


4 cases " 


IM 



MISCELLANEOUS WINE EXPORTS. 



From March 1st lo leth, 1697. 



Total C3 cases, 107 casks, 1 barrel and 180 boxes battled, 58 sixths bulk.... 



DBSTINATION. 



Acapulco . 
Queen 



Walla Walla. 



Victoria 



. Nelson 

I Vancouver. . 
Acapulco . . . 
i.u>a..<— Victoria* — 



SHIPPERS. 



PACKAGES. GALLONS. VALCE. 



O. F.T.Co Wkegs... 

Gundlncb. B W.Co.. U barrels. 

P. M. .S S. Co '31 cases.. 

Pac. Trans. Co. 1 kcK 

C. Shilling & Co barrels . 

Bach. M. & Co 1 barrel... 

Cuniilach, I). W. Co.. 2 barrels. 
Italian Swiss Colony, ^barrels.. 
M. L.ichteusteiu Abarrels... 



Total amount nl cases and. 



aoo 
an 



12 
106 

47 

loe 

259 



],09l> 



IMPORTS OF WINES AND LIQUORS BY SEA. 



FROM UVERPOOI.— Per British Ship Seafarer, March 3d, 1897. 



$100 
90 



PACKAGE AND CONTENTS. 



8 '2S cases whi.sky... 

™ iVO cases spirits 

24 1106 cases l>ecr 

69 1 00 cases whisky. . 

*7 J4 hogsheads ale ■ . . 



CONSIGNEES. 



W. II. Campbell.. 



117 



Goldlierg Ilowen&Co.. 
Bank of II. N. A 



SSIST 



FROM \^CTORIA— Ppjt Str. Umatilla, March 8th, 1897. 



I'ROM NEW YORK— Per Ship Iroqi-ois. March 1st, 1697. 



, 1 38 cases whisky | Order marked ^p]> • 



C. 1*. Mt.ornian S: Co 1 100 barrets whisky. 

Live Oak nislilling Co 67 barrels whisky. . 

J. A. Burke . .^Ibarrcls whisky... 

Meinhold .S: Heineman ! 85 cases cider 



A. Holaling {<: Co 

Order 

J. A. Burke 

Sbcn%'ood jfc Sherwcod. 



PROM AVKI.AND, N. 7..— Pick Str. Zkaiampia, March Is'. 1897. 



i » cases i»hisky, | J. n. Sfrcckels & Broa. Co.. 



SHERWOOD asa SHERWOOD,' 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

Stocks of our Agency Goods for s.ilc in bond and duty paid at 
212-214 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 24- N FRONT STREET. PORTLAND, OR. 

216 N. MAIN ST. EET, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS FOR 

"Keijsiouc anoiiottrniu iliie" and "(Old Saratoga" -Tho Finest Eastern Rye. 

.MOET A: CIIANUO.N Champagiio. K.SCHIO.N' AUKK & COS CMiimts and -Santernos. MACKICNZI K, .t Co '« Spanish .Shon-ioB mid I'oit, 

HUNT HO(J\'K 'VKAiiK ic CO. Cased Ports. A. UOU'PMAN &; CO's Holland Ciii. K & .1. HUKKIO S Nonparoil Old Tom (iin. 

K. .V i. HUKKIC'S minih •odo.rnkirk s«uk. L.WVSON'S Liiiuoiif Soot.'h WliisUy. HtlltKKS Ufnnossy Brandy and Dry (iin. 

IIASS IIATCLIKF ii GKETTON, Ltd.— Bans CI.K.N'M VKT S.-otcli WhibUy in Wood. SC1I1.IT/. .MilwMiik.yj Hlht tlio ••I'ilsi-iioi" and 

■' ■ "■ ' .InlM.KS Slon.- .\lo in Illids. and Mf Illid.s. l.i-lil SparUline, also .Schlilz in Wood. 

S »4n' lU iBd Dablia Porur (ODIIIESS M lO 1 N I lol , I IS .\nfliiir Uraiid X.-w York Cldor ROSS' Hidfast (;i n(r,.r Alo Club Soda oli'. 
I, Ut Jsm kr.»). IIIONK WArKIOSMA .Mineral Waloi-. "CLUB COCKTAILS." KVANS ili'idson A I.- 

I'LLI.^CUAIAN.N S UOYALTY GLV. 

Kok^kam, GkR-stlkv .V Co., Pim.ADEi.PliiA, I'iriiR WuisKiF.s— "Mascot. ■■ "Roiiis' Moon," "O. V. S."ani) "Private StoiK." 

/■'iiir't Ciiiittiliiin ICf/f nitisKii iilntlrrhniii .( M/ir/.i. I.l'il. I'liri'iiln. Cnniihi'. Ilollltui I'mfrr CorernnirttI Siii>rrrisiitii. 

UlC-IMl'Oin i:n t MI.ICK'A \ H IIISI\li:s CirliHir nninlmn. Si»i»ii SI, •St:. .s;t. ';><): llorsrii lli/r: O.r.C: SpriiKjhill 

H'. II. Mrltrif/rr: lleriiiiliifif ; M. I'. Mmiiiri'i , liiiilini.jiChih; Mellwoml , M<itliii<jly ; Chlrkenrork ; K. (\ Herri/ 

unit iithrr Httiiiihiril liniinln. 

ALSO AGENTS FOR NAPA VALLEY WINE COS WINES AND BRANDIES IN CASES. CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES IN WOOD 



pyVeiflC; W\,NE /rJND SflF^IT PREVIEW. 



IT 



WHISKY AND SPIRIT TO SAIM FRANCISCO. 

I'roiu March Isl lo IMh. 1897. 

COfYKIGIITUD. 



CONSICNEKS. 


SPIRl Hi 




win 


SKY 




RUM. 

Bbls. 


«IN. 


Bbis 1 Cases. 


Obis iH Bbls. Kegs. 




Cases. 


Crown Distilleries Co. . . 


273 
130 
















Jones, MuiKly it Co. ... 
































1 


ICO 
TO 


N 










Livin^-'lon & Co. ... ' 




S 




















370 
MO 


100 


t9 








341 


Christy N: Wise i 
















4S 














80 






' 






















100 
60 
G 
tl 
B 





























Thco. Cicr Co., Oakland. 































G. Cohn Co 




















3 

•J 

5 

1 
2 
1 
1 





























































































S I.e%*y 
















































• 747 


lOSl 


409 


154 




6 




241 



BEER IMPORTS BY RAIL. 
From Febraary 1st to 16th, IHil". 

COPYRIGHTED. 



CONSIGNEES. 


HOTTLED. 


BULK. 


Cases. 


Casks. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


H BbIs.;li,Bb Is. 


Kegs. 






to 
■■■ico" 


■'"so" 


10 
4J 


10 

20 


""ib" 


6j 


Royal Haglc Distilleries Co 


""ioo" 




Hilbert Bros 
























































Total 


lOO 1 198 


TO 


65 


»l 1 30 


60 



IMPORTS PER RAIL IN BOND. 



^ 1'. Co \'2 cases wine . 



, I Collector of Port . 



DEPARTME.^T STORES. 



The proprietors of three of the hxrgest department stores 
of this city were treated to a decidedl\- disagreeable surprise 
a few days ago. Mr. F. M. Charlton, of the law firm of Charl- 
ton & Copeland, swore out warrants against the following 
firms: Siogol, Cooper i^' Co., for handling counterfeit Maitel 
brandy: Frank Bros., for selling counterfeit "Three Star" iien- 
nessy , tiilka Kuminel, and Old Pepper Whisky; A. M. Roth- 
sciiild & Co., for selling imitation (lilka Kummel, and Sim- 
mons & Co., for selling spurious ''Three Star" Hennessy. All 
tlie defendants were placed under arrest and gave bonds for 
their ai)pcarances. The first case tried was that against 
Siegel, Cooper & Co., and it is needless to say created quite a 
a sensation. 

FR.\UDULENT IMITATIONS RAIDED. 

Since the abovt; was in type a raid has been made on 
on two houses in Chicago, who have evidently conducted the 
business of counterfeiting brands on a wholesale scale. 

If there are other similar concerns in this or any other 
city \\<- hope they will be rrleutlessly rooted out. 



'I'lie following extract from the daily press appearing on 
l'"eb. 2(), will prove interesting reading. 

Writs were issued by Justice V. S. Hoggs against the K. 
W. Davis Drug Company, No. 2:V2 Kinzie street, .said to be 
controlled by "iMiUer Bro.s."; Ciiarles Klyman, No. 232 Iviuzie 
street; and the Martini(iue Company, No. I'JO Van Buren 
street. They were served on the Kinzie street concerns bv 
the constable of Justice Boggs' court, accompanied by Attor- 
neys Charlton and Copeland, who rcjiresent tiie firms that are 
pro.secuting the light in Chicago against the sale of counter- 
feit liquors. 

Large bundles of labels ready lo be jjasted on bottles of 
alleged "Old Pepper " whisky, Gilka's "getreidc kummel," 
Angostura bitters, Ilenne.ssy's "three star brandy," and Marlcll 
cognac wore caj>tured and carried off to the justice's court, and 
evidence of a nourishing bu.siness in the manufacture and 
di.sposal of imitation goods was obtained, it is alleged, at the 
Kinzie street concerns. 

The Martinique Company could not be found. Its base- 
ment "rectifying" and bottling establishment. No. 190 Van 
Buren street, and its office in the Commercial Building, De;ii- 
born and Randolph streets, were both Ibund vacant and there 
were no signs to indicate whither the concern had been re- 
moved, if it is siill in existence, 

George M. Colby, one of those connected with the Marti- 
nique Company, is under indictment for counterfeiting the 
"Canadian Club" label of Iliram Walker, Sons & Co., of 
Walkcrville, Out. 

The search warrants were issued for the purpose of gath- 
ering corroborative evi<lence against firms which are charged 
with selling imitation Gilka's "getrcide kummel," Booth's "Old 
Tom " gin and IIennes.sy's brandy. Cases are pending against 
A. M. Rothschild & Co., for selling alleged imitation kummel, 
against Frank Bros., for selling alleged "Old Tom" gin, kum- 
mel, and Hennessy's brandy, and against the Simmons Com- 
pany for disposing of Hennessy brandy. 

In the basement of the Davis company were found bar- 
rels and boxes of empty bottles and cases which had once 
contained Angostura bitters, Benedictine liqueur, Hennessy 
and Martell brandies, and "Old Tom" gin, supposed to have 
been purchased from junk dealers and saloonkeepers. 

In the roomy quarters on the first floor employes were 
engaged in washing bottles, pasting on fresh labels, and pack- 
ing cases ready for shipment. A large stock of goods in- 
tended for shipment was found. "Skeleton" cases of Angos- 
tura bitters were ob.served ready for the liquor to V)e poured 
in, the cases being declared to be counterfeits. There were 
bottles with counterfeit .1. A. Gilka kummel lables on them 
which were being lilled with a fluid in close imitation of 
the color and taste of the genuine. Packages of labels were 
confiscated. 

In the establishment on the second floor, which is run 
under the name of Charles Klyman, operatives were labeling 
and filling bottles of alleged vermouth, and cases and bottles 
of .Vnu-ostura, Hennessy, "Old Tom" and Martell go< <1<. under 



4( 



PERFECTION" 



'k\<>^m^qi^ 



PRUNEX JUICE 

RC6IS \ TC0CD 

\M.HAH]V&CV 

NEW YORK 



MARTIN ERLENBACH, 

PACIFIC COAST AGENT 

404 Sacramento St . San Fr.Tncl8C0, Cal. 



(THE STANDARD) 



TURKISH PRUNE JUICE 

I.. «.iii.iiiltil :i i I K1-. 1-ki 11 i-;.MK.\CI. uli. If 1. 1111111, Mini pnrls art- 
so petlectly blended that its actiuu, u^cd as proportioned, on every 
description of spirits, such as UR.VNDV, KU.M, CIN and particularly 
WHISKY, is truly wonderful. It FISK-, ITRirii;3, MEIXOWS 
and otherwise CKNKK.XLLV IMl'ROVKS Ion remarkable degree. 

•■I'ERFECTION' TfKKISII PRCNK JCICE is an article which can- 
not be judged by its taste or bon(|iiet, it must Ix.- Mended with the 
spirits in wood to prove its value. Samples and information regarding 
proportion to use, etc., will be gladly furnished by cither our Agent or 
oursclvo. 

The advantage of giving Immature spirits, 
IN A VERY SHORT TIIVIE, the character of 
age, antd thereby greatly increasing their 
value, is obvious. 



PRUNeY JUICE 

\M HAHN&Cey 

NEW YORK 



M. HAHN & CO,, 

•OLC HANuracTuncn* 

125 Wafer Street, New York. 



18 



/ytSlflG WljslE jfk^Q SflF^IT f^EVlEW 



WINE AND BRANDY OVERLAND, 

During the Month of Februiry, 1897 Showin^r Destination and Points of Shipment. 

(()i'Kl('l.\l> FKilltli.S.) 



TO 


BRAND r 1 


WINK j 


FROM 


jiRAxny. 


WINE. 


Cases. 


Gallons. 


Cases. 


Gallons. 


Casss. 
105 


Gallons. 


Cases. 


Gallons. 








4 
8 
149 
5 
6 
10 
23 

3 

3 

3 

16U 

11 

4 


10 ■ 

664 

135697 

95 


San I'runciseo 


19365 


1372 


342042 


Othor New KnglaDd points 


"so 

3 


5 
9047 
2545 


t>aklatul 


114 


^lartint-'z 








is: 


OliK-r N Y. uud N. J. pta.. 










*'48 


Kivorint)re 






1 
12 


10688 




1 

3 


305 

20 
lOO 


2537 
183 

3135 
166 






70 


18229 


Other Pennsylvauia po-ots 

Washington," I) *^^* 

Virginia uiul Maryland pts 


Santa Clara 




108 
U6 


Mountain \'iew 





2 

1 


2455 






1 Los (Jiilos 

Santa Cruz 

Stockton 


.... 


406 


Geortjia and Carolina, pis. 
Now Orlfuns 








11)2 


10 


60 


261869 

145 

2784 

12687 

62 

1817 

5203. 

114 

.".169 

2960 

4698 

24 

2428 




52 
2400 


2616 






Hirminghain.. 










HI 70 




, 


2565 












2570 


Kort Worth 


2o 


250 
25 


205 
80 
13 

202 
22 
77 




\ 


».j65 


Sacramento 


9 


.335 

90 

100 


126 


1110 






Napa 


3826 






1071 
112 


Oakvillo 




60117 


Other Texas points 




Kutherford 




27 SO 
11640 








St. Helena 




1 
1 


72-50 


Louisville 





377 


6 

25 



16 
1 
4 
167 
9 
6 

'""i*3 

12 

29 

8 

2 


Barro 

1 Cordelia .. 

1 Calistoga 

Santa Uosa 






2451 
38 


Cincinnati 




1726 
583 


16470 
4593 

36 

3655 ! 

110 

40998 

170 

51S5 

2677 

109 

8982 

9978 

68 

90 

]39 

80 

477 

2616 

442 

320 

15634 

4265 

5741 

6171 

5643 

1497 

7609 
10 




10 


3 


1.58 






lOOfio 




6 






13160 




100 


Geyserville 




1 


2515 








1465 


53 

4 

101 

' ' 1 


40.i46 


Chicago 

OthfT Illinois noints. 




1999 


Auburn 

Woodland. . . 




32 

27 












110 

3774 

172 


33 


Alilwaiikee 




10 

630 

1077 


\'ina 

Los Angeles 

Col ton 

' Santa Barbara 


■'e 


5620 


Other Wisconsin points.. . . 




9246 






5235 






25 


Other Missouri points 

Other Iowa noints 


1 








129 


35 


Anahoini 


25 
54 


i 


56 


St Paul 




Santa Ana . 




32 








6 








Otht*r T^Iinnesota Points 






1 










(Jinaha ... 




387 
54 


6 
20 

3 
53 
21 
140 
63 
77 

1 

1 












Other Nebraska points 


4 

3 






















1234 
330 

1252 
568 
499 


1 










Other Colorado points 

T'tah I-'oints 


14 

16 
2 
2 




1 
























Montana and Idaho pts. . . 






































Rowland 












1 . . .. 


Germany 




50 




.... 




.!!JiC 




























Total 


120 


28028 


1670 


.'584212 


Total'.'.'.".'. ...'.'. 


120 


2S028 


1679 


.V842I2 



WlbblAIVI WObFF & CO. 

Importers and General Agents, 

327-329 Market Street, - - - San Francisco, Cal. 



MliSSKii. moi;t He f.IlANDON, Kpksnav, ciuinpaRnc, 

While !k«1 M'randc Cuvccl Jirut Inipcrinl 
JOHANNIB I,K, lollAXMs, Klliif of .S'ntiirnl Tabic Wnlcrn. 
MI1S.SHS. CA.STkLI.L, At COCIIKAN).:. lll'.l.l<Asr, (lltlKcr 

Ale. 
M|J,~i(-, I .v 1 M il' I ] I I (V,f.ii«c-Morl<:ll llrnlidy. 
M: ' ' ' 'S'S. I.Tii .Wai-klkvillk, 

M . O., KolMilui.ii, Scotch 

ni DIBTIU.I'.RA CO., LTD., (Win. JanicMO 

Mil. Irlih WhUky. 
MICsbRs. J..IIN iikKUVI'KK A sn.V, RnmaiOAH. Gin 
MK. ). A. GIIJIA, lIKJU.l.H, l.llka Kuiiimcl (k bckau. 



— T^CEINTS FOR- 

MHssRs. riKJU'iio \voi,i."i;s SON <t co., sciiikimm, 

Aruiiinlifitic Si'liimppH. 
M|.>SkS. Ki!ai> IIRMS . I.iiNlKiN, The "I>og'« Hcail" Hot. 

tltiiK (if c.iiiiincKs' Stout and Units' Ale. 
UAKTMOI.OMAV IIRHWINC. CO., RoClliatTKK, N, Y. 

KnItlccrlKHker Ilrcr. 
M|.>SRS. Dl'llOS I'RHKHS, lIciHliKArx, Clarcl. and Sou- 

tcrncii. 
MI',SSRS I>i;iNIIARn «l on . Ci«m.l'.NTr, Rhine and Muiille 

Wliic. 
MR. 1'. CMAl'VKNHT, NnTS, CoTll D'0«, nuriiiitldy \Vinc«. 
MKS-SKS MORC'.AN BROS., I'UKKTo tii: Saxta Mahia, 

Shcrrir*. 
WIUOW HARMONY, 1-uerto dc Santa Maria, Shirrlca. 



TltK ROYAL WINK CO., Ol-ORTo, fori Wine«. 
Mi;sSRS. Y/.AC.IIRRH ft CO , Ricrs. rarraKona \Vliic». 
Till; RDYAl. IH'NT.ARIAN I-.OVICRNMHNT WINl-: CEI. 
I.ARS. UrnAl'lsT. lliiiiKnrinii Wine*. 

rsiiioKH AND oTiiiiK <;i:rman iii:i:ks 

MR. TIII-:i) l,,\ri'l.;. Ni i-niKTi nim»hv, .\roinati(|iie lli'trt.. 
MK. marnikr i.Arosroi.i.i.;, skim; kt iiibk, fhan. i 

c.riiiKl Mnriilcr 
M1.>SKS i: CrSKN'li:R.|.II„'iAINI.: (t co. T^H\*, Cordial. 
ANI>RI-;\SSAXI.1IINHR. llriiAI'KHT.IIllliyadi Jallo. Nalma 

-Xliericnt W'lilrr 
MK. JOIIANN MARIA I'AHINA. Cm o<:m . <;ri!ciiuil«i dmi 

Juclichnplatt, Cologne, Ivau dc ColoKiie. 



Re-hnporfeil Amrrinin WhlHUlrn,—'f>.(i Exrolkii r; S|.r. '89 Hello rf Nflac.n; Spring '90 Old Cranl Dad; Iliinic; Mnvfii-li'; O. K. C ; Cliickcncock an! 
.■Ihcr Ht iplc lirunda. I.awoit iiiiirkcl <niolulioi!» fiiinmluil on n|>|ilicaliun, lo lliv wli»lv«iile Irnilo only. 



f/ceifie WIJ^E /flMD SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 



19 



iilleged counterfeit labels, were seen ready for the consumer. 

Old labels were being washed oft' Angostura bottles and fifty 
clean and empty bottles of the same shape of Angostura were 
standintr in a row rcadv lor lilling,— J/A/a's Crileriou. 



NEW YORK CORRESPONDENCE. 



New Yokk, March l;i, ISHV. 

There is but little of interest to record occuring in the 
wine and licjuor trade in this part of tlieeouiitry. Business is 
exceedingly quiet in all branches of the trade, but there are 
many reasons why such is the case. The uncertainty regaiVung 
tarilf legislation has a depressing effect on the importers, as 
well as all lines of business and local causes contribute largely 
to the depression which generally exists in the liquor trade of 
tbis State. The Legislature at Albany is again juggling with 
the excise laws and contemplate amending the Raines Law 
which is already responsible for a most disgraceful condition 
of atl'airsin the saloon trade. It lias given ri.se to more sub- 
terfuge and dishonest evasion than any lii^uor legislation ever 
placed upon the statute books of any state In fact the evils of 
the system have become so jdain that the respectable element 
of the trade are willing to submit to further infrnigements on 
their rights by the addition of further restrictions to the Bill 
if it will only result in the abolisiiment of the many dives 
flourishing under the guise of Rainers Law Hotels. In the 
meantime they are waiting and are not liuying any more stock 
than is necessary for the current needs of their trade. They are 
not hunting for any new business and looking closely after 
collections with a very short period of time allowed on pur- 
chases even to their regular trade, a condition that cannot 
but help to curtail traile very materially. 

Kentucky whiskies show no improvement and small sales 
are the rule with prices still ruling low. The trade herewith 
very few exceptions all express themselves much pleased over 
tbe passage of the Bottling-in-Bond Bill and think it will aid 
ill great degree the sale of many of Kentucky's famous brands 
and likewise be an incentive to the family trade buyers which 
will ultimately drive out all but the straight whiskies from the 
fine grocery and family .store trade. 

Eastern Ryes share in the general dullness in tbe trade 
and transactions are exceedingly limited in volume, although 
prices on standard brands are being fairly well maintained by 
the holders of goods. 

The California wine business is quiet. A\'bile there is a 
steady movement of goods through regular channels the in- 
dividual purchases are small and confined to the immediate 
wants of tlie purchaser. Prices arc .somewdiat weaker and show 
the unsatisfactory condition of aflairs prevailing. There are 
few receivers of California wines who are not W'illing to make 
concessions to induce trade, within a reasonable fitrure. One 



disturbing feature in the market is the regular auction sales 
of Calilbrnia w'ine.s. If experience teaches anything, it should 
the misguiilcd producers, who consign their goods to these 
.sales to be slauglitered at prices which do not begin reimburse 
them tor tbe cost of producing and carrying their wines, to sell 
to the regular trade. These sales wliile tbe}' do not amount 
to a great deal in the aggreate a7?!oi(/(/ of stock sold, disturb 
the balance of trade between the regular dealer ami his cus- 
tomer and so att'ect the stability of the market price of wines. 

There have been considerable outside lots of sweet wine 
offereil of late at figures below tbe corporation prices when 
freight, etc., ex{R'nses are (onsidered and in a measure demor- 
alized the market although price cutting has not been of start- 
ling proportions as yet. 

California Brandies are quiet and trade is confined to 
small lots for immediate use in bulk of sales. 

Mr. Max (ioldsebmidt of (loldschmidt Bros, of Los An- 
geles, California, was a visitor in tbis city last week. 

The U. S. Internal Bonded Warehouses here are engaged 
in a quiet game of bidding against each other to secure the 
goods brought to this market and the reduction of rates made 
by one was promptly met by the other, all of which 1)rings joy 
to the heart of tbe Califirnia Brandy producer, who has brainly 
to store in this city. 

W. A. Gkft. 

TRADE CIRCULARS. 

Fkom L. Gaxdolfi & Co. 



Nkw Yokic, March 1, 1.S97. 

Dear Sir: — The following are our importations during 
the fortnight ending P^ebruary 27, 1897. 

Per S. S. Kaiser Wilhelm 11—100 bags Italian rice;S.B. 
Porfume brand; 8 barrels Vermouth, (iancia & Co., brand. 

Per S. S. Champagne — 13 cases Kirschwasser, Ullman& 
Meyer. 

Per Ship A. G. Ropes — 400 barrels Tipo Chianti, Italian- 
Swiss Colony. 

Per S. S. Ems — 100 cases Extra Olive Oil, Francesconi 
17 baskets Parmesan cheese, Palazatti brand; 30 barrels Pied- 
mont wines, Gancia brand; ;!U cases assorted Naples wines, P. 
Scala brand; 2 cases Centerba (100 herbs) Hyerommis. 

Yours truly, 

L. G.VNDOLFI it Co. 



Fkom W. A. Taylor & Co. 



The Devonshire Sloe Gin. This is the most favorite 
liquer, now produced, and is made from ripe fresh-picked 
Sloes, gathered by the farmers in England. It is superior to 



RICHARD HELLMANN 



H. G. HELLMANN 



HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 

IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
525 FRO/ST 5TREET, - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



. . . PACIFIC COAST AGENTS FOR . . . 

KRUG & CO., REIMS, PRIVATE CUVEE CHAMPAGNE 



J. PE:{K1I;K PILS a CU., Chalons 8 Marnc. I Imnipjgne 

A1)RIEN' i.\: FILS, Kpernay — — Chauifiagne 

KdRRESTKK & CO., Xerez dc )a Frontera Sherries 

GARVEY i"c CH>.. _ _ _ .Sherries 

OFFLK'.', CRAMP & FORRESTKR. Oporto, Port Wines 

ULANKENFIKV.M & NoLET, Rottrnlam, Union Gin 
H. LECIiAT. R. Pllll.lPPi-: A CirEE.^E, X.intt-s, Snrdines 

DUBLIN DISTILLERS' CO., Lfd.. Dublin, Irish Whisky 

E. RKMY MARTIN & CO., Kouillic, — Cognacs 

P. FRAPIN ,.'t CO., Segonzic, — — " 



ENGRAXD FRERES, Angouleme, 
PATTERSON' & UIHBERT, London, [ 



— Cognacs 

Bsss' and Gainess' 

Stout 



L. DURLACIIER, Biupcn — — Rhine AVine 

H. UXDERBERG,— ALRRECUT, Rheinbcrg & Niederrhein 

I!<innekanip Bitter's 
CHAS. PAY & CO., London, Old Tom Oin, Oranse Hitlers 

J. R. HERRIFF & CO., Glasgow, .Scotch Whisky, Jamaica Rums 



ALL GOODS J.\ rXITED STATES BOSDED WAREHOVSE. 

AMERICAN WHISKIES— "BLUE GRASS" AND "BOONE'S KNOLL" 



20 



f/?eifie WIJ^E /rpJE) Sflf^^T f^EVlEW. 



any otbor make of "Slok Gi.n," great cure and attention having 
liecn paid for a number of years to tho manufacture of tliis 
liquor. It is very wholesome and pure, not too sweet, is free 
free from acidity, and has the most delicate tlavor. 

Sold in Flint-glass (.Quarts and Tints, $IG per case of 12 
bottles. 

To be obtained from all wino merchants and grocers. 
Sole agents for tho L'. S. A., W. A. Taylor it Co., New York. 

Schedule of net duty-paid prices for trade only. London 
Dock .Jamaica Rum, "Ked Lion" Brand. 

In lots of less tiian 5 cases $10 75 

In loU of ■'> cases and loss than 10 10 00 

Importation orders e.specially solicited. 

Sloe (-iin, Devonshire Brand, as supplied to the Royal 
Family of England. 

In lots less than h cases ?13 60 

In lots cases and less than 10 13 00 

Sloe Gin has recently become very popular in England. 
It is made from the Sloe berry, which is grown in England 
and I'lyniouth Gin. Be sure you get a recognized standard 
brand, as thi-re are many Sloe Gins on the market that they 
are the real article in name onlv. 



the mixture to local dealers. He secured a sample of the mix- 
ture and is now engaged in making an analysis of it. In his 
opinion the u.se of such an adulterant would soon destroy the 
salo of California wines, which are now in demand because of 
their purity." 

Tho "rresrrvanl"alludcil to is U!Hloubt<'dly thecantisfptic 
placed on this market under the name of "Anliseptieuin," 
which is maiuifactured not only in France and Germany, but 
also in Philadelphia, and possibly in other parts of tho United 
States. We analyzed tiiis antiseptic six months ago and 
found it to be ammonium and potassium silico-fluoridc. So 
far from its being "safe from detection" it is detected in wine 
with ease, and greater certainty than any otiier antiseptic in 
use. One part in 200,000 gives an unmisUikable reaction. 

This fluoride is also recommended as an agent for clari- 
fying wine. To be of any value for that purpose the dose re- 
quired would be dangerous, and even the small quantity 
required as an antiseptic, would corrode the glass wlienever 
the wine is bottled, destroying all brilliancy of color, and 
giving the wine a disagreable taste. 

Wo do not think our wine dealers are foolish enough to 
use such a preparation, the danger of which has been clearly 
pointed out to tiieni. 

J. M. CuKTis & Son. 






Fuo.M J. M. Clktis & Sox. 

San Fkan-cisco, March 9, 1887. 

Editok Pacific Wine and Spirit lieview: — The following 
appeared in the 6". F. Chronicle, of March 7th, as a part of the 
proceedings at the " Council of Associated Industries," March 
•ith. 

" According to the statement made by Profes.sor W. B. 
Rising, State Analyst, at a special meeting of the board of 
Health, held Friday evening, some of the dealers in wine in 
this State are preparing to adulterate their goods. The adul- 
terant to be used is expected to serve as a preservant and 
guaranteed to be safe from detection. 

Professor Rising stilted tiiat an agent spent some time in 
this city selling the adulterant, and disposed of over a ton o 



From R. F. Balke & Co., Distillers. 

" Normandy" Superior Pure Rye. 

No. of barrels made in — 

188fl" 1")8 189^ 

18;t0 St;G 1894 

1891 1,090 1895 

1892 1,372 1896 



Total. 



No. of barrels remaining in warehouse March 



1,S92 174 

1893 2,113 

189-1 1,417 

Total 



1895. 
1.S9(; 



1,470 
1,927 
1,840 

.11,47S 

1, 18(17 

1,927 

1,817 

T.ns 



DAWSON'S 



&) ^^ 




EERFECTION 



tt 




OLD 





In Ca^e?^ Only. 



■>• -^ •< 



SOLE AGENT FOR PACIFIC COAST 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 123 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



f/eSlfie WIJ^E /rJMD 5^P|f^lT I^EVIEW 



21 




Owners and Handlers of its own Brands 
and Also the Weil-Known . . . . 
Brands of 






Main 



OFFICES : 



> NAPA VALLEY WINE CO. 
KOHLER & VAN BERGEN 
KOHLER & FROHLING 
^'^%B. DREYFUS & CO. 

S. LACHMAN CO. 

C. CARRY & CO. 




SEGOUD anl FOLSOHl STS. \ "v" 





INCORPORATED. 




San Francisco, \ \)^ 

California \ ^.^^ 

New York Office: \ y^ 

Jo. 45 RRnnnwiiY J O 





AUQUST -to, 189A. 



^ 



•)•) 



PTOrfeipie WINE T^NO SflF(IT F^EVIEW 



TRADE N0TE5 AND PHR5()NAL5. 



Frank Czarnowski intends to oi>en a wliolesale liijiior 
liouse ut Congress ave. 

The retail license at Helena. Montana, has been raised 
Ironi $;t6 to $200 per year. 

Henry Brune of Xaber, Alfs * Brune is the happy father 
i>f a son born on the 11th inst. 



vote it.><elf entirely to the wine and mineral water tradi- 
The /V(\s-.s will be published monthly. 



The midnight closing ordinance of Grass Valley, Cal., has 
been repealed; the Mayorcastingthedeciding vote to that effect. 

Henry 1'. Wichman, of Wichman, Lutgen & Co., is con- 
tined at his homo with a somewhat severe attack of pneu- 
monia. 



Henry Cnmpe head of the house of Henry C'ampe tt Co., 
intends <;oing to Eumpe in tlie near future. His jdans are to 
start about the L'ith of April and remain abroad until tne end 
of the year. 

We are sorry to note that Governor Budd has rei)laced 
Dr. r. C. Remondino on the Board of Health, with Dr. D. D. 
Crowley. Dr. Kemondiuo was an etticient member of the 
Board and a friend to ihe Viticultural industry wortli having 
in sudi an ottieial member. 

A. Heunisch, of the Abramson-Heunisch Company, who 
has been in Germany several months on a health trip, will 
remain abroad for five or six months j-et before returning. 
He is still in poor health, but it is tliought that a few months 
of rest will suffice to effect a complete recovery. 



The Licenced Mtuallcrs Oljicial Annual for 1S97, has been 
issued by the Central Protection Sociefy of London, England, 
the officer of whicli are at .35 Great George street, Westminster, 
Lonilon, S. W. The book is a well bound one of •'Mu pages, 
and contains an immense amount of material in relation to 
the licensed British trade. 

George W. Baker, the attorney for the Protective Associa- 
tion, intends to leave for a health ami jilcasure trip to the 
Hawaiian Islands on the 1st prox. He will be accompanied 
by his wife and daughter and will be gone about six weeks. 
This will give him a month's time in which to visit the vol- 
cano and see all the sights. 

A new trade journal has been started in New York, the 
Ameriran Wine and Mineral Water 7Ve.s.s, which is published 
by L. J. Vance, at .'Jl and 3.3 Broad street. The Press will 

devote no attention to tho wliiskv busincs!!, but will dc- 



Louis jMelczer, formally in the wholesale liquor busiiK " 
in Phoenix Arizona, but for the past eleven months of Ureg'ii 
Illinois, returned lately to Phoenix to remain for some tini' 
-Mr. Meli-zer has a general merchandise store at that ])lace, and 
his family is there as well. .Speaking of the wave of prosj)erity j 
.Mr. .Mclczcr says in his section, corn is worth about ten cents a j 
buslicl, and other things accordingly. 

The lirm of E. Valche & Co.. whicli for years has con- 
ducte<l a wholesale liquor business at San Bernardino and a 
winery and distillery at Hruokside, .^an Bernardino County, 
has di.ssolved. Mr. Valche has tjiken over the wine and brandy 
property at Brookside and his former partners .Joseph Ingersul 
and Frederick .1. Esler have secured the business at San Ber- 
nardino whicli they will conduct under the name of Ingei-sol A 
Esler. 

The case of The People r.s. Siegel, Cooper A Co., for sellin,^ 
counterfeit Martell brandy, in Chicago, was terminated n 
cently by the court imposing a fine of ^inOand costs upon the 
defendants. Tliis jirosecution was brought underan old stai- 
ute. which provides only for a line. If Martell iV: Co. had had 
their labels registered at Sjiringfield, 111., as well as at Wash- 
ington, D. C, the punishment would, instead of a line, have 
been not less thon three months or more than one year in jail. 
Needless to say, MartelKV* Co. have taken steps to remedy thi- 
for the future, and have had their labels registered at Spring- 
field. 

Tlie Supreme Court of Indiana lield, in tlie recent ca- 
of Shea vs. City of Muncie, that the Moore law of 1S9.5, givi i 
cities power to exclude the sale of liquor from the suburba 
or residence portions of such cities, is constitutional, and ua- 
not repealed by the Nicholson law ; that an ordinance und< r 
tiiat law, wiiich prohibits such sales in tlie residence portion- 
of the city generally without specifying what portions arc 
meant, is not void for indefiniteness, but that whether a par- 
ticular place is within the ordinance is matter of proof: that 
under the police power any business which is dangerous t'> 
the public safety, health or morals may be e.xciuded from a 
particular locality; that a city may jtass such an ordinani , 
and enforce the same against one who has procured and paid 
for a license from the city and the county to sell liquor in 
the prohibited part of the city; that the police power of a stai> 
or municipality cannot bo surrendered or bartereil away, and 
that a part of town principally used for residence purposes is 
a residence portion, even though it contain a grocery or otln r 
business house. 




EL PINAL VINEYARD 



EST.\B1.1.'^1IKD 1S.V2. 
Largest Producers of 

PURE SWEET WINES 

IN AMERICA. 



I 



Geo. West 3t Son 



5TOCKTON, CAL., U. 5. A. 



P/rSlfie Wlj^E ANI3 Spi9!T {REVIEW. 



Brauti$cl)U)cigcr ^ Co/$ Cxbiblt 



AT OUATKMAI.A, CKNTKAU AMKKICA. 




HRAt-NSCIIWKIGER )4 COS. KXIIIMIT AT r.lATKMAr.A, C. A 



/•X.NK of tlie t'xliibits that is attracting inucii attention at the Central Aniuriuan exhibit now in progress in (iuateniala, 
is tliat of Braunschweigcr & Co. of this city. The display occupies a lloor space of over 200 square feet and is ar- 
ranged in the form of a huge lialf cone at the rear, while on the sides four columns composed of casks and bottled goods 
support the smaller portions of the exhibit. The credit of tiie display is due to the president of the firm, H. Braunschweiger, 
who designed it, and who personally attended to its forwarding. A large portion of bottled goods used in its construction are 
California products, although a very liberal portion of the center piece is devoted to the celebrated ten-year-old California 
Club Whiskey. 

There is not a better or more favorably known firm in llie West than that of Uraunschweiger iV: Co. Through the iude- 
tatigable efforts of its president, IT. Braunschweiger, it has gained a prominent place in the ranks of the prominent firms of its 
lass in the United States. The firm was organized in this city in 1874, and during tiie last twenty years has gained the con- 
iidence of the trade through the uniformity and superior quality of the goods iiandled, which are regarded as the finest and 
most perfect. During a large pdrtion of tiiat time the firm lias occupied its present commodious q\iarters at Nos. •"> and 7 
l)rumm Street. 

That tiic firm lias succeeded so well in gaining a well merileil success at the Central American Exposition is a source of 
gratiticatiuu to the tra<le of San Francssco, where its high standing and excellent reputation is recognized. — 6'. /'. Chronicle. 

The illustration on this page was made fmm a ]ihot(igraph of the exhibit, as it was set up before being sent to Central 
.Vmerica. 



24 f/reifie wijme /jmb sfif^iT [review. 

" VALE THE LEQISI-ATURE. ,.„,„„ i..u. of M.rd. 9.1897. 

578,S20. — Device fordetccting fr»uduleal refilling of bMtles. John Fawcetl 

The Legislature of 1S97 has adiourned, and the liquor trade is Ho9ionMju« ,,,.,.„,, ,. ,. 

secure from harassment Irom Sacramento in the way of adverse ..,8,5o.r-Sio,,pc.r for botiU-s. John luchic, Hrm.klvn, N. ^ . 

leiiislation for two years to come. 67H,338.-8af..ly bo'tle. Willhini H. S. Jenison. Apponiiux. K. I. 

The Legislature is remarkable for things that it did not do, to 578,848.— liolile. Willium W. MiiK'imm, Jr., Nixon, Tcnn. 

cinch the liquor men and must be. said that much of this credit is 578,370.— Jug. Iluiry Stiles, ilevilan.l, Ohio, 

due to Mr. J. P. EdolV, under whose direction the interests of the DKSKiNS. 

liquor men were guarded. 2li'729. — HoiiKr for boUlen. Kugene L Jaopies Watcrbury, Conn. 

The measures which ilied in one way or another were:— hsueof March 9, 1897. 

Androus' Constitutional Amendment, levying a ;f3.oo annual TKADK M.\KKS. 

state tax on all liquor dealers. 29,681.— Lager Beer. Kslale of Jacob Kick, William-poii, Pa. Kssential 

Withingtons' Norwegian system bill. _ fe.nlnre: A re|)re^entation of a tetrestrial globe with a glass of beer 

Wavmire's Constitutional Amendment, giving women the right standing on t< p. 

- 29,682. — Laser licer. hslate of Jacib Flock, Williamspott, I'a. Essential 

to vote. „,„„,„,„„-_,, -,,,rl ilio colnnn fealure: A i-eprescntation of a terrislrial plobe having a glass of 

Lmmons bill separatmg the corner grocery and the saloon. ^^^^^ ^^^ i^^ accompanied l.v .he words "f.tablUhed 1S54" 

Governor Budd's scheme for a $ioo state ta.\ which was never and tkc words "li stands On T..p. ' 

introduced. 29,063. — I'oner. .Miller Unwinj; Company. Hochesler. N. V. pFStnlial fcatnre: 

That is a resume of what the late body did not do. Among An eagle in lliglit holding in iu* lalons a keg or barrel with the 

things they did was to pass Senator Wolfs Bill, No. 536, relating iniii.ls '• M. I!. Co." on the end and the words "London Poiter" 

to the issuing of search warrants, Section 4. of which reads:— .eneaih. 

"Whentheproperty isacask, keg, bottle, vessel, siphon, can, WINE AND BRANDY RECEIPTS. 

case or other p.ickage.bearing printed, branded, stamped, engraved, l.,.,.,„l„ 

etched, blown, or otherwise attached or produced thereon the duly "'J *-• i.iana}. 

f^led trademark or name of the person by whom, or in whose be- .Marcli 1 .5_,.)(l() 

half, the search warrant is applied for, in the possession of any per- " 2 o4,100 5,000 

son,' except the owner thereof, or in the possession of another to " 3 2G,-4nO .... 

whom such person shall have delivered it, without such owner's .. 4 - 29,400 .... 

consent, or unless the same shall have been purchased from the "5 27 400 

owner thereof; in which case it may be taken on the warrant fiom „ i;3 "iilO 

such person, or from any place occupied by him or under his con- ,_ •li'ifin 

trol. or from the possession of the person to whom he may have __ » tl-nn 

delivered it. This gives the right to institute roads a subject which 9 _2,oUU .... 

importers are apt to avail themselves of (reely in the near future." " 10 2G,7O0 .... 

Another bill of interest which is now a law, is Senator La Rue's ■■ i[ .33,400 .... 

Pure Wine law which has already appeared in the Rezie7v, and '■ 12 .. o.GOO .... 

which considerablv strengthens the present statutes by making it „ y^ ^^ 4,,q 

the business of the College of Agriculture at Berkeley to see that „ Vi ., \ ................. . 46400 . . . . 

the law is enforced. ! "J. 

FOR SALE — Brewery, Distillery, Soda Works, Buildings 

PATENTS, TRADE=MARKS, ETC. and Lots in En.-^eiuida, Lower California; busines.s with- 

out competition; in full working order ; §9,000 — could not 

... , f . .. . be dui)licated for three times that amount. 

The follow nc list of recent patents and trade-marks of interest to our pat- t m , 1 4 oo-> i- . <• . ■ i » <• 

rons is reported by \Vm. G. HenbEUSok, solicitor of American and foreign , Summanyj-^ our town lots, 333 loct frontage .n heart of 

patenis .nd trade-mark., Norris Building, 501 F street, Washington, 1). C. A the City. I ire-proot building, corrugated lion. 40 X ..0; annex, 

copy of any of the United Sutt-s patents will be furnUhed by him for 25 cents. corrugated iron, 14x18. Dwelling liouse (4 room.S turiuturo, 

etc.;) baru and stable. Fine beer garden, well oriiflineiited 

Issue OF March 2, 1897. with trees; tde only one in town, for picnic purposes. Wind 

™'* mill, iron turbine, 10 buckets; galvanized water pipes, through 

577,930.— Bottle. Harm Ahlrichs , Petersburg, III. building.s and grounds; galvanized iron la«k. (iOOO gallons, 

578,004.-Siphon bottle. George Corbion Jr., Pbiadclphia. Pa. Boiler and steam geiieraior, 12-]i. power. Brass steam ])uini.. 

578,053-MaU turning and stirring machine. John F. Dornfeld, Chicago, III. (^'opper Still rectifier, 16 coiiipartniciit column; copper still rec- 

577,844-n..uleMopper Gilbert lJn.snn, Toulouse, France. titier Ibr pomacc or me.scal ; Ismail still. Grape crusber. 

578 144 — Piiiine or tubing lor drawing oH beer. James L. rort and ( . h. ' ^ 1 1 1 i- • i 1 1 o<\..a 11 

' Hoev. Barnsley, Kngland. prcss hand pump, tauks; tools; laiibanks scale 20U0 lbs 

578.22-2.— Bung Chas. A. Gildmeyer. Iladdonfield, N. J. Complete malting department, roller for malt; beer kettl. . 

57i]nio.— Protective bottle &c. .\licc M. Gillam, Flushing X. Y. • heated by steam; zinc cooler; reservoir tanks, barrels, etc. 

578,008. -Soda water fountain, Kobert M. Green, and Kolert M. Green, Jr.. Complete soda-bottliug Works apparatus. Strong Ilorse and 

Philadelphia. Pa. haruess, ucw dclivcrv wagon, toji-boanl bnguv.ctc. Ciily two 

577,857.-<-a*k. Thomas C. Hooman. Dillon. England men needed to lUll this plant— olic for ill.side Work and the 

578 015.— Xon-redllable bottle Henry Juckelt, Snow Hill, .Mil. 4I f 1 'l 

5:7'9C3.-Non-rcr.llabltf bottle, (has. A. Lord, San Francisco, Ca'., Oilier lor OUlSKle. , ,., , . 

.-,77 »06.-Bottle r-harle, H. Parsons, Goshen, Ind. Lxpenses are very small and prohts very large Any cn- 

677;88i. -Soda water appar..tn». i.uther w. Puller, Lakeville tcrpri.siug party With a Small capital cannot fall to may 

Plantation, Me. money in a short time. For further particulars address 

578,176.— Jug. Arthur J. Weeks, Akron, Ohio. "Brewery," care KkviKW oflice. 

TKAUK MARKS. 

29 CSC— Beer. Acme Brewing Company, Macon, Ga. I'/<sentinl feature: The r^&\/ Cl f*5l I l^fs^O I "7 t^ V^ 0» 

monogram "A B Co.- on 8 globe. t \^ / 9 VJ I CV^J^^l I / V/ IX- %i^ ^^*irV^* 

29,M1.— <iin. l-irmof Pieter lloppe, Schiedam. Netherlands, Eescniial feature: iMroiuKii* AMU \Viiui.h;sAi.K 1)kai.i.ks i.s 

The «oril«" N'ight Cap". ^^^ ^^^ 

29 638.— Whi-key. John Osborn's Sons A Company, -V.w York, N. Y. and A A / I 1\T T-^ *^ i^r T T (l I I () W ^ 

Philadflphia, Pa. Essential feature: The word and number "Old 45"_ VV i i N l__m_? OC J__i i V^:' V-v' V^ 1 V '— ^ • 

^, S40. — (i in and other spirituoiw li<)UorH. National I lislilling Company, Mil- 

w.inkec, WiH E«««-nli»l feature: The woni "Mii-lklae". —SOLE AGENTS FOR — 

29, 137 —Port Wine. Samuel Sin-il .t Co., New York, N. V. Fjwrnlial feature^ ^ , ^ ^ \\t 'W '* ^^ '% ^ ^^ 

The li- t.r, word, character and abbreviation "A. Ferreira .V Co.'' il^t^l^ ll*A(*l/^Tl lllril^llll 

and the repro>entalion of an ox can a cuk behind which in sealed a ^J d ^ L/ ^^ I V' V iV V ' ^ Wv 1/ I O IV y * 

leiniNier. "^ 

29,639.— Whiakey. VAmm Waltcre, Baltimore. Md. Essential feature: A BE SURE YOU ARE RIGHT, THEN GO AHEAD. 

repnain atii.n of a heraldic crownnl lion's h<ud ami tlic words 

"PriT.lc Slock" 224 FRONT STREET. - SftN FRANCISCO CAL. 



i 



f/ceifie WIJVJE /cJMD SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 



THE WAREHOUSE 5TAY. 



Word lias been roceivedby C'olloctor of Internal Revenue 
Welburn, that the Commissioner ol' Internal Kcvenue has re- 
voked his order issued in January directing that the general 
bonded warehouse be closed May 1st. 

This is a matter of the greatest interest to the entire liq- 
uor trade, and especially to the retail dealers and the smaller 
jobbing and wholesale houses. When the order was issued in 
January it was immediately opposed by the latter class of 
firms, and ellbrts were put forth to secure its revocation. 

With the general bonded warehouse open, the retail deal- 
er could buy in bond, and store the goods in the general 
bonded warehouse until he needed it and then withdraw it. 
Hut without the general bonded warehouse it was said he 
would either have to pay the tax on the spirits at the time of 
purchase or buy as he needed for his trade of the jobbers. 

The reason assigned by the Commissioner of Internal 
Kevenue for discontinuing the bonded warehouse at San Fran- 
cisco was that it was used so largely by the dealers in spirits 
as a place of distribution for their goods, and not, as was origin- 
nllv intended, as a place in which whiskv should be stored 
wliile it aged. The fact that there was 2,000,000 gallons of 
spirits put in the general bonded warehouse to about 400,000 
gallons of whisky was pointed to as proving this. Those who 
sought to have the general bonded warehouse retained replied 
to this that it was due to the fact that the trade of this Coast 
required about that proportion of spirits to whisky. 

There is at present about 400,000 gallons of whisky and 
spirits in the general bonded warehouse. This action of the 
Commissioner is looked upon as a triumph for the small 
(U>alers, and is in line with the action of Congress authorizing 
the bottlins of whiskv in bond. 



IMPORTANT ADVANTAGES OF BOTTLING 
IN BOND. 



All wiiiskies over four years oM, stored in bond, being 
permitted to be bottled under government supervision may be 
availed of by present holders to do away with constant outage 
by having them converted into bottled and cased goods. 

Estimating that there arc about fifteen cases to a barrel, 
and the whisky tax paid, cost |1.50 per gallon, the ajjproxi- 
niate calculation is as follows: 

Outage, H gallons per annum ^2.25 

.storage, State and County tax, one year (35 

Total ^2.90 

Presuming that the expense of bottling 
(cases, bottles, labels, etc.) be $22.00. 
Interest on above outlay ^1.30 

Credit . .§1.60 

Empty Barrel 1.00 

Net gain the first year $2,60 

and the additional advantage of stoppage of evaporation, 
including tax for subsequent years. 

It should also be borne in mind that bottled goods with 
the government guarantee can be made readily available if 
stored in a reliable warehouse, such as the Louisville Public 
Warehouse Co., for a warehouse receipt issued by a third party 
always carries additional weight with bank.s. — Mida's Criterion. 




To the Trade and the Public : 



The 



"R. B. HAYDEN" 




Old Style Hand-Made Sour Mash Whisky Distilled by 

GREBNBRieR DISTILLERY CO. 

OFFICE, LOUISVILLE, KY. . 
GReersBRieR, nbusois CO., ky. 

Is the only whisky of this name ever made in Nelson C Uiity, Ky. On ordering R. B. H.iyden from your dealer see that you get the 
Whisky that is distilled by the Greenbrier Distillery Company. 

BARDSTOWN, KY., November i, 1892. 
Greenbrier Distillery Co. — Gentlemen: In response to your inquiry I h.ue to s.iy that your distillery is operated on the old fashioned 
hand made sour mash plan, and is one of the very few distilleries in the State that adheres to the old style methods that have made 
Kentucky sour mash distilleries famous. Your house and its methods cannot be improved on. 

Respectfully yours, JNO. B. WELLER. 

Dist. Dep. Collector Int. Rev., Nelsrn Co., Ky. 

"H. B. nuydenr 

The Finest Sour Mash Whisky made in Ntlsoii Co., Kcutuekj-. Churlts Melneckc ACc, Agents, S.F. 




CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 



SOLE AGENTS 



314 SACRAMENTO STREET 




26 



f/cGlfie WljNIE /cjNID SflF(IT f^EVIEW. 



NATIONAL IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 



JANUOKr. 



IMPORTS. 



Qunnlllics. Viiluci. 



Quinlitjcs. 



Malt liquors, gallons: 

Jii lioitlcs or juKS 931389 

In other coveiings I76,b93 

Total 270,282" 

Spirits, distilled (proof gallons):! 
OJ domestic manuf'r, returned 

(subject to In. Rev tax) 103,991 

Brandy ,8,827 

All other 148.340 

Total 271,158 



92,348 
51.636 



I4<,504 



77,765 
218,347 



296.112 



'SI.331 



Spirits (not of domestic man 
ufacture) (proof gallons), im^ 
ported from — 

United Kingdom | 48,046 

Belgium 5_S37 

••"f-T>ce I 21,924 

(.ermany 

Italy 

Neiherlands 

Other Kurope 

B'itish North America. 

West Indies 

China 

Other Asia and Oceanica 

Other countries 

Total 



92.523 

50,992 

1.S9.801 



303-3'6 



74,095 
18,068 
930.37 



186,100 



Wines: 
Champagne, and other spark- 
ling 13,678 

Still Wines — 

In casks ^ 193,377 

In other coverings i.s,207 

Total 



J2,775 

3.7S6 
21,757 

9.026 
15,627 

4,583 
17,222 

6,404 
180 



167.167 



55,685 

4,853 

59,746 

10,686 

6,970 

9,404 

13,898 

30,420 

I3,9.« 

3,834 

I,2C6 

I.S6 



Wines, imported from- 
Uniled Kingdom . . , 

France 

Germany 

Italy 

<Jiher Europe 

Oiher countries 

Toial 



210793 



197,706 

136,107 
63 672 



40,900 

402 

22,097 

4,193 
890 

14,599 

2,3" 

12,197 

3,026 

99 

IC,922 
369 



113,005 



397.485 



12,717 

99,727 
12.723 



21,965 i 
213,235 
54.247 
24.367 I 
81,862 
1,809 



397,48,5 



EXPORTS. 



Malt Liquors : 

In bottles doz. 

Not in bottles gals. 

Total 



39,358 
14,0.58 



Spirits, distilled (proof gallons): 

Alcoliol, including pure. 

neutral or cologne spiriis. 

Hrandy. 



46,858 

.3,237 I 
50,095 



41,738 
32.660 



6,167 
70:j 



•t""' ' '76,459 

Whisky — 



Bourbon 

R>e 

All other 

Total 

Wine: 

In bottles doz. 

Not in bottles galls. 

Total 



9,614 i 

i,6.";5 ' 

46.585 ' 



2,.3o3 
918 

234,93 > 

12.596 

3642 

17.497 



241.189 1 271,887 



1,620 
136,181 



54.560 
3'8l 
83.1471 

37,047 
1,418- 

58.143 



234.633 



6.118' 
66.126 

72.2(4 ■ 



',905 
131.720 



KXI'OkTS Ul- luRfcllCJN Llgliihi.s 



Malt Liquors (gallons) 

In l>ottles or jugs. 

In other coverings 

Total 



Spirits Distilled (proof gallons): 
Of domestic nianfr, returned 
(subject to In. Rev. tax) 

Brandy 

All other 

Total 

Wines: Champagne and other 

sparkling doz. 

Stili. Winks — 

In casks galU 

In bottles doz. 

Total 




81 
1,006 

2,789 
3.876 

702 


295 
244 

1,634 
75' 



234.746 



169,897 



181, 103 

71,867 
59,342 



3'2.3'2 



14,398 

190,398 

23,016 

14,899 
67,394 

2,207 



3i2,3'2 



52,615 
4.6R2 



57.297 



25,055 

398 

113,480 

28,566 

2,217 

25.628 



'94,344 



7,852 
57,698 



65.550 



235 


169 











>,379 I 
3S6| 






I 355 

306 



■^.'57 



226 

415 
3.605 

,t.2.|h 

»5,2S3 

805 
968 

17.026 



79,268 
72,063 



, 64.849 
52,669 
117.228 



55,388 
151 

63.131 
3,561 
1,454 
6 gjS 

4,795 

24,399 

7,450 

19 

2,403 

209 



CAUTION! 

Decisions have been rendered in my favor oy the Hungarian 
Minister ol Coiiunerce in August and October, 1896, in conse- 
quence of which the trade marks of the following aperient waters, 
viz: 

"APENTA," 'UJ HUNYADI." 
HUNYADI MATYAS. 

LAJOS. 

LASZLO. Etc.. Etc. 

have been cancelled, all bi:inK imitations ol my "HUNVADI 
JANOS" trade mark. No other water cxcc])! my HUNYADI 
JANO.S is allowed to use the n:iinc "HUN\'ADI," this name being 
my exclusive trade mark making a part of the name of my 

HUNYADI JANOS 

NATURAL HUNGARIAN APERIENT WATER 

The Tr.ule is hereby cautioned not to handle waters bearing 
any of the above mentioned names, as I shall hold all parties selling; 
such waters responsible in diimiiees and jirotccl my iradr- 
niark-ri«lits to llie fullest extent, by action BRaiust all 
infrincers. 

ANDREAS SAXLEHNER, 

Hudda l^est Loiuion Xt?%v "^'orl-c 

PacKic Coasi flgenls lor HUNYADI JRNOS WM. WOLFF & CO 

327 9 Marltet St.. S. F. 



TRADE MARKS. 

WM. G . HENDERSON, Patent Attorney and Solicitor. 

NORRIS BLDG., 5th and F Sts.. Near U S. Patent Office, Rooms 20 to 23 

P. G. liox 122. jrAsnjyGTOx, i>. i\ 

Seventeen years' experience, including service In HxamininK Corps, U, S. Patent Office 
American niul I-ortigii Paltiils procured. Caveats filed. Rtjectcd applications revived 
( Jpinions j^ivcij as to scoi>e and valitlily of jmtents. Infringement suite prosecuted and de 
fended. TRADE-M.^RKS, LAHKLS AND COPYRIGHTS registered. 

iSTCopy of any printed patent, trade-mark or label furnished for 25 cents. Correspond 
ence invited. Hand-hook on I'atents furnished l-RKI-^ on application. 



THE - DIVIDEND, 

5 LcidosdorflF Street, 
J.i MKS O'BRIKW I'r<>i>rie'or. 

Importer of FINEST WINES, LIQUORS 

Irish and Scotch Whiskies, 
Bass' Ale and Guinness' Stout. 

Moore, noDt & GO'S WhisKits a Specially. 



BONESTELL & CO. 

-l>r. \m:ks in — ■ . 

PAPER, 

— — .\ specialty made of 

FOURDENIER TISSUE 



STRIPPED MANILA 

]'or nrapiiinjj t>cittli-.s. 

401 & 403 Sansomo Street. S. F. 



ESTABL'SHf D 18S3. 



SAMUEL WANDELT. 



-STK.VM .\NI) HAND- 



COOP V. RAG H 

t: i.ti.i.i:.-, \<)i;iii i ill i{i> s r.. iiir>()KL\ \. v. r. 

Wine and Liquor ^m^\$ and J^\$ 

.A. Specialty. 

I nm inw iircpnrcd lo iiinkcniiil funiMi Ihir InrKol.aa well «• Ihc Kinnllrst nrllilc In 
nn line 111 C >o|>crni;i:. IMiiiinK . uivn »llli )>rnMi|>liir«< All work wotinnlnl lo It fin- 



Kl.^jj.S I .\.N 1 \lNli.S— I'rcNli Ki|iitii,i .lul Lenoir i "niii>;s inr sale at ■*'"'""'*'■"'■'"""'""='"»""••' "'"'"l""'!" "">■'""><• "mrkct 
reasonable rales. Address Room 56, J30 Tine sirrel, S.nii Ir.iiiclsco. 



f/rSlfie WipJE /rJNU Sf>iF(IT F^EVIEW. 



27 



PRICES CURRENT. 

These are the long prices. The 
rate of discount on purchases of a 
considerable quality can be learned 
bv applying to the agent or dealers. 
We urgently re<iuest dealer.'^, agents 
and producers to notify us when a 
change occurs in the prices current ol 
the goods they handle. 



Gutedel, 82 6.U0 

Burgundy, S4 6.00 

Zinfandel, S3 5.00 



7.U0 
7.00 
6.00 



California Wines and Brandies. 

(The Trices given are lor i)u.irts and 
pints, put up in cases of twelve 
and twenty-four bottles.] 



C. CARl'V \- CO. 
51 1-517 Sacramento St., San Francisco 
LaKonia.Grand 'Viedoc J 7.00 f 8.00 

Burgundy 5.0c 

Zinlandel 3.50 

Sauterne 5.00 

Riesling 400 

Sweet Muscatel, 1SS2.. 9.00 

Sherrv. 1SS2 9.00 

Port, iSS2 8.00 

Cal. Rochelle Brandy. . 12.00 



6.00 

4-50 
6.00 
500 
10.00 
10.00 
9.00 
13.00 



MONT ROUGE WINES. 

Chauche iV Bon, Livermore. 

Ofliceand Depot, 13-15 First St., S. F. 

Burgundy Quarts | 9 00 

Chablis 9.00 

Claret, Retour d' Eu- 
rope 9.00 

Jurancon, Favorite wine 
of Henry IV, King of 

France .. 900 

Haut Sauternes 7.00 

Sauternes 6.00 

Light Sauternes 5.00 

Claret Grand V'in 6.00 

Table Claret 4.00 

Zinfandel 300 

f i.oo additional for pints. Red and 
white wines in bulk at all prices. 

GUNDLACH BUNDSCHU WINE 
CO. 

Cor. Second and Market Sts., S. F. 
Pricks Per Case, quarts, pints. 
Traininer, .S2 | 5.00 J 6.00 



INGLKNOOK WINES. 
Agency, Stanford and Townsend Sts., 

San Francisco. 
Table Claret, Blended 

from choice foreign 

grapes, vintage 1890.. 

Zinfandel 

Extra Table Claret, Me- 

doc type, red label, 

1SH9 

Burgundy, 18S8, reserve 

stock 7.1 

Sauterne, drv, Sauvig'n 

Vert, '85..' 

Gutedel,ChasselasVert, 

18S9 

Hock, Rhenish type, 

18S9 

Burger, Chablis type, 

1S89 

Riesling, Johannisberg 

type, 1888 

Pints of 2 dozen |r per case additional 

None genuine unless bearnig seal 
or cork brand of the proprietor. 



»3-50 
4-5° 



550 
8.00 
5-50 
4- 50 
6.00 

5-50 
6.50 



Gutedel 

Sauterne 

Sauterne, 1885. 

Claret 

Zinfandel 

Cabernet 

Burgundy . . . . 

Port, 1884 

Port, 1887 

Sherry 

Cognac, 18S5.. 



4.00 
4.00 
5.00 
2.50 
3.00 
3-50 
4.00 
7.00 
S-oo 
5.00 
10.00 



S. LACIIMAN CO. 
453 Brannan street, San Francisco. 



Old Port I 7.00 

Zinfandel 3.50 

Riesling 4.50 

Madeira 8.00 

Malaga 8.00 

Cognac 14.00 



Hock, green label | 

Hock, black label 

Gutedel 

Riesling 

Cabernet 

Burgundy 

Claret, black label 

Claret, red label 

Private Stock Hock.. . 
" " ElCerrito 

" " Sauterne. 

Claret... 
Burgun'v 
VineCliir 



$ 8.00 
4.00 
500 



KOHLER & FROHLING. 

601 Folsom Street, San Francisco. 

Riesling | 400 $4.50 



Hock 3.50 

Gutedel 4.50 

Sauterne 4.50 

Zinfandel 3.75 

Zinfandel, old 4.50 

Burgundy 4.00 

Superior Port 10.00 

Sherry 7.50 

Angelica 6.00 

Muscatel 6.00 

Madeira 6.00 

Malaga 600 

Brandy 10.00 



4 00 
5.00 
5.00 

4-25 
5.00 
450 



KOLB & DENHARD. 
420-425Montgomery St., San Franc'o 
Per Case 

Hock ^3.0 

Riesling 3.50 



C. M. MANN. 
(Successor to I. De Turk.) 
Office and cellars, 216-218-220 Sacra- 
mento St. and 221 Commercial St., 
San Francisco. 
Cognac Brandy, XXXX((iuarts)$io.oo 

" XX 9.00 

Tienturier Port 5.50 

Trousseau Port, No. i 4.00 

Dry Sherry, private stock 5.50 

" ■' superior 4.00 

Angelica, old selected stock. . . 4.00 

Muscatel " " "... 4.00 

Malaga " " "... 4.00 

Madeira " '■ ... 4.00 

Tokay, best old selected stock. 6.00 

Tokay, " " " 4.50 

Haut Sauterne, " " . 5.00 

Riesling, old " " . 3.50 

Gutedel, " " " . 3.50 

Hock, " " . 3.00 

Cabernet, "Grand Vin" " . 5.00 

Burgundy " '' " . 4.50 

Zinfandel, Claret, selected Claret 3.50 

XX Claret " " 3.50 

Claret, " " 2.75 

NAPA VALLEY WINE CO. 

Second and Folsom Sts., S. Francisco 

Sherwood & Sherwood, Agents. 

212-214 Market Street, San Francisco. 



Sherry. . 

Port 

Angelica 

Tokay 

Muscatel 

Madeira 

Brandy Crown* 



3.00 
3 so 
4.00 
450 
450 
4.00 
350 
2-75 
5.00 
9.00 
8.00 
5.00 
7.00 
12.00 
4- 50 
4. SO 
4.50 
450 
4.50 
4SO 
10.00 
12.00 
1500 
1800 



f 400 

450 
5.00 
S-50 
5- SO 
S-co 
4.00 
370 
6.00 

10.00 
9.00 
6.no 
800 

13.CO 



L. J. ROSE & CO., Lim., San Gabri 

el, Cal. 
Port, 1S73, I doz. qt.s. in case 



1S73, 
1876 

1882 •■ •■ " .. 
1886 " " " .. 
Sherry, 18S2, i doz, qts. in case 
1886 

I doz. qts. in case 



Angelica,i882, 
1886 
Muscatel, 1 882 " " " 
Tokay, 18S2, i doz. qts. in case. 

1886, •' 
Madeira, 18S2, i doz. qts. in case 

" 1888, 
Brandy, 1881, " ■' " 

Zinfandel, 1890,1 doz. qts. in case 

" " 2 " pts. " 

Burger, 1890, i doz. qts. in ca.se 
" " 2 " pts. " 

All the foregoing vintages are true 
to name and age, as indicated on la- 
bel. We guarantee the absolute pur- 
ity of every Ijottle of wine and brandy 
put up by us. 



I15.00 

12.00 

9.00 

7- SO 

■9.00 

7-50 
9.00 

7- 50 
7 50 
9.00 

7SO 
9.00 

7.50 
IS«) 
4.00 
500 
4.00 
S-oo 




Ijijnesr Score oF ({wards, wirii jlledsl and Diplomi.' 

friE 5tAllUARi> OF Pt)<FE(flOil! AiiJOtUTELV ?}}i{V. 



DISTILLCO Bv 



A. GUCKENHEIMER & BROS. 



PITTSBURGH. 



U. S. A. 



■aatMOJi^il 







ff/S TIL L CO d r 



PENN A. DISTILLING CO 

BUTLER CQ.PENNA. 

Cold stylemonongahela rye whiskey~)J 





o. 




^^^ c/c>^/^, 



k 







-^ 



28 



fjfflceifie WIJME j/k^Q Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 




REDWOOl mU. , Liquor Flavors 

WllililAf/l H. RUDKIN, 



F. KORBEL & BROS. 

723 liRYANT Stkeki, San Fkancisco 



74 WILLIAM STREET. NEW YORK. 

GENUINE XX BEADING OIL XX 

Ittducrd To $7.uO llir Oallon. 
Or at NORTH FORK MILL Good* For Sale in <allfontta otily by 

HumboldtCounty. California. REDINGTON i CO. 23-27-29 seoono st.. san ^rancsco 



Tissue Paper 

JVIanila Paper 

Label Paper 









OK ALL KINDS. 



A. Zellerbach & Sons, 



Cor. Sansome Uomnierciai sis. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



ESTABLISHED 

A. Finkes 

Prodnrfr^ of 

CUIFORNIA 

ABSOLUTELY PURE 



809 PlflNTGOinERY ST.. 

San Francisco. 

TelEtlioiie, Blacic 581. 




1864 



Widow. 

First Premium 

CHAMPflGN[S, 

t lOLU .SKAL. 

('AurE Blanche, 

Nonpareil 



Cy First Premiums for Bc»t 
California Champagnes award- 
ed by ilie Slate Knirs, 1S70-92 
and wherever exiiibited. 



Lachman & Jacobi ^onfl pRine luoiber co. 



DEALERS IX- 



California Wines aiin Biandies, 

BRYANT ANO SECOND STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO. 



Eastern Agents 



EDINGER BROS. & JACOBI, 

Cor. Ddv.T \ P.-iirl .'^ts., Broiiklyn BriilK"' Store No ■_', N. Y 



— .Sr<CI'..S.Si_)KS 'I'n- 

Have Constantly on Hand a Full Supply 
iif thi' FoUoiwng Sizes of 

CRAPE STAKES. 

2x2—4 feet Long. 2x2—5 Feet Long. 

2x2 6 Feet Long. 
Which will he .loUl at veanonnhte riitex. 



LOMA PRIETA LUMBER CO. 



Loma Prieta. 



Santa Cruz Co , Cal 




FE'RRO-QUIflA TONIC BITTERS 



A Wonderful Tonic and Strengthener 

AN ANTIDOTE AOAINST 

ANEMIA. CHLOROSIS. MUSCULAR DEBILITT. NAUSEA. HEAD. 

ACHE, PALPIIAIION OF THE HEART. PHTHISIS. SCROFULA, 

CHRONIC BRONCHITIS, GENERAL DEBILITT. LASSITUDE 

■nd olhor ditcasei cauted b) a disordered tjllcm. 

Etpeclally Recommended at a pri;«entativo againit FEVERS 
In tropical climalei 

AODRESS 

DR. D. P. ROSSI 
400 OUPONT STREET. >SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

!•">! 1 .\i,»-,VT KOIl I . S. AND I .N.NAIA. 
' 'r nriy wholiMnle or coromiMJon lioiinc in lliii City 



^m^ 



Mo nfe ©rl/^to 

CHAMPAGNE 

EXTRA DRY 

K..I-TI i;l-.r') 




D. P. ROSSI 

(Dogliani . It.ili.i .ind San Franctsco 

1400 DUPONT ST. 
Sole Agent lor the United Statei and Canada 

N. H This Hrnnil In one of ihr l«'n.llnir 
<*hninpiiK»i-a iitiI nt lh<- Koynl Couriii of Itiily. 
(•rrninriy, Kiik'Ull'l: lt« niHTlnlly iiwlormvl liy I'k-l- 
irionlro, Si'w York: I'lilin'f Ili»ii»l. I>vl Monto. Mnlitnn 
■ •nri^, MnlRnn Itlrho. Mnlfinn Tnrlnnl, INiodlc l>nfr. 
t'amiil'f. MartliK'lU'K. at tho C >mmcrclal Ilitivl. 8. K. 



$ 



f/ceifie WIJME /rJSiD SflF^IT f^EVIEW 



29 



•CKK^itA HLANCA." 

WfTMORK-lJoUliN CoME'ANY. 

140 Montgomery St , San Francisco. 

WHITE UINKS. 

Saiiterne Souvenir $ 6.00 $ 7.00 

Haiit Saiiterne Souvenir 9.00 10 00 
Cliateau Yiiueni Souv'r 11 00 ta.oo 

\VKT.M0K1M50\VEN COMPANY. 
140 Montgomery street, San Francisco 

ri;d winks. 
Table d'hote Souvenir, .fs 50 $6.50 

St. lulien Souvenir 7.00 S.oo 

Margaux Souvenir 8.00 9.00 

IN .MIUITION rO AIIOVE 

Zinfanciel 400 5.00 

lUirgundy 6.00 7.00 

Riesling 500 6.00 

EL PINAL. 

Tort, X'intage 1S90 5.50 

I'lirt, " iSSS 6.50 

I'ort. ■' 1S86 S.oo 

UUl Trousseau Port 12.00 

Sherry, Vinlage 1S90 5.50 

Sherry, " iSSS 6.50 

Sherry, " 1SS6.... 8.00 
Sherry, arnontillado type 10.00 

.Muscatel 5.50 

.•\ngelica 5.50 

Frontignan 9.00 

Brandy, 1S90 i i.co 

lirandy, 1SS8 i3-5o 

I^rand'y, 1SS6 16.00 

I'randy, 1876 2o.'!0 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

NAGLEE 1!K.\NDV IIOTTLED .\T DISTIL- 
LERY. CASE GOODS. 

White Label O.C. not un'r 25 yrs J20.00 
Ulue Label, I,";, not under 15 yrs 15.00 
Ked Label, O.N'., not un'r loyrs 1200 
Trade discounts according to quality. 

HULK. 

(In packages ol 25 gallons each.) 
Per gal. 

For ages 1S72-1876 $4.00 

" i877-iS,S2 3-50 

1S85-1.SS4 325 

Bitters. 



D. P. ROSSI, 
X.E.Cor.Dupont and Green sts., S.F. 

FERRO i.lL'INA BITTERS. 

12 quarts to case $10.00 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

AROMATIQUE. 

Per case of 12 quarts Jl2.oo 

Imported Wines. 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 
123 California street, San Francisco. 

RED WINES. 

(Barton A: Guestier, Bordeaux.) 

Qts. Pints. 

Floirac ( 7.50 | 8.50 

Chateau L.Trr.. IX .... •'^ ' " q.n> 



t'auiilac, 1SS7 S.50 9.50 

" 1881 9.00 10.00 

St. lulien I.S87 9.00 10.00 

St. Kstephe 1SS7 9.00 10.00 

Chateau du Gallan 18S1 lo.co 

" 1S7S 12.50 

" le Pain, 1S7S 11.50 12.50 

Pontet Canet, 1SS7 1350 1450 

Chat. Beychevelle, 1887 16.00 

1881 1700 

Chateau Langoa 18.00 

" " ;878.. 21.00 22.00 

1S74 . 24.50 25.50 
Chat Brown Cantenac, 

18S7 . 23.00 24.00 

Chat Leoville, 1887 24.50 25.5c 

" 1878 25.50 

" Larose, 1874 24.50 25.50 

" I^fite, 1S74 29.00 30.00 

" Margau.x, 1874... 29.00 30.00 
(11. Cuvillier & frere, Bordeaux.) 

Pauillar, 18S9 9.00 10.00 

.St. Kmilion Superieur. . 10.00 

Chat. Cheval Blanc 1SS9 14.00 

Chateau Leoville, iSSg. 16.50 

Chateau Batailey, 18S1 . 17.50 18.50 

Chat. Kirwan, 1S78 22.00 

Chat. Lapointe Pomerol 

187S 22.00 

Chat. Pontet Canet, 74 23.00 

" Beycheville, 1S74 25.00 

" Larose, 1S70 24.00 

" Talbot d'Aux, '75 24 00 25.00 

" Leoville, 1S7S 25.50 

" Cosd'Estourmer78 28.00 

(Uu Vivier & Co., Bordeaux.) 

St. Marc $7.00 f 8.00 

Pontet Canet 11.00 12.00 

WHITE WINKS. 

(P.arlon & Guestier, liordeaux.) 

Sauternes 1878 

Vin de Graves, 1S78 ... 

Barsac, 1878 

Haut Sauternes 1S87.. 
Haut Sauternes 1874.. 
Chateau Vquem 1884.. 
Chateau Vquem 1874.. 
(H. Cuvillier cS: frere. 
Chateau Giraud, 1884. 

" L'Tour l'>lanche'S4 2S.00 29.00 
(Du Vivier & Co., Bordeaux.) 

Graves premieres 9.00 10.00 

CALIFOKNIAN — RED WINES. 

(A. Duval) 

liurgundy, 1SS9 5.00 

Cabernet Sauvignon, '90 5.00 

CALIFORNIA — WHITE WINES, 

(A. Duval) 

Riesling 1889 4.50 

Chablis 1888 500 

Sauterne 1889 500 

Creme de Sauterne, '89 

(private stock) 7.50 

BURGUNDIES — RED WINES. 

(Bouchard pere & fils, Beaune Cote 

D' Or ) 
Macon 1884 n.oo 12. Oo 

Pommaril IS.SO 16.5,-, 



10.25 
11.50 
12.00 
18.50 
19.50 
31-50 



9-25 
10.50 
11.00 
17.50 
1S.50 

30-50 

36.00 

Bordeaux.) 
28.00 29.00 



6.00 
6.00 



550 
6.00 
6.00 

8.50 



Clos dc \'ougeoi, 18S7 

Monopole) iS-So 26.50 

Chambertin, 1SS4 26.00 27.00 

(Bouchard Pere ..'* Fils, Beaune, 

Cote D'Or.) 
Chablis, 1884 13.50 14.50 

HOCKS. 

(S. Friedborig, Mayence.) 

Laubenheimer, 18S9. .$ 9.50 I10.50 

Liebfraumilch, 1SS9, Se- 
lected Grapes"... 17.00 iS.oo 

Rauenlhaler, 18S4 21.00 22.00 

llochheimer Doni De- 

chauey, 1884 22.50 23.50 

Liebfraumilch, 1S76, 

"Kxtra (Jualitv".. 30.00 31.00 

Sleinberger Cabinet, 

1S76 32.00 33.00 

(Prince .Metternich's Estate) 

Schloss Johannisberger. 

'68 $45.00 $46.00 

SHERRIGS. 

(.Sandeman, Buck & Co., Jerez.) 

Maltese Cross 18.00 

Pemartin Brut 20.00 

" Umbrella 21.00 

" Amontillado. 23.00 
(E. J. Howell, London.) 
Solera Especial 13.50 

MADEIRA. 

(E. ]. Howell, London.) 
Ye Old Style, Puro Es- 
pecial 15.50 

OLD COGNACS. 

(H. Cuvillier & Frere) 
Fine Champagne, "Re- 
serve," 1870 36.00 

(Sazer.ic de Forge & Fils.) 
Very Old Cognac, 1805. 45.00 

GIN. 

Coates & Co's Original 
Plymouth(unsweet- 
ened) 10.50 

SCOTCH WHISKY. 

(Peter Dawson, DulUown.) 
Dawson's "Perfection". 12.50 
" "Special". . . 14. 50 
" "Extra Spe- 
cial" 16.50 

Dawson's "Perfection." 

24 flasks 14.00 

Dawson's "Perfeciion," 

half flasks 16.00 

CH.\MFAGNE. 

Penier-Jouet, Finest 

Extra Quality 

"Special" 33.50 35.50 

Perrier-Jouet, Finest 

Extra Quality, 

■'Brut" 3400 



Gatlitiara in case of 12 bottles.. 6.50 
Nebbiolo. red, sparkling, in 

cases of 12 bottles 8.50 

Brachetto, red, sparkling, in 

cases of 12 bottles 8.50 

Grignolino, in cases i.f 12 bottis 8.50 

Pints $1 per case more. 
C. & F. Giocobini, Allomonte, Cal- 
abria. 
Fancy wines for altar and medical ii.se 
Moscato Calabria, in c'ses 12 btis 7.00 



7.00 
7.. o 
7 00 

7-5-) 



Lacryma Christi, " 12 • 
Tokay, " 12 ' 

Malvasia, " 12 ' 

Count E. Di Mirafiore. 
Barolo,incases()f 12 bottles, 1887. 

CHIANTI WINE — l.S FLASKS. 

|. L. Ruflino, Florence. 

Per case of 2 dozen quarts 11. so 

" 4 " pints 13.00 

WHITE AND RED STILL. 

Pas(|uale Scala, Naples. 
Laciynia Clirisli, per case of 12 

bottles 7.25 

Moscato di Siracusa, per case of 

12 botlles 7.00 

Falerno, red, per case of 12 bot- 
tles 

Capri, per case of 12 bottles. . . 
Pints 75 cents per case more. 

SPARKLING WINES. 

Pasquale Scala, Naples. 

Lacryma, Chrisii, quarts '7 50 

pints 1850 

Filli. Gancia& Co., Canelli (Asli.) 
Moscato, white, in cases of 12 

quarts 14.CO 

Moscato, white, in cases ol 24 

pints 15.ro 

Passaretia, white, in cases of 12 

quarts 13.00 

Passaretta, white, in cases of 24 

pints 14 CO 



7.00 
6.50 



Half Pints, "Special". 



3600 
42.00 per c'se 
of 48 bottles 



L. GANDOLFI & CO., 

427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prices f. o. b. New York.) 

Filli, Gancia & Co., Canelli (.'Vsti.) 

Barbera, in cases of 12 bottles. . 550 

Rarolo. " "12 " .. 700 



HELLM.\NN BROS. & CO., 
52,s Front street, San Francisco. 

SHERRIES. 

Forrester & Co., Jerez, 

in wood, pergallon.$ 1.50 $5.00 
Forrester & Co., Jerez, 

per case 12.00 16.00 

Garvey & Co., Jerez, in 

wood, per gallon.. . 1.75 5.00 

PORTS. 

Oflfley $1.75 to l5-co 

Offley, per case $12.00 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

314 Sacramento street, San Francisco 

A. de Luze & Fils, Bordeaux Clarets, 
percase $8.00 to $28.00 

A.de Luze&Fils, Bordeaux Sauternes, 
percase 12.00 to 26.00 

C. Marey & Liger Belair Nuits Bur- 
gundies, white and red, per case 
15.00 to 23.00 




P. C. ROSSI, 

Pbesident 



^^ 



^4-SWISS Cot- 

A*^ ASTI, SONOriA CO., CAL. ^ vJ 



A. SBARBORO, 

SECRETARY 



ASTI, SONOriA CO., CAL. 

PRODUCERS OF FINE 



'^y 



CALIFORNIA WINES and BRANDIES 

-AND^ 

moHTECHiSTO cHflniPAcriES 

(Xaturally Fkk.menteu i.s- Bottles.) T(cadkmai;k Kkuistickkd o.tohkic Xtu. 18!)-. 

Oiniid Diploiiin or Honor Gol«l »I«-«>"I V,"J*"": }^*^inytl li-ii*-^ 

IliifhoMt AwaiMl <if'H.>:i, Kniv, 1 WO'^ <ioUI M«mI«I <.<>I.....I>iii>i li^xp n, 1W1>:$ 

<i<>l«l M.mUiI Oiililornia 311<l»nit«'i- Fnn", I^5> 1 

MAIN OFFICE, 524 MONTGOMERY STREET - - SAN FRANCISCO 

DEPOT AND CELLARS. 109 BATTERY STREET BETWEEN CALIFORNIA AND PINE STREETS 

1^ C. ROSSI VERMOUTH 

<i<.l<l :M«mIhI Tin-in. I >-i>^ » +> IIiyrli<-Mt A.-\vj«i-a Chioagro, 1894 

■ >-^ j> B ■ r^ ^■^ 1^1 o ^% ^^ r~ A — IMPORTERS OF 

L. GANDOLFI Oc CO., Eastern Agents itauian wimes anu produce 



30 



f/fglfie WIJ^E f^^Q Sflf^lT f^EVltW 



CHARLES BUND'SCHU. PmidenI 



CARL GUNOLACH. VICE Preildenl 



HENRY CUNDLACH. Secretary 





GUXDI^ACll-BLNUSCllU WIXH COMPANY 

Si ioc^es;s;()r>A to J. OL^XDJ^ACH ^S: CO. 
Vineyard Proprietors and Shippers of 

iilil'oriiiii Wiiios ainl lEraiidios, 

I'liiiriill'l'iilis RHINE FARM, NUMWi (\l 




SAN^RANCisco- -/JEW York 



d BACCHUS WINE VAULTS. 438-44-2 Bryant St., S. F 



'/ \j ^ ^ ^y San rranri.srit 0£pce, 



S. i:. con. M.IKKET A Si:CO\D ST& 



-\>H' )■()/•/. Ilniiirh 
S E Cor WAHS «. WASHINGTON STS. 



Itouis \wim\ CMape 

fiighest Grande in the World! 

Used by All the Leading Clubs 

Hotels and Restaurants . . . 

For sale by All First-Class 
(iropcrs anil AViiie ^Ipnhiinfs. 




7 <! 



rriRF.E KINDS. ALL OF LyUAL KXCELLFNCE 

BRUT {(^old Seal) 

An E.\tra I )iy Wine 

G:^AND VIN 5EC {Brown Seal) 

1 he rerkxtion of a Dry Wine 

CARTE BLANCHE ( ^^'^"/^ ^"^^) 

.\ Rich Wine 



Macondray Bros. & Lockard, 



124 SANSOME STREET 

Solo Agents for the racific Coaat. 



Thos. Kibkp.\trick, President 
San Francisco, Cal 



SllEKLKV MOORK, ViCE-PRES'T 
LOIISXIM.H. Kv. 



Q^T^ Dlf^Eei f F^OjVI bOUISVIbbE, KY. -t\ h 



pEEI^CESS U/f;?ISf^IES. 



■» > ■ ) ( • < * 




CU/^l^fifl5EED 



*- > ( ■ > < » 



These U ' 'Uion second iojioud on the lawiiio Coast. 'I'hcy have been given j/ears of trial 

■ ■■ '■ ''■ ' ' -.a.-j ^:.s c.:mmers and &re pronounced w-'' ' i peer. Whc- ,'■'■• •: a trial thet/ speak for 

■ . . .ale in qna,nW'-' '■■> p'v.t ;'" f-'n'-n'^'a or p.^n /;.... - hn 

jESse TvxooRe. hunt CO.. 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 404 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



f/rSIfie WIJME /rJ^JD Sflf^lT I^EVIEW. 



31 



D. M. l"iiierlK-cil, Jr., 

\ (.'o,, Uporto, I'ort 

WiiK's, in wood, 

per gallon 

Uiiti I'.i.rdoii & Co., 

Sheines, in wuod, 

per K^il'o" 

Lacave & Co .Sherries, 

Crown lirand in >s- 
South .Side Madeira. . . 
St. L'roi.x Kiini, LB... 
Arrack "Koyal" Ba- 

tavia 5.00 

Boord \ Son, London 

Dock Sherry, per 

case 12.00 to 

G.M.I'abstniann Sohn, 

Mainz Rhine 

Wines, per case. . . S.50 to 2S.00 
Schulz A: Wagner, 

Krankliirt o M 

Rhine Wines, per 

case 11.00 to 



2.00 to 



2.00 to 

1.40 to 
2.00 to 
550 



to 



7-50 
8.00 
S.oo 

950 
0.00 
11.50 



13-50 

8.50 



SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market St., San Francisco. 

BSCHENAUEK & CO , BORDE.\UX. 

(Juarts 

Medoc 

Merin d'or 

Bouill.ic 

Red Seal 

St. Julien Superior 

White Seal 

Pontel Canet 

La Rose 

Gold Seal 

Graves 

Sauternes 

Mackenzie's Ports and 

Sherries in wood, per 

gallon 1.75 to 4.50 

Mackenzie's Ports and 

Sherries in cases 10.00 to 1 4.1K) 

Hunt, Roope, Teague & 

i^'o.'s Ports in cases ..13.00 to 19.00 

ACHILLE STARACE. 
76 Pearl Street, Xew York. 

IT.\L1AN WINES. — RED WINES. 

(Giuseppe Scala, Naples.) 
LacrymaChristi,i2qts.;J 6.30 per case 
Falerno, " 7.50 " 

Capri, " 6.50 " 

Capri, 24 pts. 7.50 " 

Moscati di Siracusa, 12 

qts.. 

Vesuvius wines in bar- 
rels of about 60 gals. 



Stco Fine, old and dry 1.85 

O S Fine, rich and Iruity... 3.45 

C N Superti Table 3.10 

5-5° Corona Delicious and delicate. 3.25 

Soecial S Granil old wine 4.00 

Nectar— Fino, N. P. U 4.65 

5'50 KIIINK AND MOSEl.LE WINES. 

Williehn Panizz.i, Mayence. 
'•75 Per Case. 

2-5" l.aubenheinier ( S.oo 

Deidesheinier 8 50 

.Viersteiner 10.25 

6.00 Hochheinier 11.50 

l.ieblrauinilch '3.25 

Foster Jesuitgarten 13.75 

'S-co Kudesheinier 14.00 

Ebacher '4 75 

Geisenheimer 17.25 

Marcobrunner 17.50 

Kauenthaler 19.00 

Geisenheini Rothberg 21.00 

Nc-isteinier Relibach 21.50 

14.00 Rutle'heinier Berg ■ 23.00 

Hulk wines at f. o. b. prices. 

PORTS. 

Silva & Cosens. Per Gal. phoenix Bourbon OK, in 5s . 

T— Tawney |i.go ■• .< ^^ .."' 

J 7.00 K— Extra full body and rich.. . 2.05 .. .. a/ 24 pts' 

■' - taw;ney 2.25' •■ '■ Ai,' 48/< ptV 

Rock and Rye Whisky in 5s. . 
T 1> O— Ta 



lESSK MOliRE HUNT CO. IMACONDKAY BROS. & LOCK- 
404 Front Street, San Francisco. ' ARD, Agents. 

Ex P'y inbblsor J^-bbls.|6.oo to J8.00 124 .Sansome street, San Francisco. 
A A " " pf. 4.00 Louis Roederer, Carte 

^ " ■',.'; 350 Blanche $34.00 I36.00 

*- 3.00 Louis Roederer, Grand 

Ryeinbblsand ^^-libls.Jj.so to I5.00 \'in Sec 34.00 36.00 

A A in cases 1 1.00 Louis Roederer, Brut. . 34.00 36.00 

C in cases s.50 

•^ i CHARLES MELNECKE & CO. 

NABER, ALHS & BRUNE. 314 Sacramento street, .San Francisco 

323 and 325 Market St., Snn Francisco I DEUTZ & geldermann, av., ciiam- 



Phoenix Old Hourliori, .\i. 

' old sl'k 

' Ai,9opf 

" '' " OK,ioopf 

" " Pony, pri. sik 

Club House Bourbon, old .^.50 
Gold Medal Bourbon, 100 

Pl" 

Union Club Bourbon, 100 

pl" 

Superior Whisky 

" BB Whisky 

LiouoRS — In Cases. 

Per Case. 

. . 110.50 

.... 7.50 

8.00 

9.00 

7.50 



V T— Very 

V O T — Very old taw'ney 2.35 

T P-Extra tawney, delicate. . . . 2.50 Ri„„ Punch Extract in 5s .r. . . . 8m 

DDAMrv^ Vl^^'-' "l''''°'^,V,v 3.IO Blackberry Brandy in 5s 7.50 

BRANCO— White— Fine White ' ' ^ ' ■' 

Port 3.25 SPRUANCE, STANLEY & CO. 



f2.75 I PAGNE. 

3.00 |Gold Lack Sec, per 

2.50 case I32.00 I34.00 

3.50 Gold Lack Sec. 6 Mag- 

4,00 nums, per case 31.00 

6.00 Cabinet Green Seal, per 

basket 2550 27.00 

nUPANLOUl' & CO., REIMS. 

Carle B anche, per case |2i.oo I22.00 

D. P. ROSSL 

N. E. Cor. Dupont and Green sts.,SF 

Monte Cristo, 12 quarts to case.|i2.oo 

" " 24 pints " 13 00 

Special discount for quantities. 

W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 
39 Broadway, New York. 

SPARKLING SAUMUR. 

Ackerman-Laurence, Saumur, France 

Dry Royal J21.00 I23.00 

Brut " 21.00 23.00 



2.50 

1.25 

1-75 i 
I-50 



12.00 JEWEL— A specialty, old and ' 410 Front street, San Francisco. 

mellow 3.50 Kentucky Favorite $ 3.00 

SO— Superior old 3.85 Extra Kentucky Favorite 3.50 



WILLLFAM WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 
Quarts. Pints. 



a CO EMPEROR— 30 years in wood, O. P. S 2.50 ' urm,„ c^i ,r- 1 /- ' 

^^ grandoldwine 4.75 O K Old Stock ^ White Seal (Grand Cu 



.,^ .__ 5 .00 

M C R—1S27— Choicest Royal. . 6.35 Harries' Old Bourlion 2.00 

Direct shipping orders solicited on Kentucky Favorite, in cases 8. so 

H. -^ " • 
O. 



vee) $34.00 

Brut Imperial 38.00 



I36.00 
40.00 



the most favorable terms. 

TAKKAGONA WINES. 

Jose Boule, Tarragona. 

Qrs. & octs. per gal. 

* Fine, clear and smooth. . ..|i. 15 
ROYAL PURE JUICE — Full 

body and rich 1-25 

TAWNEY PORT— Light color, 

soft and old 1.25 

These wines have none of the ob- Golden Pearl. 
iectionaLle astringency so common 
in wines of this class, and are abso- 
lutely pure. 



O. B. jugs 9.00 

F. C. jugs 10.50 

"'"" "" ' "■■■ 7-50 



.\frican Stomach Bitters, cases. 



Imported Brandies. 



SIEBE BROS & PLAGEMAX. 
322 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

OK Extra 13-50 to |6.oo 

O K Rosedale 2.50 to 3.00 



Ilvai.i. 



2.75 



Marshal! 

Old Family Bourbon. 

Old Bourbon 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market Street) San Francisco. 
(Dubos Freres, Bordeaux.) 
WHITE WINES. iClarets in casks of 60 
Lacryma Christi, 12 qts.$7.50 per case ! gals $95.00 to $160.00 



9.00 

1.05 per gal 



Falerno, 7.50 

Capri, " 7.50 

Capri, 24 pts. 7.50 " 

SPARKLING WINES. 

Lacryma Christi, 12qts.l19.co per case 

" "'24 pts. 20.50 ' 

(L. Laborel Melini, Florence.) 

Chianti Wine in flasks without oil. 

Cases of 2 doz. qts...$i2.5o per case 

4 " pts 



F. Chauvenet, Nuits. Cote d'Or.) 
Burgundy wines in 



, SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market street, San Francisco 
Carlisle in bbls. Reimported 

Spring, 'S9, per gal $ 2.50 

Carlisle in bbls. Reimported 

Spring, '86, per gal 3.25 

Keystone Monogiam Rye in 

cases, per case 14.15 



W. H. CllAl'.MAX. 
123 Californi.i street, San Francisco. 
(H. Cuvillicr and Frere Cognac. ) 
Quarts. 
Fine Champagne, "Reserve," 

.„ 1870 $32.00 

2.25 IGrand Fine Champagne, i860.. 36 00 

i'^^ L. GANDOLFI & CO. 

1.50 427-431 West Broadway, New York. 
(Prices f. o. b. New York.) 
I*** Albert Dubois & Co., 

Cognac, 12 quarts I12.75 

*** Ruppart S:Co., 12 quarts. 10.50 

ITALIAN — FRATEI.I.I BRANCA, MILAN. 

Cogupc Fine Champagne, Croix 
Rouge, per case $10.00 



"f??^in,;=;;H:v-K;*"?^,!^/f°° O'^Saratogaln ca^s, pe^-case 15-^ 



W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 
Jerez de la Frontera. 

SHERRIES. Per Gal. 

No I P Table, full bodied ( , 
iVP Table, very pale \ •■$1.40 

2 P F"ull and round 1 

2VP Very pale, light, fine /• '^o 

3 P Full body, soft, rich I „ 
-,V1' Very pale, light, full t" ' ''S 
l P F'l body, old, mellow ) 



(Deinhard \- Co-, Coblenz.) 
Hock and Moselle 

wines $S.oo to ^32. 00 

(Morgan Bros., Port. St. Mary.) 
Ports and Sherries in 

w'ood, per gallon $2.00 to $5.00 

14.50 per case Ports and Sherriies in 

cases, per case 10.00 to 18.00 

(Mackenzie & Co., Jerez.) 
Ports and Sherries in 
wood, from |i-75 to $4.50 



Mascot Bourbon in bbls per gal 2.25 
Robin Hood Bourbon in bbls, 

per gal 2.50 

herwocd Private Stock in 



HELLMANN BROS. & Co. 

525 Front street, San Francisco. 

E. Remy Martin & Co , Cognac. 

Co'.'uac in octaves per gal. $5. 50 J6.50 

In cases, see special advertisement. 

P. Frapin & Co., Cognac. 



,^ ^^'?! per g« 1 - - - • - ; - . . • . • 3.00 Cognac in octaves per gal . $5.65 $6.50 

O. P. S. Sherwood in bbls, per | Planat & Co., Cognac. 

,,,?«'• ••• .••;••, ; ■ 325 Cognac in octaves per gal. $5.25 

Old Saratoga in bbls, per gal . . 4.00 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 



American Whiskies. 

L. GANDOLFI & CO. 

427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prices f. o. b. New York.) 



E. REMY MARTIN & CO., Cognac. 

HELLMANN nROS. \ CO., AGENTS. 

^.,..i:..i . : , It; , i" 525 Front Street, San Francisco. 

Carlisle reimported. Spring, '90 $2.50 Eau-de-Vie vieiUe 
s Old 



4\'P Very pale.delic'e.dry / " ^''5 "Good Luck Monogram,per case $9.00 
5 P Full body,rich, fruity \ **_ ." " " " " 1000 



5VP Pale, old, fine' -J^-2-5o Liberal 

6 P Extra Full and Iruity \ trade. 
6VP Verv fine and mellow J • ^'^S 

7 Amo A.\IONTILLADO,old 

and nutlv 2.85 

8 CLO OLOROSA, mellow, 

soft 3.25 

9 Rex Superb old Dessert 

Wine 

10 AMUNTILLADO Solera 



discount to the jobbing 



HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 

525 Front Street, San Francisco. 

Blue Grass, per gallon. .$2.00 to $3 50 

Boone's Knoll, per ". .. 2.40 to 4.50 



R. B. Hayden «; Co.' 

Grand Dad, Spring, 'go 2 25 

Mayfield, Spring, '89 2.'6s Fine Champagne;'. ■.■.'.■. 

.\therton. Spring, '90. . 2.35 GrandeChampagne vie- 

Anderson Co., Spring, '9' 1.S5 \\\^ 

Hume, Spring, '89 2.45 GrandeChampagne,ex- 

tra 

Grande Champagne, V 

O P 18.5S 

Grande Champ.agne, S 

O P1S48 

Grand Champagne, V 

SOP, 1S34 

In octaves $ 4.70 to 



Imported Champagnes. 

W. B. CHAP.^L\N. 
123 California street, S.an Francisco 
Perrier Jouet & Co. 

"-Speiial" ......$33.50 

Perrier, Reserve Dry.. 34.00 
Perrier, Jouet & Co. 

Brut 34.00 



135.50 
36.00 



$15-00 
17.00 
19.00 
20.00 

22.00 

25.00 

30.00 

3S-00 

50.00 
6.25 



36.00 



KOLB & DENBARD. 
3-35 420-426 Montgomery St., S. Francisco Half pts "Special" $42 in cases of 48 
,.„. II...- Per Gal. Per cs. bottles 

very old and nutty 4.40 Mr.nr.nr..; I t, r^ •-, ,„ 

u QUEEN VICTORIAVand ft;:;;:.;! A. •.•.•.■.; I i! :•.■.^'.•^ ''•'° 

°''' """<-■ S-65 Nonp.areil AA 5.00 

\- 1 , A r-f ^<-'*'- "f ?• , Canteen 3.50 

^^'.\^' A Clean, sound wme . . $1.25 Canteen O P S 5.S0 

B Full body and rich 1.50 "' 

Special >f Soft, full and fine t.6o CHARLES MELNECKE & 



9.00 
12.00 

8.00 
11.00 



, „ CO. 

W Soft, full body i.7S 3>4 Sacr.imento St., San Francisco. 

B Clean and sound-Fino 1.80 John Gibson Son & Co. $2. 00 to $4.00 



HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 
525 Front street, San Francisco. 
Kriig & Co. "Private 

Cuvee" per case $34.00 $36.00 

Joseph Perrier fils & 

Co., per basket 19.00 20.00 

Adrien & fil.e, per bas- 
ket 17.00 18.00 



CHARLES MELNECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco 
Champ Vineyard Pro- 
prs. Co , Boutelleau 
& Co. managers Cog- 
nac in Octaves per 

gal.. $ 5-25 to 8.50 

The Vineyard Proprs. 
Co. Boutelleau & 
Co., managers Re- 
serve Vintages $11.00 to 14.00 



32 



PASIfie WljslE /f|^D SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



W. A.TAYLOR & CO 

39 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



RERRESENTING 



GONZALEZ, BYASS & CO., 
SUVA & COSENS, - 
BLAND! BROS. & CO. 
ACKERMAN-LAURANCE, 
WILHELM PANIZZA. 
MARTINI & ROSSI. - 
I & V. FLORIO. - 
PfTER F. HEERING, - 
REIN & CO., - 



Sherries 

Ports 

Madeiras 

Sparkling Saiiiiiiir 

Rhine Wines 

Vermouth 

Marsalas 

Cherry Cordial 

Malagas 



JOSE BOULE, 
A. BRONDUM & SON, 
ROUYER. GUILLET & CO., 
JOHN JAMESON & SON, Ltd. 
THE AROBEG DISTILLERY CO., 
CHAS. TANQUERY & CO., 
MAGNUM BRAND, - - 
MAGNUM BRAND, 
MAGNUM BRAND, 



Tarragonas 

Acquavlt 

Brandies. 

Irish Whisky 

Scotch Whisky 

Old Tom Gin 

Jamaica Rum 

St. Croix Rums 

Holland Gin 



ORDERS SOLICITED FOR DIRECT SHIPMENTS. 



SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS IN TERMS, PRICES, ETC. 



S R E C I 

John Jameson & Son, Limited 

FAMOUS 

IRISH WHISKY 

III all lanJs it is recognized as beinj; 

WITHOUT AN EQUAL! 

Sells in Dublin, at auction, for nearly (knilile the jirice 
of any otlier Irish whisky 

CHAS. TANOUERAY & CO. 
OLD TOn iDd UNSWEETENED 6iN 

The hiirliost (yi)e of Engiisli (iin.s. Fast heeoniing 
liopular in the Ea.st. 

WILL SELL THEMSELVES. 



M L. T i E S 

SCOTCH WHISKY 

'GOLF CLUB" 'PIBROCH 



»5 



These two Whiskies are the finest types of Scotch 
Whisky to be found anywhere. Won in their 
class in competition against the best known 
brands in the market. 



I ( 



RED LION" 



I 

I 



JAMAICA RUMS 



An exceedingly fine. oKl Lomhm Dock Cased Rum. 



IF YOU WANT THE BEST, TRY IT. 



SOLE AGENTS W. A. TAYliOl^ St CO. 39 BROADWAY, N. Y. 



p = 

W A. TAVLOK iV; Co.. 
39 Bro.ulrtay, New York. 

COC.NAC URANDIKS. 
ROUVER, GUILLET & CO., COt;N.\C. 

Vintage. Qi. Casks per jjal. 

1886 $ A^5 

18S4 5.40 

1875 6.55 

iS6g 7.40 

1840 12.25 

VSO 17.50 

Octaves, 5 cents per gal extra. 

CASES. 

Cases * 14-50 

t " •» 16.20 

( " •»» 17.80 

" *»»■» __^ 1950 

WII.I.IAM WOLFF & CO. 

329 M.irket street, San Francisco. 

Marteli's Branily, * percase $15.00 

" " *'' " 17.00 

" " *** " 19.00 

VO " 26.00 

" VSO " 32.00 

" VSOP " 50.00 

" " in octaves 5.00109.25 



pycSlfie WIJNIE /:J^D Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



Imported Whiskies. 

\V. U. CHAPMAN, 
123 California street, San Francisco. 

SCOTCH WHISKY. 

Dawson's " Perfection" I12.50. . . 

Old Highland " E.xtra Spe- 
cial" 13.00... 

Old Highland " Special Liq- 
ueur" 16.00... 



HKLL.MAN BROS. S: CO. 
525 Front street, San Francisco. 
|. H. Sheriff t't Co., Lochindale 
Islay, Scotch whisky in wood, 
per gallon I3 So 

HELLMANX BROS. & CO. 
525 Front street, San Francisco. 

J. B. Sherrifr tS; Co. Lochin- 
dale Islay, Scotch whis- 
ky per case 12.00 

Dublin Distillers Co. Ltd., 
Dublin, Irish whisky, 
in wood, per gallon. . . 4 50 

Dublin Distillers Co. Ltd., 
Dublin, Irish whisky, 
per case 1 2 00 

CHARLES MELNECKE & CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
Boord & Son, London Finest 

Irish Malt Whiskey 12.0 ) 

Royal Hghld Scotch \V'hi.iky 12.50 

John Ramsay, Islay Malt 

Scotch Whisky 13-50 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 

212-214 Market street, San Francisco. 

Burke's * * • Irish, cases 12.00 

* * » » " " 14.00 

" Garnkirk Scotch " 12.25 

" Viceregal Scotch " 13-50 

Lawson's Liquer " " i3-5o 

L'am Var, " " 12.00 

McKenzie's Glenlivet * * * 

Scotch, per case 12.50 

Bushell's Club Irish, in wood 

per gallon 4.50 

W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 

39 Broadway, New York. 

The Ardbeg Distillery Co., Islay. 

Qrs. Octs. 

New I385 I3.90 

One Year 4.20 4,25 

Two Years 4.55 4.60 

Tnree Years 495 5.00 

CASES. 

one doz. bot. Ji t.oo 

■ ' 13-00 

■ " * * 20.00 

JOHN JAMESON & SONS, DUBLIN. 

Qrs. Octs. 

New f4.oo $4.05 

One Year 4.40 4.45 

Two Years 4.70 4.75 

Three Years 5.05 5.10 

Four Years 5.45 5.50 

CASES. 

I doz bot. |i2, K 

• 14-50 

*• 24.00 



WILLIAM WOLFF .>c CO. 

329 Market street, San Francisco. 

Canadian Club . . ..per case ... f 15.00 

IRISH WIIIsKlKS. 

(Wni. [ameson & Co., Dublin) 

Green Diamond, per case 10 50 

GoUl Diamond " 11.50 

Three Diamond " 1450 

In octaves, proof 122, per gal . . . 4.00 

SCOTCH WHISKIES. 

(Andrew I'sher iS: Co.) 

Old Vatted Glenlivet, per case.. 12.00 

Special Reserve, per case 13-50 

"The Very luiest," per case.. .30.00 
In octaves, proof 1 1 1, per gal .... 4.25 

Domestic Champagnes. 

A. FINKE'S WIDDW. 

S09 Montgomery street, San Francisco 

Prices on application. 

Liberal Discount to the trade. 

FRASli & CO. 
87, S9 & 91 Hudson street, New York. 

Imperial Cabernet, quarts $7-oo 

" " pints S.oo 

A discount to the trade. 

ARPAD HARASZTHY. 
San Francisco, California. 

THKhE NEW BRANDS. 

"Haraszthy .Sec" $16.50 $19.00 

"Haraszlhy Dry" 15-50 18.00 

"Haraszthy Brut " 14-50 17. co 

Eclipse Extra Dry i4-5o 17.00 

I'wo year's natural fermentation in 

bottle. 
Trade discounts mailed on application 

ITALIAN-SWISS COLONY. 
L. Gandolfi & Co., Proprietors. 
427-431 West Broadway, New York. 
Montecristo, extra dry, naturally 

fermented, in cases of 12 qts .$12 00 
Montecristo.extra dry, naturally 
fermented, in cises of 24 pts. 14.00 
Liberal discount to the trade. 

PAUL MASSON, 
San Jose, California. 
Less than 5 cases. 
Premiere Cuvee, Dry. . $16.00 $18.00 
" " Special 16.00 iS.oo 

Special discount for quantities of 5 
cases or more. 

A. W^ERNER & CO. 

52 Warren street. New York. 

Extra Dry $7.00 $8.00 

Syrups, Cordials, Etc. 

KOLB & DENHARD, 
421 Montgomery street, San Francisco 

Rock Candy Syrup 75c. per gal. 

Raspberry Syrup 75c. " 

Oigeat Syrup 75c. " 



1-25 



Parragona Port in 's casks 

per gallon 

A<lrien M. Warde's Italia de 

Pisco, per case 30.00 

Sardines, brand "Philippe & Canaud" 

KOLB «: l)i;.\llARD, 
426 Monlgonieryslre-jt.San Francisco 
Birch'sCrystal Bel fist Ginger Ale — 

Lots of 5 barrels $'2.75 

I barrel 13 so 

Net cash. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

(BOORD & SONS, LONDON.) 

Old Tom Gin, per case $1 r.oo 

Pale Orange Bitti rs, percase.. 1150 
Ginger Brandy. Liqueur "... 12.00 
Jani.iic.i Rum, Old prcase i2.ooto 14.00 
LAIN Royal 15at.ivia Gui in 
cases of 15 large black 

bottles per c.ise 23.50 

in cases of 15 large 
white bottles per case 24.50 
K irs ch wasser, Macholl 
Freres Bavarian High- 
land, per case 20.00 

.Swan Gin in yi casks 3.75 

Double Eagle Gin in 3.^ csks 3.60 

|ohn Ramsay Islay Scotch 

Whisky in J s casks 4.75 

Boord's Pineapple brand Ja- 
maica Rums in }i casks5.25 to 6.50 



Imported Goods. 

(MISCELLANEOUS.) 

W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California street, San Francisco. 

Plymouth Gin (unsweetened) |i5.<X) 

L. GANDOLFI S: CO., 

427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prices f. o. b. New York) 

Fili Mancabelli, Brescia. 

Anesone,casesof 12 bots, prcase $11.50 

l-'ERNKT OK IlLANCA BITTERS. 

tlli. Branca & Co., Milan. 

25 case lots and above, qts 11.00 

10 " " " " ■'•25 

S " " '■ " 11-50 

Single case, qts 1 2.00 

Case of 24 pints bottles 10.50 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO., 

525 Front street, San Francisco. 

Blankenheym & Nolet. 

Union Gin 2 60 

V'aughan Jones 
OldJTom Gin, in cases.. 11.00 

Orange Bitters " 11-50 

Patterson & Hibbert 
Bass' Stout, per double doz 3.00 

Guinness' Stout, " " 3.50 

H. Underberg-Albrecht. 
BoonekampolMaag Bit' rs 12.75 to 11.75 

J. B. SherriffiS: Co. 
[amaica Rum in Usand^ss 

per gallon 4.30105.10 



W. A. TAYLOR cS: CO. 
39 Broadway, New York. 

MAGNU.M HRAND, JAMAICA RUM. 

Qrs. Octs. 

A— Full body $3.90 $3.95 

B — Rich, fat and old 4.30 4.35 

C — Superfine, extra 5.05 5.05 

MAGNU.M 3.10 3.50 

GINS. 
CHAS. T.\SQUERAY it CO., LONDON. 

Bulk. 

Old Tom Gin, quarter casks $3.25 

Old Tom Gin octaves 3.30 

Cases, one dozen each 8.75 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market street, San Francisco. 
Per case 
A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

large black bottles. . $21.50 

A. Houtman S: Co's Gin, 

medium black bottles 18.50 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

small black bottles.. 9.00 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

large while bottles.. 22.50 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

medium'whitebottles 19-50 

A. Houtman &Co's Gin, 

small white bottles. . 9.50 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

octaves per gallon. . . 3.55 

Bass' Ale in wood, hhds. 50.00 

JoulesStone Ale in wood, 

hhds 50.00 

Ross Ginger Ale, per bbl 1500 

•' Soda Water, per case 7.00 

" Tonic Water, " 7.00 

" Potash Water, " 7.00 

" Raspberry Vinegar6 to 

gal. per case 7.00 

" Raspberry Vinegar 8to 

gal. per case 6'oo 

" Lime JuiceCordiaI6to 

gal per case 6.00 

" LimeJuiceCordial 8 to 

gal. per case 4.50 

" Lime Fruit Juice 6 to 

fal. per case 4.60 

.ime Fruit Juice 8 to 

gal. per case 3.50 

" Orange Bitters, percase 8.00 

Burke's Bass' Ale pints, per 

bbl of 8 doz :6.oo 

Burke's Guinness' Stout, 

pts, per bbl of S doz. . 16.00 

I Burke's lamaicaRum percs 12.50 

" Old Tom Gin " 10.75 

" Dry Gin " 10.75 

" Hennessy Brandy, 

per case 16.00 

" Port Wine, Gato br'd 

per case 10.00 

Fleischnian's Royalty Gin, 

10 gal. pkage-s, per gal 2.25 

Fleischnian's Royally Gin, 

15 S'''- pkages, per gal 2.32^ 



Fleischnian's Royally Gin, 

20 gal. pkages, per gal 2.20 

Fleischnian's Royally (iin, 

50 gal. pkges, per gal. 2.15 

Meinhold's Anchor Brand 

Cider, per lase, (|uarts 3.25 

.Meinhold's Anchor Brand 

Cider, per case, pints. 4.00 

WILLIAM WOLFF S: CO. 
329 M.irket street, San Francisco. 
J.deKuvperS:.SonsGin,large bot 20.00 
" " med. " " 16.00 

" " small 9.00 

Cantrell & Cochrane Belfast Gin- 
ger Ale per barrel of 10 doz. 15.00 
Wolle's Schiedam Schnapps per 

case, quarts 9.50 

Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps per 

ciise, pints 10.50 

Benedictine, percase, quarts ...20.00 

" " pints 21.50 

Tlieo. Lappe's Genuine Aroma- 

tiepie per case 1 2.00 

Gilka Kummel per case 12.50 

Dog's Head Brand of Bass' Ale 
Per case 8 doz. pints, glass, 

Read Bros. , London 14 60 

Per case 4 cioz quarts, glass. 1300 
Dog's Head Brand of Guinness' 

Stout, per CS. 8 doz pts, glass 14.00 
Per case, 4 doz (juarts " 12.40 
pidTom Gin, Sutton, Garden & Ccio.oo 
jCreme de Menthe, E. Cusenier 

fils Aine & Co 16.00 

PousseCafe,E. Cusenier, AineCo. 15.50 
Maraschino, Romano ViahovZara 15, 50 
Baiavia Arrack, 12 quart bottles 12.00 
Jamaica Rum in octaves, proof 

116, per gallon 4.50 

Kir-chwasser, Macholl Bros., .. 18 00 
.Nordhauser Kornbranntwein cases 12 

jugs, Red label jo.oo 

Black label 16.00 

Cherries in Maraschino. 12 qts . 10.00 
French Vermouth, Noilly Prat&Co 6. 75 
Grand Marnier, 12 bottles, large 20.00 
" 24 " small 21.50 

f.H.Schroeder's Cocktail Bitters 

24 pints 12.00 

Chianti, Giorgi Giglioli, Leghorn 

Italy— quarts 10.00 

pints 1 1.00 



Mineral Water. 



JOHN CAFFREY, (representing 
CHAS. GRAEF & CO., New York) 

47 First street, San Francisco. 
APENTA HUNGARIAN BITTER 
WATER, 
ex San Francisco Warehouse. 

5 CASE LOTS. 

Case of 50 glass bottles $ 7.50 

" 100 glass quarter bottles 750 
Payable 6 months from date of invoice. 
Subject to a rebate of 50 cents per 
case on certain conditions ; particu- 
lars on application. 
APOLLINARIS NATURAL MIN- 
ERAL WATER, 
ex San Francisco Wareh'se, 10 cs lots. 
Case ofsoglass qtsApollinaris 7.50 
" 100 " pts " 10.50 

•' 100 " "splits"— hlf pts 

— Apollinaris S.oo 

Payable 30 days from dale of invoice. 

Subject to a rebate of 50 cents per case 

on certain conditions ; particulars 

on applicalion. 

FREDRICHSHALL APERIENT 

WATER. 

ex San Francisco Warehouse. 

Per case of 50 bottles (5 case lots) 10.00 



WILLIAM WQLLF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

JOHANNIS MINERAL WATER, /OLLHAUS 

GERMANY. 

TEN CASES OR MORE. 

Case of 50 quarts $ 6. 25 

" 100 pints 9.75 

" 100 splits 7.50 

ONE CASE. 

Case of 50 quarts 7. 25 

'! 100 pints 10.7s 

" 100 splits 8.25 

(Terms — Net 30 days) 

llUNVADl JANOS. 

Case of 50 bottles, percase $iroo 

5 cases and over, per case 10.00 



34 



f/eifie wi;^E /tJsid spif^it f^eview. 



LEADING DISTILLERS. 



ADDRESS. INSURANCE. 



BRAND. 



B0URB0^4S. 



BELLE of ANDERSON D'G CO. 
Add: S. Grceiibaum, Louisville. 
Rate 1.25 



Belle of Anderson, 
Gleiiarinc, 
Jessamine, 
Arliiiirtoii. 



MELLW'OOD DIS'Y CO. D. No. 34 1 
Louisville, Ky i 
Rate 85c. 



Melwood 
Dun Dee. 



EARLY TIMES DIST'Y CO. 
Early Tiincs Ky. D. No. 7 
5 M. E. of Bardstown. Kntes, 1.25 
Ad.l : B. H. Hurt, Louisville 



Early Times, 
A. G. Nail, 
Jack Beam, 



0. F. C. DISTILLERY. D. No. 113 

Frankfort 
Add : Geo. T. Stagg Co., Frankfort 

Rat*- 8oc. 



0. F. C, 

Carli.slc. 



SUNNY BROOK and 

WILLOW CREEK DIST'G GO'S 
Distilleries, Louisville, Ky. 
Coutract'g Offices, 128-30 Franklin st. 

Chicago, 111. 
ROSENFELD BROS. & CO.,proi.'is 
Rates, 8.JC. and 81 Nns, ."> and 297 



J. B. WATHEN cv rt ». 

Louisville 
Rate 85c. 

OLD TIMES DIST'Y CO., 

Distillery No. 1 Louisville 

Rates, §1.00 and §1.25 



Willow Creek, 
Sunnv Brook. 



J. B Walthen & Bro., 
Kentucky Criterion. 



Old Times. 



OLD KENTUCKY DIST'Y CO., 
Louisville, Ky. 
Rates, §1.00 and §1.25 

E. J. CURLEY & CO., D. No. 3 & I5 | 
Camp Nelson 

l;:it(-: '•B,""1),""K" 1.2:.. ■•r," :!.."in 



Kentucky Comfort 

and 

Gladstone. 

Blue Grass, 

Boone's Knoll. 



ADDRESS, INSURANCE. 



GREENBRIER DIST'Y CO. 

Greenbrier D. No. 329 

Add : Win. Collins ct Co., Louisville. 

Rate 1. .'"">. 



BRAND. 



Greenbrier, 

1;. 1;. Ilavdvn. 



ANDERSON & NELSON DIST'S 

Co., Louisville. 
Add : Anderson A Nelson Distil- 
leries Co. Rate 85c. Louisville. 



Anderson, 
Nelson, 
Buchanan. 



R. F. BALKE & CO. D. No 12. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Rate 85c. 



" G. \V. S." 

Old W'n term ill 

R u m 1 V mede. 



OLD KENTUCKY DISTILLERY, 

D. Ml scliendorf, 

205 W. Main St., Louisvjllo, Ky. 

In.surance: 80c., §MiO and §1.25. 



Kentucky Dew. 



RYES. 



SUSQUEHANNA DIST'G CO., 

Milton. 
Add : Jas. Levy & ])vo., Cincinnati. 
Rates 85c A 1.25. 



Susquehanna. 



NORMANDY DIST'G Co., 

Louisville, Kv- 
P. 0. Box 2.'.o^. 

Rate S5c. 



Normandy. 
Rubicon. 



A. OVERHOLT & CO., 
Add : A. Overholt & Co., Pittsburg, 
Pa. Rate 80c. 


Overholt. 


J. B. WATIIEN & CO., 
Louisville. 
Rate 85c. 


Lackawanna Rye. 



ANDERSON & NELSON DIST'G j 
Co., Louisville. I 

Add : Andei-son & Nelson Distiller's 
Co. R:ile S5c. Louisville. 



Nel.son. 



#5#v 



^i 



cH&Di 



Best Line 

TO 

Indianapolis, 
Cincinnati 

AND THE 

South. 

CITY TICKET OFFICE: 
232 Clabu Strcct, - Chicago 



Louisville, St. Louis &l Texas Railway 



BEECHWOOD ROUTE." 



Consign your shipments from Louisville and 
interior Kentucky points, care of the Lou'sville. 
St. Louis & Texas Railway, which is a direct 
line to Pacific Coast points and same will re- 
ceive prompt attention. 

For rates and other information, address 
the undersigned : 

L. S. Parsons, J. K McCracken, H- C. Mordue, 
Traffic Man'K Gen Man'R, Asst. Gen Frt. Agt 

Louisville, Ky. Louisville, Ky. Louisville, Ky. 



fJkQ\^\(t WIJNL f^^D Sflf^lT PREVIEW 



CLASSIFIED INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



3 



CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

California Wine Association 21 

Carpy. C. & Co -^1 

Cliaiiche & Bon 6 

KistMi X'incyard Company .... 6 

Gundlach, J. <S: Co 30 

Guasti & Bernard 4 

Haraszthy, Arpad 6 

'lian-Swiss Colony .... 29 

der C^ Van Bergen 21 

er & Frohling 21 

1 ?: IVnliard." 5 

1 man tt jacobi / 28 

I iiman Co. , S 21 

Iwann, C. M 6 

Napa X'alley Wine Co 21 

National Wine Association 22 

Smith, Julius P 4 

Starace, Achille 2 

\'ina Distillery 34 

,\\"est, Geo. & Son 22 

Wetmore-Bowen Company 3 

DIS TILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Crown Distilleries Company 2 

Curley E. J. & Co 5 

rGuckenhcimer, A. & Bros 27 

[ Leading Distillers' Cards 34 

Lew, las. & Bro 36 

Mayhew, H. B. & Co 4 

Meinecke, Charles & Co 25 

• Monarch, R 26 

A. Senior & Son i 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

Chapman, W. B 20 

llnke's Widow, A : 28 

1 1 illman Bros. & Co i g 

Larhman, S. Co ■ 21 

Macondrav Bros. <& Lockard =5 

R-ssi, D. P 28 

'^ r-rwood & Sherwood 

WOirr, Wm. & Co 



' / 
18 



IMPORTERS. 



IMPORTliD BRANDY. 

E. Remy Martin & Co., Heliman, Bros. & Co., Agts. 13 

Caffrey, fohn (representing Charles Graef & Co.) . . 12 

MINERAL WATI'RS. 

Apollinaris Com])any, Ltd t 

WoUr, William & Co 26 

SYRUPS. CORDIAL.S, BITIERS, IRLNE JUICE. 

Erlenbach, Martin . . 17 

Kolb & Denhard 5 

Rudkin, Win. H 28 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Big Four Railway Routes 34 

Bonestell & Co., Paper Dealers 26 

Korbel, F". & Bros., Redwood Tanks 28 

Goodyear Ruhljer Co 2 

Henderson, Wm. G 30 

Hercules Gas Engine Works, Gas and Distillate 

Engines 15 

Loew's System Filter 11 

Loma Prieta Lumber Co ?8 

Monon Route, 1000-Mile Tickets 34 

O'Brien, James, Saloon 4 

Sanders & Co., Coppersmiths 4 

Wandelt, Samuel, Cooper and Tank Builder 26 

Wayland & Co., Wine Finings 14 

Zellerbach & Sons, Paper 28 



Cpesta Blanea 

SOUVENIR VINTAGES. 

Gold Medal, Paris Exposition, 1869 

LOCATION OF VINEYARD: LIVERMORE, ALAMEDA CO , CAL. 

Far-Simile of Lnb'l on Ofiiuine Creata Blanea Wiiim 



Chapman, W. B 

Hcllman Bros. & Co 

Micondray Bros. & Lockard, 

Sherwood & Sherwood 

Starace, .Achille 

Tavlor. W. A. & Co 

Wdlff, Wm. & Co 



20 

13 
30 
16 



32 
18 



I'Rurr BRAXD^• distilli-rs. 

Wa'den l^ Co 



S. F. WHOLESAI.I". LIOUOR DEALERS. 



Kolb i^v: Denhard 

Moore, I lunt &; Co 

Martin, E. & Co 

Kabcr. Alfs & Brune .... 
Siebe Bros. <S: Plagemann 
Spruance, Stanley <!<: Co. . 



30 
4 
4 



CrESTA BkANCA SOUVeNiR V1NTAGC6 

S A U T E R N E-S O U V E N I R 



DAL PARIi tifCMT.CI l^B.i 




CRESTA BLANCA 



San Francisco Depot 



*> ^^»-■«^/^*»«•<-c»•, 



140 MiKTCOucnr St, 



These Wines are ser\-ecl to the Guests ol all the le.icling Hotels and 
Restaurants on the Pacific Coast. 

For price-list apply t<i 

WET(nORE-BOWEN (0- 

14C MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 

BOnilNn CEL1.4SS. corner L«RKIN and MCALLISTER STS 



4: 



f/teifie WIJSIE /rJMD SflF^IT PREVIEW. 





i&LIQUORffi ■' 

;,GtNTS FOR v) 




S 




323-325 Market St., S. F. 



D. V. B. HE.NAlllE. 

E. MARTIN & CO., 

IJiroiiTEKS AKD WHOLESAXE 

mQDOH mERCHA[lTS, 

411 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Snr.K AOEXTS FOR 

J. F. CUTTER AND ARGONAUT OLD BOURBONS. 



UnPORTHm TO DISTILLEBS iD WINE PKERS. 

Iliis cul r.piiscnts our latest Ini- 
proveil Coiitiiiuons Still uliieh has 
been ptTfericd .ilit-r years of experi- 
ment and large expense. 

Thl» Still hit'* thp adTinitiiife OTer. 
nil oIIhts. -sit is ci :i>ni>niic il, easily 
operaterl and separates the aldehyde 
and other inlerior oils and makes a 
pure and lii:4h-rlass brandy; anil re 
(Inees the cost failj- iiiuetj per oer 
in labor and fuel. It reijiiircs < 
little or no w.iter and utilizes all 
heretoibre wasted. 

We refer to Geo. West 
Stockton; John UHEELfcK, ' 

111 ll.SDS CP OOPPFR VOKI DOH tl SBOET ' 

SANDERS & ' 

421 and 423 MISSION STREIT, SAN i 
Pat'd Skpt. 29, iSgi. 




CHAS. W. FOBE. 



JOHN .SPKL'.VNL'E. 



Spruance, Stanley & Co, 

IMI'0)!TF,l;S ANT) ,Tni;T:ri;S ov ri\R 

Wpes, Wiiies aiiH Lipois. . 

Sole agents for the Celebrated African Stomach Bitters. 

410 FnosT Btkeet, - - S.4N FitAXCisico, Cal. 



OLIVINAVINEYARD. 

The OLIVINA comprises 600 Aeres of Hill 

Side Vineyard, Located in tt.e 

Livermore Valley. 

i^ DRY, DELICATE. WELL MATURED TABLE 
WINES A SPECIALTY. 
gEND FOR gHMPLE ORDER, 
Correspondence Solicited by the Grower 

JULIUS PAUL SMITH, LIVERMORE. CAL. 

N. Y. Or ict. 65AND67 DuaneStbcct; 




i 



.I^'llN llKKNAKI 



.SECONDO GfASTl. 



Quasti &. ^svnavd, 



M S- M^^^^ # S». 



Grou'cr.i o.nd DM HI erg of - : 



INTEBNHL REVEiE BUD BOSTOBIS BROKERS. California WIIIES 00(1 BBBIIES 

THE EXHOFTAT ON OF GRAPE BRANDY, WHISKY /:ND \ F ^ •«»«». mm m^y^^m.mmm.mm^ 



THE EXHOFTATON OF GRAPE BRANDY, WHISKY /:ND 

SPIRITS FROM BOND OR WITH PRIVILEGE OF 

DRAWBACK, SPECIALTIES, 



Dealers inU S. Standard I lydromctersand Extra Stems, Prime's Wantage 

Rods, Die Wheels and l.auKing ro<ls. Also Distillers', Rectifiers, 

Wholesale l.iqiiiir De.ilers and Brewers' Bndljs. 



Winery at Guasti & Bernard's Spur, Between West 
Glendale aiid Tropica, Cal. 



OFFICE, 424 BATTERY STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



p. O. Box 2409. 



Telephone 646. 



bAf^GE PR09U(2Ef^S Of SWEET WINES. 

Viiiii (i/licc. Cor. .'Ill (I lid WdiiiciJii .Sts., I.<is .liij/i/c.s. I nl. 



WALDEN 6l CO. 

Geyser Peal< Vineyards and Brandy Distiilery 

GF.YSr.R] II.I.I-:. SOXOM.l CO.. C.IL. 

Walden Cognac, Manzanita Sherry, &c. 

OLD BRANDY IN CASES, BRANOIED FRUITS. 

WALDEN COGNAC is ni.i.ie alter llx- Irene h tortnida. from sclc< ted fresh Krapes, has been success- ' 
hilly introdured, and is now rej;nlarly sold in the princi|i.il m.irkets ol Europe, in competition with French 
i.onnar. (Jflicial German and KnKlish chemists have pionoiinced it the purest Brandy which comes to their 

markets. , . ., • ■ 

It is especially suitable for the dniK trade and others, where purity is demanded. \\ hiU- al)road these 
;;oods successfnllv compete, payin'.: the same duties as ihe I-rench. the American buyer has the advantaKc m 
price, between the Internal Revenue t.ix assessed here and the Customs duties on foreign Brandies. 

SAMPI RS WII.I. IIK SKNT ON API'l.KATION 

EASTERN OFFICE, 20 PEARI. STKKFT. XKW ^-ORI•C. 





"RADE-M 'JRK 



i 



f/eifie WIJME /JNtD SflF^lT '^EVIF'A 



KOLB & DENH ARD 



OLD NONPAREIL 

BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES, 



CALIFORNIA 

WINES and BRANDIES. 

OFFICE AND VAULTS 

420-i06 MOSTGO.UERY ST., S.I.V FRAyClSCO. 

TEi.EriioxK No. 50UC. 




IMPORTERS AND SOLE AGENTS 
PACIFIC COAST FOR 

B I RCHS 

CRYSTAL 

Belfast Ginger Ale 








PlSTILLERs 




felaci5^. 




OPrEFU . 









M 



iJAND MADL. • « 

♦ ♦ 50URMA5H Whiskey. 

Jes5an7ipe Co. 



Tliese n'litskies arc vtadc in the Fudiohs '• UT.l'E cn.lSS nrainS" so Q^ 
Justlfi celebrated as the home of the Jitirst M'hiskles in the ^t'orl^l. and 
\rhirh hare fjcen jar titc latit Ceiitttrif, rccofintzctl o.s sttrh, ffiriiifj the char- 
acter and Itiqh standinij to KKSTl'CliY tyillSK lt:S uhlch .'/iri/ now enjoij. 



BOURBONi^l 

E.J.CURLEY&.COJ 

lESSAMINE CO. 

KENTUCKY. 



THESE TAMOUS WHISKIES CAN BE HAD IN LOTS TO SUIT THE TRADE FROM 

HELL/V\A/N/N B-ROS. 3c CO.. 5^5 p-RO/NT STHEET. SA/N p-RA/NeiSeO. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR THE 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 

$l.SO Per Year. 



6 



f/VGIfie WIJ^E >VJMD SpiF^IT f^EVIEW. 
139-^+ -^RIU7VYPH7=^WT T^CKIN 1595 

EUROPEAM QUALITY RECOGMITIO/S 



BELGIUM 



FRANCE 



FRANCE 



FRANCE 



IRELAND 








Awarded 37 Gold, Silver and Bronze Medals ! 

THE HARASZTHY CHAMPAGNES 



CALIFORNIA 



iSKi:'i" l>K'^■ !-;xri\'A i>in:\- 

530 WASHINGTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 




0. M. MANN 

Successor to I. DE TURK- 

Wines and Brandies, 



BRANDY 


SAUTERNE 


PORT 


GUTEDEL 


SHERRY 


RIESLING 


ANGELICA 


BURGUNDY 


MUSCAT 


CABERNET 


TOKAY 


ZINFANDEL 


MADEIRA 


XX CLARET 


MALAGA 






I 



VINEYARDS: 

Sonoma County, Cal. 

OFFICE AND CELLARS: 

216-218-220 Sacramento and 221 Commercial Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



%farfi 




TJHE j-ll(aHEST AWARD f ARIS EXPOSITIO;^ 




Elstabl isi-j-ad 

CiuerfTiore l/alley, <$di 

laBQ. 



^o 



)^, 



-^9; 



,00^ 



L^ 



^^^:,^-^ 



A. G. GHAUGHE, Proprifilof. 

Office akd Dhcot ,17Fibbt St., Son FrsnciM 



1889. 



GObD JVIEI3AL. 



CKAUCHE. &. BON, Successor to A. G. CHAUCHE 

S,.i.> Ociu'ini Aneiili tor tin- MorsT-IiortiK 'Vink> 



• - 








ii^' v.L, 





Gold Medal for Sherries and Sweet Wines, Dublin Exposition, 1892. 

EISEJVI VII^EYARD CO. 



■/'/0\!:!:A' /'ROPCCI-RS OF- 



■^1 



^ W JE E T ^^ IJS^ES '\<r 



t.' u A. Htl 



Send for Prico List 
and Samples . , 



Office, 12 Stevenson Street. S. F. 










^•^r-^ 



yiigyijaf^ 



VOL. XXXVIII, Ho. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, APRIL 8, 1897. 



$1.50 PER YEAR 



Issued Semi-Monthly. 

noon C7- SC0T7, . - PUBLISI.ERS. 

WINFIELD SCOTT, EoiTCR 
R. M. WOOD. Man;;gcr 

402 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 
rr.t.v.viiosE so. 709 caiileaoorbss ■•fi hldihw- hax tRAsc-sto 

The PACIHC U'lXE AXI) SPIRIT REVIEW is the ouli/ 
paper of its clii.<s If'fst iif ('liirayo. It circulates among the 
lyiioUsale and Retail U'ine and Spirit. Dealers of the Pari/ir 
Const, the U'ine Makers and lirnnttij lUstillers of California. 
Vie If'ineaiid Urandi/ Inii/i-rs, and the Importers, Uistillers and 
Jobbers of the United Stat's. 

All CHECKS. DRAFTS, MOSEY ORDERS, ETC.. should 
be ma tepaijahle to HOOD cC SCOTT. 

Subscriptions per year—in advance, postage paid. 

For tlie United States Mexico and Canada |I 50 

For Kuropean countries 2 50 

Single c ip 65 10 

Entered at the Pan Franrisco Post Office ns second-class matter. 

AGENCY : 

EASTERN BRANCH OFFICE: 

W. A. GEFT, Manaser, Room 32, Ko. 78 Park Place, New York Ciiy. 



MARKET REVIEW 



PROrERTY FOR SALE, 



SATJFORNrA WINES.— Tliere is nothing new to relate 
regarding the wine market, the situation being the 
same us described in our last issue. The volume of 
business at this season is a disappointment to the trade, as it 
was expected that spring orders would develop to a much 
greater extent than they have. The conditions in theivisttrn 
markets are responsible for this, and the prosjiect for any im- 
mediate change for the better is very poor. Our New Yoik 
correspondent gives a gloomy review of market conditions 
existing there, and does not see anytliing very clieering in the 
future. Sweets are exceedingly slow and do not exhibit any 
signs of " getting a move on." Like many otlier products 
they are waitinj; for the wave of pro.sj)ority to create a demand 
for them. Iteceipts from interior cellars were nominal, and 
exports by sea considerably under the average. The best fea- 
. ture of the market is tiie health and strength of the Mexican 
aud Central American trade. 

Late advices from New York are as follows : There is no 
change of any importance to report in the situation of Cali- 
fnrnian wines and l)randies; tlie receivers are quite pleased 
with the prospect of an advance in tlie duty on foreign wines, 
which they think will secure an increased demand, and al- 
ready some of the dealers who heretofore have never wanted 
to do anything in domestic goods are making inquiries lor tiie 
better class of domestic wines and brandies ; this movement, 
however, is not large enough to have any influence on prices 
at present, and any improvement from that source is only 
prospective. 



The exports of Calilbrnia wines by sea in March, 18!)7, 
were as follows : 

Cases 
74 
1,728 
■1\ 



To New York 

Central America . . 

Mexico 

Hawaii 

liriti.sh America . 
.Japan ami China . 

(ireat Britain 

( iermany 

Other European.. 

Tahiti 

All other Foreign . 



t 
.J8 

10 



Gallons. 

384,843 

50,."i.53 

10,!I3!I 

ti,()67 

2,144 

1,412 

• t7 

1 Hi 



\'alue. 
$13!i,749 



FOR SALE, in a coast county, splendid vineyard and 
ranch propert}' of 410 acres, 140 acres of which arc in full- 
boaring vines. No phylloxera, and the property is so located 
that, with ordinary care, the insect will not reach it. Prop- 
erty is well improved, having 1 brick distillery, 2 brick cel- 
lars, 2 adobe cellars, and plenty of oak and redwood cooperage. 
^!ock of wine on band averages 7.5,000 gallons, which goes 
with the place. Besides the vineyard, there is 100 acres of 
liottom land for hay, 100 acres of pasture, adapted for hay; 
and 70 acres of wooded pasture wiiich can l)e set to vines. 

Aside from the vineyard, the ranch is well stocked, and 
has ample and substantial buildings. 

This is one of the choicest properties in California. The 
dry wines from the vineyard have a splendid reputation, and 
there is a steady established trade for them. Satisfactory 
reasons for selling, and the place will be sold clieap. 

For furtiier particulars ad<lress Wi.vfield Suott, care of 
Pacific Wine ancl S|>irit Review, or apply at Room 2, seventh 
floor. Mills Building, from 9 to 10 a. m. 

Vineyard for Sale at a Bargain, to Close an Estate 

THIRTY AtJUlvSchoice I'lircign wiiif graj)es, with wincrv r tt^o. 

i:J.\000 gallons, fine oak casLs) and distillery complete. Ad- /i>ALIF()RNrA BRANDIES.— It is the same old story ot 

dress G. L., Pacific Wine and Spirit Review, San Francisco, H n ^"o ""'^■'' '^'•^^''^ '""' '"" ''"''' ''^""in''- •* ^ « "''i 1 «i";l 
• ' mi ) cheerless market, with no orders l<ir round lots to break 

the monotony. However, the heavier holders are not discour- 
aged, Imt li'okfor the long |)redicted revival, when the coun- 
try at hirfie befiins tu mend its shatteretl prosperity, and that 
is aliniit till' lime the change will come. 



28,318 

7,233 

8,988 

1,1:52 

181 

29 

1()4 



l(;,l:JG 
730 



.421 
490 



T.ital 1,818 



47.'),94S Sl><'»,92(j 



Cal. 



WANTED — Situation — wanted by a married man; age, 
10. Twelve years' ex[)erience on a vineyard in wine making. 
Best references. Address .J. M., this office. 



8 



f/rSlFie Wlf>!E jfk^\c) 8^11 J r f^EViEW 



1 , .lir..iiii!. 1, iim.lv liv s.>n ill Kt'bniniy, 1897 Bottled Beer (from overland) — 351 cases, 529 casks, 24S 

was as follows: l>amls: also, via Pimaiii:!, 4 l.airols. 

( a>.>. Gallons. \aliif. Krnit .luiiv.s — 6 liarnls. 

,„ T-> i- -n t n . .)•) -o/i CS1 - «,. CiJi-r, l>v si'a, from Atlaiitii- iiorts, 415 cases. 

li> Dtinieslic Ea>torn Port.s J-! oJil ?l,)4<i > . > i • 

(ieriiiaiiv. . — 

(ireat Biitaiu — BEER EXPORTS. 

All oilier foreign 2.i 245 512 



Total. 



Hi 



Tt;.") 



§2,158 



rT'Il'^l^ll-*^- — There is notliing new to be said about a 
iiuifl market. Busines.f is moviiij; aloiip in a coii- 
.servative way, and will continue to do so until the 
coming imps i>ut some fresh money in circulation in the 
country. There is every reason to believe that the Fall and 
Winter trade will be <;ood, and, as a cunscnuence, the. jobbers 
are taking the situation iihilosophically. Eastern distributors 
and the distillers are still trying to digest the 'iKi's, or get 
them where they will not be a millstone arouiul the neck of 
prices. They are convinced that once this surplus stock is 
disposed of jiroperly, with the bottling in bond bill in opera- 
tion and taking care of the old whiskies, the younger ages will 
share a chance in the market, whereas they arc badly ncglccteil 
now. With such a situation the business would soon return 
to its normal condition. 

The receipts of American whiskies at San Francisco in 
March, 1897. were as follows: 

Cases. Barrels. Idjarrcls 

By Sea from Atlantic Ports — 371 ^ 

By Sea, Re-Imported — — — 

Bv Rail Overland l,79(t 7(i.") I(i4 



Keg.s. 



|IJ4 



Total l,7!)(l l,l;3<5 

George C. Buchanan in Fine Wltisln/ Facts, makes the 
following comparative statement of whisky in bond in Ken- 
tucky: 

.January 31, lS!t3 S2,3(;i.775 gallons. 

January 31, 1894 s;'...s70,137 gallons. 

January 31, 1895 (;!),2(i3,91(i gallons. 

Januarv 31, 1890 81,228,232 gallons. 

January 31, 1897 80.0(i4,457 gallons. 

fXPoRTM'HISKIES IN BOND— San Francisco. 

riif stock of export whiskies in bond in San Francisco, 



■v-^ 

4 



>[ 



on March :!1, 1H97, was l(!7,!t54 gallons. 



IMPORTATIONS. 



^nirSINESS has been rather lively with the importers 
x\ S during the past half nmnth, owing to the ellbrts of 
^,~^^ Ijuyers to get in surjdus stocks before the proposed 
new tariH' goes into etlect. This is better than no business, 
but the effects of overloading will be felt in the future. 
Jli>wever, it is the old case of the "bird in the hand. 

The receipts of spirits by rail overland were l,(i67 barrels. 

The receipts of foreign whiskies by sea were 159 cases. 

The exjtorts of American whiskies by sea to foreign ports 
in .Man h were 873 cases and 942 gallons, valued at ?8,()74. 

The jtrincipal importations in March, lSi^7, wen': 

''lianij>agne — 1,029 cases. 

Still Wines — 215 cases and 11 barreU. 

Brandy — 25 eases; alsti, by mil overland, 2 barrels, H half 
barrels ami On kens. 

<;in and (jeneva — from overland, 246 cases. 

IIiMi — via overland and Cape, 15 barrels. 
-:L'nntcd Liqueurs — 187 cases. 
Jilted Spirits — 20 ca.«Kf8. 

'■,...■ , . Water — 50 cases. 

Ale — -1 liotiMheads, 



; in barrels, 379 imlf barreks, 
00 <jutii'tcr burreis, and 2U0 kegs. 



MiE exports of beer from San Franci.sco in February wen 
as follows : 
_ Buttled — 1,427 cases, 172 ca.sks, 20 barrels, and 325 

boxes. 

Bulk— 100 half barrels, ICO thinl barrels, 150 quarter bar- 
rels, 50 sixth barrels, and 11(» eighth barrel.*. 
Total \alue— §15,060. 



DINGLEY TARIFF BILL. 



We publish herewith those parts of the Dingley bill relating: 
to wines, brandies, etc., as introiluced in the House of Rei)re- 
sentatives. The bill is to take ellect May 1st. A new feature 
introduced is that in Section 2!n,in Schedule II, which will 
compel Canada to admit American whisky in original pack- 
ages, or else be deprived of the right to export whisky to the 
United States. The Canadians at present will not admit 
American whisky and brandy to be imported in bulk in pack- 
ages of less than 100 gallons, but Section 291 ellectually stojis 
this discrimination. The bill reads as follows: 

Sfi'HEDULE II. 

SPUMTS, WIXKS AND OTIIEK ISEVKKAGES. 

290. Brandy and other spirits manufactured or distilKil 
from grain or other materials, and not specially provided for 
in this Act, 82.50 per gallon proof 

291. Each and every gauge or wine gallon of measur' 
ment sliall be counted as at least one proof gallon: and tin- 
standard for determining tlie jiroof of brandy and other spirits 
or liquors of any kind imported shall be the same as thai 
which is defined in the laws relating to internal revenue: 
l)rovided, that it shall be lawful for the Secretary of the Treas- 
ury, in his discretion, to authorize the aseertainment of the 
proof of wines, cordials or other liquors, by distillation or 
otherwise, in cases where it is impracticable to ascertain such 
proof by the means prescribed by existing law or regulations: 
and provided further, that any brandy or other spirituous 
or distilled litjuors imported in any sized cask, bottle. Jug or 
other package, of or from any country, dept'iideiu-y or proviiue 
under whose laws similar sized casks, bottles, jugs or other 
packages of distilled spirits, wine or other beverage put up or 
filled in the United States are denied entrance into such 
country, dependency or province shall be forfeited to the 
United States. 

292. On all com]iounds or preparations of wiiieh dis- 
tilled sjiirits are a i-ompoiuni part of chief value, there shall 
be levied a duty not less than that imposed upon distilled 
spirits. 

2!>3. Cordials, liquors, arrack, absinthe, kirschwasser. 
ratafia and other s]iirituous beverages or bitters of all kiii'!- 
eontainiug sjiirits, an<l not specially provided for in this A- 
§2.50 per proof gallon. 

2'.>4. No lower rate or amount of duty shall be le\ u : 
collected and paid on brandy, sjiirils and other spirituoi 
beverages than that fixed by law for the description of lii - 
l)roof : iiiit it shall be iiunvLsed in proportion for any greai' 
streiiL'ih than the strength of first ]>roof, and all imitations • 
brandy or spirits or wines iinporteil by any names whalev' 
.shall be suliject to the highest rale of dul}' provided for (I 
genuine articles respectively intendcil to be represented, an 
in no case less than 82.50 per gallon. 

2!i."). Bay rum or bay water, whether distilled or con 
poundetl, of first pniof, and in i>roporlion tor any great' i 
strength than first jiroof, $1.">0 per gallon. 



f/c(3If le WlJ^e jOrJMD Sfll^lT l^EVIEW. 



\VJN'1C!S. 

•J!>6. Cliaiuiiajjue and all other sparkling wiiioti, in bul- 
ilos containing each not more than one ([uart aiul more than 
OIK' [lint, .?S per ilo/.en; containing not more than one pint 
.:irh anil more than one-iiair pint, $4 per dozen; containing 
..iii-iiall [lint each or less, ^2 per dozen; in bottles or other 
\essels containing more than one ijnart each, in addition to 
ss per dozen bottles on the quantity in excess of ont' i|uarl, at 
tiie rate of §2. •">(.• per gallon. 

"297. Still wines, including wine or ginger cordial anil 
vermuth, in casks, CO cents per gallon; in bottles or jugs, per 
case of one dozen bottles or jugs, containing each not more 
than one quart and more than one pint, or twenty-four bottles 
or jugs containing each not more than one pint, ^2 per case; 
and any excess beyond these quantities found in such bottles 
or jugs shall be subject to a duty of 7 cents per pint or frac- 
tional part thereof, but no separate or additional duty shall 
be assessed on the bottles or jugs: [irovided, that any wines, 
ginger cordial or vermuth imported containing more than 24 
per centum of alcohol shall be forfeited to the Uniteil Statfes; 
and provided further, that there shall be no constructive or 
other allowance for breakage, leakage or damage on wines , 
liquors, cordials or distilled spirits. Wines, cordials, brandy 
or other siiirituous liquors imported in bottles or jugs shall be 



OFFICE 

CALIFORNIA PROTECTIVE ASSOGIATION 

MILLS BUILDING 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CAUTION TO RETAILERS. 

San Francisco, April 1st, 1897. 
TO THE RETAIL LIQUOR TRADE: 

Retail liquor dealers are hereby notified and cautioned that 
the California Protective Association is not issuing retail certificates 
of membership (formerly class C) this year. 

All subject matters pertaining to retail liquors dealers' licenses, 
etc., will be taken up by the Board of Trustees by direct communication 
through the Secretary's office. 

Any one issuing what purports to be retailers' certificates in the 
California Protective Association for the year 1897, as coming from this 
office, is a fraud. 



WINFIELD SCOTT, 
Secretary 



or colored glass bottles, or if imported in such bottles cimtain- 
ing more than one quart, MO cents per gallon, and in addition 
thereto, duty shall be collected upon the bottles or other 
covering at the same rates that would be charged if imported 
empty or separately. 



provided for in this .\rt; ohainpagne and all other sparkling 
wines; still wines, including' ginger wine or ginger cordial und 
vermuth; laces made of silk, or of .which silk is the comiionent 
material of chief value; all mineral waters and all imitations 
of natural mineral waters, anil all artilicial mineral waters, 
not spc^cially provi<letl for in this Act; i)aintings and statuary; 
sugar, molasses and other articles jtrovided for in Paragraph 
20.S of Sche<lule E of this Act, or any of them, the President 
be, and he is hereby authorized, as soon as may be after .the 
passage of this Act, and from time to time thereafter, to enter 
into negotiations with the Governments of those countries ex- 
porting to the riiite<l States the above-mentioned articles, or 
any of them, with a view to the arrangement of commercial 
agreements in which reci[)rocal and ecpiivalent concessions 
may be .secured in favor of the products and manufactures of 
the United States; and whenever the Government of any 
country, or colony, producing or exporting to the United 
States the above-mentioned articles, or any of them, shall enter 
into a commercial agreement with the United States, or make 
concessions in favor of the jirodncts or manufactures thereof, 
which, in the judgment of the President, shall be reciprocal 
and equivalent, he shall be, and he is hereby authorized and 
empowered to suspend, during the time of such agreement or 
concession, by pnu'lamation to that effect, the imposition and 

tide 
ntry 
;ied, 
ows. 



per 



ither 
! jier 

con- 

• per 
uore 
pint 
con- 
ozen 
te of 

and 

• per 
than 
3S or 
case, 
)ttles 
frac-. 
■^hall 

nent 

icral 
idcl 
: not 
a ore 
■ izeii 
-ed 



J. P EDOFF, 

President . 



SCHKDULI-: I. 

SUBJECTS FOR RECIPROCITY. 

Sec. :^. That for the purpose of equalizing the trade of the 
United .States with foreign countries and their colonies, pro- 
ducing and ex[>orting to this country the following articles 
.Vigols, or crude tartar, or wine lees, crude, chicle, brandies, 
manufactured from grain or other materials and not specially 



upon the bottles; if imported otherwise than in plain jjreen 
or colored glass bottles, or if imported in such bottles contain- 
ing more than one 'inart, 20 cents per gallon, ami in addition 
thereto duty shall be collected on the bottles and other cover- 
ings at the same rate as would be charged if imjiorted empty 
or separately. 

Paintings in oil or water colors, pastels, pen ami ink draw- 
ings, anil statuary, not specialh' provided in this Act. 20 per 
centum ail valorem. 

Sugar, molasses and other articles provided for in Para- 
graph 208 of .Schedule E of this Act, 02 per centum of the 
duty imposed thereon in said Paragraph 20S. 

And it is further provided that with a view to secure 
recipro<-al trade witli countries producing the following 



8 



f/teiFie wipjE yvj^jic) spiijr f^eview 



Tlll-C.\|.OIls «'l (':■ 


iljlllllv 1)V 


sea 


il> Kel. 


was us follows: 










( ii.-f.-. 




tialloMS 


To Domestic Knstcin Ports 


. . . -r-i 




.')'2ti 


(nriiiimv. . 


— 







( ircjit Hritiiiii 









All oilier foreiirn 


. . . 2,J 


'2-|.> 



iiaiiilv l)v sea in Kelmiary, 1897 Hottled Beer (from overland) — 351 cases, 520 casks, 248 

liamls; also, via Panama, 1 l>arnls. 
X'aliie. Fniit Juices — b barrels. 

i.\ -jc Cider, liy sea, from Atlantic ports, 415 cases. 



512 



Total. 



1« 



:(ir> 



§2,1 5,s 



Itt^Lt'll^l'^l''-'^- — 'Jl'ore is iiotliing new to he said about a 
s| 1 ' i|uiet market. Pusiness is movinj; aloiij.; in a eon- 
*^4-' .servative way, and will continue to do so until the 
coming crops jmt some Iresli money in circulation in the 
country. There is every reason to believe that the Fall and 
Winter trade will be fjood, and, as a consequence, the jobbers 
are taking the situation ])hilosophically. l^astern distributors 
and tin- distillers arc still trying to digest the "iKl's, or get 
them where they will not be a millstone around the nock of 
prices. They are convinced that once this surplus stock is 
disposed of jiroperly, with the bottling in bond bill in opera- 
tion anil taking care of the old whiskies, the younger ages will 
share a chance in the market, whereas they are badly mglectcd 
now 
to i- 

T 
Mar 



BEER EXPORTS 



MlE exports of beer from San Francisco in February were 
as follows : 

liottled — 1,427 cases, 172 casks, 20 barrels, and 325 
boxes. 

Hulk— 101) half barrels, l(i(_) third barrels, loll quarter bar- 
rels, 56 sixth barrels, an<l 110 eighth barrels. 
Total Vahu— S15,(i«0. 



UINGLEY TARIFF BILL. 



We publish herewith those parts of the Dingley bill relating 
to wines, brandies, etc., as introduced in the House of Repre- 
sentatives. The bill is to take ellect May 1st. A new feature 
introduced is that in Section 2!ll,in .Schedule II, which will 



Bv 
Bv 
Bv 



loll. 
lUC 



'I 



I I .viinricaii v\rii>Kii- f\ -• .i _,, ,...,, 

in .Mji- Ii \\<:i': ■■^7;i cases and ;»42 gallon.-, valued at ;^8,(i74. 

The j)rincipal importations in March, I.SH7, were: 

Champagne — 1,02!» cases. 

Still Wines — 215 cases and 11 barrels. 

Brandy — 25 cases: akw, by rail overland, 2 barrels, (i li;ilt 
barrels and CO keg.s. 

<iin and (jeneva — from overland, 246 ca.ses. 

limn — via overland and Ca|)e, 15 barrels. 

I'n 1 -iLniaterl l>iqueurs — 1«7 cases, 
i ite<l Spirits — 20 ca.ses. 

\ . . . . .... Water — ">0 cases. 

Ale. — 4 liogHhi'ads. 

Foreign Beer, by sea, 105 wises. 

Bulk Beer (from overland) — .'U(l barrels, :\~'.> half barrel.s, 
60 quarter barrels, an<l 200 kegs. 



ratalia and otiier siunluous beverages or biiiers of all kinds, 
containing sjiirils, ami not specially provided for in this Act, 
$2.50 per proof gallon. 

2'.»4. No lower rate or amount of duty shall be levied, 
collected and paid on brandy, spirits and other spirituous 
beverages than that fixed l)y law for the description of lirst 
proof; iait it shall be increa.sed in jirojuirtion for any greater 
strciiglii than the strength of first ]irool', ami all imitations of 
brandy or s|iirits or wines imported by any names whatever 
shall bo subject to the liighest rate of duty provideil for tin 
genuine articles respectively intended to be represented, aii'i 
in no ca.so less than $2.50 per gallon. 

2!».">. Bay rum or bay water, whether distilled or com- 
pounded, of first proof, and in proportion lor any greater 
strength than first proof, $1.50 per gallon. 



f/eifie WIJS(£. jOrjMD Sfll^lT f^EVIEW, 



WINKS. 

2!»6. C'liiunjiagiic iiiul all oIIut sparkling wiiios, in hol- 
lles containing; oacli not more than one (luart and more tlian 
iiiii' [)int, sjs por ilozcii; containing not more than one pint 
each and more tiian one-half [>in(, $4 per do/.en; containing 
(lui-iiali pint each or less, S2 per dozen: in bottles or otiier 
vessels containing more than one ([uart each, in aiidition to 
>^ per dozen bottles oa the quantity in excess of one i|uarl, at 
the rate of ^■2.r>L) per gallon. 

•Jit". Still \vini>.s, including wine or ginger cordial ami 
vernmlh, in casks, GO cents per gallon: in bottles or jugs, per 
case of one do/.en bottles or jugs, containing each not more 
than one quart and more than one pint, or twenty-four bottles 
or jugs containing each not more than one pint, $'1 per case; 
anil any excess beyond these (luantities found in such bottles 
or jugs shall be subject to a duty of 7 cents per pint or frac- 
tional part thereof, but no separate or additional duty shall 
be assessed on the bottles or jugs: provided, that any wines, 
ginger cordial or vermuth imported containing nuno than 24 
per centum of ak-ohol shall be forfeited to the United Statfes: 
anil provided further, that there shall be no constructive or 
other allowance lor breakage, leakage or damage on wines , 
liquors, cordials or distilled spirits. Wines, cordials, brandy 
or other s[iirituous licjuors imported in bottles or jugs siiall be 
[lacked in iiackages containing not less than one dozen bottles 
or jugs in each package; and all such ^bottles or jugs shall 
pay an additional duty of 3 cents for each bottle or jug, unless 
specially provided for in this Act. 

298. Ale, porter and beer, in bottles or jugs, 40 cents 
per gallon, but no separate or additional duty shall be as- 
sessed on the bottles or jugs: otherwise tlian in bottles or jugs, 
20 cents per gallon. 

299. JIalt extract, fluid, ia casks, 2") cents per gallon; 
in bottles or jugs, 40 cents per gallon; solid or condensed, 40 
per centum ad valorem. 

oGO. ('berry juice and prune juice, or prune wine, and 
other fruit juice not si>ecially provided for in this Act, con- 
taining no alcohol or not more than 18 per centum of alcohol, 
60 cents per gallon; if containing more than 18 per centum 
of alcohol, §2.50 per proof per gallon; fruits pre.served in 
spirits when containing over o per centum of alcohol, §2.oO 
per proof gallon for the alcohol contained therein. 

301. Ginger ale, ginger beer, lemonade, soda water and 
other similar waters in plain gicen or colored, molded or 
pressed, glass bottles, containing not more than three- 
fourths of a pint each and not more than one and one-half 
pints, 28 cents per dozen, but no separate or additional duty 

'shall be assessed on the bottles: if imported otherwise than in 
plain green or colored, moldetl or presse<l, glass bottles, or in 
such bottles containing more than one and one-half pints 
each, 50 cents per gallon, and in addition thereto, duty shall 
lie collected on the bottles or other coverings at the rates 
which would be chargeable thereon if imported empty. 

302. All mineral waters and all imitations of natural 
waters, and all artilicial mineral waters not specially jirovided 
for in this Act, in green or colored glass bottles, containing 
not more than one pint, 30 cents per dozen bottles; if conttiin- 
Mig more than one pint and not more than one quart. 40 
cents per dozen bottles, but no separate duty shall be assessed 
upon the bottles; if imported otherwise than in plain green 
or colored glass ijottles, or if imjiorteil in such bottles contain- 
ing more than one (juart, -"JO cents per gallon, anil in addition 
thereto, duty shall be collected upon the bottles or other 
lovering at the same rates that would be charged if imported 
■ inpty or separately. 



.SCIIKDULI-: I. 



SUBJECTS FOR KECIPROCITY. 



Sec. 3. That for the purpose of equalizing the trade of the 
United States with foreign countries and their colonics, pro- 
ducing and exporting to this country the following articles 
Argols, or crude tartar, or wine lees, crude, chicle, brandies, 
manufactured from grain or other materials and not specially 



provided for in this Act; champagne and ail otiier s[i;irkliiig 
wines; still wines, including' ginger wine or ginger cordial and 
vermuth; laces made of silk, or of .which silk is the component 
nuiterial of chief value; all mineral waters and all imitations 
of natural mineral waters, and all artilicial mineral waters, 
not spi^cially provideil for in this Act; paintings and statuary; 
sugar, mola.sses and other articles proviiled for in Paragraph 
2II.S of Si'hedule K of this Act, or any of them, the I'rcsiilent 
be, and he is hercb}' authorized, as soon as nuiy be after tlu) 
passage of this Act, and from time to time thereafter, to enter 
into negotiations with the Governments of those countries ex- 
porting to the Uniteil States the above-mentioneil artic les, or 
any of them, with a view to the arrangement of commercial 
agreements in which reci[)rocal and equivalent concessions 
may be secured in favor of the products and manufactures of 
the United States; and whenever the Government of any 
country, or colony, producing or exporting to the United 
States the above-menlioned articles, or any of them, shall enter 
into a commercial agreement with tiie United States, or make 
concessions in favor of the products or manufactures thereof, 
which, in the judgment of the President, shall be reciprocal 
and equivalent, he shall be, and he is hereby authorized and 
empowered to suspend, during tlie time of such agreement or 
concession, by proclamation to that effect, the imposition and 
collection of the duties mentioned in tliis Act, on such article 
or articles so exported to the United States from such country 
or colony, and thereupon and thereafter the duties levied, 
collected anil paid upon such articles shall be as follows, 
namely: 

Argols, or crude tartar, or wine lees, crude, 1 cent per 
pound. 

Chicle, 7 cents per pound. 

Brandies, manufacturcil or distilleil from grain oi' other 
materials and not specially provided for in this Act, §2 per 
proof gallon. 

Champagne and all other sparkling wines, in bottles con- 
taining more than one quart and more than one pint, $6 per 
dozen; containing not more than one pint each and more 
than one half-pint, $3 per dozen; containing one-half pint 
each or less, fl.oO per dozen; in bottles or other vcs.sels con- 
taining more than one cjuart each, in addition to §6 per dozen 
bottles on the ([uantities in excess of one quart, at the rate of 
$1.90 per gallon. 

Still wines, including ginger wine or ginger cordial and 
vermuth, in casks, 50 cents per gallon: in bottles or jugs, per 
case of dozen bottles or jugs containing each not niore than 
one quart and more than one pint, or twenty-four bottles or 
jugs containing each not more than one pint, $1.60 per case, 
anil any excess lieyond these quantities found in such bottles 
or jugs shall be subject to a duty of 5 cents per pint or frac- 
tional part thereof, l)ut no se[)arate or additional duty shall 
lie assessed on the bottles or jugs. 

Laces made of silk, or of which silk is the component 
material of chief value, 55 per centum ad valorem. 

All mineral waters, and all imitations of natural mineral 
waters, and all artificial mineral waters not specially provided 
for in this Act, in green or colored glass bottles containing not 
more than one pint, 20 cents per dozen; if containing more 
than one pint and not more than one quart, 28 cents per dozen 
bottles, but no separate or additional duty shall Vie assessed 
upon the bottles; if imported otherwise than in plain green 
or colored glass bottles, or if imported in such bottles contain- 
ing more than one quart, 20 cents per gallon, and in addition 
thereto duty shall be collected on the bottles and other cover- 
ings at the same rate as would be charged if imported empty 
or separately. 

Paintings in oil or water colors, pastels, pen and ink draw- 
ings, and statuary, not specially provided in this Act. 20 per 
centum ad valorem. 

Sugar, molasses and other articles provided for in Para- 
graph 208 of Schedule E of this Act, 02 per centum of the 
duty imposed tliereon in sai<l Paragraph 208. 

And it is further provided that with a view to secure 
reciprocal trade with countries producing the following 



10 f;*eifie wifjt /»jNa sfii^iT f^Evitw 

The Prices to RETAlLliKS 

are as folkiws : 



$8.--case of 50 glass bottles. 
$8. --case of 100 glass bottles. 



co 



N1 



(,01- 



,^i^' 



«^^i^K# 





SKE that the Labels 

Ijcar the well-known 

RED DIAMOND iMARK 

of the APOLLINARIS COMPANY, Ll.MlT]-:] 



SOLE EXPORTERS 

THE APOLLINARIS COMPANY, LD., LONDON. 

JOHN CAFFREY, 21 guttei' ^tiieet, ^an Fr-anciseo, I^Epre^enting CH/^I^LE? ^K\n \ CO., l\leW Vorl^. 



articles, whenever and so often as the Pre.siiK-ut shall be witis- 
fied that thi- Govcnnneut of any country or colony of .such 
Goycrnnieut producing or exporting to 'the United States 
coHee, tea and liides, or any of such articles, imposes duties or 
other exactions uj)on the agricultural, uianufadured or otlicr 
jiroducts of the United .states, which, in view of the free intro- 
duction of such coflee, tea and hides into the United States, 
he nay deem to be reciprocally unequal and unreasonable, he 
shall have the power and it .<hall be his dutv tf> suspend, by 
by proclamation to that effect, the i)rovisions of this Act relat- 
ing to the free introduction of such collee, tea and hides, raw 
or uncured, whether dry, salted or pickled; Angora goatskins, 
raw, without the wool, manufactured; asses' skins, raw or 
manufactured; and skins, except sheepskins with the wool on, 
of the products of such country or colony, for such time as he 
shall deem just: and in .-^uch cases, and' during sucli suspen- 
.sioM. duties shall be levied, collected and j,aid ujion colfee, 
tea and hides, tlie proflucLs or exports from such designated 
country, as follows: 

On colfee, 3 cents per pound. 

On ivu, 10 cents per jiound. 

Ilide-H, dry or uncured, whether dry, >altcd or pickled; 
Angora goiitxk ins, raw, without the wool,"manulactured: as.ses' 
skiu.s, raw or unmanu,actured; and skins, c.vccpl sliocjiskins, 
with the wool on, H cents j)er pound. 

DHA\VI1A(K.S. 

Sec. 2-1. That where importe<l materials on which duties 
have iiecn pair! are u.sed in the manufaclur.; of articles manu- 
factured or produced in the United States, there shall be 
allowed on the exjiortation of such articles a drawback equal 
in amount to the duties paid on the materials used, less 1 per 
centum of such duties: provided, that when the articles im- 
ported are nnide in |mrt from domestic materials, the imp.irted 
mateniils, or the parts of the articles made from siieh nnile- 
rials, slmll wi appear in the completed articles that the (pian- 



tity or measure thereof may be ascertained; and provided 

furtlier, that the drawl);Kk on any article allowed under exist- 
ing law shall be coiitimied at the rate herein jjrovided. That 
the imported materials used in the manufacture or proiluction 
of articles entitled to drawback of customs duties when ex- 
ported shall, in all cases wliere drawback of duties paid on 
such materials is claimed, be i.lentified, the quantity of such 
materials used and the amount of duties paid thereon shall lie 
ascertained, the facts of the manufacture or production ol 
such articles in the United States and their exportation there- 
from shall bedeterminctl, and the drawback due thereon shall 
be paid to the manufacturer, producer or exjiorter, to the 
agent of either or to the person to whom such manufacturer, 
producer, exporter or agent shall in writing order such chaw- 
back paid, under such regulations as the Secretary of the 
Treasury shall prescribe. 

I'KOTECTION OV TR.VDK .MARKS. 

Sec. 6. That no article of imported merchandise which 
shall copy 01- simulate the name or trade murk of any domes- 
tic manufacture or manufacturer shall be a<lmitted to entrv 
at any Custom House of the United l.Statt's: and in order to 
aid the ollicers of the customs in enforcing this prohibition, 
any domestic manufacturer who has adopted trade mark- 
may require his name and residence and a ilescrijition of his 
tr.ide mares to be recorded in Ixioks which shall be kept for 
that purpose in the Dcpardnent of the Treasury, under such 
regulations as the Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe, 
and may furnish to the department fac similes of such trade 
marks; and thereupon the Secretary of the Treasurv shall 
cause one or more copies of the same to be transmitted to each 
collector or other proper ollicerof the customs. 

KAisiss, i:tc. 

2Uo. Figs, plums, prunes, raisins and other ilried grapes, 
2 J cents |)er pound; dales and eurnuits, Z.inte or other, ]J 



I 



PAeiFie Wir^E AJM0 SPIRIT F^EVIEW. 



11 



cents per pound; olives, green or prepared, in bottles, jars or 
siinihii' packages, '25 cents per gallon; in casks or olhiTwise 
than in bottles, jars or similar packages, 15 cents per gallon. 
•2(U5. Grapes and peaches, 1 cent per pouml. 

The following solt'-explanatory correspondiMK c lias passed 
between this city and Wasliington: 

fCOPV OF TELEIJKAM TO CAHFOHXIA UEI.KC ATION. ] 

The California wiiio iri-owors, winomakors and ilealei-s and our 
jwoplo demand a full u'storatiou of the McKinley tariff on wines and 
hrandies. No ivciprocily on wines.j 

(Signed) K. K. TAVLOU, 

Chairman Uepiililican State Central Comniittoo. 
CHARLIE W. MANWAltlXG. 
Chairman San Francisco County Committee. 

'J'o this the following reply lias been received: 

[copy.] 

Your telegram in regard to tai-itl' on wines and brandies received 
and I take jjleasure in sending you to-day, under separate cover, a copy 
of the new taritT bill, which shows its provisions regaiding wines. 
Yours verv truly, 

(Signed) GF.O. C:. PEUKINS. 



A FRAUD ON THE PUBLIC. 



But Congress is limited as to its powers in the enactment 
of a law. In Section !> of the same Article, this provision ap- 
pears: "No bill of attain<ler or ex post facto law siiall be 
passed." 

Mr. Dingley's proposition, it appears to us, is clearly an 
attempt to pass an cr poM fado law. Duties arc now being 
collected under the Wihon-Gorman law. 'I'hoy will continue 
until this law is superseded by the Dingley bill or some 
other measure. To enact a new law, Mr. Dingley nmst go 
through the Constitutional procedure, when, if tiie President 
signs the bill, it becomes a law, and not till then. 

Under what right, by what Con.stitutional provision, can 
such a bill be made retro-active? It seems to us that if tlie 
timeof going into cll'ect is fixcil at April 1st, the law will be 
made rx-po-s^/ac/o, and therefore clearly unconstitutional. If 
Mr. Dingley and his tarilf-nuikers have the rigiit to fix the 
time at April 1st, they clearly have an equal right to fix it at 
August 28th, 1894, when the Wilson-Gorman law became 
operative, to assess back duty on all importations made since 
that day, and to nullify any and every act of the Democratic 
" taritf reformers." There does not apjiear any other logical 
conclusion. 

We think Mr. Dingley is running a huge bluff. 



Objection 14th: Theitem "For the use ofState University Depart- 
ment of Viticulture, ton thousand dollars." and the item "For use of 
State University Forestry Stations, eight thousand dollars," and the 
item "For State University of Agriculture for experimental purposes, 
relative to the diseases, breeding and other necessary information con- 
nected with the raising and care of poultry in this State, and the issu- 
ance of bulletins concerning same, tlvo thousand dollars," are each 
objected to and not approved, for the reasons, first, that the same are 
excessive, and second, whatever allowance may be necessary, in the 
judgment of the Uegents of the University of tlie State of California, 
oau be made from the other funds of the said University. 

During the past two years the State has liberally responded to the 
icquests of the University, giving in 18'.'5 a quarter of a million dollars 
for its artiliated colleges, and so providing for the t^nivorsity itself by 
the Act of 1897 that it shall receive two cents per annum oii every one 
hundi-ed dollars of ta.\able property in this State, being annually nearly 
another quarter of a million dollars. In ray judgment, with this annual 
income, together with the income from the regular funds now on hand, 
no further provision should be asked for by that institution, and, under 
existing financial conditions, it is the duty of the University to use such 
cai-eful economy as will make its present available resoun-es sutllcient 
for the conduct of its departments and stations as in the judgment of 
the Regents it may be necessary to maintain. — I'etooJ Governor Budd. 

Mr. Budd could have given a better reason than that 
for vetoing the viticultural appropriation. He could have 
truthfully said that the "Viticultural Department'' is a fraud 
and money expended on it wasted. Nevertheless, it is only 
another object lesson of his turning on his friends. 

Scaring off Importers. 

Congressman Dingley and his associates in the House of 
Representatives have evolved a plan to prevent imj)orters from 
taking advantage in anj' great measure of the low rates of 
duty under the Wilson-Gorman law. The Dingley bill pro- 
vides that the new tariff no\v lieing framed shall go into effect 
April 1st, notwithstamling the fact that the Senate will proli- 
ably wrangle over the bill until July 1st, and possibly August 
1st, before the final vote comes. Mr. Dingley and his asso- 
ciates undoubtedly want to scare importers for the present 
and prevent importations in the next few months, so that the 
volume of imports will not fall otf immediately after the Pres- 
ident signs the new measure, and to the further end that tliere 
may be no temporary decrease in the revenue of tiie Govern- 
ment when the bill is finally tliroiit^'h. 

Mr. Dingley has stated his full confidence that the law 
can be made to operate from April Isl, but we believe just as 
firmly that Mr. Dingley, to use a slang phrase, is bluffing. 

The manner of enacting a law is fully jirovided for in 
Section 7 of Article 1 of the Constitution of the I'nited States. 
It distinctly says that all l)ills must be passed by tlie House 
and by the Senate, and tlien .sent to the President for his 
approval. If signed, the bill Ijecomes a law ; if not, or disap- 
proved, provision is made as to subsequent action necessary 
to make it a law or to fail entirelv. 



A Sea of Wine. 



The cellars of Messrs. Moet & Chandon, the largest cham- 
pagne house in the world, contains eight miles of walks, and 
about $2(),00(),000 bottles of champagne. The different sec- 
tions of the vast cellar are named after the various countries 
to which shipments are made. Russia and England occupy 
the largest place, special provisions being made for the re- 
quirements of the courts. — Exchauf/e. 



I^oew'^ By^teii) l^iltei' 

FOR 

WINES,8EER, CIDER, LIQUORS,CORDIALS,WATER,&c. 



Onrahle ! 







Wine Dealers and Growers, I'.rewers .ind LiqiKir Me:. .. .:.: • ■■■-■ ~ 1 ti 

see filter in operation at I'acifir Coast Agency 

7 FIRST ST. S. E Cor. Market, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



12 



f/eifie WljME /cJMD Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



Trade Mark \'iulation5. 



Tliere is ubumlimt evideiKC at liaiul that the leading im- 
porters of Sail Fraiu-isi-o ari' aliout to institute a gfiuTal niovo- 
ment against trade umrk infringeiuents, and in this movement 
we liope tliey will have the suecess they deserve. Tiiey have 
had attilitional provisions and safeguards given hy the recent 
Li'gislalure, notaldy tlie rigiit of search for fraudulent laliels, 
etc. and spurious gootls. and tiiev can now condm t raids the 
same as is done in luuiy Eastern States. 

We understand tiiat they intend doing this work on the 
same line as the Wine and Spirit Traders' Society of New 
York : that is, to proceed under both Federal and State laws 
wherever jiracticable. 

Tills step is a genuine reform, ami one that comnienils 
itself to every honest dealer. Few tliere are who have any 
conception of the amount of frauds I'crpetrated in San Fran- 
cisco in this direction. It is not too much to .^ay that fully 
one-half of the alleged foreign wines and liquors sold in San 
Francisco are not what they purport to be. This is especially 
true as to spirituous litpiors, such as brandy, gin and the various 
cordials. There are houses which are well known tu every 
one in the trade, which make a specialty of such deceptions. 
Kefilled bottles, the use of " skeleton" cases ami all tiie other 
devices of fraud are too well known, and too generally prac- 
ticed. 

Morally speaking, these men who iiirate other men's 
brands, are guilty of a felony. The San (^uentin iienitentiary 
is the I'roper place fur them. A poor, hungry devil steals 
fifty dollars in this State, and the penitentiary yawns for liim ; 
a so-called res] lectable " business man" pirates another man's 
brand, which has been advertiseil, nursed, boomed into popu- 
larity on its merits, and he generally goes free. He steals 
another man's work, another man's capital, another man's 
industry, which may represent in the aggregate many thou- 
sand ilollars, and the law lays a light hand on him, if indeed 
it ever touches him. 

This does notaloni' ajiply to such articles as wines, whis- 
kies and liriuors generally. It applies to all classes of goods, 
whether domestic or foreign. Pirating on genuine liquors is 
common enough, but there arc other lines tliat .sull'er. Lea 
«fe Perrin's Worcester Sauce gets it probal)ly worse than any- 
thing, and the American representatives, Jolin Duncan's 
Sons, must be asleep. 

There isn't a single champagne, gin, brandy, still wine 
or other liquor imjiorter but who has suffered greatly in the 
last few years. It behooves them to stir themselves and cinch 
the trade thieves. 



By What Right? 

In order to insure the continuance i)f Internal Revenue 
fk-neral Bonded Wareliouse No. 1 in tiiis city. Bode tV: Ilas- 
lett are doing their utmost to exclude alcohol and spirits from 
storage. To etlect this, they have stated their intention of 
charging ?1 per barrel per month. This is to conform with 
the idea of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, to the 
the ell'ect that if whisky, gin, etc., alone are stored therein, the 
warehouse nuiy be continued. 

Bode & llaslett belong to what is generally known as the 
wareliou.se ring. This aggregation has the re[iutation of doing 
about as it pleases, and this latest edict is in the line of past 
performanoes. Legally we see nothing to prevent the ware- 
house men to charge what storage rates they |)lease, but mor- 
ally this action is iin outrage. 

Admitting the fact that the warehouse was primarily in- 
tended for whisky storage, what business is it of Bode A: Ilas- 
leit as to what class of distilled spirits arc stored in the ware- 
house ? Ih there any risk entailed in the storage of spirits not 
equally applicable to the storage of whisky'.' Ami who are 
IJode A llaslett, to make n law unto themselves where the 
Ciovonuneiit fniled to do so'.' 

One thing is plain, and that is, in refusing to sanction 
tho sifirage of spirits and alcohol, the wareliouse has made 



enemies of a class of merchants, notably the wholesale drug- 
gists, who want to speculate in alcohol and spirits. As loni: 
as that warehou.se is there, they have the moral right to ilo so 
and the self-made law of Bode ife llaslett is not calculated to 
imbue them with any friendly feelings. 



Apollinaris and Johannis, Limited. 

The Wine Trade licvicw of Limdon ainiounces the forma- 
tion of a new company, designated as above, as follows : 

Messrs, Schroder & Co. are authorized to receive subscri)'- 
iionsto .i'2,-'?8t),tl()(l, the cajiital of the company at Ajmllinai - 
and Joliannis, limited, which consists of 119, (Uiu ordinal 
shares of flO each, ami 119,0(10 cumulative jireference share- 
of flO each, in addition to which there is an issue of ..CS.jtt.O'i" 
4 per cent, debenture stock. The company is formed for tli' 
jmrpose of acquiring and amalgamating under one manage- 
ment the business of the Ajiollinaris Comjtany, Limited, and 
of .Joliannis, Limited. The pi-ospeetus states that the com- 
bined jnolits of the Apollinaris Comjiany and the Apollinan- 
Brunnen for the year ending December 1, isilo, together with 
.tl4,'28G from the Johannis Company, amounted .t 17 1,30"-'. 
but as the result of the amalgamation of these busines-scs, :i 
large saving is anticijiated in respect of management, adver- 
tising anil other expenses. The purchase price is i;3,'230,0tin. 



Portland Retailers on Law Breaking. 

In reply to the letter of District Attorney C. F. Lord, ad- 
dressed to the Retail Liquor Dealers' Union of Portland, Or,, 
in relation to the evil of admitting girls and boys underage 
in back rooms of saloons, and of other violations of la\\, the ' 
Union has addressed the following letter to Mr. Lord, under 
the seal of the Union : 

Portland, Or., March 25,1897. 

Honorable Charles F. Lord, District Attorney : 

DeakSir: Your communication of loth inst., concern- 
ing young girls and minors visiting saloons, at hand. W^e, as 
a Union of l-fetail Li(juor Dealers, agree and heartily approve 
of the suggestions in your communication, and you may de- 
pend upon the support and co-operation of all the members of 
this Union in whatever action you may deem proper to bring 
to justice those partit'S who are violating all laws of common 
decency. 

By order of the Retail Liquor Dealers' Union 

Yours respectfully, 
.1. H. MooRK, Pres., 
[i.. s.] CiiAs. F. Fkrvau, ^'ice-P^es., 

H. I. I.ARSEX, Sccretarv. 



More Qaugers Wanted. 



Now that the Commissioner of Internal Revenue has 
decided that tlie General Bonded Warehouse in this city shall 
not close on May 1st, as was contcnijilated, we think it timely 
to suggest to that official that something be done to make that 
warehouse more of a convenience tlum it is. 

More gangers are needed, and that badly. A merchant 
who has whisky stori'cl in the warehouse does not want to wai 
from two Weeks to a month to get his goods when he need- 
them. There is no (piestion but that the service at the wari - 
house has been miserable beyond belief. Merchants who 
wanted gooils out of it have been compelled to wait weeks fur 
the ganger to do his duty. 

The jilain truth is, that the tioverniiieiit has notsupplied 
the nece.s.sary force to aeconnnodate (he needs of the ware- 
house. We doubt the economy of saving up on gangers, but 
when to this is added the poor service of the First District offi- 
cials, the aggravation is only intensilled. 

The Coiiimissioncr lias stated that li.e reason lor the con- 
tinuance of the warehouse is the tlesire to accommodate the 
trade: if this be so, let us have more and better gauiiers. 



p/eeiFie wijme /tJmd Sfif^iT preview. 



13 



Auction in England. 

At the auction j:ale of MuUoy, Ki'Uy, (iraliain & Co., of 
tjl .Mark J.ane, London, E. C, held on 5larch Uth, 1S97, the 
following C'alil'ornia brandy was sold : 

247 bbls \'ina brandy, vintage of ISSil, from Bremen at 
'2s, -^d to OS. Id. per gallon (oS to 74 cents). 

;>0;! bbls \'ina brandy, vintage of 18i»0, from Hamburg, 
•2s. .')d to 2s. md. per gallon (')S to 6.S cents"). 

Additional Boulevard Subscriptions. 

Jesse .Moore Hunt Co s-j."i 

Spruance, .'Stanley & Co in 

John Sroufe tV: Co 10 

National Brewing Co 50 

Jones, Mundy it Co 5 

Sherwood it Sherwood 2.5 

Louis Taussig & Co 20 

A. Eisenl>ach 10 



Selling Distillery Bottled Goods. 

With all due respect to the opinions of certain persons, 
we give it as a fact that very lew Kentuckj' distillers have 
any wish to sell the retail trade. The average Kentucky dis- 
tiller is not over fond of details, and he realizes that were he 
to trv to sell the retail liquor trade of the L'nited States it 
would probably land him in on early grave or else in an 
insane asylum. Therefore, we predict tliat all of this talk of 
the middle man being ignored by distillers is sheer nonsense. 

It is probably true that some distillers will send sales- 
men to the retail trade to push the sale of their brands in bot- 
tles, but the orders will be turned over to middle men, and 
the jobber will receive a good profit on such business. — T. M. 
Gilmore, in Bonforts. 



Brandy from Figs. 

The fruit-growers, canners and preservers of this State are 
just now very much interested in proving that the fig is a 
berry. Upon the establishment of that proposition depends 
an industry which they tiiink, from experiments already 
made, will add a considerable percentage to the profitableness 
of fig culture, and in some years save the crop from almost 
total loss. 

The Commissioner of Internal Revenue is the final arbi- 
ter who is to determine this question, unless Congress is ap- 
pealed to as a more potent authority. 

What makes the question of whether the fig is a berry or 
not an important one just now is the fact that it has been found 
that a very remarkable (juality of brandy in good quantity 
can be made from figs. But the regulations of the Internal 
Revenue Department jirovide that the only materials from 
whicli fruit brandies can be made are apples, peaches, grapes, 
pineajjples, oranges, apricots, berries and prunes, unless the 
distiller operates his plant under the same regulations as grain 
and ninlasses distilleries. It is clear that the fig is not any 
one of these unless it is a berry. The Fresno fig growers have 
taken up the subject, and have retained John U. Youngberg, 
the internal revenue broker, to present the matter to the De- 
paitment and secure, if possible, a ruling permitting tiie dis- 
tillation of brandy from figs under the clause permitting the 
use of berries. If this is secured, it is said it will add jjracti- 
cally a new industry to California. In some years tlie fig 
crop is alinosta total failure i)ccause of the imperfect ripening 
of the fruit. But a large jiart of their value could be saved if 
they are permitted to be used in making brandy. 

I iU()\\'EIi,S who wish lo .sell good California wines lur 
cash on delivery, at moderate prices, to Eastern buyer, please 
correspond with ''B.' care editor this paper. 



Needed Damiana Bitters. 



What Corbitt needed fur his fight, 

Witii Lanky Robert Fit/,, 
Was not hard work from mf)rn till night 

But " Damiana Bits." 

Of trainers be luid ten luinore. 

Of handball hours cacli day. 
But when it came to stamina 

I Ii' ((luldn't wIti the tray. 

In iillcness he spent ten years 

.Vnd wasteil all his ])Owei's, 
No wonder, then, Fitz had no fears 

Of Jim and all his lilowers. 

What Corbett needed for his fight 

With Lanky Robert Fitz, 
Was not hard work from morn till night. 

But •' Damiana Bits." 



Death of Joseph Coblentz 



Josejih Cubleiitz, head of the firm of Coblentz, I'ike it Co., 
and one of tlu' most widely known and respected merchants 
of the coast, died on the 3rd inst., at his home in San Fran- 
cisco after a short illness. 

On the 2nd of March he slipped and fell while walking 
along Battery strei't, but at the time nothing serious was ap- 
lirehended. lie was confined to his home as a result for nearly 
four weeks, but the shock weakened his system bodily. He 
was again at business on March 31sl and .\jiril 1st, and cdii- 
tracted pleurisy, from wliieli he died in\ the .'id. The eml was 
peaceful and painless. 

Mr. Coblentz was born in Lorraine, and was in his fifty- 
seventh 3-ear. He came to California in LSoG, when a young 
man, and bought into a general merchandise business at Fol- 
som, remaining there until about 1.S70, when he removed to 
Los Angeles. There he entered the wholesale and manufac- 
turing cigar and tobacco business. After nine years of success 
in the south he came to San Francisco, and bought into the 
same line with John S. Bowman, the firm l>eing John S. 
Bowman & (,'o. In 1SS7 a line of litjuors was added to the 
business, and in 1 SKO the cigar and tol)acco department was 
dropped, the firm dealing exclusively in wines and liquors at 
wholesiile. Mr. B. D. I'ike, the remaining partner, was ad- 
mitted to partnership the same year, and in 1S92 Mr. 
Bowman retired. 

The present firm of Coblentz, PiKc it Co. was formed to 
succeed to the liusiness, and .so confinued (o Mr. Coblentz's 
death. 

Mr. Coblentz was a quiet, reserved man, careful, energetic 
and thoroughly whole souled and generou.s. He left a family 
of four children, three daughters and a son, as well as four 
brothers well known in San Francisco, Felix, David, Gus and 
Samuel. The funeral took place on the otli inst., and the in- 
terment was in the Home of Peace Cemetery in San Mateo 
Count v. 



gcs'[2s^-^:2c:g!2gSE2gsiiri}!^ 



ESTABLISHED ,^^^ 




ElEMYMARTIN&Cp 
COGIVAC ^^ 



FRANCE 



Agents in San Francisco. Cal. pj 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO. ^ 



C*- See quotations on p.i^;e V. 525 



525 FRONT STREET 



ijJ.Aj(JxX<JU^J^J>XiJUAXiwUjilXicLi 



r , X . t 



u 



pAGipie WIJ^E /v^lD SpiF^IT REVIEW 



iAiAYLHND St CO. 



U. K. WORKS, 

LONDON, ENG. 



15-25 WHITEHALL STREET, 

NEW YORK 



To Wine Growers, Distillers, Etc. 
Gentl emen: 

We beg lo advise having opened 

branch in New York as above, for the sale 

of our Wine Finings, Capillaire, Spirit 

Colorings, Essences, Preservatives, etc. 

May we ask a trial order, that you 

may prove the EFFICACY, PURITY and ECONOMY 

of our Materials? 

Yours truly, 

W. A. WAYLAND & CO. 

WAYLAND'S WINE FININGS, 

GUARANTEED FREE FROM 

T.\N.XIN, >>.Al.ieVLiC Lxna .V.NILINE. 
Kequire no preparation, arc alwiiys raaiiy lo use, clarify tlie choicest descrip- 
tions of wines, also tlinse of low alcoholic strength. IN NO WAY 
'.Ml'.VIK THK WINK. ONCK HKIIJ.IAXT, 
rKK.M.VNKSTI.Y I'.KII.I.I AXT. 

TRADE CIRCULARS. 

Fi;o.M L. CJaxdoli'i & Co. 



^"K\v York, Marcli 17, isfl7. 
Gexti.emex: 

Till' following is the list of our importntioiis (liiiiii>; tlir 
foitiiifiht I'litliiiK Marcli 15, 1897: 

PcT s.,=. \\\'YrA — 970 bo.Kcs Gfiioa macaroni, rrofiiuU) 
brand; 100 tubs Gorgon/.ola cliirsc, Polciigiii brand; '200 cases 
Feriut Branca. 

Per s.s. Sarnia — o bbl. Chianti wine. 

Per ship Jabcz Howes — 400 bbl. clant, ll:ilian-Swiss 
colony. 

Per Barbara Preve — 250 ca.ses viinnuh ..f I'm in, Mar- 
tiiiaz/.i brand; 10 cases nienthe, .siine brand; 

Per Arolaa — 1 pipe e.xti'a niarsala, I. & N. l-'lores brand; 
30 octaves siune, same brand. 

Per California — 1,010 bo.xes e.xtra Najdcs macaroni. 
Dello Jojo brand. 

Per ss. Fulda— 2o bbl. Naples wine, (i. II Profunio 
brand; 200 bags rice, .same brand; (JO cases Roman clieese, 
sjime brand; 100 eases .salt anchovies, Clieappe brand. 

Per Pro.spero Padre — .jOO cases vermuth. Martini & Rossi 
l>raiid; 2.'jO cfa.ses vermuth, Martinaz/.i brand. 

Per i'ietriono — 24 octaves niar.sala, Platamone brand. 



Fkom Union Distilling Co. 



"Zeiio" Sour Ma.sli is strictly i>ld fashione.l ; mashed in 
small tubs; nieely matured, and its line as silk. 

" Tij)j)cenMoe " whisky is made of souml grain, of which 
40 per cent by weight is Rye and Barley MmIc This gives it 
a licavy flavor, good body and pleasant fjrinking (lualities. 

" Leno.x " is a regular mash lire copper whisky. It ma- 
tures early, and will replace many higher priced whiskies to 
your advantage and the entire satisfaction <if the consumer. 
The crops are conservative and well distributed 

"A. Keller" whisky is an old-fashioned, Cenlr.il Ken- 
tucky Sweet Mash. Knriwn to the trade since is 10, „iid there 
IS no whisky better and more favoiablv known than the "A. 
Keller" among the larger Ijislern Wholesale D.'alers, It is 
lo-ilay the lea.lcr of Sweet Mm«Ims. 



FltOM TlIOMl'SON DiSTILMING Co. 



PiTTsisuKiui, V\., ^h^•ch i',, 1S!I7. 
Dkai! Siks; 

\Vc invite your attention t(p our Sam Thompson I'ui' 
Rye Whisky, and retjuest your investigation. It is one of th' 
oldest and most favorably known bninds produced in tb' 
Monongahela Valley, the home and origin of Eastern Ry<"~ 
It is oiir sole [iroduct, and nothing but the best selected \\' 
and malt is used in its manufacture. For fine llavor and 
heavy body It has no superior, as is attested bj' the liberal 
jtatronage it receives from lea<ling houses throuKhout the 
country. Its cooperage is the best obtainable and it is storeil 
iu steam-heated warehouses of exceedingly high charaeti'r. 
Its storage charge is ."> cents a barrel iier month, and insur- 
ance rate 8(1 cents a hundred and "Outage" guarantied not to 
exceed Government allowance. It is most conservatively jiro- 
duced, and no e.xjien.sc is spared to give it the widest possible 
distribution. Statistically it is in mo.st excellent contlition, 
as the accompanying statement shows. This is especially true 
when it is considered that there was but a very limited amount 
of Sam Thompson produced in Fall '9;! and Sjiring "94, none 
at all in Fall '9."), but a small crop in Spring '9-5, antl none 
since the close of .Juiu- last, and then- will be none until afti r 
Septcml)er, '97. 

Will be pleased to submit samples on request, and have 
yiiu coinjiare with other goods of highest reputation. 
Yours very respet-tfuUy, 

Thompson Distilling Co. 

Statement sliowing production and stock in the free and 
boniliil warehouses of Thompson Distilling Co. on March 
31st, 1897 : 

INSPECTION. I'KOnrCHD. IN IIOND. FRIK HOISK. 

Spring '90 •J.itjs H 

Fall '90 I,si-J ;;o 

Spring '91 -ITV.'A 1 

1-all '91 791) 1-20 

Spring '92 2,807 5.5G .... 

Fall '92 1,992 834 2 

Spring '93 2,7s 1 l.:;81 .... 

Fall '93 17(i g.'i 

Si)ring '94 l,.-)20 1,399 

Fall '94 1,10.-, 1.089 

Spring '9.5 •-',s9(i 2.S.S0 . . 

Fall '9.i None 

S])ring '9C 2,1 si> 2, ISC .... 



TotMl> 



23,o3(J 



10,(5--.l 



51 



From Dallkmand *fe Co. 



1»i:ai; Sii;; — We beg to int'oiiii yon that on April 1st, 
1897, we removed from 215 California street, to 212 Sansome 
street, and shall be ideaseil to banc a continuance of your 
always welcome and <lcsirable favors, as we are in a position 
lo till any orders cither from San Francisco or Chiiau'c), Ills , 
for goods in our line. 

Thanking you for past favors, we remain 
Wry tndy yours, 

Dallemand & Co. 



FoR SALE — One-half interest or the whole of the ri.Ldii 
to a wine faucet, recently patented, which enables wine men 
to keep dry wines on taj) in 5-gallon demijohns, pure and 
wholesome, without mani]ivdation. It is simple and thor- 
oughly eU'eclive, and is a result that has long been .sought, as 
it will enable retailers to carry small (|uantities of dry wines 
"on tap" withont spoiling. For particulars aildress (i. i\\\< 
ollicc. 

WIXEMAKKR and Distiller, 30 years of age, holding 
highest references for 12 years" services in leading establish- 
ments, open for engagement. Address "S. S.,"" this ollicc. 



i| 



pAeifie WljME /rJME) SpIRIT PEVIEW 



15 



Fkom C. H. Evans & Sons. 



Nkw Yui;k, .Miuvh 20, l.S'.»7. 

To lite Trade : 

Your profits on imported ulos will soon ho icduroil l)y 
till' :nlvaiu'i' ill till' t;irill'. Wo call your attention to this tact 
in oriiiT to illiistiati' and sulistantiate our chi'in tiiat Evan's 
India I'ak' Ak' and Brown Stout are lower in price heeauso 
tlioy pay no taritt' or ocean freights. The consumer gets the 
hest value for his money when he huys our ale and stout. It' 
you do not tind this to be so, don'l reeoiumend them. If you 
do. why shouldn't you '.' 

^'oul■s Irulv, 

('.■ n. EvAxs & So.vs. 
ISrewery and bottling works, Hudson, N. Y., New York 
City depot. 1"27 Hudson street. Telephone, 1621 Franklin. 



Drink Problem in Russia. 

The British Ambassador at St. Petersburg has sent to the 
Foreign Office certain document.s relating to the new system 
of a Crown monopoly for the sale of spirituous liiiuors. An 
Ambassador's report and the documents in (jnestion have just 
been laid before Parliament. M. de Witte's policy is to su- 
persede the Excise system under wliich vodka, or corn brandy 
was sokl by private individuals by one under which the 
Crown woukl entirely monopolize the sale. Tlu' Minister's 

\ object is not only to inerea.sc tlie public revenue, but also to 
supply corn lirandy of a quality superior to that supplied 
under the present system, and to remove some of the evils 
attending tlie old ty]>e of dramshops, where illegal [lawubnik- 
ing was combined with the sale of spirits. In January, ].S'J5, 
tiie new system was introduced bv way of experiment in the 
provinces of-Perm, Ufa, Orenburg and Samara. As the results 
were satisfactory, especiallyin a Huancial sense, the system 
was extended from July 1, 1896, to Bessarabia, Tolhynia, Ex- 
aerinoslay, Kietf, Podolia, Poltava, the Taurida, Kherson and 

' tlie Black Sea provinces, and it is to be introduced in the rest 
of the empire from July 1 next. The main features of the 
-1 heme are the abolition of the present Excise on corn brandy, 
the official control of the existing distilleries, and the supply 
by them to the Crown of rectified spirits in such ([uantities 
and at such prices as may be decided, the establishment of 
central spirit stores by the Crowi\ in each province, whence 
the spirits will be distributeil in sealed vessels to especial sliops 
in towns and rural districts where the liquor is sold by offi- 
cial agents. There is also a system of licensing inns and eat- 
ing houses to sell the spirits. The new scheme applies only 
to vodka, and not to wine, beer, etc.; which continue to be sold 
under ordinary licensing arrangements. Sir N. O'Connor 
points out that the scheme has not been applied over suffi- 
ciently wide areas or sufficiently long to enable safe general 
conclusions to be formed. — Wincnnd Spiril (lazclte {London). 



Imports and Exports 

DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



EXPORTS OF WINE. 



TO NEW YORK— Via Panama— l-KK STK. S. -. Colon. Miirili .i, Inj.. 



DESTINATION. 



siiirrrau. 



Nt*\v York Hilbcrt Hros 1^ cafwrs, 

Drooklyii '•' Cliivaliir it Co 

Knll Kivcr, Mass Lcnorinfin Bros. 

Hrookljll ColilbcrK. Ilovvcii & Co 



New York.. 



PittshurR 



Detroit .. . 
New York.. 



r.Rcllinnn ft Jacobi. 

Eturiis Itros 

e.iitiiUnch M. Wine Co.. 
Cal. Wiue Association.. 



Total amount— 87 cases and . 



Packaobs, 


QALLON!). 


VALDS. 






* 80 

1361 




270.'< 
103 
lUH 

11, vo; 

100 
9,M6 
3,600 


■i barrel 






70 




8,J80 
40 




2(W barrels 


!I,7I>0 
l,l65 








4,300 
10.000 


3,600 
2,74tl 









41.667 



S14,384 



TO CENTRAI, AMERICA— Per Str Colon, March 81, 1897. 



San J. de Ouatamala. 



Corinto 

I,a I.ibertad 

Acajutla 

ban J. de (>uatainala . 



Corinto 

[,a I.ibertad. 



Acajutla 

San J. de Guatamala . 
La Libertad 



San J. de Guatamala . 

Corinto 

Acajutla 



San }. de Guatamala. 



Champerico. 
Acajutla 



Duval it Carroll 1 10 cases 

Napa & S. Wine Co Ilu kegs , 

" lOcascs 

Cal. Wiue Association loO cases 

" i8 barrels, 2o keRS. 

" » barrels, iO kegs. 

I4uhalf barrels 

" liScasks 

C. Schilling & Co 30 kegs 

|lOcasc5 

" B kegs 

" lOOcascs 

7 Itegs 

" 4 barrels 

Lachnian & Jacobi ,2 half barrels -. . . . 

" ibOcases 

A. Bresaue J40 barrels 

!l!. FrapoUift Co lu cases 

Wetmore-BowenCo 28 Ciises 

105 bbls 

31 hf. 160 kegs... 

■20 cases 

b barrels, 9 half... 

6 half barrels 

128 cases 

3 bbls 71 hf. 

36 kegs 

10'2 cases 

4 barrels, 20kegs.. 

BO kegs 

Bbarrels 

65 cases 

3 bbls. 6 half 

2 kegs 



Gundlach-Bund. W.Co.. 



Total— AGS cases, and. 



ero 

620 

1,018 

720 

SOU 



SB 



70 

21» 

Gl 



7,91B 



40B 
169 



5,566 



419 
BOO 

273 



■16 

BO 

8-^ 

3'iS 

2110 

370 

36ll 

216 

l'.<0 

36 

41 

316 

B4 

101 

17 

88 

lOO 

40 

16S 



B5 
143 

99 
044 



30S 

m 

22B 
76 
19S 



! «I0,378 



TO ME.VICO— PER STR. ORIZABA, March 27, 1807. 







2 cases 


16 




Crown Distilleries Co 

(lundlnch-BuncI. W.Co 


10 barrels, 66 kegs., 
tf barrels 


1,1 ye 

306 
100 
406 
114 
626 
H4 


784 




8!) 






48 


Santa Rosalia 


F. S. Kordl 

H Levi ft Co 


H barrels, :/kegs 


140 
70 




G barrels, 23 kcRS... 


195 


M 






«< 




cases 


24 








38 




W. A. Schultz &Sons 

Italian-Swiss Colony 

Jesse M . Levy & Co 

B Frapolli&Co 


•J half 


66 
70 
186 
429 






7 kegs. 


27 


Allata 


'1 barrels, 8 kegs 

7 barrets, 1 keg 

1 half barrel 

I barrel. 20 kegs 

I hf cask. <0 kegs .. 

Icask, 5 kegs. 

B cases. X barrel 


114 

\1A 






'At' )1 




261' Si 


Lft Paz 


Cal Wiue Association 


4321 195 
1681 66 












! ' 




Total amount 


8 cases and 




6.016 $2.a9« 



Tcl HAWAII— I'lK IlKT. \V. H. DiMosii, March 24, !•■ 







Cal. Wine Association 

Guudlach-B. Wine Co 

John C. Nobmann 

•^. fill. I 




8S0 
1.103 


300 






10 barrels. Blialf.. 1 
'6 kegs ( 


tl 






• • 




485 


., 




11 bbls. I4B kegs ... 


1,63; 


767 




iflca'i 








Total - 


3,(i«ll 


{I.<il2 




HERCULES GAS, GASOLINE AND DISTILLATE ENGINES. 

The Best to Buy and the Cheapest to Operate. 
For Pumpino;, Hoistin'j;, Millino; and all Stationar\' Purposes. 
^^'^'^^ ENGINES AND PUMPS COMBINED FOR RACKING. A SPECIALTY 
Over 500 HERCULES ENGINES in Use by Coast Wineries and Vineyards. 





SatistaotioQ G u,ii ilu trod or Monc-j Rrfiiuiled 

SPECIAL ENGINES FOR WINE PRESSES. ETC . 

^i-'hte for ni<)«trated Catalogue : r. x 1 H. P. TD 200 H. P 

LAIiiJEHT GAS £\til.\K WOHKS IS Tilt: Wl-Ssr. 



HERCULES GAS ENGINE WORKS. 

OFFICE. 405 407 SANSOME STREET. 

WORKS, 216. 217. 219. 221. 223 225,227 229, 231 BAY STREET 



2< HP. $186 00 
DIscoun: frr Cash. 



( SAN FRANC SCO, 
( CALIFORNIA. 



16 



f/cGlfie WI|slE 7^J\I^ SflR;_IT f^EVItW 



TooAla 

San imilo 

MaiatlBu .... 

Tonal* 

Puerto AniccJ., 
Sjiu Hi nilu 



u. Crrv op >VDNKV. March 'JO. 1S97. 



<:. M Mniin 

Southern I'ncificCo. 

Ca<<tlr Ilro* 

F. r- Kotdl 

Noprt .V s Wine Co. . 
Guiullnch.llulid. W. Co....i 

I.Uuttc 

H. Levi &Co 



Tonala . . . 



Puerto ADRCl. 

Sao Bcuilo.... 



lu bnrrrl* 

1» hnll barreU.. 

5 catcH 

Vi liair barrel). 

6 hall lutrreU... 
lOhnir lulrrela.. 

fi" (egs 

lokcKt c 

lOOcaiea 



4M 

4»" 



W. A. Schulutt Sons.... 
Stc\-ens, Anthold it Co. . 



C. Schilling K Co .. .. 
Cal. Wiuc AMociation 



F.S.Kordt 

Italian SwiM Colony . 



aOkcEii 

lthairi6kcK(... 

10 keKfl 

lOCOHcS ...I 

Ibaircl 

1 keK.'J barrels. 

lOkcKs 

44 cases 

4i cases 

Ikegs 



Total amount 19U cases and 



I.IHS 
110 
■J 
too 
101 



SOU 
34) 

W 

"m 

119 
10 



TO CENTRAL AMERICA— Pkr S. S. Citv OF SvDNEV, Marc h 20, 181)7 . 



.{4baiTels 

.100 cases 

, Castle nros » cases 

. Napa S: S. \V. Co Meases 

. C. Schilling S: Co 41 cases 

" 16 barrels. 10 kegs.. 

I i kegs 

•• lObarrc's. 46 kegs... 

•' I M cases 

" ISO kegs 

" :l hall barrels 

" 41 cases 

" l-' cases 

■• 41'barrels I 

V7hf. 14 kegs. ... 1 

10 barrels, 10 half... 

" 10 cases 

10 half barrels 

lux cases 

1 barrel, 1 half.... { 

•■ Ikeg I 

Atnapala " tOcases 

Acajulla 'C. A. Baldwin 24 cases 

Cbaniperico 'GundlachBund. W. Co &2cflse8 



Li Llbertad CM. Mann. 



San J deCuatamala . 

Ocos 

La I'nion 

Amapnla 

San J dcGualamala.. 
Ocos 

Sa n I del Sur . 

ITri 



I4C1 
1.S.S1 



too 
a 



El Triumfo.. 
LaUberUd.. 



Puntas Arenas.. 



Acajutia — 
La I'nion.. 



C.il. \viue Association. 



San J de Gnatamala.. 



■> kegs 

"- caries 

^bjirrels 

'2 barrels 

2 hair, .'>1 kegs.. 



La I'nion * 

Wctmore-Bowen Co. 

I.al.ibertad Baruch «: Co 16 ban els. 

Guatatnala Gaddeni & Ciocco W barrels, 50 kegs. 

Chamiierico IStevens, Arnhold & Co lOOltegs 

B. Hrapolli&Co 44 cases 

" 12 kegs 

Amapala Italian-Swiss Colony 13 kegs 



Total— COS cases, and. 



1,117 



'"ioii 

122 

70« 

770 

l,9y8 

1,000 



30 



27" 

ta3 

70 
lK> 
TiO 

0" 
SJO 
■J3i 
III 
loO 

48 

48 

s-t 

60 
184 
1C6 

l:i 



|a,178 



JOO 
410 

4 
75 
1»9 

»a 

14 

742 
i-O 
876 

62 
901 

43 



431 
60 
3IVI 
749 



160 

00 

1'2H 

26 

6 

68 

37 

480 

307 

618 

600 

177 

22 

17 



13,260 {9,e7J 



TO NEW YORK— Via Panama— PER S. S. City op Sydnf.v, March 20, 1897. 



New York 

Savannah, Ga 

Rome. Ca 

New Y'orki 

Jacksonville, Fla. 



New York 

Total— 27 cases.a nd 



Lachman K Jacobi 1183 barrels, '.lU half .. 

Stetson RennerD. Co 1 barrel 

3 barrels 

Gundlacta-Bund. W. Co 160 barrels 

St. George V. Co hi? cases 

30 barrels, 12 hal r. . 

Cal. Wine Assn [736 bbls, 10 pns 



«,77C. 

62 

lUI 

7,67« 

'V,S7i 
3y,960 



2,769 
13 
17 

2,337 

135 

C16 

10,976 

$16,762 



TO MEXICO-PBR S. S. O'LOH, March SI, la»7. 



Acapulco (Napa jt s. W Co tl barrel 

Cal Wiiie Association 6 casks 

San Bias I " Akegs 

Manzanillo B. Frapolli jk Co 1 barrel, 3 hall.. . 

Acapulco " lOcases 

'Stevens, Amhold & Co |3 tiarrels, I keg.. 



Total— 10 cases, and. 



>0i 
aw! 

90 
139, 

"iM: 



so 

175 

77 
tJO 
4'i 
110 



7M' 



»48j 





TO 


HAWAII-Pui S S. 


Al'STRALIA, March 'J*. 1897. 


600 
1,74» 




Uonolulu 




John C. Nobiiuin 

Cal. Wine Associaiion 

M. G. Sinias & Co . . . 
Gundlach 11 W Co.. 
Italian-Swiss Colony. 
J. SchuH-lerit Co 


lobariels 

... a cases 

... JJbbls, 10 half bbls. 
... I6keg> 


I 


200 
«62 




... 47 kegs 


:«o 






... 23 cases 


40 




... 6 barrels 

... 1 barrel 




260 
62 


10 1 




34 










Total- 'J^ cases and 




2.921 


tl.KII 



Tv BRITISH COLUMBIA— PKK S. S. QCEK.N, March SIst, 1897. 



Victoria 


.... C. N.M.ann 


■i barrels. 


1(14 1 

100! 

to 
to 

t2 


562 






1 barrel 

1 barrel 

Ibariel 


•IK 


Kamloops 


4, 


25 




)■' 








Total.... 


356 


$.74 





TO JAPAN-PER S. S. PERO, March 38, I897. 






Yokohama 


Beringer Bros ivbarreis 


103 
28' 
320 


0(1 








Kobe 


MobnsS: K '4 barrels 










Total^ . 


679 


288 





TO NEW YO.K -Pp.RSHirM. 


1*. Gkacf., March aisl. 


1M>7. 








. 26 bbls 

. 2,0.Wbbls 

. 'J.SOO bbls 


I.MOO 
103,920 
1 26.000 


( 660 

41,.'i68 








Cal. Wine .\ss'u 

Total 


50,000 








230.220 


$92,218 





TO TAHITI-Pi.:b Bkt. Tropic. 


Bird March 31, 


1897. 




Tahiti 




21)bls 


107 


t 43 




Lachman ft Jacobi 


30 bbls 


1,041 




1, 


181 bbls 1 . . . . 






ii 1 <• •. 


4hr bbls) 




2,810 




Total 




in.49<i 


*3.14» 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO DOMESTIC PORTS. 



From March 16th to SIst, 1897. 



VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SmPPBRS. 


PACKAGES. 


GALLONS. 


VALUE. 


City of Sydney. 
Colon 


New York 

Fall River, Mass... 

New York 

Pitt-sbuFK, Pa 

Detroit 




.^barrels 

1 package.... 

•i3ca«es 

5 holf bbls 
3 bbls, 1 half. 


225 
22 

ISO 

119 


«440 
40 

2'>7 


Lenormand Bros 

Mellnian Bros. Ji Co.. 
Cal. Wine .Association 


Total 


-23 cases and 


406 


l.4'.>e 



SHERWOOD ^ SHERWOOD, 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

Stocks of our Agency Goods for sale in bond and duty paid at 
212-214 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 24 N FRONT STREET, PORTLAND, OR. 

216 N. MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



PACIFIC COAST AGENTS FOR 

*'Keijsione JUoiiogrniu line'' and "(Old Sar.ntogn" -The Finest Eastern Rye. 

.MOKT A: i;iI.V.N'l)(J.\' CliAiiipauiiu. IvSt.'UK.N'.MJKU .V COS Chiivls and Santoi'acs. ,\l.\i 'KKN/li; >\: Cd's Spanish SluMi'U'sanci I'oi'ts 

HU.NT ItOOl'l': TK.VUK Ji. CO. Cased Ports. V. HOUTM.\X .V: CO's llollaml Cin. K .V .1 liKltKI'; S .\on|ini'eil Old Tom CJiii. 

K. 4V J. HUKKKS llllnih •DdOirtk.ri s«u« l^.VVVSON '.•> l/ninoui' Scoti'li Whisky. HUKKKS ll.'iiiiossy Brandy and Dry (;in. 

UAS.S KATCMKK it. GKETTON, Ltd.— Baas (JLKXr.I VI'Vl' Si-i.l.-h Whisky in Wooil. SCllMTZ .Mihvankoo Hoor tho "rilsfiioi" and 

Ale ill 'A' 1. .I<>IJM;s Slon.' Mc in IIIuls. ami Uf-IIhds. Li^rhl Sparkling, also Schlitz in Wood. 

E. & J. -! Bu>' Hi »iiil Dablm Porur (OOIKItSS .M !■; I .\l lOI.D'S .Vnchor Itrand New York Cidor UOSS' Uolfast Cingor Alo, Cliil) Soda, ctr. 

Eim u. Inm krt.). U1':.\K WAKKKSHA -Mitiuial Walor. •CLUB COCKTAILS." EVANS Hudson Ale. 

FLEISCH.MA.N.N S UOVALTY GIN. 

KOH^KAM, GkR-STLKV Si Cc, PlIlLADELl'IIIA, PURE WHISKIES— "MASCOT." "RoBIN IIOOD," "O. P. S." AND "TrIVATK STOCK." 

l'iiir*t ('iiiiitiliitn Ill/I' Wliinhi) tilitilirhuiii .1 U'oi'/.i. I.l'il. Tiirniitit. Ciiiiinliii, Itolllt'il I'lulrr floreriiineiil Sii/wrrisioii. 

Jti: IMI'Oirmt t }li:illC.l .\ it III.SIili:s Curlislc lti,inho)i, S,,ri>iu 'Sl. 'sr,. •.s;t. 'ItO.- Ilormn lUir: O. /•'. (' : Sinhiijliill 

It: II. Mrllriiifi-: llrrniilinir , .»/. (. .MiiniiriU ; Iivntiiil.ii<liil>. M<llir<ti,it . MiiltiiiijUj. ChiiUenrorU . I'.. <\ lUvrn 

itHfl ttthri* Htiiitttaytl hr.intts. 

ALSO AGENTS FOR NAPA VALLEY VW I IM E COS WINES AND BRANDIES IN CASES. CALIFORNIA (WINES AND BRANDIES IN WOOD. 



p/rGlflb Wi.NE /rJMD Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



17 



EXPORTS OF WHISKY, 





From March 15th to 31st, 


1897. 






VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


PACKAGES . 


GALLONS. 


VALUE. 


City of Sydney. 


I^ I.ibcrtad 


Wctm. re-Boweu Co.. 

F. S. Kordt 

\Vm. Wolff ft Co 

Carroll .S; Carroll 

Crown Distilleries Co. 


2 barrels 


7» 


SIS 


" 


Puerto .^nuel - 

Ch.tniperico 

Tonnin 


10 cases 




4B 

IMI 


,, 


1 barrel 

4 cases 


40 


(9 


tt 






It 










II 




Rosenfeld Bros. & Co. 
C. Schilling it Co 

Crown nistilleriesCo 
Spruance, S. S: Co. . . . 
Cutting Packing Co.. 
Crown Distillerit s Co. 
J. Schusslcr -S: liros. . 
J. I).SpreckelsN:Uros. 
JohnT. Williams ... 
Crown Distilleries Co. 

Wm. Wolff & Co 

Crown DistilleriesCo. 






78 


M 


(X'os 


1 barrel 

•ikegs 

1 case 

100 cases 

4 ca-es 


43 

40 


lis 


Tnipire 

VCT\t 


San J de Guat'la... 

Ocos 

Svdncv 

Peking 

ShnnKhae 

Honolulu 

Mnhukonn 

I^nsennda 


1C<I 
12 

80 








965 








17 


J, I>. Sprtckels. 
(.>rizabji 








6 barrels 


237 


nil 


■ • 










• i 










•< 










.< 




1 barrel 

-*kegs 


20 




C ilon 


■Vcajutla 


76 

49 














Tntnl-434cn';e'; 









1!h1 




wm 


14.8'20 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO FOREIGN PORTS. 



Prom March 15th to 3Ist, 1697. 



VESSELS. DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. PACKAGES. 


GALLONS. 


; VALUE. 


•^ity of Syncy.. Puerto Angel 

" .. Champerico 






{130 
G2 
13 


11. I'rapolli & Co 2 kegs 

Italiati-Swiss Colony I keg 

Crown Distilleries Co 2 half 

C. Schilling & Co 1 keg 


2ii 

5 
K 

20 




:e 


.. San J de Guat'la... 
" Ocos 


80 
12 




John C. Nobraan i barrel 


411 


46 








'J kegs 

I. Gutte 2 pkgs 


DO 
14 












Total 21 cases 


246 


$S92 







WHISKY AND SPIRITS TO SAN FRANCISCO BY RAIL. 

l-rom March loth to :'lst, IBOT. 
COPYRIGHTED. 



CONSIGNEES. 


spiRirs 


WHISKV. 


BRANDY. C.IN. 


Bbls. 


Cases. < Bbls. 


•A Bbls. 


Bbls. 


•A Bbls.j Kegs. Cases. 


Bode & Haslett .... 


ito 

346 
C5 
130 
19-^ 
60 


















76 
72 


10 








Louis Taussig & Co 

Jones. Mundy & Co 

W Wolff X: Co 
































2 

eoo 

CO 


99 




2 


6 


60 




Hilbert Bros 
























60 
















26 














g 


GO 
20 
GO 
60 
















S 














































7 



















12 

i 

G 

e 

6 

] 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


















12 
17 
















































































J. H. Mitchell, Oakland. 






















































.... 
























Total 


i);n 


~ 


111 


-^ 


(', 


~, 


5 



EXPORTS OF MISCELLANEOUS LIQUORS. 



From March 16th to 31st, 1807. 



Queen 

Mohican 

City of Sydney 



Walla Walla . 
Australia .. .. 



W. H. nimond 

Orizaba 

Colou 



DESTINATION. 



Victoria 

Honolulu .. 
Ma/.atlnii .. 

( )cos 

San ftciiito. 

Victoria . .. 



SHIPPERS. 



, I", ixllary itCo 

. Williams, D. tk. Co... 

.IS. I'. Co 

, Crown DistilleriesCo. 

A. Vignicr 



Hiiscnada 

New York 



. I; G. Lyons Co 

,. A, Viv:nier 

.. F Dfllary&Co 

.. Crown Distilling Co 
.. JDSpreckels^BrosCo 
.. Crown Distilling Co.. 
..Western Trans. Co.. . 
.. Wm. Wolff^: Co 



PACKAGr.4 AND 
CONTENTS. 

40 cases champagne . 

6'iy cases gin 

\'2 cases bitters 

6 cases " 

20 cases ■' 

'1 cases cliampagne. . 
lOcases verniuuth... 
3 cases li<iMors 

cases '' 

cases champagne . 

(cases bitters 

Ii>.'» cases gin 

2 cases cordials 

1 case fernet 

90 cases schnapps. . . . 



Total '.I5.'t cases, etc. 



MISCELLANEOUS WINE EXPORTS. 



$017 
3,1 ]fi 

100 

an 
Aa 

108 
H'i 
30 
4? 

813 
I '2 

404 
18 
7 

7»» 

J'l.Ml 



From March 16th to 31st, 1897. 



VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


1 SHIPPERS. 

1 


PACKAGES. 


GALLONS. 


VALDE. 


Queen 


Golden, B. C 

Union, B.C 

Victoria 

SamaranK 

Vancouver 

Victoiia 


. Oundlach B W Co 




16:< 
49 
264 
117 
730 
52 
80 

no 


168 
20 
70 
47 

490 

81 



39 


Walla Walla.... 
Pern 


. Morton D. Co I barrel 

. I.achnian &J 6 barrels 

. ]•:. G. Lyons Co i casks 

. cal. Wine .Association 1 2 casks 

. Oundlach, B W. Co.. 1 barrel 

. Gaddini SiCiocca.... 1 barrel 

. C Schilling & Co ' !,:irr..u 


Umatilla 


<* 


Honolulu 


. Geo. K. Hall 

. I.achmanit J 

. Cal. Wine Association 




Albert 


140kCRS 


(60 


J 494 






8hfcks250.kg 
1 pun, 2 casks 


'l,5i2 
Hi 


602 
146 
18 
29 






..Liebniau & Waters... 
and 


M. P. Grace.... 


London 

Total— 26 cases 


2 hf barrels. . 


67 




4180 


82.070 



BEER IMPORTS BY RAIL. 

l-rora February loth to 3lst, \H'J~. 

COPYRIGHTED. 



CONSIGNEES. 


BOTTLED. 


mn.K. 




Cases. 


Casks. 


Bbls. 


Bbls. 


M Bbls.,l<,Bbls. 


Kegs. 


Royal Eagle Distilleries Co 


145 


124 
36 

"iJo" 


■■so" 


226 
66 


184 
166 


40 


40 
lOO 


E.G. Lyons Co 


jiio 












Sherwood & Sherwood 


c 


86 






' 




C. W .Craig Co., (StoutJ 
























Total 


261 


xas 


166 


286 




140 









FROM NEW YORK-Per Ship W. H. Macv, March 19, 1897. 







14 bW. bottled beer 


:; 


.±'- 


Chapme 








177 pkg whiskey 




FROM 


NEW 


YORK VIA PANAMA— Per S 


s. 


Colon, 


March 


asth. 1897. 






1 300 cases cider 


_:.• 


. 1 Cobu 


rn Tevis 


*S: Co. 



FROM EUROPE. 



3fi cases wine 

76 cases liqueurs.. 
2 barrels wine . . . 



Chas. Meineckc & Co. 
Goldt}crg Bowcn & Co. 
.\. Ross. 



FROM VICTORIA— Per Str. Umatilla, March 22d, 1897. 





1 110 cases liquors.. 


|A.P. Hotaling&Co 


FROM EUROPE- 


-Via PANAMA— Per S. S. 


Otv of Sydney, March ITtb, 1897. 


Hvariste nupont & Co. 
Luders & Stange 






166 cases wine 


...Iwm. Haas. 






PRUNEX 'JUICE 

RIOI t-\ TtBID 

vM.HAHN&Ce. 

'^^ NEW^ YORK 



MARTIN ERLENBACH, 

PACIFIC COAST AGENT 

404 Sacramento St . San Francisco, 



'PERFECTION" 

(THE STANDARD) 

TURKISH PRUNE JUICE 

Is warranted a I'l'Kll IKl'I'l' ll.\TK.\cr, \\)\- -e i. unit»i.)iient p.irts arc 
so |>erfeclly blended that its action, u«icd as proportioned, on every 
description of spirit.;, such as BRANDY, RUM, Gl.V and particularly 
WIIISKV. is truly wonderful. It FI^E-, PURIl-n-s. MKLLOWS 
and otherwise ('.KNICk.M.l.V IMI'KOVICS ion remarkable degree. 

"I'KRl-KCTION' TUKKISII PRUNI-; Jt'ICE is an article which can- 
not be judged by its taste or l)ou<|Uct, it muut t>e blended with the 
spiriU in wood to prove its value. Samples and inforniation rvKaniing 
proportion to use, etc., will l»e gladly furiiishc<l by either our Agent or 
oursclve>. 



Cal. 



The advantage of givinR Immature spirits, 
IN A VERY SHORT TIME, the character of 
age, and thereby greatly increasing their 
value, is obvious. 



CVM 



PRUNEX JOlCf 

\M.HAHlV&CV 

NEW YORK 



M. HAHN & CO,, 

•OLC HANUrACTUPCnS 

125 Water Street. New York. 



18 



Mrr 

C. 11 

n. 1- 

Jcnc 

J. A. 
Co.. I 

Ct'!' 

r..- 



f/cGIfin WIJME /rJVD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW 



vM NHW vokk-Pek Ship Kksilworth, Mireta ITlh 1897. 



Muorr Jiunt Co 
Iluikc 



.^rH cider 

: ImUcd (Ic 

'.''. rum 

..»■;* UtrrcN whi.il:ey 

"i^MirtcK whiskey 

f itncr Co ;l IwirrrK whiskey 

M Itfirrrlfi whiskey 

M ^ Go SO cnM.-!. niincrnl water 

Rt • .1^^ . li.iiiil':'i;lie 



Slierwcxxl ^ Sherwood. 

Ilellman Uroa. K Co. 
Jeiue Moore Hunt Co. 
J A llurke. 
LivitiKsloii S: Co. 
Order. 

RedlliKtun j^ Cu. 
.\ ll.ir.is7thv. 



EXPORTS OF BEER. 



I'roMi March IMh 10 31M, IW. 



lirjiTINATION. 



■ ^ lihu. 

CityofSydne>.. 



Ililo H. I.... 
San Benito.. 



I^ I'nion 

La LiberlAd. 



S. P. Breweries Ltd. 

J I) Spreckela 

I. Outte 

H. IxvISlCo 

HufToloU. Co 



I'eru 

AuKtmlia . 



Welmore Ilowcn Co. 

>nn Benito Anhcuser B. Co 

Iji Liliertod 

San J de Cunt 

IX-os I " 

Iji Inion S. F. Breweries, Ltd. 

EI Triumfo 

Ocos 

Champerico 

San Benito 



La Liliertad. . . 

Araapala 

La I'nion 

Vtadivoslock. 
Honolulu 



10 cnsko bottled... 

10 hill liottled 

« •' " .... 

'.iS cases bottled.. 



E. G. Lyons Co 

C. Schilling & Co. 



S. F. Breweries 

Uutcrprise Brew. Co. 



S. F. Breweries, Ltd. 



\V. H. Dimond. 



Orizaba. 



Royal H. nist. Co. . . . 
Uuflalo HrewinK Co. 

J n. SprcckelsS B.. 
IliUlcbrant P. &Co.. 
I'.ntfrprise Brew. Co. 

Uilbcrt Bros 

S. F. Breweries 



Colon . 



Guaymas .. . 
Fnscnada.. . 
Horcilas. — 
Ouavmas.. . 



La Paz 

San Jose de Gnat. . 



F. S. Kordt 

H. I^vi& Co 

Enterprise B. Co.. 
F. Breweries . . . 



.\cajutla 

.\cnpulco 

1^1 Liberlad 

Acapuico 

' ICOS 

Ac.ijutla 

San JosedeOuat. 
Corinto 



San J deGuat. 



Acapuico. 
Tahiti .... 



C. Schillug& Co... 

E. G. Lyons Co 

BufTalo Brewing Co, 



Koyal Eagle Dist. Co 



W. Loaiza 

IS. F. Breweries. 



Ga casks " 

« " ■• 

I cask " 

:MI cases *' 

100 cists " 

50 cases " 

fiO cases '* 

'^Ceases '' 

20cases " 

'.24 cases " , ... 

'-0 cases '* . ... 

36 cases *' 

:10 casks " 

1 cask " 

'J cases " ... . 

lease '• 

3bbls ■■ 

i60 cases " 

100 hair bbls. hulk.. 

60 third bbls. " . , 

TOeighlh bbls. " . . 

S casks bottled 

■J) casks 

100 third bbls. bulk. 
|40 eighth bbls. " . 
;lfiOt|uarter bbls. " . 

27 casks bottled 

1 case *• 

5O ca.se s " 

40 casks " 

IGcnsks " 

3t) casks " 

120 cases " 

2 casks '■ 

10 cases " 

bbl. •• .. .. 

50 cases " 

R casks " 

296 cases *' 

2 casks •' 

40 cases " . . . . 
16 cases " 

4 cases " 

21 cases '• 

160 cases '• 

24 cases '• 

14 cases '* 

16 casks " 

4S boxes " 

86 casks " 

100 boxes " 

10 cases " 

1 cask •' 



Tropic Bird. 

Touil— 1.S69 cases, S6l casks, la barrels, US boxes lx>tlled. and 100 hall barrels, 

1''-' thiril barr-N Iffo (|uarter b.irrel.. .^n(l II" eighth liaricK l)ulk 



IMPORTS PER RAIL IN BOND. 



: From March 16th to 31st, 1897. 



, 376 cases champagne [\Vm. WollT & Co. 

Oiu cases champagne ('.. H M. 5c Co.... 

rj ca-^rs wine -. Order 



00 
lou 



804 

12 
216 
fOO 
2.WI 
260 
lou 
lort 
l'.>6 
^■6 
130 
270 
!l 

13 
3 

34 
1,163 

760 

46 

180 

aoo 

56 

478 

9 

426 

.160 

162 

270 

64 6 

IB 

46 

10 

176 

60 

1,700 

IH 

180 

67 

22 

176 

809 



400 
1,474 



34 
10 



Jl'.l'O 



SWEET WINE PRODUCTION SEASON OF 

1896=1897. 

KK( AI'rm..\'l]ON TO FKliRUARY 1st, l.S!i7. 

Ol'l'R-IAI. l'Ii;i'KKS. 

W'iiu- gallons. 

Port in'othiced . l,i;'2:',,01 ,S.48 

SliiMi'v iiroduced . l,l()!»,n(ii;.2() 

Aiif^i'lica ])ri)iluccd. . 41 1..'! 1:5. -SO 

Mu.sL'iitel j)ro(luce(l .">.■'.!».( I'.i8. 12 

Malaga proiluced 2,-iGJi.l ] 

Fi'outignaii produced !t.(l'20.<i7 

Tokay produced ■ !>74 '3 1 

Total lor season to February 1, 1H!)7. .'J,'.1!t4,7o9.G> 



FIRST DISTRICT, Fkhkuary, 1897. 

Pkgs. Tax Gals. 



Brandy witlidrawii troiii distillery 
for fortification 

Brandy withdrawn from .'-pecial 
warcliouse for fortification. . 

Branily used for fortificatinn. . . . 

Port jirodiKcd 

Sherry jiroduced 

Muscat produced 

Angelica produced 



301 

120 

7101 



41,090. 1 

11,«97. :; 

7 l,S90. I' 

Will.' (ial- 

.•'..4i;:"..l 1 

17.s,',l29..jn 

114.2.5:5.71. 

277. M-, 



FOURTH DISTRICT, Fki!i;i.u;v 1«97. 

Pkgs. Ta.x Gals ,, 



Brandy \\ ithdiawn IVom di.'^tillery for I'or- 

titicutiou 4.) 

Brandy witlidiawii from special bonded 

warehouse for fortification HH 

Drauilv used for fortiiication 122 



Port produced 

Sherry produced : ... 

Angelica produced 

RECAPITULATION TO MARCH 1, 1897 



3,09.5.3 

8,(1.58.0 

9,289.2 

Wine (ial.s. 

28,7(11.43 

10,217.61 

('..58.81 



Wine Gals. 

Port jiroduced l,(j.5o,243.(l."i 

Sherry i)roduced. . . 1,.59S,213.:'.7 

Angelica produced. 412,24'.i.'.i7 

Muscatel produced fi.53.3.51..'^^ 

.Malaga protlucod 2,2(i9.1 1 

Frontignaii produced 9.()2().07 

Tokay pmduced 974..". 1 



Total lor Season to March 1. lS!i7. 



l..".:!1.:32l.M'i 



WlbblAM WObPF & CO. 



Importers and General Agents, 



327-329 Market Street, 



San Francisco, Cal 



-7^GEIN-rS ROR 



Ml KfKBNAv, Champagne, Mi:ssKS. in )i.riio wol.i-i; s SON K: CO., scim i>Asi. 

i1 Ini|H:riiil .\runinli.iii.' Si-Iitinpps. 

1 ' .1 NiiluMil Tablr Wnteio. Mi:sSKS. K1;aii IIKOS . I.iiNlMiN, The "Ilog's Head" Hot- 

»ii,.-NK^ l.v.MKl.1.1. .V I.IX 'IKANI.;, BliLl'AsT, Gluger limn o( Ciiiiincss' Slout and Bass' Ale. 

Ale. BAKTIIol.oM.W IIKKWING CO., KuCilKSTKIl, N. V., 

MK.^.iRH J ft f MAkTI'.LL, Cognac -Marlell Brandy. Knlik. il«i. ker ll.ir. 

Ml "■" \M WALKHK ^. SONS, Lti>,Wai.kiu<vii.i.k, MI->iSKS. DI'IIOS I-KKKUS, BoKlir.Al'X, Clarets and Sau. 

n.idmu Club Whinky. tcriies 

'•■' .HI-.W Lslll.K *£ CO., I'tul.'vnrKiill. Scotch Ml-l.'iSHS niaSHAKl) .Sj CO , Coiilkstji, Khine and Moiclle 

Wines 

Ml ; :■ ' KS CO, LTi>.. (Wm. Jameson MR. I- C1I.M'V1.:NHT, NriTS. Corn D'Oh. nuriiundy Wines. 

i>ky. MKS!<KS MOKCAN BROS., Pt'KHTii Im Santa Mahia, 

M . 1 I l< A S<iN, H'rmmiiAM. Gin Shcrilr«. 

MU J A.oil.KA, lli.i>i.i..<, i.ilku Kuiunicl ft Itkau. WIDOW ll,\KMONY, I uerto de Santa Maria, Shcrrle«. 



Till- KOYAL WIN|.; CO., Or..MT... Port Wine. 
Mi:SSKS. YZAi.llUKK ,\: CO . Ki t~. larraiionn Wiuc« 
rill-: KOYAL III'N'iiAKIAN C.OVl;KNMi;Nr WINl-: CI I. 
I.AKS. l»'i>,\fi>.r. IIiitiKniiiin wines. 

rsi noKR AMI oriiKK <'.i:rman iii.:i.;rs 

MR TMKo L.M'l'l-;. Nrritn ri-NiM.Ki-. .\roniatti|ue nilct^ 
MR MARNIKR I.AI'OSTOI.Li;, SKlNK KT Olgl. I !..»>. 

r.rnnd Mnrntrr 
Mi:ssKS. V CISKNII'R.I'IUSAINI-: «! CO. Paris, conlini- 
ANIlRlvASSAXI.I'IlNKR, llt'I.AI'KST.IIunvaili J..nos Natii« 

Al>erirnl Wain 
MR. JOll ANN MARIA I'ARINA, Coro<;Ni-, ncRenurl^t .1' 

JutlU'liHplali, Colt>Knr, l-'nu de Colo|ine. 



ftr-iinportrtl Amrrlran WhUklm.—'HO Fxrclsi'-r; Spr. '80 Jlclli- r( Nrlwin; Sprinit '90 OKI (Jrard Dnil; Iliimc; M«yfi<'Ul: <>. F. C; Cliickinrork tn.l 
iillior St.ipio liiBiidi. lA>wait market quotation) rurnialiui on n|>|ili<»lion, to (lie wholesale trn<lc only. 



P/reiflii WIJME /rhJD Sfif^lT f^EVIEW. 



19 



BRANDY PRODUCTION t-rs: l.ciuf,' imahk' to iiitrt llirm, are forced to retire from the 

field temi>orinily or else sell wiiii'S either at or helow iietual 

FIK^Sr DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA, Fkis , 1X97. ^'osl priee to inaiiitaiii tlieir regular trade. 

'|-.j^ ,;.i]^ AiU)tlier (ILsturlier of the trade einiilihriuin here is the 

'■ " ■■ fael that a luiudHT of California wine men, who must eitlier 

I reduced and bonded 21,?-.'(l.:i l,^, deci.le.llv hard up, or else have wine .so poor that the Cali- 

Roceived Ironi dists. in I>ourth District, Cal ],:](;.-)..(; fo,.,iia l)uvers won't touch it, are consigning it to be sold "on 

,". S!. B. W., Fourth District. Cal aceounl" at auction. It is almost needless to .sav that under 

I ranslerred from dists. to S. B. ^\ ., Lastcrn Dists. 4], -492.2 the depressed condition of the market, that it is" "sold." An 

" " 8. B. W. toS. B. W., East. Dists. ;3,(>i)4.7 outsider in any way familiar with the prices a decent wine 

';'^"1''''"' 20,102. ought to bring, would be more inclined to think "given awav" 

1 \{>orted ....... . 50 C ,, „„„-i. approjiriate designation for the trau.'^action, at prices less 

Kemaining in bond Fob. 28, 189< (J2!»,8(i9.2 |l,an wine is being sold for in California. Selling wineat auction 

might do if our growers had brands known to the trade cen- 

FOURTII DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA, Feu., 1897. erally, for certain qualities that <ould b..,lei,en.led upon to be 

I'roduced and bonded 1, :;](>. the same year after year; rnforlunately, such wines are not 

Transferred from dist. to S. 15. W. in 1st Di.st., Cal. ],;{()•").(; l>lentiful, and the fortunate owner of a wine with such a repu- 

" " " " Eastern Dists.. 4,898.6 tatiou is most decidedly not going to take any auction 

" " S. B. W. to S. B. W., 1st Dist., Cal chances, but prefers to sell his wine througli clianntls of trade 

" " East. Dists.. 1G,259.9 which he can control. As long as department stores, which 

Exported cater to the cheaper class of trade, are in the market for job 

Tax-paid 3,373.9 lots of wine, and auction houses, whose sole aim is to .secure 

Remaining in bond .Jan. 31, 1897 479,518.5 their Ijrokerage for selling such goods exist, there will be 

enough misguided growers to furnisii the wines; but as light- 
Grand total in State Feb. 28, 1897., 1,106,387.7 ning rarely strikes twice in the same place, it would seem a 

natural consequence that all the suckers would eventually be 

reached and the auction sales die for lack of stock to operate 

NEW YORK CORRESPONDENCE. upon. But there is an old adage to the effect of " a fool being 

born every minute," and the winegrowing element will proba- 

Nkw Yokk, March 30, 1897. bly contribute its pro rata. 

The general condition of trade here shows no irajjrove- The wliiksey market remains unchanged. Sales as a 

Hunt, and the stagnation rules that has been with the trade rule are in small lots. It is the general opinion of the better 

for so long a perioil. Local trade is yet affected by the excise informed members of the trade that the privilege to bottle in 

tinkering of the hayseeds who are the controlling factor in bond will serve to take off the market the larger proportions 

the State Legislature, and they are preparing to saddle on of old whiskies. If such should Ik- the case the jjosition 

this city an amended Raines Law, which will make the retail should change for the better in the cour.se of a few mouths 

trade "walk Spanish," a proceeding that will undoubtedly after the bottling in bond l)ill goes into general operation, 

cause the Republicans the loss of this city, politically, when Mr. Theo. Blankenberg, of Dresel & Co., the well-known 

the next election day rolls around. The wine trade is espec- Sonoma wine growers, was in the city last week, 

inlly dull, both in imported and domestic wines, because of Benny Kit tied ge, of the Sonoma "Wine and Brandy Co., 

the uncertainty as to what is to be done with their interests is just recovering from a bad case of la grippe, which is quite 

in the new Dingley Tariff Bill now occui)ying the attention jn-evalcnt just now. 

of Congress. As a consequence, trade is quiet. Dealers are J. 1). W. Sherman has effected a sittlement with his 

• ■'iifining their pui-chases to small lots sufficient for their creditors, and is now looking after the New York business of 

iiiiiiietliate needs, until these vexatious questions are settled Chapin & Trull, the New I-'ngland rum distillers. 

>o they will know where they "are at." The domestic wine W. H. (\evt. 
traile is exceedingly quiet and values, on California wines es- 
pecially, are ruling weak and uncertain. Competition for 
what little trade there is continues very keen, and business is 
done very much on the principle of "what will you give," 
where goods in any quantity are involved. A number of 
outside lots of sweet wines, .several of them quite large, are 
being urgently offered to the trade at prices ranging all the 
way from -'Vi to 37 cents per gallon for ports on the dock; 
the<e (iHeriiirrs have -o denuiralized ]irie(s that rcsrular deal- 



T. 7^. f— ERGUSON. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER AND IMPORTER OF 

Wiijes, Br^ijdies ^i)d Wbi^kies. 

719 MARKET STREET, 

Next to Bancroft's Histoni Building. 
TELEPHONE MAIN 1830 SAN ikvnmmo. 




Golden 6atc 
Champagne Co. 

...Incorporated... 
PRODUCERS OF 

PURE CALIFORNIA 

Champagne 

Golden Qiite Cbimpif ne 
- & Bobemiio Club. . . . 



TRY THE 



•^iJ.-7VY.-L.i<^ 



Ujrj^ 



502-504-506 Market St., 

.■^AV f KANCISCO. CAI,. 
TKLKCIIO.NK M\I\ IIIU 

CHAMPAGNE VAULTS, 4th and Minua Streets. 



jr% Private Stock Whisky. 

/r FINEST 

;vm.\ STRAIGHT WHISKY 

IJLi'' IN THE MARKET . . 

JESSE M. LEVY & CO., 

CONTROLLERS. 

506 Market Street, - San Francisco. 



20 



ja/rGIfie WIJNE /ffJO Sflf^'T f^EVlEW. 



CONSULAR REPORTS- 
SHERRY WINE INDUSTRY OF SPAIN 

On two previous occasions (Consular Reports for August 
and November, 1894). I have referetl to the terrible scourge, 
l.liylloxera. wliich tlireateneiis the existence of tlie vines on the 
favored liills around tlie town of Jeres, the district wliich, from 
time iniiueniorial, has produied tiie wine known as siierry. 
Tlie production of sherry and its slii|inu'iil was in. Iced an old- 
established trade in the time of Shakespeare, as may be seen 
from his numerous allusions to it, or "sack," as it was then 
termed, and there is no doul>t that it was at that time the most 
popular wine in England, though it is supposed to have been 

verv swtet. 

The output of sherry represents the chief item in the ex- 
ports from the port of Cadiz, as the cultivation, the growth. 
and rearing of the vine does the staple industry of the i)rovi<l- 

ence. 

The vineyards on the white Jeres hills liave gievn the 
wine drinkers of northern Europe for many generations their 
tirst favorite, but the lower jdains of sandy soils have ])rod- 
uced wine adding nothing to the luster or reputation of sherry, 
although it has it has found ready buyers in all coimtries, the 
United States included, on account of its low price and sub- 
stantial body. The tendency of modern times to bring prices 
to low level's, the keen competition, the modern craze for the 
cheap, have thrown wines of inferior .Teres origin and other dis- 
tricts (not sherry proper) into foreign markets, that of the 
United States among the rest, under the same name and dis- 
cription as good sherry. 

It is, in my opinion, the confusion existing between the 
good sherrv and the cheap which has prevented the further 
development of the trade with Cadiz in our country. Good 
sherrv onlv comes from a certain number of acres of white 
soil (albariza). The nature of this soil an.l the antiquity of 
the vine growing on it prevents any large yield ]ier acre (the 
averasre fpiantity i« about WO gallonsY The wine is subject 



to greater vicissitudes of fermentation than others, so that a 
consideralde percentage is always lo.«t: it costs also much moie 
to cultivate than land yielding double the tjuanity of inferior 
wine. Besides all this, it requires longer storage to reach 
maturity. The sherries of low grades and prices are grown at 
a ciieaper rate. 

Nature appears to have set her limits and laws so de- 
finitely in tlie matter of vins growing that no skill of art in 
man lias yet succeeded in i>iodueing line wine from uncon- 
genial soil; however similar the fruit may be, the result iii tin 
develoi'inent is always the same, the birthright ever manilcM 

There are four kin<ls of soil bearing grapes in the district 

of Jeres. 

(1) The albariza (the choice vineyards), consisting chietly 
of carbonate of lime, with a small admixture ofsilex clay ami 
occasionallv magnesia. 

(2) The barros, of quartz or sand mixed with clay and red 
or yellow ocher, forming horizontal bands extending from tin 
mouth of the Guadalquivir to t'onil. 

(.■?)Thc arenas, (juartz or sand. 

(4) The bugeo. containing argillaceous of loam, sand, an<l 
a large proportion of vegetable mold. 

The first named is the soil (about 12,000 acres) prodneiii_ 
the fine quality, and its average yield is 36,U0U butts per an 
num. 

In addition to the land yielding fine wine in Jeres. ther. 
is also a cluster of vineyards in Montilla (some lOli miles di- 
tant), which produces a famous wine called Moriles, which 
equals, in all respects, the best wines of Jeres. 

In nearly all the wine growing districts, there are sections 
which produce large quantities of grapes available for eheai 
wines, the price of the grapes being so low that there would 1 
no temptation to seek any substitute with a view of adult- 
eration. 

N'iticulture abstracts from the soil a smaller proportion oi 
alkalies and other numerous constituents than either corn or 
root crops, henec the exhaustion of the soil is slower and the 

~ 



I 



DAWSON'S 



"^t 44 




EERFECTION 



tt 




OLD 




WHISKY 



In Cashes Only. 



SOLE AGENT FOR PACIFIC COAST 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 123 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



f/rGlfie WIJME AJ^D '^PIF^IT f^EVIEW 



21 



Owners and Handlers of its own Brands 
and Also the Well-Known .... 



Brands of 



..., ^ NAPA VALLEY WINE CO. 

KOHLER & VAN BERGEN 
KOHLER & FROHLING 
B. DREYFUS & CO. 
rp^ \ S. LACHMAN CO. 

C. CARRY & CO. 









SECOIID agil FOLSOm STS. \ t^ 



San Francisco, \ \3 j^ 
California \ \3^^ 

New York Office: \ ^rK 

Jo. 45 BPDWIIL -^ O^ 



^f^ 




AUGUST 10. 189-*. 



o.> 



i«5A^jpie WiNc ,Oj\c) SpiF^iT VtVIF.W 



vine i-aii uc cuinvated ou luiil iucapiilili' ol vii-iiiiiig any 
other crop. 

All sherries in a nutnral state are quite dry — that is, the 
fermentation has removed all trace of sugar — ami in this ilrv 
state the wines are allowed to mature in the growers' cellars ; 
hut the actual demand, out of Spain, for ahsolutdy dry wine 
is very limited. Puhlic taste demands a slight admixture of 
I'edro Ximenes. or sweet wine ; this addition of sweet wine 
varies from I to 10 per cent. 

The vineyards during the winter months present a dreary 
appearance of long rows of twisted, gnarled stumps : but what 
a contrast in the spr.ng and summer — everything becomes a 
muss of green. All through the winter and early spring the 
vineyard is carefully attended to, tlie eartii round each vine 
ke|)t thoroughly moved and soft. These vines grow out later- 
ally and not upwards, hence they soon interlace with one an- 
other and iiide the ground. 

The vintage tiikes place in September. The grapes are 
put into " lagares" (wine jiresses), of which there is one in 
each vineyard, and [iressed. These lagares are a species of 
wide trough, rather larger than a billiard table, but with high 
sides, and the juice runs out at the corner or corners into casks 
placed beneath. The ferincntatirm, usually of a tumultuous 
nature, commences immediately, and in this state the wines 
are brought from the vineyards to the cooler bodegas of .Teres, 
where the fermentation is allowed complete freedom. By the 
beginning of March, this is finished and the process of racking 
from the lees takes jilace. The contents of each cask is kept 
distinct and separate, and each is left to develop its own char- 
acteristics. One of the most curious phenomena in lenology 
succeeds. Although the uniform produce of each vineyard is 
stored together, as time goes on there will be many varieties 
in what should be uniform qualitj", the conditions being pre- 
cisely the same. There will be casks of first, second, third 
and fourth merit, or even vinegar, so subtle and eccentric is 
the influence of fermentation in sherry. Chemists have de- 
vised systems to make a uniform rpiality of wine of a given 
crop of grapes, but in all coses they have failed, and the old 
plan of leaving the wine to itself is every where observed. The 
inerpiality of development is a matter of chance, of caprice in 
fermentation, but from the natural separation of varieties 
starts the diversified group of sherries, known as tinos, blor- 
osos. amontilladns, bastos. and rayas, and, according to their 
quality, each wine is given its valuation. 

What is now basto started from the vineyard witii the 
same chance as that which is nowamontillado, but it has gone 
wrong in the race and is worth very little, while amontillado 
and oloroso are worth four times as much. Uaya is only fair 
(|nality. and the vinegar is a total Hiilure. This will explain 
the difference of prices even in an albariza vintage. Only a 
certain quantit\' even of the best crop reaches perfection. 



.Vs a rule, iln- cuuix- iiiiiialed by the young wine is con- 
tinueil to the end, the superior ([ualities developing accord- 
ing to early promise, inferior ones seldom improving their 
class with age. 

When the vintages have remained sufficiently long for 
the qualities to be set and determined, which time i7iay vary 
from five to ten yeais, the merchant masses together in differ- 
ent lots all the casks of each quality — that is, all the Amontil- 
lado casks are lilended togetlier, all those casks containing 
oloroso, all those with l>asto, and so on. The.^e lots, in their 
turn, are taken to tiie almacenista's bodega, or cellar, and 
blended with wines of similar qualify, but older. The.'' 
masses or large quantities of homogeneous wine are called 
soleras. The soleras existing in a shipping bodega may be 
calleil the pillars on which the reputation of the firm rest.*, as 
tiie uniformity of the shi|(per's exports can only be maintained 
by keeping up the soleras at a )>roper standard of age and 
excellence. The system observed in the shipment of sherrj* 
varies from that of all other wine. Here, there is never a 
selling out of any jiarticular solera : only a small quantity 
proportionately is drawn lor sale from a solera. Tlie c|uanlify 
thus drawn oil' is replaced by a wine of almost equal age and 
quality, so that the newly added wine merges with the larger 
bulk and the solera quickly recovers what it might have lost 
by tiie extraction of the old and the addition of a slightly 
younger wine. 

A specialty made in .Teres is the lV<lro Ximenez, a sweet 
wine from the grape of that name. It usually comes from 
the albariza vineyards. The grapes of this wine are dried in 
the sun, and when reduced nearly to the condition of raisins, 
are pressed, and give a very sweet, dark wine : this, of course, 
is very expensive, as the grapes lose such a large percentage of 
their liquid. Thus, the quantity of I\ X. grapes required to 
fill a butt would be six times as much as tlie (juantity re- 
quired of an ordinary grape. 

Between the soleras of the exporter and the marks known 
to his customers there is the consequent connection. If the 
.•^oleras are kept at the .same standard of value, the wines taken 
by his client are, year after year, the same, the consumer rely- 
ing on and expecting always his sherry to be the same, where- 
as, as with claret and other wines, he is content to accept 
varying quality and character according to the year. 

\\'ith the exception of a limited export of wines shipped 
in a vintage form, good sherries are all matured in soleras. 
Many of tliese latter are of considerable age, a founding of 
fifty and one hundred years not being muouimon. 

It is in the colLction of soleras that the merits of a ship- 
])ing firm are more clearly discerned, and it is a matter of 
considerable interest to a keen ol)serverto pass from one solera 
to another and see with what care the quality and tyjieof each 
is preserved from year to year. It is here the personal direc- 
tion of the master is given, his individual taste impressed, in 




EL PINAL VINEYARD 



KSTABLb^IIKD is.VJ. 
Largest Producers of 

PURE SWEET WINES 

IN A\4KRICA. 



Geo. West 5l Son 



5TOCKTON, CAL., U. 5. f\. 



f/cSlfie WIJME /r^le Sflf^lT I^EVIEW. 



23 



lUiiuy (.■ases soiiu' of the .soleras luivinj;- •' ei'iadorus," or, so to 
sjicak, mirsories. 

Tliis is particularly the case in line sherries, iu wliicli a 
solera will liave two or tliree criaderas, each more stylish and 
elegant than the last, until at lenj;th, almost iniporceiitiliiy, 
the stanilard of ihc solera is readied. The solera will be re- 
tVeshed from crindera No. 1, No. 1 from No. 2, and so ou. It 
must also be remembered that every butt of wine loses from 5 
to 10 per cent a year in evaporation ; thus a vintage of twenty 
years' age will have lost some 60 per cent of its contents, 
though as the wine gets older it gets more concentrated and 
loses less. 

The stores, or bodegas, are in reality not cellars at all, but 
above-ground warehouses, large and cool stone buildings open 
to the inspection of visitors, and where a lesson iu tasting is 
always available. To mo it appears that nowhere does the 
wine tlrunk l)y ."Shakespeare and Cervantes taste better than in 
its native home. Whether it is that all fear of conseciueuces 
is removed by the sight of the workmen engaged in them, 
wild partake to the extent of an average of two bottles each 
day and are proverbially healthy, being free from gout and 
and rheumatism, or that the climatic conditions favor the 
consumption ol the wine of the country as is frequently the 
case. 1 know not. At all events, it is the wine consumed by 
high and low, and visitors are not long in falling into the 
popular taste. From personal experience, I must confess that 
any prejudice I had ac(iuired from numerous interested writ- 
ings against the wine have been removed, as I hnd good sherry 
is a sound, health-giving wine. Since nw residence in Cadiz 
I have been asked many times by American visitors whether 
genuine sherry was anywhere to be obtained ; my invariable 
answer has been, most assuredly, by paying a fair price 
for it. 

Sherries in large quantities are shijiped to the United 
States, from the medium class to the liighest qualities of indis- 
putable origin and genuine growth. As it has been my duty 
to e.xamine closely this impurtant branch of business in my 
consular district, 1 hsivc taken an interest in every stage of the 
industry, from the insect trouble, now affecting the vine, to 
I be study and analysis of the wines in the export casks. 

Although I am dealing with a subject of minor interest 
■ the mass of my countrymen (the entire consumption of 
I uropean wine representing only a fourth of a bottle per in- 
dividual per annum), these facts may be of value to a section 
of our people — the wine growers, connoi-sseurs and dealers. 

There always e.xists a difficulty for the public in discrim- 
inating between the real thing and its imitation. The state- 
ment of the great writer on .'Spain, Richard Ford, still" holds 
good ; " Sherry is not less popular amongst us than ^furillo, 
in spite of the numerous bad copies of the one, which are 
passed off for undoubted originals, and butts nf the other, 
which are .sold neat as imported." 

It behoov<?s all buyers of sherry to obtain their supply 
Irom wine dealers of reputation, many of whom are receiving 
the getuiine sherry wines from here. Excellence in all tijings 
i~ achieved only l)y trouble and cxpen.se. 

Chas. L. Ai).\.\is, 
C.ujiz, .July 21, 18'J6: Consul. 



Almeria Qrape Crop of 1896. 

The shipment of this year's crop of grapes at Almeria 
Malaga having ceased, \ have the honor to transmit the fol- 
lowing report in reference thereto, with a comparative table 
sliowing the amount <'xported for the years 1 S!(.')_9(5, which 
has been compiled from statistics published in the ( !accta 
Minera y Agrivola, of Almeria, dated the 2d instant : 

The prices oijtained for grapes in the New York market 
have not been high, due possibly to the poor condition in 
which the fruit is received, owing to the long ocean voyage. 
Fruit delivered in fair condition was sold at from S.'j.oO to 
SiJ.oO per barrel. 

Tlie London market proveil satisfaitory, good prices hav- 
ing been obtained. Certain special marks sold ashi^xh as :j3s. 



per l)arrel : regular, in mi l.'is, to iGs. ; medium, from 10s. to 
12s.: superior grades from 17s, to 21s. The ni'i^l (irdinniv 
did not fall below 8,s. 

The total crop is .")(;2,l 100 whole barrels and 4,;')00 half 
barrels, asagain.'-t (;!t2.(l!iO whole barrels and 8,2:54 half barrels 
last season. 

The total shipmeiils, crop of 1895, was r)(j(),()o!) whole 
barrels and 4,1 S-'Hialf barrels, as against (')2!),9()0 whole bar- 
rels and :!,;') l,s half barrels in ISO."), or (■>!»,f)0(; whole barrels 
less and iWi") half barrels more than in 1H!).5. 

1\. M. 1>akti.i:m.\n. 
Mai..\i..v. Nov S, l.SiHi. Consid. 



Vintage of the Rhine for I896. 



" Quantity largo ; (juality, poor," are words heaid every 
day when sj)eaking of the wine croj) of the Rhine and viciu- 
itv for 18!)r>- The mild weather of the latter part of the year 
1895 continued for the first months of the jear 189() and was 
very beneficial to the vines. The work in the vineyards com- 
menced early, and seldom has it been the case that the vine- 
yards could be kept in such perfect condition, owing to the 
favorable weather. By the end of March, the vines had all 
been trimmed and looked healthy, stiong and full of sap. 
The sprouts were a little backward until the 1st of April, but 
the warm rains soon brought them out in full force and 
strength, and better prespects were seldom, if ever, seen for a 
most magnificent vintage. In consequence of the fine (piality 
of the cuttings or sets, a great many new vineyards were 
starteil and the loss of vines in the old vineyards, caused r|y 
the severe cold of the last few winters, was repaired. Though 
the weather w-as somewhat unsettled in April, the vines made 
good progress. The much-feared cold nights, so often exi)eri- 
enced at that time of the year, did not make their a]>i>carance, 
and though the weatlu'r in May was far from being satisfactory, 
the prospects in June were splendid — thi' vines were as heavy 
with grajies as could possibly be expecteil. Heavy rains were 
followed by very hot weather until the first days in .luly, when 
we had some cooler weather, but it was agairi followed by a hot 
spell which advanced the quality and general ai)pearance of 
the grapes. Only in a few places was there any apjiearance 
of disease: the pcronospora showed in a few places, but was 
quiekly done away with. In August came the unfavoralile 
weather. August is called by'the wine growers the '"cooking 
month,'' being always the hottest month, but this year it was 
just the contrary; it was rainy and cool and the nights were 
really cold, so niueh so that the grajies did not ripen at all. 

Mount Vernon 



U.LKRV m-TTIJ 



Pure Rye 
Whiskey 

The consumer buying 
this — ihc only disiillcry- 
bottlin^' *.f iMOrXT 
VERNON (in SQUAI^R 
bottles, each bearin>r 
the numbcreJ 
guaranty label i 
— secures the 
highest gr.nU- 
Pure KyeWh 
key ill its nalu; 
eondition, 
entirely free f' 
tuiulteratii'tt ;. 
eheap spirits ai:.: 
ftavorini^s. 

For Salk hv .\i.i. 

KULIAULK UKALBRS. 

I. W. KINGMAN, 

Pacific Coast agent. 

Office and Warehouse, 41 to 49 FIRST STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




24 



f/reifie WljMt /VJSiD Sflf^lT F^EVItW, 



The <iuaiitity "f grapes ou llie vines being so large, tlie vines 
slioulil have lia«l very hot weatlier up l«> Octoher, hut we had 
so iiunli ruin ami eloudy and eool weather lliat t lie grapes he- 
gan to rot and a disease (oidium) made its appearance. In 
all parts of tlie wine-frrowing distriet-s, a very huge erop was 
gathered and ahnost everywhere it amounted to wlial is 
called a -lull crop" in <iuantity, hul the quality is very poor 
and tlu- hoj>es the wine growers entertained in the spring and 
early summer were hy no means realized, 

The jiroduet of the 189(5 eroi> was in some places and 
districts equal to the vintage of 1H94 ; in some places a little 
hctler, hut the exceptions were few. The average results are 
what is called a " small wine," which has to lie very carefully 
treated. It is a very light wine and useful to the trade, as 
light and cheaj* wine has l)een very scarce in the i)ast few 
years. As before mentioned, the 'new wine" must he very 
ean'fully treated, as so many of tlie grapes began to rot in the 
early autumn and this will .seriously all'ect the (piality. Kvcn 
the earlv grapes gave very poor lesults. In Kliine-Hesse, the 
sweet wines, the Frulihurgunder and I'ortugieser must, 
weiglied only from ")() deg. to i)3 deg. Oechsle's wine measure- 
ment, with from 10 to l-'U per cent acidity. The most of se- 
leeted grapes in the lower districts weighed only from 54 deg. 
to (Jo (leg. Oechsle, and in better parts 6') deg. to 85 deg., with 
from 7 to 11 to 14 per cent acidity; in the Khincgau (Assman- 
shausen)! red grapes weighed from 80 deg. to !M) deg. Occiisle, 
with 10 to 11 per cent acidity; in the Middle Kliine districts, 
the Fruhburgunder weighed from G8 deg. to 75 deg. (Jechsle, 
with SI to 9J per cent acidity. The vintage of the I'ortugie- 
ser in the Haardt district was finished about the 1st of Octo- 
ber, an<l the results were more tliaii satisfactory as to quantity, 
but tlie quality, as everywhere, was poor, the average weight 
being from Gd deg. to G5 deg. Oechsle. 

The weather at the commencement of the vintage was 
ba<l and continued to grow worse, so much so that the crop of 
grapes had to be gatliered much earlier than usual, Init there 
was no use liolding off, as the grapes could not ripen and the 
longer they were left on the vines the worse the rot got into 
them. Not for yeai-s has there Vieen anything like such a 
large crop, but it is the same story in all districts — (luantity 
enormous, l)ut quality poor. The wine giowers had the 
greatest difliculty in getting casks enough to hold their wine. 

On the Mo-sel, in some places, a little better result was 
shown and the must weiglied in the best districts from ")5 deg. 
to H5 deg. Oechsle, and from ft to 15 per cent acidity; on the 
Nahe, the average weight was from 55 deg. to 70 deg. Oechsle, 
witii 9 to 12 percent acidity. The results in tlie Haardt dis- 
trict, in the Palatinate, were pretty mucli the same — quantity 
very satisfactory, but quality poor ; the average weight of the 
rnusl was from 55 deg. to S5 deg. Oechsle, ami from 7 1o 12 
per cent acidity. 

The 1806 wine will be a very light and a very cheap 
wine. Of course a great deal of sugar will liave to be used to 
make it palatable. A general e.stimate of the (piantity of the 
wine crops for the last four years from the Uhine and adjoin- 
ing districts is as follow- : 

18(tt;. . i:$o,(ioi),(i0(i 

18J»6.. . 3H,6;!0,(I00 

18!H. . . 74,ti 1(1,000 

]s!p;i. . . i()0,:t(»r,,o(io 



.M.vyi:m.e, .lanuary 'M, l«tJ7. 



i'i:i;i:v BakthoI-ow, 

( 'oiisul. 



wine they say it is nothing but colored and flavored water. 
To meet the Knglish and other foreign demand, the French 
wine dealers at Bordeaux take the thin native wines and mix 
them with the mucii heavier wines of Si>ain and I'ortuga], 
ami the result is the ■ Borileaux' of commerce. 

"They have a woiiclerfully elfective and rapid method of 
iloiiig this mixing. Twc liins of French wine arc placed 
dose to one bin (.f iSimnish and one bin of Portuguese wine. 
Above them all is i)laeed another bin, emjity, and ready for 
the receiiit of the mixed wine. An electric engine, to which 
is attached four rubber suction i)ipes, does the work of mix- 
ing. One pipe goes from each bin of wine into the empty bin 
above. The wine from the four bins is sucked up and jiourecl 
in equal ([uantities into the em|ity bin. 

"Tlie mixing is thorough. Malaga wine from Spain, 
))ort, perhai>s, from Portugal, and the lliin French claret all 
all go into the one compound, and you have ' Vin Bordeaux.' 
Its com]>oiieut jiarts are all good wine. 

"The French don't like it to be known that ' \'in Boi-- 
deanx is a mixture. The former United States Consul to 
Bordeaux, George W. Roosevelt, now Consul at Brussels, was 
shot down in the streets after having described this i>rocessin 
a consular report. 

" Another misconceiition about the French drinking of 
wine is that they consume great (piantities of it. This is not 
correct. .V Freiiclin;an will go into an inn, call for a glass of 
wine, and sit down and ]>]ay a game of cards. He may be 
playing for any hour, but the wine lasts him all that time, 
lie takes but one glass. It is needless to say that under simi- 
lar circumstances an American would call for several gla.sses 
of wine — or something stronger." 



FOR SALE— Brewery, Distillery, Soda Works, Buildings 
and Lots in Ensenada, Lower California; business with- 
out competition; in full working order; §9,000 — could not 
be duplicated lor three times that amount. 
Sumiuari/ — Four town lots, 3-"?;i fed frontage in heart of 
the city. Fire-proof building, corrugated iron, 40 x 50: annex, 
corrugated iron, 14x18. Dwelling house (4 rooms, furniture, 
etc.;) barn and stable. Fine beer garden, well ornamented 
with trees; tde only one in town, for picnic j>urposes. Wind 
mill, iron turbine, 101)uckets; galvanized water pipes, through 
buildings and grounds; galvanized iron tank, (iOOtt gallons, 
Boiler and steam generaior, l'2-li. power. Brass steam ])ump. 
Copper still rectifier, IG compartment column; copper still rec- 
tifier for pomace or mescal ; 1 small still, (^rape crusher, 
])rcss lian<l pump, tanks; tools; Fairbanks scale 2000 lbs. 
Compfete maUing dejiartmeut, roller for malt; beer kettle, 
lieated by steam; zinc cooler; reservoir tanks, barrels, etc. 
Conij)lete .soda-bottling works ajiparatus. Strong horse and 
harness, new delivery wagon, top-board buggy, etc. Only two 
men needed to run this plant — one for inside work and the 
other for outside. 

l'^x]>enses are very small and ]irofits very large. Any en- 
terprising party with a small capital cannot fail to make 
money in a short time. For further particulars address 
"liri'wery," care Rkvikw oflici'. 



Charles P. Pre.ssly, I'nited States Vice-Consul at Mar- 
seilles, Franco, has the following to say about French wine.s 
and how they arc mixed ; 

" The French do not like a heavy wine," said Mr. Pressly. 
" and the darel they drink is (luite light. l"-ven this thin 
wine is nearly always mixed with water, half and half They 
Kiiy water brings out (he fruity flavor. 

" The English, on the other hand, like a thick, heavy 
wine, with good body. Win n they la.stc the Freii<h native 



H^y, Gr2vuerboIz & Co* 

ImPOKTKM ANM \Vi[oI.K-AI K I>KAI,KKS IN 

WINES & LIQUORS. 



-SOLE AGFNTS FOR- 



Daop Crock(jU Ulhiskp. 

BE SURE YOU ARE RIGHT, THEN GO AHEAD. 
224 FRONT STREET." - SAN FRANCISCO CAL 



p/^eifie wij^E j\piQ 



PATENT5, TRADE-MARKS, ETC. 



I'he follmviiiK list of recent patents and trade-nmrk^ (if interest to our pat- 
rons is reported by \Vm. <i. Henuerson, soliritor of Amencan ami foreign 
patenis and inulcniaik>, Norris Huildinj;, oOl K street, \Vashin«t m, 1) C. A 
co|iy of any of the United Slat s patents will be furnished by him for 25 cents. 

579,055 — Aiipiii-ivtiis for nd.\iiif>- liiiuids. Alfred Gates, Liverpool, Kng- 

land. 
578,884 — Apparatus for drawing off liquids containing' earlionio aeid. 

Autrust Ki-OMipor, Broslau, Germany. 
578,996 — Bottle stopper. Thomas F. Lan-j-loy, Haverhill, Mass. 
578,7o6 — Lock sealing cap for bottles. Schuyler W. Morgan. 
o7S,7t>7 — Valve operating mechanism for syrup jars. .John Ormcrod, 

Brooklyn, N. V. 
578,770— Bottle. John K. I'ope, Ottumwa, la. 
579,013 — Bottle stopper. Francis Schcnkcr, Vincennes, Ind. 

TUADE MARKS. 

•.;9,Cy<i— Whisky. John Blank & Co., New Orleans, La. Essential fea- 
ture: The monogram "J. B. F Co.," coupled with the words 
''Mount Auburn." 

Issue of March 23, 1897. 

I'atents. 
579,2'J4— Bottle. Charles E. Belch, Natick, Mass. 
579.510 — Sealing device for bottles. Henry L. Ferris, Harvard, 111. 
579,5 lii— Bottle, Albert T^. Howell, Baton Rouge. La. 
.)79,o74 — Bottle. Claude F, dit E. I^aroue. Pontarlier, Franco. 
57!i,304--Bottle. Johan .\. Pearson, Glen Cove, N. Y. 
579,353— Hood and drip tray for bottles. Fred T. Trebilcook, London, 

and C. A. Bastedo, Toronto. Canada. 
579,197 — Bottle. Richmond C!. Van Oiuian, Lorain, Ohio. 
579,290— Stopper extractor. Edwin Walker, Erie, Pa. 

TRADE MARKS. 

29,738— Whisky. William M. Fliess & Co., New York, N. Y. Essential 
feature: The words "Gold Seal" associated with the letter" F.' 



Ouand on empnai/e, on tie choisitpas (When a person borrows 
lie cannot choose). Mohns & Kaltenbach, the well-known distrib- 
utors of fine wines and li(iuors,29 Market street, near Steuart street. 
San Francisco, acting upon the toregoing principle, have concluded 
to establish their own stables, and for that purpose they liave rented 
the premises S 10-812 Fremont street. Their rolling-stock consists 
now of five horses and four vehicles, with an expectation of an early 
expanse. The firm is now running two stores, with thirteen em- 
ployees all told, all of which certainly points to a good and con- 
stantlv increasing business. — Alameda Argus. 



Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 

WINE AND BRANDY RECEIPTS 

Wine. 

Manli li; •2-1,400 

" 17 45,300 

" IS 17,!)00 

" lit 1 .•5,;{00 

" 'JO r)!),'J00 

" -i'i 24,!)O0 

" 2:i 'i.'t.'iOll 

" 24 • 27,00(J 

" 2rj 39,100 

'• 26 3!t,o.'j0 

" 27 20,700 

" 29 :'.2,100 

" 30 16,600 

" ;!i 4;',, ".too 



TRADE NOTES AND PERSONALS. 



25 



lir.uidv. 



\. I). W. .Sherman is the New York agent for the famous 
rum made by Messrs. Chapin & Trull of Boston. 



E. D. Carroll, of E. D. Carroll & Co., is recovering very 
slowly from his protracted illness. He has been suffering from a 
complication of liver and kidney disorders, and recovery is very 
tedious. 

Joseph B. Greenhut of Peoria is visiting the Salt River Valley 
in Arizona, where he has a large amount of money invested in irri- 
gation enterprises. 

John McFadden has opened a wholesale and retail house at 130 
South Main street, Los Angeles. Mr. McFadden was formerly in 
business at Butte, Mont. 



Louis Taussig & Co. have refitted their offices at their store, 
26 and 28 Main street. They now have as comfortable a suite of 
offices as any house in tiie city. 



Burr & Malpas have given up their wine cellar at iS California 
street, and have warehoused their stock. They have opened offices 
at 303 California street. 




To the Trade and the Public 



The 



"R. B. HAYDEN" 




Old Style Hand Made Sour Mash Whisky Distilled by 

CRBENBRieR DISTILLERY CO. 

OFFICE, LOUISVILLE, KY 
GHeErsBRieR, nelson CO., KY. 

Is the only whisky of this name ever made in Nelson C unty. Ky. On ordering R. B. liayden from your dealer see that you get the 
Whisky tliat is distilled by the Greenbrier Distillery Company. 

BARDSTOWN, KY., November i, 1S92. 
Greenbrier Distillery Co. — Gentlemen: In response to your inquiry I have to say that your distillery is operated on the olil fishioned 
hand made sour mash |)lan, and is one of the very few distilleries in the -State that adheres to the old style methods that have niatie 
Kentucky sour masi: distilleries famous. Your house and its methods cannot be improved on. 

Respectfully yours, JNO. B. WELI.ER. 

Dist Dep. Collector Int. Rev., Nels-^n Co.. Kv. 

The FinestSour Mash Whisky muJc in Nelson Co., Kcuiutky. Clmrks Mcinccke A Co., Agents. S.F. 




CHARLES MEINECKE & CO,, 



SOLE AGENTS 



314 SACRAMENTO STREET 




2G 



f/reifie WIJNIE /f/SlD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



C. Jost & Son, llic distillers, arc soon to rciuovf llair San 
Francisco office to 4C0 Front slreel, corner ol Clav. Tlic corner 
building is especially equipped for their use. 

A, r. Hotalinfj, Jr., has been inakin)i an extended to southern 
California. He has spent several ueeks at Coronado and Los 
Angeles, and his health is greatly improved. 

Clarence Hotlheimer, of Hdflheinier Hros., Cincinnati, has been 
on the Coast for the past two weeks in the interest of "White 
Mills" 'and the other brands controlled by the firm. 

W. W. Erskinc has opened an ofiice at 121 Market street. He 
represents the Ulinan-Goldsborough Co. ol Baltimore, Maryland, 
and will place the ryes of that house on the coast market. 

F. C. Muller, manager of the A. Finke's Widow Champagne 
house, is seriously ill at his home with pneumonia. It is expected 
that it will be several weeks before he will be able to be about again. 

Martin Erlenbach, the importer, has moved his offices to new 
and larger quarters at 309 Battery street. He has been enlarging 
his lines recently, and the change was made necessary to get more 
room. 

The wholesale firm of M. &K. Gottstein of Seattle, Wash., 
has dissolved, Mr. Moses Gottstein retiring. The business will in 
future be conducted by .Michael and Kaskill Gottstein, under the 
oiti firm name. 



The Cresta Blanca Wine Company have developed a handsome 
trade in Mexico and Central America, and are now among the 
Targest shippers to those countries. A glance at our export tables 
will show what they are doing. 

James L. Hackett, ol the Greenbrier Distillery Company, has 
returned to Kentucky after a month's visit here. He placed about 
800 barrels of "R. B. Hayden" while on the Coast, and is abun- 
dantly satisfied with the result. 

H. Braunschweiger, head of Braunschweiger & Co., is in 
Guatemala, whither he went to attend to the installation of the 
firm's exhibit at the Central American exposition as well as the de- 
tails of handling the same during the show. 



Dallemand & Co. are now located in their comfortable 
offices at 212 -Sansome street, all their stock in San Francisco hav- 
ing been warehoused. Mr. J. P. Edoff will remain in charge of the 
house. Mr. Dallemand having removed to Chicago for the present. 

Paul Masson, the San Jose champagne manufacturer, has 
made a change in his Coast agency. The agency has been 
accepted by James T. Rucker, one of the most popular Native 
Sons of the Garden City. His offices are located at -io6 Market 
street. 



HELLMA/N/N B-ROS. ^ CO. 

525 FRONT STREET, 

timSKK.IACKM.N, . S.V.N I KA M ,sl », c A I.. 

—PACIFIC COAST AGENTS FOR 

KRUC & CO., Reims Champagne 

JOS PERRJER FILS & CO.. Chalons surMarne.ChampaKne 

CARVEY &CO., X.rc/ de la (• rontera SherHes 

FORRESTER & CO., Xere-c dela Krontera Sherries 

OFFLEY, CRAMP & FORRESTER, Oporto Port Wines 

E REMY IVIARTIN & CO, Kouill.ic COKnacs 

H. UNDERBERG ALBRECHT. KheinberR am N,.-,l,rrlKi„ 

Boonekamp Bitters 

J. B SHERRIFF & CO. Ltd., Glasgow, ' Scotch Whisky 

locc-Dui r-iiv 1 ' ' 'Jamaica Rum. 
JOSEPH GUY, Ainri- Counar«i 

J. F. GINOULHIAC, Bordeaux Clarets 

• • • • • 

M.SO OFFKK yim HALK 

IRISH WHISKY-ofOul.liM Dist.lleis- Co., Ltd DuMIn * 

GUINNESS'S EXTRA STOUT-"M..rp" Hrinid-bot.led by Cam- 

criiii it S;iiiiiilers, LdikIoii. ' 

HOLLAND GIN~ll.e "Cornel" HraiulofK.J. K. It,. md... Schiedam 
SCOTCH WHISKY-ln cases. The "Slru.-.n" Whisky, hoUl..! I,, 
'..1 .:■>*< -.11 ■< lally for tills market. 

ITALIA de PISCO-fro.li M. A. Warde and A. R. McLean Peru 

MEDFORD RUM -from R.iniel Lawrence & Sons. 
DOMESTIC GIN-Thc 'AiKlior" Bmnd, ICistein DistillinK Co 
SINGAPORE PINEAPPLES-incists. Br.nml Tan IV.-r lice" 

KEN rUCKY WHISKIES-Blnc Grns^-Boone'^KZll-Hermii'aRe. 
Hermitage kyc-Old Cruw-U. S. Club-ICIk Kiin-K. C Herrv 



C A U T I () N ! 

Decisions have been rendered in my favor oy the Hungarian 
Minister of Commerce in August and October, 1896, in conse- 
quence of which the trade marks of the following aperient waters, 
viz: 

"APENTA." • UJ HUNYADI,' 
HUNYADI MATYAS. 

LAJOS 

LASZLO- Etc., Etc. 

have been cancelled, ail bt-ini; imitatiuiis ol my "HL'NVADI 
JANOS" trade mark. No other water except my HU.W.ADI 
JANO.S is allowed to use the name "HUNN'ADI," this name being 
my exclusive trade mark making a ])art of the name of my 

HUNYADI JANOS 

NATURAL HUNGARIAN APERIENT WATER 

The Tr ule is hereby cautioned not to handle waters bearing 
any of the above mentioned naims, as I shall hold all p.irties selling 
such waters rcspoiisihic ill diiiiuiges and itrotcrl my iradc- 
inark-rights lo the I'lillesl extent, by action against ull 
infringers. 

ANDREAS SAXLEHNER, 



Hudda I^es;t 



Londori 



Xew "'i'orlc 



Pacific Coasi flgenis for HUNYADI JRNOS WM. WOLFF & CO 



327 9 Market St . S. F. 



TRADE MARKS. 

WM.G. HENDERSON, Patent Attorney and Solicitor. 

NORRIS BLDG., 5th and F Sts., Near U. S. Patent Office. Rooms 20 to 23 
P. G. Box 122. n'ASmyGTOX, 1). C. 

Seventeen years' experience, including service ia HxamininK Corps, V, S. Patent offict- 
AinL-rican and l-onign Paloiits procured. Caveats filed. Rejected applications revived 
opinions K'^'t^" £*>■ to scoj)e ftiid validity of jinteiits. Iiifrin>;cnicnt suits prosecuted and dc 
feuded. TRADEMARKS. LABKI^ AND COPYRIGHTS registered. 

iSTCopy of any printed patent, trade-innrk or label furnished for 26 cents. Correspond 
encc invited. Hand-hook on Patents fiirnislied l-RKK on application. 



THE - DIVIDEND, 

5 Leldesdorflf Street, 
JAMES O'BKIES. I'loprie'or. 



BONESTELL 4, CO. 

M \: 1 l;-' IN 

PAPER, 

A spccinlty made of 

Importer of riNEST WINES, LIQUOR.? FOURDENIER TISSUE 

Irish and Scotch Whiskies, 
Bass' Ale and Guinness' Stent. , STRIPPED MANILA 

!■ Ill- wrappint: liutlli->. 

Monre, m\ & Go's WiiisHies a Specially. ' 401 4 403 Sansome Street. S. F. 



ESTABLISHED 1853. 



SAMUEL WANDELT, 

STIiAM .\Nll II.\NI) 

COO P 1^: R AG K 

<; /.li.i.t:.-, Mtniii i iin.-n s r.. iiudok t.i y. y. y. 

Wine and Liquoi^ Bbi^i^bI^ and J^\$ 

Inin now prrtniTdta ninkmnil fiinilOi Itir InritTsI,** well «• llir Miiitllciil niticic in 
m- :ilic<jl C . «|M:rnKc i;««lliintr« Hl»^n witli prnmirtncn. All work wntintilrtl lo l)c fill- 
>li •! Ill w»--'- '1101111 Ir tnnitlirr nii'l f<|ual loaily In Ilic iiinrkcr 



f/reifie WiJME /rJSIId Sfif^lT f^EVIEW. 



27 



PRICES CURRENT. 

These aie ihe Ion;; prices. The 
rate of discount on purchases of a 
considerable quality can be learned 
bv applying to the aj;ent or dealers. 
We urgently request dealers, agents 
and producers to notify us when a 
change occurs in the prices current ol 
the goods they h.indle. 

California Wines and Brandies. 

[The Prices given are for quart.s and 
pints, put up in cases of twelve 
and twenty-fonr bottles.] 

C CARPV .1: CO. 
51 1-517 Sacramento St., San Francisco 

La Lonia,Grand '^'edoc J 7,00 f 8.00 

Burgundy 5.0c 6.00 

Zinlandel 3.50 4.50 

Sauterne 5.00 6.00 

Riesling , 4.00 5.00 

Sweet Muscatel, 1882.. 9.00 10.00 

Sherry, 1SS2 9.00 10.00 

Port, 1SS2 S.oo 9.00 

Cal. Rochelle Brandy. . 12.00 13.00 

MONT ROIGE WINES. 

Chauche & Bon, Livermore. 

OfHceand Depot, 13-15 First St., S. F. 

Burgundy Quarts ;f 9 00 

Chablis 9.00 

Claret, Retour d' Eu- 
rope 9.00 

Jurancon, Favorite wine 
of Henry IV, King of 

France 9.00 

Haut Sauternes 7.00 

Sauternes 6.00 

Light Sauternes 5.00 

Claret Grand Vin 6.00 

Table Claret 4.00 

Zinfandel 300 

|i.oo additional for pints. Red and 
white wines in bulk at all prices. 

GUNDLACH BUNDSCHU WINE 

CO. 
Cor. Second and Market Sts., S. F. 
Prices Per Case, iiu.vrts. pints. 
Traminer, .S2 $ 5.00 $ 6.00 



Guledel, 82 6.00 

Burgundy, 84 6.00 

Zinfandel, 83 5.00 



55° 



INGLENOOK WINES. 
Agency, Stanford and Townsend Sts 

.San Francisco. 
Table Claret, Blended 

from choice foreign 

grapes, vintage 1S90.. 

Zinfandel 

Extra Table Claret, Me- 

doc type, red label, 

1SS9 

Burgundy, 18S8, reserve 

stock 7.00 

Sauterne, dry, Sauvig'n 

Vert, '85 

Gutedel,ChasselasVert, 

1889 

Hock, Rhenish type, 

1889 

Burger, Chablis type, 

1889 

Riesling, Johannisberg 

type, 18SS 



7«>lGutedel 

700 Sauterne 

600 Sauterne, 1885. 

Claret 

Zinfandel 

Cabernet 

Burgundy . . . . 

Port, 1884 

Port, 1SS7 

ii-S" Sherry 

4-50|Cognac, 1885.. 



4.00 Hock, grten label | 3.00 

4.00 Hock, black label 350 

5.0Q Gutedel 4.00 

2.50 Riesling 4.50 

3.00 Cabernet 4.50 

3.50 Burgundy 4.00 

4,00 Claret, black label 3.50 

7.00 Claret, red label 2.75 

5.00 Private Stock Hock... 5.00 
5.00 " " ElCerrito 
10.00 " " Sauterne. 



S. LACHMAN CO. 
453 Brannan street, San Francisco. 



Claret. 
Burgun'v 



9 CO 

8.00 
5.00 
7.00 



Vine Cliff 12.00 



'Old Port I 7.00 I 8.00 Sherry 4.50 



$ 4.00 

4.50 
5.00 
5- 50 
.S.50 
5.C0 
4.00 
370 
6.00 
10.00 
9.00 
6.00 
800 
13.00 



^0° Zinfandel 3.50 

Riesling 4.50 

5-50 Madeira 8.00 

Malaga 8.00 

4-50 Cognac 14.00 

6.00 



4.00 
5.00 



C. M. MANN. 
(Successor to I. I)e Turk.) 
^■^ Office and cellars, 216-218-220 Sacra- 
mento St. and 221 Commercial St., 



I'ort 4.50 

Angelica 4.50 

. Tokay 4.50 

. Muscatel 4.50 

. iMadeira 4.50 

Brandy Crown* 10.00 

" •' « » 12.00 

" "***... 15.00 

■'•»**. 1800 



6.50 



San Francisco. 



Pints of 2 dozen |i per case additional i„ „ , w-w/ . >.• 

None genuine unless bearing seal ,<^"8"=<^ ^'l^^V' XXXX(quarts)|io.oo 



or cork brand of the proprietor. 

KOHI.ER & FROHLING. 
601 Folsom Street, San Francisco. 

Riesling J 400 14-50 

Hock 3.50 

Gutedel 4.50 

Sauterne 4.50 

Zinfandel 3.75 

Zinfandel, old 4.50 

Burgundy 4.00 

[Superior Port 10.00 

jSherry 7.50 

1 Angelica 6.00 

',Muscatel 6.00 

Madeira 6.00 

Malaga 600 

Brandy 10.00 



XX 9 00 L. J. ROSE & CO.. Lim., San Gabri- 



Tienturier Port 5501 el, Cal. 

Trousseau Port, No. i 4.00 j Port, 1873, i doz. qts. in case. 

Dry Sherry, private stock 5. SO " 1876 " " " . 

superior 4.00 " 1882 '■ " " 



.Angelica, old selected stock.. 

400 .Muscatel " " "... 

5-00 Malaga ' ... 

5-0O|Madeira " '■ ... 

4-25 jTokay, best old selected stock. 

S-oo iTokay, " " " . 

4-50 Haut Sauterne, " " . 

Riesling, old " " 

iGutedel, " " " . 

JHock, •' " . 

Cabernet, "Grand Vin" " 
Burgundy " '' " 

Zinfandel, CIaret,selected Claret 
jXX Claret 
Claret, " " 



4.00 1 " 1S86 
4.00 jSherry, 1SS2, 



doz, qts. in rase 
4.00 ■■ 1886 " 

4.00 Angelica,i882, i doz. qts. in case 
6.00 •' 1886 " 

4.50 Muscatel,i882 " " " 
5.00 Tokay, 1882, i doz. qts. in case. 
3.50 " 1886, " 
3.50 Madeira, 1882, i doz. qts. in case 

3.00 j " 1888, 

S.oo [Brandy, 1881, " •' " 

4..50 iZinfandel, 1890,1 doz. qts. in case 
3-50 " " 2 " pts. " 

3.50 i Burger, 1890, 1 doz. qts. in case 
2.75 



KOLB & DENHARD. 
420-426Montgomery St., San Franc'o 
Per Case 

Hock ^3.0 

Riesling 3.50 



NAPA VALLEY WINE CO. 

Second and Folsom Sts., S. Francisco 

Sherwood & Sherwood, Agents. 

212-214 Market Street, San Francisco. 



liS-oo 
12.00 
9.00 
7-50 
9.03 
750 
9.00 
7-5° 
7 SO 
9.00 

750 
9.00 

7-50 
1500 
4.00 
500 
4.00 
5.00 



" 2 '■ pts. 
All the foregoing vintages are true 
to name and age, as indicated en la- 
bel. We guarantee the absolute pur- 
ity of every bottle of wine and brandy 
put up by us. 



■^l 







OfS T/L L ra ^ r 



PENNA. DISTILLING CO. 



BUTLER CO. PENNA. 



COLD,STYLE MONONGAHELA RYE WHISKEY)j 










28 



fy^eifie WIJ^E /rJSID Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 




BEIWOOD TIIPIIS. . Liquor Flavors 

WlLliIflm H. RUDKIH, 



F. KORBEL & BHOS. 

7i.; ISrvant Street, San Francisco 



7A niLLIAM STREET. NEW YORK. 

GENUINE XX BEADING OIL XX 

IU-dui4tl To $7..'iO I'll- <.(W/riii. 

Or at NORTH FORK MILL c""*!" '"'• •*^"''- '" <,iiif.,r„ia o„iy by 

REDINGTON A. CO. 23-27-29 second st.. sa/v francisco 



Humboldt County, California. 



Tissue Paper 

JVIanila Paper 

Liabel Paper 






ESTABLISHED 

A. Finke's 

Producers of 

cuiPoyiA 

ABSOLUTELY PURE 




1864 



Widow. 

First Preminm 

CHAMPUnSi 



OLU .'5i;al. 
'"■' Carte Blanche, 



Nonpareil. 



OK A.UI. IvINUS. 



.^^-t'.t'-^ 



A. Zellerbach & Sons,^"-^~t!l~' ^" 



809 mOHTGOmERY ST.. !»«.fc^5fV^ I^. First IW.um, for Be«t 



San Francisco. 

Teiephoie, Blaci; 681. 




:ilif(>rnia Ch.TmpngneK award- 
,.„, ,- -1 liv ilie Slate Fiiirs, 1870-92 

'land wliereverexliibited. 



Lachman & Jacobi . Lona prieta luoiber go. 



DEALERS IN- 



ifornia Wines aiiil BiaoHies, 

BRYANT ANO SECOND STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO. 




Eastern Agents 



—SUCCESSORS TO— 

Have Coastantly on Hand a Full Supply 

nf thi' FciUoiwMtr Sl7i>.i of 

CRAPE STAKES 

2x2 -4 feet Long. 2x2—5 Feet Long. 

2(2 6 Feet long. 
Whiv'i will he sold tit ri^anuniiltle nilci. 



EDINGER BROS. & JACOBI, 

Cor. Dover & Pearl Kts.. Brooklyn Uriilu"- Store X.. '_*, N. Y 



LOMA PRIETA LUMBER CO. 



Loma Prieti, 



Santa Cruz Co , Gal 




FERRO-QUINA TO|<IG BITTERS 



A Wonderful Tonic and Strengthener 

AN ANTIDOTE AOAINST 

ANEMIA. CHLOROSIS. MUSCULAR DEBILITY. NAUSEA. HEAD 

ACHE. PALPITATION OF THE HEART. PHTHISIS. SCROFULA. 

CHRONIC BRONCHITIS, GENERAL DEBILITY. LASSITUDE 

■ni] oth«r ditoato* cauted by a dlfordercd tystem. 

Eipnclally Recommended at a preventative agalnil FEVERS 
in tropical climatei. 



DR. D. P. ROSSI 
too DUPONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. GAL 

>"1 r. Ai.».NT FOB f. 8. A.Ml I \SAI \ 

< 'r nij- whoK'Milc or commiuion kouso in tliia tilv 



^m^^ 



XHCE ONLY OENUINK 

Mo rife ©rli^to 

CHAMPAGNE 

EXTRA DRV 

KK..l>TIKIl') 




D. P. ROSSI 

(Dogliani , It.ih.i .ml S.in Tranciico 

1400 DUPONT ST. 

Sole Agent for thu United Statei and Canad 

N. n Thlti Hrnnrl Ik nno of tho l.'inHnir 
CtiniiipnitiM-ii Uhi-il nt tin' Ki)> nl Cuiirtt i»f Itnlr, 
txTinntiy, KticlKDi) ; l<i N|H'rliil)y liulnrKoM liv l'>i*l- 
ntontrn. Now Ynrk; l*Mlnr.' Iloii*!. I»rl M«miV. Mnltmn 
■ •on''. Mutton Itlrtio, Mhi^oii Torinut, I'tioillr imir. 
* Hinpr*. ^fnriliH'lllS, Ht tr:c C inmcnMal Hulcl. H. I-' 



$ 



j^^ASlfie WIJME /VJMD Sflf^lT F^EVIEW 



"CREMA BLANCA." 
* WktMork-Bowkn Company. 
140 Montgomery St , San Francisco. 

WHITK WINKS. 

Saiiternc Smntnlr | 6.00 $ 7.00 

Ham Sautonie Souvenir 9.00 1000 
Ch.iteau Vi|iieni Souv'r u 00 12,00 

WETMORE-BOWEN COMl'ANY. 
140 Montgomery street, San Francisco 

KIO WINKS. 

Tatile d'hote Souvenir. .|5 50 

St. liilicn Souvenir 7.00 

Margau.x Souvenir 8.00 

IN ADDITION TO AilOVE 

Zinfanclel 4 00 

Hurjjundy 6.00 

Riesling 5.00 

EL PINAI.. 

Port, Vintage 1S90 5.50 

I'ort, •' iSSS 6.50 

I'ort, " 1S.S6 S.oo 

OKI Trousseau Port 12.00 

Sherry. Viniage 1890 5.50 

Sherry, " ' i.SSS 6.50 

Sherry, " 1SS6 S.oo 

Sherry, amontillado type 10.00 

Muscatel 5 50 

Angelica 5.50 

Krontisnan 9.00 

Brandy, 1S90 11.00 

Brandy, iSSS i3-50 

lirandy, i,S86 16.00 

Brandy, 1876 zo.'io 



29 



9.00 

lo.co 

11.50 
13-50 

16.00 



I6.50 

s.oo 
9.00 

5.00 
7.00 
6.CO 



iPauillac, 1887 8<5o 9.50 

' " 1881 9.00 10.00 

St. Julien 1SS7 9.00 10.00 

St. Estephe iS,S7 9.00 10.00 

Chateau du Gallau 1881 
'■ •' 1S78 

• " le Pain, i87,S 

Pontet Canet, 1887 

Chat. Beychevelle, 1887 

1881 

Chateau Langoa 18.00 

" 1878.. 21.00 

1874.. 24-50 
Chat Brown Cantenac, 

1SS7 23.00 

Chat Leoville, 1887 24.50 

" 1S7S 25.50 

" Larose, 1S74 24-50 25.50 

" Lafile, 1S74 29.00 30.00 

" Margau.t, 1874... 29.00 30.00 

(II. Cuvillier & frere, Bordeaux.) 



12.50 
12.50 
14.50 

17.00 

22.on 
25.50 

24.00 
25- 5f- 



9.00 
10.00 
14.00 
16.50 
17-50 



1S.50 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

SAGLEE IIRANDV HOTTLHD AT UISTIL- 
LKRV. CASE GOODS. 

White Label Q.C.not un 'r 25 yrsf 20.00 
Blue label, 15. not under 15 yrs 15.00 
Red Label, O.N. , not un'r loyrs 12.00 
Trade discounts according to quality. 

HULK. 

(In packages ot 25 gallons each.) 

Per gal. 

For ages 1872-1876 ^4.00 

1877-1SS2 3.50 

1883-1SS4 325 

Bitters. 



D. P. ROSSI, 
N.E.Cor.Dupont and Green sts., S.F. 

FERRO illINA BITTERS. 

12 quarts to case |io.oo 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO., 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

AROMATIQUE. 

Per case of 12 quarts $12.00 

Imported Wines. 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 
123 California sireet, San Francisco. 

RKD WINES. 

(Barton i: Guestier, Bordeau.x.) 

Qts. Pints. 

Floirac $ 7.50 f 850 

Chateau Lacroix S.co 9.00 



Pauillar, iSSg 

St. Emilion Superieur. . 

Chat. Cheval Blanc 1.SS9 

Chateau Leoville, 1SS9. 

Chateau Batailey, 1881 . 

Chat. Kirvvan, 1S78 22.00 

Chat. Lapointe Ponierol 

1878 22.00 

Chat. Pontet Canet, '74 23.00 

" Beycheville, 1S74 25.00 

" Larose, 1870 24.00 

" Talbot d'Aux, '75 24.00 25.00 

" Leoville, 1H78 25.50 

" Cosd"Estourmer78 2S.00 

(Du Vivier & Co., Bordeaux.) 

St. Marc | 7.00 $ 8.00 

Pontet Canet 11.00 12.00 

WHITE WINKS. 

(Harton & Guestier, P.ordeaux.) 

■^auternes 1878 

Vin de Graves, 1878 . . . 

Marsac, 1878 

Haut Sauternes 1887.. 
H.iut Sauternes 1874.. 
Chateau Vquem 18S4.. 
Chateau Yqut-ni 1874.. 

(H. Cuvillier & frere, 
Chateau Giraud, 1884. 

" L'Tour nianche'S4 28.00 29.00 
(Du Vivier & Co., Bordeaux.) 
Graves premieres 9.00 10.00 

CALIFORNIAN— RED WINES. 

(A. Duval) 

Burgundy, 1S89 5.00 

Cabernet Sauvignon, '90 5.00 

CALIFORNIA — WHITK WINES 

(A. Duval) 

Riesling 1889 4.50 

Chablis 18SS 5.00 

Sauterne 18S9 5.00 

Creme de Sauterne, '89 

(private stock) 7.50 

BURGUNDIES — RED WINKS. 

I Bouchard pere ^'v: fils, I'.eaune Cote 
D' Or ) 

Macon 1SS4 11.00 12.00 

Pomniard . . 15.50 16.50 



18.00 

22.0O 



23-50 



31.00 
33-00 



10.25 
11.50 
12.00 
18.50 
19.50 

3t-5o 



9-25 
10.50 
11.00 
17-50 
18.50 

30.5" 
36.00 
Bordeaux.) 
28.00 29.00 



6.00 
6.00 



550) 

6.00 

6.00 

8.50 



Clos de Vougeol, 1SS7 

Monopole) ^.s-.S" .i6.,so 

Cliamhertin, 18S4 2600 27.00 

(Bouchard Pere & Fils, Beaune, 

Cote D'Or.) 
Chablis, 1S84 1350 14.50 

HOCKS. 

(S. Friedborig, Mayence.) 

Laubenheinier, 1S89. .| 9.50 I10.50 

Liebfraumllch, 18S9, Se- 
lected Grapes"... 17.00 

Raueiilhaler, 1S84 21.00 

Hochheinier Uom De- 

clianey, 1SS4 22.50 

Liebfrauniilch, 1876, 

"Extra (Jualitv".. 30.00 

Steinberger Cabinet, 

1S76 32.00 

(Prince Metternicli's Estateji 

Schloss Johannisberger, 

"68 ^4500 ;^46.oo 

SHERRIES. 

(Sandeman, Buck & Co., Jerez.) 

Maltese Cross 18.00 

Peniartin Brut 20.00 

" Umbrella 21.00 

" Amontillado. 23.00 
(E. J. Howell, London.) 
Solera Especial 13-50 

MADEIRA. 

(E. J. Howell, London.) 
Ye Old Style, Puro Es- 
pecial 15.50 

OLD COGNACS. 

(H. Cuvillier & Frere) 
Fine Champagne, "Re- 
serve," 1870 36.00 

(Sazer.ac de Forge & Fils.) 
Very Old Cognac, 1805. 45.00 

GIN. 

Coates & Co's Original 
Plymouth(unsweet- 
ened) 10.50 

SCOTCH WIIISKV. 

(Peter Dawson, DuHtown.) 
Dawson's "Perfection". 12.50 
" "Special". . . 14.50 

"Extra Spe- 
cial" 16.50 

Dawson's "Perfection." 

24 flasks 14.00 

Dawson's "Perfection," 

half flasks 16.00 

CHAMPAt;NE. 

Perrier-Jouet, Finest 
Extra Quality 
"Special" '. 33.50 

Perrier-Jouet, Finest 
Extra Quality, 
■'Brut" 34-00 

Half Pints, "Special". 42.00 perc'se 
of 48 bottles 



6.50 

8.50 

8.50 
8.50 



7-1 
7.C0 
7 CO 

7-5-' 



tjattinara in case of 12 bottles. . 
Nebbiolo. red, sparkling, in 

cases of 12 bottles 

Brachetto, red, sparkling, in 

cases of 12 bottles 

Grignolino, in cases of 12 bonis 

Pints }i per case more. 
C. & F. Giocobini, Allomonle, Cal- 
abria. 
Fancy wines for altar and medical use 
Moscalo Calabria, in c'ses 12 btis 7.00 
Lacryma Christi, " 12 " 7.00 
Tokay, " 12 " 

Malvasia, " 12 " 

Count E. Di Mirafiore. 
Barolo, in cases of 1 2 bottles, 1 887. 

CHIANTI WINE— IN FLASKS. 

I. L. Ruflinu, Florence. 

Per case of 2 dozen quarts 1 1.50 

4 " pints 13.00 

WHITE AND RED STILL. 

Pasquale Scala, Naples. 
I.aciyma Christi, per case of 12 

bottles ^25 

Moscato di Siracusa, per case of 

12 bottles 

Falerno, red, per case of 12 bot- 
tles 

Capri, per case of 12 bottles. . . 
Pints 75 cenis per case more. 

SPARKLING WINES. 

Pasquale Scala, Naples. 

Lacryma, Christi, quarts 17.50 

" pints 1850 

Filli. Gancia >fc Co., Canelli (A.sli.) 
Moscato, white, in cases of 12 

quarts 14.00 

Moscato, white, in cases of 24 

pints 15.C0 

Passaretia, white, in cases of 12 

quarts 13.00 

Passaretta, white, in cases of 24 

pints 14.00 



7. CO 

7.00 
6.50 



35-50 



36 00 



L. GANDOLFI & CO., 

427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prices f. o. b. New York.) 

Filli, Gancia \- Co., Canelli (Asti.) 

Barbera, in cases of 12 bottles. . 5.50 

Barolo, " "12 " 7.00 



HELLMANN BROS. & CO., 
52.S Front street San Francisco. 

SHERRIES. 

Forrester it Co., Jerez, 

in wood, per gallon. I 1.50 J5.00 
Forrester & Co., Jerez, 

per case 12.00 16.00 

Garvey & Co., Jerez, in 

wood, per gallon.. . 1.75 5.00 

PORTS. 

Offley I1.75 to I5.C0 

OfHey, per case |i2.oo 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 

3 14 Sacramento street, San Francisco 

A. de Luze S: Fils, Bordesux Clarets, 
perca.se fS.oo to f 28.00 

A.de LuzeA:Fils, Bordeaux Sauternes, 
per case 12.00 to 26.00 

C. ,Marey & Liger Belair Nuits Bur- 
gundies, white and red, per case 
15 00 to 23.00 




P. C. ROSSL 

President 



SWISS 



A. SBARBORO, 

Secretary 



.p,t4^vv.ooco. 

^V^\» ASTI, SONOHA CO., CAL. ^O 



PRODUCERS OF FINE 



^h 



CALIFORNIA WINES and BRANDIES 



-AND- 



mONTECRISTO CHflfnPflGHES 



(Naturally Fkrmk.nteu in Bottles.) 

(>i-itiifl I>iploni:i of" Honor- 

Ilitflif^^t ^V>vui-«l <><-iio:i, I(:il,v. 1^1»M 

<>ol<l >I<-<l:il < ':i I H'oi itiii 



TUADK .MAUiv RKGI.-iTF.RED OCTOBER 8TH, 189-=^. 
Ciol<l >I«>«liiI l.>iil>liii, Ti-olniKl. IMOM 
Ciiold .>I<mIiiI ('oliiiiil>i:iii lii.vp'n, lr«l»:{ 



MAIN OFFICE, 518 MONTGOMERY STREET - - SAN FRANCISCO 
DEPOT AND CELLARS. 109 BATTERY STREET BETWEEN CALIFORNIA AND PINE STREETS 



P. 

<ioI»l >I<-<l!il Tui-iii. 

L. GANDOLFI &, 



C. ROSSI 



VKRlVrOUTH 

IIiu:li<-.«it Aw>»i-<1 Cliioaaro, 1894- 



CO., Eastern Agents I^AI.lA^^ 



IMroHTKRS OF 

\\IXl-;iS A.MU KKOIJUCa 



30 



f/reifie WI^E ;«VJSII3 Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



CHARLES BUNOSCMU. PmtdenI 



CARL GUNDLACH. VICE Prctibrnl 



HENRY GUNOLACH. Sccrctan 




GUNUI,AC11-BUNI)SCIUJ WINE COMPANY 

Siiooesst)i>^ t.. .|. G I.: XL) LAC H c^ CO. 

Vineyard Proprietors and Shippers of 

Calilbniiii Wines aiid liraiiilics, 



■(|undjac|'ic^ *" 

SAN pRAN CI SCO - -/J EW Yo RK^'^^ 



rr.oi'iiifioiis RHINE FARM, mm. ql 



d BACCHUS WINE VAULTS, 438-4-42 Bryant St., S. F 



San J'rattrlsi-i> OJJicr, 

s. /;. < oi:. M.tiiKicT A siccoxn sts. 



.\>ir Ydi-I. Jtriiii'li 
S E Cor WATTS & WASHINGTON STS 



I 



Itouis ^um\ CMaone 

fligbest Grade in the World! 

Used by All the Leading Clubs 

Hotels and Restaurants . . , 

Kor sale by All Kirst-Class 
Grocers and AViiie Merciiaiits. 




rilKKl'; KINDS, ALL l)K EglAL KXCKLLKNCK 

BRUT ^(^o/c/Sea/) 

An Extra Dry Wine 

GRAND Vl/N 5EC {^rowu Sea/) 

The Perfection of a 1 )ry Wine 

CARTE BLAMCHE [U'/tik Seal) 

A Rich Wine 



Macondray Bros. & Lockard, 



124 SANSOME STREET 

Sci'n' Ajjeiits f.ir the I'acific Coast. 



TllOs. KlKKrATKlCK. 1'kEsID. N 

San Kkancisco, Cal 



^ 



<> 



^^ 




^ 



pEEf^CESS U/t^ISf^JES. 



* > ■ >-: c « 



Dlf^ECT ff^OJ\/l bOUISVIbloE, KY. 




Sherlhv JlooRt, VicePrks't 
Louisville, Kv. 



"'*% 



•I^ 



^, 



^S^ 






* > < ■ >< «■ 



i 



Ihtsd W ]ave a reyntSLtion second to nond on the PaciflG Coast. TJiey have leen given years of iriai 

by the best class of trade and consumers and are pronounced without a peer. When given a trial they speak (or 
'['03^ "^ For sale in quantities to suit in Louisville or San Francisco by 

JESSe TVYOORe. HUNT CO.. 

LOUISVILLE. KENTUCKY 404 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



f/ceifie WIJME /rIMD Sflf^IT t^EVIEW, 



31 



D. M. Feiierheed, Jr., 

^■v: Co., Oporto, Port 

Wines, in wood, 

per gallon 3.00 to 

Dufl Gordon & Co., 

Sherries, in wood, 

per gallon 2.00 to 

Lacave \ Co ..Sherries, 

Crown Brand. in ,'s- i-4o to 
South -Siile Madeira. . . 2.00 to 
St. Croi.x Kiini, LB... 5.50 
Arrack ''Royal" Ba- 

tavia S.oo to 

Boord A: Son, London 

Dock Sherry, per 

case 12.00 to 

G.AM'abstniann Sohn, 

Mainz Rhine 

Wines, per case. . . S.50 to 2S.00 
Schulz A: Wagner, 

Krankfiirt o M 

Rhine Wines, per 

case 11.00 to 



Seco Fine, old and dryr 1.85 

lO S Fine, rich and Iruity... 3.45 

C N Superli Table 3.10 

5- 5° Corona Delicious and delicate. 3.25 

Soecial S Grand old wine 4 00 

Nectar— Kino, N. I*. U 4.65 

5-5° HllINK AND MOSKLLK WINES. 

Willieln\ Panizza, Mayence. 

1-75 Per Case. 

2-50 Laubenheinier f 8.00 

Deidesheimer 8 50 

N'iersteiner 10,25 

^.oo Hochheinier 11.50 

L eblrauniilih 13.25 

Foster Jesuitgarten 13-75 

'S-co Rudesheimer 14 00 

Ebacher 14 75 

Geisenheimer 17.25 

Marcobrunner '7-50 

Kauenthaler 19.00 

Geisenheim Rothberg 21.00 

Neisteimer Rehbach 21.50 



JESSE MOORE HUNT CO. 
404 Front Street, San Francisco. 
E\ P'y in bbis or Ji-bbls.|6.oo to f S.oo 
A A " " pf. 4.00 

B " " " 350 

,C " " " 3.00 

Rye in bbIs and >^-bbls.Jl3.50 to I5.00 

A A in I ases 11.00 

:C in cases 8.50 

\ NABER, ALKS & BRUNE. 
323 and 325 Market St , San Francisco 
l'h()eni.x Old Bourbon, .\i. 



|2-75 
3.00 
2.50 
3- SO 
4 00 
6.00 



400 Ruje^lieimer Berg 23.00 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. B"'k wines at f. o. b. prices. 

212-214 Market St., San Francisco. | torts. 

ESCHENAUEK & CO , BORDEAUX. I Silva & Cosens. Per Gal. 

Quarts. T — Tawnev $'90 

$ 7 00 R — Extra full body and rich. . . 2.05 

7.50 V T — Very tawney 2.25 

8.00 V O T — Very old tawney 2.35 

8.00 T P — Extra tawney, delicate. . . . 2.50 

9.50<rPO — Tawnev, extra old 3.10 

lo.ooJBRANCO— Wliiie— Fine White 

11.50! Port 3.25 

12.00 JEWEL— A specialty, old and 

13.50' mellow 3.50 

8.50 S O— Superior old 3.85 

9.50 E.MPEROR — 30 years in wood, 

grand old wine 4.75 

;M C R — 1827 — Choicest Royal . . 6.35 
1.75 to 4.501 Direct shipping orders solicited on 



Medoc 

Merin d'or 

BouiUac 

Red Seal 

St. lulien Superior 

While Seal 

Pontel Canet 

La Rose 

Gold Seal 

Graves 

Sauternes 

Mackenzie's Ports and 

Sherries in wood, per 

gallon 



" old st'k 
" " Ai,9opf 

OK.ioopf 

" '• Pony, pri. slk 

Club House Bourbon, old .^.50 
Gold Medal Bourbon, 100 

pf 2-50 

Union Club Bourbon, 100 

pf 1-25 

Superior Whisky 1.75 

BB Whisky 1.50 

LiouoRS — In Cases. 

Per Case. 
Phoenix Bourbon OK, in 5s . . I10.50 



" Ai, 
'• " Ai, 24 pts 

" Ai, 48"^ pts. 
Rock and Rye Whisky in 5s.. 

Rum Punch Extract in 5s 

Blackberry Brandy in ss 



Mackenzie's Ports and the most favorable terms. 

Sherries in cases 10.00 to 14.00 | Tarragona wines. 



Jose Boule, Tarragona. 

Qrs. & octs. per gal. 
* Fine, clear and smooth .. .$1.15 
ROYAL PURE JUICE — Full 

body and r ch i '25 

TAWNEV PORT— Light color, 

soft and old 1.25 

These wines have none of the ob- 

Mayence I7 to S29 'actionable astringency so common 

.. „„ „„„ " , in wines of this class, and are abso- 

MOSKL WINKS. 1,^^^,^ p^^^ 

Henkell & Co J7 to 29 i 



Hunt, Roope, Teague & 
Co. 's Ports in cases ..13.00 to 19.00 

JOHN CAFFREY, (representing 
Chas. Graef & Co., New York.) 
21 Sutter Street, San Francisco. 

IIOCK WINES. 

Henkell & Co. 



7 50 
8.00 
9.00 
7.50 
8.00 
7-5° 

SPRUAN'CE, STANLEY & CO. 
410 Front street, San Francisco. 

Kentucky Favoriie $ 3.00 

Extra Kentucky Kavorile 3.50 

O. P. S 2.50 

O K Old Stock 5.00 

Harries' Old Bourboa 2.00 

Kentucky Favorite, in cases 8.50 

H. O. B. Jugs 9.00 

O. F. C. J ugs 10.50 

African Stomach Bitters, cases. 7.50 

SIEBE BROS & PLAGEMAN. 
322 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

O K Extra f3-5o to $6.00 

O K Rosedale 2.5010 3.00 

Uvai.i 2.75 

Golden Pearl 2.25 

Marshall 2.25 

Old Family Bourbon. . . 1.75 

Old Bourbon 1.50 



MACONDRAY BROS. & LOCK- 
ARD, Agents. 
124 Sansome street, San Francisco. 
Louis Roederer, Carte 

Blanche l34-Oo $36.00 

Louis Roederer, Grand 

\'in Sec 34-00 36.00 

Louis Roederer, Brut. . 34.00 36.00 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco 
DKVTZ & GELDEKMANN, AV., CHAM- 
PAGNE. 

Gold Lack Sec, per 
case $32.00 $34 00 

Gold Lack Sec. 6 Mag- 
nums, per case 31.00 

Cabinet Green Seal, per 

basket 2550 27.00 

DL'PANLOUI" & CO., REIMS. 

Carte B'anche, per case|2i.oo $22.00 

I). P. ROSSI. 

N. E. Cor. Dupont and Green sts.,SF 

Monte Cristo, 12 quarts to case.$i2.oo 

" " 24 pints " 13 00 

Special discount for quantities. 

W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 

39 Broadway, New York. 

SPARKLING SAIMUR. 

AckermanLaurence, Sauniur, p'rance 

Dry Royal J21.00 $23.00 

Brut " 21.00 23.00 

WILLLIAM WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 
Quarts. Pints. 
White Seal (Grand Cu- 

vee) $3400 $3600 

Brut Imperial 3800 40.00 



SPARKLING WINES. 

Henkell & Co $7 to $29 

CLARET WINES. 

Journu Freres, Kap- 
pelhoflr& Co., Bor- 
deaux $6 50 to $26 00 

WHITE WINES. 

Journu Freres, Kap- 
pelhoff & Co., Bor- 
deaux $7 50 to $17 50! 

BURGUNDY WINES. 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market Street) San Francisco. 

(Dubos Freres, Bordeaux.) 
Clarets in casks of 60 

gals $95.00 to $160.00 

(F. Chauvenet, Nuits. Cote d'Or.) 
Burgundy wines in 

cases $10.00 to $52.00 

(Deinhard & Co., Coblenz.) 
Hock and Moselle 

wines $8.00 to f 32. 00 

(Morgan Bros., Port. St. Mary.) 



Ports and Sherries in 
wood, per gallon $2.00 to $5.00 



E. Boullay, Macon, 
Saoneet Loire.... $13 50 to $26 5° p.^.^'anT IhTrnies in 

i cases, per case 10.00 to 1 S.oo 

i (Mackenzie & Co., Jerez.) 
Ports and Sherries in 
wood, from $i-7Sto$4.50 



.$1.40 



1.70 



W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 
Jerez de la Frontera. 

SHERRIKS. Per Gal. 

No I P Table, full bodied / 
iVP Table, very pale f 

2 P Full and round \ 
2VP Very pale, light, fine / " 

3 P Full body, soft, rich 1 
3VP V'ery pale, light, full J" 

4 P V'i body, old, mellow > 
4VP Very paie.delic'e,dry ( " 

5 P Full bodv.rlch, fruity ) 
5VP Pale, old, fine /• 

6 P Extra Full and fruity 1 
6VP Verv fine and mellow / " 

7 Amo ANION riLLADO,old 

and nutlv 

8 CLO OLOROSA, mellow, 

soft 

9 Rex Superb old Dessert 



American Whiskies. 



L. GANDOLFI & CO. 
' 85 427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prices f. o. b. New York.) 
'•'5 *Good Luck .Monogram,per case $9.00 
♦» " " " ■• " lo.OC 

2-5° Liberal discount to the jobbing 
trade. 

^■" HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 

1 525 Front Street, San Francisco. 
^•85 Blue Grass, per gallon. .$2.00 to $3.50 
Boone's Knoll, per "... 2.40 to 4.50 

KOLB & DENBARD, 

W"e ■• 3-35 1420-426 Montgomery St., S. Francisco 

to AMoNriLLADO Solera, ] Per Gal. Peres. 

very old and nutty 4.40 Nonpareil $3.50 $7.50 

II QUEEN VICTORlA,grand Nonpareil A 4.00 9.00 

old wini; 565 Nonpareil AA 5.00 12.00 

SPKCIAL WINKS. ICauteen 3.50 8.00 

Velvet A Clean, sound wine $1.25 Canteen OPS 5.00 11.00 

" B Full body and rich 1.50 

Special N Soft, full and fine 1.60 CHARLES MEIXECKE & CO. 

" W Soft, full body 1.75 314 Sacramento St., Sat Francisco. 

" B Clean and sound-Fino 1.80 John Gibson Son & Co.$J.oo to $4.00 



SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market street, San Francisco 
Carlisle in bbls. Reimported 

Spring, '89, per gal $ 2.50 

'Carlisle in bbls. Reimported 

I Spring, '86, per gal 3.25 

j Keystone Monogram Rye in 

I cases, per case i4-:5 

Old Saratoga in cases, per case 15.25 
j.Mascot Bourbon in bbls per gal 2.25 
Robin Hood Bourbon in bbls, 

pergal 2.50 

ISherwood Private Stock in 

I bbls, per gnl 3.00 

O. P. S. Sherwood in bbls, per 

gal 3.25 

Old Saratoga in bbls, per gal. . 4.00 

I WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 

' 329 Market street, San Francisco. 
Carlisle reimported, .Spring, '90 $2.50 
R. B. Hayden iS: Co.'s Old 

Grand Dad, Spring, '90 2.25 

Mayfield, Spring, '89 2.65 

.\lherton. Spring, '90 2.35 

Anderson Co., Spring, '9' 1.85 

Hume, Spring, '89 2.45 



Imported Champagnes. 

W. B. CHAP.MAN. 
123 California street, San Francisco. 
Perrier Jouet & Co. 

'Special" $335° $35-5° 

Perrier, Reserve Dry.. 3400 36.00 
Perrier, Jouet & Co. 

Brut 3400 36.00 

Half pts "Special" $42 in cases of 48 

bottle.-. 



Imported Brandies. 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 
123 California street, San Francisco. 
(H. Cuvillier and Frere Cognac. ) 
Quarts. 
Fine Champagne, "Reserve," 

1870 $52.00 

Grand Fine Champagne, 1860.. 36 00 

L. GANDOLFI & CO. 
427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prices f. o. b. New York.) 
*** Albert Dubois & Co., 

Cognac, 12 quarts $'2.75 

*** Ruppart & Co., 12 quarts. 10.50 

ITALIAN — FRATELl.I BRANCA, MILAN. 

Cogn?c Fine Champagne, Croix 
Rouge, per case $10.00 

HELLMANN BROS. & Co. 

525 Front street, San Francisco. 

E. Remy Martin & Co , Cognac. 

Co'jnac in octaves per gal. $5. 50 $6.50 

In cases, see special advertisement. 

P. Frapin & Co., Cognac. 

Cognac in octaves per gal. $5. 65 $6.50 

Planat & Co., Cognac. 
Cognac in octaves per gal. $5-25 

E. REMY MARTIN & CO., Cogn<ic. 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO., AGENTS. 

525 Front street, San Francisco. 

Eau-de-Vie vieille $15.00 

" 17.00 

" 19.00 

Fine Champagne 20. 00 

GrandeChampagne vie- 
ille 22.00 

Grande Champagne, ex- 
tra 25.00 

Grande Champagne, V 

O P 1858 3000 

Grande Champagne, S 

O P1S48 35.00 

Grand Ciiampagne, V 

SOP, 1S34 50.00 

In octaves $4.7010 6.25 



HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 
525 Front street, San Francisco. 
Krug & Co. "Private 

Cuvee" per case $3400 $36.00 

Joseph Perrier fils & 

Co., per basket 19.00 20. 00 

Adrien & fil>, per bas- 
ket 17.00 18.00 



CHARLES MEINECKE & Cp., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco 
Champ Vineyard Pro- 
prs. Co , Boiitelleau 
& Co. managers Cog- 
nac in Octaves per 

gal $ 525 to 8.50 

The Vineyard Proprs. 
Co. Boutelleau & 
Co., managers Re- 
serve Vintages $11.00 to 14.00 



3l> 



PAGipie WljME /I^JD Sflf^IT F^EVIEW. 



W. A.TAYLOR & CO 

39 BROADWAY, NEW YORL 



GONZALEZ. BYASS & CO.. 
SILVft&COSENS, 
BLANDY BROS. & CO. 
ACKERMAN-LAURANCE, 
WILHELM PANIZZA, 
MARTINI & ROSSI. - 
I & V. FLORIO. - 
PtTER F. HEERING. - 
REIN & CO., - 



REPRESENTING 



Sherries 

Ports 

Madeiras 

Sparkling Sauiiiiir 

Rhine Wines 

Vermouth 

Marsalas 

Cherry Cordial 

Malagas 



JOSE BOULE, 


Tarragonas 


A. BRONOUM & SON, 


Acquavit 


ROUYER, GUILLET & CO., 


Brandies. 


JOHN JAMESON & SON. ltd. 


Irish Whisky 


THE AROBEG DISTIILERY CO.. 


Scotch Whisky 


CHAS. TANQUERY & CO., 


Old Tom Gin 


MAGNUM B^ANO, - - - 


Jamaica Rum 


MAGNUM BRAND, - - 


St. Croix Rums 


MAGNUM BRAND, 


Holland Gin 



ORDERS SOLICITED FOR DIRECT SHIPMENTS. 

SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS IN TERIYIS, PRICES, ETC. 



a 



SRECIHL-TIES 

John Jameson & Son, Limited 

FAMOUS 

IRISH WHISKY 

In all \imds it is lucogiiizwl us being 

WITHOUT AN EQUAL! 



Sells in iMil.lin, at auction, for nearly dunhle tliu price 
of anv other Irisli wlii.skv 



CHAS. TANQUERAY &. CO. 
0LPT0n2kD<l UNSWEETENED GIN 

The liigiifst type of English (iiiis. Fust hccojning 
pf)pMl:ir in Ihe I'^ist. 

WILL SELL THEMSELVES. 



SCOTCH WHISKY 

GOLF CLUB" "PIBROCH 



>j 



These two Whiskies are the finest types of Scotch 
Wiiisky to be found anywhere. Won in their 
class in competition against the best known 
brands in the market. 



tt 



RED LION" 



JAMAICA RUMS 



An exceedini,'ly fim-, old London Dock Cased Rum. 



IF YOU WANT THE BEST, TRY IT. 



SOLE AGENTS W. A. TAYUOI^ 8t CO. 39 BROADWAY, N Y 



f/ceifie WIfJE /rJMD Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



JOHN CAFFKEY, (represeniinR 
CiiAS. Graef .'V Co., New York) 
21 Sutter Street, San I'raiicisco. 
Vve. romincry I'ils & Co., Reims. 

Pommery <& Greiio "Sec" $34 50 

" pints. 36 00 

V'iii Nature (Brut) 37 50 

" pints 36 00 

W A. TAVLOR & Co.. 
39 Broadway, New York. 

COf.NAC ItRANDIKS. 
ROUYEK, GU1L1.KT iS: CO., COGNAC. 

Vintage. Qi. Casks per gal. 

iS,S6 1 4 S5 

1SS4 5.40 

>S75 6.55 

1S69 7.40 

1S40 12.25 

VSO 1750 

Octaves, 5 cents per gal extra. 

CASES. 

Cases * 1450 

•' »* )6.20 

*** 17. .So 

"'** 19 50 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 

329 Market street, San Francisco. 

Marteli's Brandy, ■■ per case J15.00 

" " '* " 17.00 

'* *' *** *' 19.00 

VO " 26.00 

" VSO " 32.00 

" VSOP " 50.00 

" " in octaves 5.00109.25 



4-45 
4.75 
5.IO 
5 5° 



New ;f4.oo 

One Year 4.40 

Two Years 4.70 

Three Years 5.05 

Four Years 5.45 

CASES 

* I doz bot. fi2. " 

* * * 14.50 

* * * * 24.00 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 

329 Market street. San Francisco. 

Canadian Club per case f 15.00 

IRISH WHISKIES. 

(Will. Jameson & Co., Dublin) 

Green Diamond, per case 10 50 

Gold Diamond " 11.50 

Three Diamond " 1450 

In octaves, proof 122, per gal . . . 4.00 

SCOTCH wmsKIKS. 

(Andrew Usher iS: Co.) 
Old Vatted Gleiilivet, per case.. 12.00 

Special Reserve, per case 1350 

"The Very I'lnest," per case.. .30.00 
In octaves, proof in, per gal 4.25 



Tarragona Port in yi casks 

per gallon 1.25 

Adrien M.Warde's Italia de 

Pisco, per case 30.00 

Sardines, brand "Philippe & Canaud" 

KOLB & di;miard, 

426 Montgomery street, San Francisco 
Birch'sCiystal HelfistGinger Ale- 
Lots of 5 barrels |i 2.75 

1 barrel 13 o 

Net cash. 



Imported Whiskies. 

W. B. CHAPMAN, 
123 California street, San Francisco. 

SCOTCH WHISKY. 

Dawson's " Periection" $12.50. . . 

Old Highland " E.xtra Spe- 
cial" 13.00... 

Old Highland " Special Liq- 
ueur" 16.00... 



Domestic Champagnes. 

ARPAD HARASZTIIY. 
San Francisco, California. 

THKHE NEW UKANDS. 

Haraszthy Sec" $16.50 $19.00 

Haraszthy Dry" i5-5o 18.00 

"Haraszthy Brut" 14.50 17. co 

Eclipse Extra Dry 14.50 17.00 

Two year's natural fermentation in 

bottle. 
Trade discounts mailed on application 

ITALIAN-SWISS COLONY. 
L. Gandolli & Co., Proprietors. 
427-431 West Broadway, New York. 
Montecristo, extra dry, naturally 

fermented, in cases of 12 <]ls .$12 00 
Montecristo, extra dry, nauirally 
fermented, in cises of 24 pts. 14.00 
Liberal discount to the trade. 



CHARLES MEINFCKE & CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

(UOORI) & SONS, LONDON.) 

Old 'Tom Gin, per case $1 1 .00 

Pale Orange liittfrs, per case. . 11.50 

Ginger Brioulv. Lifiiieur "... 12.00 

Jamaica Rum.Old prcase 12.00 to 14.00 

IAIN Royal Bat.uia Gin in 

i cases of 15 large black 

I bottles per case 

I in cases of 15 large 
white bottles per case 

K irs ch wasser, Macholl 
Freres Bavarian High- 
land, per case 

.Swan Gin in |s ca?ks 

Double Eagle Gin in }i csks 

lohn Ramsay Islay Scotch 
Whisky in '/i casks 

Boord's Pineapple brand Ja- 
maica Rums in ^s casks5.25to 6.50 



2350 
24.50 



20.00 

3-75 
3.60 

4-75 



HELLMAN BROS. & CO. 
525 Front street, San Francisco. 
]. B. Sheriff cV Co., Lochindale 
Islay, Scotch whisky in wood, 
per gallon $3 So 



HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 
525 Front street, San Francisco. 

J. b. Sherriff & Co. Lochin- 
dale Islay, Scotch whis- 
ky per case 12.00 

Dublin Distillers Co. Ltd., 
Dublin, Irish whisky, 
in wood, per gallon. .. 4.50 

Dublin Distillers Co. Ltd., 
Dublin, Irish whisky, 
per case 12.00 



CHARLES MELSECKE & CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
Boord & Son, London Finest 

Irish Malt Whiskey 12. ai 

Royal Hghid Scotch Whiiky 12.50 
John Ramsay, Islay Malt 

Scotch Whisky 13.50 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 

212-214 .Market street, San F'rancisco. 

Burke's * * ♦ Irish, cases 12.00 

♦ * * * " " 14.00 

" Garnkirk Scotch " 12.25 

" Viceregal Scotch " iS-So 

Lawson's Liquer " " i3.5o 

Uam Var, " " 12.00 

McKenzie's Glenlivet • * ' 

Scotch, per case 12.50 

Bushell's Club Irish, in wood 

per gallon 450 

W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 

39 Broadway, -New York. 

The Ardbeg Distillery Co., Islay. 

Qrs. Octs. 

New $3 85 $3.90 

One \ear 4.20 4,25 

Two Years 4.55 4.60 

Tnree Years 495 5.00 

CASES. 

* one doz. bot. $1 i.oo 

* * * 13.00 

* * * * 20.00 

JOHN JAMESON & SONS, DUBLIN. 



PAUL MASSON, 
San Jose, Calilornia. 
Less than 5 cases. 
Premiere Cuvee. Dry. . $16.00 $18.00 
" " Special i6.oo 18.00 

Special discount for quantities of 5 
cases or more. 

A. WERNER & CO. 

52 Warren street. New York. 

Extra Dry $7.00 $8.00 

Syrups, Cordials, Etc. 

KOLB & DENHARD, 
421 Montgomery street, San Francisco 

Rock Candy Syrup 7sc. per gal. 

Raspberry Syrup 75c. " 

Oigeat Syrup 75c. " 

Imported Goods. 

(MISCELLANEOUS.) 

W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California street, San Francisco. 

Plymouth Gin (unsweetened) $15 00 

L. G.'VNDOLFI & CO., 

1 427-431 West Broadway, New York. 

(Prices f. o. b. New York) 

Fili Mancabelli, Brescia. 
iAnesone,casesof 12 bots, prcase$ii.5o 

I FERNET OR HLA.NCA HITTERS. 

1 mi. Branca & Co., Milan. 

25 case lots and above, qt9 11.00 

10 11.25 

5 " ' 11.50 

Single case, qts 12.00 

Case of 24 pints bottles 10.50 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO., 

525 Front street, San Francisco. 

Blankenheym & Nolet. 

Union Gin 2.60 

Vaughan Jones 
OldJTom Gin, incases.. 11.00 

Orange Bitters " .. 11.50 

Patterson & Hibbert 
Bass' Stout, per double doz 3.00 

Guinness' Stout, " " 3.50 

H. Underberg-Albrecht. 
BoonekampolMaagBit'rsi2.75toi3.75 

J. B. Sherri(r& Co. 
Jamaica Rum in ,'4saiid>8S 

per gallon 4.30105.10 



W. A. TAYLOR & CO. 
39 Broadway, New York. 

MAGNUM BRAND, JAMAICA RUM. 

Qrs. Octs. 

.•\— Full body $3.90 $3.95 

B — Rich, fat and old 4.30 4.35 

C — Suoerline, extra 5.05 5.05 

MAGNUM 3.10 3.50 

GINS. 

CHAS. T.\N'(>UERAV & CO., LONDON. 

Bulk. 

Old Tom Gin, quarter casks $3.25 

Old Tom Gin octaves 3.30 

Cases, one dozen each S. 75 



SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD. 
212-214 Market street, San Francisco. 
Per case 
A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

large black bottles.. $21.50 

A. Houtman iS: Co's Gin, 

medium black bottles 18.50 

.\. Houtman is: Co's Gin, 

small black bottles. . 9.00 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

large white bottles. . 22.50 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

medium whiteboitles 19.50 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

small while bottles. . 9.50 

A. Houtman & Co's Gin, 

. octaves per gallon. . . 3.55 

Ba<;s' Ale in wood, hhds. 50.00 

JoulesStone Ale in wood, 

hhds 50.00 

Ross Ginger Ale, per bbl 15. 00 

" Soda Water, per case 7.00 

" Tonic Water, " 7.00 

" Potash Water, " 7.00 

" Raspberry Vinegar6 to 

gal . per case 7.00 

■' Raspberry \'inegar8to 

gal. percase 6'oo 

" Lime Juice Cordial 6to 

gal per ca<;e 6.00 

" LimeJuiceCordial 8to 

gal. per case 4.50 

" Lime Fruit Juice 6 to 

gal. per c.ise 4.60 

" Lime p'ruit Juice 8 to 

g.d. per ca';e 3.50 

" Orange Bitters, per case 8.00 

Burke's Bass' Ale pints, per 

bbl of 8 doz 16.00 

Burke's Guinness' Stout, 

pts, per bbl of 8 doz. . 16.00 

Burke's lamaicaRumpercs 12.50 

" Old Tom Gin " 10.75 

" Dry Gin " 10.75 

" Hennessy Brandy, 

per case 16.00 

" Port Wine, Gato br'd 

per case 10.00 

Fleischnian's Royalty Gin, 

10 gal. pkages, per gal 2.25 

Fleischman's Royalty Gin, 

'5 g-i'- pk''^ges, per gal 2.22 j^ 



I'leiACiimau's Ku)aliy Ciin, 

20 gal. pkages, per gal 2.20 

Fleischman's Koy.iliy Gin, 

50 gal. pkges, per gal. 2.15 

Meinhold's Anchor Br.ind 

Cider, per case, quarts 3.25 

Meinhold's Anchor Brand 

Cidtr, per case, pints. 4.00 

WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 
\ 329 Market street, San I'raiicisco. 
J.deKuyper&SonsGin, large bot 20.00 
' " " nied. " " 16.00 

" " small 9 00 

Cantrell & Cochrane BeKast Gin- 
ger Ale per barrel of 10 doz. 15.00 
Wolle's Schiedam Schnapps per 

case, c|uarts 9.50 

Wolfe's Schiedam Schnapps per 

I case, pints i o. 50 

Benedictine, per case, quarts . . .20.00 

( " " pints 21.50 

Theo. Lappe's Genuine Aronia- 

liqne per case 12.00 

Gilka Kummel per case 12.50 

Dog's Head Brand of Bass' .Ale 
Per case 8 doz. pints, glass. 

Read Bros., London 14.60 

Per case 4 doz quarts, glass. 13. 00 
Dog's Head Brand of Guinness' 

Stout, per cs. 8 doz pts, glass 14.00 
Per case, 4 doz quarts " 12.40 
OldTom Gin,Sutton,Carden&Ccio.oo 
Creme de Menthe, E. Cusenier 

(ilsAine&Co 16.00 

PousseCafe,E. Cusenier, AineCo. 15.50 
Maraschino, Romano ViahovZara 15.50 
Balavia Arrack, 12 quart bottles 12.00 
Jamaica Rum in octaves, proof 

116, per gallon 4.50 

Kirschwasser, MRCholl Bros., .. 18.00 
Nordhauser Kornbranntwein cases 12 

jugs, Red label jo.oo 

Black label 16.00 

Cherries in Maraschino. 12 qts . 10.00 
French Vermouth, NoillyPrat&Co 6.75 
Grand Marnier, 12 bottles, large 20.00 
" " 24 " small 21.50 

J. H.Schrceder's Cocktail Bitters 

24 pints 12.00 

Chianti, Giorgi Giglioli, Leghorn 

Italy— quarts 10.00 

pints 1 1 .00 



Mineral Water. 



JOHN CAFFREY, (representing 

CHAS. GRAEF & CO., New York) 

2 1 Sutter Street, San Francisco. 

APENTA HUNGARIAN BITTER 
WATER, 
ex San Francisco Warehouse. 

5 CASE LOTS. 

Case of 50 glass bottles $ 7.50 

" 100 glass quarter bottles 7.50 

Payable 6 months from date ot invoice. 

Subject to a rebate of 50 cents per 
case on certain conditions ; particu- 
lars on application. 

APQLLINARIS NATURAL MIN- 
ERAL WATER. 

•^x San Francisco Wareh'se, 10 cs lots. 

Case of 50 glass qts Apollinaris 7.00 

" 100 " pts " 10.50 

Payable 30 days from dale of invoice. 

Subject to a rebate of 50 cents per case 
on certain conditions ; particulars 
on application. 

FRIEDRICHSHALL APERIENT 

WATER. 

ex San Francisco Warehouse. 

Per case of 50 bottles (5 case lots) 10.00 



WILLIAM WOLLF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

JOHANNIS MINERAL WATER, /OLLHAL'S 

GERMANY. 

TEN CASES OR MORE. 

Case of 50 quarts $ 6.25 

" 100 pints 9.75 

" 100 splits 7.50 

ONE CASE. 

iCase of 50 quarts 7.25 

'1 100 pints '0.75 

" 100 splits 8.25 

(Terms — Net3odaysi 

HUNVADI JANOS. 

Case of 50 bottles, per case $11 -oo 

5 cases and over, per case 10.00 



3-i 



o- 



f/eifl(B V/IJ^E /;J^!D Sfir^lT (REVIEW. 



LEADING DISTILLERS. 



ADDRESS. INSURANCE. 



BRAND. 



BOURBONS. 



0. F. C. DLSTlLLKi; V. D No. 1 1:? 

Frankfort 

.\ Id : Geo. T. Stagg Co., Frankfort 

Rat« «5c. 



O. F. C, 
Carlisle. 



SUNNY BROOK and 

WILLOW CREEK DIS'fG CO'S 
Distilleries, Ec.uisville, Ky. 
Contract'g Offices, 128-30 Franklin st. 

Chicago, 111. 
R08ENFELD BROS. & CO., inop-rs 
Hates, 85c. and 8 1 Xos. 5 and 2'.)7 



Willow Creek, 
Sunnv Brook. 



J. B. WATHEX & CO. 

Loui.-5ville 
Rate S5c. 



J. B Walthen & I'.ro 
Kentm'kv Criterion. 



OLD TI.MES Dl.srV CO., | 
Dislillery No. 1 Louisville 

Rates, $L00 and $1.25 



Old Times. 



OLD KENTUCKY DIST'Y CO., 
Louisville, Ky. 
Rates, $1.00 and §1.25 



E. .J. CURLEY & CO., D. No. -i it Ir, | 
Camp Nel.-ion | 

l:,!.- B'"D.""F;' 1.2.-.. "F." ."...-iO 



Kentucky Coinft.rt 

and 

GLidstone. 

Blue Grass, 
Boone's Knoll. 



il 



BELLE of ANDERSON D'G CO. 
.\dd; S. Grcenbaum, Louisvillo. 
Rate 1.25 


Belle of .Andei-son, 
Glenarme, 
Jessamine, 
Arlington. 


MELLWOOD DIS'Y CO. D. No. 34 
Louisville, Ky 
Rate 85c. 


Xlolwood 
Dtjn Dee. 


E.\RLY TIMES DIST'Y CO. 
Early Times, Ky. D. No. 7 
5 M. E. of Bardstown. Rates, 1.25 
Add : B. LI. Hurt. Txmisville 


Early Times. 
A. G. Nail, 
Jack Beam, 



TO 

Indianapolis, 
Cincinnati 

AND THE 

South. 

CITY TICKET OFFICE: 
232 Clarr SmecT. Ci'.cag» 



ADDRESS, INSURANCE. 

CHKENiUllKi; Dl.sTY CO. 

(inenhricr D. No. 32'J 

.\dd ; Win. Ci)lliiis& Co., Louisville. 

Rate 1 ..}5. 



BRAND. 



(Jrecnbrier, 

i;. i; ii.ivd. n. 



ANDERSON & NKLSON DlS'J'S 

Cm., Louisville. 
Add : .\nderson & Nelson Dislil- 
K'ries Co. Rate s5e. Louisville. 



Anderson, 

Nelson, 

Buchanan. 



R. F. BALKE.t CO. D. No 12. 


"G. W. S." 


Louisville, Ky. 


Olrl Watermill 


Rate S5c. 


Run tTymecle. 


OLD KENTUCKY DISTHJ.llRY, 




I). Ml sfliendo.'-f, 
20.-) W. Main St., Louisville, Kv. 


Kentucky Dew. 


Insurance: Soc, §{.tiO and §1.25. 





RYES. 



SUSQUEHANNA DI.sT'G CO., 

Milton. 
.Vdd : Jas. Levy & Bro., Cincinnati. 
Rat^s 85c & 1.25. 



Susquehanna. 



NORMANDY DIST'G Co., 

Loui.-^ville, Kv. 
'. O. Bo-K -I-.WjA. 

Rate 8.5c. 



Norm an d\' 
Kt itiicon. 



A. OVERIIOLT &C0.. 
A. Id : A. Overliolt & Co., Pittsburg, 
I'a. Rate SOc. 



Ovcrho'.t. 



J. B. WATIIEN & CO., 
Louisville. 
Rate 85c. 

ANDER.SON & NELSON DIST'G 

Co., Louisvillo. 
Add : Ander.son & Nelson Distiller's 



Lackawanna Rve. 



Nelson. 



Co. 



Rate S5c. 



Louisville. 



Louisville, St. Louis & Texas Railway 

" BEECHWOOD ROUTE." 



Consign your shipments from Louiiville and 
interior Kentucky points, care of the Lousvilie, 
St Louis & Texas Railway, which is a direct 
ine to Pacific Coast points and same will re- 
ceive prompt attention. 

For rales and other information, address 
the und jrsigned : 

L S. Parsons. J K McCracken. H C. Mordue. 
Traffic Man'g, Can. Man'g. As9t. Gen. Fr(. Agt 

Louisvillo, Ky Louisvillo, Ky. Louisville. Ky. 



PAeifie WlfME AJSID SPIRIT 



PREVIEW. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX OF ADVERTISEHENTS. 



CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

Pago. 

California Wine Association '^l 

Carpy, C. & Co 21 

Cliauolie it Bon (J 

Eiseu Vinevaril Co 6 

Guiulliich, J. & Co 30 

Gnasti A: Bernard 4 

Harasztli J', Arpad 6 

Italian-Swiss Colony 29 

Koliler 1^- Van Bergen 21 

Koliler & Frobliog 21 

Kolb it Deuhard 5 

Lachuian it Jacobi 28 

Lachman Co., S 21 

Maun, CM 6 

Napa Valley Wine Co 21 

National Wine Association 22 

Smith, Julius P 4 

Starace, Achilla 2 

Vina Distillery 34 

West, Geo. & Son .22 

Wetmore-Bowen Company 3 

DISTILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Crown Distilleries Company 2 

Curlfey, E. J. & Co 5 

Guckenheimer, A. & Bros 27 

Leading Distillers' Cards 34 



Levy, Jas. & Bro 



36 



Maybew, H. B. & Co 4 



Meinecke, Charles & Co 

Monarch, R . 

Senior, A. & Son . . . . . 



25 

26 

1 



IMPORTED BRANDY. 
E. Romy Martin ife Co., HuUnianii Bros, it Co., Agents. ... 13 
Cafl'iey, John (representing Charles Graef & Co.) 12 



MINERAL WATERS. 

Apollinaris Company, Ltd 

Wolff, William it Co 



1 

26 



SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS, PRUNE JUICE. 

Erlenbach, Martin 17 

Kolb it Denhard 5 

Rudkin, Wm. H 28 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Big Four Railway Routes 34 

Boncstel it Co., Paper Dealers. 28 

Korbel, F. & Bros., Redwood Tanks 28 

Goodyear Rubber Co 2 

Hend'enson, William G 30 

Hercules Gas Engine Works, Gas and Distillate Engines.. 15 

Loew's System Filter 11 

Loina Prieta Lnmber Co 28 

Monou Route, 1000-Mile Tickets 34 

O'Brien, James, Saloon 28 

Sanders & Co., Coppersmiths 4 

Wandelt, Samuel, Cooper and Tank Builder 28 

Wayland & Co., Wine Finings 14 

Zellerbach it Sons, Paper 28 



FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

Chapman, W. B 20 

Hellniaun Bros. & Co 19 

Lachman, S. Co 21 

Macoudray Bros. & Lockard 5 

Rossi, D. P 28 

Sherwood it Sherwood 17 

Wolff, William it Co 18 

IMPORTERS. 

Chapman, W'. B 20 

Hellmann Bros. <fe Co 13 

Macondray Bros, it Lockard 30 

Sherwood it Sherwood 16 

Starace, Achiile 2 

Taylor, W. A. it Co 32 

Wolff', William & Co 18 

FRUIT BRANDY DISTILLERS. 
Walden & Co 4 

S. F. WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 

Kolb it Denhard 5 

Moore, Hunt <fe Co 30 

Martin, E. & Co 4 

Naber, Alfs & Brune 4 

Siebe Bros. & Plagemann 2 

Spruance, Stanley <fe Co 4 



Cresta Blanca 

SOUVENIR VrNTMSES. 

Gold Medal, Paris Exposition. 1899 

LOCATION OF VINEYARD: LIVERMORE, ALAMEDA CO , CAL. 

I'ac-Siinile of Label on Qenitine Cresta Jitaucti Jrines. 



Cnt&TA BlauCA SOUVENrfl VINTAGES 

S A U T E R N E-S O U V E N I R 



GOLO MEDfL PARIS CXPOSITION 1880 




CRESTA BLANCA. 

S*N Francisco Depot 140 MDNTOOHEnr St. 



These Wines nre si-rvcU to the Gues's o( all the leading Hotels and 
Restaurants on the Pacific Coast. 

For price-list apply to 

WETOIORE-BOWEN (0. 

140 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

BOnilNO CELLARS. CORNER L4HKIN AND MCALLISTER STS 



ra/reifie WIJME /fJND Sfll^lT F^EVIEW. 




^23-25 Market Street, S. F. 



D. T. B. JUl.NAl.li:. 

E. MARTIN & CO., 

IMrOllTEIlS AXD WnOLES.VLE 

liIQlJOl^ mERCHflHTS, 

411 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

SOLE AGENTS FOB 

J. F. CUTTER AND ARGONAUT OLD BOURBONS. 



L'liA.-. W. t'l'FiR. 



J'.'ll^ M'la'A.NrK. 



Spruance, Stanley & Co. 

lMri)i;Tri:s AXD .to7;t;t'I:s; or nvn 

wpes, Wiiies aiiH Llpois. 

Sole agents for the Celebrated African Stomach Bitters. 

4IC Fiii'NT Strert, - - San Fham-isio, Cai,. 



IHIEBiL SEVEHUE m GUSTiS BROKERS. 

THE EX H OF tat: ON OFGRUPE BRANDY, WHISKY AND 

SPIRITS FROM BOND OR WITH PRIVILEGE OF 

DRAWBACK, SPECIALTIES, 

Dealers in U.S. Standard Hydrometers and Extra Stems, Prime's Wantage 

Rods, Die Wheels and Gauging rods. Also Distillers', Rectifiers, 

Wholesale Liquor Oenlers and Brewers' Books. 



OFFICE, 424 BATTERY STREET, 

. p. O. Box 2409. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Telepho"e 646. 



ipiPOHTgill TO DISTILLEBS iD WljlE PKEIIS. 

'1 liis cut f prvsnils our latest Iiii- 
proved C'oiiliunoos Still which has 
been perfcrled allirr years of e.xperi- 
ment and large expense. 

Thid Still hns the adraiilnfce orrr. 
till others. I'; it is economic.il, easily 
operated ami separates the akU-hyde 
and other inlerior oils and niakes a 
pure and hi;.;li-rla-< brandy; and re- 
duces llie cost fully ninety per cent. 
in labor anil Uu I. It rei|uin.s ver> 
little or no w.itcr and utilizes all lua 
heretofore w.asttd. 

We refer to Geo. Whst & So- 
Stockton; JoH.s \\ iitELiiK, St. Helen 

111 USDS Cr COPPFR VORI DOIII k1 SBORT lOTICI. 

SANDERS & CO 

421 and 423 MISSION STRELT, SAN FRANCISCC 




^ 



1 Sept. 29. 1891 



OLIVINAVINEYARD. 

The OLIVIfJA comprises 600 Acres of Hill 
Side Vineyard, Loeated in the 
'w« Livermore Valley. 




DRY, DELICATE. WELL MATURED TABLE 

WINES A SPECIALTY. 

pENB FOR gaMPUB ORDER, 

Correspondence Solicited by the Grower. 
JULIUS PAUL SMITH, LIVERMORE, CAI. 

N.Y. Of-ICE, 65 AND 67 Du*'. -ST. ctr; 



J'UIN liEKSARI'. 



SeCOSDO GlASTI. 



Quaoti 3. ^OTnardf 



Grorvers and Distillers of 



Galiforp WljIES M BtfljiDIES 



Winery at Guasti & Bernard's Spur, Between WeH 
Glendale and Tropica, Cal. 



bT^F^GE PRODUSEf^S Of SWEET WINES. 

■ .1/(1/11 0))ice, Cot: :id tiiid Aliiwrda Sts., I.os Aiiurlis, <nl. 



WALDEN 6l CO. 

Geyser Peak Vineyards and Brandy Distillery 

GEYSER] ILL}-, SONOMA CO., C.IL. 

Walden Cognac, Manzanita Sherry, &c. 

OLD BRANDY IN CASES, BRANDIED FRUITS. 

WALDEN COGNAC is m.uic alter the French formula, from selected fresh Kf^pes, has been success- 
lully inlroducfd, and is now rc-t;ularly sold in the principal m.iikets of Europe, in conipetiiion with Erench 
i()^;nac. Onicial German and Etiglish chemists have pionounced it the purest Brandy which comes to their 
markets. 

It is especially suitable for tile drug trade and others, where puritv is <lemanded. While abroad these 
i:oods snccesshillv compete, payiu'.; the same duties as the Erencli. the American buyer has the a<lvanlage in 
price, between the Internal Revenue tax assessed her<- ami the Customs duties on foreign Brandies. 

SAMPI FS Wll.r. III'. SKNT ON APPLICATION 

EASTKRN OKI-MCR. 12Vi nEARI. STKICKT, N'l-tW VOKK. 





jyiH 



TRADE-M9RK 



f/eifie WipJE /rJMD Sflf^lT F^EVIEW 



KOLB & DENH ARD 



OLD NONPAREIL 

BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES. 
CALIFORNIA 

WINES and BRANDIES. 

OFFICE AND VAULTS 

^20-4-^O yiOSTGOMEKY ST., SAX FR.iyClSCO. 

Telephonb No. 509C. 




IMPORTERS AND SOLE AGENTS 
PACIFIC COAST FOR 

B I R C H'S 

CRYSTAL 

Belfast Ginger Ale 






BLufgRASs 




■^^ 










IandHade_ 
SourMash Whiskey. 

Je55an7ipeCo. 






W. 






BOURBONi^l 

E.J.CURLEY&.COW 

JESSAMI 



KENTUCKY. 



;^B 



T~f 



.Ji^ 



\^ Tltese Wtilslden arc made in the Famous '• IST.l'E GHASS JtECIO} 

juatly cclchralcil as the home of the fluest Jlhinklef: In the ll'orft?, and 
which hare been J t*r the last Century, rccofjntzed an such, tjiving the chav~ 
ttcter and high standiny to KESTVCKY W IIIshlES u-hlch :he>j now enjoy. 



^ 



THESE TAMOUS WHISKIES CAN BE HAD IN LOTS TO SUIT THE TRADE FROM 

HELLMA/N/N BROS. 3c CO.. 5^5 p-RO/NT STREET. SA/N FRA/NClSeO. 



SUBSCRIBK FOR THE 

PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 

$l.SO Per Year. 



6 



fyveifie wi|me anr spii^ir i^eview 



1S9^ "^RIUTVTRHT^^NtT TTG7TIN 1595 

EUROPEAN QUALITY RECOGNITIOiS 



BELGIUM 



FRANCE 



FRANCE 



FRANCK 



IRELAND 








Awarded 37 Cold, Silver and Bronze Medals ! 

THE HARASZTHY CHAMPAGNES 



CALIFORNIA 



HKI"'r 1)1<\' KXTKA l>K'\- 

530 WASHINGTON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 




C. M. MANN 

Successor to I. DE TURH^. 

Wines and Brandies, 



BRANDY 
PORT 
SHERRY 
ANGELICA 
MUSCAT 

TOKAY 

MADEIRA 

MALAGA 



SAUTERNE 

GUTEDEL 

RIESLING 

BURGUNDY 

CABERNET 

ZINFANDEL 

XX CLARET 



VINEYARDS: 

Sonoma County, Cal. 

OFFICE AND CELLARS: 

216-218-220 Sacramento and 221 Commercial Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




TJHE j-llSHEST AWARE) f ARIS EXPOSITIOJM 




Establ ishzd. 

Ciuer/T)ore l/alley, ^al 

ISBS. 



1889. 



'"^0 



^1' 






^<^^ 



,^' 



A. G. GHAUCHE, Proprietor 

Office and I'lioi ,171'iiifcT t^r., t>aii Fianc!:. c 



GObD JVIEDAL. 



CHAUCHE & BON, Successor to A. G. CHAUCHE 

Sole Ocneral Audits for the MoVNT-IioriiE »\ inks. 




eso AcRcs 



GolJ Medal for SLerneB imd Sweet Wims, bubliu Exposition, 18u2. 

EISEJM VIIMEYARDCO. 



-PIONEER PRODUCERS OF- 



■^ig \i\L E^B T ^y I N E S ^ 



Sond for Price List 
and Samples. . . 



Office, 12 Stevenson Street. S. F. 








VOL. XXXVlll. No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, Al'Kll. 23, 1897. 



i;1.50 PER YEAR. 



Issued Semi-Monthly. 
IWOn cr SCOTT, - - PUBLISHERS 

WINFIELD SCOTT. Editor 
R. M. WOOD. MAN/kGCR 

402 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
TKt.KVlHtSF.yO. 700 CABLE ADDRESS'-Fl ELDVIX.'' SAN tRASCISVtl 

The p. If It IC Wl \E A XD SI'IR I T It E VIE W is the only 
pitper of its cliiss West of' Chicago. It circiiltttes innoiiij the 
IVholesiite antl Hetail Wine ami .spirit JJealers of tlie I'arijic 
Coast, tlie Wine ^fal,■ers and Jirantli/ J>itlillers of California, 
the Willi' and Urandij luii/ers, ami tlie Importers, Distillers and 
Jobbers o; the L'niletl Stats. 



All CHECKS, DHAFTS, MONEY ORDERS, ETC., should 
he ma e payable to WOOD d- SCOTT. 



Subscriptions per year — in advance, postage paid. 

For tlie United .States, Mexico and Canada $\ 50 

Fur Kuropean countries 2 50 

Single c >pics 10 

Entered at the San Francisco Pfst Office as second-class matter. 

AGENCY : 

EASTERN BRANCH OFFICE: 
\\. A. GEFT, Manager, Room 02, No. 78 Park Place, Xew York Ciiy. 

PEOPERTY FOE SALE. 



FOE SALE, in a coast couuty, splendid vineyard and 
ranch property of 410 acres, IJO acres of which are in full- 
bearing vines. No phylloxera, and the property is so located 
that, with ordinary care, the insect will not reach it. Prop- 
erty is well improved, having 1 brick distillery, 2 brick col- 
lars, 2 adobe cellars and plenty of oak and redwood cooperage. 
Stock of wine on hand averages 75,000 gallons, which goes 
with the place. Besides the vineyard, there is 100 acres of 
bottom land for hay, 100 acres for pasture, adapted for hay, 
and 70 acres of wooded pasture which can be set to vines. 

.\side from the vineyard, the ranch is well stocked, and 
lias ample and substantial buildings. 

This is one of the choicest properties in California. The 
dr}- wines from the vineyard have a splendid rejnitation, and 
there is a steady established trade for them. Satisfactory 
reuiions for selling, and the place will be sold cheap. 

For furtlier particulars address Wixkield Scott, care of 
Pacific Wise iV Srinix Eeview, or apply at Eoom 2, seventh 
floor, Mills Building, from 9 to 10 A. M. 

VINEYARD FOE SALE AT A BAEGAIN, 
TO CLOSE AN ESTATE. 

THIETY ACRES choice foreign wine wine grapes, with 
winery (35,000 gitllons, line oak casks) and distillery complete. 
Address G. L., Pacific Wine and Spirit Review, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

WANTED — Situation — wanted by a married man; age 40. 
Twelve years' experience on a vineyard in wine making. Best 
references. Address J. M., this oflice. 



MARKET REVIEW. 



CALIFOENIA WINES.— There is little to be said re- 
garding the situation. Considering the general business con- 
ditions, the March exports were of good volume as shown by 
accompanying figures. In fact, they were better than could 
have been expected. Eail shipments, in particular, show up 
in a faii'ly satisfactory manner, the total of rail movements be- 
ing nearly 800,000 gallons, with nearly 3,000 cases. The dis- 
tribution was general, and looks well. It is only in recent 
times that New Orleans has paid any attention to our better 
grades of wines, especially in glass. W^hile maintaining her 
big demand for bulk goods, she is developing a healthy trade 
in case goods, as shown by the fact that in March the ship- 
ments to that city wore nearl}' 700 cases, all of which is a com- 
fortable .status. At this rate it will not be long ere that city 
will develop into one of our best customers in that line. 

In the Livermore Valley grape growers are getting anx- 
ious about the dry weather, and state that another good rain is 
needed to oflset the eiiects of the long-continued hot weather 
and north winds. However, we have heard no similar com- 
plaints from other sections. 

Eeports from Fresno couuty are to the efiect that the 
" thrip" is appearing in largo numbers, and it is feared they 
will do great damage. In case their ravages cannot be checked, 
the production of sweet wines and brandy in that section may 
be largeh' reduced this season. 

Late advices from New York are as follows: "During 
the past two weeks the Califoruian wines and brandies have 
not received much consideration from the jobbers, trade in 
general being exceedingly dull, and imported goods receiving 
the first call, owing to the contemplated advance in duty. 
Nearly every dealer is securing a supply, and until.this buying 
movement in imported goods subsides, the domestic products 
will be neglected." 

At the auction in New York on the 15th inst., the follow 
ing lots were sold: Port, 35i to 34c; Muscat, 34 J to 32Ac; 
Sherry, 40c; Zinfandel, 30 to 271c; Eiesling, 27i to 251 ; An- 
gelica, 30Mo 28c; pure claret, 21 to 28c; choice red table 
wine, 22i to 201c; choice white table wine, 14 to 13c; choice 
red wine, 19c; fruity Concord, 26 to 23c. 

A dispatch from Fresno dated April 17th says: "The 
vine growers of the county are greatly concerned over the 
sudden appearance of myriads of small hoppers or bugs on the 
vines, accompanied by a shrinking and folding of the leaves. 
The promise has been for a splendid raisin year, but the in- 
sects are so numerous that it is feared that only extensive 
spraying can save the crop. The damage is nominal as yet, 



s 



f/reifie WIJME >)cJM0 SflF^IT {REVIEW. 



but the result will be known in a very few days. Many of the 
wine grape vineyartls are said to Vie afl'eeted." 

The total exjiorts of California wine by sea and rail in 
March were as follows: 

Cases. Callous. Value. 

By sea . ...1,818 47o,948 $185,926 

Bv rail overland 2,8-10 771,480 31'J,U52 



Total 4,058 1,247,428 f 505,878 

C.\iiFORN"i.\ Brandy. — Trade is in a dead-alive condition, 
and, like the clown's sick mule, is getting no better fast. Still, 
it could be a groat deal worse. This is indicated by the fact 
that rail shipments during March aggregated over 35,UII0 gal- 
lons and lt)l cases. With a curtailed production this year, 
this branch of the business ought to get in good condition ore 
long. 

The total exports of brandy by sea and rail in March were 
as follows: 

Cases. Gallons. Value. 

Bv sea 40 7(55 $2,158 

By rail overland 161 35,246 54,479 



Total 207 36,011 $56,637 

Whiskies. — Without exception the jobbers report business 
quiet. At the same time they are not discouraged, but gen- 
erally look for a marked improveinent, beginning with the 
movement of the coming harvest. This opinion appears to 
prevail among capitalists and business men generally, and it is 
to be hoped that their judgment will prove correct. After the 
last four years of depression, the trade could endure " large 
quantities" of business revival without finding it necessarj' to 
enlarge their plants. 

Exports for the fortnight were light, and imports the same. 
Receipts of spirits were unusually heavy. 

T. M. Gilmore, writing in " Bonfort's" of the proposed 
consolidation of Kentucky distilling interests, says: "The 
scheme to form a combination among certain of the Kentucky 
distillers has not been given up, and there are no end of secret 
meetings on the part of committees having the matter in 
charge. Those who are interested have but little to say, and 
wo prefer not to give anything in the shape of rumors. If the 
combination should be formed and not include the large 
houses, that, so far, are taking no interest in it, there is little 
doubt that wise counsels would be required to handle it suc- 
cessfnllj'." 

Importatioxs. — The importers are still making their clean- 
up, and have been the busiest men in town, tilling orders for 
customers who want to save money on tariff duty. As a con- 
sequence, they are feeling more than usuallj' comfortable. 



f^rof. Husmann on Hayne. 

" We are sorry thus to differ with our friend Hayne, to- 
wards whom we have the friendliest personal feelings. But we 
consider it our duty to further the interests of our grape grow- 
ing friends, to the best of our knowledge and belief, and to ex- 
Co.se anything which to us seems detrimental. So we cannot 
elp echoing the opinion of a friend and grape grower, though 
perhaps expressed a little too tersely: ' Lot him bo corralled 
and kei)t at home, instead of making confusion worse con- 
founded, as he has done so far. We want ])ractical advice, not 
vague theories, contradicted at every instance, whore he tries 
to lot his rush light sliino before the benighted wine growers,' 
wJio have advanced bo><jnd swallowing everything they hoar 
from aulhoritio.s."— (}oor./e TTn'-imimi, in California '"Kruit 
Grower." 

Louis Cahen Al Co. have accepted the Coast agency of the 
Val. Blalz Brewing Co. of Milwaukee. This line, together 
with Bothesda Wiitor and " White House" whisky, gives the 
firm a lino line «illi ulu.l, (o go to the retail trade. 



Dowdell's Damage Suit, 

•lames Dowdell and Arthur B. C. Dowdell composing the 
tirm of James Dowdell it Son, filed an action against Charles 
Carpy, J. H. Wheeler, Owen Wade, the California Wine As- 
sociation and the California Wine Makers' Corporation to re- 
cover $.")0,0f)0 damages. For cause of action the complaint 
alleges that Dowell A Son are and have been wine-makers for 
many years; that the two defendant corporations were organ- 
ized to control the wine output of the State. During the sea- 
son of 1894 the jilaintills had 368,000 gallons of wine, cooper- 
age, wineries and distilleries, valued at $J5,000. To assist 
them in carrying on business, the firm, on October 15, 1894, 
borrowed ?25,000 from the Bank of St. Helena, through Owen 
Wade, its cashier, and gave as security' a mortgage on the 
wine, cooperage and wineries. On January 15, 1895, they 
obtained an additional §2500 on an unsecured note. The 
plaintiffs say that they refused to sell their wine to the de- 
fondant corporations, but instead, on Ajiril 3, 1895, with the 
consent of the bank, sold 3(J8,000 gallons to F. Chevalier A: Co. 
The complaint then alleges acts of cons])iracy by defendants, 
and recites the following specitic acts: Carjiy, for the beuetit 
of his associates, obtained the mortgage held by the Ijank on 
A])ril 13, 1895, and followed his purchase u)) with a suit in 
foreclosure, which prevented the consummation of the sale to 
Chevalier & Co. A receiver was appointed, and on May 29, 
1895, the Court rendered judgment against the Dowdells for 
128,518.75. A new trial was denied, and the property was 
sold under an execution. Last month the Supreme Court re- 
versed the judgment, and held that the action on the mortgage 
could not be maintained. 

The present suit is based on the charge that the defend- 
ants conspired to ruin the plaintiff.-;, and that the Dowdells 
suft'orcd in credit, and were unable to secure money with which 
to purchase grapes during 1895; that the defendants iirocured 
attachments to be levied against them by other creditors, and 
have discouraged and prevented competition at the foreclosure 
sale. 

Persons connected with the two defendant corporations 
gave their version of the controversy, which throws a different 
aspect upon the entire transaction. They give the following 
facts: 

The Dowdells, during the season of 1894, were memliers 
of the California Wine Makers' Association, and as such 
agreed to deliver their wine to the corporation, but, instead, 
sold the wine to Chev.dier it Co., which they had no right to 
do in the face of a jnior agreement, under which the corpora- 
tion claimed the wine, and made a deniand for it upon the 
Dowdells. Carpy took up the mortgage from the bank as an 
individual investor; none of the corporations with which he is 
connected had any interest in that transaction. The wine of 
the Dowdells was sold under an execution and bought by per- 
sons outside of the corporations. The Califcnnia Wine Asso- 
ciation, it is claimed, had no dealings with the Dowdells, 
either directly or indirectly, nor any of its officers as such, and 
they are sur))rised to find that the association is made one of 
the defendants in the action. 

Tenney Company Seizure. 

The plant of the A. F. Tenney Packing Com]>any, at Fres- 
no, has been seized by the Internal Revenue officers for an 
alleged violation of the internal revenue laws. The companj' 
has been making fig brandy under the same laws as govern the 
manufacture of braudv from grajies, apjilos poaches, pears and 
other specified fruits. Unless the company can convince the 
officers that a fig is a " berry," the cost of this jiroceeding will 
amount to a pretty itenuy. 

Morally siieaking, the Company is right. There is no 
reason why a distiller should not use one fruit as well another 
under the same law ; legally, the company has violated the law 
unless, as stated before, tlu' fig can bo proved a berry. 

The writer some years ago drew uj) an amendment to the 
government law, exempting "all seed and stone fruits" from 
the ])rovisions of the law governing grain and mol.-issos distil- 
leries. But the text of this law w.-is changed, and now it is 
im])ossible to use, for instance, cherries in the manufacture of 
brandy. 

Wo hope that the Tonnev Company will succeed in clear- 
ing thomsoivcs from this useless technicality of the law. 



J^eifie WIJ^E /cJMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



9 



WINE AND BRANDY RECEIPTS. 



Aj)ii 



Wino. 

1 35,200 

'2 14,500 

3 G'2,100 

5 -Jl.GOO 

6 33,400 

7 

8 47,800 

9 40,050 

10 30,700 

1-2 2G,G00 

i;i 51,700 

14 25,800 

15 30,300 



Bvaiuly. 
1,000 



1,'200 



Spring Elections Won. 

After the hardest and most unique campaign ever known 
iu Southora California, the election of officers to servo the city 
of Pomona for two years, took place on the 12th. The high- 
license party easily elected all its candidates except the City 
Marshal and the Attorney. The vote for these was close. 
Prayer meetings were held every hour in the churches by the 
women election day, who prayed for the success of the prohi- 
bition cause in this "election. The high-license party worked 
hard all day, and, by carriages and committees to get out 
every vote, they rolled up the largest high-license vote ever 
known here. Pomona has been the leading prohibition town 
iu California for two years. Now two saloons at $1000 license 
annually will be licensed in the course of the nest month. 

The Alameda city election was held on the same day. An 
advisory vote was taken as to whether saloons should be 
allowed in the different precincts. Of the eleven precincts in 
the citj-, eight went for license, four against license, and in 
one the vote was a tie. 

It is not thought that anything further will be heard of 
the "'no license" party. The vote at its worst was merely in 
the nature of an advisory proposition, and binds the City Trus- 
tees, a body of sensible men, to nothing. The saloons of the 
city are conducted iu an orderly manner, and there is no com- 
plaint from any of them, and, furthermore, the City needs the 
§11,000 which it annually collects in the form of license. 

Should any effort be made to eufore precinct local option, 
the proposition can be easily beaten in the courts, as the plan 
is clearly unconstitutional. The prohibitionists are welcome 
to all the satisfaction they can get out of the situation. 

The vote on the saloon license was as follows: 

First precinct, lOo yes, 74 no. 

Second precinct, GG yes, 93 no. 

Third precinct, 65 yes, 65 no. 

Fourth precinct, 78 yes, 70 no. 

Fifth precinct, 68 yes, 81 no. 

Sixth precinct, 63 yes, 59 no. 

Seventh precinct, 55 yes, 70 no. 

Eight precinct, 70 yes, 67 no. 

Ninth precinct, IG yes, 67 no. 

Tenth precinct, 95 yes, 75 no. 

Eleventh precinct, 132 j-es, 98 no. 

Twelfth precinct, 126 yes, 49 no. 

Thirteenth precinct, 53 yes, 42 no. 

V'iticultural Laboratory Burned. 

The Viticultnral Laboratory at Berkeley was destroyed by 
fire on the IGth inst. All of the records, etc., of the depart- 
ment are gone, and all of the contents of the experimental cel- 
lar ruined. The loss is upward of $15,000. It is stated that 
the books of the old Viticultnral Commission were destroyed, 
as well as the reports of the College of Agriculture. The ori- 
gin of the fire is not known. 

H. J. Barling has bought the interest of C. F. J. Pokrantz 
in the St. Hubert Vineyard Company at 224 Bush street, and 
in tlH> future the affairs of the companv will be managed by 
Mr. Bailing and Capt. St. Hubert, the St. Hubert Tonic 
Port will be made a specialty of the company. We wish both 
Capt. St. Hubert and Mr. Barling success in their venture. 



Coblcntz, Pike & Co. Embarrassed. 

Inimod lately after the death of the late Joseph Coblontz, 
senior partner of t'obleutz, Pike & Co., it became known that 
the affairs of the house were badly involved, and for awhile it 
was reported that if they had not failed outright, there would 
need be speedy action to settle matters satisfactorily to all 
concerned. For some days the firm has made no effiirt to 
transact ordinary business, the creditors wanting some sort of 
settlement with the surviving partner, B. D. Pike. 

As near as can be learned the firm has outstanding ac- 
counts to the amount of $120,000, largely due from general 
merchants and others of that class in tlie country. The trade 
of the firm is widely scattered, and collections from this source 
are necessarilv slow. In addition to this the firm has stock to 
the value of $25,000 or .S30,000. 

The indebtedness consists almost wholly of borrowed 
money. William Wolff' & Co. are the only trade creditors who 
are concerned to any considerable amount, their claim being 
for about $2400. the balance of the §80,000 or $90,000 
which the firm owes is principally duo bankers and the rela- 
tions of Mr. Coblentz, the principal amounts being as follows: 

Coblcntz Brothers $20,000 

Nevada Bank 18,000 

I. Kohn 15,000 

Melauie Levy 4,000 

On the face of the statement the firm is perfectly solvent, 
but it is understood that the brothers of Mr. Coblentz are 
wanting their money, or a secured settlement. One of these 
brothers, Felix, is known to be distinctly hostile to Mr. Pike, 
and, in the meantime, J. H. Jellett, the lawyer, has been put 
in charge to look after the interests of all concerned. 

Much sympathy is felt bj' all in the trade for Mr. Pike. 
Wherever known, and that is pretty generally, he is regarded 
as a straight-forward, honest man, who has been invol invde 
this trouble through no fault of his. 

Recent Treasury Decisions. 

Tre.\sury Department, 
Office of the Oommissioxer of Internal Revenue, 

Washington, D. C, March 26, 1897. 

CONCERNING COCKTAILS. 

Murray Vdndiver, Esq., Collector Internal Bevemie, Baltimore, Md 

Sir— In reply to the several questions contained in your 
letter of the 22d inst., you are hereby advised that, under the 
long settled ruling, a retail liquor dealer who, by mixing dis- 
tilled spirits with other materials, manufactures compound liq- 
uors for sale, under the names " Cocktails," or " Rock Rj^e," 
or " Rock and Gin," or any other names (even though the quan- 
tity compounded by him from time to time is less than five 
gallons at a time), is required to pay special tax as a rectifier 
under the third subdivision of Section 3244 R. S., if he puts 
up these compounds for sale by the pint or quart bottle or lar- 
ger package, and keeps the bottles or packages of the com- 
pounds on his shelves, or in stock, ready for delivery to cus- 
tomers. 

But, where these compound liquors are not mixed by the re- 
tail liquor dealer in advance of orders therefor, and kept in 
stock, or in bottles or other packages on his shelves, but 
merely, at the request of a customer, and at the time when the 
order is given, mixes and puts up and delivers a bottle of cock- 
tail, or rock and rye, or other like mixture, it is held by this 
office that this does not come within the notice of the law, and, 
therefore, does not necessitate the paj'ment of special tax by 
the retail liquor dealer as a rectifier. 

Respectfully yours, 
(Signed) \V. S. Forman, Commissioner. 

St. Helena citizens have organized a Board of Trade, the 
moving spirits being well-known wine-makers of the Napa 
Valley. The officers are: President, F. Beriuger; First Vice- 
President, J. H. Stoves; Second Vice-President, William 
Rennie; Secretary, L. G. Clark; Treasurer, Geo. W. Fee. 
Executive Committee — .\. N. Bell, R. H. Pithie, Henry 
Lange, F. W. Loeber, W. F. Mixon, N. Lauter, H. J. Chinn, 
W. W. Lyman and H. J. Lewelling. 



10 



f/ceifl6 W»jME /cJ^D SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



APENTA' 



LATEST CIRCULAR. 



Our attention has been called to further circulars issued by Andreas Saxlehner warning the Trade against 
handling imitations of the label and name under which Hunyadi Janos Aperient Water is sold. 

The Decision in the Court of Chancery, London, referred to in such circulars, is strictly limited in its 
effect to the United Kingdom and has no reference whatever to the position of the controversy in this country. 

We gladly direct attention to the fact that the '-APENTA" Natural Aperient Water drawn from Springs at 
Buda Pest is and has been sold under labels radically dissimilar from those used for Hunyadi Janos Water or for 
any other Mineral Water, and we are advised by eminent Counsel that such labels are lawful in every particular. 
We are therefore prepared to, and will, fully protect the Trade in the use of same. 

Charles Graef & Co., 

^oE^Ts r-oE THE APOLLINARIS COMPANY LIMITED, London, 



Sole Exporters of ''APENTA" Natui<.\l Aperient Water. 



New York, April, 1897. 



Southern Wine Interests. 



The remarkable and steady increase of the wine industry 
of Southoru California is always a .subject that demands gen- 
eral attention, for experience has taught growers and dealers 
as well as makers that for really exquisite flavor there is no 
country on earth that can excel California's best and genuine 
wines. 

While wines commonly known as dr)' wines are compara- 
tively in as high favor as the sweet wines, the American taste 
demands, largely, the sweet wines, and to this class Houthern 
California is devoting the greater energy. 

Sherry, Port, Angelica, Muscat and Malaga are among 
the many l)rauds of sweet wines; and much nf these are 
made in Southern California, while the northern and central 
parts of California excel in tlio production of dry wines — with- 
out sugar, such as Claret, KiesHngs and Sauternes. 

There are at present sixty-one stills in the southern rev- 
enue district, which represent about one-third of the number 
of vineyards; as man}' vineyards sell their grapes and do not 
make wine. But a limited number of vineyards make dry 
wines and do not require any stills. 

There are thirty-two lionded wineries in this district in 
active operation from August to January, and their product, 
in round figures, for the season of 1890, was more than half a 
million gallons of sweet wine. But this was only about one- 
half the usual product, as the crop was excessively short last 
year. 

Among the largest producers was the San Gabriel Wine 
Company, whose immense jilant is located at Hliorb Station, 
within seven miles of Los Angeles. A controlling interest in 
this is held by I. W. Hullnian, who also owns a large interest 
in the next laigest winery, the Cucamonga Vineyiird Com- 
pany, located at Cucamonga, San Herniirdino county. 

Charles Stern, whoso largo plant is hicated within the 
city limits, on Macy street, is perhaps next in point of impor- 
tance, though he is not strictly among the producers, as ho 
purchases liis grajies. 

The L. J. Kose Co., limited, an English cor|)oration, 
who operate the old L. J. Jtose vineyard property at San 
Gabriel, ar«i heavy proihicers, and rank very nigh in the qual- 
ity of the wine produced. 



E. J. Baldwin, the "lucky " millionaire owner of the 
famous Santa Anita vineyard, produces great quantities of the 
choicest wines, and recently made the most important sale 
which has been cfl'ected in California for many years, through 
the well-known wine broker, Guy B. Barliam. This sale com- 
jirised over 'iOd.OUO gallons of choice wines and old brandies 
from the Baldwin wine cellar to the Sonoma \Yine and Brandy 
Company of New York — B. B. Kittridge, buyer — who is one 
of the heaviest purchasers of wines in this country, and is the 
leading member of the firm. He comes west twice a year for 
that purpo.se. 

The Sierra Madre Vineyard Company and the Mountain 
Company of Lamanda Park are also largo i)rodaeers of the 
choicest brands of wines, mostly sweet. These are in Los 
Angeles county. 

Emile Yache & Co. and Edward Reinert are leaders in the 
wine industry in San Bernardino county, whose goods rank 
high. 

The vineyard and winery of C. B. Pironi, who has a well- 
establislied wholesale house on Main street, is one of the re- 
liable representative men of Calif(nnia, and a visit to his win- 
ery, still and vineyard at West Glendale gives one an intelli- 
gent undtTstanding of the business and its outlook. By the 
courtesy of this gentleman a Herald representative was af- 
forded a most thorough examination of his winery. His build- 
ings were originally intended for a sidinrlian hotel, erected 
during the days of the late lamented boom, and are therefore 
commodious, under the changes in i)lans, while they retain 
something of their original picturesqueness, and located as 
they are in one of the most beautiful valleys of California, 
seven miles from Los Angeles, northwest, the visit is one long 
to be remembered. — Los Angeles Herald. 

Power Means Money. 



Have you power? If not, it will pay you to buy a " Her- 
cules" (ias or Gasoline Engine; reliable, safe, economical. 
See page ISi. 

License Inspector Henry Maloou of Oakland has given 
notice that all breweries and beer-bottling establishments must 
procure municipal liquor licenses. 



fyKBlfie WI^E Jk^Q Sflf^lT I^EVIEW. 



11 



Eustis, Mayor of Minneapolis. 



At the morning sessions of the Center Street Court three 
daj'S of last week, Magistrate Cornell had company in the per- 
son of a smooth-faced gentleman, apparently about tifty years 
of age, who sat beside him and watched the application of tlio 
law to the various oftences, says the New York Journal. 

The stranger was William Henry Eustis, ex-Mayor of 
Minneapolis, and the man who would have undoubtedly been 
Governor of Miiuiosota today if he had not refused to liuuckle 
to the machine politicians of the Republican party in that 
State. Mr. Eustis's visits to the Magistrate's court, and to 
New York, for that matter, have had a rather unusual purjtose 
— he is making a study of temperance legislation from a phi- 
lanthropic point of view. He is a brother of J. E. Eustis, the 
attorney and of the Board of Education, and thirty years ago 
he was himself of New Tork, being a teacher in a grammar 
school here. He was at that time a temperance fanatic. He 
addressed meetings and urged men to sign the pledge. He 
even invaded Harry Hill's dance hall and exhorted the men 
and abandoned women to beware of strong drink. He was a 
Prohibitionist, and believed in stringent legislation to prevent 
the sale of liquor. 

Years have passed, and Mr. Eustis's views have changed. 
He no longer believes that laws can be passed and enforced 
tliat will abolish either. He believes now that habits deep- 
rooted in human nature and universal in practice are not to be 
overthrown by an act of legislation. He thinks the saloon 
keeper is an abused individual, a victim of public prejudice, 
who, if decently treated, can be induced to do a vast deal for 
temperance and morality. 

The cause of the radical change in Mr. Eustis's convic- 
tions was this: He happened to get in a position where he got 
a good chance to judge of the difference between theory and 
practice. He was elected Mayor of Minneapolis for the 
avowed purpose of enforcing the laws that would shut the sa- 
loons on Sunday and at 11 o'clock at night — the very laws that 
he had been enthusiastically upholding for thirty years or 
more. He had become a rich man since leaving New Y'ork, 
prominent in politics and public aifairs. In bis candidacy he 
was backed by the temperance element, and every minister in 
Minneapolis urged his election. Imagine the surprise of the 
godly, when, after having had time to jjonder upon the duties 
of his office, William Henrv Eustis stubborulv refused to close 
saloons on Sunday, and allowed them to keep open till mid- 
night, and even after that, provided there was no disorder. 
The ministers were aghast. They preached sermons against 
him; they passed resolutions denouncing him, they visited him 
in bodies, and they labored with him in private. Miuuea|)()lis 
had had Mayors before who had not enforced the liquor laws, 
but they had always given excuses, or pretended they were 
doing the best they could at it. But here was a Mayor who 
said bluntly that he wouldn't enfore the laws, because he said 
they were tyrannical, unjust and calculuted to injure society 
rather than to protect it. It was a Mayor of their own selec- 
tion, too, who said this to them, a temperance man, and a 
member of the Presbyterian Church. 

The attacks finally took the shape of an organized crusade. 

Bat his good nature and wit proved an impervious shield 
against the sneers and abuse. He gave statistics showing that 
in leading cities extreme temperance laws had worked liarm- 
ful results; that persecution of saloon-keepers was what made 
them lawbreakers. 

It will not surprise any one to learn that he considers the 
Raines law much of a fraud and a total failure, especiallv so 
far as it is supposed to sujipress the sale of liquor on Sunday. 

"It makes me laugh," he said recently at the Murray Hill 
Hotel, " to find this great State agitated as to whether a sand- 
wich constitutes a meal. It strikes me that the question 
should be, ' Is liquor sold on Sunday,' not whether legally or 
not. When you ))ut the emphasis upon the technical enforce- 
ment of the sale of liquor ou Sunday concerning which there 



is such a divergency of ()i)inion, you weaken by so much the 
efficiency of the administration of a city in the enforcement of 
that i>art of the law which deals with the evils that the law was 
made to correct, chiefly drunkenness, selling to minors, robber- 
ies in saloons, etc. If a man drinks six daj-s in tiie week, he 
is going to drink on the seventh, and no law is going to stop 
him." 

General Bonded Warehouse. 



Efforts are again being made to abolish the general 
bonded warehouse in San Francisco. A jietition signed bv 
forty-nine tiims engaged in the wholesale and jobbing liquor 
and spirit trade has been forwarded to the Commissioner of 
Internal Kevenue. 

There is a difl'ercnce of opinion in the trade as to the util- 
ity and advantage of the general bonded warehouse, which was 
established in 1895 under an act of Congress authorizing the 
Commissioner of Internal Kevenue to issue permits for such 
warehouses in which s]iirits other than (hose distilled from 
fruit could be stored in bond. 



Time is Honey. 



Save time and money. Buj' a Hercules Gas, Gasoline or 
Oil Engine. The best; the cheapest. See page 15. 



Articles of incorporation have been issued liy the Los An- 
geles Honey Champagne Manufacturing {'on)i)any, which is 
formed for the purpose of numufacturing honey champagne, 
described as a " sparkling beverage, non-alcoholic." The cap- 
ital stock of the company is stated at $1000, divided into 100 
shares Of this amount, §GGO is actually subscribed. The 
directors of the company are George Sotneilf, Chris. J. Dieuer, 
Alexis Koss, Victor Dreher and Charles J. Ibel, all of Los 
Angeles. 



FOK — 

WINES,BEER, CIDER, LIQUORS,CORDlALS,WATER,&c. 




wine Dealers and Growers, Brewers and I.iqiior Merchants are invited to 
Me Tilt- r in operation at P.icifir Coast Agency 

7 FIRST ST., S. E. Cor. Market, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL- 



12 



f/ceifie WIJME /rJMO SflRIT F^EVIEW. 



NOTES AND PERSONALS. 



I. W. Kinpinan, Cook & Ik-rnlieiinci's Coast represeutii- 
tive, is in Los Augelos on business bent. 

Hcnrv Canipe, the liquor merchant, has gone on a trip to 
the old country. It is his intention to spend several mouths 
in Germany, returning toward the end of the year. 

E. Waldeu, of the firm of Walden A- Co., of Geyserville, 
will be home again in a few days, after spending the winter in 
the East. Mr. Walden will pack prunes and briindied. fruit on 
a large scale this season, having been successful in selling last 
year's pack. 

The Italian-Swiss Colony Wine Company, Wlialleii Bros., 
proprietors, have opened up at 219-2'27 W. Jefferson street, 
this city. Besides wine, they carry a stock of old whiskies, 
bottled beer, mineral water and bar fixtures. — Mida's Louis- 
ville Correspondence. 

The Italian-Swiss Colony is having prepared two splen- 
didly executed hangers, showing bird's eye views of the vine- 
yards at Asti and at Madera. As soon as the work is finally 
executed copies will be sent to all of the Colony's customers 
in the United States. 

Mr. C. W. Mauk may well be pleased with the results of 
his personal efforts during the last six months in distributing 
the famous " Overholt." Intelligent and well directed labor 
is bound to tell, and is well exemplified in the exceptional 
success of Mr. Mauk. — "Mida's." 



D. P. Rossi, i)f Green ami Dupout streets, thi.s city, is 
jirojierly proud of the consideration given his champagne, 
Monte Christo, for which he is sole agent in the United 
States and Canada. At the recent annual banquet of the St. 
Andrew's Society, held at the Palace Hotel, tliis wine had the 
liouor, and was greatly enjoyed by the largo number of guests. 



The California Wine Association recently placed a largo 
order with D. P. Rossi for his Ferro Quinia bitters. These 
are to supply their trade in Central America and Mexico. This 
is a proper recognition of home products, us California wines 
and other productions are used in the manufacture. Mr. 
Rossi is well pleased with the growing demand for his bitters, 
not only in the Southern conntries, but the East. The head- 
quarters for the bitters are at Dupont and Green streets, this 
city. 

News has been received that B. H. Moore has been re- 
moved as Collector of Customs for the Alaska district, and L. 
R. Woodward of Fort Wayne, Ind., a]ipoiuted in his place. 
The removal of Moore and the api)ointnient of Woodward is 
said to bo the result of wholesale violations of the liquor laws 
of the Territory. It is stated that large quantities of liquor 
have been shipjjed into Alaska, and distributed to alleged 
druggists, whose only stock in trade is the liquor doled out to 
miners at 25 cents a drink. 



The Prohibitionists of Riverside have spent several thou- 
sand dollars of the people's money in prosecuting liquor cases, 
and yet, we are told, there are near a score of United States 
liquor licenses in that city. But there is no open saloon, and 
that is a balm that cures many ills. 

W. S. Gage, the millionaire lumberman and capitalist, 
died rather suddenly in this city on the Uth inst, at the age 
of C.5 years. Mr. Gage was the father-in-law of C. M. Mann, 
the wine merchant, and was one of San Francisco's best 
known and most respected citizens. 

Another effort will be made in the City Council in Oakland 
to license saloons on Twenty-third avenue. It is well-known 
that there is plenty of liquor sold in that locality, on the sly, 
and the city authorities are desirous of obtaining the addi- 
tional revenue due from that quarter of the city. 

Palace Wine Company has been incorporated. It is 
formed to conduct a wholesale liquor business; place of busi- 
ness, Santa Monica; directors— M. E. Wright, C. T. Buchanan, 
Santa Monica; J. A. Glow, J. M. Price, A. M. Grant, Los 
Angeles; capital stock, $10,000; stock subscribed, $50. 

Charles Carpy, the wine man, has gone to Europe, and 
will remain abroad eight months to a year. Since retiring 
from the California Wine Association he has been taking it 
easy between his city residence and his Napa county vineyard. 
He now proposes to visit all the primiiKil countries of the old 
world. 

W. E. Brodereen, cashier for Wichmau, Lutgen <fe Co., is 
once more at work, after an absonco of nearly six weeks. 
After umlorgoing a delicate surgical operation at the (ierman 
HoHjiital, Mr. Broderson went to the country for a short trip, 
returning the i)icture of health. lie is now feeling better 
than for some years. 



The firm of Henckcn & Schroder, at 208-210 Front street, 
has been reorganized. Since the death of Mr. Martin llenck- 
eu the affairs of the concern have been in probate, but a new 
])artnership has been formed to continue the business. The 
])artners are Mr. Julius .\. Hencken, sou of Mr. Martin 
Hencken, who has been with the business for some time, and 
August F. Meyer, who is well known in San P'rancisco, as the 
formerowner of the "Milkmen's Headquarters," on Eddy street. 
The firm starts out with a well-established business, and 
should have success in their undertaking. 



Secundo Guasti, of Guasti i Bernard, Los Angeles, has 
been to San Francisco in the ])ast fortnight. He says that all 
indications in Southern California point to a large crop of wine 
this year. While hero he investigated the manufacture of 
stills, and it is said intends putting in a large continuous still 
in his plant before the vintage. Mr. Guasti is building a 
large winery and sherry house and distillery in Los Angeles, 
several blocks from the present warehouse. The new wine 
will be piped underground from winery to warehouse, there- 
by saving expense and time. He reports his business moving 
in a generally satisfactory' way, and looks for good things in 
the near future. 

The sixteenth annual meeting of the stockholders of the 
Italian-Swiss Agricultural Colou3-, having its vineyards at 
Asti, Sonoma county, and at Madera, Madera county, Cal., 
was held at the office of the corporation, 51S Montgomery st., 
on the 7th inst, Piesident P. C. Rossi in tlie chair. Secretary 
A. Sbarboro read his sixteenth annual report, which shows the 
Colony to be in a prosperous condition. The Colony has now 
a vineyard of 1000 acres at Asti, together with a winery having 
a capacity of nearly 5,000,000 gallons of wine. During the 
])ast year a vinoj-ard of (MO acres, with a winery- of 1,000,000 
gallons, was purchased near the town of Madera, in Madera 
county. The following ollicers and directors were elected by 
unanimous vote: President, P. C. Rossi; Vice-president, P. 
G. Ollino ; Treasurer, London and San Francisco Bank (Lim- 
ited; Secretary, A. Sbarboro; and, in addition to the above 
named gentlemen, Charles .\. Malm, M. J. Fontana, A. Merle, 
Dr. P. De Vecohi, I Cuoniu and D. Paroni as Directors. 



f/ceifie WIJ^E /r^B Sflf^lT (REVIEW. 



13 



Messrs. Kolb & Penliiinl do uot lot any good things got 
away from them. They now havo tlie distiuotion of specially 
bottling and farni.shing the drj- wines to be used at the moot- 
ing of tlio Griind Parlor of Native Sons at Kodwood Cit}'. 
Also the light and heavy " wot " cousumod at the opening of 
the Corinthian Yacht Club. 

The destruction of the Pinal Brewery, iu Globe, Arizona, 
bj- fire a short time since, is an accident that i.s deeply to bo 
regretted, more particularly so as there was no insurance on 
the building. The proprietor, Mr. Charles Banker, is a good 
and deserving citizen. Although tho loss is great, it is to be 
hoped that ho will bo soon again ou his feet. 



We received a pleasant call recently from F. J. Hasek, 
collar-master at Korbol's near Guerneville. Tho winery, one 
of the handsomest iu the State, has been restored to even bet- 
ter condition than before tho destructive fire which gutted it 
last fall. It now contains a fermentation system that is unique 
and worthy of examination by all those who contemplate erect- 
ing or remodeling cellars. In the center of tho building is au 
elaborate platform containing the crusher and stemmer. The 
fermenting tanks are ranged around iu two circles. The tanks, 
which contain 2700 gallons each, are oval, iu order to econo- 
mize space. The tanks are filled by spouts running from the 
crusher. When the wine is fermented, au elevator carries 
it to the press. By a hj'draulic crane the refuse is removed. 
Among other improvements is an electric pump. Twenty- 
seven acres of resistants have been set out on the ranch this 
Spring. — Santa Rosa Republican. 



Concerning Consular Reports. 

The New York Herald's AVashingtou dispatch says: Sec- 
ratary Sherman has determined to make an ofScal retraction 
of the statements made in reports of United States Consuls in 
France as to the adulteration of French wines and brandies, 
against which M. Hunotaus complained in an interview on the 

» tariff bill. The retraction will appear in the nest issue of the 
Consular reports, to be published iu May. It will be made as 
a result of strong representations and an official protest sub- 
mitted by Embassador Patenotre. The retraction is now be- 
fore M. Patenotre for his approval. 

Some spicy correspondence has passed between the two 

» Governments ou the subject. Embassador Patenotre has also 
talked directly with officials in regard to the matter. He claims 
that the figures obtained by the Consuls are not official, that 
they were obtained from persons who have no offiealknowledge 
of the facts, and the reports would uot have been of the char- 
acter they are had the imformation been from reliable sources. 

The last report to which M. Patenotre enters a complaint 
is that of C. W. Chancellor, Consul at Havre, which was sub- 
mitted in July, 1895. Among other things Chancellor said: 

"Many of the large distillers of brandy in the north of 
France have been forced to close their establishments, and 
cheap light wines, which were formerly so popular and 
which Thomas Jeflfersou said wore a great gain to the sobriety 
of any country, are giving place to the most primitive ])ro- 
cesses, without rectification, and under no State uor municipal 
supervision, 

"From a hygienic point of view, it is impossible to over- 
estimate the dangers which arise from the habitual use of such 
alcoholic drinks as are now manufactured b}' farmers of France 
and a great deal of which, no doubt, finds its wa}' to the United 
States as 'puio French brandy.' It is estimated that many 
thousands hectolitres of this pernicious distillation are annu- 
ally exported to tho United States. 

"Recently- the municipal laboratory of Paris, whose func- 
tion it is to detect adulterations of food and drinks, caused 
15,000 casks of so-called wine to be seized and destroyed. 
Official analysis could not detect in the whole lot a single drop 
of grape juice. The first report of French wine adulterations 
was made by Consular Agent Thomas P. Smith, stationed at 
Cognac, France, under date of October 16, 1880. Referring 



to tho snhjtH't he said: "The principal houses I do not believe 
are guilty of adulteration of brandy, l)ut it exsists elsewhere 
on a large scale, as it jiroved by the oflicial report for the year, 
and is ellectoil by mixing lees of wino with German and other 
spirits. 

While the undeniable and unrivaled qualites of French 
braiulios,' says the official report, 'preclude the fear of the trade 
suffering from foreign competition, the question is, whether, 
in view of the great demand its excoUeuce has created and of 
tho future scant supply, it will retain its former reputation.' " 

Naglee Brandy Sold. 

At the auction of Southard & Co., 2 St. Dunstan's Hill, E. 
C, London, held on the 2.oth ult., the following California 
brandies and wines were sold : 



CALIFORNIA BRANDY. 

Naglee," vintage of 1887, at Is. 9d to 2s. per 



2s. to 2s. 2d.— 48 to 



130 hf-bbls. 
gallon — •!() to 48 cents 

157 half-bbls. same, vintage of 1885 2 
52 cents. 

141 hf-bbls. same, vintage of 1881, 2s. Id— 50 cents. 

li;i hf-bbls. .same, vintage of 1878,3s. 2d— 7(5 cents. 

214 hf-bbls. same, vintage of 1875, 3h. Gd— 84 cents. 

50 hf-bbls. same, vintage 1874, 4s. Gd to 4s. 9d— Sl.OS to 
$1.14. 

36 hf-bbls. same, vintage 1872, 3s. 7d— 86 cents. 

150 hf-bbls. same, vintage of 1871, 3s. 8d to 4s— 88 to 
9(i cents. 

11 hf-bbls same, vintage of 1870, os. 7d— $1.34. 

49 hf-bbls. same, vintage 1869, 5s. 3d— $1.26. 

33 bbls., vintage 1895, 2s. to 2s. Id— 48 to 50 cents. 
15 bbls., vintage of 1894, Eagle Natoma cognac, 3s — 72c. 
15 bbls., same vintage*** Natoma cognac — same price. 
32 hf-bbls., vintage of 1892, "H. & G." 2s. 3d to 2s. 5 d 
— 54 to 5S cents. 

CALIFORNIA \YINES. 

6 bbls. Valley View Riesling (white) 2s. 4d — 56 cents. 

bbls. Valley View Gutedel (white) 2s. 2d — 52 cents. 

25 bbls. Valley View Claret (red) Is. 8d to Is. 9d— 40 to 
42 cents. 

21 barrels Valley View Burgundy (red) Is. lid to 2s. Id 
— 46 to 50 cents. 

50 bbls Los Hermauos Riesling (white), vintage of 1893, 
Is. lOd to Is. lid— 44 to 46 cents. 

50 bbls. Los Hermauos Burgundv (red) same vinta"e. 
Is. 9d to Is. lid— 42 to 46 cents. 

47 bbl.s. " Bella Vista," Sauvignou Vert, white. Is. lid— 
46 cents. 

5 bbls. "Mountain View" Hock (white) Heney's Califor- 
nia Hock, 2s 5d. — 58 cents. 

15 bbls. Heney's " Mountain View " Sauterne, 38. 5d— 82 
cents. 

40 bbls. Heney's "Mountain View" Burgundy, vintage of 
1891, 2s. lid— 70 cents. 

50 bbls. Natoma Port, 1894, Is. 8d— 30 cents. 

— [All the foregoing wines marked in report " Is. duty."] 

GKOWKRS who wish to sell good California wines for cash 
ou delivery, at moderate prices, to Eastern buyer, please corre- 
spond with " B.," care editor this paper. 



!Xl.' [Xj'iLir:qLXGr2c:Q 



lIeSTABlisheo,^^^ 



^flHIAf^C'Af^lfAf 



■ nqc^frC^ 




E.RemyWartin&C»| 

COGNAC 



^1 

El 



FRANCE! 

Agents in San Francisco, Cal. 

HELLMANN BROS. & CO. 

■ ■ lu .1 .ii..„s .-MM,-.- ,1, 525 FRONT STREET 



14 



f/reifie WIJVJE _^]MD Sflf^lT F^Ev^IEW. 



iAZAYLAND & CO 



TRADE CIRCULARS, 



U. K. WORKS. 

LONDON, ENG. 



15-25 WHITEHALL STREET, 

NEW YORK 



To Wine Growers, Distillers, Etc. 
Gen tl emen : 

We beg to advise having opened 
branch in New York as above, for the sale 
of our Wine Finings, Capillaire, Spirit: 
Colorings, Essences, Preservatives, etc. 

May we ask a trial order, that you 
may prove the EFFICACY, PURITY and ECONOMY 
of our Materials? 

Yours truly, 

W. A. WAYLAND & CO. 



WAYLAND'S WINE FININGS, 

GUARANTEED FREE FROM 

TA.NNIX, SALICVLIC and A.NII.INE;. 

Require n> prep-iralion, are always ready lo use. clarify tlie choicest de-crip 

tions of wines als > tin »e of low alcoholic sirengih. IX XO WAY 

IMP.VIR THK WINK. ONCE liKIl.LUXT, 

i'i:uM.\Ni:.-;Ti.i' I!RII,liant. 
Practical Notes. 



Green-Colored Wines.— We do not know whether my of 
our readers have ever met witli siimples of wine which liuve 
turned slightly green. That such exist is clear, from a paper 
by A. Borntraeger, in the Cliemiker Zeituug, vol. 20, page 
68G. He has recently had a number of such samples submit- 
ted to him for examination, and, after a careful investigation, 
has come to the conclusion that the green color, « hich occa- 
sionally develops in certain wines, is due to the action of ferric 
iron on oenotannin, or, to speak in plainer English, on the 
wine lanuin. He states that this color may bo com))lete!v re- 
moved from the wine by the addition of gelatine, which throws 
down, after standing, a dirty green precipitate. If the wine 
be decanted off from this precipitate or, preferably, filtered, 
the color will be much improved, being only faintly yellow 
and containing only about as much iron as was"originall>' pres- 
ent. Some doctors seem to think that tlie )nesence of iron in 
wine is particularly beneficial to invalids, so that if any of our 
reader.s should bo troubled with a large parcel of wine that has 
gone " queer " in this way, it might be possible for them to 
make capital out of their misfortune, and after treatment with 
gelatine and subsequent filtration, they might bo able to sell 
it as a wine rich in iron, specially adapted for the use of 
anaemic i)ersons. 

The Composition of Brandy.— In a recent pai)er by Lns- 
son in tiie Moniteur Scientifitjue (vol. x., p. 785), a number of 
analyses of Ijrandies are given, the impurities being expressed 
in milligrammes per 100 c. c. of absolute alcohol. The sum 
of these immirities is called the " co-efficient of impurities," 
and it siiould be always over 340. Ho divides the impurities 
into two groups: first, the oxidation products— namely, acid 
and aldehyde; secondly, the ethers and the higher alcohols. 
The former group increases with the age of the l)randv, hence 
its determination is of imjiortance in their values. "The per- 
centage of acid and aldehyde, calculated on 100 parts of total 
impurities, varie.s between 10.9 and lo.4, the mean being 12.9. 
This number is called the " co-efficient of oxidation." This 
co-efficient gradually increases with the age of the sample, ho 
that the latter nniy be at last approximately detfrniined from 
ita number. Thus, new brandies have a co-ellicicuit of oxitla- 
tion of about 11 to 15, this number increasing fairly rapi<lly 
during the first years, but not exceeding W in a brandy fifty 
years old. Brandies to which alcohol has been added, anil 
those obtained by the distilling of alcohol from grape skins, 
give very difltjrcnt results on alalyzing them. The simple ad- 
dition of alcohol reduces the co-efficient id impurities; in other 
caaes the co-efficient of oxidation is raised. 



FitoM Bheinstrom Bros. 

Cincinnati, March 18, 1897. 

To do justice to our renowned productions of "Highest 
Standard Litpu'urs," we have deemetl it advisable to terminate 
the issue of all other styles and grades of liqueurs which we 
have heretofore furnished. 

We have taken the step, realizing the imjiortance of avoid- 
ing the use of auy brands, marks or labels which might leave 
the |)ublic in doubt as to the origin of the goods, and might be 
construed as a violation of the United States statutes govern- 
ing such matters. 

We feel confident that the trade will find it to their adyan- 
tage handling goods bearing the full name of Bheinstrom Bros, 
on each package, guaranteeing them to be of uniform (|uality, 
and " The Best." The] absolute purity of our liqueurs distin- 
guishes them from those now in the market, the imported not 
excepted. 

Liqueurs claim to be manufactured after old formula' have 
been tried and found wanting under the rigid test of purity. 
In most cases they contained inorg.-inic matter, such as alum, 
sulphate of lime, magnesia, soila and |)Otasli. The presence of 
any of these ingredients indicates a chemical process, neces- 
sary to clear liiiueurs j)roduced from essences or by imperfect 
distillation. 

Brillianc}- and stability, at any temperature, is another ex- 
celling feature of our liqueurs. Most of the fruits, herbs or 
seeds contain volatile turpentine-like substances which are ob- 
tained by distillation, together with the aroma jirojjer. These 
substances will, in course of time, cause litjueurs to lose their 
brilliancy, and, being less soluble at a low temperature, ren- 
der them milky in cold weather. (Some well-known imported 
liqueurs bear sjiecial directions how to bo treated in such 
cases.) Kecognizing the necessity of excluding these objection- 
able substances, we have aimed and, by improved methods of 
distillation, finally succeeded in producing liqueurs entirely 
Iree from alterable matter. 

Through these far-reaching improvements we have created 
a new standard of quality, totally eclipsing all imported liq- 
ueurs. Our distilling capacit}- for liqueurs is the largest in 
the world. 

We manufacture in bond for export. 

Tours respectfully, 

Eheinstrom Bros. 

From Charles Graef & Co. 

Neav York, April, 1897. 

Dear Sir — Our attention has been called to further circu- 
lars issued by .\udreas Saxlehner warning the Trade against 
handling imitations of the l.ibel and name under which Hun- 
yadi Janos A])erient Water is sold. 

The Decision in the Court of Chancery, London, referred 
to in such circulars, is strictly limited in its effect to the Uni- 
ted Kingdom and has no reference whatever to the position of 
the controversy in this country. 

Wo ^.dadiy direct attention to the fact that the ".\penta"" 
Natural Aperient Water drawn from Springs at Buda 1 est is 
and has been st)ld under labels radically dissimilar from those 
used for Hunyadi Janos Water oi' for any other Mineral 
Water, and we are advised by eminent counsel that such lab- 
els are lawful in every particular. We are therefore prepared 
to. and will fidly protect the trade in the use of same. We 
remain. Yours truly, 

Charles Graef & Co., 
Agents for the Thi: Apollinaris Company, Ltd., London, 
Sole Exporters of "Apenta" Natural A])erient Water. 

FitOiM the National Distillinq Company. 

Milwaukee, Wis., March, 1897. 
To the Trade — We are now ready to fill orders for our su- 
periiM' brand of Mistletoe Old Tom gin, warranted eipial to 
the beat imported. I'ut u]) in bulk and eases. 
l!es]>ecl fully, 

National Distilling Company. 

T. M. Ferguson, the Market-street wholesaler, is having 
his establishment thoroughly renovated, cleaneil and papered 



f/ceifie WI|^E /cJMD Sfll^IT I^EVIEW, 



15 



From Mackenzie & Co. 

Jerez de la Fhonteha, Mai-cli, 1897. 

Dear Sir — In iH'corduuco with our usuiil custom wo linve 
the pleasure of waiting ou von with our Auuual Eoport cii the 
Slicrry Vintage. 

Owing to the extremely dry weather which prevailed during 
the early part of the summer, and the absence of refreshing 
dews in August, and at the time of gatheriiig the gra])es, the 
i|uantity of the ISitl) Vintage was not so largo as most of the 
A'ineyard proprietors had expected. The quality, however, is 
Ciinsidered good, a large portion of -Must of the Afuera district 
is well developed and of good style, and other districts also pro- 
duced stout, well-tlavored Must, which will go far to compen- 
sate for the deticiencv in quantity. 

The total shiimieuts from Cadiz in ISVHi were 47,847 butts, 
against 52,431 in 18!)o and 49,69i3 in 1894. 

We have a tine, well-selected stock of Su))crior01d Wines, 
also of fine matured Olorosos, Finos, and high-class Manza- 
iiillas I'i.'c, and our friends may be confident that their orders 
will bo executed with fine value. 

deferring to our quotations annexed, soliciting your es- 
teemed orders direct, or through our London House, Messrs. 
Kenneth, Mackenzie & Co., 118 Leadenhall Street, EC, which 
shall receive our best attention, we remain. 

Tours faithfully, 

Mackenzie & Co. 

From Mackenzie, Dbiscoll & Co. 

Oporto, March, 1897. 
Dear Sir — We have again the pleasure of waiting upon 
you with our Annual Report. 

The shipments in 1896 from Oporto to all countries were 
much larger than in 1895, viz: — 

1895. 1896. 

To United Kingdom 30,516 32,839 

" Brazil 48,554 58,245 

" Other Counties 12,060 13,014 

Pipes 91,130 104,098 

The Duty payments in the United Kindom for 1S'.)(), compared 
with 1895, snowed an increase of over 78,000 gallons. 

The Douro Wines of 1896, though not a largo croji, were 
grown under favorable circumstances from first to last, and were 
gathered in fine, dry weather, and are now sliowing qualities 
superior to any since 1890, which will make them valuable as 
a Vintage Wine, as well as useful for Lodge jniriioses, and we 
shall be prepared to show you our sample in due course. 

We can still ofi'er you some selected lots of 1890 Viritage 
Wine of fine fiavor, body, and character at £54 per pipe, f.o. b. 

AVe have much pleasure in iuformingyou that we leceived 
the highest award for our Wines at the last Bordeaux Exhibi- 
tion. 

We annex list of our various marks, and soliciting the fa- 
vor of your esteemed orders, either direct, or through our Lon- 
don House, Messrs. Kenneth Mackenzie it Co., 118, Leaden- 
hall Street, E.C., which shall receive our best attention. We 
remain, Yours faithfully, 

MArKF,NZlE,DRISCOLI. k Co. 

.J. I'lielir, tlio Mission San Jose wine man, died on the 8th 
ult. Jlr. Hiehr was a native of Alsace, and was born 64 years 
ago. He left a widow and two children, a son and a daughter. 



Imports and Exports 

DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



TO JAPAN AND CHINA-Per 8tr. Ooptic, April 


1, 1897. 




DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


PACKAGES. 


GALLONS 
iiOO 


VALUE. 


SliBiigbai 


S Foster 4 Co 

LacbiDDii & Jacob! 

Cal Wine Association... 




» 135 


Kobe 






1 case 


17 


.Shftn^liai 


ao barrels 4 b(-bbl8 
12 cases 


1.170 


447 

72 


Honu'koiiK 

VcikDliama 


16 barrels 


800 
5011 
So4 


373 
140 
250 


Knbc 




Vt)kulmnia 






Kobe 


Schilling & Co 

Italian-Swiss Colony. . . 
St. Geor;;u Vineyard ... 
Stevens, Arnbokl & Co. 

J C Amcluni^ 


1 hf-barrel 

!iO barrels 

1 case 

8 cases 

4 cases 


27 
1.055 


18 

36U 

3 

28 


Yokah.Tm;i 


„ 


10 barrels 

50 cases 


517 


323 
250 




2 barrels 


100 

62 


28 


Tokio 


E. O'Neill... 


1 cask 


31 


Yokobamu 


Southern Pacific Co .. 




20 
65 




Goldberff. Bowen & Co. 




248 


Cbefoo 


3 cases 


g 


Tot al amount UO cases and 




5,186 


$2,690 



TO HAWAII— Per Bark C. D. Bryant, AprU 1, 1897 



Honolulu. 



C Schillini; & Co 17 oclaves 

Eisen Vineyard Co ]5 bbis, 70 kegs 

Cal Wine Association... i63 barrels. 
13hf-bar 
1 230 kegs. 



•els ) 

arrels ■ . . [■ 

:8 ) 



Total amount , 



191 

707 

4,820 



5,727 



t ISI 

348 

1.948 
»2.427 



TO JAPAN AND CHINA— Per City of Bio, April 10, 1897. 



Shanghai IMobns & Kaltenbach. 



Kobe I J C Siegfried . . 

Shanghai C Scliiiling it Co . 



Total amount II cases and 



1 barrel 


SO 


$40 
5 








8 


2 barrels 


66 


33 
20 










116 


tI06 







TO CENTBAL AMERICA— Per Ste. Newport, April 10, 1«97. 



La Libertad . 



San J de Guatemala. 
Puntas Aieuas. 



. IBaruch & Co 

(,' Schillimr & Co. 



11 barrels... 
S hf-barrels. 

10 kegs 

15 barrels... 
5 barrels . 



San J de Guatemala. 



Panama 

San .T de Guatemala. 

Puntas Arenas 

I.a Libertad 



Cloverdale Wine Co 

St. George V. Co 

jGundlach-Bun. Wine Co 20 barrels 20 hf-b. 
I " j20 cases...., 

j " |8 barrels.. . , 

! " |G cases 

J Martenstein A Co... '4 bariels... 

Gaddini it Ciocco jlOO barrels . 

Lachman A: Jacobi 15 barrels 

C M iMann 



Puntas Arenas 

San J de Guatemala. 



IMintas .\renas 

.Vcajutla 

San .1 de Guatemala. 
Panama 



San J de Guatemala. 



Jkegs. 



Itplian-Swiss Colony. 
Cal Wine Association. 



2 bbls 

4 cases 

5 barrels, 25 lif-bbl 

20 barrels 

40 cases 

10 barrels 

24bf-barrel8 

Castle Bros +8 kegs 

F Chevalier & Co |2 barrels, 1 hf-bbi 

" 3 cases 

Crown Distilleries Co. . . 70ca8e8 

Du Yal & Carroll, Il bf-barrel 



Total amount H3 cases and. 



556 

81 

75 

789 

249 

!,037 



432 



204 

4,285 

773 

133 



966! 
1,037| 

"'bW' 
630 
916 
130l 



24 

13,H25 



* 224 

41 

55 

330 

93 

734 

90 

162 

36 

66 

1,303 

315 

63 

22 

384 

367 

114 

178 

250 

455 

97 

15 

350 

14 

f5,658 



HERCULES GAS, GASOLINE AND DISTILLATE ENGINES. 

The Best to Buy and the Cheapest to Operate. 
For PumpinfT, Hoistincr, Millino; and all Stationary Purposes. 
^, ENGINES AND PUMPS COMBINED FOR RACKING, A SPECIALTY. 
1^ Over 500 HERCULES ENGINES in Use by Coast Wineries and Vineyards. 

HERCULES GAS ENGINE WORKS. 





S.itist otiou Gil 11 iiii t ( od or Money Refanded. 

SPECIAL ENGINES FOR WINE PRESSES. ETC . 

Write for Illu-tralcd Cal.ilofuc : = : 1 H. P. TO 200 H. P 

LAHOBST QAS ByOIXK WORKS IX Til K II K ST. 



2!^H.P. $185 00 
Dlscoun fcr Cast). 



OFFICE. 405 407 SANSOME STREET. 

WORKS, 216. 217. 219. 221. 223 225,227 229. 231 BAY STREET 



SAN FRAP4C SCO, 
CALIFORNIA. 



k. 



f/eifie WIJME /c|JD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



TO NEW YOBK VIA PANAMA— Pkb 8tr. Niwpobt. April 10. 18V7. 



NV» Y. 



New Vo 
Urooklr 



ilk. 



I ackman ■& Jacob! fS5 tiarn-ls. 

SO barreU . . 

1. !■. <• J Canrlla 2 liarrela .. 

|(iiiiialaeti-Bund. W Co.. &0 barrvU . . 

t' A Worlli 3 barrel*.. 



Ilcrlnncr Bros. 



. ... Cal Wine Asboelatloii. 
IF Cbcvallcr A Co 



2 hbU, 4 hf-bbU.. 

1 l.bl 1 bf-bbl. ... 

2 barrelB 

, ."iOll barrels 

7.'i Imrreitt 

50 barrels 



27,200 «S.09V 



100 

2,501 

14» 

212! 

771 

102, 

25.000 

3,S25| 

2,550 



25 

725 

00 

270 

75 

75 

0,S9l 

I.»I2 

1.275 



BEER EXPORTS TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 



From April Ut to April IS, 1897. 



DE£TINATIO!l. 



Total amount 



61.8.10 »;y,407 



IMPORTS OF WINES AND LIQUORS BY SEA. 



Coptic ' Hongkong . . 



Vladlroslock.. 
[Shaiigbai 

Kobe 

Kniiiilin 

.Sniitn Kittialia . 
,Huuululu 



FROM ElltOPE VIA PANAMA-Pkb Stb. NswPOKT. April 5, 1897. 


siiiprKi;- 


PACKA0B8 « OOBTBIITS. 


COtfSIOHBKS. 




10 c']i.<^e4 Klrsch 


A Vignier 




" ' -i-et, .\bsinthe 

■■ Corillals 








. . .L-.e. CI ampague 

1 fUPe Coi;iiai' 


J Scbmidt 








20 eases Ileer 


F, * 8 Heller 



.lelinle Wand 
K.inilie .\dele 
.\lden UcKsc. 

M WTufl... 

M.iriposa . . . 



8 F Breweries. Ltd. 



Clieballs.. 
Newport . 



IMPORTS BY RAIL IN BOND. 


From April Ut to April IS, 


1897. 


SIIIPI-EBS. 


PACKAGES * COSTKNTS. 


CONSIUNBES. 




80 cases Wbisky 


H H Sherwood . 




100 cases Whisky 






8 cases Curacoa 


Goldberg, Bowen & Co 






41 cafes Li.|iicur5 


" 


EXPORTS OF MISCELLANEOUS L 


IQUORS BY SEA. 


From April Ul to April 15 


. 1897. 



City of Rio.. 
Una 



iSan Bias 

jAuckland 

Diinedin 

Fiji 

Sydney 

Viadivoslock. . . . 
San J dc Quat'la. 

Acajutla 

La Liberlcd 

San J de Ouat'la. 

Boenayentura ... 

San J de Ouat'la. 

Kobe 

La Liberlad 



Crown Disl Co 

8 F llre»ericr<. Ltd 
Riiyal KaglelJislCo 
IJ D Spreekeb .\: l)r 
IWilliam Wul(f.VI'<i 
JD ISpreckels A: Br 
S F Breweries, Ltd. 



Hawlev Bros Co. . . 
Royal Eagle Dlst Co 

.\iiiieuser B Co 

C Schilling <fc Co . . 
8 F Breweries, Ltd. 



Oundlach-B W Co.. 
Dn Val & Carroll . . 

E G Lyons Co 

S F Breweries, Ltd. 



P.trKAGES. 



.50 cases bottled. .. 
100 casks bottled.. 
l.'.O cases bottled. . 
IIKI , ascs botllcd. . 
20 casks bottled. .. 
12 barrels bottled. 
2.'i casks bottled . . 
70 casks bottled. . . 
120 casks bottled. 

2 casks Stout 

10 casks bottled.. . 
10 casks bottled... 
20 cahks bottled. . . 

25 sixths bulk 

40 cases bottled. .. 

GO casks 

1.50 cases bottled.. 

1 case bottled 

ICO cases bottled. . 

2 casks bottled. . . 

cases bottled 

barrels bottled.. 

barrels 

cases bottled 

i cases bottled. . . 



Total — 684 cases; 44.*) casks and IS barrels bottled, and 2.'> si.xths-bbl. bulk. 



f XV) 

900 

1.150 

7.'KI 

180 

111 

225 

Tin 

8(50 

''7 

90 

100 

20J 

40 

2"iO 

415 

7.-|0 

2 

750 

18 

:« 

37 

17 

16 

125 

fS,120 



EXPORTS OF WHISKY BY SEA. 
From April 1st to April 15, l!!y7. 



VESSEL. 


DBSTIBATIOH. 


8HIPPEBS. 


P'K'8 AHD COIfTBHTS. 


TALDE. 


Coptic. 

Mariposa .... 


Hongkong 

Yokohama 

Shanghai 

Apia... 

Panama 


WN Diininlck 

.t O S S Co 

Goldberg, B & Co.. 
Crown Dist Co 

JR WaUon 

PMSSCo. ..•••• 

Wrimorc-B Ci 

FDc Bary ACo.... 
Heilinanii Br iV Co. 


4 ])ack»ges sjiirits 

4 cases champagne. .. 

1 case lii|ueurs 

2 cases rum 

1 case yermouth 


»41 

137 

9 

8 

30 

20 


Newport 

Cmitllla 


1 case vermouth 

1 case bitters 

2 cases bitters, 

30 cases champagne. . 
15 cases bitters 


6 


Acajutla 

Victoria 


15 
383 
131 



VESSEL. 


PEsTINATtON. 


eUIPPEBS. 


PACKAGES. 


GALLONS 


VALUE. 


Coptic 


Shanghai 

Hiogo 


Wm Wolff & Co . . 
(iundlach-B W Co.. 
Cro\vn Disl Co 

,• 

., 

J K Watson 

Braun'weiger & Co 
Crown Dist Co 

Spruance, 8>S Co.. 

lul 






t 373 


1 barrel 

15 cases .... 


38 


38 


Jennie Wand . 


Kaliului 


lie 


C D Bryant... 
Mariposa 


Honolulu 

Aula 


Ikec 

5 barrels . . . 
2 cuscs. 


15 
235 


31 
IK 


Sydney 


100 cases . . . 




900 


., 






16 


Newport 

City of Rio... 


San J de Ouat'la. 

Panama 

Yokohama 

Hilii 


4 barrels. . . . 
3 barrels .. . 
27 cases 


IfiS 
1C6 


230 

457 

231 

24 


Santiago . . . 


Vi eases . . 




'Jl': 


Total amount 211 cases a 




6-22 


»2.700 



Total amount 64 cases etc . 



$787 



WINEM.\KEK and Distiller, :50 years of age. holding 
highest references for I'J year-s' services in leading establish 
luents, open for engagenn-iit Address " .S. 8.." this oftice. 



SHERWOOD ^ SHERWOOD, 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

Stocks of our Agency tjootls lor sale in bond and duty p^iid at 
212-214 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 24 N FRONT STREET, PORTLAND, OR. 

216 N. MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



PACIFIC COAST MGENTS FOR 

"Keystone 3Uouogi-nm llyc'' autl "(DICi Saratoga"— The Finest Eastern Rye. 

.MOET i CH.\N'IJ<>.N Chanipa^fiic-. K.St •IIKN.MJKU & CO'.S fhm.ts ami .Santoi-nos. M.VKKNV.I i; \ Cis .Spani^li She rios atul Ports 

HU.N'T UmM'K TKAUK Jt CO. Casc-d Ports. .\. HoUTMAN iN^ CO's Ilollatul Gin. E iV .1 IfUKKI'. S Noiiimreil Old Tom liin. 

K. ..V ). HUKKK'.S HI In.k lod Crnkirk Sauk. L.VW.SO.N 'S Liquour .Scotch Whisky. BUUKKS lli-iiimssj Brandy anil Drv (Jin. 

UA.S.S UATtMKK i GKETTtJN, Lid.— Biuut (ILKNM VKT .S.olcli \Vlii.,ikv in Woo.l. SCHMTZ Milwaukoo Horr tho ••Plls..noi" and 
Al« In Wooil, .l()ltlj.;s .Slono .\le in Hhds. and IllUhds. Ia:;lil .Spaikling. also .Schlitz In Wooil. 



FM. 



• iniri 



•CLUU CtXJKTAILS." EVAN'S Hudson Ale 



E. .\: .1 llt'lMCr S Um' lit tti »ublia hrur (oouitss M KI.VH()LI)".S .\nch.M- Ilrand .N'ow York Cldor RO.SS' Uolfasl (Jintor Alo. flub Soda, etc. 

u. l..>i ir.,). UK.NK WAUKESHA Mineral Wator. 

^ KtJYALTY GIN. 

Ko.v.tCAM, Ckhstii V \ Co., riiii.Aiif.i fiiiA, I'likK WiiisKiFs— "Mascot," "R,iiiis Ilnoi.," "O. r. S." AMI 'Tkivatf STOiK." 
f'^nrMt Ctinailian llye HIiiHhu {tloilrrluiin lO Worln. IJ'd. Toronto, f'niuKliv, Itolllnl I'ntirr fiorerniiieiit .S'H;»r ;■»•».•<(« o. 

i:i: lyiron 1 1 i> a Mi:i:ic.i \ irii isi\ii:s - cirn-dr isourhoi,. s/niiKj 'sr. si;, sn. no: iiorsrn Uiin o f. <•: sprhitfiini. 

It'. II. Mr Itrii'irr: llrriiiil,t<ii-, .M. I'. Mimnrrli ; liinliicl.ii i'liih, MrUtnitnl , MiiHiiif/h/ . Chiil.riirorh' , /•-". <'. Urrri/ 
unit iilhrr •xhiiiiliiril hininls. 
ALSO AGCNTS FOR NAPA VALLEY WINE CO'S WINES AND BRANOICS IN CASES. CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES IN WOoD. 



P/reiflvS WIJSIE /rJSIE) SpiF^IT f^EVIEW. 



IT 



MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN WINE SHIPMENTS. 



From April Ist lo April 15, 18U7. 



BEER IMPORTS BY RAIL. 



VK88BL. 



Coptic 

Jeiiiiiu Wnnd, 
Alden liestc. 



M W Tuft . 



I DESTINATION. 



Kulinlui .. . 
lIoiioUilu. 



PACKAQES. 



C Schlllins A Co. . . 12 biiriel«. . . 

Cnnvn Dist Co \ih ki'^ti 

Kolb iVc Denluird . . . I.*) Itarri'ls... 

Cal Wine .\9s'ii ;>(i lihl ■>:> ki;. 

San Bias J W Murpliv. 1" Iu'kb. . . '. , 

i 13 Frapolli ^- Co ...[ lli;iiMiarrel8 

" I " iNapn v\: S Wine Co. 5 bbis ,^ kgs 

Mariposa I Auckland J D Sproi'kds & Br 20 cases 



1 

25N 
1,125 
215 
486 
S04 



jApia . 



Newport Bueuareutura.. . . 

Umatilla Nelson 

Vancouver 

Una l.!i l.ibertnd 



Crown Dist Co 2 ke;;6 

J U Watson 2 kei^s 

Gundlach-H W Co. 20 keys 

C Scliillinf; ,V: Co . . 4 barrels... . 
Ciundlach-B W Co.. 1 hf-barrel.. 



lU ke^s. 



'l\'l.il .imount 20 cises and 



20 
20 
180 
212 

200 

4, SIS 



$ 2.54 

87 
141 
811 
60 
15:( 
157 
7.'> 
SO 
25 
114 
58 
15 
105 

$2,091 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 



From April Ist to April 15, 1897. 



VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPEBS. 


FACKAQBS. 


VALUE 


GALLONS 


Grenada 

Newport 


Liverpool 

Puntas .\reaas. . . 
Panama 


R B Forman 

Vina Distillery 

F Chevalier iS; Co.. 

Braun'weii^er ,t Co. 


1 barrel.... 

2 barrels. .. 
1 barrel 


50 
90 
44 


t 70 

90 
33 


„ 


San J de Guat'la. 
nmonnt 2 cases . . 


20 


Total 


2bbl 2hf-b 


124 

308 


124 



WHISKY AND SPIRIT IMPORTS BY RAIL. 



From April 1st to April 13, 1897. 



COPTEIOHTKD. 



C0MS1GKRE8. 


ALC'L( SPIRITS. I WHISKY. 

1 1 


GIN. 


Bbls. Barrels Cases. 


Bbls. 


K-bbl. 


Kegs. 


Bbl. 


Kegs. 


() F T Co .. * 






2S 


169 


IS 




53 






1,175 

140 

140 

385 

65 








Crown Distilleries Co. . 


6U 




65 




















William Wolff & Co . .. 
















L ("alien tt Son 
















S McCartney 






155 
70 














1 










Chae Meineeke & Co . . 






30 
















9 
26 

5 
10 














i 
























Carroll >k Carroll 















Med Agenc}' 






I 








E l*earson 






1 
2 

2 
1 
2 
3 

I 








G Wilkins 




1 










O^Dunnell & Oineen... 














G Deluclii 




























DaNovitli & Miles 

















P Fillipini 
















E C Fenne.-*ev 






ID 
5 










L Lebentiaum 















A Cavana^ili 








1 














6 












Sbea, Bocqueraz & Co. 






60 


























Total 


60 


1,905 


76 


581 


17 




5H 



From April lat lo April 15, 1897. 



COPYBIOlITICn. 



CONSIGNEKS. 


BOTTLED. 


BULK. 


Cases. 
140 

405 


Casks. 


Barrels. 


Barrels. 


M bbls 


X-l>blB, 


Keus. 


RovalF.aglc Dlst Co... 
C .\ Zlnkand 


298 




220 
55 


40 
20 


140 






80 
170 










iis 


















W liiigcn i*i Co 






45 
20 
50 


145 
« 


120 


40 


Hansen ,V: Kaliler Oak. 




















Hilberl lircis 




120 








John HSpubr, Boot B'l 


850 
























Total 


1,418 


CG8 


115 


390 


•2.-)0 


2l!ll 


4(1 



TO WINE AND GRAPE MEN— The undersigned wi.shes 
to offer his services in manufacturing grape and other fruit 
juices without drugs by the method of Prof. Muller-Thurgan. 

Wm. Rueff, 
Sept. 6 Felton, Sauta Cruz Co., Cal. 



* And 14 barrels, 72bf-barrels Brandy*. 



FOE SALE— Brewery, Distillery, Soda Works, Buildings and 
Lots in Ensenada, Lower California; business without 
com]ietition; in full working order; §9,000 — could not be 
duplicated for three times that amount. 
Suinmari/ — Four town lots, .3;}3 feet frontage in heart of 
the city. Fire-proof building, corrugated iron, 40x50; annex, 
corrugated iron, 14x18. Dwelling house, (4 rooms, furniture, 
etc. ;) barn and stable. Fine beer garden, well ornamented 
with trees; the only one in town, for picnic purposes. Wind 
mill, iron turbine, 10 buckets, galvanized water pipes, through 
buildings and grounds; galvanized iron tank, (iOOO gallons. 
Boiler and steam generator, 1'2-h. power. Brass steam pump. 
Copper still rectifier, 10 compartment column; copper still rec- 
tifier for pomace or mescal; 1 small still. Grape crusher, 
press hand pump, tanks, tools, Fairbanks scale, 2000 lbs. 
Complete malting department, roller for malt; beer kettle, 
heated by steam; zinc cooler; reservoir tanks, barrels, etc. 
Complete soda-bottling apparatus. Strong horse and harness, 
new delivery wagon, top-board buggy, etc. Only two men 
needed to run this plant— one for inside work and the other 
for outside. 

Expenses are ver\' small and profits very large. Any en- 
terprising party with a small capital cannot fail to make 
money in a short time. For further particulars address 
"Brewery," care Review office. 

FOR SALE— One-half interest or the whole of the right 
to a wine faucet, recently patented, which enables wine men 
ti) keep dry wines on tap in o-gallon demijohns, pure and 
wholesome, without manijnilation. It is simple and thor- 
oughly effective, and is a result that has long been sou;;ht, as 
it will enable retailers to carry small quantities of dry wines 
" on tap " without spoiling. For particulars address Q, this 
office. 




MARTIN ERLENBACH. 

PACIFIC COAST AGENT 

404 Sacramsnto S! . San Francisco. 



'PERFECTION" 

(THE STANDARD) 

TURKISH PRUNE JUICE 

Is u.irr.intc'i :i i LK1-; M<nr l-;\. I K ,\(. T, whioc ciniUHmciit pnrts arc 
so iK;tlci.tly t>lcn(Jc<l that ils action, u^cd as propurtioucd, on cvtry 
dcscriplioii of spirits, such ns BRANDY, HUM, GIN and pnrticulnrly 
WIIISKY. is truly woudcrful. It ^■I^K•, PURIMKS, MIiI.LOWS 
niid otherwise C.KNHRAM.Y IMTROYllft ion remnrkable decree. 

■'i'KRI-KCTION— TrRKISH rRUNH Jl'ICE is an arlidc which cnn- 
not he judged by Us tnste or Iwunuet, it niURt l>c blended with the 
spirits in wood to prove its vnhic. Snniplcfinnd inforniatlon reKirciing 
proportion touM.etc, will be gladly rurni><hcd by cither our AKcnt or 
ourselves. 



Cal 



The advantage of grlvlng Immature spirits. 
IN A VERY SHORT TIME, the character of 
age, and thereby greatly Increasing their 
value, is obvious. 




HAHN & CO,, 

• OLC HANUFACTUntllt 

125 Water Street, New York- 



18 



/yteifie WljME /fjslB Sfll^lT I^EVIEW. 



WINE AND BRANDY OVERLAND, 

DURING THE MONTH OF MARCH, 1897, SHOWING DESTINATION AND POINTS OF SHIPMENT 

(OFFICIAL FIGURES.) 



-._ 


BRANDY. 1 


WINE. 11 


FROM 


BRANDY. I WINE. 




Cas««. 


Gallons. 


Coses. 


Oalluns. 


Cases. I Gallons. | Cases, i 

! . — I— — 1 


Gallons. 






U 

42 

4:« 

26 
143 
50 
62 


5,070 

Kl.ysd 

197,1190 

1,479 

6,6uT 

2,280 

20,874 

96 

3,260 

27 

s:« 

265,7r.;t 
4,978 


San Francisco 


128 22.7731 


2,244 
2 


446.589 


other New EngUod poluK..., 4 
New York ] 14 




Oakland 








S.92.S 

4,090 
448 


Cont'ord 






255 


.Martinez 








240 




i 


riiasanton 








45,496 




l.iveimore 








2,615 


Olbcr PeiiD. points 










187 


17 


16,864 
lO:! 


Santa Clara 




Wa.-liiMi.'lon 




3 

13 

29 

685 

5 

1 

5 

11 

30 

45 

10 

70 


Irvin^ton 

Warm Sprin^rt 








3,671) 






89 
57 
135 


26 


Geor^'ia ami CaroUua pts 


1 

2<.> 


.Mountain View 




■ 




2 955 


tJilrov 

Hollisler 








27 




50 


Mublte 






I.os Oatos 








133 


OlbiT Aia. »nd Florida points 






7,794 
5,;;97 
9,9i>8 
2,967 
2.832 
7 \:ii; 


Santa Cruz 








217 






Stockton 




210 


5 
2 


8.:i27 




7 


43 


West A Cos 




io,:soo 




Ituliach 






2,770 






110 
144 
10 
l,2u2 
15 
55 
48 


Itarttms 


i 




3,100 






.Maltenioro 


1 




12.025 


Arknn!iai> and Oklaboma pts. 


1 


19 2.52 
4 16.207 

l*t 

1 3i U .152 




11 9 44.S 






Fii-bni) 






2 

255 

3 


9,933 






Sacramento 




194 


20 272 






Nairn 




4,086 




3 


2 


' — 


Oahville 






48,9,50 




2;7i3 

199 


.St. Helena 




903 


2 


8,746 








6 


Zinfandcl 




15,600 






261 


23 

175 

lit 

1 

10 

9 

15 

16 

121 


2.190 
3.32(1 

76,691 
2,763 
3,481 
2,.549 
6,05? 
8,514 
2,760 

15,399 
6,069 
195 
75 
3,095 
4.178 
6,742 


llutherford 


■ .... 




5,575 


Oilier ludiana peints 


KruK 








61 
28 


ChkaRo 1 


10,056 

95 

596 


Cui'delia 

Santa liosa 




56 








5 


2,915 






Vineyai'd 






7,578 


Other Michigan 


G 


792 
1,976 


San Kafacl 


■'■■.■■"1 ' . .. . 




190 


Heaidsburg 


1 




50 






Cloverdale 


1 




46 




10 
10 


537 
933 


Asti 


5 535 


9 


18,879 




Elk Grove 


2,650 




lone 1 






57 


Other Missouri points 

Sioni Cily 




' 


blsM 

127 
1,056 


5 

29 

31 

2 

14 

34 

16 

6 

249 

80 

118 

69 

75 

9 




3 






1,247 


Vina 


7,066 


........ 


16,260 


Oroville 




53 






Los Anf;eles 


14 


773 


274 


16,851 






Guasli 


4,971 






30 

l,l.'i3 

52 

10 

1,486 

671 

1,24) 

179 

1,277 


416 
3.188 

255 
4,295 
9,os; 
4,160 
7.339 
4.443 
6.566 
3,442 

106 


Sborb 




50 


5 


10 






San Gabriel 




6,466 






Pomona 








64 






Santa Hal bara 








53 


Denver 

Other Colorado poHts 


16 

:t 

30 

5 

16 


Wiiillirop 








60 


Anaheim 








60 


Santa Ana 




28 




65 




liivereidc 




20,6:« 


Idaho and Montana 


Sunny Slope 




26 


15 


3,.S07 


































































































































































C....... 


















Total 


' 161 


35.246 


2.841 


771,480 


1 Total 


161 


85,246 


2,S4l 


771,480 



WlbhlAIVI WOLiFF 8t CO. 

Importers and General Agents, 



327-329 Market Street, 



HES-Sim. MOI-rr ft CIIANDON. RnaixAV, ChampaKnc, 

White Seal lOrande Cuvee) Hrul luigicrlal 
JoMANNIS I.K. JO!lA.N.M!t, Klnu of .N'alurnI Tnlile Watir». 
M1-2»SKS. CA.NTkliLL tk tOCIIKA.Vl-:, Ilr.LI'AST, OltlKcr 

Mr 

I — MortcU llrnndy. 

^, t.Tli .WAl.KLKVll.l.t'.. 

lll...k .. ...•;1jK1..V 1,SI1J.K Jh to., KDINIlt'K<;ll, Scotch 

U'huky 
nil'. Jill. !•: I. mm. I.I kS Co., Ltd., (Wm. JamcmD 



MK J 



.■» MIN, KoTTIUIDAU. Gin 
. > Kuiiiiiicl ft l-.ck«u. 



— HGENTS FOR- 

MKSSRS. fHOI.rHO WOUFr.'SSON ft CO., ScillKDASI, 

Aroninlli|u^ Schnapps. 
Ml'-'^Sk^- K1-;a1) llRO> , l.oNIMiN. The "l»OK'H Head" Uot- 

lluiK <>( ■>ulnilc«<t' Slriiit and lla^t' Ale. 
BAKTMIJI.OMAV UKKWINC CO.. KoCllKSTKa, N. V., 

KDlckcrlMK-kcr llcrr. 
MlvS.SK8. I)UIIO!i HKKKES, BoKDHAi'x. Clarets and Snu- 

teriic« 
MI%SSK8 nivINIIAKn ft CO , Conl-BNTI, Khine and Moiclle 

Wine. 
MR. l'CllAI'Vi:Nin", Nl'l-n, Com n'OH. IlurKUndy Wine». 
MI-SSKS MllKl'.AN IIROS . I'lKKTu IPK Santa Makia, 

Slirrtl.-.. 

WIDOW IIAKMONV. 1 iiertode Santa Maria, Sherries. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



THK ROYAL WINE CO., OPORTO. Pott Wlne«. 
MKSSRS. VZAOflRRH ft CO . Ri:i-«. TarraRona Wlne« 

Till-: ROVAi, hin.;akian <:(ivi:knmi;,\t wink cel- 
lars, IlroAi'i^T. Iliink'nrinn Wine-* 

rsciioKK AM) oTHKk <;i;rman iti:i;Rs 

MR Tlll-:n l,.\l>l'l-;. NKi-DiKTrNtMtHK, .AroiiiAtitine nl'tcrs 

MR MARNIHK LAPOSTOLLK. SKI.NI. IT uisr, l-BANCl. 
I'.rmid Marnier 

MKSSRS !■: Cts|-NIKR.l-|l.SAINi:ft CO Paris. Cortllnl.. 

ANDKKAS SAXI.ICIINUR. Ilri>Al'l.'ST,llnnyadi Junon Nnluia 
A|tcrlriit Wnln 

MR. JOHANN MARIA I'AHIN'A. Coioi-.nt, Genenuebcr ilcni 
Juellch.plalz, Culusne. l\au de Colo|ine. 



l{r-hi>i>i>i Iril 



liiivrirtiu WhiDUiri.— fd Kxr<l»i. r; Spr. '8» Ilcllf rf Nelson; Sprinp "."i (llil Craiil Dad; Iliimo; Mayliclil; O. K. (' 
other .Sl-iplc brands, ijornai market (|Uoltttions fuinihliol on applicalion, to llie wholesale tiailc only. 



; Cliickcncock and 



PAeipie wij\£ yvjMD sfiF^iT f^eview. 



19 



NEW YORK CORRESPONDENCE. 



New Youk, Aj)ril 12, 1897. 

Tlio wliolesjile wiiio aiul liquor trade in this section has 
been in u state of complete stagnation tbis month so far. The 
uncertninty as tt) what direction tiio local legislation niav turn, 
or what new device the rural legislators, who are in the ascen- 
dancy in the New York Legislature, may light upon to further 
hurry and bleed the trade of the State, has a most depressing 
etJect on the retailers, who are working on a liand-tu-niouth 
principle while awaiting developments. The certainty of a 
change in taritt' rates is resulting in immense importations of 
foreign goods before the law takes fll'ect, which is for the time 
being tying up nearly all the available capital of houses who 
engage in handling imported goods, and, as a result, domestic 
liquors are sadly neglected, with consequent dragging of the 
domestic wine and licjuor market. The rural members of the 
Legislature, who are responsible for that excise malformation 
known as the Eaines Law, have discovered that the section 
abolishing the free lunch has partaken somewhat of the nature 
of a boomerang, and reacted upon their pocket books in a 
manner truly alarming to those thrift}- sous of toil by reducing 
the consumption of cheese, in the manufacture of which a 
]arge number of counties of this State have become justly 
famous, to such an extent that a wail has gone up from their 
bucolic constituents, to which their representatives, with an 
eye to future elections, have made haste to heed, with the re- 
sult that the free lunch is to be restored once more. The 
high-handed manner in which the country legislators are mak- 
ing laws to the detriment of this city's interests, in the further- 
ance of their political schemes, is creating a serious distrust of 
the present condition of affairs, and there is already a move- 
ment, with a large following, toward the division of the State, 
making the State of Manhattan out of the territory embraced 
by Greater New York City and a few counties contiguous. 

In the California wine business there is nothing doing, 
and trade is exceedingly dull, and the movement of wines is 
limited to small orders. Price does not appear to be much of 
an incentive toward attracting business, as we hear of several 
good-sized lots of sweet wines on the dock otiered at extremely 
low prices, and for which there does not seem to be any buy- 
ers. Dry wines are also suffering, large wholesalers of wines 
are at present laying in large stocks of imported goods, which 
ties up so much capital as to prohibit any buying of Califor- 
nia goods in any way except to the immediate needs of their 
trade. 

Whiskies have shown no improvement, as far as the move- 
ment of goods is concerned, and there is pi-actically nothing 
ding in cither bourbons or ryes, and the representatives of 



the different Kentucky distillers are conspicuous by their ab- 
sence only in this locality. 

All New York is interested to a tremendous degree over 
the approaching ceremonies attending the turning over to the 
city of the (Jrant Monument on the '27th inst., which promises 
to bo the most stupendous affair in the recent historv of the 
city. 

Julius Paul Smith is meeting with gratifying success in 
the introtluction on this market of a sparkling Sauterne, the 
product of his Olivina Vineyard. 

The Now Y'ork branch of Cha]iin"ife Trull, the Now Eng- 
land rum distillers, is devoting considerable attention to the 
handling of California wines and brandies on consignments. 
They have ample capital to make liberal advances on ship- 
ments, and through their large trade connections are enabled 
to satisfactorily handle large quantities of those goods, and 
their mercantile standing is unquestionable. 

We notice the arrival here of i;;jo7 barrels and 51 cases of 
California wines from San Francisco, during the last two 
weeks of March. 

K. J. Dean & Co. announce that they are in better shape 
than ever to take care of brandy shipments for storage in their 
United States Internal Revenue Special Bonded Warehouse. 

W. A. Geft. 



From L. Gandolfi & Co. 



New York, April 3, 1897. 

Dear Sir: The following is our list of importations for 
the fortnight ended March 31, 1897: 

Per " Maniloa," March 18th, 62 cases altar wines, Giacobini 
brand, and 25 cases sparkling Lacrima Cristi, " P. Scala." 

Per " Kaiser Wilhem," 20th, 25 cases Chianti wine, " S. 
L. Euffiuo,"and3 barrels Parmesan cheese. 

Per " Sunset Eoute," 22d, 10 barrels white brandy, " Ital- 
ian-Swiss Colon}'." 

Per Veendam, 2-4th, 50 cases Edam cheese, Heil A- Zonen. 

Per Olympia, 25th, 500 bxs Naples macaroni, Liquori. 

Per "Athens," 2oth, 220 cases Lucca olive oil, Fortuna. 

Per " Clive," 29th, 1200 boxes Naples macaroni. 

Per "Ems," 31st, 200 cases Fernet Branca; 330 boxes 
Genoa paste, " Profumo." 



T. 7^. F^ERGUSON, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER AND IMPORTER OF 

Wiijes, Br2Li)dies nrji Wbi^Wes. 

719 MARKET STREET, 

Next to Bancroft's Hislonr Building. 
TELEPHONE MAIN 1830 SAN FRANCl.sco 




eoiacn Gate 
Cbampagne Co. 

—Incorporated... 
PRODUCERS OF 

PURE CALIFORNIA 

Champagne 

CunlrolltTN iT 

Golden Qite Cbimpifine 
& BobemiAO Club. . . . 

502-504-506 Market St., 

.SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
TE1.KPHONE MAIN II 10. 

CHAMPAGNE VAULTS, 4th and Minna Streets. 




TRY THE 



Private Stock Whisky. 



FINEST 

STRAIGHT WHISKY 

IN THE MARKET . . 

JESSE M. LEVY & CO., 

CONTROLLERS 

^ 506 Market Street San Francisco. 



20 



PASIPie Wir^E A^'IS) Spif^'T f^EVlEW 



PATE/NTS. TKADE-MA-RKS, ETC. 

The following lict of rrct-iil puliutit nnJ tr»ili--niiiiko ii( liitciobt to our palroiis 
l» reported by Wm. G. HitNOKiwoN. «oIicllor of Anifrkmi kiid foreign |)»teiil« ind 
IraJe-oiirkt. Xorrls BulUliiiK, 501 F mreft, W»sl>iiiKlon, D. C. A copy of »uy of 
llic I'ulted SUIes patents will be furiiinbed bj- Uim for 'JS cent*. 

l88fK OF March Id). 1S)7. 
57V»,7V.'— Maiblnc for Ubellni; botlleu, F-Tsii \V. Cornell, Adriftn, Mich. 
i;9.5(M— Bottle. Wllltani 8. Dawxou, Cbusurv, Howrab, India. 
5;9. 807— Wattr bottle, William B. Fcnn, Dorrnnceton. I'n. 
STD.SJS— Bottle and stopper therefor, Wilbur F. Ilyer, Meridian, Miss. 
57U,8S7— Stopper for jar». bottles, cans, etc., Edward A. Malhias, Liverpool, and 

\V. H. Harrison. Mamhesler, En|;laud. 
57VT63— Bottle washer. Henry W. .Miller. Lakeside, Ohio. 
JTB.IWl— Bottle, Adolph W. Moritr, Southfieid, X. Y. 
STU.flOt)— Tumbler washer. Joseph B. Nesbitl, Sunbury, Pa. 
579.(V»+— Bottle, Samuel I'. Howell, Boston, Mass. 
579,84»— Device for extracting loop seals from bottles, Charles F. Scbield, Cam- 

brldije, Ohio. 
479,010— Stopper for bottles. Charles H. Watkins, Wheelin);, West Va. 
5T9,6'.'9— Xon-retiilable bottle, Wm. C. Wilson, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

TRAOE-MARKS. 

29,753— Beer. Acme BrewinK Company, Macon, Ga, Essential Feature -A label 
having a blue and white tinted band arranged diagonally between upper 
and lower red corners. 

29,754 — \W: Porter and Lager Beer, The Connecticut Breweries Company, Bridge- 
port and Meridian, Conn. Essential Feature— .\ representation of a nut- 
meg and the word " Nutmeg " 

a8,755— Lager beer, Gabriel Scdlroayer, Brauerei zum Spaten, Munich, Germany. 
Essential Feature — A representation of a spade blade. 

29,75R— Lager beer, Gabriel Sedclmayer, Brauerei zum Spaten, Munich, Germany. 
Essential Feature— The word " Spatenbrau." 

•J9,757— Lager beer, Gabriel Sedlmayer, Brauerei zum Spaten, Munich, Germany. 
Essential Feature—The words " Versandt Bier von Gabriel Sedlmayer. 
Brauerei zum S])aten, Muenehen," a representation of a spade blade, and 
a surrounding margin. 

a9,75S— Lager beer, Gabriel Sedlmayer, Brauerei zum Spaten, Munich, Germany. 
Essential Feature— The word " Spaten." 

29,759— Lajer beer, The Ueymann Brewing Company, Wheeling Wes; Va. Essen 
tial Feature- The word "Parlor." 



Issue of Apkh, 6, 1897. 
5S0.24K — Oven for coloring flass, Josef Biemann, Jeannette, Pa. 



580,104 — Apparatus for manufacturing beer or ale, Andrew W. BiillDgs, Londo 

England. 
5S0,152 — Bottle, Wm. S. Blackburn, Boston. Mass. 
5St),'.'IU— Non-rclillabic bottle, William 1!. Fearn. Camden, N. J. 
580, 13S— Bottle, llichard E. Maiidley. New York City. 

580,222— Sealing caj) for cans or other receptacles. George J. Record. Cooneaut, O. 
5.80.1)03— Bottle washer. Henry A Itueler. Boston, Mass. 
580.001 — Bottle. William C. Sherman, Jacksonville, Fl». 
580,2;w— Bottle, Phllo B. Tlngiey, New York City. 
580, 239— Non-reHllalile bottle, Philo B. Tingley, New York City. 

TKAUE-UABKS. 

29,?JS— Canned Goods, Flour, Toliacco, Li'iuor. Cigars, Soap. Dried Fruit and Far- 
inaceous Foods, The Weidcman Company. Cleveland, Ohio.- F:s6enlia 
Feature — A representation of a statue of an otlicer in uniform mounted on 
a pedestal. 

29,799 — Canned Goods, Flour, Tobacco, Cigars, Liquors, Soap, Dried Fruit and Far- 
inaceous Foods, The Weidemann Company, Cleveland, Ohio.— Essential 
Feature— The word "Commodore." 

29,800— Lager Beer, Doblcr Brewing Co., Albany, N. Y'. Essential Feature a rep 
rtsentation ot a band grasping the handle on the side of a mug of foam- 
ing beer, the whole enclosed with the letter " D." 

29,801— Beer, John O. Forstburg. Chester, Pa. Essential Feature— The words 
"The William Penn Brewery," together with a representation of William 
Penn standing in a tmall boat approaching the shore. 

29,802- Carbonated beverages. Liquid Carbonic .\cid Manufacturing Company, t'hi- 
cago, III., Pittsburg, Pa., St. Louis, Mo.. and Milwaukee. Wis. Essential 
Feature— The compound word"Bromo-Pop, ' enclosed within a diamond 
shaped figure. 

OflScial figwres of the 1889 crop of France has reached the 
State Dep.irtment from Consul Wiley, at Bonloaus, showing 
a total production of over a billion gallons, valued approxi- 
mately at $234,800,000. The exact figures are 1,179,3G4,9G0 
gallons, an increase over 1895 of 468,001!, 880 gallons, ;ind over 
the average of the last ten years of 273,410,1190. In the prov- 
ince of Algeria last year's vintage amounted to 106,960,500 
gallons, while in Corsica, 7,923,000 were made. Notwith- 
standing the somewhat unfavorable atmospheric ccmditions 
which prevailed during the greater part of the year throughout 
France, the Consul says the (juality of the crop is particularly 
good. 



DAWSON'S 




EERFECTION" 




In Cases Only. 



SOLE AGENT FOR PACIFIC COAST 





W. B. CHAPMAN, 123 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



f/eifie wi^iE /;jB spii^it i^eview. 



21 



Owners and Handlers of its own Brands 
and Also the Weil-Known . 
Brands of 



NAPA VALLEY WINE CO. 
KOHLER & VAN BERGEN 
KOHLER & FROHLING 
B. DREYFUS & CO. 
S. LACHMAN CO. 

C. CARRY & CO. 




AUQU8T 10, 1804- 



2ii 



PAftipie WljME >&N3 SflF^IT REVIEW 



riurrav and Hunter River Nine Districts. 



Hi. 'M liEPOKT OF M. HLUNNO. 

MfRRAT KnEB District. — I luu miuh impressed with what 
I bare seen, and consider tliiit tliere is a great future for tbe 
wino-growing industry. Tlie wine growers received me with 
great courtesy, allowed me to taste their wliole stocks, and 
seemed anxious to profit by any suggestions th;it 1 could luiiko. 
I anticipate no failure can be feaied where natural factors — 
climate and soil, (against which it is very hard to fight,) agree 
wonderfully for ]>ioducing certain types of wine in a restrictive 
way — as it would be impossible to produce wines iu this dis- 
trict partaking of the light, delicate types produced in many 
parts of tlie continent. 

I have tasted many wines, both in the small and liyge cel- 
lars, and my impression has lieen always the same — any eflbrts 
to produce a similar wine to Hock or Claret have been crowned 
with only partial success. 

Wines jiroduced in these disti-icts c()ntain some elements 
in excess — as alcohol, coloring matter, extractive substunces ; 
therefore wines that are wanting iu harmony with the chemical 
composition, which harmony is essential for table wines, so 
they rather come in the category of blending wines. But I am 
pleased to say they are blending wines of the first quality, be- 
cause generalh' they are made from gi'apes whicli in cool 
climates, as the centre of France, give very good table wines. 
Thus they would blend more kindly than some wines grown in 
many parts of Europe which are used for blending, as they 
are of a superior species of grape. 

The work of blending these wines with a light wine, 
richer in total acidity, and more delicate, is easier than that 
whicli is necessary in manipulating blending wines of other 
countries of the world, which need great patience and jierse- 
verance to produce wines which are harmonic and kind. Even 
the earthy taste, which is very hard to eradicate in blending, 
is not so accentuated, and I am convinced that the fermenta- 
tion in small vats, which is here generally adopted, has the 
faculty of getting rid of it. 

However, experts have not as yet ascertained the cause of 
this earthy flavor. There are some who ascribe it to the for- 
mation of an organic compound, viz., etilmerca])tan *; some 
who believe it to be due to a special characteristic of certain 
kinds of grapes, while others think that it occurs when the 
bunches of grapes are grown too (^lose to the soil. As fur as 
T m concerned, I am of 0])inion that at least one of the first 
causes is the fermentation at too high a temperature; in fact, 
the earthy taste is not so common iu France with the same 
kind of grape. 

I expected to have found a greater quantity of wines af- 
fected by that dreadful disease, viz., lactic acid, from lactic 
fermentation, so frequent iu hot climates, but also from this 

The elllnieriaplan. Hie fmcll of whlih lias mil llic Blii,'hleBt alllnily wilh lliu 
cartliv laiite. i« mainlahieil liul liv few as the cause "f il. 



point of view the reality has been less than my expectations. 
Last vintage has been made under favorable conditions, for a 
period of rainfall has kept a lower temperature, but the old 
wines, too, I have found without it. Iu fact, vignerons here 
are very well informed about the influence of the high temper- 
aturc'on fermentation. Wisely they use small vats, and there- 
fore avoid that excessive temperature where the lactic ferment 
takes predominance. Some vignerons are now using cement 
vats of small size, and which have a great advantage over 
those of wooil of the same size, for tlie_hcat developed in fer- 
menting wines is more easily expelled. 

The natural conditions here also produce wines of a des- 
sert type, either dry or sweet (vins de liqueurs), and vignerons 
know that, and say themselves that wliite wines, not only 
when made with Fedro Ximenes, but even when made from 
Riesling, Tokay and Aucarot, develop a sherry type when aged. 
And I believe that the making of these types of wines for ex- 
port will in time become a profitable industry. 

With very few exceptions iirop(ir cellars have not been 
erected. Simple sheds of corrugated iron, both for walls and 
roofs, are generally thought sullicient. In these the temper- 
ature is very unfavorable for keeping sound those wines con- 
taining less than 28 j)er cent, of proof spirit, while it is very 
favorable for maturing wines with an alcoholic strength of 
over 28 per cent, as then we have to deal with dessert wines, 
either dry or sweet, which mature more quickly in hot than 
cool cellars; in fact, all stocks in Spain, Portugal, Madeira and 
Sicily, where the best dessert wines are made, are kept in but 
simple sheds, where they are subject to all changes of weather 
without harm, as they are ])rotected by a good proportion of 
alcohol, which, being above 28 per cent., paralyzes the'power 
of every germ of disease; but such hot stores are a great 
trouble for regulating the temperature of the fermenting musts 
in such a way that fermentation be pure and eomjilete. Al)out 
two-fifths of the wine-growing countries of the world have to 
fight against the too high temjierature, which, if not satisfac- 
torily' dominated, will destroy the bulk of the wine, turning it 
into an nauseous article, unfit for consumption. 

The Iberic Peninsular, Southern Italy, Sicily, Algeria, 
South Australia, parts of Victoria, and of California, as well 
as the wine-growing districts of South America are all subject 
to the