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Full text of "The Quarterly journal of the Boston Zoological Society"

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HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 




LIBRARY 



MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY. 



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THE JOURNAL 



.Boston Zoological Society 



(rbitcb bi) 



Arthur P. Chadbourne and A. C. Anthony. 



VOLUME I. 



BOSTON. MASS. : 
PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY. 

■ 18S2. 



W. H. Wheeler, Frittter, 
ij Jt ij Brighton Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

1882. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME I. 



LIST OF PAPERS. 



Anthony, A. C. 

A few Remarks on Ctct'fidelidce . 

Where Frogs go in Winter .... 

A Plant Destructive to Bees 

New England Philampeli .... 

Hydrophilus triangularis at Swampscott. Mass. 



7 

9 

9 

i8 

26 



Austin, E. P. 

Collecting S/ylopidce . . . . . . . . . .12 

Notes on Collecting Certain Biiprestidce ..... 45 

BOWDITCH, F. C. 

Notes on Certain Coleoptera . . . . . . • -27 

Chadbourne, a. p. 

The Rarer Birds of Massachusetts 4, 20, 30 

Red Squirrel Swimming ......... 25 

Entcenia sii'talis S^vallowing its Young ...... 26 

Coleman, Rev. N. 

Notes on the Larvae of Certain Heterocerous Lepidoptera . . 28 

Notes on the Changes in the Larva- of Orygia leucostigma . . 39 

Papilio crcspko?ites at Berlin, Conn. ....... 53 

Another strangely marked larva of Arctia isabella . . -54 

Havward. R. 

The Migrations of Insects ......... 2 

The Red Fox at Randolph, Mass 9 

A Note on the Whip-poor-will ........ 9 

Seletiophorus ellipticus at Nantucket ....... 10 

Notes on the Habits and Distribution of the Massachusetts Rodentia 13 

Another Spotted Egg of Empidonax minimus ..... 26 

Habits and Transformations of Bolitotherus bifurcus • • • 35 

Two Rare Carabidce from Eastern Massachusetts • • • • 37 

i Cicindcla ancocisconensis Harr. in Vermont ..... 38 



Hogg, R. W. 

Dendrcpca pinus in Winter 



25 



Lamb, C. R. 

Baird's Sandpiper at Marblehead, Mass. 



37 



Maynard, C. J. 

x\ Third Specimen of the Swallow-tailed Gull (^Xema furcahim) . 37 
On the Distribution of the Ivorj-billed Woodpecker (CamJ>e/>/iilus 
principalis) ........... 42 

Ornithological Notes from the Magdalen Islands . . . . s^2 



Noble, J. H. 

Late date for Parula ainericana 



Savage, H. 

Habits of Three Species of New England Cohibridce 
OphibGlus doliatus var. triangulus taking Refuge under Water 
The Black form o^-Cici/idela purpurea in New Hampshire 
General Habits of the New England Dytiscidce 
Abnormal Egg of the Song Sparrow ...... 



6 

9 
10 

-4 
26 



TuELOx. T. A. 

A list of the Birds observed near Bradford. Penn. 



47 



THK 



Quarterly Journal 



Oi^^ THK 



Boston Zoological Society, 



Vol. I—JAITUAEY, 1881.-NO. i 



CONTENTS. 

Page. 
THE HISTORY OF THE SOCIETY. ]. 

THE MIGRATIONS OF INSECTS. By BnJand Hmjwurd. 2. 

THE RARER BIRDS OF MASSACHUSETTS. By Arihur 

P.Chadhourtm. 4. 
HABITS OF THREE SPECIES OF NEW ENGLAND COL- 

UBRID^l^. By Henry Savaye. 6. 

A FEW REMARKS ON CICINDELID.^. Bv A. C. Anthony. 7. 

GENERAL NOTES. 9. 

Tne i.'ed Fox at Randolph, Mass.; Caribou at IJange'ey. Kc: Late date for Parula Am- 
eiicana A n< te on the whipi oor-w ill ; Ophitioius triai.guliis takins; refuge undtr wat- 
er; Where frogs go in winter; Setcnophorui ellijiticus at Nantucket; A plant destruc- 
tive to beo*; Tbf black form of <"icindela purpurea in N.H. 



BosTOx, Mass. : 

PURLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 



THE QUAETEELY JOUENAL 

OF THE 

BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

A MAGAZIXE DEVOTED TO THE STUDY OF ZOOLOGY, ES- 
PECIALLY THE VEK1 EBRATA AND IXSEOTA. 

TEEMS: 

For one .year, (postage paid) $.50, in advance, 

copy, " " .15. 



a a 



All subscriptions and contiiluitions should be sent to the 
treasurer. 

All communica'ions should reach the I'ditoi- at least two 
injnths before the pul^licalioji of the number in which they 
are intended to appear. 

Address: 
Boston Zoological Society, 

285 Marlboro' Street, 
Boston, Mass. 



The Journal 

of the 

Boston Zoological Society, 



Vol.1. Jan. 1882. • No.l. 



THE HISTOin^ OF THE SOCIEIY. 

In November of 1880 the idea of foundhig a society ior the ad- 
vancement of the knowledge of Zooiony among a lew friends 
1 e.^i(linL: in the city was formed . During the first meetings \\hic]i 
were li dd toA'aids- the end oi the month, a name and constitu- 
tion were decided ui)on. and three officers were tdected viz. a 
P^iESU'ENT, Sfcketarv and 'Ireasurek. 

It was thought well to have a nu^eUng once a wee\', so Sat- 
urday ev^^ning was deeiil^d upon as being t'lemost convenient. 
At fi st the meetings were irregular, and the ai tieles, for the 
m<>t pait, siioit; hut giaduaily they grew more regular and 
Ije ai tides iiiereas-jd in Lmgtli and interest. 

Karly in January the meetings began to assume a more 
s.ienti.ic charai-ter, and the ])apen3, whicdi previously had been 
taken f.om the works of other authors, became, for the most 
pa t, ori.Linal; being nnai liy based on the observations of the 
wri'ers. 

At theme^tingh d 1 Feb. 12, it was decided to have a library. 
Frcm that time to this it has been steadily increasing, and it 
now contains about fifty volumes. 

At the meetmg held April 2, 1881, the society decided to 
have a collection and a custodian was accordingly elected. 
Tne c Jlection was afterwards given up and the otHce of cus- 
tcdian abolished. 

Ihe annual meeting W' as held April 22, 1881, at which the 
reports of the Secretary and Treasuker >vere presented. 
These reports showed the society to be in a flourishing condi- 
tion. Afier the annual meeting the society adjourned until 
October 29J881. 

At the m-eting held on that date it w^as decided to issue a 
small quarterly journal, which, if the funds of the society 
increase, as we hope they may, will grow larger. 



2. THE JOUKXAL OF THE 

On Xov. 19, 1881, the society celebrated the jiiiinversaiT 
of it's louiidation, at the house of it's president. After speech 
es by several officers the meeting- adjourned and a collation 
was served. Thus has one year rolled by, and it is to ])e sin- 
cerely hoped that many more will pass with still more satis- 
factory results. 

THE MIGRATIONS OP IX8ECTS. 

There is perhaps no subject which could be studied with 
more advarita<>e than the one that I shall briefly treat. Iti? 
a subject which closely affects the interests nay even the lives 
of thousands even millions of people, for it is by th? sudden 
appearance of hords ol insects that famines are caused, atten 
(led l»y great loss of life. Apparently no one knows Avhat 
causes such sudden a id vniexpscted migrations of these wing 
ed creatnres from place to plac?. Of course such tundament- 
al reasons as scarcity of fo^d, change in temperature, or ex- 
cessive increai^e of numbers may pHrtially explain such move 
nientG; but even thes3 do not entirely account for the huge 
hords which, especiallv in the tropics, are constantly migral 



There is one cause, which of late years has been moi*e thor 
oughly considered, and wdiic]i,I think, has much to do Avith 
these migrations. It is the clearing away of timber, and the 
cultivation of the soil. At first sight this leascm would ap 
poar ridiculous, but neverth^lcf-s it is w^ell gnmnded. When 
the natural fjod of a species of msect is e.\ttrminated, it is on 
ly natuial for that epvcies to !?eek anoth?r as near a:-- possible 
to the one from which it foimeil}^ derived its subsistance. 
This may not be found i i the innnediate vicinity and C(mse 
qucntly the s])e.ies is obHged to migrate to another })l,icy in 
order to procure it. 

An excellent ex imple of this theory is afforded by the com- 
mon and Avell-known Colorado potato-beetle (c hkyso^iela 
1()-lixeata). The natin'al food-i)!ant of this dLvstr..cti\espe 
cies was originally n'>t th? potato bat a cimnrju W'cd (sol 
ANUM rostkatum) indigeiums to Colorado and belonging to 



I'H 



iiOST )\ ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 8. 

the siinie group of phints a?^ the potato. When on account 
of the caltivation of the laud, the potato hegau to take the 
place of the weed,;, the beetle was obliged to ehauge its food- 
j)laut aud c*ousequeutly- chose the potato as beiug closely al- 
ii .'d to its forui'ji- ()uc. Tlxei-e is another iuterestiiig- fact whicli 
is likewise prove(l by thip'f ami liar, alas too famihar insect. , 
It is a noticeable fact that man both in historic and prer' 
historic a.!:cs has always h.id the tendency to migrate west.' 
We know thatT^i^' Hlins;''i8dythians and most of the other 
ha]'l)arians that o"\4^rthrew-the Roman empire were of Orien- 
tal origin, and, aetording to iiistory, i^tarted their migrations 
from what is nowTartary in kllLsia, In yet more modern 
tunes, it was west that our f oreyf athers sailed and it is still 
west that the tide ol emigration rfqws . This, however, is exnct 
Iv tlie reverse in insects and thelo'wef* animals in ironeral. 

With tiiem the general tendency is to migrate east. It 
is east that our former fiend tlie Colorado potato-beetle 
has been migrating.'-'' ■ Itis east tlmt the chinch-bug ( blissus 
LKU(T(n»TERiTs) is noW) moving Jind; probably it always will he 
cast that insects will migrate. • )j V: = ; r 

(•)f course thei*e ai*c excvptions to the general rule, both iii 
man and insects. However it iB these exceptions which add 
s!r([ingth to the^ rule. As An exatnple, in man, Ave find that 
the North Amciican Indians have nipved east; since accord- 
in j^ to the pveseut theory, their race originated in Xorth-east- 
«'rn Asia. ' There are likewrse exceptions among insects; as 
European speciesf being tountl in this country and New Eng- 
lantrspccies Ix^ing tiiken on th<6 Pacific coast. But such oc- 
currences ai'e i-are !(nd niu'sfhe ^'onsirlered only as exceptions. 
1 could iill several j>ages \\'\{\\ remarks on the migiaticm 
of insects, h^i.t I have neither liine nor space and consequently 
nuist close Jjii^se Uiief. remaiks with the hope of having the 
pleasiue, Ai some futuie date,' of contributing^ to the Journal 
another ;uti<de^()n the same subject. ^ 

* rh«» .spt'ou's ri\ At'ci %:.\!it jit tli(> rateof seventy miles a yet^i{ and ie> iiowlound oven in Kiirope. 
t \|,jhi)iUue f .-st>r. A.lhnf'tarjifs, Aiithrf'nusgcr<)phulariae,etc- ' ' 



4. THE JOTJRJSr)4cL OF I II K 

THE EAEER BIEDS OF MASS AC H USKn\S. 

In the following list I hhve ciideavored to collect, in eon- 
venient form f( r reference, the authorities forihe oeeurreriCejs 
oforr mere uncommon birds. Owing to lack (»f space only 
the original authorltj^ is given, except in one or (wainstancoH 
where tliere is some confusionij 

llESrEROCICHLA N.^.VIA: Tpswi H. Dkckmbek, 18()-I. 

Cones, Pr. Essex Inst,, V . (1868) p.312. 
NOTE : 'i lie on 1 y Ma- .*<a( h xisniin r -cord . See 
:^. E. Bird Lilefl. (1881) p 5:^. 

[Mi]\jUs PoiYconr^: Has frequently I Cimi t: ken, I ut, 
owing to many behig escaped cage-hiitls, it is 
aim >st im[»ess^ble to de' erinine itH h'ne }> )sition.j 

FOIIOITILA CvTUriEA: C MATH AM. N()\EMHKIJ 18, 

1877 Deane, Vn^, SuiwH (lib III. (1878.) 
p. 45. Falmoi TH 1)e( E» BKi: 18, 1877. 
Swiit„Bili. :Nultal ('lib. 111. (1878) p.l4r. 
OsiEiiviLLE, Cape Cod. SeptkysB! p 2(j, 
1879. Brewer, Fr J-ost S(;c. Nat. Hist.. XX. 
(1879) p 2M. Magnolia August 27, 
1879. Deane, Bull. Nntt.dl ( 1 b V. p ge 47. 

Pakus hudsonk us : [^']S^eak Pkooj ljxe. ' ( V ) IVabodv 
Kep. Orn. Ma.^s,(ls39) p.4()2.] 
CoNCOPi). OcTOBEP :X), 1870 Brewster, 
Am. Kat, VI. (1872) p. 3(0. 
Co^coI(I). Octobep7, 16^i). Brewster. Bull. 
NuttallClub, VI page 5L 
Cambj iDGE Decempi p 31, 1880. Spelmar. 
Bulletin ^/ttall Hub, VI, page 114. 

TiiKvoTiioiMs Lui)ov](i\Nu> : ['Neap Boston.*' Sum 
MEP OF 1875 (V) M'u ot, Bulk Nut tall ( hib, I 
(1876) page 76. J ^ 



Lynx Ji lv (i, 1S7S Urcwi-:-, J>iill Xiittn 1 
Cliil). HI iKi^v^ mi 

IIkl^iitiikiu's vi:hmiv( Kis: Kast Iiamptox. \o 
DA'Jii:. St( 5t!"iis, X w En^laiul Bid T^ifV, I, 

( ISSl ) I'JILIV III. 

('AMHPvIIXiE. SkI'TEMBKII I 1>, 1 nS 1 , SjX'I- 

maii, Hull. Xuttall ("iih, VI, i)aiiv 24^^. 

JIjj.MiXTiiorHAc; A LEU(()BKnNciirALis : Xew • ox- 
viLLE. May 18, ]87(). Brewster, Aneiie-aii 
Sp n'tsiiiau, V, page 83. 

Hudson. May or June 1858. Puidie, Bull. 
XuttailClub, IV, page 184. 

Jll-LMIXTllOPHAGA CELATA: SpKINGFIELD. MaY 15, 

1863. Allen, Biiil. Essex Inst., IV, -page GO. 
1 Yxx. January 1, 1875. Brewer, Pio. lioist. 
Soc. Nat. Hist., XVll, y-Ai e 439. 
CoNC^oi^i>. OcTOBEK 2, 187(5. Brewster, Bull. 
Xuttall Clul). I, I age 94. 

UUX1>K(K( V AUDUBOXl: (\4.M»UIDGE. XoVP:MBEK 15, 

187G. A. M.Fmzer, Bull. Xuttall Club II, 
page 27. 

I Pkijissoglossa TKUxiXA : A r.ire species, but his been 
taken too f.ecpiently for mention here.] 

] )EXi)n<K( A DOMIXK A : ''On the I anks of ('hailes Riv- 
er"* Date unknown. Funbe, Bull. Xultall 
(4nb, HI. pa-e 146 

Siuias MoTAc ilea: Mount Tom. April 28, 1869. 
Allen, AuuM'iean Xatui-alist, HI, page 577. 

[()l>()HOI^XIS AGiLis: Though frequently common in 
antunni, it has never been taken hei e in spring. 

MvioDKxTEs vuTJuvTus: Brookline. June 25, 1879. 
Deaxe, IkiU. Xuttall Club, V, page 117. 

( 7V> he CO nf hi lied.) 



f). THE JOURNAL OF TllK 

HABITS OF THREE SPi:(TES OF SKW 
ENCLAXD COlABRiDK . 

STOREHIA DEKAYI. (Lifdi B,onu, Sn kt ) 

Above, grayisli-browii, Avitli a dors si band of a liohlci* col- 
or, bordered by squall dots. Head, Miiall; eyts |)r( iiiiiK'nt. 
Two brown spots on tlie occiput. Bidow, liu'lit <>iay. Leniilh 
of body, (5.(50 iiielie . Tail, 1.75. Nundxr of s -airs, 17. 
Gastrosteges, 12')-VM). 

1IAH1T8. I bave taken tlii- species in all kinds of places 
from bogs to sandbanks, in tbe early spring. Late in Oct- 
ober 1 observed several specimens, on a roadside near 
Boston Mass.. It is cuief ly insectivorous, altli(>Ui>*h it ma >' 
ver}^ probably feed on youn^iif to ids. This sp 'cies is found 
thr )n<>hout New En 'Liiid although it is rare in tlu^ noithern 
portioas. 

KEMAKKs. Altlioug"h 1 bav ' oj)eiied tie* stoma'-bs <>i' sev- 
er; 1 specimens of this species, 1 liave been nnabN* to <let('ct 
tiac.s of anythi g l)ut insects. 

EUT.EXIA SntTALI?!. (Oarfrr or Sfrijj^uf S-nflr.) 

Ui)l)er parts, dark uml er])rown, with a do.Sal and lateral 
stripe of gray. Under parts, slate-eolor, light -r on th > thr., at. 
Leno'th, 20 inches. Tail, 5.65 inches. Scales, 21. (ijs- 
ro tege?, 130-1(50 

HABITS. The habit-; ( f this abnnd.ant n k • ; r • well- n )W n. 
Its principal food is toads, fiogs, and some (d* tbc mailer 
qiadr p '(Is, sucli as field nuce, moles, etc.. It also preys (,n 
young l)irds and bird's v^^g;<. When coniered it defends it- 
self bravely, aid although it is not furnished \vit!i poisonous 
larg>, Us teeth are -haip enough to (haw bhoJ. It o-ci:r» 
t.i oughi nt North Am rica. 

IJEMAKKS. I have taken a stii[)t (1 srake with M lariic to:id 
in its n.o.th, wliich ; Itlicnigli neaily sw dlowed was still alive. 
I have also hMud ( nc with a li\c lro2 in its slom. c i. 



BOSTON ZOOJ,0(;J('AL SOCIETY. 7. 

CAK MlOnilOPS ATVKKNrS. {ti'd Snake.) 

G'o-isy cIk.'S ii'it hiowii a1)()ve. A grMxi^J lalcral ^t ipt\ 
.' p >tte(l with a darkci" ^'isvd". ' xt 'nd-; tVoiii tb * head to the 
aiiii-J. Head, sinalh th e^i h<j;h spot^ on th^ occiput, iie- 
low, sa/mon ivd, l)ccoining dark r towai'd the tail. Length 
ot l)ody, 7.50 inches. Tail, l.*"^ 5 inches. Scales, 1:3. (J^a^,- 
tns'eges 120-] ol). 

HAiUTS. Thi-! specie fi-equ nts places where the soil is 
light and sandy, xth food consists of young toads and in- 
sects. Tt is usnally fo ind under stitks and stones At Un 
derhill \^t. it was exceedinoly abiiidant along the rail-road 
track, and at other places was taken near sandy roads. It 
i. ic fcctl\ harni'e-s and when take riii the hand it makes 
JH) ( f!l/rt to defrn d itself, hut only seeks to escape. The 
sa.allcst spGclnien I have ever examined measnred a' out 
1.75hic!ies in length. The species is rare in Southern New 
England, hut in Maine, N^ r hern New Ilanpsliire j nl \^e;' 
mont it isal u idant. 

HEMAiiKs. I !iav' found n.mhes of small Carahicjje in 
th ir st( machs. hut h m bv^en ahle to det( ct no other insiH'ts. 
1 have taken oiie np. cluicn wl.osu under s'de was yolicw'sh 
]/ink. 

A Fi:\V KEMARKS OX CICiNDEJ.ID/E. 

Tile faihily of ins 'cts rankh^g fiist in the clas. iiication of 
the IJrder C< L^optera i^^ c; lied C icindeiidiX3, a word (rigiral- 
\\ (.e.ived Ironi t-ie Greek kaio mean nig to l)urn or to iilow. 
'I'his name is uiven them probably because of ^heii' biiiha:it 
m taliic lustre which r.'iiec s the sun's lays when seen in 
certain positions. 'i liey are al^o known l»y several ccm- 
nion nan.es such as s])arkl *rs, and tigei-beeiles from tlie hai.it 
of leaping ^n d nly upon their prey. 

The Cici dedda; have the antemia^ hliform; the legs long 
and slernlei', foi*n.e f( r r. niiing vei*y last ; the jaws p.omi- 
u^^nt and si(dsle-sh «j)cd; the labruni generally wliitc. Tlie 
I iid 'r side of di • hudv. Jind (lie lei>s iUtJ of a bronze or met 



8. THE JOUKXAL <)1 THK 

allic lustre of several shades, anIik-Ij is also the color of tli- 
upper side of many specievS. The le^s and sides of tlie b(;d\ 
are s mewhat hahy. 

Thes ' ins-cts are ])arlial to dry, -an ly plaii^.s ( rroac's, and 
are eiig.iged tlironirhoiit the day (•a])tn!ing an 1 devorring* 
other iiiseets. 1 hi;']' iiu^venients ru'e so quick that n< thini;- 
can elude them, rnd thicrt fore they are diflieult to captine. 
It is their hahit to s 'dd nly start up and ah<>hta few yards 
m advance, inmn diately facuig the approacli'no- object, an ! 
when it comes too n a.v, to dart off; ga*n. In ch>udy weath- 
er they arj very seklom s 'fn, hut a little ^nn>h*ne v.i 1 Mt- 
traet them in numlx rs. 

The larva} that :uv generated ftoni them ar » quit^' -inoul n* 
in their h doits. They iiv<e in cylind ical hoi s, which ti.ey 
burrow ])LTi)endi ularly into th ' (\arth to a depth of s voral 
inches. Stationed at the n:onth ol' these ( xc ivati )ns, win h 
are entir dy tilled with th'e • h .i - y h -ads. ^ ey remain until 
s( ni ' ins<^( t ap| r )iu^h^-s, whi -h th» y suddenlx s^'ize and cai-- 
rv to the b r)t1om to eat at lei^nn*. 

1 he im;:go also i as this hal it of seizing its pi'ay uni wares. 

1 have seen them captur > avni convey to the hottom of 
the h.<de insects much la gcr nnd apparently strcn.'er than 
themselves, thon<>h n^t aianed \Aith su(di sharp manddd 's as 
the tigcr-heetle possesses. 

A faro-e sjdder is often fcnmd whire ( 'i'-in hde a') nmd, 
whi(di T haA^e frequently obs m*v( d descend o t of si;,h mo 
the hole^ of th ' beetles, in their ahsence. To ;d^ ai)j)ei.r..iiee>, 
this s. i er waits until a tii>'erd)eeth' cut' r^ the hole, and then 
seizinu' it, devours it and deposits the she'l at the en ranee.. 
Th' spider a'so att cks the he^'th' on open ground, and, be- 
i JO fjuickcr in its moMinents t laii the t'g r beetle. 1 ha\eseen 
one wh> Iv V nv«'|op(Ml 1 y the l-Lsofthe spider, strug.ul ng 
to get free. 



iiosrox zo<»r.()cu('AL socu/rv. 9. 

gem-:ral notes. 

TUK RED FOX IN' KAXDOi.PK, MASS. Lfisf July, while I 

was Avalking in the I\aii(Iolj)]i woods. I noticed a red fox 
(VULPE8 vrLGARis). \\ li '11 it perceived me it took Hight, 
and soon disappeared. It is the first sj)ocinien of tliis spc( ies 
I have ever observed nrar Boston, although it has been known 

to OCCnr. B. Hay ward. 

CARIBOU AT RANGELEY, ME. Numbeisof cari])on have 
been s en in Eai^geley (Me) neighborhood hitely. One \va^ 
! hot near the Cnjjsiiptue Kiver a shoit time since. The horns 
m( asi rjd some three feet apart, and branched ont Vv^onder- 
fnlly i 1 many points. The meat weighed nearly four hi.nd- 
red p'Jdiids. A S. 

LATE DATE FOR PARULA AM RICAXA, On Xovember 

19, 1881 I shot a Bine Velh w-baeked War! ler (parula am-, 
ericana) on an ajjple tree near my house in Cambri Ige, it 
was crawling j^bont the ti-nnk like the Brown (Jreei)er (cer- 

THIA FAMILIAins). rLH.SohJ. 

A NOTE ON TiiE w Hrp-1 ooR-wiLL. The fifteenth of 

last May, about dask, I observ^ed a specimen of the Whip-poor- 
will (axtrostomus \ oci.ERL sj a.iglit up jn the dead limb 
( fan o dv tree. Afiei ren.aining- there for a few seconds, it 
siretched itself ou: to itsfnll length, inffitd up the feathers ot 
its xh'vk, and uttered its familial no.e. Occasionally it stop- 
})e<l, and in a(juick and nervous manner d.u'ted. afier seme ins- 
ect which it had det cted, caught itAvith a loud click of its bill 
and returned to the brauclt wh cj it liad l^^ft. R. Haijiuard. 

OPHIB )Ll S TKlAN^.l l.l 8 TAKIN(r li. Fl iE UNDER AVATER. 

KiiXi\ in May whil- walking i r^iLUid iicard s Pond at Vv ; y- 
hmi M.is.->., i oUsei veJ a .-m ill Checkered Adder (ophibolus 
TRJAN(. DLL's) in aboiit one foot of water. I had some dili- 
cLiltv in captir.nu" iu a- u swam jdoiio- near the b< t m. 



10. THE JOURNAL OF THE 

When3ver I disturbed the water, it swam into the m iddy wat- 
er that I hid roiled. //. Savage. 

, WHERE FROas GO IX WFXTER. U])on baili'^g out the spr'm<rs 
frogs are (ouikI ini(h'! ^toiu^s e'os' 1o the fViUiilain h'^ad; they 
coine out bri^^ht and hv h nnd of a natu • i1 e(^ ha* . The sever- 
al s])eri(^s of froi>s as well ns different kinr^s of srakes a'*e of- 
ten found to Ihi'numl^er of one hun^'red in tlie same s] ring. 

A.O.Atdhnnii, 

SKLENOPHOR17S ELLIPTIC'^S AT XAXTUCKET III Julv [88.\ 

while passing a sho -t time at Nantucket Ma-s., 1 captined 
under a sto e on the commons, fonr specimens of selenoimi- 
ORUS ellipticus. This sp(x*ies I understand is raiv in Mas- 
sachusetts. R. Hai/wqrd. 

A PLANT destructive TO REES. Til ' 1 irg-^ pod led milk 
weed (asclepias) almost invariably can e-; death to eve y 
bee alightino;- upon it. The bee either adheres to the plant, or 
ese bears away a small scale sticking to its feet, and cripples 
itself fatally in attempting to r^nnove the annoyance. -4.6'. 

Anfhony. 

THE BLACK FORM OF CICINDELA PURPUREA IX NEW HAMP 

SHIRE While at AYilton, T^.H., duiing the summer of 

1880, 1 took two spec'imens of the black form of cicini>ela 
PURPUREA This form though rare in New Eng'and is commdn 
in the West. H, Savage. 



OFFICEES OF THE SOCIETY 

1881-82. 

President 

Henry Savage. 

Secretary 

Roland Hay ward. 

Treafiurer 

Arthur C. Anthony. 



w • / 



/ 



THE 

Quarterly Journal 



OF THE 



Boston Zoological Society. 



Vol. i.-APRIL, 1882 -]N"o. 2. 



Page 

THE ANNUAL MEETING. 11 

COLLECTING STYLOPIDJE. By E. P. Austin. 12 
NOTES ON THE HABITS AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE 

MASSACHUSETTS RODENTIA. By Roland Hay ward. 13 

NEW ENGLAND PHILAMPELI. By Arthur C. AntJiony. 18 
THE KABER BIRDS OF MASSACHUSETTS. (Continued.) 

By Arthur P. Chadhourne. ^^' 
GENERAL HABITS OF THE NEW ENGLAND DYTlSCID^Ij]. 

By Henry Savaye, ^4 

GENERAL NOTES. 

Red Sqiiii-rel Swimmiug; Dendraca pivus in Winter; Abnoi-mal Egg of the Song 
Sparrow; Another Spotted Egg of Empidonax minimtis; EuUenia sirtalis S\\a\- 



lowins 



w; v\noiner ^pocteci Ji,gg or ii,mpiaonax minimus; n-uue 
its Young; HydrophUus trianguhis at Swampscott, Mass. 



Boston, Mass. : 
published by the society, 



THE QUARTERLY J0UR:N^AL 

OF THE 

BOSTOJS" ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

A MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO THE STUDY OF AMERICAN ZOOLOGY, 
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The Journal 

OF THE 

Boston Zoological Society. 
YoL L April, 1882, No, 2, 

THE AN]SrUAL MEETING. 

From the Secretary's Record Boole, 

The Second Annual Meeting of the Society was held 
at 431 Beacon Street, on Saturday evening, January 14, 
1882. After the minutes of the last meeting had been read 
and approved, several by-laws were passed and the con- 
stitution was revised, various articles being added and 
others omitted. 

The Society then listened to the reports of the Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. The report of the former showed 
that eleven meetings had been held and one new member 
elected since the last Annual Meeting. " During the past 
year the Society has been advancing with rapid strides. 
When we compare the first meeting, held but a little over 
a year ago, with the last one, we can readily perceive the 
difference; and when we look at what the Society has 
attained, and compare what it was with what it is, we feel 
that our progress has been indeed encouraging." 

The report of the Treasurer showed that the finances 
of the Society were increasing, although in this depart- 
ment there is room for improvement. 

The next business of the evening was the election of 
officers for the ensuing year. The Secretary was author- 
ized to collect and count the ballots, and announced the 
election of the following ofiicers : 

Peesident: Henry Savage. 
Secretary: Roland Hay ward. 
Treasueek: Arthur C. Anthony. 

As there was no other business to come before the 
Society, the meeting adjourned until January 21, 1882. 



12 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

COLLECTING STYLOPID^. 
By E, P. Austin, 

There are certain degraded forms of Coleoptera which 
are found as parasites on other insects, and which are 
therefore very rarely found in collections, although they 
are, no doubt, not rare in certain localities, and it only 
requires a little careful collecting to secure them. The 
StyloijidcB are found in the bodies of Hymenoptera, Two 
genera occur in the United States, one of which [^enos) 
is sometimes quite abundant in the common paper wasp 
(Polistes metrica.) 

On August 20, 1879, while collecting in the vicinity of 
Readville, Mass., my attention was called to a wasp which 
had a distorted abdomen. When I captured it, it proved 
to be " stylopized," and contained no less than seven 
specimens, although several had made their escape. 

It may be of some interest to give the result of my 
captures that day. Of fourteen male wasps, two were 
'^ stylopized," and of thirty-six females seven were " stylo- 
pized." Besides these I caught about twenty additional 
specimens which I released, after examining them. It 
will be seen that a considerably larger percentage of the 
females than of the males were infested. But when we 
come to the number of the specimens of Xenos the dis- 
proportion is very much greater. Of the seven female 
wasps taken, three escaped from the box in which I had 
them; of the four remaining, one contained a single female 
Xenos, the second a male only, the third two males, and 
the fourth no less than seven males. It will be seen by 
this that the number of male Xenos is very much greater 
than that of the females, there being eleven of the former 
but only two of the latter. 

The female, which never leaves the body of the wasp, 
has a very thin flat head and does not cause as much 
distortion as the male, so it is possible that one or more 
females may have been overlooked in a cursory examina- 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 13 

tion, but the actual number of males is no doubt much 
greater than that of the females. 

The other genus of StylopidcB (Stylops) is found in 
bees of the family AndrenidcE^ which are similar in ap- 
pearance to the Common Honey Bee {Apis mellifica^ 
but are smaller and make burrows in the sand. They 
may be found in the spring, but from the middle of April 
to the first or middle of May is the best time to look for 
them. The bees, if taken, can be kept for some time alive, 
thus giving time for the Stylops to develop. 

IS^OTES O^ THE HABITS AND DISTRIBUTION 

OF THE MASSACHUSETTS BO DENT I A. 

By Roland Hay ward. 

In the following article on the Rodentia of Massachu- 
setts, I have endeavored to give, as fully as my space will 
permit, the habits of this interesting order of Mammalia. 
As the name of the article implies, no description of the 
animals is given, but it is entirely confined to their habits 
and distribution. 

The Rodentia of this state number eighteen species, and 
are embraced in five families and eleven genera. 

SGIURIDJEJ. {Squirrels.) 

1. SciUROPTERUS VOLUCELLA Gcoff. Commou Fly- 
ing Squirrel. A common spiecies, but on account of its 
nocturnal habits it is seldom seen. It is very generally 
distributed, being found throughout the greater part of 
North America. Its nest is a very interesting structure, 
being usually placed in some hollow stump, and is formed 
of grasses, hair, pliable bark and other soft materials, the 
whole rather carelessly and loosely put together. 

2. SciURUS CAROLiNENSTS Auct. Gray Squirrel. Eath- 
er common, but locally so. It is found in the less culti- 
vated portions of the state, and inhabits thickly wooded 



14 THE jour:n^al of the 

districts in preference to more settled places. It seems to 
have a decided fondness for oak woods. 

The Gray Sqnirrel is the largest and handsomest of our 
Squirrels and is much sought after as a pet. It seldom 
constructs its own nest, but selects the deserted one of 
some hawk or crow, which it adapts to its own use. When, 
however, this species makes a nest for itself, it does so in 
a rough and careless manner, employing in the construc- 
tion sticks, pliable bark, etc. The young are reared in 
May. The Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo horealis) is said to 
prey on this species to a considerable extent. 

3. SciUTius HUDSONius Pallas. Red Squirrel. This 
species is rather more abundant than the preceding, and 
is more northerly in its distribution. It is more familiar 
and not so solitary in its habits, being found frequently in 
the immediate neighborhood of the dwellings of man, and 
sometimes making its habitations and rearing its young in 
barns and other outbuildings. 

4. SciURUS CINEREUS Liuu. Fox Squirrel. A very rare 
species, of irregular occurrence, being nothing more than 
a straggler here. It is said to occur abundantly in the 
hickory woods of Western Pennsylvania, and is usually 
found farther South than Massachusetts. 

5. Tamias striatus Linn. Striped Squirrel or Chip- 
munk. Our commonest Squirrel. It is likewise our 
smallest and most familiar species, generally occurring in 
the vicinity of cultivated estates, and seldom seeking the 
solitude of the deep woods. The nest is made in or under 
loose stone walls, in holes in trees, and other similar situ- 
ations. 

6. Arctomys iMONAx Gmelin. Woodchuck. A very 
abundant and well known species, occurring in great num- 
bers throughout all our pasture land. It is somewhat noc- 
turnal in its habits. It makes its burrows, to which there 
are generally two entrances, at the foot of trees and at 
the base of stone walls. When cornered the Wood- 
chuck fights desperately, and often becomes troublesome 
by carrying off young chickens. 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 15 

ZAFOBIBM {Jumping Mice.) 

7. Jaculus hudsonius Cones. Jumping Mouse. 
This species, though far from rare, is by no means numer- 
ous in this state. It makes its nest, in which to rear its 
young, under logs and in Hke situations; the burrow not 
exceeding six inches in depth. In winter, however, it 
probably makes a much deeper one. 

MURIBM (Mice.) 

8. Mus RATTUS Linn. Black Eat. A locally abun- 
dant species, which, though generally rare near the sea- 
board, is more common inland. It is an imported species, 
and was introduced into this country from the Old World 
before the I^orway Rat (Mus decumanus,) which is its 
mortal enemy. 

9. Mus DECUMANUS Pallas. Norway Rat. A very 
common and well known species. More abundant in the 
Eastern than in the Western portion of the state. In 
many of the cities on the sea-coast it is supplanting the 
Black Rat {Mas rattus.) It is our largest and most inju- 
rious species of Mus, and not only commits havoc in our 
larders and granaries, but also does a great deal of dam- 
age in poultry yards, carrying off numbers of young 
chickens and sucking their blood. 

10. Mus MuscuLus Linn. Common House Mouse. This 
species is so well known that many remarks on either its 
habits or distribution would be superfluous. It will be 
sufficient to state, that like the two preceding, it is an im- 
ported species and has introduced itself into almost every 
town and village. 

11. Hesperomys LEUcopus Le C. White-footed Mouse. 
An abundant species. Found throughout the fields and 
woods. On the approach of winter it retires into holes 
in stumps, and there having constructed its nest, hiber- 
nates in a half torpid state. 

12. EvoTOiMYS GAPPERi Vigors. Red-backed Mouse. 



16 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

' Generally rare, although said to occur not unfrequently in 
certain localities in Eastern Massachusetts. Mr. J. W. P. 
Jenks of Micldleboro has taken quite a number in that 
place,* and Mr. J. A. Allen states that there are several 
specimens from the neighborhood of Cambridge, Mass., 
in the Museum of Comparative Zoology.f 

13. Arvicola rip aria Ord. Field Mouse. An abun- 
dant species; at times exceedingly so. It often proves 
itself very injurious by girdling apple and other fruit 
trees, as well as young pitch pines {Pinus rigida Linn.) 

This species is generally more abundant after a winter 
in which there has been a great deal of snow, as they are 
kept warm thereby and few consequently perish from the 
cold. After an open winter they generally decrease, as 
the burrows are too shallow to protect them from being 
frozen. They occur almost everywhere from the most 
sandy fields to swampy meadows. In hay-fields the Field 
Mouse forms burrows extending for a considerable dis- 
tance under the roots of the grass. Its habits however 
vary with circumstances. In grain fields it extends its 
burrows beneath the surface. 

There are said to be at least three litters raised in a 
season, and nests are often found with yonng mice in them 
irom May until October or ]Srovember. The light variety 
of this species, described by Prof. S. F. Baird, under the 
name of Arvicola hreweri^ J has been found by Mr. Allen 
at Muskeget Island and at the Ipswich Sand-hills. 

14c. Arvicola pinetorum And. and Bach. Pine Mouse . 
The occurrence of this rare species in this state, is based 
on two specimens taken in May, 1868, at Springfield, 
Mass., by Messrs. E. and J. A. Allen. It is more abun- 
dant farther south. 

* Baird: N. Am. Mam. p. 521. 

t Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. Vol. 1, No. 8, p. 231. 

X N. Am. Mam. pp. 525-526. 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 17 

15. Fiber zibethicus, Cuv. Muskrat. This is an 
abundant and well known species occurring throughout 
the state. It is a peculiar looking animal, and the largest 
of our Mw^idce. On the approach of cold weather it has 
the interesting habit of building large dams, in the same 
manner as the beaver, in the rivers which it inhabits. 
These structures are always conical in shape, and inva- 
riably protrude a little distance from the water. Great 
numbers of them can often be seen in the same stream. 
By many the appearance of these " dams " is thought to 
indicate a cold winter, Nearly black individuals of this 
species are occasionally taken, although such variations 
from the usual color are of rare occurrence. 



8PALAC0P0DIDJE. {American Porcupines.) 

16. Erethizon dorsatus F. Cuvier. White-haired 
Porcupine. This species is now probably nearly extinct 
in Massachusetts. Mr. Allen gives it as " occasional on 
the Hoosac ranges." I have never seen it in this state. 

In various parts of Northern New England the Porcu- 
pine occurs abundantly, and in the less settled districts 
appears to supplant the rat. It frequently infests old and 
deserted houses, and, as its teeth are very powerful, does 
considerable damage by gnawing. The sound it makes 
when so doing is very loud. It is nocturnal in its habits, 
and during the day lies concealed in hollow logs or in 
holes in trees, not leaving its hiding place until well into 
the evening, generally not until nine or ten o'clock, and 
ceasing its depredations some time before daybreak. In 
Northern Vermont I have seen houses where the steps 
have been entirely gnawed away by these animals. 

The quills which cover their backs have always been 
celebrated. They vary in color from black to different 
shades of gray and even white, are very sharp, more or 
less barbed at the point, and so resisting that I have known 
a bullet to glance from the backs of the animals. 



18 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

LEFOBIDM, {Hares,) 

17. Lepus sylvaticus Bach. Gray Rabbit. An 
abundant species in most parts of the state. I have 
noticed that it is growing less common in the neighbor- 
hood of Boston ; probably on account of its persecution 
by sportsmen. During the past five or six years, I have 
seen about twice that number of specimens in this vicinity, 
but during the past year I have observed but one. The 
fur of this species is never white in winter. 

18. Lepus americanus ErxJ. White Rabbit. This 
species is less abundant than the preceding in most parts 
of the state. Mr. Allen states that it is "rare in the im- 
mediate vicinity of Springfield, though numerous at local- 
ities less than ten miles distant, in several directions." I 
have never observed it near Boston. The fur is white in 
winter. 

NEW ENGLAND PHILAMPELL 
By A, C. Anthony. 

The body of the species of this genus is large and thick. 
The head and eyes rather large and prominent; the tongue 
as long as the body. The abdomen is more than twice 
the leno:th of the thorax which is thick. The legs are long 
and thick. The chrysalis is brown, has no tongue case, and 
measures about an inch and a half in length. The pupa 
which is inclosed is of a creamy color, and all the parts 
are distinctly visible ; in the latter stages of this state the 
wings are colored as in the mature insect. 

In P. satellitia Linn, (pandorus Hubn.) the head 
and middle of the thorax are pale green, the abdomen pale 
brown tinged with green, and a dark patch on each side. 
It expands from four to five inches; anterior wings shaded 
with pale green and deep olive, with a nearly square patch 
on the inner margin shaded to the base. Posterior wings 
pale green, with a large, round, black patch near the mid- 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 19 

die. The mature larva or caterpillar has the head and 
body pale green, deeper on the sides, variegated with dark 
green spots. 

In P. achemon the body is fawn-color, with the hinder 
parts of the segments white. The anterior wings are 
about the same color as the body, with a number of dark 
brown spots near the edges; the posterior are pink with 
several reddish brown streaks; the under surface is roseate. 
The mature larva is light green, varying to pale reddish 
brown, with six cream colored spots on each side, and has 
a tubercle in place of a caudal horn, which is gradually 
dropped as the insect moults. It measures from two to 
four inches. 

While at rest, the head and first three segments of the 
caterpillars of both species are withdrawn within the 
fourth segment, which gives them a very peculiar appear- 
ance. When they have attained the full size they con- 
sume great quantities of the leaves of the woodbine, 
grape, and other vines. Crawling from the vines in 
August, they enter the earth to transform, and appear in 
the mature or moth state during the last of June and the 
first of July. I have known them, when confined, to 
pupate and come to maturity on the surface of the ground. 
The name hawk-moth is given them in the mature state, 
from their habit of hovering in the air while taking their 
food. They may be seen during the twilight flying with 
great swiftness from flower to flower, the honey of which 
they extract. In this operation they much resemble hum- 
ming birds, for which they are often mistaken. 

I have been informed, by one who has raised a number 
of specimens, that a certain species of Tachina is para- 
sitic upon these moths in the immature state, but am unable 
with the given data to arrive at any conclusion as to the 
specific name. 



20 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

THE EAEEE BIRDS OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

(Continued.) 

By Arthur P. Cliadhourne, 

Vtreosylvta PHIL adelphioa : Cambridge, Septem- 
ber 7, 1875. Brewster, Bull. Nuttall Club, 
I, (1876) p. 19. 

Magnolia, Septeajber 18, 1879. C. W. 
Townsend, Bull. Nuttall Club, V, (1880) 
p. 53. 

Brookltne, September, 1880 ( ?) Brew- 
ster, Bull. ]N"uttall Club, yi, (1881) p. 5ij. 

Lanius ludovicianus : W. Newton, October 21, 
1872. Purdie, Am. Nat., VII, (1874) p. 115. 
Newtonville, 1874. Maynard, Am. 
Sportsman, V, (Feb. 13, 1875) p. 313. 
Lynn, November, 1877. Allen, Bull. Es- 
sex Inst., X, (1878) p. 15. 
Brookline, February, 1879. Brewster, 
Bull. Nuttall Club, YI, (1881) p. 55, 

Pyranga ludoviciana: Salem, January 20, 1878. 
Brewer, Forest & Stream, (Mar. 14, 1878) 
p. 95. 
note: Its only Massachusetts record. 

Pyranga Estiva: Lynn, April 21, 1852. Putnam, 
Pro. Essex Inst, I, (1856) p. 224. {Two 
specimens.) 

Framingham, May. Allen, Am. Nat., Ill, 
(1870) p. 578. 

SwAMPScoTT, June, 1866. Allen, Bull. 
Essex Inst., X, (1878) p. 15. 

JEgiothus canescens exilipes : Swampscott, Novem- 
ber 16, 1878. Jeffries, Bull. Nuttall Club, 
IV, (1879) p. 121. 

[Dr. Brewer mentions another specimen 
" undoubtedly referable to Massachusetts," 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 21 

Pro. Best. Soc. Nat. Hist., XX, (1879) 
p. 27a] 

^GIOTHUS BREWSTERI : WaLTHAM, NOVEMBER 1, 1870. 

Kidgway, Am. Nat., YI, (1873) p. 433. 

Crithagra butyracea: South Scituate, Februa- 
ry, 1879. Brewer, Pro. Bost. Soc, XX, 
(1879) p. 271. 

note: All references refer to this specimen 
which was probably once a cage-bird. 

[Carduelis elegans: Many instances of its capture, 
but probably all escaped cage-birds, though 
it may have become naturalized.] 

Serinus meridionalis : Springfield, November. 
Allen, Am. Nat., Ill, (1870) p. 635. 
note: "It may have been a cage-bird that 
had escaped." 

Centrophanes ornatus : Magnolia, near Glouces- 
ter, July 28, 1876. Brewer, Bull. 
Nuttall Club, II, (1877) p. 78. 

Ammodromus maritimus: Naiiant, August, 1877. 
Brewer, Bull. Nuttall Club, III, ( 1878) p. 48. 

Chondestes grammica: Gloucester, About 1815. 
Putnam, Pro. Essex Inst, I, (1856) p. 224. 
Newton viLLE, November 25, 1877. Pur- 
die, Bull. Nuttall Club, III, (1878) p. 44. 
Magnolia, August 27, 1879. Townsend, 
Bull. Nuttall Club, V, (1880) p. 53. 

Spizella breweri: Watertown, December 15, 1873. 

Brewster, Am. Nat., VIII, (1875) p. 366. 
JuNco OREGONus: Watertown, March 25, 1874. 

Brewster, Bull. Nuttall Club, I, (1876) p. 19. 
[Cardinalis virglnianus: This species has been often 

captured here, but all were probably once 

ca2fe-birds.] 



22 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

GuiRACA c^RULEA : Brookline, May 29, 1880. Allen, 
Bull. ivTuttall Club, y, (1880) p. 184. 

Calamospiza bicolor: Lynn, December 5, 1877. 
Allen, Bull. Nuttall Club, III, (1878) p. 48. 

Xanthrocephalus icteroceph ALUS : Watertown, 
October 15, 1869. Allen, Am. :N"at., Ill, 
(1870) p. 636. 

Eastham, September 10, 1877. Allen, 
Bull. Essex Inst., X, (1878) p. 18. [Two 
specimens J m^ing three in all,) 

[QuiscALus MAJOR .* Xo fully authenticated instance of its 
capture. See: X. E, Bird Life, I, (1881) p. 
311; and Allen, Am. Xat, III, (1870) p. 636.] 

CoRVUS CORAX CARNivoRUs: It undoubtcdl}^ occurred 
formerly, but the only recent captures are: 
Tyngsboro', August, 1875. Maynard, 
Rod and Gun, VII, (Oct. 30, 1875) p. Q5. 
WiLLTAMSTOWN, 1876. Tcuuey, Am. Xat., 
XI, (1878) p. 243. 

[CoRVUS ossiFRAGUs: Seen by Mr. Brewster at Cam- 
bridge, March 16, 1875. (Bull. Xuttall 
Club, I, (1876) p. 19 ) It has not yet been 
actually taken here.] 

[Perisoreus canadensis. Xewtonville, " Early in 
SUMMER." Maynard, Birds Eastern X. A. 
Part 7, (1878) p. I^S, The bird though 
only seen, was undoubtedly of this species.] 

Tyrannus dominicensis : Lynn, Early in October, 
1869. Allen, Am. Xat., Ill, (1870) p. 645. 

[TlIAUMATIAS LINN^I: CAMBRIDGE, AuGUST, 1864. 

Maynard, Guide, (1877) p. 128. Xot given 
in the recent lists. See: B. B. & E.., X. 
Am. Birds, II, (1874) p. 468.] 

PiCOIDES TRIDACTYLUS AMERICANUS : LyNN, DaTE UN- 
KNOWN. Allen, Am. Xat., Ill, (1870) p. 
572. ( Two specimens^ male and female,) 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 19'^ ' 



die. The mature larva or caterpillar has the head and 
body pale green, deeper on the sides, variegated with dark 
green spots. 

In P. achemon the body is fawn-color, with the hinder 
parts of the segments white. The anterior wings are 
about the same color as the body, with a number of dark 
brown spots near the edges; the jDOsterior are pink ivith 
several reddish brown streaks; the «nder surface is roseate. 
The mature larva is light green, varying to pale reddish 
brown, with six cream colored spots on each side, and has 
a tubercle in place of a caudal horn, which is gradually 
dropped as the insect moults. Jt measures from two to 
four inches. 

While at rest, the head and first three segments of the 
caterpillars of both species are withdrawn within the 
fourth segment, which gives them a very peculiar appear- 
ance. When they have attained the full size they con- 
sume great ^quantities of the leaves of the woodbine, 
grape, and other vines. Crawling from the vines in 
August, they enter the earth to transform, and appear in 
the mature or moth state during the last of June and the 
first of July. I have known them, when confined, to 
pupate and come to maturity on the surface of the ground. 
The name hawk-moth is given them in the mature state, 
from their habit of hovering in the air while taking their 
food. They may be seen during the twilight flying with 
great swiftness from flower to flower, the honey of which 
they extract. In this operation they much resemble hum- 
ming birds, for which they are often mistaken. 

I have been informed, by one who has raised a number 
of specimens, that a certain species of Tacliina is para- 
sitic upon these moths in the immature state, but am unable 
with the given data to arrive at any conclusion as to the 
specific name. 

B 



20 THB JOURNAL OF THE 

THE EAEEE BIRDS OP MASSACHUSETTS. 

{Continued.') 

By Arthur P. Chadhourne. 

VlREOSYLVIA PHIL ADELPHICA : CAMBRIDGE, SEPTEM- 
BER 7, 1875. Brewster, Bull. Nuttall Club, 
I, (1876) p. 19. 

Magnolia, September 18, 1879. C. W. 
Townsend, Bull. Nuttall Club, Y, (1880) 
p. 53. 

Brookltne, September, 1880 ( ?) Brew- 
ster, Bull. :N^uttall Club, yi, (1881) p. m. 

Lanius ludovicianus : W. Newton, October 21, 
1872. Purdie,Am.Nat.,VII, (1874) p. 115. 
Newtonville, 1874. Maynard, Am. 
Sportsman, V, (Feb. 13, 1875) p. 313. 
Lynn, November, 1877. Allen, Bull. Es- 
sex Tnst., X, (1878)p. 15. 
Brookline, February, 1879. Brewster, 
Bull. Nuttall Club, YI, (1881) p. 55. 

Pyranga ludoviciana: Salem, January 20, 1878. 
Brewer, Forest & Stream, (Mar. 14, 1878) 
p. 95. 
NOTE : Its only Massachusetts record. 

Pyranga estiva: Lynn, April 21, 1852. Putnam, 
Pro. Essex Inst., I, (1856) p. 224. {Two 
specimens.) 

Framingham, May. Allen, Am. Nat., Ill, 
(1870) p. 578. 

SwAMPscoTT, June, 1866. Allen, Bull. 
Essex Inst., X, (1878) p. 15. 

^GIOTHUS CANESCENS EXILIPES : SWAMPSCOTT, NOVEM- 
BER 16, 1878. Jeffries, Bull. Nuttall Club, 
lY, (1879) p. 121. 

[Dr. Brewer mentions another specimen 
" undoubtedly referable to Massachusetts," 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL TOCIETY. 21 

Pro.' Best. Soc. Nat. Hist., XX, (1879) 
p. 270.] 

_/EgIOTHUS BREWSTERI : WaLTHAM, NOVEMBER 1, 1870. 

Eidgway, Am. Nat., VI, (1873) p. 433. 

Crithagra butyracea: South Scituate, Februa- 
ry, 1879. Brewer, Pro. Bost. Soc, XX, 
(1879) p. 271. 

note: All references refer to this specimen 
which was probably once a cage-bird. 

[Carduelis elegans: Many instances of its capture, 
but probably all escaped cage-birds, though 
it may have become naturalized.] 

Serln^us meridionalis : Springfield, November. 
Allen, Am. Nat., Ill, (1870) p. 635.^ 
note: "It may have been a cage-bird that 
had escaped." 

Centrophanes ornatus : Magnolia, near Glouces- 
ter, July 28, 1876. Brewer, Bull. 
Nuttall Club, II, (1877) p. 78. 

Ammodromus maritimus: Nahant, August, 1877. 
Brewer, Bull. Nuttall Club, III, ( 1878) p. 48. 

Chondestes grammica: Gloucester, About 1845. 
Putnam, Pro. Essex Inst., I, (1856) p. 224. 
Newtonville, November 25, 1877. Pur- 
die, Bull. Nuttall Club, III, (1878) p. 44. 
^ Magnolia, August 27, 1879. Townsend, 

Bull. Nuttall Club, Y, (1880) p. 53. 

Spizella BREWERi: Watertown, December 15,1873. 

Brewster, Am. Nat., VIII, (1875) p. 366. 
JuNCO OREGONUs: Watertown, March 25, 1874. 

Brewster, Bull. Nuttall Club, I, (1876) p. 19. 
[Cardinalis viRGiNiANUS: This species has been often 

captured here, but all were probably once 

cage-birds.] 



22 THE JOURNAL OP THE 

GuiRACA c^RULEA : Brookline, May 29, 1880. Allen, 
Bull. N-uttall Club, Y, (1880) p. 184. 

Calamospiza bicolor: Lynn, December 5, 18Z7. 
Allen, Bull. Nuttall Club, III, (1878) p. 48. 

Xanthrocephalus icterocephalus: Watertown, 
October 15, 1869. Allen, Am. ISTat., Ill, 
(1870) p. 636. 

Eastham, September 10, 1877. Allen, 
Bull. Essex Inst., X, (1878) p. 18. [Two 
specimens, making three in all.) 

[QuiscALus MAJOR : Xo fully authenticated instance of its 
capture. See: X. E, Bird Life, I, (1881) p. 
311 ; and Allen, Am. Xat., Ill, (1870) p. 636.] 

CoRVUS CORAX CARNivoRUS: It Undoubtedly occurred 
formerly, but the only recent captures are: 
Tyngsboro', August, 1875. Maynard, 
Rod and Gun, VII, (Oct. 30, 1875) p. Q5, 
WiLLTAMSTOWN, 1876. Tcnucy, Am. Xat., 
XI, (1878) p. 243. 

[CoRVUS ossiFRAGUs: Seen by Mr. Brewster at Cam- 
bridge, March 16, 1875. (Bull. Xuttall 
Club, I, (1876) p. 19 ) It has not yet been 
actually taken here.] 

[Perisoreus canadensis. Xewtonville, " Early in 
SUMMER." Maynard, Birds Eastern X. A. 
Part 7, (1878) p. 168. The bird though 
only seen, was undoubtedly of this species.] 

Tyrannus dominicensis: Lynn, Early in October, 
1869. Allen, Am. Xat., Ill, (1870) p. 645. 

[TlIAUMATIAS LINN^i: CAMBRIDGE, AuGUST, 1864. 

Maynard, Guide, (1877) p. 128. Xot given 
in the recent lists. See: B. B. & E., X. 
Am. Birds, II, (1874) p. 468.] 

PiCOIDES TRIDACTYLUS AMERICANUS : LyNN, DaTE UN- 
KNOWN. Allen, Am. Xat., Ill, (1870) p. 
572. {Two specimens, male and female.) 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 23 

[Bosto:n" Market, Winter of 1836. B. 
13. & E., ]Sr. Am. Birds, II, (1874) p. 534.] 

Sphyropicus varius nuchalis: Cambridge, Date un- 
known. B. B. & K., N. Am. Birds, II, 
(1874) p. 543. 

Centurus carolinus: [Springfield, May IB, 1863. 

Allen, Pro. Essex Inst., IV, (1864) p. 53. 

(Only seen.)'] 

IN'ewton, ]N'ovember 25, 1880. Plum- 

mer. Bull. J^uttall Club, VI, (1881) p. 120. 

note: a pair were seen but only the male 

secured, 

Coiiasset, May 28, 1881. Brewster, Bull. 

^STuttall Club, VI, (1881) p. 183. 

Aluco flammeus americanus: Lynn, About 1864. 
Allen, Am. ^at., Ill, (1870) p. 646. 
Springfield, May, 1868. Allen, Pro. Es- 
sex Inst., VI, (1868) p. 312. 

N'yctale tengmalmi richardsoni: Springfield, De- 
cember, 1859. Allen, Pro. Essex Inst., IV, 
(1864) p. 52. 

Lynn, 1863. Allen, Am. JSTat., Ill, (1870) 
p. 646. 

]^EWTONViLLE, February26, 1879. Brewer, 
Pro. Bost. Soc, XX, (1879) p. 272. 

Speotyto cunicul aria hypog^a : Xewburyport, May 
5, 1875. Deane, Rod and Gun, VI, (May 
15, 1875) p. 97. 

HiEROFALCO GYRFALCO OBSOLETUS I BrEED's IsLAND, 

October, 1876. Cory, Bull. Nuttall Club, 
II, (1877) p. 27. 

[Elanoides forficatus: Seen near Whately. Allen. 
Am. Nat., Ill, (1870) p. 645.] 

Buteo swAiNSONi: Salem, Winter of 1871-2. Allen, 
Pro. Essex Inst., X, (1878) p. 22. 



24 THE JOURNAL OP THE 

Wayland, September 12, 1876. Brewster, 
Bull. ]^uttall Club, III, (1878) p. 39. 

Aquila chrysaetus canadensis: Once common, the 
latest instance of its occurrence is, I believe : 
Fairhayen, ^Noyember 21, 1873. Allen, 
Bull. Essex Inst., X, (1878) p. 32. 

[Cathartes aura: " Two in 1863." Samuels, Agr. Mass. 
Secretary's Keport (1863) p. XVIIL] 

(7V) he cnntimieO.) 



GENERAL HABITS OF THE XEW ENGLAND 

DYTISCID^^, 

By Henry Savage. 

There are eighty-six species of Dytiscidoi in Xew 
England. The largest species, DytiscAts confiuens^ is 1.6 
inches iu length, while the smallest species, Hydroporus 
co7ivexus, measures only .1 of an inch in length. 

The Dytiscidoe are very much like the Carahidce in 
habits and formation. At least nine tenths of their life is 
spent under water. 

The larvae are long and cyHndrical, with large flat 
heads and powerful jaws. Their food consists of tadpoles, 
young fish and aquatic insects, which they attack with 
great ferocity. The smaller species feed principally on 
the larvae of mosquitos and other aquatic Diptera. When 
ready to transform, the larva creeps upon the shore and 
forms an oval cell; in six days it becomes a pupa, and in 
about three weeks it emerges a perfect insect, unless in 
the autumn, in which case it hibernates. The Dytiscidce 
are a very beneficial family, as they destroy many noxious 
insects. 

The imago is oval and adapted for swimming. The 
hind legs, which are used for that purpose, are long and 
thickly covered with hairs. In certain species of this 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 25 

family the elytra of the females are grooved, while those 
of the males are smooth. 

Although these insects kill their prey, they do not de- 
vour it, but obtain their nourishment by suction. 

The Dytiscidoi may be found at any season of the year. 
They fly, both by day and night, from one pond to another. 
Were it not for this, certain ponds might become over- 
stocked and the race degenerate. 

Sometimes in winter the ice is speckled with these in- 
sects which emerge through the cracks to fly, but falling 
on the ice become benumbed. 

When on the land the movements of the Dytiscidce are 
clumsy on account of the shortness of their fore legs. 
Their motions in the water are very graceful, swimming 
along near the surface and at times diving. Most of the 
DytiscidcB, and particularly the larger species, are gre- 
garious. 

GENERAL NOTES. 

Red Squirrel Swimming. The following note may be 
of interest: On March 3, 1878, when walking near a 
small pond, I saw a Red Squirrel (Sciurus liudsoniiis) 
come to the opposite bank. It entered the water and 
swam some ten or fifteen feet to an old elm tree, up which 
it climbed, and after a few moments came down and swam 
ashore. 

I have never heard of a squirrel taking voluntarily to 
the water. Arthur P. Chadhourne, Cambridge, Mass. 

Dendrgeca pinus in Winter. Mr. Brown of Framing- 
ham saw four or fiw^ Pine Warblers (^Dendroeca pinus) 
in that place on December 5, 1881, and shot one. They 
were in company w^ith Chickadees (Parus atricajnllus) 
etc. On January 1, 1882, I saw one or two in the same 
place, they were also with Chickadees and were very tame. 
The locality was west of Framingham, on rather high 
ground, not very far from pine trees. 



26 THE JOUEN^AL OF THE 

The birds seen by Mr. Brown were among alders, but 
those I saw were in apple trees and in their habits greatly 
resembled the Chickadee. Robert W. Hogg^ Boston, 
Mass. 

Abnormal Egg of the Song Sparrow. While collect- 
ing at Roxbury, Mass., I found a nest of the Song Spar- 
row (Melosjn^a meloda) with six eggs, one of which was 
pale bluish white, w^ithout markings, and of the usual di- 
mensions while the others were perfectly normal. Henry 
Savage, Boston, Mass, 

Another Spotted Egg of Empidonax minimus. In 
the Bulletin of the Nuttall Ornithological Club for April, 
1879, I mentioned a spotted Qg^ of this species, which I 
had collected at Milton, Mass. In the following July I 
found at Marblehead, Mass., a nest of this species contain- 
ing three eggs, one of which had a ring of light brown 
spots at the larger end. The Qgg was of natural size and 
the rest of the set were normal in every respect. R, Hay- 
ward, Bosto7i, Mass, 

EUT^ENIA SIRTALIS Sw ALLOWING ITS YoUNG. A fcW 

years ago I surprised a female Striped Snake (Mutcenia 
sirtalis) with her young around her. When she saw me 
she opened her mouth and the young ones quickly disap- 
peared down her throat. I killed her and on cutting her 
open found the young, of which I think there were live 
or six. 

At the time I did not know that this was anything un- 
usual, and I believe that there is still some doubt on this 
subject. Arthur P, Chadhourne, Cainbridge, Mass, 

HiDROPHILUS TRIANGULUS AT SWAMPSCOTT, MaSS. Ill 

the summer of 1879 I took a specimen of this species on 
the beach at Swampscott, Mass. It is rare in this 
state, though common farther to the north. A, C, 
Anthony, Boston, Mass, 



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THE 

Quarterly Journal 



OF THK 



Boston Zoological Society, 



Vol. i.-JULY, 1882.-NO. 3. 



CONTEXTS. 



Page. 



NOTES ON CERTAIN COLEOPTERA. By Fred C. 

Bowdifch. 27 

NOTES ON THE LARVAE OF CERTAIN HETERO- 

CEROUS LEPIDOPTERA. By Rev. N. Coleman. 28 

THE RARER BIRDS OF MASSACHUSETTS. By Ar- 
thur C. Chadhouriie. 30 

NOTES ON THE HABITS AND DISTRIBUTION OF 

BOLITOTHERUS BIFURCVS. By R. Hayvard. 35 

GENERAL NOTES. — 

Baird's Sandpiper at Marblehead, Ma^s. ; A third Specimen of the Swallow-tailed Gull 
{Xema furcaium) ; Two Rare Carabidae from Eastern Massachusetts; Cicindela 
ancocisconensis (Harr.) in Vermont. 



BOSTON, MASS. 
PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY. 



THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL 

OF THK 

BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

A MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO THE STt DV OF AM EUR AN ZOOLOGY ESPEC- 
IALLY THE VEKTEBIIATA AND INt^ECTA. 

Edited by ARTHUR P. CHADBOURNE and A. C. ANTHONY. 

TEPiMS. 

For one year, (postage paid) 50 cts. in advance. 

u u copy, " " L") '' 

All remittances should be sent to tlie Treasurer, A. C. 
Anthony. 

All communications should reach the Editors at least two 
months before the publication of the number in whicli they 
are intended to appeal'. 

Address, 
Boston Zoological Society. 

285 Marlboro' Street, 

Boston. Mass. 

ADVERTISING RATES.— First Imertlotu £0 cents 
a line (Pica); ^o-OO j^er jjcige ; ^S. 00 per half page. A 
discQunt of twenty per cent for each subsequent insertion. 



The Journal 

OF THE 

Boston Zoological Society. 
Vol, 1, July, 1882, No. 3, 

NOTES OX CERTAIN COLEOPTER A. 
By Fred. (L BowdUch. 

The pretty little Eiicrada hmneralis Mels. inhabits the 
bark of our eonmiori red and black oaks and beeches, it 
spins a small, oval, tough silken cocoon or pod, in which it 
passes the winter, and emerges in the latter part of May. 
In beech bark (which is very thin ) it is easy to find the 
cocoons, their white ends showing up plainly on the reverse 
side of the bark when the latter is stripped off. 

During the past winter I have found Dicerca panctnlata 
Schon. quite common among the debris ;ind chips of bark 
around the bases of yellow pines in which the larva bores; 
with it I also took a, specimen of Dicerca (iHperata Lep., and 
one example of dhalcoplmra inrginiensis Dr. Under hick- 
orv and walnut trees 1 have in like manner found Dicerca 
lurlda Fab. nnd Dicerca dlve'rlcata Sax. 1 am strongly of 
the opinion tliat a large nund^er of our Baprestlda^ hiber- 
nate in this manner; and finding them may also give a clue 
to the trees they infest as exampled by the five species cited. 

Several years ago 1 sugared extensively for moths. In 
thie middle of a hot day in July hapj)ening to pass one of 
the trees on which the sugar had been spread on the previ- 
ous night, 1 saw feeding, a specimen of Purparlceuas hu- 
meralw Fab. var. axillaris Hald., making the rounds of 



28 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

all the sugared trees, I captured about a dozeu specimens. 
I saw several fly down from overhead or from the tops of 
the trees ; and this coupled Avith the fact that other than the 
above I have seen but one specimen near the ground, and 
that one flying upwards, leads me to infer that the species 
though comparatively common, lives among the tops of the 
trees (hickories and walnuts) and rarely comes near enough 
to the ground to be captured unless allured by some bait. 

One of my correspondents in Ohio to whom I mentioned 
the fact told me he had captured hundreds of Puyyurlcenus 
hum er alls Fab. imr. humeraUs on sugar-cane stumps. The 
excessive love for sugar thus shown in widely separated 
localities by the type and variety strikes me as quite a 
curious incident. I propose to further investigate this 
matter durino- the comino: season. 



NOTES ON THE LARVAE OF CERTAIN HETE- 
ROCEROUS LEPWOPTERA. 

Btf Her. JV. Coleindu. 

As is well known, the early brood of the Codling-moth, 
Carpocapsa pomonelhu pass through all their changes in a 
comparatively short period, while the late brood do not 
produce the imago till the next spring. It is not so well 
known, probably, that the late brood remain in the larval 
state till spring. From some observations made the past 
season it seems certain that this is the case. While looking 
after Canker-worm moths, November 29, 1881, I found a 
cocoon of a Codling-moth under a piece of bark on an apple 
tree ; and on opening it the larva was found to be unchanged. 
Another cocoon was found April 25, 1882, and on exam- 
ination the larva in this was still unchanged. Just how 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 29 

iiiiieh loiioer it would have continued in tlie larval state is 
a question 1 cannot now answer. 

The finding of the Codling-moth larva in Noveud)er led 
me to make an examination of some pupa cases of the Squash- 
vine ^geria, ^geria cucia^bita^, and 1 found the larvae 
unchanged. I opened some cases from time to time in 
December, January and February. Tn April I opened 
the last case I had to use and no change had occurred up to 
that time. Of course it would be impossible to tell when 
the larvae become pupa^ unless one had a large number and 
could make the examinations often up to the time of the 
change. 

As far as I have been able to determine there is but one 
brood of these caterpillars in a season, but the eggs are 
laid upon the vines at different times, as might be inferred 
from finding larv^ in all stages of growth at the same time 
in the same vine. This would indicate either that the ima- 
go appears at different periods or that the time in which 
the moth works is quite extended. 

The larvae of Arctia isabeUa are black in their early 
stages, but after the second moulting one red ring appears 
— the middle one — and one more at each successive moult, 
first forward, then back of that earliest appearing, until the 
normal number is reached when no more moultings take 
place. 

Sometimes the mature larvjie have but two I'ed rings; 
sometimes but two red tufts in each of the two middle 
rings, or even only three red tufts in all. Again they appear 
wholly red except a black tuft at each extremitj % or one at 
the head, and two at the caudal segment. As nearly as 
I am able to determine now, these very different forms pro- 
duce moths differing in their markings. 



30 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

THE RAKER BIRDS OF MASSACHUSETTS, 

{(^oiK-htdprl.) 

By Arthur P, Chadhourne. 

Cathartes atrata: Swampscott, November, 1850. S. 

JiLLSON, Pro. Essex Inst., I, (1856) p. 228. 

Gloucester, September 28. Allen, Pro. 

Essex Inst., IV, (1864) p. 81. 

Hudson, 1868. Allen, km. Nat., HI, (1870) 

p. 646. 
Canace canadensis: Gloucester, 1851. Pntnani, Pro. 

Essex Inst., I, (1856) p. 224. 

RoxBi^RY, ABOUT 1865. Allen, Am. Nat. HI, 

(1870) p. 636. 
Lagopus albus: Manchester, May. 1859. Putnam. Fro. 

Essex Inst, H (1859) p. 878. 

Note: May have been an escaped cage-bird. 

See Cones. Pro. Essex Inst., V, (1868) p. 289. 
Florida c^rulea: Cohasset, about 1870. Brewer, 

Pro. Bost. Soc, XX, (1879) p. 272. (The only 

recent mstance.) 
Nyctherodius violaceus: Lynn. October, 1862. Allen, 

Am. Nat., HI, (1870) p. 687. 

Somerville, July 80, 1878. Brewster, Bull. 

Nuttall Club, IV, (1879) p. 125. 
Plegadis falcinellus: The recent mstances are: Nan- 

Ti^cKET, September, 1869. Allen, Am. Nat., 

Ill, (1870) p. 687. 

Eastham, Cape Cod, May 4, 1878. Cory, 

Bull. Nuttall Club, HI, (1878) p. 152. 

Orleans, Cape Cod, May 5, 1878. Brewer, 

Bull. Nuttall Club, HI, (1878) p. 151. 



boston zoological society. 31 

East Orleans. Cape Cod, May -j, 1878. 
Allen, Bull. Nuttall Club, III, (1878) p. 152. 

MiCRORHAMPHUS GRISEUS SCOLOPACEUS : EaSTIIAM, .NOVEM- 
BER 2, 1878. Brewer. Bull. Nuttall Club. 
IV, (187!)) p. (U. 

Note. The only recorded capture of the 
western variety is, I believe, that given 
above, but it probably occurs sparingly in 
the Hocks of M. griseus. 

ACTODROMUS BAlRDi: Lo]NG ISLAND. BoSTON HaRBOR. AU- 
GUST 27, 1870. Brewster, Am. Nat., VI, 
(1872) p. 306. 

SwAMPSCOTT. August 27. 1876. Brewer, Bull. 
Nuttall Club, 111, (1878) p. 140. 
[This species probably occurs much oftener 
than is supposed or recorded.] 

Pelidxa subarquata: Nahant, date unknowx. Deaxe, 
Bull. Nuttall Club. IV, (1870) p. 124. 
Cape Ann, 1865. Samuel's, Orn. and Ool. 
N. E. (1875) p. 444. (The specimen was 
found in the market. ) 

Ipswich, about 1875. Brewer, Pro. Bost. 
Soc. XVI, (1875) p. 441*). 
East Boston, early in May, 1871). Brew- 
ster, Bull, Nutfall Club, I, (1876) p. 51. 
Cape Cod, May 10, 1878. Deane, Bull. 
Nuttall Club, IV, (1870) p. 124. 

Machetes pugnax: Newburyport Marshes, May- 20, 
1871. Brewster, Am. Nat., VI, ( 1872) p. 306. 
Chatham, September 11, 1880. Forest and 
Stream, XV, (1881 ) p. 186. (Editorial.) 

ReCURVIROSTRA AMERICANA, LaKE CoCUITUATE, NaTICK^ 

October 19, 1880. Purdie, Bull. Nuttall 
Club, VI, (1881) p. 123. 



32 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

[HiMANTOPUS MEXiCAXUs: Mr. Maynard says in his 
'^Giiide" (p. 143) that it is occasionally seen 
by gunners, and Mr. Allen (Am. Nat., Ill, 
(1870) p. (538) speaks of two specimens seen 
in Boston Market which were said to have 
been killed in the State.] 

Kallus elegans: Sudbury Meadows, date unknown. 
Purdie, Bull. Nuttall Club, 111, (1878) p. 146. 
Nahant, November 21, 1875. Purdie, Bull. 
Nuttall Club, II, (1877) p. 22 
Nahant, Spring of 1876. Brewer, Pro. 
Bost. Soc, XIX, (1878) p. 307. 
Note: The last two references are probably 
identical. See Brewster, Bull. Nuttall Club, 
VI, (1881) p. 62. 

RaLLUS LONGIROSTRIS CREPITANS I BoSTON HaRBOR, MaY 

4, 1875. Purdie, Bull. Nuttall Club, II, 

(1877) p. 22. 

Note: The specimen taken in ''Boston Har- 
bor, May 1876" (Brewer, Pro. Bost. Soc, XIX, 

(1878) p. 307) is identical with the above. 
See Brewster, Bull. Nuttall Club, YI, (1881) 
p. 62. 

Gurnet Point, Plymouth, October, 1879. 
Brewster, Bull. Nuttall Club, VI, (1881) 
p. 62. 

PORZANA JAMAICENSIS: ClARK's ISLAND, PLYMOUTH HaR- 

BOR, August, 1869. Purdie, Bull. Nuttall 
Club, II, (1877) p. 22. 

[Streets of Boston, about September 20, 
1874. Curtis, Forest and Stream, VllI, 
(1876) 129. ''Frohabli/ this Specie><r] 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 33 

loNORNis martinica: Stoneham, November 27, 1837. 

Peabody, Report Orii. Mass. (1839) p. 258. 

EocKPORT, April 12, 1875. Whiteman, 

Am. Nat., IX, (1875) p. 573. 
[Nettiox crecca: Has been wrongly stated to occur in 

Massachusetts. See Brewer, Bull. Nuttall 

Club, 11, (1877) p. 4(1] 
Pelecaxus erythrorhynchus : North Scituate, October, 

6, 1876. Purdie, Bull. Nuttall Club, II, 

(1877) p. 22. 
Pelecaxus ruscus: [Ipswich, date unkxowx. Allen, 

Am. Nat., Ill, (1870) p. 640. Two were 

Heen?\^ 

Naxtucket, Date unknown. Allen, Am. 

Nat. Ill, (1870) p. 641. {One killed from 
flock of tkirteen.) 

Note. Wrongly given as erythrorhynchus. 
Sula leucogastra: (Jape Cod, about September 17, 1878, 

Brewer, Pro. Bost. See, XX, (1879) p. 277. 

[The specimen mentioned by Mr. Putnam 

[Pro. Essex Inst., 1, (1856) p. 221 ) was an 

immature S. hassana.^ 
Rhynchops nigra: [Cape Cod, July 1605!! Voyages 

of Samuel Champlain. Vol. II, (1604-i610) 

p. 87.] 

Wood's Holl, date uxkxowx. Brewer, 

Pro. Bost. Soc, XX, (1879) p. 277. 

Saxdwich, Cape Cod, August 19, 1879. 

Deane, Bull. Nuttall Club, IV, (1879) p. 243. 

( Three sj^ecirnens. ) 

BosTOX Harbor, August 20, 1879 Deane, 

Bull. Nuttall Club, IV, (1879) p. 243. 



34 the journal of the 

Xema sabinei: Bostox Harbor, September 27, 1874. 

Brewster, Am. Sportsman, V, (Mar. 13, 1875) 

p. 370. 
Sterna anglica: Ipswich, September, 1871. Brewster, 

Am. Nat., YI, (1872 ) p. 306. 
Sterna regia: Nantucket, July 1, 1874. Brewster, Am. 

Sportsman, Y, (1875) p. 249. 

{A male and female shot. They ivere prob- 

ahly breeding, ) 
Sterna cantuvca acuflavida: Chatham, August, 1865. 

Allen, Am. Nat. Ill, (1870) p. 644. 
Sterna fuliginosa: Williamstow^n, September, 1876. 

Tenney, Am. Nat., XL (1877) p. 243. 

Lawrence, October 29, 1876. Deane, Bull. 

Nuttall Club, II, (1877) p. 27. 

[Chatham, September, 1877. Brewer, Pro. 

Bost. Soe., XIX, (1878) p. 308. '^Several 

Megalestris skua: Georges Bank, July 18, 1878. 

Brewer, Bull. Nuttall Club, 111, (1878) p. 

188. 
Fulmarus glacialis: Georges Bank, October 28, 1878. 

Brewer, Bull. Nuttall Club, lY, (1879) p. 

64. 

PUFFINUS BOREALIS: CHATHAM ISLAND, CaPE CoD, OcTO- 

ber 11, 1880. Cory, Bull. Nuttall Club, YI, 

(1881) p. 84. 

Note. Tbe type specimen and a number cf 

otbers. 

ADDENDA. 

Helminthophaga pinus: Dedham, date unknown. 
Cabot, Pro. Bost. Soc, YI, (1858) p. 386. 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 35 

West Roxbury, May IT, 187(S. Deaiie, Bull. 
Nuttall Club, III, (1878) p. 188. 
Dendrceca palmarum palmarum: Brookline, middle of 
October, 1878. Deane, Bull. Nuttall Club, 
IV, (1879) p. (U). 

Note: Wrongly given as hifpochry^ea. 
Cambridge, September 18, 1880. Spelman, 
Bull. Nuttall Club, YII, (1882) p. 54. 
Belmont, September 7, 1881. Spelman, 
Bull Nuttall Club, Vll, (1882) p. 54. 



HABITS AND TRANSFORMATIONS OF BOLITO- 
THERUS BIFURCUS FAB. 

By R. Hayujard. 

During the past summer (1881) I had an excellent op- 
portunity to study the habits of this interesting species. 
I was passing a few weeks at Underhill, Chittenden County, 
Vt., where most of my observations were made. 

Bolitotlieriis blfurcns is far more abundant in the north- 
ern than in the southern portions of New England. It feeds 
almost if not exclusively upon the fungus of the birch, 
which in most cases, I believe, proves faUii to the tree. I 
have never seen the eggf^, but have good reason to suppose 
that they are deposited by the iemales on the outside of the 
fungus and that the young larvae hatched from the eggs 
thus laid, immediately eat their way into the heart of the 
fungus. The hole made by their inward progress is black, 
looking much as though it had been burnt, and is generally 
partially tilled with the insects' castings. The lull grow^n 



o6 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

larva is of a dull flesh-color, cylindrical in shape and measures 
about .87 of an inch in length. The mandibles are broad, 
triangular and appear capable of doing good service. The 
head is yellow and free from the body. There are three 
pairs of thoracic and no abdominal legs, and the abdomen 
is divided inlo nine segments, the last one being 
square, with a sharp spine on each side. 

The pupa measures .58 of an inch in length and is also 
of a dull tlesh color. The head is large and prominent. 
The legs and elytra are free. There is a tubercle on the 
edge of each abdominal segment. The male and female 
pupse are easily distinguishable, there being upon the tho- 
rax of the female two prominent tubercles, which, in the 
male, are prolonged into horns. 

The imago is dark brown or black, measuring about .75 
of an inch in length. The elytra and thorax are very 
rough, being covered with a large number of prominent 
tubercles. There are two prominent horns upon the thorax 
of the males which are wanting, however, in the females. 
Newly hatched specimens are generally light-brown, but 
become darker with age. 

The full-grown larviP, pupa3, and imagos were all taken 
late in July, which seems to lead to the inference that the 
time passed in the pupa state is short, probably not exceed- 
ing a week or ten days. As soon as the insects have com- 
pleted these transformations they work their way out by 
the same holes throui!:h which they entered. 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 37 



GENERAL NOTES. 

Baird's Sandpiper at Marblehead, Mass. On Aug. 15, 
1881, while shooting at Marblehead, Mass., after an easter- 
ly storm, 1 secured a specimen of Baird's Sandpiper (Acto- 
dromus hairdi). It was alone when I shot it and was, I 
believe, the only one taken during the season. Chm^Ies 
R. Lamh^ Camhridcje, jMas.s. 

[This is the third recorded instance of its capture in Mas- 
sachusetts, though it prol)ably occurs regularly during the 
migrations. — Edd. ] 

A Third Spectmex of the Sayallow-tailed Gull 
{Xema fur cat um). — I learn from my correspondent, Mr. 
Howard Saunders of London, that he has just received a 
young of the j'ear specimen of the above named rare 
Gull. This is the third specimen in collections, two others, 
both of which are also in Europe, one in the British Museum 
and the other, 1 think, nt St. Petersburg, were taken in the 
Pacific ocean off the const of California. It is extremely 
probable, however, that the usual habitat of this very rare 
bird, is the Arctic Regions. 

The more deeply forked tail and large size at once dis- 
tinguish it from X. sahmei. Length of wing of sabinel 
10. 7-"), o[ fHrcfffifTH l().-")0.— (\ J. jMf/ff/ufrd, Boston. Mass. 

Tw^o Rare Carabid.^^: from Eastern Massachusetts. — 
The occurrence of the two following rare species of Carabi- 
dee in the eastern part of the state seems to be of sufficient 
importance to merit publication in the Journal. 

Cedosrmui wUcoxi, Lee. On July 3, 1880, wdiile col- 
lecting at Nantucket, I procured a specimen of this species 
on the beach, wdiich extends along the south shore of the 



38 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

island. It was dead and in a perfect condition when I 
found it, and had it not been at considerable distance from 
high-water mark I should have supposed that it had been 
thrown on shore by the waves. This is the seventh instance 
of its occurrence in this state. 

Badister nofiatus, Hald. In the spring of 1879 I captured 
one of this species in Milton, under a stone in a rather 
high held. The species is verj^ rare in this state and I know 
of but one other instance of its capture here. — R. Hayivard, 
Boston, Mass. i 

CiCINDELA ANCOCISCONEXSIS (HaRR.) IN V^ERMONT. 

It may be of interest to the entomological readers of the 
Journal to know that 1 secured an example of Ciciiidela 
ancocisconensis at Underbill, Chittenden County, Vermont, 
on July 28, 1881. This is, 1 believe, the first recorded in- 
stance of its capture in the state, although there appears to 
be no good reason why it should not be found there, as it 
is very abundant in the White Mountains only about eighty 
miles distant. This is still more probable since the hab- 
itat of Cicindela ancocisconensis is quite extended, it having 
been already recorded from New^ Hampshire, Maine, West- 
ern Pennsylvania and Northern Illinois. — R. Hayicard. 
Boston, Mass. 



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THE 

Quarterly Journal 



OF THE 



Boston Zoological Society. 



Vol. I—OCTOBER, 1882.-NO. 4. 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 



NOTES ON THE CHANGES IN THE LARVAE OF 

OROYIALEUCOSTIGMA. By Rev. N. Coleman . 39 

THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE IVORY-BILLED WOOD- 
PECKER {GAMPEPHILUS PRINCIPALIS). By 
C. J. Maynard 42 

NOTES ON COLLECTING CERTAIN BUPRESTIDuE. 

By E. P. Austin 45 

A LIST OF BIRDS OBSERVED NEAR BRADFORD, 

FENN. By James A. Tuelou. 47 

GENERAL NOTES . . • 52 

Ornithological Notes from the Magdalen Islands ; Papilio cresphotitcs at Berlin, Conn. ; Another 
Strangely Marked Larva of Arctia isahelhi. 

P:RRATA . . . . ^ 54 

INDEX ^^ 



BOSTON, MASS. 
PUBLISHED BY TTTE SOriETY. 



THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY, 

A Magazine devoted to the study of Aimericax Zoology, 

ESPECIALLY THE VeRTEBRATA AND TnSECTA. 



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The Journal 

OF THE 

Boston Zoological Society. 
Vol. I. Octoben 1882, No, 4, 

NOTES ON THE CHANGES IN THE LARV^ OF 
ORGYIA LEUCOSTIGAIA. 

By Rev. N. Coleman. 

My attention was first directed to these changes, in the 
summer of 1877, by finding some caterpillars of Orgyia 
leiu'ostigma which differed from the description given by 
Dr. Harris in his work on "Insects Injurious to Vegetation." 

Finding some eggs of this species in the winter of 1878 
on tlie branch of an apple tree, I put them in a box for the 
purpose of rearing the larvae. The eggs hatched on May 
10. The caterpillars were dork-colored and had the head 
almost black, but showed some of the distinguishing char- 
acteristics Ijelonging to this species. They became lighter 
after moulting, but, owing to want of time, I was unable 
to ascertain how many times they moulted before pupating. 
On June 14 a number of thfem appeared after moulting 
with white tufts on the back. Some pupated on June 28 
and others on June 29. 

Supposing that sex had something to do with these 
changes in color, I watched carefully for the appearance of 
the moth. On July 3 some of these cocoons hatched, pro- 
ducing both male and female moths, and as I wished to 
obtain some eggs fur further experiment I left them in the 
box. These e^^^ hatched on July 16. Bv Aut^ust 7 all 



40 THE JOURNAL OP^ THE 

the larvae had white instead of yellow tufts, with the excep- 
tion of one, which I put in a box by itself the better to 
observe it. On August 15 this one moulted, appearing with 
white tufts, and pupated August 20. The others pupated 
from time to time between August 14 and August 27. On 
September 2, I found some larvse with yellow tufts on a 
rose-bush, and put them in a box b}^ themselves. By the 
next morning one of them had pupated, another moulted 
during the next day and appeared with white tufts. 

In the course of my experiments I observed larvre in the 
act of moultino; on several occasions. Thev fastened their 
tails to the box and soon the skin which covers the head 
separated, and was then easily pushed off. The remaining 
portion split for a part of the way along the back, and the 
caterpillar by working its bod}^ from side to side, and appar- 
ently rubbing it against the box, gradually pushed the old 
skin back till freed from it. In some instances the cater- 
pillar would bend its head under its body and rub it on the 
box to get off the old skin. Once the old skin split on the 
under side. In all cases the larvae seemed exceedingly 
exhausted by the process, but after resting commenced feed- 



nisc a gram. 



Some of the larvae hatched from eggs laid in the box, 
chano-ed back from the white to the vellow tufts before 
pupating. Some that pupated about August 14 produced 
moths September 5. The one referred to as pupating 
August 20 produced a female. From the eggs laid in the 
box about one male to ^nq females hatched, but in the 
earlier broods the proportion of males was greater. It 
would seem that sex had nothing to do with the changes 
in color. 

I noticed that the yellow stripes along the sides became 
whitish with a slight tinge of green before pupating. On 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 41 

September 10 I found some larva? on a pear tree, some with 
Avhite and others with yellow tufts. September 13 I found 
some more on an apple tree which varied in the same manner. 
In all these the stripes along the sides were greenish-white. 

The larvae found on the rose-bush SeptendDer 2 all pro- 
duced females. On September 20 and September 29, moths 
hatched in the box some males and some females. Several 
of the males reared, as well as those caught, w^ere much 
lighter colored than the others and lacked the wdiite spot 
on the wings. October 4 I found the pupa of a female, full 
of eggs, on an apple tree, showing that the eggs w^ere de- 
veloped very soon after pupating. October 4 some larvae 
w^ere still feeding on apple trees. 

On May 19, 1879, the eggs, wdiich I had kept over winter, 
hatched. The larvae were not so dark colored as those ob- 
served in 1878. The eggs which were waited for w^ith the 
greatest interest did not hatch. 

June 3 some larva? had yellow and others white tufts. 
Those with white tufts had darker colored bodies and the 
pencils of hair over their heads were shorter. I separated 
the white tufted ones from the others, but on June 5 some 
among the yellow tufted ones were found to have white 
tufts, and their heads as well as the w^arts on their backs 
were orang^e-color. On June 6 one of them moulted and 
appeared with black tufts which presented a velvety appear- 
ance. On June 7 some of the yellow-tufted ones moulted 
and appeared with white tufts, and vice versa. On June 17 
some of those first hatched pupated. On June 22 the larva 
w^ith black tufts after moulting appeared w^ith whHe tufts 
and pupated June 30. On July 6 and 7 some of the white 
tufted larva? produced both male and female moths. There 
are differences in the size and markings of moths of the 
same brood. 



42 TFIE JOURNAL OF THE 

On June 6, 1879, I found some fawn-colored larvse on 
the hazel-bush with dark-colored tufts, but did not succeed 
in raising them. 

In the summer of 1880 I experimented still fiirther with 
results similar to those above cited, with the exception that 
the proportion of males was greater. 

While I have not been able in this article to prove any 
connection between the changes in color and sex in these 
larvae, the experiments have been full of interest to me, at 
least, and I have shown that they are general feeders, eating 
almost all kinds of vegetation, cabbage included. I think 
1 have also shown that Orgyia leucostigma and O. antlqua 
of Harris are forms of the same species. Possibly, however, 
that requires some further experiment. 



THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE IVORY-BILLED WOOD- 
PECKER {CAMPEPHILU8 PRINCIPALIS) 

By C. J. Maynard. 

As this 'Trince of Woodpeckers" is becoming very rare, 
being now restricted, as far as I can learn, to a very limited 
area, a few notes on its former distribution, as compared to 
its present range, may prove acceptable. 

William Bartram in 1792 says that it is resident in Florida 
and the Carolinas. Wilson, writing in 1811, states that it 
occurs from New Jersey to Mexico, but adds that it is rare 
north of Virginia. Nuttall, evidently with this information 
in mind, says that it occurs in the Southern States, but is 
seldom found north of Virginia. He also states that it is 
found in Mexico and Brazil, but in these latter instances he 
evidently had another species, the Imperial Woodpecker 
{Cmnpephihf.^ wiperiali^) in mind. 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICi\L SOCIETY. 4o 

It remained, however, for Audubon in 1831 to fix its 
range with certainty. He sajs most emphatically that it 
has never occurred in the Middle States 'Svithinthe memory 
of man," but gives it as being found near the mouth of the 
Ohio River, up the Mississippi as far as the mouth of the 
Missouri, "west of this great river in all the dense forests 
which border its tributar}' streams, even to the very decliv- 
ities of the Rocky Mountains," and so on down to the Gulf 
of Mexico. On the Atlantic it occurred as flir north as 
Maryland but was rare in that state. It was most abundant 
in the lower part of the Carolinas, in Georgia, Alabama, 
Louisiana, and Mississippi, where it was a constant resident, 

It is fortunate for those of us who wish to know the 
former range of this bird that Aububon was so particular 
in defining it. For the Ivory-billed Woodpecker must have 
disappeared very rapidly, since Professor Baird in 1 854 says 
that it was then restricted to the Southern Atlantic and Gulf 
States. 

I have t>:ood authoritv for saving that it occurred in 
the heavily wooded portions of the State of Mississippi 
twenty years ago, and it is quite possible that a few, still 
lincrer there. If such be the case, however, it will be well 
worthy of record. 

During my various visits to Florida I have been enabled, 
by giving especial attention to this question, to ascertain its 
range in that state with tolerable certainty. There is a 
belt of heavily wooded country, either ''hummock" or 
"cypress," extending from a few miles to the eastward of 
the Swanee River, bordering the Gidf of Mexico, and stretch- 
mcr otit to the nortliward about twenty miles, but widening 



to the eastward until it reaches the Withlocoochie River on 
the south. On the St. Johns this belt of timber reaches its 
maximum width, extending from within a few miles of Palat- 



44 THE JOURNAL OF TH?: 

ka quite to Enterprise, flxr up the ''Great River." To the east- 
ward. bet^Yeen the St. Johns and the sea, the conthiuous belt 
is more broken, as it is so encroached upon by the pine woods 
in the rougher sections that the denser woorlhmd is repre- 
sented only by detached bits of "hummock," each contain- 
ing but a few acres of trees; or by cabbage flats, sections 
covered with a dense growth of palmettos- On Indian 
River and about its head the country once again becomes 
a continuous '^ hummock," and is known as ''TurnbuH's 
Swamp," which extends from Sand Point quite to New 
Smyrna. 

The whole of this woodland is the resort of the Ivory- 
billed Woodpecker and I have seen specimens from nearly 
ever}' portion of it, all of them taken during the last twelve 
or fifteen years. Yet how restricted is the range of this 
noble Woodpecker compared to what it was in former years ! 
For unless it still occurs in the State of Mississippi, which is 
doubtful, an area of one hundred miles long by say fifty 
broad will enclose its present residence. 

To crown all this the bird is nowhere common in this 
section; indeed it is quite rare in many places and is grad- 
ually growing less and less common. Why this is so I am 
unable to conjecture. At one time I was inclined to con- 
sider that constant persecution of man was the cause of its 
extinction, and while this may have been indirectly the 
reason in other sections I hardly think it true in regard to 
Florida. 

Last winter while visithig a portion of the woodland of 
which I have spoken, known as the "Gulf Hummocks," I 
found that the hunters seldom if ever shot one; indeed I 
could only learn of a single pair having been killed during 
several years. I had at one time as many as ten men 
searching: for them, and then 1 only secured ^Xyh pairs in a 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 45 

month's time. So it can readily be judged how rare they 
are even in their own stronghold, and I am confident that 
their final extinction is a mere matter of time. 

In October and November while the ^-Ivory-bills'' are 
moulting they retreat to the densest portions of the forest, 
but later in the season they wander more. Their cries, 
which differ from those of the Pileated Woodj)ecker, are 
loud and clear and may be easily recognized. 

The eggs of the Ivory-billed, which I have seen, are 
enough larger than those of any other species to be at once 
recoscnized. 



NOTES ON COLLECTING CERTAIN BUFRES- 

TID.E. 

Btj E. P. Austin. 

The species of Biijorestidce are great flivorites with col- 
lectors owing to the bright colors of many species. All, or 
nearly all, the species are wood-borers and many are injuri- 
ous to timber and fruit trees. 

The Buprestids as a rule are found most abundantly in 
hot weather and are very active fliers. If surprised too 
suddenly to enable them to escape by flight, they drop to 
the ground and Irequently escape in that manner. Among 
the smaller the species Agrili are worthy of especial atten- 
tion, as the species are numerous and individuals abound. 
They may be taken in numbers after the middle of June, 
feeding or resting on the leaves of various shrubs and trees. 
The smaller species resemble each other very closely, and 
have not yet been satisfactorily studied. Each species of 
plant is likely to have a different species of Agrili/s. Oaks, 



4f) THE JOURNAL OF THE 

poplars, hazel, shacl-berry, etc., are the species of plants 
Avhich are most infested. By carefully examining the leaves, 
specimens may be found feeding and should be kept sepa- 
rately with a note giving the plant on which they were 
found as well as the date. Care should also be taken to 
secure both males and females if possible. 

The males have generally brighter colored heads and 
often the whole body is brighter and more shining than that 
of the female, they are also more slender, the under side 
flatter, and in many species with tufts of hair, or with a 
o-roove under the thorax and abdomen which is wantinoi: in 
the female. In mounting the specimens care should be 
taken to place them in such a position that these characters 
may be readily seen, also, so that the claws of the tarsi can 
be examined with a magnifier, as there are differences in 
the position of the tooth with which each claw is furnished 
which separates species otherwise almost exactly alike. 
The males of certain species also have white hairs on the 
antennae which are easily removed but which are probably 
of importance in separating closely allied species. 

A carefully collected series, stating the food-plant and 
time of capture, would be of great importance in determin- 
ing the limits of species. Other species which are found 
in similar situations are BracJu/s, which is abundant on oaks. 
Taj)hrocerus and Pachyscelus are more common on herba- 
ceous plants, particularly 6 Lgiiminosce. 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY 



A LIST OF BIRDS OBSERVED NEAR BRADFORD, 

PENN. 



By J(mies A. Tvel 



OH. 



Before beginning to give a list of the birds found in this 
immediate vicinity it may be well to give a short descrip- 
tion of the country. The principal stream is the Tunang- 
wantj a ti-ibutary of the Alleghany River, which divides just 
below the city into the east and west branches. The Erie 
Raih^oad (Bradford Branch) follows the east branch of the 
river for a considerable distance, but, as it is farther away 
and more thickly settled, my collecting has been done 
mostly along the western branch and one or two of its 
tributaries. 

The west branch Hows for the most part through a heavily 
AvooJed country. On the eastern side for several miles are 
numerous well cleared tracts, which before the oil excite- 
ment were farms. On the western, however, there ai^e but 
few houses after leaving the city limits and these are mostly 
farm houses. There is a ^' tram-road " — surveyed years 
ago for a railroad — which follows the stream for seven or ^ 
eight miles. The road is not much travelled and along its 
sides between it and the "creek," as it is called, are numer- 
ous small patches of woods, in which I have found a few 
birds, though not as many as one would expect from the 
appearance of the land. Flowing into the west branch from 
the west side are four streams, whose general directions are 
nearly parallel with each other but which are separated by 
high hills. The most northerly of these is Bolivar Brook, 
then Bennett Brook, next Wagoner's Run, and last Marilla 
Run. I went once into Bolivar Brook but saw nothiim- 



48 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

worth mentioning. On the top of a hill between Bolivar 
Brook and Bennett Brook I have found Red-headed and 
Yellow-bellied Woodpeckers very abnndant. 

Bennett Brook flows through a narrow valley bounded by 
hills of medium height and for the most part heavily wooded. 
This part of the country, being in oil country language, 
" off the belt," has not been materially changed by any 
operations for oil, consequently it has remained in possession 
of the orio'inal owners who are flirmers. It was aloncj; this 
stream that I did most of my collecting. Wagoner's Run is 
a small stream of which I know but little having visited it 
but a few^ times. Marilla Run is quite a large stream and 
near the upper end presents a very favorable location for 
investigation; but on account of the distance I have only 
been to the upper end twice, though often to the lower, 
and there found one of the best locations I have seen. 

There is no large body of water here, neither have I 
found any extensive swamps. In places along the several 
streams are small tracts of marshy land, but nothing that 
can be compared with the fresh water marshes which border 
some of our rivers in Massachusetts. 

The land lies at an elevation of from 1440 feet, at the 
Erie Depot, to 2500 feet, the highest point in McKean Co. 
The hills around Bradford vary from 200 to 500 feet in 
height. ^' The forests consist principally of Hemlock, Spruce, 
White Pine, Beech, Cucumber, Wild Cherry, Maple, Poplar 
and Oak trees (White and Scrub). Occasionally Chestnut 
Birch, Ash, and Willow. The undergrowth is made up 
mostly of. Laurel, Rhododendron, and Hazel." (Report P. — 
Second Geo. Survey.) 

1. TuEDUS ]SHGEATORius. — Aljout as abundant as at home, 
though not seen as plentifully in the city proper, on account 
of the scarcity of trees. I have never seen this species 



BOSTOx\ ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 49 

in winter. On February 8, 1881, one was seen near the 
office. I saw none again until March 18th. Nests as in 
Massachusetts though one or two exceptional instances may 
be mentioned. A pair built their nest on what is termed the 
'^^and line block" to an oil well near the centre of the city. 
The '^sand line block " is suspended near the top of the der- 
rick which is 72 feet high. I have also seen a nest built on 
the upper side of the ^'buU wheel" of an oil well, and have 
been informed by a reliable person that this situation is fre- 
quently selected, owing perhaps to the fact that a rough 
shed is built over the wheels, thus aftbrding the birds ample 
protection from the weather. 

2. TuRDUS MUSTELiNUS. — Proba]:)ly common though I 
have seen but comparatively few. April 30, '82 saw the first 
one. May 27, '82, found a nest containing four fresh eggs, 
and on June 4, another nest containing three fresh eggs. 

3. TuRDUS PALLASi. — Quite common, more so in spring 
than fall or perhaps more commonly observed. Seen in 
spring from April to June 7. No fall quotations. 

4. TuRDUS FUSCESCEXS. — Commou but less plenty than 
the preceeding (May 21). 

5. SiURUS AURiCAPiLLUS. — A very common species, but 
although I am confident it breeds plentifully have found Imt 
few nests. Earliest May 8, '81, latest June 19, '81 and 
June 19, '82, both Avith fresh eggs. 

6. Harporhyxciius rufus. — Have seen it but once, 
May 21. 

7. MiMUS CAROLiNEXSis. — Abundant, breeds along the 
roads and in the bushes on the side hills. First seen May 
19, but it must have been here some time, for on May 22 1 
found a nest containing four fresh eggs. 

8. SiALiA siALis. — On the hill north of the city this 
species is very almndant. It is not very common in the 



50 THE JOURNAL OF THE 

lowlands but wherever there has been a fire, which has left 
numerous dead stumps standing, the birds appear to congre- 
gate. On March 16, 1881^ I saw the fir^t bird of the season. 

9. Regulus calendulus. — Quite common during the 
spring. First seen April 24, 1881, April 16 1882. 

10. Regulus satrapus — Rather more common than 
the preceeding. (November 4.) 

11. Parus ATRiCAPiLLUS. — Abundant everywhere. 

12. Certhia FAMiLLiRis. — Quite common during the 
spring of '82. First seen April 9. 

13. SiTTA CAROLiNENSis. — Common resident. I have 
yet to meet with Sitfa canadensis. 

14. Troglodytes jedox. — Have seen a few on the 
side hills aw^ay from the houses. On May 24, I found a 
nest with six eggs, incubation commenced. Later I found 
another nest with young. This species dues not seem to be 
very common as I have found none this season. 

15. Mn^iotilta vakia. — R:ither regularly though not 
abundantly distributed. (April 28 and oOth.) 

16. Parula AMERICANA. — Last season, although I w^as 
in the woods every chance I had, I did not meet with this 
species. This year about May 5 it was quite common near 
my house, where a few remained for several days. Seen 
May 5, 6, and 12. 

17. Geotiilypis TRICPL4S. — Not so common 1 think as 
in Massachusetts. I have seen but one or two. First seen 
May 27. 

18. Geothlypis piHLADELPmA. — Ou May 30, 1882, I 
shot a male in a clearing on rather high land near the head 
of Manilla Creek. I shot a female on July 16 which acted 
as though she had a nest, I could find none however. This 
bird was shot on a side hill covered with bushes and small 
trees. 



IU)S'IX)X ZOOLOGICAL SOCIRT^^ 51 

19. Dendk(ECA virexs. — Noticed in the spring on both 
high and low land. Shot one May 26 and another July 24, 
also September 25, 1881. 

20. Dexdrceca c^erulescens. — Shot a specimen May 6, 
1882. Think I have seen another. 

21. Dendrceca blackburnl^. — Common this spring, but 
I am positive that it did not occur, at least in the same 
locality, last year. First seen May 2, but common until May 
11, occurring all over the city. After the 11th they left 
as suddenly as they came and I have not seen one since. 

22. Dendrceca pexsylvanica. — Abundant (May 11 and 
20). 

23. Dexdrceca estiva. — Common. On May 2 I found 
a nest with five fresh eggs, also one June 7. 

24. Dendrceca maculosa.— Have seen but lew, shot 
one July 17 and another May 30. 

25. Dexdrceca coronata. — Common in spring. First 
seen April 24. 

26. Myiodioctes canadensis.— On July 3, 1881,1 saw 
a number of this species in a small grove in low land. On 
July 4th revisited the same grove but could not find one. 
I have also seen it several times this spring. 

27. Setophaga ruticilla. — Common, but not as much 
so as in Massachusetts. Seen about the same time as 
Dendroeca hiackburnlce, and lil>e it, more common apparently 
this season than last. A nest found June 7th contained 
three eggs. 

28. HiRUNDo HORREORUM. — Apparently not very com- 
mon (Apr. 24th). 

29. Petrochiledox luxifroxs. — Abundant, but nesting 
only in certain localities. I noticed some birds of this species 
apparently building on July 16, 1882. 

80. Tachycixeta bicolor. — Common. First seen April 



52 THE JOURNAL OP^ THE 

31. Progxe suBis.— One colony inhabits some martin- 
boxes in the city. 

32. YiREO OLiVACEUS. — The only vireo I can indentify. 
Very common last season. 

33. Ampelis cedPvORUM. — Very common. I have never 
seen them in winter. Have taken fresh eggs July 12, 26, 
and August 20. 

34. Pyeaxga rubra. — Common summer resident. It 
was unusually plentiful about the middle of May 1882. 

35. Carpodacus purpureus. — I have seen but two of 
this species. The first was found dead on a nest in the 
spring of 1882 and the second on a tall tree up Marilla Run. 

( To he Contituied. ) 



GENERAL NOTES. 

Orxithological Notes from the Magdalen Islands. 
— The following birds were obtained in the Magdalen Islands 
by my collector, Mr. k. M. Frazer, during a short stay in 
that locality. The first two are, I believe, new to the pub- 
lished lists of the ornithological fauna of that section. 

Geothlypis Philadelphia ( WIU.) Baird. Mourn- 
ing Warbler. — One specimen taken. 

Chrysomitris pinus {Wils.) Bona20. Pine Finch. — 
One specimen, a young female, was shot June 26, 1882. It 
was evidently hatched this season. 

Aegiothus linaria Cab. Red-poll Linnet. — Birds 
in nesting plumage occurred in flocks. A specimen obtained 
on June 29 were changing into the second plumage. 



BOSTON ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 5-^ 

Curvirostra leucoptera WUs. White-winged 
Cross-bill. — Birds in the nestling plnmage were taken from 
June 18 to 20. In this connection it may be well to state 
that when I was in the Magdalen Islands some years ago 
I fomid no nestlings, but the males were in fidl song, evi- 
dently about to breed, as late as the middle of Jidy. 

Finicola enucleator (Lhin.) VielU. Pine Grosbeak. 
— Four specimens were obtained by Mr. Frazer on June 29, 
which Avere about to breed. 

Scolecophagus f errungineus (Gin.) Swains. Eusty 
Blackbird. — Nestlings of this species were taken nearly 
fully fledged on June 29. 

A nest of the Black-poll Warbler {Dendroeca sb^lata) 
containing three fresh eggs was taken June 23. A full set 
of four ^gg^ of the Pigeon Hawk [Falco coJuharms) were 
obtained from a nest built in a low spruce on June 9. — 
C. J. Mnynarcl. Bosfoi) 3Iass. 

Papilio cresphontes at Berlix, Coxx. — Papilio cres- 
lohontes has been found in Berlin, Conn., for several years 
past. The first I caught was in September, 1877, and 
another was captured by a friend earlier in the same season. 
I took one in 1878, and in 1881 I also captured a very good 
specimen. This season I have taken eight, most of them 
in my door-yard. Five others have been caught in this 
town, and one at New Britain, a town adjoining. I have 
also seen several others, one of them ten miles from 
Berlin. It may be of interest to state that while two of 
the specimens were t;dven early in the season, the others were 
captured the last of August. 

It would be interesting to know what is their food-plant 
here, and also if there be two broods in a season. Some 
of the specimens taken recently were bright and fresh.— iV! 
ColemrnK Berlin, Conn. 



54 The journal of the 

Another strangely Marked Larva of Arctia Isa- 
bella. — It may be interesting to notice still another varia- 
tion in the color of the larva of Arctia Isabella, in addition 
to those mentioned bj me in the last number of the Journal. 

Sometime since I found a caterpillar of this species en- 
tirely red. After a few days it moulted and came out black 
with three red rings and two red tufts on one of the black 
rings. — N. Coleman^ Berlm, Conn. 



HKKATA. 



Page 2. lines 12 and 19, for horcls read hordes. 
" 2, " 24, for subsistance read subsistence. 
'• 4, " 11, for polyglol us YQ2i^ polyglottus. 
•^ 5, '' 13, for Hdmitherus read Helmiiithotherus. 
'' 8, '' 25, for Clcindelce read CicindpUdce. 

9, '^ 29, for took flight read took to flight. 
'' 9, " 27, and 29 for 02)hibolus trianguhis vend ophi'bolns 

doliatus yar. trianguhi.H. 
" 22, " 5, for Xantlirocephcdus read XanfJioceplicdus. 
'' 26, '* 80. for Hklropliilas trlangnlus read Hi/dropJulus 
triangularis. 
13, for Lep read Lee. 

16, for divericata, Sax read dicaricata. Say. 
28, for wilcoxi read willcoxi. 
6. for notia.fus read notat'us. 



a 


^7, 


a 


2, 


a 


37, 


&i 


38, 



INDEX TO VOLUME I. 



A. 

Abnormal egg of the Song Sparrow, 

26. 
Actodromus bairdi, 31, 37. 
Adder, Checkered, 9. 
^geria cucurbitas, 29. 
yEgiothus brewsteri, 21. 

canescens exilipes, 20 

linaria, 52. 
Aluco flammeus americanus, 23. 
Ammodromus maritimus, 21. 
Ampelis cedrorum, 52. 
Andrenidae, 13. 
Annual Meeting, the, 11. 
Another spotted egg of Empidonax 

minimus, 26. 
Anthrenus scrophularise, 3. 
Antrostomus vociferus, 9. 
Aphodius fimetarius, 3. 

fossor, 3. 
Apis mellifica, 13. 
Aquila chrysaetus canadensis, 24. 
Arctia isabella, 29, 54. 
Arctomjs monax, 14. 
Arvicola breweri, 16. 

pinetorum, 16. 

riparia, 16. 

B. 

Badister notatus, 38. 

Baird's Sandpiper at Marblehead, Mass. 

37' 
Bee, Honey, 10, 13. 
Beetle, Tiger, 7. 
Blackbird, Rusty, 53. 
Black form of Cicindela purpurea in 

New Hampshire, the, 10. 
Blissus leucopterus, 3 
Bolitotherus bifurcus, 35. 
Buprestidse, 27. 
Buteo borealis, 14. 

swainsoni, 23. 



Calamospiza bicolor, 22. 
Calosoma willcoxi, 37. 
Campephilus imperialis, 42. 
principalis, 42. 



Canace canadensis, 30. 
Cai-abidae, 7, 24, 37. 
Cardinalis virginianus, 21. 
Carduelis elegans, 21. 
Caribou, 9. 

Carphophiops amoenus, 7. 
Carpocapsa pomonella, 28. 
Carpodacus purpureus, 52. 
Cathartes atrata, 30. 

aura, 24. 
Centrophanes ornatus, 21. 
Centurus carolinus, 23, 
Certhia familiaris, 9, 50. 
Chalcophora virginiensis, 27. 
Chickadee, 25. 
Chinch-bug, 3. 
Chipmunk, 14. 
Chondestes grammica. 21. 
Chrysomela 10 lineata, 2. 
Chrysomitris pinus, 28. 
Cicindela ancocisconensis, 38. 

purpurea, 10. 
Cicindelidse, 7. 
Codling-moth, 28. 
Collecting Stylopidaj, 12. 
Colorado Potato-Beetle, 2. 
Colubridse, 6. 
Corvus corax carnivorus, 22. 

ossifragus, 22, 
Crithagra butyracea, 21. 

Crossbill, White-winged 53. 
Curvirostra leucoptera, 53. 



Dendroeca aestiva 51. 

aviduboni, 5. 

blackburnise 51. 

cairulescens, 51. 

coronata, 51. 

dominica 5. 

maculosa, 51. 

palmarum hypochrysea, 35. 

palmarum palmarum, 35. 

pennsylvanica 51. 

pinus, 25. 

striata, 53. 

virens, 51. 
Dendroeca pinus in winter, 25. 



56 



J?idtx. 



Dicerca asperata, 27. 

divaricata, 27. 

lurida, 27. 

punctulata, 27. 
Dytiscidse, 24. 
Dytiscus confluens, 24. 

E. 

Elanoides forficatus. 23. 

Empidonax minimus, 26. 

Erethizon dorsatus, 17. 

Eucrada humeralis, 27. 

Euspiza americana, 26. 

Eutaenia sirtalis, 6, 26. 

Eutsenia sirtalis swallowing its young, 

26. 
Evotomys gapperi, 15. 



Falco columbarius. 53. 

Few remarks on CicindelidtC, a. 7. 

Fiber zibethicus, 17. 

Finch, Pine. 52. 

Florida caerulea. 30. 

Fox, Red, 9. 

Frogs, 10. 

Fulmarus glacialis, 34. 

G. 

General habits of the New England 

DjtiscidEe, 24. 
General Notes. 9, 25, 37, 52. 
Geothljpis philadelphica, 50. 

tnchas, 50. 
Grosbeak, Pine, 53. 
Guiraca ludoviciana, 22. 
Gull. Swallow-tailed. 37. 

H. 

Habits and transformations of Bolito- 

therus bifurcus, 35. 
Habits of three species of New England 

Golubridse, 6. 
Hares, 18. 

Harporhvnchus rufus. 46. 
Hawk. Pigeon, 53. 
Red-tailed, 14. 
Hawk-moth, 19. 
Helminthophaga celata, 5. 
leucobronchialis. 5. 
pinus, 35. 
Helminthotherus vermivorus, 5. 
Hesperocichla njevia, 4. 
Hesperomys leucopus, 15. 
Hierofalco gyrfalco obsoletus, 23. 
Himantopus mexicanus, 32. 
Hirundo horreorum, ^i. 



History of the Society, the, i. 
Hydrophilus triangularis at Swamp- 

scott, Mass.. 26, 
Hydroporus convexus, 24. 
Hylotomus pileatus, 45. 



I. 



lonornis martinica, T^2 

J- 

Jaculus hudsonius, 15, 
Junco oregonus, 21 
Jumping Mouse, 15. 



Lagopus albus, 30. 
Lanius ludovicianus, 20. 
Late date for Parula americana, 
Leporidae, iS. 
Lepus americanus, 18. 
sylvaticus, 18. 



Linnet, Red-poll, 



M. 



Machetes pugnax, 31. 
Megalestris skua, 34. 
Melospiza meloda, 26. 
Microrhamphus griseus, 31. 

griseus scolopaceus, 31. 
Migrations of insects, the, 2. 
Mimus carolinensis, 49. 

polyglottus, 4. 
Mniotilta varia, 50. 
Moth, Canker-worm. 28. 
Mouse, Field, 16. 

House, 15 

Jumping, 15. 

Pine. 16. 

Red-backed, 15. 

White-footed, 15. 
Muridse, 15. 
Mus decumanus, 15. 

musculus, 15. 

rattus, 15. 
Muskrat, 17. 
Myiodioctes canadensis. 51. 

mitratus, 5. 



Nettion crecca, 33. 
New England Philampeli, 18. 
Note on the Whip-poor-will, a, 9. 
Notes on certain Coleoptera, 27. 
Notes on collecting certain Buprestidce. 
Notes on the changes in the larvae of 
Orgyia leucostigma, 39. 



Indt 



Notes on the habits and distribution 
of the Massachusetts Rodentia, 13. 

Notes on the larvae of certain Heter- 
ocerous Lepidoptera, 28. 

Nvctale tengmahiii richardsoni. 23. 

Nvctherodius viohiceus, 30. 

O. 

On tlie distribution of the Ivory-billed 
Woodpecker ( Campephiliis princi- 
palis)^ 42. 

Ophilolus doliatus var, triangulus, 9. 

Oporornis agilis, 5. 

Orgyia antiqua. 42. 

leucostigma, 39. 

Ornithological notes from the Magda- 
len Islands. 52. 



Papilio cresphontes at Berlin, Conn. 

52>- 
Parula americana, 9, 50. 
Parus atricapillus, 2^, 50. 

hudsonius, 4. 
Pelecanus erjthorhjncus, 33. 

fuscus, ^^. 
Pelidna subarquata, 31. 
Perisoreus canadensis. 22. 
Perissoglossa tigrina, 5. 
Petrochiledon lunifrons, 51. 
Philanipelus achemon. 19. 

pandoras, 18. 

satellitia, 18. 
Picoides tridactvlus americanus, 22. 
Pinicola enucleator, 53. 
Plant destructive to Bees, a, 10. 
Plegadis falcinellus, 30. 
Polioptila caerulea, 4. 
Polistes metrica, 12. 
Porcupines, x\merican, 17. 

White-haired, 17. 
Porzana jamaicensis, t^i. 
Progne subis, 52. 
Puffinus borealis, 34. 
Purpuricenus hunieralis var. axillaris. 

27- 
humeralis var. huineralis, 28. 
Pyranga eestiva, 20. 

iudoviciana. 20. 
rubra. 52. 

Qj.iiscalus major. 22. 



R. 



Rabbit. Grav. 18. 
White'. 18 



Ral'us elegans, 32. 

. longirostris crepitans, 32. 
Rarer birds of Massachusetts, the. 4, 

20, 30. 
Rat, Black, 15. 

Norway, 15. 
Reci.rvirostra americana, 31. 
Red Fox at Randolph, Mass., the, 9 
Red Squirrel swimming, 25. 
ReL,ulus calendulus, 50. 

satrapus, 50. 
Rh^ nchops nigra, t,^. 

S. 

Sandpiper, Baird's, 37. 
Sciuridae, 13. 

Sciuropterus volucella, 13. 
Sciurus, carolinensis. 13. 

cinereus, 14. 

hudsonius, 14, 25. 
Selenophorus ellipticus at Nantucket, 
Serinus meridionalis, 2f. 
Setophaga ruticilla, 51. 
Sialia sialis, 49. 
Sitta canadensis, 50. 

carolinensis, 50. 
Siurus auricapillus. 49. 

motacilla, 5. 
Snake, Garter, 6. 

Little brown. 6. 

Red, 7. 

Striped, 6, 25. 
SpalacopodidiE, 17. 
Sparrow. Song, 26. 
Speotyto cunicularia hypogea, 23. 
Sphvropicus varius nuchalis. 23. 

23. 
Squirrel, Flying, 13. 

Fox, 14. 

Grav. 13. 

Red'. 14'. 

Striped, 14. 
Sterna anglica. 34. 

cantiaca acuflavida, 34. 

fuliginosa, 34. 

regia, 34. 
Storeria dekayi. 6. 
Stylopid?e, 12. 
Stylops, 13. 
Sula leucogastra. 33. 



Tachina. 19. 
Tachycineta bicolor. 51. 
Tamias striatus. 14. 
Thaumatias linnsei. 22, 
Third specimen of the Swallow-tailed' 
Gull {Xema furcaturn). 37. 



58 



Index. 



Tiger Beetle, 7. 
Thrj'othorus ludovicianus, 4. 
Troglodytes iiedon, 50. 
Turdus fucescens, 49. 

migratorius, 48. 

mustelinus, 49. 

pallasi, 49. 
Two rare Carabidae from Eastern Mas- 
sachusetts, 37. 
Tjrannus dominicensis, 22. 



Vireo olivaceus, 53. 
Vireosylvia philadelphica, 20. 
Vulpes vulgaris, 9. 

W. 

Warbler, Blue Yellow-back, 9. 
Mourning. 



Warbler, Pine, 25. 

Wasp, Paper, 12. 

Where Frogs go in winter, 10. 

Whip-poor-will, 9, 

Woodchuck, 14. 

Woodpecker, Imperial, 42. 

Ivory-billed, 42. 

Pileated, 45. 



Xanthocephalus icterocephalus, 22. 
Xema furcatum, 37. 

sabinei, 34, 37. 
Xenos, 12. 



Zapodidge, 15. 



END OF VOLUME I. 



BOSTON SHOOTING SUITS, 



MADE ONLY 



By G. W. SIMMONS & SON, 

OAK HALL, BOSTON, MASS. 



WATER-PROOF DUCK. 

SUITS, $11.— Coat. $5.00; Pants, $3.00; Vest, $2.00; Cap or Hat, $1.00. 

CORDUROY. Black or Brown. 

SUITS, $22.— Coat, $12.00; Pants, $5.00; Vest, $3.00; Cap, $2.00. 

MOLE SKIN. 

S ITS, $25.— Coat, $14.00; Pants, $6.00; Vest, $3.00; Cap, $2.00. 

TAN LEATHER. 

SUITS, $60.— Coat, $22.00; Breeches, $15.00; Vest, $12.00; Cap, $5.00; 
Leggings. $6.00. 

Oak Hall, Boston, Mass. 

HELIOTYPE. 

PERMANENT PHOTOGRAPHIC BOOK ILLUSTRATIONS. 

The Heliotype Printing Company 

AKE PRODUCERS OF ILLUSTRATIONS BV THE 

Uost approved Fhoto-Mechanic&l, Photo-Lithographic and Fhoto-Engraving Processes. 

Employed by the United States Government in illustrating Scientific and Medical reports; 
by Scientific, Historical, and other learned Societies; by the leading Pub- 
lishers, and for illustrating Town and Family Histories, 
Trade Catalogues, Show Cards, &c. 

Facsimiles of Medals and Coins, Ancient Manuscripts, Paintings, Drawings, 
Sketches, and Autograph Circulars, Views and Portraits from Nature, 
Medical and Scientific Objects, x\ntiquities, etc. 

Special attention paid to the reproduction of Architects', Engineers', and 
Su rvcyors' Drazvings. 

Estimates and Specimens furnished on application. 

THE HELIOTYPE PRINTING COMPANY, 
2H Tremont Street, Boston. 

NEAR UOVLSTON sriU':KT. 



C. J. MAYNARD & CO. 

PUBLISHERS AND DEALERS IN 

And Naturalists' Supplies, 

( Estatolislieci ixi 1SS4) 

304 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 

We would especially call attention to our large Stock of Birds' E ggs 
and Naturalists' Supplies. Send for Catalogue, addressing as above. 

168 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

W. J. KNOWLTON. 

A specialty made of supplies for Naturalists and Taxidermists. 

A Case of Instruments for Taxidermists, put up in best manner and with 

superior quality of Tools, for - - - - - $12. 

OrdinarA' dissecting case, - - - - - - $4. 

Also mounted Birds, Birds' Skins, Eggs, Minerals, and Shells, and 
Natural History specimens. 



W. B. CLARK & CARRUTH, 

BOOKSELLERS, 

NO. 340 "WASHINGTON STREET, 

BOSTON. 



SECOND-HAND BOOKS PURCHASED. 



*} 



Subscriptions to Leading Periodicals received at Club Hates. 



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