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THE LIBRARIES 









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http://www.archive.org/details/qstamerOOamer 



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PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN RA 



Build ii youh 

in 1/ minutes*. 






Net 

$108°P 



THE 1^^/ LINEAR STANDARD' 
20-WATT PRE-FAB AMPLIFIER 

Qmndlo l^om in Qualiiy 
ar^ Petfoiwsnce 



Yes, just tighten 17 screws, in 17 minutes, connect your completed 
UTC Pre-Fab Amplifier into your Hi-Fi system, then sit back and enjoy 
the most spine-tingling tones you ever heard through your music 
system. And all you have used is a screwdriver. 

The UTC 'Linear Standard' is the first pre-engineered, pre-fabri- 
cated, pre-assembled amplifier kit ever offered to the home building 
audio fan, that employs the latest and most advanced techniques 
including the printed circuit. You needn't knov/ a tube from a con- 
denser, just how to use a screv/driver. 

More than a year of top level UTC engineering has gone into this 
amplifier to produce the cleanest, purest, response you have ever 
heard. It's absolutely linear: no positive feedback, hence no re- 
sponse peaks at either end of the spectrum. Excellent damping and 
transient response ... no hangover on low frequencies to cause 
boominess ... no high frequency ringing. In short, just pure, clean, 
true-to-life response that sounds as good as it tests on the meter. 

And it's the only amplifier with a feedback circuit so stable that any 
one of the tubes can be replaced and still be perfectly matched to 
its twin, with no critical circuit readjustments necessary. 

It is the finest amplifier you can own, and you can proudly say, 
"I built It myself." 



NITED TRANSFORMER CO. 



ISO VARICK STREET 



NEW YORK 13, N. Y. 



-5^ 



^^^i^ 






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^S'. 



^i^^^k, 



THIS MAN IS DESTROYING TUBES 
THAT WON'T MEET STIFF G-E TESTS 



They're being ground to powder, 
in a G-E factory machine that 
awaits tube rejects. All General Elec- 
tric tubes must demonstrate satisfac- 
tory performance before they're 
cartoned and shipped . . . any tubes 
that fail in final tests are destroyed 
as completely unusable. 
No "seconds", so-called, can leave 
a General Electric tube plant! The 
new G-E tube you buy is a first-grade 
product in every case. 



Observing this single standard of 
quality are seven G-E plants with the 
largest tube manufacturing area in 
the industry . . . staffed with many 
thousand trained employees using 
the most modern precision tube- 
building equipment, much of it de- 
signed throughout by G.E. 

See your General Elearic tube 
distributor today for tubes that are 
manufaaured to one standard of 
quality only . . . the highest! 



T^rogre^s Is Our Most Important Product 

GENERAL^ELECTRIC 




NOW.. 



PLUG-IN selectivity 
for YOUR receiver 



\ 



X^^J 




2.5 kc 
3.0 kc 
7.0 kc 
12.6 kc 



Net Each. 



$65.00 



The 353A-series Adapter is shown in o Hommerlund 
SP-400. The 353A-series Adapter olso fits the Na- 
tional HRO-60. 

Adopter Bandwidth Bandwidth 




Type 


At -6 DB At -60 [ 


353B-08 


0.8 kc 


2.5 kc 


353B-12 


1.2 kc 


3.0 kc 


353B-3) 


3.1 kc 


7.0 kc 


3538-60 


6.0 kc 


12.6kc 


Net 


Eoch 


$65.00 



The 353B-serles Adopter between the IF cons in the 
SP-600-JX receiver. 



2.5 kc 

3.0 kc 

7.0 kc 

12.6kc 




Net Each. 



$65.00 



The 353D-series Adapter in the Notional HRO-50 or 
HRO-50T1. 

COLLINS RADIO COMPANY 

CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA 



Popularity of Collins Mechanical Filters and Me- 
chanical Filter Adapters in the 75A Amateur Re- 
cei\ers has resulted in many requests for Mechan- 
ical Filter Adapters designed for use in other pop- 
ular recei\ers. 

The advantages of the mechanical filter approach 
to receiver selectivity may be immediately rec- 
ognized. For instance, Filter Adapters eliminate 
problems normally associated with improving re- 
ceiver selectivity. Installation requires only that 
an IF tube be removed and the Filter Adapter 
plugged into its socket. No modification or dis- 
figuration is necessary. The Collins Mechanical 
Filter Adapter is self-contained, permanently tuned, 
and power and signal circuits are obtained from 
the tube socket. Gain of the Filter Adapter matches 
that of the IF tube replaced. 

The convenient plug-in feature of the Filter Adap- 
ter provides a means for selecting a choice of band- 
width for reception of CW, AM, SSB or FSK. For 
example, the 800 cycle bandpass Adapter may be 
plugged in for CW reception; the 1.2 kc Adapter 
for either CW or FSK; the 3.1 kc Adapter for AM 
or SSB; and the 6.0 kc Adapter for AM. 

MECHANICAL FILTERS 
ALSO AVAILABLE 

Amateurs desiring Filters for 
application to other equip- 
ments now have a choice of center frequencies at 
500 kc, 453 kc, and 250 kc — and bandwidth char- 
acteristics to fulfill most operating needs. In the 
F455-series (455 kc), bandwidths are established 
at 0.8 kc, 1.2 kc, 3.1 kc, and 6.0 kc. The F500-series 
(300 kc) provides a bandwidth choice of 1.4 kc, 
3.1 kc, and 6.0 kc. For SSB reception with a 250 kc 
IF, the 250Z-series provides 3-2 kc bandwidths. A 
6.7 kc bandwidth is available in the F250A-67 for 
receivers with a 250 kc IF. 

F455-series __$35.00 F250Z-series (3.2 kc)__$60.00 
F500-series _. $35.00 F250A-67 (6.7 kc)__^$45.00 

FREE LITERATURE AT YOUR REQUEST 

Booklets describing Mechanical Filters and Mechanical 
Filter Plug-In Adapters are available. Included are re- 
sponse cur\es, detailed theory of operation, circuit appli- 
cations, and other informative data. See your local dis- 
tributor or contact a Collins Sales Office. 




261 Madison Avenue, NEW YORK 16 

1930 Hi-Line Drive, DALLAS 2 

2700 W. Olive Avenue, BURBANK 

COLLINS RADIO COMPANY OF CANADA LTD. 

74 Sparks St., OTTAWA, ONTARIO 



t 





JANUARY 1955 



VOLUME XXXIX 



NUMBER 1 



PUBLISHED, MONTHLY, AS ITS OFFICIAL ORGAN, BY THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE, INC., AT 
WEST HARTFORD, CONN., U. S. A.; OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE INTERNATIONAL AMATEUR RADIO UNION 



STAFF 

Editorial 

A. L. BUDLONG, WIBUD 

Editor 

HAROLD M. McKEAN, WICEG 
Managing Editor 

GEORGE GRAMMER, WIDF 
Technical Editor 

DONALD H. MIX, WITS 
BYRON GOODMAN, WIDX 
Assistant Technical Editors 

EDWARD P. TILTON, WIHDQ 
V.H.F. Editor 

Z. VERNON CHAMBERS, WIIEQ 

LEWIS G. McCOY, WIICP 

Technical Assistants 

ROD NEWKIRK, W9BRD 
DX Editor 

ELEANOR WILSON, WIQON 
YL Editor 

ANN B. FURR, WIZIB 
Production Assistant 



Advertising 

LORENTZ A. MORROW, WIVG 

Advertising Manager 

EDGAR D. COLLINS 

Advertising Assistant 

Circulation 

DAVID H. HOUGHTON 

Circulation Manager 

J. A. MOSKEY, WIJMY 

Assistant Circulation Manager 

OFFICES 

38 La SaUe Road 

West Hartford 7, Connecticut 

Tel.: AD 3-6268 TWX: HF 88 

Subscription rate In United States and 
Possessions, $4.00 per year, postpaid; 
$4.25 in the Dominion of Canada, 
$5.00 In all other countries. Single 
copies, 40 cents. Foreign remittances 
should be by International postal or 
express money order or bank draft 
negotiable In the U. S. and for an 
equivalent amount In U. S. funds. 

Entered as second-class matter May 
29. 1919. at the post office at Hartford, 
Connecticut, under the Act of March 
3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for In 
section 1102, Act of October 3. 1917, 
authorized September 9, 1922. Addi- 
tional entry at Concord, N. H., author- 
ized February 21, 1929, under the Act 
of February 28, 1925. 

Copyright 1954 by the American Radio 
Relay League, Inc. Title registered at 
U. S. Patent Office. International copy- 
right secured. All rights reserved. 
Quednn reservados todos los derechos. 
Printed In U. 8. A. 

INDEXED BY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS INDEX 

Library of Congress Catalog 
Card No.: 21-9421 



-CONTENTS- 



TECHNICAL — 

More About V.H.F. Auroral Propagation 

Rolf Dyce, W2TTU 11 

A Cubical Quad for 20 Meters 

S. B. LesliB, jr., W5DQV 21 

A Discussion of Receiver Performance 

E. W. Pappenfus, W0SYF 24 

Grounded-Grid and the 304-TH 

Thomas P. Leary, W0VTP 33 

Using the 6524 Dual Tetrode on 432 Mc. 

Edward P. Tilton, WIHDQ 38 

BEGINNER — 

A One-Element Rotary for 21 Mc. 

Lewis G. McCoy, WIICP 30 

MOBILE — 

Bandswitching a Crystal-Controlled Mobile 

Converter C. Vernon Chambers, WIJEQ 16 



A Simple Rig for Six-Meter Mobile 

R. J. Carpenter, W30TC 



28 



General Techniques of 10-Meter Mobile Noise 

Reduction Talmadge R. England, W4MJJ 37 

OPEBATING — 

W/VE Contest Results 41 

Three Stormy Sisters — PART I . . . George Hart, WINJM 42 

8th V.H.F. Sweepstakes 53 

September V.H.F. Party Results 57 

Calling All Novices: CO N-R! 59 

ARRL Countries List 60 

21st ARRL International DX Competition 65 



GENERAL — 

"It Seems to Us . . ." 9 

Our Cover 10 

ARRL QSL Bureau 10 

In QST 25 Years Ago lO 

Happenings of the Month 48 

Correspondence from Members . 50 

YL News and Views 51 

Hints and Kinks 52 

New Books 41, 54 

The World Above SO Mc 5S 



How's DX? 61 

Operating News 68 

With the AREC 70 

Station Activities 76 

Silent Keys 114 

Feed-back 126 

United States Naval Reserve . . . 134 

Homiest Calendar 138 

Militory Affiliate Radio System . 140 




Model SX-96 SELECTABLE 

SIDEBAND RECEIVER 



ers 

Chicago 24, Illinois 

In Canada: 

THE HALLICRAFTERS COMPANY • Don Mills Road • Box 27, Station R • Toronto 17, Ontario, Canad 




Covers Broadcast 538-1580 kc plus three S/W 1720 kc— 34 Mc. 

Precision gear drive dial system. 

Double conversion with selectable crystal controlled second oscillators 

Selectable side band reception of both suppressed carrier 

and full carrier transmissions. 

Highly selective 50 kc I. F. system. 

CW operation with AVC on. 

Delayed AVC. 

Calibrated bandspread— "S" meter— double superhet. 

10 tubes, 1 rectifier and voltage regulator. 




NOW A 




COST 



PR CRYSTALS FOR 75 METER 

AND 20 METER PHONE. ..IN 

THE 5 TO 5.5 MC. RANGE 



Now you can enjoy commercial 
crystal stability on SSB at ama- 
teur prices. Because of increased 




$295 

5.0 MC. to 5.5 MC. Range 



demand, PR is now making available 
Type Z-2 Crystals in the 5 to 5.5 MC. 
range at $2.95 . . . for use with SSB 
exciters, such as the lOB and 20 A for 
operation in the 75 meter and 20 meter 
phone bands. Pick your frequencies 
(integral kilocycle) and order from 
your dealer at this new, low price. 
Formerly PR crystals in this range 
were available only in commercial 
types selling for several times this 
amount. 

On SSB, where stability becomes of 
utmost importance, there's nothing 
like crystal control with PRs . . . neg- 
ligible drift (limited to less than 2 
cycles per MC. per degree C). You 
can avoid the continuous annoyance 
of drift by depending on PRs . . . then 
you KNOW where you are, and you 
know you will stay there! 







Since £;^5!?I^3 1934 

AND KNOW WHERE YOU ARE 



PETERSEN RADIO COMPANY, INC. 
28Q0^W. mOADWAY .^■fw^CQUNeiU BLUEFS, IOWA 



EXPORT SALES: Royal National Company, Inc., 75 West Street, New York 6, N. Y., U.S.A. 



Section Communications Managers of the ARRL Communications Department 

Reports Invited. All amateurs, especially League members, are invited to report station activities on the first of each 
month (for preceding month) direct to the SCM, the administrative ARRL official elected by members in each Section. 
Radio club reports are also desired by SCMs for inclusion in QST. ARRL Field Organization station appointments are 

available in the areas shown to qualified League members. These include ORS, OES, OPS, OO and OBS. SCMs also desire 
applications for SEC, EC, RM and PAM where vacancies exist. All amateurs in the United States and Canada are invited 
to join the Amateur Radio Emergency Corps (ask for Form 7). 



Eastern Pennsylvania W3BIP 

Maryland-Delaware-D. C. W3EQK 

Southern New Jersey K2BG 

Western New York W2SJV 

Western Pennsylvania W3NCD 



ATLANTIC DIVISION, 



Illinois 
Indiana 
Wisconsin 



North Dakota 
South Dakota 
Minnesota 



Arkansas 
Louisiana 
Mississippi 
Tennessee 



Kentucky 
Michigan 
Ohio 



Eastern New York 

N. Y. C. &• Long Island 

Northern New Jersey 



Iowa 

Kansas 

Missouri 

Nebraska 



Connecticut WIEFW 

Maine WIAFT 

Eastern Massachusetts WIALP 

Western Massachusetts WIMNG 

New Hampshire WIHS 

Rhode Island WIKKR 

Vermont WIRNA 



Alaska 

Idaho 

Montana 

Oregon 

Washington 



Hawaii 

Nevada 

Santa Clara Valley 

East Bay 

San Francisco 

Sacramento Valley 

San Joaquin Valley 



North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Virginia 
West Virginia 



Colorado 

Utah 

Wyoming 



KL7AGU 

W7IWU 

W7CT 

W7BUS 

W7FIX 



KH6KS 

W7JU 

W6WGO 

W6RLB 

W6GGC 

W6JDN 

W6GIW 



Canal Zone 



Los Angeles 
Arizona 
San Diego 
Santa Barbara 



Northern Texas 
Oklahoma 
Southern Texas 
New Mexico 



W5JQD 
W5RST 
W5FJF 
W5ZU 



Maritime 

Ontario 

Quebec 

Alberta 

British Columbia 

Yukon 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 



VEIOM 

VE3IA 

VE2GL 

VE6MJ 
VE7JT 

VE4LC 
VESHR 



W. H. Wiand 
Arthur W. Plummer 
Herbert C. Brooks 
Edward Graf 
R. M. Heck 



R D 1. Box 300 
3804 Rexmere Road 
800 Lincoln Ave. 
81 King St. 
RFD 1 



Gilbertsville 
Baltimore 18, 
Palmyra 
Tonawanda 
Sharpsville 



.CENTRAL DIVISION- 



W9YIX George Schreiber 239 S. Scoville Ave. 

W9BKJ George H. Graue 824 Home Ave. 

W9RQM Reno W. Goetsch 929 S. 7th Ave. 

.DAKOTA DIVISION. 



Oak Park 
Fort Wayne 6 
Wausau 



W0HNV Earl Kirkeby P. O. Box 12 

W0RRN J. W. Sikorski 1900 South Menlo Ave. 

W0MXC Charles M. Bove 1611 H E. Lake St. 

DELTA DIVISION. 



Drayton 
Sioux Falls 
Minneapolis 7 



W5FMF Owen G. Mahaffey Box 157 

W5FMO Thomas J. Morgavi 3421 Beaulieu St. 

W50TD Dr. A. R. Cortese Box 326 

W4SCF Harry C. Simpson 1863 So. Wellington St. 

GREAT LAKES DIVISION 

W4SBI Robert E. Fields 531 Central Ave., (Kentucky side) 

W8HKT Fabian T. McAllister RFD 1, Box 368 

W8AJW John E, Siringer 2972 Clague Rd. 
.HUDSON DIVISION 



Springtown 
New Orleans 20 
Crystal Springs 
Memphis 



W2ILI Stephen J. Neason 794 River St. 

W2YBT Carleton L. Coleman P.O. Box 1011 

W2VQR Lloyd H. Manamon 709 Seventh Ave. 

_MIDWEST DIVISION, 



53 Homesdale Ave. 
73 Middle St. 

91 Atlantic St. 
1702 Main St. 
Route 4 

54 Locust St. 
108 Sias Ave. 



Milton E. Chaffee 
Bernard Seamon 
Frank L. Baker, jr. 
Arthur ZavEirella 
Harold J. Preble 
Walter B. Hanson, jr. 
Robert L. Scott 

NORTHWESTERN DIVISION 

Dave A. Fulton Box 103 

Alan K. Ross 2105 Irene St. 

Leslie E. Crouter 608 Yellowstone Ave. 

John M. Carroll P. O. Box 706 

Victor S. Gish 511 East 71st St. 

PACIFIC DIVISION 



James E. Keefer 
Ray T. Warner 
R. Paul Tibbs 
Guy Black 
Walter A. Buckley 
Harold L. Lucero 
Edward L. Bewley 



3459 Kahawalu Dr. 
539 Birch St. 
1946 Harmil Way 
1546 Spruce St. 
36 Colonial Way 
1113 Elinore Ave. 
421 East Olive St. 



ROANOKE DIVISION 



Alabama W4MI 

Eastern Florida W4FWZ 

Western Florida W4MS 

Georgia W4NS 

West Indies (Cuba-P.R.-V.I.) KP4DJ 



W4W.XZ Charles H. Brydges 3246 Sunset Drive 

W4ANK T. Hunter Wood 1702 North Rhett Ave. 

W4KX John Carl Morgan Merrimans Lane 

W8FQQ Albert H. Hix 1013 Belmont St. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

W0CDX Karl Brueggeman 1945 Kearny St. 
W7UTM Floyd L. Hinshaw 165 East 4th, North 
W7PKX Wallace J. Ritter P. O. Box 797 
SOUTHEASTERN DIVISION 

Joe A. Shannon 

John W. Hollister 3809 Springfield Blvd. 

Edward J. Collins 1003 E. Blount St. 

George W. Parker 226 Kings Highway 

William Werner 563 Ramon Llovet 

KZ5RM Roger M. Howe Box 462 
SOUTHWESTERN DIVISION 

W6YVJ Howard C. Bellman 973 Mayo St. 

W7LVR Albert Steinbrecher RFD 5, Box 800 

W6LRU Don Stansifer 4427 Pescadero 

W6IOX Vincent J. Haggerty 1017 Indio Muerto St. 

WEST GULF DIVISION. 



.. Bruce Craig 1706-27th 

Dr. Will G. Crandall State Veterans Hospital 

Dr. Charles Fermaglich 618 Medical Arts BIdg. 

G. Merton Sayre Box 625 



CANADIAN DIVISION 

Douglas C. Johnson 104 Preston St. 

G. Eric Farquhar 16 Emerald Crescent 



Gordon A. Lynn 



Sydney T. Jones 
Peter Mclntyre 



10706-57th Ave. 
981 West 26th Ave. 



Leonard E. Cuff 
Harold R. Horn 



286 Rutland St. 
1044 King St. 



Williamson, W. Va. 
Bridgman 
Cleveland 26 



Troy 

East Hampton, L I. 

Asbury Park 



W0PP William G. Davis 3rd St. Mitchellville 

W0ICV Earl N. Johnston 624 Roosevelt Topeka 

W0GBJ Clarence L. Arundale 1048 South Jefferson Ave. Springfield 4 

W0CBH Floyd B. Campbell 203 W. 8th St. North Platte 

JVEW ENGLAND DIVISION. 



Southington 

Wiscasset 

North Quincy 71 

Agawara 

Concord 

Providence 6 

Newport 



Anchorage 
Boise 
Billings 
Pendleton 
Seattle 5 



Honolulu 17 
Boulder City 
San Jose 
Berkeley 9 
San Francisco 
Dunsmuir 
Turlock 



Charlotte 

North Charleston 

Winchester 

Forest Hills, Charleston 4 



Denver 

Bountiful 

Sheridan 



Cottondale 
Jacksonville 
Pensacola 
Decatur 
Urb. Truman, 

Rio Fiedras, P R 
Balboa Heights, C. Z. 



Los Angeles 42 
Tucson 
San Diego 7 
Santa Barbara 



Lubbock 
Sulphur 
Houston 2 

New Mexico Military 
Institute, Roswell 



Halifax, N. S. 
Burlington, Ont. 
Ste. Genevieve de 

Pierrefonds P. Q. 
Edmonton, Alta. 
Vancouver, B. C. 



St. James 
Saskatoon 



* Official appointed to act temporarily in the absence of a regular official. 




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LLICRAFTKRS COMPANY 
01 WEST FIFTH AVENU 
ICAGO 24, ILLINOIS 

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^^^ AMERICAN 
RADIO RELAY 
LEAGUE 



INC., 



is a noncommerdat associotion of radio amateurs, bonded for 
the promotion of interest in amateur radio communication and 
experimentation, for the relaying of messages by radio, for the 
advancement of the radio art and of the pubtic welfare, for the 
representah'on of the radio amateur in legislative matters, and for 
the maintenance of fraternalism and a high standard of conduct. 

It is an incorporated association without capital stock, chartered 
under the laws of Connecticut. Its affairs are governed by a Board 
of Directors, elected every two years by the general membership. 
The officers are elected or appointed by the Directors. The League 
is noncommercial and no one commercially engaged in the manu- 
facture, sale or rental of rodio apparatus is eligible to membership 
on its board. 

"Of, by and for the amateur," it numbers within its ranks practi- 
cally every worth-while amateur in the nation and has a history of 
glorious achievement as the standard-bearer in amateur affairs. 

Inquiries regarding membership are solicited. A bona fide 
interest in amateur radio is the only essential qualification; owner- 
ship of a transmitting station and knowledge of the code are not 
prerequisite, although full voting membership is granted only to 
licensed amateurs. 

All general correspondence should be addressed to the adminis- 
trative headquarters at West Hartford, Connecticut. 



Past Presidents 

HIRAM PERCY MAXIM, WlAW, 1914-1936 

EUGENE C. WOODRUFF, W8CMP, 1936-1940 

GEORGE W. BAILEY, W2KH, 1940-1952 



0£££cers 

Pmideni GOODWIN L. DOSLAND, W0TSN 

Moorhead, Minnesota 

Fir$i Vice-President WAYLAND M. GROVES, W5NW 

P.O. Box 586, Odessa, Texas 

Wce-Presidenf FRANCIS E. HANDY, WIBDI 

38 Lo Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 

Wce-Pres/dent PERCY C. NOBLE, W1BVR 

37 Broad St., Westfield, Mossachusetts 
Secretory A. L. BUDLONG, W1BUD 

38 La Salle Rood, West Hartford, Connecticut 
Treasurer DAVID H. HOUGHTON 

38 La Soils Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 

Generof Counsel PAUL M. SEGAL 

816 Connecticut Ave., Washington 6, D.C. 

Technical Direcfor GEORGE GRAMMER, W 1 DP 

38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 

Technical Consultanf PHILIP S. RAND, W 1 DBM 

Route 58, Redding Ridge, Connecticut 

Assistant Secretaries: 

JOHN HUNTOON, WUVQ LEE AURICK, WIRDV 

PERRY F. WILUAMS, W1UED 

38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 




DIRECTORS 

Canada 

ALEX REID VE2I 

240 Logan Ave., St. Lambert. P. Q. 

Vice-JHrector: ReKinald K. Town WEI P. 

2879 Graveley St., Vancouver 6, B. C. 

Atlantic Division 

GILBERT L. CROSSLEY W3"V 

Dept. of E.E., Penna. State l^niversity 
State College, Pa. 

Vice- Director: Charles O. Badgett W3L\ 

725 Garden Road, Glenside, Pa. 

Central Division 

HARRY M. MATTHEWS W9UQ 

702 So. 8tli, Springfield, III. 

Vice-Director: George E. Keith W9QI 

RFD 2, Box 22-A, Utica, III. 

Dakota Division 

ALFRED M. GOWAN W0PH 

1012 South Willow Ave.. Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Vice-IHrector: Forrest Bryant W0FE 

6840 Harriet Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Delta Division 

GEORGE H. STEED WSBU! 

1912 Beech St., Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Vice-Director: George S. Acton W5BMI 

Plain Dealing, La. 

Great Lakes Division 

JOHN H. BRABB W8SP 

708 Ford Bldg., Detroit 26, Mich. 

Vice-IHrector: Robert L. Davis W8EY. 

247 Highland Ave., Salem, Ohio 

Hudson Division 

GEORGE V. COOKE, JR W20B1 

88-31 239 St., Bellerose 26, N. Y. 

Vice- Director: Thoma.? J. Ryan, Jr W2NK] 

1082 Anna St., Elizabeth 4, N. J. 

Midwrest Division 

WILLIAM J. SCHMIDT W0OZ1 

306 S. Vassar, Wichita, Kansas 

Vice-Director: James E. McKim W0MVC 

1404 S. Tenth, Salina, Kansas 

Newr England Division 

PHILIP S. RAXD WIDBIV 

Route 58, Redding Ridge, Conn. 

Vice-Director: Clayton C. Gordon WIHRC 

65 Emerson Ave., Plttsfleld, Mass. 

North western Division 
R. REX ROBERTS W7CP'3i 

837 Park Hill Drive. Billings, Mont. 
Vice- Director: Karl W. Weingarten W7BG 

3219 N. 24th St., Tacoma 7, Wash. 

Pacific Division 

RAY H. CORNELL W6JZ 

909 Curtis St., Albany 6, Calif. 

Vice-Director: Harry M. Engwicht W6HC 

770 Chapman, San Jose 26, Calif. 

Roanoke Division 

P. LANIER ANDERSON, JR W4MWH 

428 Maple Lane, Danville, Va. 

^'ice-Director: Gus M. Browning W4BPD 

135 Broughton St., S. E., Orangeburg, S. C 

Rocky Mountain Division 

CLAUDE M. MAER, JR W0IC 

740 Lafayette St., Denver. Colo. 

Vice-JHrector: Walter M. Reed W0WRO 

1355 E. Amherst Circle, Denver, Colo. 

Southeastern Division 

JAMES P. BORN, JR W4ZD 

25 First Ave., N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Vice-Director: Randall E. Smith W4DQA 

902 Plaza Court, Orlando, Fla. 

Southwestern Division 

WALTER R. JOOS W6EKM 

1315 N. Overhill Drive, Inglewood 3, Calif. 

Vice-Director: Robert E. Hopper W6YXU 

4327 Santa Cruz, San Diego 7, Calif. 

West Gulf Division 

ROBERT E. COWAN W5CF 

3640 Encanto Drive, Fort Worth 9, Texas 

Vice-Director: John F. Skelton W5MA 

1901 Standish Dr., Irving, Texas 



tt 



It Seems to Us..." 




THE YEAR IN REVIEW 

In 1954 the American Radio Relay League 
marked the 40th year of its founding as a non- 
profit membership association "of, by and for 
the radio amateur." It was a banner year in 
most respects. Full membership reached the 
highest figure in our history, and the propor- 
tion voting in the autumn director elections 
showed this to be an active, participating 
interest on the part of members in their na- 
tional association. QST continued to grow in 
size and scope, perhaps soon to present another 
problem of enlarging the yearly binders so 
that twelve issues can be fitted into them! 

At yearend a new publication, Single Side- 
band for the Radio Amateur, appeared in order 
to cater to and encourage amateur use of this 
growing field. Considerable publicity on the 
attractiveness of amateur radio as a hobby 
appeared in various magazines, resulting in 
thousands of inquiries to Headquarters on how 
to get into the hobby, and also resulting in 
a heavy demand this year for "beginner" 
publications. The 1954 financial statement will 
again show new highs in gross income and 
outgo. 

While it is only late November as we write, 
it appears unquestioned that amateur radio 
itself is reaching a peak of growth, totaling 
perhaps 125,000 licensees. During the eariy 
part of the year a license fee seemed imminent, 
but it has since been pigeonholed. A major 
change occurred in June with the placing of 
Novice and Technician Class examinations on 
a mail-only basis, so that with the reduced dis- 
tance for Conditional Class eligibility, ama- 
teurs themselves are conducting more than 
half of FCC exams for newcomers. New 
questions were added to the General Class 
exam to expand its scope and bring it up to 
date. The requests to increase the size of the 
voice allocation at 14 and 28 Mc. were turned 
down by FCC. Duplex operation on 50 Mc. 
was authorized, as was maritime mobile use 
of 21 Mc. General approval was given to the 
security control program, "Conelrad," _ for 
amateurs, with specific proposed regulations 
to follow. The League was signally honored 
with the visit, in January, of five members of 
the Federal Communications Commission and 
two staff Bureau heads. 



Despite generally poor conditions for DX, 
more than 2600 amateurs have now qualified 
for the DX Century Club roster. They, with 
DXCC aspirants, are encouraged by the 
knowledge that as the sunspot cycle swirigs to 
a more favorable point, propagation conditions 
are rapidly improving and the now-occasional 
openings of 21 Mc, for example, will soon 
become everyday occurrences. With more 
than 8000 individual participants reported, 
manning more than 2000 transmitter-receiver 
installations, the ARRL Field Day was again 
the biggest ever. From the roars of "CQ SS" 
that covered the bands those November week 
ends, we'll predict the same for that popular 
activity. "Above 50 Mc." activity has a 
banner year also: more than 600 amateurs 
took part in the January V.H.F. Sweepstakes; 
a coast-to-coast relay on 144-Mc. was com- 
pleted in June; and the 10,000-Mc. DX record 
was set and broken three times during the 
year — it now stands at 109 miles! "Burst" 
reception from meteor reflections was the means 
of several long-distance QSOs, and experimen- 
tation with this form of communication at- 
tracted considerable attention, not only among 
amateurs but also in professional fields. 

At midyear a nationwide test of civil defense 
organization and facilities showed amateurs 
fully ready to perform their auxiliary commu- 
nications functions. The Simulated Emer- 
gency Test in October continued to be another 
means of keeping amateur emergency skills at 
peak efficiency. RACES licensing continued 
to grow, with one-half of the States already 
having approved plans. Both civil defense and 
normal amateur emergency-preparedness or- 
ganizations performed admirably in the East 
Coast hurricanes. The TVI specter was re-'' 
duced to a skeleton, as more and more ama- 
teurs find the best way to lick the problem is 
to tackle it. The League's demonstration was 
given at a number of western cities, completing 
coverage of the country where low-band chan- 
nels are in use. 

Once again as we come to the close of a 
year we find that amateur radio can take pride 
in an outstanding performance, through the 
organized activities of its national association, 
and a meritorious record of performance "in 
the public interest, convenience and necessity." 



OUR COVER 

This month's cover shows the interior of 
W3SMQ, Lansdowne, Pa. Equipment is com- 
pletely homebuilt, following designs presented in 
The Radio Amateur's Handbook. In the rack at 
the left are the modulator and power supplies. On 
the desk is a push-pull 807 rig running 150 watts. 
To the right are the VFO and an 8-tube superhet. 
A Monitone is to the right of the receiver, and a 
Handbook-design antenna tuner on the window- 
sill, upper left. Operator and constructor of 
W3SMQ is W. P. Hampton. 



A.R.R.L. QSL BUREAU 

The function of the ARRL QSL Bureau system 
is to facilitate delivery to amateurs in the United 
States, its possessions, and Canada of those QSL 
cards which arrive from amateur stations in 
other parts of the world. Its operation is made 
possible by volunteer managers in each W, K 
and VE call area. All you have to do is send your 
QSL manager (see list below) a stamped self- 
addressed envelope about 434 by ^M, inches in 
size, with your name and address in the usual 
place on the front of the envelope and your call 
printed in capital letters in the upper left-hand 
corner. (Bold-face type indicates change since 
last QST hsting.) 

Wl, Kl — J. R. Baker, jr., WIJOJ, Box 232, Ipswich, Mass. 

W2. K2 — H. W. Yahnel, W2SN, Lake Ave., Helmetta, 
N. J. 

W3, K3 — Jesse Bieberman, W3KT, Box 34, Philadelphia 
5, Penna. 

W4, K4 — Thomas M. Moss, W4HYW, Box 644, Municipal 
Airport Branch, Atlanta, Ga. 

W5, K5 — Oren B. GambiU, W5WI, 2514 N. Garrison 
Tulsa 6, Okla. 

W6, K6 — Horace R. Greer, W6TI, 414 Fairmount St. 
Oakland, Calif. 

W7, K7 — Mary Ann Tatro, W7FWR, 513 N. Central, 
Olympia, Wash. 

W8, K8 — Walter E. Musgrave, W8NGW, 1294 E. 188th 
St., Cleveland 10, Ohio. 

W9, K9 — John F. Schneider, W9CFT, 311 W. Ross Ave., 
Wausau, Wis. 

W0, K0 — Alva A. Smith, W0DMA, 238 East Main St., 

Caledonia, Minn. 
VEl — L. J. Fader, VEIFQ, 125 Henry St., Halifax, N. S. 
VE2 — Austin A. W. Smith, VE2UW, 6164 Jeanne Mance, 

Montreal 8, Que. 

VE3 — W. Bert Knowles, VE3QB, Lanark, Ont. 
VE4 — Len Cuff. VE4LC, 286 Rutland St., St. James, Man. 
VE5 — Fred Ward, VE50P, 899 Connaught Ave., Moose 
Jaw, Sask. 

VE6 — W. R. Savage, VE6E0, 329 15th St., North Leth- 
bridge, Alta. 

VE7 — H. R. Hough, VE7HR, 2316 Trent St., Victoria, 
B. C. 

VE8 — W. L. Geary, VE8AW, Box 534, Whitehorse, Y. T. 
VO — Ernest Ash, VOIA, P. O. Box 8, St. John's, New- 
foundland. 

KP4 — E. W. Mayer, KP4KD, Box 1061, San Juan, P. R. 
KH6 — Andy H. Fuchikami, KH6BA, 2543 Namauu Dr 

Honolulu, T. H. 
KL7 — Box 73, Douglas, Alaska. 
KZo — GUbert C. Foster, KZ5GF, Box 407, Balboa, C. Z. 



^Xr^>A/^ 




To Hams Everywhere 

— The ARRL Hq, Gang 






25 Years Ago ( 

this month I 

_JJLU-^ • 



January, 1930 

The editorial discusses the new 14,000-kc. 
'phone band, pointing out its advantages as well 
as potential difficulties which can result from bad 
judgment and poor equipment. 

A poor man's power transformer using hand- 
wound primary and filament coils and junk-box 
honeycomb coils for secondaries is described by 
E. H. Harrington, jr., W9CRR. Almost 900 volts 
each side of center tap can be furnished by the 
unit, which costs about four dollars. 

Station of the month is W9BAG, owned by 
Frank Smolek of Chicago. The transmitter is a 
50-watt crystal rig using Heising modulation on 
'phone and buffer-filament keying on c.w. The 
receiver is a superhet, with a regenerative first 
detector, two i.f. stages, regenerative second de- 
tector, and audio. A two-inch cage suspended 45 
feet in the air between two steel towers, with 70- 
foot aerial and counterpoise, serves as the radia- 
tor. 

Results of the Board of Directors elections are 
made known. Alex Reid is the new Canadian Gen- 
eral Manager; Prof. E. C. Woodruff returns 
as Atlantic Division Director; Dakota Division 
elects Cy. L. Barker; M. M. Hill represents the 
Delta Division; Louis R. Huber is Midwest Di- 
vision Director; the Pacific Division chooses Allen 
H. Babcock; and Harry F. Dobbs becomes the 
Southeastern representative. 

Trophies for the first Sweepstakes contest, a 
two-week period, are announced. Sweep brooms, 
three feet long, decorated in the League's black- 
and-gold, with radio tube handle-grips will be 
given to the top three men in the new contest. 
This month's humorous story by "Felix," 
W5LS, entitled "Hams Are Born — Not Made," 
involves W. M. "Soupy" Groves, W5NW, and 
his "Brother-in-law." 

A.c. receivers are discussed by Beverly Dudley, 
assistant technical editor. The author describes 
several circuits which were tried, and gives 
details of the final result, a completely-shielded 
receiver using a UV-224 r.f. stage, UV-224 regen- 
erative detector, and a UV-227 audio amplifier. 



10 



QST for 



More About V.H.F. Auroral Propagation 

Recent Findings and Suggestions for Improved Results 
BY ROLF DYCE,* W2TTU 



THE characteristics of propagation associated 
with the northern hghts have been described 
in the pages of QST by Moore. ^ As v.h.f. 
communication equipment has improved, ama- 
teur use of auroral propagation has multipUed 
over the past few years, especially above 144 Mc. 
A program of amateur auroral reporting was 
initiated in 1951, some of the information 
gathered thereby appearing in "The World 
Above 50 Mc." These reports were then sent on 
to Cornell, where a statistical study has been 
attempted. Some results are presented here. 
Research in England,^ Scandanavia,^-'' Canada,* 
and Alaska®''' has progressed rapidly since 1950, 
yielding new ideas about auroral v.h.f. reflections 
which may be useful to the amateur for under- 
standing the behavior of such propagation. 

Description of Auroral Signals 

An aurorally-propagated signal has a character- 
istic growl or hiss due to a fast QSB that is at 
an audio rate up to several hundred cycles per 



The b.f.o. will usuallj^ not give a clean note, so 
this is a sensitive test for signals propagated by 
aurora. 

Unlike E- or F-layer propagation, strongest 
signals are usually obtained when both stations 
point their antennas northward, regardless of 
the actual great^circle bearing between stations. 
Often all stations will appear to come from the 
same direction in the north, as if a small portion 
of the aurora is responsible for all the propagation. 
During especially strong aurora, often accom- 
panied by active overhead displays, the signals 
may appear to come from a variety of directions 
spread about north. However, in general, stations 
located to the east of the receiving station will 
have preferable directions eastward of magnetic 
north and likewise for westerly stations. 

Amateur Reports 

Amateur reports of auroral propagation, col- 
lected with the help of ARRL and dating back 
to 1951, have been assembled at the Cornell 



Fig. 1 — Useful working 
distances obtainable by au- 
roral communication. Data 
taken from amateur reports. 



^ 



200 *00 600 - 600 " 200 40O 

Airline Seporotion in Miles Between Stotions 



second.^ As the carrier frequency is increased 
from 50 to 144 Mc, the growl increases in pitch. 
'Phone is badly garbled although relatively slow 
c.w. tele graphy can get through wathout difficulty. 

* Cornell University Ionosphere Project, Franklin Hall, 
Ithaca, New York. 

1 Moore, "Aurora and Magnetic Storms," QST, 35, No. 
6, June, p. 14 (1951). See also Journal of Geophysical 
Research, 56. March, pp. 97-106 (1951). 

2 Aspinall and Hawkins, Journal British Astronomical 
Association, 60, April, p. 130 (1950). 

3 Harang and Landmark, Journal of Atmospheric and 
Terrestrial Physics, 4, January, p. 322 (1954). 

* Hellgren and Meos, Rept. No. 26, Chalmers University 
of Technology, 1952. See also Tellus 4. P- 249 (1952). 

s Currie, Forsyth, and Vawter, Journal of Geophysical 
Research, 58, June, p. 179 (1953). 

8 Bowles, presented at URSI-IRE Meeting at Washing- 
ton, D. C, April, 1954. 

7 Dyce, presented at URSI-IRE Meeting at Washington, 
D. C, April, 1954. 

8 Bowles, Journal of Geophysical Research, 67, June, p. 
191 (1952). 



January 1955 



Ionosphere Project. The individual stations were 
located on a map, and the direct airline distance 
was measured between pairs of stations reporting 
communication. This does not imply that the 
radio path was along this measuring line, but 
merely tells one at what distance communication 
was possible. Histograms showing the likelihood 
of occurrence of certain distances are given in 
Fig. 1. A similar graph for sporadic-.^ signals 
on 50 Mc. shows a prominent maximum at about 
800 miles, with a "skip" region for shorter 
distances. However, notice in Fig. 1 how the 
probabihty of communication by auroral prop- 
agation falls off with distance. The graph below 
100 miles is too low due to (1) blanketing strength 
of direct or tropospheric signal, (2) failure of 
amateurs to log familiar and nearby stations, 
(3) fewer amateurs because the inner ring con- 
tains less land area and hence fewer amateurs. 

11 













North-South 


300 




Components 










200 








100 






— n 



East- West 
Components 



Fi&- 2 — Communication is 
better along east-west directions. 
Tlie airline distance between 144- 
Mc. stations working via aurora, 
expressed in two components, 
shows east-west distances far 
greater. 



200 400 



too 600 



The 50-Mc. data suffer from the same errors, 
in addition to the fact that only one-tenth as 
many reports were sent in. 

The information contained in Fig. 1 gives 
a measure of the distance over which auroral 
communication is to be e.xpected. Such informa- 
tion would be difficult to obtain without the use 
of amateur reports. Tliis graph also supports the 
view that auroral propagation is not a skip phe- 
nomenon, as was recently suggested in Norway.^ 

The 144-Mc. data were reexamined and the 
distance between each pair of stations expressed 
in two components — a north-south and an 
east-west distance. The results appear in Fig. 2. 
A difference in the two components is clearly 
seen, showing that east-west paths are generally 
longer than north-south paths. This effect may 
be due to the oblong shape of the population 
distribution, since most reports came from a 
narrow region extending from Ohio to Massa- 
chusetts. However, the preference for east-west 
station-to-station direction is also explained by a 
theory later to be discussed. 

An Auroral Signal Recorder 

A scheme for automatically recording auroral 
signals has been assembled at the Cornell Iono- 
sphere Project and has been operating almost 
continuously now for two years. Many amateurs 
are already familiar with the high-power trans- 
missions continuously, day and night, from 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on 49.6 and 49.8 Mc 



Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, is 
located so that these transmissions come in 
strongly by auroral propagation, when it is 
present. It is possible to obtain a continuous 
record of auroral openings merely by attaching 
a recording milliammeter to the d.c. output from 
the detector. The QSB on an auroral signal is 
too fast for the recording pen to follow, so an 
average value is painted on the recording chart 
when auroral signals are present — see Fig. 3. 
Strong and frequent bursts of signal due to 
meteors can be obtained over the Cedar Rapids- 
to-Ithaca path. They provide an easy means of 
verifying that the transmitter is operating and 
for setting the receiver tuning. The occurrence 
of auroral signals as recorded in this manner 
correlates very well with such openings as re- 
ported by amateurs. Amateurs in general, and 
Michigan amateurs in particular, seem to have 
sharp ears because even brief occurrences of 
auroral propagation are caught at least by some. 
Of course, there are short periods when amateurs 
report auroral signals when Cedar Rapids has 
faded out. The reverse is also true. The recorder 
scheme provides a continuous check on the 
auroral signals throughout the entire night and 
is therefore useful for studying daily and seasonal 
variation in the frequency of occurrence of the 
auroral propagation. Records of auroral signals 
are a help in early warning of openings and in 
predicting subsequent openings. 

A graph showing expectation of auroral propa- 



23 MARCH 1954 




^ 



Fig. 3 — Example of a short 
auroral opening beginning about 
5:50 P.M. Esterline-Augus record 
of the 49.8-Mc. signal from Cedar 
Rapids shows need for checking 
v.h.f. bands in early evening 
hours. Blank spots on hour and 
half hour are 2-minute periods 
when transmitter is turned off 
automatically. 



12 



QST for 



DIURNAL VARIATION OF CEDAR 
RAPIOS SIGNALS PROPAGATED 
BY AURORA 
SEPT 1952 TO MAY 1954 



^ 



Fig. 4 — Good times for auroral 
propagation are 6:00 p.m. and 
2:00 A.M. 




gation at any time of day appears in Fig. 4. 
Isolated cases of auroral signals have been ob- 
served at almost every hour, but the phenomenon 
is chiefly a nighttime one. This curve emphasizes 
the importance of observation just before supper- 
time. An interesting dip near midnight shows 
up, for which no explanation is here offered. It 
shows that openings frequently continue into 
the early morning hours, although they may die 
out temporarily around midnight. There are 
also cases of auroral openings after midnight not 
accompanied by auroral signals earUer. _ 

The seasonal variation was plotted in Fig. 5 
by determining for each month the percentage 
of time that auroral propagation was present. 
Maxima of auroral propagation can be seen to 
occur in March and October, vnth important 
minima in December and June. A decrease can 
be seen from 1952 to 195-t that is believed to be 
authentic. This is attributed to the decrease in 
the sunspot activity over the past few years, 
expected to reach a minimum some time in 
1954. With this information, one can better 
predict when auroral signals can be expected, 
or putting it another way — when no auroral 
propagation should be observed. 



Position in Space of the 
Ionization Involved 

Most of the organized research concerning 
auroral propagation has been done using radar. 
That is, by transmitting only for a brief instant 
(about 1/10,000 of a second) and measuring the 
time for this pulse to return to the receiver, one 
can determine the distance to the auroral ioniza- 
tion. Accompanied by a sharply directional 
antenna, the range and azimuth of auroral 
echoes can therefore be determined by a single 
station. 

Some radar experiments were done at Cornell 
on 103 Mc, using a high-powered war-surplus 
search radar.® This used a large antenna 8 
dipoles vertically and 4 dipoles in width, the 
whole affair being rotatable. Echoes were ob- 
tained about 400 to 600 miles to the north. 
There was fairly good correspondence between 
the echoes obtained and ray activity (vertical 
streaks) seen by eye. There never had been 
enough auroral activity to determine whether 
one could obtain echoes when aurora was over- 
head. 

9 Thaver, Master's thesis. Cornell University. 1952. 



Fig. 5 — September and 
March are good months for 
auroral propagation. The 
decrease from year to year 
shown here should reverse 
after the 1954 sunspot 
minimum. 



SEASONAL VARIATION OT AURORAL 

SI&NALS 

APRIL 1952 -JULY 1954 

49.8 MC 




January 1955 



13 



\ 



100 500 800 

RANGE IN KILOMETERS 

During the summer of 1953, Ken Bowles 
(W2MTU, ex-ZGP) and the author had an 
opportunity to work at the Geophysical Institute 
at the University of Alaska. The Institute is 
located at College, Alaska, a few miles from 
Fairbanks. It is, therefore, only 100 miles to 
the south of the maximum auroral-activity 
zone which forms a ring around the earth's 
magnetic pole. Some observations will now be 
described that were performed by the author 
during 1953, and which are illustrative of recent 
research now under way at several locations. 
Aurora is seen frequently, is strong and occurs 
frequently over the entire sky including south of 
overhead. Hence, this northern latitude affords 
an excellent place to observe the effects of visible 
aurora on v.h.f. propagation. 

Arrangements were made to operate a c.w. 
beacon transmitter on 51.9 Mc. about 100 miles 
to the east. The signal could usually l)e heard 



Fig. 6 — Typical 50-Mc. auroral echo. The trailing 
edge of the 51.7-Mc. transmitter pulse is seen at the far 
left. Two auroral echoes can be seen delayed in time 
corresponding to 600-km. and 720-km. range. 



weakly by troposphere propagation, but was 
heard when aurora was present coming from 
the north with the characteristic growling auroral 
QSB. On a different frequency assignment of 
51.7 Mc, permission was obtained to install a 
transmitter five miles away sending pulses 150 
times per second, each being about 100 micro- 
seconds in duration. The transmitting antenna 
was originally a horizontal dipole to send radia- 
tion in all directions in the meridian plane. A 
rotary 4-element Yagi was then used for receiving, 
using a low-noise crystal-controlled converter and 
a Super-Pro receiver. The d.c. detector output 
was fed into an oscilloscope, the strong direct 
signal coming from the transmitter being used 
to initiate each sweep. With the antenna pointing 
north during aurora and with the 51.9-Mc. 
station coming in by auroral propagation, weak 
echo pulses could be obtained, and the range 
easily estimated. (See Fig. 6.) 



CENTERS OF 51.7-MC. 

AURORAL 

ECHOES 



AURORAL ZONE 



GEOMAGNETIC NORTH 



TRUE\NORTH 
AT \ COLLEGE 




900 KM. 



300 KM. 
BIG DELTA 



600 KM. 



o NORTHWAY 



Fig. 7 — Each point represents 
maximum auroral activity at a 
different time. Azimuth determi- 
nations were usually made using 
a c.w. transmitter equipped with 
a turnstile omnidirectional an- 
tenna, with a directive array on 
the receiver. A hill impeded obser- 
vations to the northwest. 



^ 



TRUE \ 




f GEOMAGNETIC 


NORTH \ 




•/ NORTH 








• 0° 






330°, 




r^ 






• y^*^ 




/ 


^^\^ 




y^ • 


\>^1_^ 


L 


' 


\30° 


300/ \^ 


\ * • / 


>- 


>;/ 


'\x 






• 


/\ 


>^ \ ' 


/ tC • 


y^\* * \ 




/ 


K\ \ 




\ /* 


/■ 


% 


\ ■ \ 


27? ~~-'— __/____^ 


J^^^ 


%■ 


> 




Variation of Ronge ond 


Azimuth l06Mq/sec. 


Rador 


Echoes from 


Aug.- Sept., !953 COLLEGE, ALASKA 






Aurora 



Fig. 8 — Results using high- 
powered search radar on 106 Mc. 
(Courtesy of K. Bowles) 



14 



QST for 



Fig. 9 — Auroral radar echoes 
do not occur at short distances. 



RANGE PROBABILITIES 



OF AURORAL 
ECHOES 
51.7 Mc. 



300 600 900 

Ronge (km) From College, Alosko 



It has been shown by parallactic photograph}^ 
that most visible auroral light comes from about 
the E region at a height of about 60 miles, or 100 
kilometers. 1° One would, therefore, expect to 
encounter echoes as close — but no closer — 
than about 100 km., and also to find echoes 
from the south when visible auroral forms could 
be seen there. This was quickly seen to be not 
the true state of affairs. Echoes were obtained 
mainly from distances greater than about 400 
kilometers and were never obtained from the 
south. Contrary to expectations, most echoes 
came from places far to the north of the auroral 
zone as shown in Figs. 7 and 8. The echoes 
clearly came mainly from the northern quad- 
rant. Some continuous film records of echo range 
were made at 51.7 Mc. They gave the statistical 
result shown in Fig. 9, showing a pronounced 
tendency for the echoes to have ranges of 500 km. 
or greater. 

To rule out the possibility that these echoes 
might be coming from overhead ionization at 
a height of 500 km., an antenna with a vertical 
main lobe was constructed for comparison pur- 
poses. Six half-wave elements in a broadside 
array were suspended above the flat metallic 
roof of the Geophysical building. A separate 



converter, receiver, and oscilloscope were con- 
nected, so that the observer could watch both 
antenna presentations simultaneously. Echoes 
from meteors were seen with both antennas, 
indicating that both sets of receivers were 
working properly. Ne.xt, observations of auroral 
echo range were made when overhead arcs, 
bands, rays, and corona were present. These 
occur frequently at College. All auroral echoes 
were definitely much stronger on the rotary 
Yagi antenna which was looking at low angles. 
Similar results were found with the 106-Mc. 
radar equipment by tilting the regular antenna 
to point overhead during overhead aurora. 
These experiments show that auroral echoes 
are (1) from targets at great distances, probably 
at a height of about 100 kilometers, and (2) 
from low angles of elevation, no matter where 
in the sky the visible auroral forms occur. 

At College, one frequentlj- sees streaks of 
auroral Ught rising from the western horizon, 
extending overhead and down to the eastern 
horizon. It has already been shown that the v.h.f. 
echoes were not coming from the overhead 

(Continued on page 116) 

'•> Stormer, Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Elec- 
tricity, SI, December, pp. 501-504 (1946). 



Fig. 10 — For v.h.f. propaga- 
tion, the bounce-point needs to 
be roughly perpendicular to the 
field of the earth's magnetic force, 
even if auroral ionization existed 
over the entire sky. In this ex- 
aggerated picture, beams A and 
B give echoes, but C, D, and E do 
not. 



^ 





'lU 


/ 


^/-yc 




« 
c 
o> 
o 
Z 


Equivalent 
Magnet 






\ Mognetic 
Equator 




J 






1 



January 1955 



15 



Bands witching a Crystal- Controlled 
Mobile Converter 

Using the B.C. Receiver as a Tunable I.F. for 3.5-30-Mc. Reception 

BY C. VERNON CHAMBERS, WIJEQ 



ALTHOUGH the converter shown in the photo- 
[\ graphs was designed primarily for mobile 
-^ •*- use, this relatively simple unit will add gain 
and stability to almost any of the less-expensive 
communications receivers that include the broad- 
cast range. While one might conclude from its 
compactness that it is rather difficult to con- 
struct, carefully planned subassembhes make the 
job comparatively easy. In a mobile installation, 
the unit can be suspended directly under the car 
broadcast receiver, where it is hardly noticeable 
and detracts nothing from the appearance of the 
instrument panel, nor from the comfort of front- 
seat passengers. 

The high-frequency oscillator in a crystal-con- 
trolled converter is fixed in frequency, of course. 
Therefore, this sj'stem departs from the more 
conventional in that the b.c. receiver, rather than 
the converter, is used to tune over the ham bands. 
The frequency stability gained by the use of 
crystal control is hard to appreciate until you 
have tried it. Over rough roads, at any speed, 
even 10-meter signals stay put. Only a jolt hard 
enough to detune the broadcast receiver will 
change the frequency. 

Another advantage that is sometimes over- 
looked is the fact that most car receivers (and all 
communications receivers) have good dials that 
are easy to handle and conveniently located. 
This is in contrast to the miniature controls 



found on most tunable mobile converters as a 
result of the effort to keep within minimum di- 
mensions. Even the smallest tunable unit requires 
space that is difficult to find in a convenient spot 
without interfering with panel instruments or 
leg room. 

While the converter draws 20 ma. at 150 volts, 
tests have shown that the performance is essen- 
tially unchanged with the plate input reduced to 
5 ma. at 45 volts. This means, of course, that the 
unit can be supplied from the car-receiver power 
pack with no danger whatever of overloading it. 
Or, if you are reluctant to dig into the receiver 
to bring a B -j- lead out, you can operate the 
converter from a small B battery. 

The Circuit 

The circuit diagram is shown in Fig. 1. A 
6AK5 is used as an r.f. amplifier, and a 6J6 dual 
triode as the frequency converter. Since the 
tuning of the converter is fixed, the circuits of 
the r.f. amplifier must be broadbanded to pass 
all frequencies in any ham band. These circuits 
consist of slug-cored coils tuned by the tube 
capacitances. However, a trimmer capacitor, C3 
in Fig. 1, is included so that the amplifier grid 
circuit can be peaked up for the particular an- 
tenna in use, or in going from one end of the band 
to the other. 

A common trouble experienced when a broad- 



The input tuning capacitor 
(C3), the bandswitch, and Si 
are in line from left to right on 
the front wall of the chassis. 
The tuning slugs for the coils 
may be adjusted through 
holes drilled in the sides of 
the chassis. Inside the unit, 
switch sections S2A through 
S'2F are in line in that order 
from front to rear. Crystals for 
the oscillator are grouped be- 
tween switch sections S2D and 

S2E. 



QST for 



cast receiver is used as a tunable i.f. is that 
strong local broadcast signals may feed in through 
the converter to reach the b.c. receiver input 
and cause interference. This effect has been mini- 
mized in this design by providing a pair of wave- 
traps, CiLi and C2Z/2, at the input. With CiLi 
tuned to the strongest signal at the low-frequency 
end of the b.c. band, and C2L2 tuned to the 
strongest local signal at the high end of the band, 
the feed-through of b.c. signals will seldom be 
bothersome. 

For frequencies above 7 Mc, the oscillator 
section of the converter works at harmonics of 
the crystal frequency. At these frequencies a cir- 
cuit is used which limits the oscillator output 
essentially to the desired harmonic frequency. 
On 3.5 and 7 Mc, the crystals work at the 
fundamental, and the circuit is a simple Pierce, 
Le being eliminated on these bands. 

For the sake of simplicity in the diagram, only 
a single set of coils (the 14-Mc. set) is shown. 
Other coils and crystals are wired similarly to 
their respective switch points. Switch section 
»S2E is not used as an active switch, its point ter- 
minals merely serving as a most convenient tie- 
point strip for supporting the junction of the 
crystals and Le coils. In the case of the 7- and 
3.5-Mc. positions, where no L% coils are used, the 
corresponding switch points are simply wired 
together, as indicated. 

*Si performs the switching necessary in shifting 
from ham-band to broadcast input. »Sia and Sib 
shift the antenna from the converter to the b.c. 
receiver, while Sic turns off the converter fila- 
ments. 

As with a conventional superhet, the frequency 
of the crystal-controlled oscillator must differ 
from the frequency of the incoming signal by the 
frequency of the i.f. amplifier. In this case, the 
i.f. will vary from about 550 to 1550 kc. — the 
usual tuning range of the b.c. receiver. An ac- 



• Here is a mobile converter that in- 
cludes bandswitching and crystal control 
— features that add much to the oper- 
ating convenience and received-signal 
stability. The standard car b.c. receiver 
is used as a tunable i.f., eliminating the 
problem of providing suitable controls 
and space often involved with tunable 
converters. Form factor has also received 
careful consideration. Plate power re- 
quirements are easily handled by the car- 
receiver supply, or even a small B battery, 
if the operator wants to avoid tampering 
with the b.c. receiver. 



companying table shows the crystal frequency, 
the h.f. oscillator frequency, and the range over 
which the b.c. receiver must be tuned to cover 
each of the ham bands. The oscillator works on 
the low-frequency side of the signal frequency in 
this instance. 

Since the range of the b.c. receiver is approxi- 
mately 1000 kc. (1550-550 kc), the tuning range 
with any single crystal is limited to 1 Mc. How- 
ever, this is more than adequate for all except the 
10-meter band. For full coverage of this band, 
two crystals are used, as indicated in the table. 
The two frequency ranges are from 28 to 28.9 
Mc, and from 28.75 to 29.7 Mc. The 11-meter 
band is not normally included, but values are 
given so that this band may be substituted for 
one of the 10-meter ranges if desired 

Con struc Hon 

The converter is built into a 2 X 7 X 7-inch 
aluminum chassis. The top cover (actually a 
bottom plate for the chassis, and not shown in 
the photographs) is a flat piece of aluminum 
measuring 7 by 9 inches. The extra inch of over- 
lap on each side provides lips for fastening the 



Connectors J\,J3 and J2 are 
mounted in that order, from 
right to left, on the rear wall 
of the converter. One-inch 
holes in the side wall permit 
the removal of tubes. The Yx 6- 
inch holes are for adjustment 
of the 28-Mc. coils. 



January 1955 




converter to the bottom cover of the b.c. receiver 
by means of machine screws and metal spacers. 

The aluminum bracket for the large subassem- 
bly should be made first. This subassembly is 
shown to the left of the bandswitch in the front 
view of the converter, and in the two detail pho- 
tographs. The bracket is 53^ inches long and IJ/g 
inches high, with ^-inch Ups bent along the 
bottom and the rear end. The detail photographs 
identify the components in this subassembly, 
indicating the holes that must be drilled for the 
tubes, coils and r.f. chokes. 

When the bracket has been drilled, place it 
against the rear wall of the chassis, and % inch 
in from the left side, and mark the mounting 
holes in the chassis. Then slide the bracket 
against the left-hand side of the chassis and spot 
the slug-adjusting holes, and the 1-inch holes 
that permit removal of the tubes. The latter are 
the ones covered with snap-in buttons in the rear 
view. 

The tube sockets are mounted on a piece of 
aluminum 3M inches long overall, and IJ^ 

5- -BC 



not project and make contact with the band- 
switch terminals later. At the conclusion of the 
wiring of the subassembly, connect power leads 
that will run to »Sic and J3, and attach a 2-inch 
length of wire to Pin 5 of the 6J6. The free end 
of the latter will later be connected to /S2D. 

The remaining slug-tuned coils are mounted as 
a second subassembly on a bracket the same in 
size as the first, although the mounting lips must 
be bent in the opposite direction. The coils are 
arranged in three groups of four coils. The coils 
are centered at the corners of a %-inch square. 
The first square is centered on the strip and at 
^ inch from the front edge of the strip. The 
second square is centered 23/^ inches from the 
front edge, and the last square is centered 35^ 
inches back. At the center of each of the two 
squares toward the front a hole is drilled for a 
1-inch 6-32 screw. A soldering lug and a %-inch 
metal spacer are slid over the screw before it is 
fastened to the bracket. The lugs are convenient 
grounding terminals. 

Before the coils are mounted, this bracket 




Fig. 1 — Circuit diagram of the crystal-controlled mobile converter. All resistors J^ watt. *Indicates a tubular 
ceramic capacitor; all other fixed capacitors disk ceramic. 



C3 — S5-nti{. variable (Hammarlund HF-35). 

Li through Le — See coil chart. 

Ji, J2 — RCA-type phono jack. 

J3 — 4-prong male chassis connector (Cinch-Jones 

P.304AB). 
RFCi — 2.5.mh. r.f. choke (National R-IOOS). 
RFC2— 10-mh. r.f. choke (National R-IOOS). 

inches wide. This piece is spaced 1^ inches 
from the bracket and is supported from it at the 
four corners by long 6-32 screws with metal spac- 
ers. It has %-inch holes opposite the two inside 
coil forms, and 5^-inch holes to clear the two 
r.f. chokes. 

Before assembling the unit, the antenna coils 
(L3) should be wound on each of the two L4 
forms. Each of the North Hills coil forms has an 
extra set of terminals that may be used as tie 
points for the switch ends of the L3 windings. 
(By judicial use of these extra terminals, it is 
possible to complete the wiring of the converter 
without employing any additional tie points.) 

Small components should be kept close to the 
tube-socket supporting strip so that they will 



Si — 3-pole 5-position (used as 3-p.d.t.) selector switch 

(Centralab PA-2007 or PA-5 wafer mounted on 

PA-300 index). 
S2 — 6-pole 6-position selector switch (6 Centralab 

PA-18 wafers mounted on PA-302 index; see 

text). 
Xtal — See frequency chart (James Knight type H-17). 

should be placed against the rear wall of the 
chassis and % inch from the right-hand side and 
its mounting holes marked in the chassis. Then, 
as before, it should be shd against the right-hand 
side of the chassis while the slug- adjusting holes 
are spotted in the wall of the chassis. 

The first group of coils toward the front are 
the r.f. grid coils, L3L4, and the plate coils, L5, 
are in the second group. With the slug screws 
facing you, the 80-meter coils are at the upper 
left, the 40-meter coils are at the upper right, the 
20-meter coils at the lower left, and the 15-meter 
coils at the lower right. The third group of coils 
at the rear include the trap coils, L2 at the upper 
left, and Li at the upper right. Below are the 20- 
meter oscillator coil (Le) to the left, and the 15- 



18 



QST for 



Frequency Chart for the Mobile Converter 


Band. 
Mc. 


Crystal 
Freg., Kc. 


Oscillator 
Freq., Mc. 


I.F. Range. 
Kc. 


3.5-4 


2900 


2.9 


600-1100 


7-7.3 


6400 


6.4 


600-900 


14-14.35 


6700 


13.4 


600-950 


21-21.45 


6800 


20.4 


600-1050 


26.96-27.23 


6575 


26.3 


660-930 


28-28.9 


6850 


27.4 


600-1500 


28.75-29.7 


7050 


28.2 


5.50-1.500 


Note: I.f. range indicates broadcast receiver tuning 
range necessary for covering the associated amateur 
frequencies. 



meter oscillator coil to the right. The antenna 
coils, Ls, should be wound on their corresponding 
grid-coil forms (L4) before assembling. 

Only a single by-pass condenser is shown in 
the diagram at Ce. Actually, there are three of 
them. One is at the junction of the cold ends of 
the two 10-meter coils, one for the 3.5- and 7-Mc. 
coils, and one for the 14- and 21-Mc. coils. 

The Bandswritch 

The bandswitch is made up from Centralab 
Switchkit parts as indicated under Fig. 1. The 
wafers are spaced as follows: index head to 
wafer >S2a — He inch, »S2a to *S2b — • ^ 3'! 6 
inch, S2B to <S2C — iKe inches, »S2c to »S2d — 
i^-fe inch, *S2d to *S2e — 1 inch, S2K to S2F 
— 1^16 inch. The tail of the bandswitch shaft 
should be cut off close to the last wafer, to leave 
space for J3, but the two assembly screws should 
be allowed to extend through the rear wall of the 
chassis to strengthen the support. In assembling 
the switch, be sure to use the small fiber washers 
between each ceramic spacer and between the 
wafers and the spacers to prevent cracking of the 
ceramic. All wafers should be placed on the as- 
sembly rods so that the rotor or "arm" terminal 
is the second terminal to the left of the upper 
assembly rod, as viewed from the front. 

The crystals can be soldered to the switch con- 
tacts after the switch is mounted in the chassis. 
They are placed between <S2d and >S2e. In the 
rear-view photograph, the crystals, left to right, 
are for 3.5 Mc, 7 Mc, 21 Mc, and the high end 
of the 28-Mc. band. The crystals for the 14-Mc. 
band and the low end of the 10-meter band are 
placed horizontally, one above the other, against 
the bottom of the chassis. They are hidden by 
the group of three lower-frequency crystals. 
Prongs taken from an octal socket and slid over 
the crystal-holder pins are a good means of con- 
necting the crystals to the switch wafers. 

The three controls are lined up along the center 
line of the front edge of the chassis, with the an- 
tenna trimmer, C3, to the left, the bandswitch at 
the center, and »Si at the right. The two outer 
controls are centered 2 inches from the band- 



switch shaft. In the final assembly these should 
be mounted first. 

Shielded phono jacks (RCA type) are used for 
J I and J2, and are placed near the two rear cor- 
ners of the chassis. In the rear view, the antenna 
jack is at the right and the output jack at the 
left. The fiber mountings of these jacks will need 
to be clipped off so that they will fit between the 
chassis and the subassembly brackets. These 
should be mounted next, and the coax leads run 
to Six and »Sib, keeping the leads along the bot- 
tom corners of the chassis. 

Next the two subassemblies can be mounted 
and connections made to the bandswitch. Most of 
these connections can be made most easily with 
bare No. 16 wire. In addition to the connections 
shown in the diagram, the bandswitch terminals 
immediately to the left of the upper tie rod (as 
viewed from the front) on <S2a and Szb should be 
connected together, and then to the ground 
terminal at the socket of the 6AK5. This grounds 
the inactive L3 and L4 coils. 

As a last operation, the power leads are 
brought to the power supply connector, Jz, and 
soldered to the terminals. 

Power Supply 

The converter requires 0.625 ampere at 6 volts 
for the heaters, and anything between 5 ma. at 
45 volts to 20 ma. at 150 volts for the plate supply. 
This can be taken most conveniently from the 
car b.c. receiver by connecting two leads to an 
audio-output-stage socket. It is preferable to 
take the filament voltage from this point, rather 
than from the car wiring, so that advantage may 
be taken of any battery-fine filtering that may 
be built into the b.c. receiver. Plate voltage should 
be taken from the screen terminal. This voltage 
will usually be about 200, and can be dropped 
down to the desired value with a series resistor. 
A 12,000-ohm 2-watt resistor will usually be 
about right. This resistor should drop the voltage 
from 200 to approximately 75 at about 10 ma. 
The hot filament and plate-supply leads, plus a 



Coil Chart for the Mobile Converter 


Band 


Turns 


Ind. Range. y.h. 


Type No. 


La Lh 1 Z/6 


ULs 


i6 


3.5-4 


30 


64-105 


■ 


120-G 





7-7.3 


8 


18-36 





120-E 





14-14.35 


4 


5-9 


18-36 


120-C 


12(VE 


21-21.45 


3 


3-5 


5-9 


120-B 


12G-C 


26.93-27.23 


3 


2-3 


3-5 


120- A 


120-B 
120-B 


28-28.9 


3 


2-3 


3-5 


120- A 


28.75-29.7 


3 


2-3 


3-5 


120-A 


120-B 


Note; Li and L2, Fig. 1, are Types 120-F (36-64 nh.) 
and 120-E, respectively. Series 120 coils are obtainable 
from North HiUs Electric Co., Inc., 203-18 35th Ave., 
Bayside 61, New York. L3 is wound with fine magnet 
wire at grounded end of Lt. 



January 1955 



19 




This view of the sub- 
assembly shows the 1- 
inch holes which permit 
removal of the tubes. 
The mounting bracket 
measures IJ-'s by 5^ 
inches and has ^-inch 
mounting lips at the 
bottom and the left 
ends, as seen from this 
angle. 



ground lead, can be brought to a connector 
mounted on the b.c. receiver, or run in the form 
of a cable terminated with a female plug that 
fits the connector at the rear of the converter. 
Shielded wire should be used for the cable. 

Antenna Coupling 

With a small antenna, such as a mobile whip, 
tight coupling to the antenna is essential for best 
signal response. It is also important in avoiding 
regeneration in the r.f.-amplifier stage. There- 
fore, especially when the antenna is a small one, 
it should be resonant. This is usually the case in a 
mobile installation where the antenna must be 
made resonant for transmitting. If a signal gener- 
ator is used for preliminary adjustment, it should 
be one having low-impedance (about 50-ohm) 
output. Here at the ARRL lab, initial tests were 
made with a signal generator. Final tests were 
made with a standard 10-meter whip loaded with 
a Johnson "Whipload-6," pread justed to each 



band. The bandswitching feature of this loading 
unit was most convenient in changing back and 
forth between bands along with the converter. 

Adjustment 

The high-frequency oscillator should be checked 
first, listening on a communications receiver at 
the oscillator frequencies fisted in the table. No 
adjustment of the oscillator is necessary at 3.5 
and 7 Mc, but at the higher frequencies the slugs 
of the Le coils must be adjusted for most stable 
output at the proper harmonic frequencies. Set 
the receiver to the desired frequency and adjust 
the slug until the oscillator signal is heard. To 
make sure that the oscillator is crystal-controlled, 
jar the converter. If the signal is crystal-con- 
trolled, no amount of jarring should change the 
frequency. If it is not crystal-controlled, the slug 
should be adjusted carefully until the oscillator 
locks in with the crystal. 

{Continued on page 120) 



L 



RFC, R 6J6 
R.^5 




This assembly sup- 
ports the tubes, the 
28-Mc. coils, and most 
of the small components 
of the crystal-controlled 
converter. The support 
plate for the tube sock- 
ets has rounded ends to 
clear coils L4 and Le, 
and a pair of ?^-inch 
holes to provide access 
to the terminals of the 
amplifier plate coils. The 
wire leads leaving the 
unit at the left connect 
to SiB, Sic, and Pin 3 of 
73, as shown by Fig. 1. 



20 



QST for 



A Cubical Quad for 20 Meters 

Reviving a Neglected Type of Beam 
BY S. B. LESLIE. JR.,* W5DQV 



• The cubical quad enjoyed brief popu- 
larity when "10" was in its glory, but 
has practically disappeared along with 
sunspots and tcn-nieter activity. The 
author finds it highly satisfactory on 
14 Mc. and offers reasons M-hy it is worth 
serious consideration if you're thinking 
of putting up a beam. 



IN pursuit of our hobby we occasionally run 
across a piece of equipment that performs in a 
satisfactory manner, is easy to build, simple 
to adjust and low in cost, j^et for some unknown 
reason is neglected and forgotten by the majority 
of amateurs. Such is the case of the cubical quad 
antenna. A few years ago, when 10 meters was 
open, the quad enjoyed considerable popularity. 
Many amateurs reported that it gave them re- 
sults equal to, and in many cases superior to, the 
conventional 3-element Yagi, some claiming gains 
as high as 10 to 11 db.^- ^ Measurements at ARRL 
headquarters gave the quad a gain of 7 to 8 db. 
over a reference dipole antenna, a gain equal to 
that of a good three-element beam.^ 

As 10 meters faded out so did the quad; the 
fellows who had been so enthusiastic about it 
failed to carry through and use it on the lower 
frequencies. Comments received over the air 
now indicate that manj' hams do not know what 
the quad is or what it is capable of doing. Those 
who are familiar with it seem surprised that a 
practical one for 20 meters could be built and all 
assume it would be a monstrous affair. Actually, 
the quad occupies less space and appears smaller 
than a three-element beam. 

The cubical quad consists of a radiating ele- 
ment and a parasitic reflector, usually spaced 
0.15 or 0.20 wavelength, both radiator and re- 
flector consisting of square loops one quarter 
wavelength on a side, making a total of one 
wavelength around the loop. This configuration 
can be arranged either as shown in Fig. lA or 
Fig. IB, that shown at IB giving slightly higher 
gain.^ In some installations the reflector is made 

* % Leslie-McCauley Clinic, 122 East 3rd St., Okmulgee, 
Okla. 

'The CQ Staff, "Cubical Quad, Topic Number One," 
CQ, December, 1948, p. 37. 

2 Hoffman & Middelton, "Constructing the Cubical 
Quad," CQ. June, 1949, p. 11. 

3 "The Quad Antenna." QST, November, 1948, p. 40. 



W5DQV adjusting the phasing stub on his 20-meter 
quad. The mala supports are bamboo Rsbing poles. 



a Uttle longer than the radiator as in Yagi beam 
construction, in others it is made the same length 
as the radiator. In either case, provision is made 
for tuning the reflector by means of a shorted 
stub or variable condenser in order to obtain 
optimum phasing. These square loops may be 
thought of as two half-wave elements stacked 
one quarter wavelength apart with, their ends 
bent to connect them together, hence a lower an- 
gle of radiation is obtained than would be ex- 
pected from a simple two-element beam. Many 
of the early versions used two-turn loops for 
radiator and reflector but this served no purpose 
except to raise the feed-point impedance.' 

Performance Data 

The amateur literature has very Uttle to say 
regarding the mode of action of the quad and 
anyone interested is urged to read the articles 
mentioned above. Since this antenna seemed to 
have several advantages over the Yagi and as 
very little e.xperimental work had been reported 
on it, a scale model for the 50-Mc. band was built 
to try to determine some of its characteristics. 
All measurements were made with the center of 
the array one wavelength above ground and the 
instruments used were a Heathkit AM-1 antenna 
impedance meter, a Millen grid-dip oscillator and 
a homemade field-strength meter. The test signal 
was furnished bj^ a transmitter feeding into a 
dipole elevated one wavelength above the 
ground and located three wavelengths from the 
antenna being tested. All measurements were 



Jcmucuy 1955 




double-checked on two different occasions to 
make them as accurate as the instruments would 
permit.^ The results are tabulated below: 



Radiator alone 


Imp. 

Gain over dipole 


110 ohms 
2db. 


Reflector spaced 0.20 


Imp. of radiator 
Gain over dipole 


75 ohms 
10 db. 


Reflector spaced 0.15 


Imp. of radiator 
Gain over dipole 


65 ohms 
8db. 


Reflector spaced 0.10 


Imp. of radiator 
Gain over dipole 


45 ohms 
8db. 


Director spaced 0.20 


Imp. of radiator 
Gain over dipole 


50 ohms 
5db. 



The gain figures seem high but they are the 
actual readings obtained. The radiating element 
alone, without reflector or director, gave a con- 
sistent gain of 2 db. over a well-matched and 



and reflector. Such a beam might prove consider- 
ably better than a three- or four-element Yagi. 
Time limitations prevented investigating these 
possibilities, but it is hoped that the above exper- 
imental work will stimulate more work on the 
quad by other amateurs. This beam is worth 
much more attention than it has received in the 
past. 

The 20-meter quad here at W5DQV has created 
considerable interest, nearly half the stations 
contacted asking for more information about 
its operation and construction. After fourteen 
months' operation on 20 c.w., this antenna has 
proven its worth as it has given results equal to 
and often superior to the three-element wide- 
spaced beam it replaced. It is definitely smaller 
than the usual three-element beam, having a 



Reflector 




Reflectot 



Radiator-* 



, All sides 
■4 wavelenqtfi- 



^Stub 



trimmed dipole. This does not agree with the 
published figures for a square loop; nevertheless, 
this 2-db. gain was obtained on two different 
occasions, using different loops and different 
dipoles, all grid-dipped to the correct length. Dis- 
regarding this 2-db. gain of the square loop, the 
0.20 spaced quad still gives a gain of 8 db., a very 
respectable gain indeed. 

A field pattern taken with the reflector at 0.15 
is shown in Fig. 2. A pattern taken at 0.20 
showed a similar outline but with somewhat 
greater attenuation of the back lobe. 

The radiation from the sides of these test beams 
and the one used on 20 meters was remarkably 
low, the field-strength meter indicating almost 
zero off the sides. On-the-air tests with the 20- 
meter quad showed a 45-db. front-to-side ratio 
and 25-db. front-to-back ratio. A square element 
tuned as a director and spaced 0.20 wavelength 
gave a gain of 5 db. over the dipole, which brings 
up the interesting possibility of a three-element 
quad using 0.15 or 0.20 spacing for both director 

^ Antenna measurements of any type tend to be tricky, 
even with elaborate and accurately-calibrated equipment, 
because of the difficulty of detecting and eliminating stray 
effects which sometimes are of the same order of magnitude 
as the quantities under investigation. Results such as those 
tabulated here (and other similar tabulations of antenna 
performance figures) are of considerable value, practically, 
if it is kept in mind that they are necessarily approximations, 
useful as a guide but not to be taken as literally as, say, 
the reading of a good quality d.c. voltmeter. — Ed. 




Fig. 1 — Two dififerent 
arrangements of cubical 
quad antennas. 



(B) 

"wing span" of only 16 feet 9 inches as compared 
to 33 feet, a boom length of only 12 feet as com- 
pared to 20 or 24 feet, and as described here, a 
weight of about 20 pounds. Yet this is a full-sized 
beam capable of giving full-sized performance; 
there are no shortened elements and there are no 
loading coils to absorb power. It is easily turned 
by a TV rotator, is constructed of readily ob- 
tained materials, and can be built, put in place 
and tuned in one or two week ends. 

Construction 

Most of the details of construction can be seen 
in the photo and drawings. It was built to be as 
light as possible and while it does whip some in 
the wind, this does not seem to cause any notice- 




Fig. 2 — Field-strength pattern of 50-Mc. cubical 
qjiad with 0.15 spacing. The broad nose and sharpl^dips 
off the sides are also very noticeable in on-the-air tests 
with the 20-meter quad. 



22 



QST for 



/2 feei 




SiuJ> 
SIDE VIEW 



Fig. 3 — End and side views of 20-meter quad. Upper insert shows method of fastening antenna wire to sup. 
port arms. Center insert shows construction of support-arm mounting bracket. Lower insert shows method of 
attaching feed line and stub to the center insulators. Two small egg insulators are used, fastened to end of lower 
boom as shown with a small nail. 



able change in loading or on received signals. 
There is nothing critical in the construction ex- 
cept the length of the wire elements, and no 
doubt many will devise better ways to build and 
support this antenna. One of the quads built by a 
local ham used 1 X 2-inch pine for the support 
arms but this beam was much too heavy and 
blew down in the first light wind. The support 
arms shown in the drawing are ordinary bamboo 
fishing poles about 16 feet long, with the butt 
ends wrapped with friction tape to prevent the 
metal mounting bracket and wire from biting 
into the bamboo. These arms are fastened to the 
mounting brackets as shown in Fig. 3 with several 
turns of No. 14 galvanized wire, and the far ends 
are not trimmed until the antenna wire has been 
fastened in place. Two mounting brackets and 
eight bamboo support arms are required. The 
mounting brackets serve to hold the arms in 
place and to fasten them to the end of the boom. 
These brackets are made by welding two 24-inch 
lengths of 1-inch angle iron together back to back 
to form a large "X" 90 degrees between legs, and 
welding a 5-inch length of IJ^-inch strap iron 
between two of the legs to fasten the "X" to the 
boom end. The arms are assembled and the an- 
tenna wire is fastened in place before attaching 
the brackets to the boom. 

Many amateurs wiU raise their eyebrows at 
the idea of using fishing poles in construction of 
an antenna, but if the poles are well treated with 
a weatherproofing compound they wiU last sev- 
eral years. Weatherproofing compounds are avail- 
able at all lumber dealers. This antenna has been 
up for over a year in all sorts of weather and as 
yet shows no signs of wear. Be sure to get straight 
poles with no splits in them. No insulators are 



necessary, the poles themselves acting as long 
insulators. The antenna shown in the photo uses 
plastic insulators but subsequent beams have 
shown these to be unnecessary. The easiest way 
to mount the antenna wire on the arms is to lay a 
long length of wire on the ground and mark it at 
quarter-wave intervals, in this case 16 feet 9 
inches, and use these marks to indicate where the 
wire fastens to the pole. Fasten loosely at first 
as it will be necessary to slide these joints up and 
down the poles a little until all four sides of the 

(Continued on page ISS) 



W 



n 



'1 



ita 



2*2 -12 ft. 

pine 



Angle iron "^ 
welded to 
Shaft 



Rotator shail_ 
I'/z in. pipe 



}k iron welded 
to shaft — 



2»2-6ft. 



aft. 472 in. , 
between upper and 
lower booms 



o 



1x2-/2 ft.pine 
\ 



Fig. 4 
bolts are 



— Assembly of booms and rotator shaft. All 
14: inch. 



January 1955 



23 



A Discussion of Receiver Performance 

Some Fine Points and Unsolved Problems of Receiver Design 
BY E. W. PAPPENFUS.* W0SYF 



• Here is an article on receivers that any- 
one with the slightest interest in "why" 
should not pass up. It won't tell you 
how to build anything, unless you read 
carefully between the lines, but it will 
certainly help you to understand some 
eflfects that may have been a mystery up 
to now. 



SINCE good communication superheterodyne 
I receivers have been available for about 
twenty years, it is surprising that there is 
anything left to discuss about this line of equip- 
ment. However, the large number of letters that 
are written to the manufacturers questioning 
receiver performance points to the need for a 
discussion of the action of a receiver under certain 
conditions. These include weak-signal reception 
as well as performance in the presence of a very 
good signal. Many hams feel that there is no 
need to miss a QSO because a signal is weak. 
They feel that if a signal can't be read, it is 
strictly the fault of the set design. At the same 
time, it is hard for many radio operators to un- 
derstand why a receiver cross-modulates and 
blocks when the kilowatt station next door comes 
on the air. As you may guess, this is a discussion 
of the reasons why a receiver is not all the ama- 
teur expects and perhaps also a defense of receiver 
design. 

The subjects to be discussed include receiver 
sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio, noise figure, 
cross-modulation and blocking. It is self-evident 
that a receiver for amateur use, and particularly 
for DX, must have a great deal of inherent ampli- 
fication. The ability of a receiver to make a lot 
of sound in the loudspeaker with a very weak 
signal is called "sensitivity." High sensitivity in 
a receiver is a necessary, but not sufficient, 
definition of weak-signal receiver performance. 
"Signal-to-noise ratio" is also very important. 

It is not quite as apparent that a good com- 
munications receiver must be free from over- 
loading or cross-modulation when strong signals 
are present. These undesirable effects are gener- 
ally overlooked in the general confusion and 
congestion of the present-day amateur bands. 
It must be admitted that the modulation splatter 
blamed on the local amateur at the other end of 
the band is sometimes generated in the receiver. 
It is unfortunate that a receiver designed for 
very good weak-signal performance should have 
difficulty with extremely strong signals. This, 
however, is the case, and it is an area in which 

* % Collins Radio Company, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 



an engineering compromise must be reached. Like 
most compromises, it is open to argument, and 
there is no completely clinching evidence to 
prove that the receiver design was right. The 
compromise involves r.f. stage gain, a.v.c. charac- 
teristics, r.f. selectivity, type of r.f. tubes, type 
of mixer tube, and mixer noise. With all of these 
balancing factors it may be seen that it is not 
an easy decision for the set designer. 

The signal-level chart for a 75A-3, shown in 
Fig. 1, will help to explain some of the items dis- 
cussed previously. In developing this chart, a 
signal generator was set for a convenient level 
at the antenna and then moved back, stage by 
stage, toward the diode detector. The signal 
generator output was adjusted to hold constant 
diode-load voltage at each point in the circuit 
and, of course, the frequency was changed 
appropriately at the i.f. amplifier. The signal 
generator was then returned to the antenna 
terminals and increased to simulate a stronger 
signal. Again the signal generator was moved 
toward the second detector holding diode-load 
voltage constant. Moving the signal generator 
along, stage bj^ stage, is equivalent to a voltage 
measurement at that point. A family of curves 
was generated, as shown, that gives a complete 
picture of receiver performance with various 
r.f. input levels. A change in gain is represented 
by a change in slope of the curve. Note the con- 
stant gain of antenna link to first r.f. grid, and 
the reduction in gain due to a.v.c. in the first r.f. 
stage and the i.f. amplifiers. It is clear how the 
gain of the five controlled stages changes to hold 
the diode-load voltage almost constant. 

A.V.C. 

The basic function of automatic volume con- 
trol in a receiver is to keep the diode-load voltage 
constant and thus hold constant audio output for 
changing signal levels. This is apparent from 
Fig. 1, because the diode-load voltage does not 
rise appreciably above 8 volts as the signal 
level is changed from 1.5 to 100,000 microvolts. 
This constancy of receiver output voltage does 
not tell the whole story, however. It is important 
to "delay" the application of a.v.c. voltage until 
a suitable signal-to-noise ratio is reached. This 
allows the receiver output to increase in a linear 
manner with input signal level so that receiver 
noise is rapidly overcome. In the 75A-3 the a.v.c. 
does not become effective until the input signal 
is about 1.5 microvolts. In addition, some sets 
delay the application of a.v.c. voltage to the r.f. 
stage until even higher signal levels are reached. 
This also contributes to a linear improvement 
in signal-to-noise ratio as the input signal is 



24 



QST for 



increased above the a.v.c. threshold. As an 
example of delayed a.v.c. action, if a 2-microvolt 
signal gives a 10-db. signal-to-noise ratio, then 
a 20-db. increase to 20 microvolts will give a 30- 
db. signal-to-noise ratio. A 10-db. signal-to-noise 
ratio provides a good readable signal, but a signal 
with less noise is more enjoyable and less tiring 
to the operator. 

By dividing the a.v.c. voltage applied to the 
r.f. stage in the 75A-3, suitable action is obtained 
without separately delaying the r.f. stage a.v.c. 
voltage. Since a sharp-cut-off tube is used in the 
75A-3 r.f. stage, there is a secondary reason to 
limit a.v.c. voltage to this tube. A 6BA6 is a better 
tube for a.v.c. action, but unfortunately it is a 
very noisy tube compared with the 6CB6 that 
is used. 

Manual gain control in the 75A-3 operates on 
the a.v.c. line, just as the automatic volume con- 
trol does. This means that the gain distribution 
is proper for any reasonable setting of the manual 
gain control. It is possible to degrade the signal- 
to-noise ratio with manual gain control if too 
much gain-adjusting action is applied to the r.f. 
stage, so that mixer noise is proportionally larger. 
Noise tests on a receiver should be made at 
various signal levels to insure that manual gain 
control is applied to the proper stages. 

Weak Signals 

It is possible to put a large amount of over-all 
amplification in a receiver because the amplifica- 
tion at a given frequency can be held to a manage- 
able level through the use of the superheterodyne 
principle in single- or multiple-conversion (75A) 
schemes. The gain from antenna to loudspeaker 
in a typical communications receiver may be 
as great as 10 million, but all this gain does not 
permit the amateur to copy a weak DX station 
unless the noise contributed by the 
antenna-coupling circuit, the first 
r.f. tube shot noise, mixer noise, etc., 
is held to a low value. That is the 
reason receiver performance is speci- 
fied by signal-plus-noise-to-noise ratio. 
A signal generator modulated 30 per 
cent at 400 c.p.s. (to simulate a 
speech signal) is fed into the receiver 
antenna terminal. The proper resistor 
is placed in series to match the re- 
ceiver input impedance. The signal 
generator output is increased until 
there is a 10-db. increase in the 
reading of an output meter con- 
nected to the receiver audio over 



Fig. 1 ■ — ^ A signal -level chart 
of the 75A-3 receiver, showing 
the signal levels that exist through 
the receiver for various input 
signals and bias voltages. 



the level present when the modulation is switched 
off. This means that the signal (modulated 
portion) plus noise is 10 db. stronger than the 
noise. A signal 10 db. stronger than the noise 
level is acceptable for voice communications, 
hence the justification for this value. A good c.w. 
operator can copy signals with a lower signal-to- 
noise ratio, but the lower the signal-to-noise 
ratio, the more expert the operator must be. 

It is dangerous to generalize, but it is possibly 
safe to say that any amateur receiver with a 
10-db. signal-to-noise ratio at from 1 to 3 juv. 
is in the high quality class. Noise-figure tests ^ of 
receiver performance make use of a noise diode 
and are the only real means of comparison be- 
tween receivers of different bandwidth, because 
receiver noise voltage varies proportionally to 
the square root of the bandwidth. A narrow-band 
receiver should not be compared directly with 
a wide-band set. Noise figure expresses the ratio 
in db. between the noise level of the receiver under 
test to a so-called perfect receiver in which all 
noise is assumed to be generated in the dummy 
antenna due to its thermal noise. (See Appendix.) 

It can be shown that a perfect receiver with 
6-kc. bandwidth and 100-ohm input would re- 
quire 1.4 /iv. to have a 10-db. signal-plus-noise- 
to-noise ratio. This receiver when operated with 
a dummy antenna matching the receiver input 
impedance has a 3-db. noise figure. It is the- 
oretically possible to improve the noise figure 
by mismatching the antenna, but this is not 
important from a practical standpoint in the 
ham bands from 10 to 160 meters, because the 
antenna impedance cannot be predicted ac- 
curately. Again a compromise in design results, 
and a 100-ohm input impedance was selected for 

'Goodman, "How Sensitive Is Your Receiver?" QST, 
Sept.. 1947. 



10.0 V. 



1.0 V. 

















J 
















J 














^^// 1 


yS9+60' 




\ 


/ 


— 


^^ 


W/ 


\ 




\y 


// 




y/^ 


/ / 




S9+40 




' 


M 




Vi 








^^ 


Y 




V / 






S9+20' 






/ 




/ 








y 






/ 






S9 ' 


c5^ 


y 


> 




1 










/ 










S5 + 




A 


/ 












/ ^ 


f^ /"' 










l.5pv. 




MIXER 

NOISE 











O.OlV 



lOOJfjv. 



I 0>n(. 



lOpv. 



Ipv. 



January 1955 



25 



the 75A-3. Since signal generators are generally 
available and noise diodes are not, it is customary 
to use the signal generator method with 10-db. 
signal-plus-noise-to-noise as the standard of 
comparison between receivers. Incidental fre- 
quency modulation in the signal generator can 
cause errors particularly at high frequencies 
and should be guarded against. 

Noise in a receiver results from so-called 
thermal-agitation noise in the input circuit, 
shot noise, mixer noise and amplifier noise. 
Pentagrid mixers are particularly noisy tubes, 
but they are advantageous because of the ease 
with which the oscillator can be fed into the 
mixer and the freedom from coupling of oscillator 
voltage to the signal grid. 

If enough gain-producing elements precede 
the mixers, then the mixer noise can be neglected. 
Since the greatest gain exists from the grid 
circuit of the first r.f. amplifier to the receiver 
output, it is logical to expect this noise to be 
louder than any other receiver noise. This is 
not always true, but in a properly designed re- 
ceiver the input noise makes the greatest contri- 
bution to over-all receiver noise. This can be 
demonstrated by peaking the grid circuit, with 



SIGNAL GEN. 
WEAK SIGNAL 



"1 



SIGNAL GEN. 
STRONG SIGNAL 



RECEIVER 
•°ANT. 
<. R 



1. 



OUTPUT 
METER 



Fig. 2 — The cross-modulation effects in a receiver 
can be measured by using two signal generators con- 
nected as shown here. 



a resistor of proper value across the antenna 
terminals. A rise in receiver noise output when 
the first r.f. tank circuit is tuned compared with 
the completely detuned condition indicates the 
proper gain distribution. A drop in noise level as 
the first r.f. tube is removed also shows that the 
mixer noise is not an important factor in over-all 
receiver signal-to-noise ratio. Two r.f. stages are 
generally not required to approach the ideal 
weak-signal receiver performance, because a sin- 
gle stage using a high-transconductance tube will 
amplify the signal sufficiently to override the 
mixer noise. The chart of Fig. 1 shows the equiva- 
lent noise present at the mixers. The gain here 
appears sufficient to override completely the 
mixer noise with 1.5-/oiv. input. 

If this peaking effect of noise with antenna 
terminals properly loaded with a resistor is not 
found, then the antenna coil gain, antenna 
circuit Q or r.f. amplifier gain should be adjusted 
until the receiver noise is dominated by the 
receiver input noise. Only then can the operator 
say that his receiver is able to hear the weakest 
stations. This actually is a rather theoretical 
consideration because of the large amount of 
static and interference prevalent, except perhaps 



on the 10-meter band. When the weakest reading 
on the S- meter across the entire 20- meter 'phone 
band is S6 to S9, because of a solid array of strong 
signals, obviously receiver noise is not then the 
limiting factor. Receiver bandwidth is much more 
important. Atmospheric and manmade static 
on the antenna also limit the signals that can 
be copied. Only rarely can the full signal-to- 
noise capabilities of a receiver be used. This can 
be checked by tuning to an unused portion of 
the band (that's a joke, son) and then removing 
the antenna from the receiver and replacing it 
with the equivalent resistance. If the receiver 
noise output drops, then the antenna noise is the 
limiting factor and not the noise developed within 
the receiver. 

Strong Signals 

For the reception of strong signals, an addi- 
tional receiver requirement is added. Radio- 
frequency voltages applied to any stage of the 
receiver must not exceed the bias for that stage 
with any signal ordinarily encountered. Fortu- 
nately, the receiver a.v.c. voltage increases the 
bias applied to each stage and at the same time 
reduces the gains through the receiver when 
strong signals are tuned in. 

Five controlled stages are used in the 75A-3 
a.v.c. circuit. By removing one controlled stage 
or by reducing the proportion of a.v.c. voltage 
fed to a stage, it is possible to change the re- 
ceiver gain distribution. The set designer has 
this "handle" by which he can set the gain 
curve to the desired shape. The curves of Fig. 
1 show sufficient r.f. gain adjustment so that the 
mixers are protected from large signal volt- 
ages for any signal within the range of the 
S-meter. Because mixers are somewhat critical 
in the application of bias, the first and second 
mixers are omitted from the controlled circuit 
and set at a suitable bias by voltage drop across 
a cathode resistor. The exact gain distribution 
within a receiver is not critical within the limita- 
tion that all stages must be held below the over- 
load region with the highest signal level ordinarily 
encountered. 

Strong signals outside the passband can reduce 
the set gain if rectified grid current flows in 
any stage which can charge up the a.v.c. line. 
A decoupfing resistor and a low-resistance a.v.c. 
fine minimize this effect. 

Representative voltages for 0.5-volt input are 
1.5 volts on the r.f. grid and 1.1 volts on the 
second mixer grid. At these voltage levels the 
mixer draws grid current and its conversion gain 
is reduced. The overload point for a receiver 
is defined as that input level at which a 6-db. 
drop in audio output occurs compared with the 
maximum audio output as the input signal is 
increased. Overload point for the 75A-3 is at 
1.4 volts. A small amount of grid current in the 
mixer is not serious, as indicated by the fact that 
the overload point is well above the input at which 
the peak r.f. grid voltage appfied to the second 
mixer exceeds its bias. 



26 



QST for 



All s.s.b. operators will cry out loudly at the 
above statement. It is possible to tolerate grid 
current in a receiver mixer because the perform- 
ance standards are so much lower than in linear 
amplifiers. In a s.s.b. transmitter it is desirable 
to keep intermodulation products down 30 db. 
Harmonic distortion of the signal in a receiver 
can be tolerated if it is 10 to 20 db. below the 
signal level. This explains the ability of the re- 
ceiver mixers to operate satisfactorily with small 
positive grid voltages. 

For the reception of weak signals described 
earlier, it is desirable to have as much gain 
as possible ahead of the mixers. This would insure 
that the signal level would be strong enough to 
override completely the noise from the pentagrid 
mixers. However, from the standpoint of strong 
signals, it is desirable to have low amplification 
until the selectivity of the receiver is effective. 
This would insure that only signals in the i.f. 
passband would tend to overload the set and these 
could be more readily accommodated by the high 
a.v.c. bias and gain control that is effective in the 
i.f. amplifier. These requirements for no amplifi- 
cation ahead of selectivity for strong signal 
reception and high gain in the antenna circuit 
and r.f. stage for weak signal reception are in 
direct conflict. It is fortunately possible to make 
an engineering compromise that will accommo- 
date the majority of operating situations which 
confront the amateurs. Weak signals can be 
handled by using just enough r.f. stage gain to 
override the mi.xer noise by about 6 db. or 
slightly more. 

Cross-Modulation 

When the receiver is tuned to a weak signal, 
and a strong signal is present outside the i.f. 
passband, then a different condition prevails 
than in the strong-signal case outlined above. 
There is very low a.v.c. bias generated to protect 
the grids of r.f. and i.f. amplifiers from grid cur- 
rent and only moderate gain reduction to prevent 
strong signals from stage to stage in the receiver. 

The only gain-reducing elements present are 
a small amount of a.v.c. bias generated by the 
desired signal, and the selectivity of the r.f. 
and variable-i.f. coils in double-conversion re- 
ceivers. The selectivity of these coils determines 
the r.f. voltage applied to mixers and i.f. ampli- 
fiers. With very large signals applied to any stage 
of the receiver, nonlinear operation causes modu- 
lation components of the strong signal to appear 
on the weak signal. This, in effect, means that 
strong 'phone signals outside the selectivity curve 
of the i.f. amplifier can still be heard. The term 
"cross-modulation" has been applied to this 
effect. Cross-modulation in a receiver is measured 
by a laboratory set-up as shown in Fig. 2. Two 
signal generators are used to simulate the two 
signals. One signal generator feeds the receiver 
through a resistor equal to the input impedance 
while the other signal generator feeds through 
a resistor of ten times the input impedance. The 
resulting impedance is then very close to the 
matching value. The signal generator feeding 



through the large resistor is set for a value of 
r.f. that will produce an antenna terminal signal 
of, say, 10 MV. (approximately S6) at receiver 
center frequencj-. The audio output is measured 
and signal generator modulation is removed. 
The second signal generator is then turned on 
and adjusted for 30 per cent modulation. At 
various frequencies near the receiver center fre- 
quency the r.f. level from the second signal 
generator is increased until the receiver audio 
output is 10 db. less than that measured with the 
first signal generator. A plot of these values for 
the 75A-3 operating at 4.0 Mc. is shown in 
Fig. 3. Adjacent signals at S9 -1- 40 db. can 
interfere if they are closer than 15 to 20 kc. 
from the desired signal. Approximately 50-kc. 
separation is required for signals that are 60 
db. above S9. The cross-modulation curve of 
Fig. 3 is an inverse composite of the receiver 
input selectivit^^ The lower part of the curve 
is determined by the selectivity of the receiver 
circuits to the second mixer grid and the upper 
part of the curve is shaped by the selectivity 



1.0 V. 



S9+60 



S9+40 



S9+20 







^ 


V 










/ 


f 












N 


\ 






/ 


/ 




UJ 
X 

S 












\ 






/ 






r 












^ 




__. 




__. 


__ 


._. 














1 










I 















\ 










CD 












V 


-/ 


— 


— 


— 


"a: 












\ 










X 














\ 



































3.8 3.9 4.0 4.1 4.2 

Frequency (Mc.) 



I.OV 



0.1 V. 



O.OIV. 



1000 pV. 



Fig. 3 — The cross-modulation characteristic of the 
r5A-3 receiver, with the receiver tuned to 4.0 Mc. 



to the first mixer giid. The r.f. stage is never 
responsible for cross-modulation below 1 volt 
r.f. on the antenna for a lO-^v. desired signal 
level. The portions of the curve at which the 
first and second mixer respectively contribute 
to the cross-modulation are indicated. A portion 
of the curve entitled "both" is a transitional 
area in which both mixers contribute to cross- 
modulation. 

The application of a.v.c. voltage to the r.f. 
stage reduces its gain and helps protect the 
subsequent stages from excessive voltages. The 
matter of cross-modulation characteristics of an 
r.f. tube is extremely complicated, so just taking 
a given tube and applying a.v.c. bias is not the 
whole answer. There is no substitute for a large 
number of cross-modulation tests to determine 
proper r.f. stage conditions. There does not seem 
to be a receiving tube available that possesses the 

(Continued on page 124) 



January 1955 



27 



A Simple Rig for Six-Meter Mobile 

A Compact Transmitter That Is Easy on Both Pocket book and Battery 

BY R. J. CARPENTER, * W30TC 



• In at least two respects the 50-Mc. 
band is ideal for mobile operation. The 
average car radio whip is the right 
length, and low power will do the job 
well enough so that nothing in the way 
of special batteries or generators is re- 
quired. Here's a 6-nieter rig compact 
enough for steering-post mounting. 
It uses only two tubes, and will work 
nicely on a small receiver-type vibrator 
supply. You can build it for as little as 
$21.00, complete; even less if you shop for 
bargains. 



PERHAPS more people would go mobile if they 
didn't have to drill holes in their cars, bedeck 
them with special antennas, and install space- 
consuming boxes of gear that require something 
approaching Hoover Dam's power capacity. The 
50-Mc. band is a big help in these problems. 
No special antenna mounts are needed, for the 
standard 5-4-inch broadcast whip is a respectable 
antenna sj^stem at 50 Mc. And the nature of 
6-meter operation is such that a moderate amount 
of power works out surprisingly well. 

A simple converter can be built that will give 
entirely satisfactory performance on 6. This 
article will describe a transmitter that should 
fill the bill on the counts of simplicitj^, small size, 
low total cost and low power drain. It is a com- 
plete 6-meter 'phone rig, running 7 watts input, 
built in a 3 X 4 X 5-inch box. Its total cost is 

*1812 Areola Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 

1 The Radio Amateur's Handbook, 1953 edition, p. 386. 




about twenty-one dollars, including crystal and 
tubes. 

As may be seen from the diagram. Fig. 1, the 
circuit is extremely simple. The basis for this lies 
in the use of 50-Mc. third-overtone crystals. 
These high-frequency rocks are no harder to use 
than their lower-frequency brothers, and their 
relatively high price is offset by the simplification 




Interior of the W30TC 50-Mc. mobile rig. Modulator 
tube and microphone transformer are at the right, 
modulation transformer and r.f. tube at the left. 

resulting from their use. (I bought mine at $1.50 
each, but figured the crystal at $7.00 in the cost 
estimate above.) Suitable 50-Mc. crystals can 
now be obtained from most of the better manu- 
facturers. 

Circuit Details 

The first section of a 12BH7 is operated as an 
overtone oscillator at 50 Mc.^ The plate voltage 
to this stage is held down by a large resistor, to 
help reduce the crystal current. Developing suffi- 
cient drive for the final does not seem to be a 
problem. Switching for two crystals is provided, 
though some retuning may be desirable if the fre- 
quency shift is more than about 100 kc. The 



No, this isn't a converter- — it's a 
complete 50-Mc. transmitter, audio 
and all. It runs 7 watts input, yet it is 
small enough for steering-post mount- 
ing. 



QST for 



%-inch diam., 



Fig. I — Schematic diagram and parts informa- 
tion for the W30TC 50-Mc. mobile transmitter. 
Ci, C2 — 1-25-tiiif. APC variable. 
C3 — lO-Aif. 25-volt electrolytic. 
Li — 53^ turns. No. 16 enam., 

close-wound. 
L2 — 2 turns. No. 20 insulated, 

yi6 inch from Li. 
L3 — 8 turns. No. 16 enamel, J^-inch diam 

wound, center-tapped. 
L4 — 2 turns. No. 20 insulated, inserted between 

turns of L3 at center. 
Ji — Single-circuit jack. 
J2 — Coaxial fitting, phono type. 
Pi — 4-pin male power fitting (Amphcnol 86-C.P4). 
Ti — Carbon-microphone-to-grid 
transformer (IStancor 
A4708). 
T2 — Plate to voice coil trans 

former (Merit A2900). 




second section of the 12BH7 is connected as a 
neutralized power amplifier. With a plate-dissi- 
pation rating of 3.5 watts per section, an input 
of up to about 7 watts can be handled safely. 
Modulation is accomplished with a single GBKo, 
using the tapped primary of a push-pull output 
transformer connected as an auto transformer. 
Microphone current is taken from across the 
cathode resistor of the 6BK5. Since the filtering 
of the current supply is not perfect, it may be 
necessary to reverse the leads to one side of the 
microphone transformer to eliminate audio os- 
cillation or extreme bassiness. Arrangement of 
parts should be apparent from the photographs. 

Tune-up 

Adjustment is best begun at a reduced B-|- 
voltage, 200 volts being reasonable. The equip- 
ment used includes a 50-ma. d.c. meter, a re- 
ceiver for si.x meters with b.f.o., and a simple 
field-strength meter. A nonmetallic device should 
be used to tune the variable condensers. After the 
initial tune-up only the field-strength meter is 
needed to touch up the tuning. 

With the final disabled by removing its plate 
voltage, the oscillator is checked for o]jeration 



by listening with the receiver. With the b.f.o. 
turned on, neutralization is next adjusted. Tune 
the final tank through resonance and vary the 
3-30-MMf- neutralizing capacitor in small steps. 
Neutralization exists at the point where tuning 
the final through resonance has practically no 
effect on the oscillator frequency. Plate voltage 
can now be reconnected, through the milliam- 
meter. The final plate current will be about 20 to 
25 ma. when the plate voltage has been raised to 
the final value of about 300 volts and the antenna 
has been loaded up. 

In my mobile installation plate power is ob- 
tained from a receiver-tjpe vibrator supply 
which is hidden in the glove compartment. No 
visible holes have been drilled in the car. 

Generally, I can work a 60-watt fixed station 
as far as it is readable over ignition noise from 
my owTi suppressed engine. Solid communication 
over a 10- to 15-mile range may be obtained in 
almost all locations, even with cross-polarization 
and the low power used. 

The author wishes to thank John J. Nagle, 
W3JES, and George R. Sugar, ex-W3KQS, for 
their work on the photographic portion of this 
article. 



Under the chassis of the 50-Mc. 
transmitter may be seen, right to left 
along the bottom of the picture, the 
crystal switch, the oscillator coils and 
tuning condenser, and the final tank 
circuit at the far left. 



January 1955 




A One-Element Rotary for 21 Mc. 

Utilizing Readily Available Materials in a Simple Antenna 
BY LEWIS G. McCOY. WIICP 



IATELY, more and more amateurs are "discov- 
ering" the 15-meter band. Here is a band 
-^ where it is possible to make long-distance 
contacts with low-power transmitters. Another 
feature of 15 meters is that antennas can be much 
smaller than those necessary for the lower fre- 
quency bands. The smaller antenna can be ro- 
tated to take advantage of the directional charac- 
teristics of an ordinary half-wave dipole. 

Before discussing the actual construction of 
such an antenna, let's first clear up an erroneous 
impression about antennas that many new- 
comers seem to have. For some reason, many 
amateurs starting in the hobby get the idea that 
a horizontal half-wave antenna has no direc- 
tional properties. In other words, they believe 
that when power is fed into such an antenna, the 
power will be radiated equally well in all direc- 
tions. This is a completely mistaken concept. A 
horizontal half-wave antenna produces maxi- 
mum radiation broadside to the radiating ele- 
ment. The least amount of radiation is from the 
ends of the antenna. Hence, a horizontal half- 
wave antenna is "bidirectional." If the ends of 
the antenna point north and south, maximum 
radiation will be east and west. To obtain the 
benefits of the directional properties of the an- 
tenna, it is only necessary to rotate it 180 de- 
grees. Here are the constructional details for such 
an antenna that can be built for less than $15, com- 
plete with mast, wall mounting and 50 feet of 
feed line. 

' A half- wavelength antenna would normally be fed with 
72-ohm cable, since the antenna offers a good match for this 
impedance value. In this antenna system, the shorter ele- 
ments, plus the small coil, offer a good match for 52-ohm 
cable. 



• Here is an antenna that practically 
builds itself. Made from electrician's 
thin-wall tubing, a material sold in any 
electrical supply store, its main feature 
is that no cut-and-try methods are in- 
volved in its construction. Build it ac- 
cording to the directions in the article, 
and sit back and watch "solid" QSOs 
pile up. 



Construction 

The antenna is made from two pieces of H-inch 
diameter electrical thin-wall steel tubing or con- 
duit. This tubing is readily available at any elec- 
tric supply shop and sells for approximately 
seven cents a foot. It comes in 10-foot lengths 
and, while 20 feet is short for a half-wave antenna 
on 21 Mc, with loading the length is just about 
right for 52-ohm feed line.^ If aluminum tubing 
is available, it can be used in place of the conduit, 
and the antenna will be lighter in weight. How- 
ever, it is sometimes difficult to obtain aluminum, 
while steel thin-wall conduit is available in any 
electrical supply house. 

As can be seen in Fig. 1 and the photographs, 
the two pieces of tubing are supported by four 
stand-off insulators on a four foot long 2 by 2. 
The coax fitting for the feed line was mounted on 
the end of one of the lengths of tubing. A mount- 
ing point was made by flattening the end of the 
tubing for a length of about 1 14 inches. The tub- 
ing can be flattened by squeezing it in a vise or 




This view shows a close-up 
of the coil and coax fitting 
mountings. Be sure that the 
coil doesn't short out to the 
outer conductor when solder- 
ing the coil end to the inner 
conductor pin on the coax 
fitting. 



30 



QST for 



Fig. 1 — (A) Diagram of the 
antenna and mounting. The 
U bolts that hold the 2 by 2 
to the floor flange are standard 
2 -inch TV mast type bolts. (B) 
A more detailed drawing of 
the coil and coax-fitting mount- 
ings. The J^-inch spacing be- 
tween turns is not critical, and 
they can vary as much as 
Me inch without any apparent 
harm to the match. 



I" Floor Flanae 

t'Pipe — 1- 



r X" 



2*2-4' Lon^ 

(A) 




Gil L, 
5 turns g' " 
Copper Tubing 



R6 8/uor 
RO sa/u - 
Coax. 



by laying the end of the tubing on a hard surface 
and then hammering it flat. This will provide 
enough space to accommodate the coax fitting 
(Amphcnol type 83-1 R). A ^-inch hole will be 
needed in the flat section to clear the shell of the 
coax fitting. 

The coil, L\, is made from Y^-\a.c\\ diameter 
copper tubing. It consists of 5 turns spaced 34 
inch apart and is 1 inch inside diameter. The coil 
is connected in series with the inner conductor 
pin on the coax fitting and the other half of the 
antenna. In order to secure a good connection at 
the coax fitting, the coil lead should be wound 
around the inner-conductor pin and soldered. 
The other end of the coil can be connected with 
a screw and nut. 

Mounting 

The antenna was mounted on a 1-inch floor 
flange and held in place by two 2-inch bolts, as 
shown in the photograph. The floor flange was 
connected to a 12-foot length of 1-inch pipe 
which served as a mast. Television antenna wall 
mounts were used to support the mast. In the 
installation shown, 19-inch wall mounts were 
used in order to clear the eaves of the house. A 
2-inch long piece of l^^-inch pipe was used as a 
sleeve, and it was clamped in the U bolt on the 
bottom wall mount. A 34-inch hole was drilled 
through the mast pipe approximately 6 inches 
from the bottom. Then a 13-^-inch bolt was 
slipped through the hole and the mast was then 
mounted in the sleeve on the bottom wall 
mount. The bolt acted as a bearing point against 
the top of the sleeve. 

Another 34-inch hole was drilled through the 
mast about three feet above the bottom wall 
mount. A piece of 34-inch metal rod, six inches 
long, was forced through the hole so that the rod 
projected on each side of the mast. To turn the 
mast, a piece of rope was attached to each end of 
the rod and the rope was brought into the shack, 
so that the antenna could be rotated by the 



"arm-strong" method. Obviously, one could 
spend more money for a "de luxe" version and 
use a TV antenna rotator and mast. 

RG-8/U 52-ohm coax cable was used to feed 
the antenna shown. For power inputs up to 100 
watts, the smaller and less expensive RG-58/U 
can be used. However, when you buy RG-58/U, 
be sure that the line is made by a reputable 
manufacturer (such as Amphenol or Belden). 




The antenna mounted against the side of the house, 
using TV wall mounts for holding the mast. The feed line 
comes out of the bottom of the mast and through the 
wall into the shack. 



January 1955 



31 



Some of the line made for TV installations is of 
inferior quality and is likely to have higher losses. 
The feed line was fed up through the mast pipe 
and through a %-inch hole in the 2 by 2. An 
Amphenol 83-lSP fitting on the end of the coax 
line connects to the female fitting on the antenna. 

Coupling to the Transmitter 

It may be found that, when the feed line is 
coupled to the transmitter, the antenna won't 
take power. Since the line is terminated at the 
antenna in its characteristic impedance of 52 
ohms, the output of the final r.f. amplifier must 
be adjusted to couple into a 52-ohm load. Where 
the output couphng device is a variable link, all 
that ma.v be needed is the correct setting of the 
link. If the link is fixed, one end of the link can be 
grounded to the transmitter chassis and the other 
end of the link connected in series with a small 
variable capacitor to the inner conductor of the 
feed line. The outer conductor of the coax is 
grounded to the transmitter chassis. The con- 
denser is tuned to the point where the final ampli- 
fier is properly loaded. Such a system is shown in 
Fig. 2. Incidentally, this is the type of system 
that could be used with the Heathkit transmitter. 





Fig. 2 — The variable coupling condenser, Ci, 
described in the text, can be connected as at (A) or 
(B), depending on which is more convenient for a par- 
ticular transmitter. The condenser can be a receiving 
type of 50 to 100 nfii. capacity. 



For transmitters having a pi-network output 
circuit, it is merely a matter of adjusting the net- 
work to the point where the amplifier is properly 
loaded. 

In the event operation on 15 meters is in an 
area where one may have to contend with TVI, 
it may be necessary to use a low-pass filter to at- 
tenuate any harmonics likely to cause trouble. A 
simple filter was described in a recent issue of 
Qgf 2 "pjjg filter is merely inserted in series with 
the coax feedline. This should take care of har- 
monic TVI problems. 

Perform ance 

Several different tests were made with the an- 
tenna including on-the-air checks with U. S. and 

2 McCoy, "The Tin Can Low- Pass," QST, Sept., 1954. 




Over-all view of the antenna and mounting. 

foreign stations. The standing-wave ratio was 
carefully checked and at no point in the entire 
21-Mc. band did the ratio exceed 1.3 to 1. 

On the first CQ using the antenna, KP4WI 
answered and kindly consented to check the 
signal while the dipole was rotated. With the an- 
tenna broadside to him, his S-meter reading was 
10 db. over S9. When the end of the antenna was 
pointed in his direction, the reading dropped to 
SI to S3. Practically identical performance re- 
ports were received from W7SFK in Montana, 
from W5KC in Louisiana, and from DL2WW in 
Germany. 

On reception, the variation from broadside to 
end was not as great as with transmitting re- 
ports. However, in many cases it was enough to 
make the difference between hearing a signal and 
not hearing one. 

The simplicity of the antenna and the low cost, 
together with the improved performance over a 
fixed antenna, make it a worth-while project for 
an amateur interested in 15-meter operation. At 
the time of this writing, an 0Q5 station in the 
Belgian Congo was heard on 15 meters working 
Novice stations. Who will be the first Novice 
DXCC? 



MEMBERSHIP CHANGES OF ADDRESS 

Four weeks' notice is required to effect 
change of address. When notifying, please 
give old as well as new address. Advise 
promptly so that you will receive every 
issue of QST without interruption. 



32 



QST for 



Using a 304-TH as a 
grounded-grid amplifier, this 
unit can utilize to good ad- 
vantage the full output of any 
of a number of popular com- 
mercially-built transmitters 
for driving power. The push- 
rod operated band-changing 
switch can be seen projecting 
through the panel at the left- 
hand end. 




Grounded-Grid and the 304-TH 

Utilizing "200- Watt" Rigs for Driving 

BY THOMAS P. LEARY,* W0VTP 



ONE thing that bothers most of us about de- 
signing and building a final amplifier is 
neutralization. This old dragon is with us 
in all conventional triode circuits, and a great 
many tetrodes also require it. But, with the right 
tube, the grounded-grid circuit will put the neu- 
tralizing condenser and split-stator tank ba(;k in 
the junk box. 

Still, we can't get something for nothing and 
grounded-grid operation requires four to six 
times the driving power. If we haven't already 
lost you, let's see what can be done with this 
arrangement. 

Only the normal drive requirement of the tube 
is dissipated in the grid circuit; the remaining 
power passes through it and is added to the total 
power output. The filament, or input, circuit has 
a very low impedance, permitting the amplifier 
to operate as a Class B linear without swamping 
resistors. 

Many amateurs own a Collins 32-V, a Johnson 
Viking or a homebrew rig with an output in the 
vicinity of 135 watts or more. When switching to 
higher power it seems a shame to dispose of this 
equipment, and somewhat ridiculous to use it to 
drive a final requiring only a few watts for the 
purpose. But such an e.xciter can be used without 
modification to drive a tube like the 304-TH to 
a kilowatt on c.w. or 750 watts on 'phone. With 
the same plate efficiency, the grounded-grid stage 

*8506 Broadmoor Dr., Omaha, Nebr. 



The top-of-chassis layout, showing 
the blower (left) and copper-tubing 
tank coil {right). The fixed output con- 
densers of the pi network are at the 
edge of the chassis in the right fore- 
ground. 



can put out more power than a conventional 
amplifier since additional r.f. is obtained from the 
driver. And, because we have no need for neutral- 
izing, a pi-section output is a simple addition to 
the circuit. In Class B linear service only about 
25 watts of drive is required which results in 200 
watts of a.m. carrier. With high level, 100 per 
cent plate modulation cannot be obtained by 
modulating the final alone, since a fraction of the 
outjjut originates in the driver, but the extra 
carrier is useful in getting through the QIIM. 

The main requirement for a tube to be oper- 
ated in this manner is a low plate-to-filament 
capacitj'. The 304-TH has a capacity of about 
0.7 /x/uf. plus the added advantage of an internal 
shield connected to the grid. The grid, which is 
grounded for r.f. through a by-pass condenser, 
shields the input and output circuits from each 
other in much the same manner as the screen 
grid in a tetrode. The driving power required 
depends to a great extent on bias and increases 
as the bias goes up. At cut-off ( — 135 volts with 
2500 volts on the plate) the 304-TH can be loaded 
to draw 400 plate milliamperes with 135 watts 
of drive and 40 ma. of grid current. Under these 



January 1955 




conditions, using a bank of light bulbs and a light 
meter, 800 watts output was measured. Since at 
least twice cut-off bias is desirable for good 
linearity with plate modulation, about —250 
volts should be used for 'phone operation. One 
hundred watts will then drive the tube to 750 
watts input, still with 40 ma. of grid current. 
However, it was found possible with this circuit 
to modulate the final at a kilowatt input with 
cut-off bias without any splatter or serious 
deterioration of quality. 

A 304-TL may also be used but drive require- 
ments will be increased about 30 per cent. As an 
example, if a 200-watt exciter is available, the 
304-TL, with -380 volts bias and 3000 volts on 
the plate, can produce more than a kilowatt out- 
put with input at the legal hmit.^ Both types can 
still be found in surplus stocks for less than 
$10.00. 



' The power rating of a grounded-grid amplifier is not 
covered explicitly in the current amateur regulations, but 
FCC's interpretation is that the plate input to the "final 
stage" shall be considered to be the sum of the plate inputs 
to all stages contributing output power to the antenna. 

— Ed. 



Circuit 

As can be seen from Fig. 1, drive is injected 
into the filament-grid circuit and the power out- 
put is taken between grid and plate. Power 
sensitivity is very low and if plate-filament feed- 
back can be kept to a minimum no neutralization 
is required. This means that the input circuit 
must carry the regular filament current in addi- 
tion to r.f., and ordinary bandswitching of the 
input is not desirable. To conserve space, the 
amplifier to be described was designed for 40, 20, 
15 and 10 meters onl3^ The main filament coil (a 
dual winding) is used alone for 40 meters and the 
other coils are switched in parallel to cover the 
higher frequencies. The 52-ohm input link is 
coupled to the filament coil only, and need not be 
varied over the different bands; however, some 
system of changing the coupling between the 
driver tank and coax line should be provided. The 
internal antenna coupler in transmitters like the 
Collins, or a pi-section in the driver output, is 
entirely satisfactory. 

The amplifier output circuit will match a 52- 
ohm line. A 9000-volt tank condenser was found 



304-TH 



)h-r^WpyW-r 








Circuit of the 304-TH grounded-grid amplifier. Capacitances are in ixf. except where specified otherwise. 



Fig. 

Ci — 150-MMf- variable condenser (Johnson 150F20). 

Ca to Ct — 0.005-Mf. mica, 1000 v. 

Cs to Ci2 — 0.001 disk ceramic, 600 v. 

Ci3 to Ci5 — 500-^1^1. carainic, 20 kv. (Sprague 20DK- 
T5). 

Ci6 — lOO-M/xf. variable, 9000 v. (Johnson 100D90). 

Ci7 — 250/1/if. variable, 0.026-inch spacing. 

Ci8 to Ca.'j — 2.500-voIt mica. 

Li — Two parallel windings No. 12 enam. on National 
XR-lOA form, 10 turns of the two wires in par- 
allel. Advance winding a notch with each turn. 

L2 — 4}^ turns No. 18 stranded, polyethylene insul., 
wound directlv on cold end of Li (TV "anode 
lead"). 

L3 — 1.3 turns No. 12 enam., IJ^-inch diam., 3 inches 
long, air-woiind. 

L4 — 6 turns 3/16-inch copper tubing, IJ^-inch diam., 
2J/^ inches long, air-wound. 

Ls — 4 turns 3/16-inch copper tubing, 134-inch diam., 
2J4 inches long, air-wound. 



Le, Ri — Filament parasitic choke and resistor; see 

text. 
L7, K2 — Plate i)arasitic choke and resistor; see text. 
Ls — See text. 

L9 — Resonate to desired TV channel with Cis. 
Jl, J2 — Coax connectors, chassis-mounting type. 
Ml — 0-500 d.c. milliammeter. 
M2 — 0-l.SO d.c. milliammeter. 
RFCi — National R.175A r.f. choke. 
RFC2, RFCs — 2-;;h. r.f. choke, 500 ma. (National 

R-60). 
RFC4 — 2.5-mh. r.f. choke. 
Si — Single-pole 4-pos. steatite rotarv (Centralab 

2542). 
S2 — Single-pole 9-pos. progressive shorting steatite 

rotary (Centralab PA 2042). Two in parallel 

will be more satisfactory. 
Ti — • 10-11-volt 12-amp. filament transformer (Thijrdar- 

son21F19). 



34 



QST for 



necessary in the pi-section to prevent arcing with 
phite modulation. The input leads for power are 
completely shielded and filtered for TVI. 

An electronically-regulated bias supply was 
found to be desirable for c.w. operation when 
keying an earlier stage. If the amplifier grid leak 
is used as the bleeder on a bias supply delivering 
cut-off voltage, as is common practice, the bias 
supply must be unusually husky because of the 
low value of grid-leak resistance recjuired. The 
bias supply circuit used is shown in Fig. 2. The 
control provides a means for varying the key-uj) 
bias between about 90 and 250 volts. Additional 



2.5 K 
25W. -C 




Fig. 2- 
regulator. 



Bias supply circuit using a 6B4G as a 



operating bias is obtained from the voltage droj) 
in the 2500-ohm adjustable resistor when grid 
ciUTent flows. 

Mechanical 

This amplifier is the result of considerable 
sweat and experimentation and the builder may 
depart from the illustrated component layout at 
his own risk. Contrary to some published informa- 
tion, grounded-grid does not eliminate parasitics 
with these tubes and great care must be taken to 
keep plate-to-tank-condenser and filament-to- 
input-condenser leads short. The parasitic chokes 
and resistors should make up most of these leads. 
Complete shielding, without any inductive cou- 
pling, must be maintained between input and 
output circuits to prevent oscillation on the 
operating frequency. 

The amplifier is mounted on a 10 X 17 X 4- 
inch aluminum chassis. The filament components 
are located on the under side at the right. A 
dividing shield and ventilated bottom cover are 
placed over this half, while the left under side is 
used to mount the filament transformer and 
meters. A 2-Ji e-ii^ch hole is cut near the front of 
the chassis, with its center 7 inches from the 
right-hand edge, and the 304-TH is submounted 
so that the internal shield is level with the top of 



The cathode tuned circuit occu- 
pies the left-hand end of the chassis 
in this view. The bifiiar coil at the 
top is used on all bands, additional 
inductances being connected in 
parallel to shift the tuning to the 
band in use. 



January 1955 



• A practical grounded-grid circuit using 
a high-power tube popular because of 
its low price in surplus. The amplifier 
incorporates the lessons learned in ear- 
lier attempts to make the 304 behave 
in a bandswitching grounded-grid ar- 
rangement covering 7 to 30 Mc. 



the chassis. The tank condenser is placed just to 
the left of the tube and mounted upside down to 
obtain a short lead from the plate cap to the 
center of the stator. The R175A choke is placed 
horizontally with its top near the tube cap. The 
tank coil is mounted to the left of the condenser 
with the "cold" end toward the front. The coax 
socket, loading condensers and switch are located 
to the rear between the coil and condenser. 

Some kind of blower is a necessity with such 
compact design since the 304TH dissipates 130 
watts continuously from the filament and a 
couple of hundred watts more when in operation. 
Plenty of space is available on the right side 
above chassis for the blower, and air can be drawn 
in through the front panel. The panel is alumi- 
num, IOJ2 hy 18:>i6 inches, and the whole thing 
will fit in the top section of a Bud Junior Cabinet 
Rack (RC-1947A) which is 21 Ji by 193^ by 10^ 
inches. The lower section needs no chassis and all 
power supply equipment, except the plate trans- 
former, can be fitted in if the arrangement is 
carefully worked out. The plate-transformer ter- 
minals may be covered with a steel chassis of the 
proper size and high voltage led to the rectifiers 
through RG-8/U cable, with the shield grounded 
as a safety measure. The transformer can then be 
set on the floor under the operating desk. The 
center tap of the high-voltage winding can be 
connected to the plate milliammeter through 
ordinary shielded wire. 

A small shield was found necessary above 
chassis between the 304-TH and the tank con- 
denser, to eliminate capacitive coupling with the 
filament. 

The main filament coil is mounted horizon- 
tally, lengthwise with the chassis, with the "hot" 
end just behind the base of the tube. To the right 
of the tube, under chassis, is the filament variable 
condenser. The 20-, 15-, and 10-meter coils are 
grouped compactly around the coil switch and 




the ends soldered directly to the tabs on the 
switch. The opposite ends of all three are soldered 
together and connected by a short lead to ground. 

The filament by-pass condensers are connected 
directly across the socket terminals. The parasitic 
choke and resistor are fastened between the 
right-hand forward socket terminal and the front 
stator connection of the filament variable 
condenser. 

The filament transformer is located under the 
chassis in the left rear corner. The transformer 
specified is somewhat overloaded for this use and 
runs hot but it will deliver the voltage if the 
11-volt primary tap is used. 

We have the old-fashioned notion that nothing 
can beat air-wound copper tubing for a low-loss 
coil. There was no room in this set-up for a con- 
ventional high-power switch, so we hit on the 
idea of using fuse clips fastened directly to the 
tank coil. The coil itself is 193^ turns of ^fe-inch 
copper tubing, 2 inches in dimeter and 7K 
inches long. First, close-wind the coil and spread 
it to 6 inches. Then spread the rear 5}^ turns 
until the whole thing is 73^ inches long. The coil 
is supported on % by 2J^-inch stand-offs and 
soldered to screws in the tops of the three insula- 
tors at the 3rd, 8th and 18th turns (approxi- 
mately) counting from the rear of the chassis. 
The fuse clips are soldered or fastened to holes in 
the tubing with small screws, in line at 33^, 5J^ 
and 83^ turns, also counting from the rear. A 
piece of 3i-inch brass rod, with the point rounded, 
acts as a shorting bar between the clips and is 
connected to a piece of 3^-inch fiber rod with a 
shaft coupling so that it can be slid in and out 
from the front panel. A ^f e-inch copper tubing 
lead runs from the front of the coil to the rear 
coax connector, and another fuse clip is fastened 
to this lead with a short piece of tubing so that it 
always grips the shorting bar to complete the 
connection. The whole assembly can be made 
quite rigid and the fuse clips make a positive, 
self-cleaning connection. Different points can be 
scribed on the fiber rod to indicate the correct 
setting for each band. 

Heat-radiating connectors should be used on 
the grid and plate leads of the 304-TH. The grid 
by-pass condenser to ground should have prac- 
tically no leads. 

The parasitic resistors are of the Globar type, 
available from General Electric TV parts dealers. 
They are about i3'lr, inch long, ^lo inch in dia- 




meter and come two to a package. The plate circuit 
parasitic choke is 23^ turns, 3^-inch diameter 
with the resistor paralleled across it with very 
short leads. The filament circuit parasitic choke 
consists of two turns wound directly on the re- 
sistor. Both are wound with No. 12 wire. 

Tuning and Operation 

Since the filament and plate circuits are essen- 
tially in series, some differences may be expected 
in tuning as compared with an ordinary ampli- 
fier. Full excitation should not be applied without 
plate voltage on, since the rated grid dissipation 
will be exceeded and tube damage can result. 
Some way of reducing driving power, such as 
switching resistance in series with the plate sup- 
ply primary of the exciter, should be provided. 

First apply reduced excitation with plate volt- 
age off. Do not exceed about 60 ma. of grid cur- 
rent; it will peak at the resonance point of the 
input condenser. Then resonate the plate con- 
denser, which will be indicated by an increase in 
grid current. It will be noticed that some plate 
current will flow even without plate voltage, and 
a dip will be found at resonance. Now apply re- 
duced plate voltage through a series resistance, 
like a 500-watt photo-flood bulb, in the primary 
of the plate transformer. With bias reduced below 
cut-off, make the usual checks for parasitics with 
different settings of the tuning condensers. Then 
apply full voltage. Grid current will probably dis- 
appear, so increase excitation and make addi- 
tional adjustments for maximum grid and mini- 
mum plate current. Loading can be controlled 
with the variable loading condensers. Keep an 
eye on the plate current drawn by the driver 
stage while making adjustments in the final, as 
coupling may have to be reduced to keep the 
driver tube from exceeding its ratings. Bias may 
be reduced to near cut-off for c.w. in order to 
obtain at least 40 grid milliamperes at a kilowatt 
input; however, the more bias the better the plate 
efficiency. With practice, the stage may be moved 
around the band very quickly; the filament cir- 
cuit tuning is fairly broad and requires only 
occasional adjustment. 

For Class B linear amplification of an a.m. 
signal, maximum input is 500 watts. Reduce the 
drive to about 25 watts or until no grid current 
flows without modulation. With modulation it 
should rise to about 20 ma. in peaks with bias 

{Continued on page 126) 



The shorting rod for band 
changing runs along the side 
of the tank coil, making con- 
tact with fuse clips fastened 
to the proper turns on the coil. 



QST for 



General Techniques of 10-Meter Mobile 
Noise Reduction 

Waveiraps as Ignition Suppressors 

BY TALMADGE R. ENGLAND,* W4MJJ 



• In this article, W4MJJ discusses the 
use of tuned wavetraps in suppressing 
electrical noise in lO-meter mobile in- 
stallations. 



MOBILE OPERATION of amateur stations is 
ever becoming more popular, and espe- 
cially will this be true if ten meters finally 
does open wide next year (it's always next year!). 
What follows is intended to give the would-be 
mobileer a fundamental insight into the cause of 
the biggest headache of mobile operation — noise. 
Compared to the elimination of noise, especially 
in the ten-meter band, the actual installation of 
the equipment is comparatively easy. 

Now every ham knows that whenever a spark 
occurs some r.f. noise is generated. In fact, it 
is not at all necessary that there be a spark 
— merely a surge of current. The current surge 
induces transients in the associated wiring or, 
what amounts to the same thing, it "shock"- 
excites the inductance and capacitance of the 
wiring into a damped oscillation. Due to the 
random distribution of these two parameters, the 
oscillations occur at many frequencies. It is 
probably unnecessary to point out that the 
car's ignition system is the biggest noise producer, 
with the generator and regulator trailing. In- 
deed, if ten-meter operation is contemplated, you 
had best decide that complete elimination is 
impossible, and purchase or build a good noise 
limiter at the outset. However, the limiter, used 
in conjunction with standard methods of sup- 
pressing noise in its various and sundrj^ spots, 
and traps in the ignition system (to be described), 
will reduce the interference to a most tolerable 
level. 

While standard methods of noise suppression 
are aptly detailed in late editions of The Radio 
Amateur's Handbook and will not be repeated 
here, it will be interesting to enumerate the 
basic methods in a general manner. By keeping 
in mind the simple idea of what transients are 
and how they arise, the following seven methods 
of reducing or eliminating them are evidently 
fundamental: (1) elimination of L and /or C; 
evidently, no oscillatory transients would then 
be possible — but neither is the method. (2) 
Elimination of the spark. This is not so impos- 
sible as it sounds, for that is precisely what we 
do when graphite grease is used in the wheel 

* % WMIK, P. O. Box 698, Middlesboro, Ky. 



bearings to eliminate wheel static. (3) Damping 
the oscillation. This is the usual method of reduc- 
ing ignition interference; i.e., by installing re- 
sistors in the wiring. Unfortunately, this method 
is not applicable to other parts of the electrical 
system. (It is interesting that from a theoretical 
viewpoint there is a critical value of damping 
resistance beyond which no oscillatory transients 
are produced, but the value is too large to be of 
practical use.) (4) Shielding of wiring. (5) Ground- 
ing of such possible radiating elements as the 
tail pipe. (6) Bj'-passing of the various electrical 




A trap installed at a spark plug in W 1 M.T.T's car. 

components of the car, such as dome light, gas 
gauge, etc. It should be kept in mind that a 
car's electrical system, being of low voltage, 
is a low-impedance system. By-passing is, there- 
fore, not so effective as might be e.xpected. (7) 
Rejection by the use of tuned traps or chokes. ^ 

The last method has been too much neglected. 
Although some amateurs do use tuned traps in 
the generator lead, no one seems to have tried 
them in the ignition wiring. The author installed 
traps on each plug, and inserted similar traps 
in the main tower of the distributor, and at the 
generator and the regulator. The generator and 
regulator traps practically eliminate noise from 
these two sources, whereas by-passing will not. 
Noise rejection in the ignition system is at least 
as good as that obtained with resistor suppressors. 
But where ignition interference is concerned, the 

{Continued on page 1S8) 



January 1955 



37 



Using the 6524 Dual Tetrode on 432 Mc. 

A Tripler- Amplifier To Follow Your Present 2-Meter Rig 

BY EDWARD P. TILTON, WIHDQ 



THE fellow who wanted to put more than 
a couple of watts on 420 Mc. had little in 
the w^ay of tube choice until recently. There 
were only a few^ transmitting tubes on the market 
that would do the job, and prices for these 
began at around $25.00 each. Introduction of 
the Type 6524 dual tetrode recently' by RCA 
should help to promote more use of the 420-Mc. 
band, as this new tube can be bought for con- 
siderably less than anything we've had available 
previously. 

Designed especially for u.h.f. mobile service, 
the 6524 is a natural for use in 420-Mc. amateur 
work. Operating from a plate supply of 300 



Tripler-amplifier for 432 
Mc. Note that complete 
shielding and forced-air cool- 
ing are employed. 



to 375 volts, one 6524 as a tripler will drive 
another as a straight-through amplifier. Output 
from the tripler stage can be as much as 8.5 
watts, and the amplifier will deliver up to 20 
watts. These ratings are for 470 Mc, so some 
leeway is left for the amateur in getting efficient 
operation at the third multiple of his 2-meter 
frequency. 

The transmitter sliown here is a modernized 
version of the dual tetrode rig that has appeared 
in the Handbook for some years. It can be driven 
with a 2E26 amplifier on 144 Mc. readily, as 
the driver power output need be no more than 
4 to watts at 144 Mc. Output on 432 Mc, 
under plate-modulation conditions, is a good 
12 watts; enough to make quite a respectable 
signal. On f.m. or cw\, it can be boosted to the 
20-watt ICAS operating conditions. 

Construction 

It will be noted that provision is made for 
enclosing the tubes and tank circuits completely. 
The enclosure serves two purposes: it provides 
a path for circulation of cooling air, and holds 
down radiation from the tank circuits. The 
latter consideration is important in getting 

' •• World Above .JO Mc," QST. October, 1951, p. 13G. 



power into the transmission line, and of course 
the shielding is an aid to TVI prevention. 

The main chassis is fitted with a bottom cover. 
Air from the fan mounted on the rear wall is 
circulated up around the tripler tube, at the 
left, and through J^-inch holes below the ampli- 
fier tube. Holes in the top cover are the only 
means for this air to escape, and thus the cooling 
flow is concentrated where it will do the most 
good. The number of holes in the top cover, 
and in the chassis under the amplifier tube, 
can be varied until an equal flow of air appears 
to be coming through the two top sets of holes. 
This can be checked readily by noting how 




briskly a sheet of paper rises from either set 
of holes when the fan is started. This check 
should, of course, be made with the bottom 
plate in place. 

The fan shown provides a flow of 17 cubic 
feet per minute, more than adequate for the 
job, so no great care was taken to stop small 
air leaks. Where a smaller fan is used, all air 
holes should be plugged. Small holes and cracks 
can be sealed with household cement, and the 
meter jacks should be plugged in this case. 

The tripler tube is mounted vertically, at 
the left, with its socket 13^ inches below 
the chassis. There is just room under the socket 
for the self-resonant input circuit, L2. The 
amplifier tube is horizontal, with its socket 
mounted in back of a plate that is 8 inches 
from the left edge of the 3 X 4 X 17-inch 
aluminum chassis. The shielding enclosure is 
3}/4 inches wide by 3}^ inches high 

Half-wave lines are used in all 432-Mc. 
circuits. The grid circuit of the amplifier is capa- 
citively coupled to the tripler plate line, the two 
overlapping about Ij^ inches. The spacing 
between them must be adjusted carefully for 
maximum grid drive. Plate voltage is fed to 
the lines through small resistors. These should 



38 



QST for 



AMPLIFIER 

6524J 




Fig. 1 — Schematic diagram and parts information 
for the 432-Me. tripler-ampHfier. 
Ci, C2 — 10-/i/if.-per-section split stator, double spaced 

(Bud LC-1664). Do not use metal end-plate 

or grounded-rotor tvpes. 
Ki, R2 — 23,500 ohms, 2 watts (two 47,000-ohm 

l-watt resistors in parallel). 
Li — 2 turns No. 20 enam., 3'^-inch diam. Insert 

between turns of Z,2. 
L2 — 4 turns No. 16 enam., 32-'nch diam., ^o inch 

long, center-tapped. 
L3 — Copper strap on heat-dissipating connectors, 

3J^ inches long. Twist 90 degrees l^ inch 

from plate end. Space % inch. 

be connected at the point of lowest r.f. voltage 
on the lines. The amplifier grid r.f. chokes are 
connected at the tube socket. 

Some interesting "bugs" were encountered 
in the development of this layout. A haj^vire test 
set-up was made to check the operation of the 
new tubes. They worked fine, so a "final" form 
was evolved as shown, e.xcept for the variable 
capacitors used for tuning the plate lines. At 
first we used a split^stator unit equipped with 
metal end-plates that grounded the rotors. 
With these the tripler gave more output on 
the second harmonic than on the third. When 
the rotor was ungrounded there was a consid- 
erable improvement. As this particular capacitor 
could not be mounted conveniently without 
grounding the rotor, we next tried the capacitors 

2 Tilton and Southworth, "A Step-by-Step Station for 
the V.H.F. Man," QST, October, 1954, p. 16. 



L4 — Copper strap 2J^ inches long, soldered to grid 
terminals. Space about }^ inch. 

L5 — Copper strap Z'yg inches long, fastened to heat- 
dissipating connectors. Space ^ inch. All 
tank circuits of flashing copper )/2 inch wide. 

Le — Coupling loop. No. 20 enam., U-shaped portion 
is 1 inch long and ^ inch wide. Mount on 
3-inch ceramic stand-offs. 

Ji — Coaxial input fitting (Amphenol 83-lR). 

J2 — Crystal socket used for antenna terminal. 

J3, J4 — Closed-circuit jack. 

Js — 5-pin male chassis connector (Amphenol 86-RCP5). 

M — Motor-blower assembly, 17 c.f.m. (Ripley Inc., 
Middletown, Conn., Type 8433). 

specified. These have metal mounting brackets, 
but they are not connected electrically to the 
rotor shaft. Even with these units, using the 
metal brackets grounded to the chassis threw 
the tank circuits out of balance, so it was nec- 
essary to mount the capacitors up on edge, 
on polystyrene plates. With this arrangement 
there was practically no second harmonic in 
evidence in the tripler tank circuit, and both 
it and the amplifier circuit tuned normally 
and showed good efficiencj'. 

Testing 

The tripler-amplifier is designed to operate in 
conjunction with a 144-Mc. transmitter such 
as the 2E26 rig shown in October QSTr A plate 
supply of 300 volts at 200 ma. is needed. Apply 
power to the 144-Mc. driver stage and adjust 
the spacing of the turns in Lo and the degree of 



Interior view, showing the 
6524 dual tetrodes and their 
half-wave line tank circuits. 




January 1955 



39 




Bottom view of the tripler- 
amplifier, with plate removed. 
The tripler tube socket is at the 
right. 



coupling between Li and L2 for maximum tripler 
grid current. This should be about 3 ma. 

Ne.xt apply plate and screen voltage to the 
tripler and tune Ci for ma.ximum grid current 
in the amplifier, with no plate or screen voltage 
to the latter. Adjust the position of the grid 
lines with respect to the plate circuit, readjusting 
Ci whenever a change is made, until at least 
4 ma. grid current is obtained. 

Now connect a lamp load across the output 
terminal, J2. Ordinary house lamps are not 
suitable. A fair load can be made by connecting 
6 or more blue-bead pilot lamps in parallel. 
This can be done by wrapping a 3€-inch copper 
strap around the brass bases and soldering them 
all together. Then another strap should be 
soldered to the lead terminals. Apply plate and 
screen voltage and tune C2 for maximum lamp 
brilliance. It should be possible to develop a 
very bright glow in the 6-lamp load with a 
plate current of about 100 ma. at 300 volts. 

Cut drive very briefly to check for oscillation 
in the final stage. Grid current should drop to 
zero. The rig is then ready for use. The screen 
and grid resistors shown are for operation with 
plate modulation. Somewhat more output 
and input can be run if the screen or grid resist- 
ance is decreased slightly, but this should be 
done only when the rig is to be used for f.m. or 
c.w. service. 

Operating conditions are about as follows: 
tripler grid current — 2 to 3 ma.; amplifier 
grid current — 3 to 4 ma. ; tripler plate and 
screen current — 90 ma. ; amplifier plate and 
screen current — 110 ma.; output — 12 watts. 

In choosing the operating frequency it is 
well to bear in mind that nearly all work being 
done in the 420-Mc. band involves tripling 
from commonly-used frequencies in the 2-meter 
band. By mutual agreement, to make it a rela- 
tively simple matter for stations using narrow- 
band techniques to find one another, stabilized 
transmitters are kept between 432 and 436 Mc. 

This tripler-amplifier was built around the 
6524 tetrodes, but the same general construction 
can be used with other dual tetrodes such as 
the 6252 and 5894A by Amperex and the 832A. 
With the 6252, operating conditions will be 
quite similar to those given above. With the 
5894A (9903), up to 40 watts output can be 



obtained on c.w. or f.m., and 25 to 30 watts 
with plate modulation. The 832A will dehver 
only about 5 watts. The pin connections given 
in the schematic diagram are for the 6524. 



WWV-WWVH SCHEDULES 

Tj^OR the benefit of amateurs and other interested 
-T groups, the National Bureau of Standards 
maintains a service of technical radio broadcasts 
over WWV, Beltsville, Md., and WWVH, Maui, 
Territory of Hawaii. 

The services from WWV include (1) standard 
radio frequencies of 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 Mc, 
(2) time announcements at 5-minute intervals by 
voice and International Morse code, (3) standard 
time intervals of 1 second, and 1, 4 and 5 minutes, 
(4) standard audio frequencies of 440 cycles (the 
standard musical pitch A above middle C) and 
600 cycles, (5) radio propagation disturbance 
warnings by International Morse code consisting 
of the letters W, U or N, together with digits 
from 1 through 9, indicating present North 
Atlantic path conditions and conditions to be 
anticipated. (See Measurements chapter of recent 
Handbooks for details on forecast symbols.) 

The audio frequencies are interrupted at pre- 
cisely one minute before the hour and are re- 
sumed precisely on the hour and each five minutes 
therefater. Code announcements are in GMT us- 
ing the 24-hour system beginning with 0000 at 
midnight; voice announcements are in EST. The 
audio frequencies are transmitted alternately: 
The 600-cycle tone starts precisely on the hour 
and every 10 minutes thereafter, continuing for 4 
minutes; the 440-cycle tone starts precisely five 
minutes after the hour and every 10 minutes 
thereafter, continuing for 4 minutes. Each carrier 
is modulated by a seconds pulse, heard as a faint 
clock-like tick; the pulse at the beginning of the 
last second of each minute is omitted. 



VE2QQ should be ready for the Commandos 
after his recent experience in "hitting the 
beaches." Within an hour, he raised K2EP, Long 
Beach, N. Y., W4BT0, Palm Beach, Fla., and 
W6MPY, Long Beach, Cal., all on 40-meter c.w. 



40 



QST for 



Results -1954 W/VE Contest 



Gordy Webster, VE2BB, contest chairman of 
the Montreal Amateur Radio Club, sponsors of 
the W/VE Contest of last September 25th and 
26th, announces final results of the activity. 
Leading Canadian score was that of Russ Wilson, 
VE6VK, who posted 37,725 points by working 
252 stations in 50 sections. Across the border, 
W9PZT led all U.S.A. entrants with 17,853 points. 
In the tabulation below, the first-listed station 
in each ARRL section is a certificate winner. 
The figure following each call indicates the final 
score. 



N.Y.C.-L.I. 

W2BVN 5375 

W2LGG 4977 

K2GHS 448 

K2CMV 448 

A'^. New Jersey 

W2EQS 14,974 

W2LYO 13,822 

W2AQT 5802 

K2EUN 3185 

K2AFQ 2304 

W2CVW 2176 

K2EGZ 1962 

K2GAS 1706 

W2MPP 1493 

W2BBK 768 

K2EPP 320 

Iowa 

W0NPF 8684 

W0VFM 6314 

Kansas 

W0GAX 3839 

Missouri 

W0GBJ 7295 

W0PXX 576 

Connecticut 

WIODW 9726 

WIJTD 5460 

WINLM 213 

Maine 

WIVEH 1344 

E. Massachusetts 

WILQQ 2730 

W5TPZ/1 1194 

W. Massachusetts 

WIYXV 3882 

WIZUU 3271 

WISYH 2616 

New Hampshire 

WIARR 3982 

WIQGU 2474 

Idaho 

WN7VWS 1024 

Montana 

W7FUB 768 

Oregon 

W7UGQ 2730 

Washington 

W7SRX 299 

Santa Clara Valley 

K6CLM 1642 

San Francisco 

W6DWJ 768 

San Joaquin Valley 

W6EUH 21 

North Carolina 

W4RXI 22 

Virginia 

W4BZE 8447 

W4APM 8361 

W4IA 6655 

W4TFX 5887 

W4JUJ 2986 

Utah 

W7QDJ 4095 

W7SOJ 554 

Wyoming 

W7UFB 2688 

Alabama 

W4WOG 2816 

E. Florida 

W4VRS 5972 

Georgia 

W4BEY 1546 

W4ZSC 43 

Los Angeles 

W6AM 577 

Arizona 
W7RZQ 1920 



San Diego 
W6WSS 1067 

A'^. Texas 

W5BJA 10,369 

W5CAY 1408 

W5VNW 896 

W5ZWR 725 

Oklahoma 

W5CFC 2560 

New Mexico 

W5VRP 9471 

W5KF 21 

Maritime 

VEIVB 18.690 

VEIAEE 15,252 

V06N* 14,766 

VEIZZ 14,706 

VEIEK 11,672 

V06U 11.571 

VEIDB 7087 

W4KVM/V06 3770 

VEICU 3380 

VEIOM 2640 

VEIWL 2436 

Quebec 

W2SVF/VE2 18.950 

VE2ATD 15,698 

VE2PZ 4623 

VE2BB 2736 

VE2AM 1140 

VE3DPG/3 464 

VE2RL 315 

Ontario 

VE3DRD 26,492 

VE3BBM 23,868 

VE3ACB 15,162 

VE3DSQ 14,580 

VE3AJR 14,184 

VE3BHS 13,720 

VE3ATR 12,768 

VE3BXF 11,400 

VE3AXL 9272 

VE3BUR 8581 

VE3DTN 6028 

VE3TM 4004 

VE3BHW 4000 

VE3DU 3762 

VE3BNQ 3402 

VE3YV 2000 

VE3AVS 1900 

Manitoba 

VE4HS 966 

VE4MT 693 

Saskatcfiewan 

VE5DA 4356 

VE5DZ 3472 

VE5AJ 1232 

VE5RU 1173 

Alberta 

VE6VK 37,725 

VE6ZR 6783 

VE60S 2190 

British Columbia 

VE7ALE 21,836 

VE7QQ 5887 

Yukon/N.W.T. 
VE8YT 9180 

E. Pennsylvania 

W3ADE 1564 

W3EAN 1024 

Md.-Del.-D. C. 

W3AYS 16,381 

W3HTK 8543 

W3HVM 7242 

W3KLA 5077 

W3VD 2389 

W3FY 1216 

S. New Jersey 

K2CPR 9599 

W2ILN 6196 

W2GND 5631 



W. New Yort 

W2SCC 12,478 

W2RJJ 2645 

K2DXV 1600 

K2BRF 1408 

W2QBB 512 

W. Pennsylvania 

W3KQD 3733 

W3 VKD 2304 

Illinois 

W9PZT 17,853 

W9WJV 3285 

W9WIO 2958 

W9ASK 2176 

W9UXN 1742 

W9CNF 363 

Indiana 

W9UWU 8020 

W9UKG 7103 

W9SWR 5119 

W9FGX 2816 

W9POB 2752 

W9FYM 2503 

W9UTL 1877 



Wisconsin 

W9GWK 15,741 

W9RKP 12,542 

W9UDK 10,174 

W9AEM 8063 

W9VBZ 4778 

W9DIK 4255 

W9HDH 1344 

W9YOS 270 

Tennessee 
W4VNE 8191 

Kentucky 

W4KVX 12,115 

W4YOL 1365 

Michigan 

W8KPL 6371 

W8MSK 2688 

Ohio 

W8AJW 16,509 

W8AQ 7679 

W8CPQ 6826 

W8MQQ 5247 

W8QHW 4607 

W8RO 4191 

W8PCS 1194 

W80WZ 1280 

W8KMF 398 



* Labrador certificate winner. 



NEW BOOKS 



Obtaining and Interpreting Test Scope 
Traces, by John F. Rider. Published by John F. 
Rider Publisher, Inc., New York. 186 pages, 5}4 
by S}/2, paper cover. Price, $2.40. 

Covers composition of waveforms of various types fre- 
quently encountered in practical work, how to adjust the 
oscilloscope for proper operation, and how to interpret what 
the 'scope shows. Particular attention is paid to pattern 
faults such as are caused by hum, distortion, and similar 
spurious effects. Chapters on Lissajous figures and various 
kinds of test set-ups are included. 



How To Use Test Probes, by Alfred A. Ghir- 
ardi and Robert G. Middleton. PubUshed by 
John F. Rider PubUsher, Inc., New York. 172 
pages, 53/^ by 8K, paper cover. Price, $2.90. 

Operating characteristics, design considerations, and use 
of probes designed to work in conjunction with vacuum- tube 
voltmeters and oscilloscopes. The probes covered range 
from high-voltage d.c. and a.c. types through rectifying and 
demodulator types for low and high frequencies. 

How To Service Tape Recorders, by C. A. 

Tuthill. Published by John F. Rider Pubhsher, 
Inc., 480 Canal St., New York 13, N. Y. Pub. 
No. 167. 154 pages, including index, 5H by 8H, 
paper cover. Price, $2.90. 

Principles of recording on magnetic tape, with both 
general and specific operating and servicing data on current ^ 
commercial equipment. 

Technician's Guide to TV Picture Tubes, by 

Ira Remer. PubUshed by John F. Rider Publisher, 
Inc., 480 Canal St., New York 13, N. Y. 160 pages, 
including inde.x, 53^2 by 8^ inches, paper cover. 
Price, $2.40. 

Describes the construction, operating principles and 
electrical characteristics of picture tubes, including pro- 
jection and color. Accessories such as yokes, focus coils and 
ion traps are covered, with adjustment and repair data for 
the service technician. 



January 1955 



41 



Three Stormy Sisters 

Part I — Carol and Edna 



BY GEORGE HART, WINJM 



• So many reports were received on 
amateur emergency activities during 
the three hurricanes that it became im- 
possible to tell a complete story in alloM'- 
able QST space for a single issue. We'll 
tell you about Hazel in a future QST. 



TROPICAL HURRICANES are fickle and unpre- 
dictable things. Perhaps that's why they 
are given women's names. Not since 1944 
has the Northeast received a visitation from a 
tropical storm, but this year, one decade later, 
as if to make up for past omissions, three scream- 
ing hurricanes, spawned in the Caribbean, made 
their destructive way up the Atlantic Coast. 
First Carol curved in out of the Atlantic, brushed 
Hatteras, howled up the Western Atlantic to 
hit the end of Long Island and deliver a smashing 
blow to Connecticut, Rhode Island and Eastern 
Massachusetts as she failed to curve out to sea 
as expected. Two weeks later Edna started 
north, maintaining a more easterly course and 
wreaking most of her havoc on Nantucket, 
Cape Cod, the Maine coast and the Canadian 
Maritime Provinces. 

But Old Dame Nature was not yet through 
with her shenanigans. Early in October she 
whomped up a hurricane to end all hurricanes, 
and this one she named Hazel. Again coming 
up out of the Caribbean, Hazel struck inland as 
far south as Myrtle Beach, S.C. Through North 
Carohna, Virginia and Maryland she screamed 
in full fury. In the mountains of Central Pennsyl- 
vania she lost some of her force, onlj^ to gather 
herself for one last blow at the Toronto area 
before she dispersed. 

Each of these stormy sisters wept millions 
of gallons of rain, tore down telephone and 
electric lines in witch-like fury, washed out roads, 
tore off roofs and smashed houses as though 
they were made of paper, and sent high tides 
with enormous waves smashing against beach 
resorts. In all areas, radio amateurs were called 
upon to provide emergency communication. 
Many of them have written Headquarters to tell 
us about it, and we intend to chronicle them here. 
Many more have never let us know what they 
did. This account is written on the basis of reports 
received. 

Carol 

The Nassau County, L. I., AREC was alerted 
by the Red Cross at 1210 on August 31st, and 
\V2KFV was put into operation on 10 and 2 
meters. Mobiles were dispatched to East Rock- 
away, Long Beach, Atlantic Beach, Point Look- 



out, Island Park, Oceanside, Freeport, Baldwin, 
Jones Beach, Gilgo Beach, Bellmore, Wantagh 
and Seaford on the south shore, and Manor 
Haven, Port Washington, Sea Cliff and Bayville 
on the north shore. A portable 2-meter station 
was set up at Red Cross headquarters in Mineola. 
The County c.d. station was activated on 10 
and 2 meters with a link to Red Cross head- 
quarters, from which contact with mobiles was 
maintained. W2KFV operated from Red Cross 
headquarters, with W2QBR relieving, and at 
c.d. headquarters W2JKX operated on 10 and 
W2KEB on 2, assisted by K2EQH. 

Contents of messages were such as reports 
of bridges out, trees down across highways, 
electric wires down, roads washed out and 
fire reports. The two-meter station at Red Cross 
was secured at 2135 after a message of commenda- 
tion had been read from the disaster chairman. 
Mobiles in operation were W2s GCK GPQ KCW 
LLR VQI YIL and K2EWB. Mobiles standing 
by were W2s DBI DUS KRP OME, K2s AXF 
and CCM. W2LBJ was in use as a fixed station. 
Other stations checked in and standing by were 
W£s ANN AZA KNA NRL QFH TUK UGF 
ZAI, K2s BGO BJG CNN and EAF. K2DHC 
was the call used at Nassau County c.d. head- 
quarters. 

At 1000 EDST on the morning of August 31st, 
WlVXL, the station of the Cranston Radio 
Association located at the Red Cross building, 
was put on the air by WIOGY as winds reached 
hurricane velocity in that area. Mobiles WIBTV, 
WILZY and WlYKQ called in shortly after- 
ward, en route to the club. When power failed, 
WIOGY assumed NCS duties from his mobile 
until WlVXL switched over to emergency 
power. By 1230 the Cranston Civil Emergency 
Net was in full operation with WlPOP operating 
WlVXL and sLx mobile units out patroling or 
standing by. A link on both 10 and 2 meters was 
established with WlAFO/1 at Cranston Police 
Headquarters. Other mobiles were Wis ZBZ 
and YRY. Others standing by were Wis JYF 
OOX RUS WUH ZPG and WNls BQB and 
YVW. 

In the late afternoon, WlWSY, at state civil 
defense headquarters in Scituate and other 
RACES stations were activated on 2 meters 
with WIWKO coordinating information for 
this net from the governor's office. WlVXL 
and WlAFO/1 also established links with 
WlWSY and WlWKO. Operation was termi- 
nated about midnight. Accomplishments: many 
messages handled for the mayor and Cranston 
police; several trips to accompany Red Cross 
vehicles; handled Red Cross and other emergency 
traffic; picked up l)lood plasma, delivered it as 



42 



QST for 



This chart shows the ap- 
proximate paths taken by the 
three hurricanes. In terms of 
damage, Carol exceeded 
Edna, but Edna was the 
larger in size. Hazel was the 
largest of all in both cate- 
gories, and we'll tell you more 
about her in the next install- 
ment. 



ONT, 



directed. After the NCS had 
secured, Wis YKQ, LZY and 
YIlY traveled in convoy 
headed by the state c.d. di- 
rector to the southern part 
of the state to attempt a 
survey of damage and leave 
a portable generator at the 
Narragansett fire station to 
aid in setting up radio com- 
munication. 

Amateurs in Hingham, 
Mass., under direction of EC 
WlMD, conducted fire pa- 
trol, since most of the city's 
telephones and fire-alarm cir- 
cuits were out. The following 
amateurs participated in this 
activity: Wis AYG BIY 
DMS MD NMK SXN and W5HNW. 

In the New Bedford area, WlAVY/1 was 
activated on 75 meters and WlWKM on ten. 
The following operators were on watch at these 
stations: Wis AEN* AGG* AVY* AWH* BMQ* 
CTZ* HPH* LAZ* MHN OH* TZU* UID 
WU* WGN* and ZPE*. Those marked with 
an asterisk also operated mobile rigs when not 
on duty from one of the control stations. A total 
of 538 messages was handled to and from the 
area. New Bedford nets also tied into Fair- 
haven on ten meters, where about 15 mobiles 
were cooperating with local pohce and mili- 
tary. 

The Cape Cod-Islands Emergencj^ Net on 
3912 did a very fine job restricting traffic for 
Cape and Islands. Other nets active were the 
Deep Sea Dragnet on 3970, Transcontinental 
'Phone Net on 3970 and the Early Bird Net on 
3845. 

In Worcester, the RACES net was activated 
within a matter of minutes by Radio Officer and 




EC WlSPF. ^lost of the damage suffered was 
from rain, although power was off over most 
of the city. Emergency power was supplied for 
c.d. headquarters by the ROTC at Worcester 
Tech. WlSPF reports 28 amateur radio operators 
on duty, plus four girls with restricted operator 
permits and 14 more waiting in reserve. The 
following are particularly to be commended for 
their work: WlNZD/m, who was the first to 
report; WlAET, who took net control; WlSPG 
for his fine work in relaying; and WIQCQ, who^ 
took over at WlYEW net control. Other ama- 
teurs participating in the order in which they 
made their appearance: Wis VDT LIB/m TJO 
ONA/m SDU NZD/m UQL/m VLN/m AJV 
NNI/m UQW/m ZJW/m CS YPG RIL ZTL 
VPE/m SPG/m VGH CLU/m AAP/m JWM/m 
and \^^K. 

In Norfolk (Mass., that is), emergency opera- 
tion was complicated by a prison break from the 
Norfolk Prison Colony. The hurricane hit its peak 
here at about 1500, August 31st, and took out all 



January 1955 



43 



means of communication other than radio. A gaso- 
line-driven generating plant was set up at the fire 
station and the amateurs alerted. Wis WMN 
VQN BFV MJO and MGL responded, and MJO 
was dispatched to the state prison colonj^ Wis 
MNW, VQN and BFV were assigned to street 
patrol. At 2245 a report from the prison colony 
indicated two prisoners had escaped and were on 
the loose. This necessitated the setting up of road 
blocks and an even greater need for communica- 
tions. The Norfolk gang were on duty for 48 hours 
without any sleep. EC WICLF reports that the 
prison colony superintendent and the Norfolk 
police chief were high in their praise of the work 
done by the amateurs. 

Carol's full force hit Haverhill about noon on 
August 31st, by which time telephone service was 
already partially disrupted. At 1245 WISIX was 
set up at police headquarters and made contact 
with WlCCF/1 at c.d. headquarters, WIFW 
operating, and also with WlCCF/mobile in 
downtown Haverhill. By 1330 mobiles included 
Wis SNZ QYR QZS QQD NAG UHH and 
WNIZUB, all cruising the city to report fallen 
trees and wires down. Wis WXE RYV WTK and 
WNIAFM came on later, all on a spot frequency 
of 147 Mc. With almost every road out of the city 
blocked by fallen trees and live wires, all mobiles 
had plenty to do. Fire-alarm and police signal 
systems were also out. The stations went off the 
air 0800 September 1st. Later, a fire patrol was 
set up tying various fire stations together and 
tying West Newbury, Mass., in with the Haver- 
hill system. This set-up was in operation until 
September 15th. 

The hams in Braintree became active starting 
at 1100 on August 31st, when WlVTH decided to 
activate WITYN, the civil defense station. 
Thirty-three stations reported in, of which 22 
were mobiles. At WlTYN, WlVTH was joined 
by WlVMU. As damage reports poured in, mo- 
biles were dispatched to various locations, often 
accompanied by a policeman, to try to keep 
everything under control. Emergency power was 
necessary at 1206, and WlTYN was off the air 
until 1225. WlJOB relieved WlVTH and WlVMU 
at 1845, but VTH was back on the air from his 
mobile after a short rest and some chow. Also 
operating at WlTYN were WlQPH and WlOSX 
(Braintree c.d. Comms. Officer), and the station 
was on the air until 2250. Other amateurs partici- 
pating in this area: Wis I A AUU EKG FQK JQA 
KJD KPX MPT OFO OKE RES RGS ROB 
SMC TQQ UYK VBB VPR WFQ WNT WSN 
YMV YYZ YZG YZP ZPI ZWQ. 

In Framingham, WIMEG reports six mobile 
units in action: Wis WMT LPM RVA MEG 
WPW and QQW. In Lynn, EC WlJLN reports 
some of their mobiles went to Saugus and were re- 
ceived heartily. They helped patrol the town. 

The situation was such in Arlington by 1030 
that the town manager ordered the c.d. hams, the 
auxiUary police and the auxiliary firemen alerted. 
WlLXR and WITHO were the first alerted, and 
moved to activate the control station at the civil- 
defense director's office. WlWBX acted as net 



control operator while WlLXR and WlTHO be- 
gan a mobile patrol of the town. WILLY and 
WlCTW entered the mobile net during the after- 
noon. Meanwhile, the six-meter net went into 
operation jointly with the auxiliary police, look- 
ing for live wires on the ground. Mobiles were 
Wis BAQ CTW FWQ LLY LXR NBI THO 
VCZ and WYC. WlWBX and WIWYC alter- 
nated as control-station operators, and WlWBZ 
helped maintain equipment. 

At the peak of the storm in Dedham, EC WISH 
requested WlLYL to report to the police station 
to assist in getting the town's poHce transmitter 
back on the air, since power was off. WlLYL ran 
200 feet of power cable from the basement to the 
transmitter on the top floor. The c.d. units were 
then able to operate on 10 and 2 meters. Return- 
ing to his home, LYL had to restore his own 
equipment to operating condition, to go into 
operation on 75 meters for ten consecutive hours. 
A big day's work for LYL. 

In Winthrop, WlTTH and WNIBOX were 
fii-st to recognize the seriousness of the situation 
and report to the control center. By 1030 the 
emergency generator was functioning. WlCMW 
also activated himself, and very shortly there 
were 10 stations on the air. Other self-activated 
stations were Wis VIS, UOC, and HFJ. Shortly 
after 1030 the power went off, and the emergency 
generator was put on the line to supply the entire 
building, including police radio control equip- 
ment, the state warning and emergency civil- 
defense equipment, fights, etc. WlTTH did most 
of the operating from the control center. The six- 
meter net was also activated and contact was 
maintained with Sector 4 headquarters in Newton 
throughout the emergency. The XYLs helped out 
as operators during the hurricane and deserve a 
lot of credit. Both in dayUght and at night, mo- 
bile units were used extensively, moving from 
place to place with reports of conditions, cooper- 
ating with police and fire units. Operators in 
this work were Wis UOC TTH HFJ BB and 
WNIBOX, with WIBDU at the control sta- 
tion. WlDJ manned the Cottage Hill unit and 
WlGGP made himself available at the hospital 
unit. 

In Bedford, WlRSY was on the air within 
minutes after Carol was reported, and was joined 
by WlBFV, who was assigned to the Veterans 
Hospital, and by WlACE/m who went to Has- 
comb Air Force Base. WlVCX was on stand-by 
from Maynard until his own area was alerted. 
When WlRSY lost both his tower and power, he 
got on from his mobile rig. C.d. headquarters was 
activated by Wl YFP, and later joined by mobiles 
Wis VGC EIQ WAE and WME. Wis NAD and 
NDI drove to Acton to assist WlTRD who was 
operating alone there. Activity continued from 
0900 August 31st to 0600 September 1st. Wis 
TCG UHV YEP and ZSG were also active. 

Edna 

After the unorthodox behavior of Carol, Edna 
was tracked very carefully, both by the Weather 
Bureau and several amateur general-coverage 



44 



QST for 



nets. But Edna, although larger and more fero- 
cious than her predecessor, followed a more east- 
erly course. Amateur networks were alerted and 
put to work all along the coast as Edna made her 
ponderous way northward, and indeed consider- 
able damage was done in many coastal areas. 
This rampant female finally spent the last of her 
fury in the Canadian Maritime Provinces. 

The Transcontinental Relaj' Xet, operating on 
7042 kc, and a special Hurricane Xet set up on 
3910 principally through the efforts of WlSS, 
followed the course of Edna very closely, relying 
principally on reports from amateurs in her waj'. 
TCRN was on the alert as soon as Edna was 
born, watching her closeh' as she moved north- 
eastward at first slowly, then with gradually in- 
creasing speed, stajdng a hundred miles or so off 
the East Coast. W4ATA was the principal source 
of information at first, and he gave the net sev- 
eral advisories until September 9th, when Edna 
started moving toward the Carolina coast; then 
W4LM of Charleston reported in to help, and 
later W4PHJ helped supph' weather information. 
As Edna moved northward, TCRN not onh' kept 
track of her closely, but got stations all over the 
nation into the network to handle possible hurri- 
cane traffic. At 1215 EST W2B0 reported that 
the hurricane was e.xpected to miss most of Xew 
England, brush the tip of Cape Cod and pass out 
to sea from that point. .\s the storm went past the 
New England coast, WlLHA and WlDTB gave 
frequent reports, the latter indicating that the 
worst was over at 1900 EST. The following were 
logged by W3CVE as having participated: ]Vls 
ARR FEQ DTB OXX PJF YEJ LHA, W2s BO 
IH JOA, K2s AEQ BJS, W3WV, W4s PL ATA 
TKR LM VHH UWE TYU PHJ WXL/4, Wos 
NRC GWT/4 RX ALZ CDP \V6SWP W7CCL, 
W8s IZQ FUM DXC JWG, W9s SG GGG JUJ 
DUA UXJ SWM, W0S KA XAW, KP4s UH ZW, 
KL7ATO/W9 — and W3CVE, of course. 

WlSS organized a Hurricane Xet on 3910 kc. 
during Edna. Constant reports of movement of 
the storm, wind velocity and barometric pressure 
readings all along the coast from Xew Jersey to 
Nova Scotia were made available to the Asso- 
ciated Press, the United Press and 
the International News Service, 
as well as to the general public 



and stations hstening to the frequency. Due 
to experience in participating in emergency 
nets, the coordination and cooperation of all the 
47 stations that comprised the net made for 
smooth and consistent operation. Actually, WlSS 
counted 131 stations reporting in at one time or 
another, including the following: Wis AFK AHX 
AWI AC A\^' BXW BUD BLM CXX DKS 
ERG EKX EAB EHT FZT GGV GMH GIX 
HSC IAS JWV JO.J JXI LYJ LBH LHZ LYD 
LBP L\^^ LOS MFI MBQ MAE MJD MLT 
XBP XCT XRZ OQT OKH PXR PCY PZY 
PAZ PRK QLL QU QHC QPU RYJ RXA RYX 
RMZ RGR SBP SAX SGL SAI SLW TOP TID 
TAY TFE TZL URR UDF UV UMC ULY USS 
URA VDB VXR VRM VTX VYI \'RM VRT 
WGP WKI WXM WXK WLM YQV YLG ZXE 
ZXF ZCH ZJM ZEL ZET KlWAB KlFCR. 
W2s ACO BKC BTB CRX DMK EEO GKQ 
GTE GMW HJR ILI IVI MQB XKD XXZ 
QHI TXI ZOL ZZG. K2s AX AAO ADV BFD 
BDW CBU EF EOF EOX GMV W3BHK 
W4XI K4AF, VEls AAO DW VE2DW. Special 
thanks are extended to the stations that mon- 
itored the frequency above and below the net fre- 
quency and assisted in keeping the band clear. 

The First Regional Xet of XTS was in opera- 
tion during most of the hurricane. WlTVJ 
started monitoring at 0650 EST Sept, 11th and 
officially opened the net for business at 0750. 
Eighteen stations reported in: Wis CRW/m 
USM CPV HUM RRX BY VGX LV ARR. W2s 
IVU AEE VXJ LJM JVC LPJ JOA, K2s DKM 
and BJS. WlBY took XCS during part of the day, 
while TVJ worked for his local c.d. At 1800 he 
reassumed XCS and the following additional sta- 
tions were in the net: Wis KYQ OAK OHT RRX 
\Y\ W3W\' ^'E1XB and VE3BJ^^ The Xet was 
greatly hampered by bad conditions in the eve- 
ning and W3W\' assisted in relaying. At 2300 the 
net was closed, but T\'J continued monitoring 
until 0100. .\t 0740 on Sunday he was on the job 
again, and the following additional stations were 
QXI: Wis WCC POK IMY COC YAO VRQ 
QJM, W2s KHQ IFP, K2s HTX CQP DSL GAS, 
W3s BFF OXB W4IF, VEls AEE WL. The net 



Here's the operating position 
from which \^ ISS controlled the 
Hurricane Net on 3910 kc. That's 
W ISS himself in the middle, 
while ^ lUPZ gets the Weather 
Bureau on the telephone and an 
INS reporter takes notes on the 
operation. 




January 1955 



45 



was continuous until 2142 that night. WlVVA, 
WIWCC and WlCRW spelled TVJ as NCS at 
times. Close liaison was maintained with TCPN 
and the Maritime Net, and much traffic was expe- 
dited as a result. Special mention should be made 
of the fine work done by WlBY, W2J0A, W3WV, 
WlCRW (who operated from his mobile rig 
much of the time), WlWCC and VEIXB. 




Emergency power units were mighty valuable during 
the hurricanes, and many AREC units remained on the 
air simply because they had their own, like the Win- 
throp organization. That's EC WIBB on the right, and 
WIAGB standing in the rear. 

The New York State 'Phone and Emergency 
Net was activated at 1800 Sept. 10th and con- 
tinued through to 1800 Sept. 11th with W2ILI 
as net control. Approximately 175 net members 
checked in on the net frequency of 3925 kc. In 
addition, the New York State Civil Defense 
Amateur Radio Service was activated and stand- 
ing by on 3993 kc. with 30 stations ready, and 
v.h.f. nets on 6 and 2 meters were activated with 
about 25 members. Links were maintained with 
Albany and National Red Cross in Washington, 
also with the Hurricane Net and the New England 
CD. Nets. 

Damage in Rhode Island was less from Edna 
than from Carol, but the Cranston Emergency 
Net was active from 1910 Friday evening until 
2155 Saturday at the request of the Red Cross. 
Net control station WlVXL was activated on 
29.52 Mc. and in the 144-Mc. band. Mobiles 
alerted included Wis BTV LZY YKQ OGY 
ZBZ OOX and YRY. Wis SGA QLD and VAY 
called in and stood by during the evening. Mo- 
biles were dismissed but on Saturday morning 
vvere called back into action. A fixed station was 
set up at the Red Cross evacuation center at 
Edgewood. WlVXL was operated by Wis POP 
BTV ZPG and OOX, and on two meters by 
WNIBQB and WlZGH. WIAFO was operated 
at police headquarters. WlEWT and WIQOF 
provided a link with Providence. WlTQW also 
furnished a fixed link in downtown Providence 
and monitored the band for other stations and 
traffic outside the Cranston net frequency'. At 



the height of the storm all fixed stations operated 
on emergency power, and mobiles were on patrol 
duty. Official traffic was handled for the Cranston 
Police and the Red Cross. Other R. I. amateurs 
participating in the operation were Wis RUS 
RVO SGA BBN QLD MIJ JYF and OAV. 

The amateurs in Lynn this time were able 
to do some collective good in their own city 
by setting up stations in the various firehouses. 
The frequency of 28,610 kc. was used. Mobile 
Wis WCB HRA QQL MHK OGK JZV were 
stationed at firehouses, SHV at Red Cross head- 
quarters, VRK at the Medical Center and VHF 
at Lynn Hospital. At home rigs were Wis RLO 
LMJ VUH ZQL UKE YQF TBL DDI JKF VHE 
CTD and KLC. WlPBQ/m was in contact with 
Lynnfield civil defense, MCC/m with Salem civil 
defense and WlJLN/1 net control, operated by 
JLN and MTG. 

In Dedham, WILYL was again active. At 
0820 on September 18th he was instrumental in 
dispatching mobile equipment from BrookUne 
to New Bedford. Later, he followed the eye of 
Edna and relayed these reports to the Dedham 
c.d. office on 2 meters. Losing power at 1515, he 
operated mobile on 2 meters to report damage 
throughout Dedham as to road blocks, washouts 
and other damage. 

The first station on the air in Winthrop was 
WlMQB, who kept an all night vigil on Edna's 
progress and estimated time of arrival. The 
net was alerted at 0700 Saturday morning and 
remained in operation until the danger from 
Edna was over. The following were also active: 
Wis DJ CMW OIR OUC HFJ/m BB BDU 
AGB/m TTH PBX and WNIBOX. Civil defense 
was prepared for evacuation, and a portable unit 
manned by WITTH was ready for this purpose. 
Officials mobiling about town checking on condi- 
tions were kept in touch with the report center by 
means of WNlBOX/m on two meters. The 
Winthrop AREC was also able to provide an 
emergency generator for power for essential parts 
of the community hospital. 

Hurricane Edna hit Haverhill on September 
18th, and this time the gang was ready. WlCCF 
and WlFW were on stand-by at c.d. headquarters 
starting at 2200 on the 17th, other units coming 
on the air about 0800 on the 18th and staying in 
operation until midnight of that date. A unit 
was again set up at West Newbury, tying into 
Haverhill c.d. on 147 Mc. Merrimac was tied 
in on 28 Mc. with Wis HP REI and PIY on the 
air in that town. WIWTK restored an emergency 
generator which failed at the hospital. Haverhill 
operation during Edna was a continuation of 
its operation from Carol, and EC WlSIX sums 
up participants as follows: Wis SNZ RLT KBQ 
CCF SIX FW QYR WTK STA IWR MTS QQD 
QZS RYV QQG REI HP WXE NAG PIY, 
WNls ZKB AFM and ZUB. 

The Framingham Radio Club Net was alerted 
Friday morning by WlMHC. The club's gen- 
erator was set up at WlRXH, who took over 
as NCS on 28,700 kc. Framingham being head- 
quarters for Mass. Civil Defense Region 3, 



46 



QST for 



liaison was made between Framingham and 
WlUQW in Worcester on 29,560 kc, contacts 
being made by WlRXH and WlMEG/m. The 
following club member stations were activated: 
Wis RXH WMT/m MHC/m QQW/m MEG/m 
SQY/m WLJ WPW/m SRG MQU/m and JUL. 
Operation was terminated Sunday afternoon. 

In Hamilton there were three stations active — 
one mobile, one emergency-powered and one 
control station: Wis YLQ TIN and LQQ re- 
spectively. WlYLQ and WlTIN were active 
on the Hurricane Net on 3859. 

The Braintree gang was again active during 
Edna. A total of 20 mobiles turned out to patrol 
the streets, reporting conditions almost as they 
occurred to the police, street, electric and fire 
departments. The mobiles assigned to assist the 
electric company's crews were especially active. 
WlVTH and WlZSZ set up a fixed radio station 
inside the electric plant to act as net control for 
the repair crews. Man}' of the.se operators served 
around the clock. During the week end seven 
amateurs with a combined operating time of 41 
hours served as net control operators: Wis SSA 
OSX CTR JOB EKG VTH and ZSZ. The follow- 
ing operated as mobiles: Wis .](.}\ KJD KPX 
MPT OSX OFO QPH RRP ROB SSA TQ(i 
UXX VMU VBB VTH YMV YYZ ZPI and 
ZSZ. Others serving in various capacities were 
Wis AUU lA ISU KWD LZB LJT MMH QVX 
QPT SAI VYI WXT YKS ZSU ZYG. 

The Bedford gang turned out for Edna as they 
did for Carol, and again assisted the Bedford 
civil defense in maintaining communication. 
EC WlRSY showed up at c.d. headquarters at 
0600 on Saturday and activated the control sta- 
tion, setting up communication with Brookline. 
Concord, Hingham and Lynnfield. Later, addi- 
tional help showed up in the persons of ll'/x 
TCG ZSG XAD SAP YFP. Operating home 
stations were Wis ACE BFV VGC and RSY. 

LTp in Manchester, N. H., the Hillsborough 
County Emergency Net went into operation at 
1200 on September 11th under net control 
WlYHI on 29 Mc. The net covered all locations 
throughout the city to provide communications 
with c.d. headquarters. The net remained in 
operation until 1820. Mobiles in action were 
Wis WUG RGC RYC URL YVX TXK and 
KYG. Others active were Wis EIQ KYX MSJ 
QJB QZV RSV TRD VCX WIZ \VXB ZHX 
ALX KEK LEH MFY XCO PDQ PFX PIU 
QNC RAL RES RIL SLM SSA TYX UYK 
VBC VEL VIA WAE WME YKD YXX ZL 
ZPL. Fi.xed stations were Wis YHI ZIZ BRY 
RET QJY YJD WUR and WUU. ZIZ set up his 
station at c.d. headquarters in the northern 
sector of the city, and WIWUU set up at Moore 
General Hospital in Grasmere. 

Edna onty sideswiped these areas, but the 
Canadian Maritime Provinces felt her full force. 
Saturday afternoon, Sept. 11th, found New 
Brunswick net control VEIPF sending out storm 
warnings and weather reports. By 1900 the 
3750 kc. channel was so congested that the Xew 
Brunswick and Nova Scotia groups divided, the 



former going to 3740 and the latter to 3770 kc. 
Yarmouth was the first to feel the brunt of the 
storm, and shortly after 2100 VElDW and 
VEIACE were the only amateurs being heard 
from that area, the latter mobile and the former 
on emergency power. Most of the power was 
off at Yarmouth, and VEIACE patroled the 
town in his mobile reporting wires down, fallen 
trees, etc. VEIDW was in contact with VEIFQ 
at HaUfax, which station was also on emergency 
power. VEIPT was patroling the Halifax sub- 
urbs and passing damage information to VEIFQ. 
.\ssisting at VEIFQ were VEIOM and VEILZ. 
Skip washed out contact toward morning, despite 
efforts of W2SAI to help in relajing, but opera- 
tion was resumed at 0700, by which time the 
storm had moved to the Gulf of St. Lawrence 
and other stations in that area were beginning 
to call in. Main bulk of traffic handled on 
Sunday consisted of telephone and power line 




During Edna, EC WIJLN set up at Fire Alarm 
headquarters in Lynn, Mass., and acted as NCS for 
the net on 28,610 kc. Operating was done by \^ IJLN 
(seated, rear) and WIMTG. {Photo by Lynn Daily Eve- 
ning Item) 

damage, press releases, weather reports, move- 
ments of goods and miUtarv. Assisting at 
VEIFQ on Sunday were VEls WL HC and LZ. 
VE3NG assisted in maintaining contact with 
Toronto. Other stations participating were VEls 
XZ/m KK MY FG BW WB ABT ACW MX 
FAI AIT SI OC FX RF ED PB BB RL ABP 
WK PD XA TF VX DF PF ADU and UT. 

Editor's note: The second part of this article, the story 
of amateur radio's participation in Hurricane Hazel, will 
appear in a future issue of QST. 



January 1955 



47 



Happenii£ 




the Month 



ELECTION RESULTS 

Recent balloting in ARRL elections has re- 
sulted in the selection of four new directors 
and three new vice-directors to take office Janu- 
ary 1st. 

Harry M. Matthews, W9UQT, becomes the 
new director of the Central Division, with 999 
votes, defeating Myron Hexter, W9FKC, with 552 
votes, Edmond A. Metzger, W9PRN, with 505 
votes, and Charles F. Reberg, W9MVZ, with 
435 votes. A radio operator and technician with 
the Illinois State Police at Springfield, "Doc" 
Matthews has a long history of club work behind 
him. He has served in all the offices of the Central 
Illinois Radio Club, and also as president of the 
Sangamon Valley Radio Club. He organized the 
Illinois Emergency Net, and has been a director 
assistant and vice-director. He is an AREC mem- 
ber and PAM. 

The new director of the New England Division, 
Philip S. Rand, WIDBM, won handily with a 
tallv of 1636 votes to 490 for Frank L. Baker, 
WIALP, and 259 for John L. Thompson, WIBIH. 
As ARRL Technical Consultant, "Phil" con- 
ducted the League's early TVI demonstrations 
and his work in the field gives him the second 
name of "Mr. TVI." He received a special cita- 
tion under the first Edison Award, and was chosen 
for ARRL's first Merit Award plaque in 1953. He 
is radio officer for Connecticut Area One CD., 
and EC for Fairfield County, and a member of 
IRE, AREC, and an OPS. Club work includes 
the founding and first presidency of the Amateur 
Radio Emergency Corps of Norwalk, Conn., and 
presidency of the Falmouth (Mass.) Radio Club. 
He is an electronic engineer at Remington Rand. 

A former vice-director and SCM, Clayton C. 
Gordon, WIHRC, becomes the new vice-director 
of the New England Division with 1617 votes to 
745 votes for Ira J. Hemingway, jr., WlHUM. 
"Clayt" has served as vice-president and treas- 
urer of the Providence Radio Association and 
president and vice-president of the Pittsfield 
Radio Club. He is employed as a transmission 
tester in the long lines department of A. T. & T. in 
Pittsfield, Mass. He holds ORS, OPS and A-1 
Operator Club certificates. 

With 900 votes, Walter R. Joos, W6EKM, 
nosed out Raymond E. Meyers, W6MLZ, with 
860 votes, to become director of the Southwestern 
Division. Director Joos, a salesman for Johnson, 
Carvel and Murphy, food products representa- 
tives, Los Angeles, just concluded four years as 
vice-director of his division. His club work in- 
cludes the past offices of president, vice-president, 
and secretary of the Inglewood Amateur Radio 
Club. 

For vice-director of the Southwestern Divi- 
sion, Robert E. Hopper, W6YXU, polled 1060 



votes to the 694 votes of Roger D. Mace, W6RW. 
Vice-director Hopper is employed at the U. S. 
Navy Electronics Laboratory, San Diego, as a 
technician. For the past four years he has been a 
director assistant. He has served as president of 
the San Diego Amateur Radio Club, and as 
Chairman of the Southwestern Division Conven- 
tion in 1949 and 1952. 

Robert E. Cowan, W5CF, becomes the new 
director of the West Gulf Division with 732 
votes, defeating incumbent A. David Middelton, 
W5CA, with 684 votes, and Charles Fermaglich, 
W5FJF, with 401 votes. W5CF is employed as 
manager of the Ralston Purina Company's Fort 
Worth plant, and is active in civic and city 
governmental work. He is a charter member of 
the Kilocycle Club of Fort Worth, a member of 
Air Force MARS, and AREC. 

John F. Skelton, W5M A, becomes vice-director 
of the West Gulf Division with 1322 votes to 
473 votes for Richard L. Hawkins, W5FEC. 
W5MA is division manager of the central division 
of Texas Power and Light Co., and has been a 
director of the Dallas Amateur Radio Club and 
chairman of the TVI Committee. He is well 
known as coauthor of "The Dallas Plan for TVI." 

TECHNICIAN CLASS FILING 

As explained in detail in last month's editorial, 
the Board of Directors of the League has heartily 
endorsed the FCC proposal to open the 50-Mc. 
band for the use of Technician Class amateur 
operators, but has been obliged to oppose the 
similar opening of 144 Mc. on the grounds it 
would defeat the original purpose in increasing 
6-meter occupancy. The text of the League's 
fifing with the Commission follows: 

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 
Washington 25, D. C. 



In the Matter of 

Petitions for amendment of Part 

12, Rules Governing Amateur 

Radio Service, concerning 

Technician Class operator 

privileges. 



DOCKET NO. 11157 



COMMENTS OF THE 
AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE, INC. 

Pursuant to Paragraph 6 of the Notice of Proposed Rule 
Making in Docket 11157, the American Radio Relay 
League files these comments on behalf of tlie more than 
45,000 U. S. -licensed amateur radio operators who are 
members of the League. 

These comments were formulated after extensive de- 
liberation by the ARRL Executive Committee and subse- 
quent vote by the elected Board of Directors of the League. 



The League concurs in the proposal to open the 50-Mc. 
band to amateur licensees of the Technician Class, but 
opposes the proposal to open the 144-Mc. band for those 
licensees. 



48 



QST for 



Aa to 60-Mc. Technician Use 

Some time prior to the release of the present Notice by 
the Commission, the Executive Committee was in the 
process of examining an independent proposal received 
through League channels that the 50-Mc. band be opened 
to Technician Class licensees. The Committee rendered a 
report unanimously in favor of such a proposal, which was 
thereupon confirmed by the Board of Directors. Mean- 
while, the Commission released its own proposal. Thus the 
League heartily endorses that portion of the present Docket 
which proposes to open the 50-Mc. band to Technician 
Class licensees. 

In this respect the League concurs with the Commis- 
sion's belief that "greater occupancy of, and experimenta- 
tion in," the 50-Mc. band is desirable. We beUeve that the 
pattern of occupancy of an amateur band, particularly one 
above 30 Mc, depends to a considerable extent upon be- 
ginner interest in such band. Beginner interest above 
30 Mc. has in recent years been concentrated in the 144-Mc. 
band, with little or none shown in 50 Mc. The League be- 
lieves that it is necessary to take special steps to promote 
beginner interest in the 50-Mc. band, and urges the adop- 
tion by the Commission of this aspect of the proposal. 

As to 144-^tc. Technician Use 

With the issuance by the Commission of the present 
Notice, proposing that Technicians be permitted also on 
144 Mc, the League again carefully examined the matter, 
particularly as to the overall effect of the combined pro- 
posals, and both the Executive Committee and the Board 
of Directors voted in opposition to the proposal. Thus the 
League is obliged to oppose the proposal to open the 144-Mc. 
band to Technician Class Ucensees. 

The League's examination of the proposal fails to disclose 
any compeUing reason for its adoption. Occupancy of the 
144-Mc. band is not a problem. Since the war this band has 
had its proportionate share of amateur use. With the open- 
ing of a substantial segment of it for use by Novice Class 
licensees, in 1951, occupancy has increased to more than 
an adequate level. This band now has suitable beginner 
interest, which we have stated we believe is so necessary 
to continued occupancy. Thus we see no immediate need 
for regulatory action to promote usage of the band. 

Nor does the League's examination of the proposal enable 
it to agree to the argument that its adoption would increase 
participation in the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Serv- 
ice. Under RACES rules, station authorizations may not 
be issued to the holders of Technician Class Licensees. Thus 
adoption of the proposal would not increase the number 
of stations available for civil defense communication under 
RACES. The value of the Technician Class licensee to civil 
defense communications lies, of course, in operator avail- 
ability. In this respect the League notes it is already pro- 
vided in RACES rules that Technician Class licensees may 
obtain authorizations to operate in that ser\'ice, using 
designated segments not only to the 50-Mc. band but any 
RACES band segment. Thus the League does not see any 
specific advantage to civil defense communications by 
adopting the proposal under discussion. 

The League believes that adoption of the proposal would 
certainly hinder, if not actually negate, the stated aim of 
obtaining more occupancy also in the 50-Mc. band. Should 
both bands be opened to Technician Class licensees, in the 
League's opinion such Ucensees would congregate on 144 
Mc. almost to the exclusion of 50 Mc. This is for the reason 
that occupancy tends to promote occupancy, and such 
newcomers would be drawn to the band of greater occu- 
pancy. Further, obtaining equipment for the 144-Mc. band 
is a much simpler problem than for 50-Mc., both in respect 
to commercially-available units and surplus equipment. 
The only result would be greatly-increased occupancy of 
the already-populated 144-Mc. band and little — or, more 
hkely, no — increase in 50-Mc. activity. This would ob- 
viously prevent the fulfillment of the objective, common 
to the Commission and the League, of encouraging greater 
occupancy of 50 Mc. It is primarily for this reason the 
League is obliged to oppose the 144-Mc. aspect of the 
proposal. 

Though of lesser importance, the League also comments 
that adoption of the proposal would appear to make the 
Technician license rather too attractive. It is the League's 
view, and one which we believe is also shared by the Com- 
mission, that incentives should be provided for amateurs 
to progress to higher grades of license. In the case of the 



Novice, this is adequately handled by the one-year license 
term. In the case of the Technician, the primary incentive 
is frequency privileges. In areas where there is extensive 
v.h.f. activity there are hundreds of newcomers who will be 
perfectly satisfied with Technician status if they can work 
on all frequencies from 50 Mc. up. There is a considerable 
number of amateurs today of Conditional Class, or higher, 
abeady devoting their entire time to v.h.f., and perfectly 
content to do so. They very Ukely would never have both- 
ered to obtain their present class of license had all the 
privileges above 50 Mc. been available to them with a 
Technician authorization. 

Summing up, the League believes it to be not in the best 
interests of the amateur service to open the 144-Mc. band 
to Technician Class licensees, because there is no valid 
objective to be accomplished, because such action would 
negate the desirable objective of populating the 50-Mc. 
band, and because such action would also have the unde- 
sirable effect of removing, to a considerable extent, incentive 
to progress to a higher grade of license. 

AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE, INC. 

By Paul M. Segal 
lis General Counsel 

A. L. BUDLONQ 

Us General Manager 
November 15, 1954 

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

The Federal Communications Commission will 
give Extra and General Class amateur examina- 
tions during the first half of 1955 on the following 
schedule. Remember this list when j'ou need to 
know when and where examinations will occur. 
\\'here exact dates or places are not shown below, 
information may be obtained, as the date ap- 
proaches, from the Engineer-in-Charge of the 
district. Even stated dates are tentative and should 
be verified from the Engineer as the date approaches. 
No examinations are given on legal holiday's. All 
examinations begin promptly at 9 a.m. except as 
noted. (Novice, Technician and Conditional exams 
are given only by mail. See page 50, May 1954 
QST, or the License Manual for details.) 

Albuquerque, N. M.: April 2. 

Amarillo, Texas: March 25. 

Anchorage, Alaska, 53 U. S. Post Office Bldg. : By appoint- 
ment. 

Atlanta, Georgia, 411 Federal Annex: Tuesday and Friday 
at 8:30 a.m. 

Baltimore 2, Md., 500 McCawley Bldg.: Monday through 
Friday. When code test required, between 8:30 a.m. and 
9:30 a.m. 

Bakersfield, Calif.: Sometime in May. 

Bangor, Maine: May 18. 

Beaumont, Texas, 329 P. O. Bldg.: Monday through Friday 
except Thursday only when code test required. 

Billings, Mont. : Sometime in May. 

Birmingham, Ala. : March 8, June 8. 

Boise, Idaho: Sometime In April. 

Boston, Mass., 1600 Customhouse: Wednesday through 
Friday 9:00 A.M. to 2 P.M. 4 

Buffalo, N. Y., 328 P. O. Bldg.: Thursday. 

Butte, Mont. : Sometime in May. 

Charleston, W. Va. : Sometime in March and June. 

Chicago, 111., 826 U. S. Courthouse: Friday. 

Cincinnati, Ohio: Sometime in Februarj' and May. 

Cleveland, Ohio: Sometime in March and June. 

Columbus, Ohio: Sometime in January and April. 

Corpus Christi, Texas: March 10, June 9. 

Dallas, Texas, 500 U. S. Terminal Annex Bldg.: Monday 
through Friday, except Tuesday only when code test 
required. 

Davenport, Iowa: Sometime in January and April. 

Denver, Colo., 521 New Customhouse: 1st and 2nd Thurs- 
days, 8 a.m. 

{Continued on page ISO) 



January 1955 



49 




Correspondence 
From Members- 



The publishers of QST assume no responsibility for statements made herein by correspondents. 



V.H.F. BURSTS 

Thayer School of Eng. 
Dartmouth College 
Hanover, N. II. 
Editor, QST: 

I don't know whether or not you have heard from Dr. 
deBett€ncourt, but Edward P. Tilton's paper, " 1000- 
Mile Burst Reception on 144 Mc. by Radio Amateurs," 
was duly presented at the Xlth General Assembly of URSI 
at the Hague. Sir Edward Appleton, president of Inter- 
national Commission III, was chairman of the session in 
which the presentation was made, and he said that all 
of the bursts looked like meteors to him. Dr. G. MiUing- 
ton of Marconi's Wireless Company presented Mr. G. A. 
Isted's work on the correlation of v.h.f. bursts with lightning 
strokes, and suggested that some of the longer bursts on the 
tape might be this phenomenon. I mentioned that you were 
already on the trail of this matter and Appleton was most 
impressed with the fact that amateurs in the United States 
would be aware of such recent work. He asked that the Com- 
mission's highest compliments be conveyed to W4HHK, to 
W2UK, and to WIHDQ for such high caliber work being 
carried out by amateurs. 

— Millet G. Morgan, WIHDA 

RTTY ELECTION RETURNS 

WNYC/WNYC-FM 

New York, N. Y. 
Editor, QST: 

I wish to express my thanks for the fine work done by- 
all concerned in transmitting by amateur radio the election 
returns for broadcast by the Municipal Broadcasting Sys- 
tem. 

The information collected and forwarded (by John 
WilUams, W2BFD, and his fellow operators) was received 
at a central point in Manhattan and relayed from there by 
amateur radioteletype directly into the studio from which 
the broadcast originated. 

Due to their good work, we were able to disseminate these 
returns about two hours ahead of commercial services. 

It is jobs like this, well done, which bring to public atten- 
tion the accomplishment of amateur radio. 

— Seymour N . Siegel, Director 

FAMILY CIRCLE 

81.57 Harper Ave. 
Chicago 19, III. 
Editor, QST: 

Bet you are getting quite a chuckle out of the feud be- 
tween the various groups whose interests seem to be at 
variance with each other. I've wondered, reading the 
letters, if it has ever occurred to each group how interde- 
pendent we are on each other, really. 

To those who love to build gear is due the credit for 
much of our technical advancement, but if it weren't 
for those who love to operate, what good would advance- 
ment be? If no one wanted to operate, except to test, what 
use could be found for new circuits and equipment? 

The ones who prefer net operation to free-lancing make 
possible the traffic handling which has been a major item 
in the justification of our amateur service. However, if it 
weren't for the free-lancers, no one would have developed 
the VFO. 

If the bands hadn't been crowded, no one would have 
bothered to figure out the crystal filter, and if no one had 
been interested in "just operating" there would have been 
no one to use it. 

If everyone built their gear and no one bought it, we 
would not have the advantage of manufacturers' research, 
and that is certainly nothing to be sneezed at. You don't 



sneer at the man who drives a Cadillac just because he 
didn't build a homemade car and use it instead. 

The boys who brag about their design abilities seem to 
forget that radio has already been invented, and they are 
largely making improvements in design rather than origina- 
tions, while the operators who razz the builders forget that 
their gear is the outcome of builders' ideas. 

And so it goes, all through the picture. Each would be a 
total loss without the other. The boys who knock c.w. should 
try to handle traffic through heavy QRN and QRM, while 
those who knock 'phone should consider how it expedites 
the exchange of intelligence when conditions are right. One 
could go on and on, but this gives you the idea. We're really 
just one family! 

— Ralph C. Cole, W9LCG 

V.H.F. FOR CD. 

9330 TSU Ord., Det. B 
Redstone Arsenal 
HuntsviUe, Ala. 
Editor, QST: 

After each and every situation where emergency traffic is 
liandled by amateurs I read the comments and complaints 
about stations failing to clear the emergency net frequencies 
and interfering with communications in general. 

Here again is the time to consider the further exploitation 
of v.h.f. bands for practically all emergency communica- 
tions. The state of the art has progressed to the point where 
the reliability and range of v.h.f. equipment even exceeds 
that of the lower-frequency units of equivalent power under 
most conditions. In the original organization of many nets, 
emphasis was placed on the use of existing equipment among 
the members. This fact dictated the use of the so-called 
"popular bands." As time progresses it becomes more im- 
portant to turn attention to more effective equipment de- 
signed with civil defense, etc., specifically in mind for more 
permanent installations. This to me means v.h.f. 

— Rutherford L. Ellis, jr., W4LNG 

DX MANNERS 

1414 Oakley St. 
Orlando, Fla. 
Editor, QST: 

Oh, what lousy manners 20-meter DX hounds have. Why 
can't these gentlemen stop frothing at the mouth and 
wait? To hear some of them you'd think that the only way 
they wiU ever be satisfied to QSO a foreigner is to break up 
his QSO with someone else. 

As a victim of the DX hunter's cunning, I speak! How 
many good ones have been snatched from my trembling 
grasp by some scheming American? Ouch, boys, pleez. You 
can wait! 

— Arthur M. Hale, WJfTVQ 

HAWAIIAN PARADISE 

P. O. Box 1748 
Lihue, Kauai 
Editor, QST: 

In conversing with U. S. hams plagued with TVI and 
BCI, they frequently have expressed their desire to b; 
in some place like Hawaii. 

Far from being a dreamy South Pacific isle, Hawaii has 
13 standard broadcast stations, 3 TV stations, and 3 f.m. 
stations, not to mention high-powered communications 
facilities by the major communications companies, CAA, 
Army, Navy, and electronic navigational facilities serving 
the entire Pacific. 

So, you see, it is not all hula girls and pineapples in Hawaii. 

— K. Nose, KH6IJ 
{Continued on page 138) 



50 



QST for 





NEWS 
wVIEWS 




BY ELEANOR WILSON,* WIQON 
Weil-Groomed YLs 

IooK to your dressing table . . . your mani- 
cure set is more valuable than you may 
-^ realize! 

In the General Electric Company's service 
Ijublication, "Techni-Talk," radio serviceman 
L. A. Frankel of Astoria, N. Y., reveals that 
milady's manicure set can serve as a tool kit in 
the field of radio repair. A filed-down orange 
stick makes a good nonconductive screwdriver. 
Emery boards and nail files can clean connections 
to be solderd. Use nail polish for color-coding or 
cement, nail polish remover as a plastics solvent. 
Nail clippers can cut and strip small wires, and 
tweezers can pick up tiny parts drojjped inside 
the set or hold small parts in place for work 
within cramped confines. 

Wonder what useful purpose false fingernails 
would serve? 

"XYL" or "MYL" 

Wives of thirteen members of tlie East Bay Radio Club 
(Oakland, Calif.) have protested the use of the term " XYL." 
They suggest that unlicensed wives of hams be referred to 
as "M YLs " — married young ladies. This renews an un- 
settled discussion scanned in this department several times 
previously. ^ , _, . 

The complications arc increasing, though. "MYL is 
the term most frequently offered as a substitute for the 
popular but inappropriate epithet "XYL" — both terms 
denoting the unlicensed wife of a male amateur. However, 
if we consider the merit of WlYNI's suggestions as given 
in the .January, 54, column, an " MYL " would be a married 
female amateur with license. (Bettys comjilete oflfering: 
"YL" — single woman with license; "MYL" — married 
woman with license; "SYL" — single woman without 
license; "XYL" — married woman without license.) ^ 

What will be tlie fate of our time-honored "YL" and 
"XYL"? Let's hear from interested pazrties and find out. 

*YL Editor, QST. Please send all contributions to 
WlQON's home address: 318 Fisher St., Walpole, Mass. 




When Captain "Stay-put," W2ZXM/MM, of Flying 
Enterprise fame (see p. 36, March 1952 QST) is on the 
high seas, it's nice to have the home station in operation. 
Captain Kurt Carlsen's two young daughters, -Sonia 
(left) and Karen, are now KN2IVT and KN2JAT, re- 
spectively. (Photo courtesy E. D. Collins) 

80-Meter C. W. Net 

A new 80-meter c.w. net for all YLs is announced by 
YLRL Vice President W6KER. The net meets Mondays on 
3680 kc. at 2100 PST. NCS is W7GLK. The October issue 
carried the complete schedule of nets listed with the YLRL. 

Keeping Up with the Girls 

W1R.IY, Estlier, is happy to have her long-sought DXCC 
certificate. . . . W2EEO, MadeUne, and OM W2CYK 
had a nice write-up in an article entitled " W2CYK Calling," 
which appeared in the August '54 issue of Hardware Retail- 
ers. . . . WIYYM, Ellen, finds it pays to start the day 
early. At 0530 EDST one morning she greeted VKIAC on 
Macquarie Island, good DX in anyone's log. . . . Allowed 
the use of a room in the Physics Building at Ohio Wesleyan 
University where she's a freshman, W80SD, Virginia, 
daughter of W8SPU, Helen, operates portable with her 
Johnson Ranger. So long as high grades are maintained, the 
physics department doesn't mind the arrangement. . . . 
W6KER, Gilda, was instrumental in obtaining a pump 
organ to send to W7R0Z, Father Clem, for one of the 
churches in his 10,000 sq. miles of territory in King's Can- 
yon, Ariz. . . . Teacher of a number of young girls who 
earned ham tickets, it was a thrill for W9MGT, Leonore, to 
have her mother become'*.WN9KJF (Irene). . . . K2CLC, 
Barbara, has joined MARS falong With her dad, K2BWQ. 
. . . W700Y, Jeannine, has been appointed chairman of 
the YLRL Seventh District, replacing W7SBS, who resigned. 
. . . Wos SYL, Iva, WXY, Bernice, and YKE, Martha, 
helped relay some 300 messages at the Dallas Fair. . . . 
W9SEZ, technical instructor and code teacher for the 
Chicago YLRL Unit, is currently coaching nine students 
{Continued on page 136) 



Last October, 18 YLs from six 
states braved some nippy weather 
to carry out picnic plans at Big 
Meadows on Skyline Drive, Vir- 
ginia. The girls are members of 
the YLRL net conducted by 
W4HLF, Arlie, which meets 
Tuesdavs on 3900 kc. at 0800 
EST. (L. to r., top row): W4B0I, 
W4DBP, W4AJV, W3YWK, 
W300F, W4WJX, W4TVO, 
W3MSU, W4KYI: (seated) 
W3RX.T, W4RIG, WIUKR, 
W4HLF, WIVOS, W3TYC. 
W4YYJ. W4BLR and W3TSC 
also attended. 



January 1955 





Hints "** 

For the Experimente 




BETTER AUDIO WITH THE MONITONE 

AFTER recent completion of a Alonitone, it 
-LX. was discovered that the audio quality was 
somewhat distorted at normal settings of the re- 
ceiver gain control. The received signals sounded 
chopped or clipped at the audio level I prefer to 
use. This condition was quickly remedied by the 
substitution of a 6SN7GT for" the 6SL7GT rec- 
ommended for the circuit. No component or wir- 
ing changes are required by the new tube. 

— Dick Bourne, WlTVJ 



USING A CARPENTER'S BRACE 
AS A WRENCH 

A carpenter's brace makes an especially 
good "wrench" for turning the square-head 
cap screws used to tighten chassis punches. Fre- 
quently, when the corners or other hard-to-get- 
at places of a chassis are being tackled, it will be 
found that a brace is a more convenient tool to 
use than a regular flat wrench. Furthermore, the 
ratchet feature of the brace will make the job as 
easy as would be the case were a ratchet-type 
socket wrench employed. 

— Rev. Jos. A. Terstegge, W9LQE 

INEXPENSIVE FEEDER SPREADERS 

PLASTIC clothespins, a product of Vermont 
Plastics, Inc., are available at many variety 
stores at a cost of approximately three cents each. 
Easily disassembled, each provides two spreaders 
for open-wire lines. One hole already exists in the 
improvised spreader, and the other can be drilled 
to provide two-inch spacing. 

— D. B. Angel, W8DBF 

THREE-BAND OPERATION WITH A 
7-MC. GROUND-PLANE ANTENNA 

BECAUSE of the growing popularity of the 
quarter- wave vertical, especially on 7 Mc, it 
may interest some of the gang to learn that this 
antenna can be made to do a fair job at 3.5 and 
21 Mc. also. The method used to obtain 3- 
band operation here at W3NWA is shown in 
Fig. 1. 

In the diagram, L is a loading coil used when 
the antenna is operated at 3.5 Mc. When the 
s.p.d.t. switch, *S, is in the neutral position, it 
connects L in series with the radiator and the 
RG-8/U transmission line. In one of the closed 
positions the switch shorts the coil, permitting 
normal 7-Mc. operation of the system. The an- 
tenna will also take power at 21 Mc. when the 
loading coil is shorted out. In the third position, 



the switch connects the vertical to the grounded 
radial support to provide Ughtning protection. 

In the original installation, the Premax whip 
was adjusted to favor operation at the low end of 
the 7-Mc. band. The loading coil used to resonate 
the system at 3550 kc. consists of 22 turns No. 12 
enameled, 2J^-inch diameter, 4 inches long. The 



Fig. 1 — Drawing of the base- 
loading system which permits 
3.5-Mc. operation with a 7-Mc, 
ground-plane antenna. 



33' i," 



r-N^ 



L^-*^^ ' Ground Plate 
— •— forRadialSj 




Cof^necior 



coil was cut from a 10-inch length of commercial 
stock which had been temporarily installed intact 
and then tapped experimentally during the initial 
stages of testing. A grid-dip meter may be 
used to help resonate the coil, provided the feed 
point (the coaxial connector shown in Fig. 1) is 
connected to the grounded radial support. 

A liberal appUcation of Duco cement along the 
existing support bars for the air-wound coil will 
provide added strength to the assembly. One coil 
so treated has been exposed to the weather for an 
entire winter with no apparent ill effects. 

In actual operation at 3.5 Mc, good reports 
have been received from all over the eastern part 
of the U. S. A., using 100 watts on c.w. Reports 
are consistently better than formerly received 
while using a random-length horizontal wire, 
probably due in part to the low-angle radiation 
from the vertical. The s.w.r., while not as low as 
on 7 Mc. (using the same RG-8/U feeder), is not 
high enough to cause trouble, provided operation 
is Umited to a 100-kc. band centered on the fre- 
quency for which the loading coil has been 
resonated. 

— R. E. Young, W3NWA 



52 



QST for 



8th V.H.F. Sweepstakes, Jan. 8th-9th 

ARRL Certificates to Leaders; Gavel to Top Club 



THE Eighth Annual V.H.F. Sweepstakes, open 
to all amateurs who can work 50 Mc. or 
higher, will offer the v.h.f . enthusiast unparal- 
leled opportunities for new DX records, addi- 
tional states, and meeting new friends. The con- 
test period starts at 2:00 p.m. your local time, 
Saturday, January 8th, and continues to mid- 
night, Sunday, January 9th. 

Just call "CQ Sweepstakes" on 'phone or 
"CQ SS" on c.w. to get in touch with other 
contestants, then exchange SS data as shown 
elsewhere in this announcement. This informa- 
tion is similar to a message preamble, with the 
ARRL section (see page six of this QST) sub- 
stituted for the city and state, and the RS or 
RST report for the "check." 

Make contact with as many stations as pos- 
sible. (You can rework a station for credit on 
other v.h.f. bands, so ability to work several 
bands pays off in score points.) When an ex- 
change of SS "messages" has been completed in 
both directions, two points may be claimed. 

To figure your score, multiply total contact 
points by the number of different ARRL sections 
worked. You may use 'phone, m.c.w., or c.w., 
with results all contributing toward one score. 

Certificate awards will go to V.H.F. Sweep- 
stakes top-scorers in each of the 73 ARRL sec- 
tions from which entries are received. In addition. 



a certificate will be given to the top Novice or 
Technician in each section where at least three 
such licensees submit valid contest logs. 

Clubs, especially, are urged to get their mem- 
bers on the air from their individual stations to 
compete for the certificates which go to leading 
club operators. The club whose members ac- 
cumulate the top aggregate score will also 
receive a cocobolo gavel with a sterling-silver 
band engraved with the name of the winner. 

Contest reporting forms are now available 
from the ARRL Communications Department 
and will be sent free upon request. If you don't 
use these forms, please follow the log arrange- 
ment shown. ARRL welcomes all contest reports 
to assist in cross-checking and to make complete 
results in QST possible. Novices and Techni- 
cians: be sure to report your totals, large or small, 
so that the license-class leader in your section 
will qualify for a certificate. 

The 1954 V.H.F. Sweepstakes smashed all 
v.h.f. activity records before or since, with an 
unprecedented 610 stations reporting. The SS 
coming up may well be bigger yet. Why not give 
your v.h.f. set-up a check? In this one January 
week end, you'll be able to tell more about how 
your equipment and antennas are functioning 
than in months of casual operating. Plan now to 
take part! (Rules on following page.) 



STATION W. . . . — SUMMARY OF V.H.F. SWEEPSTAKES EXCHANGES 




















Number 






SENT {1 point) 








RECEIVED U point) 






ofEadi 




Freq. 




Time 


Date 








Date 


Different 
New Sec- 


•S 


















Band 






CK- 




..ST 


(Jan.) 






CK- 




Time 


(Jan.) 


tion as 




(Mc.) 


NR 


Stn. 


RST 


Section 






NR 


Stn. 


RST 


Section 






Worked 


2 


50 


1 


WlAW 


57 


Conn. 


4:15 p.m. 


8 


3 


WIPHR 


47 


Conn. 


4:18 P.M. 


9 


1 


50 


?. 




43 




4:35 p.m. 


8 


7 


WIHDQ 


59 


Conn. 


4:40 P.M. 


9 




2 


50 


8 




58 




9:09 P.M. 


8 


6 


WITAM 


359 


Maine 


9:11 P.M. 


9 


2 


2 


144 


4 




49 




9:30 P.M. 


8 


32 


WIOOP 


58 


E. Mass. 


9:36 p.m. 


9 


3 


2 


144 


5 




57 




9:50 P.M. 


8 


15 


WNICGG 


58 


Conn. 


9:46 p.m. 


9 




2 


50 


fi 




54 




11:.30p.m. 


8 


11 


W2A0C 


48 


N. Y. C.-L. I. 


11:32 p.m. 


9 


4 


2 


420 


7 




58 




11:35 p.m. 


8 


30 


WlPHR 


57 


Conn. 


11:35 P.M. 


9 




2 


144 


8 




57 




11:45 P.M. 


8 


21 


W3LMC 


59 


Md.-Del.-D. C. 


11:56 p.m. 


9 


5 


2 


144 














18 


W9QXP 


59 


111. 


12:34 a.m. 


10 


6 


1 


144 


9 


WlAW 


34 


Conn. 


8:50 a.m. 


9 


27 


WIRFU 


59 W. Mass. 


8:47 a.m. 


10 


7 


2 


50 


in 




479 




9:18 p.m. 


9 


12 


W5NHB 


370x 


S. Tex. 


8:20 P.M. 


10 


8 


2 


50 


11 




589 




10:40 P.M. 


9 


20 


VEIQY 


569 


Maritime 


11:35 p.m. 


10 


9 


2 






B 


ands Used: 50, 144 and 420 Mc. 


9 Sec, 23 Pts 








Number and names ofoperaiors having a share in abov 
Claimed score: 23 points X 9 sections = 207. 


IL 
























Participating for dub award in the 






{name of dub), of which I ( 


im a member. 






I hereby state that score and points set forth in th 


e above 


sumnn 


ary are correct and true. 








Tubeline-up 










Signatur 
iddress 




























n uy V 





















January 1955 



53 



EXPLANATION OF V.H.F. SS CONTEST EXCHANGES 


Send Like Standard NR 
Msg. Preamble 


Call 


CK 


Place 


Time 


Date 


Exchanges 


Contest num- 
bers 1,2.3, etc., 
a new NR for 
each station 
worked 


Send your 
own call 


CK 

(Readability 
and strength or 
RST of station 
worked) 


Your ARRL 
section 


Send time of 
transmitting 
this NR 


Send date of 
QSO 


Purpose 
(example) 


QSO NR tells 
how you are 
doing (NRl) 


Identification 

(WlAW) 


RS or RST 
report (589) 


See page six 
for section 
list (Conn,) 


Time and date mast fall in 
contest period (6:55 p.m. Jan. 

9) 



Rules 

1) Eligibility: Amateur operators in any ARRL section 
(see page 6) operating at home, or mobile or portable under 
one call on or above 50 Mc. are invited to take part. 

2) Object: Participants will attempt to contact as many 
other stations in as many ARRL sections as possible. 

3) Contest Periods: The contest starts at 2:00 p.m. your 
local time, Saturday, Jan. 8, 1955, and ends at midnight, 
Sunday, Jan. 9, 1955. 

4) Exchanges: Contest exchanges, including all data 
shown in the sample, must be transmitted and receipted 
for as a basis for each scored point. 

5) Scoring: (a) Contacts count one point when the 
required exchange information has been received and 
acknowledged, a second point when exchange has been com- 
pleted in both directions. 

(b) Final score is obtained by multiplying total contact 
points by the number of different ARRL sections worked 
(the number in each of which at least one SS point has 
been credited). 

6) Conditions for Valid Contact Credit: (a) Repeat contacts 
on other bands confirmed by completed exchanges of up to 
two points per band may be counted for each different station 
worked. {Example: WIHDQ works W8BFQ on 50 and 144 
Mc. for complete exchanges of 2 points on each band; 2 -|- 2 
gives 4 points but only one section multiplier.) 

(b) Cross-band work shall not count. 

(c) Portable or mobile station operation under one call, 
from one location only, is permitted. 



7) Awards: Entries will be classified as single-or multi- 
operator, a single-operator station being defined as one 
manned by an amateur who neither receives nor gives as- 
sistance to any person during the contest period. Certificates 
will be awarded in each ARRL section to tlie top-scoring 
amateur in the single-operator classification. In addition, a 
certificate will be awarded to the top Novice or Technician 
in eacli ARRL section where at least three such licensees 
submit valid contest logs. Multioperator work will be 
grouped separately in the official report of results in QST. 

When three or more individual club members compete 
and submit logs naming the club with which they are identi- 
fied, an ARRL certificate will be issued to the leading club 
member. When less than three individual logs are received 
there will be no club award or club mention. 

A gravel with an engraved sterling-silver band will be 
offered the club whose secretary submits the greatest aggre- 
gate score, provided such scores are confirmed by receipt at 
ARRL of the individual contest logs from such members 
(resident club members only). Claims from federations, 
radio club councils, or other combinations of radio clubs, 
will not be accepted. Special memberships granted for con- 
test purposes will not be recognized. 

8) Conditions of Entry: Each entrant agrees to be bound 
by the provisions of this announcement, the regulations of 
his licensing authority, and the decisions of the ARRL 
Award Committee. 

9) Reporting: Reports must be postmarked no later than 
January 24, 1955, to be considered for awards. 



NEW BOOKS 



RCA Receiving Tube Manual, RC-17. Pub- 
lished by Radio Corporation of America, Harri- 
son, N. J. 300 pages, SVs by 5% inches, paper 
cover. Price, 60 cents. 

Those who have owned preceding editions of the " Receiv- 
ing Tube Manual" will hardly need more than the word 
that a new edition is out, since it is an old stand-by. In addi- 
tion to containing more detailed data on receiving tubes 
and kinescopes than can be obtained from the conventional 
tube tables, the new edition continues (with additions) the 
sections on tube operation, installation and rating informa- 
tion, amphfier and oscillator design, and the resistance- 
coupled amplifier tables. Some new hi-fi circuits have also 
been added to the circuit section. Altogether a most useful 
member of tiie amateur's library. 

The Oscilloscope at Work, by A. Haas and 
R. W. Hallows. Puljlished for Wireless World by 
Iliffe & Sons, Ltd., Dorset House, Stamford 
Street, London, S.E.I. 171 pages, including index, 
5M by 8M. cloth cover. Price, 15s. Od. 

54 



How the oscilloscope functions, and how to use it in mak- 
ing measurements. Over 200 patterns photographed from 
the c.r. tube screen, with interpretations. Also contains a 
chapter on shooting trouble in the 'scope itself, and one on 
auxiUary de\'ices such as probes and the electronic switch. 

Radio Troubleshooting Guidebook, Vol. 1, 
by John F. Rider and J. Richard Johnson. Pub- 
lished by John F. Rider Publisher, Inc. 156 pages, 
including index. 5% by 8M, paper cover. Illus- 
trations. Price, $2.40. 

A general treatment of the subject, divided into three 
parts. Part I covers the operating principles of superhetero- 
dyne receivers for both a.m. and f.m.. Part II the funda- 
mentals of truuble-shooting, and Part III the most common 
symptoms and remedies. 

The Oscilloscope, by George Zwick, pubUshed 
by Gernsback Publications, Inc., 25 West Broad- 
way, New York 7, N. Y. 192 pages, including 
index, 5J4 by 8K, paper cover. Price, $2.25. 

For the ervice tecluiician, principles of 'scope tubes, 
oscilloscope, circuits, and accessories. Covers use of the 
oscilloscope ii servicing TV receivers. 



QST for 




I'l 2.500 Z'ISO SJ'" - 3S^O « 5fe50-S92S 10,000 - lO.SOO 21,000-22,000 ' 

CONDUCTED BY EDWARD P. TILTON, WIHDQ 



We're indebted to W6BCX for bringing the 
idea back into focus. During a visit with 
him and W6VR, Wood}' dug into his QST 
file and came up with the July, 1928, issue, ^id 
I remember the "Warner Splatter System" of- 
fered to a waiting world by the late K. B. Warner 
on the editorial page of that issue of more than 
25 years ago? The idea was to spray large 
amounts of r.f. at the ionosphere; if you throw 
enough stuff up there some of it is bound to come 
back down again — "just as a firehose, with its 
nozzle directed at the ceiUng would provide a 
sure-fire way of wetting every square inch of 
the floor in jig time." 

KBW was always coming up with something 
Hke that; concepts that had everyone laughing 
at the time, but somehow had a way of proving 
out years later. He was talking of 10-meter DX 
then, but he'd be vastly amused to find what is 
essentially his splatter system in use today, 
providing consistent communication in the v.h.f. 
range over distances of 1000 miles or more. And 
making v.h.f. work possible from locations where 
no ham in his right mind would have tried 50 ^NIc. 
or higher bands even a few years ago. 

It is just such "scattering from irregularities 
in the ionosphere, when other forms of iono- 
spheric transmission are absent" ^ that is now 
assumed to be responsible for the success of 
the well-known Cedar Rapids to Washington 
experiment on 49.8 Mc. and higher frequencies. 
And a very similar kind of scattering, ionospheric 
and tropospheric, is being used by some of our 
best 2-meter stations in working consistently 
over distances up to 500 miles or so. 

The beauty of all this is that, since an elevated 
scattering medium is involved, the location of 
the v.h.f. station is relatively unimportant. If the 
normal radiation pattern of your array clears 
obstructions in the immediate vicinity of your 
antenna, you may do just as well in this kind of 
v.h.f. DX as the fellow on the top of a hill. A 
high hill is still nice to have, but it is by no means 
necessary for successful v.h.f. work. 

But suppose j^ou're a valley dweller; you look 
out from your shack window to snow-capped 
mountain peaks in every direction. \Miat chance 
is there for a v.h.f. man in such a spot? Well, 
don't give up until j'ou've given it a good try; 
you may find that you have a really good loca- 
tion. No, don't send for the men in the white 
coats; it can be that way. Your snug valley may 
turn out to be better than a spot out on the open 
plains ! 

We've mentioned "knife-edge refraction" in 

iN.B.S. Technical Report No. 1682, Augiist, 1952. 

January 1955 



these pages before, but our recent s-ning through 
much of our really high mountain country showed 
that few v.h.f. men (present or potential) in these 
areas have given much thought to the appUcation 
of the theory to their particular set of circum- 
stances. Yet it has been demonstrated that a 
sharp ridge at just the right point between two 
low-lying v.h.f. stations can provide enough re- 
fraction to bring the signal level up more than 
70 db. above the value that would be obtained 
over the same distance in open terrain! 

Few hams are likely to be fortunate enough 
to achieve any such "obstacle gain" but again 
and again in our mobile work in the western 
mountains we saw knife-edge refraction at work. 
In several instances we had strong signals over 
mountainous paths of greater length than we've 
ever worked over rolling New England or the 
flat Middle West. And of course the 2-meter work 
between Arizona stations and others at distances 
of 350 miles or more, recently reported in these 
pages, is further proof that high mountains are, 
at least, no certain barrier. 

Add to these factors the still newer possibility 
of v.h.f. DX by reflection from meteor trails, now 
being exploited by W4HHK, W2UK and others, 
and the tropospheric and auroral phenomena 
we've known about for years, and you have 
rather convincing evidence that v.h.f. can be 
fun just about anywhere. Are you getting in on 
it? 

Don't jump to the conclusion, from what we've 
been sa^-ing, that all j^ou need is a 522 and a 
folded dipole to work 400 miles over the moun- 
tains on 144 Mc. It's not that simple, by any 
means, or we'd have been doing it long ago. The 
signals you get over long indirect paths are Hkely 
to be very weak at best; you'U need plenty of 
power, a good big antenna, and the best available 
receiver to turn the trick. Highly selective re- 
ceivers and c.w. techniques are a must, at least 
at first. If you've tried a tough path and failed, 
with anything less than a combination of all 
these assets, you can't say that it can't be done. 
Working long hauls over high mountains is^ 
job to separate the men from the boys. Give it 
all you've got, and the chances are j^ou'll be 
pleased with the results! 

OES Notes 

W2RHQ, Syracuse, N. Y. — Now on 432 Mc. with 2C39 
grounded-grid amphfier, driven by an 832A tripler. Would 
like to hear from anyone with dope on gear for 1215 Mc. 
Recently got 32-element 144-Mc. array working properly 
by bringing two 16-element sections closer together. With 
the orighial arrangement (sections a half wave apart between 
element ends) there was a split forward lobe. Now hearing 
W2UK, W3BGT and other distant stations off the backs of 

55 



their beams fairly regularly; wish stations in New Jersey 
and Pennsylvania would aim toward central New York 
State more often. 

W2UTH, Victor, N. Y. — Back in business in new loca- 
tion after extensive damage to house and antennas by 
Hurricane Hazel. Activity on 220 Me. developing in Roches- 
ter area with W28 POM RTB MHU UXP and K2CEH on. 

W3UQJ, York, Pa. — Would like to hear as to results 
from anyone who has tried 220-Mc. mobile. Suggest more 
use of c.w. on 220, as contacts have been made. As result of 
many skeds with W3LZD, W3SJB, W3UJG and W4UMF, 
it has been found that anytime a readable signal is heard on 
144, 220 is just about equally good. 

W4FLW, Dresden, Tenn. — Gradually developing more 
activity on 50 and 144 Mc. Working W4CYR, Nashville, 
and W4HF0, Martin, on 6 and W4BQG, McKenzie, on 2. 

W4HHK, Collierville, Tenn. — Daily skeds continue with 
W2UK and WIHDQ. Burst count on W2UK runs as high 
as 79 for his 10-minute tape transmission at 0640 CST. 
WIHDQ heard fairly regularly, but with lower burst count, 
on 5-minute transmission at 0635 CST. Similar meteor- 
scatter skeds with W5VWU, Albuquerque, N. Mex., 960 
miles, have produced only unidentifiable pings, though 
W5VWU copied complete call sequence on one occasion. 
Tests also being made with W7VMP, Phoenix, Ariz., 1300 
miles, but no identifiable sigs either way as yet. 

Revamped crystal-controUed converter recently, putting 
in overtone crystal on 45.667 Mc. Enough frequency varia- 
tion is possible in tuning the oscillator plate circuit so that 
it can be set exactly on frequency, multiplying to 137 Mc. 
Now the communications receiver dial reads exactly 7000 
kc. for 144 Mc, a real aid in keeping weak-signal skeds. 

W5GIX, Baton Rouge, La. — New Orleans and Jackson, 
Miss., always reliable on 144 Mc. W4UUF, Pensacola, Fla., 
W4TLV, DemopoUs, and W40ZK, Gadsden, Ala., also 
heard frequently. 

W60RS. Alhambra, Calif. — Working on 220-Mc. crystal- 
controlled converter. Rig for 220 Mc. (Feb., '54, QST) work- 
ing nicely. 

W6ZD0, Canoga Park, Calif. — Daily operation on 220.9 
and 221.1 Mc; conditions much hke 112 and 56 Mc. of 
many years ago, even to superregen receiver QRM! Con- 
verted 1350-Mc. radiosonde to 1215-Mc. band. 

W7JHX, Port Orchard, Wash. — Made first TV transmis- 
sion Oct. 18th. Put rig on following evening and left it run- 
ning while away from home. Main power transformer 
shorted, causing much smoke and excitement. Everything 
repaired within a few days, and can now transmit video on 
441.36 Mc. any evening and Sundays by appointment. Can 
usually be reached on 2 meters, or through Puget Sound 
Net. 

W9KLR, Rensselaer, Ind. — Here's a fellow who must 
hold some kind of record: W9JNZ, on the air three times 
since he was Ucensed, made 20 contacts in 15 states and 6 
call areas on 144 Mc! 

VE7FJ, New Westminster, B. C. — Much talk, by W7s, 
of^going horizontal on 144 Mc. VE7s, always in favor of 
horizontal, will welcome change. 

V06U and W7SNR/V06, Goose Bay, Labrador — 'LocaX 
activity on 50, 144 and 220 Mc. These fellows should have 
a fine opportunity to make v.h.f. historj', if they watch con- 
ditions closely for chanres to work down tlin .Atlantic Sea- 
board and elsewhere. 



2-METER STANDINGS 



States 

WIRFU 

WIHDQ 

WICCH 

WIIZY 

WIIEO 

WIAZK 

WIMNF 

WIBCN 

WIKCS 

WIDJK 

WIMMN ... 



CaU 
Areas 
19 7 
19 6 
17 5 
16 6 
16 5 



W20RI 23 

W2UK 23 

W2NLY 23 

W2AZL 21 

W2QED 21 

W2BLV 19 

W20PQ 19 

W2DWJ 17 

W2AOC 17 

W2UTH 16 

W2PAU 16 6 

W2PCQ 16 5 

W2LHI 16 

W2CFT 15 

W2DFV. . . .15 
W2AMJ. . . .15 

W2QNZ 14 

W2BRV .... 14 



Miles 
1150 
1020 
670 
750 
475 
650 
600 
650 
640 
520 
520 

1000 
1075 
1050 
1050 
1020 
910 

632 
600 
880 
740 
650 
550 
625 

550 
400 
590 



CaU 
States Areas MUes 

W6WSQ 3 3 1390 

W6BAZ 3 2 320 

W6NLZ 3 2 360 

W6MMU. ..2 2 240 

W6GCG. ... 2 2 210 

W6QAC .... 2 2 200 

W6EXH 2 2 193 



W7VMP 4 

W7JU 3 

W7LEE 3 

W7YZU 3 

W7JUO 2 

W7RAP 2 



25 8 
22 8 
20 8 



W8BFQ 29 8 

W8WXV 28 8 

W8WJC . 
W8RMH 
W8WRN 
W8DX . . 
W8BAX. . . .20 

W8EP 18 

W8UKS. . . .18 
W8RWW. ..17 
W8WSE .... 16 
W8SRW 16 



.20 



W3RUE .... 23 8 950 



W3NKM 
W3BNC . 
W3FPH . 
W3KWL 
W3LNA. 
W3IBH . 
W3GKP, 
W3TDF. 



.15 6 
.13 5 



W4HHK 26 8 

W4AO 22 7 

W4PCT 20 8 

W4JFV 18 7 

W4MKJ 16 7 

W4UMF 15 6 

W40XG....14 7 

W4JHC 14 5 

W4WCB 14 5 

W4TCR .... 14 5 

W4UBY....14 5 

W4IKZ 13 5 

W4JFU 13 5 

W4ZBU 10 5 

W4UDQ 10 5 

W4TLA 7 4 

W5RCI 21 7 

W5JTI 19 7 

W5QNL....10 6 

W5CVW 10 5 

W5AJG 10 4 

W5MWW. . . 9 4 

W5ML 9 3 

W5ABN. ... 9 3 

W5ERD 8 3 

W5VX 7 4 

W5VY 7 3 

W5FEK 7 2 

W50NS 7 2 



660 
750 

720 
720 
570 
800 
570 

1020 
950 

830 
666 
600 
500 
720 
740 
720 
435 
720 
720 
800 
850 
850 

925 
1000 
1400 
1180 
1260 
670 
700 
780 
570 

1200 
580 
950 



W9EHX 23 7 

W9FVJ 22 8 

W9EQC 22 8 

W9KLR. . . .21 7 

W9BPV 20 7 

W9UCH 20 7 

W9KPS 19 7 

W9REM 19 6 

W9LF 19 - 

W9ALU .... 18 7 

W9MUD....18 6 

W9JGA 17 6 

W9WOK....17 6 

W9ZHL 17 6 

W9MBI....16 7 

W9BOV 15 6 

W9LEE 16 6 

W9JNZ 15 6 

W9DDG 14 6 

W9FAN .... 14 7 

W9QKM 14 6 

W9DSP 14 5 

W9UIA 12 7 

W9ZAD 11 5 

W9GTA 11 5 

W9JBF 10 5 



W0EMS....25 8 

W0IHD 24 7 

W0GUD 22 7 

W0ONQ....17 6 

W0INI 14 6 

W0OAC....14 5 

W0ZJB 12 7 

W0WGZ 11 5 



W6ZL 3 3 1400 



VE3AIB . 

VE3DIR 18 

VE3BQN. . .14 
VE3DER. . .13 

VE3BPB 12 

VE3AQG . . .11 

VEIQY 11 

VE2AOK ... 10 
VE7FJ 2 



20 8 



417 
247 
240 
240 
140 
165 

850 
1200 
775 
690 
670 
676 
656 
800 
720 
630 
830 
700 

726 
850 
820 
690 
1000 
750 
660 



800 
640 
720 
600 



780 
560 
700 
680 
620 
700 
540 
700 
540 
760 

1175 

870 
1065 
1090 

830 

726 
1097 

760 

890 
790 
790 
800 
715 
800 
900 
550 
365 




C. W. Reception with the Communicator 

Use of c.w. on 144 Mc. is increasing all the time, and 
probably would have progressed further if there were some 
{Continued on page 134) 



With this 24-element array, 
W7LHL/7, Bolan Peak, in southern 
Oregon, worked the Northwest's best 
2-meter DX in the September V.H.F. 
Party. 



QST for 



September V.H.F. Party Results 

Increased Western Activity Nets Record Number of Logs 



WE MAY never be able to set up any wholly 
fair system for scoring v.h.f. contests, 
or any other operating activity, on a na- 
tional scale, but the disparity between various 
sections of the country is dropping with every 
v.h.f. party. Of course, a "national high" is 
only a mythical honor, anyway, as there is com- 
petition only within your own ARRL section, 
but it is interesting to look through the tabula- 
tion at the end of this report and see where the 
really high scores were made. 

Of the geographically small and densely pop- 
ulated ARRL sections along the Eastern Sea- 
board, only Northern and Southern New Jersey, 
Western Massachusetts, New Hampshire and 
Connecticut reported September V.H.F. Party 
totals higher than the 2095 points piled up in 
the East Bay Section by K6GWE, Berkeley, 
Calif. Five eastern sections, supposedly cinches 
for high spots in a national ranking, were topped 
by Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Santa Clara Valley, 
East Bay and Los Angeles. 

Ignoring the section multiplier, an unfair 
factor in national comparisons, we find that the 
number of contacts made is becoming more uni- 
form, the country over, with every contest. In 
only two ARRL sections. Northern New Jersey 
and Los Angeles, were more than 200 contacts 
reported. In the bracket between 150 and 200, 
we find Illinois, Ohio, Western Massachusetts 
and New Hampshire. Of the sections reporting 
100 to 150 contacts, Indiana, Michigan, Santa 
Clara Valley and East Bay are outside the "fa- 
vored" Atlantic Seaboard states. The country's 
highest one-band score was made, not by an 
East Coast station, but by W8WXV, Shiloh, 
Ohio, who worked 196 stations in 17 sections, 
3332 points, on 144 Mc. alone. 

The ability to work several bands is the most 
important factor in high scoring, in any section. 
The rules were set up with that in mind: to pro- 
mote versatility and encourage the use of our 
higher bands. Working all bands from 50 to 
1215 Mc. enabled K2CMB, Paterson, N. J., 
to make 280 contacts for 8456 points, the coun- 
try's high for a single-operator set-up. The 230 
contacts of W6WSQ, Pasadena, Calif., made on 
50, 144 and 420 Mc, is second in number of 
QSOs. Lee Waite, W2FBZ, a frequent Northern 
New Jersej^ wnnner, worked 4 bands for 206 
contacts and 7488 points, running K2CMB a 
close second for national single-operator high. 

Mountain expeditions, as always in spring 
and fall parties, contributed greatly to the suc- 
cess of the contest. For once, the WlMHL/1 
team came off second best. A combination new 
to v.h.f. contests but with long Field Day ex- 
perience, W2GSA/2, Garden State Amateur 
Radio Association, nosed out the Waltham 



group, with 327 contacts on 50, 144 and 220 
Mc, for 9715 points. Some nice 2-meter DX was 
worked in the Northwest b}^ mountain portables. 
W7PVZ/7 in a fire lookout on Capitol Peak, 
near Olympia, Wash., worked W7LHL/7 on 
Bolan Peak in Southern Oregon, about 350 
miles. An indication of the growth of 2-meter 
interest in that region: W7PVZ/7 worked 83 
different stations on 144 Mc. 

The 1215-Mc. band loomed as a v.h.f. con- 
test factor of some proportions. As the result 




Sixty-four clement beam atop a 100-foot tower — 
\\ 8\\ XV, Shiloh, Ohio, country's top one-band scorer. 
.\1 worked 196 stations on 144 Mc. 

of cooperative effort by K2CMI, K2DFS and 
W3UQB, five nearly identical 1215-Mc. stations 
were built. These used 2C39 cavity oscillators, 
delivering about 12 watts output. Tuned-cavity' 
crj-stal mixers with 144-Mc output worked into 
Gonset Communicators as tunable i.f.'s. Dupli- 
cate corner-reflector arrays were used for trans- 
mission and reception. The rigs were used by 
WlJRV/1 at Mead Pond, just over the line in 
Connecticut, W3UQB/2 at Balanced Rock, 
Nyack, N. Y., K2DFS, at his home in Bergen- 
field, N. J., and K2CMI/2 and W2FSN/2 in 
Manhattan high spots, to give K2CMB five con- 
tacts in four ARRL sections on 1215 Mc. 

Around San Francisco there was enough doing 



January 1955 



57 



on 144 Mc. so that W6TDP made 56 contacts 
with 5 watts input to a 5763 doubler (rig built 
from W2IHW's description in February, 1954, 
QST), and a cut-dowTi TV Yagi hung in his 
basement ! 

Two 0-0-0 scores don't appear in the tabula- 
tion, but they represent effort and good inten- 
tions. One goes to W7RCC, Panguitch, Utah, 
who was in there trying, but heard no signals. 
The other was earned by WlHDQ/0. Your 
conductor got up before 0600 Sunday morning 
and drove out from the Dakota Division Con- 
vention Headquarters in Rapid City, S. D., to 
a fine clear spot in the Black Hills. Having been 
in every v.h.f. contest since the first one in 1939, 
he was going to give this one the "college try," 
l)ut he didn't reckon with the effects of the 
bright South Dakota sun. With the car parked, 
windows closed, all the previous day, the crystal 
mike just couldn't take it. Having no provision 
for keying the rig or copying c.w., on the mobile 
receiver, WlHDQ/0 folded his beam and si- 
lently stole back to Rapid Cit3^ 

In the following tabulation, scores are listed by ARRL 
Divisions and Sections. Unless otherwise noted, the top 
scorer in each section receives a certificate award. Columns 
indicate the final score, the number of contacts, the section 
multiplier, and the bands used. A represents 50 Mc; B, 
144 Mc; C, 220 Mc; D, 420 Mc; and E, 1215 Mc. Multi- 
ple-operator stations, with calls of participating operators, 
are shown at the end of each section tabulation. 



ATLANTIC DIVISION 

E. Pennsijlvmiia 
W3TDF. .2016-112-18-AB 
W3TYX. .1024-128- 8-B 
W3MRQ/3.714- 48-14-BCD 
W3YWF...644- 89- 7-BC 
W3SAO. . . .596- 85- 7-B 
W3OLV/3..540- 60- 9-B 
W3WED...112- 28- 4-B 

W3THB 48- 16- 3-B 

W3LCM 16- 8- 2-B 

W3KX/3« (W3s DXT LZD 
YPG NNH QGX PMG) 
4288-117-32- 

ABCD 
W3LCK/3 (W3s LCK NEP) 
228- 32- 6-BD 

Maryland-Delauare-D. C. 
W3TOM. . .988- 76-13-AB 
WSC'GV. . .832- 63- 13- ABC 
W3YHI....792- 88- 9-B 
W3LMC. . .729- 81- 9-B 
W3UJG....648- 51-12- ABC 
W3LZZ. . . 220- 44- 5-B 
W30JU. . . . 189- 27- 7-A 
W30TC. . .116- 21- 6-A 
W3NZR. . .115- 23- 5-B 
W3KMV...114- 19- 6-A 
W3PGAI. .110- 22- 5-B 
W3NH .... 104- 26- 4-B 
W30NP. . .104- 26- 4-B 
WN3YLQ. .93- 31- 3-B 

W3BYG 88- 22- 4-B 

W3ZMK .75- 25- 3-B 
W4WrL/3. .36- 18- 2-B 

S. New Jersey 
W2QED..3425- 127-25- 



W2CTA .... 46- 23- 2-B 

W2QY 42- 21- 2-B 

W2EFO 38- 19- 2-B 

W2BLN/2..24- 8- 3-B 
KN2INO. . .23- 23- 1-B 

W2BLP 10- 10- 1-B 

W2RJL 10- 5- 2-A 

W2TBQ 7- 7- 1-B 

W2JGJS (W2s JGJ UPT) 

1660- 83-20-AB 
W20FQ/2 (W2s OXS MSM 
HAX K2s HWS AQP) 

715- 54-13-BD 

li'. Pennsylvania 
W3FPH. . .517- 47-1 1-AB 
W3KWL . . 342- 57- 6-AB 
W3KX1 . . .275- 55- 5-B 

W3QCN 10- 5- 2-B 

W3KWH (W3s UHM SVJ 
ZDW MPK WHY) 

585- 65- 9-AB 

CENTRAL DIVISION 



W2UK. . 
W2BLV. 
W20RA . 
W2BAY. 



ABCD 
. 2006-1 18-17-B 
.561- 47-1 1-BD 
. .248- 31- 8-AB 
. . . 16- 4- 4-A 



^VesleTn New York 
W2ALR. . . 1 177-107-1 1-AB 
W2RUI. . .1144- 79-13- 

ABCD 
K2CEH .750- 75-10-AB 
W2UTH. . .700- 70-10-AB 

W20RI 432- 72- 6-B 

W2WFB. . .400- 50- 8-B 
W2RHCi. . .384- 63- 6-AC 
KN2HA() .284- 71- 4-B 
W2FCG/2. 204- 34- 6-B 

W2KZ 200- 50- 4-B 

W2QNA.. .152- 38- 4-B 
W2RXG. . .125- 25- 5-B 
K2CVX. .52- 13- 4-B 



W9WOK 
W9EQC . 
W9DRN. 
W9QKM.. 
W9VIT. .. 
WN9HYG 
W9VNW.. 
W9ALR. . 
W9USI. . . 
WN9ECiB. 
W9ADO . . 
W9BOI. . . 
W9KCW. . 
W9KLD. . 
W91FA. . . 
W9KCM.. 
W9f)EV . . 
W9ZEX. . 
W9MYt;.. 
W9CX.... 
W9PMN.. 
W90TV.. 



Illinois 

2325-155-15-AB 
1120-112-10-B 
1070-103-10-BC 
.890- 89-10-AB 
.525- 75- 7-B 
.434- 62- 7-B 
.402- 67- 6-B 
.390- 65- 6-B 
.345- 69- 5-B 
.312- 52- 6-B 
.216- 36- 6-B 
.200- 40- 5-B 
.170- 34- 5-B 
.160- 32- 
.150- 25- 
.120- 24- 
.100- 20- 
. . 80- 20- 
. . 46- 23- 
. .45- 15- 
..30- 10- 
. ...9- 



5-B 
6-B 
5-B 
5-B 
4-B 
2-B 
3-B 
3-B 
1-B 



Indiana 
W9KLR. .1441-131-11-B 
W9ZHL. . . . 732- 61-12-AB 
WN9IM0..112- 16- 7-B 
W9THW....90- 18- 5-B 
W9VAY. . . .88- 22- 4-B 
WN9IOC. . .50- 10- 5-B 

Wisconsin 
W9RXS . . . 408- 68- 6-B 
W9ZAD. . .378- 54- 7-AB 




Antennas and part of 360-degree view at the location 
of K6GWE, Vollmer Peak, Berkeley, Calif., East Bay 
Section leader. 



W9TQ 210- 35- 6-AB 

W9BTI 150- 25- 6-AB 

W9UJM . . . 144- 36- 4-B 
W9GJE... .100- 25- 4-B 

W9DSP 80- 16- 5-B 

W9ZJA 56- 14- 4-B 



DAKOTA DIVISION 

Minnesota 

W0TJF 60- 12- 5-B 

W0OAC .... 48- 12- 4-B 

W0MVP 4- 2- 1-C 

W0OFY 4- 2- 1-C 

W0OFZ 4 2- 1-C 



DELTA DIVISION 

Tennessee 
W4HHK...320- 32-10-B 
W4GIS 69- 23- 3-B 



GREAT LAKES 
DIVISION 

Kentucky 

W4PCT. . . .935- 85-1 1-AB 

Michigan 

W8RMH. . 2040-1 15-17- 

ABCD 
W8DX. . .1320- 80-15- 

ABCD 
W8NOH. . .288- 48- 6-B 
W8NSH. . .240- 48- 5-B 
WN8PNX2.205- 41- 5-B 
W8CiYU. . .200- 40- 5-B 
W8DDO . . 180- 36- 5-AB 
WN8PSN. .164- 41- 4-B 
W8BGY . . . 152- 38- 4-B 
W8GTK. . . 148- 37- 4-B 

W8JXIT 90- 30- 3-B 

W8T(;H 63- 21- 3-B 

WNSPCE .57- 19- 3-B 
W8HLQ. . . .52- 26- 2-B 
WN8Q()C (WN8S PJS QOO 
SXZ) 144- 36- 4-B 

Ohio 
W8WXV. .3,332-196-17-B 
W8LPD.. .2100-133 15- ABC 
W8NRM.. 1722-112-14- 

ABCD 
WSSDJ . . .680- 85- 8-B 
W8H(>n. . .600- 73- 8-BC 
W8LAII. . .512- 64- 8-B 



W8JSW. . .486- 81- 6-B 
W8HQK. . .432- 72- 6-AB 
W8LOF . .360- 60- 6-B 
W8BMO .340- 63- 5-BC 
WN8PER2.325- 65- 5-B 
W8BAX . . . 290- 56- 5-BC 
W8WRN.. .273- 37- 7- ABC 
W8QLB. . .238- 34- 7-AB 

W8IJL 235- 47- 5-B 

WN8SRO. .235- 47- 5-B 
W8FAZ 215- 40- 5-BC 
W801N .215- 43- 5-B 
W8PMJ. . . 185- 37- 5-B 
W8KOM...114- 57- 2-B 
W8LCY. . .112- 28- 4-B 
WN8QEP . .92- 46- 2-B 
WN8QIU . . .74- 37- 2-B 

W8NAF 72- 36- 2-B 

W8HSY .... 70- 35- 2-B 
WN8SVU. . .62- 31- 2-B 
WN8PKS/8 56- 28- 2-B 

W8IFZ 44- 22- 2-B 

W8WAB.. . .34- 17- 2-B 

W8INQ 12- 6- 1-C 

W80IM 7- 7- 1-B 



HUDSON DIVISION 

Eastern Neio York 
W2RMA..1134- 63-18-AB 
W2MXJ, . .670- 67-10-B 
W2ACY. . .624- 52-12-B 
K2DRV. . .410- 41-10-B 
W2MHE.. 341- 31-11-B 
W2RTE. .112- 16- 7-B 
W2Y1K . . 100- 20- 5-AB 
W2RML/2 (W2s RML ESE 
K2GCH KN2HPK) 

560- 70- 8-B 



N. Y. C.-L. I 
W2KIT.. 2044-146 



W2BRV . 
K2IEJ/2 
W2JBQ. . 
W2DZR. 
W2KIR. . 
W2AOD . 
W2FYQ . 
W2DLO. 
W2GLU. 
K2DUI. . 
W2LID . 
W2FTN 



. 1260-126- 
.948- 79- 
.936- 78 
.882- 98- 
.882- 98- 
.856-100- 
.804-134- 
.748- 68- 
.546- 78- 
.480- 40- 
.470- 94- 
.455- 91- 



W2BNX/2 370- 74 
W2AWH.. .312- 52- 



K2ESZ. 
W2EEN. 
W2YHP. 
W2LKP. 



.252- 63 
.240- 60- 
.188- 47- 
. ISO- 25- 



14-B 
10-B 
12-B 
12-B 

9-B 

9-B 

8-Bn 

6-B 
11-AB 

7-B 
12-B 

5-B 

5-B 

5-B 

6-AB 

4-B 

4-B 

4-B 

6-BD 



58 



QST for 



KN2HOR2.184- 46- 4-B 
K2CMV . . . 164- 41- 4-B 

■W2IX 144- 48- 3-B 

W2TUK. . .144- 36- 4-B 
K2CWS. . . . 144- 36- 4-& 
W2WOF. . . 110- 17- 5-BD 
KN2HMM/2 

42- 21- 2-B 

KN2IPH.. . . 15- 15- 1-B 

W2JZT/2 (W2s HJM JZT) 

270- 45- 6-B 

A^ Xew Jersey 
K2CMB . . 8456-280-28- 

ABCDE 
W2FBZ. . . 7488-206-32- 

ABCD 
■W2RGV. .5150-194-25- ABC 
W2DZA.. . 1683- 81-17- 

ABCD 
W2LHI. . . .732- 61-12-B 

■W2MM 540- 60- 9-B 

K2BJP .... 532- 76- 7-B 
KN2IEY/M 

460-115- 4-B 
W2PEV.. . .408- 51- 8-AB 
K2EQD. . .200- 40- 5-B 
W2ESC/M 123- 41- 3-B 
W20AE .... 92- 23- 4-B 
W2GSA/2 (W2s FZY CQB 
PAT PWX GUM NBE HWX 
AF K2s EGO HNA) 

9715-327-29- ABC 

MIDWEST DIVISION 

Iowa 
WN0USQ. . .66- 22- 3-B 
Kansas 

W0IIJ 182- 26- 7-B 

W0BDK 95- 19- 5-B 

W0HAJ 85- 17- 5-B 

W0JAS 60- 15- 4-B 

W0MOX/0. .27- 9- 3-B 

Missouri 

W0ETJ 648- 54-12-B 

W0IHD....192- 32- 6-B 

A'efirosta 
W0HXH. . . 156- 26- 6-B 
W0VEC . . . 150- 25- 6-B 
W0LEF. . . . 105- 21- 5-B 

NEW ENGLAND 
DIVISION 

Connecticut 

W2BVU/1 

4263-137-29- 

ABCD 
WIKHL. .2646-126-21-AB 
WIHDQ^' * 

2332-105-22-ABD 
W1PHR..1683- 97-17-ABD 
WIREZ.. .1260- 90-14-B 
WITXI ...900- 90-10-B 
WIURC. . .510- 51-10-B 
WIQAK. . .459- 51- 9-B 
WIZDR-".. .420- 60- 7-B 
WIRMU.. .336- 56- 6-B 
WIYDB . . .270- 45- 6-B 
W1AW<'5.. 228- 38- 6-AB 
WN1CDD2.228- 57- 4-B 
WIULY. . 210- 42- 5-B 
WISTU . . . 188- 47- 4-B 
WX1AMY.150- 50- 3-B 
WIYDS. . .111- 37- 3-B 

WIAKX 98- 49- 2-B 

WIKHM. . .84- 21- 4-AB 

WINEQ 75- 25- 3-B 

WNICDC. .60- 30- 2-B 
WlQJL/1. . .56- 28- 2-B 
WIEFW. . . .36- 18- 2-B 
WIWHF. .. . .4- 4- 1-B 

Maine 
W1TAM...374- 34-11-AB 

WILKP 24- 4- 4- 

ABCD 

E. Massachusetts 

WIOOP.. . 1921—102-17- 

ABCD 
WIAQE . . 1200-100-12-AB 
WIJSM. . . 1188-108-1 1-B 
W1CTW...918- 92- 9- ABC 
W1LYL....345- 69- 5-B 

WIDJ 240- 30- 8-A 

WIBRK. . . 108- 27- 4-B 
WNIZOC. . .75- 25- 3-B 
WNIBYI. . .60- 62- 2-B 
WIMEG... .56- 14- 4-B 
WICTR. . . .36- 12- 3-B 
W1MGP/M.33- 11- 3-A 

WITUM 28- 7- 2-C 

WIAEQ 22- 11- 2-B 

W1QCC/1« (Wis QCC VZQ) 
3500-120-28- 

ABCD 
WIKBN (Wis KBX VKT) 

80- 20- 4-B 
WIYIZ (Wis LJN YIZ) 

48- 16- 3-B 



W. Massachusetts 
WIRFU. .5348-191-28-AB 
WIVNH. . 2875-1 13-25-ABD 
WIJWV . . . 150- 30- 5-B 
K2GIR/1..128- 16- 8-A 
WlHXD/1 (Wis HXD RGM 
UIY WRG) 

742- 53-14-AB 

New Hampshire 
WlFZ/1. .4752-166-27- 

ABCD 
WIUIZ /1 . 2976-1 19-24- ABC 
WIWBM. . .78- 13- 6-AB 
WlMHL/16 (WlsLUWPYM 
QMX RUD) 

9316-257-34- 

ABCD 
WILUW/M (Wis LUW 
QMX) 10- 5- 2-B 

Rhode Island 
WIZJQ. . .2002-143-14-B 
WlUEF/1 (Wis KFL CEF 
WUJ) 355- 71- 5-B 

Vermont 
W1MMX...96- 16- 6-B 
WlYDM/1 (Wis VLJ YDM) 

1691- 89-19-AB 

NORTHWESTERN 
DIVISION 

Oregon 
•W7OKV/7.180- 60- 3-B 
W7XGW...112- 28- 4-AB 
W7IXX. . . .81- 27- 3-AB 

W7HBH 69- 23- 3-AB 

W7XXR . . .42- 21- 2-B 
W7JIP/7 (W7s JIP OAY 
SAO) 284- 71- 4-AB 

Washington 
W7rFE. . .315- 63- 5-AB 
W7PVZ/7. .249- 83- 3-B 
W7JHX. . .200- 50- 4-AB 
WX7rZB .153- 51- 3-B 
W7SRL' . . 126- 43- 3-B 

W7RT 106- 53- 2-AB 

W7TMU . . .87- 29- 3-AB 

W7PRV 72- 36- 2-B 

W'KO 68- 34- 2-AB 

W7ALr 56- 28- 2-B 

WX7WRI. .40- 20- 2-B 

W7PCJS 36- 18- 2-AB 

\V7HML 30- 15- 2-B 

W7HYK 30- 15- 2-AB 

W7BB/7 (W7s QKE lEE) 
335- 67- 5-AB 



Virginia 
W4rBY . . 1326-102-13-AB 
W4UMF. . .876- 69-12- ABC 
W4JCJ. . . .783- 87- 9-B 
W4MLR. . .354- 59- 6-B 
W4VVE . . . 175- 23- 7-BD 
W6LOX/4.155- 31- 5-B 
W3SFY/4 (W3s SFY WBY) 
780- 78-10-AB 

SOUTHEASTERN 
DIVISION 

Alabama 
W4TLV 28- 7- 4-B 

SOUTHWESTERN 
DIVISION 



PACIFIC DIVISION 

Xernda 

W7JU 8- 4- 2-B 

Santa Clara Valley 
W6YEQ. .1708-1 14-14- ABD 
W6EDC . . 1224-100-12-ABD 
W6S.\W. . .612-102- 6-B 
W6EXX. . .540- 90- 6-B 
KX6CQG..208- 52- 4-B 
KX6DTS..150- 30- 5-B 
W6BDO/6 (W6s BDO YGX 
SSA ODK K6CZ1) 

1365- 98-13-.\BD 

East Bay 
W6UPD. . .205- 41- 5-B 
W6PEG/M.57- 19- 3-B 
K6GWE'' (W6s DXX MXQ 
RLB UOV VSV) 

2096-121-16- 

ABCD 
W6JOX (W6s JOX MGO) 
llU-lOl-ll-AB 
KX6EDX/6(W6QZE K6ERG 
KX6EDX) 636-106- 6-B 
K6AZH/6 (W6s RKT EXL 
VDRJLG).540- 90- 6-AB 

San Francisco 

W6AJF. ..1425- 86-15- 

ABCD 
W6BAZ....610- 61-10-AB 
W6TDP . . . 280- 56- 5-B 
KX6HIK . . 252- 63- 4-B 
KX6HIT/6 189- 63- 3-B 
K6GVB....10S- 27- 4-B 

Sacramento Valley 

W6PIV 304- 38- 8-AB 

W60TX...216- 36- 6-B 
W6VBU .... 88- 22- 4-B 
W6KUI/6« (W6FXJ K6BIQ) 

531- 59- 9-AB 

K6BAT (K6s AXX BAT) 

152- 18- 8-ABD 



ROANOKE DIVISION 

North Carolina 
W4MDA....30- 10- 3-B 



Los Angeles 




W6WSQ . . 


1617-230- 


7-ABD 


W6MMU. 


.999-109- 


9-ABD 


W6IWY . . 


.819- 82- 


9- 
ABCD 


W6QGX. . 


.543-181- 


3-B 


K6ACF. . . 


.396-132- 


3-B 


K6DXJ . . 


.333-111- 


3-B 


W6LIT .. 


.330- 66- 


5-AB 


KX6GMX 


.330-110- 


3-B 


W6MRH.. 


.294- 98- 


3-B 


W6HZ. . . 


.280- 54- 


5-BC 


W6WRT.. 


.222- 74- 


3-B 


W6DXI. . 


. .60- 60- 


1-B 


K6CJG . . . 


...6- 6- 


1-B 


W6LEE/6 


...2- 2- 


1-B 


W6YZU/6 


...2- 2- 


1-B 



Arizona 

W7LEE 95- 19- 5-B 

W7VMP 95- 19- 5-B 

W7YZU 28- 7- 4-B 

Santa Barbara 
W60HQ/6 . 364- 50- 7-BD 
K6CRJ 129- 43- 3-B 



KX6HEC ...54- 18- 3-B 

WEST GULF 
DIVISION 

Northern Texas 
W5SXX .... 3- 3- 1-B 
Oklalwma 

W5DFU 21- 7- 3-B 

New Mexico 
W5FAG/5.. 24- 12- 2-B 

W5FPB 11- 11- 1-B 

W5EYR 7- 7- 1-B 

W9EYV/5...6- 6- 1-B 

CANADIAN DIVISION 

Maritime 

V06U 12- 4- 1-AC 

W7SXRA^06.9- 6- 1-AC 

Ontario 
VE3BQX/3 

1067- 93-11- 

ABCD 
VE3DXX..869- 78-11-BC 
VE3AIB . . . 776- 95- 8-ABD 
VE3DIR . 462- 66- 7-B 
VE3AQG...335- 71- S-B 
VE3BGI. . .225- 45- 5-AB 
VE3DSU.. .215- 43- 5-B 
VE3DHG..210- 42- 5-AB 
VE3DER . . 204- 34- 6-AB 
VE3AET.. .185- 37- 5-AB 
VE3AGW. . 168- 42- 4-AB 
VE3BMB .132- 33- 4-B 

VE3BPB 72- 12- 6-B 

VE3KM 9- 9- 1-A 

Quebec 
VE2AOK..126- 18- 7-B 

British Columbia 
VE7FJ 48- 16- 3-B 



1 WN3ZAQ, opr. ^ Novice award winner. 
^ WlVLH, opr. ■* Hq. staff — not eligible for award, 
opr. * Multiple-operator award winner. ^ W7QPM, opr. 



•WIWPR, 



CALLING ALL NOVICES: 
CO N-R! 

The Novice Round-up makes its fourth 
annual appearance this year, January 8th 
through 23rd. Old-timers are invited to 
join in the fun and give the newcomers 
contacts. 

Full details appeared in December QST, 
but as a reminder, don't forget that the 
Round-up starts on Saturday, January 
8th, at 6:00 p.m., local time, and ends on 
Sunday, January 23rd, 9:00 p.m. local 
time. A time Umit of forty hours is avail- 
able. This can be used any way you prefer 
in operation on 80, 40, 15 and 2 meters. 

You've still time to get extra scoring 
credits by qualifying in the Code Pro- 
ficiency Run from WlAW on January 
14th, or from W60WP on January 7th. 
In the meantime, send to ARRL Head- 
quarters for your free map of the United 
States, a contest log, and reporting forms 
for the Novice Round-up. The fine outline 
map can be posted in your shack to keep 
a visual check on your worked-aU-states 
progress. 

Remember to read December QST 
again for full details on rules. 



January 1955 



59 



A.R.R.L. COUNTRIES LIST • official List for ARKL bX Confest and the Postwar DXCd 



ACS Sikkim 

AC4 Tibet 

AP Pakistan 

BV, (C3) Formosa 

C (unofficial) China 

C3 (See BV) 

C9 Manchuria 

CE Chile 

CE7Z-, LU, VKl, VPS Antarctica 

CE0 Easter Island 

CM, CO Cuba 

CN2, KTl Tangier Zone 

CN8 French Morocco 

CP Bolivia 

CR4 Cape Verde Islands 

CRo Portuguese Guinea 

CR5 Principe, Sao Thome 

CR6 Angola 

CR7 Mozambique 

CR8 Goa (Portuguese India) 

CRO Macau 

CRIO Portuguese Timor 

CTl Portugal 

CT2 Azores Islands 

CT3 Madeira Islands 

CX Uruguay 

DJ, DL, DM Germany 

DU Philippine Islands 

EA Spain 

EA6 Balearic Islands 

EA8 Canary Islands 

EA9 If ni 

EA9 Rio de Oro 

EA9 Spanish Morocco 

EA0 Spanish Guinea 

EI Republic of Ireland 

EL Liberia 

EQ Iran (Persia) 

ET2 Eritrea 

ET3 Ethiopia 

F France 

FA Algeria 

FB8 . . Amsterdam & St. Paul Islands 

FB8 Kerguelen Islands 

FB8 Madagascar 

FC Corsica 

FD French Togoland 

FES French Cameroons 

FF8 French West Africa 

FG Guadeloupe 

FI8 French Indo-China 

FK8 New Caledonia 

FKS8 (SeeOE) 

FLS French Somaliland 

FM Martinique 

FN French India 

F08 Clipperton Island 

F08... French Oceania (e.g., Tahiti) 
FP8..St. Pierre & Miquelon Islands 

FQ8 French Equatorial Africa 

FR7 Reunion Island 

FU8, YJ New Hebrides 

FY7 French Guiana & Inini 

G England 

(3C Channel Islands 

GD Isle of Man 

GI Northern Ireland 

GM Scotland 

GW Wales 

HA Hungary 

HBl, 9 Switzerland 

HC Ecuador 

HC8 Galapagos Islands 

HE Leichtenstein 

IIH Haiti 

HI Dominican Republic 

HK Colombia 

HK0. . .Archipelago of San Andres 

and Providencia 

HL Korea 

HP Panama 

HR Honduras 

HS Siam 

HV Vatican City 

HZ. .Saudi Arabia (Hedjaz & Nejd) 

II Italy 

II Trieste 

15, MS4 Italian Somaliland 

ISl Sardinia 

JA, KA Japan 

JY, ZC7 Jordan 

JZ0 Netherlands New Guinea 

K, W United States of America 

KA (See JA) 

KA0 Bonin & Volcano Islands 

KB6... Baker, Howland & American 

Phoenix Islands 

KC4 Navassa Island 

KC6 Eastern Caroline Islands 



KC6 Western Caroline Islands 

KG4 Guantanamo Bay 

KG6 Mariana Islands 

KH6 Hawaiian Islands 

KJ6 Johnston Island 

KL7 Alaska 

KM6 Midway Islands 

KP4 Puerto Rico 

KP6. . .Palmyra Group, Jarvis Island 
KR6.Ryukyu Islands (e.g., Okinawa) 

KS4 Swan Island 

KS6 American Samoa 

KTl (SeeCN2) 

KV4 Virgin Islands 

KW6 Wake Island 

KX6 Marshall Islands 

KZ5 Canal Zone 

LA, LB Jan Mayen 

LA, LB Norway 

LA, LB Svalbard (Spitzbergen) 

LU Argentina 

LU-Z (See CE7Z-, VKl, VPS) 

LX Luxembourg 

LZ Bulgaria 

Ml San Marino 

MB9 (See OE) 

MP4 Bahrein Island 

MP4 Kuwait 

MP4 Qatar 

MP4 Trucial Oman 

MS4 (See 15) 

OA Peru 

0D5 Lebanon 

OE, MB9, FKS8 Austria 

OH Finland 

OK Czechoslovakia 

ON4 Belgium 

0Q5, Belgian Congo 

OX Greenland 

OY Faeroes 

OZ Denmark 

PA0 Netherlands 

PJ2 Netherlands West Indies 

PKl, 2, 3 Java 

PK4 Sumatra 

PK5 Netherlands Borneo 

PK6 Celebes & Molucca Islands 

PX Andorra 

PY Brazil 

PZl Netherlands Guiana 

SM Sweden 

SP Poland 

ST Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 

SU Egypt 

SV Greece 

SV Crete 

SV Dodecanese (e.g., Rhodes) 

TA Turkey 

TF Iceland 

TG Guatemala 

TI Costa Rica 

TI9 Cocos Island 

UAl, 3, 4, 6 European Russian 

Socialist Federated Soviet Republic 

UA9, Asiatic Russian S.F.S.R. 

UB5 Ukraine 

UC2 White Russian Soviet 

Socialist Republic 

UD6 Azerbaijan 

UF6 Georgia 

UG6 Armenia 

UH8 Turkoman 

U18 Uzbek 

UJ8 Tadzhik 

UL7 Kazakh 

UM8 Kirghiz 

UNI Karelo-Finnish Republic 

U05 Moldavia 

UP2 Lithuania 

UQ2 Latvia 

UR2 Estonia 

VE, VO Canada 

VK. .Australia (including Tasmania) 

VKl (See CE7Z-, LU-Z, VPS) 

VKl, ZC2 Cocos Island 

VKl Heard Island 

VKl Macquarie Island 

VK9 Norfolk Island 

VK9 Papua Territory 

VK9 Territory of New Guinea 

VO (See VE) 

VPl British Honduras 

VP2 Leeward Islands 

VP2 Windward Islands 

VP3 British Guiana 

VP4 Trinidad & Tobago 

VPS Cayman Islands 

VP5 Jamaica 



VP5 Turks & Caicos Islands 

VP6 Barbados 

VP7 Bahama Islands 

VPS (See CE7Z-, VKl, LU-Z) 

VPS Falkland Islands 

VPS South Georgia 

VPS, LU-Z South Orkney Islands 

VPS South Sandwich Islands 

VPS, LU-Z. . .South Shetland Islands 

VP9 Bermuda Islands 

VQl Zanzibar 

VQ2 Northern Rhodesia 

VQ3 Tanganyika Territory 

VQ4 Kenya 

VQ5 Uganda 

VQ6 British Somaliland 

VQS Chagos Islands 

VQS Mauritius 

VQ9 Seychelles 

VRl GUbert & Ellice Islands 

& Ocean Island 

VRl British Phoenix Islands 

VR2 Fiji Islands 

VR3 Fanning Island 

(Christmas Island) 

VR4 Solomon Islands 

VR5 Tonga (Friendly) Islands 

VRff Pitcairn Island 

VS 1 Singapore 

VS2 Malaya 

VS4 Sarawak 

VS5 Brunei 

VS6 Hong Kong 

VS9 Aden & Socotra 

VS9 Maldive Islands 

VS9 Sultanate of Oman 

VU2 India 

VU4 Laccadive Islands 

VU5. .Andaman and Nicobar Islands 

XE Mexico 

XZ Burma 

YA Afghanistan 

YI Iraq 

YJ (See FUS) 

YK Syria 

YN Nicaragua 

YO Roumania 

YS Salvador 

YU Yugoslavia 

YV Venezuela 

Z A Albania 

ZBl Malta 

ZB2 Gibraltar 

ZC2 (See VKl) 

ZC3 Christmas Island 

ZC4 Cyprus 

ZC5 British North Borneo 

ZC6 Palestine 

ZC7 (See JY) 

ZDl Sierra Leone 

ZD2 Nigeria 

ZD3 Gambia 

ZD4 Gold Coast, Togoland 

ZD6 Nyasaland 

ZD7 St. Helena 

ZDS Ascension Island 

ZD9 Tristan da Cunha & 

Gough Islands 

ZE Southern Rhodesia 

ZKl Cook Islands 

ZK2 Niue 

ZL New Zealand 

ZM6 British Samoa 

ZM7 Tokelau (Union) Islands 

ZP Paraguay 

ZSl, 2, 4, 5, 6. .Union of South Africa 

ZS2 Marion Island 

ZS3 Southwest Africa 

ZS7 Swaziland 

ZSS Basutoland 

ZS9 Bechuanaland 

3A Monaco 

3VS Tunisia 

4S7 Ceylon 

4W1 Yemen 

4X4 Israel 

5A Libya 

9S4 Saar 

Albadra Islands 

Bhutan 

Comoro Islands 

Fridtjof Nansen Land 

(Franz Josef Land) 

Mongolia 

Nepal 

Tannu Tuva 

Wrangel Islands 




How's DX? 




CONDUCTED BY ROD NEWKIRK,* W9BRD 



Why: 

Well — 1955. A new DX year coming up ! 

We've instructed Jeeves to go out and pin 
down the reasons for all the wide smiles of high 
DX morale prevalent at this writing. Here's what 
the ear-tufted gentleman uncovered in the line of 
facts, ma'am, DX blessings that are no sorrow to 
comprehend : 

. . . The propagational worm has turned and 
conditions on our higher-frequency DX bands are on 
a slow but sure mend. About time! 

. . . Fifteen meters, our newest DX band of vast 
potentialities, is about to come into its own. If any 
band has a chance to unseat Old Pro Twenty as the 
DX band, 21 Mc. is it. Indeed, counting 11 meters, it 
won't be long before we have four DX bands simul- 
taneously capable of producing rare daylight DX. 

. . . There are more ARRL DXCC Countries 
List items readily workable than ever before, this 
despite the general absence of U-prefixed stations. 
Increasing traffic at WlWPO's Hq. DXCC desk 
reflects this and vou'U be able to prove it for yourself 
next month in the annual ARRL DX Competition. 
QRV? 

. . . Liberalization of amateur regulations in sev- 
eral overseas countries during 1954 now is evident 
in the increasing number of formerly rare prefixes 
heard on DX bands. Austrian, Japanese and Philji)- 
pine nationals particularly benefited. The sluggish 
ITU "ban" list which originally included over a 
dozen countries now is whittled down to French 
Indo-China, Indonesia, Iran, Korea and Thailand. 

. . . TVI terrors continue to wane. Guys who 
surrendered to the one-eyed monsters a couple of 
years ago now are back on the air with modern 
single-frequency-output rigs, working DX and grous- 
ing about another nuisance — ITV. 

. . . Single-sideband DX in 1955 no longer is just 
around the corner. It's here. Flip your receiver on 
and you'll hear DXers eagerly putting s.s.b. to work 
on long-haul A3 paths, a facet of the game attracting 
converts and exponents daily. 

... A relatively new DX-hunting gimmick is 
creating much interest and finding wide acceptance: 
the "midget" rotary beam. Thoroughly propounded 
in 1954 QSTs, these miniature squirters have given 
cliff dwellers a better chance to slug it out with the 
antenna-farm lads, and have made 7-Mc. rotaries 
highly practicable. 

That's enough detail to go into in our limited 
space. And there you are, as George Gobel puts it. 
You need no rose-tinted specs to diagnose the 
1955 DX world sound, substantial, and rarin' to 
go. And, as usual, your monthly chunk of QST is 
rarin' to record your 1955 reports and contribu- 
tions — band by band, QTH by QTH, continent 
by continent, photo by photo and cliche by 
cliche. Like this, for instance. . . . 

What: 

Fifteen, as we were saying, is coming along nicely. 
W7AHX radiotelephoned with a wide selection of stuff 
including CX3BH, EL2X, HC2JR, KA8AB, KC6AA, 

* New Mailing Address: Effective immediately, please 
mail all reports of DX activity to DX Editor Newkirk's new 
address: 5833 North Kenmore Ave., Chicago 40, Illinois. 



KG6GX, KJ6AZ, OQ5RU and ZB2A CN8MM, 

ZC4JA, ZS3s BC and E came back to K2CHS on voice 

HCs 1MB 2PG and VK9DB top WSQXX's 

lengthy A3 list W6ZZ caught up with voicers 

DU7SV, HK3FV, JA4BB, KW6s AT BB. VP3YG, a VPS 

and unusual XE5PD Ws IJLN IMGP and 4YQB 

catch their share of the goodies, WIMGP with a mere 3- 

watt mobile outfit . . _ Newark News Radio Club 

logged 21-Mc. 'phone candidates CP5EK, CT3AN, EA9s 
AR AS. ELs 3A 12A, TA3AA, SV0WK, VQs 2DT 4EZ 
4RF 5BVF, ZBls AUV BO, ZEs 2KR 5JJ, ZS3B, 4X4s BC 

and BL Fifteen c.w. is equally productive and 

ZD6BX recommends FY7YC, HZIHZ, SUIXZ, YI2AM, 

YVs IAD 5AE and ZD2DCP W2ES0 stalks code 

men ZSs 7D and 91; Ws ICTW and 8DAW nabbed ZD6BX 

(73) 14 EST DU7SV, LUIZT, PJ2AA, TI2BX, 

YV5BJ and ZE5JJ swapped c.w. with W7AHX 

KP4KD reached 83 15-meter c.w. countries by way of an 
FY7, OE5JK, TF3MB (80) 17 GMT and a ZD6. 

Twenty 'phone reeks with goodies and K2CJN made off 
with CR4AL (125) 16 EST, FF8AP, LXIDU (148) 9, 
ST2N VV 16, VQs 2DT 3RJB, ZD4BR and 3V8BB. VQ5DES, 

Y03CM, 4S7LM, 4X4DK and a ZD3 escaped 

VPs IGG and 7NS (190) 15 EST worked VE5HR 

ET2XX (198), OD5AB and TA3AA will ship QSLs to 

VV7AHX W5KUC and the 200-DXC boys drew 

beads on scrumptious FY7YE (185) 0, LH2P (145) 6-8 
of Svalbard, VQ8CB, VS4HK (100-200) who moves to 
VS5, YKIAE (148) 14, ZC3AC, 4S7s FG (110) 18, YL 

(105) 18and9S4AP (190) 15, all times GMT The 

West Gulf DX Bulletin, W5s ALA and FXN prime movers, 
has these 20-meter 'phone items under surveillance: AC3PT 
(102) 13 GMT, GD2FRV (172) 14, MICP (95) 14, YA2KB 

(108) 14, ZD3BFC (107) 19 and 4S7YL (107) 13 

So. Calif. DX Club's Bulletin lists 'phones CR6BX (158) 
14, CS3AC (195) 17, FE8AC, FM7WN (160) 8, F08s AB 
(113) 10, AD (150), AG (197) 22, OQ5FO (125) 14, VSs 
IFK (47) 9, IMK (146) 8, 2DS (96) 9, ZC7D0, ZDs 4BL 
(180) 14-15, 9AB (150) 6, ZM6s AL (183) 19-20, AT 
(161-182) 18-22, 4S7BR (105) 7, 5As 2TZ (150) 17, 3TE 

(110) 11 and 4TR (150) 11, times PST NNRC 

sources tagged 14-Mc. A3ers CR6AC, CT2AG, DUs lAP 
IAS 9JY 8 EST, EAs 6QS 6SN 9AR 14, 0AC (150) 16. 
EL2X 14-15, FM7WF (172), FQ8AK 15, GCs 3EBK (100) 




January 1955 



61 




17. 8MF (135) 17, GD3IBQ, HI8\\ F, HZIAB. JA7BN, 
KC6AA, KM6AX, KR6KS (180), KTls LU PU VVX (185), 
KW6BB, KX6s AF NA, OD5s AJ AP BA LC, OQos CX 
ER 13, OX3ZO, PIIJ in Holland, ST2NVV 16, TAs 2EFA 
3AA, TG9s BG BH, VK9s BS 8. RG 7, VG YT, VPs lAB 
(160), 2DA (155) 2DL 7NG TNT 7NU 8AA (143) 20, VQs 
4ERR 4EU 4EZ (149) 14, 4RF (130) 10, VR3A 7, VSs IFE 
2BS 2DB 2DQ 2DY 2EB, YNILB (110), Y03RL 17, YSs 
IMS 102AG, YUls AD CY GM (148) 12, ZBs 1A.JX (173), 
2A (125), ZP5s CF CG. 4X4s DR 10, ED, 5As 3TC 4TN 
and 4TU (120-145) 15. 

Twenty c.w., night-shy in northern latitudes, remains top 
banana for the bunch. K2GFQ worked DU7SV (Volt really 
gets around!), HRIMC, LUs 2ZC 8ZS of So. Shetlands, 
VP8AQ (10) 22-23 GMT of So. Orkneys, VU2EJ (40) 2, 
YI2AM (65) 21, ZC4GF and a KM6 . _ . ^ . _ VV4YHD 
rai.sed CRs 6CS 7AG (15) 9, EAs 8BK (45) 11, 9DF (55) 
11, FQ8AX, GD3IBQ (36) 12, ISITAW, ST2AR (10) 19, 
VP2s G\V, KB (100) 23, VQ.s 2AB (20) 19, 4RF, ZE5JA 
(73) 18. ZS3AH (80) 20, 3V8AN (102) 5, O05s CP (15) 
22. GU RA (40) 13 and a flock of KA brethren, all times 

GMT FY7YE (61) 17 EST, MP4BBL (87) 11, 

UB5KAB. VQSCB (60) 11. VU2FX and ZM6AX chatted 

with W8DAVV ZD6BX picked up FB8s BC BN 

BR XX, SUICN. VKIPG (44) IbGMT, VSs IBJ lEG lEW 
IFE IGG 2DF (15) 15, 6CG 8CW 9GV, VU2AX, Y03RF 
(78) 15, ZC4XA, ZD2DCP, ZS8D, 4S7s KH LB NG NX 

(66) 15, 4X4s BX DH and DR KM6AX (60). 

VP7NG (10) and VP8AA (15) wound up in W7UAB's 
ledger ._._._ Nearing the century mark. Wl WAI grabbed 
HAoKBP (71) 18 GMT, ISIAHK (67) 20 and LZIKAB 

(81) 17-18 CNs 2BE 8FQ 8GB, F9QV/FC. an 

FQ8. a GD3, KV4AQ, OQos BB BQ, OX3UD. OE13USA, 
SVISP, VP7NN. YOs 3GY 6AW, ZBIJRK, ZE5JE and 

CP4MT answered W3UXX CN8FL caught 

FK8AC, KR6LP (05). KX6BF (50). MP4BBE, VR2AS 

(30), YNIAA, ZKIAB (35) 6 GMT and 4S7HK 

Among K2BZT's monumental assemblage we find CR7LU 
14 EST, CT3AV (50) 13. FQ8AT 15, FF8AJ 17. HZIHZ 11, 
JAs 4AF (09) 18. OAD (66) 18. 0CA (70) 18 (not Iwo). KAs 
2CG 2CR 3SV 9MF. LU9ZM (86) 17, VQ2AB (90) 16, a 
VQO. Y03RD. ZE2JC (86) 15, a ZD6 and ZS3T (20) 16. 

This makes it 129 for Hay,den Here and there, 

W20LU hooked: FM7WP (42) 16 EST, a VP7. W7AHX: 
CT3AB, EA9AP, ZBIBF. W0VFM: VP6GT (70) 22-23 
GMT. W9UKG: FY7YZ (32) 11 CST. C02SW: CE0AD 
(18) 23-OG'A/r. CR5JB, EA0AB. LUs IZT 7ZM. MP4BBL 
(20) 15, ZD4s AB BK, ZSs 7C 91. VESHR: YU2DU 

WGDXC 14-Mc. c.w. pickings: CP3CA (50) 21, 

CR6CJ (45) 20, ETs 2PA (62) 23, 3S (55) 19, FK8AO (75) 0, 
F08AG (68) 21, GC4LI (95) 14. OD5BA (05) 14, OY2Z 
(2) 23-0, VP8BE (57-78) 1-2, VQs 4BNU (38-50) 18-19, 
6LQ (07) 14-15, VRs 2AA (30) 3, 3A (63) 3. 2RO (G2R0), 
ZE.3JA (9.5) 0. ZS3s K (20) 20. Q (72-100) 19-20, T (18) 21 
and 4X4CK (52) 14, time.s GMT NCDXC offer- 
ings: FG7XA (20) 14, FR7ZA (20) 15, GC2FZC (20) 15, 
HK0AI (71) 15. HZIAB (79) 15, MP4s QAH (12) 15, QAJ 
(59) 15-16. SP2KAC (59) 15. SV0VVL (51) 15, TA3AA (26) 
15-16, UA9KAB (64), VK9RH (72) 5 of Norfolk Isle, VQs 
2JN (60) 20, 4EZ (24) 15, VS4HK (47) 16. Y03GY (45) 15. 
ZBIEB (88) 16, ZC4IP (94) 15. ZD3BFC (40) 20. 4X4s 
AM (5.3) 15-16. CK (88) 15-16 and GY (58) 17. all PST 

Noted by SCDXC: C3AR (22) 23 PST. KG6IG 

(65) 20-21 of Chichi Jima. KJ6AN (40) 18-19, VKls AC 



Though relatively a newcomer to DX ranks, DTJICV 
of Laguna, Luzon, P. I., has done more than his share 
to make the Philippines available on several DX bands. 
\ il runs 250 watts of 'phone or c.w. {Photo via DU7SV) 



(20) 22. EG (36) 22-23 of Antarctica, and VQ8CE (11) 10 
of the Chagos. 

Forty c.w. served up EAs 8BF (10) 3 GMT, 9AP (1) 22, 
9DF (.30) 7 of Rio de Oro, HA5KBA (12) 22, ISIAHK (10) 
22, KC6CG (20) 12, KG6GX (30) 12. LU7ZM (24) 3, ST2s 
AR (2) 0. NG (7) 1. VKIAC (7) 12, ZS3K (30) 5, 4X4s DE 
(10) and FW (3.5) 2 to W4YHD ZD6BX ac- 
counts for JAs 3AA 6HK, VU2BY and 4S7NX on 40; 

4S71).I got away W2ESO collected LZIKAB. an 

yT2. VK9AU (1.5) 6 EST, VS9AS. VQ2GVV 20. ZL2QN/- 
VQ4 (30) 20, 4X4RE 17; HZIHZ, OD5AX and other 

LZls were heard VV6CAE and KOEC nailed down 

ZD6BX (24-28) 14-15 GMT WOLRU worked 

CE.3AG (12) 9 PST, DU7SV (28) 12 and FKSAO (38) 6. 
Don stalks FB8XX 15 and FR7ZA 15 on the low edge 
._._._ 7-Mc. c.w. doings at this shack and that shack, at 
WIAPA: LU3ZB. VP6GT. WIWAI: HRIJZ (20) 12 
GMT. K2ALA: ITITAI, HKITH. TI2PZ, YU3ABC, 
YV5DE. W3WPG: HA5KBA, OQ5GU, PJ2CE, YSlO. 
W8DAW: FG7XA (9) 18 EST. W9UKG: HK0AI (75) 5-6 
GMT, LU2ZI, a VPO. CN8FL: AP2K (70), VS6CG (20). 

DL4ZC: ZE6JJ. KP4 KD: VP8AZ (30) 8-9 GMT 

7-Mc. customers CRs 6AC (17) 18-19, 7BC (27) 5 GMT, 
7CI (24) 3. HK4EF (20) 20. HRIAA (28) 20, LU7Z0 (28) 
6, OQ5GU (28) 5, VPs 7NG (23) 5, 8BE (22) 6 and ZS3K 
(37) 5-6 are recorded by WGDXC SCDXC 




VR2CD's consilient Fiji signal ea»ii> will be rt-called 
by the DX crowd. Chas. is shown here during a stop 
at ARRL Hq. while recently touring the U. S. A. with 
his family as VE7ASL/W/mobile. Ultimately, ex- 
VR2CD plans to settle down in Hawaii to await a 
future KH6 call sign. 

cohorts add EL2X (5) 7 PST, FP8AP (40) 18-19, JAIAA 
(23) 7, VKIRJ (25) 5. VP8AD (12) 0-1. VQ6LQ (30) 7. 
VSIFE (16) 8. ZMs 6AI (1), 7AL (1) and ZS7D (3.5) 7. 

Forty 'phone, tough as nails, furnished DU7SV and 

HP3FL for VV7AHX HCIMB, HK0AI (204) of 

San Andres, KG4AJ, TI2WLC, VPs 5SC 6FR and YV5AB 

used 7-Mc. A3 with WIAPA NNRC hsts 40-meter 

radiotelephone activity by CPIBG, HPITS, HRIAT, DUs 
lEC IGF 6IG 7NO 9JM, dozens of JAs, KC6s AA CG UX, 
KG6GX, KV4BD, OA2A, many VKs and ZLs, yN4CB 
YV5EY, ZSOs BW and DW (85) 23 EST. 

Eighty c.w. mainly was featured by the pursuit of ZDs 
2DCP (11) and 6BX (99) by the East Coast crew; and 

DU7SV plus VR3A by the West Coast contingent 

Europeans were the most common commodity and K2BZT 
found about a dozen Gs, several DLs, Els 4X 9J, CTITT, 

three PA0s, GI5UR and OKIKBW available 

Watch for ZDOBX around 3600 kc. between 9 and 10 EST 



62 



QST for 



KP4KD went to 'phone to clinch Dominican Re- 
public, HI6TC on 3900 kc; a fast QSL resulted. 

One-sixty c.w. saw many hands preening for this season's 
transatlantic efforts. TI2BX put a new country on the 
band; Ws 2EQS 2GGL 3RGQ 8ANO and 9PNE were 

among his lucky pursuers in late October G6GM 

got across to WIBB and W2EQS; G3PU swapped 1.8-Mc. 

reports with WIBB Quite a few rather rare Afn- 

cans and Asians have reported 160-meter interest. Depend- 
ing on conditions, we may see several new top-band "firsts" 
claimed in 1955. 

Ten 'phone and its mercurial openings require quick 
work. Using his new 10-element rotary with corner reflec- 
tor W4NQM cashed in on 28-Mc. 'phones CEs 2HJ 3CZ, 
CR6BX, CXs 2CN 3AA 4CS, HCls MB RT, LUs 3AAT 
4AAR 4DJT 7DAA 8FP 9AQ, PYs 2CK 4AS 4EM, TI3LA, 




.) A()A1) has one of the more potent 14-Mc. Asian 
signals these days and has accounted for over 125 
ARRL DXCC List countries since activating in 
December, 1952. Hire runs 300 watts to the transmitter 
at right. {Photo via Wl YYM) 

VPs 2MY 6WR, VQ2FU, XEIIQ, YVs 3BK SAB, ZSs 4CX 

and 60P 28-Mc. A3 luck here and there, at 

K2AJD: KV4BI, KZ5s, a VP2. WSEDI: HRIAA. WSESE: 
LU4AAT, PY4PQ. WSQMG: LU3BQ, a VP2, ZSIKK. 

W0BJP: CE5GG, CXIGG, PY7HS, ZS4CW 

G3IDG finds ten open for DX on about one day out of four. 
Allan has heard FAs 3JY 9RZ, LUs 1D.1C 3AQ 5DC 9AG 
9AW, O05RU, PYs lAGP 2AHS, VQs 2NS4RF, ZD3BFC, 
ZS6s CV SG WW and ZK. All save FA9RZ were using 
voice. Other Gs were heard calling or working CN8s, 

OQ0DZ and ZP stations Out west, W6NJU 

QSOd CE3QJ, CX3AA, KH6PM, LU6AB and a PY2. 
Who wiU claim the first 1955 WAG on 28 Mc? 

Where: 

ARI General Secretary IIAXD writes that all Trieste- 
bound QSLs now can be sent through ARI, Via Paolo 10, 
Milan, Italy, or by way of IIBLF/Trieste who is API's 

manager for the Territory W2FCT has VP3JM's 

log for the period Sept. 20, 1946, to Oct. 10, 1948. If you 
still need Andy's QSL, send a stamped self-addressed en- 
velope plus full QSO data to W2FCT's Call Book QTH 

F7BM IS another who recently received a UB5CF 

QSL direct from Odessa. Several other UB5s now answer 

to the address to follow "All QSLs for XE6AM 

QSOs have been sent and anyone not receiving his please 
notify W6COH." Stations who worked other Todos Santos 
XE6s in August and who still need QSLs are also advised 



Here's the op and set-up responsible for providing 
hundreds of Liechtenstein QSOs and many a new 
country for DXers throughout the world. He's Kurt 
Bindschedler, HB9MX, active as HBIMX/HE on 
many 1954 week ends using mostly 15, 20 and 40 
meters, 'phone and c.w. The rig is a Collins 310 and the 
receiver a Philips CR-101. HBIMX/HE has rolled up 
over eighty ARRL DXCC List countries since last 
September. {Photo via HE9RZF) 



to contact W6C0H who will alert the operators concerned 

From WIJDE: "I was formerly TG9FG in 

Guatemala and worked more than 3000 stations while sta- 
tioned there. While I QSLd 100 per cent I feel that there 
are many hams who did not receive my QSL cards because 
of the poor mail situation there." Send QSO particulars to 
WIJDE if you still need his TG9FG pasteboard. He has 

his Guatemala logs and plenty of QSLs You must 

thank Wis APA UED WPO YYM, W2s MLO OLU, W3s 
SOH UKO WPG, W5KUC, W8DAW, ZC4FB, NNRG, 
WGDXC and 200-DXC for running down the following 
addresses : 

C3AR, OARMA, APO 63, % Postmaster, San Francisco, 

Calif ex-CN8EG, D. R. Thrasher, W8PHX, 6521 

Berwyn St., Garden City, Mich e.x-CN8FL, Narvel 

W. Reece, W8EZF, 1578 Van Zandt Rd., Cincinnati 31, 

Ohio CN8IB, Norm Kiernan (WIZIN), Navy 214, 

Box 40, FPO, New York, N. Y" C020S, Box 2425, 

Havana, Cuba _. . ._ DL2WO, K. G. Summerfiend, Sgts. 

Mess, RAF Sundern, BAOR 39, Germany FY7YZ, 

Box 7, Cayenne, French Guiana- . HA5KBA (QSL via 

HSWRL) ex-HH3DM, D. J. Morris, W0EMN, 

City Engineer, Waverly, Iowa_ . HPIEV, E. Valencia, 

P.O. Box 1728, Panama City, Panama ex-KM6AB 

(QSL to KH6WW) ex-MD5BY (QSL to G3IUU) 

MDSDD (QSL via RSGB) 0X3KM, K. 

Madsen (OZ4KM), Nipisat Loranstation, Disko Oen, 
Greenland _. . . _ ex-OX3KS, Knud Sorenson, Valbygaard 
Skov pr. Frederikslund st., Denmark- . . ._ OX3ZO (QSL 

via EDR) PYICK (QSL via LABRE) 

ex-SUlMK (QSL to G3IGU) ex-TA3MP, Meade M. 

Padgett, KOEWZ, 428 Alameda Rd., San Anselmo, Calif. 

ex-TG9FG, F. W. Greene, WIJDE, 4 Ryder Dr., 

Woburn, Mass . . _TG9MB, Box 115, Guatemala City, 

Guatemala , TI2RMA, P.O. Box 1523, San Jose, 

C. R TI2WZZ, J. R. Acuna, P.O. Box 923, San 

Jose, C. R .._UB5KAB, Box 52, Odessa, Ukraine, 

U.S.'S.R. (airmail only) UB5KFX (see UB5KAB) 

VK6KJ. B. H. Gates, % A. K. CoUins, Stirling 

Tee., Albany, W. A., AustraUa VP2GW, Box 108, 

Grenada, Windward Islands, B. W. I ex-VP3JM 

(QSL to W2FCT) ex-VP4LK, D. C. Gittens, 68 

Honor Oak Rd., Forest Hill, London SE23, England 

VP6KL, F. Roberts, % Ash & Watson, Ltd., Broad St., 

Bridgetown, Barbados, B. W. I VP7NN (QSL via 

W3RUZ) VQ3CF, H. A. Seaman, P.O. Songea, 

Tanganyika Territory VQ4FB, I/P Ward, Signals 

Officer, Kenya Police Div. Hq., Meru, Kenya 

V06L0, Box 11, Hargesa, British Somaliland ._ 

VQSCB (QSL to VQ8AB) VR2AA, % RNZAF, 

Lauthala Bay, Fiji Islands ex-YI3BUX (QSL to 

G3BUX)_ . . .-ZBICH, Point de vue Hotel, Rabat, 

Malta ex-ZBlEB, (QSL to G3IJU) ZC4RH 

(QSL via ZC4IP) ex-4S7XG, (QSL to G3HVG). 

Whence: 

Asia — "Activity in ZC4 is on the upward trend again. 
ZC4GF is concentrating on 160 meters, 50 watts to a half- 
wave wire; ZC4CK is on 40 meters; ZC4s CA and PB are 
on 20 and 40; ZC4PB hopes to get on 160 and ZC4CA will 
have a week or two on top band before packing his sea 
baggage for the U.K.; ZC4MW is temporarily QRT; 
ZC4IP is, I beUeve, on 40, 20 and 15; and ZC4RH is a 
new one." This from ZC4FB who is giving 20 and 40 a 

final fling before he heads hack toward England 

Don't throw away vuur old A^siau QSLs — JARL (Japan) 
has uinln r.,ns,.l.r:,nn,, :,,, AIUAm:, HX :,xv:ir.l t,, !,.■ mx;iiI- 



January 1955 




able on a world-wide basis. _ . _ . _ 4S7XG goes back to 
G3HVG after over three years of diligent Ceylon DX work 
._._._ Gender Tuezuenalp, Hamamonue Firin Sok No. 
16/1, Ankara, Turkey, is a would-be Turkish ham who 
desires to correspond with W amateurs. He'll soon QSY to 

the U. S. for schooling W4TBQ, active since 1935 

as WIPEF, W6NQY and KAIAC, expects to replace 

W60ME as one of TASAA's 1955 operators Ex- 

TA3MP schedules an assault on his Turkey QSL backlog, 
circumstances ensuing from QSL orders that went astray. 
Check Meade's present K6EVVZ QTH in "Where." TA3s 
AA, Ankara; US, Izmir; WD, Izmir; and TA2EFA, Ankara, 
still represent Turkey on ham bands. TA3QN also is in 
Turkey but for security reasons cannot QSL. _ . _ . _ The 
hamshacks of VS6AE, JA8AG and KA2CC were visited 
in person by W0YDZ/KG6. _._._ Recent geopolitical 
developments may have put a damper on future FN7-FN8 
amateur operation. CR8AB continues to represent Por- 
tuguese India DX interests on 20 meters. 

Africa — Illumination of Dark Continental DX doings 
thanks to ZD6BX: "ZD6EF now is postmaster at Blantyre 
and is rebuilding; he has a low-power rig on 40 temporarily. 
VQ5BVF, active on 15 'phone, reports several VQ5s on 
U.K. leave. VQ5EK is on 20 'phone. FB8BR is a new one 
in Tananarive with 20 watts on 20 c.w. SUIXZ operates all 
bands, 160 through 10 meters. ZS9I 'is getting some QSLs 
off soon.' ZS7D continues very active on 40 c.w." As for 
his own installation, Vic pens: "ZD6BX now is mainly on 
15 meters, with occasional forays on other bands." He hopes 
to rack up some 3.5-Mc. DX this season but b.c. QRM 
makes it necessary to operate around 3600 kc. ZDGBX's 
power goes off from 2100 to 0400 GMT, considerably re- 
stricting night DX activities. CN8s EG and FL 

return home to W8s PHX and EZF, respectively, where 
they're willing to clear up any outstanding QSL matters 
(see "Where") . _ AAEM (Morocco) sponsors an in- 
teresting DX award based on 30, 25, 20, or 15 CN8-contact 
QSLs, the requirements depending on one's location. It's 
called Diplome de V AAEM. For full details write L' Associa- 
tion des Amateurs Emelteurs du Maroc, B.P. 2060, Casa- 
blanca, Morocco. EA9DF still is bent on 1955 Ifni 

activity . _ QSL managers are familiar fellows, bless 

'em, but here's a new sign of the times: EL2X and CN8MM 
act as QSO managers for ZD3BFC. 

Oceania — Hats off to ZKIBG for alert monitoring and 
quick action in October when he did much to assure the 
rescue of adventurer Willis and balsa raft Seven Little Sisters 

near Samoa.- From the DXer: Ex-PK4DA is back 

in Indonesia for a spell but reports little possibility of ham 

activity there in the near future . _ SCDXC advices: 

VKIHM and ZC2AC are QRT, their silence to be followed 
by that of ZC2AD who leaves the Cocos next month. Thus 
ZC2-land joins Christmas Island (ZC3) in the amateurless 
category; ZC3AB is in Australia and ZC3AA never ac- 
tivated. Don't forget that G2RO plans operation on Cocos 
around February 6th-8th. F08AG swapped islands, 
Makatea for Tahiti, and VKIAC returns to VK3IB. The 
ex-F08.4J team is thinking of possible DXpeditioning in 
the ZM7 area next summer. VR3A looks forward to more 
40- and 80-meter work as well as a 1956 visit to California. 
VR2BZ continues his RNZAF flying visits to VR5, ZM7 
and other areas, firing up a rig whenever he has the oppor- 
tunity. ZM7AL (ZM6AL) is intermittently available on 
40's low edge. 

Europe — HVIAA hit the airwaves far behind schedule 
and QRTd far ahead of schedule. W4YHD reports that 
only two contacts were made, both of these on 14-Mc. 

'phone (no Ws) F7s BM DH and DZ are hard at 

work ironing out plans for a more tightly-knit F7 ham 




organization replete with hamfests, call book and local nets. 
Club secretary K2JCS notes that DL2WW (W2FK0). 
0N4ZI and YUIGM (W4GMP) probably are the only 
Americans operating ham stations in their respective coun- 
tries or licensing areas. _ . _ . _ In the wake of the recent 
Trieste settlement, AG2s and MF2s go off the air in favor 
of II licensees. MF2AA reports that the Trieste DX award 
rules now conform to omit reference to AG2 and MF2 

prefixes Contact GW8WJ for info on the Tops 

C.W. Club, a group of code-hounds with members in 21 

countries In QSO with W8DAW, UB5KAB states 

that certain U.S.S.R. "collective stations" are authorized 
to QSO outside the curtain. Finally? Now how about some 
UIs ULs and UMs. 

South America — Cooperative LABRE Secretary Flavio 

Serrano now sports call sign PYICK . _ W20HF was 

notified by PZIRM that PZIAL unfortunately has joined 

the ranks of Silent Keys "Chilean transport Es- 

meralda now is on its way to Easter Island and I expect to 
have at the end of November a copy of CE0AD's log for 
the communications he has made from the beginning of the 
year to date," writes CE3AG, ex-CE0AA. Luis then will 
be able to answer the 300-plus pasteboards RCC has re- 
ceived for CE0AD. CE0AC returned to Chile and will 
QSL the few contacts he made. Conditions on Easter remain 
inhospitable to hamming, the main difficulty being lack of 
generator fuel. 

Hereabouts — C02SW breaks a long silence and clews 
us in on Cuban DX doings. Active DXers down Sergio's 
way are CM9AA, C02s BM CT OE OM WD SW, C07AH, 
all c.w.; C02s BL and OZ on 'phone. C02CT is cranking 
up a new rotary and kw. while C02SW rebuilds toward 
faster bands\vitching. Sergio needs tracers on former EPls 
C AL, MD5PC and KC6WA, all worked in '47 and '48 
._._._ September 18th, at Chicago, the annual W9- 
DXCC meeting drew the attendance of over 40 DX sharp- 
shooters. W9s PNV TRD and ARRL QSL Manager 
W9CFT headed an entertaining program. W9s ABA ABB 
AEH AMU DHT ESQ EWC FDX FID FJB FJY FKC 
GDI GIL GRV HUZ lOD lU JIP JJF JUV KA KXK 
LI LNM MZP NN PGW QIY RBI RHA RKP RQM 
TKV UXO VND WFS WKU and YFV were on hand. 
W9s FID FKC NN and QIY were elected to the W9-DXCC 
executive committee for the new year, W9FID as chairman 

W6s CAE BZE CHV GBG MGT, K6s DGB and 

EC invaded W6LRU's abode in early November for a meet- 
ing of the San Diego DX Club. Don looks for hints on how 
to pry QSLs from VKls AF RL, ZM6AA and 5A2TR 
The Fourth Informal Get-together of New Eng- 
land DXCC Members, held at Cambridge, November 4th, 
saw dozens of DXers enjoy a program featuring WIDX, 
WIFH and ARRL QSL Manager WIJOJ. Many of the 
gang could swap tales of antenna damage at the hands of 

YLs Edna, Carol and Hazel Ex-HH3DM is QRX 

at the "Where" QTH for those who still need his QSLs 
._._._W0PRM would like lines from hams interested 

in, and specializing in, QRP DX . _ W6YY knocked 

off the NZART (New Zealand) WAP award, the first 
LI. S. A. station to earn it on 'phone. _ . _ . _ A letter from 
Hallicrafters Co., Chicago, to W2MIyO mentions the possi- 
bility of future DXpeditions d la F08AJ. QRV! 

W2WC rolled up 173 ARRL DXCC List countries, 117 on 
7 Mc, then moved from Brooklyn to become WIWY 

W9VND is glad to be ex-W8GTV and is back in 

DX business just outside Chicago with 100 countries 
worked in less than four months. _ . _ . _ The DXer men- 
tions possible February TI9 activity courtesy W6MHB. 
Also that W6RRG, now in the Bahamas, may see some 

ZD8 acti\'ity. Don't forget the gala joint meeting 

of the Southern and Northern California DX Clubs sched- 
uled for the 15th and 16th of this month at Hotel Cali- 
fornian in Fresno. All DXers are welcome — waste no time 
in contacting meeting chairman W6TI for arrangements 

. OT KP4KD, now over the 200-mark confirmed, 

could use suggestions toward MP4BAU and VS9AP QSLs. 



A veritable European pile-up was snapped at the 
Yugoslavia International Hamfest held last August 
in Ljubljana. From left to right are well-known DXers 
YUIGM (W4GMP), OZIFM, SVISP, G2MI, DLIDH 
and OESHN. {Photo via YUIAD) 



QST for 



21st ARRL International DX Competition 

'Phone: Feb. llth-13th and Mar. llth-13th; 
C.W.: Feb. 25th-27th and Mar. 25th-27th 



AMATEURS all over the world are cordially in- 
\ vited to take part in the 21st ARRL Interna- 
~^^~^ tional DX Competition, to be held four 
week ends in February and March. U. S. and 
Canadian operators will be trying to add to 
their DX country totals, other stations to work 
needed states and provinces for their WAS and 
WAVE awards, and everyone to match operat- 
ing skill with others in his country or ARRL 
section. 

Two week ends are devoted to c.w. and two 
to 'phone operation, giving everyone a chance to 
participate on both 'phone and c.w. "Rest up" 
periods are provided between week ends. 

The rules of the contest are the same as those 
of last year, with this exception: U. S. and Cana- 
dian amateurs will send a signal report plus their 
state or province (instead of indicating input 
power). This information is of special interest to 
overseas stations aiming to fill in states for WAS 
and provinces for WAVE. 

As in the past, certificate awards are offered 
to the top single-operator 'phone and c.w. scorer 
in each country and ARRL section. A special 
category recognizes multiple-operator stations in 
those sections or countries from which three or 
more valid multiple-operator entries are received. 
Within a club, single-operator entries can com- 
pete for the club certificate awards given to the 
highest c.w. and 'phone scorers. A handsome 
gavel is also offered to the cilub whose members 
run up the highest aggregate score. 

Stations outside W (K) and VEVVO will call 
"CQ W/VE" or "CQ TEST" and trade contest 
exchanges with U. S. and Canadian participants. 
Those overseas, just as in past years, will transmit 
5- or 6-digit numbers, the first numbers indicat- 
ing the signal report and the last three the power 
input. Stations with 500 watts input would use 
a power number of 500; those with 25 watts, 025. 



EXPLANATION OF DX CONTEST 
EXCHANGES 


Stations in U.S. and Canada Send: 


Sample (c.w.) 
Sample ('phone) 


RS or EST 

Report of 

Staiioji Worked 


Your State or 
Province {or 
Abbreviation) 


579 
57 


VT 

Vermont 


Stations Outside U.S. and Canada Send: 


Sample (c.w.) 
Sample ('phone) 


RS or RST 

Report of 

Station Worked 


Three-Digit Number 

Representing Your 

Power Input 


579 
57 


075 
500 



CONTEST TIMETABLE 




'Phone Section; 








Time Starts 


Ends 1 


GMT Feb. 11th 


2400 


Feb. 13th 


2400 


AST Feb. 11th 


8:00 P.M. 


Feb. 13th 


8:00 P.M. 


EST Feb. 11th 


7:00 P.M. 


Feb. 13th 


7:00 P.M. 


CST Feb. 11th 


6:00 P.M. 


Feb. 13th 


6:00 P.M. 


MST Feb. 11th 


5:00 P.M. 


Feb. 13th 


5:00 P.M. 


PST Feb. 11th 


4:00 P.M. 


Feb. 13th 


4:00 P.M. 


The second period of this con- 


The second period of | 


test starts at these 


ame hours 


the contest 


ends at 1 


Mar. 11th. 




these same hours | 






Mar. 13th. 




C.W. Section: 








GMT Feb. 25th 


2400 


Feb. 27th 


2400 


AST Feb. 25th 


8:00 P.M. 


Feb. 27th 


8:00 P.M. 


EST Feb. 25th 


7:00 P.M. 


Feb. 27th 


7:00 P.M. 


CST Feb. 25th 


6:00 P.M. 


Feb. 27th 


6:00 P.M. 


MST Feb. 25th 


5:00 P.M. 


Feb. 27th 


5:00 P.M. 


PST Feb. 25th 


4:00 P.M. 


Feb. 27th 


4:00 P.M. 


The second period of this con- 


The second period of | 


test starts at these 


same hours 


this contes 


ends at 


Mar. 25th. 




these same hours | 






Mar. 27th. 





Example: J.\:i\F, 500 watts input, might send 
"509500" on c.w., "56500" on 'phone. 

U. S. and Canadian amateurs will transmit an 
RS or RST report plus (heir state or province, or 
some abbreviation for the state or province. 
Example: W2SAI, New Jersey, might send 
"579XJ" on C.W., or say "57 New Jersey" on 
'phone. Note that W (K) and VE/VO entrants 
will no longer indicate power inputs. 

For purposes of conformity, it is suggested 
that W/VE C.w. amateurs use this tabulation to 
indicate their states or provinces. Overseas oper- 
ators may use it as a check-off Hst of states and 
provinces worked, and for logging abbreviations. 

n-; _ CONN MAINE MASS NH RI VT 

\V2 — N.J NY 

irs — DEL MD PA DC 

\Vlt — ALA FLA GA KY NC SC TENN VA 

,f o _ ARK LA MISS NMEX OKLA TEXAS 

ire — CAL 

,l'7_ARIZ IDAHO MONT NEV ORE UTAH 

WASH WYO 
IFS — MICH OHIO WVA ' 

lO — ILLIND WIS 
ir0 — COLO IOWA KANS MINN MO NEBR NDAK 

SDAK 
VEl — NB NS PEI 
VE2 — QUE 
VES — ONT 
YEU — MAN 
VEd — SASK 
VEl — BC 

VE8 — NWT YUKON 
VO — NFLD LAB 

You can try a "CQ DX" or "CQ TEST" if 
you're in U. S. or Canada, but past experience 



January 1955 



65 



LOG, 21st INTERNATIONAL 
DX COMPETITION 

Call ARRL SECTION 

Band. . . . '1 . . . A/c. Sheet. . /. . . of. . ^. . . 


Coun- 
try 


Station 
Worked 


Dale 


Time 
(GMT) 


Sent 


Received 


c 
o 

J 


0D5AX 


2/26 


1300 


589CONN 


479075 


0D5AV 


2/26 


1345 


569CONN 


579080 










































-3 
C 

c5 


G6CL 


2/26 


1306 


589CONN 


469150 


G2MI 


2/27 


1245 


579CONN 


469125 


G3KP 


2/27 


1255 


569CONN 


579100 


G5BA 


3/26 


1430 


469CONN 


559100 


G6Z0 


3/27 


1822 


579CONN 


589125 


G5RI 


3/27 


1851 


469CONN 


459075 


c 

B 
O 


DLIKB 


2/26 


1315 


559CONN 


449050 


DLIDX 


2/27 


1149 


469CONN 


559080 


DLIBR 


3/26 


1502 


559CONN 


559045 

































Sample of report form that roust 
be used by W/VE c.w. participants. 
^ hen a station is worked for less 
than the maximum number of points 
allowed, the additional contact to 
make up the points not earned in the 
first contact should be entered at the 
bottom of the sheet. Canadian en- 
trants should allow two blocks for 
each country, but may record no 
more than eight contacts therein. A 
separate set of sheets should be used 
for each band. 



« 



shows that this does not pay off very often. On 
c.w. W/VE amateurs have quotas, but this 
doesn't apply to 'phone. Amateurs overseas have 
no quotas; they will attempt to QSO as many 
stations in the 19 W (K) and VE/VO licensing 
areas as possible on each band, 160 through 10 
meters. 

Keep your log carefully and send a copy of it, 
in the form shown, to ARRL. Free contest forms 
are now available upon request from ARRL, 
West Hartford, Connecticut. Get your station 
functioning at top efficiency, make no social 
commitments for the important week ends, read 
the rules to acquaint yourself with the details, 
and then get set for DX aplenty. 

Rules 

1) Eligibility: Amateurs operating fixed amateur stations 
in any and all parts of the world are invited to participate. 

2) Object: Amateurs in the continental U. S. and Canada 
will try to work as many amateur stations in other parts of 



Sample of report form that must be used by W/VE 'phone entrants and a// participants outside U. S. and Canada, 
'phone and c.w. This example is a U. S. A. 'phone log. Foreign competitors, of course, would have reverse informa- 
tion in the "Sent" and "Received" columns; their "Received" column would show exchanges like "579CAL," 
5890NT" (or, on 'phone, "46 Vermont," "58 Georgia," etc.), indicating signal reports received and different 
states and provinces worked; their "Sent" column would carry signal reports and power indicators transmitted. 





LOG, 21st A.R.R.L. INTERNATIONAL DX COMPETITION 




Sheet of. 


Cal 


ARRL SeHion or Count 










Date & Time 
GMT 


Station 
Worlced 


Country 


Record of New Countries for 
Each Band 


Exchange 


P 



i 
n 
t 

8 


1.8 


3.5 


7 


H 


21 


27 


28 


Sent 


Received 


Feb. 12 
0005 


HRIFM 


Honduras 








1 








56 Maine 


57080 


3 


Feb. 13 
1300 
1306 
1345 
2030 
2310 


PA0ULA 
G3C0J 
PA0VB 
LUIDDV 

VP9X 


Netherlands 

England 

Netherlands 

Argentina 

Bermuda 








2 






1 
2 
2 
3 


58 Maine 
58 Maine 

56 Maine 
58 Maine 

57 Maine 


47075 
46150 
59080 
67750 
56050 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Mar. 12 
1020 
1035 
1105 
1421 


ZLIMB 
VK5XN 
VK2RA 
PA0XD 


New Zealand 
Australia 
Australia 
Netherlands 




1 
1 




3 






3 


58 Maine 
47 Maine 
46 Maine 
45 Maine 


58075 
46100 
45100 
57100 


3 
3 
3 
3 


Mar. 13 
0925 
1245 
1255 
1350 
1430 
2320 


EI9A 
G2PU 
G3D0 
G2PU 
G5BA 
KZ5DG 


Ireland 
England 
England 
England 
England 
Canal Zone 








4 
5 






3 
3 
3 
3 


57 Maine 

56 Maine 

57 Maine 
46 Maine 

58 Maine 


57050 
40125 
57100 

55100 
58500 


3 
2 
3 
1 
3 
3 



66 



QST for 



SUMMARY. 21st A.R.R.L. INTERNATIONAL DX COMPETITION 

Entry Call ARRL Section or Country 

(C.ir. or 'Phone) 

Name Address 

Transmitter Tubes Power Input 

Receiver Antenna(,g) 

(Logs from \V(K) and VE/VO show number of foreign countries worked. Logs from other countries show number of U. S. A. and Cana- 
dian call areas worked.) 



Bands 


1.8 
Mc. 


.5.5 
Mc. 


7 
Mc. 


H 
Mc. 


27 
Mc. 


■28 
Mc. 


Total 


No. Countries 
QSOd 




1 




5 




3 


*9 


No. of Contacts 




2 




5 




8 


lo 



Number of Different Countries Worked Number of Hours of Station Operation. 

.issisting Personfs): Name(s) or CaW(«) 



.. X 



{Points) 
Participation for Club .\uiard in the. 



{Multiplier) 



405 

FINAL SCORE 



(Name of Club) 



I certify, on my honor, that I have observed all comjietition rules as well as all regulations established for amateur radio in my country, 
and that my report is correct and true to the best of my belief. I agree to be bound by the decisions of the ARRL Award Committee. 



Operator's Signature 



' Figure in this box is multiplier. 



Sample of siuntnary sheet tliat must accompany all reports. 



the world as possible under the rules and during the contest 
periods. 

3) Conditions of Entry: Each entrant agrees to be bound 
by the provisions of this announcement, the regulations of 
his licensing authority, and the decisions of the ARRL 
Award Committee. 

4) Entry Classifications: Entry may be made in either or 
both the 'phone or c.w. sections: c.w. scores are independent 
of 'phone scores. Entries will be further classified as single- 
or multiple-operator stations. Single-operator stations are 
those at which one person performs all the operating func- 
tions. Multiple-operator stations are those obtaining assist- 
ance, such as from "spotting" or relief operators, or in 
keeping the station log and records. 

5) Contest Periods: There are four week ends, each 48 
hours long: two for 'phone work and two for c.w. The 
'phone section starts at 2400 GMT, Friday, Februarj- 11th 
and Friday, March Hth, ends 2400 GMT, Sunday, Febru- 
arj' 13th and Sunday, March 13th. The c.w. section starts 
at 2400 GMT, Friday, February 25th and Friday, March 
25th, ends 2400 GMT, Sunday, February 27th and Sunday, 
March 27th. 

6) Valid Contacts: In the 'phone section, all claimed 
credits must be made voice-to-voice. In the telegraph 
section, only c.w. -c.w. contacts count. Crossband contacts 
may not be counted. 

7) Exchanges: 

a) Amateurs in I'. S. and Canada will transmit a three- 
figure number, representing the RST report, plus their 
state or province. (The latter may consist of an appropriate 
abbreviation.) 'Phone participants will transmit a two- 
figure number consisting of the readability-strength report 
plus the state or province. Example: WIATE in Connecti- 
cut might transmit "579CONN" on c.w., "57 Connec- 
ticut " on 'phone. 

b) Amateurs outside W (K) and VE/VO will transmit 
six-figure numbers, each consisting of the RST report plus 



three "power" numbers; the power indicator will repre- 
sent the approximate transmitter power input. 'Phone 
contestants will transmit five-figure numbers, each con- 
sisting of a readability-strength report and the three 
"power" numbers. Example: VK2EO, with 100 watts 
input, might transmit ".569100" on c.w., ".56100" on 
'phone. If the input power varies considerably on different 
bands, the " power " number should be changed accordingly. 

8) Scoring: 

a) Points: One point is earned by a W (K) or VE/VO 
station upon receiving acknowledgment of a contest ex- 
change sent, and two points upon acknowledging an 
exchange received. Two points are earned by any other 
station upon receiving acknowledgment of a contest ex- 
change sent, and one point upon acknowledging an exchange 
received. 

b) Final Score: W (K) and VE/VO stations multiply 
total points earned under Rule 8(a) by the number of coun- 
tries worked on one band plus the number of countries 
worked on each other band. All other stations multiply 
total points earned under Rule 8(a) by the sum of the 
number of W (K) and VE/VO licensing areas worked on 
one band plus the number of W (K) and VE/VO licensing 
areas worked on each other band. 

Countries will be those on the ARRL Countries List. 
There are 19 licensing areas: 10 in the L'nited States, 9 in 
Canada (VO, VE1-VE8). [See Countries List on p. 60 
and Footnote 1 on p. 132 — Ed.] 

9) Repeal Contacts: The same station may be worked 
again for additional points if the contact is made on a dif- 
ferent frequency band. The same station may be worked 
again on the same band if the complete exchange for a total 
of three points was not made during the original contact 
on that band. 

10) Quotas: The maximum number of points per country 
per band which may be earned by W (K) stations in the 

(Continued on page 132) 



January 1955 



67 




Operating 
Hevrs 




F. E. HANDY, WIBDI, Communications Mgr. 
R. L. WHITE, WIWPO, Asst. Comm. Mgr., C.W. 
PHIL SIMMONS, WIZDP, Communications Asst. 



Proven Operating Ability. Some test their 
mettle as operators in the "SS" — others have 
a fine time and roll up accomplishments by brief 
daily participation in their Section traffic net. 
There's no better way to become an expert in 
procedure and the ability to copy accurately. 
The fullest enjoyment of all that amateur radio 
affords in working DX and other operating 
specialties goes hand in hand with operating 
ability and copying proficiency. This month 
we're glad to start honoring those consistently 
turning in BPL-dimensional totals by listing 
the first to receive the Traffic Medallions. See the 
rules and first announcement in August QST 
if you need more information. Any individual 
amateur working at his own station is eligible. 

Speaking of "copying down" ability, ARRL 
provides to all comers daily transmission of code 
practice at stated speeds aimed at assisting new- 
comer and old-timer alike in knowing where he 
stands on the matter of copying ability. If not 
ARRL-certified, be sure you look for VVIAW or 
W60WP on their next Qualifying Runs. Send 
us what you get to be considered for certification. 
Don't stop with an initial speed unless at the top. 
Stay with us until you have the full set of endorse- 
ment stickers. Prove to yourself and others what 
you can copy, and at the same time you will 
have extended the range of what you can do in 
communication with amateur radio. If your 
casual hamming has never gone ahead to include 
DX countries and traffic ability along with some 
experimenting, this can be a suggestion to ex- 
pand know-how and horizons in the New Year. 

We've heard the sad story of the fellow who 
flunked the exam because he "guessed" he knew 
enough to pass. Few that have copied over the 
air until they got their 10-w.p.m. certifications 



WMACMA 
50 LOW ABOUT 
JOE"? 




- A.v>/, 1 TMOUCiHr 
I COULD COPV 20 W.RM. 
UMTIU 1 FLUWKEP A\-/ 
C:>EMECA,L TOPAV 




ever flunked the Novice Test; and few ARRL- 
certified through 20 w.p.m. ever failed on their 
General Class code test. The majority who have 
trouble, we're told, are those who mistakenly try 
to get by or are mistakenly working for medium 



GEORGE HART, WINJM, Natl. Emerg. Coordinator 
ELLEN WHITE, WIYYM, Asst. Comm. Mgr., 'Phone 
LILLIAN M. SALTER, WIZJE, Administrative Aide 

(instead of maximum) progress. We mention this 
just to suggest, in starting the year, that all 
amateurs and amateiw groups, including the 
Novice, work for new results, objectives, and 
top results, rather than the minimum, to get the 
most fun and know-how from amateur radio. 

Club Operating- Versatility Contest? This is 
the season of the year when a good many affiliated 
radio clubs are starting their code and theory 
classes (and holding examinations) for the club 
members and other community members inter- 
ested in qualifying for licenses. Also, clubs are 
announcing in many cases special events — a 
working toward WAS or competitions for the 
greatest number of DX QSLs that can be earned 
and turned in by club member operators as of 
some date next spring — encouraging competi- 
tion between club members to help them reach 
these desirable goals. WILLY comes forward 
with an idea that it would be interesting to set 
aside some designated week end for a Versatility 
Contest. The idea would be to credit all-around 
station and operator ability. The "package" 
set-up in the operational rules would establish a 
quota to limit points attainable by any one 
means, or band, to a sniall number. Then multi- 
pliers would be applied (1) for each band worked; 
(2) each mode of emission (c.w., a.m., f.m., 
n.b.f.m., f.s.k.-RTTY, a.f.s.k.-RTTY, s.s.b., fac- 
simile and/ or TV) ; (3) each mobile band operated 
'phone and c.w. (additional multipliers to that 
for fixed operation); (4) multiplier for originating 
one message; (5) multiplier for putting this into 
section-NTS net (each band or mode used); and 
(6) for working one foreign country outside the 
North American continent. 

Operating Calendar for the New Year. 
The first month of the year is one of the top ones 
of the season from the standpoint of things to 
do in radio operating. Stations can be tested, 
states got for WAS and other awards. There's 
the V.H.F. "SS," Jan. 8th-9th, for the v.h.f. 
man; for the newcomer (and others to work him) 
the "NR" runs from Jan. 8th-23rd — a few 
QSOs a day and you have it "made"; appointees 
look forward to their quarterly c.w. and 'phone 
parties the week ends of the 15th and 22nd. DX 
men probably will be busy getting rigs and an- 
tennas ready for the ARRL DX Competition 
for which scheduled periods in February and 
March have been announced. To attract the 
foreign participation the W (K) and VE/VO 
contingent will identify their states and provinces 
(helping the DX station fill out working them 
all!) following the signal-report part of the 



68 



QST for 



exchange this time: returns from across the water 
being the custopiary six numerals. So earmark 
the calendar and contest announcements you are 
interested in, and get in the swim. — F.E.H. 

OCTOBER CD QSO PARTIES 

Despite the depredations of Hurricane Hazel, which 
roared up the Atlantic Seaboard and left some appointees 
nainus power and antennas, our c.w. CD Party was a highly 
successful event. The notable e.\ploits of top-scorer \V6MUR 
are chronicled with the accompanying photograph. Another 
Californian, ORS \V6BIP, earned second place with 174,26.5 
points. Rounding out the top three, Assistant Director 
W4KFC made his customary impressive showing with 
155,295 points. Sections-worked honors were copped by 
W6MUR with 67, while VV4KFC led in number of contacts 
with 486 in just 11 hours .30 minutes on the air. 

An even dozen operators in the 'phone session turned in 
scores over 10,000. Tops among them was the 18,150- 
pointer of W9KDV, with \V9VFY doing the talking. .\nd 
CD regulars W8\0H and W4HQN, both of whom may 
always be relied on for outstanding voice work, earned 
second and third positions. QSO leader was \V9KDV with 
110, and W5j\IFX worked the most sections, 36. 

The highest scores follow. Figures after each call indicate 
score, number of contacts and number of ARRL sections 
worked. Final and complete results will appear in the 
January CD Bulletin. 



C.W. 

W6MtR 271,953-451-67 

W6B1P 174.265 294 65 

W4K1'C 155,295-486-63 

WIMX' 147.735-462-63 

W5Rin 146.010-468-62 

W4HQ.V-\ . 14t..s75 468-61 

K6FAE 127.710-215-66 

W7PCZ 124.780 235-59 

WIJYH 122,700-402-60 

WIEOB 122.610-395-61 

W'7JLr 116.761-216-59 

W"2ZVW 112.240 361-61 

WIODW 10.i,020 3.56-59 

W3DV() 105.000 368-56 

W^SXOH 105,000-34.5-60 

W4YZC 9il,.s40-377-52 

VE7QC 97.200 200-54 

WIRAX 97.1S5 33.5-57 

W7tTM 95,468-179-58 

W2IFP 95,190-327-57 

W9SDK 92,335-306-59 

W3PWX' 91,280-321 56 

W4YZK 90, 000-297 60 

W4PXK ,S9.040 336-,53 

W5TC-- SN.SOO 292 60 

WIZUP 88.000 313 55 

W6SYY 85.500-190-50 

WIBIH ,S3.780-277-59 

WSGBF 83.505-286-57 

WIWPO 82,655-264-61 

W4WK(J ,81,810-303-54 

K6BWD 81,290-162.55 

W4LAP 79,750-275-58 

W2IVS 79.060-261-59 

W4XH 75,.s70-2,sl-54 

Wl.\(iE 7.5.60C- 280-54 

WSHZ.\ 74,520-270-54 

W6YHM 69.801-143-53 

W18RM 69,390-250-54 

W4WUW 69,165-256-53 

W9CMC 69,120-252-54 

W3KI,A 68.770-299-46 

\V9XH 68,750-244-55 

W4WXZ 67,830-264-51 

WSLHV 67,760-235-56 



W8TZO 
W3TMZ 
WIWEF 
VEIZZ . 
W 2HWH . 
WSJ.'VR 
W3ADE. 
VE6ZR . . 
W2C;XC . 
W0JTF . , 
W7CT 
W2LPJ 
W3JX(i 
W3I,.MM. 
WIWLW 
W4BDI' , 



.67,760 
. 67,500 
67.320 
66,37.5 
64,220 
63.335 : 
.62.910^ 
62,736 
62.565 
62.540 
62.322- 
61.965- 
61.570- 
60.S40 
60.580 
60.135 



235-56 
270^50 
300-44 
225-59 
243-52 
233-53 
226-54 
143-48 
291-J3 
236-53 
133-51 
238-51 
262-47 
230-52 
230-52 
211-57 



•PHONE 

W9KDV< 1^.1.50- 

WS.XOH 15.200- 

W4HQX 14.6.S5- 

WIMRP 14.415- 

W5MFX 13.500- 

W3EAX 12.400 

WICRW 11.880- 

W4FV 11,600- 

W2AEE^ 11.00.5- 

W4YE 10.850- 

W8ZJM 10.270- 

W2Z\'\V 10.000- 

WlZIf) 8610- 

WIKFV S295- 

W3MWL" 8190- 

W9.SZR/9 819()- 

WSPBX 7410- 

WIFZ 7I4(H 

W4KMS 6890- 

W5IWJ 6580- 

WSZXf 6240- 

WIAQE 6200- 

WgrXL 5760- 

W4W()C; 5405- 

W2DLO 5400- 

WITRX 5355- 

W8BOK 5060- 



110-33 
90-32 
82-33 
93-31 
70 36 
75-31 
88-27 
75-29 
66-31 
70-31 
73-26 
73-25 
78-21 
72-21 
60-26 
.58-26 
57-26 
63-21 
53-26 
44-28 
52-24 
62-20 
43-24 
47-23 
49-20 
51-21 
40-23 



' W4YHD. opr. 2 W3GRF. opr. ^ W5JX.M. opr. * W9VFY' . opr. 
5 W2AIP, opr. « W3ULI, opr. 

BRIEF 

MjTon Bowden, WIYIL, Secretary, Port City Amateur 
Eadio Club, sponsors of the Worked All Xew England 
award, advises that the first fifty WANE certificates have 
been Lssued to the following amateurs: WIFTJ, WIBFT, 
WlCDX, W2.JIL, W6ZZ, WlTY, WlLQ, WlYUF 
WITCR, WIVUH. W8AQ, W2XIY, W.30P, WIGK.], 
WIMEG, W2QHH, W2KTU, WlWTG, W1B,JP, WIUET, 
WIMRQ, W2.JCO, WIEFX, W2RSY, W2WZ, WlFZ, 
W2TYC, W4HYW, WlRXA, WlGMH, WITYU, WIBBX, 
WITOP, WIRES, WIRFC, Wl.IWJ, WlFPS, WIXHJ, 
W8AL, WIHWE, WIVZE WlAXX, WIWJA. WIYCU, 
\\;iUZR, K2BH/W1QGU, WIVMC, WlLIG, WIYYO, 
W1H.\. Rules for obtaining tlie WAXE award appeared on 
page 63, September 19.53 and page 69, August 1954 QSTs. 




Any c.w. CD Party enthusiast who hasn't worked 
this fellow lately better turn in his receiver and head- 
phones! Posting the nation's best score in both Juiv and 
October, GO Bill Johnson, Vt6MLR, has really been 
ritiging the bell. Jfis tape fist and snappy operating 
bring credit to the CD gang, as does that crisp-keying 
l)ig sig" stemming from the home-brew 450THs at the 
right. Time was when 80 meters was thought a "must" 
as far as amassitig huge tallies was concerned, but 
^^6^Il H does FH on just 40 and 20: in October he 
stacked up 4.il Q.>>Os in 67 sections for a smashing 
271,9.1,3 points. Shown fingering the bug and bending 
over the operating table, Bill portrays the traditional 
stance of the inveterate I)\er. Indeed, D\ is his main 
interest. And if he can again be enticed from pursuit of 
-Africans and Asiatics, you'll see him in the January CD! 

CODE-PRACTICE STATIONS 

The following scliedules bring up to date the list of sta- 
tions (p. 75, Xovember QST) currently transmitting code 
practice in the ARRL Code-Practice Program. 

W3VEJ, James Alcorn, 207J^ Longfellow St., Vander- 
grift, Penna.; 7150 kc; Men. and Thurs., 2100 EST; 5-15 
w.p.m. 

W4ZRH, Carlton R. Commander, 17 Joyce St., Mt. 
Pleasant, S. C; 3700 kc; Mon. tlu-ough Fri., 1830 EST; 
5-13 w.p.m. 

W0OXF, for Se Kan Radio Club, Kenneth M. Parker, 
Bo.\ 141. Howard. Kansas; 3805.5 kc; Mon., Wed. and Sat., 
1730 CST; 3 '2-15 w.p.m. 



NATIONAL CALLING AND 
EMERGENCY FREQUENCIES (kc.) 

C. W. 'PHONE 



3550 14,050 

7100 21.050 

28.100 



3875 14.225 

7250 21,400 

29,640 



During periods of communications emergency these 
channels will be monitored for emergency traffic. .\t 
other times, these treQuencies can be used as general 
calling fre luencies to expedite general truffle movement 
between amateur stations. Emergency traffic luis prece- 
dence, .\fter contact has been made the frequency 
should be mcated immediately to accommodate other 
callers. 

The following are the Xational Calling and Emer- 
gency Frequencies for Canada: CAr. — 3535, 7050, 
14.060; 'phnne — 3765. 14,160. 28.250 kc. 



NATIONAL RTTY CALLING 
AND WORKING FREQUENCIES 

3620 kc. 7140 kc. 



January 1955 



69 




The principal theme of letters being received by your 
NEC these days seems to be complaint regarding QRM 
to emergency oi)erations on 75 meters. Before we make 
the comments that we're going to make, let it first be 
admitted that considered and impartial afterthought 
does not always coincide with actions or attitudes in the 
pressure of the moment. Or, to put it another way, it's 
all very well to rationalize, but not always so easy to act 
accordingly. 

It is maddening to have someone's casual CQ fcreak 
up a message concerned with the safety or life of a person 
or persons, and perfectly natural for one's thoughts on 
such occasions to be along lines of daggers, machine guns 
and gallows. When such QRM appears to be deliberate 
(very difficult to prove), and derogatory remarks are 
passed around ("tin soldiers," "paper policemen," etc.), 
it is indeed difficult to restrain a homicidal impulse; the 
only wonder is that all that results are numerous letters 
to us saying, in effect, that "there oughta be a law." We 
know; we've been through the wringer ourselves. 

But — and here comes that rationalization — we cannot 
help but observe that the most crowded band in the radio 
spectrum is really not the best suited for emergency com- 
munications purposes. This is especially true in the eve- 
nings, when long skip conditions wash out local communi- 
cation almost entirely and bring in stations from far away 
loud and clear. By all logic, it is ridiculous to try to pursue 
an emergency purpose under such conditions when it 
could be done easily, given the proper equipment, using 
a frequency band without such idiosyncrasies. Still, logic 
or not, the guys are there, on 75; most of them cannot use 
other bands, for one reason or another, so what are we 
going to do about it? 

Several suggestions have been made. W4NV proposes 
establishing monitoring frequencies (3801 and 3995 kc.) 
and appointment of " National Emergency Broadcasting 
Stations" in each state to man the two frequencies during 
any emergency. His plan is very reminiscent of our former 
National Emergency Net, and reminds us to remind you 
that there still exists a set of National Calling and Emer- 
gency frequencies for just such purposes. W4ANK, incensed 
at QRM from stations participating in a contest during 
Hurricane Hazel, urges a national or divisional emergency 
organization aimed at reducing QRM on emergency fre- 
quencies, automatic conversion of traffic nets to emergency 
nets during an emergency, and some means of making 
allowance for an emergency arising during a contest. 

Certain provisions already e.xist for emergencies, and 
perhaps before considering the merits and demerits of 
proposals being made, we ahould examine those which 
now exist. Let's do this briefly: 

(1) FCC provides a measure of respite for amateurs 
plagued by QRM in emergencies in its Section 12.156 
of the amateur regulations. This is summarized in our book- 
let Emergency Communications (p. 8), and outlines a pro- 
cedure by means of which stations operating in an emer- 
gency may apply to FCC for a "clear channel." 




(2) Nets of ARRL's National Traffic System are under 
instructions to activate themselves automatically in the 
event of an emergency, to handle emergency traffic if 
called upon. This procedure was described in an Emer- 
gency and Traffic Bulletin some time ago, and is due for 
repetition. Many non-NTS traffic nets have an agreed- 
upon procedure for automatic conversion for emergency 
purposes. 

(3) As mentioned above, we still have National Call- 
ing and Emergency Frequencies. You will see these listed 
in a box somewhere in the Operating News section of 
QST each month (unless the space problem is extremely 
acute, when the editor usually finds room for them else- 
where in the issue). Instructions for their use are included. 

The question then is: what other measures need be 
taken, besides plugging and publicizing jjresent arrange- 
ments, to make our alertness for emergencies more wide- 
spread and instantaneous? Your thoughts on this question 
are solicited. Just in passing, however, let's also observe 
that QRM is a quite natural phenomenon when an amateur 
band is crowded six-to-a-kilocycle, and the real solution 
lies not in regimentation of our existing bands, but in 
"selecting the channel to suit the need" — a clause bor- 
rowed from Emergency Communications, which more of 
you ought to read. 

Extensive flood conditions in Northern Indiana and 
Illinois precipitated some activity among AREC groups, 
over the SET weekend of October 9-10 and extending to 
the eleventh. We have three reports: 

(1) In La Orange Park, Illinois, heavy rains caused 
backup of sewers and natural drainage into tlie streets 
and basements. As the situation worsened, W9JJD called 
Radio Officer W9FKY and suggested some action be taken. 
The c.d. radio group was activated, and within a very 
few minutes two mobiles were in action. One of the cars 
worked with Water Department trucks and the other 
one accompanied the fire engines. At 1830 that evening 
as the rain continued a third mobile unit was pressed 
into action. Shortly afterward, calls from alarmed residents 
became so numerous that all three cars were placed in 
service answering them, each accompanied by one or 
two firemen. All mobiles were kept extremely busy, each 
with a backlog of calls, until after, midnight. W9KMT 
and W9MAT also participated in this activity. 

(2) The Calumet Area Emergency Net was called into 
action on October 11 by request of Hammond (Ind.) city 
officials as the Little Calumet River went on a rampage 
due to heavy rains. The Lake County Amateur Radio 
Club station, W9ZKW, was set up at the Hammond City 
Hall, with W9GRA/9 at the Woodmar Country Club 
in the middle of the flood area. Other fixed portable stations 
assisting were W9CWO/9 at Highland, W9PVQ/9 at 
Black Oak, W9SNF/9 at Hammond and W9RWN at 
East Hammond. EC W9KRJ monitored and assisted in 
clearing the f recjuencv. MoV)iles operated on 1805 kc. and in- 
cluded W9s KRJ pVq IFC DRJ DWF JZA IBZ WFI 
MNO DDK UXK RXB MOC EHY UVR WTW ZJH 
and APO. 

(3) In Indiana, the towns of Plymouth and Knox were 
hard hit. In Plymouth, EC W9AYP set up communication 
facilities at tliat point, assisted by W9ATT and W9LDJ 
with W9JWI of (Tulver also assisting. Both the Michiana 
Radio Club and the Mobile Amateur Club of St. Joseph 
County participated, the former keeping W9AB, the 
Red Cross station of South Bend, on the air. The Indiana 
Phone Net also greatly assisted by relinquishing the net 
frequency for emergency traffic when the occasion war- 
ranted. Later, a call came from Knox that help was needed 
in communications. Eight mobile units with two base 
station operators were formed into two groups, one for 
immediate use and the other to furnish relief when needed. 



One of the most active mobile emergency groups in 
the country is the Philmont Mobile Radio Clnb. 
W3JGB is NCS of the weekday ".Scrambled Egg Net" 
on 29,493 kc. Everyone or anyone is invited to drop 
in on this frequency to say hello. 



QST for 



The problem at Knox was protection of the local disposal 
plant from rising waters. The Mobile Amateur Club of 
St. Joseph County furnished the equipment and personnel. 
The c.d. base station, W9UB, at South Bend, acted as 
a base. W9YEA of Knox did most of the organizing as 
EC. W9AYP, \V9JWI and W9YEA went many long hours 
without sleep in helping out. 

Others not mentioned above who also assisted included 
W9s GAV DDE UZP AQA AQB YME ZIB CC JEG 
EKK ECH QWI EHZ AWN SXT QXF EOG YRF LVS 
MYI BRM YVR OGZ OGF SMW LVS CKR BR-M 
NAR BRR EZS. 

On August 1.5th, the Red Cross in four Florida counties 
held a hurricane drill in which amateurs actively partici- 
pated. Many stations throughout the Eastern Florida 
section gave assistance, and stations out of state assisted 
in relaying traffic to Atlanta and Washington. The counties 
involved were Palm Beach, Broward, Dade and Monroe, 
an area in which reside an estimated 800 amateurs and 
in which 197 amateurs are registered in the AREC. Eastern 
Florida SEC W4IM records 7.3 stations as having partici- 
pated, 21 of them mobile, in this well-planned and extensive 
exercise. 



The AREC of De Kalb County, Georgia, on the Labor 
Day week-end repeated their .July 4th performance for the 
Red Cross by assisting in rendering aid to accident victims 
in the general vicinity of the intersection of Highways 
12 and 78 near Avondale, Ga., reputed to be one of the 
worst places for highway accidents. On Friday night 75 
meters was used, but QRM and QRX hampered operations, 
so on Monday the mobiles were shifted to ten meters. 
Contact was maintained mobile to mobile and with fixed 
stations set up at police headquarters. Seven accidents 
occurred within one two hour period, three of them re- 
quiring first aid and one involving three cars requiring 
ambulance service. Red Cross personnel were standing 
by at the police stations to rush to the scene wherever 
need was reported by the mobiles. Twelve operators 
participated in this "Operation Bandaid"; W4s NS PUM 
MV EPM IPL ZUF LXR SOV RVH PDD FKE UMO. 



Members of the Blossomland .\mateur Radio Associa- 
tion of St, .loseph, Mich., assisted the Berrien County 
Sheriff Department in providing mobile communication 
during the heavy traffic period over the Labor Day Week- 
end. The main control station was set up at the Sheriff's 
office, using W8MAI/8. Alternate control stations at 
strategic points around the countrv were W8s FGB/8 
SCS and RAE. Mobiles were W8s FGB JFW MWO JUA 
SCS MVO BKL QBN HKT XSA QQO FBV GTM and 
QFV. The boys operated in eight hour shifts, five units 
in service at a time. A regular uniformed Deputy Sheriff 
was assigned to each mobile to perform regular police 
duties. The fre(iuencj' used was 1890 kc. Other participants 
were W8s MXI PQI ORM CRD YKS and WN8QOD. 

Another Labor Day exercise was the furnishing of radio 
communication for the annual Pikes Peak races by Colo- 
rado Springs EC W0TV and his gang. The group loaded 
up their field gear in WBMJD's truck and took off at 0.30J 
on September 6th. Individuals were assigned posts along 
the winding road to the summit, ten of them in all, to 
report every racer by number as he passed his post. W0WPK 
was at the starting line, W0HEM at Post 1 and W0EYX 
and W5BTI/0 at the summit, operating on 29.624 kc. 
for the purpose of passing official orders as re.iue.sted. 
The otliers operated on 388.5 kc. as follows: Starting line 
and NCS— W0SDW; Post 1 — W2IMC: midway be- 
tween Post 1 & 2 — W0AXX; Post 2 — W0HHR; Post 
3 — W0PBN ; Post 4 — W0M JD ; Post .5 — WOCA'G ; Post 
6 — W0CVG; Post 7 — W3MFF; Post 8 — W0QQX; mid- 
way between Posts 8 & 9 — W0JMB; Post 9 — W0MEY; 
Post 10 (summit) — W0PTR and W0VCZ. W0TV was 
standby on either band at the starting line, operating; 
with his receiver on the PA system so that observers at 
the starting line could trace the racers to the summit. 

Our SECs are improving greatly in the matter of re- 
porting. For the month of September, seventeen SEC re- 
ports were received, representing activities of 42.56 AREC 
members, and three new sections have been added to 
this year's reporting roster: Arizona, Louisiana and Ver- 



mont. The September record this year tops that of both 
1953 and 1952, and the total number of sections for the 
year is now 28, compared to 22 in 1953 and 29 in 19.52. 
We're also ahead of last year in total number of reports 
(135 to 114), but trailing our 1952 record of 157 at this 
time. 

Let's keep those reports coming in, fellows! 

MEET THE SCMs 

Thomas J. Morgavi, currently serving the Louisiana sec- 
tion in the capacity of SCM, was issued his first license in 
1935 with the call he now holds, W5FM0. 

A former Official Relay Station and Official 'Phone Sta- 
tion, he is presently an Official Observer. Since his par- 
ticipation several years ago in a Frequency Measuring Test 
with a home-built Wien bridge, he has become extremely 
interested in frequency measurement and has built a second- 
ary standard, cycle counter, and other associated equip- 
ment. SCM Morgavi is active in the Greater New Orleans 
Amateur Radio Club and is trustees of the club station. 




W5L'K. Two Public Service certificates have been issued to 
him for his work in the 1947 Florida Peninsula-Gulf Coast 
Hurricane and the Big Freeze of February, 1951. He likes 
to handle traffic for overseas stations on ^L\RS frequencies. 

W5FMO's station layout consists of push-pull 810s in the 
final modulated by push-pull 80.5s, 600 watts on 'phone and 
c.w. ; also a low-power BC-610 exciter, 75 watts 'phone and 
c.w. Receiver is an HQ-120. Antennas include an 80- and 
40-meter vertical, a three-element 20-meter rotary beam, 
and a Marconi for the small rig. All bands 160 through 15 
meters, 'phone and c.w., are used. 

Tom expects to be successful in the near future in induc- 
ing his XYL, Helen, to get her ham ticket. Baseball and 
boxing are his favorite sports. The Corps of Engineers, U. S. 
Army, has employed him as radio operator and radio 
service en^dneer since 1940. 



A.R.R.L. ACTIVITIES CALENDAR 

Jan. 7th: CI' Oualifying Run — \*60WP 
Jan. 8th-9th: ^ .H.F. Sweepstakes 
Jan. 8th-2.'5rd: Novice Hound-up 
Jan. 14th: CP Qualifying Run — WlAW 
Jan. 15tli-16th: CD (jisO Party (c.w.) 
Jan. 22nd-23rd: CD QSO Party Cphonc) 
Feb. 5th: CP Qualifying Run — W 60\* P 
F'eb. 8th: Frequency Measuring Test 
Feb. llth-13th: DX Competition ("phone) 
Feb. 14th: CP Qualif>ing Run — WlAW 
Feb. 25th-27th: DX Competition (c.w.) 
Mar. 5th: CP Qualifying Run — WbCtt P 
>lar. llth-13th: DX Competition ("phone) 
Mar. 15th: CP Qualifying Run — WlAW 
Mar. 25th-27th: DX Competition (c.w.) 
Apr. 1st: CP Qualifying Run — \l 60WP 
Apr. 13th: CP Qualifying Run — \« lAW 
Apr. 16th-17th: CD QSO Party (c.w.) 
Apr. 23rd-24th: CD QSO Party ("phone) 



January 1955 



71 



BRASS POUNDERS LEAGUE 




Winners of BPL Certificates for Octo 


ber traffic 




Call Orig. 


Reed. 


Rel. 


Del. 


Total 


W3CUL 219 


1974 


1411 


426 


4030 


W3\VIQ 53 


973 


881 


71 


1978 


W0T(JD S 


914 


901 


13 


1836 


WtlJUJ 17 


817 


635 


55 


1524 


\V9D() 7 


662 


587 


82 


1338 


\V0SCA 29 


560 


533 


2 


1124 


W5MN 36 


529 


396 


128 


1089 


W0CPI 7 


460 


410 


50 


927 


KG6IG 20 


444 


457 


3 


924 


K6FAE 16 


432 


438 


12 


898 


W7FRU 1 


450 


374 


63 


888 


W4PFC 9 


438 


431 


4 


882 


W9VBZ 52 


402 


360 


29 


S43 


W6PHT 42 


347 


307 


135 


831 


W7BA 12 


408 


385 


20 


825 


W40GG 9 


406 


348 


50 


813 


W7PGY 152 


294 


282 


12 


740 


W2KEB 27 


335 


234 


101 


697 


\V9NZZ 178 


254 


2 


252 


686 


W9SNT 65 


301 


263 


38 


667 


W6LYG 36 


306 


180 


126 


648 


W2KFV 22 


310 


295 


15 


642 


W5TFB 16 


316 


287 


19 


638 


W4DVR 497 


28 


43 


11 


579 


W0BLI 5 

W7APF 7 


284 


262 


15 


566 


273 


273 





553 


KA2MC 80 


236 


209 


27 


5.52 


K5FFB 36 


238 


198 


76 


548 


K6FCZ 30 


256 


244 


12 


542 


W6IZG 5 


26 


261 


246 


538 


K2BSD 12 


262 


247 


15 


536 


WIUKO 10 


263 


250 


12 


535 


W2RUF 34 


267 


185 


39 


525 


W8ELW 17 


250 


225 


25 


517 


W4PJU 6 


254 


210 


44 


514 


W3WV i5 


280 


167 


45 


507 


W0QXO 9 

Late Reports: 


246 


190 


56 


501 










K6FCZ (Sept.) . 37 


513 


499 


14 


1063 


W4PFC (Sept.) 40 


350 


345 


5 


740 


More-Than- 


One-Operator Stations 




Call Orig. 


Reed. 


Rel. 


Del. 


Total 


KG6FAA 256 


2112 


2062 


50 


4480 


W6IAB 51 


1515 


1444 


72 


3082 


KA2USA 67 


1149 


1199 


31 


2446 


K0AIR 28 


643 


577 


66 


1314 


K6FDG 70 


615 


542 


54 


1281 


K4WAR 245 


463 


415 


48 


1171 


K9FCA 1 1 1 


525 


380 


34 


1050 


KA2AK 332 


260 


237 


23 


852 


KA2GE 191 


331 


226 


97 


845 


K4FDY 58 


335 


286 


41 


720 


Late Reports: 










W3nSA (July) . 39 


569 


511 


97 


1216 


W3nSA (Aug.). Ill 


458 


441 


128 


1138 


W3USA (Sept.) . 92 


463 


424 


131 


1110 


BPL fo'- 100 or more originations- pi 


us deliveries: 


KA7SL 320 W4YRX 158 


W3CVE 


114 


K2CBD/1 245 V()6N 152 


W0K(iD 


113 


KA8AB 239 W0WNA 150 


VK3XI) 


113 


KA2HQ 202 VE3NG 150 


WIBDI 


103 


W0FQB 181 W6KVB 146 


Late Report: 


W6CMN 163 W0NIY 117 


K2FAV(Sept.) 321 


More-Than- 


One-Operator Stations 




WlAW 129 K4WBP 103 








BPL medallions (see Auc. 1954 QS7\ p. 64) liave been | 


awarded to the following amateurs up t 


) and inc 


uding 


September traffic: W 


2B(). W2J()A. \VL 


,IZ.\. \VL 


ki:b. 


W2KFV, WSCl'L, 


W3CVE, 


\V3\\ H.). \V(ii:L(i, 


W6LY(;. W6PHT, 


W6UM(), 


W6SWP, \V61TSY, 


W7BA, \V7P(!V. WSRJC, W9CXY. W91X), W9JUJ, 1 


W9.\ZZ, W9\HZ, W0BDR. W0BLI, W0C-PI W0GAR, | 


W0SCA, \06X. 










The BPL is open to all amateurs in the United States, | 


Canada, Cuba, and 1 


. S. possessions wli 


report to their 1 


SCMs a message tot 


al (jf 500 or 


mcire, 


c,r 100 (1 


more 1 


originatlons-pius-<Iel 


veri(vs fcpp ai 


y cale 


idar nion 


til. All 


me.ssages mast be 


haiidleil cm 


amateur Ireiiuencles, 1 


within 48 hours of receipt, in standard 


\RRL fci 


"m. 



TRAFFIC TOPICS 

What's in a name? Anions tlie luaidreds of nets registered 
in the ARRL Net Directory, some call themselves traffic 
nets and some emergency nets, but in actual practice the 
traffic nets frequently mobilize in an emergency, and the 
emergency nets usually handle traffic in their drills and test 
— and always during the real thing. A good gen ral rule in 
that a traffic net should be an emergency net as well, and an 
emergency net should also be a traffic net. The designation 
as one or the other is to indicate the principal, not the only, 
dedication. 

That the emergency net should know how to handle traf- 
fic (and that means doing it as a matter of course) is incon- 
testable. This is not to say that they all do know how to 



handle traffic, only that few people if anyone will argue 
that they should. We think that, generally speaking, emer- 
gency nets are better versed in the handling of traffic than 
traffic nets are in organization for emergencies. And that 
brings us, finally, to the subject for this column this month; 
that every traffic net should have an emergency plan. 

Many already have. We can't mention them all, but more 
power to those traffic nets which have swung into action in 
emergencies, and even more power to those which have a 
plan for doing so. On the other hand, a good many of them 
liandle only routine traffic and, in an emergency, find them- 
selves on the outside looking in — looking for a place 
wherein they may be of assistance. 

The National Traffic System has a policy for emergency 
operation which was set down in an Emergency and Traffic 
Bulletin dated Spring, 1950. Its salient points bear repeat- 
ing. During an emergency, NTS nets should be self-acti- 
vating; that is, they should be able to swing into action or 
take care of an emergency situation in any alTected area. 
NTS nets in surrounding areas should be activated to take 
care of outside communications if and when called upon. 
Depending upon the urgency involved and the volume of 
emergency traffic, official or otherwise, the not manager con- 
cerned must determine whether his net in any particular 
situation shall handle official traffic only, all emergency 
traffic, or all traffic as usual. In most cases it will be possible 
to handle all types of traffic but to give precedence to official 
emergency traffic in view of its inherent public interest and 
importance. 

Tlie extent of NTS activation in emergencies will depend 
entirely on the extent of the emergency. If a local flood, the 
section traffic net will probably be adequate, with activation 
of the regional net, if required, to handle outside contact. If 
tlie emergency extends over several states or ARRL sec- 
tions, probably the regional net should be activated in addi- 
tion to section nets, with "shuttle liaison" from one to the 
other, and possible activation of the area net to provide 
outside contact. If the emergency is area-wide, all NTS nets 
within that area should be on the job, with possible activa- 
tion of an adjacent area net to provide outside contact. 

There is much more to this subject of using traffic nets for 
emergency purposes than can be discussed here and now. 
We simply wish to point out that it is not a new idea, and to 
renew the thought that traffic nets have an emergency ap- 
plication, and that ECs should know of traffic affiliations of 
any of their AREC members for possible use in emergencies. 
And you net managers — have you a plan for operation in 
emergencies? Better give it some thought. 

Three miscellaneous October net reports: (1) The Early 
Bird Net reports traffic amounting to 686. (2) The North 
Texas — Oklahoma Section Net held 31 sessions, 1010 
check-ins and a traffic count of 319. (3) The Transconti- 
nental Phone Net registered 782 message counts with eleven 
stations participating in the First Area. 



National Traffic System. NTS has a place for every traffic 
man if said traffic man has a place in his inclinations for 
NTS. The System is built on the basis of the "bestest for 
the mostest." Any amateur who really wants to participate 
may do so, and welcome. This includes old shellbacks who 
can copy 4.5 w.p.m. with a four-inch paint brush down to the 
newest Novice who had to hump to get past five w.p.m. 

But this does not mean that you may participate at any 
level you please. NTS has many levels, and each participant 
must find his own — section novice or training nets for rank 
beginners, section traffic nets, regional nets, area nets and 
the Transcontinental Corps — depending on such factors as 
experience, dependability, and aptitude. We have been 
sniped at for this policy, but we still think it's a good one. 
The system was not set up to serve any individual or 
organization, but to serve amateur radio by creating an 
organized nationwide service. 

Of course it does not always work as planned; even major 
leaguers never bat 1.000. It you are not participating, 
naturally you are hurting NTS, especially if you are one of 
the experienced traffic men we need to make it work. But 
we'll do what we can with what we have, and hope that the 
system will continue to show improvement through the 
years as traffic-handling amateurs learn that there is pleas- 
ure to be had in operating as part of a team. 

An announcement: effective November 15, 1954, the 
ARRL National Traffic System officially adopted a six-day 
week. Many NTS nets already have been operating on Sat- 



72 



QST for 



urdays and others e.xpanded their .schedules to cover Sat- 
urday at our suggestion. Some are finding it difficult to ob- 
tain Saturday NCSs and liaison stations (volunteers needed). 
Generally speaking, however, there will no longer be that 
crucial 48-hour period from Friday to Monday that NTS 
does not function. 

October reports: 





Ses- 






Aver- 


Repre- 


Net 


sions 


Traffic 


Rate 


age 


sentation 


IRN 


20 


297 


0.47 


14.8 


92.1% 


3RN 


16 


193 


0.70 


12.1 


97.9% 


4RN 


24 


184 


0..58 


7.0 


46.4% 


RN6 


42 


27o 




6.5 




RN7 


39 


237 




6.1 


37.3% 


8RN 


32 


165 




5.1 


76% 


TEN 


68 


1826 




26.8 


58.6% 


TRN 


20 


101 


0.46 


6.0 


75% 


EAN 


21 


813 




38.7 


95.2% 


CAN 


20 


702 




35.1 


100%, 


PAN 


23 


526 


0.56 


22.8 


89.1% 


Sections* 


377 


2244 




6.0 




Summary 


702 


7562 


3RN 


17.7 


CAN 


Record 


766('52) 


7562 




17.7 





Late Reports: 

2RN (Aug.) 22 175 0.25 



7.9 87.9% 



♦Section Nets reporting: AENB & AENP (Ala.); MSN 
(Minn.) ; KYN (Ky.) ; CN (Conn.) ; Tenn. Hi Speed & Tenn. 
Sectional; VVSN (Wash.); NEB (Nebr.); SCN (Calif.); 
WVN (W. Va.) ; QKS & QKS-SS (Kans.) ; TLCN (Iowa). 

Connecticut, New Hampshire and Western Mass. get 
stars for perfect attendance on the IRN report. 3RN 
started operating a se.ssion at 1830, starting November 15. 
W40GG has taken the reins as manager of RN5, and 
VE7ASR is the new manager of RN7; we wish them both 
the best success. W8DSX says the second session of 8RN is 
not very well attended. VE3GI commends VE3AJR for her 
performance on TRN. W8SCW says he is still trying to get 
out an EAN bulletin. CAN certificates have been issued to 
W5CAF, W5MXQ and W4TYU; Peggj- is having trouble 
getting NCSs for CAN. If interested, drop her a line or 
radiogram. A PAN certificate has been issued to W6ZRJ; 
W7NH is back at the helm of PAN. 

The TCC roster is gradually filling up, but some of the 
long haul schedules are having difficulty with conditions so 
screwy. What we ought to have are raidwestern relays to 
stand in on the schedules. Anyone want to be considered for 
that role once or twice per week? 

WlAW OPERATING SCHEDULE 

{All limes given are Eastern Standard Time) 

The WlAW Fall-Winter operating schedule remains in 
effect. Master schedules showing complete WlAW opera- 
tion in EST, CST or PST will be sent to anyone on request. 

Operating- Visiting Hours: 

Monday through Friday: 1500-0300 (following day). 

Saturday: 1900-0230 (Sunday). Sunday: 1500-2230. 

Exceptions: WlAW will not observe its regular hours 
from 0300 Jan. 1st to 1500 Jan. 2nd and from 2230 Feb. 
21st to 1500 Feb. 23rd. 

General Operation: Refer to page 70, September QST, for 
a chart to determine times during which WlAW engages in 
general operation on various frequencies, 'phone and c.w. 
This schedule is still in effect but is not reproduced herewith 
for space considerations. Note that since the schedule is 
organized in EST, certain morning operating periods may 
fall on the evening of the previous day in western time 
zones. Wl.AW will participate in all official ARRL operat- 
ing activities, using scheduled general operating periods for 
this purpose if necessary. 

Official ARRL Bulletin Schedule: Bulletins containing 
latest information on matters of general amateur interest 
are transmitted on regular schedules: 

Frequencies (kc): 

C.W.: 1885, 3555, 7125, 14,100, 21,020, 52,000, 145,600. 

'Phone: 1885, 3950, 7255, 14,280, 21,350, 52,000, 145,600. 

Frequencies may vary slightly from round figures given; 
they are to assist in finding the WlAW signal, not for exact 
calibration purposes. 

Times: 

Sunday through Friday: 2000 by c.w., 2100 by 'phone. 

Monday through Saturday: 2330 by 'phone, 2400 by c.w. 



Code Proficiency Program: Practice transmissions are 
made on the above listed c.w. frequencies, starting at 2130 
daily. Speeds are 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 w.p.m. on Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday, and 5, 7H. 10 and 13 w.p.m. on 
Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Approximately 
ten minutes of practice is given at eaoh speed. Code-practice 
transmissions will be replaced by Code Proficiency Qualify- 
ing Runs on January 14th and February 14th, and by a 
Frequency Measuring Test on February 8th. 

BRIEF 

Ray Grob, jr., W8YFJ, President of Sandusky Valley 
.Amateur Radio Club, reports that a Mobile Caravan held 
July 18th, sponsored jointly by the Toledo Radio Club, 
Toledo Mobile Radio Club and SV.'VRC, was a big success. 
A caravan of 160-meter mobiles started out from Toledo 
on a tour through the SVARC area, including Port CUnton, 
Fremont, and Woodville, Ohio. At their home stations the 
members of SVARC formed a net and worked the mobiles 
one by one as they passed through the area. In this manner 
the Toledo boys qualified for the SVARC honorary mem- 
bership award by working five or more members, and the 
SVARC gang qualified for the WTO award by working 
fifteen Toledo stations. QRM was non-existent due to strict 
maintenance of net discipline. 

DXCC NOTE 

Effective November 1, 1954, French India, FN8, has been 
deleted from the Countries List, since on that date it became 
a part of India. All confirmations of FN8 contacts prior to 
November 1, 1954 will be credited for DXCC, but con- 
firmations of contacts after November 1st will be credited 
as India. 



DX CENTURY CLUB AWARDS 






HONOR ROLL 




WlFH . . . 
WSHGW. . 
\V6VFR... 
W0YXO. . . 

W6AM 

\V3BES. . . 
W6ENV. . . 


.252 G2PL 247 W6SX.... 

.251 W3GHD...244 W2AGW. . 
250 W2BXA...243 W4BPD. . 

. 250 \V3JTC 242 W6SYG . . . 

, 249 W3KT 242 G6RH 

.248 W6MEK...242 G6ZO 

.247 PY2CK... 

RADIO TELEPHONE 


.242 
.241 
241 
.241 
.241 
.241 
.241 


PY2CK. . . 
WIFH . . 


.235 XEIAC 215 WIJCX... 

224 WIMCW. 214 WIXWO. . 


.213 
.212 
.210 
.207 


VQ4ERR. . 
ZS6BW.... 


.222 W8HGW .214 W9RBI . . . 
.219 SM5KP. .. 


From October 15 to Xovember 15, 1954, DXCC 
certidcates and endorsements ba-sed on postwar contacts 
with 100-or-more countries have been issued by the 
ARRL Communications Department to the amateurs 
listed below. 




NEW MEMBERS 




W6PCS.... 
W8LKH. . . 
WIAWE .. 


.166 P.\0HP 121 W50FM.. 

. 148 W4XBV ... 1 16 GW2CPU . 
.125 GI3DQE...116 SM3AKW. 
G2BVX 107 

RADIOTELEPHONE 


.104 
.102 
.101 


CP5EK.. . 


. 136 IIBJC 121 W4XBV. . . 

ENDORSEMENTS 


.107 


PA0UX . . . 
KV4AA . . . 
W9F1D .. 
VK2ACX.. 
W9XLM . . 
W6MHB. . 
G3FXX . . . 
CP5EK... 
PYIHX... 
W7AH . . . 


.240 CX8MM...180 W8TMA . . 

.230 W0AIH 170 WIAPU... 

.222 W4HVQ...161 W9DGA.. 
.220 W5BXO. . . 160 W0XLY. . 

.212 W4ML 140 W5LCI . . . 

.200 W0DGH ... 132 PA0TAU. . 
.200 W7XKW. .130 EA3CK. . . 
.183 W0FXX...13O WIEIO... 

. 183 V03X 130 W2ZGB. . . 

. 182 YV5BZ .... 130 W9IHN. . . 
W2IJU 124 

RADIOTELEPHONE 


.121 
.120 
.120 
.120 
.119 
.117 
.112 
.110 
.110 
.110 


W8GZ . . . 
G3FXX . . 


.190 PY2AHS...162 W8ZOK. . . 
.175 IICAR 151 IICTE. ... 


.122 
.121 


CALL AREA LEADERS 


W5M1S. . . 


.239 W7AMX. ..238 VE4RO... 


.222 




W9NDA. ..240 




RADIOTELEPHONE 




W2APU . . 
W3JNN . . 
W4HA.... 


.202 W5BGP....203 W7HIA... 

.203 W6AM 196 W0ArW... 

.175 VESKT... 


.175 
.162 
.163 



January 1955 



73 



CODE PROFICIENCY PROGRAM 

Twice each month special transmissions are made to 
enable you to qualify for the ARRL Code Proficiency Certif- 
icate. The next qualifying run from WlAW will be made 
on January 14th at 2130 EST. Identical texts will be sent 
simultaneously by automatic transmitters on 1885, 3555, 
7125, 14,100, 21,020, 52,000 and 145,600 kc. The next 
qualifying run from W60WP only will be transmitted on 
January 7th at 2100 PST on 3590 and 7138 kc. 

Any person may apply; neither ARRL membership nor 
an amateur license is required. Send copies of all qualifying 
runs to ARRL for grading, stating the call of the station 
you copied. If you qualify at one of the six speeds trans- 
mitted, 10 through 35 w.p.m., you will receive a certificate. 
If your initial qualification is for a speed below 35 w.p.m., 
you may try later for endorsement stickers. 

Code-practice transmissions will be made from WlAW 
each evening at 2130 EST. Speeds are 15, 20, 25, 30 and 
35 w.p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and 5, 7M. 
10 and 13 w.p.m. on Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and 
Saturday. Appro.ximately 10 minutes' practice is given at 
each speed. References to texts used on several of the trans- 
missions are given below. These make it possible to check 
your copy. For practice purposes the order of words in 
each line of QST text sometimes is reversed. To get send- 
ing practice, hook up your own key and buzzer and attempt 
to send in step with WlAW. 

Dale Subject of Practice Text from November QST 
Jan. 3rd: A MuUihand 813 Final, p. 11 
Jan. 6th: The Lazy Man's Panoramic Adapter, p. 14 
Jan. 11th: A Public Relations Project, p. 18 
Jem. ISth: Audio fur the Mobile or Fixed Station . . . , p. 21 
Jan. 19th: An R.F. Bridge . . . , p. 29 
Jan. 21st: Simplified "Break-In with One Antenna," p. 30 
Jan. 24th: The CD-IO-TC, p. 32 
Jan. 27th: Fulminatin s from OV Fogey, p. 34 

SUPPLEMENT TO NET DIRECTORY 

The following list will supplement and correct the listing 
on page 78, November QST. Please inform us promptly of 
any errors or omissions so that they can be included in the 
March QST installment. An asterisk (*) indicates correction 
from previous listing in November QST. Tliis listing brings 
the record up to date as far as November 17, 1954. Regis- 
trations received later than this date will appear in the 
March QSr supplement. 



Name of Net 


Freq. 


Time 


Days 


Albert Net (Conn.) 


29,460 
145,200 
52,420 


1945 EST 


2/Mon., Fri 


Alberta Phone Net (APN) 


3765 


1930 MST 


Mon., Wed 
Fri. 


American Legion Amateur Net 


3975 


1900 PST 


Daily 


Anthracite Net (AN) 


3610 


1900 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Amateur Radio & Coffee Society 


29,400 


Always 


Daily 


(ARCS) 








Arizona CW Net (AZN) 


3690 


2000 MST 


Tue., Thu. 


Arizona Emerg. Net (AEN) 


3865 


1900 MST 


Tue.-Thu. 


AREC Net (Calif.) 


3900 


1030 PST 


Sun. 


Atlanta Forty CW Net 


7150 


2100 EST 


Sun. 


Atlanta Ten Phone Net 


29,600 


2200 EST 


Sun. 


.\zalea Emerg. Net fAla.) 


29.680 


2000 CST 


Mon. 


Badger Emerg. Net (Wis.) 


3950 


1800 CST 


Daily 


Bakersfield & E. Kern Co. 


145,440 


1900 PST 


Mon. 


(Calif.) Emerg. Net 








Barn Yard Net, The 


3960 


0700 EST 


Mon. -Sat. 


Barnyard Net 


3924 


0700 EST 


Mon.-Sat. 


Batavia Amateur Radio Assn. Net 3565 


2030 EST 


Wed. 


(N. Y.) 








Bedford (Mass.) Club CW Net* 


3600 


1815 EST 


Thu. 


Bergen Co. (N. J.) CD Net 


29,510 
29,550 


1945 EST 


Wed. 


Berks Civil Defense Net (Pa.) 


145,400 


2000 EST 


Mon. 


Bloomfield (N. J.) Communica- 


29,520 


1100 EST 


Sun. 


tions Group 








Blue Ridge 160 Meter Net 


1800 


0830 CST 


Sun. 


British Columbia AREC Net 


3755 


1800 PST 


Mon.-Sat. 


(BCAREC) 








Brooklyn (N. Y.) AREC 


3700 


1100 EST 


Sun. 


Buckeye Net (Ohio) (BN) 


3580 


1900 EST 


Mon.-Sat. 



Catalpa Amateur Radio 

Society Net 
CentineUa Valley AREC 

Central Area Net (CAN) 
Central Gulf Coast Hurricane Net 
Central Illinois Net 
Central Virginia Amateur Radio 

Club CW Net 
Charlotte CD Net (N. C.) 
Colo. Emerg. Phone Net 

Colo. Slow Speed Net 

Columbia Amateur Radio Pool 

(Fla.) 
Commanche Countv (Okla.) 

AREC Net (CCEN) 
Conn. Nutmeg Net (CN) 
Coastal Emerg. Radio Net 
Cranston (R. I.) Civil Emerg. 

Net 
Davidson Co. (Tenn.) 2 Meter 

Emerg. Net 
Delaware Lehigh Amateur RC 

Net (Pa.) 
Dixie Traffic Net 
Duluth Emerg. Net 
Dutchess Co. (N. Y.) 2 Meter 

CD Net 
East Able Fox (EAF) 
East Able Baker (EAB) 
East Tennessee Net 
Eastern Area Net (EAN) 
Eastern Mass. Net (EMN)* 

Eglin Amateur Radio Society's 
Hurricane and Incidentals Radio 
Net 

Eight BaU Net, The (Ohio) 

Elbow Benders Net 

Fall River Emerg. Net (FREN) 
(Mass.) 

Falmouth (Mass.) Emerg. Net 

Fifth Regional Net (RN5) 



First Regional Net (IRN) 

Fish Net 

Florida Phone Traffic Net (FPTN) 3945 

Forest Hill (Ont.) Amateur Radio 

Club 
Garfield Co. (Okla.) Emerg. Net 
Gator Net (GN) (Fla.) 

Gem Net (Idaho) 



General Coverage 
Georgia Cracker Net 

Golden Empire Emerg. Net 

(GEEN) 
Grand Rapids (Mich.) 

Emerg. Net 
Green Bay (Wis.) Emerg. Net 

Gulf Emerg. Mobile Net (GEM) 

(Miss.) 
Hair Net 
Hillsborough Co. (N. H.) 

Emerg. Net 
Hi Noon Net (Colo.) 
High Noon Net, The (Mich.) 
Holbrook CD Net 
Illinois Emerg. Net (lEN) 

Indiana CW Net (QIN) 



Iowa 160 Meter Net 

Iowa Tall Corn Net (TLCN) 

Kansas 75 Meter Phone Net 



3970 


1000 EST 


Sun. 


29,610 


0900 EST 


Sun. 


28,680 


1930 PST 


Tue. 


147,120 






3670 


2030 CST 


Mon.-Fri. 


t 3935 


1815 CST 


Daily 


1815 


0830 CST 


Sun. 


3650 


1945 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


3825 


0900 EST 


Sun. 


3980 


0830 MST 


Sun. 




1700 MST 


Tue., Thu. 


3570 


1715 MST 


Mon., Wed., 
Fri. 


7183 


0630 EST 


Mon. 


3860 


1230 CST 


Sun. 


3640 


1845 EST 


Mon.-Sat. 


146,800 


2000 CST 


Tue. 


39,510 


2000 EST 


Alt. Thu. 


145,200 


2000 CST 


Mon. 




1930 CST 


Thu. 


29,640 


1000 EST 


Sun. 


3970 


0800 CST 


Mon.-Fri. 


29,600 


2130 CST 


Tue. 


145,350 


2100 EST 


Mon. 


3915 


2030 EST 


Sun. 


3503 


2030 EST 


Sun. 


3980 


0545 CST 


Mon.-Fri. 


3670 


2030 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


3660 


1300 EST 
1900 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


29,560 




1900 CST 


Mon. 


1895 


1000 EST 


Sun. 


1806 


2100 EST 


Tue. 


29,200 


1900 EST 


Wed. 


3585 


1415 EST 


Wed. 


3645 


1945 CST 
2130 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


3605 


1915 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


3740 


1930 CST 


Thu. 


M) 3945 


0700 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


3765 


1900 EST 


Sun. 


3825 


0900 CST 


Sun. 


7105 


1005 EST 


Sun. 




1835 EST 


Tue. 


3638 


2000 MST 


Mon., Wed. 
Fri. 


3990 


1400 EST 


Sun. 


3995 


0930 EST 


Sun. 




1830 EST 


Tue.-Thu. 


1920 


2000 PST 


Mon. 


29,610 


2030 EST 


Mon. 


3950 


0730 CST 


Sun. 


29,620 


1300 CST 


Mon. 


29,600 


1900 CST 


Thu. 


29,560 


1900 CST 


Mon. 


29,000 


1900 EST 


Fri. 


3945 


1200 MST 


Mon.-Fri. 


3663 


1200 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


28,570 


1900 EST 


Mon. 


3940 


1800 CST 


Tue., Thu. 




0900 CST 


Sun. 


3656 


1600 CST 
1830 CST 
2200 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


1815 


1900 CST 


Daily 


3560 


1830 CST 


Mon.-Fri. 


3920 


1230 CST 


Tue., Wed. 
Fri. 




0800 CST 


Sun. 



74 



QST for 



Kennehoochee Emerg. & Traffic 


29,460 


21.30 EST 


Sun. 


Prep School Net, The 


3950 


1400 EST 


Wed. 


Net 








Province of Quebec Net (PQN) 


3670 


1915 EST 


Daily 


Kent Emergency Group 


145,160 


2000 EST 


Mon. 


Puerto Rico Amateur Emerg. Ne 


3559 


2000 AST 


Mon. 


Kentucky Korn Krackers 


3945 


0700 CST 


DaUy 




3925 


2000 AST 


Wed. 


Kentucky Phone Net 


3945 


1830 CST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Quarter Century Wireless Assn. 


3810 


1100 EST 


Sun. 


Knights and Ladies of Round- 


3885 


0830 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


Net 








table Net (KLR) 








Restricted Speed Net (Ont.) 


3645 


1330 EST 


Sun. 


Knights of the Kilocycles 


3910 


0730 EST 


Sun. 


Rhode Island Novice Net (RINN) 3743 


1830 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Lucas Co. (Ohio) Emerg. Net 


29,200 


1030 EST 


Sat. 


Rhode Island Traffic Net (RIN) 


3540 


1900 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


"MAK" Chap. 2 (Mass.) 


29,240 


1900 EST 


Tue. 


Rockland Co. (N. Y.) CD Net 


147,210 


1930 EST 


Mon. 


Maiden (Mass.) Emerg. Net 


29,540 


1930 EST 


Mon. 


Sask. ARRL Phone Net 


3780 


1830 MST 


Daily 


Manitoba CVV Net (MAN) 


3700 


1900 CST 


Daily 


Sea Gull Net (Me.) 


3960 


1700 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Manitoba Phone Net 


3760 


1900 CST 


Daily 


Second Regional Net (2RN) 


3690 


1830 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


MARC Net (Ind.) 


29,620 


1900 CST 


Mon., Wed., 






1945 EST 










Fri. 


Seventh Regional Net (RN7) 


1988 


1945 PST 


Mon.-Sat. 


Maryland Delaware DC Section 


3650 


1930 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 






2130 PST 


Thu., Sat. 


Net 










3575 


1945 PST 


Mon.-Sat. 


Maryland Emerg. Phone Net 


3820 


1830 EST 


Mon., Wed., 






2130 PST 


Thu., Sat. 








Fri. 


Sheridan Emerg. Net (SEN) 


3825 


1930 MST 


Tue. 






1300 EST 


Sat., Sun. 


(Wyo.) 








Merced Co. (Calif.) Emerg. Net 


3995 


1900 PST 


Fri. 


6 Meter Emergency (Tenn.) 


50,700 


1900 EST 


Tue., Fri. 


Mercer (N. J.) Emerg. Net 


147,150 


2100 EST 


Sun. 


Sixth Regional Net (RN6) 


3615 


1945 PST 


Mon.-Fri. 


(MEN) 












2130 PST 




Mich. Buzzards Roost Net 


3930 


1730 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


St. Paul Civil Defense Net 


29,520 


1930 CST 


Fri.-Wed. 


Michigan Emerg. Net 


3930 


0900 EST 


Sun. 


(Minn.) 








Milton (Mass.) Emerg. Net 


146,808 


1930 EST 


Mon. 


South Bend Mobiles 


29,493 


1930 CST 


Mon., Wed 


Minn. Section Net (MSN) 


3595 


1830 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 








Fri. 


Mo. Amateur Radio Teen Age 


3830 


0700 CST 


Sun., Tue., 


South Carolina Net (CW) (SON) 


3525 


1900 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Net 






Thu. 


So. Dak. 160 Meter Phone Net 


1905 


0800 CST 


Daily 






1645 CST 




Southern Calif. Net (SCN)* 


3600 


1930 PST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Monmouth Co. (N. J.) 


147,150 


2130 EST 


Mon. 






2030 PST 


.Mon.-Sat. 


Emerg. Net 












1000 PST 


Sun. 


Morning Conn. Net (MCN) 


3640 


0630 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Sunrise Radio Club Net (N. Y.) 


3950 


1000 EST 


Sun. 


Nassau Co. (N. Y.) 


28.720 


2000 EST 


Thu. 


Tar Heel Net 


3865 


1930 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


10 Meter Net 


28,680 






Teenage Net (TAN)* 


3630 


2315 EST 


Daily 


Nebraska CW Net 


3525 


1845 CST 


Daily 


Teen .Age Rag Chewers Net 


3525 


1700 EST 


-Mon.-Fri. 


Nebr. Slow Speed Net (NSS) 


3750 


1700 CST 


Daily 


Tennessee HI SPEED Net 


3635 


1830 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


New Hampshire Emergency Net 


3850 


1300 EST 


Sun. 


Tennessee Phone Net (TPN) 


3980 


1245 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


(NHEN) 












1830 CST 


Tue., Thu. 


New Hampshire Slow Speed Net 


3685 


1730 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 






1300 CST 


Sun. 


New Jersey Civil Defense Net 


3993 


0930 EST 


Sun. 


Tenn. Regular 


3635 


1900 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


New Hampshire CW Traffic Net 


3685 


1800 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Tenth Regional Net (TEN) 


3545 


1945 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


N. J. 75 Meter Emerg. Phone Net 3900 


0900 EST 


Sun. 






2130 CST 




New Jersey Net (NJN) 


3695 


1900 EST 


Mon.-Sat. 


Thirteenth Regional Net (TRN) 


3675 


1945 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


New Mexico Breakfast Club 


383S 


0700 MST 


Daily 






2130 EST 




New Mexico CW Net 


3633 


1900 MST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Topeka Emerg. Ten Meter Net 


29,500 


0930 CST 


Sun. 


N. M. 75 Meter Emerg. Phone 


3838 


0730 MST 


Sun. 


Toronto Ten Meter Net 


28,250 


0930 EST 


Sun. 


Net 




1800 MST 


Tue., Thu. 


Traffic Exchange Net (TXN) 


7165 


1900 CST 


Daily 


Newport (R. I.) Emerg. Net 


28,900 


1000 EST 


Sun. 


Tropical Phone Tfc Net (TPTN) 


3945 


1800 EST 


Daily 


N. Y. State Phone Emerg. & 


3925 


1800 EST 


Daily 


(Fla.) 








Traffic Net 








Trans Continental Relay Net 


7042 


0215 GMT 


Daily 


Night Owl Net (N.J.) 


29,000 


2300 EST 


Sat. 






0615 GMT 




Nine Jacks and Queen Net 


3870 


1210 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


Tri Town Radio Amateur Club 


3860 


1900 CST 


Wed. 


Ninth Regional Net (9RN) 


3640 


1700 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 






0900 CST 








1945 CST 




Tulsa Co. (Okla.) Teenagers Net 


3735 


1900 CST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Northampton Co. (Pa.) CD Net 


29,640 


1000 EST 


Sun. 




3883 


1200 CST 


Sat. 


North Central Phone Net (NCN) 


3915 


0700 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


Tuboro Radio Club L. I. N. Y. 


29,520 


1900 EST 


Tue. 


North Fork Net (Okla.) 


3815 


1215 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 






1130 EST 


Sun. 


Northland Net (Que.) 


3680 


1915 CST 


Mon. 


Union County AREC Net 


145,940 


2000 EST 


Tue. 




3775 


1915 EST 


Wed. 


Upper Peninsula Net 


3950 


1000 EST 


Sun. 


North Texas CW Net (NTN) 


3770 


1900 CST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Virginia Fone Net (VFN) 


3835 


1900 EST 


Daily 


N. Te.xas-Okla. Net (NTO) 


3960 


1730 CST 


Daily 


Virginia Slow Net (VSN)* 


3680 


1830 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Northwest Texas Emerg. Net 


3950 


0800 CST 


Sun. 


Waltham (Mass.) CD Net* 


145,800 


2100 EST 


Mon. 


NYC-LI CW Traffic Net (NLI) 


3630 


1930 EST 
1900 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 

Sat. 


Wash. Section Net (WSN)* 


1988 


1900 PST 
1930 PST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Oak Ridge (Tenn.) Emerg. Net 


50,700 


1900 EST 


Tue., Fri. 




3575 


1900 PST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Ohio Emerg. Net 


3860 


1800 EST 


Thu. 






1930 PST 




Okla. CW Net (OLZ) 


3682.5 


1900 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


Weakley Co. (Tenn.) 


50,353 


2130 CST 


Mon. 


Okla. Phone Emerg. Net (OPEN) 


3860 


0800 CST 


Sun. 


Civil Defense Net 








160 Meter Screwball Net 


1992 


1230 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


Wellesley D. D. Net (Mass.) 


147,250 


0900 EST 


Sun. 


Ontario Civil Defense Net 


3765 


1900 EST 


Tue., Thu., 


Western Mass. Net (WMN) 


3560 


1900 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 








Sat. 


Western Penna. ORS Net 


3585 


1900 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Ontario Forty Meter Net (QON) 


7160 


1930 EST 


Daily 


W'estlake Net (Ohio) 


3950 


1000 EST 


Sun. 


Oregon Emerg. Net 


3840 


1800 PST 
1900 PST 


Daily 


West Park Radio Ops 
Emerg. Net (Ohio) 


29,520 


2200 EST 


.Mon. 


Oregon State Net (OSN) 


3585 


1830 PST 


Mon.-Fri. 


West Virginia CW Net 


3570 


1900 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Ottawa Six Meter Emerg. Net 


50,400 


2100 EST 


Tue. 


Whittier Emerg. Net (Calif.) 


3885 


2015 PST 


Thu. 


OX Net (Me.) 


29,500 


2000 EST 


Daily 




29,520 


1900 PST 


Thu. 


Pacific Area Net (PAN) 


3670 


2030 PST 


Mon.-Sat. 




145,280 


1930 PST 


Thu. 


Penna. Fone Net (PFN) 


3850 


1830 EST 


Mon.-Fri. 


Wisconsin CW Traffic Net (WIN) 


* 3625 


1800 CST 


Daily 


Pensacola Emerg. Net 


29,560 


1900 CST 


Mon. 


Wisconsin Phone Net 


3950 


1215 CST 


Mon.-Sat. 


Polecat Net (Pa.) 


3665 


1130 EST 


Sun. 






0930 CST 


Sun. 


Potomac-Rappahannock Valley 


3935 


0900 EST 


1/3 Sun. 


Worcester (Mass.) Civil Defense 


28,720 


1930 EST 


Mon. 


Net (PRVN) 








Phone Net 









January 1955 



75 




tatioi|p|lctivitie 




• All operating amateurs are invited to 
report to the SCM on the first of each 
month, covering station activities for the 
preceding month. Radio Club news is 
also desired by SCMs for inclusion in 
these columns. The addresses of all 
SCINIs will be found on page 6. 



ATLANTIC DIVISION 

EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA — SCM, W. H. Wiand, 
W3BIP — SEC: IGW. RM: AXA. PAM: PYF. E.Pa. 
Nets: 3610, 3850 kc. A new radio club was formed by the 
amateurs of Tamaqua with meetings held the 2nd and 
4th Mon. of each month. The new group has applied for 
ARRL affiliation under the name of Tamaqua Amateur 
Radio Club. The organizing officers of RZV, pres. ; PTM, 
vice-pres.; WN3ZRQ, secy.; WN3ZPW, act. mgr.; KJJ 
chairman, emergency committee. The club publishes a 
niontlily bulletin known as the Sardine Wrapper. New 
officers serving the DX Club for another year are VSS, 
pres.; PQB, act. mgr.; SDE, secy.-treas. The West Phila- 
delphia ARA offers code and theory classes every Tue. 
with Novice examinations given every month. Hurricane 
Hazel found the club station, MKA, fully staffed with OWK, 
VCE, VCY, RKP, and WN3ZFC at the operating posi- 
tions. PYF, manager of the PFN, reports a total of 121 
stations reported into the net on Hurricane Hazel night 
with the FCC declaring the net frequency a clear channel 
emergency frequency. With the aid of the reporting stations, 
PFN was able to track Hazel at least one-half hour ahead of 
the weather bureau notifications. PDJ, secy, of the Abington 
Township ARA now stationed in Baltimore and reporting 
for other members of ATARA also with Uncle Sam, says 
RFI is operating 20-meter mobile while stationed at the 
White Sands Proving Grounds, N. M., and RCE skeds 
RFI from his QTH in Warrington. OQG is operating IO- 
meter mobile while stationed at Ft. Devens, Mass. WN3- 
ZUB, YL and sister of PDJ, operates portable from Buck- 
nell University where she's a junior. NQT is back home again 
at Mountain Top near Wilkes Barre and can be found 
wherever there is traffic to be handled. Traffic men will 
be interested to know that NQT was the operator at 
K4USA signing Hank. Welcome to the E.Pa. Net, Hank. 
JNQ reports losing all fiis antennas but one during the 
big blow. Traffic: (Oct.) W3CUL 4030, PYF 95, NOK 94, 
AXA 68, BFF 58, GES 56, RXW 52, UOE 51, OZV 50. 
DUI 46, NQT 46, TEJ 32, MWL 27, OK 26, QLZ 18, 
YJM 18, PVY 12, JNQ 9, GIY 6, VXQ 6, VPY 5. YGX 2. 
(Sept.) W3NQT 54, MWL 43, ABT 5, YHX 4, CHU 3, 
KFK2. 

MARYLAND-DELAWARE-DISTRICT OF COLUM- 
BIA — SCM, Arthur W. Plummer, W3EQK — SEC: PRL. 
The MDD Section Net operates caeh of the five week days 
on 3650 kc. at 7:30 p.m. EST. The NCS is WV. The MEPN 
operates each Mon., Wed., and Fri. at 6:30 p.m. EST and 
Sat. and Sun. at 1:00 p.m. EST on 3820 kc. The NCM is 
FDK. The MMRC meets at 9:00 p.m. EST the 1st and 3rd 
Fri. of each month on 29,560-kc. mobile. The NCS is QLG. 
QQS now has a new folded dipole antenna. WV appears to 
be about the most active c.w. man in the section. HC took 
part in the 2nd Army "Tobacco Leaf IV" activity. TGF calls 
into MDD and 3RN occasionally. PRT has organized the 
Lafayette Amateur Radio Club with 17 members. ECP 
reports that the prize purchase at the recent Falls Church, 
Va., club auction was a 60-ft. triangular tower by a WN4 
for $1.00. The catch is he has to remove it from the seller's 
Q'TH! CDQ attended the Roanoke Division Convention in 
Richmond Oct. 30th. She reports a visit from Ada, 0RNO, 
Oct. 3rd. NPQ assisted several WN4s in getting their 
tickets. TKE won an NC-98 receiver, a BC-906 frequency 
meter, and a Heathkit grid-dip meter kit. ONB is now the 
proud possessor of a miU. EEB made a contact recently on 
160 meters with his new Viking, his first 160-meter QSO in 
20 years. JZY reports he has buried several hundred feet of 
antenna wire for ground-plane radials at his place. GRF 
reports operating 4HQN in both the CD and World Wide 
DX Contests. PZW, jr. operator of WV, at present operates 
KL7FAF. Maj. Frederick B. Mcintosh, of the USAF, gave 
a very interesting talk Oct. 25th to the Chesapeake Amateur 
Radio Club on "The Effect of the Novice on Ham Radio." 



A movie, "The Functions of the Air Research and Develop- 
ment Command" also was shown. Maj. Mcintosh is a 
member of MARS and the Annapolis Radio Club. The 
MMRC elected VAG as pres. and NKY as secy.-treas. The 
first liidden transmitter hunt of the Maryland Mobile 
Radio Club was held Oct. 22nd with 15 mobiles competing. 
2PAV' stunned everyone by traveling 13 miles and finding 
3 YLL/3 in 35 minutes. WN3ZBV, secretary of the Woodrow 
Wilson High School, Washington, D. C, announces that 
JEP, located at the school, is in operation and ready for 
business. IFTV, formerly of Massachusetts, now is 3ZBH. 
NSV is getting back on the air soon after a two-year layoff. 
WN3YVR is moving from a trailer to an apartment so he 
will have more room for a 40-meter antenna. He also is 
building a 36-ft. ketcli in which he intends to circumnavigate 
the globe wth plans for expeditions to remote islands in 
the South Pacific. WN3YVS is building a Viking Ranger. 
Hurricane Hazel took down all of EQK's antenna. "Hazel" 
also took down HWZ's antennas and bent an element on 
JLX's beam. AVL was flooded out of his country QTH at 
Hollywood, Md., and HL, at Crisfield, was off the air for a 
week. JZY lost his antennas up in the hills near Smithburg. 
Communications for the Mummers Parade in Hagerstown 
was furnished by 3EHA, 8GPD, 3NZT, OYX, WTO, 
WWM, and VAM of the Antietam Radio Association. 
OXL, TJV, and RAH attended the Roanoke Division 
Convention. MFJ is back after doing some mobiling on 75 
meters in Wisconsin and Nebraska. QLF gave a most inter- 
esting talk at the first November meeting of the Chesapeake 
Club on the construction of 10-meter direction finders for 
transmitter hunts. WKB now has a new 44-ft. vertical for 
40 and 20 meters. Your SCM is now an official member of 
ARRL's Old Timers Club. The Andrews Electronics Assn. 
is conducting code classes for Novices 5 nights each week. 
Traffic: (Oct.) W3WV 507, CVE 251, RV 178, COK 131, 
UE 40, ECP 30, PKC 16, NNX 12, HC 10, WKB 9. (Sept.) 
W3USA 1110, COK 86, UE 79, ONB 63, RV 55, JZY 35, 
ECP 30, EQK 5, WKB 2, TGF 1. (Aug.) W3USA 1138. 
(July) W3USA 1216. 

SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY — SCM, Herbert C. 
Brooks, K2BG — PAM: Zl. During Hurricane Hazel the 
South Jersey Radio Assn. demonstrated its ability to or- 
ganize quickly and maintain communications on both 2 
and 10 meters. Those participating were W2ABQ, K2AFJ, 
W2ASG, K2BWG, BZK, W3AOE/2, K2DWY, W2EGP. 
FTO, KN2GHY, KN2GYN, KN2JEI, W2JR0, LY, NFL, 
W30EN/2, W20QN, PAU, PEN, PTM, PZX, QBH, 
TBD, TXP, VX, YPQ, and YRW. The Burlington County 
Radio Club also did a sweU job with EVR, GOK, JJV, 
WKI, WUP, and ZNB. NFL now is located in Merchant- 
ville. 3ESX's new QTH is Audubon. The JP Net promoted 
a transmitter hunt to stimulate activity on 10 meters. SDB 
is doing a good job keeping everyone posted on DX activi- 
ties, especially the International DX Contest. K2JIG is a 
new member of this section. Woody is ex-3B0X and is 
located in Glassboro. KN2IJC and KN2HXD are interested 
in starting a Novice Net. If interested, please contact these 
fellows. ZVW Ls on 15 meters working DX in addition to his 
regular EAN assignment. SUG has received his MARS 
certificate. BAY is rebuilding all his antennas as a result of 
the hurricane damage. ASG also has repairs to make. ZI 
has returned from a Florida vacation; he worked mobile all 
the way. KN2JID is the dad of K2ART and K2DSL. 
K2CLD has dropped the "N" and is heard occasionally 
operating W2ZQ. The Hamilton Twp. Radio Assn. is plan- 
ning to reactivate its Friday night mobile net. Traffic: 
W2RG 126, K2BG 66, W2ZI 14, SUG 12, ZVW 12. 

WESTERN NEW YORK — SCM, Edward G. Graf, 
W2SJV — Asst. SCM: Jeanne Walker, 2BTB. SEC: UTH/ 
FRL. RM: RUF. PAMs: GSS, NAI. NYS meets on 3615 
kc. at 6:30, and 3925 kc. at 7 p.m.; NYSS on 3595 kc. at 
8 P.M.; NYS CD. on 3509.5 and 3993 kc. at 9 a.m. Sun.; 
TCPN 2nd call area on 3970 kc. at 7 p.m.; SRPN on 
3970 kc. at 10 a.m.; ISN on 3980 kc. at 3 p.m. The v.h.f. 
group of the RARA held a meeting at the QTH of UXP. 
K2CUR received a personalized, hand-made QSL card 
nearly 3 ft. square from IBWB. EMW has the 50-watt 
rig on while getting the bugs out of the 813. Under the 
leadership of K2BEG, CUU, LXE, CYE, and K2s HUK 
and DVD provided mobile communications for the an- 
nual Sports Carnival Races held in Buffalo. RHQ worked 
40 miles on the first try on 420 Mc. K2AHH/2 is work- 
ing mobile to and from college. QBB is working DX on 
40 meters running 500 watts to a pair of 813s. Receiver is 
a BC-312, antenna a 7-Mc. )-^-wave Zepp up 25 feet. 
K2CEH is the most active ham on 220 Mc. in the Rochester 
Area. Also on are POM and RTB. ZYQ was elected prexy of 
the Utica ARC with SSL, vice-pres.; and QJH, secy.-treas. 



76 



QST for 



A committee headed by QXA will handle Novice and Tech. 
Class exams. SSL, with the help of former 8K0D and Wl^K, 
is organizing c.d. KBT has resigned as manager of NYSS. 
OPD has been named as NYSS mgr. with BNC as asst. 
mgr. Hurricane Hazel removed UTH's 2- and 6-meter 
beams. FE is active in Frequency Measuring Testa and LO 
and CD Parties. Speakers at RAWNY meetings were TKO 
on RTTY, and R. Russell and C. Confers, of BeU Labs., on 
Meters and their Uses. NAI, Schoharie EC, reports that 
her group was activated for the S.E.T. QCO now is 4FSS in 
Florida. BON was M.C. of the OT Nite sponsored by the 
RARA. ICE presented the RARA OT show, films, and dis- 
plays at the New England Division Convention. GVJ has 
a new 20-meter beam. GBN dropped the "N." KN2s IJV, 
INP, and JBV are members of the Timon HS ARC. K2BUI 
uses a Matchbox and VFO and is building a Heathkit VFO 
for his brother, lZNH/2. We regret to report the passing to 
Silent Keys of VZ. OLH is on 80 meters with 45 watte, 
S-40B receiver and 75-ft. long-wire antenna; also on 7050 
kc. KEL would be glad to have those who hear his Official 
Bulletins come back to him for repeats if desired. Hurricane 
Hazel took down RUT's antennas. There is much interest 
in the code classes conducted by K2GDI. CXM lost his 
antenna during Hurricane Hazel but is back on 20 meters 
with a kw. QQ visited VE3DJI while vacationing. NYS is 
cooperating with NTS on a full-time schedule. Traffic : (Oct.) 
W2RUF 525, QHH 171, K2DXV 125, W2BNC 108, HKA 
96, K2DSR 84, W2ZRC 65, OE 50, K2BUI 36, DJN 30. 
W2DSS 29, CXM 22, EMW 14, SJV 13, GBX 9, K2CUQ 
6. (Sept.) K2FAV .393, DJN 14, W2RQF 11, OPD 10, DVE 
5. (Aug.) K2DJN 9. 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA — SCM, R. M. Heck. 
W3NCD — SEC: GEO. RMs: UHN, NUG, GEG. P.^Ms: 
LXE and AER. The WPA Traffic Net meets at 7:30 p.m. 
on 3585 kc. Newly-organized is the Radio Club of Indiana 
County with the following officers: VKD, pres. ; OTN, 
vice-pres. ; YUG, secy.; Cliff Porter, treas. ; and WXX, 
act. mgr. Good luck, gang, and keep us informed as to your 
activities. LOD reports on the McKean County Radio 
Club activity. Those active in the S.E.T. there were SJV, 
LQQ, OCR, LPO, MEY, and \VN3ZMF. The Club abo is 
attempting to hold study in radio and code and has set up 
a committee to aid in mail-licensing needs there. The Radio 
Association of Erie still holds weekly classes in theory and 
code and is having a bumper attendance, with enrollment 
around 75. STK is chief instructor with NXK, VNB, and 
KNQ assisting. Tlie R.\E c.d. mobile units have been con- 
ducting tests to find tlie best spots for good coverage of the 
county and expect soon to cooperate in a c.d. test. A box 
social was held and enjoyed by all who attended. Fine 
lunches, movies, and music were the features. VVSO is new- 
General Class licensee in the area. A reliable source reports 
MMI and OIH taking to the air now with wings as well as 
by radio. Put both togetlier and let us know how they come 
out. I also had the fine newspaper. A' 11'//, here but am 
sorry to report that I seem to have mislaid it at this writing 
and will have to humbly ask the SC.\RC to please excuse 
my bad manners. However, I can report that the SCARC 
was host to the Western Pennsylvania .\mateur Radio Club 
Council at its October meeting, when the following officers 
were elected: GEG. chairman; OVM, vice-chairman; KWL, 
secv.; and MTP, treas. Traffic: W3WIQ 1978, QPQ 206, 
LMM 154, YA 92, LXQ .54, UHN 30. NCD 13, UTR 12, 
LXE 11, PWN 8, RVS 8, MIZ 6. KNQ 5. 

CENTRAL DIVISION 

ILLINOIS — SCM, George T. Schreiber, W9YIX — 
Section nets: ILN (3515 kc), lEN (3940 kc). RMs: BUK, 
MRQ. PAM: UQT. SEC: HOA. .\sst.: VTL. Cook County 
EC: HPG. IVMW, author of Hmr's D X , again has re- 
turned to the section and is operating under his old call, 
9BRD. More than 25 amateurs handled the communications 
for the Chicago civil defense authorities in a mass feeding 
experiment early in November, the first time hams were 
called on to do sucli work. Calls included HPG, FZI, 
GRW, ZRF, YWH, NPN, KIK, QAO, GPV, SES, BWN, 
YLB, ZGX, VSV, ZQG. QQS. KCW, PZP, PEN, HXI, 
IKZ, MCS, ZIH. GOB, and EGB. Possibly there were some 
others we have left out. .IMG is a new OPS. New ORS ap- 
pointees are .\.'\ and YRS. KJ has a kw. on the air wliich he 
claims is TVI proof. PBI again placed first in the September 
F.M.T., with .\TY second and 6CIW/9 third. Incidentally 
6CIW, who is a Naval Commander, has been ordered to 
Puerto Rico, 10th Naval District, as industrial manager. 
PTZ is stationed in Japan and is trying to get a 20-meter 
rig going to talk to liis dad. STZ. The Southtown Net 
operates in the Chicago .\rea each Mon. at 7:30 p.m. with 
HPG as NCS, and on Tue. with GPV directing the western 
section. Frecjuency is 29,640 kc VL is back on the air 
operating on 7 and 21 Mc. His former call was EWG. VTO 
has moved to Iowa. SEH, ACZ, and ZYE are the amateurs 
composing the license exam committee of the Twin City 
Radio Club. The Quarter Century Wireless Operators .\ssn. 
is putting on a drive for members. Chairman of the Illinois 
chapter is LZ, with WR, CYD, and EVA the other officers. 
REC, ex-8AUB, again is operating in lOinois and enjoyed 
the S.E.T. New Novice calls are JZK, KZA, and IXN. 
They are interested in forming a Novice traffic net. HUX 



built a new relay rack out of a discarded day bed. The 
Starved Rock Radio Club makes it a practice to keep track 
of the membership in ARRL of club members and reminds 
them of expiration. The XYL of IDA is recovering from an 
operation. TLC is back on the air after repairing fire dam- 
age. DKW has completed a new station with Viking II and 
NC-183D. ZEN finished his boat in time to store it in the 
garage for the winter. RQY really has been busy at OO work. 
He sends in a fist of 22 stations to whom friendly warnings 
were mailed. FLL and lOS enjoy 15 meters with great 
success. LI is working DX like mad with his new switchable 
vertical. His brother, GDI, also has a vertical that works, 
but neighbors have a pool on when it will bend double in the 
wind. YLU motored to Mexico City and secured a p)ermit to 
operate as XE5PD. KWK is a new call in this area. Goodbye 
and luck to NXC, who is moving to California. As assistant 
radio editor for a Chicago paper Tony always had a good 
word to say for amateur radio in print. The committee for 
the '55 DXCC Convention is FID, QIY, FKC, and NN. 
The latter is trying to interest ex-BB in again getting a ham 
call. ATH and CKU are eying the multi-band vertical an- 
tenna. OAV, after three years of study, can now order a cup 
of coffee in Spanish. The strange frying noise in PEB's 
inodulator has stopped, but so has the modulator. The 
fire department had a nice run to his home. KHJ is now 
on 20, and 10 meters is again peaceful Traffic: (Oct.) 
W9D0 1338, K9FCA 1050, W9AA 124, YIX 81, QGG 74. 
HPG 67. OR 46, CEE 43, MRQ 41, SXL 30, WN9GMK 
26, W6CIW/9 25. W9LXJ 21, STZ 16, REC 13. FRP 10. 
VTO 10. (Sept.) W90R 32, LMC 13, HPG 8, FRP 4. 
(July) W90R 49. 

INDIANA — SCM. George H. Graue. W9BKJ — The 
Indiana Radio Club Council (IRCC) met at Indiana U.. 
Bloomington, Oct. 24th. OflBcers elected were CMT, pres.; 
QBJ, vice-pres.; WTY, treas.; GRA. secy.; IHO. MBL, and 
JBQ, directors. EC's in Hammond, Plymouth, and Knox 
offered amateur radio assistance during the recent heavy 
rains. Mobile units of the Mobile Amateur Radio Club of 
South Bend, the Michiana Radio Club, and the Lake County 
Amateur Radio Club were in operation. The LCARC has 1 1 
active 160-meter mobile units, and is setting a goal of 
15 2-meter mobile units. WWT reports for RFN with a 
total traffic of 203; OLX, for QIN, reports a total of 446; 
NT.\, for IFN, reports a total of 119. New in Evansville are 
N9KCU, KFE, KDJ, and KEP. Active in Princeton are 
URQ, ZZR, AYK, ZYV, N9JEP, lYR, lYX, and N4HRU/9. 
OVB has an 813 rig per Jan. QST. GPR has an all-band 
mobile. WEI is active on 20- and 40-meter c.w. or 'phone 
from Lake Lawrence. TGX is active at Vincennes on all 
bands with a B. & W. rig. RVM has 30 countries and 43 
states on 15-meter 'phone. GZT is active on 80-meter s.s.b. 
GFS and UMS were mobile in Canada. DGA was elected 
president of TARS. The T.\RS transmitter hunt was won 
by NYX. The ham colony at Saint Meinrad Archabbey 
consists of NTR, WWF, ABW. UVJ, INT, AOO, N9INX, 
and 2GQW/9. ERB transmits Official Bulletins on 2, 6, 

20, 40, and 80 meters. The IRC will have an amateur radio 
exhibit at the hobby show in Indianapolis. HXR received 
a 20-w.p.m. sticker. NZZ has 150 on his DXCC. SNT re- 
built for higher power. The Mike and Key Club of New 
.\lbany purcliased 24 mobile and 2 base stations for the 
2-meter F.M. Net. The Clarke Co. Radio Club has code 
and theory classes under way. LNA and ZVS are on 29-Mc. 
mobile. DFW is active on 80- and 40-meter c.w. EAO has 
a new modulator. TT is building a new shack in the base- 
ment. WRO is active on 75-meter 'phone. JKR is on with a 
complete Heathkit station. 80PZ now is 9PSJ in Muncie. 
CEA has a new antenna. KLR worked Virginia for his 21st 
state on 2 meters. Traffic: W9JUJ 1524, NZZ 686, SNT 667, 
JBQ 466, TT 401, QYQ 213, UQP 168, UWU 100, STC 
81, VNV 49, WRO 44, EHZ 40. NTA 31, CMT 30, SVL 
30, YIP 26, CC 25. KDV 25, TG 25, YB 22, EQO 21, ZRP 

21, BKJ 16, DKR 16, FYM 14, DOK 12, WBA 12, ZIB 
12, YVS 7. NH 6, QR 6, DGA 4, CEA 3, NTR 3. 

WISCONSIN — SCM, Reno W. Goetsch, W9RQM — 
SEC: OVO. PAMs: ESJ. GMY. RMs: IXA, RTP, UNJ. 
Nets: BEN, 3950 kc, 6 p.m. daily; WIN, 3625 kc, 6 p.m. 
daily; WPN, 3950 kc. 1215 Mon.-Sat., 0930 Sun. Mobile 
and c.d. frequency: 29,620 kc. VBZ received a BPL Medal- 
lion, and qualified for Traffic 12,000 Messages Club. ESJ 
has 4 states worked on 144 Mc. Net certificates (BEN) were 
issued to UTN, GTJ, WLW. and FFC. WWJ operates onlv 
week ends. OVO reports that there are 437 members ana 
187 mobiles officiallv registered in the Wisconsin AREC. 
SZR has 48 countries with FQ8, CE0, TF, and EA8 on new 
inverted "V" Windom 100 feet high. UTVand RUB won the 
FLARC hidden transmitter hunt. RUB is building a two- 
element 20-meter beam. FFC is building a Viking II rig. LSK 
is E.E. student at M.U. New officers of the Point Radio 
.\mateurs are CFW. pres.; DPN. \'ice-pres.; BCC, secy.- 
treas. CFS and CFW have dropped the "N" from their 
calls. UIM is working on break-in for his station. UIT, 
after 5 years of almost 100 per cent daily transmissions of 
ARRL Bulletins, has decided to relinquish liis OBS schedule. 
MR AC members participating in harbor accident com- 
munications were GPI and HIF fixed, and YFW, PD, SNK, 
and ONY, mobiles. UFX, Wisconsin RO, is getting the State 
RACES Net on an operational basis. MQK is Madison RO, 
whUe UGT is a new EC. HAT has TBS-50 and SX-43. 



January 1955 



77 



SQM's mobile has Gonset Super-6 and Stancor transmitter 
with Hy-Q whip on 75 meters. MRAC mobiles CUW, 
TKY, MPF, VLK, ROH, and ONY took part in M.U. 
Homecoming Parade. The MSOE Club (HHX) has as new 
officers 0CEO, pres.; IBNA, vice-pres.; 6IM, secy.; 9AXY, 
treas.; VCH, trustee. AXY is interested in RTTY. After 
losing his 828, DYL is designing around a pair of 826s. 
Now at MSOE, 6IM has been licensed since 1923. Congrats 
to IXA on an FB issue of the WIN bulletin. IIU operates 
from the WHKW site with a B. & W. 5100 and S-20 or 
348-L, and Windom antenna 100 feet high. KKK has 
TBS-50 and S-20R with VHF-152A. LVB's new QTH is a 
"Ham's Paradise." Traffic: (Oct.) W9VBZ 843. ESJ 346, 
WWJ 99, IXA 62, RPT 61, FXA 57, SAA 55, GMY 36, 
OVO 13, SZR 11, RQM 9 LSK 8, RUB 8, AEM 7, IBF 6, 
RKP 6, KWJ 4, FFC 2. (Sept.) W9KWJ 10. 

DAKOTA DIVISION 

NORTH DAKOTA — SCM, Earl Kirkeby, W0HNV — 
RM: FVG. PAM: GZD. ORSs: CAQ, EBA, KTZ. OBSs: 
KZZ, MXD. Sorry we had no news to report the last two 
months but, fellows, if you want our section to appear in 
this space every month let us know what you are doing. 
Thanks to the few who faithfully send in their traffic reports 
every month. I know most of you have been too busy this 
summer for ham radio but with winter here we expect re- 
newed activity. Orchids to GZD for the fine job of rejuvenat- 
ing the North Dakota 75-meter 'Phone Net, which meets on 
3845 kc. at 6 p.m. every night except Sun. SHZ has dropped 
the "N" from his call. DAO now is at Condo, N. Dak. QOB 
is active at Devil's Lake and UXQ is stationed at Finley, 
N. Dak. Your SCM reports the arrival of YL operator No. 
1 at his house Oct. 9th. Traffic: W0KTZ 179, EXO 142, 
KLP 141, FVG 85, NPR 69, EBA 62, KZZ 8. 

SOUTH DAKOTA — SCM, J. W. Sikorski, W0RRN — 
Asst. SCMs: Earl Shirlev, 0YQR, and Martha Sliirley, 
0ZWL. SEC: GCP. RM: SMV. PAMs: BNA, PRL, NEO. 
DES received a Ranger for his birthday. BNA is NCS of 
the NJQ Net, with NEO as assistant, and GDE is NCS of 
the night 7.5-Net, with RMK as assistant. EYB, now Gen- 
eral Class, has a new Globe Scout. The Mitcliell ARC is 
conducting "Amateur Radio from Scratcli" classes. GCP 
now has a Gonset converter in his Ford. October average 
attendance on the 75-Net was 37 per session. The C.W. 
Net reports a total QNI of 117 in 13 sessions, handling 46 
messages. SMV is asking for more operators on the C.W. 
Net. BJH, NOT, and RRN attended 3 weeks' microwave 
school in Omaha. The 160-Net reports 436 QNI in 30 
sessions. MZJ reports some of the Brookings gang are 
working on 420 Mc. Thanks to those who sent in reports. 
Traffic: (Oct.) W0SMV 61, GDE 52, MPQ 49, DVB 35, SCT 
30, ZWL 26, NEO 17, GCP 12, BNA 9, OOZ 6, OJQ 4, AYD 
3, HOH 1, WUU 1. (Sept.) W0PRL 20, DVB 7. 

MINNESOTA — SCM, Charles Bove, W0MXC — Asst. 
SCM: Vince Smythe, 0GGQ. SEC: GTX. RMs: DQL, 
OMC. PAMs: JIE, UCV. The St. Paul Radio Club, Inc., 
held an election of officers. Results were as follows: HKF, 
pres.; THY, 1st vice-pres.; KWG, 2nd vice-pres.; PAK, 
secy.; and FGN, treas. HFY is planning on going on 2 
meters. KLG is the new manager of the MSN C.W. Net. 
DQL has a new Viking. DQL, KLG, HFY, and TKX at- 
tended the Midwest Division Convention at Des Moines. 
KJZ is visiting 4ZDB and family. WQL is a new ham in 
Minneapolis. The Mankato Radio Club's station is now 
licensed with the call WCL. TOK now has his General 
Class license. OJH bouglit a new SX-71 from LUX. QKA is 
teaching code at the Mankato Vocational School. All 
beginners are requested to join the class on Thurs. nights. 
DJT is in the hospital and should be OK by the time you 
read this. BWF has purchased a 20-meter beam from LIL. 
The St. Paul Radio Club's emergency station, REA. has 
in its possession a bunch of new equipment. This includes 
four 2-meter Gonset Communicators, four Gonset Com- 
manders which are 30-watt transmitters for all bands, 6 
through 80 meters, and three 2-, 6-, 10-, and 11-meter re- 
ceivers with 2 more on the way, together with various gen- 
erators, mikes, antennas, etc. These boys really are serious 
about emergency work. QBW has been working DX since 
getting on 20 meters. TQQ is back home again after operat- 
ing portable up near Ely all summer. KFN and EUI were 
mobiling in Florida. OVO is reactivating K0WAA at the 
National Guard Armory in Minneapolis. He will be using 
the big vertical tower on the 6th Ave. side. Traffic: W0WNA 
289, KLG 213, KFN 127, KNR 91, UCV 69, IRJ 55, DQL 
48, QNY 48, TKX 40, EHO 34, GTX 32, LST 30, LUX 
30, PBI 25, K.JZ 24, OJH 22, T.JA 19, TUS 15, IKJ 14, 
GGQ 13, ABA 10, CID 10, RVO 10, ALW 9, MXC 8, 
BZG 6, DYC 6, GWU 6, GWJ 5, PUO 4, BUO 3, LIG 3, 
QDP 3, OPA 2. 

DELTA DIVISION 

ARKANSAS — SCM, Owen G. Mahaffey, W5FMF — 
Hi, gang, liere we go with our first report. First let us all 
thank our past SCM, Fred Ward, LUX, for the great job 
he did for us. The OIK Net meets at 7 p.m., on 3695 kc, 
Mon. through Fri. Meet you there. VQD paid us a visit. 
He is building a pi-network antenna tuner. CAF meets 



RN5 and is doing an FB job. Send a report on what you 
are doing and what you want. Ham clubs should appoint 
a reporter to send me the dope on what you do, meeting 
nights, dates, etc., as I may drop in sometime. 

LOUISIANA — SCM, Thomas J. Morgavi, W5FMO — 
PAM HEJ advises that an emergency 'phone net has been 
organized for the Monroe Area which meets on 1825 kc. 
at 0900 Sun. HEJ and IVF have CD appointments in 
Monroe. KRX is back on after working over his transmitter. 
ZSP lost his plate transformer but expects to get back on 
soon. In the meantime he is practicing on his Lampkin 105 
for the next Frequency Measuring Test. GIX advises no 
2-meter activity to the west but several contacts in Mis- 
sissippi and Florida. The Istrouma ARC is sporting a panel 
truck with a BC-654, BC-669, a new PE201, 1-kw. a.c. 
generator, and a brand-new club call, HUD. ONM is its 
president. LV is MM on 15 meters. INL has a new Johnson 
Ranger on the air. HA is an s.s.b. fanatic and is active on 75 
meters. BUK is constructing a new bandswitching exciter, 
JCC has gone mobile. VND is back in town and on the air. 
UPM is operator on the SS DickLykes and is operating MM. 
SEC lUG reports the participation in the nationwide 
Simulated Emergency Test of Oct. 9-10 was very successful. 
Contact was maintained with 11 areas in Louisiana by the 
State Civil Defense Mobile Communications Control 
Center. Participating were LFF, DHE, UXG, KHJ, YCO, 
IHR, MWE, YNG, DKU, FMO, and SQB. NLK reports 
26 hours transmitter operation time, 5 hours of which were 
spent sending 17 bulletins, 21 hours ragchewing, and no 
time testing. That last item should be noted and adhered to 
by all of us. Ex-SCM DKR is back and active on 40-meter 
C.W. His jr. operator, a Novice, is GRW. Traffic: (Oct.) 
W5NDV 91, EA 36, MXQ 31, HEJ 13, SQI 2. (Sept.) 
W5KRX 12, MWE 10, HEJ 8. (Aug.) W5KRX 74. 

MISSISSIPPI — SCM, Dr. A. R. Cortese, W50Tp — 
We need some new ECs in various cities. Let's get Missis- 
sippi well lined up. Now for the news: TIR is now in Jack- 
son. EPI has a new General Class license. CTY is now in 
Japan. That's all the news as received. Traffic: W5VME 
201, EWE 73, TIR 56, KYC 34, JHS 33, CTY 28, OTD 4, 
BSE 2. 

TENNESSEE — SCM, Harry C. Simpson, W4SCF — 
SEC: RRV. PAM: PFP. RM: WQW. PL still is vacationing 
in Texas. Weather reports now are being given by stations 
QNI Tennessee 'Phone Net. Information thus collected is 
being used by a Nashville TV station as a public service. 
FWX and CRP are opposing candidates as president of the 
Memphis Club. TPI's homecoming game fell on the same 
date as the S.E.T., so UWA/4 had many visitors. DZM, 
ZLT, APD, ZLZ, lAY, ZLK, WXL, ETJ, SGU, ZJY, PVD, 
and WJH visited and operated the 20-watt emergency rig 
set up by UWA, GUE, and KN4AAU. A new ham in So. 
Fulton, "Tenn., is KN4AOK, just 11 years old. FLW reports 
6- and 10-meter use during the S.E.T. BQG now is working 
Jackson, Memphis, and Marks, Miss., on 2 meters with 
sixteen-element rotary beam. A nice RN6 Bulletin was re- 
ceived from Mgr. OGG, who informs us that aU NTS nets 
are now 6-day. WQW reports both c.w. nets are in full 
swing and invites more attendance. UWA reports fine 
attendance on the Upper Cumberland Net, with CTF 
missing no sessions. Roses to PVD and UWA for the fine 
UCN Bulletin. Thanks to the efforts of WQW, AEE, and 
others, the c.w. net was an integral part of the Tennessee 
Communications Alert and colors are flying! HIH is a new 
ORS. New ECs are RHK and BTS. RRV reports the section 
in fine shape on ECs with only a few counties open. Traffic: 
(Oct.) W40GG 813, PFP 138, IIB 129, HIH 119, K4FET 
113, W4BQG 110, WQW 103, UWA 100, OEZ 52, WAX 
.52, SCF 49, TZD 35, RRV 30, PQP 29, ODR 24, UVS 24. 
VJ 24, RET 17, YPG 14, WIJ 13, IV 12, PNG 12, BAQ 11, 
FLW 10, PVD 10, COY 9, PAH 9, RMJ 8, TIE 5, WN4HSX 
3, HUT 3, W4SGI 1. (Sept.) W4UZY 35, PQP 32, BBD 9, 
TU0 5. 

GREAT LAKES DIVISION 

KENTUCKY — SCM, Robert E. Fields, W4SBI — 
Looks like JUI is our No. 1 station with an 00 appointment. 
He is working on the 6- and 2-meter rig and already has 
receivers and standards for tiiose bands. CDA has a very 
potent 'phone signal on 75 meters now, the first time 
on 'phone since he got his ticket in 1930. SYD says skip is 
causing him no end of trouble handling traffic on KYN. 
WN4GTC is asking for information about a Novice net on 
80 meters. WNH has a 32-element beam up for 2 meters, but 
blew up a relay on the big rig, temporarily curtailing opera- 
tion on 80 meters. K4FBW has completed a 6146 parallel 
final and is rebuilding an exciter. KKW is working the traffic 
nets, KYN, 9RN, and UTL, and getting his share of traffic, 
YZE is a new OBS appointee and is doing an FB job with 
Official Bulletins. The following stations make up the 
KYN C.W. Net: BAX, BAZ, BBU, BRI, CDA, K4FBW. 
FR, GFG, HEA, lAY, JBQ, .ICN, JDU, JHU, JSH, 
KFA, KKG, KKL, KKW, KTA, LDL, LUR, LXA, 
MGT, MRT, MMY, MWX, NBY, NEP, NIZ, NVR, 
OEE, OGP, OXX, PRT, PXX, RAE, RHZ, RYL, SBI, 
SUD, SXP, SYD, SZL, TAV, TRO, TQC, UVH, UWA, 
UYA, VBA, VKC, VYO, WAO, K4WBG, WHC. WNF, 
(Continued on page 82) 



78 



tuned b tmorrm *Nationate> 



=^>= BEST WISHES FOR A NEW YEAR =0= 
THAT'S ''TUNED TO TOMORROW" 

1955 

From all the gang at National Company, Inc., Headquarters ! 

Call Name Department 

WIATD C. LOUIS GAGNEBIN 895 

WIAQA HENRY BARNICLE 5°^ 

WIBAQ HERMAN S. BRADLEY 19° 

WIBHW HARRY HORNER ^^^ 

WIBJJ G. H. STAPLEFORD 58U 

WICTW CALVIN HADLOCK 51U 

WICUD ELLIOT RUTTENBERG 950 

WIEXR WILLIAM H. OSBORNE 19° 

WIEYZ G. R. RINGLAND 540 

WIGQQ J. D. BASSETT 5bO 

WIHOH DAVID SMITH 511 

WIHXY JOSEPH ROSSI ^tt. 

WIIFM JOHN S. BOYERS 5cJ0 

WIJEL EDMUND HARRINGTON 510 

WIJOX ROBERT L. WILLIAMS 530 

WIKNI K. W. ROBBINS 550 

WIKXQ VICTOR G. lARVIS 5/3 

WIKPB FRANK G. LOPEZ °^5 

WILML LEO A. GREEN 199 

WILNV FRANK WADEN °11 

WIMGP SAMUEL H. BEVERAGE 19° 

WIMTS VICTOR E. PENNEY °o^ 

WIMWX RALPH H. HEMEON 19» 

WIMXC DONALD J. POULIN 52^ 

WIMYH DEXTER H. ATKINSON °54 

WINYU MARTIN OXMAN 510 

WIOCY EVERETT CHAPMAN 510 

WIOEX RALPH HAWKINS 

WIOOP H. H. CROSS 

WIPSJ HYMAN KANA _.. 

WIQIU RAYMOND G. JORDAN, JR 520 

WIRYE WILLIAM P. SULLIVAN 510 

WISYA REDMOND G. SHEETS 19o 

WITPB TED N. SMITH 19° 

WITV WILLIAM S. DOYLE 522 

WIULB FRANK SANTAGELO 511 

WIVPQ BENJAMIN BALLARD °51 

Wl VXE ROBERT L. SNOWMAN 19° 

WIWTS DOMINIC DIMARCO 19° 

W2AQX JACK E. WILLSON °1^ 

K2HJF A. EARLE FISHER %i. 

W3UFP JOHN HEIM 5b 

KL7PDG BOB MITCHELL 511 



510 
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573 



THE NATIONAL COMPANY, INC. 






r 



NATIONAL COMPANY, INC. ^^^^^iwT 

61 SHERMAN STREET, MAIDEN 48, MASS. 

"FORTY YEARS OF WORLD-WIDE DISTINCTION IN ELECTRONICS" 



79 




_7o/720Tto6i7d ^ian±mitiz\ 



KILOWATT 




..s^ 




Available as a self-contained pedestal type unit or witi 
optional matching executive type desk top and three dr; 
pedestal. Late February delivery. 
Cat. No. 240-1000 Viking Kilowatt Power Amplifier-wii 

tested, complete with tubes $1595.00 Amateur 

Cat. No. 251-101-1 Matching Accessory Desk Top 
three drawer pedestal . . . . : $123.50 FOB Cory 



E. F. J H N S 



• ^odau ! 




OWER AMPLIFIER 

1000 Watts Continuous Wave* 

1000 Watts Amplitude Modulated Phone* 

1000 Watts Single Sideband* 

iximum power input allowed by FCC for amateur service 



This compact pedestal contains the com- 
plete Viking Kilowatt. Excitation require- 
ments are 30 watts RF and 15 watts audio 
for AM and 10 watts peak for SSB. The 
Viking "Ranger" transmitter/exciter 
(shown above) is an ideal RF and audio 
driver for AM and CW, and the New 
Viking SSB transmitter/ exciter, soon to 
be announced, will drive the Viking Kilo- 
watt to full output on SSB. 



A magnificent new kilowatt . . . unequalled in performance . . . 

luxurious in appearance! This boldly styled Viking Kilowatt is truly 

tomorrow's concept of electronic equipment design and operating 

i/enience. Of course you'd guess it's built by Johnson, unquestioned 

leader in the amateur transmitter field. 

operating the Viking Kilowatt is a never-to-be forgotten experience . . . 

you'll marvel at the ease of selecting SSB, AM, or CW with the flip 

of a single switch . . . you'll enjoy the convenience of its desk top 

trols ... and you'll immediately sense the authority of its full kilowatt 

signal lifting you into a select group of leading amateurs . . . 

commanding the admiration of all. You'll be delighted, too, knowing 

that all this can be yours at an unbelievably low price. This Viking 

stands alone as a crowning achievement in all things that make a 

perfectly engineered kilowatt a pleasure to own and operate. 

For more than just a look at the functional exterior beauty of the 
Viking Kilowatt, a deluxe brochure with the complete inside story may 
; be yours on request. Write for your copy today. 

j CONTINUOUS COVERAGE FROM 3.5 TO 30 MC. MAKES THE 

t VIKING KILOWATT AN IDEAL CHOICE FOR COMMERCIAL APPLICATIONS, TOO. 




Interior view showing conservatively 
rated power equipment, heavy duty 
(PP810) modulator and push-pull venti- 
lating fans. Shielded RF power amplifiers 
are parallel connected 4-250A's. High volt- 
age supply (872A's) delivers 2500 volts 
at over 700 ma. Screen supply is VR tube 
regulated. 



The Viking Kilowatt is compact yet com- 
pletely accessible. Containing RF power 
amplifier, modulator, power supplies, and 
all control equipment, the entire unit rolls 
out of the pedestal on ball bearing rollers. 
This provides complete accessibility to all 
electrical components for adjustment or 
maintenance. 



P A N Y 



WASECA, MINNESOTA 



o 
# 

G 
« 

9 



Hr" CAPACITOR 




The Ideal 

High Frequency 

Tuner! 

The "HF" is a single section tun- 
ing capacitor, employing the same 
rotor and stator design found in 
the famous Hammarlund "APC" 
which is still recognized after 20 
years as the standard capacitor of 
its type. Extra long sleeve bearing 
and positive contact nickel-plated 
phosphor bronze wiper make the 
"HF" ideally suited to high fre- 
quency applications. 

Silicone treated steatite insula- 
tion. Single hole or base mounting. 
Special spacing or capacity values, 
finishes and other modifications 
are available to manufacturers on 
special order. 




For your free copy of The 
Hammarlund Capacitor Cat- 
alog, which gives listings 
of the complete line of 
standard capacitors, write 
to The Hammarlund Manu- 
facturing Co., Inc., 460 
West 34th St., New York 1, 
N. Y. Ask for Bulletin CI. 



^mS 



(Continued from page 78) 
WNH, WPY, WXL, YDL, YYL, YZE, ZCI, ZCM, ZDA, 
ZDB, ZKS, ZLK, ZPM, ZRE, and ZXO. Most of these 
stations already have earned their Section Net certificates. 
Traffic: W4KKW 180, K4FBW 138, W4ZLK 92, SBI 80, 
SYD 30, JCN 25, ZDB 22, PXX 20, AZQ 18, CDA 16, 
JUI6. 

MICHIGAN — SCM, Fabian T. McAUister, W8HKT — 
Asst. SCMs: Bob Cooper, 8AQA; and Joe Beljan, 8SCW. 
SEC: GJH. RMs: URM, NUL. At tliis writing the SCM 
has just returned from a couple of weeks down in Norfolk 
and Portsmouth, and found the mailbag loaded with letters 
from the gang! Patience, fellows, and I'll get them all an- 
swered. There was a goodly pile of traffic reports, too, and 
finite a few new calls were seen. Welcome, feOows, let's hear 
from you often. ELW made BPL again this month; our 
only one. Looks like Seth is going out after that award in 
earnest. MQH and OQH are new NCS on QMN, and have 
been doing very well. FX is battling power-Une noise in the 
receiver, and thinks he has it licked. MGQ has moved to 
Huntington Woods, so won't be heard (except on mobile) 
for a month or so. DLZ reports a new "wind direction 
indicator" on his garage roof. He says his 40-meter vertical 
really leans under the wind! The Mount Pleasant Club has 
taken over the radio class in the .\dult Education Program 
at High School. The Motor City Club has a new and very 
interesting club bulletin. The Hard Luck .A.ward of the 
month goes to SCS. He moved as far into the country as he 
could in order to avoid powerline QRM, etc., and now the 
power company is building a high voltage line (and we do 
mean high!) right past his property! Traffic: W8ELW 517, 
NUL 280, ILP 187, FLM 175, ZLK 150, IX 110, RTN 94, 
NOH 78, FX 59, MQH 52, QQO 50, MLR 48, JKX 45, 
NTC 41, DSE 36, PHA 29, OQH 25, TBP 22, IV 17, TIJ 
17, HKT 14, ZHB 14, OT 12, MGQ 11, DLZ 10, INF 8, 
KOX 8, WVL 8, AUD 7, EGI 7, HSG 7, WXO 6, lUJ 5, 
JPE 4, PHM 1. 

OHIO— -SCM, John E. Siringer, W8.UW — Asst. 
SCMs: J. C. Erickson, 8DAE; W. B. Davis, 8JNF; and 
E. F. Bonnet, 80VG. SEC: UPB. RMs: DAE, FYO. 
PAMs: EQN, HLTX. In an effort to more closely coordinate 
the State's communication department OVG, Dayton, has 
been appointed Asst. SCM and EQN, Springfield, has 
been made a PAM. On Oct. 9th the Ohio Council of Amateur 
Radio Clubs held a meeting in Columbus. The delegates 
voted in favor of FCC Docket No. 11157. New OCARC 
affiliates are the Toledo Mobile Radio Assn. and Franklin 
Mike and Key. A copy of the Council's constitution and 
by-laws may be had by writing Ralph E. Cramer, W8VH0, 
236 South Burgess Ave., Columbus 4, Ohio, secy. The 
OC.\RC offers trophies for both Field Day and Sweepstakes 
Contests, awards the WAOC certificate, and sponsors the 
Oliio Intrastate QSO Party. EQN is contest and awards 
manager. HUX is on s.s.b.s.c. witli an SS75 exciter and 813 
final. LJ has moved from Dayton to Cleveland. LJS, 
former QSL Mgr., has returned from Florida to live in 
Cleveland. D.\E got tapped by an induced voltage from 
lightning during a recent snowstorm. W.W was appointed 
NCS, Air Force MARS Net No. 9. RXM is the call of the 
Davton Civil Defense Hq. GDQ was heard by EL2X and 
LU3EL on 160 meters. MQQ made WAS. SPU and QOV 
are holding the c.d. fort in Wyandot Co. NYL was married 
Oct. 23rd with 9JZN as best man and 9QBJ as usher. ZOD 
got married recently. The Tiffin group meets the 1st and 3rd 
Mon. at 8:00 p.m. "in the Tiffin City Hall. The CAC.-VRC 
reelected its 1954 officers. Thirty-one Toledo amateurs 
participated in the recent S.E.T. with CRA and HUX 
serving as net control stations; 44 messages were handled. 
Congratulations to ERR and his group on the noteworthy 
job thev did during the ref-ent Ohio River flood. According 
to DSX, mgr. of 8RN, RO, DSX, LHV, and FYO are 
the most consistent Ohioans in the net. TLW lost his masts 
three times during the month, once because of termites, 
once from a windstorm, and lastly from falling tree limbs. 
Dayton's RF Carrier advises that PTF and HCD are on 
s.s.b.s.c. on 75 meters; HB, CUJ, YCP, and GQ rank 
1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, in the Ohio section in the recent 
F.ISI.T. ; FIB showed up as a fireman at a fire at HCD's 
QTH recently; .JAO/M now is a minister in Athens; KKH 
recently suffered a broken ankle; ZOF is suffering from an 
allergy called drooping antenna; and the Dayton 5:00 
P.M. Mobile Net meets on 29,600 kc. We regret to report the 
untimely death of DL, and extend our deepest sympathy 
to his family. Cincy's Mike and Key states that PR and 
YTM are in Germany where they are working with the 
"Voice of America," while Queen City's other publication. 
Ether Waves, informs us that LPD and PBU have 32-element 
2-meter beams; EV recently worked his 143rd country; 
and 14 members have gotten past the 100-countries-worked 
goal. The Fort Hamilton Bulletin mentions that HXB 
lectured on grid-dip meters at the last club meeting and 
RDJ was a guest at a recent get-together. Springfield's Q-5 
advises that the club soon will become incorporated. The 
Columbus Carascope states that MRC has installed three 9 
full-wave 20-meter "V" beams; B.\X has worked 20 states 
on 144 Mc; OMV has a kw. on s.s.b.s.c; and GL has 
returned from the hospital. Shark Gossip from over Toledo 
way tells us that there are 10 licensed YLs in town; NB, 
{Continued on page 84) 



THE HQ-140-X 



SEEMS TO STRETCH THE BANDS 




In these days, when the amateur bands 
are more crowded than ever, it's im- 
portant to make sure the receiver you 
buy will bring in the desired signal with 
minimum interference from adjacent 
channels. That's why more and more 
'hams' are turning to the HQ-140-X 
communications receiver. 

The HQ-140-X's outstanding perform- 
ance under today's difficult operating 
conditions is achieved because of the 
Hammarlund patented 455Kc crystal 
filter and phasing network. This circuit, 
identical to the one used in the Super 
Pro-600-JX professional receiver, is con- 
trolled by a front panel 6-position 
Crystal Selectivity switch and provides 



an OFF position and five increasingly 
selective bandwidths. 

The Crystal Phasing control is a 
differential-type variable air capacitor 
which permits precise adjustment of the 
crystal selectivity for extremely high at- 
tenuation of closely adjacent channel 
interference. 

Because there is no interlocking effect, 
the Selectivity or Phasing Controls can 
be changed without de-tuning. 



THE HQ-140-X IN ACTION AT SEA 

The HQ-140-X is the receiver in the radio 
shacks of many American Merchantmen. Its 
dependability and ruggedness make it very 
popular with seagoing hams. 



Get the details on these and other Important advantages of the HQ-140-X. Write to 
The Hammarlund Manufacturing Co., Inc., 460 W. 34th St., New York 1, N. Y. Ask for Bulletin Rl. 





The invaluable Instrument for all 
Hams. Numerous applications 
such as pretuning, neutralization, 
locating parasitics. correcting TVI, 
adjusting antennas, design pro- 
cedures, etc. Receiver applications 
include measuring C. L and Q of 
components— determining RF cir- 
cuit resonant frequencies. 

Covers 80. 40,20. 11.10. 6, 2. and 
1 '4 meter Ham bands. Complete 
frequency coverage from 2 — 2.')i) 
Mc, using ready-wound plug-in 
coils provided with the kit. Acces- 
sory coil kit. Part 341-A at S:5.()ll 
extends low frequency range to 
3.50 Kc. Dial correlation curves 
furnished. 
,f|^^CA cu- v./ Compact construction, one hand 

J ■ %M9V •>"'?• Wt. operation, AC transformer opcr- 
■^ I 7 • ■^ "55- ='"^'l' variable sensitivity control, 

thumb wheel drive, and direct read- 
ing calibrations. Precalibrated dial 
with additional blank dials for individual calibration. You'll 
like the ready convenience and smart appearance of this 
kit with its baked enamel panel and crackle finish cabinet. 



MODEL GD-1B 

4 lbs. 




MODEL AC-1 



$1450 



Ship. Wt. 
4 lbs. 



ANTENNA COUPLER 

KIT 

The new Heathkit An- 
tenna Coupler Model 
AC-1 was specifically 
designed to operate with 
the Heathkit Amateur 
Transmitter and will 
operate with any trans- 
mitter not exceeding 75 
watts RF input power. 
Rugged design has resulted 
in a sturdy, well shielded 
unit featuring a copper plat- 
ed chassis and shield com- 
partment. Coaxial 52 ohm 
receptacle on the rear 
of the chassis connects 
to a three section Pi- type low pass 
filter with a cut-off frequency of 36 Mc. 
Tuning network consists of a variable 
capacitance and tapped inductance in 
an impedance matching unit. 
Capacity coupled neon lamp 
serves as a tuning indicator 
and will also provide a 
rough indication 
of power output. 

^eat/i&ct IMPEDANCE 

METER KIT 



The Heathkit Antenna Imped- 
ance Meter is basically a resist- 
ance type standing wave ratio 
bridge, with one arm a variable 
resistance. In this manner it is 
possible to measure radiation re- 
sistance and resonant frequency 
and antenna transmission line 
impedance; approximate SWR 
;ind optimum receiver input. 
I'se it also as a monitor or as a 
Held strength meter where high 
.sensitivity is not required. Fre- 

M?ft <;hir. W» luency range of the AM-1 is 
2 Ibr ""'^" ^'^'^ ^^^ ■"^"Se "f impcd- 
• .i IDS- ance measurements 0-600 ohms 

The circuit uses a 100 microam- 
pere Simpson meter as a sensi- 
tive null Indicator. Shielded aluminum light weight 
cabinet. Strong self supporting antenna terminals. 



MODEL 
AM-1 



HEATH COMPANY 

BENTON HARBOR 9, MICHIGAN 




IZQ, and BZD form the TRC's committee for giving Novice 
e.xanis; the HYEs received a bundle from heaven — a girl; 
Novice QCT has 41 states confirmed toward WAS; and a 
Lucas Co. QSO Party -svill be held on Jan. loth from 8:00 
P.M. until midnight on 160, 80, and 10 meters, sponsored 
by the AREV with HNP serving as referee. Eastern Ohio's 
Ham Flashes reports that SKF is a new Novice in Newton 
Falls; HSP, of Phalanx, has a new 50-foot steel tower; 
SFG has 21 states on 2 meters, while RSW has 19; JZY 
recently completed a 35-day leave prior to assignment in 
England; KBC has finished basic training at Sampson; and 
EJC is attending Kent State U. Traffic: (Oct.) W8FY0 
342, ARO 222, LHV 164, REL 133, DAE 109, DQG 106, 
MQQ 102, AMH 94, RO 83, HUX 76, RXM 60, AJH 52, 
CRA 48, ILC 48, AL 31, OXS 28, FPZ 26, SRF 23, AJW 22, 
LMB 21, HNP 19, RN 18, IJH 17, KIH 13, TLW 12, BEW 
11. HHF 11, HXB 10, PBX 10, WAV 10, ROX 9, ET 8. 
QIE 8, GZ 7, HFE 7, BLS 6, EQN 6, OQP 6, LXE 5, 
SPU 5, MGC 4, NQQ 4, AQ 2, GDQ 2, PM 2. (Sept.) 
W8A1MH 57, ZAU 28, LFX 24. 

HUDSON DIVISION 

EASTERN NEW YORK — SCM, Stephen J. Neason 
W2ILI — SEC: RTE. RM: TYC. PAMs: GDD, IJG. 
K2EHI has a very effective 14-Mc. beam working. Congrats 
to K2BSD, who made BPL again. I regret to report tlie 
passing of our PAM, JQI; also 7IPM, recently modified 
to K2HTD. K2HVN is active on NNETN. OKI is working 
plenty of DX on 7 and 14 Mc. with a new all-band rig and 
dipole antennas. CGT, WVS, and ZBS have new sixteen- 
element beams on 144 Mc. MHE is back on 144 Mc. and 
is organizing a v.h.f. society. AIH and K2BCU are operating 
portable from Boston on 144 and 29 Mc. LEL joined the 
CAP. LWI moved from Long Island to Pok and is active 
on 144 Mc. with an 829 final. HIQ squirts a signal from 
Brewster on 144 Mc. Welcome to BGO, wlio moved into 
Rockland County. HJO has a new VFO for his Bandmaster. 
LDS and PCQ have new beams on 144 Mc. HFQ, RO for 
Rockland, is on 144 Mc. from Nyack. Our annual Eastern 
New York section conference held at the YMCA in Pok 
recently proved to be worth while and interesting to all who 
ufie able to attend. Your SCM acted as chairman. SEC 
RTE and EC LDS were in charge of the arrangements and 
Iirovided the meeting place. Other officials and guests 
present were OBU, Hudson Division Director; INJM, 
ARRL NEC; BGO, of the NYSCD commission; J. Gaul, 
C.D. Director Putnam County; and ECs LEL Ulster, ZTZ 
Rockland, and HZZ Pok. K2DQH is mobile on 29 Mc. 
K2BRY is operating portable from Jolins Hopkins Univer- 
sity. Because of a change in QTH BVU will be limited to 
mobile and portable operation on 144 Mc. New in Schenec- 
tady is KN2JTY. RML is back on 144 Mc. AU clubs inter- 
ested in the Eastern New York Council of Clubs, please 
write EFU for information. Traffic: (Oct.) K2BSD 536, 
BE 50, EOQ 42, W2EFU 31, ILI 24, K2EHI 12, HVN 5, 
W2APH 1. (Sept.) K2EOQ 20, W2BSH 18, K2HVN 4. 

NEW YORK CITY AND LONG ISLAND — SCM, 
Carleton L. Coleman, W2YBT — Asst. SCM: Harry 
Dannals, 2TUK. SEC: ZAI. PAM: JZX. RMs: VNJ, LPJ. 
ZAI reports a good increase in AREC activity with excellent 
S.E.T. results. KGN, Brooklyn EC, sparkplugged the big- 
gest AREC gain in the section. Nassau County radio ama- 
teurs once again demonstrated amateur radio in action at 
the Mineola Fair, operating K2DHC/2 on all bands. YBT 
is active from a new location in East Hampton on 75 and 
80 meters and reports that WSL is 100 per cent ham-con- 
trolled at the transmitter plant with W2s AJR, BTC, CRZ, 
and YBT there. AEE participated in the Columbia Univer- 
sity Bicentennial Convocation. K2CRH reports that the 
BAR EC Net has shifted operations to 3700 kc. and in\-ites 
Novice participation, listening for KNs around 3710 kc. 
GP says he has been QRL but reports into four nets and 
had a high score in the CD Party. MDM says business 
pressure keeps him from more than 20 hours of hamming 
per week. K2EWJ reports fine results with new 20-meter 
two-element shortened beam with Viking II and HQ-140X. 
The CCNY club station, HJ. is on the air with high power 
and 75A-3 receiver. KN2JPG is a new Novice at H.J. 
K2HT0 recently dropped the "N." Stuyvesant HSRC, 
CLE, has reorganized with K2DGR, president, and 
K2DKQ, trustee. The station is on the air with an NC-98 
and ARC-5 looking for traffic skeds around 36.50 kc. week- 
days between 1250 and 1400. The Amityville Memorial 
School Club has elected KN2IYK, pres.: and K2D0Q. 
vice-pres. New members of the Fordham Radio Club are 
W2AMR, K2HID, and KN2s IAD, JBK, and JRR. MFW 
i.s on 10 meters with 300 watts to a ground plane. K2HKH 
has a pair of 6146s in the new rig under construction. 
K2AMP was made a Class I Observer. Besides some excel- 
lent observing, Wally visited lAW and had time to snag 
F8FW, FC on 20 and 40 meters. K2DGT is active on 20, 
40, and 80 meters with HT-18 pushing 813s. lEH can be 
heard on 75 meters. EBZ reports excellent attendance at 
the Amateur Radio Teletype Society meeting, wliere BFD 
demonstrated some RTTY gear. K2EOF and KN2ITS are 
new members of the ever-growing NYRC. Al^K has changed 
Novice code and tlieory instruction to Wed. night. K2HVK 
{Continued on page 86) 



84 



• «?*«•. 




# Smooth 3CtinE illuminated and precalibrated dial. 

# 6AU6 election coupled Clapp oscillator and 0A2 volla(e regulator. 

# 7 Band coverage. 180 through IQ meters-lO Volt RF output. 

# Copper plated chassis-aluminum cabinet-easy to build-direct 
keylne. 



Here is the new Heathklt VFO you 
have been waiting for. The perfect 
companion to the Heathkit Model 
AT-1 Transmitter. It has sufficient output to 
drive any multi-stage transmitter of modern 
design. A terrific combination of outstanding 
features at a low kit price. Good mechanical 
and electrical design insures operating stability. Coils are wound on heavy duty 
ceramic forms, using Litz or double cellulose wire coated with pol.vstyrene 
cement. Variable capacitor is of differential type construction, especially de- 
signed for ma.\imum bandspread and features ceramic insulation and double 
bearings. 

This kit is furnished with a carefully precalibrated dial which provides well 
over two feet of calibrated dial scale. Smooth acting vernier reduction drive 
in.sures easy tuning and zero beating. Power requirements 6. .3 volts AC at .4.5 
amperes and 250 volts DC at lo mills. Just plug it into the power receptacle 
provided on the rear of the AT-1 Transmitter Kit. The VFO coaxial output 
cable icrmiiiiitcs in plastic plug to fit standard J^' crystal holder. Construction is 
slmi>lc and wiring is easy. 







Smooth acting 






illuminated 




layout, — 




Clean 


easy to l>uild 




appearance 






— rugged 


wirinE. -^m 




construction - 




^^^^^H 




accessible 




HH^^I 


1 


calibrating 




bISI 


1 


adjustments. 



'^eaM4ci; AMATEUR TRANSMITTER KIT 




MODEL AT-1 



2950 



Here is a major Heathklt addition to the Ham radio field, the 
AT-1 Transmitter Kit, incorporarlng many desirable design 
features at the lowest possible dollar-per-watts price. Panel 
mounted crystal socket, stand-by switch, key click filter, 
A. C. line filtering, good shielding, etc. VFO or crystal excita- 
tion—up to 35 watts input. Built-in power supply provides 
425 volts at 100 MA. Amazingly low kit price includes all 
circuit components, tubes, cabinet, punched chassis, and 
detailed ronstniotinn manual. 



Four band 

operation 533 to 

to 35 Mc, 



Stable BFO 
oscillator 
circuit. 




51/2 inch PM 
Speaker- 
Headphone 
Jack. 



HEATH COMPANY 

BENTON HARBOR 9, MICHIGAN 




'»eai44a COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVER KIT 



SPECIFICATIONS: 

Range 535 Kc to 35 Mr 

12BE6 Mixer-oscillator 

12BA6 1. F. Amplifier 

12AV6 Detector — AVC — audio 
12BA6 ...B. F. O. oscillator 

12A6 Beam power output 

5Y3GT Rectifier 

105-125 volts A. C. 50-60 
0"cles, 45 watts. 



A new Heathkit AR-2 communi- 
cations receiver. The ideal com- 
panion piece for the AT-1 Trans- 
mitter. Electrical bandspread scale for tuning 
and logging convenience. High gain minia- 
ture tubes and IF transformers for high 
sensitivity and good signal to noise ratio. 
Construct your own Communications 
Receiver at a very substantial saving. 
Supplied with all tubes, punched and 
formed sheet metal parts, speaker, 
circuit components, and detailed step- 
by-step construction manual. 



MODEL AR-2 

Ship. Wt. 12 lbs. 
CABINET: 

Proxylin impreg* 
nated fabric 
ered plywood > 
inet. Ships, wo 
5 lbs. Number 
10, $4.50. 



85 



is now General class and can be found rock-bound on 7052 
kc. AOD worked 7 stations on 420 Mc. in the recent V.H.F. 
Q80 Party. PF now is single-sidebanding with 20A exciter. 
KR, JVO. GJX, K2DW, and others are pusliing high power 
on s.s.b. It was your reporter's pleasure to attend the recent 
QCVVA dinner "with my OM, GO. The old-tiuiers had a 
splendid turnout and presented an excellent audience for 
KUJ's talk on s.s.b. The QCWA Net meets on Sun. at 1100 
on 3810 kc. RB soon will be heard on 144 Mc. now that the 
boating season is over. GYL was heard chasing DX on 
7 Mc. EEN has high-power final under construction. 
With 1955 upon us, let's check our equipment so that we 
radiate the best signal possible. Watch the modulation and 
the keying. Remember, too, switch to safety! See you in the 
V.H.F. Sweepstakes. Traffic: (Oct.) W2KEB 697, KFV 
642, LPJ 411, K2CQP 301, W2AEE 153, OME 84, K2CRH 
80, W2J0A 63, K2ABW 58, W2GP 40, GXC 39, K2DDU 
17, W2EC 17, lAG 14, GPQ 12, K2HID 10, EWJ 9, CMV 
3, W2JBQ 3, OKU 3, K2DVT 2, HYK 1, W2TUK 1. 
(Sept.) K2E0R 175, DEB 54, W2GXC 52, JGV 30, ZM 16, 
MUM 9. 

NORTHERN NEW JERSEY — SCM, Lloyd H. Mana- 
mon, W2VQR — Asst. SCM: Charles Teeters, K2DHE. 
SEC: UN. PAM: CCS. RMs: NKD, CGG, EAS. K2DSW 
is temporarily QRL because of school at RCA in New York 
City. K2CHI was active in the CD Party. The Irvington 
Radio Amateur Club meets in the Community Center 
Bldg. the 1st and 3rd Mon. of each month. Code and theory 
classes are conducted every Mon. night. Automatic tape 
machines are available for code practice, wliich are run at 
speeds qualifying the students for either Novice or General 
Class. Interested parties are invited to attend the club 
meetings and code classes. If you desire to work the Club 
Net look for it on 28.7 Mc, every Sun. at 1200 hours. This 
is a very business-like club, gang, so take advantage of the 
offer and pass the word around to prospective new hams. 
If you desire to write the club, contact K2DZR, 65 Garrison 
St.. Newark. K2BEV again is active in OO work. CQB, PAT, 
GUM, ENM, and K2DHE put on a demonstration of 
amateur radio communications for local fire departments. 
The Windblowers V.H.F. Society held its installation 
dinner on Nov. 14th. A special QSL card still is available 
to anyone working a member of the society. K2EUN is 
NCS on JN each Mon. evening. Bogota is organizing a 
mobile civil defense net. K2GPB has his new mobile rig 
working FB. KN2JOM is working out real well with his 
Heathkit transmitter. BRC worked in the CD Party for 
the first time in over four years. K2BCK will be QRL after 
this month because of active duty at sea with the Navj'. 
EAS has been out of town on a business trip K2BAY is 
back on the c.w. bands and is doing a bit of experimenting 
on antenna systems. Brad also is active on the New Jersey 
C.W. Civil Defense Net, 3505.5 kc, Sun. at 1900. 2ZEP/7 
is in the Air Force down Arizona way. He has obtained an 
ORS appointment in the Arizona section, but will be back 
in Northern New Jersey next year. DRV is active in JN, 
daily except Sun.; 3695 kc. 00 reports were received from 
DME, GVZ, TPJ, NIY, K2BEV, AFQ, and BWQ. K2DHE 
is making test runs with his new mobile installation up and 
down Sunset Ave. Much QRM to K2ICE results from these 
tests which pass by in front of liis QTH. Annie, the assistant 
YL operator at K2ICE, holds the local QSO record on 144 
Mc. Iv2HNA discovered to his extreme regret that his 
144-Mc. antenna has been terminated at the change-over 
relay box. Result, no DX. HJL is on 75-meter 'phone with 
the new rig. George visited New England and came home 
with his brother's 150-B rig. KN2GVB is keeping the 
144-Mc. band hot at his QTH. NIE has terminated his 
yachting activities for the season and is back on 75 meters 
again. K2CTL is sporting a new ham shack in the attic. 
The arrival of a new daughter forced him to vacate his 
former downstairs comfortable shack. K2ARQ, a member 
of the local Marathon QSO Net, stays right with them 
with the aid of a full pot of coffee. Traffic: (Oct.) W2CQB 
68, K2BWP 61, BWQ 43, EUN 42, W2EAS 26, FMP 21. 
K2IKS 14, W2BRC 10. K2GER 8, W2CVW 6, K2BAY 5, 
BCK 4, KN2J0M 3, K2CHI 2, W2CJX 2. NIY 2. (Sept.) 
K2DSW 63. W2DRV 12. (Aug.) W2DRV 16. 

MIDWEST DIVISION 

IOWA — bCM. William G. Davis, W0PP — PP re- 
turned much refreshed from his vacation. Many thanks to 
SCA for subbing for me. The North East Iowa Radio Club 
had a very successful c.d. drill Oct. 31st, with 13 mobile 
rigs and all towns in Black Hawk County using their 
emergency rigs. BDR and SCA have received their traffic 
award medallions. BLH was elected TLCN mgr. CGY is 
getting some DX with his 3^-kw. TNY completed his 
813 VFO-controUed all-band transmitter and gave it to the 
radio club, BXR. HMM is conducting radio classes at the 
club with 30 prospects up for examination soon. There are 
5 YLs in the class. BJP, laid up with kidney trouble, is 
getting in a lot of hamming. LJW is a new ORS. ZAM is 
back on TLCN. KVJ, a recent addition to TLCN. is NCS 
on Mondays. Ex-QAO now is K4AQQ. VYH is a new 
Burlington ham just out of the Army. LCX is getting on 2 
meters. NGS reports that Ft. Dodge now has 49, paid mem- 
bers. BQC/0 along with IVS/0 and WN0UNC, is trying to 



get a ham club going at Luther College. LGG has ai'new 
CoUins 32V-3. TVC reports most of his activity is on 2220 
and 4020 kc. on MARS and 1815 and 3970 kc. KWT and 
HWU have been holding weekly radio classes. THU is a 
brand-new father. SFK got his Conditional Class license 
Oct. 22nd. The reporting was swell this time. Keep it up, 
fellows. Traffic: W0SCA 1124, CZ 257, LJW 106, BLH 35, 
KVJ 31, KJN 30, QVA 22, LCX 20, NGS 19, JTF 18, SFK 
16, W9BQC/0 14, W0DDV 12, RMG 12, EHH 11, LGG 10, 
TVC 7, HWU 6, NYX 3, PAN 1. 

KANSAS — SCM, Earl N. Johnston, W0ICV — SEC: 
PAH. RM: KXL/NIY. PAM: FNS. The Scott County 
RACES Plan has been approved with ZUX as Radio 
Officer and YLO as CD Director. The Topeka-Shawnee 
County c.d. area hams are organizing a 2-meter net on 
145.5 Mc. ONF, of Howard, plans to start a code practice 
schedule Mon., Wed., and Sat. at 1730 on 3805.5 kc. EOT 
plans to help part time. The Lawrence Emergency Net 
meets each Sun. at 1400 on 3820 kc. K0FED is a new Na- 
tional Guard station at Concordia with a Viking II, VFO. 
and NC-125 receiver, according to KSY, and will be active 
in the Air Force MARS nets as well as other amateur activ- 
ity. VGA is a new station in Mulvane. Bob uses a Viking 
Ranger with a vertical antenna to put out that FB signal. 
LBJ, who is working on a new 600-watt rig, took time to 
participate in the CD Party working 10 sections. MOX, 
of Lawrence, keeps daily skeds with EMS in Adair. Iowa, 
on 2 meters. Louis has six states on 2 meters and is open 
for skeds with anyone anywhere. WIZ, of Emporia, is new 
Asst. EC for the Neosho Valley Amateur Radio Club 
at Emporia. UAT, of Fort Scott, is building a new 250- 
watt rig. Thanks, fellows, for your support in the SCM 
election. We hope to do bigger and better things for the 
section in the next few years. Traffic: (Oct.) W0BLI 566, 
NIY .331, OHJ 138, EOT 1.37, WGM 107, TOL 94, FDJ 85, 
MXG 84, MLG 51, ECD 45, NFX 41, FEO/0 35, QMU 33, 
MAE 32, UMV 26, ABJ 22, SVE 22, ONC 21, ONF 21, 
AAJ 20, LOR 19, HS 17, DEL 16, UAT 16, LIX 15, 
KFS/0 12, LBJ 10. RBO 9, ICV 8, KAJ 8, NLV 8, TNA 8, 
YFE 8, REP 7, TSR 7, YOS 7, QGG 6, VRZ 6, LOW 4, 
LQX 4. (Sept.) W0EOT 138. 

MISSOURI — SCM, Clarence L. Arundale, W0GBJ — 
SEC: VRF. PAM: BVL. RMs: OUD, QXO. Missouri lost 
one of its most active old-time hams when CRM recently 
passed away. CPI handled a large volume of traffic originat- 
ing in the area affected by Hurricane Hazel. OUD advises 
that MON is meeting at 7:00 a.m. in addition to the regular 
evening net schedule time because of present skip condi- 
tions. WYJ/4 has received his ticket and will be at home in 
St. Louis in April. BZK has earned his 1,000 Traffickers 
Club certificate. ORP and GFF are located at the Ardmore 
AFB. SZT now has a 75A-2. TDF has a Viking II and SX-71 
in operation. WN0VPM uses an Eldico TR-75TV and 
HQ-140X. S.E.T. activities were reported by HUI and 
FKM. CPI raised liis doublet to fifty feet. Bad skip condi- 
tions on 40 meters kept GAR's trp.ffic total down. FLN 
reports 25 members are taking code classes in preparation 
for their Novice Class examination. K0FBO is installing 
a Johnson 20-meter beam. The radio club at Southwest 
Missouri State College, with LQC as trustee, has applied for 
a station license. US recently visited CKQ to pick up a few 
pointers on the new 813 rig that US is building. We hear 
that CKQ recently received an A-1 Operators Club certifi- 
cate. DOA has a 10-watt s.s.b. exciter that works out in fine 
shape. MUX recently completed his new rig which runs 450 
watts to an 813. JUY did a beautiful job in constructing the 
aU-band 2E26 rig recently described in QST. AKS still has 
audio "bugs" troubling Mm. Traflic: (Oct.) W0CPI 927, 
QXO 501, GAR 240, BVL 175, CKQ 55, EBE 39, KIK 30, 
HUI 29, OUD 27, KA 24, GBJ 21, BKV 20, RTW 18, 
QWB 12, BUL 10, CXE 4, FLN 4, QBX 4, QMF 4, TGC 4, 
BZK 2, ETW 2. TCF 2. ZWI 2. (Sept.) W0BVL 59, 
QMF 6. 

NEBRASKA — SCM. Floyd B. Campbell. W0CBH — 
Asst. SCM: Tom Boydston. 0VYX. SEC: JDJ. PAM:EUT. 
The North Platte Club now has a call. W0WYM. The 
transmitter will be located upstairs over the County Sheriff's 
office. The SCM suggests that appointees check certificates 
and get them in for endorsement. EXP has a 20A exciter 
and is figuring on 811s for the s.s.b. final. UK is rebuilding 
his s.s.b. for 300 watts. RIG has the 4-65A working fine. 
RIG has a new 7-lb. 8-oz. YL. CBH built the 50-kc. fre- 
quency standard in July QST. AQJ gets nice reports with 
his new B. & W. 5100. JCK has moved to Albuquerque, the 
land of mobiles. QMD is using a WRL Globe King. QMW 
is using 40-meter vertical. QOU. PHW. VKQ, and AIY 
are heard on 2 meters. A 2-meter net for Nebraska is shaping 
up with 145.35 Mc. as the frequency. State-wide coverage 
is almost assured. The frequency was picked to be in the 
RACES portion of the band. NET has stacked a TV 
antenna on his 65-ft. 10-meter beam. ERM had such good 
results with his flea-power mobile recently that he has given 
up the idea of more power (mobile). VQR is president of 
the Tri-Citv Radio Club at Scottsbluff; QKR is vice- 
president. IRW and FTQ are members of AREC. UOV is 
NCS for the North Platte Club Net. Traffic: W0TQD 1836, 
K0AIR 1314, W0FQB 2.30, ZJF 230, FTQ 51, AEM 49, 
MAO 38, HTA 35, KDW 25, VYX 23, EGQ 16, ORW 14, 
(Continued on page 88) 



86 




Eimac designed^ Eimac produced 
...for Eimac QUALITY 



Included in the incomparable list of Eimac developed 
electron-power tubes, which range to 9600mc and 25 
kw power output, are six favorites of Amateur Radio 
Operators. Application-proved in many types of 
commercial and military service, the 4-65A, 4-125A, 
4-250A, 4-400A and 4X150 radial-beam power tet- 
rodes and 4E27A radial-beam power pentode possess 
the inherent features of Eimac multi-grid tubes — high 
power gain, minimized neutralization needs, and on- 
the-air economy. Mobile or shack, 2mc or 420mc, CW 
or phone, there's a tube in the Eimac Amateur's Big 
Six to do the job for you with a wallop. When visiting 
your distributor ask for Eimac — the mark of excel- 
lence in electron-power tubes. 

Write our Amateur Service Bureau 
for further information. 



EITEl-McCULLOUGH, INC. 

SAN BRUNO, CALIFORNIA 




*Eimac 


developed 1 


electron 


■power tubes 1 


4-65A 




75TL 


4-125A 




lOOTH 


4-250A 




lOOTL 


4-400A 




152TH 


4-1000A 




152TL 


4PR60A 




2S0TH 


4W20,000A 




250TL 


4X1S0A 




304TH 


4X150D 




304TL 


4X150G 




450TH 


4X500A 




450TL 


4X500F 




592 3-200A3 


4E27A S-125B 


750TL 


3K20,000LA, 


F, K 


lOOOT 


3KS0,000LA, 


F, K 


1500T 


3W5000A3 




2000T 


3W5000F3 




2-25A 


3W10,000A3 




2-50A 


3X2500A3 




2-150D 


3X2500F3 




2-240A 


3X3000A1 




2-2000A 


3X3000F1 




250R 


2ST 




253 


35T 




8020(100R) 


3STG 




KY2IA 


7STH 




RX21A 



87 




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Compare These Wide Spread Ranges and Features: 

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0-1.2-3-12-60-300-600-1200-6000 volts. 

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^ 7 DC CURRENT RANGES: 

0-60-300 /i«. 0-1.2-12-120-600 Ma. 0-12 Amps. 

• 5 RESISTANCE RANGES: self-contained 
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• 8 DECIBEL RANGES: —20 DB to +77DB. 
DB = 1 Milliwatt, 600 ohms. 

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protects meter during transport and storage. 

■A^ CUSTOM-MOLDED PHENOLIC CASE and PANEL 

MODEL 120 . . . complete with internal ohmmeter 
batteries, banana -plug test leads and detailed 
operating manual. Overall Case Dimensions 
53/8 X 7 X 31/8" Net Price $39.95 



PRECISION App.r.l«. C. ln<. 

70-31 84th Street, Glendale 27, L. I., N. Y. 

Export: 458 Broadway, New York 13, U. S. A. 
Canada: Atlas Radio Corp., Ltd., 560 King St., W, Toronto, 2B 



RNH 14, K0WBF 14, W0KLB 12, WR 12, AIN 10, .TDJ 
10, CBH 9, PDJ 8, PZH 8, HXH 7, PQT 7, OCU 6, PQP 6, 
LEF 4, LRK 4, NHS 4, OFL 4, RRH 4, CIH 3, DJU 3, 
NGZ 3, HQN 2, JHI 2, THX 2, POL 1, UVU 1. 

NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 

CONNECTICUT — SCM, Milton E. Chaffee, WIEFW 
— SEC: LKF. PAM: LWW. RM: KYQ. MCN and CN 
3640, CPN 3880, CEN 29,580 kc. RAN got home from 
W.P.I, for tlie CD Party and has added a beam for 14 Mc. 
UBM, daughter of EBO, married YOC in September and 
ham radio was the factor that brought them together. CHX 
is ex-4TGO, now active from West Hartford. UJG has 
abandoned 220 to concentrate on 144 Mc. NFG reports a 
successful "Operation Goblin" as a Hamden Halloween c.d. 
exercise. Current officers of the Bristol Radio Club are VOV, 
pres. ; ZFH, treas. ; and YOE, secy. The Southington Ama- 
teur Radio Assn. was organized in October with GVT 
pres.; ZZK. vice-pres. ; GVZ, secy.; ZTQ, treas.; and 
SBI, activities. New ECs: OGQ and RMG for Waterbury 
and New Haven. ORS renewals: RWS, QJM, and KV. EC 
renewal: RPX. LWW reports for CPN: 101 stations 
participated with ZFF, LIG, VWL, MLT, and DAV most 
active. MNF has gone s.s.b. AWV now has General Class 
ticket and is active on 2- and 10-meter mobile. RRE is 
much better after a long illness. COB is active again with a 
Viking. Welcome to ex-3EDA, 9ADE, now active in West 
Hartford as lEDA. APA snagged HK0AI for country No. 30 
on 40-meter 'phone. WPO now is DXCC. We regret to 
note FWH now is a SUent Key. NJM enjoys mobile c.w. 
BDI hit BPL this month largely from the RTTY Net. 
GTH and ZZK are on 420 Mc. RBF is rebuilding for a pair 
of 6146s in the final. WNICKA is building up practice on 
40 meters. VOS and VOV attended the W4 YL picnic 
in Virginia. TD transmits Official Bulletins on 146 Mc. 
CN handled 300 messages in 22 sessions, according to RM 
KYQ, with a high of 36 in one night. KYQ, RGB, and LV 
are high in QNI. MCN handled 88 in 21 sessions with 
IBE, YYM, and RFJ sharing QNI honors. CTN, just under- 
way, has adjusted schedule to Sun. morning, with RFJ 
and HYF doing the NCS work. New Net certificates went 
to FMU, FTM, LWW, MLT, RMZ, VWL, DAV, KGT, 
VOV, UED, HUM, and YUP. Everybody set for the FCDA 
radio test in Region 1 in February? Thanks for the many 
reports; keep 'em coming. Traffic: WlAW 309, CUH 268, 
YBH 198, KYQ 154, BDI 132, LIG 90, NJM 87, HUM 82, 
HYF 73, RGB 58, QJM 56, YU 47, YYM 43, VOS 38, 
LV 37, BVB 33, EFW 33, FTM 28, RFJ 25, KV 19, VOV 
19, UED 16, APA 6, EDA 2. 

MAINE — SCM, Bernard Seamon, WIAFT — SEC: 
BYK. PAM : WRZ. RM : OHT. The Sea Gull Net meets at 
1700 on 3960 kc. Mon. through Fri. ; the Barnyard Net at 
0730 on 3960 Mon. through Fri. ; and the Pine Tree Net at 
1900 on 3596 kc. Mon. through Fri. Recent OPS appointees 
are WTG, LYR, UDD, and WRZ. Ex-IIXE is back on in 
Damariscotta with a new call, BWM. BX has worked 
seventeen countries with his underground antenna, using 
35 watts input. ZNL is in the veterans hospital at Togus 
for a check-up. TWR is in the CMG hospital at Lewiston 
for an operation. Latest report is that both are doing well. 
LHA is off for his annual cruise in southern waters with the 
Maine Maritime Academy Training Ship. He is the radio 
officer. Our new PAM is going great guns and is keeping 
your SCM busy issuing OPS and Section Net certificates. 
What is with you and the Pine Tree Net, OHT? We miss 
your usual fine reports. BPI has his Donald Duck working. 
The BBC has been coming in right well on 3960 kc. during 
Sea Gull Net time. The music is very pretty blended with 
the cries of the wild gulls. Your SCM and his YL wish you 
all a Happy New Year. Traffic: WIWTG 220, LKP 131, 
UDD 38, TVB 32, YYW 18, AFT 17, LYR 15, BTY 14, 
LHA 13. BX 12, EFR 11, UOT 11, VYE 9, WRZ 9, ZBN 9, 
NXX 7, YTE 7, RSC 5, LOA 3. 

EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS — SCM, Frank L. 
Baker, jr., WIALP — New appointments: WLU as EC 
for Watertown, NF as OBS, BPW as OES. Appointments 
endorsed: ATP Holliston, AVY New Bedford, HUP Dover, 
MON Stoughton, UBB Boxford, QQL Lynn as ECs; AVY 
and HUP as OPSs; AVY, BDU, EMG, and EPE as ORSs; 
ALP and UIR as OBSs; QQW as OES; UE as RM for 80- 
meter c.w.; TVZ, Hopkinton, as EC. Please add to your list 
of nets the Braintree Emergency Net on 28,560 kc. Mon. 
at 2100, and change the frequency of Weymouth and 
Holbrook to 28,580 kc. TF3CJ is attending M.I.T. and took 
part in the recent F.M.T. along with PXH and LQQ. 
GAG's XYL won an SX-88 receiver at the New England 
Division Convention. AKN moved to Sandwich. A Region 
5 committee meeting was held with DFS, BL, RM, TQP, 
KTG, NJN, ALP, ZYX, and CQ present. A Sector 5 
meeting was held with GNK, GOF, FWS, SH, UXN, 
MME, THY, SMV, ISU, EKG, ALP, and MD present. 
K2BJB/MM is on 10 meters in Boston Harbor. The Brain- 
tree, Weymouth, and Quinoy mobiles were out on Hallo- 
ween with the auxiliary police. Heard on 2 meters: CAV, 
YTB, and LXR. Heard on 10 meters: FED, VAI, AL, 
BFV, VPP. CNG, UKG, TWN, EYP, AYN, KIX, ALX, 
TFD, ABJ.BJT, MNW, QNC, LIU, and YKD. MobUe 
Continued on page 90) 



88 



MALLORY HAM BULLETIN 



MALLORY 
6 -Volt 



Battery Charger 




Keeps Mobile Unit on the Go 



Those of IIS who liave tried mobile operation 
are fully aware of the very diffi<iilt problem 
of how to keep the car Itattery charged 
adequately for starting purposes, and still 
provide plenty of juice for a reasonable 
amount of time on the air. 

Recently, one of our good amateur friends, 
who is a red-hot mobile fan, told us of a 
method he used for keeping his battery at 
top performance and still add no extra equip- 
ment to his automobile. His system sounded 
so practical, that we'd like to pass it along. 

Here is what he did. First, he visited his 
Mallory distributor and bought a small, 
inexpensive Mallory 6-volt Batterv Charger 
(the 6SAC6 or 12SAC5 for 12-volt systems) 
together with a special automobile Cigarette 
Lighter Plug (Mallory R675) to be used for 
inserting the Charger output into the elec- 
trical circuit of his car. The Lighter Plug w as 
attached to the Battery Charger and the 



P. R. MALLORY & CO. Inc. 

P.O. Box 1558 
INDIANAPOLIS 6 INDIANA 



whole business was then mounted con- 
veniently in his garage. 

After an evening of mobile operation, he 
simply inserted the Plug into the cigarette 
lighter socket, turned on the 117 VAC line, 
and the next morning, presto, his battery 
was ready for heavy starting action. 

With this very convenient arrangement, this 
ham was able to operate his mobile rig the 
year 'round, with little fear of even tough 
wintertime starting. 

Incidentally, if your car is not equipped with 
a cigarette lighter, don't let that handicap 
y ou, simply ask your distributor for a Mallory 
Dashboard Receptacle (R652) which may be^ 
clamped to the dashboard without drilling 
a single hole. Lsed in conjunction with a 
Cord Assembly (R670) this arrangement will 
provide all the convenience afforded by the 
lighter plug method of installation. 




89 




LOOKING FOR DX? 



GET A 



GOTHAM BEAM 



Reports tell the story oF 
GOTHAM BEAM performance 
— the gang says you can work 
more DX In a day off a 
GOTHAM BEAM than In a 
year off a V'lre or dipole. 
GOTHAM BEAMS are strong, 
loo; easy to assemble and in- 
stall, no special tools or elec- 
tronic equipment necessary; foil 
instructions included, matching 
is automatic; maximum power 
gain built into the design — AND 
ALL AT LOW, LOW, PRICES. 



and work the world! 



15 M. BEAMS 



NEW! NEW! 



NEW! 



2-Meter Beam Kits 

GOTHAM proudly presents a 6 
element Yogi beam for 2 meters 
at only $9.95. Contains a ) 2 foot 
boom, 1 " alum, tubing; Va" alum, 
tubing for elements; Amphenol 
fittings; all hardware, and instruc- 
tions. Vertical or horizontal polari- 
zation, terrific performance! 

And GOTHAM'S new 12 ele- 
ment Yogi for 2 meters at only 
$1 6.95! Contains a I 2 foot boom, 
1" alum, alloy tubing; Vb" tubing 
for elements; all Amphenol fit- 
tings; oil hardware, and instruc- 
tions. Vertical or horizontal polari- 
zation, multiplies your power by 
321 



10 M. BEAMS 

SIOJT^Std. 10m 3-EI. T 
match, $18.95. 1 — 8' Boom, 

H" Alum. Tubing; 3 — 6' Cen- 
ter Elements. ?4 " Alum. Tub- 
ing 6 — 6' End Inserts. Js" 
Alum. Tubing; 1 — T Match 
(4'), Polystyrene Tubing; 1 — 
Beam Mount. 



D103T»DeLuxe 10m 3-EI. T 
match, $25.95. 1 — 8' Boom, 
1" .•\lum. Tubing; 3 — 6' Center 
Elements, 1" Alum. Tubing; 
6 — 6' End Inserts, %" Alum. 
Tubing; 1 — T Match (4'). 
Polystyrene Tubing; 1 — Beam 
Mount. 



S104T«Std. 10m 4-EI. T 
match, $24.95. 1 — 12' Boom, 
1" Alum. Tubing; 4 — 6' Center 
Elements, ■'4" Alum. Tubing; 
8 — 6' End Inserts, %" Alum. 
Tubing; 1 — T Match (4'), 
Polystyrene Tubing; 1 — Beam 
Mount. 



D104T.DeLuxe 10m 4-EI. T 
match, $30.95. 1 — 12' Boom, 
1" Alum. Tubing; 4 — 6' Center 
Elements. 1" Alum. Tubing; 8 
— 6' End Inserts, %" Alum. 
Tubing; 1— T Match (4'), 
Polystyrene Tubing; 1 — Beam 
Mount. 



S152T»Std. 15m 2-El. T 
match. $22.95. 1 — 12' Boom, 
1" Alum. Tubing; 2 — 12' Cen- 
ter Elements, ^4 " Alum. Tub- 
ing; 2 — 5' End Inserts, %" 
Alum. Tubing; 2 — 7' End In- 
serts, %" Alum. Tubing; 1 — 
T Match (6'). Polystyrene Tub- 
ing; 1 — Beam Mount. 
D153T«DeLuxe 15m 3-EI. T 
match, $39.95. 1 — 12' Boom, 
1" Alum. Tubing; 3 — 12' Cen- 
ter Elements. 1" Alum. Tubing; 
2 — 5' End Inserts, Vs" Alum. 
Tubing; 2 — 6' End Inserts, ''A" 
Alum. Tubing; 2 — 7' End In- 
serts, %" Alum. Tubing; 1 — T 
Match (6'), Polystyrene Tub- 
ing; 1 — Beam Mount. 

20 M. BEAMS 

S202N • Std. 20m 2-EI. (No 
T), $21.95. 1 — 12' Boom, 1" 
Alum. Tubing; 2 — 12' Center 
Elements. 1" Alum. Tubing; 4 

— 12' End Inserts, Va" Alum. 
Tubing; 1 — Beam Mount. 
.S202T • Std. 20m 2-EI. T 
match, $24.95. 1 — 12' Boom, 
1" Alum. Tubing; 2 — 12' Cen- 
ter Elements, 1" Alum. Tubing; 
4 — 12' End Inserts, 14" Alum. 
Tubing; 1— T Match (8'), 
Polystyrene Tubing; 1 — Beam 
Mount. 

D202N • DeLuxe20m2-EI.(No 
T), $31.95. 2 — 12' Booms, 1" 
Alum. Tubing; 2 — 12' Center 
Elements, 1" Alum. Tubing; 
4 — 12' End Inserts. %" Alum. 
Tubing; 1 — Beam Crosspiece, 
1" Alum. Tubing; 1 — Beam 
Mount. 

D202T • DeLuxe 20m 2-El. T 
match. $34.95. 2 — 12' Booms, 
1" Alum. Tubing; 2 — 12' Cen- 
ter Elements, 1" Alum. Tubing; 
4 — 12' End Inserts, Vs" Alum. 
Tubing; 1— T Match (8'), 
Polystyrene Tubing; 1 — Beam 
Crosspiece. 1" Alum. Tubing; 
1 — Beam Mount. 
S203N • Std. 20m 3-EI. (No 
T), $34.95. 1 — 12' Boom. 1" 
Alum. Tubing; 3 — 12' Center 
Elements, 1" Alum. Tubing; 6 

— 12' End Inserts, W Alum. 
Tubing; 1 — Beam Mount. 
S203T • Std. 20m 3-EI. T 
match. $37.95. 1 — 12' Boom, 
1" Alum. Tubing; 3 — 12' Cen- 
ter Elements. 1" Alum. Tubing; 
6 — 12' End Inserts, Va" Alum. 
Tubing; 1— T Match (8'), 
Polystyrene Tubing; 1 — Beam 
Mount. 

D203N • DeLuxe 20m 3-EI. 
(No T;, $45.95. 2 — 12' Booms, 
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on 10 meters: UCP, RBA, LXZ, KZW, RES, OHB, ZPI, 
QLB, TTS, and YMV. WNICRO is a new ham in Quincy. 
KLC is on 2, 6, and 10 meters. New Novices: CAF, CAS, 
CDR, CNW, CPQ, CPW, CQB, CQC, CQE, CQL, and 
CSP. Tech. Class: WQH and YRI. Otlier new hams: BTX, 
AAV, and CPP. B,IW has General Class license and added 
2E26 to the rig. MKW reports a Cape Cod 10-meter Net 
on 28.9 Mc. with VTX, FQK, YXJ, YQT, UMC, DVS, 
BLM, ONK, ZHC, and BMW on 160 meters. BPA, ex- 
3FAU and 8ZNQ, now is in Acton and will be on with a 
Viking Ranger. The Braintree Radio Club held a meeting 
and a discussion on a 2-meter net. Radio Amateur Open 
House held a meeting at the Cambridge YMCA with a 
talk by CTW. ZVI is the rail of the Pequossette ARS in 
Watertown. ALP has his Viking II kit going and is on 10 
meters. WPVV is all-mobile operation and is on MARS and 
other nets. VTT has a new NC-12.5. MKW reijorts the fol- 
lowing on during the storms on the 2-meter Net: MFI, 
BCN, ARC, CFQ, MKW, MBQ, PMC, BLM, JNI, DJK, 
WMN, MNF, OMQ, LYV, WHC, TQS, BFI, AOQ, UUM 
GRC, OH, LNR, TYZ, WNs ZSJ, ADQ, and AQN. YPT 
has new 10-meter ground plane. VTZ has co-ax for 10 
meters on the roof. BLM has a Viking Ranger. BBM is on 
144 and 2,30 Mc. JNI has mobile Elmac. BGW is on RTTY 
most of the time, and worked DL4RO on 20 meters. RCJ is 
on 2, 6, and 10 meters and his wife, ZEN, also is on. OSS 
is on 20, 40, and 80 meters. The License Plate Committee 
of the South Shore Club is going into action. TVF is in 
Germany with the Army. AKN's son, VP7NV, is on 20 
meters. New officers of the Waltham ARA, MHL, are 
NXY, pres. ; QMN, vice-pres. ; 2BVU, secy.-treas. New 
officers of the Wellesley ARS are FFO, pres.; HRY, vice- 
pres.; OQP, treas. ; WGM, secy. SS gave a talk on "Proper 
Procedure within the Operations of an Emergency Net" 
at the last meeting. The Maiden ARA held an auction with 
HKG as auctioneer. Sorry to report the death of QPR, 
trustee of BWU. The T-9 Radio Club held a meeting at 
WNK's. AZU has an antenna farm location. ZPE is teaching 
his XYL the code. CNT has TBS-.50r) and HQ-129X. CDO 
is awaiting a Ranger transmitter. BND has an Elmac rig. 
PJ, Everett EC, reports that TNI was on during the storm 
using gas power with walkie-talkies and mobiles BHD, 
YID, HXY, KNA, SXH, RLE, and VXE. T.JW, Falmouth 
EC, reports that during Hurricane Hazel the net was on 
with QLT, LYV, DVS, UXG, and T.JW, with WNM, the 
club station, as NCS. BB is getting ready for the 160- 
meter DX tests. BPW is working on Yagi beam and is on 
2 meters. The Falmouth Amateur Radio Club has a training 
program going on at the Recreation Bldg., Wed. at 8 p.m. 
New members are CCR, AIV, UXH, CMT, and DJK. 
The Winthrop drill had BDU,CMW, DJ.OIR, MQB, BOX, 
BB, and XYLs on the air. VIS is busy on the crystal units 
for their TR4s. BOX is running a code cla.ss. PYK and 
YZP are on 10 meters. Traffic: (Oct.) WIUKO 53.5, EPK 
144, EMG 67, AVY 56, UE 42, IBE 32, QLT 32, VTT 25. 
NUP 10, TY 9, WU 9, WPW 6, BY 4, UTH 3, AHP 2. 
DWO 2, LLY 2. (Sept.) WINUP 38, UE .34, IBE 32, BGW 
13, ZDQ 4, AHP 2, EMG 2. (Aug.-Sept.) WIMKW 26. 

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS — SCM, Roger E. 
Corey, WIJYH — RM: BVR. WMN meets at 7 p.m. EST 
Mon. through Fri. on 3560 kc. New officers of the Hampden 
County Radio Assn., Inc., are KUE, pres.; HRV, vice- 
pres.; VNE, treas.; and UKR, clerk. RAD, AAY, MVF, 
and PGQ were elected directors. Proud new owners of 
Viking Rangers in the Springfield Area are TTL, OBQ, and 
MNG. JRA will maintain Official Bulletin schedules on 
3555 and 3830 kc. daily. For times drop a card to JRA at 
Amherst College or to the SCM. EFQ has a new tower with 
a 10/20-meter rotary ready for the DX Contest. UVI con- 
ducts a code class twice weekly at his home in WestfieLl. 
Any prospective hams who are interested may contact him. 
The October CD Party produced a record turnout in 
Western Massachusetts with ABD, YXV, WCG, TVZ, 
WDW, SRM, ZIO, HRC, JYH, WEF, VE2AKJ/W1, 
CJK, RRX, KFV, WCC, YCG, and AMI taking part. 
WDK is operator at MARS station KIWAV and has a new 
Elmac AF-67 at his home station. BVR spoke at the New 
England Division Convention held at Manchester, N. H. 
This is my last column as SCM. Your new SCM is Art 
Zavarella, MNG, 1702 Main St., Agawam, Mass. I woul i 
like to thank those who contributed to this column during 
the last two years and especially BVD, BVR, COI, TVJ, and 
TAY, who reported every month without fail. My special 
thanks also to the many throughout the section who gave 
so much of their time to support ARRL activities in the 
public interest and in every phase of the hobby. I know 
you all join me in promising Art the same cooperation that 
I have had and in wishing him the best of success. Traffic: 
K2CBD/1 445, WIUKR 372, WCG 84, HRV 79, BVR 66, 
WCC 34, MNG 28, UVI 25, TAY 19, WDK 14, RRX 12, 
WDW 11, JYH 9, ABD 7, YXV 5, OBQ 1, TVJ 1. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE — SCM, Harold J. Preble, WIHS 
— SEC: BXU. RM: CRW. Asst. RM: TBS. PAM: AXL. 
At the request of the new SCM, HS, GMH is writing this 
month's report as HS has just been elected and has not had 
time to get started. All the best to you, Hal. WUU is NCS 
for the TCPN on Saturday nights. He has the rig formerly 
owned by GMH with 813s in the final. The Concord Brass 
(Continued on page 92) 



90 



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Pounders' held an enjoyable Halloween Party at the Kettle 
and Crane House in Boscawen, N. H. PTB received honor- 
able mention in the local paper for keeping the c.d. person- 
nel well informed of the progress of Hurricane Edna. YVK 
has a new 32V-3. TRM is having fun on 40-meter 'phone. 
WUG has an Elmac A67 and says it is FB. UNV gets to use 
the Marine station, K4MC, to QSO back home. We welcome 
BVD to New Hampshire from Pennsylvania. Glad to see 
PFU has recovered enough from his fractured hip to discard 
his crutches. 9BQC wants schedules with New Hampshire 
stations to complete WAS during the Christmas holiday. 
Write to him at 2811 Custer Ave., Rockford, 111., if vou can 
help him out. Traffic: (Oct.) WIWUU 54, GMH ,50, COC 
.36, QGU 26, FZ 7. (Sept.) WIQGU 22. 

RHODE ISLAND — SCM, Walter B. Hanson, jr., 
WIKKR — SEC: MIJ. RM: BTV. RIN meets Mon. 
through Fri. at 7 P.M. EST on 3.540 kc. Meet tlie gang 
Sundays at 11 a.m. on 1890 kc. Tliis 160-meter net is grow- 
ing fast and is the best we've had yet. JFF, YAO, and 
WNIAYZ did a great job providing comiuunications for 
the sport car time races at Newport. AYZ's new Gonset 
at the finish complemented JFF's home-built at the start. 
In an attempt to learn just how the various towns on 
Aquidneck Island could perform together when we have our 
next hurricane, BBN Portsmouth, ULS Tiverton, and JFF 
Newport acted as control centers on a combined 2-meter 
10-meter fixed/mobile test. 4TSD/1, 4CVO/1, ZUX, and 
ZUL were the mobile end of the team. All the control 
centers were operated on emergency power. TRX, ZJQ, 
YAO, YAP, and MMX monitored the test. The NAARO's 
bean supper and auction on Nov. 4th was attended by about 
125 Rhode Island hams. A very welcome letter was received 
from ZXA which will be turned over to KKR for next 
month's report. JBB, with the writing of this report, 
completes his tour of SCM duty and wishes KKR a pros- 
perous two years. Please help KKR as much as you have 
JBB. Traffic: (Oct.) W4CVO/1 33, WIFDS 8, YAO 8. 
(Sept.) WIVXC 127, ULS 115, YAO 66. 

VERMONT — SCM, Robert L. Scott, W1RNA~SEC: 
SIO. PAM: RPR. RM: OAK. Vermont nets: VTPN 3860 
kc, 0930, Sun. only; VTN, 3520 kc, 1900, Mon. through 
Fri.; GMN, 3860 kc, 12001300, Mon. through Fri.; Vt. 
C.D. 3993 and 3501.5 kc, alternate Sun., 1000. Several 
XYLs of the Burlington boys are active on Novice fre- 
quencies. Is that why we seldom hear the boys from that 
area on 75 meters? The news comments around the State 
seemed to have faded out before reaching tliis QTH, so — 
Traffic: WIOAK 126, AVP 85, RNA 69, IT 24, VZE 14, 
TXY 6, UGW 1. 

NORTHWESTERN DIVISION 

ALASKA — SCM, Dave A. Fulton, KL7AGU — AOW, 
formerly of Anchorage, now is looking for KL7 QSOs from 
home with the call W4BFO. ABT expects to depart for 
W7-Land early in '55. AWB still is looking for a DXCC 
prior to his departure sometime in '55. Many KL7s in the 
Anchorage Area expect to go s.s.b. on all bands in the near 
future. BEW has worked eight maritime mobiles on 15 
meters; she also has 29 states confirmed for her WAS and 
sure is working hard to get the balance. CP has tied a 
Viking Ranger to his squashed rhombic and it sounds 
mighty fine. The Anchorage Amateur Radio Club held an 
election and the lineup for '55 is as follows: AOT, pres. ; 
ATL, vice-pres.; BHE, secy.; BDU, treas.; PIV, act. mgr. 
The long-awaited c.d. radio gear has arrived and is in the 
process of being placed now and should be in operation 
before too many more months. Traffic: KL7AWB 18. 

IDAHO — SCM, Alan K. Ross, W7IWU — Twin Falls: 
NH is busy with PAN trying to find some volunteers with 
high power for NCS. Kellogg: RQG is the new Emergency 
Coordinator for Shoshone County. Gifford: VWS is apply- 
ing for ORS appointment. Lewiston: ONP has liis mobile 
installed in the new Oldsmobile. OOV has recovered after 
spending four days in the hospital. WN7VI0 is looking for 
some new crystals since he took the Conditional Class exam 
in October. From hamming radio to Hammond organ is 
OOW's range. The Lewiston and Boise gang helped the 
police on Halloween. Boise had a 2-nieter link to 10-meter 
mobile stations. Caldwell: EYR now has a Viking II and is 
putting up a 20-meter beam. Preston: RKI is active as Offi- 
cial Observer. Boise: GVN is back with us now after 6}^ 
years in Africa. Two meters is active again with a station 
at the KBOI-TV site, up 7000 feet. Traffic: (Oct.) W7NH 
113, RQG 66, RSP 34. (Sept.) W7VWS 6. 

MONTANA — SCM, Leslie E. Crouter, W7CT — The 
Great Falls Radio Club is starting a training program in 
theory and code. WIF and RIL are on 420 Mc RRI is on 
mobile. QPK returned to school in California. UWN is 
on s.s.b. RIL moved across town. JRG rebuilt the s.s.b. 
exciter and 813 Hnear final. SFK is building a ham shack. 
SFK and TGF are NCS for the North Montana 160-meter 
'phone net operating on 1995 kc. at 1900 MST. Laurel 
reports the Simulated Emergency Test was witnessed by 
the local Red Cross and newspaper representatives. TTC 
and RDM built new VFOs. SMY and UXA are rebuilding 
transmitters. LER, JFR, CJN, LNS, LNU, OIO, and CDW, 
all Butte mobile stations, operated a mobile relay chain 
{Continued on page 94) 



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between Butte and Helena during the Simulated Emer- 
genry Test. FUB checks in regularly on Montana and South 
1 i:ik(ita c.w. nets. NZJ cliecks into the North Montana and 
^^iiiitli Dakota 160-meter 'phone nets every day. CT sends 
AHRL Official Bulletins Mon. through Fri. on .3520 kc. at 
1830 MST. Recent endorsements or appointments: RSJ, 
FUB, and DSS as EC; NSJ, PCZ, and TDW as OPS; 
SFKasOO. Traffic: W7CT 56, CJN 32, LBK 28, FUB 14, 
SMY 7, TTC 5, NZJ 3, QGJ 2, RDM 2, IRN 1. 

OREGON — SCM, John M. Carroll, W7BUS — OJA 
now believes that roller skates and radio do not mix and has 
a broken leg to prove it. SBT uses a bicycle mobile. ISP is 
new Medford Area EC. lEY is visiting clubs on the Coast 
speaking on MARS. HUI is out of the hospital and back on 
the air. J HA has retired from the Navy and plans to spend 
the rest of his life hamming. WAT is new Asst. ESC and 
is ORS and OPS for Oregon. QFY and the OARA planning 
coiiiiiiittee are working on the convention to be held in 
Pdrtland May 7 and 8, 1955. KTL finally got a one-eyed 
monster. HDN and NSD are the same fellow. The Teen- 
agers Net in Oswego is going along fine. UAB has WAS. 
RVN is teaching code classes for the OARS. TNF is a CAP 
comimmications officer. NWE finally is planning on s.s.b. 
SV and family have moved to Salem. AZP and KR have 
been liuuting elk. TVW was reelected president of the Pen- 
dleton Radio Club. FFD has turned brick-layer and is 
building a fireplace. VCH has a new jr. operator. The 
Cascade Net on 29.2 Mc. had 425 check-ins, with PRU as 
liigli cheek-in station for the montli. The Oregon State Net 
had 24 sessions with a total attendance of 203. Tlie whole 
net is out for AREC with a c.w. net for AREC stations. 
Traffic: (Oct.) W7APF 553, WAT 93, ESJ 74, AJN .52, 
LZG 51, QEI 50, TBT 49, THX 42, PRA 41, WLL 13, 
HDN 11. (Sept.) W7HDN 19, KTL 6. 

WASHINGTON — SCM, Victor S. Gish, W7FIX — 
The Richland Amateur Radio Club, Inc., meets the 2nd or 
3rd Mon. at the QTH of OHS at 8 p.m. Officers are NLI, 
pres. ; RMQ, vice-pres. ; KHZ, secy.; RJO, treas. The 
Tacoma Amateur Radio Society meets the 1st and 3rd Fri. 
at South Park Comnnmity Center at 8 p.m. Officers are 
SOI, pres.; ETK, vice-pres.; GVV, secy. The Radio Club 
of Tacoma, Inc., meets the 2nd and 4th Wed. at the Red 
Cross Bldg., 7th & Broadway, at 8 p.m. Officers are AZI, 
pres.; RXS, vice-pres.; OVW, secy.; QPM, treas. Tacoma 's 
RACES plan has been approved by FCDA and now is in 
the hands of FCC. EVW and OS attended the Puget 
Sound RTTY meeting at the QTH of KV. Bremerton Club 
members attended a Tacoma Club meeting at which there 
was a discussion of call letter license i^lates. UYK is mobile 
with the Babcock transmitter he won. MFG had to unwind 
his antenna after a recent windstorm. JHX is on 441.36 Mc. 
video; also the Puget Sound 2-meter Net, 145.8 Mc, at 
8 P..M. Mon. UQY submitted an FB 40-meter 00 report. 
6REF/7 now is at Redmond. Welcome back to the section, 
Betty! FRU, BA, and PGY made BPL again. PGY is dis- 
playing his BPL medallion. BA made BPL in the first half 
of October and took off for another vacation in KH6-Land. 
LFA is back Stateside after duty in the Far East. EHH lost 
ten days on the air because of a broken ankle as the result 
of a hunting accident. FWD sends code practice Mon. 
through Fri. 1800 PST, 3695 kc, followed by Official 
Bulletins transmitted at 1845 PST. AIB spent the last half 
of October vacationing in the Southland. ZU skeds jr. 
operator (PRZ) on 14 Mc each Sun. at 2CXM. TGO 
reports school is cutting into his hamming. AMC is setting 
up a ham demonstration at the state capitol to help get 
plates. KT talked to si.x state senators and rei)resentatives 
re license plates. AHQ is building a new 'phone-cw. rig. 
AVM is QRL work. SFN is hunting TV Indians. PHO has 
94 countries and is liandling Far East traffic. ULK's family 
is 100 per cent ham. ETO is hunting deer. ETK is running 
1-kw. s.s.s.b. — about 500 watts a.m. OCA reports Army 
Radio was assigned 3612 kc. by mistake. Happy New Year 
to all! Traffic: (Oct.) W7FRU 888, BA 825, PGY 740, 
FIX 69, OEB 64, VAZ 40, USO 34, AMC 23, APS 18, EHH 
18, TGO 18, BG 16, AIB 14, WND 14, ZU 13, FWD 12, 
ETO 11, KT 10, PQT 10, JEY 9, EVW 5, ULK 5, AHQ 4, 
AVM 4. (Sept.) W7KZ 101, SOI 66, EHH 21, VRL 17. 

PACIFIC DIVISION 

NEVADA — SCM, Ray T. Warner, W7JU — KOA, of 
Elko, received very favorable newspaper publicity when he 
talked down a disabled Douglas Skyraider to safety from 
tlie I'jlko CAA tower. UPS has erected a new 20-meter three- 
element beam. VIU received his "Worked 25 Nevada" 
certiftcate. Virginia, SNP, keeps busy on 75 and 40 meters, 
'phone and c.w., since receiving her new ticket. Al, of 
K7FDB, reports activity in a 2-meter net picking up and 
increased mobile activity on 7268 kc. K7FDB, who makes 
BPL every month, handled 1048 during October. VZS, of 
Las Vegas, is heard on 10 meters when the band is open. 
VIU, UPS, K0.\, and QYL were active during the recent 
S.E.T. SEC, PAM, and OO appointments are available to 
(lualified members. Traffic: VV7JU 8, VIU 8, UPS 2. 

SANTA CLARA VALLEY — SCM, R. Paul Tibbs, 

WdWGO — K6BAM is holding daily sked with KL7BEX. 

K6KFR is active on 40 meters. EEX is spending time on 

v.h.f. UTV is very QRL with color TV. YHS is finishing 

{Continued on page 96) 



94 



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Write, Wire or Call 




s.s.b. exciter using surplus crystals. It can be heard bcint; 
used by TTB. BM has a new QTH in San Jose. Pappy puts 
in time off the air working at the plant of EI. NX reports 
workinK ZLs on 20-ineter s.s.b. as early as six in the evening. 
\NHB is using grounded-grid amplifier one 837 driving two 
in parallel driving uj) to about oOJ watts input in s.s.b. 
This amplifier is the answer to you boys looking for medium 
power at little expense. C.w. operators are needed in the 
section to work on RN6, PAN, and TCC appointments. All 
those who can give one niglit a week to this work will find 
mucli pleasure helping with an important job. More infor- 
mation can be obtained by contacting HC in San Jose. 
Well, gang, this is my first report as your SCM. With your 
help tiie section can be one of the most active in the ARRL 
field organization. You can help by sending reports of your 
activities as well as those of your friends. Keep others 
posted on activity in your club through this section in QST. 
Many of your club members keep in touch with home by 
reading this each month. Have your reports in the mail 
by the first of each month. Traffic: W6HC 145. UTV 50, 
K6BAM 16, EER6. 

EAST BAY — SCM, Guy Black, W6RLB — Asst. 
SCMs: Oliver Nelson, 6MXQ (v.h.f.); Harry Cameron, 
6RVC (TVI). SEC: WGM. RMs: IPW, JOH. PAM: LL. 
ECs: CAN. CX, FLT, QDE, TCU, ZZF, K6ERR. A re- 
minder to all ARRL appointees — it's time for most of you 
to have your appointments renewed. Those who have not 
made any kind of report for the last year are especially 
urged to drop me a note. If I do not hear from them it will 
be assumed that they no longer are interested in their at> 
pointments. Tlie Skyriders Radio Club has new officers: 
NCL,j)res.; BSE, vice-pres.; Dot Crill (ZOZ's XYL), secy.; 
MMK, treas. and net control. The East Bay teen-agers 
have KN6HE,J, pres.; KN6GBZ, vi?e-pies.; K6EHW, secy.; 
and KNfiHRE, program chairman. IIRE also is presiJent 
of the El Cerrito High S;'hool Radio Club. EHW says her 
(^Tll seems to be lieadquarters for the Magoons and the 
KtiNCG gang. Second-liand reports have come this way 
to the effect that the Richmond gang feels that there is 
not enough news about tliem in the column. Shu"ks, gang, 
don't be so bashful. Let me know what's cooking and you'll 
see it in print. EJA is reported to be enjoying a receiver, 
and QDE is re|)orted to be rebuilding. The Ri-limond Club 
now has a Viking for a club rig. The Havvvard Radio Club's 
TVI committee includes PUH, LGE", SIF, and AXW. 
0HTG is the East Bay Radio Club's TVI chairman. FDJ is 
heading the Oakland TVI Committee. All of these groups 
reijort a ^•ery satisfactory TVI situation this last year with 
relatively few comi)laints. BXE has built a new speech 
limiter. FDG is working s.s.b. skeds with Japan. ITH re- 
ports work on 1.5- and 40-meter 'phone., YDI liad a spell in 
the hospital. ACN had an operation which it is hoped will 
get him back in tip-top shape. WZR lias a new job. GOP 
recalls the good old days on 160 meters with flea power. 
NDR has a new beam due from his XYL. LL reijorts traffic 
despite his busy duty as MTN traffic manager. Region 3 
civil defense has started a series of drills on 6 meters, 47 
Mc, 1761-kc. DCS band. K6ERR will get two different 
AREC nets going in the Berkeley-Albany-El Cerrito Area. 
Fifty-eight persons attended the East Bay Radio Club's 
dinner. The Mt. Diablo Radio Club meets the 3rd Fri. at 
8 P.M. in the Coast Counties Gas. Co. Bldg., Walnut Creek. 
The teletype gang has set up a Sunday brex srdiedule 
8 A.M. on the last Sun. of the month, percolator, Oakland. 
See FDJ for more details. Traffic: (Oct.) K6FDG 1281, 
WfiQPY 243, K6GK 1.56, WAY 108, W6LL 80, JOH 77, 
EFD 63, ASJ .35, ITH 34, YDI 9, EJA 8, CIB 6, K6EDN 4, 
W60UU 1. (Sept.) W6LL 90. 

SAN FRANCISCO — SCM, Walter Buckley, WT)GGC 
— SEC: NL. Congratulations to the new officers of the San 
Francis -o Radio Club: AHH, pres.; PHS, vice-pres.; QMO, 
secy.; and Harry Witzke, treas. Harry always keeps the 
books in the black instead of red. Altliough it was thought 
best for the club to change officers every two terms we 
couldn't spare Harry. The HAMS have decided to go on 
6 meters. Tliose interested and new members are expected 
to join the group. The San Francisco Naval Shipyard Club 
is busily making plans for the Christmas Dinner to be held 
at the Naval Shipyard. AJF, of Sonoma, is busy rebuilding 
tlic rig, is doing additional work on tlie 2-meter beam design, 
and lias completed a new v.h.f. receiver. The 29ers lost FVK 
to I'ncle Sam. Gordon was a very faitliful net control on 
10-uieter transmitter hunts and always Johnnj'-on-the-spot 
for c.d. drills. SLX was stationed at Treasure Island during 
( )it()ber. Friends saw him at the San Jose Hamboree but 
lie nnist have had very little free time as he never showed 
up at any of the local amateur club meetings. Ed said he was 
taking notes from the Bay Area back to Eureka with him. 
The 14 Mobileers and their families took a trip uij to Carson 
City, Nev., to handle communications for the Admission 
Day Parade. EJY acted as net control in his new Oldsmo- 
bile. CTH sat at the judges' stand, acted as relay station, 
and watched all the Vjeautiful girls as they marched by. 
GGC had the portable Elmac rig set up. ISO helped set up 
tlie antenna and the XYLs made corrections, omissions, and 
additicms on the parade sheets for the announcer. Oh, yes, 
tlicy also called tlie two amateurs to attention when the 
boys were too busy to hear net control contact them. They 
{Continued on page 98) 



Technical Bulletin 



for Amateurs and Experimenters 



A Note About Crystal Tolerance: 

In the manufacture of cryitals, certain limits must be adhered to when finishing the unit. Such 
limits are often held to better than .001% for commercial applications. Tolerances of this 
magnitude mean nothing unless the oscillator in which the crystal is to operate is on exact 
reproduction of the oscillator in which the crystal was calibrated. This same thing applies to 
wider tolerances. Persons doing work where close tolerances ore required, (Broadcast, Com- 
mercial Two-Way, Civil Defense, CAP, etc.) should keep this in mind. The FA-5 ond FA-9 
Crystals ore guaranteed to be calibroted to better than .01% of the specified frequency. The 
average FA-5 or FA-9 Crystal is held to better than .005%. This tolerance applies only when 
the crystal is operated into 32 mmf, for fundamental crystals and anti-resonant operation for 
overtone crystals. The information shown in Table I is of value in setting the crystal to 
frequency. (Crystals of closer tolerance, and for special circuits, ore available from our com- 
mercial line.) 



TABLE I 



OSCILLATOR LOAD CAPACITANCE 





32 mmf 


50 mmf 


20 mmf 


10 mmf 


MEASURED 


2000 


1999.950 


2000.060 


2000.200 


CRYSTAL 


3000 


2999.800 


3000.200 


3000.600 


FREQUENCY 


4000 


3999.700 


4000.400 


4001.000 


IN 


7000 


6999.200 


7001.200 


7003.300 


KC 


14000 


13998.0 


14003.1 


14008.1 



r^ 



!^^i 



,^^"- 



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ONE-DAY Processing 



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M-9 



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PRICES 



FA-9* (Pin Diameter .093)* 
FA-5 (Pin Diameter .050) 



Pin Spacing .486 (*FA-9 fits same socket as 
n-743) 

RANGE TOLERANCE PRICE 

Fundamental Crystals FA-9 FA-5 

2000-9999 KC .01% $2.80 $2.70 

10000-15000 KC .01% $3.90 $3.80 

Overtone Crystals 

(for 3rd overtone operation) 

15 MC — 29.99 MC .01% $2.80 $2.70 

30 MC — 54 MC .01 % $3.90 $3.80 



.01% TOLERANCE-Crystals are all 
of the plated, hermetically sealed 
type and calibrated to .01 % or bet- 
ter of the specified frequency when 
operated into a 32 mmf load capac- 
itance. 



Orders for less than five crystals will 
be processed and shipped in one day. 
Orders received on Monday thru 
Thursday will be shipped the day fol- 
lowing receipt of the order. Orders 
received on Friday will be shipped the 
following Monday. 



HOW TO ORDER 



In order to give the fastest possible serv- 
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handled by any jobber. Where cash oc- 
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prepay the Airmail postage; otherwise, 
shipment will be made C.O.D. Specify 
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frequency with the unit operating into a 
32 mmf load capacitance. i 



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coils for 80M operation 
/ 40DB or more SB suppression 
^ New Carrier Level Control - in- 
serts carrier for AM operation - 
zero beating VFO-or tuning, 
without disturbing carrier sup- 
pression 

Superb Anti-Trip Voice Control 
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were very busy watching the beautiful girls, also. The 
boys have taken over the 49ers Motel at Carson City each 
year and latest reports have it that the owners of said 
motel intend to spend the winter studying the code and 
hope to have W7 calls next year. 7ZT held his usual party 
for the gang the evening of the parade. Carson City cer- 
tainly gives the amateurs a roval welcome each year. W6 
calls heard in \V7-Land were CTH, EJY, GCG, ISO, 
PAZ, U.I, UUQ, BMY, YPM, FNC, LFZ, GPU, and GGC. 
Svmday morning the boys had their usual cIuId breakfast 
before setting off for home — all with a little lighter pocket- 
book. The 2-meter boys on c.d. have been invited to join 
the East Bay C.D. Net, 2 meters. ACN recently underwent 
an operation. Archie worked hard to get the license plates 
for the \V6 boys. Calls were heard on ]\ITN for blood dona- 
tions and many responded. Congratulations to PHT on 
the BPL total. SWP didn't get liis usual high score in as his 
wife was in the hospital. Reports are that she is well on the 
road to recovery now. Traffic: W6PHT 831, SWP 452, 
QMO .357 GGC 34, MWF 12. 

SACRAMENTO VALLEY — SCM, Harold L. Lucero, 
Wd.IDN — Asst. SCMs: Ronald G. Martin, W6ZF; 
Edward V. Fuller, K6BMU; Gerald R. Hobbs, W6TMP. 
SEC: ,JEQ. Asst. SEC: EKP. OBSs: FNS, MWR, ILZ, 
SBN, AKF. OPSs: FNS, MWR. LJ. ORSs: ASX, SYY, 
FYK, L.J, OMR. ECs: ULC, AYU, EXP, JKA, NCV, SIY, 
SLV, CFZ, JDN. PAM: TYC. OESs: LSB, QAC. RM: 
OPY. OOs: BIL, FYK, FNS. These calls are for your future 
field and other ARRL contests. From now on the winter will 
bring us added contests as to our ability to cope with any 
emergency so, fellows, let's really be on the ball. We have 
lost one of our main traffic stations, REF. Betty has moved 
to Wasliington State. Luck to you at your new location, 
Betty. TYC reports that he is getting along very well with 
the PAM appointment. OPY is the man to get the c.w. nets 
on their way and I believe Harvej' is doing everything 
possible. Keep up the good work, Harvey. SUP, K6GKR, 
and KN6HLO are father, mother, and son. SBH is more 
than filling his schedule as OBS. New officers of the Tehama 
County Amateur Radio Club are OEY, pres. ; SBH, ^^ce- 
pres. ; TMP, secy.-treas. This is a very fine choice and the 
Club sliould go far. Tlie new SJVN is now going and has 
several members in this section. I hear that this net is to 
change its name to the Central Valley Net. We are sorry 
to report that BHV had an auto accident and broke his 
back. 6ANR has moved to Nevada and now has the call 
7ANR. Well, fellows, the appointments are coming along 
fine. Let's have more. Traffic: W6MWR 20, K6CFZ 15, 
W6JDN 10. 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY — SCM, Edward L. Bewley, 
W6GIW — SEC: EBL. RM: K6BGM. PAMs: ZRJ, WJF. 
The SJVN is active again on 3635 kc. After getting poor 
results on CCN, our RM decided to try to get the old SJVN 
gang active again, and so far it looks hopeful. Any of you 
who are interested in handling some traffic, check in on 
3635 kc. at 1900. A net has been started on 3900 kc. at 1100 
Sun. by EBL in an attempt to bolster AREC actjvity and 
to help formulate ideas for the good of the section. It is 
hoped that all ECs and i epresentatives from all the clubs 
in the section will check in regularly, and inform the rest of 
the section of the loc„l acti\aties. This also should help to 
coordinate activity between the various clubs. TXM is the 
new Kern County EC. FKY is in Detroit for a \Tsit. A club 
is beginning to take shape in the Sonora Area. This will 
take in a large mountainous area, with hams widely scat^ 
tered. These are adverse conditions for a club, but the gang 
is determined and we are sure it wUl be a success. A 2-meter 
transmitter hunt held by the Tu'-lock Club was won 
by SQR, who was accompanied by GYN. The Stockton 
Club visited a TV station, watched a studio program, and 
then took a tour of the entire station. K6DUU and W6ZRJ 
presented very interesting and informative talks to the Tur- 
lock Club on incorporation and c.d. K6BGM is NCS on 
PAN Sat. nights. OHB is hunting in Wyoming. DVI &t- 
tained an excellent rating in the last Frequency Measuring 
Test. Traffic: K6FAE 898, W6ZRJ 290, TTX 133, EBL 
43, FEA 21, WJF 18, SJJ 15, ADB 10, K6BMM 3. 

ROANOKE DIVISION 

NORTH CAROLINA — SCM, C. H. Brydges, W4WXZ 
— SEC: ZG. RM: VHH. PAM: ONM. 00: SOD. NCN is 
trying to get a new start on 3605 kc. There might be a few 
hams who remember the c.w. alphabet. YPZ has a new 
Telrex 20-meter beam. The Gastonia C.D. Net meets at 
7 o'clock on 29,300 kc. A project by the members is to build 
portable transmitters and receivers with batteries for fixed 
or portable operation. The Cliarlotte C.D. Net meets on 
3825 kc. at 9 a.m. Sun. Plans are now being looked over 
for a state-wide emergency organization in case of another 
"Hazel." FUS is making a roster of stations and their 
hours of operation during the hurricane. If your station 
has not been reported, mail information to FUS, Maiden, 
N. C. The call letter license plate bill is one we all have to 
work on. It is not a one-man or a group job. I have lots of 
information from the Virginia group which pushed it through 
in that State, and we liave lots of work ahead of us. CZR 
is a new Official Bulletin Station. He transmits on 3860 kc. 
{Continued on page 100) 



98 



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CHICAGO STANDARD 

"POLY-PEDANCE" 
MODULATION 

TRANSFORMERS 



These multi-tapped Stancor 
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load impedances of 2,000 to 
20,000 ohms. With these 
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you can change transmitting 
tubes or operating charac- 
teristics without having to 
invest in a new modulation 
transformer. 



PART 
NO. 


MAX. 
WATTS 


MAX. D.C. 


MTG. 
TYPE 


LIST 
PRICE 


A-3891 


15 


Pri— 100 ma 
Sec— 100 ma 


D 


$13.60 


A-3892 


30 


Prl-150 ma 
Sec "150 ma 


D 


17.20 


A-3893 


60 


Pri— 180 ma 
Sec 180 ma 


D 


18.60 


A-3894 


125 


Pri 225 ma 
Sec— 225 ma 


D 


22.50 


A-3898 


300 


Pri— 260 ma 
Sec— 260 ma 


FS 


70.65 


A-3899 


600 


Pri— 500 ma 
Sec— 500 ma 


FS 


140.70 




There are many other Chicago - Stancor 
modulation transformers, for every class of 
operation, from this 



5 watt, 1 pound, Stancor unit. 
Part No. A-3812 





to this 5KW, 1 100 pound 
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Steel" modulation trans- 
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for 891-R tubes 



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99 



Plan Now 
for the 




inTodio-electronics! 



IRE 



National Convention and 

RADIO 
ENGINEERING SHOW 



March 21-24«New York City 



Once again, youMI soon have the 
opportunity of appraising all of 
the important new developments 
of the past year in radio and elec- 
tronics. In 4 days, from March 21 
through 24, the IRE National 
Convention and Radio Engineer- 
ing Shov/ v/ill give you the com- 
plete picture of significant 
developments in the industry 
achieved during the past year. 

You^ll hear the presentation of 
scientific and engineering papers 
of vital interest to you, carefully 
arranged into related groups of 
technical sessions. 

You'll see more than 700 exhibits 
in a 4-acre panorama of all that's 
new in the radio and electronics 
field, at Kingsbridge Armory and 
at Kingsbridge Palace. 

The Institute 
of Radio Engineers 

1 East 79th Street, New York City 




at 2015 Mon. through Thurs. YPY has p.p. 813s and will 
be on with a "killer-watt" in tlie near future. A wide-spaced 
beam is used on 20 meters. I would like to take tliis oppor- 
tunity to congratulate everyone who helped during Hurri- 
cane Hazel. All did a noteworthy job, especially the Wil- 
mington boys, who were red hot. MVP and TLA are new 
ECs and VHH is the new RM. Happy New Year to all. 
Traffic: W4WXZ 20. 

SOUTH CAROLINA — SCM, T. Hunter Wood, 
W4ANK — South Carolina amateurs did an outstanding 
job in providing emergency communications during Hur- 
ricane Hazel. Reports from ECs in Georgetown and Flor- 
ence, W4FFH in Charleston, our PAM, and W9MQV/4, 
who operated from Myrtle Beach, have been consolidated 
in a report to the NEC. W9MQV/4 now is K4AQQ. ZIZ 
reports that his activity must be reduced be:'ause of the 
doctor's orders. LXX reports from Florence that FGX 
is working DX on 20-meter c.w., TSU has a new Harvey 
Wells transmitter, and LXX still is working toward WAS. 
ANK and TL in the last Frequency Measuring Test made 
average errors of 3.0 and 5.0 parts per miUion, respectively. 
WN4H0Z has worked 22 states with his 60 watts and re- 
ports that ERN, FM, HQC, and SBR have been a big help 
to him and he hopes to pass his General Class exam soon. 
WN4HGW has an HQ-129X and Heathkit transmitter. 
.\NK and 3H1I/4 attended the Roanoke Division Conven- 
tion and were the only South Carolina hams there. Traffic: 
W4ZIZ 88, FM 2. 

VIRGINIA — SCM, John Carl Morgan, W4KX — VN 
and VSN meet on 3680 kc. ; VFN on 3835 kc. ; VON on 1820 
kc, and ODN on 3845 kc. An outstanding job was done by 
the Virginia gang during Hurricane Hazel. The Blue Ridge 
ARC, Roanoke, keeps PCC fired up. The RARC is to be 
congratulated on its usual fine job of putting on a bang-up 
Division Convention. The Shenandoah Valley ARC's 
new club house now is under construction. New officers 
cf the PVARC are 3GRF, pres.; KXV, veep and act. mgr.; 
AMZ, secy. ; CC, treas. NRO, back at William and Mary, 
says the college club and PYN are back in business. Ex- 
PYNers 2KJE and 3UQU now are Mr. and Mrs. ZFV, back 
at V.P.I., reports a club is in formation there. The Uni- 
versity of Virginia club station, SKI, was quite active 
during the summer. 3QQE really is keeping the Quantico 
Marine Hobby Shop station, PFC, rolling as evidenced by 
traffic totals. 3WDP does likewise at K4MC but complains 
of lack of outlets for southbound traffic, which indicates 
the need for more Virginia participation in 4RN. CHK, 
now Gen. Class, is NCS of the Southeastern Novice Net 
(3735 kc, Mon., Wed., and Fri. at 1700 EST). YHD, now 
back at M.I.T. and IMX, says he worked 87 countries 
during the summer vacation from his home QTH in Loudoun 
County. LW is taking time out between issues of his FB 
Virginia Bulletin to build a new VFO and an all-band 
transmitter. JUJ has a new B. & W. 5100. CGE is trying 
new skywires to squeeze more out of 40 watts. JOS moved 
to North Carolina. KFC reports a mess of new plumbing 
atop a 50-foot pole. IF is complaining of skip snafuing VN. 
RJW says, "Back to the salt mines in mobile." YVG does 
music-making five nights, watch-repairing every night, yet 
keeps the rig mighty warm. Traffic: (Oct.) W4PFC 882, 
TFZ 138, K4MC 122, W4BLR 106, YKB 106, VYZ 72, 
YVG 70, KX 67, DWP 58, RJW 45, PCC 30, TYC 27, 
VZC 24, OLD 13, IF 9, LW 9, CKI 7, BYZ 5, BZE 4, 
ZYV 3, JUJ 2, ZFV 2, HJK 1, PYN 1. (Sept. corrected) 
W4PFC 740. 

WEST VIRGINIA — SCM, Albert H. Hix, W8PQQ — 
LTSO has a new 20-meter beam. IXG has mobile rig on 40 
meters. JUW is home from 5A3-Land and is at K4AF. HNC 
has a new rig with p.p. 810s at a kw. QHG has a new Ranger 
and is building new high-power final. KDQ has the new c.w. 
break-in system working well. GCZ got his 2nd-clags tele- 
plione commercial ticket and is active on both nets. VCT 
.sliduld be back from Texas before too long. The following 
attended the Roanoke Division Convention in Richmond: 
GBF, JWX, PZT, BOK, NYH, CLX, and PQQ. NLT 
had a ham get-together at his home recently. PQQ was in 
Texas for a month. BKI had DX as a guest recently. He is 
doing a lot of 2-meter work. .\TF, now in Weston, will 
be on soon with new all-band rig. YPR, the SEC, has the 
AREC plan for this State worked up and it is urged that 
clubs get a copy of same in order to make final criticism 
and comments before it is printed and distributed. If any 
groups have suggestions and ideas as to what can be done 
to further organize for emergency operations, please contact 
YPR by letter as soon as possible. Tests are being conducted 
on 160-meter 'phone to determine what its possibilities arc 
in being used for emergency communications. Traffic: 
W8AUJ 130, GEP 67, HZA 36, JWX 33, ETF 29, NYH 29, 
DEC 21, KDQ 8, HNC 7, IXG 5, PQQ 4. 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION 

COLORADO — SCM, Karl Brueggeman, W0CDX — 
SEC: MMT. RM: KQD. PAM: lUF. Congratulations to 
KQD on her appointment as RM and to lUF as new PAM. 
KQD also was elected to the Pacific Area Staff as member- 
at-large. The new officers of the Ski-Hi Radio Club are DRY, 
pres.; OHB, vice-pres.; OXS, treas.; W. H. Kadesch, secy. 
7QHF and family have moved to Alamosa from Phoenix, 
(Continued on page 102) 



100 




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Ariz. The Hi-Noon Net handled 231 messages in 18 sessions. 
WVZ is bucking the Rio Grande RR extra board and is home 
a lot working DX on 20-meter c.w. LZY will be keeping 
the same OBS schedules. They are Mon., Tue., and Wed. 
at 1200 noon on 7094 kc. Elmer is working nights and 
can't keep any net schedules. lA has a new Class B final 
that puts out about 100 watts. Gene reports that there 
still is no activity on the Colorado Army MARS. The 
Colorado Slow-Speed Net will be active this winter, meeting 
on Mon., Wed., and Fri. at 1715 hours on 3.570 kc. K0WBB 
and W0KQD will alternate as NCS. The Fort Collins group 
has applied for affiliation with the League. The Club's 
name is the Trout Route Mike and Key Club. Our Director, 
IC, has prepared all the necessary paper work for the intro- 
duction of the auto license bill to the State Legislature. It 
is now up to all of us to contact the officials of our districts 
and acquaint them with the bill before it is introduced. If 
we all do our part, fellows, we'll get this through; so don't 
shirk, just work. Traffic: W0KQD 473, CYT 49, AMR 39, 
lUF 36, HOP 13, lA 9. 

UTAH — SCM, Floyd L. Hinshaw, W7UTM — The 
UARC program for October embraced a discussion of s.s.b. 
which was very ably directed by JPN. OOK, of the Club's 
TVI Committee, gave details of its activities. The Club 
is conducting a drive for new members and expects a large 
increase because of the prizes being offered by NMK. 
SAZ is mobile with war surplus and junked car receivers. 
Bert uses modified vibrator pack for filament supply. His 
signals are very FB even if the gear is not "commercial." 
RQT is sporting a new all-band whip antenna. RPY and 
QDJ won the second transmitter hunt held by the Ogden 
Club. Six mobiles participated in the hunt. KUX has a 
new lOB exciter and is running about 500 watts on s.s.b. 
now. Erv also is active on 2 meters. VEX, VHV, WMM, 
and RVX recently received General Class licenses and are 
now heard almost daily on 75 meters. The Novice Net still 
meets at 2 p.m. every Sun. on 3735 kc. Traffic: (Oct.) 
W7PIM 141, UTM 10, QWH 2. (Sept.) W7QWH 5. 

SOUTHEASTERN DIVISION 

ALABAMA — SCM, Joe A. Shannon, W4MI — SEC: 
TKL. RM: KIX. PAM: RNX. New appointments: TKL 
as SEC; DZF, WOG, and WOH as ECs; WOG as OBS. 
Welcome to the following newcomers in the section: KN4s 
AIW, AIL, and AIP in Huntsville; AJG in Tuscaloosa; AJJ 
in Childersburg; and KN4FMI and W4BHF in Tuskegee. 
S.s.b. is hopping in Birmingham with EBD, KNW, RKS, 
and YEG each striving to get on first. DFE now has Old 
Timers Club certificate. WJX, ARR, and YY.J took in the 
YLRL picnic in Virginia and visited with KYI, SIB, CXI, 
and ZOI in Kannapolis, N. C. The Birmingham Club held 
a hot dog supper for members \\'ith about fifty turning out. 
The Montgomery Club is holding raffles of parts to raise 
money for a new club house. FMW does the honors as auc- 
tioneer. Transmitter hunts again are being held the 2nd 
Sun. of each month at 1400 on 3825 kc. HFK, in Northport, 
now has his General Class license and is making plans for a 
new rig to work 75 meters. OR reports that activity is 
increasing in Cullman and lists the following newcomers 
at St. Bernard CoUege: BFT, GUR, and WN4s FTO and 
HFZ. Welcome, fellows. TraflBc: (Oct.) K4FDY 730, 
W4KIX 140, WOG 96, TXO 39. YRO 29, TKL 26, DXB 
24. PWS 22, EJZ 17, OAO 14, OR 11, VIY 8. (Sept.) 
W4UHA 69, PWS 28, WHW 7. 

EASTERN FLORIDA — John W. HoUister, Jr., 
W4FWZ — Birthday greetings to the Flamingo Net. In 
the October S.E.T. held near Palatka five ECs and 19 sta- 
tions participated in a joint drill. The Miami S.E.T. 
brought out 45 stations. Thanks to ECs UHY, DVR, OBB. 
UHC. WEM, and lYT. A new net is the Transcontinental 
C.w. Net, on 3790 kc, starting at 4 a.m., mth BMY as 
NCS. Use it to QSP the left-overs or to originate ; it has very 
wide coverage. There will be plenty of net traffic for all 
at the State Fair at Tampa which starts Feb. 5th. The 
Novice Hurricane Net Bulletin (by YJE) is full of news 
about the gang. Get a copy. The NHN is going places. 
Ft. Lauderdale: FNR reports twenty 144-Mc. stations are 
expected as the result of renewed interest. AB, club station, 
uses Viking and NC-240D. PM says JZV, EUV, and ZUJ 
are using 20-meter VP beams. EC PPR turned out a good 
drill for the S.E.T. Jacksonville: The DCEN mobile gang 
meets Thurs. at 1931 on 29.0 Mc. and now includes 7 
stations. The JARS sets up traffic-taking booths wherever 
they can. Key West: DRT finally got WAS. ELS reports 
a ham club on board at the NAS with 20 very active 
members. Merritt Island: FIQ reports new club officers are 
FIQ, FXH, and GED. Ken uses a Viking II. Miami: 
Here's a new wrinkle: The club auctioned off kits! lEH 
moved to Ft. Lauderdale. BSX, an Asst. EC, moved to 
Oklahoma. DRD got a Coast Guard citation for doing a 
good job with the Auxiliary Net. PBS has a 500-watt emer- 
gency generator for use with DEN work. The DEN has 
.36 active members on 29,044 kc. Clippers and compressors 
are being built like mad, says PBS of the gang. Ocala: That 
traffic booth at Silver Springs made BPL for DVR again. 
Orlando: We grieve with DQA in tlie loss of his jr. operator. 
BMY has p.p. 813s fora kw. on c.w. St. Augustine: WN4FJE 
{Continued on page 104) 



102 



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says he lost his good antenna that really snagged the QROs. 
At Ketterlinus are AGK, AGU, WN4FJE, and KN4AHA, 
a good group for EC UHC. St. Petersburg: With a sad heart 
we report the death of EYI. Tampa; New club officers are 
YII, LAW, YFI, and ALP. Traffic: W4DVR 579, PJU 514, 
LAP 139, WEO 114, BMY 100, lYT 76, DRD 71, WS 47, 
TRN 34, RWM 25, FWZ 24, ZIR 21, DSC 18, FSS 12, 
FIQ 5, YW 4, WEM 3, YNM 1. 

WESTERN FLORIDA — SCM, Edward J. Collins, 
W4MS/RE — SEC: PLE. ECs: HIZ and MFY. QK has a 
pair of 813s going on 75 meters. CCY is perfecting his mo- 
bile gear. JPD has put up 40-meter ontenna for the winter 
season. TTM had transformer trouble with the HT-9. 
9CPI/4 is enjoying 20-meter c.w. on the B. & W. HJA is 
looking at the s.s.b. unit for his B. & W. DAO/DEF is QRL 
with the club station, K4ALI. UYS, YRF, BGG, BBU, 
HBK, KN4AGM, and W4AYS are planning big things for 
the Pensy High School Radio Club station, K4AFF. GMS 
keeps weekly sked with Pensy from Tallahassee. UUF keeps 
the 144-Mc DX stations jumping KN4AEP is having 
transmitter trouble. MUX reports from Rome, Italy, while 
on vacation. OWN reports many early morning QSOs on 
40 rneters. EAR meets the gang on 10 meters. ZFL has FB 
vertical and gets out FB on 20-meter c.w. The gang wishes 
Mrs. UCY a speedy recovery. MS is working on linear 
amphfier for lOB exciter. WKQ worked 303 in 54 sections 
during the CD Party. CPE has a new converter in the car. 
ROM is back on 10 meters. RKH has the monitor for 10 
meters going full time. 

GEORGIA — SCM, George W. Parker, W4NS — SEC: 
OPE. PAMs: ACH, LXE. RMs: MTS, OCG. Nets: Georgia 
Cracker Emergency Net meets on 3995 kc. Sun. 0803, Tue. 
and Thurs. 1830 EST; Georgia State Net (c.w.) 3590 Mon., 
Wed., Fri. at 1900. New appointments: IKK as OES. CFJ 
and FZO as OPS. The Atlanta Radio Club has a new 
meeting place in the Red Cross Building on Peachtree St. 
Meetings are held the first Thurs. of each month at 7:30 
P.M. All Atlanta hams and visitors are invited to attend. 
KN4ANZ now is on in Moultrie. FGH, of Quitman, and 
CFJ, of Atlanta, are building on TV stations. BXV has a 
new 348-R. OCG reports that the c.w. net is picking 
up; he still needs more Georgia outlets and more Georgia 
traffic. IKK, in Rome, EUK in Marietta, KGD in Dahl- 
onega, and CFJ in Atlanta, are getting rigs on 420 Mc. 
IKK wants to hear from anyone who would like to try for 
Rome on 220 or 420 Mc. WN4HYV, the XYL of OGG, 
is on the Novice bands in Augusta. YRX, active on 75 
meters in Warner Robins, is looking for traffic. K4WBP 
operated from the Southeastern Fair this year. FZO got 
32 states on 40-meter 'phone in October. LXE has a new 
mobile rig. IPL is rewiring his mobile for a new 12-volt car, 
and is moving his home rig into a new pine-paneled shack. 
The Macon Club meets every other Mon. at the City Hall. 
All Macon amateurs and visitors are welcome. WKP is 
getting a new^ mobile from Santa this year. Thanks to the 
club secretaries and others for all the news this month. 
Happy New Year. Traffic: K4WAR 1171, W40CG 285, 
YRX 166, IMQ 140, K4WBP 127, W4BWD 107, WN4HYV 
76, W4ZWT 63, MTS 44, NS 22, MA 11, FZO 3, BXV 2. 

WEST INDIES — SCM, William Werner, KP4DJ — 
SEC: HZ. ZW received ORS appointment. DV renewed 
ORS, OBS, and OO appointments. WD and MS have Tel 
Rex beams on 20 meters. RK built a short beam for 20 
meters. WR has a 300-watt Eldico on 15 meters. The 
PRARC meets at the N. G. Officers Club the first Tue. of 
each month. ZV is ex-W4KZT, W6PXC, DL4XD. WF sends 
greetings from the U. of Miami; WS sends greetings from 
the U. of Maryland. KD worked HI6TC for No. 209. ES, 
CI, BI, and EE loaned the Ponce c.d. their Gonset Com- 
municators when c.d. equipment failed during the floods. 
The first 2-meter contact from Red Cross station ID was 
with AAN and CX, using Gonset Communicators. AC and 
PK are using 430 Mc. ID wiU call the roll of the P. R. 
Emergency Net at 7 p.m. AST because of skip at 8 p.m. on 
3925 kc. The AntiUes Net, YX NCS, meets at 7 a.m. and 
6 P.M. on 3865 kc. OOs DV, KD, and RL qualified in the 
September F.M.T. 2-meter activity in the San Juan Area 
now includes VX, CX, HZ, DV, EA, JM, and AAN, all 
using Gonset Communicators. HN uses a Millen 75-watt 
job; the frequency is 145.26 Mc. MV built a copy of tlie 
Tel Rex beam for 20 meters. K2BLN and W3HOU visited 
KP4-Land. YX has new 75A-3 receiver. W4DKW now is 
ABC. W7SVJ/KP4 and W8DRT/KP4 are on 75 meters. 
KH6ABS/KP4 is on 20-meter c.w. AAO is a Navy 'copter 
pilot. ML is back from stateside military training. ZN was 
sent a lOO-signature scroll from Rosario, Argentina, thank- 
ing him for sending a vitally-needed drug that saved a 
lady's life. QA sent reports to a Colombian amateur station 
on their team's progress in the international bicycle race 
here. PRARC's Work KP4 Contest will be held in January. 
Traffic: KP4ZW 5, GP 3, RK 3, ZD 1. 

CANAL ZONE — SCM, Roger M. Howe, KZ5RM — 
WA replaced RM as SEC, DG is the new PAM, and DE and 
GF continue as RMs. GF finally got that hundredth card. 
W5FJA spent a week here as the guest of WA and had a 
fine time. He even had the privilege of seeing those "mad 
beam erectors," the washer crew, in action at GF's QTH. 
DG and KA are "witches" No. one and six, respectively, 
and handle quite a bit of traffic for the Maritime Mobilers 
(Continued on page JOS) 



104 



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on 15 meters. Ex-KZ5BL, now K4AEE, is on the air at 
Miami Springs, Fla. Your former SCM, NM, has been very 
ill but is improving daily. For a while FL, DG, and XYL LM 
were keeping daily skeds with W5TAF to report on his 
condition to his family. DL6NU was in town and attended 
the monthly meeting of the CZARA, which was held at the 
home of club prexy, RV. The CZARA station, KZ.5JW, 
is on the air with a Viking I and NC-125. Traffic: KZ.JVVA 
57, KA 5, RM 2. 

SOUTHWESTERN DIVISION 

LOS ANGELES — SCM, Howard C. Bellman, W6YVJ 
— Latest happenings include the appointment of Hank 
Carman, 6BHG, as Assistant SCM, with Bill Schuch, 
6CMN, taking over Hank's job as RM of SCN. The last 
Traffic Breakfast of the year was held at Clifton's again and 
BHG was the chairman. The next meeting will be held in 
January. The following qualified as Class I Observers in 
the September F\ALT. in order of accuracy: AXV, LIY, 
RW, NKT, MUR, MSG, CK, ENR, and K6FA. Although 
not ciualifying, K6HB also took the test. Included in the 
Oscillator, the magazine of the Associated Amateurs of 
Long Beach, are two pages of "Cures for TVI Caused by 
Fundamental Blocking." SCW, scoutmaster, informed me 
that his Explorer Post 177, sponsored by the Whitney 
High Handicapped School, has a radio unit with a 300- 
watt, 20-meter layout. The financial backing comes from 
the Studio City Rotary Club. One of the Explorers is 
KN6ICL of Canoga Park. Ages run between 14 and 18. 
Bob, the scoutmaster, used to be 7MQH. NCP was visited 
by KL7AMT, ex-W6ZFV. LVQ reports that the Whittier 
50 Club had seven mobiles patrolling the city on Halloween 
at the request of the police. The boys also participated 27 
hours in the S.E.T. in Whittier. LDR is running 1 kw. now 
and says he is sporting a new 20-meter beam. ORS tells 
of a rig blowing up at UID/6 while mobile on 2 meters. 
LYG is bragging about his Viking Ranger. He now needs 
outlets in Santa Ana and Newport Beach on 2 meters. 
K6BEQ is trying to form a 40-meter net. For details see 
K6DDI and/or K6EZM. Walt went bike-mobile with a 
buzzer and worked a mobile. LPE, of K6FCZ, wants to 
start a 20-meter net on 14,260 kc. Dave Wersen, K6CV, 
announces that the Frank Wiggins Radio Club, Y.\S, is a 
member of the Council of Radio Clubs in Los Angeles. 
K6DIM and CV are delegates to the Council while KPQ is 
alternate. New officers at the Club include K6DIM, pres.; 
KN6EBJ, vice-pres.; IPS, secy.; K6IDW, treas.; K6IDX, 
sgt. at arms; KPQ, station mgr. ; and K6CV, sponsor. The 
members will accept traffic from 1600 to 2200 Mon. through 
Fri. on 14.1 Mc. Traffic: (Oct.) W6LYG 648, K6FCZ 542, 
W6CMN 384, K6FCY 278, W6FMG 180, GYH 94, NCP 
94, USY 64, BHG 46, CK 24, K6BWD 22, DQA 17, W60RS 
16, K6BEQ 13, W6DWP 13, FAI 13, NTN 11, K6COP 6 
KN6HOV 6, W6LVQ 6, AM 2, PZN 2. (Sept.) K6FCZ 
1063, DQA 89, W6GYH 86, GJP 27, PZN 6. (Aug.) K6DQA 
84, W6GYH 50, PZN 10. (July) W6GYH 30. 

ARIZONA — SCM, Albert H. Steinbrecher, W7LVR — 
Asst. SCMs: Kenneth P. Cole, 7QZH; Dr. John A. Stewart, 
7SX. SEC: VRB. PAM: KOY. Arizona 'Phone Net: Tue. 
and Thurs., 7 p.m., 3865 kc. Arizona C.W. Net: Tue. and 
Thurs., 8 P.M., 3690 kc. In accordance with the recent policy 
of our new SEC, VRB, of having the ECs in various sections 
around the State sponsor alerts, October saw the AREC in 
action in a statewide "Operation Car Count," sponsored 
by Tucson, with LAD, local EC, in charge. The purpose 
of the alert was to spot mobiles on the main highways 
leading to and from .\rizona communities; to count all 
incoming and outgoing vehicles; to report same to a local 
fixed control station, which in turn would relay this informa- 
tion to headquarters at Phoenix. The alert was a huge 
success, thanks to the following ten fixed and mobile sta- 
tions located in ten communities around the State: BFA, 
CDQ, DRQ, HUV, IRX, KUJ, LAD, LHF, LND, LVR, 
MQE, MVV, MWD, NYT, OEE, PJY, PSH, QHD, QHT, 
RBA, REO, ROZ, SQX, STQ, TJT, TNY, TOA, UCA, 
UCX, UNL, UXK, VRB, VVJ, 6SBK, K6BAW, and 
KB6AN. RUX received MARS appointment. ULP and 
VAG got General Class hcenses. TVJ is new EC for Douglas 
Section. 5BDB/7 is moving back to Dallas. VOZ is back 
from .Alaska. VRB won a Worked AU Tucson (WAT) 
certificate. Traffic: W7LVR 15, RUX 8. 

SAN DIEGO — SCM, Don Stansifer, W6LRU — Asst. 
SCMs: Tom Wells, 6EWU; Shelley Trotter, 6BAM; Dick 
Huddleston, 6DLN. SEC: VFT. ECs: BAO, BZC, DEY, 
DLN, HFQ, HRI, IBS, KSI, KUU, and WYA. RM: ELQ. 
K6DBG, OBS, in Santa Ana, now is putting out bulletins 
on 145.3 Mc. Mon., Wed., and Fri. nights. The Rohr Club 
is giving instruction on Tue. and Thurs. for beginners in 
both code and theory. K6DGB is building a Ranger Kit. 
GBG tells the gang to try 21 Mc. more often with good 
openings from sunrise on noted. The Orange County gang 
went all out in the recent S.E.T. with 33 stations participat- 
ing. The AREC in San Diego County held a very successful 
S.E.T. on 75, 10, and 2 meters with the majority of its 
members participating. The organization was much better 
than last year, and the speed of traffic-handling because of 
frequency allotments was noted. GBM passed his exams for 
Naval Air Cadet. K6HKX is a new amateur in Santa Ana. 
(Continued on page 108) 



106 



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MGT is chasing DX, and is up to 50 countries. Nine San 
Diego DX men attended a DX meeting at the home of 
LRU in November. We are glad to note more activity in 
tliis field locally, which should have more representation 
DX-\vise considering the number of active amateurs. For 
information on meetings, contact LRU or BZE. KN6DVF 
has a new HQ-140. KOBEC has an LM frequency meter 
now. KeCtfZ has a new VFO and 3.3-foot vertical, and 
swears he might work out of the State now. The Convair 
Club is very successful with its classes, and many are taking 
their Novice and General Class exams as a result of the 
knowledge gained attending this worthwhile activity. Happy 
New Year and good hunting in 19.5.5. Traffic: W6IAB 
3028, IZG 538, YDK 4.39, KVB 207, P:LQ 169, K6DBG 38. 
SANTA BARBARA — SCRL Vincent J. Haggerty, 
W6IOX — The traffic report from KONBI by radiogram 
was delivered by J PP. K6CRJ reports of 2-meter signals 
from Santa Maria being heard in Santa Barbara, wliich 
constitutes an extensive "over the hills" jump. IHD is 
building an amplifier to go with his 20.\ s.s.b. exciter. FYVV 
is active on CARS and runs skeds with JFP on 14.5.8 Mc. 
Art Monsees, HJP, reported from OfTutt Air Force Base in 
Nebraska to say he will be locating his antenna system in 
the Santa Barbara .\rea one of these days. Members of 
the section are reminded that it is time to be considering a 
replacement for the present SCM, who wishes to retire at 
the end of his term. Trathc: K6NBI 121, CR.J 7, W6FYW 2. 

WEST GULF DIVISION 

NORTHERN TEXAS — SCM, T. Bruce Craig, W.5.JQD 
— SEC: RRM. PAMs: IWQ, PAK. RMs: PCN, QHL The 
Dallas Amateur Radio Club had an interesting program on 
Transistors with a movie on "The Atom Goes to Sea" as 
part of the Nov. 2nd meeting. A new NoWce in Dallas is 
WN.5HHK. Our Vice-President, NW, has every QST, since 
tlic beginning except Jan. 1943. K5FFB reports the BC-610 
is back on the air with 3-band vertical. JLT reports the visit 
of a Navy buddy, 0IGP, recently, the first time since 1945. 
SYL reports as one of the operators at the Dallas T'air where 
200 operators made over 2000 contacts and handled 308 
messages. PTK has completed the 300-watt rig, complete 
with VFO power supply, speech amplifier, etc., all in 8J^ 
panel. He uses a 4-125A final with a pair of 81 1.4 modulators. 
KVA is completing the kw. rig with 4-400, lOOTH modula- 
tor, and power supply all in a 17}^-inch panel space. DYU 
reports as one of 55 amateurs in the Fort Worth c.d. test 
on Oct. 31st. Sixteen mobile units were employed and 25 
"handy-talkie" units. CVA headed the Fort Worth ama- 
teurs. YIJ, at Marlin, is handling traffic for vets in the 
hospital there. The October SEC report shows a gain to 
311 reporting stations. The Terry County Amateur Radio 
Club has been issued the call HPI. The club (NFO, pres.) has 
30 members and meets the 1st and 3rd Tue. of each month. 
SNX, OES, reports a v.h.f. meeting was held in Brownfield 
on Oct. 23rd with 50 present. Fellows, please have your 
club secretary send in a postal card with activities to your 
SCM. The v.h.f. boys are making progress and we are still 
ho] ling to get a complete link of 2-meter operation across 
tlie entire northern half of Texas. Traffic: W5TFB 638, 
K5FFB .548. W5YPI 207, AHC 172, KPB 162, PAK 121, 
UBW 63, UFP 54, ACK 47, ZWR 33, CF 30, SYL 24, TFP 
21, RRM 18, DYU 9. 

OKLAHOMA — SCM, Dr. Will G. Crandall, W5RST — 
Asst. SCM: Ewing Canady, 5GIQ. SEC: KY. PAMs: PML, 
SVR, ROZ. RM: GVS. While on a Goodwill Tour of the 
South .\meri"an countries for the Federal Department of 
State, (!o\-ern()r Murray of Oklahoma kept in regular touch 
with liis office in Oklahoma City by means of amateur radio 
via (;ZK. The North Fork Amateur Radio Club of Western 
Oklahoma obtained excellent state-wide publicity on its 
Simulated Emergency Test on Oct. 17th with very favorable 
editorial comment in the Greer County News of Mangum. 
Publicity of this sort should be the aim and object of every 
amateur and amateur group as it amply justifies the reten- 
tion of amateur frequencies for public service. KY, as SEC, 
has definitely enlivened the State for AREC by appoint- 
ment of many new county ECs and is holding a weekly 
EC round table following OPEN on Sun. morning. The Will 
Rogers High School Amateur Radio Club has been or- 
ganized with 15 members and has the club call ETJ. 
Olfiiers are DCC, pres.; CEG, vice-pres.; DCA, secy.; 
WN5DBZ, treas.; and ZWT, trustee. Newly-elected officers 
of the Enid ARC are GIQ, pres.; PCQ, vice-pres.; KWF, 
secy.-treas. ; REC, asst. secy.; WN5HBL, custodian. A 
new code class also has been started. Many tlianks to 
those sending in news and traffic reports. Traffic: \\'5MRK 
192, PML 35, SVR 32, SWJ 25, EEC 23, MQl 20, Q.\C 
20, KY 17, TNW 16, RST 15, ADC 14, WSM 12, EllC 10, 
TC 9, REC 8, VAX 8, MFX 7, PAA 5, PNG 5, BYC 2, 
WTA2. 

SOUTHERN TEXAS — SCM, Dr. Charles Fermaglich, 
W5IMF — ZIH, MRV, and RPH detected a faint c.w. 
sit;iial on 75 meters from RES mobile in the hills of New 
Mexico. His car was broken down "60 miles from nowhere." 
They made a long distance call to Hobbs, N. IMex., and 
liad repair parts taken to him. New officers of the Temple 
ARC: VLF, pres.; VRN, vice-pres.; WDW, secy. The 
TARC is sponsoring a local mobile emergency net. Drills 
(^Continued on page 110) 



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are held Tue. at 5:30 p.m. on 3855 kc. PNP is NCS. UPO 
and VLF are now mobile. VRN found the hidden trans- 
mitter at the Oct. 24th family picnic. AET, Hidalgo County 
EC, reports a considerable amount of activity on the border. 
The Rio Grande Valley staged the 1st Red Cross simulated 
disaster just a few weeks before the recent flood. FZO, 
control station for STEN Zone 4, and member of TSG and 
MARS, has a kw. power unit for emergency work. The 
RGARC in Edinburg is doing an FB job and many new 
amateurs will be heard in the near future. The boys in 
Harlingen have organized a new club and had a transmitter 
hunt in cooperation with the Harlingen AFB amateurs. 
SZB found tlie transmitter and AET was second. The Rio 
Grande Valley has organized a motorcycle corps of Boy 
Scouts, industrial mobiles, USNR, National Guard, State 
Cniard, Border Patrol, amateurs, etc. SZB reports from the 
RGARC. AET changed his mobile loop to a center-loaded 
whip. YDI has a new mobile. SU is putting up a new 15- 
meter beam. BRD is on 40-meter c.w. working DX. TVL 
is back with a new rig. WN5BWT took the Tech. Class 
exam. CRA has a new B. & W. transmitter. AUO has a 
new mobile converter on all bands. VIT has a new TCS. 
NVQ has a new 813 rig on the air. MBU has a new low- 
drain emergency rig. FZO has a vertical on 75 meters and 
a 40-meter vertical beam. PAR is operating on Padre I. 
with a kite antenna. PBU is building a new shack. BYI has 
a 40-meter beam which is a pair of 40-meter dipoles fed 
135° out of phase. GLA has an HT-9 on the air. Mary Ann 
reports the GCARC club house is coming along FB. YDO is 
spraying it. OGG is giving code lessons. AUN is looking for 
a pair of 813s. VUS is putting up a vertical for his 813. 
Gateley is now WN5HWS. Devaney has been racking up a 
lot of DX with a new ground plane. BPF also is doing FB 
with DX. DJD is decorating the club walls with QSL cards. 
OGG is custodian and trustee of the club transmitter. 
URU has been elected to the board of directors of the 
HARC. FJF, recently in Washington, passes along 73 from 
Mr. and Mrs. George Ashenden, formerly of the F.C.C. 
office in Houston. JQ made all-40-meter c.w. WAS. lUY 
is operating mobile. The HARC is conducting a drive to 
raise funds for a new club house. Traffic: W5MN 1089. 

NEW MEXICO — SCM, G Merton Sayre, W5ZU — 
SEC: KCW. PAM: BIW. V.H.F. PAM: FPB. RM: JZT. 
The NMEPN meets on 3838 kc. Tue. and Thurs. at 1800, 
Sun. at 07.30; NM Breakfast Club every morning except 
Sun. 0700-0900 on 3838 kc; the NM C.W. Net daily on 
3633 kc. at 1900. GEM has taken NCS for NMEPN until 
BIW gets the big rig back on. On Oct. 9th WBJ, THA, 
UDM, GEM, EDN, OME, BIW/DRA, and lRII/5 helped 
out with "Seaborn Collins Day" at Las Cruces. The 
Tularosa Valley ARC's new officers are JMM, pres. ; DVA, 
vice-pres. ; FWV, secy.-treas. ; ORP, program ch.; DGR, 
station mgr. ; Lou Oliver, pub. mgr. The Caravan Club is 
very active in the Albuquerque Area. SUC w'on the award 
for the most outstanding Junior Amateur in the West 
Gulf Division at the Kerrville Convention. RFF won 
the V.H.F. Award for New Mexico in West Gulf competi- 
tion, AYU in Texas, and SCX in Oklahoma. VWU has 
worked 7VMP in Phoenix on 2-meter c.w., and has been 
copying meteor scatter from 4HHK. He now has 32-element 
2-meter beam operating. FAG also copies VMP. HZC, 
HZG, HZH, and HZP are new Novices in Albuquerque. 
In the Sept. 16-17 F.M.T. the following average errors in 
parts per million were made: QHK 5.7; BIH 13.0; GRI 
40.3. This cjualifies them as Class I Observers. Ruidoso in 
1956! Traffic: W5ZU 115, WPA 40, AQQ 35, HJF 33, 
BXP 13, ZSL 10, GEM 7, WBC 6, CEE 5, QR 5, UTS 5, 
ZGG5. 

CANADIAN DIVISION 

MARITIME — SCM, Douglas C. Johnson. VEIOM — 
Asst. SCM: Fritz A. Webb, IDB. SEC: RR. PAMs: 
VEIOC, V02AW, V06N. ECs: VEIDQ, V02G. V06U. 
RM: V06X. New appointees are VEIHJ as RM, W7SNR/ 
V06 as OPS. HJ reports formation of the Maritime Prov- 
inces C.W. Net (MPN) which meets on 3570 kc. daily except 
Fri. and Sun. at 7:15 p.m. AST. Give this net your full 
support. We regret the passing of FJ. Back home to the 
Halifax Area are ex-VElEP (V06EP) and ex-VElHT. OC 
is active on 14- and 21-Mc. 'phone. PB is signing portable 
V02 from Torbay. A recent visitor to Halifax was VE6HM. 
During Fire Prevention Week FRAC members set up club 
station VEIND for exhibit and operated 75 meters. EC 
V02G reports 7 AREC members in the Gander Area and 
hopes for a permanent club station set-up soon. V02JH 
is rebuilding the station, including the winding of his own 
power transformers. W4KVM/V06 is active on all bands. 
W1UBW/V06 transmits Official Bulletins regularly. V06N 
is getting good results with 4-65A final. V06X is QRL with 
bartending. New calls at Goose are V06Q and V06AB. 
Traffic: (Oct.) VOON 409, VEIFQ 170, V06U 135, V0")AH 
r,'.), VOGS 51, VEIUT 39, VEIME 28, VEIOM 22. VEIOG 
18, VKIHJ 12, W4KVM/V06 7, V06X 5, VEIDB 1. (Sept.) 
W4KVM/V06 5. 

ONTARIO — SCM, G. Eric Farquhar. VE3IA — 
Thanks are extended to all hams who assisted in emergency 
work during Hurricane Hazel. NG and NO are this section's 
(Continued on page 112) 



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latest members of the Brass Pounders League. DFE gave 

his antenna system its annual pre-winter overhaul. AEH 
and BMY have completed mobile installations. DRE has an 
antenna rotor. AXZ, at Carmat, operates a Mark Nineteen 
set on batteries. DLN is trying hard for Class A. AIG, 
who visited VE2FL and OB recently, hopes to be working 
mobile soon. There was an uplift in 10-meter activity 
in October. The Hamilton Emergency Radio Corps gave 
fine demonstrations at home and school association of 
the Prince Philip School. BSW covered 3300 miles on his 
vacation trip to the Deep South. NN gets good reports on 
10-meter f.m. mobile. The Quinte Club held a successful 
auction. VZ, manager of OSN, which operates nightly on 
353.5 kc., solicits your traffic. AJR contacted \V8RP/VE3, 
who was mobiling in the Windsor .Area and r>iloted him and 
his family right to her festive board. Up Ivapuskasing way 
A VS has formed a northern net in an effort to provide cover- 
age to northern Ontario and Quebec and to provide traffic- 
handling experience for amateurs situated in the Bush 
Country. The Net operates twice weekly at 1915 EST Mon. 
on 3680-kc. c.w., and Wed. on 37.55-kc. 'phone. Newly- 
elected officials of the West Side Radio Club of Toronto 
are AYO, pres.; IZ, vice-pres.; AIB, secy. At the helm 
of the Mohawk Radio Assn. we find CC, pres.; DQU, vice- 
pres.; BLT, secy. This club has a fine 2-meter mobile 
program well under way. The Hamilton Amateur Radio 
Chib officers are CJM, pres.; IQ, vice-pres.; DFP>, secy. 
BNQ is editor of the club's monthlv bulletin. "Traffic: 
VE3NG 260. NO 220, BUR 129. BJV 126, .\JR 113, VZ 94, 
TM 87, ATR 82, GI 82, AUU 73, DQX 61, AOE 45, CP 
37, DFE 14, AVS 5. 

QUEBEC — SCM, Gordon A. Lynn, VE2GL — WW 
has five-element beams on both 20 and 15 meters, also a 
six-element beam on 10 meters, and placed guys on the 
supporting mast after Hurricane Hazel! JR has 120 watts 
on 20-meter 'phone with a two-element beam. PZ has 500 
watts 'phone on 20 meters. .4PH is using three-element 
beam on 20-meter c.w. AAO took part in the Frequency 
Measuring Tests with gratifying results. EC reports with 
regret the death of XV. VEIY\y now is VE2ANK. AM and 
VA are newcomers in Victoria ville. AL^H is on 3.7 Mc. from 
Forestville. ACS, LE, and AME are now operating VE2CL, 
the club station at Laval LTniversity. KG has completed 
walkie-talkie and gave it a workout during the CD. Test 
and is converting the home rig from 814 to 833A. PL reports 
formation of the Northland Net on 3755 kc. at 1915 hours 
Wed. with 13 reporting stations, all members of AREC. ZZ 
\isited several of the boys in Trois Rivieres. AON has flea 
power on 75 meters. ADK has had the call changed to IQ. 
UQ. formerly VE3DPG, has Command transmitters on 80, 
75, and 40 meters with 1155 receiver. II again is active with 
battery-operated equipment from his summer place at 
Wallis Lake, with 175 watts c.w. on 80 and 40 meters 
and Eimac AF-67 on 'phone with S-76 and NC-240D re- 
ceivers from Sherbrooke. AGG now has the big rig operating 
from Drummondville on both c.w. and 'phone. CP has been 
appointed alternate PQN net control and EAN liaison TRN 
Wed. DR reports conditions poor with net work difficult. 
Traffic: (Oct.) VE2DR 104, GL 32, EC 25, ATQ 10, FL 9. 
(Sept.) VE2EC 21. 

ALBERTA — SCM, Sydney T. Jones,VE6MJ— XG has 
been appointed Route Manager and is in the process of 
organizing a new net to be known as the Pipe Line Net on 
a frequency of 3620 kc. This net meets daily except Sun. at 
1930 hours, and will have outlets to OSN, WSN, RN7/VE7, 
and the Polar Net. Harry is interested in hearing from all 
who may wish to take part in this net activity. .4L is a new 
ORS, OS is a new OBS. HM has returned from a visit to 
Halifax. A new radio club has been formed at Coaldale with 
AM, pres.; CK, vice-pres.; and TS, secy.-treas. \\C reports 
he will have to rebuild to get away from TVI. The Northern 
Alberta Radio Club has code classes under way on 3687 kc. 
on Mon., Wed., and Fri. at 1930. Comments regarding 
reception would be appreciated. Calls of the code practice 
stations are 6CE, 6WR, 6YP, and 6ZR. Your SCM will 
welcome applications for any of the ARRL appointments. 
Emergency Coordinators are needed in all the larger 
centers in Alberta. Traffic: VE6HM 47, OD 22, WC 8, 
YE 8, M.I 7. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA — SCM, Peter Mclntyre, 
VE7.JT — Congratulations to ASR, who was nominated 
by the \\' group of RN7 to take over the managership of 
the RN7 traffic net. As he has accepted, your cooperation 
with Whitey would be appreciated by him. Also congrats 
to AV upon winning the BCAR.\ Trophy Cup. Denny 
Readville has been untiring in his efforts in amat<;ur affairs 
and has been president of the BCARA for three terms. Both 
he and his capable executive have just been reelected for 
another term. Others who had been nominated for the 
BCARA Trophy were FY, QC, JB, US, and XW, all of 
whom have contributed to the betterment of amateur 
radio in one form or another. The thanks of the British 
Columbia amateurs is extended to them for the work they 
have done in their individual fields for amateur radio. A new 
revised edition of the Amateur Radio Telephone Direc- 
tory is being revised and brought up to date as soon as 
possible and the listings will be as of the latest DOT address 
listing, so if any errors in QTHs are made you didn't get 
your change of address in soon enough for the "Book." 
{Continued on page 114) 



112 




Pla^ciio StLa^ok. Oorp>ora,tion 

230-234 Oro^wn Street 
l<Te-^7v Ha."v^erL lO, Oonneotio-uLt 



NEW HAVEN'S RADIO SHACK duplicates in every way the operations of 
the 32-year-old parent company at Boston. In its own three story building on 
busy Crown Street in downtown New Haven between Temple and College 
Streets, the new Radio Shack carries the complete line of 30,000 items shown 
in our 224-page 1955 catalog. Branch Manager WlWIS — sometimes referred 
to as Mr. Single Sideband — and staff are alert to the needs of novice and 
veteran Hams alike; not to overlook the music lovers, servicemen, experimenters 
•and "do-it-yoyrself" gentry who naturally gravitate to Radio Shack because 
more things are in stock at the right time . . . and because our prices are 
capital-L-low. In other words, Radio Shack of Connecticut is a full-fledged 
husky, not a 90 lb. weakling. We hope you'll use our facilities and our 
SPruce 7-6871 phone number often! 



At New Haven: 

MYRON FRIEDMAN, WlWrS 

Branch Manager 
JOSEPH BAKUTIS 

Industrial Sales 
KENNETH STARR 

Audio Comparator 




224-r^a.ge 

Oa,ta,log!' 



Write or stop In today for your copy 
of this world-famous buying guide. 
Send written requests for catalogs to 
Boston. 



RADIO SHACK CORPORATION 

NEW HAVEN 10 — 230 Crown St. ■ BOSTON 8 — 167 Washington St. 



113 



2-METER CONVERTER 

Now you can receive 2-meters on a conventional Short Wave 
Receiver. Especially designed I'ush -Pull 6J6 R. F. Amplifier 
into 6J6 Oscillator-Mixer. Balinced line input, coaxial output. 
All slug-tuned adjustments, high quality components. Output 
frequency is 21 to 25 MC. Highly stable oscillator. 
Small Size, 5" long. 3 U" wide. J i^" deep. ... An Excellent 
Buy of Component Parts Enables Us to Sell at These 
Low Prices . . . We Guarantee Satisfactory Results 



Additional Details in CO Magazine: Page 32, Dec, 1953 




Model 2 A {lUuslraled) with A.C. Pcnfer Supply 
COMPLETELY WIRED, TESTED, ALIGNED UNITS 
Without Power Supply 



MODEL lA — 

With Tubes. . 

MODEL 2A — With A.C. Power Supply 

With Tubes 



$16.95 
$21.95 



In Kit Form, Less Tubes, with Complete Simplified 
Instructions. Prewired, Excepting Tuned Circuits and 
Power Supply. Anyone with even the slightest experience can 
complete in a comparatively short time. 

MODEL 1 — Without .^i.C. Power Supply. . $9.95 

MODEL 2 — With AC. Power Supply $ I 4.45 

See your Local Jobber or Write Us 

MARSHALL MANUFACTURING CO. 

Associated With K &• L RADIO P.^iRTS CO. 
1406 VENICE BLVD. LOS ANGELES 6, CALIF. 

♦Coming: V'FO for 2 Meters, Highly Stable, Reasonably Priced 




Founded In 1909 

RADIO TELEPHONY 

RADIO TELEGRAPHY 

RADAR & TELEVISION 

Courses ranging in length from 7 to 12 months. Dormitory 
room and board on campus for S48.00 a month. 1 he college 
owns Kl'AC, 5 KW broadcast station with studios located on 
campus. New students accepted monthly. If interested in 
radio training necessary to pass F.C.C. examinations for 
first-class telephone and second-class telegraph licenses, 
write for details. New: Advanced TV Engineering Course. 

PORT ARTHUR 
TEXAS 



AQS and his XYL have left for the Barbadoes. The Island 
seems to be ha\-ing a surge of mobilitis, with more reports 
of fellows going mobile. The interior gang wants to start a 
2-meter net. Anybody want to start the ball rolling? 
Traffic: VE7TF 118, QC 70, DH 39, KL 27, ZV 19. 

MANITOBA — SCM, Leonard E. Cuff, VE4LC — NW 
has been doing some experimenting recently and finds that 
using a lamp bulb as a dummy load is just the thing to 
work up to 50 miles on 75 meters. GY, the Air Force Club 
station, has been heard again on the 75-meter band putting 
out a big signal. AY, at Haskett, is being heard again after 
a long lay-off with a very good signal. YR has moved to 
a new home in the same locality. AP is reported to have been 
visiting AI at Binscarth. AN is a new one on 75-meter 
'phone. KG went hunting in the Dauphin Area but did not 
report what he was hunting or what success he had. HL paid 
one of his periodic visits to Winnipeg and informs us that 
he has new antennas on 80, 40, and 20 meters. AI is a fre- 
quent visitor to Winnipeg these davs. The Manitoba C.W. 
Net is in fuU swing on 3700 kc. daily at 1900 CST. Anyone 
interested in the c.w. net, please contact HL, the RM. The 
NCSs for this Net are AZ, KL, and KN. Those of you who 
wish to keep up to date with the ARRL Official Bulletins 
should tune in to JM, who is an OBS and may be heard at 
the following times on 3760 kc: Mon., Wed., and Fri. at 
1830 CST., and Sun., Tues. and Thurs. at 1230 noon. 
Traffic: VE4AI 33, GE 19, EF 17, HL 14, KG 7, RB 5, 
GB 4, QD 4, NW 3, JW 2, MK 2, MO 2, WS 2. 

SASKATCHEWAN — SCM, Harold R. Horn, VE5HR 
— CW reports from Regina that local AREC members had 
a good workout in the Oct. 9-10 Simulated Emergency Test. 
Jlv, JW, GH, RH, HA, DM, DP, ZZ, and CW, as control 
station, made 112 points. Besides the home stations 1 
mobile and 2 walkie-talkies were used. New officers of the 
Regina Club are CW, pres.; TS, vice-pres. ; HA, secy. The 
Club visited the local TV station and gained considerable 
knowledge but no equipment. OC is on a new shift and should 
find it better for chasing the rare ones. EO is now on 'phone 
and is a new member of the 'phone net. HJ has moved to 
Lloydminster; GK also is a new ham there. JZ is new at 
Pelican Narrows. 5RE did better than the VE6s, getting 
100 per cent check-in on their 'phone net. TH is in VE3-Land 
for a few montlis. RC took unto himself an XYL. FY says 
amateur frequencies are poor at Uranium City. YF is heard 
occasionally between home and school meetings. DN advises 
that activities at Prince Albert are at a low ebb. JO and DA 
work 21 Mc. with good results. The XYL of MV presented 
him with a young YL. Traffic: (Oct.) VE5HR 28, DS 22, 
CW 17, DR 14, FG 13, RE 12, BF 10, GC 10, BZ 8, JN 8, 
GX 6, LU 6, GO 2. KG 2, QL 2. (Sept.) VE5DS 29. 



PORT ARTHUR COLLEGE 



Approved for G. I. training 



Silent ilepg 

IT IS wath deep regret that we record the 
passing of these amateurs: 

WIGWA, Thomas J. O'Brien, South Windham, Me. 
W2JQI, Harry C. Condon, Albany, N. Y. 
W2VDM, Harry Green, White Plains, N. Y. 
W2VZ, Samuel Woodworth, Jordan, N. Y. 
e.\-W3AWT, A. A. DeVine, Palo Alto, Calif. 
W3ME, Charles Robert Sherrer, Baltimore, Md. 
W4EYI, Wilton C. Spence, St. Petersburg, Fla. 
W4WHG, L. O. DeLonchaw, jr., Bellflower, Calif. 
WOF'TH, William Race, Sherman Oaks, Calif. 
K6GL0, Thomas T. McCoy, Oakland, Calif. 
W6GPN, Richard G. Cowell, Sacramento, Calif. 
W6LLJ, Damon D. Barrett, San Francisco, Calif. 
ex-W6YEZ, John C. Leo, San Mateo, Calif. 
W7KTD (ex-W6MBN), Harry J. Henke, Portland, 

Ore. 
W8DWB/W8KTD, Ralph H. Babcock, Cedar, 

Mich. 
W8FWK, Virgil E. Farrell, Hamilton, Ohio 
W8JRS, Lawrence T. Johns, Aurora, Ohio 
W9MDO. Dr. Worrall S. Kelly, Chicago, 111. 
W9PZM, J. Michael Murphy, West Lafayette, Ind. 
W0BDO, Bud Crawford, Broken Bow, Nebr. 
W0CPA, Graham C. Dodge. Denver, Colo. 
VE2LP, Luc Bernier, Ville Lemoyne, Que. 
VE3DCE, Russell Sudden, St. Catharines, Ont. 
EI9T, Rev. Fr. P. Macartney, Dublin, Eire 
PZ1.\L, Eugene Van Leeuwaarde, Paramaribo, 

Surinam 



114 



ALWAYS HAS IT.. .IN STOCK 

For IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 



The Exciting JQHNSON VIKING 
NEW l-KW POWER AMPLIFIER 

The ullimote in Deluxe Transmitters at a sensational price — CW, AM and SSB trans- 
mission at the maximum allowable amateur power. Amplifier, modulator, power supply 
and controls self contained in a single, gray metal desk pedestal base. Accessory top and 
three drawer pedestal unit is availoble at extra cost, to form executive type metal desk. 
Never Before Hove You Seen Such a Transmitter With These Features: 



• Single switch selects maximum legal 
input SSB, AM phone or CW, with 250w 
input position for tuning and/or low power 
operation. 

• All controls easily reached from seated 
operating position. 

• Requires only 30w RF and 15w audio 
for AM, or lOw peak for SSB. 

• Continuous tuning 3.5 to 30Mc. with 
no coil changing. 

• Rugged wide range pi-network plate 
tuning and loading assembly, can be 
tuned at full power without danger of 
damage. Matches nominal 50 to 500 ohms 
impedance with additional capability of 
tuning out large amount of load reactance. 



* Bridge neutralized 4-250A final ampli- 
fier tubes are completely stable. 

* High level class 'B' modulotors, using 
push-pull 810's, has plate saturation 
limiting. 

* 2500v. plate supply delivers over700ma. 

• Push-Pull blowers in modulator-power 
section for continuous air exchange. 

• Requires 210-240v., 50-60 cy., 1 -phase. 

• Thoroughly TVI-suppressed. 

* Entire compact chassis unit slides out 
of cabinet on rollers for instant and com- 
plete accessibility. 

• Engineered throughout for safe opera- 
tion. Complete overload protection with 
electrical reset switch and fuses locoted 
on power control panel. 




Illustrated 
with RANGER 
XMTR-EXCITER 



240-1000 Johnson Viking KW 
Amplifier, wired, adjusted and 
lab tested, complete with oil 
tubes. Amateur Net, only 

Matching accessory desk top, and pedestal 

(specify right or left hond). Amateur Net 

133.50 



»1595 



COMPLETE YOUR GALLON RIG with any of the fol- 
lowing transmitters as an exciter-driver unit. 



JOHNSON VIKING 'RANGER' 

Transmitter- Exciter Kit 

A rugged, compact, and completely self 
contained transmitter-exciter designed for 
easy assembly by either novice or experi- 
enced amateur. These ore the feotures: 

• TVI Suppressed • Built-in VFO — 
7" diol • Instant bondswilching— 1 
to 160 meters • 75 watts CW — 65 
watts phone • Pi network output 

• Panel mounted crystal sockets 

• 6146 final and 1614 modulators 

• Dimensions: 15x12x9" 



Complete Kit, less tubes 
Factory Wired ond Tested 



$179.50 

258.00 



Deluxe Transmitter Kit 
JOHNSON VIKING II 

100 WATTS ON PHONE 
130 WATTS ON CW 

Every desirable feature has been included 
in this outstanding transmitter: BAND- 
SWITCHING to all amateur bands, from 
160 through 10 meters ... TVI suppression 
...100% AM modulaHon ... PARALLEL 
OUTPUT 6146 tubes . . . PUSHPUU 807 
MODULATORS. Supplied complete with 
pre-punched chassis, copper-plated steel 
cabinet, tubes, hardware, assembly in- 
structions, and oil necessary ports and 
components $279.50 

Viking II complete with tubes, 

wired and air tested 337.00 



We're Generous 
On Trade-Ins 

If You Want To Talk 

SWAPS and DEALS 

write ... or call W2DIO 



NOTE: Prices Net, F.O.B., N. Y. C. 
Subject to change without notice 



saw 

TRANSMITTER 

Model 5100 

Complete self-contained amateur trans- 
mitter with moximum operating ease and 
efficiency. Only three tune-up controls: 
VFO set, final amplifier, and Pi network 
loading. Single bandswitch selects cor- 
rect output frequency and Pi network 
inductance for desired bond. Blue-gray 
steel contour cabinet with recessed touch- 
latch cover. 

Feotures: • 135 watts phone, 150 watts 
CW • Self-contained VFO • Covers 80- 
40- 20- 15- 11- 10-meter bands • Rapid 
bondswltching • Built-in low-pass filter 
• TVI suppressed • Pi network output. 

Complete with tubes $442.50 

SINGLE SIDEBAND ADAPTER Incompact 
matching cabinet now avoilable for Model 
5100 opprox. 250.00 

New CENTRAL ELECTRONICS 

Model 20 A Multiphase 
Bandswitching SSB Exciter 

Has new performance features, plus the 
proven characteristics of the popular Model 
10A. 20 wotts peak output (440 CA 
- SSB, AM, PM, CW ^^HT.JU 

In Kit Form 199.50 

MULTIPHASE EXCITER 10B-10 watts 
peok output-SSB, AM, PM, CW. 179,50 

In Kit Form 129.50 

SIDEBAND SLICER— An SSB adapter that 
will improve any receiver 74.50 



Write for HARVEY's 
NEW HAM CATALOG 

Complete specifications 
on any item in this ad 
available on request. 




COLLINS 31V-3 

AMATEUR TRANSMITTER 

A receiver-sized high-performance rig built 
to Collins standards in every detail. Rated 
at 150 watts input CW, 120 watts phone, 
gang-tuned with bandswitching to cover 
80, 40, 20, 15, 11, and 10 meter bands. 
Excellent audio gives extraordinary good 
readability. Stable VFO, completely en- 
closed R-F section and thorough filtering 
and shielding provide maximum protection 
against TVI. Complete with S7TC 
tubes "113 




HARVEY is Icnown the world over . . . wherever Hams operote ... as a reliable 
source for Ham Equipment . . . assuring fast service and prompt deliveries. 



S 



Harvey 



RADIO CO., INC. 



103 W.43r(l St., New York 36. N.Y.-JUdson 2-1500 

Established 1927 



115 



For 1955/ 

The DOW-KEY CO. now offers a silent open type 
AC power relay. 

The only .AC power relay with a written guarantee 
coxering silent operation. These midget relays, with 
a rating of 25 amps, set a new standard. X'ersatile 
design provides 5 possible mounting positions. Avail- 
able in all voltages both .-XC and DC. 

The popular DOW coaxial line has the new look for 

'55! 

The service we promised to consumer and dealer is 
now axailable with enlargement and tooling program 
recently completed. 



Complete information is in our new catalog 
and free by request — send for your copy 
today. 



Only DOW guarantees silent AC relays. "It's the 
principle of the thing." 

Territories in both Canada and USA 
open for established factory reps. 

THE DOW-KEY CO., INC. 

WARREN, MINNESOTA 



SLASHED ON lOOFT^ 



PWCES SLA: 



Self Supporting 

STEEL TOWERS 

For Rotary Beams, FM, TV 



New Streamlined VESTO 

100 ft. Tower 

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ONLY 

SMALL DOWN PMT.— EASY TERMS 

The heavy demand for 100 ft. VESTO towers 
now enables us to produce them in large 
quantities and pass the savings on to youl 
Also available in a wide selec- 
tion of other sizes for amateur 
and commercial use. These 
are listed below: 
22'-$I04, 28'-$127, 33'-$149, 
39'-$182, 44'-$2«8. 50'-$239. 
and 6r-$299. 



4-POST CONSTRUCTION 
GALVANIZED STEEL 
LADDER TO TOP 
COMPLETE 
EASY TO ERECT 
STANDS ANY WIND 



Shipped to your home knocked 
down, FOB Kansas City, Mo. 
4th class freight. Prices subject 
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money order ... or write for 
free information. 

Cable address: "VESTO" 



WRITE TOOftl 

fOR COMPl-tTt 

FREE INfORMftTIOH 

AND PMOTOCRAPHS 



VESTO CO., Inc 

20th and Clay 
North Kansas City, Mo. 



Auroral Propagatioxi 

(Continued from page 16) 

visible portion of such formations, but one 
might expect that a good returned signal could 
be obtained from the ends of the arc which 
appear near the horizon. The rotary Yagi showed, 
however, no signals coming from those directions. 
This is another case of no signal coming from the 
brightest part of the visible aurora. This is in 
agreement with Figs. 7 and 8, showing that 
signals are rarely observed in the east or the 
west, but only in the northern quadrant. 

V.h.f. auroral radar echoes have been studied 
at several other places in the northern hemi- 
sphere, where the above-described large ranges 
and restrictions of the echoes to the north have 
also been found. At most locations, however, 
the visible aurora has occurred predominantly 
at large distances from the observing site, and 
so the radar results were to be expected. For 
example, at Ithaca, New York, most visible 
aurora is at low angles in the north. Overhead 
visible aurora is seen only for a total of a few 
hours over the whole year, and southern aurora 
is even more difficult to study. For high latitudes, 
with generous quantities of aurora, the experi- 
mental observations require some unusual process 
to be involved which will limit the echoes to the 
ranges and azimuths that are found. 

An Explanation 

Supported by these observations, Booker, 
Gartlein, and Nichols ^^ at Cornell have enlarged 
upon a theory by Moore ^^ which considers the 
auroral ionization to be composed of numerous 
streaks of ionization running parallel to, or 
concurrent with, visible auroral rays. Aurora is 
believed to be caused by charged particles shot 
from the sun which are able to enter the earth's 
atmosphere only if they follow the lines of the 
earth's magnetic field. Indeed, auroral rays are 
sloped slightly with respect to your horizon, 
because they are following the lines of the 
earth's magnetism. A corona (overhead star- 
shaped formation) is a bundle of such rays 
viewed up from the bottom, the center appearing 
slightly to the south. Now meteor trail ionization 
has been previously studied and has been found 
to give v.h.f. radio reflections best when looking 
perpendicular to the trail. ^^ The perpendicular 
requirement becomes more severe as one uses 
higher frequencies. The strength of the reflected 
signal fluctuates during formation and during 
wind distortions of the meteor trail, because the 
contributions to the total signal from the different 
parts of the trail interfere with each other.^^ 
The Booker, Gartlein, and Nichols theory im- 

(Continued on page 118) 

'1 Booker, Gartlein, and Nichols (to be published). Pre- 
sented at URSI-IRE Meeting at Ottawa, Canada, October, 
1953. 

'2 Moore, Journal of Geophysical Research, 56, p. 97 (1951). 

13 Lovell, Banwell, and Clegg, monthly notices of the 
Royal Astronomical Society, 107, p. 164 (1947). 

1* Manning, Villard, and Peterson, Journal of Geophysical 
Research, 67. p. 387 (1952). 



116 



HENRY DARES < 



TO ^IVE yOM 

THIS OMAl^AWTEE 



1007. SATISFACTION 

orVoMr Money Back ^ end of 10 da/Trial 




NEW ^^ 
VIKING 

Transmitter 
Exciter Kit 



Immediate delivery. 
Also available wired. 



RANGER 

Built-in VFO-TVI Sup- 
pressed — Band-switching 
—seven bands— 75 Watts 
CW Input - 65 Watts 
phone input. Offers more 
features than any Trans- 
mitter/Exciter ever built 
for amateurs! 



NEW SX 96 




For top performance with 
extra pull power and abil- 
ity to tune in stations. 

$25.00 Down 

18 monthly payments of $13.60 
—$249.95 Cash Price. 



Some of the many items in 

B & W 5100 442.50 

B & W 51SB 279.50 

Collins 75A3 550.00 

Collins 32V3 775.00 

HQ140X 264.50 

Viking II kit 279.50 

Viking II wired 337.00 

Adventurer 54.95 

Elmac PIV1R6A 134.50 

Elmac AF67 177.00 



stock: 

Central lOB kit 129.50 

Central lOB wired..l79.50 

Central lOA kit 199.50 

Central 20A wired..249.50 

Morrow 5BR-1 74.95 

Morrow 5BRF 67.95 

Morrow FTR 128.40 

Gonset Super 6 52.50 

Commander xmitter 124.50 
Communicator II....229.50 



Hallicrafters S38D.. 49.95 
Haliicrafters S85....119.95 
Hallicrafters SX99..149.95 
Hallicrafters SX96..249.95 
Hallicrafters SX71..249.95 
Hallicrafters SX88..595.00 

National NC88 119.95 

National NC125 199.95 

National NC183D ..399.50 
National HR060 533.50 




Bob Henry, 

W(dARA 

Butler, Mo. 



Ted Henry, ^ 

W6UOU 

los Angeles 





We have complete stocks of all makes and models of amateur receivers, 
transmitters, beams, parts, etc., at lowest prices. 



Write, wire, phone or visit either store today. 



Top Trades 
Only 10% Down 
Easy Terms 
Fast Delivery 
Personal Service 
Low Prices 
Complete Stocks 



We wonf yow to be satis- 
fied. Ask any Ham about 
Henry. And Henry has the 
new equipment f'lnt. 



Butler 1, Missouri _^^ 

Phone 395 PJ-TQ 



BRadshow 2-2917 
11240 West Olympic Blvd. Los Angeles 64 



BUY OF A LIFETIME! 

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lETTINE MODEL 240 TRANSMITTER WITH MOBILE 
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greater efficiency — never obsolete — will take any new freq. 
Ideal for General Class Amateur, Novice, CAP, CD, MARS. 
Broadcast, Marine and Airport Communications. An out- 
standing buy, direct from our factory, ready to operate. 

The 240 is a 40 to 50 watt Phone-CW rig for any freq. from 
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final. 5U4G rect.. 6SJ7 crystal mike amp., 6N7 phase inver- 
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80. 20, 10 meter coils $2.91 per Band. 160 meter coils $3.60. 

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62 Berkeley Street Valley Stream, N. Y. 




A-27 

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• Q-Max provides a clear, practically loss- 
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In 1 , 5 and 55 gallon containers. 



MARLBORO, NEW JERSEY 
(MONMOUTH COUNTY) 
Telephone: FReehold 8-1880 



agines the auroral ionization to be composed 
of hundreds of such "meteor" trails. This would 
explain the observed fast-fading or growl of the 
aurorally-propagated signal. It would also re- 
quire that the radio-ray paths be nearly perpen- 
dicular to the trails, or in this case, the earth's 
magnetic field. (See Fig. 10.) 

Calculations have been made by Chapman '^ 
for locating the feet of perpendicular lines from 
the receiver and transmitter to the lines of the 
earth's magnetic field. These calculations relate 
the height above the earth, the range of e.\pected 
echoes, the angle of elevation of the radio path, 
and the latitude of the echo point for a given 
magnetic latitude of the observing site. Theo- 
retically, auroral echoes should be limited to 
northerly directions in the northern hemisphere 
and should occur only at large distances having 
low angles of elevation. This, as shown in earlier 
paragraphs, is verified by experiment. 

Since auroral reflections can come only from 
low angles of elevation with respect to the hori- 
zon, the amateur should design his antenna to 
favor these directions. The antenna should be 
very sharp in the vertical plane and pointed at 
the horizon. Thus, vertical stacking is highly 
recommended. Low-angle radiation requires that 
the antenna be high above the surrounding ter- 
rain and emphasizes the importance of a good 
QTH and a tall tower. The perpendicularity 
theory would suggest a greater spread in azimuth 
than in the elevation angle, and indeed, simul- 
taneous echoes have been obtained from sep- 
arated directions in the north. It would, therefore, 
be wise to leave the horizontal pattern as broad 
as 30 degrees or so, meaning that the antenna 
should not be wider than about 4 dipoles. Fre- 
quently, during violent aurora, there is difficulty 
in finding the direction that gives maximum sig- 
nal. It is tempting to think that such behavior is 
due to signals arriving from high angles of ele- 
vation, where the auroral light appears brightest, 
l)ut this explanation is probably false. The per- 
pendicularity theory may explain why aurora 
seen visually does not give a signal because of its 
position. (In addition, it is felt by some that 
active ray forms will give stronger signal than 
quiet arc forms.) In general, sufficient low-angle 
radiation is a more important aid in getting 
strong auroral signals than was previously ex- 
pected. 

Acknovrledgeiaents 

A large vote of thanks is due the many ama- 
teurs that have sent in auroral reports via Tilton 
and QST. Here is a further example of amateur 
radio supplying research information difficult to 
obtain in any other way. Assistance has been 
rendered by Ken Bowles, W2MTU, and Ed Til- 
ton, WlIIDQ. Financial aid has been provided 
by the U. S. Army Signal Corps at Cornell and 
the Geophysical Institute at the University of 
Alaska. 

1^ Chapman, Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Phys- 
ics, S, pp. 1-29 (1952); see also Journal of Geophysical 
Research, 58, September, pp. 347-352 (1953), 



118 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS 
or PHYSICS GRADUATES 

ivith experience in 

RADAR or ELECTRONICS 

or those desiring to enter these areas. . . 

The time was never more opportune than now for becoming 

associated with the field of advanced electronics. Because of military 

emphasis this is the most rapidly growing and promising sphere 

of endeavor for the young electrical engineer or physicist. 



Since 1948 Hughes Research and Devel- 
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in an expanding program for design, de- 
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fighter and interceptor aircraft. This re- 
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field to serve companies and military 
agencies employing the equipment. 

As one of these field engineers you will 
become familiar with the entire systems in- 



Hughes Field Engineer 
H. Heaton Barker (right) 
discusses operation of fire 
control system witti Royal 
Canadian Air Force techni- 
cians. Avro Canada CF-100 
shown at right. 

Relocation of applicant must 
not cause disruption of an 
urgent military project. 



volved, including the most advanced 
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assignments are open to single men only. 



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119 



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or write for literature. 



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Mobile Converter 

(Continued from page SO) 

The r.f. amplifier may now be lined up, band 
by band, by tuning in a signal from a generator 
or the antenna, and then adjusting the amplifier 
grid and plate coils for maximum response. The 
grid-coil slug should be adjusted with signals 
near the high-frequency end of the band, and 
with Cs set near minimum capacitance. The an- 
tenna coupling should then be adjusted to the 
point where a shght peak in signal or background 
noise is heard within the range of C3. 

At 3.5 and 7 Mc, it is important that the re- 
ceiver used with the converter be well shielded if 
broadcast-band interference is to be avoided. 
Most car receivers are well shielded, but some of 
the less-expensive communications receivers may 
not be. However, the converter will be most use- 
ful to a communications receiver at the higher 
frequencies where feed-through will usually be 
negligible. When interference from local broad- 
casting stations is experienced, the slug of Li 
should be adjusted to minimize the strongest 
b.c. signal toward the low-frequency end of the 
b.c. band, while the slug of L2 should be likewise 
adjusted for the strongest signal toward the high- 
frequency end of the band. These two adjust- 
ments will usually serve to attenuate most other 
b.c. signals between the two extremes of fre- 
quency. However, other combinations may be 
advisable, depending on the frequencies of the 
local stations. In most cases, it should be possible 
to wash out b.c. interference, by adjustment of 
these two traps to the point where it is no longer 
bothersome. 

In some parts of the country, the second har- 
monic of the 2900-kc. crystal will beat with 
WWV's 5-Mc. signal, so that it will be heard 
when the b.c. receiver is tuned to 800 kc. (or sig- 
nal frequency of 3700 kc). This can be used as a 
check point for the frequency alignment of the 
b.c. receiver. 

With the crystal frequency known, ham-band 
frequencies can be determined quite accurately 
(if the b.c calibration is correct) by simply adding 
the h.f.-oscillator frequency, given in the table, 
to the reading of the b.c. dial. 

Measurements with a signal generator showed 
that recognizable audio output could be obtained 
with a signal input as low as 0.1 /xv. Most of the 
background noise disappeared with the input 
signal raised to 0.3 ^v., and solid reception was 
possible with an input signal of about 0.5 fiv. 

The cost of a complete set of components for 
this converter will run about $65.00. The crystal 
and set of three coils required for each band runs 
about $7.65, so that the cost will be reduced by 
this amount for each band that is not needed. 



TVI and BCI we're all familiar with, but 
K2EPD has WPI. Everytime he fires up the rig, 
his mother complains she can hear him in the 
ivater pipes! 



120 



^^T^ci^ 




// 



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122 



Cubical Quad 

(Continued from page S3) 

loop are at equal distances from the center. A 
permanent joint can then be made between an- 
tenna wire and pole by wrapping several turns of 
bare copper wire tightly around the pole where 
the antenna touches it, threading the ends of this 
bare wire through small holes drilled in the bam- 
boo pole, and then soldering together as shown in 
Fig. .3. Use a good grade antenna wire so it will 
not stretch later. 

The main boom consists of a 12-foot piece of 
2X2 pine with another 6-foot piece used as a 
center brace to prevent the ends of the boom 
from dropping. This boom is mounted at its 
center by bolting it to a piece of angle iron welded 
to the top of the rotator shaft. A lower boom 
composed of a 12- foot piece of 1 X 2 pine is 
mounted by means of a small bracket 8 feet 43^ 
inches down the rotator shaft parallel to and in 
the same plane as the main boom. The completed 
radiator and reflector are fastened to the ends of 
the main boom by means of the mounting brack- 
ets, and the center insulators for the radiator and 
reflector are fastened to the ends of the lower 
boom which also serves to support the feed line 
and the reflector stub. This lower boom is prob- 
ably unnecessary but it does make the beam 
neater and stronger. 

The radiator and reflector are made exactly 
the same. Small insulators are placed in the cen- 
ter of the bottom side of both reflector and 
radiator and the stub is fastened to the one and 
the feed line to the other. Seventy-two ohm coax 
will give a very close match, but 52-ohm coax has 
been used here with very good results, even 
though there is some mismatch. The stub for the 
reflector is 6 feet long and spaced 3 inches. A very 
simple sliding short can be made by putting a 
Fahnestock clip on each wire of the stub and then 
soldering a wire between these clips. This "short" 
can be easily slid along the stub from the top of 
the antenna tower or pole by means of a small 
stick. Remember to use bare cooper wire for the 
stub or the sliding short will not work. After the 
beam is in place atop the tower, the reflector may 
be tuned by sliding the shorting bar up and down 
the stub until a minimum S-meter reading is ob- 
tained from a local ham located off' the back of the 
beam. That is all there is to it; you are now tuned 
on the nose and ready for business. 

Antenna articles always seem to contain a 
paragraph or two telling about the results 
achieved with the antenna under consideration, 
usually in very glowing terms. This article is no 
exception. This beam has consistently given good 
results, DX reports averaging about 1 "S" point 
higher than on the old three-element job, and if 
the band is open at all it is unusual to call CQ DX 
and not receive at least one reply. The power 
usually runs 125 watts here. This beam is not a 
cure-all for your DX and QTIM problems, but it 
will certainly give the three-element boys a good 
run for their money. Put one up — you'll like it. 



rminal Radio 



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123 



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124 



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Receiver Performance 

(Continued from page 27) 

extremely large signal-handling capabilities re- 
quired. Several tubes recently announced show 
some promise, but until they are proven the 
receiver designers laughingly suggest a 4-125A 
or similar for the receiver r.f. stage. 

To prove cross-modulation when operating 
"on the air," the received signal can be reduced 
with a 20-db. resistive attenuator. This will 
reduce an S9 signal to about S6, which is still 
readable, but at the same time drop a 1-volt 
signal, due to that kilowatt next door, to 0. 1 volt. 
If the splatter disappears when the atteimator is 
placed in the antenna lead, then the difficulty is 
in the receiver. Remember not all modulation 
splatter is in the receiver. A few inconsiderate 
amateurs are guiltj^ of severe overmodulation. 
A more simple test is to remove the normal an- 
tenna and connect anj' short piece of wire that 
will reduce the desired signal to a just readable 
level, and then note the presence or absence of 
splatter. Either test is acceptable for tracing the 
source of this type of interference. 

If you are not looking for weak signals, either 
of the above methods for reducing input signal 
level can help receiver cross-modulation. A sepa- 
rate r.f. gain control (variable cathode resistor) 
is also sometimes helpful in reducing the cross- 
modulation that occurs in the mixers. 

This receiver discussion has been handled in 
general terms. A later article will give some hints 
as to how the 75A-3 can be adapted best to serve 
the amateur with special interests like DX work 
on one hand or just local rag-chewing on the 
other. 

I would like to express my appreciation to the 
many Collins engineers who assisted in this dis- 
cussion of receiver performance. 

AppBiidix. 

So-called thermal noise is generated in any resistance 
whether it is the antenna resistance, the parallel tuned 
impedance of the r.f. stage grid circuit, or an actual re- 
sistor. Noise power is proportional to absolute temperature, 
bandwidth, and resistance. Noise power is given by 

N = — = 

R R 

where 

K = Boltzman's constant = 1.38 X 10-23; 

T = Absolute temperature, 300° at room temperature; 

A/ = Bandwidth in cycles; 

Req = Noise resistance of the receiver plus the dummy 

antenna; and 

R = Sum of the receiver input resistance plus the 

dummy antenna resistance. 



Signal power is given by S = 



(mgc)2 
R 



where m is the percentage of modulation divided by 100 
— sometimes called modulation factor; 

Ec is carrier voltage of receiver signal; and 72 is as above. 
.\ perfect receiver is one wliich has no noise due to cou- 
pling circuit, r.f. stage shot noise, mixer noise, or any other 
noise contribution except that of thermal noise given by the 
above expression. 

S/N t heoretically perfect receiver 
Noise figure = N.F. = S/AT actual receiver 

(Continued on page 1S6) 







For the past 35 years radio amateurs throughout the world have been purchasing equipment 
and supplies from me. Their friendship and loyalty have been the determining factors in 
our success. For this we are grateful and it is time that we made an effort to express our 
appreciation in a material way. 

Many amateur radio clubs need financial aid. Many others can use extra funds if these 
funds can be obtained without assessing their members. We have a plan which will 
greatly assist all amateur radio clubs. 

For every order received until March 1, 1955, we will send our check for 15% of your 
order - to your radio club for deposit in their treasury. When you place your order'be 
sure to include the name and address of your club and treasurer. 

My best wishes for a healthy, happy and prosperous New Year. 

73 -CUL 
Uncledave, W2APF 



RADIO DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 



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TELEPHONE ALBANY S-1594 



125 



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HIGH PASS FILTER 



The AMECO high pass filter is 
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As the actual receiver approaclies theoretical performance, 
the above expression approaches 1.0, or db. If the receiver 
noise is zero except for thermal noise across /?eq, and the 
antenna matches the receiver input resistance, then fleq = 
21? and the noise figure is 2.0 (3 db.), because tlie noise 
power is doubled over tliat of the ideal receiver. 

Example 1: 

.Assume a perfect receiver of 6-kc. bandwidth and a 100- 
ohm antenna with no input circuit losses or set noise. What 
is the required input level at m = 0.3 for a signal-phis-noise- 
to-noise ratio of 10 db.? 

S + N S 

If ^^=10,- =9 



(mEc) 2 



N 4 AT A ant /ft 
Ec = 0.98 microvolts. 
If the receiver is matched to the antenna (which should 
be done in the practical case), then the noise is 3 db. greater 
and, to preserve the same signal-to-noise ratio, the signal 
must increase 3 db. 

Ec = 0.98 X 1.4 = 1.39 microvolts. 

Example S: 

Suppose the receiver of Example 1 was found to have a 
signal-phis-noise-to-noise ratio of 10 db. with an input of 
1.8 microvolts in a matched case. What is the noise figure? 
From Example 1: 1.39 X 10'* volts for N.F. = 3 db. 

1.8 
N.F. = 3 -1- 20 log Y^ = 5.2 db. 



2502 Jefferson 
Tocomo 2, Wash. 



Phone 
BR 3181 



Grounded-Grid 

(Continued from, page 36) 

near cut-off. An oscilloscope is necessary for 
proper adjustment. With the 'scope connected to 
the r.f. output of the linear the loading, bias and 
excitation should be adjusted until the waveshape 
of a 400-cycle tone is a replica of the same tone 
being applied to the driver. When modulation is 
removed the amplifier input should not vary and 
the height of the r.f. envelope on the 'scope 
should be reduced to half the full-modulated size. 
For adjustment with single-sideband exciters 
refer to the 1954 ARRL Handbook. 

A copper plated, expanded steel shield was 
used over the top of the chassis and no TVI 
complaints have been filed. 

Don't forget that every point in this circuit 
contains potentially dangerous r.f. or d.c. power. 
Pull out the wall phig before monkeying with the 
works. 

The final test is an 8 p.m. CQ on forty. The 
blast of QRM answering on your frequency is 
very satisfactory! 



FEED-BACK 



The following errors have been detected in 
Burns, "Sideband Filters Using Crystals," in the 
November, 1954, issue: 

Page 39, reference 14, should be Electrical Com- 
munications, December, 1949. 

Page 148, seven lines from the bottom of the 
column, Cc should appear instead of one of the 
Cds. 

Page 150, third line, replace Cc with Cd- 

Page 150, /l2C2 and /l3C3 in the equations of 
Appendix I should each have an exponent "2." 
In other words, the correct values will be the 
s(iuare roots of those determined by the formulae 
as shown. 



126 



CO 



M. R. BRIGGS, A HAM OPERATOR FOR 3S YEARS. IS MANAGER OF MISSILE 
GROUND CONTROL ENGINEERING, WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRONICS DIVISION 




ALL ELECTRONIC ENGINEERS 
WITH A DESIRE TO 

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The building of a ham station is an outlet for some of our 

creativeness. In the 35 years I've been a ham operator, I've 

found a lot of satisfaction in my hobby: but nothing gives me more 

creative pleasure than my job. 

At the Westinghouse Electronics Division, creativeness is 

encouraged. Important, too, is the fact that the work is so vital ! 

We're working on advanced development projects that are both 

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we are looking for electronic engineers experienced in radar and 

Missile Guidance Systems. 

Of course, Westinghouse offers the finest income and benefit 

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living accommodations and many big-city attractions. 

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filled in the near future, drop us a line today! 

R. M. Swisher, Jr. 

Employment Supervisor, Dept. 34 

Westinghouse Electric Corp. ^hhhh i 

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yiou CAN 66 SURE ...if ni 

A^stindiouse 




127 



In this top rated rig 

TVI is sealed in with 

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This inexpensive 
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For sealing your own rigs or any consumer, 
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leakage METEX Electronic Weatherstrip is 
highly effective and is a simple operation. 
It's made of highly resilient compressed knit- 
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434 Patterson Road 



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MARCH OF DIMES 




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Noise Reduction 

{Continued from page S7) 

really big advantage of the traps is that they 
do not interfere with motor performance. The 
decreased motor performance will bother the 
amateur who loves his car, as he does his ham 
rig. Here in the Cumberland Mountains, the 
loss in power on grades when suppressors were 
used was distinctly noticeable. 

The traps are easily constructed, and the 
mounting problem solved, by drilling through 
standard commercial suppressors to open their 
resistance (not strictly necessary, but it will 
increase the Q of the circuit), and then winding 
the coils around them. If no grid-dipper is 
available, 7 turns of No. 20 wire, close-wound, 
tuned with a 50-MAif. disk ceramic condenser, 
will be effective over the entire ten- and eleven- 
meter bands. If only one-band operation is 
desired, these traps are well worth the effort 
spent in constructing them. Similar traps should 
effectively solve your noise problems in circuits 
where simple by-passing fails. 

In case anyone is worried about it, removal of 
the suppressors did not result in an increase in 
noise on the b.c. band. 



HAMS AT HEADQUARTERS 

• 
WlAW, ARRL Headquarters Station 




• 


The following 


calls and personal sines belong to 


members of the Headquarters gang: | 


WIBDI 


F. E. Handy, "fh" 


WIBUD 


A. L. Budlong, "bud" 


WICEG 


H. M. McKean, "mac" 


WNICIE 


Connie Hegarty, "con" 


WNICIH 


Gerald Pinard, "ger" 


WNICIJ 


Muriel Roche, "mic" 


WNICIM 


Lorraine Brouillette, "bru" 


WNICKZ 


Samuel K. Cowles, "sam" 


WNICLC 


Joan Mulligan, "joan" 


WICUT 


E. Laird Campbell, "elc" 


WIDF 


George Grammer, "gg" 


WIDX 


Byron Goodman, "by" 


WIHDQ 


E. P. Tilton, "ed" 


WIICP 


L. G. McCoy, "lew" 


WIJEQ 


C. V. Chambers, "vc" 


Wl.IMY 


J. A. Moskey, "joe" 


WILVQ 


John Huntoon, "jh" 


WINJM 


George Hart, "geo" 


WIQIS 


Murray Powell, "mp" 


WIRDV 


Leland W. Aurick, "lee" 


WITS 


D. H. Mix, "don" 


WIUED 


Perry Williams, "pw" 


WIVG 


L. A. Morrow, "pete" 


WIWPO 


R. L. White, "bob" 


WIWPR 


C. R. Bender, "cr" 


WIWRJ 


A. Murray Romni6, "mr" 


WIYYM 


Ellen White, "In" 


WIZCS 


Marie L. Page, "rie" 


WIZDP 


Phil Simmons, "phil" 


WIZIB 


Ann Furr, "ann ' 


WIZID 


Anne Welsh, "aw" 


WIZIM 


Miriam Knapp, "kp" 


W1Z,IE 


Lillian M. Salter, "lil" 



128 




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TVI. Pi Network output matches any antenna 
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Pi-network output matches 50-500 ohms 
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1955 , 
CATALOG! 

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129 



CASCODE CRYSTAL 
CONTROLLED CONVERTER 

for 144 or 220 Mc. 




Provides: 



• HIGH SENSITU'ITY — Sensitivity better than 1/10 
microvolt. Gain api)rox. 30 db. Noise approx. 4 db. 

• COMPLETELY STABLE. C.W. on 144 mc. NO mechani- 
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• RUGGEDLY BLULT — Suitable for mobile application. 

• USE WITH ANY COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVER — 
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Maryland & D. C. residents please include 25c sales tax 



Happenings 

{Continued from page 4'>) 

Des Moines, Iowa: Sometime in January and April. 

Detroit, Micli., 1029 Federal Bldg.: Wednesday and Friday. 

El Paso, Texas: March 29. 

Fort Wayne, Ind.: Sometime in February and May. 

Fresno, Calif.: March 18, June 17. 

("■rand Rapids, Mich.: Sometime in January and April. 

Hartford, Conn.: March 8. 

Hilo, T. H.: AprUS. 

Honolulu, T. H., 502 Federal Bldg.: Monday through 

Friday. 
Houston, Texas, 324 U. S. Appraisers Bldg. : Tuesday and 

Friday. 
Indianapolis, Ind. : Sometime in February and May. 
Jackson, Miss.: March 9, June 8. 
Jacksonville, Fla.: April 16. 

Juneau, Alaska, 7 Shattuck Bldg.: By appointment. 
Kansas City, Mo., 3100 Federal Office Bldg.: Friday. 
Ivlamath Falls, Oregon: Sometime in May. 
Knoxville, Tenn.: March 23, June 22. 
Lihue, T. H.: April 12. 
Little Rock, Ark.: January 12, April 13. 
Los Angeles, 539 U. S. Post Office and Courthouse: Wednes- 
day, 9 A.M. and 1 p.m. 
Louisville, Kentucky: Sometime in May. 
Manchester, N. H.: June 8. 
Marquette, Mich.: May 11, 10 a.m. 
Memphis, Tenn.: January 7, April 7. 
Miami, Fla., 312 Federal Bldg.: Thursday. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin: Sometime in January and April. 
Mobile, Ala., 419 U. S. Courthouse and Customhouse: 

Wednesday and by appointment. 
Nashville, Tenn.: February 2, May 4. 

New Orleans, La., 400 Audabon Bldg.: Monday through 
Friday except Monday through Wednesday only at 8:30 
A.M. when code test required. 

New York, N. ¥., 748 Federal Bldg., 641 Washington St.: 
Monday through Friday. 

Norfolk, Va., 402 Federal Bldg.: Monday through Friday 
except Friday only when code test required. 

Oklahoma City, Okla. : January 13-14, April 14-15. 

Omaha, Nebr. : Sometime in January and April. 

Philadelphia, Pa., 1005 U. S. Customhouse: Monday 
through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Phoenix, Ariz.: Sometime in January and April. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. : Sometime in February and May. 

Portland, Maine: April 12. 

Portland, Ore., 433 U. S. Courthouse: Friday, 8:30 a.m. for 
20- and 13-w.p.m. code tests. 

Rapid City, S. D. : Sometime in May. 

Roanoke, Va. : April 2. 

St. Louis, Mo. : Sometime in February and May. 

St. Paul, Minn., 208 Federal Courts Bldg.: Friday. 

Salt Lake City, Utah: March 18, June 17. 

San Antonio, Texas: February 3, May 5. 

San Diego, Calif., 15-C U. S. Customhouse: By appoint- 
ment. 

San Francisco, Calif., 323-A Customhouse: Friday. 

San Juan, P. R., 323 Federal Bldg.: Thursday, and Mon- 
day through Friday at 8 a.m. if no code test required. 

Savannah, Ga., 214 P. O. Bldg.: By appointment. 

Schenectady, N. Y.: March 16-17, June 15-16, 9 a.m. and 

1 P.M. 

Seattle, Wash., 802 Federal Office Bldg.: Friday. 

Sioux Falls, S. D.: March 9, June 8, 10 a.m. 

Spokane, Wash. : Sometime in May. 

Springfield, Mo.: Sometime in June. 

Syracuse, N. Y. : Sometime in January and April. 

Tampa, Fla., 410 P. O. Bldg.: By appointment. 

Tulsa, Okla.: January 17-18, April 18-19. 

Tucson, Ariz. : Sometime in April. 

Wailuku, T. H.: AprUS. 

Washington, D. C, 415 22nd St., N. W.: Monday through 

Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
\\ ichita, Kansas: Sometime in March. 
Williamsport, Penna. : Sometime in March and June. 
Wihuington, N. C. : June 4. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. : February 5, May 7. 



130 




RECORDING TAPE 



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131 



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MAN 

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801 S. Main Street, Burbank, California 



DX Competition 

{Continued from page 67) 

c.w. section is 18, and contacts made on the same band 
with the same country after the quota is filled will not 
count. Thus complete exchanges with 6 stations in one 
country on one band fill the band quota for that country. 
The maximum number of points per country per band 
which may be earned by VE/VO stations in the c.w. section 
is 24, and contacts made on the same band with the same 
country after the quota is filled will not count. Exchanges 
with 8 stations in one countrj' on one band are thus per- 
mitted Canadian participants. There is no quota for stations 
in the c.w. section outside of the U. S. and Canada. There is 
no quota for any station in the 'phone section. 

11) Reporting: Contest work must be reported as shown 
in the sample form. Each entry must include the signed 
statement as shown in that example. Contest reports must 
be mailed no later than April 29, 1955, to be eligible for 
QST listing and awards. All DX Contest reports become 
the property of the American Radio Relay League. No 
contest reports can be returned. 

12) Awards: To document the performance of partici- 
pants in the Twenty-First ARRL International DX Com- 
petition, a full report will be carried in QST. In addition, 
special recognition will be made as follows: 

a) A certificate will be awarded to the high scoring single- 
operator 'phone and to the high-scoring single-operator c.w. 
entrant in each country (as shown in the ARRL Countries 
List) and in each of the 73 U. S. and Canadian ARRL sec- 
tions (see page 6 of this issue) from which valid entries are 
received. In addition, a certificate will be awarded to the 
high scoring multiple-operator station in each section or 
country from which three or more valid multiple-operator 
entries are received. 

b) A suitable certificate will be awarded to the operator 
making the highest single-operator 'phone score in each 
ARRL-affiliated club, provided the club secretary submits 
a listing of a minimum of three 'phone entries by bona fide 
resident members of such club, and provided further that 
these scores are confirmed by receipt at ARRL head- 
quarters of the individual contest logs from such members. 
The highest single-operator c.w. scorer in each club will 
be awarded a certificate under the same conditions. 

c) ARRL will award a gavel to the affiliated club sub- 
mitting the greatest aggregate 'phone and c.w. score by 
bona fide resident club members, whether single- or mul- 
tiple-operator entries, provided such scores are confirmed 
by receipt at ARRL headquarters of the individual contest 
logs from such members. 

13) Judges: All entries will be passed upon by the ARRL 
Award Committee, whose decisions will be final. The Com- 
mittee will void or adjust entries as its interpretation of 
these rules may require. 

14) Disqualifications: Each participant agrees to observe 
the contest rules as well as all regulations established for 
amateur radio in his country. Some examples of grounds 
for disqualification are: off-frequency operation as con- 
firmed by a single FCC citation or advisory notice or two 
ARRL accredited Official Observer measurements; low 
tone reports in logs; working countries on the "banned 
list 1" — footnote information applies to U. S. A. amateurs 
only. 

' As we go to press, prefixes to be avoided are FI8, PK 
(except PK7), EP-EQ, HL, HS, 3W8 and XW8. 



Patience, practice and persistence have paid 
off for W3T0C of Etna, Pa. Licensed as a Novice 
three years ago, he qualified for his General Class 
license in November. Suddenly stricken by blind- 
ness sixteen years ago, the code was quite an 
obstacle. Bill isn't resting on his laurels, though 
— he's now busy helping five bhnd friends be- 
come hams! 



132 



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Also available wired and tested, less tubes Only $25.80 down 

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133 




SPRINGER Model ARSG 
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THE ANTENNA ENGINEERING 
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"Your Rig Is Only as Effective as the Antenna You Tie It 
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Bob Jackson personally at the address given. 

134 



World Above 50 Mc 

(Continued from page 66) 

simple means for obtaining a c.w. beat note witli receivers 
like the 522 and Gonset Communicator. W6NOB suggests 
a b.f.o. method that may not have occurred to some owners 
of these receivers. He has a Command transmitter hooked 
lip near his Comiimnicator. Turning on this unit and tuning 
it so that it beats with the Communicator i.f. does the trick 
very nicely. A simple crystal oscillator on a frequency about 
1000 kc. away from the receiver i.f. will also do. 

Such makeshifts will allow you to copy the c.w. sigs you 
hear, but remember that they will not give you a full appre- 
ciation of the value of c.w. in weak-signal reception until 
you go to the higher selectivity that c.w. makes possible. 
Narrow the passband down to a few hundred cycles and 
you'll be amazed to hear the way the readability of weak 
c.w. shoots up. This, however, also shows that the tunable 
oscillators in these receivers are rather unstable. The next 
step is, of course, a crystal-controlled converter, a must 
for any real 2-meter DX enthusiast. 




U. S. N. R. (^ 



AN ardent amateur radio operator is the commanding 
-^ officer of Naval Reserve Electronics Division 8-12, Paris, 
Texas, which won the Hooper trophy in national competi- 
tion for excellence in Naval Reserve electronics training. 
He is Cmdr. Paul H. Daniels, USNR, W5CTM. He has 
held an active amateur license for 30 years and a com- 
mercial license for 28 years. 

Cmdr. Daniels' interest in amateur radio activities 
helped him to progress rapidly in the Naval Reserve. He 
enlisted as a radioman first 
class in 1931. Three years 
later he was chief petty 
officer in charge of USNR 
Communication Reserve 
Unit No. 7, .Junction City, 
Kans. At that time he was 
discharged to accept a com- 
mission as ensign in the 
Naval Reserve. He re- 
ported for active duty to 
the Commandant, Norfolk 
Navy Yard, as assistant 
communications officer in 
April, 1941. 

During World War II 
Cmdr. Daniels served on 
the staff of Commander, Operational Training Command, 
U. S. Atlantic Fleet. In 1947 he was designated to command 
Volunteer Electronics Warfare Company 9-146, Emporia, 
Kans. He was relieved of command when he moved to 
Paris in 1949. Cmdr. Daniels was assigned to Volunteer 
Electronics Warfare Company 8-51, Paris, as training 
officer. He assumed command of the company in August, 
19.50. On deactivation of the volunteer company in 1951 
and activation of Organized Electronics Company 8-12, 
Cmdr. Daniels was named commanding officer. 

He has made his hobby his profession. In civilian life, 
he is chief engineer for the Paris radio station, KPLT. 




Cmdr. I'aul II. 
Daniels, USNR. 



Six members of Naval Reserve Electronics Platoon 
8-50, Clarksville, Ark., hold amateur radio licenses. They 
are Lt. James K. Harrison, W5WXN, officer in charge; 
Russell E. Murray, CWO, W5VUL; Phillip B. Latimer, 
ETC, W5JPY; Grover F. Krohn, ATC, W.5SXM; Frank 
Carl Eichenberger, SA, W5WUP; and Joseph V. Murray, 
SN, WN5BGX. W5WXN, WN5BGX, and WoWUP 
obtained their General Class licenses through membership 
and training in the Clarksville unit. 

Last year W5JPY organized a code class for members 
of a Boy Scout troop to qualify them for a code merit badge. 
Eight scouts continued their study and four now hold 
Novice licenses. 




1955 
EDITION 






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radio theory and technique. A valuable asset, a constant reference source 
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accepted Handbook — plus a complete catalog section featuring leading 
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West Hartford l, Conn. 



135 



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part tied down. Lifetime gray Hammcrtone metal 
case, easy to install. Examine -compare -buy 
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Price complete with tubes, plugs ^**t\ en 

and instruction book. Ham net $119.50 

Contact your dealer or write for literature 



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Vacts About 

l^earnins, Code ^-^ K *^,.''' 



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T'eLEPLEX is the method ^ ,^ 

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Perfect automatic transmission to put Code prac- 
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YL News and Views 

(Continued from page 51) 

for ham lioenses. Eleanor was also elected president of the 
Unit for tlie coming term. . . . The daughter of W4MS, 
SCM of Western Florida, recently became K4AGM (Gwen). 
. . . YLs who attended the ARRL West Gulf Division 
Convention were W5s DEW EGD JAD KQG RYX SPV 
WXT YAJ. . . . Ten hours after the birth of her first 
child, KN6HRP, Laura Lee, began a series of two-meter 
QSOs from her hospital bed with OM KN6ELR at their 
home in Santa Barbara. The baby's pediatrician was 
KGCR.J (this item by way of OM Iv6ATX). . . . YLs 
who attended the October hamfest of the Federation of 
Long Island Radio Clubs were W2s EEO IGA JZX KDP 
MWY; K2s AFR CFF EBU; KN2.JHQ. . . . OM W3IIX 
points out an article in the National Radio-TV Neivs. Oct.- 
Nov. '.')4 issue, which briefly describes the educational use 
of amateur radio by W8NEJ and XYL W8NEK, Marianne, 
in connection with their work on the Seney National Wild- 
life Refuge in Michigan. . . . The licensing of four more 
Y'Ls who work at Headquarters (see photo, December QST. 
page 52) brings the total of Y'Ls at 38 La Salle Road to ten, 
thanks in large measure to WIYY'M, Ellen, who has con- 
ducted classes during lunch hour for months. Several of the 
girls who started as Novices have gone on to General or 
Technician Class licenses. Calls of the Headquarters girls 
are Wis YYM ZCS ZIB ZID ZIM ZJE; WNls CIE CIJ 
CIM CLC. 

YLs You May Have Worked 

Since acquiring her license in August. 19.53, W0OMM, 
Donna Hosey, has worked various frequencies daily from 
morning until late at night- Active in RACES, a member of 



V A 


1 ^'-'x '^'^ 


2 


. ^ ■ ■ ft 


^S 


^^ 



WPOMM 

the Independence Three Trails Radio Club, the Missouri 
Emergency Net, the Kansas Net, and the YLRL, Donna 
particularly likes to handle traffic going into Kansas City. 
She usually makes several telephone calls a day to deliver 
messages from servicemen and college students. Donna 
works 10, 20, 40, and 75. Her OM is W0QZY and her son 
is W0OMP. 



1955 FIELD DAY DATES 

ARRL is pleased to announce that the 
1955 Field Day will be held the week end 
of June 25th and 26th. Whether you plan 
to participate with a club or on an individ- 
ual basis, it's not too early to start thinking 
about Field Day. Watch QST for complete 
rules. 



136 



ft ir> i i!arv<(anftaw<an ' tBftftan ^ b'e w ^'{^ 





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m^rrti^Bt of QIljrtHtmaB^B 

anin I|appir0t at 5f^m f ^ara 

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137 



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Correspondence 

(Continued from page 60) 

FOGEY 

80.37 Otli Court So. 
Birniingham 6, Ala. 
Editor, QST: 

Keep up the good work (" Fulminatin's from Ol' Fogey," 
Nov. QST). To me, a great deal of the pleasure of amateur 
radio operating is gone today because of the sloppy tech- 
niques that are in use — even in my favorite game of traffic 
handling. . . . 

— Marc Molynetcx, jr., W4MVM 

1917 Glenview 
Park Ridge, 111. 
Editor, QST: 

. . . Such articles as "Fogeys" are very exasperating to 

me; you may as well devote the space to advertising. . . . 

— Jim Strandberg, W9JBZ 

SEEK YOU 

Rice Rd., R.R. No. 2 
East Aurora, N. Y. 
Editor, QST: 

I just got my Novice about two months ago, and am 
I ever having fun! 

One thing which is very noticeable on the Novice band 
is the time spent on calling CQ. A lot of the Novices call 
CQ ten times or more before giving their call. I feel that a 
CQ consisting of CQ three times, the call three times, and 
then that again is very adequate. Also, after making a 
contact with a station it is only necessary to give his call 
and sign yours once, or at the most twice. I am quite sure 
that when someone calls CQ for a seemingly endless period 
of time, he loses contacts because a lot of people don't 
want to wait until the call letters come around. 

So, Novices, let's make our CQs a little shorter, thus our 
QSOs a little more interesting and numerous. 

— Nancy Townsend. KN2JIR 

PI-NET SAFEGUARD 

Chatham, Mass. 
Editor, QST: 

There are many transmitter circuits in QST and the 
Handbook which use a pi-network output circuit. In most 
of these circuits danger exists in case of failure of the d.c. 
blocking condenser. This can place the d.c. plate voltage 
on the antenna and feeder. In commercial designs this 
possibility is anticipated and protection provided by the 
use of an r.f . choke between the output terminal and ground. 
Examples of circuits in wliich this danger could exist may 
be found in Dec. 1953 QST, p. IS, June 1954 QST, p. 18, 
and the 1952 Handbook, pages 171, 156, 138. 

After giving a httle thought to this situation I think 
you will agree that you should bring this point to the atten- 
tion of readers of your publications. 

This problem is not based on theory only. I know of an 
instance where a serious shock resulted. 

— William C. Ryder, WIJNM 

[EoiTOR'a Note — This source of danger has been recog- 
nized in the ARRL Safely Code which appeared in the June, 
1952, issue of QST. This measure also reduces the peak 
voltage across both input and output condensers, since it 
provides a d.c. short across the capacitors. Since the 
failure of the blocking condenser may cause the choke to 
bum out, the primary of the plate transformer should be 
fused, not only as a measure of personal safety, but also to 
save the equipment.] 



HAMFEST CALENDAR 

District of Columbia — The Old Timers Club of the Wash- 
ington and Baltiiiiore area will hold their winter dinner and 
meeting the third Saturday in February in Wa.shington, 
D. C. Tickets for the event will be $3 per person, and reser- 
vations may be obtained from Dr. A. J. Dalton, 1007 Paul 
Drive, Rockville, Maryland. 



138 




Don't forget 
the big date — 
make a note on 
your calendar now. 



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A Radio Corporation of America Subsidiary 



139 



QUARTZ CRYSTALS 

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Low Frequency — FT-241A for SSB. Lattice 
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Fundamental Frequencies , fract ions omitted. 



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370 393 414 

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FT-243 - .093" Pin Dia. - 
.486" Pin SPC iot Ham and 
General Use. 



49c each — 10 for $4.00 



99e each— 10 for only $8.00 



CR-IA 

SCR 522- H 
Pin, 'o"SP 
5910 7350 
6370 7380 
6450 7390 
6470 7480 
6497 7580 
6522 7810 
6547 7930 
6610 



2030 
2045 
2065 
2082 
2105 
2125 
2145 
2155 



FT-171B — BC-6I0 
Banana Plugs. 
'4 "SPC 
2220 2360 3202 3850 
2258 2390 3215 3945 
2260 2415 3237 3955 
2282 2435 3250 3995 
2290 2442 3322 
2300 2532 3510 
2305 2545 3520 
2320 2557 3550 



TG 34A CODE KEYER 
AUTOMATIC CODE PRACTICE 
SENDING AND KEYING OSCIL- 
LATOR. 



115 



230 



V (•' 50-60 cycles. Portable, 
eaker and amplifier. Variable 
5 to 25 w.p.m. Uses inked tapes. 

$19.95 



Built 
speed fi 

Brand new 

Set of -S ilijTerenI tnpex 



4035 
4080 
4165 
4190 
4280 
4300 
4330 
4397 
4490 
4495 
4535 
4735 
4840 
4930 
4950 
4980 
5030 
5205 
5300 
5385 



5379 
5437 
5485 
5500 
5660 
5675 
5700 
5706 
5725 
5040 
5750 
5773 
5780 
5806 
5840 
5852 
5873 
5875 
5880 
5906 



5925 
5940 
5950 
5973 
6240 
6250 
6273 
6275 
6300 
6325 
6350 
6373 
6375 
6400 
6406 
6425 
6673 
6675 
6700 
6706 



7573 7850 

7575 7873 

7600 7875 

7606 7900 

7625 7906 

7640 7925 

7641 7940 
7650 7950 
7673 7973 
7675 7975 
7700 8260 
7706 8273 
7725 8275 
7740 8300 
7750 8325 
7773 8630 
7775 8683 
7800 8690 
7825 
7840 



99«l each — 10 for $8.00 



1015 6125 

2125 6140 

3680 6150 

3735 6175 

3800 6200 

3885 6440 

3940 6450 

3955 6473 

3990 6475 

6000 6500 

6025 6506 

6050 6550 

6075 6573 

6100 6575 



7175 8075 

7250 8100 

7300 8125 

7306 8140 

7325 8150 

7340 8173 

7350 8175 

7375 8200 

7400 8340 

7425 8350 

7440 8380 

8000 8400 

8025 8425 

8050 8450 



Add 20c' postage for every 10 crystals 
(or less). Indicate 2nd choice; subst. 
may be necessary 



$3.75 



mmaMmEmm 



520 TENTH ST. 
N.W..Wash.,D. C. Dept. Q. 




RCA INSTITUTES, INC. 

A Service of Radio Corporafion of America 
350 West 4th St.. New York 14, N. Y. 

OFFERS COURSES 

IN ALL TECHNICAL PHASES OF 

RADIO, TELEVISION, ELECTRONICS 

Approved for Veterans 

Write Dept. ST for Catalog 



m^MS-'^^'^^ 



Be a Radio Ham or Commercial Operator. Pass 
FCC code test in few weeks. Fascinating hobby. 
" V/^ Good pay, interesting work in Commercial field. 
/yf^A Same system used by radiotelegraph specialists. 
'"" FREE book explains how Amateurs and Onerators 

learn code and develop amazing skill and speed. 

Candler System C;o.,Dept. 4-A. Box 928, Denver l.Colo., U.S.A. 
and S2b, Abingdon Kd., Kensington High St., London W. 8, England 



GONSET HEADQUARTERS 



THE GONSET 
SUPER-CEIVER 

Crystal controlled. 
RF and AF gain con- 
jkp trots. Adjustable 
^- squelch. Self-con- 
tained power supply. 
Ham Net only $1 19.50 






M. A. R. S. 



Army-Air Force Observe 
MARS Sixth Anniversary 

The Military Affiliate Radio System has en- 
tered upon its seventh year of operation. MARS 
will continue to emphasize the training of ama- 
teur radio operators who want to learn more 
about mihtary radio practices and procedures. 

Efforts are being made to establish an effective 
in-placo system which can l)e made available 





Maj. General Back 



Maj. General Blake 



to military commanders for planned use in the 
event of peacetime disaster or national emer- 
gency. 

The Chief Signal Officer, U. S. Army, and the 
Director of Communications, U. S. Air Force, 
sent the following message to all MARS members 
on the anni versary date : 

SPECIAL BROADCAST — 26 NOVEMBER 1954 
To All MARS Members 

The Sixth Anniversary of the Military Affiliate Radio 
System, 26 November 1954, marks another year of inte- 
grated radio operation and training between Army and Air 
Force communications and United States licensed amateur 
radio operators. Events of the past year have proved that 
military unit stations at Army and Air Force Bases can 
be netted with personally-owned and operated amateur 
facilities to provide a reliable system for training and 
for MARS administrative traffic. Personal messages han- 
dled for Armed Forces personnel and their families and 
friends have contributed to the high morale of our service- 
men everywhere. The Chief Signal Officer and tlie Director 
of Communications unite in extending sincere thanks for 
your loyalty and support. We urge you to continue to carry 
on the advancement of MARS. Sgd Major General George 
I. Back, Chief Signal Officer, United States .A.rmy, and 
Major General Gordon A. Blake, Director of Communica- 
tions, United States Air Force. 



ISVOURSONFILE 

WITH YOUR QSL MGR?. 



ioud 




140 




lommunicator: 

A big 2 meter success story 



in three simple words... 9 

PERFORMANCE, PORTABILITY, PRECISION 1 



f-METER STANDARD COMMUNICATOR 
(Less squelch, etc.) 
115V AC/6V DC. #3026 . . . 209.50 



2-METER DELUXE COMMUNICATOR 

115V AC/6V DC «302S . . . 229.50 
115V AC/12VDC #3057 . . . 229.50 



6-METER DELUXE COMMUNICATOR 

115V AC/6V DC #3049 . . . 229.50 
115V AC/ 12V DC #3058 . . . 229.50 



Every modern 
circuit element 
essential to 
outstanding 
performance 




2-METER VFO .... #3024 . 
AT rOUB DISrSIBUTOI 



\ 



Avoilable separately 



integrated into o ^ 

completely unique 
20 pound package. 



I GONSETCO. 



801 South Main Street 



Burbank, Calif. 



OTHER 

COMMUNICATORS 

FOR 

LOW POWER 

INDUSTRIAL 

AND 

GROUND-TO-AIR 

APPLICATIONS^ 




Me^jU FREED COMPONENTS /o^ HI-FIDELITY AMPLIFIER 
PROVIDE IMPROVED PERFORMANCE 



This Freed circuit incorporates several changes 
from the original Williamson circuit to provide op- 
timum performance at high and low frequency ex- 
tremes. It is rated at 10 watts with triode connected 
output tubes. However, by connecting the screen 
grids of these tubes to taps provided on the Freed 
KA-10 output transformer, it is possible to double 
the power output for a given distortion percentage. 

Recommended power supply is choke-input type 
with a two-section L-C filter to maintain constant 
D.C. output and to improve filtering to the voltage 
amplifiers. 



Other high quality Freed components Include minia- 
ture audio transformers, magnetic amplifiers, toroidal 
inductors, subminiature encapsulated pulse trans- 
formers, precision filters and a complete line of 
precision laboratory test instruments. Complete cata- 
logs are available to engineers requesting same on 
firm letterheads. 




Freed components required 
for this amplifier include: 
FREED KP-IO POWER TRANSFORMER 
FREED KA-IO OUTPUT TRANSFORMER 
FREED KC-10 FILTER REACTOR 
FREED KC-n FILTER REACTOR 



A DETAILED TECHNICAL SHEET AND PARTS LIST IS AVAILABLE ON REQUEST 

ASK FOR BULLETIN NO. 5402 



FREED TBANSFOBMER CO.. INC. 



1703Weirfield St.. 
Brooklyn (Ridgewood) 27, N.Y. 



141 



Be^^ of Your Transmitter to Antenna Match 
with the new CoAx Ratiometer (swr.) 



Install a CoAx Ratiometer in the line between your trans- 
mitter and antenna (or tuner) and stop guessing at a proper 
match. In this new device, well-established principles are 
applied to produce a unique answer to the problem of 
measuring standing wave ratios. The result is a design of 
exceptional accuracy and simplicity. 

There are no condensors to balance, no resistors in line 
to dissipate your power. The unit handles frequencies from 
2 to 200 MCS, power loads from 10 to 1000 watts (so it 
can't be overloaded). Rugged construction, but so compact 
it can easily be permanently installed inside your trans- 
mitter. Free mounting bracket included with every unit. 

Sensing unit may be purchased with or without the 
easy-to-read remote indicator. Complete instructions include 
how to make your own remote indicator. See your favorite 
distributor today. If he hasn't heard about the CoAx Rati- 
ometer, send us his name and your check. We'll ship direct 
to you, postpaid. 73-W8IJ 

UNIVERSAL SERVICE 

114 N. Third St. Columbus 15, Ohio 



Model KW-4 

Specify 52 or 72 Ohm 

CoAx Unit and Switch Box 

$27.50 




Model KW-4M 
Specify 52 or 72 Ohm 
CoAx Unit with Meter 

$47.50 

Full One Year Warranty 
on Both Models 



164 PAGE 

1955 B-A CATALOG 



complete guifle to tverytning in Kaaio. 
TV and Electronics tor Dealers. Service- 
men, Schools, Amateurs, Broadcasters, 
Public Utilities, Engineers, Experi- 
menters, Factories and Laboratories. 
BURSrilN-APPLEBEE CO., 1012 McCEE ST., KANSAS CITY, MO. 



DX-O-GRAPH 



/t's a first in amateur radio! A DX predictor every 
DXer has been waiting for! When used with the 
Bureau of Standards ionosphere predictions, it sug- 
gests which bands to work and when for best DX 
results. This prediaor is a real educational addition 
to any hamshack. Stay abreast of band conditions with 
, DX-O-GRAPH. $2.50 postpaid, USA. Send /or flyer! 

DX-O-GRAPH • Box 4596 • Winston-Salem, N. C. 



For ""top-man-on-the-frequency"^ results! 



BEAMED POWER - 
PERFECT MATCH - 
BALANCED PATTERN 



YOU'RE THERE! 

- wiih 




PRB-TUNED 

BEAMED POWER' 
ROTARIES 

4\ End your antenna problems with the precision- 
. — j buih rotaries that are pre-tuned and matched ior 
optimum performance at your site WHEREVER 
YOU ARE. No tuning or adjusting necessary. 
Quality constructed of finest materials throughout. 



lolhlo yy inc. "coN/CAt-v-BCA/vis' 

^'^^^^ *>*^^^ ASBURy PARK 2, N. J. - Tel.-. Prospect 5-7252 



142 



4 




4^NEW! MASTER-MATCHER! 

H0- 



f^0^j.l WITH BUILT-IN FIELD STRENGTH METER... 





AUTOMATICALLY TUNES THE 
ENTIRE BAND . . . FROM THE DRIVERS SEAT! 



Here! — the latest, most valuable instrument for 
all Hams! The remote controlled band-matcher 
tunes your mobile antenna to exact operating 
frequency. Just flip the switch, presto! ... the 
Master-Matcher goes to work! QSY in any par- 
ticular band without jumping out of your car to 
adjust the antenna loading coil. No guesswork! 
. . . built-in FIELD STRENGTH METER. Peak per- 
formance from your antenna! 

The panel light automatically 

indicates when roller is at Hq\ ^^ ^1 95 
minimum inductance position. 
Available in 6 and 1 2 volt 
models 



Complete 



24 




Mcude/i MoJuU Afo4Uiil, Hhc. 

1306 BOND STREET -LOS ANGELES 36, CALIFORNIA 



AT LEADING 

RADIO JOBBERS 

EVERYWHERE 



143 



il ' . ' you are an. 

Active Amateur 




you 



NEED these 



rvecord keeping can often be tedious. But not with the 
ARRL Log Book. Fully ruled with legible headings it helps 
make compliance with FCC rules a pleasure. Per C^tf 



book . 



JNIobile and portable operational needs are met by the 
pocket-size log book, the Minilog. Designed for ut- 
most convenience and ease 



SO^ 



First impressions are important. Whether you handle ten or 
a hundred messages you want to present the addressee with 
a neat looking radiogram . . . and you can do this by <p ^^ 
using the official radiogram form. 70 blanks per pad. . ^^^ 

If you like to correspond with fellow hams you will find the 
ARRL membership stationery ideal. Adds that ^^ /5/5 
final touch to your letter. Per 100 sheets "^f ,C/C/ 



and they are available 
postpaid from . . . 



The American Radio Relay League 

Wesf Hartford, Connecticut 



VIKING ADVENTURER 




tingle-knob bandswitching 80 through 10 meters. 
Rated at 50 watts input and effectively TVI sup- 
pressed. Self-contained power supply Is wired for 
use as an "extra" station power source when trans- 
mitter is not in use. Clean, crisp break-in keying. 

SELECTRONIC SUPPLIES, INC. 

Radio and Electronic Supplies 
1320 Madifon Ave., Toledo 2, Ohio, W8G0E, Mgr. 
803 South Adami St., Peoria 2, III., W9YYM, Mgr. 



RADrO and TELEVISION 

Over 30 years N.E. Radio Training Center. Train 
for all types FCC operators' licenses. Also Radio 
and Television servicing. FM-AM broadcasting 
transmitters at school. Send for Catalog Q. 

MASS. RADIO SCHOOL 



271 Hunlington Avenue 

Lie. by Comr 



Boston 15, MassochuseHs 
. Mass. Dept. Educ. 



CHASSIS - BRACKETS 
CHANNELS - BOXES 

with IKie A.B. Parker 

sheet met si folding mch'm 

Save dollars! Fold /our own chassis, brackets, and boxes 
with this famous English-mode sheet metal brake. Forms 
any metal up to 18 guoge mild steel by 24 inches wide with 
simple pull of the handle. Portable vise model — perfect 
for hams, service shops, schools, and laboratories. Price: 
only $12.95 plus smoll duty charge. Write today for catalog 
sheet ond order form! 

TELVAC Dept. 12 Box 6001 Arlington 6, Va.' 



144 






Ground Plane Receptacle 

. . . for 20, 15 or 10 meters. Hole in bottom 
threaded for 1" pipe. Holes for antenna and 
for four horizontal or drooping rodials take 
Vi" tubing. Solid aluminum casting. Weight 2'/2 
pounds. 

Posfpaid anywhere in U. S. $0«95 

I KKCf\ 509 Skyvlew Drive, 
LCE\«\^ Nashville 6, Tenn. 




for everything in Electronics! 



1440 page MASTER 

•Detailed specs • 8,500 illus. 

• 85,000 items • Fully indexed 

• Full descriptions • Wgt. 6 lbs. 



$1.95 at most distributors. List $6.50 
UNITED CATALOG PUBLISHERS, INC., 
110 Lafoyette St., N. Y. C. 13 



^XJJ DIRECT 
FROM -FACTORY 



MIDDLEMAN 
PROFITS 



MASTER MECHANIC PORTABLE 
LIGHT PLANTS, PUSH BUTTON START 

AC riant 600-700 Watts — 115 v. 60 eye. 
l"o\vi-ri-d by a riiRged 2 hp. easy starting 
Briggs gas engine. No wiring necessary; 
just plug in and operate. I'lenty of current 
for receivers, transmitters, antenna motors, 
emergency lights, etc. which require up to 
700 Watts. Ideal for radio amateurs. Civil 
Defense, trailers and camps. Comi)Icte with 
Voltmeter and built-in winding to charge 6 
V. auto batteries. 
Item 24. Wt. 75 lbs. Be prepared if war or storms 

knock out power lines 

700-800 Watt Plant (Item 44) same as above but 

with larger engine and greater capacity 

1000-1200 Watt Plant (Item 45) same as Item 24 but 
with larger generator and engine — 50% greater out put 

We make all sizes up to 25,000 Walts. Write for information. 

Send Wt for big 1955 Catalog. Free with order. 

Prices f.o.b. factory. Money back guarantee. Send check or M.O. 

Master Mechanic Mfg. Co., Depl. 62-J, Burlington, Wis. 




$143.50 
$169.95 
$199.50 



THERE'S MONEY I 

Commercial Mobile- Radio Maintenance wi(, 
2n(i Class Ticket and LAMPKIN METERS! 





MOW Check frequent) 

Xt«500MC! 



LAMPKtN 105-B MICROMETER FREQUENCY METER. 
Heterodyne type, uses only one crystal to meosure oil 
tronsmitters 0,1 to 175 mc, crystol-controlled trans- 
mitters to 500 mc. Precision CW signal generator for 
receiver final lilignment above 20 mc. Weight 12'''' 
lbs. Width 13". Price $220.00. 



LAMPKIN 205-A FM MODULATION METER. Tunoble 
25 to 500 mc. in one band. Direct indicotion of peok 
voice deviotion, 0-25 kc. positive or negative. Relative 
field -strength meter.- Built-in speaker. Weight 14 lbs. 
Width 12 "4". Price $240.00. 

r 



MAIL 
COUPON 
TODAY! 



LAMPKIN LABORATORIES, INC. bradenton, Florida 



LAMPKIN 

Mfg. Divisi 

Please 


LABORATORIES, INC. 
in, Bradenton, Florida 
rush me more dope Dn 


the 105 


B 


and 


205-A. 




City 






State. 









145 



HAM-ADS 



(1) Advertising shall pertain to radio and shall be of 
nature of interest to radio amateurs or experimenters in 
iheir pursuit of the art. 

(2) No display of any character will be accepted, nor can 
any special typographical arrangement, such as all or part 
capital letters be used which would tend to make one adver- 
lisement stand out from the others. No Box Reply Service 
can be maintained in these columns. 

(3) The Ham-Ad rate is 30* per word, except as noted in 
paragraph (6) below. 

(4) Remittance in full must accompany copy. No 
cash or contract discount or agency commission will 
be allowed. 

(5) Clo.'^ing date for Ham-Ads is the 20th of (he second 
month preceding publication date. 

(6) A special rate of 7t per word will apply to adver- 
tising which, in our judgment. Is obviously non- 
commercial In nature, and Is placed and signed by a 
member of the American Radio Relay League. Thus, 
advertising of bona fide suri;lus e<iuiiimcnt owned, used au(l 
for sale by an individual or apparatus offered for exchange or 
advertising inciuiring for special equipment, if by a member 
of tiie American Radio Relay League take the 7i rate. An 
attempt to deal in apparatus in quantity for profit, even 
if by an individual, is commercial and all advertising by 
him takes the 30C rate. Provisions of paragraphs (1), (2) 
and (5), apply to all advertising in tliis column regardless 
of which rate may ai)ply. 

(7) Because error Is more easily avoided. It Is re- 
quested signature and address be printed plainly. 
Typewritten copy preferred. 

(8) No advertiser may use more than 100 words in any 
one issue nor more than one ad in one issue. 



Having made no invest igalion of the advertisers in the classified 
columns, the publishers of QST are unable to vouch for their 
integrity or for the grade or character of the products or services 
advertised. 



QUARTZ — Direct importers from Brazil of best quality pure 
quartz suitable for making piezo-electric crystals. Diamond Drill 

Carbon Co., 248 Ma dison Ave., N e w York City 16. 

MOTOROLA used communication equipment bought and sold. 

W5BCO , Ral ph Hicks, 204 E. Fairview. Tulsa, Okla. 

SUBSCRrPTION.sTliadio publications. Latest Call Books, $3.50. 

Mrs. Earl Mead, Huntley, Montana^ 

WANTETD: Cash or trade, fixed frequency receivers 28/42 Mc. 

W9\TY. T roy, 111. 

WANTED: All types of aircraft radios, receivers and transmitters. 
Absolutely top prices. Dames, W2KUW, 308 Hickory St., Arlington. 

N.J. 

WANTED: Early wireless gear, books, magazines and catalogs. 
Send description and prices. W6GH, 1010 Monte Drive, Santa 

Barbara, Calif. 

CODE slow? Try new method. Free particulars. Donald H. Rogers, 

Ivyland. Penna. 

URGENTLY need AN/APR-4 items. New high prices. Littell, Far 
Hills Branch. Box 26, Dayton 9, Ohio. 

WANTED: Cash paid for BC-610 xmttrs and BC-221 frequency 
meters. In addition we buy technical manuals. Also TCS sets, RSA0 
ARN-7, ART-13, DY-17, others. Amber Company, 393 Greenwich 
St., New York 13, N. Y. 

DON'T Fail! Check yourself with a time-tested Surecheck Test. 
Novice, $1.50; General, $1.75; Amateur Extra, $2. Amateur Radio 
Supply, 1013 Seventh Avenue, Worthington, Minn. 

MICHIGAN HAMS! Amateur supplies, standard brands. Store 
hours 0800 to 1800 Monday through Saturday. Roy J. Purchase, 
W8RP, Purchase Radio Supply, 605 Church St., Ann Arbor, Michi- 
gan. Tel. 8-8696, No. 8-8262. 

WANTED: Bargains in transmitters, receivers, laboratory and test 
equipment, also miscellaneous and unusual gear, etc. What have you? 
Please state price desired. Especially interested in husky power 
supplies, large filter chokes and condensers, etc. Also need plate 
transformers putting out about 4,000 V or more each side center. 
Harold Schonwald, W5ZZ, 718 North Broadway, Oklahoma City 2, 
Oldahoma. 

HANDIEST gadget the c.w. man ever had. Variable speeds for your 
bug key. Whether QSO or traffic, you can change speeds instantly 
to suit the receiving operator. Chrome plated. Send $1.98 with make 
and model of key to J. A. Hills, 8165 Inwood Ave., Dayton 5, Ohio. 
W8FYO. 

SURPLUS: RG-8/U cable 100 ft. $5.95; 250 ft., $13.25; 500 ft. 
$25.00. New connectors, PL-259 and SO-239, 5 for $2.00; new oil- 
filled condensers. 600 WVDC, 2 mfd, 69«, 4 mfd. 90f(. 7 mfd, 95<i, 
dual 8 mfd. $1.95; 1000 WVDC, 1 mfd. 69*. 2 mfd 90«. 4 mfd, $1.59; 
8mfd.$3.2S. AN/APS-13 420 MC transceiver with 17 tubes, $15.50. 
Postage extra. Request new bargain bulletin. Visit new store for 
thousands of unadvertised bargains. Wanted to purchase: Surplus 
radio equipment. Navy synchros. Lectronic Research Laboratories, 
715-19 Arch St., Philadelphia 6, Penna. 



COLLECTING War Dept. Technical Manuals, etc.. in communi- 
cations and electronics. What have you got? Write to: Bob Briody, 
140 West 57th St. (1 RE), New York 19. N. Y. 



FOR Sale: 2 BC-611F Handle- Talkies, in excellent condition. 
W4MFW, Robert J. Moore, 402 Edgewood Avenue, Rome, Georgia. 

WANTED: A U.H.F. Resonator 3-element or Telrex 5-element 20- 
meter beam. Also, a 66 ft. whip. John Wilson, W8ZWX, Lawyer St 
Club, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 



QSLS? QSLS? Get America's finest and largest variety super-glosa 
QSL samples. 2H (refunded). Sakkers. W8DED, Holland. Michigan. 
QSL's-SWL's Meade W0KXL. 1507 Central Avenue, Kansas City. 

Kans. 

QSLS-SWLS. 100, $2.85 and up. Samples 10*. Griflfeth, W3FSW 

1042 Pine Heights Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

QSLS. Samples 100. Printer, Corwith. Iowa. 

QSLS! Advanced Designs! Fast Delivery! Samples 100. Tooker Press, 
Lakehurst, New Jersey. 

QSLS, SWLS. America's Finest!!! Samples 100. C. Fritz, 1213 
Briargate, Joliet, 111. 

QSLS, SWLS. Samples free. Backus, 5318 Walker Ave., Richmond, 
Va. 

QSLS. New — Different. Samples, 100. Graphic Crafts, Route 12, 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 

QSL's, SWL's. Fair prices for excellent quality cards. Eleven styles 

for you to choose from. Samples, 100. Almar Printing Service, 423 

Barker Bldg., Omaha, Nebraska. 

DELUXE QSLS. Petty, W2HAZ. Box 27, Trenton, N. J. Samples, 

100. 

QSL-SWLS. Samples, free. Bartinoski, Houlton, Me. 



QSLS. Samples free. Albertson. W4HUD, Box 322, High Point, N. C. 



QSLS! Two colors, $2.00 hundred. Samples for stamp. Rosedale 

Press, Box 164, Ash er Station. Little Rock, Ark. 

QSLS "Brownie," W3CJI, 3110 Lehigh, Allentown, Penna. Samples 

100; with catalogue, 250. 

QSLS! Taprint, Union, Mississippi. 



QSLS: Beautiful blue, silver and gold on white glossy stock: $3.85 
per 100. Two-day delivery. Satisfaction guaranteed. Rush order and 
get surpr ise of your life. The Constantino Press, Bladensburg, Md. 
QSL-SWL carcls. Sensational offer. Bristol stock 500^1 color $3.95. 
2 color $4.95. 3 color $5.95. Super gloss $1.25 extra. Rainbow cards. 
Samples. QSL Press. Box 71. Passaic. N. J. 



QSL samples. Dime, refunded. Roy Gale, WIBD, Waterford, Conn. 



WANTED: ART-13 transmitters. Write James S. Spivey, Inc., 
4908 Hampflcn Lane, Washington 14, D. C. 

TOP Dollar r>ai<i for ART-lis, dynamotorg, parts, racks and all 
other component parts. Write to Harjo Sales Co., 4109 Burbank 
Boulevard, Burbank, Calif. 



QSLS. Postcard brings samples. Fred Leyden. WINZJ, 454 Proctor 

Ave., Revere 51, Mass. 

QSLS Personalized. 150, $2.00. Samples, 100. Bob Garra, Lehighton, 

Penna. 

QSLS-SWLS. as low as $1.50 per color. Samples dime. Stronberg, 

P.O. Box 151. Highland Station. Springfield. Mass. 

WESTERN Hams, order your QSLS in the west. Save time, save 
money. Personal Prints. P.O. Box 64553, Los Angeles 64, Calif. 
QSLS-SWLS. Samples 100. Malgo Press. 1937 Glendale Ave.. Toledo 
14. Ohio. 

QSLS: Nice designs. Samples. Besesparis, W3QCC, 207 S. Balliet 

St., Frackville. Pa. 

QSLS! Only the very best! Oscar Craig. P.O. Box 157. Newark, 

Arkansas. 

W6HTN, Riesland, prints QSLS. $1.00 for 100. 

QSLSIWant'em fast? Reasonably priced? Cleanly printed "Super 

speed Specials" are the answer. Dozen samples. 100. Robinson. 

W9AYH, Dept. U. 12811 Sacramento, Blue Island, III. 

QSLS-SWLS. Rainbows, Cartoons, Others. Reasonable. Samples 100 
(refunded). Joe Harms. W2JME, 225 Maple. North Plainfield, N. J. 
QSLS distinctively different. Postpaid. Samples free. Roland J. 

Dauphinee. WlKMP/6, Box 78374, Los Angeles 16, Calif. 

BE Admired. Be recognized. Your call-letters on a beautifully fin- 
ished Rhodium tie-bar. $2.00. Val's. 22 Brookshire Road, Hyannis, 

Mass. 

GONSET Communicator converted to new power supply for 12 volt 
ignition. New 12/115 volt Communicator with warranty, $219.50 or 
your Gonset converted, $24.50. Pacific Engineering Co.. 839 N. 
June St.. Los Angeles 38. Calif. 

FOR Sale: 1 basestation transmitter, 2 car transmitters and a num- 
ber of different types of receivers for base station and cars. The 
transmitters are set at 24.58 Kcs. For information on these please 
write or contact Mr. Grover C. Harrison. Police Commissioner, 

Electra, Texas. 

REAL bargains: New and reconditioned Collins. National. Halli- 
crafters. Hammarlund. Johnson, Elmac. Gonset. Morrow. Babcock, 
RME, Barker & Williamson, Harvey- Wells, Millen, Meissner, 
Lysco, Eldico, Sonar, Central Electronics, others. Reconditioned 
S38, $29.00; S38C. $.?9.00; S40A. $69.00; S40B. $79.00; S76, $129.00; 
SX71, $159.00; NC57, $59.00; NC88, $79.00; NC98. $119.00; 
NC125. $129.00; NC173, $149.00; HR05TA1, $159.00; HRO60, 
$389.00; 32V1, $345.00; 32V2, $445.00; Meissner EX, $,i9.00; 
VHF152A. $49.00; RME45, $89.00; HQI29X, $169.00; SX62, 
$179.00; 75A1, $279.00; 75A2, $349.00; 75A3, $429.00; Viking I, 
Viking II, many others. Shipped on trial. Easy terms. .Satisfaction 
guaranteed. List free. Henry Radio, Butler, Mo. 

BARGAINS (with new guarantee): R-9-er. $14.95; Gonset Tribaiid, 
$27.50; S-72, $59.50; S-38C, $35.00; S-40, $65.00; NC-57. $65.00; 
RME-45, $99.00; Lysco 600. $109.00; S-27. $99.00; SX-43, $129.00; 
S-76, $149.00; SX-71, $169.00; SX-42, $189.00; HRO-50, $275.00; 
HT-17. $32.50; EX Shifter, $39.00; Globe Trotter. $49.50; Harvey 
Wells. Sr.. $69.00: DeLuxe. $89.00; Viking I. $209.50; New SS-75, 
$189.00; HT-9, $159.00; Globe King, $275.00; 32V1, $395.00; 
32V2, $475.00; 32V3, $595.00. Free trial. Terms financed by Leo, 
W0GFQ. Write for catalog and best deals to World Radio Labora- 
tories, 3415 West Broadway, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

WANTED: ART-13. DY-12, CU-25, BC-610;iJC-6r4~. BC-9397^C- 
729, BC-348, BC-342, BC-312, ARC-1 , ARC-3, ARN-7, RTA-1 B, TCS, 
Teletype, keyboard perforators. Boehme equipment. BC%221. LM. 
TS test equipment. Technical manuals. Signal thorps catalogs. 
APR-4, APR-5. Any parts for these sets, (.ash or tr.adc (will take any 
amateur or surplus equipment in trade) for new Johnson Viking, 
Ranger, Barker & Williamson, Hallicrafters, Hammarlund, National, 
Gonset, Elmac, Telrex, Central Electronics, Harvey Wells, etc. 
Time payments. Alltronics, Box 19, Boston 1, Mass. Richmond 

2-0048. 

CENTRAL Electronics lOB, $139.95; Collins 32V1. modified, 
$475.00; 32V3. $595.00; Deltronic ( 1)1 44, $129.95; ICIilico M1)-40P. 
$44.95, MT-2, $39.95, MR-2, $44.95; Elenco HSM-3, $50.00; 
Hallicrafters S-38B, $39.95; S-53A, $64.95; .SX-62, $250.00; 
SX-71, $159.95; HT-I?, $39.95; HT-18, $75.00; SR-75. $39.95; 
Heath AR-2, $24.95; AT-1, $24.95; Hickok 198, $30.00; 288X, 
$79.95; Harvey- Wells APS-50, $29.95; TBS-50A, $79.95; TBS-SOr, 
$79.95; TBS-SOl). $99.95; Millc-n 92101, $17.50; 9080(1 $19.95; 
National HI'S. $99.95; HRO-M. $125.00; N(:-46. $69.95; N( -183. 
$199.95; N( -1830, $299.95; SW-54, $34.95; RME DB-20, $29.95; 
Sonar MR-3, $39.95; other used items available. Free list from Carl, 
WIBFT, Evans Radio, P.O. Box 312, Concord, N. H. 



OUTSTANDING ham list always. Our prices on trade-ins of all 
amateur brands are realistic and down to earth. We feature Johnson, 
National. Collins, Hallicrafters. Gonset, Elmac, Harvey-Wells, 
Morrow. Central Electronics and other leaders. We trade easy and 
offer our own time-payment plan tailored to fit you. All leading 
brands of new equipment always in stock. Write today for latest 
bulletin, Stan Burghardt, W0BJV, Burghardt Radio Supply, Inc., 

Box 41, Watertown, S. Dak. 

FOR SALE: Transceiver No. 19 Mark II complete with manual; 
BC342-N llOV AC with speaker; T-20/ARC5 converted 80m see 
QST Nov. 51; Transformer 1700V ct 500 mils. K2GXA, 2 Knoll 

Ro ad, Ten afly , N. J. Will take best offer. 

SELL:QSfsin binders 1939 thru 1943 $1.50 per year. Unbound 1944 
thru 1949, $1,00 per year. Surplus BC-406 best offer. W9DKW. 632 

Pearl St. Ottawa, Illino^s^ 

TRADE: Universal Lawn Mower Sharpener, made by Rogers Mfg. 
Co., takes 24" mowers, excellent cond. for good receiver, HQ 129 X, 
SX 71 or equivalent. .Sell; Heathkit AR-2 and cabinet, $20; Tape- 
master Pt-125 tape recorder, S60 or trade. H. N. Webster, 106 

Nasturtiu m Ave., Sebring, Florida. 

WE255A Polar Relays new, boxed, S6.50; #12 Teletypewriter with 
keyboard, Sync, motor, S70; 21A Printer, S30; Heath Signal Tracer. 
S14; Want Teletype equipment complete or parts. Andrew Stavros, 

W2A KE, 116-32 132 St., South Ozone Park, N. Y. 

SELL: Heathkit Signal Generator SG-8, $13,00; Heathkit Audio 
Wattmeter, $19.00; Heathkit A.C.V.T.V.M.. $19.00, all in brand 
new condition and assembled; Dumont Oscilloscope Type 274, 
$25.00; Hylite 20 meter Beam Type 3E20T, $30.00. James M. 

Hartshorne, 502 Veterans Place, It haca, New York. 

FOR Sale: RME-45 receiver with matching speaker, $100.00; 
RME-DB22A Preselector, $50.00. Both in excellent condition. 

L. Wetz el, 910 Mt. Vernon Ave.. Haddonfield. N. J. 

ELDICO 60 Watt XMTR 40 and 80 meter coils. Hallicrafter S-77A 
Receiver, excellent condition. Best offer takes. A. Gantcher. 1973 

8l3t Street. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SELL: Gonset Commander transmitter with tubes and mike, 
$65.00; Gonset 75-160 meter converter, $15.00; both for $75.00. 
Good condition. Gullberg, W5GGS, 405 Bluebonnet Drive, La 

Marque. Texas^ 

WANTED~BC-348R, RS/ARN-7. T-47A/ART-13. CU 2S/ART- 
13, BC-653, CU-32/ART-13, DY-17. Send full list of what you have. 
Top dollar paid. Radalab, 87-17 124 Street, Richmond Hill 18. 

New York. 

SELL: Hammarlund 4-20 xmitter. 35w 80 to 10 TVI'ED, coils in- 
cluded, with VFO, $50.00; 4-11 Mod, $35.00; S40 RCVR, $65.00; 
all band precelector, $8.00. Perf. Cond. V. P. Ternullo, 43 Robblee 

Ave.. San Franciso. Cal. Va. 4-6569. Local Preferred?? 

SALE: Viking-I, VFO. de-TVPD; 4D32 spares, 522 transmitter 
with supply, 10 meter mobile transmitter, bandswitching VFO 75 
watt-transmitter-exciter, NC-100-ASD Receiver and speaker, R'9er, 
100 kc std Gonset 10-11, TR-2 rotator, PE-103 complete, 10 m 
beam, VTVM, Sears Drillpress. Williamson HI-FI amplifier, mikes, 
parts, meters, test equipment etc. Send for list. Peter Rosenbaum, 
W2GAW. 41-26. 73rd Street. Jackson Heights. N. Y. Apt. 22D 
NC: 183. speaker, and NFM adapter, like new, $200. WSISS. 3902 

Park Lane, Dallas. Tex. 

TRADE: Custom rifle .257 Remington, Gibson barrel. Waffenfa- 
brick Mauser action. Weaver K4 scope, Litschert 8x attachment. 
sheepskin gun-carrying case. Very good condition, originally $240.00. 
Want good clean receiver in HRO class. All correspondence answered. 
WIVZB. Ed Chm iele wski. 291 Dyer street. New Haven. Conn. 
BRAND new lOB multiphase exciter. Aligned and tested. Never 
used. $149.50. Lots of parts and gear for sale and trade. Send for list. 

W0 QFZ. 2318 Second Ave.. Council Bluffs. Iowa. 

SELL: Supreme 150 watt transmitter with coils for ten, twenty, forty 
and eighty meters. Instruction book. RME 69 receiver with DB 20 in 
one cabinet, with speaker. Both like new. Wind Turbine roof tower, 
with rotary mechanism. New. with prop pitch motor. Two Selsyn 
motors — matched. $300.00 takes all. Local only. Must pick up. 
W2NQN, 31-14 103rd Street, Corona, L. I., New York. 

WEBSTER Model 81 wire recorder, $45.00; BC-348 S meter external 
power supply, $60.00; 3-100 mmf. 20KV vacuum condensers. $9.00 
each; Prewar Super-Pro, $70.00; RCAF communications receiver 
140Kc-21Mc with 12V dynamotor,$40.00; Navy MO-1 ship/shore 
transmitter/receiver 4 crystal controlled channels 40 watts 2-3 Mc, 
$75.00; 2.1-3MC command transmitter, $12.00; 2 Setchall-Carlson 
BC-1206 receivers, $4.00 each; 5" Heathscope, $25.00; Telrad fre- 
quency standard, $14.00; UTC 300 watt modulation transformer 
with screen tap, $10.00; Kenyon conmercial plate transformer 
{150 lb.) 220 volt primary with filament transformers for bridge 
rectifier 2500 V 800 MA DC. $40.00. Want 7SA2 receiver. W2CFT. 
Box 483, Lake Ronkonkoma. L. I., N. Y. 

FOR Sale, complete Delux Custom TVI proofed station. Includes 
Super Pro Receiver with lOOkc frequency standard, CW monitor, 
speaker and power supply. 400 watt transmitter, pi network output 
with rotary final coil, completely bandswitching. Electronic key, bug, 
24 hour clock, vertical ground plane antenna for 20 meters. Price 
$380. Photo on request. A. W. Speyers, W2CZA. 39 Lowell ave.. 
Summit, New Jersey. 

WILCOX-GAY Recordio, dual spd. disc recorder, good condx. 
First $50 or best offer. W9DSV, Box 261, Webster. Wise. 

SELL — G. E. Plate Voltage Transformer, 2400 each side of center 
tap, 1000 Mils., $20.00. 2 Taylor Tubes, T-124 B with new Sockets 
and Filament Trans., $10.00. Robbins & Myers MG set, 500 Volts 
D.C.,like new, $25.00. Earl Brockway. 714 Clifford St.. Flint. Mich. 

SIGNAL Corps Frequency Meter BC221-K 125-20,000 KC. AC 
operated, modulated, complete with crystal and calibration charts, 
condition very good. Ack Radio Supply Company. 3101 4th Avenue 
S., Birmingham, Ala. 

FOR Sale: Garrard 3-speed RC-80 Record-Changer, both spindles, 
$37.50; Pickering 230-H Preamplifier with tubes, 132-E Record Com- 
pensator. S-120M Cartridge, $30; RCA- Victor 45EY2 Record- 
Changer, $22.50; Teletone AM-FM 8-tube Radio. $25; Cascade 
2-speed Disc-Recorder-Radio-Phonograph, $50; Electro- Voice 950 
"Cardax" Mike, $18; Eicor Tape Recorder, 7 H" speed, 7" reels, $75. 
All excellent, priced FOB, sold on money-back guarantee. V. R. 
Hein, 418 Gregory, Rockford. Illinois. 

FOR Sale: Viking I with 4D32. Factory wired with Johnson VFO. 
Ready to go. Going higher power. Price $195.00. Woodie, WIVYI. 
Main St., Topsfield. Mass. Phone TUcker 7-5555. 



BAY Area Hams — Best offer takes 500 watt fone rig with 4-125s in 
final. Also 4 band ACR-5 set. LM-14. 1250 volt power supply plus 

other items. W6PYR. 

FABULOUS K2CBO/20M '•Short" Beam puts low power man on 
map, ask any Brooklyn ham. lOM dimensions, seven pounds, 1:1 
SWR, front-back 28 db! Only $39.95. Specifications wTite Gellman. 

K2C BO, 1268 East 12, Brooklyn 30, N. Y. 

RECEIVERS repaired and aligned by competent engineers, using 
factory standard instruments. Prompt service, at low cost. Our 
nineteenth year. Douglas Instrument Laboratory. 176 Norfolk 
Avenue, Boston 19, Mass. 

VAN SICKLE has the new gear in stock. Alliance antenna rotators 
with control box, $20.00 prepaid in U. S. A. Bargain hunters ask for 
housecleani ng list. W9KJF, 1320 Calhoun. Ft. Wayne, Indaina. 
RECORDING Fans! Swap tapes everywhere. Details free. Box 

1404-B, San Francisco 1, Calif. 

SELL AR88 receiver, like new. Also VHF 152A, like new. Make an 
offer. W2MFS, D. W. Keefe, 37 Highridge Road, Hartsdale. N. Y. 
FOR Sale: ATR battery eliminator, model 610MC — Elid. new, 
$25.00; low-pass filter B&W 426, $10; microphone, D-104 and stand 
$12.00; Chicago plate transformer 4700 volts ct. at .500 amps, new, 
$30.00; transformer, 6.3 v. at 20 amp., new, $4.00. Gasoline generator 
"Home Lite," 28)2 VDC, 2000 watts; carbon-pile regulator, like 
new, $100; Master Mobile Mount 75 m. "Hi-Q" coil, antenna, $12; 
dynamotors, 12VDC to 600 VDC at .200 amps, $12. New Westing- 
house panel meters, 3", $5.00; 75-A2 with speaker, excellent, $320; 
Simpson "240" multimeter, new, $17.50. W5VRO. Capt. James 

Craig, jr.. 341 3 W. Roosevelt Dr.. Lake Charles, La. 

WANTED: Back in Ham Radio. Will buy good receiver and 500- 
to 1000 watt all-band transmitter. Send full details and price to 

H. G . Palin. P.O. Box 41, Carmel, Ind. 

WANTED: Copy John Riders book "Cathode Ray Tube at Work." 
State condition and price. Walter Babcock, W2RXW, 405 Sayles 

St . , Oneida, N. Y. 

SELL: Thordarson Type 22R35 combination plate and fil. power 
xfrmer 800 VCT, 340 Ma. 5v-6a, 6.3v-7a and Thordarson choke 7hy 
300 Ma., new, used 2 months. Both for $11.00. W0NUI, Box 171, 
Henderson, Minn. 
ROYAL Air Force receiver 1155 powerpack, loudspeaker. A. Glass, 

9401-64 Rd . New York 74, Illinois 9-0905. 

SELL 61 -foot Vesto tower, tilt head, complete 20-meter Gordon ro- 
tator and beam, control and coax cable, H.D. power supply parts, 
VM-5 modulation transformer for KW rig. W4KTZ. 377 Winton, 
Louisville. Ky. 

LATE Hallicrafters S-76, $125.00. TV set suitable monitor. $30. 

W4 API, 1420 South Randolph, Arlington, Va. 

SWAP: antique magneto, 10-line telephone switchboard sold by Sears 
Roebuck & Co., in good shape, for multi-band transmitter and 
receiver for ham bands, complete. W. G. Horn. W5GSF. Bay Springs, 

Miss. 

TR75tV, good shape, 40 and 80 mtr. coils, $49.00. Postpaid W0OSE, 

B ob Sleyster, 1032 N. 77th Ave., Omaha, Nebr. 

SW-3 wanted. State model, condition, accessories, W2IXZ, 245 E^st 
51 , N. Y. 22, N. Y. 

SELL: Instructograph with 16 tapes, $25.00. In excellent condition. 
Dick Werner, W80EJ, 808 Lexington Ave., Terrace Park, Ohio. 

SELL: Lettine Model 240 transmitter, $65.00; matching antenna 
tuner with R.F. meter. $15.00; both like new with coils for 40 and 80. 
$75. Spencer Lane, 3985 Gouverneur Ave., New York 63, N. Y. 

FOR Sale: Hallicrafters S40 with manual. Good condition, $49. 
Leiber, W5VUE, 130 Langston, Hot Springs, Ark. 

SELL: Beautiful commercial custom-built 200-watt phone trans- 
mitter completely enclosed in 6 ft. cabinet, quick shift 80—40 with 
single control. Cost about $2,800. Sale price: $278.00. Also complete 
power supply, 1000 VDC at 500 Ma or 2000 V at 300 Ma, plus AC 
filament and DC relay voltages, $78. 450TH tubes, $1 7.50 each or two 
for $30. All F.o.b. W7DI, Cheyenne, Wyoming. Write for details: 
Carl B. Hempel, Box 2098. 

WANTED: National HFS 6 volt supply 686S. C. B. Thurston, 440 
Rice St., Anoka, Minn. 

FOR Sale: General Electric YRS-1 single sideband selector with 
instruction book, $60.00. E. Seller, East Bloomfield, N. Y. 

WHY shop for a deal? Write me: I will offer highest trade-in in the 
country for your used equipment. Uncle Dave, W2APF, Fort Orange 
Radio Distributing Co., 904 Broadway, Albany, N. Y. 

SELL almost new RCA W056A, $145.00. Simpson 260, $25.00. 
R. Guttentag, 828 Midwood Street, Brooklyn 3, N. Y. Tel: HI: 
6-8989. 

FOR Sale: Deluxe kilowatt rig, with 100 watt exciter which can be 
used as separate AM modulated transmitter, either available or 
both. NC183. S-72. 100 watt portable rig. Delu.xe 3-band mobile fig, 
VFO and band switching from front seat while in motion. Wanted: 
Hickok 288X generator. Don M. Lidenton, 701 Poplar, Poplar Bluff, 
Mo. 

SELL: Small prop pitch rotor system complete, except cable. Used 
very little, $40. W2GWT, Francis Orcutt, RFD 5, Penn Van, N. Y. 

BACK issues of QST, in good condition: 277 copies 1924-1949, with 
some years complete. Best offer in 30 days takes all. Ex-W3HR, 1010 
Dale Dr., Silver Spring, Md. 

FOR Sale: Lysco Model 6QO, 35 watt VFO/xtal TVI suppressed 
transmitter. Never used. Clamp modulator can easily be added. 
Have gone VHF. Price: $100. Les Murray, W8BKA, 19723 Frazier 
Dr., Cleveland 16. Ohio. 

SELL: 2 power supplies 1750 and 1000 volts at 300 Ma. Also tubes. 
meters, etc. Send for list. WIHOU. 

FOR Sale: All the equipment of W2NFU consisting of following: one 
transmitter running a Kw with pr. of 813s in final modulated by pr 
of 805s; the driver is Lysco Transmaster with own modulator. All 
are mounted in a 6-ft. deluxe rack. One 522 transmitter and rcvr with 
a Wl Rey front end for continuous tuning; an "S" meter circuit is 
built-in and it has a high gain xtal stage in transmitter; all built into 
a 3-ft. deluxe enclosed rack. One Collins 75A-1 modified to the A2 
by Winters Lab (factory rep). Assortment of parts, tubes; all equip- 
ment should be seen to be appreciated. No reasonable offer will be 
refused. Reason for selling: moving to city apt. Sid Tritsch, 2 Center 
Dr., Flower Hill, Roslyn. L. I., N. Y. 



FOR Sale: Moving! Transmitter. 1000 w. C.W. and F.M. 750 w. 
phone; shielded and de-TV'I'd final, pair of RK65s tetrodes, complete 
band-switching 10-75. Py-L network. Modulator 810s. Meissner 
signal shifter and FM unit mounted in Par-Metal rack; SX-25 re- 
ceiver. Best offer. W2FOR, Merry, 3992 Clarke St., Seaford, N. Y. 

Tel. SUnset 1-4110. 

WANTED: Collins 75A2 or 1 rcvr. Cash for best deal. Write to 

Fred W. Rudolph, Stryker, Ohio. 

FOR Sale: BC221, original crystal, calibration chart with instruction 
book and built-in V.R., A.C. power, S65.00; Regen grid dipper 
(p. 473 of 1952 ARRL Handbook), coils, power and 3" 500 /ilia. 
meter. S15.00; Collins 310V'-1 e.xciter for rack mounting with 5 band 
turret, plus extra speaker panel and speaker for side tone oscillator, 
S195.00; 350V (after filter) 100 Ma., new plate dfrmr, $3.00; dual 
12 h., 100 Ma. chokes (two in one casing), $2.25; 2.5v lOA fil. .xfrmr 
$2.50; Triplett mod. 3256 freq. meter, $10.00; unused National 697 
(similar to 5886 but for 25/60 cycle) power supply, $8.00. W8NKK, 

Parker, 1240 Be dford , Detroit, 30, Mich. 

WANTED: HRO-7 in tip-top condition, with coils, pwr supply and 

speaker. W. C. Joh nson, WIFGO. Norwich, Vt. 

SELL: Complete fi.xed and mobile ham station complete or in part: 
HQ129X receiver. Globe Champion transmitter coils for 10, 20, 75, 
antenna tuner, IOmeter Hy-Lite beam, rotator. 10 ft. tower. Bab- 
cock mobile DX-mitter mod. MT5A with PS4A power supply. LS-1 
antenna tuner. Electro-Voice 208 mike. Morrow 5BR converter. 
Equipment in the very best condition. Must sell. Dick Giese. 
W9SGN, Withee, Wisconsin. 

S.\LE: Underwood teletype, communications model, "mill." Good 
condition: $45.00. W60DD. Wilkerson. Box 776. Camarillo. Calif. 
LEICA: Focomat enlarger and complete dark room equipment. 
Want Viking 1 or II. W2JSM, 316 George St., Babylon. L.I.. N. Y. 
WANTED: An early model UV-203 RCA 50-watt tube to complete 
collection. Must be in good mechanical order, burned-out filament 
acceptable. Will buy for cash. Please advise your price. Paul Watson. 

27 Price Street. West Chester, Pa. 

SELLING out: 32V1 with spare final tube, $325.00; 75A1 for $225; 
Eldico Electronic bug. $20; all in very good condition. E. T. Penning- 
ton. 202 Chestnut St.. Huntington. W. Va.. W8WUH. 



RECEIVERS repaired and aligned by competent engineers, using 
factory standard instruments. Prompt service, at low cost. Our nine- 
teenth year. Douglas Instrument Laboratory, 176 Norfolk Ave., 
Boston 19. Mass. 
XIKING I. local. $129. GF-12 transmitter, 4 sets coils, manual, 

$16.00. WIIK W. 

DRAFTED! NC-98, speaker, never used, original packaging, 
$145.00. C.o.d. Grand Rapids, Mich. WN80OS, 309 Briarwood. 
FOR Sale: Collins 310B exciter, like new, $200. tinused Precision 
E-200-C AM signal generator, $50.00. Five amp. Variac, $9.00; 
Eico VTVM, $15.00; unused 75 meter Amphenol antenna. $5.00; 
Balun coils, mounted, $3.00; coax antenna relay, $5.00; Silver wave- 
meter. $8.00; RCA Image Orthicon. $7.00. George Kravitz. W20TR. 

7919 20th Ave.. Brooklyn 14. N. Y. 

FOR Sale: Johnson or Heath VFO, both wired for Viking II. Will 

sell either one. W9LQI. Boyd, Ashton, 111. 

FOR Sale: HRO-60, practically new, used less than 10 hours, per- 
fect without a mark or fingerprint; includes coils for all the bands, 
xtal calibrator. Guaranteed perfect. Will ship anywhere. A steal at 
$393.00. Cooper. W0IOS, 901 S. 86th St., Omaha 3, Nebraska. 
PRESER\'E your operator's permit in Plastic! Billfold size, 25^. 
Hualmar Perma-Seal Service, 303 No. Tillotson, Muncie, Ind. 
SELL: Gardiner "Type S" Automatic sender, good as new, with 
10 original tapes, $21.00 postpaid. John M. Scowcroft, W9HVK, 

7739 Birch Drive. Hammond. Ind. 

COLLINS 32V3. $500; CoUins 75A3, $450. Both in original bo.xes, 
SS75, SSSB exciter with extra 807, 100 watts. $175.00. Good reason 
for selling. All splendid equipment. W40DK, 480 Skain Street. 
Lexington. Ky. 

EVANGELICAL Missionaries. EX-W3KJV. grateful for old equip- 
ment. TVI no problem. Write David Hartt, Bananier, Guadeloupe. 
SELL: 750 volt at .75 amp, Variac controlled and 300 volt at .1 
amp, plus 6.3, 12.6, 25.2 volts filament power-chassis mounted 
power supply, S29.95; WRL exciter 50 watts with one set of coils. 
$18.95; Bendix TA-12D 100 watt. $24.95; transmitter 160-40 
meters. $24.95. Prices include tubes, postage collect. Henry H. 

Harris. Jr.. W4VPU. P.O. Box 1187 Charlottesville, Va. 

FOR Sale: Used Instructograph code machine. A-C operated with 
oscillator and 10 tapes. First $30 takes it. R. C. Cromer, 5673 Bis- 
cayne Avenue. Cincinnati 11, Ohio. 

SELL: 750W. rig in 6 ft. closed relay rack, speech amp. 811s CI. B, 
with 1500 V. supply. 2 RF units. 10 meters and 20-75. VFO, 807. 814 
pp HFlOOs. 1500-2000 V supply; new tubes: three 304TL, two 
866A, three 807, three VT127A. two 810. nine 826 and one 832A; 
one BC221AA. W. Asbury. 185 Soundview Road. Huntington, N. Y. 

FOR Sale: Elmac .•\F67 xtrmttr. Elmac PNR 6A rcvr, home-built 
supply for rcvr (Vibrator) Master Mobile all bander, top and bot- 
tom whip sections, used less than 20 hrs. $250.00. W2PBC, RFD, 
Perry, N. Y. 

IRE Proceedings 1953 and 1954 for sale. $15.00 per year. W2EC, 
Thiede, 169 Buckingham Rd., West Hemsptead, L. I., N. Y. 



NEW Johnson Match-Box and S.W.R. bridge. $42.50. W9ET. 
210 Van Buren. Terre Haute. Ind. 

SELL: Two-meter receiver and transmitter, deluxe rack and panel, 
conversion of SCR-522. separate power supply, single-switch relay 
controlled, metered, xtals, mike, 8-element Hy-Lite beam, built-in 
speaker, schematic, spare xmitter for parts, complete station ready 
to operate, nothing else to buy. $95.00 takes all. W2NQR, 61 Henry 
St., Merrick, L. I. , N. Y. 

GROUNDED-GRID 304th final amplifier as described in this issue. 
Complete equipment includes power supply (plate and bias) plus 
350 watt 304TH bias shift modulator, all fully metered, with tubes, 
$350. W0VTP. 8506 Broadmo or Omaha, Nebr. 

FOR Sale: 400 W. 6AG7-2E26-813, pi network rig, no TVT, $75; 
BC453 converted with power supply. $20.00; BC4S9 converted, no 
TVI, $20. Ralph J. Roode, W8SNJ. Worthington, O hio. 

RADIO Diagrams $1.00, Television $2.00. Give make, model. 
Diagram Service, 672-St. Hartford 1, Conn. 

FOR Sale: Power supply 2500 V. DC 900 KVA, $35.00. F.o.b.; 
Escanaba, Paul Eden. W8KZI, Escanaba, Mich. 



FOR Sale: Eldico TR75TV xmitter, good working condx. K6BBD. 
SELL or trade: Conservatively rated 350-watt Onan gasoline gen- 
erator, llOV. 60 cps plus 12 VDC automatic start. Pulled Viking 
and receiver for field day. Want mobile gear or cash. W0PVY, 1908 
Vermont, Lawrence, Kansas. 

SELL or trade: Model 26 teleprinter with table, condition excellent; 
HRO Sr. receiver with coils and power supply, condition fair. J. W. 
Knoche, W4LCR, 118 N. Cove Terrace Dr.. Panama City. Fla. 
JOHNSON rotator complete with control box direction indicator, 
instruction book and 10() feet multiconductor operating cable. Best 
offer over $195.00 F.o.b. W5DA. 4425 Bordeaux, Dallas, Texas. 
WANTED: Harvey-Wells Senior and VFO, current models. Give 

details and price. WIDY, Box 328, Norwell, Mass. 

USED PE-75. 2500 watt, 120 volt, single phase, 60 cycle A.C. 
$19 5.00. F.o.b. San Antonio. Texas. W5EDX. 645 E. Woodlawn. 
TU NGER Battery chargers wanted, 2 and 6 ampere sizes. WIBB. 
FOR Sale: Complete GE diathermy, $25. Electrostatic tweeter, 
$4.00. Wanted: Mobile equipment, Oliver Nash, Sanford, Mich. 
COLLINS 75A-2 in top condition with matching speaker, 8R-1 
callibrator, 148-C-l FM adapter and manual, $330. W2GAU. New 
York City. MO 6-2276. Purchaser pays any crating or shipping 
charges. 

FOR Sale: SX-71 receiver. $150; Pentron 9T3 tape recorder. $75; 
Eico 425K 'scope. $35; Johnson Viking mobile VFO. $25; Crystali- 
ner with 10 crystals. $15; Heathkit VTVM. $15; all in excellent 

condition. Philip Schwebler. Jr.. W2ZHE. Alcove. N. Y. 

FOR Sale: Collins 30K with 310 exciter completely TVI'd. Spare 
final tube and spare modulator tube. $1,000. F.o.b. Waco, Texas. 

W 5KAU, 2323 N. 39th St. 

STILL the biggest list of ham gear for a three-cent stamp. Re- 
ceivers, transmitter, parts, meters, rotators, the accumulation of a 
lifetime. Want coax switches, relays, rotary inductors. Collins 7SA3, 

c ash or trade. W9ERU, 2511 Burrmont Road, Rockford, 111. 

WANTED: 250-300 watt modulator or parts. Paul Powell, 801 

M atamoros, Laredo, Texas. 

VIKING I Transmitter, in excellent condition, complete TVI. 
$150.00. Cannot pack or ship. Ernest L. Plant. W2GDL. 47-37 

18 9th St.. Flushing. N. Y. Flushing 7-7510. 

SELL: Eldico TR75-TV transmitter with coils for 10 through 80 
meters. $45.00; Eldico 40-watt modulator. $30.00; Meissner EX 
VFO all bands. $50.00. All equipment in excellent condition. Paul 

J uliff. WISWO. Choate School. Wallingford. Conn. 

COLLINS 32V-3. fine condition. $565. W0VTP. 8506 Broadmoor 

Dr.. Omaha. Nebr. 

NEW Crystals for all commercial services at economical prices; 
also regrinding or replacement crystals for broadcast. Link. Mo- 
torola. G. E. and other such types. Over 19 years of satisfaction 
and fast service. Send for L-7 catalog. Eidson Electronic Co. Temple, 
Texas. 

MORROW SBR, newest, used a few hours, $63.00; S40A and 
SM40 "s" meter, gud condx, $63. Sylvan TR2-144, new 2-meter 
100 watt trans., $25; Fada FM tuner, new, $15, same used, $12. 
Want SP44 Panadapter and mod. trans, for pr 81 lA or 5514. 
W2HDR. John A. Schwerbel, 111 W. Hoffman Ave.. Lindenhurst. 

L. I.. N. Y. 

SELL: QSTS 1925-1939 inclusive except for 4 issues, in excellent 
condition, make offer; HRO B.C. coil. $5; four 24G's. $1.00 each; 
pair ART-13 Mod. trans.. 300W.. $7.50; 5 Mc. xtal. $2.50. D. L. 

Robinson. 1609 Westview Drive. New Kensin gton, Pa. 

FOR Sale? Collins 32V1 transmitter, $300. Approximate 500 watt 
final transmitter with modulator, best offer. Audio amplifier, 60 
watt, $30; Elmac A54 transmitter with power supply, $1()0; Elmac 
PMR 6A receiver with power supplies, $100. Goldye Farrell, 912 

Noyes Ave., Hamilton, Ohio. Phone 4-6780 or 3-6557. 

PRINTED Circuits: Make your own etched wiring for transmitters, 
receivers, etc. Simple process. No silk screens or photographic 
plates. Kit contains all materials and illustrated instructions. Send 

$2.95 now. Felix Dutko. 2078 Vyse Ave.. Bronx. N. Y. 

SELL: Variacs. 5 amp. $5. 45 amp. $50; new BC-459A. BC457A. 
$5; Fil. trans. 11 volt 65 amp. $10; Mine detector SCR625. $30; 
ARC4 RX. TX, $20; 75 meter mobile station. $90; Thordarson 
21M64 300W mod. xfrmr. $20; HQ129X. NC;il73. Want 75A. 

W6WZD. 

FOR Sale: Elmac AF-67. $145; Gonset Super Six. $42; both two 
weeks old. used only H hour. A steal. . . . Also PE103. $14; 
666 all-bander coil. $11.00. W8NYA. Lafferty. 917 South Shore, 

Holland, Mich. 

SELL: HQ129X. Gonset Communicator with squelch, Telrad fre- 
quency standard, unmodified BCS22 receiver, modified BC522 
receiver and transmitter, 1" National oscilloscope with internal 

swee p circuit. Best offers. W2DC0. 

SEL L: Navy long wave receiver 600 to 15 Kc, $35.00. W40F. 

FOR Sale: 450TH and 808 power tubes, new. never used. Other 

equipmen t also. Write Donald Pratt, Harpersville. N. Y. 

CRYSTALS: FT-243's, 3500 to 8700 Kc± 2 Kc, $1.00 each. All 
C.A.P. frequencies this range like 4507.5, 4585, 4467.5, 8008.2. 
8230. $2.50 each. .005% setting. Hundley Crystal Co.. 2951 North 

36t h. Kansas City 4, Kans. ___^ 

A.C. Instructograph. 10 tapes, built-in oscillator, instructions. 
Hardly used. Best offer over $35.00. K2GMA. Michael August. 10 

R ahway Rd.. Millburn. N. J. 

SELL: ART-13. modified. UOv. power supply. Emission switch 
controls remote 24VDC. 24 VAC. 4S0V. 1500 V @ 500 mill supplies. 
Complete with spare 813. 1625. Tech. manual, schematic showing 
modifications, power supply, cable connections. de-TVl'd. On air. 
Best offer. SCR-522 with tubes. $35.00. BC-342. new paint, knobs, 
markings. Rear connections for speaker, converter, antenna, ground, 
send/receive. Modified per QST Sept. 46. Best offer. J. D. Rivers. 

Jr. . W4JVM, Rt. 4, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

SELL: Johnson Viking II factory-wired and VFO 1 H year old. In 
A-1 condition. $310. Ernest Nettum. W0FVG. Kindred. No. Da- 
kota^ 

FOR Sale: TR-75TV. coils 10. 20. 40. extra grid coil. $40; MB-40L, 
unused tuner. $9; JCXSOE. $5; DM-36B. 6-10 converter. $13; 
814's. $2; 35T8. $1.50; W8JRB. Seyler. 3286 Rinda Lane. Cin- 

cinnati 24, Ohio. 

REFLECTORIZED aluminum call sign. Regular $1.50, Jumbo, 
$2.00. Lawn stake, $2.75. Overnight shipment. Whitley. W2LPG, 
133 Airsdale Ave., Long Branch, N. J. 



NC-125 receiver, LYSCO 600 xmitter (no TVI), Clampmaster mod- 
ulator and antenna coupler for highest bidder over S200. WIBML, 
LeRoy Flatt, 19 Vern on Rd., Natick, Mass. Phone OL-38891. 
SELL: 400-watt complete transmitter, 3STs P.P., 6-ft. rack, $150. 

R . Julien, Maryknoll P.O., N. Y. 

VIBRAPACKS: Navy surplus, 6V input. 2S0v at 165 Ma. output. 
Filtered, fused and with control relay. New. $15.95. Kit of basic 
components to built above unit. less chassis with diagram. $6.95. 
Drillick Electronic Sales Co.. 5279 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles 19, 

Cali f. Tel. WEbster 1-9202. 

NOVfCES: Hallicrafters .S-,38B. Good condition. $25. Dave Lifton, 

140 Bea ch 13 5th St. , Rockaway Beach, L. I . N. Y. 

DANGER! High~Voltagel embossed metal signs, 3" x 12", baked 
enamel colors, $1.00 each. W9WFT, Lackner. 2029C Bradley, 

Chicag o 18, 111. 

TRANSMITTER 300 watts PP35Ts spares, relay rack enclosed 
cabinet, coils for 40, 20 and 10 Class B modulator, separate preamp, 
$100. Make an otfer local. Meek T60 xmitter, 60 watts, 10-meter 
coils. Phone or c.w., $50. Val Brgynak. W8VDF. 668 E. 130th St.. 

Cleveland 8, Ohio. ___^ 

FOR Sale: NC98 rcvr, in original carton. First $100 takes it. Dom 

Garofano . W3VMJ. 43 32 Germantown Ave.. Phila. 40. J^ 

LONG Island Hams! We have moved to a larger store! It's easy 
to get to. Plenty of parking space. Lots of bargains. Trade-ins 
taken. Algeradio Electronics Co., 236 N. Franklin St., Hempstead, 

L. I.. N. Y. 

TAPE Recorders accessories, Hi-Fi phonographs. Exceptional 
values. Cerston, 215 East 88th NYC 28. 



FOR -Sale: HT-9 with VFO, $150; BC348 MOD for UOV, $90; 851 
vac tube, $30; 67" black enclosed xmitter cabinet, $25; 1 KW 11 v. 
fil. xformer, $20; Gonset 10/11 converter, $20; list of other old-style 
xmitter parts, meters, cords, xfrmrs, ckt bkrs and Inst. Bks avail- 
able. Want SSB equip. Lt. Col. Hilcr. W2SQ/4. 280 Coral Drive. 

Eau Gallie. Fla. __^ 

FOR Sale or trade: Globe Scout 50-watt phone/c.w. transmitter. 
Used less than one year and complete with Balun coils and micro- 
phone. Completely bandswitching 160-10 M. $85; T-69-20A Mo- 
torola lOM mobile transmitter including power-supply, control box 
and microplione. $35.00. Gonset lOM converter. il2.00. R. Hanson. 
4609 Drew Ave., So., Minneapolis 10, Minn. 

FOR Sale: NC-125, brand new, with spkr, $130; Viking Ranger, 
complete with tubes, ready to operate, $265; both for $375. Eicor 
5.8 volt 425 volt 375 Ma. dynamotor. new, $20; live (5) 4/xfd. 
6000-volt filter condensers, $12, each five, $50. Neill A. Jennings, 
W4NWW, 1714 Friendly Road, Greensboro, N. C. 

WANTED: Johnson or Minis rotator, complete. Panoramic adap- 
tor. 3000/4000 volt filter condensers. -Sell or swap: 450TLs, Eico 
VTVM DuMont 3" 'scope. LM, VHF152A. BC348. 805s. 4D32. 
4-125A, 81,3s, Collins MBF. King. W7NRB. Box 488. Kirkland, 
Washington. 

vTklNG Ranger, like new, $175. Will not ship. John Warner, 
W8GPT. West Unity, Ohio. 

BC221 with chart, excellent, $125. Meissner shifter. Model EXl* 
clean and stable, $45. RME 10 and 5 converter, unmodified Mode 
DM36 like new, $25. BC312, fair condition, $25. Prices F.o.b. 
P.O. Box 691, Woodcliff Lake, New Jersey, or phone Parkridge 
6-0591 M. 

SELL: BC-6S4. $25; NC-183-R, $185: 21A Teletype m'dget tape 
printer with wiring diagram, $45; Dumont ^241 'scope, $275; 
Collins 30-J, 600 watt input phone and c.w., crystal controlled; 
2-60 Mc. $375; NC-125, $145; NC-IOOX, $95; RBM 12 JOO ohm 
relays, $1.75. Want: ART-13, ARC-1, DY-12, BC-221, BC-342. 
APR-4 tuning units, technical manuals. Tom Howard, WIAFN. 
46 Mt. Vernon St., Boston 8, Mass. Tel. Richmond 2-0916. 

WANTED: Late model Gonset or Elmac mobile transmitter and 
receiver. Dr. Roger West, W4CPQ, P.O. Box 2423. Norfolk 1. Va. 

HARVEY-WELLS DeLuxe TBS- SOD with Bandmaster VFO. HE. 
power supply. Astatic JT-30 mike. Hallicrafters S40A. 7S-watt 
antenna tuner w/10. 20. 40 and 80 JCL coils and changeover relay. 
All excellent condition. Best offer over $200 or will trade on Viking 
II. Wm. C. Harnsberger. W4ZNT. 126 Shamrock Rd., Charlottes- 
ville, Va. 

VIKING II, factory-wired, new in appearance and in first class 
condition. $275. Fred E. Norton. 1450 Winchester Dr., Muskegon, 
Michigan. 

QS'ER. McMurdo-Silver. with power supply. $18.00; Gonset Tri- 
Band, perfect, no holes, $30; Stancor P-4086 transformer, 5 volts. 
14 amperes, 10.000 volt insulation, $11.00; unused 813s. $7 or trade 
for 304TL's. W. T. Curtis. W2IWS, R.D. |1. Jamesville, N. Y. 

ALL models Elmac receivers, transmitters, power supplies in stock. 
Dow Co-ax relays, beams. 6 and 12 volt dynamotors. $29.50. Bob 
Wolfe. W3HDT, Bob Wolfe Electronics. 2506 Hoffman St.. Balti- 
more 13, Md. 

CLEANING housel Mobile equipment. NRI xmitter. BC4S4B 
with llOv. supply, components, etc. Write for list. W0FXD. Van 
Vickie, Box 25, Mount City, Mo. 

SELL: Hallicrafters S-76 receiver with R-46 matching speaker, new. 
in perfect condition. Make an offer. Allan Turpin, W4ZXU/6, Deep 
Springs College, via Dyer, Nevada. 

WANTED: All tubes, receiving, transmitting and industrial. Lab 
test and TS equipment and Selsyns. Carrier equipment CF-IA, CF-4, 
repeater CF-5, ARC3, BC221, BC610. BC611. BC614, BC729, 
BC939, BC739, BC191, BC375. BC151 and all tuning units. "TAB" 
111 Liberty St., New York City. 

BC-458 converted for 75-80 or 40 meters with modulator, power 
supply, either rig. $50. New pair 813's. $15.00; new 4D22. $10; parts 
for pair of 811 modulators, includes AN/ART-13 transformers; 
misc. parts, power supplies, etc. Cleaning out at give-away prices. 
Seidman, W2GNZ, 1535 Longfellow, Bronx, N. Y. 

FOR Sale: Signal slicer, $37.50, Eico VTVM, $22.50, HS33 headsets, 
no plugs, $1.25 each. Send for list of other parts. Want National 
ML40BS. W3PKI, E. Aicher, 737 Pine. Steelton. Penna. 

SALE: 32V3, in tip-top condx. Little used, $595. W3WPM. Col. 
F. L. Moore, Hq. AACS. DCS/O, Andrews AFB, Washington 25, 
D. C. 



In the Months 

AHEAD 




a lot may happen . . . 
You may vrin 

fame 

fortune 

success 

the DX Contest 

the Sweepstakes 

BUT . . . whatever happens . . . 

QST will continue to bring you the best in 
amateur radio . . . new developments af- 
fecting our hobby . . . construction articles 
on all types of equipment . . . station and 
operating ideas . . . top-notch special ^"n- 
terest columns. QST is always cover-to- 
cover reading all ways. It is the complete 
magazine on amateur radio. Do you get 
your copy regularly? 

QST and ARRL Membership 

$4 in the USA $4.25 in Canada 

$5 elsewhere 

The American Radio Relay League, Inc. 

West Hartford 7, Conn. 





The No. 90901 

One inch 

Instrumentation Oscilloscope 

Miniaturized, packaged panel mounting 
cathode ray oscilloscope designed for use 
in instrumentation in place of the conven- 
tional "pointer type" moving coil meters 
uses the l" ICPl tube. Panel bezel 
matches in size and type the standard 2" 
square meters. Magnitude, phase displace- 
ment, wave shape, etc. are constantly 
visible on scope screen. 



JAMES MILLEN 
MFG. CO., INC. 

MAIN OFFICE AND FACTORY 

MALDEN 
MASSACHUSETTS 




Index of Advertisers 

Allied Radio Corp 152 

American Electronics Co 126 

American Radio Relay League, Inc. 

OST 149 

Supplies 144 

Handbook 135 

Hints &> Kinks 106 

Binders HO 

Antenna Engineering Corp 111. 134 

Arrow Electronics, Inc 139 

Ashe Radio Co.. Walter 121 

Babcock Radio Engineering, Inc 136 

Barker & Williamson, Inc 91 

Buchan Co., R.J 108 

Burghardt Radio Supply, Inc 133 

Burstein-Applebee Co 142 

Candler System Co 140 

Central Electronics, Inc 95 

C&G Radio Supply Co 96, 108, 112, 126, 136. 140 

Chicago Standard Transf. Corp 99 

Collins Radio Co 2 

Communication Products Co 118 

Crawford Radio 130 

Dow-Key Co., Inc., The 116 

DX-O-Graph 142 

Eitel-McCullough, Inc 87.112 

Electrons, Inc 

Electro- Voice, Inc 

Elmar Electronics, Inc 

Engineering Associates 

Equipment Crafters, Inc 

Evans Radio 

Ft. Orange Radio Distrib. Co. Inc 

Freed Transformer Co., Inc 

Gardiner & Co 

General Electric Co 

GonsetCo.,The 

Gotham Hobby Corp 

Hallicrafters Co 

Hammarlund Mfg. Co., Inc 

Harrison Radio Corp 

Harvey Radio Co 

Harvey-Wells Electronics, Inc.. 

Heath Co., The 

Henry Radio Co 

Hughes Research & Dev. Labs.. 

Hy-Lite Antennae, Inc 

Institute of Radio Engineers. . . . 

Instructograph Co 

International Crystal Mfg. Co. 

Johnson Co., E. F 

Lafayette Radio 

Lakeshore Industries 



145 

. . 151 

. . 138 

128 

130 

132 

.. 125 

.. 141 

.. 138 

1 

132.141 

90 

. . . .4.7 

. .82,83 

137 

.. 115 

. . 101 

. .84,85 

117 

119 

143 

100 

. 110 

. . . . 97 

. .80,81 

. . 131 

98 



Lampkin Laboratories, Inc ., 145 

Leeco .*. .- 145 

Lettine Radio Mfg. Co 118 

Lewis & Kaufman, Ltd 105 

L W Electronics Lab 120 

Mallory & Co., Inc., P. R 89 

Marshall Mfg. Co 114 

Mass. Radio & Teleg. School 144 

Master Mechanic Mfg. Co 145 

Master Mobile Mounts, Inc 143 

Metal Textile Corp 128 

Millen Mfg. Co., Inc., The Jas 150 

Mosley Electronics, Inc 103 

Multi-Products Co 109 

National Co., Inc Cov. Ill, 79 

National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis 128 

Palco Engineering, Inc 122 

Penta Laboratories, Inc 102 

Petersen Radio Co 5 

Plasticles Corp 134 

Port Arthur College 114 

Precision Apparatus Co., Inc 88 

F^rojects Unlimited, Inc 138 

Radcliff's 132 

Radio Corp. of America . Cov. IV 

Radio Shack Corp., The 113 

Radio Specialties, Inc 107 

Raytheon Manufacturing Co 124 

RCA Institutes, Inc 140 

RCA Service Co., Inc 139 

Selectronic Supplies. Inc 144 

Sonar Radio Corp 93, 106 

Sooner Electronics Co 124 

Springer Aircraft Radio Co., Earl W 134 

Steinberg's, Inc 94 

Sun Parts Distributors, Inc 140 

Swartzlander Radio Ltd 124 

Teleplex Co 136 

Telrex, Inc 142 

Telvac 1 44 

Tennalab 126 

Terminal Radio Corp 123 

Triplett Elec. Instrument Co 92 

United Catalog Publishers 145 

LInited Transformer Co Cov. II 

Universal Service 142 

Valparaiso Technical Institute 122 

VestoCo.,Inc 116 

VibroplexCo.,Inc.,The 122 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 127 

Wheaton Research & Dev. Co 130 

Wind Turbine Co 120 

World Radio Laboratories. Inc 129 





A good microphone can improve your results 
as much as a high gain antenna 

Ever notice that two signals of the same "S meter" intensity sound dif- 
ferently? One is muddy, dull, a little hard to read — the sibilant letters 
like S and F almost alike. The other signal is sharp, clean and readable 
even in QRM and QRN — because there's usable intelligence. No mistake 
about the call or comments. 
The greatest variation is in the microphone. A sharp peak adds no intelligibility but 
limits the modulation to that value. A peak of, say 6 db, which is usual in many 
ordinary microphones, will reduce voice power by HALF. Don't be fooled by a 
microphone that sounds "louder" — loudness by itself is not a criterion of perform- 
ance; quite the contrary since it may indicate undesirable peaks. 

An E-V microphone with smooth, peak-free response, replacing an inferior instru- 
ment, often will do more for a phone signal than a new antenna or increased power. 
As a further plus, of course, you get well-known E-V durability, style and perform- 
ance. An E-V microphone, to raise stations, to carry through a QSO, is your best 
station investment. ' 



Shown above are a few of the E-V microphones designed for effec- 
tive communications. Amateur discount applies. 

(upper left) Model 611 high output dynamic and Model 911 crystal. 
On-Off switch. List from $25.50 to $37.50 

(upper right) Model 950 Cardax high-level crystal cardioid, with 
dual frequency response- On-Off switch. List, $42.50 

(lower left) Model 630 wide range, high output dynamic, with ex- 
clusive Acoustalloy diaphragm. On-Off switch. List, $47.00 

(center) Model 636 "Sllmair" wide range dynamic. Pop-proof head. 
Acoustalloy diaphragm. On-Off switch optional. List, $70.00 

(lower right) Model 623 slim-type high output dynamic, with E-V 
Acoustalloy diaphragm. On-Off switch. List, $49.50. Also Model 926 
crystal, less switch and connector. List, $24.50 

(Other E-V microphones for mobile and aircraft communications, 
telecasting, broadcasting, recording, and public address.) 



For further information, 
see your E-V Distributor 
or write for 
Condensed Catalog No. 119 



ELECTRO-VOICE, INC.* BUCHANAN, MICH. 

BxporU 13 £. 4Qtb St., New York 16, U.S.A. Cables: Arlab 



151 



iElLLIED RADIO 

CATAiOG NO. 140 1955 



always refer to the 
most widely used 

AMATEUR & INDUSTRIAL 

BUYING GUIDE 




^! 



send for AlllED'S 
308-Page 1955 Catalog 



we're o»w«VS *'«"'*"" 



„st AlllED'S \955 cataiog 
,or tvervtWna m ««*'«"'" 

f t„ keep your 308-Page 
^°"'" "ca a og handy always-not 
ALLIED Catalog ^^^.^_^ ^^^as 

only to fill all you omptly with 
but to provide you P ^^^_^t 
everything m ol«*°""=!"7s Your 
^°"^;"cSt"t th^Cestand 

rrt^sSc^^^-VurScrn-; 

„Uters^electron tubes 

^''T fadio-TV components and 
corders, radio i .guipment. 

-'^n""^trtan7n.o"ey-ffll«« 
Save time effort an ^^^^ 

^°"' t^r^BD Catalog. If you 
rJt have tt-^rite for .K.-opy. 





receiver? Select 
«hy woit ">' '""^f.toek them all) and 
any new model (wej' y ^q^p. 

get the top t«de-.n on yo ^^^ /^ 

Lent. Enio^Xd"^ 'down payment, 
down, or your trade ^^^^ 

So why wait? Just a ^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 

nient, tell us «hat youj ^^^^ ^^^ 

we'll reply P-^o^P^y, T_ 
anywhere. Write us today. 



Trade HIGH at ALLIED 



Everything in 
ELECTRONIC^ 



ALLIED RADIO 

100 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago 80, Illinois 



PRINTED IN U.S.A. 
RUMFORD PRESS 
CONCORD. N. H. 



plus all these: 




No other receiver at anywhere near the 
low price offers you these eight "high- 
priced" features: (1) Calibrated band- 
spread for 80, 40, 20, 15 and 11 meter 
bands (large 6" indirectly-lighted lucite 
scales). (2) Delayed A.V.C. (3) Higher 
sensitivity. (4) New miniature tubes used 
exclusively. (5) Antenna trimmer. (6) Bet- 
ter selectivity. (7) An extra tube (total of 
eight plus rect.). (8) More compact. 
For complete catalog of $lt| Q9S 

National receivers, write to 
Dept. Q 155. 



Calibrated bandspread for 

80, 40, 20, 15, 11 and 10 

meter bands (large 5" 

indirectly-lighted 

lucite scales). 

Advanced A.C. superhet 

circuit uses 8 high gain 

miniature tubes plus 

rectifier 

Covers 540 kcs. to 40 mcs. 

in 4 bands 

Tuned R.F. stage 

Two I.F. stages 

Two audio stages with phono 

input and 2-position tone 

control 

Antenna trimmer 

Separate high frequency 

oscillator 

Sensitivity control 

Series valve noise limiter 

Delayed A.V.C. 

Headphone jack 

Standby-receive switch 

Conelrad(CD) frequencies 

clearly marked 



^/3m^ ^^m^mm^ *^ 




vj 



Nafionai^ 



61 SHERMAN ST 



MALDEN 48, MASSACHUSETTS 




I^ITH THE RCA-652a 

A new, low-cost twin beam power Ivbe lor "ham" use in the 420-450 Mc band 

;" J if you are planning a new rig for fixed or mobile operation in 
the 420-450 Mc range, the new RCA-6524 is the tube you 
want. The high power sensitivity and high efficiency of the 
6524 permit operation with moderate plate voltages to give 
large power output with small driving power. In cw service, 
the tube will take 45 watts input (ICAS) at 470 Mc. (See 
table for Ham-Band ratings.) 

Design features of the 6524 include balanced compact 
beam power units which have low interelectrode capaci- 
tances, and a cathode common to the two units to reduce 
cathode inductance to a minimum. High-conductivity seals 
and short, heavy, internal leads minimize rf losses. 

The 6524 is available now. Ask your local RCA Tube Dis- 
tributor about it. For technical bulletin, write to RCA, Com- 
mercial Engineering, Section A37M, Harrison, New Jersey. 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

ELECTRON TUBES HARRISON, N.J. 



RCA-6524— Max. Plate Input and 

Voltage vs. Frequency (Push-pull, 

Class C Operation) 


Service (ICAS) 


Frequency 
Band 
Mc 


Plate 
Input 
Watts 


Plate 
Voltage 
(Volts) 


Plate- 
Modulated 
Telephony 


144-148 
220-225 
420-450 


49 ' 

44 

31 


435 
370 
300 


Telegraphy 
(CW) 


144-148 
220-225 
420-450 


78 
68 
47 


540 
460 
380 


Frequency 
Tripler 


144-148 
220-225 
420-450 


46 
40 
35 


380 
370 
370 





March 1955 



55c in Canada 



d e JV P t e d 



anm 



^.2i...h 




PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE 



THE STANDARD OF COMPARISON FOR OVER 2 YEARS 

HIGH FIDELITY 



FROM STOCK... ITEMS below and 650 others in our catalogue b. 

TVPICAU UNITS 




LINEAR STANDARD seri** 

Linear Standard units represent the acme 
from the standpoint of uniform frequency 
response, low wave form distortion, 
thorough shielding and dependability. LS 
units have a guaranteed response within 
Idb. from 20 to 20,000 cycles. 
Hum balanced coil structures and multi- 
ple alloy shielding, where required, pro- 
vide extremely low inductive pickup. 
These are the finest high fidelity trans- 
formers in the world. 85 stock types 
from milliwatts to kilowatts. 













LS-i6x| 
















































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LS-10X Shielded Input 

Multiple line (50, 200, 250. 500/600, etc.) 
to 50,000 ohms . . . multiple shielded. 

LS-19 Plate to Two Grids 

Primary 15,000 ohms. 
Secondary 95,000 ohms C.T. 



LS-50 Plate to Line 

15.000 ohms to multiple line . 
level. 



.+15 db. 




LS-63 P.P. Plates to Voice Coil 

Primary 10,000 C.T. and 6.000 C.T. suited 
to Williamson, MLF, ul. -linear circuits. 
Secondary 1.2, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, 20, 
30 ohms. 20 watts. ■ 



CASE LS-t LS-2 lS-3 

Length 3V8" 4-7/16" 5-13/16" 

Width ,25/8" 3V2" 5" 

Height 31/4" 4-3/16" 4-11/16" 

Unit Wt.3 lbs. 7.5 lbs. 15 lbs. 



HIPERMALLOV series 

This series provides virtually all the 
characteristics of the Linear Standard 
group in a more compact and lighter 
structure. The frequency response is 
within 1 db. from 30 to 20,000 cycles. 
Hipermalloy nickel iron cores and hum 
balanced core structures provide mini- 
mum distortion and low hum pickup. In- 
put transformers, maximum level +10db. 
Circular terminal layout and top and 
bottom mounting. 







. 


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HA-100X Shielded Input 

Multiple line to 60.000 ohm grid . . . tri- 
alloy shielding for low hum pickup. 

HA-106 Plate to Two Grids 

15,000 ohms to 135,000 ohms In two sec- 
tions . . . -|-12 db. level. 





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HA-113 Plate to Line 

15,000 ohms to multiple line . . 
level ... DC in primary. 



HA-133 Plate (DC) to Line 

15,000 ohms to multiple line . 
level ... 8 Ma. DC in primary. 



, -f 12 db. 



. +15 db. 




Case H-t H-2 1 

Length 2H" 3-9/1 

Width 1-15/16- 2-13/ 

Height 3Vi" 3V4' 

Unit Weight 2 lbs. S I 



ULTRA COMPACT series 

UTC Ultra Compact audio units are small 
and light in weight, ideally suited to re- 
mote amplifier and similar compact 
equipment. The frequency response is 
within 2 db. from 30 to 20,000 cycles. 
Hum balanced coil structure plus high 
conductivity die cast case provides good 
inductive shielding. Maximum operating 
level is +7db. Top and bottom mounting 
as well as circular terminal layout are 
used in this series as well as the ones 
described above. 



K 






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A-20 








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1 









A-10 Line to Grid 

Multiple line to 50,000 ohm grid. 



A-18 Plate to Two Grids 

15,000 ohms to 80,000 ohms, primary and 
secondary both split. 



A-2D Mixing Transformer 

Multiple line to multiple line fo' mixing 
mikes, lines, etc. 



A-26 P.P. Plates to Line 

30,000 ohms plate to plate, to multiple 




A CASE 

Length \W 

Width IVi" 

Height _ 2' 

Unit Weight „...V4 H). 



OUNCER series 

UTC Ouncer units are ideal for portable, 
concealed service, and similar applica- 
tions. These units are extremely compact 
. . . fully impregnated and sealed in a 
drawn housing. Most items provide fre- 
quency response within 1 db. from 30 to 
20,000 cycles. Maximum operating level 
db. These units are also available In 
our stock P series which provide plug-in 
base. The 0-16 is a new line to grid trans- 
forme, using two heavy gauge hiper- 
malloy shields for high hum shielding. 



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0-1 Line to Grid 

Primary 50, 200/250, 500/500 ohms to 
50,000 ohm grid. 

0-6 Plate to Two Grids 

15,000 ohms to 95,000 ohms C.T. 



0-9 Plate (DC) to Line 

Primary 15,000 ohms. Secondary 50, 

200/250, 500/500. 



0-14 SO: 1 Line to Grid 

Primary 200 ohms. Secondary .5 megohm 
for mike or line to grid. 




OUNCER CASE 

Diameter _ '/a" 

Height i-a/ie* 

Unit Weight -...1 oz. 



UNITED TRANSFORMER CO 

150 Varick Street, New York 13, N. Y. export DIVISION: 13 E. 40th St., Nev/ York 16, N. Y. CABLES: "ARLAE 



M A 



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All G-E Tubes get individual tests 
to assure maximum dependability! 



QUALITY-CONTROL sampling isn't 
enough — though G-E standards 
for this lead the industry. Every Gen- 
eral Electric tube is checked for im- 
portant operating characteristics. 

Instrument dials say if the tube plate 
current is correct ... if transconduct- 
ance equals the prescribed value ... if 
no undesirable reverse current flows 
in the grid . . . if there is no tube short, 
open circuit, or vacuum leak. 

G-E tubes that pass these individual 
tests, must run the gauntlet of quality- 
control checks for over-all satisfactory 
performance. Are microphonics at a 
minimum.-* Does life-testing leave tube 
characteristics unchanged.' Only if the 



answers to these and many other ques- 
tions are "yes" can G-E tubes be car- 
toned and shipped. 

The tubes your G-E tube distributor 
sells are the best that precision manu- 
facture, rigid inspection, and thorough 
testing can produce. Install them with 
confidence! General Electric Co., Tube 
Department, Schenectady 5, New York. 



General Electric congratulates the winner of the 
1954 Edison Award, Benjamin S. Hamilton, W6VFT, 
La Mesa, California. The judges named Mr. Hamil- 
ton as the amateur whose achievement was most 
noteworthy, because he provided San Diego County, 
California, with "an outstanding Civil Defense and 
disaster-emergency radio network". Recognition 
given to Award-winner W6VFT and to others whom 
the judges cited, was equally a tribute to the public- 
spirited efforts of radio amateurs everywhere. 



GENERAL 




ELECTRIC 



MALLORY HAM BULLETIN 



Mallory Type "K" 

Rheostats 
for 25 to 500 watts 




In the course of experimental ^^o^k, you occa- 
sionally run into a spot where you need a power 
rheostat or high-wattage voltage divider. ^ hen 
you do. we heiieve that Mallory Type "K" \ itreous 
Enamel Resistors will give you performance com- 
parable to that which you have been getting from 
other Mallory wire-wound controls in lower wat- 
tages. This series is available in a complete range 
covering ratings from 25 to 500 watts. 

One of the first things you will notice about the 
Series "K"' control is its smoothly operating sliding 
contact, mounted snugly in its unique, spring- 
loaded and hinged carrier. 

The firm direction of force exerted by this assem- 
bly eliminates completely the problem of "rocking"" 
contacts which has jtlagued power control users for 
years. The specially compounded copper-graphite 
contact lubricates the resistance element, at the 
same time that it reduces the contact resistance 
between the two parts. A flexible pigtail connection 
provides a direct electrical path between the contact 
and the center collector mechanism. 

Perhaps the most outstanding feature of this whole 
assembly, however, is its construction which allows 
the contact to be lifted from the resistance element 
for cleaning purposes without distorting or dis- 
turbing the applied force. Incidentally, the contact 
is almost as easy to replace as the brushes in a 
small ele<tric motor. 

The spring coiiertor and shaft assembly is spring- 



loaded to assure virtually constant electrical con- 
ductivity for the life of the control. In addition, all 
Series "K" controls above 25 watts are equipped 
with a copper-graphite buffer plate as a part of the 
collector assembly to reduce erosion as well as 
assure positive electrical contact. The shaft is 
centered and insulated from the electrical circuit 
by means of a high quality steatite bushing. 

The body of each Series "K" cbntrol is formed 
from electrical grade porcelain and each turn of the 
resistance winding is uniformly wound on this 
form to provide an even progression of resistance 
change vs. shaft rotation. A non-alkaline, non- 
hygroscopic enamel is applied carefully to the 
winding, and then heated to a hard, glass-like 
finish for maximum protection to the vulnerable 
parts of the winding. 

The smaller sizes, 25 through 150 watt, are equipped 
with conventional threaded bushings for panel 
mounting; sizes above 150 watt are equipped with 
set screws. All sizes have panel locating lugs which 
may be adjusted for universal mounting. Suitable 
knob and dial plate are supplied with each. 

A brochure containing dimensional drawings of 
these controls, plus catalog listings, has been pre- 
pared. For your copy, write to us at Box 1558, 
Indianapolis 6, Indiana. Meanwhile, check with 
your Mallory Distributor, and take a good look at 
these power controls. Their construction alone will 
inspire confidence in their ability to operate prop- 
erly for a long, long time. 



P. R. MALLORY & CO. Inc. 

p. O. Box 1558 
INDIANAPOLIS 6 INDIANA 




MARCH 1955 

VOLUME XXXIX . NUMBER 3 

PUBLISHED, MONTHLY, AS ITS OFFICIAL ORGAN, BY THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE, INC., AT 
WEST HARTFORD. CONN.. U. S. A.; OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE INTERNATIONAL AMATEUR RADIO UNION 



STAFF 



Editorial 

A. L. BUDLONG, WIBUD 

Editor 

HAROLD M. McKEAN, WICEG 
Managing Editor 

GEORGE GRAMMER, WIDF 
Technical Editor 

DONALD H. MIX, WITS 

BYRON GOODMAN, WIDX 

Assistant Technical Editors 

EDWARD P. TILTON, WIHDQ 

V.H.F. Editor 

C. VERNON CHAMBERS, WlffiQ 

LEWIS G. McCOY, WIICP 

Technical Assistants 

ROD NEWKIRK, W9BRD 

DX Editor 

ELEANOR WILSON, WIQON 

YL Editor 

ANN B. FURR, WIZIB 

Production Assistant 

WILLIAM A. PAUL, W3UDO 

Editorial Assistant 



Advertising 

LOHENTZ A. MORROW, WIVG 

Advertising Manager 

EDGAR D. COLLINS 

Advertising Assistant 

Circulation 

DAVID H. HOUGHTON 

Circulation Manager 

J. A. MOSKEY, WIIMY 

Assistant Circulation Manager 

OFFICES 

38 La SaUe Road 
West Hartford 7, Connecticut 
Tel.: AD 3-6268 TWX: HF 88 

Subscription rate In I'nited States and 
Possessions, $4.00 per year, postpaid; 
$4.25 In the Dominion of Canada, 
$5.00 In all other countries. Single 
copies, 50 cents. Foreign remittances 
should be by International postal or 
express money order or bank draft 
negotiable in the U. S. and for an 
equivalent amount in U. S. funds. 
Entered as second-class matter May 
29, 1919, at the post office at Hartford, 
Connecticut, under the Act of March 
3, 1S79. Acceptance for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for in 
section 1102, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized September 9. 1922. Addi- 
tional entry at Concord, N. H., author- 
ized February 21. 1929, under the .\ct 
of February 28, 1925. 
Copyright 1955 by the American Radio 
Relay League. Inc. Title registered at 
U. S. Patent Office. International cop.v- 
rlght secured. All rights reserved. 
Qvedan reservados lodos los derechos. 
Printed in U. S. A. 



INDEXED BY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS INDEX 

Library of Congress Catalog 
Card No.: 21-9421 



-CONTENTS- 

TECHNICAL — 

A Compact Dual Beam for 20 and 40 Meters 

L. J. Jensen, W0MIQ 11 
Frequency Marker with 50-Kc. Intervals 

Beverly Dudley 14 
Overtone Crystals — How and Where To Use Them 

Edward P. Tilion, WIHDQ 16 
Flexibility in the Antenna Coupler 

T. H. Puckett, WSJXM 18 
Low-Noise Receiver Design 

Harry Longerich, W2GQY/4, 
and Robert D. Smith, W5LHD 20 
The Multimatch Antenna System 

Chester L. Buchanan, W3DZZ 22 

You Can't Beat F.M.! Don H. Gross, W3QVC 37 

The 5100 Transmitter and 51SB Single-Sideband 

Generator (Recen t Equipmen t) 40 

260 Series Power-SWR Meter (Recent Equipment) 43 

The RME-100 Speech Clipper (Recent Equipment) 44 

The P-500 Power Amplifier (Recent Equipment) 45 

BEGINNER — 

Meet the S.W.R. Bridge Lewis G. McCoy, WIICP 30 

MOBILE ~ 

The "Hidden Gem" Clifford Abel, W8IWB 24 

Transmitter Hunting — Seattle Style 

/. Alan Duncan, W70TA 25 
Unidirectional Loops for Transmitter Hunting 

Warren U. Amfahr, W0WLR 28 
A Mobile S.S.B. Receiver for 80 and 40 

Robert A. Thomason, W4SUD 33 

OPERATING ~ ^ 

Net Know-How E. S. Van Deusen, W3ECP 62 

Three Stormy Sisters — Part II . . . George Hart, WINJM 64 

GENERAL — 

QST — Volume III (Part I) . . Sumner B. Young, W0CO 48 



"It Seems to Us . . ." 9 

Our Cover 10 

Coining ARRL Conventions .... 29 

On the TVI Front 32 

Hints and Kinks 36 

Military Affiliate Radio System 45 

Correspondence from Members . 46 

Happenings of the Month 47 

In QST 25 Years Ago 53 



YL News and Views 54 

The World Above 50 Mc 55 

Hows DX? 57 

Operating Nev7S 70 

With the AREC 72 

Station Activities 77 

Hamfest Calendar 126 

Silent Keys 136 

Feed-back 152 



only 




S-53A The finest small communications receiver 
built and ideal where maximum performance is 
required in small space. Several steps better 
than the S-38C, but not quite up to larger 
S-40B. Covers Broadcast Band 540-1630 kc plus 
four short-wave bands covering 2.5-31 and 48- 
54.5 Mc. 



Electrical bandspread for easy tuning. Two i-f 
stages. Switches for automatic noise limiter, 
code reception and high-low tone. Phono jack 
for records. Headfone tip jacks on rear and 
built-in PM speaker. Temp, compensated to re- 
duce fading due to frequency shift. For 105/ 
125 V. 50/60 cycle AC. 





Brand New and very much wanted- 
Model HT-30 Single Sideband AM and 
CW Transmitter/Exciter. 

• Highly stable VFO with full 100:1 
ratio gear drive system built-in, cal- 
llbrated in kc. 

• Stability comparable to most crys- 
tals .009%.IFuII band switching. 

• Ample gain for 55 db microphone. 
Hum and noise 40 db down. 



Full 50 v/att peak envelope outpU|i 
Complete built-in metering. j. 

Unwanted sideband at least 40 
down. AM-CW-SSB. 
Undesired beat frequency down 
db or more. T. V. 1. suppressed. 
Stable 50 kc filter system. 
Provisions for coaxial output fitting. 
Built-in voice control circuit with 
bias switching for final amplifier. 



Model SX-9G Selectable Sideband Receiver 



Covers Broadcast 538-1580 kc plus three 

S/W 1720 kc-34 Mc. 

Double conversion with selectable crystal 

controlled second oscillators. 

Selectable sideband reception of both sup- 



pressed carrier and full carrier transmis- 
sions. Highly selective 50 kc I. F. system. 
CW operation with AVC on. Delayed AVC. 
Calibrated bandspread-"S" meter-double 
superhet. Precision gear drive dial system. 
10 tubes, 1 rectifier and voltage regulator. 



HAIVE 




S-94 (S-95) These two new Civic Patrol receivers a 
over 10 times as sensitive as previous models, great 
increased audio power output and built-in relay squel 
system. Perfect for monitoring, police, fire, taxicj 
telephone-mobile, forestry. Civil Defense. The S- 
covers 30-50 Mc and the S-95 150-173 Mc. Built 
speaker and provisions for headphones. Eight tub 
plus rectifier. 105/125 V. 50/60 cycle AC/DC. 




S-38D Low cost unit with high priced perform- 
ance over Broadcast Band 540-1650 kc plus 
three short-wave bands from 1650 kc-32 Mc. 
Electrical bandspread operates over large easy- 
to-read dial. Headphone tip jacks on rear and 
powerful built-in PM speaker. Oscillator for re- 
ception of code signals. Four tubes plus recti- 
fier. 105125 V. 50/60 cycle AC/DC. 




Write for complete specifications. 



hallicrafters 



Chicago 24, Illinois 



In Canada: 

The HALLICRAFTERS COMPANY 
Don Mills Road • Box 27, Station R 



Toronto 17, Ontario 





TYPE 2XP 

FUNDAMENTAL 

1600 to 12000 Kg. 
1 5 Kg. $3.95 

3RD MODE 

12001 to 25000 Kg. 

±10 Kg. $5.00 



the new LOW COST 

PR crystal 
especially made for 
converters, experimental 
applications, etc. 

Increased demand for broad tolerance 
crystals (frequencies outside amateur 
bands) has resulted in the new, low-cost 
Type 2XP . . . especially created for con- 
verters, some types of receivers, experi- 
mental applications and other special 
uses. Now you can buy top PR quality 
crystals in Type 2XP for these special re- 
quirements at practically the same cost as 
regular amateur frequencies. ASK YOUR 
JOBBER FOR THE NEW 2XPs. Of course, 
if close tolerance is required, we recom- 
mend PR Type Z-1, our regular commercial 
crystal . . . but these will cost more, nat- 
urally. You will find that the inexpensive 
Type 2XP will fill most of your require- 
ments, at a big saving! 




AND KNOW WHBIE YOU ARE 



PETERSEN RADIO COMPANY, fNC, 
il^SOO J^f^BROADWAY 1. COUNCIL BLUFFS.iIQWA , 



EXPORT SALES: Royal National Company, Inc., 75 West Street, New York 6, N. Y., U. S. A. 



Section Communications Managers of the ARRL Communications Department 1 


Reports Invited 


. All amateurs, especially League members, are invited to report station activities on the first of each || 


month (for preceding 


month) direct to the SCM, the administrative ARRL official elected b> 


members in each Section. ■ 


Radio club reports are 


also desired by SCMs for inclusion in QST. ARRL Field Organization station appointments are || 


available in the areas i 


hown to qualified I 


-eague members. These include ORS, OES, OPS, OO and OBS. SCMs also desire ■ 


applications for SEC, 


ECRM and PAM 


where vacancies e.xist. .4// amateurs in the United States and Canada are invited 1 


to join the Amateur Radio Emergency Corps (ask for Form 7). 








ATl.ANTln niVISION 




Eastern Pennsylvania 


VViBIP 


W. H. Wiand R 1) 1, Box MiO 


Gilbertsville 


Maryland-Delaware-D. 


C. W3EQK 


Arthur \\ . Plummer '804 Rexmere Road 


Baltimore 18, Md. 


Southern New Jersey 


K2BG 


Herbert C. Brooks 800 Lincoln Ave. 


Palmyra 


Western New York 


W2SJ\' 


Edward Graf 81 King St. 


Tonawanda 


Western Pennsylvania 


W.^NCD 


R. M. Heck RED 1 
rRlMXRAI niVISION 


Sharpsville 


Illinois 


W9VIX 


C.corge Schreiber 239 S. Scoville Ave. 


Oak Park 


Indiana 


W9BKJ 


George H. Graue 824 Home Ave. 


Fort Wayne 6 


Wisconsin 


W9R0M 


Reno W. Goetsch 929 S. 7th Ave. 
nAKOTA niVI.SION 


Wausau 


North Dakota 


VV0HNV 


Earl Kirkeby P.O. Box 12 


Dravton 


Sotith Dakota 


W0RRN 


J. W. Sikorski 1900 South Menlo Ave. 


Siou'x Falls 


Minnesota 


W0MXC 


Charles M. Bove 1611 4 E. Lake St. 
npiTA nivi.sinTM 


.Minneapolis 7 


Arkansas 


WSFMF 


Owen G. Mahafltey Box LS7 


Springtown 


Louisiana 


W5FMO 


Thomas J. Morgavi 3421 Beaulieu St. 


New Orleans 20 


Mississippi 


WSOTD 


Dr. A. R. Cortese Box 326 


Crystal Springs 


Tennessee 


W4SCF 


Harry C. Simpson 1863 So. Wellington St. 
ORF.AT I AKR.S niVI.SION 


Memphis 


Kentucky 


W4SBI 


Robert E. Fields 531 Central Ave., (Kentucky 


side) Williamson, W. Va. 


Michigan 


W8RAE 


Thomas G. Mitchell 409 Liberty 


Buchanan 


Ohio 


W8AJW 


John E. Siringer 2972 Clague Rd. 
Hiinsnv nivisioNT 


Cleveland 26 


Eastern New V'ork 


W2ILI 


Stephen J. Neason 794 River St. 


Troy 


N. Y. Co- Long Island 


W2YBT 


Carleton L. Coleman P.O. Box 1011 


East Hampton, L. I. 


Northern New Jersey 


W2VQR 


Lloyd H. Manamon 709 Seventh Ave. 
MinWR.ST niVISIOM 


Asbury Park 


Iowa 


W0PP 


William G. Davis 3rd St. 


Mitchellville 


Kansas 


VV0ICV 


Earl N. Johnston 624 Roosevelt 


Topeka 


Missouri 


W0GBJ 


Clarence L. Arundale 1048 South Jefferson Ave. 


Springfield 4 


Nebraska 


W0CBH 


Floyd B. Campbell 203 W. 8th St. 
NRW RNfJI AlSin niVISION 


North Platte 


Connecticut 


WIEFVV 


Milton E. Chaffee 53 Homesdale Ave. 


Southington 


Maine 


WIAFT 


Bernard Seamon 73 Middle St. 


Wiscasset 


Eastern Massachusetts 


WIALP 


Frank L. Baker, jr. 91 Atlantic St. 


North Quincy 71 


Western Massachusetts 


WIMNG 


Arthur Zavarella 1702 Main St. 


Agawam 


New Hampshire 


WIHS 


Harold J. Preble Route 4 


Concord 


Rhode Island 


WIKKR 


Walter B. Hanson, jr. 54 locust St. 


Providence 6 


\'ermont 


WIRNA 


Robert L. Scott 108 Sias Ave. 
NORTHVVR.STRRM niVISION 


Newport 


Alaska 


KL7AGU 


Dave A. Fulton Box 103 


Anchorage 


Idaho 


W7IWU 


Alan K. Ross 2105 Irene St. 


Boise 


Montana 


W7CT 


Leslie E. Crouter 608 Yellowstone Ave. 


Billings 


Oregon 


W7ESJ 


Edward F. Conyngham 11901 PowcU Blvd. 


Portland 


Washington 


W7FIX 


V'ictor S. Gish 511 East 71st St. 
PADIRir niVISION 


Seattle 5 


Hawaii 


KH6AED 


Samuel H. Lewbel P.O. Box 3564 


Honolulu 


Nevada 


W7JU 


Ray T. Warner 539 Birch St. 


Boulder City 


Santa Clara Valley 


W6V\GO 


R. Paul Tibbs 1946 Harmil Way 


San Jose 


East Bay 


W6RLB 


Guy Black 1546 Spruce St. 


Berkeley 8 


San Francisco 


V\-6GGC 


Walter A. Buckley 36 Colonial Way 


San Francisco 


Sacramento Valley 


W6JDN 


Harold L. Lucero 1113 Elinore Ave. 


Dunsmuir 1 


San Joaquin \'alley 


W6GIW 


Edward L. Bewley 421 East Olive St. 
ROAMOKR niVISION 


Turlock 1 


North Carolina 


W4W\Z 


Charles H. Brydges 3246 Sunset Drive 


Charlotte 


South Carolina 


W4ANK 


T. Hunter Wood 1702 North Rhett Ave. 


North Charleston 


\'irginia 


W4KX 


John Carl Morgan Merrimans Lane 


Winchester 


West \'irginia 


W8FQQ 


.Albert H. Hix 1013 Belmont St. 
ROCKV MOUNTAIN niVISION 


Forest Hills, Charleston 4 


Colorado 


WOCDX 


Karl Brueggeman 1945 Kearny St. 


Denver 


Utah 


VV7UTM 


Floyd L. Hinshaw 165 East 4th. North 


Bountiful 


Wyoming 


W7PKX 


Wallace J. Ritter P.O. Box 797 
SOITTHRASTRRN niVlSlON 


Sheridan 


Alabama 


VV4MI 


Joe A. Shannon 


Cottondale 


Eastern Florida 


W4FWZ 


John W. Hollister 3809 Springfield Blvd. 


Jacksonville 


Western Florida 


W4MS 


Edward J. Collins 1003 E. Blount St. 


Pensacola 


Georgia 


W4NS 


George W. Parker 226 Kings HL^hway 


Decatur 


West Indies (Cuba-P.R. 


-V.I.) KP4DJ 


William Werner 563 Ramon Llovet 


Urb. Truman. 

Rio Ficdras, P. R. 


Canal Zone 


KZSRM 


Roger M. Howe Box 462 
SOIITHWRSTRRN niVISION 


Balboa Heights. C. Z. 


Los Angeles 


W6YVJ 


Howard C. Bellman 973 Mayo St. 


Los .Angeles 42 


Arizona 


W7LVR 


Albert Steinbrecher RFD 5, Box 800 


Tucson 


San Diego 


W6LRU 


Don -Stansifer 4427 I'escadero 


San Diego 7 


Santa Barbara 


W6IOX 


Vincent J. Haggerty 1017 Indio Muerto St. 
WRST mil p niVISION 


Santa Barbara 


Northern Texas 


WSJQD 


T. Bruce Craig 1706-27th 


Lubbock 


Oklahoma 


WSRST 


Dr. Will G. Crandall State Veterans Hospital 


Sulphur 


Southern Texas 


W5FJF 


Dr. Charles Fermaglich 618 Medical Arts BIdg. 


Houston 2 


New Mexico 


W5ZU 


G. Merton Sayre Box 625 
nANAOIAN niVISION 


New Mexico Military 
Institute. Roswell 


Maritime 


VEIOM 


Douglas C. Johnson 104 Preston St. 


Halifax. N. S. 


Ontario 


VE3IA 


G. Eric Farquhar 16 Emerald Crescent 


Burlington, Ont. 


Quebec 


VE2GL 


Gordon A. Lynn R.R. No. 1 


Ste. Genevieve de 
Picrrefonds P. Q. 


Alberta 


VE6MJ 
VE7JT 


Sydney T. Jones 10706-57th Ave. 


Exlmonton, Alta. 


British Columbia 


Peter Mclntyre 981 West 26th Ave. 


Vancouver. B. C. 


Yukon 
Manitoba 








VE4HL 


John Polmark 109-13th, N.W. 


Portage la Prairie, Man. 


Saskatchewan 


VE5HR 


Harold R. Horn 1044 King St. 


Saskatoon 



• Official appointed to act temporarily in the absence of a regular official. 




hallicrafters 



CIVIL DEFENSE 




Write Dept. Littlefone for details 



Chicago 24, Illinois 



2-way FM radio telephone for 30 to 54 Mc. and 144 to 173 Mc. 



^«^ AMERICAN 
RADIO RELAY 
LEAGUE, INC., 

is a noncommercial association of radio amateurs, bonded for 
the promotion of interest in amateur radio communication and 
experimentation, for the relaying of messages by radio, for the 
advancement of the radio art and of the public welfare, for the 
representation of the radio amateur in legislative matters, and for 
the maintenance of fraternalism and a high standard of conduct. 

It is an incorporated association without capital stock, chartered 
under the laws of Connecticut. Its affairs are governed by a Board 
of Directors, elected every two years by the general membership. 
The officers are elected or appointed by the Directors. The League 
is noncommercial and no one commercially engaged in the manu- 
facture, sale or rental of radio apparatus is eligible to membership 
on its board. 

"Of, by and for the amateur," it numbers within its ranks practi- 
cally every worth-while amateur in the nation and has a history of 
glorious achievement as the standard-bearer in amateur affairs. 

Inquiries regarding membership are solicited. A bono fide 
interest in amateur radio is the only essential qualification; owner- 
ship of a transmitting station and knowledge of the code are not 
prerequisite, although full voting membership is granted only to 
licensed amateurs. 

All general correspondence should be addressed to the, adminis- 
trative headquarters at West Hartford, Connecticut. 




Past Presidents 

HIRAM PERCY MAXIM, WIAW, 1914-1936 

EUGENE C. WOODRUFF, W8CMP, 1936-1940 

GEORGE W. BAILEY, W2KH, 1940-1952 



Oihcers 

President GOODWIN L DOSUND, W0TSN 

Moorhead, Minnesota 

Firsf Vice-President WAYLAND M. GROVES, W5NW 

P.O. Box 586, Odessa, Texas 

V/ce-Pres/defjf FRANCIS E. HANDY, W1BDI 

38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 

Vice-Presidenf PERCY C. NOBLE, WIBVR 

37 Broad St., Westfield, Massachusetts 

Secretory A. L. BUDLONG, WIBUD 

38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 

Treojurer DAVID H. HOUGHTON 

38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 

• • • • • 

General Manager A. L. BUDLONG, WIBUD 

Communicot/ons Monoger .... FRANCIS E. HANDY, WIBDI 

Technical Director GEORGE GRAMMER, W 1 DF 

38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 

Genera/ Counsel PAUL M. SEGAL 

816 Connecticut Ave., Washington 6, D.C. 

Assistant Secretaries: 

JOHN HUNTOON, W1LVQ LEE AURICK, WIRDV 

PERRY F. WILLIAMS, WIUED 

38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 



DIRECTORS 

Canada 

ALEX REID VE2BE 

240 Logan Ave., St. Lambert, P. Q. 

Vice-Director: Reginald K. Town VE7AC 

2879 Graveley St., Vancouver 6, B. C. 

Atlantic Division 

GILBERT L. CROSSLEY W3YA 

Dept. of E.E., Penna. State University 
State College, Pa. 

Vice-Director: Charles O. Badgett WSLVF 

725 Garden Road, Glenside, Pa. 

Cen tral Division 

HARRY M. MATTHEWS W9UQT 

702 So. Sth, Springfield. 111. 

Vice-Director: George E. Keith W9QLZ 

RED 2, Box 22-A, Utica, 111. 

Dakota Division 

ALFRED M. GOWAN W0PHR 

1012 South Willow Ave., Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Vice-Director: Forrest Bryant W0FDS 

6840 Harriet Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Delta Division 

GEORGE H. STEED W5BUX 

1912 Beech St., Pine B\uft, Ark. 

Vice-Director: George R. Acton W5BMM 

Plain Dealing, La. 

Great Lakes Division 

JOHN H. BRABB W8SPF 

708 Ford Bldg., Detroit 26, Mich. 

Vice-Director: Robert L. Davis W8EYE 

247 Highland Ave., Salem, Ohio 

Hudson Division 

GEORGE V. COOKE, JR W20BU 

88-31 239 St., Bellerose 26, N. Y. 

Vice-Director: Thomas J. Ryan, Jr W2NKD 

2339 Redwood Rd., Scotch Plains, N. J. 

Midwest Division 

WILLIAM J. SCHMIDT W0OZN 

306 S. Viussar, Wichita, Kansas 

Vice-Director: James E. McKim W0MVG 

1404 S. Tenth, Salina, Kansas 

New England Division 

PHILIP S. R.4XD WIDBM 

Route 58. Redding Ridge, Conn. 

Vice-JHrector: Clayton C. Gordon WIHRC 

65 Emerson Ave.. Pittsfleld, Mass. 

Northwestern Division 

R. REX ROBERTS W7CPY 

837 Park Hill Drive, Billings, Mont. 
Vice-Di'ector: 

Pacific Division 

RAY H. CORXELL W6JZ 

909 Curtis St., Albany 6, Calif. 

Vice-Director: Harry M. Engwicht W6HC 

770 Chapman, San Jose 26, Calif. 

Roanoke Division 

P. LANIER ANDERSON, JR W4MWH 

428 Maple Lane, Danville, Va. 

Vice-!Hrector: Gas M. Browning W4BPD 

135 Broughton St., S. E., Orangeburg, S. C. 

Rocky Mountain Division 

CLAUDE M. MAER, JR W0IC 

740 Lafayette St., Denver, Colo. 

Vice-Director: Walter M. Reed W0WRO 

1355 E. Amherst Circle, Denver, Colo. 

Southeastern Division 

JAMES P. BORN, JR W4ZD 

25 First Ave., N.E., Atlanta, Ga. 

Vice-Director: Randall E. Smith W4DQA 

902 Plaza Court, Orlando, Fla. 

South w^estern Division 

WALTER R. JOOS W6EKM 

1315 N. Overhill Drive, Inglewood 3, Calif. 

Vice-Director: Robert E. Hopper W6YXU 

4327 Santa Cruz, San Diego 7, Calif. 

West Gulf Division 

ROBERT E. COWAN W5CF 

3640 Encanto Drive, Fort Worth 9, Texas 

Vice-Director: John F. Skelton W5MA 

1901 Standish Dr., Irving, Texas 



« 



It Seems to Us..." 




FCC'S 20th anniversary 

The Federal Communications Commission 
last year marked its 20th anniversary of exist- 
ence as the federal agency regulating all forms 
of radio and wire communication. 

Old-timers will recall that most radio matters 
were administered by the Department of Com- 
merce prior to 1927 ; the Radio Act of that year 
created a Federal Radio Commission, with 
duties obvious from its name. Our affairs were 
handled by FRC until the Communications 
Act of 1934 designated a Federal Communica- 
tions Commission to take over radio regulation 
from FRC, and to have in addition responsi- 
bility for wii-e telephone and telegraph matters. 
The 1934 change had no particular effect on 
amateurs oi- on radio in general, for it was 
simply administiation by substantially the 
same Commission and staff as FRC. The anni- 
versary seems an appropriate one to look 
back to our regulatory status two decades ago. 

The new Commission inherited from FRC 
(in reality, from itself!) a fairly sound set of 
amateur regulations — they having been com- 
pletely revised, in consultation with the 
League, a year earlier. It was also an extremely 
simple text; that the one printed page of 
regulations existing sUghtly more than 20 
years ago has grown to more than 10 pages of 
fine print today is a measure of the increasing 
complexity of even the amateur phase of the 
art. 

In June, 1934, there were 46,390 amateur 
radio operators; today there are approximately 
125,000. In those days licenses were issued in 
Classes C, B or A for three-year terms, a 
relatively new set-up from the earUer one-year 
licenses of the generallj^-comparable Tempo- 
rary, First Class, and Extra First Class tickets. 
(Comparable, that is, except for the Tempo- 
rary^ certificate, which like our pi'esent Novice 
license had a one-j'ear nonrenewable term.) 
There were 32 quarterly examination points, 
compared with (31 at present (plus thousands 
more volunteer amateur examiners under our 
current procedures.) 

The code speed was 10 w.p.m. and you had 
to copy the text in longhand — • no printing. 
One 3^ear's experience was required before 
taking the Class A test, which license entitled 



you to the delights of voice operation in 3900- 
4000 (that's as big as the 'phone band was) 
and 14,150-14,250 kc. A commercial 'phone 
license waived the technical e.xam. Flunking 
any exam made you wait 90 days before tack- 
ling it again — it's now 30 days. The power 
limit, as always, was a kw. If you used any of 
the bands below 14.4 Mc. you had to put a 
filter on your i)ower supply, but raw a.c. was 
permissible above that point. It is worthy of 
note that we had "gone d.c." for even the 
lower bands only a few years earlier. You 
could operate mobile only above 56 Mc. (mean- 
ing, in effect, the 56-60 Mc. band), and only 
in aircraft — there was no mobile operation 
as we know it todaj'. The license automatically 
granted jjortable privileges in any band, but 
this was also a brand new regulation; only a 
3'ear earlier separate portable licenses and calls 
were required for such operation. 
The bands were: 

1715-2000 ke. 

3500-4000 kc. 

7000-7300 kc. 
14,000-14,400 kc. 
28.000-30,000 kc. 
56,000-60,000 kc. 

You could also operate anywhere above 110 
Mc; no one else was using those "micro- 
waves" in 1934. But it w\as pretty tough to 
generate any r.f. with gear then available; 
even to get to 56 Mc. a lot of hams were remov- 
ing "lossy" bases from tubes. 

For 'phone operation any amateur could use: 

1800-2000 kc. 
28,000-28,500 kc. r 

56,000-60,000 kc. 

with the Class A boys additionally entitled 
to 75- and 20-meter voice. You could transmit 
music if 3'ou were engaged in bona fide tests 
of modulation gear. 

In the interests of strict accuracy, we 
should point out that amateurs were assigned 
one additional band: 400,000-401,000 kc. 
To our knowledge no amateur ever had a QSO 
there. As the story goes, the band was ear- 
marked for us, j^ears and years ahead of any 
possible practical use of that territory, because 
that frequency was calculated . (erroneously, as 
it turned out) as one for which the parabolic 



reflector of the common electric heater could 
be used for beam purposes. 

It should be noted that the few differences 
between the over-all band limits above and 
those we have today are largely a result of 
international regulatory agreements and not 
arbitrary rulings bj^ the Commission; FCC 
has always assigned amateurs in this country 
practically every kilocycle permitted under 
international treaty. In the formation of the 
U. S. viewpoint toward international regula- 
tion the Commission has been an unqualihed 
supporter of the amateur, as of course ha\-e 
most other Government agencies concerned. 
In this field during the last twenty years we 
recall particularly the 1936 FCC hearings, 
looking toward the Cairo world conference of 
1938, and the 1944 hearings, looking toward 
the Atlantic City conference of 1947, at both 
of which — as in every conference since 1927 
— amateur radio was practically on trial for 
its life. We know, with pardonable pride, that 
the testimony put into the records on behalf of 
amateur radio established pretty thoroughly 
our right to continued use of our frequencies 
because of our record of operation in the public 
interest, convenience and necessity. Yet many 
of the contributions of amateur radio are in- 
tangibles, and it is indeed a rare group of men 
who are possessed of sufficient wisdom and 
vision to w^eigh these against the hard and cold 
facts and statistics of the commercial users, 
and come up with the answer they have. 

The progress that amateur radio has made 
these past twenty years could never have been 
made without the help and cooperation of a 
Federal agency, representing the established 
Government viewpoint toward encouragement 
of scientific endeavors on the part of its 
citizens as an advancement of the national 
interest and culture. To the Commission as 
an agency, the League extends its sincere 
appreciation. Equally as important, to the 
many individuals on the staff who have over 
these years worked in our interest, the League 
on behalf of all amateurs extends its warm 
thanks. 



OUR COVER 



Nowadays accurate frequency checking is an 
important responsibility of every amateur. The 
secondary frequency standard shown on this 
month's cover is designed for just that purpose, 
as well as being compact and economical. It is 
capable of supplying 50-kc. check points through- 
out the communications spectrum. In addition, 
it can be used with high-frequency crystals for 
identification of the points. The unit is described 
in detail starting on page 14 of this issue in 
"Frequency Marker with 50-Kc. Intervals." 

The author, Beverly Dudley, ex-9BR, is now 
editor of The Technology Review at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. A former 
ARRL staff member, Mr. Dudley was an Assist- 
ant Technical Editor of Q^ST just twenty-five 



years ago 



WHAT BANDS AVAILABLE? 

Below is a summary of the U. S. ama- 
teur bands on which operation is permitted 
as of February loth. Changes will, as usual, 
l)e announced by Wl AW bulletins. Figures 
are megacycles. A0 means an unmodu- 
lated carrier; Al means c.w. telegraphy; 
A2 is m.c.w. ; A3 is a.m. 'phone; A4 is fac- 
simile; A5 is television; Fl is frequency- 
shift keying; n.f.m. designates narrow- 
band frequency- or phase-modulated ra- 
diotelephony; and f.m. means frequency 
modulation, 'phone (including n.f.m.) or 
telegraphy. 

3.500-4.000 — Al 
3.500-.3.800 — Fl 
3.800-4.000 — .\3 and n.f.m. 
7.000-7.300 — .\1 
7.000-7.200 — Fl 
7.200-7.300 — A3 and n.f.m. 
14.000-14.350— Al 
14.000-14.200 — Fl 
14.200-14.300— A3 and n.f.m. 
14.300-14.350— Fl 
21.000-21.450 — A 1 
21.000-21.250 — Fl 
21.250-21.450 — A3 and n.f.m. 
26.960-27.230 — A0, Al, A2, .\3, A4, f.m. 
28.000-29.700— A 1 
28.500-29.700 — A3 and n.f.m. 
29.000-29.700 — f.m. 

50-54 — Al, .\2, .A.3, A4. n.f.m. 
51-54 — A0 
52.5-54 
144-148 \ 
220-225 J 
420-4501 1 
1,21.5-1,300 / 
2,300- 2,450 ' 
3,300- 3,500 
5,650- 5,925 
10,000-10,500 
21,000-22,000 I 
All above 30,000 J 
1 Peak antenna power must not exceed 50 watts. 

In addition, Al and A3 on portions of 
1.800-2.000, as follows: 

Power (walls) 
Area Band, kc. Day Night 

Minn., Iowa, Mo., Ark., 1800-1825 .500 200 
La. and east, including 1875-1900 
Puerto Rico and Virgin 
Ids. 

N. and S. Dak., Neb., 1900-1925 .500* 200* 
Colo., N. Mex., and west, 1975-2000 
including Hawaiian Ids., 

Texas, Okla., Kansas lSOn-1825 200 75 

1875-1900 
* Except in State of Washington where daytime 
power limited to 200 watts and nighttime power to 
•"lO watts. 

Novice licensees may use the following 
ficfiuencies, transmitters to be crystal-con- 
t rolled and have a maximum power input 
of 75 watts. 

3.700-3.750 Al 21.100-21.250 Al 
7.175-7.200 Al 145-147 .\1, A2, A3 

Technician licensees are permitted all 
amateur i)rivileges in th(> bands 220 Mc. 
and above. 



f.m. 












A0, Al, 


--^2, 


A3, 


A4, 


f.m. 




A0, Al 


A2 


A3 


A4 


■A5, 


f.m 


A0, Al. 


A2, 


A3, 


.\4, 


A5, 


.m. 


pulse 













10 



QST for 



A Compact Dual Beam for 20 and 
40 Meters 

Two-Band Operation with Simplicity 
BY L. J. JENSEN.* W0MIQ 



• W0MIQ has built a simple compact 
dual rotatable beam for 20 and 40 meters. 
After preliminary adjustments, bands 
can be changed instantly at the flip of a 
switch. The system is fed with a single 
coax transmission line with low s.w.r. on 
both bands. The boom is only 15 feet 
long, and the elements 24 feet, so it will 
fit in almost any backyard. 



THE recent revival of loaded antennas has not 
only made it possible for the ham with a 
small backyard to put up a rotatable arraj^ 
for 20 meters, but it has also made a 40-meter 
parasitic beam mechanically feasible for the aver- 
age ham. A logical development of this principle 
is the use of a single set of elements for two-band 
operation, simply shorting out loading coils, or 
portions of them, for the highcr-frequencj^ band. 
Element spacing is not a problem because a 
spacing of approximately 0.1 wavelength at 40 
meters, where maximum gain occurs with the 
parasitic element tuned as a director, becomes 
0.2 wavelength spacing at 20 meters. This spacing 
is close to optimum if the parasitic element is 
adjusted as a reflector. The loading coils can be 
shorted out by means of relays. 

The photographs and sketches show the con- 
struction of a two-element beam covering 20 and 
40 meters. The boom is 15 feet long, and the 
elements are 24 feet long. The array is easil}^ 
turned with a TR-4 TV rotator. 

Loading short elements, especiall}- when the 

*20 West 9th St., Kansas City o, Mo. 



This view shows the assembly at the 
driven-element end of the boom. Ex- 
cept for the Hnk winding and coax- 
cable connection to it, the assembly at 
the parasitic end of the boom is identi- 
cal. Shielded relay control wires also 
are run through the boom, emerging 
through a hole in the boom, and enter- 
ing the relay box at the rear. Vertical 
guys are attached to the insulators at 
the ring-bolt in the end of the boom, 
and horizontal guys to the inner ends 
of the upper-element conductor. The 
metal base and angles between the 
boom and redwood support help to 
stiffen the mechanical joint. The 
enter braid of the coax cable is con- 
nected to the boom. Weather-proof 
tape is used to seal the coax cable and 
reduce corrosion at electrical joints. 



elements are close-spaced, results in a high-Q 
circuit in which the reactance will vary rapidly 
with a change in frequency. Thus any matching 
adjustment will hold over only a relatively small 
portion of the band. This can be alleviated to a 
considerable degree by using a pair of conductors 
for each element, and fanning them, as shown in 
the photographs. This, in effect, increases the 
size of the conductor. The curves of Fig. 1, made 
with a Millen s.w.r. bridge, show that with a 
match at the center of the 7-Mc. band, the 
s.w.r. does not e.xceed 1.75 to 1 at the ends of the 
band. At 14 Mc, there is the added benefit of 
wide spacing. These curves were made with a 
single matching adjustment for both bands. 

The transmission line (52-ohm coax) is in- 
ductively coupled to the center loading coil. 
On 20 meters, the radiator element is shortened 
only sufficiently to permit the use of enough 
loading-coil inductance to provide adequate 
coupling to the link. Loading inductance is added 
to make the electrical length of the elements 
suitable for 7-Mc. operation. A pair of relays 
shorts out the 40-meter loading coils in each ele- 
ment when operating on 20 meters. 

Construction 

The boom is a 15-foot section of 3-inch diame- 
ter ST-61 aluminum tubing with J/fg-inch wall. 
A guy wire, connecting the ends of the boom, 
runs over a truss at the center of the boom to 
add rigidity. The boom is fastened at its center 
to a mounting, shown in one of the photographs, 
by means of two large U bolts. This mounting 
permits the boom to be tilted in either direction 
for adjustment of the loading coils merely by re- 



March 1955 





The elements of this dual 
20 - 40-nieter beam are only 
24 feet over all, and the boom 
is 16 feet long. The elements 
are fanned for broadbanding. 



moviiifi (jne of the hinge bolts or the other. 

Similar U bolts at each end of the boom support 
a mounting for the antenna elements. These 
mountings are of redwood, l^g inches thick, 3% 
inches wide and 7 feet long. 

Each half element is made up of two 12-foot 
lengths of ST-61 aluminum tubing, jo inch in 
diameter with Jig-inch walls. At each of the 
inner ends, the tubing is flattened and drilled 
for the threaded rod of a feed-through insulator. 
At the outer ends of the supports, the elements 
are attached to similar feed-through insulators 
by means of clamps fashioned from sheet metal. 
The threaded rod of the outer feed-through 
insulator is made to e.xtend about 6 inches above 
the top of the insulator. This extension serves 
as a vertical truss in bracing the elements. Also 
attached to this insulator with a sheet-metal 
strap is a 30-inch length of ^-inch aluminum 
tubing that will serve as a horizontal truss. The 
ends are guyed to the vertical truss at the feed- 
through insulator. 

The two conductors of each element are fanned 
out at the ends so that their tips are separated 30 
inches. The spreaders are made of the same ma- 
terial as the elements, and are flattened at the 



ends and drilled for screws that fasten them to 
the elements. The tips of the elements are simi- 
larly flattened and drilled, but the elements are 
not flattened for the short intermediate spreaders, 
since this would weaken the elements. The short 
spreaders are placed as shown in the photograph. 

A system of gu.y wires is used to brace the ele- 
ments both vertically to prevent drooj)ing, and 
horizontally to reduce whip. Copper-clad stranded 
steel guy wire used in TV work is good material 
for these guys. The guy wires are insulated from 
the boom, but not from the elements. On each 
side of the boom, a guy wire runs from a strain 
insulator fastened to the boom, over the truss at 
the outer feed-through insulator, and thence to 
the upper bolt at the short spreader. 

The horizontal guj'S run from the stand-off 
insulators at the inner ends of the elements to the 
horizontal truss, and thence to a bridle at the 
short spreader. This bridle is simply a piece of 
guy wire loosely spanning the spreader. 

The relays that short out the 40-meter loading 
coils are enclosed in standard 3 X 4 X 5-inch 
aluminum bo.xes. The relays should be of the 
antenna-changeover type with good insulation 
and heavy-current contacts, such as the Ad- 



Each element is guyed both vertically and horizontally. The vertical truss is a brass rod extending above the 
outer feed-through insulator. The horizontal truss is a piece of aluminum tubing attached to the same insulator with 
a clamp. Similar clamps anchor the clement conductors to the insulator. 




12 



QST for 



vance AT/2C. I was able to pick up some surplus 
28-volt models at $1.29 each,^ operating them 
from a 100-ma. selenium-rectifier supply. 

Leads to the loading coils are larought out 
through 1-inch ceramic feed-through insulators 
set in the sides of the boxes. These feed-through 
insulators also serve as mountings for all coils ex- 
cept the link coil. The latter is fastened to a piece 
of 34-inch polystj'rene sheet attached to the red- 
wood support for the elements. The mounting 
screws also serve as terminals for connecting the 
coax line to the link. The coax line is fed through 
the boom to a point near the center where it leaves 
through a hole to an anchorage on the mast. 



<0 1 


^ 












"" 


'■*^-- 


.....^ 






^^ 



7.1 7.2 

FREQ.. Mc. 



7.3 






1.5 



14 



14.1 



14.2 
FREQ.,Mc. 



14.3 



14.4 



Fig. 1 — Curves showing s.w.r. measured on trans- 
mission line feeding the dual heani. 

The loading coils shown are wound with heavy- 
duty aluminum clothesline, although 3 8-i"ch to 
^Ye-inch copper tubing, or No. 8 copper wire 
could be used. The 20-meter loading coil in the 
driven element has 8 turns 13 2 inches in diameter, 
turns spaced approximately the diameter of the 
conductor. The link coil has 5 turns, similarly 
spaced, 2 inches in diameter. The 40-meter load- 
ing coils in the driven element each have 20 turns 
13-2 inches in diameter. In the parasitic element, 
the 20-meter coil has 11 turns, and the 40 meter 
coils 18 turns each, all 13^2 inches in diameter. 

After completion, the entire beam was sprayed 
with two coats of acrylic or plastic lacquer. All ex- 
posed electrical connections were first covered 
with plastic tape and then sprayed. 

Adjustment 

The parasitic element should be adjusted as a 
reflector for 20- meter operation first, with the 
40- meter loading coils shorted out and the driven 
element open at the center. In my case, it was 
made 5 per cent electrically longer than a half 
wave for 14.2 Mc. With a grip-dip meter cou- 
pled to the 20-meter loading coil, the resonant 
frequency should be adjusted to 13.5 Mc. bj^ 
squeezing or spreading the turns as necessary. 
If this does not suffice, it may be necessary to 
add or subtract a turn. Then, with the shorts re- 
moved from the 40-meter loading coils, the coils 
should be adjusted for element resonance at 7.5 

' Potter Radio Co., 1314 MoGee St., Kansas City. Mo. 
2 Measurements Chapter, ARRL Handbook, 30th edition, 
et seq. 



Mc. This gives an electrical length about 4 per 
cent shorter than a half wavelength — a proper 
length for operation as a director. 

Attention should now be turned to the driven 
element. With the 40-meter loading coils shorted 
out, the output terminals of a 52-ohm s.w.r. 
bridge should be connected to the link terminals, 
and a suitable r.f. source fed to the bridge. Fol- 
lowing recommended procedure,- the 20-meter 
loading coil should be adjusted for minimum 
s.w.r. Then, with the shorts removed from the 
40-meter loading coils, these coils should be ad- 
justed similarly. 

The 52-ohm coax line may then be connected 
and a recheck of the match made by connecting 
the bridge to the transmitter end of the line. Ad- 
justment should be made as close to the final 
elevation as possible. If the adjustment as checked 
with the s.w.r. bridge at the input of the line does 
not hold after the array has been put in place, 
the s.w.r. measurements will show the frequency 
of minimum s.w.r., and thus the direction in 
which the driven element should be retuned. 

If greater f.-b. ratio is desired, the procedure will 
be the same, but it should start out with a greater 
electrical length (lower resonant frequency) for 
the reflector, and a shorter electrical length 
(higher resonant frequency) for the director. 

In conclusion, I want to thank W0PUB whose 
ever-ready strong arm enabled countless experi- 
ments to be completed with success. 




Tlie tilting mount for the liooni. ] he stub is an U-inili 
piece of 13^-inch pipe welded to a channel of 3^ -inch 
steel. This channel is 8 inches long, 6 inches wide, and 
the sides are 2 inches high. The mounting plate (with 
U bolts in place) is of '/-fi-inch hardened aluminum, 6 
inches wide and 24 inches long. The U-shaped strips 
attached to the mounting plate are of steel strip '/fe- 
inch thick and 2 inches wide, case-hardened after 
processing and fitting. The pins are ^-inch steel with 
nuts welded at one end and cotter-pin holes at the 
other. The boom may be tilted in either direction. 



March 1955 



13 



Frequency Marker with 50-Kc. Intervals 

A Compact, Low-Cost Unit Using Surplus Crystals 

BY BEVERLY DUDLEY * 



• Here is a frequency staiiiiurd huilt 
around the low-freqiieiiey F'r-2HA crys- 
tals, and using a niultivihrator to oittain 
markers every 50 kc. t hrcjupliout the 
eoniniunication spe<'lruni. The oscil- 
lator circuit is one thai Mill work Mith 
high-frequency crystals as well, and thus 
provide spot checks for identifying the 
oO-kc. harmonics. 



A FREQUENCY MARKER providing spot frequen- 
cies at intervals of 50 kc. per second is a 
'- useful piece of measuring equipment for the 
radio amateur, not alone because it permits ac- 
curate determination of the amateur band limits, 
but because it provides means for calibrating 
receivers, variable-frequency oscillators and simi- 
lar gear. The frequency marker described in this 
article provides crystal-controlled marker fre- 
quencies at 50-kc. intervals up to at least 30 Mc. 



Power to operate the unit is taken from the 
60-cycle line. The frequency marker contains its 
own power supply, consisting of a 6.3-volt 1-am- 
pere filament transformer, and a half-wave 
selenium rectifier and resistance-capacitance 
smoothing filter comprised of Ci. d, and Ri. 
Protection against short circuits to ground is 
provided by the ground coupling capacitor, C12, 
in the output circuit. 

The crystal oscillator uses a 6AK5 pentode in 
an electron-coupled Pierce oscillator circuit, with 
the screen of the pentode serving as the plate of 
an equivalent triode while output to the multi- 
vibrator is taken from the plate of the pentode. 
The frequency of oscillation can be adjusted over 
a small range by means of the variable capacitors 
Cs and d. Capacitor d is used to raise the fre- 
quency, whereas C3 lowers the frequency slightly. 
Both of these capacitors are mounted on a single 
ceramic base as a double trimmer, and each has 
a capacitance range of from 10 to 170 /x^f- A 
series capacitor, C5, was used to reduce the 

50-Kc. MULTIVIBRATOR 




Fig. I — Circuit of the 50-kc. frequency marker. Resistors are 3^-watt composition unless otherwise specified. 
Capacitances in nfii. except where specified otherwise. 

Ci, C2 — Electrolytic. Ce, C7, Cs, C12 — Ceramic or paper. 

Cs, C4 — Dual ceramic-mounted trimmer. CRi — 75-ma. selenium rectifier. 

Cs, C9, Cio, Cii, Ci3 — Mica. Si — D.p.s.t. slide. 



Except for the 115-volt a.c. source of power, it is 
entirely self-contained in a standard metal case, 
3 by 4 by 5 inches in size. It uses a low-frequency 
crystal, such as are now readily available on the 
surplus market in FT-241 or FT-243 holders for 
two dollars or less. 

Circuit 

As the wiring diagram. Fig. 1, shows, the 
marker comprises a OAKS crystal-controlled 
oscillator, followed by a ()U8 triode-pentode 
frequency-controlled multivil)rator adjusted to 
provide marker frequencies at intervals of 50 kc. 
Output is ample for communication-type receiv- 
ers up to 30 Mc. 

* 22 Temple Street, Belmont 78, Mass. 



maximum capacitance of C4 to about 60 ixfii. 
Output from the plate of the 6AK5 is fed to the 
grid of the triode section of the 6U8 multivibrator. 
The frequency divider consists of an electron- 
coupled multivibrator. When free running (i.e., 
not controlled by the crystal oscillator) its fre- 
quency^ range extends from about 30 to 80 kc, 
depending upon the setting of the frequency- 
adjusting resistor, R(,. When the multivibrator is 
frequency controlled to operate at 51) kc, R(, has a 
value of about 23,000 ohms. Aside from the fea- 
ture of electron coujiling, which virtually elim- 
inates effect of load on operation of the fre- 
quency marker, the only unusual feature of the 
multivibrator circuit is the use of series resistors 
in the grid circuits. These tin; not necessary but 



14 



QST for 




This unit generates fretiuency marker signals at 50-kc. 
intervals, using surplus crystals in the 400- to 500-kc. 
region as the primary frequency source. In this front 
view the oscillator tube is at the left rear and the multi- 
vibrator tube at the right. 

are used as an aid in producing a reasonably good 
square-wave output at 50 kc. 

Adjustment 

The oscillator goes into oscillation easily when 
the crystal is plugged into its holder. The multi- 
vibrator is, perhaps, easiest adjusted by coupling 
its output to a communications-tjpe receiver 
and varying the resistance of Rr, until 
marker frequencies are produced at in- 
tervals of 50 kc. This adjustment is 
most easily done in the broadcast band, 
or a similar low-frequency band of a 
multiband receiver. Proper adjustment 
is that for which the note in the receiver 
is sharp and clean. It will probably be 
found that the desired condition of 
operation can be obtained with Rf, ad- 
justable throughout a small range of 
angular rotation. If adjustment is made 
b}' means of a receiver alone, the mid- 
point of this angular rotation is prob- 
ably the best adjustment, but a check 
at the high-frequency end of the receiver 
is advisable. 

If a cathode-ray oscilloscope is avail- 
able, it can be used to permit the output 
to be adjusted more nearly to a square 
wave. This is done by connecting the 

» 



Power-supply components are at the 
top in this interior view of the fre- 
quency marker. Most of the oscillator 
and multivibrator circuit components 
are mounted on the Vector sockets for 
the two tubes. 



output of the multivibrator to the input termi- 
nals of the vertical-input amplifier of the oscillo- 
scope. The oscilloscope sweep circuit should be 
adjusted to provide horizontal sweep of from 
10 to 50 kc, and the synchronizing adjustment 
should be advanced to lock the trace into a sta- 
tionary pattern showing several cycles of wave- 
form of the multivibrator. The resistor Rg may 
then be adjusted to that value of resistance 
which yields the most nearh- square wave on 
the screen of the oscilloscope. 

Operating Data 

Power consumption is small (approximately 
10 watts) and thus the unit may be left running 
continuously. Very little drift — only a few 
cycles per second — is observed in warming up, 
however, so for most frequency measurements it 
is not really necessarj' to leave the unit running. 
The crystal frequency can be adjusted to e.xact 
value by varying C'3 or C'4 until the output is in 
zero beat with signals received from WWV. 

A score of crystals have been used with this 
frequency marker and in all cases oscillation oc- 
curred readily. The multivibrator has synchro- 
nized easily with crystals whose fundamental 
frequencies were 200, 400, and 500 kc. The oscil- 
lator also worked well with cr\'stals having fre- 
quencies of 10(M) and 5000 kc, but the multi- 
vibrator would not SN-nchronize at all with the 
5-Mc. crystal, and only with difficulty and not 
too satisfactorily with the 1-Mc. crystal. This is in 
accordance with usual good practice of not using 
multivibrators for dividing the frequency of the 

(Continued on page 120) 




March 1955 



15 



Overtone Crystals — How and 
Where To Use Them 

Some Circuits and Their Adaptation to V. H. F. Gear 

BY EDWARD P. TILTON, WIHDQ 



THOUGH we've used overtone crj-stal oscil- 
lator circuits in v.h.f. work for quite a few 
years, it's a safe bet that the vast majority 
of all hams who employ overtone techniques have 
little understanding of what actually goes on in 
such oscillators. Several types of overtone crj'stal 
circuits were discussed in detail in QST some 
years back/ and this information appears in 
boiled-down form in all recent editions of the 
Handbook. It is suggested that the reader go over 
these references, as what is to follow is supple- 
mentary to them. 

All overtone oscillator circuits have one basic 
feature in common: some method of introducing 
additional feed-back, beyond that normally 
present in simple oscillator circuits. The differ- 
ence between the various overtone circuits lies 
mainly in the method of controlling the feed- 
liack. The idea is to give the crystal a little extra 
regenerative kick, on the frequency of the desired 
overtone, to encourage oscillation at that fre- 
quency rather than on the fundamental. There 
should be only just enough to accomplish this, 
without causing the stage to take off on a fre- 
quency determined by the tuned circuits, rather 
than by the crystal. 

How Crystals Work on Overtones 

The frequency at which a quartz plate will 

1 Tilton, "Overtone Crystal Oscillator Circuits," QST, 
April, 1951, page 56. 




t t 



(B) 



(C) 



• The economy and circuit simplicity 
that are achieved through the use of 
overtone crystal oscillators have a price: 
the need for some care on the part of the 
user, to be sure that they are adjusted 
and operated properly. Overtone crystals 
and circuits should he thought of as 
tools useful in attaining certain ends, 
rather than as an all-inclusive technique 
to replace other methods in v.h.f. circuit 
design. Here the good and bad features 
of overtone circuitry are sorted out, to 
enable the v.h.f. man to decide whether 
they are right for the job at hand. 



oscillate is determined by the waj' it is cut from 
the main crystal, and in the case of frequencies 
we're interested in here, by its thickness. The 
crystal. Fig. lA, is deformed mechanically during 
oscillation, as shown in greatly exaggerated form 
in Figs. IB and IC. When the crystal oscillates on 
an overtone (the fundamental frequency divided 
by some odd number) it breaks down into sep- 
arate layers. There are three layers for a 3rd- 
overtone oscillation, five for 5th, and so on. The 
overtone crystal looks like Fig. ID and IE, again 
greatly exaggerated. There is no fundamental- 
frequency oscillation at this time, nor is it possi- 
ble to develop oscillation on even multiples. 



(D) 



(E) 



j<'ig. I — How crystals oscillate at fuudanieuial and overtone frequencies. The crystal. A, is shown at successive 
peaks of the cycle, when oscillating on its fundamental frequency, B and C. When oscillation is on overtones the 
crystal is broken down into layers, as shown at D and E. 



16 



QST for 



When we remember that a crystal is actually a 
very thin plate, we can see why some work per- 
fectly on their design frequencies, but refuse to 
oscillate on overtones. And it is obvious why 
extreme care must be taken in grinding and 
mounting crystals where overtones higher than 
the third are to be used. A 7-Mc. BT-cut crystal 
is only about 0.014 inch thick. This means that 
the overtone layers, even for 3rd-mode operation, 
are less than 0.005 inch in thickness. For 5th 
mode they are less than 0.003 and for 7th, 0.002 
inch thick! This doesn't allow much for varia- 
tions in thickness due to imperfect grinding. 
Even a tiny scratch on the surface may destroy 
overtone-mode operation entirely. The slight con- 
vex curvature usually imparted to the surfaces 
of standard crystals also may prevent high-order 
overtone oscillation. 

The method of mounting, too, may have con- 
siderable bearing on how well the crystal will 
work in overtone service. Pressure mounting, as 
in the FT-243 type of holder so commonly used, 
clamps the crystal in place and tends to inhibit 
overtone oscillation. In general, crystals mounted 
in the small CR-7 type of holder, with electrodes 
in the form of plated areas on the crystal surfaces, 
tend to work better on overtones than do pres- 
sure-mounted types. The capacitance of the 
holder may be an important factor in the attain- 
ment of high-order overtones, and here, again, 
the CR-7 holder and mounting method are 
superior. 

Just about any crystal that will work well on 
its intended frequency will oscillate reasonably 
well on its 3rd overtone. Higher overtones are 
generally unsatisfactory with crystals ground for 
fundamental use. The 5th may be found, but 
with a majority of run-of-the-market crystals it 
will be low in output and very critical in adjust- 
ment. This applies to crystals between 5 and 12 
Mc. Lower than 5 Mc, the crystals are thick 
enough so that 5th and sometimes higher over- 
tones can be developed. Fifth-mode operation of 
3.5-Mc. crystals, for instance, may be quite 
satisfactory. We keep hearing about this or that 
pet circuit that makes possible the development 
of high-order overtones with any cr^-stal, but 
many hours of tedious adjustments with any 
number of circuit variations and with hundreds 
of crystals have convinced the writer that trying 
for overtones beyond the 3rd with crystals higher 
than about 5 Mc. is a waste of time and patience, 
unless crystals ground especially for overtone 
service are used. 

Overtone Circuitry 

With crystals ground and mounted for over- 
tone use, even simple circuits will work satis- 
factorily, provided that there is a tuned circuit at 
the overtone frequency, as in Fig. 2A. This is 
suitable for use between 12 and 54 Mc, the range 
over which relatively ine.xpensive 3rd-mode crys- 
tals are currently available. There is some over- 
lap between 12 and 20 Mc. as to whether a crystal 
is an overtone type or not. Most manufacturers 
supply overtone crystals for any frequency above 



12 Mc, though fundamental crystals can be 
made up to about 20 Mc. 

The simplest circuit, Fig. 2A, ordinarily does 
not provide enough feed-back to make funda- 
mental crystals in the 6- to 9-Mc. range take off 
on the 3rd overtone, however, so some provision 



V2 6U8, 12AT7, 6J6 



l2toS4Mc 



12-54 Mc 




'/zeue, I2AT7,6J6 50, 



I2-S4MC. 




OR iT ilOOK 



(B) .; 



6AK5,/26U8 




1 (c) 



Fig. 2 — Three circuits for use with overtone crystals. 
Circuit A, the simplest possible overtone circuit, is suit- 
able for use with crystals processed for overtone service. 
Circuit B introduces more feed-back, and may be used 
with fundamental-type crystals. The circuit at C is for 
obtaining high-order overtones with crystals that were 
processed for 3rd-overtone use. It was sent in by 
W9MBI, who reports use of it for direct control at fre- 
quencies as high as 216 Mc. In all three diagrams, the 
tuned circuits are resonated at the frequency of the 
desired overtone. The grid circuit in C may be tuned 
with a capacitor for greater range. 

must be made to increase and control regenera- 
tion. In addition to the circuits we've been using 
for several years ' there are variations such as the 
one shown in Fig. 2B. This circuit was first used 
in QST through the courtesy of the Robert Dollar 
Co. and W6EFT. The feed-back element here is 
the smaller of the two capacitors connected be- 
tween the low side of the plate coil and ground. 
Decreasing the capacitance increases the feed- 
back, though the value of 50 Ai^f. has been satis- 
factory in several applications in which we've 
tried many types of crystals. This takes only one 

{Continued on page ISO) 



March 1955 



17 



Flexibility in the Antenna Coupler 

A Wide-Range Antenna Tuner and Coax-Matching Circuit 

BY T. H. PUCKETT,* W5JXM 



• Antenna couplers don't seem to have 
chanfjed much over the years, but 
matchinfi the coupler to a coax line is 
becoming increasingly important to 
amateurs. Here is a unit which performs 
both functions in one package. 



THE advent of low-pass filters and pi-tank 
output circuits has just about made some 
form of transmission-line impedance match- 
ing a must in amateur stations. Also, if a balanced 
antenna and transmission line is used, most 
amateui's these days prefer to put in some 



anced to single-ended convcision, and an adjust- 
able L-C section for matching to the coax 
transmission line. 

The complete circuit is given in Fig. 1. Barker 
and Williamson type TA plug-in coils are used 
for 7'i, the balanced-to-single-ended converter. 
These are designed for this purpose, being made 
of tinned wire so that taps may be easily made. 
Two clips are furnished with each coil for making 
taps. 

The antenna side of the circuit is a more or 
less conventional plug-and-jack arrangement 
which may be connected for either series or paral- 
lel feed. Fig. 2A shows the plug arrangement for 
parallel feed, and B for series feed. The taps on 




Fig. 1 — Complete schematic of the coupler. Ti should be as required for series- or 

parallel-tuning of the particular antenna-feeder system used (Barker & \\ illiamson type 

TA antenna coil used in the unit pictured). 

Ci, C2 — 250-nni. variable, 3000- 
volt rating (see text). 

C3 — 250-/x/if. variable, 1000-volt 
rating. 

C4 — Nine 200-/iMf. 1250-voIt 
working, mica con- 
densers. 

Si — 2 poles, 3 positions, steatite. 

S2 — 10-position progressive 
shorting (Centralab PIS 
section, steatite). 



device to convert to unbalanced coaxial line 
because of its greater convenience in installation. 
This antenna coupler is designed to perform 
both of these functions in one package, and to 
have enough range to accommodate any of the 
usual amateur antenna-feedline combinations. 
This is achieved by using plug-in coils for bal- 



Xoriiian, (_)kl;i. 




Front view of the <<pii|ili-r. 
controls the antenna tiiiiiiii; cajiacit 
angle drive. 'I "he two knobs at the lower left eontrt 
the matehing-section eapaeitan<e, the switch eiuitr.il 
the matching-seetion circuit, and the counter dial drives 
the matching-seetion variable inductor. All controls 
have arbitrary letter designations. 



the coil are not needed for series feed, but are 
indicated because the same coil might be used for 
both series and parallel feed at different times. 
Dummy jacks are provided for storing the taps. 

The antenna tuning capacitors Ci and Co 
have a maximum capacitance of 250 nnt each, 
which is considerably more than is necessary 
to resonate the 80-meter coil. However, it 
is sometimes convenient to have the extra 
capacitance available, as some antennas couple 
considerable reactance into the tuner which 
must be canceled out to achieve resonance. 
As it was expected to use this coupler only on 
the 80-, 40- and 20-meter bands, no great 
thought was given to the rather large minimum 
capacitance of these capacitors. If regular 
15- or 10-meter operation is planned it is sug- 
gested that 150- or even 100-/u/if. capacitors be 
substituted. Also, it would probably be wise to 
make the circuit a little more symmetrical. As 
may be seen in the back view, one capacitor is 
much nearer the variable inductor than the other, 
and has an aluminum support bracket fastened 
to it. 

The coax line side of the unit may be set to 
three different configurations by the circuit 
switch Si. These are shown in Fig. 3. A shows 
the switch in position 1, where the fixed link is 



18 



QST for 



Rear view of the coupler. 
The antenna feed line comes 
in from the top. The L-C 
matching section components 
are along the bottom. The 80- 
meter coil is plugged in. A 
standard 103^-inch aluminum 
rack panel is used as a mountin;? 
base. The output coax con- 
nector is behind the variable 
inductor. 



series tuned. B shows the switch in position 2, 
with an L-C matching circuit that is useful when 
the impedance looking into the link is high. C, 
position 3, is useful when the impedance looking 
into the link is low. 

Switch 8-2 is a progressively shorting ten-posi- 
tion switch which can connect nine 200-/u/if. 
fixed mica capacitors, C4, in parallel with the 
250-/iMf. variable capacitor, C3. This gives a 
total capacitance range of about 2000 fi/xL The 
variable inductor Li is a 15-mici-ohcnry job. 
Barker and Williamson No. ;^852, which is driven 
from the front panel b}^ a B & W No. 3902 100- 
turn counter dial. 

Operation 

A standing-wave ratio bridge of some kind 
is an excellent indicator for adjusting the coupler. 




w w 



tT- 



■>♦■ 



i«7 



■>♦ 



(A) 



WW 



7^ 



• K" 

(B) 

Fig. 2 — (A) shows the plug connections for a parallel- 
tuned antenna-feed line combination. (B) shows the 
connections for series tuning. 



The controls are simply manipulated to produce 
a null on the s.w.r. bridge. If one of the "Micro- 
match" type is used, it may be left in the line 
continuously. A calibration chart should be 
prepared which lists the control settings vs. 
frequency. 

The suggested operation of the coupler when 
it is being calibrated is as follows: Set Si on 
position 2, and C3, C'4, and Li on minimum 
capat'itance and inductance, respectively. Plug 
in the proper coil and adjust the antenna tuning 
capacitors, Ci and Co, and the coil taps, if used, 
to give resonance. This would be indicated by 
a dip on a standing-wave indicator. Then adjust 
C3, Ci and L] until the line is matched. Try the 
other two positions of <Si if necessar}^ Position 2 
of (Si is preferred, as it should give the best 

(Continued on page 126) 



Q}-^p{h 





Fig. 3 — The three possible matching section circuit 
arrangements. (A) shows i'l in position 1, (B) in position 
2, and (C) in position 3. 



March 1955 



19 



Low-Noise Receiver Design 

Reworking a Receiver for Maximum Sensitivity 
BY HARRY LONGERICH,* W2GQY/4, AND ROBERT D. SMITH,** W5LHD 



• This is an interesting article telling 
how two amateurs were able to improve 
considerably the performance of a com- 
mercial receiver. We think you will be 
interested in the reasoning and the cir- 
cuitry involved. However, it should be 
pointed out that the improvement that 
can be expected with any receiver will 
be in proportion to the poorness of its 
present performance and the lack of 
outside noise at one's location — you 
can't expect these changes to help a 
currently-good receiver or one in a noisy 
location. 



AFTER spending several hundred dollars for a 
/% new receiver, most of us feel rather pleased 
-^ ■■- with ourselves — if we didn't, that hollow 
sensation in the hip pocket would be hard to 
bear. But how about a few months later, when 
the noveltj' has worn off and we've settled down 
to some serious DX operating? Are there ever 
any little gnawing doubts? Probably more often 
than most of us would care to admit. The crux of 
the situation is that while one receiver may have 
better selectivity, stability, or operating con- 



* Major, Office of the Chief Signal Officer, Washington 
25. D. C. 

** Lieut.. 6207th AC&W, APO 74, % Postmaster, San 
Francisco, Calif. 

1 Two r.f. stages are not necessarily better than one. If 
a low-noise mixer is used, one good r.f. stage should he 
sufficient, and it would lessen the chances of cross-modula- 
tion in the front end. — Ed. 



venience than another, they are pretty much 
alike so far as front-end performance is con- 
cerned. This is because the industry long ago 
settled on pentode r.f. amplifiers and pentagrid 
mixers as the accepted standard. Obviously, two 
r.f. stages are better than one or none, but manu- 
facturer X's r.f. amplifiers or mixers will have 
essentially the same noise figure as those of 
manufacturer Y.^ 

.\s it turns out, low-noise amplifiers have 
been easiest to build for the v.h.f. bands because 
of the small frequency coverage (percentagewise) 
demanded of most v.h.f. receivers. External noise 
is lowest in the v.h.f. bands, and hence full ad- 
vantage can be taken of low-noise r.f. amplifiers. 
General!}' accepted theory considers that ex- 
ternal noise (static, etc.) is so strong below 25 
Mc. that it is useless to use special circuits to 
reduce internal receiver noise on our general 
operating frequencies. While this is essentially 
true, we believe the critical frequency to be 
more in the order of 10 Mc, indicating low- 
noise circuits for three of our most important 
DX bands. This figure of 10 Mc. is somewhat 
variable, depending on local conditions; certainly 
the man who lives under a trolley line is little 
concerned with internal set noise at virtuallj^ any 
frequency. 

Testing Your Receiver 

Here is a simple test to determine whether or 
not a lower noise figure would help j'our own 
receiver: set it to or near your favorite DX band 
(use your regular receiving antenna), tune in a 
frequency entirely free of any signal, advance the 



1st R.F AMP. 



2nd R.FAMP 



'ExiST'NGr*^!::; I 

' inwc'h 1^ V / 




I ^— '^ "^ 




Fig. 1 — Circuit diagram of the 
low-noise receiver "front end," as ap- 
plied to an IIIU) -1. The added 6C4s 
are nioiinted under tlie chassis. 

All resistors are 3^ watt. 



I CIRCUIT U» 
I jj 



20 



QST for 



signal 
Input 



TRIODE-HEXODE CONVERTER 
6K8 



+ ISOV. REGULATED 

PENTAGRID CONVERTER 
6SA7, 6BE6, 
OR feSBV 



Sipnal 
mput 




(BEFORE) 



6C4 




(AFTER) 




Connect 
to point "X" 
in Fi^. 1 



+ B 105 V. 




^^mf^^^osv. 



Connect to 

M_ I ^ point "X" 
~r 'in Fig. 1 



(AFTER) 



Fig. 2 — Typical oscillator circuits, 
before and after modification. 



gtiiii until the noise is at a comfortable level, and 
now substitute a resistor having the same value 
as the antenna input impedance, usually about 
300 ohms. If there was not an appreciable de- 
crease in noise when the antenna was replaced by 
the resistor, your receiver can stand improve- 
ment: most of the noi.se remaining is being gen- 
erated within the receiver. 

We made the above test on a modified HRO-5, 
and found that internal set noise masked much of 
the weak-signal DX. In the course of testing this 
and other receivers, another interesting fact 
came to light. Literature covering weak-signal 
reception, available to us, generally states that 
the first r.f. stage is the most important since its 
noise is amplified more than that of any other 
stage. This apparently does not hold true for the 
average amateur receiver; a considerable amount 
of noise is contributed by the pentagrid mi.xer 
or converter stage. Further research into the 
subject disclosed that pentagrid mi.xer and con- 
verter tubes available today have an equivalent 
noise resistance ranging from 62,000 to 300,000 
ohms; " in addition, conversion transconductance 
is low. Economic factors and construction con- 
venience have generally dictated the use of 
conventional mixers or converters, because they 
are simple and inexpensive and perform fairly 
satisfactorily for most medium frequency ap- 
plications. However, at frequencies above 10 

2 RadiotTon Designer's Handbook, 4th Edition, page 938. 

3 The more elements there are in a vacuum tube, the 
greater the noise tliat is produced, because of the random 
division of the cathode current between the elements. See 
Terman, Radio Engineer's Handbook, page 294. 



Mc, they may leave quite a bit to be desired. 

R. F. Amplifiers 

The triode is the least noisy vacuum tube 
amplifier known. A check of tubes narrowed our 
choice to a triode-connected 6AC7, or the minia- 
ture version, the 6AH6, since they have the 
highest Qm and therefore the lowest equivalent 
noise resistance of available triodes.' 

A straight triode amplifier is not practical 
because it will oscillate without neutralization, 
and neutraUzation is impractical in multiband 
receivers. The grounded-grid ampUfier overcomes 
this objection, but in turn has the drawback of 
heavy input-circuit loading. To overcome this 
disadvantage, the cathode follower is made to 
order. The high input impedance of a 6C-1 cathode 
follower stage decreases loading of the tuned 
circuit, resulting in greatly increased input- 
signal voltage, and improved r.f. selectivity; 
while the low output impedance of the cathojle 
follower matches the input of the grounded-giid 
stage. Our experience has shown the combination 
to be relatively noise free. 

Mixer 

Since the grounded-grid amplifier and cathode 
follower proved so successful, it was decided to 
try the combination in the mixer stage. Cathode 
injection looked like a good bet. * The circuit 
was incorporated in the modified HRO-5 and it 

{Continued on page 128) 

■* Goodman, "Some Notes on Improving Small Receiver 
Performance," QST, December, 1953. 



March 1955 



21 



The Multimatch Antenna System 

Unique Design Providing Essentially Constant Impedance 
Over Several Bands 

BY CHESTER L. BUCHANAN.* W3DZZ 



• For a long lime, hams have been 
searching for a single antenna that could 
be fed efficiently Mith a low-impedance 
transmission line on several bands. At 
last a simple but ingenious design by 
W3DZZ provides a solution. He has ap- 
plied some well-known but neglected 
principles to both wire and parasitic- 
beam antennas. 



RADIO transmitters and receivers have en- 
joyed rapid development in flexibility to 
- the point where changing bands is a matter 
of only spinning a dial or two and flipping a 
couple of switches. In contrast, the operation of a 
single antenna on several bands is usually done 
only at the expense of high standing waves on 
the feed line, because of the wide variation in 
antenna feed-point impedance from band to 
band. 

Some work done by the author several years 
ago in connection with a dual-band parasitic 
array^ has led to the development of a simple 
wire antenna covering five bands, from 80 to 
10 meters. This antenna can be fed with a low- 
impedance transmission line without incurring 
excessive s.w.r. on any of these bands. 

Basic Design 

The fundamental principle of the system can 
be explained with the aid of Fig. 1. In Fig. lA, 

tig h, h, hj 

<ss r \ I I \ jr \ H I ^ 

8.2ph. // 8.2jih. 

/ (A) 



UmJ 




uuuJ 



Fig. 1 — Sketch illustrating the three furulamcntal 
modes of the multimatch antenna. 

*4671 Lacy Ave., Washington 23, D. C. 

1 Buchanan, " Duo-Band Ham Antenna," Radio & Tele- 
vision News, December, 1950. 

2 Morgan, "A Multifrequeney Tuned Antenna System," 
Electronics, August, 1040. 



sections hi constitute a half-wave dipole for 
some frequency /i. This dipole is terminated in 
lumped-constant trap circuits resonant at /i. 
Additional wire sections, /12, extend beyond the 
traps. If the system is excited at frequency fi, 
the traps serve to isolate the dipole much as 
though insulators were inserted at these points.^ 
At frequencies much lower than /i, the traps 
no longer isolate the dipole, but act simply 



«1 , 

5^> 
















^.^ 


2 




^ 












^ 












^ 


■:u. 


«st 


^ '' 


"* 




3.5 


3.6 


3.7 


3.8 


3.9 


4.0 


3 
2 


<N 


^ 






















-^v 


s^ 
















^o 


7.1 


7.2 


7.3 


7.4 




^ ? 






















cn 






















1 


1.0 


14.1 


14.2 


14.3 


14.4 




3 
2 












































' 


1.0 


21.1 


2 


1.2 


21.3 


21.4 


21.5 


3 
2 




























"~~" 










. 





28.0 28.5 29.0 29.5 30.0 

/mc. 

Fig. 2 — S.w.r. measurements made on the antenna 
of Fig. lA. The dashed lines show measurements made 
on a 122-foot dipole in the same location for comparison. 

as loading inductances in a second dipole whose 
electrical length is made up of hi, hi and the 
inductive reactance of the traps, as in Fig. IB. 

At frequencies much higher than /i, the traps 
again cease to isolate the sections, the traps now 
acting as series capacitances, as in Fig. IC. 

Another important consideration in this multi- 
band system is that low impedance at the center 
feed point of the antenna occurs not only at its 
fundamental resonance but also at any odd 
harmonic of the fundamental. 

By applying these principles, and by proper 
selection of the values of L and C in the traps, 
and choice of lengths for hi and h-i, it has been 
possible to arrive at a design where the system 
operates as follows: 

1) Sections hi form a half-wave diijole resonant 



22 



QST for 



in the 40-meter band. The 
traps, resonant at the same 
frequency, isolate this dipole 
from the outer sections. 

2) The inductive reactance 
of the traps is such that the 
entire sj-stem, including sec- 
tions ho, resonates as a loaded 
half-wave dipole for the 80- 
meter band. 

3) The capacitive reactance 
of the traps at higher frequen- 
cies is such that the entire 
system resonates as a 3/2 
wavelength antenna on 20, 
5/2 wavelength on 15, and 7/2 wavelength on 10 
meters. 

The antenna is fed with 75-ohm Twin-Lead, 
and Fig. 2 shows the results of s.w.r. measure- 




nnnr 



L2'5"^ 



HH 



nnnn 



HH 



Lightweight wealheri)roof t^a[>^ made h_v the uiitinr. I n lln- left is the type 
inserted in beam elements, while the other one is suitable for wire antennas. 

walls, molded around the inner conductor. The 
polystyrene is also flowed into a series of holes 
in one end of the outer conductor so that the 
strain of the antenna will not pull the assembly 
apart. The inductor is wound with No. 14 wire 
and is concentric with the capacitor. The in- 
ductor is weatherproof ed by molding it in insu- 
lating material. Other construction might be 
used, of course. As an e.xample, a conventional 
inductor and capacitor could be enclosed in a 
plastic box, suspended across an insulator. This 
would, however, add to the weight. 



-TZ'f," 



rector 
Boom— > 



r^ 



csw 



'2'|l^'- 



HH 



nnnn 



HH 



-8'lV 



Driven 
Element 



'-T Match 
75n. Twin-Leod 



28-Mc Reflector 



^ 



k 



h3'2'f 



nnnrLp.fi..nnnri 



HH 



HH 



6' 9" 



6'9r 

23'6° 



Fip. 3 — Dimensions of the .'?-hand parasitic beam 
found optimum at \X .^DZZ. Dimensions are, of course, 
duplicated on the opposite side of the boom. 

ments made across each band. Proper dimensions 
are given in Fig. lA. 

Trap Construction 

The values of C and L used in the traps are 
quite critical. The capacitance should first l)e 
adjusted accurately to 60 fxfxi.. then the in- 
ductance should be trimmed until the trap 
resonates at 7200 kc. This should be done before 
the traps are inserted in the antenna. The in- 
ductance will be approximatel}' 
8.2 ^h. The traps made by the 
author are (3 inches long and 
weigh only 6 ounces and the Q 
is well over 100. They will with- 
stand the voltage developed by 
a l-kw. transmitter. Samples 
are shown in the photograph. 
The wire-antenna capacitor is 
made up of concentric lengths 
of 1-inch and ^-inch alumi- 
num tubing separated by poly- 
stj-rene tubing with J/g-inch 




A Three-Band Parasitic Beam 

The principle of isolating sections of an antenna 
with resonant traps has been applied to a parasitic 
beam antenna that operates on 10, 15 and 20 
meters. This array with dimensions is sketched 
in Fig. 3. The arraj' is a five-element job on 10 
meters, with two reflectors spaced approximateh' 
0.15 wavelength, and two directors spaced ap- 
proximately 0.2 wavelength. On the other two 
bands, three elements are active. On 15 meters, 
spacings are approximately 0.22 wavelength for 
the reflector and 0.29 for the director. On 20 
meters, the approximate spacings are 0.14 and 
0.2, respectively. 

Fig. 4 shows a breakdown of a suggested 
method of construction of the three main ele- 
ments. Each element starts out with a 12-foot 
center section to which various sections are 
added at each end. Provision is made for adjust- 
ing the length from the center of the element 
to the first (28-Mc.) trap, the length between 
traps, and the section on the outside of the second 
(21-Mc.) trap. The photograph shows an exam- 
ple of the array traps used by the author. Here, 

(Continued on page 130) ^ 



Ve" LD 



*< IPolyl U-17'-^ k-20"— 4 l^-l/M iPolyl h— 2 Ft.— H [«— l8"->j 




Fig. 4 — Breakdown of the element assembly. 
Sections A and B are assembled permanently. Other 
sections may be telescoping for adjustment. Detail 
of the polystyrene inserts is at the right. The J^-inch 
o.d. sections should be inserted to a depth of 2^^ 
inches. 



« 3" 


H 


— h-r- 

1 1/4" Va 

i 



March 1955 



23 



The "Hidden Gem" 

A Field- Strength Indicator for Mobiles 

BY CLIFFORD ABEL,* W8IWB 



• All niobileers will find this little gadget 
mighty convenient and valuable. A 
simple field-strength indicator helps to 
tell you when you are getting the most 
out of your rig on any band. 



ONE of the main problems besetting today's 
struggling mobileer is getting maximum 
power output from his installed equipment. 
Considering the relatively low-power input and 
poor antenna radiation efficiency with which he 
must contend, the mobile operator can ill afford 
the additional losses of improper antenna or 
transmitter tuning. After the transmitter and 
antenna of his choice have been installed, he must 
make the most of it no matter what his power 
input or what the inherent efficiency of his an- 
tenna system may be. What could be a better 
method of making the most of it than by measur- 
ing the relative strength of the radiated field as 




The field-strength indicator is mounted on the 
inside of the glove-compartment door, oriented so that 
it can be seen easily from the driver's seat. The an- 
tenna banana plug is at the left rear, the sensitivity 
control is at the upper left, and the slug screw of the in- 
ductor at the lower right. Small holes in the top of the 
can provide access to the sheet-metal screws holding 
the unit to the glove-compartment cover. 

the antenna and transmitter tuning are changed ! 
In other words, use a field- strength indicator. 

Nearly any type of field-strength meter could 
be used to do the job. A de luxe commercial 
meter borrowed from a fixed station or a simple 
crystal rectifier in series with the low-current 
scale on j'our volt-ohmmeter will work with a 
proper pick-up antenna. But most desirable is a 

* 783rd AC&W Squadron. Charleston, W. Va. 



unit which is an integral component of the 
mobile system — an indicator that will give a 
relative power-output measurement from minute 
to minute, and day to day. 

You may have abeady been convinced of the 
value of a mobile field-strength indicator, but 
then the question arises of where to put the 
thing. Your under-dash mounting space may be 
pretty well used up by now, so why not stick 
it in the glove compartment? In there it's com- 
pletely out of the way and out of sight. Better 



ANT. 



2.5mh. 




Fig. 1 — Circuit of the field-strength [indicator. 
L\ and Mi are discussed in the text. Li should be 
approximately 200 /xh. 

yet, if you mount it on the inside top of the glove- 
compartment door, it will take up little of the 
useful space in the compartment. When the door 
is opened, the indicator drops down into a posi- 
tion where the scale can be seen easily, and the 
compartment light illuminates the meter for 
nighttime operation. Two small sheet-metal 
screws can be used for mounting. 

Construction 

The circuit, shown in Fig. 1, is conventional, 
and none of the values is critical. Nearly any 
type of crystal detector can be used, and the 
meter movement can be anything from 50 ;ua. to 
2 ma. or more, depending upon the size and 
placement of the pick-up antenna and your 
transmitter power output. All the components 
are housed in a small tin can. The round can is 
available and cheap, and takes up less space than 
other types of housing. It doesn't look half bad 
if it's new and shiny, or if you give it a coat of 
black crackle paint. The can is the 8V2-ounce 
size. That's the same diameter as a can of Camp- 
bell's soup, but somewhat shorter. Of course, the 
smaller the meter you can find, the smaller the 
can may be. The pick-up antenna lead-in comes 
in to a banana plug. Thus, the whole assembly 
can be detached quicklj' from the car and can 
be used anywhere that a field-strength indicator 
might be needed. By using the terminals on all 
the fixed-mounted components and one 3-point 
soldering-terminal strip, all the other components 
may be mounted easily and compactly. 

(Continued on page ISO) 



24 



QST for 



Transmitter Hunting — Seattle Style 

A De Luxe D.F. System for Ten Meters 

BY J. ALAN DUNCAN,* W70TA 



•This story on hiddcn-transnii t itr 
hunting should strike a response 
in every mobile ham. It includes, along 
M'ith other useful information, descrip- 
tions of a special S-mcter circuit and a 
dirccticin-findinji loop with suggestions 
for mounting. 



WITH civil-defense and disaster-relief train- 
ing on the steady increase throughout the 
nation, it becomes more and more neces- 
sary that amateur mobile stations be kept ever 
alert and active, so they may supply that vital 
communication link so important if the situation 
should arise. Hidden-transmitter hunting has 
been found to be one of the best drills for keeping 
the moi)iles trained for this type of activity, 
because it develops the qualities required for 
successful emergency mobile communication. It 
also affords more thrills, more opportunity for 
technical development, and more participation 
by the whole family, than most other phases of 
amateur radio. The mobile operators in the radio 
clubs of Seattle, Washington, have been kept 
active on 29 Ale. almost continually since Don 
Newman, W7C0, first brought hidden-transmit- 
ter hunting to Seattle some five years ago. 

Various methods and technirjues are used to 
locate the hidden transmitter, depending upon 
the equipment on hand and the ingenuit.y of the 
hunter. Some mobileers do remarkat)ly well with 
just their transmitting whips, using the direc- 
tional characteristics of the car, and by determin- 
ing the signal strength by ear. The author prefers 
a more exact method, however, and describes 
the following equipment and tracking technique 
for those moi)ileers who would use a more scien- 
tific approach to this exciting sport. 

The Loop 

Essentially, a directional loop and a signal- 
strength meter are the required auxiliary equip- 
ment for successful hunting. The author's loop 
is a one-turn resonant circuit, nine inches in 
diameter, requiring about 65 fx/if. of capacity 
to tune it to 29 Mc. The signal is fed from the 
loop to the receiver through a 50-ohm coaxial 
cable which is gamma-matched to the loop. Fig. 
1 shows the loop dimensions and the method of 
coupling the coaxial cable to it. The loop diameter 
is not especiallj' critical so long as it is kept small 
(under about 10 inches), and am' discrepancy 
may be compensated for in the adjustment of the 
variable capacitor. The dimension of the coupling 

* 6016 45th Ave. N.E., Seattle 5. Wash. 



tap is shown onlj- as a starting value. Further 
adjustment will be required in the tuning process. 
For the tuning capacity the author is using a 
oO-jUMf- fixed capacitor in parallel with a 25-MMf- 
variable capacitor (Hammarlund .\PC-25). This 
tuning arrangement was arrived at after some 
experimenting, and has been found to be very 
steady and extremely eas\' to tune. The capacitor 
combination is enclosed in an old surplus capaci- 
tor casing (Sangamo type F-2) with the original 
capacitor removed. With a new sealed-in fiber 




The loop assembly mounted on WTOTA's car. The 
mounting is a triangular framework of tubing or rods 
with plates that hook over the window frame, and a 
rubber suction cup at the bottom. The loop mast re- 
volves in a section of tubing. Large rubber bands to the 
external rear-view mirror and door handle help to hold 
the assembly in place. * 

bottom cover, this makes a nice weatherproof 
housing. 

The type of stock used, the method of mount- 
ing the loop to the car, the dimensions of the 
mount, etc., will certainly varj- with desire and 
circumstances. The author constructed his loop 
and mount entirely of duralumin tubing, though 
most hunters use copper for the loop. The style 
and mounting are shown in the illustration. 

Adjustment 

Tuning the loop is a very simple process. 
Connect it through the coaxial cable to the an- 



March 1955 



25 



tenna terminal of the receiver. Radiate a 29-Mc. 
signal with a grid-dipper, r.f. signal generator, 
or some other calibrated source, and tune the 
loop to res;)nance as indicated by maximum sig- 
nal. The loop should also be rotated for maximum, 
and then rocked back and forth across maximum 
as the capacitor is being adjusted. Then adjust 
the gamma match by moving the connection 
back and forth along the loop until maximum 
transfer is indicated. This may throw the loop 
off resonance, so the processss should be repeated 
until neither causes any noticeable improvement. 
The loop should be tuned ver}^ carefully, other- 
wise a sharp null may not be obtained. Although 
the maximum signal is used when tuning the 
loop, the minimum signal (null) is used when 
locating the hidden transmitter. This is because 
the angle of minimum is so much smaller than 
the angle of maximum signal. 

S-Meter 

Difficulty is usually encountered in trying to 
tell a difference between maximum and minimum 
signal by ear as the hunter closes in, and a signal- 
strength meter becomes very desirable. A meter 
in the cathode circuit of one of the a. v.c. -con- 
trolled tubes was tried, but the change in deflec- 
tion from maximum to minimum signal, as the 
hidden transmitter was approached, was as in- 
distinguishable as by the aural method. The 
author finally came up with the amplifier-bridge 
circuit shown in Fig. 2. This system operates by 
sampling the a. v.c. voltage, amplifying the volt- 
age change causing a change in the jjlate resist- 
ance of the 6C-4 tube. This change in plate re- 
sistance upsets the balance of the bridge circuit 
(see equivalent circuit in Fig. 2B), causing a dif- 
ference of potential to exist between points D 
and B. The resulting current flow through the 
meter causes the needle to deflect. Potentiometer 
Ri is a gain control and governs, to a certain 
extent, the amount of deflection of the meter. 
Potentiometer 7^2 is the zero adjustment used 
to balance the bridge. As the signal of the hid- 
den transmitter changes in intensity, both the 
gain and zero controls will need adjusting. A 



6] 



Last /.FSto-^e 

Detector 



■D'uwi.-9" 



Tuning capacity 
housed i/} surplus 
casing (See text) 



^ copper or 
ahuvuium iubina 



Length of 
mast depends 
upon thpe of 
instaLLotion 




Fig. 1 — Sketch sliouiiifs ilcluils of the 10-mcter tl.f. 
loop. 

little technique is involved in making these 
adjustments during the short transmissions from 
the hidden transmitter, but after a couple of 
hunts it will be accomplished very simply. Also, 
the hunter will find that with a little practice, 
the sensitivity and gain of the amplifier-bridge 
S-meter can be adjusted such that full-scale 



roAMC. 
Bus 



A.V.C.Bus-* 





Fig. 2 — A — Schematic dia- 
gram showing the circuit of the 
S meter with sensitivity control 
and how it is connected to the 
receiver a. v.c. bus. B — Equiva- 
lent hriclse circuit. 



26 



QST for 




PILOT LAMP 
"S" METER 
"B" SUPPLY S\N. 
ZERO ADJUST 
.GAIN CONTROL 

V , i J I ii n 

Close-up showing the S-metcr unit mounted on the 
steering post. 

deflection is possible (from maximum to minimum 
signal during rotation of the loop) regardless of 
whether the transmitting station is very weak 
and distant or whether he is within a few feet. 
As a matter of fact, on a particular hunt, W7C0 
(the hidden transmitter that night) was asked 
by the author at the beginning of the hunt if he 
was using his mobile whip or his receiving antenna 
for transmitting. The hidden transmitter operator 
replied that the hunters would have to loop 
in and find out. When the author arrived along- 
side the hidden transmitter and asked for a 
transmission, he was able to develop a very 
definite null (actually more than full-scale deflec- 
tion) with the pointer directed at the rear trans- 
mitting antenna, less than four feet away. 
None of the leads in this circuit need be 



shielded, and the lengths are not critical. AIbo, 
don't put off making this unit just because you 
don't happen to have a 150-jtta. meter, as some 
of the boys are using 1-ma. meters with quite 
good results. Even the GC4 tube may be re- 
placed by practically any other triode tube. Half 
the fun is in experimenting with various values 
and components. 

The S-meter unit may be housed in any 
convenient chassis or box. The author originally 
mounted his S-meter under the dash, next to the 
transmitter control unit. This was difficult to 
read without stopping the car, so the unit was 
rebuilt into a surplus pilot's control box, with the 
meter mounted just above in an old coil shield 
can. This unit was then hung on the steering 
column. This proved to be a very handy location. 
Finally a pilot lamp was installed so as to illumi- 
nate the meter and is ver}- helpful for night 
hunting. 

\'arious tochniques are used to track down 
the hidden transmitter or "bunny" as he is re- 
ferred to in Seattle. The author has used the 
triangulating method of pin-pointing the bunny 
l)v using a map, etc., but doesn't recorrunend it 
because it is too undependable. This is especially 
true in hilly country. Such phenomena as reflec- 
tions, wave-polarization changes, and antenna 
effects will cause some readings to be in error by 
a considerable amount. This makes a very dis- 
couraging triangulation plot on a map, in addition 
to a possible waste of considerable time. The 
errors reduce to insignificance as the hidden 
transmitter is approached, however, and regard- 
less of the system or technique used, if complete 
trust is placed in the loop, the hunter should 
eventuall}' arrive. 

Typical Operation 

At 7:15 P.M., on the first and third Thursdays 
and second and fourth Fridays of the month, the 
Seattle mobileers (usually some ten cars) assem- 
ble in front of the museum at Volunteer Park. 
They proceed to tune their loops and ready them- 
selves for the bunny hunt. At 7:30 p.m., the 
operator of the hidden transmitter calls, "QST, 
QST, QST. This is W7QPR mobile (or whatever 

{Continued on page 134) 



W70TA all set to start out 
on a hidden-transmitter hunt. 




March 1955 



27 



Unidirectional Loops for Transmitter 

Hunting 

Less Guesswork in Mobile D.F. Work 

BY WARREN U. AMFAHR,* W0WLR 



MOBILE hams in the Wichita area have Ijeen 
running 10-meter liidden-transmitter hunts 
each week for the past three years or 
more. Not long after these hunts were inaugu- 
rated, it became evident that the affairs were 
rapidly degenerating into rat races. Under the 
usual rules, where the first car to arrive at the 
site of the transmitter was declared the winner, 
the honor sj-stem for compliance with existing 
speed limits failed completely. It became obvious 
that the contests would have to be conducted 
along different lines, if they were to be continued 
on a safe and sane basis. In the interest of public 
safety, w^e felt that we could not continue to en- 
courage speedy and hazardous driving We 
realized too that our call license plates and long 




The unidirectional 10-meter d.f. loop is a simple 
affair, consisting of two turns of copper tubing mounted 
on an insulating rod. Directivity is adjusted by the 
trimmer condenser at the center. 

whip antennas could easily draw attention to us 
in any adverse publicity. 

For some time now, we have been operating 
under a scheme in which precision and skill are 
substituted for speed and recklessness. The 
time element has been eliminated entirely, and 
all hunts are now based on the mileage covered 

* 3096 Clifton, Wichita 10, Kansas. 



• Thi.s article not only describes the con- 
struction and use of a d.f. loop that 
eliminates much of the uncertainty in 
making "fixes" in fox hunts, but it also 
contains some interesting observations 
regarding the conducting of this highly 
popular activity. 



between a common starting point for all cars and 
the hidden transmitter. Speedometer readings 
are recorded at the starting point, and again 
when the car reaches the objective. There is no 
time limit, and the winner is the one who reaches 
the hidden-transmitter site over the shortest 
route. 

The changes in rules naturally have brought 
about a search for more accurate direction- 
finding gear, rather than speedier cars. Perhaps 
the most important result has been the adoption 
of a unidirectional loop antenna by the hunters. 
It has eliminated the possibility of starting out 
in exactly the opposite direction, and reduced the 
probabiUty of overshooting the transmitter. In 
eliminating the necessity for triangulation, it has 
simphfied the limiting technique, and placed it 
more within the grasp of the YL and Jr. Ops. 

The unidirectional loop antenna works on 
rather well-known principles. In simple terms, 
a loop that is not accurately balanced in respect 
to ground will exhibit two modes of operation. 
One mode is that of a true loop, while the other is 
that of an essentially nondirectional vertical an- 
tenna of small dimensions. The voltages intro- 
duced by the two modes are out of phase, and 
will add or subtract, depending upon the direction 
from which the wave is arriving. 

The theoretical true loop pattern is illustrated 
in Fig. lA. When the voltage introduced by the 
antenna mode is large, the nondirectional pattern 
of the vertical-antenna mode predominates, and 
the loop will show little directivit}', as shown in 
Fig. IB. When the antenna effect is small, one of 
the loop lobes will be reduced, while the other 
will be correspondingly enlarged (see Fig. IC). 
\\'hen the voltages introduced by the two modes 
are equal and 90 degrees out of phase, one of the 
lobes will be canceled out, making the loop 
unidirectional, as indicated in the pattern of 
Fig. ID. 

Since the loop pick-up will usually be pre- 
dominant, when the dimensions of the loop are 
small in terms of wavelength, the loop and an- 
tenna effects can be balanced by detuning the 



28 



QST for 



loop so as to reduce its pick-up to equal that 
introduced bj' the antenna effect. 

The loop shown in the photograph consists 
of two turns of 14-inch copper tubing, 11 inches 
in diameter. The two ends are flattened out, 




(A) 




(B) 





Fig. 1 — Small-loop field patterns with varying 
amounts of "antenna" effect. The heavy lines show the 
plane of the loop. 

and fastened to opposite sides of a 1-inch diameter 
insulating rod that serves as a mounting. The 
center of the loop is l)roken, and a 20-/.iAtf. mica 
trimmer is inserted in series. The ends of the 
tubing at the break are supported in a slot cut in 
the end of the insulating rod. The rod of the loop 
shown in the photograph is a piece of 1-inch 
polystyrene. However, a piece of ordinary broom- 
stick will provide adequate insulation. 

The loop is connected to the receiver input 
with a length of coax cable. After the receiver 
has been tuned to the desired operating fre- 
quenc}^, the trimmer condenser in the loop should 
be adjusted for ma.\imum background noise. If 
no peak in noise can be found, the condenser 
range value should be changed. An 11-inch loop 
should require no more than 5 to 15 fjLfxi. 

Once a noise peak has been established, a 
signal and the receiver S-meter should be em- 
ployed. (If the mobile receiver is not equipped 
with an S-meter, the circuit of Fig. 2 can be 




Fig. 2 ■ 
hunting. 



■ S-meter circuit widely used in transmitter 



added.) The capacity of the loop condenser 
should then be carefully reduced until the loop 
acquires a unidirectional characteristic. The 
final setting of the trimmer condenser depends 
upon the front-to-back ratio desired. Complete 
cancellation of signals from the back can be ac- 



quired at the expense of a certain amount of 
frontal signal pick-up. 

This type of loop is, of course, oriented for 
maximum signal in contrast to a conventional 
d.f. loop which is usually worked on the signal 
null. In the use of the loop, it will be found that 
resonant antennas or other objects are highly 
capable of receiving signal energy and reradiating 
it. The possibility of the loop receiving reflected 
signals from the mobile whip should be thor- 
oughly investigated. Usually, the loop when 
used on one side of the car will be more suscepti- 
Vjle to whip reflections than it will be on the 
other. This depends upon the car body contour 
and the distance between the loop and the whip. 
In some installations, it may be necessary to pull 
the whip down while taking loop bearings. 

In the process of hunting, it is advantageous 
to keep the hidden transmitter on the loop side 
of the car. The ma,\imum-to-minimum signal, 
and the exact direction, will be less pronounced 
if the loop has to look across a reflecting or dif- 
fusing car roof. Whenever the loop is used in the 
vicinity of a strong signal, some means of at- 
tenuating the antenna circuit should be used, 
rather than to decrease the S-meter sensitivity. 
Various resistor values, switched in parallel with 
the antenna ini)ut, will achieve this. 

Those who organize, or participate in, this 
popular activity will find that many headaches 
will be avoided if the rules place strong restriction 
against hunting or hiding on private property. 
We have also found it highly advisable to notify 
the local police in advance of a scheduled hunt. 
Summer-night hunts, with dozens of dangling 
loops and seeking searchlights, can load the 
police telephone circuits with curious inquiries! 



W5UXP, enjoying a late-afternoon 75-meter 
QSO while parked and waiting for his XYL to 
QRT work at \\'BAP-TV, was confronted by one 
of the station engineers: "You're 50 per cent 
station level on the program monitor in master 
control!" the e.x-ham engineer exclaimed. 

You just can't get away from 'em! 



COMING A.R.R.L. CONVENTIONS 

May 21st-22nd — Pacific Division, Fresno, 
Calif. 

June 10th-12th — West Gulf Division, 
Fort Worth, Texas 

■ Southeastern Division, 
Fla. 

August 12th-13th — Roanoke Division, 
Old Point, Va. 

October 8th-9th — Central Division, 
South Bend, Ind. 



June llth-12th - 
St. Petersburg 



March 1955 



29 



Meet the S.W.R. Bridge 

Simple Instrument for Adjusting Antenna Circuits 
BY LEWIS G. McCOY. WIICP 



• Here is a nontechnical description of 
ho'w to build and use a standing-wave- 
ratio bridge, an inexpensive instrument 
that is worth many times the small out- 
lay for its construction. The use of such a 
bridge will help you to solve some an- 
tenna-circuit problems that can be 
solved in no other wav. 



DID you ever stop to wonder if your trans- 
mitter was properly coupled and matched 
into the antenna or antenna coupler? If 
3'ou're the average ham, this problem has prob- 
ably bothered you a great deal. Well, there is 
one simple way to find out, and it won't cost 
you more than a few dollars. 

When working with antennas and antenna 
couplers, the standing-wave-ratio bridge is prac- 
tically an indispensable instrument. With the 
s.w.r. bridge, it is possible to know when the 
coax line between the transmitter and antenna 
coupler is matched, or if a coax-fed antenna is 
properly matched to the feed line. When a low- 




pass filter is used to attenuate harmonics, it is 
important to keep the s.w.r. low in the connect- 
ing line, otherwise there is always the possibility 
that the filter may break down. By setting the 
system up with the s.w.r. bridge, one can be sure 
the filter will be working in a line with a low 
s.w.r. It has been mentioned that the s.w.r. 
bridge only costs a couple of dollars; another 
attraction is that the unit is very easy to build. 

S.W.R. Bridge Construction 

As can be seen from Fig. 1 and the photo- 
graphs, the bridge consists of four resistors, two 




Top view of llic Itridnf. IJi- miic to mark tin- input ;uid 
output connectors to avoid luistakes when usin^ the 
unit. The Uifi at the liottoui end of tlic case offers a 
clip-on point for the minus side of I lie meter. 



Meter 



Fig. 1 — Circuit diagram of the s.w.r. bridge. All 
resistors are J-o watt, composition type, =*= 10 per cent 
tolerance. 



condensers, a cr3'stal diode, an isolantite stand- 
off, two coax connectors and a chassis. A tip 
jack is used for the -|- meter terminal, and the 
chassis case for the — side. The value of Ri will 
depend on the type of coax the bridge is designed 
for. If for 52-ohm line, then Ri would be a 50- 
ohm resistor, and the value would be 75 ohms 
if 72-ohm coax is used. Whichever type is used, 
buy two resistors, because one will be used in 
the bridge and the other for testing the unit. 
All of the resistors are l-i watt, and be sure they 
are composition-type and not wire-wound. 

In the construction of the bridge, the resistors 
and the crystal should be mounted at right 
angles to each other, as shown in the photograph. 
This is done to avoid stray coupling that might 
give erroneous readings. The unit shown in the 
photographs was built in a 4 X 2 X H^c-inch 
channel-lock box. If this size is used, it should 
be simple to follow the layout in the photograph. 

When soldering the leads of the cr^'stal diode, 
the leads should he held bj' a pair of pliers in 
order to conduct the heat away from the crystal. 
Don't hold the iron to the soldering point any 
longer than necessary, as it is easy to damage 
the crj'stal with excessive heat. 

Testing 

The com])leted unit is connected to the trans- 
mitter with a piece of coax of the proper impe- 



30 



QST for 



dance, the coax going to the input side of the 
bridge. A 0-1 milHammeter is connected to the 
bridge with the + side of the meter going to the 
pin jack and the — side to the chassis. The out- 
put side of the bridge is left open. 

The ne.xt step is to adjust the transmitter out- 
put so that a full-scale reading is obtained on 
the 0-1 meter. A very small amount of r.f. is 
needed for this, so it may be necessary to turn 
off the final amplifier and just allow the driver 
stage to run. If the transmitter has a drive con- 
trol, such as the Viking and Viking Ranger, it is 
merely a matter of advancing the drive control 
to a point where full-scale reading is obtained. 
With the meter reading full scale, the test re- 
sistor is connected between the output coax 
connector's inner conductor and the shell or 
ground side of the connector. The reading on 
the meter should drop to, or near, zero. If the 
reading is appreciably above zero, there is stray 
coupling between the resistor arms in the bridge, 
and their placement should be carefully checked 
and changed if necessary. 

Several different resistors of the same value 
were tried in testing the unit shown, and in 
every case the reading dropped to zero, indicat- 
ing that the 10 per cent tolerances were close 
enough for the purpost^. 

Using the S.W.R. Bridge 

For an e.xample of using the bridge, let's as- 
sume we have an antenna fed with open-wire 
line, and that an antenna coupler is used with 



the open-wire line. A length of coaxial line con- 
nects the transmitter to the coupler. Such a sj's- 
tem is illustrated in Fig. 2A. Our problem is to 




Inside view of the s.w.r. bridge. The resistor connected 
between the inner conductor pins of the coax sockets is 
Ri. One of the 47-ohm resistors is on the right, connected 
between the inner conductor pin and the junction of a 
0.001-uf. disk condenser and the other 47-ohm resistor. 
Note the three resistors are mounted at right angles 
to each other. The 1000-ohm resistor at the lower left is 
connected between the tie point andthc meter terminal. 





rrn\ 




4NTENN4 




OPEN-WIRE 
LINE 




XMTR. 






^x<X 




ANT. 
CPLR. 


XT-C3?^ 













(A) 




Fig. 2 — At A we see the typical layout described in 
the text. At B the schematic shows the actual connec- 
tions one would make f«)r using the bridge. 

take the power out of the final amplifier and get 
it to the antenna coupler, with as little loss on 
the way as possible. 

The Novice will probably wonder why an 
antenna coupler is used instead of connecting 
the open-wire line directly to the output termi- 
nals of the transmitter. The feeders could be 
connected directly to the transmitter, but it 
greatly simplifies coupling problems to use an 
external antenna coupler, particularlj' if the 
antenna is to be operated on more than one band. 

Where most amateurs run into trouble with a 
system such as this is in adjusting the coupler 
and getting the transmitter to load. With an 
s.w.r. bridge inserted in the coax line between 
the rig and the coupler, it l^ecomes an easy job 
to adjust the coupler to the proper operating 
values. An ideal set-up, for adjusting the coupler, 
and the link at the coupler, is shown at Fig. 2B. 
This coupler, incidentally, is the unit described 
at Fig. 13-32 in the 1953, '54, and '55 editions of 
The Radio Amateur's Handbook. Complete de- 
tails are given for component values. 

The bridge of Fig. 1 does not make actual 
s.w.r. measurements — this takes a more com- 
plicated bridge — but it shows when the s.w.r. 
is a minimum and as such is used to adjust the 
coupling system for a good match. 

The first step is to set the meter to full-scale 
reading with the output side of the bridge dis- 
connected. Once full-scale reading is set on the 
meter, the transmitter controls are not touched 
again for the test unless the frequency is changed. 
The coax line from the antenna coupler link is 
then attached to the output side of the bridge. 
The feed-line taps are attached to Lo at or near 
the outside turns of the coil, making sure they 
are equidistant from the coil ends. The coupler 
capacitor Co is then tuned for minimum reading 
on the milliammeter. When this point is reached, 

{Continued on page 138) 



March 1955 



31 



• On^JthjL TVI 3JumL 



ADJUSTING LOW-PASS FILTERS 

To adjust a low-pass filter for maximum atten- 
uation of harmonies falling in a particular TV 
channel, it is often necessary to unsolder the 
coils used in the low-pass and adjust their in- 
ductance using a grid-dip meter. A short-cut that 
possibly provides more accurate tuning is to in- 
sert the filter into the TV receiver antenna feed 
line and tune for maximum attenuation of the 
TV picture on the critical channel. This method 
may be criticized by those who take a dim view 
of the mismatch created by inserting a 52- or 
75-ohm low-pass in a 300 ohm line — but it 
works! — Kenneth Montgomery, W5ABY 

MORE ON SIGNAL SHIFTER TVI 
SUPPRESSION 

Some months ago a method was shown for re- 
ducing harmonic radiation from the Meissner 
Signal Shifter.' It was tried and found inade- 
quate in suppressing harmonics which interfered 
with Channels 2 and 4 at this location. 

It was found that quite a bit of r.f. was being 
picked up by five 115- volt a.c. leads which go to 
the rear of the chassis from the switch on the 
front panel. These were inserted separately in 
shielded copper braid grounded in the center and 
at both ends. This reduced r.f. in the a.c. line 
about 50 per cent. 

Further inspection revealed that the output 
link coils in the turret are closely coupled to the 
plate in luctances of the 807 stage. It was reasoned 
that if the output coils were tuned, the harmonics 
should be considerably reduced. An external as- 
sembly mounted in a small aluminum box (Fig.l) 
was used to accomplish this objective. 



6"-72 A I IsTl I 72X1 



To 813 Grid 
•To Xmtr. Chassis 



J 



Fig. I — Schematic of external assembly for addi- 
tional TVI suppression in the Meissner Signal Shifter. 
Ci — l^-iMtii. variable (low-loss). 
Li — Output coil of Signal Shifter. 

L2 — 10 turns No. 18 plastic insulated on 1-inch steatite 
form tapped as follows: 3.5 Mc. — whole coil; 
7.0 Mc. — 8 turns; 14.0 Mc. — 6 turns; 21.0 
Mc. — 4 turns; 28 Mc — 2 turns. 
Si — 5-position s.p. ceramic rotary. 

The completed unit was fastened to the rear 
of the Signal Shifter. This unit consists of a 
tapped coil in series with the output coil of the 
VFO through a 6-inch length of 72-ohm coax. In 
addition, a 75-ij.hL variable capacitor was con- 
nected from the output side of the tapped coil to 
ground. Another 72-ohm coax line was used to 
connect the external assembly to the untuned 
grid of an 813 final. 

' McCoy, "Suppressing TVI in the Meissner Signal 
Shifter," QST, Oct., 1953. 



Measurements showed that harmonic radia- 
tion was almost completely eliminated, and as 
further proof, the interference in the TV set 
disappeared. — M. J. Grainger, KP4JE 

TVI COMPLAINT 

2ICO N. Mason Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 
Editor, QST: 

On Friday, January 21, 195.5, I received rather unique 
publicity in one of Chicago's newspapers about a case of 
TVI that came to me via the Presidential ofhce in Washing- 
ton, D. C. Apparently some of the other news services 
picked up this "scoop," adding or subtracting their own 
twist, resulting in nation-wide radio and newspaper pub- 
licity. I received considerable mail about this matter and 
believe an explanation is in order. 

The transmitter in use here is a Viking II, equipped with 
a low-pass filter. My operation is on the 40-meter 'phone 
band, and I have no interference on TV receivers in my 
own home. Extensive checks have been made with several 
neighbors and no TVI was encountered. 

After becoming aware of this much publicized case of 
TVI, through the local FCC office, I had my son, who is a 
TV engineer and also a radio amateur, conduct an investiga- 
tion. The complainant's TV receiver is one of a well-known 
manufacturer, about six years old. Both the audio and video 
on all channels (2, 5, 7, and 9) were being affected in the 
same manner. My son installed a high-pass filter. 

Tests were conducted which proved that the cause of 
this TVI was definitely the TV receiver. The complainant 
promised to contact the manufacturer and have them install 
a high-pass filter. 

I am writing this in the hope that it may clarify the 
amateurs' side of the story. — Anthony Shragdl, W9SEF 




25 Years Ago 

this month 

jjX-^ 



March 1930 

. . . With the Wouff-Hong in his right hand, and typing 
with his left, the editor proceeds to lambaste those careless 
operators who have been found in large numbers outside 
the bands, clobbering AT&T and USN circuits. 

. . . Continuing the theme of the editorial, the first 
technical article deals with a description of an extremely 
accurate frequency standard, written by J. K. Clapp and 
John D. Crawford. 

. . . "The Old Connecticut Yankee" passes out some 
timely advice on "cooperating with the BCL," in his 
usual helpful fashion. 

. . . How to build — and how not to build — a 20- 
meter 'phone transmitter is discussed by Beverly Dudley, 
with full plans for a particular rig, using push-pull UX-210s 
in the final, modulated by parallel UX-250s. 

. . . Clark C. Rodimon explores the use of electrolytic 
condensers in transmitter high-voltage power supplies. 

. . . The Old Man announces he's back on the scene, 
complete with Rettysnitch, Wouff-Hong and the pot of 
boiling transformer oil to get the Young Squirts back 
on the straight-and-narrow. 

. . . George E. Fleming describes a high-gain direct- 
coupled power amplifier for audio frequencies, with com- 
ment on the relative merits of transformer, condenser and 
direct coupling. 

. . . Some constructional liints are described by George 
Grammer, including the use of old tube bases as coil forms, 
shielding, winding copper tubing, and insulating shafts 
from metal panels. 

. . . Station W9BVII is featured as the station of the 
month, and with good reason. The three-tube exciter unit 
is laid out in a unique circular form, and both exciter and 
driver are shielded. The final is a UX-852 running about 
450 watts input. 



32 



QST for 



A Mobile S.S.B. Receiver for 80 and 40 

Using a Tunable I.F, and Crystal- Converter 

BY ROBERT A. THOMASON,* W4SUD 



• Here is some sound reasoning on what 
should go into a good receiver for niohile 
work, and some suggestions on how 
to work over a BC-453-A to meet 
those requirements. If you have a BC- 
453-A that is now gathering dust, this is 
vour meat. 



WHAT FEATURES would an ideal amateur 
mobile receiver have for a.m., c.w., and 
s.s.b. reception? While everyone might 
not agree across the board, the writer believes 
they should include: 

1) Exceptional frequency stability (for s.s.b.). 

2) Good selectivity (2J^ kc. at 6 db. down). 

3) Adequate sensitivity. 

4) Plenty of bandspread. 

5) Good calibration (reset witliin 2 kc). 

6) Built-in automatic noise limiter. 

7) Automatic volume control. 

8) Stable b.f.o. (with switch control). 

9) Separate a.f. and r.f. gain controls. 

10) Independence of b.c. receiver. 

11) Low image response. 

Wail a second! That's a lot of receiver. You've 
got to make it fit somewhere in the family jaloi^y 
and operate it from an average car batterj'. Well, 
then, let's make the next two features: 

12) Compactness (under-dash mounting). 

13) Reasonable power consumption (100 ma. at 2.50 volts). 

Assuming these specifications could be met, 
who could afford it? Also, the average amateur 
does not have the "know-how" or test equipment 
to build it. So we have: 

14) Moderate cost. 

15) Simple construction. 

This receiver was realized in the writer's mobile 
station by converting a BC- !53-.\ low-frequency 
(190-550 kc.) Command receiver. 

At this point, the one drawback this receiver 
does have should be mentioned: Limited fre- 
quency coverage (3.5 and 7 Mc). 

This is rather serious for many mol)iIe enthusi- 
asts. However, by adding a high-frequency con- 
verter with output on 40 or 80 meters, the higher 
frequencies can also be covered with the possible 
partial loss of stability, bandspread, and calibra- 
tion, depending upon the quality of the converter. 

Changes & Additions 

The following additions and modifications were 
performed on the BC-453-A to obtain our almost- 
super mobile receiver: 

1) Add a crystal-controlled pentagrid converter (6BE6). 
This is mounted on the rear apron of the receiver originally 
occupied by the dynamotor. The Command receiver is used 

* 1825 Cherokee Drive, Owensboro, Ky. 



as a tunable i.f. amplifier from 190 to 550 kc. A different 
crystal is used for each 360 kc. covered. The crj'stal switch 
could include a crystal for WWV or perhaps a local broad- 
cast frequency. 

2) Add one stage of audio amplification (6C4) between 
the second detector and power amplifier. The stage is 
mounted on a small subchassis underneath the receiver. 

3) .4dd a.v.c. 

4) -Add shunt noise limiter (1N34). 

5) Add a.f. and r.f. gain controls. 

C) Replace all 12-volt tubes with their 6-volt equiva- 
lents. The 12A6 was replaced by a 6V6. 

7) Rewire all heaters in parallel. 

8) Replace the antenna trimmer capacitor with a unit 
that is screwdriver-adjusted from the side. The capacitor 
thus released was used as a b.f.o. pitch control. 

9) Add speaker and matcliing transformer. 

Details 

Let's take each feature and study how it can 
be accomplished. 

The frequency stability is exceptional in this 
unit. The crystal-controlled high-frequency os- 
cillator, together with the excellent stability 
found in these receivers, makes s.s.b. reception 
easily possible even while driving over rough 
roads. 

The BC-453--\ has an intermediate freciuency 
of 85 kc. and has six tuned i.f. circuits. This gives 
good selectivity. The selectivity with minimum 
coupling in each i.f. transformer is ju.'it sharp 




A BC-453-A with a few revisions makes a good tun- 
able i.f. amplifier for a mobile receiver. One is shown 
here tucked under the dash. 



March 1955 



33 



enough for s.s.b. reception. (The coupling can be 
varied by unscrewing the knurled cover and ad- 
justing the fiber rod.) "Up" position is minimum 
coupling. More coupling is desiral)le for a.m. 
(e.xcept for exalted-carrier reception).' The noise 

CONVERTER 
6BE6 



an r.f. gain control. This was retained in the final 
design for s.s.b., and an audio control was added 
for normal a.m. reception. In the writer's in- 
stallation, this receiver is independent of the 
broadcast set except for the speaker. 

TO 

OBC-453 




GND. O- 

Fig. 1 — Circuit diagram of the 3.5-7.3 Mc. con- 
\erter that is added to the revamped BC-453-A. 
Li — 40 turns No. 22 enam. close-wound on V2-inch 

diam. form; antenna tap at 11th turn. 
RFCi, RFC2 — 2.5-mh. r.f. choke. 
Xtals — See text. 



:45K. 

: 5W. 



-O 



250V., O.C. 



figure is better than the usual noise found on the 
lower frequencies. 

The entire dial covers 350 kc, giving plenty of 
bandspread. (Two crystals are required in the 
h.f. oscillator to cover all of the c.w. portion of 
the 80-meter band.) 

By using a 350()-kc. crystal in the h.f. oscillator 
to cover the 75-meter 'phone band, a dial reading 
of 500 kc. is 4000 kc, 450 kc. is 3950 kc, and so 
on. The calibration will stay put indefinitely. 

The automatic noise limiter was added at 
little additional labor or expense. It will jDrove 



When it was first tested on a long-wire an- 
tenna, this receiver had rather high image re- 
sponse. However, when it was installed in the car 
and the center-loaded whip used as an antenna, 
the images dropped to a negligible value. The 
tuned antenna apparently acts like an additional 
front-end tuned circuit. 

The over-all dimensions are 5 by 5^ by 11 
inches deep, exclusive of speaker and power 
supply. This is small enough for under-dash 
mounting in almost any car. 

The power consumption is 100 ma. at 250 v. 



1st AUDIO AMP. 
6C4 




6V6GRID 



Fig. 2 — Modifications in 
the detector and audio circuit 
of the BC-453-A. 



more valuable if the higher frequencies are cov- 
ered with an outboard converter. A.V.C. was also 
easily added and requires few additional parts. 
The b.f.o. operates at 85 kc;. and is very stable. 
The antenna trimmer capacitor is used as a pitch 
control. Normally, the BC-453-A is used with only 

1 Goodman, "Selectivity and 'Phone Reception," QST, 
March, 1954. 



This can be furnished by a small dynamotor, or 
by the broadcast receiver power supply, if its 
regular load is switched off while operating the 
BC-453-A. 

The Command receiver used in our car was 
removed from the hamshack where it was serving 
as a Q5-er. It was felt the loss was more than 
offset by the addition of a good mobile receiver. 



34 



QST for 



For those who do not owb a BC-453-A, remember 
that although the price is considerably higher 
than a few years back, they are still well worth 
their money. Even at today's prices, this modified 
receiver costs less than the cheapest commercial 
converter. 

The modifications are simple and require a 
minimum of test equipment. The average ama- 
teur should have no difficulty in this respect. 

The 6BE6 crystal converter is built into a 
homemade metal box that just fills the space on 
the rear apron of the receiver. The simplicity of 
the circuit can be seen in Fig. 1. The only caution 
the builder should observe is to keep Li and the 
r.f. chokes well separated. The controls, C'l and 
Si, are mounted on the rear of the metal box. 
The side may be more convenient if space is 
available in the reader's car. However, it is only 
necessary' to adjust them when changing Ijands. 
so the rear mounting is satisfactory. 

The regular antenna post was removed and 
the hole plugged. A wire was soldered to th< 
small mica condenser that was originally tied tn 
the antenna post and then run along the inside 
top of the cabinet to the converter in the rear. 
This will minimize stray pick-up on the i.f. inter- 
mediate frequency. It is necessary to remove tin 
top cover and variable-condenser cover in order 
to reach the antenna post. While these covers are 
removed, small holes can be drilled for the 
wire going to the converter. The heater choke 
mounted just below the d\'namotor plug under- 
neath the chassis was removed and discarded. 
This gave more working room. The wires goinjr 
to the dynamotor plug were left as originally con- 
nected. The heater, B-f-, and ground leads were 
thus convenient to the converter by soldering to 
the banana plugs. 

The socket on the rear of the receiver wa- 
removed and the hole enlarged to 1^J^^4 inche.-^. 
This permitted the installation of a conventional 
octal tube socket. Plugs for these sockets are 
made by Amphenol and are available at most 
distributors. The only wires retained on this plug 
were ground, heater, B-|-, and audio output. 
The others were cut loose at their source and re- 
moved. 

The wires and neon lamp were removed from 
the antenna trimmer condenser: then the stator 
plates were connected to Pin 6 of the 6SQ7 
(formerly a 12SQ7). The antenna trimmer thus 
became a b.f.o. pitch control. A 30-.u^if. com- 
pression condenser was mounted on the side of 
the chassis to serve as a screwdriver-adjustable 
antenna trimmer. There is sufficient gain in the 
receiver for this antenna trimmer to be omitted 
entirely, if desired. 

The small metal box and condenser mounted 
on the front panel should now be removed to 
make room for the audio and r.f. gain controls, 
b.f.o., a.v.c, and a.n.l. on-off" switches. This 
makes things quite crowded, and miniature com- 
ponents should be purchased for use here. All the 
wiring going to the small metal box should be 
cut at its source and removed, except the green 
and red wires; these are r.f. gain and b.f.o. 



"off," respectively. The r.f. gain control is a 
20,000-ohm unit, and is connected to a switch 
that grounds it to turn the b.f.o. on. The wiring 
for the other controls is shown in Fig. 2. 

The output transformer used in the original 
set was retained and a 2000-ohms-to-voice-coil 
transformer mounted at the speaker. This made 




Lnder chassis view of the reworked BC-4.53-A. Th^ 
metal strip running across the chassis at about the 
center is used to support the 6C4 socket. 

a little less modification work than replacing the 
output transformer. Also, it made 2000 ohms 
output impedance available for headphones. 

If the receiver is used for s.s.b. reception, for 
the sake of stability it would be more desirable to 
mute the receiver at the speaker rather than to 
remove B-(- during transmitting periods. This is 
not a necessity even for s.s.b. reception, if the 
builder wishes to use his receiver supply for a 
portion of the transmitter. 

(Continued on page 136) 



March 1955 



35 




Hints «<« Kinks 

For the Experimente 




THREE-WAY SWITCH FOR THE 
SIMPLEST MODULATOR 

Oi'EiiATORs who employ the "Simplest Modu- 
lator" for casual 'phone operation with their 
existing c.w. rigs must remember to unplug the 
modulator whenever the mode of operation is 
changed from 'phone to c.w. Of course, if the 
cathode of the final is keyed and if the modulator 
output terminals are connected in parallel with 
those of the key, the unplugging motion is un- 
necessary. However, in installations where the 
oscillator or a low-level stage is ke^'ed, it is neces- 
sary to disconnect the modulator so that the r.f. 
output tube may work at normal input. 

The ch'cuit shown in Fig. 1 shows how a single- 
pole three-position switch has been put to use 



OATH. 
'Phono of AMP 



(^ 



» For Tuning •=" 

a Zero 
Beating 



Fig. 1 — Circuit diagram of the switching system 
described by W3PVY. 



with the transmitter and modulator used here at 
W3PVY. Two of the switch positions provide for 
rapid change over from 'phone to c.w. operation, 
and the center or third contact allows the final 
to be disabled during zero-bearing or tuning ad- 
justments. 

To clarify the circuit of Fig. 1, it should be 
mentioned that all components other than *Si 
are parts of the modulator circuit appearing on 
page 15 of September, 1953, QST, and page 250 
of the ARRL Handbook, 31st edition. 

— Ed Rittenhouse, W3PVY 

CONVERTING FILAMENT TRANSFORM- 
ERS FOR PLATE-SUPPLY USE 

IN searching for miniature power transformers 
for such low-power items as grid-dip oscilla- 
tors, etc., I have found it convenient to make my 
own, using small filament transformers. Since 
most of these have the low-voltage winding wound 
on the outside, it is a easy to remove the few fila- 
ment turns to make room for the rewinding. 

The procedure is simple. Count the turns re- 
moved to determine the turns per volt ratio for 
the core. Now rewind the filament turns with a 
smaller size wire. Follow this with the "high- 
voltage" winding using the number of turns per 
volt previously determined. The wire sizes should 
be chosen so the PR losses in the two secondaries 



under load do not exceed the rated PR loss for 
the removed turns. This allowable loss is fairly 
flexible and can be exceeded by 50 per cent or so 
for intermittent duty or where some ventilation 
is present. 

— Ben Vester, W3TLN 

[Editor's Note: Additional data pertaining to the re- 
winding of transformers will be found in Chapter 7 of The 
Radio Amateur's Hatidbook.] 

IMPROVED AUDIO CIRCUIT FOR THE 
50-MC. CD. UNIT 

ALTHOUGH the circuit to be presented is in- 
-^ tended primarily for use with the 50-Mc. 
unit described in May, 1952, QST, it deserves con- 
sideration by anyone embarked on a speech- 
amplifier project designed with carbon- micro- 
phone input in mind. 

The new circuit, shown in Fig. 2, uses a 6U8 
triode-pentode as a replacement for the 12AT7 
originally employed in the microphone input and 
the amplifier-clipper stages of the c.d. unit. Not 
only does the revised arrangement retain all of 
the desirable features discussed in the original 
constructional article, but it increases the gain of 
the speech amplifier by 10 db. or more. This 
represents an improvement over the 12AT7 
line-up and eliminates the need for crowding the 
microphone so that full modulation may be ob- 
tained. 



'/26U8 



I/26U8 



6AQ5 




Fig. 2 — Schematic diagram of the revised audio cir- 
cuit for WlCTW's 50-Mc. c.d. unit. 



In Fig. 2, the pentode section of the 6U8 is 
used as the microphone coupling tube and the 
triode section is employed as the voltage ampli- 
fier and clipper. The schematic shows that a 0.1- 
megohm screen dropping resistor and a 0. l-juf. 
screen-to-cathode capacitor have been added to 
the circuit and that the plate resistor for the 
input stage has been increased to 33,000 ohms. 
It should be pointed out at this time that the 
values of the plate and the screen resistors are 
quite critical from the standpoint of maximum 
obtainable gain. Further study of Fig. 2 shows 
that the component values and the wiring origi- 

(CorUinued on page 140) 



36 



QST for 



You Can't Beat F.M. ! 

Advantages of "Almost-N.F.M." for V.H.F., with Practical 
Application in a 48-54 Mc. Exciter 

BY DON H. GROSS,* WSQVC 



SOME of the brethren may think me a bit daft 
for saying so, Vjut for v.h.f. voice work 
nothing excels the right kind of f.m. Per- 
haps a few hardy souls will want to venture 
through the technical difficulties of single side- 
band on frequencies above 50 Mc, but aside 
from such a remarkable feat, a.m. is definitely 
inferior to f.m., if the latter is properly used. 
Go ahead and laugh, but please read on. 

The word has gotten around prettj^ well that 
f.m. eliminates high-powered modulators, and 
that it is far better than a.m. when it comes to 
TVI or BCI. We can also see that the high grid 
drive and higher plate dissipation and voltage 
ratings necessary for a.m. make it difficult when 
we approach the u.h.f. region. Then, too, a 100 
per cent modulated a.m. transmitter in the 
420-Mc. band is limited to 12.5 watts antenna 
power (since 50 watts peak is the law), while up 
to 50 watts antenna power is legal with f.m. 
But we usually see a tendency to he apologetic; 
about the communications value of f.m. This is 
mainly because most of our thinking since the 
war has been in terms of stricth' narrow-band 
f.m., where second-order sidebands are kept in- 
significant so that our signals will occup\' no 
wider channels than a.m. 

In order to keep to true n.f.m., the modula- 
tion inde.x must not exceed 0.6. Under these 
conditions, as the venerable Handbook saj's, "so 
far as effectiveness is concerned, a narrow-band 
f.m. or p.m. transmitter is about equivalent to 
a 100 per cent modulated a.m. transmitter oper- 
ating at one-fourth the carrier power." At this 
rate, n.f.m. is enough to discourage any self- 
respecting DX man. Add to this the horrible 
method of detecting f.m. signals by slight de- 
tuning on an a.m. receiver, as nefariously prac- 
ticed by most of us, and anyone with a brain in 
his head would conclude that if you want a 
signal without any vitamins, if j'ou want your 
voice dro\\aied in a waterfall of noise and clob- 
bered with QRM, just use f.m. 

Whoa There! 

However, dear friends, w^e have been over- 
looking a juicy item. Above 52.5 Mc. (and on 
some frequencies below) we aren't confined to 
the narrow-band version of f.m. What if we 
crank the audio gain up to give us a modulation 

*1146 Prospect Road, Pittsburgh 27, Pa. 

^ In most locations there is not so much v.h.f. QRM that 
the extra bandwidth would matter much; and in any case 
heavily-modulated a.m. transmitters in the region above 
144 Mc. are already using more space than f.m. with a 
deviation ratio of 1.0. 



index of 1.0? Second-order sidebands appear, 
but they are still relatively weak.^ The happy 
part is what happens to the first-order sidebands. 
Now they have some real zip. Put this signal 
through an i.f. ampUfier of 6 or 7 kc. bandwidth, 




The \\ 3Q\ C f.m. exciter is a compact package. At 
the right front is the 6.\G7 oscillator, with the modula- 
tor behind it. Left is the tripler, with the 5763 doubler 
in the back corner. The voltage-regulator tube is visible 
in back of the modulator. Note ventilation holes in 
the side of the bottom cover. 

detect it with a good ratio detector or discrimi- 
nator-foUowing-a-limiter, and presto — f.m. 
comes into its own! 

Rummage through the old QSTs published 
just before the war and there you will see the ^ 
beginnings of a development in amateur f.m. 
that was nipped in the bud at Pearl Harbor. 
Look, for instance, at that fascinating article 
by ^Murray Crosbj^ on "Bandwidth and Reada- 
bilit}' in Frequency Modulation," page 26 of 
March, 1941, QST. There we see that for maxi- 
mum readability of weak signals the deviation 
ratio should be 1.0, and that such an f.m. signal 
is always more readable than a.m. In fact, at 
some weak signal levels this "almost-n.f.m." 
signal is as readable as an equivalent 100 per 
cent modulated a.m. signal of four times the 
power. Thus the tables are turned. If it is trans- 
mitted and received properly, you can't beat f.m. 



March 1955 



37 



How To Get Good F.M. Above 50 Mc. 

Reactance-tube modulation of a self-excited 
oscillator just isn't stable enough for good 
narrow-band work on v.h.f. WIVLII has the 
right idea in his phase-modulation exciter.- A 
crystal oscillator provides the necessary sta- 
bility. Reactance modulation of a tank circuit 
provides phase modulation. The only difference 
between a p.m. and an f.m. signal is that with 
p.m. the f requeue J' deviation rises in propor- 
tion to the modulating audio frequency (assum- 
ing that the amplitude of the modulating wave 
is held constant), while with f.m. the deviation 
is the same for all audio frequencies. So the 
secret of turning p.m. into f.m. is to make the 
output of the speech amplifier vary in inverse 
proportion to the audio frequency. Only the r.f. 
section of an exciter is to be described here, but 
the speech amplifier that is used with it ends up 
with a 6SJ7 having an effective load resistance 
of 50K. A 0.006-juf. condenser across this load 
gives the proper inverse frequency response. A 
clipper-filter circuit is also used, and this is most 
desirable. 

A Phase-Modulation Exciter 

The exciter shown here is a straightforward, 
highly stable affair with sufficient output at 
48-54 Mc. to drive an 832 tripler to 144 Mc. It 
uses single-control tuning, for compactness and 
simplicity of operation. Crystals for 8 to 9 Mc. 
plug in the front. Shielding, short wiring, and 
voltage regulation of the oscillator screen all 
serve to give excellent isolation of the grid- 
screen oscillator circuit from the phase-modu- 
lated plate tank, even though both operate at 
the same frequency. 

The 6AG7 reactance modulator has enough 
gain and plate-current capacity to provide ade- 
quate deviation at 50 Mc, and more than enough 
for multiplication to higher frequencies. About 
two volts of audio (at normal voice frequencies) 
gives proper deviation for the 144-Mc. band. 
Some care has been taken in by-passing the 

2 Southworth, "A Phase-Modulation Exciter for tiie 
V.H.F. Man," QST, Adjust, 1954. 




screen and cathode of the modulator, as well as 
in adjusting the grid to ground capacity, in 
order to eliminate v.h.f. parasitic oscillations. 

The plate tank tuning range is determined by 
Li, Ci, and other circuit capacities across Li. 
Tracking is accomplished through adjustment of 
L2, C4, L3, and C5. TVI is prevented by proper 
shielding and by-passing. An electrostatically 
shielded output link helps further in coupling 
out only the desired frequency. All tubes have 
protective cathode bias. Power supply require- 
ments are 300 volts at about 125 ma., and 6.3 
volts a.c. at 2.7 amp. 

Construction 

The exciter is built in a 3 X 4 X 5-inch alu- 
minum box (Bud CU-3005 Minibox). Holes are 
drilled in the cover opposite the mica trimmers 
Ci and Cf, to allow adjustment after assembly. 
They may then be covered with adhesive tape. 

The crystal was at first mounted in the center, 
but had to be moved closer to the oscillator 
tube to achieve proper isolation from the rest of 
the circuit. A small aluminum shield partition is 
placed between the 6AG7 oscillator and the 
tuning condenser; the cathode by-pass condenser 
is placed so as to shield the plate contact on the 
tube socket from the grid; and RFC\ is small, 
with a short lead to the screen grid. All these 
precautions carefully isolate the crystal circuit, 
to achieve maximum stability. 

A small-diameter octal socket allows the 
tripler tube to be mounted in its limited space. 
Don't dope the tripler plate coil until its circuit 
is aligned. Note that the center section of the 
tuning condenser is used for the oscillator plate; 
the front section for the tripler plate; and the 
rear section for the doubler plate. Insulated 
'phone tip jacks are used for grid-circuit meter- 
ing. The modulator screen by-pass in the photo- 
graphed unit is a mica condenser; a disk ceramic 
condenser is specified because it is cheaper. 

Adjustment and Operation 

The initial tune-up procedure is as follows: 

1) Put the bottom cover on, but without its 
screws. Set d to minimum capacity. Plug in the 
highest frequency crystal to be used, and con- 
nect a high-impedance voltmeter between J 3 
and ground. Adjust the main tuning condenser 
for maximum negative voltage. This should be 
aliout 130 to 150 volts. 

2) Change the meter to Ji, and tune C4 for 
maximum negative voltage, which should be 
around 70 to 90 volts. 



ISoIlom view of the oseiilatoi-iiiodulator side of the 
f.m. exciter. Note the small shield partition for isolat- 
iiig the erystal circuit. Two phono-type jacks are for 
audio input and r.f. output. Tip jacks are for measuring 
tripler and douhler grid voltages. 



QST for 



Bottom view from the tripler-amplifier side. In the 
foreground are the trlpler plate coil and the two mica 
tracking trimmers. The doiibler tank coil is at the right. 



3) Plug in the lowest-irequeiKy crystal and 
tune the ganged condenser for niaxinium volt- 
age at /s;. 

4) Adjust the slug in L2 lor maximum volt- 
age at J4. 

5) Repeat Steps 1 through -4 until no further 
adjustments are necessary. The spacing of the 
turns of L2 may have to be changed if the slug 
does not give enough tuning range in the right 
direction. Remember that minimum inductance 
is with the slug all the way in. Inductance also 
decreases as the turns are spread apart. ^Vhen 
you are sure the slug will properly align L2, 
dope the turns in place. 

6) Now for the output tank. With the highest 
frequency crystal, tune the ganged condenser for 
maximum voltage at J3. Then tune C5 for 
maximum output. 

7) Try the ^oti;esi-frequency crystal. Tune the 
ganged condenser for a maximum voltage at J3 
again. Note which direction, if any, C^ must be 
tuned for maximum output. If you had to in- 
crease its capacity by tightening it, squeeze the 
turns of Ls together a bit; if you decreased C5, 
spread L3 a little. You will have to remove the 
bottom cover to do this; be sure to replace it 
before checking alignment. 

8) Repeat Steps 6 and 7 until no change in 
C5 is necessary for Step 7. 




The exciter is now aligned. Screw on the 
bottom cover. After this, all you do is plug in 
the desired crystal and tune the knob for maxi- 
mum output. 

Frequency deviation is adjusted by controll- 
ing the output of your speech ampUfier. The 
optimum adjustment is that which gives maxi- 
mum output without appreciable distortion, at 
a moderate signal level, in a receiver with a 6- 
or 7-kc. i.f. bandwidth, equipped with a ratio 
detector or limiter-and-discriminator. The n.f.m. 
adapters advertised for a number of the stand- 
ard commercial ham receivers fill the bill per- 
fectly. 

My thanks go to my good neighbor, Andrew B. 
Potter, for the photographs used in this article. 



OSC.-BUFFER 
6AG7, 




6AG7 6AG7 



Fig. 1 — Schematic diagram and parts information for the v.h.f. f.m. exciter. Capacitor values 0.001 and larger are 

in microfarad*. All resistors 3^ watt. 



Ci, C2, C3 — 3-gang variable, 25-MMf.-per-section (Bud 

LC.1847). 
C4, C5 — 3-30-/j^f. mica trimmer. 
Li — 18 turns No. 20 enam., close-wound on 1-inch 

diam. form (National XR-2). 
L2 — 53^ turns No. 20 enam., % inch long, wound on 

%-inch diam. brass-slug form (National XR-73). 
La — 5 turns No. 12 enam., J^-inch diam., ^4 inch long. 
Ij4 — 1 turn RG-58/U coaxial cable around cold end 

of L3; end of inner conductor soldered to outer 



braid; end of outer braid left unconnected. 

Leave outer insulation on. 
Ji — 8-pin male chassis fitting. 
J2, Js — Phono-type coaxial fitting. 
Js, J4 — Phone-tip jack. 
RFCi — SO-juh (National R-33). 
RFC2 — 2.5-mh. (National R-lOO). 
RFC3 — 1 mh. (National R-300). 
RFC4 — 7 txh. (Ohmite Z-50). 



March 1955 



39 



(fkxjuiL ^quipmsmt — 



The 5100 Transmitter and 51SB 
Single-Sideband Generator 



ANY amateur interested in a complete 'phone/ 
/% c.w. transmitter in the 150-watt class, to 
■^ -*- which he can later add s.s.b. with a mini- 
mum of effort, will do well to consider the new 
Barker & Williamson 5100 Transmitter and its 
companion unit, the 51 SB Single-Sideband Gen- 
erator. When the two units are tied together, 
switching to c.w., a.m. or s.s.b., or any amateur 
band, 80 through 10 meters, is simple and quick. 

The 5100 Transmitter 

Designed for table-top operation, the 5100 
is 22 inches wide, llH inches high and 14% 
inches deep. It weighs 83 pounds. The r.f. line-up 
consists of a 6BJ6 VFO (in the 160-meter band) 
followed by two 6BJ6 buffer stages. The second 
buffer stage is grid-block keyed, and serves as the 
crystal oscillator when crystal-controlled opera- 
tion is demanded. The frequency-multiplication 
section of the transmitter uses up to four 6AQ5s, 
depending upon the multiplication requirement, 
and this entire section is broadbanded and conse- 
quentlj^ requires no tuning in operation. The 
output stage uses two 6146s in parallel, with a 
pi-network output circuit. A small variable con- 
denser across the grid circuit of the output stage 
trims the circuit and serves as an excitation 
control. Recommended operation of the 6146s 
permits a power input of 135 watts on 'phone and 
150 watts on c.w. 

The audio section of the 5100 uses a 6U8 
triode-pentode speech amphfier, 6AQ5 trans- 



former-coupled driver, and a pair of 6146s for 
modulators. 

A low-pass filter is included in the transmitter, 
which makes it mandatory that the transmitter 
work into the same load resistance (75 ohms) on 
all bands. All leads entering or leaving the pack- 
age are filtered, as a further precaution against 
TVI. The manufacturer states that the low-pass 
filter has a minimum attenuation of 85 db. over 
the TV range, with over 100 db. at Channel 2. 
The instruction book devotes two pages to sug- 
gested antenna systems, apparently to allay any 
fears that working a transmitter into a given load 
resistance may represent an insurmountable 
obstacle. Actually, of course, it is the only way a 
transmitter with a built-in low-pass filter of this 
type can be operated, and it has the advantage 
that the pi-network circuit can be properly de- 
signed for the same Q on all bands. 

Two power supplies are included in the trans- 
mitter, a high-voltage one for the 6146s and a 
low-voltage one for the other stages and for bias 
voltages. A pair of 5R4GYs is used in the heavy 
supply and a 5V4G handles the job in the other 
supply. Two VR tubes take care of the regulation 
problems. 

One bit of unusual circuitry can be found in the 
frequency-multiplier section where, for d.c, 
one pair of 6AQ5s is connected in series with the 
other pair of 6AQ5s across the 600-volt high- 
voltage supply. This is a good way to utilize a 
power supply to best advantage, but it is the 




A top view of the 5100 Trans- 
mitter shows how the construc- 
tion has been broken down into 
subassemblies. The r.f. output 
section can be seen at the left 
near the panel, while the 6146 
modulators are at the right near 
the panel. The four tubes in the 
r.f. multiplier section are mounted 
horizontally. 



40 



QST for 



This view of the 51SB Singie- 
Sidehand Generator shows the 
audio subassembly in the fore- 
ground and the r.f. section behind 
it. The audio phase-shift network 
is housed in the gray metal-tube 
envelope between two small trans- 
formers. 



first time we have seen it in a piece 
of commercial gear. A similar dodge 
was used a few j-ears ago in a mo- 
Inle rig described in QST} 

For c.w. operation the screens of 
the output 6146s get their power 
from the low-voltage supply; on 
'phone the screens are fed from the high- voltage 
supply through a dropping resistor, so that 
modulation is applied to both plates and screens. 
For tune-up on either 'phone or c.w., the voltage 



1 Harrington, "Ten-Meter Mobile With Remotely-Tuned 
VFO," QST, August, 1951. 




of the big supply is reduced by dropping the 
line voltage through a resistor. 

The owner of a 5100 doesn't have to give up 
the unit when going to higher power — • terminals 
at the rear permit utilizing the audio power (up 
to 75 watts) to drive a larger modulator. 

Looking at the 5100 from the operating stand- 




n 



lOuh 



500jLik. 



1st DRIVER 



A.F. 



IsoOuh. 




'5K| BALANCE .0°' 



lO/^. 



finnrff] 



Fie 1 — Simplified schematic of the balanced modulator circuit used in the 51SB. The r.f. phase shift is obtamed 
bv proper constants at Li and C. In the actual unit, these constants are switched for each band change, as is L2. 
' Sideband selection is obtained by reversing the polarity of one of the audio channels. One cathode of each balanced 
modulator is opened for carrier unbalance when tuning the following r.f. stages. 



March 1955 



41 




The r.f. subassembly of the 
51SB, with the bandswitch shaft 
and the balanced-modulator tun- 
ing shaft removed to permit bet- 
ter visibility of the parts. The 
compartments, from left to right, 
are 6V6 amplifier (the shield 
straddles the socket), 6CL6 am- 
plifier, balanced modulators, and 
r.f. phase-shift networks. 



point, the front panel carries the VFO knob (a 
large one), bandswitch, meter switch for measur- 
ing grid and plate current of the output stage 
and plate current of the modulator, a CW-VFO- 
PH switch for selecting the mode and for spotting 
frequency, and A.C., Tune-Operate and Plate 
switches. Once the band is selected, the operator 
has only to set the VFO and adjust the plate 
tuning and loading controls of the output stage, 
touching up the excitation control also, if neces- 
sary. The VFO frequency can be easily read on 
the slide-rule type scale. 

The 52 SB Single- Sideband Generator 

The companion s.s.b. generator for the 5100 is 
a small 10 X Uli X 145i-inch package that 
is placed to the right of the transmitter and tied 
in electricall}^ with interconnecting cables and 
mechanically with bolts. Once it is properly con- 
nected to the 5100, it is a relatively simple matter 
to change from s.s.b. to a.m. or c.w. and back 
again. 

The 51SB takes r.f. at the output frequency from 
the 5100 multiplier section and generates s.s.b. 
at the output frequency through audio and r.f. 
phase shifts. Fig. 1 shows a simplified schematic of 
the two balanced modulators. The audio section 
of the 51 SB uses IJ2 sections of 12AT7s in cas- 
cade before the audio is introduced into the audio 
phase-shift network. A 3500-cycle cut-off low-pass 
filter ahead of the network protects the network 
from audio frequencies beyond its range. From 
here the signal is amplified and then trans- 
former-coupled into the two 12 ATT balanced 
modulators. The voice-controlled break-in and 
antitrip (for loudspeaker operation) circuits use 
12AT7s and a 6AL5. The output of the balanced 
modulator is amplified through a 6CL6-6V6 
chain to build up the amplitude to the point 
where it is sufficient to drive the pair of 6146s in 
the 5100 transmitter. Two tuning controls are 
included in the s.s.b. generator: the balanced- 
modulator output circuit and a ganged control 
for the 6CL6 and 6V6 plate circuits. The r.f. 
phase-shift networks are broadbanded and do not 
require adjustment. Consequently, the tune-up 
procedure of the 51SB is quite similar to the 
tune-up of any series of r.f. stages, and the opera- 
tor does not have to be familiar with how s.s.b. 
works to put the rig on the air. A switched meter 
in the unit monitors the grid current of the 6146s 
and, by using a pair of germanium diodes, the 
out j)ut of the 6VG driver. The r.f. output position 



is used to set up the two carrier-balance panel 
controls. 

The voice-operated control circuit closes a 
three-pole double-throw relay that provides a 
keying circuit for the transmitter, an antenna 
relay control circuit, and a receiver-silencing 
channel. Adjustable voice-control threshold and 
hold-in controls are available inside the unit, as is 
the antitrip sensitivity control. The unit can be 
used "push-to-talk" from a switch on the micro- 
phone or with full voice-controlled break-in, as 
desired. 

Most of the panel controls have been men- 
tioned, but in addition there is a carrier-unbal- 
ance switch (for tune-up), upper or lower side- 
band selector switch, bandswitch, tune-operate 
switch, and an audio gain control. In operation 
it is necessary, of course, to make sure that the 
bands witches on the 51 SB and the 5100 are set to 
the same band. A minor inconvenience, but noth- 
ing to worry anyone who has gone this far in 
equipping a complete station, is the necessity for 
changing microphone from unit to unit when 
going from s.s.b. to a m., but this could be solved 
by using two microphones or a shielded switch. 

All of the power leads leaving or entering the 
51 SB are filtered, in keeping with the TVI pre- 
cautions in the 5100. A 5Y3G in the power supply 
handles the plate-power requirements of the 
exciter. 

Genei'al 

In both the 5100 and 51 SB, considerable use 
has been made of subassembly type construction. 
This is illustrated in the accompanying photo- 
graphs. The subassemblies are a production ex- 
pedient, of course, but they also contribute to 
shielding within the unit. 

Instruction books for both units are careful to 
give step-by-step instructions for all operations, 
and anyone who takes the time to read them 
should have no trouble. 

Of special interest to home constructors of 
s.s.b. gear is the little audio phase-shift network 
used in the 51 SB. It is similar to others on the 
market in that it provides a 90-degree shift over 
the 300-3000-cycIe range, but this one is com- 
pletely enclosed in a metal-tube envelope of the 
size used for a 6J5. Thus, plug-in convenience 
and good shielding are provided in a very small 
package. This unit, the B & W Model 350, is 
marketed separately. 

— B. G. 



42 



QST for 



260 Series Power-SWR Meters 



THE newest additions to the MicroMatch 
line of instruments for measuring power and 
standing-wave ratio feature operating con- 
venience: With these meters it is no longer 
necessary to reverse the r.f. input and output 
connections in making measurements of forward 



The two types of indicator units, 
Model 262 at left, 263 at right. The 
principal difference is in the switching 
arrangement used for measuring for- 
ward and reflected power and for 
changing the full-scale range. 



and reflected power, as was the case with the 
original MicroMatch. The Models 261 and 263 
each consist of essentially two MicroMatch 
bridges arranged back to back so that one reads 
the outgoing voltage continuously while the other 
monitors the reflected voltage. 

Xmtr. ° Load 




line balances out the forward voltage and re- 
sponds to the reflected voltage, which is rectified 
by CRi. The voltmeter, a 0-200 microammeter 
with appropriate series resistors for several usable 
voltage ranges, can be connected to either circuit 
liv means of the single-pole single-throw switch. 




Fig. 1 — Basic circuit of the back-to-back bridges 
used in the Models 262 and 263 MicroMatches. 

The basic circuit by which this is accompUshed 
is shown in Fig. 1. /?i is the series resistance of the 
original MicroMatch circuit. CRi is the voltmeter 
rectifier for reading the forward voltage. The 
bridge formed by Ri, Ci, Ca and the transmission 



Internal construction of the coupler 
unit is shown by the view with the cover 
removed, at the left. The unit comes 
furnished with protective caps for the 
coax connectors as shown at the right. 
The units are designed for use with 52- 
ohm lines. 



Both models consist of a "coupler unit" and 
an "indicator unit." The former contains the 
actual bridge and the latter the voltmeter and 
multipliers. The coupler units are identical in 
both models except for the Une connectors; regu- 
lar coax fittings are used on the 261 and "N" 
tjT)e fittings on the 263. The indicator unit for 
the Model 261 (it has a separate number, 262) 
uses a variable resistor as a multiplier, with cali- 
bration points for 10, 100 and 1000 watts full- 
scale reading marked on the resistor scale. The 
Model 263 indicator uses an individual factory- 
adjusted variable resistor for each of the same 
three ranges and selects them with a switch. The 
meter calibration is in watts and is the same on 
both indicators — 0-10, 0-100, and 0-1000 — 
and the same type of meter is used in both. The 
actual power delivered to a load is found by tak- 
ing the difference between the forward and re- 
flected power readings. The voltage standing- 
wave ratio is found by taking the ratio of the 
forward to reflected power and reading the cor- 
responding v.s.w.r. in instruction book chart. 

Either coupler can be left in the transmission 
line continuously, provided the power does not 
exceed one kilowatt with an s.w.r. of 1 to 1. The 
bridges are designed for 52-ohm lines. ^ 

The circuit of a measuring instrument is rarely 




March 1955 



43 



the whole stor}' of its performance, as the sources 
of error are seldom obvious. The accuracy of a 
bridge of this type is almost entirely determined 
by the selection of components and the method of 
construction. The inside view of one of the coupler 
units shows the special constructional arrange- 
ment adopted to maintain accuracy over the 
frequency range from 3 to 225 Mc, and to pre- 



vent the coupler from introducing an impedance 
"bump" in the line. The insertion loss is stated 
to be less than 0.1 db. 

Couplers and indicators can be obtained 
separatelJ^ The instruction book with the coupler 
contains circuit information for home construc- 
tion of an indicator unit, in case only the coupler 
is purchased. — G. G. 



The RME-100 Speech Clipper 



THE advantage of speech clipping should be 
quite well known by this time. Modulation 
percentage is limited by the amplitude of the 
modulating wave form, rather than by average 
modulating power. The speech clipper increases 
the ratio of average modulating power to peak 
amplitude by clipping the peaks of the wave 
form. This increases the average percentage of 
modulation, improving the intelligibility without 
increasing the transmitter power. Since clipping 
introduces distortion in the form of harmonics, a 
filter for the harmonics follows the clipper. 

The RME-lOO consists of a two-stage pream- 
plifier, using a 6SC7 dual triode, followed by a 
6H6 clipper and a harmonic filter. Power supply 
is included in a unit measuring 5 by 6 by 7 inches. 
The circuit is shown in Fig. 1. The unit is 
designed to be inserted between the microphone 
and the first stage of the speech amplifier, and a 
switch is provided for cutting the unit in or out 
of the circuit. The gain is limited to about 6 db. 
at the maximum clipping level so that a mini- 
mum of readjustment of the speech-amplifier 
gain control is necessary when the clipper is 
switched in or out. 

About 15 millivolts of audio is required to pro- 
duce a full 24 db. of clipping. This is usually 
obtained from a crystal or dynamic microphone 
when talking normally with the microphone at a 
distance of about 3 inches. The clipping control 



switch has 5 positions, to 24 db. in steps of 6 db. 
The clipper feeds into a low-pass filter, at- 
tenuating frequencies above 3000 cycles at the 
rate of about 20 db. per octave, and limiting the 
sideband width. At the low-frequency end, the 
amplifier has a roll-off characteristic attenuating 




The RME-lOO Speech Clipper in its streamlined cabinet. 

frequencies below 300 cycles. The output im- 
pedance is 47,000 ohms, and the input impedance 
of the stage into which the unit feeds should be a 
minimum of 100,000 ohms. Hum level is 40 db. 
below signal at average clipping level. — • D. M. 




Fig. 1 — Circuit of the 
RME-lOO speech chpper. 
All resistors J^ watt un- 
less otherwise specified. 
All capacitances in fit. 



44 



QST for 



The P-500 Power Amplifier 



THE Lakeshore Industries P-500 power ampli- 
fier is another in the current crop of power 
amplifiers designed primarily to boost the 
power level of a single- sideband signal. It uses 
a pair of 5514 triodes in push-pull, with multi- 
band tuners^ in the grid and plate circuits to 
cover the amateur bands from 80 to 10 meters. 
As a consequence, there is no bandswitch of any 
kind, and the panel has two dials, for the grid 
and plate tuners, and a knob for controlling the 



The Lakeshore Industries P- 
500 power amplifier uses a pair of 
5514 triodes mounted horizon- 
tally. Multiband tuners hoth in 
grid and plate circuits eliminate 
the need for a bandswitch. Nor- 
mally, the grid-circuit compart- 
ment is covered by an aluminum 
plate. 

The construction of this unit is 
interesting in that no normal 
"chassis" is used. The grid com- 
partment is a box within the 
larger box that makes up the 
unit. A cane-metal top covers the 
box shown here, and the whole unit 
then fits into a painted cabinet. 



grid-circuit coupling. A 0-500 milliammeter on 
the panel is connected in the filament return to 
ground and reads the total of grid and plate 
currents. 

The line cord coming out the rear of the 
cabinet connects to the filament transformer — 
terminals for connecting to the plate supply 

1 King, "No Turrets — Just Tune!," QST, March, 1948; 
Johnson, "Multiband Tuning Circuits," QST, July, 1954. 



and the bias supply are at the rear of the chassis, 
as are the connectors for r.f. input and output. 
The bias supply to be used will, of course, depend 
upon the plate voltage available. The factory 
recommendation is a plate supply of 1000 to 
1250 volts. The output terminals provide for 
connection to either balanced or coaxial line. 

Circuitwise, the P-500 is similar to any other 
neutralized push-pull triode amplifier, except 
perhaps for the use of tapped parasitic r.f. chokes 




in the plate leads and 56-ohm resistors in series 
with the neutralizing condensers. (A number of 
triode amplifiers used as linears seem to require 
these resistors; e.g., the 811- A amplifier described 
in March, 1951, QST.) Loaded parasitic- sup- 
pression chokes are also used in the grid circuit, 
together with a 2700-ohm swamping resistor for 
better driver loading. 

— B. G. 




M. A. R. S. 



Operational Readiness Vital 
to Successful Disaster Work 

Operational readiness is the key to success in 
disaster communications service and for public 
service operations where the time element is 
important. Two recent examples of alertness 
and operational readiness follow: 

In the first instance, an earthquake rocked 
the Fortuna, Calif., area at 1956Z hours on 22 
December 1954, causing extensive property dam- 
age. T. V. Conroy, A6GQY, of Fortuna immedi- 
ately established an emergencj^ link with Sixth 
Army Headquarters and with the Civil Defense 



Coordinator for Region One, Col. T. Monroe. 
The circuit was in operation at 2004Z, just eight 
minutes after the initial shock. Communication 
was maintained continuously until 0215Z on the 
23rd when it was officially determined that 
services of the Sixth Army Engineers wofild 
not be required. A6GQY reports that circuit 
discipline on 4020 and 4025 kc. was excellent. 

Five days earlier, on 17 December 1951, 
a radio link was set up between Clovis (N.M.) 
Air Force Base and Goose Bay, Labrador, to 
provide medical information concerning an air- 
man who had been bitten by a rabid dog. Sta- 
tions A5HJF and AA5WSP were instrumental in 
this operation. A relay was established between 
Goose Bay Dispensary and the Clovis Air Force 
Base Hospital so that additional information 
could be transmitted. The Air Force MARS 
emergency frequency of 3838 kc. was used. 



March 1955 



45 




Correspondence 
From Members- 



The publishers of QST assume no responsibility for statements made herein by eorrespondents. 



GOLDEN NETWORK 

Granite City, 111. 
Editor, QST: 

The hams in tlxis area did a wonderful job of collecting 
pledges during the 38-hour telethon for the benefit of Cere- 
bral Palsy victims. The entire St. Louis, East St. Louis, 
Granite City, Madison, Venice, Alton area was blanketed 
by mobile operators who gathered in the gold as it was 
pledged via land line to several hundred operators at the Keil 
Auditorium Cerebral Palsy headquarters. About $50,000 
was pledged and picked up by the mobile hams. W0QDF 
was the spark plug who mustered the hams into the drive 
and created an efficient mobile pick-up network, but just 
about every operator in the area deserves credit for having 
given of his time to make the drive the success that it was. 
Hundreds of fixed stations were involved, all controlled by 
\V9AIU, the Egyptian Radio Club Headquarters. 

— Egyptian Radio Club, Inc., W9AIU 



21-MC. VIOLATIONS 

Pleasant Street 
Rochdale, Mass. 
Editor, QST: 

Several times wliile operating 21-Mc. 'phone there have 
been more W stations in the foreign 'phone section than 
there has been DX. 

This may be attributable to the fact that the band is 
fairly new or that the majority of receivers do not have too 
accurate frequency markings, or none at all for the band. 
Of course, there is also the possibility that some Ws do not 
know the limitations of the American 'phone band on 21 
Mc. So, I would recommend that in the near future a listing 
be made of 21 Mc. showing the frequency restrictions and 
pointing out the band limits. I hope this note will possibly 
save someone from receiving a " pink " ticket for out-of-band 
operation. 

— Kenneth SchofieU, WIRIL 

IEditor's Note — As shown again in " Happenings " this 
month, the voice segment is 21,250-21,450 kc] 



NOVICE CHANGE 

331 Forest Drive, S.E. 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 
Editor, QST: 

I should like to hear some discussion on proposing a 
change in Novice regulations to extend the term to "one 
year or to the 13th birthday." I think the younger guys and 
gals should be given a break. What do you say gang? 

— R. Ray Weeks, W0LPK 



FOR THE BIRDS 

Ilobbs, N. Mex. 
Editor, QST: 

I think it's about time I had my say about one of my pet 
gripes: c.w. in the 'phone bands. This is for the birds! I'll 
admit c.w. was here first, and it undoubtedly has its place 
in ham radio, but I personally think it is a thing of the past. 

I think the 'phone bands should be reserved for 'phone 
operation. After all, if c.w. operators are going to be allowed 
to have large portions of each band set aside for their ex- 
clusive use, with big keep-off signs posted to 'phone men, it 
is only fair tliat 'phone men should enjoy the same rights. 



Any night you can hear c.w. and teletype all over the 
75-meter 'phone band, while there are wide-open spots all 
over the c.w. portion. 

I was enticed into ham radio by the reduced code-speed 
requirements of the Novice ticket, and now I am being 
booted out by the c.w. and Sloppy Splatter-Band operators. 
Don't misimderstand me; I like ham radio. I've learned 
enough radio since going on the air as an amateur to pass 
my commercial 'phone exam. 

All I'm asking is fair treatment for all hams. If a man 
wants to operate c.w., that's his business, but if the FCC is 
going to let him have his run of 'phone bands, then let the 
'plione men into the c.w. bands. 

— M.J. Clark, W5UWQ 



IT'S FOR THEM 

326 So. Walnut Street 
Cookeville, Tenn. 
Editor, QST: 

There has been quite a big blow for the past few years 
about putting both c.w. and s.s.b. off the air. Or at least off 
the 75-meter 'phone band. Both of these modes of transmis- 
sion seem to bother the a.m. 'phone men. 1 think the prin- 
cipal reason for this is the fact that most of the a.m. 'phone 
men have forgotten what their b.f.o.'s are used for ... if 
they ever knew. Anyway, they couldn't read c.w. 

What I would like to know is this: Would it be possible 
to put a.m. 'phone (the kind with a carrier and two side- 
bands) off the air completely? 

There is a good argument for this action. Both c.w. and 
s.s.b. rigs are much more economical to build and operate. 
They are both less likely to cause TVI. They both can be 
operated with greater spectrum economy. 

In a 15-kc. segment, only one a.m. 'phone station can be 
operated without interference. (I have heard several of the 
kilowatt-give-or-take-a-hundred-watts rigs around here that 
are much broader than 15 kc.) But in the same l£-kc. seg- 
ment, two s.s.b. stations and ten c.w. stations may be oper- 
ated without cross-interference. This is figuring the s.s.b. 
stations as being 3000 cycles wide and the c.w. stations 
operating within 900 cycles of each other, which is entirely 
practicable. 

I would like to hear from other hams and get their opin- 
ions on the proposal of outlawing a.m. 'phone. The time has 
come that we cannot waste any parts of our crowded ama- 
teur bands! 

— Al Brogdon, W4UWA 



R.F.D. No. 2 
Bradford, Ohio 
Editor, QST: 

A year or so ago, when s.s.b. began to be an issue, I was 
violently and openly opposed to any part of it. However, 
this past summer I had plenty of time to do some considering 
of the issue. After careful study and consideration of the 
subject, I had to admit that perhaps some of my personal 
and "technical" opinions didn't add up to the right answer 
— that is, what I wanted them to add up to. I went so far 
as to visit a s.s.b. station, and talked over the rig. It made 
sense. After some more study I bought an exciter, built an 
amplifier, with the purpose in mind of finding out for myself 
what s.s.b. had and didn't have to offer. 

I found out some of the following things. The s.s.b. group 
of operators, by the somewhat more technical nature of 
their equipment, are trying to do a good job, and are forced 
by the criticisms of others in their group to radiate a reason- 
ably good signal. The group is immediately critical of a bad 
(Continued on page H2) 



46 



QST for 






Happenii^#fff the Month 



NATIONAL AMATEUR RADIO WEEK 

Senator Prescott Bush of Connecticut, joined 
by Senator William A. Purtell of Connecticut and 
Senator George A. Smathers of Florida, has 
again this year introduced into the Congress a 
Resolution (S. J. Res. 25) to designate one week 
in the month of June each jear as National Ama- 
teur Radio Week. The text follows: 

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives of the United States of America in Congress 
assembled. That the President of the United States 
is authorized to designate one week in June of 
each year as National Amateur Radio Week, and 
to issue a proclamation inviting the people of the 
United States to observe the week with appropri- 
ate exercises to further and stimulate interest in 
amateur radio in the United States. 

The measure has been referred to the Judiciary 
Committee of the Senate. If passed by the 
Senate, the bill will then go to the House for simi- 
lar action. We understand that the Federal Com- 
munications Commission has endorsed the bill 
this year, and this action is interpreted as afTord- 
ing the measure a better chance than last year, 
when a similar resolution died in Committee. It 
is the intention of the language, if adopted, to 
select each jear the week ending with the annual 
ARRL Field Day tests. 

In introducing the bill. Senator Bush addressed 
his colleagues on the Senate floor as follows: 

Mr. President, radio amateurs in the United 
States have made invaluable contributions toward 
the advancement of radio. In times of emergency, 
local and national, they have performed essential 
services to the public by providing a network of 
communications linking agencies dealing with 
disasters. 

Connecticut is especially conscious of the con- 
tribution to the general good made by these men 
and women, afifectionately known as "hams," 
because the American Radio Relay League, their 
official organization, has its headquarters in our 
State, at West Hartford. . . . 

The month of June was selected because during 
that month each year is held the American Radio 
Relay League's annual field day in which more 
than 7000 amateurs throughout the country set 
up portable and emergency-powered radio com- 
munications in remote areas and man the gear in 
shifts for 24-hour periods. The purpose is to dem- 
onstrate the skill of volunteer amateur radiomen 
in providing emergency communications ser\ace 
in the event of disaster — military, civil or natural. 

The week of this event would be a most appro- 
priate one for designation as National Amateur 
Radio Week. 

At this point interested amateurs and club 
groups who would like to see such a "week" can 
help b\^ writing brief letters to members of the 
Senate Judiciary Committee urging favorable 
action on the resolution; individuals and groups 



in the states represented on the Committee can 
be most effective. The list of Senate members, 
who can be addressed simply at the U. S. Senate 
Office Bldg., Washington, D. C, is: 

Arkansas — John L. McClellan 
Idaho — Herman Welker 
Illinois — Everett M. Dirksen 
Indiana — William E. Jenner 
Maryland — John Marshall Butler 
Mississippi — James O. Eastland 
Missouri — Thomas C. Hennings, jr. 
North Dakota — William Langer 
SotUh Carolina — Olin D. Johnston 
Tennessee — Estes Kefauver 
Texas — Price Daniel 
Utah — Arthur V. Watkins 
West Virginia — Harley M. Kilgore 
Wisconsin — Alexander Wiley 
Wyoming — Joseph C. O'Mahoney 

The League is of course filing a statement urg- 
ing its adoption, in language similar to that 
shown on page 53 of May 1954 QST. 

F.C.C. REGION CHANGES 

In January FCC completed the revision of its 
regional-office set-up by dropping the regional 
office at Detroit and redesignating supervisory 
responsibilities to the Chicago regional office in 
the case of the Detroit district office (No. 19) 
and to the New York regional office in the case of 
the Buffalo district office (No. 20). This action 
has no effect on amateur e.xamination schedules, 
but is of interest to TVI committees in the Detroit 
and Buffalo districts since they will now have 
liaison with new regional offices. 

The total of regional offices is now reduced to 
si.x, those at Houston and Anchorage, Alaska, 
having been closed last year. 

REEXAMINATION AMENDMENT 

To clarify the eligibiUty of applicants for ama- 
teur licenses to take another e.xamination after 
having failed one, FCC has modified the lan- 
guage of Sec. 12.49 of our rules. It now says: 

Eligibility for re-examination. An applicant who fails e.x- 
amination for an amateur operator license may not take 
another examination for the same or a higher class amateur 
operator license within 30 days, except that this limitation 
shall not apply to an examination for a General Class license 
following an examination conducted by a volunteer exam- 
iner for a Novice, Technician or Conditional Class license. 

The principal effect is to make it plain that 
failing applicants for Novice and Technician 
Class licenses, now all handled by mail, have the 
same privilege as those failing Conditional Class 
— i.e., to appear before an FCC examiner and 
take the General Class exam without waiting 30 
days. In fact, they can go up the very next day if 
the}' wish. 

(Continued on page 144) 



March 1955 



47 



QST- Volume III 



Parti — Foreword to Sumner B. Young's (W0CO) Index "^ 



VOLUME III was the first complete volume to 
be produced under the guidance of a full- 
time editor. Its twelve issues extended from 
August, 1919, to July, 1920. Much information 
lies between its covers; but to collect and to 
organize it is often very difficult. 

By all odds, the most important story recorded 
in this volume was the development of amateur 
"tube" transmitters by a small group of experi- 
mentallj'-inclined and progressive amateurs; 
and it is a pity that the material in QST is of such 
nature that only a few of the individual partici- 
pants can now be identified. 

No large-scale shifting over to c.w. transmitters 
occurred, although some unsupported general 
statements published in the magazine may imply 
the contrary. Later, there was a quickening of 
interest in c.w., during the period covered liy 
Volume IV; but the real rush came only after the 
results of the first successful "Transatlantics" 
had been announced, in January, 1922. See Vol- 
ume V. 

Back in the days covered by the two postwar 
issues of Volume II, there had been some signs of 
interest in c.w. methods of transmission, even 
before the Navy had lifted the "lid" on "send- 
ing." 1 

Volume Ill's first offering of information on the 
subject was an unsigned article called "More 
About V.T. Transmitters."^ It showed a circuit 
"found quite satisfactory on some sets supplied 



the government during the war," and specified 
the size of an antenna coil for 200-meter opera- 
tion. A second circuit "developed by the Marconi 
Company especially for use with the Marconi- 
DeForest V.T., and said to give the best results 
for that tube of any circuit tested," was dia- 
grammed. 

An unusual feature of this article was a sugges- 
tion that c.w. sets be developed which would use 
the same tubes for transmitting and receiving; 
and a sketch showing a possible application of the 
idea was given. The author (whoever he was) 
added: "... We believe that the ideal c.w. set 
of the future will incorporate some such feature 
as this."^^ 

An announcement at 24, 30, September 1919, 
probably referring to the DeForest Telephone & 
Telegraph Company, read as follows: 

We are promised that soon the amateur world will 
have a bulb transmitter complete, designed primarily 
as a radiophone but also an efficient c.w. telegraph, 
and at a reasonable price. It sounds almost too good 
to be true but we believe it can be done. This set is 
being developed by a prominent commercial com- 
pany and should be announced soon.* 

The "Liberty Number" (November 1919), 
under "Strays," carried this important call for 
information, at page 32: 

Anybody working c.w. sets on 200 meters? We'd 



t "QST— Volume I" appeared in October, 1954, QST, 
p. 40; "QST — Volume II" appeared in February, 1955, 
QST. p. 42. 

1 At 19, June 1919, J. O. Smith, traffic manager of the 
League, said that many stations were then installing, or 
planning to install, undamped transmitters; and he pointed 
out some of the great merits of these sets. 

Warner's "Essentials of V.T. Transmitters" had ap- 
peared, at 3 to 6, July 1919. 

An unsigned article called "On Resuming Transmitting," 
at 18 to 19, July 1919, had characterized v.t. transmission 
as "perhaps the most important development of wartime radio 
from our standpoint." [Italics by S. B. Y.] 

2 22, 24, September 1919. 

2A This suggestion was repeated, with approval, at 48, 
February 1920, in the article "Auto-Modulated C.W. 
Telegraphy." 

^ See the ad of the DeForest Radio Telephone & Tele- 
graph Company, on the inside back cover of the November, 
1919, issue. The set operated on 60-cycle 110-volt a.c; and 
the "tested ranges" were stated as: "telephone 10 to 20 
miles," and "telegraph 50 to 75 miles." The price was 
$200.00, complete, including bulbs. The operating wave- 



lengths were not stated. Rectifier-tubes were used to pro- 
duce h.v. plate current. 

* I can testify, from experience, that the early amateur 
c.w. transmitters simply would not work on wavelengths 
much below 300 meters. 

See the "Editor's Note" appended to E. W. Whittier's 
article, "A Sure-Fire C.W. Circuit," at 29, July 1921 
(Volume IV). 

In a "C.W. Building-Contest," conducted by the Radio 
Club of Hartford, it was specified that the operating wave- 
length of the transmitters entered in the competition should 
not exceed 200 meters. Only two sets submitted would "get 
down " even as low as 200 meters. These were built by F. H. 
Schnell (IMO) and J. C. Randall (lANQ). Both rigs would 
operate as low as 180 meters. See 24 to 25, September 1921 
(Volume V). 

At 13, November 1921, McMurdo Silver stated that it 
was then possible to operate an amateur transmitter, ef- 
ficiently, below 200 meters (Volume V). At 63, January 
1922 (Volume V), Kruse (in a letter) stated that c.w. 
transmitters could easily be operated below 200. At 50, 
February 1922 (Volume V), a "Stray" reported that 9ZT 
could "put out" one ampere of c.w. on 125 meters, but that 
he could find nobody who was equipped with a receiver 
tuning down that low. 




be glad to have a description of any that are proving 
successful. We're afraid we're going to have lots of 
trouble with 200-meter undamped. The frequency is 
so high that an extremely precise adjustment of the 
heterodyne frequency must be made at the receiver.* 

On the same page, right below this item, an- 
other Stray referred to the shortage of suitable 
transmitting tubes for amateur use : 

The only power tube available for us seems to be 
the so-called Marconi tube, made by Moorhead and 
licensed by DeForest for the use of three electrodes. 
The Marconi Co. have enjoined DeForest from the 
manufacture of the Oscillion, on the grounds that it 
violates the Fleming patents. It takes rather a 
stretch of the imagination to see how this can be.^ 

A motor generator, designed to produce 
h.v. d.c. for plate circuits in tube transmitters, 
was first advertised in QST in the Decem- 
ber, 1919, issue. The International Radio Tele- 
graph Company, of 326 Broadway, New York 
City, offered a 100-watt unit (200 ma. at 500 
volts) for .1^75.00, f.o.b. factory. « 

In any event, a small and diversified group of 
amateurs decided to pioneer in the tube-trans- 
mitter field. It is difficult to identify and to locate 
them, in most instances, from the pages of QST; 
but a few published items are of limited assist- 
ance. 



At 34, February 1920, J. O. Smith declared: 

. . . The short-wave c.w. set has arrived. There 
is no doubt but that the development of these short- 
wave c.w. sets will greatly add to the interest and 
welfare of amateur radio. A few of these sets are now 
in operation in the Atlantic Division. . . . 

At 48, February 1920, it is recorded that 
2AB (N. y. City) worked 3ZH (Trenton, N. J.) 
on buzzer-modulated telegraph}^, with 1.1. am- 
peres in the antenna; and that 8DA (in Ohio) 
heard 2AB's signals "verj- QSA." 

At 28, March 1920, Entwistle's Report identi- 
fies Stuart Briggs and Fred Bowditch (both of 
Brookline, Mass.) and Francis Praj' (of Somer- 
ville, Mass.) as the owners and oj^erators of 
"undamped transmitters." 

The April, 1920, issue of QST contained an 
article (probabl}' by Warner) entitled "The Ad- 
vent of Amateur C.W." ^ This mentioned some 
of the "pioneers": 

. . . 2ZV, Richmond Hill, L. I., is using a 340- 
meter wave for c.w. telegraphy, compensated wave 
.350 meters, with an antenna current of 6 amperes, 
representing 350 watts. The oscillating equipment is 
two Type P pliotrons. This station should be good for 
1500 miles. 

. . . Others we know of are 2ZL, 2FS, 2AB, 2EX, 



^I can testify that a fairly active "black market "for 
various tubes developed around Greater Boston shortly 
after the "lid" was lifted on transmitting. "Western Elec- 
tric" transmitting tubes, rated at 5 watts, could be had for 
around $10.00 or $15.00 apiece. 

A "Stray," on page 32 of the November, 1919, issue, 
stated that the Marconi v.t. was a pretty good tube, how- 
ever; and tliis paragraph cited the success achieved by a 
hurriedly-constructed transmitting set which had been 
installed aboard the U. S. S. George Washinglon. Using one 
Type "RH" Moorhead tube, that ship had worked Otter 
Cliffs, Maine (on c.w.), while 1200 miles out. The plate 
voltage was only 750. The wavelength used was not stated. 

A "Stray" (at 24, December 1919) spoke of "salvaged" 
VT-2s for amateur c.w. transmitters. I am glad that some 
"salvaging" was done. A year or two would have been 
wasted, if "irregular" supplies of tubes had not been 
tapped. 

^54^, December 1919. Also, see the "Stray" at 24, De- 
cember 1919, which reads: "At last a cheap and good 
motor generator set for high-voltage d.c. has arrived. . . . 
Its lack hereto/ore has been the big drawback to amateur V.T. 
iransmission. . . ." [Italics by S. B. Y.| For a scheme for 
converting "ceiling-fan" motors into h.v. d.c. generators, 
see "Strays," at 43, June 1920. 

Motor generators were considered an expensive item by most 
early hams. Also, the noise and vibration from them were 
aiuioying. 

Some of the biggest boosts later given to c.w. work were 
furnished by the development of other means of producing 
h.v. d.c. First came the electrolytic rectifier; and then came 
rectifier tubes, plus filter systems. 

On the advent of the electrolytic rectifier, see: "An 
Electrolytic Rectifier for C.W.," by P. J. Furlong (IFF), at 



17 to 18, 28, February 1921 (Volume IV). For its later de- 
velopment, see: "A Symposium on .\luminum Electrolytic 
Rectifier Operation," edited by S. Kruse, at 20 to 25, June 
1922 (Volume V). 

On rectifier tubes, plus filters, see the following references. 
In Volume III: "Construction of a 500- Volt Rectifier 
Transformer for C.W. Work," by Robert Muns (2ACQ), 
and editorial note thereto appended, 17 to 19, June 1920. In 
Volume IV, see: 9, September 1920; and 36, November 1920 
(Russell's report). Volume V references: 28 to 29, October 
1921 ("S" Tubes, with smootlung filter); 25, .\pril 1922 
("Rectifier Battle," at Third and Fourth District Conven- 
tion) ; and 12, March 1922 (only three of the successful 
stations in the "Second Transatlantics" used tube-type 
rectifiers). 

On h.v. synchronous rectifiers, see the following reference 
in Volume V: 18 to 19, June 1922 (editorial note). The 
synchronous rectifiers never achieved wide use. 

At 49, November 1920 (Volume IV), .\rthur K. Ransom, 
in a letter, expressed the opinion that the need for produc- 
ing h.v. d.c. was the biggest obstacle to the widespread 
adoption of c.w. transmitters by amateurs. 

" 13, 14, 16, .\pril 1920. 

Note that NSF, the Naval Radio Laboratory at Anacos- 
tia, Wasliington, D. C, is mentioned, in this same article 
(p. 13), as "testing bulb sets of various powers on 200 and 
425 meters, using straight and chopped c.w." 

Also note that some experimental work by the Glenn L^ 
Martin Co., of Cleveland, is mentioned: "... One set 
puts 2.5 amperes in the antenna on ISO meters with 250 
watts input, and the other set 4 amperes on 270 meters 
with an input of 350 watts. . . ." [Italics by S. B. Y.] 

The Glenn L. Martin Co. stations used Air Service calls 
(UM and CMC). See 13, April 1920. 




i 



2ZM, 8XK, 8Y0, and 2XX. 2XX, ex-2XG, the 
station of Mr. Robert F. Gowen at Ossining, New 
York, has secured perhaps the best distance to date, 
signals being nightly QSA in Little Rock, Arkansas. 
Voice modulated and straight undamped are used. 

. . . Probably the most interesting work is that 
done by 2ZL, the station of our traffic manager, Mr. 
J. O. Smith. That the c.w. is proving up is attested by 
the fact that 2ZL is junking its spark set as outgrown. 
The equipment consists of a few small oscillators in 
parallel, with an antenna current of 1.2 amperes, 
straight c.w. on 275 meters. . . . Traffic has been 
put thru to Ohio and Massachusetts by this station 
when the spark signals were powerless to combat 
QRM and QRN.s . . . [Italics by S. B. Y.] 

J. O. Smith's "Operating Department Report" 
(at 28, April 1920) adds no more c.w. stations to 
the list, but makes this encouraging comment: 

, . . Short-wave c.w. transmission has done much 
more than was expected of it, in that it has turned 
out to be a very docile, tame and willing worker, 
instead of a fiy-by-night, unreliable, unsteady means 
of communication. More power to it. . . . 

At 34, January 1920, the "Calls Heard" list 
of L. E. Furrow (420 Lake St., Troy, Ohio) states 
that on December 8, 1919, he heard station DA 
and station 3ZH working one another, both on 
c.w. and on 'phone. This is the first mention of 
v.t. transmissions by amateurs which I have been 
able to find in that particular department of QST. 
DA was probably an unlicensed station. 

The one-tube 20-watt c.w. transmitter of Mr. 
Carter, of Cleveland (call UM), is referred to in 
8DA's list of "Calls Heard" at 42, March 1920. 
The call UM appears also to have been used by 
the Glenn L. Martin Aircraft Co., at Cleveland; 
and it is said to have been an old Air Service call. 
See 13, April 1920, and the editorial note to the 
letter from H. V. Simmons, at 54, July 1920. 
However, it may well be that Mr. Carter's sta- 
tion, signing the call UM, was an unlicensed sta- 
tion. 8DA (at Salem, Ohio, 60 miles away), 
stated that he worked UM regularly. 

Don Mix (ITS, of Bristol, Conn.), whose 
"Calls Heard" lists eventually earned him the 
nickname of "Sleepless Wonder," reported hear- 
ing several stations on 'phone and modulated 



telegraphy. See his list at 51, April 1920.' 

The May (1920) issue of the magazine con- 
tained another leading article (unsigned) en- 
titled: "An Experimental C.W. Transmitter."^'' 
It featured the Colpitts circuit, described as "a 
little complex, but beautiful in principle." ^^ For 
amateur use, Western Electric VT-2s, General 
Electric VT-14s, and Class II Marconi bulbs were 
recommended.'^ 

This May (1920) issue also contained a state- 
ment by J. O. Smith, at page 26, indicating that 
many amateurs desiring efficient transmitters 
had installed c.w. rigs. No statistics were given. 

At page 31 of this same number, R. H. G. 
Mathews (9ZN) said that he was thinking of 
adding a ]/2-kilowatt c.w. transmitter to his sta- 
tion during the coming summer or fall of 1920. 
This was real news, because in March (1920) 
9ZN's spark, on 275 meters, had established a 
new record for amateur stations.^' 

The June (1920) issue carried an announce- 
ment that the Nola Radio Club (of New Orleans, 
Louisiana) was experimenting with radiophones 
and c.w. sets.'* 

At page 51 of the same issue, O. A. Gulledge 
(4AT), of Ft. Pierce, Florida, announced (by 
letter) that he had installed a DeForest "Oscil- 
lion" radiophone; and that he would send out 
"music, speech, and c.w. signals," at stated 
times, on WO meters. 

A well-written article, showing touches of true 
wit and humor besides, was published at 15 to 
17, July 1920: "C.W. for the Amateur," by 
Howard L. Stanley (2FS).'^ He described a c.w., 
m.c.w., and 'phone transmitter which he had 
developed with the help of 2ZL (J. O. Smith). 

More generalities appeared in Warner's edi- 
torial (called "C.W.") at page 24 of the July, 
1920, issue: 

Reports from all over the country show the 
gradual but sure trend from spark to undamped in 
amateur radio, just as we thought would develop, 
and we are glad to see it. 

We are strongly in favor of c.w. and are going to 
do all we can to help it along. . . . 

We are on the eve of a great transition in amateur 
methods. We plead for the undamped the serious 
consideration that its many advantages merit. 



* The final paragraph in this article (16, April 1920) 
contains this interesting language: "The Editor urges the 
adoption of c.w. by all serious experimenters as a field of 
highest interest and unlimited possibilities, but with the 
warning that they'll have to learn transmission all over, for 
the old dope of spark days will not apply. QST hopes in 
the near future to establish a special laboratory for c.w. 
experiments looking toward the development of sets par- 
ticularly adapted to 200-meter relay work." 

" He listed the following: 2XG ('phone and modulated 
telegraphy); 2XJ ('phone); 2XX ('phone and modulated 
telegraphy); 2ZL (spark and modulated telegraphy); 2ZV 
(spark and modulated telegraphy); SCO ('phone); and 
8XU (spark and modulated telegraphy). 

A few more early tube sets can be identified by referring to 
other lists of "Calls Heard," in later numbers of Volume III 
of QST. 

At 44 to 45, July 1920, ITS reported hearing lAW on 
spark and 'phone; 2FS on spark and c.w.; 2XB on c.w. and 
'phone; and 2XK on spark and modulated c.w. 

At 46, July 1920, the Waverly (N. Y.) Radio Research 
Assn. reported hearing 2XA (on "Tel."). 

8LF (Crafton, Penn.) reported hearing 8CB (on spark 



and "Mod."), during May, 1920. His list is at 55, August, 
1920. 

The later list of the "Sleepless Wonder" (ITS), found at 
55, August 1920, which records results obtained at Bristol, 
Conn., between May 18 and June 20, 1920, speaks of 
working lAY, who used spark. Mod. c.w., and 'phone; and 
of hearing 2QR's spark, c.w., and 'phone signals. 

Note that the Editor of QST had announced (at 48, 
February 1920) that he would be pleased to receive reports 
of amateur v.t. transmissions. 

10 5 to 8, May 1920. 

11 5, May 1920. 

12 6, May 1920. The article added that only the Class II 
Marconi tubes were "now regularly available on the mar- 
ket for communication purposes." 

'3 On March 9, 1920, 9ZN's 275-meter spark set was 
copied aboard a vessel lying in Colon, Panama. On March 
12, 1920, the same ship heard him when 200 miles south of 
Balboa. See 8, May 1920. (Incidentally, the next day — 
March 13th — the vessel caught fire at sea and was de- 
stroyed. All hands were saved. See 8, May 1920.) 

14 45, June 1920. The club is identified on 38, June 1920. 



50 



QST for 



In the same issue, Traffic Manager J. O. Smith 
(2ZL) was equally vague as to how many stations 
were shifting over to tube sets, and where those 
stations were, although he said that a trend was 
developing: 

. . . The long-heralded change from spark to 
continuous-wave transmission is now in full swing, 
and in quite a number of cases spark sets have al- 
ready been discarded. . . . 

Amateur radio is now in transition from spark to 
C.W., and a complete change-over is merely a ques- 
tion of time.'^ . . . 

I wish I felt competent to make a fairly 
accurate estimate of how many amateurs were 
actively engaged in c.w. work, as of July 1, 
1920, and concerning their geographical dis- 
tribution; but I simply cannot do it. My best 
guess is, that as of that date, there were not over 
200 v.t. transmitters in operation, in amateur 
stations, in the entire U. S. A. 

This brings us to a study of the data published 
(in Volume III of QST) bearing on the number 
of licensed hams in the United States, and in- 
dicating their distribution throughout the nine 
Districts. 

The material is incomplete, and unanalyzed. 
QST published lists of calls of new amateur sta- 
tions, as follows: 42 to 43, November 1919; 10 
to 14, December 1919; a separate supplement to 
the January, 1920, issue, containing 15 pages of 
call letters; 39 to 40, April 1920; 35 to 36, May 
1920; 35 to 36, June 1920; and 41 to 42, July 
1920. The January, 1920, supplement was a 
cumulative affair. Starting with it, and adding 



further amateur calls published thereafter (and 
eliminating all calls published by way of correc- 
tion), I get the following picture: 

Toted Licensed Amateur 
District Stations Therein 

First 458 

Second 350 

Third 181 

Ninth 159 

Eighth 119 

Sixth 100 

Fifth 65 

Seventh 56 

Fourth 33 

Total Licensed Amateur Stations in 
the 9 Districts 1521 

The main trouble with these data is that they 
give us no inkling of the dates as of which the 
various lists were accurate and complete. 

Evidently, the Editor's idea was to devote 
two pages per issue to the publication of new 
calls, and to catch up as best he could, at this 
unchanging rate; ^^ and I have now confirmed 
my suspicion that these lists were a good distance 
behind the actual march of events, as of (say) 
July 1, 1920. It is a pity that somebody like 
Edgar Felix did not get the correct and complete 
figures from government sources and analyze 
them for QST's readers. 

Mr. Entwistle presented some interesting facts 
re the number of licensed amateur stations in 
the First District in the June (1920) issue, at 
page 25. Just when he "put pen to paper" is not 
stated ; but he said : 



1^ Anybody who had the experience of working with one 

of the early "tube" sets will get a good laugh out of Stan- 
ley's description of his troubles. 

Looking back at my log for July 21, 1920, I find that I 
first tried to operate a tube transmitter (built for me by the 
Atlantic Radio Co. of Boston, Mass.), on that date. All I 
accomplished was the burning-out of the plate-current 
meter, and the melting of the glass envelope on one of the 
four " VT-2 " transmitting tubes. 

After IDH (E. W. Whittier, himself) had made some re- 
pairs, I got J^ amp. into my antenna, at Duxbury, Mass., 
on Saturday, August 7, 1920. 

My first contact was a local — IRAA. I worked him on 
c.w. and buzzer-modulated c.w. on August 8, 1920. The 
"radiophone" part of my rig wouldn't work at all. 

On Sunday, November 21, 1920, after more help from 
Whittier, and after I had moved my set back to Dorchester, 
Mass., I got 0.7 amp. into a big "cage" antenna, at my 
station (lAE), on 360 meters; and I worked IPAI, and was 
heard by IKAY, in Portland, Maine. 

More changes, made mostly by IDH (who worked for 
Atlantic Radio), followed. The first real traffic handling 
which I ever did, on c.w., was in the early hours of Sunday, 
December 26, 1920. Between 1:18 a.m. and 2:34 a.m., I 
sent 9 messages to ITS (Bristol, Conn.), on 260 meters. lES 
kindly helped on the receiving work. 

On January 27, 1921, I received written permission from 
H. C. Gawler, RI of the First District, to operate on c.w. 
at 325 meters, for 30 days, commencing February 15, 1921, 
to try to establish reliable communication with 2ZL. Some 
interesting results followed. 

Mr. J. O. Smith (2ZL) really had a fine station. At 27, 
April 1921 (Volume IV), it was referred to as being probably 
the most powerful amateur c.w. station. See, also: editorial, 
"The Berries!" at 29, March 1921; and 48, May 1921. 
(Both in Volume IV.) Also, look at 13, April 1920; and 28, 
April 1920. (Both in Volume III.) 

1® 26, July 1920. The reports of the division managers 



which follow Mr. Smith's general remarks (in that same 
issue) shed little light on the subject, either. 

Entwistle (New England Division) made this statement 
(at 27, July 1920): "... One significant fact that stands 
out as inspiring is the gradual C-W-izing of New England. 
The following have c.w. sets: Wood, Arnold, Winchester; 
ICK; IXF. Providence; Mass. Radio School; lYC; lAY; 
IQP." 

The Northwestern Division Report (33, July 1920) in- 
cludes these words by Acting-Manager Hertz: "... The 
tests conducted by 7CR. 7ZB and 7CW with the Forestry 
servnce radiotelephone sets have made us reluctant to hang 
up our 'phones. It is interesting to note that the c.w. radiat- 
ing 0.46 ampere and spark signals radiating 1.5 to 2 amperes, 
both at Portland, are equal in audibility at 7CW, about 40 
miles distant. ..." 

The Ontario Division Report (34, July 1920) states that 
there are presently four amateurs with c.w. sets in the City 
of Toronto, with others ready to build tube sets almost at 
once. The situation is described thus: "... A great transi- 
tion seems to be taking place in the Toronto district. Every-^ 
thing seems to point to the fact that c.w. and radiotelephony 
are going to entirely replace spark telegraphy in this district 
with all advanced amateurs in the very near futiire. ..." 

The evidence, in other words, of an actual "shifting- 
over," was very indefinite, and very "thin." 

Astute amateurs who had experienced the advantages of 
c.w. sets could confidently predict the end of spark trans- 
mitters; but nobody except a small group of "pioneers" 
had yet "gone over" to tube sets. 

'"See 39, April 1920: "Fellows, devoting a half dozen 
pages per issue to calls got to where it detracted from the 
reading value of QST and scared us. Then we hoped to pub- 
lish monthly supplements carrying advertising to finance 
the thing, but the Post Office Dept. has just come out best 
in an argument on that. So we resume in QST — two pages 
a month until we get them all. You can cut out this sheet 
and keep it with the .Januarj' supplement." 



March 1955 



51 



At the time of writing this report there are 1125 
licensed amateur stations of the first and second class 
in the First Radio Inspection District with probably 
90% of the total number of the former grade. Only 
one special amateur license has been issued, and that 
is located at Springfield, Mass. (Mr. Sabin). One 
additional school license has been issued, to Dart- 
mouth College, call letters lYB. The other technical 
school license was granted previously to the Rhode 
Island State College, call lYA. Naturally the dis- 
tribution of these stations varies from state to state 
and in different parts of the same state. Greater 
Boston has the greatest density per capita; Wollaston, 
the most of any one city. . . . [Italics by S. B. Y.] 

Note that the number of Hcensed amateur 
stations in the First District alone, according to 
Mr. Entwistle, totaled 1125. His report probably 
was written sometime in May (1920), and pos- 
sibly was written in April of that year. The time 
lag between the list of calls published in QST 
and the actual licensings of the stations them- 
selves is strikingly illustrated, when this 1125 
figure is compared to the 458 First District calls 
printed in QST up to and including the July 
(1920) issue, and when it is compared with the 
total of 1521 calls for the entire U. S. A., so 
published.^"* 

It is interesting to see that the Fourth Distiict 
still occupied the last position in total number of 
stations licensed. ^^ 



As more and more stations came onto the air, 
the QRM problem became acute, especially 
around the larger cities. 

In addition to the suggestion that tube trans- 
mitters be used in place of the "good old" spark 
sets — an impossibility until such time as power 
tubes and other essentials should become gen- 
erally available to amateurs, and until decent 
c.w. receivers should be produced — two tech- 
nological approaches were recommended. One of 
them was the use of highly-directional under- 
ground receiving antennas; and the other was the 
use of wavelengths below 200 meters, by low- 
powered spark transmitters. 

As to the use of underground antennas, the 
literature is scanty. It is certain that only a very 
few amateurs actually experimented in this field. 
The need for elaborate shielding of all leads to 
the underground wires, and the necessity for 
employing elaborately-shielded receivers, or com- 
pletely-screened receiving rooms, offered serious 
practical drawbacks. However, a handful of 
amateurs made the effort. They found some 
refuge from static, and verified the fact that at 
short wavelengths, underground antennas ex- 
hibited marked directional properties.^" 

Part II of W0CO's index to Volume III of 
QST will appear in our April issue. — Ed. 



'8 Including the July (1920) list, at 41 to 42, July 1920, a 
grand total of 1521 U. S. A. calls and 58 Canadian calls had 
appeared in the QST lists. 

The late Clinton B. DeSoto, at page 61 of Two Hundred 
Meters and Down, said: ". . . At the end of the fiscal year, 
June 30, 1920, the number of amateur stations had grown 
to 56 per cent of all stations licensed by the U. S. Govern- 
ment. The Department of Commerce reported that there 
were 5719 amateur stations, fifteen times as many as all 
other types of land stations put together. Although this 
was 370 fewer than in 1917 when all amateur stations were 
closed down, the disparagement was not due to decreased 
interest but to the fact that a number of amateurs were 
either still in the service or were fully occupied in commer- 
cial operating or manufacturing activities. . . ." 

The best estimate which I was able to make, from the 
data in QST before I found this reference, was: 5000 ama- 
teurs as of July 1, 1920. I reached this by first multiplying 
1521 by 2.45. (The "2.45" was obtained by dividing the 
First District "published" figure into Entwistle's First- 
District figure.) The multiplication gave 3726.45. To this, 
I added 1200 (my estimate of 2 months' new licensing), 
getting 4926.45. This I rounded off to 5000. Such are the 
"fruits" of incomplete figures. 

19 Look back at: 163, 185, July 1916; footnote 8, page 7, 
of my "Foreword to the Index to Volume I of QST"; 32, 
April 1917; and pages 11 to 12 of my "Foreword to the 
Index to Volume II of QST." 

2" The only amateur experimenters referred to, in QST, 
so far as I can see, were R. H. G. Mathews {9ZN), wlio was 
chief engineer of tlie Chicago Radio Laboratory, and some 
members of the Nola Radio Club, at New Orleans, La. See 
"The Underground Antenna Adapted to Amateur Waves," 
by Mathews, at 14 to 16, June 1920; and at 18 to 19, July 
1920. The item re the Nola Radio Club is under "The 
Affiliated Clubs," at 45, June 1920. 

The first reference to underground antennas for amateur 
use that I have found in QST appears in an advertisement 
of Chicago Radio Laboratory, at 44, August 1919. It points 
out the merits of an audio amplifier. This ad states: "Static 
elimination by use of the Rogers underground antennae is 
perhaps the most striking and far-reaching discovery made 
during the war. By this system 'static' is absolutely elimi- 



nated, the only atmospheric interference being due to 
ground strays. In cutting out the static, however, the signal 
strength on 200 meters is also reduced to about one-eighth 
of tlie value of the same signal on the ordinary antenna. In 
order to render ordinary signals readable on the under- 
ground antenna it is therefore necessary to use one or more 
steps of amplification. . . ." 

Mathews had become acquainted with the work done by 
Rogers, and with the later experiments conducted by A. 
Hoyt Taylor (Lt. Commander, USNRF), through his 
(Mathews') association with the Great Lakes Radio Labo- 
ratory during World War One. See 30, November 1919. For 
Taylor's articles on short-wave and long-wave spark and 
undamped reception, with subterranean or submarine 
wires, see: "Short- Wave Reception and Transmission on 
Ground Wires (Subterranean and Submarine) ", 7, Proc. 
I.R.E.. 337-361 (August, 1919); "Long- Wave Reception 
and the Elimination of Strays on Ground Wires (Subter- 
ranean and Submarine) ", 7, Proc. I.R.E., 559-583 (De- 
cember, 1919); and "The Use of Ground Wires at Remote 
Control Stations," 8, Proc. I.R.E., 171-190 (June, 1920). 
(The last of these 3 articles was written by Taylor and by 
A. Crossley, Lieut, (j.g.), USNRF.) 

The best practical results had been obtained, in the Navy, 
in the reception of long-wave spark and imdamped trans- 
Atlantic signals; and after April 7, 1918, all such reception, 
at the Belmar, N. J., station, had been conducted by the 
use of submarine wires, "balanced" against a "ground" 
wire, or against a loop antenna. See pages 570-572, Volume 
7, Proc. I.R.E. (December, 1919). 

Some success with the reception of ship-to-shore traffic 
on 600 meters had been demonstrated. See descriptions of 
"Remote-Control Stations" at Great Lakes, Hampton 
Roads, and New Orleans, at 175-189, 8, Proc. I.R.E. 
(June, 1920). 

On the Iransmitling side, the best work had been between 
Great Lakes and Chicago, a distance of 36 miles. (See 7, 
J'roc. I.R.E., 360, .\vigust 1919). The first transmissions — 
about .January, 1918 — had been on 340, 600, and 720 
meters. (See 7, J'roc. I.R.E., 356). .\ few weeks later, 450 
and 550 meters had been used. (See 7, Proc. I.R.E., 357). 
At Chicago, Mr. A. L. Howard's receiving station had been 
utilized. (See 7, Proc. I.R.E., 356). 



52 



QST for 



S^.S trays 



SL 



Recently W5TYM rounded up, from Hq. and 
other sources, background material for a ham 
radio story to be used in his company's house 
organ. There must have been some potent argu- 
ments there — John Wood of the public relations 
department is now WX5FLSI 



On Januarj' 31st the Henrj' Radio Store, 
Butler, Mo., was broken into and the following 
equipment stolen: two Collins 75A-3s (serials 
1573 and 1585), one Collins 32V-3 (serial 1489), 
one Elmac PMR-6.\ (serial 3096) and one Elmac 
PSR-12 (serial 554 j. 

A reward will be paid b\' Robert Henry, owner 
of the store, to anyone giving information leading 
to the arrest and conviction of the person or 
persons participating in the crime. Compensation 
will also be made for the return of the equipment. 



In recent measurements by the National 
Bureau of Standards the velocity of liglit has 
been redetermined. I'sing the molecular constants 
method, the new value obtained was 2;t9,792,0(K) 
±6000 meters per second; by the radio interfer- 
ometer method, the new velocity value was 
299,795,100 ±3100 meters per second. 



We are saddened to report the passing of 
Theodore G. Deiler, Engineer-in-Charge of the 
FCC 8th Radio District. In 1919. Mr. Deiler 
began his career with the Radio Division of the 
Department of Commerce. While with that 
organization he became Supervisor of Radio at 
New Orleans, La. With the transfer of the Radio 
Division to the Federal Communications Com- 
mission, he was designated Inspector-in-Charge 
and later became Engineer-in-Charge. 

Mr. Deiler was very well-known and respected 
in the radio industry' and among amateurs. The 
thousands of commercial and amateur radio op- 
erators who were licensed under his supervision 
will mourn his passing. 



There are man\- new amateurs in and around 
Davenport, Iowa, thanks to the Davenport 
Radio Club. W0HMM reports on a new series of 
classes sponsored by the DRAC incorporating 
the best training features of lectures, films, 
and experiments, .\fter observing a few of the 
lectures, the faculty of St. Ambrose College 
volunteered full use of the college laboratory 
and projection rooms to the Davenport club, 
in recognition of their outstanding program. 




Your (lull's educational program may be able 
to utilize the club code award shown. Any 
reasonable amount of these certificates will be 
forwarded to j'our group, for certifying both 
receiving and sending proficiency. The club 
code awards and a sample course outline can be 
obtained from the League's Communications 
Department. 



Transient L'. S. armed forces personnel in or 
near Southampton, England, are invited to 
attend meetings of the Southampton Group of 
the RSGB. The get-togethers take place on the 
first Saturday of each month at 1 Prospect Place, 
Southampton. Those interested should telephone 
either G3TR, 68839, or G3CCE, 22478. 



Members of the Montreal Amateur 
Radio Club, sponsors of the 1954 W/VE 
Contest, attend presentation of trophies 
donated by Emerson Radio of Canada. 
The large cup is retained by the club; 
the miniature goes to Russ \t ilson. 
VE6VK, winner of the contest. Front 
row (I. to r.): B. Halickman, VE2AKT; 
Ethel Pick, VE2H1: Alex Reid, VE2BE, 
ARRL Canadian Division director; R. 
Grant, VE200, Emerson manager; H. 
Ward, VE2XZ, president of MARC; 
C. Lockhart, Emerson asst. manager; 
Gordy Webster, VE2BB, MARC contest 
chairman. Back roic: R. ^ . Phillips, 
VE2EY; T. Lott, VE2AGF; D. Brom- 
wich, VE2HY; J. Miller, VE2TA; 
H. Morav, VE2ZN. 




March 1955 



53 





NEWS 
wVIEWS 




BY ELEANOR WILSON,* WIQON 

AMONG our YLs there are some (too few, alas!) 
\ who are "dyed-in-the-wool" v.h.f. opera- 
-i^^ tors. They concentrate the bulk of their 
operating and experimenting on the higher 
frequencies — they do what they can to create 
activity and interest in the world above 50 Mc. 
Liane Waite, W2FBZ, is another^ YL who is 
so enthusiastic about v.h.f. operation that she 
is happy to do what she can to help swell the 
population in the upper 
segment of the ham 
bands. And, as WlHDQ 
has said, "this is the gal 
who has won several 
Northern New Jersey 
section awards in our 
v.h.f. contests, and has a 
few times posted the top 
score for the country." 
In the Sept., 1953, V.H.F. 
Party, Liane followed in W2FBZ 

second place nationally ^xot^tt^^ t> 

another leading YL v.h.f. operator, W8BFQ. Re- 
ferring to Margaret and Liane, WlHDQ wrote 
in Q.ST for Jan., 1954: "... two topnotch v.h t. 
YLs whose untiring efforts have earned thena the 
respect of v.h.f. men everywhere." In the June, 
1954, Party, Liane made the country's high score 
in the single-operator class. 
Liane writes: 

I have been licensed since 1951, starting in as a 
Novice. Unhappy with conditions on 80 cw., 1 
was instrumental in getting my husband 
(W2F BR) to build gear for 2-meter operation. 
*YL Editor, QST. Please send all contributions to 
WlQON's home address: 318 Fisher St., Walpole, Mass. 
iSee Apr., '53, department for information on other 
v.h.f. YLs. 





COMING YL GET-TOGETHERS 

April 23rd — Wl YLs, Sheraton Plaza Hotel, 
Boston. Write WITRE for details. 

May 20th-22nd — LAKK Convention, W9 YLs, 
AUerton Hotel, Chicago. Write W9MYC. 

June 24th-27th — First YLRL International 
Convention, Hotel Miramar, Santa Monica, 
Calif. W6LIHA, General Chairman. 



We met a congenial group of local hams who 
were interested in higher frequencies, and I be- 
lieve that, more than anything else, caused a 
continuation of interest in those bands, even 
after obtaining the General Class hcense. We 
became interested in contests, which I feel is one 
of the greatest ways for checking gear and pro- 
moting the building of new gear. Because of this, 
we got on 220 and 432 — at the same time we 
were on 6 and 2 meters. We are interested in 1215 
and hope to be on that band by next spring. 

There is quite a challenge to me in operating 
frequencies where it is possible to accomplish 
something that has not been done before. We are 
interested in carrying on any v.h.f. schedules 
which would be desirable to set up, and we have 
two goals. One of them is to work Florida on 2 
meters; the other is to work England. 

May Liane soon realize both goals, and may 
her words encourage more YLs to take to the 
higher frequencies. 

Reminder! 

YLs and OMs — don't forget your date to meet in the 
Sixth Annual YL-OM Contest on M^rch 5th-6th and 
19th-20th. Complete details were on page 49, February Qt> 1 . 

And speaking of OMs — we are encouraged and perhaps 
a bit flattered to realize how much mail for his department 
cories from them. The proverbial "battle of the sexes 
seems nonexistent in our hobby; rather, the spirit is one of 
r^utual respect, enthusiasm, and cooperation. We re always 
pleased to hear from OM readers and hope that their in- 
terest in the distafT side will continue! 

Keeping Up with the Girls 

W5TTU YLRL 5th District chairman, reports the or- 
ganization 'of the Texas YL Round-up Net which meets 
ga,nizaiioii ui •. c W5WXY, Bermce, is 

Thursdays at 0930 Cbi, 38»U Kc. vvovvaj., ', 

NCS with W5ZTB as alternate. Pat also observes that the 
Southern Belle Net has changed its meeting time to 08|0 
nuT c^wn kc Fridays). . • • New members Kbs ayj 
ElT KnZ EXQ EXV GRA GQW IDL IHD, W6S HVC 
QGC QOO TMB bring the Los Angeles YLRC membership 
up to 55. For the club's annual Christmas party, W6QGX, 
Harryette. trimmed a tree with small pieces of radio com- 
ponents and topped it with a miniature 16-d«me-* J-^^S 
beam designed by KN6GMX, Jayne. At the January 
{Continued on page 148) 



WITRE, Barbara Harrington, of Topsfield, Mass 
turned in the highest claimed 'phone score in the Eastern 
Masrsection during the 1954 Sweepstakes^ Licensed m 
1951, Barbara has been on «"« ,^1^^ «;/°7^|^ ^^h 
since Currently she operates 10, 15, 20, 40 and '^' w«ii 
4 her favorite band. Holder of a 'phone W AC certifi- 
cate, she has worked 78 co"ntries with 56 confirmed 
She is alternate net control with W6UHA of the 20 
meter YLRL net. A registered nurse she is the X\ L o 
Wl JEL and the mother of two daughters, 5 and 7, both 
of whom are working at learning the code. 



^. lA-g zap 



i> 




W'l 2.JOO 2tSO 53oo.ssT>o V5650-592S 10,000-10^00 2tOOO-22,000 

^^Wim ^ilMliiliil'iiimif^ffffj ;"" i ii^'nii||iiiiimiiiiijim, 

CONDUCTED BY EDWARD P. TILTON, WIHDQ 



ALONG about the last week in January each 
/\ year you can measure v.h.f. activity with a 
-^ ■*- ruler — a ruler alongside the logs mailed in 
to Headquarters following the Annual V.H.F. 
Sweepstakes. Time was when a pile an inch high 
looked big for a v.h.f. contest. But you need the 
better part of a one-foot scale for the eighth run- 
ning of this popular event, January 8th and 9th. 

When you look through the comments accom- 
panying the entries, you find things Uke "Never 
heard so many signals in my life" — "Activity 
here was at an all-time high" — " Had to peel the 
signals off in layers" — -"New contacts were 
made right up to the last minute!" Nobody re- 
ported conditions as being good, but there seems 
little doubt that the 1955 event will break all 
previous records for v.h.f. contests. 

At least a dozen participants reported more 
than 200 contacts each, K2CMB/2 leading with 
248. W2TBD made 225 contacts on 144 Mc. 
alone. The country's top score, so far, is W2UK's 
6336 points, made possible through the amazing 
total of 18 ARRL sections worked on 144 Mc. ! 
Last year's record score of 3952 points, by 
WIRFU, was topped by at least 8 contestants, 
with W2RGV, WlUIZ/1 and WIRFU all over 
5500 points. 

Club records seemed sure to fall, though the 
big-club totals have not been checked as we 
write. The South Jerse}^ Radio Association seem 
to have maintained their near-monopoly on 
V.H.F. SS gavel awards, their claimed total 
for 1955 running over the 50,000-point mark. 
Their perennial competitors, the York Road 
Radio Club, from just across the Delaware River, 
outdid their previous efforts, and it looks like a 
close one between these two rivals. Several 
smaller clubs posted totals that would have been 
good for top place a few years back, and the num- 



ber of clubs participating was well up over 
previous years. 

Propagation appeared close to the winter 
average, from your conductor's vantage point. 
This would have meant a quiet Sunday afternoon 
and evening in years past, as the field would 
have been prett}' thoroughly covered bj- noon of 
the second day. But not in 1955. The 2-met«r 
band, particularly, was jumping with activity, 
right down to the last minute. There was never 
an hour, including those just before dawn on 
Sunday morning, when it was not possible to 
make hay in this contest. In manj- areas j'ou no 
longer post a winning total and get anything like 
a normal night's rest in a V.H.F. SS week end! 

Through the Middle West many operators 
reported conditions the worst they'd seen all 
winter. Particularly west of the Mississippi, 
contacts were made only over short distances. 
But still we find reports coming in, in better than 
former numbers, from most of this territory. 
Far-western v.h.f. men, too, report the going 
rough, but there are some good W6 and W7 logs 
coming in, with the deadline for their mail still 
a few days awaj'' as we write. 

There was heartening evidence of new v.h.f. 
activity in many quarters. They won't hit a 
high spot in the national scoring, because of 
their lack of point-building section multipliers, 
but the Albuquerque V.H.F. Club came through 
with 20 logs. A goodl}' number of reports came 
from North Carolina groups, whose principal 
complaint was that stations they should have 
been able to work in Virginia and farther north 
didn't turn their beams around to the south often 
enough. 

Checking a contest of this magnitude is not 
done in an idle hour; it will be some time before 
the final results are known. But one thing is sure: 



One of the more popular items of v.h.f. gear described in QST in the past year was the ''One-Package 2-Meter 
Station" by Vk IVLH, in the April, 1954, issue. These pictures show an adaptation of the design by \^ 2NGN, whj^ 
followed the original closely circuitwise but modified the la>(iut tn fit a murr riinimonly-availalili- ca-e. 




The 8th V.H.F. Sweepstakes provided a week end 
of competition that will not soon be forgotten. 

Here and There on the V.H.F. Bands 

More on tlie Sejjt. IStli fireball: In December QST, 
page 08, \vc reiiorted strange doings on 144 Mc. that 
appeared to tie in with the appearance of a fireball in western 
skies tlie night of Sept. 18th. At that time we knew that 
\V0TJF had heard W5VWU, and that several New Me.xico 
stations had heard unidentified DX, apparently reflected 
from the region around the fiery visitor. In response to our 
request for information on any other reception of this sort, 
\V0VEC, Lincoln, Nebr., sends us the following: 

At about 2130 CST, W0VEC heard a c.w. station on 144 
Mc. say, "—SO GA \V?FAG DE W7VMP". Undoubtedly, 
the station being worked was W5FAG. At 2143, W5VWU 
was heard by W0VEC and called, following reception of his 
CQ. The signal had risen to a peak of S8 to 9, in a series of 
bouncing fades, and it faded out in the same way. The 
entire period of reception was about 30 seconds. The 
W7VMF signal was steadier, about SI. 

The 2-meter reports from various parties appear to span 
a period of half an hour or more, yet reports of the fireball's 
appearance relate to only a few minutes, at the most. It 
appears possible that tlie reception reports resulted from a 
fairly general meteor shower, of w Inch the fireball may have 
been merely one spectacular part. We suspect that quite a 
bit more of this sort of thing would be observed, if 2-meter 
activity were maintained regularly on the scale that prevails 
during a v.h.f. contest week end. 

Here's a fellow who really has had antenna trouble! 
\V4CVQ, Raleigh, N. C, had just put up 24 elements each 
for 220 and 144, when Hurricane Hazel dropped a tree 
across his guy wires. All antennas, including a 6-meter 
beam, a "d.c.-band long wire," and the above, toppled 
110 feet to the ground. Next, a 32-element 144-Mc. beam 
was erected, and seven days later a turkey flew into it. 
(Jake says the array looked as if the invader was a bomber!) 
The latest in the line of 2-meter beams is a 24-element, 
W2NLY-style coUinear, horizontal. It works out better 
than the 32-element for .lake's requirements, as it is less 
critical as to direction. 

This can be important in an area where much searching 
of the band is required, and this certainly applies to North 
Carolina, though things are looking up there on 2. The 
V.H.F. SS file contains quite a batch of logs from North 
Carolina entrants, for the first time. Several of the boys 
complain that they couldn't work out of the state because 
the stations to the north didn't turn their beams down that 
way of ten enough. 

W4CVQ is another of those fellows who is working 
miracles with 826s. His pair run very easily at 500 watts 
input on voice, and have been pushed to 800 watts input 
without undue heating. 

W4DWU, Falls Church, Va., thinks that all 2-meter men 
must use old call books. He was formerly located in St. 
Petersburg, Fla., and he still has to spend quite a bit of 
time disillusioning excited 2-meter ops who think they have 
just snagged a Florida station. 

How consistent is communication over a 450-mile path 
on 144 Mc? Some idea can be gained from results between 
W8BFQ and WIHDQ. Both stations have good locations, 
but the terrain in between is very rough, all the way. In 
the period between October 25th and the end of the year, 
a schedule kept at 1715 EST produced identifiable signals 
each way on 24 tries. This figures out to quite a bit better 
than half the time, when equipment troubles and inability 
of one or the other to keep the skeds are included. Tests 
consisted of only two minutes of transmission each way. 
Experience the previous winter, and through last spring, 
indicated that when 5-minute transmissions were made by 
W8BFQ, at least some recognizable signal could be heard 
by your conductor just about every try. Similar results, or 
better, have been achieved in nearly all parts of the country, 
and over paths that apjjear even more formidable than the 
one between West Kichfield, Ohio, and Canton, Conn. 

There is increasing interest in extended-range tests in 
many (|uartcrs, as word gets around that hops of several 
hundred miles can be worked regularly on 144 Mc— i/ 
sufficiently good equipment and antennas are used. W5FAG, 
Albuquerque, N. Mex., is making nightly tests with 
W6WSQ, W6NLZ, and W7LEE at 2200 MST. Hub has a 
low-noise converter and a selective i.f. system. His antenna 



2-METER STANDINGS 



States 
WIRFU. 
WIHDQ. 
WICCH. 
WIIZY. . 
WIIEO.. 
WIUIZ.. 
WIAZK. 
WIMNF. 
WIBCN. 
WIKCS. 
WIDJK. 
WIMMN 



Call 
Areas 
19 7 
19 6 
17 5 
16 6 
16 5 
15 6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 



W20RI.. 
W2UK. . 
W2NLY . 
W2AZL.. 
W2QED. 
W2BLV. 
W20PQ . 
W2DWJ . 
W2AOC . 
W2UTH. 
W2PAU . 
W2PCQ . 
W2LHI.. 
W2CFT. 
W2DFV. 
W"2AMJ . 
W2QNZ. 
W2BRV . 



W3RUE . 
\V3NKM . 
W3IBH.. 
W3BNC. 
W3FPH . 
W3TDF. 
W3KWL. 
W3LNA . 
W3TDF . 
W3GKP. 



.13 
.10 

.23 
.23 
.23 
.21 
.21 
.19 
.19 
.17 
.17 
.16 
.16 
.16 
.16 
.15 
.15 
.15 
.14 
.14 



.26 8 
.22 7 
.20 8 



W4HHK. 

W4AO... . 

W4PCT . . 

W4JFV.. 

W4MKJ. 

W4UMF. 

W40XC . 

W4JHC.. 

W4WCB. 

W4TCR . 

W4LTBY. 

W4IKZ.. 

W4JFU . . 

W4ZBU.. 

W4UDQ. 

W4DWU 

W4TLA . . 



W^SRCI 21 

W5JTI 19 

W5QNL 10 

W5CVW....10 

W5AJG 10 

W5MWW... 9 

W5ML 9 

W5ABN. ... 9 
W5ERD. ... 8 

W5VX 7 

W5V^" 7 

W5FEK .... 7 
W50NS 7 

W6ZL 3 



MUes 
1150 
1020 
670 
750 
475 
680 
650 
600 
650 
540 
520 
520 

1000 
1075 
1050 
1050 
1020 
910 

632 
600 
880 
740 
650 
550 
525 

550 
400 
590 

950 
660 
570 
750 

720 
720 
720 
570 
800 

1020 
950 

830 
665 
600 
500 
720 
740 
720 
435 
720 
720 
800 
850 
625 
850 

925 
1000 
1400 
1180 
1260 
570 
700 
780 
570 

1200 
580 
950 



Call 
States Areas Miles 
W6WSQ .... 3 3 1390 

W6BAZ 3 

W6NLZ 3 

W6MMU. . . 2 

W6GC'G 2 

W6QAC". ... 2 
W6EXH. ... 2 



320 
360 
240 
210 
200 
193 



W7VMP. ... 4 

W7JIT 3 

W7LEE 3 

W7YZU .... 3 

W7JUO 2 

W7RAP. ... 2 



W8BFQ 29 8 

W8WXV,...28 8 

W8WJC 25 8 

W8RMH....22 8 

W8DX 22 7 

W8WRN....20 8 

W8BAX....20 8 

W8JWV 18 8 

W8EP 18 7 

W8RVVW. .17 7 

W8WSE....16 7 

W8SRW 16 7 



W9EHX 23 7 

W9FVJ 22 8 

W9EQC .... 22 8 

W9KLR....21 7 

W9BPV 20 7 

W9UrH 20 7 

W9KPS .... 19 7 

■W^9MrD. ,. .19 7 

W9REM....19 6 

W9LF 19 - 

W9ALU....18 7 

W9JGA 17 6 

W9WOK....17 6 

W9ZHL 17 6 

W9MBI 16 7 

W9BOV 15 6 

W9LEE 15 6 

W9DSP 15 6 

W9JNZ 15 6 

W9DDG....14 6 

W9FAN....14 7 

W9QKM .... 14 6 

W9GAB .... 14 6 

W9U1A 12 7 

W9ZAD. . . .11 5 

W9GTA....11 5 

W9JBF 10 5 



W0EMS....27 8 

W0IHD 24 7 

W0GUD 22 7 

W0ONQ. . . .17 6 

W0INI 14 6 

W0OAC .... 14 5 

W0TJF 13 4 

W0ZJB 12 7 

W0WGZ 11 5 



t 



VE3AIB. . 

VE3DIR.. 

VE3BQN. 

VE3DER. 

VE3BPB.. 

VE2AOK . . .12 

VE3AQG ...11 

VEIQY 11 

VE7FJ 2 



20 8 



18 

.14 7 

.13 7 

12 6 

5 

7 

4 

1 



417 
247 
240 
240 
140 
165 

850 
1200 
775 
690 
675 
670 
685 
650 
800 
630 
830 
700 

725 
850 
820 
690 
1000 
750 
660 
640 



800 
720 
600 

660 

780 
760 
560 
700 
680 
620 
570 
540 
700 
540 
760 

1175 
870 
1065 
1090 
830 
725 

1097 
760 

890 
790 
790 
800 
715 
550 
800 
900 
365 



is a 16-element array, but a 64-element job is nearing 
completion, as is a 1-kw. final stage. Activity and equipment 
on 432 Mc. are improving, also. W5s NSJ EDK FJE and 
FAG all have crystal-controlled gear and low-noise con- 
verters on that band, too. 

W5VWU, formerly of Albuciuerciue, has moved to Florida, 
taking with him a 1-kw. final and all the other gear needed 
to do outstanding work on 144 Mc. We may get that Florida 
activity yet — if John doesn't let that climate get him down 
too soon. Another prospect for 2-meter DX tests: W7LHL, 
Seattle, Wash., is making a winter project of the construc- 
tion of a high-powered final stage and a big horizontal beam. 

As 2-meter activity becomes more universal around the 
country, a closer tie-in between v.h.f. men and the ARRL 
field organization miglit well be made a major objective 
of SCMs and other ARRL oflficials. One way that this aim 
can be served is to arrange for more fre<iuent and widespread 
transmission of ARRL Official Bulletins on the v.h.f. bands. 
W9USI, Wilmette, 111., transmits bulletins on 144 Mc. as 
regularly as possible at 1930 CST nightly. He runs through 
(Continued on page 144) 



56 



QST for 




^^Y 



CONDUCTED BY ROD NEWKIRK,* W9BRD/9 



Who: 

Well, the first half of the 21st ARRL Inter- 
national DX Competition now is history'. How're 
you doing? Hah, if you think you goofed, here 
follow some early and tragic DX Test flashes 
from around the country. For your 1955 Ail- 
American All-Call- Area All-Star DX Test line-up, 
Jeeves nominates: 

Wl — , Orson A. Roundalot, whose imagination was work- 
ing so well that every number he lieard was meant for him. 
So far, best score he ever (tliought he) made. 

W$ — , Zeke N. Peck, an expert touch-typist, who kept 
his entire log on a mill but didn't notice the ribbon break 
during the first hour. 

W3 — , Watkins D. Mallcrhy, who spent the whole first 
Test week end tearing apart his factory-built k\v. Then 
found it had stopped working because the XYL had kicked 
out the wall plug while dusting. 

W4 — , Warren N. Beelup, whose beam rotator froze in 
the southeast quadrant as the Test began. Came out of the 
first week end with 638 KP4s. 

W5 — , Hugh R. Buggybud, w ho got panicky and signed 
W4 — /5 instead of W5 — /4. Must work his 293 contacts 
all over again to correct the mistake. 

W6 — , Don B. Sophani, who ran out of logsheets and 
scrap paper early in the Test. Used his tool-chest stock of 
sandpaper as an emergency measure and wore out 35 ball- 
point pens. 

W7 — , Wayne E. Wether, who didn't get out worth a 
dern after he complained bitterly to the pow-er company 
about an annoying power leak. They licked it by dropping 
his lino level to 37 volts. 

W8 — , Willie Everbreaihe, who sought to cash in on 
1.8-Mc. multipliers and rushed out to erect a long-wire with 
a spool of No. 8 Copperweld. Got it unwound, all right, 
but it sprang back into a roll from whicli he was finally 
extricated eighteen hours later. 

W9 — , Otis S. Terrybcll, wlio invited 147 friends and 
neighbors over on the week end preceding the Test, tliereby 
assuring subsequent peace and quiet for an all-out effort. 
As the party guests arrived, found he had misread his cal- 
endar — that was the Test week end. 

W0 — , Preltywcll Schott, who swapped his smooth triple- 
conversion superhet for a nifty 5-element rotary in the 
interests of a higher score this year. Sat down to make a 
killing as the Test began, then committed suicide; no 
receiver. 

Our K, VE and VO friends were having their 
problems, too, but the foregoing brief grief 
accounts should suffice. No one need despair, 
though, for the last portion of the Test is still to 
come. Plenty of time to boost that tally — good 
fishin' ! 

What: 

Or should we have said good fission? That's just about 
what it takes to crack through the Test pile-ups around 
some of those gaudy numbers leaking through. We'll save 
a line or two this month by being a bit arbitrary, using 
Greenwich Time exclusively. And so to press . . . 

Twenty 'phone, first off. W9RBI caught up with CR7CF 
(14,105) 19, GC6FQ (157) 15, HC8GI (159) 23 on Gala- 

*New Mailing Address: Effective immediately, please 
mail all reports of DX activity to DX Editor Newkirk's 
new address: 4128 North Tripp Ave., Chicago 41, Illinois. 



pagos, HK0AI (205) 16 of San Andres, MIB (114) 15, 
VQ8AR (146) 18, VS2DQ (195) 14 and 3V8BP (158) 16-17 

EL9A (325) 21, ET3Q (325) 17, MD5FA (185) 9 

of Suez, MP4KAC (18.5) 14 and ZD3BFC (11.5) 21 hooked 

up with CN8IE W9WHM collected EA8AI, 

KA0IJ (285) 22, TF.5SV (110) 16, VQs 4RF 5EK (150) 21 
and a ZD3. FB8BL (91) 21 and ZD2DCP (140) 21 were 
gottaways ._._._ That Iwo item, KAs 3RR and 8SC 
worked \V6UED, while \V4BYJ settled for SP2AA and an 
HK0 ._._._ SWL S. Tonsi, Wisconsin, lieard the boys 
grappling for ET2US (190), FM7WN (160) 18, KAs 2IM 
(140),8FC(198),OQ.5sEC(125),FO(100),VPs2KI\I (162) 

17-18, 7NG (200), VQ2DT (141) and SA4TL (1.30) 

••200" DX Club .sleuths tracked dowTi AGs 3PT (190) 16, 
4LM (270), 4NC (103) 12, CR8AB (170) 18, LZIKAA (128) 
14, MP4QAH (100) 13-14, 0Y2A (142), UB5KBE (100- 
150), VKIPG (132) 15, VP8AQ (118) 0, VU2AK (160) 14, 
YI2AM (110) 14, YJIAA due back on soon, ZC3AC (163) 
10-14, ZDs 2RWW (198) 19-20, 9AB (170) 23, 9AC (130) 
20, ZSs 2MI (90-110) of Marion Isle, and 81 (.345) 17-18 
._._._ Northern and Southern California DX Clubs 
cornered CR6s AT (121) 21, BX (143) 20-21, FB8BC (170) 
5, FY7s YE (220-280) 17, YZ (12.5-185), GC2FZC (200) 
16, HA5KBA (1.57) 15, KB6AQ (230) 19, SVIAZ (98) 17 of 
Crete, VKIDY (94) 8, VQSCB (100) 15 of the Chagos, VSs 
IFS (199) 14, 4HK (.30-200) 10, 5KU (25) 12-16 and 
ZD6BX (68) 17 We-st Gulf DX Club's DX Bulle- 
tin calls attention to 14-Mc. radiotelephones CN2AD (220) 
9, CRs 6AC 22, 6CK (155) 21, 7AU (190) 21, 7CZ (139) 21, 
SAC 8SA (,53), 10AA, DU7SV (94) 7, EAs 9BC (129) 14-15, 
9DF (187) 19 of Rio de Oro, 0AC (195) 9, EL2X (337) 18, 
FB8s BB (143) 22, BN (109-197) 19, BP (115-195) 18, XX, 
FF8BB (146), FL8AI (1.50) 18, FQ8AK (125) 21. FY7YA, 
HBIMX/HE (101) 15, HZ.s lAB (150) 14, 2AEH (105) 15. 
KTIWX (175) 14, MP4s BBL (70) 14-15, QAD 16-18, 
OKIMB (109-348) 1.5-20, PXIYR (130) 21, SP9s KAB 
(195) 15, KAD (138) 16, UBSKAB (132) 13, BKs lAC 
(145) 8, 9RH (118-14,5) 5-7, VPs IGG (169) 2, 2DA (106) 
22, 2KM (140) 17-18. 3YG (135) 22-23, 5AE (147) 19 of 
Turks, 8A0 (158) 5, VQs 3RJB (142) 21, 6LQ (119) 21. 
8AL (115) 18. imminent VQ9\ZK, VRs 4AE (180) 8, 3A, 
VS4BG 14, VU2AL, YN4CB (186) 22-23, YUls AD (140) 
14-15. GM (10.5) 16, ZD8AA. ZM6AT (160), ZSs 3An 
(130) 15, 7C (167) 21. 7D (125) 19-20, 9G (16.5), 3V8BL 




March 1955 



57 





One of Portugal's outstanding DX enthusiasts, 
CTICB runs 250 watts to the VFO rig at left, likes his 
S-40 inhaler and loads up a 20-meter half-wave skywire. 
A picture of the Portuguese Indian station of CR8AB, 
CTlCB's son, appeared last month. 

(107-130) 8-15, 4S7s WA (208), YL (155) 14 and 4X4GB 

(100) 17 Newark News Radio Club 20-meter A3 

loggings: AP20, CN2AB, CRs 4AG 4AL 6AG, CTs 2AG 
3AN, DUIAL, EASs AV AW, ET2AB, FF8AY, FM7WQ, 
F08AD, GD3s ENK IRQ, HRls CB BG, HVICM (200) 
13, ITIBXX, JA4BB, KAs by the dozens, KGs 4A0 4AR 
6SB, KR6s AF HJ, KV4BB, LXIWA, OQs 5CX 5FL 5FN 
0DZ, PJ2s AB AF AI AK, ST2NW, TA2EFA, TG9MB, 
Y02KAB, VPs 2DC 2GW 3HAG 7NV, VQs 2FU 3ES 4AQ 
4ERR 4EZ, VSs IFL 2BQ, ZD4BR, ZEs 2KE 6JI, ZS3P, 
4X4DK 5As ITT 2TZ 3TF 4TJ 4TL 4TR 4TY 4TZ and 
9S4AD. 

Twenty c.w. next, and the slot's a-jumpin'. ET3S (65) 
16-17, VKlAG's lOO-watter (45) 14-15, VP8AQ (80) 1-2, 
VQ6LQ (60) 20, ZAIBB (50) 18, ZD2DCP (85) 21-22 and 

enigmatic UB5KBE (70) 15 answered W8YIN 

W9AVJ (W9GVZ) got that UB5 as weU as EA8AX (83) 
21, ET3GB (63), FG7XB (79) 18, JAs lACA ICC ITD 
2AN 3AF 3BN 3DM 4AF 6AD 6AO 6FB 6HK 7DK 8AQ, 
KA3AC (59), KG6AAL (60), VKIEG (44) 14 of Antarctica 
and ZBICH (52) 16. AH those JAs hovered between 14,040 

and 14,070 kc. OY2Z (30) 13, SVIAZ (105) 16, 

VP8BD (95) 14 and ZD6BX (83) 20-21 came back to 

W9RBI CN8IE picked off AP2K (70) 9, F9QV/FC 

(70) 8, TF3MB (70) 12, UB5KAB (70) 10 and VP8AO 

(50) 20 At K2BZT we find EL5B (37) 17, ET3LF 

(19) 18, JAICR (37) 22, KM6AX (75) 22, OQ5s CP (22) 
19, ER (30) 18, VQ2JN (62) 18, YNIPM (10) 19, a ZAl, 

ZD4BQ (73) 22 and ZE3J0 (56) 18 WISSZ 

raised CN8EL (75) 13, FP8AP (71) 16-19, GD3UB (40) 

15, PJ2CK (95) 12, SP2KAC 13 and ZB2A (25) 18-20 
._._._ XG6A, a cutie giving QTH as Gulf of Mexico's 
Guanto Island, regaled many of the gang around 14,013 kc. 
._._._ WIOJR went at it hammer and tong, landing 
stuff like CR7s AD (75) 20, AF (55) 19, MB (22) 17, CT3AB 
(90) 20, EAs 8BM (22) 18, 9AP (20) 18-19, an ET3, an 
FP8, FM7WP (25) 13, HP2TP (95) 16, OQ5LL (60) 21, 
SP3PK (10) 15, an Antarctica VKl, VQs 3FN (35) 18, 
4FG (25) 18, 4FK (15) 20, ZEs 3JL (19) 18, 3JP (63) 20, 
4JE (65) 19, ZS3HX (52) 17 and 9S4BS (38) 17. HC4MK 
(90) 23 and HK4BD also came back but weirdies WAIAB 
and CU3YY escaped Vic's net ._._._ The cream of 
W4TFB's bumper 14-Mc. c.w. crop are DU7SV 23, EA9DF 
23, GC2FZC (65) 15-16, HI8WA 22, an HK0, IIBLF (42) 
15-16 of Trieste, JAs lAQ 0, SAB 23, LZ1KAB21, OD5LC 
18, ST2AC (37) 19-21, VQ2AS (65) 21, VR2BZ (56-70), 
Y03GY 18 and ZC4IP 16. Don's ill luck included EA8AX 
(50) 21, FM7WD, MP4QAIi (40-72) 15, OX3UD (40) 17, 

SV0WY, a VQ6 and ZS7D (28) 19-20 W6QPM 

reached 126 by way of FQ8AX, FY7YE (35) 13, GD3IBQ 
(70) 16, HA5KBA (85) 13-14, I5SV (47) 16, OY4XX (30) 

16, VQ4RF and ZE5JJ ET3Q (50) 20, Turks' 

VP5AEand4X4DK (100) 15 enraptured W9KXK 

W4YZC made off with CR6AI (21) 18, EL2X, KA2CR, 
PJ2AJ and a ZD6 thanks to his new 3-el. whirler ._._._ 
Two fixed elements are enough for W3UXX to bag CR7LU 
(30) 20, a GD3, HR2AD, KG4AN, ST2NG, TI2RI, V02IM , 

ZE3.IP (14) 9, ZS3K and SAITC (46) 19 W2WZ 

fancied FQ8AG (23) 21, LZIKAA (41) 13-14, MP4s BBE 



Madagascar now sprouts hams by the dozens where 
formerly they were rarities. FB8BC often can he found 
on 15, 20 and 40 meters running 25 watts of 'phone to a 
VFO-807 ensemble. His favorite time for W/K -hunting 
is 1700-1900 GMT. (Photo via W9RBI and ZS6BW) 

(77) 13, BBL (75) 13-14, VU2AL (55) 13 and 4S7LB (47) 

14 JAs ISR 3CS 7AD 8BL 0AA (not Two), KAs 

2CG 2GC 8SE and KX6NA (134) hit the spot with W7PUA 
._._._ A DXamination of doings here and there, at 
WIWAI: EL2P (45) 13, an ET3, FM7WM. W2GVZ: 
a DU7, a ZAl. W3WPG: CN8FQ. W6BIL: an ST2, a 
ZB2. W6S0F: F08AC, JA3AB, KA2USA. BS 4-5, TI2BX. 
W7RVD: JAs INI IXR 2LC 3BK 5CP 8AA 0BR, that 
KD6AT, KR6s KS OY, OQSPU (25) 20. W8DLZ: one 
FG7XE (20), OD5LJ (25) 14-15, ZE6JF (23), ZS7D (27) 
19-20. W0PWN: HRIJZ. W0VFM: FAs 8RJ (28) 14-15. 

9VN (76) 20, VP3VN (54) 14 CE0AD (22). 

CR5JB (40), HH3DL (36), HRIMC (32), LU "Z" boys 
2ZC (28), 7ZM (40), 7ZO (82), TA3US (38) and VP8AZ 

(20) answered W4ZAE. AP2R shpped Mick's hook 

IIBNU/Trieste (35) 16, SP9KAD (40) 15 and ZBIJRK 
(17) 20 are among the many goodies spotted by San Diego 

DX Club stalkers SCDXC's Bulletin and 

NCDXC's DXer specify 14-Mc. code catches EAs 9AR 
(55) 18, 0AB (12) 9, ET3AB (53) 15, FB8s BC (65) 18, BK 
(90) 0, XX (40) 13, ZZ (40) 15, GC8N0 (53) 17, HE9LAA 
(64) 16, HZls AB (94) 15-16, HZ (53) 16-17, KP6AK, 
LXIAC (31) 15, LZ1K:SP (73) 15-16, MIL (72) 15-16, 
OQ0DZ (28) 18, VKIPG (65) 8, VQ8CB (50) 19, VSs 
4HK (35-160), 5KU (24-60) 20, ZBls BF (22), BU (65) 
15-16, CO (17) 15, ZD6RD (52) 17. ZSs 2MI (150) of 

Marion, 3B 20 and 9S4AX (50) 15 WGDXC's 

DX Bulletin spothghts CRs SAD (25) 20, 6CU (1) 21, 
8SA (53), CS3AC (90) 16, CT2AF (58) 22, FB8s BL (83) 
20, BR (25) 17-19, FE8AE, FK8s AO (88) 21, AP (30) 14, 
F08s AB (80) 4, AK (65) 4, FR7ZA (18) 18, HA5s KBA 
(85) 13-14, KBN (68) 14, HVIOR, HZ2AEH, KC6UZ (80) 
22, KJ6AZ (93) 23-0, KH60R/KM6, LZIKPZ (49) 14, 
OD5AX (69) 14, OQ5HI (60) 18, OYs 2Z (53) 13-23, 
3GA (81) 15, SP3s AK (29) 14, AN (50) 14, PK (41) 15-16, 
SV7AZ (80) 13, UAIDH (62) 14-15, VQs 2DR (17) 19-20, 
2GW (40), 2W (90) 22, 21, 3BM (78) 19, 5EK (69) 19, 
VR2CG (52) 16, VU2EJ (52) 14, YI2AM (60) 14, Y03RD 
(12-28) 15, ZBIAU(IO) 13, ZC5SG (50), ZEs4JE (3) 18-19, 
5JE (62) 19, ZP9AY (50) 13, 3V8AN (25-45) 13 and hopeful 
ZD8AA of Ascension. 

Forty is sporty, especially from the c.w. angle. K6EC 
put the bite on CN8GB (15) 22, CR9AF (22) 16, KG4AE 
(12) 2, KR6KS (17), VP8BD (24) 2 and VS6DD (15) 8. 
Ev also encountered characters AIIBC (21), JK20R (29) 

and KD6AT EA8BF (40), ET2FQ (18), FG7XB 

(23) 12, LZIKAB (25), TG9MB (22), VP8A0 (12) and 

YSIO (8) contacted, or were heard by, W4ZAE . _ 

A 7-Mc. QSL from VK5LF/MM, QTH off the South 
AustraUan coast, confirmed that he used a 5-watt 25L6 

rig when working W20BX W4TFB worked 

CN8GB6, FA8s DA 6. RJO,ZZ 7, IIBNU/Trieste 3, KG6GX 
10, LU "Z" brethren IZT 2ZC 2ZI 4ZB 8Z0 8ZS 9ZM 

and a healthy helping of VP8s CRs 4AL (10) 3, 

7CD (6) 4, 7CI (27) 3, EL2s C (12) 22. X (12) 22, HK0AI 
(7) 4, LZIKSI (18) 8, TF5TP (10) 0, TG9LM (7) 0, 
VQ4EZ (13) 11, ZC4PB (18) 22, ZS7D (13) 21 and 3V8ES 
(11) 21 swapped 73 with W4YHD. Jim also heard, or 
heard about, 7-Mc. possibilities UA2AC, VQ4BNU, VS6CG 



58 



QST for 



(29), VK9RH of Norfolk, ZAs IKAB 4KBA (9) and 4S7NG 

(25) W7JHJ did fine with JZ0DN (12) on Biak 

Isle, KC6CG (30) , KG6IG of the Volcanoes (25) and VK9AU 
(40). UA0S KFA and KJA (28) wouldn't come back 
._._._ \VN3Z0G managed nice NoWce-style DX in 
snagging CN8MM (190) 0. Any other Novices working 

Africa on 40? CE3DZ, HH2LR, TF3MB, JAs 

lAFF I KM 2LC 3JA 3LK 5AA and many Europeans 

QSOd \V(JRZS's813 40-meter frolicking hither and 

yon, at WIWAI: HCILE (25) 12. KSALA: CT3AB, 
EA6AE, TF3AB, VP7XG, a Trieste II. WSIVPG: EA9DF, 
HA5KBA, OE5AH, ST2AR. W4WR Y: an FG7. W4 YZC: 
EA0AC, HRIJZ (20) 3-4 W6CAY: DU7SV (20) 9, an 
HK0, OKIMB. W7UKA: a. DU, JAs lEA (6), 2BL (2), 

3JA(6) 7-Mc.c.w.clubsurveillance,by WGDXC: 

OX3AY (28) 2-3, ZS3HX (20) 4. SCDXC: FB8ZZ (20) 7, 
VKls EG (20) 7 and DY (20) 7. 

Forty 'phone, courtesy NNRC digging: CR6BC, CT2AG, 
EA6BK, HI6TC, HRIFM, JAls AEA AGU. KG6GX, 
KJ6AZ, TG9s LR VS, VK9s FM OK RC R.M, VPs IRS 
2GW and VS2CP. Definitely a band that separates the men 
from the boys! 

Eighty c.w. came into its own of late and no mistake. 
Though spotty at times, the north Atlantic path treated 
the whole U. S. A. to Europeans by the logfuls. FA8DA 
(10), KL7s APZ (9), AVVB (10), FAJ (8), KM6AX (.32), 
OKs IDE (9) and 2KSV (9) fell prey to W9GVZ at W9AVJ. 
G2PU around 3800 kc. had a stand-out 'phone signal 

The better items at K2BZT include CT2BO 

(10) 1, HA5KBA (3) 5, LA2HE (10) 6, OE2JG (7) 4, OKs 
1MB IKTVV 3AL and 9S4AX (3) 1. Hayden abo riddled 
five Swedes, eight Germans and 14 Britons ._._._ 
EL2X made the long hop into the ledger of \V7JLU on 
3510 kc. VK5K0 also nabbed the Oregonian ._._._ 
W4YZC captured GD3UB, OKls KBW KTI, YV5BJ, 

many Gs and a 9S4 A CT2, OZ4X and TI2BX 

(6) 1 wiU QSL WIVVAI \V9UDK bagged an 

EL, KL7PI, OX3AY and many Europeans with his 12-foot- 
high window. George also was among the unlucky ones to 
catch the phoney 3.5-Mc. FG7XB ._._._ Jeeves' recent 
misinterpretation of W2ES0's report, switching Gene's 
heard and worked items, was not in the nature of a base 
canard. OE3SE was a new number on 3.5 Mc. for W2ESO 

W2QHH made off with HBIMX/HE, a KM6 

and ZKIBG, all lovely 80-meter munchings ._._._ 
The DA' Bulletin adds EA9AP (14) 0, FA9VN (13) 6, 
HBIHQ/HE (20) 7, ZS3K (12) 5 and 4X4GB (1) 2 to the 
3..5-Mc. stew. 

Fifteen 'phone continues its able role as a substitute 
for old friend ten during the latter's m.u.f. vacation. W9RBI 
took a liking to 21 Mc. after sessions with FB8BC (220) 
18, KW6BB (270) 22-23, VQ2FU (220) 18, YUIGM (255) 
17, ZBIAUV (170) 19, ZSs 7C (1.50) 17, 91 (240) 16 and 
4X4DX (15). Ross adWses that VPSAE of Turks has rocks 

on 21,140, -180, -200, -220 and -310 kc, A3 

WICTW has 61 countries on 15-meter c.w. but still seeks 
his first Asian QSO in 30 years. The ARRL DX Test 
now in progress ought to do it! ._._._ KA2KC and 
KJ6AZ bounced back to W6UED; KC6AA and TI2BX 
likewise to W6SGF, all A3 \V6ZZ made it 67 on 



CAUTION 

Under this country's treaty obligations and on 
formal notice received from other nations, FCC- 
licensed amateurs are warned to engage in no com- 
munications with stations in the countries listed 
below. This is in accordance with FCC Public Notice 
of December 21, 1950 (p. 23, Feb., 1951 QST), and 
as since revised. 

French Indo-China (Cambodia, Laos and Viet- 
Nam), Republic of Indonesia, Iran, Korea, Thailand. 

Prefixes to be avoided: FI8-XW8-3W8, PK 
(Netherlands territories excepted), EP-EQ, HL 
and HS. 



21 Mc. via ZM6AR. Miles also grabbed KA2KS, KV4BD, 

VP6GT, some ZLs and ZS3AB From \V8YIN 

we hear of CR6BH (225) 18-19, V02A\V (165) 20 and 

ZD6BX (50) 19 . NNRC's most recent roster of 

15-meter 'phones: CN8s MF MM, DU7SV, ELs 2X lOA, 
FA3JY, OE13USA, 0Q.5s BI GU, VP3YG, VQs 2ST 
3CB 4BF 5CJ, ZC4JA. ZD9AD, ZE2JK, ZSs 3AB 3BC 

7G and 4X4BG . WGDXC found FY7YC (40) 

19-20 and ZE.5.IJ (30) 20 using c.w. 

One-sixty c.w. grudgingly gave ground under persistent 
onslaughts. WIBB and W9PNE reached 28 and 17 coun- 
tries worked on Low Band, respectively. Several hands 
were out after their last continents for 1.8-Mc. VVACs but 
the going was rough. This DX is being worked or heard 
by W/K/VE/VO participants: G2s AJ HX PL, G3s ABM 
AJZ BKF BRU ERN EHV GGN GIG HDZ HIS HKQ 
HRW IGT JDK JED JEQ JJZ JOJ JVL PL" QD, G5s 
JU RI VB, G6s G.M LB PD, GD3FBS, GI3s HCG IVJ, 
GMs 2BUD 3HRZ, GW2IN0, EI9J, HB9C.M, KP4s CC 
DV KD, KV4s AA BB, LU3EL, OKls III KTI, TI2BX, 

VP7s NG NM, irVSDE, ZC4GF and ZL3RB 

\V9PNE writes: "Very anxious for Asian QSOs. DX must 
stay below 1835 kc. to be readable here. Best frequencies 
are 1826 to 1831 kc, and 1870 to 1875 for those who can 
operate outside the L'. S. A. band." ._._._ By next 
month's deadline the dust should be settling after comple- 
tion of both the 160-meter Transatlantic Tests and the 
21st ARRL International DX Competition. Scribes WIBB, 
W3RGQ and W9PNE undoubtedly will fill us in on further 
1.8-Mc. developments. Until then we'd better make the 
most of what's left of this sunspot minimum and squeeze 
the last DX drops out of old 160. Good luck! 

Where: 

Guadeloupe QSL info courtesy W4LVV: Cards should 
be sent directly to FG7XA and FG7XB. If you desire your 
return QSL to arrive direct, send a stamped self-addressed 
envelope to W4LVV at Box 104, Miami; othermse they'll 
reach you Wa bureaus ._._._ W4LVV also notifies that 
he's closing out his duties as VP5BF (Caicos) QSL secretarj-. 
The VP5 now is beheved to be Jamaica-stationed. Over 



W0YDZ, who made his 
"How's" photographic de- 
but last month, has this ex- 
otic W0YDZ/KG6 layout 
perking on Guam. A 5-ele- 
ment 14-Mc. rotary appears 
at left; the lethal-looking 
object at right is a 10-element 
lO-meter job. 




March 1955 



59 



4000 VP5BF Caicos cards have been distributed; if you 
still have one coming, ship that stamped self-addressed 

envelope to W4LVV VP5AE, of Grand Turks, 

desires similarly-prepared envelopes from those who \s'ish 
direct QSLs: Maj. D. E. Evelyn, PAA, Grand Turks Island 
via Patrick AFB, Fla. Otherwise, QSL %-ia WSLMO and 
await your confirmation via the bureau route ._._._ 
"Still awaiting permanent quarters so I haven't yet un- 
packed. Expect to be settled shortly and hope to be on the 
air thereafter." So writes W4VE, ex-KA9AA-KR6AA, who 
expects QSL inquiries at the address to foUow — full QSO 

data necessary Wis ARR CTW MX OJR SSZ 

UED WAI WPO ZDP, \V2s OLU VVZ, K2BZT, \V4s TFB 
YHD YZC, \V6s SGF UED ZZ, K6EC. W7JLU, W8YIN, 
W9s AVJ CFT EU GVZ RBI RTY, CN8IE, PJ2CJ, 
NCDXC, NNRC, OVSV, SCDXC and 200-DXC got the 
goods on : 

ex-ARlWW (QSL to W3VLG) CN8EB (QSL 

via \V3WDI) CN8HX, F. Murray, WIIRE, 29 

Ferry St., Boston, Mass. _ . . . _ CR6CW, Box 1400, Lu- 
bango, Angola _..._ CR7MS, Box 12, Quelimane, 
Mozambique _ . . . _ ex-DL4WK, Capt. M. S. Arbogast, 
K6DOM/7, Hq. 9470 Tech Unit, AEPG, Ft. Huachaca, 
Ariz. _. . ._ ex-DL4YK, SFC E. F. Diehl, jr., 9470 Tech 

Unit, Det. 1, AEPG, Ft. Huachaca, Ariz . . _ EA8BM 

(QSL \-ia URE) _ . . . _ EL2C (QSL via WIJOJ) _ . . ._ 

ex-EPlAL (QSL to W3VLG) ET3LF, Box 114, 

Addis Ababa, Ethopia . _ ET3Q, Box 1636, Addis 

Ababa, Ethiopia F7EH (QSL to VVISWX) 

GC6FQ, Col. P. Northey, ex-G6FQ, Pendeen, Mont 
Felard, Jersey, C.I., U.K. _ . . . _ HC4MK, Box 2327, 
Quito, Ecuador _ . . . _ HK4BD, Box 2263, Medellin, 
Colombia _ . . . _ HPIAW, Box 586, Panama, Rep. of 
Panama _ . . . _ HZ2AEH, APO 616, New York, N. Y. 

JZ0DN (QSL to PA0DN) KA2GC, SFC 

G. I. Clineman, Sig. Opns. Co., 8060 AU, APO 343, San 
Francisco, Calif. _ . . . _ KA2KC, L. Cox, Box 14, Na\-y 

830, FPO, San Francisco, CaUf. KA2RR, Staff 

USN COMSTS W. Pac. Area, Navy 3923, Box 73, FPO, 

San Francisco, Calif. . _ KA2WL, NAF, Na^•y 875, 

FPO, San Francisco, Calif. ex-KA9AA-KR6AA, 

Co. F. Wester velt, 54th Med. Gp., Ft. Benning, Ga . . _ 

KL7BHL, PFC C. Wratchford, 333 C/R Co., APO 949, 
Seattle, Wash. _ . . . _ KL7BNU, Western Electric Co. 

Unit, APO 722, Seattle, Wash KR60Y (QSL via 

W7UMH) ex-KW6BB (QSL to W6UMP) 

KZ5DK, Box 600, Balboa Hts., C. Z. _ . . . _ KZ5MN, 



Box 415, Amador, C. Z . . _ OE6JR, J. Rauschl, Graz, 

Austria _ . . . _ OE6YR, Ursula Rauschl, Graz, Austria 
OKIHI, J. Hyska, Cechova 31, Praha XIX, Czecho- 
slovakia _ . . ._ OQ5HI, Box 6.34, Elisabethville, Belgian 
Congo SVIAZ, Box 15, Candia, Crete 




Not far removed distances Im-, but rare L\ reason of 
its small ham population, is Guadeloupe, I'.Vi'.I. A 
burst of activity on the part of Antoine Noel, FG7XB, 
however, has put this country in the logs of many 
happy amateurs recently. Look closely at the neat set- 
up above and you'll see Antoine's 10-watt transmitter — 
smaller than the bug — in front of the receiver. To the 
delight of U. S. A. DXers, FG7XB is currently plugging 
away at his WAS on 20- and 40-meter c.w. {Photo via 
Salt Creek Radio Club, W9A VJ) 




Wherever there's a far-flung expeditionary outpost 
you'll invariably find ham radio. Together, these two 
QSLs are a unique collector's item, both stations having 
been active at the same time from opposite polar ice 
caps. Nope, they didn't QSO. 

UB5KBE, P.O. Box 352, Odessa, Ukraine, U. S. S. R. 

VPIRS, R. Squires, 1144 Pick-stock St., Behze, Br. 

Honduras VP5HQ (ex-MDlA), Caribbean Sig. 

Sqdn., Uppark Camp, Kingston, Jamaica _... _ VP5LE 

(QSL via VPoAD) VP7NX (QSL via W6RRG) 

VP8BG (QSL via W5GEL) VP9CB, P. R. 

Gendreau, 1604 Materiel, APO 856, New York, N. Y. 

VQ3HJP, H. J. Powell, Mafia Island, Tanganyika 

W1VDR/KH6, C. J. Bro\vn, 3721 Radford Dr., 

Honolulu, T. H. XG6A (QSL via LMRE) 

ex-ZK2AA, W. Scarborough, 18 Norwich St., Auckland, 

N. Z ZS3AH, J. Swart, P. O., Okahandja, S. W. Afr. 

ZS3F, C. P. Stiemie, Posbus, P. O. Box 1113, Wind- 
hoek, S. W. Afr ZS3P, P. C. A. Ferreira, P. O. 

Box 586, Windhoek, S. W. Afr 4X4FW (QSL via 

lARC) e.x-5A2CE, L/Cpl. Baker, 9 Med. Wireless 

Tp., MELF 12, Middle East ex-5A2CH, 139 

Rectory Rd. Gp., Essex, England. 

Whence: 

Asia — JAICV raps out a DX column for Japan's Radio 
Ej-perimenter and regularly schedules K6DV. Kazu runs 
100 watts to a five-stage VFO-807s arrangement on 10 
through 40 meters, receiving with a homebrew 10-tuber 
._._._ British authorities continue attempts to obtain 
ex-AC4RF's release from a China mainland prison ._._._ 
WGDXC Asian ridbits: HZ2AEH gets around with a BC- 
610, 51 J and 3-element spinner. WIJRA is confident of 
obtaining a permit for hamming in Afghanistan. VU2JP 
does QSL chores for ACs 3PT 3SZ 4NC and has Sunday 
0500 GMT skeds with the latter. VSIGH (ex-GM3AV0) 
occasionally visits Labuan and Nicobar. EP3SS has hopes 
for early relaxation of Iranian ham radio prohibition 
._._._ KD6AT's bearing appears to be Korea; too bad. 

Africa — "I hope to go on a DXpedition to Ifni sometime 
in March provided I can obtain a \asa and license to operate 
there. At present I'm making up a schedule for submission 
to the Spanish consulate in application for license and \-isa. 
I hope to be there at least one week and will operate mostly 

20-meter 'phone." This from CN8IE (W0LRP) 

VQ4EI and ZD6BX chorus a few don'ts for all DX hunters: 
QRM from indiscriminate and ill-timed calling is an omni- 
present bugbear; only the rankest DX rookie should be 
caught calling a station before he hears its signals, unless it 
be on schedule. QSYing with final amplifier on is another 
frequent curse. Overlong transmissions are nuisances; let 
the rare-DX station set the pace and tone of QSO. Stepping 
on another fellow's final transmission is strictly for the boors; 
wait until you hear an SK from each end of a QSO before 



60 



QST for 



barging in, and if both ends aren't audible, be careful. 
Working DX with a nou-T9x signal is no accomplishment; 
you'll only be worked in self-defense ._._._ RSEA (East 
Africa) has discontinued its WEA (Worked East Africa) 
certificate award. They add. "We hope to issue a new certifi- 
cate with revised rules in the near future and will send fur- 
ther details wlien available." ._._._ Present active ZDGs 

include BX EF HJ HN JL and RD NCDXC and 

SCDXC Africanisms: ZD3BFC looks forward to two more 
years on 20 and 40, Al and A3. ZS5JY is about to put his 
rotary atop a 150-foot b.c. tower and rival ZSISW hoisted 
liis wide-spaced job to the llo-foot level. ZSs 7C 8E and 9H 
regularly are heard. 

Oceania — In WIA's monthly organ Amateur Radio we 
note that top Aussie DXers per call area are VKs 2NS 
with IM countries, 3BZ 224, 4IIR 210, 5FL 143, GRU 199, 

7LZ 110 and 9GW 1.00 ._ Yank hams interested in 

the NZART (New Zealand; WAP and WAZL awards can 
save time and postage by writing W0IUB. Roy will forward 
full details upon receipt of requests accompanying stamped 
self-addressed envelopes ._._._ SCDXC and NCDXC 
Oceanograms: F08AD QRTd in favor of European TV 
activities. VRGAC is preparing a rig for Pitcairn action. 
FIvSAL, just back from France, goes at it with p.p. 807s. 
Routine relief of Australian expeditionary outposts may see 
VKls DC and ZM replacing AC DJ and GA on Macciuarie; 
VKls AWI and RA may spell EG in Antarctica. Ex- 
MP4BBD still endeavors to crack the red tape wrapped 
around his future DU license on Luzon. 

Europe — This month sees the arrival of European 
DXcitenient. USKA (Switzerland) throws its annual 
Helvetia-22 ball from 1.500 GMT, March lOMi, to 1700, 
March 20th. All amateurs arc invited to participate, 'phone 
and/or c.w., on all bands from 3.5 through 30 Mc. Stations 
outside Switzerland will strive to work as many HB stations 
in as many Swiss cantons (states) as possible. "CQ HB" or 
"CQ Switzerland" is the key. Scoring is simple: 3 points per 
band-QSO, tliis total to be multiijlicd by the total number of 
band-cantons worked. The exchange is the usual RS or 
RST report followed by the contact number (001, 002, etc.). 
But it's a task to tell the players without this scorecard of 
canton abbreviations which will be appended to HBO or 
HBl call signs: AG, Argovie; AR, Appenzell; BE, Berne; 
BS, Basle; FR, Fribourg; GE, Geneva; GL, Claris; GR, 
Grisons; LU, Lucerne; NE, Neucliatel; NW, Unterwald; 
SG, .St. Gall; SH, Schaffhouse; SO, Solcure; SZ, SchwTz; 
TG, Thurgovie; TI, Tcssin; UR, Uri; VD, Vaud; VS, 
Valais; ZG, Zoug; and ZH, Zurich. T^ogs, a separate sheet 
for each band, may be sent to USKA Traffic Manager 
HB9CZ. Certificates of merit are to be awarded to the three 
liighest entries from each DXCC List country. And don't 
forget that USKA offers a classy 11-22 sheepskin to each 
amateur wlio can suljmit proof of contact with all of Switz- 
erland's 22 cantons. 'Tain't easy! ._._._ REF (France) 
sponsors an ojjportunity for amateurs throughout the world 
to further DUF award aspirations. Dates: radiotelephone, 
1200 GMT, March 5th, to 2400, March 6th; continuous 
wave, April lGth-17th, same hours. All amateur bands 
may be used and the exciiange is the same as that for the 
H-22 shindig. A "CQ REF" ought to set the ball a-rolhn'. 
Logs, scores and comments can be addressed to F8TM. 

REF, BP 4201, Paris RP, France DL40R may 

attempt some HVlORing about the time you read this 
._._._ URE's EA5 contingent threw an on-the-air QSO 
spree over tlie past three months which netted lucky parties 
interesting DFV (Dij.loma Fallas Valencia) certificate 
awards. The deal was held in conjunction with Junta Central 
Fallera, Valencia's recent "Festival of Fire" si)ectacular 
._._._ 0N4s LJ and QX, Antwerp area members of UBA 
(Belgium), call attention to the WOSA "Worked Only 
Stations in Antwerp" diploma now available world-wide. 
W/K/VE/VO aspirants must obtain QSLs from five 
QSOd Antwerp 0N4s, 'phone and/or c.w. For fuU details 
write 0N4QX . _ G3JOQ, radiop aboard British life- 
boat Aries on its transatlantic test cruise last summer, 
writes: "On behalf of the captain and crew of Aries I wish 
to thank hams for their kind and able assistance. The 
QSLs which they will receive will be 'collectors' pieces' for 
there will be only nine at the most for U. S. A. out of a total 
of 140." ._._._ W8SHW, who recently completed a tour 
of U. K. duty, desires to express thanks to the G gang for 
outstanding hospitaUty received. Maurice befriended over 
50 British amateurs and was a participant or interested 
observer in many of their organizational and operational 
undertakings ._._._ PJ2CJ points out that a few PJ- 



prefixed Netherlands calls were issued in error. PJ calls 
henceforth will be N.W.I, issues exclusively ._._._ 
PA0GER wants a tracer on 1952 SV0s WO and WW, also 
noting that SV0WM is ex-W9SGC. 

Hereabouts — FG7XA paid a recent personal visit to 
W4LVV and the two got together on the Guadeloupe QSL 
jMoblem. XA took back with him a BC-348Q inhaler to 
augment the 6V6-807 rig he uses, as well as antenna wire for 
himself and FG7XB. Both radiops are with PTP, the 
French version of CAA. W4LVV also supplied Andre with 
much miscellaneous gear plus some extra crystals to help the 

boys duck the pUe-ups . _ TI2BX's XYL has taken to 

hamming con gusto, assisting in keeping the Westlake in- 
stallation warm for a good part of each day. TI2BX works 
all bands, 160 through 15 meters, and one of their fortes is 
the accumulation of MM QSOs. The Westlakes picked off 
78 countries in less than eight months of casual DXing. 
A Viking II, an NC-183 and several beams are employed 

Two more states on 160 will give W2QHH WAS 

on six bands. A new Ranger rig and a higher skyhook are 
bound to help. Howy now has 111 countries collected on 
3.5 Mc. and has QSOd some 400 YLs 'twixt DX sprees 
._._._ WlCTW tells a story about the neophyte DXer 
who thought CN2s and CN8s were Chinese Novices! 

YNIPM is ex-W10EK-W4SXD and expects to 

remain in Nicaragua indefinitely. Paul has a c.c. 25-watter 
readily workable on twenty ._._._ W3UXX could use a 
hint or two regarding means of securing VS9BC's QSL 

. W4KRR dropped in on a January meeting of the 

San Diego DX Club held at K6EC's diggings . 

Old-school DXer W9FLH, now relaxing with a 40-watter 
while contemplating a better DX QTH, would like a tip 
toward up-to-date info on old friend prewar J2GX, father 

of the yagi . _ . The Salt Creek Amateur Radio Club 

gang at W9AVJ prepared for the 21st ARRL DX Test 
with a vengeance. Up went a 6-elementer on 10 meters, 108 
feet high; 5 elements on 15 meters, 100 feet up; and 5 more 

on 20, only 92 feet skyward . Big-sigger VV4ESK 

now is back in the DX badlands as W7ESK, according to 

SCDXC sources WGDXC has it that YN4CB has 

DXpeditionary eyes focused on the Great Corns; VP8AQ 
uncorked a batch of QSLs Statesward; and FP8AP sports a 
new 811s rig courtesy W0.\IVV. 



Deign to dig the new Chicago address of your 
conductor; we'll try to hang onto this one for a 
while. (It's a wonderful spot for Jeeves to con- 
tinue lii.- imliMji-loop antenna e.xperiments.) 




Ham radio provides valuable release and relaxation 
at our outposts in the Far North. Call signs VE80G, 
VE8SD, VE8SM and VE8YT are in use among the ten 
members of the Frobisher Bay, N.W.T., Amateur Radio 
Club shown here. {Photo via W4HYW) 



March 1955 



61 



Net Know-How 



Improving Emergency Communications Effectiveness 

BY E. S. VAN DEUSEN,* W3ECP 



• In any emergency operation, the abil- 
ity to handle third-party traffic promptly 
and efficiently is a "must." W3ECP 
bases his recommendations on experi- 
ence gained in actual emergency net 
operations. 



4MATEUR RADIO exists as a hobby because it 
/\ qualifies as a service. " ^ The extent of our 
-^ -*- service is limited by our ability. The 
responsibility for furthering these abilities is 
up to each one of us. Experienced traffic men 
will undoubtedly want to add to the following 
observations and suggestions for improving opera- 
tions during an emergency. All hands will agree, 
however, that almost all amateurs are extremely 
cooperative during a communications emergency. 
The occasional operator who fails or refuses to 
cooperate during such a period deserves short 
shrift, with thorough application of the Wouff- 
Hong and the Rettvsnitch. 

The operator who learns of an emergency and 
experiences the universal deshe to help may 
unnecessarily delay and complicate the flow of 
traffic, if he has little or no concept of acceptable 
net procedure. He can best serve by familiarizing 
himself with the situation by listening. Careful 
listening will enable an operator to locate stations 
and places and to get a good idea of the over-all 
situation so that he will best know how to help if 
needed. A desire to help through transmitting is 
often more hindrance than help. If you're not 
needed, silence is the biggest help! Eagerness to 
aid isn't an excuse for breaking into the net. 
Proper procedure by the net control should pro- 
vide opportunity' periodically for additional sta- 
tions to report in. Only when urgent information 
pertaining to the situation at hand should be 
made known to the NCS is breaking-in permis- 
sible. Having once reported into a net, however, 
every station should monitor the net until he is 
excused by net control. 

C. W. Circuits Always Advisable 

In the initial stages of an emergency, much may 
depend on a single station's ability to com- 
municate with the unaffected area through use 
of "flea-power" c.w. equipment. When com- 
mercial power fails, there may or may not be 
an emergency a.c. source available. On the other 
hand, there undoubtedly will be auto storage 
batteries in the area. Reliance on such primary 

♦Route Manager, ARRL; 3711 McKinley St. N.W., 
Washington 15, D. C. 

' ARRL manual. Emergency Communications. 



power sources requires the ready availability 
of suitable vibrator or dynamotor units. It 
is obvious that c.w. circuits should alwaj's 
be provided whenever and wherever possible, 
as either the primary or a secondary channel 
into the affected area. No single emergency 
situation has been observed recently in which 
the amateur effort could not have been aided 
materially by the use of both 'phone and c.w. In 
several recent situations involving 'phone emer- 
gency networks, a request for supplemental c.w. 
circuits, or an inquiry regarding the possibility 
of setting up such circuits, has been included in 
the operations shortly after the net had been 
organized. 

NCS Qualifications 

Efficient management of a net of any sort, 
and especially one working under emergencj^ 
conditions, requires firm discipline by a suitable 
net control station. The NCS should be capable 
of hearing and being copied by a majority of the 
participating stations. This individual (or group) 
should be thoroughly familiar with control pro- 
cedures, and cognizant of the propagation condi- 
tions that currently exist on the band in use. He 
should be able to think logically and quickly. Real 
competence as a control station can best be at- 
tained by practical experience. Book learning 
alone can't replace the knowledge gained from 
hours spent listening to net operations, analysis 
of the various situations which arise, and think- 
ing out a better way of handling them if you 
had been NCS. A frequent turn as NCS is an 
invaluable aid to put your ideas into action and 
test your reactions. 

Net Discipline the Responsibility 
of the NCS 

The supreme authority for priority and traffic 
routing is the net control station. In an emergency 
the first station becoming aware of the situation 
should assume control and retain it until some 
station better qualified (by virtue of experience, 
location, or ability to contact a greater number of 
participating stations) becomes available. When 
a previously organized and trained net is in- 
volved in the incident, this is fairly simple to 
accomplish. Generally speaking, the most effec- 
tive emergency networks are organized before 
an emergency. In many cases, however, the net 
organization is evolved after the situation arises. 
When this occurs, the station first assuming con- 
trol must exercise a high degree of common sense 
in analyzing facilities which become available, 
and should act quickly and without rancor in 
turning over control to a better qualified station 



62 



QST for 



that reports into the net. On the other hand, 
until such a transfer is made, no other station 
has any right to attempt to usurp the control 
function. 

In prolonged operations involving the services 
of a succession of net control stations, a complete 
list of stations active in the circuit at the time, 
tlie areas they serve, and the outstanding traffic, 
if any, should be given to his successor by a con- 
trol station who may be leaving the net. 

E.xperience with established traffic nets has 
conclusively demonstrated the increased effi- 
ciency which results from the use of at least two 
or three adjacent channels. One frequency, 
preferably the center frequency, should be us?d 
for monitoring b}- all stations, and transmission 
by the net control. The additional channels are 
used as message-clearing frequencies. On c.w. 
nets, a separation of 5 kc. is sufficient; on 'phone, 
a wider dispersion may be desirable. 

When FCC declares a general state of emer- 
gency', a 10- or 15-kc. band segment may be 
designated exclusively for emergencj' communi- 
cations (Section 12.156, FCC Rules and Regula- 
tions). With this in mind, it's logical to start net 
organization (under these conditions) on two chan- 
nels about 8 kc. or so apart, and modify the 
arrangement as the situation develops. During 
such an emergency period, "guard" stations 
should be assigned the specific job of transmitting 
the FCC order and warding off interference. 

Provisions of the Law Must Be Observed 

A possible law violation (Section 005 of the 
Communications Act) may inadvertently occur 
when press representatives are permitted to be 
present in the amateur "shack" during emer- 
gency operations, especially when the operation 
is being handled by 'phone. They should be 
reminded that the Act states that the content of 
the communications may not be divulged to or 
used by any person or persons except the addressee 
or his agent. "Pirating" of traffic is an obvious 
violation of the Act. When situations arise in 
which a station may be in a position to deliver or 
expedite certain traffic that has been copied dur- 
ing monitoring, permission must be obtained 
from the transmitting station to accept the 
message. Only when this station releases its own 
commitment does the monitorjng or requesting 
station become authorized to handle the traffic. 
Under no circumstances is a listener permitted 
by law to put pirated traffic on another net; this 
might easily result in duplicate delivery of two 
widely differing versions of one message, in addi- 
tion to being a distinct violation of the secrecy 
provisions of the Act. 

Accuracy Is More Important Than Speed 

Accuracy first should be the motto governing 
all traffic operations. It is especially applicable 
to an emergenc}^ situation when lives and prop- 
erty safety often depend on the messages being 

2 Note last sheet bound into ARRL Logbooks. — Ed. 
^ Actually, QRX means: I'll call you again at a specified 
time. — Ed. 



handled over the amateur network. Accuracy is 
more readily achieved when uniform message 
procedures are employed. Uniformity of the mes- 
sage form is very important. In emergency situa- 
tions, it is always desiral)le to include the filing 
time which is frequently omitted from the 
message preambles routinely handled on normal 
amateur circuits. The use of standardized te.xts 
such as the appropriate ARL-Xuml^ered Text "' 
and the "book message" method and, whenever 
possible, a combination of both, can result in the 
movement of a surprisingly high volume of 
traffic when applied with common sense. The 
receiving stations should withhold a "Roger" 
(voice) or "QSL" (code) for any message until 
it is certain that the entire message has been 
completeh^ and accurately transcribed. 



DONT R06EQ TMATMe«5AC>6 
UNLESS YOU HAVE IT lOO PCT / 




More elTective voice intelligibility is obtained 
by the use of words instead of c.w. abbreviations. 
(In military practice, accepted 'phone procedure 
prohibits the use of coded c.w. prosigns and re- 
quires the use of the worded meaning.) For ex- 
ample, the use of QRX ^ instead of "wait" may 
be misconstrued as QRS unless phonetics are 
used to clarify the letters QRS. You'll wind up 
by saying the one word "wait" anyway, so use 
it in the first place and you'll avoid confusion 
and time loss. 

Many 'phone operators speak too rapidly for 
the average operator to copj'. The time spent in 
securing "fills" or confirmations often takes 
longer than would have been required to clear the 
entire message if it were transmitted at a proper 
rate. It is very helpful to speak in phrases, allow- 
ing time between phrases for the receiving opera- 
tor to cop.y legibly. As a rough gauge, transmit the 

{Continued on page 150) 




USE PMONETICS FOR TCUUV- DOUSTFUU OR 
DIFFICULT WORDS ONL/AS REQUIRED 



March 1955 



63 



Three Stormy Sisters 

Part lit — Hazel 

BY GEORGE HART, WINJM 



COVERING more land area than either of her 
older sisters, Hazel probably did by far the 
greatest amount of damage. We received 
reports from each section on Hazel's route, plus 
a good man}' reports from sections on her fringes. 
And this gal had some fringes. Although she 
passed through Central Pennsylvania and West- 
ern New York, Hazel produced 8ixt3'-mile-per- 
hour gales and torrents of rain in many areas 
not more seriouslj' afflicted. 

On the evening of October 14th, Hazel ap- 
proached the Carolina coasts. The South Carolina 
Emergencv Net was alreadj^ in operation under 
PAM W4FFH, assisted by W4HDR and 
W4HMG. At 0130 Georgetown EC W4ZGP 
assembled his AREC members W4s FTN GIF 
KTI COA and DYP to place W4ZGP/4, the club 
emergency station, on the air. This station was 
manned throughout the night. 

At 0300 W9MQV/4 reported into the net from 
M3Ttle Beach, and also remained on through the 
night. W4LLH helped maintain contact with the 
coastal stations through the night. Communica- 
tion and power lines began to fail by 0800 Friday 
morning and weather reports from W9MQV/4 
and W4ZGP/4 enabled the Weather Bureau to 
determine that the hurricane went inshore at 
Murrells Inlet, S. C, at 1000 Friday. 

Continuous contact was maintained with the 
Georgetown and M3Ttle Beach stations with on- 

t Part I of this article appeared in Jamiary, 19.55, QST. 






• Vt e asked for them, and we got them 
— more reports on activities during 
Hazel than Me could possihiy use. In this 
second installment of the hurricane 
story, >ve have tried to stick to facts and 
credits in condensing volumes of report 
material into a few ()ST pages. 



W4KFC'8 beam elements don't always have this 
graceful curve. This is a shot taken during the height 
of the storm in Annandale, Va. 



the-spot reports being sent showing the extent of 
the damage as it happened. Intercepts of ham 
operations as provided by W4FFH were being 
broadcast over radio and TV stations in Charles- 
ton. W4ULH/mobile was sent from Florence, 
while mobiles W4U0Q and W4QRH were sent 
from Charleston. These emergency stations were 
confronted with a most serious situation. All 
communications and power lines were out. There 
was urgent need for troops, blankets, emer- 
gency rations and medical supplies. Through 
W4ULH/m and W4HDR in Columbia, Myrtle 
Beach authorities were advised where rations and 
blankets were available, and that National Guard 
troops were being ordered into the area. Shortly 
W4U0Q/m with W4ZRH riding with him re- 
inforced W4ULH/m. Police officials and reporters 
rode with W4ULH/m to tie in with police radio 
and the outside to conduct emergency operations. 
Georgetown power failed about 1000 and control 
was shifted to W4ZGP/4 from his car, using a 
long wire to replace his mobile antenna at 1400. 
Then mobile W4s ZGP COA and KTI cruised 
Pawle\s Island and near-by beaches. The ama- 
teur mobiles coordinated with other units to pro- 
vide communications with damaged areas. 

On Friday W9MQV/4 was back on the air bj^ 
1730. Weather reports by ham radio assisted the 
Weather Bureau to give an early all clear. 

In Florence, EC W4AUL had mobilized his 
AREC group W^s DXW TSU VAM VOH ULH 
and LLH long before the storm struck. W4LLH 
maintained contact with W9MQV/4 all night 
Thursday. W4ULH/m was dispatched to the 
coast Friday morning. W4s AUL DXW TJA and 
TSU helped dispatch ACL trains. On Saturday 
morning the AREC membership cards permitted 
amateur mobiles to cruise into restricted areas to 
continue their work. Only those messages of high- 
est urgency were accepted for delivery. On Satur- 
day evening, W4s ZGP DYP and FTN set up a 
transmitter unit at Myrtle Beach and operated 
all night. 

Operations were carried on for daj's after the 
storm with W4FFH conducting the net almost 
continuouslj', assisted by W4s HDR ZIZ and 
HMG. W4BNN provided contacts with Dillon 



64 



QST for 



When ilazel decided to take a jauut over- 
land. Myrtle Beach, S. C, was the first to 
feel her fury, and Al Powell, K4AQ0, was 
there wailing for her. l-'roni this compact 
station layout, K4AQQ (who was signing 
W9M0V/4 at the time) provided sole con- 
tact with Myrtle Beach for many hours. 



and W4MPR with Marion county. The following 
stations deserve special recognition: W4s ZGP 
FTN GIF KTI COA DYP UOQ ZRH ULH 
FFH HDR LLH AUL DXW TSU VOH VAM 
ZIZ HMG STN TWW IZD K4ADP USN 
W4MPR BNN TWW TJA and W9MQV/4. 
PAM W4FFH logged 168 stations reporting to 
assist. 

EC W4S0D reports that Lumberton lost 
power at 1051 Friday, October 15th, and he, 
from his mobile rig, became the only contact from 
the area. 

In Raleigh, W4HUW operated entirely on 
emergency power from 1330 October 15th until 
2000 October 16th, mostly in the Tar Heel Emer- 
gency Net. Among those reported as participat- 
ing, W4HUW hsts W4s ACA APP AHY AWM 
AUL AWC AJT ANU ATC AEF BMD BUA 
BFB BTZ BDH BIP COG GPL CVQ DIU 
DJC DCI DRC DVR DXJ EFX EPI ED EC 
EYZ FRH GNF GJS GOB HZX HPS HAY 
HCB HSO HUW IBT INL ISH JZQ KYI 
LWU LPN LR LGT LVZ MVP MPR MBR 
MDR NC NHV NTQ NYN NRN NY PZE QI 
RXH RCZ RRV RJ RRH RAZ RNA SCS SGD 
SVD VZW VWM VUA WSS WUW WDN 
WTF YPZ YPI ZMG ZQB ZQA ZEA ZAV, 
K4s NAW NRI WAR FDY WBK, W3STU/4, 
K2BSC, and W0WDJ. The net handled about 
2000 messages from October 14th to 20th. 

The Virginia 'Phone Net and the Old Do- 
minion Net combined forces on 3835 as the Vir- 
ginia Emergency Net starting on October 14th 
and operating continuously until the evening of 
October 16th. FCC declared 3830 to 3840 kc. a 
clear frequency within 1000 miles of the coast. 
Doing yeoman service as NCS were the following: 
W4s PCC (operated by W4s BTL GPS LNX 
JXE KQC SBZ UGO ZZV and W8NYH) TFX 
HQN SIE TVO ONV VYG NV SB and BTL. 
W3BHK served almost continuously as liaison 
with Washington, assisted by W30HI. W4VYZ 
acted as relay to handle traffic between the 
Pentagon and Fort Monroe, Va. W4KX lists the 
following known participants: W4s AAD ACA 
AHY AJA APP AWQ/4 BCW BGZ BIG BLR 
BMH BSM BUS CKI CLD CSC CYK/4 DWP 
DXJ EC FPR FV CWY/m GBD HJH JAQ 
JAU JG KAV KBE KDJ KSE KX LAS 
LHC MAN MRH MT NBA NPT NY OCX 
OKM OM/m OXY PHL PJT PMF QCA 
QEL/4 QIE/m RCZ RDI/m RGN/m RGZ 
RJW RLA RTV TFZ TJA TJW TLA UBC 




ULZ UMC VAH VOD VW VYZ WEL WLQ 
WUW WYI/m YCC YKB YVG ZBU ZCL 
ZMG ZXT ZUQ; WN4FTD; K4s ABQ AF AIR 
MC NRT; WlUKZ/4; W2FYT; W3s BHK BM 
BRC JE JTU/4 LUV/4 LZY NOL OHI HDV 
STU/4 TVJ/m TYU UF WBJ WVF/mm WZN 
YYF; K2FBD; W9GWY/4. 

In Hampton, W4AJA was on the air from 0800 
on Saturday until the same time Sunday morning, 
when c.d. control W4RGN took over. W4VYZ 
handled a crucial message to Fort Monroe via 
W9GWY/m near Washington. The following sta- 
tions in Hampton participated: If 4s AJA RGN 
MAN/m VYZ/m RTZ QCA/m ZXL GZD/m 
JCM. W4RGN and W4QCA operated on emer- 
genc}^ power. 

In Norfolk, EC W4PAK alerted the AREC 
gang at 1900 on October 14th, and 29 mobiles and 
two net control stations turned out. Participation 
was on both the VFN frequency of 3835 and the 
local 29.6 Mc. frequency. By 1500 on Friday the 
winds had reached 100 m.p.h. and things started 
to happen. Communications were handled for 
the power companj', the Weather Bureau, Civil 
Defense, and local Red Cross and emergency 
traffic was being handled as fast as the net could 
take care of it. All transmitting was done with 
auxiliary power equipment. When the 75-meter 
antenna blew down at the control station, 
W4PWX and W4LCW maintained communica- 
tion for Norfolk. 

EC W3WN of Frederick, Md., reports a close 
tie-in with Frederick police, working with them 
from the time Hazel hit Frederick (1745, Oct. 
15th) until about 2100. Mobiles were dispatched 
with policemen to points of hazard. The Fred- 
erick net mobilized without being alerted. '^ 

In the Washington area, W3KZQ, W3NL, and 
W3ECP were early on the job getting the Wash- 
ington Mobile Radio Club organized at the re- 
quest of the D.C. Chapter, American Red Cross. 
W3WLA took over net control on 29,520 kc. at 
1615 on October 15th and checked in mobile 
stations to take part (almost 100 per cent). 
W3KZQ conducted the 1800 roll call on emer- 
gency power. W3ECP maintained close contact 
with the Red Cross during the blow. Stations 
listed as active: WSs AQZ DAH DZZ ECP EOV 
EQH FVD FZ lEF IZL KZQ MAX MBZ MSU 
MYA NDL NL NUT ODK OLK OPO QBC 



March 1955 



65 




llazleton. Pa., was one of the cities hard hit hy 
Hazel. EC W3DUI activated his small group and 
operated on emergency power. That's him at the 
telephone, while W30IIX uses the mike. 



RCZ RXJ SFY THP WAM WLA WOX WXA 
WYP YAE ZER, W4s: BF BFN DWD EFJ 
EHO GEE JCJ JKX JSG KCX KMG LL OP 
TNQ TTA UEQ VYP YWF ZZ. 

The AREC of Washington County, Md., was 
alerted by both Civil Defense and Red Cross and 
by 1415 October 14th seven AREC members had 
three fixed stations and five mobile units ready 
for action. By 1800, fourteen AREC members 
were monitoring 3827 as well as assisting the 
MEPN and the VFN with emergency traffic, 
with five mobiles and one portable power unit 
on a stand-by basis. The alert was secured at 
2030. Stations on deck: WSs CIQ CKJ CSX 
EHA NZT OAY OXL OYX RAH SCC TJV 
VAM WWM YRK. 

The Maryland Emergency 'Phone Net was 
active on 3920 kc. At 1155 on the 15th, the 
emergency plan was put into effect. At 1650, FCC 
declared 3815-3825 kc. an emergency channel. 
The frequency clearance was withdrawn at 2200, 
but many members continued operating through- 
out the night. The following day operation con- 
tinued, most traffic being relaj^ of information 
north and south concerning the extent of the 
damage. As conditions deteriorated Saturday 
night, FCC gave voluntary clearance on 3820 at 
1800. The net was official signed off at 2000. 
W3FWR submits this list, with apologies to any- 
one left out: WSs AKX AVL ADQ AED BM 
BSV BRU BHK DKT EHA EPC EQK FRV 
FWR FII GA CD HWR HXN HWZ HL IJF 
JZY JE JQN JH KMT KVM KAN KZH KAV 
LZY LUV MCD MAX NJT NST NNX NNS 
OHI OLK OKZ PMQ PRL PQT PPY PV PGB 
QDI QAN QQH RU RMD SSC SZW SOG 
SPT TJV TDV TUX TAT UNV UAC UQS 
UAB UWV UF VAM VPN VZZ VCN VVV 
WKB WTF WBY WV WBP WEH WEM 
WZN YWK YYF ZME ZA ZZK, KSs FBD 
WBJ NAR WAS, W2FUW, W4s BUS HZ NFD. 

Mobiles in Anne Arundel County under EC 
W3SLG got together as prearranged at 1700 on 
the 15th and manned the control center, using 
emergency power since regular power was off. 
Net Control W3VPR (manned by W3JKU and 
W3SLG) contacted State Control W3W^BP on 
29.64 Mc. W3TRG/m was assigned to handle 
Red Cross communication. W2UQS/m was sta- 
tioned at Edgewater police station. Telephones 



failed at the control station at 2000, and all com- 
munications were handled on 6 and 10 meters. 
Clearance from emergency was obtained at 2200. 
Damage was slight. Other mobiles in the act: WSs 
NLX LHK VU NAE OEJ TRG UKO UQS. 

In Allegany County, amateurs under EC 
W3PMQ installed six-meter equipment at the 
police station and the club room of the Mountain 
Radio Club at the American Legion building. The 
call W3YMW was used. The following amateurs 
participated: WSs ECU MGO KMT UAB UAC, 
WNSs YII YIJ and W8GHS. 

The Radio Officer of Maryland's Fifteenth 
CD. District, W3QLG, was called upon to pro- 
vide communications and enlisted the aid of WSs 
FMG WCW KLA and WN3YLQ, all with mo- 
biles on two or ten meters. The mobiles went 
into action at 1730 October 15th. Evacuation 
was their main task, the mobile units being 
placed at the disposal of the c.d. officer in charge. 
All communications and power were out in the 
area until the following day. Mobile units were 
released at 0400 October 16th. 

W3AVL reports for Southern Maryland that 
considerable damage was wreaked by high winds 
in that area, after weather reports had indicated 
that the hurricane would pass to the west. Elec- 
tric-power failures occurred at intervals from 
1100 until 1700 on the fifteenth, at which time 
power in the entire area was shut off, and tele- 
phone service also was out. W3AVL operated 
with emergency power. On Saturday W3AVL/m 
traveled to St. George's Island where information 
on the amount of damage to houses and other 
property was reported via W3PPY. 

In Cecil County, W3VZZ started organizing 
the local net at 1430 on the 15th. At 1600 his 
power went off, so his station was set up at the 
fire house, with the help of WN3ZVX and 
W3TXR. The station was put on the air, imme- 
diately reported into the net and started handling 
traffic. The county c.d. director was much im- 
pressed with this operation. 

As a result of activity of Maryland amateurs 
during Hazel, a letter was received by State 
Radio Officer W3JE from Maryland Governor 
McKeldin saying, in part: "It is gratifying to me 
to know that our State has such a magnificent 
communications network which can be utilized 
in the event of any large-scale disaster. I com- 
pliment you and your associates for your out- 
standing organizational activities and hope that 
my congratulations for a job well done can be 
extended to j'our membership." 

On Friday night October 15th from 1800 to 
2000 Hurricane Hazel unleashed its furj^ on Dela- 
ware. W3SQV, chairman of the local "Blue Hen 



66 



QST for 



Mobile Group," at about 1700 called the Net on 
29,520 kc. and offered service to the Wilmington 
Red Cross and the Delaware State Police. Those 
standing by were WSs FFF NNK PCZ QWR 
QZI SQV TDU TKM UO and W4ANL/3. The 
group was released by the Red Cross and the 
State Police at 2130. 

W3BHK did a great deal of relay and contact 
work for Washington Red Cross during the hur- 
ricanes. During Hazel alone he indicates 60 sent, 
40 received, 33 relays and 22 patches. He op- 
erated 48 V^ hours, 5^2 of them on emergency 
power. 

In Montgomery County, Pa., EC W3CN0 
reports communication established with state- 
level key station W30JE at 1920 on the 15th, 
and set up monitoring watches on 28,888 and 
29,493 kc. between the hours of 1800 and 2100 
EST. The following stations called in: WSs 
TER/m TWQ VST. WSs HYU and IGW were 
listening. All stations had mobiles available in 
case of need. The net was secured at 2100 EST. 

York County (Pa.) got the brunt of the storm, 
and by 1500 on the 15th power was off in large 
sections of the county. W3GES took over as 
Acting EC and took part in the Pennsylvania 
Fone Net, acting as NCS for a part of the time. 
Earlier, W3GES had alerted three other local 
amateurs with mobiles and had offered services 
to the local Civil Defense and Red Cross. W3GES 
was assisted by W3VNJ and W3WWF. 

Hazel roared toward the Philadelphia area in 
the late afternoon of the fifteenth. The cit}''s c.d. 
volunteers were alerted and manned the c.d. 
centers, starting at 1800. Members of the Phil- 
Mont Mobile Club checked in from their radio- 
equipped cars and stood by for assignments. The 
Fox Chase Control center lost power after 1900, 
but a generator on a c.d. rescue truck was utilized 
to supply power. The centers were allowed to 
"secure" at 2145. A partial list of participants as 
submitted by EC W3DYL: WSs SQW VKO 
ULR SAM YUH WMY SLP DYL NJS FPC 
YAX VSC OWK UQV RKP VCE VCY DFJ 
JWC UOE PST. 

Luzerne County had some activity, reported 
by EC W3DUI. He got together with W30HX, 
who had emergency power available, and about 
1900 when power went off operation commenced 
from that station. The police and c.d. were served 
by amateur communications. W3THB and 
W3PVY were also on hand and two mobiles were 
ready. 

The Pennsylvania Fone Net, under W3PYF, 
did an excellent statewide job during Hazel. 
W3PYF asked W3GES to start organizing the 



'I'lic Norlliainpton County (Pa.) AHEC gang acti- 
vated the station at c.d. headquarters in Bethlehem 
during Hurricane Hazel. The station operates under 
the call W3POX/3 in the Delaware Lcliich Amateur 
Radio Net. Left to right are W30K, \V3FQ\ and 
W 3NNT. {Photo by JTSPYF) 



net at 1525 on the 15th, while he set up his 
emergency power and took over the net at 1600, 
by which time 26 Pennsylvania stations had 
already called in. QRM gathered, too, and with 
the assistance of W2JWN, W3UKF and W3BHK 
FCC was asked to declare a clear channel which 
they did (3850 plus and minus 5 kc.) at 1915. By 
2000, 21 stations had called in. 

There was also activity in the local Northamp- 
ton County (Pa.) Net on 29,640 kc. The Beth- 
lehem C.D. -Red Cross stations were activated 
with W3QBF at Red Cross and W3NNT and 
W3PQX at C.D. headquarters, both on emer- 
gency power. Contact was maintained with mo- 
biles in the stricken area at all times (WSs NF 
OK QMH ELH and WlUVE). 

The New York State Phone Traffic and Emer- 
gency Net was in operation starting at 1700 
October 15th with K2BY0 as NCS. W3s ZRV 
UNF JNM ILI and YXE consecutively took 
over NCS duties, and at 2300 Oct. 15th when 
skip lengthened, W8PXF assumed net control, 
and later W9VRK. The net was closed at 0115. 
About 52 stations participated. 

In Broome County (N. Y.) the two meter net 
was in operation with W2s SWF/2 OW PST/m 
JOJ FCG QXX HJS UJS HZP/m DOM SDA 
and K2CWD. The Binghamton area was badly 
hit, and W2SFW/2 was set up at the Binghamton 
Sun offices to receive reports of damage. 

At about 2000 on October 15th, electric power 
and half of the telephones went out in Oswego 
County. EC W2ZHU/m, W2UMI and W2FFU 
went into action on 2 meters. W2UMI reported 
two fires burning in Mexico, N. Y. The AREC 
stood by to assist in fire communications until 
the fires were brought under control at 2300. 

Four Oneida County stations reported in on 
3925 kc. about 1730 October 15th and remained 
until 0100 Oct. 16th. Two meters was monitored 
from 1800 the 15th until 1200 the 16th. 

In Seneca County, local AREC mobile stations 
were alerted at 2045. At 2130 Hazel struck the 
area, commercial power went out and many trees 
went down. From 2135 to 0030 the mobiles 
assisted in providing emergency communication 
for the police, who had no emergency power. At 
2230 until 0030 mobiles also provided additional 
communications for the Sheriff's Department. 
Participants were W^s YPP HXK and K2s 
BFF HMY and DYA. 

The Finger Lakes 2 M(^trr Xot was in operation 



March 1955 





from 2000 to 2300 Oct. 15th. Stations in this Net 
included amateurs in Monroe, Ontario, Wayne, 
Cavuga and Genessee Counties. Participants 
were: W£s BCL BLP CTA ECM OWF QY 
TKY UXP VBH ZHB ZS UTH, K2s BWK 
CEH DBB, KN2IN0. 

In the SjTacuse area, W2BTB was kept busy 
with weather and radar reports to the local Red 
Cross Chapter Disaster Chairman, and handling 
a number of welfare requests for Red Cross' 
Home Service Department. At Red Cross head- 
quarters, W2CRD was activated and performed 
valuable service all during the hurricane. 

Hazel poured between five and eight inches of 
rainfall into the Toronto area within the space of 
a few hours, precipitating unprecedented floods. 
More than fifty bridges and culverts were washed 
out, and hundreds of homes near the river were 
washed away or damaged. The AREC plan of 
listening on the emergency frequencies of 3765 
kc. and 51 Mc. was followed. 

Of the v.h.f. group, VE31Z was the first to 
become active, out in his mobile at 0730 on Oc- 
tober 16th. VE3AIB joined him at 0900, and 
shortly thereafter VE3BQK/m and VE3BYY 
came on. These four set up a v.h.f. net on 51 




This innocent-looking contraption is an emergency 
generator. Simple enough, but it spelled the difference 
between being on the air and not being on the air during 
Hazel in a great many places. Does your AREC group 
have one, ready to go at a moment's notice if needed? 
Hazleton has, and this is it, plugging away during 
Hurricane Hazel. 

Mc. and advised the 75 meter net control, 
VE3N0, of their availability. VE3IZ/m and 
VE3BQK/m were dispatched to Woodbridge 
while VE3BYY/m and VE3AIB/m went to the 
Weston area, both hard hit. VE3DER operated 
fixed to keep them in contact with telephones. 
The next day mobiles wore dispatched to Weston 
to assist in the search for bodies. The 51 Mc. 
control station (VE3AZY/3) was moved from 
CD headquarters and set up in the Weston police 
station, with VE3DQW assisting. From approxi- 
mately 1300 until 1730, communication between 



various search parties and headquarters was 
maintained via VESs ARV/m IZ/m and AIB/m. 

This grim task was not the end of it for the 
Toronto gang. Communications were out in the 
area for several days after the hurricane, par- 
ticularly in the Westmount area, and the AREC 
was instrumental in providing communications 
for emergency purposes. As late as October 24th, 
the Toronto v.h.f. group was working with offi- 
cials in Westmount, Etobicoke, Woodbridge and 
Pine Grove, as well as Toronto. Mention should 
be made of the supplementary work of the fol- 
lowing: VESs AIB ATB ARV/m AZY BJB 
BYY BYZ DER DQW DHG IZ and UT. 

Low frequency groups were also active in the 
Toronto area. VE3EAM alerted VESs BBM and 
EAU, then took off for Woodbridge. Arriving at 
1200, Bert set up his equipment in the municipal 
office, and the first message he handled was from 
the maj^or requesting troops, food, medical sup- 
plies, etc. From then on he handled a constant 
stream of urgent traffic to VE3BBM who relayed 
to VE3BJV for delivery by Toronto telephone. 

Nets were also set up and operative on the ten 
and 75 meter bands, under VE3NG and VE3RG 
respectively. VE3N0 did an admirable job as 
net control on the 75 meter net, and VE3NG 
turned in an outstanding performance on 10. 

The Hamilton AREC group was called in on 
Sunday the 17th to help in the Woodbridge area. 
Six cars and a portable unit were immediately 
dispatched. They set up immediately on arrival 
and helped with communications for the Red 
Cross and Fire Department. Later, they opened 
a ten meter net to Toronto. In action : VESs KM 
DGJ DRM AXV DRI AGJ BOW CJM EAB 
DHQ CJ CC AYW and BV. 

All in all, a stellar job done by Ontario ama- 
teurs, especially the gang in and around Toronto. 
Here's a list of participants not already mentioned 
above: VESs AZX ATR AWY APN AET AJA 
AID AIA APF AXW AMB AEU AYO AMT 
ANL AOE AGW AIS ANY BWA BQT BBM 
BJI BUT BRI BCT BBX BCR BKV BAX BLQ 
BIV BTY BXK BXW BJV BWE CD CP CJ 
DDT DHL DTO DFN DZA DUG DSG DNE 
DLS DEW DQX DFP DPD DEG DFA DFK 
DCF DNK DNA DIQ DAT DAK DOW EAO 
KW GK RU RH IL HZ TA NS GJ VG RW NI 
HO GG LN OR SI HS VZ YD VT WY VE2UQ. 
Our thanks to VE3KM, VE3AIB and VE3IL for 
their comprehensive reports. 

The swirls of Hazel's skirts produced havoc 
elsewhere than along the path of her baleful eye. 
W2RTE reports activity in Eastern New York 
section comparable to that in Carol and Edna, 
nets operating on 75, 10 and 2 meters. W2RTE 
himself had to set up emergency power to stay 
with the net on Saturday. Even over in eastern 
Mass. the effects of the hurricane were severe 
enough that six members of the Falmouth Ama- 
teur Radio Association formed a net to maintain 
contact with Civil Defense, the Coast Guard and 
the National Traffic System. The amateurs who 
turned out were Wis QLT LYV DVS UXG and 
TJW with the club station WlWNM as NCS. 



68 



QST for 



The six-meter gang was very active in the 
Toronto area during the hurricane. This is 
VE3AIB, one of the Toronto ECs, operating 
equipment belonging to VE3IZ in Weston, 
Out. This set-up, from a church location, 
provided emergency communications for 
over two days from Weston. 



W2ZAI reports activity in both Queens and 
Nassau Counties, N. Y. In Queens, the ten-meter 
net was in operation from 2030 on the 15th until 
1300 on the 16th, with 25 stations reporting in. 
Six members staj-ed at the Queens County Con- 
trol all night: WBs AFA AKR ANK CVU CJP 
and ZTX. Early Saturday morning mobiles 
W2ZTX and W2ANK were dispatched to Rocka- 
way Beach, along with W2CJP. Traffic handled 
was in regard to flood damage and evacuation. 
The Nassau County AREC was alerted at 1630 
on October 15th by EC W2FI. He set up W2FI/2 
at the Red Cross, and three other stations, 
W2KEB, W2KFV and K2DHC (operated by 
W2JKX), were activated. Mobiles used both 2 
and 10 meters. Forty-four stations reported into 
the net, three from Suffolk County. 

Although considerably west of Hazel's path, 
flooding occurred in the Ohio River Valley. 
Amateur radio was called into action at Steuben- 
ville by the Red Cross, and three stations were 
set up. Operators taking part included WSs DNQ 
ERR JNL SFI EZC ZEI VGK EZH and CHE. 
In the Camden, N. J., area, two and six meter 
nets were activated by the South Jersej' Radio 
Association at 1800 on the 15th. W2YRW was 
NCS of the 2-meter net from his car at first. 
Later, W2PAU took control using emergenc}^ 
power. W2TBD assisted the local police in Med- 
ford and Medford Lakes. W2LY reported from 
mobile that cross-country high lines were falling 
near Route 38, hampering vehicular traffic. 
Others reporting in on the two-meter net were 
WSs EGP JRO PEN NFL VX ASG OQN PTM 
PZX, K2AFJ and KN2s GYH GYN and JEI. 
K2AJD was NCS of the ten-meter net, assisted 
by W2QBH and K2BWG. The roll call produced 
WSs ABQ YPQ CIJ FTO CKX TXP, K£s 
DWY BZK, WSs AOE/2 OEN and HEK. Many 
of these were mobiles. Contact was maintained 
with the Burlington County (N. J.) net on 29,560 
kc. Operation of both nets continued from 1800 to 
2200. W2YRW reports that 32 operators turned 
in 128 man hours of work in his area. 

The Burlington County (N.J.) Radio Club also 
reports considerable activity during Hazel. With 
four mobiles and two fixed stations, the entire 
group of six stations was in operation during the 
storm: W2s EVR GOK JJV WKI WUP and 
ZNB. 

The RACES net of Conn. Area 4 was active 
during Hurricanes Carol, Edna, and Hazel. The 




net control station, WlTIJ, is located in the 
State Police barracks in Colchester, which is 
equipped with auxiliary power. The following 
radio officers were active: Wis IWY YFG UQV/l 
ZYJ/1 NPB EBO KZQ NPE/1 MHF and LF. 
WlPHP is radio officer for Area 4. 

The transcontinental Relay Net again was 
on alert following the path of Hazel and sending 
out Imlletins concerning her progress, speed 
and direction. The frequency of 7042 was kept 
clear for the bulletins and reporting stations. 
Net stations, especially those in Hazel's path, 
kept close touch with their local weather bureaus 
both to receive and give information. The net 
likewise did a most commendable job of handling 
a great deal of long haul emergency traffic, much 
of it of an official nature. Many of the stations 
were operating on emergency power. Net manager 
W3CVE submits the following list of participat- 
ing stations: Wis QA YEJ, W^s BO CGG EQG 
IFP QDM, K2BJS, WSs BFF CUL CVE DVO 
lA RQK/4 UUA WWQ WOR WZL, W4s AMZ 
ARV ATS ATC DNB DNR ENI EJQ HIH 
MCY MPF ONK SVG TJI UWE VPD VHH 
WQT, K4WBK. W6s BOM/2 EUM ULS, 
W7CCL, WSs AUJ CJK DNC FUM FFW IZQ 
ZWE, W9s JUJ NZZ RHA UIN VBZ WRO, 
W0S AJD CIO GBJ KA, VESs BXF BUR DUY, 
KL7ATO/W9. 

Epilogue 

Many of those who reported also reported the 
many lessons they learned in operating under 
emergency conditions as hurricane followed hur- 
ricane into some of the most populated and 
industrialized parts of our country. These three ' 
diabolical visitations, similar to but more ex- 
tensive than the series of tornadoes we experi- 
enced in 1952, have a parallel in atomic warfare. 
What we amateurs did in the hurricane emergen- 
cies wo must be prepared to do in the event of 
nuclear attack, multiplied manifold. If the visits 
of Carol, Edna and Hazel can be considered in 
any way to be good, then it was because of the 
"shot in the arm" the}' gave to emergency pre- 
paredness everj^where they visited, and to the 
increased awareness on the part of public offi- 
cials. Civil Defense and otherwise, of the values 
and potentialities of the radio amateur. 



March 1955 



69 




Operating „ « x 



F. E. HANDY, WIBDI, Communications Mgr. 
R. L. WHITE, WIWPO, Asst. Comm. Mgr., C.W. 
PHIL SIMMONS, WIZDP, Communications Asst. 



More on FCC Suspensions. Two amateur 
operator license suspensions were reported in 
these columns last month in QST. Looking at 
eleven other 1954 amateur operator license sus- 
pensions, there were some five kinds of violations 
that drew this type penalty. In each case the 
suspension required that the license be turned 
in to FCC and the station not be operated by any 
person for the specified period. 

1) Two instances, violations of Sec. 12.157 by using 
"obscene, indecent or profane language" on the air, re- 
ceived penalties of 90 days (W4ESP), also four years' sus- 
pension (remainder of license term) was invoked in the 
case of another amateur licensee, now deceased, for wilful- 
ness in committing this violation. 

2) One Technician Licensee, WIUZZ, drew a 90-day 
suspension for operating on the 144-Mc. band contrary to his 
license privileges. 

3) Three Novice (WN0QIY, WN9ZEV, KN6B0S) and 
two Technician licensees (K6AXX, W6CKW) received 
suspensions of 30, 90 days and for-remainder-of-license 
term for violations of one, or combinations of more-than- 
one, of the following: use of A-3 in 3.8-4 Mc, or in 7 Mc. 
(12.23 d-e); using call not assigned (12.158); use of un- 
modulated carrier for protracted periods (12.134); and for 
failing to keep a proper log (12.136 b and f). 

4) A suspension of 30 days was made in the case of 
WIZE for permitting operation by an unlicensed person, 
which is a violation of Sec. 12.28, and Sec. 318 of the Act, 
also for failure to keep an accurate log (Sec. 12.136) and 
failing ability to produce logs in the 1-year period prior to 
May 10, for FCC inspection, a violation of Sec. 12.137. 

5) WGSAC's 30-day suspension was for use of power in 
excess of 1 kw. (12.131). 

6) A suspension for remainder of license term was ordered 
in the case of WN9YDZ for using a frequency and call not 
authorized a Novice. 

On Improving Message Handling. Besides the 
questions from amateurs newly interested in 
this field these days, some traffic netters are 
urging steps for progressively improved results 
. . . such as an increased use of the service 
message. Operating an Amateur Radio Station, 
page 12, gives the low-down on such between- 
station traffic, customarily started to get missing 
information, or report inability to deliver, or 
other aspects of the operating service. Each year 
for three years there has been a substantial 
increase of interest in traffic handling. With the 
trend continuing this year, we hope the "service 
message" will account for a proper proportion 
of the increase, for the great good this can do. 
Missing parts really should bo queried at source 
(l)y originators), of course, so incomplete traffic 
n(!ver gets started! However, we suggest making 
it common practice to use the service message to 
get the missing parts when they are not put in 
by the originator. Undeliverable messages should 
bo reported by message to originating stations in 
all eases. But let's stop at source, by reasonable 
interrogation, crijjpled traffic that has vital sec- 



GEORGE HART, WINJM, Natl. Emerg. Coordinator 
ELLEN WHITE, WIYYM, Asst. Comm. Mgr., 'Phone 
LILLIAN M. SALTER, WIZJE, Administrative Aide 

tions missing from the preamble or an insufficient 
address. Any service message sent not only counts 
in one's total but is a direct contribution to our 
amateur ability to handle record traffic in a 
praiseworthy manner. 

Edison Award Winner Acclaimed. Ben 
Hamilton, W6VFT, ARRL SEC, of La Mesa, 
Calif., was honored February 10th at a Washing- 
ton, D. C, public dinner presentation of the 
1954 Edison Radio Amateur Award. This was 
in view of his outstanding civil defense communi- 
cations, organizational and educational work in 
San Diego County, Calif. There were special 
citations for the notable services of Carl Theis, 
W8BKH, in constructing equipment for mis- 
sionaries resulting in saving lives, and for the 
excellent amateur radio communications estab- 
lished and maintained by Carter Rogers, W8NCS, 
in the West Virginia flash flood. Besides proclaim- 
ing Mr. Hamilton award winner, the judges also 
adopted a resolution commending the merito- 
rious services of more than 800 amateurs helping 
with emergency communications in the triple 
hurricane emergency. Besides the special honor 
to Mr. Hamilton, we regard this acclamation as 
a great honor and recognition of importance of 
civil defense amateur radio organizational work. 

Observations of a Novice working in the 
Round-up are the subject of a letter from 
KN2nW. He writes, "We can't all be perfect but 
calling attention to some of our operating errors 
in QST should help in improvement. I found 
myself going over my speed and having to correct 
errors, also e.xtending my calls too long and 
repeating too much of my text. Then there is the 
man who has never heard a WlAW tape or so it 
seems . . . when he calls CQ you can only 
guess what it means. Another has a note like 
water bubbling in a pipe so it's a wonder he gets 
any answers outside of FCC citations. My pet 
peeve is a WN using a bug with jerky spacing; 
the dits get away from him. . . ." All amateurs 
will agree that a bug has no place on the air until 
it has been mastered in practice of? the air! 
Sending in step with our WlAW tapes and with 
hand key is still a fine way to cultivate sending 
accuracy and judgment in "spacing." All ama- 
teurs will do well to monitor their transmitters. 
Use the receiver with antenna off, if no monitor 
is available, to check that note. It is our guess 
that all operators in taking part in the January 
Novice Round-up got useful practice in self- 
correction of common difficulties like poor choice 
of speed and calling times. Only by practice doe.s 
one develop into a good operator who can get 



70 



QST for 



most enjoyment and the best results with his 
gear. A specific objective such as the N-R calls 
for powers of coordination beyond casual work, 
and builds operating know-how. 

DX Test in Progress. There's a second 
'phone (Mar. llth-13th) and a second c.w. week 
end (Mar. 25th-27th) coming up in March in the 
current ARRL International DX Competition. 
If you weren't all set for the February period it's 
not too late to try your hand at DX in March; 
and if you got a start in February you can very 
well extend your score in March or maybe grab 
off some of the new countries that will be in 
there! See the announcement in January QST 
if you need details. All scores and reports will be 
welcomed by ARRL. 

Good luck, and in making out your QSLs 
always be sure they are sufficiently complete in 
information. The date, the band, the mode, the 
state (for amateurs working for WAS), the report 
for 'phone or c.w. and the fraternal spirit they 
convey are all part of the great tradition guar- 
anteed by your signature, as the man behind the 
key or mike. — F.E.H. 

BRIEF 

Conducting code and/or theory classes? Drop a line to 
Headquarters for a card to register your class schedule. This 
information will help many newcomers interested in obtain- 
ing their Novice licenses. 

CODE PROFICIENCY PROGRAM 

Twice each month special transmissions arc made to 
enable you to qualify for the ARRL Code Proficiency Cer- 
tifioate. The next qualifying run from WlAW will be made 
on March 15th at 2130 EST. Identical texts will be sent 
simultaneously by automatic transmitters on 1885, 3555, 
7125, 14,100, 21,010, 52,000 and 145,600 kc. The next quali- 
fying Twnfrom W60\VP only will be transmitted on Marcli 
5th at 2100 PST on 3590 and 7138 kc. 

Any person may apply; neither ARRL membersliip nor 
an amateur license is required. Send copies of all qualifying 
runs to ARRL for grading, stating the call of the station 
you copied. If you qualify at one of the six speeds trans- 
mitted, 10 through 35 w.p.m., you will receive a certificate. 
If your initial qualification is for a speed below 35 w.p.m., 
you may try later for endorsement stickers. 

Code-practice transmissions will be made from WlAW 
eacli evening at 2130 EST. Speeds are 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 
w.p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and 5, 7J^, 10 
and 13 w.p.m. on Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Satur- 
day. Approximately 10 minutes' practice is given at each 
speed. References to texts used on several of the transmis- 
sions are given below. These make it possible to check your 
your copy. For practice purposes the order of words in each 
line of QST text sometimes is reversed. 

Dale Subject of Practice Text from January QST 
Mar. 2nd: More About V.H.F. Auroral Propagation, p. 11 
Mar. 4th: A Cubical Quad for 20 Meters, p. 21 
Mar. 8th: A Discussion of Receiver Performance, p. 24 
Mar. 10th: A Simple Rig for Six-Meter Mobile, p. 28 
Mar. 14th: A One-Element Rotary for 21 Mc, p. 30 
Mar. 17th: Grounded-Grid and the 304-TH, p. 33 
Mar. 21st: Using the 6624 Dual Tetrode on 432 Mc, p. 38 
Mar. 24th: Three Stormy Sisters, p. 42 
Mar. 30th: September V.H.F. Party Results, p. 57 

WlAW OPERATING SCHEDULE 

(All times given are Eastern Standard Time) 

The WlAW fall-winter operating schedule remains in 
effect. Master schedules showing complete WlAW operation 
in EST, CST or PST will be sent to anyone on request. 

Operating-Visiting Hours: 

Monday through Friday: 1500-0300 (following day). 

Saturday: 1900-0230 (Sunday). Sunday: 1500-2230. 



Exceptions: WlAW will not observe its regular hours from 
0300 April 8th to 1900 April 9th. 

General Operation: Refer to page 70, September QST, for 
a chart to determine times during which WlAW engages in 
general operation on various freciuencies. 'phone and c.w. 
This schedule is still in effect but is not reproduced herewith 
for space considerations. Note that since the schedule is 
organized in EST, certain morning operating periods may 
fall on the evening of the previous day in western time 
zones. WlAW will participate in all official .\RRL operating 
activities, using scheduled general operating periods for this 
purpose if necessary. 

Official ARRL Bulletin Schedule: Bulletins containing 
latest information on matters of general amateur interest 
are transmitted on regular schedules: 
Frequencies (kc.): 

C.W.: 1885, 3555, 7125, 14,100, 21,010, 52,000, 145,600. 
Phone: 1885, 3945, 7255, 14,280, 21,350, 52,000, 145,600. 
Frequencies may vary slightly from round figures given; 
they are to assist in finding the W1.\W signal, not for exact 
calibration purposes. 
Times: 

Sunday through Friday: 2000 by c.w., 2100 by 'phone. 
Monday through Saturday: 2330 by 'phone, 2400 by c.w. 
Code Proficiency Program: Practice transmissions are 
made on the above listed c.w. frequencies, starting at 2130 
daily. Speeds are 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 w.p.m. on Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday, and 5, 714, 10 and 13 w.p.m. on 
Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. .Approximately 
ten minutes of practice is given at each speed. Code-practice 
transmissions will be replaced by Code Proficiency Qualify- 
ing Runs on March 15th and -April 13th. 

MEET THE SCMS 

Washington's SCM, Victor S. Gish, W7FIX, first became 
interested in amateur radio in 1912, at which time he did 
some spark coil experimental work, but it wasn't until 
1935 that he obtained his first license. 

The rigs currently in use at W7FIX's basement shack 
include: (1) 6L6 crystal, 807 buffer, p.j). T-40s final for 
80- and 40-meter work; (2) 6AG7 VFO, 6AG7 buffer. 




813 final for 80 meters; and (3) 1626 crystal, 1625 final for^ 
160 meters. Receiving equipment consists of a BC-312, 
an SX-71, an SX-25, an EC-1, and Command receivers. 

SCM Gish is assistant director of the Nortliwestern 
Division, as well as Route Manager, Official Relay Station, 
and Official Observer, and is a member of the North Seattle 
Amateur Radio Club. In addition he manages to find time 
to enjoy participation in the CD Parties. His copying speed 
is 35 w.p.m., for which he has been awarded a Code Pro- 
ficiency certificate. Rag Chewers Club and A-1 Operator 
Club certificates also have been issued to him. 

At the age of 17 Vic joined the Navy and in 1917-1918 
installed the first bridge-controlled radio on the USS 
Pennsylvania. In 1941 he was physically retired, was re- 
called the next year to be placed in charge of the wire room 
of the 13th Naval District, and was released in 1946. 

Vic's hobbies include printing PAN News and reading 
westerns and historical novels. His pet sports are baseball 
and football. 



March 1955 



71 



WithJheARFC 









Each year at aljout this tinio tlie ofTicers and directors of 
the League prepare annual reports to tlie Board of Directors 
outlining activities and progress during the previous year. 
This gives the Board members sometliing to think about 
(as if they didn't liave enougli worries already!) prior to the 
annual meeting. Naturally, the officers' reports are longer 
and more comprehensive, since they have to do with the 
conduct of League affairs on a nation-wide day-t'> day basis. 

In the Communications Manager's annual r>port, there 
is always a section devoted to the status of the AREC and 
emergency work in general. Tliat means us. We do not use 
the pronoun "us" in the editorial sense, refeninj; to the 
writer. It means you and me, all of us who are lesponsible 
for the affairs and activities of the Amateur Radio Emer- 
gencj' Corps throughout the year and throughout the nation 
Your NEC is not in any sense the director of amateur emer- 
gency affairs; he is the coordinator of those affairs, the point 
of consolidation at which the things you do are pinpointed 
and moulded into a presentable nation-wide picture. He is 
entirely and utterly dependent on you for the size and shape 
and completeness of that picture. At annual report time, it 
is his job to paint the picture, your job to supply the paint. 
Naturally, if you supply only a small amount of paint, the 
picture is really not a picture at all, but only a sketch. 

That's the way it has been in past years. The EC Annual 
Report form goes out with the SET Bulletin. About ten per 
cent of the ECs return them. This year, we sent out a re- 
minder card, and it paid off to the extent of bringing in a 
dozen or so additional reports. A good many ECs replied 
that they had nothing to report of any consequence. Others 
had mislaid the report forms. Some reported informally, not 
even knowing that there was a report form. Most of them 
never replied to the reminder card just as they had never 
replied to the initial receipt of tlie form in the first place; 
probably an extension of the developing negative reaction 
to recaipt of any printed third-class mail. 

We have said before and we'll say again that we would 
rather have a good, active EC who never reports than an 
inactive one who reports regularly (usually, that he is in- 
active). First things come first; if energetic pursuit of your 
function as EC does not leave the five minutes or so per 
month for a Form 5 report or the half hour or so per year 
for an annual report, then let it be so. The report of statistics 
is not all important, but it is quite important just the same. 

Perhaps next year, instead of burying the EC Annual 
Report form in the SET Bulletin, we'll make it the subject 
of a special, later mailing. Will that help? It's too late now 



NATIONAL CALLING AND 
EMERGENCY FREQUENCIES (kc.) 



C.W. 

3550 14,050 

7100 21,050 

28,100 



'PHONE 

3875 14,225 

7250 21,400 

29,640 



During periods of communications emergency these 
cliannels will be monitored for emergency tratTic. At 
other times, tli&se frequencies can be used as general 
calling frequencies to expedite general traffic movement 
between amateur stations. Emergency traffic has prece- 
dence. After contact ha-s been made the frequency 
.should be vacated immediately to accommodate other 
callers. 

The following are the National Calling and Emer- 
gency Frequencies for Canada: c.w. — 3535, 7050, 
14.060; •phone — 3765. 14,160. 28,250 kc. 



NATIONAL RTTY CALLING 
AND WORKING FREQUENCIES 



3620 kc. 



7140 kc. 



to send in your Annual Report for 19.54, but file away a 
reminder to yourself to give your SEC and Headquarters 
the dope on your group regularly during the coming year, 
and fdl out that annual report form you get in the fall. 

We account for the two following items not by making 
any lame excuses — only by saying that they were deleted 
from our copy for ,Iune, 19.54. QST (which already had two 




ISot all of our ECs are ugly old men. Meet up with 
W5CXM, EC for Blaine County, Okla., who not only 
adds charm to our unglamorous ranks but who also, 
from all reports, does a whale of a good organizing job 
in her area. Says SEC ^ SKY: "I wish 1 had a baker's 
dozen of ECs cut to her pattern." Not a bad idea, eh? 

full pages of material), put into a "hold " file and have just 
come to light. Despite their tardiness, we want these items 
recorded in QST. Apologies to W2SJV and W4SPD re- 
spectively. 

On M.xrch 29, 19.54, a severe snowstorm hit the Buffalo 
area, causing traffic jams and people to be late or unable 
to get home. Mobilers W2HS1, K2DVD and W2LYE, by 
contacting other amateurs, were not only able to get word 
to their own families of their pro licamcnt. but performed 
the same service for a great number of other motorists 
caught in the same traffic jams. Taking turns as NCS for the 
improvised net were WSs CMS and OV.l. Stations taking 
traffic included Wis MYN NZA UXS POM PRI E/l'X 
K2GHF, VE3DD0. 

A tornado liit the ^lacon, Georgia, area on March 13th, 
1951, taking off the roof of W'4SPD's house and all his 
transmitting antennas. After settling his family, he went to 
the home of EC W4LXE and found Stubby already on the 
air using emergency power, with four mobiles already out 
searching for stricken areas. The mobiles relayed needs of 
victims back to W4LXE, from whence they were telephoned 
to the Red Cross (W4SPD is chairman of the Macon Red 
Cross Disaster Communications Committee). Mobiles were 
manned by ll'^s LQW ,JMW LXE and ZYA. W^s UJC 
UMN and SPD manned the kilowatt at W4LXE. W4TAZ 
operated his fixed station for relay work. Although fortu- 
nately all areas were available to mobile units this time, the 
Macon Amateur Radio Club has begun construction of a 
number of two-meter hand-carried units. Others active in 
this emergency were W4s DZL TED YVVW and KL7AQJ/4. 



While traveling along Skyline Boulevard about forty 
miles south of San Francisco, and participating in the Sky- 
riders Net, W6WD noticed fresh skid marks on the highway. 
Slowing down and investigating, he discovered that a car 
liad crashed 25 feet off the highway into a ditch — out of 
sight of the road — and that two ladies and an elderly 
gentleman were injured. W6WD broke into the net ahead 
of turn and apprised them of the situation. K6EER tele- 
phoned the San Mateo County sheriff and a radio ambulance 
and patrol car were dispatched. While the ambulance was 
en route, WOWD administered first aid to the injured 
parties. WGANK was net control, and the entire net re- 
mained on the air until everything was well under control. 
Thanks to K6EER for reporting this incident. 

This is precisely the sort of thing we were talking about 
in August QST last year (p. 66). K6EER suggests that 
amateur mobiles equip themselves with first-aid kits in 
order to be the more useful in such a contingency. 



A tornado struck the town of Wellington, Ala., with prac- 
tically no warning at about 1330 on Sunday, Dec. 5, 1954, 



72 



QST for 



causing 30 casualties and several hundred thousand dollars 
worth of damage. Amateurs in Anniston were alerted by 
W4BCU, who notified W4SUF and W4GCV. Organization 
began at 1430. SUF/m, in contact with GCV, was unable 
to reach the stricken area because of poor visibility. W4PJB, 
with W4V0Q riding with him, was the first to reach Wel- 
lington, after having difficulty getting through Highway 
Patrol roadblocks. Services were offered to the Highway 
Patrol, Red Cross and Civil Defense. W4s UHA and OAO 
undertook to establish contacts on 75 meters. The Alabama 
Emergency Net (AENP) was alerted and put on stand-by. 
Contact between the two nets, one on 75 and the other on 
10, was maintained by landline. W4DZF/m was dispatched 
to a hilltop to establish contact with both P.JB/m in Annis- 
ton and with control station W4GCV. From this point he 
acted as a relay station during the entire emergency, and 
also succeeded in establishing contact with W4EBD in 
Birmingham. At 1600 W4s SVM/m and SUF/m joined 
W4P.JB/m in Wellington and operation settled down to 
routine. All traffic originating in Wellington was relayed by 
W4DZF/m to W4GCV in Anniston. W4YCO was assisting 
W4DZF/m. The Red Cross furnished casualty lists which 
were relayed to Wellington, Birmingham and Gadsden. 
W4s OZK and PAC/m operated from Padoden. Mobiles 
remained at the Wellington site until about midnight, at 
which time they were released. Traffic was handled for the 
Governor, Red Cross, Anniston T'ire Dept., .\nniston Police 
Dept., State Highway Patrol, National Guard, the Birming- 
ham News, the Anniston Star, Civil Air Patrol and Civil 
Defense. 

— W4GCV, EC Anniston-Oxford. Ala. 

Ninety-six amateurs participated in an air-raid drill held 
in Pittsburgh on October 25, 19.54. Ninety-three stations 
were available. The complete Allegheny County emergency 
radio system was operated in accordance with RACES 
plans. The network operated on ten meters, and tie-in was 
effected with state c.d. networks operating on 75 meters. 
EC W3LMM reports that the distribution of all stations in 
the individual zones was excellent. In one zone he de- 
liberately refrained from notifying the control station of 
the yellow alert, just to see what would happen. A mobile 
unit took over as zone control prior to the red alert, and 
immediately following the all-clear the regular zone control 
station was active. WSLMM (who is also radio officer for 
R.\CES) feels that the drill was most successful; participa- 
tion increased 100 per cent over a similar drill held last June. 



Tennessee civil defense conducted a statewide alert on 
November 7th last year, centered around Knoxvillc, which 
was "bombed." SEC W4RRV reports that the AREC gang 
aroimd the state did a good job for amateur radio. Cities 
represented included Knoxville, Chattanooga, Nashville, 
Memphis, Cookville and Oak Ridge. The Tennessee C.W. 
Net was also active and received high praise from c.d. offi- 
cials. In fact, one newspaper quoted the Chattanooga Area 
Deputy Civil Defense Director as saying that the local 
amateurs "can offer the best commimication service in that 
field of anywhere I have ever seen. I am amazed at their 
service." Nice going, Tennessee gang. 

Twelve SECs reported activities for November, 195t. 
Total AREC membership represented was 4330. None of the 
twelve was new to the reported list, so the total remains at 
29 sections. We aLso had twelve reports for November last 
year. Sections reporting: Los Angeles, Western New York. 
New York City-Long Island, Eastern Florida, Wisconsin, 
South Dakota, Montana, Western Florida, San Joaquin 
Valley, Georgia, Colorado, Alabama. 



Last December the Maryland Civil Defense Control 
Center was honored by an inspection visit from Marv- 
land's Governor McKeldin. The RACES installation 
came in for its share of interest, as shown in the picture. 
The operators, left lo right, are WSQIF and W3IF\^ . 
Standing, left to right, are W3.TE (Md. C.D. Radio 
Oflficer), Governor McKeldin and Sherley Ewing (Md. 
C.D. Director). 



March 1955 



TRAINING AIDS 

If you're a member of an ARRL-affiliated club and have 
not seen the films available to your group, ask your club 
secretary to write the Communications Department for a 
list of current training aids. At present they include 30 
films, 13 film strips, two slide collections and ten different 
quizzes. The demand is high but items available now can 
furnish your club with many a lively and educational 
evening. 



DX CENTURY CLUB AWARDS 






HONOR ROLL 






WIFH. . 


. 258 


W3BES 248 


W6SYG 


245 


W6VFR . 


. .254 


G2PL..::::247 


W3JTC . 


'. '. 244 


W6AM . . 


. .251 


W6SN 246 


W3KT 


244 


W6EXV. 


..251 


W3GHD. . .245 


PY2Ck;. 


.';244 


W8HGW 


..251 


W6MEK.. .245 


W2BXA . 


. .243 


W0YXO. 


..250 


Radiotelephone 


W5MIS. 


. .243 


PY2CK.. 


. .237 


WIJCX 215 


WINWO 


. .212 


WIFH. . 


..230 


W1MCW...215 


W9RBI . . 


..201 


VQ4ERR 


..225 


XEIAC 215 


SM5KP.. 


..207 


ZS6BW 221 

From Decern b 


W8HGW...214 


W3JNN. 

nuary 15. 


..206 
1955. 


er IS. 1954. to Ja 


DXCC certificates and endorsements based on postwar 1 


contacts with 100-or-more countries 


have been 


Issued 1 


by ttie ARRL Communications Deoartment to the 1 


amateurs ILsted below. 








NEW MEMBERS 




CTIJS. . 


. .159 


W4GQE....103 


W0BCJ . . 


..101 


WIDIT. . 


. . 122 


W8MWL...102 


W20XR 


. .100 


F3CB . . . 


..107 


KH6ER....102 


W2MUM 


..100 


W9VP... 


. .106 


W5HDS....101 
Ra dio telephone 


W6ZEN. 


..100 


GOBS. . . 


..120 


W2GLF... .114 


W5KUJ. 


..101 


ZLIKC. 


..120 


W4NHF. . .106 
OD5BA 105 


W4FP.S. . 


..100 




ENDOHSEMENTS 




W2HUQ. 


..240 


W9AH.\ ISO 


W6ID . . . 


..142 


W5ASG . 


..240 


KZ5WZ 173 


W2FXE. 


..140 


W8KIA . . 


. .233 


G6BS 170 


W0DXE . 


. .132 


W6VE... 


. .220 


IIXK 169 


PA0ZL.. 


. .131 


OX4AU. 


..220 


W6LDJ 168 


W0NLY. 


..130 


W0AIW. 


..212 


W5DML...160 


WIBTE. 


..120 


W2HMJ. 


. .201 


WSLKH. . .160 


W5WI . . . 


..120 


W9HUZ. 


..200 


ULIQT 153 


W3KDF. 


. . 120 


KP4KO 


. .200 


W3MDE.. .150 


W9TMU 


..111 


W2LDD. 


. .180 


W5DMR...150 
W3MFW...145 

Radiotelephone 


WIJEL. . 


..110 


W0AIW. 

wSkt . . 


..175 


W9BVX . . . 148 


W2JY... 


-.130 


..170 


r<)2BK . . .140 


W2FXE. 


..121 


W8KML. 


. .161 


CR6BX 1.33 


W1P3T. . 


..120 


W2VWN. 


. .150 


W8BKP....132 


W5DMR 


..111 


C02BL 150 

W/VE/VOCal 




W8VDJ....110 
ental Leaders 


'Area and Contir 


VV4BPD 


. .241 


VE3QD 210 


VESAW. 


..160 


W7A.MX. 


. .238 


VE4RO 223 


V06EP. . 


. .190 


W9XDA. 


..240 


VE5QZ 140 


4X4RE. . 


. .210 


VKIHG. . 


..150 


VE6GD....108 


ZS6BW. . 


..229 


VE2WW. 


..181 


VE7HC .... 209 
Radiotelephone 


ZLIHY. . 


..231 


W2APU. 


. .202 


W7HIA 175 


VK4RO. . 


. .120 


W4HA. . . 


..177 


W0AIW....162 


VE7ZM.. 


. .140 


W5BGP. 


. . 205 


VEICR 120 


OD5AB.. 


..154 


W6AM 


. .199 


VE2WW. . .102 
VE3KF. ... 163 


ZLIHY. . 


. .190 




TRAFFIC TOPICS 

W0KXL brinps up the matter of the need for certain end- 
ing signals in traffic net operation. On QKS (Kansas Section 
Net) they follow a procedure by means of which any listen- 
ing station wlio just happens to turn on his receiver or get 
tuned in can tell by the ending signal used by the NCS 
whether or not the way is open for him to QNI. 

Perhaps we traffic men ought to adopt some sort of stand- 
ard procedure in ending signals, since the signals adopted 
by ARRL after the war were adopte d pri marily with the 
needs of the DX man in mind. We hear KN used quite often 
in casual contact these davs. The ending signal we hear most 
of the time, however, is AR K, which signifies nothing except 
that the transmitting station is ending a transmission. Ac- 
cording to the ARRL code (Operating Aid No. 2), it would 
mean the station has just called another station and wishes 
any station to answer him. Not very logical. 

W0KXL points out that ending signals should be used in 
net operation, otherwise the receiving station has no way 
of knowing when the transmission is ended. Perhaps he has 
a point. Most of us have run into this difficulty in our c.w. 
traffic nets. Here are a few examples of some ending signals 
that we need : 

1) Acknowledge instructions. 

2) Reply desired by stations concerned only. 

3) Do not reply, or no reply necessary. 

4) End of QTC list (used by station reporting into net). 

5) Stations may report into net. 

We're collecting suggestions on the above. Anybody have 
any? 

Miscellaneous Net Reports: (1) The Transcontinental 
Relay Net had a traffic count of 1622 in 31 sessions, aver- 
aging 52 per session; five stations participated. (2) The 
Transcontinental 'Phone Net reports 14 stations handling 
827 messages. (3) North Texas-Oklahoma Net handled 531 
messages in 31 sessions, 854 check-ins. (4) The Early Bird 
Transcontinental 'Phone Net handled 1304 messages in 
December, making their total 9519 for the year 1954; they 
count each message only once, no matter how many times 
relayed. 

United Trunk Lines announces that its directors for 1955 
are W3WV, WODDE and W9TT. Each division averaged 
close to 1300 messages per month in 1954. 

Those of you who prefer 'phone and don't mind climbing 
out of the hay at a rather early hour might like to have a 
whirl with the Early Bird Transcontinental Net. This net 
was formed back in the late Forties. It started as a rag-chew 
group, but W6BPT kept reporting in with traffic, and event- 
ually it