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Full text of "Pacific wine and spirit review"

PERIOD!'^ ' AKiiviiiw* 




ACCESSION 



•f663 HI ^ 



238684 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LfBRARY 



FORM 3427-5000-8-46 



PERIODICAL DEPARTMENT 



THE GREATEST 
AMERICAN WHISKEY 



YELLOWSTONE 



TAYLOR & WILLIAMS, INC., DISTILLERS 

GEO. DELAPORTE, Pacific Coast Agent 

820 Mission Street 

San Francisco, CaL 



A WHOLESALER'S AND RETAILER'S MEDIUM 










,0^?t^■< 



ESTABLISHED 1878 



VINICULTURE .v^^V*^ 



■^^^ 



VOL. XLXIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES, NOVEMBER 31. I9I0 



No. 1 





Its d sign of good 
dmes to drinK 

OLD KIRK 
WHISKY 

"BestonthemarKet" 





CINZANO 

ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



THe Standard of Quality 
the "World Over 



In 1909 over (J49fc of all the Vermouth 
exported from Italy was CIN?ANO 



ALEX D SHAW & CO 

UNITED STATES AGENTS 
NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO CHICAGO 



MARTINI 
& ROSSI 

ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



Is by far the Biggest Seller in the 
United States 

WHY? 

Because EVERYBODY can mix a better 
Cocktail with it than with ANY other Brand 



F. E. MAYHEW & CO. 

INTERNAL REVENUE and 
CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 

Hydrometers and Elxtra Stems and All Kinds of Revenue Books 



N. E. Cor. Eattery and Washington Sts. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



GL AUK'S 




HEAB 



G!^ AUK'S HEAD 



"THE BEST THE BREWERS BREW 

BASS'S ALE 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



GEORGE W. LAMB, President WM. T. LEMMAN, Vice-Preiident GEO. 1. LEMMAN, Sec'y and Treat. 



SOUTH END 
WAREHOUSE CO. 



South End U.S. Bonded Warehouse 

South End Warehouse 

King Street Warehouse 

Ternninal Warehouses 

California Warehouses 

Special Bond No. 2 

General Bond No. 2 

Phoenix Warehouse 

Cape Horn Warehouses 




WAREHOUSEMEN 
AND FORWARDERS 

MAIN OFFICE: 

Cor. 2nd & Townsend Sts. 

Tel. KEARNY 2200 



AGENTS FOR 

GENERAL BONDED WAREHOUSE 

NO. 2 






AGENTS FOR 

SPECIAL BONDED WAREHOUSE 

NO. 2 



Youngbcrg & Son 



CUSTOM HOUSE AND INTERNAL 
REVENUE BROKERS 



5 1 1 Washington Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Tel. KEARNY 729 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^> % ^v ^ ^^^^^^^^w^^^^^^^^^^w^/w^^w^ . 



''Paul Masson'' 

CHAMPAGNES 



"The Pride of 
California" 



Extra Dry, Sparkling Burgundy 
Oeil de Perdrix... 

The Best Sparkling Wines Produced in America 



PAUL MASSON CHAMPAGNE: COMPANY 

SAN JOSE. CALIFOKNIifV 



joacxjiyiS^^^^^^^^^Ei^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



S 



IMON 



\Jk Abricotine and other Cordials 

Legler Pernod, Couvet & Pontarlier 

Absinthe and Kirschwasser 



Levy <Sc Co. 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 



SPECIALTIES 



P. Garnier, Enghien les Bains 



R. Slater & Co., Glasgow 



0) 

\0^ Hills & Underwood, London 

^ Old Tom Gin, Dry Gin, Sloe Gin and Orange Bitters 

\K • Connor & Sons, Belfast, Bally Castle Irish Whiskey 



C. A. Lindgren & Co., Stockholm 



c« 



Swedish Punch fyil 



A. J. Anderson & Sons, Goteberg, Sweden ^S 



Branvin and Aquavit 



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Ben Cruachan Scotch Whiskey ^ j 



PHONE KING 2173 



346-348 WASHINGTON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 

THEO. GIER COMPA|slY 

Wholesale Wine and Liquor Merchants 

Sole Distributors Metropole Bourbon Whiskey, Metropole Bourbon Whiskey in 
Bond. Puck Rye Whiskey. Also handlers of Straight and Blended Whiskeys. 



I 575-577 Eighteenth Street ^"^ Oakland, CaHfornia 



GIERSBERGER 
WINES 

OUR SPECIALTY 

From our Vineyards at 

Livermore, Napa, St. Helena 

THEO. GIER WINE CO. 

571-75 Eighteenth Street 



Oak 2510 



Home A 2510 



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SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMANN 



WHOLESALE 






WINE AND LIQUOR Mg:RCHANTS 



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SOLE -PROPRIETORS 

K. ROSEDALE 

RYE & BOURBON 

Western Distributors 

Herbert's 
Pi/re Malt Whiskey 

Bottled By 
HOFFHEIMER BROTHERS 

Cincinnati, OInio 



E. J. Baldwin's 

APRICOT 
BRANDY 

THE FINEST IN THE 
WORLD 

Phone Douglas 1798 



CALIFORNIA'S FINEST BRANDIES 

"•"9^1 SENATOR 

J\ Leiand Stanford's 

PURE 
VINA BRANDY 



IT'S PURE— THAT'S SURE 
THERE'S NOTHING LIKE IT 



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BRUNSWICK RYE AND BOURBON 

SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMANN, 430-434 Battery Street San Francisco. WESTERN DISTRIBUTERS 



ltSi3«5r.SJSS,^;«^«^S«3«^S<S<3«SiS(5«»Si»»»3«R5H»3a3Kjr.3<»5KjKa<j»5Ji^ 



QUALITY UNEXCELLED IN BULK OR CASES ^ 

SPECIAL ORDERS SHIPPED DIRECT I-ROM DISTILLERY ^ 

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G. S. NICHOLAS & CO. 

41-43 BEAVER ST., NEW YORK 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 



J. & P. MARTEL Brandies 

(San Frunelsco excepted.) 

ANDREW USHER & CO Scotch Whlttkiex 

WYNAIVD POCKINK Cordials and Gins 

PBRJVGD PILS Absinthe and Klrsch 

FIELD, SON & CO Sloe Gin, Orange Bitters, etc. 

\V. E. EDDISON & CO Apricot and Peach Liqueurs 

J. WRAV & NEPHEW Jamaica Rums 

GEORGE ROE & CO Irish Whiskies 

WiH. JAMESON & CO Irish Whiskies 

DUBLIN WHISKY DISTILLERY CO.Irlsh IVhlskies 

BOOTH & CO Old Tom and High and Dry Gins 

DEINHARD & CO Rhine and Moselle Wines 

KHUG & CO Champagnes 



NATH'L JOHNSTON & SONS Clarets, Sauterues and Olive Oil 

(San Prandsco excepted.) 
BOUCHARD PBRE & PILS Burgundies 

(Pacific Coast^excepted.) 

GOMEZ, CUVILBb & CO Sherries 

GOMEZ & CO . . ici5 Malagas and Sherries 

MARTINEZ, GiAMlOT & CO., Ltd. . . Alto Douro Ports 

DONALDSON &^0 Madeiras 

ROMAN PEaP^Jl Turrngona Ports 

PREUND, BAllLOtl * CO Vermouth 

J. A. MENTZENDORPP A CO Russian Allasoh Kummel 

GIROLAMO LUXARDO Maraschino dl Zara and Cherry Cor- 

(Paclflc Coast excepted.) dial 

R. SCHLUMBERGER Austrian \Vines 

GIORGIO GIGLIOLI Italian Olive Oil 

MARCEL ALIOTH & CO French Olive Oil 



San rrancisco Office, 2 1 S-2 1 6 XVestbank Bids., 830 Market St. JOS. 



L. EPPIINGER, Representative 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




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THE STANDARD WINE OF CALIFORNIA 

^ We are the largest producers aQd bottlers of high grade 
CaliforQia Wine. 

^ We oWQ our vineyards ar)d tnake all of our wiQes aod 
can therefore guarantee t^e purity of every bottle. 

NO INCREASE IN PRICES OF CRESTA BLANCA WINES 



^nm\i 




Location of Vineyards, LIVERMORE, CAL. , 

Send for Price List 



42-44 Davis St., San Francisco 
10 West 33rd Street, New York 
37 South Water Street, Chicago 






^ 



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4»^4'44'4^*4^4«l«^4«4'4-H-H-H-l«*«*-i'4'44'*44=**4'4-H^^ 



SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD 

We do not Rectify or Compound 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 



-FOR— 



J. H. Cutter Celebrated Kentucky Whiskies. 

Burke's (Guinness' s) Porter and Bass's Red Label Ale 

Dewar's Fine Old Scotch Whisky. 

Keystone Monogram (Philadelphia) Rye. 

Burke's Irish and Garn-Kirk Scotch. 

Evan's Pale Ale and Stout. 

G. & W. Canadian Rye Whisky. 

Schramsberg California Wines. 



SEATTLE 
801 So. 1st Ave. 

Phonet : 

Main 103 

Independent 105 



Schlitz Milw^aukee Beer. 

Sherwood Robin Hood Whisky. 

Mackenzie & Go's Spanish Sherries and Oporto Ports. 

Feist Bros. & Sons' Rhine and Moselle Wines. 

Holland Gin in wood and glass. 

Anchor Brand New York Ciders. 

Schweppe's Soda and Sarsaparilla. 

Bass's Ale in wood. 









PORTLAND 
9andIlN.4thSt. 

Phone: 

Main 2779 


SAN FRANCISCO 

41-47 Beale St. 

Phone: 

Kearny 1182 


LOS ANGELES 
346 North Main St 

Phone* : 

Main 670 
Home A7804 



I 

PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 5 



Italian Vineyard Company 

MAIN OFFICES, SALESROOMS AND WINERIES 

1234 to 1248 PALMETTO ST., near Mateo - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

PRODUCERS OF 

CALIFORNIA PURE 
WINES AND BR ANDIES 

Owners of the LARGEST VINEYARD in the U. S.— 4000 Acres 

At Guasti, San Bernardino County, Cal. 
PLANTED IN THE FINEST VARIETIES OF WINE GRAPES 



NEW YORK BRANCH CHICAGO BRANCH NEW ORLEANS BRANCH 

Offices and Wine Vaults 152 West Kinzie St. 237 Decatur Street 

202-204 Center Street and 213-215 Hester Street 

Seattle, Washington, 78 West Marion Street 



WILLIAM WOLFF & COMPANY 

IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION 

MERCHANTS 

= 52-58 BEALE STREET = 



PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS FOR 

J. & F. Martell, Cognac _ - _ Martell Brandy 

John de Kuyper & Zoon, Rotterdam - - - - - - - - Holland Gin 

Sir Robert Burnett & Co., London and New York - - - Old Tom and Dry Gin 

Cantrell & Cochrane, Belfast Ginger Ale and Sarsaparilla 

E. H. Taylor Jr. & Sons, Frankfort, Ky. - - _ . Old Taylor Bottled in Bond Whiskey 

Mellwood Distillery, Cincinnati, Ohio - - - Mellwood Whiskey 

IMPORTERS OF 
Vintage Wines, Staple Cordials, Bitters, Absinthe, Preserves, Olive Oil, Etc. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 







^ 
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^ 

^ 

^ 

^ 

^ 

^ 

^ 

^ 
^ 



^QXQXQXQXOJ^QXQXQXQXQXQXSfmSXQXQXQXOXOj^^ 



WIELAND'S EXTRA PALE LAGER 




OUR VERDICT 



"It Is Better Than Ever" 



Office and Brewery: 

240 SECOND STREET 



I 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Sl5X5XSXSX5XSXSX5X5XSXSX5X^5xeXSXexe^SXSX5^^ 



v^ 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



C. H. WENTE, 

President 



FRANK A. BUSSE, 

Oeneral Manacer 




'SONOMA ^S^<T NAPA 

I'ffi.ie^J: Selecled 
Wines 



<*r 



COCNAC BRANDY 

Oro Fino Cognac*" $12. OO per case 

( PURE MEDICINAL BRANDY) 



Vineyard and Winery : Livermore, Gal. 

OFFICE AND CELLARS! 

112-116 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 

PHONE MARKET 2836 



FERNET- BRANCA 




Specialty of 

FRATELLI BRANCA 

MILAN, ITALY 



The King of Appetizers 
Best Flavor to Cocktails 



GRAND PRIZE 

ST. LOLHS 1904 

Sole North American Agents 

L. GANDOLFI & CO., 

427-31 W. B'way, New York 
IMPORT ORDERS SOLICITED 




BUFFftLO 

NEW BREW 
BOHEMIAN 

Sacramento, [lal. 



BREWING 



A. H. LOCHBAUM CO. 

AGENTS 

125 King Street 



PALE EXPORT 
CULMBACHER 
PORTER 



COMPANY 



PHONE 1010 Main 



K. H. PEASE, President 



F. M. SHEPARU, JR., Treasurer. 



C. F. RUNYOlt, Secretary 



Qoodyear Rubber Company 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

RUBBER GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 




WINE AND BREWER'S HOSE. 



RUBBER-LINED COTTON HOSE. 



"GOLD SEAL" IS THE BEST 

61-63-65-67 FOURTH STREET, PORTLAND, OR. 
587-589-591 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR EVERYTHING MADE OF RUBBER 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



NITED STATES FIDELITY m GUARANTY CO. 



PHONE 
Kearny 925 



CAPITAL, $2,000,000 SURPLUS AND RESERVE, $5,145,729.67 

rHis Company is Accepted as 

SOLE SURETY UPON ALL INTERNAL REVENUE AND CUSTOMS BONDS 

Required by the United States Qovernment from 

Distillers, Brewers and Cigar Manufacturers 



PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 



BORLAND & JOHNS, General Managers 



Nevada Bank Building 



r 

i 



-*»- 



A. ROSSI & CO. 

\MACHINISTS 



►*»- 






{ Wine Presses 



FOR SAL£— Second-hand Redwood TanRs and OaR Casks 



• 

I BROADWAY, Near 6?ansome 



tSan Francisco 



Grape Crusher ( 

i 



Barrett's Unrivalled Prune Juice 




GUARANTEED UNDER THE 
FOOD AND DRUGS ACT 

GUARANTY No. 49 



Now to be had from 




AMERICAN MERCANTILE CO. 



• • • 

• • • 



514 BATTERY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SAMPLES SENT 
ON APPLICATION 



Skrra madre Uimage Co. 



GROWERS AND PRODUCERS OF 



Pure California Wines ^"^ Brandies 




PORT AND SHERRY 

A Specialty 

La Manda Park, Los Angeles County, Cal. 



Gold Medal Paris Exposition, 1900 
Gold Medal Pan-American Exposition. Buffalo, 1901 

Qold Medal Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904 
Gold 'Medal Lewis & Clark Exposition, 

Portland. Oregon, 1#05 
Qold Medal Jamestown, Va. Exposition, 1907 
Gold Medal Alaska-Yukon Expositon, 1909 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



THE BARTON VINEYARD CO., L'td. 



ESTABLISHED 1880 

GROWERS AND DISTILLERS OF 



The Famous Barton Wines and Brandies 

Vineyards and Cellars, Fresno, California 



Chicago Agent 

BYRON E. VRATCH 

37 South Water Street 



WM. RENNIE, Manager 
Fresno, Cal. 



New York Agents 

E. L. SPELLMAN & CO. 

792 Washington Street 



NEXT TIME TRY 

"Semper Idem" Filter Pulp 



Guaranteed Chemically Pure. Long fibre with asbestos 
Used by the largest wine producers in California to 
whom we refer by permission. Correspondence solicited 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Exclusive selling agents ip the Vnited States 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OAKLAND 



Send us ft trial order 



LOS ANGELES 



The LOEW SYSTEM 

Patent 
Wine and 
Liquor 
Filter 

=SAVES= 




Cost of Clarifying" 

Materials, as well 

as Storage, 

Shrinkage and 

Waste 



Filters to crystal brilliancy the 
most turbid wines and liquors, 
without any deterioration or loss 
in color, flavor, quantity or qual- 
ity, imparting a lustre and fin-' 
ish to the product. 

Easily and quickly cleaned. 

Packed and unpacked in a few 
minutes. 

Send for Catalog. 

The Loew Manufacturing Co. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 




LUNDSTROM HATS 

"From Maker to Wearer" 

For Twenty-five years LUNDSTROM HATS 
have been the standard of quality and style 

FIVE STORES 
1178 MARKET ST. 72 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 2640 MISSION ST. 

26 THIRD ST. 



Send for Illustrated Catalogue to MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT 1178 Market Street 



§e©€)SXi)®®®SXiXiXsXSgXS(iXjXS5^ 



"The Rules of The Game 



99 



A California Novel 

BY 

Stewart Exlward White 

THIS will be one of the many special features in SUNSET 
MAGAZINE for 1910; a stirring tale of Life in the High 
Sierra, of the Sheepmen and the Cattlemen, of the Life Above 
the Clouds. It will run as a serial in SUNSET for 1910. 
ONE HIGH IN AUTHORITY in our sister republic is 
writing a series of articles on MEXICO TODAY. Coming at 
this time and showing the absurd exaggerations of conditions, it 
will prove intensely interesting. The first of the series appears 
in January SUNSET. 



SPECIAL MAGAZINE OFFERS 



Sunset Magazine 
Anwrjcan Magazine . 
Review of Reviews . 

Sunset Magazine 
American Magazine . 

Sunset Marazine 
American Magazine , 
Woman's Home Compi 

Sunset Magazine 
McClures .... 



$1,501 Our price 
I. SO I alitor 
3.O0J $3.25 
I Our Price 



$1.50 
1.50 



1 
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i] 

Jl.50l<"" 
1. 50 J $2 



$2.00 

All for 



SISOI 
lloj $2.75 
Priw 

$2.35 



Sunset Magazine . . . 
Woman's Home Companion 
Review of Reviews . . . 

Sunset Macazine . . 

Woman's Home Companion 

Sunset Magazine . . . 
Forest and Stream . . . 

Review of Reviews . . 
Sunset Magazine . . 
Van Norden's Magazine 



$1,501 Our Price 
1.50 1 alitor 
l-50j $3.50 

$1.50] O'"'''"" 
i-5oJ $2.25 
r Price 
$3.00 

{3 001 Our Price 
I 50 I 
1.50 J $3.10 



Sunset Magazine $1.50 per year 

FREE with any of the above offers will be sent two beautiful four-color views of the Yosemite Valley, 
hanrlflomely mounted. They wiil be sent fiat, not rolled. 

Send now to 

SUNSET MAGAZINE 



313 BATTERY STREET 



San Francisco 



Califi 



ornia 



10 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



0%^M AutamoMJmff 




V^PfV IinnOt'tRn't ^^^ agency for the distribution of ^UMIS on the Coast, formerly held by A. P. Hotaling & Co., of San 

^ i- Francisco, has been voluntarily relinquished by them and transferred to AMI VIGNIER (Inc.) 

605-611 Battery Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

The Fred Krug Brewing Co., brewers and bottlers of ^UMIS "The Beer You Like," bespeak for Messrs. Ami 
Vignier, Inc., an unbounded success in the handling of this high-grade beer. 

AMI VIGNIER (Inc.) Coast Distributors, 605-611 Battery Street, San Francisco 



RUSCONI, FISHER & COMPANY 

I IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS I 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

ALEXANDER & McDONALD 
SPORTSMAN SCOTCH 
SANDY MCDONALD'S 
LIQUOR SCOTCH AND 
CORONA VINTAGE WINES 



•i; 



DOG ON 
OOOD WHISKEY 



KENNEL CLUB 
WHISKEY 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

KENNEL CLUB 
BOURBON AND RYE 
WHISKIES 
JAMES GRAHAM 
TOM GIN 



U0rivaled for Purity and Excellence 



f"^ 

326 JACKSON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



11 



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•*»***4(**«IH 



•tl**«t«*W«li 



SEATTLE AND NORTHWEST NEWS ! f> | 



w«»^*«ia I ■!♦■ I 11 i|i «»^<«i»**«i» ■ ■ii» I ■ii»M<iiB I ■ti x i m 



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..4. 



SEATTJ.E, Nov. 19, 1910 :— There has been considerable 
speculation as to the effect that the enfranchisement of wo- 
men in A\'ashinjiton will have cm the question of wet or dry. In 
Seattle there is not a verj' radical element of dry advocates 
among the women other than those affiliated with Prohibition 
movements and tlie work of temperance societies. Now there is 
Dr. ilaker, wlio has been attacking the Rev. Dr. M. A. Matthews 
because Matthews tolerates Edgar J. Brown as a deacon in the 
First Presbyterian Church, IJrown being at the same time presi- 
of the Rathskeller Cafe, with bar attachment. 

I have it from good authority — church authority at that — 
that the women of a certain well known religious organizaticm 
denounced Dr. Maker for his attack, taking the gi'ound that 
there is nothing in the Bible against taking a drop now and 
then "for thy stomach's often infirmities." This reminds me 
that the name BroAvn is famous for liberality. There is Brown 
the famous Kentucky distiller, who beat the Baptists who 
sought to make him ineligible as a deacon because he was a 
distiller. Of course this Brown is known to the Review readers 
as a writer in the liberal side of the liquor question. 

It is the opinion of those who have observed closely that there 
are thousands of liberal women in Wa.shington — women who 
like their beer and wine, possibly also a drop of the "wee crit- 
ter," and these will not be for the bootlegger. Take the Episco- 
palians and Catholics, for example. There are many of both 
denominations in this State, and it is well known that Prohibi- 
tion has never crept into their confessions of faith, and prob- 
ably it never will. 



It is to be regretted that three of our best towns up this way 
have voted dry. Everett, Avith 22,000, Bellingham with 25,000, 
and Mt. Vernon, with 3,000 have been lost temporarily to the 
cause of the saloon. It is said that shipments of beer and wine 
have been large into those towns since the election. The Jaffe 
people say that much California wine is finding its way to these 
cities. Those who can not get a drink at a saloon are taking 
to the table custom, and that means more wine and beer. 



There have been some very bitter fights on the Prohibition 
question during the last ten weeks, especially in the towns that 
went dry. There were also some hot fights in the places that 
went wet. Among the notable Washington towns that scotchetl 
the Prohibition snake may ha named the following: Auburn, 
a town of 1,000; Burlington, a population of 1,200; Sedro-W'ool- 
ley, 2,000 ; Anacortes, 5,000 ; and Sumas, 1,200. 



There has been great indignation all over the State over the 
inhuman tactics of the Prohibitionists at Auburn, which voted 
wet. That town produced a band of desecraters of the dead 
who, in a cowardly and ghoulish nmnner perpetrated the crime 
of the year. They found two corpses in the morgue of the little 
town. One had died while drunk, having been struck and injured 
by a vehicle. The other, a globe-trotting Englishman, who bore 
the Victoria Cross for bravery in war, had died of acute alcohol- 
ism. These unfortunates were put in coffins, the lids of Avhich 
were removed. Then they were exhibited in a show Avindow 
within sight of voters. Over the coffins was this grewsomi^ 
legend: "These men Avere killed by Avhisky." 

The indignation of the people kncAV no bounds and it Avas hard 
to prevent riots. The town Avent *et as a stern reproof to such 
conduct. The State is ashamed that it has been adA^ertised as 
having such fanatics Avithin its border. The.se folk belong in 
Carrie Nation's precinct in Kansas. 



Cresta Blanca Avines haA'e had a big run in Seattle lately, as 
liaA'e those of A. Repsold, says the sales manager of Goldie's 
Avholesale department. The Mount Rouge Avines have run a 
strong race in this line also. It seems that Seattle is learning 
the table Avine habit. 



Milton Stearns, the Avell knoAvn Chicago glassAvare man, has 
been in the NortliAvest selling a large bill of goods here and 
there to hotels, bars and cafes. He traA'els for Burley & Co., of 
Chicago and has found trade good among the saloons. 



Edgar J. BroAvn, president of the Rathskeller Cafe, has gone 
to NcAV York to iuA'estigate ncAV methods in connection with 
cafes of the type of his resorts. 



Joe ilurphy, the Pommery man, has been doing Seattle, where 
he found business HacIv. 



The Lutina Cafe Avill .soon be opened under the Grand Opera 
House. It is under corporation management and Avill be a fine 
resort of a high class. 



Goldie & Klenert haA'e taken the agency of McCallan's Perfec- 
tion Scotch. They Avill haA'e the territory of Alaska and Wash- 
ington. 



IN A. D., 1910? 

Here's a true story of a brcAAer, and it would be hard to beat 
it even in a church. Some years ago Leopold F. Schmidt, the 
famous Olj'mpia breAver, extended considerable credit — some 
fll.OOO — to one Ole Hansen, a well-meaning but unfortunate 
Sa\ ede Avhose saloon ncAer seemed able to get it's head above 
Avater. 

It Avas not altogether Hansen's fault, for financial crashes, 
the historic fire, and some other things boosted him down hill. 
One day he closed up the place, gave Schmidt a mortgage on 
three lots that Avere barely Avorth |2',000, and drifted out of 
sight. 

This Avas more than a decade ago. Well, about a year ago — 
although the story has ncA'er been published — Schmidt, in look- 
ing OAcr his vast holdings, got to Avondering hoAV and Avhere he 
got some valuable lots that he had been paying high taxes on, 
along with some heaA-y regrade bills. 

"Why, those AAcre Ole Hansen's lots," said one of the sons of 
the old brewer. 

Then the picture of poor little Hansen and his struggles came 
up before the breAAcr — the picture of forgotten years. 

He said nothing to his sons, but began a search for Hansen. 
Finally, after .some Aveeks, he located his former customer and 
debtor at the i^^G toAvn of Auburn, Av^here the broken Swede 
was struggling MP^J foi* ^ humble cottage. 

Entering the^ittle place suddenly, and finding Hansen, 
Schmidt exclai^d, "You rascal, I have found you at last. I 
have come to s^'hoAV much of that balance of $9,000 you can 
pav me." ; ■. 

"I'm groAvingold and feeble uoav," said Hansen, "and my 
wife is far from Avell. We are trying to finish paying for this 
house and I am afraid I can never earn $9,000 for you." 

"Give me a i^h-tgage on the house or acknoAvledge the debt 
in the presence af Avitnesses," exclaimed Schmidt. 

Hardly had i^ finished speaking when he opened the door 
and beckoned -t^p trusted friend in an automobile. The friend 
came in Avith a^g containing |24,000 in gold, all of Avhich was 
spread on the kftchen table before the astonished gaze of Han- 



12 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



sen and his wife, who had been attracted by the commotion. 

"That's your share of the lots," said Schmidt, "for they 
brought 135,000 and I charge you no interest on the old debt." 

And when old man Schmidt tells the story to a chance friend, 
in strong German accent, with tears in his eyes, he usually con- 
cludes like this : "By dunder, dot woman and her alt man yoost 
hugged me and veer all cried. It vas very much fun. If I 
could have so much fun mit all my money, I'd give it all oudt 
dot vay." L. 



Oregon Goes Right. 



The cause of liberal laws won a great victory in Oregon, which 
repudiated state wide prohibition by a rousing majority of 
18,000. In Portland and Multnomah county 22 precincts out of 
186 absolutely refused to consider any of the Anti-saloon 
crowd's resolutions. All were repudiated. 

Umatilla, Morrow, Gilliam, Curry, Mulheur, Klamath, Tilla- 
mook and Polk counties hitherto dry repudiated Oregon's pro- 
hibitionist State wide amendment by sliding into the wet col- 
umn. The State repudiated prohibition by eighteen thousand 
strong. Multnomah county went wet by over nine thousand 
majority. 

It is usual for outsiders to compare 'Washington and Oregon, 
as judged by recent voting on the liquor question. Many per- 
sons have erroneously judged that Washington is getting into 
the cranky list and that Oregon is showing liberality. 

No view could be more misleading, for if Oregon had the 
same laws that W^ashington has, and if the same issues had been 
presented to the Oregon voters, there is no doubt that the dry 
element would have won some battles, just as they did in Wash- 
ington. 

But the Prohibitionists of Oregon foolishly tried to force 
State wide prohibition on the people, and these rejected it with 
vigor. The Oregonian warned the Prohibitionists all through 
the campaign that their fanatical desire to force State wide 
Prohibition on the voters would result in the triumph of the 
saloon element. 

Those who have studied the situation closely say that many of 
those who voted for the wet ticket would have voted for the 
dry side if the questiou had i)ertained to their own town or 
precinct. Many good citizens dislike a saloon in their little 
home town, but they like at the same time to have the right to 
buy liquor elsewhere. They Avill not refrain from drinking, but 
they will not consent to have a saloon in their home neighbor- 
hood. 

And the wise old Oregonian has not allowed the Prohibition- 
ists to forget the lesson of the voting. It means that the people 
have registered a verdict against State wide Prohibition. It 
means that they do not object to the sale and moderate use of 
liquor. It so happens, also, that many thousands of men in 
Oregon believe in the sale and moderate use of liquor, but do 
not believe in the open saloon, the public tippling house. 

Now here in Washington there happens to have been no State 
wide question at issue. We have what is known as a quasi unit 
system. If a county has ten towns there are eleven units in that 
county, each town being one unit, the county making the 
eleventh. It has not yet full voting power, but the question is 
pending in the Legislature. 

Now the very towns that refused State wide Prohibition in 
Oregon might have voted dry if they had been presented a choice 
under some such law as that of Washington, a sort of local 
option. 

In Washington, each town is a unit that decides its own bat- 
tles regarding the sale or non sale of liquor in that town — 
The county, outside of the towns, may yet decide whether there 
are to be any saloons outside of the towns. The result is to be 
final, if the law is perfected. 



State wide Prohibition would have got a great wallop had it 
been an issue in Washington. On the other hand, many towns 
that voted wet in Oregon, under a foolish proposition that 
sought to enforce narrow laws on all, would have voted dry had 
there been a chance to limit the vote to that town alone. It 
was the sweeping clause that disgusted the liberal element even 
among the dries. 



Southern California's Absurd Position 

ONE of the absurd things that strikes visitors to Southern 
California as inconsistent is the fact that, while so much 
excellent wine is made in that section, there are a number of 
good-sized towns, known the country over as beauty spots and 
attractive resorts in which to rusticate, where it is impossible 
for visitors to get even a glass of wine or liquor of any sort. 
Tourists, who are used to wine with their meals, or are anxious 
to sample our much-advertised vintages, quickly give these cara- 
vansaries the cold shoulder, and their lack of patronage usually 
brings about the failure and disaster, not only to the handi- 
capped hotel, but to the community at large, which is deprived 
of the stream of coveted gold that flows into the coffers of other 
more sensible cities. 

Every now and then, we hear of well-known hotel men being 
forced to close their doors, or reduce expenses, because they 
can not make their establishments pay without serving guests 
with liquid refreshments. Take the case of James S. Aurand, 
for example. He claims that the patronage of his hotel at 
prohibition Redlands this summer has been a little less than 
half of last summer, and the reason assigned is that the table 
license was taken away last spring. In an earnest appeal to the 
Board of City Trustees, the other day, he asked for a revision of 
the liquor ordinance, by which permission might be granted to 
his hotel to serve liquors with meals. The trustees had pledged 
the people that there would be "nothing doing" along these lines, 
and Mr. Aurand's request, backed by a petition signed by thou- 
sands of sympathizers, was turned down, and he will have to 
Avait two years before he can hope for a reconsideration. 

The privilege of serving liquors with meals at La Casa Loma 
was not abused by Manager Aurand. He states that he lived 
up not only to the letter, but also to the spirit, of the law, so 
that no liquor was ever obtained by any one during his manage- 
ment, except as provided by the law, which permitted serving 
with regular meals. 

The Glenwood, of Riverside, has the privilege of sei-Aing with 
meals, and it is asserted that this contributes not a little to the 
popularity of that hotel. At Venice, a permit for a period of 
fifteen years has just been granted a hotel company in order 
that the latter may erect there a tourist hotel costing upAvards 
of a quarter of a million dollars. In Colton, where the Hotel 
Anderson was a popular hostelry, the permit privilege was 
withdrawn and resulted in the hotel closing, with the declara- 
tion that it would never again be opened without the permit to 
serve liquors with meals. — Louisville Bulletin. 



Australian Production of Wine 



CONSUL-GENERAL JOHN P. BRAY writes from Sydney 
that, although still an important feature of its industrial 
life, wine production in Australia is apparently not increasing. 
In the year 1903-4 the total production was 6,260,169 gallons. 
Since then it has fluctuated, having been as Ioav as 4,450,038 
gallons. In 1908-9 there was a recovery to 5,515,801 gallons. 
South Australia is the only State which has shown steady 
progress. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



13 



♦ ♦___ ♦ ♦ 

I f> I Washington Notes | f> | 



SEATTLE, Washingtou, dispatch points out that the defeat 

of D. A. Scott, of Ritzville, is a sign that the next Ivegis- 

l^ature will leave the liquor question alone. Scott was recog- 

lized as the "dry" candidate for Speaker, in case of election; 

ind he entered the campaign with the practical indorsement of 

Jovernor M. E. Hay. He has been beaten by a "wet" Democrat. 

[is defeat is ascribed to the fact that he advocated the county 

lit instead of the present liquor law. 



Tacoma, Washington, is about to pass a revised ordinance 
defining who are disorderly persons. A provision has been in- 
serted which is designed to keep young girls out of saloons and 
cafes where drinks are served. Men who entice girls under 18 
years of age into saloons and other places where intoxicants are 
disposed of, will be liable to prosecution, and proprietors will 
be privileged to order young women of tender age out of their 
places if they find any there. Failing in this, the proprietors 
themselves will be subject to arrest. 



Pat MuUius, because North Yakima had sufficient self-respect 
to vote the "wet" ticket, intends to build a new office and hotel 
tructure on North First street, anticipated to be eight stories 
in height. Mullins' statement that if the city went wet he would 
t)uild, if dry he would not, \\as ridiculed by the anti-saloon 
campaigners before election. 



The Good Govei'nment League of Eureka has decided to have 
the liquor ordinance it has drawn up published. It represents 
high license, restricted district, discrimination against manu- 
facturers running retail businesses, and a number of provisions 
relative to closing, clear glass in front door unobstructed dur- 
ing closing hours, no screens at all in wholesale establishments, 
no free beer at the brewery to any but employes. The ordinance 
provides for but one room to saloons, save a possible office for 
the manager. 




Sumas, Washington, has the high honor of being the only 
licensed town in Whatcom County. The vote, 121 to 74 for 
common sense, personal freedom and the licensed saloon, proves 
Sumas to be a sensible and responsible community. 



The Washington Supreme Court during the month ruled that 
Pierce County must refund to F. J. Bart, a saloon man of Wil- 
kinson, 90 per cent of the unearned portion of his license fee. 
This sets aside the decision of the Superior Court of Pierce 
County by which 55 per cent was ordered refunded. Such 
ruling by the Supreme Court will no doubt greatly benefit many 
saloon men in that State, who have recently been driven out of 
business by "dry" victories at the last election. 



An Oroville (Butte County) dispatch states" that local liquor 
dealers are doing a splendid package business in shipping liquor 
of various kinds into dry Plumas County. The business has 
proved very remunerative and is growing all the time. Since 
Plumas County went dry it has been hard in certain sections to 
secure booze. Plumas County's anti-liquor ordinance forbids 
the sale of intoxicants, but does not prevent their being shipped 
into the county or possessed by residents of that section. 



(ASH'S BITTERC 



14 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



( Over The Sparkling: Wine Cup !! 



I 



; 



Anecdotes of Famous People at Home and Abroad 

BY HORATIO F. STOLL. 



WHILE Theodore Roosevelt is not Avhat is linown as a lover 
of intoxicants, he has been the cause of more than one 
upheaval in temperance circles. When he first entered the 
White House, the question of barring intoxicants from the state 
and other dinners was brought before him, as it has been 
broached to every President who succeeded the first temperance 
President, Rutherford B. Hayes. He refused to make any prom- 
ises which would banish wine from the mansion. In this re- 
spect, according to Catherine Frances Cavanagh, in the National 
Food Magazine, he followed in the footsteps of Garfield, who 
told the temperance delegation that "a man's house is his cas- 
tle," and intimated that it is not the business of any society to 
reform the customs of the White House. 

When the White House was remodeled in the first years of 
Roosevelt's administration, a wail went up from White Rib- 
boners and lovers of antique alike when the press got hold of 
the fact that, among other effects banished from the White 
House was a sideboard presented to Mrs. Hayes by some temper- 
ance advocates, and that this precious relic had been sold by auc- 
tion and bought by a saloonkeeper ! Of course, it was not known 
that a saloonkeeper was the highest bidder at the time the side- 
board was knocked down to him. Nevertheless, the fact remains 
that, instead of being relegated to the attic — that limbo of un- 
wanted antiques in the White House — this piece of furniture, 
which should have been preserved as evidence of the first cru- 
sad for temperance in the White House, was hurled out on the 
streets, as it were. Of course, President Roosevelt could not be 
held personally responsible for this piece of work, inasmuch as 
such matters are generally left to the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings and Grounds at Washington; and so he escaped at 
least one-half of the criticism which otherwise would have been 
heaped upon him. 



The new Lord Mayor of London, Sir Thomas Vezey Strong, 
whose year's term commenced on November 9th, is the first in 
the long history of the office to be a teetotaler. He has drunk 
nothing stronger than water all his life, but the London papers, 
in announcing this fact, hasten to assure the public that "it is 
his full intention to maintain in every way the honorable tradi- 
tions of civic hospitality^, which means that he will serve wines 
to others, even though he may not partake of them himself. 
There is much speculation as to what he will do when he attends 
the ceremony at Law Courts, when it is customary for the Lord 
Mayor to drink the health of the King with the law lords. Ac- 
cording to the ancient custom, a loving cup filled with Avine is 
passed around from which all drink. The mere idea of a loving 
cup being filled with water seems barbarous, and it is doubtful 
if Sir Vezey Strong will attempt to break the traditions of cen- 
turies and substitute anything for the customary liquid sun- 
shine. On the other hand, if it does contain wine, it is certain 
that he will not let a drop pass his lips, for he is at the head of 
London's temperance societies, and if he took even the slightest 
sip, a howl would go up from the English White Ribboners that 
V, ould make him repent for the rest of his life. 



In his interesting book entitled "Fourteen Years in Parlia- 
ment," Mr. Griffith-BoscaAven relates the following anecdote 
about ex-Chancellor Sir Michael Hicks-Beach (now Lord St. 
Aldwyn I : "It was my duty as secretary to see that Sir Michael 
. :.i ; ;i t on budget days, and, as a rule, he brought down 



some of his own in a flask. On one occasion he forgot it and I 
procured him some at the refreshment bar — a light wine from 
the wood of a tawny hue. It happened that there had been a 
considerable increase in the consumption of rum during the 
past year, and Sir Michael, after giving the figures, turned to 
the House and asked, 'Who drinks rum?' and immediately took 
a sip of his tawny port. The House was convulsed with lauglitcr, 
most members believing he was drinking rum himself." 



The late Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) Avas an excellent 
listener as well as speaker at public banquets and could not ti)l- 
erate any one who did not enter into the spirit of a good dinner 
party. It is related that once he Avas seated next to a gloomy 
diA'ine aa-Iio did not smile at the most amusing jokes, but acted 
as if he Avere bored to death. 

"What's the matter Avith you?" cried TAvain. "The stories are 
all good, the wine is fine, Avhy don't you laugh?" 

"Ah, sir," said the melancholy guest, "hoAV can I laugh when 
I remember that every time I breathe a soul passes into the 
great beyond." 

"Good gracious," the humorist is quoted as saying, Avith a 
sympathetic smile, "that can easily be averted. Did you ever try 
cloves?" 



I have often heard of men Avorking in Avine cellars being 
asphyxiated by carelessly entering empty tanks before lowering 
a lighted taper to find out if it Avere safe. But I never heard of 
any one deliberately seeking death in a tank of Avine until I read, 
the other day, of the historic death of the Duke of Clarence 
in a barrel of Malmsey,. It seems that he was excessively fond 
of Greek Avines, and Avhen the decree of death Avas pass«l upon 
him, he begged as a last favor that he could choose the manner 
of his dying. When it was granted, he said, "Then Avill I die 
in a barrel of Malmsey. A SAveeter death cannot be found." 



The King of Italy, like the Gemmn Kaiser, believes in en- 
couraging loyalty to home products. Only the other day, he 
administered a severe rebuke to the officials avIio had in charge 
the ceremonies connected Avith the launching of the Dante, 
Italy's first Dreadnaught. When the critical moment came for 
the christening of the vessel, a bottle of French champagne Avas 
handed to Queen Helena, Avho Avas to act as godmother to the 
beautiful addition to Italy's navy. The King Avatched the pro- 
ceedings closely and is said to have shoAvn his dis]>leasure the 
moment he noticed that the bottle bore a French label. Ad- 
dressing one of his aides, he said, so that those in the immediate 
vicinity could plainly hear him, "The Queen of Italy does not 
need a French Avine to christen an Italian ship.'' The ceremonies 
Avere tactfully delayed a few moments Avhile the blunder Avas 
rectified, and then a bottle of sparkling Italian wine AAas broken 
on the bow of the battleship Dante. 



And talking about champagne, reminds me of the graphic ac- 
count I read the other day of the discoA^ery of sparkling wines 
at Hautvilliers, on the picturesque slopes of the Marne. Then^, 
are doubtless others to whom the story is ncAV and I am sure 
that Vizetelly's account Avill prove interesting, for it reads al- 
most like fiction. 

It seems that in pre-revolutionary days, this little Frencli 
hamlet, about fiftet^n miles from Rheims, Avas a mere dependency 
upon a spacious abbe,y dedicated to St. Peter. Here the Avorthy 
monks of the Order of St. Benedict had lived in peace and pros- 
perity for several hundred years, carefully cultivating tlie acres 
of vineland extending around the abbey, and religiously exact- 
ing a tithe of all the other Avine pressed in their district. The 
revenue of the cortimunity thus depending in no small degree up- 
on the vintage, it Avas natural that the post of cellar nmster 



I 



PACIFIC WINK AND SPIUIT HKVIEW 



IB 



should be one of importance. It liappened that about the year 
1688 this office was conferred upon a worthy monk named Dom 
Perignon, and Avith the spirit of a true Benedictine, Dom Perig- 
non hit upon the idea of "marryinj,'" the produce of one vineyard 
with that of another. He had noted that one kind of soil im- 
, parted fragrance and another generosity, and discovered that a 
white wine could be nmde from the blackest gi-apes, which Avould 
keep good, instead of turning yellow and degenerating like wine 
obtained from the white ones. IMoreover, the happy thought oc- 
curred to him that a piece of cork was a much more suitable 
stopper for a bottle than the flax dipped in oil, which had here- 
tofore served that purpose. 

Ever busy among his vats and presses, barrels and bottles, 
Perigmm alighted ui)on a discovery destined to make not (mly 
the abbey but France famous for its wines. He found that the 
wine burst out of the bottle and overflowed the glass, that the 
wine was twice as dainty to the taste, and twice as exhilerating 
in its effects. It was at the close of the seventeenth century that 
this discovery was made. 

The new wine became popular at once, and all sorts of fables 
■ were current about it. Imitators were soon able to make a 
s]>arkling wine, but why it foamed and sparkled was a mystery, 
for as yet Baume's aerometer was unknown, and the connection 
between sugar and carbonic acid undreamt of. The general be- 
lief was that the degree of effervescence depended upon the time 
of the year at which the wine Avas bottled, and that the rising 
of the sap in the vine had CA-erything to do with it. Certain Avise- 
acres held that it was influenced by the age of the moon at the 
time of bottling, Avhilst others thought the effervescence could 
be best secured by the addition of spirit, alum and A^arious nasti- 
nesses. It Avas this belief in the use and efficacy of di'ugs that 
led to a temporary reaction against the wine about 1715, in 
which year Dom Perignon departe<l this life. 
;• Later, hoAvever, the cellar master of St. Peter's found Avorthy 
*r successors, and thenceforAvard the manufacture and the popu- 
% larity of cham]>agne Avent on steadily increasing, until to-day its 
* production is carried on ui)on a scale and Avitli an amount of 
V painstaking care that AA'ould astonish its originatx)r. For good 
cham]>a,gne does not rain doAvn from the clouds, or gush out 
from the rocks, but is the result of incessant labor, patient skill, 
minute precaution and careful obserA^ation. 



Bellingham's Dire Strait 



no license money from saloons during 1911, you will lose the 
full year's revenue from this source next year, Avhich Avill amount 
to $44,000, thus making a loss in your revenues during the next 
twelve months of |66,000, or the equivalent of .f5500 a month. 

"As a large investor in your city securities and knowing that 
your city is now over its limit of bonded indebtedness and no 
further bonds can be issued, I am anxious to knoAV hoAv, with 
the loss of this large revenue, you can hope to protect your city's 
credit and pay the interest on your large bonded indebtedness, 
unless you largely increase your leVy next year beyond Avhat 
it has been in the past. Unless your city does largely increase 
its tax levy, Avhich as at present madii must be burdensome on 
your taxpayers, as I note it is considerably greater as compared 
Avith other Western cities of much larger size, it looks to me as 
if the investors in your securities, Avho through your influence 
and representation, have bought freely of your city bonds, Avould 
be Avithout protection, the result being a default of the interest 
on their investments, Avhich Avould put your city in the 'black 
list' column, Avhich it Avould take you many years to overcome. 
I must add that as the matter looks to me I Avill be unable to 
entertain any proposition for further iuAestments in Belling- 
ham securities of any class xmtil you can give me positive assur- 
ance of better conditions than noAV appear to maintain." 

We are afraid that Bellingham Avill not be the only city put 
into a deep financial hole, by not following the dictates of com- 
mon sense rather than doctrines of religious fanatics, Avhich, 
being impractical, are bound to financially injure all communi- 
ties governed by them. 



JUDCrING from certain letters recently published, it Avould 
ai)pear that the city of Bellingham, Washington, by going 
"dry," has practically become bankrupt. In asking the pub- 
lication of these letters A. L. Black, president of the Taxpayers' 
League, states that he has absolutely no solution to the financial 
problem presented. He says that, although he believes the city 
could be operated more cheaply, he does not see hoAV it can be 
run on fOG.OOO less than the amount available from all sources, 
and he intimates that he Avould like to have a solution of the 
problem from one of the "drys." 

One of these letters is from the H. L. Dickinson Company, 
which for the past twenty years has been actively engaged in 
purchasing and disposing to Eastern clients the securities of 
IJellingham City and Whatcom County. In this letter is en- 
closed another from an Eastern purchaser of such securities, 
which tlie Dickenson letter states "propounds such pertinent 
(luestions that before replying thereto we feel we need 'more 
light.' We are therefore handing you a copy of our client's let- 
ter, trusting that Avith your intinmte knowledge of the financial 
conditions of the city for many years you can shoAV us a AA^ay out 
of Avhat seems to us a hopele-ss case financially." 

The second letter says in part: "As I understand it, your 
assessed valuation as made for this year holds for two years 
and cannot be changed. It therefore folloAvs that if you receive 



lASH'SBITTERC 



Topazor 

The White Wine 



Nectarubi 

The Red Wine 



The Perfection of California Table Wines 



ol/l^ta/ 



taajt^ 




ESTABLISHEDBIN 1880SINCORPORATED IN 1906 

CONTRA COSTA WINERY, MARTINEZ 
WINDSOR WINERY, SONOMA CO. 



Office and Salesrooms: 
549 WASHINGTON STREET 






)an r rancisco 



16 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



„** ^^ «» ^fc «»- 



-«» ^fc «»- 



»«» ^fc »» ^fc «»- 



Wine Industry in France 



IT is evident tliat of late years the interest in wine culture has 
been steadily decreasing with the result that last year France 
imported 6,218,000 hectoliters (164,260,906 gallons) of wine. 

The decreased production of wine in recent years is due, in 
part at least, to the law passed by the French Parliament on 
July 29, 1907, regulating the watering and sugaring of wines, 
but this law had the wholesome effect of assuring a better 
quality of wine and higher prices for the producers, as well as 
effectively suppressing frauds which had sprung up in the 
making of wine. 

The area planted to grapes in 1875 was 2,421,000 hectares 
(5,982,291 acres), and in 1909, 1,625,000 hectares (4,015,375 
acres) ; the decrease between the years given has been steady 
and continuous. 

The abandonment of large tracts of vineyards in France on 
account of the ravages of the phylloxera is not distributed 
uniformly throughout the country, but is peculiar to only a 
number of Departments, in some of which viticulture has been 
almost entirely abandoned, while in others there is no apparent 
loss in the area devoted to that crop. The southwest portion 
of France, known as the "bassins" of the Garonne and Charente, 
comprising 11 Departments, has suffered a reduction of nearly 
50 per cent since 1875. Where the Departments of Charente 
counted 655,815 acres thirtj'-five years ago, today they have not 
more than 195,209 acres. The grape crop of Charente is not all 
converted into wine for present consumption but is used almost 
exclusively for the production of cognac. The plain wine is 
said to be only a mediocre drink. 

Le Midi region, which comprises the six Departments of the 
Mediterranean coast, has suffered only a small diminution of 
its vintage acreage, due to the fact that the planters, when the 
invasion of the phylloxera came, were able to combat it by 
substituting the more hardy American plants for the native 
vine. The wines of this region are known to be very thick and 
heavy. In the eastern portion of France, and the valleys of the 
Rhone, Beaujolais, and Bourgogne, comprising six Depart- 
ments, nearly one-fourth of the area has been abandoned by the 
wine growers during this period of thirty-five years. In the 
valley of the Loire, comprising six Departments, there has been 
a falling off of 383,000 acres, or about one-fifth, during the 
thirty-five-year period. 

Notwithstanding the great diminution in the area of wine 
lands, the production has remained almost the same; in fact, 
for the last six years it has increased, owing largely to the 
healthy American plants which have been introduced into 
France and which proved to have greater resisting powers 
against the ravages of the destructive wine moths. It is inter- 
esting to note that with the exception of 1875, which was an 
unusually favorable year, the production of wine has steadily 
increased for the last sixty years. 

The region of Le Midi, or the Mediterranean coast, comprising 
the Departments of the Pyrenees-Orientales, Aude, Herault, 
Grad, Bouches-du-Rhone, and Var, furnish more than one-half 
of the wine produced in France, their total production for 1909 
being 780,489,265 gallons. The next most important is the 
.southwest or the valleys of the Garonne and the Charente, which 
produce one-fifth of all the wine grown in France. The valleys 
of the Rhone, Beaujolais, and Bourgogne, in the eastern part of 
France, furnished nearly one-tenth of the wine harve.st of 1909. 

Notwithstanding the abundant wine harvests which France 
has enjoyed in the past, she has been compelled to import vary- 
ing quantities of wine according to the visibly supply at home. 



These importations have assumed significant figures from time 
to time, but have remained somewhat steady during the last 
three years. 

A large percentage of imported wines come from Algeria, and 
as the wines from that colony are very thin they are mixed with 
the heavy wines of Le Midi. There are also considerable quan- 
tities of wines imported from Spain, Italy, and Portugal. 

A few years ago a commission of wine producers of the United 
States came to France for the purpose of establishing a market 
for the California wines, but met with little encouragement. 
It is possible that if the prices of the local products continue 
to rise, as a result of this year's shortage, California wines can 
be sold in France in competition with the Spanish and Italian 
products. 

There has been but little fluctuation in the amount of wine 
exported from France since the year 1888. 

The following table shows the imports and exports during the 
last three years : 



Imports. 
Year. Gallons. 

1907 156,467,891 

1908 182,039,547 

1909 164,260,906 



Exports. 

Gallons. 
76,820,636 
68,974,787 
66,570,840 



Excess of 
imports. 
Gallons. 
79,647,255 
113,064,760 
97,690,066 



It is very evident that France is by no means able to produce 
enough wine for home consumption and is compelled annually 
to import large quantities. 

The French people have learned to regulate their appetite for 
drink according to the price they are compelled to pay and the 
visible supply of the article; in other words, the consumption 
of wine in France varies with the abundance of the harvest. 
Consequently, an increased production means an increased con- 
sumption. 

In the folloAving statement, giving the number of gallons of 
wine consumed annually in France, are only included the wines 
taxed and placed upon the markets, the wines consumed in the 
places of production, not being subject to revenue, can not be 
statistically compiled: 1906, 1,241,599,000, 1,268,016,000 and 
1,294,435,000 gallons, respectively. If the harvest of 1910 shows 
a shortage of only a few million hectoliters from the normal 
production there is not likely to be great alarm among the wine 
drinkers. — From Deputy Consul-General Bartley F. Yost, Paris. 



Spanish Vintage Returns 



THE vintage of this district has been exceedingly short this 
year, owing principally to the late frosts. The variety of 
vines which are planted in sandy soils, or arenas, and which 
produce the inferior quality of musts, bud and flower earlier 
than those vines planted in the best soils, or afueras, and conse- 
quently have suffered more. 

It was thought at first that the new vines that have been 
recently planted to replace those destroyed by the phylloxera, 
and which are commencing to give crops, would have compen- 
sated to some extent for the damage done by the frost. This, 
however, has not proved to be the case, for the vintage has been 
far less than last year, in some vineyards the shortage being 
more than one-half of that produced in 1909. 

This condition is general all over Spain, the result being a 
rise in the prices of young wines and brandies. — From Consul 
Percival Gassett, Jerez de la Frontera. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



17 





YOD HEBE! AND WHITE HOBSE, TOOI 











CHAS. MEINECKE & CO 



Agents P. C. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



18 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIEIT REVIEW. 







OREGON 



*?VT**i "It would be diflficult to find a man who is not in favor of 

fllTTni ros^nlatinij tlie liquor traftic, and, as we are nearly all of the 

same mind, there should be little or no opposition to the reform 

measures we propose." 




\W^\ 



Governors and Mayors Arraign Prohibition 



THE Greater Orejjon Home Rule Association, in an effort to 
obtain facts and advice on prohibition, has telegraphed the 
Governors of States and Mayors of cities where it has been tried. 
Up to date not one telegram has been received that does not 
condemn prohibition as a statewide measure. 

The Mayors of Memphis, Tennessee ; of Fall River, Mass. ; of 
Chattanooga, Tenn.; of New Bedford, Mass., and Nashville, 
Tenn., all agree that prohibition has proved a failure. The 
Governor of Rhode Island states that "Rhode Island constitu- 
tion was amended in April, 1886, prohibiting manufacturing 
and sale of intoxicating liquor, but owing to unsatisfactory 
working the amendment was repealed in June, 1889. At pres- 
ent the cities and towns vote each year on the question under 
the local option law with apparent satisfaction to all interests." 

Governor Davidson of AVisconsin says : "In our State law is 
local option with power to grant or refuse liquor licenses under 
strict regulation in towns, villages, and mimicipalities by direct 
vote of electors of each community. The system is quite satis- 
factory from the standpoint of regulation and home rule." 

Malcolm R. Patterson, Governor of Tennessee, cannot find 
anything bad enough to say of prohibition. Read his statement : 
"Prohibition is a failure in Tennessee, just as it has been in 
every other State where it has been tried, and as it will be in 
Oregon if adopted. Local option, with high license, regulation 
and control by law is, in my judgment, the only practical way 
to deal with a difficult subject. The experience of Tennessee 
with prohibition has resulted in decreased revenues, disturbance 
of political conditions, bad feeling engendered among the people, 
and with no corresponding benefit whatever, so far as I or any 
other conservative citizen of that State can see." 



SC. McAllister, general manager of the Greater Oregon 
• Home Rule Association, recenth' stated that he wantetl 
it understood that the association is preparing a model liquor 
license ordinance, and no one else. He said : 

"We promised the voters of Oregon that we would regulate 
the liquor traffic if they voted our amendment into the consti- 
tution, and we are going to take the first step in keeping faith 
with the people by writing those promises into the model liquor 
license ordinance. I think there Avill be no trouble about having 
the ordinance adopted by the Council of Portland, and all City 
Councils in the State, for that matter. 



The Portland, Oregon, City Council intends to stop brewery 
control of saloon licenses when it meets to act on the licenses 
for the year. Councilman Cellars is quoted as saying that "there 
are 419 saloon licenses in this city and out of that nximber there 
are 115 or IIG held by the brewers under powers of attorney." 
Mr. Cellars is also of opinion that the saloon keepers who give 
powers of attorney to the breweries are not usually of the better 
class, and believes if this power of attorney plan was got rid of, 
a higher standard of men would go into the saloon business. 



In IJoise, Idaho, prohibition suffered a severe blow as a result 
of the late election. The people, it is evident, believed that the 
time had come to protest against State-wide prohibition. This, 
undoubtedly, caused the defeat of James H. Brady, Republican 
candidate for Governor and present Chief Executive of the State, 
and resultetl in the election of his o])ponent, James H. Hawley, 
Democratic candidate. The Democrats wisely avoided the pro- 
hibition issue, declaring only for strict enforcement of the local 
option laws. Governor-elect Hawley has indorsed precinct local 
option, but is opposed to county option. 



So bitter was the liquor fight in Oregon that an anti-prohibi- 
tion preacher will sue a "dry" brother for defamation of char- 
acter. "Thus," says the Oregonian, "Oregon is in the thick of 
hateful strife and ecclesiastical bitterness even before prohibi- 
tion is started. What, then, are Ave to expect after prohibition 
shall arrive? Really, however, regulation or attempted suppres- 
sion of liquor traffic makes an economic issue, instead of a 
religious or an ecclesiastical one." 



A curious question has been raised in relation to the Portland, 
Oregon, law to prevent sale of liquor on Sunday. In the case 
of a man fined by the Municipal Court for selling liquor on 
Sunday, it is contended on appeal, that the law is unconstitu- 
tional because it does not say in its title that it is a law to pre- 
vent the sale of liquor on Sunday. Further, that the act itself 
unconstitutionally combines the licensing of billiard tables, ball 
alleys and peddlers Avith the licensing of saloons and closing 
them on Sunday. 



A Portland, Oregon, dispatch says that Portland saloon- 
keepers ,composing the Retail Liquor Dealers' Association, have 
met to discuss proposed reforms. The changes being consid- 
ered are, they say, evidences of their appreciation at not having 
been voted out of business at the late election. 







We 
manufacture 



TANKS 



for all purposes 

WINE— BEER— VINEGAR 



We also manufacture 

WOODEN WATER PIPE 

If interested in Wood Pipe send for special litera- 
ture. Address nearest office 

PACIFIC TANK AND PIPE CO. 

318 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Equitable Bank Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Kenton Station, Portland, Oregon 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



19 



BOTTLED 
IN BOND 



IN THE PUBLIC MARKETS OF AMERICA. 

THIS MERITED POSITION STAMPS ITS ESTEEM 
IN THE FAVOR AND CONFIDENCE OF THE DIS- 
CRIMINATING PUBLIC. 

THEGOVERNMENTiS GUARANTEE STAMPOVERTHE 
CORK OF BOTTLED IN BONDWHISKEY IS GREEN 
AND SO ISTHE MAN WHO DOES NOT LOOK FOR IT. 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 

SOLE DISTRIBUTERS 

San Francisco, California 



20 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



onr/ 





FROM OCTOBER 20TH TO NOVEMBER 20TH, 1910, 



Domestic. 



Destination. Cases. Gallons. 

•To Alaska 65 3,138 

" British Columbia 98 5,099 

"Central America 86 12,824 

"China 10 

"Hawaiian Islands 136 84,801 

" Japan 4,245 

"Mexico 1 4,325 

"New York 12 1,242,155 

" Society Islands 51 

" South America 1,660 

"Antwerp 2,500 

" Germany 38,176 

"London 1,020 

" Cooks Island 25 

" Australia 105 

" Samarang ,„ ?2? 

' New Orleans 59,879 

"Other Eastern States 235 37,682 

Total 633 1,499,820 

*Also includes shipments last half September. 

WHISKY. 

Destination. Cases. Gallons. 

To Alaska 56 890 

" Central America 1 5 

"Hawaiian Islands ■••■ 423 1,419 

" Mexico 3 

"Philippine Islands •• 50 1,699 

Total 533 4,013 

60 cs and 581 gals Whisky in bond to Hawaiian Islands. 
179 cs Whisky in bond to Philippine Islands. 
26 bbts Whisky in bond to Philippine Islanis. 
2 cs Whisky in bond to Japan. 
5 cs Whisky in transit to Hawaiian Islands. 
20 cs Whisky in transit to Mexico. 



Value. 

$1,452 

2,544 

5,161 

8 

36,472 

1,212 

1,489 

356,890 

23 

981 

800 

11,716 

1,020 

15 

53 

208 

39,960 

9,963 

$470,611 



Value. 

$3,029 

43 

6,005 

21 

2,874 

$11,972 



FROM OCTOBER 20TH TO NOVEMBER 20TH, 1910. 



BKER. 



Destination. 

To Alaska : 

" Central America 

■ Hawaiian Islands 

" Australia 

" South America 

Total 

26 cs Beer in bond to Hawaiian Islands. 
6 bbls Beer in transit to Hawaiian Islands. 

BRANDY. 

Destination. ^ Cases. 

To Alaska ^'' 

• British Columbia ■• 

' Hawaiian Islands !•* 

"New York 

■• Germany 

" Boston 

Total 38 

1 cs Brandy in bond to Central America. 



Packages Packages 

Bottled. Bulk. Value. 

1 $10 

126 962 

40 52 1,976 

1 7 

60 176 

226 52 $3,131 



Gallons. 


Value. 


407 


$l,iaO 


10 


25 


2,114 


2,18S 


1,314 


1,688 


50 


• o 


50 


49 



3,945 



$5,155 



MISCEIil.AlVBOUS WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Destination. Packages and Contents. 

To Alaska 4 cs Mineral Water, 5 cs Cordial, 3 cs Bitters, 2 cs Gin 

4 cs Grape Juice, 2 cs Rum, 3 bbls Alcohol 

" British Columbia 2 cs Tamarando, 40 cs Mineral Water, 1 kg Gin 

41 gals B. B. Wine 

" Central America 2 cs Cherries in Maraschino, 5 cs Mineral Water 

7 cs Grape Juice, 1 cs Alcohol 

" China 4 cs Cherries in Maraschino, 37 cs Grape Juico 

" Hawaiian Islands ..28 cs Grape Juice, 20 cs 2 bbls Alcohol, 8 cs Grape Juice 

29 cs 1 bbl Cider, 4 cs 45 bbls 1 hf bbl Gin, 10 bbls Spirits 

70 cs Champagne, 9 cs 1 hf bbl Cordial, 44 cs Mineral Water 

50 cs 9 bbls Liquors, 1 kg Ginger Ale, 7 cs Cherries in Maraschino 

10 cs Syrup, 2 cs Curacoa 

" Japan 5 es Cherries in Maraschino 

" New York 2 cs Mineral Water, 1 cs Sake 

" Philippine Islands . .20 cs Grape Juice, 25 cs Creme de Menthe, 1 bbl Alcohol 

25 cs Ginger Brandy, 1 cs Mineral Water 

" South America 30 cs Porter 

" Australia 3 cs Liquors, 2 cs Cherries in Maraschino, 7 cs Syrups 

Total 520 cs 71 bbls 1 hf bbl 2 kgs 41 gals 

Value $10,298 

125 cs Bitters In bond to British Columbia. 

1 cs Mineral Water, 3 bbls Ginger Ale, in bond to Japan. 
50 cs Gin, 7 cs Cordials, in bond to Hawaiian Islands. 
1 cs Gin, 4 cs Spirits, In bond to Central America. 
22 cs Vermouth, 31 cs Bitters, 55 cs Gin, 17 cs Liquors, 50 cs Cham- 
pagne, ill transit to Hawaiian Islands. 

7 fs C?hina Wine in transit to Mexico. 
1 cs Mineral Water to Mexico. 



FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Governor, October 20th. 
10 cs Grape Juice Order. 

FROM HAWAIIAN ISLANDS— Per steamer Sierra, October 20th. 
2 cs Sake Order. 

FROM SEATTLE: — Per steamer President, October 21. 

15 cs Whisky J. Levin & Co. 

1 5 ts Ale Lang & Stroh. 

20 hf bbls Beer Olympic Beer Co. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Admiral Sampson, October 22. 

389 csks Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

80 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

FROM SEATTLE— Per steamer Watson, October 25. 

100 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

160 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

120 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

90 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

120 hhds Beer John Rapp & Son. 

140 bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

210 hf bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

180 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Buckman, November 1. 

325 bbls Beer . . .' John Rapp & Son. 

81 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

25 bbls Beer North Star Bottling Co. 

120 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

80 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

90 hf bbls Beer ....Tacoma Bottling Co. 

16C qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

FROM SEATTLE— Per steamer Admiral Sampson, November 7. 

10 bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

240 hf bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

120 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

25 hhds Beer Order. 

70 bbls Beer Order. 

80 hf bbls Beer Order. 

60 qr bbls Beer Order. 

FROM PORTLAND — Per steamer Rose City, November 8. 
25 cs Bitters Johnson-Locke Co. 

FROM SEATTLE— Per steamer Watson, November 13. 

118 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

60 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

140 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

100 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

20 cs Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

180 hhds Beer John Rapp & Son. 

no bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

120 hf bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

100 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

5 hhds Beer Kisshin & Mault. 

5 bbls Beer Kisshin & Mault. 

60 hf bbls Beer Kisshin & Mault. 

40 qr bbls Beer Kisshin & Mault. 

FROM PORT TOWNSEND— Per steamer Umatilla, November 16. 

6 hf bbls Wine Rosenblatt Co. 

1 bbl Whisky F. Barry. 



FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer President, November It. 



6 bbls Wine Rosenblatt Co. 

2 cs Whisky Rosenblatt Co. 

1 cs Bottled Beer Los Angeles. 

1 bbl Whisky El Monte Distilleries Co. 

7 bbls Beer Olympia Beer Co. 

1 kg Wine F. Barry. 

BEER IN TRANSIT. 



To Oakland 116 hhds 265 bbls 121 hf bbls 32 qr bbls 3 sixth bbls 170 csks 

" San Jose , 15 bbls 60 qr bbls. 

" Santa Clara 60 bbls 10 qr bbls. 

" Alameda 220 csks. 

" Vallejo 50 bbls 20 hf bbls, 

" Reno 567 pkgs. 

" San Bernardino 209 pkgs. 

" Los Angeles 10 hf bbls. 

" Pasadena 1 bbl. 



IMPORTS BY RAIL IN BOND. 



FROM OCTOBER 20TH TO NOVEMBER 20TH, 1910. 



Via New OrlentiM — 

25 cs Brandy From Liverpool. 

1260 cs Champagne " Antwerp. 

50 cs Wine 

Via New York— 

97 cs Wine From Antwerp.. 

1000 cs Champagne " " 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



21 



IMPORTS BY SEA. 



Foreign. 



FROM OCTOBER 20TH TO NOVEMBER 20TH, 1910. 



FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Isthmian, October 21. 

3 cs Wine F. <Je Bary, San Francisco. 

15 cs Wlilsky F. de Bary, San Francisco. 

5 cs Brandy J. C. Haslam, San Francisco. 

3 bbis Gin .WUmerding, Lowe & Co., San Francisco 

25 cs Sherry F. Draz & Co., San Francisco. 

6 csks Sherry F. Draz & Co., San Francisco. 

18 csks Brandy F. Draz & Co., San Francisco. 

5 bbls Whisky Werle & Willoh, San Francisco. 

265 cs Wine A. Guirlanl & Bro., San Francisco. 

300 cs Cordials A. Guirlanl & Bro., San Francisco. 

15 cs Brandy J. Castaloupes, San Francisco. 

12 csks Gin F. Rasche Co., Sacramento. 

10 cs Brandy F. de Bary & Co., Portland. 

5 bbls Whisky Arata Bros., Portland. 

FROM EUROPE — SAME VESSEL 

1 csk Brandy H. Jevne & Co., Los Angeles. 

45 cs Beer J. Robertson. Portland. 

25 cs Wine Order, Portland. 

450 cs Champag-ne F. Draz & Co., San Francisco. 

Ill cs Champagne Macondray & Co., San Francisco. 

34 cs Wine Old Louvre, San Francisco. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN — Per Tenyo Maru, October 21. 

120 csks Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

20 cs Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

416 csks Sake N. A. Mercantile Co., San Francisco. 

FROM VICTORIA — Per Senator, October 22. 
20 cs Kummel A. Cora, San Francisco. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Ancon) — Per Newport, October 25. 
238 cs Wine Napa c& Sonoma Wine Co., S. F. 

FROM GENOA— SAME VESSEL. 

4 bbls Vermouth Crown Distilleries Co., San Francisco. 

1 cs Whisky Wells, Fargo & Co., San Francisco. 

6 cs Wine I. Besse, San Francisco. 

1 bbl Rum J. Besse, San Francisco. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Columbia, October 26. 
10 cs Liquors St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco. 

5 bbls Gin St. Francis Imp. Co., San Francisco. 

100 cs Whisky Rathjen Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

100 cs Whisky Borgfeldt, Propte & Co., San Francisco. 

6 cs Cordials Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

49 bbls Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

250 cs Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

670 cs Whisky W. H. Campbell, San Francisco. 

2 csks Wine C. F. Schmidt & Peters, San Francisco. 

250 cs Champagne ..... A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

2 bbls Wine A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

525 cs Gin Wilson Dist. Co., San Francisco. 

1 cs Brandy J. Roratsos, San Francisco. 

2 csks Gin Sutter Home Wine Co., San Francisco. 

22 bbls Gin Baird, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

10 cs Gin Balrd, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

2 csks Gin Baird, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

5 bbls Whisky Ladd & Co., Stockton. 

4 csks Gin Ladd & Co., Stockton. 

10 cs Gin Ladd & Co., Stockton. 

25 cs Brandy Jaffe & Co., Seattle. 

25 cs Brandy Continental Dist. Co., Seattle. 

2 bbls Rum Silver Grill, Tacoma. 

150 bbls Beer Hackteldt & Co., Honolulu. 

FROM EUROPE— SAME VESSEL. 

11 csks Wine P. Wolch, Seattle. 

2 cs Wine D. Warmberg, Seattle. 

55 cs Beer J. Robertson, Seattle. 

2 octs Brandy ... .Order, Seattle. 

2 cs Brandy Order, Seattle. 

10 cs Brandy G. S. Bush & Co., Seattle. 

12 cs Whisky Davies & Co., Honolulu. 

FROM ANTWERP — Per Penrith Castle, October 31. 

25 cs Liquors L Taussig Co., San Francisco. 

25 cs Liquors Roth & Co., San Francisco. 

100 cs Gin Roth & Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Whisky Wichman, Lutgen & Co., San Francisco. 

103 cs Gin Wichman, Lutgen & Co., San Francisco. 

2 cs Bitters Wichman, Lutgen & Co., San Francisco. 

60 cs Mineral Water Tillman & Bendel, San Francisco. 

72 cs Liquors .'. Rathjen Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

195 cs Gin Rathjen Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Bitters Rathjen Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

58 cs Absinthe American Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

110 cs Stout American Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

40 cs Ale American Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Benedictine American Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

300 cs Amer Picon Jas. de Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 



156 cs Mineral Water Jas. de Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

875 cs Gin J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

335 cs Whisky J. Levin & Co., San Francisco, 

555 cs Whisky , Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

175 cs Gin Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

3 cs Wine . . A. Carpentier, San Francisco. 

150 cs Mineral Water Apollinaris Co., San Francisco. 

175 cs Liquors A. Guirlanl & Bro., San Francisco. 

4 bbls Wine A. Vlgnier Co., San Francisco. 

15 cs Wine \. Vlgnier Co., San Francisco. 

46 cs Liquors A. Vlgnier Co., San Francisco. 

300 cs Gin Jesse Moore-Hunt Co., San Francisco. 

41 cs Wine L. D. McLean, San Francisco. 

195 cs Gin Borgfeldt, Propfe & Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Bitters . Borgfeldt, Propfe & Co., San Francisco. 

96 cs Gin M. Augenblick & Co., San Francisco. 

4 cs Bitters M. Augenblick & Co., San Francisco. 

193 cs Wine Continental Dist. Co., Seattle. 

100 cs Whisky Continental Dist. Co., Seattle. 

300 cs Gin Bluraauer & Hoch, Portland. 

95 cs Gin Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

5 cs Bitters Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

97 cs Gin J. Zimmerman, Portland. 

3 cs Bitters J. Zimmerman, Portland. 

100 cs Gin Fleckensteln & Co., Portland. 

FROM ANTWERP — Per Inverness, November 3. 

120 cs Beer • \merican Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

25 cs Mineral W^ater V. Vignier Co., San Francisco. 

500 cs Mineral Water. Apollinaris Co., San Francisco. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Nebraskan, November 3. 

5 octs Gin H. Campe & Co., San Francisco. 

3 bbls Gin H. Campe & Co., San Francisco. 

32 cs Gin H. Campe & Co., San Francisco. 

1000 cs Bitters Johnson-Locke Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

11 bbls Gin Baird, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

690 cs Whisky Lang & Stroh, San Francisco. 

5 cs Champagne Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

34 cs Liquors Order, San Francisco. 

2 bbls Mastic Order, San Francisco. 

350 cs Whisky J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

10 bbls Whisky Shapiro Bros., Portland. 

10 bbls Whisky Kuchner & Hanno, Portland. 

3 cs Whisky Kuchner & Hanno, Portland. 

3 bbls Wbisky M. Zetasch, Portland. 

25 cs Whisky J. E. Kelly, Portland. 

10 cs Whisky D. Gerwanner, Portland. 

1 bbl Whisky D. Gerwanner, Portland. 

5 bbls Whisky Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

5 bbls W^hisky Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

25 cs Whisky J. Burnies, Portland. 

2 bbls Whisky J. E. Kelly, Portland. 

' ' FROM EUROPE — SAME VESSEL. 

126 cs Whisky Rusconl, Fisher & Co., San Francisco. 

86 cs Whisky Samuel Co., San Francisco. 

7 csks Whisky Samuel Co., San Francisco. 

270 bbls Stout Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

30 bbls Ale Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

50 bbls Beer Lang & Stroh, San Francisco. 

50 cs Beer Johnson-Locke Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN— Per Korea, October 28. 

50 cs Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

50 csks Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

151 csks Sake N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Sake N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

30 cs Sake Sonoma Wine Co., Los Angeles. 

40 csks Sake Sonoma Wine Co., Los Angeles. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Alaskan, November 10. 

5 cs Wine Plumel & Co., San Francisco. 

100 cs Whisky Fontana & Co., San Francisco. 

75 cs Wine New Granucci Grocery Co., S. F. 

25 cs Wine Levaggi, Granucci Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Whisky Muller & Co.. San Francisco. 

22 cs Wine V. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

11 bbls Gin =;herwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

5 csks Gin Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

5 bbls Whisky VIexander & Co., San Jose. ■ 

4 bbls Gin Brassy & Co., San Jose. 

6 csks Gin Brassy & Co., San Jose. 

6 bbls Whisky ihawmut Liquor Co., Seattle 

10 bbls Whisky i. Larnord Co., Seattle. 

10 cs Whisky '^. Larnord Co., Seattle. 

753 cs Whisky J. H. Kahnley & Co., Seattle. 

10 cs Wine S. Hyde, Seattle. 

25 cs Lime Juice Fisher Bros., Seattle. 

3 bbls Gin E. Marre & Bro., Oakland. 

18 kgs Gin E. Marre & Bro., Oakland. 

11 cs Gin E. Marre & Bro., Oakland. 

20 bbls Whisky Ladd & Co., Stockton. 

50 cs Whisky Peacock & Co., Honolulu. 

602 cs Liquors Lovejoy & Co., Honolulu. 

2 bbls Liquors Lovejoy & Co., Honolulu. 

(Concluded on Page 24) 



E. A. QROEZINQER 



Established 1864 



E. 0. SCHRAUBSTADTER 



SPARKLING ANo VINTAGE WINES 

CHAMPAGNES 



809 MONTGOMERY STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



22 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 









I^IaI Generous California Wine Men Boost Exposition with l^JA;! 
|^j^|= Car Load of Wine j^|W| 



O f I ■♦>■ I ■«♦' 



"CHOICE CALIFORNIA WINES." 

"PRESENTED TO THE CONGRESSIONAI. COMMITTEE 
BY THE WINE MEN OF CALIFORNIA TO HELP 
SECURE FOR SAN FRANCISCO THE EXPOSITION 
IN 1915." 



THE stranger within our gates who desires to learn whether 
or no California has the proper exposition spirit, should 
liave seen the parade of two two-horse drays the other day 
through the streets of this city. They caiTied for the edification 
of the public 300 cases of the choicest California Avines of all 
varieties, thereby showing that the patriotic wine men of the 
State, besides subscribing |50,000 to the exposition funds, had 
freely given the wine in question, of a value of some $900, for 
the good of the cause. 

It was presented to the Congressional committee of the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition Committee, now traveling to Wash- 
ington to espouse the cause of San Francisco before Congress, 
as the best place to hold the 1915 exposition for the celebration 
of the completion of the Panama Canal. The following is a list 
of the names of the donors : Lachmau & Jacobi, Italian-Swiss 
Colony, Theo. Gier Wine Co., California Wine Association, 



"SAN FRANCISCO THE EXPOSITION CITY IN 1915." 

Of course such action on the part of the wine men is to be 
highly commended, but here it creates no surprise because the 
people of both city and State are heart and soul in favor of 
San Fz'ancisco being chosen, but we flatter ourselves it will 
astonish other communities a big bit and strike New Orleans 
in the solar plexus. To that end the signs in question will be 
attached to the i*ailway car transporting the wine, and every 
hamlet, town and city at which the train may stop, will learn 
that California, the land of sunshine, wine and flowers, noted 




GROUP IN THE CENTER: PRESIDENT F. A. BUSSE, OF THE ALLIED GRAPE AND WINE INDUSTRIES, CENTER; THEODORE GIER OF 
THE THEODORE GIER COMPANY AND HORATIO F. STOLL, SECRETARY OF THE ORGANIZATION, LEFT. 



Wetmore-Bowen Co., Napa & Sonoma Wine Co., Arthur Lach- 
man, Schlesinger & Bender, C. Schilling & Co., Wm. Hoelscher 
& Co., E. H. Lancel Co., The Rosenblatt Co., E. (i. Lyons & Raas 
Co., Chauche & Bon, Tokalan Vineyard Co., Anglo-California 
Wine Co., French-American Wine Co., Mount Hamilton Vine- 
yard Co., Inglenook Vineyard Agency, A. Finke's Widow. 

In addition to the foregoing, a presentation of thirty-eight 
cases of similar wine was made to Mr. R. E. Ccmnolly, head of 
llie publicity department of the Panama-Pacific Exposition 
( "ompany, who recently left for Washington. This gift will 
enable the National Press Club to enjoy the California vintages 
and drink success to San Francisco. 

Horatio F. Stoll, the active secretary pro tem of the Allied 
Industries, managed the affair with his usual adroitness. The 
drays bore tliree large signs as follows: 



all over the world for its generosity and hospitality, is the only 
place in this broad country in which such an exposition can be 
carried out with the success due to a national celebration of an 
event of vast benefit to the world at large — the opening of the 
Panama Canal. 

May success crown our efforts, the members of Congress enjoy 
the wine so generously given, and (>ndorse the city it came from 
as the pi"oper place in which to hold the exposition. 



Mayor Mott of Oakland has signed the ordinance doing away 
with private boxes in all establishments where intoxicants are 
sold. The oi-dinance will become law within 30 days after its 
passage, but it is rumored that the new ordinance will be de- 
layed in some way so as not to become a law before the first of 
the new year. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



23 




The Vintage 



THE vintage of 1910 has been brouglit to a successful close. 
The weather conditions were as a rule very favorable, and 
in all sections the promise is for a right good quality of wine. 
As to the total yield it is estimated that it will be about the 
same a.s that of last year, when the dry wine output was in the 
neighborhood of 27,000,000 gallons, and the sweet wines a little 
less than 18,000,000 gallons. The shortages in both the dry 
and sweet wine sections were about made up by the product of 
new vineyards that came into bearing this year. 



DRY WINES : — There is no longer any doubt that the tide 
has turned for the California wine industry, and is inov- 
ing toward genuine and continued prosperity. The nation- 
wide reaction of public sentiment with reference to prohibition 
and local option, has had a marked effect upon the wine busi- 
ness. Dealers who were in the districts threatened by prohi- 
bition or local option, dared not order beyond absolute immeili- 
ate needs, but now that the prohibitionists have been defeated 
nearly everywhere, the buyers ai*e in a position to stock up with- 
out fear of their enemies. The sea export figures in this issue 
show that they are not losing any time sending in their orders. 
For all of which the California wine men are duly grateful. 

Speaking of the situation, one of the biggest men in the indus- 
try writes the editor as follows : "It looks to me as if the long 
expected readjustment of the wine market is at hand and I be- 
lieve that the future of California wines is most promising. 
The defeat of prohibition bills in several States on November 
8 has done much to stimulate the demand for our wines, and 
the failure of the European vintage has also resulted in a de- 
mand for our product in Germany, France, Italy, Belgium, 
Switzerland, and other European countries where wines are 
judged by their trxie merit and not by their labels." 

As an indication of the trend of affairs in the industry it may 
be noted that the California Wine Association stocks jumped 
three points on the 17th inst. Recent reports from the Associa- 
tion show financial impx'ovement and the stockholders are en- 
thusiastic. Preferred stock, it is said, goes on a dividend basis 
at the first of the year. 

Exports for the month ending November 20th were of un- 
usual large volume, comparatively. The figures were 633 cases, 
1,495,495 gallons, valued at |469,122. The exports for the same 
period last year were 523 cases, and 914,877 gallons, valued at 
|!269,267, showing a very heavy and satisfactory increase. 

Imports were of fair volume, the chief item being 2,348 
cases. 



SWEET WINES:— The mai'ket is getting in much better 
shape and the wine men have reason to be much encourage<l 
with the outlook. The figures of production of the entire State 
are not available for this writing, the statistics from the fourth 
district not being at hand. The production in the first and sixth 
districts for the month of October totaled 7,048,863 gallons. The 
indications are that the output of sweets this season will be 
nearly the same as last year. 



WHISKY: — The whisky men are a unit in declaring a 
great improvement in business during the past month. 
This applies particularly to the State and Coast. While com- 
mercial conditions are steadily improving in the city, they have 
not yet reached the normal, but with the decision of Congress 
in favor of San Francisco as the Exposition City for the Pan- 
ama Canal, the situation locally will change for the better at 
once, and general activity follow'. The important victory in 
Oregon over the cock-sure Prohibitionists was a great event 
for the trade, and as stated elsewhere in this issue, by far-seeing 
men, it appears to be only a matter of a year or two when the 
whole State will revert to license and regulation. 

Exports by sea for the month were of ordinary volume, the 
figures being 530 cases and 4,013 gallons, valued at f 11,951. 

Imports of whisky by sea were 6,945 cases, 216 barrels, 19 
casks, 46 octaves and one keg. 



IMPORTATIONS : — Business with the importers has been sat- 
isfactory, considering the conditions resulting from the stock- 
ing up of the trade generally to anticipate the increase in tariff 
which took place in August last. Along with the other branches 
of the trade the outlook for winter business is very satisfac- 
tory. Herewith are the figures of imports for the month ending 
November 20th. Among the principal items champagne leads 
with 4,301 cases. (Jin also takes a good exhibit with 3,219 
cases : 



IMPORTS BY SEA:— Whisky, 6945 cases, 216 barrels, 19 
casks, 46 octaves, 1 keg; Wines, 6 half barrels, 12 barrels, 1 
keg, 2348 cases, 13 casks, 4 hogsheads; Beer, 1173 quarter bar- 
rels, 581 cases, 1,640 barrels, 1,151 half barrels, 779 casks, 166 
hogsheads, 776 packages, 3 sixth barrels ; Sake, 292 cases, 1223 
casks; Ale, 55 cases, 195 barrels; Bitters, 1,424 cases; Brandy, 
178 cases, 19 casks, 2 octaves; Champagne, 4,301 cases; Gin, 42 
baiTels, 3219 cases, 31 casks, 5 octaves; Sherry, 25 ca.ses, 6 casks; 
Cordials, 306 cases; Kummel, 20 cases; Vermouth, 4 barrels, 
1,850 cases ; Rum, 3 barrels ; Liquors, 971 cases, 2 barrels ; Min- 
eral Water, 2137 cases; Absinthe, 88 cases; Stout, 110 cases, 720 
barrels; Benedictine, 50 cases; Amer Picon, 300 cases; Spirits, 
100 cases; Fruit Juice, 3 casks. 



BEER : — There is nothing of any moment to be said regard- 
ing the trade. Business is giving a good account of itself 
and the brewers and brewers' agents look for an exceptionally 
good year in 1911. Exports were nominal. The figures were 226 
packages bottled and 52 bulk, valued at |5231. 



BRANDY : — The market has a firmer tone at advanced prices 
and there is every indication that the increase is liable to 
be followed by further advance at a not far distant date. Pro- 
duction in the first and sixth districts aggregated 190,422 gal- 
lons. Figures of the production in the fourth district are not 
available for this issue. 

Exports by sea were 38 cases, and 3,495 gallons, valued at 
$5,155. 

Imports by sea were 178 cases, 19 casks and 2 octaves. 



New York Wine Marl<ets 



THERE has been a little improvement of late in the movement 
of wines and brandies; the withdrawals of brandies being 
exceptionally heavy. The advance in prices which went into 
effect early in the month is fairly well established and condi- 
tions resulting therefrom are more satisfactory than for some 
time past. — Bonfort's, November 25, 1910. 



2i 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



Imports by Sea — Continued 



Reciprocity With Canada 



30 

85 

10 

30 

1 

35 

10 

1 

75 

20 

175 



1 

100 

100 

r.oo 

100 
50 
50 
60 
20 
50 

196 
15 
25 
20 

190 
3 

14 

3 

336 

45 

SO 

16 

700 

800 

250 

2E15 

4 

100 

100 

50 
20 

7 
50 
27 
10 
25 
895 
50 

5 

670 

68 

7 

450 
90 
15 
10 
25 
1 

100 
10 
25 
10 

1200 

3 
60 

400 
50 

500 



FROM EUROPE— SAME VESSEI* 

cs Mineral Water Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Whisky J. Robertson, Portland. 

octs Whisky J. Robertson, Portland. 

octs Whisky Fleckenstein & Mever, Portland. 

csk Whisky Fleckenstein & Meyer, Portland. 

cs Whisky Fleckenstein & Meyer, Portland. 

octs Whisky H. Fleckenstein, Portland. 

csk Whisky Butler Hotel, Seattle. 

bbls Ginger Ale Wolf & Co., Seattle. 

cs Wine Bernstein & Sons, Seattle. 

cs Mineral Water Apollinarls Co., Los Angeles. 

FROM EUROPE (via Ancon) — Per Peru, November 10. 

cs Bitters Johnson, Ijocke Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

FROM LIVERPOOL (via Seattle)— Per Buckman, November 4. 

Oct Whisky T. G. Aitken, Porterville. 

cs Whisky L. Taussig & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Whisky Tillmann & Bendel, San Francisco. 

cs Whisky Jas. Buchanan & Co., San Francisco. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN — Per Amiral E-xelmans, November 11. 

csks Sake Macondray & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Sake Macondray & Co., San Francisco. 

csks Sake Order, San Francisco. 

csks Sake Kagavi^a & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Sake N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

csks Sake N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

csks Sake K. TogasakI, San Francisco. 

csks Sake Order, Los Angeles. 

cs Sake Order, Los Angeies. 

FROM ANTWERP— SAME VESSEL. 

cs Beer Fin lay & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Wine W. Berg, San Francisco. 

FROM MARSEILLES — SAME VESSEL 

cs Wine L. Bazet, San Francisco. 

csks Fruit Juice Delsol Bros., San Francisco. 

cs Wine Pascal, Dubedat & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Liquors Pascal, Dubedat & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Absinthe Pascal, Dubedat & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Mineral Water Pascal, Dubedat & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Vermouth Pascal, Dubedat & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Vermouth LevaggI, Granucci & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Vermouth A. Cora, San Francisco. 

cs Mineral Water Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

hhds Wine Cal. French Wine Co., San Francisco. 

cs Vermouth Jevne & Co., Los Angeles. 

FROM VICTORIA— Per Queen, November 12. 

cs Spirits .American Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz)— Per Pleiades, November 15. 

cs Wine LevaggI, Granucci Co., San Francisco. 

cs Wine ■. F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Whisky p. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

<=** Wine J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Liquors J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Brandy j. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Cliampagne J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Whisky J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

?? ," hisky A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

''''^?,,T^^'®''y A. Levis, Sacramento. 

?? Whisky Clark & Co., Portland. 

bbls Whisky Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

cs Liquors Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

FROlt EUROPE— SAME VESSEL 

K?!® a',""' Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

. ^IS.,' Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

°<='|, Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

cs Wli sky Order, San Francisco. 

cs Whisky Order, San Francisco. 

kg Whisky Coyne & Hewlett, Bakersfleld. 

■^^ T,?J;'' 1- Johnson-Locke Mer. Co., Los Angeles. 

® S, ^^^ ^^^ ^ Kellerman, Los Angeles. 

cs Whisky Jeffries & Kepper, Los Angeles. 

csks Whisky Grand Hotel, San Diego. 

FROM VICTORIA— Per City of Puebia, November 18. 

cs Champagne G. A. Kessler & Co., San Francisco. 

FROM ANTWERP— Per Balmoral, November 19. 

tl Rr»nH''v ^^1^7' WHson & Co., San Francisco. 

'^s Brandy A. Vlgnler Co., San Francisco. 

cs ^V|llsky C. Melnecke & Co., San Francisco. 

cs Wine Order, San Francisco. 

cs Mineral Water Apollinarls Co., San Francisco. 



According to Spokane, Washington, advices, brewers in tliat 
section are trying to stem the swelling tide of local option by 
extolling the merits of beer as a "temperance" beverage and 
promoting its sale in place of more rigorous intoxicants. 



The Pacific Northwest Brewmasters' Convention was held at 
Spokane, Washington, during the month, some forty members 
being in attendance. There was a very interesting discussion 
regarding the best and most scientific methods of brewing, the 
use of electricity, refrigeration, etc. 



THE conference between representatives of the United States 
and Canada has terminated. It is said that while no definite 
arrangements were concluded, the ground was cleared for a 
further conference, which Avill be held in Washington early in 
January. Mr. Fielding, the Canadian finance minister, an- 
nounces that it is the firm belief that an agreement will be 
reached which will be satisfactory to the people on both sides of 
the line. 

The winemen of California, many of whom do considerable 
business in Vancouver and Victoria and the surrounding cities 
are anxious that some concessions be shoAvn to this country. 
The other day, the Allied Grape and Wine Industries of Cali- 
fornia sent a telegram to Hon. P. C. Knox, Secretary of State, 
saying : "In making reciprocity treaty witli Canada, please see 
that American wines are placed on same footing as French 
wines." 

Whether Canada will do this remains to he seen. However, 
as no wine is produced in the Dominion and there is, therefore, 
no competition with the home product, there seems to be no 
reason why our product should not be welcomed and all bar- 
riers removed. 

It is said that the feeling in Ottawa is that as a result of the 
agreement, the natural products of Canada will be given easier 
access to the United States and that some American manufac- 
tures will be given freer admission to Canada. "This forecasts 
precisely the kind of jug-handle reciprocity which, however, 
acceptable it may be to the manufacturers of this country, will 
find considerable opposition from other producers here," com- 
ments the Post-Intelligencer, of Seattle, which adds: 

"Real reciprocity is one thing; an alleged recoprocity which 
favors one section or one interest at the expense of the others, 
is an entirely different matter. The suggested arrangement 
with Canada will be highly satisfactory to New England, be- 
cause New England will benefit on both sides of it. New Eng- 
land wants, in any event, the fri^e admisson of coal, lumber and 
foodstuffs, except, of course, fish, because New England has a 
large fishing interest. In return for getting the free materials, 
that it wants from Canada, New England is to get a larger mar- 
ket for its manufactured goods in Canada. 

"The states which produce lumber, coal and foodstuffs get 
the worst of it. They have no reduction of duties on the ma- 
terials which they might wish to import from Canada, because 
they do not pi'oduce them at home, while they do have to meet 
Canadian competition in the markets of this country on every- 
thing which they produce. There is too much sectionalism about 
this. Honest reciprocity with Canada should cover every ar- 
ticle which is produced in both countries. To such a reciprocity 
there would be but slight, if any opposition, along the border 
states." 

So think the winemen ! 



From Q. S. Nicholas & Co. 



We learn from Winters that the result of the past election 
shows that tlio inhabitants of Blacks and Dunnigan will have 
to remain dry for the next two years. The vote in Dunnigan 
was, for saloons 3G, against U, and Blacks about the same. 



WE beg to inform you that Messrs. Andrew Usher & Co. have 
conceded to us their representation for the Pacific Coast, 
so that we are now their sole agents in the United States. It is 
our desire, if possible, to confine our business to taking orders 
for shipment of the celebrate<l Avhiskies shipped by tliis liouse. 
We are also sole agents for the United States for Deiuhard 
& Co., Rhine and Moselles. 

Orders may be addressed to us or to Mr. Jos. L. Eppinger, 830 
Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 



I 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



25 



I Vote of Confidence i 

I The Liquor Dealers Find in the Results in Nation 1 

THE following statement to the public was issued yesterday: 
"This association desires to express its appreciation of 
ihe vote of confidence as evidenced by the defeat of the prohibi- 
tion forces in Missouri, Florida, Oregon, Idaho, Alabama, Min- 
nesota, Utah and other States, in which the people registered 
their votes yesterday on various phases of liquor legislation. 

"The tremendous victory of the liberal forces is conclusive 
evidence tliat the voters have decided that license and regula- 
tion, under proper laws, work for temperance, and that statu- 
tory prohibition laws are not enforceable and result in dis- 
regard for all laws. 

"This association intends to continue to move along the lines 
adopted at the national convention held at Niagara Falls 
in June, 1908, as confirmed at the national conventions held in 
1909 and 1910 — that 'it is our firm conviction that those who 
honestly seek to promote the cause of true temperance will find 
the surest and safest method in the continuance of the licensed 
saloon, conducted under proper laws and reasonable regulations 
strictly enforced, and that in the granting of a license the char- 
acter of the applicant and not the fee should be the factor. 

"THE NATIONAL WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS' AS- 
SOCIATION OF AMERICA, 

"Morris F. Westheimer, President." 

Cincinnati Enquirer, November 10, 1910. 



Lundstrom's Five Hat Stores — Home Industry 



LUNDSTROM'S have recently opened the fifth in their chain 
of hat stores in San Francisco. The newest "baby" is at 
26 Third street, in "Newspaper Row." It is the handsomest of 
the firm's stores. Lundstrom hats are not a new commodity, but 
represent the oldest continuous established exclusive hat house 
in San Francisco. 

The business was originally established by K. A. Lund.strom 
in a basement at 314 Sutter street. A few years later a store 
at 605 Kearny street was established, and in 1896 the big store 
at 1178 Market street was opened. Several other stores have 
been established since the fire, until now Lundstrom Hats con- 
trol the local hat market, being considered the standard. Five 
stores and a factory, where the bulk of the Lundstrom hats are 
made, makes this house quite a factor in the commercial world. 

Mr. Lundstrom is a great believer in "Home Industry," and 
since 1885 has manufactured hats here. The house also does 
quite a mail order business and every s])ring issues a handsome 
catalogue, Avhich is mailed free for the asking. 



I 



A dispatch fi*om Klamath Falls, Oregon, states that as a 
result of Klamath County's action in going "wet" at tlie recent 
election, Klamath Falls is to have a big brewing plant within a 
short time, according to the announcement of N. Mugler, of 
Sisson, who represents a Redding, Cal., brewing company. No 
imnecessary time is to be lost. The plan is to move the Redding 
plant here and replace it in the California toAvn with a larger 
one. It is also current rumor that the Salem Brewing Company 
has been negotiating for a place here to establish a brewing 
plant, and has been awaiting the decision of the voters of the 
county before beginning its establishment. 



HOMEPMONE 

THE IDEAL TELEPHONE FOR EVERYBODY 

AUTOMATIC SERVICE 

No more wraiting for numbers; but instant connection and 
disconnection. 

SECRET SERVICE 

No intervening operators to listen; 
secrecy guaranteed. 

LONG DISTANCE 

Adequate Transbay Service in- 
cluding Oakland, San Francisco and 
Berkeley. 

Lower Rates: Better Service 
Rates $1.50 a month up 

BAY CITIES 
HOME TELEPHONE COMPANY 

333 Grant Avenue, San Francisco 




BREEN 8c KENNEDY. 

DISTILLERS a BLENDERS. i 




THOMAS W. COSTELLO 

Pacific Coast Representative 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 160 PINE STREET 

Phones: Douglas 2903; Home, C 2337 

Owners of the celebrated Cedar Creek Sour-Mash Bourbon and Rye distilled by this 
firm at Distillery No.. 33, 7th District, Ky., situated at I rankfort, Ky, and controllers of 
an elegant line of straight goods, among which are the famous Belle ( f Nelson Bourbi n 
and old fashioned Day & Haff Bourbon. These gocds we carry in stock at San Fran- 
cisco and sell them under he double stamp regauged and delivered, thus saving the 
retailer all outage, costs of reducing, deliv ry, etc. 

Also owners of the celebrated straight blends of pure natural whiskies in the following 
brands: 



Henderson's Smoothest Bourbon 
Maryland Reserve Pure Rye 



Comrade Bourbon and Rye 

Calumet Club Bourbon & Rye Special 



Cedar Creek Bourbon and Rye canied in three sizes, bott'ed in bond full measure. 

Belle of Nelson bottled straight at 90 proof, full quarts. 

A lar'ge stock continually carried in San Francisco for delivery at short notice, and 
trade especially solicited from independent retail liquor dealers, desiring to buy high grade 
straight Bourbons and Ryes, regauged, and genuine straight blends direct from the manu- 
factjrer. 

Our aim is to give the greatest possible value in fine whiskies st most reasonable 
prices. 

A trial of any of our goods will assuredly make you one of our customers. 



Distilleries, Kentucky 



Blending House and Main Office, Chicago, 111. 



26 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



m 



LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT 



m 



i 



THE last of the grapes were crushed before the 12th of the 
month and some of the larger wineries had finished during 
the first week of November and though the vintage was nearly 
two weeks earlier this season about the same amount of wine 
was turned out. Vintners generally' report this season's vintage 
a satisfactory one the grapes being of good quality. With favor- 
able weather during the crushing season the wine crop promises 
to be of excellent quality. Internal Revenue reports for the 
month of October show a decided increase in the amount of 
sweet wines manufactured this season over last year's product 
during the same month, October 1910, showing a production of 
1,302,337 gallons as against 1,041,042 gallons for October 1909, 
an increase of 261,295 gallons. A pretty good showing for a 
county that is being harassed by local option and every other 
method that the ingenuity of the Prohibition element down this 
way, which makes no discrimination between the retail saloon 
and the vineyardist, could devise. 

Many of the wineries are now busily engaged in the making 
of brandy and it is expected that there will also be a propor- 
tionate increase in the brandy figures for this month's produc- 
tion over those of November, 1909. 

Now that election is over the local liquor men are looking over 
the list of those elected and trying to decide as to what the 
future has in store for them. The peculiar temperament of a 
large number of those enjoying the voting franchise in this 
county has the past few months kept the liquor men guessing 
as to what next in the "reform" movement would be sprung 
upon them, and it was with relief and satisfaction that when 
the returns were all in the name of Woolwine, the Prohi- 
bitionist, Independent, Good Government and Democratic can- 
didate for District Attorney was among the missing. It was 
about the only crumb of comfort left them, for the local option 
questions was in the majority of the county precincts decided 
against not only the granting of saloon, hotel and restaurant 
licenses, but also against the wineries as well. This in some 
cases where the wineries and vineyards had been established 
for the past twenty years. The large wineries are not affected 
by this to any appreciable extent as their business was almost 
entirely transacted with outside markets, but to the small wine- 
grower crushing the products of his own small vineyard and 
whose trade was with the residents of the locality, it will prove 
a matter of considerable loss. Those precincts voting against 
wineries were Baird, Freeman, Rowland, Gardena, Downey, 
Eagle Rock, San Dimas, La Mirada, Ivanhoe, Montebello, Lan- 
kershim, El Monte, Glendale and Sherman, while Del Rey, Na- 
ples, Lancaster, Newhall, Lamanda Park, Artesia, Palmdale, 
Del 'Sur, La Canada, East Whittier, Spadra, San Gabriel, Mali- 
bu, Ballona and Wilmington were in favor of licensing the 
wineries. In most of the precincts favoring wineries there are 
wineries established though not in all of them. 



In the voting on saloon licenses in the county the majority 
of the precincts were against their issuance. One of the jokes 
of the campaign was the vote in the Annandale precinct which 
took away the license of the swell Annandale Club of which 
many of the shining lights of the "reform" element were mem- 
bers and now a wild yell has gone up for aid to circumvent that 
"odious" ordinance and a purse is being raised to defend the 
"club's rights." It sometimes makes quite a difference whose 
ox is gored. 



>tl**»t H I IIW^^tfM^ H I « H »»»I H I ■■!■ I l,f»«|0 



The Police Commission has granted a social club liquor license 
to the Concordia Club, Sixteenth and Figueroa streets. 



H. J. Woollacott, one of the pioneer liquor dealers of Los 
Angeles, but who had retired from the business several years 
ago, and a man very prominent in the city's commercial life, 
died on the 17th of November. 



Claude I. Parker, U. S. Internal Revenue Collector for the 
Sixth District, has been to Seattle attending the meeting of all 
the Pacific Coast Internal Revenue Collectors the 14th of this 
month. 



Carl Leopold, proprietor of the saloon at 116 North Spring 
Street, ended his life by suicide on the 14th. Business reverses 
is said to have been the cause of his unfortunate death. 



David and Rosa Cohn have been charged with selling liquor 
without paying the government tax and their case is before 
the U. S. District Court. This is said to be the first prosecu- 
tion of the kind brought in Southern California for many years. 



The Waldorf Annex is justifying the confidence of the Becker 
Bros, who foresaAv the possibilities of trade for a high class 
cafe in that neighborhood immediately after the completion of 
the Pacific Electric Building and station and who opened the 
Waldorf Annex long before the completion of the magnificent 
office buildings on the other three corners of Sixth and Main 
streets, whose habitues find refreshment to their liking at the 
Waldorf Annex. 



John Davin, former owner of the Faust Cafe, is said to be 
negotiating for repurchase of that place, since the location of 
the Post office at Spring and Temple streets has awakened north 
of First street considerably. 



An unfortunate case of "getting in wrong" has had its clos- 
ing chapter in the case of Jack Edwards. Edwards in the days 
when the saloon licenses were owned largely by the breweries, 
bought at a fancy price the license of the saloon at Main and 
Winston streets also paying a fancy price for the good will of 
the business which consisted largely of a good trade with an 
undesirable reputation. In all Edwards put in about |15,000 
cash and the Los Angeles Brewery accepted several mortgages 
for the balance. Enter reform administration, Edwards' license 
was forfeited, the brewery foreclosed all its mortgages and now 
Edwards and his family are thrown in the street while he is 
practically penniless. 



Ralph L. Knapp of Los Angeles, well known as a champagne 
agent to the wine trade here and in the East, lias inherited a 
large fortune and has quit business. His mother's estate, valued 
at nearly |3,000,000, has been divided between Ralph and his 
two brothers, David and Harry Knapp. 



The complete result of the late election in San Bernardino 
County shows that of the precincts outside of incorporatetl 
cities, 34 went "dry" and 19 "wet." Taking the entire county, 
inclusive of incorporated cities, the total shows 55 "dry" pi-e- 
cincts to 31 "wet." 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



27 



£^ 



v^-~- 




nivtNJI ON • - ^^ 



'm\ f::^lt/\NP NOTE/ 



Charles M. Fisher, of Rusconi, Fisher & Company, returned 
during the latter part of the month from a trip through the 
southern part of the State. He was very successful in promoting 
the sales of "Kennel Club Whisky" and "Kinsey Rye." He re- 
ports business improving right along and the outlook very en- 
couraging. 



The Napa and Sonoma Wine Company reports trade normal, 
collecticms better, and is of opinion that prices of both wine and 
brandy will rise. The company is highly pleased with the suc- 
cess of the "Oro Fino California Cognac Brandy," which is 
receiving very considerable recognition at the hands of the 
trade. This brandy is distilled entirely from the true wine 
grape, is absolutely pure and unadulterated. 



Jdanager Craig, of Brown-Forman's local establishment, said 
that the house had been branching out and was doing very 
extensive pictorial advertising on billboards of "Old Tucker" 
whisky, bottled in bond. Mr. Craig reports the firm to be doing 
a rapidly increasing business through the Stockton Wholesale 
Liquor Company in Stockton, from which city he had just re- 
turned, having made contracts with the company in question to 
place the goods in two-thirds of the best saloons in San Joaipiin 
County. The contracts also cover the same work in Sacramento. 
He was in the Capital City during the State Fair and found at 
that time that all first-class saloons had turned their attention 
to "Old Tucker" in bond and gave very encouraging reports of 
its popularity with customers. Trade was reported improving 
very fast through the country and many mail orders had been 
received from Oregon since the Home Rule amendment was 
passed, and Mr. Craig believes that the whole State will open 
up for liquor traffic by April 1, 1911. 



Manager Baker, of Jesse Moore, Hunt Company, considered 
the recent election very satisfactory from all points of view. 
This was particularly so in Oregon. The "drying," however, of 
Bellingham and Everett, Washington, was greatly to be regret- 
ted and means a considerable loss to that house. As far as 
business was concerned he could say with truth that November 
was the best month the firm had ever enjoyed. Naturally, there- 
fore, the house was well satisfied with present conditions, and 
believed that everything was favorable for a prosperous winter's 
business. 



Reports obtained from the James de Fremory Company state 
that that noted brand, "Carstair's Rye Whisky," has been hav- 
ing a big call lately both in city and country. This is attributed 
partially to the recent advertising, but more particularly to the 
intrinsic merit of the whisky itself, which has been a great 
favorite with the public since it was first distilled in 1788. The 
firm's own brand of bourbon, "Old Crane," is making many new 
and losing no old friends, while as to "Old Jordan," that fine 
brand of whisky is proving a favorite wherever tried. Busi- 
ness was reported fair during the beginning of the month, but 
has shown a great improvement toAvards the end. 



Taussig & Company are rejoicing over the great improvement 
of business in the country, while that in the city is looking up, 
but not quite so fast. Carroll rye has lost none of its attrac- 
tions for the public, and is proving, as of old, a first-class seller 
wherever introduced. Mr. Hugo Taussig is at present enjoying 
an automobile tour through Europe, and Avill no doubt look into 
Irade conditions there, particularly as to Californian products, 
as he is known to be an energetic booster of the Golden State. 
His brother, Mr. Rudolph Taussig, Avhile looking after the busi- 
ness of this well-known house, is very busy also working hard 
for California's interests, as he is the secretary of the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition. 



lASH'SBITTERC 

La To>\\c \_a>xa:t\v^ W 



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28 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIEIT REVIEW. 




mcmc 




Satisfactory Results of the Elections 



R. M. WOOD Editor 

Office: No. 127 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, California. 
Rooms 304-305 
Phones: Kearny 2597 Home C 2559 



P. C. Rossi Sees Return of Prosperity to Wine Industry 



WE take much pleasure in publisliinc: the following 
from P. C. Rossi, president of the Italian-Swiss Colony, 
concerning the condition of the wine industry. Mr. Rossi is 
neither an optimist nor pessimist but conservative always. This 
being a fact, his statements as to the present situation and the 
promised future of the industry must be accepted as authority. 
Mr. Rossi says: 

"Last year the production of sweet wines was the greatest 
in the history of the industry, namelj-, 17,983,465 gallons, while 
the dry wine output totaled about 27,000,000 gallons. 

"In regard to the output for 1910, I would not be surprised 
if the total amount of dry and sweet wines was about the same 
as last year. In Sonoma and Napa Cotinties, the short- 
age did not run more than ten per cent, as the difference in 
the crop was made up to a large extent by the area of new vines 
that have come into bearing. 

"The same thing applies to the sweet wine section. While 
there was a shortage of about twenty-five per cent around Fresno 
and in Southern California, owing to the climatic conditions, 
such a large .area came into bearing in the neighborhood of 
Turlock, Lathrop, Ceres, Modesto, Manteca, Lodi and Stockton 
that I think much of this shortage was made up. 

"Owing to the favorable commercial conditions, this produc- 
tion is none too great. It looks to me as if the long-expected 
adjustment of the wine market is at hand, and I believe that 
the future of California wines is most promising. 

"The defeat of the prohibition bills in several States on No- 
vember 8th has done much to stimulate the demand for our 
Avines, and the failure of the European vintage has also resulted 
in a demand for our product in Germany, France, Italy, Bel- 
gium, Switzerland and other European countries where wines 
are judged by their true merit and not by their label. 

"The fact that the leading wine merchants of these countries 
have turned to California first to make up their own shortage 
should convince American wine drinkers that our native pro- 
duct is now the equal of any made, and that there is no sane 
reason why they should purchase wine with a foreign label. If 
the most discriminating EurojMian wine drinkers consider our 
product worth buying, I think it surely ought to be good 
enough for the American people." 



The New Mexico convention called to formulate a State 
Constitution closed its labors on the 21st instant. Prohibition 
and local option were excluded but the way was left open to 
the next Legislature to deal Avith these questions. The con- 
vention believes that it has formulated a fundamental law that 
will be ratified by the people and approved by Congress and 
President Taft. 



THE election returns of November 8th show conclusively that 
the prohibitionists have at last got to the end of their rope, 
which, being a long one, has given tliem the opportunity of 
hanging themselves. Not satisfied with having invaded the peace 
and prosperity of many States, cities and other communities; 
with having been the cause of riot, bloodshed and all kinds of 
law-breaking, they attempted to bring about state-wide prohibi- 
tion wherever they believed they held tlu; balance of power. 
The old saying, "Those whom the gods desire to destroy they 
first make mad," was certainly demonstrated by the last election, 
for wherever prohibition, whether of State, county or precinct, 
was the issue, the aqua-maniacs were defeated in a large major- 
ity of cases. As an exchange aptly expresses it : "Business in 
many localities has been practically ruined by the enactment of 
unenforceable prohibition laws without in any sense lessening 
the consumption of alcoholic beverages. This fact has become 
so apparent that it is not surprising that the voters of the coun- 
try arose in their wrath on election day and voted to put a stop 
to the progress of a movement which has been so damaging 
to the business interests of the country." And, it should be 
added, has done so much to injuriously effect it morally. 

Let it be understood, hoAvever, that this gratifying result has 
been brought about by the expenditure of a vast amount of labor 
and money. President Westheimer of the National Association, 
in a circular to the members, says: "Let no one inuigine that 
success fell from the heavens. Hard work, intelligent general- 
ship, untiring effort and unflagging industry nmde success pos- 
sible." This truth is worth serious consideration, for while a 
partial victory has been won, it is only the beginning of an end, 
which can only be brought about by further labor and cost. It 
is up to the trade, therefore, to make fresh exertions in the 
future so that the triumphs of common sense and j>orsonal lib- 
erty recently obtained in old Missouri, Oregon and Florida, 
which rejected state-wide prohibiton; and in the great States 
which rendered an adverse vei'dict to the S])read of the fanatical 
doctrine which has played such havoc Avith Uw country, may be 
repeated." 

As Ave said before, Ave believe the recent victories to be the 
beginning of the end. May that end soon come, Avhen the in- 
tolerant spirit of prohibition shall be deeply buried, and the 
scars of the wrongs inflicted by it on this fair land be removed 
by "time's effacing fingers." 



Government Shows Prohibition a Fraud 



A DISPATCH from Washington, D. C, dated November 27th, 
states that rcA-enue receipts show a big gain and figures for 
the fiscal year have made the record in the li([uor business. Here 
is the record of the nation for the tAvelve months ending June 
30tli as shoAAu by the figures of the International Revenue Bu- 
reau : , 

One hundred and sixty-three million gallons of distilled spir- 
its, 30,000,000 gallons more than the year before; 59,485,111 
barrels of fermented liquors, an increase of 3,000,000 of beer. 

Illicit distilling and manufacturing of moonshine whisky are 
on the increase, "especially," the Bureau says, "where there are 
state-wide prohibition laAvs." 

Commissioner CalK'll's report, speaking of illicit distilling, 
says Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina lead 
in offenses of that character. \\'ithin the year officers closed 
1911 plants, 200 more than last year. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



29 



OBITUARY j# 

M -m_ tr -^ <r — > tr — > n — ■ f 1 i " ' ~ " - - ! 

Charles D. Qalbraith 



What the Victory in Oregon Means 



is with sincpre regret tliat we announce the sudden death in 
Los Angeles on the IGth inst., of Jlr. Charles Drake Galbraith, 
aember of the firm of Borland, Johns & Galbraith, managers of 
he Pacific Coast department of the United States Fidelity and 
luaranty Company. Mr. Galbraith started on his southern 
rip in apparent good health and his associates in the firm did 
lot know he was ill. A telegram notified them that he was 
lO more. The deceased came to this State fourteen years ago 
jid joined the company in February, 1906, in the capacity of 
pecial agent. On October first, this year, he was appointed 
membership in the firm of Borland & Johns as a reward for 
lis long and faithful services to the company. He was a man 
unong men, of higli character, and great energy, a man who is 
mown among his fellows as a producer — a man who does 
hings. His untimely death will be greatly felt by his friends 
IS well as his business associates. He was 48 years of age and 
torn in London, Ontario. He leaves a widow. 



BENJAMIN ARNHOLD, who for many years was deeply 
interested in the success of the California wine industry, 
lied on the 23d instant at his residence in this city, aged 49 
'ears. Mr. Arnhold, who was a native of Kourland, a northern 
)rovince of Russia, came to this city in early life, and resided 
iere until his early decease. A clever and energetic man of 
)usiness, he rose to the high position of secretary of the Alaska 
^mmercial Company, of which important body he was a trusted 
)flficer until he left it to join the Stephens-Ai'uhold Company, 
landling the well known "Inglenook" brand of wines, and rep- 
■esenting the viticultural interests of the Niebaum Estate. 

The deceased retired from that company in Septeml)er, 1909, 
)ecause of ill health. He visited Europe and placetl himself in 
he hands of specialists, and submitted to an operation, but the 
jenefit therefrom did not last long, and he died after a severe 
tickness lasting over a year. 

I Mr. Arnhold was financially successful during his business 
ictivity, and his wife and son are left comfortably provided for. 
&e was highly respected in commercial circles and was a niem- 
)er of the Argonaut and Union League clubs. 



What County Option Means 



' IRST and last it means prohibition. 

Stagnation of business. 
Vacation of business rooms and many residences. 
Confiscation of property. 
Loss of employment of hundreds of families. 
Increase of taxes. 
Riot of blind pigs and blind tigers. 
Ti'iumph of the bootlegger. 
Loss of revenue. 
A blow at personal liberty. 
Ruins many — -reforms nobody. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



MANY people no doubt do not understand what the "Greater 
Oregon Home Rule Bill" really signifies, and what its 
adoption by voters means to that State. 

It gives cities and towns the right to have saloons or no 
saloons. It gives the people who live in cities the right to vote 
on and decide this question themselves. It puts the control of 
the liquor traffic into the hands of the voters of each precinct, so 
that every residential district in a city or town is protected. 
It means real local option. All State criminal laws are main- 
tained. Under it the farmer has the same protection he now 
enjoys. It is a law fitted to local conditions as they actually 
exist in every section of the State. It gives absolute control of 
the liquor traffic, particularly in towns and cities, where it is 
most needed. It will prevent the county from wiping out the 
city vote on city measures. It is a law which makes prohibition 
possible where wanted, and impossible where not wanted. It 
means regulation which regulates. 



Leung Kwok Chun and others have been given a trial of the 
monopoly of spirit licenses at Canton, China, on the ground 
that wines and spirits are a luxury. The monopolists must 
undertake to pay an annual revenue of $420,000 gold. 



An Excellent Publication 



THE Wine and Spirit Review, published in San Francisco, 
entered upon the thirty-third year of its publication, with 
its issue of October 31st. It is an excellent publication of its 
class. — St. Helena Star. . 



FIRST OVER THE BARS 





HUNTER 
BALTIMORE RYE 



IS DISTILLED FROM THE BEST RYE MONEY CAN 

BUY, RIPENED BY YEARS OF CAREFUL WATCH- 

FULNESS. AND IN ITS PERFECTION TO-DAY IS 

THE HIGHEST TYPE OF 

The American Gentleman's 
Whiskey 



Sold at i 11 firet-daas Cjfes and by jobbers 
WM. LAN.\HAN A SON, B;atimore, Md. 



30 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




Keep Out the Minors 



Master Brewers Entertained 



ON November 20th, the business men of Sacramento enter- 
tained an excursion of members of the Master Brewers' 
Association of California. The party arrived there late at night 
and left for San Francisco the following evening. A theater 
party, banquet, and automobile rides throughout the suburbs 
and city formed the features of the entertainment. Those in 
the party were : 

From San Francisco — John V. Oppel, J. B. Oppel, Fritz 
Kaiser, Adolph H. Hieronimous, Julius A. Hieronimous, F. R. 
Schwartz, Emil Barthold, W. D. Squires, Carl A. Thornburg, 
L. H. Handy, F. Schubert, John Wack, Felix J. Wallner, E. 
Remensperger, Ben Kellogg, Henry Killian, George Kluftinger, 
Phillip Zimmerman, Charles Bach, J. P. Rellenmayer, George 
Roehm, (xeorge Blaufuss: Oakland, Charles Kummerlanter. 



THE Rev. W. A. Wasson, rector of Grace Episcopal Church, 
Riverhead, Long Island, spoke recently against prohibition 
and in favor of true temperance, at Everett, Washington. The 
eloquent lecturer stated that when prohibitionists are asked to 
point out a single passage in the Bible that condemns the use 
of wine they quote some text that condemns drunkenness, as if 
that proved their case. Of course, the Bible condemns drunken- 
ness, all the way through ; it condemns intemperance in every- 
thing; in eating as well as drinking, and nobody but a fool would 
advocate intemperance. 

Mr. Wasson said : "We do not stand for intemperance nor 
lawlessness. We stand for law and order and genuine tem- 
perance, and I repeat that there is not a word in the whole 
Bible that condemns the moderate use of wine, and wine, mind 
you, is a strong alcoholic beverage, containing anywhere from 
10 to 20 per cent of alcohol, and this beverage has been the 
national beverage, you might say the social beverage of the 
Jewish people for the last 3000 or 4000 years. It was in use 
during the whole of the Old Testament period; it was in use 
during the lifetime of the Foimder of the Christian religion, and 
if there is one author for us Christians which is supreme and 
infallible and final that author, it seems to me, is the author of 
Christianity." 



ONE of the most difficult of the problems confronting tlui 
retail wine and spirit dealer is the exclusion of the minnv 
No dealer wants the name of selling to minors, or to undergo tin 
penalty prescribed for selling to minors or permitting them t( 
frequent liis place. The laws prohibiting the selling of malt oil ■ 
spirituous liquors to minors are strict in all states, even thonc,!' 
the age specified varies, but they are laws that should be serupu 
lously lived up to. 

It is admitted, even by the most unreasonable opponent of th(; 
trade, that a retailer is liable to make a mistake on the age o1 
a youth or young man who seeks service in his place. JFany -. 
youth of eighteen seems to be of voting age and many uiidci 
eighteen look fully that age. 

But where intent to observe the law strictly is shown, then , 
mistake, if made, can be more easily sIioa^ti to have been justifij 
able. This intent can easily be demonstrated by the posting ol 
signs bearing the legend, "Minors Not Allowed." 

Such a sign does not take up much room. Its cost is merel\ 
a matter of the individual taste of the proprietor. All that i 
needs is a conspicuous posting in the bar room or at its en 
trances. Its presence is certain to have a beneficial effect. 

For there are many minors who do not carry about with thi'i: 
an ever present realization of their minority, and many do no 
know that liquor or beer is denied to them by law. — Nort.]\ 
American Wine and t^pirit Joiniial. 



The "Drier," The "Wetter" 



Bloomington i 



THE dryer she gets, the wetter she gets." 
not the only town that this will apply to. In fact it wil 
fit almost any of the dry towns in the state. — Bloomingtoi 
(Ind.) Star. " 



In relation to the new home rule amendment to the Con^ 
tuti(m of Oregon, the Oregonian says: "We shall see many 
oases in the dry Oregon desert — many of them where they she 
not be — unless there are proper and desirable limitations pla^ 
on the home rule act. For example, no small community 
siring to set up a saloon should be allowed to do it if the co 
mon sentiment of the surrounding territory is against it, att 
if the wet area is not in itself large enough, strong enough aa 
populous enough to make it clearly able to regulate its owij 
affairs. In other words, the home rule unit should not apply t() 
villages or country communities." 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



31 



Established I860 



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1844 GEARY STREET 



Tel. West 7616 Home S 3223 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



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has NO WASH OR SOUR WINE TO PUT INTO BRANDY. 
Our Stills are Known as Numbers 263 or 357 First District, California. 
These Numbers ARE BURNED on the GOVERNMENT or STAMPED 
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CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED I 



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Specialty of Italian Dishes 



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605-607 Montgomery Street 

Near Clay Street 

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lelephones: Home C 2980 



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The Chronicle Bar 




6 Kearny San Francisco, Gal. 

P. W. WOBBER, Proprietor 



32 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 







^^^ 




The Upheaval in Maine 



No greater example of the thoroujjh hnnibug of prohibition 
can be given, than the fact that the State of Maine went Demo- 
cratic at the last election. The world knows that in spite of its 
stringent liquor laws, there are today a larger percentage of 
drunkards in Maine, in proportion to the population, than in 
any other State in the Union. It was in order to obtain the 
privilege of supplying the drinking element with intoxicants 
that Maine flopped over to the Democratic column. In other 
words, it was the intent to continue to carry on this illicit 
trade, and enjoy the profits thereof, which changed the politics 
of the State. 

Two years ago the Maine Legislature, being aware that that 
State was becoming the laughing stock of the nation, passed a 
law that the Governor could appoint special State liquor in- 
spectors to travel all over the State, usurp the local officials' 
duties, and attempt to enforce the anti-liquor laws. Whether 
the latter part of the programme was ever attempted is ex- 
tremely doubtful. All that the special State liquor inspectors 
appear to have done, is to have diverted the profits made from 
the liquor traffic into another channel, and away from the 
pockets of the local officials. Hence the change in politics ! 

Two years was quite sufficient to enlighten the county officials 
as to the financially pernicious effect of the new law. So at the 
last election they succeeded in placing those in power, who 
would repeal the harmful act, and restore to them the valuable 
privilege of handling the money earned by deliberately and 
intentionally breaking the Maine liquor law ! 

The real conditions existing in Maine, whether under the local 
county officials, or the special State liquor inspectors, are best 
shown by the recent statement of Admiral Evans, that when the 
fleet under his command visited Maine, he never let his sailors 
go ashore, because they would get more "paralyzed" by drugged 
and home made whisky, than they ever did in other American 
ports or in those of foreign countries. Certainly the whole 
business shows the rottenness of prohibition, when such a state 
of things can exist in the total abstinence State of Maine ! 



Palouse, Washington, has gone "dry" and eight saloons will 
quit business on January 8th, because of the action taken by 
the voters at the recent election. Since the railroad building 
stopped at Palouse the number of saloons has gradually de- 
creased until there are now only eight, and these are now to 
be closed. 



On November 23d Collector of the Port, Fred S. Stratton, 
filed charges of neglect of duty against Daniel O'Connell, the 
customs official representing the government at the Haslett 
bonded warehouse, where it was found that barrels of water 
had been substituted for whisky. 



Articles of incorporation of the Independent Brewing and 
Malting Company, of Oakland, have been filed, with a capitaliza- 
tion of 1100,000, of which flTOOO has actually been subscribed. 
The incorporators are George Roelim, Julius Follmer, S. A. 
Appledorn, Daniel Sullivan and B. Solari, all of that city. 



The Board of Freeholders are hard at work upon the new 
Oakland Charter, and we understand that a committee com 
posed of Joseph R. Ward, G. S. Hale and John Davidson havf 
presented their report to the Board making but few changes in 
the proposed Charter. Had Section IX been adopted as at first : 
proposed, it would have caused a revolution in the li(iuor busi- 
ness, as it provides that no saloons shall be located in the resi- 
dence districts. This section says "Provided, however, that no 
spirituous, malt, vinous or alcohol li(iuors in a saloon, public 
such license shall be granted for tlie sale or giving away of 
bar, or any other place located in tiie residence portion of the 
city," etc. 

Happily for the retailers, there will be an amendment to the 
above which provides that saloons at present existing in the 
residence districts shall not be forced to close, but no new li- 
censes will be issued therein. Excei)t for this amendment, as 
the City of Oakland is principally composed of residence dis- 
tricts, at least half of the present number of saloons in that city 
would have been put out of business. 



At a recent meeting at Colusa called by the Rev. Father Wall-1 
rath, 300 people showed complete indifference to the liquor 
question. A petition was presented calling for saloon regula- : 
tion, but not a motion was made towards adoj)ting or signing it. 
Father Wallrath said that regulation of the saloons was better 
than abolishing them, as that Avould mean the liquor avouUI be 
brought into the homes and women and children would be 
tempted. The petition was read and it called for the closing 
of salo(ms each night at 12 o'clock and from Saturday night at 
12 until Sunday noon, and close again at 6 o'clock. 



Protect Your Health 

LET 

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SPRINGS 
MINERAL 
WATER 

BE YOUR DRINK 
AND BE 

WELL 



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Telephone MarRet 588 SAN FRANCISCO 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 33 




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34 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




Men About Town Drinking Less 



IN an interesting article in the November Century, Dr. Henry 
Williams says : "It is, I think, a common experience of the 
man abont town that his associates in general drink less than 
they (lid five or ten yeai"s ago. Go into any restaurant in Ne\\' 
York where business men congregate at the lunch hour, and you 
will note that a large number of tables, often the majority, have 
no beverage but water. As a general rule the waiter will not 
thrust the wine card before you with old-time insistence, know- 
ing from experience that you probably do not want it. Even 
at dinner time, in these same restaurants, many tables show no 
wine glasses, whereas formerly they were all but general. More- 
over, it is distinctly the rule, even at private dinner parties of 
some formality, to serve a single wine, following the English 
custom, whereas until recently New Yorkers were notorious for 
'mixing* their drinks. 

"Of course I do not mean to imply that wines are not still 
served in conventional sequence, from cocktail and sherry to 
])ort and liquor, at formal banquets and many bons vivants ; but 
I speak of the prevailing custom, and this assuredly has altered 
very decidedly within the last decade. Clearly, then, the tem- 
j>erance spirit is abroad in metropolitan no less than in rural 
di.stricts." 



Notice has been given that the Board of Trustees of Colusa 
have decided to hold a special election on November 29th, when 
the question whether the Trustees shall or shall not issue li- 
censes for the sale of intoxicants in that city will be submitted 
to the voters. 



R. Andrade, a Mexican shoemaker at San Diego, has been 
leading a dual life. During the working days of the week he 
mended shoes. At night he conducted religious street meetings, 
and his silver-toned voice, speaking words of encoxiragement to 
his fellow-countrymen, caused crowds to stop and listen. Sun- 
days he laid aside his ministerial cloak and conducted a "blind 
pig" where those who had money could be served with most 
any kind of an intoxicant. 



No additional saloons will be permitted in Tracy. At a recent 
meeting of the Board of Trustees, Trustee (irunauer, D. R. 
Payne and William Schmidt voted to refuse licenses to three 
petitioners who desired to conduct saloons in that city. The 
present number of saloons in Tracy is 12 and the Trustees are 
opposed to increasing the number. 



Thornton, in the northern part of San Joaciuin County, went 
"dry" at the last election because the antis, with their usual 
duplicity, circulated the story that a camp cook got intoxicated 
and hanged himself. So the one saloon at Thornton will have 
to put up its .shutters the first of the year. 



As a result of the local option plank on the ballot, San 
Joaquin ( Vmnty scored a few surprises at the late election. Some 
dry precincts went wet and a few precincts voted out the 
saloons. All told, there are 12 precincts in the county that 



voted dry. They are Bnrwood, Clements, Elliott, Elkhorn, 
French Camp, Kerrick, Linden, Liberty, Manteca, Ripon and 
I'nion. Bellota cast a tie vote. Each side for and against the 
saloons cast just 24 votes. In Elkhorn the dry element won by 
two votes. At Clements the antis removed the saloons by a 2 
to 1 vote. 



A recent dispatch from Plumas County states that the hard 
and bitterly fought anti-saloon question bids fair to be reopened 
in that county. It is learned that the liquor men are circulating 
a petition throughout the county asking the Supervisors to 
rescind the ordinance closing all the saloons in Plumas County, 
or to call a special election before December 1st to submit the 
question to a vote of the residents of the county. 



A THEATRICAL man told the editor this incident of life in 
•*»• bonnie Scotland, which seemed to be a new one : 

An old man from Peebles had arrived at the station on a 
visit to his successful son. As he descended from the train the 
son, who was there to meet him, could not help noticing a certain 
look of depression on the paternal visage. 

"Father, what is it?" he asked. 

"My son, I have lost my luggage." 

"How was that, father?"- 

"The cork came out, my son." 



Half-Pints 



Sing a song of sixpence 

Pocket full of rye — 
That's the way to carry it 

Where the town is dry. 

— Philadelphia Telegraph. 



Sacramento's two Leading 
Hotels 




Capital Hotel Golden Eagle Hotel 

FINEST GRILL AND CAFE 



BEST SAMPLE ROOMS LARGEST GUEST ROOMS 

EVERY ROOM EQUIPPED WITH TELEPHONES 

BEST LOCATION 

European Plan, $ 1 .00 and Upwards 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY 

The Bowers -Titus Hotel Co. 



W. O. BOWERS. 
President 



C. J. TITUS, 
Vice-Pres. and Mgr. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



35 



I "The Cabin" 

I PURE GOOD S 

i • 

■f 105 Montgomery St. ; ; ; Near Sutter St 



ot»««tot 









t 

I 



"Only the Best the Market Affords' 



=Cuisine and Service Excellent : 

■■f 



i 
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f 

4 

i 
^ 
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f 
i 



1 



!| 



GOUAILHARDOU & RONDEL 

Proprietora 

540 Merchant Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 






'Co«ee Royal" 

A Mighty Bracer 



I 



I Market Cafe 1 

f GOUAILHARDOU & RONDEL 2 



//of Luncheon 
At 11 A. Af. /)aiVy 



0»»i|i<WH 






»tt1 



KOH 



I 
I 
I 



o»»:oToToToTo:oTo:o:c3:o:oTo:o^o:ao:o:o:^^^ 




John Caley, Prop 



Tel. Kearny 2306 



JOHNSROUFE&CO. 



IMPORTERS OF WINES AND LIQUORS 



Fine Kentucky Whiskies 




41 Drumm St., near Market 

Sole AcenU for Slatcr'a Premium Bourbon SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CALETS 



333 MONTGOMERY ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones 
^«. Kearny 1610 

ii" ' Home C 1610 




MONTGOMERY 



IF |ANf RANCiSE 



-M 



H. P. A.NOCRSEN, Proprietor 


THE 


CUllKR 


709 MarKet St. 


Phone Douglas 2954 


Call Annex Bld^. 


SAN FRANCISCO 



36 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



.T9 a 





J. F. Plumel Go's Proud Position 



What is the Matter With Kansas 



COI'NTY ATTORNEY TAGdERT, of Kansas City, Kan., 
in a recent interview, said : 

"The prohibitory law is the worst law ever passed in any state. 
It ha.s made tliieves and perjurers of men who are honest, and it 
has resulted in corrupted officials. It can not be enforced any- 
where, and under the present system it drives the men who would 
be contented with a single drink at the bar to drink a half pint 
instead. 

"It is costing Wyandotte County, I figure, at least |30,000 a 
year to maintain a semblance of enforcing the law. There were 
250 convictions last year, but the revenue from them went, for 
the most part, to the attorney general's office, not to the county. 
This town is also in a worse condition in the matter of rentals 
than was before. The tax rate is increased 4 per cent on the 
§1,000, and the business streets are full of "for rent" signs. The 
business that was formerly transacted in saloons here now goes 
to Kansas City, Mo. There isn't any less drinking, nor any 
less drunkenness." 



Maine Newspaper on the Prohibition Question 



WE are not in favor of the saloon or free rum, but we do be- 
lieve with our neiglibors of Massachusetts, Vermont and 
New Hampshire that prohibition does not prohibit and that 
laws for regulation may be enacted that will bring far better 
results for the cause of temperance of morality and general good 
citizenship than does the present law of Maine, which is a pro- 
hibition law only in name. — Bangor Gommercml. h 



At Puente the "drys" won one of the closest and hardest 
fought battles of the State at the late election. Of the 176 
votes cast, 97 Avere against saloon licenses and 79 for. The 
winery license was lost by one vote and the hotel license by 
eight. Seventy-eight votes favored pool room license and 56 
were against it. 



NO firm of wine and spirit merchants on the Pacific Coast 
stands higher in reputation than the J. F. Plumel Com- 
pany, of 63-65 Ellis street. In fact tlie house is looked upon as 
the home of the best domestic and imported wines and liquors. 
While handling the most select brands of California wines and 
American whiskies, it also imports the finest European bran- 
dies, wines,-olive oil and pure wine vinegai's. It has at present 
on hand Frcnleric Cajxleville & Company's fine IJordeanx wines; 
Henri Couroux's noted Burgundies; Palugay & Sohue's Hun- 
garian Tokay wines ; Girard & Company's celebrated old Cognac 
brandies. The firm is continually receiving prai.se from connois- 
seurs for its Virgin olive oil from Nice, and its pure old wine 
vinegars from Orleans, France. It is said that this oil and 
vinegar, expertly blended in proper (juantities, makes the most 
delicious salad dressing to be concocted. 



BRANCHES of the Greater Oregon Home Rule Association 
in counties voted "wet" at the recent election, are busy 
preparing model liquor license ordinances. La Grande, which 
has been "dry" for two years, has the most drastic ordinance of 
any so far reported. It follows closely the provisions of the 
model liquor license law. 

La Grande's ordinance, which is now up for final action by 
the City Council, provides that an applicant for a saloon license 
must first pay |1250, the license fee for the year, into the City 
Treasury, and present a bond of flOOO, backed by a responsible 
surety company, before it will be considered by the Council. 
The applicant's personal character Avill also be considered as 
well as the proposed location of the saloon. Upon conviction 
before the City Recorder of any violation of the criminal laws 
of the State or provisions of the ordinance governing the sale 
of liquor, the offender loses his license, forfeits his bond and 
may also be punished by fine and imprisonment. The ordinance 
provides that there shall be no dice, cards, slot machines or 
music in the saloons and that there shall be no frosted windows 
or screens. Women are prohibited from entering a saloon. 
Gambling is also barred. The number of saloons is limited to 
eight and they must be closed from 1 o'clock Saturday night 
until 5 o'clock Monday morning. 

Attorneys for the Home Rule Association are preparing a 
similar ordinance to govern the saloons in Portland. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



sK!«s^«w^slSKf«t's«p^«:^£)s«^««^!«!S!^^«^tt:'«?««?«)«>s«^tt?K^«^»«£«?)i'K«^is«»« 



VE HAVE NOTHING TO OFFER THE TRADE, EXCEPT 

Fine Goods, Square Prices 
Honorable Dealing 



SOLE AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS 
OF THE CELEBRATED 



"Castlewood" Bourbon and Rye 




Cartan McCarthy & Co. 



Established 1873 



Telephone Kearny 3688 






IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE 

LIQUOR MERCHANTS 

S. E. CORNER BATTERY & COMMERCIAL STS. SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



:37 



Sam T. Bernard, Pbes. 
Joe zanetta, secv. 




^^ 



<ff>'FINE GOODS A SPECIALTY -©= 
MERC-HANTS LUNC-H 11 A.M.to 2.30PM. 



UNC-H,GrI LL&WlAlE RoOAS. 

^ECOND BELOW/'VaRKET 



parvcisco 



,(.1. 



ROEDER'S 



Opp. Emporium 



CAFE 

834 Market Street 

SsiTk Francisco 



(iee&sis®(s®&s®&s>&i^^ 




i 




*£JlU 


A 


■■■<^- 


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OR IGINAL 

: : Coppa : : 
Restaurant 



^ J. COPPA, Proprietor 

^ Pine St. Bet. Montgomery 
and Kearny 



Music Evenings 

SAN FRANCISCO 

7J3L 



ALL ALE AND 

PORTER DRINKERS 



Should call for the celebrated 



BurnelVs 
Ale and Stout 

Brewed from the Best Malt Hops 
on the Market and used by all the 
Leading Clubs, Hotels and Bars 



Order through any Grocer ot 
Liquor Dealer, or direct from 



Albion Ale and Porter Brewery 



IINCORPORATED ~ 

494 OTarrell St. 

TELEPHONE FRANKLIN 728 

San Francisco 




m Ererffreen Private Arbor-Booths «^ 

m 

g^ Shuffle Board .g Salt Water Bathing 



California's Most Famous Road House 

Midway of Sausalito and San Rafael 

= Finest Wines and Liquors = 

SERVICE UNEXCELLED 



N. BIEGEL, 

Proprietor 

Escalle, Marin County 

California 









if? Boating ^ ^ Refreshments 



^ 



THE OLD RELIABLE 



1871 GATO 1871 

CLEAR HAVANA CIGAR 



S. BACHMAN & CO. (Inc.) 

DISTRIBUTERS 



38 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



mf 



LOUISVILLE DEPARTMENT ! 












i 



G. D. Grain, Jr., 
305 Keller Bldg., Louisville, Ky. 

LOUISVILLE, Ky., Nov. 19.— The whisky district of this city 
is more active than it has been for years. Orders are 
pouring in from all sections, and shipments are being made in 
such volume that the railroads are being taxed to supply equip- 
ment. The demand is steady and solid, and general enough to 
indicate that it is not merely spasmodic, or representative of 
only a few districts. In other words, business has struck its 
gait, and the wholesalers and distillers in this market are con- 
fident that it will continue to hold the present pace. 

Practically all of the distilleries in this State have commenced 
oi)erations, although some of them started later than it had 
been thought they would. In spite of this, however, estimates 
as to the season's production are that it will be one of the 
biggest on record, and will far exceed that of last year, which 
passed the 36,000,000-gallon mark. Estimates made to the 
Louisville representative of the Pacific Wine and Spirit 
Review are that the crop will be anywhere from 40,000,000 to 
45,000,000 gallons. 

It is not believed that there Avill be an overproduction. The 
scarcity of all bottling in bond ages, from 1907 back, is such 
that holders of old whisky are reluctant to sell even at the high 
prices which are now prevailing, and believe that the upward 
movement is bound to continue simply because the supply is not 
here. For that reason it is figured that by the time the 1911 
crop is ready to be bottled, the demand will be so. much greater 
that the ci'op will be easily absorbed. 

The results of the November elections were especially pleasing 
to the whisky men, inasmuch as they gave prohibition a setback 
nearly everywhere the issue was brought to a vote. State-wide 
prohibition Avas defeated overwhelmingly in Missouri, and simi- 
lar action was taken in Oregon. Florida declared against ex- 
tending prohibition beyond the present county option method, 
and thus gave the agitators another hard blow. The effect of 
the election is already seen in increasetl business, for buyers in 
territories affected by the vote naturally hung back until after 
the issue had been decided. Now they are ordering heavily in 
order to stock up against the healthy normal demand which has 
come into being. 



The Louisville Board of Trade compiles statistics showing the 
movement of manufactured articles out of this market, and its 
report for October, the latest on hand, shows that during that 
month of 1909 the shipments of whisky amounted to 49,730 
l>arrels, while last month they reached 55,992 barrels. It is 
believed that the figures for November will show a still greater 
increa-se. Shipments from local houses to their Pacific Coast 
agents have been especially good, one house alone reporting 
having shipped four carloads during the first three weeks of 
the month. 



Word has just been received of the action of the Supreme 
Court of Tennessee on the subject of the "four-mile law" passed 
by the liegislature in 1909. The law provided against the sale 
of whisky, either at wholesale or retail, within four miles of a 
school house, or in other words effectually prohibited its sale at 
all. The court held it to be valid, but also held that it does not 
affect the sales of Tennessee wholesalers outside the State. 
Thus, while the retail sales continue to be under the ban, Ten- 
nessee distillers can operate and sell their product outside the 
State. 



An important decision has been handed down in the case of 
J. R. Wathen & Co., against the Kentucky Distilleries and Ware- 
house Company, in which it is held that a warehouse is not liable 
for shrinkage of whisky held beyond the four-year period during 
which allowance is made for this factor by the Government. 

The case developed as the result of a sale of Avhisky to the 
Kentucky Company, some of which had already been disposed of 
to other parties, under an agreement providing for a shrinkage 
allowance. 



The State Board of Valuation and Assessment has fixed the 
basis of assessment on Avhisky at .flO a barrel. This is only a 
tentative figure, however, such as is always announced, for it is 
met with a uniform protest. The assessment finally adopted last 
year was |9 a barrel, although the distillers assert that this is 
much too heavy. They believe that they will be able to have the 
amount reduced to |9 or less for the coming fiscal year. 



The Brown-Forman Company, whose building at 117 West 
Main street was badly damaged by fire recently, has about com- 
pleted the improvements which it has made in connection with 
the repairs. A modern bottling plant has been installed, which 
greatly increases the bottling capacity of the company's ^piip- 
ment. 



Frank Fehr, the well known Louisville brewer, is being prom- 
inently mentioned in connection with the position of colonel 
of the First Kentucky Regiment. Mr. Fehr has been promi- 
nent in military affairs for years, and has a genius for com- 
mand. He had headed numerous crack drill teams of local 
fraternal organizations, and it is generally believed that as Col- 
onel of the First Regiment h<i would be able to build it into a 
sijhmdid organization. 



The Old Kentucky Distillery has completed the construction 
of its 30,000-barrel warehouse opposite Cherokee Park, and has 
also finished the construction of its new bottling house, which 
has a capacity of 1000 cases a day. The plant is equipped with 
up-to-date machinery, electric power being used, and the com- 
pany expects to sell more bottled goods this season than ever 
before. 



Marion E. Taylor, head of Wright & Taylor, who has been out 
of harness for a long time, as the result of a severe attack of 
rheumatism, is back on the job again, although he is not holding 
himself to any regular office hours. ]Mr. Taylor, who was 
formerly President of the Board of Trade, and is still a director, 
attended a recent meeting of the board and was given a warm 
welcome after his long absence. He had not been present at a 
board meeting for six months. 



The old question of whether whisky storage accounts are as- 
sessable is still being fought out in the Kentucky courts, Judge 
AValker, in the Circuit Court at Harrodsburg, holding in the 
case of the Commonwealth against Jas. B. Thompson that 
whisky storage accounts actually due on September 1, when 
assessments are made, are taxable, but otherwise are not. This 
is a big victory for the whisky men, but the State will carry the 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



39 



ise to the Court of Appeals in an endeavor to have a judgment 
iolding storage accounts of all kinds, whether due on the date 
mentioned or not, taxable. 



m The Governors' Conference, which is to be held in Frankfort 
and Louisville November 30 and December 1, will bring together 
a notable body of men, and Kentuckians are to see to it that they 
are royally entertained. Bernard Bernheim, of the Bernheim 
Distilling Companj', has been made chairmen of the Finance 
Committee in charge of looking after the entertainment ex- 
])enses. Col. E. H. Taylor, the well known Frankfort distiller, 
will entertain the visitors with a luncheon at his home on the 
occasion of their visit to Frankfort. 



The George T. Stagg Company, of Frankfort, which operates 
the O. F. C. and Carlisle distilleries near that city, has filed 
amended articles of incorporation, increasing its capital stock 
from 1250,000 to .1|;500,000. George H. Watson, G. Paul Duffy 
and Walter J. Duffy are the principal stockholders. 



Felix S. Ashbrook, a prominent distiller of Cynthiana, and 
juanager of the F. S. Ashbrook Distillery Company of that city, 
died at his home there November 18 at the age of 48. Neuralgia 
of the heart was the cause of his death. De had been prominent 
in local affairs, serving 17 years as Mayor of Cynthiana. 



M. G. Stirman, for man.y years connected with the Internal 
Revenue Department at Wensboro, has been appointetl to an im- 
])ortant position with the Rock Spring Distillery Company, of 
that city, and will have charge of the oft'ice. On the occasion of 
his retirement from the department he was i)resented with a 
handsome gold watch. 



Lawrence Jones, of Paul Jon(\s & Co., the local whisky house, 
is famous all over the world as an exhibitor at horse shows, and 
was prominent at the New York show, taking several ribbons. 
Poetiy of Motion, his great three-gaited saddler, ccmtinxied liis 
string of victories, which has never been broken, by capturing 
the events in which he was entered. 



W. L. Jones, son of Saunder Jones, of Paul Jones & Co., has 
been appointed advertising manager of the compauA'. Though 
a youngster, Mr. Jones has already shown that he can make good 
at the advertising game. 



Bowling Green, Ky., now has the highest saloon license in 
the State. The amount was recently fixed at |5,000 a year, and 
•'iglit applications have been filed. 



The Oklahoma Injunction 



An injunction against the delivery of shipments of liquors 
within the State of Oklahoma by the railroads and express com- 
panies was secured by Fred S. Caldwell, attorney for the Gover- 
nor, by the decision of Supreme Court Judge Meenden. But 
the Judge granted the railroads and express companies permis- 
sion to make a supersedeas bond to indemnify, the state and the 
people against any loss or damage which might result from the 
delivery of whisky within Oklahoma, while the case is being 
appealed to the Supreme Court. Each railroad and express 
company will be required to furnish a separate bond ranging 
from .flO,000 to .f25,000. Ten railroads and three express 
companies will have to give bond. 

In the meantime an appeal has been made to the -Supreme 
Court. . . . 



1 




Goulds 

Pyramid Pump 

and Electric 

Motor 



(loiilds Pyramid Pump and Electric Motor 
Mounted on Truck for Wine Cellar 




MOUNTED ON TRUCK FOR 
WINE CELLARS 

This Pump and Afotor 
complete, as per cut, is es- 
specially constructed for 
Wine Cellar use, being self 
contained nnd mounted on 
a neat truck. Can be used 
in any part of cellar. The 
electric motor is easily at- 
tached to the electric wire 
by means of electric cord. 
During the past year we 
have sold a large number 
of these Pumps fitted up 
in this manner and (hey 
have given the very best of results. This outfit can be used 
for pumping water or any other liquids. Pump has a brass- 
lined cylinder and brass valves. We are prepared to furnish 
th<;Be outfits with Motor, Pump, Truck, Relief Valve and 
everything complete as illustrated in cut, ready for use, and 
with the following capacities: 1000, 1500, 2500, 4000 gallons 
per hour. WRITE FOR PRICES. 



Celebrated 
Challenge Double Acting Wine Pump 

Used in AU Wine Cellars 

Of great compactness and power, for use in WINE 
CELL.A.RS for pumping from one tank into another. The 
ftvlinders of our iron pumps are brass lined, the piston rod, 
valves and valve seats are brass. Our all brass pumps are 
made entirely of brass, with the exception of the lever. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

Woodin-Little Pump House 

33-41 Fremont Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 



TANKS THAT LAST 

Water, Wine, Oil Tanks 

Made of Selected Stock by Experienced Workmen 



GEORGE WINDELER, TANK BUILDER 

144-154 Berry St., San Francisco 

Phone KEABNT 212 and J 2552 




I The Oscar Krenz Copper 
I and Brass Works, Inc. 

I GENERAL COPPERSMITHS 

I 
I 

= 

I 212-214 FREMONT ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



Manufacturers of Winery, Distillery and Brewery 
apparatus of all descriptions 

Our Continuous Stills, Pasteurizers, Evaporators and Concen- 
trators produce a superior quality of Brandy, Wine and 
Syrup, and surpass any on the market in simplicity of 
construction and economy in operation. 



40 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



— :rr ^^^ 




uxmmt: 















The Tucson Wine and Li<iuor Company, of Tucson, Ai'izona, 
has been incorporated by Chas. R. Clauberg, Fritz Pistor and 
P. H. McGar. It has a capital stock of |20,000, divided into 
filOO shares, and the aggregate indebtedness is limited to $5000. 



Adolphns Busch, of the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Company 
of St. Louis, is about to spend $35,000 in the erection of a 
handsome building in Santa Monica. He is expected back at 
his beautiful winter residence in Southern California during 
the present month. 



The Cook's Springs Mineral Water, which has already a great 
reputation in this State, is making very great headway, as the 
water contains such qualities that cannot be found in other 
mineral waters and it is far superior and more beneficial than 
any other Avater in this market. The agents of the same, Aug. 
Lang & Co., are doing everything to have it in every cafe in 
the State. 



Articles of incorporation of the Independent Brewing and 
Malting Company of Oakland, with a capital stock of |100,000, 
divided into 100 shares of the par value of $100 each, of which 
$7000 have actually been, subscribed, have been filed in the 
office of the County Clerk. The incorporators are George 
Roehm, Julius Follmer, C. A. Peldorn, Daniel Sullivan and 
D. Solari, all of that city. 



It has been noticed of late that the Red Lion Stout Porter; 
also the Ale, brewed by the Red Lion Brewery, controlled by 
August Lang & Company, is very rapidly cutting out the im- 
ported goods in this line. It is gratifying to know that this 
stout and porter, made in California, is equally as good as the 
imported, brewed in England. We wish them every success 
and think it will be only a matter of a short time when the 
Red Lion Stout Porter and Ale can be had in every cafe in 
this State. 



A. P. Hotaling & Company stated that they found trade very 
good during November, that in fact that month showed a 40 per 
cent increase over October. Business was particularly good in 
the San Joaquin Valley, exceptionally so in the oil districts 
around Coalinga and Bakersfield. The same might be said for 
a like reason about the San Luis Obispo district. The house 
looks forward to a big business next year, it believing that the 
low price of corn would lower that of whisky. If so, the big 
jobbers could stock up, causing a very large volume of business 
to be transacted. 



Wichman, Lutgen & Company were also visited and IVIr. 
Staude reported "business good and getting better." He con- 
sidered the trade generally in better shape today than a year 
ago, certainly in a more stable condition. This was clciU'ly 
shown by Bradstreet's reports, and he believed that this <]<'- 
sirable state of things was caused in this city partly by tli(> 
action of the Board of Police Commissioners in limiting the 
number of licenses in the city and county of San Francisco. 
This, he considered, gave a real value of several hundred dollars 
to those now in existence. It is also partly caused, according to 
Mr. Staude, by the growing assurance that the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition would be held here in 1915. This is of coxtrse a great 
inducement to every man in the trade to hold on in order to 
receive his share of the benefits arising from tlie vast amount 
of money about to be expended thereon. Mr. Staude .said : "In 
fact the entire situation is like the whisky we sell, 'Gilt Edged,' 
the demand for which is now so great that if you wanted to 
buy twenty-five cases I could not supply you, in spite of the fact 
that I have extra hands in the bottling department." 



The American Mercantile Company, of 514 Battery street, 
has accepted the agency for the Pacific Coast of Barrett Com- 
pany, of New York, for the sale of their prune juice. "Barrett's 
Unrivalled," as their prune juice is called, has been favorably 
known to the blenders of whisky for nearly thirty years. Its 
purity is guaranteed under serial No. 49, Barrett Company 
being the first house in the liquor business to obtain a serial 
number from Washington. The quality of Barrett's Prune 
Juice, coupled with the activity of the American Mercantile 
Company, should place this famous blending medium in a 
strong position on the Pacific Coast. 



There can be no question whatever which side Daggett be- 
longs to — prohibition or licensed saloons. At the late election 
the voters of that aspiring biirg left no doubt about the matter, 
the record being 33 to 4 in favor of common sense, personal free- 
dom and properly regulated saloons. 



The saloon-keepers of Colusa have petitioned the city authori- 
ties for some wholesome regulations. They propose closing 
at midnight Saturday, to remain closed until no(m Sunday, 
and then to open from noon until Sunday evening at 6 o'clock. 
It is believed that this will put an end to considerable disorder. 



£.5. CiPRICO. P»iS'Di« 



PHONE MARKET 2836 



ALTAVISTA WINES 




The Wines California Makes Famous 

ALTA VISTA WINES CO. 



MAIN OFFICE 



112-114- TENTH ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 41 



BRANDY PRODUCED 

OFFICIAL REPORT 

FIRST DISTRICT— Month of October, 1910. Tax Gals. 

Produced and bonded in this district, this does not include figures of production in 6th (new) district _ 176,966.3 

Received from other Districts, California 22,174.2 

Received from special bonded warehouse, other District, California 512-7 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse, Eastern District. _ 202,908-2 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. Eastern Districts 35,239-7 

Exported _ - — 

Tax paid 83,055-0 

Used in Fortification of Wines - 20,813-7 

Remaining in bond, October 31. 1910 _...l, 338, 565 - 6 



SIXTH DISTRICT— Month of October, 1910. - Tax Gals. 

Produced and bonded in this district 13,456-3 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. First District 18,498-8 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. First District 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse, Eastern District _ 14,407-3 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. Eastern District _ 2,948-0 

Tax paid - - 6.198-3 

Used in Fortification of Wines 340, 153-0 

Remaining in bond, October 31, 1910 - ~ : 229,755-1 



SWEET WINES PRODUCED 

FIRST DISTRICT— Month of October, 1910. Pkgs. Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification 5,534 1,465,916-8 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification - 236 19,369-6 

Brandy actually used for fortification - 6,061 1,508,313-2 

Wine Gals. 

Port produced _ _ „_. 2,542,213-24 

Sherry produced ,. 1,961,611-38 

Angelica produced - - - - - - - 527,024.20 

Muscat produced - 347,594-88 

Tokay A - - _ 67,147-42 

Malaga _ _ — — - — 83,146-83 

Madera - - 217, 788 - 13 

Total sweet wine produced in October, 1910 -- -- 5,746,526-08 



SIXTH DISTRICT— Month of October, 1910. Pkgs. Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification - - 327,517-9 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification - - - - 958-8 

Brandy actually used for fortification -- 340, 153 

Wine Gals. 

Malaga : -- -. -- „ 1 9, 772 - 58 

Port produced - : 623,497-48 

Sherry produced-- - - - 342,134-32 

Angelica produced -- - -.. -. 201,250-40 

Muscat produced - - - - 115,683-06 

Total sweet wine produced in October, 1910: : 1,302,337.84 



42 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



Vineyard and Cellar 



The Fulton Winery in Sonoma County has enjoyed a pros- 
perons season. Some 4300 tons of jjrapes were crushed and the 
machinery was kept busy to the middle of the present month. 



The California Wine Association, which leased fi'om Henry 
Miller the Glen Orchard, west of Gilroy, has completed the pick- 
ing and delivery at the winery of the crop of grapes, which 
amounted to 800 tons. The entire crop of grapes raised in this 
vicinity is now practically picked and delivered. 



Advices from Petalunia state that during November an order 
for 2000 barrels of wine was received by Lachmanu & Jacobi, 
and the firm's large establishment at that city has been kept 
busy getting the wine and cooperage ready to ship the order 
East. 

Bornhorst & Ebeling, who erected and equipped a winery on 
their vineyard in St. Helena this year, have closed a successful 
vintage. They crushed five hundred tons of grapes and made 
80,000 gallons of choice wine, entirely filling their cooperage. 
During the past year Bornhorst & Ebeling have built a hand- 
some bungalow, a large bam and a wine cellar, put in new 
cooperage and expending in improvements about $15,000. — St. 
Helena Star. 

We understand that the wine market is moving on the right 
road, and this is demonstrated by the fact that representatives 
of leading wine houses are abroad in the land looking for bar- 
gains. The Cloverdale press repi'esents the producers as in no 
hun-y to sell, as indications point to a stronger market within 
the next few months. But few sales of northern Sonoma wine 
of this year's vintage are reported. Leading wine makers of 
this vicinity have expressed the opinion that the depression pre- 
vailing in the wine business for so long has run its course and 
that the business from now on will show marked improvement. 
For that reason they say the producer is likely to receive better 
prices by holding on for a while longer. Wine makers who 
bought grapes at this year's low prices figure on making a good 
profit when they sell. 



The Lodi Co-operative winery has crushed 12,000 tons of 
grapes, with the prospect of crushing about 2000 additional 
tons before the season closes. Last year the total number of 
tons crushed by this winery was 11,406. This year considerable 
more tankage was added and it was the intention to crush 16,000 
tons, but on account of the shortage of crop of different members 
they will fall short of that amount by about 2000 tons. 



The clean-up of the grape crop in the 4000-acre vineyard of 
the Italian Vineyard Company, located three miles east of 
Ontario, at Guasti, has been made. The report is that the crop 
this season is 5000 tons short, owing to heavy winds. La-st 
spring the oncoming crop was damaged by the northers that 
swept sand across the vineyards. This fall, while the grapes 
were hanging ripe upon the vines, the winds came earlier than 
usual, and the damage to the fruit was considerable. 



We hear from Lodi that up to the middle of the month the 
West & Son wineries, including both the Lodi and Urgon plants, 
have crushed about 8000 tons of grapes this season, and out of 
this district they have shipped to the El Pinal winery at Stock- 
ton about 12,000 tons. They intend to crush about 1500 tons 
additional at the local wineries before the season is over. The 
run at present is mostly on Tokays, although there are still a 
few tons of Ziufandels and Mission varieties coming in. It is 
claimed, by Local Manager Adolph Bauer that they will handle 
about the same tonnage of gi'apes this season as they did last. 
The prices they will pay for this season's grapes have finally 
l)een settled upon. 



The Brunswick -Balke-CoUender Co. 



Billiard and Pool Tables 

Bar Fixtures, Bowling Alleys 

Manufactured in our San Francisco factory 





LOW PRICES, EASY TERMS 

LARGE STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND 

Special Designs and Estimates Cheerfully Furnished 

767 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

BETWEEN THIRD AND FOURTH STREETS 
TELEPHONE SUTTEE 323 .•.-.•.•.• TELEPHONE HOME J 1638 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



43 



1^1 New York Correspondence J^t 



N 



E\V YORK, Nov. 20, 1010.— The wholesale trade are satis- 
fied. It has been a loug time since so confident a feeling 
lias been apparent. While locally there is some complaint 
amongst retailers, "out-of-town" returns are highly encour- 
aging. 

All the houses appear to be doing a good business anil the 
whivSky market is bound to soon advance even more than it has 
recently. Kentucky whiskies, although not .so much in evidence 
in the East as elsewhere, are growing in popularity even here. 
Their statistical condition is such, that some quite conservative 
members of the trade predict an advance of at least twenty-five 
;per cent within the next few months, and some look for an even 
greater advance. 

The older inspections are almost unobtainable, being held by 
houses who need tliem in their business— much of the demand 
is occasioned by the bottled in bond requirements Avhich is con- 
stantly growing. Blending liouses are regarding this with more 
complacency than heretofore, for they believe a reaction Avill 
come. This, they expect, will result from the fact that there is 
so .small a profit on most of the brands, and that the time Avill 
come when liandlers of such whiskies must content themselves 
with a mere nominal margin. But if they grow in demand, as 
they have the past year or so, the trade may find they have 
educated the public to such a degree that the "frovemment guar- 
antee" will be a necessity. 

With the exterminating of so many saloons, in different parts 
1 of the country, whiskies in glass are bound to gain in popularity 
and the green stamp becomes more and more recognized by the 
public as possessing a value that ordinary or extraordinary 
blended whiskies do not have. It is remarkable, however, how 
sloAvly bottled in bond whiskies are obtaining a foothold in New 
York, but they are gradually making some headway. 

Ryes are also much stronger than they were and withdraAvals 
of these whiskies indicate blends are by no means out of favor. 



With the settlement for a time, at least, of prohibition mat- 
ters in a number of St<ates, at the recent election, there has been 
[ a great improvement in business. Houses no longer feeling the 
1 necessity for extreme conservatism have started in with a vim, 
which Avas lacking whilst the question was uncertain. All look 
for a good business this winter. 



In New York City, strikes have done much to retard business 
in general, but gradually they are being settled, and already 
there are signs of improvement. 



The greater sti'ength of the East(n'n rye market seems to be 
concentrated in 1908's, 1909-s and 1910's, and while in many 
instances the first two seemingly are more favored, conservative 
buyers attach greater importance to the tens and elevens. This, 
in part, is no doubt due to the fact that they calculate on the 
sixes and sevens "carrying over" to some exten,t for the 1908's, 
but taking into account that the short crop of 1908 was beyond 
that of 1909, which in turn exceeded the production of 1910, the 
'' question becomes pertinent, "Where to secure the goods to tide 
over until the 1911's?" 

The goods which were made during 1908, 1909 and 1910 are 
^ held pretty close by those who were far-seeing enough to con- 
tract, and already demand has so far o'ertopped supply, that the 
'OS's and '09's are held from fifteen to twenty cents higher — in 
some instances — than the sixes and sevens. 

A reflex action from this condition is not improbable so far 
s values of sevens are concerned — for rather than pay the price 



ruling on the eiglits and nines, many houses will undoubtedly 
carry over sevens instead. 

Therefore, with minimum values on eights and nines pretty 
well determined, and supported by relative supply and demand, 
while increased demand for sevens must needs correspondingly 
stimulate prices, the general sentiment of the trade is much 
more optimistic than at any time during the past five years. 

It is somewhat surprising, with mail order houses the leading 
feature of the whisky industry today, that this medium of reach- 
ing the actual consumer has not been tried out — so to speak — by 
American wine growers or dealers. While generally deploring 
the fact that the Americans have not been educated up to the 
more extensive use of table wines, there has always been lacking 
some vital force about concentration of action, which would 
more assuredly tend to this desired result. 

When one takes into account the hundreds of thousands of 
gallons of whisky Avliich go into the homes annually through 
mail orders, it does seem that a relative amount of activity on 
the part of American wine interests would bear great results, 
and more certainly accomplish the desired establishment of 
California wines than leaving the introduction to present 
methods. 



According to English statistics, people over there are becom- 
ing temperate at a rapid degree. The consumption of beer for 
the year 1909 fell off 412,100 barrels, a decline of about one and 
a half per cejit. The average for ten years of John Bull was 
fifty glasses of beer. Last year it Avas forty-one. 

The annual drop in the consumption of spirits was even more 
remarkable, amounting to as much as thirty-three and a third 
per cent in 1909. In ten years the quantity of spirits drunk in 
England has fallen from 45,402,500 to 26,006,200 gallons, a 
decline of forty-three per cent. 

NEW YORK. 



Way Down in Chili 



A SANTIAGO, Chile, subscriber of the San Francisco Chron- 
icle Avrites to that paper as folloAvs : 
"Several months ago I .saw in one of your editorials a mention 
that the Avine groAvers of California deplored the fact that the 
city hotels serveil very little Avine on their tables, and the Chron- 
icle's comment that the Avine groAvers should follow the example 
of the brewers and bottle their Avine in splits, as a quart or pint 
is entirely too much for a business man. I Avish to say that here 
in Chile the groAvers have found that out long ago, and even 
champagne is put up in splits and is as popular as beer or 
English stout in nips is at home." 



Laudable Ambition of San Francisco 



THE city of San Francisco, Cal., Avith its Avell knoAvn daunt- 
less spirit and vim is out to capture the honor of being the 
seat of the Exposition City of 1915, to celebrate the completion 
of the Panama Canal. Already it has raised the enormous sum 
of .f 17,500,000 to that end, and it is given out that San Francisco 
Avill not ask or accept any financial a.ssistance from Congress, 
and all it desii'es is Federal recognition of its claims. 

Any city which caii recover from a |400,0 00,000 calamity in 
four years and then, without difficulty, raise $17,500,000 and say 
to the United States that she wants to hold an International Ex- 
position Avhich Avill be a great credit to our country and receive 
the commendations of the nations of the entire Avorld, certainly 
deserves a helping hand. — Criterion, Nov. 16, 1910. 



44 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



I^PI Correspondence I^^I 

From E. H. Taylor, Jr. & Sons 



FRANKFORT, Ky., November 7, 1910. 

I. 

AN open letter to the trade: We beg to announce that 
whilst other houses may be increasing their output, we 
shall materially diminish our forthcoming 1910-1911 produc- 
tion of Old Taylor whisky. 

By this plan we effectively insure to patrons of Old Taylor 
an enhancing value on all their present bonded holdings, and 
give to the proposed later small crop of 1910-1911 a much 
augmented value. 

In view of the limited crop we are about to make, we believe 
our customers Avill consult their interests by noAV contracting 
for their wants in 1910-1911 Old Taylor at our minimum pres- 
ent contract price. This contract price will not be lowered, 
and Avhilst we do not desire to advance it, Ave can foresee con- 
ditions that may make an advance necessary. 

The unparalleled strong position of our older inspections 
insures the value of the short crop of 1910-1911 Old Taylor, and 
a stiffening in prices is sure to ensue. 

From 1906 to the past season, inclusive, it has been our fixed 
l)olicy to predicate our production upon the total promised 
Kentucky output, with a view to producing Old Ta\dor — the 
only brand we make — at inverse ratio to the aggregate. 

In other words, when the general production has promised to 
be small, Ave have somewhat enlarged our output. When the 
general output promises, in our opinion, to be large, Ave dimin- 
ish our production of Old Taylor. 

The Old Taylor's first position on the country's markets, as 
shoAvn by all inspections, is ample evidence of the Avisdom of 
the ratio policy thus adopted. 

II- 

This season, fall 1910-Spring 1911, promises to be one of 
general OA-er-production among distillers. 

The Old Taylor policy Avill, therefore, be rigidly applied in 
making a relatiAely small crop of 1910-1911, and our patrons 
may feel absolute security in purchasing our current season's 
product. 

The promised general over-production Avill be in the com- 
moner class of Avhisk}^ — usually spoken of as "cheap Avhlskies." 

Whilst there is little conflict betAveen Old Taylor and this 
class of whi.sky, all manufacture is more or less influenced by 
surfeits. 

In thus curtailing our 1910-1911 Old Taylor product, Ave are 
running the hazard of finding that crop inadequate, when it 
reaches the bottling in bond age, to meet the trade requirements. 

Each individual inspection of Old Taylor is in an integral 
position of strength, not equalled by any other brand on the 
market. 

This stability is intrinsic. 

We believe each inspection is inadequate to the certain de- 
mand. 

III. 

The consumptive demand for Old Taylor is demonstrated by 
the fact that of the combined seasons of fall 1902-spring 1903, 
fall 1903-spring 1904 and fall 1904-spring 1905, there are left 
in bond today only 59 barrels— one barrel less than the daily 
capacity of our bottling in bond house. Of the fall 1905-spring 
1900 croji of Old Taylor there remains in bond less than a three 
months' liottling supply, based on our September and October 
bottling in bond operations. 



This existing situation noAv demonstrates that all inspections 
of Old Taylor, up to this season, will prove short of the legiti- 
mate and certain demands therefor. These inspections are held 
diversely by the strong and higher class trade throughout the 
country, and together Avitli the short crop we are about to make, 
constitute, in Old Taylor, one of the few commodities that is 
just a little bit better than "ready money." 
Very truly yours, 

E. H. TAYLOR JR. & SONS (Inc.), 
Distillers, Frankfort, Kentucky. 

V. S. — We take pride in the present status of the Old Taylor 
distillery, it being one of the best, if not the best equipped 
distillery in this or any other country for the production of the 
highest gi*ade of beverage Avhisky. 

Our Avarehouses are simply the most perfect ever constructed 
for the storage and maturation of the topmost beverage whisky 
—Old Taylor. 

Like distillery and Avarehouses our bottling in bond plant 
surpasses an3^ ever constructed. 

We should be pleased to have every patron, or any member of 
the trade, Avhether or not a patron, visit us and verify our state- 
ments. 



From the American Wine Growers' Association 



NEW YORK, Nov. 10, 1910. 
T^O the Members of the American Wine GroAvers' Association. 
A Gentlemen : — Referring to the coming annual meeting of 
the association, I Avould earnestly urge each and every member 
to take an active and personal interest in making this meeting 
"the best ever." 

Let us shoAv that spirit of co-operation, Avhich is found among 
those engaged in other lines of business, and which, Avhen 
brought into our wine industry, Avill do more to extend and in- 
crease the sale of our products than any other one thing. It is 
only by being thoroughly united, by acting together, and by 
working through a national association that we have influence 
and standing Avhereby Ave can accomplish definite and lasting 
results for the benefit of all. 

Therefore, each and every member should "do something" to 
support, and strengthen the association. To this end I hope you 
will ti-y to get ucav members. If each member brings in one 
new active or associate member during the next year, it Avould 



Pacific Copper Works 

L. WAGNER & SONS, Props. 




573 Mission Street, San Francisco 



OUR SPECIALTY OF MANU- 
FACTURING ALL KINDS OF 
STILLS, FILTERS, PASTEUR- 
IZERS AND COPPER AND 
BRASS WORK FOR WINERIES, 
DISTILLERIES, BREWERIES, 
ETC. FURTHER INFORMA- 
TION GIVEN UPON APPLI- 
CATION. 



Gold and Silver Medal awarded at 
Mechanics' and Midwinter Exposition 
for continuous still.. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



46 



add gToatly to our prestige. Membership in the A. W. G. A. now 
means something; it is a valuable asset for any individual, firm, 
or company. 

This being so, it is up to our members to do everything in their 
power to have the coming meeting a great success. Let us make 
a new record. Yours very truly, 

W. E. HILDRETH, 

President. 



Some Whiskey Statistics 



From the American Wine Growers' Association 



NEW YORK, Nov. 1, 1910. 

EDITOR Wine and Spirit Review:— We are again called 
upon, so soon after the recent announcement to you of the 
deaths of two active members (IMr. Charles Bundschu and Mr. 
H. C. Roualet), to mourn the loss of another active and es- 
teemed member of the association, Egisto Mariani, New York 
representative of the Italian Vineyard Company, Los Angeles, 
California. 

Mr. :Mariani died at his home in New York City on October 
27th last, in the 58th year of his age. He was born in Vitiana, 
Italy, ]Marcli 31, 1853, and came to this country in 1860. After 
engaging in several occupations he became identified in 1900 
with the wine industry, both as an importer and as representa- 
tive of the California wine trade. 

Mr. :Mariaiii was conuectwl witli a number of business and 
.social organizations. He was a prominent member of the 
National Board of Trade and was vice-president of the Italian 
Chamber of Commerce of New York. 

Our deceased member is survived by a widow and three chil- 
dren, to whom are extended the sympathies and condolences of 
the members of this Association. 



Russian Liquor Monopoly Statistics 



CONSUL A. HEINGARTNER, of Batum, reports that the 
Russian government sale of vodka in 1909 covered 65 gov- 
ernments and 10 departments — total p()])uhition 144,297,400. 
The sales were effected in 26,971 shops, 431 less than in 1908, 
and the quantity sold amounted to 273,958,256 gallons, valued 
at -1371,012,782, being 5,469,496 gallons less, and |5,997,358 
more than in 1908. The expenses amounted to $99,574,687, 
leaving a net profit of 1271,438,095, or 99 cents a gallon. 



THE annual report of the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce 
for the calendar year 1909 was issued during the fortnight. 
The statistics in this report Avere compiled by the veteran super- 
intendent, Charles B. Murray, one of the foremost statisticians 
of the country, and the delay in its issue this year until such a 
late date is due to a serious sick spell which deprived Mr. Mur- 
ray of three months of his time during the summer. 

The report contains much of interest relative to the whisky 
trade, and I reproduce some of the whisky statistics of the Cin- 
cinnati market as they appear in the report. In his "trade re- 
view," Mr. Murray says : 

The receipts of whisky in 1909 were 211,425 barrels, compared 
with 183,134 for 1908, and an annual average of 213,000 barrels 
for five years. Shipments were 365,487 barrels, compared with 
313,221 for 1908. 

Returns of production of distilled spirits in Cincinnati and the 
immediate vicinity in 1909 indivate a total of 9,979,718 gallons, 
compared Avith 9,165,888 for 1908, and an annual average of 
10,543,000 for five years prior to 1909. 

The total quantity of Avhisky represented by a local production 
and receipts for the year was 20,128,118 gallons, compared with 
17,956,320 for 1908, and an annual average of 20,767,000 for five 
years prior to 1909. The approximate valuation for 1909 was 
126,235,000, against |23,436,000 for 1908, and an annual average 
of $26,465,000 for five years prior to 1909. 

The production of rectified spirits in 1909 was slightly in- 
creased, tlie total amounting to 10,818,750 gallons, compared 
with 10,585,072 for 1908, and an annual average of 14,117,000 
for five years prior to 1909. 

The basis price of finished spirits in this market at the close 
of 1908 was f 1.37 per gallon. The changes during 1909 were as 
follows; January 4, |1.35; May 18, |1.37; October 6, fl.35. 
The general average for the year was |1.35.77 per gallon, against 
$1.34.81 for 1908, and an annual average of |1.30 for five years 
prior to ldO*X—Iionforts, Nov. 10, 1910. 



When chargcHl with being drunk and disorderly and askwl 
wliat lie had to say for himself the prisoner gazed pensively at 
the magistrate, smootlunl down a remnant of gray hair, and said : 

"Your honor, man's inhumanity to man makes countless thou- 
sands mourn. I'm not as debased as Swift, as profligate a.s 
Byron, as dissipated as Poe, as debauched a — " 

"That Avill do !" thundered the magistrate. "Ten days ! And, 
officer, take a list of those names and run 'em in. They're as 
bad a lot as he is!" — London Mail. 



There Avill be no separate submission of the State-Avide pro- 
hibition question at the election for the ratification of Arizona's 
constitution, the convention so deciding by a vote of 39 to 15. 
The majority report of the committee on separate submission 
recommended the rejection of the proposition. The convention 
also for the third and, probably last time, squelched woman 
suffrage by taking the same course Avith the proposition for 
separate submission of the question to voters. The A'ote Avas 
30 to 19. 



The annual report of the Independent Brewing Company, of 
Pittsburg, for the year ended October 22, 1910, shoAvs a surplus, 
after bond interest, of $680,914, equal to 15.13 per cent on the 
$4,500,000 preferred stock as compared Avith 7.72 per cent the 
previous year. The surplus available for dividends after deduc- 
tion for depreciation is $423,801, equal to 9.42 per cent on 
preferred. 



O*'^^**' 



-*•- 



>♦» ^fc «* ^ «»- 






»«» ^fc «» ^fc «»- 



>«»-^fc.««-^fc.«» ^»» **" 



,«» ^fc «* ^fc «»- 



>«» "^ «»- 



i>«0 



Wine Machinery 



COMPLETE PLANTS [ 



FITTED OUT 



Contintioxis Presses 



] 

ft 
« 

\ CrtisHers, Stetnmers 
i and Must Pumps 



\ 



Toulouse & Deloreux ( 

405 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. / 



46 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



i Working: Out The Pure Food Law / 

Food Inspection Decision No. 127 

Decision of the Attorney-General in regard to the labeling of 
whiskies sold under distinctive names. 

The following decision of the Attorney-General in regard to 
the labeling of whisky is hereby promulgated as Food Inspection 
Decision No. 127. 

WILLIS L. MOORE, 
Acting Secretary of Agriculture. 
Washington, D. C, October 26, 1910. 

Department of Justice, 
Washington, October 19, 1910. 
The honorable the Secretary of Agriculture. 

Sir: I have received your letter of July 28, 1910, in which 
you submit to me the following question of law for my opinion : 

Is "Canadian Club whisky" such a distinctive name, imder 
the provisions of section 8, paragraphs 10 and 11, of the food 
and drugs act of June 30, 1906 (34 Stat, 768), as to relieve a 
mixture of two separate and distinct distillates of grain from 
the requirement of being labeled "A blend of whiskies," under 
section 8, paragraph 12, of the same act? 

Your letter informs me that — 

"Canadian Club whisky" is a mixture of grain distillates, 
duly aged after mixing, without further admixture, and reaches 
the consumer at 90° proof. It is a particular kind and brand 
of whiskies made by Hiram Walker & Sons (Limited), at 
Walkerville, Ontario, and is now and has been for years known 
and sold under the name "Canadian Club whisky." It is known 
by that name and no other to the trade and consumers in the 
United States and other countries, and no other Avhisky is 
known by that name. "The Department of Agriculture," you 
advise me, "claims that the product is required to be labeled 'a 
blend of whiskies,' under the law as interpreted in Food Inspec- 
tion Decision 113. The distillers contend that 'Canadian Club 
Avhisky,' under section 8 of the food and drugs act, is such a 
distinctive name as is there described, and therefore that the 
product is not required to be labeled as a blend." 

By arrangement between your Department and Messrs. Hiram 
Walker & Sons (Limited) briefs were submitted to me by the 
Solicitor of your Department and the counsel of Messrs. Hiram 
Walker & Sous, respectively, in support of their respective 
contentions; and I have also had the assistance of oral argu- 
ment by such Solicitor and counsel. 

By executive order dated April 8, 1909, the President referred 
to the Solicitor-General of the United States certain questions, 
including, among others : 

I. What was the article called whisky as known (1) to the 
manufacturers, (2) to the trade, and (3) to the consumers at 
and prior to the date of the passage of the pure-food law? 

II. What did the term Avhisky include? 

The Solicitor-General took a voluminous amount of testimony 
and heard the arguments of parties appearing before him, 
and reported to the President on May 24, 1909, among other 
things, that — 

(1) The article called whisky as known to the manufac- 
turers at and prior to the date of the passage of the pure-food 
law was — 

(ff ) What is often spoken of as "straight whisky,'? made from 
grain. 

(b) Also what is often spoken of as "rectified whisky," made 
from grain, when not a mere neutral spirit, as described in 
section {il ; below, of the answers to this question I. 



(c) Also a mixture of straight whiskies, or of rectified whis- 
kies, or of straight whisky and rectified whisky, or of straight 
whisky and what is often known as neutral spirit (made from 
grain), or of rectified whisky and such neutral spirit (made 
from grain), or of straight whisky, rectified whisky, and sucfl 
neutral spirit (made from grain), if in the particular case the 
mixture satisfied the description of whisky given below in an- 
swer to question II (Proceedings, etc., p. 1245). » * * 

The article called whisky as known to the consumers * * » 
was — 

(a) What is often spoken of as "straight whisky," made 
from grain. 

(6) Also what is often spoken of as "rectified whisky" if 
confoiTning to the description of whisky given below in answer 
to question II. 

(c) Also a mixture of straight whiskies, or of rectified whis- 
kies, or of straight whisky and rectified whisky, or of straight 
whisky and what is knoAvn as neutral spirit (made from grain), 
or of rectified whisky and such neutral spirit (made from gi-ain) , 
or of straight whisky, rectified whisky, and such neutral spirit 
(made from grain), if in the particular case the mixture satis- 
fied the description of whisky given below in answer to ques- 
tion II. 

In answer to the (luestion, "What did the term 'whisky' in- 
clude?" he reported as follows: 

The term "whisky" included, both at and prior to the date of 
the passage of the pure-food law, and has since included, the 
spirituous liquor composei\ of (1) alcohol derived by distil- 
lation from grain; (2) a substantial amount of by-products 
(often spoken of as congeners), likewise derived by distillation 
from grain, and giving a distinctive flavor and properties; 
(3) water sufficient without unreasonable dilution to make the 
article potable; and (4) in some cases — though such addition 
is not essential — harmless coloring or flavoring matter, or both, 
in amount not materially affecting other qualities of whisky 
than its color or flavor. 

A mixture of two or more articles, being each a lohislcy within 
the foregoing description, was at and prior to the date of passage 
of the pure-food law, and has since been, whisky. A mixture of 
one or more whiskies, being each whisky within the foregoing 
description, with alcohol or a neutral spirit — being an article 
different from A\hisky through lack of a substantial amount of 
by-products derived by distillation from grain and giving dis- 
tinctive flavor and properties — is whiskj^ if the alcohol or 
neutral spirit is derived by distillation from gi-ain and if the 
mixture still conforms to the above general description , of 
whisky ; and so it was at and prior to the date of passage of the 
pure-food law. (Proceedings, etc., p. 1246.) 

Upon exceptions to this report the decision of the Solicitor- 
General was reviewed by the President, who differed with him 
only in that he thought the Solicitor-General had fallen into the 
error of — making too nice a distinction in reference to the 
amount of congeneric substances or traces of fusel oil required 
to constitute whisky for practical purposes, Avhen the flavor and 
color of all whiskies but straight whiskies have been chiefly that 
of ethyl alcohol and burnt sugar. 

And the President held : 

After an examination of all the evidence it seems to me over- 
\Ahelmingly established that for a hundred years the term 
"whisky" in the trade and among the customers has included 
all potable liquor distilled from grain ; that the straight whisky 
is, as compared Avith the whisky made by rectification or re- 
distillation and flavoring and coloring matter, a subsequent 
improvement, and that therefore it is a perversion of the pure- 
food act to attempt now to limit the meaning of the term 
"whisky" to that which modern manufacture- and taste have 
made the most desirable variety. 



i 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



It is undoubtedly true that the liquor trade has been disgrace- 
fully full of frauds upon the public by false labels, but these 
frauds did not consist in palming off something which Avas not 
whisky as whisky, but in palming off one kind of whisky as 
another and better kind of whisky. Whisky made of rectified 
or redistilled or neutral spirits and given a color and flavor by 
burnt sugar, made in a few days, was often branded as Bourbon 
or rye straight whisky. The way to remedy this evil is not to 
attempt to change the meaning and scope of the term "whisky," 
accorded to it for one hundred years, and narrow it to include 
only straight whisky; and there is nothing in the pure-food law 
that warrants the inference of such an intention by Congress. 

Following the decision of the President, the Secretaries of the 
Treasury, Agriculture, and Commerce and Labor prepared and 
promulgated a regulation under the food and drugs act known 
as "Food Inspection Decision No. 113," the portions of which 
material to this opinion are as follows : 

Under the food and drugs act of June 30, 1906, all unmixed 
distilled spirits from grain, colored and flavored with harmless 
color and flavor, in the customary ways, either by the charred 
barrel process or by the addition of caramel and harmless flavor, 
if of potable strength and not less than 80° proof, are entitled 
to the name whisky without qualification. ♦ » « 

Whiskies of the same or different kinds, i. e., straight whisky, 
rectified whisky, redistilled whisky, and neutral spirits whisky 
are like substances; and mixtures of such whiskies, with or 
without harmless color or flavor used for purposes of coloring 
and flavoring only, are blends under the law and must be so 
labeled. 

This ruling would require "Canadian Club whisky" to be sold 
under a label stating it to be "A Blend of Whiskies," unless, as 
claimed by the manufacturers, "Canadian Club whisky" is its 
own distinctive name, within the meaning of section 8 of the 
pure food law. 

That section prohibits the misbranding of all articles of food 
(which include drink), and specifies that the term "misbranded" 
shall apply to all articles the package or label of which shall 
bear any statement, design, or device regarding the article or 
ingredients contained therein which shall be false or misleading 
in any particular; that the article shall also be deemed mis- 
branded — 

If it be labeled or branded so as to deceive or mislead the 
purchaser. ♦ ♦ ♦ 

If the package containing it, or its label, shall bear any state- 
ment, design, or device regarding the ingredients or the sub- 
stances contained therein, which statement, design, or device 
shall be false or misleading in any particular : Provided. That an 
article of food which does not contain any added poisonous or 
deleterious ingredients shall not be deemed to be adulterated or 
misbranded in the following cases: 

First. In the case of mixtures or compounds which may be 
now or from time to time hereafter known as articles of food 
under their own distinctive names, and not an imitation of or 
offered for sale under the distinctive name of another ar- 
ticle. * * » 

Second. In the case of articles labeled, branded, or tagged so 
as to plainly indicate that they are compounds, imitations, or 
blends, and the word "compound," "imitation," or "blend," as 
the case may be, is plainly stated on the package in which it is 
offered for sale * * *. 

It is conceded that the requirements in paragraphs first and 
second, above cited, are alternative, and that a mixture or com- 
pound which may be sold under its own distinctive name, pur- 
suant to the provisions of the first paragraph, need not be 
marked as a "compound," "imitation," or "blend" under the 
provisions of the second paragraph. Canadian Club whisky is, 
you say, entirely "a mixture of grain distillates, duly aged after 



mixing, without further admixture 



It is, therefore, 



a mixture of two whiskies, as under the President's decision the 
term "whisky" in the trade and among customers includes all 
potable liquor distilled from grain. Being a mixture of whis- 
kies, it is distinguished from all other whiskies by the name 
"Canadian Club." 

Regulation 20 of the "Rules and Regulations for the enforce- 
ment of the Food and Drugs Act," promulgated by the three 
Secretaries under date of October 17, 1906, and published as 
Circular No. 21 of the office of the Secretary of Agriculture, 
reads as follows : 

(a) A "distinctive name" is a trade, arbitrary, or fancy 
name which clearly distinguishes a food product, mixture, or 
compound from any other food product, mixture, or compound. 

(h) A distinctive name shall not be one representing any 
single constituent of a mixture or compound. 

(c) A distinctive name shall not misrepresent any property 
or quality of a mixture or compound. 

(d) A distinctive name shall give no false indication of 
origin, character, or place of manufacture, nor lead the pur- 
chaser to suppose that it is any other food or drug product. 

Applying this definition, it will be seen (1) that "Canadian 
Club whisky" is a trade or arbitrary name which clearly dis- 
tinguishes the particular mixture of whiskies so designated from 
any other whisky or mixture of whiskies. 

(2) This distinctive name "Canadian Club whisky" is not 
one representing any single constituent of the mixture, because 
the word whisky applies to hoth of the component elements of 
the mixture, and to each of them. 

(3) The name "Canadian Club whisky" does not misrepre- 
sent any property or quality of the mixture, because within the 
President's definition each of the elements of the mixture is 
whisky, and the resultant mixture is whisky. 

(4) The name "Canadian Club whisky" gives no false indi- 
cation of the origin, character, or place of manufacture, because 
the mixture in fact is made in Canada; nor does it lead the 
purchaser to suppose that it is any other food or drug product, 
as it clearly asserts that it is whisky — which is the fact — and in 
your letter it is stated that it is known by that name and no 
other to the trade and consumers in the United States and other 
countries, and no other whisky is known by that name. "Cana- 
dian Club whisky" is therefore the distinctive name of a whisky 
so called; that name distinguishes the product to which it is 
attached from all other whiskies and clearly identifies it as the 
particular kind and brand of whiskies made by Hiram Walker 
& Sons (Limited) at Walkerville, Ontario. The name distin- 
guishes the particular goods in relation to which it is used from 
other goods of a like character belonging to other people. 
( Hopkins on Unfair Trade, sec. 2. ) It is certainly as distinctive 
as the designation "S. N. Pike's Magnolia Whiskey," which, in 
Kidd V. Johnson (100 U. S., p. 617), w^as held to constitute a 
trade-mark, because distinguishing the whisky of the manufac- 
ture of S. N. Pike & Co., and their successors in Cincinnati, from 
all other whisky. 

The brief of the Solicitor of the Department of Agriculture 
contends that the distinctive name under which a mixture or ' 
compound may be sold must, in its entirety, be purely arbitrary 
or fanciful, and must not contain the name of the component 
elements of the compound. A mixture of wheat and barley, he 
concedes, might be sold as "Force" or "Vita" without stating of 
what elements it was composed, but a mixture of two kinds of 
barley could not be sold as "Melrose barley" without stating 
that it was "a blend of barleys." It seems to me that such a 
construction of the term "distinctive name" is not only unwar- 
ranted, but undesirable. The two main purposes which the 
pure-food law was designed to accomplish are, first, to prevent 
the sale of adulterated foods, and, second, to prevent deception 



48 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



being practiced on the public. It would seem to me that the 
latter purpose is more apt to be secured by permitting the sale 
of a product under its own name, qualified by some distinguish- 
ing characterization, than by requiring it to be masked in an 
anonymity which would give no clue to any of its component 
elements. 

But, without entering into an analysis of the many decisions 
cited in the briefs of the respective parties, or further pursuing 
a discussion of the question, it appears to me clear that the 
name "Canadian Club whisky" is a distinctive name, so arbi- 
trary and so fanciful as to clearly distinguish it from all other 
kinds of whisky or other things, and a name which, by common 
use, has come to mean a substance clearly distinguishable by the 
public from everything else. ( See United States v. 300 Cases of 
Mapleiue, per Sanborn, D. J.; Notice of Judgment 163, Food 
and Drugs, Act, p. 3.) 

In my opinion, therefore, it is not necessary that the label 
under which "Canadian Club whisky" is sold shall state that 
it is "a blend of whiskies." 

I have the honor to be, respectfully, 

GEO. W. WICKERSHAM, 

Attorney-General. 



Viticulture in South Russia 



"Old Taylor" Vindicated 



THE great bottled-in-bond whisky house of E. H. Taylor Jr. 
& Sons, of Frankfort, is making vast increases in its plant 
so that it can handle the enormous business in the product of 
its distillery. The Free Press is glad to see this success for this 
splendid firm. Some years ago when Col. Taylor was preaching 
"bottled-in-bond" and demanding that the label should tell the 
truth and that the name "Kentucky Whisky" should not be used 
on anything but the genuine whisky made in Kentucky, there 
was a good deal of laughing at him. 

One of the biggest rectifiers in the country said to the Free 
Press man, at that time: "If Col. Taylor would attend to his 
own business and quit this cranky nonsense about straight 
whisky, he would make some money. The first thing he knows 
he is going to lose everything he has." 

Well, he didn't quit, but he did go right along spending vast 
amounts of money on his magnificent plant at Frankfort, never 
apparently doubting that bottled-in-bond whisky was the com- 
ing article. Today, the plant and business of E. H. Taylor Jr. 
& Sons are among the biggest in the world, and the "cranky 
nonsense about straight whisky" has become the biggest reality 
in the whisky business. It is only fair that the man who made 
the fight for straight whisky when it was almost suicidal, should 
have the place of honor among the distillers of real Kentucky 
M'hisky that has at last, thanks to his courage and foresight, 
come into its own again. — Free Press, Louisville. 



THE Portland (Oregon) Oregonian gives the following in- 
teresting "Side View of Prohibition" : 

"Another fact to bear in mind, as to liquor and prohibition, 
is that proper use of liquor is no more a crime or a vice than 
eating sugar .or beefsteak. This matter has been lost sight of 
by large numbers of persons in the present prohibition wrangle 
in Oregon. The moderate drinking of wine, or beer, or whisky, 
is not a wrongful act, in world-round opinion ; excessive use is a 
vice (not a crime), and is guarded against best by warning and 
example and lessons of experience. 

"Vast numbers of citizens, the world over, use liquors soberly 
and properly; their example opposes the claims of prohibition- 
ists and they will not accept the version of prohibitionists that 
they arc criminals or debauchers of youth or undesirable citi- 
zens." 



RECENTLY there came to a close in Odessa a five-day 
congress of viticulturists convened under the auspices of 
the Imperial Society of Agriculture of South Russia. 

Delegates numbered 150, from the Provinces of Kherson, 
Podolia, Bessarabia,, and Taurida. Viticulture in South Russia 
during the last generation has made such great strides forAvard 
that it is attracting much attention. The rapidly growing popu- 
lation provides not merely more consumers and more workers, 
but it deals with and leads to a finer distribution of lands and, 
of necessity, encourages serious study of the question how to 
get a living out of a plot of land which can not keep a family 
engaged in plain agriculture, the solution suggesting wine 
growing. Although the market is well provided, it is not as 
yet overstocked, since the upcountry demand is annually 
growing. 

The treatment of the grape juice becomes annually more 
skillful, and, from new and better varieties of grapes, even finer 
varieties of wine are prepared, which bring prices that Avere not 
to be expected a dozen years ago. Delegates in the congress 
called for still higher instruction in viticulture, for new and 
finer planting material from abroad, for long credit against 
wine as security, so as to prevent wine from coming too early 
into the market, for better and cheaper means of transportation, 
and for special combines of wine growers aiming at combating 
various pests and sicknesses which attack vines and grapes. 
It has long been said that the greatest hindrance to the proper 
development of viticulture has been the small grower, who has 
not possessed enough of any particular variety of grapes to 
treat them separately. Instead, they have mixed most hetero- 
geneous products together and the result has been a nondescript 
and nameless cheap wine, which has affected the market detri- 
mentally. Here it is that the combination of these small growers 
into co-operative circles can enable them to obtain far superior 
results. It has been decided to institute a special viticultural 
station for instruction in wine growing. In aid of the work the 
Emperor has contributed |i5150. — From Consul John H. Grout, 
Odessa. 



Commitment of Drunkards 



THE States of Massachusetts, Connecticut, Vermont, Penn- 
sylvania, Minnesota, Iowa, and Nebraska already provide 
for the commitment of habitual drunkards by civil courts upon 
the petition of relatives, accompanied by proper medical cer- 
tification. Bills were introduced in several additional States 
during the last two years, providing for such commitment and 
a department commission in England, appointed to investigate 
the workings of the inebriates' acts, has also recommended a 
similar step for Great Britain. 

In most of the States, hoAvevei", a habitual drunkard can not 
be committed on any institution unless he has previously been 
arrested and convicted of disorderly conduct. When a man has 
completely lost his self-control and is a constant burden to his 
family and friends, it should not be necessary for him td become 
so obnoxious to the community in which he lives as to incur 
arrest and conviction of disorderly conduct before he can be 
committed to the institution, where he may be isolated from 
alcoholic drinks, and such treatment as may be needed be given 
him. A direct commitment to such an institution would at once 
be for the man's good, for the good of his. family and for the 
well-being of society. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



49 



} 



The Review's Buyers' Directory 



( 



*-»_ )( -m_ «> ~ » «r — > r — fc 1 — > rr ~ M « — a » i i r ~» 1 1 i r ~^ tr — m «r ~ > ri — ■ r i - — i ri — ■ t r— m * 



CALIFORNIA WINES. 
Geo. West & Son, Incorporated ... .Stockton, Cal. 

California Wine Association 

180 Townsend St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 

A. P. Hotaling & Co 

429 Jackson St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Pacific Copper Works 

573 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Siebe Bros. & Plagermann 

430-34 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sanders & Co's. Copper Works 

..Beale and Howard Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Theo. Gier Co 



575 Eighth St., Oakland, Cal. 



Wetmore-Bowen 

42-44 Davis St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Italian Vineyard Co 

1234 Palmetto St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Rusconi, Fisher & Co 

326 Jackson St., San Francisco, Cal. 



DISTILLERS. 
E. H. Taylor, Jr. & Sons Frankfort, Ky. 



Jas. Qibb 1844 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Julius Kessler & Co. . . .Hunter BIdg., Chicago, III. 



Sherwood & Sherwood 

.41-47 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Wm. Lanahan & Son Baltimore, Maryland 



Hiram Walker & Sons Walkerville, Canada 



Napa & Sonoma Wine Co 

110 10th St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sierra Madre Vintage Co La Manda, Cal. 



John Sroufe & Co... 41 Drumm St., San Francisco 

Cartan, McCarthy & Co 

..Battery and Com'l Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Western Grain & Sugar Products Co 

110 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Barton Vineyard Co., Ltd Fresno, Cal. 



Susquenac Distilling Co Cincinnati, Ohio 



A. Finke's Widow 

....809 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



William Wolff & Co 

52-58 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 



E. H. Lancel Co 

549 Washington St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co 

431-435 Clay St., San Francisco, Cal. 

L. Taussig & Co 

200 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Alta Vista Wines Co 

112-114 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



George Delaporte 

820 Mission St., San Francisco. Cal. 



Paul Masson Champagne Co San Jose, Cal. 



Lachman & Jacob! 

706 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

French American Wine Co 

....1821-41 Harrison St., San Francisco, Cal. 



IMPORTERS. 

Chas. Meniecke & Co 

314 Sacramento St., San Francisco, Cal. 



W. A. Taylor & Co 29 Broadway, N. Y. 



Italian-Swiss Colony 

1235-67 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Simon Levy & Co 

...346-48 Washington St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sacramento Valley Winery Sacramento, Cal. 



BREWERS AND BREWERS' AGENTS. 
Lang & Stroh Co. .104 Clay St. San Francisco, Cal. 

John Wieland Brewery 

204 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sherwood & Sherwood 

43 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Wm. Wolff & Co 

52-58 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 



L. Gandolfi & Co. 



Buffalo Brewing Co Sacramento, Cal. 



.427-31 W. Broadway, New York 



Fred Krug Brewing Co Omaha, Nebraska 



Alex. D. Shaw & Co 

214 Front St., San Francisco, Cal. 



American Mercantile Co. 

514 Battery St., San Francisco; Cal. 



American Mercantile Co 

514 Battery St., San Francisco^ Cal. 



Henry Weinhard Brewery Portland, Oregon 

494 O'Farrell St., San Francisco, Cal. 



J. F. Plumel & Co 

63-65 Ellis St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Albion Ale & Porter Brewery 

494 O'Farrell St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Chapman & Wllberforce 

....705-707 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Frank Fehr Brewing Co.; Louisville, Ky 
Jas. De Fremery & Co., Agents, 
519 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Enterprise Brewing Co San Francisco, Cal. 



Seattle Brewing & Malting Co.; Seattle, Wash. 
John Rapp & Son, Agents. 
. .8th and Townsend Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



TANKS, COOPERS, COPPERSMITHS, ETC. 
Pacific Tank & Pipe Co.... Wine and water 
tanks, boxes, irrigation pipe and pipe for 
water systems. 

318 Market St., San Francisco, Cal.; Equi- 
table Bank BIdg., Los Angeles, Cal.; Ken- 
ton Station', Portland, Oregon. 



Geo. Windeler; wine and water tanks 

144-154 Berry St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sacramento Brewing Co.; Sacramento, Cal. . . . 
G. B. Robbins, Manager, 
..14th and Harrison Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Oscar Krenr, Copper and Brass Works 

212-214 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Kirby Distilling Co Fowler, Cal. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 
INTERNAL REVENUE BROKERS. 

F. E. Mayhew & Co 

510 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Youngberg & Son 

509 Washington St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WINE PRESSES, CRUSHERS, ETC. 
A. Rossi & Co.. 322 Broadway, San Francisco, Cal. 



Toulouse & Delorieux Co 

■ 405 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



BILLIARD AND POOL TABLES, BOX FIXTURES 

Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co 

767-771 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WINE AND BREWERS' HOSE, ETC. 

Goodyear Rubber Co 

589 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



SURETIES. 

U. S. Fidelity & Guaranty Co 

Nevada Bank BIdg., San Francisco, Cal. 



BLENDING CORDIALS. 
Barrett Co 43 Front St., New York 



BOTTLE WRAPPERS, ETC. 

Zellerbach Paper Co 

..Battery and Jackson Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



FILTERS. 
Loew Manufacturing Co Cleveland, Ohio 



BITTERS. 

Lash Bitters Co 

1721 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



L. Gandolfi & Co. 



.427-31 West Broadway, New York 



MINERAL WATER. 

Aug. Lang & Co 

..18th and Alabama Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



CIGARS. 

Boltz, Clymer & Co 

312 Clay St., San Francisco, Cal. 

S. Bachman & Co 

Commercial & Front Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 
(SEE NEXT PAGE) 



50 PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 

Review Buyers' Directory, Continued ■^^''^''•..^"^.^'346•pi•ne•st.;•san■F•ranc■isco;ca,. 



HOTELS. 
Capitol Hotel; Golden Eagle Hotel 



Market Cafe. .540 Merchant St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Caley's. .333 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sacramento Cal ''''^* Russ. .247 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Hotel Victoria. .7th & Hope Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. Jas. P. Dunne. .1 Stockton St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Hotel Madera Corte Madera, Cal. Chronicle Bar. . . .6 Kearny St., San Francisco, Cal. 



James Raggi 

624 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Hotel Montrio Monte Rio, Cal. xhe Waldorf. .648 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



The Cutter . . . .709 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

The Hoffman Cafe Co 

27 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 



"Jellison's" 10 Third St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WINE PUMPS, MOTORS, ETC. 

Woodin & Little 

70-72 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Matt Grimm's 

BOTTLES AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLIES. ^^O Liedesdor^St., San Francisco, Cal. 

LIndeman, Sloman & Co 

381 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. Bank Exchange 

1 Mont'y and Wash'ton Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

RETAILERS AND CAFES. 

The Yellowstone "The Cabin" 

22 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal 105 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



W. F. Roeder's Cafe 

834 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Original Coppas Restaurant 

453 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

"Escalles" Escalle, Marin Co., Cal. 



Ratto's Italian Restaurant 

..605-607 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Trade Marks Souglit to be Registered in the Patent Office 



WASHINGTON, D. C, November 14, 1910. 

THE following trademarks have been favorably acted on by 
the Patent Office and will be registered at the expiration of 
30 days unless objected to. Any person who believes he would 
be damaged by the registration of a mark is entitled by law 
to oppose it within the said time. All inquiries should be ad- 
dressed to Edward S. Duvall, Jr., patent and trademark law- 
yer. Loan and Trust Building, Washington, D. C, who will 
furnish particulars how to proceed. 

Serial No. 10,047. Words: Peach Blossom, together with a 
representation of peach. Owner: Chicago Distilling Co., Chi- 
cago, 111. Used on straight whisky. 

Serial No. 38,918. Representation of 8 medals of reward ar- 
ranged in a white oblong having the name of Peter F. Heering, 
the founder of the firm, now deceased, as written by Peter Nico- 
lai Heering, senior member of the applicant firm. Owner : Peter 
F. Heering, Copenhagen, Denmark. Used on cherry cordial. 

Serial No. 50,675. Word: Paradise. Owner: ("armel Wine 
Company, New York, N. Y. Used on wine-brandy imported 
from Palestine. 

Serial No. 51,683. Words : Blue Ribbon, with a representa- 
tion of a seal with ribbon streamers. Owner: Geo. Benz & 
Sons, St. Paul, Minn. Used on angelica wine and tokay wine 
and sherry. 

Serial No. 51,316. Word: Manru. Owner: A. Schreiber 
Brewing Company, Buffalo, N. Y. Used on bottled beer. 

Serial No. 51,022. Words : Yours Truly, under Avhich in small 
white letters are the words "Trademark." Owner: Stanley 
Clague, Chicago, 111. Used on straight whisky, brandy, gin, 
cocktails, cognac and cordial. 

Serial No. 51,873. Words : "Yours Truly." Owner : The J. 
& G. Butler Co., Columbus, Ohio. Used on blended whisky. 

Serial No. 28,733. Representation of 4 labels. The first is 
a palm tree in a white circle with the words, C. Meijer & Co., 
Schiedam, The United Maltwine Proprietors, aiTanged around 
it; the second an oblong band in which are arranged the words, 
"International Exhibition, Gold Band Medal, Capetown, 1905"; 
the third is a palm tree with a man and hor.se under it and ar- 
ranged over the palm tree are the words "Holland.sche Genever," 
and under it the words, "C. Meijer & Co., The United Maltwine 
Proprietors, Schiedam"; and the fourth is an oblong divided 
into three parts by heavy black lines, with the following words 
Avritten in them. Purchasers are respectfully requested to take 
noij^of the name of our firm on cork and capsule — Schiedam 
(Holland), 'C. Meijer & Co.,' " (The name C. Meijer & Co. is a 
facsimJc of the firm-name as written by Agatha Stephania An- 
tonia Maria Meijer.) Owner: C. Meijer & Co., Schiedam, Neth- 
erlands. Used on Holland Geneva. 



Serial No. 28,734. Representation of 5 labels, the first, sec- 
ond and fifth being like the first, second and fourth of Mark No. 
28,733; the third is a building with a fanciful scroll around it 
arranged in an oblong ; over the building are the words, "Cele- 
brated Geneva, Palm Tree, Superior Quality," and under it "The 
United Maltwine Proprietors, C. Meijer & Co., Director.^, Schie- 
dam"; the fourth is a white oblong with two medals arranged 
in it. On one medal are the words, "Capetown Industrial Exliihi- 
tion, 1905," and on the other "Gold Medal, C. Meijer & Co., Dis- 
tillers, Schiedam." Arranged over these medals are the words, 
"Gold Medal, Capetown, 1905," and under it the words, "C. 
IMeijer & Co.'s Palm Tree, the Best Brand of Holland Geneva." 
Owner : As above. No. 28,733. Used on Holland Geneva. 



Julius Kessler & Go's. Liberal Policy 



FOR many years the name of Julius Kessler & Co., of Chicago, 
Louisville and New York, has been familiar to the retail 
liquor trade from one end of this country to the other. "Cedar 
Brook," the same old W. H. McBrayer hand-made sour mash 
whisky, bottled-in-bond and commanding the highest price, has 
been sold by Kessler Avherever there are discriminating users of 
fine Kentucky whiskies. It is made in the old Kentucky town 
of Lawrenceburg and is the same whisky that was drunk by 
Southern planters, before the war and before there were rail- 
roads. This is the type that all imitators of Kentucky whisky 
try to copy. 

Julius Kessler is known as far and is just as popular as his 
famous brand of whisky. Everybody likes him, for a big-hearte^l. 
robust, hearty distiller of the old school. He originated the 
liberal selling plan by which retailers can buy Avhisky in bond 
and carry it until it is just as old as they wish it to be, realizing 
the increase in value, and upon a small advance payment, paying 
the balance when they are ready to take the goods, which remain 
stored for them in a United States bonded warehouse. 

This plan was so liberal that some people thought it could not 
be straight, and a trade paper said as much. Mr. Kessler asked 
a retraction and when it was not forthcoming he filed a suit for 
libel and the publishers learned when it was too late that there 
was absolutely no ground for their unwarranted susi)icion. Mr. 
Kessler got a verdict for |10,000. Then he told the publishers 
of the paper to print a true statement of the facts as they had 
learned them in court, and he promptly released them from 
damages. 

That is the sort of people that Julius Kessler & Co. are, and 
Kentuckians regard them as among the squarest and best in 
the trade, and their whisky as just as good as ever was made in 
the only State in the Union that in law, or in fact can make 
"Bourbon" whisky. — Free Press, Louisville. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 51 



J. F. Plumel Co. 



65-65 ELLIS STREET 

PHONES :^( C. SS94 



Proprietor of the Celebrated 

KOLAKINA 



IMPORTER OF 

Bordeaux Wines, Fine Brandies 



and Olive Oil 



... Sole Pacific Coast Agents for ... 

VAN DEN BERGH & CO. 
...GINS ... 



KK3K»3WKSJ3«3WSfiK3«J«3«»3K3K5«3i»»3K3«3re»OKa«5«»Se»3«»3ifflGK^ 



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Hotel Montrio 



Russian River 




Station 



SPORTSME N»S 
IDBAI. RBSORT 



Black Bass Fishingf 
Deer Hunting: 




Fine Cuisine 
Bathing, Boating 



CnAS. r. CARR, Pro|>rietor 



I Ahrens-BuUwinkel Co. 



WHOLESALE 



Liquor Merchants 

, First and Harrison Streets 
San Troncisco, Cal. 



SOLE PROPRIETORS 

Royal Stag Bourbon and Rye. 

Old Pal Kentucky Bourbon. 

Celebrated Chief Tonic. 

Hiawatha Bitters. Chief Bitters. 

Diamond Star Rye and Bourbon. 

Tlliawood Bourbon. 



IMPORTERS 

Slater V. O. Scotch Whiskey, 

Scotland, Thorpe & Co. 
Mermaid Old Tom Gin, London. 

P. Van der Kamp, 
Fine Old Wood Cock Gin, Hol- 
land. 
Mourallle Freres Cogmac, 
France. 



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California Wines and Brandies 

706 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
LACHMAN & JACOBI New York Office, 65 and 67 North Moore St. 



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52 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



.^Jage, 



^/>e IDEAE, BEVERAGE 



g'^Xd 



rSha IDEAL BEVERAGE 







Made in a brewery where Purity is paramount, and where men know how- The plumpest, 
sweetest and cleanest of grain is used. The Hops are selected especially for us from the 
very best. The water, after being purified and filtered by nature, comes up in its crystal 
purity through 1500 feet of Rock and Gravel. 

Frank Fehr's Extra Lager 

No Beer, no matter the name, make or reputation, is so highly approved by the connoisseur. 
For home use our Bottled Beers are especially adapted ; nourishing, pure and delicious. Aged 
and cured by time as time only can accomplish. Its rapid growth in popular favor at homo 
and abroad proves its superiority. 



Frank Fehr Brewing Co. 

Louisville, Kentucky 



James Dc Fremery & Co. 

Pacific Coast Distributors 

519 Mission Street, San Francisco 



T 
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BRBWED BY THE 

ENTERPRISE BREWING CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 53 



i 



A SUIT FOR LIBEL 

HAS been instituted by us against JULIUS 
LEVIN COMPANY, of San Francisco, in 
the United States Circuit Court. Said JULIUS 
LEVIN COMPANY advertised a certain brand of 
Canadian Whisky in these words: 

** The only Canadian Whisky that was not seized by the 
" United States Government for containing injuri- 
"ous ingredients at the time the Pure Food Law 
" took effect." 

We beHeve that no Canadian Whisky was seized on such grounds. 
Certainly CANADIAN CLUB WHISKY never was. 
The reason given for seizing CANADIAN CLUB was that it did 
not contain as much FUSEL OIL as so-called STRAIGHT 
WHISKIES contain. 

THIS IS STRICTLY TRUE, WE ARE GLAD TO SAY, 
FOR WE HAVE ALWAYS INTENDED THAT OUR 
WHISKY SHOULD CONTAIN THE LEAST POSSI- 
BLE AMOUNT OF FUSEL OIL CONSISTENT WITH 
THE DESIRED FLAVOR. 

President Taft decided, after a full review of the evidence and the 
history of Whisky, that it is not necessary that the noxious Fusel 
Oils should be left in Whisky. 

Any persons who, to our knowledge, make false statements about 
our brand, either directly or indirectly, will do so at their peril. 

HIRAM WALKER S SONS, LIMITED 

WALKERVILLE, ONTARIO, CANADA 

London New York Chicago Mexico City Victoria, B. C* 



^ 






54 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



m 






s 



CELLARS AND VINEYARDS «' Icaria^,Healdsburg, Cloverdale, and Madrone, Sonoma County 
_^^^^^^^_____^.^_____ and at Rutherford and St. Helena, Napa County, California 

French-American Wine Co. 

SUCCESSORS TO CHAIX <> BERNARD 
PRODUCERS, GROWERS, DISTILLERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES 

Pure and Unadulterated California Wines Our Specialty 



m 



© 



"W. D. SEYMOtJR, 516 MAGAZINE ST., (St. 515 CONSTANCE ST., NE'W ORI^EANS AGENT 
NK-W YORK DEPOT, 32 1VASHINGTON STREET 

5 1821 to 1841 Harrison Street 

@©@©©@©®©«a©©©@@®©©©©©©©©©©©©©©®@@@@@©©©©®©©©@©@©©©©©@©@@@@@ 



San Francisco, Cal. © 




Winners 






JULIUS 



NEW YORK 

NEW YORK WORLD BLDG. 



CHICAGO 

HUNTER BUILDING 



& CO. Distillers 



LOUISVILLE 

30th AND GARLAND AVE. 



I 










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■^-^^-^^-^■ 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



55 



The E. G. Lyons & Raas Co 



FOLSOM & ESSEX STREETS 



Telephone Kearny 489 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



Distillers of High Grade Cordials, Fruit Brandies and Syrups 




ESTABLISHED 1853 . 




--h-^-^-h-^-^-^ ^ ♦ ♦-♦- ■♦--4- ♦> ■♦- ^ 4- ■ 



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HILLIPS & VAN ORDEN CO. 

PRINTERS. PUBLISHERS, BOOKBINDERS 



WE PRINT THE "WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW" 
GOOD PRINTING COSTS NO MORE THAN THE 
OTHER KIND, IF YOU GO TO THE RIGHT PLACE 



509-513 Howard Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Douglas 2301 Near First Street 



H. P. WICHMAN 



JOHN LUTGEN 



FRED STAUBE 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

Sole Proprietors of "Gilt Edge" Whiskies 
Also Sole Distributors of "Old Identical Whiskey" 

(Bottled in Bond) 

431-435 CLAY ST.. and 428-434 COMMERCIAL ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



>o ^^ «»- 



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CARROLL RYE 
WHISKEY 



MORVILLE A. A. A. 
OLD BOURBON 



r 

i LOUIS TAUSSIG AND COMPANY 

/ IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS 

• - 



MAIN AND MISSION STREETS 



5 PHONES: 

i SUTTER 50; J 2745 



.«a« 



»0*' 



SAN FRANCISCO 5 

.1 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



P. C. ROSSI, President 



A. SBARBORO, Secretary 



Italian-Swiss Colony 

LARGEST PRODUCERS OF THE FINEST VARIETIES OF 

California Wines and Brandies 

Vineyards, Wineries and Cellars at Asti, Fulton, Cloverdale and Sebastopol in Sonoma County; Madera, Madera County; Selma and Kingsbury 

in Fresno County, and Lemoore in Kings County, California, 



PRODUCERS OF 



The Celebrated Tipo 



(Red or White) 




GRAND OlfLOMA OF HONOR. Genoi, Italy, 1892 
GOLD MEDAL. COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION, I8S3 
GOLD MEDAL, Dublin, Ireland, 1882 |j 



GOLD MEDAL. Turin. 1898 

GOLD MEDAL, CAL. MIDW. FAIR, 1894 

SILVER MEDAL, BORDEAUX, FRANCE, I89S 



GOLD MEDAL, PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION, 1901 
GOLD MEDAL. LEWIS&CLARKE EXPOSITION. 1904 
GRAND PRIZE, ALASKA-YUKON-PACIFIC 

EXPOSITION, 1909 



Naturally 

Fermented in 

Bottles 



Sparkling Burgundy and Asti Special 

(DRY) 

P. C. ROSSI VERMOUTH AND FE.RNET-AMARO 



Trade-Mark 

Registered 

October 8, 

19S5 



GOLD MEDAL, TURIN, 1884 



HIGHEST AWARD CHICAGO, 1894 



PROPRIETORS OF THE AMERICAN VINTAGE COMPANY 



Office and Salesrooms: Corner Battery and Greenwich Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

Vaults: 1235-1267 Battery St. 101-160 Qreenwich St. 1334-1339 Sansome St. 

NEW YORK OFFICE: West Uth and Washington Sts. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



57 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 

Issued Monthly 

TREASURY REGISTER CO PUBLISHERS 



r. m. wood, .... president and editor 

e.f.wood, - - - . secretary and treasurer 

Office: 127 Montgomery Street, San Francisco- 
Wilson Building : Room 304-305 : Phone Kearny 2597. Home C2559. 



The PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW is the only 
paper of its class West of Chicago. It circulates among the Whole- 
sale and Retail Wine, Spirit and Beer Dealers of the Pacific Coast, 
the Wine Makers and Brandy Distillers of California, the Wine and 
Brandy Buyers, and the Importers, Distillers and Jobbers of the 
United States. 

Entered at the Post Office at San Francisco, CaL, 
as Second-Class Matter. 



ALL CHECKS, DRAFTS, MONEY ORDERS, Etc., should be made payable to 

R. M. WOOD 

Subscriptions per year — in advance, postage paid: 

For the United States, Mexico and Canada $2 00 

For tlie United States, Mexico and Canada, six months 1 25 

For European Countries 3 00 

Single copies..-. 20 



<{•»« 






MM 



MM 



^ 

I 



EXCELLENCE OF QDALITY 

PURITY IN MANUFACTURE 



S EXQUISITE IN FLAVOR 



5 ALL COMBINED IN 




DAWSON'S 
SCOTCH I 



IN GLASS ONLY 



I CHAPMAN S WILBERFORCE 

I IMPORTERS 

; 705-707 SANSOME ST. 

i SAN FRANCISCO 



4.M 



MM 



»t»4 



MM 



MM 



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iPOBTllliT TO DiSTILUeS P WIjIE PREIIS. 




¥ 



Patd Sept 29, 1S91 



The accompanying cut illustrates 
our ORIGIN A I, CONTINUOUS 
STILL, which we have improved 
rach season until it has reached its 
present perfection. 

Phis STILL, which has always 
recciwd our special attention and 
study, has been of material assist- 
ance 10 securing forCalifornia sweet 
wines and brandies the high rank in 
the world which they hold today. 

We manufacture not only high- 
class STILLS, but also Copper and 
Brass Work of all descriptions for 
wineries, distilleries, breweries, etc. 

Our Pasteurizers and Wine Filters 
enjoy the same high standard of 
popularity as our STILLS. 

Referrncbs :— All successful sweet 
wine and brandy producers of Cali- 
fornia. 



AU KINOS or COPPER WORK DONE *T SHORT NOTICE. 

Sanders Copper Works 

C.\RL SCH.^LITZ. Pres. and Mjrr. 

BEALE AND HOWARD STS. SAN FRANCISCO 

Southern California Branch: 

649 North Main St. Los Angeles, Cal. 




JOHN RAPP 



&. SON 



Agents 

Opp. 8th and Townsend Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



irvere i>S 

TVOTri/lTl/d 

rrva/p 'will 
recuperale 
exrtau>STea 
force more 
uickly xK 



ari/ 






Subscribe for the PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW; $2.00 Per Year 



58 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



BOTTLES 

CORKS 

CROWN BOTTLE 
CAPS 

LABELS 

MACHINERY 

ETC. 


Lindeman, Slonian & Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Bottles and Bottlers' Supplies 


CARLOAD LOTS A SPECIALTY 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 
WRITE US 

381-389 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Telephone 
PACIFIC— MARKET 6261 HOME J 2161 


- Pacific Coast AgentB for 

Chicago Specialty 
Box Co. 
Chicago 

Ferd. autmann ft Co. 
New York 

Continental Glass 

Decorating Co. 

Chicago 



I o 000X5X3 OBXxaaoBX3aaoxxoBBX):oBoo 



RATES: $1.00 A DAY AND UP 
Tourist and Commercial 

FIREPROOF 




Everything new, comfortable 

Homelike, plenty of life. 
Beautifully furnished 

Highest class. 



Hotel 
Victoria 

Formerly the ORENA 
I. W. Bradt & Johnston, Props. 

Los Angeles, California 

Opposite Post Office 
Cor. 7th and Hope Sts. 



GEORGE WEST & SON, 'S!-™ | 

je^ PRODUCERS OF ^^ I 

SWEET WINES AND BRANDIES 



i 

Ik 



STOCKTON, CAL., U. S. A. 



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I C. A. SLACK, Proprietor 



E. RATTO, Manager | 



Telephone, Park 5 

Private Exchange connecting 

all Guests' Rooms 



HOTEL KIRK 

NEW MODERN HOTEL 

Opposite Entrance to Golden Gate Park 



Connecting by 

Private Entrance with Arcade 

Auto Livery Garage 



N. E. COR. STANYAN AND HAIGHT STREETS SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



WHEN DRY AND DUSTY, CALL FOR 

GILT EDGE^ DOPPEL 

LAGER ~ °'~ BRA V 



TTie Purest and Most Delicious Beers Brew^ed. On Draught in all First Class Cafes 



SACRAMENTO BREWING CO. 

F. J. RUHSTALLER, Mgr. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE: 
14th and Harrison Sts. 

Q. B. ROBBINS. Mgr. 



PACIFIC WINE ANI> SPIRIT REVIEW. 




• A« • A» -A* •^« -^^ • A* '^^ -^^ ic? 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



WESTERN GRAIN AND SUGAR PRODUCTS CO. ^ 

FORMERLY 

WESTERN DISTILLERIES 



Purity Brand Spirit* 

Win* for Purity 
Clean in Neutrality 



Gins 



A PACIFIC HOME INDUSTRY 

SPIRITS AND ALCOHOL 

Our Latest Improved Guillaume Still is Producing (192% Highest in the United States) 

Denatured Alcohol, Special Denatured Alcohol 



Purity Brand Alcohol 

Most Neutral in the 

United States 



Rums 



Western Distributing Co. 

Office Rooms: 304, 305,306—110 SUTTER STREET, S. F. 



Sole Agents* Pacific Coast ^ 

Distillery: AGNEW, CAL. ^ 



PHONE KEARNY 204 



BENJ. S. DONAHUE, President 

OCCIDENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

580-582 HOWARD STREET 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 



Tannin; Russian Isinglass; Gelatine; Bottle Caps; Filter Pulp; and all Wine Makers' Supplies 

Owners of the celebrated brand Eureka Filter Pulp 

Owners of The Western Press, the most up-to-date label plant on the Pacific Coast 

Largest handlers of Demijohns; Flasks; Imported and Domestic Bottles 

Pacific Coast Agents for Miguel, Vincke & Meyer, Spanish Hand Cut Corks; National Cork Co's Machine Cut Corks 

Pacific Coast Agents International Cork Co. 

WRITE to US for PRICES 



44 



Tea Kettle" 



Is the leading old fashion, 
straight Sweet Mash 
Whiskey 



^ 



44 



Crab Orchard" 

straight Sour Mash. The 
brand owned by us is distilled 
in Trimble County, Ky. Do 
not use any other. 



"SUSQUEHANNA" 



GUARANTEED ALL RYE 



"PILGRIMAGE" 

HIGH FLAVOR HEAVY BODY 



44 



Richwood" 



A High Type Bourbon 



The Susquemac Distilling Co. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 



44 



OldQ.W.H." 



Straight Sour Mash Worth trying 



THE GREATEST 
AMERICAN WHISKEY 



YELLOWSTONE 



TATLUR & WILLIAMS, INC., DISTILLERS 

GEO. DELAPORTE, Pacific Coast Agent 

820 Mission Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 



A WHOLESALER'S AND RETAILER'S MEDIUM 




ESTABLISHED 1878 



VINICULTURE 



VOL. XLXIll, 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS. ANGELES, DECEMBER 31. 1910 



No. 2 





The only tKiii^'* 
in a bottle of^^ 

APHOTALINGS 

OLD KIRK 

are pure whiskey 
and satiafaction. 





CINZANO 

ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



The Standard of Qualitx 
tKe ■World Over 



In 1909 over 04% of all tlie Vermouth 
; exported from Italy was CINZANO 



ALEX D SHAW & CO 

UNITED .ST.\TES AGENTS 

NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO CHICAGO 



MARTINI 
& ROSSI 

ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



Is by far the Biggest Seller in the 
United States 

WHY? 

Because EVERYBODY can mix a better 
Cocktail with it than with ANY other Brand 



F. E. MAYHEW & CO. 

INTERNAL REVENUE and 
CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 

Hydrometers and Extra Stems and All Kinds of Revenue Books 



N. E. Cor. Battery and Washington Sts. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



PIT ■llMin 



^ GL AUK'S HEAD 



"THE BEST THE BREWERS BREW" 

R ASS'S Af.Fl 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



GEORGE W. LAMB, Prasident WM. T. LEMMAN, Vice-Preiidant GEO. H. LEMMAN, Sec'y and Treat. 



SOUTH END 
WAREHOUSE CO. 



South End U.S. Bonded Warehouse 

South End Warehouse 

King Street Warehouse 

Terminal Warehouses 

California Warehouses 

Special Bond No. 2 

General Bond No. 2 

Phoenix Warehouse 

Cape Horn Warehouses 




WAREHOUSEMEN 
AND FORWARDERS 

MAIN OFFICE: 

Cor. 2nd & Townsend Sts. 
a 

Tel. KEARNY 2200 



. AGENTS FOR 
GENL.IAL BONDED WAREHOUSE 
NO. 2 



AGENTS FOR 

SPECIAL BONDED WAREHOUSE 

NO. 2 



Yoiinsberg & Son 



CUSTOM HOUSE AND INTERNAL 
REVENUE BROKERS 



5 1 1 Washington Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Tel. KEARNY 729 



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B^S3S'^S^^S^^3^SS^3^3S^^3S3SSS^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S^^Si3S^3Si^i^^^^^^Z^^3^^^^^aS^^S'3Sa 




^ ^^^^^^^»^^l^^A^^^ ^ > ^ ^v ^ ^v^^^^^^w^/v^^^^^^v^^v^»/wwwvwy 



''Paul Masson'' 

CHAMPAGNES 



"The Pride of 
, California" 



Extra Dry, Sparkling Burgundy 
Oeil de Perdrix... 

The Best Sparkling Wines Produced in America 



PAUL MASSON CHAMPAGNE: COMPANY 

5AN JOSE, CALirOR-NIA 






Simon Levy & Co. 8 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS ^= tt 

P. Gamier, Enghien les Bains 

Abricotine and other Cordials 

Legler Pernod, Couvet & Pontarlier 

Absinthe and Kirschwasser 



Hills & Underwood, London 

Old Tom Gin, Dry Gin, Sloe Gin and Orange Bitters 

Connor & Sons, Belfast, Bally Castle Irish Whiskey 



346-348 WASHINGTON STREET 



C. A. Lindgren & Co., Stockholm 

A. J. Anderson & Sons, Goteberg, Sweden 

R. Slater & Co., Glasgow 



Swedish Punch 



Branvin and Aquavit l^» 
Ben Cruachan Scotch Whiskey fj j 

SAN FRANCISCO KH 



PHONE KINQ 2173 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



m-)@S®(s&S&S®S<S®®®&^^ 



THEO. GIER COMPANY 

Wholesale Wine and Liquor Merchants 

Sole Distributors Metropole Bourbon Whiskey, Metropole Bourbon Whiskey in 
Bond. Puck Rye Whiskey. Also handlers of Straight and Blended Whiskeys. 



a^ 



575-577 Eighteenth Street 



Oakland, Cahfornia 



GIERSBERGER 
WINES 

• OUR SPECIALTY 
From our Vineyards at 
Livermore, Napa, St. Helena 

THEO. GIER WINE CO. 

571-75 Eighteenth Street 



Oak 2510 



Home A 2510 



(jXiX5<jX:XS®®®®®®®®®(SXj^^ 



i%'l«&'l^!^S^&'!«i^!^'''^!«*5='^S5='^'*^''^>^'^'^''^'^'^^'^'^'^'^''^'^'^^'- -'■^i«5S!S««£«K««£K!«JS«}SJ5«»!«^fe»J«KS!««»»»»%«6!«»»>SK«:KtKS!6»;e»KK5e»»JgaKKKJ«S«iKKKJft 



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SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMANN 



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WHOLESALE 






WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS 



o. 



SOLE -PROPRIETORS 

K. ROSEDALE 

RYE & BOURBON 
Western Distributors 

Herbert's 
PuYe Malt Whiskey 

Bottled By 
HOFFHEIMER BROTHERS 

Cincinnati, Otiio 



CALIFORNIA'S FINEST BRANDIES 



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QUALITY UNEXCELLED IN BULK OR CA^^ES ^ 

SPECIAL OI^DERS SHIPPED DIRECT I-ROM DISTILLERY |5 

I SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMANN, 430-434 Battery Street San Francisco. WESTERN DISTRIBUTERS I 



E. J. Baldwin's 

APRICOT 
BRANDY 

THE FINEST IN THE 
WORLD 

Phone Douglas 1793 



SENATOR 

Leiand Stanford's 

PURE 
VINA BRANDY 

IT'S PURE-THAT'S SURE 
THERE'S NOTHING LIKE IT 



BRUNSWICK RYE AND BOURBON 



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G. S. NICHOLAS & CO. 

41-43 BEAVER ST., NEW YORK 



-SOLE AGENTS FOR- 



J. »fc F. MARTBL, 

(San FrauelMeo excepted.) 

ANDREW USHER & CO 

WYNAND FOCKINK 

PERNOD FII.S 

FIELD, SON & CO 

W. E. EDDISON & CO 

J. WRAV * NEPHEW 

GEORGE ROE & CO 

WM. JAMESON * CO 

DUni.IN WHISKY DISTILLERY CO. 

BOOTH * CO 

DEIXHARD & CO 

KHUG * CO 



Brandies 



Seoteh Whiskies 

Cordials and Gins 

Absintiie and Kirsoli 

Sloe Gin, Orange Bitters, etc. 

Apricot and Peach Liqueurs 

Jamaica Rums 

Irish >Vhisl<ie8 

Irish AVhlslcies 

Irish Whiskies 

Old Tom and Hisl> and Dry Gins 

Rhine and Moselle AViues 

Cliampagnes 



NATH'L JOHNSTON & SONS Clarets, Sauterues and Olive Oil 

(San Francisco excepted.) 
BOUCHARD PBRE & FILS BurKundles 

(Pacific Coast excepted.) 

GOMEZ, CUVILLO & CO Sherries 

GOMEZ & CO Malagas and Sherries 

MARTINEZ, GASSIOT & CO., Ltd... Alto Donro Ports 

DONALDSON & CO ; Madeiras 

ROMAN I'ERPINA Tarragona Ports 

FREUND, BALLOR & CO Vermouth 

J. A. MENTZENDORFF & CO Russian Allasch Kumniel 

GIROLAMO LUXARDO Maraschino di Zara and Cherry Cor- 

(Paciflc Coast excepted.) dial 

R. SCHLUMBERGER Austrian AVines 

GIORGIO GIGLIOLI Italian Olive Oil 

MARCEL ALIOTH & CO French Olive Oil 



San Francisco Office, 215-216 Westbank BIdg;., 830 IV1ari<el: St. 



JOS. L. EPPINGER, Representative 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 






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THE STANDARD WINE OF CALIFORNIA 

fl We are the largest producers ar)d bottlers of high grade 
CaliforQia Wine. 

^ We oWQ our viQeyards ar)d make all of our wiQes ar)d 
can therefore guarantee tbe purity of every bottle. 

NO INCREASE IN PRICES OF CRESTA BLANCA WINES 



Location of Vineyards, LIVERMORE, CAL. 

Send for Price List 



42-44 Davis St., San Francisco 
10 West 33rd Street, New York 
37 South Water Street, Chicago 



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SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD 

We do not Rectify or Compound 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 



-FOR— 



J. H. Cutter Celebrated Kentucky Whiskies. 

Burke's (Guinness' s) Porter and Bass's Red Label Ale. 

Dewar's Fine Old Scotch Whisky. 

Keystone Monogram (Philadelphia) Rye. 

Burke's Irish and Gam-Kirk Scotch. 

Evan's Pale Ale and Stout. 

G. & W. Canadian Rye Whisky. 

Schramsberg California Wines. 



Schlitz Milwaukee Beer. 

Sherwood Robin Hood Whisky. 

Mackenzie & Cos Spanish Sherries and Oporto Ports. 

Feist Bros. & Sons' Rhine and Moselle Wines. 

Holland Gin in wood and glass. 

Anchor Brand New York Ciders. 

Schweppe's Soda and Sarsaparilla, 

Bass's Ale in wood. 



SEATTLE 
801 So. 1st Ave. 

Phones : 

Main 105 

Independent 105 



PORTLAND 

9andllN.4thSt. 

Phone : 

Main 2779 



SAN FRANCISCO 

41-47 Beale St. 

Phone : 
Kearny 1 1 82 



LOS ANGELES 
346 North Main St. 

Phones : 

Main 670 

Home A7804 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



Italian Vineyard Company 

MAIN OFFICES, SALESROOMS AND WINERIES 

1234 to 1248 PALMETTO ST., near Mateo - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



PRODUCERS OF 



CALIFORNIA PURE 
WINES AND BRANDIES 



Owners of the LARGEST VINEYARD in the U. S.— 4000 Acres 

At Guasti, San Bernardino County, Cal. 
PLANTED IN THE FINEST VARIETIES OF WINE GRAPES 



NEW YORK BRANCH CHICAGO BRANCH NEW ORLEANS BRANCH 

Offices and Wine Vaults 152 West Kinzie St. 237 Decatur Street 

202-204 Center Street and 213-215 Hester Street 

Seattle, Washington, 78 West Marion Street 



WILLIAM WOLFF & COMPANY 

IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION 

MERCHANTS 



52-38 BEALE STREET 



PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS FOR 

J. & F. Martell, Cognac - - Martell Brandy 

John de Kuyper & Zoon, Rotterdam - _-_---- Holland Gin 

Sir Robert Burnett & Co., London and New York - - - Old Tom and Dry Gin 

Cantrell & Cochrane, Belfast ------- Ginger Ale and Sarsaparilla 

E. H. Taylor Jr. & Sons, Frankfort, Ky. - - - . Old Taylor Bottled in Bond Whiskey 
Mellwood Distillery, Cincinnati, Ohio - -- -- - - - Mellwood Whiskey 

IMPORTERS OF 
Vintage Wines, Staple Cordials, Bitters, Absinthe, Preserves, Olive Oil, Etc. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



5^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Q^^^^^^^3^^^ 



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WIELAND'S EXTRA PALE LAGER 




uohnWielandPS^ery oNfr'^^^ 



; ?">■ 



<■..;,*«*«« 



OUR VERDICT 



"It Is Better Than Ever" 



Office and Brewery: 

240 SECOND STREET 



San Francisco, Cai. 



Si5xexsxsxsxsxsxsx5^sxsxgx^xsxsxsxsxsxsxsxsxsxsxsxg 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



C. H. WENTE, 

President 



FRANK A. BUSSE. 

Qeneral Manager 



Eagle Brand 




2 V-li WAPA 




"sONOMA 



ajf <>7' NAPA / LIVERMORC 



1^- 



' ^C'SBTB' 




Sjiecicillvj 
Selecicd 
Wii\6S 



COGNAC BRANDY 

Oro Fino Cognac*** $12. OO Pen case 
( PURE MEDICINAL BRANDY) 



Vineyard and Winery: Livermore, Cal. 

OFFICE AND CELLARS! 

112-116 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



PHONE MARKET 2836 



«*'^^0'^^«*- 



FERNET- BRANCA 




Specialty of 

FRATELLI BRANCA 

MILAN, ITALY \ 

\ 



The King of Appetizers 
Best Flavor to Cocktails 



GRAND PRIZE 

ST. LOmS 1904 

Sole North American Agents 

L. GANDOLFI &, CO., 

427-31 W. B'way, New York 
IMPORT ORDERS SOLICITED 




BUFFALO 

NEW BREW 
BOHEMIAN 

Sacramento, Hal. 



BREWING 



A. H. LOCHBAUM CO. 

AGENTS 

125 King Street 

PHONE 1010 Main 



PALE EXPORT 
CULMBACHER 
PORTER 



COMPANY 



ft. H. PEASE, President 



F. M. SHEPARU, JR., Treasurer. 



C. F. RUNYOI*, Secretary 



Qoodyear Rubber Company 

Manufacturers and-Dealers In 

RUBBER GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 




WINE AND BREWER'S HOSE. "GOLD SEAL" IS THE BEST RUBBER-LINED COTTON HOSE. 

61-63-65-67 FOURTH STREET, PORTLAND, OR. 
587-589-591 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

WE«ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR EVERYTHING MADE OF RUBBER 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




NITED STATES FIDELITY m GUARANTY CO. 



PHONE 
Kearny 925 



PAID CAPITAL, $2,000,000.00 SURPLUS, $816,000.00 TOTAL ASSETS, $5,713,158.00 

rtiis Company is A.cceptecl as 

SOLE SURETY UPON ALL INTERNAL REVENUE AND CUSTOMS BONDS 

Required by the United States Government from 

Distillers, Brewers and Cigar Manufacturers 



PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 



BORLAND & JOHNS, Managers 



Nevada Bank Building 



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A. ROSSI & CO. 

{MACHINISTS 



i Wine Pre! 



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Grape Crusher ( 



sses 

FOR SALE— Second-hand Redwood TanRs and OaK CasKs f 

I BROADWAY, Near Sansome San Francisco j 



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-*»- 



-O ^^ *» ^fci »♦ ^^ »» ^^ *» ^^ ** ^^ «» ^^ *• ^^ ** ^^ ««- 



Barrett's Unrivalled Prune Juice 




GUARANTEED UNDER THE 
FOOD AND DRUGS ACT 

GUARANTY No. 49 



Now to be had from 




AMERICAN MERCANTILE CO. 



• • • 

• • • 



514 BATTERY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SAMPLES SENT 
ON APPLICATION 



Sierra madre Uimage Co. 



GROWERS AND PRODUCERS OF 



Pure CdUfornia Wines ^"^ Brandies 




PORT AND SHERRY 

A Specialty 

La Manda Park, Los Angeles County, Cal. 

Qold Medal Paris Exposition, 1900 

Gold Medal Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, 1901 

Gold Medal Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904 

Gold 'Medal Lewis & Clark Exposition, 

Portland. Oregon, 1*05 
Qold Medal Jamestown, Va. Exposition, 1907 
Gold Medal Alaska- YuI<on Expositon, 1909 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



THE BARTON VINEYARD CO., ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1880 

GROWERS AND DISTILLERS OF 



I 



The Famous Barton Wines and Brandies 

Vineyards and Cellars, Hresno, California 



Chicago Agent 

BVRON E. VRATCH 

37 South Water Street 



WM. RENNIE, Manager 
Fresno, Cal- 



New York Agents 

E. L. SPELLMAN & CO. 

792 Washington Street 



NEXT TIME TRY 

"Semper idem" Filter Puip 



Guaranteed Chemically Pure. Long fibre with asbestos 
Used by the largest wine producers in California to 
whom we refer by permission. Correspondence solicited 

Zeileri)^Gii Paper Company 

Exclusive selling agents in the United States 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OAKLAND 



Send us ft trial order 



LOS ANGELES 



The LOEW SYSTEM 

Patent 
Wine and 
Liquor 
Filter 

=SAVES= 




Cost of Clarifyingf 

Materials, as well 

as Storage, 

Shrinkage and 

Waste 



Filters to crystal brilliancy the 
most turbid wines and liquors, 
without any deterioration or loss 
in color, flavor, quantity or qual- 
ity, imparting a lustre and fin- 
ish to the product. 

Easily and quickly cleaned. 

Packed and unpacked in a few 
minutes. 

Send for Catalog. 

The Loew Manufacturing Co. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 




mmwi HATS 

"From Maker to Wearer" 

For Twenty-five years LUNDSTROM HATS 
have been the standard of quality and style 

FIVE STORES 
1178 MARKET ST. 72 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 2640 MISSION SL 

26 THIRD SL 



Send for Illustrated Catalogue to MAIL ORDER OEPARTMENT, 1178 Market Street 



''The Rules of The Game 



>9 



A California Novel 

BY 

Stewart Edward White 

THIS will be one of the many special features in SUNSET 
MAGAZINE for 1910; a stirring tale of Life in the High 
Sierra, of the Sheepmen and the Cattlemen, of the Life Above 
the Clouds. It will run as a serial in SUNSET for 1910. 
ONE HIGH IN AUTHORITY in our sister republic is 
writing a series of articles on MEXICO TODAY. Coming at 
this time and showing the absurd exaggerations of conditions, it 
will prove intensely interesting. The first of the series appears 
in January SUNSET. 

SPECIAL MAGAZINE OFFERS 



Sunset Magazine 
American Magazine , 
Review of Reviews . 

Sunset Magazine 
American Magazine . . . 

Sunset Magazine . . . 
American Magazine . . 
Woman's Home Companion 

Sunset Magazine . . . 
McClures 



$1,501 Our Price 
1.50 I all for 
3.O0J $3.25 

$l.50l<"'f''"" 

l5oJ $2.00 

{1.501 All for 

IJoJ $2.75 

$1,501 <''"■•'"'* 

i-5ol $2.35 



Sunset Magazine . . . 
Woman's Home Companion 
Review of Reviews . . . 

Sunset Magazine . . 

Woman's Home Companion 

Sunset Magazine . . 
Forest and Stream . . 

Review of Reviews . . 
Sunset Magazine . . 
Van Norden's Magazine 



$1,501 Our Price 
I.SO I all for 
I50j $3.50 

{{.SOlO'"' Price 
I -50 J $2.25 
Our Price 
$3.00 



$1.50 
3.00 



$3 001 Our Price 
I 50 I 
1. 50 J $3.10 



Sunset Magazine $i .50 per year 

FREE with any of the above offers will be sent two beautiful four-color views of the Yoaemite Valley, 
handsomely mounted. They will be sent flat, not rolled. 

Send now to 

SUNSET MAGAZINE 



313 BATTERY STREET 



San Francisco 



California 



o yyooTo:o;o;o;o.o;oo:o:o:o:o:o:o:o;o.o;o.o.o:o:o.o:o:o:o:o.o:o:o.o.o.o.o 



10 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




AMI VIGNIER (Inc.) Coast Distributors 

605-611 BATTERY STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 





RUSCOM, FISHER & COMPANY 






IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS 


















1 








^^^W DOG ON ^^^^1 
^^^r GOOD ^^^H 

^ M 










SOLE AGENTS FOR 

ALEXANDER & McDONALD 
SPORTSMAN SCOTCH 
SANDY MCDONALD'S 
LIQUOR SCOTCH AND 
CORONA VINTAGE WINES 






SOLE AGENTS FOR 

KENNEL CLUB 
BOURBON AND RYE 
WHISKIES 
JAMES GRAHAM 
TOM GIN 




KENNEL CLUB 1 
L WHISKEY A 
















""tsmi^ 


1 














II,, 


rivaled for Purity and Excelle 








Ull 


lice 




326 JACKSON STREET SAN FRANCISC 


:0, CAL. 





VV^i*«*< 






PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



M 



••l**«tt»*««i 






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SEATTLE AND NORTHWEST NEWS 



SEATTLE, Dec. 20. — There is no doubt that the recent vic- 
tories of the Antis in a nninber of Washington towns, as 
_i)utline(l in tlic; last issue of the Review, coupled with the tri- 

aiph of woman's rights, has alarmed the trade in this state. 

There are two camps of doctors now busy on the case. Tliere 
I no great disagrcKMiient as to the malad}', for the diagnosticians 

all schools — brewers, wine men, wholesalers, retailers — agree 
lat the i)atient needs treatment. 

Sometimes a scare is a good tiling, particularly if, instead of 

inerving the victims, it acts as a battle cry. Well, the trade 

is been drawn closer together than ever before and the leaders 
beginning to plan things. One school, Avhich seems to be in 
le minority, would wage a bitter war against fanaticism, so- 
llled. The other school asks, "How can yon convert a man to 
Basonable views if you begin to abuse him and call him a 
matic?" 

The case finally reached the consultation stage. There was a 
leeting of some fifty brewers, wholesalers, retailers, and others 
at the lUitler Hotel on December 10. It was not intended that 
the news of that meeting should become public, but the Post- 
IntcUif/oicer correspondent is in position to give you .some in- 
side facts as to what is likely to be done. 

It was the sentiment of those who have paid most attention to 
the situation that Washington is today an object lesson of a 
possibility not altogether displeasing to the saloon men. 

On close inspection, it is found that the women of this State 
are not Pharisaical. The majority are amenable to reason. A 
judge who has presided for niany years in a state where women 
are enfranchised tells the leaders of the liquor cause that wo- 
men make better jurors than men of the same rank in life. He 
says they will listen to and Aveigh evidence. 

Therefore it has been decided to appeal to the women along 
broad lines, to submit the patent facts as to drunkenness, se- 
ductions, and other crimes in ilaine, where the open saloon has 
been out of commission for a good long generation, and then 
some. 

It was the sense of the meeting that the trade should do some 
high grade publicity Avork. It is not improbable that something 
unique in original investigation will be done. Possibly a clever 
man will be sent to Maine and Kansas to report on conditions. 
The reports he makes will be given publicity, not in liquor jour- 
nals alone, but in the daily and weekly press. 

The complete fruition of the plans outlined by the leaders 
looks to the establishing of a permanent organization, a bureau 
of publicity that shall exploit the subject from the highest points 
of view. 

Your correspondent has been interviewed by an active man 
connected with a prominent brewery, and he has submitted a 
plan that looks to a dignified two years' campaign that shall 
put the essential facts of the Prohibition failui'e before the 
people. This must be done by human interest articles that are 
in the nature of what editors call "must" copy, things that 
must be printed because newsy or timely. Then the second 
phase of the campaign is to reform the saloon itself. It was ad- 
mitted at the conference that several evils connected Avith the 
minority of saloons have served to poison the minds of the peo- 
ple against them. Reference is had to such conditions as the 
following : 

Profanity and obscenity; the presence of undesirables, such 
as macquereau, ex-convicts, dope fiends, pickpockets, and other 
degenerates; the predominance of tenderloin men and Avomen 
in saloons or in proximity thereto and easy touch therewith. 
To these evils, Avhich the public is likely to charge to the saloon 






i W 1 



as an institution, must be added the illegal and unwise habit 
of selling to men Avho are already drunk or far on the way to 
drunkenness. The prevalence of this evil is greater than most 
saloon men realize. Were it not so, it Avould be well nigh im- 
possible for a man to get drunk unless he should purchase a 
bottle and deliberately go to his room for the purpose, as the 
Maine drunkards do. 

T5y reforming the saloon of these abuses and conducting an 
intelligent, aggressive, though not offensiA-e, campaign against 
the Antis, it is hoped to prevent Washington from falling into 
the error of state Avide Prohibition. It is likely that the meeting 
at the Rutler Hotel Avill result in such Avork as has here been 
outlined for the first time in print. 



Tacoma has passed a uarroAv anti-treating ordinance, and 
"What Avill you have?" is noAv an unlaAvful expression in the 
pretty little Puget Sound City. The public has not taken kindly 
to the attempt of the local solons to take care of sumptuary mat- 
ters. In fact, the anti-treating ordinance has already been 
attacked by petition. The masses ask that the laAv be either re- 
pealed or submitted to the voters for approval. This is in line 
with modern thought in Wa.shington, Avhere the Oregon idea — 
initiative and referendum — is taking firm hold. Several thou- 
sand more names than are required to enable the council to 
submit the proposition to the people have already been ob- 
tained and more are coming in. However, if no special election 
shall be held, the laAv Avill go over for sixteen months, or until 
the next general election. It is not likely that the council will 
repeal the ordinance. 



One of the most noticeable signs of the times in Seattle is 
the increase in the sales of California Avines. During the holi- 
day season the .sales of sparkling Avines have been larger than 
during any previous season. Manager Joe Barmon, of the Im- 
perial Liquor Company, 305 Pike street, says there has l>een 
an unprecendented demand for sparkling burgundy and sau- 
terne and that the sale of these wines has materially decreased 
the inquiry for imported goods. Not only so, but the steady 
demand for Riesling and claret is greater than during any pre- 
vious season. In short, the people are learning to drink Cali- 
fornia Avines. 



Ernest C. RaAvlings, formerly of Wheland, and Collins, San 
Francisco, then of the Alaskan Cafe and now of the Lotus Cafe 
here, says the Revieav must be seen by all the traA'eling men in 
the country. A little item about him a feAV months ago re- 
sulted in many letters from old friends. He thinks he is likely 
to be coaxed back to the California .sod if things continue thus. 



Olympia beer is increasing its sales in Seattle, although the 
Rainier still predominates. 



Lionel SAA'ayze, formerly genial mixologist of the Press Club, 
is a poet and Avriter as Avell as a mixer. He is noAV .secretary 
of the Lumber Exchange and out of the old business for good 
he says. His headqxmrters are still at the Press Club. 



Senator Potts, of the Arlington Hotel — its OAvner, in fact — 
is a friend of California Avines. He says he has convinced hun- 
dreds of guests that it is really better than the imported that 
gets to this port. 



12 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



Manager Herman, of the College Inn, is making improve- 
ments in his wines and bar goods. He says he wants the best 
California products. He is an old Californian himself. 



Failure of the European Vintage 



Charles Manning, the hustling Everett saloon man, has been 
busy at Seattle lately, where he has held many conferences on 
"the situation." There are those who predict that Charles will 
soon own something pretty good at Seattle. 



Henry G. Behneman, formerly well known to the trade, whose 
father used to be with the Burnell ale people, is now Seattle 
manager of the John R. Cole Company, San Francisco. 



The Luneta Cafe, in the Grand Opera House, is the latest 
of novelties here. It is on the order of the old Portola and 
somewhat like the modern Bismarck, of San Francisco, and is 
"making good." 



A number of champagne men have been dallying with the 
trade here this week. Among them may be named Joseph Deer- 
ing, of the White Seal, and Robert McCracken, of Cook's Imper- 
ial. Joseph Murphy, representing Pommery, left town just as 
the others came in. 



Al Mayer, representing Grommes & Ullrich, has gone to Chi- 
cago to spend the holidays, after which he will return to nurse 
the Puget Sound trade. 



Sydney Hart, of the Stuart Distilling Company, has l)een put- 
ting in a number of large orders for Carstaii*'s rye this week. 



The Snug Harbor Bar, 1411 Third avenue, opened its cafe on 
December 17th to a large business. 



The Imperial Liquor Company has bought the Royal Bar, at 
818 First avenue and will put Joseph Barmon in charge. He 
will be aided by Jack Maddigan, now manager of the place. 
The Royal was conducted last year by Charley Bacon, of San 
Francisco. It is to be entirely remodeled at great expense and 
made like the Lotus, owned by the same company. The floors 
will be beautifully tiled and the finishings will be superb 
throughout. So anxious are the owners to get in the harness 
that workmen are busy during three shifts each day. 



Canteen Abolition Cause of Crimes 



WASHINGTON, D. C, Nov. 18.— The same old story told 
by many commanding officers of the army of the deplor- 
able result of the abolition of the canteen is repeated in a 
graphic way by Brig. Gen. Ramsay D. Potts, commanding the 
department of the Luzon, Philippines. 

Gen. Potts says that the most of the courts martial last year 
were traceable directly to the influence of the native liquors, the 
deleterious and in many cases disastrous effects of which, he 
said, are too well known to call for comment. 

"It is a violation of law to sell such liquor to soldiers, but 
the law cannot be enforced," says Gen. Potts. 

"One who has never seen the effects of even a small quantity 
of native liquor upon a young American unaccustomed to its 
use can form no judgment as to the seriousness of the situation 
now i)resented, a situation which is beyond the control of the 
military authorities, while the civil authorities can do very 
little."' 



RECENT reports on the Avine production of Europe indicatt 
that there ha.s not been such a disastrous failure in the 
vintage since 1810 as that of the present year. 

The causes contributing to the general failure of the year's 
vintage were the lack of sunshine during the spring and early 
summer, and the excessive humidity throughout the season, 
which engendered various forms of insect life, which so blighted 
the grapes that in some localities there were none to harvest. 
This was especially true in the more northern wine-producing 
districts of Europe, including France, Germany, portions of 
Italy, and Switzerland. 

MONETARY LOSS INVOLVED IN THE FAILURE. 

A summary of the reports on the year's vintage indicates that 
the wine production for the season is not more than half the 
average yield, which in a normal year is calculated approxi- 
mately at 3,000 million gallons, about one-third of which is 
produced in France. 

France is not only the largest producer, but also the largest 
consumer of wines, the annual consumption being about 100 
bottles per capita, and the failure of the grape crop is little short 
of a national misfortune, as it affects not only the manufac- 
turers, large and small, and a great many people dependent upon 
the industry, but also curtails the food supply of the countiy. 
Next to France the failure of vintage falls most heavily upon 
Germany, in certain districts of which the production of wine 
constitutes one of the chief industries. 

ESTIMATES ON THE YEAR'S VINTAGE. 

The following estimate of the vintage for 1910 in the import- 
ant wine-producing districts of Europe is based upon recent 
reports from the Wine Growers' Association. 

In Germany, along the Rhine and Moselle, there is only one- 
tenth an average crop ; in the Champagne and Saumur districts 
and in the Burgundy and Chablis districts of France the vintage 
is a failure; in Cognac there are so few grapes that there will 
be no brandy distilled this year; in the Medoc and other dis- 
tricts of Bordeaux, which have perhaps been more favored than 
other parts of France, there will not be much over a third of 
the average quantities of claret and sauterne produced; in 
Austria-Hungary there will be also one-third; and in Italy not 
much over half a crop. In Sicily the yield will about equal that 
of 1909. In northern Spain and also in the south and sherry 
districts there will be from half to three-quartei-s of a crop. 
In Portugal the yield is nearly up to the average, and the 
quality of the wine is good. 

SWISS PRODUCIT — LARGER YIELD OUTSIDE EUROPE. 

Most of the wine produced in Switzerland is consumed in the 
country, only a small per cent of the product being exported. 
But this year's failure of the grape crop, which is almost com- 
plete, will result in a shortage in one of the staple beverages of 
the country and will be seriously felt by the working classes, 
who consume large quantities of cheap native wines, because of 
the consequent increa.sed cost. 

Outside of Europe those countries from which wine is ob- 
tained seem to have enjoyed seasonable weather, and they have 
produced fairly good crops of grapes. Madeira has a vintage 
nearly up to the average, with good quality. Algeria has an 
excellent vintage, both as regards quality and quantity, nearly 
all of which is consumed in France, where it is now more highly 
appreciated than many of the cheaper French productions. — 
From Consul-General R. E. Mansfield, Zurich, Switzerland. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



13 



Hiram Walker & Sons' Important Victory 



Just A Plain Hold-Up 



I T would appear to us that tho eutlre wine and spirit trade of 
*■ tiie United States has good reason to be very grateful to 
Hiram Walker & Sons of Walkerville, Ontario, Canada, for the 
husky fight they have put up, in the matter of the Pure Food 
LaA\'. While, as a matter of fact, the makers of Canadian Club 
whisky have obtained a notable victory, the benefit which they 
have conferred upon the trade has been the bringing of the law 
lu question, as far as it concerns the label, strongly into the 
limelight. The big fight that has been made by the Walker firm 
caused a decision to be rendered which will in the future govern, 
and act as a precedent, in all label decisions, thereby greatly 
aiding in deciding this much-vexed question. 



THAT liquor men closed out by local opti<ra cannot get their 
license money back, is the option of (leorge A. Lee, Assist- 
ant Attorney-General of the State? of Oregon. The opinion cites 
that once money is paid into the state treasury and placed to 
the credit of the general fund, it cannot be taken unless there is 
a special act of the Legislature authorizing it. Thus the saloon 
men who have been put out of business by the local option elec- 
tions can have their licenses transferred to other persons and to 
other places, but thej' will get no rebate on the portion of the li- 
cense money paid to the state. 

Informally, the office also holds that no portion of 10 per 
cent of the liquor license collected by cities, towns and counties, 
paid to the state, will be returned to saloon men in units that 
have voted dry. 

How is that for highway robbery? 




The recent petition in the city of Colusa asking better regu- 
lation of saloons has been incorporated in an ordinance provid- 
ing that the saloons shall be closed at midnight and be open 
only half a day on Sundays. The proprietors of saloons have 
obtained their licenses for 1911, so that any increase in the cost 
of licenses which may be included in the new ordinance will not 
affect them until 1912. 



A dispatch from Weed, Siskiyou county, states that the news 
of the action of the Board of Supervisors in closing the saloons 
in the county outside of incorporated cities, brought gloom to a 
section of that town known as "Shastina," the section of Weed 
AA'here the saloon has prospered because the Weed Lumber com- 
pany would not permit the selling of liquor on its townsite. 



The women of Placerville won their fight, when they sub- 
mitted to the City Trustees a remonstrance to the repealing of 
the ordinance closing saloons at midnight. The matter was 
brought up upon the petition of a large number of business 
men asking that saloons be allowed to remain open after mid- 
night, and was denied by the Board. 



During December every seller of liquor in Fresno City made 
application to the Board of Trustees for the renewal of the li- 
cense for the year 1911. The applications were not read, but in 
bulk referred to the mayor and chief of police to report on at 
the next meeting. The applications are classified as follows: 
Class A restaurant 20; Class B restaurant 3; Wholesalers 8; 
Retailers 47; total 78. 



14 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



I Over The Sparkling* Wine Cup i 

§ American Wines for Americans I 

By Hokatio F. Stoll. 



IT woiikl be Avell if all our commercial oi'ganizations in Cali- 
fornia followed the example of the Merchants' Association 
of San Francisco, which believes in not only advocating the use 
of home products, but practicing what it preaches. 

At the annual banquet held at the Fairmont Hotel on De- 
cember 8, 1910, only native wines were served, the selection 
being Asti Tipo white, Calwa Cabernet and Cresta Blanca 
sparkling Moselle. Covers were laid for over five hundred 
prominent San Franciscans, and I am sure that many were im- 
pressed Avith the quality and purity of these choice California 
wines, of Avhich Ave have reason to be proud. 

The Italian-Swiss Colony Avines are particularly popular at 
banquets and dinner parties, not only in California but in many 
sections of the United States. Their Tipo Avas the only red 
wine served at the banquet given by the citizens of San Fran- 
cisco in honor of GoA^ernor J. N. Gillett, at the Palace Hotel, 
on Thursday, December 29th, Avhen the Theodore Gier Wine 
Company's Riesling Avas also drunk. 

At the banquet Avhich marked the close of the North Beach 
Thanksgiving festivities, the guests Avere regaled Avith Haut 
Sauteme and Burgundy bottled by the Italian-Swiss Colony 
especially for the occasion in honor of their Majesties Queen 
Erminia I and King Angelo I. 

On December 15th, one of the features of the breakfast en- 
joyed by the ladies of the San Francisco BroAvning Society at 
the Fior d'ltalian Avas the split Tipo bottles Avhich Avere placed 
beside each plate. A special label had been prepared, on Avhich 
AA'as printed BroAvning's famous lines: 

Open my heart and you Avill see 
Graved inside of it — "Italy." 

All of the women carried the bottles home Avith them as 
souvenirs of the delightful occasion. 

The annual banquet of the American Wine-GroAvers' Asso- 
ciation is alAvays notable for the number of native Avines that 
are served to the fortunate guests that are present. These in- 
clude not only members of the Association, but some of Ncav 
York's most notable clul) men Avho enjoy tlie conviviality of the 
hospitable wine men and like to avail themselves of the oppor- 
tunity of tasting America's finest wines under the most favor- 
able circumstances. 

At the banquet given at the Hotel Manhattan, on the evening 
of December 8th, the Avine list Avas headed by the motto "Amer- 
ican Wines for Americans." One sweet Avine, six Avhite Avines, 
nine red wines, seven champagnes and three liqueurs Avere of- 
fered during the different courses of the elaborate menu. 

Our California product was represented by tlie Italian-Swiss 
Colony's red Tij>o ; the Italian Vineyard Company's old Sherry ; 
the California Winery's Riesling, Burgundy and old Brandy; 
the California Wine Association's Vine Cliff and Hill Crest 
Claret; the Gundlach-Bundschu Wine Company's Cabinet Gute- 
del and Burgundy; Wetmore-BoAven Company's Souvenir Sau- 
terne and St. Julian Souvenir, and the Sonoma Wine and 
Brandy Company's Coronado Burgundy. 

W. E. Hildreth, president of the American Wine-GroAvers' 
Association, presided at the banquet, and among the toasts de- 
livered were : "Wine vs. Temi>erance," by Rev. Dr. C. H. Park- 
hurst ; "Our Vine-Clad Hills," by Hon. Henry A. Wise, United 
States District Attorney; "Why Wine?" by Mr. Arthur Bris- 
bane, editor of the New York Journal; "Bubbles," by Mr. Jos- 
eph E. G. Ryan of Chicago ; and "A Good Host," by Mr. George 
C. Boldt. 



THE ANTI-TKKATING CRUSADE. 

When Assemblynmn Harry Polsley introduced an Anti-Treat- 
ting Bill at the last Legislature, his action Avas looked upon as a 
huge joke. Californians have always been knoAvn for their hos- 
pitality and since 

"The days of old, 
The days of gold, 
The days of '49" 

treating has flourished in this State; consequently the bill was 
promptly chloroformed and died in committee. 

During the last tAvo years, hoAvever, the crusade against treat- 
ing and tipping throughout the United States has been groAviug, 
until today it is a punishable offense, in several cities, to ask 
your friend to haA'e a "smile" Avith you. Only the other day, an 
Anti-Treating Ordinance Avas adopted by the Tacoma City Com- 
mission making the buying of an intoxicating drink for another 
person a misdemeanor. The measure Avas introduced by Mayor 
FaAVcett and supported by two of the other four Commissioners, 
the understanding being that the ordinance Avould go into effect 
Avithin ten days. 

The State of Washington seems to be Avilling to pass almost 
any kind of a "reform" measure. They have adopted Avoman 
suffrage and have tried to Avipe out tipping by making it a State 
offense to tip a porter, Avaiter, barber or any other person. To 
my perscmal knowledge, hoAvever, there is as much tipping in 
Seattle, Tacoma and Spokane by tourists as in any of the large 
cities of other States. 

It remains to be seen Avhether or not the Anti-Treating Ordi- 
nance of Tacoma Avill also prove a joke. Mayor FaAvcett says 
he Avill see that it is enforced, but I fear that while his inten- 
tions are good, he will find that his ordinance Avill have a rough 
road to travel. 

In Oregon, the people of Rose City Park, have gone a step 
further. They do not aim particularly at treating over the bar 
in the saloon, but also against treating in candy and drug 
stores, Avhere daily countless Avomen sit around soda fountains 
and treat one another. Perhaps they Avill also attempt to do 
aAvay Avith the habit of one man paying another's carfare. The 
Portland Orefionian, in commenting on the evil of this latter 
custom, says: 

"When Harry insists on paying Peter's carfare he poses as 
a model of free and manly generosity, but it is a pose and 
nothing more. The apparent generosity is spurious. If Peter 
does not pay both fares on the return trip he feels outraged and 
tells everybody Avho Avill listen that his companion is a miserly 
tightwad. 

"The only purpose of this .sort of treating is to enable people 
to delude themsehes for a little Avhile Avith the thought that 
they have conferred a favor. It is not a real favor ; for they 
always expect a return Avithin a few minutes; but Avhile the 
self-deception lasts it is agreeable perhaps. Still it is only 
agi-eeable to one party. The other is humiliated, often embar- 
rassed and annoyed. 

"Why should Henry arrogate to himself the privilege of be- 
stoAving his petty largess on Peter? What right has he to 
assume that I'eter needs or desires the gift of a nickel? If he 
must show off his Avealth and liberality, there are better Avays 
of doing it than by forcing his reluctant friend to accept a 
gratuity of 5 cents. Let him bestOAV a thousand dollars or a 
million. Peter in accepting it may still feel like a beggar, but 
the compensation Avill make the disagreeable experience toler- 
able." 

Apparently the only form of treat that can never cause hard 
feelings is the "Dutch treat," although if the prohibitionists 
had their Avay, it Avould be a crime to treat even one's self. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



15 



,«» ^fc «» ^^ ** ^^ *»~ 



»«» ^fc «»- 



Our Wine Will Go to Italy / 



OME exporters of Southern California wine are considering 
whether they ought to request the Premier of Italy to ask 
i^hy his Minister of Agriculture is a knocker. The gentleman 
las said that our wine is poor stuff. However, Italian grape 
rowers and wine makers of this city state there is no need to 
6ay any particular attention to the assertion. It is manifestly 
kbsurd and was made merely for political effect. It is probable 
that Italians at home will soon get an opportunity to judge this 
^or themselves, for arrangements are being made to ship quite a 
luantity of California wine from Los Angeles to Italy. 

A commercial house in Milan has already entered into nego- 
tiations for a consignment of the fermented juice of the grape, 
and if it proves acceptable, as it undoubtedly will, more will 
follow. 

The first lot ordered from this section as a kind of trial ship- 
ment consists of 10,000 hectoliters, or about 264,170 gallons. 
It was ordered by the Milan firm because there is an alarming 
shortage in not only Italy but France and Spain, and Southern 
California is the only section which can be looked to to make up 
the deficiency. 

DID HE EVER TASTE IT? 

Competitors of the Milan firm "viewed with alarm" this ac- 
tion by their more hustling rival and appealed to the Minister 
of Agriculture for protection. Signor Raineri, who, local men 
say, probably has never tasted the wine of Southern California 
and therefore knows nothing of its quality, sought to quiet the 
alarmed growers by issuing an official statement saying that "it 
is not good and is not likely to meet the taste of Italian con- 
sumers." Here is the full text of the curious announcement by 
the Cabinet Minister: 

"The Italian Government ha.s ascertained that the vintage of 
California is limited and does not allow of exportation on a 
large scale. The prices are so high that when California wine 
is brought to Italy it cannot be sold short of 35 cents a gallon. 
Its (juality is not good and it is not likely to meet the taste of 
Italian consumers. As the importers will probably try to mix 
it with Italian wine in order to increase its alcoholic strength 
the government has taken strict precautions to prevent 'doctor- 
ing.' " 

As Los Angeles is a leader in the California wine industry 
such a statement, published officially, could not be allowed to 
go unchallenged. However, the leading Italians here who are 
interested in the wine industry smile at it and decline to take it 
seriously. Officials of the Italian Vineyard Company of this 
city, who own a vast acreage in vineyards at Cucamonga and 
Guasti, stated yesterday that the announcement was merely 
issued for the purpose of seeking to allay th^ feai-s of some of 
the growers in Italy. A. Alberti, of the Italian Vineyard Com- 
pany, speaking of the matter, said : 

"The grape crop is exceptionally poor in France, Italy and 
Spain this year. The wine makers here in California have been 
crowded with requests from the other side for quotations and 
samples and some have actually received orders for wines and 
brandies. 

"This company, among others, has been asked to forward 
samples and to dispose of some of its product in- Italy. I cannot 
say yet whether it will pay us to export. We have to consider 
duties, shipping charges and other matters connected with'the 
question. We are investigating the matter fully and may make 
some shipments. It certainly looks as if California wdll supply 
a certain amount of wines and brandies to make up the shortage 
in the three countries I have mentioned. 
"Italy relies to a large extent on its agricultural products and 



among these that of grapes is one of the largest. The govern- 
ment is strongly protectionist and seeks in every way in its 
power to protect the industries and prevent importations from 
other countries which may adversely affect them. 

"It is evident the Minister of Agriculture does not know much 
about California wines. I don't suppose he ever drank any. 
There is no question that some of our wines can compete with 
the highest brands of Italy. California cannot compete with 
France in its very best champagnes, but it can and does do so in 
all others. The best California wines may be said, generally 
speaking, to be as good as any others on earth." 

Mr. Alberti intimated that seeing they drank more wines and 
brandy in Italy, France and Spain than Califomians do, and 
seeing that this State is the only other section of the world which 
produces wines on a large scale, those countries have to look to 
this section for relief. Italy has over 9,300,000 acres under 
vines, France 4,000,000 and Spain 3,140,000 and the production 
runs to billions of gallons of wine. This has been materially 
curtailed this year, in that this is the worst season the grape 
growers of Europe have known for a long time. — Los Angeles 
Times. 

This Is Progressive 



AT Chehalis, Washington, ten saloon men have joined in a pe- 
tition to the Council asking that an ordinance be passed 
prohibiting minors, habitual drunkards and persons of Indian 
blood from entering or frequenting saloons. This is the first 
time the liquor dealers have ever asked for passage of an ordi- 
nance restricting their business. 



We are glad to hear that Anacortes, Washington, the second 
largest city in Skagit (^ounty, went "wet" in spite of female 
suffrage which was exercised for the first time at the recent 
election. The city polled 936 votes. Of this number 316 were 
women registered, only about two-thirds of Avhom took advan- 
tage of tiie right given them by the recent woman suffrage 
amendment and the Governor's proclamation. This is the third 
defeat of the "drys" at Anacortes, and the liquor question is 
now shelved for the next twflf years. 



In Washington there were more than seventy local option 
elections. The net result is that an increased number of towns 
voted wet. The wets likewise made gains in the Lower House, 
but they lost in the Senate. No state-Avide or county option 
question was in issue, and it is argued therefrom that the pres- 
ent state liquor law is satisfactory, therefore there should be no 
further meddling with it. 



On December 6th the election held in the town of Castle 
Rock, Washington, resulted in a victory for the progressive, or 
business element in favor of properly regulated saloons. The 
victory was won by a larger majority than on former occasions. 

At Everett, Washington, which has gone "dry" the municipal 
officials have discovered that the matter of overcoming a de- 
ficit in the city treasury created by the lack of saloon licenses 
revenue next year is not the only problem created by the local 
option election in which Everett voted "dry." They have 
looked over the local option law, and discover that under its 
provisions, unless special city legislation is enacted, all moneys 
from fines for offenses against the local option laAV will go into 
the state treasury, and the city will gain nothing thereby. 

So it is probable that January will see an ordinance passed 
providing that any place where liquor is sold shall be deemed 
a public nuisance, and as such the city courts would have jur- 
isdiction and power to assess fines for the benefit of the city 
treasury. 



16 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



( Chicagfo Liquor and Wine Trade j 

( Special Correspondence. ) 

Mr. Byron S. Rosenblatt, president of the Rosenblatt Com- 
pany of San Francisco, is out on his annual trip visiting the 
trade up in the Northwest. 



Mr. M. Altman, who recently returned from a trip through 
Wisconsin and Illinois, said : "Trade conditions are very good 
and sales are satisfactory. Bills are being met promptly and 
the outlook for business for the coming year was never better. 
I look for a much larger trade for 1911 than w^e had in 1910, and 
the trade of 1910 exceeded anything previous." 



The dealers doing a mail order business report that this 
branch of the business is growing rapidly and in some localities 
has become very h^avy. This is especially true where local 
option prevails. In speaking of this phase of the business, Mr. 
R. A. Hoefer, manager for A. J. Anderson & Co., said: "We 
are doing just as much business in prohibition districts as 
formerly, but by different methods." 



Mr. F. Madlener in speaking of trade conditions said : "While 
trade has been a little quiet the outlook is excellent. We are 
selling just as much whisky in prohibition territories as we 
did before the law was passed. In my judgment the way to 
regulate the liquor business is to cut out this treating habit 
that we Americans have gotten into. If this were abolished the 
objectionable features of the whisky business would disappear." 



"There is more whisky sold per capita than in former years," 
said Mr. Thomas Dennehy, manager of Chas. Dennehy & Co. 
There is a very marked increa.se over 1900. There is a decided 
increase in the consumption of California wine. Our firm 
sells liquors from Ohio west to Washington. We find business 
excellent, but cannot say that one locality is doing any better 
than another. It is marvelous, however, the amount of liquors 
going into so-called prohibition territories. The amount has 
not seemed to decrease, but the style of package is different. 
There is a marked increase of illicit stills in prohibition locali- 
ties. U. S. Marshals are kept very busy in Georgia, North 
Carolina and South Carolina." 



Some of the dealers report that business has been especially 
good in Missouri and Pennsylvania. The call for California 
wine has been especially strong. The demand is principally for 
ports and sherry. There is very little dry wine sold, as com- 
pared to port and sherry. 



Port wine has proved to be the most popular of all California 
wines. Some dealers report that the trade in this wine is grow- 
ing to large proportions and in many instances is taking the 
place of imported goods. In fact California wine seems to be 
replacing imported goods all along the line. Of course there is 
always likely to be a steady demand for imported champagne, 
but that does not necessarily come into competition with Cali- 
fornia wine. 



The Italian Vineyard Company of Los Angeles, California, 
on account of the death of Mr. Egisto Mariani, their New York 
manager, last October, have transferred Mr. Romano, their 
Chicago manager, to New York and will place Mr. A. Albert! in 
Mr. Romano's place. 



"Shipments of wine to Chicago have increased twenty-five 
per cent during the past year," said Mr. William B. Frolich- 
stein, local manager of the California Wine Association of San 
Francisco. "The market is very firm owing to shortage of this 
year's vintage. The crops abroad were very short. Everything 
indicates a bigger business in domestic wines than ever before. 
The prices have been maintained and demand constant." 



The glass bottle men report a very strong demand for their 
goods. In fact some quarters report that the call for glass 
bottles is unprecedented in the glass bottle business. When 
Mr. W. C. Forbes, Chicago representative of A. M. Foster & Co., 
was asked what was the immediate cause of this unusual de- 
mand, he said without any hesitancy that it was due to the fact 
tliat so many localities had adopted prohibition. "There is just 
as much liquor sold," said he, "but it is now put out in bottles 
instead of barrels or casks." 



Mr. Fred Finden, local representative of the Contra Costa 
Wine Company, recently returned from an extended pleasure 
trip to Europe. While absent, Mr. Finden visited London and 
Southampton. In speaking of his trip he said: "Of course I 
had a fine time, but I would have much rather gone to California 
except but for the fact that my wife insisted that we must make 
this trip to Europe. I consider California the garden spot of 
the world." 



It is claimed by some of the dealers that the pure food law 
is not operative so far as it relates to liquors. Some insist that 
unprincipled men are manufacturing a very low grade article 
out of the cheapest of wine and passing it off as California wine. 
The uninitiated know no better and drink the vile stuff. In 
speaking of the matter, Mr. Fred Finden of the Contra Costa 
Wine Company said : "There is no question but that this is 
being done. The pure food law is not operative. Something 
should be done to stop it. Not only in the interest of the trade, 
but the public as well. In many instances the stuff concocted 
and called California wine is unfit to enter the stomach. It is 
one of those frauds that at once affect the consumer. This, of 
course, does not affect the trade among people who know what 
they are buying, but there is a large per cent of buyers who do 
not know what good wine is." 



Clark street saloon men say that if any more of those deep sea 
feeders come to town they are going out of business. Last week 
a husky bluejacket cast anchor in a Clark street booze bazaar 
and tied up to the lunch counter wdth his hatches wide open and 
his grapplers out for grub. For ten minutes he took on cargo 
at a rate that aroused the admiration of all passing craft and 
he had safely stowed the thirty-fifth "hot dog" and was steering 
for the thirty-sixth some peart when the bartender hove along- 
side and signaled him to slip cable and make for the open. 
But it took a bunch of police to start him on his course and the 
bartender afterward said that if many more people came along 
and got outside of thirty-six hot dogs as a chaser for only one 
glass of beer at 5c a throw, it would put the house on the scrap 
heap in another week, and every man in the audience grabbed 
a hot dog and agreed that the argument was reasonable. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



17 





YOtJ HEEEl AND WHITE HOBSE, TOOI 






"mm 




CHAS. MEINECKE & CO 



Agents P. C. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



18 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



i 




OREGON 



i 




Portland, Orogon, advices state that after a long verbal strug- 
gle with the members of the special committee of the City Coun- 
cil appointed to draft an amended liquor ordinance, Paul Wes- 
singei', manager of Weinliard's brewerj', yesterday morning, suc- 
ceeded in having the time limit for the operation of saloons under 
powers of attorney extended one year further, to the end of De- 
cember, 1912. A special meeting of the committee was called 
to hear Mr. Wessingei''s arguments. 

Wessinger also succeeded in having the Weinhard brewery 
excepted from the clause which forbids the sale of liquor within 
400 feet of a school building. The Weinhard brewery is within 
a stone's throw of the Portland school of Trades. 

Mr. Wessinger said that his brewery, which controls about 60 
powers of attoi*ney, is willing to accept responsibility for the 
proper operation of the saloons conducted under them, but the 
committee fails to amend the penalty clauses so as to make the 
nominal and real owners of the saloons operated in this manner 
equally responsible in case of violation of the law. 



A dispatch from Grant's Pass, Oregon, states that under the 
Oregon Constitution, as amended by the people at the last gen- 
eral election, petitions have been filed with the City Auditor, 
praying for an election December 31 to decide whether the 
Council shall license the sale of intoxicating liquors within the 
corporate limits. An ordinance has been passed ordering the 
election to be held. 



Elgin, Oregon, Avent "wet" at the last election, but the mayor 
has taken an action reducing the number of saloons from 4 to 2. 
He was elected on a "dry" platform and refused to approve 
any bonds except those of two old-time saloonkeepers, Henry 
Bader and Ott Young, who own their buildings and homes. The 
Mayor contends it is impossible for more than two saloons to 
legally exist in a town of Elgin's size. 



Word comes from Portland, Oregon, that with the arrest of L. 
F. McPherson, an old resident along the Siuslaw River, the 
revenue officers of the Ignited States have begun a campaign of 
extermination among the illicit stills said to be operating in the 
Coast Range of mountains in Lane, Douglas and Josephine 
counties. ]kIcPherson was apprehended by Deputy United 
States Marshal Hammersly. He resides about two miles from 
Lorraine and is charged with having operated a still for the 



manufacture of prune brandy. The still was captured by Rev- 
enue Officers H. Shellberg and F. A. Tomlinson and has been 
turned over to David ^\. Dunne, Collector of Internal Revenue 
for the Oregon district. 



il 



The Councilmen of Athena, Oregon, have drafted a drastic 
liquor ordinance regulating the saloons in that city. The 
amount of the license is fixed at .1600 ; that a bond of f 1000 must 
be given to the City of Athena, said bond to be given by a repu- 
table surety company; there shall be no gambling of any kind, 
no shaking of dice nor shall there be any music of any kind; 
that the place of business shall not be opened on Sunday; that 
all windows and glass doors of places where intoxicating liquors 
are to be sold shall be of plain glass without painting or frost- 
ing thereon, and the bar shall be so situated as to be in plain view 
from the outside; that all places and houses where such liquor;-: 
are to be sold shall consist of but one room, without any par- 
titions, blinds or screens, in which no chairs lunch tables or card 
tables shall be permitted; that the punishment for any violation 
shall be a fine ranging from |50 to |250 or imprisonment from 
five to 30 days, and on second offense the violator shall forfeit 
his license and the bond company will be required to pay said 
bond. 



We learn from a Portland, Oregon, dispatch that all social, 
fraternal, commercial and civic clubs maintaining sideboards 
or bars in their clubx'ooms for the purpose of dispensing liquors 
to members will l)e required to pay a license fee to the city of 
|800 a year, the same as saloons pay, according to the provis- 
ions of the model license law now being prepared by a special 
Council committee. 

It is the contention of the committee that no more considera- 
tion should be given private institutions which dispense liquor 
for a profit than any other retail establishment. The announce- 
ment has brought a storm of protest from the clubs and their 
members, and plans are under way to block the measure when 
it comes up for passage. 



A victory for the "drys" is reported from Stan field, Oregon, 
where the fii*st regular city election was held at the begin- 
ning of the month. The fight was a strong one, prohibition fur- 
nishing the bone of contention between factions, but the water 
wagon brigade carried the city by a large majority. 



Olympia, the capital of Washington, remains wet and for the 
third time elected Michael Harris, Republican, Mayor. The 
election means much to the liijuor trade for if the Citizens' 
ticket had won the Mayor and Council would have been dry 
and intended to put the saloons out of business. 




We 
manufacture 



TANKS 



for all purposes 
WINE— BEER— VINEGAR 



We also manufacture 

WOODEN WATER PIPE 

If interested in Wood Pipe send for special litera- 
ture. Address nearest office 

PACIFIC TANK AND PIPE CO. 

318 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Equitable Bank Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Kenton Station, Portland, Oregon 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



19 



&U 



BOTTLED 
IN BOND 



IN THE PUBLIC MARKETS OF AMERICA. 

THIS MERITED POSITION STAMPS ITS ESTEEM 
IN THE FAVOR AN D CONFIDENCE OF THE DIS- 
CRIMINATING PUBLIC. 

THE GOVERN MENTiS GUARANTEE STAMP OVER THE 
CORKOFBOTTLEDINBONDWHISKEY IS GREEN 
AND SO ISTHE MAN WHO DOES NOT LOOK FOR IT. 

E.H.TAYL()RJR.&SONS.p,Tn^^,^^^,^,^, 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 

SOLE DISTRIBUTERS 

San Francisco, California 



20 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



onr/ 




FROM NOVEMBER 20 TO DECEMBER 20, 1910. 



WINE. 



Destination. 

To Alaslta 

" British Columbia . 
" Central America . . 

" China 

" Hawaiian Islands 

* Japan 

*' Mexico 

" New York 

" South America ... 
" Samoan Islands . . 
" Society Islands . . . 
" Strait Settlements 
" Dutch East Indies 

' Switzerland 

" England 

" Germany 

" France 



Cases. 

24 
310 
102 

189 
5 

22 
420 

16 

"i 
10 



Gallons. 

100 

3,504 

20,659 

60 

69,838 

4,832 

5,760 

564,903 

3,699 

224 

2,594 

400 

244 

5,100 

508 

51,000 

53 



Value. 
i 139 

2,686 

7,941 

40 

33,173 

1,671 

2,119 

179,792 

1,443 

94 

738 

255 

310 

1,887 

254 

14,462 

50 



Total 

1 case in transit to Mexico. 



BRANDY. 



Destination 

To Alaska 

" Hawaiian Islands 
" New York 



1,099 



Cases. 



Total . 



Destination 
To British Columbia . 
" Central America . 
'• Hawaiian Islands 

" Mexico 

" New York 

" Philippine Islands 
" South America . . . 



■\VHISKY. 



Cases. 



232 

1 

205 



733,478 


$247,054 


Gallons. 


Value. 


5 


» 13 


52 


130 


50 


20 


107 


$163 


Gallons. 


Value. 


260 


$ 520 


293 


1,902 


530 


2,917 




31 




2,050 


484 


484 


227 


341 



Total 

10 cs in bond to Hawaiian Islands. 

1 cs in bond to South America. 
33 cs 1 kg in bond to Mexico. 
208 cs in bond to Philippine Islands. 



Destination. 

To Central America . 

" Hawaiian Islands . 

'* South America . . . . 

" Society Islands . . . 

" New Zealand 

" Marquesas Islands 



690 



1,794 



$8,245 



Packages Packages 
Bottled. Bulk. Value. 



Total 



144 

84 

88 

3 

5 

4 

328 



118 



23 



141 



$1,479 

1,863 

465 

217 

40 

52 

$4,116 



MISCELLANEOUS EXPORTS. 

Destination. Packages and Contents. 

To Alaska 10 cs Grape Juice, 2 bottles Liquors 

" British Columbia 93 cs Grape Juice, 20 cs Blackberry Brandy 

" Central America 12 cs Gin, 20 cs Mineral Water, 20 kgs Vermovitn 

4 OS China Wine, 4 cs Cherries in Maraschino, 10 cs Porter 

" Hawaiian It-lands 161 cs Liquors, 43 cs Grape Juice, 38 cs Vermouth 

2 cs Absinthe, 18 cs Cordials, Z cs Cocktails, 8 cs Syrups 

3 cs 1 bbl Alcohol, 30 cs Cider, 173 cs Mineral Water 

...2 OS Cherries in Maraschino, 15 kgs 2 bbl3 Coca Cola, 7 cs Rum 

17 cr Bitters, 110 cs 1 bbl Gia, 10 cs Stout 

32 cs Champagne, 11 cs Rock and Rye, 5 cs Grenadine 

" Japan 2 cs Grape Juice, 30 cs Cherries in Maraschino 

" Mexico 3 cs Cherries in Maraschino, 10 cs Mineral Water, 2 cs Absinthe, 

10 cs Gin. 

2 cs Tamarindo, 1 cs Grape Juice, 1 cs Liquor, 1 cs Rum 

Philippine Islands 45 cs 12 bbls Liquors, 50 cs Gin 

Korea 2 cs Grape Juice 

London 16 cs Cordials 

South America 4 cs Champagne, 20 cs Vermouth 

Samoan Islands 14 cs Liquors 



Total 1052 cs 16 bbls 35 kgs 2 bottles 

Value $8596 

273 cases Orange Bitters in Transit to London. 




noniestle. 



FROM NOVEMBER 20 TO DECEMBER 20, 1910. 



FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer President, November 21. 

1 bbl Whisky El Monte Distilling Co. 

7 bbls Beer '^Ivmpia Beer Co. 

1 kg Wine F. De Barry. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Buckman, November 23. 

424 pkgs Beer lohn Rapp & Son. 

100 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

50 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

50 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

60 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

FROM PORT TOWNSEND— Per steamer City of Pueblo, November 26. 

10 cs Kummel C. W. Craig & Co. 

74 cs Champagne F. De Barry. 

1 csk Beer F. De Barry. 

1 csk Beer Marcus Moses. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Admiral Sampson, November 29. 

1 cs Bottled Beer c. H. Bell. 

195 hhds Beer John Rapp & Son. 

20 bbls Beer John Rapp c& Son. 

240 hf bbls Beer Tohn Rapp & Son. 

120 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

1 hf bbl Whisky J, McCoy Distilling Co. 

1 kg Liquor Wilmerding-Lowe Co. 

40 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

100 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

130 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

FROM SAN PEDRO — Per steamer Rose City, December 1. 

25 cs Ginger Ale P. R. Williams. 

FROM PORT TOWNSEND — Per steamer City of Pueblo, December 3. 

2 cs Cordial Cal. Wine and Cordial Co 

1 bbl Whisky Cal. Wine and Cordial Co. 

1 bbl Whisky Brown-Forman Co. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Watson, December 5., 

100 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

40 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

82 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

70 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

130 hhds Beer lohn Rapp & Son. 

100 hf bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

140 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

4 cs Wine J. Levin & Co. 

3 cs Champagne Kessler & Co. 

1 kg Rum V. Chevalier. 

FROM PORT TOWNSEND — Per steamer Umatilla, December 12. 

5 csks Bottled Beer Order. ' 

1 hf bbl W^ine Gaffney Drayage Co. 

1 bbl Wine Paul Masson. 

FROM SEATTLE— ^Per steamer Buckman, December 12. 

343 pkgs Beer John Rapp & Son. 

110 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Admiral Sampson, December 15. 
260 hhds Beer John Rapp & Son. 

70 bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

310 hf bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

120 qr bbls Beer John Rar>D & Son. 

3 sixth bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

140 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

50 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

140 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

70 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

FROM SAN PEDRO — Per steamer Rose City, December 16. 

5 bbls Brandy Order. 

BEER IN TRANSIT. 

To Oakland 104 bbls 122 pkgs. 

" Los Angeles 2 csks 1 pkg. 

" San Mateo 3 csks. 

" San Jose ..... 140 pkgs. 

" Vallejo 60 pkgs. 

•' Nevada 42 hhds 35 bbls 23 qr bbls 268 pkgs 

■' San Bernardino 128 pkgs. 

" Alameda 30 qr bbls. 

" Stockton 20 qr. bbls. 



E. A. QROEZINQER 



Established IS64 



E. 0. SCHRAUBSTADTER 



iTi 



SPARKLING AND VINTAGE WINES 

CHAMPAGNES 



809 MONTGOMERY STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



IMPORTS BY SEA. 



Forelgrn. 



FROM NOVEMBER 20 TO DECEMBER 20, 1910. 



^B bbls Gin L. Taussig & Co., San Francisco.- 

^5 cs Bitters Borgteldt, Propfe & Co., San Francisco. 

95 cs Bitters J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

'1 cs Wine C. F. Schmidt & Peters, San Francisco. 

2 cs Liquors Wm. Wolff & Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Wine W. B. Sanborn, San Francisco. 

2 cs Whisky W. B. Sanborn, San Francisco. 

2 bbls Sherry A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Wine A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

33 cs Liquors' A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

2 cs Wine G. Clofte, Sacramento. 

2 cs Bitters G. Clofte, Sacramento. 

5 cs Brandy A. Levas, Sacramento. 

5 bbls Whisky Ladd & Co., Stockton. 

3 bbls Liquors R. Casclato, Portland. 

9 cs Bitters Callstro & Co., Portland. 

3 cs Cordials Van Schuyer & Co., Portland. 

670 cs Whisky Reader Warehouse. Seattle. 

664 cs Whisky Continental Dlst. Co., Seattle. 

4 cs Wine T>. Bozzlo, Seattle. 

2 cs Bitters O. Bozzlo, Seattle. 

1 bbl Wine L. A. McCoy, Seattle. 

1 cs Wine L. A. McCoy, Seattle. 

80 cs Whisky n. A. Keene, North Yakima. 

12 cs Bitters Order, Seattle. 

1 bbl Liquors Order, Seattle. 

2 cs Bitters Ricconi & Co., Tacoma. 

30 cs Mineral Water Order, Vancouver. 

25 cs Bitters Peacock & Co., Honolulu. 

15 bbls Gin Peacock & Co., Honolulu. 

150 bbls Beer Hackfeldt & Co., Honolulu. 

FROM EUROPE — SAME VESSEL. 

388 cs Beer Flnlay & Co., Los Angeles. 

7 cs Wine Barham & Co., Los Angeles. 

16 cs Wine C. Rougny, Los Angeles. 

79 cs Beer Peterson & Co., San Francisco. 

500 cs Brandy De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

20 octs Brandy Oe Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Brandy . Taussig & Co., San Francisco. 

60 cs Champagne Chapman & Wilberforce, San Francisco. 

26 cs Brandy Rosenberg & Co., Salt Lake City. 

25 cs Whisky Palace Hotel, San Francisco. 

85 bbls Beer Lang & Stroh, San Francisco. 

40 bbls Ginger Ale Lang & Stroh. San Francisco. 

25 cs Lime .Juice T.ang & Stroh. San Francisco. 

15 cs Mineral Water Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

22 cs Wine Haas Bros., San Francisco. 

55 cs Wine De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

750 cs Champagne A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

83 cs Gin Mattoon & Co., San Francisco. 

1 csk Gin Mattoon & Co., San Francisco. 

13 cs Beer Norwegian Imp. Co., Portland. 

51 cs Whisky T. Robertson, Seattle. 

25 octs Whisky I. Robertson, Seattle. 

10 cs Gin J. Robertson, Seattle. 

90 cs Beer •. . . .J. Robertson, Seattle. 

125 cs Brandy Continental Dlst. Co., Seattle. 

25 cs Brandy A. J. Wolff, Tacoma. 

25 cs Brandy Greenhood & Co., Missoula, Mont. 

65 cs Whiskv J. J. Sliver, Honolulu. 

140 cs Whisky Hoftschlager & Co., Honolulu. 

10 cs Wine ". Davies & Co., Honolulu. 

5 cs Mineral Water Hackfeldt & Co., Honolulu. 

FROM ROTTERDAM — Per St. Louis, November 25. 

600 cs Mineral Water Apollinarls Co., San Francisco. 

FROM VICTORIA — Per Queen, November 25. 

200 cs Ale Haslett Warehouse Co., San Francisco. 

250 cs Stout Haslett Warehouse Co., San Francisco. 

200 cs Spirits American Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

250 cs Kummel J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

FROM HAMBURG — Per Biarritz, November 27. 

100 cs Fruit Juice American Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

660 cs Mineral Water . Order, San Francisco. 

92 cs Wine Repsold & Co., San Francisco. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN — Per China, November 26. 

298 csks Sake N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

100 cs Sake N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

50 csks Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

30 cs Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

25 csks Sake S. Tanlmoto, San Francisco. 

4 cs Sake S. Tanlmoto, San Francisco. 

70 csks Sake G. Hamura, Los Angeles. 

FROM ANTWERP — Per Setos, November 21. 

12 cs Wine Order, San Francisco. 

6 csks Whisky Macondray & Co., San Francisco. 

2 cs Liquors L. Lehmann, San Francisco. 

135 cs Liquors De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

75 cs Wine De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

1000 cs Gin De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

102 cs Whisky . . Jaffe & Co., Los Angeles. 

300 cs Gin Continental Dlst. Co., Seattle. 

5 cs Wine H. R. Clise, Seattle. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Isthmian, November 27. 
25 cs Gin Wahl & W^olf, San Diego. 

1 bbl Gin Stanard W. & Liquor Co., San Diego. 

10 cs Gin Stanard W. & Liquor Co., San Diego. 

15 bbls Gin Sherwood & Sherwood, Los Angeles. 

55 cs Gin Sherwood & Sherwood, Los Angeles. 

70 bbls Whiskv Haas, Baruch & Co., Los Angeles. 

1 bbl Fruit Juice Golden State Wine Co., Los Angeles. 

25 cs Gin J. Melczer & Co., Los Angeles. 

1 bbl Liquors Hartman, Goldsmith & Co., Los Angeles 

17 cs Liquors A. Wolf, San Francisco. 

35 cs Wine New Granucci Grocery Co., S. F. 

5 cs Brandy New Granucci Grocery Co., S. F. 

15 cs Cordials A. VIgnler Co., San Francisco. 

12 bbls Gin T. W. Collins & Co., San Francisco. 

15 cs Gin T. W. Collins & Co., San Francisco. , 

50 cs Whiskv El Monte Dist. Co., San Francisco. 

5 bbls Whisky El Monte Dist. Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Cordials Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

15 cs Champagne A. Decks Co., San Francisco. 

10 bbls Gin Taussig & Co., San Francisco. 

10 kgs Gin Taussig & Co., San Francisco. 

7 cs Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

50 cs Whisky ...'.'. Rusconl, Fisher & Co., San Francisco. 

2 cs Liquor's J. de Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

200 cs Wine : : . .C. F. Schmidt & Peters, San Francisco. 



21 



FROM EUROPE— SAME VESSEL. 

1 csk Rum Last & Co., San Diego. 

35 cs Wine ' H. Jevne & Co., Los Angeles. 

32 cs Beer Goldberg, Bowen & Co., Los Angeles. 

60 cs Wine Melnecke & Co., Los Angeles. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Virginian, December 3. 

35 cs Liquors J- Aronson, Seattle. 

10 bbls Whisky Continental Dist. Co., Seattle. 

25 cs Gin J- Robertson, Seattle. 

8 cs Cordials Goldie Dist. Co., Seattle. 

15 cs Wine University Club, Seattle. 

10 cs Brandy S. Hyde. Seattle. 

25 cs Cordials Halyman Co., Spokane. 

10 cs Whisky Halyman Co., Spokane. 

5 bbls Whisky Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

25 cs Whisky Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

10 cs Punch Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

1 csk Fruit Juice Schlesenger & Bender, San Francisco. 

15 cs Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

1 cs Wine • • -H. Brenta, San Francisco. 

1 cs Bitters H. Brenta, San Francisco. 

45 cs Wine Levaggl-Granucci Co., San Francisco. 

25 cs Whisky A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

55 bbls Whisky J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

100 cs Whisky J- Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

110 cs Cordials J- Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Whisky Ladd & Co., Stockton. 

25 csks Mineral Water Jevne & Co., Los Angeles. 

25 cs Liquors Imperial Liquor Co., Seattle. 

67 cs Wine Continental Dist. Co., Seattle. 

25 cs Gin J. Robertson, Seattle. 

1 csk Whisky Butler Hotel, Seattle. 

2 cs Beer Order, Portland. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Nebraskan, December 5. 

10 cs Bitters Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

670 cs Bitters W'. H. Campbell, San Francisco. 

69 bbls Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

25 cs Gin Donnelly & Co., Sacramento. 

5 bbls Whisky ..... Ladd & Co., Stockton. 

FROM EUROPE— SAME VESSEL. 

165 bbls Stout Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

60 bbls Ale Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

200 cs Ginger Ale Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

327 cs Whisky Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

151 cs Gin Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

2 csks Rum Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 



FROM NEW YORK (via Ancon)- 
155 bbls Beer T. 



—Per Mackinaw, December 2. 
W. Collins & Co., San Francisco. 



FROM KOBE, JAPAN — Per Manchuria, December 4. 

677 csks Sake N. A. Mercantile Co., San Francisco. 

150 cs Sake N. A. Mercantile Co., San Francisco. 

149 csks Sake Mural & Co., San Francisco. 

26 cs Sake Mural & Co., San Francisco. 

10 csks Sake Masuda & Co., Oakland. 

40 csks Sake Sonoma Wine Co., Los Angeles. 

FROM HAMBURC3 — Per Serak, December 7. 
2 bbls Wine E. Lott, San Francisco. 

1 bbl Cider A. Elchler, Ran Francisco. 

2 cs Wine Order, San Francisco. 

100 cs Liquors De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

800 cs Gin De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

34 cs Wine L. Dreyfus, Santa Barbara. 

4 cs Champagne L. Dreyfus, Santa Barbara. 

25 cs Fruit Juice Continental Dist. Co., Seattle. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN — Per Chlyo Maru, December 9. 

20 csks Sake Masuda & Co., San Francisco. 

130 csks Sake Togasakl & Co., San Francisco. 

80 csks Sake Toyo Bussan Co.. San Francisco. 

471 csks Sake N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

50 csks Sake N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

221 csks Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

70 csks Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

250 csks Sake Order, Los Angeles. 

70 cs Sake Order. Los Angeles. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Mexican, December 12. 

702 cs Wine Continental Dlst. Co., Seattle. 

1 bbl Whisky Hotel Savoy, Seattle. 

670 cs Whisky Readman Warehouse, Seattle. 

30 cs Cocktails B. C. Wine Co., Vancouver. 

10 cs Cordials Williams & Rowland. Tacoma. 

29 cs Wine Silver Grill, Tacoma. 

17 cs Champagne Silver Grill, Tacoma. 

5 bbls Whisky Silver Grill. Tacoma. 

1 bbl W^hiskv Wing Wo Tal, Honolulu. 

9 cs Bitters Gorgia & Co., Portland. 

1 csk Liquors Gorgia & Co., Portland. 

10 bbls Wine Van Schuyer & Co., Portland. 

675 cs Wine Van Schuyer & Co., Portland. 

5 cs Cordials Muller & Co.. San Francisco. 

1 cs Wine T. de Turk, San Francisco. 

5 bbls Gin Roth & Co., San Francisco. 

FROM LIVERPOOL (via Seattle) — Per Watson, December 6. 
50 cs Stout Wm. Hoelscher & Co., San Francisco. 

1 hhd Whisky . Pacific Union Club. San Francisco. 

2 csks Whisky ..... Palace Hotel Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Whiskv J. Herrscher & Co., San Francisco. 

5 octs Rum American Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

500 cs Whisky J. Buchanan & Co., San Francisco. 

200 cs Spirits Spiropulos & Costalupe, San Francisco. 

3 bbls Spirits Spiropulos & Costalupe, San Francisco. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN — Per Asia, December 16. 

486 csks Sake N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

205 cs Sake . N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

20 csks Sake ..... Mutual Supply Co.. San Francisco. 

50 csks Sake Mural & Co., San Francisco. 



IMPORTS BY RAIL IN BOND. 



FROM NOVEMBER 20 TO DECEMBER 20, 1910. 



Via New York — 

3100 cs Champagne From Antwerp. 

18 cs Wine '' Hamburg. 

5 kegs Wine 

Via New Orleans'^ 

40 cs Wine From Antwerp. 

25 cs Cognac " Bordeaux. 

5 csks Vermouth " 



22 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 

f> I LOUISVILLE DEPARTMENT 



I III ■ II > «l ■l»»»*»l »• ■ll* » *ll» »* II* III* II ■ • ■♦♦»*^tl >»<!♦■ Ill ■♦!» Ill ■♦♦»»*il><i»«l><l ■♦♦•♦*«♦■ II ■ II B U I ■«>»lll ■«♦■ lll««l>« H H» III aH^^^H^^^H ■<!■«♦< 



j 



LOUISVILLE, KY., Dec. 20.— Conditions in the Louisville 
whisky market are described by one of the veterans in the 
business as being 'like old times." That is as optimistic a view 
as could possibly be taken, and means that trade is coming up 
fully to expectations. 

The holiday rush this year has been heavier and more contin- 
uous than for three years. Even 1907 was no better than this 
season, and the general character of the demand is taken to 
indicate that improved conditions are in effect everywhere. 

While there is some apprehension among big financiers and 
business men as to the industrial outlook, every indication re- 
ceived by the local trade points to continued good conditions. 
Crops have been good, and as the big corn crop will probably 
lower the cost of many food products, including meat, the cost 
of living may be brought down low enough to allow a more 
generous margin for liquor than is now possible. 

The consumption of Kentucky whiskies, according to reports 
that are coming in from all sides, is increasing at a rapid rate, 
and the bottled in bond consumption is especially encouraging. 
This gives color to the statement of those in the local trade who 
believe that there is no likelihood of an overproduction, such 
as has been hinted at of late. 

"When it is considered," said one of the big Main street dis- 
tillers to the representative of the Pacific Wine and Spirit 
Review, "that consumption has been increasing faster than pro- 
duction, it doesn't seem likely that there will be more whisky 
made than will be consumed four years hence. Another point 
that must be considered is that the distillers in a large measure 
make according to contract for the jobbing and wholesale trade. 
They do not turn out more goods than they have contracted to 
sell, and the jobbers usually have the demand pretty well in 
hand before they order. I regard that as an automatic propo- 
sition by means of which the production will be regulated to the 
needs of the market." 

Prices are holding firm, as before, and the only indication is 
that looking to increases. As heretofore pointed out in this 
correspondence, holders of old whiskies believe that the decided 
shortage of certain crops will continue to enhance the value of 
their holdings, and they are not disposed to let go of them be- 
fore the top price has been reached. This is another fact which 
seems to support the proposition that an overproduction of 
whisky at this time is hardly probable. 

The distilleries of Kentucky are practically all in operation 
and are running to their full capacity. The Kentucky Distiller- 
ies and Warehouse Company has announced that its plants will 
account for 20,000,000 gallons this season, so that there seems 
to be no reason for changing the prediction made several 
months ago to the effect that the output will probably pass the 
40,000,000 gallon mark and may possibly go as high as 45,000,- 
000. One result of this situation has been the announcement of 
higher prices for packages. The cost of white oak staves and 
other cooperage stock entering into the production of whisky 
barrels has been advancing of late, and the distillers have con- 
tracted for their season's supply of packages at figures consid- 
erablj' in excess of last year. 



The wholesale trade in Louisville have been contributing 
liberally to the building fund for the Y. M. C. A., which raised 
1350,000 in sixteen days for the purpose of erecting a new 
building. Paul Jones & Co., Bonnie Bros., the Brown-Forman 
Company, Bemheim Bros, and others were among the con- 



tributors. George G. Brown, of the Brown-Forman Company, 
has been an active worker in the campaign. 



Local distillers and wholesalers are up in arms over the new 
regulations proposed by R. A. Cabell, Commissioner of Inter- 
nal Revenue, in regard to the making of sour-mash whisky and 
sweet goods, as well as gauging, which he wishes to have done 
according to the weight system. A meeting was recently held at 
the Gait House, at which Joseph DeBar, secretary of the Na- 
tional Wholesale Liquor Dealers' Association, was present, to 
discuss the situation. Mr. DeBar said that he believed the new 
methods proposed Avould result in the production per bushel 
being decreased for sour mash whisky. W. W. Watts was ap- 
pointed chairman of a committee to draw up resolutions protest- 
ing against the change, and Thomas S. Jones, a well known |i 
broker, was appointed for the purpose of preparing a brief 
which is to be laid before the Commissioner. Mr. Jones is a for- 
mer distiller and acquainted with the situation, and he will get 
the views of others in the trade before preparing the brief. 



The State Board of Valuation and Assessment of Kentucky 
has declared that the highest valuation ever placed on whisky 
in Kentucky Avill be effective during the next year for the pur- 
poses of taxation. A committee of distillers appeared before 
the Board, which met at Frankfort, and protested against the 
increase from |9 to $10, but the Board held that the latter 
figure was a fair cash valuation and upheld the assessment. 
This will cost the distillers thousands of dollars unless they 
succeed in getting a reconsideration, which does not appear to 
be likely at this time. John McCullough, of Owensboro, has 
been most active in his efforts to have the lower figure used as a 
basis for taxation. 



Every district in Kentucky is showing increases in the amount 
of internal revenue collected as the result of the heavy with- 
drawals of bottled in bond Avhisky. The Seventh district, in 
which Lexington is located and which collects the largest taxes 
on whisky in the State, with the exception of the Louisville 
office, reported its November collections at $505,481, a gain of 
$111,000 over the corresponding month of 1909. This was the 
largest amount ever collected in the district. The Louisville 
office is reporting collections approaching a million and a 
quarter a month. 



Marion E. Taylor, president of Wright & Taylor and a former 
president of the Louisville Board of Trade, has received the 
highest honor in the gift of that organization, being named as 
an honorary member. This is a tribute which has not been paid 
since 1887. The recipient of this honor, according to the laws 
of the Board, must receive two-thirds of the votes of all the 
directors, and no nominations are made. Mr. Taylor was the 
recipient of congratulations when it became known that he had 
been elected. 



I. W. Bernheim, of Bemheim Bros., has given $50,000 for the 
erection of a new library building for the Hebrew Union College 
at Cincinnati. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 23 

BRANDY PRODUCED 

OFFICIAL REPORT 

FIRST DISTRICT— Month of November, 1910. Tax Gals. 

Produced and bonded in this district, this does not include figures of production in 6th (new) district 358, 531 . 1 

Received from other Districts, California 66* 194. 6 

Received from special bonded warehouse, other District, California 3i335.7 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. Eastern District „ 364* 671. 7 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. Eastern Districts 36^ 423-6 

Exported 42.4 

Tax paid 52,853.4 

Used in Fortification of Wines 70,070. 2 

Remaining in bond, November 30, 1910 1,593,206.4 

FOURTH DISTRICT— Month of November, 1910. Tax Gals. • 

Produced and bonded in this district 79,021 -7 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. First District, California 61,110.7 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse, Eastern District _ 24,938.2 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to' special bonded warehouse. First District, California 3,347.7 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. Eastern Districts 16,540.7 

Exported . 

Tax paid 12,369.9 

Used in Fortification of Wines 75,608.7 

Remaining in bond, November 30, 1910 677,111.8 

SIXTH DISTRICT— Month of November, 1910. Tax Gals. 

Produced and bonded in this district- - 25,122.4 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. First District - 14,597.6 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse, First District - 20,404.1 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. Eastern District 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse, Eastern District 6,607.2 

Tax paid 7,644.0 

Used in Fortification of Wines 113,518.7 

Remaining in bond, October 31, 1910 240,704.0 

SWEET WINES PRODUCED 

FIRST DISTRICT— Month of November, 1910. . Pkgs. Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification 1,977 545,686.3 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification 297 57,488-0 

Brandy actually used for fortification 2,410 623,583.0 

Wine Gals. 

Port produced , 560,644-45 

Sherry produced 1,439,067-10 

Angelica produced 65, 707- 40 

Muscat produced - 249,115-63 

Tokay - _ ~ _ - - — - 70,230.18 

Madera.IIir.;!I"I."ZZZ IZZ ZZZ I"'"Z IZZ .." .Z Z_.IZ Z.. _ _ Z Z'.. 28!978 . 34 

Total sweet wine produced in November, 1910 - 2,445,617.43 

FOURTH DISTRICT— Month of November, 1910. Pkgs. Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification 234 75,608.7 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification ■ 

Brandy actually used for fortification 255 77,484-6 

Wine Gals. 

Tokay - - - 3,674.49 

Port produced 41.516.89 

Sherry produced 227,075.37 

Angelica produced 46,468-82 

Muscat produced 6,791-29 

Total sweet wine produced in November, 1910: 325,526-86 

SIXTH DISTRICT— Month of November, 1910. Pkgs. Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification _ 109,023.0 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification _ 1,666.4 

Brandy actually used for fortification ._. 113,518.7 

Wine Gals. 

Malaga 292,840.8 

Port produced 878, 544. 1 

Sherry produced 2,828,680.4 

Angelica produced 81,326.5 

Muscat produced _ 224,504.4 

Total sweet wine produced in October, 1910 4,285,456,5 



24 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 





Great Future For 
Grape Syrup 



THE vast extent of the viticultural industry in California 
renders every new use to Avhich grapes can be put of the 
greatest importance, not only to grape growers, but to the entire 
community. While it may be said with pride that the qualities 
of California wines have by the assiduous study of makers, and 
the introduction of advanced scientific principles into the pro- 
cess of fermentation, taken their place side by side with the 
celebrated vintages of Europe, the demand for the wine is at 
present not equal to the supply. Hence what may be spoken of 
as "off years" occur when, owing to the amount of wine on hand, 
prices of grapes are low, in some cases so low as to be unremu- 
nerative to growers. It is in such years that a great want is 
felt for some other commercial industry which will find a use for 
the grape crop at a fair price. 

We are glad to be able to announce that we firmly believe that 
such an industry has not only been discovered, but is being 
successfully developed, in the manufacture of grape syrup. 
It appears that a process for this purpose was designed by W. J. 
Wayte, an expert in sugar and syrup producing machinery. 
This was submitted during the present year to Louis Wetmore, 
manager for George West & Son, Inc., of Stockton, California, 
and a laboratory sample of the syrup produced. This was so 
satisfactory in purity, flavor, and general desirability, that Mr. 
Wayte was called upon to put up the necessary machinery to 
make sufficient syrup to "test the market." The result of the 
experiment was the production of from 8000 to 10,000 gallons 
of a pure and most delicious syrup at a figure which enables it 
to compete in American markets with syrup made from sugar, 
and which is selling readily. 

The principal point about the new syrup, which we believe 
means so much to grape growers in the future, is its absolute 
purity. Nothing is added to it, and all that is eliminated from 
it are the albuminoids and acids natural to the grape. Among 
all the syrups on the market today the new grape syrup is the 
only one for which absolute purity can be claimed. For in- 
stance, so-called "maple" syrup is mixed with cane and beet 
sugars; all so-called "sugar" syrups are compounded with glu- 
cose; and the so-called "corn" syrup, now so widely advertised 
throughout the country, is nothing more than glucose properly 
tiavored. 

Under these circumstances it would certainly appear there 
should be no trouble in finding a wide market for pure grape 
syrup, and further, that by the manufacture of it, the value of 
the grape crop will be sensibly increased and continual re- 
currence of "off years" be prevented. 

The grape syrup, as described, was manufactured by machin- 
ery designed for this process by Mr. Wayte and made at the 
Oscar Krenz Copper and Brass Works, this city, which have 
this season constructed a very long line of evaporating appa- 
ratus. These works have made this year two 25,000-gallon stills 
for George West & Son, which on a test recently ran 66,000 
gallons of 9 per cent distilling material and delivered an average 
product of 184 degrees net proof. The works have also turned 
out during the season the largest copper evaporating pans ever 
made on the Coast for the California Salt Company. They have 
also made and installed copper evaporating pans for the con- 
centration of malt extract used in making the "Holsum" bread, 
now becoming so popular in this city. 



m The Proposed New i^^j 
^j Outage Bill 'l*gm] 

' - — » "- — ■ " — t f r — fc f fc f r ~fc « r— ^ ir — »_ tt - < ^ s » 

WE present herewith the full text of the new Outage Bill 
which is now before Congress, and which it is sincerely 
hoped will become a law. Anyone who has given the matter 
serious attention knows of the rank injustice to the distillini; 
and liquor trade of the present inadequate outage laAvs. Since 
the present law was adopted great changes have taken place 
in the storing and aging of Avhiskies. For instance, the steam- 
heated warehouse is now the modem storage place, whereas 
the old warehouse was subject to climatic variations. In otlier 
words, the warehouse which is kept at a certain temperature the 
year round develops and evaporates whiskies very rapidly, and 
the evaporation under these conditions is far greater 
during a given term than under the old unheated warehouse 
system. The fact is, in short, that the trade and distillers 
are paying government taxes on whisky that is not in existence. 

Every distiller and every man in the trade is interested in 
this proposition and it would be a great help if they would write 
or wire their representative in Congress and senator to favor 
Outage Bill H. R. No. 29,466. This measure is backed by the 
National Wholesale Liquor Dealers' Association of America. 
The text of the bill follows : 

61st CONGRESS— H. R. 29466. 



In the House of Representatives, December 15, 1910. Mr. 
Dalzell introduced the following bill, which was referred to the 
Committee on Ways and Means : 

A Bill to provide an allowance for loss of distilled spirits de- 
posited in Internal Revenue bonded Avarehouses. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the United States of America in Congress assembled. That the 
distiller of any distilled spirits which shall be on deposit on the 
first day of July, 1911, or which may thereafter be deposited 
in any distillery warehouse, or special or general bonded Avare- 
house existing under the Internal Revenue laws of the United 
States, may, prior to the expiration of eight years from the date 
of original gauge as to fruit brandy, or original entry as to all 
other spirits, file with the Collector a notice giving a description 
of the packages containing the spirits, and request a regauge of 
the same, for the purpose of tax payment of such spirits. If 
upon such regauging it shall appear that there has been a loss 
of distilled spirits from any cask or package, without the fault 
or negligence of the distiller thereof, taxes shall be collected 
only on the quantity of distilled spirits contained in such cask 
or package, at the time of the withdrawal thereof from the dis- 
tillery warehouse or other bonded Avarehouse: Provided, how- 
ever, That the alloAvance which shall be made for such loss 
of spirits as aforesaid shall not exceed one proof gallon for one 
month or part thereof; one and one-half gallons for two months; 
tAvo gallons for three months ; tAvo and one-half gallons for four 
months; three gallons for five and six months; throe and one- 
half gallons for seven and eight months; four gallons for nine 
and ten months; four and one-half gallons for eleven and 
tAvelve months; five gallons for thirteen, fourteen and fifteen 
months; five and one-half gallons for sixteen, seventeen and 
eighteen months; six gallons for nineteen, tAventy, and tAventy- 
one months; six and one-half gallons for twenty-tAvo, tAventy- 
three and tAventy-four months; seven gallons for tAveuty-five, 
tAventy-six and tAventy-seven months; scA'en and one-half gallons 
for tAventy-eight, tAventy-nine and thirty months; eight gallons 
for thirty-one, thirty-tAvo and thirty-three months; eight and 
one-half gallons for thirty-four, thirty-five and thirty-six 
months; nine gallons for thirty-seven, thirty-eight and thirty- 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



25 



jine months; nine and one-half gallons for forty, forty-one, 
id forty-two -months; ten gallons for forty-three, forty-four, 
id forty-five months; ten and one-half gallons for forty-six, 
forty-seven and forty-eight months ; eleven gallons for forty- 
nine, fifty, fifty-one and fifty-two months; eleven and one-half 
gallons for fifty-three, fiftj'-fonr, fifty-five and fifty-six months; 
twelve gallons for fifty-seven, fifty-eight, fifty-nine and sixty 
months; twelve and one-half gallons for sixty -one, sixty-two, 
sixty-three and sixty-four months; thirteen gallons for sixty- 
five, sixty-six, sixty-seven and sixty-eight months; thirteen and 
one-half gallons for sixty-nine, seventy, seventy-one and seventy- 
two months; fourteen gallons for seventy-three, seventy-four, 
seventy-five, seventy-six, seventy-seven and seventy-eight 
months; fourteen and one-half gallons for seventy-nine, eighty, 
eighty-one, eighty-two, eighty-three and eighty-four months; 
fifteen gallons for eighty-five, eighty-six, eighty-seven, eighty- 
eight, eighty -nine and ninety months ; fifteen and one-half gallons 
for ninety-one, ninety-two, ninety-three, ninety-four, ninety-five 
and ninety-six months : And promded further, That taxes shall be 
collected on the quantity contained in each cask or package as 
shown by the original gauge, Avhere the distiller does not re- 
quest a regauge before the expiration of eight years from the 
date of original entry or gauge; And provided also, That the 
foregoing allowance of loss sliall apply only to casks or packages 
of a capacity of forty or more wine gallons, and that the allow- 
ance for loss on casks or packages of less capacity than forty 
gallons shall not exceed (me-half the amount allowed on said 
forty-gallon cask or package ; but no allowance shall be made on 
casks or packages of less capacity than twenty gallons; And 
promded further, That the proof of such distilled spirits shall 
not in any case be computed at the time of withdrawal at less 
than one hundred per centum. 

Sec. 2. That section 50 of the Act of August 28, 1894, en- 
titled "An act to reduce taxation, to provide revenue for the 
support of the Government, and for other purposes," Section 1 
of the Act of ilarch 3, 1899, entitled "An act to amend the In- 
ternal Revenue Laws, relating to distilled spirits, and for other 
purposes," and the Act of January 13, 1903, entitled "An Act 
to amend the Internal Revenue laws, be and the same are 
hereby repealed from and after first day of July, 1911." 

FOR SALE. 

One French champagne corker for carbonating wines; also one six- 
stem Kiefer bottling machine; both in good condition; at A. REPSOLD & 
CO., 104 Pine Street, San Francisco. 



A. Alberti of the Italian Vineyard Co. Promoted 



MR. A. ALBERTI, for a number of years connected with 
the Italian Vineyard Co. in various capacities of respon- 
sibility, has been placed in charge of its important branch in 
Chicago. 

Mr. Alberti was bom in Venice, Italy, about 38 years ago. 
He had a college education and came to this country several 
years ago where he was for a while president and manager of 
a small corporation — the A. Alberti Importing Company of 
Boston, Mass. The desire to become connected with a larger 
firm and also of living in the Golden State, Avhere a brother 
of his had settled years before, brought him to Los Angeles 
and since he came to that city he has been connected with 
the Italian Vineyard Co. Working for this firm under the 
masterful guidance of its president, Chev. Secondo Guasti, and 
coached by the clever and experienced mind of its secretary, 
ilr. J. A. Barlotti, he had the opportunity of acquiring that 
knowledge of the wine business that prompted the company 
to put him in charge of its branch in Chicago. 



The Salesphone 



Somebody — this minute — is ordering 
goods or making arrangements to do this 
by 'phone. 

The phone that's easiest and pleasantest 
to use carries the bulk of these messages. 
It is a salesphone — the merchants' and 
dealers' best salesman. 

The Homephone is the ideal Salesphone 
because it is so easy and pleasant to use — 
and it costs so little. 

If you already have one telephone, get 
another. Remember that two 'phones 
will bring in more business than one. 




Bay Cities Home Telepltone Company 

SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND BERKELEY 



BREEN 8c Kennedy: 

DISTILLERS ft BLENDERS. 




THOMAS W. COSTELLO 

Pacific Coast Representative 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 160 PINE STREET 

Phones: Douglas 2903; Home, C 2337 

Owners of the celebrated Cedar Creek Sour-Mash Bourbon and Rye, distilled by this 
firm at Distillery No. 33, 7th District, Ky., situated at 1- rankfort, Ky, and controllers of 
an elegant line of straight goods, among which are the famous Belle uf Nelson Bourbin 
and old fashioned Day & Haff Bourbon. These goods we carry in stock at San Fran- 
cisco and sell them under the double stamp regauged and delivered, thus saving the 
retailer all outage, costs of reducing, deliv; ry, etc. 

Also owners of the celebrated straight blends of pure natural whiskies in the following 
brands: 



Henderson'* Smoothest Bourbon 
Maryland Reserve Pure Rye 



Comrade Bourbon and Rye 

Calumet Club Bourbon & Rye Special 



Cedar Creek Bourbon and Rye canied in three sizes, bottled in bond full measure. 

Belle of Nelson bottled straiglit at 90 proof, full quarts. 

A large stock continually carried in San Francisco for delivery at short notice, and 
trade especially solicited from independent retail liquor dealers, desiring to buy high grade 
straight Bourbons and Ryes, regauged, and genuine straight blends direct from the manu- 
facturer. 

Our aim is to give the greatest possible value in fine whiskies at most reasonable 
prices. 

A trial of any of our goods will assuredly make you one of our customers. 



Distilleries, Kentucky 



Blending House and Main Office, Chicago, 111. 



26 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



a- 



LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT 1 f> | 

.^.m^,m..m ■ ■■■■ . ^■■, ■■III I |>X|Q 



LOS ANGELES, Dec. 20 :— The effects of the holiday season 
arc being felt in the liquor trade as well as all other com- 
mercial lines, and local trade is especially good this season. 
All thf- wholesale and family stores report business active. The 
wine tvade find a larger movement of wines than has obtained 
for mr^ny months and large eastern orders have kept all the 
winery and cellarmen hustling to fill orders. Now that the 
price of wines is advancing buyers have become numerous and 
shipments have been large. Practically all the surplus brandy 
has bt!en sold and prices are hardening rapidly. The sweet wine 
figures show that the bulk of the sweet wines were made this 
year in October, the season being considerably earlier than last 
year and of this crop a very large percentage has already been 
sold. 

The local situation as regards the liquor traffic remains 
quiescent and the liquor men are beginning to hope that with 
the passing of Deputy District and City Attorneys Shaw and 
Eddie some of the petty harassments that were features of the 
attitude these near-prohibitionist officials during their term of 
office, will cease. Considerable apprehension is felt however by 
the trade as to the attitude of Lieut-Governor Wallace who it is 
reported has a county local option scheme which he intends 
forcing upon the people of the State if he can cajole or coerce 
the Legislature to pass it. The long hairs have found in their 
different attempts to foist prohibition on Los Angeles that the 
sentiment in the city proper is too strongly against such a pro- 
ceeding, and the liquor men fear that the reported scheme of 
Wallace is aimed directly at this city's independence and that 
by aid of the county at large vote to accomplish what has been 
impossible when submitted to the electors of the city alone. 



An attempt was made by the restaurant and cafe men to 
have the council extend the closing time one hour on New 
Year's Eve because of the throngs who will "see the old year 
out and the new year in," but the utmost concession the com- 
missioners and council would grant was that wines and liquors 
ordered for use at meals before 12 o'clock midnight and on the 
tables at that hour might be consumed, but all bars must close 
promptly at midnight. 

One of the despicable methods being used by the loughairs, 
is the sending of lads under age, but large of stature, to enter 
saloons and cafes and attempt to purchase liquor and if suc- 
cessful in imposing on the bartenders and securing a drink to 
prefer charges against the cafe owner before the Police Com- 
mission asking for revocation of licenses. Several such cases 
have occurred recently, but in nearly every case the charge has 
been dismissed. 



The squabble between the Pacific Electric Railway and the 
former proprietor of the Casa Verdugo who when ousted by the 
Railway, which owned the property, took his license and opened 
up a new "Casa Verdugo" across the street, has been practi- 
cally closed by the issuance of a liquor license to the Railway 
by the Board of Supervisors for the old stand and now the 
public can pay their money and take their choice as to which 
"Casa" they will favor with their patronage. 



A proposed amendment to the liquor ordinances provides that 
lessees of property be put on the same footing as property 
owners in the signing of remonstrances against issuance of li- 
censes in their block, and where these leases run for 5 jears or 
more their signatures take precedence over that of the owner 
of the property. Another proposed amendment forbids the sale 
of liquor in cafes and restaurants, under a hotel license, without 
meals. A third proposed amendment — as a sop to the German 
vote, composing the Liberal Alliance — provides that the Police 
Commission be given po^ver to issue liquor licenses for a single 
day, not more than six times a year to any club, society or 
association. 

An instance of the rank injustice possible under the liquor 
ordinances is the case of the Faust Cafe. Carl Leopold, its pro- 
prietor, committed suicide, and the executor representing the 
widow was about to close a sale for the saloon, etc., when the 
Commission suspended the license, resulting in a complete loss 
of several thousand dollars to the widow and family of the 
deceased. It is said Leopold paid |16,000 for the place when the 
license, stock, fixtures, etc., were transferred to him a few 
months ago and it is estimated by those competent to judge that 
the place now is not worth over |500, because of the loss of the 
license. 

Postmaster John Munz at Elizabeth Lake has again peti- 
tioned the Board of Supervisors for a winery license. The 
Board turned down a similar application about two years ago, 
on the ground that it was too close to an acqueduct camp. Now 
that the acqueduct is finished in that neighborhood and the 
camp gone, Munz hopes to get his license. 



Owing to the death some time since of E. Mariani, the man- 
ager of the New York branch of the Italian Vineyard Com- 
pany of this city, a number of changes are under way in the 
management of the eastern branches of the company. Mr. C. 
Barlotti, secretary of the Company, is at present in New York 
looking after that important branch house. This week Mr. A. 
Alberti, for many years connected with the Los Angeles office, 
leaves for Chicago where he will assume the management of that 
branch. Mr. E. C. Romano, present Chicago manager, will be 
promoted to the New York branch management and Mr. Bar- 
lotti will shortly thereafter return to his duties in this city. 



Joseph Melcer and wife, together with the wife and daughter 
of I. Summerfield, partner in the house of Joseph Melczer & Co., 
are in Berlin where during Christmas week they attended the 
golden \vedding of their parents. After the first of the year 
the party will proceed on their journey around the world, spend- 
ing the remainder of the winter in Italy. They are not expected 
home for two years. 

The attaches of the Internal Revenue office are busy these 
days with the liquor and other revenue licenses, winery and dis- 
tillery affairs, increase in custom duties, etc., because of ship- 
ping activity through Los Angeles harbor and corporation taxes. 
All hands from Collector Parker down are sure earning their 
salaries. 



Thieves jimmied an entrance to the Waldorf Annex at 521 
South Main street the last of November and relieved the cash 
register of some |80 in change. 



Henry Baer, of the Los Angeles Wine Co. now that the vint- 
age is over, is back in the store occasionally. The removal of the 
Company to the mucli larger, modem store now occupied by 
them has permitted a very attractive display of stock and busi- 
ness has shown a considerable and satisfactory increase. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



27 




Lieut. Governor Wallace Denies (ud 
Allegations as to His Attitude j|||J 



»«»-^fc-«»-" 



DURING the latter part of the late campaign, it was com- 
monly declared in the press and out that A. J. Wallace, the 
then candidate for Lieutenant Governor on the Republican 
ticket, was preparing and would father a local option bill on 
the County Unit basis. During a recent visit to Los Angeles, 
the editor discovered a great deal of anxiety among the wine and 
liquor trade caused by these rumors, which are still in circu- 
lation. The theory was that if such a measure was offered 
by the Lieutenant Governor of the state it would meet with 
far greater support than if introduced by a plain, ordinary 
representative. 

In order to ascertain if possible the attitude of Mr. Wallace 
on this question, the writer addressed the following letter to 
the gentleman on December 13. 

Los Angeles, Dec. 13, 1910. 
Honorable A. J. Wallace, Lieut. Governor-elect of California, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 
Dear Sir: — As the publisher of the Pacific Wine and Spirit 
Review, which for a third of a century has represented the wine 
and grape industries of California, in which there are directly en- 
gaged some sixty thousand people, with a total investment of about 
one hundred and twenty million dollars, I am here to ask you 
the following plain questions. 

I assure you these questions are asked in the utmost good 
faith and any reply you may make will be given verbatim, and 
fairly to you and to the wine men and grape men of this state. 

You are reported to be preparing a bill for local option on the 
County Unit Basis. Is this true? 

The wine growers and grape growers of all California, having 
in view the situation in Los Angeles county as applying to the local 
option law as to wineries in precincts, respectfully request you to 
state if it is your intentioui, or that of your representative in the 
Legislature, to present a bill on the County Unit plan, which will 
apply to wineries, as does the law now in effect in the county of 
Los Angeles. If this is not your intention, what is to be the atti- 
tude of the measure to these two great interests therein involved? 
It is common rumor throughout the state, that in appoint- 
ing committees of the senate, you will select a majority of members 
favorable to your local option measure, or other measures with 
similar purpose. Are these rumors and allegations ill-founded? 

These sixty thousand people with their one hundred and twenty 
million dollars invested in these two great industries are vitally 
anxious to know your attitude with respect to these momentous 
questions. They would appreciate an answer now. 

Respectfully submitted. Yoiu-s very truly, 

R. M. WOOD, 
Editor and Publisher Pacific Wine and Spirit Review. 



asked me to make such selections; I had not thought of it myself, 
and the first suggestion that such a plan might be adopted came in 
the letter to which this is a reply. 

A certain San Francisco daily and another in Los Angeles orig- 
inally endeavored to make the impression, and it would seem from 
your letter had succeeded, that I was to be the father of a local 
option bill, but I supposed experienced business men would know 
about what attention to pay to newspapers that were known to be 
antagonistic. Yours very truly, 

A. J. WALLACE. 
There is some satisfaction in Mr. Wallace's reply. First, 
he is not to father a local option bill, and second, his reply in 
the closing paragraph would indicate that as a business man 
he would not favor a local option bill. We sincerely trust this 
inference is the correct one, but there are reported to be several 
measures ready for presentation intended to regulate the liquor 
traffic in this state and it therefore behooves the trade and 
industry to prepare to make the fight of their lives at Sacra- 
mento this season in order to overcome the enemies that are 
known to be ready for war. 



On December 23d the following communication was received 
from the Lieutenant Governor-elect: 

Los Angeles, Dec. 22, 1910. 
Mr. R. M. Wood, Editor Pacific Wine & Spirit Review, 127 Mont- 
gomery Street, San Francisco., Cal. 
My Dear Sir: I have your favor of December 13th in which 
you asked me two "plain questions." 

The first: "You are reported to be preparing a bill for local 
option on the COUNTY UNIT BASIS. Is this true" No, it is 
not true, nor has one single person asked me to prepare any such 
bill or any clause of such a bill. 

Your second question has reference to the rumor that "in 
appointing committees of the senate, you will select a majority of 
members favorable to your local option measure." No one has 



National Liquor League Official Call 



Chicago, 111., Nov. 29, 1910. 

To Whom it May Concern : 
Notice is hereby given that the eighteenth annual confer- 
ence of the National Liquor League of the United States of 
America will be held in the club room of the National Hotel, 
Pennsylvania avenue and Sixth street, N. W., Washington, 
D. C, commencing Tuesday, January 17, 1911, at 2 p. m., and 
continuing its sessions from time to time until all business has 
been duly and legally transacted. 

Each State Association duly affiliated with the National 
League is entitled to three delegates and three alternates, to- 
gether with the members of the Executive Committee and the 
National officers from said State, as per Section 2, Article IV, 
of the Constitution. 

The Executive Committee from each State is requested to 
present a written report of the work of its association during 
the past year. The Executive Committee will meet at the Na- 
tional Hotel at 9 a. m., on Tuesday, January 17th, for the 
transaction of general business. 

The officers or representatives of the State Retail Liquor 
Dealers' organizations not already affiliated with the National 
Liquor League are cordially invited to attend this important 
convention and take part in its deliberations. 

It has been decided to make Washington the permanent con- 
vention city, and in view of this fact the Washington liquor 
dealers have been requested not to prepare any festivities, as it 
is the intention to make this and all future conventions purely 
business meetings. 

Headquarters of the National Liquor League during the con- 
vention will be located at the National Hotel ; special rates have 
been granted to delegates and their friends as follows : Ameri- 
can plan, 12.50 to |3; with bath, |3.50 to |4; European plan, 
|1 to 11.50; with bath, |2 to |2.50. The hotel has recently been 
modernized and is centrally located with reference to the many 
points of interest at the national capital. 

As Congress will be in session, those desiring to secure rooms 
in advance must apply as soon as possible to Hugh F. Harvey, 
Chairman of the Congressional Committee, 2006 Pennsylvania 
avenue, Washington, D. C. 

For further particulars regarding the convention address 
Robert J. Halle, National Secretary, 109 Randolph street. 



Chicago. 



TIMOTHY L. McDONOUGH, President. 
ROBERT J. HALLE, Secretary. 



28 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




^GiFie 




Outrage on the Wine and Liquor Traffic 



R. M. WOOD Editor 

Office: No. 127 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, California. 

Rooms 304-305 

Phones: Kearny 2597 Home C 2559 



California Champagne —No Home Production 
for Them 



PERHAPS the gentlemen composing the general commit- 
tee of the convention of the Western Fruit Jobbers Asso- 
ciation at Sacramento have not yet learned that really first 
class champagne is being manufactured in California and has 
been for years. We will mention two instances — Paul Masson 
and the new champagne department of the Italian-Swiss Col- 
ony. Surely they ought to be conversant with the merits of 
the Paul Masson wine, the eastern demand for which far ex- 
ceeds the supply. This has been on the market for years and 
holds its own with any imported brand. 

Nevertheless, according to the Sacramento Bee, the mem- 
bers of the general committee believe that the State product 
lacks "class" for the entertainment of the visiting fruit men. 
The Bee says: "While it was decided at the meeting of the 
general committee of the convention of the Western Fruit Job- 
bers' Association last night that California-made white and red 
wines should grace the banquet board at the Hotel Sacramento 
on the night of February 16th, a storm of protest greeted the 
motion of S. W. Russell to the effect that California vintages 
be used throughout — including champagne. 

"Although the meeting was largely attended, several mem- 
bers present being interested in the wine industry, the Rtissell 
resolution died without a second. 'High livers' was the de- 
scription given of the delegates who will attend the conven- 
tion next February, 15-18, and nothing but the imported arti- 
cle will suffice for this most important item of the banquet's 
menu." 

What is the matter? Are the general committee a congrega- 
tion of snobs, who in their false estimate of their state's pro- 
duction are afraid to let their visitors quench their thirst in 
California champagne? We can only suppose that cheap rail- 
road facilities must have filled the state with men unworthy 
to bear its name, and that they, under the domination of the 
eastern love for everything European, as against everything 
American, have come to a conclusion that California products 
are unworthy of those eastern palates which will attend the 
convention in question. Perhaps the Bee will be kind enough 
to tell us who the snobs forming the general committee are, 
so that we may be able to give them some deserved, if undesired, 
notoriety. 



Pendleton, Oregon, has a new liquor license law which takes 
effect January 1st. The fee for saloon is |1200 a year, with 
a f 2000 bond. Restaurants |150 ; Drug Stores flOO a year. No 
free lunches, no screens, no brewery licenses. Licensee must 
be a resident and must remember that his license will be for- 
feited for second violation of any provision. 



T 



HE liquor trade of this state is considerably exercised over 
the way the Anti-Saloon League has contrived to place its 
organization, as it were, under the guardianship of the State 
Board of Health. The league has injected itself into the spe- 
cial monthly bulletin of the board. Dr. Martin Regensburger, 
president of the board, claims not to know how it was done. 

Regensburger stated the Anti-Saloon League had no right 
to its position on the official calendar; that he would have 
prevented its publication had he been aware of the intention 
of the league, "as the liquor question has no place in the work." 

Under these circumstances it would appear to us that the 
League will gain nothing by its little adroit trick, that is of 
course if the statement of the president represents the feeling 
of the majority of the Board of Health. If it has no business 
there as he states, there should be no difficulty of straightening 
out the tangle caused by the league's usual cunning and under- 
hand method of doing business, and therefore no cause for un- 
easiness on the part of the trade. 

Three points are objected to in the health bulletin. The first 
is in the index, where the name of the California Anti-Saloon 
League appears under the title, "The newer organizations 
engaged in fortifying the individual and the home against die- 
ease." In the official list of "Public health organizations car- 
rying on important health work," the league is again listed. 
Finally, as a culminating cause for wrath a special article ap- 
pears on page 337, on "Anti-Saloon Territory in California," 
by Irving B. Bristol, superintendent of the Anti-Saloon League 
of California. 

It gives a lengthy recital of the number of towns, districts 
and counties that have "gone dry," which is estimated at 5000 
square miles. 

Careful inquiry in this matter leads us to believe that those 
most interested are of opinion that now it has been calletl to 
the attention of the proper authorities it will be at once righted. 



Famous Winery Case to Higher Court 



T"* HE Tisnerat case Avas recently decided adversely to the 
1 winery men by the Superior Court. Tisnerat is the agent 
of Frank Sandez, who for 16 years has conducted a winery at 
Chino. As such agent he sold a bottle of grape brandy to 
Ralph Homan, the complaining witness in the case, August 17. 
The matter was prearranged in order to test the validity of an 
ordinance passed by the city trustees of Chino to prevent tlie 
sale of liquor by wineries. The contention of the Aviuery man is 
that they have a right to sell any product that the law permits 
manufactured. 

The matter was brought to the attention of the Superior 
Court by the petition of Tisnerat for a writ of habeas corpus, 
Avhich was denied. The court held that the ordinance is A^alid, 
not in conflict with the general laws of the State and not against 
public policy. It is proposed to carry the case as far as the 
United States Supreme Court if necessary, to give the principle 
involved a complete test in the courts. 



The municipal officials of Oroville are in troubled water, 
because they are accused of granting a liquor license Avithout 
due publicity and protests are being made. There is a move- 
ment on foot against the amendments propo.sed by the business 
men's committee, and while the majority of trustees are under- 
stood to be opposed to any change in the present ordinance, the 
license committee took the matter under advisement. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



29 



i 



#i OBITUARY 

Alexander Bell, Veteran Newspaper Man, Is Dead 



ALEXANDER D. BELL, a veteran California newspaper- 
man, died December 21 at the Harrison Sanatorium in 
Alameda, following a brief illness. He was a native of Eng- 
land and 84 years of age. 

He came to the coast in 1862 from England, settling first in 
British Columbia, where he followed newspaper work. He 
moved to San Francisco in 1865. He was connected with the 
Chronicle, the BuUetin, and the Post, at various times. 

In 1879 Bell founded the San Francisco Merchant, afterward 
merged into the Wine and Spirit Review. In 1890 he founded 
the Butchers' Gazette, and advocated the establishing of stock 
yards in San Francisco similar to the eastern yards. 

He retired from active work twenty years ago. He leaves a 
widow, Mrs. Julia Bell, and three sons, all well known business 
men. Alexander G. Bell is secretary of the E. Martin Company 
of San Francisco, a second son, William L. Bell, is manager 
of the Fulton Engine Works of Los Angeles, and the third son, 
Arthur F. L. Bell, is field manager for the Associated Oil Com- 
pany. 



Frederick A. Kuhls 



FREDERICK A. KUHLS, president of the well knoAvn 
liquor firm of Kuhls, Schwarke & Company, incorporated, 
died on Fridaj^, Decembet 23d. For some twenty years Cap- 
tain Kuhls has been a conspicuous and successful member of 
the liquor trade and held in high estimation by all coming in 
business contact with him. 

He was of strong personality outside his own business, in 
many ways an active citizen and a veteran of the state militia. 
He was also a prominent member of Excelsior Masonic Lodge, 
No. 166, Verien Eintract, California and Germania Schuetzen 
Clubs and Deutcher Krieger Verein. The funeral, which was 
held on Christmas Day, was largely attended and marked by 
unusual affection and respect for the deceased. 

The company of which he was president desires it mentioned 
that business will be carried on along the same lines as here- 
tofore, and every effort made to treat customers the same as 
when deceased so successfully managed the business. Captain 
Kuhls was extremely popular, and his loss is keenly felt by 
his business partners and the members of the many fraternal 
orders to which he belonged. 



In Memoriam 



J AS. B. NEWMAN, of Napa, is constructing a handsome 
monument of Barre granite to be placed on the grave of 
the late George Husmann Sr. The inscription is worded : "To 
the memory of George Hussmann, pioneer promoter of Ameri- 
can viticulture. Born in AVeyenberg, Germany, Nov. 4, 1827 ; 
died in Napa, Nov. 5, 1902." The stone will be artistically 
carved with representations of grapes and vines. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



This Is the Way They Keep It Dry 



WASHINGTON, Nov. 27.— The United States has just 
passed through a banner year for drinks. Here is the 
nation's record for the twelve months ended on June 30th, as it 
shows in the figures of the Internal Revenue Bureau : 

Distilled spirits— 163,000,000 gallons; 30,000,000 gallons 
more than the year before. 

Fermented liquors — 59,485,111 barrels; an increase of 3,- 
000,000 barrels. 

MOONSHINING IN DRY STATES. 

Illicit distilling and manufacturing of moonshine whisky is 
on the increase, "especially," the bureau says, "where there are 
State-wide prohibition laws." 

The internal revenue receipts on beverages, cigars, cigarettes, 
playing cards, mixed flour and oleomargarine amounted to more 
than .$289,000,000, and Commissioner Cabell's organization col- 
lected it at a cost of about $5,000,000. 

It cost a penny and a little more than seven mills to collect 
each dollar. 

MANY STILLS IN SOUTH. 

Commissioner Cabell's report, speaking of illicit distilling, 
says Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina lead 
in offenses of that character. Within the year officers closed 
1911 plants, 200 more than last year. 



U.S. 



AGRICULTURAL CLASSIFICATION UNDER 
THE NATIONAL PURE FOOD LAW 

No. 12279 

WAS GIVEN TO 

HUNTER 

BALTIMORE 

RYE 




UNDER WHICH THE PROPRIETORS GUARANTEE IT 
TO BE AN ABSOLUTELY PURE RYE WHISKEY. RIPE, 
REFINED IN QUALITY AND MELLOW IN TONE 

HENRY CAMPE & CO., INC. 

Distributors for California and Nevada, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



m^^Z€.^^^m3333S3EMZ€m^Z€m 



30 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 








Oakland's New Charter, 



ON December 8th Oakland adopted its new charter. It had 
been apparent for some time before the election that pub- 
lic opinion heartily endorsed this excellent and liberal charter. 
By this action Oakland places itself in line with the most pro- 
gressive cities in the country, and its rapid growth and develop- 
ment is assured. 

By a majority of 7597 to 4519 the alternative proposition re- 
ferring to the granting of liquor licenses in saloon districts was 
defeated. As this alternative proposition was complicated and 
vague in its wording, and might possibly have been so construed 
as to injure saloon men, the trade is to be congratulated that it 
was defeated. As the matter now stands every one connected 
Avith the liquor traffic has reason to be satisfied. The charter 
does great credit to the men Avho drew it up, and the city which 
adopted it. 



Judge M. L. Clifford of the Superior Court of the State of 
Washington, during November made a notable decision in a 
saloon suit. Henry Newman, a colored man, sued to recover 
flOOO damages from George M. Shreeder, proprietor of the 
Olympic Club saloon, because he was refused a drink when 
he tendered the price. Judge Clifford decided in favor of de- 
fendant. 

The decision set forth that "the trend of the legislature in 
this state has been as far as possible, to disassociate saloons 
from places of public resort and amusement and confine them to 
the sale of liquors as a private business, whereas the construc- 
tion insisted upon by the plaintiff gives them a public character 
with public functions, where he has a right to demand that 
which he would not have as to any private business. 

"Upon a careful consideration of this case I am of the opin- 
ion that the saloon is not included within the intent and scope 
of the statute that prohibits the denial to any person on ac- 
count of color that full enjoyment of any of the accommoda- 
tions, advantages and facilities or privileges of any place of 
public resort, accommodation, assemblage or amusement." 



headquarters 



For Everybody 
Who Likes 



'Sood ^hinga 



Siskiyou' Stringent Law. 

THE Board of Supervisors of Siskiyou county have passed 
an ordinance putting that county on the dry list outside of 
the incorporated cities. It is one of the most stringent laws 
passed in any of the counties in the State, and forbids the giving 
away or distributing, or having in possession any intoxicating 
liquors. This ordinance affects the following places, where sa- 
loons are conducted : Coles, Hilt, Ager, Edgewood, Greenview, 
Callahan, Weed, McCloud, Happy Camp, Scott Bar, Sawyers 
Bar, Mt. Hebron and Horn brook. The ordinance goes into ef- 
fect the first of January, 1911, and provides for a fine of not 
less than |150 nor more than |500, or imprisonment for not 
less than thirty days nor more than six months. It is believtHi 
to be effective. 



A little Welsh Presbyterian Church, tucked in a secluded 
nook on Harrison street, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth 
streets, may be a stumbling block which will cause the magnifi- 
cent new Bankers' Hotel to fail to get a liquor license for its 
cafe. The new charter, recently adopted, contains a clause 
denying a license to any bar within 300 feet of a church or 
school building. No doubt this matter will be amicably ad- 
justed, and probably the place of worship-will be willing to seek 
a fresh location. 



Here is a pretty piece of sparring between the Huntington 
Beach News and the San Diego Herald. The former says: 
"San Diego intends to make its streets and parks attractive be- 
fore it holds its Panama exposition. But what about its 
saloons?" While the Herald comes back with: "Why bless 
you, don't you know that San Diego has the most attractive 
saloons in this State, Some of them are patronized by the 'la- 
dies' and some by the leading prohibitionists." 



Gilroy has a new liquor ordinance which differs from the 
former act, in that it prohibits the sale of liquor to women or 
minors or their visiting a saloon ; also musical instruments, 
boxes and back rooms; also boxes and private rooms in restau- 
rants. It gives the council greater power to revoke licenses for 
violations of the ordinance. 



The Marin county supervisors have refused licenses to six 
saloonkeepers in Northern Marin. Four places were closed 
at Novato — P. Nave, Keating & De Borba, A. Delina and Sut- 
ton Brothers. At Point Reyes Farley & Lafargue and Gradi & 
Co. were closed up. The saloons are all in Supervisor Pacheco's 
dictrict. Several are closed pending the hearing of complaints 
and protests and others for failure to apply for license. 



T5§ 



Yellowstone 



m 
^ 



l2ia330SSS33.28S<a£l8B8S<8ES8£S3Sa3SeS3Si 



« 



22 MONTGOMERY ST. 

San Francisco 

JIMMY TWOMEY ED. BORREMANS 

COLD LUNCH 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



31 



Established I860 



GIBB S SPECIAL" BOURBON 

1844 GEARY STREET 



Tel. West 7616 Home S 3223 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 



I 
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AMERICAN BRANDY 



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THE KIRBY DISTILLING CO., Inc. 

FOWLER, FRESNO CO., CAL. 

Makes a Specialty of PURE GRAPE BRANDY, and Making NO WINE 
hat NO WASH OR SOUR WINE TO PUT INTO BRANDY. 
Our StilU are Known as Numbers 263 or 357 First District, California. 
These Numbers ARE BURNED on the GOVERNMENT or STAMPED 
HEAD of EVERY PACKAGE, there being No Other Genuine "KIRBY 
BRANDY." 



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SOLD ONLY IN CARLOAD LOTS TO THE TRADE 
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 



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Specialty of Italian Dishes 



Service a La Carte 



Ratto's Italian Restaurant 

THE RATTO CO., Inc. 

605-607 Montgomery Street 

Near Clay Street 



Telephones: ^Z^y,X 



Home C 2980 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Table d'Hote Dinners from 5 to 8 P. M. 
Open Sundays 




Liquors and Cigars Phone Douglas 608 I 




247 Montgomery Street 

Sem Francisco, Cal. 
RUSS CIGAR AND LIQUOR CO.. Prop. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 



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The Chronicle Bar 




6 Kearny San Francisco, Cal. 

p. W. WOBBER, Proprietor 



32 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 





)fjpEi^ii:iS^ % 



Southern Politics. 

SAY the jest aboxit the julep in the camphor balls at last, 
For the miracle has happened and the olden days are past ; 
That which makes Milwaukee thirsty does not foam in Ten- 
nessee. 
And the lid on old Missouri is as tight locked as can be; 
For the eggnog now is nogless and the rye has gone awry, 
And the punch bowls hold carnations, and the South, "bj' Gawd, 
sir" 's dry. 

By the still side on the hillside in Kentucky all is still. 

For the only damp refreshment must be dipped up from the rill. 

N'th C'lina's stately ruler gives his soda glass a shove 

And discusses local option with South C'lina Gov', 

For the mint bed makes a pasture and the corkscrew hangeth 

high. 
And the cocktail glass is dusty and the South, "by Gawd, sir" 

'a dry. 

All the night-caps now have tassels and are worn upon the head. 
Not the night-caps that were taken when nobody went to bed; 
When the Colonel and the Major and the General and the Jedge 
Meet to have a little nip to give their appetites an edge, 
Now each can walk a chalk line when the stars are in the sky, 
For the fizz glass is fizzless, and the South, "by Gawd, sir" 
's dry. 

Though she still has pretty women and her horses still are fast, 
"Ole Kentucky's' crowning glory is a mem'ry of the past ; 
Now the partisans of "straight goods" of the "Rectified" speak 

well, 
For what's the use of scrapping when the businesses gone to 

hell; 
In those lovely tasseled cornfields all the crows are living high, 
Each distillery's a graveyard, for the South, "by Gawd, sir" 

's dry. — Anon. 



People Drinking Less. 

AS MY forty-second anniversary as a priest, and my 
twenty-eighth as pastor in the city of Milwaukee draws 
near, it grieves me because I cannot see a greater improvement 
in the morals of the people," said the Very Rev. Hiram F. Fair- 
banks, pastor of St. Patrick's Church, who was 42 years a priest 
on Saturday last. 

"There has been a marked improvement as far as drinking 
and swearing are concerned, but there is less honesty in busi- 
ness, more divorce, and the immorality of the people is leading 
to a greater amount of race suicide. 

"In the drink evil I can see a great improvement. People 
are drinking less, and there are fewer people who drink at 
all." — Beverage Trade Neus, February 11, 1910. 



She laid the still white form beside those which had gone 
before; no sob, no sigh forced its way from her heart, throb- 
bing as though it would burst. Suddenly a cry broke the still- 
ness of the place — one single heart-breaking shriek; then sil- 
ence; another cry; more silence; then all silent but for a gut- 
teral murmur, which seemed to well up from her very soul. 
She left the place She would lay another egg to-morrow. 



Now It's Sauerkraut! 

OCH, ACH, und auch, Oi, yoi ! 
Ain't dot der end off der limit? Vot? You don't haf 
heard it yet? Listen once — sauerkraut iss going up, up und 
yet up. Today es kostet so much again as yesterday. Nor it 
ain't satisfied yet, so ambitious vat it iss! 

Wie man sagt in der chokebooks, "Und de wurst yet iss to 
come." Ja wohl, for meats alretty are going up one day after 
an odder, ain't it? Und if meats iss up dey pull wienerwurst 
und frankfurter up mit 'em, ain't it? Gewiss. 

Right dere iss it where we get it in der neck, wie man sagt 
in slang Englisch. Dat efery meats should go up iss schlecht 
genug, but ven sussaches und kraut should chase along behind 
dat iss yet too much. 

Ven de meats iss crawl 'way up so dat champagne iss a 
bargain besides dem, all der peoples get togedder und schreien : 
"Stick side by each und we vill boycott de meats." We said 
nottings. For why? We had kraut und wieners, dat iss for 
why. Und now dey iss too got a climbing fit. Donnerwetter ! 

A bluff? Nein. If it iss a bluff den I'm a Irisher. Look 
once, here it stands in der paper: 

"Appleton, Wis. — Local buyers are paying |30 per ton for 
cabbage and even at this high figure farmers do not care to 
dispose of their stock. It is believed that the price will go even 
higher before spring." 

Bluff? Nocheinmal, nein! It is a word dat starts mit a 
"h" and finishes mit a "1" — dat's vat iss it! 



Drink and Women. 

ONE prisoner, at Auburn prison, said: "Drink and women 
have put most of us behind the bars." Why did he not tell 
the truth and say that abuse of drink and women has put us 
here? But if both drink and women have put most of the pris- 
oners behind the bars, then the women should be prohibited. 
This would be hard on the proliil)s, but is where their logic leads. 



Protect Your Health 




LET 



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SPRINGS 
MINERAL 
WATER 

BE YOUR DRINK 
AND BE 

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AGENTS 

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TelepHone MarRet 588 SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



33 



THE WALDORF 

136 South Broadway 

Opposite Mason Opera House 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

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648 MARKET STREET 



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34 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 








What the Saloon Should Be 



WE HAVE connected with the wine, spirit and beer trades 
a great many organizations — national, State, county 
and municipal — and these organizations are working along 
separate lines, and along expensive lines, and it is to be hoped 
that ultimately all of these organizations will come together 
and adopt one policy, and that this policy will contemplate, 
not alone the successful defense of the liquor business before 
the bar of public sentiment, but a real common sense solution 
of what is known as the liquor problem, by encouraging the 
passage of laws that will insure the retirement from our busi- 
ness of every man who does not respect public sentiment, and 
who does not obey the mandates of society as expressed in the 
statutes of States and in the ordinances of cities. 

The elevation of the retail liquor traffic to the plane it ought 
to occupy will benefit that trade marvelously, and it will benefit 
society beyond measure, for the saloon should not be looked 
upon as a menace to society, but should rather have recogni- 
tion as a factor of inestimable value to society, and most espe- 
cially in our great centres of population. 

The saloon, under fair and reasonable laws, would attract 
a class of men who would not merely conduct it in obedience to 
law, but who would develop it into a resort for both sexes ; into 
the club for the masses; into a place of warmth and light, of 
good-fellowship, music, sobriety and intellectual conversation. 

It is to be hoped that the organizations connected with our 
business will recognize the great possibilities that lie before 
them, not merely to turn the tide of prohibition, but along con- 
structive lines to build up a great national resort for the people 
corresponding with the beer gardens of Germany, and as well 
the cafes of France. 

In our complex civilization, amid the rush, the cares, the in- 
justices, the frightful strain of existence as we know it, there is 
need for resting places, for places where laughter, song, music, 
light, warmth and relaxation may take us in hand, and renew 
us, and kindle again the fires of ambition, and light again the 
lamp of hope, and such a place the saloon should be, and such 
a place it will be, if wisdom shapes its destiny and fair laws 
become its portion. 

The literature of Great Britain was largely made, her writers 
and poets were discussed, her standards to a great extent were 
fixed, and in no small measure her national policies were con- 
ceived, within the hospitable walls of her famous taverns; the 
cafes of Paris have practically directed the destinies of France ; 
and the beer garden is the bulwark, and as well the boon, of 
German civilization. 

May we not hope that the American saloon will in time and 
at no distant date become, through evolution and through wise 
direction, and because of fairness and toleration, of equal 
worth to the tavern of old England, the cafe of Paris and 
the beer garden of Germany, as an institution for the develop- 
ment of patriotism, of art, of learning and of those civic virtues 
which make a people great, and which give real value to human 
existence under adverse circumstances as regards opportunity 
and the distribution of wealth production? 

A revolution may be hatched within the gathering places of a 
nation's populace, but resorts that temper the hard winds of 
fate are more of a safeguard than a menace to government, 
because laughter, song and human intercourse are enemies to 
discontent, and they soften the passions that might otherwise 
let loose the dogs of civil strife. 



For a century almost the forces credited to reform have 
worked in vain to bring about a solution of the liquor problem ; 
untold millions have been expended, lives have been sacrificed, 
communities and families have been disrupted, energies gigantic 
and eloquence most powerful have been contributed, all in 
obedience to the protest against the evils of intemperance and 
against the abuses that, like hideous barnacles, have attached 
themselves to the retail liquor traffic, but the liquor problem 
remains a problem still, and a problem it must continue until 
the men who are close to the saloon and who understand it 
unite in lifting it up to its great possibilities as a dispenser of 
good cheer and a foe to national discontent. — T. M. Gilmore, j 
President National Modern License League. 



Colusa Remains "Wet" 



A COLUSA dispatch at the end of November says that after 
an exciting campaign lasting several weeks, the voters of 
Colusa decided at the recent election that the city shall remain 
"wet." There Avere 383 votes polled. Of these, 229 were for 
saloons and 154 against them. This is the first campaign 
waged here against saloons, and the strength of the antis was 
somewhat surprising. Saloon men sent autos for miles into the 
country to bring absent voters to the polls. A large part of 
Colusa county is "dry" as a result of recent elections, and 
Colusa is the main battle groimd between the two factions. 



Sacramento's two Leading 
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C. J. TITUS. 
Vice-Pres. and Mgr. 



The saloons in Graham County, and in the Gila Valley, Ari- 
zona, closed on December 3rd. The local press states that now 
it will be open to demonstration just what the effect of the 
saloon has been in that locality. 



I 

f : 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



35 



"The Cabin" 

PURE GOODS 






105 Montgomery St. 



Near Sutter St 



Market Cafe 

COUAILHARDOU & RONDEL 

Proprietor* 



540 Merchant Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



! 



X "Only the Best the Market Affords' 

•^ -Cui«ine and Service Excellent = 



! 



•Coffee Royal" 

A Mighty Bracer 




Hot Luncheon 
^ W A Mighty Bracer At 11 A. M. DaUy 



J 



JOHNSROUFE&CO. 



IMPORTERS OF WINES AND LIQUORS 



Fine Kentucky Whiskies 




41 Drumm St., near Market 

Sole Agent! for Slatcr't Premium Bourbon SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



John Caley, Pro{» 



Tel. Kearny 2306 



CALETS 



333 MONTGOMERY ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones 
Kearny 1610 
«. Home C 1610 




MONTGOMieRY 

ST '§!$ 






H. P. ANDE,RS£N, Proprietor 



THE CUTTER 



709 MarKet St. 

Call Annaac Bld^. 



Phone Dou^laa 2954 

SAN FRANCISCO 



86 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




The Local Warehouse Troubles 



Woolley Would Throttle Hawaii 

AT the beginning of the month another campaign for the 
establishment of prohibition in the Hawaiian Islands was 
commenced in Washington, by the introduction of a bill by Re- 
presentative Miller of Kansas for that purpose. The last Con- 
gress authorized an election in Hawaii to determine whether 
the territory itself favored abolition of the liquor traffic. This 
election, held in August last, resulted in a defeat of the pro- 
hibition plan by a heavy majority. 

John G. Woolley, representative of the Anti-Saloon League 
in Hawaii, and other officers of the league are considering the 
matter of asking now for a straight prohibition act to apply to 
the territory. 



A PORTLAND, Ore., dispatch states that the model ordinance 
now being drafted in that city is far more drastic than any 
other measure ever enacted in Portland regulating the liquor 
traffic. Evidently the Greater Oregon Home Rule Committee 
intends to keep its pledges, as the dispatch sets forth that the 
measure will probably be passed, according to present indica- 
tions. Under its terms the liquor license committee is to be the 
sole judge as to whether an applicant for a license is a proper 
person to hold it. The committee is also given power to con- 
duct investigations, subpoena witnesses and make them testify 
and to inspect places where liquor is sold. 

Retail liquor licenses are limited to their present number 
until such time as the population of the city exceeds 1000 inhabi- 
tants for each saloon. Licenses are to be issued semi-annually, 
and the fee must be paid in advance. The manufacturers' li- 
cense fee is to be |800 a year; wholesalers, |800; wholesalers 
and rectifiers, $1000 ; grocers selling liquor in original packages, 
1400 ; restaurants serving liquor, |800 ; druggists who sell liquor 
without prescriptions, .f400; retail liquor dealers, $800. Sa- 
loons are to remain closed from 12 o'clock Saturday night until 
5 o'clock Monday morning, instead of i>ermitting the sale of 
liquor between the hours of 12 and 1 o'clock Monday morning. 
On conviction of violation of the ordinance for the third time a 
saloon-keeper's license is to be self -revocable, or if he violates 
the Sunday-closing law only once his license is to be forfeited. 



TIHE determined effort which has been made to unravel the 
mystery of the local warehouse frauds, has led, it is said, 
to the securing of considerable evidence. According to a recent 
statement by Collector of the Port Fred G. Stratton, the parties 
ultimately responsible for the alleged evasion of the internal 
revenue law by the substitution of water for whisky and spirits 
removed from the eighty barrels in the Haslett warehouse, are 
in the toils. He further says : "There will be be no protection 
of higher-ups or lower-ups. We have the evidence that connects 
several of the employes and others with the abstraction of the 
spirits." 

There is a federal statute which compels all goods stored in 
bonded warehouses to be owned by the warehouse firms. This 
was enacted to fix the responsibility and there can be no doubt 
when the case comes up in court the entire matter will be thor- 
oughly investigated. 



We are glad to see that many saloonmen are confining them- 
selves to useful presents at the gay and festive seasons of 
Christmas and New Year. For example, Friedrich's Cafe at 
310 Montgomery street, distinguished itself by giving its cus- 
tomers leather cases combining a currency pocket with card 
and memorandum pockets. This useful and ornamental me- 
mento will serve to impress upon the memory of those to whom 
they are given the many merits of this popular cafe. 



Adolph Becker, of the Waldorf Cafe, this city, returned re- 
cently from an extended stay in Southern California. He spent 
quite a little time in Imperial Valley with his father and 
brother, had a great time and came back looking as brown as 
a Mojave Indian. 



One of the suggestive features of the retail liquor trade of San 
Francisco as reported by representative retailers is the rapid 
increase in the demand for Old Taylor whisky, both bottled in 
bond and distillery bottling. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



VE HAVE NOTHING TO OFFER THE TRADE, EXCEPT 

Fine Goods, Sqtiare Prices 
Honorable Dealing 



SOLE AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS 
OF THE CELEBRATED 



"Castlewood" Bourbon and Rye 



Cartan McCarthy & Co. 




Established 1873 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE 



Telephone Kearny 3688 



LIQUOR MERCHANTS 



S. E. CORNER BATTERY & COMMERCIAL STS, SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



37 




Sam T.Bernard, Puts. 
Joe Zanetta, secy. 



ik 



[unc+i.Grill&Wine Roo/\s. 

^ECOND BELOW/'UrKET 

(3)a.r\ l>, 



par\cisco 



.(.I 



#— FINE GOODS A SPECIALTY -<S>a 
MERC+IANTSLUNOH 11 A.M.to Z.30RM. 



Madera Hotel 

Marin County's 
Famous and Handy Resort 



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^ Corte Madera^. 



Take 
Northwestern Pacific Ferry 



^jSlfS)S)&S@&SS)@&S@S/S^^ 



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PORTER DRINKERS 

Should call for the celebrated 

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Ale and Stout 

Brewed from the Best Malt Hops 
on the Mau-ket and used by all the 
Leading Clubs, Hotels and Bars 



Order through any Grocer or 
Liquor Dealer, or direct from 



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INCORPORATED 

494 OTarrell St. 

TELEPHONE FRANKLIN 728 

San Francisco 



W. F. 



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Opp. Emporium 



CAFE 



834 Market Street 

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^ 



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f^ 




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OR IGINAL 

: : Coppa : : 
Restaurant 



^ 



J. COPPA, Proprietor 

Pine St. Bet. Montgomery 
and Kearny 



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SAN FRANCISCO 



BSi 




M 



California's Most Famous Road House 
Midway of Sausalito and San Rafael 

= Finest Wines and Liquors = 

SERVICE UNEXCELLED 



M ETergreen PriT»t« Arbor-BootKi ^ 
Shuffle Board ^ Salt Water Bathing 



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Escalle, Marin County ff\ 

California 



w 



THE OLD RELIABLE 



1871 GATO 1871 

CLEAR HAVANA CIGAR 



S. BACHMAN & CO. (Inc.) 

DISTRIBUTERS 



88 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 





- MARKET - 
CONDITIONS 



DRY WINES : — The volume of business the past month has 
been fairly saisfactory, all conditions considered. A very 
significant feature of the situation has developed during the 
month, which certainly means great things for the California 
Wine Industry. The fact that a prominent Italian wine firm 
in Italy had purchased a large quantity of sweet wines from 
Southern California has been widely circulated by the general 
press. There was naturally much astonishment that such a con- 
dition could exist, but there is a greater surprise to come, and 
that is in the fact that a great wine house of Burgundy has 
ordered a large trial lot of California wine, which has gone for- 
ward. In Italy the import duty on wines from the United 
States is nine cents per gallon, but in France the impost is 
thirty cents per gallon on wines from the United States. It is 
plain from the high import duty w-hich France insisted upon 
when the recent treaty was made that there was fear or jealousy 
of the present and future wines of California. 

The French wine men know that California embraces wine 
growing territory sufficient to produce as much wine and as 
good as can France. Were the French duty at this time as low 
as that of Italy, there would be a large demand for the best 
class of California vintages and the introduction of our wines 
in the French markets would lead to valuable results. 

The most important phase of this peculiar situation of send- 
ing "coals to New Castle" is that the fact that France, owing 
to the failure of her vintage, sends to far-away California for 
wines with which to replenish her stock, will necessarily be im- 
pressed upon the mind of the American drinker of imported 
wines. The man that drinks "by the label," and has any think- 
ing apparatus, knowing the foregoing facts, must certainly con- 
clude that California wines must have high merit when French- 
men import them for sale in France. 

We feel confident that this will lend a new impetus to the 
sale of California wines in glass, a branch of the industry which 
has been developing rapidly during the past two years. Every 
American wine house should make it a point to continue to 
impress upon their customers the importance of the foregoing 
announcement. 

Exports during the month by sea were 1099 cases and 733,- 
478 gallons, valued at |247,454. 

Imports by sea were 3275 cases, 17 barrels, 1 half barrel and 
2 kegs. 

An indication of the revival in the wine industry is the fact 
that the California Wine Association common stock advanced 
to 154 on the 15th inst. The shares of the Association have been 
steadily advancing. 



will swell the total for the year 1910, so that the output will 
equal, if not surpass, that of last year. 



Q WEET WINES :— Sweets are having their share of the gen- 
*^ eral revival and the outlook is quite encouraging. The 
order for a quarter of a million gallons to be shipped to Italy 
may be the beginning of great possibilites. The producton in 
the three districts during November aggregated 3,199,683 gal- 
lons. 

According to the official report of the First, Fourth and Sixth 
Internal Revenue District, the total sweet wines produced in 
California during the months of September, October and No- 
vember amount to 17,900,638.29 gallons, which is only 82,700 
gallons less than last year, which was the largest in the history 
of the industry. It is probable that the figures for December 



D RANDY: — The market continues firm and the future is 
■LJ quite assuring. Exports by sea Avere nominal and imports 
the same, the latter totaling only 771 cases, 5 barrels, 20 
octaves. 

Production during November was of large volume, aggregat- 
ing 462,675 gallons. 

There remained in bond in the State on November 30th, 
2,698,863.2 tax gallons. 



"W/ HISKY : — The Avhisky men have had a very satisfactory 
VV month and look forward to a continual improvement in 
business, particularly in San Francisco, where the trade is still 
unsatisfactory. It is a certainty that the settlement of the 
question of holding the Panama-Pacific Exposition, during this 
month, will loosen up business in all lines, and this will result 
in a return of normal conditions in the liquor trade. 

Exports by sea were nominal, the figures being 690 cases and 
1794 gallons, valued at f8245. 

Imports were quite heavy, particularly in case goods, the 
totals being 4446 cases, 235 barrels, 1 half barrel, 25 octaves, 
9 casks and 1 hogshead. 

Miscellaneous exports were 1052 cases, 16 barrels, 35 kegs- 
value 18596. 



I MPORTATIONS.— There is nothing of special interest in the 
*■ importing trade. Importations for the month were of fairly 
good volume, as will be seen by the following: 

IMPORTS BY SEA :— Gin,' 2549 cases, 60 barrels, 1 cask, 10 
kegs; Wine, 2275 cases, 17 barrels, 1 half barrel, 2 kegs; 
Whisky, 4846 cases, 238 barrels, 1 half barrel, 25 octaves, 9 
casks, 1 hogshead ; Beer, 605 cases, 857 barrels, 1052 half bar- 
rels, 580 quarter barrels, 7 casks, 965 hogsheads, 767 packages, 
3 sixth barrels; Mineral Water, 710 cases, 25 casks; Brandy, 
771 cases, 5 barrels, 20 octaves; Sake, 585 cases, 3167 casks; 
Ginger Ale, 25 cases, 240 barrels; Rlxm, 1 keg, 5 octaves and 
3 casks; Liquors, 351 cases, 5 barrels, 1 keg and 1 cask; 
Bitters, 122 cases; Champagne, 4023 cases; Lime Juice, 25 
cases; Ale, 200 cases, 60 barrels; Stout, 300 cases, 165 barrels; 
Fruit Juice, 125 cases, 1 barrel, 1 cask; Cordials, 178 cases; 
Kummel, 260 cases; Cider, 1 barrel; Punch, 10 cases; Cock- 
tails, 30 cases; Cognac, 25 cases; Vermouth, 5 casks. 



D EER : — The brewers are having their quiet season and mak- 
*-' ing preparations for the good business which is sure to 
develop with the opening of spring. 

Exports by sea were small, figures being 328 packages bottled 
and 141 packages bulk of the value of $4116. 

Imports foreign and domestic were 605 cases, 857 barrels, 
1052 half barrels, 580 quarter barrels, 7 casks, 965 hogsheads, 
767 packages, 3 sixth barrels. 



A Boise, Idaho, dispatch says that the Supreme Court of that 
State has recently ruled in the famous Lewiston liquor case that 
the sale of liquor in a dry county is illegal. The decision states 
that the Legislature, by enacting the special charter of the 
City of Lewiston, did not delegate to the city authority to license 
persons to sell intoxicating liquors within the city contrary to 
the general laws of the State,"' says the court. "Special char- 
ter cities cannot by ordinance make acts lawful that are made 
criminal by the general laws of the State. When the general 
law prohibits or makes a certain business criminal, the city 
cannot make such business lawful by licensing it." 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



39 



No Question Where Oregon Stands 



UNDER the heading "Again on to Rattle," the Portland. 
Oregon, Orcf/aniuii, says : 

The Executive Committee of the Oregon Dry party suspends 
its strenuous labors at the pumps of the water-logged craft 
of state-wide prohibition long enough to inform the observing 
public that the war is only just begun and that the old ship will 
he in trim to sail on to victory in 1912. We guess not, unless 
the Avidely-advertised and much-vaunted effort to regulate and 
reform the saloon shall fail utterly meanwhile. Rut undoubted- 
ly the drys will not cease trying until it is obvious even to them 
that there is nothing doing. They shake the dust of the wallop- 
ing defeat from their clothes, adjust their pained features to the 
semblance of the old-time smile-that-won't-come-off (very dry) 
and challenge the enemy again to come on. They are as hard to 
beat into submission as the wliolly submerged female suffragists. 

All this is very fine, if one is disposed to admire determina- 
tion unlinked with discretion ; but what is to be the result? The 
public is hardly in the humor to face another shivering agitation 
of the liquor question after a decisive registration of its will. 
The prospect would appear to be that, if the home rulers make 
good, even measurably, the drys will lose much of the support 
that came from an electorate not wholly convinced of the effi- 
cacy of pi'ohibition, but much disgusted with the conduct and 
operation of the saloon. 

The prohibitionists mustered in the recent election a gallant 
army of 42,649, while the opposition had 63,569, or a majority 
against the amendment of more than 20,000. It will doubtless 
be conceded all around that the wets were more scared than 
hurt during the campaign and that their vote was larger than 
anyone expected. Yet it may reasonably be said that the test 
was complete and the result decisive. There is no question 
where Oregon stands now on state-wide prohibition. What is 
there of hope or cheer or encouragement for the Avarlike prohi- 
hibitionists in so plain and emphatic a demonstration of the peo- 
ple's will and purpose? Do they fight merely for the love of 
battle? Don't they know when they are licked? Or don't they 
care? 



The long talked of and hotly fought over, local option elei'tion 
was held at Colusa on November 29th, and a great victory ob- 
tained for common sense and personal freedom. There were 
383 votes polled, of which 229 Avere for licensing saloons and 154 
for closing them. A large part of Colusa County Avent dry at 
the recent elections and the city of Colusa was the main battle- 
ground betAA^een the tAvo factions. As Colusa is an important 
business center and a groAving city, it AA'as an act of wisdom for 
its citizens to throAv out fanatical and impractical doctrines, 
and decide to run their city according to the dictates of expe- 
aence and common sense. 



I 



We hear from Santa Rosa that R. W. McPberson of San 
Francisco has filed suit against the Moulton Hill Vineyard 
company for the recovery of f7,000 due him on a promissory 
note, given on February 18, 1908, and secured by two parcels 
of land, one of 208 acres and the other of nine acres. The note 
Avas signed on behalf of the company by L. M. Iloefler, the 
laAvyer, partner in the firm of l>ishop, Iloefler, Harwood & Cook, 
who is president of the vineyard company, and Leo Mund, its 
secretary. 




Goulds 

Pyramid Pump 

and Electric 

Motor 



MOUNTED ON TRUCK FOR 
WINE CELLARS 

This Pump and Motor 
complete, as per cut, is eft- 
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Wine Cellar use, being self 
contained and mounted on 
a neat truck. Can be used 
in any part of cellar. The 
electric motor is easily at- 
tached to the electric wire 
by means of electric cord. 
During the past year we 
, „ . , ., 1 T-, . . », i have sold a large number 

Goulds Pyramid Pump and Electric Motor „{ these Pumps fitted up 

Mounted on Truck for W ine Cellar j„ this manner and they 

have given the very best of resulta. This outfit can be used 
for pumping water or any other liquids. Pump has a brass- 
lined cylinder and brass valves. We are prepared to furnish 
these outfits with Motor, Pump, Truck, Relief Valve and 
everything complete as illustrated in cut, ready for use, and 
with the following capacities: 1000, 1500, 2500, 4000 gallons 
per hour. WRITE FOR PRICES. 




Celebrated 
Challenge Double Acting Wine Pump 

Uaed in All Wine Cellars 

Of great compactness and power, for use in WINE 
CELL.^ItS for pumping from one tank into another. The 
evlindcrs of our iron pumps are brass lined, the piston rod, 
valves and valve seats are brass. Our all brass pumps are 
made entirely of brass, with the exception of the lever. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

Woodin-Little Pump House 

33-41 Fremont Street 

San Franciscp, Cal. 



TANKS THAT LAST 

Water, Wine, Oil Tanks 

Made of Selected Stock by Experienced Workmen 




GEORGE WINDELER, TANK BUILDER 

144-154 Berry St., San Francisco 

Phone KEABNY 242 and J 2SS2 



1 The Oscar Krenz Copper j 
I and Brass Works, Inc. | 



i 
i 
I 



GENERAL COPPERSMITHS | 

Manufacturers of Winery, Distillery and Brewery $ 

apparatus of all descriptions I 

Our Continuous Stills, Pasteurizers, Evaporators and Concen- J 

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Syrup, and surpass any on the market in simplicity of • 

construction and economy in operation. J 



212-214 FREMONT ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



40 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 







•^1"%* 






W'^J^SD NOTE/. 



Brown-Forman Co., of Louisville, Ky., wish to announce that 
the}' have completed their hottling room, recently destroyed 
hy fire, and that there are none better equipped for putting 
up goods than they are. 



One of the original wholesale houses of Los Angeles, for- 
merly Woolacott's and later Lagomarsino's changed hands 
recently and is now known as Goodman & Co. Mr. Goodman 
is one of the old-time successful and popular men in the busi- 
ness in California and should meet with unqualified success. 



We are pleased to acknowledge receipt of an exceptionally 
handsome calendar from the Sacramento Valley Vineyard. 
The brand of the company is "Vestal Vintage," and the picture 
of the calendar is a half-life-sized portrait of a beautiful young 
girl. The work is not only rich in coloring, but artistic, and the 
calendar is entitled to a place of honor in any office. 



I\rr. Frank Thomp.son, one of the best known and capable 
salesmen in the wine and liquor trade of California, recently 
resigned his position with Schmidt & Peters as salesman of 
Cliquot Champagne. It is understood that :Mr. Thompson Avill 
accept a very desirable appointment at an early date in the 
same line of business. 



The many friends of Mr. Geo. L. Barry, who for four years 
was with the great house of Lachman & Jacobi, as treasurer 
and secretary, will be pleased to know he has accepted a po- 
sition as general manager of the well known house of Bertin 
& Lepori on Washington sti-eet, this city. This institution 
was one of the two wholesale liquor houses that escaped in 
the great fire and as a result of their good fortune, they have 
developed a very extensive business. We congratulate both 
Bertin & Lepori and Mr. Geo. L. Barry. 



The Fredericksburg Brewery of San Jose, the pioneer estab- 
lishment in the manufacture of lager beer, has an annual ca- 
pacity of 75,000 barrels, the output being sold throughout 
California, Arizona and Nevada, where it has a ready market 
and where its popularity and demand are constantly increas- 
ing. Employment is given to fifty men, to whom the company 
pays nearly |100,000 annually, thus demonstrating the im- 
portance of the Freflericksburg Brewing Company in the 
prosperity of the state, as well aa the magnitude of its business. 



Mr. Leigh Irvine, one of the best known and most capable 
newspaper men of San Francisco, has set his stakes in Seattle. 
We are informed that Mr. Irvine, who was one of the most 
active workers in the organization of the Northwestern Devel- 
opment League, has been elected secretary thereof. Ur. Irvine 
is certainly the man for the place, as he is full of energy, 
has brains and is a tireless worker. R. S. Stacey, vice-president 
of the National Bank of Commerce is president of the League. 
This League is to carry on the development work of Seattle, 
Tacoma, Vancouver and fifty other Northwestern towns. 



THE Ad Men's Club, of St. Joseph, Mo., on December 15, 
passed an unanimous resolution endorsing San Francisco 
for the Panama-Pacific Exposition. Californians can thank 
an old Californian for this victory. The gentleman in question 
is a widely known San Franciscan now a resident of St. 
Joseph and a prominent member of the Ad. Men's Club of 
that city. W. H. McNeil was long in charge of the exhibit of 
the old Viticultural Commission in this city and later in charge 
of the exhibit of California wines and brandies at the World's 
Fair, Chicago. He was also secretary and juror of the wine 
jury of the Alaska- Yukon Exposition. 



The Sonoma Brewing Company recently elected a new board 
of directors. The officials for 1911 are as follows: John 
Steiner, H. H. Granice, A. Beretta, Norman J. Heggie, Fred 
Batto, F. Nichelini, A. Froment and Joseph Felder. The 
reports of the officers showed the affairs of the brewery to 
be in splendid condition. It is free from debt and has assets of 
172,970.44. 



Articles of incorporation of the Theodore Gier Vineyards 
and Wine Company were filed December 9th. The capitaliza- 
tion is named at |1,000,000 of Avhich $500 has been actually 
subscribed. The incorporators and directors are : Henry Gier, 
Gerhard N. Kersten, Max Vockel, Hugo Lorenz and George B. 
Merrill. Place of business, Oakland, California. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



.5. CiPRICO, P»l5lOt»T. 



PHONE MARKET 2836 



ALTAVISTA WINES 




The Wines California Makes Famous 

ALTA VISTA WINES CO. 



MAIN OFFICE 



111-114 TENTH Sr. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



I 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



41 



At Beaulieu Vineyard. 



Never Again. 



THE vintage in Napa County this year was of unusual ex- 
cellence. In the valley, which is acknowledged as the home 
of the choicest wines of California, it is saying a great deal when 
we pronounce the vintage of 1910 unexcelled by any of former 
years. 

Wednesday we had the pleasure of visiting Beaulieu Vine- 
yard, at Rutherford, and there found the owner, Mr. G. de 
Latour, busier than usual, if such a thing could be possible, as 
he always seems rushed with work. Mr. de Latour has but re- 
cently finished making a large quantity of Muscat, Angelica, 
Port and other sweet wines. These we sampled and we were 
greatly impressed by the excellency of their bouquet and flavor. 
They were remarkably fine and need but a little ageing to make 
them excellent, and above criticism. 

Mr. de Latour's dry wines are of splendid quality. The large 
cellar is filled to its utmost capacity with over 250,000 gallons 
of the different kinds of dry wines for which Beaulieu Vineyard 
is noted. Mr. de Latour found it necessary, before the close of 
the recent vintage, to have erected two additional storage tanks, 
each with a capacity of 20,000 gallons. Just at present the cel- 
lar master has a force of men at work preparing for shipment 
six carloads of assorted wines to the East. Before the wine is 
placed in packages, Mr. de Latour personally tastes and in- 
spects it, as he takes pride in seeing that none but the best leaves 
his cellars. 

The reputation of Beaulieu wines is such that Mr. de Latour 
justly feels great pride in seeing that every order is filled with 
just the kind and quality the customer orders. This rule pre- 
vails whether the orders are for different kinds of sweet wines 
or for dry wines. Mr. de Latour has men at work just at present 
until midnight every day in order to fill orders for sparkling 
wines, trade in these being exceptionally good for the holidays. 
He has been compelled to wire to Paris for an additional ma- 
chine so as to be able to promptly fill the orders being received 
daily. 



THE character of the wines of California has been well estab- 
lished during late years and growers are not so aggressive 
as formerly in proclaiming their good qualities. There was a 
time, however, when they waged constant warfare against the 
fraudulent label which was often used by dealers whose inter- 
ests demanded that they should support the reputation of the 
vintages of the State, but who could not resist the temptation 
held out by the hope of immediate profit. In those days a cus- 
tomer could go to certain dealers and have an assorted case 
containing all the choice French Chateau wines, and the dozen 
bottles would not cost him any more than if they were labeled 
pure California wine. Long before Dr. Wiley was heard of the 
practice ceased, and Californians learned to appreciate and 
drink their own vintages. If there is any good California claret 
still masquerading as Chateau Margeaux or La Fitte it is not 
in this State, but back East, where the few who do not drink 
wine, as a rule, don't know the difference between the real thing 
and cider. — San Francisco Chronicle. 



Seven months have passed since the prohibition ordinance 
passed by the City Council of Provo, Utah, went into effect and 
there has not yet been a conviction for illegal liquor selling. 
All that the prohibition ordinance has done has been to change 
the location of the saloons, and, in some instances, cause the 
traffic in beer and whisky to go into other hands than it was in 
when the sale of such beverages was licensed. 



GUS KILBORN 
J. ERNEST HAYDEN 



BALDWIN _ FERRY 
CAFE ^ CAFE 



844 MARKET STREET 



34 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



THE NEW BIG WINERY IN SACRAMENTO 
SOLICITS YOUR PATRONAGE 

CALL FOR 

"VESTAL VINTAGES" 



SACRAMENTO VALLEY WINERY 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



42 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 
From The Hoffheimer Bros. Co. Pure Food Wiley Soon to Take Bride. 



Cincinnati, December 1, 1910. 

DEAR SIR : — In view of tlie fact that there appears to be a 
prevailing idea that there will be an overproduction of 
whisky in Kentucky, we take occasion in announcing that we 
will pursue the same conservative course we have always done 
in the past, in the production of our White Mills aud Lynndale 
whiskies. 

While our tax payments for the past two years have been far 
in excess of what we have produced, we have decided to only 
make this year of White Mills and Lynndale whiskies the same 
amount that we have made in previous years. 

We wish everyone that handles our whiskies to feel that they 
have a valuable and increasing asset, and that their holdings 
will not be jeopardized by an overproduction on our part. 

Yours very truly, 

THE HOFFHEIMER BROS. CO. 



WASHINGTON, December 13.— Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, the 
Covernment's pure food expert, w^ho heads the bureau 
of chemistry of the Department of Agriculture, soon will cease 
to be a bachelor. He admitted today that he was engaged to 
Miss Anna G. Kelton of this city and that they would be mar- 
ried next spring. Miss Kelton is an emloyee in the Library of 
Congress. 



Dayton, Oregon, is as usual having a lively time over the 
liquor question. This time the fanatical highbinders who, 
though they are supposed to drink nothing but water, do more 
to disturb the peace of any locality they may happen to be in 
than any number of drunks, have been attacking the clubs. To 
no effect however as District Attorney Robert M. Sturdevant 
and City Attorney E. W. Clark gave an opinion that a club 
can dispen.se beer or other intoxicating liquors without inter- 
ference of the law. 



Increased Demand For Brewing Barley. 



D 



AYTON, Wash., Nov. 30.— The grain market is astir in 
Dayton as tlie result of orders received from Puget Sound 
for forty cars of brewing barley, to l)e shipped at once. As fast 
as the railroads can supply cars the order will be filled by 
Dayton agents, Avho are gathering up the cream of the 1910 
crop with Avhich to fill the order. It appears that Columbia 
County barley is preferred to that grown in any other part of 
the Northwest, this section having established a reputation 
years ago for the production of fine brewing stuff. Eastern 
brewing companies usually secure large lots hei*e. 



A Portland, Oregon, dispatch dated December 23, states that 
opposition is growing to the new "model" liquor license, and 
it is possible that law may never pass. It is believed that 
the regulation of saloons under the present laws is more re- 
strictive than it would be under the new liquor law as pre- 
pared by the sepecial committee. 



It is understood that jMunicipal Government of San 
Jose are preparing an ordinance which, if it becomes 
law, will place full responsibility for the granting of liquor 
licenses in the hands of the Mayor and Council, instead of, as 
at present, dividing it between that body and the Police and 
Fire Commission. 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



43 



^ ^ ♦ ♦ 

1^1 Value of Acidity in Wines | # | 

THE average Avine maker usually pays much attention to the 
quantity of sugar present in the must, but many of them are 
less careful about the amount of acidity. Fortunately, there are 
good instruments specially designed for the purpose of deter- 
mining the acidity in musts. The Salleron-Dujardin scale used 
in France and the Twitchell scale in this country are simple in 
construction, easy to handle, and fairly accurate. A knowledge 
of analytical chemistry, as well as of the microscope, is now 
becoming almost indispensable to successful wine making. 

Tlie expert wine maker will test his grapes from time to time 
before they are fully ripe and ready for pressing. He thus finds 
liow the acidity in the grape decreases until maturity is reached, 
when it remains staticmary for a time, then increasing again in 
proportion to the shrinking of the fruit. The future value of a 
wine depends largely upon the kind and amount of acid in it. 
It is the acidity that helps to give the wine certain of its quali- 
ties, as improving its color, contributing to its freshness, and 
assisting in the formation of ethers and also its pre.servation. 
The question of acidity is an important one for wine makers 
in California, especially those Avho make dry wines during a 
warm season. The great German chemist, Liebig, in his "Let- 
ters on Chemistry," Avhich was published as far back as 1851, 
])ointed out the necessity of proper acidity in the production of 
high-class wines, and he remarked that "wines made in hot 
climates from overripe grape are always deficient in acidity, 
and never of good or high qua.lity." 

A private analysis Avas made a few years ago of some thirty 
different musts collected in California, and the ratio of total 
acids to 100 parts of sugar was found to be only 3, as compared 
with an average ratio of 4.9 and 5 of the German and French 
musts. Prof. L. Ross, head of the Viticultural Station at He- 
rault, France, and one of the best authorities on wine making in 
warm climates, says: "All dry wines to be of good quality 
should contain 8.6 grammes of total acids per liter, calculated 
as tartaric acid. All Avines favorably judged by expert wine 
tasters ahvays possess a relatively high acidity, which is never 
below the figures given." 

There are good reasons for holding that some of the Cali- 
fornia Avine makers could improve the quality of their wines, 
either by pressing earlier than they usually do, or by adding 
tartaric acid. This latter practice is current in Algeria and the 
south of France, and there should be no objection, as it adds 
nothing which does not exist naturally in the grape. 

The total acids in Avines unite to give them a certain vigor or 
"constitution," so that different Avines like different races of 
people mature at an early age. As a rule, wines that become 
fully "ripe" at the end of a year or year and a half do not gener- 
ally maintain their best qtialities very long, but they soon "groAv 
oki," and then "break doAvn" and lose their finest characteristics. 
This is usually the fate of dry wines produced in Avarm coun- 
ti'ies. 

On the other hand, Avines produced in northern or cool cli- 
mates come to maturity more slowly and last longer than Avines 
groAvn in the southern or Avarm districts. Thus, some of the 
finest and most expensive Avines of Europe come from the Rhine 
region of Germany, where the grapes ripen late and just escape 
frost in the fall. These wines ahvays mature late, and sometimes 
are not ready to bottle until they are three years old, and in the 
bottle such wines will go on improving until they are ten, twelve, 
or even fifteen years old. 

The Avine makers in the United States are beginning to notice 
the effect of climate and acidity on their wines. The most suc- 
cessful wine-growing districts in the Eastern States are in tem- 



perate or cool zones, as, for example, in the Lake Keuka and 
Chatauqua districts of Western Ncav York, and in Northern 
Ohio along Lake Erie. The well-known dry white Avines produced 
in Lake Keuka region, Avhile often high in total acidity, as are 
the Rhine Avines, like them mature sloAvly and have good tasting 
qualities. Their acidity and other properties also correspond 
to the wines from the Champagne district of France, and the 
result is that most of the American champagne is produced in 
the Lake Keuka district, which has its natural advantages. 

The same conditions prevail and the same results have been 
found in California. The red and Avhite dry Avines made in the 
Avarm districts of that state usually lack the proper amount of 
total acidity ; they mature rapidly and hold their best properties 
only for a feAV years at the longest. The finest dry Avines in that 
state have been grown in those places Avhere the grapes ripen 
late and contain the proper proportion of the fruit acids. The 
large dealers, who buy their Avines from different wine makers 
in various sections of the state, found out this fact some years 
ago, and therefore they pay more for certain wines from certain 
places than they do for the same kind of wines from other places. 

The Avhole theory of blending Avines is based upon the differ- 
ences betAveen Avines, so that the mixing together of different 
kinds or qualities of Avines when intelligently done by the cellar 
master gives a good result, the blended wine being much better 
than any one of the Avines that Avent into the mixture. — By L. M. 
Martin, in American Wime Press. 



Suggestions for a True Temperance Society 

WE extract the folloAving from the closing words of a pamph- 
let on "The Drink Question," by Henry E. O. Heineman, 
editor of the American BreAvers' Review, being a reprint from 
the Journal of the Society of Brewing Technology : 

It may be worth while to consider the advisability and feas- 
ibility of the formation of a society somewhat after the pattern 
of the True Temperance Association recently started in Lon- 
don, England, with the following avowed aims : 

1. To create a healthy and reasonable public opinion on 
the subject of temperance in drinking. 

2. To encourage the development of the public house in the 
direction of making it in the best sense a place for the present- 
day social needs of the people, and to help in the removal of 
all legislative and administrative hindrances to such develop- 
ment. 

3. To promote fairness, justice and common sense in dealing 
Ai'ith the problem of intemperance. 

4. To iuA^estigate methods for the further reduction of 
drunkenness. 

5. To assist, where expedient, existing agencies for reform- 
ing drunkards. 

6. To promote inquiry into the physiological effects of the 
component parts of alcoholic beverages. 

7. To ascertain what is being done for the promotion of tem- 
perance in other countries. 

8. To assist all efforts for securing the wholesomeness of 
beverages. 

To which I would add, from the program of the National 
League for Liberty and Culture recently formed in Norway, 
the following under Section 4 : 

"And to oppose the misuse of alcoholic beverages, especially 
in the form of improper customs, chiefly the 'treating' habit." 

And perhaps another paragraph suggested by the Norwegian 
society might be added, something in this form: 

9. To make the so-called "drink question" part of the general 
Avork for wholesome living instead of dealing Avith it as a dis- 
tinct problem. 

But, whatever steps may be taken, I insist on the necessity 
of two things above all : Publicity and a constructive program. 
The people are waiting for both. 



44 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



-«»■• 



►«»•" 



-«»■■ 



-•»- 



-«»- 



►*»- 



-«»- 



The Contest In California 



At Pomona the local W. C. T. U. has presented a petition to 
the Board of Freeholders, asking that body to incorporate in the 
proposed charter a section forbidding the sale of liquors in that 
city for all time. The Freeholders' siib-committee has already 
decided upon inserting a no-saloon section in the charter, but 
has recommended that the matter of licensing hotels to serve 
bottle malt or vinous liquors with meals, be left to the City 
Council or to a special commission to be named under operation 
of the new charter. 



The City of Merced has passed an amendment to the liquor 
ordinance now in force. It says : "No permit issued under this 
ordinance shall be assignable or transferable; except, with the 
consent of the Board of Trustees of said City first had and ob- 
tained." 



A saloon regulation has been adopted in the city of Gilroy 
prohibiting the sale of liquor to women unless served in the 
public dining room was recently passed by the city council. In 
addition to this, the new law prohibits minors visiting saloons, 
musical instruments in saloons, boxes and back rooms in sa- 
loons and boxes and private rooms in restaurants. The coun- 
cil is in a better position to deal with violators of the laAv, and 
the number of saloons in the city is limited to seventeen. 



We hear from Stockton that saloons open every day in the 
week and until 12 o'clock at night will be the rule for all San 
Joaquin county precincts that voted wet, commencing Christ- 
mas day. The Supervisors ordered changes in the county or- 
dinance by which the Sunday saloon and the daily midnight 
regime will be restored. 



At the recent election in Colusa County each precinct voted 
on the saloon question with the following result: Sycamore 
went "wet" by one vote, the votes standing twenty-six to 
tAventj'-seven in favor of the saloon. Grimes went "dry" by a 
substantial majority. The vote stood even in Cortina, the vote 
being seven to seven. Princeton goes "wet" after a short reign 
imder the "dry" system; Maxwell stays "dry" and Fouts 
Springs voted "wet." College City went "dry" and Arbuckle 
"wet" by a big majority ; Stonyford will remain "dry" ; Sulphur 
Creek voted "wet;" Williams remains "wet" as before and 
there Avas no change in the other precincts. 



After December 1st there will be no more liquor licenses 
granted in the residence district of Vallejo. This is the decis- 
ion of the Board of Freeholders which is now busy framing the 
new charter. The Board has asked the City Trustees to grant 
no more licenses until the voters pass upon the charter on Jan- 
uary 9th of next year, and the members have promised to do so. 
The Freeholders took no action relative to the downtown section. 
All those saloons now in the residence section, which are three 
in number, will be allowed to continue business. 



The Santa Clara Brewing Company is making great improve- 
ments in its establishment in the city of Santa Clara. The 
brewing plant is being perfected and a bottling plant of the 
most improved machinery is about to be installed. Hereafter 
the Company will not only brew a high class beer, but bottle it. 



During the month the Town Trustees of Los Gatos have 
pa.ssed an amendment to the liquor ordinance in force. The 
amendment removes the restriction placed upon applicants for 
licenses who are not electors of the municipality. 



It is said to be probable that early in 1911 the city of Eureka, 
Humboldt county, will take a referendum vote on the new liquor 
ordinance Avhich is being framed by citizens in conjunction with 
the Good Government League. The proposed ordinance is 
drawn up after the pattern of the Los Angeles law, which it 
follows closely. It is said that the aim of the framers of the or- 
dinance is to draw up a document which will be moderate, and 
not open to the charge of going to such lengths either way as to 
antagonize by the extremity of its propositions. 



The San Diego Consolidated Brewing Company is installing 
the latest type of counter pressure fillers. Many men are en- 
gaged in setting up machinery in the bottling department, in 
fact in each department of the brewery new machinery is being 
installed. Some parts of the plant have recently been enlarged 
and when the entire work is finished the output of the brewery 
will be increased materiallv. 



At the recent election at Dixon the "wets" won by a vote of 
157 to 97, and as a result things will remain as thej' now are in 
that town for the next two years,. This vote was simply ad- 
visory, but it is believed that the Trustees will act in accordance 
with the wishes of the voters. 



The Martinez Board of Trustees have adopted an ordinance 
limiting the saloons for this city to twenty. There are now 
twenty-six resorts. Six of these will be eliminated by the con- 
fiscation of their licenses when they lapse. The ordinance fur- 
ther provides that no saloon transfers to non-American citizens 
will be allowed; no women will be permitted to enter any sa- 
loon, and all the resorts must be closed from 12 midnight to (! 
o'clock each morning. 



Coni'ad Winters, a Los Angeles pioneer, in retaliation of the 
action taken by the Police Commission in revoking his saloon 
license, changed the provisions of his will, by doing which the 
city loses |100,000. Winters says that after considerable de- 
liberation he decided to leave his estate to the city as a token of 
his interest in its future prosperity. He feels that a great in- 
justice was done him by the Police Commission when they re- 
voked his license, therefore he disinherited the city. From all 
we can gather the Los Angeles Police Commission have earned 
the distinction of disgusting both friends and foes, and now by 
its action it has to its credit the robbery of the city Avhich it 
represents of -f 100,000. 



Pacific Copper Works 

L. WAGNER & SONS, Props; 




573 Mission Street, San Francisco 



OUR SPECIALTY OF MANU= 
FACTURINQ ALL KINDS OF 
STILLS, FILTERS, PASTEUR- 
IZERS AND COPPER AND 
BRASS WORK FOR WINERIES, 
DISTILLERIES, BREWERIES, 
ETC. FURTHER INFORMA- 
TION GIVEN UPON APPLI- 
CATION. 



Gold and Silver Medal awarded at 
Mechanics' and Midwinter Exposition 
for continuous still. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



45 



ll Vineyard and Cellar 1®^^( 
M Notes };^;} 



m 



The Lodi Co-operative Winery has closed its season's run 
after crushing steadily for the past three months. The total 
amount of grapes crushed by this winery this season is 13,019 
tons, which is sufficient to make about 100,000 gallons of sweet 
A\'incs. Although the run was not as great as anticipated, most 
of the independent wineries throughout the State received the 
same disappointment on account of the shortage of the wine 
grape crop. 



M. F. Varozza, Avho owns the Summit Vineyard on Spring 
Mountain, has made 7000 gallons of Ko.sher wine for Rabbi 
Radinsky, of New York. A number of years ago Mr. Varozza's 
father made a large quantity of wine for this same Rabbi. This 
vintage Rabbi Radinsky came in search of Mr. Varozza and 
found that, while he had passed away, his son is in the wine 
business. Arrangements were made and 7000 gallons of the 
Kosher wine was made under the personal direction of the 
Rabbi. It was then sealed and will be racked and prepared for 
shipment by a personal representative of Rabbi Radinsky from 
San Francisco. The wine will be shipped to New York next 
spring. — 8t. Helena Star. 



t' 



The Lodi Co-operative Winery is now holding its wine for 
better prices. An exchange says : "Although the Lodi Co-oper- 
ative Winery have had numerous opportunities to dispose of 
their entire vintage for this season, together with the wine car- 
ried over from last year, at a price which would net the growers 
good returns, the directors are reluctant to sell, firmly believing 
that prices on all sweet wines will greatly advance in price. 
The million gallons of sweet wine made this year, together with 
300,000 gallons carried over from last season, makes 1,300,000 
gallons on hand at the present time. The splendid grade of 
wine made this season is better than wheat in warehouse for 
fact that it is believed the increase in value will far exceed 
legal interest and can be used, if necessary, in negotiating loans 
the same as grain in storage." 

IN referring to an article in the last issue of the 8tar in which 
we called attention to the superiority of the wines produced 
this year over those of former vintages, J. H. Wheeler says that 
it is a fact that the new wines are excellent, and far better, in 
his judgment, to any yet produced in Napa County. Mr. Wheeler 
accounts for this largely from the fact that the season of 1910 
was very favorable and because the production was not large. 
More particularly, however, he gives as the reason that all our 
vineyards are young and very healthy and the grapes are of the 
best known varieties. Mr. Wheeler says that the high percent- 



age of sugar has made a rich, sound wine, and he believes the 
vintage of 1910 will be in good demand as soon as the wines are 
ready for shipment. Speaking of the Avine market, Mr. Wheeler 
said that while there is more demand than for some time, the 
price is still very low, and he attributes the brisk movement of 
the past fortnight to the approach of the holiday season. In the 
shortage of the French vintage Mr. Wheeler sees an opening for 
California wines in the South American Republics, but he says 
that even if that market is sought after with vigor, it will take 
six months before any marked stimulating effect in the market 
will be felt. — St. Helena Star. 



THE Upland, California Netcs is rejoicing because the town 
it represents is about to be blest with another live industry. 
Only recently the Southern California Vineyard Company 
filed articles of incorporation, making its principal place of 
business at Upland. It is capitalized at $75,000, a large part of 
which has been actually subscribed. The directors named for 
the first five years are W. H. Crabtree, C. R. Crabtree and E. 
B. Dickerman. All are prominent vineyardists, who propose to 
put Upland squarely on the map for vinous products. As the 
business increases the field of activity will be enlarged. 



According to Prof. Husmann of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, the largest vineyard in the world is that 
of the Italian Vineyard Company at Cucamonga, in San Bernar- 
dino county, where, in the seemingly barren sand, there are 
3500 acres devoted to wine grapes. The Riverside Vineyard 
Company has 2200 acres in vineyard there also. Both of these 
growers have profited greatly by the government's work. "This 
work was taken up in California," says Prof. Husmann, "be- 
cause the conditions there were so exceptionally good. The 
work will benefit not only California, but all the rest of the 
country where grapes can be grown." 



Now is the busy time in the wineries, and therefore the proper 
one to call attention to the high quality of hose dealt in by the 
Goodyear Rubber Company. For so many years this first-class 
and most reliable company has been supplying the wants of the 
wine men, brewers and distillers of the Pacific Coast, that it 
Avould appear almost unnecessary to call special attention to 
such rubber goods as are used by them, but the merits of the 
Goodyear "Gold Seal" and "Obelisk" brands of hose can be 
specially recommended because of the general endorsement they 
have received by the public ever since they came into general use. 

It must also be remembered when treating of this company 
that they deal in every kind of rubber goods, the class of which 
is not surpassed in the market, so the readers of the Review 
can have their wants supplied in any line by calling upon the 
Goodyear Rubber Company, 587-589-591 Market street, San 
Francisco. 



a»'^^«*' 



>*» ^fc «»- 



>«» ^^ «»-^fc,«»-^fc.«»- 



>«» ^^ «»- 



>«o 



i Wine Machinery ^"'"^^^^^ ""^^"^^ * 



FITTED OUT 



Contintious Presses 



\ CrusKers, Stemmers 
I and Must Pumps 



Toulouse & Deloreux | 

405 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. / 



o«- 



46 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



I Hot Scotch vs. Hi^h Balls | 



♦♦ 



By Henry Wattbrson. 



ONCE more tlie Bulletin is indebted to the Courier- Journal 
for one of its admirable editorials here reproduced in full 
from its issue of August 10th : 

Mr. Watterson's ideals are always fine and his defense of 
them able and entertaining. 

Anti-Masom-y and Know-Nothingism and Prohibition are an 
interesting trio of American folly-fads. 

Two of them have met their fate and the third is rapidly 
nearing the toboggan of innocuous desuetude. 

Mr. Watterson writes under the heading "Hot Scotch vs. 
High Balls" : 

I. 

"That 'sweet little cherub that sits up aloft' singing 'Little 
Drops of Water,' in other words the Twice-a-Week Oazette, of 
the angelic post-village of Clinton and the good county of Hick- 
man, commends the Coiirier-Jonriial to the perusal of the fol- 
lowing, which it quotes from that valorous old Hot-Scotch, 
Thomas Carlyle: 

" 'My friend, if thou hadst all the artillery of Woolwich 
trundling at thy back in support of an unjust thing, and infinite 
bonfires visibly waiting ahead of thee, to blaze centuries long 
for thy victory on behalf of it, I would advise thee to call halt, 
to fling down thy baton, and say, "In God's name. No!" Poor 
devil, what will thy success amount to? If the thing is unjust, 
thou hast not succeeded; no, not though bonfires blazed from 
North to South, and bells rang, and editors wrote leading arti- 
cles, and the just thing lays trampled out of sight, to all mortal 
eyes an abolished and annihilated thing.' 

"In one place the New Testament speaks of the Disciples 
drinking wine and in- another place it is written,' 'Go thou and 
do likewise,' Avhich would be about as opposite in argument as 
the above citation from Carlyle and its application to the 
Courier-Journal by our critic of the pleasant post-village of 
Clinton and the good county of Hickman, who nevertheless 
proceeds as follows: 

" 'The saloon, Colonel, say what you will in its defense, is an 
"unjust thing," and though it may through men like you, be 
sustained years longer than of right it should exist, in the end, 
with you and the few remaining men of your talents who up- 
hold it and defend it, it will die and the earth will be better for 
being rid of it.' 

"Why, bless your dear little cherub heart, we have never 
spoken in defense of the saloon, or in favor of intoxicants, or 
anywise against temperance or morality. 

"The saloon as it is commonly conducted, is all you say it is. 
In isolated neighborhoods, where it can be put out of commission 
by the force of a public opinion strong enough to make its 
mandate effective, it has been put out of commission. Ninety- 
six out of 119 counties in Kentucky have thus voted it out. They 
seem able to keep it out. It is the determination of a chance 
majority to force its narrow prescription of teetotalism upon a 
protesting minority, the wisdom and virtue of which the Courier- 
Journal contests. Even as a police regulation, even as a moral 
deterrent, the attempt does more harm than good. But, as an 
outcropping of bigotry and a forerunner of corruption, it is in 
every way demurrable. 

II. 

"Religion and politics mix no more than oil and water. 
Religion relates to the soul of man. Politics relates to the body 



of man. Religion is spiritual. Where it is not, it becomes either 
despotism or hypocrisy. Politics is concrete, materialistic, 
aimed at the economic disposition of public affairs. 

"The moment that a politician gets hold of a sentimental or 
moral issue which seems to have a popular echo he thinks he has 
a gold mine and runs into all sorts of excesses. The moment 
the theologian finds himself in undisputed power he wants to 
compel everybody to think as he thinks and do as he does by 
act of conventicle. The separation of Church and State in the 
construction of our Republican autonomy had its origin in the 
dread of our fathers of religious bigotry, which had kept the 
world in a state of bloody chaos for two thousand years. 

"Prohibitionism is simply a craze. From time to time we 
have had many such ebullitions of impractical sentimentality, 
developing into irrational popular fury. There was the anti- 
Masonic outburst. A worthless tinker by the name of Morgan, 
who had printed a book pretending to reveal the secrets of 
Masonry, made a great ado in Western New York, and for 
several years and as far away from base as Kentucky and Ten- 
nessee the excitement ran to fever heat. It got into politics. 
There was organized an anti-lNIason party. This party proved 
strong enough to determine for a number of years the political 
complexion of the Empire State. Seward and Weed rose to 
power upon its wave of ignorance and malevolence. Nobody 
ever kneAv just what became of Morgan. One day he dis- 
appeared. A body was fished out of the lake near Niagara. 
It could not be identified as the missing tinker, but ' 'tis good 
enough ^Morgan till after the election,' attributed to Thurlow 
Weed, became a saying of the time and has remained an 
aphorism in political slang from that day to this. 

"Hardly had the fanaticism of Anti-Masonry died out than 
the fanaticism of Know-Nothingism came in. It was heralded 
and organized by an adventurer of the name of Judson, who 
went by the pen-name of Ned Buntline. The official title he 
gave it was the Native American party. To its opposition to 
foreigners it added opposition to Catholics. It was a secret 
society. To all inquiries from the outside its lodge members 
were required to answer, 'I Know Nothing.' Thus it became 
the Know-Nothing party. 

"The Know-Nothings flourished for a few years. They were 
years of hatred and malice, not unmixed with crime. In New 
York, Philadelphia and Baltimore there were brutal anti-foreign 
and anti-Catholic riots. In Louisville its legacy of evil was 
Bloody Monday. 

"The Know-Nothing organization was at war with all our con- 
ceptions and ideals and inspirations of justice and freedom. 
Henry A. Wise struck it a death blow in Virginia. Andrew 
Johnson struck it another in Tennessee. At last it passed out 
with a bang and a stench. 

"The last of the 'crazes' was Free Silver. Men went wild 
about it. Careers were made and wrecked by it. It swept over 
the South and West like a prairie fire. In four successive na- 
tional elections it defeated and discredited Democracy. And 
what was there in Free Silver for anybody to get excited 
about? 

"It was a fiscal question pure and simple; no more and no 
less. In had by right and reason as little to generate heat as 
might the suggestion that two and two make four. Its sole 
merit lay in a single aspect, that of creating fifty-cent dollars 
appealing .solely to the debtor class. To the Democratic party 
it proved a delusion and a snare. It ran its course of insane 
folly and went to the boneyard, like anti-Masonry and KnoAv^ 
Nothingism before it. 

"In combating the Prohibition craze we seek to save Democ- 
racy. It is quite as dissonant to Democracy as anti-Masonry 
and Know-Nothingism. We have been sufficiently punished for 
the craze of Free Silverism. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



47 



"Prohibition as a scheme to make men good by act of As- 
sembly is precisely of a piece with the others. It is a pure fan- 
tasy. It does not promote either temperance or virtue. It 
arouses human passion to frenzy by invading private rights. It 
does not reduce drunkards. It multiplies Pharisees and male- 
factors. It has no just recognition or belonging in the economy 
of government or the autonomy of true religion. It is in its es- 
sence ignorant, tyrannous and dishonest. They who advance it 
as a political argument are either bigots or cheats. 

"And so, cousin and comate of the admirable post-village of 
Clinton and the good county of Hickman, forgive our levity and 
proceed with your reading of Thomas Carlyle. Yet have a care 
how you monkey with that old rooster. A mighty queer party 
was the philosopher of Chelsea. They do still say along Chein 
Row that he had no patience with mawkish sentiment and 
Pharisaism. Truly, justice lives and will reign long after the 
effort of one man to coerce another man — whether by fagot or 
by statute — has proved abortive, and Prohibition, like anti- 
Masonry and Know-Nothingism, yea, and fifty-cent dollars, 
have given place to some other quack nostrum for the regenera- 
tion of man." — National Bulletin. 



abroad were to follow his example, the complaint that Califor- 
nia wine is not kept by eastern caterers would soon cease. 



Passing of a Historic Vineyard 



A NXIETY has been aroused among European epicures by 
■** the news that phylloxera has attacked the famous vineyard 
of Schloss Johannisberg and pessimists express their fears that, 
the most costly of German wines may be lost to mankind. 

It is true that so far much more than 2 per cent of the Johan- 
nisberg vines have suffered but it is pointed out that when 
phylloxera has once had hold of a vineyard the destructive ac- 
tivity of the pest is very frequently as complete as it is swift. If 
things should come to the worst the Austrian princely house of 
Metternich will suffer a considerable diminution in its revenues, 
for Schloss Johannisberg has brought into its coffers many thou- 
sands a year since an Emperor of Austria rewarded Avith this im- 
perial gift the services of that arch diplomatist Metternich at the 
Congress of Vienna. 

The Austrian Emperor obtained it cheaply by the simple 
process of depriving Kellermann of it. That French General 
possessed it seven years. Napoleon, who had dispossessed the 
Prince of Orange Nassau, presented it to Kellermann in 1808. 
The Prince of Orange Nassau had turned out the Abbot of 
Fulda. 

The original proprietors of this pearl among German vine- 
yards were the monks, Avho from before the date of the Norman 
Conquest down to the Reformation produced at Johannisberg 
a wine even centuries ago of name and fame. There was a mon- 
astery on the hill. What the Reformation left of it was wiped' 
out by the Swedes in the Thirty Years War, and a castle took its 
place. Hence we have the phrases Schloss Johannisberg or 
Chateau Johannisberg. In the vast cellars in the mountain 
are priceless stores of this most sought after of all Rhine wines. 



The Independent points out that "Peoria is one of the largest 
interior cities of Illinois, with a population of about 75,000. 
It enjoj'S Illinois river transportation during most years and 
like Stockton is a railroad center, but not dependent on rail- 
roads for commercial intercourse with the world. It has the 
largest distilleries in the country, that have yielded revenue 
to the government of |37,000,000 in one year. To get Califor- 
nia wine introduced in such a city would be an entering wedge 
that would go farther. Mr. Dickenson writes: "As a large 
portion of this (revenue) money comes from California, I be- 
lieve in reciprocity and would like to see some Peoria and other 
Illinois money drift your way. Mr. Dickenson takes the right 
course to cause a reciprocal flow and if other Californians 



Who Inspired This Speech? 



BEFORE the convention of the United States Brewmasters' 
Association yesterday Harry Rickel of this city delivered 
an address on "In Advance of True Temperance," in which he 
took the position that the time had come when the manufac- 
turers of beer must free themselves from the unjust accusation 
of belonging to the liquor interests. He argued that beer is 
not a liquor, and that prohibition only injures the cause of true 
temperance. 

His talk indicates that the brewers intend to start a cam- 
paign of education as to the merits of beer as a beverage, and 
that they will in the future refuse to be allied with the whisky 
interests of the country. In part Mr. Rickel said : 

"Beer is not liquor, and we are not the liquor interests. The 
classification has been mistakenly foisted upon us, and unfortu- 
nately countenanced by us to our detriment. As we do not be- 
long there, we must protest against being put in the same class 
with the liquor interests. Our concern is in a totally different 
matter, the welfare of an industry that produces a naturally 
fermented, nutritious beverage of only 314 per cent alcohol. 

"This word liquor, after examination, will be found to cover 
and define a product artificially distilled, generally called spir- 
ituous liquors, such as rum, gin, whisky, brandy, and other 
highly ardent spirits, containing in the neighborhood of 50 per 
cent alcohol. 

"On the other baud, the word liquor during the progress of 
recent agitation has been made to cover more or less harmless 
naturally fermented beverages, such as light wines, of about 10 
per cent, alcohol, also porter, ale, and particularly beer, con- 
taining among healthful constituents, only 3I/2 per cent alco- 
hol, this being 50 per cent less of alcohol than cider. In the ab- 
sence of true temperance, let us put the consumer in particular, 
and the public in general, in possession of such facts that they 
are able first to distinguish between the strong, artificially dis- 
tilled, ardent spirits containing 50 per cent of alcohol and the 
naturally fermented beverages, such as light wines of about 10 
per cent of alcohol. 

"After we have made clear this distinction we should go one 
step further and point out that the course of true temperance is 
seriously injured by prohibition and anti-saloon activities. 

"The object of direct attack was always the most prominent 
factor in the foreground, the saloon. We will admit that the 
brewer, through the exigencies of unregulated competition, was 
at fault and blameable for establishing too many saloons. But 
after they were established, it was the whisky that debauched 
them and made some of them the deplorable objects they proved 
to be in some instances. 

But when we ask the public to distinguish and to read us out 
of the liquor party, we, in turn, have our duty to perform, and 
that is, to read ourselves into the temperance class." — Detroit 
Free Press. 



Evidently Dayton, Oregon, "dry" or "wet," objects to being 
made either by female suffrage, and there is great dissatisfac- 
tion growing out of the action of the election board in allowing 
the women of Dayton to enter the voting booths and cast their 
ballots like the men. It is probable that the recent election may 
be declared void on this ground, as Supreme Court decisions and 
the State Constitution rule that the Legislature had no power 
to add to or take from the constitution, and therefore had no 
right to confer upon the women of Dayton the special privilege 
of voting at municipal elections. 



48 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



Trade-Marks Sought to Be Registered in the 
Patent Office 



Washington, D. C, Dec. 14, 1910. 
T^HE following trade-marks have been favorably acted on by 
•'• the Patent Office and will be registered at the expiration 
of thirty days unless objected to. Any person who believes he 
would be damaged by the registration of a mark is entitled by 
law to oppose it within the said time. All inquiries should be 
addressed to Edward S. Duvall, Jr., Loan & Trust Building, 
Washington, D. C, who will furnish particulars how to proceed. 

Serial No. 24,046 — Words: Bartholomay's Apollo arranged 
in a white oblong. Owner: Bartholomay Brewery Company, 
Rochester, N. Y. Used on beer and ale. Used ten years. 

Serial No. 44,207 — Representation of a statue in an oblong in 
which are arranged the words, "Loeflund's Malt Soup, Prof. 
Dr. A. Keller," and a facsimile-signature of Ed. Loeflund. 
Owner: Ed. Loeflund & Co., Grunbach, Germany. Used on 
malt extract containing potassium carbonate. 

Serial No. 47,631 — Word : Norwood. Owner : Smith, Kline 
& French Company, Philadelphia, Pa. Used on root-beer ex- 
tract. 

Serial No. 49,581 — Word: Euclid, under which is a repre- 
sentation of a building. Owner: The Weideman Company, 
Cleveland, Ohio. Used on ginger-ale, sarsaparilla, birch-beer. 

Serial No. 52,159 — Word : Chantecler with a representation 
of a rooster. Owner : United Wine & Trading Co., New York, 
N. Y. Used on sherry and port wine. 

Serial No. 45,374 — Initials: G E A arranged one over the 
other in a double circle. Owner : Gustav E. Ahrens, New York, 
N. Y. Used on blended rye whisky. 



Serial No. 50,994— Words : Coral Hill. Owner : J. Y. Cov- 
ington & Co., Monroe, La. Used on straight whisky. 

Serial No. 51,335 — Words: Four Hoops. Owner: Lucien 
Ardin, New York, N. Y. Used on straight rye whisky. 

Serial No. 52,020 — Words: Once Again. Owner: The Da- 
viess County Distilling Co., Owenboro, Ky. Used on straight 
whisky. 

Serial No. 52,470 — Word: Chantecler. Owner: United 
Wine & Trading Co., New York, N. Y. Used on sherry and port 
wine. 



Wants to Know "What Is Beer?' 



D ESOLUTIONS were recently passed at a meeting of the 
■*■ ^ American Society of Equity, asking Secretary Wilson of 
the Agricultural Department at Washington as head of the 
United States Board of Pure Food and Drug inspection, to give 
an official definition of what is "Beer?" They set forth that an 
actually harmful product made of cheap grits and deleterious 
ingredients is sold under the name and label of the pure barley, 
malt and hops." Further that "such practice not only reduces 
the market for our barley and permits the use of a cheaper 
and inferior quality of grain, but it is a fraud upon those who 
consume the product — in numerous instances by order of and 
under the direction of a physician as a tonic and to build up 
wasting vitality, which the adulterated product cannot do." 

For the above reasons it is desired to obtain the opinion of the 
Board as to what beer really is,, for the purpose of having 
the sale of imitation liquors prevented. 



San Francisco-The Exposition City 

Articles by Rufus Steele, Governor Gillett, Homer S. King, R. E. Connolly 
Beautifully Illustrated in Full Color 

showing the Cosmopolitan features and wonderful 
material progress of San Francisco 

The Best You Ever Saw! 

In this number begins £ llC 1^13611 ^^ ^' ^' ^^^ ^' ^* Williamson 

Authors of "The Lightning Conductor," "The Chaperon," "Lady Betty Across the Water," etc. 



A Western Serial Novel of romance and thrilling automobile adventures 
in Sunny California — The best story of the year 



Help San Francisco by sending 
this special December number of 

NOW ON SALE 



Sunset Magazine 



ALL NEWS STANDS 



to your Eastern 
friends 

15 CENTS 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 49 

. ji — >_ jf ->_ g r~>. « r~> «r — fc < r— > t r ~ > rii r~ > r ■ r — ■ rr — i r ^- ~ "'^ " "" * """ -'^ ^ 

The Review's Buyers' Directory 







CALIFORNIA WINES. 
Geo. West & Son, Incorporated ... .Stockton, Cal. 

California Wine Association 

180 Townsend St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 

A. P. Hotaling & Co 

429 Jackson St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Geo. Windeler; wine and water tanks 

144-154 Berry St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Theo. Gier Co 575 Eighth St., Oakland, Cal. 



Siebe Bros. & Plagermann 

430-34 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Oscar Krenz, Copper and Brass Works 

212-214 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Wetmore-Bowen 

42-44 Davis St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Rusconi, Fisher & Co 

326 Jackson St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Pacific Copper Works 

573 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Jas. Gibb 1844 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Italian Vineyard Co 

1234 Palmetto St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Sanders & Go's. Copper Works 

..Beale and Howard Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sherwood & Sherwood 

41-47 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Napa & Sonoma Wine Co 

110 10th St., San Francisco, Cal. 



DISTILLERS. 
E. H. Taylor, Jr. & Sons Frankfort, Ky. 



John Sroufe &. Co... 41 Drumm St., San Francisco 



Julius Kessler & Co. .'. .Hunter BIdg., Chicago, II 



Sierra Madre Vintage Co La Manda, Cal. 



Jesse Moore Hunt Co., 

Second and Howard Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Wm. Lanahan & Son Baltimore, Maryland 



Barton Vineyard Co., Ltd Fresno, Cal. 



A. Finke's Widow 

809 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Cartan, McCarthy &. Co 

. . Battery and Com'l Sts.. San Francisco, Cal. 



Hiram Walker & Sons Walkerville, Canada 



E. H. Lancel Co 

549 Washington St., San Francisco, Cal. 



William Wolff & Co 

52-58 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Western Grain & Sugar Products Co 

110 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Alta Vista Wines Co 

112-114 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co 

431-435 Clay St., San Francisco, Cal. 

L. Taussig & Co 

200 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Susquenac Distilling Co Cincinnati, Ohio 



Kirby Distilling Co Fowler, Cal. 



Paul Masson Champagne Co San Jose, Cal. 



George Delaporte 

820 Mission St., San Francisco Cal. 



Lachman & Jacobi 

706 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

French American Wine Co 

182141 Harrison St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Italian-Swiss Colony 

1235-67 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Breen & Kennedy; Thos. W. Costello, Mgr... 

160 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 
INTERNAL REVENUE BROKERS. 

F. E. Mayhew & Co 

510 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Youngberg & Son 

509 Washington St., San Francisco, Cal. 



IMPORTERS. 

Chas. Meniecke & Co 

314 Sacramento St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WINE PRESSES, CRUSHERS, ETC. 
A. Rossi & Co.. 322 Broadway, San Francisco, Cal. 



Sacramento Valley Winery Sacramento, Cal. W. A. Taylor & Co 29 Broadway, N. Y. 



Toulouse & Delorieux Co 

405 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



BREWERS AND BREWERS' AGENTS. 
Lang & Stroh Co.. 104 Clay St. San Francisco, Cal. 



Simon Levy & Co 

...346-48 Washington St., San Francisco, Cal. 



John Wieland Brewery 

204 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sherwood & Sherwood 

43 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 



BILLIARD AND POOL TABLES, BOX FIXTURES 

Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co 

767-771 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Buffalo Brewing Co Sacramento, Cal. 



Wm. Wolff & Co 

52-58 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WINE AND BREWERS' HOSE, ETC. 

Goodyear Rubber Co 

589 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Fred Krug Brewing Co Omaha, Nebraska 



L. Gandolfi & Co. 



American Mercantile Co 

514 Battery St., San Francisco-, Cal. 



.427-31 W. Broadway, New York 



SURETIES. 

U. S. Fidelity & Guaranty Co 

Nevada Bank BIdg., San Francisco, Cal. 



Henry Weinhard Brewery Portland, Oregon 

494 O'Farrell St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Alex. D. Shaw & Co 

214 Front St., San Francisco, Cal. 



BLENDING CORDIALS. 
Barrett Co 43 Front St., New York 



Albion Ale & Porter Brewery 

494 O'Farrell St., San Francisco, Cal. 



American Mercantile Co 

514 Battery St., San Franciscov Cal. 



BOTTLE WRAPPERS, ETC. 

Zetlerbach Paper Co 

..Battery and Jackson Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Frank Fehr Brewing Co.; Louisville, Ky 
Jas. De Fremery & Co., Agents, 
519 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



J. F. Plumel & Co 

63-65 Ellis St., San Francisco, Cal. 



FILTERS. 

Loew Manufacturing Co Cleveland, Ohio 



Chapman & Wilberforce 

....705-707 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Enterprise Brewing Co San Francisco, Cal. q g. Nicholas & Co. . . .41 Beaver St.. New York 



BITTERS. 

Lash Bitters Co 

1721 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Seattle Brewing & Malting Co.; Seattle, Wash. 
John Rapp & Son, Agents. 
..8th and Townsend Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sacramento Brewing Co.; Sacramento, Cal. . . . 
G. B. Robbins, Manager, 
..14th and Harrison Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



TANKS, COOPERS, COPPERSMITHS, ETC. 
Pacific Tank & Pipe Co.... Wine and water 
tanks, boxes, irrigation pipe and pipe for 
water systems. 

318 Market St., San Francisco, Cal.; Equi- 
table Bank BIdg., Los Angeles, Cal.; Ken- 
ton Station; Portland, Oregon. 



L. Gandolfi & Co. 



.427-31 West Broadway, New York 



MINERAL WATER. 

Aug. Lang & Co 

..18th and Alabama Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 
(SEE NEXT PAGE) 



60 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



Review Buyers' Directory, Continued 

CIGARS. 

Boltz, Clymer & Co 

312 Clay St., San Francisco, Cal. 

8. Bachnnan & Co 

Commercial .i. Front Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



BOTTLES AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLIES. 

Lindeman, Sloman & Co 

381 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



"The Cabin" 

105 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



RETAILERS AND CAFES. 

The Yellowstone 

22 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Thos. J. Walsh & Co 

346 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Market Cafe. .540 Merchant St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Caley's..333 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



James Raggi 

624 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



HOTELS. 



The RUSS..247 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



The Cutter 709 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Capitol Hotel; Golden Eagle Hotel. 



.Sacramento, Cal. Jas. P. Dunne.. 1 Stockton St., San Francisco, Cal. 



The Hoffman Cafe Co 

27 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Hotel Victoria. .7th & Hope Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. Chronicle Bar. . . .6 Kearny St., San Francisco, Cal. 



W. F. Roeder's Cafe 

834 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Hotel Madera Corte Madera, Cal. 



Hotel Montrio Monte Rio, Cal. 



The Waldorf.. 648 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. Original Coppa's Restaurant 

, „ .„ -,-Z~n^ o - . ^ . ^^3 P'"* St., San Francisco, Cal. 
"Jelhson's" 10 Third St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WINE PUMPS, MOTORS, ETC. 

Woodin & Little 

70-72 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



"Escalles" Escalle, Marin Co., Cal. 

Matt Grimm's 

130 Liedesdorf St., San Francisco, Cal. Ratto's Italian Restaurant 

Bank Exchange . .605-607 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Mont'y and Wash'ton Sts., San Francisco, Cal. Rusconi Bar. .505 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



♦» 



♦f 



1^1 Internal Revenue |^| 

(T. I). 1663.) 
Fortified vnnes for export. 
Provisions of Regulations 29, governing the exportation of dis- 
tilled .spirits, extended to withdrawal of brandy for use in 
fortifying wines for export, and to the exportation of such 
fortified wines. 

Treasury Department, 
Office of Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 

Washington, D. C, November 15, 1910. 
August E. Muenter, 

Collector First District, San Francisco, Cal. 
SiK : The following instructions, respecting the fortification 
of wine for export, under the provi.sions of section 46, act of 
October 1, 1890, are furnished for your information and guid- 
,ance: 

(1) Brandy intended for the fortification of such Avines must 
be withdrawn from a special bonded warehouse; and the pro- 
visions of Regulations No. 29, relating to the withdrawal of 
spirits from bonded warehouses for export, so far as applicable, 
are hereby extended to brandy withdrawn for the fortification of 
wine for export. 

A modified form of application (206) and tran.sportation 
bond (548) will be used in such cases, and each package will 
have marked thereon the words, "For Fortifying Wines for 
Export." A like description will be entered in the export 
stamps to be affixed to the packages. 

(2) The wines to be exported must be fortified alongside of 
the vessel (or car, if exportation is by rail) under the imme- 
diate supervision of an internal-revenue officer; and the brandy 
used for this purpose must in no instance exceed that necessary 
to fortify the wines according to the demands of the foreign 
market. 

(3) The officer assigned to this work will make a report of 
the fortification on a modified form 275, and he will mark upon 
each cask containing such fortified wines a serial number, the 
name of the exporter, the district, etc., which brand marks may 
be abridged as follows : 

No. 125, 

Cal. Wine Ass'n. 

1 Cal. 

W. G. 49.80—15% ale. 

Ex. Nov. 20-10. 

(4) The wines when fortified and properly marked for iden- 
tification must be duly entered for export, inspected, laden, and 



cleared; and so much of Regulations No. 29 as relate to the 
exportation of distilled spirits are hereby extended to the expor- 
tation of such fortified wines. 

The export bond in such case, however, will be filed with the 
collector of internal revenue, and will be executed in duplicate 
on Form 547, one copy of which, with the otlier papers in tlie 
case, will be forwarded by the collector to this office. 

Where such wines are to be exported by rail, the same must 
in every such case be shipped over bonded routes and in sealed 
cars. 

(5) Brandy withdrawn for the fortification of wines will be 
so reported by the storekeeper on Forms A86^/{> and A87, and 
by the collector on lines 17 and 33 of Form A94. 

Proof of landing in a foreign country, prescribed in article 123 
of Regulations No. 29, will be required as to such fortified wines. 
Such proof when received will be forwarded by the collector 
with his bonded account A94, and credit will be entered on 
line 21 of that account for the brandy withdrawn and so ac- 
counted for. 

(6) Where any portion of the brandy witlulraAvn is not used 
in fortifying such wines, or where any portion of the wine for- 
tified is not duly accountetl for as exported, the tax on the 
brandy in such cases will be at once collected, and such tax, if 
not paid by stamp, Avill be reported by the collector on Form 58 
of his assessment list. 

Respectfully, 

Royal E. Cabell, Commissioner. 
Approved : 

Franklin MacVeagh, Secretary of the Treasury. 



Consumption of Vodka in Russia. 



THE FOLLOWING statistics covering the manufacture and 
sale of vodka in Russia in 1908 were furnished by Consul 
James W. Ragsdale from St. Petersburg : 

There were in Russia in 1908, 2,676 vodka breweries, 1 fiscal 
spirit distillery and 43 sections of the same, 511 private dis- 
tilleries, 26 reserve stores and 27,402 shops for the sale of 
vodka. The total amount of vodka sold during the year 
amounted to 232,813,382 gallons, a consumption of 1.66 gallons 
per capita. The total sales were 2,356,232 gallons less than in 
1907. The revenue and expenditures were as follows : Revenue, 
$365,015,424; expenditures, 11102,726,605; net revenue, |262,- 
288,819. The revenue and expenditures of denaturalized vodka 
were as follows : Revenue, $1,275,139 ; expenditures, |] ,106,228 ; 
net revenue, $168,911. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 51 



J. F. Plumel Co. 



63-65 BLLIS STREET 

FHONES : \ c. 6894 



Proprietor of the (,^eleb>ra.tecl 

KOLAKINA 



IMPORTER OF 

Bordeaux Wines, Fine Brandies 



and Olive Oil 



... Sole Pacific Coast Agents for ... 

VAN DEN BERGH & CO. 
... Q IIS S ... 



K3K»3»3K3KS!3tt3H3fiW3K!K3«^3«3KSt3a<S«»»3H30«»»»»»S(»8W»3W^ 



Hotel Montrio 



Russian River 




Station 



SPORXSME N>S 
IDEAL RKSORT 



Black Bass Fishingf 
Deer Hunting 




Fine Cuisine 
Bathing, Boating 



CIIAS. r. CARR, Pro|>rletor 



i Ahrens-Bullwinkel Co. 



WHOLESALE 



Liquor Merchants 

First and Harrison Streets 
San Francisco. Cal. 



SOLE PROPRIETORS 

Royal Stag Bourbon and Rye. 

Old Pal Kentucky Bourbon. 

Celebrated Chief Tonic. 

Hiawatha Bitters. Chief Bitters. 

Diamond Star Rye and Bourbon. 

Tiliawood Bourbon. 



IMPORTERS 

Slater V. O. Scotch Whiskey, 

Scotland, Thorpe & Co. 
Mermaid Old Tom Gin, London. 

P. Van der Kamp, 
Fine Old Wood Cock Gin, Hol- 
land. 
Mourallle Freres Cognac, 
France. 



®®®®®®®®®®®®®gX5®(gXSg^^ 



" Ik 

I =Cacbmaii & lacobl^ 



ill 



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«S??i|S|;,f 



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ih 

fr. 
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Jr. 



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ir. 



California Wines and Brandies 



706 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 



LACHMAN & JACOBI 



New York Office, 65 and 67 North Moore St. 






>''*«««»«W3<*S8««<3«»r^»»(SJ^S».^^*3«;,^?WS1^S:5KX=«S;,^,^S<Si;K^ 



52 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



T 



, , g>»c IPEAE, BEVERAGE 



a^XA 



WHOLESOME ^s SUNSHINE 



S»a IDEAI^ BEVERAGE 









Made in a brewery where Purity is paramount, and where men know how. The plumpest, 
sweetest and cleanest of grain is used. The Hops are selected especially for us from the 
very best. The water, after being purified and filtered by nature, comes up in its crystal 
purity through 1500 feet of Rock and Gravel. 

Frank Fehr's Extra Lager 

No Beer, no matter the name, make or reputation, is so highly approved by the connoisseur. 
For home use our Bottled Beers are especially adapted ; nourishing, pure and delicious. Aged 
and cured by time as time only can accomplish. Its rapid growth in popular favor at homo 
and abroad proves its superiority . 



4 






Frank Fehr Brewing Co. 

Louisville, Kentuclcy 



James De Fremery & Co. 

Pacific Coast Distributors 

519 Mission Street, San Francisco 



T 

T 

T 

4» 



T 
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4 



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T 
\ 

I 

T 

T 



NEW BREW 



^5* 

'^ 

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YOSEMITE 
LAGER 




BREWED BY THE 



ENTERPRISE BREWING CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



1 
t 



4 



i 



T 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



53 






A SUIT FOR LIBEL 

HAS been instituted by us against JULIUS 
LEVIN COMPANY, of San Francisco, in 
the United States Circuit Court. Said JULIUS 
LEVIN COMPANY advertised a certain brand of 
Canadian Whisky in these words: 

** The only Canadian Whisky that was not seized by the 
" United States Government for containing injuri- 
"ous ingredients at the time the Pure Food Law 
" took effect." 

We beheve that no Canadian Whisky was seized on such grounds. 
Certainly CANADIAN CLUB WHISKY never was. 
The reason given for seizing CANADIAN CLUB was that it did 
not contain as much FUSEL OIL as so-called STRAIGHT 
WHISKIES contain. 

THIS IS STRICTLY TRUE, WE ARE GLAD TO SAY, 
FOR WE HAVE ALWAYS INTENDED THAT OUR 
WHISKY SHOULD CONTAIN THE LEAST POSSI- 
BLE AMOUNT OF FUSEL OIL CONSISTENT WITH 
THE DESIRED FLAVOR. 

President Taft decided, after a full review of the evidence and the 
history of Whisky, that it is not necessary that the noxious Fusel 
Oils should be left in Whisky. 

Any persons who, to our knowledge, make false statements about 
our brand, either directly or indirectly, will do so at their peril. 

HIRAM WALKER S SONS, LIMITED 

WALKERVILLE, ONTARIO, CANADA 

London New York Chicago Mexico City Victoria, B. C» 



Si*^^;i<A^5;iKiW^^c5;jW;^5^^ 




54 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



^ 
® 

m 
@ 

m 
® 
® 



CELLARS AND VINEYARDS "t Icaria^Healdsburg, Cloverdale, and Madrone, Sonoma County 
^-__.^__^_^^_^^__^_^^____ and at Rutherford and St. Helena, Napa County, California 

French-American Wine Co. 

SUCCESSORS TO CHAIX A BERNARD 
PRODUCERS, GROWERS, DISTILLERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES 

Pure and Unadulterated California Wines Our Specialty 

W. D. SEYMOUR, 516 MA.GA.ZINE ST., (Sb 515 CONSTANCE ST., NEW ORI^EANS AGENT 
NE"W YORK DEPOT, 32 VI^ASHINGTON STREET 



© 
© 

© 



© 1821 to 1841 Harrison Street 



San Francisco, Cal. © 



© 





Winners 





JULIUS KESSLER & CO. Distillers 



NEW YORK 

NEW YORK WORLD BLDG. 



CHICAGO 

HUNTER BUILDING 



LOUISVILLE 

30th AND GARLAND AVE. 






t 



^--♦-'f 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



55 



The E. G. Lyons & Raas Co. 






FOLSOM & ESSEX STREETS 



Telephone Kearny 489 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



Distillers of High Grade Cordials, Fruit Brandies and Syrups 




PHILLIPS & VAN ORDEN CO. 

■'' PRINTERS. PUBLISHERS, BOOKBINDERS 


H. P. WICHMAN • JOHN LUTGEN FRED STAUBE 

Wichiiian, Lutgen & Co., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 

WINES AND LIQUORS 


WE PRINT THE "WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW" 
GOOD PRINTING COSTS NO MORE THAN THE 
OTHER KIND, IF YOU GO TO THE RIGHT PLACE 


Sole Proprietors of "Gilt Edge'* Whiskies 
Also Sole Distributors of "Old Identical Whiskey" 

(Bottled in Bond) 

431-435 CLAY ST., and 428-434 COMMERCIAL ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


509-5 1 5 Howard Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Douglas 2301 Near First Street 



¥» ^^ O "^fc »» ^^ ** ^^ »»- 



>»» ^^ «o» ^^ »o» ^^ «o»- 



»a»-^fc.*»- 



( CARROLL RYE MORVILLE A. A. A. f 

j WHISKEY OLD BOURBON j 

I LOUIS TAUSSIG AND COMPANY | 

f IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS f 

f MAIN AND MISSION STREETS / 

j """sUTTER 50, J 2745 SAN FRANCISCO } 

»* ^^ o ^^ *» ^fc «» ^^ »» ^^ » ^^ »> ^^ *■* ^^ *o» ^^ »o» ^^ »o» ^^ »o> ^fc It* ^fc *» ^^ t* ^fc *» ^fc t t ^^ «» ^fc t*-^ wo ^^ »» 



56 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 






p. C. ROSSI, President 



A. SBARBORO, Secretary 



Italian-Swiss Colony 

LARGEST PRODUCERS OF THE FINEST VARIETIES OF 

California Wines and Brandies 

Vineyards, Wineries and Cellars at Asti, Fulton, CloverdaleJJandJSebastopoliJin Sonoma County; Madera, Madera County; Selma and Kingsbury 

in Fresno County, and Lemoore in Kings County, California, 



PRODUCERS OF 



The Celebrated Tipo 



(Red or White) 




GRAND DIPLOMA OF HONOR, Genoa, Italy, 1892 
GOLD MEDAL, COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION, 1893 
GOLD MEDAL, Dublin, Ireland, 1892 



GOLD MEDAL, Turin, 1898 

GOLD MEDAL, CAL. MIDW. FAIR. 1894 

SILVER MEDAL, BORDEAUX, FRANCE, I8S5 



GOLD MEDAL, PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION. 1901 
GOLD MEDAL, LEWIS4 CLARKE EXPOSITION, 1904 
GRAND PRIZE, ALASKA-YUKON-PACIFIC 

EXPOSITION, 1909 



Naturally' 

Fermented in 

Bottles 



Sparkling Burgundy and Asti Special 



Trade-Mark 

Registered 

October 8, 

1985 



(DRY) 

P. C. ROSSI VERMOUTH AND FERNET-AMARO 

GOLD MEDAL, TURIN, 1884 HIGHEST AWARD CHICAGO, 1894 

PROPRIETORS OF THE AMERICAN VINTAGE COMPANY 

Office and Salesrooms: Corner Battery and Greenwich Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

Vaults: 1235-1267 Battery St. 101-160 Qreenwich St. 1334-1339 Sansome St. 

NEW YORK OFFICE: West 11th and Washington Sts. 



^ ____ 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



57 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



Issued Monthly 

TREASURY REGISTER CO - - - 



PUBLISHERS 



PRESIDENT AND EDITOR 
SECRETARY AND TREASURER 



H. M. WOOD, 
E. F. WOOD, - 

Office: 127 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
Wilson Building : Room 304-305 : Phone Kearny 2597. Home C2559. 



The PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW is the only 
paper of its class West of Chicago. It circulates among the Whole- 
sale and Retail Wine, Spirit and Beer Dealers of the Pacific Coast, 
the Wine Makers and Brandy Distillers of California, the Wine and 
Brandy Buyers, and the Importers, Distillers and Jobbers of the 
United States. 

Entered at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cat., 
as Second-Class Matter. 



ALL CHECKS, DRAFTS, MONEY ORDERS, Etc., should be made payable to 

R. M. WOOD 

Subscriptions per year — in advance, postage paid; 

1 or the United States, Mexico and Canada $2 00 

For the United States, Mexico and Canada, six months 1 25 

For European Countries 3 00 

Single copies 20 



»4M 



HH 



EXCELLENCE OF QUALITY 



4>M 

I 

I PURITY IN MANUFAC TURE 
i EXQUISITE IN FLAVOR 



MH 



MM 



MH 



»4f 



* ALL COMBINED IN 




DAWSON'S 
SCOTCH I 



IN GLASS ONLY 



I 



CHAPMAN S WILBERFORCE 

IMPORTERS 

705-707 SANSOME ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



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Pat'd Seit 29, iSgi 



The accompanying cut illustratrs 
our ORIGINAI, CONTINUOUS 
STILL, which we have improved 
each season until it has reached its 
present perfection. 

This STILL, which has always 
recci»ed our special attention and 
stiiily, has been of material assist- 
ance m securing forCalifornia sweet 
wines and brandies the high rank in 
Uie world which they hold today. 

We manufacture not only high- 
class STILLS, but also Copper and 
Brass Work of all descriptions for 
wineries, distilleries, breweries, etc. 

Our Pasteurizers and Wine Filters 
enjoy the same high standard of 
popularity as our STILLS. 

Refekrnces :— All successful sweet 
wine and brandy producers of Cali- 
fornia. 



Ml KINDS OF COPPER WORK DONE AT SHORT NOTICE. 

Sanders Copper Works 

CARL SCHALITZ. Pres. and Mirr. 

BEALE AND HOWARD STS. SAN FRANCISCO 

Southern California Branch: 

649 North Main St. Los Angeles, Cal. 




0pp. 8th and Townsend Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



^ferlxeiti^e 

inhere i>$ 
n/OTri/iixd 
riva/i 'Will 
recu/peraxe 
exkau>st7ea 
force more 
ruickly mari/ 



Subscribe for the PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW; $2.00 Per Year 



58 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



BOTTLES 

CORKS 

CROWN BOl ILE 
CAPS 

LABELS 

MACHINERY 

ETC. 


Lindeman, Slonian & Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Bottles and Bottlers' Supplies 


CARLOAD LOTS A SPECIALTY 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 
WRITE US 

381-389 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Telephone 
PACIFIC—MARKET 6261 HOME J 2161 


Pacific Coast Agents for 

Chicago Specialty 
Box Co. 
Chicago 

Ferd. Qutmann & Co. 
New York 

Continental Glass 

Decorating Co. 

Chicago 



e6X9©®®®(sXjXS®SXs)®SX5X:Xi^^ 



RATES: $1.00 A DAY AND UP 
Tourist and Commercial 

FIREPROOF 




Everything new, comfortable 

Homelike, plenty of life. 
Beautifully furnished 

Highest class. 



Hotel 
Victoria 

Foimerly the ORENA 
I. W. Bradt & Johnston, Props. 

Los Angeles, California 

Opposite Post Office 
Cor. 7th and Hope Sts. 



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GEORGE WEST & SON, 



INCORPORATED 



^^ PRODUCERS OF jtjt 



SWEET WINES AND BRANDIES 



STOCKTON, CAL., U. S. A. 



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C. A. SLACK. Proprietor 



E. RATTO. Manager 



Telephone. Park 5 

Private Exchange connecting 

all Guests' Rooms 



HOTEL KIRK 

NEW MODERN HOTEL 

Opposite Entrance to Golden Gate Park 



Connecting by 

Private Entrance with Arcade 

Auto Livery Garage 



N. E. COR. STANYAN AND HAIGHT STREETS 



oB:o:o:o:omoB:o:o:ox5:o:o:o:oxxo:o;o:o;o:o;o:o;o:o;o:o;^^^ 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



WHEN DRY AND DUSTY, CALL FOR 

GILT EDGE DOPPEL 

LAGER ~°' BRAU 



The Purest and Most Delicious Beers Brewed. On Draught in all First Class Cafes 



SACRAMENTO BREWING CO. 

F. J. RUHSTALLER, Mgr. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE: 
14th and Harrison Sts. 

a. B. ROBBINS, Mgr. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIEIT REVIEW. 




* 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



I WESTERN GRAIN AND SUGAR PRODUCTS CO. | 

FORMERLY g 

WESTERN DISTILLERIES | 

A PACIFIC HOME INDUSTRY 



Purity Brand Spirits 

Wins for Purity 
Clean in Neutrality 



Gins 



SPIRITS AND ALCOHOL 

Our Latest Improved Guillaume Still is Producing (192% Highest in the United States) 

Denatured Alcohol, Special Denatured Alcohol 



Purity Brand Alcohol 

Most Neutral in the 

United States 



Rums 



Western Distributing Co. 

Office Rooms: 304, 305,306—110 SUTTER STREET, S. F. 



Sole Agents, Pacific Coast ^ 

Distillery : AGNEW, CAL. |J 



PHONE KEARNY 204 



BENJ. S. DONAHUE, President 

OCCIDENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY. Inc. 

580-582 HOWARD STREET 
HEADQUARTERS FOR 



Tannin; Russian Isinglass; Gelatine; Bottle Caps; Filter Pulp; and all Wine Makers' Supplies 

Owners of the celebrated brand Eureka Filter Pulp 

Owners of The Western Press, the most up-to-date label plant on the Pacific Coast 

Largest handlers of Demijohns; Flasks; Imported and Domestic Bottles 

Pacific Coast Agents for Miguel, Vincke & Meyer, Spanish Hand Cut Corks; National Cork Cos Machine Cut Corks 

Pacific Coast Agents International Cork Co. 

WRITE to us tot PRICES 



"Tea Kettle" 



Is the leading old fashion, 
straight Sweet Mash 
Whiskey 



-r 



44 



Crab Orchard" 

straight Sour Mash. The 
brand owned by us is distilled 
in Trimble County, Ky. Do 
not use any other. 



"SUSQUEHANNA 



?> 



GUARANTEED ALL RYE 



"PILGRIMAGE" 

HIGH FLAVOR HEAVY BODY 



44 



Richwood" 



A High Type Bourbon 



The Susquemac Distilling Co. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 



44 



OldQ.W.H." 



Straight Sour Mash Worth trying 



THE GREATEST 
AMERICAN WHISKEY 



YELLOWSTONE 



TAYLOR & WILLIAMS, INC., DISTILLERS 

GEO. DELAPGRTE, Pacific Coast Agent 

820 Mission Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 



A WHOLESALER'S AND RETAILER'S MEDIUM 




ESTABLISHED 1878 



VINICULTURE 



/OL. XLXIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES, JJS^Ifjk'^'lSljglP 



No. 3 





Its a sigVi of good 
times to drinK 

OLD KIRK 
WHISKY 

" Best on the marKet" 





CINZANO 

ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



TKe Standard of Qualitr 
the MTorld Over 



In 1909 over (yl<fe of all the Vermouth 
exported from Italy was CINZANO 



ALEX D SHAW & CO 

UNITED ST.\TE.S AGENTS 
NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO CHICAGO 



MARTINI 
& ROSSI 

ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



Is by far the Biggest Seller in the 
United States 

WHY? 

Because EVERYBODY can mix a better 
Cocktail with it than with ANY other Brand 



F. E. MAYHEW & CO. 

INTERNAL REVENUE and 
CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 

Hydrometers and Elxtra Steins and All Kinds of Revenue Books 



N. E. Cor. Battery and Washington Sts. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



IT. IIIK'C 



-9 ... GL AUK'S HEAD 



"THE BEST THE BREWERS BREW" 

BASS'S ALE 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



"Old Tucker 



ff 



Direct From Bonded 
Warehouse to You 



Brown-Forman Co. 

Distillers 
Louisville. Ky. 






PACIFIC COAST 
BRANCH 

705-7 Sansome Street 

San Francisco 




''Paul Masson'' 

CHAMPAGNES 



"The Pride of 
California" 



Extra Dry, Sparkling Burgundy 
Oeil de Perdrix... 

The Best Sparkling Wines Produced in America 



PAUL MASSON champagne: COMPANY 

5AN JOSE, CAI.irOR.NIA. 




CO 



Simon Levy & Co 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

SPECIALTIES 



P. Gamier, Enghien les Bains 



\ijk Abricotine and other Cordials 

Legler Pernod, Couvet & Pontarlier 

Absinthe and Kirschwasser 

Hills & Underwood, London 

Old Tom Gin, Dry Gin, Sloe Gin and Orange Bitters 

Connor & Sons, Belfast, Bally Castle Irish Whiskey 



Q 



C. A. Lindgren & Co., Stockholm 

A. J. Anderson & Sons, Goteberg, Sweden 

R. Slater & Co., Glasgow 




PHONE KING 2173 



34.6-348 WASHINGTON STREET 



Branvin and Aquavit lAj 
Ben Cruachan Scotch Whiskey ^ | 



SAN FRANCISCO 



\-3>A 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



i)®®®®®®®®iX3®<jX5Xj)®®®S^^ 



THEO. GIER COMPANY 

Wholesale Wine and Liquor Merchants 

Sole Distributors Metropole Bourbon Whiskey, Metropole Bourbon Whiskey in 
Bond. Puck Rye Whiskey. Also handlers of Straight and Blended Whiskeys. 



A, 



575-577 Eighteenth Street 



Oakland, CaHfornia 



GIERSBERGER 
WINES 

OUR SPECIALTY 

From our Vineyards at 

Livermore, Napa, St. Helena 

THEO. GIER WINE CO. 

571-75 Eighteenth Street 



Oak 2510 



Home A 2510 



fe®®i®®®»5SX5®®SX5®Sx3®(^^ 






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SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMANN 



WHOLESALE 



SOLE -PROPRIETORS 

O. K. ROSEDALE 

RYE & BOURBON 
Western Distributors 

Herbert's 
PuYe Malt Whiskey 

Bottled By 
HOFFHEIMER BROTHERS 

Cincinnati. Ohio 



WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS 

CALIFORNIA'S FINEST BRANDIES 



E. J. Baldwin's 

APRICOT 
BRANDY 

THE FINEST IN THE 
WORLD 

Phone Douglas 1798 



SENATOR 

Leiand Stanford's 

PURE 
VINA BRANDY 

IT'S PURE-THATS SURE 
THERE'S NOTHING LIKE IT 



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BRUNSWICK RYE AND BOURBON 



QUALITY UNEXCELLED 



IN BULK OR CASES 



SPECIAL ORDERS SHIPPED DIRECT 1- RO.M DISTILLERY 



SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMANN, 430-434 Battery Street San Francisco. WESTERN DISTRIBUTERS 



laa'.,T.SiSl»Si3S'»J«S(^^Se«»'^«^'«3<'«'*'^'''«'«^^*'2^'^''»3<»»i«»^ 



WHEN DRY AND DUSTY, CALL FOR 

GILT EDGE _DOPPEL 

LAGER °'" BRA U 



The Purest and Most Delicious Beers Brewed. On Draught in all First Class Cafes 



SACRAMENTO BREWING CO. 

F. J. RUHSTALLER, Mgr. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE: 
1 4th and Harrison Sts. 

Q. B. ROBBINS, Mgr. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



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THE STANDARD WINE OF CALIFORNIA 

fl We are the largest producers aQd bottlers of high grade 
CaliforQia Wine. 

^ We oWQ our virjeyards oQd make all of our wiQes ar)d 
can therefore guarantee tl^e purity of every bottle. 

NO INCREASE IN PRICES OF CRESTA BLANCA WINES 



Location of Vineyards, LIVERMORE, CAL. 

Send for Price List 



42-44 Davis St., San Francisco 
10 West 33rd Street, New York 
37 South Water Street, Chicago 



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J. F. Plumel Co. 



63-65 E^LLIS STREET 

PHOVPS) ^^AENY 3667 



Proprietor of the Celebrated 

KOLAKINA 

... Sole Pacific Coast Agents for ... 



IMPORTER OF 

Bordeaux Wines, Fine Brandies 
and Olive Oil 



VAN DEN BERGH & CO. 
... O I IN S ... 



<&%%j(iaA7m^<i!3mK3(mm»»re^ 



The Brunswick- Balke-CoUender Co. 




Billiard 

and Pool 

Tables 

BAR FIXTURES 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

MANUFACTURED IN 

OUR SAN FRANCISCO 

FACTORY 



LOW PRICES, EASY TERMS. LARGE STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND 

Special Designs aiui Kstinu.tcs Cheerfully Furiiisheil 

767 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

BETWEEN THIRD AND FOURTH STREETS 
TELEPHONE SUTTEE 323 .•.-.•.•.• TELEPHONE HOME J 1538 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



Italian Vineyard Company 

MAIN OFFICES, SALESROOMS AND WINERIES 

1234 to 1248 PALMETTO ST., near Mateo - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

PRODUCERS OF 

CALIFORNIA PURE 
WINES AND BR ANDIES 

Owners of the LARGEST VINEYARD in the U. S.— 4000 Acres 

At Guasti, San Bernardino County, Cal. 
PLANTED IN THE FINEST VARIETIES OF WINE GRAPES 



NEW YORK BRANCH CHICAGO BRANCH NEW ORLEANS BRANCH 

Offices and Wine Vaults 152 West Kinzie St. 237 Decatur Street 

202-204 Center Street and 213-215 Hester Street 

Seattle, Washington, 78 West Marion Street 



WILLIAM WOLFF & COMPANY 

IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION 

MERCHANTS 



52-58 BEALE STREET 



PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS FOR 

J. & F. Martell, Cognac - - - Martell Brandy 

John de Kuyper & Zoon, Rotterdam - ___---- Holland Gin 

Sir Robert Burnett & Co., London and New York - - - Old Tom and Dry Gin 

Cantrell & Cochrane, Belfast ----- - - Ginger Ale and Sarsaparilla 

E. H. Taylor Jr. & Sons, Frankfort, Ky. - - - - Old Taylor Bottled in Bond Whiskey 

Mellwood Distillery, Cincinnati, Ohio - - - Mellwood Whiskey 

IMPORTERS OF 
Vintage Wines, Staple Cordials, Bitters, Absinthe, Preserves, Olive Oil, Etc. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




2)XQxexQxsxexexexexsxexexc^XQXQXQxsx 



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WIELAND'S EXTRA PALE LAGER 




OUR VERDICT 



"It Is Better Than Ever" 



(^ 

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Office and Brewery: 

240 SECOND STREET 



San Francisco, CaL 



sexsxsxsx5xsxsxexexexsxsx£#5xex5xsxsxsxs^sx5x5^^^ 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



C. H. WENTE. 

President 



FRANK A. BUSSE, 

General Mmnacer 



Eagle Brand 




Selecied 
Wiives 



COGNAC BRANDY 

Oro Fino Cognac*** $12. OO pir case 

( PURE MEDICINAL BRANDY) 



Vineyard and Winery: Livermore, Cal. 

OFFICE AND CELLARS! 

112-116 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 

PHONE MARKET 2836 



FERNET- BRANCA 




Specialty of 

FRATELLI BRANCA 

MILAN, ITALY 



s fkpry — 



i M 



The King of Appetizers 
Best Flavor to Cocktails 



GRAND PRIZE 

* ST. LOLMS 1904 

Sole North American Agents 

L. GANDOLFI & CO., 

427-31 W. B'way, New York 
IMPORT ORDERS SOLICITED 




BUFFflLO 

NEW BREW 
BOHEMIAN 

Sacramento. (lal. 



BREWIN6 



A. H. LOCHBAUM CO. 

AGENTS 

125 King Street 

Phone loio Main 



PALE EXPORT 
CULMBACHER 
PORTER 



COMPANY 



B. H. PEASE, President 



F. M. SHEPARD, Vice-President 



R. H. PEASE, JR., Treasurer 



C. F. RUNYON. Secretary 



Goodyear Rubber Company 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

RUBBER GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 




WINE AND BREWER'S HOSE. "GOLD SEAL" IS THE BEST RUBBER-LINED COTTON HOSE. 

61-63-65-67 FOURTH STREET, PORTLAND, OR. 
587-589-591 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

WE*ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR EVERYTHING MADE OF RUBBER 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




NITED STATES FIDELITY m GUARANTY CO. 



PHONE 
Kearny 925 



PAID CAPITAL, $2,000,000.00 SURPLUS, $816,000.00 TOTAL ASSETS, $5,713,158.00 

rHis Company is Accepted as 

SOLE SURETY UPON ALL INTERNAL REVENUE AND CUSTOMS BONDS 

Required by the United States Government from 

Distillers, Brewers and Cigar Manufacturers 



PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 



BORLAND & JOHNS, Managers 



Nevada Bank Building 



■i 



>*» ^^ **' 



i 

{ Wine Presses 



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A. ROSSI & CO. 

\MACHINISTS 



I 
Grape Crusher ( 

FOR SAI^E:— Second-hand Redwood TanKs and OaK CasKs { 

I BROADWAY, Near Sansome San Francisco f 



m: 



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-«S 



Barrett's Unrivalled Prune Juice 




GUARANTEED UNDER THE 
FOOD AND DRUGS ACT 

GUARANTY No. 49 



Now to be had from 




AMERICAN MERCANTILE CO. 



• • • 

• • • 



514 BATTERY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SAMPLES SENT 
ON APPLICATION 



Sierra madre m\m €o. 



GROWERS AND PRODUCERS OF 



Pure Calif ornia Wines ^"^ Brandies 




PORT AND SHERRY 

A Specialty 

La Manda Park, Los Angeles County, Cal. 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



11 




EXPORTS AND IMPORTS DURING 1910 

[BY SEA] — ■■ 




THE figures showing the export and import movements of wines, liquors, beers, etc., at the port of San Francisco during the cal- 
endar year, 1910, will be of particular interest. 

A great increase will be found in the exports of bulk wines and in the value of wine exportations. The figures are 9,866,539 gal- 
|lons, valued at $3,162,600. 

Case goods shipments of wine by sea were considerably less than during the preceding year. Comparative figures of 1909 show 
7,440,294 gallons, valued at $2,386,111, showing nearly a million dollars' increase in value of exports, and a million and a half over 
those of 1908. 

Brandy exports by sea do not make as good an exhibit as those of 1909, but are double those of 1908 in value. The figures for 
1910 were 567 cases, $24^004 gallons, valued at $31,746. The exports for the preceding year totaled 938 cases, 36,144 gallons, valued 
at $33,806. The export value for 1908 was only one-third of that of 1909. 

The increase in prosperity of the whisky trade for San Francisco will not be found in the figures of export by sea during the past 
year. The tables show that there was a slight falling off as compared with the business of 1909. The totals were 10,940 cases, 
52,842 gallons, valued at $194,914. In the previous year the totals were 11,317 cases and 58,262 gallons, valued at $211,263. 

Beer exports by sea show a slight falling off from the figures of 1909 and a marked decrease from those of 1908. The totals 
for 1910 were 4324 packages bottled and 1055 bulk, valued at $45,846. The export value of 1909 was $59,303 and in 1908 $69,583. 

The foregoing remarks will aptly apply to the figures of exports of miscellaneous wines and liquors. 

Among the various imports by sea Champagne shows a slight decrease as compared with last year ; Absinthe had an immense 
falling off ; Beer holds up well, as does Bitters. There is a decrease in Gin, Liqueurs and Wine and a very heavy one in Brandy. 
There is a gain in Mineral Water in cases and Whisky in cases, but a heavy falling off in Whisky in barrel. Vermouth as usual 
shows a healthy increase every year. 

The details of export and import figures will be found in the following columns : 



EXPORTS OF wine:. 



(By sea.) 

Year ending December 31, 1910. 

(With comparative figures.) 



To 



Destination. 

Alaska 

British Columbia... 
Central America.... 

China 

Hawaiian Islands... 

Japan 

Mexico 



Cases. 

681 

932 

553 

47 

1,736 

42 

349 

New York 1,219 

Philippine Islands. . . 660 

South America 149 

Samoan Islands 2 

Society Islands 1 

France 

German y 

England 22 

Australia 

Siberia 

Holland 

-Switzerland 

New Orleans 

Straits Settlement... 10 
Dutch East Indies. . . 2 

Korea 

British Oceanica 1 

French Oceanica 

Cooks Island 

Other Eastern States. 235 



Gallons. 

22,911 

35,999 

128,846 

2,441 

784,744 

73,606 

53,208 

8,421,288 

21,102 

28,582 

1,105 

12,147 

104 

113,601 

50,146 

207 

2,112 

2,600 

5,100 

59,879 

500 

2,736 

583 



635 

25 

42,332 



Value. 

$12,860 

17,647 

49,787 

1,455 

326,616 

20,980 

19,541 

2,575,592 

9,424 

13,080 

655 

3,632 

90 

32,814 

19,883 

143 

917 

850 

1,887 

39,950 

295 

2,392 

244 

S 

192 

16 

11,663 



Totals 6,521 9,866,539 $3,162,600 



(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1909 
Destination. Cases. 

To Alaska 1,382 



British Columbia . . 
Central America... 

China 

Hawaiian Islands.. 
Japan 



477 

477 

22 

1,673 

105 



New York 2,825 6 



Mexico 

Philippine Islands . . 

South America 

Society Islands 

Samoan Islands 

France 

Germany 

Holland 

Australia 

Scotland 

England 

Korea 

British India 

East Indies 

Dutch East Indies... 
Straits Settlements . . 



289 

226 

310 

10 

3 

2 

5 

18 



Gallons. 
15,991 
30,396 

119,040 
6,879 

929,709 
36,032 

,132,885 
46,564 
11,829 
24,207 
15,207 
1,994 



156 



3 
160 



10,603 

2,322 

102 

'53', 53 6 
356 

' '2,412 
330 
900 



Value. 

$17,406 

13,052 

48,936 

3,087 

357,865 

12,716 

1,859,442 

20,201 

4,618 

13,666 

5,702 

862 

12 

3,464 

920 

46 

889 

18,677 

186 

889 

1,870 

249 

445 



Totals 8,143 7,440,294 $2,386,111 



(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1908. 



Destination. 

To Alaska 

" British Columbia . 
" Central America . . 

" China 

" Hawaiian Islands . 

" Japan 

" Mexico 

" New York 

" Philippine Islands 



Cases. 
. 513 
. 123 
. 1,263 

115 

. 1,597 

69 

. 284 

. 462 

132 



Gallons. 

7,143 

21,794 

89,129 

6,066 

712,051 

33,934 

46,461 

3,267,268 

3,027 



Value. 

$6,268 

7,778 

46,428 

3,030 

326,014 

14,738 

20,466 

1,196,642 

1,842 



South America 

Society Islands 

•All other countries. 



59 



30,128 

9,719 

35,079 



15,165 

3,642 

15,076 



Totals 4,701 4,250,799 $1,657,089 

•Includes 15 cs 20,708 gallons to London. 



BRASIDY. 



(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1910. 
Destination. Cases. Gallons. 



To Alaska 
" British Columbia . . 
" Central America . . 
" Hawaiian Islands . 

" Japan 

" Mexico 

" New York 

'* Philippine Islands 
" South America . . . . 

" Germany 

" Guam 

" Boston 



217 



169 

1 

51 

15 

64 



50 



Totals. 



2,112 
138 
166 

3,6S3 

45 

150 

16,287 

126 

156 

1,092 

60 
24,004 



667 

(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1909. 
Destination. Cases. Gallons. 



To Alaska 
" British Columbia '. 
" Central America . . 

" China 

'* Hawaiian Islands . 

" Mexico 

" New York 

" Philippine Islands 



286 

36 

1 

1 

570 

38 

5 

1 



Totals. 



938 



1,312 
257 
228 

' '2,068 
160 

32,013 
106 

36,144 



(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1908. 



Destination. Cases. 

To Alaska 46 

•' British Columbia ... 9 

" China 37 

" Central America .... 30 
" Hawaiian Islands ... 325 

" Japan 6 

" Mexico 48 

" New York 

" Philippine Islands 

" Society Islands 4 

" South America 

" All other countries 



Gallons. 
1,166 
200 



10 

2,787 

" '22 

2,369 

302 

"i35 
64 



Totals. 



505 



7,071 



WHISKY. 

(By sea.) 

Year ending December 31, 1910. 

Destination. Cases. Gallons. 

To Alaska 1,007 21,703 

" British Columbia ... 7 904 

" Central America .... 996 2,464 

" China 3 140 

"Hawaiian Islands ... 3,202 19,716 

" Japan '... 92 566 

■' Mexico 850 429 

" New York 1,197 1,407 

" Philippine Islands . . 3,560 6,116 

" South America 18 227 

" Society Islands 1 

" Siberia 7 

•• England 170 

Totals 10,940 53,842 



Value. 

$7,814 

120 

230 

6,563 

52 

686 

14,595 

620 

100 

617 

300 

49 

$31,746 



Value. 

$7,353 

560 

626 

7 

11,023 

646 

33,565 

1S7 

$63,806 



Value. 

$2,988 

266 

329 

208 

8,059 

67 

353 

3,041 

256 

23 

203 

81 

$15,863 



Value. 

$56,474 

2,141 

10,812 

167 

74,970 

1,242 

5,105 

18,691 

24,642 

440 



62 
260 



(By sea.) 

Year ending December 31, 1909. 

Destination. Cases. Gallons. 

To Alaska 1,191 26,927 

" British Columbia ... 61 441 

" Central America .... 1,306 1,280 

" China 42 

■' Hawaiian Islands . . . 2,885 19,446 

•' Japan 300 120 

" Mexico 1,001 1,267 

" Philippine Islands . . . 4,521 8,738 

" South America 22 6 

" Society Islands 6 

" Samoan Islands 5 

" Chemulpo 20 



Value. 

$81,910 

1,395 

12.740 

219 

67,157 

6,684 

7,477 

33,368 

138 

25 

30 

120 



Totals 11,317 

(By sea.) 
Year ending December 
Destination. Cases. 

To Alaska 1,412 

" British Columbia .... 250 
" Colombia 2,618 



58,266 $211,263 



China 

Hawaiian Islands . 

Japan 

Mexico 

New York 

Philippine Islands . 

South America 

Society Islands . . . . 
All other countries. . 



323 

3,072 

48 

1,131 



3,582 

48 

6 

56 



31, 1908. 

Gallons. 

10,003 

369 

1,100 

629 

17,647 

236 

1,308 

50 

6,117 

130 



230 



Value. 

$34,662 

1,427 

20,498 

2,664 

54,740 

496 

1,854 

300 

23,063 

396 

88 

780 



Total 12,546 37,818 $147,868 

In bond — - 

To Hawaiian Islands 160 cases, valued at $1,066 

" Philippine Islands 537 cases, valued at 2,282 



BEEIR. 

(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 



Pkgs. 

Destination. Bottled, 
To Alaska 1,884 



America 



Central 

China 

Hawaiian Islands 

Japan 

Mexico 

South America . . . 
Society Islands . . 
New Zealand . . . . 

Australia 

Siberia 

India 

British Oceania . . 
French Oceania . . 



685 

3 

1,319 

72 

2 

214 

112 

5 

1 

8 

2 

13 

4 



1910. 
Pkgs. 
Bulk. 



1,008 



Totals 4,324 



44 



1,065 



(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1909. 



Pkgs. 

Destination. Bottled. 
To Alaska 1,202 



Central America 

China 

Hawaiian Islands 

Japan ". . . . 

Mexico 

South America . . . 
Samoan Islands . . 
Society Islands . . 

Australia 

Chemulpo 

Java 



119 

242 

2,174 

125 

14 

56 

6 

104 

3 

159 

1 



Pkgs. 

Bulk. 
70 
15 

' 3,484 



$194,914 



Totals 4,203 



3,584 



Value. 

$16,458 

6,464 

85 

21,416 

545 

28 

1,182 

1,382 

40 

7 

85 

6 

96 

62 

$46,846 



Value. 

$16,644 

1,647 

3,137 

33,910 

1,497 

189 

253 

92 

926 

47 

943 

IS 

$59,303 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1908. 



Destination. 

To Alaska 

'• British Columbia . 
" Central America . . 

" China 

" Hawaiian Islands . 

" Japan 

" Mexico 

" Philippine Islands . 
" South America . . . . 
" Society Islands . . . 
" All other countries 



Pkgs. 

Bottled. 

340 

3 

443 

783 • 

, . 3,033 

30 

70 

. . 2,990 

100 

61 

73 

. . 7,926 



Pkgs. 
Bulk. 
100 

20 

' 1,484 

ii 



1,615 



Value. 

$4,060 

21 

2,091 

7,800 

29,960 

360 

585 

23,220 

336 

567 

683 

$69,683 



Totals 

In bond — 

To China 200 bbls 1260 csks, valued at $14,211 

■■ Japan 120 csks, valued at 1,600 



MISCELIiAISEUirS WINBS AND LIQUORS. 



(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1910. 
Pkgs. 
Destination. Cases. 

To Alaska 1,686 



British Columbia 
Central America . . . . 

China 

Hawaiian Islands . . . 

Japan 

Mexico 

New York 

Philippine Islands . ■ 
South America ....... 

Society Islands 

Samoan Islands 

Germany 

Australia 

Siberia 

London 

Cuba 

British Oceania 

British India 

Korea 

Straits Settlement.... 



591 

415 

261 

5,288 

96 

677 

966 

2,654 

98 

3 

28 

106 

66 

215 

16 

10 

10 

61 

10 

6 



Bulk. 

207 

18 

70 

5 

269 

17 

28 

S 

71 

i 

3 



Gallons. 
"262 



96 
181 



6 

'si 



Totals 13,052 

Value 



701 



536 
.$132,194 



(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1909 
Pkgs. 
Destination. Cases. 

To Alaska 1,921 

" British Columbia ... 626 
" Central America .... 120 

" China 149 

" Hawaiian Islands ... 7,396 

" Japan 219 

" Mexico 667 

" New York 10,656 



Philippine Islands 
South America . 
Society Islands 
Samoan Islands 

Australia 

Liondon 

India 

Chemulpo 

East Indies .... 
Bangkok 



1,869 
147 

3 
27 
29 

2 

1 
10 

3 
10 



ulk. 


Gallons. 


211 




6 


68 


18 


10 


6 


66 


392 


463 


16 




13 


4C 


6 




3 


10 



11 

2 
6 



Totals 23,764 

Value 



683 



653 
.$157,647 



(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1908 

Pkgs. 
Destination. Cases. 

To Alaska 1,311 

" British Columbia . . . 440 

" Central America . . . 570 

" China 248 

" Hawaiian Islands . . 3,840 

" Japan 162 

" Mexico 769 

•' New York 2,679 

" Philippine Islands . . 3,419 

" South America 160 

" Society Islands 14 

" All other countries... 588 



Totals 14,180 

Value 



Bulk. 


Gallons. 


120 


S3 


125 




3 


214 


2 




379 


5,041 


438 




17 


250 


148 


62 


14 




8 




6 




1,259 


6,610 




..$171,841 



GENBRAI, MISCBLLANEOVS EXPORTS. 
ITBMIZBD. 



(I 

Year ending 

Articles. 

Amer Picon 

Absinthe 


3y sea.) 
December 

Cases. 
10 
14 


31, 1910 
Pkgs. 
Bulk. 




524 




Apricot Cordial 


3 

2 


1 


Bitters 


434 


2 


Benedictine 


3 




Blackberry Brandy . . 
Blackberry Cordial . . . 
Cherries in Maraschino 
Coco Cola 


66 

2 

.. 846 

1 


2 
' 37 




1 




China Wine 


27 


2 




32 








3 


Cordial 


413 


7 


Creme de Menthe 

Champagne 


79 
689 


2 


Cocktails 

Cider 


60 
181 


23 




17 




Fruit Juice 


99 




Ginger Brandy 


50 





Gallons. 



168 



200 



Gin 2,123 



139 
6 

1 
7 
2 



701 

1, 1909. 

Pkgs. 

Bulk. 

62 

i 



Grape Juice 1,403 14 

Grenadine 10 

Ginger Ale 211 103 

Kummel 47 

Ijlqueurs 3 

Liquors 1,821 

Mineral Waler 2,690 

Prune Juice 

Rum 41 

Rock and Rye 63 

Soda Water 4 

Syrup 97 6 

Stout, Ale and Porter... 163 6 

Sake 28 

Spirits 118 71 

Tamarindo 8 

Vermouth 790 32 

Totals 13,052 

(By sea.) 

Year ending December 3 

Articles. Cases. 

Absinthe 32 

Alcohol 983 

Anisette 2 

Apricot Brandy 61 

Amer Picon 15 

Ale, Porter and Stout... 220 1 

Bitters 280 1 

Blackberry Brandy .... 22 2 

Benedictine 34 

Chartreuse 2 

Cassia 66 2 

Curacoa 48 

Cocktails 66 

China Wine 87 1 

Champagne 751 1 

Coco Cola 22 3 

Cordials 291 9 

Creme de Menthe 217 1 

Cider 160 47 

Cognac 65 3 

Caromel 3 6 

Cherries in Maraschino.. 240 

Fernet 31 

Fruit Juice 22 1 

Ginger Ale 956 96 

Grape Juice 11,769 

Gin 2,992 141 

Grenadine 16 

Kummel 98 

Klrsch 6 

Liquors 1,252 

Liqueurs 168 

Mineral Water 1,984 4 

Rum 39 92 

Rock and Rye 80 

Spirits 65 201 

Sake 10 

Syrups 48 6 

Tamarindo 3 8 

Vermouth 600 10 

Totals 23,764 



693 

(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1908. 



Articles. Cases. 

Absinthe 11 

Amer Picon 20 

Alcohol 3,230 

Ale, Stout and Porter. . . 358 

Apricot Brandy 5 

Bitters 189 

Benedictine 3 

Blackberry Brandy .... 10 

Casbo In Rum 

Champagne 662 

Cognac 14 

Cocktails 60 

Cider 142 

Cordials 246 

Cherries in Maraschino.. 383 

Cassia 

Curacoa 10 

(Chartreuse 3 

China Wine 110 

Creme de Cocoa 6 

Coco Cola 

Caromel 1 

Creme de Menthe 

Flormigs 

Fruit Juice 31 

Fig Brandy 20 

Gin 1,005 

Ginger Ale 248 

Ginger Brandy 

Grape Juice 3,425 

Kummel 50 

Liquors 1,460 

Liqueurs 20 

Malt Kxtract 

Mineral Water 1,942 

Punch 2 

Prune Juice 

Rock and Rye 31 

Rum 31 

Sake 142 

Syrups 13 

Spirits 33 

Vermouth 276 

Totals 14,180 



Pkgs. 
Bulk. 



38 
27- 



15 

4 



70 



165 

74 



12 



140 
3 



21 

484 
3 

187 
5 



1,259 



Year ending December 31, 1910. 



61 



536 



Gallons. 
'"274 



IMPORTS BY RAIL IN BOND. 



40 



28 



144 



167 



653 



Gallons. 
"l',64i 



311 
"52 



323 



78 



2,990 
214 



5,610 



Articles. Cases. 

Wine 1,085 

Brandy 302 

Champagne . . . 8,924 



Bbls. Csks. Oct. 
1 29 



Bas- 
Kgs. kets, 
2 



163 



Whisky 

Cognac 

Vermouth 

Gin 

Liquors 

Mineral Water. 
Cordials 



304 
26 

"45 

n 

420 
3 



Articles 
Aquavit . 
Arrac . . . 
Absinthe 
Beer .... 
Brandy 



Year ending December 31, 1909. 



Cases. 

15 

25 

200 

1 

996 



Bbls. Csks. Oct, 



Champagne 9,324 

Cognac 40 .... 

Cordials 8 .... 

Cider 61 .... 

Fruit Juice 50 .... 

Gin 152 

Liquors 908 1 

Mastic 32 .... 

Mineral Water 74 .... 

Stout 15 .... 

Whisky 879 50 

Wine 3.193 6 



12 



6 
136 



Hhds 



5 
13 



Year ending December 31, 1908. 



Articles. 
Absinthe . 

Ale 

Aquavit . .. 

Beer 

Bitters .... 
Brandy . . . 
Champagne 

Cider 

Cognac . . . 
Cordials . . 

Gin 

Klrsch 

Liquors 1 

Mineral Water 

Mastic 

Mescal 1 

Punch 100 



Cs. Bbls. Csks. Csks. Hhd. Oct. Gl. 
525 



73 
5 
169 

79 
728 
9,929 
120 
291 
139 
620 

50 
,421 
849 



20 



6 1-6 csks. 



72 



72 



Porter 
Rum .... 
Sherry . . 
Stout . . . 
Teguila . 
Vermouth 

Wine 5,17 

Whisky 2,475 



150 
60 



70 

6 

100 



170 

1 

1 

67 

16 



20 
156 



325 
19 



14 
1 



11 



64 



IMPORTS. 



(By sea.) 

Year ending December 31, 1910. 

(With comparative figures.) 

ALE, STOUT ,\ND PORTER. 

^ ,„,„ Cases. Bbls. V4 Bbls.Csks.Hhds. 

In 1910 3,191 5,104 15 

■ 1909 1,426 5,538 59 

829 1,913 '5 



1908. 



ABSINTHE. 



In 1910. 
" 1909. 
" 1908. 
" 1907. 



Cases. 
. 628 

. 4,776 
. 3,840 
. 3,901 



BEER. 

% % 

In Cases. Bbls. Bbls. Bbls. Kgs. Hhds.Csks. Pkgs 
1910. 2,389 22,690 fi.480 6,832 269 8,619 1.465 •! 314 
1909.10,657 22,024 4,822 5,733 103 7,032 473 
1908.10.941 25.637 320 590 2,335 910 3 '6 088 

•Size of packages not given In manifest. 

BITTERS. 

, Cases. Csks. 

In 1910 15,151 

'• 1909 7,218 60 

1908 3,203 

CHAMPAONE. 

Cases. 

In 1910 6,772 

" 1909 16.049 

" 1908 8,810 

" 1907 2,828 

GIN. 



Crates. 


Bskts. 


16 


1 


300 


30 



In 1910, 
•• 1909. 
" 1908. 
" 1907. 


Cases. 

.42,834 
.50,378 
.26.941 
.24,492 


Bbls. Bbls. Csks. 
213 25 249 
168 6 102 

18 96 

110 1 290 

LIQUORS. 


Oct. 

149 

77 

4 

33 



10 



21 
10 



Cases. 

In 1910 8,512 

" 1909 10,415 

'■ 1908 12,408 

" 1907 17,518 



Bbls. Bbls. Csks. Oct. Kgs.Crts. 

1 . . . 2 ... 1 2 

2 3 2 1 10 298 

81 '.'.'. '.'.'. '.'.'. '.'.'. '.'.'. 



MINER.%.L WATER. 

Cases. Bbls. Csks. Cbys. 

In 1910 18.607 41 243 

"1909 16,111 276 315 2 

'■1908 17,278 50 100 

" 1907 9,759 

WINE. 

% 
In Cases. Bbls. Csks. Csks. Oct. Kgs. Hhds. Pps.Bts. 
1910.. 17,861 381 724 8 1,448 14 17 . . 4 
1909. .18,742 402 1,059 41 487 105 46 53 15 

1908. .12,036 432 189 24 153 . . 4 . . 17 



1907.. 12, 620 1,313 377 



603 



6 



In 1910 
" 1909 
" 1908 
" 1907 



In 1910 
■■ 1909 
" 1908 
" 1907 



Cases. 
.52.682 
.43,337 
.13,837 
.21,629 



■WHISKY. 



% 



Bbls.Bbls.Csks.Csks.Oct.Hds.Drm. 

786 1 118 5 166 4 

4,003 16 138 1 97 6 1 

815 . . 97 4 59 2 

5 99 .. 210 30 

VERMOUTH. 

Cases. Bbls. Csks. 



.63,383 
.50,207 
.41,875 
.23,060 



15 

7 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



13 



BRANDY. 

'A 
Cases. Bbls.Bbl3.Csks.Oct.Hhds.Ovls 

In 1910 3,610 25 ... 123 40 

"1909 20,655 45 1 18 49 5 8 

■■ 1908 4,305 2 

•■ 1907 4,449 53 ... 32 50 

MISCBI.I.ANBOIIS IMPORTS. 

(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1910. 

Pkgs. 

Articles. Cases. Bulk. 

Amer Picon 1,450 

Aquavit 375 

Alcohol 10 

Byrrh 25 

Benedictine 255 .... 

Cognac 102 6 

Chartreuse 70 .... 

Cider 56 1 

("ordials 1,096 5 

lornet 8,750 

I'rult Juice 150 50 

Grape Juice 162 .... 

Ginger Ale 231 728 

Klr.^ch 20 

Kummel 1,015 

Lime Juice 170 

Mastic 2 

Punch 123 

Rum 175 49 

Hoot Beer 1,779 

Sake 2,732 9,973 

Soda Water 200 .... 

Sherry 89 165 

(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1909. 

Pkgs. 

Articles. Cases. Bulk. 

.Vmer Picon 4,200 

Aquavit 670 80 

Arrac 3 

Baryte 50 

liyrrh 224 

IJenedictine 1,307 

' 'ognac 4,403 75 

Cider . 265 5 

I'uracoa 2 .... 

I reme de Menthe 10 .... 

i.'^sla 200 

.idials 4,940 

MOO Cola 268 1 

lernet 7,478 

rruit Juice 148 50 

'linger Ale 27 1,632 



Gentiane 30 

Grape J uice 578 

Kummel 1,449 

Klrsch 165 

Punch 130 

Sake 1,278 

Spirits 2,484 

Rum ■ 165 

Vodka 6 

(By sea.) 
Year ending December 31, 1908. 

Articles. Cases. 

Apricot Brandy 20 

Amer Picon 2,900 

Anesone 25 

Benedictine 705 

Blackberry Brandy 26 

Blgarreaux 100 

Baryte 

Cognac 3,483 

China Wine 2,694 

Cider 50 

Cherry Brandy 100 

Cherries in Maraschino 100 

Coco Cola 245 

Cassia 5,349 

Fernet Branca 5,340 

Fruit Juice 

Grape Juice 141 

Ginger Ale 500 

Gentiane 25 

Klrsch 177 

Kummel 101 

Liqueurs 321 

Madeira Wine 15 

Mescal 5 

Miso 

Orange Brandy 30 

Orange Wine 1 

Punch 356 

Peppermint 50 

Port Wine 194 

Rum 165 

Sake 2,773 

Sherry 10 

Spirits 1,080 

IMPORTS IN TRANSIT. 

(By sea.) 

Year ending December 31, 1910. 

Articles. Cases. 

Whisky 19,903 

Sake 220 



7,397 
45 

51 



Pkgs. 
Bulk. 



1,042 
84 



23 



3 

'480 



4 
600 



21 

47 

309 

138 



Pkgs. 

Bulk. 
1,262 
1,155 



Wine . i . :. . 5,533 • 474 

Ale, Stout and Porter 1,608 376 

Aquavit 10<^ 

Grape Juice 1,318 .... 

Kummel 10 ' ..... 

Cocktails 225 

Fruit Juice 26 1 

Spirits .■•. 57 - 

Cider 25 

Benedictine 140 .... 

Punch 80 .... 

Soda Water 30 10 

Mineral Water 2,128 76 

Gin 13,157 211 

Beer 5,204 1,735 

Ginger Ale 100 176 

Champagne 818 .... 

Bitters 204 

Vermouth 4,375 2 

Cordials 232 20 

Lime Juice 1,141 .... 

Fernet 25 

Absinthe 75 ' 

Rum 318 17 

Liquors 2,491 8 

Brandy 1,980 156 

I'UGET SOUND BEERS IN TRANSIT TO PACIFIC 
COAST POINTS. 



Year 



To 
Oakland . 
Fresno . .. 
Alameda . 
Nevada . . 
Bkrsfleld . 
L. Angeles 
SanJose . . 
Sta. Clara 
Stockton . 
Vallejo . . . 
Hantord .. 
S. B'nrdino 
Pasadena . 
S. Mateo .. 
Honolulu . 

Total . . 



Cs. 



(By sea.) 
ending December 31 

Bbls, ~ 

3,598 



1910. 



Hhd 

705 
10 

280 
42 
58 

105 
62 
49 



2,626 

1,591 

2,504 

857 

1,107 

1,769 

804 

905 

485 

474 

204 

1 



Bbls.Bbls.CsksPkgs3ds 6s 
640 344 376 287 . . 3 

92 20 

705 322 

207 1,300 
140 

2 



166 

644 

240 

468 

20 

110 

67 

85 

64 

425 



835 



200 
85 
80 



1 
294 



400 



80 



70 



60 .. 



8 337 



26 



2 1,311 17,325 2,929 1,853 2,181 1,814 26 3 



Production of Dry Wines by Years 

Gallons. 

1900 13,762,953 

1901 13,698,645 

1902 - 27,000,000 

1903 21,900,000 

1904 15,590,000 

1905 : 19,500,000 

1906 24,500,000 

1907 26,000,000 

1908 22,500,000 

1909 23,000,000 

1910 27,500,000 



Wine Receipts from Interior Cellars, 19 iO 

Gallons. 

January . 1,211,500 

February 2,000,700 

March 1,099,050 

April 1,245,100 

May 984,300 

June 919,350 

July 936,900 

\ August 1,082,475 

September . . . , 1,096,000 

October 1,157,350 

November 1,241,300 

December 1,3(56,300 



Brandy Receipts from Distillery and Warehouse, 1910 

Gallons. 

January 55,550 

February 74,000 

March 39,800 

April 25,950 

May 14,250 

June 15,875 

July 2,675 

August 7,060 

September 20,850 

October m,mO 

November 98,050 

December 80,600 

Grand total 500,710 



Wants Wine Company Declared Insolvent 



Grand total 14,340,325 



A PETITION ha.s been filed with the Ignited States District 
Court asking that the Anglo-California Wine Company 
be declared an insolvent debtor. Giavanni K. Rafetto, the appli- 
cant, alleges that the corporation owes liim .fSOOO in money ad- 
vanced over and above the securities lield by him. He claims 
that on September 16 last the company committed an act of 
insolvency by mortgaging all of its r(^al and personal property 
to the Illinois-Pacific Glass AVorks, W. D. Sink & Sons, L. G. 
Morelli, the California Rarrel Company and Louis Lands- 
berger, to secure a debt of .'};51,965, with the intent to prefer 
them over other creditors. 

The foregoing news is fro surprise to the trade. The methods 
of the concern in securing credits could only result in one way. 



14 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



J>3' I American People Begfinnin§: to Appreciate Native Wines l^^j 



EDITOR Pacific Wine and Spirit Review — Dear Sir: The 
past year has certainly seen a marked clianjje for the better 
in the wine business of California. The failure of the vintage 
abroad has resulted in orders being received from Switzerland, 
Belgium, France, Germany and other of the large wine pro- 
ducing countries of Europe, and inasmuch as the .sales were the 
result of the submission of samples, we feel sure that the foreign 
wine dealers are at last willing to admit that the quality and 
purity of California wines are now the equal of those produced 
anywhere in the world. 

Recently, we have shipped wine even to France, and we are 
sure that they never would have purchased our wines unless 
they realized their true value. 

I have no doubt that we will be able during the coming year 
to do considerable business in Europe, but what I am depending 
upon more than anything, is that our own market will be better 
and our wines become better known from the fact that they ar(? 
now purchased in Europe. 

I think that the fact that we have filled orders from the lead- 
ing wine countries of Europe will change the public sentiment 
and that from now on our Eastern branches will have little 
difficulty in convincing American people that there is no reason 
why they should buy the foreign article, if they desire a superior 
wine. 

During the past year, we have also noticed a healthy increase 
in the sale of ca.sed goods, not only at home and in the North- 
west, but also throughout the Middle West and in the Atlantic 
States. This is the result of extensive advertising on our part, 
the good effects of the protective tariff, and the gradual change 
of sentiment which is certainly being felt in favor of native 
wine.s, since the public have had a chance to taste our best 
California wines under California labels. In the old days, our 
best California wines were sent to New York and there bottled 
in the "dark cellars" of the metropolis and given the label of 
some famous foreign brand. Only our poorer California wines 
were offered under their true label and naturally they did not 
make a very favorable impression on our Eastern brethren. 

But the Pure Food Law has changed all this and today the 
American people are able to taste our very best wines under 
their true label, with the result that Americans are recognizing 
their merits and using them more freely every day. I refer not 
only to our still wines but to effervescent wines as well. 

And in" this connection, I want to say that at a well-knoAvn 
cafe, the other day, I invited about fifteen guests to sample our 
new sparkling wines made under the supervision of M. Charles 
Jadeau, who for twenty-five years has been connected with one 
"of the largest champagne plants in France. For over a year he 
has been preparing 250,000 bottles of white and red sparkling 
wines, and I was anxious to have my friends give me their honest 
opinion of what he had accomplished. I am glad to say that the 
wines proved a big surprise and my guests did not hesitate to 
predict a splendid success for our new Asti Special, Sec, (white) 
and Asti Rouge (red), as the wines are to be known when they 
will be placed on the market in a few months. 

Mr. Jadeau, who was present, was highly complimented, and 
in discu.ssing his work said : 

"I must confess that I left France with much misgivings and 
apprehension when I contracted to come to California. But 
after having sampled the different vintages at Asti for months, 
studying the distinctive characteristics of each wine, and maldng 
everj- possible test, my fears were promptly dispelled. 

"^In the immense vineyard of the Asti Colony, I have found 



all the choicest vines of Champagne, La Touraine and Anjou. 
There is the Meunier, which supj)lies the white juice in Cham- 
pagne; the black pinot, which produces our fine red Bourgognes; 
also two or three other vines whose wines struck me as being 
especially suited for the 'Cuvee.' 

"I am glad to say that if I came here without enthusiasm and 
a little uneasy, it was because I liad been misinformed of the 
true conditions. I am satisfied now that the sparkling wines I 
have produced at Asti will be able to hold their OAvn with any of 
the imported brands sold here in America." 

My guests found that the two samples of champagne which 
were offered, one diy and the other a trifle sweeter, had as flue 
a bouquet, fragrance and velvety taste as any effervescent wines 
produced in France ; while the .sparkling Burgundy, called Asti 
Rouge, is soft, fruity, mellow, with a rich ruby color that is 
beautiful. 

"You have the wine," remarked one enthusia.st, "the only 
thing you will have to overcome is the prejudice of the American 
people, who have been educated to believe that a sparkling wine 
must have a foreign label to be really good." 

This is true, but the Italian-Swiss Colony believes that the 
American people are beginning to realize the truth about our 
home product and that from now on the importers will flnd that 
they cannot longer hoodwink the people with their absurd 
claims. Very truly yours, 

P. C. ROSSI, 

San Francisco, January, 1911. Pres. Italian-Swiss Colony. 



Percy T. Morgan to Retire from Wine Association 

THE wine men not only of California, but of the TTnited 
States, will read with sj^ecial interest the announcement 
that Percy T. Morgan, the well known San Francisco capitalist 
and the "live wire" of the California Wine Association, will 
retire from his official ])osition on the 2.3d of February, at wliicli 
time the annual meeting will be held and his resignation ac 
cepted. 

Mr. Morgan's retirement is due entirely to failing heallli 
which demands that he shall suspend all business activity, and 
take an indefinite rest. 

It is Mr. Morgan's intention to depart Avith his family for 
Europe where he Avill place two of his children in school. ITc 
will take a year's rest and then return to San Franci.sco to re- 
sume his residence. 

As to Avho Avill succeed Mr. Morgan is an undetermined ques- 
tion insofar as the outsiders are concerned, ilanager Han.son 
of the Wine Association, when asked as to Mr. ^lorgan's pioh- 
able successor .stated that there Avas no information on that line 
for publication, and that news would not be forthcoming until 
after holding the annual meeting. There are a number of names 
mentionetl as probable successors, but we do not deem it advisa- , 
ble to mention them in this connection. 9 

Percy T. Morgan has been Avith the r'alifornia Wine Associi' 
tion .since its organization. He Avas first secretary, then treas- 
urer and finally president. Formerly he occui)ie(l a high de- 
partmental position in the Pacific Tele])lione & Telegi'aph Com- 
pany. He is a man of great energy' and always too ready to 
take on extra labors in the interest of the welfare of his insti- 
tution. The trials and hardships and extraordinary efforts 
following the earthquake and fire broke his health and he has 
finally found it necessary to get away from all business cares. 
His many close personal friends Avill Avish him an early 
return and thorough recovery, as does the Review. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



IB 



Italian-Swiss Colony 



Producers of Choice California 
Sparkling Wines 




Asti Special, Sec. 
(white) 



Naturally Fermented in the Bottle 
and NOT CARBONATED 



MAIN OFFICE 
Battery and Greenwich Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

NEW YORK OFFICE 
N. E. Cor. W. 11th and Washington Sts.* 

CHICAGO OFFICE 
27 West Kinzie Street 




Asti Rouge 
(red) 




VAULTSilN THE NEW CHAMPAGNE*BUILDING OF THE ITALIAN-SWISS COLONY AT ASTI 



16 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 
The Status of Imported Wines Fred Staude Gives A Good Talk 



WB. CHAPIMAN, of the old establi.shcd firm of rha])iiian & 
• Wilberforce, importers of Dawson's Scotch Whisk}' 
and high class European Avines, gave some important facts iii 
regard to the European wine trade in the present condition 
caused by the almost total failure of the vintage of 1910. 

ilr. Chapman was pleased to give the Review his views in 
regard to the situation during the past year, but said that he 
found it by no means an ea.sy matter to say anytliing of gen- 
eral interest. This statement he followed up by the following 
reinarks : 

"As far as our personal experience is concerned Ave can sim- 
"-:^^ we have no reason to grumble, but we cannot cer- 
tainly speak enthusiastically of the past year. 

"The ncAv tariff has not much aflfectefl us, although it may 
perhaps have somewhat diminished our sales. W'e find that 
there is a large class here who insist on having the best of every- 
thing, and if necessary many are Avilling to pay Avell for it. 

"The talk of good crops throughout the country, the easier 
financial situation and the increase of population as shoAvn by 
the last census, in our opinion, cannot but help to bring about 
better business. The thing which has most troubled us is the 
disastrous crops in Europe, particularly in France and Ger- 
many. 

"As far as Ave can learn this failure of the 1910 vintage Avill 
more particularly affect the cheaper and commoner class of 
Avines, as there are fortunately very large stocks of old vintages 
still left to draw upon. As a matter of fact the comparative 
dullness of the last few months has prevented prices advanc- 
ing as they might otherwise have done, except in the case of 
cheap grades, which Avere largely exhausted, and Avhich Avill 
be found very difficult to supply. The pure food laAv has pre- 
vented the shipment to this country of any Avines Avhich Avere 
not authentic — that is to say produced at the place called for 
by the label. 

"About champagnes we would say that it must be remembered 
that while there Avill be a great scarcity of cheaper grades of 
champagnes, there is nearly five years' supply of old vintages 
still left for export. The same may be said of Rhine wines. With 
regard to clarets, the demand for this class of Avine has greatly 
decreased during the last feAv years, our native California wine 
having seriously competed Avith them. On this head it may be 
mentioned that while there is not so much of good old Bordeaux 
Avines in France itself, there is a large quantity still to be had 
at second hand from London and other sources. 

"With regard to the future Ave are very optimistic. Our best 
clubs have now reopened and San Francisco feels itself more 
at home, and ready to extend her well known Californian hos- 
pitality. NoAV that the fear of a dry season has been removed, 
and plenteous crops reasonably assured, business must certainly 
improve. To the above reasons may be added the largely in- 
creased influx of moneyed people, attracted by the enlarged 
opportunity for movement soon to be created by the early open- 
ing of the Panama Canal Avhich— fair or no fair, although Ave 
certainly hope the former— cannot help being an immense bene- 
fit to the entire Pacific Coast." 



During the present month judgment Avas rendered by the 
Superior Court in favor of the plaintiff in the suit of L. M. 
Hoefler against the Moulton Hill Vineyard Company, in an 
action brought to recover on two promissory notes, one for 
110,187 and the other for |10,]95. The liti'gatiim grew out 
of financial difficulties in Avhicli the Moulton Hill Company 
became involved. 



ON behalf of Wichman, Lutgen & Company I desire to in- 
form you that our corporation has found 1910 an improve- 
ment upon 1909 as far as business is concerned. This I attrib- 
ute to the notable increase of population in San Francisco and 
also to tlie growing demand for a better class of goods brought 
about by the passage of the Pure Food Law. At the close of 
the past year, as far as Ave can penetrate the future, every firm 
of standing in the wholesale liquor trade should materially in- 
crease their business in 1911. 

Now that Mike de Young has come out plainly Avith the state- 
ment in Washington that we are going to have a Panama Ex- 
position, whether international in character or not, Ave believe 
that future business is assured. Of course the one depends 
upon the action of Congress, Avhile the other is the unmistakable 
decision of the people of California, Ave might say of the entire 
Western States, as shown by the literal bombardment of Pres- 
ident Taft with telegrams. While Ave hope Congress Avill decide 
in our favor, Ave feel satisfied that a Pacific Coast Exposition, if 
it must be confined to that, will do wonders in bringing about 
good times and an active market. 

We are in a position to state that our belief in the future is 
so strong because we know the capitalists of the Avorld, Avho are 
looking to the Pacific Coast as a ncAV field for investments, are 
prepared to advance millions to cultivate its possibilities, and 
also strengthen and develop Oriental trade upon the broad 
Pacific. Under such circumstances there should indeed be a 
bright future for the wholesale liquor business Avest of the 
Rockies. 

Take for example those aggressive firms Avhich have borne 
fully the brunt of hard times in the past, and have re-established 
themselves since the fire Avith larger capital and increased 
facilities. These firms deserve, and in our opinion will most 
certainly receive, the benefits derived from the vast influx of 
people who will be drawn from all quarters of the globe by the 
completion of the Panama Canal. We are heartily in favor of 
properly celebrating the opening of this great Avaterway, by a 
magnificent fair, by which Ave can show our Avelcome to the 
advent of this stream of settlers, whose arriA^al means Avealth 
and prosperity for the entire Pacific Coast. 

FREDERICK STAUDE, 
Vice-President and Secretary. 



Hotaling & Co. Had Exceptionally Good Year 



EDITOR Wine and Spirit Revieav : — Replying to your inquiry 
as to our business during the past year Avould say that Ave 
enjoyed an exceptionally good trade during 1910. Furthermore, 
Ave consider the prospects for 1911 not only excellent, but bet- 
ter than for several years past. Our experience, speaking of 
demands for various lines of liquors, is that the trade on this 
coast is gradually getting back to blends again, as against 
straight double-stamp Avhisky. We do not know wliat ex])eri- 
ence other houses haAC had, but our past yeai*'s business proves 
this proposition to us. 

It may be of interest to the trade of the Coast to knoAV that 
we have taken over the agency of F. Cliauvenet's imported bur- 
gundies. This is one of the liigliest class wines of France and 
it has a remarkably good sale in tliis market. The demand, 
during the time Ave have had tlie agency, has been surprisingly 
good, and Avill continue so. Tlie brand is widely known and 
appreciated among connoisseurs. 

A. P. HOTALING CO., 
Per J. F. Moroneyj General Manager. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 17 



CHARLES MEINECKE 'Si CO. 

IMPORTERS 

314 Sacramento Street San Francisco, Cal. 



SOLE AGENTS ON THE PACIFIC COAST FOR 

WILLIAMS & HUMBERT J. J. MEDER & ZOON 

Jerez, Spain SHERRIES Schiedam, Holland SWAN GIN 



WARRE & CO. JOHN RAMSAY 

Oporto, Portugal _. _ PORTS Islay, Scotland SCOTCH WHISKY 



SCHRODER & SCHYLER & CO. DUBLIN WHISKY DISTILLERY CO. 

Bordeaux, France ..CLARETS, ETC. Dublin, Ireland IRISH WHISKY 



EDUARD SAARBACH & CO. GREENBRIER DISTILLERY CO. 

Mayence, Germany HOCK WINES Louisville, Ky. "R. B. HAYDEN" WHISKY 



C. MAREY & LIGER-BELAIR J. A. J. NOLET CO. 

Nuits, France BURGUNDIES Baltimore DOUBLE EAGLE GINS 



MACKIE & CO. JOS. S. FINCH & CO. 

Islay, Scotland "WHITE HORSE" SCOTCH WHISKY Pittsburg, Pa. "GOLDEN WEDDING" RYE WHISKY 



BOORD & SON FREUND, BALLOR & CO. 

London, Eng. BOORD'S OLD TOM AND DRY GINS Torino, Italy ITALIAN VERMOUTH 

I 

■ BOUTELLEAU & CO. A. BOAKE, ROBERTS & CO. 

^ Cognac, France COGNAC BRANDIES London, Eng ..BREWERS' MATERIALS 

■ 



18 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



^49^VVVTW9f t9V9TTV^Wf IWWfV^P^M v*^^** r^^^^WT^^^^V f f ^^^^Vtt^^^^V? t^^^^Wf ^^^^Vt r^>^^^V9V^^^^W "^ 

j Grape Syrup Evaporater j # j 



I w j 



A Success 



WE have received the folloAving interesting coninmnication 
in relation to grape syrup from Mr. W. J. Wayte, an 
English engineer, and an expert in sugar-producing machinery. 
He says: 

"In my work on grape syrup I find a great difference in the 
methods of handling necessary hetween this and sugar syrups 
from other sources. The sugars contained in the grape are the 
most delicate of any in existence and deteriorate more quickly 
than any other sugars I have ever handled. They are perfectly 
amenable, however, to proper methods and when I had once 
found out the conditions necessary to work under, I had abso- 
lutely no difficulties whatever, and obtained a product that for 
delicacy of flavor cannot be equaled by sugar from any other 
source. I have tried every type of evaporation that is in the 
market and was totally unable to produce a proper product 
until I got the apparatus now being built by the Oscar Krez 
Copper and Brass Works, which certainly does not only proper, 
but very effective work. 

"When recently in New York I was introduced to Dr. Wiley, 
a member of the Pure Food Inspection Board, and rated as one 
of the best chemists in the United States by Congressman Need- 
ham. After showing him samples of my grape syrup, I asked 
him his opinion as to the use of them for sweetening the sweet 
wines of Ohio instead of using sugar. He replied that he would 
think we Californians would prefer to hold up his hands in his 
struggle to prevent Ohio and other sections, where the grapes 
were not sufficiently sweet for sweet wines, from making them 
and allow us to make all the sweet Avines in California where we 
had the proper grapes to do so. I agreed with him, but pointed 
out the almost impossible task of preventing such manufacture 
and submitted that under these circumstances we would like to 
supply the syrup, and so create a market for our grapes that we 
could not get otherwise. After considerable discussion of the 
subject. Dr. Wiley, while taking the position that it was entirely 
a question for the legal department to settle, expressed himself 
emphatically in favor of the use of grape syrup in place of the 
sugar now used for sweetening purposes. 

"He expressed himself as very much pleased both with the 
flavor, color and general appearance of the syrup, and also Avith 
the fact that it was absolutely pure and Avas not admixed Avith 
any other material whatever. He said he kncAV of no other syrup 
Avhatever that Avas in this condition, every other in the market 
being the result of compounding, and asked that samples be 
sent him for analysis and report, Avhich is noAV being done." 

In the above communication Ave think it is clearly shown, as 
far as that can be done before the analysis now being made by 
the Pure Food chemists is completed, that the syrup in question 
has many uses: First — that it Avill take the place of sugar in 
the SAveetening of sweet Avines wherever necessary ; second — that 
from its purity and delicious flavor, it is bound to be largely 
used for domestic purjjoses. We also learn that it is uoav being 
prescribed by physicans in cases of diabetes. 

While in Ncav York Mr. Wayte found out that Avhile a new 
substance in the United States, grape syrup, or raisin sugar as 
it is there known, is very old in Europe. In Professor Surface's 
book, "The Story of Sugar," that Avell-known Yale professor has 
this to say on the subject : "Sugar is manufactured from raisins 
in practically all the countries of Southern Europe and Western 
Asia. There are two forms of raisin sugar imj)orted into NeAv 
York, the one from Syria, Asia Minor and Turkey, and the other 



from Spain. That from the Levantine countries is said to be 
consumed by 250,000 Arabic-speaking people in the cities of the 
AtlaTitic seaboard, avIio prize this syrupy sugar very highly as 
a coffee SAveeteiier. The Turks add to tlie delicacy of the SAveet 
by the use of a fcAV drops of roscAvater. The crystallized raisin 
sugar is made in Spain, Avhere it constitutes one of the common 
domestic products of the small farm. Small quantities are im- 
ported into the United States by immigrants from the Iberian 
Peninsula." 

The above extract set him thinking that perhaps the syrup 
referred to could be found in the Armenian quarter of Ciothani. 
For some time his search AA^as fruitless, but eventually he found 
that it Avas in use under the name of "concentrated grape juice,'" 
Avhich had been adoptcnl to lessen the amount of ini])ort duty. 
ilr. Wayte obtained some, and brought a can back from New 
York Avitli him. It is practically the same as the syrup made 
by him, the latter being better, because of the more perfect 
mechanical devices used in nmnufacturing it. 

It Avill therefore be plain, as before statetl by the Revieav, that 
the manufacture of this syrup must necessarily open up a large 
market for Californian grapes, containing, as they usually do, 
between 20 and 25 per cent of sugar. 



Adulteration and Misbranding of Brandies 



NOTICE OB' JUDGMENT NO. 683, FOOD AND DRUGS ACT. 

ON or about April 16, 1909, Julius Heymanson, doing busi- 
ness under the name of the Consolidated Importing Com- 
pany, Chicago, 111., shipped from the State of Illinois to the 
State of Missouri a quantity of alleged brandy labeled "Jas. 
Ilennessy & Co. Cognac. Registered in United States Patent 
Office. France. Guaranteed under the Food and Drugs Act 
June 30, 1906. Serial Number 3241." Samples of this ship 
ment Avere procured and analyzed by the Bureau of Chemistry, 
United States Department of Agi'iculture, and as it appeared 
from the findings of the analyst and report made that the pro 
duct Avas adulterated and misbranded Avithin the meaning of 
the Food and Drugs Act of June 30, 1906, the Secretary of Ag- 
riculture reported the facts to the Attorney-General Avith a 
statement of the evidence upon Avhich to base a prosecution. 

On September 16, 1910, a criminal information Avas filed in 
the District Court of the United States for the Northern Dis- 
trict of Illinois against the said Julius Heymanson, charging 
the above' shipment and alleging that the product so shipped 
Avas adulterated, in that a substance, to Avit, an imitation brandy 
had been mixed and packed Avith said article of food so as to 
reduce, loAver, and injuriously affect its quality and strength; 
in that an imitation brandy had been substituted Avholly or in 
part for the product ; and in that said article of food had been 
colored Avith caramel in a manner Avhereby its inferiority Avas 
concealed; and alleging the product to be misbranded, in that 
the label above set forth Avas false and misleading because it 
purported that the article Avas a foreign product Avheu as a mat- 
ter of fact it Avas not, but Avas an imitation brandy made in the 
United States and sold and shipped under the labels of Jas. 
Hennessy & Co., of France; in that the product was an imita- 
tion brandy offered for sale under the distinctive name of an 
other article, to Avit, "Jas. Hennessy & Co. Cognac. France." 

Upon arraignment the defendant entered a plea of guilty 
to the above information and the court imposed a fine of |10. 

This notice is given pursuant to section 4 of the Food and 
Drugs Act of June 30, 1906. 

W. M. HAYS, 
Acting Secretary of Agriculture. 

Washington, D. C, November 1, 1910. . 
Issued Dec. 7, 1910. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



19 



BOTTLED 
IN BOND 



IN THE PUBLIC MARKETS OF AMERICA. 

THIS MERITED POSITJON STAMPS ITS ESTEEM 
IN THE FAVOR AND CONFIDENCE OF THE DIS- 
CRIMINATING PUBLIC. 

THEGOVERNMENTiS GUARANTEE STAMP OVER THE 
CORKOFBOTTLED IN BOND WHISKEY IS GREEN 
AND SO ISTHE MAN WHO DOES NOT LOOK FOR IT. 

E.H.TAYLORJR.&SONS..i'fMl'r^^i¥Kv 



FRANKFORT. KY 



WILLIAM WOLFF & CO. 

SOLE DISTRIBUTERS 

San Francisco, California 



20 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




FROM DECEMBER 20, 1910, TO JANUARY 20, 1911. 



Destination 



To Alaska 
■■ British Columbia 
" Central America . 

" China 

" Hawaiian Islands 

" Japan 

" Mexico 

'* New York 

" Philippine Islands 
" Soutli America . . . 
" Samoan Islands . . 
** Society Islands . . . 

"-Samarang 

" Germany 

" London 

" France 

" Fanning Islands . . 
" New Orleans 



Cases. Gallons. 

351 

1,794 

29,731 

1,170 

76,412 

4.467 

2,624 

929,548 

1,120 

1,190 

258 

1,012 

256 

7,100 

5,095 

20,200 

168 

96,000 



68 

131 

80 

277 



440 
40 



Value. 

$202 

965 

10,288 

775 

36,250 

1,494 

963 

200,972 

600 

599 

151 

347 

256 

2,480 

1,700 

8,080 

81 

26,400 



Total 

120 cases Wine in transit to Central America. 



992 1,108,496 $292,603 



BRANDY. 



Destination 

To China 

" Hawaiian Islands 

" New York 

" London 

" Philippine Islands 



Cases. 
"36 



Gallons. 

50 

340 

7,500 

3,583 



Total 



35 



11,473 



Value. 

$28 

898 

1,617 

1,800 

33 

$4,376 



BEiEIRa 



Destination. 

To Alaska 

" Central America . 
" Fanning Islands . 
** Hawaiian Islands 
" Society Islands . 



Packages Packages 

Bottled. Bulk. Value. 

7 $97 

9 76 

14 122 

36 1,083 

4 112 



Total 

In transit to Central America 118 cs Beer. 



1 

60 
4 

72 



63 



WHISKY. 



Destination 

To Australia 

" Central America . . 
" Hawaiian Islands 

" Japan 

" Mexico 

" Philippine Islands 



Cases. Gallons. 



167 

268 

12 

15 

16 

477 



20 
1,263 



1,372 



$1,490 



Value. 

$112 

1,017 

6,142 

77 

130 

78 

$7,556 



Total 

25 cs Whisky in bond to Mexico. 

MISCEL,L,AlVEOUS EXPORTS. 

Destination. Packages and Contents. 

To British Columbia 50 cs Mineral Water, 19 cs Liquors, 2 cs Cherries in 

Maraschino. 

1 kg Prune Juice, 1 kg Syrup 

" Central America 25 cs Grape Juice, 2 cs Cordials, 2 cs Cherry Brandy 

14 cs Mineral Water, 1 cs Alcohol, 12 cs Spirits 

" China 2 cs Cherries in Maraschino. 1 hf bbl Cordial, 3 cs Grape Juice 

" Hawaiian Islands. 25 cs Liquor, 1 bbl Coco Cola, 60 cs Cordials, 10 cs Kummel 

17 cs Grape Juice, 1 cs 2 bbls Alcohol, 45 cs Champagne 

220 cs 4 bbls Gin, 1 cs Cherries in Marascliino, 5 cs Bitters 

188 cs Mineral Water, 2 cs Porter. 5 cs Rock and Rye 

5 cs Syrup, 3 cs Creme de Menthe, 4 cs Cocktails 

" Japan ..2 cs Champagne, 1 cs Mineral Water, 10 cs Cherries in Maraschino 

" Mexico 5 cs Gin, 56 cs Mineral Water, 3 cs Spirits, 10 cs Amer Picon 

1 cs Cherries in Maraschino, 2 cs Pousse Cafe 

" New York 50 cs Champagne 

" Australia 6 cs Gin 

" Samoan Islands 10 cs Grape Juice 

" Philippine Islands. 58 cs Liquors, 47 cs Cherries in Maraschino, 11 cs Cordials 

90 cs Creme de Menthe, 5 cs Syrup, 50 cs Cider 

10 cs Bitters, 25 cs Ginger Brandy, 5 cs Kummel 

2 cs Mineral Water, 3 bbls Ginger Ale 



Total 1172 cs 10 bbls 1 hf bbl 2 kegs 

Value $13,000 

In transit to Mexico, 6 cs 2 hf bbls Spirits. 

In transit to Central America, 5 cs Mineral Water, 25 cs Vermouth, 18 
cs Spirits. 




Domeittlc. 



FROM DECEMBER 20, 1910, TO JANUARY 20, 1911. 



FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Buckman, December 22. 

200 hhds Beer John Rapp & Son. 

125 bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

100 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

25 bbls Beer North Star Bottling Co. 

FROM PORT TOWNSEND— Per steamer Umatilla, December 27. 

1 bbl Wine B. Arnhold & Co. 

1 bbl Wine Leventhal Bros. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Admiral Sampson, December 27. 
65 pkgs Beer John Rapp & Sons. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Watson, December 30. 

60 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

40 ht bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

100 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

60 hhds Beer John Rapp & Son. 

28 hhds Draft Beer John Rapp & Son. 

72 bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

200 ht bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

180 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

1 hf bbl Brandy A. Beard. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Buckman, January 3. 

45 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

100 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

124 ht bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

7.') qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

198 cs Champagne Schmidt & Peters. 

100 cs Whisky Tillmann & Bendel. 

50 cs Whisky L. D. McLane Co. 

1 hhd Whir.k"/ Pacific Union Club. 

70 hhds Be-»r John Rapp & Son. 

100 hf bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

100 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Watson, January 9. 

260 hhds Beor John Rapp & Son. 

60 bbls Beer Tohn Rapp & Son. 

100 hf bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

100 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

FROM TACOMA — Per steamer Senator, January 9. 
17 pkgs Liquors Rosenblatt Co. 

FROM NEW YORK — Per ship Manga Reva, January 9. 
38 csks Wine Order. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Governor, January 13. 

10 cs Vermouth Bertin & Leporl. 

2 bbls Wine Tom McCoy. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Admiral Sampson, January 17. 

243 hhds Beer John Rapp & Son. 

21 hf bbls Beer . John Rapp & Son. 

12 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

2 cs Wine Otis, McAllister Co. 

50 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

IN TRANSIT. 

To Oakland 230 hhds 135 bbls 170 hf bbls 40 qr bbls 78 pkgs 3 6th bbls 

" Stockton 160 pkgs 

" Santa Clara 135 bbls 70 hf bbls 124 qr bbls 10 6th bbls 

" San Pedro 50 hhds 20 hf bbls 50 qr bbls 

" Los Angeles 125 bbls 8 hf bbls 

" San Jose 130 bbls 80 hf bbls 90 qr bbls 

" Vallejo 40 bbls 25 ht bbls 20 qr bbls 



E. A. QROEZINQER 



Established 1864 



E. 0. SCHRAUBSTADTER 



SPARKLING ANo VINTAGE WINES 

CHAMPAGNES 



809 MONTGOMERY STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



ALEX D SHAW & CO 



NEW YORK 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CHICAGO 



Agents for 



DUFF GORDON & CO 


PORT ST MARY'S SHERRIES 


COCKBURN SMITHES & CO 


OPORTO 


PORTS 


ARTHUR GUINNESS SON & CO Ltd 


DUBLIN 


EXTRA STOUT ON DRAUGHT 


JAMES BUCHANAN & CO Ltd 


SCOTLAND "BLACK & WHITE" SCOTCH WHISKEY 


COATES & CO 


ENGLAND 


PLYMOUTH GIN 


THE OLD BUSHMILLS DISTILLERY CO Ltd 


IRELAND 


PURE MALT WHISKEY 


D LEIDEN Ltd 


GERMANY 


RHINE AND MOSELLE WINES 


F CINZANO & CO 


XTURIN 
VCHAMBERY 


ITALIAN VERMOUTH 
FRENCH VERMOUTH 


BISQUIT DUBOUCHE & CO 


COGNAC 


FINE BRANDIES 


COSSART GORDON & CO 


MADEIRA 


MADEIRA WINES 


INGHAM & WHITAKER 


MARSALA 


SICILY WINES 


E H KEELING & SON 


LONDON 


JAMAICA RUMS 


SCHOLTZ BROS 


MALAGA 


SPANISH WINES 


S DARTHEZ Succrs 


REUS 


TARRAGONA WINES 


E CUSENIER FILS AINE & CO 


PARIS 


FINE CORDIALS 


COMPAGNIE FERMIERE DE 


/la GRANDE 


CHARTREUSE ^ ^^^^ „ 

LIQUEURS 


LA GRANDE CHARTREUSE 


\FRANCE 



HEIDSIECK & CO 

WALBAUM GOULDEN & CO Succrs 



) 



MONOPOLE RED TOP \ 
REIMS I CHAMPAGNES 

DRY MONOPOLE BRUT/ 



San Francisco Office, 214 Front Street 

EDWIN C. HAMMER, Ma.i\ager 



22 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT KEVIEW. 



1 



IMPORTS. 



Foreign. 



FROM DECEMBER 20, 1910, TO JANUARY 20, 1911. 



FROM NEW YORK (via Sallna Cruz)^Per Pleiades, December 21. 

2 bbls Gin Roth & Co., San Francisco. 

18 OS Brandy J. Castaloupes, San Francisco. 

10 bbls Gin Baird, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

8 csks Gin Balrd, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Gin ■ L. D. McLean, San Francisco. 

SO c"! Wine Granucci Grocery Co., San Francisco. 

10 cs Wine A. Guirlani & Bro., San Francisco. 

10 cs Clianipagne Jas. Stall, San Francisco. 

5 cs Wine Jas. Stall, San Francisco. 

ll.*) cs Whisky A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

26 cs Wine F. de Bar.v & Co., San Francisco. 

33 cs Brandy F. de Bary & Co.. San Francisco. 

10 cs Whisky F. de Bar.v & Co.. San Francisco. 

13 csks Sherry South End Warehouse, San Francisco. 

3 cs Whisky Sherwood &. Sherwood, San Francisco. 

16 cs Brandy A. Levas, Sacramento. 

FROM EUROPE. 

30 cs Champagne Wieland Bros., San Francisco. 

50 cs Beer H. Campe & Co., San Francisco. 

5 octs Brandy E. Martin & Co., San Francisco. 

327 csks Whisky C. W. Cral? & Co., San Francisco. 

8 octs Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

FROM VICTORIA — Per President, December 21. 
200 cs Stout Haslett Warehouse Co., San Francisco. 

FROM ANTWERP, ETC.— Per Tanls, December 25. 

100 cs Vermouth Wm. W^olff & Co., San Francisco. 

'41 cs Wine D. G. Dreyfus, San Francisco. 

50 cs Spirits Crown Distilleries Co.. San Francisco. 

1 200 cs Gin De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

1400 cs Vermouth . De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Liquors Continental Distillery Co., Seattle. 

350 cs Gin Continental Distillery Co., Seattle. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Sallna Cruz) — Per Missourlan, December 26. 

677 cs Whisky W. H. Campbell, San Francisco. 

20 cs Wine F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

1 cs Sherry MuHer ^ Co.. San Francisco. 

5 bbls Gin Wilmerding', Lowe & Co., San Francisco. 

5 bbls Gin Balrd, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

a cs Gin Baird, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

39 cs Whisk v J. Levin, San Francisco. 

10 bbls Whisky Jones & Co.. Sacramento. 

5 bbls Whisky Fleishner, Mayer & Co.. Portland. 

15 bbls Wine Krellshelmer Bros., Seattle. 

26 cs Champagne S. Hyde, Seattle. 

50 cs Cordials S. Hyde, Seattle. 

42 cs Champagne Goldie Dist. Co., Seattle. 

25 cs Cordials Jaffe & Co., Seattle. 

50 cs Cordials Continental Dist. Co., Seattle. 

10 cs Rum Continental Dist. Co., Seattle. 

25 cs Branilv Order, Seattle. 

153 cs Wine Kreilshoimer Bros., Seattle. 

10 bbls Whisky Order. Honolulu. 

110 bbls Whisky Int. Revenue Storekeeper, Honolulu. 

15 bbls Gin Peacock & Co., Honolulu. 

FROM EUROPE. 

90 bbls Beer Lang & Stroh, San Francisco. 

125 cs Whisky Macondray & Co., San Francisco. 

10 octs Brandy Order, San Francisco. 

102 cs Brandy Order, San Francisco. 

46 cs Liquors Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

118 cs Wine Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

2 cs Gin Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

30 cs Beer Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

100 cs Mineral Water ApoUinaris Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Brandy Rieger & Lindley, Salt Lake. 

50 cs Wine Gottstein & Co., Seattle. 

50 cs Brandy Hanson & Co., Seattle. 

150 cs Porter Busch & Co., Seattle. 

3 cs Brandy Schlossmacher & Co., Seattle. 

101 cs Brandy Order, Seattle. 

16 cs Beer Hoffschlagcr & Co., Honolulu. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Sallna Cruz) — Per Isthmian, December 29. 

14 cs Cordials J- I''- Plumel, San Francisco. 

5 octs Gin H. Campe & Co., San Francisco. 

5 bbls Gin H. Campe & Co., San Francisco. 

61 cs Gin H. Campe & Co., San Francisco. 

10 cs Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

38 cs Liquors W. B. Sanborn, San Francisco. 

1 csk Wine W. B. Sanborn, San Francisco. 

8 cs Liquors A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

10 bbls Whisky Ladd & Co., Stockton. 

1 bbl Whisky Imperial Hotel, Portland. 

1 bbl Whisky D> Germains, Portland. 

11 bbls Whisky Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

2 bbls Whisky J. E- Kelly & Co.. Portland. 

FROM EUROPE. 
53 cs Wine tie Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

31 cs Wine Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

3 cs Wine Emporium, San Francisco. 

2 cs Brandy Emporium, San Francisco. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN — Per Henrlk Ibsen, December 29. 
285 csks Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

70 cs Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

84 cs Sake N. A. Mercantile Co., San Francisco. 

50 csks Sake K. Togasaki, San Francisco. 

ItO cs Sake K. Togasaki, San Francisco. 

59 csks Sake Mural & Co., San Francisco. 

50 csks Sake ....'. Macondray & Co.. San Francisco. 

50 csks Sake Order, Los Angeles. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN — Per Mongolia, December 30. 

lOB csks Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

200 csks Sake N. A. Mercantile Co., San Francisco. 

128 cs Sake N. A, Mercantile Co., San Francisco. 

20 csks Sake Masuda & Co., Oakland. 

20 csks Sake Akl & Co., Sacramento. 

20 csks Sake J. Tawara, Sacramento. 

5 cs Sake , T. Tawara, Sacramento. 

60 cs Sake Sonoma Wine Co., Los Angeles. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN — Per Tenyo Maru, January 6. 
150 csks Sake Akl & Co., Sacramento. 

20 cs Sake Akl & Co., Sacramento. 

200 csks .«ake N. A. Mercantile Co.. San Francisco. 

30 csks Sake Sonoma Wine Co., Los Angeles 



FROM ANTWERP— Per Marlborough Hill, January 3. 

475 cs Liquors A. Vignier Co., San Francisco. 

475 cs Mineral Water ApoUinaris Co., San Francisco. 

FROM EUROPE (via Ancon) — Per Aztec, January 6. 
20 cs Brandy American Mercantile Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Champagne S. B. Fugazl, San Francisco. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Sallna Cruz) — Per Columbian, January 9. 
7 bbls Gin Silver Grill, Tacoma. 

6 bbls Whisky Arata Bros, Portland. 

5 bbls Whisky Hraun Bros., Portland. 

6S2 cs Whisky Clark & Co., Portland. 

175 bbls Beer Hackfeld & Co., Honolulu. 

FROM EUROPE. 
3 cs Wine H. T. Gage, Los Angeles. 

1 csk "Brandy Jevne & Co., Los Angeles. 

25 cs Whisky Hilf Mer. Co., Los Angeles. 

100 cs Champagne Los Angeles Warehouse, Los Angeles. 

275 cs Champagne United Warehouse, Seattle. 

10 cs Beer Hackfeld & Co., Honolulu. 

2 kgs Wine Delsol Bros., San Francisco. 

80 cs Wine Delsol Bros.. San Francisco. 

510 bbls Stout Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco, 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN— Per Korea, January 13. 

30 cs Sake N. A. Mer. Co.. San Francisco. 

70 csks Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

30 cs Sake Kagawa & Co., San Francisco. 

50 csks Sake Mural & Co.. San Francisco. 

40 csks Sake G. Hamura, Los Angeles. 

30 csks Sake G. Hamura, Los Angeles. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Sallna Cruz) — Per Nebraskan, January 17. 

14 cs Wine F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

10 cs Whisky ..." F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Whisky A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

670 cs Whisky W. H. Campbell, San Francisco. 

1379 cs Whisky C. W. Craig & Co., San Francisco. 

.57 bbls Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

100 cs AVhisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

25 cs Gin Chapman Ik Wilbertorce, San Francisco. 

10 cs Gin H. Campe & Co.. San Francisco. 

500 cs Absinthe G. S. Nichols & Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Champagne \. Vignier Co . San J'^rancisco. 

10 bbls Gin MuUer & Co., San Francisco. 

100 cs Gin Muller & Co., San Francisco. 

11 cs Wine Blumauer & Hoch, Portland. 

FROM EUROPE. 

6 cs Wine Wm. ClufC & Co., San Francisco. 

3 cs Spirits Wm. ClufE & Co.. San Francisco. 

45 csks Mineral Water tH^erwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

200 cs Beer Jevne & Co., San Diego. 

86 cs Wine Jevne & Co., Los Angeles. 



IMPOHTS BY RAIL IIV BOND. 

FROM DECEMBER 20, 1910, TO JANUARY 20, 1911. 



Via New York — 

30 cs Wine From Hamburg. 

102 cs Liquors " Greece. 

5 bbls Wine 

1 csk Wliisky " Glasgow. 

2 cs Wine 

VIb New Orleanii— 

2 hhds Whlskv From Liverpool. 

450 cs Champagne " Antwerp. 

105 baskets Champagne " " 

VIn Victoria, B. C — 

3 cs Whisky From Victoria. 



New York Takes 6,000,000 Gallons 



ALMOST at the conclusion of our resume for the year we 
come to the fibres showing the arrivals of California wines 
at New York. In commenting on the various imported articles 
we were inclined to believe that consumers economized during 
the year 1910, which statement we think is corroborated by the 
figures showing the arrivals of California wines at New York. 
It will be noted that we received here over 6.,000,000 gallons of 
these wines, which is some 2,000,000 in excess of the year pre- 
vious. This is a remarkable showing, and even at the time 
before the fire in San Francisco the figure of 1910 was never 
equaled. The producers of Californian wines are offering to the 
public a high class article, and through judicious advertising 
they have popularized their product throughout the country. 

We are pleased to publish beloAV the receipts of Californian 
wines at New York for the past six years : 

Gallons. Gallons. 

1905 2,843,550 1908 1,751,400 

1906 1,887,900 1909 . .4,042,850 

1907 1,503,700 1910 <),0r.5,850 

— Bonfort's Animal, 1911. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 23 

t BRANDY PRODUCED 

OFFICIAL REPORT 

FIRST DISTRICT— Month of December, 1910. Tax Gals, 

reduced and bonded in this district, this does not include figures of production in 6th (new) district _ 487,596-9 

.eceived from other Districts, California 66'877.0 

Received from special bonded warehouse, other District, California 3,743.1 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse, Eastern District 95|884.7 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. Eastern Districts 126^928 

Exported 3,612. 3 

Tax paid 52,748.2 

Used in Fortification of Wines 30,006.0 

Remaining in bond. December 31, 1910 1, 934^959. 5 

FOURTH DISTRICT— Month of December, 1910. _ Tax Gals. 

Produced and bonded in this district 25,035-4 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. First District, California 63,506-7 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse, Eastern District 21,363-9 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. First District, California - 6,590-2 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse, Eastern Districts 28,7323 

Exported 

Tax paid , 9,2769 

Used in Fortification of Wines '. 7,674.8 

Remaining in bond, December 31, 1910 ..- 676,702-3 

SIXTH DISTRICT— Month of December. 1910. Tax Gals. 

Produced and bonded in this district - 56,443-6 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. First District - — 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. First District 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. Eastern District 74,467.6 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. Eastern District 4.891-9 

Tax paid 6,963-5 

Used in Fortification of Wines : 2,179.3 

Remaining in bond, December 31, 1910 274,878.1 

SWEET WINES PRODUCED 

FIRST DISTRICT— Month of December, 1910. Pkgs. Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification 292 63,315-0 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification 56 17,924-7 

Brandy actually used for fortification .- -- 309 77,541-1 

Wine Gals. 

Port produced 10, 569 - 21 

Sherry produced 248,324-62 

Angelica produced 35,329-73 

Muscat produced 636-50 

Tokay „ _ _ _ _ 

Madera _ _ " 

Total sweet wine produced in December, 1910 -- 294,86006 

FOURTH DISTRICT— Month of December, 1910. Pkgs. Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification - 89 7,674-8 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification 

Brandy actually used for fortification 4 519-2 

Wine Gals. 

Tokay 

Port produced 

Sherry produced 2,014-08 

Angelica produced 

Muscat produced 

Total sweet wine produced in December, 1910: 2,014-08 

SIXTH DISTRICT— Month of December, 1910. Pkgs- Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification 2,709.3 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification 

Brandy actually used for fortification „ 2,709.3 

Wine Gals. 

Malaga 

Port produced 

Sherry produced ~ 

Angelica produced ...!. 

Muscat produced ., 

Total sweet wine produced in December, 1910 - - 10,131.06 



24 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 






44*<li««»**«»«**«»»* 



m 



LOUISVILLE DEPARTMENT 



W 









J 



LOUISVILLE, Ky., Jan. 25. — Conditions in the Louisvillo 
whisky market and in other parts of the State are good, 
and the fine trade that was noted a month ago continues to be 
in evidence. Of course the volume of shipments made during 
the weeks previous to the holidays was augmented on account 
of the season, and therefore January business has naturally not 
been so large. HoAvever, it has been well above the average of 
the past few years, and nobody has had any complaint to regis- 
ter. Business on the Coast, local Avholesalers and distillers re- 
port, has been excellent, although in some parts of that terri- 
tory the political situation has been unfavorable and conditions 
have been unsettled on that account. 

Prices have been somewhat stimulated during the past few 
weeks. There is a decided shortage of whisky of the bottling in 
bondage, and stock of the crop of 1907 and older is commanding 
a premium, while even younger goods is hard to get in volume. 
The average advance is about 21/0 cents a gallon. It is re- 
ported that 1906 whiskies are almost entirely out of the market, 
and that some of the biggest interests are turning down orders 
which have been offered for 1000-barrel lots. 

The market situation is stimulating the production of whisky 
and practically all of the distilleries are now operating to their 
full capacity. A few of the big plants will begin about Feb- 
rutry 1, but most of them have been going steadily for a month 
or two already. It is safe to assert that the production for the 
season will be considerably above the 40,000,000 gallon mark. 

Some of the more conservative distillers are taking the view 
that there is danger of an over-production. They say that they 
are holding their own output to the same figures as was main- 
tained last season, and assert that by the time the bonding period 
has elapsed the wisdom of their course will be evident. 

"As a matter of fact," said one leading member of the trade, 
to the Louisville representative of the Pacific Wine and Spirit 
Review, "everybody has the bottled-in-bond craze. People arc; 
forgetting that it has its evils as well as benefits. One of the 
former is that a lot of cheap whisky which is almost unsalable 
otherwise, is being bottled in bond because in that guise it finds 
a comparatively ready market. The result of this plan, it seems 
to me, is bound to be a revulsion on the part of the consumer, 
who will ultimately conclude that the mere Government label 
does not insure quality and who will call for brands, irre- 
spective of the question of bottling in bond. Then the bottom 
will fall out of that trade. 

"Another factor that argues for conservative manufacture is 
the probable effect of the latest pure food decision. Many rec- 
tifiers who under the previous ruling have been using whisky 
have now returned to the use of spirits, which were formerly 
utilized by them to the relative exclusion of whisky. They will 
thus be out of the market to a large extent, and with this branch 
of the consuming trade eliminated, there will not, in my opinion, 
be the big call for stock which has been in evidence of late." 

That these views do not seem to be shared by the majority of 
those in the business, however, is evidenced by the fact that pro- 
duction is going ahead on the scale indicated above. Time is 
the final arbiter, and developments in that direction must be; 
awaited to decide the value of the suggestions quoted above. 

Louisville whisky men are much interested in the prospect 
of American wine coming to the front by reason of the failure 
of the grape crop abroad. There is no reason to doubt the po- 
tential supremacy of the domestic article, and this is an oppor- 
tunity that has been waited for for a long time. Local wine 
dealers are already quoting advances of 5 cents on California 
goods in view of the market situation. 



James A. Wathen and J. B. Wathen, local distillers, recently 
appeared before the Ways and Means Committee of the House 
of Representatives at Washington for the purpose of making 
arguments in favor of increasing the outage allowance as pro- 
vided in the bill now pending in the lower house. It was shown 
that the government will lose nothing by the new arrangement, 
and it is generally believed that the revenues will be increased, 
as whisky will be allowed to remain in storage longer than under 
the present system. 

An interesting announcement involving a change in policy 
on the part of a leading house was made through the filing of 
articles of incorporation by the United American Company, 
which has been capitalized at |650,000 and will take over the 
Warwick distillery at Silver Creek and the new distilleries 
recently erected by the Bernheim Distilling Company. Both 
plants were operated by the latter company. Under the new 
arrangement the Bernheim company will discontinue the dis- 
tilling business. Both of the companies intend to sell mainly 
through the wholesalers. 

James E. Pepper & Co., who operate large distilleries at Lex- 
ington, Ky., have executed a deed of trust in favor of the Lex- 
ington Banking & Trust Company for the purpose of securing 
an issue of |45,000 of bonds, 
an enormous increase during 1910, the total being |18,139,000, a 

Internal revenue collections in the Louisville district showed 
gain over the previous year of |1,674,000. The collections were 
composed mainly of tax payments on whisky, and close to a 
million and a half a month is coming into the internal revenue 
department from the distilleries. 

Dun's Review, discussing conditions in the whisky trade here 
during 1910, says: "Representative whisky merchants report 
the business in better shape than at any time since 1888, when 
Kentucky distillers curtailed production by agreement. On ac- 
count of the small crops of 1907, 1908 and 1909, and the great 
demand for bottled in bond Avhiskies, prices have been advanc- 
ing and are likely to continue to do so. Records of tax payments 
show sin increasing demand for Kentucky goods." 

The R. B. Grainger Distilling Company, which has a capi- 
tal stock of 110,000, has filed articles of incorporation. The 
incorporators include R. B. Grainger, E. P. Farrington and 
A. M. Stark. 

"Prohibition has been a failure." This is the statement ex- 
pressed by the mayors of the leading cities of Tennessee, Mem- 
phis, Nashville and Chattanooga. They are agreed that a change 
should be made in the State law by Avhicli the larger cities may 
be excepted from its provisions. 

Walter B. Duffy, president of the New York & Kentucky Malt 
Company, died January 14 in Rochester, N. Y. He was onf 
of the best known men in the local trade, his company handling 
the output of .several Kentucky distilleries. 

John W. OAven, connected for 55 years with J. T. S. Brown & 
Sons, local distillers, died in this city recently at the age of 73. 
He was a member of the famous Orphan Brigade in the Con- 
federate army. 

According to the report of Bernard Bernheim, chairman of 
the Whisky Committee of the Board of Trade, made at the an- 
nual meeting of the board early in January, the shipments of 
whisky out of Louisville during 1910 amounted to 545,816 bar- 
rels, against 456,752 barrels in 1909. He stated tliat the 
trade is in much better condition as the result of the evident 
receding of the prohibition wave. 

Charles A. Hollenl)ach, son of August Hollonbach, who for 
many years conducted a famous wine house in this city, has 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



25 



taken over the business, in company with Karl A. Hollenbach, 
and it will be operated as the Hollenbach Wine House. 

D. JNIesohendorf, president of the Old Kentucky Diltillery, was 
stricken with asthma while on a visit to the Southwest, and 
for a time was reported to be in a critical condition. Later de- 
velopment indicatetl his rapid recovery, however. 

Hewitt Brown, treasurer of J. T. S. Brown & Sons, is re- 
ceiving congratulations upon his marriage to Mrs. Laura Overiti 
Lemon, which was recently solemnized. 



f 



Taussig & Co., Prophesy Great Prosperity 



San Pkancisco, January 10, 1911. 

The expected lull in business after the holidays has not oc- 
curred, but to the contrary, rush orders from both local and 
out-of-town customers have been coming in daily. The welcome 
fall of rain just at this time will doubtless add increased stimu- 
lus to country trade, and Ave all look forward to a banner 
January business. City trade is anxiously awaiting the decision 
of Congress in the matter of the Panama-Pacific Exposition, and 
a favorable report will have, we think, an immediate good effect 
on local business. Threats of adverse legislation by our present 
State Legislature are causing little alarm, as it is believed that 
no radical changes in laws relating to the liquor traffic will be 
made, excepting, possibly, for better regulation, which will be 
welcomed by those who have at heart the best interests of the 
business. 

Distillers report 1910 a record year for business, and the 
steady increase in prices of standard Kentucky bourbons and 
Eastern ryes indicate tliat this condition will be maintained 
during the coming year. Taking all into consideration, we feel 
that 1911 will be the beginning of an era of great prosperity in 
the liquor business. 

LOUIS TAUSSIG & CO. 

San Francisco, Janvxiry, 1911. 



FOR SALE. 

One French champagne corker for carbonating wines; also one six- 
stem Kief er bottling machine; both in good condition; at A. REPSOLD & 
CO., 104 Pine Street, San Francisco. 



Allied Grape and Wine Men's New Quarters 

THE Allied Grape and Wine Industries of California have 
given up their costly exhibit room in the Russ Building, 
because the interior locaticm prevented tourists and strangers 
from viewing it. The great expense necessary to keep such an 
elaborate display in first-class condition was therefore not con- 
sidered justified and the members of the organization decided 
to content themselves for the present with rooms in one of the 
modern office buildings. Temporarily all mail should be ad- 
dressed to President Frank A. Bussee, 110 Tenth street. 

The comprehensive series of pictures showing the viticultural 
industry of California, which was a feature of the display at the 
Russ Building, has been turned over to the California Develop- 
ment Board which has given the collection the place of honor 
in its quarters at the Ferry Building. The first thing that 
greets the visitor's eye as he enters the Board's impressive dis- 
play room, is the "Exhibit of the Allied Grape and Wine Indus- 
tries of California," as the framed announcement reads. The 
figures calling attention to the investment, acreage, yearly pro- 
duction and employment in the industry show the importance 
of grape growing and wine making in California, and the pic- 
tures of the notable wine plants, hill and valley vineyards, un- 
usual vines, vintage scenes, etc., cannot help giving the visitor 
food for thought. Every time the writer has visited the head- 
quarters recently, he has observed a number of people inspecting 
the pictures and reading the inscriptions. 

The California Development Board has also been entru.sted 
with the moving picture film showing the Vintage Season in 
California. They are to display the films at conventions, fairs 
and boost meetings throughout the United States in conjunc- 
tion with lectures given by the Board to attract colonists to 
California. The pictures will be projected at the Fair to be 
held at Omaha in a few weeks and the residents of Washington, 
D. C, will also soon have a chance to see California grapes 
picked, hauled, crushed, and get a good idea of the large scale 
on which the industry is carried on in this State. 

The Allied Grape and Wine Industries of California are to 
be congratulated on having made arrangements to secure the 
co-operation of the California Development Board, for there are 
countless opportunities when the two bodies can work hand in 
hand and achieve valuable results to the industry and the whole 
State as well. 



BREEN 8c KENNEDY. 

DISTILLERS » BLENDERS. 



-7-771. 



THOS.W.COSTELLO. 






THOMAS W. COSTELLO 

Pacific Coast Representative 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 160 PINE STREET 

Phones: Douglas 2903; Home, C 2337 

Owners of the celebrated Cedar Creek Sour-Mash Bourbon and Rye, distilled by this 
firm at Distillery No. 33, 7th District, Ky., situated at h rankfort, Ky, and controllers of 
an elegant line of straight goods, among wliicli are the famous Belle of Nelson Bourbon 
and old fashioned Day & Haff Bourbon. These goods we carry in stock at San Fran- 
cisco and sell them under the double stamp regauged and delivered, thus saving the 
retailer all outage, costs of reducing, deliv. ry, etc. 

Also owners of the celebrated straight blends of pure natural whiskies in the following 
brands: 



Henderson's Smoothest Bourbon 
Maryland Reserve Pure Rye 



Comrade Bourbon and Rye 

Calumet Club Bourbon & Rye Special 



Cedar Creek Bourbon and Rye carried in three sizes, bottled in bond full measure. 

Belle of Nelson bottled straight at 90 proof, full quarts. 

A large stock continually carried in San Francisco for delivery at short notice, and 
trade especially solicited from independent retail liquor dealers, desiring to buy high grade 
straight Bourbons and Ryes, regauged, and genuine straight blends direct from the manu- 
facturer. 

Our aim is to give the greatest possible value in fine whiskies at most reasonable 
prices. 

A trial of any of our goods will assuredly make you one of our customers. 



Distilleries, Kentucky 



Blending House and Main Office, Chicago, 111. 



26 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



<^ 



LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT 



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•til I iHaviiiawao**** »><«iibii mtt*^t**imm^**»m*tt9^K**fmmt*mmmt*mmmttmmmttm i iiii i ■«!■ i ■< 



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^<t**«<t**«IH 



•^"-"••O 



Los ANGELES, Jan. 20.— The crj of the South for rain has 
been heard, and though the amount of precipitation was 
not as much as required, it was a rain of the kind that does 
much good, falling at an opportune time to save the grain crops 
and was of a steady soaking nature worth several times the 
amount of hard stormy rain. The result is already apparent 
in the much better feeling shoAvn in all lines of trade, among 
which the liquor men have benefited by largely increased 
orders, and the payment of bills, being held out because of the 
fear of a dry year and the consequent inclination of every- 
one to hold on to all the ready cash available as long as possible. 

The wholesale wine trade has shown much activity of late, ithe 
several advances in the prices of sweet wines have had the effect 
of driving those buyers who wex'e holding off out of cover, and 
into the market before another rise of prices. Shipping orders 
from all the Southern California wineries have been much 
above the average the past few weeks all being very busy get- 
ting out orders of carlots and over, mostly for the far-eastern 
markets and at the present time it is doubtful if there is any 
more wine in Southern California cellara than is needed to 
supply the usual demand of their regular trade for the season. 

Local conditions appear to be more satisfactory, at least there 
is not the uncertainty now felt, since the passing from office 
of the long-haired legal contingent, whose principal business 
while in office, seemed to be that of devising new schemes to 
worry the liquor trade; and the feeling that they would re- 
ceive plain business consideration from the new administration, 
has caused a much better business feeling. 

The laying of the campaign bogie, as to the intentions of 
Lieutenant-Governor Wallace, in the appointment of commit- 
tees and fathering a county local option law in this Legis 
lature, through his announcement in the columns of the 
Review last month, was needed to restore the liquor men to a 
feeling of confidence that they were to be treated as business 
men and not outlaws, and as a result conditions are better iu 
the trade here than for many months. This is evidenced by the 
opening of several new wholesale and also retail establishments 
of the higher class up in the business center of the city. 

Huntington Beach is in a fair way to become "wet" unless 
the prohibs can find some technicalities to tie up the matter. At 
the last meeting of the trustees it was voted to instruct the city 
attorney to draw up an ordinance repealing the present exist- 
ing prohibition measure. All of which means woe in the camp 
of the long-hairs. 

The Board of Police Commissioners recently denied the peti 
tion of Marcotte & Marcotte for a retail license at 625 South 
Spring street, because of a protest entered by the property 
owners of that block. A permit was also denied J. R. McDonald 
for a saloon at 764 South Main street. The license of Andrew J. 
Lenox at 1201 East Sixth street was revoked and a new license 
issued to Lenox & Rosin, B. Rosin buying into the business aiid 
becoming a partner. 

Santa Monica is undergoing its usual prohibition cramp. 
Mayor Dudley, who is a W. C. T. IT. advocate, has declared that 
he would submit an ordinance closing all liquor establishments 
between the hours of midnight Saturday until after noon Sun- 
day, together with the usual "regulation" frills, but it is doubt- 
ful if much will come of it as the council has shown a dis- 
position to let well enough alone. 

The Los Angeles Eagles, to whom many of the liquor men 
belong, gave the biggest vaudeville show of the season this 
month, and which proved a splendid success. The purpose of 
the show was to provide funds to bring to Los Angeles and 
to entertain eastern delegates to the Grand Aerie of the Order 
of Eagles to convene in San Francisco next. August. 



Mr. Guy Barham, Southern California's Internal Revenue 
broker, has been entertaining William Randolph Hearst and 
Mrs. Hearst of New York the past few days, with jauntings 
to Catalina and other points. As Mr. Barham is past master 
in the art of entertaining, his guests will have a -pleasant time 
while in Los Angeles. 

Sir. Frank Becker is back at the desk at the Waldorf Cafe 
after an absence of several months. Adolph Becker is shoAving 
that he is a man of versatility by running a ranch down in 
Imperial Valley as a vacation from the care of the firm's large 
interests. 

J. W. Salter, purchaser of the "Faust Cafe," held a grand 
opening and reception on the 21st of December. He has re- 
christened the place and it is now known as the Magnolia Buffet. 
Salter is a popular and well known saloon man of this city 
Avith a host of friends and will make a success at this once- 
popular stand. 

The police raided the Royal Cafe at San Pedro last Aveek 
and its proprietors, Louis Moran and Louis Mitchell, Avere 
arraigned before the police court for selling liquor Avithout a 
license. The officers caught them serving liquors in coffee cups 
to customers, hence their appearance in court. They Avere held 
in f 100 cash bail for trial. 

Secretary Barlotti, of the Italian Vineyard Company, is still 
in the East, but has started on his return trip homcAvard. He 
Avill be some time on the way as he Avill visit the Company's 
branch house in Chicago and then come home via the Northwest, 
visiting the principal cities en route. He is expected home 
about the middle of February. 

The Ideal Wine Company is the name of a ncAV family licjuor 
store Avhich recently opened at 122 West Third street. 

E. Mansbach, formerly one of the proprietors of the Old 
I'lautation Distillery Company, has severed his connection tliere- 
Avith and is in business as E. Mansbach & Co. on South Spring 
street, betAveen Fifth and Sixth, Avhere he has a Avell stocked 
commodious store. 

Charles Krug has opened a Avell appointed Avholesale house 
on Third street, betAveen Main and Spring and is making a 
strong bid for patronage. 



Home Industry Movement 



THE "Home Industry League of California," organized 
March, 1910, Avith a membership of some 750 manufac- 
turers and supply houses, are making great headway in con- 
vincing the public to patronize home manufacturers as much as 
possible. The retail dealers are beginning noAV to take active 
part in the same and some of the manufacturers are greatly 
benefited. 

Aug. Lang & Co., who are the distributers for TiA'oli beer, are 
making special efforts to bring before the people the fact that 
their beer Avhich is breAA'ed in San Jose is equally as good if n< 
better than beer sent into the State by outside brcAvers. It 
hoped that other local manufacturers avIII take as much interest 
and thereby keep thousands of dollars in this State Avhich is 
noAV being sent aAvay from here. . 

It is gratifying to see that the Red Lion Ale and Stout which 
is breAved by the Red Lion BreAvery is making great headAvay. 
^lany places Avhich sell these goods to the public sell the same 
as imported, which shoAVS that there are still nmny among our 
population Avho imagine imported goods better than honestly 
made, home made goods. It is hoped that the time is not far 
off Avhen the community Avill accept no other goods than those 
matle by the manufacturers of this State. 



II 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



27 



>*» ^^ *»" 



-« » ^^ *» ^^ »■*- 



/^^r Is Local Option A |@^|! 
3^^) Prohibition Wedge? |^^j 



THE liquor interests in California are told at this time, in a 
number of articles published in newspapers throughout the 
State, that local option measures will be presented for consid- 
eration of the Legislature at the coming session of that govern- 
ing body. The merits of such proposed laws and the consti- 
tutionality of such measures have been set forth in public print 
hy their propoirents. There has been a noticeable absence of 
;)resentations of the liquor man's ai'guments, and by invitation 
I shall be glad to say a few things bearing on the subject, tak- 
ing the broad stand of common rights and justice in the prem- 
ises. 

As to the constitutionality of local option laws, I can afford 
little enlightenment, as the legal aspect is usually not within 
I lie scope of learning or training of one engaged in viticultural 
pursuits; but there are some thoughts in the lines of fairness 
and regard for a fellow man's right of existence that suggest 
themselves to the point of expression. 

What does the instigator of a local option bill want? 

Is it not true that back of all his activity there is the final 
(ibject in view of compelling absolute prohibition? 

Is it not a fact that lie aims step by step finally to crush even 
legitimate licjuor traffic out of existence, and if possible to de- 
stroy the viticultural industry of California, which now ranks 
of such great importance to our whole common Avealth? 

-Finally, is not the agitating element an "out and out" abso- 
lute prohibition preacher? 

I once asked a reformer whether or not he would be satis- 
fied with even all of the regulations and restrictions he pro- 
posed, and I finally got the truthful answer, that the ultimate 
object was absolute prohibition. This is the theory on which 
most people in the liquor business base their conclusions and 
take their stands. It is the theory, too, Avhich influences the 
layman who exercises his voting prerogative, after looking 
into the full depth and meaning of tlie question. 

Local option laws, taking as a unit the county outside of the 
incorporated cities therein, and then again the city as a imit 
without the county, are probably constitutional. But when the 
question has been submitted, and the vote registered emphat- 
ically against the measure, the agitator immediately calls for 
another submission of the issue, and wants to break up the 
cities into wards and precincts (each with its own boundary 
option laws), and the counties into similarly defined pieces and 
sections. 

It is merely the wedge of prohibition, defeated in a fair field 
and resorting to gorilla tactics to hamper and harass a general 
public that may have tunied down proposed legislation, which 
it considered as emanating from narrowed and warped minds. 

The liciuor traffic is a legitimate business. Our government 
recognizes it as such, and 95 per cent of the individuals engaged 
therein invite all reasonable regulations governing the pursuit 
of such business. 

There are laws enough now in practically every county and 
city in California to abolish any undesirable element of the 
saloon trade. Here in our own city our trustees may take away 
a man's license even without giving him a hearing, and if regu- 
lation of that character is not effective, it is the fault, not of the 
law or of want of laws, but of those elected by the people to 
enforce municipal regulations. 

After all. The People have the voice, and when they put into 
office a representative of their ward or district they should 
know who he is and how he stands on the question of public 
morals and other matters affecting the welfare of their section 
or community. 



Don't blame the laws. Tliere are too nmny of them now. We 
could get along with half as nuiny and accomplish the best re- 
sults, if they were enforced. 

It is agreed quite generally that city charters should provide 
for the selection of trustees or councilmen from each ward 
within a city, but that the vote should he "at large" and not 
confined to the voting strength in each particular ward or dis- 
trict. This sentiment seems to prevail in the making of most all 
new city charters, and it certainly helps along the cause of good 
government. 

"Keep the saloon man out of politics" is a silly demand. 
Sounds good to the man without a mind or a thought, but is 
absurd advice. 

Where is the man, who is a man, who won't fight for his rights 
and his livelihood? Shall the man in the liquor business keep 
out of politics, when his enemy is in politics trying to crush him? 
A man who would is not human. Tell the liquor man how to 
keep out of politics, and I'll wager he'd be glad to do it if your 
advice is feasible. He's in politics only when compelled to be 
there for self-preservation. 

There is no more law needed on the liquor question. Elect 
your trustee or supervisor to office after he has pledged himself 
to do his full duty in your section, and if you want to be par- 
ticular, ask him some direct questions. You can find out how 
any man stands, and if he leaves you in doubt, he's against 
you and your wishes. 

No set of reputable liquor men want to see a dive exist, nor 
can they afford to support it in the slightest degree. Such a 
place is a menace to the respectability of a community as well as 
to the liquor interests in general ; but let it not be forgotten that 
there cannot be one standard of appearance or atmosphere for 
all retail liquor establishments. There must be the saloon 
where the real thirsty stevedore may quench his thirst and not 
feel out of place in his shirt sleeves, as well as the handsomely 
fitted saloon Avhere men of other walks in life may choose to 
enter. Each should be made respectable. A failure to do so 
in either ca.se should close up the place. 

I claim this, that the ratio of responsible and irresponsible 
men in the liciuor traffic today is as a thousand to one. Among 
the best and most charitable people in every comnumity you 
find the wholesale liquor dealer, the saloon man, the grocery 
man, the restaurant keeper, and the hundreds who are depend 
ent on them or in their employ. 

Is it up to a prosperous city or a prosperous State to heed the 
oft-repeated cry of the chronic reformer? 

Isn't it getting tiresome? — E. M. Shechan, Dec. 1010. 



Bottles and Bottlers' Supplies 



ONE of the largest and most enterprising firms in this line 
is that of Lindeman, Sloman & Co., doing business at 381 
to 389 Tenth street, San Francisco. This is the only supply 
house on the Pacific Coast Avhich has as a special feature an up 
to date bottle-washing plaut Avhereby they are enabled to more 
properly Avash and sterilize bottles for their customers. 

Lindeman, Sloman & Co., by their energy, perseverance and 
upright dealings have won the hearty support of the bottling 
trade generally, and we bespeak for them a brilliant future. 
They do a large business in imjiorting as well as exporting new 
and second-hand bottles, in addition to which they are Pacific 
Coast agents for the Chicago Specialty Box Co., and the Con- 
tinental Gla.ss Decorating Co., of Chicago, and Ferdinand G-ut- 
manu & Co., of New York City. 



28 



PACIFIC WINE AND vSPIRIT REVIEW. 




iSAGiric 




SPESP!^, 



R. M. WOOD Editor 

Office: No. 127 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, California. 

Rooms 304-305 

Phones: Kearny 2597 Home C 2559 



Wyllie's Local Option Bill 



A S was expected, four days after the Legislature convened 
•**■ at Sacramento, Assemblyman G. W. Wyllie, of the Twenty- 
seventh District, introduced a Local Option Bill, which is sure 
to prove an interesting bone of contention during the present 
session. For the information of our readers, we shall quote a 
few of the more important sections of Assembly IJill No. 37, that 
will directly and indirectly affect the distribution of wine in 
this State, if it is passed. 

"Section 1. Qualified electors of any incorporated city or 
town, or of that portion of any county not included within the 
boundaries of any incorporated city or town, numbering not 
less than twenty-five per cent of the number of votes cast for 
governor in the territory described in the petition, at the last 
preceding election for governor of the state, may petition the 
city council, board of trustees, board of supervisors or other 
legislative body of such city, town or county, to call an election 
to vote upon and determine whether the sale of alcoholic liquors 
shall be licensed in such city, town, or county outside of incor- 
porated cities and towns therein. . . . 

"Section 6. If said petition shall be certified as sufficient 
within six months and not less than forty days before the hold- 
ing of the next general state or municipal election within the 
territory therein describetl, such question shall be submitted at 
said general election ; otherwise a special election to vote upon 
the question shall be called to be held Avithin not less than thirty 
nor more than sixty days after the petition has been certified as 
sufficient, pi'ovided that no election under this act shall be held 
within two years of any previous election lield under this act 
within the same territory. . . . 

"Section 10. Unless a majority of the votes cast ou this ques- 
tion at such election are in favor of license, the territory de- 
scribed in the petition shall be no-license territory on and after 
sixty days from the date of said election ; and the city council, 
board of supervisors, or other governing body having juris- 
diction thereof, shall thereupon make an entry on its records 
declaring that such described territory is no-license territory: 
but a failure to make such entry shall not affect the result or 
effect of such election. . . . 

"Section 15. It shall be unlawful for any person, corporation, 
company, association or club, within any no-license territory, to 
solicit orders, take orders or make agreements for the sale or 
delivery of alcoholic liquors; provided that this slmll not apply 
to the taking of such orders from a registered pharmacist at his 



place of business, or to the taking of orders for vinous or malt 
liquors on the promises where manufacturwl, under the con- 
ditions stated in Section Ki hereof. 

"Section 16. Nothing in this act shall be interpreted as ren- 
dering it unlawful to keep alcoholic liquors for distribution, or 
to sell or distribute such liquors, in no-license territory in tlic 
manner and for the jiurposes in this section provided : 

"1st. The serving of such liquors by any person at his own 
home to members of his family or to his guests, as an act of 
hospitality, when no money or thing of value is received in 
return therefor, and when said home is not a place of public 
resort. 

"2nd. The serving or dispensing of such liquors by any regis- 
tered pharmacist for bona fide medicinal purposes only, upon a 
prescription issued, signed and dated by a duly licensed phy- 
sician ; provided that the name of the person applying for the 
prescription and the name of the person for whose use the ])n'- 
scription is made shall be inserted therein by the physician 
issuing the same at the time the prescription is made or given, 
and that not more than one sale or furnishing is made upon 
such prescription and that all such prescriptions are kept on file 
at the place of business of such ])harmacist, open to public 
inspection ; provided, further, that no sncli liquors so dispensed 
shall be drunk ujwn the premises where disi)ensed. 

"3rd. The selling of alcohol by a registered pharmacist for 
other than beverage purposes; provided tliat such pharmacist 
shall keep a record of such sales in which shall be entered the 
date of the sale, the (luantity sold, the purpose for which pur- 
chased, and the signature of the person purchasing the same; 
such record to be open to public inspection. 

"4th. The selling of wine by a regularly licensed pharmacist 
for sacramental purposes only ; provided such wine is sold only 
to a regularly ordained minister of some religious denomination, 
or upon the written order of the local official board or governing 
body of a religious organization; provided, further, that such 
pharmacist shall keep a record of such sales in whicrh shall be 
entered the date of the sale, the quantity sold, and the signature 
of the person purchasing the same; such record to be open to 
public inspection. 

"5th. The distributing of wine at the sacramental service of 
any religious organization. 

"6th. The keeping of vinous or malt liquors on the premises 
where manufactured, receiving orders at said premises for such 
liquors, and the shipping of the same from such premises ; pro- 
vided said liquors are not distributed or delivered to any person 
or place in no-license territory, except to a regularly licensed 
pharnmcist at his place of business. 

"Section .19. Any i)erson violating any of the provisions of 
this act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon 
conviction thereof shall be punished by a fine not exceeding six 
hundred dollars, or by impris(mment in the county jail not 
exceeding seven months, or by both such fine and imprisonment; 
but any person found guilty of violating any of the provisions 
of this act, by conviction for an offense committed, after a pre- 
vious conviction under this act, shall be punished by a fine not 
exceeding six hundred dollars nor less than one hundred dollars 
and by imi)risonment in the county jail not exceeding seven 
months, nor less than one month. 

"Section 21. The term 'alcoholic liquors,' as used in this act, 
shall include spirituous, vinous and malt liquors, and any other 
li<luor or mixture of liquors which cout^iins one per cent, by 
volume, or more, of alcohol, and which is not so mixed with other 
drugs as to prevent its use as a beverage." 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



23 



Prohibition Killed In Oregon 



Our Wines In France 



NOW THAT the ((tiiiplctc tii;ures of the Orc.con olcction are 
before us aud can be leisurely analyzed, it develops that 
Ore<];on occupies a imique position in the Union in the recent 
I'lection on proliibition and local option votes, in that the local 
option vote in 22 of the 24 counties of the State was brought 
about by petition of the "wets." It is common practice for the 
"drys" to circulate petitions calling for local option elections, 
hut the initiative taken hy the "wets" is almost unprecedented. 

While the State voted si majority of moi'e than 20,000 against 
statewide prohibition, the result of the local option votes de- 
throned the Prohibitionists in Oregon, as they lost 11 counties 
that had been "dry" for two years and gained only one "wet" 
county. 

The carrying of the home rule bill, which gives each incorpo- 
rated city the right to litdd an election and determine the 
right to sell li(iuor witliin the city limits, iri*espective of the 
county vote, which heretofore declared the cities "dry" even if 
fliey votetl "wet" locally, is another blow to the prohibitionists. 

In nine of the counties where local option elections Avere held 
and voted "dry," the cities have the right, under tlic home rule 
bill, to call an election and vote on the liquor question within 
their corporate limits. As most of these cities cast a nuijority 
vote in favor of the "wets" and are preparing to call a local 
option election, it is generally conceded that they will vote 
"wet" again. 

As cities in these ooiinties are conceded to the "wets," the 
Prohibiti<niists have not only lost 11 counties outright, but 
virtually lost nine counties more through the operaticm of 
the home rule bill, making a total loss of 20 counties out of 
the 23 formerly in the "dry" column. The only three counties 
in the State that are now "dry" and must remain so within 
their boundaries are Yamhill, Benton and Lane, wliere no 
local option elections wei'e held. 

The counties lost to the Prohibitionists outright were Tilla- 
mook, Polk, Crook, Klamath, Sherman, Gilliam, Morrow, 
Umatilla, ITnion, Grant and ^Malheur. The counties that voted 
"dry," but when; the honu' rule bill will give cities the right 
to regulate the liquor traffic within their corporate limits, are 
Linn, Douglas, Coos, Cui'ry, Josephine, Jackson, Hood River, 
Wheeler and Wallows. 

Coos County, which was held by the "wets" by 74 majority 
two years ago, is now "dry" by 17 votes. It is the only county 

the "wets" lost. 



James Horsburgh, Jr., general passenger agent of the South- 
ern Pacic ('omi)any, believes in the thorough entertainment of 
prominent visitors to San Francisco. Whenever a convention 
assembles here, the president and officers of the organization 
are given a sample or so of Horsburgh's hosi)itality, and invari- 
ably leave for their homes in the East talking about it. 

According to Waldemar Young, the other day, Horsburgh's 
programme of entertainment began with a luncheon at the 
Cliff House to the presid<'nt and officers, eight in number, of 
the National Sunday School Association, who are here nmking 
arrangements for their annual convention. Horsburgh who, by 
the way does not touch liquor of any kind, had one of his lieu- 
tenants telephone out to the Clift" House to have a nice luncheon 
ready, and then the party began the trip via autos. 

Upon arrival they found everything in readiness. In fact, 
the luncheon had been just a little too completely nmde ready. 

At each plate for the gentlemen of the Sunday School Asso- 
ciation stood a large, adult-sized Martini cocktail. 



WHEN the next treaty n(>gotiations are carried on with 
France by this country, it is to be hoped that an effort 
Avill be made to permit the entry of American wines on a more 
favorable basis. Today tlie French duty on our wines coiitain- 
ing 12 degret^s or less of alcohol is 35 francs ($7) per hectolitre 
(26.41 gallons) and for wines containing more than that amount 
of alcohol, 2.2 francs (44c) is added for every additional degree 
per hectolitre. 

However, despite the fact that this high duty on American 
Avines makes the sale of our product almost prohibitive in 
France, the Italian-Swiss Cobmy has succeeded in interesting 
several large firms in their choicest product, and the first ship- 
ment of Asti wines is already on its way to France. 

Charles Jadeau, the champagne expert, who is making a brief 
visit abroad, took with him a number of samples of Asti wine, 
and in a letter from Mercury, dated December 21, 1910, he 
writes : "I have permitted a number of eminent French wine 
experts and connoisseurs to taste your wines and they were all 
astonished at the quality of your 1910 claret and 1909 Burgundy 
and Zinfandel. The claret is pronounced e»|ual if not superior 
to the fine red wines of Beaujolais, while the Burgundy and 
Zinfandel can hold their own in ciuuparison with our excellent 
Bourgogne wines." 

Mr. Jadeau believes that if the United States were favore<l 
with the same preferential duty on wine enjoyed by Italy, Spain 
and Portugal, California wine manufacturers would have no 
difficulty in introducing their product generally, as the shortage 
of the vintage last fall is already being keenly felt, and he adds : 
"If the bad weather continues, all the crops, including grapes, 
are doomed for next vear." 



California Wine Production 



Dry Wines. Sweet Wines. Brandy. 

Year. Gallons. Gallons. Gallons. 

1901 16,473,731 6,270,300 1,688,482 

1902 28,224,146 14,835,146 3,564,173 

1903 21,900,500 12,670,356 5,776,571 

1904 15,589,342 13,571,856 4,420,839 

1905 20,000,000 10,700,000 1,250,000 

1906 26,000,000 15,000,000 1,345,000 

1907 27,500,000 15,500,000 1,450,000 

1908 28,000,000 16,250,000 1,525,000 

1909 30,000,000 18,280,000 1,820,000 

1910 27,500,000 18,000,000 2,500,000 

After 1904 brandy used in fortifying sweet wines is not shown 
in figures. 

The largest administrator's bond ever written in California, 
if not in the United States, was filed in the Superior Court of 
San Beniardino County, Califoraia, with the United States 
Fidelity & Guaranty Company as sole surety on January 16, 
1911. It was in the penal sum of $7,500,000 and was written 
for John S. Cravens, as administrator of the estate of George 
S. Meyers, decased. The estate consisted of |3,500,000 personal 
property and real estate worth approximately |400,000. Meyers 
was one of the tobacco magnates and formerly resided at St. 
Louis. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



30 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 





fgl^^ 



Use of Drugs in San Francisco 



THE prohibitionists never miss a chance to blame the liquor 
interests for all the crimes that are committed, claiming 
that the demon "alcohol" is at the bottom of everything. Charles 
M. Fickert, District Attorney of San Francisco, believes that 
most of the crime in California's metropolis can be traced to 
the open and wide-spread use of opium, cocaine and morphine. 
"It is a menace to our city," he says, "and must be stopptnl. 
The extent of drug addiction that prevails is amazing. Carefully 
compiled figures of the innocent victims lured to the opium dens 
and enslaved by the drug habit, and of the general operations 
of the opium smugglers and drug venders, are in the possession 
of this office. 

"I want the public to know that the drug habit in this city 
is a scourge by the side of Avhich the tenderloin agitation and 
the Chinatown bribery sink into insignificance. It is the prob- 
lem that is confronting the administration today, and immediate 
action is demanded. The drugs are everywhere to be found. 
They are everywhere to be bought. Even the jails and the 
prisons, according to investigators employed by this office, 
are not free from the entrance of opiates and their uses. 

"Kill the opium traffic in this city and you will reduce half 
the work of this office; and of the city courts. The nmjor por- 
tion of the crimes committed and with which this office has had 
dealings can be traced, directly or indirectly, to the unresti'icted 
drug traffic. Months ago I set out to prevent the violations of 
tlie law. 

"Our first findings showed that the soldiers at the Presidio 
were exposed to the inroads of scores of regular "dope ped- 
dlers," and tliat a great percentage of the enlisted men were 
given to the use of morphine and cocaine. Then I had a number 
of distributing points for the drugs raidetl. The traffic operate^! 
without obstacles." 



The Levaggi Company, formerly located at filO Front street, 
have moved into their new quarters at 333 Clay street, a hand- 
some three-story building, all of which will be utilized by them 
as a wholesale liquor establishment. Heretofore this company 
were importers of groceries as well as liquors, but since moving 
into their new establishment will abandon the grocery depart- 
ment and deal exclusively in liquors in the import and exjioit 
business. They have also taken the Pacific Coast representation 
of several large Eastern distilleries. 



Emperor William's recent "temperance" utterances haA'e been 
received Avith mixed feelings in Germany. Teetotallers have 
been rejoicing and schnapps-producers have been much alarmed 
owing to the kaiser's repeated warning to army and navy stu- 
dents against drink. I'eople have been asking anxiously wlictlicr 
the kaiser is turning a "white ribboner," in his old age. 

Now, however, the semi-official ])ress has been instructed to 
state in reply to these inijuiries that the kaiser demands tee- 
totalism as little as he approves of alcoholism. "His majesty," 
they say, "far from overlooking the good effects on a ship's 
crew of a stiff hot grog in cold and stormy weather does not 
suppose for one moment that it is possible to secure total ab- 
stinence in the army or the navy. He objects to excessive drink- 
ing, particularly to cominilsory drinking, but he has no in- 
tention of combating excessive indulgence by excessive ab- 
stinence." 



ANGELO MYERS 

DISTILLER 




RECISTERED DISTILLERY NO. 63. FIRST DISTRICT PENNA. 

DISTILLERY, LINFIEl D, IV^ONTGOMERY CO., PENNA. 

Home of the Fatnous - 



KINSEY and LINFIELD PURE RYES 

OFFICES 

311-313 NORTH THIRD STREET. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



ARNOLD POPPIC CHARLES M. FISHER 

Representatives for 
CALIFORNIA NEW MEXICO 

NEVADA TEXAS 

ARIZONA LOUISIANA 

MEXICO 

San Francisco Office - - 326 Jackson Street 






yieadquartenf 



For Everybody 
Who Likes 



'iSccd ^kingtf 



til 






JHE 



Yellowstone 



22 MONTGOMERY ST. 

San Francisco 

JIMMY TWOMEY ED. BORREMANS 

COLD LUNCH 



a 

i 



m 



a ?S3a6asss22s s^SBSsss&Bssa^asssssafss^s'aasssBSB^SBSBsssBSRsssssBss^^asssasssss&^BPBG 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



31 





Established I860 


"GIBBS 


SPECIAL" 


BOURBON 




1844 GEARY STREET 


Tel. West 7616 


Home S 3223 


SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



I 

1 

♦ 

I 



AMERICAN BRANDY 



FINEST IN THE WORLD 

THE KIRBY DISTILLING CO., Inc. 

FOWLER, FRESNO CO., CAL. 

Make* a Specialty of PURE GRAPE BRANDY, and Making NO WINE 
has NO WASH OR SOUR WINE TO PUT INTO BRANDY. 
Our StilU are Known as Numbers 263 or 357 First District, California. 
These Numbers ARE BURNED on the GOVERNMENT or STAMPED 
HEAD of EVERY PACKAGE, there being No Other Genuine "KIRBY 
BRANDY." 



I 
} 

« 
•f 



SOLD ONLY IN CARLOAD LOTS TO THE TRADE 
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 



I »» ^^ **' 



>«» ^^ o- 



-*»- 



-t»-" 



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>«<i 



GUS KILBORN 
J. ERNEST HAYDEN 



BALDWIN FERRY 

CAFE >? CAFE 



844 MARKET STREET 



34 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Liquors and Cigars Phone Douglas 608 




247 Montgomery Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 
RUSS CIGAR AND LIQUOR CO., Prop. 

I ^ 

Jas. p. Dunne 

1 Stockton St. 

SAN FRANCISCO gg 



For explanation go to 

Thos. J. Walsh 
& Co. 

346 Pine St., at Leidesdorff St. 

Formerly 733 Market and 15 Powell St. 
Bar Supplied with Standard Brands ot 

WINES AND LIQUORS 




PHONE DOUGLAS 925 



HOME C 1366 



&SSIS®S)&&S)S&S&S^^ 



The Chronicle Bar 




6 Kearny San Francisco, Gal. 

p. W. WOBBER, Proprietor 



32 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




Status in Alabama 



American Wines 



THE following sensible and convincing editorial comment on 
the wines of America is the best voluntary boost for our 
native wines, outside the trade journals, that has recently ap- 
peared. It is from the New York 8un: 

For many years most native wines were held in light esteem 
in this country, a condition for which their makers were in no 
small part responsible. The efforts that were made to sell sound, 
wholesome wines as something they were not raised in the 
minds of the public the utterly unjustified belief that these 
beverages were not good, and thus handicapped their sale on 
their merits. Several years ago the more enlightened men in- 
terested in the business recognized the error that had oppressed 
the trade and began a concerted effort to put their products 
on the market under honest labels. 

That this campaign has been successfully begun and promises 
to end in great popularity for American wines was testified 
to by the men most concerned at the annual convention of grape 
growers and pressers in this city last week. The prejudice 
against honest labels, for that is what the common contempt 
for American wines amounts to, is being overcome, consumption 
is increasing rapidly, and a sure market is being made for the 
output of the wineries of the country. It is significant that 
many of the customers of the wine makers are retailers supply- 
ing families and not saloons. The use of light, moderately 
priced wines on the family table is increasing rapidly, accord- 
ing to the figures compiled by the shippers. It is not to be ex- 
pected that the native products will find their readiest market 
in the hotels and restaurants of higher prices, but there is a 
large consumption in more modest establishments. It is the 
"family trade" that is particularly interesting, however, for 
the absence of drinkables other than water from the domestic 
tables of this country has always been a matter of comment 
with foreigners. Whether it was a subject for congratulation 
or regret, this situation appears to be changing. 

In 1905 the amount of wine produced in the United States 
was 34,000,000 gallons. This was 10,000,000 gallons more than 
in 1900, and a larger increase has unquestionably taken place 
in the last five years. California, with its favorable climate, 
leads the States in quantity produced, but the business repre- 
sents important investment in this State, in New Jersey, in 
Ohio and in Pennsylvania, and these interests are constantly 
increasing in value. This year, owing to the failure of the crop 
in France and its impairment throughout Europe generally, 
there have been several shipments of American wines to the 
other side of the Atlantic, the success of which has not yet 
been proved. Of the possibility of creating here a rich and un- 
failing demand for native wines there is no question, and the 
steps that have been taken to that end have already proved 
amply profitable." 



It is a satisfaction to see that home mineral waters are very 
rapidly crowding out the waters of the East and elsewhere. 
This is another good sign, showing that we have mineral water 
here of the very best quality ; such as Cooks Mineral Water, put 
up by the Cooks Springs Mineral Water Company of Colusa 
County, which takes the place of mineral water sent here from 
France and elsewhere. 



WHILE Governor-elect O'Neal is opposed to prohibition, it 
h considered unlikely, at least at next session of the 
legislature, that the Ballard State-wide prohibition law will be 
repealed. To do so would involve the State in much confusion 
and exi)ense. It would throw the state wide open, and it would 
be necessary to hold local option elections in every county. It 
is recognized that in some counties which were dry before 
state-wide prohibition w^as introduced, the feeling is still in 
favor of the dry policy, while other counties were forced into 
the dry column against their will. 

The plan will probably be to let state prohibition nominally 
stand, but to allow local option in all counties that vote in favor 
of saloons or dispensaries. 

It is considered by practical politicians hardly likely that a 
representative would introduce a bill to which his constituency 
is opposed, and it is held that in this Avay the vexing question 
can be satisfactorily decided without great cost and Avithout 
great loss of legislative time. 

Fully a hundred local option, dispensary, and other liquor 
bills have been prepared. Practically every Senator and Rep- 
resentative has one up his sleeve. 

The early part of the O'Neal administration will see an inter- 
esting battle on this, and it is considered more than likely that 
the general prohibition law will stand and that certain coun- 
ties, notably Montgomery, Mobile, Jefferson and Madison, will 
be operating saloons and dispensaries under local laws. — 
Criterion. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



Protect Your Health 




LET 



COOKS 
SPRINGS 
MINERAL 
WATER 

BE YOUR DRINK 
AND BE 

WELL 



AUG. LANG 6; CO. 

A.GENTS 

IStH and Alabama Sts. 

TelepKone MarRet 588 SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 33 



THE WALDORF 

136 South Broadway 

Opposite Mason Opera House 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

* 



The Waldorf 



BECKER BROS. Proprietors 



648 MARKET STREET 



NEW 

SAN FRANCISCO'S 

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LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
I 



San Francisco's Most Magnificent Bar 

CHOICEST IMPORTED GOODS AMERICA'S FINEST WHISKIES 

lO THIRD STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL- 



JOHN B. RUSCONI, Propr. 



Phone Douglas 5637 




com 



i Bar 



Straight Goods 

My Specialty 



UNEXCELLED SERVICE 



505 Market St. 

San Francisco 



^ 



I Telephone Kearny 900 






Matt. Grimm 



Fine Imported and Domestic 
Wines and Liquors 



130 Leidesdorff Street 

Corner Hallcck 
Bet. California and Sacramento Streets 



San Francisco, Cal. 



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Back at the same old 
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Pisco de Italia, Madeira 

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1 



34 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




Col. Taylor and the Governors 



Cheering Words" from Susquemac Distilling Co. 

CINCINNATI, December 30, 1910. 

EDITOR Wine and Si'Ikit Review. Gentlemen : We have your 
esteemed favor of the 23rd inst., asking us to contribute 
an article for your publication of January 31st. 

It affords us pleasure to comply with your request, and we 
embrace the opportunity of extending to the trade on tlu; Pa- 
cific coast, our congratulations upon the prosperous condition 
of the trade in general. 

The pi'ohibition wave is subsiding in the south and middle 
west but may not as yet have been checked on the Pacific 
coast. Whether or not it will be allowed to create further 
havoc depends largely upon the trade itself. 

Times are good; the country is prosperous, and people as a 
whole are tired of the fanaticisin of the prohibitionist, but the 
employees of the Anti-Saloon League depend upon a continuance 
of the agitation for a continuance of their income. 

If the Wine Growers, Brewers and Wholesale Liquor Dealers 
in (California, Washington and Oregon will create and main- 
tain a proper organizaiton they can prevent further hostihs 
activity by the prohibition party and its allies. A Tri-State 
organization, under the control of a practical and high-class 
Superintendent, can direct a publicity campaign that will bring 
home to the people of the Golden West the facts that prohi- 
bition does not reduce the consumption of liquor, but reduces 
the quality, and forces the business out of the hands of the; 
legitimate dealer and into the hands of the law-breaking boot- 
legger and blind tiger. ' 

A Tri-State organization properly financed and organized 
would bring home to the cheap politician, who lives on agitation, 
that he can no longer with impunity attack an industry that 
represents millions in investments, and is conducted by men 
of the highest character in the west and northwest. 

The straight whisky business is, as everyone knows, in an 
excellent condition. The trade in blended whiskies of the better 
grades is also entirely satisfactory. The only cloud on the 
horizon is the hysterical wave of fanaticism conducted by the 
Anti-Saloon League. It is entirely in the hands of the dealers 
in California to create, together with the Brewers and Wine 
Growers, such an organization as will dissolve the possibb; 
danger of a revival of the Prohibition movement. 

San Francisco will, in all probability, be selected as the place 
to- hold the Panama International Exposition, bringing with it 
added glory and increased prosperity. Nothing should be al- 
lowed to interfere with the success of that great enterprise. 
Respectfully yours, 
THE SUSQUEMAC DISTILLING COMPANY, 

Morris Wertheimer, Pres. 



IT is not often that a hired editor, especially, has the oppor- 
tunity to rub up against so many distinguished men as the 
writer did at Frankfort recently, through the courtesy of that 
prince of gentlemen. Colonel Edmund H. Taylor, Jr., and his 
no less distinguished son, Mr. J. Swigert Taylor. 

In honor of the visiting Governors and their wives the Colonel 
gave a sumptuous luncheon at his magnificent suburban home, 
and invited something less than a thousand friends to meet them. 
The house was beautifully decorated and each of its three stories 
was filled with happy guests who enjoyed the pleasure of in- 
troductions to the Governors of a score and a half of States, 
and the general flow of good cheer that prevailed. The Colonel 
is always happiest when entertaining and was at his best when 
he met each visitor and extended a hearty welcome. It was 
an occasion long to be remembered by those fortunate enough 
to be present, and none of them will ever forget the Colonel's 
hospitality, Avhich permitted them to shake hands Avith so many 
men who preside over the destinies of their respective States. 

In receiving he was assisted by Colonel and Mrs. J. Swigert 
Taylor, and Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Hay. 

Everything was splendidly arranged and Frankfort as usual 
did herself proud in one of the most noted of the many occasions 
that she has been hostess. Her people are so used to big occa- 
sions that they come naturally. — Kentucky State Jourual. 



lASH'SBITTERC 

La TO>^\C \-i\XA.-T\V^ W 



Champagne Imports for 1910 Fall Off 

NEW YORK, Jan. 15.— The customs returns from 1910, just 
issued, show that the importation of champag-ne into the 
United States has decreased 47 per cent, compared Avith the 
previous year. In 1909 480,000 cases Avere imported from 
France, and last year the number amounted to only 250,000 
cases. The decrease in consumption is said to be due to the 
increase in prices put on last year. 



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OWNED AND,#PERATED BY 

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W. O. BOWERS, 

President 



C. J. TITUS, 
Vice-Pres. and Mgr. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



36 



5. CiPnico, Pfts'c 



PHONE MARKET 2836. 



ALTAVISTA WINES 




The Wines California Makes Famous 

ALTA VISTA WINES CO. 



MAIN OFFICE 



ll2-n4-TENTH Sr. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



JOHNSROUFE&CO. 



IMPORTERS OF WINES AND LIQUORS 



Fine Kentucky Whiskies 







Market Cafe 



1 



GOUAILHARDOU & RONDEL 

Proprietors 

540 Merchant Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



"Coffee Royal" 

A Mighty Bracer 






Hot Luncheon 
At 11 A. M. Daily 



John Caley, Prop 



Tel. Kearny 2306 



CALEY'S 



333 MONTGOMERY ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Phones 
Kearny 1610 
Home C 1610 







41 Drumm St., near Market ^ 

Sole Aient. for SUUr-. Premium Bourbon SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. ^ 



H. P. ANDERSEN. Proprietor 



THE CUTTER 



709 Market St. 

Call Ji.nnmx Biatf. 



PHone Douglas 2954 

SA.Ii FRANCISCO 



36 



PACIFIC WINE AND SIM KIT HE VIEW. 








Pity for a Food Expert's Wife 



Enterprise Brewing Company's Progress 



San Fkancisco, Cal., Dec. 27, 1910. 

EDITOR Wine and Spirit Review — Dear Sir: In ansAver to 
your request of the 23d received by us recently we wisli to 
state, that while the year of 1910 was not as expected, we did go 
ahead a little and conditions are generally more normal. The 
output of this plant shows about 115,000 barrels annually, Avhich 
is a great improvement from 12,000 barrels commencing the 
year 1892. 

We are now rated as the largest plant on the Pacific Coast 
outside of one in the Northwest. Our plant is equipped with all 
the latest machinery, so that improvement in this line is not 
necessary. 

- We were the first ones to operate automobiles for transporta- 
tion, and have gradually replaced our stock with automobile 
trucks. We have placed an order for spring delivery, three 
three-ton trucks and one of five-ton capacity, Avhich we figure 
with the ones in operation Avill very nearly take care of our 
trade. 

W^e find that the home industry topic has done considerable 
to boost the home product, and feel for the year 1911 that results 
will be forthcoming, and expect a much larger increase of busi- 
ness. 

Our bottling establishment has been greatly increased, and 
we are contemplating an enlargement in the machinery in this 
line. We are also figuring on a new kettle of 450 barrels ca- 
pacity, which must be added to our plant this spriiig. 

We still maintain our trade in Alaska, as well as Tahiti, 
South America and Japan. In fact, are receiving daily in- 
quiries and quoting prices on our product, due solely to the 
merits of same, as we have no direct representation outside of 
the State, and depend entirely upon the returns, by the success 
of our products. 

Knowing of nothing further of interest, we Avill conclude Avith 
our heartiest Avishes for a most prosperous Ncav Year, and are, 

Very truly yours, 

ENTERPRISE BREWING CO. 

Per W. A. Remensperger. 



AN editorial Avriter in the Tacoma Ledger says that much 
as he admires Dr. Har\'ey W^ Wiley, government chemist 
and pure food expert, he cannot help feeling pity for the 
charming employee of the congressional library Avhom he has 
just married. Listen to the Avriter's reasons : 

"One can think of no man in the country Avho is more likely 
to taste food at the table critically. After all these years of 
chemical analysis of food, the doctor has doubtlessly de- 
veloped a superfine sense of taste. In a moment he can detect 
Avhether a steak has been too long broiled for the good of the 
human body and Avhether the potatoes have been too long boiled 
or baked. His cultiA'ated palate Avill ascertain quickly Avliether 
the chemical changes produced by heat have been right and 
Avholesome. 

Good-natured man that he is, it is unlikely that he Avill engage 
in critical chemical comments at the table, though Ave doubt 
Avhether he can restrain certain looks of significance AA'hen he 
takes a SAvallow of milk he has reason to suspect is tubercular 
and germ-laden. 

We are willing to give credit to Dr. Wiley for trying noAv 
and then to forget germs. His Thanksgiving proclamation 
shows this. "Eat thy fill on Thank.sgiving Day," said the doc- 
tor, a day or tAvo before the holiday, "and forget Wiley and the 
microbe; but do not eat cold storage turkey. I believe that 
tlie eating public is entitled to one day in the year upon whicli 
the inner man shall be satisfied Avithout thought of germs." 

"This is a big concession, coming from Dr. Wiley, though we 
believe that his Avife Avill ask for a greater concession, if slie 
does the cooking. Inasmuch as she has been employed in the 
congressional library, she may be a bookish AA'oman, quite 
Avilling to turn the superintendence of the kitchen over to Dr. 
Wiley and let him cook as scientifically as he likes. But, even 
so, she should be pitied. 

"If Dr. Wiley receives numerous letters of counsel from 
women in the pure food crusade throughout the country, now 
that he has announced his engagement, he Avill have no just 
ground for complaint. For years he has been coxmseling other 
folks about things domestic." 



lASH'SBITTERC 



SVSKVlK<MyiWl)SV!s'S)!PlS)S'ilK)!iVl'J!l^i«\^i>SV~V£ltVl«VliS^)li):S>M«^ 



I WE HAVE NOTHING TO OFFER THE TRADE, EXCEPT 

Fine Goods, Square Prices 
Honorable Dealing 



SOLE AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS 
OF THE CELEBRATED 



"Castlewood" Bourbon and Rye 



Cartan McCarthy & Co. 



Established 1873 



Telephone Kearny 3688 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE 

LIQUOR MERCHAINTS 

S. E. CORNER BATTERY & COMMERCIAL STS. SAN FRANCISCO 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



37 



Sam T.Bernard, Pres 
Joe Zanetta, secv. 




%.:■ [unch.Grill&WiaieRooas. 

^ECOND BELOW/'VaRKET 

(3)a.r\ l>arvcisco,rBkl. 



<g^FlNE GOODS A SPECIALTY—^ 
MERC+IANTSLUNC-H 11 A.M.to 2.30RM. 






♦-->■ 



"The Cabin" 

PURE GOODS 

■ — 

105 Montgomery St. : ; ; Near Sutter St. 
"Only the Best the Market Affords" 

— =:Cuisine and Service Excellent = 



ALL ALE AND 

PORTER DRINKERS 

Should call for the celebrated 

BurnelVs 
Ale and Stout 

Brewed from the Best Malt Hops 
on the Market and used by all the 
Leading Clubs, Hotels and Bars 



Order through any Grocer or 
Liquor Dealer, or direct from 



R 



W. F. 



Opp. Emporium 



OEDER'S 

CAFE 

834 Market Street 

Soltx Francisco 



t 



EP^^P^^^^^ ^^^^^^S^@ 




I 
I 

P^ J. COPPA, Proprietor 

^ Pine St. Bet. Montgomery 
m and Kearny 



ORIGINAL 

: : Coppa : : 
Restaurant 



Music Eivenings 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Albion Ale and Porter Brewery 



INCORPORATED 

494 OTarrell St. 

TELEPHONE FRANKLIN 728 

San Francisco 




M 

I 

i 



California's Most Famous Road House 

Midway of Sausalito and San Rafael 

-^^ Finest Wines and Liquors = 



SERVICE UNEXCELLED 



Evergreen Private Arbor-Booth» ^ 
Shuffle Board .^ Salt Water Bathins 



Boating 



Refreshments 



N. BIEGEL, 

Proprietor 

Escaile, Marin County 

California 



K 



M 






THE OLD RELIABLE 



1871 GATO 18"?'1 



CLEAR HAVANA CIGAR 



S. BACHMAN & CO. (Inc.) 

DISTRIBUTERS 



38 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



- MARKET - 




As announced elsewhere in these columns by nienibei-s of the 
trade, business both in the wine and liquor trade has been 
of jjood volunu' durinfj; the month and the j:;enei'al outlook is 
hif^hly satisfactory. The advance of six cents per gallon on 
dry and sweet wines comes as a godsend to the producer and 
merchant and there is a good reason to believe that the way 
will be found to hold prices to a profit-taking basis. If the price- 
cutters can be managed, the future of the industry is virtually 
assured. 

At Sacramento the local option bill is causing some anxiety, 
but we believe before it goes to a vote certain amendments will 
be made which will deprive the Wylie measure of its dangerous 
features with reference to the California wine industry. Rep- 
resentatives of the wine interests should be on hand to i)romote 
these amendments and to see that those local option tricksters 
don't slip in a joker, as they are wont to do whenever oppor- 
tunity presents. 

The introduction by Senator Sanford of a bill on Jlodel 
License lines is important at this time. Mr. Sanford is not 
only a man of parts, but his idea as expressed in his proposed 
bill is very favorably' receivwl by the licjuor trade. Its main 
feature is a provision that sahxms shall be restricted to one 
to every five hundred population and with a provision for the 
uniform closing and opening hours throughout the State. There 
are other provisions that are for both sides. 

In view of the fact that California has a local option law 
and that this Sanford bill appears to be a step in the way of 
progress which Wylie's local option bill is not, it Avould seem 
that the tliinking men in the Legislature would properly side- 
step the local option bill and give their attention to the San- 
ford measure. It should be remembered that the Anti-Saloon 
Leagu(^ is conducted by men who are working for big wages 
and general gi-aft otherwise they would let the jmblic go to 
the devil instead of making their allied "Christian" efforts 
to save the American citizen from enjoying his personal rights. 

Wine exports by sea were of good value, the total being 021) 
cases or l,108,49fi gallons, valued at f2<)2,(>3(). Tlic figures 
for the same month of last year were 198 cases, or 817,449 
gallons, valued at |290,118. 

The i)roduction of swet^ts during December totaled 307,000 
gallons. This brings the production for 1910 higher than the 
high year of 1909. 

Brandy exports seem to be somewhat better than usual, the 
figures being 35 cases, 11,473 gallons, valued at !|437(). The 
production in the three districts was of unusually large vol- 
ume considering the season. The figure was 509,075 gallons. 

The exports of whisky by sea were of nominal volume, the 
totals being only 477 cases, 1372 gallons, valued $7556. 
The misc(!llaneous exports were valued at $13,000. 

Im])orts by sea were of good volume, the detailed items are 
given herewith : 

IMPORTS BY SEA:— Beer, 966 hogsheads, 647 barrels, 717 
quarter barrels, 65 packages, 585 half barrels, 305 cases; 
Wnie, 4 barrels, 39 casks, 757 cases, 2 kegs; Champagne, 736 
cases; Brandy, 1 half barrel, 420 cases, 15 octaves, 1 cask; 
Whisky, 4045 cases, 327 casks, 8 octaves, 227 barrels, 1 hogshead ; 
Liquors, 17 packages, 617 cases; Vermouth, 1510 cases; Gin, 59 



barrels, 8 casks, 1803 cases, 5 octaves; Sherry, 13 casks, 1 case; 
Stout, 200 cases, 510 barrels; Spirits, 53 cases; Cordials, 139 
cases; Rum, 10 cases; Mineral Water, 575 cases, 45 casks; Por- 
ter, 150 cases ; Absinthe, 500 cases ; Sake, 1422 casks, 537 cases. 
IMPORTS BY RAIL IN BOND:— Wine, 32 cases, 5 barrels; 
Liquors, 102 cases; Whisky, 3 cases, 1 cask, 2 hogsheads; 
Champagne, 450 cases, 105 baskets. 



Theodore Qier Co. Report Good Year 



THEODORE GIER, vineyardist, wine-maker, banker and 
without doubt the busiest man in Oakland, tells us that 
business in 1910 has been more satisfactory than in 1909. He 
says : In the first place, in the latter year we had a very large 
crop of medium quality grapes because of the weather condi- 
tions that then prevailed. This caused over production of me- 
dium quality wine. In the second place, in 1909 there was a 
strong antagonistic movement not only to the wine industry, 
but to the trade in general, which assisted in depressing busi- 
ness and prices at the end of that season. 

At the beginning of 1910 the outlook for another large crop 
intensified the prevailing depression of the industry. Towards 
the fall, however, conditions changed materially. The crop 
proved only from 60 to 75 per cent of that 1909, and the grapes 
could not be in better condition. Therefore, the wine produced 
from them was of unusual excellence, what is known in Europe 
as a "special vintage," in fact the Avines of 1910 were of the best 
quality I have known in my 25 years' experience. Naturally 
prices were stimulated thereby. The situation was further re- 
lieved by the results of the Eastern elections, demonstrating a 
change to a more tolerant and liberal policy. Another condition 
in our favor was the unfortunate destruction of the European 
grape crop by a cold and wet season, causing a great enquiry 
for our wines especially those of the Rhine and Moselle types. 
These various reasons dissipated the former depression and 
created a firm market at a slight advance. 

In relation to the recent rise in sweet Avine prices, I would 
say, that as I do not make sweet wines, those I handle will 
cost me more. Such excess I shall pay with pleasure, as I am 
heartily in favor of the united work of all wine men, and be- 
lieve it will not only increase prices but do much good to the 
entire trade. In the future, I believe that the general demand 
for our wines will still further improve, and that within a short 
time standard prices will reach a point that will prove profit- 
able to the entire viticultural industry — in my opinion the fore- 
most industry in the State 

In conclusion Mr. Gier stated that the recent incorporation 
of the Theodore Gier Wine Company was undertaken for tlie 
purpose of enabling the enlargement of capital. This activity 
he said, showed his faith in the future of California viticul- 
ture, for such new capital would be used in buying more vine- 
yards and further increasing the general business of the com- 
pany. 



Arnold Poppic; of the Zamora Vineyard Co., this city, and 
one of the best known salesmen on the coast, departed a few 
days ago on an extended trip covering the I5ast, South and 
North. The Zamora Vineyard Company is a compartively 
young institution, but is meeting with flattering success. Mr. 
Poppic explains this by giving his axiom, which is this : "When 
yow go out with the quality and have ability as a salesman, y<ra 
are sure of success — you can't fail. Now I have the goods and 
I know how to sell 'em. So I can't fail." 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



39 




40 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



,«» ^^ «»-^^«» ^fci «•- 



>«» ^^ »- 



Grapes and Copper ; 



WE have received the following iuteresting communication 
from Sanders & Company's Copper Works, entitled by 
Mr. Schalitz, "Grapes and Copper." It clearly demonstrates the 
great benefit that the growers and handlers of grapes in Cali- 
fornia have received from the mechanical genius and first-class 
work of the coppersmiths : 

"Winemakers and coppersmiths are old, we read about them 
in historical works, but they are more combined in California, 
especially in the sweet wine district, than they were then, and 
now both are friends through necessity. The wiuemaker learned 
what the coppersmith knew, one has the work to be done and 
the other requires work to do, just as "necessity is the mother of 
invention," or as the German says, "hunger lernt erfinden." 

"About thirty-five years ago when the winemaker ordered a 
still he described to the coppersmith just what he desired as to 
shape and form and he received it nicely made with all the 
fancy touches of the coppersmith, regardless as to whether this 
extra work would do any good to the still. For looks it was 
perfect, but to fill the object that was another question. 

"From that time up to about twenty years ago the copper- 
smith knew little about what the winemaker required. About 
twenty years ago there was an appropriation made by the State 
of California to help the wine industry, and the coppersmith was 
asked what he could do to further the industry. He gave his 
information and ideas of how it could be improved by what he 
could produce. At that time a 300-gallon or possibly a 500- 
gallon charging still or one that could distill 1800 to 3000 gal- 
lons of wine in twenty-four hours was a large still. At the 
same time there were grapes going to waste containing from 
22 to 30 per cent sugar because the distilling capacity of the 
winery was too small and they could not handle these grapes. 
The coppersmith was doing nothing and the winemaker was 
losing money and Uncle Sam's revenue man was not welcome 
at the winery because the winemaker could not produce with his 
still what it was surveyed for and therefore he had to work 
extra to do so. The winemaker had the idea that the product 
of the grapes had to lay and rest, as they called it, but the 
coppersmith advised him to distill and to use stills as large or 
larger than the crushing capacity per day and rather have thi^ 
still stand idle than have the winery blocked. 

"Then the continuous stills came into use, although some 
winemakers would not believe in them, but they gi-adually came 
in line, and those who had used the old style stills wei'e the 
most pleased with them, because they appreciated the difference. 
One of the best winemakers Avho took a great interest in the 
welfare of the wine industry in general, and Avho made a spe- 
cialty of good brandy, wrote after he had used the still a season 
that if all the brandy makers would use this still they would get 
10 cents more a gallon for their brandy. Then there was no 
demand for brandy and hardly any contracted for,-: and the 
buyer only bought when the brandy was made and the prices 
were according to the quality. Within a few years several 
wineries commenced the season with contracts for brandy to 
start with on the strength of the still that they were going to 
use. Nobody wanted muscat brandy and of course very little 
was made, but in a couple of years many tons of second and 
third ci-op muscat grapes went to the Avineries, which, but for 
the improvement in stills, would have rottetl on the vines, to be 



turned into muscat brandy, and there has been a great demand 
for it since. At this time a still that would distill 5000 gallons 
of wine in twenty-four houi's was a large still, and to make tlircr 
or four of them a season was a very busy year for the copper- 
smith. In nearly all cases these stills were too small after a 
year or two, although they produced more than bargained for, 
and larger stills had to be made. Many of these, with the excep- 
tion of those that Avere destroyed by fire, are still doing good 
Avork and Avere in operation last year, some of them have been 
(m four different foundations and have initiated the winemaker 
into the business. These stills have been further improved, and 
about 100 of them Avere in operation last year, the capacity 
varying from 3000 gallons to 40,000 gallons per day, and Avith 
only one exception, which was a good many j^ears ago, the wine- 
maker has paid the coppersmith in full and sometimes before it 
was due, showing the good Avill betAveen them. 

"Last year, although prospects Avere poor, twelve of these 
stills varying in capacity from 3000 gallons to 40,000 gallons 
per day, were made by this company, and operated. 

"It has also during 1910 manufactured and installed three 
grape syrup plants. It is believed that the making of this syrup 
in years Avhen the price offered by Avinemakers is below the 
average, will be of great benefit to grape growers, and Avill there- 
fore afford another instance Avhere the mechanical skill of the 
coppersmith has been utilized for the good of the viticultural 
industry. 

"Therefore, judging the future by the past, Ave have every 
reason to predict there is a bright future for both groAver, Avine- 
maker, distiller and coppersmith, avIio have worked together for 
so many years for the benefit of all concerned. 

"CARL L. SCHALITZ, 
"Pi*esident and Manager." 



The Fact that the Bulk of the Whiskey 

Sold Throughout the United States is 

Blended Proves the Popularity of 

This Form of Whiskey 



HUNTER 

BALTIMORE 

RYE 



Is a Blend of Maryland's Purest Straight 

Rye Whiskies of Uniform Excellence 

and is the Perfection of Quality 

and Flavor 



HENRY CAMPE & CO., Inc. 

Distributors for California and Nevada 

San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



41 



The Rational Methods of the Swiss 



San Francisco, January 9, 1911. 

PACIFIC Wine and Spirit Review, San Francisco, Cal.— 
Dear Sirs: I believe that you invited me to contribute 
something to your Annual, and in conformity with my usual 
liabit, I have refrained from sending you anything, as I had 
nothing original to send. Such matter is generally contributed 
l)y your other correspoudents in this line of business. However, 
I beg to hand you herewith a clipping from the New York 
Tribune, copied from the London Standard, in reference to the 
Swiss alcohol monopoly, from Avhich you will see how the Swiss 
Government handles the liquor question, and I think our Pro- 
labition friends, Avho desire to intei'dict the consumption of all 
kinds of liquors, might well study with profit to themselves and 
to evei'ybody else the rational way in Avhich the Swiss Govern- 
ment attemiits to solve the drink question. 

Yours very truly, 

J. J. JACOBI. 



The article follows : 



: 



SWISS ALCOHOL MONOPOLY. 



In 1887, by a popular vote, a form of the referendum, the 
Swiss people voluntarily handed over the monopoly of alcohol 
to the federal authorities, who have controlled the importation, 
manufacture and wholesale distribution of spirits — in quanti- 
ties of not less than forty litres — since that date. 
; The latest statistics, from 1887 to 1909, show how the monop- 
oly has been worked for the last twenty-two years, and with 
Avhat good results. The loans and expenses required to estab- 
lish the monopoly, amounting to £207,840, were paid off within 
ten years by the government, and tlie profits from the sale of 
good alcoohl, supervised by federal experts, amounted during 
the twentj'-two years to £5,176,000. 

The profits were divided each year among the cantons accord- 
ing to their population, and one-tentli of the revenue was ap- 
plied according to the law to counteract alcoholism, with very 
encouraging results. The government, by abolishing communal 
and cantonal duties on Avines and beer, by suppressing the evil 



of the many small stills that existed in the country before the 
monopoly, by increasing the taxes on spirits to three times as 
rnuch as before 1887, has carried out its original policy of sup- 
planting the use of spirits by that of fermented beverages, and, 
above all, has succeeded in reducing drunkenness and increasing 
the health of the Swiss people. 

In 1904 the consumption of alcohol of 50 per cent in Switzer- 
land was per head 4 litres 30 centilitres, and in 1909 it had 
fallen to 3 litres 72 centilitres, and is said to be gradually de- 
creasing. Such is the >vork accomplished by the alcohol monop- 
oly in Switzerland, brought into birth by the referendum, by the 
people for the people. — London Standard. 



iitarving Workers Wreck Wineries 



PARIS, Jan. 19. — The wine riots in the Champagne district 
are seriously occupying the attention of the government 
which today decided to dispatch troops to end the disturbances 
in the Rheims region, where the local authorities are helpless. 

Although the misery of the wine workers resulting from poor 
crops and small wages is recognized officially, it is pointed out 
that large sums already have been appropriated by parliament 
to alleviate the sufferings. 

Last night 2000 men and Avomen from the surrounding coun- 
try marched into Haueville carrying red banners and singing 
revolutionary airs. They broke into several wine cellars and, 
smashing the casks, poured the contents, valued at thousands 
of dollars, into the streets until the thoroughfares ran with 
champagne. Thousands of bottles of wine Avere emptied into a 
creek. 



The AvcU-knoAvn firm Pacific Copper Works, L. Wagner & 
Sons, Avish to report that they have no reason to complain in 
regard to all kinds of copper work for distilleries, Avineries, etc., 
which has been turned out during the year. Their long estab- 
lished record speaks for itself and the prospects are that they 
Avill have a very busy season turning out all kinds of stilLs, 
pasteurizers, filters, etc., wiiich are in great demand. 



THE NEW BIG WINERY IN SACRAMENTO 
SOLICITS YOUR PATRONAGE 

CALL FOR 

"VESTAL VINTAGES" 

SACRAMENTO VALLEY WINERY 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



42 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



The Success of Breen & Kennedy 



FEW firms in this country have shown more aggressiveness 
during the past few years, than have the firm of Breen & 
Kennedy of Chicago, who also have a branch house in San 
Francisco, under the management of our well known Mr. Thos. 
W. Costello. 

The year of 1909 started out with somewhat better prospects 
than were evident in the beginning of 1908. Many victories 
had been won by our side in the great prohibition contests 
throughout the country, and prohibition. seemed to be weaken- 
ing to a marked degree. This greatly encouraged the firm of 
Breen & Kennedy, who adopted and put into effect some ag- 
gressive plans which have largely contributed to their remark- 
able success. 

Through the year of 1909 this firm acquired all of the crops 
of the Belle of Nelson whisky from 1901 to 1908 inclusive. This 
gave them about 17,000 barrels of that famous old time brand. 

Some time ago they also became distillers in their own right, 
their distillery being locatetl at Frankfort, Ky. Here they make 
a large crop of whisky each year. Their plant is known as the 
Cedar Creek Distillery. The warehouse connected with same 
has a capacity of 37,000 barrels, and is one of the largest ware- 
houses in the State of Kentucky. The distillery has a mashing 
capacity of 750 bushels daily, and is a thoroughly modern plant. 

No finer gentleman can be found connected with this trade 
than Mr. Martin J. Breen, president of this concern. Both Mr. 
Breen and Mr. Patrick Kennedy, his partner, were men Avho 
began at the bottom of the ladder, worked their way up grad- 
ually from the positons of salesmen, and later credit men, 
with the well known firm to which they formerly were both 
attached for many years. 

They later started in business for themselves and in the pass- 
ing of the last ten years forged to the front and became one of 
Chicago's most substantial concerns. During this time their 
many salesmen were busily engaged in exploring the country 
in quest of trade, and gradually the lines were laid which re- 
sulted in bringing to this firm the volume of business which tliey 
enjoy today. 

Quite recently they were compelled to move into one of the 
largest and most substantial buildings now in the wholesale 
district in Chicago, located at 130 Franklin street. 

Much of the success of this firm can be attributed to the re- 
markable business ability and courteous disposition of Mr. 
Breen; though a shrewd business man, he is never so busy as 
to forget to be pleasant and civil to those calling upon him. In 
fact this policy dominates the whole firm, and no doubt has had 
much to do with their progress. 

In April, 1909, they started a venture, which was looked upon 
by local trade as a more or less unwise one. They secured the 
services of one of the coast's most able and well known sales- 
men, namely : Mr. Thos. W. Costello of San Francisco, and 
acting upon his advice and at his direction opened a branch 
house in San Francisco in order to get a share of the coast 
trade. 

They paid no attention to what other distillers or dealers 
said or predicted, because Breen & Kennedy know no such word 
as fail. In the first nine months attending the opening of the 
San Francisco branch their venture had proved a success, 
and the following year just passed has enabled them to triple 
the business secured during the first year of their experience in 
this city, under the direction of Mr. Costello, in the States of 
Oregon, Washington and California. 

Mr. Costello has kept the main office busy making up and 
filling his orders for the many carloads of goods he is continu- 
ally bringing to San Francisco. The method of doing business 
^d the policy of dealing with the retail trade adopted by Mr. 
fcostello, seems to have met with great favor; particularly in 



the vicinity of San Francisco, where they now enjoy a splendid 
trade and where we hear of so much favorable comment. 

The firm is reported as having in their control somewhere 
between 40,000 ajid 50,000 barrels of Kentucky Avhisky in bond. 

Mr. Costello, in a recent interview, states that he will shortly 
be compelled to take a larger office and wareroom, as his busi- 
ness has grown beyond the capacity and facilities offered by 
his present location on Pine street. He will carry a large stock 
in the new location, for which he is at present engaged in nego- 
tiating a long lease. 

The success of the house of Breen & Kennedy is an object 
lesson, showing what can be accomplished by tlie proper combi- 
nation of goods and brains. The house furnish the whiskies 
as per guarantee and to Thos. W. Costello, the Western man- 
ager, was delegated the arduous task of making the market. 
Being one of the star salesmen on the coast he has made good as 
the experience of the house shows. 



Advance in Wine Prices Puts Industry Rightl] 



QEStS!:^ 



T^ ARLY in the present year a tacit agreement was made 
•L--« between the California AYine Association and a number of 
sweet wine makers by which a general advance lias been made 
in the price of all California wines. The increase on sweets 
is 6 cents a gallon in carload lots, and the same advance has 
been authorized on clarets and other standard dry wines. 

The largest independent wineries in San Joaquin county, Sac- 
ramento, Fresno and Los Angeles have advanced prices on sweet 
wines with the consent of the California Wine Association. All 
sweets have advanced 6 cents for carload lots of new wines, 
and tliere is an agreement to maintain this status if no rate 
cutting is indulged in. 

This means that port wines in large wholesale lot-i, witliout 
coop(>rage, is being offered at 22 and 23 cents i)er gallon instead 
of IG and 17 cents. Twenty-two cents means about .fl(;.50 jxt 
ton for grapes, including cost of wine making. 

So much for the result of united action of wine men, and 
it would appear therefrom that if it is continued tlie entire 
industry will be gi-eatly benefited thereby. A. Mattei, a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the California Inde|)endent 
Wineries, gave as a reason for the increase m jjvice, tliat it 
had been dtme because of the good market for wim- which now 
prevails in the East. He further said that 1910 had been a 
good year for the wine men. 

The co-operative wineries at Lodi are also deliglited at the 
prospect, and state that the advance in wine prices will be a 
great benefit to the growers as the wineries will pay tliem 
about |13 a ton, Avhich nmkes all the difference between ruin 
and prosperity. 

The result of the amicable agreement, we are also informed, 
will be that the California Wine Association will net a hand- 
some profit from the sale of wines in hand which were made 
from low priced grapes. Everybody, therefore, seems satis- 
fied, the independents, the co-operatives and the Association, 
and we learn from several prominent wine men interviewed 
that if this "entente cordiale" only lasts there is a bright out-^ 
look for the California wine and grape industries during 1911. 



Calls Prohibition a Failure in Alabama 



|V/| ONTGOMERY, Ala., Jan. Ifi.— In his inaugural address 
IVl delivered before the Legislature today, (Jovemor Emmett 
O'Neal declared Alabama's prohibition laws to be an invasion 
of individual rights and constitutional guarantees, and branded 
the attempt to insert a prohibition clause in tlie State Consti- 
tution as an offspring of intolerance and bigotry. He pro- 
claimed prohibition a failure. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



43 



L"^^'£*-!Hi^'^'i*i^-? &l^^*¥''^'*S^i?'^^^"^S^-^*^^.5*^* 



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44 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT UEVIEW. 



Fools and Weak People Cause the TroubJe 



San Francisco, Jan. 28, 1911. 

MR. R. M. WOOD, Editok Wine and Si'IUIT Review — 
Dear Sir: — In response to your recjuest for a few lines, 
for yonr annual issue, the topic that sufjjjcsts itself as a live one 
is the constant agitation of the so-called "Temperance" ques- 
tion. 

Instead of true temperance, however, man.v agitators contend 
for total abstinence from all liquids of any alcoliolic strength, 
and in doing so, they overlook indisputable facts tliat tlie tem- 
perate and wise use of liquids with alcoliolic strength (which 
are converted from grains and grapes) aid digestion and 
strengthen the physical and mental powers instead of impairing 
them. 

The further one looks to France, Germany, Italy or Great 
Britain for facts along these lines, the same deductions must 
be drawn, that not the wise but the unwise use of such bever- 
ages is what makes the trouble. 

The agitatoi's cannot change human nature and ever since 
P>iblical times, when wat^r Avas turned into wine by the Lord, 
who did not advocate total abstinence — such beverages have 
added to the Avelfare of mankind, as well as to their troubles, 
when fools and weak people use them unwisely. 

As well might one advocate the abolition of niaking gun 
powder, because some people get blown up, as to prohibit the 
manufacture and use of beverages of alcoholic strength, be- 
cause some people use them unwisely. 

Absolutely pure beer without any chemicals, like Schlitz 
beer, and pure whisky like J. H. Cutter bourbon and Keystone 
IVIonogram rye without any raw spirits are types of beverages 
that wisely used will help rather than hinder the race. 

Where prohibitory laws are in force, pure alcoholic bever- 
ages are driven out and the impure high wines and raw spirits 
take their place, because those who will have their alcoholic 
beverages, must get them clandestinely and in the least tiine, 
with the quickest effect, all of which is injurious to the moral 
and phy.sical well being. 

Yours very truly, 

SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, 

By H. H. Sherwood, Pres. 



Progress in Southern California Wine Industry 



A LOS ANGELES exchange calls attention to the fact that 
"the wine industry receipts for Southern California are 
climbing skyward by leaps and bounds. The receipts for the past 
four months exceed by more than .f250,000 those of the cor- 
responding months of 1909, according to figures of the United 
States Internal Revenue Collector. The rapid rise in the wine 
industry receipts for the closing months of 1910 disprove the 
fears that the extensive colonization projects Ixnng prosecuted 
throughout Southern California have injured the wine traffic. 

As far as avc understand tlie matter the recent greatly in- 
creased profits upon the sale of wines are caused directly from 
the high quality of the 1910 vintage and the almost entire 
failure of European grape crops, a conjunction of causes which 
may never occur again. 

Whether or no southern viticulture has been injured by the 
"extensive colonization projects" we are not in a position to say, 
but believe it may be truthfully stated that normal returns 
from the industry cannot be fairly estimated by the results of 
such an exceptional year as 1910. In which case it would be 
impossible, basing conclusions on last year's vintage, to arrive 
at a fair decision as to whether they have or not. 



Brandy Produced By Years 

1890 1,072,957 

1891 • 1,245,(598 

1892 1,475,525 

1893 2,209,617 

1894 , 2,007,905 

1895 . .1,754,002 

1896 2,090,000 

1897 1,442,40S 

1898 1,250,000 

1899 1,090,000 

1900 ....1,250.513 

1901 1,688,482 

1902 1,504,172 

1903 1,970,571 

1904 1,420,892 

1905 1,934,00S 

1906 1,345,000 

1907 1,450,000 

1908 1,525,000 



Among those wine makers at Calistoga who have thus far 
sold their wines are R. H. Walsh, E. Light, L. Nolasco, J. L. 
Hittel and J. Schleicher. The prices obtained are reported fair, 
although not so good as they would have been had their stock 
been lield a little lonjrer. 



John B. Rusconi, 505 :Market street, is among the enterpris- 
ing retailers of the city. As a boost for the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition he put out a very attractive watcli fob bearing on 
one side the motto of "Land divided, the world united— Panama 
Canal." On the reverse side, "Boost for 1915 Fair at San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., and for .John P.. Rusconi, 505 ilarket St., San 
Francisco." 



The Italian-Swiss Colony reports the sale of 400,000 gallons 
of wine uj) to the present time in excess of the best year since 
they have been in business. 



Pacific Copper Works 

L. WAGNER & SONS, Props. 




573 Mission Street, San Francisco 



OUR SPECIALTY OF MANU= 
FACTURINQ ALL KINDS OF 
STILLS, FILTERS, PASTEUR- 
IZERS AND COPPER AND 
BRASS WORK FOR WINERIES, 
DISTILLERIES, BREWERIES, 
ETC, FURTHER INFORMA- 
TION GIVEN UPON APPLI- 
CATION. 



Gold and Silver Medal awarded at 
Mechanics' and Midwinter Exposition 
for continuous still. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



45 




IRo 



1 

1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 



Port. 
2,414,106.68 
4,100,464.46 
5,526,561.68 
4,786,419.25 
4,241,789.93 
6,777,423.46 
5,174,165.59 
5,007,299.51 
8,694,252.36 



Sherry. 
3,392,599.58 
7,117,613.54 
2,944,455.48 
^,559,397.41 
3,149,498.84 
4,669,279.13 
5,245,480.21 
4,421,703.87 
5,765,370.85 



Angelica. 
347,095.91 
768,945.24 
821,685.95 
987,367.21 
4/70,852.85 
878,832.19 
1,334,473.86 
829,553.71 
980,921.21 



Muscat. Malaga. 
1,875,008.27 
1,701,780.57 

645,845.84 81,146.05 

1,350,538.11 18,847.69 

789,647.18 8,098.89 

1,363,527.15 11,899,75 

2,269,929.73 216,390.08 

2,084.469.28 73,518.57 

2,323,824.00 81,175.20 



Tokay. 




9,776,975.42 5,894,330.61 1,275,652.82 1,087,401.01 223,739.16 



Theo. Qier Co. Incorporates For Million 



Madera. Marsella. Total. 

8,028,810.44 
13,714,384.23 
10,016,011.28 
10,716,649.78 
8,659,887.69 
13,700,961.'68 
13,316.07 3,488.79 14,269,644.60 
51,716.42 12,490,770.40 

2,785.01 17,983,465.83 

Catawba. 
153,760.42 346,138.00 4,763.50 18,762,760.94 



25,580.42 

316.28 

14,080.11 



12,400.27 

22,516.04 

133,132.27 



T^HE Theodore Gier Vineyard and Wine Company, recently 
■^ incorporated witli a |1,000,000 capital, orfjanized and headed 
by that well known vineyardist and wineniaker, Theodore 
Gier, has issned bonds in $250,000, underwritten by the Union 
Trust Company of San Francisco. The latter is secured by 
mortgages on the corporation's personal and vineyard property 
iu Alameda and Napa county. Mr. Gier says : "In order to 
be prepared for the growth of business which will follow, I 
have incorporated and issued bonds to obtain capital for the 
expenses. I have been forced to extend my business to such 
an extent that incorporation became a necessity. I have taken 
this step merely with a view to meeting expansiim of business 
in the near future." 

The Theodore Gier Wine Company has been in business 
in Oakland for twenty years and has done a large local and 
Eastern business. Colonel Gier's present holdings total .|600,- 
000, and the additional property which he is soon to acquire, 
and the improvement added from the |250,000 bond issue pro- 
ceeds, the value of the company will exceed the amount of in- 
corporation. 




Residence of Superintendent Italian Swiss Colony 
Asti, California 



The Chronicle Editor's Bad Break 



Mr. A. C. Garcia, who for several years has aided the Italian- 
Swiss Colony in working up an excellent business in Mexico, 
and Central and South America, sailed for Mexico on the 
steamer "Curacao" on January 7th. He will enjoy a well- 
earned vacation at Mazatlan, State of Sinaloa, and then proceed 
to the City of Mexico where he will study the wine business and 
endeavor to stimulate the use of California wines in preference 
to the European article. 



WE desire to call the attention of the editor of the Chronicle 
to a slight misstatement made in the issue of January 
8, 1911. The announcement is prominently made in tabular 
form that during 1910 the exports of Avine from San Francisco 
by sea totaled 688,611 gallons. It further gives the figures by 
months. 

The actual total of exports of wine by sea was 9,866,539 gal- 
lons. It will be seen that the Chronwie editor made a mistake 
of only nine millions of gallons. We trust he Avill embrace the 
first opportunity to correct this foolish statement. 



o»- 



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Wine Machinery 



COMPLETE PLANTS i 
FITTED OUT 



j Coxitinuotis Presses 
\ CrusKers, Stemmers 
I and Must Pumps 



Of 



Toulouse & Deloreux I 

405 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. / 



46 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



i Over The Sparkling* Wine Cup ( 

f Toasts and After=Dinner Oratory j 



By HoKATio F. Stoll. 



THE 150 fjiiosts who wore invited to the dinner party ofifr.and 
.Mrs. Patrick Callionn at tiie Hotel St. Francis on Tue.sday 
evening, January 3rd, were given an opportunity to see the head 
of the I'nited K'ailroads in a particularly happy frame of mind, 
ami to listen to a graceful toa.st tiiat was in shaii) contrast to the 
many vitriolic utterances he lias made in tlie daily press during 
the past few years. The occasion was the announcement of tlu^ 
engagement of his daughter, ilargaret, to Paul Foster, son of 
A. W. Foster, one of California's foremost citizens. 

Nowadays, betrothals are usually revealed by the women folks 
at teas or receptions. Jlr. Calhoun evidently i)referred the good 
old Southern custom of the head of the family making the 
announcement, and his felicitous speech was a welcome innova- 
tion to the prominent people who sat at table. 

"My friends," he said, "it has become my agreeable duty to 
convey to you a pleasing piece of news. Having seen it rumored 
in the papers and having been specially invited to hear it, you 
will, of course, be surprised. 

"The indescribable charm of California, which has seized in 
its life-long embrace every member of my family, as it does every 
one who lingers in the State, renders it natural that my daughter 
JIargaret should have found here the one man for her in all 
the world. 

"Added to its Avonderful natural charms, California will ever 
be to Mrs. Calhoun and me one of the dearest spots on earth on 
account of the loving acts of friendship which have been so 
generously shown us and the loyal support which thousands 
have given me who have known me only through my works. 

"We therefore rejoice that Margaret has determined to make 
California her permanent home. We know that the splendid 
father of the man she has chosen will Avelcome her as a daughter 
and that this noble lady at my right already envelops her in a 
mother's love, while you, my friends, from the abundance of 
your generous natures will, we know, continue to lavish upon 
her those charming sentiments of friendship wiiich have so 
endeared you to Mrs. Calhoun and me. We sliall love to think 
of our daughter amidst the sunshine and flowers of California 
surrounded by the. tenderest sentiments of love and friendship. 

"I now announce to you the engagement of my daughter 
ilargaret to Mr. Paul Scott Foster, and ask you to join with me 
in drinking a rising toast to their health and happiness." 

Mr. Calhoun's toast was certainly apropos, but at the average 
dinner party, I must confess I dislike "speeches" or "toasts," 
unless it is a family affair, when the close relations of every one 
present allow a certain freedom and license which is productive 
of mirth and laughter and does not call for any efforts at 
oratory. 

If there are to be "toasts," however, I believe that those ex- 
pected to scintillate should have an op})ortunity to prepare for 
the ordeal. On several occasions, I have been amazed at the 
poor showing nmde on the spur of the moment by men of the 
world who dine out often and represent a wide variety of in- 
terests and nationalities. I have in mind a recent dinner party, 
which did not celebrate any special event, an anniversary, birth- 
day or anything else of moment. One of the guests offered a 
charming toast to the host and hostess and then called on others 
to "say a few words." Apologies, embarrassing attempts to be 
facetious, and some indifferent stories, not particularly well 
told, were the only fish that came into the dragnet of the self- 
appointed toastraaster. 



It has always seemed strange to me why people, who are not 
(luick-witted and clever, do not fortify themselves with the ideas 
of others. There are so many appropriate toasts that can readily 
be memorized and prefaced with a few spontaneous and appro- 
l)riate remarks, that there is no reason why any person should 
be caught napping. Take Francis Wilson's charming little 
tribute to the hostess : 

"Here's to the hostess who has worried all day 
And trembled lest everything go the wrong way; 
May the grace of contentment possess her at once. 
May her guests — and her servants — all do the right stunts." 

Oliver Herford's jingle in honor of the chaperone can also be 
used to advantage by budding youths : 

"Here's to the chaperone! 

May she learn from Cupid 
Just enough of blindness 
To be sweetly stupid." 

L. H. Jerome's toast "To the Ladies" is always provocative of 
laughter and permits of some effective "stage business" : 

"Our arms your defense, 
Your arms our recompense, 
Fall in!" 

Sheridan paid his respects to women in a rollicking ballad, 
a characteristic stanza of which runs as follows : 

"Here's to the maiden of bashful fifteen, 
Here's to the widow of fifty; 
Here's to the ilaunting, extravagant queen 
And here's to the housewife that's thrifty; — 
Let the toast pass; 
Drink to the lass. 
I'll warrant she'll prove 

An excuse for the glass!" 

The toast, "Friend.ship," has been pithily handled by Dickens, 
who said : 

"Here's to the wings of friendship — may they never molt a feather!" 

Dobson thus expressetl his sympathy for the bachelor : 

"Pass me the wine. To those that keep 

The bachelor's secluded sleep 

Peaceful, inviolate and deep, 

I pour my libation." 

Pen Jonson's coui)lets 

"To the old, long life and treasure; 
To the young, all health and pleasure," 

is always welcome and appropriate where the ages of the guests 
are strongly c<mtrasted. 

One might go on indefinitelj' (|uoting suitable toasts for dif- • 
ferent occasions, hut these are a few that come to my mind as I 
write. They seem to me infinitely better than the hodgepodge of 
jests of all ages that are usually peri)etrated at private as well 
as public dinners and ban(|uets by s])eakers Avho are anxious to 
set the table in a roar. 

This tendency to tell jokes reminds me of the story of the man 
who came late to a banquet and was grieved to find that every 
jest of his fell flat. When he had made an end of speaking, he 
sorrowfully asked the man next him what was the matter and 
whether his stories Avere not good ones. "Oh, ye — es," was the 
answer, "they were good enough, I suppose, but then, you see, 
the earlier speakers had told all of them." 

Prander Matthews declares that wci Americans are too good- 
natured at times, too tolerant, else would a tedious speech meet 
with swift and deserved punishment. "The Pritish," he says, 
"are less courteous. They interrupt promptly, they badger, they 
catcall. We sit silent and writhe without shirking and, at worst, 
Ave steal aAvay Avithout protest." Perhaps Mr. Matthews is right. 

At any rate, Ave knoAv that humor and funny stories are not 
ahvays synonymous. Head the speeches of Mark Twain ( Samuel 
L. Clemens) and you get an idea of the clever way in AA'hich he 
introduced his droll stories Avhich always had point. Evon 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



47 



I'obbod of hiss delijilidul (k-livcry tlic.y ai-e very amusing. They 
show a wholosomo onthjok on life, a hatred of shams and a kindly 
huiuoi' that was characteristic of the man. Take his toast to the 
babies, for ('xami)U' : 

"We haven't all had the good fortune to be ladies; we have not all been 
generals, or poets, or statesmen; but when the toast works down to babies, 
we stand on common ground— for we've all been babies. As they comfort us 
in our sorrows, let us not forget them in our festivities. Here's to the 
babies— God bless them!" 

No one enjoys a banquet more than do I when the number of speakers 
is limited and the committee is careful to choose them judiciously so that 
their several styles of speaking may contrast agreeably. Five toasts or six 
at the most are the limit of enjoyment and it seems to me that every one 
who is asked to respond to a toast should be requested not to exceed fifteen 
minutes. We are told that the five-minute speeches with which Judge Hoar 
year after year delighted the Harvard Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa con- 
tained "but one original idea, clearly stated, and but one fresh story, 
well told." 

Of course, if one really has something vital to say, the most blase diner 
will listen attentively. It Is related that when Lowell went to London as our 
Ambassador, he was always in demand, for he always had something to say, 
something that brought out the kinship of the two nations, while at the same 
time emphasizing the independence, the equality and the dignity of the 
United States. 

He had many kinks to unravel, too, and was constantly forced to feel his 
way carefully in order not to antagonize the English people. But he had 
tact and always came through the ordeal with flying colors. One day, when 
he was the guest of the Incorporated Society of Authors, he remarked, "I 
have been told often to remember that my countrymen are apt to think they 
are always in the right— that they are apt to look at their own side of the 
question only. Now this characteristic conduces certainly to peace of mind 
and imperturbability of judgment, whatever other merits It may have." 
Then he paused for a moment and dryly asked, "I'm sure I don't know where 
we got it— do you?" In a moment the laughter and applause proved to him 
that his shaft had gone home. 

There are times when the most polished speaker would rather not be 
called upon, when his remarks are likely to be misinterpreted or policy 
prevents him from voicing sentiments that would please others. I recall an 
amusing incident at Asti, a few months ago, when the American Chemical 
Society was being lunched there. A number of enthusiastic visitors had 
praised California wines and declared that where they were freely used, 
the people were temperate and intoxication was unknown. 

There was great applause and mirth when a professor from Stanford 
University was called upon, for as every one knows, the college city is one 
of the dryest spots in California. He hesitated for a moment, but only a 
moment, and then, smiling, said he felt much as did the delegates from 
Kansas when they visited Kansas City, Missouri, and found everyone laugh- 
ing over William Allen White's famous article, "What's the matter with 
Kansas?" Realizing they would be the butt of much joking, they wore 

Inittons reading, "Laugh, d n you, laugh." The Stanford professor said 

his only regret was that he was not provided with a similar button, since his 
association with "dry" Stanford seemed to arouse so much laughter. 

"Nerves" have prevented many experienced speakers from doing their 
best. They know that great things are expected from them and the feeling 
of having to "make good" often unfits them before they arise to speak. 

When a public dinner was arranged in New York for Charles Dickens on 
his visit to America, Washington Irving was chosen to preside. Curtis tells 
us that Irving went about muttering, "I shall certainly break down." After 
the dinner was eaten, Irving arose to propose the health to Dickens. He 
began pleasantly and smoothly in two or three sentences. Then he hesitated, 
stammered, swallowed and stopped. He tried in vain to begin again. But it 
was no use, and so he gracefully gave it up and announced his toast, "Charles 
Dickens, the guest of the Nation," and sank into his chair amid immense 
applause, whispering to his neighbor, "There, I told you I should break down 
and I have done it." 

James N. Gillett, during his term as Governor, acted as toastmaster at 
many a notable banquet and on every occasion he had something interesting 
to say about the progress and future of our glorious State or some graceful 
compliment for the speakers of the evening. Gavin McNab Is another 
speaker with a magnetic personality, a beautiful flow of language and an 
impressive delivery. He always rouses his auditors to enthusiastic applause. 
George A. Knight, Joseph D. Redding, Benjamin Ide Wheeler, Edward F. 
Adams, David Starr Jordan are all speakers of distinction who have widely 
contrasting styles and of whom we may well be proud. 

C. C. Moore, James Rolph, Jr., and R. B. Hale are other of our popular 
citizens, who at banquets galore recently have been called upon to speak in 
behalf of San Francisco as the Exposition City in 1915. At the St. Francis, 
the other night, with the fifteen other members of the Executive Committee 
of the Portola Festival, they celebrated the first anniversary of the carnival 



and one of the novel features was the sending of telegrams of greeting to 
all the foreign ambassadors who graced the Portola festivities, a year ago, 
with their presence. The messages conveyed to those dignitaries the infor- 
mation that the Portola Festival Committee was celebrating the carnival 
anniversary and that those present had drunk a toast standing to the absent 
representatives of the foreign countries which had sent their ships to the 
bay of San Francisco to assist in rejoicing over the rehabilitation of San 
Francisco. 

This reminds me of the toast prepared by President William H. Taft in 
honor of San Francisco for the Portola celebration in October, 1909. The 
President has a happy faculty of making felicitous remarks at the many 
public functions he is obliged to attend, and his toast to California's 
reconstructed metropolis was dignified and sincere, although there were 
many who thought it lacked warmth. 

I think the four greatest post-prandial efforts I have ever heard were 
delivered at the banquet given by the Union League Club in the Maple Room 
of the old Palace Hotel, when Chauncey M. Depew for an hour held the 150 
guests spellbound. General W. H. L. Barnes, Horace Piatt and Irving M. 
Scott were the other leading speakers. 

Depew was visiting California with Cornelius Vanderbilt for the first time 
and there was great curiosity to see and hear him. No one was disappointed. 
He lived up to expectations, proving to be a man of the world, skilled In the 
niceties of social life and perfect in his way of addressing people who have 
dined. He won every one with his first sentences. "Several gentlemen here 
told me this evening that they recognized me by my pictures," he began. 
This was said with his face wreathed in smiles. Instantly he changed the 
expression to one of feigned indignation, as he added: "I wonder if they 
meant some of the pictures in the San Francisco papers, pictures that made 
me a contemporary of Noah and as wrinkled as he was when h« had his 
photograph taken after leaving the ark." 

Depew was thoroughly at home. His address was graceful, easy, bubbling 
with fine humor and couched in choicest language. Every intonation and 
gesture showed that he was an actor and a humorist. His praise of Cali- 
fornia was so mingled with humor that the keenest listener could scarcely 
tell where jesting began and sober earnest ended, for he said some of the 
drollest things in a fashion as solemn as the rotund benediction of an old 
fashioned preacher of the gospel. 

He convulsed every one when he announced that he was a prohibitionist, 
for a moment before he had been sipping his first glass of wine. "I believe 
in the liberal use of water," he said. There was a pause and then he 
hastened to explain — "I mean, for irrigating the vast stretches of thirsty soil 
that will be transformed into beauty spots when they are blessed with the 
precious fluid." Throughout his talk, he chuckled over his own stories with 
as full enjoyment as anybody. I like a man who enjoys the story he tells. 
You know what Charles Lamb said: "The man who offers me wine and will 
not praise it is as offensive to me as the man who tells me a joke that he 
will not laugh at himself." 

General W. H. L. Barnes, acknowledged to be California's best product 
in oratory and a friend of Depew, referred to the guest of honor as "the 
most distinguished American citizen in private life," and he added, "He is 
the only one of my Yale chums who has fulfilled an early promise of great- 
ness." I am not sure that Barnes made the speech he intended before 
dinner. It was full of beautiful word pictures and overflowed with patriotism, 
but the tone of the evening was turned to politics in a way for which he was 
not altogether prepared, and he had to follow the lead. 

Horace G. Piatt, who was then president of the Bohemian Club, spoke for 
that organization and his address was so full of good things that he was 
almost continuously interrupted by applause and shouts of laughter. He was 
the only Democrat bidden to the feast and he emphasized this fact by 
remarking that "the Democratic party is here a unit which is more than the 
Republicans seem to be able to say." 

Throughout his speech he showed his tact and good taste, especially when 
he explained that he was an American of the type described by Bryce — "a 
man who listens to a good thing, well said, and enjoys it even if he does not 
agree with any part of it." He said Depew reminded him of one of New 
York's skyscrapers. He was tall and grand and, like them, "his reputation 
as an after-dinner speaker has been built up by piling story on top of story." 

Irving M. Scott was the other speaker, his subject being "The American 
Navy," a topic in which he was vitally interested and one on which he could 
talk eloquently. 

Of these four noted speakers, only Depew is alive. 

Barnes, Piatt, Scott! A generation ago, these were names to conjure with 
in club and business circles. But, alas, they have passed over to the silent 
majority and, before long, their names will be only memories. However, I 
am sure that those who were present on this notable occasion will, when 
they recall the beaming countenance of the smiling Chauncey, remember too, 
how proud they felt when Barnes, Piatt and Scott covered themselves with 
glory, despite the fact that they were pitted against New York's most popular 
after-dinner speaker. 



48 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 






••* 



i f> 



SEATTLE AND NORTHWEST NEWS 



i f> 






>»»ai«<4> 



SEATTLE, January 20: — It is well that the wine, beer, and 
spirit nu'u of this State are bestirring themselves, for the 
meddling brigade is busy. I have been permitted to see an 
advance copy of Governor Hay's message to the legislature, 
which will be taken up about the time the Review^ is going to 
press. 

Governor Hay is regarded as a good, but rather weak man 
in an executive position, so he hedges a little, but may be re- 
lied on to favor the weak-kneed if they press him. He cites 
the fact that more liquor legislation is brewing, and he hopes 
that the bitter fights on this question will not dwarf the minds 
of legislators so that they will not treat other legislation fairly. 
He wants to prevent the log-rolling of last year. 

The people have tried to make the saloons reform themselves," 
he says, "but since the saloons have utterly failed to achieve 
any substantial betterment the people are determined that 
further reliance on them is futile and that reforms must come 
from without." He then says : "The people may wipe out the 
abuses of the traffic, even to absolute prohibition of the manu- 
facture and sale of all manner of intoxicants, if necessary." 
He adds that most of the voters prefer the principle of the 
present local option law, and he himself is for the daylight law, 
as seen in Nebraska. 

Meantime, the saloon men really see that they have been 
sleeping too long. There is a strong probability that they will 
bestir themselves to show the voters how prohibition fails and 
will try to make the bad saloon men behave. A stricter qualifi- 
cation on the part of license holders is being urged by the 
trade itself. 



The Post-lTitclligencer, Seattle's only morning newspaper and 
the paper that wants Mayor Gill recalled — the paper that the 
churches like better than they do the Times, is opposed to 
further liquor laws. In a recent editorial it says: "For the 
present the existing local option law in Washington, enacted 
two years ago after much bitter wrangling and a great waste 
of time, is satisfactory to the people, and the legislature should 
.spend no time in considering any proposed change in the law. 



"If Boj'^d P. Doty, representing the Anti-Saloon League, 
wishes to render this State a really good service, he will pack 
his grip, get away from Olympia and let the legislature alone 
so that it may deal promptly and intelligently with the more 
serious problems which demand legislative attention and ac- 
tion, and if Mr. Doty doesn't pursue such a course the legisla- 
ture ought to pass him up and go on about its business. 

"The advocates of more stringent liquor laws should wait 
until the present local option law has been in force long enough 
to demonstrate its strength or its weakness before they again 
begin a liquor agitation in the legislature. Such an agitation 
can accomplish no good. It will be hurtful. It will beget bit- 
terness, stir up petty antagonism between members and fac- 
tions in the legislature and seriously interfere with the public 
business. 

"The men who are advocating more stringent local option 
laws, and the men who are opposing these changes in behalf 
of the liquor interests, should get away from Olympia and let 
the legislature alone, and if they refuse to go, the legislature 
should speedily dispo.se of the entire issue and give them to 
understand that this session is not to be burdened and harassed 
by a wholly useless and senseless liquor agitation. 

"Liquor isn't the only thing in this State. The liquor prob- 
lem isn't the the only problem the legislature must deal with. 



There are graver and more important problems to consider at 
this time, and if the lobbyists on both sides of this question 
persist in efforts to press the liquor problem upon the legis- 
lature, the legislature should close the door on them both and 
tell them to go home." 

Though the legality of this resolution has been questioned, it is 
probable that it will stand. 



It is well for the trade, perhaps, that President Paulhamus, 
of the Senate, gave the Prohibitionists the best of the principal i 
committees early in the session of the legislature. The liberal 
element was disgusted, but at the same time spurred to action, 
so the next thing done was in the Assembly. The liberals got 
together and passed a resolution that no further tampering 
with the liquor question be indulged in during the session. 



Emey Rawlings, who had a successful summer at the Alas- i 
kan and whose last two months in Seattle were spent at the ! 
Lotus, got the San Francisco fever Christmas week and broke 
for water like a thirsty deer. Without saying farewell to any- j 
body except his landlord he hastened to the pier and took ! 
passage for San Francisco on the Watson. Erney made a 
number of friends here and his headquarters soon became the , 
rendezvous for Califomians. For a time it was thought that ! 
he would get "the Seattle spirit," but the fever came upon him 



in a night. 



He is now happy with Wheeland and Collins. 



Offending Seattle Visitors 



Weather predictions for Seattle are always for "dry" on 
Sundays, regardless of the meteorological signals. Many sa- 
loons exhibit a sign on Saturdays, running thus : "For Sunday, 
dry; Don't forget your Sunday bottle." This sign confronted 
"Doc" Leahy and the Tetrazzini company on their arrival here 
a few days ago. It was hard for "Doc" to realize just what 
had happened or where he was, so he laid in a supply. On 
arriving at the Washington hotel, however, a delightful sur- 
prise awaited him. The firm of J. F. Plumel Co., San Francisco, 
had thoughtfully shipped him a few bottles of twenty-year old 
rye. 

But a second surprise disgusted the Tetrazzini company on 
their arrival in the dining room. It was Manager Leahy's 
birthday, so he ordered champagne. It came — but how? In 
coffee cups, for there is a bigoted law here that champagne 
can not be served in a hotel dining room, so the cup is the 
subterfuge. 

"Two-thirds of the delight of champagne is in the glass," 
said Leahy, "and to drink it from a coffee cup is like eating soup 
with your fingers. Your scenic grandeur cannot overcome the 
narrowness of your laws." 

He had a similar experience in Portland, just how, I have 
forgotten, but if you want to see a man who appreciates Cali- 
fornia and her liberal laws — well, just make an engagement 
with Leahy. 



Jimmy Durkin, who owns four saloons at Spokane, is a 
wonderful advertiser and believer in printer's ink. One of his 
saloons is combined with a large restaurant, a place that feeds 
two thousand people a day. He runs a column in the Spokane 
papers, always headed, "What Jimmy Durkin Thinks." Well, 
he fights the narrow laws as hard as anybody in the world can 
fight them with common sense, but one thing he insists on — that 
they be obeyed. He recently wrote to a Seattle saloon man that 



Iwb poll 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



49 



policy of disol)eyiug laws was sure to result in greater 
Iiardsliips on the trade of this city. He was right. There is 
talk of making stricter regulations simply because some of the 
saloon meu are reckless. 



Several saloons here are no«- making a specialty of Olympia 
k'er. The Sno(iualmie, U21 Pike Street, has a big run on the 
Sdimidt product. Many patrons walk several blocks for a 
I aste of that delicious fluid. 



Seattle is in a turmoil over the removal of the so-called 
•icistricted" or red-light district to a remote sjjot out on First 
Avenue South, a spot near the mud. flats. The police predict 
that the crusaders for purity are luring the patrons of that 
i district to a lonely spot where a carnival of robbery and murder 
ix sure to follow. 



One of the prominent politicians of Seattle, a man formerly 
jhigh in the councils of the Federal Administration, has just re- 
i ceived a letter from Sacramento. The writer is a State Senator 
who believes in tlie efficacy of prohibition and the anti-cigarette 
{type of legislation. I am not permitted to use names in this 
; account of the correspondence. However, the point is obvious 
without names. Here is an extract from the letter: "We pro- 
jpose to have a State saloon tax and shall try to model our anti- 
: cigarette law on the excellent statute passed some time ago by 
Washington. Tell me something of its Avorkings." 

A portion of the reply runs thus : "Yes, my friend, we have 
I a model anti-cigarette law. It works without the least bit 
of trouble to anybody. It was forced through on a log-rolling 
ideal by which its author was helped in consideration of aid 
I he might render to others. He himself wanted to stop an 
[overgrown and somewhat unpromising son from smoking cigar- 
ettes. The son is today a confirmed cigarette smoker. That the 
law missed the one unimportant person it was aimed at is 
perhaps a misfortune to the author of the bill ; but the rest of 
the public, what of that? Frankly, old man, I doubt if one man 
in ten knows of the existence of the law. One can buy almost 
any brand of cigarettes at any of the cigar stands. Everybody 
'who pursues the habit smokes cigarettes openly without moles- 
|tation. Oh, there is one good thing about the law. The tobacco 
Imen keep tlie cigarettes out of sight, but within easy reach. 
Possibly some of the dealers charge a little more for the favorite 
brands because they have to reach under for them." 

Tiiis reminds me of another famous law passed by the 
regulation jackasses up this way — the law against tipping any- 
body for anything. Nobody pays the slightest attention to it. 
Recently all the waiters of the principal club here were dis- 
cliarged and a new set hired because the old bunch of waiters 
were so tip-hungry that the tip cost the guest more than the 
meal, or he got no service. 



Andrea Sbarboro has advised the Washington liquor men to 
take steps to make a dignified fight against prohibition and to 
start an earnest campaign of education. The Italian-Swiss 
Colony has many friends up this way and those in the trade, 
knowing how ably Mr. Sbarboro has fought for sane laws, are 
deliberhting earnestly over his advice. 



President Paulhamus, of the Washington Senate, has given 
the Prohibition contingent the best of it on every important 
committee, which seems to indicate that there is a good fight, 
ahead and that the dry element will force it. President Frank 
P. Goss, of the Seattle Press Club, who is a representative 
from the most thickly ])opulated 1>usiness district of Seattle, 
will probably lead the fight in the Lower House against nar- 
row laws. Goss is a clever speaker, a good writer, and a young 



man of philosophical tendencies. Being liberal in his own 
views he desires the rest of the world to have a chance to think 
its own way. 



A Good Example 



One of the musical concert-hall restaurants of Seattle, with a 
bar attachment, is known as the Angelus. It is at 1424-6 First 
Avenue; one of the busy central parts of the City. The pro- 
prietors are thrifty Germans, who conduct their business on the 
old country line. Those seeking to reform saloons might take 
a lesson from them. On their cards — the reverse side of their 
regular business card — is a notice that the fii'm wants to be 
advised by the friends of drunkards, so that they may be ex- 
cluded from the place. The notice runs thus : 

"To Whom it May Concern : Know ye that by the payment 
of flOOO we are permitted to retail intoxicating liquor in this 
City. To the wife who has a drunkard for a husband, or a friend 
who is unfortunately dissipated, we say emphatically, give us 
notice in person of such case or cases in which you are inter- 
ested and all such shall be excluded from our place. I^et 
mother.s, fathers, sisters and brothers do likewise and their 
requests will be regarded. We pay a heavy tax for the privilege 
of selling whisky and other liquors, and we want it distinctly 
understood that we have no desire to sell to drunkards or 
minors, or to the poor or destitute. We much prefer that they 
save their money and put it where it will do the most good to 
their families. There are gentlemen of honor and men of money 
who can atford it, and it is with those we desire to trade. 

"THE ANGELUS." 



Internal Revenue 



(T. D. 1670.) 

Notiecii and returns after rectifieation of spirits. 

Regulations modified so as not to require Form 237 to be made 

in duplicate on and after February 1, 1911. 

Treasury Department, 

Office op Commissioner of Ixtern.\i/Revenuk, 

Washington, D. C, January 7, 1911. 

To collectors of internal revenue: 

On and after February 1, 1911, rectifiers in giving notice of 
completion of rectification and gauging officers in making re- 
turn of gauge after rectification will not be required to make 
Form 237 in duplicate. A single copy only of said form will be 
made in each instance and the same will be filed in the olfice of 
the collector of the district. Duplicate notice on Form 237 will 
not thereafter be required to be forwarded to the Commissioner 
of Internal Revenue. 

All regulations and in.structions inconsistent with the fore- 
going ai-e hereby revoked as of February 1, 1911. 

Collectors will instruct rectifiers and gauging officers assigned 
to rectifying houses in their respective districts in accordance 
with the foregoing. 

Royal E. Cabell, Commissianer. 

Approved : 

Franklin MacVeagh, Secretary of the Treasury. 



A Red F>lul¥ lawmaker. Assemblyman Harry Polsley, has pro- 
posed a constitutional amendment for the purpose of stopping 
the employment of women in places where liquor is sold. The 
amendment provides "that the selling or handling by women 
of intoxicating liquors or the presence of women in any capacity 
or at all in a saloon, hall, theater or other place where intoxi- 
cating liquors or intoxicating drugs are sold, drank or given 
away, shall not be considered a lawful business or vocation 
within the meaning of this section." 



60 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



Solon Heads Off Local Optionists 



SACRAMENTO, Cal., Jan. 27.— The ingenuity of Senator 
John Bunyan Sanford was by no means exhausted on his 
scheme to postpone consideration of the women's suffrage ques- 
tion by submitting it to an advisory vote of the women of the 
State. He has a bill designed to beat the local optionists to 
the punch. By a simple legislative declaration Sanford would 
limit the saloon in California to one for each 500 population 
and compel them to remain closed between the hours of 1 and 6 
o'clock in the morning. Here are Sanford's own reasons for 
his bill and possibly for his opposition to the local option bill 
if that measure reaches the upper house : 

"It is impossible," said Sanford today, "to legislate morality 
and sobriety into people. It has long been patent that a more 
strict legislation of the liquor traffic in California is neces- 
sary. The supporters of local option measures are confident 
that the passage of a local option bill would remedy all the 
defects that now exist in our system of liquor regulation. This 
is doubtful, inasmuch as local option measures would only im- 
pose a drastic regulation on certain portions of the State and 
none whatever upon others. 

GENERAL LEGISLATION PROPOSED. 

"The aim of this measure is to impose a general regulation 
throughout the State that all may fare alike. In addition to 
the number of good liquor laws now on the statute books the 
passage of this bill with penalties it imposes seems to cover 
the situation thoroughly. 

"The bill first prohibits the conduct of saloons by aliens who 
are irresponsible and invariably run groggeries of the worst 
order". This factor will be eliminated and the standard of 
saloons permitted will be of a higher order. Second, it limits 
the number of saloons in every community, and no new licenses 
can be granted until the number has been reduced to one for 
each 500 inhabitants. 

"Third, it regulates the hours of closing, which is important, 
inasmuch as the chief cause of complaint against saloons is the 
rascality that is hatched there between the hours of midniglit 
and dawn when the law abiding world is slumbering. 

PROTECTS REPUTABLE SAIX)0NS. 

"Fourth, it is a protection both to the reputable saloonkeeper 
who desires to comply with the law and the minor who is under 
18 years of age by making both equally responsible for the vio- 
lation of the law. 

"This bill is not intended to interfere with the wholesale 
liquor dealers or with restaurants, drug stores or groceries 
where li(iuor is sold in packages; it is intended to regulate 
where regulation is necessary, namely, the saloons." 



The anti-treating bill made its appearance in the assembly 
today. It is drafted after the Tacoma city ordinance enacted 
last December and would make it a misdemeanor to ask a friend 
to have a drink in a saloon. 

Every saloonist would keep posted in a conspicuous place Oi 
white i>lacard printed in black letters not less than three inches 
high the words "No treating saloon." 

A fine of not less than |10 nor more than flOO, or imprison- 
ment in the county jail for a term not to exceed 30 days, is spe- 
cified as a penalty. 



Calendars Received 



THE Sierra Madre Vintage Company has, as usual, put out a 
highly artistic calendar. This year it is a marine view on 
the coast of Holland, showing the arrival of the herring fleet, 
and illustrating the peculiar style of fishing boats, as well as the 
methods of landing the catch. The picture is rich and unique in 
coloring and the calendar is one that everybody should be glad 
to give a prominent place in the office. The reproduction is 
from the famous painting by Wm. Ritschel. 



J. F. Plumel Co. favored their friends with a very artistic 
calendar for 1911. Like the goods carried by the house, the 
souvenier is "all quality." The toast accompanying the cal- 
endar is well worth reproducing. It follows: 

"May every day recorded here be filled with gladness and 
good cheer. May health and happiness abound where e'er this 
Calendar is found. May generous fortune smile on you. May 
friends be ever staunch and true. And far away all care be 
driven in Nineteen Hundred and Eleven." 



The Theodore Gier Co. sent out a novel calendar to their 
friends and patrons. It was an elaborate affair opening in ac- 
cordion fashion, showing a typical snow scene of tlu; Eastern 
States. It is something that would be appreciated in any office 
or home. 



A. Fluke's Widow have sent their friends a very catcliy cal- 
endar for this year. The main feature is a half-life size por- 
trait of a charming "widow," typical of the firm name, "A 
Finke's Widow," and like the original of the portrait it would 
be welcome everywhere. 



One of the handsomest calendars received in this office is that 
of the It^ilian-Swiss Colony. Like the one of the ])i'e(('ding year 
it is a colored reproduction of a note<l Italian painting. It is 
an interior view showing two groups of six persons and is 
entitled "Grateful Admirers." The advertising feature is the 
Colony's celebrated "Tipo*" wine. 




We 

manufacture 



TANKS 



WINE- 



for all purposes 
-BEER— VINEGAR 



We also manufacture 

WOODEN WATER PIPE 

If interested in Wood Pipe send for special litera- 
ture. Address nearest office 

PACIFIC TANK AND PIPE CO. 

318 Market St., San Francisco, CrI. 

Equitable Bank Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Kenton Station, Portland, Oregon 



I 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



5t 



Additional Duty to be Placed on Whisky 



Trade=Marks Sought to be Registered in the 
Patent Office 



WASHINGTON, Jan. 22.— Countervailing duties will now 
b(> assessed on all Seotoh and Irish whiskies imported 
from Great Britain. The effect of the ref>ulation made by the 
Treasury Department today will be to add nine cents a gallon 
to the duty already imj)osed. Whether it will raise the ])rice of 
I lie Scotch high ball is conjectural. About $125,000 a year will 
Ik» added to the customs receipts of the United States. The 
trade in Scotch and Irish whiskies amounts to about $2,500,000 
a year. 



The house of James Gibb has enjoyed a highly satisfactory 
business during 1910 and it is safe to say that no whisky house 
on the Coast can make a better comparative showing. Not- 
withstanding the fact that the past year has been a trying one, 
particularly to local business, Gibb's special whiskies made a 
steady advance in demand. The house is proud to announce 
that the increase in volume in the past two years has quad- 
rupled. That such results can be obtained in these of¥ times 
shows conclusively that there is a successful combination not 
only of (]uality in the goods, but business ability, of the highest 
order. We congratulate the house on its success. 



Chas. Fisher, one of the liveliest and most successful men 
in the whisky selling business, has gone on a regular trip through 
Oregon and the Nortliwest, representing. the house of Angelo 
'Meyers, distiller of Kinzey and Linfield Pennsylvania ryes. 
These are among the highest class goods on the market and 
have a great demand. Mr. Fisher will be absent about a month. 



THE following trade-marks have been favorably acted on by 
the Patent Office and will be registere<l at the expiration 

Washington, D. C, Jan. 13, 1911. 
of thirty days unless objected to. Any person who believes he 
would be damaged by the registration of a mark is entitled by 
law to oppose it within the said time. All inquiries should be 
addressed to Edward S. Duvall, Jr., Ix>an & Trust Building, 
Washington, D. C, who will furnish particulars how to proceed. 

Serial No. 41,920 — Representation of a wine glass over which 
is a small vine with three leaves on it and under it a fanciful 
scroll. 0^vne^ : The Sarrburg-Moselle Co., Ltd., London, Eng- 
land. Used on moselle wine. Claims use since August, 1906. 

Serial No. 50,548 — Words : R. A. Mollenhauer with the let- 
ters M. A. B. after same, and Thomas B. Culver, with the abbre- 
viation Treas. after same. These are written vertically on either 
side of a black space. 

Serial No. 52,120 — Words : Gold Leaf with a representation 
of a gold leaf. Owner: W. P. Squibb & Co., Lawrenceburg, 
Ind. Used on rye whisky. 

Serial No. 52,160 — Representation of three roosters' heads 
arranged in a semicircle. Owner : United Wine & Trading Co., 
New York, N. Y. Used on sherry and port wine. 



lASH'SBiTTERC 




Grape Syrup Evaporater 
= — =A Success 

The Only Successful 

Vacuum Evaporater 

in the Market 

For Grape Syrup and Malt Extract 



MANUFACTURED BY 

The Oscar Krenz Copper & Brass Works 



212-214 Fremont Street 



San Francisco, California 



52 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIKIT REVIEW. 





The California Wine Industry 
Past, Present and Future 



ABOUT twenty years ago the California wine industry was 
very nuicli depressed. Prominent dealers were advocat- 
inji, in tlie newspapers, the pourinji of the surplus wiues into 
the ocean and so relieving the intolerable condition. Competi- 
tion among the large handlers was so keen and bitter that ruin 
apparently stared all in the face. 

Out of this chaos, the California Wine Association was 
evolved. The steadying influence of concentrated capital was 
exerted for the general good of the industry. Wine-makers 
likewise organized and, Avorking for a time in harmony with 
other elements in the wine trade, more stable conditions pre- 
vailed. 

A surplus of wine or of any other commodity only becomes 
a surplus when everyone tries to market his entire stock at the 
same time and so places himself at the buyers' mercy. The 
associated wine-makers, unfortunately, were not wisely led and, 
having been brought to the thought that they had things all 
their own way, attempted to force the price of new vintages to 
a figure at which the dealers could not profitably handle the 
product and obtain a return upon the large capital engaged 
in this branch of the business. The result was that the deal- 
ers purchased only from hand to mouth and the wine-makers 
retaliated by attempting to market their raw product direct. 
The dealers protected their trade and, on the down grade of 
prices, averaged the cost of their Avines, with the final result 
that, after some years of contest, the several conflicting ele- 
ments again got upon speaking terms and prosperity once more 
resumed its sway. 

For about eight years none in the California wine industry 
had much cause for complaint. Profits to all were fair. The 
growers got fully their share. They then tried to double up, 
planted more acreage than could readily be taken care of when 
the resulting grapes were brought to the wineries to be turned 
into wines. The San Francisco fire inteiTened to wipe out a 
threatened surplus. For a couple of years prices went sky- 
ward; too much so for the permanent good of the California 
wine industry. The importation of great quantities of foreign 
wines was made possible, and the manufacture was encouraged 
of so-called wines that never saw a grape except as an illustra- 
tion upon the bottle. 

This brings the record up to 1908, just subsequent to the 
"Roosevelt" panic. Tens of thousands of good Italians, faithful 
drinkers of California vintages, were driven home to Italy by 
lack of employment in this country. Once more wine stocks 
accumulated. Competition became acute. Despondency settled 
again over the industry. 

For two years the situation was unmanageable and a long 
pull was looked forward to before prosperity could come again. 
Suddenly, almost at the close of the year 1910, after the vintage 
had been reluctantly garnered, several unexpected conditions 
arose. The European crop was a failure and a demand at a 
price sprang up thence for California wines. An inspection 
of the carry-over in the country developed that a great many 
wines of previous vintages were spoiled and that there was a 
large proportion of defective wiues of the 1910 vintage. The 
crop of 1910 was much shorter than anticipated. Buyers be- 
came more eager than sellers. The inevitable rise in prices 
came, due to that condition. 

So far the dry wine market has been the most favorably 
affected, but, with the opening of the spring trade, about the 
first of April, all classes of wines should feel the revival of in- 
terest. 



A little good sense and mutual forbearance among the ele- 
ments which constitute the California wine industry is now 
all that is necessary to bring about, once again, an area of rea- 
sonably good times for all. If every one rushes in at an unsea- 
sonable time, eager to sell to the same man, then that man 
will take advantage of the situation to demand and gain con- 
cessions in price, but if wine holders will place a value on what 
they have to sell and stick to that price, the demand must inev- 
itably come which must be filled and, provided prices are not 
too rapidly or radically advanced and planting of vineyards is 
not too soon resumed, the increase in consumption will take 
care of the yield from the existing vineyards. 

What I said ten years ago I now desire to repeat as a vale- 
dictory. 

"The viticultural industry has had its fill of controversy. Let 
peace now reign, and its concomitants — plenty and prosperity — 
will follow as naturally as water flows down hill. Let the 
various elements come together, talk together, work together. 
All Avant success, but let not the success of one spell disaster 
for the other. All can be prosperous if all will only 
co-operate instead of each element regarding the other as his 
natural enemy or as his natural prey. Therefore, let the maxim 
henceforth be fairness. Fairness from the grower to the wine- 
maker, the wine-maker to the merchant, and the merchant to 
both grower and wine-maker." 

PERCY T. MORGAN. 
President California Wine Association. 



Jesse Moore-Hunt Co. Handle Big Business 



Wine for Temperance Pleads Sbarboro 



JESSE MOORE-HUNT COMPANY enjoyed a highly satis- 
factory business during 1910. The house reports that the 
past year's trade was better than the year before and that the 
business of each month exceeded that of the same month of the 
preceding year, without exception. The trade seems to be gen- 
eral and not confined to any particular locality. While the city 
has been slow nearly all the year, during the past two months j I 
it has shown signs of improvement. They anticipate a very 
prosperous 1911. The shoAving of Jesse Moore-Hunt Company 
is a remarkably good one Avhen one recalls the dullness of other 
lines of trade during the past year. 



r^URING a discussion of the Wylie Local Option Bill at 
y^ Sacramento, Andrea Sbarboro addressed the House as 
follows: "I propose to assist in removing, or at least minimiz- 
ing, the evil of drunkenness from this State. In the United 
States prohibitory and restrictive legislation has divided States 
into Avarring political factions and brought about endless lit- 
igation — ^crusades in nearly every city, large and small. 

"The good people of each side are fighting for the same cause 
— the reduction and eventually the removal of the evil of drnnk- 
enness from our country. The only difference between the 
contending parties is the means by which it can be attained. 
One of the first means of Aviping out the drunkenness which 
exists is to reform the drunkards themselves. Every person 
arrested on the streets in a drunken condition should be put 
in jail. 

"The next step will be for our government t« give a ration 
of wine at table to all its soldiers and sailors in the Army and 
Navy. This system is strictly adhered to by the wine-producing 
countries of Europe." 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



53 




DiTOR Wine and Spirit Review — Dear Sir : Your request 
for an article on the expansion of the cased trade business 
of California wines has been received, but owing to the rush of 
business during January, I have not had time to write such an 
article as I would like. At some future day I promise you a 
good letter on this subject, going more into details. At the pres- 
ent time I can only give you a few facts concerning the Cresta 
Blanca brand of wine. 

The past year was an exceptionally good one for us and we 
have demonstrated the fact that the people in foreign coun- 
tries like the Cresta Blanca wines just as well as the people 
of the United States do. This assertion is borne out by the 
increased orders from foreign countries. During the past year 
we have received orders for Cresta Blanca wines, both still and 
sparkling, from Scotland, England, Germany, Denmark, Hol- 
land, Malay States, Manila, China, Japan, Central America, 
Mexico, British Columbia, India and Panama. This we con- 
sider a good showing and we expect even a better one for the 
present year, as we are now sending samples to several new 
fields with good prospects for some future orders. 

To show how well the Cresta Blanca wines are thought of I 
will quote a portion of a letter received from a wine merchant 
in Bordeaux, France. 

Bordeaux, Oct. 21, 1910. 
Messrs. Wetmore-Bowen Co., San Francisco: 

Sirs: Received some samples of Cresta Blanca wines and 
wish to state to you that your Sauteme wines are exceptionally 
good and we plainly see now why our trade with the United 
States in Sauterne wines has fallen off. We have very few 
wines in France that excel your Haut Sauteme Souvenir and 
Chateau Cresta Blanca. Please let us know how much of these 
wines you have and if there are more acres in the Livermore 
Valley that could be planted." 

Such statements as this confirm our saying that Cresta 
Blanca wines are good enough for the American people and if 
they are buying foreign wines they are spending more money 
for an article no better than our best California wines. 

Let the American people remember that a dollar spent for 
California wine is a dollar left in this country, while a dollar 
spent for foreign wines goes out of the country. The way to 
build up this country is to build up our industries. 

Anticipating an increased demand for Cresta Blanca wines 
this year and the coming years, we will increase our vineyards 
and also finish a new bottling cellar at Livermore, which when 
completed, will double our present facilities. With a five-year 
stock of wine on hand and new vineyards coming into bearing, 
we are in a good position for the increased trade that is surely 
to come. In this connection will say that our business for the 
first month of this year was 30 per cent better than the same 
month in 1910. 

Wishing your paper the best of success for the coming year, 
I am, Yours sincerely, 

CLARENCE J. WETMORE, 
President Wetmore-Bowen Co. 



Luxus Beer 



'T'HE Luxus beer because of its many characteristic fine quali- 
••■ ties, among which is its remarkable effervescence, is becom- 
ing more and more popular in this market as well as elsewhere. 
There is great competition on the Coast between local and east- 



ern beers, but the continual increase of sales of Luxus is the 
best proof of the fact that this beer is entitled to the favored 
and important place it takes in the market. The agents are 
The Ami Vignier, Inc., 605 Battery street, San Francisco. 



Edwin Hammer, coast manager of the Alex. D. Shaw Co., re- 
turned from a trip through the Northwest during the month, 
where he went to arrange for agencies for distribution of the 
various braads carried by his house. He had a successful 
journey. 



The best is good enough for the King, whom God bless, and 
the fact that last Thursday the Royal Warrant as Scotch whisky 
distillers to His Majesty King George V was granted to Messrs. 
James Buchanan & Co. is all that need be said of either Messrs. 
Buchanan or their whisky. — The Pelican, December 7, 1910. 



Mr. Eddie Baker, manager of the Jesse Moore-Hunt Co., de- 
parted on an extended trip throughout the Northwest the fore- 
part of the month. Jesse Moore whisky has a great sale in the 
upper country as well as in California and Mr. Baker is one 
of the most successful men who have promoted the sale of this 
popular brand. The house reports an excellent year's business 
during 1910. 



Rusconi, Fisher & Co. announce that 1910 was a better year 
than was expected, and furthermore, that business is good and 
rapidly improving. At the present rate it will soon be in the 
"best" column. A very good line on the situation of the trade 
of the State is the fact that collections of late have been better 
than in a long time past. Messrs. Rusconi, Fisher & Co. look 
forward to a busy and profitable year. 



Charles Jadeau, the champagne expert of the Italian-Swiss 
Colony, who is now in France, took with him numerous sam- 
ples of Asti wines. In consequence of which, in spite of the 
almost prohibited duty, the first shipment of the Italian-Swiss 
Colony wines is now on its way to that country. 

Mr. Jadeau writes : "I have permitted a number of eminent 
French wine experts and connoisseurs to taste your wines, and 
they were all astonished at the quality of your 1910 claret and 
your 1909 burgundy and zinfandel. The claret is pronounced 
equal, if not superior, to the fine red wines of Beaujolais, while 
the burgundy and zinfandel can hold their own in comparison 
with our excellent Bourgogne wines." 

He believes that if the United States were favored with the 
same preferential duty on wine as Italy, Spain and Portugal 
have, California wine manufacturers would have little difficulty 
in introducing their wine generally, as the shortage of the 
vintage last fall is being keenly felt, and he adds : "If the bad 
weather continues, all the crops, including grapes, are doomed 
for next year." 



54 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



{ The Part Machinery Plays in the ( 
i Manufacture of Wine 1 

iji ^ i> » > r~* t r ~ > rr ~ > r — > r — i i r ~ m » r ~ * i> ~>_ lu 

I N the year 1863, California was credited with having made 
^ 3000 gallons of wine. In order to do this it was necessary to 
use 300 tons of grapes, taking 30 hogsheads and 10 pipes and 
sundry jars, bottles, etc., for retainers, and taking 50 men 
each 5 days' time, or 250 days (assuming that each two men 
had G tons) to harvest this crop and make the same into wine, 
of a more or less palatable nature. 

Ten years later we find the number of gallons increased to 
15,000, but the same conditions approximately existing in re- 
gard to its manufacturing. In 11)0!) we made 36,000,000 gal- 
lons of a high grade wine. The wineries now have to consider 
every fraction of a cent in the cost of manufacture, in order to 
pay their running expenses, and grapes must be handled both 
cheaply and clean, and in order to do this machinery must be 
called upon for help. 

The improvements have been so great that one over-enthusi- 
astic owner of a winery that we tH]uipped, who annually crushers 
about 10,000 tons of grapes, stated tliat if all his men left dur- 
ing wine-making season, ho could, with the aid of his cellar 
foreman and vineyard superintendent, run the place without 
any other help. While this could not be done, eight to ten men 
could readily operate the entire plant. 

Not until 1889 did any great improvement in the manufac- 
ture of wine by machinery take place, at which time, at many 
different parts of the State, machinery was imported from 
France, Spain and Italy, to decrease the cost of making wine, 
and to improve the quality. These machines, however, were 
never adapted to handling the grapes successfully in California, 
but served as tlie foundation upon which our local talent at 
first improved upon the weakness of tlie imported machines and 
then devised new and different methods to handle the grapes 
and make the same into wine. 

Each year since that time many new and useful improve- 
ments have been added to make life bearable to the man who has 
to take care of large (luantities of grapes of delicate varieties 
in the short space of time allotted to him for that purpose, and 
with as little high-priced help as possible. 

Here is where the clear-headed superintendent shows to ad- 
vantage, and he well knows that without the aid of efficient 
machinery and appliances, he cannot hope to make a success- 
ful vintage. He must have his floors as clean as any kitchen 
of the careful housewife. All the pipes (and there are miles 
of them), the pumps, buckets, hose, tanks and things too numer- 
ous to mention, must be sweet and clean, for if dirt is left any 
place, there is liable to be a contamination, and an easily 
spoiled tank or vintage is the result, so that the greatest care 
must be exercised to have and kciep evc^rything scrupulously 
clean. 

The modern method of handling grapes is the result of con- 
tinually trying to improve the <iuality of wine manufactured. 

Grapes are now delivered to tli(> wineries in wagons or cars, 
both loose and packed in boxes, from which they are forked or 
dumped into the long conveyors; these conveyors in turn 
deliver them to the crushers and stemmers, where the berries 



are first crushed and afterwards separated from their stems. 
The berries are then run into a receiver and the stems thrown 
away. To tlie receiver is attached a .Mus( lMiiii]» which tiikcs 
the must and delivers same through a system of pipes, to tlie 
fermenting tanks. After- fermentation has taken place, and the 
free wine is drawn off, a conveyor is i>hKed into the tanks and 
the fermented pomace is then delivered by a system of conf 
veyors to the presses, which, when finished ])ressing, discliarges 
into another conveyor, delivering finished pomace on to the ref-. 
use pile, where it is allowed to rot for fertilizer. m 

During all the time after the grapes are picked, they are 
never again touched by hand, until they reach tlie refuse pile. 
By these means, California is not only able to make a good 
wine, but is able to make it at a price that the people of the 
country can use and enjoy it as a beverage, at the same price 
as the people of France, Italy and other places, regardless of 
the very high Avages paid to the labor, during the process of 
manufacture, in this State. In a few years, at the most, we can 
expect to hear it said by the people who know wine, that France 
and Italy are trying to imitate California wines. 

TULOUSE & DELORIEUX CO., INC., 
405 Sixth Street, San Srancisco, Cal. 



The trade of the city were surjirised during the month with 
the announcement that the premises in the 800 block in Market 
street, the Westbank Building, running througli to 25 Ellis 
street, had been secured by Herman Helbusch and that the 
Police Commissioners had granted a retail liquor license there- 
for. There was a great protest and property owners repre- 
senting many millions of dollars tried to prevent the granting 
of the license, but Helbusch was successful. 



TANKS THAT LAST 

Water, Wine, Oil Tanks 

Made of Selected Stock by Experienced Workmen 



GEORGE WINDELER, TANK BUILDER 

144-154 Berry St., San Francisco 

Phone KEABNT 242 and J 2552 




1 The Oscar Krenz Copper 
and Brass Works, Inc. 



! 

i 
I 

! 

i 



GENERAL COPPERSMITHS 

Manufacturers of Winery, Distillery and Brewery 
apparatus of all descriptions 

Our Continuous Stills, Pasteurizers, Evaporators and C' ncen- 
trators produce a superior quality of Brandy, Wine and 
Syrup, and surpass any on the market in simplicity of 
construction and economy in operation. 



i 
I 
I 



■BDrrr 

TBI I 



I 212-214 FREMONT ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



! 
I 




^•&'W*'«f'4E'«^«i«?)fe'!«>«!««i«s'«)i'«)t'««J«i)««f«(!lf««!««f(^«««?«J«^ 






V.' 



=Cacbman $ 3acobi= 






)!i 



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California Wines and Brandies 

706 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
LACHMAN & JACOB I New York Office, 65 and 67 North Moore St. 



^ 
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>**«»aB3«a<^a«*»3K»(S(»5r.S<S«StS?a«S<3W^*W5K?«5«3«a5a<^»J«SJ,^S!5«^^ 



56 PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 






S^S^XJL 



^/>e IDEAE, BEVERAGE Mg Mm MmWf ^^^ Ci^c IDEAL BEVERAGE 




Made in a brewery where Purity is paramount, and where men know how. The plumpest, 
•|» sweetest and cleanest of grain is used. The Hops are selected especially for us from the 

very best. The water, after being purified and filtered by nature, comes up in its crystal 
purity through 1500 feet of Rock and Gravel. 



• • 






Frank Fehr's Extra Lager 

No Beer, no matter the name, make or reputation, is so highly approved by the connoisseur. 
• • For home use our Bottled Beers are especially adapted ; nourishing, pure and delicious. Aged 

and cured by time as time only can accomplish. Its rapid growth in popular favor at home 
and abroad proves its superiority. 

^ . ,, . _ James De Fremery & Co. 

Frank Fehr Brewing Co. 



* 



• « 



Pacific Coast Distributors 

Louisville, Kentuclcy 519 Mission Street, San Francisco t 



f 



••i 






NEW BREW 


YOSEMITE 


LAGER 


(f*^ H- BREWED BY THE 

i^^Wi ENTERPRISE BREWING CO. 

* SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 






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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 57 



A SUIT FOR LIBEL 

HAS been instituted by us against JULIUS 
LEVIN COMPANY, of San Francisco, in 
the United States Circuit Court. Said JULIUS 
LEVIN COMPANY advertised a certain brand of 
Canadian Whisky in these words: 

" The only Canadian Whisky that was not seized by the 
" United States Government for containing injuri- 
" ous ingredients at the time the Pure Food Law 
" took effect." 

We believe that no Canadian Whisky was seized on such grounds. 
Certainly CANADIAN CLUB WHISKY never was. 
The reason given for seizing CANADIAN CLUB was that it did 
not contain as much FUSEL OIL as so-called STRAIGHT 
WHISKIES contain. 

THIS IS STRICTLY TRUE, WE ARE GLAD TO SAY. 
FOR WE HAVE ALWAYS INTENDED THAT OUR 
WHISKY SHOULD CONTAIN THE LEAST POSSI- 
BLE AMOUNT OF FUSEL OIL CONSISTENT WITH 
THE DESIRED FLAVOR. 

President Taft decided, after a full review of the evidence and the 
history of Whisky, that it is not necessary that the noxious Fusel 
Oils should be left in Whisky. 

Any persons who, to our knowledge, make false statements about 
our brand, either directly or indirectly, will do so at their peril. 

HIRAM WALKER 8 SONS, LIMITED 

WALKERVILLE, ONTARIO, CANADA ^ 

London New York Chicago Mexico City Victoria, B. C* ^ 



1 



58 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



^ 
^ 




^ 



CELLARS AND VINEYARDS at Icaria^Healdsburg, Cloverdale, and Madrone, Sonoma County 
wcut^Mi^j /\i^L> Yii^i^Jt\K.Ui? ^^ ^j Rutherford aSd St. Helena. Napa County. CalifornU 

French-American Wine Co. 



SUCCESSORS TO CHAIX & BERNARD 

PRODUCERS, GROWERS, DISTILLERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



I CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES S 

Pure and Unadulterated California Wines Our Specialty ^ 



Mr. D. SEYMOUR. 516 MAGAZINE ST., (Sb 515 CONSTANCE ST., NE\ir ORLEANS AGENT 
tiErW YORK DEPOT, 32 -WASHINGTON STREET 



S 1821 to 1841 Harrison Street 



San Francisco, Cal. ^ 





Winners 





JULIUS KESSLER & CO. Distillers 



NEW YORK 

NEW YORK WORLD BLDG. 



CHICAGO 

HUNTER BUILDING 



LOUISVILLE 

30th AND GARLAND AVE 



i 




If 

■f 

4 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



59 



The E. G. Lyons & Raas Co 



FOLSOM & ESSEX STREETS 



Telephone Kearny 489 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Distillers of High Grade Cordials, Fruit Brandies and Syrups 





-f-f-*--f-^ -♦--♦- ^ 



PHILLIPS & VAN ORDEN CO. 

^ PRINTERS, PUBLISHERS, BOOKBINDERS 



WE PRINT THE " WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW " 
GOOD PRINTING COSTS NO MORE THAN THE 
OTHER KIND. IF YOU GO TO THE RIGHT PLACE 



509-515 Howard Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Douglas 2301 Near First Street 



H. P. WICHMAN 



JOHN LBTGEN 



FRED STAUliE 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in ; 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

Sole Proprietors of "Gilt Edge" Whiskies 
Also Sole Distributors of "Old Identical Whiskey" 

(Bottled in Bond) 

431-435 CLAY ST.. and 428-434 COMMERCIAL ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



f 



CARROLL RYE 
WHISKEY 



-*»- 



>*» ^^ »o» ^fc *a* ^^ *o» ^fcfc *a* ^^ ** ^^ »» ^^ o ^^ »» ^^ o- 



-*»- 



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MORVILLE A. A. 
OLD BOURBON 



} 



1 LOUIS TAUSSIG and COMPANY ! 



i 

i PHONES: 

SUTTER 50; J 2745 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS 



MAIN AND MISSION STREETS 



I 



i-*»- 



>«o» ^^ *a* ^^ •a*- 



.«a« 



►rt»- 



-•»- 



SAN FRANCISCO 5 



-*»■* 



60 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



it. 



p. C. ROSSI, President 



A. SBARBORO, Secretary 



Italian-Swiss Colony 

LARGEST PRODUCERS OF THE FINEST VARIETIES OF 

California Wines and Brandies 

Vineyards, Wineries and Cellars at Asfi, Fulton, Cloverdale and Sebastopol in Sonoma County; Madera, Madera County; Selma and Kingsbury 

in Fresno County, and Lemoore in Kings County, California, 



PRODUCERS OF 



The Celebrated Tipo 



rfr ~T- 



(Red or White) 




i^fifeS^^^'iA?^^'^*' I 



GRAND DIPLOMA OF HONOR, Genoa. Italy, 1892 
GOLD MEDAL, COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION. 1893 
GOLD MEDAL. Dublin, Ireland, 1892 



GOLD MEDAL, Turin, 1898 

GOLD MEDAL, CAL. MIDW. FAIR, 1894 

SILVER MEDAL. BORDEAUX, FRANCE. I8SS 



GOLD MEDAL. PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION. ISOl 
GOLD MEDAL. LEWIS&CLARKE EXPOSITION. 1904 
GRAND PRIZE. ALASKA- YUKON-PACI Fir 

EXPOSITION. 1909 



Naturally' 

Fermented in 

Bottles 



Sparkling Burgundy and Asti Special 

(DRY) 

p. C. ROSSI VERMOUTH AND FERNET-AMARO 



Trade-Mark 

Registered 

October 8, 

1895 



GOLD MEDAL. TURIN, 1884 



HIGHEST AWARD CHICAGO, 1894 



PROPRIETORS OF THE AMERICAN VINTAGE COMPANY 



Office and Salesrooms: Corner Battery and Greenwich Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Vaults: 1235-1267 Battery St. 101-160 Greenwich St. 

NEW YORK OFFICE: West nth and Washington Sts. 



1334-1339 Sansome St. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



61 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 

Issued Monthly 

TREASURY REGISTER CO - - - - - PUBLISHERS 



r. m. wood, .... president and editor 

e. f. wood, . - - . secretary and treasurer 

Office: 127 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
Wilson Building : Room 304-305 : Phone Kearny 2597. Home C2559. 



The PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW is the only 
paper of its class West of Chicago. It circulates among the Whole- 
sale and Retail Wine, Spirit and Beer Dealers of the Pacific Coast, 
the Wine Makers and Brandy Distillers of California, the Wine and 
Brandy Buyers, and the Importers, Distillers and Jobbers of the 
United States. 

Entered at the Post Office at San Francisco, Col., 
as Second-Class Matter. 



ALL CHECKS, DRAFTS, MONEY ORDERS, Etc., should be made payable to 

R. M. WOOD 

Subscriptions per year — in advance, postage paid: 

For the United States, Mexico and Canada $2 00 

For the United States, Mexico and Canada, six months 1 25 

For European Countries - 3 00 

( Single copies 20 






I EXCELLENCE OF QUALITY 

I 



PDRITY IN MANUFACTURE 



S EXQUISITE IN FLAVOR 



1 



! ALL COMBINED IN 




DAWSON'S 
SCOTCH 1 



IN GLASS ONLY 



! CHAPMAN » WILBERFORCE 

I IMPORTERS 

I 705-707 SANSOME ST. 

t SAN FRANCISCO 



4>M 



MH 



MM 



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«l»*<l<» 



iPORTjillT TO DISTILLEB8 P Wi)iE IKEfiS. 

The accompanying cut illustratfs 
our O R I G I N A I, CONTINUOUS 
STILL, which we have improved 
each season until it has reached its 
present perfection. 

Phis STILL, which has always 
received our special attention and 
study, has been of material assist- 
ance ID securing forCalifornia sweet 
wines and brandies the high rank in 
the world which they hold today. 

We manufacture not only high- 
class STILLS, but also Copper and 
Brass Work of all descriptions for 
wineries, distilleries, breweries, etc. 

Our Pasteurizers and Wine Filters 
enjoy the same high standard of 
popularity as our STILLS. 

Refekrkces:— All successful sweet 
wine and brandy producers of Cali- 
fornia. 

AU KINDS Of COPPCR WORK OONt AF SHORT NOTICE. 

Sanders Copper Works 

CARL SCHALITZ. Pres. and Mirr. 

BEALE AND HOWARD STS. SAN FRANCISCO 

Southern California Branch: 

Pat D Seit 29, 1S91 649 North Main St. Los Angeles, Cal. 




■ 




^ierlxeiti^e 

iri/ere i>S 
rtoTrviii'd 

recx3/pera,Te 
exn/au>ST7ea 
force more 
uickly xK 



arv 



&. SON 



UOHN RAI 

Asents 

Opp. 8th and Townsend Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO 






Subscribe for the PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW; $2.00 Per Year 



62 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



BOTTLES 

CORKS 

CROWN BOllLE 
CAPS 

LABELS 

MACHINERY 

ETC. 


Lindeman, Slonian & Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Bottles and Bottlers' Supplies 


CARLOAD LOTS A SPECIALTY 

CORRESPONDENCE SOUCITED 
WRITE US 

381-389 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Telephone 
PACIFIC— MARKET 6261 HOME J 2161 


Pacific CoatI Atcntt for 

Chicago Specialty 
Box Co. 
Chicago 

Ferd. autmann & Co. 
New York 

Continental Glass 

Decorating Co. 

Chicago 



e©®€«3Si(jXtXsXsX3SXsX3SX5(:XiXi^^ 



RATES: $1.00 A DAY AND UP 
Tourist and Commercial 

FIREPROOF 




Everything new, comfortable 

Homelike, plenty of life. 
Beautifully furnished 

Highest class. 



Hotel 
Victoria 

Formerly the ORENA 
I. W. Bradt & Johnston, Props. 

Los Angeles, California 

Opposite Post Office 
Cor. 7th and Hope Sts. 






GEORGE WEST & SON, 



INCORPORATED 



j^j^ PRODUCERS OF jftj» 



SWEET WINES AND BRANDIES 



i 



1 



STOCKTON, CAL., U. S. A. 



San Francisco-The Exposition City 

Articles by Rufus Steele, Governor Gillett, Homer S. King, R. E. Connolly 
Beautifully Illustrated in Full Color 



showing the Cosmopolitan features and wonderful 
material progress of San Francisco 



The Best You Ever Saw! 



In this number begins £ hC i^DCll ^^ ^' ^* *"*^ ^' ^' Williamson 

Authors of "The Lightning Conductor," "The Chaperon," "Lady Betty Across the Water," etc. 



A Western Serial Novel of romance and thrilling automobile adventures 
in Sunny California — The best story of the year 



Help San Francisco by sending 
this special December number of 

NOW ON SALE 



Sunset Magazine 



ALL NEWS STANDS 



to your Eastern 
friends 

15 CENTS 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 

*" WESTERN GRAIN AND SUGAR PRODUCTS CO. 

FORMERLY 

WESTERN DISTILLERIES 

A PACIFIC HOMi: INDUSTRY 

SPIRITS AND ALCOHOL 

Our Latest Improved Guillaume Still is Producing (192% Highest in the United States) 

Denatured Alcohol, Special Denatured Alcohol 



Purity Brand Spirits 

Wins for Purity 
Clean In Neutrality 



Purity Brand Alcohol 

Most Neutral in the 

United States 



Gins 



Rums 



^ 



Western Distributing Co. 

Office Rooms: 304,305,306—110 SUTTER STREET, S. F. 



Sole Agents, Pacific Coast 

Distillery : AGNEW, CAL. 






^5)^5j(J5J|AiJ^5j|K|(?^^;^^ 



PHONE KEARNY 204 



BENJ. S. DONAHUE, President 

OCCIDENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 



580-582 HOWARD STREET 
HEADQUARTERS FOR- 



Tannin; Russian Isinglass; Gelatine; Bottle Caps; Filter Pulp; and all Wine Makers' Supplies 

Ovraers of the celebrated brand Eureka Filter Pulp 

Owners of The Western Press, the most up-to-date label plant on the Pacific Coast 

Largest handlers of Demijohns; Flasks; Imported and Domestic Bottles 

Pacific Coast Agents for Miguel, Vincke & Meyer, Spanish Hand Cut Corks; National Cork Co's Machine Cut Corks 

Pacific Coast Agents International Cork Co. 

WRITE to US for PRICES 



a 



Tea Kettle" 



Is the leading old fashion, 
straight Sweet Mash 
Whiskey 




44 



Crab Orchard" 

straight Sour Mash. The 
brand owned by us is distilled 
in Trimble County, Ky. Do 
not use any other. 



"SUSQUEHANNA" 



GUARANTEED ALL RYE 



"PILGRIMAGE" 

HIGH FLAVOR HEAVY BODY 



"Richwood" 

A High Type Bourbon 



The Susquemac Distilling Co. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 



"Old Q. W. H." 



Straight Sour Mash Worth trying 



YELLOWSTONE 



GEO. DELAPORTE, Pacific Coast Agent 

820 Mission Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 



I 



A WHOLESALER'S AND RETAILER'S IflEDIUM 




STABLISHED 1878 



VINICULTURE 



L. XLXIII. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES, FEBRUARY 28, 191 



No. 4 





The only thixi^V 
in a bottle o " 

AP HOTALING'S 

OLD KIRK 

are purewhisKey 
and satisfaction 





CINZANO 

ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



THe Standard of Quants' 
tKe 'World Over 



In 1909 over 64% o£ all the Vermouth 
exported from Italy was CINZANO 



ALEX D SHAW & CO 

UNITED STATES AGENTS 
NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO CHICAGO 



MARTINI 
& ROSSI 

ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



Is by far the Biggest Seller in the 
United States 

WHY? 

Because EVERYBODY can mix a better 
Cocktail with it than with ANY other Brand 



F. E. MAYHEW & CO. 

INTERNAL REVENUE and 
CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 

Hydrometers and Extra Stems and All Kinds of Revenue Books 



N. E. Cor. Battery and Washington Sts. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



AUK'S 



HEAR M~ 



G'^ AUK'S HEAD 



"THE BEST THE BREWERS BREW 

BASS'S ALE 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 




We 
manufacture 



TANKS 



WINE- 



for all purposes 
-BEER— VINEGAR 



We also manufacture 

WOODEN WATER PIPE 

If interested in Wood Pipe send for special litera- 
ture. Address nearest office 

PACIFIC TANK AND PIPE CO. 

318 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Equitable Bank Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Kenton Station, Portland, Oregon 




^^^A^^»/>^»vvvys^f^^/»^^^A^v>^^^^^^^^vvvvvvvvvv^^/v»/»^N^vv»Avvyvs^<vvvyv» 



''Paul Masson'' 

CHAMPAGNES 



"The Pride of 
California" 



Extra Dry, Sparkling Burgundy 
Oeil de Perdrix... 

The Best Sparkling Wines Produced in America 



PAUL MASSON CHAMPAGNES COMPANY 

SAN JOSE. CAI,irOR.NIA. 






S 



IMON 



Levy & Co. 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

SPECIALTrES 



P. Gamier, Enghien les Bains 

Abricotine and other Cordials 



£1 

^^ Legler Pernod, Couvet & Pontarlier 

lAi Absinthe and Kirschwasser 

J^J Hills & Underwood, London 

Old Tom Gin, Dry Gin, Sloe Gin and Orange Bitters 

Connor & Sons, Belfast, Bally Castle Irish Whiskey 




C. A. Lindgren & Co., Stockholm 

A. J. Anderson & Sons, Goteberg, Sweden 

R. Slater & Co., Glasgow 



PHONE KING 2173 



346-348 WASHINGTON STREET 



ft 
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Swedish Punch fyfl 
Branvin and Aquavit lAi 
Ben Cruachan Scotch Whiskey M J 

SAN FRANCISCO KN 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



)®!)(£)®®3X5)S®j)®®®®(^^ 



THEO. GIER COMPANY 

Wholesale Wine and Liquor Merchants 

Sole Distributors Metropole Bourbon Whiskey, Metropole Bourbon Whiskey in 
Bond. Puck Rye Whiskey. Also handlers of Straight and Blended Whiskeys. 



575-577 Eighteenth Street ^"* Oakland, CaHfornia 

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GIERSBERGER 
WINES 

OUR SPECIALTY 

From our Vineyards at 
Livermore, Napa, St. Helena 

THEO. GIER WINE CO. 

571-75 Eighteenth Street 



Oak 2510 



Home A 2510 



■ ^ 



SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMANN 



WHOLESALE 



WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS 



o. 



SOLE -PROPRIETORS 

K. ROSEDALE 

RYE & BOURBON 

Western Distributors 

Herbert's 
Pifre Malt Whiskey 

Bottled By 
HOFFHEIMER BROTHERS 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



CALIFORNIA'S FINEST BRANDIES 



E. J. Baldwin's 

APRICOT 
BRANDY 

THE FINEST IN THE 
WORLD 

Phone Douglas 1733 



SENATOR 

Leiand Stanford's 

PURE 
VINA BRANDY 

IT'S PURE-THAT'S SURE 
THERE'S NOTHING LIKE IT 



BRUNSWICK RYE AND BOURBON 



OUALITY UNE.XCELLED IN EULK OR CASES 

&PECIAL ORDERS SHIPPED DIRECT I-KOM DISTILLERY 



I SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMANN, 430-434 Battery Street San Francisco. WESTERN DISTRIBUTERS 



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WHEN DRY AND DUSTY, CALL FOR 

GILT EDGE ^__ DQPPEL 

LAGER °' BRAU 



The Purest and Most Delicious Beers Brewed. On Draught in all First Class Cafes 



SACRAMENTO BREWING CO. 

F. J. RUHSTALLER, Mgr. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE: 
14th and Harrison Sts. 

Q. B. ROBBINS, Mgr. 



4 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



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THE STANDARD WINE OF CALIFORNIA 



iiihk^A Si^Uf iWS, SP^/^ttoK *i 



fl We are the largest producers ar)d bottlers of high grade 
CaliforQia Wine. 

^ We ov/Q our viQeyards oQd make all of our wiQes aod 
can therefore guarantee thje purity of every bottle. 

NO INCREASE IN PRICES OF CRESTA BLANCA WINES 



l?l!i|@|l''|@gEil 



Location of Vineyaids, LIVERMORE, CAL. 

Send for Price List 



42-44 Davis St., San Francisco 
10 West 33rd Street, New York 
37 South Water Street, Chicago 






^ 



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J. F. Plumel Co. 

65- eT ELLIS STREET 



Proprietor of the Celebrated 

KOLAKINA 



Pwnwpc' KEARNY 3567 
PHONES: I c. 5894 



IMPORTER OF 

Bordeaux Wines, Fine Brandies 
and Olive Oil 



... Sole Pacific Coast Agents for ... 

VAN DEN BERGH & CO. 
... Q I IV S ... 






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K3K3K3«3»W5K«Sraa(3KS«3K3K»»»3«JH»3W5«a6!OK»5«5W»JK5«»3i«^ 



The Brunswick-Balke-CoUender Co. 




Billiard 

and Pool 

Tables 

BAR FIXTURES 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

MANUFACTURED IN 

OUR SAN FRANCISCO 

FACTORY 



LOW PRICES. EASY TERMS, LARGE STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND 

Sp?cial Dvsig.is and Estimates Chetrfully Furnished 

767 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

BETWEEN THIRD AND FOURTH STREETS 
TELEPHONE SUITER 323 TELEPHONE HOME J 1535 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 

Italian Vineyard Company 

MAIN OFFICES, SALESROOMS AND WINERIES 

1234 to 1248 PALMETTO ST., near Mateo - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



PRODUCERS OF 



CALIFORNIA PURE 
WINES AND BRANDIES 



Owners of the LARGEST VINEYARD in the U. S.— 4000 Acres 

At Guasti, San Bernardino County, Cal. 
PLANTED IN THE FINEST VARIETIES OF WINE GRAPES 



NEW YORK BRANCH CHICAGO BRANCH NEW ORLEANS BRANCH 

Offices and Wine Vaults 152 West Kinzie St. 237 Decatur Street 

202-204 Center Street and 213-215 Hester Street 

Seattle, Washington, 78 West Marion Street 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 








QxexQxexsxQxexsxexexsxs^xexsxexoxQXQXQxoxex^ 



WIELAND'S EXTRA PALE LAGER 




OUR VERDICT 



"It Is Better Than Ever" 



Office and Brewery: 

240 SECOND STREET 



San Francisco, CaL 



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PACIFIC WINE ANb SPIRIT REVIEW. 



i»-^fc-«#-^^-«»-* 



C. H. WENTE. 

President 



FRANK A. BUSSE. 

General Manager 



Eagle Brand 




>y Napa & SohttTOiWuifeC^^ ^j ^ 





X>1 



■iZ? 

m 



LIVERMORE 

J 

Sjieci&llv) 
Selecicd 
Wines 



COGNAC BRANDY 
Oro Fino Cognac*** $12. OO pcr c«sc 

( PURE MEDICINAL BRANDY) 



Vineyard and Winery: Livermore, Cal. 

OFFICE AND CELLARS: 

112-116 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 

j PHONE MARKET 2836 



FERNET- BRANCA 




Specialty of 

FRATELLI BRANCA 

MILAN, ITALY 



The King of Appetizers 
Best Flavor to Cocktails 



GRAND PRIZE 

ST. LOUJS 1904 

Sole North American Agents 

L. GANDOLFI & CO., 

427-31 W. B'way, New York 
IMPORT ORDERS SOLICITED 




gOFFALO 

NEW BREW 
BOHEMIAN 

Jacramto, Cal. 



BREWING 



A. H. LOCHBAUM CO. 

AGENTS 

125 King Street 

PHONE 1010 Main 



PALE EXPORT 
CULMBACHER 
PORTER 



COMPANY 



«H. PEASE, President 



F. M. SHEPARD, Vice-President 



R. H. PEASE, JR., Treasurer 



C. F. RUNYON, Secretary 



Qoodyear Rubber Company 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Rubber goods of every description 




RUBBER-LINED COTTON HOSE. 



WINE AND BREWER'S HOSE. "GOLD SEAL" IS THE BEST 

61-63-65-67 FOURTH STREET, PORTLAND, OR. 
587-589-591 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

A/F \DP MPAnmiAPTrPS FOR EVERYTHING MADE OF RUBBER 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




NITED STATES FIDELITY m GUARANTY CO. 



PHONE 
Kearny 925 



1 



TOTAL ASSETS, $6,000,000.00 



PAID CAPITAL, $2,000,000.00 SURPLUS, $933,103.43 

rilis Company is Accepted as 

SOLE SURETY UPON ALL INTERNAL REVENUE AND CUSTOMS BONDS 

Required by the United States Government from 

Distillers, Brewers and Cigar Manufacturers 



PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 



BORLAND & JOHNS, Managers 



Nevada Bank Building 



0»- 

I 



A. ROSSI 8c CO. 

\MACHINISTS 



►*»- 



.A^'^tO 



( Wine Presses 



! 

Grape Crusher (i 



i! 
FOR SALE.— Second-hand Redwood TanKs and OaR CasKs j! 

I BROADWAY, Near Sansome San Francisco f 



m' 



'** ^^ ** ^^ *» ^»fc ** ^^ *♦ ^^ ** ^^ ** ^^ ** ^^ ** ^^ »» ^^ O ^^ *» ^^ *»'■ 



>*» ^^ **" 



-♦»- 



Barrett's Unrivalled Prune Juice 




GUARANTEED UNDER THE 
FOOD AND DRUGS ACT 

GUARANTY No. 49 



3 C 

Now to be had from 




AMERICAN MERCANTILE CO. 



• • • 

• • • 



514 BATTERY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SAMPLES SENT 
ON APPLICATION 



Sierra madre Uintage Co. 



GROWERS AND PRODUCERS OF 




Pare California Wines ^"'^ Brandies 

PORT AND SHERRY 

A Specialty 

La Manda Park, Los Angeles County, Cal. 

add Medal Paris Exposition, 1900 
Gold Medal Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, 1901 

Gold Medal Louisiana Purchase Exposltloa, 1904 
Gold'Medal Lewis & Clark Exposition, 

Portland. Oregon, 1»05 
Odd Medal Jamestown, Va. Exposition, 1907 
Gold Medal Alaska-Yukon Expositon, 1909 , 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



THE BARTON VINEYARD CO., ltd. 



ESTABLISHED 1880 

GROWERS AND DISTILLERS OF 



The Famous Barton Wines and Brandies 

Vineyards and Cellars, Fresno, California 



Chicago Agent 

BYRON E. VKATCH 

?>1 South Water Street 



WM. .RENNIE, Manager 
Fresno, CAt. 



New York Agents 

E. L, SPELLMAN & CO. 

792 Washington Street 



NEXT TIME TRY 

"Semper Idem" Filter Pulp 



Guaranteed Chemically Pure. Long fibre with asbestos 

Used by the largest wine producers in California to 

y- whom we refer by permission. Correspondence solicited 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

' ..[ Exclusive selling agents in the United States 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OAKLAND 



Send us a trial order 



LOS ANGELES 



The LOEW SYSTEM 

Patent 
Wine and 
Liquor 
Filter 



THELOEWflLTERCO. 




Cost of Clarifying 

Materials, as well 

as Storage, 

Shrinkag-e and 

Waste 



Filters to crystal brilliancy the 
most turbid wines and liquors, 
without any deterioration or loss 
in color, flavor, quantity or qual- 
ity, imparting a lustre and fin- 
ish to the product. 

Easily and quickly cleaned. 

Packed and unpacked in a few 
minutes. 

Send for Catalog. 

The Loew Manufacturing Co. 

CLEVELAND, OHro 




LUNDSTROM HATS 

"From Maker to Wearer" 

For Twenty-five years LUNOSTROM HATS 
have been the standard of qualityand style 

FIVE STORES 
1178 MARKET ST. 72 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 2640 MISSION ST. 

26 THIRD ST. 



Send for lilustraled Catalogue to MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT, 1178 Market Street 



Topazor 

The White Wine 



Nectarubi 



The Red Wine 



The Perfection of California Table Wines 



oUuoy 




ESTABLISHED IN 1880 INCORPORATED IN 1906 

CONTRA COSTA WINERY, MARTINEZ 
WINDSOR WINERY. SONOMA CO. 



Office and Salesrooms: 

549 WASHINGTON STREET 



San F 



rancisco 



10 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




AMI VIGNIER (Inc.) Coast Distributors 

605-611 BATTERY STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 



RUSCONI, FISHER & COMPANY 

I IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS I 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

ALEXANDER & McDONALD 
SPORTSMAN SCOTCH 
SANDY MCDONALD'S 
LIQUOR SCOTCH AND 
CORONA VINTAGE WINES 




SOLE AGENTS FOR 

KENNEL CLUB 
BOURBON AND RYE 
WHISKIES 
JAMES GRAHAM 
TOM GIN 



Unrivaled for Purity and Excellence 



326 JACKSON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC WlNi: AND tsl'lKIT UEVIKW, 



11 






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Ml»*<*»»*<*«»* *«*»*»**»* •**»*<* O « *'>*H*«i< »»***>■*<**»» <ll»*<U>»<l»»lli*lt»<iil«l»**l*« 



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LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT 



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Los ANGELES, Fob. 20.— The principal topic of intemst to 
the li(|Uoi* trade of this section is the attempt of the reform 
administration of tlie State to fasten tlie Wylie Local Option 
iiieasnre on the pe()i)le. The staunch fight made by Senator 
.luillard of Sonoma County in defense of the wine interests 
deserves th(> utmost praise from all those who believe in personal 
liberty. While Senator .luillard is for strict rejiulatitm, he feels, 
as evidenced by his championshij) of the Township Unit amend- 
ment of the bill, that th(> great wine industry of the State de- 
serves recognition, and it is largely to his efforts that the hand 
of the rabid prohibitionist is stayed. 

Locally the licpior men have biM^i so harassed by the long-hairs 
that they have become apathetic. As (me pi'ominent dealer 
remarked the other day, "I don't care a snap of my fingers what 
iliey do. I'll turn my store into an ice cream parlor, and thus 
become respectable if local option carries." Nevertheless the 
passage of the county local option law would mean trouble to 
the Los Angeles liquor dealer. 

The reappointment of Cornelius IN-ndleton as Collector of 
the Port for Los Angeles has given those having business with 
the Customs Department much satisfaction. His administra- 
tion of affairs here has been very satisfactory during the wo!i- 
derful growth of imports from 1250,000 a year a few years ago 
to its present extent of over a million dollars yearly and it.s 
consequent problems arising from such an extraordinary in- 
crease of business at this port. 

The Independent Wine Dealers' Association, the combination 
of all those interests of the wineries outside of the California 
Wine Association, have cemented the organization by the addi- 
tion to their member.ship of those few wineries that held out 
waiting for the evidence that the combination would succeed, _ 
which has so strengthened the Independents that they can main- 
tain prices^ with every i)rospect of good values for three or four 
years to come. The season up to the present has been very 
favorable for a good crop the coming, year, but with their strong 
organization and the present unity of purpose of those control- 
ing the industry there will be no break in prices. 

Collector of Internal Revenue Claude I. Parker is rendering 
every assistance and the facilitie-; of his office here for those 
dealers who expi'ess their intenticm of tax-paying goods in this 
district. The establishment of the Bonded Warehouse here and 
the encouragement l)eing given to shippers and buyers, should 
sotm result in the principal amount of tax on liijnors being j)ai(l 
in this district and credited to this State that is now being paid 
to Eastern distilleries and warehouses of shipments made here 
in bond and being freed here; sonu'thing heretofore unkiioAvn. 



the cash registers were jimmied and the contents appropriated 
bv the thieves. 



James A. Barlotti, secretary of the Italian Vineyard Com- 
pany, has just returned from an extended trip covering several 
months, devoted to the inspection of the different branches of 
the company throughout the Eastern States. 3Ir. Harlotti re- 
ports business good and all indications favorable for a fine year 
during 1911. The immense shortages of wine throughout the 
French, (Jernuin and other European Avine countries is begin- 
ning to make itself felt in the Eastern markets, to the steadying 
and uplifting of the California wine trade. 



Burglars have been making saloons t)f this city their especial 
])rey of late and several burglaries have been reported, among 
them being the Eintracht Saloon at 103 North Si)ring street and 
Dillon's Saloon at 111 South San Pedro street, in both of which 



The E. Bernhard Liquor Company is the name of a new con- 
cern recently opened at 175 North Spring stn^t. 



The Santa Fe Bar, located at 937 East First street, is one of 
the East Side bars that commands a good class of trade, is doing 
a fine business and is an attractive and up-to-date place. 



Adtilph Becker, of Becker Brothers, proprietors of the Wal- 
dorf Cafes, Los Angeles and San Francisco, arrived this week 
from several weeks" vacati(m down on his 300-acre ranch eight 
miles from Calexico, in the Imperial Valley. Dolph is as brown 
as a desert rat and his vacation has done him a world of good. 
His principal recreation has been duck shooting, thousands of 
(lucks flying over his ranch night and moi'ning, and the royal 
canvasback and mallard Avere on his daily bill of fare while 
down there. 



"Link" Knowles, of the Nadeau Buffet, reports business as 
very good, ai;d from the appc^arance of the crowd thronging his 
place he certainly has no cause for comi)laint. 



The Tap Room is an up-to-date bar recently opened on Second 
street in the new Higgins Building and is commanding a fine 
trade alreadv. 



Henry Baer of the Los Angeles Wine Company reports a very 
decided increase in the volume of business since the removal of 
their business to larger quarters and Henrj' is correspondingly 
happy, notwithstanding the ^Vylie Option Bill cloud. 



The niany friends of Joseph ^lelczer will be glad to hear that 
from the reports sent home by him, that he is having the time 
of his life and thoroughly enjoying himself on his trip around 
the world. He is at the present time in Rome, Italy. 



eJ. H. Traphagen has been appointed manager and salesman 
of the grape juice factory of the California Vineyards and Im- 
provement Company at North Cucamonga, and is taking steps 
to push the sale of the "Mission Brand'' of grape juice. At 
the recent annual meeting of the company the following offi- 
cers were elected : F. B. Van Fleet, President ; A. T. Gallows, 
Vice-President; B. Ballow, Secretary; Directors, R. E. Gilbert, 
F. W. ^^'hitney, R. L. Booth and F. E. George. 



The Anaheim Fniou Brewing Company recently held its an- 
nual meeting of stockholders, and the following officers were 
elected: President, Anton Hessel; vice-president, Tony Hessel 
Jr. ; tr(^asurer, Jos. A. Hessel ; secretary, Paul Hessel ; directors, 
Louis J. Zimmermann, Jos. Dauser. The reports showed that 
the past year was a record-breaker, and that never in its history 
has the brewery turned out such a large quantity, and so fine a 
quality of beer. 



According to the San Diego Sun the citizens of Coronado are 
looking for the proper party to open a restaurant in that city. 
A licpior license can be secured for |25 per month. 



12 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT UKVIEW, 



Boosting Home Products 



"M- 



ADEIN CALIFORNIA WEEK" proved a great success 
and without doubt familiarized our own people, as well 
as thousands of visitors and stran<i:ers in town, with the wide 
variety of choice articles made and grown in our wonderful 
State. 

Some of the most attractive window displays dealt with our 
choice native wines. The one in the p]mporium, featuring the 
Italian-Swiss Colony's wines, was particularly artistic and at- 
tracted much attention. A real wine press, festooned with au- 
tumn tinted leaves and hunches of artificial grapes, served as 
a center decoration and about it were grouped pyramids shoA\ - 
ing all the varieties of wine manufactured at Asti. The Cohmy 
has some beautifully colored panoramic views, grape studie;s, 
gla.ss signs and fancy bottles and they all were shown to ad- 
vantage. 

At the Ferry Cafe, Buckley's grocery store on Union street, 
Heinecke Brothers, Eighteenth and Collingsvood streets, 
and Silvestri's, on the corner of Frederick and Cole Streets, 




'^'l .Artistic "Made in California" Exhibit of the Italian-Swiss Colony 

at the Emporium, this City 

elaborate displays of the Colony's wines were also made, while 
in the Tapestry Room of the Hotel St. Francis, they divided 
honors with a neat assortment of Paul Masson and Cresta 
Blanca wines and were greatly admired by the social favorites 
and notable strangers who frequent this cozy lounging room. 

The Orpheum, on Washington's Birthday, projected the Al- 
lied Grape and Wine Industries series of moving pictures show- 
ing the vintage season in California and thus many other hund- 
reds of visitors were impressed with the importance of our wine 
industry. 

There is no question that this novel and refined method 



of reaching the ]jublic's eye is effective, for while the spectators 
may not read the wine advertisements in the programme, they 
cannot help seeing the moving ])ictures on the screen and in 
the course of a thousand f(>et of fihns, which refjuires twenty 
minutes to unreel, they are bound to observe something new, 
something that will give them food for thought, something that 
will make them realize that they ought to be loyal to our native 
products. 



Noted Visitors Wined and Dined 



WHEN the delegates to the Western Fruit Jobbers' Associa- 
tion's convention departed for their Eastern homes last 
week, there were fe\\- facts about our viticultural industry which 
they had not thoroiiglily absorlied. Their educati(m was rapiil 
but complete. In fact, there was scarcely a moment duri-iji 
their sojourn in Califoi-nia when our wines were not called td 
their attention. 

The annual convention this year was held at Sacramento from 
February 1.3th to 19th, and for their benefit a Northern Cali- 
fornia Citrus Fair was held in the new Studel)aker Building. 
It was comparatively small, but a gem in its way. Besides a 
fine display of citrus fruits, the Italian-Swiss Colony, Sacra- 
mento Valley Winery and Wetmore-Bowen & Co. nuide a brave 
showing of our best native wines. At the fornuxl banquet given 
in li(mor of the visitors on Thursday evening, Februai-y Kith, a1 
the Hotel Sacramento, they had a chance to taste six of our well- 
known brands of wines, including Coi'dova Sherry (Sacramento 
County), Vestal Riesling (Sacramento County), Cresta Blama 
Souvenir (Alameda County), Asti-Special Sec (Sonnmn Coun- 
ty), Cordova Burgundy (Sacramento Count3'), and "Eye of 
Partridge" (Santa Clara County). 

The menu was made up entirely of California i)rnducts and 
was so elaborate and representative of the good things our State 
provides, that Ave take pleasure in printing it in full : 

California Orange A])])etizer, California Oyster Cocktail (San 
Le.'indro County), California Ripe Olives (Butte C(mntv), Cali- 
fornia Celery (San Joaciuin County), California Salted Al- 
monds (Yolo County), California Clear Oreen Turtle Soup 
(San Diego Bay), SacranuMito River Salmon Hollandaise, Po- 
tato Dauphine, Cutlet California Milk Lamb (Tehama County), 
Heart of California Artichoke Macedoine (Sutter County), 
Frozen California Fruit Punch, California Fruit Fed S(|uabs, 
Raisin Stuffing (Fresno County), Fresh Asparagus, Hot, An 
Beurre, cut in February, 1911 (Sacramento County), California 
Fruit Salad (Placer County), Tutti Frutti Ice Cream, Cateaux 
Fantaisie, Petaluma ( hciese. Bent's Crackers, Demi Tasse, Cali- 
fornia Raisin Bread (Fresno County), Cigars, Cigarettes and 
California Cognac and Curacoa. 

When prizes at the Citrus Fair wiu'e awarded, it was found 
that the judges, three Eastern delegates, had given the gold 
medal for the most artistic exhibit to the Sacramento Valley 
Winery, while the Italian-Swiss Colony carried off two gold 
medals for the finest wines and packages and the best natural 
sparkling wine. It is said that while the wines were being 
.sampled, one of the judges canu' in for a great deal of "joshing." 
When his fellow delegates were asked the reason, they confided 
that in his home town he had been elected to a fat municipal 
job on the i)rohibition ticket, and they expressed regret that his 
rabid constituents ccmld not see him partaking liberally of the 
sauternes, ports and .sparkling wines of the different exhibitors. 

On Sunday, February 19th, the greater portion of the dele- 
gates left by boat for San Francisco, stopping en route, for an 
hour, at \\'inehaven, whei'e they were shown' about the Califor- 
nia Wine Association's great plant. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



13 



( ( Over The Sparkling: Wine Cup ( ( 

( ' The California Wine Display at the Panama- I ' 



u 



Pacific 



'acinc Exposition in 



1915 



U 



By Horatio F. Btoi.l. 

SAN FRANCISCO has been appointed the Exposition City 
for 1915 and the rejoioinji; and festivities attendant upon 
the return of the delegation to Washington, whose united 
eliforts secured tlie plum for us, are now over. We have spread 
our "arguments"' broadcast and assured the world that we would 
provide a show that would surpass anything that has heretofore 
been attempted. 

The period for blowing our liorn and patting ourselves on the 
back is now over. We must get doAvn to business at once and 
"make good." There is plenty of work for everyone, including 
even the winemen and grape growers, avIio will find the next four 
years none too long for them to arrange their plans, secure the 
co-operation of everv'one connected with the viticultural in- 
dustry, collect a substantial sum to insure a display in keeping 
witii the importance of the industry, and avail themselves of 
every twist and turn in the affairs of the exposition to secure 
jjublicity for our native wines. The opportunities Avill be bound- 
less, if the right person is selected to look out for our interests. 
I have heard it said again and again, "Oh, the management 
has to favor us. One of our most representative wine men, ilr. 
P. C. Rossi, is a director and didn't we subscribe |50,000 to the 
fund and give tAvo hundred cases of wine to help the Congres- 
sional party in their fight to secure the Fair." 

EXPOSITION NOT A LOCAL AFB^AIR. 

These statenu'iits are true, but our wine men must not forget 
that this is an international world's fair, and the display of 
wines Avill not be confined to our native product by any means. 
We want every wine-producing nation of Europe represented 
liere. ^Ve want them to send their very best products, ^^'e want 
to have a cimnce to compete with their choicest vintages, and if 
we conu' through the ordeal with Hying colors, we will have 
won a victory that will advertise our wines better and quicker 
than any other method, for it will convince the American people 
that our wines can hold their own with those produced any- 
where. 

FOREIGN WINES VS. AMERICAN WINES. 

We have nothing to fear, for even at expositions in the gi-eat 
wine-producing centers of Europe we have been able to win 
recognition. Gold medals were awarded California wines at 
Paris, France, in 1899; at Genoa, Italy, in 1892; at J.,yons, 
France, in 1894; at Bordeaux, France, in 1895; at Turin, Italy, 
in 1898 ; and at the I'aris World's Exposition, in 1900, when our 
wines carried off four gold metlals, nine silver medals and nine 
bronze medals, notwithstanding that the choicest qualities were 
not permitted to compete for prizes because, as the Frenchmen 
claimed, the labels bore the names of French districts, such as 
California Burgundy, Sauterne, etc. 

RECOGNITION IN FRANCE. 

I have just received the following letter from Charles Jadeau, 
the famous champagne expert, who recently returned from 
Europe, wliich shows the strong impression made by our wines 
in France: 

AsTi, February 14, 1911. 

Dear Mr. S toll : Upon my return from France, in June, 1910, 
after my first work in California, I talked on many occasions 
with vine growers and merchants about California's vineyards 
and wines. 



^^'hen I described the fine vineyards I had seen and the good 
w ines I had tasted in tliis beautiful land, everyone smiled at my 
enthusiasm, and said : "Yes, my dear air, we know you are a 
clever wine maker, but we are inclined to believe that you draw 
too rosy a picture." 

That is why, when I returned again to France, last November, 
I took with me a large assortment of samples of red and white 
wine from Asti, and why I requested you, my dear sir, to supply 
me with a representative set of slides, devoted principally to 
the vineyards at Asti. 

At a public conference in Mercurey (Bourgogne), attended 
by many well-known proprietors and merchants, I used these 
pictures to advantage. I had a professional projector show the 
slides for me and, as they were flashed on the screen, I explained 
their significance. Later I gave all present a chance to taste the 
good wines brought from Asti. 

After the conference, which lasted three hours, many vine 
growers came to my house with samples of their own wines, and 
asked me to permit them to taste them in comparison with the 
California Avine. U(7/( one exception, every one gave his own 
preference to the California Burgundy wine. I was very much 
pleased to be able to prove that I was right, when, six months 
before, I said to these same vine growers that the California 
idne is as good as the Jiurgiinili/ trine of France. 

The pictures, which you loanwl me, helped materially in show- 
ing the progress made in wine making in California, for seeing 
is believing, and the views proved a revelation to the wine men 
\yho had an entirely wrong idea of California wines and vine- 
yards. 

After this conference, I was asked to speak at the Agricul- 
tural State School at Fontaines, and at several other cities, but 
as I was too busy and had no time, I promised to do so on my 
next visit to France. 

I just received a letter from one of the best merchants in 
Beaiine saying: "After tasting the fine California Avine you 
gave me, I pray you to tell me if you liave some larger samples. 
AVill you also give me all the information you can about these 
excellent wines?" 

From this letter, and others which I Avill show you when you 
visit Asti again, you can see hoAV much California Avines are 
appreciated. I regret to say, however, that the excessive French 
duties prevent many purchases. 

With nuniy thanks for your kind assistance, believe me, 

Truly yours, 
(Signed) Charles Jadeau. 

COMPETING AT FOREIGN EXPOSITIONS. 
This year the Italian-SAviss Colony — and I believe other Caii- 
fornia wine men will be included — intend to display their finest 
wines at the Turin Semi-Centennial Exposition Avhich opens in 
April, at the Paris International Exhibition to be held in the 
Palace d'Orleans in .March, and at the International Exposition 
to take place at Antwerp, Belgium, during the months of Sep- 
tember, October and November. The Colony's wines are sure to 
attract attention, for the failures of the European vintage dur- 
ing the past two seasons have creatcnl a great deficit that must 
be made up and, even though the tariff in many continental 
sections is prohibitive, Ave ought to do some business there Avith 
our best Avines. That we Avill come in for some awards of honor 
is a foregone cnclusion, since the Colony is sending only its 
oldest and finest wines for competitive purposes. 

THE TEST AT ST. LOUIS. 

At the great St. Louis World's Exposition in 1903, it will be 
remembered that American wines stood the test Avhen they Avere 
placed in competition Avith the best from every great grape-groAV- 
iug and Avine-producing nation in the Avorld. Out of thirty odd 
entries of Avines, California alone Avas aAvarded three grand 



14 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



])rizps and nineteen <!;old medals. In proportion to our entries, 
Taliforuia received more prizes for it« wine-i, brandies, A'er- 
nioutli and clianipajjne tlian any otlier exhil)itor at lionie or 
abroad. The wine jury was comprised of twenty-one mem- 
bers, of wliich seventeen were foreij>iiers. Tlie latter included 
seven experts from France, four from (jermany, and some from 
Italy, Chili, Japan and Canada. This distin<juished jury, as 
competent and impartial, perhaps, as the world could supply, 
acknowledged the merits of our wines and i-ewarded our wine 
maker.s accordinjfly. The im])ortance of their decision may be 
understood when it is realized that it took ninety-five points 
to win a grand prize, and to secure a gold medal the product 
had to score an average of ninety points. 

FAIR PL.\Y TO FOREIGN EXHIBITORS IN 1915. 

I mention these facts merely to impress upon our winemen 
and grape growers tiuit they must not sit l)ack calmly and expec^t 
the Exposition managenumt to show them every preference. If 
they do, they will be disapjiointed. It would be unfair to the 
foreign exhibitor.s an<l give New Orleans and other disgruntled 
communities an opportunity to say that their predictions had 
come true, that our fair is only a "local" i)roposition and not 
truly international in its scope and treatment. 

The foreign wine men, especially the champagne manufac- 
turers, will be here with costly exhibits, you nuiy be assured. 
They know California is their only real competitor for t\u) 
American trade and they will outdo themselves, for it is their 
only hope if they expect to hold the business they have built u)) 
at such expense through the social favorites who have acted as 
their agents, and who will no doubt play an important part in 
the many bancjuets and notable festive occa.sions that will occur 
during the life of the Exposition. 

HOW WE CAN WIN OUT. 

There is only one way to take the wind out of their sails and 
that is by making a cond)ined exhibit that will be so over- 
whelming and imi>ressive that the hundreds of thousands of 
sight-.seers who flock here will be forced to take notice and 
admit that California is one of the great viticultural sections of 
the world, that we are today able to provide as fine wines as are 
made anywhere. 

We should house our exhibit in a pretentious building, for Ave 
have much to show that is interesting and instructive. Tiers of 
bottles alone will not do, handsome though the labels may be. 
Every grape growing section of the State must be represented. 
We should have an educational display installed under the 
supervision of Professor George Hussman, showing what is 
being done at the experimental stations of the l)e}>artnu'nt of 
Agriculture, and another by Professor F. T. IJioletti, of the 
Cniversity of California. We should insist upon a special day 
being set aside for a "Vintage Festival"' and above all, we 
must give the strangers an opportunitj^ to taste out wines freely, 
or at least at a nominal cost. 

As so<m as the location of the exposition grounds is decided 
upon, there is going to be a scramble for favorable sites and 
there ought surely to be sonni one appointed to see that the wine 
interests are not side-tracked and relegated to a secondary 
I'osition. 

PROMPT ORGANIZATION NECEL;SARY. 

I believe that if an organizaticm was started, whose sole pur- 
l)ose was to arrange for a suitable building at the Fair, there 
would be little ditficulty in enlisting the enthusiastic assist- 
ance of (>very grape grower and wine maker in the State, and 
that in the next four years, it would be an easy matter to secure 
ample funds to put up a <lisj)lay that would not only be a credit 
to the wine industry, but a decided attraction for the great Fair. 

Let the winemen get together promptly and inaugurate such a 
nu>vement. There; is no necessity for elaborate headiiuarters 



or an expensive secretary. A few earnest workers can starl 
the work of interesting the growers tliroughout the State. Of 
course, it will take time, but if a nominal contribution is asked 
in each of the years 1011, 1912, 1913 and 1914, to provide fuud«! 
with which to ct>llect and maintain a proper and arle:|uate ex- 
hibition, showing and portraying every phase of the viticultural 
industry of this State, I am confident the response will be 
gratifying. I, for (me, am willing to do all in my power to in- 
terest my friends throughout the State in such an organization 
and if each of our Avell-known winenu'u will call the matter 
to the attention of the growers with whom he does business, 
I am satisfied we can make a grand siiowing and the industi-y 
will be materially benefited. 

This is a golden ojiportunity that should be improved and one 
that will probably not be repeated during the lifetime of our 
leading winemen. The publicity that we can secure is alone 
worth the effort, for as Frank L. l^rown, one of the leading 
directors of the Exposition, remarked at the Cloverdale Citrus 
l"'air the other day : "During the next five years, California will 
be advertised throughout the world as no other State or section 
ever was advertised before. Every industry in the State must 
join in the movement if it hopes to profit through this ad^er- 
tising." 

This is .sane advice. Let the winemen "get busv." 



Richmond and Winehaven 



RICHMOND, the big young industrial city over on the east 
side of the bay, within who.se limits is Winehaven, the 
largest Avinery in the world, has asked the olt'icials of that com- 
pany to put the name "Richmond" (m all the bottles and pack- 
ages it sends throughout the world. 

While this would probably be impractit-al for the Avine cor- 
poration, as it does not mention the names of any places Avhere 
it has wineries, it gives an example of the enterprise AAhicli, 
Avith the renuirkable natural adA^antages the city possesses, has 
made Richmond one of the wcmders of California municipal de- 
velopment. 

Cheap oil fuel— the Standard's big refinery being located 
then; — cheap electrical power, and transcontinental railroads 
meeting deep water shii)ping, haA'e combined to give Richmond 
more than 10,000 j)opulati()n since it began business ten years 
ago. The Pullman Company has recently erected a large plant 
there because it deemed it a railroad center. 

Some fortunes have been made out of saloons in Richmond, 
and at present there are fifty-four in the city. The Council is 
preparing to pass an ordinance limiting the number to tAventy- 
fiA'e, but it Avill affect n<me of those now in existence. When- 
ever one goes out of business the license will die. Permits AviJi 
not be denied firi^t-dass hotels. 



The Wood Brewing As.sociation of Los Angeles, recently incor- 
porated Avith a capital stock of |!l,000,000, has purchased a 
location on Santa Fe aA-enue in that city, upon which it is in- 
tended to erect immediately a fl5,000 building for the manu- 
facture of various beverages, principally non-intoxicating beer 
and tonic. 



Senator Roynton's bill which recently passefl the Senate 
declares illegal all selling of li(juor within a mih; of the Uni- 
A'ersity of California farm Avhich is in the outskirts of Davis. 
It is understood the (lovernor will sign this bill so all the 
.saloons in the junction town of Davis will be closed on July 1st. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT KKVIEW 



15 



(^ 



j_;_..j 



LOUISVILLE DEPARTMENT 

G. D. GRAIN, JR., Regular Correspondent, 305 Keller Eldg., Louisville, Ky. 






I 



LOUISVILLE, KY., Feb. 20.— While the boom stage of the 
(leniaiul in tliis iiiaiket has passed for the time being, ap- 
parently, the rush quality of the business having been disposed 
of, there remains a heavy volume of substantial trade which 
is being liandled and Mhich is keeping tlie aggregate of ship- 
ments well above the normal. 

General conditions continue good, and the prospect is that 
tiie Louisville distilling and wholesale whisky trade Avill have 
one of the best years tiiat has been recorded for some time. 
The progress of elections and the action of legislatures over the 
country have been generally favorable, and in Alabama and 
Indiana especially it looks as though the trade will be estab- 
lished more firmly than ever before. 

In connection Avith the change of conditions in "dry'' terri- 
tory, wliich the recession of the prohibition wave has paradoxi- 
cally allowed to become wet, an interesting situation exists. 
It is pointeil out that the mail order houses, which sprang into 
existence witii the need and opportunity developed by the pass- 
age of proliiliition laws, have built up an excellent business, 
and the doubt is expressed as to whether the relaxation of the 
s-evere barriers to business which were erected a few years ago 
will have any serious effect as far as putting the mail order men 
out of business. One of the biggest distilleries in Louisville, in 
discussing this question with the local representative of the 
I'ACii'iG \\'iNE AM) Wi'iurr KicviEW, ventured the opinion that 
they will cimtinue to thrive. He said that only a comparatively 
small part of the "dry" section is affected, and chiefly the 
cities, so tliat the rural districts will continue to furnish a fer- 
tile field for the mail order men. 

"They liave really devel(q:e(l a fine system of business," he 
said. "Tiiey have been selling liigh-grade goods as well as the 
cheapi r lines and have shown advertising skill and executive 
ability in handling the business. While from our standpoint it 
would be much better to have this business handled through 
the retailei's, the impossibility of this condition returning gener- 
ally leads me to Ixlieve that the use of the mails in the distribu- 
tion of wliiskv will continue on a large scale." 



An interesting (juestion which has excited considerable dis- 
cussion in local circles was developed by a recent decision of 
Judge Archibald in the Federal Court of Api)eals at Pittsburg, 
in which it was held that warehouse receipts on whisky, is- 
sued by the distiller himself, are not valid as colatteral on loans. 
Inasmuch as loans are made by local bankers on certificates 
of this character, $10,000,000 to |;15,000,000 being involved an- 
nually, steps have been taken by means of conferences between 
bankers, distillers, brokers and others interested to devise some 
])lan of meeting the situation. The most feasible idea which has 
been proposed is tlie organization of a surety company to guar- 
antee the certificates. The surety company would assume the 
responsibility for their being genuine and effective and would 
thus relieve the banks of possible loss. It is proposed that 
those interested shall take stock in the new company. Details 
of the plan have not yet been completed, but it is expected 
that thev will be work«l out in the near future. 



A big victorj' was won by the Kentucky Distilleries & Ware- 
house Company and the whisky trade generally through a 
decision handed down by Judge Walter Lincoln in the Jeffer- 
son Circuit Court recently. State revenue agents have been at- 
tempting to collect taxes on storage charges accruing from 
whisky in warehouses, on the basis of the storage charge of 5 
cents per month per barrel. Judge Lincoln, in an exhaustive 



opinion, has decided thiit such a tax would be in the nature of 
an income tax, and that there is no basis for making the charge. 
The State has brought suits of this kind all over Kentucky, and 
the Court of Appeals will doubtless have to decide the issue 
finally. Close to |100,000 in taxes is inv(dved, as a decision ad- 
verse to the distillers who are defendants in the present pro- 
ceedings would of course result in similar suits being brought 
against all owners of w"arehouses. 



An indication of the big production of whisky which is as- 
sured this seas(m is given in the activity of all the large coop- 
erage plants sujiplying the trade. All of them are running 
full time, and one has put in service two big Packard trucks 
which are to be used in getting packages to the distilleries in 
double-quick time. The coopers, by the way, are aiding the dis- 
tillers in their efforts to secure the passage of the new outage 
bill which will increase the allowance for leakage and evapora- 
tion. The coopers agree Avith the distillers that it is becoming 
more difficult to secure white oak of the close grain formerly 
used, and that the .southern oak now being utilized for the 
manufactur(» of i)ackages is mucli more porous than the Middle 
Western variety which was formerly available. 



It is reported that the collection in the Louisville revenue 
district during the fiscal year 1911, which ends June 30, Avill 
run close to .fl9,000,000, establishing a new mark. The inter- 
nal revenue officials announced that during the calendar year 
1910 there was produced in the Louisville district 18,991,220 
gallons of whisky. In the Frankfort district, in which the 
"Old Taylor" produced by E. H. Taylor & Co., is distilled, col- 
lections in January amounted to i?244,300, as 5,849 l>arrels of 
whisky Avere taken out of bond. This is a big increase over 1910, 
•and the collector for the district believes that the annual re- 
ceipts from Avhisky will soon reach |2,500,000. 



Thomas S. Jones & Co., local brokers, recently shipjjed to 
Eastern points 150 barrels of old Kentucky Avhisky of which 
there is little left in the Bluegrass State. It was from 12 to 
20 years old, and sold at around .fl2 a gallon. Most of it AA'as 
aged in local warehou.ses. The consignment was the result of 
a lot of Avork on the part of Mr. Jones, on account of its scarcity. 
The price paid was considered very reasonable. 



According to a Washington dispatch recently printed, there 
are noAV in bonded Avarehouse.s 330,000,000 gallons of Avhisky, 
compard Avith 240,000,000 gallons last year. The ncAvspaper 
Avhich quoted the figures said that there should be a marked 
drop in price as the result of the large supply. The writer evi- 
dently overlooked the fact that consumption is increasing faster 
than production and that as long as the law of supply and de- 
mand holds good prices are bound to stay up. 



Tim Hayes, a distiller of Falmouth, Ky., recently sold to 
O'Bryan P»ros., a well known local Avholesale house, 35,000 bar- 
rels of Avhisky 
tuckv this season. 



The deal Avas one of the lai'gest made in Ken- 



Leopold Labrot, one of the best known Avhisky men in Ken- 
tucky, died at his home in Frankfort, February 2 as the result 
of heart disease. He has been in declining health for some time. 
He was a native of France and Avas for several years interested 
in the Hermitage Distillery. He Avas later connected Avith the 
distilling firm of Labrot-Graham. 



16 



PACIFIC WINIO AM) SI'llHT KKVIEW. 



The Countervailing Duty on British Spirits 



THE attention of the Keview has been called by importers 
of Scotch and Irish whiskies, Enf^lisli «ijins, etc., to the coun- 
tervailing duty enacted by the United States, and covered by 
a Treasury order January 31, 1911, which is as follows: 

(T. D. 75418) 
Spirits, the product of the United Kingdom of Great Bi-itain 

and Ireland. 
Additional duty under Section 6 of the Tariff Act of 1909, equiv- 
alent to the export bounty paid, to be collected on certain 
'■ spirits, the product of the United Kingdom of Great Brit- 
ain and Ireland. 

Treasury Department, January 21, 1911. 
To the Collectors and Other Officers of the Customs, ainl others 
Concerned — 
It appears from certain laws of the United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and Ireland, copies of which have been transmitted to 
the Department by the Secretary of State;, that export boun- 
ties are paid by that country as follows : 

On "Plain British Spirits," "spirits of the nature of spirits 
of wine," and ''methylated spirits," 3 pence ])er gallon computed 
at hydrometer proof. 

On "British compounded spirits," 5 pence per gallon, com- 
puted at hydrometer proof. 

You are hereby instructed to collected additional duties un- 
der Section 6 of the Tariff Act of August 5, 1909, accordingly, 
whether the spirits be imported directly or indirectly. 

The Department is advised that one gallon of P>ritish proof 
spirit (ascertained always with Sykes' hydrometer) is equal 
to 1.2009 United States gallons of spirit, 114.4 per cent United 
States proof, or 1.374 United States proof gallons. 

This decision will take effect thirty days after date, as pro- 
vided in T. D. 26637 of December 15, 1907. 

(Signed) Franklin :MaoVe.\(;h, 

Secretary. 
A dispatch from Glasgow states that distillers do not antici- 
pate that the new countervailing duty of 9 cents per gallon 
which is to be imposed by the I'nited States Government on all 
imported Scottish and Irish whiskies will have any serious 
effect on the export of spirits from that country to America. 
It is recognized, hoAvever, that the imposition or increase of 
any duty tends as a general rule to restrict the consumpticm of 
the particular article on which the duty is imposed, and doubt- 
less to this extent the Scottish and Irish export ti'ade will suffer. 
The reason given for the imposition of the new duty by the 
United States is that Great Britain has been paying for many 
years an export bounty of 3d per gallon to exporters. This, 
however, is denied by the British government, as sho\\n by the 
following extract from a letter received by the British Embassy 
in Washington from the Foreign Office, January, 1911 : 

"The United States Government appears to be under some 
misapprehension as to the nature of the allowance paid on 
British Plain Spirits exported from the Ignited Kingdom nnd 
as to the grounds upon which the payment is made. The allow- 
ance is referred to as a "bounty" but, as stated by the Finan- 
cial Secretary to the Treasury-, in the House of Commons on 
the 2d of September, 1909, no bounty is paid upon the export 
of British Spirits from this country. An allowance of 3d per 
gallon is granted on British Spirits on exportation as an equiv- 
alent to the British distiller for the cost to him of the require- 
ment and restriction imposed by the revenue laws and regula- 
tions in connection with his plant and methods of manufacture. 
The effect of this allowance is not to put the British producer 
of spirits in a position of advantage as compared with his for- 
I eign competitor, but to save him from being placed in a position 
of disadvantage. 



The allowance was originally sanctioned in 18G0 by 23 and 
24 Vic. c. 129, Sec. 4, "in consideration of the loss and hin- 
drance caused by Excise regulations in the distillation and rec- 
tification of spirits in the United Kingdom," and the Finance 
Act of 1902, mentioned in the Ambassador's letter, merely au- 
thorized an increase in the amount of the allowance from 2d to 
3d per proof gallon. 



Warm Correspondence Over the Whiskey Controversy 



THE following warm correspondence between Prof. H. W. 
Wiley of the department of Agriculture and Messrs. Hiram 
Walker & Sons, distillers of "Canadian Club" whisky, concern- 
ing the whisky controversy, will be found interesting: 

Washington, February 10, 1911. 
Hiram Walker & Sons, Limited, 

Walkerville, Canada. 
Gentlemen : I acknowledge with thanks the receipt of the 
very interesting publication entitled "A PLOT AGAINST THE 
I'EOPLE." I may say frankly that I find it very amusing, and 
with equal frankness that the "Plot against the people," is not 
that headed by Dr. Wiley. I consider that a work of this kind 
will do much to commend me to the people of the United States, 
and for this reason I thank you very kindly for your effort in my 
behalf. Attacks of this kind only strengthen a man who stands 
on the truth as a platform, and whose endeavors are, in so far as 
he knows, in the interests of the American people. 

Respectfully, 

(Signed) H.W.WILEY. 



Walkerville, February 13th, 1911. 
Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, 

Bureau of Chemistry, Washington, D. C. 
Dear Sir : We are truly delighted to learn from yours of the 
10th that you like our pamphlet and expect its circulation to 
commend you to the people of the United States. That being 
the case, you will, of course, be glad to aid us in giving it the 
widest possible distribution; we, therefore, invite you to send 
us extensive lists of names and addresses. The pamphlet is in 
very active demand; but the field is large, and while we are 
about it we wish you to get all the credit to which you are 
entitled; and we do not mind the expense, considerable though 
it is. 

It is true that the numerous letters we have received from 
readers of the book do not altogether bear out your expecta- 
tions; thej^ indicate that the average man has intelligence enougji 
to judge for himself what the facts of the Whisky Controversy 
shoAv. We have never agreed with those who say that the 
public are "mostly fools," but that has seemed to us to be your 
estimate of them for a very long time. 

Awaiting your hearty co-operation as suggested. 
We are, yours truly, 
(Signed) HIRAM WALKER & SONS, LIMITED, 

By William Robins, Director. 



The City Council of Richmond has decided to pass an ordi- 
nance limiting the number of saloons in that city to twenty- 
five. There are now fifty-four, and none of these will be force<l 
to close, but when they do, their licenses will lapse. There are 
so many applications for licenses that the Council has decided 
it is time to call a halt. Licenses will not be denied first class 
hotels. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT KKVIICW. 17 



CHARLES MEINECKE ® CO. 

IMPORTERS 

314 Sacramento Street San Francisco, Cal. 



SOLE AGENTS ON THE PACIFIC COAST FOR 

WILLIAMS & HUMBERT J. J. MEDER & ZOON 

Jerez, Spain ..SHERRIES Schiedam, Holland SWAN GIN 



WARRE & CO. JOHN RAMSAY 

Oporto, Portugal PORTS Islay, Scotland SCOTCH WHISKY 



SCHRODER & SCHYLER & CO. DUBLIN WHISKY DISTILLERY CO. 

Bordeaux, France... CLARETS, ETC. Dublin, Ireland IRISH WHISKY 



EDUARD SAARBACH & CO. GREENBRIER DISTILLERY CO. 

Mayence, Germany HOCK WINES Louisville, Ky "R. B. HAYDEN" WHISKY 



C. MAREY & LIGER-BELAIR J. A. J. NOLET CO. 

Nuits, France BURGUNDIES Baltimore DOUBLE EAGLE GINS 



MACKIE & CO. JOS. S. FINCH & CO. 

Islay, Scotland "WHITE HORSE" SCOTCH WHISKY Pittsburg, Pa. "GOLDEN WEDDING" RYE WHISKY 



BOORD & SON FREUND, BALLOR & CO. 

London, Eng BOORD'S OLD TOM AND DRY GINS Torino, Italy . ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



BOUTELLEAU & CO. A. BOAKE, ROBERTS & CO. 

Cognac, France COGNAC BRANDIES London, Eng BREWERS' MATERIALS 



IS 



I'AfMFIC WINE AND SIMKIT liEVIEW 



The Riots in the Champagne District 



ACCORDINd to William Philip Simms, one of the best- 
known Paris correspondents, the f'hanipajine country is 
seethins lik*^ a j^lass of the bubbly wine which gets its name from 
the district. Only the presence of soldiers has prevented a se- 
rious outbreak. Lots of stories have been cabled to the United 
States as to the cau^e of this trouble. Some have been nearly 
accurate; none has told the entire truth about it. One has to 
visit the scene of the strife, talk with the wine growers them- 
selves, see them in their homes and learn their ways to compre- 
hend the trouble now smouldering in the land from which 
America gets her green bottles and fizzly amber-and-gold. 

The principal brands such as are drunk in America are out- 
side the rumpus altogether. They are real champagne. Hut in 
the hist twenty years, in Champagne, scores of small wine mer- 
chants and shippers have sprung into existence and many of 
these have grown rich. They make a specialty of the cheaper 
champagnes. .Manifestly the fine wine nmde from the grape-* 
grown in the district was too expensive for these shippers to 
buy, so they got substitutes. These came from the Bordeaux 
country, the :Midi and central France principally, where com- 
paratively little care of the soil is necessary and plain wines 
are not so dear. This wine the dealers brought into the (1iam- 
pagne country in tanks like those the Standard Oil hauls over 
the railroads. They could get this wine for 7 to 15 cents a quart, 
and when stored a while, then "champagneized" it could be sold 
at very low prices. 

In the nu'antime the cellars of Champagne wine growers were 
filling up. The growers could not sell what little Avine they 
made. The past two years of rain, when the grape harvest was 
nil, or nearly so, added to the misery of these people. For, con- 
trary to most other French farmers, these vineyard workers and 
proprietors even, do not save their money. In the old days, 
when the year was good, they spent their surplus on a trip to 
Paris or to the seashore, or bought some article or other which 
they didn't need especially, but wanted. 

PEOl'I-K KE(^KLKSS Sl'EXDEUS. 

The spirit of t hampagne is in the people — they are reckless 
spenders when they have anything to spend. Now that two 
years of bad weather has hit them, and Avhat wine they had 
found no market because the wine shippers could get an inferior, 
cheaper wine from another district, they suddenly got together 
and swooped down on some of the men whom they l)elieved to 
be engaged in this soi-t of thing, and so(m trash and tin cans and 
things floated down the gutters on crests of bubbling cham- 
pagne. They had broken up wholesale bottles and barrels. 

Soldiers were poured into the couutry in droves. The whole 
district resembled a state of siege. Every grape vine, almost, 
had a sentinel standing over it and every wine cellar or ware- 
house was heavily guarded. Wisely enough the Avine growers 
decided to cease hostilities. There came a sudden outbreak in 
another spot where the soldiers were not so thick and imme- 
diately troops flocked thither. Then all was calm and serene 
again. 

But the calmness and the serenity is only there in appear- 
ance. The storm is raging in the bosoms of these people yet. 
It will keep on raging until every bottle and barrel and vat and 
cask in the country is broken open and the Avine spilt in the 
stre(;t — or until the government passes a law prohibiting ship- 
pers in the Champagne district from selling wines from other 
sections save when labeled in their true colors: "Beaujolais 
Champagneized,'' "Bordeau in Champagne Form," etc. 

This very thing has been proposed, in bill form, in the Cham- 
ber of Deputies and any day now the lawmakers Avill A'ote upon 
it. If it passes and the law is enforced, all Avell and good. If it 
fails to pass, or if after passage it is not immediately and 



effectively put into operation, well look out. The Cliampagut 
population stand together on this thing as one man ami thej 
will again take the law into their own hands. 1 



Intoxicants and Tobacco 



WE are drinking more alcoholic drinks than ever, more not 
only in gross, but per capita. So the Internal Revenue 
P>ureau says after totaling up its receipts for the year ending 
on the 20th of last June. Here is the report of some of the 
products that paid taxes : 

163,000,000 gallons of distilled spirits, 30,000,000 gallons 
more than the year before. 

59,485,117 barrels of fermented liquors, an increase of 3,000.- 
000 barrels. 

7,600,000,000 cigars, 160,000,000 more than 1909. 

6,830,000,000 cigarettes, an increase of 1,000,000,000. 

402,000,000 pounds of plug, flue-cut, cube-cut, granidated, or 
sliced smoking or chcAving tobacco or snuff, 4,000,000 pounds 
more than the year before. 

141,862,282 pounds of oleomargarine, 50,000,000 pounds in- 
crease. 

It appears that the consumption of spirits increased last year 
by oA'er twenty per cent. Perhaps taxes Avere paid on more 
licpior than Avas drunk, but the payments from year to year are 
a pretty close measure of consumption. That drinking should 
increase in the face of so much prohibition and local-option 
legislation causes some astonishment, but is not, Ave believe, 
contrary to exi)erience. Legislation may have an effect in man 
ners, methods and details of consumption, but it does not change 
habits. Prohibition, if Maine is any criterion, does not help at 
all in promoting temperance. Local option may do good, but is 
more likely to benefit the rising generation than the one Avhose 
habits are formed. 

It is possible that in spite of the Internal Revenue figures the 
manner of drinking may be improved and the drinks better dis- 
tributed. 

It bears on this subject that of the nine millions of ih)])u1i- 
tion in New York State seven millions live in cities. Local op- 
tion in this State is cpnflned to country townships. The in- 
crease of city population all over the country has doubtless a 
relation to this increase in the consumption both of alcohol and 
tobacco. The nervous tension of city life is greater than of 
country life, calling more for stimulants, and affording more 
convenient opportunities to get them. Di-inking and smoking, 
too, are both social practices, and there is more society in the 
cities than in the country. 

The consumption of spirits has increased more in proportion 
than the consumption of beer, and the consumpticm of cigar- 
ettes more than of cigars. The report is not complimentary to 
legislation. — Harper's Wceklij, December 3, 1910. 



THE Los Angeles Graphie comes to the front with the 
following very sensible remarks upon the Wylie local 
option bill : "Local option, as the bill is now framed and passed 
by the Assembly, is neither fair, right nor democratic in spirit. 
Local option sounds good and true, but Avhen this bill is ex- 
amined it is found to be not local, but county option. Assem- 
blyman Slater's proposition to substitute "toAvnship" for 
"county" in the bill, making the township the unit of opticm, is 
correct. California counties are entirely too large to be made 
the unit of option. A croAvd of teetotalers in one end of San 
Bernardino county, for instance, could A-ote dry a stretch of ter- 
ritory larger than certain Euro])ean nations. This Avould be 
coercion of the majiu-ity by the minority. We are not arguing in 
favor of the Fniuor traffic, but merely protesting against unjus- 
tifiable intolerance." 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



19 



BOTTLED 
IN BOND 



IN THE PUBLIC MARKETS OF AMERICA. 

THIS MERITED POSITION STAMPS ITS ESTEEM 
IN THE FAVOR AND CONFIDENCE OF THE DIS- 
CRIMINATING PUBLIC. 

THEGOVERNMENTiS GUARANTEE STAMPOVERTHE 
CORKOFBOTTLEDINBONDWHISKEY IS GREEN 
AND SO ISTHE MAN WHO DOES NOT LOOK FOR IT. 

E. H.TAYLOR JR.& SONS p.TnI^,^^-/,,. 



JULIUS LEVIN CO. 

San Francisco, California 



20 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



onr/ 




FROM JANUARY 20, 1911, TO FEBRUARY 20, 1911. 



Destination 
o Alaska 

■ Hritish Columbia 

" Central America 

• China 

• Hawaiian Islands 

" Japan 

■ Mexico 

' Marquesas Islands . . . . 

■ Philippine Islands . . . . 

" South America 

" Society Islands 

" Samarang 

" London 

" France 

" Holland 

Germany 

" New York 

" Other Eastern States 
" New Orleans 



Cases. 

1 

55 

110 

10 

55 



101 



1 

241 

5 



Gallons. 

184 

4,478 

18,751 

200 

58,201 

5,520 

6,547 

l,05r 

4,602 

3,650 

3,995 

204 

2,000 

2,500 

2,750 

73,280 

,442,514 

36,653 

3,250 



Value. 

i 123 

2,032 

8,372 

190 

26,144 

1,590 

2,703 

306 

642 

1,825 

1,088 

204 

800 

1,000 

1,200 

21,546 

397,760 

14,482 

1,300 



Total 



619 1,670,036 $483,307 



BRA.\DY. 



Destination 

To Alaska 

" Hawaiian Islands 

• New York 



Total 



Destination. 
To Central America 

" China 

' Hawaiian Islands 
" Society Islands . . 
" South America . . . 



Cases. 
1 
3 
1 



Gallons. 
65 
274 
1,725 

2,064 



Value. 

I 170 

353 

2,710 

$3,233 



BBBR. 



Packages Packages 



Total 



Destination 

To Alaska 

" Central America . 
" Hawaiian Islands 

" Japan 

" Mexico 

" Philippine Islands 



WHISKY. 



Bottlel. 


Bulk. 


Value. 


6 




$ 68 


100 




840 


57 


5 


632 


4 




32 


30 




90 


197 


5 


$1,662 


Cases. 


Gallons. 


Value. 


7 


52 


$ 259 


260 


120 


1,526 


363 


708 


4,38J 


4 




21 


123 


448 


1,257 




904 


619 



Total 

2 bbls to Mexico in bond. 



757 



2,232 



$8,065 



MISCELLAIMBOUS >VINES AND LIQUORS. 

Destination. Packages and Contents. 

To Alaska 2 cs Alcohol, 1 cs Vermouth 

" British Columbia 1 cs Vermouth, 1 cs Syrup 

" Central America. ... 20 cs Mineral Water, 2 bbls Alcohol, 1 kg Vermouth, 

50 cs Grape Juice 

" China 13 cs Grape Juice, 5 cs Cherries in Maraschino 

" Hawaiian Islands 2 cs Grape Juice, 2 cs Cider, 42 cs 2 bbls Liquors 

4 cs 1 kg Cordial, 2 cs Ginger Ale, 6 cs Bitters 

6 cs Alcohol, 10 cs Cocktiils, 1 bbl Stout, 63 cs Vermouth 

245 cs Mineral Water, 8 cs 27 bbls Gin, 132 cs Champagne 

' Japan 8 cs Champagne, 1 cs Ginger Ale, 1 cs Cider 

2 cs Grape Juice, 1 hf bbl Blackberry Cordial 

' Mexico 10 cs Mineral W^ater 

■' Philippine Islands 15 cs Cider, 1 bbl Cordial, 20 cs Gin, 40 cs Liquors 

25 cs Cocktails, 49 cs 1 bbl Grape Juice, 1 cs Alcohol 

3 bbls Ginger AJe 

" South America 1 cs Grape Juice, 4 cs Bitters 

" Society Islands 1 cs Alcohol, 1 cs Cider 

•' Sydney, N. S. W 3 bbls 2 crates Spirits 

Total 794 cases 40 bbls 1 hf bbl 2 kegs 2 crates 

Value $8246 




Domestic. 



FROM JANUARY 20, 1911, TO FEBRUARY 20, 1911. 



FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Watson, January 20. 

59 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

1.") bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

30 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

40 <ir bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

160 hhds Beer Tohn Rapp & Son. 

200 bbls Beer lohn Rapp & Son. 

100 hf bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

100 qr bbls Beer John Rapp & Son. 

2 cs Champagne Schmidt & Peters. 

FROM SEATTLE— Per steamer Buckman, January 25. 

1 bbl Whisky Order. 

60 hhds Beer 'I'acoma Bottling Co. 

15 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

20 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

40 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Go. 

3G0 hhds Beer John Rapp & Son. 

PROM PORT TOWNSEND — Per steamer Umatilla, January 26. 

65 cs Whisky Moore, Hunt & Co. 

94 bbls Beer John Garber. 

10 cs Grape Juice Johnson-Locke Co. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Admiral Sampson, January 28. 

120 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

30 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

60 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

80 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

35 pkgs Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

1 cs Beer Heidleburg Club. 

FROM SAN DIEGO — Per steamer President, January 29. 
10 cs Bottled Beer Order. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Buckman, February 8. 

120 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

35 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

70 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

40 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

150 hhds Beer John Rapp & Son. 

10 bbls Beer Tohn Rapp cS; Son. 

122 hf bbls Beer Tohn. Rapp & Son. 

92 qr bbls Beer Tohn Rapp cS; Son. 

FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Admiral Sampson, February 11. 

76 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

35 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

70 hf bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

60 qr bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

180 pkgs Beer ■. Tacoma Bottling Co. 

301 hhds Beer Tohn Rapp & Son. 

4 bbls Beer lohn 

107 hf bbls Beer Tohn 

48 qr bbls Beer John 

75 pkgs Beer Tohn 

30 hhds Beer Order. 

40 hf bbls Beer Order. 



n 



Rapp & Son. 
Rapp & Son. 
Rapp & Son. 
Rapp & Son. 



FROM SEATTLE — Per steamer Watson, February 18. 

60 hhds Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

15 bbls Beer Tacoma Bottling Co. 

30 hf bbls Beer Tacrma Bottling Co. 

40 qr bbls Beer Tac-ma Bottling Co. 

130 hhds Beer John Rapp & Son. 

IN TRANSIT. 

To San Jose 112 hhds 30 bbls 183 hf bbls 100 qr bbls 10 third bbls, 5 casks 

" Alameda 190 hhds 45 bbls 110 hf bbls 210 qr bbls 

" Bakersfield 65 hhds 59 bbls 40 hf bbls 25 qr bbls 

" San Bernardino 70 bbls 40 hf bbls 



E. A. QROEZINQER 



Established 1864 



E. 0. SCHRAUBSTADTER 



SPARKLING AND VINTAGE WINES 

CHAMPAGNES 



809 MONTGOMERY STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



11 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



21 



IMI'OKTS< BY SBA. 



ForelKn. 

FROM JANt ARY :!<), lail, TO FEBRUARY 20, 1911. 



FROM ANTWKRP— Per Amiral Fourlchon, January 21. 

iW cs Beer Flnlay & Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Whisky Crown Dist. Co., San Francisco. 

10 cs Bitters Crown IJist. Co., San Francisco. 

.•iO cs Gin Wictiman, Lutgen & Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Bitters Wichman, Lutgen & Co., San Francisco. 

ino cs Amer Picon Delsol Bros., San Francisco. 

!)0 cs Mineral Water Uelsol Bros., San Francisco. 

16 cs Wine Delsol Bros., San Francisco. 

2,53 cs Wlilsky St. Francis Imp. Co., San Francisco. 

i;50 cs Vermouth Delsol Bros., San Francisco. 

.■; csks Brandy Pascal, Dubedat & Co., San Francisco. 

325 cs Wine Pascal. Dubedat & Co., San Francisco. 

140 cs Brandy Pascal, Dubedat & Co., San Francisco. 

75 cs Amer Picon Pascal, Dubedat & Co., San Francisco. 

240 cs Liquors Pascal, Dubedat & Co., San I-'rancisco. 

1200 cs Vermouth Pascal, Dubedat & Co., San Francisco. 

21 cs Wine G. W. McNear, San Francisco. 

5 csks Vermouth Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

2S15 cs Mineral Water Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

250 cs Vermouth A. Cora, San Francisco. 

SOO cs Vermouth Levaggi, Granuul & Co., San Francisco. 

TOO cs Vermouth A. Guirlani & Bro., San Francisco. 

25 cs Brandy F. Raschen, Sacramento. 

150 cs Vermouth H. .levne, Los Angeles. 

FROM NKW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Alaskan, January 21. 

7 cs Wine Chapman & Wilberforce, San Francisco. 

10 bbls Gin Baird, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

3 csks Whisky Baird, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

5 bis Gin T. W. Collins & Co., San Francisco. 

5 csks Gin T. W. Collins & Co., San Francisco. 

49 cs Bitters H. Campe & Co., San Francisco. 

35 cs Wine F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

25 cs Brandy F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

160 cs Gin Muller & Co.. San Francisco. 

8 bbls Gin Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

7 csks Gin Sherwood & Sherwood. San Francisco. 

1 csk Cherry Juice Crown Dist. Co., San Francisco. 

2 bbls Gin Scheld & Co., Sacramento. 

3 Gets Wine Atlas Liquor Co., Seattle. 

25 cs Gin Hotel Washington, Seattle. 

5 cs Whisky Davenport's, Spokane. 

fi36 cs Whisky Rothschild Bros.. Portland. 

10 bbls Whisky Hilo Liquor Co., Honolulu. 

FROM EUROPE— SAME VESSEL. 

225 cs Champagne F. Draz & Co., San Francisco. 

^30 cs Champagne Macondray & Co., San Francisco. 

55 cs Wine Hellman Bros., San Francisco. 

50 OS .Stout American Mercantile Co., San Francisco. 

26 cs Whisky Chapman & Wilberforce, San Francisco. 

20 cs Whisky G. W. McNear, .San Francisco. 

30 cs Gin Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

4 csks Gin Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Whisky GoHberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

3 csks Wine .Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

40 cs Wine Clark & Co.. Portland. 

70 cs Wine Williams & Rowland, Tacoma. 

70 cs Wine Cont. Dist. Co.. Seattle. 

2 csks Wine Cont. Dist. Co., Seattle. 

750 cs Champagne F. Draz & Co., Seattle. 

19 cs Wine '. C. H. Frye, Seattle. 

15 cs Beer HoiTschlager & Co., Honolulu. 

50 cs Vermouth Hilf Mer. Co., Los Angeles. 

100 cs Champagne Ixis Angeles Warehouse, Los Angeles. 

10 csks Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, Los Angeles. 

50 cs Whisky J. Melczer & Co., Los Angeles. 

FROM ANTWERP — Per St. Ronald, January 25. 
410 OS Whisky J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Benedictine J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

070 cs Gin J. Levin & Co., San Frartcisco. 

100 cs Absinthe J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

10 cs Bitters J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

TiOO OS Vermouth J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

363 cs Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

100 cs Whl-sky ....Rathjen Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

150 cs Gin Rathjen Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

35 OS Whisky A. Cora, San Francisco. 

50 OS Benedictine A. Cora, San Francisco. 

200 OS Gin A. Cora, San Francisco. 

25 OS Liquors A. Cora, San Francisco. 

35 cs Whisky Borgfeldt, Propfe & Co., San Francisco. 

200 cs Gin Borgfeldt. Propfe & Co., San Francisco. 

100 cs W^hisky TjUmann & Bendel. San Francisco. 

5 cs Gin Tillmann & Bendel, San Francisco. 

105 cs Mineral Water Tillmann & Bendel, San Francisco. 

150 bbls Soda Water Wm. Wolff & Co., San Francisco. 

10 nets Whisky Hellman Bros., San Francisco. 

35 OS Whisky C. Meinecke & Co.. San Francisco. 

1 osk Whisky Swavne & Hovt, San Francisco. 

2 oots Whisky E. Martin & Co., San Francisco. 

31 cs Whisky P. M. Paulsen, San Francisco. 

21 OS Whisky Rosenberg Co., San Francisco. 

65 cs Gin James de Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

104 cs Mineral Water James de Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Brandy James de Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

500 OS Amer Picon James de Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

100 OS Gin Hotaling & Co.. San Francisco. 

97 cs Gin L. D. McLean, San Francisco. 

2 cs Rum L. D. McLean, San Francisco. 

1 cs Bitters L. D. McLean, San Francisco. 

19S OS Gin Fontana & Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Bitters Fontana & Co.. San Francisco. 

">o OS Gin Goldberg. Bowen & Co., San Francisco. 

">'> OS Gin a. Lew & Co.. San Francisco. 

S"" cs Gin Rothenberg & Co., San Francisco. 

"S OS oin Levaggi & C".. San Francisco. 

Ofl OS Gin Augenbllok & Co., San Francisco. 

< OS Bitters Augenbllok & Co., San Francisco. 

150 OS Stout Amer. Mer Co;, San Francisco. 

1^nn eg Vermouth Amer. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

500 OS Vermouth A. Vignier, San Francisco. 

61 OS Wine A. Vignier, San Francisco. 

" osks Vermouth Crown Dist. Co., San Francisco. 

^ pkgs Wine .......... Shiaffino, Musante & Co.. San Francisco. 

31 cs Whisky Ebner Bros., Sacramento. 

1 not Whisky Ebner Bros., Sacramento. 

31 OS Whisky . C. H. Kamm, San Luis Obispo. 

1 o=k T\'-liisky C. H. Kamm. San Luis Obispo. 

•> n^ts Whisky Standard Liouor Co., Oakland. 

■1 OS Whisky T. E. Ksrey Co.. Hanford. 

S' o'! Whisky Ladd & Co . Stockton. 

100 OS Gin Brassy & Co.. San Jose. 



50 cs Whisky Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

100 cs Gin Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

5 cs Bitters .'. . .Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

100 cs Whisky Blumauer & Hoch, Portland. 

126 cs Gin :;ontlnental Dist. Co., Seattle. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Ancon) — Per Olson & Mahony, January 26. 

16 bbls Gin Hotaling & Co., San Francisco. 

7 csks Gin Hotaling & Co., San Francisco. 

FROM VICTORIA — Per Umatilla, January 26. 

220 cs Whisky American Mer. Co., San Francisco 

250 cs Kummel F. B. Pierce & Co., San Francisco. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Pleiades, January 28. 

2 bbls Gin McDonald & Cohn, San Francisco. 

770 cs Whisky J. Levin & Co., San Francisco. 

1 csk Liquors Plumel & Co., San Francisco. 

2 cs Liquors Plumel & Co., San Francisco. 

12 cs Whisky F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

2 cs Wine F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

3 cs W'Ine de Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

27 csks Liquors A. D. Shaw & Co.. San Francisco. 

50 cs Brandy Rathjen Bros.. San Francisco. 

310 pkgs Whisky Sherwood & Sherwood, San Francisco. 

60 cs Liquors Zasakatas & Co., San Francisco. 

7 cs Liquors Marre & Co.. Oakland. 

FROM EUROPE — SAME VESSEL. 

50 cs Spirits Naber, Alfs & Brune, San Francisco. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz)— Per Arlzonan, February 1. 
500 cs Gin Wilson Distilling Co., San Francisco. 

10 cs Whisky Wilson Distilling Co., San Francisco. 

15 bbls VThisky Muller & Co., San Francisco. 

17 OS Wine F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

1 csk Whisky F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

3 cs Whisky Muller & Co., San Francisco. 

36 cs Whisky King & Co., San Francisco. 

1 bbl Cordials Rothenberg & Co., San Francisco 

11 bbls Brandy Swiss-American Wine Co., S. F. 

5 bbls Whisky Wholesale Liquor Co., Stockton. 

8 bbls Whisky A. W. Kenlson, Auburn. 

50 cs Whisky Hackfeld & Co., Honolulu. 

120 bbls Beer Hackfeld & Co., Honolulu. 

FROM EUROPE — SAME VESSEI.. 

, „1 csk Wine Crown Dist. Co., San Francisco. 

180 cs Mineral Water Goldberg, Bowen & Co., San Francisco 

J2il ''^ Mineral Water James de Fremery & Co., San Francisco! 

,2 £t *^'" James de Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

cil ""^^ ^^^^ James de Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

800 cs Beer Finley & Co., San Francisco. 

52 cs Wine De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

41 cs Wine Guggenhime & Co., San Francisco. 

110 bbls Beer Lang & Stroh, San Francisco. 

2 OS Spirits Lang & Stroh, San Francisco. 

30 bbls Ginger Ale Lang & Stroh, San Francisco. 

26 cs Brandy Marre & Bro., Oakland. 

21 cs Brandy Robertson & Son., Portland 

80 cs Beer Robertson & Son., Portland 

60 cs Whisky Robertson & Son., Portland' 

10 octs Whisky Robertson & Son., Portland 

25 cs Vermouth Order, Portland. 

25 cs Brandy Bush & Co., Portland, 

45 cs Gin Robertson & Son, Seattle. 

2fi cs Brandy Robertson & Son, Seattle. 

45 cs Beer Robertson & Son, Seattle. 

4 octs Wine M. & K. Gottstein, Seattle. 

50 cs Punch Continental Dist. Co., Seattle. 

15 cs Wine Order, Seattle. 

10 cs Rum Bush & Co., Seattle. 

25 cs Gin • Butler Hotel, Seattle. 

150 cs Mineral Water Apolllnaris Co., Seattle. 

FROM ANTWERP — Per Itaurl, February 1. 
167 cs Liquors De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

58 cs Wine De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

1700 cs Gin .De Fremery & Co., San Francisco. 

100 cs Bitters De Fremerv & Co., San Francisco. 

6 cs Wine Marcus & Co.. San Francisco. 

125 cs Gin M. & K. Gottstein, Seattle. 

FROM LIVERPOOL (via Seattle)— Per Watson, February 3. 

50 cs Brandy Laventhal Bros., San Francisco 

10 octs Wine Crown Distilleries. San Francisco 

5 cs Whisky St. Francis Imp. Co., San Francisco. 

1 csk Whisky St. Francis Imp. Co., San Francisco. 

500 cs Gin A. D. Shaw & Co.. San Francisco. 

750 cs Whisky A. D. Shaw & Co.. San Francisco. 

50 cs Whisky L. D. McLean, San Francisco. 

1 hhd Whisky Pacific-Union Club. San Francisco 

200 cs CHiampagne Schmidt & Peters. San Francisco 

200 cs Whisky Tillmann & Bendel, San Francisco. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN— Per Siberia, February 3. 

20 csks Sake S. Tanlmoto, San Francisco 

100 csks Sake N. A. Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

50 cs Sake r N. A. Mer. Co.. San Francisco. 

60 csks Sake Mural & Co., San Francisco. 

24 cs Sake Mural & Co., San Francisco. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Ancon)- Per G. W. Fenwick, February 6. 

130 cs Beer T. W. Collins & Co., San Francisco. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN— Per Hercules, February 6. 

20 csks Sake K. TogasakI, San Francisco. 

50 csks Sake Yamato & Co., San Francisco. 

20 csks Sake s. Ban. Portland. 

FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz)— Per Isthmian, February 7. 

3 bbls Gin Wllmerding. Lowe & Co., San Francisco 

2 OS Gin Bonestell & Co., San Francisco. 

10 bbls Gin St. Francis Imp. Co., San Franoi-sco. 

11 cs Wine F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

36 cs Brandy F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

5 cs Whisky F. de Bary & Co., San Francisco. 

25 cs Brandy Rathjen Mer. Co., San Francisco. 

30 cs Whisky Mel. Mllani & Co.. San Francisco. 

5 bbls Whisky Mei. Milanl & Co.. San Francisco. 

100 cs Bitters Muller & Co., San Francisco. 

670 cs W^liisky W H. Campbell. San Francisco. 

20 cs Brandy Order, San Francisco. 

3 bbls Gin Marre & Co., Oakland. 

11 kgs Gin Marre & Co., Oakland. 

60 bbls Whisky Order, Portland. 

553 bbls Whlskv Rothschild Bros., Portland. 

25 bbls Whisky Oregon Transfer Co., Portland. 

4 bbls Whisky Remington Co., Portland. 

FROM EUROPE— SAME VESSEL. 
130 osks Mineral Water Goldberg, Bowen & Co.. San Francisco. 

40 csks Mineral Water Sherwood & Sherwood. San Francisco. 

35 cs Wine St. Francis Imp. Co.. San Francisco. 

90 cs Wine A. Cora, San Francisco. 

237 cs Wine Macondray & Co., San Francisco. 



22 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



FROM NEW YORK (via Salina Cruz) — Per Virginian, February 11. 

10 bbls Gin Baird, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

10 csks Gin Baird, Daniels & Co., San Francisco. 

10 cs Gin Sutter Home Wine Co., San Francisco. 

33 bbls Whisky Muller & Co., San Francisco. 

5 bbls Wine A. D. Shaw & Co., San Francisco. 

300 cs Absinthe Guirlani & Bro., San Francisco. 

200 cs Vermouth Guirlani & Bro., San Francisco. 

140 cs Wine Guirlani & Bro., San Francisco. 

1 bbl Whisky Remington Co., Portland. 

FROM EUROPE— SAME VESSEL. 

15 cs Wine H. C. Breeden, San Francisco. 

30 cs Champagne H. C. Breeden, San Francisco. 

1 bbl Wine A. Borel & Co., San Francisco. 

150 cs Mineral Water .^pollinaris Co., Seattle. 

29 cs 'Wine S. Hyde, Seattle. 

69 cs Win* Durkin Liquor Co., Seattle. 

55 cs IJquors Durkin Liquor Co., Spokane. 

25 cs Gin Robertson & Son, Portland. 

5 cs Champagne Order, Vancouver. 

100 OS Whisky Hackfeld & Co., Honolulu. 

100 cs Gin Gonsalves & Co., Honolulu. 

FROM KOBE, JAPAN — Per Manchuria, p-ebruary 17. 

300 csks Sake Okada & Ichida, San Francisco. 

103 cs Sake N. A. Mer. Co.. San Francisco. 

55 OS Sake Yamato & Co., San Francisco. 

20 csks Sake Masuda & Co.. Oakland. 

.^5 cs Sake G. Hamura, Los Angeles. 

20 csks Sake S. Ban, Denver. 



Our Work Is Bearing Fruit 



IMPORTS BY R.4^IL, IN BOND. 

FROM JANUARY 20, 1911, TO FEBRUARY 20, 1911. 

Via New York — 

300 OS Champagne .From Antwerp. 

655 cs Whisky " Glasgow. 

1 csk Wine " Genoa. 

3 cs Beer " London. 

Via NeTT Orleans — 

20 cs Wine From London. 

Quite recently the Woodland Trustees agreed to place the 
saloon question upon the ballot at the April election. The 
matter was presented to the Board bj' G. P. Hurst, who based 
his request on the fact that the present board was elected on a 
plaforni which pledged that the question was to remain undis- 
turbed four jears. That time will have expired by the time 
the April election comes round. He also said that it was simply 
giving the people an opportunity to decide a very important 
question for themselves. 



OUR members will read this telegram from Indianapolis 
to the Courier Journal with interest : 

INDIANA DEMOCRATIC EDITORS INDORSE MARSHALL. 

"INDIANAPOLIS, Feb. 3 (Special).— Governor 
]\Iarshall explained to the Indiana Democratic Edi- 
torial Association his signature to the change of the 
county local option bill tonight by saying he believed 
it to be a good piece of legislation and wf)rthy of be- 
coming a law. In return for his signaturi; he e.\;pects 
the Legislature to pass a model license law for the 
regulation of saloons. 
The Fleming Model License bill, before the Indiana Senate, 
providing for one saloon in the future for each 500 of popula- 
tion, has been withdrawn in favor of the Proctor Model License 
bill, which calls for one saloon for eacJi 1000, and the Proctor 
bill has had its third reading and will pass. 

Model license must prevail because it satisti(!S the i)ress and 
the public and deals fairly with the reailer. 

THE NATIONAL MODEL LICENSE LEAGUE, 
February 4, 1911. Louisville, Ky. 

Judge R. B. Tappan, of Alameda, is down on "blind pigs" 
and does not consider the present fine of .|200 under the city or- 
dinance sufficiently severe. He has, therefore, requested the 
City Council to amend it, and make the maximum fine to pun- 
ish illegal sellers of liquor |500. 



The Sebastopol Board of Trustees have passed an ordinance 
prohibiting the furnishing of intoxicating liquors and wines 
to habitual drunkards and minors. The town marshal will 
serve notices forbidding the sale of intoxicants to the parties 
named therein, to hold good for six months. Any violation of 
this ordinance is to be punished with suspension of license. 



SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD 

We do not Rectify or Compound 

PACIFIC COAST AGENTS 

— FOR— 



J. H. Cutter Celebrated Kentucky Whiskies. 

Burke's (Guinness's) Porter and Bass's Red Label Ale. 

Dewar's Fine Old Scotch Whisky. 

Keystone Monogram (Philadelphia) Rye. 

Burke's Irish and Gam-Kirk Scotch. 

Evan's Pale Ale and Stout. 

G. & W. Canadian Rye Whisky. 

Schramsberg California Wines. 



Schlitz Milwaukee Beer. 

Sherwood Robin Hood Whisky. 

Mackenzie & Go's Spanish Sherries and Oporto Ports. 

Feist Bros. & Sons' Rhine and Moselle Wines. 

Holland Gin in wood and glass. 

Anchor Brand New York Ciders. 

Schweppe's Soda and Sarsaparilla. 

Bass's Ale in wood. 



SEATTLE 
801 So. 1st Ave. 

Phones : 

Main 105 
Independent 105 



PORTLAND 
9 and UN. 4th St. 

Phone : 

Main 2779 



SAN FRANCISCO 
41-47 Beale St. 

Phone : 

Kearny 1 1 82 



LOS ANGELES 

346 North Main St. 

Phones : 

Main 670 
Home A7804 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 23 



BRANDY PRODUCED 



OFFICIAL REPORT 

FIRST DISTRICT— Month of January, 1911. Tax Gals. 

Produced and bonded in this district, this does not include figures of production in 6th (new) district 82,117-1 

Received from other Districts, California 21,053.9 

.Received from special bonded warehouse, other District, California 11,236.2 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. Eastern District 7,366-2 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. Eastern Districts 62,602.1 

Exported 133.6 

Tax paid 52,592-1 

Used in Fortification of Wines - 

Remaining in bond, Jauuary 31, 1911 „ 1,931,195-6 

FOURTH DISTRICT— Month of January, 1911- Tax Gals. 

Produced and bonded in this district - _ 3,179-1 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. First District, California - - 2,086-0 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse, Eastern District _ — _ „ 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. First District, California 10,821-1 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. Eastern Districts 17,590-5 

Exported 

Tax paid - - 12,464-8 

Used in Fortification of Wines - 735-8 

Remaining in bond, January 31, 1911 647,058-3 

SIXTH DISTRICT— Month of January, 1911. , Tax Gals. 

Produced and bonded in this district - - - 16,330.8 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. First District - 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse, First District - 4,897.8 

Transferred from distillery to special bonded warehouse. Eastern District - - 

Transferred from special bonded warehouse to special bonded warehouse. Eastern District --— 9,251.6 

Tax paid - - - 7,909.2 

Used in Fortification of Wines 

Remaining in bond, January 31, 1911 --'- - - - 271,030.6 

SWEET WINES PRODUCED 

FIRST DISTRICT— Month of January, 1911. Pkgs. Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification - - - - 119 10,525-5 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification - — — 

Brandy actually used for fortification - - - - - 170 15,304-9 

Wine Gals. 

Port produced ,. - - ' 1,152.37 

Sherry produced - 54,870.48 

Angelica produced- - - - 

Muscat produced - 

Tokay .— -.■•■ 

Malaga - --- 

Madeira - 

Total sweet wine produced in December, 1910: — - 56,022-85 

FOURTH DISTRICT— Month of January, 1911. Pkgs. Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification - - 9 785-8 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification - — 

Brandy actually used for fortification — — - • 9 735-8 

Wine Gals- 
Port produced _ :. — — 

Sherry produced - ~ ■-- • - 3,271.84 

Angelica produced - - - 

Muscat produced - - - - : : 

Tokay - 

Malaga ■ •• - - 

Madeira - ' 

Total sweet wine produced in January, 1911 --• 3,271-84 

SIXTH DISTRICT— Month of December, 1910. Pkgs. Tax Gals. 

Brandy withdrawn from distillery for fortification - 2,709.3 

Brandy withdrawn from special bonded warehouse for fortification 

Brandy actually used for fortification 2,709.3 

Wine Gals. 

Malaga ; 

Port produced ' 

Sherry produced ■■•• • • •• ^^ 

Angelica produced ..: — - ■ — ■ ■ 

Muscat produced ■ - • • ;■ 

Total sweet wine produced in January, 1911 -: — 



24 



PAf'IFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



California Wine Association Report for the Year Ending December 31, 1911 



San Francisco, Cal., February 23, 1911. 
To the Stockholders — 

Your directors beg to submit herewith for your consideration 
their annual report of the affairs and finances of your Associa- 
tion. 

As anticipated in the last annual report the California wine 
business has shown a steady improvement during the past year. 

It was not, however, until the 1910 vintage was concluded 
that the betterment in the dry wine situation was realized even 
by your management, which from its wide range of observation 
has great opportunities for judging conditions. The change 
came suddenly after the discovery that a considerable gallonage 
of wine of earlier vintages in producers' hands, hitherto figured 
as a surplus, had not developed the necessary keeping qualities 
and was therefore unsuitable for the market. The available 
vintage of new wines has also proved less than estimated. Fur- 
thermore, due to disastrous weather in Europe which almost 
destroyed the wine crop, a demand, as unexpected as it was 
sudden, has sprung up for California wines for export. . 

Thus a vintage season entered upon with gloomy prospects 
ended with a buoyant demand for dry wines, which by rapidly 
depleting country holdings has restored a confidence which was 
for some years lacking. 

The raise in import duty, which has recently become effective, 
under the new tariff, and the shortage in the European crop 
should tend to lessen importations of foreign wines which of 
late years have threatened to assume alarming proportions. 

This should bring an expanding domestic market for Califor- 
nia wines, in the benefits of which your Association will par- 
ticipate. Your wine stocks having invariably been carried on 
the books at a conservative value, any improvement in the 
general wine market is immediately reflected in increased 
profits. 

The struggle for a market which for some years character- 
ized conditions in sweet wines and brandy is less acute. The 
new factors which solicited the trade have, by experience, real- 
ized there must be a bottom below which competition cannot go 
without producing disaster. Consequently there has been an 
alignment of interests among the large handlers outside of your 
Association, which has had the effect of steadying and improv- 
ing the market without restricting or lessening distribution. 
It is hoped this organization may continue in strength and sol- 
idarity so that an occasional small surplus may not cause the 
demoralization which a panicky condition among a great num- 
ber of individual holders cannot fail to engender. 

Your management made little effort for a large crushing of 
grapes during the last vintage, believing it wiser to carry 
smaller stocks and thus be enabled, in an improving demand, to 
sustain the market by buying, rather than risk being in the 
position, as it was after 1907, of being compelled to sacrifice 
its own surplus in a market rendered highly competitive by the 
necessities of growers, carrying heavy wine stocks, for which 
the large handlers could give them no relief. 

PROHIBITION. 

The shadow of prohibition which was over the industry pre- 
vious to the elections of last November is clearing away. Com- 
munities which for decades have made prohibition a fetish, 
and newer ones which more recently experimented with it, have 
discovered that prohibition neither prohibits nor regulates the 
human appetite. The undoubted and wide-spread expression 
of popular will that regulation rather than prohibition is the 
proper way to handle this great questjon eliminates a danger to 
the wine industry through the closing of avenues of distribution 
which has occasioned much anxiety; though California, in one 
of those periodical paroxysms of reform which it is hoped may 



not swing the pendulum so far as to render this State unat- 
tractive to new capital, has among other burning questions in the 
State Legislature taken up prohibition in one of its many guises. 
From the same source it is fashionable to denounce, in a 
manner which cannot fail to cause apprehension for future 
results, the Payne-Aldrich tariff, and to vilify all the friends 
in Washington, leaders in Congress, who have so magnificently 
and consistently, even at the expense of consumers in their own 
localities, supported California in its cry for protection on the 
many products of its soil, such as citrus and dried fruits, nuts, 
lumber, hops and wines, both under the tariff and the sweet 
wine law, not to speak of the more recent contest over the 
World's Fair when the men so savagely, and as those who know 
them personally sorrowfully realize, unjustly assailed, were 
too noble to take an opportunity of petty spite. 

FINANCES. 

Conditions being more favorable your directors took steps, 
as foreshadowed in previous annual reports, to place the 
finances of your Association on a stable and permanent basis. 
Having paid an assessment the previous year to meet pressing 
requirements, you were asked last June to approve a plan 
whereby preferred stock could be offered to stockholders at a 
price on which the interest return would recompense subscrib- 
ers for the previous contribution to the Association's needs. 
Owing to the generous response of stockholders the expense of 
this issue was nominal and very little of the preferred stock 
became available to the Underwriting Syndicate which had 
agreed to take any unsubscribed part of the stock. 

The accounts herewith presented reflect the immensely im- 
proved financial position of your Association, which is now on 
a perfectly safe basis to enable it to reap the benefits which 
are accruing from the better conditions prevailing in the Cali- 
fornia wine trade. 

Your directors are also grateful for the confidence and pa- 
tience which you have extended them for many weary years in 
their prosecution through the courts of the unpaid insurance 
resulting from the San Francisco fire. The skill and labor 
of your attorneys has resulted in a complete victory. The item 
"Insurance Claims" appearing so long on your annual state- 
ments has been converted into cash. The contesting companies, 
although early advised by us that the "earthquake defense" 
could not prevail in our case, because our fires did not so or- 
iginate, carried on a fierce litigation (which enabled them to 
compromise, at a low percentage, with others in the same 
locality who could not afford to fight) and after resorting to 
every device to lengthen and render the litigation prohibitorily 
expensive, were finallyy forced to disgorge in full with four 
years' interest. The names "Commercial Union," "Palatine" and 
"Alliance" of London, and "Norwich Union," should remain 
graven on the memory of the insuring world, and particularly 
of San Franciscans in connection with the conflagration, for 
insurance that did not insure anything but the privilege to pros- 
ecute a law suit or take fifty cents on the dollar. 

THE year's business. 

The gallonage output of the companies in which your Asso- 
ciation is interested showed a gratifying increase during the 
past year, and, indeed, has almost reached the volume enjoyed 
before the disastrous panic of 1907, which, combined with the 
prohibition scare, so restricted the business. The increase over 
the previous year of gallonage output in 1910 was 21.48 per 
cent and over 1908, 44.58 per cent. Prices, however, continued 
to rule quite low. 

The total business in money of all the companies for 1910 
was 18,620,133.95, an increase over the previous year of 12.65 
per cent. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



25 



The facility with which the increased business was dispatched 
lias already demonstrated the wisdom of your Winehaven in- 
vestment, which, as the volume continues to grow, will in- 
creasingly be realized in the effectiveness and economy of this 
ijTeat wine handling plant. 

Your vineyards in expanding acreage are yielding up to the 
happiest expectations. 

Your winery plants are in excellent condition for ^econom- 
ically handling a large tonnage. 

Your properties have been re-inventoried and liberal writings 
off from depreciation have been made. 

Your stock of aged and maturing wines is sufficient for your 
business, and of highly satisfactory quality. 

An inspection by the stockholders of the vast properties of 
the Association would be most beneficial to the management 
in giving the owners that confidence which direct and personal 
knowledge alone can supply. 

The bottling department has made gratifying progress during 

I the year. The stock of aged bottled wines, destroyed during 

ithe great fire, has been again amply replenished and restored 

to condition for enhancing the reputation of California Avines 

among the most discriminating connoisseurs. 

The financial statement shows a surplus for 1910 amounting 
to 1490,255.47, a portion of which is due to the releasing of 
1 profits which liabilities of the various subsidiary concerns pre- 
vented from previously being taken into your accounts. 

DIVIDENDS. 

, Quarterly dividends on the preferred stock issue for a full 
year in advance, amounting to |85,575.60, have been declared, 
after providing for which there remains a credit to "Surplus 

' Account 1910" of $404,679.87. The total surplus over par value 
of capital stock at December 31, 1910, is $1,204,679.87, and con- 
tingent fund stands at $67,696.85. 

The financial statements presented to the meeting enter more 
fully into details of your Association's affairs. 

For fifteen consecutive terms, the directors annually ap- 
pointed by you have honored your president with a re-election. 
But the time has come when he asks to be relieved of his duties 
so that he may take the rest from business cares and responsi- 
bilities which his health demands. The directors you will ap- 
point today will select a successor, to whom a continuance of 
the loyalty and support by stockholders, directors and bankers 
of the Association, which has been accorded to the retiring 
president, cannot fail to be an incentive and inspiration for the 
successful operation of your business to which every indication 
now seems to point. 

For the Directors, 

PERCY T. MORGAN, President. 



STATEMENT OP CALIFORNIA WINE ASSOCIATION^ DEC. 31 1910. 

ASSETS. 

Inventory of wines, etc $ 2,193,828.33 

Bills and accounts receivable 912,299.58 

Investments in other companies 4,954,984.53 

Real estate, plant, machinery, etc 1,497,135.60 

Tax and insurance accounts 20,619.77 

Sinking fund for redemption of bonds 108,000.00 

Insurance fund — cash and bonds deposited with Union Trust Co. 66,395.25 

Cash in banks 385,135.51 

n0,138,398.57 
LIABILITIES. 

Capital stock: 

Common stock authorized $8,000,000.00 

Reserved for bond conversion 2,000,000.00 

6,000,000.00 
Unissued 1,245,800.00 

Issued — 47,542 shares 4,754,200.00 

Preferred stock authorized 2,000,000.00 

• Unissued 573,740.00 

Issued— 14262 6-10 shares 1,426,260.00 6,180,460.00 

Bonds: 

Authorized 2,000,000.00 

Cancelled 62,000.00 

In treasury . . 385,000.00 447,000.00 1,553,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits: 

Surplus Dec. 31, 1909 800,000.00 

Surplus 1910 490,255.47 

Less dividend on preferred stock 85,575.60 404,679.87 1,204,679.87 

Contingent reserve fund 67,696.85 

Preferred stock dividend for current year 85,575.60 

Current Liabilities' 

Due to owned companies 135,198.18 

Notes payable . .* ' 623,798.90 

Grape accounts 153,892.77 

Bond interest accrued, due March 10, 1911 24,204.15 

Sundry accounts 109,892.25 1,046,986.25 

$10,138,398.57 



(Concluded on page 26) 



lASH'SBITTERC 



WILLIAM WOLFr ^ COMPANY 

IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

52-58 BEALE STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC COAST DISTRIBUTORS FOR 

J. & F. MARTELL, Cognac • Martell Brandy 

JOHN DE KUYPER & ZOON, Rotterdam ....: Holland Gin 

CANTRELL & COCHRANE, Belfast Ginger Ale and SarsapariUa 

MELLWOOD DISTILLERY, Cincinnati, Ohio Mellwood Whisky 

STOLE & CO., Lexington, Ky Bond and Sillard Whisky 



IMPORTERS OF 
VINTAGE -WINES. STAPLE CORDIALS. BITTERS. ABSINTHE, PRESERVES. OLIVE OIL. ETC. 



26 



PACIFIC WINP] AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OP CONDITION OF CALIFORNIA WINE ASSOCIATION AT DECEMBER 31, 1901-1911. 

ASSETS. 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 
Inventory of wines, etc.. 1,717,463.90 2,915,313.68 3,004,467.22 2,561,716.74 2,596,204.81 2,146,289.42 2,704,067.39 2,269,392.43 2,130,612.65 2,193,828.33 
Hills and accounts re- 
ceivable 1,035,536.32 1,415,291.33 1,294,386.73 1,142,784.20 539,402.63- 601,863.52 911,629.01 932,152.26 868,624.12 912,299.58 

Insurance claims 328,123,09 283,810.02 280,310.02 264,006.42 

Investments in other com- > 

panies 1,819,687.45 2,051,905.58 2,171,547.12 2,503,241.00 4,072,065.08 4,102,232.62 4,675,517.72 4,621,519.80 4,713,343.44 4,954,984.53 

Real estate, plant, machin- 
ery, etc 1,644,081.12 1,653,008.88 1,725,328.37 1,721,122.40 958,706.32 688,189.84 1,157,477.28 1,532,154.05 1,570,989.51 1,497,135.60 

Tax and insurance accts. 26,250.47 30,727.45 25,242.06 26,050.54 22,620.22 29,705.07 27,559.88 19,364.31 27,203.13 20,619.77 

Insurance fund 41,668.35 49,497.45 60,866.68 66,395.25 

Sinking fund for bonds 108,000.00 

Cash in banks 95,366.25 42,667.33 84,744.98 97,595.18 3,114.33 380,179.01 287,642.66 385,135.51 

6,243,019.26 8,066,246.92 8,316,337.75 7,997,582,21 8,273,744.04 7,993,998.74 9,804,843.98 10,084,569.33 9,923,288.61 10,138,398.57 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital stock 4,337,200.00 4,336,700.00 4,354,200.00 4,354,200.00 4,354,200.00 4,354,200.00 4,754,200.00 4,754,200.00 5,229,620.00 6,180,460.00 

Surplus 331,657.03 532,849.39 692,509.92 737,694.76 809,999.82 820,000.00 1,000,000.00 1,000,000.00 800,000.00 1,204,679.87 

Reserve 75,000,00 100,000.00 175,000.00 250,000.00 250,000.00 328,123.09 535.114.58 82,233.13 68,489.84 67,696.85 

Bonds 1,443,000.00 1,485,000.00 1,505,000.00 1,505,000.00 1,505,000.00 1,553,000.00 

lUlls payable 1,359,750.00 2,680,650.00 2,669,093.66 2,464,580.84 1,229,567.34 703,500.00 1,477,405.80 2,241,797.54 1,802,439,05 623,798.90 

Bond interest accrued 23,404.12 23,404.12 23,404.12 23,404.08 24,204.15 

Preferred stock dividend 85,575.60 

Outstanding grape and 

wine accounts 101,947.18 251,235.47 419,189.18 182,587.49 154,200.72 144,080.89 452,195.92 340,040.76 178,187.52 153,892.77 

Sundry accounts 37,465.05 164,812.06 6,344.99 8,519.12 32,776.16 135,690.64 57,523.56 137,893.78 316,148.12 245,090.43 



6,243,019.26 8,066,246.92 8,316,337.75 7,997,582.21 5,273,744.04 7,993,998.74 9,804,843.98 10,084,569.33 9,923,288.61 10,138,398.57 



Good Suggestions from "Show Me" Land 



EDITOR Wine and Spirit Rkvirw : — San Francisco is now 
the Exposition City for 1915. The Senate passed the 
House resolution on Saturday by an unanimous vote. At this 
writing only awaits^ the signature of the President. 

The campaign of nearly a year has been a strenuous one. The 
men who conducted the fight are to be congratulated for their 
constant and never flagging energy. There were many trying 
situations which at times were very discouraging, and provok- 
ing and many promises were broken. At present the question 
of the site is the absolute topic. For me the Golden Gate Park 
site is by far the best. It is already a public park, owned by the 
city. Any permanent improvements go to the city, whether in 
buildings or improvement of the grounds. 

One of the strong decorative and pleasure features of the 
Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893, were the waterways, 
fountains and canals made easy by the nearness to Lake Mich- 
igan. Then some features could be obtained by a pumping plant 
(as the Lurline) taking water from the Ocean, then with a 
water tower, also a fire protection. 

Too much land like at St. Louis, is a detriment ; one-third was 
not used except for a dumping ground for rubbish, making it 
very unsightly. 

At Paris, 1900, not having any large body of vacant land, 
both sides of the River Seine were used and a park for heavy 
machinery, 7 miles from the main buildings, had to be utilized. 
The A. Y. P, Exposition at Seattle was really the gem of any 
held in the United States. Small, compact, and all portions vis- 
ible from any other. Expense of maintenance being light, it 
was a financial success. It does not take a large tract of land 
to make a successful exposition. Grouping of buildings, easy of 
access, and landscape features, go farther than immense terri- 
tory to make it a success. The steel landing pier shown in the 
Chronicle picture is a new departure in expositions. Giving a 
landing place for all exhibits from foreign countries and 90 
per cent will go there that way; and in modern engineering a 
very feasible feature. The Lurline pier has stood for years; 
that does not reach deep water, but one that does would not ex- 
tend very much farther out. This is a matter for engineers to 
figure on. 



I hope that the Grapb^ Wine and Allied Industries can liavc 
a building of their own, and not be tucked away in a corner of 
some other large building as heretofore. To have a building 
large enough to house all exhibits, to have a large restaurant or 
cafe properly conducted with a cellar for proper storage of 
all exhibits especially of wines to be sold and for the jury. 

All processes to be shown from the preparation of the ground 
through all stages of wine and raisin making to the proper 
sampling of the products. The Grape Growers' Association 
were among the first to endorse the "Panama-Pacific Interna- 
tional Exposition." Strong resolutions were passed at their 
meeting, February 10, 1910, reported in the Chronicle the next 
morning. I hope they will continue their effort to have a viti- 
cultural palace as described above. From what I know of Cali- 
fornians, especially those of San Francisco, I am confident the 
Exposition will be a success in every way. 

I am yours ever for California and her products. 

W. H. McNIEL. 

St. Joseph, Missouri. 



Always the Same 



HL. DICKINSON, a business man of high standing of 
• Bellingham, Washington, said on January 26th: 

"Bellingham has been 'dry' 25 days and there is as much 
liquor consumed as ever. Every man who wants liquor has his 
own jug. Under the laAv the breweries deliver beer in cases 
to residences and wholesale liquor dealers have the right to 
sell to family trade. The only difference under the new order 
of things is that Bellingham is losing |42,000 a year revenue 
from liquor licenses. 

"Prohibition certainly doesn't prohibit the consumption of 
liquor in Bellingham. It has stopped the retail trade and noth- 
ing more. The recent election does not reflect public sentiment 
and I believe if another election could be held the city would 
vote 'wet' by a big majorty. What made Bellingham 'dry' 
was politics, not a sincere desire on the part of a majority 
of the voters to prohibit the sale of liquor." 



PACIFIC WTNE AND SI'ITJIT REVIEW 



27 




DRY WINPyS : — Conditions in the wine market have contin- 
ued to improve. There are many reasons to believe that 
I lie progress of the industry will not be seriously interrupted 
lor a long time to come. 

The Wyllie local option bill, in the California Legislature, is 
the center of interest with the wine industry and the trade at 
this writing. The bill was introduced for the purpose of mak- 
ing the county the unit, and it passed the Lower House in this 
shape. However, it was so outrageously unfair to the great and 
jgrowing wine industry that the Senate would not accept it. Ac- 
cordingly, amendments were made intended to give the wine in- 
terests fairly decent consideration. The measure, as amended 
by the Senate, providing the township shall be the unit, and 
iWhich is the only fair basis of legislation, has gone back to the 
jHouse, and there is a great roar of protest therein. 

The promoters of the Wyllie bill have insisted that they were 
endeavoring particularly to reach the saloons and the liquor 
traftic generally. By their attitude in decrying the township 
unit amendment, they show themselves in their true light, as 
eaemies of the California wine industry and general viticulture, 
representing .1125,000,000 investment. It is evident by their pro- 
ceeding on these lines that they believe they must either cripple 
or destroy this great industry, in order that they may force 
local option upon California. 

The men who are battling these underhanded fighters, who hit 
foul, should keep this fact in mind and force upon those men, 
who come from the wine and raisin districts, the fact that these 
optionists are after the scalp of the wine industry first and the 
liquor dealers second. Any man who has the industrial welfare 
of this great State at heart, should not allow himself to be de- 
reived by the families who are fighting them from a masked bat- 
\ tery. At the present writing the bill has little chance of passing, 
I and the good fighters at Sacramento who have brought the fight 
to the present status should bend their energies to put the fear 
of the Lord and the love of justice into the minds of those As- 
semblymen who have been lead by the nose by Mr. Wyllie. 

Exports of wine by sea for the month ending February 20th 
were of good volume, the totals being 619 cases and 1,670,036 
gallons, valued at |483,307. 

Imports of wine by sea were 1363 cases .6 barrels 17 octaves 
and 6 casks. 



SWEET WINES : — Business is progressing at a fairly satis- 
factory i-ate, and it is evident that this improvement will 
continue. Production in the State was naturally of very small 
volume. The figures of the output will be found in the usual 
sweet wine tables. 



BRANDY : — The market is moving along and keeping pace 
with the. progress of diy and sweet wines. 
Exports were of nominal volume, the figures being 5 cases and 
2064 gallons, valued at |3233. Imports by sea were 519 cases 
1 barrel 5 casks. 

Production of brandy in the several districts will be found in 
the usual statistical tables. 



WHISKY : — With the whisky men business is steadily get- 
ting into good shape. The average house rei)orts tilings 
improving steadily, particularly throughout the Coast, while 
city business remains sluggish. More than one big house re- 
ports outside business for Fel)ruary greater than ever l»efore and 
of unexpected activity generally. The trade may take this as an 
indication that from now on, at least during the P^xposition 
years, they may expect good and growing business. 

Exports by sea were 757 cases and 2033 gallons, valued at 
18065. Miscellaneous exports were 794 cases, 45 packages bulk, 
valued at |8246. Imports by sea were 5494 cases 274 barrels 1 
hogshead 16 casks and 25 octaves. 



I MPORTATIONS :— Business with the importers during Feb- 
••• ruary was better than was expected and shows a much easier 
feeling among buyers. One of the leading houses stated that 
the volume of their trade for the short month, with three holi- 
days, was very satisfactory and the outlook for improvement 
never better. The figures of importations are given herewith : 

IMPORTS BY SEA :— Wine, 1343 cases 6 barrels 17 octaves 

6 casks ; Whisky, 5494 cases 274 barrels 1 hogshead 17 casks 25 
octaves; Beer, 1571 cases 1626 hogsheads 761 barrels 649 half 
barrels, 540 quarter barrels and 290 packages ; Gin, 6625 
cases 69 barrels 33 casks 11 kegs; Brandy, 519 cases 1 bar- 
rel 5 casks; Liquors, 556 cases 28 casks; Vermouth, 5825 cases 

7 casks; Sake, 267 cases 610 casks; Mineral Water, 3658 cases 
170 casks ; Stout, 200 cases ; Soda Water, 150 barrels ; Absinthe, 
400 cases ; Rum, 12 cases ; Benedictine, 100 cases ; Bitter.s, 289 
cases; Amer Picon, 675 cases; Cherry Juice, 1 cask; Kummel, 
250 cases ; Cordial, 1 barrel ; Champagne, 1662 cases ; Spirits, 52 
cases; Ginger Ale, 30 barrels; Punch, 50 cases; Grape Juice 10 
cases. 

IMPORTS BY RAH. IN BOND :— Champagne, 300 ca.ses; 
Whisky, 655 cases ; Wine, 20 cases 1 cask ; Beer, 3 cases. 



BEER : — By reason of the exceptionally cold winter weather 
these are days when the brewer does not jubilate, because 
the "hard liquor" man is to the front. The beer men are attend- 
ing to export business and gettting ready to handle the big 
trade during the coming season. 

Exports were of small volume, the totals being 197 packages 
bottled and 5 bulk, the value of which was $1662. Importations, 
domestic and foreign, a.ssumed large figures, the totals being 
1551 cases 1626 hogsheads 761 barrels 649 half barrels 540 quar- 
ter barrels and 290 packages. 



New York Wine Market 



THE usual dull period immediately following the holildays 
has again been experienced, but the outlook for the future 
is fair. A further advance in prices of the cheaper wines may 
be looked for at any time. The prices of standard wines remain 
unchanged. — Bonfort's, Feb, 10. 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

FOR SALE — 80 acres in South San Joaquin Irrigation District — no better land 
in the valley; 40 acres in grapas. Small house, barn, windmill and tank, well 
located for a winery, on R. R. station. Will sell at a sacrifice on account of sickness. 
Box 407, Escalon, Cal. 

WINE MAKER— POSITION WANTED— Young wine maker, graduated from a 
school of viticulture in Germany, two years in California, wants position now or 
later, where he has opportunity to advance. Wages no object to start. Box .389, 
Vina, Cal. 




PAC^IFIC WTNE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



^GIFIC 




R. M. WOOD Editor 

Office: No. 127 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, California. 

Rooms 304-305 

Phones: Kearny 2597 Home C 2559 



PUT THE EXPOSITION 
IN THE PARK 



The Amended Local Option Bill 



•"pHE Wyllie Local Option Bill, which passed the Assembly 
•'• 1).>' a vote of 55 to 21, received such rough handling when it 
came up for consideration by the Senate on February 20th, that 
after the six hours' scrimmage was over, its author must have 
felt ashamed to look at its changed and amended face. 

Onc(> again, it was our valuable viticultural industry that 
saved the day for the liquor interests. The State Board of 
Agriculture emphasized this point by addressing a communica- 
tion to the Senate urging that no legislation against the wine 
industry be enacted. The Board called attention to the fact that 
viticulture ranks fourth among the industries of California, 
250,000 acres being planted with vines, and most of this acreage 
being practically useless for other purposes. 

"Efforts are now being made," the board wrote, "to create a 
sentiment which, if allowed to unchecked, would result in the 
depreciation of the value of the properties already improved, and 
wipe out the i*esult of years of labor and the investment of 
$125,000,000, and would work a great injury to the people of the 
State. We strongly recommend the encouragement of the viti- 
cultural industry in this State, and we look with positive dis- 
favor upon the enactment of any legislation, either by the Fed- 
eral Government or the State Legislature, that Avould discourage 
this most important industry, which is destined, if encouraged 
and fostered, to be the most important industry of the State." 

Senator L. V. Juilliard of Sonoma County led the fight against 
the local option bill and the wine industries of the State have 
cause to be proud of the logical and forceful manner in which 
he presented his telling arguments. Senator Juilliard offered 
three sets of mendments. The first — and most important — made 
the township, and not the county, the unit of local option. 

The second provided a number of alternative propositions to 
be voted on. These included limiting the number of saloons, the 
fixing of license fees, the sale of liquors in quantities, the re- 
striction of saloons to certain distances from churches or pub- 
lic schools, and the serving of liquors in hotels or restaurants. 

The third provided protection for wholesale wineries in local 
option districts. 

The three sets of amendments were referred, as a matter of 
procedure, to Senator Martinelli as a committee of one. He 
reported immediately and favorably on the series and moved the 



adoption of the report. The motion was seconded by Senator 
Hans. 

Nearly six hours were consumed in the presentation of argu- 
ments pro and con, Senators Juilliard, Wolfe and Hurd speaking 
against the bill, and Senators Gates, Harkins and Estudillo 
favoring it. In closing the debate, Senator Estudillo remarked, 
"If you want to stop the prohibition wave, pass this bill." He 
asserted that it would drive liquor from politics. But the ma- 
jority of the Senators did not agree with him. The rolLcall on 
all three measures was almost identical. 

On the amendments making the county township the unit of 
option, the vote was : 

Ayes — Senators Beban, Bills, Birdsall, Bryant, Burnett, Cam- 
inetti, Cassidy, Curtin, Finn, Hans, Hare, Holohan, Hurd, Juil- 
liard, Martinelli, Regan, Rush, Sanford, Stetson, Tyrrell, Welch, 
Wolfe, Wright— 23. 

Noes — Senators Avey, Bell, Black, Boynton, Campbell, Cart- 
wright, Cutten, Estudillo, Gates, Hewitt, Larkins, Lewis, Rose- 
berry, Shanahan, Strobridge, Thompson, Walker — 17. 

On the amendments, providing for a series of questions con- 
cerning license and other restrictions. Senator Stetson voted no, 
making the vote 22 to 18 in favor of the amendments. 

On the amendments intended to define clearly the rights of 
wineries in dry territory. Stetson swung back again and voted 
for this one, making the vote 23 to 17. 

Senator (*artwright then offered an amendment allowing the 
saloon-keeper six months after election to go out of business, 
if the election so ordered. Permission to refer this amendment 
to a committee of one, which was the only way to get it before 
the Senate, was refused by a vote of 15 to 23. 

When the bill, with the township unit and other amendments 
incorporated, came up in the Senate again, on February 27th, it 
was passed by a vote of 30 to 3. Before the vote was taken. Sen- 
ator Juilliard paid his respects to the Rev. S. Eraser Langford, 
pastor of the First Baptist of Sacramento, who stated in a ser- 
mon that the Wyllie local option bill Imd fallen among thieves 
in the Senate. Langford referred to Juilliard as "sallow and 
lean," well groomed and cold of eye." Juilliard resented the 
minister's attack, and declared that he and the other Senators 
who had voted for the township amendment did so in good faith, 
believing that the township unit was right and just. "I am in 
favor of a local option bill," Juilliard said, "but I want a prac- 
tical measure, which will work some good and not result in hard- 
ship." 

The much-amended Wyllie bill now goes back to the Assembly, 
where it will probably be turned down. A conference committee 
will then be appointed from the two houses, and as both Speaker 
Hewitt and Lieutenant-Governor Wallace are for local option, 
they will doubtless support the stand of the lower house and 
repudiate the attitude of the Senate, which means that it is 
likely to be a long drawn out affair before the matter is disposed 
of by the Legislature. 

In the meantime, the Avine men may rest assured that Senator 
Juilliard will guard their interests carefully. He is a grape- 
grower himself, represents the largest dry wine section in the 
State, and, it will be remembered, acted for two terms as presi- 
dent of the Grape-Growers' Association of Santa Rosa. He de- 
clares that he will leave no stone unturned to protect the vine- 
yardists and hop-growers against a radical local option bill, and, 
judging by the success he has already achieived, he will come 
through the ordeal triumphantly. 



I 



PAriPK^ WINE AND SPIlilT REVIEW 



29 



Strong Case Against the Wyllie Bill 



Colonel Wisser Makes Plea for Canteen 



THE State Board of Agriculture fears that the proposed local 
option bill will hurt the grape and wine industries. It 
lierefore sent a communication to the Senate setting forth that 
iticulture ranks fourth among the industries of California, 
:50,000 acres being planted with vines, and most of this acre- 
ige being practically useless for other purposes. 

"Efforts are now being made," the board continues, "to cre- 
ite a sentiment which, if allowed to go unchecked, would re- 
mit in the depreciation of the value of the properties already 
mproved, and wipe out the result of years of labor 
md the investment of $125,000,000, and would work 
L gi-eat injury to the people of the State. We strongly re- 
:ommend the encouragement of viticultural industry in this 
?tate, and we look with positive disfavor upon the enactment 
•f any legislation, either by the Federal Government or the 
5tate Legislature, or by any counties of this State, that would 
liscourage this most important industry, which is destined, if 
■ncouraged and fostered, to be the -most important industry of 
lie State." 



Author of the "Sun" Article 



THERE has been much speculation as to the author of the 
, six-coluniu article Avhich appeared in the New York Sun 
i >f February 5th, dealing with "The Vineyards of California,'' but 
jinyone who has followed the columns of the Wine and Spirit 
Review for the past year and read the series of interesting con- 
ributions under the heading, "Over the Sparkling Wine Cup," 
nust have promptly recognized that the article was from the 
t)en of Horatio F. Stoll. He is a keen observer, has studied the 
conditions in our vineyards thoroughly and by treating the sub- 
ect from every possible angle, has succeeded in placing hundreds 
)f valuable informational articles in the Eastern papers and 
magazines during the past three years. 

"There is no doubt but what his latest article in the Sun will 
.attract much attention to the wines and viticultural industrv of 
California, for the Stm has a nation-wide circulation and al- 
ready the article has been quoted in many leading papers 
i Iiroughout the country." 



Senator Sanford's Original Bill 



SENATOR SANFORD of Fkiali introduced a bill which pro- 
vides for the regulation of the liquor traffic in California 
and contains a few revolutionary features, most important of 
which is the requirement that every retail dealer in liquor shall 
be an American citizen. It limits licenses to one for every 500 

tr>oT.tjons, and regulates the hours of closing, 
he prohibitionist party declares that this bill was introduced 
the purpose of defeating the local option bill introduced by 
,..icin, but Senator Sanford protests that his bill has no bearing 
\\ liatever upon the local option question. 



Local option, so far as the thirteenth session of the Washing- 
Ion Legislature is concerned, is di.sposed of. Quietly and un- 
j ostentatiously, the House of February 24th, by a vote of 50 
'to 42, without debate or discussion of any kind, indefinitely 
postponed S. R. 121, which aimed to amend the present local 
I option laws of the State, adding enforcement features and mak-- 
'ing the county, with the exception of first-class cities, the unit. 
Then to spike down the lid of the coffin securely. Assembly- 
man Reach's motion to reconsider the vote was laid on the table, 
I a roll call showing the members lined up 52 to 40. Speaker Tay- 
llor announced that, under the rules, the bill could not be re- 
considered again in the House. 



COLONEL JOHN P. WISSER, in command at the Presidio, 
favors the establishment of a post exchange. The canteen, 
he states, does away with intoxication. In Berlin, where he 
spent four years as military attache, well-regulated sale of 
liquor, he says, proved more than satisfactory. 

Colonel Wisser said : "Since I was here as inspector general 
in 1906 I noticed a marked increase in the number of saloons 
near the Presidio. I wish newspapers and the city officials 
would help us in keeping these places closed. To prevent drunk- 
enness entirely, however, the army needs a post exchange." 



A Farce and a Graft 



ANEW liquor law has been laid before the Legislature. Sen- 
ator Roynton introduced a bill making it a misdemeanor to 
sell alcoholic drinks within a mile of the University of Califor- 
nia at Berkeley, or the University Farm at Davis, or a mile and 
a half of any soldiers' or sailors' home, or any hospital, or 
within half a mile of any State prison, or within 1900 feet of 
any reformatory. This law is particularly aimed at Davisville 
for the purpose of destroying the liquor trade there. The "Davis 
Farm," as a public institution, is largely a farce and a graft on 
tax-payers. 



In ''Free" America 



A DISPATCH from Quincy, Plumas County, states that that 
county does not propose to wait for the Legislature to en- 
act an anti-treating law, as the new ordinance has a clause to 
that effect which makes it a misdemeanor to furnish liquor to 
more than one person at the same time. 

The anti-treating provision is not the only drastic measure in 
the ordinance. No saloons are allowed within four miles of any 
camp where there are twenty-five men employed. The interior 
of all saloons must be visible from the street, and it shall be 
unlawful to obstruct the view from the street in any way. 



Labeling Champagnes in France 



CONSUL WILLIAM BARDEL, of Rheims, reports that 
while French manufacturers of sparkling wine, whose 
effervescence is produced by natural fermentation, label the 
product "Mousseux," those manufacturers of wine whose effer- 
vescence is produced partly or wholly by the addition of car- 
bonic-acid gas must plainly label the product "Mousseux fan- 
taisie," the word fantasie marking the distinction. 



Senator Regan is the author of another bill against "blind 
pigs," and one which if passed will prove their death blow. It 
is in the form of a joint resolution asking the internal revenue 
department to refuse to issue internal licenses for the sale of 
liquor unless accompanied by city or county licenses. "This 
will sweep away all illicit saloons which now abound," says 
Regan. "They pay $25 a year for a federal license, but if they 
are required to pay a few hundred dollars more a year they will 
go out of business. They will defy local authorities, but they 
will not dare defy the government." 



lASH'SBITTERC 



30 



PACIFir WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 




Visalia^in "Dry" Column 



AT Visalia the Board of Trustees, by a three to one majority, 
ordered a special election on the liquor question to be held 
February 23d. On that date after a whirlwind anti-saloon cam- 
paign, the "drys" Avon out by 141 majority. Visalia is the last 
town in Tulare county to vote out the saloons, and when they 
have closed their doors the entire county will be devoid of liquor 
houses. The entire vote was 1200. Of these 518 were for wet 
and 659 for dry. Twenty-three were thrown out because of in- 
correct balloting. The first count showed a majority of only 
138, but because of a slight error the saloonmen demanded 
a recount, which gave the anti-saloonists a larger majority by 
three votes. 



A petition is being circulated in Berkeley asking for the 
amendment of the city charter so that liquor may be permitted 
to 1)6 sold there in sealed packages. The object is to place local 
merchants who are now prohibited from such sale, on an equal- 
ity with those of Oakland who are doing a large trade in 
supplying the wants of the Berkeleyites, by delivering liquor 
in that city. If the amendment is made it will add consider- 
ably to the business now done at the university town. 



The City Council of Marysville has received a petition from 
the local Royal Arch lodge asking that the liquor license be so 
amended as to stop all kinds of gambling and prevent women 
from entering saloons. Steps have been taken to change the 
ordinance according to the wishes of the petitioners. 



At a meeting of the Oakland City council the proposed 
amendment to the box ordinance, which would have permitted 
saloons having an exclusively male clientele to retain private 
rooms and to which objection has been made by the Men's 
League of the First Congregational Church, was withdrawn by 
Councilman William J. Baccus. Therefore the box ordinance 
will be permitted to remain as it now stands without alteration, 
prohibiting private boxes in cafes, restaurants and saloons 
in which liquor is served to women. 



Simon Levy & Co. Have the True View 

MR. SIMON LEVY of Simon Levy & Company, 346-48 
Washington street, stated to a representative of the Re- 
view that the 1910 business had been fairly satisfactory. He 
pointed out that he practically sold everything in the liquor 
line, and was pleased to report that the aggregate of the busi- 
ness done had been normal. While he had nothing to boast of, 
he had nothing to complain of. In fact, he Avas contented with 
the showing made in 1910, and looked forward to increased 
business in the present year. 

In his opinion the Exposition question while no doubt of 
great importance to both city and State, would really have a 
less effect upon future business in his line than the late copious 
rains. Mr. Levy drew attention to the recent development of the 
horticultural and agricultural industries of California, and the 
vast increase of output bound to arise from sufficient moisture. 
When the interior is prosperous the business in this city is in- 
creased in proportion and the late storms had already stimu- 
lated trade. While he ardently felt San Francisco would s^et 
the great International Exposition of 1915, he pinned his faith 
upon the development and prosperity of this State and the 
Pacific Coast generally, as the principal mainspring which made 
the wheels of commerce revolve and insured a substantial in- 
crease of business in all lines. He desired to wish the rest of the 
ti'ade a happy and prosperous uoav year. 



A WALLACE, IDAHO, dispatch states that one phase of the 
saloon question certain to come up in Idaho is the conten- 
tion that the dry counties of the State should not benefit by 
the saloon license money contributed by the counties where local 
option is not in force. The wet counties furnish the argument 
upon which the protest will be based when they contend that 
saloons cause expense in the local government for police protec- 
tion and additional court costs, and it does not seem fair that 
tliose counties which escai)e this tax should contribute nothing 
to the State school fund and should profit by the license money 
paid in by other counties. 



A dispatch from Port Townsend, Washington, says that the 
Classen Chemical Company, which has just completed its by- 
product plant, at a cost of more than .|50,000, will soon start op- 
erations. The plant is at the extreme head of Port ToAvnsend 
bay and is constructed of concrete. The machinery was im- 
ported from France, and in duty alone amounted to .f20,000. 
SaAvdust, slabs and stumps will be utilized in the manufacture 
of alcohol and other products, under a French patent. The 
process removes the poison from the alcohol made from wood. 
A contract has been let for the delivery of two scowloads, or 
320 tons, of sawdust from the Everett mills each week. 



^ 



JAMES TWOMEY 



ED. BORREMANS 



^eadquarlem 



For Everybody 
Who Likes 



5eci ^hinqa 



JHE 



Yellowstone 

22 MONTGOMERY ST. 



San Francisco 



HOT LUNCH FROM 11 TO 2 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



31 





Established I86( 


) 


"GIBB'S 


SPECIAL^^ 


BOURBON 




1844 GEARY STREET 


Tel. West 7616 


Home S 3223 


SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



»» ^ » »^fc»«*- 



,«« ^^ ** ^^ «» ^^ «> ^fc «»- 



-••f 



AMERICAN BRANDY 



I 



FINEST IN THE WORLD 

THE KIRBY DISTILLING CO., Inc. 

FOWLER. FRESNO CO., CAL. 

Make, a Specially of PURE GRAPE BRANDY, and Making NO WINE 
has NO WASH OR SOUR WINE TO PUT INTO BRANDY. 
Our Stills are Known as Numbers 263 or 357 First District, California. 
These Numbers ARE BURNED on the GOVERNMENT or STAMPED 
HEAD of EVERY PACKAGE, there being No Other Genuine "KIRBY 
BRANDY." 



Liquors and Cigars Phone Douglas 608 




*»- 



SOLD ONLY IN CARLOAD LOTS TO THE TRADE 5 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED j 



GUS KILBORN 
J. EMMET HAYDEN 



BALDWIN FERRY 

CAFE >? CAFE 



844 MARKET STREET 



34 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



247 Montgomery Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 
RUSS CIGAR AND LIQUOR CO., Prop. 



^ 



Jas. p. Dunne 



1 Stockton St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



M 



m 




The Chronicle Bar 




6 Kearny San Francisco, Cal. 

p. W. WOBBER, Proprietor 



32 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 




To Build Big New Brewery 



EVIDENTLY the breweries are not afraid tliat the local 
option law will seriously affect their business, as several of 
them combined lavSt month for the purpose of building one of 
the largest breweries in the West, at Fifth and Kirkham streets, 
Oakland, where it is proposed to brew and bottle the highest 
class of beer. This new corporation is to be known as the 
Golden West Brewing Company and prominent and successful 
brewers from Berkeley, Alameda, Hayward and Oakland have 
cast their fortunes together to erect this plant. 

Mr. George White of the Washington Brewery, Oakland, is 
the president of the Golden West Brewing Company ; Mr. Jos- 
eph Raspelier, of the Raspelier Brewery, Berkeley, is vice- 
president; Mr. Joseph Kramm, proprietor of Anchor Brewery, 
Oakland, is secretary, and Mr. Charles Heyer, president of 
Hayward Brewery, and Mayor of that city, is treasurer. The 
other member of the board of directors is ]\Ir. George Goerl 
of the Palace Brewery, Alameda. 

The location chosen is all that could be desired, as it abutts 
on the Southern Pacific, is close to the Western Pacific, and 
will also be tapped by the Oakland belt line. 



Mr. J. A. Barlotti, secretary of the Italian Vineyard Com- 
l)any, Los Angeles, Cal., has been making an extended trip 
throughout the country and in returning from the East favored 
the Criterion office with a call. Mr. Barlotti has a most thor- 
ough and intimate knowledge of the wine industry both here 
and abroad and is firm in the belief that the Italian enterprises 
in wine production in America will inure to the best interests 
in the development of the business. — Criterion. 



combined would indicate that the average by each family in 
the United Kingdom in 190!) was 1.74 a week. 

The present age has well been described as the tea and cocon 
age in Great Britain. These beverages are being used more gen 
erally than ever before. 



Tobacco and Beverages in United Kingdom 

[From Consul General John L. Griffiths, London] 

FIGITRES have been published by the British Government 
Statistical Office of the consumption of and expenditure 
for tobacco in the United Kingdom in 1909. 

The value of the manufactured and unmanufactureti tobacco 
entered for consumption in that year was $127,986,906. To 
this amount must be adde<l the outlay for pipes, matches, and 
smokers' sundries amounting to $2,903,568, making a total of 
$130,890,474. 

As compared with 1908 there was a decrease in the quantity 
consume<l of 2,464,995 pounds, but an increase in the expendi- 
ture amounting to $3,914,257. The decrease in manufactured 
tobacco amounted to 151,966 pounds, and in unmanufactured 
tobacco 2,313,029. 

The highest consumption in the United Kingdom was in 
the year 1907, which was about 2.057 pounds per individual, 
taking the whole population as a basis; while in 1909 it fell to 
1.975 pounds per individual. 

Of the amount paid for tobacco in 1909, the Government re- 
ceived $74,367,254. 

The total cost per individual per annum in 1909 was about 
f2.90y2, and counting a family as consisting of 4.62 persons 
(which is a census basis), the annual expenditure of such family 
was $13.43, which amounts to a weekly expenditure of 251/0 
cents. 

The annual average for intoxicants for a family of the size 
above mentioned is estimated at $77.51. The two expenditures 



Would Have State License Tax 



IT would appear that the members of the Legislature have lit 
tie better to do than to legislate around the liquor trade, ;i 
large number of bills directly and indirectly affecting it havini; 
taken up much of the solons' time. One of these, introduced b\ 
Senator Sanford, provides for a State liquor tax on saloons and 
wholesale liquor stores. It is a substitute for a bill which he 
put in last month to regulate the liquor traffic and to limit tin 
number of saloons according to population. 

He says that the license tax will sufiiciently restrict the ntmi- 
ber. Wholesale dealers are to pay $200 annually, saloons that 
have more than four bartenders $150, and other saloons |100. 
The Anti-Saloon League, which is urging leal option, is against 
the State license on the ground that it may be impossible to close 
liquor places so licensed in communities that vote to go dry 
Sanford's measure consequently is regarded as a proposal put: 
forward by the liquor interests to defeat local option. 

Sanford contends that the license tax which he proposes wil] 
annually yield at least $1,750,000 to the State. There are, he 
says, 784 wholesale dealers in California and 14,389 saloons 
His bill directs that licenses shall be granted only to citizens, 
that saloons must be closed from 1 to 6 a. m., and that minors 
and habitual drunkards shall not be allowed in them. 



lASH'SBITTERC 

1h to>\\c \_a.xa.-t\\/^ w 



Protect Your Health 




LET 



COOKS 
SPRINGS 
MINERAL 
WATER 

BE YOUR DRINK 
AND BE 

WELL 



AUG. LANG 6, CO. 

AGENXf 

18tK and Alabama Sts. 

TelepHone MarRet 588 SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



THE WALDORF 

136 South Broadway 

Opposite Mason Opera House 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



The Waldorf 



BECKER BROS. Proprietors 



648 MARKET STREET 



NEW 

SAN FRANCISCO'S 

FINEST BUFFET 



OPPOSITE 
PALACE HOTEL 

SAN FRANCISCO 



THE 

Waldorf Annex 

521 South Main St. 

Next door, Peoples Theatre 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

1 



>«» ^fc «»- 



Telephone Kearny 900 



^'^elliscn^d 



99 



San Francisco's Most Magnificent Bar 

CHOICEST IMPORTED GOODS AMERICA'S FINEST WHISKIES 

lO THIRD STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



Matt. Grimm 



JOHN B. RUSCONI, Propr. 



Phone Douglas 5637 



Rusconi Bar 



Straight Goods 

My Specialty 



505 Market St. 

San Francisco 




UNEXCELLED SERVICE 



130 Leidesdorff Street 

Corner Halleck 
Bet. California and Sacramento Streets 



Fine Imported and Domestic 
Wines and Liquors 



San Francisco 






>«» ^fc. «»- 



, Gal. 1 



HOUSE POUNDED 1853. 



i BANK EXCHANGE 



Back at the same old 
stand ; same old goods ; 
same excellent service. 
The fire did not get me. 



I import 

Famous Old Campbeltown 

SCOTCH WHISKY 

Pisco de Italia, Madeira 

Wine 

Sazerac de Fofg:e & Sons' 

Brandy 

DUNCAN NICOL 



S. E. CORNER MONTGOHERY AND WASHINQTON 5TS. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



(S®!J 



I MADE IN TAMPA | 

I EL PALENCIA Se^^JKI 1 

I ACKNOWLEDGED BEST OF THE BEST I 

2 ^ Preferred by particular people wKo appreciate the comfort and satisfaction of a perfect Havana Segar. 2 

I Boltz, Clymer & Co. I 

I SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. TAMPA, FLORIDA t 



34 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



1 







m 



I 




^Ml 




W. A. Ross, Jr., Finds Conditions Good 



Y^T A. ROSS JR. of W. A. Ross & Bro., of New York, is 
' ' * paying "his aimual visit to the Pacific Coast. Mr. Ross 
is as usual full of appreciation of this side of the Rockies as a 
good field for business. He reports trade good in the North- 
west. Seattle he speaks of as a live town, but during his visit, 
under apprehension of further meddling by the prohibitionists 
Avith the liquor question. Business, however, continued good, 
as also in Portland, where the Home Rule bill had given gen- 
eral confidence. In San Francisco he found business good in 
all the various Ross brands. He said that while trade generally 
had been quiet for some time, the Ross brands had more than 
held their own. Now that San Francisco had won the great 
victory in Wa.shington and had been accorded the honor of 
helding the Exposition to represent the United States in 1915, 
he believed that business would show a wonderful increase. In 
speaking of the past satisfactory trade, Mr. Ross did not fail 
to attribute it to the strenuous efforts of his representative 
here — that prince of salesmen, John Renner. He further re- 
ported that the rapid growth and development of the American 
ti-ade in the Great Auk's Head brands of Ale and Porter had 
necessitated the removal of the Liverpool bottling department. 
In 1906 very large premises, considered at the time far too 
si)acious, had been taken, but such had been the increase in the 
demand for this Al brand that the premises were now much 
too cramped and a new location, giving additional i-oom, had to 
be secured. 

'Mr. Ross further stated that Ross & Company's Belfast Gin- 
ger Ale was becoming a very favorite brand in the United 
States. Because of its high quality and condition this Ginger 
Ale was in use on the Southern Pacific, the Western Pacific 
and the Pacific Mail steamers. Naturally Mr. Ross was well 
pleased not only with the prospect of new business in San 
Francisco, but the whole Pacific Coast. 



Will Punish Refillers 



•"TANQUERAY, GORDON & CO, LIMITED, of London, com- 
■'• menced suit March 1st against Joseph Herscher & Co. and 
Oscar Lazansky, both of this city, for the sum of $10,000 in each 
instance. The complaint was filed in the United States Circuit 
Court, and recites that the firm refilled bottles of gin which 
originally had been used by the London firm. 

A determined effort to stop imitations and refilling of Gor- 
don's Gin has been commenced and parties cauglit infringing 
will be severely dealt with by Messrs. Tanqueray, Gordon & Co., 
Ltd., London, who have appointed Messrs. Miller & White, 
trade-mark attorneys, to look after their interests on the Pacific 
Coast. 



"Eddie" Baker Reports Northwest Conditions 



lyi ANAGER E. P. BAKER of the Jesse Moore-Hunt Cofii- 
^ ' A pany, in speaking of his recent journey throughout the 
Northwest, said : 

"My trip through the Northwest consumed a period of about | 
eight weeks and every town of importance in Oregon, Washing- 
ton and Southern Canada was visited. I found the trade in Ore- 
gon to be jubilant over the result of the election and optimistic 
about the future. They are buying with confidence and the 
volume of their business justifies their purchases. 

"In Washington, the recent defeat of the county unit bill wa.s 
a source of much joy to the trade in the State and while there 
was a temporary (]uietude in the liquor line all over the State, 
the outlook is very bright. 

"In Southern Canada the consumption of American whisky 
is increasing rapidly and it is only a question of time when 
that field will be an important one to local Avholesalers. 

"The recent victory of the "drys" in Visalia is to be regretted 
and the wholesalers should take concerted action at once to off 
set that defeat and place Visalia on the proper footing. I sin- 
cerely hope to see an early campaign in our behalf." 



On February 15th the Pennsylvania sailed for Ancon. Her 
cargo included 1699 barrels of California wine, 10,000 cases of 
canned goods, 4000 cases of raisins, 2500 sacks of beans and 
1000 sacks of nuts. A wonderful showing of the increased de- 
mand for California products. 



Sacramento's two Leading 
Hotels 




Capital Hotel Golden Eagle Hotel 

FINEST GRILL AND CAFE 



BEST SAMPLE ROOMS LARGEST GUEST ROOMS 

EVERY ROOM EQUIPPED WITH TELEPHONES 

BEST LOCATION 

European Plan, $ 1 .00 and Upwards 



OWNED AND OPERATED BY 

The Bowers -Titus Hotel Co. 



W. O. BOWERS. 

President 



C. J. TITUS. 
Vice-Pres. and Mgr. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



E.S.ClPRitO- P-ts'"""' 



PHONE MARKET 2836 



ALTAVISTA WINES 




The Wines California Makes Famous 

ALTA VISTA WINES CO. 



35 

H 



MAIN OFFICE 



112 - ] 14- TENTH ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ANGELO MYERS 

DISTILLER 




RESISTERCD DISTILLERY NO. 63, FIRST DISTRICT PENNA. 

DISTILLERY, LINFIELD, MONTGOMERY CO., PENNA. 



iHome of the Famous^ 



KINSEY and LINFIELD PURE RYES 

o;ffices 
311-313 NORTH THIRD STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



ARNOLD POPPIC CHARLES M. FISHER 

Representatives for 



CALIFORNIA 

NEVADA 

ARIZONA 



MEXICO 



NEW MEXICO 

TEXAS 

LOUISIANA 



San Francisco Office - - 326 Jackson Street 



I 

2 

I 



Market Cafe 

GOUAILHARDOU & RONDEL 

Proprieiorg 



540 Merchant Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



i 



I 



' Coffee Royal " 

A Mighty Bracer 



Hot Luncheon 
At 11 A. M. Daily 



I 






John Caley, Prop 



Tel. Kearny 2306 



CALEY'S 



333 MONTGOMERY ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 




Phones 
Kearny 1610 
Home C 1610 



Wines' 



624- '^ 
M0NT60MKRY 




* »^ i^ii^ttiim; 



H. P. ANDERSEN, Proprietor 


THE 


CUllEK 


j 70«? MarKet St, 


PKone Douglas 2954 j 


1 Call Annex Bld^. 


SAN FR.ANCISCO 



36 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 





The Anti=Treating Bill 



^^ ^m^ 



San Francisco Breweries, Ltd., Report Year 
of Good Progress 

The San Francisco Rreweries, by the courtesy of C. F. Wag- 
ner, the nijinaji;er of the bottling department, states that the 
rapid growth and development of the businens during tlie past 
year has proved most satisfactorj'. One of the main evidences 
of this was the fact that the bottling department, large and 
perfect as it was, had to be enlarged to meet the increased de- 
mand. It seems only the other day that the Review reported 
tlie great extent of this department, and the machinery installed 
therein, making it the largest plant of the kind on tlie Pacific 
Coast. That this should have to be enlarged, plainly evi- 
dences the vast growth in the demand for John Wieland beer 
at home and abroad. 

This, Mr. Wagner states, is in a large extent due to the 
fact that the San Francisco Breweries have opened an agency 
in the cities of Hongkong and Shanghai, in China, where this 
fine brand 6i San Francisco beer is a great favorite. Another 
agency has been established at Panama, to give those working on 
the canal a chance to quench their thirst with pure malt and 
hops, prepared for their consumption at the John Wieland 
Brewery. The result is that that excellent brew known as 
"brown beer^' has become extremely popular over the entire 
canal zone, causing a large monthly demand. 

The city trade, both draft and bottle, has also increased con- 
siderably during the past year, and taking the total output 
into account, there can be no doubt that the "John Wieland" 
brand is becoming more popular every day, resulting in that 
brewery going ahead of its competitors. As to the San Fran- 
cisco market, the merits of this fine home-made beer has been 
so fully demonstrated, and the demand has grown to such a 
pitch, that the management has been forced to take under con- 
sideration the improvement of the delivery department by the 
employment of motor trucks. 



AT the end of January Assemblyman Polsley introduced h! 
"anti-treating" bill, the first section reading as follows: 

"Every licensed saloon in the State of California shall b 
conducted on the plan of 'no treating,' and every owner of an 
such saloon shall post and keep posted in a conspicuous ])Iac 
within the bar of such saloon a white placard, on which shal 
be printed in lilack letters not less than three inches liigh tli 
words 'No Treating." 

The bill also provides that any proprietor who sells liquo 
to any person to be drunk on the premises by any person othc 
than the one who pays for it shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. 



The recent liquor ordinance passed by the Blue Lake Board 
of Trustees limiting the number of saloons in that town to four, 
is receiving severe criticism, and a change is asked for. The 
Union hotel cannot be opened without a bar, and the drastic 
law passed prevents a license being granted for the hotel. 



Twenty Saloons For Alameda 



THERE will be no free licenses for Alameda social clubs d( 
siring to sell liquor on the premises to members. It w;i 
proposed to amend the charter to permit the Council to gran 
two such free licenses, but the Council voted down the propos 
tion by a vote of 4 to 2, and the liquor license ordinance wi] 
remain unchanged, providing for twenty licenses at iifSOO a yeai 
Nineteen of the twenty licenses are in effect, the final licoiis 
being reserved for a tourist hotel. 



Viewed from the standpoint of a business proposition tli 
liquor dealers of this city were well within their rights in a] 
pealing to the City Council to have the cost of licenses reduce* 
but the wisdom of the action, owing to the temper of the poo])l 
on the subject, is not so apparent. It is doubtless true that tli 
business at the present time does not justify the license fee d( 
manded by the city, but this condition is due to the fact that tli 
business is overdone; but, like any other line, this will reguhit 
itself, and will result in the survival of the fittest. The denloi 
of this city must recognize that the tendency of the times is liii; 
license and stricter regulation, and the less agitation the Iictti 
for all concerned. 

As a rule the saloons in this city are well conducted and con 
ply with requirements of the law, but it is a self-evident ]u-o]i 
sition that the dealers would be conserving their own interes 
by accepting conditions as they find them, and not enibarr;! 
the City Council by any further radical changes in the liceii- 
laws. 



lASH'SBITTERC 



» ' * ' * '« 






X 

?> 
^ 






■n 



WE HAVE NOTHING TO OFFER THE TRADE, EXCEPT 

Fine Goods, iSqtiare Prices 
Honorable Dealing 



' SOLE AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS 
OF THE CELEBRATED 



"Castlewood" Bourbon and Rye 

Cartan McCarthy & Co. 



Established 1873 



Telephone Kearny 3688 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE 

LIQUOR MERCHANTS 

S. E. CORNER BATTERY & COMMERCIAL STS. SAN FRANCISCO 



^»x,;;ixmR»»Sf<»»»»»»»»»»x»»}(^3tX<ff^Si^?i^x-}A»»K^^^ 



.1 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



37 



i 



Sam T.Bernard, Pbcs. 
Joe Zanetta. secy. 





[uNC+1 ,G RI LL &WlN E Roo AS. 

§ECOND BELOWyAARKET 

(3)aLr\ rV>ar\cisco,(al. 



#.-FINE GOODS A SPECIALTY -Ss ■ 
MERC+UNTSLUNC-H U A.Mto 2.30RM. 



R 



W. F. 



Opp. Emporium 



OEDER'S 

CAFE 

834 Market Street 

San Francisco 



-f-f--^-^ 






"The Cabin" 



PURE GOODS 



105 Montgomery St. ; ; ; Near Sutter St. 



^ "Only the Best the Market Affords" 

^Cuisine and Service Excellent = 



■f 

t 

■4- 



8 
I 




OR IGINAL 

: : Coppa : : 
Restaurant 



I 



J. COPPA, Proprietor 

Pine St. Bet. Montgomery 
and Kearny 



Music Evenings 

SAN FRANCISCO 



ALL ALE AND 

PORTER DRINKERS 



Should call for the celebrated 



BurnelVs 

Ale and Stout 

Brewed from the Best Malt Hops 
on the Market and used by all the 
Leading Clubs, Hotels and Beurs 



Order through any Grocer o( 
Liquor Dealer, or direct from 



Albion Ale and Porter Brewery 



INCORPORATED 

494 OTarrell St. 

TELEPHONE FRANKLIN 728 

San Francisco 




§1 

M 

m 



California's Most Famous Road House 

Midway of Sausalito and San Rafael 

= Finest Wines and Liquors = 



SERVICE UNEXCELLED 



Evergreen Private Arbor-Booth» ^^ 
Shuffle Board ^ Salt Water Bathing 



K 
^ 
^ 



Boating 



Refreshments 



N. BIEGEL, 

Proprietor 

Escalle, Marin County 

California 



q5 
w 

M 



^ 



THE OLD RELIABLE 



1871 GATO 1871 



CLEAR HAVANA CIGAR 



S. BACHMAN & CO. (Inc.) 

DISTRIBUTERS 



38 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



# j Quality of More Importance Than # t 

# Quantity in Vineyard. j#j 



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (College of Agricxil- 
ture), Oct. 20, 1910.— My Dear Mr. Wetmore: I am in 
receipt of several copies of the Stockton Record, and note with 
pleasure that \o\x are going to be a regular contributor to that 
journal. If you can make all your articles as interesting as 
the one I have just read, they ought to very much increase the 
circulation of the paper. 

Please stir up the wine makei's to the necessity of making 
better wine. Most of our troubles are due to the poor stuff 
we are turning out. If we could only grow better grapes and 
handle them intelligentlj^, there is no reason why we sliould 
care whether there is a large or a small crop in France. 

Hoping you will have good luck in your venture, I am yours 
very sincerely, FREDERIC T. BIOLETTI. 

The foregoing from the Professor of viticulture at Berkeley 
betrays me into a discussion which I would rather avoid for the 
present. 

I have had several inquiries as to the best varieties of grapes 
to be used in making unfermented grape juice; also as to same 
for preparing syrup to be used after dilution as a beverage; also 
as to the reason why so nmny people say they prefer the grape 
juice which is bottled in New York State. 

To these questions I can only give very general information. 
The question of taste is one that can not easily be discussed. 
I have seen some who like and prefer, both in unfermented 
grape juice and wines, qualities Avhich are entirely different 
from anything that I should select. 

The special quality that is liked in some of the Eastern grape 
juice is due to the peculiar flavor of the Concord variety, largely 
planted along the Hudson river. That grape imparts some of 
the wild flavor of the native American variety, to which Eastern 
palates are accustomed. It yields also much less sugar than our 
California grown European varieties, and being lighter in body, 
with pleasant harmony of acids and tonic properties, it is found 
grateful to the palate without dilution with water. Something 
may be due also to the lengtli of time the crushed fruit has been 
heated so as to extract the flavors of skins and seeds. In com- 
parison to some of the Eastern juices, some of ours tastes in- 
sipid, and being so sweet that they require dilution, they are not 
palatable without the addition of a little lemon flavor. 

The Zinfandel grape, Avhen overripe, is not likely to make the 
juice that will please many, although when it is known to be 
pure, and cheap enough, the consumer will drink it contentedly 
when improved with the lemon and diluted with a carbonated 
water. The Zinfandel has been often used because it was easier 
to procure than any other finer varieties, and at first was 
picked too ripe. Selecting the grapes at an earlier period and 
extracting more flavor from the skins and seeds has resulted 
in much improvement. 

All the ladies in this county who put up blackberries in jars 
know how much finer in flavor for such purposes are the wild 
berries, which they are willing to pay 10 cents a pound for, when 
they can get the luscious cultivated fruit for 5 cents. There are 
just the same distinctions of quality in many of the finer varie- 
ties of wine grapes, little understood, however, in this valley. 
Nevertheless, there are some selections that could be made here 
from grapes already bearing, and vast improvements are possi- 
ble by grafting many common stocks with fine varieties of Bur- 
gundy, Bordeaux and other places. 

In this line, it is not fair to reveal all that one privately 
knows of the skill acquired by certain producers, but it should 
ie evident that when John Swett & Son of Martinez, who have 



had twelve years' experience in this business and whose pro 
ducts rank highest among connoisseurs, come to this count\ 
and pay twice as much for grapes, which they select, as the local 
wineries pay, the question of the variety is an important one. 
The Swett vineyard in Contra Costa county was original] \ 
planted to make fine wines of the French types. They were 
pioneers in introducing grape juice, and their experience shows 
that the producer must stiidy quality as well as quantity and 
cheapness, if he wishes to please consumei's. 

The Martinez juice goes pricipally to Eastern markets and 
continues in favor. The California Wine Association at first 
found the question of insipidity a commercial obstacle to the 
popularity of the large output that they started to offer. Their 
recent products, however, show that they have modified their 
methods by selecting fruit better adapted to the purpose, and 
the demand for their bottlings shows largely increased favor. 

The flame Tokay will surely make a fine syrup, when properly 
treated to remove excess of acid and cream of tartar, and may 
eventually drive much of the corn syrup out of the market; 
or which is just as well, fairly divide the greater market which 
is coming for such good table supplies. So also will the Mission 
grape, while other varieties may be better for making syrup 
containing all the natural properties of the pure juice to be used 
after dilution as a beverage. 

Producers need not expect to please the taste of the public, 
if they have none of their own and do not consult with more 
experienced men before deciding how to conduct a new business. 
The question of purity is not the whole thing. The wine men, 
especially those of other counties, Avho have experience witli the 
finer varieties of wine grapes, can give them very useful liints. 
Most of the wine grapes in this section h.ave been planted with 
special reference to sale at standard prices to the big sweet win(> 
establishments, which have not offered sufficient premium to 
induce the planting of such varieties as are used for the finesi 
dry Avines. To get quality in unfermented grape juice, there 
must be a sacrifice in quantity of crops and a commensurate 
increase in prices for grapes according to (]uality and yield. 

This is a timely discussion, because now is the season for pre 
paring to graft vines, to suit future tastes, There is a great 
insuft'iciency of the fine varieties in all the counties, but no one 
is tempted to plant, or graft with them in this valley, becaus'' 
there are no wine makers making a specialty of fine wines. 

Those who are dissatisfied with low prices for grapes and an 
willing to go into the business of making fine wines on their 
own premises, according to methods that are very different from 
those which they see about them, should do something to ac 
quire the necessary elementary knowledge. The first step is to 
get together those Avho are willing to learn, as we used to do iu 
the coast counties, and, through exchange of information and 
the discussion of principles by experts, advance in skill as their 
work goes on. The first step is to determine to make up their 
own crops, beginning with small wineries suited to their cli- 
mate, small cooperage, good fellowship and an entirely new 
stock of vines, which they must order very soon, before the 
cuttings are all burned. 

There ought to be enough public spirit among growers to 
provide regular places of meetings and to subscribe funds to 
pay ordinary expenses. Subjects such as they wish to discuss 
technically are not such as newspapers can indulge in to the 
extent necessary for practical improvement. 

As to improvement in wine making, I could offer much, but 
unless it is desired by some who are not now wine makers it 
would be rather unwelcome criticism. Let it be understood, 
however, that when advocates of wine drinking are speaking, 
they are not thinking of sweet wines fortified with spirits, whiclt 
should never be used except as an occasional luxury in small 
glasses. 



n 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



39 



Conceruinjj: sweet wines, or the whole class of products Avhich 

coutain a large percentage of distilled spirits, I must admit that 

I the steady market demand makes tliem more staph? than the dry 

■tij|inps. and for that reason they should be perfected as far as 

Hnssiblc. Those who use wine only occasionally, especially the 

^ladies, prefer the strong sweet wines, to be served Avith cake or 

desserts. Convalescents are also directed to use them in small 

doses by many doctors, and sherries are often desired as mere 

appetizers. Habitual wine drinkers, who use light clarets and 

hite wines at their i.neals, seldom touch a glass of sweet wine. 

The improvements that can be made in sweet wines are many 

d are largely involved in proper aging and clarifying. Tin? 

thods of fermentation mav also be verv different from what 



the general practice here. The 



general 



public is, however, 



Dt interested in the details of technical work, Avhich should be 
iken up with plenty of time for proper discussion by the few 
10 may wisli to associate together to acquire information. 
|I will, however, venture to say that even with the grapes now 
Ranted and the general method of fermentation adopted, such 
iprovement in our present cellars could be made by proper 
^llar treatment that in one year the demand for products would 
doubled. I am sure that this would be true with respect 
the dry wines. 
;I was once asked to write for a wine journal in the East, 
lich was attempting to call out a concensus of opinion that the 
)ple should drink more wine, and reasons why they did not 
so. I sent a brief answer to the effect that instead of ad- 
TTressing such a (piestion to the wine dealers it should be ad- 
dressed to consumers. I called attention to the old saying that 
"you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink.'' 
The horse should be asked why he does not drink. The answer 
would probably be that the horse didn't like the water. So 
much wine is made to plea.se the lowest class of trade and to 
( ompete for cheapness that the more fastidious tastes prefer to 
find satisfaction in beer and whisky. 

There are not as many fine wine grapes, nor as much choice 
w ine in the State now as there was twenty-five years ago. Is 
(he denmnd or the supply to blame? Such a question can only 
1»(; properly discussed when there are men who wish to engage 
in an effort to prove that better qualities Avill find a market. 
Co-operation is quite out of the question in this field. Each 
individual must cultivate his own taste and sell goods on his 
own merits. Not every man is qualified by nature to be an artist 
or a good cook; and each producer must have some taste for 
(lie business and respect for his products. He must learn to be 
his own cellar master, and 100 acres will be a large area for 
him to care for. One hundred such wine makers, if they had 
I he true spirit and lived on their vineyards, might find occupa- 
(ion here. But can you find 100 gi-ape growers in this county 
who would be happy in such a life pursuit? 

Let me add only this much : It is a mistake to think that this 
county is only fit for sweet Avines. Fine dry wines can be made 
here, but not by present methods. In 1886 we had only a fcAV 
bearing varieties of the famous Bordeaux claret grapes to begin 
(ine Avine making. I used Avhat I had then in Livermore and 
Ceorge AV'est sent me the feAv tons he had in Stockton. I made 
(hem up separately, and, as all fine Avines should be kept, ma- 
(ured the products separately. The Avines made from the El 
Pinal vineyard Avere among the lot I exhibited at the Paris ex- 
])()sition in 1889 and much admired by French connoisseurs- 
>io much so that I received a gold medal and letters from Paris 
asking for the agency for my vintage. They did not knoAV hoAV 
little Ave had of such fine material. The El Pinal Bordeairx 
vines have since been killed by phylloxera, and none replanted. 
TAventy-five years ago the El Pinal brandies, from the White 
Prolific in the old fashioned Avay and properly aged. Avere es- 
teemed luxuries and popular in all our local clubs. Today you 
can find no such product. Choice qualities of port and other 



sweet Avine grapes Avere then kept separate in small cooperage, 
aged .and broiight high pi'ices. 

CHAS. A. WETMORE. 



There Were Blends in Pliny's Day. 



JEMSHEED, Avho is celebrated as the founder of Persepolis, 
is said to have been the first Avho invented Avine. He was 
immoderately fond of grapes, and desired to preserve some; 
they Avere placed for this purpose in a large A'essel, and lodged 
in a vault for future use. ^Vhen the vessel Avas opened the 
grapes had fermented; and their juice, in this state, Avas so 
acid that the King belicAed it must be poisonous. He had some 
vessels filled Avith it, and poison Avritten upon each; they Avere 
placed in his room. It happened that one of his favorite ladies 
was affected with a nerAOus headache, aud the pain disti'acted 
her SO much that she desired death. Observing a vessel with 
poison Avritten on it, .she took it, and swallowed the contents. 
The Avine, for such it had become, OA'erpoAvered the lady, who 
fell doA\n in a sound sleep, and aAvoke much refreshed. De- 
lighted Avith the remedy, she repeated the dose so often that the 
monarch's poison Avas all drank ! He soon discovered this, and 
forced the lady to* confess Avhat she had done. A quantity of 
wine Avas made, and Jemsheed and all his court drank of the 
ueAv beverage; which, from the circumstance that led to its 
discovery, is this day known in Persia by the name of Zeher-e- 
Kooshon, the delightful poison. 

Wine among the ancient Romans Avas serA-ed in large earthern 
vases, Avhich circulated as the decanters do, after dinner, at an 
English table, each having a label describing the age and qual- 
ity of the li(iuor it containwl. The Romans had cups to drink out 
of, of \arious dimensions and materials. The most generally 
used was called a ci/athus. It Avas a small goblet, Avliich, at 
elegant tables, Avas. usually of gold or silver, and not unfre- 
quently ornamented with precious stones. It contained about 
the same quantity as a modern Avine glass. 

The Avine, Avhen brought to table, Avas passed through strain- 
ers, in Avliich Avere small pieces of ice, and it was sometimes 
both cooled and Aveakened by an admixture of snoAv. In Avinter 
it Avas usual to temper it Avith Avarm water. The Avine was not 
poured from the vase, but the cyathus Avas dipped into it; and 
in houses Avhere much eticnu^tte of attendance Avas observed that 
duty Avas performed by boys, attired with more care than the 
ordinary slave. 

The Avine Avas kept in large jars, formed like urns, and usually 
stopped Avith a composition of pitch and mastick, cork being 
but seldom used for that purpose. The date of the vintage Avas 
marked on the stoi)per, Avhich was sealed and had the signet of 
the groAver as an attestation of the genuine quality of the 
liquor. 

The Avine Avas often preserved to a great age. In the time of 
Pliny the Elder there Avas wine Avhich Avas made during the 
consulshi]) of L. Opimius, and, consequently, about tAvo hundre^l 
years old. This old irinc icas not drunk, but chiefly employed 
to f/ire strength and flavor to other vyihe tcith tchieh it ims 
mixed in small quantities; and the price ims so excessive that an 
ounce weight of it, according to Pliny, must have cost about four 
pounds English. 



lASH'S BITTERC 



40 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 




^^ 






% -'WmSD NOTE/. 



Jas. de Fremery & Co. report that the advertising campaign 
of Carstairs whisky has begun to develop a very considerable 
demand for that high grade whisky. In consequence, C. L. 
Fisher, well and favorably known in the trade, has been en- 
gaged to handle the sale of it in San Francisco and the Paci- 
fic Coast generally. 



Such has been the public's demand for Yosemite beer that 
the Enterprise Brewing Company has been obliged to make 
enlargements and improvements. In consequence a 450-barrel 
copper brewing kettle has ben installed, and an order placed 
for a bottle filler with the capacity of 75 quarts or 120 pints to 
the minute. Other improvements are in course of construction. 



The many friends of James Raggi, the popular importer and 
retailer in the Montgomery Block, will read with great satisfac- 
tion that he has entirely recovered from Brtght's disease. Mr. 
Raggi is enjoying the climate of Los Angeles and will remain 
until he has again regained his strength. Mr. Raggi's case was 
a desperate one and he Avas saved by taking Fulton's Renal Com- 
pound. 



Paul Masson, president of the Masson Champagne Company 
of San Jose, Cal., was in the city during the past week, helping 
to greet the men who went to Washington and brought back a 
World's Fair Exposition. Replying to a question as to the 
status of his business, Mr. Masson stated that during the past 
year it had quadrupled. "I don't know why this great increase 
developed, except that it is a matter of appreciation of my 
Avines," said he, "for I have made no extra effort to create a 
larger demand. The outlook is highly gratifying, and I believe 
that the World's Exposition will do great things for California.'' 



Percy T. Morgan, retired president of the California Wine 
Association, will take his family to Europe shortly and indulge 
himself in a two years' rest, to the end that he may recover his 
health. Speaking to the writer of his retirement, Mr. Morgan 
said that he had the satisfaction of knowing that in resigning his 
position he leaves the Association to his successor in a better 
financial condition that it ever Avas before. It Avas the strenuous 
labor of bringing the big corporation up to this point that un- 
dermined Mr. Morgan's health and made it necessary for him 
to temporarily retire from all active business. His many, many 
friends will wish for him a pleasant sojourn and restored health. 



Hugo T. Taussig is noAV touring in Asia and has reached the 
desert country, from which he has sent home several photo- 
graphs. He does not say so, but it is a reasonable deduction 
to be drawn from the views in question that he thinks that it is 
a good country for the prohibitionists to be banished to. There 
is but little Avater to drink and any one indulging in intoxicants 
of any kind Avould be liable to death under the ^laluminiedan 
biAV. In that country, Avhere there is no god but Allah, and 
.Mahomet is his prophet, blind pigs and boot-leggers would be 
soon al)olished, and Bristol et al. could haul doAvn the cross and 
hoist the Crescent, it being well knoAvn that tlieir love and ador- 
ation of the Son of God is bounded only by the possibility of 
enacting a Mahommedan laAV in a Christian country. 



J A. BARLOTTI, secretary of the Italian Vineyard Company 
• of Los Angeels, called at the Review sanctum on his Avay 
home from an extended trip East in the interest of his com- 
pany, particularly in reorganizing tlie New York office. Mr. 
Barlotti reported conditions very encouraging. Buyers took the 
recent raise in Avine prices very nicely, realizing that it Avas just 
and necessary to the Avell-being of the trade and industry. 
Things are moving along in good shape and it is believed a steady 
improvement Avill continue. He took an active part in boosting 
for the Exposition, Avorking through the American Wine Asso- 
ciation, the Board of Trade, Chamber of Commerce and social 
clubs of NeAV York in the interest of San Francisco. Mr. Bar- 
lotti feels assured that the Exposition Avill do great things for 
not only this city, but the entire Coast. 



Siebe Bros. & Plagemann, Avholesale Avine and liquor mer- 
chants, 430-34 Battery St., and handlers of California's finest 
brandies, reported that 1910 Avas an improvement upon 1909 
and believed 1911 promised to be a successful year in the Avine 
and spirit trade. Reports received from their commercial trav- 
ellers intimated that uoav sufficient rain had put at rest all 
fears of a dry year, prosperity in the interior Avas bound to 
reflect upon the amount of trade done by San Francisco whole- 
salers. The company intervicAved said that the Exposition 
Avould be the greatest advertisement that the Pacific Coast had 
ever enjoyed, and it naturally foUoAved that the result Avould 
be great trade activity in all lines. Such activity A\-ould reflect 
particularly upon both the Avholesale and retail branches of the 
Avine and liquor trade, and Siebe Bros. & Plagemann tliereforc 
belicA-ed that the holding of the Exposition in San Francisco 
would insure good business conditions for years to come. 



i 

i 

i 
I 

i 

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►«»-^te-«»- 




THIS TRADE-MARK REPRESENTS 

THE HIGHEST STANDARD OF 

EXCELLENCE, THE AMERICAN 

GENTLEMAN'S WHISKEY 

RIPENED BY MATURITY, IN ABSOLUTE PURITY 

HUNTER 
BALTIMORE RYE 



Wm. Lanahan & Son, Baltimore, Md. 



i- 



PACIFIC WINE AND SriRIT REVIEW 



41 



Wine Association Elects New President. 



ON February 23(1 the California Wine Association held its 
seventeenth annxial ineetini?. Percy T. Morgan, president 
of the Association, read his report for the year, after which the 
following Board of Directors was elected : B. R. Kittredge, M, 
J. Fontana, J. Frowenfeld, I. W. Hellman Jr., J. J. Jacobi, 
Daniel Meyer, C. O. G. Miller, Henry Rosenfeldt, P. C. Rossi, 
V. ^y. Van Sicklen and W. Hansen. 

President Morgan, who has guided the fortunes of the Asso- 
ciation for sixteen years, announced his retirement, which led 
to speeches in high appreciation of his services, by P. C. Rossi, 
All)crt Meyer, Claus Schilling, J. J. Jacobi and I. W. Hell- 
:inan Jr. ' ' 

^"Then followed the election of Benjamin R. Kittredge as 
president of the Association in Mr. Morgan's place. The new 
president is well known to the wine trade. He is a member of 
the firm of George West & Son, Inc., of Stockton, the Sonoma 
Wine and Brandy Company of New York, and one of the largest 
producers of sweet wines in the United States. A graduate of 
Harvard University, he turned the knowledge obtained at his 
Alma ilater to good account, amassed a large fortune, and has 
been classed as a millionaire in New York, of which State he 
has hitherto been a resident. Hereafter California will be his 
home, and as Mr. Sbarboro, in speaking of Mr. Kittredge's ap- 
pointment, pertinently said, "He has conducted his own affairs 
to so great an advantage that there can be no doubt of his suc- 
cess as the head of the California Wine Association." 

Claus Schilling was re-elected as a director, but he insisted 
upon resigning, as he is about to leave for Europe. 

J. Frowenfeld was re-elected first vice-president and William 
Hansen second vice-president, secretary and manager, in wliicl! 
position he has for a long time past rendered the Association 
most acceptable service, and by his bonhomie and courtesy 
made many friends. 

The business of the meeting was followed by an enjoyaltle 
banquet, the Association's cellars being drawn upon for the 
choicest brands, and as usual at the Association's meetings, 
those present returned well satisfied that the future had in store 
many years of usefulness and financial profit for the sharehold- 
ers and all connected with it. 



In 1909 Plumas went dry. Since that time there has been an 
agitation for the reopening of saloons under strict regulations 
and it was claimed that the dry ordinance had proved ineffec- 
tive. So the present ordinance has been drawn up fixing the 
license at the sum of |400 annually, or f 100 a quarter, and a 
bond of 12000 must be furnished. The board reserves the right 
to revoke the license at any time for cause or the violation of 
any of the provisions of the ordinance. 



Petitions are being circulated in Bakersfield by the W. C. 
T. U. requesting the City Trustees to enact an ordinance making 
it illegal for saloons to do business evenings and Sundays. The 
Union desires that the saloons shall be obliged to keep the usual 
business hours of other stores, opening at 7 a. m. and closing at 
6 p. m., except on Saturday nights, when they may keep open 
until 10 p. m., closing then until Monday at 7 a. m. 



A Sisson dispatch states that some of the wholesale liquor 
dealers in Siskiyou are up against it since the county outside 
of the incorporated towns went "dry" on January 1st. The 
Southern Pacific refuses to receive liquors for shipment to any 
points in Siskiyou County except the incorporated towns of 
Yreka, Etna Mills, Fort Jones, Dunsmuir, Dorris, Sisson and 
Montague. Thus, a Avholesale liquor dealer in Sisson might ex- 
pect to do a good business in Weed, Edgewood and McCloud, 
all close by, but shipments by rail are impossible. 



Immense Beer Consumption. 



T^HE beer sales of 1910 were over 61,000,000 barrels as against 
A 57,000,000 in 1909, 56,000,000 in 1908, and 60,000,000 in 
1907, the high record year prior to 1910. BrcAvers generally 
believe that this record quantity will be increased in the pres- 
ent year. 

Beer sales in every month last year increased over the corres- 
ponding month of 1909, except in November, when there was 
a snmll decrease of 88,031 barrels. The largest gain was in 
March, when the increase was 914,570 barrels. Figures for 
December show a gain in output of 247,738 barrels, the total 
production for the month being 4,457,780 barrels. 



THE NEW BIG WINERY IN SACRAMENTO 
SOLICITS YOUR PATRONAGE 

CALL FOR 

"VESTAL VINTAGES" 

SACRAMENTO VALLEY WINERY 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



42 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



tfttmm*»^ttmt*mm^i**»^***m*mttmmmtt 9 * m ii> »■ ii > * mnmrnm** ■ • ■ n mmm*tmmmt*^mmtfmm*t^mm**mm m i 4* *»*«*>• 






i # I SEATTLE AND NORTHWEST NEWS i w 



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i 



1 



! 












SEATTLE, Fob. 20 : — Seattle's cafes and regular restaurants 
have been struck a hard blow by the new Chief of Police, 
appointed by Mayor-elect Billing. Captain Banning is not 
a prude, but the new Mayor, despite his friends' contention 
that he was a "good felloAV," is going to extremes that are likely 
to bankrupt a number of men. He dug up an old ordinance — 
1884 — to the effect that women and others can not drink licjiior.s 
in a restaurant unless that restaurant has ca bar in full view. 

There are many repairs going on, but the laAV is onerous and 
extreme. Thousands of persons, wont to indulge in a glass of 
beer or a bottle of wine at their meals were inconvenienced. 
There are a number of similarly silly regulations under way, 
all of which are wonderfully annoying. 

The new Mayor was once a member of the Legislature here. 
His record is almost forgotten, for he was young and his acts 
were mediocre except for one thing. He always voted "dry." 
He Avas a fanatic on the question of liquor, as he is today. It is 
predicted that he will turn to. his old habits as far as possible 
before he has been in office long. 



Bellingham is noAV showing the rest of the State the beaxities 
of a dry town, where vice and drink are unknown. Recently, 
however, the beauties of the new regime astonished some of the 
good folk of the dry league. Several police sergeants and 
patrolmen raided a cellar in this desert place and arrested 
thirty men who were found buying booze from the dry-pigger 
who ran the place. As an evidence of the thoroughly arid con- 
dition of the toAATi it is said that more arrested men are hope- 
lessly drunk these days than ever in the history of Belling- 
ham. Of the thirty arrested in the cellar, for example, twelve 
were not able to walk to the police station and three taxicabs 
were summoned into the service as auxiliary aids. 



J. J. Cavanaugh, late of Worcester, Massachusetts, is one of 
the best informed men in Seattle on matters pertaining to the 
failures of Prohibition in the East. Worcester, be it known, 
was for three years the largest absolutelv "dry"' city in the 
United States, but during those three years, savs Cavanaugh, 
the humidity alcoholically speaking, Avas greater than at any 
time in the history of Worcester. Mr. Cavanaugh, be it knoAAU, 
is a A\ddely traveled man, though a natiAC of Worcester. He is 
an educated commercial traveler, for years a dealer in Avorld's 
fair concessions, and a good mixer. Here is his story of Wor- 
cester's experiment: 

"Drunkenness and indecency throve to such an extent during 
those three years that the sensible folk of the city OA^erwhelming- 
ly voted for high license, since the ado])tion of which the morals 
have assumed their normal condition. During the 'dry' years 
beer and whisky in large quantities reached men, Avomen, and 
even little boys. Express Avagons carrying liquor were fre- 
quently robbed bA' mobs of lads from 14 to IS, and it Avas neces- 
sarv to put policemen on the wagons. EA'en this did not stop 
the floAv of booze. Prostitution and drunkenness Avere never so 
bad as during those years. Rooming houses and cellars became 
dens of drunkenness and debaucherv." 



Everett has folloAved Bellingham in its cm of blindpigging. 
-Tames Xnos, a Greek proprietor of a house on RiA^erside, has 
boon arrested and convicted for runnintr a blind pig. Uo 
pleaded guilty and AAas fined $10. The police sav there are so 
many others operating that it is strange that Xnos was con- 



victed. It is generally known that there is plenty to be had if 
the person only knoAvs how to get it. Xnos AA-as a little careless. 

Whatcom county, Washington, now has only six saloons 
doing business openly and these six are located in the town 
of Sumas, Avhere the majority of the citizens have voted to kec]) 
the place "Avef for another two years. Recently the last re- 
maining five saloons in the country districts, outside the incor- 
porated toAvns, closed their doors, by order of the board of 
county commissioners. No excitement or trouble of any kind 
marked the close of the saloons in the country. As Avas the 
case Avhen the saloons of Bellingham closed, the saloonmen sold 
a big part of their stocks to people AA'ho Avanted to lay in supplies 
of the liquid refreshments for the long dry period ahead of 
them. 



Mayor A. V. FaAvcett of Tacoma, Washington, has been re- 
called and is naturally on the Avarpath in consequence. He noAP 
declares that his life is threatened and |5000 offered for his 
assassination. As he has been a bitter enemy of the saloons 
he attributes the threat against his life and his recall to the 
Royal Arch and special interests. M. B. Stambaugh, AA'ho con- 
diicted the recall movement against FaAVcett, declares, hoAvever, 
that he is not acting for the Royal Arch but in behalf of the 
taxpayers generally. 



The standing of Washington's Governor on the local option 
question is clearly shown by his message, in which he recom- 
mends a county unit laAA', and that it be strengthened in the 
clauses providing for the enforcement provisions. He also 
recommends as a further regulative measure that from and 
after January 1, 1912, the sale of liquor in licensed territory 
be confined to the hours betAveen sunrise and sunset, on the 
lines of the Avell knoAA^n Nebraska daylight saloon laAV. 



Whew ! 

THE Portland, Oregon, Oregonian declares that the "driest'' 
bill that Avas ever introduced in the Oregon Legislature, 
or perhaps in any Legislature, Avas presented to the Senate by 
Senator Dimick, by request. The bill would not only prohibit 
the selling of liquor on any train or boat of any description, 
but Avould impose a fine of |50 to |500 and imprisonment from 
10 to 30 days, upon any one taking aboard a train, streetcar, 
stag(% boat or public conveyance, liquor in any quantity, either 
inside or out, for the bill prohibits persons under the influence 
of li(]uor from boarding any such public conveyances. The hill 
has the approval of the Oregon State Railroad Commission. 



Bellingham, Washington, has raised the question of Avhcther 
or not a person has a right to store away intoxicating ]i(iuorsi 
Charles Lind, a contractor, Avho became possessed of a quantity 
of intoxicating li(iuids by the foreclosure of a mortgage on the 
CroAvn bar, has been arrested and Avill have to stand trial, al- 
though there is no evidence that he tried to sell any Avhisky from 
his stock of goods. Hoav is that for tyrannical persecution? 



The City Attorney of Roseburg, (Mc, lias rendered an opin- 
i(m that licenses can be issued in tlmt town Avithout the neces- 
sity of an election. He says, "If the home rule bill means any- 
iliing, it means that cities that voted 'wet' at the last election, 
when the bill was carried, have the right to regulate the sale 
of intoxicating liquors Avithin their corporate limits Avithout 
holding an election." 



PAriFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



43 



Plans Pure Food Campaign. 



Duriiif: Jauuary at Newport, Oregon, the new council in 
deference to the wishes of the people, as expressed in last No- 
vember's election, when the "wets" won by a majority of 22, 
issued four licenses for saloons under a very stringent ordi- 
nance. Business is permitted from 5 a. m. to 10 p. m., except 
on Saturday when 11 p. m. is the closing hour. Besides the 
$1000 license fee each applicant had to put up a $2000 bond 
and have a petition signed by at least 20 per cent of the voters 
of the Unvu at the last general election. 

1 Food Manufacturers Association that the organization is 
now an incorporated body. Its members are planning a vigor- 
us camgaign for this season. The principles to which the asso- 
tion is committed include the following: 
"Absolute prohibition of the use of chemicals of any kind in 
e manufacture of food products. The strictest observance 
the laws of health, sanitation and cleanliness in the pro- 
ess of manufacture. The use of only the purest and most 
wholesome raw products in the manufacture and packing of 
foods. Sti'ict enforcement of the National Food and Drugs 
Act, and the most efficient, scientific and legal interpretation 
of the law's provisions. The enactment and strict enforcement 
of State food laws corresponding to the National Food Law. 
The open-to-the-public principle in all establishments engaged 
in commercial food products. The education and enlighten- 
ment of the public with regard to conditions under which foods 
are prepared commercially. The support of public measures 
looking to the protection of the public health and welfare." 

The members are: The Shredded Wheat Co., Merrill-Soule 
Co., E. C. Hazard, Price Flavoring Extract Co., Belle Meade 
Sweets, the Walter M. Lowney Co., Chase & Sanborn, William 
Underwood Co., the Flei.schmann Co., Charles Gulden, Hyler's, 
Beech-Nut Packing Co., H. .J. Heinz Co., Franco-American Food 
• Co., Richardson & RobbiTis^ Sealshipt Oyster System, Charles E. 
Hires Co., J. W. Beardsley's Sons, Hunt Brothers Co., Atmore 
& Son. 



Trademark.s Sought to Be Registered in the Patent Office. 

THE following trademarks have been favorably acted on by 
the Patent Office and will be registered at the expiration of 
30 days unless objected to. Any person who believes he woiikl 
be damaged by the registration of a mark is entitled by law to 
oppose it within the said time. All inquiries should be ad- 
dressed to Edward S. Duvall, Jr., patent and trademark lawyer. 
Loan and Trust Building, Washington, D. C, who will furnish 

(particulars how to proceed. 
I Serial No. 51,789. Representation of a typical Dutch high 
Wficial in the dress of the seventeenth century, the picture be- 
ing fanciful. Owner: Blankenheyn & Nolets Distilleerderij, 
Rotterdam, Holland. Used on gin and cordials. Claims use 
since June 1, 1909. 

Serial No. 49,407. Word : Coin. Owner : The Krantz Brew- 
ing Company, Findlay, Ohio. Used on beer. Claims use since 
about June 15, 1905. 

Serial No. 52,132. Representation of portrait of applicant 
with the words, Braumeister Beer Extract arranged in an 
ellipse around the portrait. Owner: Henning Wennersten, 
Chicago, 111. Used on a concentrated extract of malt and hops 
for use as a beverage. Claims use since on or about June 1, 
1908. 

Serial No. 49,122. Representation of a narrow bottle in the 
center of which is a portrait of a man and around the whole a 



fanciful border. Owner : Bosch & Co., Badalona, near Barce- 
lona, Spain. Used on anisette. Claims use since 1878. 

Serial No. 52,200. Representation of a small doe's head ar- 
ranged at the top and in the center of four concentric circles. 
Owner: Whitbread & Company, Ltd., London, England. Used 
on ale. Claims use since November, 1869. 

Serial No. 52,201. Label same as 52,200. Owner: Same as 
52,200. Used on stout. Claims use since November, 1869. 



Criticism of California Brewing Barley. 



THE California Development Board is in receipt of a commu- 
nication indirectly from Mr. Adolphus Busch of the An- 
heuser-Busch Brewing Company of St. Louis, in which he makes 
some pertinent criticisms on California barley. He states that 
the United States needs about one hundred million bushels of 
barley for its beer and malt production and that California 
could easily supply 33 1-3 per cent of that consumption if the 
barley were properly handled. It is Mr. Busch's opinion that 
the crops should be handled with the same care that is shown 
wheat and that the shipments should be properly rated by ex- 
pert officers duly appointed so that the purchaser of this cereal 
would get a certificate which would be a sufficient guarantee 
as to the quality and general cleanliness of Iiis barley. The 
barley should be rated just like wheat in three grades, namely, 
bay brewing, feed barley and chevalier. Every carload of barley 
leaving the State should go out with a certificate showing just 
the condition. Neglect of this very important feature of agri- 
culture may mean a lo.ss to this State of many thousands of dol- 
lars each year. Mr. Busch is a large purcha.ser and is naturally 
interested in getting the best article that can be produced. 
Some time ago he communicated with commission men on this 
subject with the result that the consumers get a slightly better 
grade of barley and that the growers have since been getting 
better prices. Inasmuch as California derives a large revenue 
fi'om the growing of barley and as the future business in this 
staple is bound to be large, it should be the business of every 
barley grower in this State to pay more attention to the culture 
of better varieties and to the cleanliness of the barley itself. 



THE SUPREME TEST 

flWhen the good news came Tuesday morn- 
ing, Jan. 31, tliat our dear Sm Francisco 
would get the Fair, everybody wanted to 
telephone. 

fl Upstairs in the Main Central Office of the 
Home Telephone Company, at 333 Grant 
Avenue, where the automatic switchboards 
are located, the connecting devices started 
in to hum and click. 

^As the volume of messages increased the 
automatic machines made a noise Hke ten 
thousand typewriters all going at once, for 
the whole city wa.s telephoning — but the 
Homephone stood up under the load. 

' flWe met the extreme emergency, and tlie 
many thousands of Homephone patrons 
received instant information from their 
friends that S in Francisco would surely get 
the Fair. 

Bay Cities Home Telephone Company 

SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND BERKELEY 




44 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



»«» ^^ «>- 



Large Wine Cellar. 



Vineyard and Cellar 



,«»^>i « » ^fc »» ^fc «» ^fc «»- 



Large Acreage of Vines is Being Planted. 

A CONSIDERABLY larger acreage of new vines than usual 
is being planted in the vineyards of the Livermore valley 
this year. The stock is all resistant and most of it is imported 
from France. The Sauterne varieties predominate. 

The acreage as far as obtainable that is being planted by the 
various vineyardists is as follows: Theo. Oier Company, 30 
acres ; C. H. Wente, 15 acres ; Concannon Estate, 8 acres ; Louis 
Mey, 6 acres ; Wetmore-Bowen Co., Cresta Blanca vineyard, 10 
acres; C. A. Buckley, 10 acres; G. H. Hughes, 2 acres; Mrs. 
Sara B. Smith, Olivina, 5 acres; C. L. Crellin, Ruby Hill vine- 
yard, 10 acres ; John Gilcrest, Escondido vineyard, 10 acres. 



Urge Qrape=Qrowers to Organize Associations. 

CERTAINLY C. A. Wetmore's advice to grape-growers in- 
structing them to form a local association, should be fol- 
lowed. He points out the advantage of having a manager to 
nmrket such an association's crop, so as to be able to enjoy the 
same advantage as the owners of the large vineyards. He says : 
"This plan is favored, I understand, by Ceorge West & Son. It 
is more satisfactory to deal for crops from 400 to 500 acres in a 
bunch than to bargain for many small lots independently. It 
is plain to see that the owners of large vineyards have had a 
great advantage over the small growers, and the reason is ob- 
vious. The large vineyards are temptations to owners to put up 
wineries, and to ki^p them from doing so they very naturally 
receive offers from the big wineries which are more satisfactory 
than i)rices paid to snuiU growers, wlio are not feared as com- 
ix'titors." 



J. Fredson, the winery uuin between Windsor and Healds- 
burg, Sonoma County, is shipping his stock of wine to a prom- 
inent house of San Francisco. He has about 120,000 gallons 
to ship and is well known by the wine dealers for his excellent 
vintage. 



Another organ i7-ation of Avine men is re])()rted from Pasadena, 
namely, the filing of articles of incorporation by 1'. Etienne, J. 
M. Etienne Jr. and J. F. Thompson, with a capital stock of 
$25,000. The new corporation covers the business of Etienne 
Bros, of Pasadena. 



A Healdsbxirg dispatch states that a well-known Dry Creek 
wine maker has been offered 15 cents for his cellar of last year's 
wine, about 30,000 gallons. The offer was refused in the evi- 
dent expectation of better prices in the near future. It is also 
reported that John Miaglia has sold his 1909 vintage for 17 
cents. 



Angelo Lencioni of Dry Ci-eek Valley, recently shipped three 
carloads of wine to his Seattle house. Mr. Lencioni says the 
wine market is looking brighter and that he will increase the 
capacity of his winery next season, which is indicative of a 
stronger market and means good prices for next season's grape 
crop. 



Early in January a considerable numter of grape-growers 
assembled at Fresno to open up a small quantity of grapes 
which had beeii in cold storage a year. It is said that the grapes 
Avere found to be in excellent condition and that grapes are 
likely to be stored in large quantities for shipment in the win- 
ter and spring. 



ARCHITECT LANSBURCH has let contracts to Masow & 
jMorrison for the erection of important wine cellars and 
cooperage for Schlesinger & Blunder, the wine merchants, and 
work is noAV under way for the erection of their new warehouse, 
which will cover 27,000 square feet of ground upon a triangular 
lot bounded by Sixteenth street, Kansas street and the Western 
Pacific right of way, upon which this company has laid a pri- 
vate spur track. The capacity of these cellars will be 1,500,000 
gallons. The building will have reinforced concrete founda- 
tions. The exterior walls will be of different colored brick. 
The building with its fixtures will cost in the neighborhood of 
$100,000, at a total aggregate rental of $125,000. 



Thousand=Acre Vineyard. 



SEVEN hundred acres of Muscatel grapes are to be ])ut in 
on the Homeland Aci-es, Escondido, by the Escondido Val- 
ley Land and Planting Company. Three hundred acres were 
put in last .season, which makes this one of the large viueyards 
in the State. 



As far as Sutter county is concerned, if recent reports are to 
be believed, there will be a shortage of wine grapes the comiug 
season A recent dispatch from Yuba City states that the Sutter 
county growers have graftfnl their wine grapes Avith Thompson 
seedless. The dispatch adds: "With many thousands of acn^s 
of land adapted to raisin groAving in the Sacramento Valley, it 
is predicted that Avith the new grajye prodiwt that it Avill not 
be a great number of years beff)re the northern part of Califor 
nia will equal the Fre.sno district in the raisin production.'" 



A rumor among Lodi shipi>iug men alleges that Frank West 
has nmde a statement that the prices that the California Wine 
Association will offer for Avine grapes this coming season Avill 
be as folloAvs: Zinfandels, $10 a ton; Alacante, B(mschet, $12; 
Petit SiiTali, $12; Tokays, culls or grapes on the vines, and with 
a seven-year contract, $8. They believe that in Mr. West did 
make such a statenu>nt he had authoritiy to do so from th(- 
Association. It Avonld appear to us that it is far too early for 
the Association or any other large buyer to have come to a con- 
clusion as to prices for the coming season. 



Pacific Copper Works 

L. WAGNER & SONS, Props. 

w^M 573 Mission Street, San Francisco 

I = 

OUR SPECIALTY OF MANU- 
FACTURING ALL KINDS OF 
STILLS, FILTERS, PASTEUR- 
IZERS AND COPPER AND 
BRASS WORK FOR WINERIES, 
DISTILLERIES, BREWERIES, 
ETC. FURTHER INFORMA- 
TION GIVEN UPON APPLI- 
CATION. 




Gold and Silver Medal awarded at 
Mechanics' and Midwinter Exposition 
for continuous still. 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



45 



'The stockholders of the California Vineyards and Improve- 
ment Company met at the grape juice plant at North Cuca- 
monjja and elofted the following hoard of directors : F. B. Van 
Fleet, president; A. T. (ialloAvay, vice-president; Benton Ballon, 
secretary; R. E. Gilbert, F. W. Whitney, R. L. Booth and F. E. 
George. The company has engaged the services of J. H. Trap- 
hagen as manager and salesman and he will at once undertake 
the work of visiting the various towns of Southern California 
with the object of interesting the merchants in the Mission 
brand of grape juice This company is mainly composed of local 
business men and grape growei-s and its success will mean a 
good market and better prices for the grape crop in this vicinity. 

I^PWith the noted Johannisberg vineyard, and, we fear, other 
celebrated German vineyards suffering from phylloxera, it is 
with pleasure that we note the fact that in both Sonoma and 
Napa counties the policy of progressive vineyardists is to sup- 
plement the yield of ordinary grapes with the choicer and finer 
varieties of grapes. Ex])erimental plantings are continually be- 
ing made, and from these many tests are bound to come good 
results and great improvements in the quality of our wines. If 
this policy is ])ei'severed with we hope the time will soon come 
when we may possess a Johannisberg of our own. 



The failure of the wine cro]) is to France Avhat the failure of 
the wheat or corn crop would be to the T'nited States. The aver- 
age annual production of wine in Fi-ance is 1,000,000,000 gal- 
lons. Last season the yield was only about 500,000,000 gallons. 
Figuring the wine at 20 cents per gallon, the loss to France 
would be 1100,000,000. It should be remembered that in France 
wine is jiart of the daily food and always on the table, even of 
the poorest peasant. Already it is observed that the scarcity 
and higher price of wine have caused thousands of French people 
to drink cider and beer in place of wine. Why not lower the 
present duty and import California wines? That would help 
some. 



(Jeorge W. Ashley, president of the San Joaquin Table Grape 
(irowers' Association, in his annual report, lauds the inde- 
pendent wineries. He says: "The wine grape industry is in 
better condition than for several years, thanks to the short crop 
in Europe and to the independent Avineries here, and especially 
to the independent wineries corporation, which is the banding 
together of over thirty of the independent wineries of the State 
^nd the consequent control of the majority of the sweet wines of 
e State by the growers. And right hei'e place a great big credit 
lark after the names of W. C. Brown and Ed Williamson. 
D(m't think it has not taken a whole lot of work to organize our 
winery. Don't think that Messrs. Gatske, Tarpey, Rogers and 
Brown do not deserve Avhole chunks of praise for what they 
have done for the wine industry of this State." 



If 



Congressional Sobriety 



WHETHER or not there is as much conviviality in vogue in 
Congressional life in Washington as formerly may be 
doubted, but in times past, and not so far past, either, there 
have l>een celebrated some wonderful occasions, according to 
tales one hears recited nowadays and particularly when 
prompted by some orator from the South Avho is loud for pro- 
hibition and who increases the volume of his voice and polishes 
the splendor of his rhetoric from sources he would prohibit the 
use of. 

Patrick Henry of Mississippi, who is now gathered to his 
fathers, was one such, or at least many is the tale his memor\- 
has to stand sponsor for. It is declared of him that he dearly 
loved to preach the beauties of prohibition, but not until after 
he had had a long confereence with "red liquor." 

Another member of the House from the South was as good 
as a clockpiece. With unfailing regularity his condition was 
always the same at a certain time in the afternoon. Communi- 
ties differ ver}' much in their appraisement of men they send to 
Congress. One gentleman of reputation, Avho hails from a com- 
munity giA'en in a certain respect to steady habits, has not been 
himself for a long, long time, and it Avas thought last year he 
would die from this cause and that, at all CA^ents, he Avould be 
retired to his constituents, but he Avas re-elected by even a larger 
majority, and to top all Avas indorsed by the prohibitionist 
party. 

Washington still loves to tell of the c(mvivial enterprise of a 
fametl Senator of the West, fabulously Avealthy, but noAV re- 
tired, Avho was a "king pin" in his specialty. 

He dearly loved to sing on such occasions, although he had 
no voice, but yet believing he Avas a Caruso. 

At great stag dinners he was fond of mounting the table and 
singing from there. "Let me haAe room," he Avould cry, as he 
kicked off the costly dishes and afterward paid several hundred 
dollars for the privilege. He Avas fond of caroling patriotic airs 
and is still famous for his "Tar-Bangled Spanner." 

NoAv and then he Avonld have with him in a duet another 
famous Western Senator, highly regarded by the church, and 
it is related that their vocalizations Avere excruciatingly enter- 
taining. 

But that Senator is now no more, having been called to his 
^'alhalla. — Washington Letter. 



W. E. Alexander, president of the Escondido Valley Land 
and Planting Company has been busy during the past and pres- 
ent month planting 700 acres of vines on the rolling lands just 
south of Escondido. Choice muscatel cuttings Avere set out 
by creAvs of men, of 18,000 a day. When completed, this plant- 
ing Avill complete a 1000-acre vineyard, Avhich is expected to 
nuike Escondido famous as a gi'ape producing section. 



-•»-^ta-«»-^fc-«»-^^».«»-" 



,«» ^fc * » ^fc ** ^fc »o 



I Wine Machinery 



FITTED OUT 



! 

I and Must Ptimps 



Continuous Presses 
I CrusKers, Stetnxners 



COMPLETE PLANTS ( 

Toulouse & Deloreux ( 

405 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. / 



»«»-^%^.»» ^fc M ^. O-^^fc-O «^ «»- 



-*o 



46 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



American Production of Tight=Cooperage Stock 



THE production of tight-barrel staves in tlie United States 
during 1909 was 379,231,000 pieces, valued at |9,201,964, as 
against 345,280,000 pieces in 1908, and 385,232,000 pieces in 
1907, valued at |10,009,295 and |12,942,885, respectively. The 
output of tight-barrel heading during the same years was 20,- 
691,201 sets in 1909, 20,515,072 sets in 1908, and 27,692,994 sets 
in 1907, valued at |3,716,296, |4,397,148, and $6,864,485, re- 
spectively. 

DECREASE IN AVERAGE VALUE PER UNIT. 

While the average value per unit of the total production of all 
classes of both tight-barrel staves and headings has decreased 
steadily since 1907, this movement has not extended to all 
classes of the stock separately, nor has it been so marked as 
the shrinkage in the total value of tight-cooperage stock during 
the three years would seem to indicate, the changing composi- 
tion of the totals of stave and heading output having exerted 
a considerable influence in this direction. In 1907 saAved staves, 
which have a lower average value per thousand than any of 
the other three classes of tight-barrel staves, formed 87.1 per 
cent of the total reported production, while in 1908 they con- 
tributed 87.4 per cent and in 1909, 90 per cent. Furthermore, 
the average value per thousand of sawed staves decreased 
markedly during these three years, being |27.83 in 1907, |24.47 
in 1908, and $20.76 in 1909. In this connection it is of interest 
to note the increasing use of other and cheaper woods than 
white oak as sawed-stave material. In 1907 76.8 per cent of 
the sawed staves were made from white oak, while in 1908 and 
1909 the percentages of the totals were 70.7 and 63.6, respec- 
tively. Some of the more important species in point of (piantity 
being substituted for white oak are: Red oak, basswood, gum, 
pine, ash, chestnut oak, and cypress, in the order named. The 
substitution of other woods for white oak as material is prac- 
tically confined, however, to saAved staA^es, the other three classes 
of tight staves, namely, bucked and split, hew^ed, and beer and 
ale, requiring the best grade of selected oak. 

The comparative summary for 1909 follows : 

Class. Number. Value. 

Sawed : 

Oil and tierce 158,457,000 $3,503,899 

Spirit and wine 38,933,000 1,637,839 

Half barrel 19,356,000 160,446 

Pork 13,457,000 243,522 

Bourbon 11,991,000 566,128 

All other 99,065,000 974,014 

Total 341,259,000 $7,085,808 

Bucked and split: 

Bourbon 8,332,000 452,373 

West Indian 2,517,000 159,710 

" Spirit and wine 1,949,000 83,332 

All other 2,306,000 52,661 

Total 15,104,000 $ 748,076 

HeAved : 

French claret 5,320,000 425,205 

Pipe 825,000 145,795 

Tank 76,000 41,660 

All other 100,000 5,900 

Total 6,321,000 $ 618,560 



Beer and ale : 

Beer, barrel .■ 1,560,000 

Beer, half-barrel 6,217,000 

Beer, quarter-barrel 5,399,000 

Beer, one-sixth barrel 1,056,000 

Beer, one-eight barrel 2,058,000 

Ale, hogshead 145,000 

All other 112,000 

Total 16,547,000 

Grand total 379,231,000 

Heading (in sets). 
Sawed : 

Oil and tierce !),172,0!)9 

Spirit and Avine 2,207,596 

Half barrel and keg 1,680,004 

Bourbon 1,289,713 

Pork 393,319 

All other 4,992,962 

Total 19,735,693 

Beer and ale: 

Half-barrel 342,735 

Barrel 91,050 

Hogshead 150 

All other 521,573 

Total 955,508 

Grand total 20,691,201 

— Preliminary comparative report for 1909 
Census Bureau. 



126,.525 
315,943 
207,275 

18,.-)28 
56,009 
16,265 

8,975 

$ 749,520 
$9,201,964 



$1,531,983 

737,004 I 

163,902 I 
527,704 

58,900 j 

515,374 I 

$3,534,867 

$ 70,983 . 

32,700 I 

188 I 

77,558 ' 

181,429 

.$3,716,296 I 
issued by the 



Striking Figures 



THE official figures for the consumption of alcoholic bever- 
ages in the country shoAV that the per capita consumption 
of spirits fell from 2.52 gallons in 1840 to 1.37 gallons in 1909. 
Since the drinking of spirits is almost entirely confined to 
Avhisky, rum, gin and brandy, it is apparent that the c(msurap- 
tion of the liquors which contain the largest proportion of alco- 
hol has been reduced about half. If the figures for the closing 
decades of the eighteenth and the early decades of the nineteenth 
centuries Avere aA'ailable they Avould shoAv that there was even 
more "hard drinking" at this early period. 

The consumption of wine has more than doubled from 1840 
to 1909, increasing from .29 to .70 gallon. A large part of this 
increase is due to the consumption of native Avines. 

When we consider the per capita consumption of beer and 
ale, the greatest change is apparent. This has increased from 
1.36 gallons in 1840 to 19.97 gallons in 1909. To hoAV great an 
extent this change is due to the German immigration, which 
first came to this country in large numbers about 1848, is, of 
course, problematical. Many of the Avine-drinking races, like 
the Italians, after a brief residence in this country, liecome 
consumers of beer. 

Although there has been a great increase in the total consump- 
tion of intoxicants during^ the period 1840 to 1909, there has 
been a change from those drinks containing a high percentage 
of alcohol to those containing a Ioav percentage — and this is 
the one cause for encouagement. — William Bailey, assistant pro- 
fessor of political economy in Yale University, in the Inde- 
pendent. 



PACIFiri WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



47 



The Alleged Warehouse Whisky Frauds 



HE matter of the whisky frauds — the substitution of water 
for whisky in the Haslett warehouse — was submitted to the 
Fedei"al Grand Jury on the 24th instant, and several witnesses 
were examined. 

Treasury Agents L. W. Bean, W. H. Tidwell and George E. 
Channing were examined at length by the jurors and gave a 
full report of their investigation. They told of the discovery 
that over eighty barrels of water had been substituted for the 
same number of barrels of whisky. The sum of |5397 being 
the amount due the government on this amount of spirits, has 
already been paid by the Haslett Warehouse Company and the 
ujtfh-own Distilleries Company. 

I^Bc. W. Isaacs of the Western Union Telegraph Company was 
l^mmmoned for the purpose of testifying to a number of tele- 
"grams said to have passed between an officer of the Crown 
Distilleries Company and Acton Haven of San Diego relative to 
the matter under investigation. Daniel O'Connell, the store- 
keeper of the Haslett Warehouse at Sansome street and Broad- 
way, who was suspended from duty by Collector of the Port 
Stratton, after stating that he had been offered a bribe by a dis- 
tillery representative if he would allow whisky to be taken out 
illegally, was another important witness examineil. Several of 
the other employes of the warehouse \vere subpenaed, but 
were not examined, their testimony being postponed for a later 
session of the Grand Jurv. 



The Martinez Board of Trustees have passed a liquor ordi- 
nance by which the saloons in that city must close at midnight 
and open at 6 o'clock the following morning. The introduction 
of the measure caused a heated discussion and it was finally 
passed by a vote of three to two. The new ordinance is now in 
operation. 



Mayfield, in Santa Clara county, is red hot about the liquor 
question. It is a prohibition town by its own ordinance and 
also within a mile and a half from Stanford University, and 
therefore covered by the State law, nevertheless the sale of 
liquor still continues. 

According to the District Attorney of Santa Clara county, he 
is wating for a decision from the Supreme Coiirt in the Meyer 
case, by which the validity of the law prohibiting the sale of 
liquor within a mile and a half of the college campus will be 
decided. He says: "In the event that a favorable decision for 
the people is given in the Meyer case I will immediately insti- 
tute proceedings against the liquor dealers of Mayfield. At 
present they are running their places under a town ordinance. 



The City Council of San Diego having won its fight against 
the social clubs of that city being allowed to dispense licjuor to 
their members without a license, have now passed an ordinance 
placing the license giving them that right at |5 per month. 




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48 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 




?tt 



En^oi^l'^'fe%«^j^ 



t^mSMION 






«!? 



lAND NCTPEi: 



H. N. Cohn, vice-president of the Sunny Brook Distilling 
Company, is in Southern California and recently visited Ana- 
heim. When there he met Swope Bros, of the California Wine 
Company, and placed the county agency with them for this 
noted whisky. 



Italian-Swiss Colony Tipo (red) and the California Wine 
Association's Vinecliff (Riesling) were the choice native wines 
served at the Hotel St. Francis on Monday evening, February 
27th, when the joint committee on reception and entertainment 
gave an elaborate banquet in honor of the delegation to Wash- 
ington, whose united efforts secured the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition for San Francisco. 



The United States Fidelity and Guaranty Company are keep- 
ing up their record in California for writing large bonds. On 
February 3rd, they executed a bond for Luella R. Hughson, 
Administratrix of the estate of Hiram Hughson, in the amount 
of 11,132,000, which was filetl in the Superior Court of Stanis- 
laus County. On Tuesday last they executed another in the 
amount of |1,340,000, for M. C. Chapman, special administra- 
tor of the estate of William E. Dargie, late owner of the Oak- 
land Tribune. 



S. Federspiel, assistant manager of the Italian-Swiss Col- 
ony, California, is entour of the States, taking a bird's eye view 
of conditions and giving special attention to the several branches 
of the company. Mr. Federspiel is a gentleman who at once 
inspires respect and confidence. He is in a position to speak 
with authority upon all subjects affecting the wine interests, 
having devoted twenty years to the business with the above- 
mentioned company, and if his personality is any index, must 
have contributed ranch in poise and perception in the advance- 
ment of the best interests of his concern. — Midas. 



We have the following from Messrs. G. S. Nicholas & Co., 
New York : 

LONDON, February 4th, 1911. 
We have very great pleasure in informing you that Messrs. 
Booth's Distillery, Ltd., have the honor of receiving the Royal 
Warrent of Appointment to His IMajesty King George V. 

(Signed) FIELD, SON & CO. 



Benjamin S. Donahue, president of the Occidental Supply 
Company, has gone to Europe with his family for a vacation 
trip in which pleasure will be intermingled with business. Mr. 
Donahue was quite sick during the beginning of the winter 
and absent from business for some time; under these circum- 
stances he is certainty wise to take the present trip which his 
friends hopes will prove greatly beneficial to his health. He 
left on February the 18th and will return in July, with no 
doubt the latest wrinkles as to how they conduct his line of 
business in Europe. Mr. Donahue is a representative San Fran- 
cisco business man and his presence on the other side of the 
herring pond at this time cannot fail to interest many promi- 
nent merchants in San Francisco and her coming exhibition. 



E. Palmer Bernheim has resigned his position as treasurer 
of the Bernheim Dirtilling Compan; on account of ill healtli. 
He is to make his home in Baltimore hereafter. Lee S. Bern- 
heim will act as treasurer temporarily. The latter has also 
taken charge of the position of advertising manager. 



William Tarr, known as one of the pioneer distillers of Ken- 
tucky who helped to make the Bluegrass State famous as a dis- 
tilling center, died at his home near Paris, Ky., at the age of 
86. 



How the newspaper editors of Fresno love one another is 
clearly shown by the following excerpt from the Mirror: 

"In Thursday's RrpKhlinni. Editor Rowell told the wine men 
wliat they must do to keep liim from putting them out of busi- 
ness. Briefly stated, it is to give up a part of their business to 
save the other part. Of course, everybody knows that Mr. Row- 
ell is "close up" to Governor Johnson, still he may be exagger- 
ating his influence with the Governor somewhat when he gives 
tlie impression that he can enlist liim in destroying one of the 
State's greatest industries. It might even be that if Governor 
Johnson knew that Editor Rowell's opposition to the wine in- 
dustry was the result of wounde<l vanity he would turn a deaf 
ear to his representations. We suggest that some one enlighten 
the Governor." 



The following bankruptcy notices relating to the wine and 
liquor trade have been published during February: F. G. 
Thode, saloonkeeper, San Franicsco; liabilities, $2989; assets, 
11795. John R. Needham, saloonkeeper, of Dixon; liabilities, 
12664; assets, flOOO. Harry Snowbelt, saloonkeeper, of Elm- 
hurst; liabilities, |1767; assets, nil. 



A very strong objection has been raised to the erection of a 
brewery in Claremont avenue, Oakland, and a protest made 
to the Board of Works. The Independent Brewing and Malt- 
ing Company desire to build a brewery on the corner of Clare- 
mont avenue and Clifton street, which the protestants point 
out is entirely a residence district. 



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>«» ^^ «» ^fc **■ 



PAriFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 49 



i#| Internal Revenue j^J ji#j Pure Food Judgment |#( 



^^ (T. D. 1672.) 

Ik Restamping packages of fermented liquors. 

Collectors of internal revenue authorized to restamp packages 
of fermented liquors upon proper application prior to ap- 

Iproval by commissioner. — Modification of Department Circu- 
lar No. 58 of 1907, Internal Revenue Circular No. 705 (T. D. 
1226). 
[ "Treasury Department, 

I Office of Commissioner of Internal Revenue, 

Washington, D. C, January 14, 1911. 
It has been found from experience that the detention of pack- 
ages of fermented liquors from which stamps have been lost or 
destroyed by unavoidable accident is apt to cause loss on ac- 
I count of the deterioration of the product during the lapse of 
time necessary to secure stamps for restamping, as provided for 
in internal revenue circular No. 705, dated September 6, 1907. 
In order to facilitate the restamping of such packages under 
I the provisions of section 3315, Revised Statutes, the method of 
procedure as outlined in circular 705 in the case of fermented 
liquor packages is hereby modified as follows : 

The notice of loss or destruction of fermented liquor stamps 
shall be filed with the collector of internal revenue for tlie dis- 
trict in which the packages are held. 

Upon receipt of such notice the collector will detail a deputy 
collector to inspect the packages and ascertain the condition of 
the same and report whether said packages in his opinion were 
duly stamped at time of shipment and are entitled to l)e re- 
stamped under the provisions of section 3315, Revised Statutes. 
The owner or consignee in whose hands the packages are found, 
or otlier person having knowledge of the facts, must file with the 
collector a statement under oath that the original stamps af- 
fixed to the packages at the brcAvery have been lost or destroyed 
by unavoidable accident. 

Upon receipt of the report of the deputy collector and the 
sworn statement of the owner, consignee, or other person having 
knowledge of the facts the collector will, if the evidence is satis- 
factory, furnish to the deputy collector the stamps necessary to 
replace those lost or destroyed, and such stamps will then be 
affixed to the proper packages under the supervision of a deputy 
collector. 

All the papers in each case will be transmitted to the Com- 
missioner of Internal Revenue with the collector's monthly re- 
port on Form 103, accompanied by statement containing the 
names of all persons to whom fermented liquor stamps have 
been issued for restamping, giving the numbers, denominations, 
and value of stamps issued in each case. 
The stamps thus issued should be entered on a separate line'on 
■r^^ collector's record or reports. Form 103, and the a^gi'(>gate 
Mblue shown on said report sent to the Commissioner of Internal 
l^wvenue. 

In every such case the collector will obtain a receipt from the 
person receiving the stamps so issued and transmit such receipt, 
together with other papers, with his report on Form 103 for the 
month in which the stamps were issued. 

Collectors should take credit on Form 103 for stamps thus is- 
sued, inserting a note on said form in red ink to this effect, 
I "Issued under authority of Circular No. 58, as modified, on ap- 
plication of ." 



F. & D. No. 1349. I. S. No. 2140-b. Issued January 28, 1911. 

Misbranding of a Food Product — Hochheimer Wine 

Notice of Judgment No. 711, Food and Drugs Act 

ON or about October 13, 1909, the Empire State Wine Com- 
pany, a corporation, Penn Yan, N. Y., shipped from the 
State of New York to the State of Massachusetts a quantity of 
a food product contained in glass bottles, labeled: "Hoch- 
heimer," in large letters, in the center of the label with the 
word "type" in small letters, placed beneath the word "Hoch- 
heimer," the said label bearing at the top thereof the design 
or representation of a crown, the case containing the said bot- 
tles being labeled "Hochheimer, 12 bottles." Samples of this 
shipment were procured and examined by the Bureau of Chem- 
istry, United States Department of Agriculture, and as the 
findings of the analyst and report thereon indicated that the 
product was misbranded within the meaning of the Food and 
Drugs Act of June 30, 1906, the said Empire State Wine Com- 
pany- and tlie parties from whom the samples were procured 
were afforded opportunities for hearings. As it appeared after 
hearings held that said shipment was made in violation of the 
act, the Secretary of Agriculture reported the facts to the 
Attorney-General, with a statement of the evidence upon which 
to base a prosecution. 

In due course a criminal information was filed in the District 
Court of the United States for the Western District of New 
York against the said Empire State Wine Company, charging 
the above shipment, and alleging that the product so shipped 
was misbranded in that it was labeled as above set forth, so as 
to deceive and mislead the purchaser, and purport to be a for- 
eign product when not so, the name "Hochheimer" as applied 
to wine being a well-known trade name applied commonly and 
generally only to a certain brand of foreign-made wine, when 
in truth and in fact the product in question was a domestic 
product, having been manufactured witliin the State of New 
York. 

On October 11, 1910, the defendant entered a plea of guilty 
to the above infornmtion, and the court imposed a fine of f 100. 

This notice is given pursuant to section 4 of the Food and 
Dnigs Act of June 30, 1906. JAJIES WILSON, 

Secretary of Agriculture. 

Washington, D. C, November 22, 1910. 



Masson Champagne Company's Fine Exhibit 
VV/ E note that Santa Clara County has recently installed an 
W exceptionally fine wine exhibit in the rooms of the De- 
velopment Board in the Ferry Building. This exhibit was pro- 
cured through the efforts of the local Commercial Club from the 
Masson Champagne Company. It includes all varieties of wines, 
champagne and sparkling burgundy, and, in all, makes one of 
the most effective exhibits to be found in that excellently man- 
aged and well-arranged collection of California products. 



ROYAL E. CABELL, Commissioner. 
Approved : 

FRANKLIN MAC VEAGH, Secretary of the Treasury. 



TANKS THAT LAST 

Water, Wine, Oil Tanks 

Made of Selected Stock by Experienced Workmen 




GEORGE WINDELER, TANK BUILDER 



144-154 Berry St., 



San Francisco 



Phone KEASNT 242 and J 2552 



50 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



I 



-*»- 



►*»- 



-*»-"«^fc.«»- 



»*»- 



-«»- 



-*»■■ 



-*»- 



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►*»- 



The Review^'s Buyers' Directory 



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CALIFORNIA WINES. 
Geo. West & Son, Incorporated. .. .Stockton, Cal. 



WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 

A. P. Hotaling & Co 

429 Jackson St., San Francisco, Cal. 



California Wine Association 

180 Townsend St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Theo. Gier Co 575 Eighth St., Oakland, Cal. 



Siebe Bros. & Plagermann 

430-34 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Wetmore-Bowen 

42-44 Davis St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Rusconi, Fisher & Co 

326 Jackson St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Jas. Gibb 1844 Geary St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Italian Vineyard Co 

1234 Palmetto St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Napa & Sonoma Wine Co 

110 10th St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sherwood & Sherwood 

41-47 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 

John Sroufe & Co... 41 Drumm St., San Francisco 



Sierra Madre Vintage Co La Manda, Cal. 



Jesse Moore Hunt Co., 

Second and Howard Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Barton Vineyard Co., Ltd Fresno, Cal. 



A. Finke's Widow 

....809 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



E. H. Lancel Co 

549 Washington St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Cartan, McCarthy & Co 

..Battery and Com'l Sts.. San Francisco, Cal. 

William Wolff & Co 

52-58 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Alta Vista Wines Co 

112-114 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Paul Masson Champagne Co '. . San Jose, Cal. 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co '. 

431-435 Clay St., San Francisco, Cal. 

L. Taussig & Co 

200 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Lachman & Jacobi 

706 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

French American Wine Co 

1821-41 Harrison St., San Francisco, Cal. 



George Delaporte 

820 Mission St., San Francisco. Cal. 



Breen & Kennedy; Thos. W. Costello, Mgr.. . 

160 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Italian-Swiss Colony 

1235-67 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



IMPORTERS. 

Chas. Meniecke & Co 

314 Sacramento St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sacramento Valley Winery Sacramento, Cal. W. A. Taylor & Co 29 Broadway, N. Y. 



BREWERS AND BREWERS' AGENTS. 
Lang & Stroh Co. .104 Clay St. San Francisco, Cal. 



Simon Levy & Co 

...346-48 Washington St., San Francisco, Cal. 



John Wieland Brewery 

204 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Buffalo Brewing Co Sacramento, Cal. 



Sherwood & Sherwood 

43 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Wolff & Co 

52-58 Beale St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Fred Krug Brewing Co Omaha, Nebraska 



L. Gandolfl & Co. 



American Mercantile Co 

514 Battery St., San FranciscOj Cal. 



.427-31 W. Broadway, New York 



Henry Weinhard Brewery Portland, Oregon 

494 O'Farrell St;, San Francisco, Cal. 



Alex. D. Shaw & Co 

214 Front St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Geo. Windeler; wine and water tanks 

144-154 Berry St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Oscar Krenz, Copper and Brass Works 

212-214 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Pacific Copper Works 

573 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sanders & Go's. Copper Works 

..Beale and Howard Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



DISTILLERS. 
E. H. Taylor, Jr. & Sons Frankfort, Ky. 



Julius Kessler & Co.... Hunter BIdg., Chicago, III. 



Wm. Lanahan & Son Baltimore, Maryland 



Hiram Walker & Sons Walkerville, Canada 



Western Grain & Sugar Products Co 

110 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Susquenac Distilling Co Cincinnati, Ohio 

Kirby Distilling Co Fowler, Cal. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 
INTERNAL REVENUE BROKERS. 

F. E. Mayhew & Co 

510 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Youngberg & Son 

509 Washington St., San Francisco, Cal, 



WINE PRESSES, CRUSHERS, ETC. 
A. Rossi & Co.. 322 Broadway, San Francisco, Cal. 

Toulouse & Delorieux Co 

405 Sixth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



BILLIARD AND POOL TABLES, BOX FIXTURES 

Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co 

767-771 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



WINE AND BREWERS' HOSE, ETC. 

Goodyear Rubber Co 

589 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



SURETIES. 

U. S. Fidelity & Guaranty Co 

Nevada Bank BIdg., San Francisco, Cal. 



BLENDING CORDIALS. 
Barrett Co 43 Front St., New York 



Albion Ale & Porter Brewery 

494 O'Farrell St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Frank Fehr Brewing Co.; Louisville, Ky 
Jas. De Fremery & Co., Agents, 
519 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



American Mercantile Co 

514 Battery St., San Franciscov Cal. 

J. F. Plumel & Co 

63-65 Ellis St., San Francisco, Cal. 



BOTTLE WRAPPERS, ETC. 

Zellerbach Paper Co 

..Battery and Jackson Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



FILTERS. 
Loew Manufacturing Co Cleveland, Ohio 



Chapman & Wilberforce 

705-707 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Enterprise Brewing Co San Francisco, Cal. ^ g Nicholas & Co.... 41 Beaver St., New York 



BITTERS. 

Lash Bitters Co 

1721 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Seattle Brewing & Malting Co.; Seattle, Wash. 
John Rapp & Son, Agents. 
. .8th and Townsend Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Sacramento Brewing Co.; Sacramento, Cal. . . . 
G. B. Robbins, Manager, 
..14th and Harrison Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



TANKS, COOPERS, COPPERSMITHS, ETC. 
Pacific Tank & Pipe Co.... Wine and water 
tanks, boxes, irrigation pipe and pipe for 
water systems. 

318 Market St., San Francisco, Cal.; Equi- 
table Bank BIdg., Los Angeles, Cal.; Ken- 
ton Station; Portland, Oregon. 



L. Gandolfl & Co. 



.427-31 West Broadway, New York 



MINERAL WATER. 

Aug. Lang & Co 

..18th and Alabama Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 
(SEE NEXT PAGE) 



\ 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



51 



eview Buyers' Directory, Continued 

CIGARS. 

Ditz, Clymer & Co 

312 Clay St., San Francisco, Cal. 



BOTTLES AND BOTTLERS' SUPPLIES. 

Lindeman, Sloman & Co 

381 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 

RETAILERS AND CAFES. 

The Yellowstone 

22 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



"The Cabin" 

105 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Market Cafe.. 540 Merchant St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Caley's..333 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Bachman & Co 

Commercial >t Front Sts., San Francisco, Cal. '^^°^- J- Walsh & Co 



346 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 



HOTELS. 



The RUSS..247 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



apitol Hotel; Golden Eagle Hotel. 



.Sacramento, Cal. Jas. P. Dunne.. 1 Stockton St., San Francisco, Cal. 



James Raggi 

624 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

The Cutter . . . .709 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

The Hoffman Cafe Co 

27 Second St., San Francisco, Cal. 



otel Victoria.. 7th & Hope Sts., Los Angeles, Cal. Chronicle Bar 6 Kearny St., San Francisco, Cal. 



otel Madera Corte Madera, Cal. 



The Waldorf. .648 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



otel Montrio Monte Rio, Cal. 



"Jellison's" 10 Third St., San Francisco, Cal. 



W. F. Boeder's Cafe 

834 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Original Coppa's Restaurant 

453 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 



"Escalles" Escalle, Marin Co., Cal. 



WINE PUMPS, MOTORS, ETC. 

jin & Little 

70-72 Fremont St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Matt Grimm's 

130 Liedesdorf St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Bank Exchange 

Mont'y and Wash'ton Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 



Ratto's Italian Restaurant 

..605-607 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Rusconi Bar.. 505 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Second Edition 

Internal Revenue Law 
and the Retailer 

WILL BE OUT ABOUT APRIL 1ST 

$1.00 per copy, or given as a 
premium to the Pacific Wine 
and Spirit Review. 
The Paper for ONE year and 
the BOOK for $2.00 



SEND YOUR ORDERS NOW TO 

Pacific Wine and Spirit Review 



127 Montgomery Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



52 






•r 









PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



'44" 



^/>e IDEA£, BKVERAGE 



^M^ 



VAe IDEAL BEVERAGE 




Made in a brewery where Purity is paramount, and where men know how. The plumpest, 
sweetest and cleanest of grain is used. The Hops are selected especially for us from the 
very best. The water, after being purified and filtered by nature, comes up in its crystal 
purity through 1500 feet of Rock and Gravel. 

Frank Fehr's Extra Lager 

No Beer, no matter the name, make or reput ation, is so highly approved by the connoisseur. 
For home use our Bottled Beers are especially adapted ; nourishing, pure and delicious. Aged 
and cured by time as time only can accomplish. Its rapid growth in popular favor at home 
and abroad proves its superiority. 



Frank Fehr Brewing Co. 

Louisville, Kentuclcy 



James Dc Fremery & Co. 

Pacific Coast Distributors 

519 Mission Street, San Francisco 



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NEW BREW 



YOSEMITE 
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BRBWED BY THE 



ENTERPRISE BREWING CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



53 



33J^55^^'J^2^3lfe!^^3!fe^5fefe!^5!^^ 



A SUIT FOR LIBEL 

HAS been instituted by us against JULIUS 
LEVIN COMPANY, of San Francisco, in 
the United States Circuit Court. Said JULIUS 
LEVIN COMPANY advertised a certain brand of 
Canadian Whisky in these words: 

" The only Canadian Whisky that was not seized by the 
" United States Government for containing injuri- 
" ous ingredients at the time the Pure Food Law 
" took effect." 

We beHeve that no Canadian Whisky was seized on such grounds. 
Certainly CANADIAN CLUB WHISKY never was. 
The reason given for seizing CANADIAN CLUB was that it did 
not contain as much FUSEL OIL as so-called STRAIGHT 
WHISKIES contain. 

THIS IS STRICTLY TRUE, WE ARE GLAD TO SAY. 
FOR WE HAVE ALWAYS INTENDED THAT OUR 
WHISKY SHOULD CONTAIN THE LEAST POSSI- 
BLE AMOUNT OF FUSEL OIL CONSISTENT WITH 
THE DESIRED FLAVOR. 

President Taft decided, after a full review of the evidence and the 
history of Whisky, that it is not necessary that the noxious Fusel 
Oils should be left in Whisky. 

Any persons who, to our knowledge, make false statements about 
our brand, either directly or indirectly, will do so at their peri'. 

HIRAM WALKER S SONS, LIMITED 

WALKERVILLE, ONTARIO, CANADA 

London New York Chicago Mexico City Victoria, B. C* 



!rc5XS5XS5X?J 



^ 



54 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



«k CELLARS AND VINEYARDS at Icaria^Healdsburg. Cloverdale, and Madrone, Sonoma Coumy @ 

<W and at Rutherford and St. Helena, Napa County, California *!* 

^ : © 



CELLARS AND VINEYARDS ** Icarla^Healdsburg, Cloverdale, and Madrone, Sonoma County 

and at Rutherford and St. Helena, Napa County, California 

French-American Wine Co. 



SUCCESSORS TO CHAIX jl BERNARD 
PRODUCERS, GROWERS. DISTILLERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 






CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES t 



Pure and Unadulterated California Wines Our Specialty 



« 
^ 



"W. D. SEYMOUR. 516 MA.GAZINE ST., Olb 515 CONSTANCE ST., NEIV ORI^EANS AGENT 
N£'W YORK DEPOT, 32 IVASHINGTON STREET 



5 1821 to 1841 Harrison Street 



^ 
© 
® 
@ 
© 



San Francisco, Cal. © 



® 





Winners 





JULIUS KESSLER & CO. Distillers 



NEW YORK 

NEW YORK WORLD BLDG. 



CHICAGO 

HUNTER BUILDING 



LOUISVILLE 

30th AND GARLAND AVE. 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



55 



k- 
^ 



■^-*-' 



-^-^ 



The E. G. Lyons & Raas Co. 






FOLSOM & ESSEX STREETS 



Telephone Kearny 489 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Distillers of High Grade Cordials, Fruit Brandies and Syrups 




PHILLIPS & VAN ORDEN CO. 

^ . ... PRINTERS, PUBLISHERS. BOOKBINDERS 



WE PRINT THE "WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW" 
GOOD PRINTING COSTS NO MORE THAN THE 
OTHER KIND, IF YOU GO TO THE RIGHT PLACE 



509-3 1 5 Howard Street, San Francisco 



Telephone, Douglas 2301 



Near First Street 



H P. WICHMAN 



JOHN LUTGEN 



FRED STAUBE 



Wichman, Lutgen & Co., 

Importers and Wholesale Dealers in 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

Sole Proprietors of "Gilt Edge" Whiskies 
Also Sole Distributors of "Old Identical Whiskey" 

(Bottled in Bond) 

431-435 CLAY ST., and 428-434 COMMERCIAL ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



II ~ > _ i> ~ > _ II ~ w _ II ~% i >~% < r ~^ I f ~fc <n r ~^ rin r ~ fc rnr ~ > rn r ~ a i t — m i t — ^ i t ~ m i t — m i t ~ m rr ~ > r r~ i x" 



CARROLL RYE 
WHISKEY 



MORVILLE A. A. A 
OLD BOURBON 



I LOUIS TAUSSIG AND COMPANY I 

i 



IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS 



! 

k SUTTER 50; J 274S 

»» ^^ ** ^fc» ** ^^ ** ^^ ** ^^ ** ^^ *■* ^mm »* ^^ *a* ^^ <o* ^^ *o* 



MAIN AND MISSION STREETS 



PHONES: 



SAN FRANCISCO i 

I 



56 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



2S 



p. C. ROSSF, President 



A. SBARBORO, Secretary 



Italian-Swiss Colony 

LARGEST PRODUCERS OF THE FINEST VARIETIES OF 

California Wines and Brandies 

Vineyards, Wineries and Cellars at Asti, Fulton, Cloverdale and Sebastopol in Sonoma County; Madera, Madera County; Selma and Kingsbury 

in Fresno County, and Lemoore in Kings County, California, ' 



PRODUCERS OF 



The Celebrated Tipo 

— — ' ■III) w^'mr^^^m 



(Red or W^hite) 



E^j,JiK./!,j?if,.„V 






i.*. s, J '^*iMS.- 








GRAND DIPLOMA^OF HONOR. Genoa, luly, I8S2 
GOLD MEDAL, COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION, 1883 
GOLD MEDAL, Dublin, Ireland, 1892 



GOLD MEDAL, Turin, 1898 

GOLD MEDAL, CAL. MIDW. FAIR, 1894 

SILVER MEDAL, BORDEAUX, FRANCE. I8S5 



GOLD MEDAL, PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION, 1901 
GOLD MEDAL, LEWIS&CLARKE EXPOSITION. 1904 
GRAND PRIZE, ALASKA-YUKON-PACIFIC 

EXPOSITION. 1909 



Naturally 

fermented in 

Bottles 



Sparkling Burgundy and Asti Special 

(DRY) 

P. C. ROSSI VERMOUTH AND FE-RNET-AMARO 



Trade-Mark 

Kegistered 

October 8, 

1895 



GOLD MEDAL, TURIN. 1884 



HIGHEST AWARD CHICAGO. 1894 



PROPRIETORS OF THE AMERICAN VINTAGE COMPANY 



Office and Salesrooms: Corner Battery and Greenwich Sts., San Francisco, Cal. 

Vaults: 1235-1267 Battery St. 101-160 Greenwich St. 1334-1339 Sansome St. 

NEW YORK OFFICE: West 11th and Washington Sts. 



'^^^ »**^ t^^j <^^ -1^% I i^%i t^^ i^v »^v* t^^ t^*> i^V" <^%j *^t i^%j ij\j 1^%^ Jt. JCf JC^ JC/ i^C" i^lj Jt '.^Xj -J^ JC/ JC/ i^V Jv 'Jl' ■wfj JCi J«p JC" ^%j Jt JC/ i^C- i^C" JC/ t^\j JCj k^V" 'J\j ^^ s^Ij <^' 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



57 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 

Issued Monthly 

TREASURY REGISTER CO - - - - - PUBLISHERS 



R. M. WOOD, 
E. F. WOOD, 



PRESIDENT AND EDITOR 
SECRETARY AND TREASURER 



Office: 127 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
Wilson Building : Room 304-305 ; Phone Kearny 2597. Home C2.S59. 



The PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW is the only 
japer of its class West of Chicago. It circulates among the Whole- 
iiale and Retail Wine, Spirit and Beer Dealers of the Pacific Coast, 
;he Wine Makers and Brandy Distillers of California, the Wine and 
3randy Buyers, and the Importers, Distillers and Jobbers of the 
Jnited States. 

Entered at the Post Office at San Francisco, Cal., 
as Second-Class Matter. 



i,L CHECKS, DRAFTS, MONEY ORDERS, Etc., should be made payable to 

R. M. WOOD 

Subscriptions per year — in advance, postage paid: 

'or the United States, Mexico and Canada $2 00 

or the United States, Mexico and Canada, six months. 1 25 

or European Countries .s 3 00 

Single copies 20 



♦M 






MM 









EXCELLENCE OF QUALITY 

PURITY IN MANUFACTURE 



i EXQUISITE IN FLAVOR 



I ALL COMBINED IN 




DAWSON'S 
SCOTCH 



IN GLASS ONLY 



CHAPMAN » WILBERFORCB 

IMPORTERS 

705-707 SANSOME ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



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liOBTmiT TO DISlLEfiS P WP lOKEfiS. 




Pat'd Sept 2g, 1S9 



The accompanying cut illustrates 
our ORIGINAL CONTINUOUS 
STILL, which we have improved 
each season until it has reached its 
present perfection. 

This STILL, which has always 
recci»ed our special attention and 
Bluily, has been of material assist- 
ance in securing for California sweet 
wines and brandies the high rank in 
the world which they hold today. 

We manufacture not only high- 
class STILLS, but also Copper and 
Brass Work of all descriptions for 
wineries, distilleries, breweries, etc. 

Our Pasteurizers and Wine Filters 
enjoy the same high standard of 
popularity as our STILLS. 

References :— All successful sweet 
wine and brandy producers of Cali- 
fornia. 



Ml KINDS Of COPPER WORK OONt AI SHORT NOriCt. 

Sanders Copper Works 

CARL SCHALITZ. Pres. and M?r. 

BEALE AND HOWARD STS. SAN FRANCISCO 

Southern California Branch: 

649 North Main St. 



Los Angeles, Cal. 




UOHNRAPPlB &, SON 

AKents 

Opp. 8th and Townsend Sts. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



^erExeiti^e 

iri/ere i>S 
ri/OTn/iixd 

recu/peraxe 
exrtau^st/ea 
force more 
ruickly xKan/ 



Subscribe for the PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW; $2.00 Per Year 



58 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



BorrLES 

CORKS 

CROWN BOTTLE 
CAPS 

LABELS 

MACHINERY 

ETC. 


Lindeman, Sloman & Co. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Bottles and Bottlers' Supplies 


CARLOAD LOTS A SPECIALTY 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 
WRITE US 

381-389 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cai. 

Telephone Telephone 
PACIFIC— MARKET 6261 HOME J 2161 


Pacific Coa t Agents for 

Chicago Specialty 
Box Co. 
Chicago 

Ferd. autmann & Co. 
New York 

Continental Glass 
Decorating Co- 
Chicago 




RATES: $1.00 A DAY AND UP 
Tourist and Commercial 

FIREPROOF 




Everything new, comfortable 

Homelike, plenty of life. 
Beautifully furnished 

Highest class. 



Hotel 



Victoria 

Formerly the ORENA 
I. W. Bradt & Johnston, F 

Los Angeles, Califoi; 

Opposite Post Office 
Cor. 7th and Hope Sts. 



^)®®®®(5Xi)(iXiXi)®®®j)®®3®^^ 



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K:',-:«.i-«'««'5t; 



GEORGE WEST & SON. 






INCORPORATED 



^je PRODUCERS OF ^> I 

SWEET Wines and brandies! 



STOCKTON, CAL., U. S. A. 



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California Wines and Brandies 

706 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 
LACHMAN & JACOBI ^ew York Office, 65 and 67 North Moore St.. 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



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PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 

I WESTERN GRAIN AND SUGAR PRODUCTS CO. ^ 

S f\ FORMERLY 

1 WESTERN DISTILLERIES ^ 

HOME INDUSTRY ^; 

ALCOHOL 



Purity Brand Spirits 

Wins for Purity 
Clean in Neutrality 



A PACIFIC 



SPIRITS AND 



Gins 



Our Latest Improved Guillaume Still is Producing (1927o Highest in the United States) 

Denatured Alcohol, Special Denatured Alcohol 



Purity Brand Alcohol 

Most Neutral in the 

United States 



Rums 






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^ Western Distributing Co. Sole Agents* Pacific Coast | 

^ Office Rooms: 304,305,306—110 SUTTER STREET, S. F. Distillery : AGNEW, CAL. ^ 



BENJ. S. DONAHUE, President 



PHONE KEARNY 204 



OCCIDENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 



580-582 HOWARD STREET 
HEADQUARTERS FOR- 



Tannin; Russian Isinglass; Gelatine; Bottle Caps; Filter Pulp; and all Wine Makers' Supplies 

Owners of the celebrated brand Eureka Filter Pulp 

Owners of The Western Press, the most up-to-date label plant on the Pacific Coast 

Largest handlers of Demijohns; Flasks; Imported and Domestic Bottles 

Pacific Coast Agents for Miguel, Vincke & Meyer, Spanish Hand Cut Corks; National Cork Co's Machine Cut Corks 

Pacific Coast Agents International Cork Co. 

WRITE to US for PRICES 



44 



Tea Kettle" 



44 



Is the leading old fashion, 
straight Sweet Mash 
Whiskey 






^' 



44 



Crab Orchard" 

straight Sour Mash. The 
brand owned by us is distilled 
in Trimble County, Ky. Do 
not use any other. 



"SUSQUEHANNA" 



GUARANTEED ALL RYE 



ii 



PILGRIMAGE" 

HIGH FLAVOR HEAVY BODY 



Richwood " 



A High Type Bourbon 



The Susqucmac Distilling Co. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 



44 



OldQ.W.H." 



Straight Sour Mash Worth trying 



! THE GREATEST 
AMERICAN WHISKEY 



YELLOWSTONE 



TAYLOR & WILLIAMS, INC., DISTILLERS 

GEO. DELAPORTE, Pacific Coast Agent 

820 Mission Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 



A WHOLESALER'S AND RETAILER'S MEDIUM 



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STABLISHED 1878 



/OL. XUCIIl. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS ANGELES, MARCH 31, 1911 



No. 5 





^ 



Its a sign of good 
dmes to drii\K 

OLD KIRK 
WHISKY 

"BestonthemarKet" 





CINZANO 

ITALIAN VERMOUTH 



The Standard of Quality 
the World Over 



In 1909 over 64% of all the Vermouth 
exported from Italy was CINZANO 



ALEXD SHAW &. CO 

UNITED STATESJAGENTS 
NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO CHICAGO 



There is More 



Martini's^ Rossi 



Imported into the United States than all 
other brands of Italian Vermouth combined 



IT IS THE BASIS OF THE ORIGINAL 



Martini CocKtail 

^/fs flavor IS itniqite and inijnitable 



F. E. MAYHEW & CO. 

INTERNAL REVENUE and 
CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 

Hydrometers and Extra Stems and All Kinds of Revenue Books 



N. E. Cor. Battery and Washington Sts. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



RLAIIK'.^ HFAn 



"THE BEST THE BREWERS BREW" 
EXAC C^9C^ AT-C^ 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 




We 
manufacture 



TANKS 



WINE- 



for all purposes 
-BEER— VINEGAR 



We also manufacture 

WOODEN WATER PIPE 

If interested in Wood Pipe send for special litera- 
ture. Address nearest office 

PACIFIC TANK AND PIPE CO. 

318 Market St., San Francisco, Cat. 

Equitable Bank Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Kenton Station, Portland, Oregon 




^^^A^^^^^^^^^^^^^> ^ ^ ^ ^^^^^^^^wv^<^^^^^^vv^^»/w</»/^^l^^v^^»^^ 



''Paul Masson'' 

CHAMPAGNES 



I "The Pride of 
California" 



Extra Dry, Sparkling Burgundy 
Oeil de Perdrix... 

The Best Sparkling Wines Produced in America 



PAUL MASSON CHAMPAGNE COMPANY 

SAN JOSE. CALIFORNIA. 






fOSOSOSOl^SgOSCSSOlsOSOsQSOSQSOSQSO^ 



Simon Levy <Sc Co. 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS 

SPECIALTIES 




P. Garnier, Enghien les Bains 

Abricotine and other Cordials 

Legler Pernod, Couvet & Pontarlier 

Absinthe and Kirschwasser 

Hills & Underwood, London 

Old Tom Gin, Dry Gin, Sloe Gin and Orange Bitters 



C. A. Lindgren & Co., Stockholm 



PHONE KING 2173 



Swedish Punch |y^ 

A. J. Anderson & Sons, Goteberg, Sweden ^N 

Branvin and Aquavit km 

R, Slater & Co., Glasgow LU 

Ben Cruachan Scotch Whiskey Q | 

Connor & Sons, Belfast, Bally Castle Irish Whiskey yVi 



346-348 WASHJNGTON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



1 






PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



i<s®@&?)Sii&se®®S!S®®(^^ 



I THEO. GIER COMPANY 

Wholesale Wine and Liquor Merchants 

Sole Distributors Metropole Bourbon Whiskey, Metropole Bourbon Whiskey in 
Bond. Puck Rye Whiskey. Also handlers of Straight and Blended Whiskeys. 



A, 



575-577 Eighteenth Street 



Oakland, CaHfornia 



GIERSBERGER 
WINES 

OUR SPECIALTY 

From our Vineyards at 
Livermore, Napa, St. Helena 

THEO. GIER WINE CO. 

571-75 EighteentK Street 



Oak 2510 



Home A 2510 



!XS(:XiXS®®(:X3®®®®<j^^ 



«5 



>U 



SIEBE BROS. «& PLACEMAN N 



WHOLESALE 



WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS 



o. 



SOLE -PROPRIETORS 

K. ROSEDALE 

RYE & BOURBON 



CALIFORNIA'S FINEST BRANDIES 



Western Distributois 

Herbert's 
Pifre Malt Whiskey 

Bottled By 
HOFFHEIMER BROTHERS 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



E. J. Baldwin's 

APRICOT 
BRANDY 

THE FINEST IN THE 
WORLD 

Phone Douglas 1793 



SENATOR 

Leiand Stanford's 

PURE 
VINA BRANDY 

IT'S PURE-THATS SURE 
THERE'S NOTHING LIKE IT 



BRUNSWICK RYE AND BOURBON 



^ 



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QUALITY UNEXCELLED IN BULK OR CASES 

SPECIAL ORDERS SHIPPED DIRECT FROM DISTILLERY ^ 

SIEBE BROS. &, PLAGEMANN, 430-434 Battery Street San Francisco, WESTERN DISTRIBUTERS I 



WHEN DRY AND DUSTY, CALL FOR 

GILT EDGE _DOPPEL 

LAGER °' ~BRAU 



The Purest and Most Delicious Beers Brewed. On Draught in all First Class Cafes 



SACRAMENTO BREWING CO. 

F. J. RUHSTALLER, Mgr. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE: 
14th and Harrison Sts. 

Q. B. ROBBINS, Mgr. 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 






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f^ lL4ft4 S§We^ 



THE STANDARD WINE OF CALIFORNIA 



Hhk^ISs S^WiMiS, SP'i^lKUfiSC tfi 




gi 



^ We are the largest producers ai^d bottlers of high grade 
CaliforQia Wine. 

^ We oWQ our viQeyards oQd make all of our wiQes aQd 
can therefore guarantee tbe purity of every bottle. 

NO INCREASE IN PRICES OF CRESTA BLANCA WINES 

ifif S|@^i 4@f li C@Rll^'5i^^ 



Location of Vineyards, LIVERMORE, CAL. 

Send for Price List 



42-44 Davis St., San Francisco 
10 West 33rd Street, New York 
37 South Water Street, Chicago 



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tie»m!i>i)!&%))i%)>sim))^^^ 



J. F. Plumel Co. 



63-65 BLLIS STREET 



Proprietor of the Celetsrated 

KOLAKINA 



1 



PHnwrs. ' KEAENY 3667 
PHONES:-, c. S891 



IMPORTER OF 

Bordeaux Wines, Fine Brandies 
and Olive Oil 



... Sole Pacific Coast Agents for ... 

VAN DEN BERGH & CO. 
... O I IN S ... 



i 



v,im^?(!!&^<^^s?(Si%?((i<i7(:^^^ 



The Brunswick -Balke-Collender Co. 



..jmiVh 




Billiard 

and Pool 

Tables 

BAR FIXTURES 
BOWLING ALLEYS 

MANUFACTURED IN 

OUR SAN FRANCISCO 

FACTORY 



LOW PRICES. EASY TERMS, LARGE STOCK ALWAYS ON HAND 

Spcttial Dtsigris and Estimates Cheerfully Furnished 

767 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

BETWEEN THIRD AND FOURTH STREETS 
TELEPHONE SUTTEE 323 TELEPHONE HOME J 1536 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



Italian Vineyard Company 

MAIN OFFICES, SALESROOMS AND WINERIES 

1234 to 1248 PALMETTO ST., near Mateo - LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



PRODUCERS OF 



CALIFORNIA PURE 
WINES AND BR ANDIES 

Owners of the LARGEST VINEYARD in the U. S.— 4000 Acres 

At Guasti, San Bernardino County, Cal. 
PLANTED IN THE FINEST VARIETIES OF WINE GRAPES 



NEW YORK BRANCH 

Offices and Wine Vaults 



CHICAGO BRANCH 

152 West Kinzie St. 



NEW ORLEANS BRANCH 

237 Decatur Street 



202-204 Center Street and 213-215 Hester Street 

Seattle, Washington, 78 West Marion Street 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




r« 






^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 
^ 

^ 

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sxexexsxexexexQXQxexQxstmsxexQxexQXsx^^ 



WIELAND'S EXTRA PALE LAGER 




OUR VERDICT 



"It Is Better Than Ever" 



Office and Brewery: 

240 SECOND STREET 



(o^ 






San Francisco, Cal. 






MW^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^)^m^<Sm^^^m^)&^ 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



C. H. WENTE, 

President 



FRANK A. BUSSE. 

General Manager 



Eagle Brand 








COGNAC BRANDY 
Oro Fino Cognac*** $12. OO per c<sc 

( PURE MEDrCiNAL BRANDY) 



Vineyard and Winery: Livermore, Cal. 

OFFICE AND CELLARS! 

112-116 Tenth St., San Francisco, Cal. 



PHONE MARKET 2836 



fc.**-^^**-" 



FERNET- BRANCA 




Specialty of 

FRATELLI BRANCA 

MILAN, ITALY 



The King of Appetizers 
Best Flavor to Cocktails 



GRAND PRIZE 

ST. LOUJS 1904 

Sole North American Agents 

L. GANDOLFI & CO., 

427-31 W. B'way, New York 
IMPORT ORDERS SOLICITED 




BUFFALO 

NEW BREW 
BOHEMIAN 

Sacramento, [al. 



BREWING 



A. H. LOCHBAUM CO. 

AGENTS 

125 King Street 

PHONE 1010 Main 



PALE EXPORT 
CULMBACHER 
PORTER 



COMPANY 



R. H. PEASE, President 



F. M. SHEPARD, Vice-President 



R. H. PEASE, JR., Treasurer 



C. F. RUNYON, Secretary 



Goodyear Rubber Company 

Manufacturers and Dealers In 

RUBBER GOODS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 




WINE AND BREWER'S HOSE. "GOLD SEAL" IS THE BEST RUBBER-LINED COTTON HOSE. 

61-63-65-67 FOURTH STREET, PORTLAND, OR. 
587-589-591 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

WE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR EVERYTHING MADE OF RUBBER 



8 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




NITED STATES FIDELITY m GUARANTY CO. 



PHONE 
Kearny 925 



PAID CAPITAL, $2,000,000.00 SURPLUS, $933,103.43 TOTAL ASSETS, $6,000,000.00 

FHis Company is Accepted as 

SOLE SURETY UPON ALL INTERNAL REVENUE AND CUSTOMS BONDS 

Required by the United States Qovernment from 

Distillers, Brewers and Cigar Manufacturers 



PACIFIC COAST DEPARTMENT 



BORLAND & JOHNS, Managers 



Nevada Bank Building 



©»- 



►*»- 



-«»- 



-«»- 



-*•- 



»*»- 



-*»- 



-«»- 



..*»- 



-*»"■ 



-*»- 



-*»- 



-*»- 



-•*- 



-*»- 



►*»- 



-*»- 



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A. ROSSI & CO. 

; \MACHINISTS 

I Wine Presses 



« 



/ 



FOR SAI^E:— Second-hand Redwood Tanks and Oak Casks 
N. B.— A Steel Beam Hydraulic Press, 48x48, for Sale Cheap 

I BROADWAY, Near Sansome 



Grape Crusher | 

« 

tSan Francisco I 



-*»- 



-*»- 



-«»- 



-*»- 



►*»- 



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-*»- 



-*♦- 



-*»- 



-*»' 



►*»- 



-*»- 



-*♦- 



-*»- 



.«»- 



►*»- 



Barrett's Unrivalled Prune Juice 




GUARANTEED UNDER THE 
FOOD AND DRUGS ACT 

GUARANTY No. 49 



Now to be had from 




AMERICAN MERCANTILE CO. 



• • • 

• • • 



514 BATTERY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SAMPLES SENT 
ON APPLICATION 




GROWERS AND PRODUCERS OF 




Pare Calif ornia Wines ^"'^ Brandies 

PORT AND SHERRY 

A specialty 

La Manda Park, Los Angeles County, Cal. 

Gold Medal Paris Exposition, 1900 
Gold Medal Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, 1901 

Gold Medal Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904 
Gold 'Medal Lewis & Clark Exposition, 

Portland. Oregon, 1*05 
Gold Medal Jamestown, Va. Exposition. 1907 
Qold Medal Alasica-Yukon Expositon, 1909 




PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



THE BARTON VINEYARD CO., L'td. 



ESTABLISHED 1880 

GROWERS AND DISTILLERS OF 



The Famous Barton Wines and Brandies 

Vineyards and Cellars, Fresno, California 



Chicago Agent 

BYRON E. VRATCH 

37 South Water Street 



WM. RENNIE, Manager 
Fresno, Cal. 



New York Agents 

E. L. SPELLMAN & CO. 

792 Washington Street 



NEXT TIME TRY 

"Semper Idem" Filter Pulp 



Guaranteed Chemically Pure. Long fibre with asbestos 
Used by the largest wine producers in California to 
whom we refer by permission. Correspondence solicited 

Zellerbacli Paper Company 

Exclusive selling agents in the United States 



SAN FRANCISCO 



OAKLAND 



Send us a tri&I order 



LOS ANGELES 



The LOEW SYSTEM 

Patent 
Wine and 
Liquor 
Filter 

=SAVES= 




Cost of Clarifying 

Materials, as well 

as Storage, 

Shrinkage and 

Waste 



Filters to crystal brilliancy the 
most turbid wines and liquors, 
without any deterioration or loss 
in color, flavor, quantity or qual- 
ity, imparting a lustre and fin- 
ish to the product. 

Easily and quickly cleaned. 

Packed and unpacked in a few 
minutes. 

Send for Catalog. 

The Loew Manufacturing Co. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 




LUNDSTROM HATS 

"From Maker to Wearer" 

For Twenty-five years LUNDSTROM HATS 
have been the standard of quality and style 

FIVE STORES 
1178 MARKET ST. 72 MARKET ST. 

605 KEARNY ST. 2640 MISSION ST. 

26 THIRD ST. 



Send for Illustrated Catalogue to MAIL ORDER DEPARTMENT, 1178 Market Street 



Topazor 

The White Wine 



Nectarubi 



The Red Wine 



The Perfection of CaHfornia Table Wines 



oXamoj 







ESTABLISHED IN 1880 INCORPORATED IN 1906 

CONTRA COSTA WINERY, MARTINEZ 
WINDSOR WINERY. SONOMA CO. 



Office and Salesrooms: 

549 WASHINGTON STREET 



SanF 



rancisco 



10 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 




AMI VIGNIER (Inc.) Coast Distributors 

605-611 BATTERY STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 



RUSCONI, FISHER & COMPANY 

I IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR MERCHANTS I 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

ALEXANDER & McDONALD 
SPORTSMAN SCOTCH 
SANDY MCDONALD'S 
LIQUOR SCOTCH AND 
CORONA VINTAGE WINES 



DOG ON 
GOOD WHISKEY 



KENNEL CLUB 
WHISKEY 



SOLE AGENTS FOR 

KENNEL CLUB 
BOURBON AND RYE 
WHISKIES 
JAMES GRAHAM 
TOM GIN 



Unrivaled for Purity and Excellence 



326 JACKSON STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC WINK AND SPIRIT REVIEW. 



n 




f> I 



LOS ANGELES DEPARTMENT 



i» I n i»»air»ii ti n I i m I ii n I «»» III «»»»«»— »»«i O - • TT - I T 1 n il i iiii i li n i iiii 



»"**«"»**'i»»«n— ii» I "i n I «.i« I «iO 



LOS ANGELES, March 22.— Outside of supplying the de- 
mands of the regular traffic there has been nothing of in- 
terest transpiring in the trade in this section the past niontli. 
Ijocal business has been up to the usual standard at this time 
i)f the year, in fact somewhat better than at this season in 
Ii)10. The plentiful rains have insured good crops and there 
is a general feeling of stability manifest among the trade. In 
the city there has been rather more than the usual quota 
3f tourist visitors and the hotels have all been full and the 
retail trade has benefited accordingly. Outside orders have 
loen of satisfactory volume and taken altogether the season 
^o far has been good. IMuch wine is moving to the Eastern 
■enters and this season's vintage will see far less Avine on 
tiand in the cellars and wineries than has been the rule for 
■several years past. 

The establishment of Los Angeles harbor as a port of call 
if the Bates & Cheesebrough line of steamers has been a boon 
to Southern California Avinemen, and much of the wine that 
leretofore Avas sold to northern operators or else sent by rail 
to San Francisco, or else by rail direct East, is noAv being 
■shipped direct from this port by steamer to NeAv York. 
Ettienne Bros., of Pasadena, are uoav shipping about Aa-c car- 
loads eA^ery steamer to Ncav York, and Vache Bros., of San 
Bernardino, are also shipping quite heavily. Several other lai'ge 
•shippers are taking advantage of the Avater route and conse- 
luent loAA-er rates afforded by this neAV line and Avill undoubted- 
ly deA'elop into quite a large business fbr the Southern Califor- 
lia A\'inemen Avho are being encouraged and given every assist- 
ance hj the steamship company in a manner that promises all 
necessary facilities for the successful handling of his business 
in the future. 

The Avinemen here are a little doAvncast, because after just 
passing through the throes of a local option campaign, precipi- 
tated by the Board of Supervisors, they Avill be called upon 
^oon, because of the passage of the Wyllie Local Option Bill, 
to again defend their right to do business. In fact, here in 
i^outhern California, owing to the activity of the "Long Hairs" 
it resolves itself more into a fight for business existence. It 
loes seem a pity that an industry of so much stability and 
importance to the State of California should be so harassetl 
and its AA-hole existence threatened by the actions of a small 
:!oterie of fanatics here in Southern California Avho have 
nothing at stake and consequently nothing to lose. It is to be 
iioped that the Wyllie bill will finally effectually settle the local 
)ption question in such a manner that the AvinegroAvers and 
tintners will be able to know Avhere they stand. 

The holding here of the Pacific Land & Products Exposition 
the past fortnight has caused the thronging of the immense 
?^hriner Pavilion Avith people, citizens of Los Angeles and local 
OAvns of the county, with many thousands of visitors in the 
■ity from Eastern States. Much to our surprise the AAanemen 
3f Southern California did not aA^ail themseh'es of this op- 
portunity to make a display of their products such as their 
importance justifies. The Los Angeles Wine Company, Avhose 
n^inery and distillery are located at East Glendale, Avas the 
anly concern to make an exhibit of its products at the expo- 
sition, despite the fact that the Avine industry represents many 
millions of capital in the county alone. Wetmore-BoAven Co. 
if San Francisco made a small but creditable exhibit. 

The winemen of Southern California are particularly grati- 
!ied over the selection of B. R. Kittredge, the head of the great 
Sonoma Wine & Brandy Company, of NeAV York, as the suc- 
cessor of Percy T. Morgan as the president of the California 



Wine Association. Mr. Kittredge's long connection with the 
California Avine business, thorough knowledge of the needs of the 
industry and his ability, point to a most successful conduct 
of the affairs of this great corjwration. 

Alden & Thompson, proprietors of the Hotel Nadeau, have 
taken over the cafe privilege, formerly farmed out and have 
thoroughly remodeled and rebuilt the old building formerly so 
occupied and are noAv conducting therein in connection Avith 
the hotel a thoroughly up-to-date cafe and restaurant, an insti- 
tution much appreciated by the patrons of the popular old 
Nadeau Hotel. 

Tavo applications for Avinery licenses Avere made to the Board 
of Supervisors, during the month. The Artesia Vineyard Com- 
pany at Artesia and the Ettienne Bros., Incorporated, at 
Lamanda Park, both of Avhich applications Avere ordered ad- 
vertised. 

The Anheuser-Busch BrcAving Company are planning the 
erection of a |300,000 modern bottling plant in this city. 
Ground has already been purchased and a five story building 
will be erected at once and ready for occupancy by June first, 
by F. A. Heim & Co., the Anheuser-Busch Southern California 
agents. 

The Police Commission has issued the last of the 200 retail 
and 90 wholesale liquor licenses that Los Angeles is permitted 
to have according to ordinance. These Avent to James E. Brady, 
retailer, 1021 East Seventh street, and Morley & Gastor, the 
wholesale license. 

The City Council has finally decided that long vexed prob- 
lem as regards the status of the oyster cocktail. In their Avis- 
dom they decided it to be a drink beverage, thus allowing 
it to be sold on the streets Avithout the protection of a restau- 
rant license. 

City Prosecutor Guy Eddie has discovered another field 
for pernicious activity. He has discovered that the locker sys- 
tem installed by the members of the Jefferson Club is a "vio- 
lation" of the laAV and has caused the arrest of several of the 
officers of the club to bring the matter before the courts in a 
test case. 

The Customs Department of the Federal Government of 
Southern California, has since the opening of Los Angeles har- 
bor by the steamship companies making it a regular port of call, 
become (juite important, and has very considerably passed the 
million per month mark in importations direct. Much of the 
credit of this is due to the Avork of Guy B. Barliam, Southern 
California's custom house broker who has been an earnest ad- 
vocate of direct importation among the merchants of not only 
this city but all Southern California. 

The Southern California Vineyard Co., of Uplands, Cal., with 
vineyard and winery at Cucamonga, has been incorporated 
Avith $75,000 capital, of which |30,000 has been issued. The 
company now offers $10,000 worth of stock at par |1 per share. 
There are no liabilities. The assets consist of a 60-acre seven- 
year-old vineyard, stone Avinery, concrete buildings and wine on 
hand, the Avhole valued at more than $30,000. With the pro- 
ceeds from the sale of 10,000 shares it is intended to erect two 
more stone buildings and install additional cooperage for hold- 
ing and maturing wines. The management of the company ex- 
pect to sell direct to the consumer. 

A modern bottling plant will be erected by the Anheuser- 
Busch Brewing Company at North Main and Albion streets, 
Los Angeles. The project will cost $300,000. The new plant 
will be occupied June 1 by F. A. Heim & Co., the Anheuser- 
Busch agents. 



12 



PACIFIC WINP] AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



<P 



LOUISVILLE DEPARTMENT 

G. D. CRAIN, JR., Regular Comspondent, 305 Keller Eldg., Louisville, Ky. 






L 



OUISVILLE, Ky., March 25. — "The Kentucky whisky mar- 
ket is in the best condition of its history." 
This is the statement which meets one everywhere, and Main 
street distillers and wholesalers are smiling the smile that 
won't come off. The demand, considering the time of year, 
is almost unprecedented, and business is holding up in a way 
that is giving satisfaction to everybody concerned. 

The local market seems to be entirely cleaned up, as far as 
old whiskies are concerned. There is little stock of either 1909 
or 1910 on the market, distillers who produce for the whole- 
sale trade, having sold out their holdings almost to the last 
barrel. The retail trade is calling for goods steadily, and the 
result is that the market has a substance and strength that is 
remarkable. 

Prices have been advancing in view of this situation, and 
from 2 to 10 cents has been added to the selling price of nearly 
every age that is held in anything like large quantities. The 
prospect is that if the situation continues to shoAv improve- 
ment, and if the demand increases as it has done for the next 
few months, still further increases will be chalked up. 

The general situation offers sufficient reason for the heavy 
production that is now going on. Every distillery in the State 
is operating to its capacity, and the predictions which have 
been made for several months previous in the Pacific Wink 
AND Spirit Review will be fulfilled without question. As a 
matter of fact, it looks as if the statement that 40,000,000 gal- 
lons will be made this j^ear is too conservative, as the prospect 
is now that at least 41,000,000 gallons will be the aggregate 
of the crop. Other statements are heard on the street, and opti- 
mists believe that even the record of 1893, when 45,000,000 gal- 
lons were produced, may be surpassed. 

The distilleries will probably run for several months longer 
this year than they have done in a long while. Usually many 
of them begin to close in April or May, while a few run until 
June. Already, however, there are indications that practically 
all will operate until the month of roses, while some distillers 
are planning to continue through July and until August is 
well begun. This is another reason for believing that the crop 
will be far in excess of expectations at the beginning of the 
season. 

Reference was made last month to the discussion the situ- 
ation caused by the recent decision of Judge Archibald in the 
Federal Court at Pittsburg. The decision was to the effect 
that warehouse receipts issued by the distiller on his own 
goods are not good collateral. This decision caused a consid- 
erable stir here, as the use of receipts of this nature has been 
general. For a time it was thought that a guaranty company 
would be formed for the purpose of handling the situation and 
giving surety as to the validity of the receipts. This was made 
unnecessary, however, by an opinion of Kennedy Helm, attor- 
ney of the Kentucky State Bankers' Asociation, who investi- 
gated the matter exhaustively and made a report. He said that 
in Pennsylvania, where the decision was rendered, the com- 
mon law governed, because there is no statute regulating the 
use of the warehouse receipts. In this State, however, their 
use is regulated and protected by a State statute, and there is 
not the most remote danger of loss growing out of their use 
as collateral. He advised bankers to accept them as hereto- 
fore. This opinion was a great relief not only to the bankers, 
who have from $10,000,000 to |15,000,000 every year tied up 
in the ^A'hisky warehouse receipts, but to every branch of the 
whisky trade. 



The local trade was considerably stirred by the action of the 
Federal Grand Jury, now in session, in calling before it sev- 
eral prominent straight whisky men. J. A. Wathen, of the 
Kentucky Distillers & Warehouse Company, was one of those 
Avho was called as a witness, the investigation being conducted 
by R. C. Shelley, special revenue agent of the Government. The 
fact that Capt. Shelley was in charge led to the belief that 
the investigation had to do with matters affecting the tax pay- 
ment on whisky, especially as only those connected with dis- 
tilleries were called. The grand jury made no report in the 
matter, however, and it is supposed that the cases have been 
dropped. No information was given out, of course, by any 
of those who were called before the grand jury. 

An interesting question, affecting practically every distillery 
in the State, has been raised by the State Board of Health, 
which has sought to compel the Kentucky Distilleries & Ware- 
house Company to cease disposing of the slops from two of 
its distilleries in Anderson county by allowing them to run 
into streams which empty into the Kentucky river. It is alleged 
that their disposal in this way is a menace to health. The com- 
pany has secured a temporary restraining order against tlio 
State Boai'd of Health, and the case will be argued shortly to 
determine whether the injunction shall be made permanent. 
The distillers assert that the slops are not a nuisance and that 
they are dissolved in the streams in such a way that they are 
in nowise dangerous. In the event that the State Board wins 
its case, it is likely that all of the distilleries in the State which 
have not done so already Avill be compelled to equip their plants 
with drying machinery for the disposal of the slops. Many of 
the whisky houses have found that a commercial feed can he 
made in this way which is salable at a good price and which 
soon pays the cost of installing the driers. 

George G. Brown, of the Brown-Forman Company, has been 
in the limelight locally on account of an act of unusual charac- 
ter. Mr. Brown, in company with Hugh L. Barret, another well 
known local business man, has discharged an obligation of over 
.fl2,000 incurred twenty years ago in connection with a tobacco 
company in which they were interested and which failed with 
considerable liabilities. They paid as much of the debt at that 
time as posslible and were discharged from obligation to their 
creditors. Mr. Brown, however, took out an insurance policy, 
which was to mature in twenty years. The policy, which was 
written in an endowment form, has just matured, and Mr. 
Brown used the proceeds of it to pay the remaining part of 
the obligations incurred more than 20 years ago. The Citizens' 
National Bank of Louisville, one of those which profited by 
this step on the part of Mr. Brown, presented to him a hand- 
some silver vase suitably inscribed. The incident, showing 
an unusual sense of moral obligation, attracted wide atten- 
tion. Mr. Brown is now traveling in California, where his firm 
has extensive interests. 

Reports which have reached Louisville from Richmond, Va., 
indicate that the distilling of whisky may be abandoned to a 
large extent in the Old Dominion capital. Distillers have 
been given orders by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue 
to disconnect pipes leading from distilleries to rectifying plants, 
and they have closed their distilling houses, asserting that if 
the old practice is no longer to be allowed they prefer to buy 
their whisky in Louisville and other markets. Commissioner 
Cabell declared there is no reason for this assertion. 



PACIFIC WINE AND Sl'IRIT REVIEW 



13 



' I Over The Sparkling: Wine Cup f f 

U 



I 



CALIFORNIA WINES DISCUSSED 

By Horatio F. Stoll. 



rHERE is no doubt that much good will come from the 
luncheon of the Home Industry League of California given 
t the Palace Hotel on Friday, March 10th, at which a number 
jif leading California wine men were the guests of honor. This 
^irganization, which has already accomplished much good in its 
lief career, expressed a desire to co-operate with the wine 
aen, saying that if it was pointed out to them how they could 
boost" our native Avines, they would gladly do so. 

Nearly a hundred members, besides the guests, were seated 

1 1 table, and much surprise was expressed among the wine men 

Ihat ice water only was provided, but Mr. C. J. Wetmore 

romptly supplied the omission and ordered every one served 

rith a glass of Cresta Blanca Sauterne. 




THE WINE PRESS OF THE WORLD 

— Courtesy of the San Francisco Evening "Post" 

The guests were welcomed by Col. George Pippy, and then 
vir. P. C. Rossi was introduced by President F. C. Parker. In 
he course of his pithy remarks, Mr. Rossi said : 

"The failure of the vintage abroad has done much to open the 
yes of the European nations to the merits of California wineS. 
SoAvever, the shipment of one or two million gallons of wine 
ibroad is nothing in itself. The real benefit to California is the 
standing it gives our Avines in the estimation of people who 
earn that the California product is of such quality that it is 
?ood enough for the European connoisseurs to buy and drink. 
This one fact has caused many firms in America to turn to the 



domestic product to replace tlie supplies they have hitherto 
obtained across the water. This Avill prove a permanent benefit 
to us. Consumers will become habituated to drinking Califor- 
nia wines and will not change so long as we give them a satis- 
factory article. I consider this the biggest feature of the entire 
matter. * ♦ » 

"Encouraged by the favorable protective tariff and the ten- 
dencies of the American people to recognize the merits of our 
native wines, the Italian^Swiss Colony has undertaken the manu- 
facture of the finest sparkling wines, naturally fermented in the 
bottle. At great expense, and after much coaxing, we succeeded 
in luring to California Charles Jadeau, one of France's most 
famous champagne experts. For the past two years, he has 
been working at Asti and is producing sparkling white and red 
wines, which when they are put on the market in a few months 
will prove not only a success, but a revelation to all. 

"I do not intend to praise our sparkling wines further my- 
self. I always have a hesitancy about telling how good our 
wines are, for I prefer to let the other fellow throw the bou- 
quets. I realize that there are many other good California 
wines made, and when I taste something good, I appreciate it, 
no matter by whom it is manufactured. Likewi.se, if I think 
that we can improve on our own methods, I do not hesitate to 
confess the fact." 

"For years we have been experimenting on the production of 
sparkling wines, which while they turnetl out to be excellent, 
were not such as to boast about. I realized that they could be 
considerably improved and that Avas the reason of the efforts 
made during my last visit to France to induce Mr. Jadeau to 
come to California. I have already had occasion to judge the 
results of his skillful work, and I hope that before many months 
I will have the pleasure of inviting you gentlemen of the Home 
Industry League to visit Asti, Avhere you Avill be able to inspect 
our sparkling Avine department, meet Mr. Jadeau and have a 
chance to taste and judge of our sparkling wines for your- 
selves." 

Mr. M. F. Tarpey, AA'ho had just returned from Washington, 
D. C, paid a pretty tribute to the Avine men Avho presented 200 
cases of Avine to the Congressional delegation, saying that it 
had contributed much to shoAV the hospitality of the generous 
Californians and had figured in many a little dinner that was 
planned to land another vote. 

Mr. Tarpey recited many experiences he had in the East 
Avhere hotels and cafes had tried to impose other than California 
wines on him Avhen he ordered the latter. But he said he always 
insisted on getting California Avines and did get them. 

He also expressed the hope that the viticultural industry 
Avould be represented at the Panama-Pacific International Ex- 
position with a splendid exhibit Avhich would shoAv the world 
the progress Ave have made in Avine making during the past fifty 
years. 

L. R. Rogers, of Las Palmas Winery, Fresno, declared that 
the Home Industry League could aid the wine men greatly if 
they attempted, first, to teach the American people to buy a 
Avine for its merits and not for the label; second, to get the 
hotels to put the price doAAn to a reasonable figure; and third, 
to give their moral support in legislative matters. 

He deplored the attempt of the Anti-Saloon League to injure 
our industries Avith their unreasonable AVyllie Option Bill and 
told of his encounter with the Rev. Dr. Bristol Avhen he at- 
tempted to "dry up" Fresno. 

"It AA'as only by holding the Avrath of God over the head of 
our Mayor," he explained, "that aac got him to A'eto a measure 
Avhich Avould have discredited the industry from Avhich Fresno 
County derives its largest revenue." 



14 



PACIFIC AVINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



C. J. Wetmore, who is one of the charter members of the 
Home Industry Leas'iie, spoke of the recognition California 
wines were receiving purely on their merits. He suggested that 
if all loyal Califoruians would always insist upon getting a 
home wine, the large Eastern hotels would feel obliged to carry 
them. 

Theodore Gier called attention to the local option fight that 
was being waged at Sacramento, and expressed the hope that 
the Home Industry League would show its interest in our viti- 
cultural industry by addressing a strong telegram to the Senate 
asking the upper house to protect the viticultural, hop and 
barley industries by opposing the Wyllie Option Rill as orig- 
inally passed by the Assembly. 

President Parker, who has been interested in the eight-hour 
and the liability bills, facetiously remarked : "I am glad to see 
that there are others who have legislative troubles." But he 
said that the Home Industry League stood ready to do all in its 
power to aid the wine interests and that if a committee of three, 
which he appointed, would put in concretet form a telegram to 
Senator L. T. Juilliard, he would be glad to sign and forward it 
at once. 

P. C. Rossi, C. J. Wetmore and J. A. Hieronimus were se- 
lected to word the message, which read as follows : 

"The Home Industry League of California, in meeting assem- 
bled to-day, unanimously resolved that the Senate be asked not 
to recede from its position in regard to the Wyllie Local Option 
Bill." 

It is to be hoped that all the representative wine houses will 
promptly ally themselves with the Home Industry League, for 
there is no doubt that this new boosting organization can aid 
them materially in crystallizing public opinion in favor of the 
viticultural industry and in making known to the world the 
merits of California wines. 



'wrapping' tobacco. It has a large silken leaf and is considered 
nearer to the Sumatra product than any American tobacco. 
Fortunately it has not the bitterness of the Sumatra weed. I am 
confident that it is only a question of time when it will be in 
general demand for wrapping purposes. 

"Our pineapple industry is going ahead with such leaps and 
bounds that it threatens to rival our sugar output. A temper- 
ance drink known as 'pinectar,' the pure juice of the pineapple, 
is having a tremendous sale, surpassing even the popularity of 
the juice gotten out by the Dole Company. Thousands of addi- 
tional acres are being set out in pineapples and some of our 
biggest packers, like the California Fruit Canners' Association, 
Libby, McNeil & Libby, and others are establishing canneries in 
the Islands to supply the demand. 

"As for prohibition, the subject is absolutely dead. At tlic 
plebiscite last year, the liquor interests won out by a decisive 
vote of 4 to 1. In Honolulu, the trade is regulated by a Board 
of License Commissioners Avho have tlie power to give licenses 
and rescind them for cause. They are strict but fair, and the 
result is that every objectionable feature is promptly and satis- 
factorily dealt witli. Even the rabid prohibitionists concede 
that the liquor business, as handled at the present time in the 
Islands, is as near perfection as can be found anyAvhere. 

"California sweet wines are especially popular in the Islands. 
The Hawaiians and Japs drink sweet wine very freely. Beer is 
sold over the bar at 10 cents a glass in Honolulu and so is an 
(>qual amount of sweet Avine. For years sake was imported to 
the Islands in large quantities for the Japanese, but they have 
acquired a taste for California sweet wines, and as a result the 
demand for sake is decreasing every year. .And strange to say, 
intoxication also among the Hawaiians and Japs is on the wane 
since they have taken to drinking California wines." 



[' A 'Noted Visitor Jfrom the Islands} 1 

MR. J. C. COHEN is up from the Hawaiian Islands on a 
six weeks' visit, most of which time will be spent in San 
Francisco and the bay cities. He is one of Honolulu's principal 
business men and represents the Italian-Swiss Colony through- 
out the islands. He reports that business in general is very 
good and the prospects better than ever. 

"During the past year our tourist travel has doubled,'' he 
informed me, "and the large number of troops sent by the Gov- 
ernment as well as the influx of skilled and ordinary laborers, 
Avho are employed in the development of Pearl Harbor, dredging 
and building drydocks and fortifications, have done much to 
stimulate business. 

"The people of Honolulu consider themselves almost a part 
of San Francisco, and Avhen the news was cabled that your city 
had been chosen as tlie Exposition City for 1915, the event Avas 
celebrated with almost as much enthusiasm as if the metropolis 
of the islands had won the coveted prize. You may be sure Ave 
will send a great exhibit, for Ave are doing big things down there 
and raising any number of ncAV products. 

"For example, AA^e are going into the rubber business. Our 
trees are noAv just beginning to arrive at an age when they are 
ready to be tapped and there is no question that this industry 
AA'ill prove profitable in localities Avhere the land cannot be used 
for any other purpose. We are also groAving sisal, a species 
of hemp. The quality is very fine and cordage manufacturers 
are buying it up as fast as they can get hold of it. 

"Cotton is also a success, the samples examined having 
been pronounced superior to anything groAvn in the South Sea 
Islands. The texture is finer even than the American or South- 
em product, and of course it will bring a larger price. Our 
tobacco, too, is of such high quality that it is noAV classed as 



Recent Liquor Legislation 



NEWS from the front tells of several reverses recently suf- 
fered by county option and prohibition forces. The legis- 
lative battle is being Avaged in many States. A few days ago 
the Governor of Indiana signed a bill that substituted the mu- 
nicipal and township unit for the county unit, which had been 
in force two years. The issue Avas fought out in the campaign 
of last fall and the party committed to a repeal of the connly 
option law won. 

The Anti-Saloon League county option bill Avas defeated tlic 
other day in the Minnesota Legislature, and the same thing 
happened to the bills of that organization in the Nebraska and 
Washington Legislatures. 

In Maine a bill is pending to resubmit to the people the ques- 
tion of State-Avide prohibition. The Governor recommended 
such a measure and it is reported that the necessary two-thirds 
vote of the Legislature Avill support it. The forces opposed to 
prohibition on principle are supported on the resubmission issue 
by the element that is disgusted over failure to keep out "blind 
pigs." 

In connection with the issue noAv up in Maine, the action of 
Alabama in repudiating the prohibition law and of Oregon in 
substituting the municipal unit after a county option laAV had 
been in force six years is instructive. 



lASH'S BITTERC 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



15 



New French Laws for Champagne Wine 



VT OTWITHSTANDING the law against adulterating food 
'.N products enacted by the French Chambers on August 1, 
1)05, and the law of December 17, 1908, which established the 
loundaries of the region, the wine produced from grapes grown 
vithin which alone is permitted to be called champagne, there 
lave been committed recently a number of serious infractions 
if this law. 

Several chami)agne manufacturers are now under iudict- 
aent for having bought at reduced prices wine growu in other 
>arts of France, and, after applying to it the methods applied 
n making champagne wine, sold it as such, thus doing serious 
lamage to those producing champagne wine strictly within 
III' limits of the champagne district and the limits of the law. 
ll'he honest manufacturers of champagne wine have there- 
lore for some time appealed to the French Government to 
ave the existing laws amended in a manner that such business 
jvould be made impossible. The Government gave these appeals 
line consideration. Action, however, was accelerated when, 
11 January, a number of small vine growers, owing to the very 
|>oor harvests of grapes during the last three seasons, of which 
h\e last was a total failure, had been reduced to such poverty 
s to have to accept assistance from the Government and from 
he wine merchants for their mere wants of life. 

REMKDI.VL MEASURE PASSES HOUSE OF DBPUTIB6. 

Tlie French Congress (Clmmbres des Deputes), upon urgent 
ecommendation nuide by the Government, under date of Feb- ^ 
uary G, 1911, passed a law, a translation of which reads as fol- 
i)ws : 

leasures to be taken to guarantee the origin of champagne wine in the 

region whose boundary was fixed by the law of December 17, 1908, to 

be the champagne district. 

Art. 1. On being forwarded from the presses, magazines, and cellars 

( cultivators of wine in the territory legally delimited as the "champagne 

istrict" all wine coming from this district must be accompanied by a cer- 

iflcate of origin issued by the excise officer. 

Art. 2. In order to be entitled to be named "champagne" all sparkling 
ines must originally come from the vintages and wines grown in the cham- 
pagne district, in which also they must have been stored, handled, and com- 
lately prepared in premises which must be separated from any premises 
ntaining wines from other districts, and access to which can be had only 
rom the public thoroughfare. A transfer of wine from one of these prem- 
ses to another can be made only upon the production of a certificate of 
rigin issued by the excise commissioner. 

Dating from the promulgation of this law, a delay of three months will 
e accorded the merchants who (a) make or have made since September 
. 1910, champagne wine coming from the champagne district and wine 
rom other districts at the same time; (b) those who have only one maga- 
ine, or if they have more, they can be entered only through one door from 

public highway. 

As an exception to paragraph 1 there could be kept in the premises 
eslgnated by this paragraph the wines destined for the private use of the 
lanufacturer and his employes, under the limits and conditions agreed 

nnually by the departmental commissioner of indirect taxes. 

As another exception it could be permitted for a period not longer than 
year after the promulgation of this law that wine other than the 
nal champagne wine can be kept together with the original champagne 
provided that it had been there at the time of the declaration pro- 
id for in article 4; also such wine as had been placed there by virtue 
he second paragraph of this article. 

During' the delay granted, as per the foregoing paragraph a special account 
if wine coming from the original champagne district must be kept in these - 
nixed magazines; this account will be subject to the same' rules and the 
ame penalties as is the general wine account. This special account is to 

ive as a basis for the declaration of the origin when the wine has to be 

ived. 

Art. 3. After a delay of one year, dating from the promulgation of this 
resent law, the bottles containing sparkling wines from the champagne 



district, taken from the separate premises, must be provided with a label 
containing the word "champagne" in well legible characters. The boxes 
or other receptacles likewise must be marked with the same word. 

One month after the promulgation of this law the bottles at the time 
of recorking (degorgeage) must be closed by a cork marked "champagne" 
on the part which is contained in the neck of the bottle. 

Art. 4. The merchants and manufacturers subject to the rulings of 
article 2 shall, within eight days after the promulgation of this law, declare 
at the excise office the amount of their stock of original champagne wine. The 
commissioner of indirect taxes shall have the right to demand proofs of origin 
and to reject all or part of these proofs. Appeal can be taken from this 
before a court of arbitration formed by one expert chosen by the excise com- 
missioner, one by the appellant, and, in case of disagreement, a third one 
to be appointed by the president of the civil court. 

Art. 5. All infractions of this present law shall be punished by confisca- 
tion of the wine, by a penalty of from 500 to 5000 francs ($96.50 to $965), 
independently of the penalties which could be pronounced upon application 
cf the law of August 1, 1905. Such infraction will be proved and prose- 
cuted in the same manner as are violations of the laws concerning indirect 
taxes. 

This laAv, which it is believed will be sanctioned by the Senate 
and will be promulgated soon, has been receive<l with great sat- 
isfaction by the lionest wine manufacturers as well as by the 
vine growers, and should be received with satisfaction by all 
consumers of French champagne wine. — From Consul W. 
Bardel, Rheims. 



Local Wine in Toronto Market 



I 



CALIFORNIA wines — particularly those which are the pro- 
duct of Sacramento — are finding great favor in Toronto, 
Canada, among the French residents of that section, accord- 
ing to the statement of T. W. Home, citizen and business man 
of Toronto, who is in Sacramento tliis week visiting his old 
friend C. F. Rich, manager of the California Winery. 

DISPI/ACING FOREIGN WINES. ■ 

"Before the California companies commenced sending their 
samples to Toronto," said Home, in the course of an interview 
with a Bee reporter this morning, "the wine market of that sec- 
tion was entirely controlled by European producers. Those 
who have sampled the stock sent from Sacramento were agree- 
ably surprised at the quality and excellence of the California 
product." 

Home is hei-e largely on a pleasure trip, and leaves with Rich 
for San Francisco this evening in the latter's machine. After 
seeing the sights of the California metropolis, the two will prob- 
ably make the trip by auto to Los Angeles, over the Coast 
road, and finish up with a tour of Southern California. 

PLEASED WITH SACRAMENTO. 

The Toronto man is very much pleased witli Sacramento and 
stated that, from all he had seen and heard of the productive- 
ness of this valley, it was simply marvelous. 

"Until recently in Canada," said Home, "we heard but little 
of California, except as a resort for sick people. During the 
last two years, however — whether from some system of adver- 
tising or other reasons, I know not — everybody is talking Cali- 
fornia. It may be because more of our people are traveling 
in the United States now than formerly — for duriug the last 
few years our farmers hav(! become very ])rosperous at grain 
farming and most of them and their families now spend tlie 
winter traveling around America and Europe. 

"Then, too, I believe the reciprocity negotiations between 
the two countries have been largely responsible for making the 
people who are engaged in business the more oareful in inform- 
ing themselves regarding things in the LTnited States." — Sac- 
ramento Bee, March 7, 1911. 



16 



PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEW 



Famous Russian Dancers Perplexed 



Exports From Spanish Vineyards 



ACCORDING to Ben H. Atwell, who acts as advance agent 
for Mile. Pavlova and M. ^Mikail Mordkin, who danced 
themselves into favor in San Francisco a few months ago, the 
great Russian artists have a very poor idea of American liberty. 

"They were informed," says Mr. Atwell, "that to give a per- 
formance in New York on Sunday would be to court arrest. 
Two weeks later we gave Sunday performances in Chicago and 
it was difficult to convince them that they would not land in 
jail. Immediately after that we opened a new theater in a 
Michigan city en route to Detroit. After the performance they 
could get nothing to drink with their dinner becau.se the local 
ordinance forbade .selling liquor after 10 o'clock. The limit 
was reached in Toronto a few days later, when Mordkin was 
compelled by the local authorities to wear tights lest his bare 
legs .should shock the sensibilities of the public. 

"A few days later we were in Iowa and again they could 
get no wines with their meals, or at any other time. To prevent 
this annoyance we put a well-stocked private dining car on our 
own train. Within forty-eight hours the authorities at Lincoln, 
Neb., made the train crew pull down the curtains of the diner 
because they were in doubt whether it should be raided as a 
'blind pig.' The Russians were angry, but they had to pass the 
day living by gas light. Cigarettes and tea are the two most 
important factors in a Russian's enjoyment. In many States 
and a large number of cities the sale of cigarettes is prohibited 
by law. After experiencing much inconvenience, they sent to 
New York and received a consignment of cigarettes that would 
stock a good-sized store. 

"When Oklahoma was reached the porters on our private 
cars collected the drinking glasses in the lavatories and locked 
them up. When the Russians set about completing their toilette 
in the morning and found no glasses there was a near-riot. 
The porters were obdurate, explaining that under the State 
law they would be fined and sent to jail for permitting the 
glasses to be used. It is a hygienic regulation. We had to 
make a stop at the first town we reached and purchase an indi- 
vidual supply. 

"The next day we rolled into Texas. While all were dining 
the train stopped for water and an officer came aboard and 
arrested us because liquors were being served. There is a spe- 
cific State law against drinking on a train. We fixed the mat- 
ter up in a hurry by paying a fine and costs, but for the re-' 
maining four days we were in Texas neither wines nor liquors 
were served with meals. It was utterly incomprehensible to 
the Russians why a State that permits the sale of a commodity 
in hotels, cafes, etc., should make the consumption of that 
commodity on a train a criminal action. They are in love 
with the energy shown by Americans, with the rush and bustle. 
with the climate, the business opportunities and with the indi- 
vidual character of Americans, but no amount of argument can 
convince them that we enjoy as full a degree of personal liberty 
as is po.ssible in Russia." 



CONSUL ROBERT FRAZER, Jr., of Valencia, submits the 
following review of the Spanish vineyard output: 

The total exports of Spanish wines during the past year arc 
officially valued at about |1G,310,000, of which ordinary red 
wines represent |4,318,000; Malagas, |2,920,300; sherries, 
12,220,500; and white wines, .|1,145,G00. The changes in tastes 
of consumers of Spanish wines is evidenced by the continual 
decline in exports of sherries, which was |1,003,000 le.ss than 
in 1908, while Malagas continue to gain in favor and improved 
$1,028,000. White wines also increased $79,000, but ordinary 
red wines have receded $681,000. 

The past season's wine crop is the shortest during the last 
20 years, being estimated at slightly under 15,000,000 hectoliters 
(396,255,000 gallons), the average of recent vintages being 
computed at $24,000,000 hectoliters (634,008,000 gallons). 
Hence, though the export demand continues dull, prices of 
ordinary wines have advanced sharply since the beginning of 
1910 from 11 to 20 pesetas per hectoliter ($1.98 to $3.60) in 
this region, and stocks are .said to be nearly exhausted. 

The exceptional shortage of wine is -attributed to neglect of 
cultivation consequent on long continuance of unremunerative 
prices, reduced area of vine plantations, and destruction of 
plants by phylloxera and a variety of cryptogamic pests. Home 
consumption of wine has also been stimulated by the recent 
suppression of the heavy octroi or municipal tax on wine en- 
tering Spanish cities and which amounted in most cases to over 
150 per cent ad valorem. 

Exports of fresh grapes amounted to $2,012,200, an improve- 
' ment over the previous year of $383,000, while raisins reached 
$3,714,300, an increase of $391,000. 



A Canadian lawyer tells an amusing story of a bailiff who 
went out to levy on the contents of a house. The inventory 
began in the attic and ended in the cellar. When the dining- 
room was reached, the tally of furniture ran thus : 

"One dining-room table, oak; 

"One set chairs (6), oak; 

"One sideboard, oak; 

"Tavo bottles whisk, full." 

Then the word "full" was stricken out and replaced by 
"empty" and the inventory went on in a hand that