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Full text of "Quarterly Journal of Science, Literature and the Arts"

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INDEX 



THE FIRST TWENTY VOLUMES 



QUARTERLY JOURNAL. 



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INDEX 



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QUARTERLY JOURNAL 



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SCIENCE AND THE ARTS. 




LONDON : 
JOHN MURKAY, ALBEMARLE-STREET, 



WDCCCXXV^. 



LONDON 
PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES 

North um lie rl a iid^ o urt . 




INDEX 

TO 

THE FIRST TWENTY VOLUMES 

OF THE 

QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF SCIENCE j 
AND THE ARTS, 



Abel (Dr. Clarke), notice of galvanic experiments of, ix. 261, 
262, notes 

Aberdeenshire, observations on the granite of, x. 29-51. See 
Mac Culloch 

Aberration of stars, investigation of the corrections of, viii. 21-27 

an easy method of computing, xii. 51, 154. Of com- 
pound lenses and object glasses, 369 

Aberthaw limestone, analysis of, xviii. 187 

Abo, notice of the observatory at, xii. 432 

Academy of Sciences of the Royal Institute of France, proceed- 
ings of, ii. 179, 190. iii. 145-179. iv. 84 

. the Lalande prize medal conferred on M. Bessel, iv. 

85. Baron Humboldt on caverns of rocks, and on their relation 
to the strata in which they are found, ibid. Annual meeting of 
the Academy, 86. Subjects for prizes proposed by it, ibid. 
Notice of M. Devaux's memoir on the methodical arrangement 
of Lycopodia and Filices, 87. And of M. Rigaud de I'lsle's 
memoir on the aria cattiva, near Rome, ibid. Miscellaneous 
proceedings of the academy, 88, 92-94, 96, 97, 100, 101, 102. 
Experiments of MM. Chevillot and Edwards on the cameleon 
mineral, 89. Of M. Portal on vomiting, 91. Of M. PineFs 
report of M. Esquinal's memoir on hallucination, 94, 95. Of 
M. Girard's memoir on the valley of Egypt, 98. Of Dr. 
Edwards's experiments on frogs, toads, and salamanders, 99 

B 



55 ^ INDEX. 

Academy, prize-questions of, v. 360, 361-378 

Acceleration of the pendulum in different latitudes, notice of ex- 
periments for determining, xii. 363-367 

Accum's (Mr.) treatise on coal gas, notice of, vii. 317 

— evidence of, with remarks in the cause of Severn and 

Co. against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 332, 333 

Acetate of lead, new ore, viii. 379, 380 

— — of alumine, ix. 182 

— of lime, phosphorescence of, xvii. 163. Of morphia, 

how detected in cases of poisoning, 168-170. Of copper, 383. 

Acetic acid, experiments to ascertain the strength of, vi. 258-261 

Acetometer, principles of the construction of, vi. 255-262 

Aching, sense of, how produced, ii. 16, 17 

Achromatic telescope of the Royal Observatory at Paris, xx. 286 

Acids, on the constitution of, i. 287, 288. Composition and com- 
binations of phosphoric acid, 291 

■ and sulphuretted hydrogen gas, experiments on the mu- 

tual decomposition of, ii. 152, 153 

' substance, experiments, and observations on a new one 



generated from ether, iii. 77-81 
' researches concerning. Acetic, vi. 258-261 ; benzoic. 



152; boracic, 152; gallic, 154; malic, 153; oxy-acids, new, 
152 ; sorbic, 153. What acids are useful or hurtful in calculous 
disorders, 200 ; — their probable mode of acting, 203. Account 
of the acid formed by the slow combustion of ether, 318-326 
new, of sulphur and oxygen, account of, vii. 371-375. 



Caseic acid, notice of, 389,390. Pyroligneous acid, 391. 

of arsenic, composition of, viii. 378 

— — . of the French Pharmacopoeia ^ observations on, ix. 242-244 
action of an oxide of gold, x. 118. Benzoic found in 



melilot and Tonquin bean, 173. Pyroligneous, antiseptic 

power of, ibid, 174, 175. Of manganese, experiments with, 

175-179. Boracic, analysis of, 196. Fluoric found in mica, 196 

new, produced by the distillation of citric acid, xiv. 422. 



Properties of the pyro-citric acid, 423-425 ; its constituent 
parts, 436. Experiments on the combination of acetic acid 
and alcohol with the volatile oils, 425-427 



INDEX. 3 

Acids, of the triple prussiates, experiments on, xvi. 102, 103. On 
the purpuric acid, 104. Cyanic, new mode of forming, 104» 
105, 106. Tartaric, its influence in certain cases of analysis, 
107-109. Comparative examination of the apids of butter, of 
the phocenic and hircic acids, 112-113. Nitric, its action on 
charcoal, 161. Hydriodic, test for platinum in solution, 166, 
On the carbonic and muriatic acids of the atmosphere, 172 

succinic and benzoic, facts relative to the history of, xvii. 

141. Preparation of sulphurous acid gas, 163,164. Acid tar- 
taro-sulphate of potash, 171. Gallic, its conversion into ulmin, 
174. lodous, its analysis, 3S1. Sulphurous, its liquefaction, 
391. Meconic acid, its action on the animal economy, 393 

— — — sulphuric of Nordhausen, researches on, xviii. 145-148. 
Nitric, its action on charcoal, 180. The oxalate and formiate 
of ammonia converted into hydrocyanic acid, 397 

Acoustical machine, new, described, ix. 175-177 

Acrid poisons, classification and treatment of, iii. 51 

Adam's Peak, a mountain in Ceylon, description of, v. 28-30. 
Pilgrimages made thither, 26, 27, Its height determined, 151 

Adams (Robert), abstract of his narrative of his shipwreck in 
Morocco, and residence in Timbuctoo, i. 275'277 

Adams (Sir W.) on the restoration of vision, injured or de- 
stroyed by the cornea assuming a conical form, ii. 403-415 

Adamson (W. Esq.), observations of, on the common horizontal 
water-wheel, iv. 46, 47. Explanation of the new patent 
horizontal water-wheel, and the principle of its action, 47-57 

Adder, specific for the bite of, v. 141 

Adelung, notice of the philological labours of, x. 201 

Admiralty Chronometrical arrangements, remarks on, xiii. 211-218 

Aeriform fluids^ characters of, i. 96, 97 

Aerolites, accounts of, v. 292, 293. Conjecture on their origin, 294 

• notices of, vi. 368, 369 

• on the composition of, x. 189, 190, 462 

fall of, at Juvenas, account of, xii. 425, 42(5 

notices of, xiv. 448-450. 

of Epinal, analysis of, xv. 166, 316 

B 2 



4 INDEX, 

Aerolites, notices of, xvi. 1S4 

• composition of, xx. 185 

Aerometer, for correcting pneumatic experiments, v. 52-55 
Affinity (chemical), anomalous case of, i. 81-86 
Africa, account of the plague in, viii. 183-185 

prospectus of an expedition into, ix. 428-430 

(Western) account of a journey from Egypt to, xiv. 3-14. 

■ (Southern) observations on the climate of, 241-254 
African expedition, failure of, v. 146, 147 
Agamous vegetation, observations on, v. 257-264. vi. 20-31. 

210-226 
Agave, account of a new species of, ii. 86-90 
Agrarian divisions of the Egyptians, observation on, ii. 187 
Agriculture (Board of), premiums offered by, vi. 137, 13S 
when instituted, x. 304. Confers its gold 

medal on Mr. A, Young, 307 

I on the use of oxen in, 218 

prize question in, x. 445 



Ague, new remedy for, xiii. 233 

AiKiN (Arthur, Esq.), evidence of, with remarks, in the cause of 
Severn and Co., against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 349 
Air, effects of on vegetation, ii. 48-50 

— on the weight of, vii. 380 

— on the flotage of small heavy bodies in, and on certain at- 
mospheric phenomena dependent thereon, viii. 245-258 

— poisonous in the higher mountainous regions of Hindostan, ix.65 

— has weight, xi. 262-264. How to ascertain to what volume 
of air a certain quantity of water is reduced, 265. Proof that 
air is rendered heavy by the mixture of some matter heavier 
than itself, 268. And by the compression of its parts, 269 

— rendered heavier by the separation of its lighter parts, xii. 
54-56. Thickened by fire, 61-64. Proof that it diminishes in 
weight, 294-295 

— influence of green fruits on, xiii. 152-154 

— experiments on the vibration of, xvi. 371, 372 

— of marshes bordering upon the sea, notice of the insalubrity 
of, XX. 401-403 



INDEX. O 

Air-gun, notice of tlie first discovery of, xi. 271, note, 

experiments on the light produced by the discharge 

of, XV. 64-CG 

Air-pump, successful application of, to the impregnation of sub- 
stances with fluids, xii. 108 

Albbrtus (Magnus), notice of, ix. 299 

Albumen, influence of water on, xiii. 410 

Alburnum, of spring and winter felled trees, different qualities of, 
x.395 

Alchemy, sketch of the history of, ix. 225-239 

Alcohol, average quantity of, in different kinds of wine, table of, 
V. 152-154 

obtained from potatoe apples, vi. 157. 

on the formation of in fruits, vii. 385 

formation of, by fluoboric gas, xi. 394, 395 

effect of voltaic electricity on, xiy. 232 

■ its combination with volatile oils, xiv. 4'27. Concen- 

tration of by bladders, xviii. 180 

action of lime on, xx. 180-181. Rectification of, at 



common temperatures, 400 

Ale, experiments on the strength of, v. 124 

Alexandria, observations on the inscription on the column at, x. 
1-7. Fac-simile of it, 8 

Algae, observations on the formation and fructification of, vi. 
211-218 

Algebraical and fluxional notation, remarks on the principles of, 
XX. 321-325 

Algol, table of the recurrence of the smallest light of, xvii. 184, 
185. 

Ali Bey, abstract of the travels of, i. 264. The reality of this 
traveller asserted, ibid. 265. Notice of the different hypo- 
theses respecting the course of the Niger, 265-267. Evidence 
collected by Ali Bey, for the existence of a Mediterranean sea 
in the middle of Africa, in which the Niger terminates, 267« 
272. Account of his crossing the Great Desert, 273-275 

Alisma Plantago useful in hydrophobia, vi. 165, 166 

Alison (Dr.), observations on the theory, which ascribes sensa-» 



O INDEX. 

tions to the agency of the nerves, ix. 106-124. Remarks on 
some of his positions, 253-260 

Alison (Dr.)» observations of, on the theory which ascribes se- 
cretions and animal heat to the agency of nerves, x. 269-282 

Alkali, from potato stalks, v. 122, 123. A new one discovered, 
152. Account of it, 337-340 

new vegetable, notice of, vi. 149. How detected in 

vegetables, 361 

quantity of, yielded by potatoes, vii. 183. Account of 



a new vegetable one, called strychnine, 375. viii. 156, 378 

new vegetable, account of, x. 171-173. xi. 204. 

new test for, xiv. 445 

vegetable, discovered in rhubarb, xvi. 172 



Alkalies, what, are beneficial in calculous disorders, vi. 205-207. 

In what manner they operate, 207-209 

. new vegetable, account of, ix. 186-191,402 

Alkaline carbonates, effect of a vacuum on, xv. 383. 

minerals, analysis of, xii. 169-171 

Alkornok, an Indian medicine, analysis of, ii. 172 

Allan (Thomas, Esq.), Review of his work on Mineralogical 

Nomenclature, i. 242-244 

on the lead mine of Dufton, ii. 198-200 

his dividing engine, specimen of the examination of, xii, 

381-386. Results of his measures, 387 
Allason (T. Esq.) on the columns of the Athenian temple, x. 

204-206 
Allen (W. Esq.), evidence of (with remarks) in the cause of 

Severn and Co. against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 333 
Alloys of platinum, vii. 387 

• of steel, experiments on, ix. 319-330. xii. 316. xiv. 377 

of antimony and potassium, first produced by Geoffroy, 

xix. 152 
Almanack, computation of the elements for, x. 159-161 
Almonds (sweet), analysis of, v. 125 

(bitter), analysis of, v. 126 

. on the volatile oil of as a poison, xiii. 404 

experiments on the volatile oil of, xv. 155, 156 



INDEX. 7 

Almonds, notice of a crystallized deposit in the oil of, xv. 376 

Alps, analysis of the red snow of, ix. 199-201 

Alsop (Mr.), method of, for secret writing, xix. 140. On the 

properties of Margosa oil, 162, 163 
Alstenia Teiformis, account of, ii. 92. Experiments on by M. 

Palacio Faxar, 93. And by M. Faraday, 93, 94 
Alta Gracifi (Capuchin mission of), notice of, ix. 24, 25 
Altar (Roman), notice of, xi. 411 
Altitudes, influence of different, upon vegetation in different zones 

of the earth, x. 262-26G 
Alum, phenomena attending the process of solution of, i. 25, 26 

prepared from soda, vi. 363 

chemical analysis of, xi. 342. Found in decomposed mica 

slate, xii. 414 

analysis of, and number of alumina, xiii. 227 

formations, analysis, and uses of soda-alum, xiii. 276-278 

crystals, method of colouring, xiv. 445-446 

action of, on blue colours, xviii. 396 



• slate of Freinwald, analysis of, xii. 278-282 

stone of Tolfa, analysis of, xii. 277,278 

Alumina, fusion of, by the blow-pipe, ii. 110 

• new method of obtaining pure, iv. 387. Analysis of 

silicated hydrate, and siliceous sub-sulphate of, v. 139-140, 
376 ; and potassa, analysis of the sub-sulphate of, xi. 3S9 

Alumina, analysis of the hydrate of, xiii. 436 

on a peculiar sulphate of, xiv. 435 

notice of native phosphate of, xv. 168. Of the native 

sulphate of iron and alumina, 389 

■ geological notice of, xix. 82-83 



Aluminite, component parts of, xi. 342 

Aluminous soap prevents the ravages of moths in cloths, xi. 

393 
Amalgamation of nickel and cobalt by arsenic, xvi. 106 
Amaria, genus, notice of, iii. 127 
Amaryllis, genus, review of, ii. 342-371 
Amber, on animals preserved in, xvi. 41-44, 393, 391-. Remarks 

on its nature and origin, xvi. 44-4S. 



8 INDEX. 

America, botanical researches of MM. Humboldt and Bonpland 
in, ii. 52-54} 

(North) geological divisions of, iii. 84, 85 

• ravages of locusts in, vi. 102. Account of an Ameri- 
can sea-serpent, 163-164. Notice of ancient coins disco- 
vered in, 180. Account of a water-burner invented in, 367. 
Meteoric iron found in North America, 369 

notice of a scientific excursion in, vii. 198 

scientific expedition into the interior of, viii. 188. 



Description of Indian antiquities there, 224-232 

antique silver cup, found in, ix. 210 

statistics of, x. 203. Census of, 432 

— — tyrant shrikes of, observations on, xx. 267-285 



Amethyst, globules of water found in, xx. 187 

Amici, (Prof.) account of some optical inventions by, xii. 398-401 

• abstract of the microscopical observations of, xvi. 388-393 

Ammonia, observations on the solution of silver in, iv. 268-273 
combinations of with chlorides, v. 74-77. A specific 

remedy for the bite of an adder, 141. On the oxide of silver 

by ammonia, 368, 369 

i lampate of, vi. 321 

— experiments on the carbonate of, vii. 294-296 



Ammonia, formation of, ix. 182. Notice of calculi, composed of 
urate of ammonia, ix. 405-406 

. solution of oxide of copper in, xiii. 226 

— (bi-phosphate and bin-arseniate of,) on the relation 

between the crystalline form and chemical proportions of, xiv. 203- 
204. And of the arseniate and phosphate of ammonia, 204-205 

, — muriate of, from coal strata, xv. 169-170. Discovered 



in lava, 169 

experiments on a per-sulphate of iron and, xv. 381, 382 

on the presence of, in the rust of iron formed in houses. 



xvi. 380, 381 

. — and carbon, re-action of the sulphuret of, and on the 



combinations thence resulting, xviii. 149-155 

the oxalate and formiate of, converted into liydrocy- 



anic acid, xviii. 397 



INDEX. 9 

Ammonia, observations on some cases of the formation of, xix. 
16-26. Advantageous preparation of compounds of, 344 

Ammoniacal gas, action of on copper, xv. 157 

inflammability of, xvi. 165, 166 

Ammonite discovered, containing shells, xviii. 188, 411 

Ampere (M.),newelectro-magnetical experiments of, xiv. 441, 442 

experiments of, on the nature of the electric current, 

xviii. 381, 382 

Amulets, origin of, xiv. 360 

Anagram, a curious one, xiii. 300 

Analogies between undecompounded substances, observations on, 
i. 283-286 

among different rocks, observations on, and on their 

resemblances to unconsolidated strata, xix. 200-208 

Analysis of new Scientific Books, xv. 108-127, 320-348. xvi. 
134-138, 301-347. xvii. 105-130, 335-359. xviii. 111-144, 
332-338. xix. 100-108, 294-327. xx. 113-160, 329-356, 374 

— — of sea-water, i. 292, 294, 297 

« of soils, process for, iii. 193, 194 

Analysis of mineral waters, observations on, x. 217, 230. Of 
rhubarb, 288-292. 

Analysis of ferro-arsenical sulphuret of copper, xii. 30-32. Of 
an antimoriial sulphuret of copper, 32-34. Of a cupreous 
sulphuret of lead and antimony, 34, 36. Of the sulphuret 
of copper and bismuth, 36-37. Of the blue iron ore of 
Eckartsberg, 38. Of granular chromic iron ore, 39, 40. Of 
alkaline minerals, 169, 171. Table of their results, 328. Of 
black and green tea, 201-206. Of cererit, or cerite, 262-264. 
Of the oxide of cerium, 264, 265. Of a compact ore of Titanium 
from Arendac, 265, 266. Of the topaz, 266. Particularly that 
of Saxony, 266-268. Of zoisit from Carinthia, 268, 269. Of 
the foliated augite of Carinthia, 269, 270. Of conchoidal apa- 
tite, 271, 272. Of the columnar brown spar of Mexico, 272- 
274. Of dolomite, 274. Of anhydrite, 275. Of bitter spar 
from the Tyrol, 276. Of the green earth of Verona, 276. Of 
the alum-stone of Tolfa, 277 : and of Frienwald, 278-282. Of 
the crystallized calamine of Limbourg, 328. Of an arsenical 



10 INDEX. 

pyrites, 328. Of the garnet of Broddbo, 329, Of malacolite, 
329. Of meteoric stones, 329-331. Of chondrodite, 329. Of 
copper pyrites, 331. Of anhydrite, 275, 276 

Analysis of the roots of black hellebore, xiii. 150. Of the ores of 
nickel, by means of chlorine, 15G-160. Of Mica, 160. Of 
the oxide of Titanium, 226. Of alum, 227. Of soda-alum, 
276. Of the mineral and thermal waters of St. Nectaire, 396. 
Of a salivary calculus from a horse, and also of the saliva, 399. 
Of the hop, 402. Of the bark of Quassia Simaronha^ 416. Of 
the salmon, ibid. Of the mineral and thermal waters of Mount 
Dore, 417. Of the table-spar of Pargas, 419. Of a meteoric 
stone, 420. Of the meteoric stone of Juvenas, 420, 438. Of 
forense and formate of lead, 429. Of yellow copper-ore, 
434. Of the native carbonates of manganese, 435. Of the 
native chromates of iron, 436. Of the hydrate of alumina, ibid. 

of verdigris, xiv. 228. Of Chinese white copper, 232. 

Of tutenag, ibid. Of resin elemi, 2BS. Of intestinal concre- 
tions, 237. Of several celebrated quack medicines, 374. 
(Ultimate) of vegetable and animal substances, 388. Of a new 
blue colour, 437 

of a new sulphur spring at Harrowgate, xv. 82-89. Of 



an aerolite, 106, 166, 316. Of uranite, 168. Of native 
phosphate of alumina, 168. Of crystallized stalactitic quarte, 
169. Of the waters of Carlsbad, 170. Of different French 
limestones, 311-314. Of the touchstone, 315-316. Of the 
fruit of the areca catechu, 317. Of native sulphate of iron 
and alumina 
(chemical) uncertainty of, xvi. 164-165; 378. Various 



analyses by M. Arfwedson, 394 

of cafeine, xvii. 174. Of sodous acid, 381, 382 

of mountain-tallow, xviii. 187. Of Aberthaw lime- 



stone, ihid. Of the Holywell water near Cartmel, 188. Of 
a calculus, 189. Of the sulpho-iodide of antimony, 396. Of 
the glass of antimony, 397. Of the volcanic saline matter of 
Vesuvius, 407. Of Erlanite, 408 
of selenium from the Anglesea pyrites, xix. 151, 152, 



Of chloride of titanium, 156, 157 



INDEX. II 

Analysis of a human calculus, xx. 49. Of two mineral waters 

from the springs in Windsor Great Park, 264, Of a calculus 

from a hog, 411 
Analytical review of foreign literaiy journals, iv. 386-399 
Anatomical specimens, improved mode of preserving, xiii. 232, 

233. XV. 391. 

preservative of, xix. 368. xx. 200 

Ancient glass, composition of, xx. 180 

Ancillaria, the genus, a monograph of, with a description of several 

new species, xviii. 272-289 
Aneurism, notice of professor Scarpa's mode of curing, iii. 404 
Anger, effects of, in producing change of functions in the living 

body, iv. 222, 223 
Angle, instrument for the graphical trisection of, xix. 139, 

140 
Angostura, journal of an excursion from, to the Capuchin mis-^. 

sions of the Caroni, viii. 260-287. ix. 1-32 
Animal genealogy, outline of a new system of, ii. 157 

— m calculi and concretions, experiments on, vii. 193. 

■ soap, new notice of, ix. 409. 

' substances, on the separation of the proximate principles 

of, xiii. 287-289 

charcoal, action of, in the refining of sugar, xv. 156 

' kingdom, outlines of Sir E. Home's system of, proposed 



from the modification of the human ovum, xvi. 324-326 

heat, causes of, xviii. 412 

system, effects of lightning on the, xx. 404 



Animals, new classification of, ii. 429-431 

observations on the secreting power of, ix. 251-264. 

xi. 40-44. New mode of killing, ix. 411 

preparation of specimens of, x. 457 

on marine luminous, xi. 248, 260 

— remarkable fact in breeding, xii. 126, 127 

■ on the nature of the saline matters existing in the 

stomachs of, xviii. 142-144 
Amiales de Chimic, analytical review of, iii. 159» 166, 427-448, 

452, 453 



12 INDEX. 

Annates de Chimie, strictures on, 449-452. iii. 211-218. iv. 
386-389, 395-398 

Maritimes et Coloniales, analysis of, iii. 383-390 

Annealing of cast-iron, importance of, xiv. 224 

Annonay, notice of an economical bridge at, xv. 136 

Annuities, theorem on the doctrine of, xix. 258-260 

Anthracite, fusion of, xvi. 160 

Anti-attrition preparation, effects of an, xx. 375 

Antigua (island) of, its geological structure, v. 312 

Antimony, sulphuret of, how prepared, vii. 386 

■ observations on the preparations of, in the French Phar- 
macopoeia, ix. 247, 248 

and lead, analysis of a cupreous sulphuret of, xii. 34- 



S6. Compounds of, 171-172. On the detection of arsenic in 

the ores of, 412 

sulpho-iodide of, analyzed, xviii. 396. Composition 



of the glass of, 397. Compound of muriate and hydrosul- 
phuretted oxide of, xix. 156 
combinations of with chlorine and sulphur, xx. 390- 



398 

Antiquities recently discovered, notices of, at Chadderden, in 
Derbyshire, V. 147. In the Crimea, 148. At Largs, in Scot- 
land, 149. At Charlton, in Cheshire, ibid. Roman Villa, 
near Oxford, 150. Egyptian antiquities, 151. Near Chiusi, 
384. At Paris, ibid. At Bushire, 385. At Hieres, ibid. 
At Avignon, ibid. Various discovered in England, 386, 387 

' recently discovered, Roman station at Haceby, vi. 114. 

Roman cemetery near Eye, 174-175. Roman villa, near Big- 
Bor, 175. Remains of antiquity at Sanda, 175. Ancient 
graves, 176. Roman pavement, ibid. Discoveries among the 
Pyramids, 176, 177. Antique rings, coins, and medals, 178 

Greek, found in the Crimea, notice of, vii. 195 ; at 



Aries, 196; at Pompeii, 403; at Namur, ibid.; in Sweden, 

ibid. 
Ants, utility of, in destroying venomous insects, viii. 174, 175 

" ravages of prevented, by using salt as a manure, x. 67, 68 
Antshar or poison-tree, account of, and of the mode of preparing 



INDEX. IS 

the poison, ii. 332-335. Results of experiments with the 
poison, 336-339 

Apatite of Devonshire, account of, iv. 369-372 

(conchoidal) analysis of, from Zillerthal, xii. 271, 272 

Aphonia, or loss of utterance, cured by electricity, ii. 204 

Apograph, notice of, xii. 169 

Apothecaries' Company, historical notice of, xvi. 193-195. In 
what manner its aifairs are conducted, 196-198. Description 
of the laboratories of, 199-202 

Apparatus for distilling sea-water, vi. 147, 148 

(new) for the combustion of the diamond described, 

ix. 264-265. 

Apple-trees, blight in, how prevented, v. 357 

' • bread, notice of, xi. 384 

Aqua Regia, observations on, i. 67, 68 

Aquatic plants, effects of, ii. 55 

• • salamander, the process of the re-production of the 

members of, described, xvi. 84-96 

Aqueduct of Alcantara, Portuguese description of, v. 283. Ac- 
count of by Mr. Rennie, 2S4. Dimensions of its arches, 285 
Appearance and analysis of its w^aters, 287. Description of 
the reservoir, 289. Inscription on its south side, ibid. 290 

Arabic digits, conjectures respecting the original formation of, 
i. 166-168. ii. 147. v. 321, 322 

^— grammar, ix. 428 

Arago (M.), experiments of, on the influence of copper, &c., on 
the magnetic needles, xix. 147 

repetition of his experiments on the magnetism developed 

during the act of rotation, 276, 277. His experiments on 
the mutual action of magnetic and unmagnetic bodies, 336, 
337 

Arago and Fresnel (MM.), improvements of, in the construction 
of oil lamps, xi. 381 

Arch, theory and uses of the, iv. 140. Advantages of the elliptic 
arch illustrated, 141 i 

Arctic expedition, account of tlie, vi. 295-300. On the instru- 
ments employed in, 351, 352 



14 INDEX. 

Arctic voyage of Captain Parry, account of, x. 355-361 
Areca catechu, analysis of the fruit of, xv. 317 
Arenaceo-calcareous substance, found near Delvine in Perthshire, 

account of, xvi. 79-84 
Arfwedson (M.), process by, for preparing lithia, xiii. 224, 225 
his mode of preparing the pure oxide of uranium, xvii. 

382. And uranium pyrophori, 383 
' experiments of, on the decomposition of sulphates by 



hydrogen, xviii. 392-394 
Argonauta argo, notice of, xx. 189 
Argyleshire, scenery of, described, xiii. 181 
Aria cattiva, near Rome, observations on, iv. 87 
Arnott (Dr. N.), on the construction of fire-places, vi. 364- 

367 
Arragonite, difference between the optical properties of, and of 

calcareous spar, iv. 112-114 
Arsenic (white) observations on, vi. 341, 342 
— composition of the acids of, viii. 378 

sulphuret of, a new yellow dye from, ix. 184 

• antidote to the poison of, x. 193 

^ test for, xii. 411. On the detection of, in ores of anti- 



mony, 412 

action of water on metallic, xiv. 233 

nickel and cobalt amalgamated by, xvi. 166 

detection of, in cases of poisoning, xvii. 165 

test for the presence of, xx. 398, 399 



Arsenious acid, tests for, xi. 341 

Arseniuretted hydrogen, new mode of preparing, xiii. 225 

Art, fragment of, discovered in Newfoundland, xi. 223 

' notice of remains of, in a limestone formation, xii. 191 

Artephius, an alchemist, notice of, ix. 225 

Arteries, experiments on tlie action of, on circulation, iii. 178 

Articulations of particular words, observations on, xix. 10-16 

Artificial gold, notice of, xx. 399 

Artillery, account of a new piece of, xviii. 380 

Arts, the fine, progress of at Rome, v. 147, 148 

— ^ prize questions in, vi. 138 



INDEX. 15 

Asbestos, used in micrometers, vii. 369 

Ascension (island of), barometrical measurement of the height of 

the mountain-house at, xv. 69 
Ashantees, on the origin of, x. 73. The close resemblance (and 
in many instances the identity) of their customs with those of 
the Abyssinians, a proof that they are descended from the 
civilized Ethiopians, described by Herodotus, 73-80. Coinci- 
dence between their superstitions, manners, and arts, and those 
of the ancient Egyptians, 81-84 : and Jews, 85-86 
Asiatic Researches, notice of the twelfth volume of that work, ii.388 
Association, theory of in matters of taste considered, iii. 135-145 
Astringent poisons, on the classification and treatment of, iii. 50 
Astronomical Collections, ix. 149-347. On comets, 149-167, 171. 
Lunar distances of Venus, 168-170. x. 145-165, 412-426. 
xi. 172-185,*353-380. xii. 137-151, 381-401. xiii. 201- 
218, 353-395. xiv. 186-197, 402-415. xv. 128-135, 351- 
366. xvi. 139-154, 348-366. xvii. 85-104, 295-334. xviii. 
99-110, 339-378. xix. 109-131, 281-293. xx. 94-112, 
308-328 

' Phenomena, tables of, for the first three months of 

the year 1S24, xvi. 286-297 
for April, May, and June, 1824, xvii. 77- 



84. And for July, August, and September, 238-244 
for October, November, December, 1824, 



xviii. 81-89 

Astronomy, progress of, in Germany, for 1818, viii. 84-95. Prize 
question in, 345 

— (physical), observations on the modern theory of, 

xvi. 270-272 

Athenian mercury, bibliographical notice of, xiii- 41-42 

Athens, o])servations on certain columns at, x. 204-206 

account of a cinerary vase found at, xiii. 72-76 

Atkin's rock, position of, xii. 406 

Atlantic, observations on the currents of, iv. 110, 111. Meteoro- 
logical observations, and journal on a voyage across, xiv.l 1 5-141 

Atmosphere, the causes of the constant proportion of azote and 
oxygen in, accounted for, ii. 421-423 



IG INDEX. 

Atmosphere, resistance of, to falling bodies, vii. 369 
description of a new hygrometer for measuring tlie 

force and weight of aqueous vapour, and the corresponding 

evaporation in, viii. 29 8 -3 IS 

detail of experiments with, 319-322 

— • nature of, x. 1 1 . Observations on the passage of light 



through, 12-25. Temperature of, how far affected by the 

great eclipse of September 7th, 135-137 

of the Baltic sea, temperature of, xii. 341-342. The 



atmosphere, variation of the temperature of, deduced from the 
mean refraction, 396-398 

electricity of the, xiii. 431 

oh the finite extent of, xiv. 167 

on the ascent of clouds in, xv. 165, 166 

a finite and exact expression for the refraction of one, 



nearly resembling that of the earth, xvii. 255'256 
■ I on the ra(Jiation of heat in, xviii. 305-312 

— ' variation in the composition of, xx. 393 



Atmospheric electricity, researches on, ii. 416-418 

electrometer, account of, ii. 249-253 

Atmospherical phenomena, .1817, v. 132. 

refraction, observations on, xi. 353-370 

. historical sketch of the various solu- 
tions of the problem of, xviii. 347-378 

Atomic theory, historical sketch of the rise and progress of, iii. 
154-156 

• weights, table of, xvii. 383 

Atoms (spherical), observations on the theory of, and on the rela- 
tion which it bears to the specific gravity of certain minerals, 
iv. 30-42 

Atropia, analysis of, xi. 204 

Attraction of cohesion, nature of, i. 90. Of composition, ibid. 
Capillary attraction, 94. Investigation of the theory of capil- 
lary attraction, 290 

and repulsion without electricity, phenomena of, ii. 

427-428 

capillary, experiment on, xis. 134 



r INDEX. 17 

Attraction manifested at sensible distances })y solid surfaces, moist- 
ened by and immersed in a liquid, xx. 379-3S3 
Attrition, the cause of the light emitted on discharging an air- 
gun, XV. 66 
Augite, (foliated) of Carinthia, analysis of, xii. 269-271 
Aurora Borealis, remarks on the height of, vii. 188 

remarkable notice of, viii. 357, 35S. Notice of, ix. 210 

results of observations on, xviii. 185 

Avignon, notice of antiquities, discovered at, v. 385 

wines of, xviii. 127, 128 

Axes, (stone) ancient, discovered in France, v. 145 

Axletree, moveable, notice of, v. 121 

Azimuth compass, directions for using, v. 219-221 



Baader (Chevalier), observations of, on the explosions of steam 

engines, iii. 195, 196 
Babbage (Charles, Esq.), demonstrations' by, of some of Dr. 

Matthew Stewart's general theorems, i. 6-19. His account of 

some new properties of the circle, 19-24 
• — observations of on the calculus of functions, i. 290, ii« 

371-379 

note of, respecting elimation, iii. 355-375 

on the application of machinery to the purpose of cal« 



culating and printing mathematical tables, xiv. 222, 223 
and J. F. Herschell, Esq., repetition of M. Arago's ex* 



periments on the magnetism, developed during the act of rota* 

tion, xix. 276, 277. xx. 355 
Babington (Dr.), on a peculiar vegetable product, possessing the 

principal properties of tallow, xix. 179-184 
Babylonian cement, analysis of, v. 130 
Bacon (Lord), scope and influence of the philosophical writings 

of, considered, v. 173, 174 
requisites of, for secret writings, x. 89. Ohservations 

thereon, 90-91 



J8 INDEX 

Bacon (Lord), his system of ciphers, remarks on, xii. 24, 25. 

Bacon (Roger), notice of the alchymistical works of, ix. 227, 228 

Badnall (Mr.), improvement of, in dyeing with Prussian blue, 
xvii. 167 

Bagne, lake and glacier of, account ot, xv. 390, 391 

Bagnold (Captain), account of a table furnace by, v. 131 

■ pocket blow-pipe, notice of, vii. 186 

account of a waterspout, ix. 414 

Baily (Mr.), his remarks 'on the nautical almanac refuted, xiii. 
201-207 

Bain's (William), essay on the variations of the compass, iv. 102. 
Notice of different unsuccessful attempts to ascertain and ac- 
count for the variations of the magnet, 102, 103. And of the 
principal changes to which the magnetic needle is subject, 104, 
105. Observations of Captain Flinders, on the inclination of 
the needle, 106. Dangerous consequences of neglecting to 
attend to the irregularities of the compass illustrated, 107-109. 
Observations on the currents of the Atlantic, 110, 111. Proof 
that the change of the variation is influenced by the nature of 
the ship's cargo. 111. Character of the work, 112. 

Bake WELL (Mr.), theory of, to account for the production of sound, 
by the opening of a subterraneous gallery, xvii. 152. His table 
of vegetation at different heights, 176 

Balance, new one described, xi. 280 

< • observations on the construction of, xii. 40, 41 

' sensible one described, xx. 161, 162 

Balard (M.), on the means of testing for iodine, xix. 343 

Balloons, coal gas first applied to the inflation of, by Mr. Green, 
xiii. 114. Account of his ascent from Portsea, 115. Observ- 
ations and experiments made during the voyage, 116. Remarks 
thereon, 117, 118 

Balsams of Peru and Tou, identity of, ascertained, x. 28. How 
obtained, ibid, 

Baltic Sea, observations on the atmosphere of, xii. 341-342. 

Bamboo, account of, v. 46-48, particularly those of South America, 
48-50, andof the tabasheer, or inspissated juice of the South 
America bamboo. 



INDEX. 19 

Banca (Island of), its physical constitution and productions) ii. 
190, 191 

process followed in working the tin-mine there, 191, 192. 

ix. 412-414. 

Bandana, gallery at Glasgow described, xv. 209-216. 

Bank-notes, reports of the commissioners for inquiring into the 
mode of preventing forgery of, ix. 142-148 

Banks (Mr.), on the case of a child that had swallowed a knife, 
V. 265-268. 

Banks (Sir Joseph), on an ancient canoe found in Lincolnshire, 
i. 244, 245 

honourable tribute to, v. 344, 345 

Banquets of the ancients, notice of, xviii. 124. 

Barbadoes (Island), geological structure of, v. 311. xi. 10-20 

Barban^ois (M. de), on a new classification of animals, ii. 429-431 

Barium, sulphuret of, experiments on, xv. 149 

Bark of the quassia simarouba, analysis of, xiii. 416 

Barlow (Peter, Esq.), experiments and observations by, on the 
daily variation of the horizontal and dipping needles, under a 
reduced directive power. On the magnetism imparted to iron 
bodies during the act of rotation, xix. 263^ 264 

Barometer, improvements in tlie construction of, i. 295 

-— for marking the maximum of elevation, or of depres- 
sion during the observer's absence, description of, iii. 399 

— new notice of, v. 120. And thermometer, variation 



of, XV. 371-372 

periodical rise and fall of, xvi. 396. Description of 



a mountain-barometer, 277-279 

—— horary oscillation of,xvii. 189-197. Remarks on the 



barometer, 345-347. On the formation of mercurial vapour in, 

380 

on one of the causes of the movements of the, and of 



the south and west winds, xx. 14-21 

Barometrical mensuration, observations and tables for tlie correc- 
tion of, xiii. 76-91 

.■ of the height of the sugar-loaf mountain at Sierra 

C2 



20 



INDEX. 



Leone, xv. 67-69. Of the mountain-house at Ascension, 69. 

Of the Port Royal mountains, Jamaica, 70. Of the hlock-house 

at Fort George, Trinidad, ibid. Of the Pico-Ruivo in the 

Island of Madeira, 75-82 
Barry (Mr. T.), evidence of, with remarks, in the cause of Severn 

& Co. against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 334, 335 
Bartholomew (St.), island of, its geological structure, v. 312 
Baruel, (M.) process hy, for procuring pure platinum, palladium, 

rhodium, iridium and osmium, from the ores of platinum, xii. 
• 246-256. Remarks thereon, 256-262 
Barytes, fusion of, with the hlow-pipe, ii. 109. Metal of, thus 

obtained, 119, 120 

■ lampate of, vi. 321, 322 
— test for, X. 189 

analysis of the ferro-prussiate of, xi. 209 

. test for, XV. 383 

■ composition of the muriate of, xvi. 384 

— — — separation of, from strontia, xix. 153, 154 
Basseterre, geological appearances of, v. 318-319 
Batavia, why peculiarly unhealthy to Europeans, vii. 1, 2, 276. 
Symptoms and treatment of the fever prevalent there, 2, S. 
Public hospitals, 4. Ignorance of a Dutch physician, 5. The 
manner of living of the Batavians, a cause of their sickliness, 6. 
Description of it, ibid. 7. Dress and manners of the women, 
S-11. Account of the different kinds of inhabitants, 12. 
Europeans, ibid. Portuguese descendants of the first occupants 
of Batavia, ibid. Native Javanese, ibid. Slaves, 13. Their 
treatment, manners, and customs, 14-18. Character of the 
Javanese and Malays, 18, 19. Roguery of the Chinese settlers 
and merchants, 19, 20. Account of a singular antiseptic 
powder used by the Batavians, 273, 274. The sciences, why 
little cultivated at Batavia, 276. Structure of the edifices 
there, 277, 278. Sketch of the country round it, 278, 279. 
Account of the Buffaloes there, 281 , 282. Notice of the oopas- 
tree, 283. Of the nutmeg plants, ibid. 284. Extraordinary 
vegetable gums, 285, 286. Expedients of the Batavians to pre- 



INDEX. 21 

vent tlie attacks of musquitoes, 287. Their jealous care of the 
pepper-jjlants, 28S 

Batavian Society's Transactions, analysis of, ii. 326. Institution 
and objects of tlie Society, 327. Notice of its earlier volumes, 
328. Contents of the 7th volume, 329. The fable of the 
oopas-tree exploded, 331, 332. Account of the Antshar or 
real poison-tree of Java, and the mode of preparing the poison, 
332-335. Results of experiments with the poison, 33G-33a 

Bateau roulant^ experiments with, x. 449, 450 

Batli, notice of a proposed scientific institution at, viii. 190, 191 

waters, remarks on the neglect of, in the cure of disease, 

xiii. 28-35 

Baths of Mont d'Or, phenomena of, explained, iii. 174 

Bats, observations on, ix. 217 

Battery, new electrical, notice of, viii. 384 

Baudin (M.), geographical discoveries of, stated, ii. 383-385 

Bauer's (Mr.), publication of Strelitzia, notice of, v. 152 

— - — microscopical observations of, on the red snow, vii, 222- 

229. X. 395, 396 
on the suspension of the muscular motions of the 

vibrio tritici, xvi. 326 
Baup (M.), memoir of, on the preparation of the sulphates of 

cinchonia and quinia, xix. 161, 162 
Beans, diseased, proposed remedy for, ii. 180 

of St. Ignatius, analysis of, vii. 379 

recent vegetation of ancient, xx. 189 

Beavan (B. Esq.), notice of the observations of, on the heights of 
places in the trigonometrical survey of Great Britain, xvi. 330 

Beavers, the habits of, notice of, xx. 188 

Becquerel (M.), account by, of the electrical effects produced at 
the moment of the combination of the metals and alkalies, with 
the acids, xvii. 136-138. On the electro-motive actions produced 
by the contact of metals with liquids, 374, 375. His test of the 
alteration of solutions by contact with air, 379 

on the electrical effects "observed during chemical 

action, xviii. 169-171. And on the distribution of electricity 



22 INDEX. ' 

5n the Voltaic pile, 171, 172. On the electro-motive action of 
water on metals, 380. On the electrical actions produced by 
the contact of flames and metals, 381. And on the electrical 
phenomena accompanying combustion, 382. On the intensity 
of the electro-dynamic force, xix. 147 
Bee, or universal weekly pamphlet, bibliographical notice of, xiii. 

297 
Beet-root, expense of making sugar from, v. 357, 358 
Bell (Charles Esq.), on a new arrangement of the nerves, xii. 
^7Q, 377 

observations of, on the nerves of respiration, breathing, 

speaking and expression, xiv. 381, 382 
Belladonna, a preservative against scarlet fevers, xii. 428 
Belloue (M. Fleuriande), observations of, on meteorolites, xii. 192 
Belzoni, (M.), discoveries of, among the pyramids, vi. 176, 177 

notice respecting the operations and discoveries of, in 

Nubia, vii. 344-346 
Bengal (Bay of), formation of an island in, ix. 197 

black varnish of, how prepared at, x. 315, 316 

Ben-LiOmond, meteoric appearance of, xx. 182, 183 

Benzoate of mercury, experiments on, vi. 159, and on the ben- 

zoates of iron and of zinc, 160 
Benzoic acid, how procurable, vi. 152. Found in the Tonquin 
bean and in melilot, x. 173 ; and in the ripe fruit of the clove- 
tree, xvi. 378 
Berard (M.), observations of, on the ripening of fruit, xi. 395-397 
Berkeley (Bishop), notice of his theory of distance, iii. 1-2 
Berkshire county, U. S., notice of the flexible marble of, xx. 185 
Bernard (convent of St.), notice of subscriptions to, xii. 432 
Berthier (M.), on the analysis of alkaline minerals, xii. 169-171. 
On the alloys of chromium, iron, and steel, 173, 174 

— table of his results, 328. Analysis of the mineral and 

thermal waters of St. Nectaire, xiii. 396. And of those of 
Mount Dore, 417 
'■ researches of, on the uses of sulphate of lead in the 



arts, xiv. 230, 231 



INDEX. 23 

Bkrthier (M.), experiments of, on sulphurets produced from sul- 
phates, XV. 147-151. Analyses of different French limestones, 
311-314 

. ■ on the sulphurets resulting from the reduction of some 

sulphates, by means of charcoal, xvi. 100-102 

on the preparation of sulphuretted hydrogen, xvii. 164 



Of the saturated hydro-sulphuret of potash or soda, 165. And 

of the pure oxide of nickel, 166 

experiments of, on the nature of scales of iron when 



heated, xviii. 387. On the reduction of the oxide of iron 
by cementation, 388-389 

Berthollbt (Count), memoir of, on the history of the atomic 
theory, iii. 154-156 

Berthoud (F.), observations of, on the dead escapement, with 
remarks, xvi. 2-8 

Berzelius's (J. Jacob), " attempt to establish a pure scientific sys- 
tem of mineralogy, by the application of the electro-chemical 
theory, and chemical proportions," i. 226. His canon for de- 
fining the theory, of chemical proportions, examined and re- 
futed, 227-236. Examination of his new property of mineral 
analysis, 237-238. Remarks on his phraseology, 239-241, 
Supplement to the discoveries of, ii. 445 

on the analysis of euclase, viii. 171, 172 

• — observations of, on ferro-prussiates, x. 179, 180. xi. 

208-216 

^-^— on the compounds of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, 



antimony, &c. xii. 171, 172 

on oxide of chromium, 172-178. Reluctantly acknow- 



ledges Sir H. Davy's chloridic theory, 306, 307. Abstract of 
his paper on several inorganic combinations, which serve as the 
base of calculations, relative to the theory of chemical propor- 
tions, 307-310. Remarks thereon, 321-323. Analysis of the 
crystallized calamine of Limbourg, 328. On the oxide of 
platinum and gold, 412. Decompositions of oxalic acid by, 413 
on the analysis of the ores of nickel, by means of chlo- 



rine, xiii. 156-lGO. Analysis of his treatise on the use of the 



24 INDEX. 

blow-pipe in chemical analysis, and in the examination of mine- 
rals, 319-333 

Berzelius's (J. Jacob), experiments and observations on the chemi- 
cal composition of the white efflorescing pyrites, xiv. 208. On 
the composition of the alkaline sulphurets, 209-216, 410, 420 

letter from, xvii. 273,274 

remarks of, on fluoric acid, xviii. 156. And on the 
best mode of procuring silicium and zirconium, ibid. 157. On 
the preparation of lithia, S'dG 

Bessel's theory of refractions, remarks thereon, xv. 356, 357 

Beudant CF. S.), review of his Essai cVun Cours elementaire et 
general des Sciences Physiques, i. 87. His work ably executed, 
ibid. Laws and properties of space and matter, 88-92. Laws 
and properties of liquids, 93-96. Characters of aeriform fluids, 
96,97. Properties of caloric, 98. Of light, 98-101. Elec- 
trical energy, how produced, 101, 102. 

■■ — on the possibility of rearing the river Mollusca in salt 

water, and vice versa, ii. 159-160 

— " • inquiry into the connexion between crystalline form 



and chemical composition, and the causes which influence the 
changes of the former in the same mineral, vi. 117-122. Re- 
marks thereon, 123-131. 
Bevan (Mr.), experiments by, on the adhesion of nails in different 

kinds of wood, xvii. 360 
Bewley (Mr.), contrivance of, for warming manufactories, xix. 

137, 138 
Bhote, productions of, vii. 65. Description of the Bhdtiya vil- 
lages, 66; and inhabitants, 67. Temperature of the Aveather 
there, 67, 68 
Bibliotheca Italiana, analysis of, ii. 177-179 

• Literaria Bibliographica, notice of, xiii. 290 

BibliothequeAnglaise,(Cho'isee)h\h\iogr3.iph[cal noticesof, xiii. 52-57 
Bibliothiique dcs Sciences et des Arts, analysis of, ii. 415-426 
BiCHAT (M.), outline of his system of physiology, i. 1-I-5, 146. 

Examination thereof, 147-151 
• examination of hi? theory of muscular motion, ii. 225, 226 



INDEX. 25 

Bidder (George), notice of, vii. 198. List of some of the ques* 
tions proposed to him and of his replies, 34(?-349 

BiDONE (M.) , Hydraulic experiments of, on the propagation of 
waves, xvi. 370, 371. 

BiELA (M. de), observation of, on the phenomena of comets, 
xviii. 165 

BioELOw (Dr.), on the use of the clavus or ergot of rye in medi- 
cine, ii. 60. Notice of his experiments on this disease in rye, 
61. Its effects on the human system, 62. First used as a 
medicine in America, ibid. Notice of cases in which it was 
exhibited, 63, 64. Observations on the ergot of wheat, 65, 
Its efficacy in parturition, 6G. Abstract of his account of the 
white mountains, 392-399 

BiGSBY (Dr. J. J.), notes by, on the geography and geology of 
Lake Superior, xviii. 1-34, 22S-2G9 

Bile, effects of, on the process of indigestion, xiv. 341-344 

Biliary calculus of extraordinary size, account of, x. 86-88 

Bills of mortality, remarks on, v. 307, 308 

BioT (M.), experiment of on the polarization of light, iii. 174. 

observations of, relating to the operations undertaken to 

determine the figure of the earth, v. 340-351 

experiments of, to ascertain the phenomena of magnetic 

variation, vi. 96 

■■ memoir of, on the magnetism impressed on metals, by elec- 
tricity in motion, xi. 281-290 

Birds, observation on the migration of, xviii. 138-142 

Births, number of, at Paris in 1818, ix. 213 

Bis hi hu-ivay or poisonous air of India, effects of, ix. 65, 66 

Bismuth, phenomena attending the process of the solution of, i. 29 

experiments on the triple tartrates of, vi. 158 

beneficial effects of the white oxide of, in a severe dis- 
order of the stomach, viii. 295-298 

■ sulphuret of, and copper, chemical analysis of a, xii. 36-37 

■ sub-nitrate of, a remedy for ague, xiii. 233 



Bitumen, existence of, in minerals, xv. 389 
crystallization of, xviii. 179 



26 INDEX. 

Bizio (M.), experiments of, on the colouring matter of the blood, 

xvi. 173, 174; and on evitrogene, 174-176 
I experiments of, on the black principle of sepia, xx. 181 

Black (Dr.), his sensible balance, xx. 161, 162 
Black enamel, obtained from platina, xiv. 229. 
Black powder, fall of, from the air, ix. 202 
Black Prince, silver coins of discovered, x. 474 
Blackburn (C. Esq.), on a method of finding the latitude at sea, 
by the altitudes of two fixed stars, when on the same vertical, 
xviii. 99-110 

■ ■ rule for clearing the lunar distance from the effects 

of parallax and refraction, xix. 117, 118 
Bladder, on the production of calculi in, viii. 205. Nature of 
them, 205-210. Treatment of them, 211-218 

• notice of an instrument for breaking calculi in, xiv. 453. 

XX. 21-24 
Blainville (M.), Sur les Ichthyolites^ analysis of, with strictures on 

his errors, and the imperfections of his work, xvii. 105-201 
Blair (W. Esq.), remarks on his system of secret writing by ci- 
phers, xii. 25-27 
Blake (Captain), description of the royal gardens of Lahore, ix. 

311-318 
Bleaching Powder, analysis of, xii. 175 

— — its process of manufacture explained, xiii. 9-14 

■ experiments for ascertaining the strength of, 

xviii. 182-185 
Bleeding, successfully employed in a singular case of cough, vii. 

43-48 
Blight, in apple-trees prevention of, v. 357 

Blood, huffy coat of, not confined to venous blood, i. 295 ; but 
als o found in arterial blood, ibid, 

• on the heat evolved by, during coagulation, ii. 246-249 

on the changes of, in the act of coagulation, iv. 362, 363 

diameter of the globules of, xiii. 155, 156 

' remarks on the huffy coat of, xiv. 378-380 

^— examination of, and of its action on the different pheno- 



INDEX. 27 

mena of life, xvi. 115-123. On its colouring matter, 173» 

174 
Blount's (Sir T. Pope), Censura Authorum^ bibliographical notice 

of, xiii. 40 
Blow-pipe, account of a new one, i. 65, 6Q 

(improved), account of, ii. 379-382 

• notice of, improvements for increasing its security, iii. 

575, 576 

- (pocket,) notice of, vii. 186 

« directions for using, xiii. 325 ; for oxidation and reduction, 

ibid. 326 ; glass tubes, S27. General rules for conducting 
experiments with the blow-pipe, 329-331 

combustion by, under water, xvi. 167. Supports for the 

ignition of particles by, 379 

self-acting described, xvii. 236, 237 

support of substances before, xix. 151, 152 

Blue colour, analysis of a new one, xiv. 437, 438 

action of alum upon vegetable, xviii. 396 

matter from certain urines, notice of, xx. 409-411 

Blue Mountains, journal of an excursion beyond, ii. 455-457 
Boa Constrictor, observations on the temperature of, vi. 115, 116 
— ^— — — — killed at the island of St. Vincent, notice of, 

ii. 428 
i urate of ammonia found in the excrement of, 



xvi. 177 
BoAG (Mr.), notice of his discoveries in Egypt, v. 172 
Bodies, on the specific heat of^ vii. 379-383 
Bohnenberger's electrometer, notice of, xi. 208 
Boiling water, effects of, xiv. 237, 238 

points of saturated solutions, xviii. 89-91 

variation of, xix, 1 48 

Boletus Igniarivsj observations on, xvi. 185 

BoLLAERT (Mr. \y.), experiments by, on the oil of mace, xviii. 

317-319 
Bojnbicc Disparair., ravages of, vi. 163 
Bonne, notice of the uniA'ersity at, ix. 211, 212 



28 ^ INDEX. 

BoNPLAND (M.), botanical researches of, in America, ii. 52-54 
BoNSDORFF (M.), researches by, on the composition of the anti- 

monial sulphuret of silver, xiii. 416, 417. Analysis by, of the 

table spar of Pargas, 419, 420 
r on tincture of Brazil-wood, as a re-agent, xiv. 226- 

227 
Books (scientific), analysis of, xi. 119, 337. Select lists of, 225, 

412. Notices of new ones in hand, 412 

analyses of, xv. 108^127, 320-348. xvi. 134-138, 301- 

347. xix. 100-108, 294-327 
Boopidese, a new family of plants, account of, ii. 186 
Booth (Dr. John), analysis of his observations on hydrophobia, 

with remarks, xviii. 111-114. His plan of treating this disease, 

115-117 
Boracic acid, observations on, vi. 152 
' — found in a volcano, viii. 350 

analysis of, x. 196 

singular property of, xi. 403 



— effects of, on the acid fluate of potash, xv. 308 



Boracete, analysis of, xvi. 394 

Borax, phenomena attending the solution of, i. 25-27 

purification of, vi. 355 

constituent parts of, when deprived of its water of crys- 
tallization, xvi. 394 

Boron, how prepared, xviii. 396 

BosTOCK (Dr.), evidence of, with remarks in the cause of Severn 
and Co. against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 330, 331 

— — experiments of, on evaporation, xviii. 312-317. 

remarks on a passage in his work on physiology, 290, 

291 

Botanical works of South America, notice of, iii. 124-129 

announcement of new, iv. 382 

Botany, science of, promoted by the labours of Tournefort and 
Ray, X. 53, 54 

Bottles, on the substitution of tubes for, in the preservation of 
small quantities of fluids, xix. 149, 150 



INDEX. 29 

Bougainville (M. de), account of the life and writings of, i. 21a. 
His early education and studies, 216, Brilliant achievements 
in America, 217. Founds a colony on the Falkland Isles, 218, 
219. Obliged to cede it to the Spaniards, 219. Undertakes a 
voyage round the world, ibid. Passes the Straits of Magellan, 
and arrives at Otaheite, 220. His reception by the islanders, 
221. Returns to France and publishes his voyage, 222. Em- 
ployed during the American war, 223. Prevented from making 
an attempt to reach the North Pole, ibid. His loyalty to the 
Bourbons during the French Revolution, 225. His death and 
honourable character, ibid. 226. 

BouHiER (the President), anecdote of, iii. 263 

Bourgeois (Sir F.), anecdote of, vii. 262, 263 

BoussiNOAULT (M.), experiments of, on alloys of steel, xii. 316- 
318. 

and RivERo (MM.), memoir of, on the milk of the 

cow-tree, xvii. 142. On the hot springs of the Cordilleras, 143 

BouTRON Charlard (M.), experiments of, on civet, xix. 164, 165 

BowDicH (T. E.), proposals of, for an expedition into Africa, ix. 
428-430. 

Box-Sextant, use of the pocket, to travellers, xviii. 50-60. 

Boyce's (G. p.), remarks on the different systems of^ warming and 
ventilating buildings, analysis of, with observations, xviii. 334- 
338 

Boyd (Mr. William), observations of, on Mr. Rider's rotatory 
steam-engine, xvi. 268-270 

Brackenbridge (H. G. Esq.), voyage of, up the Missouri River, 
iii. 91. Account of his progress, 93. Description of Indian 
warriors returning from battle, 95, 96 

Braconnot (M.), on the use of the Datisca cannabina in dyeing, 
ii. 435, 436 

researches of, on the action of sulphuric acid on 

animal substances, ix. 392-395 

observations of, on the crystallization of sugar, xi. 



397 

account of a new green colour, xv. 309, 310 



30 INDEX. 

Braconnot (M.), on an acid universally diffused through vege- 
tables, xix. 350-352. On the presence of oxalic acid in the 
mineral kingdom, in certain plants, and its advantageous pre- 
paration, 353-355 

Brain, microscopical observations on, xii. 12S 

extraordinary affection of, cured by cold, &c., xv. 8-1 i 

(human), internal structure of, compared with that of 

fishes, insects, and worms, xviii. 136-138 

— microscopical observation on the materials of, xix. 270 

Bramah's patent lock, account of, iv. 134, 135 

(T. Esq.), evidence of, in the cause of Severn & Co. 

against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 337 

Brande (Everard, Esq.), on the bad effects of the incautious use 
of magnesia, i. 297-299 

— on a singular case of cough cured by extensive bleed- 
ing, vii. 43-48 

Brands (WilliamThomas, Esq.) , account by, of some wine, supposed 
to be older than the period of the fire of London, i. 135. Ac- 
count of the Greek wine called Lissa or Dalmatian wine, 136. 
On the application of coal-gas to the purposes of illumination, 
71-80. Account of Mr. Clegg's improvements of the apparatus 
employed in gas-illumination, 278-283. Plan of his extended 
and practical course of lectures and demonstrations on che- 
mistry, 307-309. ii. 213-215; 466-468 

— . experiments of, on the waters of Cheltenham, iii. 54- 

71. On a new species of galls from China, 130. Sketch 
of his introductory lecture to a course of mineralogical and 
analytical chemistry, delivered in the Royal Institution, 358-368 

report of his lectures on mineralogical chemistry, iv. 



66'76. Plan of his course of Chemical Lectures, 148-150. 
Table of the average quantity of spirit in different kinds of 
wine, 289-291 
account of his lectures on mineralogical chemistry, v. 64. 



Account of platinum and its compounds, 64-66. And of mer- 
cury, 67, 68. Of copper and its compounds, 69. Of lead, 69- 
72. Tests for discovering lead in water, 73. And in wines, 



INDEX. 31 

ibid. Table of the average quantity of alcohol in different 
kinds of wine, 152-154, On iron, its compounds and uses, 
291-299. On tin and its compounds, 299, 300. Reply to Dr. 
Young on the London Pharmacopoeia^ 359, 360. 

Brandb (William Thomas, Esq.), Plan of his Course of Lectures 
and Demonstrations on Chemistry at the Royal Institution, vi. 
182-185 

observations of, on the medico-chemical treatment of cal- 
culous disorders, 195-209 

' introductory discourse of, delivered at the London Insti- 



tution, vii. 205-222 

on the medico-chirurgical treatment of calculous disorders, 



viii. 66-72, 205-218. Outline of his lectures on chemistry, 
198. Description of a portable gas-lamp, 233, 234. On a sub- 
stance produced during the distillation of coal-tar, 287-290 

sketch of the history of alchymy, ix. 225-239 

outline of his Course of Lectures on Chemistry, x. 215, 



216. Observations on the analysis of mineral waters, 217-230. 
On the analysis of rhubarb, 288, 292. Abstract of his evi- 
dence with remarks, in the cause of Severn & Co. against the 
Imperiallnsurance Company, 330, 331 
on the separation of the proximate principles of animal 



substances, xiii. 287 

plan of his Course of Lectures on Chemistry, xiv. 240 

outline of his Course of Lectures on Chemistry at the 



Royal Institution, xvi. 191, 192 

observations on the ultimate analysis of certain vegetable 



salifiable bases, 279-286. Notice of his course at Apothecaries* 
Hall, 399 
prospectus of his Course of Lectures on Electricity, xvii. 



282-284. And on vegetable chemistry, 288, 289 

plan of a Course of Lectures by, on Chemistry, xviii. 199, 



200. Facts by, towards the chemical history of mercury,29 1-297 
outlines of his lectures on geology, xix. 63-92, 184-198. 



XX. 24-40. 235-259 

analysis by, of two mineral waters from springs in 

Windsor Great Park. xx. 2iiU2QG 



32 INDEX. 

Brandy from corn, cause of its disagreeable flavour, iii. 417. 
Brard (M.), on the action of frost upon building materials, xvii. 

14S, 149 
Brazil woods (inferior), process for improving the dye of, xii. 332 
Breant (M.), experiments of, on the preparation of damasked 

steel, xviii. 386, 387 
Breithaupt (M.), analysis of eslanite by, xviii. 408 
Bremer (Dr.), observation of, on the' blue colour of cow's milk, 

iii. 191, 192 
Brewing, application of artificial sugar to, vii. 180 
Brewster (Dr.), on the optical properties of the fluate of lime 
and of muriate of soda, i. 118. On a chromatic thermometer, 
119. On the sleeping woman of Dunninald, 121. On the 
probable existence of a new species of rays in the solar spectrum, 
122. On a new optical and mineralogical property of calca- 
reous spar, 293. On the communication of double refraction 
to glass &c., by mechanical compression and dilatation, ibid, 
294. On some new discoveries on light, 297 

on the descent of the fluid which lubricates the 

cornea, ii. 127-131. Experiments of, on light, 207. On the 
decomposition of light by simple reflection, 211. On the effects 
of mechanical pressure, in communicating double refraction to 
regularly-crystallized bodies, 460. Experiments of, on the ac- 
tion of regularly-crystallized bodies upon light, 461 

■ experiments of, on the human eye, iii. 134 

observations of, on the difference between the optical 



properties of arragonite and calcareous spar, iv. 112-114. On 

the optical structure of ice, 155 

— • instrument of, for distinguishing minerals, v. 139. 



Observations of, on a singular affection of the eye, in a healthy 
state, 173. History of his kaleidoscope, with remarks on its 
supposed resemblance to other combinations of plain mirrors, 
324-336 

observations of, on the physical and optical properties 

of Tabasher, vii. 363-365, notes. 

notice of a new fluid discovered by, in the cavities of 



minerals, xv. 374, 375 



INDEX. 33 

Brewster (Dr.), observation of, on a peculiar fracture of quartz, 
xviii. IGG, 167 

Brianchon (M.), on the explosion of fulminating powders, xix. 
348, 349 

Bridge, ancient Roman, discovered, vi. 382 

ancient, over the Rhine, notice of, vii. 19G 

•^ over the Arno, notice of, xiv. 225 

of tlie Holy Trinity at Florence, observations on the cur- 
vature of the arches of, xv. 1-8. Economical one at Annonay, 
13G. Observations on the taking down and rebuilding of 
London Bridge, 269-278. Notice of the laying of the first 
great iron plate for tlie bridge at Menai Straits, 3G7 

Bridges and bridge-building, accounts of, iv. 141 

' notice of improvements in the structure of, xvii 

chain, xx. 162 

Brinkley's (Professor) observations and elements of the orbit of 
the great comet of 1819, ix. 164 

observations of, on refraction, xi. 364-370 ; and on 

M. Delambre's remarks relative to the problem of finding the 
latitude from two altitudes, and the time between, 370 

on an easy method of computing the aberration of the 



stars, xii. 151-154. Notice of his observations for investigat- 
ing the effects of the parallax and aberration of the places of 
certain fixed stars, 374 
catalogue of the polar distances of thirty-nine principal 



stars, with remarks, xiv. 186 

remarks on the parallax of a Lyrae, xvii. 26 4 



Brisbane (Sir Thomas), account of experiments made by, with 

an invariable pendulum, at New South Wales, xvii. 128 
Brisseau MiRBBL (C. F.), observations of, on cryptogamous 

plants, and agamous vegetation, v. 257-264 
Bristol Library and Philosophical Institution, foundation and plan 

of, ix. 215, 21G 
Britain, climate of, deteriorated, iv. 281. Probable cause of 

such deterioration, 2S2 

D 



34 INDEX. 

Britain (Great), and France, comparative table of the extent, 
population, riches, debts, revenue, and taxes, for the year 
1S19, viii. 187 
British Apollo, bibliographical notice of, xiii. 49, note 

• Channel, observations on the soundings in, xvii. 245 

Museum, receipts and expenditure of, v. 381 

— ' — ■' proposal for removing to Somerset-House, vii. 

111-124. Observations on it, 259-266 
Brodie (B. C, Esq.), observations of, on the effects produced by 

the bile in the process of digestion, xiv. 341 
Bronchocele, remedy for, x. 191, 192 
Bronze, ancient, test for ascertaining, ii. 115, note 
Brooke (H. T. A., Esq.), description by, of some undescribed 

minerals, xvi. 274 
Broughton (S. D., Esq.), observations and experiments by, illus- 
trative of the influence of the eighth pair of nerves over the 
organs of respiration and digestion, x. 292-314 

observations of, on the divisibility of the eighth pair 

of nerves, xi. 320 
Brown (Dr. John), his system of excitability exploded, ii. 228 
Brownrigg, (Dr.) on the effects of salt as a manure, x. 56 
Brown Spar, of Mexico, analysis of, xii. 272 
Bruce, (Robert, king of Scotland,) tomb of, discovered, v. 143 

■ _— _ account of the exhumation 

and reinterment of, ix. 138 

Brucine, a new vegetable alkali, production and properties of, 

ix. 186 
Brugnatelli (Dr.), account of a new salifiable base, xii. 177 
Brunton (Mr.), notice of his contrivance for consuming smoke, 

xii. 350, 351 
Bucholz (M.), on the separation of magnesia from lime, by means 

of a neutral carbonate of potash, iii. 217 
BucKLAND (Rev. W.), account by, of fossil remains discovered 

at Kirkdale, xiv. 170 

■ • ReliquicB Diluviance, analysis of, with remarks, xv. 



337-347 



INDEX". 35 

Budding, or Inoculation of trees, remarks on, vii. 168 

BuDDLE, (John, Esq.) on the practical application of the wire 
gauze safety lamps, i. 302. Observations thereon, 305 

BiJFFON, anecdote of, x. 55 

Buhr-stones, notice of, for grinding corn, xiii. 220, 221 

building materials, remarks on, iii. 381, 882 

— power of, to resist frost, xix. 136, 137 

Buildings, observations on the best mode of warming and venti- 
lating, xi. 229-240 

Bulletin des Sciences^ analytical review of, iii. 180, 185. iv. 391 

BuNDY (Mr.), account of his improvements in the dressing of flax, 
iv. 334-341 

BuRCHELLj (John, Esq.) notice of travels by, in South Africa, ii. 
79. Arrives at the village of Klaarw^ater, ibid. Difficulty of 
procuring Hottentots to accompany him, 80. Reaches the vil- 
lage of GraafReinel, 81. His friendly reception by the Bush- 
men, ibid. Discoveries by him in natural history, 82. Reaches 
Litaa-Kun, ibid. : Prosecutes his researches, 83. Returns to- 
ward Cape Town, 84. Explores the Auteniqua country, 85. 
Results of his travels, 86 

BuRCKHARDT (Mr.), biographical notice of, viii. 28. Embarks for 
the East, in the service of the African Association, 29. As- 
sumes the Mohammedan costume, and the title of Sheikh Ibra- 
him, 30. Account of his interview with Mr. Legh, in Upper 
Egypt, 31, 34, 38, 39. Sketch of his proceedings in Egypt 
and Nubia, 40-44. Account of his pilgrimage to Mecca, 45, 
46. Notice of Macea, 74 ; and of the commerce carried on 
there, 48-50. Account of his dangerous interview with the 
Pasha of Egypt, at Taif, 51-54. Account of the ceremonies 
performed by the pilgrims to Mecca, 55-58. Is swindled by a 
pilgrim, 60. His return to Egypt, 64, 65. His death, 66. 

BuRCKHARDT, astronomical tables of, compared with those of Car- 
lini and Coimbra, xviii. 340, 842 

Burgundy wines, account of, xviii. 126, 127 

Burnet (Dr. J.), theory of the earth, xix. 65, 66 

Burning spring, description of, ix. 196 

D 2 



30 INDEX. 

Buiinese imperial state carriage, its arrival in this country, no- 
tice of, XX. 201 

Busby (Mr.), notice of the hydro parabolic mirror of, xv. 137 

BussY (M.), memoir of, on carbon considered as a discolouring 
matter, xiii. 406-416 

' researches of, on the sulphuric acid of Nordhausen, xviii. 

145-148 

Butter, comparative examination of the acid of, xvi. 112. Facts 
subservient to the history of cow-butter, 114 



Cabbages, method of guarding them from the ravages of cater* 

pillars, xiv. 238 
Cadet db Vaux (M.), observations of, on the purification of vinous 

liquors from fruits, xviii. 399 
Cadmium, a new metal, notice of, v. 370 

— chemical properties of, vi. Ill, 226 

— observations on, ix. 403-405 

discovery of, in metallic zinc, xiii. 226. Source of, 427 

-^ from zinc works, xvi. 383 

•* — — discovered in Ireland, xix. 348 

Cafeine, composition of, xvii. 173, 174 

Cagniard de la Tour (Baron), experiments of, on the action of 

heat and pressure on certain fluids, xv. 145-147 
Calcareous spar, a new optical and mineralogical property in, 

discovered, i. 293 

■ »' ' formation of, xv. 384 

Calcium (sulphuret of), experiment on, xv. 149 

« chloride of, used as a manure, xix. 153 

Calcination of potash with an animal substance, vi. 358 

. . of metals, essays on, xiii. 136-141, 278-286 

Calculation of probabilities, on the application of, to natural 

philosophy, i. 120 
Calculi (animal), analysis of, vii. 193 
Calculi, on the production of, in the kidneys, viii. 66. Different 



iffOB*. 37 

kinds of, 67. Theii* treatment, 68-72. Nature of calculi of 
the bladder, 205-210. Treatment of them, 211-218. On the 
animal substances which generally accompany uric acid in 
calculi, 370 

Calculi in the bladder, notice of an instrument for breaking-, 
xiv. 453 

Calculous disorders, observations on the medico-chemical treat- 
ment of, vi. 195-209 

Calculus (biliary), extraordinary, account of, x. S0-S8 

analysis of the salivary calculus of a horse, 399 

. large human, notice of, xiii. 441 

■ analysis of, xviii. 189. New method of destroying, ziic/. 

(human) analysis of, xx. 49, 50. From a hog, 411 

of functions, solutions of some problems by means of, ii. 

371-379 

Caldes de Rainha, account of the mineral springs of, v. 60* 

Analysis of them, 63 
Caldasia^ genus, notice of, 127, 128 
Caldcleugh (Alex., Esq.) Meteorological Journal and observations 

of, at Rio Janeiro, and on the equator, xiv. 41-48 
Calomel, process for manufacturing, v. 131, 132 
Caloric, properties of, i. 98 
experiment on the transmission of, ii. 424 

observations and experiments on, xii. 31 1 

— notice of researches on, xiv. 206, 207 

Cambrian Society, premium of, viii. 395 
Cambridge, new observatory at, V. 117 

. university, number of members of, ix. 428 

" ■ ' — observatory, account of the new transit instrument at, 
xix. 268, 269 

Cameleon mineral, experiments on, iv. 89, 386, 387. x. 175, 179 

preparation of, xviii. 180 

Camp (Roman), at Mitchley, near Birmingham, remains of, de- 
scribed, xvi. 24 

Campbell (Colin), adventures of, ii. 74 ; is landed on one of the 
Sandwich Islands, z6if/. Returns to England, 77. Account of 
his farm, 78, 79 



38 INDEX. 

Campbell (Mr.), observations of, on the theory of vision, iii. 374 

Camphor, on the rotation of pieces of, viii. 383 

Canals of Britain and France, comparison of, xiv. 220, 221. Im- 
provement in canal navigation, 431 

Cancer, employment of iodine for the relief of, xiv. 237 

Cancerous tumour, extraordinary operation for, described, vi. 
47-50 

Candolle (M. de.), on the origin of the ergots or clavus, in corn, 
ii. 272. Proof that it is a species of sclerotium, 273 

Canoe, ancient found in Lincolnshire, i. 244, 245 

Cantharadin found in the potato-fly, x. 457 

Canton (Mr.), hypothesis of, to account for magnetic variations, 
vi. 97, 98 

Caoutchouc, a preserver of steel goods, xiii. 424. Notice of 
Caoutchouc bottles, 430 

Cape of Good Hope, appearance of, ii. 210 

■ vines of, ravaged by insects, x. 64. Salt re- 
commended as a preventive, 65 

account of some parhelia seen at, xvi. 365, 



366 ; and of a remarkable grotto in the interior of that coun- 
try, 272 
remarks on the wines Of, xviii. 134 



Capillaiy attraction, phenomenon of, explained, i. 94. Investi- 
gation of its theory, 290 

■ — tubes, experiments on the escape of gases through, iii. 
354, 355 

action of fissures, Sec, remarks on, xvii. 151, 152 

■ attraction, experiment on, xix. 134 



Capuchin Missions of the Caroni, Journal of an excursion to^ 
from St. Thome de Angostura, in Spanish Guayana, viii. 260. 
Notice of the village of Panapana, 261. Arrival at the farm-? 
house of San Felipe, 253. Hospitable reception there, 264. 

. Arrival at the missionary station of Carnache, ibid. Descrip- 
tion of it, 265. And of the missionary station of San Antonio, 
26Qt 267. Arrival at Upata, the capital of these missions, 268. 
Description of it, 269, 270. State of the plantations in its 
vicinity, 271. Industry of a planter at Tarife, 272. Plan of 



INDEJt. ^9 

the mission of Cupapuy, and of the Indian houses there, 274* 
Description of it, 275. Origin and process of the Capuchin 
missions, 276. Their present state generally, 277. Manufac- 
tures of Landa, 278. Plan of Alta Grkcik, 280. Present 
state of this mission, 280 ; and of the mission of Santa 
Maria, 283. Excursion in the vicinity, 286. Spanish mode 
of clearing land, 287 

Capuchin Journal of, from St Thom^ de Angostura in Spanish 
Guayana, ix. 1. Excursion from the mission of Santa Maria to 
that of Cumano, i. 2. Description of a potrerOf or breeding- 
farm for horses, 3. Arrival at Cumano, ibid. Present state 
of that mission, 4. Account of the mission of Miamo, 5. 
Sunday service of the Negroes there, 6. Arrival at the 
mission of Tumeremo, 7. Notice of it, 8, 9. ThatofTupu- 
quen, 10. Of Carapo, 11. Upata, 12. Pastora, 13. Ex- 
cursion into its vicinity, 14. Mode of taming wild horses, 15. 
Arrival at Puedpa, 16. State of that mission, ibid.) and of 
that of Santa Clara, 17. Mode of catching wild cattle, 18. 
Notice of the mission of Euri or Guri, 19. Caraib war-dance 
described, ibid. Arrival at Cupapuy, 21. Excursion in the 
neighbourhood, 22, 23. Population of several missions, 
23. Number of cattle belonging to them, 24. Unhealthy 
state of Alta Grkci^, 24, 25. Notice of the mission of San 
Felix, 26 ; and of San Miguel, ibid. Causes of its unhealthi- 
ness, 27. Arrival at the mission of San Joaquin, 28. State 
of it, ibid. ; and of Caroni, 29. Notices of the missions of 
Murucuni and Carnache, 30, 31. Arrival of the tourist at 
Angostura, 32 

Caraccas, tremendous earthquake of, described, ii. 400 

Caraib war-dance described, ix. 19. 

Carapo (Capuchin mission of), notice of, ix. 1 1 

Carbon and chlorin'fe, on two new compounds of, xii. 129, 130. 
Experiments on another new compound of, 375 

and iron, combinations of, xix. 154 

— and hydrogen, new compounds of, obtained during the 

decomposition of oil by heat, xix. 273-275. xx. 348-355 



40 INDEX. 

Carbon considered as a discolouring substance, xiii. 40G-412. 

Table of the discolouring power of different kinds of, 413. Its 

mode of action in discolouring, 414 

new mode of obtaining the hydriodide of, xv. 297-;^01 

experiments with the sulphuret of, xvi. 99. Notice of 

crystallized carbon, 162 
— and ammonia, reaction of the sulphuret of, and on the 



combinations thence resulting, xviii. 149-155 
Carbonate of lime, phenomena attending the process of solution 
of, i. 28. Facts relative to the artificial production of crystal- 
lized, vi. 35-40. Experiments with, on nitric acid, 250. De- 
posited in wood, xi. 405. xii. 408. Solubility of, in water, 
xii. 408. Existence of, in the urinary calculi of herbivorous 
animals, xvi. 109. Geological notice of, xix. 82 
■ ■ of barytes, phenomena attending the solution of, i. 29 

of strontian, phenomena attending the solution of, i. 29 

green and blue, of copper, comparative analysis of, 

iv. 273-281 
of ammonia and soda, experiments on, vii. 294-299. 



of strychnine, 377, 378 

of magnesia, nature of, discovered, viii. 171 

its analysis, xi. 388 

native, of iron, described, ix. 411 

of manganese, native, analysis of, xiii. 435 

of soda, native, found in India, xvi. 178 



Carbonic acid gas, action of, on fruits, vii. 385 

_ . estimation of the quantity of, in mineral waters, 

XV. 158, 159 

natural sources of, xx. 175. Action of, on hydro- 



sulphurets, 393 
Carburet of nickel, how procured, xii. 173 
Carburetted hydrogen gas, notice of a new ono, xvi. 381 
Carda7nine pralensis, observations on the leaves of, ii. 15G 
Carlini, astronomical tables of, compared with those of Delambre 

and Burckhardt, xvii. 340 
Carlsbad, analysis of the mineral waters of, xv. 170 



?NDEX. 41 

Carmine, ])reparation of, x. 203 

Carnache (Capucliin mission of), described, viii. 2G5. ix. 31 

Carnot's theory of defence by vertical fire, strictures on, viii. 

290-2^5 
Caroni, (Capucliin) mission of, its present state, ix. 29 
Carr (Mr.), notice of his machine for sweeping chimneys, v. 12^ 
Carrara marble, natural changes in, xvii. 178 
Carriage (new), notice of, vi. 349 
Cartilage of the ear, and cartilaginous ligaments, on the influence 

of water on, xiii. 419 
Caseic acid and caseous oxide, experiments on, and properties of, 

vii. 3S9-391 
Casks, report on an improved sliding rule for gauging, with rules 
for its use, xvi. 357-3G1. Mode of computing the contents of a 
cask from the wake, 362,363 
Cassini (M.), observations of, on a new family of plants, ii, 186 
Cassius, purple precipitate of, affords an indelible ink, vi. 362,363 

how to prepare, viii. 3S5 

Casting (metallic), improvements in, xiv. 431 

Castorina, a new animal substance, process for obtaining, xviii. ISl 

Cat, instance of electricity in, xv. 163 

Cataract, Indian operation for, described, ii. 68-72 

Caterpillars, depredations of, prevented by sowing hemp-seed, 

xiv. 238 
Catgut-strings, hints on the manufacture of, x. 267 
Cattle, health of, promoted by the use of salt, v. 146 

— ' number of consumed in London, vi. 384 

wild, how caught in South America, ix. 18. Numbers 

of, belonging to several of the Capuchin missions, 24 
Cauchy (M.), demonstration of a curious theorem in numbers, ii. 

175, 176 
Cauliflower, hint for the preseiTation of, xii. 406 
Qaulinea fragilis^ circulation of the sap discavered in, xvi. 3SS 
Caustic, employment of, to destroy the variolous eruption, xx. 200 
Caustic lime (native), from Tuscany, account of, i. 2G0. Analysis 
of it, 26 1. Observations thereon, 262 



4r INDEX^ 

Caverns of rocks, remarks on, and on their relation to the strata 

in which they are found, iv. 85 
Gawood (Mr.), ohservation on gas retorts, vi. 71-73 
Celebes, notice of an earthquake on the coast of, xii. 427 
Cement (Babylonian), analysis of, v. 130 

•*^ — recipe for preparing, xiii. 425 

calcareous observations on, xix. 329-331. xx. 60-57 

Cementation, reduction of the oxide of iron by, xviii. 388, 389 
Cemetery (Roman), discovered, vi. 174, 175 
Censura Temporum, bibliographical notice of, xiii. 55 
Census of America, xii. 433 
Cephalopodes, observations on, iii. 148 
Cerite, analysis of, xii. 262-264 

titaniferous, a new mineral discovered, xix. 156 

Ceres (the planet), elements of, viii. 87. Places of, for the year 

1822, 208 
Cerium, properties of the oxide of, xii. 264, 265 
Cerquero (D. J. S.), table by, for facilitating the calculation of 

the equation to equal amplitudes, xiii. 353 
Ceylon, brief notices of the natural history of, v. 233 
Chain Bridges, application of the tenacity of iron to, xx. 162, 163 
Chaja Aiass, interesting adventures of, ix. 316-318 
Chalk formation, remarkable strata of, described, iv. 227-232 
formation of rocks in England, xiv. 148. Manufacture of 

wine improved by, 227 

effects of burning on, xvi. 386, 387. xvii. 361 

Chalybeate minerals, remarks on the incautious use of, xiv. 349 

water, artificial, notice of, xvii. 386 

Champagne wines, observations on, xviii. 125, 126 
Champollion (M.), letters relating to the discoveries of, in Egyp- 
tian literature, xiv. 255-261. On the zodiac of Dendera, 

402-410 
Changes (apparent), in the place, colour, size, and figure of the 

heavenly bodies, x. 9-25 
Chapman (M. W.), on the formation of coal districts, ii. 205 
Charafiexilisj organization of, xvit 389 



INDEX. 4B 

Charcoal, properties of, in preserving meat, iv. 367 

■ polishing powder from, xi. 203 

• and hydrogen, on the aeriform compounds of, xii. 133 

— considered as a discolouring substance, xiii. 406» 

Table of the discolouring power of different charcoals, 413* 
On the mode of action of charcoal in discolouring, 414 

animal, action of on lime, xv. 384 

. fusion of, xvi. 158, 159. The action of nitric acid on, 



161, 162. Discovered in the cinders of Vesuvius, 180. Ex- 
periments on the properties of, obtained from woods of a greater 
specific gravity than box-wood, 264 
account of an electrical arrangement produced with 



different charcoals, and one conducting fluid, xvii. 174, 175 
fused, examination of, xix. 151 



Chaudet (M.), on the action of muriatic acid on alloys of tin 

and antimony, iii. 214, 215 
Chemical affinity, anomalous case of, i. 81 
' proportions, doctrine of, noticed by Professor Berzelius, 

examination and refutation of his theory concerning them, 

ibid, 228-236. 

[ ' analysis, new work on, announced, iv. 383 

composition, connexion between, and crystalline form 



examined, vi. 117-131 

empirics, remarks on, xii. 354 

equivalents, notice of an improved circular table of, iii. 



397 
Chemical Science, miscellaneous intelligence in, viii. 154-170) 

362-393. 

ix. 177-193, 392-411 

x. 171-190, 451-462 

xi. 201-216, 385-404 

xii. 169-187, 407-422 

xiii. 143-224, 396-426 

— xiv. 226-235, 433-446 

■ XV. 145-164, 374-385 

xvi. 156-177, 372-388 



4^ INDKX. 

Chemical Science, xvii. 153-175, 3G0-S8G 

xviii. 169-185, 381-404 

xix. 148-165,330-360 

XX. 169-182,387-401 

. progress of, on the Continent, 306-342 

xiv. 198-219, 415-430 

Chemistry, lectures on, plan of an extended and practical course 

of, i. 307. XX. 203 
(mineralogical and analytical), sketch of an introductory 

lecture on, iii. 358 
' notice of discoveries in, vi. 149-160, 354-368 
prize-questions and discoveries in, vi. 148, 160, 354, 

368. viii. 168 
■ — application of, to industrious economy, ix. 411 

Chenevix (R., Esq.), on a new method of secret writing, x. 89- 

101 
— . — ciphers of, for secret writing, remarks on, xii. 22 
Chess, account of a problem in the game of, solved by Euler, iii. 

72-77 
Chestnut-wood a substitute for oak-bark, viii. 165, 166 
Chevreul (M.), memoir of, on the causes of the diversities found 

in soaps, and on a new group of organic acids, xvi. 109. Facts 

collected by him relative to the history of cow-butter, 114 
. . — observations of, on the action of bodies on the organs 

of taste, xvii. 392, 393 

• — experiments of, on cholesterine, xviii. 403 

— — — on organic bodies, xx. 388 



Children (J. G., Esq.), on the chemical properties of cadmium, 

vi. 226 

— observations of, on cadmium, ix. 403 

■ evidence of, in the cause of Severn and Co. against the 

Imperial Insurance Company, x. 347 
translation by, of Key's Essay on the Calcination of 



Metals, &c. xi. 72-83, 260-271. xii. 54-64, 294-299. xiii, 
136-141, 27S-2S6 
Children (J. G., Esq.), analysis of his translation of. Professor 
Berzelius's treatise on the use of the blow-pipe, xiii. 325-332 



iN{>fix. 45 

Children (J. G., Esq.), observations of, on some alvine concre- 
tions, xiv. 102 
Cliildrenite, a non-descript mineral, account of, xvi. 274, 275 
Cliili, account of the earthquake at, in November, 1822, xvii. 38 
Chimneys, a new method of constructing them described, iii. 351. 

Its advantages, 348 
■ on a new machine for cleansing, iii. 394. v. 354-356 

• — importance of attending to the construction of, especi- 

ally for furnaces, xii. 352 

— extinction of fires in, xvi. 156 

— improved cowl for, xvii i. 165 



Chinese mode of making sheet-lead, v. 369 
' settlers and merchants of Batavia, character ofj vii. 19, 

Cruelty of the Chinese magistrates, 341 

■ year, remarks on, xvi. 331 

Chisholme (Dr.), on vegetable antidotes to poisons, x. 193 
Chiswick, account of an overflowing well at, xvii. 70-74 
Chloric acid, observations on, iv. 289 
Chlorides, nature and properties of, iv. 240 

of silver, reduction of, by hydrogen, v. 360 

■ on the decomposition of, by hydrogen and 

zinc, viii. 374 

■ ' — of potassium and sodium, analysis of the mixtures of, 
viii. 367 

. of gold, action of salts on, x. 118, and of soluble and 

insoluble salifiable bases on, 119 
of lime, by whom invented, xiii. 1. Notice of the ex- 



periments on it by Mr. Dalton and Dr. Henry, 1 ; by Mr. Welter, 
4 ; by Dr. Thomson, 5 ; result of their experiments, 6 ; re- 
marks thereon, 8. Experiments and researches of Dr. Ure, 9 ; 
his process for manufacturing it, 14. On the triple chloride of 
gold and sodium, xiii. 400 

of potassium thrown out by Vesuvius, xvi. 395 

lime, effects of, as a disinfector, xvi. 395 

instructions for ascertaining the strength of,xviii. 182 

of calcium, use as a manure, xix. 153. Of titanium, 



experiments on, 15a 



4» INDEX. 

Chlorine, properties and combinatioils of, first accurately de- 
scribed by Sir H. Davy, i. 2S4, 7iote. Experiments on different 
combinations of, 286 

-♦-. — ■ use of, in hydrophobia, xii. 190, New compound of it 

and carbon, 375. Heat produced by it, 413. Explosion of, 
and of hydrogen, ibid. 

— — * precipitation of nitrate of silver by, xiii. 227 

experiments on the hydrate of, xv. 71-74. Triple 



compounds of, 378. Its action on muriate of iron, &c., 378 

a remedy in scarlet fever, xvi, 395 

remedy for the effects produced by the inhalation of, 



XX. 199, 200 
Chlorophile, properties of, vi. 361, 362 
Cholesteric acid, account of, v. 125 
Cholesterine discovered in human bile, xviii. 403 
Chondrodite, analysis of, xii. 329 
Christie (S.H., Esq.), observations on the diurnal variation of the 

horizontal needle, when under the influence of magnets, xvii. 

128 ; and on the effects of temperature on the intensity of 

magnetic forces, 279 
— — on the alteration in the magnetism of an iron plate 

occasioned by a rotation on its axis, xix. 265-268. Further 

experiments on this subject, 277,278 
Christopher, island of, its geological structure, v. 320 
Chromate of iron, found in Shetland, x. 196,462. 
— of lead, on the application of, as a dye to silk, &c. x. 

451,452. xi. 392 

application of, in the arts, xix. 347 
of iron, analysis of, xiii. 436 
• discovered in the island of Unst, xi. 222 



ammoniacal of copper, production of, xix. 155; and 

of artificial crystals of chromate of lead, ibid. 
Chrome, on the sulphuret of, x. 452 

notice of a new native oxide of, xi. 219, 220 

Chromic oxide and acid, experiments on, v. 124. xi. 386, 387 

— T acid, combination of with potash, xv. 310 

Chromium, on the preparation of the oxide of, x. 452 



INDBX> iflf 

Chromium, on the coinpounds of, xii. 171, 172» Oxide of, 172. 

Alloys of, with iron and steel, 173, 174. On various compounds 

of, 317 
Chronometers, effects of the proximity of masses of iron on the 

rates of, xii. 374, 415. On the chronometers used in the Arctic 

expedition, 402 

influence of magnetism on, xvii. 197, 202, 365 

' effects of the induced magnetism of an iron shelly 

on the rates of, xviii. 84-47. Method of obtaining the rate of 

on ship-board, 168 
Chronometrical arrangements of the Admiralty, remarks on, xiii. 

211-218 
Chrysoberyl (Brazilian), analysis of, xvi. 394 
Churchman (Mr.), hypothesis of, to account for the phenonena 

of terrestrial magnetism, vi. 94, 95 
Cinchona, substitute for, vii. 103, 194 
■ notice of, in its wild state, effects of, viii. 182, 272. 

Adulteration in, exposed, xiii. 151 
. analysis of, xvi. 279, 282, 285 



Cinchonia, sulphate of, how prepared, xix. 161, 162 

Cinchonine, process for obtaining, xii. 325 

Cincinnati and Miami Country, natural and statistical view of, iii. 
81. Its first settlement, ihid. Increase of population, 82. 
Divisions and produce of the country, ibid. Its geological 
structure, 83. Plan of the town of Cincinnati, 86. Diseases 
chiefly prevalent in the state, 87. Favourable prospects for its 
future prosperity, 87 

Cinerary vase found at Athens, xiii. 72 

Cinnabar (native), notice of, viii. 357 

new process for preparing, xv. 161 

Cinnamon stone of Ualsjo, analysis of, xvi. 394 

Cipher proposed by Lord Bacon, x. 89. Observations on it, 
90; and on that proposed by anonymous writer in Rees'i 
Cyclopedia, 94. A new one proposed, with remarks, 95 

for secret writing, remarks on, xii. 21. On Mr. Chenevix's 



48 INDteX. 

22, 2S. Lord Bacon's, 24. Mr. Blair's, 25. Specimens of 
some ciphers, by the Rev. Edward Hincks, 29 
Circle, account of some new properties of, i. 19-24 
Circulation, experiments on the action of arteries in, iii. 178i 

Nature and action of the organs of circulation explained, 308 
Citric acid, on a new acid formed by the distillation of, xiv. 

422 
Civet, experiments on, xix. 164 

CiviALE (Dr.), new method of, for destroying calculi, xviii. 189 
Civilization promoted by gardening, x. 55 
Clarification of wine, process for, xv. 385 

Clarke (Dr. E. D.), experiments of, with Newman's blow-pipe, 
by inflaming a highly condensed mixture of the gaseous con- 
stituents of water, ii. 104. Description of his apparatus, 106. 
rapid fusion of platinum, 107; of palladium, 108; of various 
earths, ibid.; of native compounds, 110, 113; of alkalies, 116. 
Combustion of the diamond, 113. Experiments with some of 
the metals, 114-118. Metals obtained from the earths of ba- 
rytes and strontian, 119-122. Iron obtained from meteoric 
stones, 123. Account of the repetition of his experiments, but 
with different results, 461 
• ■ observations on the conjectures of, relative to the inscrip- 

tion on the ancient column at Alexandria, x. 3. Copy of that 
inscription as deciphered by him, 7 
Classical manuscripts, notice of the discovery of, x. 473 
Classification of animals, new system of, ii. 429 

of minerals, advantage of, illustrated, iv. 6G 

Clavus of rye and wheat. See Rye, Wheat 
Claws of crabs, liow thrown oiF, xx. 1-11 
Clayton (Rev. Dr.), first discoverer of coal-gas, i. 71 
Cleaveland (Prof.), treatise of, on mineralogy and geology, ana- 
lyzed, with remarks, xiv. 391-401 
Clearing the compass, of the regular eifect of a ship's permanent 

attraction, ix. 372, 380 
Clegg (Samuel, Esq.), account of his improvements of the appa- 
ratus employed in gas illumination, i. 278-283. ii. 132-138 



INDEX. 49 

Clement (M.), on a mode of preserving grain, xiii. 1G5 

Cleopatra's Needle, notice of, x. 474 

Climate of Great Britain, probable cause of the deterioration of 

iv. 281 

• of Southern Africa, observations on, xiv. 391 

— of London, meteorological remarks on, xvii. 340 

Clocks, antiquity of, ix. 174 

— the daily rate and error of, at one time of the day being 

known, a table to find its corresponding error, throughout the 

day, xii. 155-166 
improved method of constructing the dead escapement for, 



xiv. 334 
Clock-dial of the Tron Church at Glasgow, account of the illu- 
mination of, by gas, xii. 229 
Cloth, spontaneous combustion of, x. 1S6. Improvements in dye- 
ing, 1S8. On rendering it incombustible, 463 

process for making waterproof, xvi. 155 

Clouds, observable on the Atlantic, remarks on, xiv. 131. On 
the suspension of, 445 

on the ascent of, in the atmosphere, xv. 165 

Clover, a new species of, recommended, xiv. 452 
Clove -tree, benzoic acid found in the ripe fruit of the, xvi. 378 
Clyde (River), list of steam-boats actually plying on, viii. 241 
Coaches, number of, that daily leave London, viii. 243 
Coagulation of the blood. See Blood. 

Coal-gas, on the application of, to the purposes of illumination, 
i. 71-80. Experiments on the quantities and constituent parts 
of gas from given quantities of coal, 75. Quantities of coal 
consumed at the principal gas-light works, 77. Experiments 
with substitutes for coal in the production of gas, 78. Ad- 
vantages and disadvantages of coal-gas, 79. Improved appa- 
ratus for, 278 

mines, account of Sir H. Davy's wire gauze safe-lamps for 

preventing explosions in, and giving light in explosive atmo- 
spheres, i. 1. Proofs of their utility, 131 

on their practical application, 302 

E 



50 INDEX. 

Coal districts, conjectures on the formation of, ii. 205 

— new products from, v. 307 
• analysis of, viii. 163 

tar, observations on a substance produced during the dis- 
tillation of, 287 

gas obtained from, xiii. 227 

gas, theory of the formation of, xi. 344 

successfully applied to the inflation of air balloons, xii. 114 

' strata of England, notice of, xiv. 151. New seam of dis- 
covered, 453 

gas retorts, artificial plumbago in, xv. 159. Estimate of 

the force of explosion of, 278 

— coal strata, products of the combustion of certain, xvii. 
ISO 

found in Mexico, description of, ix. 27 

CoATEs (Dr.), new hydrostratic balance of, ix. 388 

Coating for specula, xviii. 181 

Cobalt and nickel, amalgamation of, by arsenic, xvi. 166 

Cochrane (Lord), observation on the lamp reflectors of, v. 178 

CocKERELL (C. R., Esq.), notice of his researches in Greece and 

Asia Minor, iii. 390 
■— observations of, on the original composition of the 

statues of Niobe and her children, v. 99 
' observations of, on the Egina marbles, vi. 327. 



vii. 229 

Cod-bank, newly discovered, vi. 383 

Code Napoleouy regulation of, concerning the devolution of pro- 
perty, in cases of possible survivorship, iii. 40 ; and also on 
the legitimacy of a child, 44 

Coe-fire of Derbyshire, phenomena of, described, x. 459 

Cohesion, attraction of, i. 90 

CoiMBRA, astronomical tables of, compared with those of Delam- 
bre and Burckhardt, xviii. 340-342 

CoiNDET (Dr.), remedy of, for bronchocele, x. 191 

■ on the use of iodine in medicine, xii. 187. Particularly 

in scrofula, 243 



IN{>BX. 51 

CoiNDET (Dr.), account by, of the injection of a solution of opium 
into the veins of an hysterical patient, xvii. 145 

Coins, ancient British and Roman discovered, v. 144, 388. vi. 
178, 180, 383 

CoLBURN (Zerah), notice of, vii. 198 

Colchester, description of an ancient sphinx, found at, xii. 1-17 

Colchicum Aulumnalej effects of, ii. 204 

" observations on the use of, in gout, iii. 377. 

vi. 105 

Cold and heat, effect of, on the colours of natural bodies, i. 299 

' effects of, on vegetation, ii. 46 

on the artificial production of, vii. 177. Observations 

thereon, 383 

at sunrise, observations on, ix. 421 

produced by the evaporation of liquids, experiments and ob 

servations on, xv. 294 

CoLEBRooKE (H. T., Esq.), remarks on fluidity, and an hypo- 
thesis on the structure of the earth, ix. 52-61 

■ ' on the geology of the Hymalaya Mountains, x. 470 

obsers^ations of, on the height of the Dhawala-giri, 

or White Mountain of HymaUya, xi. 240 

— — — -— meteorological observations and diary of, on a voyage 



across the Atlantic, xiv. 115. Remarks of, on the climate of 

Southern Africa, 241 
Colin (M.), experiments of, on the manufacture of hard soaps, 

ii. 444 
CoUalo freestone, account of, iv. SSI 

Collectors of libraries and museums, remarks on, vii. 259-266 
Collimator (floating), description of, xix. 301 
CoLLYER (C, Esq.), observations by, on univalves, xvii. 27-2 
Colocynth, active principle of, xviii. 400 
Colour of Avaters, observations on, v. 81-99. Change of colour 

by acids, 125; and by heat, 129 
new theory of, vi. 134. Authentic rase of change of, in 

the skin, 379 

of metals when heated, researches on, viii. 362 

E 2 



filT' INDEX. 

Colour, observations on the changes of, in heavenly bodies', 

X. 20-25 
— vegetable, on the change of, as an alkaline property, 

xiii. 315 
curious change of, in the oxides of cobalt and zinc, xix. 

342. Nature of, in mineral productions, 343 
Colouring matter, new, notice of, vi. 56 1 
Columbite, locality of, xviii. 40S 
Column (ancient) at Alexandria, observations on the inscription 

on, X. 1-7. Fac-simile of the inscription, 8 
Combustion, influence of solar light upon, xx. 387 
Comet of 1811, remarks on, iii. 412 

(new), notice of, v. 117. vi. 348« viii. 51 

• supposed transit of one, v, lis 

on the easiest and most convenient mode of calculating 

the orbit of, from observation, ix. 149-162. x. 416-42G. 

xi. 177-182. xiii. 336-385 
on the comet of 1819, by Prof. Olbers, ix. 163; by Prof. 



Brinkley, 164-167; and at the Royal Observatory at Green- 
wich, 381. Notices of new comets, 171. Elliptic elements 
of Pons* comet of 1819, 382 

of 1822, places of, computed, x. 413 

on the transit of the comet of 1819 over the sun, xi. 182 

on determining the equations of, xii. 137. Correction 



of the elements of an orbit of, that has been determined, 

149 
— seen at Val Paraiso, remarks on, xiv. 165. Elements of 

one, 411 
triennial re*discoveiy of, xv. 132. Notice of a new 

one, 168 

catalogue of the orbits of, which have hitherto been com- 



puted, xvi. 149-154, 349-356. xvii. 85-96. Remarks on 
the periodical (86 01b.), 96-99. Elements of that of 1S23-4, 
by various computers, 104 

phenomena of, xviii. 165 

of Encke, catalogue of the stars in, xix. 119 



INDEX. 53 

Comet, continuation of the catalogue of, xx. 308-31 1 

Commerce of Mecca, viii. 47-50 

Compass. (See Bain and Variations,) antiquity of, vi. 87. Its 

variation when discovered, 88, table thereof, 89. Supposed 

causes of it, 89-105 
observations on the variation of, in the late Voyage 

of Discovery to the North Pole, ix. 81-lOG. Computations for 

clearing the compass of a' ship's permanent attraction, 372- 

380 
— — needle, best kind of steel and form for, xii. 132 



Composition, attraction of, i. 90 

Compound substances, results of the fusion of, with the blowpipe, 
ii. 110-113 

Compounds, insoluble and difficultly soluble, hygrometric pro- 
perties of, xix. 92 

Compressibility of water, experiments on, x. 399 

Conchology remarks on different systems of, xiv. 67-86 

Concretions intestinal, analysis of, xiv. 237 

Conductor, new, for lightning, ix. 199 

' ■ eifects of lightning upon a bad one, x. 460 

for lightning, report on, xix. 145 

Conductors (fluid), on the motion produced in, when transmitting 
the electric current, xvii. 256 

CoNFiGLiAccHi (M.), experiments of, on the poison of vipers, x, 
193 

Congelation, progress of, in Switzerland, vii. 166 

on the limit of constant, in the Himalaya Mountains, 

vii. 38-43 

Conglomerate rocks, formation of, xix. 208-212 

Coniferous plants of Koempfer, observations on, ii. 309-314 

Connaissance dcs Terns for 1812, note respecting it, xi. 176. Vin- 
dication of that work, 373 

Consolidation of rocks, xix. 32-38. Different rocks and their 

modes of consolidation, 38-43. General causes of it, 43 
Constantinople, account of the Souterazi of, vi. 350 
Constituents of rocks, xix, 28-32 



64 INDEX. 

Consuegna, genus, notice of, iii. 126 

Consumption of the lungs, remedy for, vi. 172 

^ on the use of prussic acid in, ix. 418 

Contortion, sense of, how produced, ii. 15 

CoNYBEARE (Rcv. W. D.), and Phillips (Wm., Esq.), their outlines 
of the geology of England and Wales analyzed, xiv. 142. De- 
scription of the two principal geological basins, 144. Various 
articles found in the London clay, ibid. History of the wells 
of London, 145. Supermedial order of rocks, 147. Chalk 
formation of, 148. Oolitic series, 149. Red marl, and 
magnesian limestone, 150. Carboniferous strata, or medial 
order of rocks, ibid. Account of coal strata, 151. Carbo- 
niferous limestone, 152. Old red sandstone, 153. Trap- 
stone, ibid. General character of the work, 154 

Cooper (Mr. J. T.), on some combinations of platinum, iii. 119- 
124 

— on the separation of lime and magnesia, vii. 392 

« ■ on the analysis of zinc ores, ix. 191. Strictures on his 

communication, 403 

■ evidence of, in the cause of Severn & Co. against the Im- 



perial Insurance Company, x. 336 

analysis by, of the ancient ruby glass, xvii. 165. His 



lamp furnace for the analysis of organic bodies, 232 
Cooper's Hill, ancient subterraneous apartments discovered at, 

V. 143 
Copper, comparative analysis of the blue and green carbonates of, 

iv. 273-281 
' and its compounds, account of, v. 60. Native copper 

found in North America, 140 
■ mines of England and Wales, present state of, vi. 345- 

347. Lampate of, 323 
• ore from Cornwall described, vii. 95-100. Analysis of it, 

100-102. Analysis of a protoxide of copper, 181. Notice of 

native copper, 399 

• — hydrated carbonate of, viii. 382 

and silver, oxidation of, viii. 168 



INDEX. 55 

C5oppei', new test for, ix. 408. x. 182 

plate engraving, extraordinary improvement in, ix. 391. 

— — ores from Siberia, chemical analysis of, xi. 274-278. 

Analysis of the copper glance of Rothenburg, 279. On the 

granulation of, 386 
analysis of a ferro- arsenical sulphuret of, from Freiberg, 



xii. 30-32. Of an antimonial sulphuret of copper from Kap- 
nik, 32-34, 258. Of a cupreous sulphuret of lead and anti- 
mony, from Clausthal in the Hartz, 34-36. Of the sulphuret of 
copper and bismuth, 36. Effects of copper on vegetation, 178. 
Pyrites, 330. Account of the native mines on Lake Superior, 
422 

oxide of, dissolved in ammonia, xiii. 226. Component 

parts of the deutoxide of, 428. Analysis of yellow copper 

ore, 434 

experiment on the sulphuret of, xv. 1 50. Process of 



refining or toughening it, 156. Action of ammoniacal gas on, 
157 

experiments on the acetates of, xvii. 383. Sheathing 



of ships, how prevented from corrosion, 253 

plates of, suggestion for the preservation of, xviii. 167. 

— ^— ' influence of, on magnetic needles, xix. 147. Massive, 

obtained by the moist process, 154. Ammoniacal chromate of, 

155 
— observations on the changes which have taken place in 

some ancient alloys of, xx. 296 
Copying machine, substitute for, viii. 346 
Coral formation of rocks, geological remarks on, xiv. 283-295 
CoRDiER (M.), on the composition of volcanic rocks, ii. 434 
— — .-^— on the systematic arrangement of volcanic masses, iii. 

201-207 
Cordilleras, on the hot spring of, xvii. 143. Account of the dif- 
ferent masses of iron, which have been found in the eastern 

Cordillera of the Andes, 394 

(musty), simple process for purifying, v. pre/, vii. 

may be beneficially reaped before it is perfectly ripe, x, 447 



56 INDEX. 

Corn, prevention of smut in, xvi. 156 

Cornea, observations on the descent of the fluid which lubricates 

the, ii. 127-131 

. • influence of water on the, xiii. 419 

Cornwall, present state of the mines in, vi. 345. Notice of the 

Literary and Philosophical Society of, 381 

— Geological Society, report of, viii. 354 

Correspondence (secret), easy method of, xii. 292 

Corrosive Poisons, on the classification and treatment of, iii. 47 

sublimate, antidote for, ix. 401 

Cotton goods, experiments on stoving them with sulphur, iv. 

196 

on the spontaneous combustion of, v. 367 

mill, new mode of warming, xix. 137 



Coughs, successful treatment of chronic and nervous, with prussic 

acid, iv. 351 
Cough, singular case of, cured by extensive bleeding, vii. 43-48 
Countenance, effects of paralysis of the different facial nerves on, 

xiii. 120-135 
Covenants, liow made in Chinese Tartary, ix. 66 
Covent-garden theatre, notice of improvements in, iv. 383 

account of the ventilation of, v. 300 

Cow's milk, mode of ascertaining the comparative value of, 

iv. 157 
Cow-pock, native, in India, vii. 192 
Cow-tree, memoir on the milk of the, xvii. 142 
Cowl, improved for chimneys, xviii. 165 
Cowley and Staines (Messrs.), English opium of, further account 

of, xix. 141 
CoxwELL (H., Esq.), evidence of, in the cause of Severn and Co, 

against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 336 
Crabs, means by which they throw off their claws, xx. l-ll 
Cranch (Mr.), collector of natural history in the expedition to 

the Congo, biographical memoir of, v. 1 1 1 
Crane, useful one noticed, iv. 322 
Creation (Mosaic), account of, explained, xv. 116 



INDEX. 57 

Creighton (H., Esq.) on an instrument for taking the specific 
gravity of solid bodies, xiii. 237-2G0 

Crimea, notice of the Greek antiquities in, vii. 195 

Crinum genus, review of, iii. 102-115 

Crotch (Dr.), syllabus of his lectures on music, xvii. 287 

Crotoii'Tiglium, experiments and observations on the seeds of 
xiii. 62. On the oil thence obtained, 69-72. xx. 231 

Croup, sulphate of copper an excellent remedy in, xvii. 181 

Cruelty of the Chinese, vii. 340 

Crum (M.), important points by, in the chemical history of Indigo, 
XV. 152-154 

Cryptogamous vegetation, observations on, v. 257-2G4. vi. 20- 
30, 210-22r» 

Crystal, unequal dilatation of, in different directions, xvii. 157 

Crystalline form, and chemical composition, inquiry into the con- 
nexion between, vi. 117-131. xiv. 198-20G, 415-418 
■ form of artificial salts, observations on, xv. 282 

Crystallization, application of some phenomena attending the pro- 
cess of solution to the laws of, i. 47. Application of such 
phenomena to the illustration of crystalline arrangements in 
general, 30. Mons. Meuthuon's theory of, 124. Account of 
his facts and experiments in support of it, 124-128. Corolla- 
ries thence deduced, 128. Observations thereon, 130 

■ notice of M. Haiiy's theory of, iii. 365 

i saline, experiments and observations on, v. 106 

■ of sugar, xi. 397 

_ supposed effect of magnetism upon, xvii. 15S 

^ of the sub-carbonate of potash, xvii. 167 



of bitumen, xviii. 179 



Crystals, preservation of, ix. 185 

■ on the dissection of, xi. 202 

Crystals, loose, discovered in quartz, xvi. 394 

on the direction of the axes of double refraction in, xviii. 

172 

Crystals of sulphate of soda, composition of, xix. 152. Artifi- 
cial crystals of chromate of lead produced, 155. General 



.58 INDEX. 

method of calculating the angles made by any planes of 
crystals, 296 
Cucumber, immense, notice of, vii. 399 

Cucuta (valleys of), description of, iii. 337. Their situation and 
physical geography, 399. Productions, 340. Inland navigation , 
ibid. Notice of the trade in cattle, and of the manners of the 
drovers, 341. Population, 343. Dress and amusements of the 
inhabitants, ibid. 344. Degraded state of the Indians of, 345. 
State of the men of colour, 346. Account of the dances of the 
Cucutians, 347 
Cunnemara, notice of an earthquake at, xii. 426 
Cumano (Capuchin mission of), present state of, ix. 3 
CuMMiNG (Mr.), observations of, on the dead escapement, xvi. 9 
CuMMiNG (Prof.), table of thermo-electrics by, xvi. 171. On 
thermo-electric rotation, 372 ; and on a thermo-electric phe- 
nomenon, with iron, 374 
CuNOBELiN a British monarch, remarks on some coins of, xii. 6- 

8, 12, 13 
Cupapuy (a Capuchin mission in Spanish Guayana), plan of, viii* 

274. Description of it, 275. ix. 21. 
■ excursion in its vicinity, ix. 22 

Cupellation, of metals, experiments on, ix. 183 
Currents of the Atlantic, observations on, iv. 110 
Curvature of the arches of the bridge of the Holy Trinity, at 

Florence, observations on, xv. 1-8 
CuTBusH (Dr.), experiments by, with nitric acid, on charcoal, 

xvi. 161 
CuTHBERT (Mr.), on a reflecting compound, and single micro- 
scope, XX. 377 
Cutlery, analysis of the stone used in setting, vii. 399 
CuviER (M.), notice of his memoir on Cephalopodes iii. 148. 

Observations of, on a hitherto undescribed fossil body, 158 
Cyanate of potash, how prepared, xviii. 394 
Cyanide of mercury, new compound formed by mixing a solution 

of, with a solution of iodide of potassium, xiii. 401 
Cj'-anogen and its compounds, observations on, vii. 179 



INDEX. d9 

Cyanogen on the combinations of oxides with, xii. 175 

' on a peculiar acid, formed by the combination of with 

alkalies, xiv. 421 ^ 

• experiments on a crystalline matter, formed in a solu- 



tion of, XV. 302 

production of, xvi. 161 

crystallized hydro-sulphuret of, xviii. 154 



Cyanurets, production of, xv. 381 

— of iodine, process for obtaining, xviii. 173 

of mercury, experiments on the compound of, with the 

nitrate of silver, xix. 159 
Cystic oxide, compounds of, xvi. 176 



Da Costa (Dr.), observations of, on the geological structure of 

the north of Ireland, iv. 160-163 
Dacier and Colladon (MM), experiments of, on the action of 

iron in motion on tempered steel, xviii. 160 
Dahlia, notice of the oil of, xviii. 179 
Dahline, a new vegetable principle, account of, xvi. 387 

discovery of, in the Jerusalem artichoke, xvii. 385 

Dairy, mode of ascertaining the comparative value of each cow's 

milk in, iv. 157 

Dalton (Mr.), observations of, on the solution of carbonate of 
lime, xii. 408 

Damp walls, effects of, xvi. 433 

Dances of the Inhabitants ofCucuta, described, iii. 347 

Daniell (J. F., Esq.), on some phenomena, attending the process 
of solution, i. 24. Observations of, on their application to the 
laws of crystallization, 47 

on the mechanical structure of iron, developed by solu- 
tion, and on the combinations of silex in cast iron, ii. 278 

on a new species of resin, from India, iii. 113 

— — ■ observations of, on the theory of spherical atoms, and 



on the relation which it bears to the specific gravities of certain 



GO INDEX. 

minerals, iv. 30. On the strata of a remarkable chalk forma- 
tion in the vicinity of Brighton and Rottingdean, 227-232 
Daniell (J. F., Esq.), mistake of, corrected, v. 188 

. ■ on the formation and decomposition of sugar, and 

the artificial production of crystallised carbonate of lime, vi. 
32-40. On the acid formed by the slow combustion of ether, 
318-326 
on a new hygrometer, which measures the force and 



weight of aqueous vapour in the atmosphere, and the corre- 
sponding degree of evaporation, viii. 298. ix. 128-134. Its 
excellence, xiv. 185. Manner of using the instrument, viii. 
301. Tables of the force, density, and expansion of aqueous 
vapour at different degrees of temperature, from 0° to 92*, 306. 
Observations thereon, 308. Table of the force of vapours, and 
the full evaporating force of every degree of temperature from 
28« to 85°, 311. Observations thereon, 314. Table of the 
results of the foregoing tables, 322. Application of this 
hygrometer to barometrical measurements, 323, 325. Me- 
teorological Journal, with the hygrometer, 326. ix. 134, 269. 
X. 131. xii. 97 
observations of, on the editors of the Blhliothcque Uni- 



verselle, relative to his new hygrometer, x. 123-131. Experi- 
ments to ascertain the effects of the great eclipse in September, 
1820, on the gaseous and aqueous atmospheres, 135 

description of a new pyrometer, xi. 309-320 

— inquiry (with experiments) into the nature of the pro- 



ducts of the slow combustion of ether, xii. 64-74. Comparative 
remarks (with three tables) on the weather and seasons of the 
years, 1819-20-21, 111-114. Illustrative remarks on Mr. 
Green's acriel voyage, 117 
on the corrections to be applied in barometrical men- 



suration for the effects of atmospheric vapour, by means of the 
hygrometer, xiii. 76-91 
observations and experiments of, on evaporation, xvii. 



46-61. On the horary oscillations of the barometer, 189. Re- 
view of his Meteorological Essays and Observations, 335 



INt)E5t. 61 

Daniell (J. F., Esq.), observations of, on the radiation of heat in 
the atmosphere, in reply to M. Gay-Lussac, xviii. 305-312. 

• correction of an error by, in the " Meteorological Es- 
says," XX. 74-7S. On the barometer, ibid. 93 

Darwin (Dr.), hypothesis of, that sensations consist in the motion 
of the nervous fibres, examined, i. 47 

. theory of, concerning sensorial power, exploded, ii. 229 

Datisca cannabina, on the use of, in dyeing, ii. 435 

Daturium, a new vegetable alkali, notice of, xi, 204 

Davis (J. F., Esq.), notice of his remarks on the Chinese year. 
xvi. 331 

Davt (Sir H.), on the wire gauze safe-lamps, for preventing ex- 
plosions from fire-damp, and for giving light in explosive at- 
mospheres, in coal-mines, i. 1. Statement of experiments that 
led to his discovery, ibid. Description of the instrument, 3. 
Directions for its use, 4. Proofs of its utility, 131. Ac- 
count of its practical application, with observations by Sir H. 
Davy, 303. Remarks of, on aqua regia, or nitro-rauriatic 
acid, 67. A mistake of, corrected, 231. Observations of, on 
the analysis of the native caustic lime from Tuscany, 262, 
On the analogies between undecompounded substances, and on 
the constitution of acids, 283. Vindication of his disco- 
veries respecting the properties and combinations of chlorine, 
284, note. On the prussic basis and acid, 288 

experiments of, and new views on flame, ii. 124-127. Notice 

of his further experiments on flame, 463. Efticacy of his wire 
gauze safe-lamps, 464 

retrospect of his discoveries, iii. vii. Notice of his in- 
vestigations on flame, 130. Observations of, on the cause of 
the diminution of the temperature of the sea on approaching 
land, or in passing over banks in the ocean, 368. Remarks of, 
on a note in No. II. of this Journal, 378 

observations of, on the longevity of trees, iv. 1 1 

the Rumford gold medal conferred on him by Uie Royal 



Society, 131 



abstract of his discoveries and researches concerning flame 



62 INDEX 

and the safety-lamp, v. pref. i.-vi. His safety-lamp applied 
as an argand lamp, v. 124 
Davy (Sir H.), report of, on the state of the manuscripts of 
Papyrus, found at Herculaneum, vii. 154-161 

discourse of, to the Royal Society, x. 380 

• observations of, on the magnetic phenomena produced by 

electricity, xii. 126. His discourse on awarding Sir Godfrey 
Copley's prize-medals, to J. F. W. Herschel, Esq. and Capt. 
E. Sabine, 300. His chloridic theory reluctantly acknow- 
ledged by foreign chemists, 306. Notice of his observations 
and experiments on the Papyri of Herculaneum, 367; and of 
his further researches on the magnetic phenomena produced 
by electricity, with some new experiments on the properties 
of electrified bodies, in their relation to conducting power and 
temperature, 377 

on some principles of combination, xiii. 143 



observations of, on the electrical phenomena exhibited in 

vacuo, xiv. 165. On the state of water and aeriform matter 
in cavities found in certain crystals, 385 

address of, on delivering the Copley medal, to Mr. Pond, 

xvi. 298 

on a new phenomenon of electro-magnetism, xvii. 122. On 



the application of liquids formed by the condensation of gases as 
mechanical agents, 125. On the mode of preventing the cor- 
rosion of copper sheathing by sea-water in ships, 253, 279 

analysis of his discourse at the anniversary meeting of the 

Royal Society, on awarding the Copley medal to Dr. Brinkley, 
xviii. 327 

researches of, on the preservation of metals by electro-che- 
mical means, xix. 271. xx. 343. Address of, to the Royal 
Society, 304 

Davy (Dr. John), on the temperature of the air, &c., between the 
tropics, ii. 208. On the heat evolved during the coagulation 
of the blood, 246 

description of Adam's Peak in Ceylon, v. 25. Analysis of 

Indian snake-stones, 124. Sketches of the natural history of 
Ceylon, 233 



INDBX. 63 

Davy (Dr. John), remarks of, on the huffy coat of the blood, xiv. 
878 ; and on corrosive sublimate, 384 

on air, found in the pleura, in a case of pneumat-tho r ax, 

xvii. 130, 263 

Day, invariable duration of, demonstrated, viii. 113 
Dayak, or aboriginal inhabitants of Borneo, notice of, ii. 340 
Dead escapement, theory of, and on the reducing it to practice, 
for clocks with seconds and longer pendulums, xvi. 1-24 

sea, analysis of the water of, viii. 164 

Dean Forest, outline of the stratifications of, ix. 37-48 
Dkbret (M.), experiments of, on the comparative advanfc^e of 

coke and wood as fuel, xvii. 36 1 
Decolouring power of different substances, experiments on, xix. 

165. 
Decomposition (slow) of glass, observations on, xx. 259 
Degrees, table of equivalents for converting them into time, 

xiii. 395 
Delambrb (M. Le Chev.), on the life and writings of M. De Bou- 
gainville, i. 215 

■ astronomical tables of, compared with those of Car- 

lini and Coimbra, xviii. 340 
Db La Rive (M.), observations of, on the voltaic pile and current, 

xix. 337 
Deleuze (M.) on the life and writings of Hedwig, i. 103-113 
Delphine, a new vegetable alkali, viii. 155, 157. ix. 189 
Db Luc (M.) observations of, on the primitive matter of lavas, 

ii. 158 
Delvine, account of an arenaceo-calcareous matter found near, 

xvi. 79-84 
Dendera, remarks on the zodiac of, xiv. 402-410 
Denmark, notice of the geometrical measurements in, ix. 390 
Density of the earth, remarks on, ix. 32. xii. 370 
■ of water, maximum, xv. 372. xix. 149. 

Depression of mercury in glass tubes, observations on, xi. 83 
Depth, variable, of the ocean, hypothesis to account for, vl. 230, 

242 



64 INDEX. 

Derby Infirmary, mode of warming and ventilating, ii. 201-204 

Derbyshire, notice of the mineral productions of, viii. 349 

Desert (tlie Great), account of, i. 273 

Desfosses (M.), experiments of, on the formation of alcohol, by 
fluoboric gas, xi. 394 

on the manner of estimating the quantity of sulphuretted 

hydrogen gas in sulphurous mineral waters, xiv. 445 

Despretz (M.) on the destiny of vapours, xv. 297 

Desquamation of certain rocks, observations on, xiii. 237-257 

Dessaigens (M.) on the influence of temperature, mechanical pres- 
sure, and the humid principle on electricity, ii. 154. On the 
phenomena of repulsion and attraction without electricity, 427 

— — — experiments of, on galvanic action, iii. 207 

Des Vaux (M.), notice of his memoir on the methodical arrange- 
ment of Lycopodia and Filices, iv. 87 

DeuChar (M.), on the tenacity of glass and siliceous bodies, 
xiv. 439 

Devillb (Mr. J.), evidence of, in the cause of Severn and Co. 
against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 33G 

Dew, remarks on the deposition of, xvi. 35-41 

observations of some phenomena, relative to the formation 

of, on metallic surfaces, xvii. 1-12 

annual quantity of, fallen, xviii. ISG 

Diabetes, singular case of, xv. 386 

Diallage rock of Shetland, observations on, x. 103-108. 
Synopsis of its different divisions, 108 

Diamond, combustion of, by the blowpipe, ii. 113. Observa- 
tions on the glazier's diamond, 205. Account of the Mattan 
diamond, 342 

m observations on the combustion of, iv. 155 

■ imbedded, notice of, v. 378 

new apparatus for the combustion of, ix. 264 

on the structure of, x. 1G7 

• — fusion of, xvi. 160. Matrix of the Brazilian, 178 

best adapted for microscopic magnifiers, xix. 133 

Djdot (M.), process of, for casting new stereotype plates, xv. 138 



INDEX. 65 

Dichroism of tourmaline, remarkable, xiii. 219 

Dick (M. T. L.), observations of, on the appearances called the 
parallel roads of Glenroy, iii. 132 

on those of Lochaber, v. 175 

Dictionary of Chemical Apparatus, Review of, xviii. 832 

Diet of valetudinarians, remarks on, xiv. 367 

Differential Thermometer described, viii. 218 

DiGBY (Sir Kenelm), notice of the pretended alchemical re- 
searches of, ix. 235 
Digestion, influence of the eighth pair of nerves on, illustrated 
by experiments and remarks, x. 292 

— of ruminating animals, experiments on, xix. 169 

Digestive organs, the action of, explained, iii. 305 

— — canals in the foetus of vertebral animals, observations 

on the contents of, xx. 197 
Digitaline, process for obtaining, xviii. 178 
Dilatation of fluids, observations on, ii. 163 

DiLLWYN (L. W., Esq.), observation of, on fossil shells, xvii. 129 
Diod-griafol, notice of a liquor so called, xi. 394 
Dip of tlie needle, observations on, x. 459 

Dip micrometer and dip sector, observations on the use of, v. 223 
Dipping-needle, directions forusing, v. 21 1 

■ invention and uses of, vi. 84, Table, and 

causes of its variation, 89 

■ . general results of, xvii. 104. Experiments 



and observations on the daily variation of the horizontal and 
dipping needles under a reduced directive power, xvii. 128 

Disney (John, Esq.), conjectures of, concerning the original for- 
mation of the Arabic digits, i. 166 

Dissemination of plants, observations on, iv. 1 

Distance, on the origin of our notion of, iii. 1. Outline of 
Bishop Berkeley's theory, 2. Notions of distance and magni- 
tude, how far acquired by the sense of touch, 3. Proof 
that perception and idea are homogeneous, 6 

Distension, simple mechanical, the cause of the action of invo- 
luntary organs of sensation, ii. 22 
♦ F 



66 INDEX. 

Distillation of sea-water, apparatus for described, vi. 47 

. — experiments on the acceleration of, xix. 149 

• of fatty bodies, experiments on, xx. 391 

Dive (M.), notice of his formation of prussiate of potash, xii. 323 
Dividing engine of Ramsden, report on the present state of, xii. 

381-388 
Diving machine, new notice of, xi. 200. 
Divisibility of matter, remarks on, xi. 306 
Division of the eighth pair of nerves, observation on the effect 

of, xi. 45 
Dobereiner's apparatus for making extracts, notice of, xv. 16.2 
• extraordinary experiment by, on the ignition of 

platinum by a jet of hydrogen, xvi. 179 ; and on the action of 

platinum on mixtures of oxygen, hydrogen, and other gases, 

373. Notice of his eudiometer, 374 
' ^ . on the capillary action of fissures, xvii. 151. 

Notice of his instantaneous light apparatus, 378 
' . observations and experiments of, on the composi- 



tion of formic acid, xix. 355 

Dock-yards, observations on the state of science in, xviii. 320 

Dogs, experiments on feeding, with white and household bread, 
xix. 172 

i)oLLOND (Mr. G.), account of a micrometer made with rock crys- 
tal, xii. 131 

DoLOMiEu (M.), historical notice of, ii. 94. Enters the order of 
Malta, ib. Condemned to death, but pardoned, ib. Regains 
his liberty, and applies himself to the study of natural 
history, 95. Notice of his mineralogical travels, 96 ; and of 
his writings, 97. His services to the order of Malta, 98. Goes 
to Egypt, 99. Is shipwrecked in the gulf of Tarentum, and 
imprisoned, ib. 100. Is again liberated, 101. Resumes his 
mineralogical travels, 102. His death, 103. Defect of his 
theory of mineralogical distinctions, ib, 

Dominica (Island), geological structure of, v. 317. 

DouALT, WiELAND (M), proccss of, for preparing artificial gems, 
X.184 



INDEX. ti7 

DoNKiN (B. Esq.), evidence of, with remarks in the cause of 

Severn and Co. against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 

326 
Donovan (Mr.), experiments of, on the compounds of mercury, 

viii. 358 
Douglas (Sir H.), observations of, on M. Carnot's theory of de* 

fence by vertical fire, viii. 290 
Dracontius, poems of, discovered, v. 143 
Drais (Mr. C), new carriage invented by, vi. 349 
Drake (D., Esq.), natural and statistical view of Cinclnnata 

and the Miami country, iii. 81-88 
Drapiez (M.,) antidote recommended by, for poisons, x. 192 
Drawing tables, improved, notice of, xiii. 222 
Dreaming, remarks on, vii. 255 
Drosometer, notice of, xviii. 185 
Drovers of South America, manners of, iii. 341 
Druidical sepulchre, notice of, xi. 412 
Dry rot, suggestions for preventing, v. 122. viii. 348. 
in ship timber, prevented by filling up their pores with 

salt, X. 448 
experiment for preventing, xv. 141 



Dry voltaic piles, notice of, xx. 169 

Dryness of air, or gases, test of, xv. 160 

DuBOUT (Madame), account of the alcalino-vegetable poudrettes 
of, xii. 334 

Ductilimetre, or instrument for measuring the ductility of cer- 
tain metals, notice of, xiv. 221 

DuFouR (Colonel), experiments of, upon the tenacity of iron wire, 
xvi. 367. Account of the wire bridge of suspension, con- 
structed by him at Geneva, 369 

Dufton, acc6unt of a lead mine at, ii. 198 

Dugong, an herbivorous animal, from Sumatra, notice of, xii. 370 ; 
peculiarities that distinguish it from the Manatee of the "West 
Indies, 375 

DuLONG and Petit (MM.), memoir of, on radiant heat, v. 364. 

•— and Thenard (MM.), experiments by, on the properties 

F 2 



68 INDE^. 

some metals possess, of facilitating the comLination of elastic 

fluids, xvii. 132 
Dumbness, case of, cured by electricity, xvi. 187 
PuMERiL (M.), report of, on the medicinal application of leeches, 

xix. 174 
DupuY (M.) on the distillation of fatty bodies, xx. 391 
DuTRocHET (M.) on the influence of motion in the direction of 

vegetables, xiv. 430 
Dyckman (Dr.), notice of his dissertation on the pathology of 

the human fluids, i. 300 
Dyeing, improvements in, x. 188 
Dye (yellow), a new one discovered, ix. 184 



Ear, its organization, cause of it receiving impressions of sound, 
ii. 6 

Earle (Henry, Esq.), observation of, on the eifect of galvanism 
on the nervous system and its disorders, xiv. 111. On the 
mechanism of the spine, 380 

Earth, observations on the figure of, v. 2.35. On the know- 
ledge which the ancient Egyptians appear to have had of it, 
247. Observations on the operations undertaken to determine 
the figure of the, 340 

-^ observations on the figure of, as deduced from the mea- 
surement of arcs of the meridian, vii. 229 

influence of the changes of, on the latitude of places. 



viii. 85. On the figure of, 108 

remarks on Laplace's computation of the density and 



figure of, ix. 32. Hypothesis concerning its structure, 52. 

Temperature beneath its surface, 197 

temperature of the, at various depths, xii. 338. Re- 



marks on its mean density, 370 

observations on the temperature of, xiii. 144 

sketch of the diff'erent theories of, by Dr. Thomas Bur- 



INDEX. 



69 



nett, xix. 65. Dr. Woodward, 67; Mt. Mitchell, 69; and 
Mr. Whitehurst, 70. Neptunian theory of Werner, 72. Plutonic 
theory of Dr. Hutton, 74. Account of the surface of, and 
different strata found beneath it, 79, 186. Experimental data 
on the temperature of the surface of the earth, 173 

Earth, experiments for determining the figure of, xx. 141 

green of Verona, analysis of, xii. 276 

acid of Persia, experiments on, xvi. 179 

Earthenware reflectors, notice of, x. 170 

Earthy matter, rain of, at Naples, v. 370 

Earthquake of the Caraccas, ii. 400 

■ — notices of, v. 134. vi. 16S. vii. 191 

— in South America, viii. 355. At Trinidad and in 

Lower Canada, 356. At Kutch in the East Indies, ib. ix. 205. 
At Cork, 425. x. 199 

' — in the Island of Zante, account of, xii. 341. In Cu« 



maneana, 420. On the coast of the island of Celebes, 427 

-' phenomena, of, xiii. 232. Effect of earthquakes on 



magnetism, 434 

— notices of, xiv. 450 

— ^— shock of, at sea, xvi. 184 

notice of, xx. 183 

• in Cliili, account of, xvii. 38 



Eating and drinking, connexion between, vi. 13 

Eaton (Prof.) observations of, on the boletus igniarmi^ xvi. 185 

Eclipse of September 7th, 1820. Calculations concerning, viii. 94 

. account of, xi. 26, 291. The 

great eclipse, its effects on the gaseous, and aqueous atmo- 
spheres, X. 135. Observations made during it, 458 
Economy of fuel, experiments and remarks on, xiii. 58 
Edgware Parish, population of, v. 309 
Edinburgh, progress of public education at, xii. 431 

remarks on the geology of the country around, xiii. 

171 
Education, state of, in Ireland, xix. 220 

Edwards (Dr.), notice of his m^Qmoiv sur l^ Asphyxie dans les Bu^ 
(raciens, iv. 09 



70 INDBX. 

Effect produced by the inhalation of chlorine, remedy for, xx. 
199 

Effluvia, unhealthy, of several manufactures, experiments for 
counteracting, iii. 408 

Egg, observations on the changes which it undergoes, during in- 
cubation in the common fowl, xiv. 383 

Eggs, new mode of preserving, x. 449 

— — singular preservation of, xii. 342. xiii. 424 

Egypt, ancient town discovered in, vii. 196 

— — notice of Mr. Salt's researches in, x. 475 

Egyptian literature, notice of discoveries in, xiv. 255 

mummy, description of, xix. 261 

Elaine, separation of, from oils, xv. 384 

Electric and magnetic phenomena, connexion of, x. 361 

Electrical energy, how produced, i. 101 

— experiment, x. 188 

phenomena, exhibited in vacuo, remarks on, xiv. 165. 

Experiments on Vesuvius, 333 

' — machine, horizontal plate, notice of, xvi. 171 

machines, variation in the construction of, xvii. 161. 



Account of an electrical arrangement, produced with different 

charcoals and one conducting fluid, 174 

effects produced at the moment of the combinations of 



the metals and alkalies with acids, xvii. 136 
Electricity, how affected by temperature, mechanical pressure, 
and the humid principle, ii. 154. Experiments on the circula- 
tion of, 157. Beneficial effects of, in aphonia or loss of utter- 
ance, 204. Researches on atmospheric electricity, 416 

— = — (human), extraordinary account of, viii. 180 

insulation of, ix. 206. Illumination by, 208 

— relation of a remarkable phenomenon in, xii. 182. 

Observations on voltaic electricity, 183. Contact in, 185. 
Magnetism produced by, 185 
on the magnetic phenomena produced by, xi. 281. 



xii. 74, 126 

'■ Zamboni's discovery in, confirmed, xiii. 229. Of 

the atmosphere, 431. 



INDEX. TI 

Electricity, (voltaic), effects of, on alcoliol, xiv. 232 

of a cat, instance of, xv. 163 

produced by pressure, 368. Developement of, by 

two pieces of the same metal, 369 
on the employment of, in the treatment of calculous 



cases, xvi. 185. Instance of dumbness cured by, 187 
connexion of phosphorescence with, xvii. 163. On 



the separation of parts, 162. Light produced by, ib. Ob- 
servations on a reciprocity of insulating and conducting action, 
that the incandescent platina of Davy exerts on the two elec- 
tricities, 369. On the magnetic action of strong electrical 
currents on different bodies, 372. Measurement of the con- 
ductibilityof bodies for electricity, 376. Distinction of positive 
and negative, 377. Produced by the congelation of water, ib. 
observed during chemical action, 169. Distri- 



bution of in the voltaic pile, xviii. 171. Supposed electro- 
magnetic light proved to have no existence, 172. Nature of 
the electric current, 381. Electro-motive action of water on 
metals, 382. On the electrical action produced by the contact of 
flame and metals, 383. Phenomena of, accompanying com- 
bustion, 384. On the electrical conducting power of melted 
resinous bodies, 403 

" ■ electric flash producing lightning, notice of, xx. 172 



Electro-dynamic force, intensity of, xix. 147 
Electro-magnetical motions, xii. 74, 184, 186, 283, 415 

«^_______ experiments, xiii. 161. xiv. 441. xv. 374 

I effect of lightning, 442 
effects of alkalies, acids, and salts, xvi. 168- 

170. Experiments by Oersted, WoUaston, and Sebech, 342 
Electro-magnetism, observations on the electro-magnetic multi- 
plier of Schweigger, and on some of its applications, xvi. 
123. Thermo experiments in, 126. Table of thermo-electrics, 

171. On thermo-electric rotation, 372. Phenomenon witlw 
iron, 374 

on a new phenomenon of, xvii. 122. Electro- , 

magnetic multipliers, 161. Electro-motive action, produced 
by the contact of metals and liquids, 374 



72 INDEX. 

Electro-magnetism, a simple method of exhibiting the deflection of 

the magnetic needle by, xx. 400 
Electrometer, atmospherical, account of, ii. 249 

■ new, notice of, xi. 208 

■ — for minerals, xiii. 432 

; of Dr. Hare, notice of, xvii. 377 

Elemi resin, analysis of, xiv. 235 

Elephant, death of, x. 203 

Elevation above the level of the sea, effects of, on the geography 

of plants in France, iv. 176. Influence of, on temperature, 

178. Its action upon light, 187. Of height, as affecting 

moisture, 189. Its agency in the rarefaction of air, 191. 
Elias, an alchymistical artist, notice of, ix. 233 
Elimination, note respecting, iii. 355 
Elk (fossil), of Ireland, description of, xix. 269 
Elmes (Mr.), observations of, on the construction of prisons, 

V. 190 
Embossing on wood, new method of, xix. 134 
Emery, mode of preparing, xix. 135 

Emetic tartar, a remedy for comsumption of the lungs, vi. 172 
Encke's triennial comet, re-discovery of, xv. 132. xvii. 

(86 Olb.) 96 
Engine boilers, observations on the feeding of, xv. 137 
England, proofs of the increasing population of, v. 305 
Englefield (Sir H.), directions for using the barometer of, v, 

229 
Engrafting of trees, process for, viii. 154 
Engraving on steel, new mode of, described, ix. 125 
Epidermis of plants, microsopical observations on, xvi. 391 
Epilepsy, on the use of nitrate of silver in, xii. 189. 
Equation of comets, on the determination of, xii. 137 
Equisetacea, observations on the structure and fructification of, 

vi. 20 
Equivalents, table of, for converting hours, minutes, and seconds 

into space, xiii. 394 ; and for converting degrees, minutes, and 

seconds into time, 395 
Ereri (Capuchin mission of), notice of, ix. 19 



INDEX. 73 

Ergot of rye and wheat, See Rye and Wheat. Observations on, 
iii. 157 

■ on the origin of, notice of, xx. 189 

Erithric acid, directions for preparing, viii. 373 

Eritrogene, experiments on, xvi. 174 

Erman (M.), experiments and observations of, on a reciprocity of 
insulating and conducting action, which the incandescent platina 
of Davy excites on the two electricities, xvii. 369 

Errors in longitude, on the correction of, x. 396 

Escape from fire, notice of a simple one, xiv. 139 

Escapement (dead), for clocks, improved method of constructing, 
xiv. 334. See Dead Escapement. 

Eskimaux inhabiting the west coast of Greenland, account of, 
vii. 72. Their first interview with the English, 73. De- 
scription and representation of an Eskimaux knife, 79. Ap- 
pearance and dress of the, 81. Description and representation 
of their sledges, 82. Canoes not known to them, 83. Their 
habitations and amusements, 85. Superstitions, 86. Ignorance, 
87. Similarity of their language with that of South Green- 
land, 89. Vocabulary of Eskimaux and English words, 90. 
Identity between Eskimaux and Greenlanders, 92 

Eslanite, a new mineral, analysis of, xix. 408 

Ether, observations and experiments on a new acid body, formed 
from, iii. 77 

(sulphuric), effects of inhaling the vapour of, iv. 158 

account of the acid formed by the slow combustion of, vi. 

318 

■ experiment on, made by the simultaneous application of 



heat and pressure, xvi. 98. Remarks on, 100 
Ethiop's mineral, new process for preparing, xiii. 225 
Etna, account of the eruption of, in 1819, xix. 227 
Etruscan Vases, observations on the manufacture of, xx. 163 
Euclase, analysis of, viii. 171 
Eudiometer, notice of a new one, xvi. 374 
Euler's method of solving a problem relative to the movoa of a 

jKnie^ht, in the game of chess, iii. 72 



74 INDEX. 

EuLER, experiments of, to account for the phenomena of terres- 
trial magnetisms, vi. 94 
Euphorbium, case of death by, iii. 51, note, 
Europeans and Savages, comparative strength of, ix. 213 
Eustatia (St., isle of), its geological structure, v. 321 
Evans (Mr.), sketch of the excursion of, beyond the Blue Moun- 
tains in New South Wales, ii. 453 
Evans (Col.), experiments of, on the action of sulphur on iron, 

xvii. 165 
Evaporation of ice, ix. 423 
' of spirits, experiments on, x. 187 

' ' observations and experiments on, xvii. 46 

Evelyn (Sir G. S.), notice of the re-measurement of the cube, 

cylinder, and sphere used by, in his inquiries respecting a stand- 
ard of weights and measures, xii. S7^ 

Evelyn (John), analysis of the Fumifugium of, xii. 343 

Evidence of medical men before coroners, in case of suicide, 
strictures on, iii. 35. Its uncertainty, 37 

Explosion of steam-engines, observations on, iii. 195 

Extracts, process for making, iii. 222 

- method of preparing, by evaporation, in vacuo, viii. 360 

notice of an apparatus for, xv. 162 

Eye, organization of, the cause of receiving impressions, ii. 6. 
Account of the Indian operation for cataract in the eye, 68 

■ human experiments on, iii. 134 

on the anatomical structure of, xiv, 166 

■ on the motions of, in illustration of the uses of the mus- 
cles, and nerves of the orbit, xvii. 123, 124, 127 

Eyes, effect of a paralytic stroke on the powers of adjustment of, 
to near distances, i. 86 

on the apparent direction of the, in a portrait, xvii. 264 



Facial nerves, on the difference of the functions in certain, illus- 
trated by their anatomy in the inferior animals, and by a com- 



INDEX. 75 

parlson of their uses in men and brutes, xii. 231. Compa- 
rative anatomy of the fifth pair of facial nerves, 240 

Falkland Isles, colony founded on, by M. de Bougainville, i. 
218. Ceded to the Spaniards, 219 

Falling stars, notice of, ix. 204 

theory of, xv. 39 1 

Fallows (Rev. F.), account of some parhelia seen at the Cape of 
Good Hope by, xvi. 365 

• an easy method of comparing the time indicated by any 

number of chronometers, with the given time at a certain sta- 
tion, xvii. 315 

Faraday (M.) on native caustic lime of Tuscany, i. 261 

on the Alstena Teiformis, or tea of Bogota, ii. 92. On 

the effects of the oxy-hydrogen blow-pipe, 461 

• experiments and observations on a new acid substance, 



iii. 77. On the escape of gases through capillary tubes, iii. 354. 

vii. 106 

• on the combustion of the diamond, iv. 155. ix. 264. 



On the solution of silver in ammonia, iv. 2C8. On a new oxide 

of silver, 269. On the sulphuret of phosphorus, 361 

on some combinations of ammonia with chlorides, v. 74. 



On chromic oxide and acid, 124. Strength of ale, ih. 
change of test-paper colour, by acids, v. 125. vi. 152. 



xi. 403. Changes of colour by heat, v. 128. On the sounds pro- 
duced by flame in tubes, 274. Reduction of oxide of silver by 
ammonia, 368 
on a supposed new metal, Sirium or Vestium, vi. 112, 



vii. 291. On the hydrometer, vi. 133. On effect of boracic acid 
on turmeric paper, 152. xi. 403. On separation of iron and 
manganese, vi. 153, 357. On gallic acid, tannin, &c., 154. On 
triple tartrate of bismuth and manganese, 158. Muriate of 
zinc, 159. On some metallic benzoates, ih. On ' pure 
spring water, 171. On preparation of pure manganese, 358. 
On action of chlorine and carburetted hydrogen, ih. On pre- 
paration of nitrous oxide, 360 
on inflammation of gunpowder by percussion, vii. 183. 



76 INDEX. 

Analysis of wootz, or Indian steel, 288. Pyrometrical gauge, 
384. On palm wine, 387. Analysis of a stone used in cutlery, 
399 

Faraday (M.), on strength of JEtna. wines, viii. 16S. On the de- 
composition of chloride of silver by hydrogen, and by zinc, 374. 

preservation of crystals, x. 185. On alloys of steel, 

319.. On red fire, 411 

' on a test for baryta and strontia, x. 189. On vapour 



of mercury at common temperatures, 354. On chlorides of car- 
bon, 386. xi. 129 

on dissection of crystals, xi. 202 

— on some new electro-magnetical motions, and on the 



theory of magnetism, xii. 74, 416. On contact in voltaic elec- 
tricity, 185. On new electro-magnetic apparatus, 186, 283. 
On the changing of vegetable colours, as an alkaline property, 
and on other bodies than alkalies possessing it, xiii. 315. xiv. 
234 

on the composition of hydriodide of carbon, xiii. 429 

effect of cold on magnetic needles, xiv. 435. On the 



temperature produced by vapour, and on the temperature of 

vapour, 439 

. on hydrate of chlorine, xv. 71. Condensation of 



chlorine gas into a liquid, 74, 163. xvii. 123. Historical 
statement respecting electro-magnetic rotation, xv. 288 

change of musket-balls in Shrapnell shells, xvi. 163. 



Action of gunpowder on lead, ib. Effect of light on the colour 

of plate glass, 164. xix. 341 

change of fat by water, heat, and pressure, xvi. 172. 



Historical statement respecting the liquefaction of gases, 229 
on the condensation of several gases into liquids, xvii. 



124. On the existence of a nitrate and a salt of potash in 
Cheltenham water, 178. On a supposed new metal taschium, 
390 

on fumigation, xviii. 92 

on some cases of the formation of ammonia, and on the 



means of testing the presence of minute portions of nitrogen in 



iiJt)EX. 77 

certain states, xix. IG. On the substitution of tubes for bottles 

in the preservation of certain fluids, &c., 149. Composition of 

crystals of sulphate of soda, 153. Artificial crystals of chromate 

of lead, 155. On new compounds of carbon and hydrogen, &c. 

273. XX. 348. On the electro-magnetic current, xix. 338. 

Electric powers of oxalate of lime, ib. 
Faraday (M.) on new compounds of carbon and hydrogen, and on 

certain other products obtained during the decomposition of 

oil by heat, xx. 348 
Farkas (M.), notice of a new diving machine Invented by, xi. 200 
Farrar's (Prof.) description of a violent and destructive storm in 

New England, in September, 1815, vii. 102 
Fascinating power of serpents, vi. 374 
Fasti ConsulareSj new fragment of, discovered, vii. 195 
Fat bodies, results of the decomposition of, by oxide of copper, 

xii. 323 
— change of, by water, heat, and pressure, xvi. 172 
Faujas (St. Fond), notice of the death of, viii. 196 
Faxar (M. Palacio) on a soda lake in South America, i. 188 
■■ description of the valleys of Cucuta in South America, iii. 

337, 54S 
Fear, influence of, in producing changes of functions in the living 

body, iv. 217 
Febrifuge (new), notice of, ix. 198 
February, 1824, astronomical phenomena for, xvi. 292 
Feetham (Mr.), apparatus of, for sweeping chimneys, described, 

V. 354 
Ferns, observations on the geographical distribution of, iv. 57 

on the construction and fructification of, vi. 210 

Ferrari (M.), process for obtaining strychnia, xvii. 170; and on 

the volatility of its salts, 171 
Ferro-prussiates, observations on, x. 179. xi. 208 

of potash, constitution of, xiii. 147 

Feuillca CordifoUa^ a remedy for vegetable poisons, x. 192 
Fever of Batavia, symptoms and treatment of, vii. 2 
Fibrina, on the influence of water on, xiii. 419 



78. INDEX. 

Fielder and Hagen (MM.), [observations of, on sand-drigs of 

fulgorites, xvii. 181 
Fields of ice, account of the generation of, iv. 251 ; and of their 

tremendous concussions, 253 
Fig-trees, hints on the management of, vii. 169 
Figure (of the earth), observations on the operations undertaken 

for determining, v. 340-351 

observations on, viii. 108. ix. 32. xx. 141 

of the heavenly bodies, observation on the apparent 

changes in, x. 9 
Figures (Arabic), conjectures upon the original formation of, i.l 66 
Filberts, fertilization of the female blossoms of, xv. 107 
Finch (Mr.), account of a land-slip, by, xiv. 455 
. description of a Roman camp by, at Mitchley near Bir- 
mingham, xvi. 24 
Fire, experiments to prove that it has weight, xi. 260. By its 

heat can thicken homogeneous bodies, xii. 56. Can thicken 

water, 58 ; and air, 61 
Fire-damp, explosion from, v. 370. viii. 382 
Fire-escape, simple, described, vi. 139 
Fire (green), component parts of, xiv. 232 
Fire-places, observations on the construction of, vi. 364 
Fire (red), how obtained, ix. 411 
Fire, extinction of, in chimneys, xvi. 156 
Fish, Chinese mode of hatching, xvii. 176 
' experiments on the transportation of, from salt to fresh 

water, xvii. 209. xix. 238. On the generation of fish, xvii. 

277 
Fish oil, mode of purifying, xiii. 423 
Fisher (Mr.), astronomical observations of, during the Arctic 

Expedition, v. 299 
observation of, on the figure of the earth, as deduced from 

the measurement of arcs of the meridian, and on pendulums, 

vii. 299 
' obseiTations of, on the variation of the compass observed 



in the late Voyage of Discovery to the North Pole, ix. 81 



INDEX. 79 

Fisher (Mr.), on errors in longitude, x. 396 

FiSK (Rev. Dr.), observations of, on the junction of the fresh 
water of rivers with the salt water of the sea, ii. 208 

Fissures, on the capillary action of, xvii. 151 

FiTZWiLLiAM (the late Lord), anecdote of, vii. 262 

Fixed stars, corrections in the right ascension of thirty-six, for 
every day in the year, x. 427. xi. 186 

Flame, experiments on, by Sir H. Davy, ii. 124. New views 
thence resulting, 125. Account of further experiments on, 463 

• nature of, v. ii. May be extinguished by cooling, iii. 

Nature of the light of, iv 

Flammel (Nicholas), account of the alchymistical labours of, ix. 
230 

Flaguergues (M.), remarks of, on the variation of thermometers, 
xiv. 441. Notice of the drosometer of, xviii. 185. His ac- 
count of the annual quantity of dew fallen, 186. Notice of his 
rain gauges, ib. 

Flax and Hemp, ordinary modes of dressing, iv. 324. Account 
of Mr. Lee's improvements in dressing flax in the dry way, 
329 ; and of Messrs. Hill and Bundy's apparatus, 334. Pro- 
cess of spinning flax, 342 

Flax and Hemp, report of the committee of the House of Com- 
mons on Messrs. Hill and Bundy's and Mr. Lee's petitions, 
relative to machinery for the manufacture of flax, v. 30. Evi- 
dence of Mr. Millington on this subject, 32 ; of other wit- 
nesses, 41. Disingenuity of the French concerning these 
machines exposed, 186 

. , dry, dressing, observations on, vi. 141 

Flinders (Capt.), priority of his discoveries asserted, ii. 383 

observations of, on the inclination of the magnetic 

needle, iv. 106 

important observations of, to account for magnetic va« 



riation, vi. 99. 
Flour, directions for ascertaining the purity of, vii. 370 

analysis of two species of, xiii. 405 

Flouebns (M.), analysis of the memoir of, on the properties a:ud 



80 INDEX. 

functions of the nervous system, in the different vertebrated 

animals, xiv. 427 
Flower, luminous appearance produced by, x. 469 
Flowers, action of, on air, xv. 317 
Fluidity, observations on, ix. 52 
Fluids, observations on the boiling point of, v. 361 

action of heat and pressure on, xv. 145 

Fluoboric gas, experiments on the formation of alcohol by, xi. 

494 
Fluo-silicic acid, observations on, iv. 287 
Flouric acid found in mica, x. 196 
Fly in turnips, prevention of, v. 397 

■ remedy for, viii. 153 

Flying fish seen in the channel, notice of, xx. 412 

Fodere's (M.) Medecine Legale, iii. 34. Objects of his work, Ss. 

Physical qualities of men, and the age of maturity considered, 

39. At what time the period of gestation ceases, ib. On the 

relative and absolute duration of life, 40. Rule of Code Na^ 

poleon on this subject, ib. Defect of the English law in this 

point, 41. Different effects of the mind, ib. Pregnancy, 42 ; 

utero gestation, 43 ; signs of life, 44 ; appearances of 

death, 45 
Foetus, extraordinary animal, account of, viii. 1S5 
Fogs of the Polar Seas, remarks on, xx. 1 1 
Food, table of the consumption of, at Paris, for 1819, xi. 224 
Forense and formiate of lead, analysis of, xiii. 429 
Forests, benefit and necessity of, in mountainous countries, ii. 57 
Forgery of bank-notes, reports of the commissioners for inquiring 

into, ix. 142 
Formic acid, artificial production of, xiv. 232 

composition of, xix. 355 

For SHAMMER (Dr.), experiments of, on the Cameleon mineral, 

X. 175 

analysis of the oxides of manganese by, xi. 201 

Fortifications (Indian), vestiges of, in North America, described, 

viii. 224 



INDEX. 81 

FosBROKE (John, Esq.), geological description of the hills from 
Ross to Chepstow, ix. 35. Characteristics of the Hereford- 
shire formations, and an outline of the stratifications of the 
forest of Dean, and the opposite shores of the Severn, 37 

Fx)ssil remains, notice of, v. 377. vi. 376. viii. 252 

wood, notice of, vii. 194 

elephant found in Siberia, ibid, 95 

bones discovered at Plymouth, xii. 124. At Kirkdale, 

described, xiv. 170 

shells, observations on, xvii. 129, 2G7 

observations on, xix. 190. Description of the fossil 



Elk of Ireland, 269. Of the iguanodon, a fossil reptile found 

in Tilgate forest, 304 
FouRCROY, theory of, concerning the principle of Aroma, x. 110 
Fourier (M.), observations of, on the temperature of the earth, 

xiii. 144 
Fourier (Baron), account of some thermo-electric experiments, 

xvi. 126 
FouRNiER (Dr.), memoir of, on the defective pronunciation of the 

letter R, iii. 170 
France, economy of the chemists of, compared with that of the 

English chemists, xii. 355 
.-^— — observations on the state of pharmacy in, ix. 239 

account of the wines of, xviii. 125 

Frediani (Cavalier), letters of, to Canova, describing his travels 

in Africa and the East, x. 364 
Freestone, superior, found in Scotland, iv. 381 
Freezing of wine, observations on, i. 69 

of water, evolution of heat by, ix. 409 

French, early settlements of in North America, viii. 226 
Fresco-paintings, a new process for the preservation of, xii, 406' 
Frescoes of Domenichino transferred to canvass, vi. 177 
Fresnel (M.), observation of, on the ascent of clouds in the at- 
mosphere, XV. 165 
on the repulsion exerted by heated bodies at sensible 

distances, xx. \Q% 



82 INDEX. 

Frog, observations on the changes of the ovum of, during the 

formation of the tadpole, xix. 295 
Frost, test for the action of, on building materials, xvii. 148. 

xix. 136 
Frost (Mr.), syllabus of his course of lectures upon Botany, xvii. 

2S4. Remarks on the mustard-tree of the Scriptures, xx. 57. 

On a new emetic oil, 59. On the expressed oil of the seeds 

of the croton tiglium, 231 
Fruits, action of carbonic acid gas on, vii. 385. Observations on 

the ripening of, xi. 395 
— — (green), influence of on the air, xiii. 152 
Fruit-trees, beneficial effects of salt in making them productive, 

X. 61 ; and in rendering them unfit for the habitation of 

worms or insects, 63. Ripening of wall-fruit, how facilitated, 

448. To protect fruit from wasps, ibid. 
Fuel, remarks and experiments on the economy of, xiii. 58 

comparative advantage of coke and wood for, xvii. 36 1 

Fuller's earth discovered in chalk, xi. 220 
Fulminating gold, preparation of, viii. 368 

. — ■ — mercury, explosion of, x. 182 

. ■ powders, explosion of, xix. 348. Notice of Moretti's 

fulminating acid, 349 
silver and mercury, results of experiments on, xvii. 153 



Fulminic acid and Fulminates, experiments on the analysis of, 
xvii. 386 

Functions of the human body, observations on the periodical sus- 
pension and renewal of, vi. 1, 20 

Fungi, structure and fructification of, vi. 222 

which tinge snow red, experiments on, x. 395 

notice of a new species of, xv. 172 

Furnace grates, improvements in, 140 

Fusible metal, preparation and application of, xiii. 444 
IFusiNiERi (Signor), researches on the colour acquired by metal 
when heated, viii. 362 



INDEX. ^ 

Gallic acid, observations on, vi. 154 

■ — experiments on, vii. 178 

• conversion of, into ulmin by oxygen gas, xix. 363 
Galls from China, experiments on, iii. 130 

Galvanic action, experiments on, iii. 207 

— pile of Zamboni, strictures on, ii. 161. Vindication of 

those remarks, 449 

• experiments on the body of a criminal after execution, 

vi. 288 

Galvanism, benefit of, in asthmatic dyspnoea, ii. 458 

observations on the agency of, viii. 72-87 

. proof of the identity of, with nervous influence, xi. 261 

■ — effects of, on the nervous system, xiv. 105 

Galvanometer (new), notice of, xx. 170 

GARPBN(jVIr. Alexander j, evidence of, in the cause of Severn and 
Co. versus the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 348 

Gardening, historical sketch of the progress of, in ancient and mo- 
dern times, x. 52. Its influence on society, 55 

Gardens of Lahore described, ix. 311 

Gardiner (Lieut. F.), notice of a life-boat, invented by, vi. 331 

Garlic, experiments on, iii. 186 

Garnet, analysis of the, vii. 401. xii.329 

Garnett (Mr.), observations of, on the production of ice at the 
bottom of rivers, v. 268 

Gas apparatus, account of Mr. Clegg's improvements in, ii. 13B 

lights employed in London, iii. 216 

on the production of, from oil, vi. 108. viii. 120. xiii. 423 

a new inflammable one discovered, vi. 153. Procured from 

turf, 157 

retorts, observations on, vi. 71 

■ illumination, facts relating to, vii. 312. Advantages of oil 
gas over that obtained from coal, 315. Notices of Mr. Accum's 
treatise on coal^as, 317; and of Mr. Peckston's treatise, Sit 

lamp (portable), described, viii. 233 

> lighting, improvements in, x. 464 

— — tubes lined with lead, benefit of^ 170 

G 2 



84 INDEX. 

Gas-tar, useful green paint made from, xii. 407. 

— - from oil and coal, experiments on, xii. 135. Successful 

application of gas to the illumination of the clock dial of the 

Tron Church at Glasgow, 229 
— — obtained from coal-tar, xiii. 227 

— lighting in London, extent of, xv. 367 

— — evolution of, during metallic precipitation, xvi. 168. His- 
torical statement of the liquefaction of gases, 229. Correction 
of the bulk of gases for temperature, 378 
— - hydrogen, the odour of, proved to be extraneous, xvii. 380 

inflammable, inspiration of, xx. 393. 

correction of an error in the expansion of, xx. 294 

Gascony, notice of, the wines of, xviii. 129 
Gases, intestinal, experiments on, ii. 185 

■ experiments on the escape of, through capillary tubes, iii. 
354. vii. 106 
" on the specific gravity of, vii. 187 

■ specific heat of, ix. 400 

— new test for ascertaining the dryness of, xv. 160. Con- 



densation of into liquids, 74, 163. xvii. 123. On the ap- 
plication of liquids formed by such condensation, as mechanical 
agents, 125. 

Gaseous mixtures, action of platinum on, and its application to 
their analysis, xix. 101 

Gasking (Thomas), mathematical talent of, vi. 132 

Gauge, pyrometrical, account of, vii. 384 

Gauss (M.), notice of a new signal invented by, for trigonome- 
trical measurements, xiii. 421 

Gay-Lussac (M.), claim of, as the first discoverer of iodine, re- 
futed, i. 284. Note. Strictures on his classification of unde- 
composed substances, 285. Remarks on his nomenclature, 288. 
Confirmation of his researches on the prussic basis and acid, 
288 

on the dilatation of liquids, ii. 163 

— observations of, on the solvent property of the acid 

tartrate of potassium, iii. 213 



INDEX. 85 

Gay-Lussac (M.), observations and experiments of, on the boiling 

point of fluids, v. 3GI 
and Wblter, on a new acid of sulphur and oxygen, 

vii. 371 
— — on the analysis of the water of the Dead Sea, viii. 



164 ; and of the river Jordan, 165 

on the laws of the propagation of heat, xiv. 207 



Congelation of mercury by, 441. On the suspension of clouds, 
446 

experiments and observations of, on the cold produced 

by the evaporation of liquids, xv. 74, 163 
experiments of, on the acid of the triple prussiates. 



xvi. 102 

instructions of, for ascertaining the strength of chlo- 



ride of lime, or bleaching powder, xviii. 182. Reply to his ob- 
servations on the radiation of heat in the atmosphere, 305 
abstract of his report on paratonneres or conductor* 



of lightning, xix. 143. Letter of, to Mr. Danibll, on the ex- 
pansion of gases by vapour, xx. 294 
Gkber, an alchymist, notice of, ix. 227 
Gelatine, new test for, x. 454 
Gems (vegetable), of Batavia, notice of, vii. 285 

(artificial), new mode of preparing, x. 184 

(ancient), representing (Edipus expounding the enigma of 

the Sphinx, xii. 1 1 
Gemellaro (Signor), extracts from the meteorological journal of, 

on the volcanoes in Sicily, xiv. 322 
■ . account by, of the eruption of Mount MtuA in 1819, 

xix. 227 
General literature, miscellaneous intelligence concerning, vi. 173. 

xi. 223, 411 
Geneva, notice of a bridge of suspension at, xvi. 369. Expense 

and durability of, xvii. 147 
Geoffroy (M.), the first producer of the alloy of antimony and 

potassium, xix. 152 



S6 



INDEX. 



Geography of plants in France, how influenced by elevation above 

the level of the sea, iv. 176 

—— — of Africa, remarks on, vii. 329 

— defined, x. 239. Strictures on Baron Humboldt's 

works on this subject, 240 

. remarks on, xiii. 162 

. , — and geology of Lake Superior, notes on, xviii. 1 , 



22S 

Geological maps and works, notice of, x. 206 

Geologies (mineral and Mosaic,) comparative estimate of, analysed, 
XV. 108 

Geology of the West India islands, observations on, v. 311 

— ' — " miscellaneous intelligence concerning, vi. 169. x. 196 

of Barbadoes, memoir on, xi. 10 

of the Padrian-Vicentine, and Veronese territories, re- 
marks on, xiv. 16. Of England and Wales, two principal 
basins described, 144; supermedial order of rocks, 147. Chalk 
formations, 148. Oolitic series, 149. Carboniferous strata or 
medial order of rocks, 150. Coal strata, 151. Carboniferous 
limestone, 152. Old red sandstone, and trapstone, 153 
■ '■' remarks on some crude theories of, xix. 64. Abstract 



of Dr. Thomas Burnett's theory of the earth, 65. Of Dr. 
Woodward's, 67. Geological researches of Mitchell, 69; and 
Whitehurst, 70. Sketch of the Neptimian theory of Werner, 
72 ; and of the Platonic theory of Dr. Hutton, 74. Order of 
Mr. Brande's lectures on, 77. Account of the earth's surface 
ajid different strata, 79, 186. Observations on the deposits of 
gravel, 196 
„ x)utlines of, xx. 24. Position of chalk strata, 25; its 



organic remains, 27. Flints, 29. Varieties of sand and 
clay^ ih. Portland stone, 31 ; oolitic formation, 32 ; old 
red sandstone, red marl-gypsum, 33 ; salt deposits, 35 ; coal 
formation, ironstone, 2G ; faults or dykes, ib. ; theory of the 
origin of coal, 39 ; limestone, 235 ; toadstone, 238, ; old red 
sandstone of the Wernerian school, 238. Grauwacke, 240. 



INDEX. 87 

Clay-State, its aspect and various contortions, 241. Granitic 
formation, 248. Hornblende, ib. Serpentine, ib. Aspect 
of granite tracts, 251. Gneiss and mica-slate, 253. Junction 
of granite and mica-slate, 255 ; with other rocks, 256. Con- 
cluding observations on the numerous theories to account for 
the various appearances, and irregularities of the surface of the 
earth, 25G 

George III., interesting anecdotes of, ix. 293 

Gestation period, at what time it ceases, iii. 39 

Getres, notice of the removal of the glacier of, xvii. 396 

GiESSE (M.), account of a supposed new metal, from the residue of 
sulphuric acid, xii. 315 

Gilbert (Davies, Esq.), observations of, on the properties of the 
catenarian curve, with reference to bridges by suspension, 
X. 230-235 

on the ventilation of rooms, and the ascent of heated 

gases through flues, xiii. 113-120 

investigation by, of the methods used for approximating 



to the roots of affected equations, xiv. 353 
researches on the vibrations of heavy bodies in cycloi- 



dal and circular arches, &c., xv. 90-103 
observations of, on the nature and advantage of wheels 



and springs for cari'iages, the draft of cattle, and the form of 

roads, xviii. 95 

on the vibrations of heavy bodies, xx. 69 



Gillan's (Dr.), account of Batavia, its inhabitants, commerce, 
&c., vii. 1-20, 273-288 

GiLLERON (M.), experiments of, on capillary attraction, xix. 134. 

Giomale di Fidca, analytical review of, iii. 896-405 

GiRARD (M. P. S,), on the attraction manifested at sensible dis- 
tances by solid surfaces moistened by, and immersed in a 
liquid, XX. 379-383 

GiRAUD (M.), notice of his memoir on the valleys of Egypt, iv. 98 

Glaciers, alarming progress of, iv. 282 

increase of, in Switzerland, v. 134 

fall of, ix. 426 



88 INDEX. 

Glaciers, remarkable, near Behring's Strait, xiv. 236 
Glasgow, population of, x. 202 

account of the mode of illuminating the clock-dial of 

the steeple of the Tron church at, xii. 229 

number and power of the steam-engines at, xix. 328 



Glass, on the communication of double refraction to, by mecha- 
nical compression and dilatation, i. 293 

brittleness of, prevented, viii. 383 

on the structure of, when in a state of vibration, ix. 390 

■ affinity of, for water, xiv. 439. Its tenacity, ibid. 

impermeability of, to water, xviii. 168 

for telescopes, account of M. Guirand's experiments for 

making, xix. 248-258. On the colour of, as affected by light, 
341 

— — action of water upon, with some observations on its slow 



decomposition, xx. 259-264 

Glaze (new), for porcelain, xi. 392. Improved, for red earthen- 
ware, XV. 142 

Glazier's diamond, observations on, ii. 205 

Glenroy, parallel roads of, remarks on, iii. 132 

Globe (terrestrial), in relief, notice of, x. 450 

temperature of the interior of, xiv. 207 

Gloiodine, how obtained, ix. 400 ; its properties, ibid. 

Glowing-lamp, silver wire for, vii. 183 

Gluten of wheat, researches on, ix. 399. An antidote for corro- 
sive sublimate, 401 

Gmelin (Prof.), on the new production of anhydrous sulphuric 
acid, xix. 345. 

Goad (S. T., Esq.), on a volcanic eruption in the island of Java, 
i. 256 

Gold, experiments on the precipitation of the oxides of, by potash, 
&c. ii. 166. Method of assaying, 438 

^— nature, properties, and combinations of, described, iv. 240 

lampate of, vi. 322 

— — native, notice of, vii. 399 

" action of acids on the oxide of, x. 118 ; and of salts on its 



INDEX. 89 

chloride, US. On the iodide of, 121. Conclusions of M. Pel- 
letier relative to this metal, 123 

Gold, experiments on some combinations of, xii. 318 

crystallized, xiv. 42S. Triple chloride of, and sodium, 400 

— — trinkets, suggestion for cleaning, xviii. 179 

• native of North Carolina, observations on, xix. 364. 

GoLDiNGHAM (John, Esq.), on the longitudes of Madras, Fort Wil- 
liam, Bombay, &c., xiv. 386 

' experiments of, for ascertaining the velocity of 
sound, xvi. 332 

GoMPERTZ (Benjamin, Esq.), on pendulums vibrating between 
cheeks, iii. 13-34 

notice of the researches of, on the nature of the func- 
tions of mortality, xix. 279 

GoNORD (M.), extraordinary improvement of, in copper-plate 
printing, ix. 391 

Gordon (Dr.), experiments to shew that the bufFy coat, or in- 
flammatory crust, is not confined to venous blood, i. 295 

opinion of, respecting the heat evolved during the coa- 
gulation of the blood, controverted, ii. 246. 

GoRHAM (Dr. John), on the analysis of India corn, xi. 206. Cri- 
tical notice of his Elements of Chemical Science^ 348 

Goring (Dr.), on indistinctness of vision, caused by the presence 
of false lights in optical instruments, and remedies for it, xvii. 
17-28, 202. On the adaptation of a compound microscope, to 
act as a dynameter for telescopes, 367 

improvement in microscopes, suggested by, xix. 132. 

Gottingen, Royal Society of, prize question of, v. 361. 

GouGH (Mr.), anecdote of, viii. 261. 

Gout, on the use of colchicum autumnale in, iii. 373. 

Graham (George), inventor of the dead escapement, xvi. 1. Bio- 
graphical notice of him, 2. 

Grain, preservation of from mice, xv. 140. xviii. 166. 

Grand-terre, geological structure of, v. 312. 

Granite in many instances preferable for building, iii. 381. 

of Aberdeenshire, observations on, and on the identity 



90 INDEX. 

of certain varieties of, with other rocks pertaining to the trap 
family, x. 29. Geological resemblance between it and the trap 
rocks, 40. Instances in which its essential characters are as- 
sumed by trap-rocks, 45, xi. 404 

Granulation of copper, xi. 386 

Granville (Dr.), on the physical and chemical properties of 
the Malambo bark, i. 59. History of its discovery, 60 ; its 
physical properties, 61 ; chemical properties, 63 ; reflections on 
its constituent principles, 64. Report on M. Meuthon's Me- 
moir, entitled " Decouverte de la Maniere dont se Forme les 
Cristaux Terreux ei MetalUques non Salins, &c., 123-130. An- 
notation thereon, 138. 

. report of, on Sig. Monticelli's Memoir on the erup- 
tion of Vesuvius, in December, 1813, ii. 25. Report of, on 

M. Vauquelin's experiments on the ergot, or spur of rye, 320 

his memoirs of Baron Guyton de Morveau, iii. 249, 



296 



treatise of a hydro-cyanic acid reviewed, x. 398-407 
description of an Egyptian mummy, analysis of, xix» 



261 



— — ' • essay by, on the Egyptian mummies, and observa- 
tions on the art of embalming among the ancient Egyptians, 
XX. 337-343 

Grasses, observations on the natural family of, v. 46-52 

Grassington Moor, notice on the level of, vi. 348. 

Grass-rope, notice of, from New Zealand, vii. 170. 

Gravel in the human body, constituent parts of, vi. 41. Causes 
of the disorder, 43. Treatment of it, ib. General observa- 
tions on the early symptoms of this disorder, and on the 
modes of treating them, 197 

deposits, observations on, xix. 196 

Gray (Mr.), observations of, on the artificial production of pearls, 
xix. 167. 

Great Britain, remarks on the numerical changes of population 
in, xvi. 203 

Grecian University, notice of, viii. 393 



INDEX. W 

Greek fire of the middle ages, conjectures on, xiv. 22 

Green (Mr.), ascent of, in a balloon from Portsea, xiii. 115. 

Observations and experiments made by, during his aerial 

voyage, 116. Remarks thereon, 117 
Green colour, account of the preparation of a new one, xv. 309 

fire, component parts of, xiv. 231 

Greenland, or polar ice, account of, iv. 247-267. Account of the 

devastations of ice in, 283. 
Greenwich mural circle, accuracy of, xvi. 1 89. 

computation of the latitude of, xx. 98-108. 

Gregory (Dr.), experiments of, on the velocity of sound, xviii. 

162 
Gregson (Mr. Joseph), on a new method of constructing chimnies, 

iii. 348. Its advantages, 349. Description of his method, 351 
Grenadines (islands), geological structure of, v. 314 
Grief, influence of, in producing changes in the living body, iv. 

209 
Griffiths (J. R., Esq.), description of an instrument for de- 
stroying stone in the bladder, xx. 21 
I (Mr. Ralph), biographical notice of, xiii. 309 
(Mr. T.) on the component parts oi green fire ^ xiv. 231. 

On the action of water upon metallic arsenic, 233. Method of 

colouring alum crystals, 445 
experiments on the proportion of charcoal obtained 



from woods having a greater specific gravity than box-wood, 

xvi. 264 

account of an electrical arrangement produced with 



different charcoals and one conducting fluid, xvii. 174 
experiments on the boiling points of saturated solutions, 



xviii. 89. On the electrical conducting power of melted resi- 
nous bodies, 403 
on the hygrometric property of insoluble and difficultly 



soluble compounds, xix. 92-98. On an apparatus for exhibiting 
the simultaneous rotation, of two voltaic conducting wires 
round the opposite poles of magnets, 336 
on the action of water upon glass, with some observa- 



^ INDEX. 

tions on its slow decomposition, xx, 259. On the hygrometric 
property of sulphuric acid, 400. Apparatus for exhibiting the 
deflexion of a magnetic needle by the electric current, ib. 

Griping, sense of, how caused, ii. 12 

Groboogan (Plains of), account of a singular volcanic eruption 
in, i. 256 

Groombridge (Stephen, Esq.), empirical elements of a table of 
refraction, xv. 128 

■ ■' transit circle, accuracy of, determined, xvi. 189 

• comparison by, of the new tables of refraction, 

with observations, xvii. 100 

■ researches of, on the theory of atmospherical re- 



fractions, xviii. 365 
Grotto in the interior of the Cape of Good Hope, xvi. 272 
Grouvelle (M.), on the combinations of oxides with chlorine, 

iodine, and cyanogen, xii. 174. On various compounds of 

chromium, 319 
— — — — disingenuousness of, exposed, xiii. 8. On the sub 

and super-nitrates, 396 
Guaiacum, on the action of gluten on, viii. 376 
— — — tincture of, a test for copper, x. 182 
Guayana (Spanish), journal of an excursion from Angostura to 

the Missions of, viii. 260-287 
Guiana, the common, observations on, xvii. 255 
GuiBOURT (M.), abstract of his facts towards the chemical history 

of mercury, xviii. 29 1 
Guienne, notice of the wines of, xviii. 129 

GuiNAND (M.), bibliographical notice of, and of his optical disco- 
veries, xix. 244-253 
Gum obtained from starch, vii. 181 
Gums, salivations and ulcerations of, produced by hydrocyanic 

acid, xii. 428 
Gunpowder, inflamed without a spark, viii. 183 
■ by whom invented, ix. 229 

analysis of, xi. 390. Fired by electricity, 391 

■■ inflammation of, under water, xv. 164/ 



INDEX. 93 

Gunpowder, action of, on lead, xvi. 163, Inflammation of, by 
slaking lime, ib. 

GuRi (Capuchin), mission of, noticed, ix. 19 

GuRNEY (Goldsworthy), lectures of, on chemical science, reviewed, 
xvi. 301. Extravagant eulogies of them in some newspapers, 
ib. Specimens of the author's originality in treating of the 
higher departments of chemistry, 301 ; and of his blunders in 
the practical parts of that science, 305 

GuYTON DE MoRVEAU (Baron), memoir of the life and writings of, 
iii. 249, Birth and early education, 250. Notice of his poem,- 
entitled the Kat Jconoclaste^ with specimens, 251. Appointed 
advocate-general of the parliament of Dijon, 254. Analysis 
of his memoir on public instruction, 255. Commencement of 
his chemical studies, 257. Account of his early experiments, 
260-264. His connexion with Buffon and Malesherbes, 265. 
Discovers the mode of disinfecting air by means of acid gases, 
266. Delivers a course of lectures on chemistry at Dijon, 267. 
Notice of his Elemens de Chimie, 269. Forms a mineralogical 
cabinet, and discovers valuable mines of lead and coal, 272, 
Undertakes the chemical department of the Encyclopedie 
Methodique, 273. Account of this work, 284. Effects an 
important change in chemical nomenclature, 276. Translates 
the Opuscida Chemica of Bergman into French, 278. Esta- 
blishes a manufactory of soda, 279. Ascends in a balloon 
with M. Virly, 280. Verses on that occasion, 281. Sensations 
of Morveau during the ascent, 282. His important discoveries 
on steel, 283. Rejects the Stahlian doctrine of phlogiston, 
286. Embarks in the public service, 289. His efforts in 
behalf of science, 290. Follows the armies of the republic, 
and contributes to the victory of Fleurus, 290. Elected a 
member of the Royal Society of London, 287; and of the 
National Institute of Paris, 291. Resigns his public employ- 
ments, and applies himself wholly to scientific pursuits, 292. 
Appointed a member and officer of the Legion of Honour, ib. ; 
and created a baron of the empire, 294. Retreats from public 
duties, ib. Review of his public and private character, ib. 



94 INDEX. 

Hail, nature of, ix. 424 

Hailstones, form of, xviii. 11 

Hair (human), permanency of, xix. 168 

Hall (Capt. Basil), on a meteoric stone that fell near Bombay, i. 
117. Results of experiments made by, with an invariable 
pendulum, xvii. 126 

Hall (Dr.), his suggestion for a register thermometer, iv. 43. 
Note of, on the formation of spots on cotton goods by stoving, 
198 

— description of an aerometer for correcting pneumatic 
experiments, v. 52. Experiments and observations of, on vision, 
249. On a mode of preserving some vegetable remedies, 366. 
On the spontaneous combustion of cotton goods which have 
been imbued with linseed-oil, 367. Memoir of on the combined 
agencies of water and oxygen gas, in the oxidation of iron, vii. 
. 55. On M. Gay-Lussac's mode of producing cold, 383 

-< observations on the physiology of speech, xix. 8-16 

-r— — on one of the causes of the movements of the barometer. 



and of the south and west winds, xx. 14-21 
Hall (Messrs.), experiments of on stoving cotton goods, with 

sulphur, iv. 196. 
Hallbr's theory respecting muscular motion examined, ii. 225 

' of irritability considered, xiii. 98 

Halley (Dr.), notice of the experiments of, to account for the 

phenomena of magnetic variation, vi. 91 
Hallucination, observations on, iv. 95 
Halo (lunar), described, v. 371 
Haloes, artificial formation of, xv. 367. 
Hamilton (Mr.), conjectures of relative to the ancient inscription 

on the column at Alexandria, x. 4. Copy of that inscription 

as deciphered by him, 7 
Hammers (mineralogical) observations on the forms of, xi. 1-10 
Hampstead parish, population of, v. 309 
Hancock (Dr.), account of the native oil of laurel, xviii. 47. 
Hancock (Mr.), process of, for preparing caoutchouc, xvii. 364 
Hansteen (Prof.), experiments of, for determining the law of 

magnetic attraction, xii. 335 



INDEX, 95 

Hansteen (Prof.), discoveries of, in terrestrial magnetism, xiii» 

432. Results of liis observations on the intensity of the magnetic 

force in various parts of the world, 434 
on the nature of shooting-stars seen in the daytime, xx. 

168 
Hare (Dr.), account of his single gold-leaf electrometer, xviii. 

378 ; and of his voltaic trough, ib. On the preparation of 

artificial chalybeate water, 380. On the combustion of iron 

by sulphur, 381 
Harpinella, a new musical instrument, notice of, v. 120 
Harpoon (new), notice of, v. 121, and of harpoon-guns, ib. 
Harris (Mr. J.), evidence of, with observations, in the cause of 

Severn & Co., against the Jmperial Insurance Company, x. 324 
Harrogate, analysis of a new sulphur-spring at, xv. 89 
Hart (Mr. John), observations on the production of light by. the 

discharge of an air-gun, xv. 64 
Hartshorn, use of, in intoxication, xi. 407 
Harvest-moon, phenomenon of, v. 354 
Harvey (George, Esq.), experimental inquiries relative to the 

formation of mists, xv. 55-64 
— remarks of, on the deposition of dew, xvi. 35, xvii. 1. On 

the numerical changes of the population of Great Britain, 203. 

On the influence of magnetism on chronometers, 179-202, 3G5. 

Experimental inquiries relative to tlie distribution and changes 

of the magnetic intensity in ships of war, 261 ; xix. 333 
— — obser^^ations on the effects of the induced magnetism of 



an iron shell on the rates of chronometers, xviii. 34-47. Re- 
sults of his experiments relating to the comparative means of 
defence afforded by ships of war having square, and curvilinear 
sterns, 201-223 

— — remarks of, on the returns of the population in Ireland, xix. 
217. Tables of the number of pupils receiving instruction in 
that country, witli observations on the state of education, 220. 
On some improvements in naval architecture, 235. 

remarks by, on the fogs of the Polar Seas, xx. 1 1 



Harwood (Dr.), syllabus of his lectures on zoology, xvii. 286 



96 INDfiX. 

Hastings (Dr. C), observations on the division of the eighth pair 

of nerves, xi. 45. Reply thereto, 320. xii. 96. 
Hatchett (C. Esq.), his process for purifying musty corn, v. 

-pref. vii. 
Hatching fish, Chinese method of, xvii. 178 
Hats, improvement in the manufacture of, ii. 180 
Haussman (Prof.), remarks on the manufacture of Etruscan vases, 

XX. 163 
Hauy (M.), notice of his theory of crystallization, iii. 365 

experiments of, on the insulation of electricity, ix. 206 

Hauyne, supposed discovery of, vi. 376 

Hawkins' (Mr.), mode of preparing emery, xix. 135 

Hay's (E. W. A., Esq.) description of an ancient monument found 

at Colchester, representing the Theban sphinx, xii. 1 
Hay-plant of Northern India, description and uses of, xix. 1 
Hayotte, advancement of the ground in the village of, xvii. 180 
Heart, singular case of mal- conformation of, i. 49-55 

■ existence of nerves in, denied by Soemmerring, xiii. 102, 
Asserted by Scarpa, 103 ; and again denied by Bichat, 103, 
Observations on M. Le Gallois's account of the uses of the 
cardiac nerves, 105 

Heart-wood of trees, remarks on the office of, v. 169 
Heat and cold, effects of, on natural bodies, i. 299 
Heat, effects of, on vegetation, ii. 47. Evolved during the coa- 
gulation of the blood, 246. Experiment on the transmission 
of,' 424. 

■ change of colour effected by, v. 129. Experiments and 
observations on radiant heat, 364 

specific, of gases, ix. 403. Evolution of, by freezing, 409. 

Great degree of, at Bagdad, 423 

■ laws of the propagation of, xii. 180. Of the sun's rays dur- 
ing the solar eclipse of September 7, 1820, 313 

of solutions crystallized by exposure to air, xiii. '^2^. 

in the moon's rays, remarks on, 229. Effect of, on the 

colour of the ruby, 427 
and pressure, action of, on certain fluids, xv. 145. xvi. 91. 



INDEX. 97 

Remarks on, 100. Produced by friction of a solid against a 
liquid, XV. 1G2 

Heat, solubility diminished by, xvi. 165 

on the radiation of, in the atmosphere, xviii. 305 

and light from terrestrial sources, observations on, xix. 45, 

64, 213 

Heated bodies, repulsion exerted by, at certain distances, xx. 1C4 

Heavenly bodies, observations on the apparent change in the 
place, colour, size, and figure of, x. 9 

Heavy bodies, supplement to a paper on the vibrations of, xx. 69 

Hebrew medal, of ancient brass, discovered in Ireland, vi. 382 

Hebrides (islands), geology of, xiii. 192 

Hedwig (John), life of, i. 103. Birth and early education, 104. 
Progress of his botanical studies, 105. Removes to Leipsic, 
108. Publishes his discoveries on cryptogamous plants, 109. 
Appointed professor of medicine, ih. List of different trea- 
tises published by him, 110. His character, 112. 

Heinrich (M.), experiments and observations of, on phosphores- 
cence, xi. 399 

Hellebore (black), analysis of the roots of, xiii. 150 

Hematitic iron ore, recent formation of, xx. 187 

Hemp-seed, sowing of, a preventive of the depredations of cater- 
pillars, xiv. 238 

Henderson (Dr.), analysis of his History of Wines, with re- 
marks, xviii. 117 

Henderson (Mr.), his improved method of computing an ob- 
served occupation, xviii. 344 

on a method of computing the sun's horizontal paral- 
lax, from observations of the transits of Venus, xx. 94. Ob- 
servations on the method of computing the true from the appa- 
rent lunar distance, 315. Occultations of the planets and fixed 
stars, not less than the fourth magnitude, visible at Greenwich 
in 1S2S, 325 

Hendrick (Robt., Esq.), evidence of, in the cause of Severn and 
Co. against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 33G 

Hennell (Mr.), experiments of, on mercury, xviii. 295, 

H 



98 INDEX. 

Hennell*s (Mr.), note on the production and nature of oil of wine, 

xix. 96 
Henry (Dr.), analysis by, of native carbonate of magnesia, xi. 

387. Correspondence of Dr. Ure with, 402 
on the aeriform compounds of carbon and hydrogen, xii. 

1 34. Experiments on the gases obtained from oil and coal, 1 35 
Elements of Chemistry (ninth edition), review of, xvi. 332. 

Remarks on the formulae employed by him for equating the 

volumes and specific gravities of gases, 334. His chapter on 

chemical affinity, ib. On the atomic theory, 338. His views 

of electricity, 341. 
— — — on his arrangement of the metals, 344. Letter of, in 



reply to this review of his work, xvii. 131. 

on the action of finely-divided platina on gaseous mix- 



tures and its applications, 277. xix. 101 

Henry (Mr. W.), tribute to the memory of, vlii. 1. His birth 
and education, 2. Settles in the medical profession, 3. Notice 
of his chemical pursuits, 5. His literary publications, 9. No- 
tice of his essay on ferments, 10. His consideration on wool, 
silk, and cotton, as objects of the art of dyeing, 11. Account 

. of his unsuccessful attempt to establish a college of arts and 
sciences at Manchester, 13. His discoveries in the art of bleach- 
ing, 14. Retirement from public business, and death, 16. Esti- 
mate of his character and acquirements, 17. Tribute to his 
character, 21 

Henry's (M.) new process for extracting strychnine, xiv. 443 

Henry (M.) on the action of carbonic acid upon hydrosulphu- 
rets, XX. 393 

Hepaticas, observations on the structure and fructification of, vi. 28 

Herculaneum, conjecture on the cause of the destruction of, v. 
382. Attempts to unrol the manuscripts of papyrus found at, 
ib. vii. 154. xii. 367 

Hermes Trismegistus, notice of, ix. 225 

Herring fishery, natural history and navigation of, xvi. 210. 
Observations on the present commercial and political state 
of, 222 



INDEX. 



99 



Herschell (J. F. W., Esq.), Sir Godfrey Copley's gold medal 
awarded to, xii. 300. Sir H. Davy's address to him on that 
occasion, ib. On the aberration of compound lenses and 
object-glasses, 369. On the separation of iron from other 
metals, 372 

analysis of the Bakerian lecture by, xviii. 256 

on the inferiority of reflecting telescopes when com- 
pared with refractors, xx. 288 

Herschell (J. F. W., Esq.), and South (James, Esq.), observa- 
tions by, on the apparent distances and positions of certain 
double stars, xvii. 250 

Hieroglyphics discovered in Sweden, notice of, vii. 403 

• prospectus of a work on, viii. 191 

High operation for the stone, account of a successful case of, 
XX. 44 

Highland Society of London, premium of, viii. 394 

Hill (Mr. P.), particulars by, relating to the Ornithorhynchus 
Paradoxus J xvii. 247 

Hill and Bundy (Messrs.), machinery of, for manufacturing flax ; 
Report of a Committee of the House of Commons on, v. 30. 
Evidence of Mr. Millington concerning their inventions, 32. 
Of other persons', 40 

Himalaya Mountains, observations on the height of, ii. 889. vi. 
51. Latitudes, longitudes, and elevation of them, 58 

. ^ observations on the limit of constant con- 

gelation in, vii. 38 

geology of, X. 470 



' • observations on the height of the White Mountain of, 

xi. 240 

HiNCKs (Rev. Edward), observations of, on secret writing, xii. 
21. Remarks on Mr. Chenevix's cipher, 22. On Lord Bacon's, 
24. On Mr. Blair's, 25. Specimens of ciphers, 29. xiii. 136 

Hircic acid, comparative examination of, xvi. 112 

History of Plants defined, x. 239 

■ of Learning^ bibliographical notice of, xiii. 42, 50 

' of the Present State of the Republic of Letters, xiii. 293 

H2 



100 INDEX. 

History of the Works of the Learned^ notice of, xiii. 51, 30 1 
HiTT (Mr.), observations of, on the efficacy of salt in preventing 

the ravages of insects on fruit-trees, x. 65. 
Hoar-frost, peculiar appearance exhibited bj', xx. 40 
Hodgson (Rev. J.) on the use of Sir H. Davy's safety-lamp, 

i. 131 
HoLLiNGSHEAD (Mr.) on the beneficial effects of salt as a manure, 

x. 57 
Holywell water, near Cartmel, analysis of, xviii. 186 
Home (Sir Everard, Bart.) on the internal structure of the Su- 
rinam frog, i. 57. On the effects of a paralytic stroke upon 
the powers of ^adjustment of the eyes to near distances, 86. 
On the influence produced upon the secretion of milk in the 
ass, by taking away the foal, 165. His experiments to ascer- 
tain the mode of action of specific medicines, 290 

— on the effects of colchicum autumnale, ii. 201. On the 

formation of fat in the tadpole, 205. On the structure of the 
feet of animals moving in opposition to gravity, 206. On the 
circulation of blood in the lumbricus marinus, 457 

on the use of colchicum autumnale in gout, iii. 373. vi. 

105 

— on the changes of blood in the act of coagulation, iv. 262 

. — on an extraordinary biliary calculus, x. 86 

on the rete mucosum of the negro, as a defence against the 



;Solar rays, xii. 125. Microscopical observations on the brain 
and nerves, 127. Notice of his account of the Dugong, 370 ; 
and of the peculiarities which distinguish it from the Manatee 
of the West Indies, 375 

on a new species of rhinogeros, found in the interior of 



Africa, xiv. 163. On the anatomical structure of the eye, 166. 
On the changes which the egg undergoes during incubation in 
the common fowl, 383. On the placenta, 386 
Lectures on Comparative Anatomy, analysis of, xvi. 134. 



Plan of the work, with extracts and remarks, 134. His disco- 
very of the human ovum, 321 ; and of the breeding of marsu- 
pial and of cold-blooded animals, 323. Remarks on, and 



INDEX. 101 

outlines of his synopsis of a newsclieme for the classification of 
animals, 324. Ou the difference of structure between the hu- 
man membranum tympani, and that of the elephant, 327. On 
the double organs of generation of the lamprey, 332 

Home's (Sir E., Cart.) facts relative to the natural history of the 
walrus and seal, xvii. 262. Account of the organs of generation 
of the Mexican proteus in a developed state, 278 

— — observations on the internal structure of the human brain, 
as compared with that of fishes, insects, and worms, xviii. 136. 
Reply to Dr. Bostock, 290. Discovery of nerves in the fcetal 
and maternal placenta, 323 

• on the changes which the ovum of the frog undergoes 

during the formation of the tadpole, 324. xix. 295. 

' on some facts relating to the walrus and seal, xix. 100. 



Microscopical observations of, on the materials of the brain 
and the ova of animals, and on the analogy between them, 270. 
Notice of his Croonian Lecture on the nerves of the placenta, 
294 
on the source of animal heat, xx. 30G, 335. 



Homer's Jliadj ancient manuscript copy of, discovered, viii. 395 
Honey of the Lecheguana wasp, relation of a case of poisoning 

by, XX. 404 
Honey-dew, ravages of, prevented by using salt as a manure, x. 64 
Hooker (Mr. W. J.), on the Tayloria Splachnoides, a new species 

of moss, ii. 144 
Hooping-cough, vaccination a remedy for, xiii. 441 
Hoopoe shot, v. 375 
Hop, analysis of, x. 205. xiii. 402 
Horner (Mr.), account of a new photometer by, v. 118 
Hornstone, extraordinary formation of, xvi. 178 
Horse-tails, on the structure and fructification of, vi. 20 
Horse, analysis of a salivary calculus from, and also of its saliva, 

xiii. 399 
Horses, chronic himcncss in, new method of treating, iii. 373 
breeding of, for farms described, ix. 3. Mode of taming 

wild lior.^cs, I 5 



102 INDEX. 

HoRSFiELD (Dr.)> on the antshar or poison-tree, and mode of pre- 
paring its poison, ii. 332. Results of his experiments with it, 33G 

Horticultural Society, sketch of the history of, vii. 366. Its 
regulations and objects, 367. Sketch of the proceedings of, 
viii. 339. XV. 105 

Horticulture, state of, in ancient times, x. 52. Progress of, in 
Europe, 53. Its influence on society, 55 

Hospitals at Batavia, notice of^ vii. 4 

.Hours, table of equivalents for converting into space, xiii. 364 

Houses, observations on the best mode of warming and ventilating, 
xi. 229 

Howard (Luke, Esq.), observations of, on the extraordinary de- 
pression of the barometer, xiv. 169 

■ (Dr. W.), description of a differential thermometer, 

viii. 218 

Hudson (Mr. W. B.), improvement by, in gas illumination, x. 462 

Hughes (Rev. Thos.), remarks on a passage in his Travels, rela- 
tive to the Athenian temples, x. 204 

Humboldt (M.), botanical researches of, in America, ii. 52 

. account by, of the volcano of Purace, xviii. 404. And of 

the sulphur mountain of Ticsan, 406. On obsidian thrown out 
by the volcano of Sotara, 408. On the form of hailstones, 41 1 

(Baron), observations of, on the geographical distri- 



bution of ferns, iv. 57. Notice of his remarks on the caverns 
of rocks, and on their relation to the strata in which they are 
found, 85 

on the natural family of the grasses, v. 44 

on the orchidese, vi. 67 

on the causes affecting the distribution of vegetable 



forms, xii. 338 

on the geography of plants, xiii. 162 

analysis of his Essai Geognostique^ xix. 306. Remarks 



on his style, 307. Specimen of it, 309. Comment on his vague 
and indefinite assertions, 310. His character of Werner, 319. 
Remarks on it, 320. Exposition of his extravagant pretensions, 
323. His geognostical pasigraphy, 324. Remarks on it, 325 



ZVDVX. 103 

Hume (Mr.), notice of his discovery of a new vegeto-alkaline base 

in jalap, xvii. 38S 
Humite, analysis of, xv. 324 
Hungaiy, wines of, xviii. 131 
Hunger, sense of, how produced, ii. 13. vi. 1 
Hunter (Mr.), new nautical instrument of, vi. 135 
(Dr.), opinion of, on the non-evolution of heat during 

the coagulation of the blood confirmed, ii. 248 
-^— — noble design of, how frustrated, vii. 266 
' observations of, on the vitality of the blood, xiii. Ill 



Hutchinson (A. Copland, Esq.), letter from, to Sir E. Home, Bart., 
on a successful case of the high operation for the stone, xx. 44 
Hyalograph, notice of the instrument so called, xiii. 425 
HuTTON (Dr.), notice of his remarks on the mean density of the 
earth, xii. 370 

■ theory of the earth, sketch of, xix. 74 
Hydrate of silica and alumina, a new mineral, v. 376 

■ of chlorine, experiments on, xv. 71 
Hydraulic lime, analysis of, xii. 414 

Hydriodic acid, a test for platinum in solution, xvi. 156 

Hydriodide of carbon, xiii. 429 

' • new mode of obtaining, xv. 297 

Hydrocyanic acid, process by Scheele for the preparation of, x. 
401; Vauquelin, ib. ', and Majendie, 402; and the Apotheca- 
ries' Company, ib. ; by Pessina, xv. 380 

. _«- salivation and ulceration of the gums produced by, 

xii. 428 

' the oxalate and formiate of ammonia converted into, 



xviii. 397. How detected in the bodies of animals poisoned 
by, 398 

Hydrogen (carburetted), decomposition of, vi. 359 

compounds of, with carbon, xii. 133. xix. 273 

and chlorine, explosion of, xii. 413 

• (sulphuretted), combination of with potassium and sul- 
phur, xiv. 213 



104 iNbEX. 

Hydrogen, preparation of, xvii. 1G4. Odour of, proved to be 
extraneous, 380 

pure, process for obtaining, xviii. 180. Eruption of, 
188. Decomposition of metallic sulphates by, 392 

Hydrometer, directions for using, v. 223 

observations on the construction and uses of, vi. 133 

Hydroparabolic mirror, notice of, xv. 137 

Hydrophobia, remedies for, v. 141. viii. 362. x. 194 

-— Alsima plantago used in, vi. 1 64 

on the use of chlorine in, xii. 190 

• excision of the bitten part, in what case an effec- 
tual preventive of, xviii. 111. Remarks on the different plans 
of treatment hitherto proposed, 112. Suggestions of Dr. Booth 
for the treatment of this malady, 115. The hydrophobic poison 
said to lose the power, after its first transmission, of conveying 
the disease, 412 

Hydrostatic balance (new), notice of, ix. 388 

Hydrosulphuret of potash, preparation of, xvii. 165 

Hydroxanthic acid, preparation of, xv. 304. Account of its pro* 
'ducts and combinations, 305 

Hygrometer (new), notice of, vii. 395 

— — for measuring the force and weight of vapours in the 

atmosphere, and the corresponding degree of evaporation, de- 
scription of, viii. 298. Manner of using the instrument, 301. 
Table of the force, density and expansion of aqueous vapour at 
different degrees of temperature from 0° to 92°, 306. Obser- 
vations thereon, 308. Table of the force of vapour, and the 
full evaporating force of every degree of temperature from 28*^ 
to 85**, 311. Observations thereon, 314. Table of their results, 
322. Application of it to barometrical results, 323. Mete- 

. orological journal kept with it, 326 

— — — observations on the form of, ix. 128 

excellent, of Mr. Daniell, xiv. 185 

Hygrometric property of sulphuric acid, notice of, xx, 400 

Hyoscyamia, analysis of, xi. 205 



INDE,X. 105 

Hypoxylea^ structure and fructification of, vi. 222 
Hysterical patient, effect of tlie injection of a solution of opium 
into the veins of, xvii. 1 45 



Ice found at the bottom of rivers, the surface being unfrozen, ii. 
205 ; V. 268; xiii. 228 

— experiments on producing, iv. 133. Observations on its opti- 
cal structure, 155. Account of the Greenland or Polar ice, 
247. Different names given to it, under various circumstances, 
by seamen, 248. Effects of the ocean freezing, in a rough sea, 
250; and in sheltered situations, ib. Fields of, how gene- 
rated, 251. Their tremendous concussions, 253. Account of 
ice-bcrgsj 255. On the situation of the Polar ice, and the 
effects produced on it by a change in the seasons, 256. Obser- 
vations on the properties, peculiar movements, and drifting of, 
262. Effects of, on the sea and the atmosphere, 263. Alarming 
increase of, in the glaciers, 282. Extensive devastations of, in 
Greenland, 283 

— progress of floating masses of, from the north, v. 372 

— islands of, in the AVest Indies, vi. 371 

— on the evaporation of, ix. 423 

— caves (natural), account of, xvii. 396 

— of running water, observations on, xix. 364 
Iceland, notice of volcanic eruptions in, xvi. 396 
Icelandic literature, account of, vi. 381 

Idea and perception, proofs of the homogeneous nature of, iii. 6 
Ignatius (St.) bean, on its analysis, vii. 379 
Iguanodon, a fossil reptile, description of, xix. 304 
Illumination of streets, remarks on, v. 177. By electricity, ix. 208 
Immobility, a disease of horses, cause of, xvii. 145 
Imperial Insurance Company, observations on the chemical evi- 
dence given in the cause of Severn and Co. against, x. 316 
Impressions (corporeal), influence of, in producing changes of 
function in the living body, iv. 13. Influence of painful, 16. 



106 INDEX. 

Of graceful, 20 ; and of organic sympathy, 22. (Mental), 207. 

Usual classification of the passions, ib. Influence of grief 

considered, 209. Of joy, 214. Of fear, 217. Of anger, 220. 

Of love, 222. Of mental sympathy, 223 
Incubus, remarks on, vii. 257 
India, tiger and lion hunt in, described, vii. 266 
r-- — journal of the temperature of, ix. 202 
Indian warriors' return from battle, description of, iii. 95. Resin, 

account of a new species of, 115 
' . — steel, analysis of, vii. 288 

• fortifications in North America, notice of, viii. 224 

• corn, analysis of, xi. 206 

Indians of Cucuta, in South America, degraded state of, iii. 345 

Indigestion, effects of the bile on, xiv. 341 

Indigo, description of, vi. 363 

- important discovery of British, xv. 140. Some points in 

the chemical history of, 1 52 
— common and deoxidized, composition of, xix. 165 



Infirmary at Derby, mode of warming and ventilating described, 
ii. 201 

Inflammability of ammoniacal gas, xvi. 165 

Inflammable gas, new, discovered, vi. 153 

Inflammation of gunpowder by slaking lime, xvi. 163 

Ink, directions for making, v. 296 

indelible, vi. 362 

■ similar to China, process for preparing, xix. 141 

Inns in France described, ix. 300 

Inoculation, benefits of, xiv. 453 

Inscription on the ancient column at Alexandria, fac-simile of, x. S 

on a wall among the ruins of Meroe, xviii. 300. Con- 
jectures thereon, 304 

Insects, new method of destroying, v. 350 

remedy for preventing the ravages of in plants, vii. 176 

esculent plants or fruit-trees rendered unfit for their ha- 
bitation by salt, X. 63. Eff'ectually destroyed by using common 
salt as a manure, 68 



INDEX. 107 

Insects (luminous), on the phosphorescence of, xii. 181 

solution for destroying, xvii. 146 

Inspiration of inflammable gas, xx. 893 

Institutions (literary and scientific), vindication of, vii. 219. 

Introductory discourse of Mr. Brande delivered at the London, 

205 
Instrument for destroying stone in the bladder, description of, 

XX. 21 
Insulation of electricity, ix. 206 
Intermittents, sub-nitrate of bismuth a remedy for, xiii. 233 

prussiate of iron a remedy for, xvii. 145 

Intestinal gases, experiments on, ii. 185 

Intoxication, antidote to, xi. 407 

Inverse series, extension of, for the computation of refraction, 

together with a direct solution of the problem, xvi. 139 
Iodide of gold, experiments on, x. 121 ; analysis of it, 122 
of potassium, new compound formed, by mixing a solution 

of, with one of cyanide of mercury, xiii. 401 

of nitrogen, preparation of, xv. 381 

Iodine, observations on the crystallization of, v. 364 

test for, vi. 362 

'. found in marine animals, x. 182 ; and in sponge, 456, 

A remedy for bronchocele, xi. 191 
« its application as a medicine, xi. 407. xii. 187 

on the combination of oxides with, xii. 175 

employed for the relief of cancer, xiv. 237 



— — notice of a new compound of, xv. 376 

— — presence of, in the water of Sales, xvi. 168. xvii. 180 

process for obtaining the cyanuret of, xviii. 173 

means of testing for, xix. 343 

i — . its existence in a mineral" substance, xx. 173. Its pre- 
sence ascertained in sulphureous mineral waters, 344 

Ireland, geological^ account of the north of, iv. 160 

remarks on the population returns of, xix. 217. Tables 

and observations on the state of education in that country, 220 

Ireland (M., Esq.) on the external changes which take place in 



108 



INDEX. 



the Surinam frog,' from its earlier stages till it becomes a per- 
fect animal, i. 55 

Irides, remarks on the formation of, viii. 258 

Iris (blue), new test colour from, xv. 161 

Iron, meteoric mass of, discovered in Brazil, ii. 205. Observa- 
tions on the mechanical structure of, as developed by solu- 
tion, and on the combination of silex in cast, 278 

■ clay of the Giant's Causeway, geological and chemical ac- 
count of, iv. 160 

■ ■ ■ effects of water and oxygen in oxidizing, v. 169. vii. 55. 

Native, where found, v. 293. Different classes of ore, 295 ; 
pyrites, ib. ; magnetic, ib. ; specular, ib.; hcematites and ar- 
gillaceous ironstone, 296. Properties and uses of iron, ib. 

improved process for the separation of, from manganese, vj. 

153, 357. On benzoate of, 159 

uses of the refuse oxide of, vii. 1S2. Decomposition of 



water by, ib. 

magnetic ore of, viii. 351 

native of Louisiana, ix. 193. Supposed meteoric, at Aix- 

la-Chapelle, ib. Micaceous iron ore discovered, 194. Obser- 
vation-on the preparations of, in the French Pharmacopoeia, 
249. Test for, 408. Discovery of carbonate of, 411. 

— chromate of, found in Shetland, x. 196, 462 

in the Isle of Unst, xi. 222. Analysis of, 436. Fall of an 

iron bridge in America, xi. 385. Permeability of, to tin, ib, 

— of blue ore, xii. 38. Granular chromic ore of, analysis of, 
xii. 39. Alloys of, and steel, with chromium, 173. On the 
separation of, from other metals, 372. Effects of the proximity 
of masses of, on the rates of chronometers, 374, 415. Cast, 
curious effect of sea-water upon, 407. Oxalate of, found as a 
mineral, 422. 

— -^ recent pyrites of, discovered, xiii. 437. 

magnetic attraction of hot, between the white and blood-red 

heat, xiv. 170. On the strength of, 223. Pipes of, preferable 

to those of lead, for pumps, 352. 
Iron, sheet, new process for soldering, xv. 142. Analyijis of a, 



INDEX. 109 

persulphate of, and ammonia, 381. Test for the proto-salta 
of, 3S2. Analysis of the native sulphate of, and alumina, 389 
Iron, alloys of zinc with, xvi. 383. 

action of sulphur on, xvii. 165. On the development of 
magnetical properties in, by percussion, 254. Combustion of 
by sulphur, 381. Ammonia found in the oxides of, ib. On 
the different masses of, found in the eastern Cordillera of the 
Andes, 394 

- action of, in motion upon tempered steel, xviii. 160. Scales, 
nature of, when heated, 387. Oxide of, reduction by cementa- 
tion, 388 

■ ■ combinations of, with copper, xix. 154. The drawing of iron 
wire facilitated, 135. On the magnetism imparted to, by rota- 
tion, 263. Alteration in the magnetism of an iron plate, occa- 
sioned by a rotation on its axis, 265. Method of browning 
iron, 329. Effects of the exposure of, to air in high regions, 347 

furnaces, metallic titanium found in, xx. 176 ; hematitic 

ore, recent formation of, 187; stone, phosphate of lime found 
in, 412 ; tenacity of, as applicable to chain-bridges, 162 

wire, experiments on the tenacity of, xvi. 367 

suspension bridge at Geneva, account of, xvi. 369. Ex- 
pense of, xvii. 148. 

suspension bridges, remarks on, xvii. 147 



Irritability, summary of Haller*s theory of, xiii. 98. Remarks 
thereon, 99. Of plants, xvii. 176 

Irritation of the spinal nerves, remarks on, xii. 428 

Ischia, notice of a particular substance formed by the vapour of 
the thermal waters at, viii. 376 

Island, newjformed in the Bay of Bengal, ix. 197. Off the island 
of St. Michael, 414 ; and off Cape Horn, 417 

rent asunder, notice of, x. 475 

Italy, remarks on the wines of, xviii. 132 

Ive's (Dr. A. W.) analysis of lupulin, xi. 205 

Ivory (Mr.) on an investigation of the theory of capillary attrac- 
tion, i. 290 

account of his method of computing the latitude from two 

altitudes, and the time iotervening, xii. 389 



110 INDEX. 

Ivory (Mr.), apology for the postscript on refraction, in answer 

to his remarks, xii. 390 
observations and calculations of, on astronomical refractions, 

xviii. 373 



Jackson (Mr.), hypothesis of, on the termination of the Niger, 
i. 267 

cursory observations of, on the geography of Africa, 

and on the errors of European travellers, caused by their igno- 
rance of Arabic, vii. 329 

— on the plague in Africa, viii. 1S3 



Jalap, a new vegetable principle discovered in, xvii. 386 

James's powders, composition of, xvi. 167 

Jameson (Prof.), analysis of mountain tallow by, xviii. 187 

January, 1824, astronomical phenomena for, xvi. 289 

Japanese, high civilization of, ii. 197 

Jardine (Mr.), experiments of, on the strength of leaden pipes, 
XX. 375 

Jasper, general observations on, xi. 63. Synopsis of its varie- 
ties, 70 

Jass^rt (M.), notice of a quadruple salt discovered by, xvi. 384 

Jaundice, cure of, by phosphoric acid, xiii. 233 

Java, account of a singular volcanic eruption in the island of, i. 
248-258 

geological constitution of, ii. 193. Remains of antiquities 

discovered there, 194. Account of the language of the Ja- 
vanese, 'i6. Importance of cultivating it, 330. The fable of 
the oopas, or poison-tree, of, exploded, 331. Account of the 
antshar, or genuine poison-tree, and of the manner of prepar- 
ing the poison, 332. Results of experiments with the poison, 336 

Javal (M.), experiments of, on some combinations of gold, xii. 318 

Javanese, inhabitants of Batavia, manners and character of, vii. 
12 ; peculiar antiseptic powder used by, notice of, 274. 

Jeffreys (Mr.), account of the chimney invented by, for condens- 
ing smoke, xviii. 270 



INDEX. Ill 

Jbhangeer (Emperor), mausoleum of, described, ix. 315 
Jenner (Dr. E.), observations of, on the migration of bird^, 

xviii. 138 
Jet of water, force of, ix. 171 
Jews, singular coincidence between the customs of, and the Ashan- 

tees, X. 85 
Johnson (Dr.), reflections of, on the progress of a manufacture, 

iii. 3G7 

— observations of, on the genus planaria, xiv. 387 

^—^ further observations by, on planaria, xx. 334 
Johnson's Dictionary, inaccuracies in Mr. Todd's edition of,x. 284 
Jones's hygrometer, description of, xix. 279 
Jordan (G.W., Esq.), observations of, on the colours of waters, 

V. 81 

on the floatage of small heavy bodies in the air, and cer- 
tain atmospheric phaenomena dependant thereon, viii. 245 

on the apparent changes of place, colour, size, and 

figure of the heavenly bodies, x. 9 

Journals (foreign scientific), analytical review of, \\.\b\,ctscq. 

Annalesde Chimie^W. 159,438 

■ Bihlioteca Italiana, ii. 177 
Bibliotheca Literaria, xiii. 290 

Bihlidh^que Angloise, xiii, 57 

Bihliotheque Choisee, xiii. 52 

■ Bibliotheque Universal des Sciences etdes Arts, ii. 176 

Bulletin de la SocietePhilontatique de Paris, ii. 172 

— : Bibliotheque des Sciences et des Arts, ii. 415, 426. iii. 



179,222 

Journal des Savans, xiii. 36 

Journal de Pharmacie et des Sciences Accessoii*es, ii. 166, 



iii. 185. iv. 393 
Journal de Physique, ii. 152,427, 438. iii. 199. iv. 

389, 391, 397 
Joy, effects of, in producing change of function in the living body, 

iv. 214 
Juice of the sugar-cane an antidote to arsenic, x. 123 



112 



INDEX 



Jumotri, notice of the hot-springs at, xvi. 183 
Juno (the planet), elements of, viii. 89 
— places of, for 1822, xiii. 208 

JcTST (Dr.), results of the experiments of, on fulminating silver and 
mercury, xvii. 153 



K^MPFER*s History of Japan, authenticity of, proved, ii. 196. Ob- 
servations on the coniferous plants collected by him, 309 

Kaleidoscope, history of Dr. Brewster's invention of, v. 324. 
Observations on its supposed resemblance to other combinations 
of plain mirrors, 320 

Karsten (M.) on combinations of copper with iron, pig-iron, &c. 
xix. 154- 

*— observations by, on the solution of steel and iron in acids, 

&c., XX. 395 

Kater (Capt.), notice of his experiments for determining the 
length of the pendulum vibrating seconds, in the latitude of 
London, v. 168. On the length of the French metre esti- 
mated in parts of the English standard, 169. Directions by, 
for using the instruments executed under his superintendence 
for the Northern Expedition, 202. On the use of his re- 
peating circle and azimuth compass, 217. On the altitude in- 
strument, 221 ; and hydrometer, 223 

• letter from, on the instruments provided for the Arctic 

Expedition, vi. 351 

• illiberal remarks on his experiments for determining the 



length of the seconds' pendulum in London, viii. 259 

observations of, on the construction of a balance, xii. 40. 



On the comparison of various British standards of linear mea- 
sure, 130. On the best kind of steel and form for a compass- 
needle, 132. Notice respecting a volcanic appearance in the 
moon, 133 ; and of his account of the re-measurement of the 
cube, cylinder, and sphere, used by the late Sir George Shuck- 
burgh Evelyn in his inquiries concerning a standard of weights 
and measures, 393 



INDEX. 113 

Katbr, description by, of a floating collimater, xix. 301 

■ account by, of the construction and adjustment of the 

new standard of weights and measures, xx. 299 
Kcdir Nat'h, a reputed holy place in Hindostan, legendary account 

of, ix. 62 
Kennedy (Mr.) on an improved barometer, i. 295 
Ker (J. B., Esq.) on a systematic view of the plants contained in 
the LiliaceeSf par J. P. Redoute, i. 16S. Explanation of the 
term LiliaceeSy 169. His systematic arrangement of plants, 
169 

review of the genus Amaryllis^ by, ii. 342 

on the genus Crinurriy iii. 102. On the genus Pancratium, 316 

Kermes, mineral preparation of, xiii. 428. xvii. 165 
KiDD (J. M. D.) on the anatomy of the mole cricket, xx. 329 
KiRCiioFF (M.) on changing fecula into sugar, ii. 167 

• new process of, for preparing cinnabar, xv. 161 

Kirkdale, account of fossil remains discovered at, xiv. 170 
Klaproth (Martin Henry) on the chemical analysis of mineral 
substances, xi. 272. Analysis of electrum, 272 ; of the pacos, 
or red silver ore of Peru, 273 ; of the hepatic mercurial ore 
of Idria, 274 ; of the lamellar red copper ore from Siberia, 
276 ; of the fibrous blue copper ore of Siberia, 278 ; and of 
the copper glance from Rothenburg, 279 
*- analysis of the ferro-arsenical sulphuret of copper, 

xii. 29 ; of an antimonial sulphuret of copper, 32 ; of a cu- 
preous sulphuret of lead and antimony, 34 ; of the sulphuret 
of bismuth and copper, 36 ; of the blue iron ore of Eckartsberg, 
38 : of granular chromic iron ore from Steimark, 39 ; 
of cererit, 262; of the oxide of cerium, 264; of a com- 
pact ore of titanium, 265; of the topaz, 266; particularly 
the Saxon, 26 S ; of zoist from Carinthia, ib. ; of the foliated 
augite of Carinthia, 269 ; of conchoidal apatite from Tillen- 
thahl, 271 ; of the columnar brown spar of Mexico, 272 ; of do- 
lomite, 274; of anhydrite, 275 ; of the green earth of Verona, 
276 ; of the alumstone of Tolfao, 277 ; and of that of Frien- 
wald, ib. 

I 



114 INDEX. 

Knife of the Esquimaux described, vii. 79 

Knight (T., Esq.), observation of, on two general principles in 
the method of differences, v. pref. x. On the construction 
of logarithmic tables, xi 

Knight (T. A., Esq.), observations upon the office of the heart- 
wood of trees, v. 169 

on the different qualities of the alburnum of spring and 

winter felled oak trees, x. 395 

Knowles (T. Esq.), on the advantages of the [curvilnear form 
introduced by Sir R. Seppings, in the construction of the stern 
of British ships of war, xiv. 325 

Knox (Hon. G.), experiments on the Newry pitchstone, xiv. 382 

Koenig's (Charles, Esq.) account of the rock specimens collected 
by Captain Parry, during his northern voyage of discovery, 
XV. 11 

Konilite, a new mineral, notice of, xi. 218 

KoTZEBUE (Captain), voyage of circumnavigation by, announced, 
xvi. 396 

Kramp (M.), observations on Sir Isaac Newton's table of re- 
fractions, xviii. 358. Remarks on his mathematical theory of 
refractions, 363 

Kuhoo (village), account of the saline mud-lake in, i. 256 

Kumaon (province of), abstract of latitudes, longitudes, and 
elevations above the sea in several places in, vi. 58 

Kupferschaum, analysis of, xvi. 277 

Kiitch (territory of), account of an earthquake in, viii. 356 



Laboratories at Apothecaries' Hall described, xvi. 199 
Lacemaking, notice of improvements in, v. pref. xv 
Lactometer, improved, description of, iii. 393 
Laenne (Dr.), new medical instrument invented by, vi. 172 
La Grange (M.), experiments of, on garlic, iii. 186 
Lahore, royal gardens of, described, ix. 311 

Lake formed in the valley of Bagne, in the Valais, description of, 
v. 372 



INDEX. 115 

Lake, Superior, geography and geology of, xviii. 1, 228 

Lakes, temperature of, x. 198 

Lalagunilla (valley of), in South America, situation of, i. 188. 

Account of the soda-lake there, ib. The urao or soda, how 

extracted, 190. Its uses, 191 
Lalande (M.), error in the logarithmic tables of, corrected, xviii. 

347 
Lamarck's genera of shells, analysis of, xiv. 67, 298. xv. 23, 

216 
. translated, xvi. 49, 241. Remarks on his system, 

258. Explanation of the plates illustrative of the genera of 

shells, 260 
Lamb (M.) on the tenacity of iron, as applicable to chain- 
bridges, XX. 162 
Lambton (Lieut. -Col.), corrections by, applied to the great 

meridional arc, to reduce it to the parliamentary standard, xvi. 

328 
Lameness, chronic, in horses, new mode of treating, iii. 873 
Lamp, portable, for gas, described, viii. 234 

new, notice of, ix. 392. xv. 143 

improved, description of, x. 101 

of a new sinumbral one, xi. 290. Improvement of oil- 
lamps, 381. Account of coal-oil parish lamps, 382. 

furnace, for the analysis of organic bodies, xvii. 232 

Lampates, account of various, vi. 321 

Lampic acid, preparation and properties of, vi. 318. Its com- 
binations, 320. Analysis of it, 324 

Lampyrides, inquiry into the nature of the luminous power of 
some, xvii. 267 

Lancasterian schools, progress of, in various parts of Europe, 
ix. 212 

Landa, manufactures of, viii. 278 

Landriani (M.) on new and delicate thermometers, vii 183. 
Principle of his self-registering thermometers, 186 

Land-slip, account of, xiv. 455 

12 



116 INDEX. 

Langier (M.), analysis of a meteoric stone by, xiii. 420 

Languedoc, mines of, xviii. 128 

Lapidaries' \xhee\ for cutting stones in the East Indies, account 

of, xviii. 380 
Lapis Li/dim^ or touchstone, analytical examination of, xv^. 

315 
La Place (the Comte) on the application of the calculation of 

probabilities to natural philosophy, i. 120 
• on the length of the seconds' pendulum, iii. 158. No- 
tice of the supplement to his analytical theory of probabilities, 

181 
■ latest computation of the density and figure of the 

earth, ix. 32 
system of astronomy, remarks on, xiv. 410. Addition 

of, to a memoir on the theory of elastic fluids, 430 
Larch-tree, use of, in tanning, xii. 40S 
Larvce, tenacity of life in, xx. 189 
Lassaigne (M.), experiments of, on the colouring matter of the 

lobster, xi. 203 
on a new acid, produced by the distillation of citric 

acid, xiv. 422, 435 

— — experiments of, on the compounds of nickel, xv. 151 

on the purpuric acid, xvi. 104. On the existence of a 



carbonate of magnesia in the urinary calculi of herbivorous 

animals, 109. On the compounds of cystic oxide, 176 
— .— on the preparation of the oxides of nickel, xvii. 140. 

On the detection of acetate of morphia in poisoning, 168 
Latitude, a direct method of computing, from two observations of 

the sun's altitude, and the time elapsed between them. xi. 172. 

Remarks thereon, 370. xii. 389 
• easy approximation to the diiference of, on a spheroid, 

xvii. 316 
at sea, method of finding, by the altitude of two fixed 



stars when on the same vertical, xviii. 99 

of Greenwich, as computed by Professor Bessel, xx. 93 



INDEX. 117 

Latour (M. D.) on the effects obtained by the simultaneous 
application of heat and pressure, to certain liquids, xvi. 98. 
Experiments of, with certain substances under high pressures, 
156 

Laugier (M.) on the composition of acirolites, x. 189 

analysis by, of meteoric stones fallen in Poland, xviii. 

389 ; and of the volcanic saline matter thrown out of Vesu- 
vius, 407 

. new mineral discovered by, xix, 15G 



Laurel, nature and properties of the native oil of, xviii. 47 
Lava, observations on the primitive matter of, ii. 158 

of Vesuvius, examination of, xvi. 180 

Lavoisier's chemical discoveries, notice of, iv. 23S 
Lead-mines, geological account of, at Dufton, ii. 198 

of England and Wales, present state of, vi. 3t7 

and its compounds, account of, v. 69. Tests for detecting it 



in water, 73. Sugar of, not used in adulterating wines, ib. 
Oxide of crystallized, 363. Sheet, Chinese mode of making, 
3G9 

— and tin, mutual precipitation of, vi. 363 

— native, notice of, viii. 357. Volatility of the oxides of, 379, 
New acetate of, ib. 

— chromate of, applied as a dye to silk, x, 451, xi. 392. Appli- 
cation of, in the arts, xix. 347 

— analysis of the ferro-prussiate of, xi. 210 

— and antimony, analysis of a cupreous sulphuret of, xii. 
34. Increase of weight during calcination accounted for, 
295. On the disappearance of the celestial heat in, 297. 

— weight, if not increased by the consumption of the aerial parts, 
xiii. 136 ; nor by soot, 138; nor from the vessel in which it is 
calcined, 140; nor from the vapours of the charcoal ; nor from 
the volatile salt of the charcoal, 278 ; nor from volatile mercu- 
rial salt, 280 ; nor from moisture, ib. ; but from the mixture of 
the thickened air, 282. Why the calx of lead does not increase 
in weight adinJinUum^ ib. Whether it increases in weight like 
tin, 284 



118 INDEX. 

Lead, use of the sulphate of, in the arts, xiv. 230. Observations 
on the deleterious effects of, 352. On the relation between the 
crystalline form and chemical proportions of the neutral 
arseniate and phosphate of, 416 

sulphuret of, experiment on, xv. 150 

action of gunpowder upon, xvi. 163. Pyrophorus obtained 

from the tartrate of, 385. Sugar, an antidote to, in case of 
poisoning, 395 

plaster, water essential to its formation, xx. 400 

Leaden pipes, experiments on the strength of, xx. 375 

Leake (Colonel), copy of an ancient manuscript by, at Alexandria, 
X. 7 

Leaves of plants, nature of the green matter of, iv. 394 

• new colouring matter found in, vi. 36 1 

Lecanu and Serbal (MM.) on the preparation of the oxide of 
uranium, xvii. 139. Collection of facts by, on the history of 
the succinic and benzoic acids, 141 

Lee (Mr.), evidence of, on the application of coal-gas to the pur- 
poses of illumination, i. 73 

— account of his improvements in dressing flax, iv. 329 

Leeches, medicinal application of, xix. 174 

Leghorn straw-plat, premiums for, xvii. 1 53 

Lebson's (Mr. H. B.) description of a self-acting blowpipe, xvii. 
236 

Le Gros (Mr. P. T.), notice of his machine for cleaning chimneys, 
iii. 394 

Leonardi da Vinci, interesting geological observations of, vi. 
380 

Lepidolite, identity of, with mica proved, iii. 84 

Leslie (T., Esq.) analysis of his treatise on meteorology, with re- 
marks, xiv. 172 

■ invention of, for conducting examinations under 

water, xviii. 167 

Letters, benefit of the revival of, vii. 213 

Leuthwaite (Mr.), experiments of, for firing gunpowder by elec- 
tricity, xi. 391 



INDEX. 119 

Levity, non-existent in nature, xi. 8 1 , 

Levy (Mr.), observations of, on the crystalline forms of artificial 
salts, XV. 282 

Letden (Dr.), sketch of Borneo by, ii. 340 

Leyden jar, improvement in the construction of, xvii. 162 

Lichens, observations on the growth of, ii. 54 

■ » or river- worts, construction and fructification of, vi. 218 

LiEBEG (Dr.), experiments of, on fulminating silver and mercury, 
xvii. 153; and on fulminic acid and fulminates, 386 

Life, on the relative and absolute duration of, iij. 40. Regulation 
of the Code Napoleon on this point, ib. Defects of the English 
law thereon, 41. Uncertainty of the signs of, 44 

boat, new, notice of, vi. 351 

tenacity of in larvae, xx. 189 

Light, properties of, i. 98. Notice of some new discoveries re- 
specting, 297 

effects of on vegetation, ii. 48. Experiments on, by Dr. 

Brewster, 207. Decomposition of by simple reflection, 211 

evolution of, by the expansion of oxygen, vii. 384. Mag- 



netism by, 398 

evolved by pressure, xv. 368 

influence of, on the purple tint of plate-glass, xvi. 164. 



xix. 341 

■ effects of, on the colour of sodalite, xviii. 179. Of incan- 



descent bodies, 384 
and heat from terrestrial sources, observations on, xix. 



45, 213. Produced during crystallization, 341 

of haloes, polarized state of, xx. 167 

houses, new, notice of, vi. 136. vii. 170. x. 450. Sug- 



gested improvements in, xx. 376 , 

Lighting explosive atmospheres in coal-mines. Sir H. Davy's con- 
trivance for, i. 1. Proofs of its utility, 131, 302 

Lightning, straw a conductor for, ix. 199 

discharge of, through a bad conductor, x. 460 

effect of, xii. 414 

• case of palsy cured by, xiii. 419 

■ electro-magnetic effect of, xiv. 442 



m 



INDEX, 



Lightning, on the direction of, xvi. 185 

' effects of, on the human body, xviii. 190 

■ report on the construction of conductors for, xix. 143. 

Course of, underground, 339 
■ length of the electric flash producing, xx. 172. Its 



effects on the animal system, 404 
Ligneous matter, on the conversion of into gum, sugar, a particular 

acid, and ulmin, viii. 386 
Lignite, or fossil- wood, account of a stratum of, viii. 352 
' beds of, discovered in Russia, xiv. 235 

' remarks and observations on, xx. 205 

Lime (native caustic) of Tuscany, account of, i. 260. Analysis 

of, with remarks thereon, 261 

fasible with the blowpipe, ii. 108 

facts on the artificial production of the crystallized carbonate 

of, vi. 35. Experiments with carbonate of, on nitric acid, 250 
on the separation of from magnesia, 313. vii. 392. 



ix. 177 

— lampate of, vi. 322 

— notice of experiments on the oxymuriate of, vii. 182 
a remedy for the fly in turnips, viii. 155 

— ■ how converted into hydraulic lime, x. 408. On slaking, 
409. Hydrates of, ib. Effects of, on hydraulic mortars, 410. 
Hydraulic nature of, 411 

— on the solution of, xi. 202. Analysis of the ferro-prussiato 
of, 209. Carbonate of, deposited in wood, 405 

— on the composition and manufacture of the chloride of, 
xiii. 1 

— action of animal charcoal on, xv. 384 

— composition of the murjates of, xvi. 384. Effects of the 



chloride of, as a disenfector, 395 

— geological notice of the carbonate of, xix. 82 

— action of on alcohol, xx. ISO. Phosphate of, process for 



detecting, 175 
Limestone, scintillating, notice of, viii. 33G 
' quality of, how to be ascertained, x. 407 



INDEX. 1^1 

Limestone, magnesian, of England, remarks on, xiv. 153 

. analysis of different specimens of French, xv. 311 

experiments on the burning of, xvii. 36 1 

of Aberthaw, analysis of, xviii. 187 

Lime-water, a cure for ringworm, xiv. 238 

a test for arsenic, xx. 398 

LiNANT (M.), account of his expedition to Sennaar, xviii. 298 
Lincolnshire, account of an ancient canoe found in, i. 244 
Lindley's (Mr. John) account of the Prangos hay-plant of Northern 

India, xix. 1 
Liquefaction of gases, historical statement respecting, xvi. 229. 
Liquids, laws and properties of, i. 93, 

' on the cold produced by the evaporation of, xv. 294. 

Literary Journals (periodical), account of, from 1681 to 1749, 

xiii. 36, 289 ; and of the Journals of Ancient Greece, 298. 

Bibliographical notice of the Literary Joinnal published at 

Dublin, 301 

Magazine y bibliographical notice df, 297 

Literary notices, xvi. 397 

Literature, causes of the vicissitudes of, v. 4, Observations on 

the studies of, the arts and sciences, 1 1 
(general), miscellaneous intelligence concerning, viii. 

187. X. 201, 473 

(Greek), present state of, x. 201. xii. 193, 430 

— state of, in New South Wales, ix. 427 

of ancient Egypt, notice of discoveries in, xiv. 255 



Lithia, a new alkali, lately discovered in Sweden, account of, 

V. 337 
. — test for detecting it in minerals, vii. 385. Analysis of 

some minerals containing it, 400 

discovered in lepidolite, xi. 202 

process for preparing, xiii. 224 



Lithographic stones, substitute for, vii. 170 

press, notice of a new one, xiv. 432 

Lithography, or printing from stone, process of, described, iii. 89i 
iv. 206 



1^ 



INDEX. 



Lithography, improvements in, xi. 382 

application of, to the taking of impressions from 

plants, xii. 405; progress of at Munich, 431 
Liver, analysis of, vii. 387 
Liverpool, extraordinary export from, v. 145 

museum, formation of, ix. 216 

Liverpool, (Earl of), letter to, on removing the British Museum 

to Somerset House, vii. 111. 
Lizard, imbedded in coal, vi. 375 

Lochaber mountains, observations on the parallel roads of, xlx. 195 
Locusts found in England, vi. 162 ; ravages of, in North America, 

163 ; mistakes concerning them rectified, 372 
Logarithms, errors in the best tables of, xx. 312- 
London, means of intellectual improvement in, vi. 182 

number of stage-coaches that daily leave, viii. 243 ; 

account of the communication by sea between, and Leith, 244 
evils resulting to the inhabitants of, from smoke, xii. 343 ; 



state of them in the 17th century, ib. ; in the 18th century, 
345 ; at the present time, 346 ; remedy suggested for, 347 ; 
account of various expedients for consuming smoke, 348 
clay, geological remarks on, xiv. 144 ; history of the 



•wells of, 145 

bridge, observations on the taking down and re-building 



of, XV. 2Q7 ; and on the late Mr. Rennie's design for, xvi. 27 
observations on the climate of, xvii. 340 ; table of the 



level in, above the highest water-mark, 361 

institution, liberal design of, vii. 207 ; view of the 



advantages resulting from, 208 
Longchamp (M.) on the uncertainty of chemical analysis, xvi. 164 
Longitude, report of the committee of the Board of, for examining 
instruments and proposals upon the mode employed for deter- 
mining the errors of dividing engines, ix. 347 



act of, notice of, xi. 411 

of Madeira and Falmouth determined, xvii. 270 

remarks on the determination of, from observations of 



the moon's right ascension, xix. 109 



INDEX. 129 

LoRiMER (Dr.), hypothesis of, to account for magnetic variation, 

vi. 98 
Loudon (J. C), observations of,* on the construction of prisons, 

iv. 169 
LowRY (Miss), conversations of, on mineralogy, analysis of, 

xiv. 154; remarks on some of her definitions, 155; plan of 

her work, 157; specimen of, 158; some etymological errors 

corrected, 160; general character of the work, ib. 
Lozania, genus, notice of, iii. 125 

Lucas (Mr.) on the oxidation of silver and copper, viii. 168 
Lucia (St.), island of, its geological structure, v.* 316 
LuLLY (Raymond), notice of the alchymistical labours of, ix. 229 
Lumbricus marinus^ account of the circulation of the blood in, ii. 

457 
Luminous marine animals, observations on, xi. 248 
Lunar distances of Venus, tables of, ix. 168, 383 
correction of, by means of Mr. Thompson's lunar 

and horary tables, xviii. 339 
observations on the method of computing the true 



from the apparent, xx. 315 

— observations, comparative view of the principal methods of 



correcting, ix. 350. Without either tables or instruments, ib. 
By the line of chords, ib. By the scale and sector, 351. By 
common logarithmic tables, 353. By the requisite tables, 359. 
And the appendix, ib. By Dr. Brinkley's tables, 361. By 
logarithms, carried to seconds, ib. By Mendoza*s and Shep- 
herd's tables, 363. By scales of reduction, ib. By various 
formulae, 365. Tables of minute contractions, with illustra- 
tive examples, ib. 

— occultations, table of the places of all stars not below the 
fourth magnitude that are liable to, x. 145. For the different 
places of the moon's node, 152. Computation of a visible, 161 

— tables, table of the errors of, x. 166 

for 1819, and 1820, errors of corrected, xv. 131 



Lungs, remedy for the consumption of, vi. 172 
Lycopodiacece^ observations on the structure and fructification of, 
vi. 30. 



124 INDEX. 

Lycopus Europceusy a substitute for Peruvian bark, x. 194 

Lyall (Margaret), the Sleeping Woman of Dunninald, account 

of, i. 121. 
Lyonnais, wines of, xviii. 127 

Macartney (Dr.), process of, for preserving anatomical prepara- 
tions, XV. 391 

Mac Culloch (Dr.) on the introduction of the shawl-goat into 
Great Britain^ ix. 330 

observations of, on the granite of Aberdeenshire, 

and on the identity of certain varieties of granite, with other 
rocks appertaining to the trap-family, x. 29. Geological re- 
semblance between granite and trap rocks, 40. Enumeration 
of instances in which trap-rocks'assume the essential characters 
of granite, 45. On the diallage rock of Shetland, 103. The 
manufacture of catgut strings, 267 

on the forms of mineralogical hammers, xi. 1. Notice 



of his geological classification of rocks, 21G. Two new mi- 
nerals discovered by him, 21 S. Remarks on marine luminous 
animals, 24S. On the potash to be obtained from potatoes, 
382. On the resemblance between certain varieties of granite 
and trap, 404 
— • observations of, on the varieties and formation of 



pitchstone, xii. 41. Synopsis of its varieties, 51. Simple 
pitchstone, ib. Porphyritic, 52. Concretionary spheroidal 
pitchstone, ib. Amygdaloidal, 53. On the defects of the ex- 
isting charts of the Shetland isles, 206 
— — — on the desquamation of certain rocks, and on its 



connexion with the concretionary structure, xiii. 237 
conjectures of, on the Greek-fire of the middle ages, 



xiv. 22. Observations on certain elevations of land connected 
with the actions of volcanoes, 202 

— i observations of, on mineral veins, xv. 183 

on animals preserved in amber, xvi. 41. Remarks 



on the nature and origin of that substance, 44. On an arenacio- 
calcareous substance found near Dclvine in Perthshire, 79. 



INDEX. 125 

On tlie migrations and natural history of the herring, 210. On 

the present commercial and political state of the lierring fishery, 

222 
Mac Culloch (Dr.), on the possibility of changing the residence 

of certain fishes from salt-water to fresh, xvii. 209. xix. 235 
observations of, on the concretionary and crystalline 

structures of rocks, xviii. GO 
• suggestion of, for the preservation of copper-plates, 

xviii. 1G7. Of the origin, material composition, and analogies 

of rocks, xix. 2S. 
on the means by which crabs throw off their claws, 



XX. 1. On a peculiar appearance of hoar-frost, 40. Observa- 
tions of, on the lignites, 204 

Mace, experiments on the oil of, xviii. 317 

Machinery, application of, to the calculation and printing of ma- 
thematical tables, xiv. 222 

Mackenzie (Sir George), on the theory of association in matters 
of taste, iii. 135. Illustrations of his theory, 139. Examina- 
tion of Mr. Alison's theory of taste, 141 

Mackenzie (Colin), review of One Thousand Chemical Experi- 
ments by, xii. 354. Strictures on his want of order, 356. Spe- 
cimen of his incorrectness, 35S 

Maclure (Mr.), observations of, on the geology of the West India 
islands, v. 311 

Macneill (John), observations of, on the influence of local attrac- 
tion on the magnetic needle, xv. 22 

Macrometer, directions for using, v. 225 

Madariga (Don), voyage of, down the river Meta, ii. 140 

Madder lake, notice of a newly-invented, xii. 1G9 

Madeira wines, account of, xviii. 133 

Magendie (M), observations on the memoir of, concerning the 
nutritive properties of substances not containing azote, ii. 446 

— experiments of, on the action of arteries in circulation, 

iii. 17S 

on the use of prussic acid in certain diseases, iv. 348 

notice of his physiological researches on the symptoms 



and treatment of the gravel, vi. 40 



126 INDEX. 

Magendte (M), on some recent discoveries relative to the nervous 
system, xvii. 143 

experiments of, on feeding dogs with bread, xix. 172 

Magnesia, bad effects of the incautious use of, i. 297 

fusion of, with the blowpipe, ii. 109 

-iA* — on its separation from lime, by means of a neutral car- 
bonate of potash, iii. 216. vi. 313. ix. 177 

— lampate of, vi. 322. vii. 392 

i native carbonate of, viii. 171 

. solubility of, xii. 407 

experiments on the sulphate of, ix. 407 

test for, xiv. 229 

geological notice of, xix. 83 



Magnesium (sulphuret of), experiments on, xv. 149 
Magnetic force, observations on, v. 212 

and its connexion with electrical phenomena, x. 36 1 

• — attraction, experiments on the law of, xii. 335 

— needle, recession of, ix. 425. xiv. 220. Dip of, 161. 

Deflection of, by the electric current, xx. 400 
Magnetism produced by the violet rays, experiments on, iii. 406 
' applied as a test of iron, v. 136. Morrichni's ex- 
periment repeated by Mr. Playfair, 138 
phenomena of, vi. 73. Communicable from one body 



to^another, 77. Artificial magnets, ib. Horseshoe magnets, 79, 
Process, for forming, 82. Invention and uses of the dipping 
needle, 84. Of the compass, 87. Table of magnetic variation, 
remarks thereon, and hypothesis to account for it, 89. Obser- 
vations on the decline of the magnetic needle, 169. Terres- 
trial, 371 

- by light, vii. 398. Encouraged in Prussia, and ex- 



ploded in Austria, 402 

effects of the sun's rays on, viii. 383 

impressed on metals, by electricity in motion, xi. 281. 



The force of, compared with the dip, 374 

■ observations on some new electro-magnetical motions. 



and on the theory of, xii. 74. Phenomena produced by electricity, 
126. Production of, 414. Electro-magnetic rotation, 415 



INDEX. 127 

Magnetism, terrestrial, account of Professor Hansteen's discoveries 
in, xiii. 432. Intensity of magnetic force in various parts of 
the world, 434. Effect of earthquakes on, ib. 

< by percussion in iron and steel, experiments and 

observations on, xiv. 376 

I apparent, of metallic titanium, xvii. 129. Supposed 



effect of, on crystallization, 158. Thermo-magnetism, ib. 
Influence of, on chronometers, 197, 365. Intensity, changes of, 
in ships of war, 261. xix. 333. New effects of, 276. Theory 
of, 317. xix. 122 
of an iron shell, effects of, on the rate of chronome- 



ters, xviii. 34 

influence of copper, &c. on, xix. 147. Imparted to 



iron bodies by rotation, 263. Alteration of, in an iron plate, 
occasioned by a rotation on its axis, 265. Developed by the 
act of rotation; repetition of M. Arago's experiments on, 276. 
On the mutual action of magnetic and unmagnetic bodies, 336 

Magnitude and distance, notions of, how far acquired by the sense 
of touch, iii. 3 

Maio (Signor), notice of ancient MSS. discovered by, xii. 193 

Maize, analysis of, xi. 206 

properties of the zei'ne of, xii. 402 

M'Keever (Dr. T.)on the influence of solar light on the process 
of combustion, xx. 387 

Malacolite,analysis of, xii. 329 

Malambo-bark, discovery of, i. 59. Account of its physical pro- 
perties, 61. Chemical, 63. Observations on its leading prin- 
ciples, 64 

Malays, of Batavia, character of, vi. 18 

Malformation of the heart, singular case of, i. 49 

Malic acid, the same as the sorbic, vi. 153 

MalloAv, flowers of, a test for alkali, xiv. 445 

Mammoth, remains of, discovered, v. 140 

found in Siberia, description of, viii. 95 

— . account of the remains of one found near Rochester, 

xi. 20 



128 INDEX. 

Man, physical qualities of, considered, iii. 38 
Manatee, how distinguished from the dugong, xii. 373 
Manganese metallic, properties of, v. 126 

. separation of, from iron, vi. 153, 357. Tartrate of, 

and potash, 15S 
• the acid of, experiments with, on the cameleon 



mineral, x. 175 

— analysis of the oxides of, xi. 201 

— . atomic weight of, xiii. 23. Native carbonates of, 



analysis of, 435 

> — sulphuret of, experiments on, xv. 150 

— new mode of preserving, xiii. 224 



Manufactories, new mode of warming, xix. 137 
Manufacture of Etruscan vases, observations on, xx. 1G3 
Manures, abstract of a dissertation on, xii. 332. Notice of the 

alkalino-vegetable poudrettes of Madame Dubout, 334 
Manuscripts of Herculaneura, memoir on the present state of, 

vii. 154 

ancient Latin, discovered, x. 201 

Maracaybo (lake), notice of, iii. 337 

Marble, primitive, remarks on the rock-crystal of, xiii. 231 

flexible, notice of, xx. 185 

Marbles of Athens, casts of, at Florence, vi. 178. Of Egina, 

observations on, 327 
Mar GET (Dr.), experiments of, on the saline contents of sea- water, 

xiv. 388 
March, 1824, astronomical phenomena for, xvi. 295 
Marco Polo, abstract of the travels of, vi. 273 
Margosa oil, properties of, xix. 172 
Mariegalante, island, geological structure of, v. 317 
Marine luminous animals, observations on, xi. 248 
Marsh (Mr.), experiments of, on thermo-electric rotation, xvi. 373 
Marshes, insalubrity of the air of, bordering upon the sea, xx. 401 
Martin (James), problem prepared by, vi. 131 

■ on the effects of salt as a manure, x. 69 

Martinico island, geological structure of, v. 317 



INDEX. 



Ui) 



Mary-le-bone Parish, population of, v. 309 

Massachusdls Historical Sociohj, notice of the publications of, i. 

301 
Massey's sounding-lead, superiority of, vi. 135 
Materia Medica, sketch of the history of, xiv. 359 
Mathematical instruments, notices of improvements in, iv; 384 

prize questions for 1820, v. 353 

problem, -vi. 131. Talent, extraordinary instances of, 

132 

Mattan diamond, account of, ii. 342 

Matter, laws and properties of, i. 88 

Matting, economical, notice of, xiii. 223 

Mausoleum, ancient, discovered, v. 385 

Ma WE (Mr.), observations of, on the tourmalin and apatite of 
Devonshire, iv. 369 

Maxwell (Mr.), hypothesis of, on the probable course and termi- 
nation of the Niger, i. 266 

Maycock (Dr.), geological description of Barbadoes by, xi. 10 

Maynard (Thomas, Esq.), his notice of the shepherds of the 
Landes, ii. 253 

Meadow saffron, experiments on, x. 468 

preparations of, xv. 170 

Mean specific gravity, experiments and observations on, iv. 151 

Measure, new standard of, xv. 137 

Measures, ancient models of, discovered, v. 144. Model of Romati 
measures, 382 

Measurements (astronomical), of the ancients, remarks on, xiv. 
190 

Meat preserved by charcoal, iv. 367 

by the pyroligneous acid, vii. 391 

Mechanical Science, miscellaneous intelligence, in vi. 131, 348. 
vii. 168. viii. 151, 345. ix. 171,388. x. 167,445. xi. 199, 
381. xii. 168, 402. xiii. 219,421. xiv. 220, 430. xv. 136, 
3G7. xvi. 155,367. xvii. 147, 360. xviii. 160, 379,. ..xk. 
132, 328. XX. 375. 

Mechanism of the spine, remarks on the, xiv. 380 

K 



130 INDEX. 

Meconic acid, action of, on the animal economy, xvii. 393 

Medals, ancient, discovery of, vi. 179 

. ■ Roman, discovered at Namur, notice of, vii. 303 

Medical Benevolent Society, notice of, viii. 180 

instrument, new, notice of, vi. 172 

jurisprudence, importance of the science of, iii. 34. Ob- 
jects which it embraces, ib. Remarks on the slight evidence 
frequently adduced before coroners in cases of suicide, 35. 
Suggestions for improving, in this country, 36. Uncertainty of 
the evidence of medical men, 37. Notice of the regulations 
concerning, in various countries of Europe, ib. Notice of the 
work of M. Foder(5 on Legal Medicine, 38 ; and of M. Orfila 
on poisons, 46 

Society of Paris, prizes offered by, v. 379 



Medicine, prize question in, viii. 36 1 

I miscellaneous intelligence in, x. 191, 465 

• on the use of iodine in, xii. 187. Of nitrate of silver, 

189. Of chlorine, 190 

Medicines specific, experiments to ascertain their mode of action, 
i. 290 

-action of, how caused, ii. 21 

Medico-Chirurgical Society, notice of the formation of, xii. 194 

Mediterranean Sea, evidence for the existence of one in the middle 
of Africa, i. 267 

Melania. See Sepia. 

Melania setosa, a new species of fresh-water shell, description of, 
xvii. 13 

Melida, remarkable phenomena observed in the island of, xx. 417 

Melilot, benzoic acid found in, x. 173 

Mellowing wine, new mode of, ii. 148 

Melville Island, meteorological observations on, xi. 222 

— remarks on rock-specimens from, xv. 18 

Memes (J. L., Esq.), observations of, on the solar eclipse of Sep- 
tember, 1820, xi. 26 

Memoires lit^raires de la Grande Bretagne, bibliographical notice 
of, xiii. 67 



INDEX. 131 

Memoirs for the ingenious— for the curious— and of literature, 

bibliographical notice of, xiii. 48, 291 
Memory, loss of, notices of, xx. 408 
Mental sympathy, effects of, in producing changes of functions in 

the living body, iv. 223 
Merchant ships, new principle of constructing, x. 893 
Mercurial ointment (new), account of, viii. 358 
Mercurio-pneuraatic apparatus, a new one described, i. 185 
Mercury and its compounds, account of, v. 67 

benzoate of, vi. 159. Lampate of, 323 

observations on the preparations of, in the French Phar- 
macopoeia, ix. 245 

vapour of, at common temperatures, x. 354. Properties 



of, when solid, 358 

depression of, in glass tubes, observations on, xi. 83. 



Hepatic mercurial ore from Toria, analysis of, 273 

existence of, in the waters of the ocean, xiii. 233. ledo- 



cyanuret of, and potassium, 429 

congelation of, xiv. 441 

— — fulminating, results of experiments on, xvii. 153 

oxides of, chemical history of, xviii. 291. Sulphurets of, 



292. Chlorides of, 295 

Merian (Professor), observations of, on ground ice, or the ice of 
running water, xix. 364 

Meridian, description of a method of determining the direction 
of, xix. 270 

Meroe, copy of an ancient manuscript found at, xviii. 800. Con- 
jectures thereon, 304 

Mesotype from Vesuvius, notice of, xv. 389 ^ 

Meta (river), description of, ii. 139 

Metal (fusible), metallographical application of, x. 453 

Metals, experiments on, with the blowpipe, ii. 114 

■ — observations on the course of veins of, iv. 71. Opinions 
of Hutton and Werner on the theory of, 73. Observations on 
the tenacity of, 138. Account of the nature, properties, and 
combinations of the precious metals, 240. The cooling of, con- 

K 2 



132 INDEX. 

sidered as a means of ascertaining their specific caloric and 

conductibility, 396 
Metals (new), account of, vi. Ill 

. researches on the colours acquired by, when heated, viii. 362 

on the cupellation of, ix. 183 

on the calcination of, xi. 79 ; xiii. 136, 278 

experiments on the property which some metals possess 

of facilitating the combination of elastic fluids, xvii. 138 
• preservation of, by electro-chemical means, xix. 271 ; xx. 



343. Cold produced by the combination of, 341 
Metallic surfaces, observations on some phenomena relating to 

the formation of dew on, xvii. 1 
— — vegetations, x. 181 
Meteoric iron, mass of, in the Imperial Museum at Vienna, ii. 314 

•— character of, v. 317 

> found in America, vi. 369 

— in Poland, xviii. 389 

Meteoric stone that fell near Bombay, i. 117 

-— — notice of, v. 292. Conjectures concerning their 

origin, 294 ; vi. 161. Cobalt found in one, 162 

— found in China, notice of, vii. 393 

. on the composition of, x. 189, 462 

analysis of, xii. 329, 410 

of Juvenas, analysis of, xiii. 420 

found in Poland, xviii. 389 

. fall of one noticed, xx. 184 



Meteorolites described, viii. 176 

observations on, xii. 192 

Meteorological Diary, kept at Earl Spencer's seat at Althorpe, for 
January, February, March, April, May, 1816, i. 139 

for June, July, August, 1816, ii. 216. Sep- 
tember, October, and November, 470 

. I for December, 1816; January, February, 



1817, iii. 223. March, April, and May, 419 
— June, July, August, September, October, 



and November, iv. 164, 403 



INDEX. 



133 



Metereological Diary for December, 1817 ; January, February, 

March, April, May, 1818, v. 193, 301 
June, July, August, September, October, 

and November, vi. 385 
for December, 1818 ; January, February, 



March, April, May, lS19,vii. 199,404 

June, July, August, September, October 



and November, viii. 197, 396 
for December, 1819; January, February, 



March, April, and May, 1820, ix. 219, 431 
June, July, August, September, October, 



and November, X. 144, 477 

for March, April, May, 1821, xi. 413 

for December, 1821 ; January, Febru- 



ary, March, April, May, 1822, xiii. 23G, 443 
June, July, August, September, October, 



and November, xiv. 456 

for December, 1822 ; January, February, 



March, April, May, 1823, xv, 174, 392 

June, July, August, September, October, 



November, xvi. 190, 398 

for December, 1823; January, February, 



March, April, May, 1824, xvii. 187, 398 
^ June, July, August, September, October, 



November, xviii. 197, 416 

.- for December, 1824 ; January, February, 



March, April, and May, 1825, xix. 175,373 
for June, July, August, September, Octo- 



ber, November, xx. 202, 420 
MeteorologicalJournal in India, ix. 203; in England, for 1819,209 
. one shewing the pressure of the aqueous 

atmosphere, three times in the day, ix. 135, 269 

for June, July, and August, 1820, x. 13S 

and observations at Rio Janeiro, and on the 



equator, xiv. 41. On a voyage across the Atlantic, 115. At 
Cape-Town, and at Hottentots' Holland, in Southern Africa, 244 
Metereological observations on Melville Island, xi. 222 



134 INDEX. 

Meteorological observations for one year, xii. 27. Remarks on 
(with tables) the weather and seasons of the years 1819, 1820, 
and 1821, 111 

Meteorology, prize question in, viii. 177 

— notice of various '^^experiments on, xiv. 178. Stric- 
tures on Mr. Leslie's treatise on, 175 

Meteors (luminous), notices of, v. 132. vi. 160. vii. 187, 395 

outline of a new theory of, xiii, 319. 438 

' remarks on the nature of, xiv. 447. xv. 167 

Methuon (M.), report on his memoir on crystallization, i. 123. His 
theory, 124. Detail of his facts and experiments in support 
of, lb. Corollaries deduced by, 128. Observations thereon, 130 

Miami (Capuchin Mission of), present state of, ix. 5. Sunday- 
service of the negroes there, 6 

Mica, fluoric acid found in, x. 196 

analysis of different varieties of, xiii. 160 

presence of titanium in, xviii. 392. Process for discover- 
ing, xix. 157 

Mice, preservation of grain from, xv. 140 

MiCHELLEAu (M.), extraordinary case of, and operation on de- 
scribed, vi. 47 

Micrometers, two, description of, designed and used as pyrome- 
ters, vi. 230 

— asbestos used in, vii. 369 

made of rock-crystal, account of, xii. 131 

Microscopes, single glass, notice of, vii. 368 

observations on the indistinctness of vision caused 

in, by false lights, and on the remedies for it, xvii. 202. On the 
adaptation of a compound microscope, to act as a dynameter 
for telescopes, 367 

improvements in, xix. 132 

notice of a new one, xx. 377 



Migration of birds, remarks on, xviii. 138 
Mildew prevented in wheat, viii. 154. x. 446 
Military station, Roman, discovered, vi. 174 
Milk, secretion of, in the ass, how influenced by taking away the 
foal, i. 165 



INDEX. 135 

Milk of cows, observations on the blue colour of, iii. 191 

of sweet almonds and animal milk, analogy between, iv. 393 

hint for the preservation of, xii. 406 

Millbank, account of the fumigation of the Penitentiary at, xviii. 92 

MiLLiNGTON (John, Esq.), his description of the water-ram, 
i. 211 

— — appointed professor of mechanics to the Royal Insti- 
tution, iv. 131. Analysis of his course of lectures on practical 
mechanics, 136, 321 

' evidence of, concerning the improved machinery for 



manufacturing flax, v. 32. His observations on the illumina- 
tion of streets, 177 
— report of his lectures at the Royal Institution, vi. 73. 



Observations of, on dry flax-dressing, 145 
MiLziNSKY (Count), notice of an undescribed larva, which preys 

on snails, xvii. 176 
Mimosa Pudica, remarks on, xv. 387 
Mind, gradations in the defects of, iii. 42 
Mineralogical nomenclature, remarks on, i. 242 
— chemistry, sketch of the progress of, iii. 359 ; of 

the Wernerian system, 362 ; and of M. Haiiy, 366 

■ report of Mr. Brande's lectures on, iv. 



66. Advantage of classifying minerals, 66. Strictures on mi- 
neralogical nomenclature, 69. Account of the courses of veins 
of metals, 71. Opinions of Hutton and Werner on the theory 
of, 74. Number and properties of metals, 234. Discoveries 
of Rey and Mayow, 237 ; and of Lavoisier, 238. Nature and 
properties of metallic oxides, 239. Of chlorides, 240. Ac- 
count of gold and its compounds, ib. Of silver and its com- 
pounds, 243. V. 64, 291 

hammers, observations on the forms of, xi. 1 

Mineralogy of Scotland, illustrations of, 207 

Minerals (complex). Professor Berzelius\s theory for determining 
the proportion of earth, and common metallic oxides combined 
in them, examined and disproved, i. 232. Exposure of his 
erroneous theory for ascertaining the proportions of the ingre- 



136 INDEX. 

dients of minerals Ly the oxygen, which they do not contain, 
238 

Minerals, instrument for distinguishing, v. 139 

— double refraction of, x. 168. xi. 199 

— pyro-electricity of, xiii. 430 

■ new fluid discovered in the cavities of, xv. 375. Ex- 
istence of bitumen in, 3S9 

' (new), found in Mount Vesuvius, xvii. ISO 

— extraordinary, discovered at Warwick, Orange County, 



New York, xx. 186 
Mineral substance (new), notice of, xii. 191 

■ on the existence of iodine in, xx. 173 

Mineral Waters (artificial) mode of preparing, observations on 

the analysis of, x. 217. Tests and apparatus required for, 218. 

Examination of by tests, 219. Analysis of, 222 

• on the sulphureous nitrogen in, xii. 409 

(thermal), of St. Nectaire, analysis of, xiii. 396. 

Of Montd'Or, 417 
(sulphureous), mode of estimating the quantity of 



sulphuretted hydrogen gas in, xiv. 445 

presence of iodine discovered in, xvii. 180 

analysis of those in Windsor Great Park, xx. 264 



Mineral and Mosaical geologies, comparative estimate of, xv. 108 

Mines of tin in the Isle of Banca, notice of, ii. 191. Of lead at 
Dufton, in Westmoreland, geological account of, 198 

observations on the temperature of, vii. 401 

Mining intelligence, vi. 345 

Mint (Roman), notice of, xi. 411 

Minutes, table of equivalents, for converting into space, xiii, 394 ; 
and into time, 395 

MiRBEL (M.), general views of vegetable nature by, ii. 35. De- 
velopment of the law by which different tribes of vegetables 
are distributed over the globe, ih. Local circumstances, a 
cause of the variation of temperature, 44. Effects of cold, 
heat, and light, on vegetation, 46. Botanical researches in the 
Pyrenees and Alps, 50 ; and in America, 52. On the growth 



INDEX. 137 

of lichens, 54. Of aquatic plants, 66. Baneful effects of de- 
stroying trees in a mountainous country, 57. Important results 
produced by vegetation, 58 

MiRBEL (M.), observations on the dissemination of plants, iv. 1 ; 
and on the death of plants, 7 

Miscellaneous letters, bibliographical notice of, xiii. 49. 

Missions of the Capuchins in Spanish Guayana, origin and pro- 
gress of, viii. 276. Their present state generally, 277. 

of the Caroni, journal of an excursion to, ix. 1 

Mississippi district, geological appearance, and weather of, iii. 85. 
Importance and extent of the river of, 87. 

■ — — list of the steam-boats employed on, viii. 152 

Missouri river, voyage of Messrs. Lewis and Clarke up, iii. 92, 
Account of a second voyage up, by several Americans, 93. De- 
scription of Indian warriors returning from battle, 95. Pro- 
gress of Mr. Hunt and his party from the banks of, to the Co- 
lumbia, 97; and of Messrs. M'Kenzie and others, 99 

. nitre caves of, ix. 194 

Mists, experimental inquiries into the formation of, xv. 55 

Mitchell, the blind and deaf lad, case of, i. 119 

Mitchell (Professor), on the antiquities of New York, viii. 222. 
Ancient remains of the town of Pompey described, 224. Early 
settlement of the French there, 226. Indian traditions con- 
cerning them, 227. Ancient fort in the town of Camilles, 
228. In Oxford, 229. In the Genessee country, 231. On the 
south side of Lake Erie, ibid. 

's theory of the earth, notice of, xix. 69 

Mitchley, remains of an ancient Roman camp at, described, xvi. 24 

Mitra, description of several species of, xvii. 34 

MiTSCHEKLiCH (Mr. E.), on the relation which subsists between 
crystalline form, and chemical proportions, xiv. 198, 415 

M6, or inspissated juice of tobacco, how prepared, and its uses, 
i. 191 

MoHAJiED MisiiAR, biographical notice of, xiv. 2. Account of 
his journey from Alexandria to Western Africa, 3 

MoHS (Professor), his system of mineralogy, notice of, xiv. 1^38 



1^ INDEX. 

Moircc metalliqxte, on the manufacture of, v. 368. Modification of, 

vi. 363 
Mole-cricket, on the anatomy of, xx. 329 
MoLii and Van Beck (Drs.), experiments by, on the velocity of 

sound, xvii. 266. xix. 108 
MoLLERAT (M.) on the cultivation of the potatoe, considered as to 

its produce in potash and in roots, xix. 331 • 
Mollusca, existence of salt and freshwater, together, viii. 174. 
MoNGE (M.), death of, vi. 182 
Montague-house, present state of, vii. 117 

Mont d'Or, phenomenon of the baths of, explained, iii. 174. 
Monte Nuovo, account of the rise of, in 1588, xii. 424 

Rosa, height of, ix. 196, 417 

MoNTEiTH and Co. (Messrs.), great Bandana gallery of, at Glas- 
gow, described, xv. 209 

Monthly Review^ bibliographical notice of, xiii. 307 

MoNTiCELLi (Signor) on th6 eruption of Vesuvius in December, 
1813, ii. 25-34 ; in 1817, v. 199 

and CovELLi (MM.), examination of the recejit lava 

of Vesuvius by, xvi. 180. Volcanic electricity of, 181. Erup- 
tion in October, 1822, 182 

Montpellier, notice of a calcareous rock, of fresh-water forma- 
tion, in the vicinity of, iii. 149 

Montserrat (Island), geological structure of, V. 319 

Moon, influence of on the weather, viii. 88 

notice of a volcanic appearance in the, xii. 133 

remarks on the discordance of the observations on, made at 

Greenwich and at Paris, xix. 116 ; and on the determination of 
the longitude from observations of the moon's right ascension, 
109. A rule for clearing the lunar distance from the 
effects of parallax and refraction, 117. Tables of third and 
fourth differences for interpolating the place of, 287 

MooRCROFT (John, Esq.), observations of, on the properties -and 

use of the Prangos Hay plant of Northern India, xix. 2 
MoRETTi's fulminating acid, account of, xix. 349 
MoRLAND (Mr. Samuel), the inventor of the steam-engine, xii. 193 



INDEX. 139 

MoROsi (M.), experiments of, on the force of a jet of water, ix. 171 
Morphia, process for making, iv. 159. xviii. 399 

analysis of, xvi. 283. 

test for, xvii. 170. 

meconiate of, simple mode of procuring, xx. 399 

Mortars (hydraulic), effects of slaking lime in, x. 409. Action of 

water thereon, 410. EtFects of lime on, ib. Rapidity of their 

desiccation, 411 

(common), observations on, xv. 314 

MoRYEZ (M.) on the phenomena of shadows, xvi. 371 
Mosaic art, observations on, v. 389 

Moscow, history of the plague at, in 1771, vii. 134 
Moss, a new species of, described, ii. 144 

on the structure and fructification of, vi. 22 

Motion, laws of, i. 91 

(natural), none in the upper regions, xi. 82 

™- influence of, in the direction of vegetables, xiv. 

430 
of the heart, observations on, xviii. 223 



Mountain-ash, beverage made from the berries of, xi. 394 
Mountain-barometer, description of, xvi. 277 

tallow, properties of, xviii. 187 

Mountains, cause of vegetation on, ii. 50 

table of the distant visibility of, x. 169. Notice of 

the falling of one, 199 
MouNTNORRis (Earl of), observations of, on the inscription on the 

ancient column at Alexandria, x. 1. Fac-simile and translation 

of, 6 
Mouth, organization and functions of, xix. 8 
Moving power, notice of a new one, vi. 349 
Moving rocks of Salisbury, notice of, XX. 162 
Mowee (Island), heights of mountains in, xiii. 233 
Mud of the Nile, analysis of, iv. 98 
Mud-volcanoes in the Cimmerian Bosphorus ; Professor Pallas's 

opinion on their origin, i. 246. Further conjectures thereon, 

247. In the island of Java, 248 



140 INDEX. 

Mud-volcanoes in bogs, notice of, xii. 427 

Mummy (Egyptian), account of, xix. 261 

— observations on the art of embalming among 

the ancient Egyptians, xx. 337 
Murdoch (Mr.), experiments of, on the application of coal-gas to 

the purpose of illumination, i. 72 
Muriate of baryta, case of poison from, iv. 3S2 

of iron, action of chlorine on, xv. 37S 

— of platinum, experiments on, iv. 76 

of potash in salt, x. 181 

■ of potash and soda in a mixture of, to determine the pro- 
portions of each, xx. 394. 

of strontia, baryta, and lime, composition of, xvi. 384 

■ • of strychnine, vii. 376 



Muriatic acid, action of, on alloys of tin and antimony, iii. 214 

' refractive powers of, ix. 1 S I 

— on the constitution of, at "different densities, xii. 287 

— — existence of free, in the stomach, xvii. 181 

Murray (Dr.), on the analysis of sea- water, i. 292 

his system of chemistry, character of, ii. 253 

' suggestion for increasing the safety of Mr. Brooke's 

new blow-pipe, iii. 375 
— ■ > experiments and observations on muriatic-acid 



gas, V. 171. On the relation of the laws of definite proportions 
in chemical combination, 174 

(Mr. Hugh), hypothesis of, on the probable cause and 



termination of the Niger, i. 267. On the ancient geography of 
Central and Eastern Asia, 292 
Murucuri (Capuchin mission of), notice of, ix. 30 
Muscular motion, laws of, considered, ii. 223. Nature of, defined, 
224. Theories of Haller, Whytt, and Bichat, examined, 225* 
Proofs that nervous influence produces change in, 227. Bru- 
nonian theory examined and exploded, 228. No radical differ- 
ence between voluntary and involuntary motion, 233. The 
existence of certain contractions no proof to the contrary, 237. 



INDEX. 141 

The connexion between tlie vital properties and the state of 
circulation, examined and illustrated, 24>l 
Muscular motion, inquiry into the varieties of, iii. 296. Structure 
of the voluntary organs, 29S. The extent and variety of their 
evolutions accounted for, 299. Great powers of contraction 
possessed by the muscles at the back of the neck, 300. Proof 
that it exists both in a morbid and in a healthy state, 302. 
Ordinary effects of involuntary muscles, 303. Action of the 
muscles of respiration explained, 304 ; and of the organs of 
digestion, 305. Nature of the action of the organs of circula- 
tion, 308 
Museiim,{The) a literary journal, bibliographical notice of, xiii. 304 
Mushrooms, formation and fructification of, vi. 222 
Musical instrument (new), notice of, ix. 174. xi. 384. 
Musket-balls, change of, in shrapnell shells, xvi. 163. 



Nails, experiments on the adhesion of, when driven into different 

kinds of wood, xvii. 3G0 
Napier (Mr.), remarks upon the influence of Lord Bacon's 

philosophical writings, v. 173 
Naples, notice of a cabinet of ancient glass at, xii. 430 
Naphtha of Amiano, observations on the nature of, iii. 411 

(native), properties of, ix. 408 

lamps, notice of, xix. 328 

Narcotic poisons, on the classification and treatment of, iii. 52 

and of acrid poisons, 53 
Natural History, Society, of Switzerland, notice of, iii. 194 
• miscellaneous intelligence concerning, vi. 102. 

viii. 173,349. ix. 193,411. x. 191,465. xi. 216,404. 

xii. 187, 422. xiii. 230. xiv. 235, 446. xv. 165, 3S5. xvi. 

177, 388. xvii. 175, 392. xviii. 185, 404. xix. 166, 360 
Nature, nothing light in, xi. 81 
Nausea, sense of, how produced, ii. 12 
Nautical instrument, improved, notice of, vi. 135 



14*2 INDEX. 

Nautical almanac for 1822, errors in, noticed, ix. 380 "^ 

— — vindicated from the strictures of Mr. Baily, 

xiii. 201 
■ and Astronomical Collections, ix. 149, 347. x. 145, 



412. xi. 172, 353. xii. 137, 381. xiii. 201, 353. xiv. 186, 
402. XV. 128, 351. xvi. 139, 348. xvii. 85, 295. xviii. 99, 
339. xix. 109, 281. xx. 94, 308 

eye-tube, notice of, xvii. 153 



Naval architecture, observations on, xviii. 320 

— on the formation of a society for the cultiva- 
tion of, XX. 386 

Navier (Mr.), experiments and observations of, on the mechanical 
action of combustibles, xii. 311 

Necker de Sajjssure (L. a.). Voyage en Ecosse, et aux isles 
Hebrides, xiii. 166. Qualification of the author for his work, 
166. Strictures on the Huttonian and Wernerian systems of 
geology, 170. Plan of the work, 171. Outline of his tour, 
with extracts and remarks, 171. — See Scotland. 

Needle (magnetic), notice of the changes to which it is subject? 
iv. 104. Observations of Captain Flinders on the principal 
changes to which it is liable, ih: ; and on its inclination, 106. 
Proofs that its variation is influenced by the nature of the ship's 
cargo. 111 

' . the influence of local attraction on, xv. 22 

horizontal and dipping, observations on the daily variation 

of, xvii. 128 

Negro, observations on the rete mucosum of the, xii. 125 

Neptunian theory of the earth, sketch of, xix. 72 

Nerves, on the influence of, on the sensations, i. 114 

influence of, in producing organic sympathy, considered, 

iv. 22 

■ observation on the theory which ascribes sensation to the 

agency of, ix. 106 

observations on the agency of, x. 269. Experiments and 



remarks illustrating the influence of the eighth pair of, over the 
organs of respiration and dfgestion, 292 



INDEX. 143 

Nerves, observations on the effect of the division of the eighth 
pair of, xi. 45. Reply thereto, 320 

additional facts relative to, xii. 19. Microscopical 

observations on, 127. On the diflference of the functions in 
certain nerves in the face, illustrated by their anatomy in the 
inferior animals, and by a comparison of their use in man and 
brutes, 231. Comparative anatomy of the fifth pair of facial, 
240. New arrangement of the nervous system, by Mr. Bell, 
376. On the irritation of the spinal nerves, 428 

■ of the heart, the existence of, denied by Soemmerring and 



BichS.t, xiii. 102. Asserted by Scarpa, 103. Remarks on 
M. le Gallois's account of the uses of the cardiac, 105. On the 
effects produced on the human countenance by paralysis of the 
different systems of facial nerves, 120. Examination of the 
phenomena of the nervous system, 261. Particularly on the 
temperature of the secreting processes, 274 
spinal morbid influence of, xiv. 296. On those which 



associate the muscles of the chest in the actions of breathing^ 

speaking, and expression, 381 

discovered in the foetal and maternal placenta, xviii. 323. 



xix. 294. 

additional proof that they are the source of animal heat, 

XX. 306. Supposed electric current in, 404 

Nervous influence and galvanism]supposed to be identical, ix. 261 

— and sensorial functions compared," xiv. 92. The nervous 

and muscular power capable of performing its functions after 
the sensorial power is withdrawn, 96. The nervous system the 
connecting link between the sensorium and the world which 
surrounds us, 103. Effects of galvanism on the nervous sys- 
tem, 105. On the properties and function of, in different ver- 
tebrated animals, 427 

■ recent discoveries relative to, xvii. 143 



Nevis (Island), geological structure of, v. 319 
New England, violent storm in, described, vii. 102 
Newfoundland, notice of a fragment of art discovered in, xi. 223 
New South Wales, river discovered in, vi. 1 SO 



144 



INDEX 



New York historical society, notice of tlie publications of, i. 301 

Newman (Mr. John), on a new blow-pipe, i. 65. On a new mer- 
curio- pneumatic apparatus, 185 

description of his new machine to measure a ship's way 

by the log-line, ii. 90. Account of experiments made with his 
blow-pipe, by inflaming a highly- condensed mixture of the 
gaseous constituents of water, 104. Observation on its singular 
utility, 124. Account of his improved blow-pipe, 379 

description of a mountain-barometer, with an iron 



cistern, xvi. 277 
Newry pitch-stone, observations on, xiv. 382 
Newton (Sir Isaac), table of atmospherical refractions, xviii. 

358. Remarks thereon, 359 
Nice, geology of the country around, v. 173 
Nickel, phenomena attending the process of the solution of, i. 29 
' process for separating from cobalt, vii. 181 

' process for obtaining pure, viii. 16 1 

— carburet of, xii. 173 

analysis of the ores of, by means of chlorine, xiii. 1 56 

' protoxide of, xv. 151. Deutoxide of, ibid; sulphuret of, 

ibid ; chloride and iodide of, 152 ; and cobalt, amalgamation of, 

by arsenic, xvi. 166 
experiments on the oxides of, xvii. 140 



NiEBUHR (Baron), notice of ancient MSS. discovered by, x. 201 

Niger (river), conjectures relative to the source of, i. 265. 
Opinion of Major Rennell concerning its source and termi- 
nation, ib. Hypothesis of Mr. Maxwell and M. Reichard, 
266, Of Mr. Hugh Murray and Mr. Jackson, 267. The evi- 
dence adduced by Ali Bey for the existence of a Mediterranean 
Sea in the centre of Africa, 267, v. 155. Objections to its 
supposed identity with the river Zaire, or Congo, v. 157. 

NiMMo (Dr. John), experiments and observations on the chemical 
composition of the seeds and oil of the Croton Tiglium, xiii. 62. 

Niobe, observations on the original composition of the statues of, 
and her children, v. 99 

Nitrate of strychnia, vii. 396 



INDEX. 



145 



Nitrate of silver, economical mode of preparing, ix. 405 

■ on the use of, in epilepsy, xii, 189 

■ experiments on the compound of cyanogen with, xix. 159 

(native), of soda, xiii. 436 

Nitre of plants, observations on, ix. 422 

Nitric-acid (liquid), experiments to determine the constitution of, 
and the law of progression followed in its densities at succes- 
sive terms of dilution, iv. 291 

experimental researches on, with carbonate of lime, 

vi. 250. With sub-carbonate of soda, 252. With sub-carbonate 
of potash, 254. Observations on the composition of, vii. 171 

and charcoal, action of, xviii. 180 



• — ether, on the preparation of, viii. 369 

Nitrogen of sulphureous mineral waters, observations on, xii. 409 

action of, in the process of respiration, xv. 386 

— - means of testing the presence of minute portions of, in 

certain cases, xix. 16 

Nitro-muriatic acid, observations on, i. 67. Effects of in syphi- 
litic affections, 205. How administered, 208 

Nitrous oxide, effects of, vi. 360 

Nixon (Dr.) on the effects of electricity in[aplionia, ii. 204 

NoBiLi (Mr.) on a new galvanometer, xx. 170 

Noehden (Dr.), observations of, on the meteoric stones in the im- 
perial museum at Vienna, ii. 314 

Nomenclature of mineralogy, strictures on, iv. 69 ; and on that 
of chemistry, 389. Of pharmacy, xiv. 364 

Nordhausen, researches on the sulphuric acid of, xviii. 145 

North Pole, remarks on the hazard of attempting to reach it, i. 
223. North-East passage, probability of, iv. 378. Notice of 
a new voyage of discovery to, ix. 430. Rewards for discoveries 
in the, xii. 432 

Northern Expedition, instructions for the use of the instruments 
intended for, v. 202 

Norton's Ordinale of Alchymy^ extract from, ix. 236 

Nubia, notice of Mr. Belzoni's operations and discoveries in, vii. 
344 

h 



146 INDEX. 

Numbers, developement of some curious properties in the powers 

of, V. 55 
Nutation of stars, investigation of the correction of, viii. 21 
Nutrition of plants, observations on, ii. 5. Of animals, 183 



Oak bark, substitute for, viii. 165 

Oatmeal, spontaneous combustion of, x. 454, 

Object-glass (triple), remarks on the concentric adjustment of, 
xiv. 163 

Observatory, new astronomical, at the Cape of Good Hope, ix. 391 

Ocean, hypothesis to account for the variable depth of, vi. 226 

— elevation of, xiii. 230 

Occultations (lunar), table of the places of certain stars that are 

liable to, x. 145. Table of the logarithms of the corrections in 

seconds, to be applied with the proper signs of the series, 148. 

For the different places of the moon's node, 152. Computation 

. for a visible occultation, 161 

< ■ ■ rules for computing, xviii. 343 

Odier (Dr.), bibliographical notice of, iii. 418 

Odours, theory of the origin of, x. 1 16 

(Edipus expounding the enigma of the Sphinx, description of an 
ancient gem representing, xii. 1 1 

Oersted (M.), observations of, on Schweigger's electro-magnetic 
multiplier, xvi. 123. Experiments of, on thermo-electric mag- 
netism, 126. Account of his experiments with the magnetic 
needle, 342 

' experiments of, on accelerating distillation, xix. 142 

Ohio (state), first settlement of, iii. 81. Soil and produce, 82. 
Population, ib. Geological structure of, 83 

(river), description of the cat-fishes found in, ix. 48 

Oil, production of gas from, vi. 108. yii, 313. 

— gas, advantages of, over that from coal, vii. 313. viii. 120. 
xiii. 423. 

— obtained from pumkins, vii. 370 

— painting, purple colour for, viii. 38, 38 

— of wheat, remarks on, iii, 417. 



INDEX. 



147 



Oil lamps, improvement in, xi. 381. 

— question, observations on the chemical evidence given in the, 
xi. 86, 327 

— from the seeds of the croton tiglium^ experiments and re- 
marks on, xiii. 69. Process for purifying fish-oil, 423. Oil 
for watchwork, 221. Soap, a substitute for, in setting cutting 
instruments, 221. Of turpentine rendered palatable, 441. On 
the volatile oil of bitter almonds as a poison, 404 

— experiments on, xv. 155 

— new process for extracting elaine from, xvi. 109 

— of laurel, nature and properties of, xviii. 47. On the oil of 
mace, 317 

— of wine, production and nature of, xix. 96. Properties of the 
Margosa, 172. New compounds of carbon and hydrogen, ob- 
tained during the decomposition of, by heat, 273 

Olbers (Dr.) on the easiest and most convenient method of cal- 
culating the orbit of a comet from observations, ix. 149. On 
the comet of 1819, 163 

on the elliptic elements of Pons's comet of 1819, ix. 

382. x. 416. xi. 177. On the transit of the comet of 1819 
over the sun, 182 

■ essay on comets, translated, xii. 137. On some equations 



of the first and second order which have been proposed for de- 
termining the equations of, 137. Correction of the elements of 
an orbit which has been determined, 149. xiii. 336 
■ catalogue of all the comets whose orbits have hitherto 



been computed, xvi. 149, 349. xvii. 85 

continuation of the catalogue of comets, xx. 308 



Oldys's British Librarian^ bibliographical notice of, xiii. 299. 

Curious anagram of Oldys on his own name, 300 
defiant gas, observations on the oil obtained from, ii. 166 
Olive oil, test for, ix. 185 
Olive-trees, method of propagating, v. 356 
Olivine, a new product from the gum of the olive-tree, ii. 178 
Onions, beneficial effects of salt in the culture of, x. 60 
Oolitic series of rocks in England, notice of, xiv. 149 

L 2 



148 ir/Dfi:^. 

Oolitic formation, remarkable, notice of, xix. 363 

Ophtlialmia, Indian remedy for, x. 193 

Opium, observations on the nature of, iii. 105 

• ' assuages hunger, vi. 1 1 

" British apparatus for the manufacture of, viii. 230. In- 
structions for collecting and making, 238. ix. 69 

« improved process for extracting the salt of, xii. 331 

— successful culture of English, xv. 139. xix. 141 

« — effect of the solution of, when injected into the veins of an 

hysterical patient, xvii. 145 

Optic nerves, on semi-decussation of, xvii. 259 

Optical instruments, on the indistinctness of vision caused in, by 
false lights, and remedies for it, xvii. 17, 202 

> inventions of Professor Amici, account of, xii. 398 

Optics, prize question in, x. 16S. Account of an optical decep- 
tion, 282 

Orchard-trees, cleansed by lime, xiii. 423 

'OrchidecE, description of three species of, iv. 199 

— select, from the Cape of Good Hope, described, v. 104. 

vi. 44. viii. 220. ix. 310 

Orpila's (M.) -Toxicologie Generale^ iii. 34. Plan and division of 
his work, 4a. Classification and treatment of corrosive poisons, 
47. Astringent poisons, 50. Acrid poisons, 51. Narcotic 
poisons, 53. Narcotic acrid poisons^ ib. 

Organic remaiiis, discovery of, vi. 169. xiii. 437. xv. 172 

substances, effects of the simultaneous application of 

gaseous oxygen and alkalies on xx. 388 
Organs (sentient), difference of texture in, the cause of the varie- 
ties of sensation, ii, 3. Changes in the mechanism of the 
organ of sense, 5. Of taste and smell, 6. Of touch 7. The 
seat of these sensations proved, 9. Affinity between changes 
excitmg sensations of cold and heat on the external surface, 
and those which occasion sensations of nausea and thirst on the 
internal, 13. Changes in the organs of voluntary motion pro- 
•duced by fatigue, 14. The use of stated, 17. Simple mecha- 
nical distension the cause of action in involuntary organs, 17 



INDEX. 



149 



Organs of digestion, action of, explained, iii. 305. Nature and 

action of tlie organs of circulation, 308 
Ormskirk medicine, component parts of, xviii. 114 
Ornithorhynchm-Paradoxusy some particulars respecting, xvii. 247 
Orthometer, notice of, xiii. 220 
Oswald (James), account of a singular mal- formation of the heart 

of, i. 49. Appearances on dissection, 51, Observations oa his 

case, 52 
Otaheite, state of printing at, ix. 427 
Ouachitta, notice of hot springs of, ix. 195 
Ovum (human), notice of Sir E. Home's discovery of, xvi. 321 
Owhyhee, height of the mountains of, xiii. 244 
Oxalate of potash and manganese, ix, 409. 

of iron, found as a mineral, xii. 422 

' of lime, electric powers of, xix. S3S 

Oxalic acid, decomposition of, xii. 413 

-■ tests for detecting, xiv. 234 

' presence of, in the mineral kingdom) and in certain 

plants, xix. 353 
Oxen, use of, in agriculture, ix. 218 
Oxford University, number of members of, ix. 428 , 
Oxidation of copper and silver, viii. 168 
Oxides of platinum, experiments on, iv. 76. Account of metallic 

oxides, 239 
of mercury, conaposition of, viii. 379. Of lead, volatility 

of, ib. 

of manganese, analysis of, xi. 201. Of chrome, 219 

I combinations of, with chlorine, iodine and cyanogen, xii. 



175 

— — of titanium, process for analyzing, xiii. 226 

of uranium, experiments on, xiv. 86. xvii. 136. Of nickel/ 



experiments on, 140 

of mercury, facts towards the chemical history of, xviii. 291 

■ of iron, on the separation of titanic acid from, xx. 176 



Oxyacids, new, account of, vi. 150 

Oxygen and hydrogen, compressed, notice of experiments with, 
ii. 461 



150 INDEX. 

Oxygen and sulphur, account of a new acid of, vii. 371. Results 
of -the combfnatlon of, with water, 379. On the evolution of 
light by the expansion of, 384. 

— — — gas, combined agency of, and water in the oxidation of 
iron, vii. 55. 

> and alkalies, effects of the simultaneous application 

of, and alkalies on organic substances, xx. 388 

Oxygenated water, observations on the preparation of, viii. 114 

■ — — efficacy of, in restoring white in pictures, x. 168 

Oxymuriate of lime, experiments on, vii. 182 

Oxymuriatic salts accelerate and increase the growth of vege- 
tables, X. 59 



Pacos, or red silver ore, of Peru, analysis of, xi. 273 

Paint (green), for coarse wood work, xii. 407 

Paintings, process for restoring the white in, x. 168 

■ on pottery, experiments on, xvi. 156 

Pajot des Charmes (M. C), notice of the new-coloured test pa- 
pers invented by, xvi. 380 

Palacio Faxar (M.) on the alstenia teiformis, ii. 92, Experi- 
ments made by him upon it, 93. His description of the river 
Meta, 139. Account of the earthquake of the Carraccas, 400 

Palladium, fusion of, with the blowpipe, ii. 108 

Pallas (Professor), opinion of, respecting the origin of mud-vol- 
canoes, i. 246 

Palm- wine, chemical experiments on, vii. 388 

Palotta (M.), experiments of, on parilline, xix. 163 

Palsy, case of, cured by lightning, xiii. 419 

Pamplona (province), notice of, iii. 338 

Panapana (village), notice of, viii. 261 

Pancratium, genus, review of, iii. 316 

Paper-string, notice of, vi. 140 

new substance for, vii. 371 

Papyri of Herculaneum, notice of Sir H. Davy's experiments and 
observations on, xii. 367 



INDEX. 151 

Parallax, on the calculation of, for a spheroid, x. 412 

of a Lyrse, remarks on, xvii. 264 

Parallel roads of Glenroy, observations on, iii. 132 

of Lochaber, v. 175 

Paralytic stroke, effects of, on the powers of adjustment of the 
eyes to near distances, i. 86 

Paralysis of the facial nerves, effects of, on the human counte- 
nance, xiii. 120 

Paratonn^rres, or conductors of lightning, reports on, xix. 143. 
Proper height of, for churches, powder magazines, and ships, 146 

Pargasite, anew mineral, notice of, v. 138. Its constituents, 139 

Parhelia, seen at the Cape of Good Hope, account of, xvi. 365 

Parillin6, or the salifiable base of sarsaparilla, discovered, xix. 163 

Paris, population of, vii. 197 

number of suicides in, viii. 189 

state of schools at, ix. 212 

state of its population for 1818, ix. 213. x. 202 

- table of the consumption of food in, for the year 1819, xi. 224 
Paris (Dr. J. A.), on the artificial formation of rock, vi. 170. 

Piece of plate voted to him for his scientific researches, 181. 
Communication from on white arsenic, 341 

memoir of Mr. Arthur Young, by, ix. 279 

his Pharmacologia analyzed, xiv. 359. Sketch of the 

history of the Materia Medica, ih* Errors of the French 
Pharmacopceiay 363. Remarks on watering places, ib. 
Ambiguity of nomenclature, 364. On the application and 
misapplication of chemical science, 365. Importance of diet 
to valetudinarians, 367. On the combination of medicines, 
and most efficacious forms of prescriptions, 370 ; particularly 
of pills, 372 ; and powders, 374. Analyses of several cele- 
brated quack medicines, 374 

Park (Dr. T. R.), on the laws of sensation, with a prefatory view 
of the present state of physiology, i. 141. The laws of sensa- 
tion and motion not hitherto ascertained, ib. Historic^al 
sketch of the progress of physiological researches, 144. Ab- 
stract of M. Bich^t's system of physiology, 145. Examination 



h^ 



INDEX. 



of his classification of the functions, 147. The nature of sen- 
sation defined, 152. Unreflected sensation, what, 153. Sen- 
sation the function of the nerves, 155. Refutation of Dr. Dar- 
win's hypothesis, ib. The nature of physical influence con- 
sidered, and what it has in producing sensation, 152. Ef- 
fects of vital influence in the production of, considered, 159 

Park's (Dr. T. R.) inquiry into the varieties of sensation, ii. 1. 
nature of, ib. Defects in the theories of Drs. Hartley, Reid, 
and Darwin, 2. Physical changes on the external organs of, 3 ; 
and on the internal organs, 5. On the organs of taste and 
smell, 6. On the sense of touch, 7. The rete mucosum the 
seat of, 9. Proof that the sensation awakened in any organ 
depends upon the peculiarity of that organ, 12. The use and 
end of the different varieties of, 17. Simple practical dis- 
tension the cause of the actions of involuntary organs, 22 

' inquiry into the varieties of muscular motion, iii. 296. 

Retrospect of the former paper, 297. Structure of the volun- 
tary organs, 298. The extent and rapidity of their evolutions 
accounted for, 299. Great powers of contraction possessed by 
the muscles at the back of the neck, 300. Proof that it exists 
both in a morbid and in a healthy state, 301. Ordinary effects 
of the involuntary muscles, 303. Action of the muscles of 
respiration considered, 304 ; and of the digestive organs, 305, 
Nature of the organs of circulation,308 

on the influence of corporeal impressions in producing 

change of function in the living body, iv. 13. Influence of 
painful impressions, 16. Of grateful, 20 ; and of organic 
sympathy, 21. Mental impressions, 207. Of grief con- 
sidered, 209. Of joy, 214. Of fear, 217. Of anger, 220. 
Of love, 222. Of mental sympathy, 223 

on the periodical suspension and renewal of the human 

body, vi. 1. On the cause of hunger, ib. On that of thirst, 13 

«p— observations of on the cause of sleep, vii. 238. On 
dreaming, 255. On incubus, 257. On somnambulism, 258 

Park (Mungo) probably lost his life by shipwreck, xiv. 6 

Parker's portable static lamp, notice of, xv, 143 



INDEX. 103 

Parkes (Samuel, Esq.), on the freezing of wine, i. 69 — fl^tec- 
tion of an error, by M. Vauquelin, respecting the specific gra- 
vity of diluted sulphuric acid, 70 

on the Cheltenham waters, iii. 54 

• description of the processes used in the manufacture of 

tin-plate, viii. 141 

on the progress of horticulture, x. 52. On the benefi- 



cial effects of salt in promoting the health and growth of 
vegetables, 56 ; in rendering fruit-trees and esculent plants 
unfit for the food and habitation of insects, 63 ; and also in 
destroying them, 68; as well as weeds and other noxious vege- 
tables, 70. Minute of the evidence in the Cause of Severn and 
Co. versus the Imperial Insurance Company, 327. Observa- 
tions thereon, 329. His abstract of that case, 317; and re- 
marks on the chemical evidence then given, 321, 330, 352» 
Description of an apparatus for boiling sugar, 353 
additional observation by, respecting the oil question, 



xi. 86. Reply thereto, 327. 

account of early Periodical and Literary Journals from 



1698 to 1749, xiii. 36, 289 
(Messrs.), notice of the contrivance of, for consuming 



smoke, xii. 351. Remarks thereon, 352 

experiments on economy in fuel, as connected with the 



improved method of heating steam-boilers and burning smoke, 

xiii. 58 
Parkinson and Frodsham (Messrs.), observations of, on the chro- 

nometers used in the Arctic Expedition, xii. 402 
Parrot, a new species of, described, xix. 199 
Parry (Dr.), note of, respecting his father's priority of claim con- 
cerning coincidence in opinion between him and Dr. Park» 

iv. 156 
Parry (Capt.), account of the voyage of, to the Polar Regions, 

X. 355 
account of rock specimens collected by, during his 

northern voyage of discovery, xv. 11 
Partington (Miles, Esq.), case of dumbness cured by, by means 

of electricity, xvi. 187 



154 INDEX. 

Parturition facilitated by the use of ergot, or spurred rye, ii. 66 
- symptoms of, iii. 43. 

Paste, directions for making, that will not become mouldy, xv. 141 

Passions, influence of, on the human frame, illustrated, iv. 209 

Pastora (Capuchin mission of), notice of, ix. 13. Excursion 
into its vicinity, 14 

Patent medicines, analysis of, xiv. 374 

Patter (M.), notice of a new moving power discovered by, 
vi. 349 

Pa VON (Don Jose) on the native country of the potatoe, x. 25 

Paten (M.), experiments of, on the discolouring power of differ- 
ent substances, xix. 165 

Payne (M.), new vegetable principle discovered by, xvi. 387 

Peach of China, notice of, xv. 105 

Pearl, beautiful Scottish, notice of, xii. 427 

— artificial production of, xix. 167 

Chinese mode of forming, xx. 411 

Peck (Mr.), observations of, on the sea serpent, vii. 68 
Pbckston's (Mr.) treatise on gas-lighting, notice of, vii. 318 
Peclet (M.), new process invented by, for extracting elaine from 

oils, xvi. 109 
Pelletier's (M.) observations on the venom of the common toad, 

V. 127 
— — facts and experiments by, relative to gold, x. 117. Che- 
mical researches of, in conjunction with M. Caventou, on cin- 
chonine, 388 

■ on the analysis of the active principle of pepper, xi. 398 

— . researches of, on strychnine, and on the processes em- 



ployed for its extraction, xiv. 217 

on the active principle of the upas poison, xyiii. 176 



Pendulums, importance of the discovery of, iii. 13. Problems 
and observations on those vibrating between cheeks, 14. Ob- 
servations on the length of the seconds, 158 

— — — experiments for determining the length of one (for a 
clock) vibrating seconds in the latitude of London, v. 108. 
Observations necessary to obtain the number of vibrations 
made by one during a given interval, 203 



INDEX. 155 

Pendulums, remarks on, vii. 308 

. Captain Sabine's experiments for determining the ac- 
celeration of, in different latitudes, xii. 363 
' mean length of, vibrating seconds at Madras, xiv. 170 



Penitentiary at Millbank, account of the fumigation of, xviii. 92 

Penn (Granville, Esq.) analysis of his comparative estimate of 
the mineral and Mosaical geologies, xv. 108. Supplement to, 
xvi. 309 

Pepper, factitious, remarks on, iii. 188 

Pepys (W. H., Esq.) on a new construction of the voltaic ap- 
paratus, i. 193. XV. 143. 

■ improved apparatus for the manufacture of soda-water, 
iv. 358 

Perception and idea, homogeneous nature of, iii. 6 
Perkins (Mr.), his process for engraving upon steel, ix. 125 
on the compressibility of water, x. 399 

change of fat in his engine, by water, heat, and pressure, 

xvi. 172 

contrivance of, for warming houses and other buildings, 

xviii. 336 

Peron (M.), historical notice of, ii. 294. His birth and edu- 
cation, ib» Enters the republican army, 295. Studies medi- 
cine and natural history, ib. 296. Engages in an expedition 
to the South-Seas as a zoologist, ib. Account of his re- 
searches and discoveries, 29 S. Returns to France, ib. Result 
of his labours, 301. General character of the published nar- 
rative of his voyage, 302. Notice of his unpublished works, 
303. His character, 304. Anecdotes of his integrity, 306. 
Last illness and death, 307. Analysis of the second volume of 
his Voyage de Decouvertes aux Terres Australes, 382 

Persia, mode of purifying silver in, viii. 160. Steel, how pre- 
pared there, 161 

Persulphate of iron and ammonia, component parts of, xv. 38 1 

Peruvian bark, extraordinary effects of, viii. 182 

■ substitute for, x. 194. Chemical researches on, 
388 



156 INDEX. 

Peschier (M.), researches of, on the compounds of titanium, 
xviii. 174. His experiments repeated and confirmed, 392 

»■ process of, for discovering titanium in mica, xix. 1S7. 

Observations of, on the red snow of the Alps, 106 ; and on the 
cure of the goitre, 16S 

Petiver (James), bibliographical notice of, xiii. 54 

Petrarch, copy of an original memorandum of, ix. 215 

Pharmacopoeia of the College of Physicians, observations on, v.35S 

■ remarks on the nomenclature of, xiv. 364. Errors 

of the French, 363 

Pharmacy, remarks on the state of, in France, ix. 239 

Phenomena, remarkable, observed in the island of Melida, pro- 
vince of Ragusa, xx. 417 

Phial, notice of a, for preserving volatile and deliquescent sub-* 
stances from the surrounding air, iii. 376 

Philip (Dr. Wilson) on the influence of the nerves on the 
secretions, i. 114 

" facts by, relative to the attack of, on the Royal Society, 

vii. 161. His reply to some observations thereon, 349 

on the agency of galvanism, viii. 72 

note on the experiments of, ix. 197. His observations 



on the secreting power of animals, 251, xi. 40. Repeats cer- 
tain of his experiments, 325 
^ . strictures on his theory of the nervous system, 25. 



269 
■ additional facts by, relative to the division of the eighth 

pair of nerves, xii. 17 

review of some of the general principles of physiology, 

with the practical inferences to which they have led, xiii. 96] 
comparison of the sensorial with the nervous functions, 



xiv. 92. The nervous and muscular power capable of per- 
forming its functions after the sensorial power is withdrawn, 99. 
Difficulty of explaining why respiration should cease on the re- 
moval of the brain, 9S. The nervous system the connecting 
link between the sensorium and the world which surrounds us, 
103; effects of galvanism upon the, 105. Some positions re- 



INDBX. 



157 



specting the influence of the voltaic battery in obviating the 
effects of the division of the eightli pair of nerves, 161 

Phillips (Richard, Esq.) on an anomalous case of chemical affi- 
nity, i. 80 

comparative analysis by, of the green and blue carbonates 

of copper, iv. 273 

remarks of, on Dr. Ure's experiments to determine the 

constitution of liquid nitric acid, v. 162 

— strictures on, by Ure, vi. 242. On the separation of 

lime and magnesia, 313 

— experiments of, on the carbonates of ammonia and soda 



vii. 294 

observations of, on the new French Pharmacopoeia, ix. 239 

evidence of, with remarks, in the cause of Severn and Co. 



versus the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 343 

observations of, on Mr. Parkes's remarks on the evidence 



adduced in the oil question, xi. 327. Analysis of verdigris by, 389 

' analysis of yellow copper by, xiii. 434 
experiments of, to determine the certainty of chemical ana- 



lysis, xvi. 378. On the composition of the mui'iates of baryta, 
strontia, and lime, 384 
— on the detection of arsenic in various cases of poisoning, 



xvii. 167. Analysis of his translation of the London Pharma- 
copoeia, with remarks, 349 

Phillips (W.Esq.), description of an ore of copper frompornwall, 
vii. 95. Analysis of it, 100. Letter to Dr. Ure on nitric 
acid, 171 

— — Elementary Introduction to the Knowledge of Mineralogy, 
analysis of it, xv. 320 

Philosophy and prejudice, contest between in France, iii. 269 

Phocenic acid, comparative examination of, xvi. 112 

Phosphate of strychnine, vii. 376 

of soda and ammonia, constituent parts of, xiv. 437 

of alumina, analysis of, xv. 168 

• of lime found with iron-stone in coal-beds, xx. 412. 

Process for the detection of, 175 



158 INDEX. 

Phosphorescence, experiments and observations on, xi. 399 
' of wounds, remarks on, xii. 180; and of lumi- 
nous insects, ISl 

' ' notice of phenomena of, xiii. 145. Of sulphate 

of quinia, 14G 
connexion with electricity, xvii. 163. Of ace- 
tate of lime, ib. 
Phosphoric acid, on the composition and combinations of, i. 291 

discovered in vegetables, viii. 382 

use of, in jaundice, xiii. 233 

Phosphorus, experiments on the sulphuret of, iv. 361 

new acid of, ix. 397 

• on the preparation of, x. 181 

• action of, on water, xv. 383 

Photometer (new), account of, v. 118; xix. 299 
Phthisis, on the use of prussic acid in, ix. 418 
Physicians, prospectus of the Society of, xviii. 194 
Physiology, historical sketch of, i. 143. State of this science in 
the early and middle ages, 144. Improvements made by Haller 
and others, 145. Analysis of M. Bich4t's system, ib. His 
classification of the functions examined, 147 

' of speech, observations on, xix. 8 

Phytolacca dodecandra, or the mustard-tree of the Scriptures, 

remarks on, xx. 57 
Pico-Ruivo, barometrical measurement of the height of, in the 

island of Madeira, xv. 75 
PicTET (Professor) on the spots in the sun, ii. 420 

thoughts by, on voltaic electricity, xii. 183 

" on the permanency of the human hair, xix. 168 

Pigment (green), notice of, xiii. 223. Directions for preparing, 

xvi. 385 
Pilgrimage to Mecca, account of, viii. 45. Ceremonies performed 

there by the pilgrims, 55 
* Pinhoen oil,' remarks on, xx. 59 

Piperine, a new vegetable alkali, notice of, ix. 403. xi. 398 
Pitcairn's Island, information concerning, vi. 263 



INDBX. 159 

Pitchstone, observations on the formation and varieties of, xii. 41. 
Synopsis of its varieties, 51. Simple pitchstone, ib. Porphy- 
ritic, 52, Concretionary spheroidal pitchstone, ib. Amygda- 
loidal, containing imbedded nodules of another mineral, 53 

Place, observations on the changes of, in heavenly bodies, x, 9 

Placenta, observations on the nerves of, xix. 294 

Plagnb (M.), analysis of sea-water by, viii. 167 

Plague, supposed remedy for, vi. 379 

— of Athens, as described by Thucydides, vii. 125. Opinion 

of various ancient writers relative to its contagion, 126. His- 
tory of that of Moscow in 1771, 134 

how introduced into Africa, viii. 183. Observations on 

the treatment of, 184 

remedy for, ix. 198 



Planariae, observations on, xx. 334 

Plana's (M.) researches relating to refraction, remarks on, xv. 

362 
Planets, errors of the tables of, corrected, xi. 182 

small, places of, for the year 1822, xiii. 208 

Plantain-root, a febrifuge, x. 195 

Planting through trees, mode of, xviii. 409 
Plants, experiments on the respiration of, iii. 199 
' how disseminated, iv. 1. Duration and death of annuals, 

biennials and perennials, 7. Observations on the longevity of 
particular trees, 10; and on the effect of elevation above the 
level of the sea upon the geography of plants in Fraijce, 176 

remedy for preventing injury to, from insects, vii. 170. 



Notices of various useful ones in the East Indies, 398 

geography of, defined, x. 239. History of, ib.., 240. 



On the number of known plants, and their distribution in va- 
rious parts of the world, ib. Their geographical distribution, 
241. Their social and solitary appearance, 254. AVhether, 
and in what degree, the new and old worlds possess the same, 
255. Comparative view of the temperature of both great con- 
tinents, 25G. Influence of different altitudes upon the vegeta- 
tion of, in the different zones of the earth, 202, Determina- 



160 INDEX*. 

tion of those relations of climate which are most favourable to 
any of the more common cultivated plants, 266. Singular in- 
stance of their vitality, 46S 

Plants, on the distribution of, xii. 338. Impressions of, taken 
by lithography, 405 

on the geography of, xiii. 163 

• ' — experiments on the mode of circulation of the sap in, 

xvi. 388. On their epidermis, 391. Mode of union in their 
vegetable structure, 392. On their air-vessels, ib. 

Plates (thin), chemical phenomena of, xiii. 426 

Plate-glass, purple tint of, affected by light, xvi. 164 

Platinum, how separable from other metallic substances found 
with it, in the state of ore, i. 259 

fusion of, with the blow-pipe, ii. 107 

' — experiments on some combinations of, iii. 119. Ful- 
minating, 135 

account of experiments on the sulphuret of, iv. 74. 



On the triple Salts of, 388. v. 64. Wire of ignited, 369 
lampate of, vi. 322. Native, discovered in South 



America, 376 

alloys of, vii. 385 

leaf, notice of, ix. 411 

-^ sulphate of, a test for detecting gelatine, x. 454 

process for procuring ure platinum, palladium, rho- 



dium, iridum, and osmium, from the ores of, xii. 246. Re- 
marks thereon, 256. On the oxide of, with gold, 412 

black enamel from, xiv. 229 

chromium detected in the ore of, xvi. 166. Hydriodic 



acid a test for, in solution, ib» Extraordinary experiment on 
the ignition of, by a jet of hydrogen, 179. Its action on mix- 
tures of oxygen, hydrogen, and other gases, 375 ; and its ap- 
plication to their analysis, xvii. 277. xix. 101 

Pleometer, notice of, xiii. 220 

Player (R. P.), on the morbid influence of the spinal nerves, 
xiv- 296 

Playfair (Professor), experiments of, for detei-mining the pro- 



INDEX. 161 

portion between the load and draught of horses in waggons, 

i. 18. on barometer tubes, 121 
Playfair (Professor), observations of, on some appearances on the 

sides of the mountains in Switzerland, ii. 459 
Plumbago, notice of artificial, in coal-gas retorts, xv. 159. 

fusion of, xvi. 157 

Plutonian theory of the earth, sketch of, xix. 74 

Plutonium, a new metal, notice of, ii. 120 

Plymouth, breakwater at, v. 120. Incombustible storehouse at, 354 

Pneumatic apparatus, new stop-cock for, described, viii. 347 

Pneumato thorax, remarks on a cause of, xvii. 130 

Poisons (corrosive), on the classification and treatment of, iii. 47. 

Astringent, 50. Acrid, 51. Narcotic, 52. Narcotic acrid 

poisons, 53 

(vegetable), remedy for, x. 192 

of the viper, experiments on, x. 193 

■ — detection of, xiv. 218 

poisoning by arsenic, tests for detecting, xvii. 167 

by the acetate of morphia, how detected, 168 

action of, on the vegetable kingdom, xx. 191. Relation 

of a case of poisoning by the honey of the Lecheguana wasp, 

404 
PoissoN (M.), extract of his memoir on the theory of magnetism, 

xvii. 317. xix. 122 
Poland, notice of organic remains in, xvi. 179 
Polar ice, account of the formation of, iv. 247 

seas, observations on the expedition to, v. 182 

Polarization of light, experiments on, ii. 174 
Police (pharmaco legale), severity of, xii. 331 
Polishing-powder from charcoal, xi. 203 
Polyhalite, analysis of, vi. 170 

Pombea genus, notice of, iii. 126 

Pomegranate-root, use of, as an anthelminthic, xviii. 412 
Pompeii, conjectures on the probable cause of the destruction of, 
V. 382 

beautiful vase discovered at, vii. 303 

M 



162 INDEX. 

Pompeii, successful excavation at, viii. 189. x. 202 

Pompey's pillar, the column so called, erected in honour of the 

Emperor Dioclesian, x. 6 
Pond (Mr.), Lalande's medal awarded to, v. 120 ; and that of 

the Royal Academy of Sciences at Paris, 354 

predicted and observed places of the principal stars, by, 

XV. 135 

— address to, on his receiving the Copley medal, xvi. 298. 
Observations of, on some of the changes which have taken place 
in the declination of some of the principal fixed stars, 328 ; 
and on the parallax of a, Lyrse, 329. xvii. 130 

' methodby, of determining the direction of the meridian, xix. 

270. On the annual variation of some of the principal fixed 
stars, 278 

Poppies, on the manufacture of British opium from, viii. 234 

on the culture of, ix. 70. Their juice, how to be col- 
lected and manufactured into opium, 71 

Population of Paris, x. 202. Of Sweden, ih. Of Glasgow, ih. 
Of America, 203. Of Great Britian, remarks on the change 
of, as divided into the classes of agriculturists, manufacturers, 
and non-productive labourers, 203 

Populousness of England, observations on the measure of, v. 305 

Porcelain-glaze, notice of, xi. 392. 

clay (new), vein of, discovered, xiv. 453 

Portal (M.), experiments of, on vomiting, iv. 91 

Port-Royal mountains, Jamaica, barometrical measurement of, 
XV. 70 

Portugal, remarks on the wines of, xviii. 130 

Portuguese, inhabitants of Batavia, character of, vii. 12 

Potash, tartrate of, and manganese, vi. 158. Experiments on 
nitric acid with the sub-carbonate of, 254. Calcination of, 
with animal substances, 356. Lampate of, 321 

— experiments on, vii. 387 

> . ■ — action of, on the chloride and oxide of gold, x. 119. 
Muriate of, found in salt, 181. Analysis of the chromate of, 453 

, obtainable from potatoes, xi. 382. Analysis [of 



INDEX. 163 

the ferro-prussiate of, 209 ; and of the sub-sulphate of, 
389 
Potash, constitution of the ferro-prussiate of, xiii. 147 
bin-arseniate and bi-phosphate of, on the relation be- 
tween the cr}'stalline form and chemical proportions of, xiv. 
201 ; and on the phosphate and arseniate of potash and soda, 
415. 
observations on the crystalline forms of the salts of, xv. 



282. Effects of the boracic acid upon the acid fluate of, 303. 
Experiments on the hydroxanthate of, 305. Combination of 
the chromic acid with, 310 
preparation of the saturated hydro-sulphuret of, xvii. 165. 



Crystallization of the sub-carbonate of, 167. Acid tartaro- 
sulphate of, 171. Cyanate of, how prepared, xviii. 394 
solvent property of the acid tartrate of, iii. 212 



Potassium and sodium, analysis of mixtures of the chlorides of, 

viii. 367 

iodo cyanuret of, and mercury, xiii. 429 

■ different proportions with which it can combine with 

sulphur and sulphuretted hydrogen, xiv. 213 
sulphuret of, experiments on, xv. 149. On the pre- 



paration of, 380 

Potatoe, spirit obtained from, iii. 187 

stalks, alkali obtained from, v. 122. Yellow dye ob- 
tained from their tops, 125. Native country of, 138 

• apples, alcohol obtained from, vi. 157 

— -^ sugar discovered in, vi. 354 

apples contain tartaric acid, vii. 179 

observations on the native country of the, x. 25, 470. 



xiv. 454 

the growth of, promoted by using salt as a manure, x. 57. 

On the employment of, in steam-enginss and other boilers, 
to prevent the calcareous incrustations on their bottoms and 
sides, 444 

(wild), on the native country, and cultivation of, xv. 259 

— a substitute for soap, xviii. 165. 

M 2 



164 



INDEX. 



Potatoe, cultivation of, Considered as to its produce in potasli and 
roots, xix. 331 

Potrero, or breeding-farm for horses, in Spanisli Guayana, de- 
scribed, ix. 3 

I^owders, remarks on the component parts of, xiv. 372 

Powell (Rev. Baden), on light and heat from terrestrial sources, xix. 
45,213, 216. Conclusions deducible from his researches into the 
nature of the radiant heating effects from terrestrial sources, 305 

Prangos hay-plant of Northern India, account of, xix. 1 

Pregnancy, on the signs of, iii. 42 

Frehnite found in Tuscany, notice of, iii. 394 

Premiums, list of, offered by the Board of Agriculture, vi. 137. 
For rail-road, offered by the Highland Society, 138 

for flax, offered by the Prince Regent, vii. 170. For 

Memoir on the progress of experimental physiology, 192. 
Notice of various, offered in France, 198, 371 

Preparations (anatomical), notice on the preservation of, xx. 200 

PreseiTatk>n of meat by means of charcoal, iv. 367 

of wrecked persons, experiments for, vi. 135 

of milk, direction for, xii. 406. Of cauliflowers, 

ih. ; and of fresco-painting, 407 

of grain, description of a building for, xiii. 165. 



Of steel goods, 424. Of eggs, ib. 

,_ — ^ of echini, asterise, crabs, &c., xv. 172. Of anato- 
mical preparations, 391 

Pressure and heat, action of, on certain fluids, xv. 145. Electri- 
city produced by, 368. Light evolved by, ib. 

Prevost (Professor), on the causes of the constant proportion of 
a^ote and oxygen in the atmosphere, ii. 421 

strictures on his observations on light, iii. 418 

suggestion of, for demonstrating the resistance of the 

atmosphere to falling bodies, vii. 369 

notice of the death of, viii. 195 

(Dr.), and Dumas (M.), examination of the blood by. 



and of its action on the different phenomena of life, xvi. 115 
— experiment of, on the employment of electricity in cal- 



INDKX. 



165 



culous disorders, I8->. Observations by, on tlie generation of 
fishes, xvii. 277 

Prevost and Roybr (MM.), on the digestion of ruminating ani- 
mals, xix. 1G9 

' and CoLLADON (MM.), experiments by, on magnetic rota- 
tion, XX. 385 

Price (Dr.), an alchymist, notice of, ix. 23r 

Prime equivalent numbers, table of, for the U^e of chemical 
students, xiv. 49 

Printing on stone, account of, ill. 88 

improvements in, v. "pref. xiv. xv. 138 

beneficial effect of the invention of, vii. 213 

• in Otaheite, ix. 427 

designs, notice of a new mode of, xiii. 432 

Prisons, observation on tbe construction of, iv. 169 

descriptions of an improved plan for, 170. v. 190 

Prize-questions in the arts, vi. 138. Proposed by tbe Royal 

Academy of Inscriptions and Belles Lettres, at Paris, 173. 
In chemistry, 148, 353. In medicine and physiology, 377. 

. (miscellaneous), vi. 380. viii. 168. By the Royal 

College of Surgeons, 186. In literature by the Royal Aca- 
demy of Inscription, at Paris, 193. In mathematics and geo- 
logy, by the Royal Academy at Copenhagen, 194. In astro- 
nomy, by the Royal Academy of Sciences at Naples, 345. In 
medicine, by the Royal Society of Sciences at Paris, 361 ; and 
by the Society of Practical Medicine at Paris, 362. In philo- 
logy, by the Royal Society of Gottingen, 395 

in meteorology, by the Academy at Dijon, ix. 



199. On the variation of the compass, by the Royal 
Academy of Copenhagen, 425. On'animal magnetism, by the 
Royal Academy of Sciences at Paris, ih. Literary prize- 
question at Amsterdam, 427 

in optics and mathematics, by the Royal 



Academy of Sciences of Prussia, x. 168. -; In medicine, by 
the Society de Medecine, and the Academy of Sciences at 
Paris, 195, 468; and by the Society of Sciences at Copen- 



166 INDEX. 

hagen, 19 G. In agriculture and the arts, by the Haerlem 
Philosophical Society, 445. Chemical prize-questions, by the 
same society, 466. In eloquence, by the French academy, 
474 

Prize-questions by the Society of Sciences and Arts at Utrecht, 
xi. 385. By the Royal Academy of Sciences at Paris, 409. 
By the Societe Medicale d'Emulation, 410. By the Helvetic 
Society of Natural Sciences, ib. 

. by the Society of Apothecaries at Paris, xii. 179. 

By the Academic Society of Nantes, 190. By the Society 
of Sciences and Arts at Mentz, 405. By the Royal Academy 
of Sciences at Toulouse, 405. By the Academical Society of 
the Lower Loire, 430. By the Royal Society of Medicine at 
Marseilles, 430. 

remarks on, xiii. 151. Astronomical, of M. 



Lalande, 422. Of the Academy of Sciences, 430. Ana- 
tomical prize-question, 442. Jacksonian prize -question of the 
Royal College of Surgeons, 442 

mathematical, by the Royal Academy of Sciences 



of Prussia, xiv. 431 

on the magnetism of the solar rays, xv. 163 

— ■ by the Royal Academy of Sciences at Paris, xvi. 



177; xviii. 192; xix. 269 

— — by the Geographical Society, xviii. 193 

by the Royal Academy of Sciences at Toulouse, 



xix. 165 

notices of, xx. 168, 418 



Probabilities, on the application of the calculation of, to natural 

philosophy, i. 120 
Proceedings of the Academy of Sciences of the Royal Institute of 

France, ii. 179. iii. 146. iv. 84, 102, 364. 
Projects (useful), observations on, vii. 48 
Propagation of heat, laws of, xii. 180 
protoxide of copper, analysis of, vii. 181 
pROUT (Dr.), remarks on his calculation of the weight of atoms, 

xiii. 322 



INDEX. 167 

Prout (Dr.), on the changes which take place in the egg during 

incubation, xiv. 385 
on the existence of free muriatic acid in the stomach, 

xvii. 181 

, on the nature of the acid and saline matters usually ex- 



isting in the stomachs of animals, xviii. 142 
analysis of a calculus by, xx. 49 



Provence, wines of, xviii. 128 

Prussian blue, on the nature of, ix. 179 

discovered in urine, xvi. 177 

Prussiates, experiments and observations on the composition of, 
xi. 208 

(triple), experiments on the acid of, xvi. 102 

. of iron, a cure for intermittents, xvii. 145 

Prussic acid and base, experiments on, i. 288 

experiments on, to show its deleterious properties, iv. 

349. Successfully applied in cases of chronic and nervous 
coughs, 352 ; and of phthisis pulmonalis, 355. ix. 418 

Scheele's process for making, x. 401. Vauquelin's, ib. 



Majendie's, 402 ; and the apothecaries vindicated, 402 
salivation and ulceration of the gums produced by, 



xii. 428 
. specific gravities of, xiii. 312. Test for ascertaining 

its purity, 313. Proper state of it for medicinal use, 440 
P^«7/flcw5 jPie/c/«, description of, xix. 199 
Pteroglossus, genus of birds, two new ones described, ix. 266 
Publications (new), select list of, i. 313, (foreign) ii. 219. iii. 

236, 422. iv. 167, 401. vi. 189, 388. vii. 201, 405. 

viii. 199, 397. ix. 220, 432. x. 208, 478. xi. 225, 412. 

xii. 195, 433 
Puedpa (Capuchin mission of), state of, ix. 16 
Puget's head of the Saviour discovered, v. 389 
Pulmonary consumption relieved by the vapour of tar, v. 380 
Pumpkins, oil obtained from, vii. 370 
Pumps, cast-iron pipes recommended for, xiv. 352 
Purace volcano, account of, xviii. 404 



168 INDEX, 

Purity of flour, directions for ascertaining, vii. 370 

Purple colour (new) for oil painting, vii. 3S0. Of Cassius, new 
mode of preparing, 385 

Purpuric acid, directions for preparing, viii. 373 

■ note on, xvi. 104 

Puzzolana (artificial), mode of preparing, xviii. 381 

Pyramids, researches among, vi. 176 

Pyrenees, botanical researches in the, ii. 50 

Pyrites, chemical composition of the white efflorescing, xiv. 208 

Pyro-citric acid, properties of, xiv. 423. Its constituent parts, 436 

Pyro-electricity of the tourmaline, vii, 397 

of minerals, xiii. 430 

Pyroligneous acid, antiseptic properties of, vii. 397. x. 173. Pu- 
rification of, ib. 

" proved not to be discovered by the French, 

viii. 3G8 

ether, properties of, xiv. 436 

preparation and analysis of, xvii. 171 



Pyrometer, description and uses of a new one, xi. 309. New 

material recommended for, xiii. 427 
Pyromucous acid, preparation and analysis of, vii. 179 
Pyrophorus obtained from the tartrate of lead, xvi. 385 



Quack medicines, analyses of, xiv. 374 

Quartz, phaenomena attending the process of the solution of,i. 29 

• • analysis of crystallized stalactitic, xv. 169 

• • peculiar fracture of xviii. 167 

Quassia simarouha^ analysis of the bark of, xiii. 416 

QuiNCY (M. Quartremere de), letters of, on the Elgin marbles, 

and the sculptures of the Temple of Minerva at Athens, vii. 21 
Quinia, process for obtaining, [xii. 325. Its use in intermittent 

fevers, 327 

— analysis of, xvi. 283 

sulphate of, how prepared, xix. 162 



INDEX. 



169 



R, observations on the defective pronunciation of the letter, 

iii. iro 
Radiation of heat in the atmosphere, xviii. 305 
Raffles' (Sir T. S.) account of the Sunda Islands and Japan, 

ii. 190 
Rakinesqub (C, S.), description of the silures or cat-fishes of the 

Ohio, ix. 48 
Rail-road, premium^for essay on, vi. 138 
Rain, temperature of, in Paris, ii. 448 

extraordinary fall of, v. 136. Account of rain of earthy 

matter at Naples, 370 

(coloured), notice of showers of, vii. 189. ix. 201 

fall of, in the tropics, xv. 167 

quantity of, which falls at different heights, xix. 173 

Rainbow, theory of the, vii. 168 

observations on, x. 19 

Ramond (M.), result of his botanical researches in the Pyrenees, 
ii. 51 

Ramsam (forest of), account of a salt lake and mud hillocks in, 
i.257 

Ramsden's dividing engine, report on the present state of, xii. 3S1 

Rana^ on the urinary organs and urine of two species, xii. 130 

Rattle-snake skeletons, discovery of, xiii. 438 

Ray, botanical discoveries of, x. 54 

Rays composing the solar spectrum, account of, v. 77 

Reaping of corn before it is perfectly ripe, benefit of, x. 447 

Red cabbage, colour of, to preserve, xviii. 402 

Redoute (J. P.), systematic view of the plants contained in his 
LiliaccSi i. 169 

notice of his work on Roses j iii. 417 

Red snow of the Alps, analysis of, ix. 199 

. early appearance of, x. 199. Experiments on, 395 

Red-ware, new glaze for, xv. 142 

Reflecting telescopes, mode of protecting the specula of, xv. 52 

— inferiority of, when compared with refrac- 
tors, XX. 288 



170 INDEX, 

Reflectors, earthenware, notice of, x. 170 

Refraction (double), on the communication of, to glass and other 
hard and soft substances that refract singly by mechanical com- 
pression and dilatation, i. 293. ii. 460 

— — refractive powers of muriatic acid, ix. 181 

(double), of minerals, x. 168. xi. 199. Observations 

on atmospherical, 353 

elements of a table of, deduced from observations only, 

xiv. 189 

empirical elementsof a table of, xv. 128. Remarks 

on Mr. Plana's researches relating to, 362 

comparison of the new tables of, with observations on 



astronomical refraction, xvii. 130 

Register thermometer, form of, iv. 43. A new principle sug- 
gested for it, 44 

Regla (Count de), description of coal found on the estates of, 
xix. 27 

Regnier (M.), ductilimetre of, described, xiv. 221 

Rein-deer successfully brought to England, xii. 427 

Rennel (Major), on the probable course and termination of the 
river Niger, i. 265 

Rbnnib (George, Esq.), account of the mineral springs of Caldas 
de Rainha, v. 60. Description and measurement of the aque- 
duct at Alcantara, 281 

' remarks of, on the design for London Bridge, xvi. 28 

Repeating-circle, directions for using, v. 213 

* Republique de Lettres,' notice of, xiii. S7 

Repulsion and attraction without electricity, phenomena of, ii. 

427 
exerted by heated bodies at sensible 

distances, xx. 164 
Resin (Indian), experiments on a new species of, iii. 113 
Resinous bodies, electrical conducting power of melted, xviii. 403 
Resistance of air, as determined from Captain Kater's experi- 
ments on the pendulum, xv. 351 
Respiration, action of the muscles of, explained, iii. 304 



INDEX. 171 

Respiration, influence of the eighth pair of nerves on the organs 

of, illustrated by experiments and remarks, x. 292 

how to put a stop to, by the brain, xiv. 98 

Rete mucosum, the seat of touch, ii. 9 

— of the negro, observations on, xii. 125 

Retina, insensibility of, xix. 368 

Retinasphaltum discovered in the independent coal formation, 

xi. 221 
Retorts for gas, observations on, vi. 71 
Rbvbro and Boussinqoull (MM.), account by, of the different 

masses of iron found on the eastern Cordillera of the Andes, 

xvii. 394 
Rey (M.), notice of the mineralogical discoveries of, iv. 237 
(Jean), bibliographical notice of, xi. 74. Essays of, on the 

calcination of metals, 76, 260. xii. 54, 294. xiii. 136, 

278 
Reynold's (Dr. P. G.), outline of a new theory of meteors, 

vii. 319 
Rhenish wines, account of, xviii. 130 
Rhinoceros, skin of, musket-shot proof, vii. 196 
■ account of a new species of, found in South Africa, 

xi?. 163 
Rhubarb, analysis of, x. 288 

. vegetable alkali discovered in,xvi. 172 

Richland (M.), experiments and inquiries of, on the respiration 

of plants, iii. 199 
Richer AND (M.), on a surgical operation, in which parts of two 

ribs and of the pleura were removed, vi. 47 
Rider (Mr. Job.), description of the rotatory steam-engine in- 
vented by, xvi. 267. Remarks thereon, 269 
RiDOLFi (Marquess of), on a method of separating platina from 

other metallic substances, which are found with it in the state 

of ore, i. 259 ; and on the native caustic lime of Tuscany, 

260 
• — notice of the improvement of Woulfe's apparatus by, 

xii. 179 



17^ INDEX. 

RiGAUD DE l'Isle (M.), memoir of, on the Aiia cattiva, near 
Rome, iv. 87 

Right hand, why used in preference to the left, ii. 123 

• ' line, geometrical process for the division of, xviii. 157 

Ring-worm, lime-water a cure for, "xiv. 238 

Riode Janeiro, remarks on the climate of, xiv. 41. Meteorolo- 
gical journal kept at, 42 

Rio de la Plata, extraordinary rise of the xx. 183, 414 

Ripley's "Compound of Alchymie," extract from, ix. 231 

Ritchie (William), account of a new photometer by, xix. 292 

Rive (M. de la), notice of electro-magnetic instruments invented 
by, xii. 184 

Rivers, observations on the junction of the fresh water of, with 
the salt waters of the sea, ii. 298 

' on the formation of ice at the bottoms of, v. 268 

Rivesaltes, vineyards of, xviii. 128 

Robertson (Anthony, Esq.), evidence of (with remarks) in the 
cause of Severn & Co. against the Imperial Insurance Com- 
pany, X. 325 

RoBiQUET (M.), process for making morphia, iv. 159 

-« experiments of, on the nature of Prussian blue, ix. 179 

•« . observations of, on aroma, x. 109 

•' — notice of the speculations of, on the constitution of the 

ferro-prussiate of potash, xiii. 147 

experiments of, on the volatile oil of bitter almonds, 



XV. 155 
Rochester, account of a mammoth found near, xi. 20 
Rock crystal of primitive marble, observations on, xiii. 231 
Rocks, artificial formation of, vi. 170 

* on the geological structure of, xi. 216 

' on the desquamation of, xiii. 237 

' specimens of, from North America, account of, xv. 1 1 

' of Lake Superior, observations on, xviii. 1, 228. Lami^ 

nated, foliated and schistose, structures of, 60. Prismatic and 

columnar structures, 63. The spheroidical, C&. The porphy-* 

ritic, granular, and araygdaloidai, 73 



tNiDEX. 173 

lioclis, constituents of, xix. 28. Consolidation of, 32. Different 
rocks, and the modes of their consolidation, 38. On the ge- 
neral causes of consolidation, 43. Analogies among, and their 
resemblance to unconsolidated strata, 200. Formation of con- 
glomerate, 208. Transitions among, 212. Natural transfer- 
ence of, and stones, 3G0 

• (moveable), of Salisbury, xx. 162 

Rocking-stone at Savoy, Massachusetts, notice of, xix. 362 

RoGKT (Dr.), explanation of an optical deception by, xix. 298 

Roller pump, notice of a new one, v. 356 

Roman station discovered, v. 383. vi. 174. Cemetry, notice of, 
ib. Villa at Bignor, 175. Pavement, 176. Coins, ISO. An- 
cient bridge discovered in Holland, 383. 

Ronalds (F., Esq.), account of an atmospheric electrometer, ii. 
249. Electric experiments by, on Vesuvius, in June and 
July, 1819, xiv. 333 

Rooms, on the ventilation of, xiii. 113 

Roots of affected equations, investigation of the methods used for 
approximating to, xiv. 353 

RoscoE (William, Esq.), discourse of, on the origin and vicissi- 
tudes of literature and the arts, v. 1. The causes of such vicis- 
situdes stated, 4. Observations on the studies of literature, as 
distinguished from the arts and sciences, 13 

Rose (M. G.), observations of, on felspar, albite, labradore, and 
amorphite, xvi. 106 

notice by, on the composition of aerolites, xx. 185. On the 

combinations of antimony with chlorine and sulphur, 296 

Rose (Mr. H.), on titanium, and its compounds with oxygen and 
sulphur, xvi. 97. Further experiments on titanium, 381. 
Titanates, 332. Sulphuret of titanium, 382. On the influ- 
ence of tartaric acid in certain cases of analysis, 107. On the 
solubility of substances induced by the tartaric acid, 379 

Ross (Mr.), new porcelain glaze invented by, xi. 392 

Rotation electro-magnetic, historical statement respecting, xv. 
288. Alteration produced by, on the magnetism of iron plates, 
253 



174 INDEX. 

Rotation (magnetic), notice of experiments on, 385 

Roussillon, wines of, xviii. 128 

Royal Institution of Great Britain, notice of the descriptive cata- 
logue of British specimens deposited in its geological collection, 
i. 138. Plan of Mr. Brande's extended and practical coarse of 
lectures, and demonstrations on chemistry there, 307 

— — notice of lectures at, ii. 465 

' account of the rise and progress of, iii. "pref. i. 

Objections against it answered, iii. Sketch of the benefit con- 
ferred on science by it, ib. Chemical science, iv. Mechanical 
science, v. Services of Count Rumford, vi. Brilliant disco- 
veries of Sir H. Davy, vi. xiii. Notice of the lectures on mine- 
ralogy, chemistry, mechanics, botany, and the fine arts deli- 
vered at, xiii. xvi. ; and of its library, xiii. Future objects and 
prospects of, xviii. xxiii. List of its members, iii. 224 ; and of 
the donation to the library, 233 ; and to its mineralogical collec- 
tion, 235. Sketch of an introductory lecture to a course of 
mineralogical and analytical chemistry, delivered at, 358 

. proceedings of, iv. 131. Improvements in its 



collection of machines and models, 132. Scientific meetings 
held at, 133. Experiments on freezing water, ih. Account of 
Mr. Bramah's patent lock, 135. Experiments of M. Biot, on 
the polarization of light, ih. Notice of machines, &c., pre- 
sented to, 135 ; and of the courses of lectures delivered, 136. 
Analysis of Professor Millington's lectures on practical me- 
chanics, 136. Plan of Professor Brande's courses of chemical 
lectures, 143 ; and of the lectures for the next season, 385 
— • present state of, v. pref. xx. List of new mem- 



bers, xxi. ; and of books presented to its library, xxii. 
notice of lectures at, vi. 385. See Brande and 



Millington^ vii. 355. Report of the visiters, ih. 356. List of 
books presented to, 356 ; and of members newly elected, 361 
proceedings of, in 1824. xvii. 281. Syllabus 



of the various courses delivered there, 282. List of its officers, 
282. Terms of admission, 291. Report of the visiters, 292 
Royal Society of Edinburgh, proceedings of, i. 1 17, 2^2. ii. 206, 
459. iii. 132, 374 



INDBX. 175 

Royal Society of London, i. 113, 290. ii. 204, 457. iii. 129, 
372. iv. 130, 3G2. v. 168, 351. vi. 343. vii. 160, 162. 
viii. 337. ix. 148, 346. x. 378. xi. 118. xii. 119, 122, 300, 
360. xiii. 142, 317. xiv. 356, 160. xv. 164, 262. xvi. 297. 
xvii. 122, 250. xviii. 136, 323. xix. 98. xx. 296 

Ruby glass (ancient), composition of, xvii. 167 

RuMFORD (Count), notice of his discoveries, iii. 6 

Ruminating animals, experiments on the digestion of, xix. 169 

RuMK£R (Charles), re-discovery by, of Encke's triennial comet, 
XV. 132 

■■■ catalogue by, of the stars in the comet of Encke, xix. 

110 

Rupert's drops, new method of exhibiting the force of, vii. 371 

Russian voyage of discovery, vi. 180 

Rust of iron, on the presence of ammonia in, xvi. 380 

— — — — — preservative against, xx. 396 

Rutherford (Dr.), death of, ix. 214 

Rye, experiments on the clavus or ergot of, ii. 61. Effects of 
spurred rye on the human system, 62. First used as a medi- 
cine in America, ib. Notice of cases in which it was 
exhibited, 63. Its efficacy, 6G, Proofs that the clavus or 
ergot is a species of scleroticum, 273. Discordant opinion 
in France on that subject, 321. Its physical and chemical pro- 
perties, 322. Experiments of M. Vauquelin on the ergot of, 
323 



Saba island, geological structure of, v. 32 1 

Sabine (Captain), account of the Esquimaux who inhabit the west 
coast of Greenland, vii. 72. His observations on the actual 
results of the late voyage to the North Pole, 93 

Sir Godfrey Copley's prize-medal awarded to, xii. 300. 

Sit Humphrey Davy's address on the occasion, 302. Account 
of his experiments for determining the acceleration of the pen- 
dulum in different latitudes, 363 



176 INDEX. 

Sabine (Captain), notice of his experiments to ascertain the 
amount of the dip of the magnetic needle in London, xiv. 161 

■ details by, of a barometrical measurement of the Sugar- 

loaf mountain at Sierra Leone, xv. 67 ; of the mountain-house 
at Ascension, 69 ; of the block-house at Fort-George, Trini- 
dad, 70 ; of Port- Royal mountains, Jamaica, ib. ; of the height 
of the Pico Ruivo in the island of Madeira, 75 
■ on the temperature at considerable depths of the Carib- 



bean Sea, xvii. 126. Comparison of barometrical measure- 
ment with the trigonometrical determination of a height at 
Spitzbergen, 268 "* 

analysis of his work on experiments to determine the 



figure of the earth by means of the pendulum vibrating seconds 
in different latitudes, and on various other subjects of philoso- 
phical inquiry, xx. 141 

Sabrina island, account of the formation of^ ix. 414 

Safety-lamps, account of Sir H. Davy's for coal-mines, i. 1. Proof 
of their beneficial effects, 131, 302 

— — observations on, v. 6. Applied to the Argand lamp, 

124. Account of his ignited wire-lamp, 128 

Salamander (aquatic), the general process of the reproduction of 
the members of, described, xvi. 84. Variations in that process, 
89. Comparison of the process in different animals possessing 
this power, 92. General observations, 94 

Salifiable base, account of a new one, xii. 177 

Salisbury (R. T.), observations of, on the coniferous plants of 
Kaempfer, ii. 309 

Saline crystallization, remarks on, v. 106 

Salivation, extraordinary instance of, iii. 402 

Salmo Eperlanus of Linnaeus, analysis of, xiii. 416 

Salt (Mr.), copy of an inscription by at Alexandria, x. 7. Notice 
of his researches in Egypt, 475 

Salt, phenomena of the solution of, i. 24. Account of salt-mud 
in the village of Kuhoo, 256. Lake in the forest of Ramsam, 
257 

— notice of a mountain of, in Spain, ii. 153 



INDEX. 177 

Salt, benefit of, in feeding cattle, v. 146. Its medical properties, 
381 

beneficial effects of, in promoting the growth of vegetables, 

X. 58. In rendering fruit-trees or esculent plants unfit for the 
habitation of worms or insects, 53, and also in destroying 
them, GS; as well as weeds and other noxious Vegetables, 70» 
Premium offered for experiments on the effects of, as a manure, 
72. Muriate of potash found in, 181. Found in two volca- 
noes in Tartary, 197. A remedy for mildew in wheat, 446, 
A preventive of dry-rot, 448 

- on the contamination of, for manufacturers, xii. 1G9 

found on the shore of the Severn, notice of, xx. 201 

new quadruple, notice of, xvi. 384 

Salts, action of, on chloride of gold, x. 118 ; and of soluble and 

insoluble salifiable bases, 119. Of uranium, experiments on, 

xiv. 86. Action of salts on turmeric paper, 234. Artificial, 

observations on the primitive forms of, xv. 282 

San Antonio, Capuchin mission of, described, viii. 266 

Sanda, one of the Orkney isles, ancient remains discovered at, 

vi. 175 
Sand-drigs, observations on, xviii. ISl. 

Sandwich Islands, state of, ii. 72. Improvements effected by 
their sovereign, Tamaahamah, 73. Account of his residence 
and mode of living, 76. State of society in the, ib. Trade of 
the islanders, 78. Their military force^ ib. 
San Felix, Capuchin mission of, notice of, ix. 2G 
San Joaquin, Capuchin mission of, notice of, ix. 26 
San Miquel, Capuchin mission of, notice of, ix. 26 
Santa Cruz (island), geological structure of, v. 313 
Santa Maria, a Capuchin mission in Spanish Guayana, present 

state of, viii. 283 
Sarcophagus (ancient), notice of, v. 385 

Sarsaparilla, salifiable base of, discovered, xix. 163. Its pro- 
perties, 164 
Savages and Europeans, results of the comparative strength of, 
ix. 213 

N 



178 INDEX. 

Saxon antiquity, discovery of, v. 147 
Scald head cured by supertartrate of potash, iii. 403 
Scales of iron, composition of, xviii. 387 
Scarlet-fever, preservative against, xi. 407. xii. 428 

- chlorine a remedy for, xvi. 395 
Schmalcalder's patent portable theodolite, described, vi. 65 
Schools (Lancasterian), progress of, in Spain, Portugal, and Den- 
mark, ix. 212. Of mutual instruction at Paris and in France, 
progress of, ib. 
ScHUBLER (M.), researches of, on atmospheric electricity, ii. 406 
Schweigger's electro-magnetic multiplier, observations on, xvi. 

123. Notice of insects discovered by him in amber, 393 
Science, consideration of the advancement of, as connected with 
the rise and progress of the Royal Institution, i. pre/, xxiii. 

intimate connexion of, with the useful arts, illustrated, 

V. 215 
. (foreign), progress of, xvi. 97 



Scientific Journals (foreign), analytical review of, ii. 151, 415. 

iii. 179, 222, 396,419 
books, X. 393. xvii. 105, 335. xvi. 134,301. xiv. 

142. Conybeare's and Phillips's Geology and Wales, 142. 

Mr. and Miss Lowry's Conversations on Mineralogy, 154. 

Transactions of the Royal Society for 1822, Part I., 161 ; 

Part IT., 375. Leslie's Treatise on Meteorology, 173. Paris's 

Pharmacologia, 359. Cleaveland's Treatise on Mineralogy, 391 
. questions proposed by the Royal Academy of Sciences 



at Brussels, viii. 194. See Prize Questions. 
Scissors, improvement on, ix. 173 
Sclerotium^ a genus of fungi, account of, ii. 273. The clavus or 

ergot of corn proved to be a species of, 275. See Rye and 

Wheat. 
Scoresby (Mr. W.), observations of, on Greenland or Polar ice, 

iv. 247 

announcement of a new work by, 268 

— experiments and observations on the developement of 

the magnetical properties of steel and iron, by percussion, xiv. 



INDEX. 179 

376, xvii. 254. General results of observations by, on the 
dipping-needle, 104- 
Scotland, illustrations of the mineralogy of, x. 207 
> remarks on the polemical discussions of the geologists 

and geognosts of, xiii. 167. Geological structure of the country 
round Edinburgh, and on the banks of the Firth of Forth, 171. 
Scenery of Argyleshire delineated, 181. Geology of the isle 
of Arran, 182 ; and of the Hebrides, 192. General view of 
the geological structure of, 193 
Scott (Dr. H.) on the arts of India, i. 195. Effects of nitric 
acid taken internally, and used as a bath for various diseases, 
197. Certain diseases unknown in the tropics, 198. His sub- 
stitute for nitric acid, 203. Its effects in syphilitic affections, 
205. His mode of administering it, 208 

■ on the arts of India, ii. 07. Account of the Indian ope- 
ration for the cataract, 68 

Scott (H. Esq.^, particulars by, respecting the Ornithorhynchus 

Paradoxus^ xvii. 254 
Scrofula, on the use of iodine in, xii. 243 
ScRooPE (G.P. Esq.) on the geology of the Paduan, Vicentine, 

and Veronese territories, xiv. 16 
— account of the eruption of Vesuvius in October 1822, 

XV. 175 

■ considerations of, on volcanoes, xx. 356 



Sculptures of the Temple of Minerva at Athens, remarks on, vii. 
22 ; and on those of the iEgina marbles, 229 

Scutellearia Lateriflora, a remedy for hydrophobia, x. 194 

Sea, the cause of the diminution of its temperature on approaching 
land, considered, iii. 368 

observations on the freezing of, when rough, iv. 250 ^and in 

sheltered situations, 251 

elevation of, xiii. 230. Encroachment of, in America, 231 

Caribbean, temperature of, at considerable depths, xvii. 126 

Sea-horses, account of, vi. 297 

Seal, fact in the natural history of, xvii. 263 

Sea-serpent, supposed to be seen near Boston ia America, evi- 
dence concerning, iv. 378 

N 2 



180 INDEX. 

Sea-serpent, notice of, vi. 163. vli. 68 

Sea-water, on the analysis of, i. 292 

— — — apparatus for raising up from certain depths described, 

V. 227, 23 1. On the use of distilled, 380 
— — — apparatus for distilling, vi. 147 



• analysis of, viii. 167 

curious effect of, on cast-iron, xii. 407 



experiments on the saline contents of, xiv. 388 

Sea-weeds, observations on the formation and fructification of, vi. 
211 

Seconds, table of equivalents for converting into space, xiii. 394 ; 
and into time, 395 

Secretions, on the influence of the nerves on, i. 114. On the in- 
fluence produced upon the secretion of milk in the ass by taking 
away the foal, 165 

Secreting power of animals, observations on, ix. 251. xi. 40 

Secret writing, requisites of, x. 89. Of the Spartans, 90. Ob- 
servations on Lord Bacon's rules for, ib. New system of, pro- 
posed, with remarks, 91 

remarks on, by means of ciphers, xii. 21. Easy 

and secure method of, 292. xiii. 136. xix. 140 

Seebbck (M.), new experiments of, on electro-magnetic action, 
XV. 374 

Seed (grain), improvement in, vi. 351 

Seeds, preservation of, xviii. 411 

Seine (river), purification of the water of, xiii. 423 

Selden (Mr.), anecdote of, vii, 261 

Selenium, notice of, xi. 386 

. discovered in the volcanic rocks of the Lipari, xviii. 173 

from Anglesea pyrites, analysis of, xix. 151 

found in the sulphur of the Lipari islands, xx. 174 

Sementini (II Cavalier), observations of, on the use of nitrate of 
silver in medicine, xii. 189 

Senna, the active principle of, discovered, xi. 398 

Sennaar, account of the country of, xviii. 302 

Sensation, on the laws of, (See Park, Dr. T. R.) 

•^ensation experienced at great altitudes, xv. 386 



INDEX. 181 

Sensitive plant, remarks on, xv. 387 

Sensorial and nervous functions compared, xiv. 02 

Sepia, experiments on the black principle of, xx. IS I 

Seppinqs (Sir R.), the Copley medal voted to, vi. 3ii 

on a new principle of constructing merchant ships, 

X. 393. 
Sepulchre (ancient), discovered, notice of, v. S84» 

(druidical), notice of, xi. 412 

Serpents, account of a new species of, discovered in the Antilles, 

ii. ISl 

fascinating power of, accounted for, vi. 374 

Serrulas (M.), observations of, on a new compound of iodine 

hydrogen and carbon, xv. 297 
process of, for obtaining cyanuret of iodine, xviii. 

173 
Severn and Co. (Messrs.), observations on the chemical part of 

the evidence given upon the trial of the action by, against the 

Imperial Insurance Company, x. 316 
Severn, geology of the river, xx. 413. Notice of salt found on 

the shores of, 201 
Sewell (Mr.), on a new method of treating chronic lameness in 

horses, iii. 373 
Shadows, on the phenomena of, xvi. 571 
Shaw (John, Esq.), See Facial Nerves and Paralysis, 
Shawl-goat, account of attempts made for the introduction of, 

into Great Britain, ix. 330. Account of the habits, treatment, 

and produce of these animals, 339 
Shell, effects of the induced magnetism of an iron one upon the 

rates of chronometers, xviii. 34 
Shells, analysis of Lamarck's genera of, xiv. 67, 298. xv. 22, 

216. xvi. 49, 241. Observations thereon, 258. Description 

of the plates illustrating them, 260. 
■ two new species of fresh water, described, xvii. 13. The 

characters of several new ones belonging to the Linnaean Vo- 

lutae, 28 

(Shrapnell), change of musket-balls in, xvi. 163. 



182 INDEX. 

Shepherds of the Landes, account of, ii. 253 

Shetland Isles, remarks on the chart of, xii. 206 

Shillibeer (Mr.), suggestion of, for preventing the dry rot, 

V. 122 
Ship, supposed, buried in the earth, discovered in Africa, 

V. 150 "^ 

Ship*s-way, account of a new machine for measuring, ii. 90 
Ships (merchant), new principle of constructing, x. 393. Dry 

rot prevented in, by means of salt, 448 

— account of a new adhesive lining for the sheathing- of, 
xii. 168 

■ of war, advantages of Sir R. Seppings's curvilinear form in 
the construction of the sterns of, xiv. 325 

" having square and curvilinear sterns, results of experi- 

ments relating to the comparative means of defence afforded 
by, xviii. 201 

— observations on the distribution and changes of the mag- 
netic intensity in, xvii. 261. xix. 333. Improvements in the 
construction of, 335 

the copper sheathing of, how prevented from becoming cor- 
roded by the action of sea- water, xvii. 253 

Shipwrecked persons, experiments for preserving, vi. 135 

Shooting-stars, seen in the day-time, on the nature of, xx. 1G8 

Siberia, account of the mammoth or fossil elephant discovered in, 
viii. 95 

chemical analyses of various copper ores from, xi. 276 

Sicily, meteorological remarks on the volcanoes of, xiv. 322 

Siderographic engraving, process of, described, ix, 125 

Sierra Leone, journal of the weather at, vi. 301 

Silica fusible by the blow-pipe, ii. 110. Experiments and ob- 
servations on the combinations of, in cast iron, 285 

• • geological account of, and its uses, xix. 80 

Silicium, process for procuring, xviii. 156 

SiLLiMAN (Professor), fusion of charcoal, plumbago, and anthra* 
cite, by, xvi. 157 

Silures, See Ohio. 



INDEX. 183 

Silver, principal mines of, iv. 243. Different kinds of, ih, 2ii. 

Its comp'ounds, ib. 245. Modes of extracting and assaying, 

245. Relative value of gold and, 240. Observations on the 

solution of, in ammonia, 268 

lampate of, vi. 322 

■ Persian mode of purifying, viii. 160. On the oxyda- 

tion of copper and, 168. On the decomposition of the chloride 

of, by hydrogen and zinc, 374 

economical preparation of the nitrate of, ix. 405. Gup, an- 



tique, found in North America, 210 

' • on the reduction of the chloride of, x. 453 

ore (red) of Peru, analysis of, xi. 273 

on the use of the nitrate of, in epilepsy, xii. 189. Expe- 
riments and observations on the atomic weight of, 286 
• new researches on the composition of the antimoniated 



sulphuret of, xiii. 416 

■ (fulminating) results of experiments on, xvii. 153 
on a compound of cyanogen with the nitrate of, xix. 159 



Silvester (Mr.), account of his mode of warming and ventilating 

the Derby infirmary, xviii. 337, His method of condensing 

smoke described, 270 
Sinumbra lamp, description of, x. 101 
Siren, a new acoustical machine, described, ix. 175 
Sirium, a supposed new metal, account of, vi. 112. vii. 291 
Siveright's (Mr.), microscopes of glass, notice of, vii. 308. On 

the pyro-electricity of the tourmaline, 397 
Size of the heavenly bodies, observations on the apparent changes 

in, x. 9 
Skin, change of colour of, vi. 379 
Skull of a deer found in a tree, notice of, xii. 193 
Slates (artificial), mode of preparing, xiv. 432 
Slaves, treatment and manners of, at Batavia, vii. 13 
Sledge (Esquimaux), described, vii. 82 
Sleep, observations on the cause of, vii. 238. Phenomenon of, 

255 
Sleeping woman, account of an extraordinary, i. 121 



184 INDEX. 

Sliding-rule, for gauging casks, report on an improved one, xvi. 

357 
Smalt detected in refined sugar, xiv. 444< 
Smell, organ of, peculiarly adapted for its object, ii. 6 
Smith (Alexander), one of the mutineers of the Bounty, anecdotes 

of, vii. 257 
(Professor), on the use of prussic acid in consumptive 

cases, ix. 410 
Smoke, observations on some vulgar notions concerning, viii. 245 
■' pernicious effects of, to the inhabitants of London, in the 

seventeenth century, xii. 343. In the eighteenth century, 345 ; 

and at the present time, 346. Remedy suggested for, 347. 

Account of various expedients for consuming, 348. xix. 138] 
Smoky chimneys, method of curing, xx. 376 
Smut in wheat prevented, viii. 348. xvi. 156 
Snails, account of an undescribed larva which preys on, xvii. 176 
Snake-stones of India, analysis of, v. 124 
Snow (coloured), notice of showers of, vii. 181. Microscopical 

observations on the red snow, 222 
early appearance of, x, 199. Experiments on, 395. Per- 
petual regions of, 200 

(red), of the Alps, observation on, xix, 166 

Snowden, measurement of, x. 397 

Snow-storm, luminous, account of, xix. 366 

Soap (hard), experiments on the manufacture of, ii. 444 

- notice of a new animal one, ix. 409 

a substitute for oil in setting cutting instruments, xiii. 221 

causes of the diversities of, xvi. 110. Considered with re- 
gard to smell, 112 

potatoes a substitute for, viii. 165 

Soda, experiments with the sub-carbonate of, on nitric acid, vi. 
252. Lampate of, 321. Prepared from alum, 363 

on the carbonate of, vii. 296 

of commerce, assay of, ix. 410 

alum, preparation and analysis of, xiii. 276 

on the relation between the crystalline form and chemical 



INDEX. 185 

proportion of the neutral arseniate and phosphate of, xiv. 205 ; 
and of the biphosphate and the binarseniate of, 417 
Soda, native carbonate of, found in India, xvi. 178 

preparation of the saturated hydro-sulphuret of, xvii. 165 

lake of Lalagunilla, in South America, account of, i. 188. 

The urao, or soda, how extracted, 190. To what uses applied 
in South America, 191 

Sodalite of Mount Vesuvius, observations on, iii. 165 
— - effect of light on the colour of, xviii. 179 
Soda-water, improved apparatus for the manufacture of, iv. 358 
Sodium (sulphuret of), experiment on, xv. 149. Preparation of, 

379 
ScEMMERRiNG (M.) on a new mode of mellowing wine, ii. 148 
Soils, process for analyzing, iii. 193 
Solanum pseudo-quinia, chemical examination of, xx. ISl 
Solar spectrum, obseiTations on the rays composing it, v. '77. 
• eclipses and occultations of the planets by the moon, in the 

year 1826, xx. 327; elements for computing, ib. 
Soldering sheet-iron, new process for, xv. 142 
Solids, properties of, i. 9 1 

Solima territory, geographical notice of, xv. 171 
Solubility diminished by heat, xvi. 165 
Solution, account of some phenomena attending the process of, 

i. 24. Application of them to the laws of crystallization, 47 
Solutions, boiling points of saturated, xviii. 89 
Somervillite, a nondescript animal, account of, xvi. 275 
Sonorous chords, on the oscillations of, xv. 374 
Sound, observations on that produced by flame in tubes, &c. 

V. 274 
' produced by opening a subterraneous gallery, xvii. 152. 

Experiments on the velocity of, 266. xviii. 162. xix. 108 
Sounding instruments, comparative value of, vi. 135 
Souterazi of Constantinople, iiccount of, vi. 350 
Sooth (James, Esq.), corrections by, in right ascension of thirty- 
six principal fixed stars, to every day in the year, x. 427. xi. 

186. The clock's daily rate and error at one time of the day 



186 INDEX. 

being known, a table to find its corresponding rate and error 

through the day, 155 
South (James, Esq.), astronomical observations by, in January 

and February, 1822, xiii. 209, 386. Observations of, on the 

Admiralty chronometrical arrangements, 211 
astronomical phenomena arranged by, for the first, three 

months in the year 1824, xvi. 286 

from April to June, 1824, xvii. 77. See Herschell 

for October, November, and December, 1824, xviii. 81 

■ examination by, of the large achromatic telescope of the 



Royal Observatory at Paris, xx. 286. On the apparent dis- 
tance and position of four hundred and sixty double and triple 
stars, 297 

Spade labour, beneficial effects of, vii. 370 

successful instance of, x. 447 

Spain, statistics of, xii. 431 

remarks on the wines of, xviii. 129 

Spalding (Dr.) on remedy for hydrophobia, x. 194 

Spar (brown) of Mexico, analysis of, xii. 272 ; and of bitter spar 
from the Tyrol, 276 

observations on the different species of, xvi. 106 

Specific gravities of elastic fluids, table of, iii. 415 

of gases, experiments on, vii. 187 

of solid bodies, instrument for determining, xiii. 

257. Table of the prussic acid, 313. 

Specific heat of bodies, vii. 380 

Specific medicines, experiments to ascertain their mode of opera- 
tion, i. 290 

Specula of reflecting telescopes, mode of protecting, xv. 53 

coating for, xviii. 181 

Speech, observations on the physiology of, xix. 8 

Spherical atoms. See Atoms. 

Spider, singular anecdotes of, viii. 174. Floatage of, in the air 
accounted for, 249 

Sphinx (ancient) discovered at Colchester, xii. 1. Its dimensions, 
2. Reasons for thinking it to be of Roman workmanship in 



INDEX. 187 

Britain, 3. Description of a bronze, 5. The sphinx not older 
than the time of the first Claudius, G ; though respect for it 
may be traced to that of Augustus, ib. Probably placed in the 
pro naos, or vestibule of the temple of Claudius, 10. Instances 
from antiquity of sphinxes represented as having completed 
the destruction of their victims, 11. Probable circumstances 
that have preserved this specimen, 14. Remark on the en- 
gravings of it, 1 5 

Spinal nerves, on the irritation of, xii. 428 

■ observations on the morbid influence of, xiv. 296 

Spirit, table of the average quantity of, in different wines, iv. 289 

economical mode of rectifying, viii. 381 

on the evaporation of, x. 187 

Spirit-level (Russian), notice of, vii. 370 

Spohn's (Professor) remarks on his essay De Lingua el Literis 
Vetcrum Egyptiorum^ edited by Professor Seyfifarth, 4to. Leip- 
zig, 1825, XX. 159 

Sponge, iodine found in, x. 456 

experiments on the bleaching of, xviii. 402 

Spoon-bill (white) shot, v. 375 

Spots in the sun, observations on, ii. 420 

Spring-water, analysis of, vi. 171. Remarkable eruption of, xi. 

406 
Springs for carriages, observations on, xviii. 97 
Squire (Colonel), copy of an ancient inscription by, x. 7 
Stars, investigation of the corrections of the places of, for aber- 
ration and nutation, viii. 21. Observations on the transits of, 
84. Experiments on the light of, 92 

easy method of computing the aberration of, xii. 151 

mean places of forty-six Greenwich stars, xiii. 387. Cor- 
rections in right ascension of thirty-six principal, 388. xiv. 192 

catalogue of the polar distances of thirty-nine principal, 

xiv. 186 

principal, predicted and observed places of, xr. 135 

observations on the apparent distances and i)ositions of 



certain double and triple, xvii. 250 



188 INDEX. 

Stars, catalogue of, in the comet of Encke, xix. 119. A falling 
star seen at mid-day, 369. Observations on the apparent dis- 
tance and position of four hundred and sixty double and triple, 
XX. 297. See Fixed Stars, 

Statistics of America, x. 203 

Statuary marble quarries, notice of newly discovered, in Tus- 
cany, xii. 19a 

Stavesacre, new vegetable alkali found in, viii. 154 

Steam, action of, on solution of silver and gold, xvi. 162 

Steam-boats, extended use of, vi. 136 

' list of, employed on the river Mississippi, viii. 152. 

List of those now building, 153. Account of the progress of 
steam-navigation in Great Britain, 240. List of, now plying 
on the river Clyde, 241 

Steam-engines, observations on the explosions of, iii. 195 

■' — of England, remarks on the power of, xii. 404 

■ indicator for, description of, xiii. 91 

—— — '— method of securing, xviii. 3S5 

. of Glasgow, number and horse-power of, xix. 328 

Steam-pits for forcing plants, notice of, viii. 340 

Steam-plough, remarks on the practicability of, vii. 54 

Steel, properties of, v. 298 

• (Indian), analysis of, vii. 288 

Persian mode of making, viii. 160 

■ experiments on the alloys of, with a view to its improve- 
ment, ix. 319. xii. 173, 316. xiv. 377 

— — goods, process for preserving, xiii. 424 

on the magnetism of, and iron, by percussion, xiv. 376. 

xvii. 254 

cutting of, by soft iron, xvi. 155 

experiments on the elasticity and strength of hard and 

soft, xvii. 267. xix. 104 

' action of iron in motion upon, xviii. 160. Menstruum for 

etching steel plates, .^75. Mode of preparing damasked steel, 
386 

explanation of the cutting of, by iron, xx. 383 ; and ii;on, 



INDEX. 



189 



observations on the solution of, in acids, and on the residua. 

395 
Stereotype-plates, new process for casting, xv. 13S 
Sterns of ships, advantages of the curvilinear construction of, 

xiv. 325 
Stevenson (Mr.), observations of, on the operation of the waters 

of the ocean and of the river Dee, iii. 376 
Stewart's (Dr. Mathew) demonstrations of some of his general 

theorems, i. 6 
Stockler's (Mr.) inverse method of limits, xv. 357 
Stodart (J., Esq.), experiments of, on alloys of steel, ix. 319. 

xiv. 377 
Stomach, beneficial effects of the white oxide of bismuth in a 

severe disorder of, viii. 295 
■ — existence of free muriatic acid in, xvll. 181 
of animals, on the nature of the saline matters usually 

existing in, xviii. 142 
Stone in the bladder, account of a singular mode of removing, 

i. 199 

process of printing on, described, iii. 88 

account of porous vessels of, v. 146. Observations on me- 
teoric stones, 292. vii. 324 

bridges, influence of temperature on, xviii. 371 

Storm (violent), in New England, described, vii. 102 

Straker (Mr. J.), new method of embossing in wood by, xix. 

134 
Strata forming the basis of the valley of the Rhone, notice of, iii. 

183 

of the earth, geological account of, xix. 83 

Stratification of the forest of Dean, and of the opposite banks of 

the Severn, ix. 37 
Straw, a conductor for lightning, ix. 199 
Straw-plat, premium for, xvii. 153 

Strengtli, comparative, of Europeans and Savages, ix. 213 
of cast-iron, remarks on, xiv. 223 



190 INDEX. 

Stro MEYER (M.) on the analysis of the salts of strontian, and 
some other minerals, iii. 215 

— — notice of a new metal discovered hy, v. 370 

Strontia, fusion of, with the blow-pipe, ii. 109. Metal of, thus 
obtained, 121. Experiments to determine the quantity of, in 
several species of arragonite, 164 

■■ test for, X. 189 

— - separation of, from baryta, xv. 383. xix. 153 

Strontium, sulphur et of, composition of, xv. 140 

Structures of rocks, remarks on, xviii. 60 

Strychnia, a new vegetable alkali obtained, vii. 375. Its com- 
pounds, 376. New researches on, and on the processes employed 
for its extraction, xiv. 217. New process for extracting it, 
443. Process for obtaining the salts of, xvii. 170. Their vo- 
latility, 171 

Sub-carbonate of soda, experiments with, on nitric acid, vi. 
252 ; of potash, 254 ; vii. 387 

Sub-nitrate of bismuth, a remedy for intermittent fever, xiii. 233. 
On the sub and super nitrates, 396 

Sub-sulphate of alumina and potash, analysis of, xi. 389 

Sublimate (corrosive), antidote for, ix. 401 

Succinic acid, formation of, ix. 410 

process for obtaining, xii. 179 

__ discovered in turpentine, xv. 171 

Sugar, producible from fecula, by means of gluten, ii. 167 

■ notions of the ancients concerning, v. 51. Test for, 123. 

Expense of its manufacture from the beet root, 357 

— facts on the formation and crystallization of, vi. 32. 



Discovered in potatoes, 354 

— .^- artificial, application of, to brewing, vii. 180 

description of an apparatus for boiling, x. 353 

— — on the crystallization of, xi. 397 

(refined), smalt detected in, xiv. 444 

— . — action of animal charcoal in the refining of, xv. 1 56 
— - use of, as an antidote to lead, xvi. 395 



INDEX. 



191 



Sugar-cane, juice of, an antidote to arsenic, x. 193. Change of, 
xiv. 438 

Sugar-loaf Mountain, Sierra Leone, barometrical measurement of 
the height of, xv. 67 

Suicides, number of, at Paris, viii. 189 

instances of religious, ix. 63 

Sulphates of copper and magnesia, phenomena attending the pro- 
cess of the solution of, i. 27 

— of strontia, used as a flux, vii. 183. Of strychnia, 

376 

of magnesia, experiment on, ix. 407 

— of quinia, phosphorescence of, xiii. 146 

of lead, uses of, in the arts, xiv. 230. On a'peculiar one 



of alumina, 435 

(native) of iron and alumina, analysis of, xv. 389 

'■ of copper, an excellent remedy in croup, xvii. 181 

(metallic), experiments on the decomposition of, by hy- 



drogen, xviii. 392 

■ of soda, composition of the crystals of, xix. 152. Super- 



sulphate of quinia, how prepared, 161 
Sulphovinous acid, how procured, ix. 396. Its properties, 397 
Sulphur, experiments on the stoving of cotton goods with, iv. 
196 

and oxygen, account of a new acid of, vii. 371 

. on the compounds of, xi. 388 

experiments and researches on a new class of com- 
pounds of, xiv. 433 

action of iron upon, xvii. 165 

' — - mountain of Teican, account of, xviii. 406 

spring, analysis of, at Harrowgate, xv. 82 

of the Lipari islands, existence of selenium in, xx. 174 



Sulphuret of lead, phenomena of its solution, i, 29. 

of platinum, experiment on, iv. 75 ; and on that of 

phosphorus, 351. Researches on alkaline sulphurets, 372 
• (ferro- arsenical) of copper, analysis of, xii. 30. Of anti- 



192 INDEX. 

monial, 32. Of a cupreous sulphuret of lead and antimony, 
34. Of bismuth and copper, 8(5. 

Sulphurets, experiments on the composition of the alkaline, xiv. 
209. To determine if the hepar formed in the dry way is a 
sulphuret of an oxide or of a metal, ib. On the different pro- 
portions in which potassium can combine with sulphur and sul- 
phuretted hydrogen, 213. Combinations of sulphuretted hy- 
drogen with potash, 215. Formation of hepars in the humid 
way, 419 

produced from sulphates, experiments on, xv. 147 

I experiments on, resulting from the reduction of sul« 
phates by means of charcoal, xvi. 100 

of carbon and ammonia, on the re-action of, xviii. 149 



Sulphuretted hydrogen, preparation of, xvii. 165. Inflammation 
of, by nitric acid, 3S0 

Sulphuric acid, mistake of M. Vauquelin concerning, corrected, 
i. 70 

■ experiments to determine the law of progres- 

sion, followed in its densities, at different degrees of dilution, 
with several new tables, iv. 114 

. action of, on animal substances, ix. 392. Its ac- 



tion on alcohol, and the new acids thereby formed, 395 

experiments on, xi. 3SG 

account of a supposed new metal from the resi- 



duum of, xii. 315. Cause of its high price in England, con- 
trasted with that manufactured in France, 355 

action of, on muriates, xiii. 146 

on the fixedness of, xv. 383 

. of Nordhausen, researches on, xviii. 145 

hygrometrical indications by, xix. 34*6, (Anhy- 



drous), new production of, 345 

■ hygrometric property of, xx. 400 



Sulphuric ether, effects of inhaling, iv. 15S 
Sulphurous acid, liquefaction of, xviii. 39 1 
Sun, rays of, effects on magnetism, viii. 383 



INDBX. 193 

Sun, account of the eclipse of, in September 1820, xi. 26, 291, 
Observations on the heat produced during, xii. 313 

temperature of, xviii. 385 

— -^ times of the motion of spots in, xix. 328 

Sunda Islands, account of, ii. 190. Physical constitution and 
productions of the isle of Banca, 190. Process of mining pur- 
sued there, 192. Notice of Borneo, ib. Geological constitu- 
tion of Java, 193. Remains of antiquities discovered there, 
ib. Language of, 194. Practices peculiar to the islanders, 195. 

Superior (Lake), account of the copper-mines of, xii. 422 

notes on the geography and geology of, xviii. 

1, 228 

Surfeit, remedy for, vi. 172 

Surinam frog, account of the external changes in, from its earlier 
stages till it becomes a perfect animal, i. 55. Remarks on its 
internal structure, 57 

SwAiNsoN^s (William, Esq.), description of two new birds, of the 
genus pteroglossus, ix. 266 

• — • description by, of two new fresh-water shells, xvii. 

13. On the characters of several new shells belonging to the 
Linnsean voluta, 31. Remarks on the present state of concho- 
logy, 29. A monograph by, of the genus ancillaria, xviii. 272 
Description of a new species of parrot, xix. 198 

• monograph by, of the genus tachyphonus, a group of 



birds belonging to the tanagra of LinnoBus, xx. 60. Obser- 
vations by, upon the tyrant shrikes of America, 267 

SwAYNB (Rev. G.) on budding, and on the fig-tree, vii. 1C8 

• on the importance of manufacturing British opium, viii. 

234. Description of an apparatus for that purpose, 236. In- 
structions for its use, 238 ; and for the cultivation and collection 
of the juice of poppies, 69. On the quantity of opium pro- 
per acre, 74. Cautions relative to its preparation, 76 

Sweden, ancient hieroglyphics discovered in, vii 

• notice of the universities of, viii. 189 

' — population of, x. 203 

O 



1.9.4 INDEX. 

Switzerland, comparison of the climate of, with that of the north- 
countries of Europe, iii. 407 

Sylvester (Mr.), evidence of, with remarks, in the cause of 
Severn and Co. against the Imperial Insurance Company, x, 
335 

Sylvester (Mr. Charles), observations of, on the best mode of 
warming and ventilating buildings, xi. 229 

Sympathy (organic), influence of, on the functions of the living 
body, iv. 21. (Mental), 223 

Syphylitic affections, beneficial effects of the nitro-muriatic acid 
in, i. 205 



Tabasheer, observations on the vegetable substance so called, 

vii. 363, Note. 
Table-furnace, account of, v. 131 

spar of Pargas, analysis of, xiii. 419 

Tachyphonus, a monograph of the genus, xx. 60 

Taddei (Dr.), researches of, on the gluten of wheat, ix. 399 

Tadpole, observations on the formation of fat in, ii. 205 

Tallow (vegetable), account of, xix. 179 

Tamaahmaah, sovereign of the Sandwich Islands, improvements 

effected by, ii. 73. Account of his residence and mode of 

living, 76 
Tamar (river), notice of an intended chain-bridge over, xvi. 155 
Tanning, use of the larch-tree in, xii. 406 
Tanno-gelatine, experiments with, vi. 156 
Tapeworm, cause of, in pointers and spaniels, x. 472 
Tapir discovered in Africa, vii. 19 1 
Tar, use of, in pulmonary consumption, v. 380 

i (lamp), notice of, vi. 353 

— from coal, observations on a substance produced during thy 

distillation of, viii. 287 
Tarchonanthus CamphoratuSf observations on, ii, 175 



INDEX. 195 

Tartar (emetic) of the shops, impurity of, xix. 248 
Tartaric acid obtained from potatoe-apples, vii. 179 

' influence of, in certain cases of analysis, xvi. 107 

Tartaro-sulphate of potash, xvii. 171 

Tartary, volcanoes of, x. 197 

Tartrates (triple) of bismuth, experiments with, vi. 158; and 

with that of potash and manganese, ib. Of lead, pyrophorus 

obtained from, xvi. 385 
Taschium, a supposed metal, notice of, xvii. 390 
Tassaert (M.) on the combinations of chromic acid with potash, 

XV. 310 
Taste, organs of, how affected by different bodies, xvii. 392 
Taylor (Messrs.), experiments and apparatus of, for procuring 

gas from oil, vi. 108. viii. 120. On the construction of the 

acetometer, 255 
Taylor (Dr. Brook), his method of solving the problem of atmo- 
spherical refraction, xviii. 346 
Taylor's (John, Esq.) evidence of, with remarks, in the cause of 

Severn and Co. against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 347 
Taylor (Mr. T. G.), account of a coloured circle surrounding the 

zenith, xi. 40 
Taylorian theorem, demonstration of, xvi. 229. xvii. 74 
Tayloria Splachnoidesy a new species of moss, account of, ii. 144 
Tea (black), analysis of, xii. 201 ; and of green tea, 202. Remarks 

thereon, 204. Table of soluble matters in, iv. 206 
.— adulteration of, by the Chinese, detected, xviii. 166 

plant successfully reared in France, vi. 375 

shrub, at Katmandu, vii. 398 

Tears, cause of, explained, iv. 211 
Telegraphs, celerity of, v. 356 

Telescope, notice of a large reflecting, xi. 385 
on the indistinctness of vision caused in, by the pre- 
sence of false lights, and remedies for it, xvii. 17 
account of M. Guinand's glasses for, xix. 248 



Temperature, changes in, caused by local circumstances, ii. 44, 

O 2 



196 INDEX. 

Of the air, sea, animals, &c. within the tropics, 208. On and 
beneath the surface of the earth, v. 123. vi. 171 

Temperature of mines, vii. 

of lakes, x. 198 

. of the earth at various depths, xii. 339. xiii. 144 

. of the Atlantic, remarks on, xiv. 1 17. Of the interior 

of the globe, 207. Of vapour, 439 

' increased, of mines, hypothesis to account for, xvi. 



317, Note 

of the sea at various depths, xvii. 126. Effects of, 



on the intensity of magnetic forces, 279 

influence of, on stone bridges, xviii. 379 

on the earth's surface, experimental data respecting, 



xix. 173 

I'emple of Concord, site of, ascertained, v. 144 

— of Castor and Pollux, excavation around, v. 384 

Tenacity of iron-wire, remarkable instance of, xv. 136. Remarks 

on, 373. xvi. SQ7 
Tendons, influence of water on, xiii. 418 
Tennantite, analysis of, vii. 100 
Tenore (Dr. Michael), notice of his Flora Neapoliiana, and 

appendix, iii. 370 
Terazi, or Grecian level, notice of, vi. 352 
Terpodion, a new musical instrument, notice of, xi. 384 
Test for detecting lead in water, v. 73. For sugar, 123. For 
copper and iron, ix. 408. x. 183. For baryta and strontia, 
189. XV. 383. Enumeration of tests proper for the analysis 
of mineral waters, 217. Examination of them by, 219. New 
one for gelatine, 454. Infusion of violets, 45G 

for arsenic, xii. 411 

for proto-salts of iron, xv. 382 

papers, notice of two new coloured ones, xvi. 380 

■ elderberries used for, xviii. 400 

■— for iodine, xix. 343. For muriatic or nitric acids, or the 
salts of these acids, 345 



INDEX. 197 

Thames-water, observations on the saltness of, in particular 
places, ill. 367. Its extreme softness accounted for, ib, 

' river, probable mischiefs from, on taking down and re- 
building: London-bridge, xvi. 27, Remarks on Mr. Rennie's 
design for a new bridge over, 28 

-, design by Mr. Ware, for making a public road 



under, xviii. 62. Notice of other tunnels attempted or pro- 
posed, 66 

Thenard (M.), analysis of his Trade de Chimie, ii. 255. Remarks 
on his mode of treating chemical affinities, 256. On heat and 
expansion, 250. On cold, 268. Defects in his chapter on 
light, 2^. On electricity, 261. On chlorine, 264; and com-* 
bustion, 265. Remarks on his classification of the metals, 
266 ; and on the metallic salts, 269. Defects of his chemical 
physiology, 271. Concluding observations, 272 

- new results of, on the combination of oxygen with 

water, vii. 379. viii. 114, 154 

process of, for restoring the white in paintings, x. 



168 

Blue colour, invented by, preparation of, xv. 381 
Theodolite, patent portable, described, vi. 65 
Thermo-electrics, table of, xvi. 171. Experiments in thermo- 
electric magnetism, 126 ; and in thermo-electric rotation, 372. 
Phenomenon with iron, 374 
Thermometer (chromatic), account of, i. 119 

— for measuring heights, notice of, iii. 372 

new and delicate, account of, vii. 183 ; and of new 

self- registering, 185 
(differential), description of, viii. 218 



Thermometers, variation of, xiv. 441. xv. 160, 361 

Thirst, sense of, how produced, ii. 12. vi. 13 

Thomas (St.), island, geological structure of, v. 313 

Thompson (Dr.), mistake of, corrected, i. 229. On the composi* 

tion and combination of phosphoric acid, 291 
■ system of chemistry by, character of, ii. 253 ; review 

of, iv. 299 ; its want of system exposed, 300 ; strictures on 



198 INDEX. 

his repetition, ih. ; on his account of the separation of simple 
bodies and their compounds, 303 ; on his doctrine of combus- 
tion, 305 ; of electricity, 308 ; of ponderable bodies, particu- 
larly chlorine, 309 ; of the doctrine of definite proportions, 
310 ; concluding strictures, 317 
Thompson (Dr.), new inflammable gas discovered by, vi, 153 

mode of obtaining, pure nickel, viii. 161. Analysis of 

coal, 163 
analysis of his system of chemistry, xi. 119 ; his claims 



to precedence over other British compilers stated, 121 ; stric- 
tures on the plan of his work, 126 ; exposure of his errors on 
the subject of caloric, 129; electritricity, 135; ponderable 
bodies, 140; simple incombustibles, 143; simple combustibles, 
150; compound bodies, 152; acids, 153; mineralogy, 166; 
analysis of minerals, ib. ; physiology, 169 
his reply to the review of it in this Journal, xiii. 333 ; 



specimens of the doctor's inaccurate language, 334; opinions 
of foreign chemists on his system, 335 ; specimens of his repe- 
titions, 337; of his inconsistencies, ib. ; exposure of his errors, 
346 ; table of atomic weights by, xvii. 383 

attempt of, to establish the first principles of chemistry, 



by experiment ; analysis of his work, xx. 113 ; remarks on his 
historical introduction, 1 17 ; on the specific gravities of oxy- 
gen and hydrogen gases, and his mode of experimenting, 121 ; 
remarks on his experiments on the atomic weights and specific 
gravities of chlorine and iodine, 130 ; his tables of nitric acid, 
ib.\ experiments on the atomic weights of the acidifiable com- 
bustibles, 133 ; of the alkalies and alkaline earths, 135 ; on the 
atomic weight of the vegetable acids, 139; remarks on the 
style of his writing, 139 
Thompson's (Captain) tables, examination of, xix. 281 
Thompson (Mr.), account of the wells sunk hy^ at Cheltenham, iii. 
56,380. His laboratory for preparing Cheltenham salts, 58^ 
Various saline preparations made by him, 67 

(Mr. G.), description of a grotto in the interior of the 

Cape of Good Hope, xvi. 272 



INDEX. 199 

Thorina, compound nature of, demonstrated, xx. 391 
Thouin (M.), on a mode of planting through trees, xviii. 409 
Thunder-storms, observations on the periodical returns of, iii. 390. 

xvi. 39a 
TiARCK (Dr.), longitude of Madeira and Falmouth determined 

by, xvii, 270 
Tide-gauge, new, description of, xvi. 348 

extracts relative to the theory of, xvii. 295 

Tiger hunt in India described, vii. 266 
Timbuctoo, remarks on the state of, vii. 333 
Time-keeper (new), notice of, vii. 369 
Time-table, for reducing sidereal to mean, xii. 167 

— of conjunction in right ascension, an easy method of 
computing, from an observed occultation, xv. 360 

— indicated by any number of chronometers, an easy me- 
thod of comparing with the given time at a certain station, 
xvii. 315 

Tin, nature and properties of, v. 299 

and lead, mutual precipitation of, vi. 363 

increased weight when calcined, accounted for, xii. 295 

mines in the isle of Banca, how wrought, ii, 191 

plate, manufacture of, described, vii. 141 

Tinning, process of, described, vii. 145 

Tissues, how rendered incombustible, xii. 413 

Titanic acid, separation of, from the oxide of iron, xx. 176 

Titanium, found in iron ore, viii. 167 

— analysis of a compact ore of, xii. 265 

. process for analyzing the oxide of, xiii. 226. (Metallic) 

notice of, xiv. 441 
combinations of, with oxygen and sulphur, xvi. 07. 



Experiments and observations on metallic, 326 

on the apparent magnetism of, xvii. 129 

on the various combinations of, xviii- 174 

the presence of, in mica, confirmed, 392. xix. 1/J7. 



Analysis of the chloride of, 156 

(metallic), found in iron furnaces, xx. 17« 



200 INDEX. 

Toad, the common, account of the venom of, v. 127 

instance of one found in a solid rock, xv. 3S6 

Todd (Dr.), observations of, on the torpedo, i. 116 

• on the process of the reproduction of members of the 

aquatic salamander, xvi. 84 
inquiry into the nature of the luminous power of some of 

the lampyrides, xvii. 269 
— ■ (Rev. Mr.), inaccuracies of, in his edition of Johnson's 



Dictionary pointed out, x. 284 

Toddalia, a substitute for Peruvian bark, vii. 193 

Tombs (ancient), discovered, vi. 177 

■ (Celtic), near Cambridge, notice of, vii. 195 '; 

Tongue, instance of its being swallowed, iii. 182 

irritability of, xv. 385 

Tonquin bean, benzoic acid found in, x. 173 

Tooth-ach, cause of, ii. 17 

Topaz of Saxony, analysis of, xii. 266 

Torpedo, observations on, i. 116 

experiments on, iii. 129 

Torricellian tube, on the alteration in the bulk of successive por- 
tions of air introduced into, xx. 378 

Torture used in China, vii. 341 

Touch, organ of, adapted to its peculiar functions, ii. 6. Rete- 
mucosum, the seat of, 9 

. ■ notions of magnitude and distance, how far acquired from, 

iii. 3 

Touchstone, analytical examination of, xv. 315 

. wood, observations on, xvi. 185 

Tourmaline pyro-electricity of, vii. 397 

' ■ remarkable dichroism of, xiii. 219 

Tournefort, botanical discoveries of, x. 53 

Traill's (Dr. T. S.) description of coal recently discovered in 
Mexico, xix. 27 

Transitions among rocks, remarks on, xix. 212 

Transit instrument, observation on stars with, viii. 84 

put up at the Cambridge observatory account of, xix, 23S 



INDEX. 201 

Transits of Venus, method of computing the sun's horizontal 
parallax from observations of the, xx. 94 

Transmutation of metals into gold, notice of supposed instances of, 
ix. 232 

Transplanting of vegetables, notice of experiments and observa- 
tions on, iii. 401 

Transportation of fish from salt to fresh water, experiments and 
observations on, xix. 235 

Trap-rocks, identity of, with certain varieties of granite, x. 29. 
Geological resemblances between them and granite, 40. In- 
stances in which they assume the essential characters of granite, 
45. xi. 404 

Travellers, use of the pocket box-sextant to, xviii. 50 

Tread- wheel, application of, to canal navigation, xiv. 431 

Tredgold (Mr.), on the strength of cast-iron, xiv. 223. His 
work commended, 224. xvii. 150. Account of his experiments 
on the elasticity of hard and soft steel, 267. xix. 104 

Trees, importance of, in mountainous countries, ii. 57 

mode of ingrafting, viii. 154. On the latitude of, in 

Sweden, 173 

growth of, how promoted, xv. 388 

antiquity of, xix. 166 



Tren GROUSE (Mr.), contrivance of, for preserving wrecked per- 
sons, vi. 135 

Trifolium i?icarnatuni recommended to agriculturists, xiv. 452 

Trigonometrical surveys, notice of, ix. 389 

Trinkets of gold, suggestions for cleansing, xviii. 179 

Trusses, improvement in, xiv. 433 

Tubes, experimental observations on the passage of gases through, 
vii. 106 

— on the substitution of, for bottles in the preservation of 
certain liquids, xix. 149 

TucKEY (Captain), notice of the voyage of, to explore the rirer 
Zaire, v. 158 

Tumeremo (Capuchin mission of), notice of, ix. 8 



202 INDEX* 

Tunbridge Wells, hints on a mode of procuring soft water at, 

xiv. 345 
Tungsten, on some new compounds of, xii. 171 
- experiments on its combinations, xx. 177 

Tungstic acid, how detected, v. 123 
Tunja province, notice of, iii. 338 
Tupuquen (Capuchin mission of), notice of, ix. 10 
Turf, gas obtained from, vi. 157 
Turmeric paper, action of salts on, xiv. 234 
Turnips, prevention of the fly in, v. 357. viii. 155 

beneficial effects of salt, in the culture of, x. 58 

preservation of, xv. 161 

Turpentine (oil of), rendered palatable, xlii. 441 

- — • succinic acid discovered in, xv. 161 

TuRRELL*s menstruum for etching steel plates, xviii. 175 

Tutenag, analysis of, xiv. 232 

Tyrant Shrikes of America, observations on, xx. 267 



Ulmin (artificial), viii. 392 

gallic acid converted into, by oxygen gas, xix. 353 

Ultramarine, adulteration of, xvi. 167 

Unio GigaSf a new species of fresh-water shell, description of, 

xvii. 15 
United States of America, philosophical and literary intelligence 

from, i. 137, 300 
Univalves, remarks on, xvii. 272 

Universelle Historial Bibliotheque, bibliographical notice of, xiii. 39 
Universities of Germany, notice of, viii. 188 ; and of Sweden, 189 ' 
■ of Rome, ix. 21 1. Of Oxford and Cambridge, present 

state of, 428 
Upas poison, active principle of, xviii. 176 
Upata (a Capuchin mission in Guayana), described, viii. 269. 

State of the plantations in its vicinity, 271. ix, 12 
Uranite, analysis of, xv. 16S 



INDEX. 



203 



Uranium, experiments on, vi. 123 

. the oxides and salts of, xiv. 86. Phosphoric acid found 

in the green ore of, 453 
, — preparation of the oxide of, xvii. 139, 382. Notice of 

uranium pyrophori, 383 

native sulphate of, discovered, xviii. 409 



Urate of ammonia, notice of calculi of, ix. 405 

Ure (Dr.), experiments of, on sulphuric acid, iv. 114. Observa- 
tions of, on mean specific gravity, 151. On the constitution of 
liquid nitric acid, and the law of progression followed in its 
densities at successive terms of dilution, 291 

I remarks on saline crystallization, iv. 106. v. 162. vi. 250 

. strictures of, on Mr. Phillips, vi. 242. Account of some 

experiments made on the body of a criminal immediately after 
execution, 283 

notice of his Chemical Dictionary, xi. 216. Analysis of it, 

with specimens and remarks, 337. Correspondence of, with 
Dr. Henry, 401 

on the atomic weight of silver, and on the constitution of 

muriatic acid at different densities, xii. 286 

communication of, on the composition and manufacture of 

chloride of lime, xiii. 1 ; of bleaching powder, 14 ; and on the 
atomic weight of manganese, 23. On the formation and uses 
of soda-alum, 276. On the specific gravity of prussic acid, 
312. Test for ascertaining it, 313 

on the ultimate analysis of vegetable and animal substances, 

xiv. 388 

on a mode of protecting the specula of reflecting telescopes, 

XV. 52 

letter of, on Job Rider's rotatory steam-engine, xix. 142 

Uric acid, action of nitric acid and chlorine on, viii. 157. Notice 
of the animal substances which generally accompany it in cal- 
culi, 370 

Urinary concretions, analysis of, viii. 361 

Urine, pink sediments of, accounted for, ix. 185 

' peculiar blue matter obtained from certain, xx. 409 



204 INDEX. 

Urns, ancient funereal, discovered, vi. 176 
Useful arts, connexion of, with the sciences, illustrated, vii. 215 
Utero gestation, observations on the period of, ii. 43. English 
law on this point, 44 



Vaccination, discovery of, modestly claimed by the French, ii. 169 

a supposed remedy for the plague, vi. 379 

a cure for the hooping-cough, xiii. 441 

benefits of, xiv. 453 

Vacuum, effect of, on alkaline carbonates, xv. 383 

Valais, devastation of, by inundation, described, vii. 166 

Valenzuelia, genus, notice of, iii. 128 

Valetudinarians, remarks on the diet of, xiv. 367 

Valley of Egypt, notice of a memoir on, iv. 98 

Valleys of Cucuta, in South America, description of, iii. 337 

Vapour of sulphuric ether, effects of inhaling, iv. 158 

(aqueous), table of the force, density and expansion of, 

at different degrees of temperature from 0° to 92*^. viii. 306. 
Observations thereon, 308. Table of the force of, and the 
full evaporating force of every degree of temperature from 
20° to 85°, expressed in grains of water that would be raised 
per minute from a vessel of six inches in diameter, supposing 
that there were no vapour already in the atmosphere, 311. 
Observations thereon, 314. Table of results, 322 
researches on the temperature of, as well as on the 



temperature produced by vapours, xiv. 439 

experiments on the density of, xv. 297 

(metallic), method of condensing, xviii. 270 

increased production of, xix. 148 



Variation transit, directions for making adjustments on, v. 207 ; 
and for using it, 209 

of the compass, notice of several unsuccessful attempts 

to ascertain, iv. 102; and of the different changes to which 
the magnetic needle is subject, 104. Pangerous consequences' 



INDEX. 205 

of non-attendance to the variation of the compass illustrated, 

107. Proofs tliat the variation is affected by the nature of the 

ship's cargo, 1 1 1 
Variation of the compass, table of, vi. 89. Causes of, and 

observations to account for it, 89. Further observations on, 

169. Solution proposed for it, 371 
« ■ observations on, during the late voyage 

of discovery to the north pole, ix. 81 
(daily) of the horizontal and dipping-needle under a 

reduced directive power, xvii. 128 

—— of thermometers, xv. 160, 369; and of barometers, 371 

annual of some of the principal fixed stars, xix. 278 



Variolous eruption, employment of caustic for the destruction 

of, XX. 200 
Varnish (black), process for making, used in Bengal, x. 315 
Vase (beautiful), discovered at Pompeii, vii. 403 

(cinerary), discovered at Athens, xiii. 72 

Vauban (M.), anecdote of, xiv. 221 

Vaudoncourt (General), notice of a map of Turkey, by, ii. 212 

Vauquelin (M.), mistake of, concerning the specific gravity of 

sulphuric acid, i. 70 
> experiments of, on the egot or spur of rye and wheat, 

ii. 320 
on the sulphurets, oxides, and some other combinations 



of platinum, iv. 74. Researches of, on sulphurets, 372 
on the action of nitric acid, chlorine, and iodine. 



viii. 157 

experiments of, on the decomposition of blood, xi. 394 

on the combination of acetic acid and alcohol with 



volatile oils, xiv. 425 

on crystalline matter formed in a solution of cyanogen. 



XV. 302. Analytical examination of touchstone by, 315; and 
of an aerolite, 316 

reflections on volcanoes by, xvi. ISO 

experiments of, on the acetate of copper, xvii. 383 

on the active principle of colocynth, xviii. 400 ; and 



of the Daphne Alpina, 401 



INDEX; 

Vauquelin, on a destructible green matter, the produce of a mi- 
neral water, xix. 358 

■ — examination of the solanum pseudo quinia, xx. 181 

Vegetable nature, general views of, ii. 35. Developement of the 
laws by which different tribes of vegetables are distributed 
over the globe, ib. Effects of cold, heat, light, and air on 
vegetation, 46. Important results produced by, 58 

' principle, outline of a classification of, iii. 189 

•* remedies, suggestions for preserving, v. 366. Alkalies, 

notice of, vi. 149. viii. 156, 378 

Vegetables, presence of alkali in, how detected, vi. 361 

-————- phosphoric acid, found in, viii. 382 

— — — growth of, prevented by using salt as a manure, x. 56 ; 
and also rendered unfit for the habitation of worms or insects, 62 
Noxious vegetables destroyed by salt, 70 

origin of, xi. 411 

on the existence of sulphur in, xiv. 234. Ultimate 



analysis of vegetable and animal substances, 388. The in* 

fluence of motion in the direction of, 450 

power of life in, xviii. 413. Action of poisons on, xx. 



191. See Plant. 
Vegetation, influence of different altitudes upon, in different 

zones of the earth, x. 262. 

• effects of copper on, xii. 178 

— — in atmospheres of different densities, experiments 

on, XV. 388 
• — table of, at different heights, xvii. 176 



Vegetations, metallic, x. 181 

Veins of metals, observations on the courses of, iv. 71. Opinions 

of Hutton and Werner on the theory of, 73 
Velocity of sound, vii. 369 
results of experiments for determining, xiv. 

433. xvii. 266. xviii. 162 

■ in Holland, xix. 108 



Ventilation of Covent-garden theatre, v. 300 

of houses and other buildings, observations on, xi. S29 

of rooms, xiii, 113 



INDEX. 207 

Venom of the common toad, account of, v. 127 

Venus, table of the lunar distances of the planet, ix: 168, 383. 
Remarks on the statue of, 301 

Veratrine, a new vegetable alkali, account of, x. 171 

Verdigris, analysis of, xi. 389. xiv. 228 

— - observations on, xvii. 384 

Vermont, notice of scintillating limestone in, yiii. 356 

Verona, analysis of the green earth of, xii. 276 

Vertical fire, observations on M. Carnot's theory of defence by, 
viii. 290 

Vesta, places of, for 1822, xiii. 208 

Vestium, a new metal, observations on, vii. 291 

Vesuvius (Mount), appearances of, after the eruption of 1812, ii. 
25. Singular phenomena, preceding its eruption in December, 
1813, 26. Account of that of December 25, 26, and 28. Ana- 
lysis of volcanic products, 33 

eruption of, in 1817, described, v. 199 

— sea-salt found in, x. 462 

notice of an eruption of, xiv. 236. Electric experi- 
ments in June and July 1819, 333 

eruption of, in October 1822, xv. 175, 183* Notice 



of mesotype from, 389 
examination of recent lava from, xvi. 181. Charcoal 



discovered in its cinders, 180. Electric phenomena of, 181. 
Account of its eruption in October 1822, 182. Chloride of 
potassium throAvn out of, 395 

• notice of new minerals found in, xvii. ISO 

volcanic saline matter of, xviii. 407 



Vetch (Capt.), account of the remains of a mammoth by, xi. 20 

Vibrations of heavy bodies, researches on, xv. 90 

Vibrio Triticiy microscopical observations on the suspension of the 

muscular motions of, xvi. 326 
Vicat(M.), analysis of his Recherches Experimentales, on lime 

and mortar, x. 407 
— on the peculiar effects of burning on lime, xvi. 386. 

xvii. 361 



208 INDEX. 

Villa (Roman), discovered in Oxfordshire, v. 150. vi. 175 

VjNCE (Professor) opinion of, to account for the apparent changes 
of place, colour, size, and figure of the heavenly bodies, x. 
14. Observations thereon, 15. Theory to account for such 
changes, 16 

Vincent (St.), island of, its geological structure, v. 315 

Vin despoulesj recipe for making, iii. 191 

Vinegar, experiments on the strength of, vi, 258 

Violets, test infusion of, x. 456 

Violine, notice of a new vegeto-alkaline substance, xvii. 385 

Vision restored, when injured or destroyed by the cornea assum- 
ing a conical form, ii. 403 

observations on the theory of, iii. 374 

experiments and observations on, v. 249 

on the indistinctness of, in optical instruments, and re- 
medies for it, xvii. 17, 202 

.— singular imperfection in, xix. 368 



Vitality of plants, singular instance of, x. 468 

— . of the blood, observations on, xiii. 110 

VoGEL (M.), on the mutual decomposition of acids and sulphu- 
retted hydrogen gas, ii. 152 

process of, for bleaching sponge, xviii. 402 

Volatile oils, experiments on the combination of acetic acid and 
alcohol with, xiv. 425 

Volatility of substances hitherto considered as fixed, iii. 402 

Volcanic rocks, on the composition of, ii. 434 

masses, systematic arrangement of, iii. 201 

islands in the West Indies, geological description of, v. 

311. General observations concerning them, 321 

. appearances in the moon, notice of, xii. 133 

phenomena, hypothesis on the cause of, xvi. 130. Re- 



marks on volcanoes and on volcanic electricity, 131, 181. 
Eruption in Iceland, 396 
Volcanoes, definition of, i. 245. Probable cause of the mud 
volcanoes near the Cimmerian bosphorus, assigned by Pro- 
fessor Pallas, 246. Conjectures on the cause of, ib. 24>7, 



INDEX. 



209 



Account of a remarkable one in the Tomboro mountain in 

the Isle of Java, 248 
Volcanoes of St. Vincent, notice of, viii. 251. Analysis of dust 

from it, 252 

of Tartary, notice of, x. 197 

(new), notice of, in Portugal, xi. 407 

of mud in bogs, probable origin of, xii. 427 

in Iceland, notice of, xiii. 440. In the western extre- 



mity of North America, ib. 

geological remarks on the actions of, in producing cer« 



tain elevations of land, xiv. 2Q2. Observations on those of 
Sicily, 322 

of mud, eruption of, in Sicily, xvlii. 193. Account of 



the volcano of Purace, 404. Obsidian thrown out by the 
volcano of Sotara, 408 

of Etna, account of the eruption of, 1819, xix. 227 

considerations on, xx. 350 



Voltaic apparatus, a new one described, i. 193 

■ pile (new), notice of, viii. 177 

electricity, observations on, xii. 183. Contact in, 185 

. new form of, apparatus, xv. 143 

trough of Dr. Hare, notice of, xvii. 378 

• . pile, on the distribution of electricity in, xviii. 171 

and current observations on, xix. 337. Apparatus for 

exhibiting the simultaneous rotation of two voltaic conducting 
wires round the opposite poles of magnets, 336. 

piles (dry), notice of, xx. 169 



Volutoe, character of several new shells belonging to the order 

of, xviii. 31 
Vomiting, experiments on, iv. 9 1 
VoRuz (N.), geometrical process of, for the division of a right 

line, xviii. 157 
VuLLiAMY (B. L., Esq.), improved method of constructing the 

dead-escapement for clocks, xiv. 334 
on its theory, and the reducing it to practice for clocks 

with seconds, and larger pendulums, xvi. 1 

P 



210 INDEX. 

VuLLiAMT (Lewis, Esq.), account of a cinerary vase discovered by 
him at Athens, xiii. 72 



Wacke, geological account of, from the north of Ireland, iv. 

162 
Wahlenberq (M.), observations made by, in the Carpathian 

mountains, ii. 441 
Wake of a cask, xvi. 362. Mode of computing the contents of a 

cask therefrom, ib. 363 
Walker (Mr.), syllabus of his lectures on plane geometry, xvii. 

285 
Walls, mode of preventing the effect of damp on, xiv. 433 
Walrus, new fact in the natural history of, xvii. 262 
Walsh (John, Esq.), observations of, on the modern theory of 

physical astronomy, xvi. 270 
Ware (Samuel, Esq.) on the curvature of the arches of the 

bridge of the Holy Trinity, at Florence, xv. 1 
design by, for making a public road under the 

Thames, with observations, xvii. 62 
War-dance of the Caraibs described, ix. 19 
Warming of houses and other buildings, observations on, xi. 229 
" Mr. Perkins's plan for, xviii. 336. Mr. Sil- 
vester's, 337 
Warra, an inland kingdom of Africa, notice of, xiv. 4 
Water, extraordinary disappearance of, in the neighbourhood of 

Mount Vesuvius, ii. 27 
. experiments on freezing, iv. 133 
observations on the colours of waters, v. 81. Influence 

of light on the colours of, 82. Various tints presented by the 

ocean, 85. By rivers, lakes, canals, and all inland basins of 

water, 92. Those exhibited at the surface of water reflected 

by the air incumbent on the water, 97 
memoir of the combined agencies of, and of oxygen gas in 



the oxidation of iron, vii. 55. Decomposed by iron, 182. New 



INDEX. 211 

resultg on the combination of, with oxygen, 879. Weight of, 
and air, 3S0 
Water, mode of preserving sweet, suggested by Mr. Henry, viii. 7. 
Analysis of the waters of the Dead Sea, and of the river Jordan, 
164. Preservationof,at sea, 166. Analysis of sea-water, 167 
■ force of a jet of, ix. 171. Simple mode of purifying, 
186 



• on the compressibility of, x. 899 

— thickened by fire, xii, 58 

experiments on the evaporation of, xiii. 58. Singular 

congelation of, 228. On the influence of, on certain animal 
productions, 418. Analysis of the mineral and thermal waters 
of St. N^ctaire, 396 ; and those of Mount Dore, 417. Purifi- 
cation of the waters of the Seine, 423 
action of, on metallic arsenic, xiv. 233. On the effects 



of boiling water, 237 

■ hydraulic instrument for raising, xv. 137. Change of, at 



falls, 172. Maximum density of, 372. xix. 149 

action of phosphorus on, xv. 383 

— notice of an optical instrument for examinations beneath 



the surface of, xviii. 167. Impermeability of glass to water 
demonstrated, 168. Source of the exhalation of water during 
inspiration, 192 

globules of, found in amethyst, xx. 187. Action of. 



upon glass, 259. Use of, in the formation of lead plaster, 400 
Watering-places, remarks on, xiv. 363 
Water-proof cloth, notice of, xvi. 155 

ram, an hydraulic machine described, i. 211 

retting of hemp and flax, process of, described, iv. 

326 

■ spout, notice of, v. 134 
extraordinary, notice of, vi. 162 



wheels (horizontal), observations on those of the ordinary 

construction, iv. 46. Description of a new patent one, and the 
principles of its action, 47 

Watt (Mr.), biographical memoir of, viii. 136 

P 2 



212 INDEX. 

Watt (Mr.), notice of his important discoveries in the powers and 
properties of steam, xi. 343 

— — contrivance of, for consuming smoke, xii. 349 

Watts's (Mr.), remarks on Captain Kater's experiments for de- 
termining the length of the second's pendulum, viii. 239 

Waves, hydraulic experiments on the propagation of, xvi. 370 

Wavellite, analysis of, viii. 351 

Wax (virgin), analysis of, xv. 384 

Weather, journal of the state of, at Sierra Leone, from May to 
December, IS 12, vi. 301 

Weaver (Thomas, Esq.), description by, of the fossil elk of 
Ireland, xix. 269 

Weaving, improvement on the salubrity of, xii. 332 

Webb (Capt.), experiments of, to determine the height of the 
Himalaya mountains, vi. 51 

memoir of the services and proceedings of, vii. 30 

journey of, in Thibet, ix. 61. Legend of Kcddr-nat'h, a 

. reputed holy place among the Hindus, 62. Instances of re- 
ligious suicide there, 63 ; affected by the bis ki huwa, or 
poisonous air, 65. Approaches the frontiers of Chinese Tar- 
tary in the garb of a trader, 66. Account of his mercantile 
adventure, 67. Notice of the town of Daba, 69. Barometrical 
observations, ib. 

Wedge, observations on the theory of the, xix. 234 

Wedgwood (Thos., Esq.), on the origin of our notion of dis- 
tance, iii. 1. Outline of Bishop Berkeley's theory, 2. How 
far the sense of touch communicates notions of distance and 
magnitude considered, 3. Perception and idea have one com- 
mon nature, 6. Illustration of this law, 7 

Weeds, growth of, successfully prevented or destroyed by the use 

of salt, X. 70 
Weekly Memorials for the Ingenious^ bibliographical notice of, 

xiii. 38 
Weighing machines, temporary contrivance for, xviii. 164 
Weight exists in all matter, xi. SO 
Weights and measures, difficulty of obtaining a standard for, iv. 147 



INDEX. 213 

Weights and measures, third report of the commissioners ap- 
pointed to consider the suhject of, xi. 378 

— — ■ account of the construction and adjust- 
ment of the new standard of, xx. 299 

Wells of London, account of, xiv. 145 

overflowing, at Chiswick, xvii. 70 

Welter on the laws of the propagation of heat, xiv. 207. See 
Gay-Lu^sac. 

Wernerian system of mineralogical chemistry, outline of, iii. 3^2 

AVerner's Theory of the Earth, sketch of, xix. 72 

West India Islands, observations on the geology of, v. 311 

West (Wm., Esq.), analysis by, of a new sulphur-spring at 
Harrowgate, xv. 82 

Whale, fossil bone of, discovered, v. 140 

skeleton of, found, viii. 172 ; its dimensions, 173 

Wheat, remarks on the ergot of, ii. 05. This disease proved to 
be a fungous excrescence, a species of scleroticum, 273 

, musty flavour of, remedy for, iii. 130, 416. See Brandy. 

, mildew of, how prevented, viii. 154. Rate of the increase 

of, 345 

smut in, prevented, 348. x. 446 



Wheeler (J. L,, Esq.), experiments and observations of, on fluo- 

silicic and chloric acids, iv. 287 
Wheels for carriages, observations on the nature and advantages 

of, xviii. 95 
Whbwell (W. Esq.), on the method of calculating the angles 

made by any planes of crystals, and the laws according to which 

they are formed, xviii. 325. xix. 296 
Whidbey's (Joseph, Esq.) account of the fossil bones found at 

Plymouth, xii. 124. xvi. 330 
Whiskey, a preservative of anatomical specimens, xix. 368 
White (John, Esq.), experiments and observations of, on calca- 
reous cements, xx. 50 
White in paintings, process for restoring, xi. 108 
White mountains of New Hampshire, account of, ii. 392. Geo* 

logical ajipearances of, 396. Their vegetation^ 397 



214 INDEX. 

Whitehurst's (John) theory of the earth, notice of, xix. 70 

Whytt's (Dr.) theory of muscular motion examined, ii. 225 

WiLFORD (Mr.), observations of, on the boa constrictor, vi. 115. 
His journal of the temperature of the weather at Sierre Leone, 
301 

Wilkinson (Mr. Samuel), evidence of, in the cause of Severn and 
Co., against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 337. Ob- 
servations thereon, 339 

WiLMOT (Edward, Esq.), demonstration of Taylor's theorem by, 
xvi. 229 

Wilson (Mr. Daniel), evidence of, in the cause of Severn and Co. 
against the Imperial Insurance Company, x. 321 

Wine, observations on the freezing of, i. 69. Account of some 
supposed to be older than the period of the fire of London, 
135. Of some Greek wine, 136 

a new mode of mellowing described, ii. 148 

table of the average quantity of spirit in different kinds of, 

iv. 289. V. 152. Rarely adulterated with sugar of lead, 7S. 

of Etna, strength of, viii. 168 

manufacture of, improved by chalk, xiv. 227 

process for clarifying, xv. 385 

qualities of, how affected, xviii. US. Account of the ma- 
nagement of by the ancients, 119. Of the wines of France, 
125. Spain and Portugal, 129. Germany and Hungary, 130. 
Of Italy and Greece, 132. Of Madeira, 133. Of the Canary 
Isles, 134. Cape of Good Hope, i6. Persian wines, 2Z>. Vi- 
nous liquors, how purified from fruits, 399 

.1 oil of, production and nature of, xix. 96 

Wire (iron), drawing of, facilitated, xix. 135 

« gauze safe-lamps, for preventing explosion in coal mines, 

account of, i. 5. Proofs of their utility, 131. Observations 
on their practical application, 302. ii. 464 

Wires, vibration of, in the air, xviii. 379 

Wodanium, a supposed new metal, notice of, vii. 181 

*- — analysis of, x. 456 

WoHLER ;(M. F.), new mode of forming cyanic acid by, xvi. 102 



INDEX. 215 

WoHLER (M. F.), cyanate of potash prepared by, xviii. SO*. On 
a compound of cyanogen and nitrate of silver, xix. 1 59 

experiments of, on tungsten, xx. 177 

Wolfe's apparatus, new one described, viii. 384 

WoLLASTON (Dr.), on the equivalent of mercury, i. 230 

on the glazier's diamond, ii. 205 

observations of, on the use of some instruments in- 
tended for the northern expedition, v. 223 

• on sounds inaudible by certain ears, x. 398 

'■ — report of, on the present state of Ramsden's dividing 



engine, xii. 38 1 

— — on the concentric adjustment of a triple object-glass, 



xiv. 163. On the finite extent of the atmosphere, 167 
notice of the researches of, in electro-magnetism, 



xvi. 343. Experiments on metallic titanium, 326 

on its apparent magnetism, xvii. 129. On the semi- 



decussation of the optic nerve, 259. On the apparent direction 

of the eyes in a portrait, 274 
WoLLAsTON (Rev. Mr.), on a thermometer for measuring heights, 

iii. 372 
■■ table by, shewing the acceleration of sidereal, or 

mean and solar time, xii. 167 
Women of Batavia, dress and manners of, vii. 8 
Wood buried in the ground, effects of time on, x. 455 

on the deposition of carbonate of lime in, xi. 405 

■ new method of embossing on, xix. 134 

Wood (Captain), on the mud volcano of Mount Tomboro, in the 

island of Java, i. 252 
Wood (Mr. W.), notice of the adhesiye pelt invented by, for lining 

the sheathing of ships, xii. 168 
WooDHOusE (Robert, Esq.), account of the transit instrument 

put up at the Cambridge observatory, xix. 268 
Woodward (Dr.), sketch of his theory of the earth, xix. 67 
Woollen manufactures, notice of improvements in, v. 16 

cloths, ravages of moths in, how prevented, xi. 803 

WooLNooTH (Lieutenant J. C), analysis by, of the Holywell water 

near Cartmel, xviii. 187 



216 INDEX. 

Wootz, or Indian steel, analysis of, vii. SSS 
*' Works of the Learned," bibliographical notice of, xiii. 43 
Worms effectually destroyed by using common salt as a manure, 
X. 68. Esculent plants or fruit-trees rendered unfit for their 
habitation by salt, 63 
AVouLFE (Peter), notice of, ix. 237 
Wounds, on the phosphorescence of, xii. ISO 
Wrecked persons, contrivance for preserving, vi. 135 
Writing (secret), requisites of, x. 89. Of the Spartans, 90. Ob- 
servations on Lord Bacon's rules for, ib. New system of, pro- 
posed, with remarks, 91 

.. by means of ciphers, remarks on, xii. 21. Easy and 

secure method of, 292 



Xanthic oxide, viii. 209, Note, 



Year of the Chinese, remarks on, xvi. 331 

Yeast used as a manure, x. 446 

. expeditious modes of making, xv. 141 

Yeats CI^r.)> observations of, on the opinions of the ancients con- 
cerning contagion, vii. 124 

. on the beneficial effects of the white oxide of bismuth in 

a severe affection of the stomach, viii. 295 

.- hints on a mode of obtaining soft x^ater at Tunbridge 



Wells, xiv. 345. Observations of, on lead and its deleterious 
effects, 352 

I on a cure of an affection of the brain by cold, &c. xv. 8 



Yellow dye obtained from potatoe tops, v. 125 

Yew berries, a protection of fruit-trees from wasps, x. 448 

tree at Peronne, notice of the age of, xx. 412 

Young (Arthur, Esq.), biographical memoir of, ix. 279, His 
education and early pursuits, 281. Commences author, 282. 
Notice of some of his earliest productions, ib. Becomes a 
farmer, 283 ; and marries, ib. Notices of his political essays 
on the British empire, and of his six weeks' tour through the 



INDEX. 217 

southern counties, 284. His northern tour, and his expediency 
of a free exportation of corn, 2S5. Remarks on the style and 
character of his tours, 28C. Notices of several of liis publica- 
tions on rural economy, 2S8. Becomes a reporter to a news- 
paper, 289. Performs a tour through Ireland, which he pub- 
lishes, 290. Its character, ih. Honours conferred upon liim 
for his services to the public, 292. Commences the publication 
of the Annals of Agricullure^ 293. Observations on it, witli 
extracts, 294. Domestic calamities, 297. Performs several 
tours through France, the result of which he publishes, 298. 
Remarks on them, with extracts, 299. Notice of his example 
of France a warning to Britain, 303. Vindication of his poli- 
tical sentiments and conduct, ib. Appoanted Secretary to 
the Board of Agriculture, 304 ; which honours him with its 
gold medal, 307. His works translated into French, 305. No- 
tices of his other political pamphlets, ib. Decided change in 
liis religious sentiments, 30G. Their happy influence on his 
declining years after he became blind, 308. His death and 
character, 309 

Young (Rev. Arthur, jun.) surveys the government of Moscow, 
ix. 307. Settles in the Crimea, ib. 

(Dr.), observations of, on atmospherical refraction, xi. 353 

■ report of, on an improved sliding-rule for gauging casks, 

xvi. 357. Mode of computing the contents of a cask from the 
wake, 3G2 

< a finite ,and exact expression by, for the refraction of an 



atmosphere nearly resembling the earth, xvii. 255 

method of, for computing an observed occultation, xviii. 



343. Remarks on his table of atmospherical refraction, 369. 
Conjectures on an ancient inscription found at Meroe, 304 

(Nathan L., Esq.), on a singular mal-formation of the 



heart, i. 49. Account of the patient, 50. Appearance on dis- 
section, 51. ^Observations on the case, 52 
** Young Students* Library,*' bibliographical notice of, xiii. 38 



218 INDEX. 

Zaire (or Congo}, the river, conjectures concerning the course of, 
V. 130. Objections to its supposed identity with the Niger, 
158. Notice of Captain Tuckey's expedition to explore this 
river, 158 
Zamboni's dry galvanic pile, experiments on, i. 161 

_- new arrangement of, ii. 177. viii. 

177. XX. 169 
Zante (island), account of an earthquake in, xii. 341. xiii. 232 
Zea (Don Francisco Antonio), on the culture of the arracacha, 

X. 27. On a new species of Indian corn raised in France, ib. 
Zecchinelli (M.) on the use of the right hand in preference to 

the left, ii. 423 
Zeine of Maize, properties of, xiii. 402 

Zeise (Dr.) on a new class of compounds of sulphur, xiv. 433 
on the hydroxanthic acid and some of its compounds, xv. 304 

— experiments of, on the re-action of sulphuret of carbon and 
ammonia, and on the combinations thence resulting, xviii. 149 

Zenith, account of a coloured circle round the, xi. 40 
Zimoma, properties of, ix. 401 

Zinc, experiments on the muriate of, vi. 159 ; and on the ben- 
zoate of, 160 

ores of, analysis of, ix. 191 

. • experiments on the sulphuret of, xv. 150 

alloys of, with iron, xvi. 383. Cadmium obtained from zinc 

works, ib. 

— properties of an amalgam of, xviii. 181 
Zirconia, discovery of, v. 378. 

— process for procuring, x. 1S3 

Zirconium, process for obtaining, xviii. 157 
Zodiac of Dendera, remarks on, xiv. 402 
Zoisit, analysis of, from Carinthia, xii. 268 
Zoological geography, observations on, ii. 386 

Society, prospectus and plan of, xix. 369 

Zoology, miscellaneous intelligence concerning, vi . 162 
Zoophytic animals, remarks on, v. 374 

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