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Full text of "Queen Esther cook book"

Class / J X^^ 



Copyright }l^_ 



COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT. 






C/aZ^!lL«A- t-<>^^-o^--C-. 



QUEEN ESTHER 
COOK BOOK 



Q Q Q 



B 



Compiled by 

THE QUEEN ESTHER CIRCLE 

of the 

FIRST METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

of 

EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 






6 



%^ 



Copyright, 1911. 
by mrs. alfred l. lindsey. 



SCI.A305410 
wo. I 



Foreword! 



The good ladies who compiled this book, perhaps doubt- 
ing my literary taste, did not ask me to write it. They have 
honored me all the more, however, and tacitly credited me 
with another kind of taste by asking me to pen this fore- 
word. 

It has been my privilege to eat a great deal of Methodist 
cooking in my time. Unhesitatingly, I give it a high mark. 
With the aid of this volume, it becomes possible for any 
family to enjoy the best of eating. Dr. Frost's doughnut 
recipe reads amazingly good. Even the holes in those 
doughnuts possess nutritive value. Bishop Quayle's method 
of woods-broiling a beefsteak has its appeal to the vege- 
tarian also. 

Eating is one of the oldest habits of the human race. J 
believe it antedates clothing. Eating may bring us either 
happiness or unhappiness, depending not so much upon 
what we eat as how it is prepared. Professor Scott's recipe 
for preparing apples, however, has a pre-adamic tinge to it. 

A good cook is a genius. A good recipe is an inspiration. 
The knowledge of how to follow a recipe is pure talent. 
The willingness to give one's knowledge of good cookery 
to be perpetuated in such a book as this for the benefit of 
humanity is one of the highest types of human kindness. 

This is a book you will enjoy reading, in the hammock 
in summer or before the fire during the long winter even- 
ings. One can devour the contents of this book, without 
caring much whether the hero finally marries the heroine 
or not. This book is a library in itself. In it are potato 
poems, raspberry romances, hot bread history, and a world 
of jams, jellies, cakes, pies and other joys amid which to 
travel. It truly is that splendid type of book — one we may 
read, mark and inwardly digest. 

WILBUR D. NESBIT. 



Table of Contents 



Soups 

Fish and Oysters 

Meats and Poultry 

Vegetables 

Luncheon Dishes 

Salads and Sandwiches 

Puddings and Sauces 

Frozen Desserts 

Pastry 

Cakes and Icings 

Cookies and Small Cakes 

Bread and Breakfast Cakes 

Pickles and Preserves 

Favorites of Our Favorites 

Queen Esther Sweets 

Beverages 

Miscellaneous 

Tables of Weights and Measures 



Your Banking Home 

By extending at all times 
careful personal attention 
to the affairs of each cus- 
tomer, the officers and 
directors of this institu- 
tion strive to make it a gen- 
uine banking home for all 
the people -:- -:- -:- -:- 



Interest Paid on Savings 

STATE BANK of EVANSTON 

Fountain Square 



CAPITAL and SURPLUS $300,000.00 



Officers 

William A. Dyche, President 

H. J. Wallingford, Vice-President 

F. J. Scheidenhelm, Cashier 

G. H. Tomlinson, Assistant Cashier 



"The fate of Nations depends on how they are fed." 



Be sure to patronise our advertis- 
ers, for it is by their help that we 
have been able to place this l)ook in 
your hands at so lozv a price. 

Queen Esther Circle. 



"When two do the same thing, it is not the same thing 
after all." 

Publius Syrus. 



MEMORANDA 



Soups 



"You cannot choose your earthly lot, 
Nor right all seeming zvrongs; 
The ^ clam likes not 
The chozvder hot, 
But that's ivhere he belongs." 



10 SOUPS 

OYSTER SOUP. 
One quart water, }4 teacup butter, 1 pint milk, 2 tea- 
spoons salt, 4 crackers rolled fine and ^ teaspoon pepper. 
Bring all to boiling point quickly, then add 1 quart oysters, 
let the whole come to boiling heat as soon as possible and 
then remove from fire. 

Mrs. N. M. Jones. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

One quart oysters, 1 quart milk, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 
tablespoon flour. Put oysters on fire, skim carefully, mix 
to a cream, butter and flour, add to the oysters, season to 
taste, and let it just come to a boil. 

Mrs. C. E. Pope. 

JELLIED CONSOMMfi. 

One can consomme (Campbells), J^ box Knox's acidu- 
lated gelatine, juice of ^ lemon, salt and pepper to taste, 
I3/2 cans water. Mix thoroughly. Dissolve gelatine, add- 
ing it lastly to other ingredients. Let mixture chill 4 or 
5 hours. Serve in cups with bread sticks. Will serve 8 
persons. 

Katherine Howard Ward. 

SCOTCH BROTH. 

To lJ/2 lbs. of mutton of the shoulder add 5 quarts cold 
water. Boil, then add 1 cup each of barley and green dried 
peas. Chop very fine ^ head of cabbage. Grate 2 medium 
sized carrots, 2 small turnips. Add these, and 1 small onion 
and a little parsley chopped fine. Salt and pepper to taste. 
Simmer slowly for four hours, skimming often. 

Christina Mackay. 

CREAM OE TOMATO SOUP. 

Drain the liquor from a can of tomatoes. Cook the pulp 
with a bit of onion until thoroughly soft, then press it 
through a sieve. Cook again until as thick as catsup. Heat 
1 quart of milk and add to it 1 even teaspoon cornstarch 
dissolved in a little cold milk, and a generous lump of but- 



SOUPS 11 

ter. Salt and pepper to taste. Before combining, stir >4 
teaspoon baking soda into the hot tomatoes. After the 
foaming has ceased add the milk and let all just come to 
a boil. Serve immediately. One may prepare the tomatoes 
the day before or in the morning so that the finishing will 
take only the few moments needed to prepare the milk. 

Mrs. A. B. Phipps. 

MACARONI AND TOMATO SOUP. 

Two lbs. of the neck of beef, 3 quarts water, 1 pint 
stewed tomatoes, 1 pint macaroni in two inch pieces, 1 
onion, 2 cloves, sprig of parsley, ^ cup cornstarch, 3 tea- 
spoons salt and Yz teaspoon pepper. Cut the meat into 
small pieces. Put into the soup-pot with the cold water and 
heat slowly to the boiling point, then skim carefully and 
simmer 2 hours, then add onion, parsley and cloves, and 
cook an hour longer. Skim off all fat and mix the corn- 
starch with a cup of cold water and stir into soup. Now 
add tomato, salt and pepper, and cook gently for half an 
hour longer. Cook the miacaroni in a quart of boiling water 
20 minutes, boiling rapidly ; then turn it into a colander and 
pour a quart of cold water over it stirring all the time. 
Strain the soup and return to the kettle, then add the mac- 
aroni and cook for twenty minutes. 

Mrs. C. E. Kaile. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

Cut 2 lbs. of cod or haddock in pieces and have ready 3 
large potatoes peeled and sliced thick, 2 onions sliced. Fry 
brown in soup kettle 3 slices salt pork. Remove pork and 
put in layer of fish, potatoes and onions, salt, pepper and 
parsley. Continue until all ingredients are used, cover with 
cold water and boil twenty minutes. When nearly done 
add 2 cups milk, 4 hard crackers split and dipped in cold 
water. Then boil 5 minutes. 

Miss Raddin. 

CORN CHOWDER. 
Dice two ounces of salt pork and fry in a deep stew pan 



12 SOUPS 

until crisp. Then add four potatoes and two onions, also 
diced, and cover with water. When potatoes are done, add 
one quart of milk and one can of corn. Boil up once, sea- 
son with salt and pepper and serve very hot. 

Mrs. Horace M. Ford. 

CHICKEN GUMBO. 

Cut up chicken as for frying, roll in flour and fry in 
bacon fat. Chop 1 large onion fine and fry. Add 4 cups 
sliced okra, or one can okra, a sprig parsley, piece of red 
pepper and salt to taste. Then add to this 1^ cups toma- 
toes, 3 cups boiling water. Cook all together until chicken 
is very tender. More hot water can be added as it cooks if 
one likes the soup not so thick. Serve with spoon of 
boiled rice in each dish. Veal, cut in pieces, is an excellent 
substsitute for the chicken ; or oysters may be used in place 
of the chicken. 

Mrs. A. B. Phipps. 

ASPARAGUS SOUP. 

Cook 2 bunches of asparagus until tender. Remove the 
heads and set aside. Rub the stalks through a sieve and 
add the pulp to a pint of chicken stock. Heat a pint of thin 
cream in a double boiler. Cook together one tablespoon of 
butter and two of flour, add asparagus pulp. Season with 
salt and pepper and when ready to serve add the asparagus 
tips and the hot cream. 

Mrs. Alfred L. Lindsey. 

MUSHROOM SOUP. 

Pick, peel and wash 1 pound of mushrooms ; cut them 
in pieces with a silver knife ; put them in a porcelain sauce 
pan ; add 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 1 tablespoon boiling 
water, ^ tablespoon salt, stir the mushrooms with a silver 
fork and cook for 5 minutes. Let them cool, then drain, 
skim out, and put through a meat chopper, add them to the 
liquor. Put 1 quart milk into a double boiler ; rub together 
1 tablespoon butter and 2 tablespoons flour. Stir into the 
milk, cook until creamy, add the mushrooms, season with 



SOUPS 13 

salt and pepper. If made with the white mushroom, add 
the yolk of an egg just before taking from the fire. 

J. C. L. 

SCOTCH POTATO SOUP. 

To V/i lbs. of mutton of the shoulder add 5 quarts cold 
water, boil, then add 6 medium sized potatoes. Grate and 
add 2 carrots, also, 2 small turnips. Chop fine %. head of 
cabbage, 1 onion and a little parsley. Simmer slowly for 
four hours, skimming often. 

Christina Mackay. 

BAKED BEAN SOUP. 

Cook together for 20 minutes 2 cups cold baked beans, 
2 cups of hot water, 2 slices of onion, 2 stalks of celery, 1^ 
cups of tomatoes. Rub through a sieve. Season with salt 
and pepper and thicken with 2 tablespoons each of butter 
and flour cooked together. 

Boston Cooking School. 

PUREfi OF BEANS. 

Boil 2 cups Navy beans until the skins come ofif. While 
boiling add 3^ onion. Put all through a sieve and to every 
tablespoon of paste add 1 cup soup stock thickened with 
flour and butter rubbed together. Season with salt, pep- 
per, 1 clove and celery leaves. One may vary this soup by 
substituting peas or potatoes for the beans. 

Mrs. C. F. Champlin. 

CREAM OF CLAM SOUP. 

Drain liquor from 1 small can minced clams and add it 
to \y2 pints milk. Scald in double boiler and bind with 2 
tablespoons butter and 1 tablespoon flour. Cook for 5 min- 
utes. Salt and pepper to taste. Add minced clams and 
serve at once with a little whipped cream on each portion. 

Mrs. Claude B. Cumnock. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

Cook 3 cups chopped celery in 2 cups boiling water 15 



14 SOUPS 

minutes. Add 2 cups chicken or veal stock, boil 15 min- 
utes more and rub through sieve. Scald 1 slice of onion 
in 2 cups milk and remove onion. Add milk to stock. Bind 
with 2 tablespoons butter and 3 tablespoons flour, salt and 
pepper to taste. A cup of cream may be added or a spoon- 
ful of whipped cream put in each cup. 

Mrs. William V. Brothers. 

CREAM OF SPINACH SOUP. 

Two cups boiling water, 2 quarts spinach, 54 teaspoon 
soda. Cook thirty minutes and rub through sieve. Add 
2 cups stock, heat and bind with Yx cup butter and 5^ cup 
flour. Season with salt and pepper. Last, add 2 cups milk, 
bring to boiling point and serve at once. 

K. R. G. 
CREAM OF CORN SOUP. 

Run a can of corn through a sieve or flour sifter. Heat 
and slightly thicken with 2 tablespoons of flour rubbed up 
with an equal amount of butter. Add thickened corn to a 
quart of boiling milk and heat together in double boiler 
for 20 minutes to half an hour. Canned peas may be 
treated in the same wa}'. This makes a very wholesome 
dish for children. 

Mrs. G. W. Boot. 

NOODLES FOR SOUP. 

Rub into two eggs as much sifted flour as they will ab- 
sorb, then roll out as thin as a wafer ; dust over a little flour 
and then roll over and over into a roll. Cut off thin slices 
from the edge of the roll, and shake into long strips. Put 
them into the soup lightly and boil for ten minutes. About 
a salt spoon of salt should be added while mixing with the 

flour. 

Mrs. George M. Sargent. 



SOUPS 15 

VEDVET SOUP. 

One quart of any kind of good stock, 1 cup of cream, sea- 
son to taste, pour boiling hot on the beaten yolks of 4 eggs, 
with Yz cup of cream. Reheat and serve as soon as it 
reaches a boiling point. Serve in cups like bouillon. Very 
nice indeed. 

Mrs. C. S. Coburn. 



^a^^^esa^^^^S!*? 





When You Buy Oysters 
In Cans Like These 

You are sure of getting the Cleanest, 
Freshest, Purest Oysters in all the World. 

Because — 

They are grown on the Best Government 
Inspected Beds. 

Because — 

The Hermetical Seal on every Can 
KEEPS IN the Good Oyster Flavor and 
KEEPS OUT all Dust, Dirt and Impuri- 
ties. Our Signed Guarantee is on every 
can. 

Booth's Guaranteed Oysters 

In Sterilized Hermetically Sealed Cans 
''They're Sealed by Us to be opened by You" 

Send us your Dealer's name and we will mail you our Recipe 
Book "Oysters in a Hundred Ways" — FREE. 

Booth Fisheries Company 

General Offices 
2222 Majestic Bldg. CHICAGO 



Fish and Oldsters 



'From the rude sea's enraged and 
foaming mouth." 

—Twelfth Night. 



18 FISH AND OYSTERS 

BAKED FISH WITHOUT DRESSING. 

Rub the clean fish with plenty of salt and let it lie for an 
hour; then wipe off the salt and rub well with lemon juice, 
leaving it another half hour where it will keep very cold. 
Now split down the back enough so that it can be opened 
and spread out fiat ; dredge with flour and put in a shallow 
tin in the oven, pouring over it about 3 tablespoons of fresh 
milk and dotting with bits of butter, or thin slices of fat 
salt pork. Bake from 20 minutes to one half hour. Serve 
in a hot platter with a few spoons of hot cream and a little 
butter poured over it, or use a Hollandaise sauce poured 
around it. This manner is equally good for halibut or 
fresh cod steaks. 

Tuesday Ten Cook Book. 

JELLIED FISH. 

One large or 2 small white fish (about 4 lbs), ^ pack- 
age Nelson's gelatine, bay leaves and whole white peppers. 
Boil the fish in well salted water until thoroughly done. 
Remove skin and bones, carefully preserving the shape of 
the fish ; place on the fish platter with head and tail in 
place, and sprinkle with some whole peppers and bay 
leaves. Soak the gelatine one hour, pour over it 1 quart of 
the hot fish stock, pour this over the fish and set on the 
ice. When ready to serve loosen the edges of the gelatine 
and place under and around the fish, crisp lettuce leaves 
and pour over the whole a sauce Tartare. 

Mrs. L. C. Tallmadge. 

CREAM FISH. 

Pick into bits 1 cup fish, add to it 2 cups cream or 2 cups 
milk, with butter size of an egg. Let it come to a boil, and 
add 1 egg and Yz teaspoon cornstarch rubbed smoothly to- 
gether with a little cold milk. Serve on toast. Good break- 
fast dish. 

Mrs. C. E. Pope. 

FISH A LA CR£ME. 
Put 1 cup milk on to boil in a double boiler. Scald with 



FISH AND OYSTERS 19 

it a bit of bay leaf, a sprig of parsley and Yi slice onion. 
Salt and pepper to taste. Rub together 2 tablespoons each 
of flour and butter. Into this stir slowly the boiling milk 
to make a white sauce. Have ready \Y\ cups flaked cold 
fish and Yz cup buttered cracker crumbs. In a baking dish 
place alternate layers of fish, crumbs and sauce and put in 
the oven until a nice brown. This may also be baked in 
ramekins or shells. 

Mrs. C. N. Stevens. 

FRENCH CODFISH. 

Cream half a package of prepared cod fish and put in 
small buttered dishes, filling each half full. Beat the white 
of an ^gg stiff and gradually add a cup of mashed potatoes, 
beating all till light. Drop spoonful on top of fish and keep 
in hot oven until it puffs and browns. 

Mrs. Margaretta S. N. Helm. 

COD FISH CAKES. 

Wash 1 cup raw salt codfish, picked up in half inch 
pieces and freed from bones. Pare 1 pint potatoes and cut 
into quarters. Put potatoes and fish together in a stew- 
pan and cover with boiling water. Boil 25 minutes or un- 
til the potatoes are soft. Drain off the water, mash and 
beat the fish and potatoes until very light. Add 1 teaspoon 
butter and Y\ saltspoon pepper and when slightly cooled 
add 1 ^gg well beaten. Shape in a tablespoon without 
smoothing very much, slip off and fry in smoking hot lard 
for 1 minute. Fry only five at a time as more will cool 
the fat. The lard should be hot enough to brown a bit of 
bread while you count 40. Drain on soft paper. 

Mrs. S. A. Kean. 
CODFISH BALLS. 

One bowl of potatoes, pared and sliced, Y2- bowl picked 
codfish. Boil the potatoes. When ready to mash put in the 
minced fish. Add butter the size of a small ^gg, 1 teaspoon 



20 FISH AND OYSTERS 

cream, 1 egg, and mash all together thoroughly. Make into 
balls and fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. N. M. Jones. 

SALMON LOAF. 

One can salmon, ^ cup bread or cracker crumbs, 4 ta- 
blespoons melted butter, 2 tablespoons milk, 2 eggs, pepper 
and salt to taste. Put all together, beat well and steam one 
hour. If steamed in baking powder or similar cans, it 
can be sliced and very prettily served. Sauce : Boil 1 cup 
milk, thicken with 1 tablespoon cornstarch and add it to the 
liquor from the salmon with 1 tablespoon butter, 1 egg and 
1 tablespoon catsup. Put the egg in last and very care- 
fully. Boil one minute, and then pour over salmon which 
has been turned out of the mold. 

Mrs. J. F. Leigh. 
SALMON LOAF. 

One pound can salmon, drain off oil. Mince salmon, 
add 3 tablespoons melted butter, ^ cup fine bread or crack- 
er crumbs, pepper and salt and minced parsley to taste, one 
whole egg and yolks of two more well beaten. Mix and 
put in buttered mould ; set this in a pan of water in the 
oven. Bake about 45 minutes. When done, set in cold 
water for a minute, then turn out on platter and serve hot 
with following sauce. Make a cream sauce of 1 cup milk, 
1 tablespoon cornstarch, 2 tablespoons butter. When boil- 
ing hot, turn over the well beaten whites of two eggs, and 
fold together. Season with a dash of cayenne. 

Clara D. Manley. 

SALMON BALLS. 

Moisten 1 cup cold flaked salmon with sauce made of 
y2 cup milk and 2 tablespoons flour. Season with salt, 
lemon juice and cayenne pepper. Cool and shape, having 
creamed peas in the center of each. Dip in crumbs, egg 
and crumbs again and fry in deep fat. Heat ^ cup peas 
with 2y2 tablespoons butter, add ^2 teaspoon sugar, 1 



FISH AND OYSTERS 21 

teaspoon flour and Xyz tablespoons cream, add to a Hol- 
landaise sauce and pour around balls. This is equally good 
if haddock or halibut is used in place of salmon. 

Mrs. A. L. Lindsey. 

JELLIED SALMON. 

One can of salmon, minced, 1 tablespoon of powdered 
gelatine dissolved in ^ cup of cold water, juice of ^ a 
lemon, with a pinch of salt. Mix all together with salad 
dressing and turn into a mold. Serve on lettuce leaves 
and garnish with olives. 

Mrs. E. C. E. Dorion. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

Drain a can of salmon and pick it over well. Make yi cup 
of white sauce and heat with the salmon, stirring and beat- 
ing until the fish is smooth. Season with salt and pepper, 
and spread in a mass two inches thick on a platter and set 
aside for two hours. Then cut in pieces and mould in 
small pyramids. Dip each in sifted bread crumbs, then in 
slightly beaten o^^g yolks, and again in the crumbs, and fry 
in deep fat in wire basket. Drain in oven on brown paper. 

Margaretta S. N. Helm. 

SHRIMPS AND TOMATOES. 

Cook half a can of tomatoes until thick, adding a slice 
of onion chopped fine. Put this through a sieve and thick- 
en with a level tablespoon of flour, rubbed smooth with 
two tablespoons of butter. Wash and dry a can of shrimps 
and heat in the tomato sauce. Season with salt and cay- 
enne pepper and serve on mound of boiled rice. 

Margaretta S. N. Helm. 

LOBSTER CHOPS. 

Two tablespoons of butter heated in small sauce pan. 
Add 2 tablespoons of flour, 1 cup of milk or cream, and 
beaten yolks of two eggs. Cook ten minutes. Add to this 



22 FISH AND OYSTERS 

sauce, 2 cups of chopped lobster, 1 tablespoon chopped par- 
sley, Yi nutmeg, salt and paprika to taste. When mixture 
is cool, shape into chops with small claws in place of chop 
bone. Dip carefully in slightly beaten wdiites of two eggs, 
then in bread crumbs and fry in deep fat. 

Mrs. John T. Gascoigne. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

For one quart of oysters. Dressing: One pint of milk, 
2 heaping tablespoons butter, 2 tablespoons flour, ^ tea- 
spoon salt, Yz saltspoon pepper, ^ teaspoon celery salt, 1 
tablespoon lemon juice, none of the oyster liquor. Place 
the oysters in a skillet and when thoroughly heated, turn 
into the dressing. Serve on toast. 

Mrs. A. W. Patten. 

CELERY OYSTERS. 

Cook 1 pint oysters in their own liquor until they are 
plump. Drain and then strain the oyster liquor and add 
to it enough cream to make 1^ cups. Melt in a chafing 
dish 6 tablespoons butter and 5 tablespoons flour and stir 
to a paste. Pour in the liquor gradually and beat until 
creamy. Season with pepper, salt and celery salt. Add the 
parboiled oysters and cook until just at the boiling point. 
Pour this over slices of buttered toast and sprinkle with 
finely chopped celery. 

Mrs. B. F. Traxler. 

FLOUNDER, RED SNAPPER OR RED FISH. 

In a dripping pan large enough to hold the fish, put a 
layer of thin slices of bacon. Salt and pepper and add a 
bit of onion. On this lay the fish whole ; sprinkle with salt 
and pepper, dredge with flour, and spread with lard or but- 
ter. Bake 3^ hours. 

Sauce : With the drippings in the pan make a sauce by 
adding 2 heaping tablespoons flour. Stir till smooth. Add 
1 tablespoon mustard and seasoning, and enough water to 
make of the desired consistency. 

Ilda C. Wilson. 



FISH AND OYSTERS 23 

BAKED HALIBUT. 

Wash, dry and salt 2 lbs. halibut steak. Bake 35 minutes, 
basting often with the following sauce : Tomato sauce, 3 
tablespoons each of butter and flour, J/^ can tomatoes. 1 cup 
water, 1 onion minced fine, 1 sweet green pepper cut into 
thin strips, 1 doz. almonds chopped fine, ^ tablespoon sugar, 
salt and pepper to taste. Serve fish with the tomato sauce 
poured around it. Garnish with parsley. 

Mrs. Walter Dill Scott. 

BROILED HALIBUT. 

Have halibut steak cut 1 inch thick. Put on well greased 
broiler and place far enough below fire so that when 
browned it will be well done. Place on hot platter (or 
plank), season with butter, salt and pepper. Garnish with 
browned mashed potatoes and slices of lemon. 

Mrs. R. D. W. Johnson. 

PIGS IN BLANKETS. 

Allow 6 oysters to each person. Wrap each oyster in a 
half slice of bacon and secure with a toothpick. Put in a 
pan and place on broiler. Cook until oysters swell and 
bacon is well browned on both sides. Remove toothpick, 
place oysters on triangles of hot toast and serve at once. 

Mrs. James T. Hatfield. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Roll bread or crackers fine and cover the bottom of a 
well buttered pan ; then add a layer of oysters, season with 
salt and pepper and plenty of butter, then another layer of 
crumbs and so on until the dish is full, finishing with crumbs 
and bits of butter. Pour over it the oyster liquor and 
enough milk to moisten. Bake Yz hour. 

Mrs. W. F. McKenzie. 



MEMORANDA 



Meats and Poultry 



"Some hae meat and canna eat, 
And some wad eat that want it, 
But zve hae meat and zve can eat, 
Sae let the Lord he thankit." 

— Burns. 

"Stuffed zvith all honorable virtues. 
— Much Ado About Nothing. 



26 MEATS AND POULTRY 

FILLET OF BEEF. 

Have the fillet larded, and when prepared place a sliced 
onion, a little parsley, bits of bay leaf in the pan and put 
the fillet on it. Spread thickly with butter, add 1 teaspoon 
salt to y^ cup of boiling water and pour into the pan. Bake 
in a hot oven 30 minutes, basting three or four times. Take 
out the fillet and add to the pan 1 tablespoon butter ; brown, 
then add 1 tablespoon flour and 1 pint of stock. Strain 
after all has boiled and add 1 can mushrooms and 1 tea- 
spoon catsup. 

Mrs. A. L. Lindsey. 

CHICKEN EN CASSEROLE. 
Heat 3 tablespoons butter in skillet, and in it fry an 
onion sliced until a light brown. Roll pieces of chicken in 
flour and fry in skillet until a rich brown. Heat Casserole 
in oven and place in it 1 diced carrot, 1 cup diced celery and 
a minced pimento. Place chicken on vegetable, pour over 
it 1^ cups thin stock or hot water, add 1 tablespoon salt. 
Cover dish tightly and bake in moderate oven 2 hours. 

Mrs. E. L. Phillips. 
From Good Housekeeping. 

SMOTHERED BEEFSTEAK. 

Take a piece of the upper cut of round steak 2^/2 inches 
thick. With the edge of a saucer pound into the meat ^ 
cup of salted flour, pounding first on one side and then 
the other. Melt suet or lard in a heavy iron skillet and 
when very hot sear the meat well on both sides. Pour on 
boiling water until the meat is nearly covered. Draw to 
the back of range to simmer slowly for 2j/2 hours. 

Mrs. J. A. Scott. 



DRIED BEEF CREAMED. 

Shred carefully fine >4 lb. of dried beef. Heat and 
brown slightly in 2 tablespoons of butter, turn into a col- 



MEATS AND POULTRY 27 

antler and let the cold water faucet wash out the butter 
and salt. Take 1 tablespoon of butter and 1 tablespoon of 
flour and cream together. Heat 3 cups of milk and add 
to the mixture, stirring over the fire till smooth, then add 
the beef to the cream and serve on toast. 

Mrs. Morris R. Eddv. 



BEEF LOAF. 

One lb. Hamburg steak, 34 ^b. salt pork, 1 cup bread 
crumbs, 1 egg well beaten, season to taste, milk enough to 
make very moist, at least 1 cup. Mold into loaf, pour boil- 
ing water over it and set in hot oven to roast. Frequently 
the drippings are sufficient to use with milk and flour for 
gravy. 

Mrs. G. H. Tomlinson. 



BEEF LOAF. 

Two pounds of chopped or ground steak from the round. 
Have ground with it j4 pound of fat, salt pork. Mix with 
this 1 teacup of fresh bread crumbs, IjA cups of milk, 1 
egg and a piece of butter the size of an egg. Salt well and 
season with onion and sage to suit the taste. Bake one 
hour in a bread pan, setting it in a pan of water. This 
amount serves eight persons. 

Mrs. A. L. Fanning. 



BEEF GOULASH. 

Cut 2 lbs. round steak into dice. Slice 1^ lbs. salt pork 
thin, and fry until crisp, then roll steak in flour and fry in 
salt pork fat. Put steak into kettle, cover with boiling 
water, add 1 bay leaf, l^^ green peppers cut thin. Boil slow- 
ly 2^ hours. About one hour before dinner add onions, 
carrots, y^ can tomatoes and if necessary a little thickening. 

Helen Hale. 



28 MEATS AND POULTRY 

VEAL BIRDS. 

Cut 1 lb. thin veal steak into strips 2 inches wide and 
pound a little. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and form 
into little rolls. Then fasten a slice of bacon around each 
roll with a skewer, or toothpicks will do. Brown on all 
sides in the spider ; then cover the meat with water and let 
it simmer for 1^ hours. Mix 1 tablespoon flour in part of 
a cup of water and add it to the liquor to make a gravy. In 
this gravy let the meat cook for about 10 minutes. 

Mrs. L. J. Aikin. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Mix well together 3^ lbs. chopped veal, j4 lb. chopped 
salt pork, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon salt, V2 teaspoon pepper (sage 
if desired) ^4 cup fresh milk, 1 cup cracker crumbs. Pack 
closely in pan. Bake 3 hours in covered pan placed inside 
another containing water. 

Mrs. N. M. Jones. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

Boil 2y2 pounds lean veal until it drops from the bones. 
When cool, chop fine. Put }i pounds butter in a sauce pan 
with 8 even tablespoons of flour. When melted add three 
cups milk, a small onion chopped fine and 2 tablespoons 
chopped parsley. Cook until thick. Take from the fire 
and add 3 eggs, salt, nutmeg, pepper and the veal. Make 
into croquettes, dip in egg and bread crumbs and fry in 
deep lard. Large recipe. 

Mrs. H. B. Ridgway. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

To every pint of cold cooked chopped veal, allow ^ pint 
milk. 2 tablespoons flour, 2 tablespoons chopped parsley, 1 
tablespoon butter, 1 teaspoon salt, ^ teaspoon white pep- 
per, 1 teaspoon onion extract or juice. Make the white 
sauce and add to the veal, then make up into croquettes, 
dip in eggs and crumbs and fry in deep hot lard. 

Mrs. C. N. Stevens. 



MEATS AND PO ULTRY 29 

ROMAN MEAT PUDDING. 

This rule calls for cold veal, chicken, lamb or beef. To 
1 pt. of meat finely minced, add 1 cup of good stock, well- 
seasoned, 1 egg, some lemon juice or tomato sauce, a few 
bread crumbs and chopped parsley. Line a mould with mac- 
aroni previously boiled until tender. Fill with the meat mix- 
ture and steam for Yz hour. Turn out on chop dish and 
serve surrounded with white sauce. This is very nice when 
made with chicken and served with mushroom sauce, 

Mrs. B. F. Traxler. 

EVANSTON CHOP SUEY. 

Cut 1^ lbs. round steak in finger lengths, add 2 onions 
and stew very slowly 2 hours. Then add a bunch of celery 
cut in dice, pepper and salt. Stew 20 minutes, thicken the 
gravy and serve in a ring of plain rice. 

Mrs. T. F. Holgate. 

MEAT SOUFFLfi. 

Make 1 cup cream sauce, season with chopped parsley 
and onion juice. Stir 1 cup of chopped meat (chicken, 
fresh tongue, veal or lamb) into the sauce. When hot, add 
the beaten yolks of two eggs ; cook one minute and set 
away to cool. When cool stir in the whites, beaten stiff. 
Bake in a buttered dish about twenty minutes, and serve 
immediately. Fine with mushroom sauce. 

Mrs. Edgar Blake. 
(From Mary J. Lincoln's Cook Book.) 

BOUDINS. 

Chop cold cooked poultry very fine, and add to each pint 
of the chopped meat a level teaspoon of salt, a dash of cay- 
enne and a tablespoon of chopped parsley. Put in a sauce- 
pan 1 tablespoon of butter, 1 gill of stock or milk and 2 
tablespoons of stale bread crumbs; stir until boiling; add 
the meat, take from the fire and add 2 well beaten eggs. 
Fill into small greased moulds, or custard cups, stand in 



30 MEATS AND POULTRY 

hot water and bake in the oven until firm. Turn out on a 
platter and pour about the patties a cream sauce made from 
rich milk thickened to the consistency of cream. Alternate 
with the patties, mounds of well seasoned peas. Fish flaked 
with a fork may be substituted for the poultry. 

Mrs. F. C. Eiselen. 

CREAMED MEAT. 

Melt in skillet 1 tablespoon of butter. Work in 1 table- 
spoon flour, 1 teaspoon of chopped onion, and celery or 
parsley, or both. Gradually add milk and stir over the 
fire into a drawn butter sauce. Have cooked meat of any 
kind, but chicken, veal or pork tenderloin are best. Boiled 
meat is better than meat cooked in another way. Cut in 
small pieces and add to the white sauce. It is improved by 
adding canned peas and mushrooms. 

Mrs. C. E. Pope. 

HAM CROQUETTES. 

One cup finely chopped cooked ham, 1 cup bread crumbs, 
2 cups hot mashed potatoes, 1 large tablespoon butter, 3 
eggs, dash of cayenne pepper. Beat ham, butter, pepper 
and 2 of the eggs into the potato. Let mixture cool slight- 
ly then shape into croquettes. Roll in bread crumbs, dip in 
egg, again in bread crumbs and cook 2 minutes in deep hot 
lard. 

Mrs. C. N. Stevens. 

POTTED MEAT. 

One three or four pound chicken, two meaty veal shanks, 
one lb. pork, one lb. calf's liver. Boil the meat till 
it loosens from the bone, lift it from broth or liquor, of 
which there should be about three pints, and put where 
it will become very cold. Strain the broth and when it 
jellies, skim ofif all fat. Cut the boned meat across the 
grain, into small pieces and shave the liver fine. Heat the 
broth and put into it all the meat. Add two tablespoons salt, 
one of pepper and one teaspoon paprika, or — what is bet- 
ter advice — season to your taste. Stir well, let it simmer 



MEATS AND POULTRY 31 

for a few minutes and pour into a large enameled pan. It 
should slice down firm and smooth. Several hard boiled 
eggs dropped here and there through the pan, give a fancy 
and appetizing appearance to the slices. The meat may be 
divided, and a finely minced onion, with vinegar to taste, be 
put into one portion. 

Mrs. Bentley Masslich. 

FRIED RABBIT. 

Select young rabbits, cut in pieces, rejecting ribs on 
which there is very little meat. Boil in water to which is 
added a large onion and salt. The onion removes a charac- 
teristic rank taste, and that, with the broth, should be 
thrown out. When the meat is tender fry in butter or lard, 
and make a flour gravy with a tablespoon of flour rubbed 
into the butter, hot water added, and stirred over the fire 
until it is a thickened gravy. 

Mrs. C. E. Pope. 

CHICKEN MARYLAND STYLE. 

Cut chicken as if to broil and wipe dry. Flour each piece 
and dust lightly with salt and pepper. Place in a pan with a 
small slice of bacon on each piece of chicken. Pour half a 
cup of melted butter into the pan. Put into oven and cook 
slowly for 1 hour, basting frequently. When thoroughly 
done, place on hot platter, bacon with chicken. Into the 
drippings, put 1^ cups milk — thicken with flour, season 
with pepper and salt and pour over the chicken. 

Mrs. J. E. Lukey. 

CHICKEN BAKED IN MILK. 

Quarter your chickens and put into casserole, cover with 
a mixture of half milk and cream. Salt and pepper to 
taste and bake. By the time the milk is cooked down to 
within one inch of the bottom the chicken will be ready to 
serve. 

Mrs. Marion Green. 



32 MEATS AND POULTRY 

SHAKER FRICASSEED CHICKEN. 

Cut up a chicken as for an ordinary fricassee, put in a 
kettle with a perforated stand at the bottom to prevent 
burning, use water enough to steam, and cook 1 hour ; then 
add salt. When the meat is tender, put it in the oven and 
brown thoroughly; then add rich cream to the gravy, thick- 
ening it with a little flour and butter and seasoning to taste. 
Serve in deep dishes. 

J. B. G. 

CREAM CHICKEN. 

Time 1^ hours. Two medium siz^d chickens cut up 
as for fricassee, 2 quarts of milk made into a thin cream 
sauce. Pour 1 qt. over the chickens in a covered pan and 
bake 1 hour in moderate oven. Remove from oven, add 2 
quarts of cream sauce, return to the oven uncovered and 
bake till a rich brown, about 3^ hour. It is even better 
to bake this for 1 hour in the morning and set it away cov- 
ered to stand till wanted ; then add the second cream sauce 
and bake for the other 3^ hour. 

Marion T. Day. 

SPRING CHICKEN. 

Split the chickens down the back as for broiling, lay them 
breast down in a baking pan, filling the depression inside 
the ribs with equal quantities of finely minced onion, carrot, 
celery and peas, season with salt and a dash of paprika, 
adding a generous lump of butter for each bird. Pour in- 
to the pan Yz cup of hot water to which has been added 2 
tablespoons of mushroom catsup and cook in a hot oven 
for Yo hour or until the vegetables are tender, basting 
frequently. Remove the vegetables and turn the chickens 
to brown the breasts slightly. Serve them covered with a 
sauce made from the same vegetables moistened with a 
very little hot cream. Garnish with tiny squares of fried 
hominy and sweet potato croquettes. 

I. C. L. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Cut up small, as for stewing, a 4 or 4^/2 lb. chicken. 1 



MEATS AND POULTRY 33 

lb. lean veal with small bone, cut in small pieces. Put to- 
gether over fire in kettle, with cold water to cover. Skim 
as soon as it boils. Add }i slice Bermuda onion (about 2 
tablespoons when cut up) and 1 teaspoon sage. Let it 
boil slowly (not simmer) until it will easily separate from 
the bone. Add salt and pepper to taste. About >4 hour 
before done drain and cut up small while hot. Put in 
mould, cover with enough liquor, so that when an inverted 
plate is pressed onto mould the liquor will rise to plate. 
Hard boiled eggs may be sliced and put on bottom of 
mould before chicken is put in, if desired. 

Mrs. L. J. Towne. 

TURKEY DUMPLINGS. 

This is an old-fashioned Nfew England dish, much es- 
teemed by our Puritan forefathers. Make a rich shortcake 
dough, rolling it out on the bread board, and cut into cir- 
cular pieces about four inches in diameter; spread each 
piece generously with butter, and place in the center of 
each a tablespoon of turkey prepared as follows : Chop 
a cup of cold turkey, not too fine ; add a tablespoon of the 
dressing and a stalk of minced celery, and mix well, moist- 
ening with a little giblet gravy. Fold the paste over, lap- 
ping the edges, and form into balls with the hands ; arrange 
in a deep baking dish, and bake 20 minutes in a quick 
oven. Serve the dumplings with Bechamel sauce as fol- 
lows : Cook 1^ cups of white stock with a slice each of 
onion and carrot, a bay leaf, a sprig of parsley and six 
peppercorns until reduced to one cup. Brown ^ cup of 
flour in 34 cup of butter, add the stock, and beat until 
smooth, then beat into it a cup of hot cream. Season to 
taste with salt and pepper. 

From Good Housekeeping. 

(Casserole Dishes.) 

(Mrs. J. B. Gascoigne, from Good Housekeeping 

Magazine.) 

BAKED VEAL EN CASSEROLE. 

Lay in a heated, buttered casserole Ij/^ lbs. veal steak. 
Add 1 cup seasoned stock or hot water, then spread over 
steak a dressing made of 2 cups bread crumbs, 1 chopped 



34 MEATS AND POULTRY 

onion, 1 beaten egg, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 1 saltspoon pepper. Cover and cook ^ hour in hot 
oven, then uncover and brown. Serve with sour jelly or 
spiced gooseberries. 

LAMB RECHAUFFfi. 

Place in casserole 2 cups of diced lamb. Add 3 cups of 
hot lamb broth, or seasoned hot w^ater, 1 cup strained to- 
matoes and 1^ teaspoons of salt. Stir in % cup washed 
uncooked rice and a minced pimento if desired. Bake 40 
minutes. 

CHICKEN RECHAUFFfi. 

Place in casserole 1 cup cooked string beans, ^^ cup 
diced celery, ^ minced pimento, 1 small onion sliced and 
^2 minced carrot. Add lyz cups diced chicken, 1 table- 
spoon salt. Pour over all 1 cup chicken broth and ^^ cup 
strained tomatoes. Add a little butter. Bake 40 minutes. 

RAMEKINS OF CHICKEN. 

Cut into cubes sufficient cooked chicken to make 1^ 
cups. Have ready a cup of cooked and drained peas, fresh 
or canned, and ^ cup sliced mushrooms. Melt ^4 cup 
butter; when hot and bubbling add j4 cup of flour and 
gradually ^2 cup each of chicken stock, cream, and the 
liquor from the canned mushrooms. Season to taste with 
salt and paprika, add the chicken, peas and mushrooms, 
when all are mixed thoroughly, place in the ramekins. Cover 
with browned bread crumbs and serve. 



BREAD SAUCE. 

To serve with game or roast fowl. One lb. loaf of bread, 
1 qt. milk, ys lb. butter, 2 large onions, 1 cup thick sweet 
cream, season to taste with salt, pepper and mace. Boil 
onions in milk until thoroughly flavored, pour over crumbed 



MEATS AND POULTRY. 35 

bread (without crusts). Let it stand for one hour or more. 
Place on fire and reboil adding butter, cream and seasoning. 
If too thick add cream. 

Mrs. Townsend Smith. 

TARTARE SAUCE. 

One pint oHve oil, yolks 3 eggs, pinch each of salt and 
red pepper, 1 teaspoon Coleman's mustard and 2 table- 
spoons vinegar. Place in a bowl the yolks of the eggs, salt, 
pepper, mustard and vinegar; mix well, then add the olive 
oil drop by drop, stirring as for a mayonnaise. When done 
flavor with ^ of a lemon. Take 2 sour pickles, 1 onion, 1 
tablespoon capers, 1 clove garlic, parsley and cloves ; chop 
fine and add to the balance ; stir well and serve. 

Mrs. George R. Sargent. 

SAUCE HOLLANDAISE. 

Rub together 2 tablespoons flour and 2 tablespoons but- 
ter. Add gradually 1 pint boiling water and stir a moment 
over the fire. Then take from the fire and add carefully 
1 tablespoon butter, the beaten yolks of 4 eggs, and 2 
tablespoons tarragon vinegar. Strain and add a tablespoon 
chopped parsley. 

Clara D. Manley. 

SUITABLE SAUCES FOR MEATS. 

Roast Beef — Grated horseradish. 
Roast Mutton — Currant jelly. 
Roast Pork — Apple sauce. 
Roast Lamb — Mint sauce. 

Venison and Wild Duck — Black currant jelly or grape 
jelly. 

Roast Goose — Apple sauce. 

Roast Turkey — Oyster sauce. 

Roast Chicken — Bread sauce. 

Compote of Pigeons — Mushroom sauce. 

Broiled Blue Fish — White cream sauce. 

Broiled Shad — Rice. 

Fresh Salmon — Green peas with cream sauce. 



MEMORANDA 



Vegetables 



"I'm a careless potato, and care not 

a pin 
Hozv into existence I came; 
If they planted me drill-vuise or 

dribbled me in, 
To me 'tis exactly the same." 

— Thomas Moore. 

"Fruit, vegetables and doctors do 
not thrive together." 



38 VEGETABLES 

SCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Place alternate layers of sliced cooked potatoes and white 
sauce in baking dish. Cover with cracker crumbs. Bake 
until browned on top. White sauce: 1 cup milk, 2 table- 
spoons each of flour and butter. Cook until thick, then add 
a little chopped parsley. 

Mrs. W. F. McDowell. 



POTATOES AU GRATIN. 

Cut cold boiled potatoes into slices ^ of an inch thick. 
Put 2 tablespoons of butter into a saucepan ; when melted 
add 1 tablespoon flour and ^ pt. milk and stir until boiling. 
Take from fire and add the yolks of 4 eggs, 4 tablespoons 
grated cheese, ^ tablespoon salt and a little pepper. Put 
a layer of this in the bottom of a baking dish, then a layer 
of potatoes sliced or chopped, and so on alternately until 
the dish is filled. Sprinkle the top with fine bread crumbs 
and brown in quick oven. 



Mrs. R. H. Pooley. 



POTATO PUFFS. 

Mash the potatoes and season with butter, salt, pepper 
and cream. Beat stiffly the whites of three eggs and stir 
lightly into the potatoes. Form into cones on a buttered 
pan and brown slightly in a hot oven. 

Mrs. H. H. Harris. 



GLAZED SWEET POTATOES. 

Wash and pare 6 medium-sized potatoes. Cook 10 min- 
utes in boiling salted water. Drain, cut in halves length- 
wise, and put in a buttered pan. Make a syrup by boiling 
Yi cup of sugar and 4 tablespoons water together 3 minutes. 
Add 1 tablespoon butter, pour syrup over potatoes and 
bake 15 minutes. Baste twice with syrup. 



VEGETABLES 39 

SWEET POTATO. 

Heat 1 cup rich milk, add a little butter, salt and pepper. 
Turn into it two medium-sized sweet potatoes forced 
through ricer. Beat with a fork until thoroughly mixed. 
Beat 2 eggs until light and add to potato mixture. Bake 20 
minutes in a covered pan, then remove cover and brown. 

Katherine Howard Ward. 

ESCALLOPED CORN. 

Put layer of cracker crumbs in baker, then layer of canned 
corn. Season with butter, salt and pepper. Moisten with 
cream and repeat until the dish is full, having cracker 
crumbs and butter on top. Bake 30 minutes. 

Mrs. H. H. Harris. 

P. E. O. CORN CUSTARD. 

One can corn, 1^ cups sweet milk, salt and pepper to 
taste, 1 tablespoon each of sugar, cornstarch and butter, 
3 eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately. Mix all to- 
gether adding whites last. Bake in moderate oven 3/2 
hour. 

Mrs. H. B. Williams. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

To one can of Kornlet add 2 eggs, 2 heaping tablespoons 
flour. Salt and pepper to taste. Drop into skillet of very 
hot butter and lard, of each 1 tablespoon, and fry until 
brown. 

Mrs. C. E. Pope. 

CELERY ON TOAST. 

Cut several stalks of celery into small pieces and boil 
in salted water until tender. Put 2 heaping tablespoons 
butter in a frying pan and brown. Drain celery, stir it 
into the browned butter and serve on toast placed either 



40 VEGETABLES 

on a platter or on individual plates. This is a good way 
to use the coarser stalks of celery, leaving the hearts and 
finer portions to serve in other ways. 

Mrs. A. S. Stults. 

GERMAN CARROTS. 

Chop 4 small carrots fine, using chopping bowl and 
knife. Put into a sauce pan one rounded tablespoon but- 
ter and a small onion cut fine. Fry, stirring constantly until 
golden brown and tender. Add the carrots and 1 teaspoon 
sugar, cover closely and let simmer gently. When tender 
(in about ^ hour) season with salt and pepper and add % 
cup cream and 1 teaspoon minced parsley. This dish is im- 
proved by the addition of cold cooked or canned peas, add- 
ing the peas at the very last and allowing them to heat 
through thoroughly. 

Mrs. F. C. Eiselen. 

BERLIN SPINACH. 

Wash and wash and wash again to remove all sand. 
Drain and throw leaves into a large kettle using no water. 
Sprinkle with a saltspoon of salt for each 2 qts. of spinach. 
Cover closely but do not forget to toss and turn the leaves 
now and then to insure thorough cooking. When tender, 
drain in a colander, and put through the meat chopper. 
Make a cream sauce of 1 cup milk and 1 heaping table- 
spoon flour seasoned with salt and pepper and enriched 
with one tablespoon butter. Stir spinach and cream sauce 
together until piping hot. Serve in vegetable dish and 
garnish with slices of hard boiled eggs. 

Mrs. F. C. Eiselen. 

CAULIFLOWER AU GRATIN. 

Break the boiled cauliflower into small flowerets, place 
them in a pudding dish in alternate layers with white 
sauce and grated cheese. Cover the top with crumbs moist- 
ened with butter and bake until the sauce bubbles through 
the crumbs. 



VEGETABLES 41 

PEAS IN BOXES. 

Cut stale bread in two inch cubes and make boxes of 
them. Brush inside and out with melted butter and brown 
in oven. Drain 1 can peas and put in a sauce pan ; add 1 
cup milk thickened with 1 tablespoon each of butter and 
flour rubbed together ; add peas, stirring across, not around. 
Add 1 teaspoon salt, fill boxes and serve. 

Mrs. Alfred L. Lindsey. 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Cut ripe tomatoes into thick slices. Season with salt and 
pepper, dredge well with flour and fry them brown on 
both sides evenly, in hot butter and lard mixed. Make a 
cream gravy by adding flour and milk, and pour over the 
tomatoes. 

Mrs. W. T. Hobart. 

FRIED BANANAS. 

Slice bananas %. inch thick; dip in white sugar, fry in 
very little butter until a light brown, then make a syrup 
of 1 cup sugar, juice of 1 lemon, ^4 cup of water; boil un- 
til thick and serve hot on bananas. 



MEMORANDA 



Luncheon Dishes 



'The king and queen did eat thereof 
The noblemen beside, 
And zvhat they did not eat that 
night, 

1 he queen next morning fried." 



44 LUNCHEON DISHES 

CHICKEN OR VEAL CREAMS. 

Mince 1 lb. chicken or veal freed from bone and gristle. 
Rub and pound to a paste. Add two dozen blanched chop- 
ped almonds, 1 teaspoon onion juice, 1 teaspoon salt, Yi 
teaspoon white pepper. Mix and add gradually the un- 
beaten whites of 3 eggs. Then carefully stir in 1/2 pint 
cream, whipped. Fill into timbale moulds and bake in pan 
of boiling water in a moderate oven for 20 minutes. Turn 
out on a platter and serve with a rich white sauce made of 
half milk and half stock from the veal or chicken. This 
is equally good made from salmon, using 1 can, or 1 lb. 
fresh boiled, rubbed and pounded to a paste. With the 
salmon use Sauce Hollandaise. 

Clara D. Manley. 

OMELET. 

Yolks of 6 eggs, whites of 6 eggs, Xy^ cups of milk, salt 
and pepper to taste. Beat yolks of eggs slightly. Add 
milk, then salt and pepper to season. Beat whites of eggs 
to a stiff froth and fold carefully into first mixture. Pour 
this into a hot buttered baking dish and bake in oven until 
a golden brown. 

Mrs. H. H. Kingsley. 

EGGS STUFFED WITH MUSHROOMS. 

Boil 6 eggs for 20 minutes, pour cold water over them, 
shell and cut them in halves, lengthwise. To the yolks 
mashed, add 34 pound of mushrooms chopped very fine ; 
cook until tender. To this mixture add 1 teaspoon butter, 
season to taste with salt and pepper and stir in a dessert- 
spoon of cream. Mix thoroughly. Fill the whites with 
the mixture, rounding the top to the shape and size of a 
whole yolk. Over the top sift fine bread crumbs, add tiny 
bits of butter and brown for a moment in the oven. Ar- 
range on the dish and pour around them a white sauce 
into which a few chopped and cooked mushrooms have 
been stirred. Garnish with parsley. 

Mrs. Wm. A. Vawter. 



LUNCHEON DISHES 45 

SCOTCH WOODCOCK. 

Shell and chop the whites of 6 hard boiled eggs very fine. 
Rub the yolks to a smooth paste, with 2 tablespoons of 
melted butter, ^4 teaspoon of salt, a dusting of paprika and 
a teaspoon of cornstarch. Add 1^ cups of rich milk and 
cook in a double boiler to a thick cream. Have ready a 
number of slices of thin crisp buttered toast. Spread a layer 
of yolk cream over each, sprinkle with the chopped whites 
which have been kept warm over hot water, pile on a hot 
platter, pour over the remainder of the sauce and serve at 
once. 

Mrs. J. B. Gascoigne. 

CHEESE SOUFFLfi. 

Melt an ounce of butter in a saucepan, mix smoothly 
with it one ounce of flour, a pinch of salt and cayenne and 
a quarter of a pint of milk. Simmer the mixture gently 
over the fire, stirring it all the time, till it is as thick as 
melted butter. Stir into it about three ounces of finely 
grated cheese. Turn into a basin and mix with it the 
yolks of two well-beaten eggs. Just before the souffle is 
put into the oven add the whites of 3 eggs well beaten. 
The baking dish should be only half filled as the souffle 
will rise very high. Bake twenty minutes and serve im- 
mediately. 

Mrs. S. A. Kean. 

CHEESE TOAST. 

To a half pound of grated American cheese, add butter 
the size of a walnut, and the beaten white of an egg. Heap 
on rounds of toast and put in the oven until brown. Serve 
hot with tea or coffee, 

Eleanor Harris DeGolyer, 

SPANISH TOAST. 

Cut up 2 or 3 green peppers and 1 or 2 slices of onion. 
Add a cupful of thick tomatoes, canned or fresh. Simmer 
the mixture until smooth and pour over buttered toast. 

Louise E. Whitehead, 



46 LUNCHEON DISHES 

CHESTNUT BOULETTES. 

One cup mashed chestnuts, 2 egg yolks, 2 tablespoons of 
cream, 1 tablespoon of sugar, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, yg 
teaspoon of salt, 2 egg whites. Boil chestnuts in salted 
water about 20 minutes, shell, skim and mash. Add cream, 
sugar, salt and vanilla. Cut in well beaten whites. Form 
in balls about the size of chestnuts, dip in white of egg, 
and then in bread crumbs. Repeat eggs and bread crumbs, 
fry in deep fat and serve with any good sauce. 

Mrs. John H. Long. 

MEAT SOUFFLfi. 

One cup chopped meat, 1 cup white sauce, 1 egg. Mix 
yolk with meat. Add sauce when cool. Stir in white of 
egg, beaten stiff. Bake J^ hour. 

Mrs. William Eraser McDowell. 

NUTS WITH RICE. 

Two cups of cooked rice, 1 cup of chopped almonds or 
peanuts, 2 tablespoons grated cheese, season to taste with 
salt. Mix together with a beaten egg and shape into balls. 
Fry to a golden brown in deep boiling lard, and garnish 
with water cress or lettuce. 

Mrs. Wm. A. Vawter. 

CHEESE CUSTARD. 

One tea-cup grated cheese, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon melted 
butter, 1 large tablespoon milk. Rub butter to a cream, 
add cheese, milk and salt. Bake in earthen plate 10 min- 
utes. Serve immediately. 

Mrs. William Eraser McDowell. 

LUNCH DISH. 

One cup rice, boiled until soft, >^ can deviled ham, lump 
of butter. Put in buttered baking dish. Sprinkle grated 
cheese on top, and bake about fifteen minutes. 

Caroline Spalding. 

VEGETABLE CHOP SUEY. 
One cup raw potatoes, 1 cup white turnips, 1 cup celery, 



LUNCHEO N DISHES 47 

1 cup onions. Peel the vegetables and cut in half inch 
cubes. Mix all together, rinse in cold water and sprinkle 
well with salt and pepper. Put 1 heaping tablespoon but- 
ter in agate saucepan with a tight fitting cover; heat and 
pour in vegetables. Put cover on and do not remove it. 
Steam 25 minutes. No water needed. Low fire. Shake the 
pan occasionally without removing cover. When done the 
vegetables should be soft but not mushy, and the full flavor 

will be retained. t.^ r\ -n r^ t.- 

Mrs. D. R. Curtis. 

RICE CAKES. 

One cup soft boiled rice, yolks of 4 eggs, 2 small table- 
spoons of flour — salt. Beat whites of 4 eggs stiff, mix with 
rest. Fry on buttered griddle. 

Mrs. C. B. Cleveland. 

TOMATO AND MACARONI. 

One quart of tomatoes cooked until tender with 4 or 5 

cloves, salt, pepper, and 1 medium sized onion. When 

soft, put through a strainer and thicken with 1 tablespoon 

flour rubbed with 2 tablespoons butter. Cook part of a 

package of macaroni in plenty of water slowly for 1 hour. 

Drain macaroni and throw over it a dash of cold water; 

drain again thoroughly. Now mix J^ cup grated cheese 

with the tomato sauce and pour over the macaroni which 

has been put in a baking dish. Cover top with bread 

crumbs and bake V2 hour. ,, 

^ Mrs. J, A, James. 

BAKED MACARONI. 

One cup French spaghetti broken into small pieces ; boil 
20 minutes, drain and put into cold water. Rub together 
1 tablespoon butter and 2 tablespoons flour. Add 1 pt, sweet 
milk, cook until thick, season with salt and pepper. Add 
1 cup grated cheese, stir well. Place macaroni in buttered 
dish and pour over it the cooked mixture. Cover with 
bread crumbs and bake quickly until brown. 

Mrs. N. M. Jones. 

THANKSGIVING HASH. 
Fill a pudding dish with alternate layers of bread crumbs 



48 LUNCHEON DISHES 

chopped turkey and oysters, using the bread crumbs for 
the bottom layer. Pour over all 1 pint cream sauce and 
bake in a quick oven for 20 minutes. 

Mrs. B. F. Traxler. 

DEVILED SALMON. 

One can salmon, sixteen large crackers, one small onion, 
two ounces butter. Flake or rub salmon fine with a silver 
fork and roll the crackers. Into a well buttered bak- 
ing dish put altenate layers of salmon and cracker, season- 
ing with salt, pepper, paprika, onion and butter. Pour one 
pint of hot water over and through the mixture which 
should be finished with a layer of the cracker crumbs plen- 
tifully dotted with butter, and bake to a delicate brown. If 
the fish is very oily less butter will be needed. 

Mrs. Bentley Masslich. 

TURKISH PILAF. 

Stew Yi can of tomatoes for twenty minutes, and strain. 
Put into a double boiler one cup of the strained tomatoes 
and one generous cup of beef, veal or chicken stock ; seas- 
on lightly with pepper and salt, and while boiling, add ^ 
cup of well washed rice. Cook for about an hour or until 
the rice has absorbed all the liquor. Then add Y^ oi 2l 
cup of butter and set where it will keep warm for 20 min- 
utes. A little before serving remove the cover and let the 
steam escape. Stir with a fork. Serve on a plate or 
platter, as a vegetable, with border of croquettes or pieces 
of chicken. 

Mrs. A. L. Fanning. 

ASPARAGUS AND BACON. 

Wash asparagus and cook in salted water until tender, 
placing asparagus in an upright position so the tops are 
just out of water. Place toasted bread which has been well 
buttered on a platter. When asparagus is tender, pour over 
milk enough to cover, and season with salt, pepper and 
butter. Place asparagus on toast, pour hot milk over it, 
and arrange slices of crisp bacon around edge of phtter. 

Mrs. H. H. Kingsley. 



LUNCHEON DISHES 49 

WARMED-OVER BAKED BEANS. 

A layer of baked beans, a layer of tomatoes, a layer of 
onions shaved thin, butter, salt and pepper. Repeat each 
layer. Bake 20 to 30 minutes. See that there is plenty of 
juice with the tomatoes to moisten the ingredients well. 
This looks best baked and served in individual dishes. 

Mrs. H. H. Harris. 

BAKED BANANAS. 

Remove skins and lay in baking dish so that they do 
not touch. Three even tablespoons butter, 7 tablespoons 
powdered sugar, 4 tablespoons lemon juice. Mix thor- 
oughly in a warm place where ingredients will melt. Baste 
bananas frequently with the mixture while baking. Bake 
for half an hour in a moderate oven. Sufficient for 8 or 10 
bananas. 



J. C. L. 



MUSH BREAD. 



Stir carefully into 1 pint hot milk, in a double boiler, two 
thirds cup corn meal (white preferred). Salt to taste, cook 
and stir 5 minutes. Take from fire, and when cool (not 
cold) add the beaten yolks of 4 eggs. Carefully fold in 
the well beaten whites. Turn into a baking dish, and bake 
30 minutes in a quick oven. Very nice as a luncheon dish. 

Mrs. C. N. Stevens. 

DEVONSHIRE CLOTTED CREAM. 

Pour 4 or 5 quarts of fresh, or good sweet unseparated 
milk into a wide topped milk pan or earthen crock. Let it 
stand until the cream is well risen (about 12 hours in the 
icebox.) Then without disturbing the contents of the pan, 
place over a kettle of boiling water, steam gently, without 
a cover until cream starts to crinkle. Remove from fire 
and let stand until very cold, then skim. This makes a 
delicious dish whether used as cream, as is usual, or spread 
thickly over bread in place of butter for four o'clock tea. 

Mrs. G. W. Boot. 



For Twenty Years the Choice 
of Connoisseurs 

Yacht Club 



nil' f 1111 



5j«8gs and purti«5«g 
Stolor or prcsetYiliSB^ 




Salad Dressin. 



Salads and Sandwiches 



'To make them one must have a 
spark of genius." 

'Ground hetzveen the upper and the 
nether millstone." 



52 SALADS AND SANDWICHES 

A RELISH. 

One package cream cheese, a 10 cent bottle stuffed olives, 
% cup nuts, butter size of walnut, 1 hard boiled egg. Cream 
cheese, adding a little cream if necessary. Chop the olives, 
nuts and eggs quite fine and add to cheese, then add the 
butter creamed. 

Mrs. A. L. Fanning. 



POTATO SALAD. 

Three cold boiled potatoes, 3 hard boiled eggs, ^^ cup 
English walnuts, 12 olives. Break up walnuts saving a 
dozen halves unbroken. Cut potatoes and eggs into bits 
as large as your finger tip. Stone olives and cut up. Mix 
together in a bowl but do not stir much. Sprinkle well with 
French dressing and put on the ice. Just before serving 
mix quickly with stiff mayonnaise and garnish with lettuce. 

Marian Graves Day. 



CABBAGE SALAD. 

One cup fresh cabbage, ^ sweet red pepper chopped 
rather coarse. Mix and chill. Just before serving add V/i 
doz. Malaga grapes seeded and chilled. Serve in lettuce 
leaves with the following dressing : To ^ cup cream add 2 
teaspoons sugar, ^ teaspoon salt, Y^. saltspoon paprika. 
Whip well and add >^ cup vinegar. 

Marian Graves Day. 

COMBINATION SALAD. 

One good sized head of lettuce, two large tomatoes, one 
bunch of radishes, one-half of a cucumber or one-half of a 
can of asparagus. Cut the tomatoes in thick slices, radish- 
es and cucumber in thin slices and cover all with French 
dressing. 

Mrs. R, D. V. Johnson. 



SALADS AND SANDWICHES 53 

TOMATO SALAD. 

Peel very firm tomatoes and remove pulp. Cut in small 
pieces, cucumbers, walnuts and olives. Add to the pulp 
and mix with mayonnaise dressing. Fill tomatoes with the 
mixture, dot the top with dressing, a whole olive and a 
walnut. Serve on lettuce. 

Mrs. E. C. E. Dorion. 

COLUMBINE SALAD. 

One can of tomatoes, 1 slice of onion, celery tops, salt 
and pepper to taste. Mix, bring to the boiling point and 
pour it over 1 tablespoon powdered gelatine which has 
been covered with cold water for 5 minutes and flavored 
with the juice of ^ a lemon. When the gelatine is dis- 
solved, strain the mixture into moulds and serve on lettuce 
leaves with the following dressing: To the beaten yolks 
of 2 eggs add slowly ^ cup of olive oil, the juice of 1 
lemon (or vinegar,) y^ teaspoon mustard, 1 teaspoon salt, 
beating all well. Should be like thick cream. 

Mrs. A. D. Sanders. 

NAVY BEAN SALAD. 

Prepare Navy beans as for table ; serve 1 tablespoon 
on lettuce for each person and pour over it 1 tablespoon 
hot salad dressing just before serving. Dressing: 1 cup 
vinegar, 1 cup sugar, a dash of salt and pepper, butter the 
size of an ^gg, 1 teaspoon mustard. Mix and boil a mom- 
ent, then pour over three well-beaten eggs. Heat to just 
below the boiling point. This is a good dressing, when cold 
for almost any kind of a salad. 

Mrs. F. L. Blanchard. 

CUCUMBER JELLY. 

Soak 1 pkg. gelatine in a very little water. Peel enough 
cucumbers to make four cups full and chop fine. Add 1 
small onion, a little celery, a little parsley and juice of 
three lemons. Melt gelatine over hot water and stir all 
thoroughly together. Mould in cups and serve as a relish 
^^■^th meats. ^^^ ^^^^ ^ Long. 



54 S ALADS AND SANDWICHES 

SALAD OR RELISH. 

One half box Knox's gelatine soaked in ^ cup cold 
water, ^ cup vinegar, 1 pint boiling water, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 3 cups chopped cabbage and celery in any desired 
proportion (cucumber may be used if desired, Yz cup 
sugar, 1 small green pepper, finely shredded, 1 small red 
pepper finely shredded. When pepper cannot be obtained, 
use 2 pimentoes and a little ground red pepper. To the 
gelatine and cold water add vinegar, boiling water, sugar, 
salt and other ingredients. Turn into mould and chill. 
May be used as a relish or is very nice served in individual 
moulds with mayonnaise dressing. 

Clara D. Manley. 

NUT, CELERY AND APPLE SALAD. 

One cup of nicely cut celery, 1 cup of apples cut in small 
cubes, Yi cup of cut or broken walnut meats. Mix together 
and serve with a mayonnaise dressing or lettuce. One half 
a cup of white grapes, skinned and cut, is a good addition. 

Mrs. A, L. Fanning. 

PINEAPPLE SALAD. 

Marinate slices of pineapple in French dressing. Lay a 
slice of the marinated pineapple on a lettuce leaf on each 
salad plate, scattering around it cream cheese which has 
been put through a potato ricer. Place in the center of each 
slice a maraschino cherry. (As served in Marshall Field 
Tea Room.) 

Clara A. Sargent. 

CHERRY SALAD. 

Remove the pits from large California cherries and in- 
sert hazelnuts. Serve with mayonnaise on lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. A. L, Fanning. 

ORANGE SALAD. 

Cut up oranges, removing seeds and white fibre. Mix 
with a little sugar and serve with the following dressing: 



SALADS AND SANDWICHES 65 

Mix together j^ cup vinegar, ^ teaspoon salt, dash of 
cayenne, Yi cup sugar and the yolks of 3 eggs. Put into a 
double boiler stirring constantly until creamy. Beat the 
whites of the 3 eggs to a stiff froth and add them to the 
hot creamy mixture, beat thoroughly ; remove from the 
fire. Cool and then add 2 cups of sour cream and it is 
ready for use, 

Mildred Johnson. 
Glenwood Mission Inn, Redlands, Cal. 

GRAPE SALAD. 

Halve and seed Tokay grapes, chop walnuts and celery 
and add to the grapes. Serve with mayonnaise dressing. 

Mrs. E. C. E. Dorion. 

P. E. O. SALAD. 

One cup boiled chicken, chopped, one cup chicken stock, 
one cup whipped cream, whites of three eggs, beaten stiff. 
One tablespoon gelatine dissolved. Celery salt. Salt and 
pepper to taste. Mix and put in mould. Serve cold, cov- 
ered with mayonnaise dressing on lettuce leaf. 

Mrs. H. B. Williams. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

Time for mixing 20 minutes. Yolks of 2 eggs. 1 tea- 
spoon mustard, Yx teaspoon paprika or pepper, 1 table- 
spoon of sugar, 1 lemon, the strained juice. Mix thor- 
oughly, then add 1 small pint of olive oil if light in quant- 
ity, if heavy only half the bottle. Beat 15 minutes with 
^%g beater, then add 3 tablespoons of mild vinegar, 2 whites 
of eggs beaten separately. Beat 5 minutes. Cream, also, 
may be added. 

Marian Graves Day, 

MAYONNAISE, 

(Taken from "Vital Question Cook Book.") 
One level teaspoon each, of salt and mustard, 1 level 
tablespoon powdered sugar, ^ teaspoon paprika, 2 table- 
spoons each of lemon juice and vinegar, 2 eggs, 1^/2 cups 



56 SALADS AND SANDWICHES 

olive oil. Thoroughly chill oil, bowl and spoon to be used, 
before beginning the dressing. Separate the eggs. Mix 
the dry ingredients in the bowl, add yolks of eggs, mix 
well, then add the oil, a drop at a time in the beginning. 
Stir constantly, and as the mixture thickens, thin it with 
the lemon juice and vinegar used alternately. Then add 
more oil until all is used. Lastly add the whites of the 
eggs beaten dry. If a white dressing is desired, use all 
lemon juice, stirring very thoroughly. After half the oil 
has been used it may be added in larger quantities. If the 
mixture should curdle, it is because the oil has been added 
too rapidly. This may be remedied by taking another egg 
yolk and adding the curdled mixture to it slowly. 

Minnie R. Terry. 

BOILED SALAD DRESSING. 

Four tablespoons butter, 1 tablespoon each of flour and 
sugar. 1 teaspoon each of salt and dry mustard, 1 cup each 
of mild vinegar and milk, 3 eggs, pinch cayenne. Let the 
butter get hot, add flour and stir until smooth, being care- 
ful not to brown ; add milk, stir and boil up. Place the 
sauce-pan in another of hot water ; beat eggs, salt and 
mustard, add vinegar and stir into the boiling mixture. 
Q)ntinue stirring until it thickens. 

Frances A. Bronson. 

CREAM SALAD DRESSING. 

One teaspoon each of flour and mustard, ^ teaspoon 
salt, 1 tablespoon sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, 2 egg yolks, 
% cup vinegar. }i cup cream. Mix the dry ingredients with 
the butter, add yolks of eggs, then the cream and lastly the 
vinegar. Cook over hot water until it thickens. Strain if 
necessary and chill. 

Mrs. C. E. McCabe. 

FRUIT SALAD DRESSING. 

Cream together the yolks of 4 eggs, 4 tablespoons sugar 
and 1 teaspoon mustard. Add pinch of salt and red pepper, 
a small lump of butter and 3 tablespoons vinegar. Cook 



SALADS AND SANDWICHES 57 

until thick, and when ready to serve, thin to right consist- 
ency with whipped cream. 

Ella Trelease. 

MAPLE SUGAR SANDWICHES. 

Cut 1 loaf of graham bread into slices about half an inch 
thick. Melt to the consistency of jam, 3^ lb. maple sugar 
and 1 tablespoon butter. Add a little lemon juice. Spread 
this maple paste on the slices of bread, press the slices into 
sandwiches and toast just before serving. 

Mrs. F. M. Wigmore. 

PEANUT SANDWICHES. 

Put fresh peanuts through a meat grinder. Add enough 
salad dressing to make a paste and spread on bread. This 
is much better than the peanut butter you buy. 

Mrs. S. A. Kean. 

PIMENTO AND CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Chop together 1 can of pimentos, J^ cup English wal- 
nuts, and 1 package cream cheese. Add 2 tablespoons may- 
onnaise dressing. Spread thickly between thin buttered 
slices of bread. 

Mrs. Roy H. Goddard. 

DAINTY SANDWICHES. 

Fig Sandwiches — Steam and chop very fine a sufficient 
number of figs ; add enough water to make the consistency 
of marmalade, and simmer to a smooth paste ; flavor with 
a little lemon juice. When cool, spread on thin slices of 
buttered bread ; sprinkle thickly with finely chopped nut 
meats. 

Date Sandwiches — Wash, dry and stone the dates. Mash 
them to a pulp and add chopped English walnut or pecan 
meats. Moisten slightly with lemon juice. Spread smooth- 
ly on thinly-sliced brown bread. 

Alice Patterson Curl. 





^<X\e\OKX"b 



Natural Fruit Flavors ^\Cl\)OXV!M0^ 



Vanilla 
Lemon 
Orange 
Rose, etc. 




As whole- 
some, nour- 
ishing and 
palatable as 
any food ever 
made. Unlike 
any other 
food. A mix- 
ture of Wheat y 
Rice, Oats and 
Barley. 



Ask Your Grocer 



Puddings and Sauces 



'The end crowns all." 



60 PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 

SUET PUDDING. 

One cup molasses, 1 cup suet, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 cups 
raisins, 2^^ cups flour, 1 teaspoon ginger, 1 teaspoon cinna- 
mon, y2 teaspoon allspice, 3^ teaspoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon 
soda. Boil or steam about 2 hours. Sauce: Two table- 
spoons butter, 2 tablespoons flour, ^^ cup sugar, 1 ^gg. Add 
boiling water to make proper consistency. 

Mrs. Alonzo C. Fry. 

SUET PUFF. 

One ^gg, Yz cup sour milk, ^ cup molasses, 1 cup flour, 
Yz cup chopped suet, 1 cup chopped raisins, Yi tablespoon 
soda, in milk. Put into cups and steam Y\ of an hour. Fill 
cups half full. 

Mrs. J. A. James. 

FRUIT SUET PUDDING. 
(By request.) 

Pour over one cup finely chopped suet, 1 cup boiling 
water. To this add 1 cup dark brown sugar, 1 teaspoon 
each of cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg, grated, 1 cup each 
of raisins and apple, chopped and floured, 2 heaping tea- 
spoons baking powder in enough flour to make a stiff bat- 
ter. Place in a pan and steam 3 hours, or use a double 
boiler. 

Mrs. H. B. Williams. 

SMALL PLUM PUDDING. 

One cup milk, ^ cup sugar, ^ cup molasses, 3/2 cup 
butter, 2 cups flour, 1 cup raisins, 1 teaspoon soda. Steam 
2 hours and serve with hard sauce or whipped cream. 

Mrs. N. W. Helm. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

Eight eggs, y^ lb. suet, 1 lb. raisins, 1 lb. currants, Ya 
lb. citron cut in small pieces, 1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. bread crumbs, 
2 teaspoons Royal baking powder, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 61 

1 teaspoon cloves (scant), 1 teaspoon allspice, 1 nutmeg. 
Steam 3 hours. 

Mrs. F. A. Wells. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 

One cup baking molasses, 1 cup hot water, 2 cups flour, 
1 tablespoon butter, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in a little 
hot water, 1 cup seeded raisins, 1 saltspoon salt. Steam 
1^ to 2 hours and serve with any kind of pudding sauce. 

Jennie Woodworth Barrett. 

FIG PUDDING. 

One cup sweet milk, ^ cup butter, 1 cup molasses, 1 lb. 
chopped figs, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 3^ teaspoon soda in a 
little hot water, 2 eggs, 3 cups flour. Steam for 2 hours. 
Sauce for above: Beat together for 15 minutes; 1 cup 
sugar, 1 egg, ^ cup butter, then set it over the tea kettle 
until it creams and becomes foamy. Stir in lastly 1 tea- 
spoon vinegar. 

Mrs. Frank B. Dyche. 

TROY PUDDING. 

Three tablespoons sugar, Syi cups flour, 1 teaspoon soda, 

1 cup chopped suet, ly2 cups milk, 1^ lbs. currants, Ij^ lbs. 
seeded raisins, ^2 teaspoon salt, }^ lb. citron, small pieces 
of orange peel. Mix, mould and steam 3 hours. 

M. Wyckoflf. 

BLACK PUDDING. 

One pint bread crumbs, ^ pint flour, ^ pint hot water, 

2 tablespoons butter, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, ^ teaspoon 
salt, y2 pint seeded raisins, ^^ teaspoon each of nutmeg, 
cloves, allspice, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 3^ pint molasses. 
Mix and steam 2 hours. Serve with Black Pudding Sauce : 
Cream together 2 cups pulverized sugar and 1 cup butter. 
Then add white of 1 egg, not beaten. This makes a hard 
sauce. 

Clara A. Sargent. 



62 PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 

BREAD AND APPLE PUDDING. 

Six apples, ^ cup granulated sugar, 2 tablespoons butter. 
Slice apples into a baking dish and add sugar. Soak .3 
slices stale bread in water with pinch of salt. Then lay 
bread on top of apples. Put butter on top of bread and 
bake in slow oven, 

J. C. D. 

DATE PUDDING. 

Use one pound dates, washed well, stoned, and cut up 
fine. 1 cup sugar, 1 cup English walnuts chopped fine, 
whites 6 eggs beaten stiff. Fold in carefully and put in 
moderate oven 15 minutes or until brown. Serve with 
whipped cream. 

Ella Dahl Rich. 

DATE TORTE. 

Chop 1 cup nuts and 1 cup dates. Add 1 cup sugar, 2 
eggs, 3 tablespoons each of milk and Hour, 1 teaspoon bak- 
ing powder. Bake 3^ hour. Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. A. E. Wessling. 

QUICK PUFF PUDDING. 

One pint flour, 2 tablespoons baking powder, a little salt, 
milk enough to make very soft batter. Place in well-greased 
cups a spoonful of batter, one of fruit and another of bat- 
ter. Steam twenty minutes, 

Mrs. A. W. Patten. 

GRAHAM PUDDING, 

One cup each of milk, N, O. molasses, seeded raisins and 
currants, 2^^ cups graham flour, ^ cup each of butter and 
citron, 1 teaspoon each of cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg and 
soda. Steam for 2 hours. 

Jane Scott, 

CHOCOLATE BREAD PUDDING. 
One cup of fresh bread crumbs, 2^ cups of milk, 1^ 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 63 

squares of Baker's chocolate, 2 eggs, 3^ teaspoon vanilla, 
sugar to taste. Stir the bread crumbs into the milk, add the 
chocolate, which has previously been melted in a bowl over 
steam or in hot water. Add the eggs, well beaten, vanilla 
and sugar and bake for three quarters of an hour. Serve 
warm with hard sauce, made by creaming together 1 cup 
sugar and 5^ cup butter. 

Mrs. A. L. Fanning. 

BLUEBERRY PUDDING. 

Favorite recipe at Bois Blanc Island, Straits of Mack- 
inac. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 egg, butter size of an egg, 
2 cups flour. 2 tablespoons baking powder, 1^ cups berries 
mixed carefully in the batter. Bake in oven. Sauce : boil 
1 cup berries in a little water, press through sieve, add flour 
to juice to thicken, butter, sugar and salt to taste. A little 
lemon juice if desired. 

Ruth S. Atwell. 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 

One grated pineapple (or 1 can), ^ cup butter, 1 cup 
sugar, }^ cup milk, 2 tablespoons cornstarch, 6 eggs, separ- 
ated and well beaten. Cream butter and sugar until light, 
add yolks and other ingredients and last of all the whites. 
Turn into well buttered pudding tin and bake in a moderate 
oven ^2 hour. Serve with whipped cream. Equally good 
hot or cold. 

Mrs. G. W. Boot. 

PINEAPPLE CREAM. 

Two tablespoons granulated gelatine, ^2 cup water, 1 
can grated Hawaiian Pineapple, -)4 cup water, 3/2 cup 
sugar, Yz lemon, 2 cups cream whipped. Soak gelatine in 
water. Heat pineapple, ^ cup water, sugar and lemon 
juice and when boiling add gelatine. When cool and be- 
ginning to thicken add whipped cream. Serve very cold 
with candied cherries. 

Miss Grace Ericson. 



64 PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 

One package gelatine, 1 pint cold water, 1 quart can pine- 
apple. Pour into this gelatine mixture the beaten whites of 
two eggs. Sprinkle chopped nuts on top. Serve with 
whipped cream. 

Grace E. Hall. 

SHORT CAKE. 

Measure 3 cups flour, add 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
rub in ^ cup butter. Beat 1 egg very light, add to it 1 cup 
cold water and stir into the flour. Spread on 2 well-greased 
shallow pans. Sprinkle one teaspoon granulated sugar over 
top of each and bake from 10 to 15 minutes in a very hot 
oven. Serve with fresh or canned crushed fruit. 

Mrs. D. D. Thompson. 

DUTCH PEACH SHORTCAKE. 

One egg, 34 teaspoon salt, 3^ cup sweet milk, 1 table- 
spoon melted butter, % cup flour, 1^ teaspoons baking 
powder. Pour batter in deep pie dish, cover with halves 
of canned peaches, sprinkle with 3 heaping tablespoons of 
sugar. Bake in a rather hot oven. Serve with a hot sauce 
made by thickening peach juice with a little cornstarch. 

Lillian R. Eiselen. 

SHORT CAKE. 

Two cups flour, 4 level teaspoons baking powder, ^ tea- 
spoon salt, 2 teaspoons sugar, -)4 cup milk, ^4 cup melted 
butter. Mix dry ingredients and sift. Add butter, and 
lastly milk, slowly. When baked spread with hard sauce 
and then berries partly crushed. 

Mary Ross Potter. 

STRAWBERRY PUDDING. 

Whites of 2 eggs, yolk of 1 egg, 1 cup milk, J^ cup water, 
2 tablespoons melted butter, 2 teaspoons baking powder 
sifted twice through 1^ cups flour. Steam steadily for 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 65 

40 minutes. Serve with strawberry sauce: One large box 
ripe strawberries. 1>4 cups powdered sugar, ^ cup butter 
stirred to a cream; then add berries and put on ice for 2 
hours before using. 

Mrs. Amos W. Patten. 

SPONGE PUDDING. 
(By special request.) 

One pint milk, Yz cup butter, J^ cup sugar, ^ cup flour, 
6 eggs. Cream flour and butter, add scalded milk and 
sugar. After cooling, add beaten whites and yolks of eggs. 
Bake in a pan of water from 30 to 45 minutes. Sauce : One 
cup maple sugar, ^ cup water, ^^ cup whipping cream. 
Boil sugar and water to a syrup and add whipped cream. 

Louise E. Whitehead. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

One pound prunes, boiled until soft. Remove stones and 
mash. To this paste add the whites of 4 eggs, well beaten 
and ^ cup sugar. Flavor with vanilla. Place baking dish 
in one of water and bake 1 hour in slow oven. Serve cold 
with whipped cream, sweetened and flavored. 

Mrs. J. H. Ruttan. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

One scant pint bread crumbs, 1 quart milk, 1 cup sugar, 
1 lemon, 5 eggs, butter size of ^%g. Grate the rind of the 
lemon and put it into the sugar, butter and bread crumbs. 
Add a pinch of salt and pour over all the scalding milk. 
Let stand till cool, then add yolks of eggs well beaten. Bake 
until set. When cool spread with jelly or jam and cover 
with a meringue made with the whites of eggs, Yz cup sugar 
and the juice of the lemon. Brown slowly in oven. Serve 
cold with cream or hot with fruit sauce. 

Mrs. J. McCallum. 

ORANGE JELLY PUDDING. 
One cup orange juice, juice of 2 lemons with grated rind 



66 PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 

of one, Yz box gelatine in cold water enough to dissolve 
it, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup boiling water. Mix the ingredients 
together and heat to the boiling point, stirring and skimming 
off foam. Strain into mould. May be colored with fruit 
coloring. Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. M. S. Terry. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

Two cups scalded milk, yolks of 3 eggs beaten until light, 
1 teaspoon vanilla, 2 scant tablespoons cornstarch. Mix 
and bring to the boiling point, stirring all the time. When 
cold pour this dressing over 3 or 4 oranges sliced, and 
spread the top with the whites of 3 eggs beaten very light 
and sweetened with 1 tablespoon sugar. 

Mrs. Frank B. Dyche. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

One tablespoon cornstarch, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup water, 
yolks 2 eggs, 1 small lemon. Cook in double boiler. Use 
whites of eggs for meringue. Bake slowly till meringue 
is cooked. Place on ice and serve when cold. 

Mrs. R. H. Pooley. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

Two large lemons, grated rind and juice. 1 cup sugar, 
8 eggs, 1 tablespoon gelatine, ^ cup water. Heat lemon 
juice and half the sugar in double boiler, then put in yolks 
and other half of sugar and cook till thick. Add softened 
gelatine and whites of eggs beaten stiff. Pour into mould. 
Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. D. A. Hayes. 

MAPLE CREAM PUDDING. 

One pint milk, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 cup maple syrup, 
Yz pint cream, ^ box lemon gelatine in Yz pint water. Scald 
milk and sugar. Add maple syrup, then gelatine. When 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 67 

it begins to congeal add Yo pint whipped cream. Set in 
mould and serve with cream. 

J. C. D. 

MAPLE CREAM. 

One tablespoon gelatine, one third cup water, two- 
thirds cup boiling water, 2 cups maple syrup, yolks 6 eggs, 
2 cups whipped cream. Soak gelatine in one-third cup 
water and add boiling water ; cool. Cook in double boiler 
syrup and yolks of eggs until slightly thickened. When 
cool add gelatine, and when this thickens add whipped 
cream. Serve with whipped cream and decorate with 
candied cherries. 

Miss Grace Ericson. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE. 

Melt one square Baker's chocolate in ^^ pint hot milk, 
add 1 pint milk. 1 small cup sugar, 1 large tablespoon pow- 
dered gelatine that has been soaked in a little water ; cook 
until gelatine dissolves ; add a pint of cream, flavor with 
vanilla and pour into moulds, serve with whipped or plain 
cream. 

Mrs. A. D. Sanders. 

COFFEE CREAM. 

One half tablespoon granulated gelatine, ^ cup cold 
water, ^cup sugar, Xy^ cup cream, V^ cup strong coffee. 
Soak gelatine in cold water, add boiling coffee and the 
sugar. Dissolve gelatine in this and strain into dish. Place 
on ice to cool, stirring it occasionally. When the liquid is 
the consistency of syrup, add whipped cream. Beat until 
thick but not hard. Turn into moulds. 

Mrs. John Trelease. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD. 

Four cups scalded milk, 5 eggs, Yz teaspoon salt 1 tea- 
spoon vanilla, ^ cup sugar. Put sugar in iron or steel 



68 PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 

pan and stir it constantly over fire until melted to a syrup 
of light brown color. Add gradually to milk. As soon as 
sugar is melted in milk add mixture to eggs slightly beaten, 
add salt and flavoring and strain into buttered mold. Bake 
with pan set in water. Chill and serve with caramel sauce. 

Mrs. C. F. L. 

MERINGUE DESSERT. 

To the whites of 3 eggs, beaten to a stiff froth, add slow- 
ly 1 cup of sugar, 1 teaspoon vinegar and 1 teaspoon vanil- 
la. Bake in muffin tins for one hour in a very slow oven. 
Before serving, carefully remove tops, fill with whipped 
cream and fruit, and replace tops. This amount will serve 
eight. 

Mrs. C. M. Stuart. 

BANANA PUDDING. 

One quart milk, 2 eggs, 1^ tablespoons of corn starch or 
flour, 4 tablespoons sugar, Yz teaspoon vanilla. Cook in 
double boiler. When cool pour it over 6 bananas sliced thin 
in a pudding dish. Serve very cold. It is like ice cream. 

Mrs. U. S. Grant. 

A QUICK DESSERT. 

Put raisins through the meat chopper and then spread 
between buttered graham crackers. Serve with a hard 
sauce or a lemon sauce. Delicious. 

Mrs. A. S. Stults. 

MARSHMALLOW DELIGHT. 

One half lb. marshmallows cut fine, 1 can pitted red 
cherries, Yi lb. walnuts, chopped, 34 Ih. figs chopped, whites 
of 2 eggs, beaten. Mix all together and when ready to 
serve add whipped cream. 

Mrs. E. C. E. Dorion. 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 69 

CREME CARAMEL. 

Put 1 pt. milk to boil in a double boiler. Dissolve 1 cup 
brown sugar in a skillet, stirring all the time ; when it is 
a liquid, add to the hot milk and stir until dissolved ; take 
from the fire and add the yolks of 4 eggs and 3 dessert 
spoons of cornstarch, dissolved in 1 cup cold milk. Return 
to fire and cook until it thickens. After taking from fire 
add 2 teaspoons vanilla. Beat well and put in molds. Serve 
with whipped cream. 

Mrs. A. E. Wessling. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING WITHOUT MILK. 

To a quart of boiling w^ater add 1 cup of sugar and a 
little salt. Beat separately the whites and yolks of 2 eggs. 
Dissolve 4 heaping tablespoons of cornstarch in a little cold 
water. Pour this into the boiling water, stir well from the 
bottom of the kettle and let it boil thoroughly for a couple 
of minutes. Take from the stove and add the yolks beating 
hard. Add a teaspoon of vanilla or any other flavoring and 
lastly the stiffly whipped whites of the eggs. Pour into a 
mould and let cool. 

Mrs. A. F. Townsend. 

SOUR MILK PUDDING. 

One pint of sour milk, 1 cup of brown sugar, %. cup of 
butter, 2 eggs, 1 level teaspoon of soda and 1 level teaspoon 
each of cinnamon and cloves, 1 cup of seeded raisins or 
1 cup of currants. Thicken with dried bread crumbs and 
bake in a moderate oven. To be eaten with or without 
cream or with any kind of sauce. 

Mrs. A. F. Townsend. 

SPICE SAUCE. 

To 1 pint boiling water add 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon 
flour. 1 teaspoon cinnamon, ^^ nutmeg, grated. Boil all to- 
gether and then add 1 tablespoon butter. This sauce is very 
nice to serve with apple dumplings or apple puddings. 

Mrs. Andrew Lindsey. 



70 PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 

CARAMEL SAUCE. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup boiling water. Melt sugar as for 
custard. Simmer 10 minutes after water is added and cool 
before serving. 

Mrs. C. F. C. 

RAISIN PUFFS. 

Two eggs, Yz cup sugar, 1 cup milk, y^ cup melted but- 
ter, (a small cup), 1 cup raisins, 2 cups flour, 3 teaspoons 
of baking powder. Steam % of an hour in custard cups 
half filled. Serve with lemon sauce or any tart sauce. 

Mrs. C. N. Stevens. 

FOOD FOR THE GODS. 

One cup sugar, yolks of 2 eggs, 4 tablespoons of cracker 
crumbs (rolled, but not powdered), 1 cup English walnuts 
chopped, 1 cup dates, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 salt- 
spoon salt, vanilla. Beat whites of eggs and add last. Bake 
slowly in flat buttered pan 25 minutes. Ice cream, or 
whipped cream may be served with this. 

Alice Patterson Curl. 

MARSHMALLOW DESSERT. 

One-half pint cream, whipped, ^4 lb. marshmallows cut 
into rather small pieces, ^ lb. chopped walnuts. Mix all 
together, chill and serve in small dishes. 

Mrs. Charles M. Stuart. 

LEMON CREAM. 

Beat together the yolks of 4 eggs and 4 tablespoons sugar. 
Add the juice and grated rind of 1 lemon and 2 tablespoons 
of hot water. Simmer until it thickens, then remove from 
fire and stir in lightly the whites of eggs beaten to a stifif 
froth with 2 tablespoons sugar. Set away to chill ; serve in 
small glasses. Must be used the same day it is made. 

Mrs. S. F. Wilson. 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 71 

BROWN BETTY. 

Fill baking dish about ^ full of sliced apples, then take 
dry bread, dip in cold water, squeeze dry and lay over 
apples to the depth of an inch or more; add a little watei, 
sprinkle with sugar and nutmeg and generous pieces of 
butter. Bake until the apples begin to brown a little on 
the bottom and the top is crisp ; serve with cream and sugar. 

Mrs. P. C. Lutkin. 

STEAMED CHERRY PUDDING. 

One cup thick sour milk, I/2 cup butter, 3^ cup sugar, 2 
eggs well beaten, 1 teaspoon soda, flour enough to make 
as stiff as cake. Add 1 teacup canned cherries without 
juice. Steam IJ^ hours. Sauce: 1 cup sugar, 5^ cup but- 
ter, 1 tablespoon flour; mix well together, add Yi pint 
boiling water, 3^ cup cherry juice. Any fruit may be used 
in place of cherries. 

Mrs. Ira LeBaron. 



Bowman Dairy 
Company 

Milk bottled in the Country 

Pure, Clean, 
Natural Milk 

Office, 1922 Ridge Avenue 
Telephone 380 

Evanston, 111. 



JONES' CAFE 

A. L. JONES, Proprietor 

Telephone 1605 
611 Davis Street -:- Evanston, 111. 



Frozen Desserts 



'Then farezvell heat, and welcome 
frost." 

— Merchant of Venice. 



74 FROZEN DESSERTS 

ORANGE ICE CREAM. 

The juice of 3 large oranges and 1 large lemon. 1%. 
pints thin cream, 1 cup of sugar, dissolved in juice, 1 small 
tablespoon gelatine. Soak the gelatine in a little milk, then 
beat to dissolve and add the cold cream. Put cream in 
freezer first to get cold, then add fruit juice in which sugar 
is dissolved, and freeze. 

Mrs. J. A. James. 

GRAPE SHERBET. 

Boil 1 lb. sugar and 1 qt. water together for 5 minutes. 
When cold add 1 pt. unfermented grape juice and 3 table- 
spoons lemon juice. Freeze. The mixture swells in freez- 
ing to about twice its liquid size. 

Mrs. D. R. Curtiss. 

MARMALADE ICE CREAM. 

Put 1 pint of milk in a double boiler, adding }^ cup 
sugar. When the milk reaches the boiling point, thicken 
with one level tablespoon corn starch which has been moist- 
ened with a little cold milk. Add ^ teaspoon salt and let 
cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Beat together 
until light, 1 egg and ^ cup sugar. Add this to the thick- 
ened milk and cook for about 5 minutes stirring constantly. 
Remove from the fire and let cool. When ready to freeze, 
add 1 pint rich cream and 5^ glass of "Amber Marmalade" 
and you will have a dish fit for a king. 

Mrs. F. C. Eiselen. 

FROZEN STRAWBERRIES. 

Wash and pick over 1 quart strawberries. Add enough 
sugar to make very sweet. Put into freezer with the un- 
beaten whites of 3 eggs and freeze, using 3 parts ice to 1 
part salt as for any ice cream. Garnish with whipped 
cream and whole berries. 

Mrs. J. E. Lukey. 



FROZEN DESSERTS 75 

AIAPLE SOUFFLE. 

Three-fourths cup maple syrup and whites of 4 eggs. 
Beat together and cook in double boiler until thick, stirring 
constantly. When cool add one pint of cream whipped. 
Pack in salt and ice for 4 hours. 

Margaretta S. N. Helm. 

CHOCOLATE SAUCE FOR ICE CREAM. 

One ounce chocolate ( more may be used), 1 cup sugar, 
Yz teaspoon salt, 1^4 cup boiling water. Stir all together 
over fire until boiling and cook 5 minutes. Stir 1^ level 
teaspoons cornstarch with a little cold water to a smooth 
paste. Stir this into hot mixture and boil 6 or 8 minutes. 
Add 1 teaspoon vanilla and use hot or cold. 

Mrs. C. F. C. 

MAPLE MOUSSE. 

One pint of cream, 4 eggs, 1 cup of maple syrup. Boil 
the syrup and pour slowly over the yolks of eggs beaten 
light ; beat whites of eggs stiff ; add to them the cream, beat 
all together, cool and freeze. 

Mrs. Walter M. Pond. 



All of the Country's 
Best Cooks— 

Mrs. Mary J. Lincoln, Mrs. Siarah Tyson Rorer, Mrs. 
Helen Armstrong, Marion Harland, Lida Ames Willis, 
and a dozen others of national reputation — recommend 
Cottolene in preference to lard or any other medium 
for frying and shortening. 

Isn't the testimony of such experts worth something 
to you? 

COTTOLENE 

means Food Purity. The woman who fries or shortens 
her family's food with lard is doing so because she is 
unaware of the ill effects which may come. Lard-cooked 
food never has been, and never can be, as healthful as 
food cooked with Cottolene. Here's why? 

Lard is made from hog fat, and is bound to be more 
or less indigestible. 

On the other hand Cottolene comes from the cotton 
fields of the Sunny South, and is made from the choic- 
est refined cotton oil, which physicians today recom- 
mend as being fully as healthful as olive oil. 

Cottolene is guaranteed 
— Your grocer is hereby 
authorized to refund your 
money in case you are not 
pleased, after having giv- 
en Cottolene a fair test. 

Never Sold in Bulk — 
Cottolene is packed in 
pails with an air-tight top 
to keep it clean, fresh and 
wholesome, and prevent it 
from catching dust and 
absorbing disagreeable 
odors such as fish, oil, etc. 

Order a pail from your 
grocer today. 

Made only by The 
N. K. Fairbank 
Company. 




Pastrp 



'Oh! flaky and crusty and succulent 

pie, 
They call you dyspeptic; 'tis here- 
sey; fie!" 



78 PASTRY 

CHOPPED PIE CRUST. 

Sift together 1 quart flour, 1 tablespoon sugar and 1 
scant teaspoon salt. Put in chopping bowl with lyi cups 
butter and ^ cup lard, mixed. Chopped all together and 
then with a knife mix in slowly 1 cup cold water. 

Mrs. Richard C. Hall. 

PIE CRUST. 

One and one-half cups flour, ^ cup lard, %. cup butter, 
1 teaspoon salt. Cut shortening into flour with a knife, add- 
ing enough cold water to bind ingredients together. Handle 
as little as possible. Roll thin. 

Mrs. C. F. Champlin. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

Boil together 1 pint milk, ^ cup grated chocolate and % 
cup sugar ; stir in 1 tablespoon cornstarch dissolved in milk, 
add butter the size of an tgg, the yolks of 3 eggs and the 
white of one. Beat 2 whites to stiff froth and add 2 table- 
spoons of sugar. Bake pie crust first, pour in chocolate 
and spread whites of eggs on top. Brown lightly. 

Emma Ailing Murdock. 

LEMON PIE. 

Cream 1 cup sugar and 1 tablespoon butter. Add 1 
heaping tablespoon cornstarch, yolks of 6 eggs, grated rind 
and juice of 2 lemons and a tumbler of water. Cover with 
meringue and bake. This makes 2 pies. 

MERINGUE. 

Beaten whites of 6 eggs and 6 tablespoons powdered 
sugar. 

M. Wyckoff. 

PEACH CUSTARD PIE. 

Use dried peaches. Soak over night, and cook until 
tender. Pour off the water, mash fine through a colander 



PASTRY 79 

adding sugar to taste. Fill a pie crust about Va inch thick 
with the mixture ; over this pour to the depth of V2 inch, a 
boiled custard. Bake. To be eaten cold. 

Mrs. C. N. Stevens. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

One cup boiling milk, V^ cups pumpkin sifted, 1 tea- 
spoon butter, 1/2 cup (scant) sugar, ^ teaspoon each of 
salt, ginger, cinnamon and allspice, 1 &gg. This is the 
amount necessary for one pie. 

Alice Hargrave Crew. 

CREAM FILLING FOR PIE. 

One pint of new milk, yolks of 2 eggs, >4 cup sugar, 2 
tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in cold water. Mix and 
when cold put in baked pie crust and cover with white of 
egg, beaten stiff, to which a little sugar has been added. 

Mrs. D. D. Thompson. 

LEMON FILLING FOR PIE. 

Juice of 1 lemon and a little of the grated rind, yolk of 
1 egg, 1 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in 
a little cold water. Set on stove and add slowly 1 teacup 
boiling water. Let all boil for a few minutes. When cold 
put in baked pie crust and cover with white of egg beaten 
stiff with a little sugar added. 

Mrs. D. D. Thompson. 

BANBURY TART. 

Mix together 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, 
1 cracker (rolled), and the juice and grated rind of one 
lemon. Put about a teaspoon of the mixture on a saucer- 
shaped piece of pie crust and fold as a turnover. 

Mrs. Richard C. Hall. 

ENGLISH APPLE TART. 

Line a pie plate with a rich pie crust, and fill with un- 
cooked sour apple sliced fine. Cover with another crust 



80 PASTRY 

without openings and bake until apple is tender. Remove 
from oven and lift off the upper crust, stir the apples, add- 
ing sugar, nutmeg and a little butter. Replace the crust, 
sprinkle with sugar and serve. 

Mrs. C. E. Pope. 

MINCE MEAT. 

Six quarts chopped apples, V/i quarts chopped suet (buy 

1 lb.), 3>4 quarts chopped beef (buy 6 lbs. from round), 

2 lbs. currants, 2 lbs. raisins, 1 lb. citron (half the quantity 
of fruit can be used). 2 tablespoons cinnamon, 1 table- 
spoon cloves, 2 level tablespoons salt, 2 level tablespoons 
black pepper. Boil the following: 5 lbs. coffee sugar, 1 
quart vinegar, ^ quart water, 2 cups N. O. molasses. 
Pour hot over mincemeat. Add 1 quart good boiled cider. 
The above makes three gallons. 

Mrs. N. M. Jones. 

ELDERBERRY PIE. 

Many cooks do not know that the common elderberry 
makes an uncommonly good pie. One large cup of sugar, 
two tablespoons of vinegar and a liberal sprinkling of 
flour or cracker crumbs is needed for one pie. Bake with 
two crusts. A large pinch of Tartaric Acid, used instead 
of the vinegar, brings out the flavor, supplies the necessary 
"tart," and gives to the berry the hue of the cherry. 

Mrs. Bentley Masslich 

JELLY PIE. 

Cream together 1 cup sugar and }i cup butter. Add 
yolks of 2 eggs, J^ cup sweet cream, ^ cup sour jelly (such 
as currant), 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 tablespoon flour. Bake 
the mixture in a single crust and when done cover with a 
meringue made from the 2 whites. 

Clara D. Manley. 

MINCE MEAT. 
(By special request.) 

Use bowl holding V/^ pints. Mix together the following: 



PASTRY 81 

3 heaping bowls chopped beef (from the round), 6 heap- 
ing bowls chopped apples (greenings if possible), 3 lbs, 
seeded raisins, y^ lb. chopped suet, 2 bowls brown sugar, 
3 large cups molasses, 6 tablespoons cinnamon, 4 table- 
spoons cloves, 3 tablespoons allspice, 3 nutmegs grated, 3 
cups sweet pickle juice (from green tomatoes is best), 2 
lemons (juice and grated rind), 2 or 3 teaspoons salt, vine- 
gar if necessary. Moisten with the liquor from the meat 
and boil about 5 minutes. 

Mrs. Andrew Lindsey. 

SEEDLESS GRAPE PIE. 

Make a pie crust in the usual manner. Line a pie tin and 
bake. Wash and skin Concord grapes and cook them until 
the skins are well broken. Put this pulp through a sieve 
to remove seeds (save the clear juice for grape juice). Mix 
the pulp with the yolks of 2 well beaten eggs, add sugar 
to taste (about 1 cup). Fill the baked crust and bake for 
10 minutes. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth; 
add 2 tablespoons sugar and spread over top of pie. Brown 
this meringue in oven. One-half basket makes one deep 
pie. 

Miss Josephine Peterson. 



A Book of Unique Recipes 
For the Asking 

This book tells how you can improve the best 
meal prepared from splendid recipes by using 

Welch's 

Grape J^^ice 

How to Make a Welch Grape Punch 

TAKE the juice of two lemons and one orange, 
one cup of sugar, one pint WELCH'S 
Grape Juice, one pint of water (plain or charged.) 
Pour over chunk of ice in punch bowl, and gar- 
nish with sliced fruits. 




This and many other recipes for 
delicious drinks and dainty desserts 
will be found in a book of recipes 
which will be mailed for the asking 
by The Welch Grape Juice Com- 
pany, Westfield, N. Y. 

Do More Than Ask for 
* * Grape Juice ' ' — Ask for 
WELCH'S— and Get It! 

Your dealer will supply you by 
bottle or case. 



Cakes and Icings 



'What a brave piece of cookery" 
— Ben Johnson. 



84 CAKES AND ICINGS 

A CAKE WITH VARIATIONS. 

Cup Cake. 

One cup sugar, 3^ cup butter, 2 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2 cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon flavoring. 

I. White Cake. 

Omit yolks of eggs in preceding recipe — flavor with al- 
mond or vanilla. 

II. Gold Cake. 

Omit whites of eggs. Flavor with lemon or orange. 

III. Christmas Cake. 
Add to the white cake recipe ^ cup cocoanut, Yz cup 
shredded almonds, ^ lb. sliced citron, ^ lb. thinly sliced 
figs. Bake slowly. 

IV. Nut Loaf. 
Chop 1 cup nut meats and add to the cup cake recipe. 

V. Crazy Cake. 

Divide white cake dough into three parts. Color one- 
third pink with red sugar or coloring, one-third brown with 
chocolate or spices, one-third remaining white. Flavor each 
color differently and bake like marble cake. 

VI. Chocolate Loaf. 

Add to the cup cake yo cup grated chocolate dissolved in 
a very little hot water. Flavor with vanilla. 

VII. Marble Cake. 

Make both the gold and the white cake. Color the gold 
very dark with either chocolate or spices. Bake in layers 
forming a ribbon cake. 

VIII. Yellow Watermelon Cake. 
Stir up the yellow cake and the white cake. Put raisins 



CAKES AND ICINGS 85 

in the yellow part. Arrange in the pan with the white on 
bottom and around the sides leaving the yellow in center. 
Put the white on top also. Ice with boiled icing colored 
green with juice of pounded spinach. 

IX. Sweet Pea Cake, 

Make a marble cake of white and very delicate pink 
(made by using pink sugar in mixing). Ice with pink icing 
sprinkled with grated cocoanut. 

Mrs. H. B. Williams. 

SPONGE GINGERBREAD. 

Into 2 cups molasses sift 2 teaspoons soda, and ginger to 
taste. Stir to a cream, then add 4 well beaten eggs, 1 cup 
melted butter, 1 cup sour milk in which 1 teaspoon soda 
has been dissolved. Mix all together, then add flour to the 
consistency of pound cake. Bake. 

Miss Raddin. 

GINGER BREAD. 
(By request.) 

To one egg beaten, add 1 cup sour cream and 1 cup molas- 
ses, stir well and add 2 cups flour sifted with 1 teaspoon 
ginger and 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Add 1 teaspoon baking 
powder if desired. Stir well and add 1 teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in water. Bake in gem pans or square pans in hot 
oven 20 minutes. This is better baked in gem pans. 

Faith Williams. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

Stir together to a cream % cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 
cup New Orleans molasses and 1 tablespoon ginger. To 
this add 1 cup sour milk or buttermilk, then 2 eggs beaten 
until very light, and 1 teaspoon soda. Lastly add 5 cups 
(or about 2 coffee cups) of flour and beat hard for about 
10 minutes. Bake at once in gem pans. Served hot with 
rich cream this makes a delicious dessert. 

Mrs. Frank B. Dyche. 



86 CAKES AND ICINGS 

CHRISTMAS LOAF. 

One pint sweet milk, 2 eggs, 1^ cup sugar, ^ lb. seeded 
raisins, ^ lb. blanched almonds, 1 lemon rind, 2 oz. citron, 
2 cakes yeast foam. Dissolve yeast in little warm water, 
then add flour to make sponge, keep in warm place for a 
few hours, then add milk, melted butter, eggs, sugar and 
flour enough to make into a loaf. Before quite stiff add 
nuts, raisins, citron and lemon rind. Then let it rise over 
night. Mould into loaves and bake as bread. 

Clara A. Sargent. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites of 7 eggs, yolks of 5, 1^ cups granulated sugar, 
1 cup flour, a scant one-third teaspoon cream of tartar, a 
pinch of salt added to whites of eggs before whipping. 
Flavor to taste. Sift, measure and set aside flour and 
sugar. Beat yolks to a very stiff froth. Whip whites to 
foam and add cream of tartar, whipping until very stiff. 
Add sugar to whites and beat in ; then yolks and beat in ; 
then fold flour lightly through. Bake in a moderate oven 
about 40 minutes. Much depends upon the mixing of this 
cake. 

Mrs. J. H. Ruttan. 

APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, Yz cup butter, Yz cup dried currants, ^ 
cup raisins (or 1 cup of either ), 1 cup apple sauce, pinch of 
salt. Spices — cinnamon and allspice. 2 cups flour. Bake 
in slow oven either as a loaf or in small patty-pans. 



Minnie R. Terry. 



BREAD CAKE. 



One cup bread sponge, Yz cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 table- 
spoons molasses, 2 eggs, \Yi even cups flour, 1 cup raisins, 
1 teaspoon cinnamon, 3^ teaspoon allspice, ^ teaspoon 



CAKES AND ICINGS 87 

soda, 1 teaspoon baking powder. The raisins and part of 
the spices may be omitted if preferred. Moisten the soda 
with a Httle sour milk or boiling water. 

Mrs. H. H. Harris. 

ECONOMICAL SPICE LOAF. 

Put in a saucepan 1 cup brown sugar, ^ cup lard, 1 cup 
water, 2 cups raisins, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, % teaspoon 
nutmeg, ^ teaspoon cloves, pinch of salt. Boil 3 minutes. 
When cold add 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in warm water. 
Stir in 2 cups flour sifted with 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

Mrs. J. E. Lukey. 

SCOTCH CAKE. 

Three cups sifted flour, 10 eggs, ^ lb. butter, 2 cups 
sugar, 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 cup currants, %. cup chopped 
citron, %. cup chopped orange peel, Yz cup pounded Eng- 
lish walnuts, 1 teaspoon vanilla, %. teaspoon salt. Beat 
butter to a cream, add gradually the sugar, beating all the 
while. Beat eggs without separating until very light, add 
gradually to the butter and sugar, beating the whole vigor- 
ously. Add sifted flour, then vanilla and pounded nuts. 
Add flavored fruit last. Bake in one large loaf in moder- 
ate oven. Better after being kept a week or two. 

Christina Mackay. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

To the whites of 11 eggs add 1 teaspoon cream of tartar, 
a saltspoon of salt, and beat very stiff. Then add V/z cups 
sifted sugar and 1 teaspoon vanilla. The last thing, add 1 
cup flour sifted seven times. Do not beat any after adding 
flour. Bake .50 minutes. 

Mrs. Edgar Blake. 

MOCK ANGEL CAKE. 
Sift together 7 times: 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar, % tea- 



CAKES AND ICINGS 



spoon salt, 3 level teaspoons baking powder. Add 1 cup 
milk heated to boiling point and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Beat 
thoroughly, then fold in the stiffly beaten whites of 2 eggs. 
Bake in an ungreased pan in moderate oven about 40 min- 
utes. Ice when cold. Moist and delicious. 

Mrs. D. R. Curtiss. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Three eggs well beaten, 1^ cups sugar, 1 cup boiling 
water added slowly, 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 
^ teaspoon vanilla. Bake in moderate oven one hour. 

Mrs. C. M. Stuart. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Three eggs well beaten, 1^ cups sugar, 1 cup boiling 
sugar, 1 cup flour, J4 teaspoon soda and ^ teaspoon cream 
of tartar (or 1 teaspoon baking powder). Bake in moderate 
oven. 

Mrs. M. S. Terry. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup flour, 4 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder, 1 tablespoon vinegar, 2 tablespoons water. Sift 
flour, sugar and baking powder into a bowl and add the 
well beaten eggs and lastly the vinegar and water. 

M. Wyckoflf. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Two cups granulated sugar, 4 eggs, whites beaten separ- 
ately, 2 cups sifted flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. Add 
last % cup boiling water. Flavor to taste. Delicious. 

Katharine Howard Ward. 

FIVE MINUTE CAKE. 
Break whites of 2 eggs into glass measuring cup. Fill 



CAKES AND ICINGS 89 

the cup to half -full with soft (not melted) butter. Then 
finish filling it with milk. Have ready in your bowl 1 cup 
granulated sugar and I3/2 cups sifted Swansdown flour, to 
part of which has been added 1 teaspoon baking powder. 
Flavor, and beat everything together vigorously for five 
minutes. This is a delicious white cake and can be used 
with a variety of fillings. 

M. Wyckofif. 

PHILADELPHIA CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, 5^ cup butter, ^ cup sour 
milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 squares Baker's chocolate dissolved 
in Yi cup hot water, 2 eggs beaten separately, 1^ cups 
flour. Bake either in a sheet or in two layers with chocolate 
frosting. 



Mrs, Trelease. 



DEVIL'S CAKE. 



Cream two-thirds cup butter and 1^ sups sugar. Add 
the following, melted together : 4 tablespoons powdered 
sugar, 2 tablespoons hot water, 2 squares Baker's choc- 
olate. Then add 1 cup milk, 3 cups Swansdown flour, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon vanilla, whites of 5 
eggs. Bake in layers and spread with boiled icing. 

M. Wyckoflf. 

DEVIL'S CAKE. 

Custard part : One cup of grated chocolate (or one-half 
of a bar of Baker's chocolate), 3^2 cup sweet milk, 1 cup 
brown sugar, yolk of 1 egg, 1 teaspoon of vanilla. Stir to- 
gether in a granite pan and cook slowly for 5 minutes or 
less time. Set away to cool. 

Cake part : One cup brown sugar, Yz cup butter, 2 cups 
flour, Yi cup sweet milk, 2 eggs. Cream the butter, sugar 
and yolks of eggs, then add milk, sifted flour and whites 
of eggs (beaten stiff). Beat all together and stir in the 
custard. Lastly add 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in a little 



90 CAKES AND ICINGS 

warm water. This makes a large loaf which keeps indefin- 
itely. A more attractive cake can be made by baking in 
layers and putting together with the following. 

Filling: One cup granulated sugar, 1 cup water, 1 tea- 
spoon vinegar. Boil until thick like candy and then stir 
in the beaten whites of 2 eggs and ^ lb. marshmallows. 
Boil up again and place on cake after it gets cool. 

Mrs. F. M. Vawter. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, % cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 3J^ 
cups Sawansdown flour, whites of 6 eggs, 2 heaping tea- 
spoons baking powder, %. teaspoon vanlila. 

Lizzie C. Johnson. 

ASHLAND CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Put 2 squares chocolate in ^ cup boiling water and let 
stand while mixing cake. Mix ^ cup butter and 1 cup sug- 
ar. Add yolks of 2 eggs beaten and the chocolate mixture, 
then %. cup sour milk and 1 cup flour. Lastly add the 
whites of the 2 eggs beaten stifif. Bake in a sheet or loaf. 

BUTTER CREAM ICING FOR CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

One and % cup confectioner's sugar, 2 teaspoons melted 
butter. Cream to make paste to spread. Beat hard until 
light and flaky. More sugar can be added until right thick- 
ness to spread. 

Mrs. C. F. Champlin. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Six egg whites, >4 cup butter, 1>4 cups sugar, >4 cup 
milk, 2 cups flour, 2^ teaspoons baking powder. Mode: 
Cream butter and sugar, add a little flour "to bind." Add 
milk and flour alternately, then egg whites thoroughly beat- 
en and finally the baking powder. It makes 3 large layers. 
Filling: Six egg yolks, 3/2 cup sugar, ^ cup milk, }4 cup 



CAKES AND ICINGS 91 

chocolate, sinimer in double boiler until smooth. 

Mrs. S. J. Herben. 

DEVIL'S CAKE. 

Two cups brown sugar, 2>^ cups flour, 2 eggs, ^ cup 
sour milk, ^^ cup butter, ^ cup boiling water, Yz cake 
chocolate, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in 2 tablespoons coffee. 
Put all together, then add hot water and 1 teaspoon vanilla. 
Beat as little as possible. 

Mrs. C. S. Raddin. 

WHITE CAKE. 

One half cup butter, 1 cup granulated sugar, ^ cup 
sweet milk, 2 cups pastry flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
1 teaspoon vanilla, whites of 3 eggs. Sift baking powder 
and flour together three times. Cream butter, add sugar 
then add alternately the milk, flour and eggs. 

Mrs. Joseph Lee. 

FRENCH DATE CAKE. 
(By request.) 

Three eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, 1 cup 
sugar, 1 tablespoon milk or water, 1 teaspoon baking pow- 
der sifted with 1 cup flour, 1 cup dates stoned and cut, 1 
cup walnuts broken not chopped, 1 pinch salt. Bake in a 
thin sheet for 10 or 15 minutes. 

Helen Lindsey. 

STREET FAIR CAKE. 

One cup molasses, ^ cup sugar (brown is best), Yz 
cup melted butter, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 
2^ cups flour, 2 teaspoons soda dissolved in 1 cup boiling 
water, yolks of 4 eggs, well beaten and added last. Bake 
in layers. Filling: Ten teaspoons boiling water, 2 cups 
granulated sugar. Boil until candied and pour over the well 
beaten whites of 4 eggs. Beat 5 minutes and add 1 cup 



92 CAKES AND ICINGS 

chopped and seeded raisins. Continue to beat until cool 
enough to spread on cake. 

Mrs. G. W. Boot. 

WHITE NUT CAKE. 

One and one half cups sugar, ^4 cup butter, ^^ cup milk, 
2^ cups pastry flour sifted with 3 teaspoons baking pow- 
der. Whites of 8 eggs beaten light and with ^ teaspoon 
cream of tartar, 1 cup walnut meats cut in pieces. Bake in 
two square pans. 

Mrs. Gary G. Calkins. 

NUT CAKE. 

One cup sugar, ^ cup butter, ^ cup milk, 1% cups flour 
(pastry flour), 2^ even teaspoons baking powder, whites 
of 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 cup nut meats cut fine. 

Filling: One cup sugar, %. cup water. Cook without 
stirring only enough to keep from burning. Cook until, 
when lifting the spoon, the syrup runs off and hairs ; pour 
slowly upon the beaten white of 1 egg, beat until cool and 
spread quickly. Flavor with vanilla. Bake in one sheet or 
two layers. 

Mrs. A. D. Sanders. 

COCOANUT LAYER CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, J^ cup butter, 1 cup milk, 3 cups flour, 
3 teaspoons baking powder, 4 whites of eggs, vanilla. 



Miss Kaley. 



COCOANUT FILLING. 



One cup sugar and three tablespoons water boiled with- 
out stirring until it hairs. Pour slowly into stiffly beaten 
whites of two eggs. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla and 1 cup 
cocoanut. Spread between layers and on top, finishing tops 
with sprinkling of dry cocoanut. 



CAKES AND ICINGS 93 

CREAM PIE. 

Three eggs, 1 cup sugar, 1^^ teaspoons soda dissolved in 
a little hot water, 1 teaspoon cream of tartar and one 
and two-thirds cups flour sifted together. Bake in flat pie 
tins. Cut open and spread with the Cream: Boil 1 pint 
milk, then stir in 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons flour 
and 2 eggs. Boil a few minutes. Take off stove and cool. 
Flavor with 2 teaspoons lemon essence. 

Miss Raddin. 

CREAM PIES. 

Nearly a cup milk, ^ cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups 
flour, 4 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream of tartar. 
Makes 2 pies. 

Cream : 2 eggs, 2^ cups milk, 1 cup sugar, ^ cup flour. 
Split cakes and put cream inside. 

Mrs. H. B. Ridgway. 

ICING NO. I. 

To the whites of 2 eggs add a pinch of salt. Put in 
double boiler without beating. Add 2 tablespoons cold 
water and 1 cup granulated sugar. Have water at boiling 
point in lower boiler then set in the upper part and beat 
contents with a Dover egg beater exactly 8 minutes. Re- 
move from fire and add any flavoring preferred. 

ICING NO. 2. 

Two cups of granulated sugar, 1^/2 cups water, 1 tea- 
spoon vinegar. Mix and put over the fire in a covered pan. 
Boil without stirring until it will hair. Pour slowly on 
stiffly beaten whites of 2 eggs, beating all the time. Use 
any flavoring preferred. 

Mrs. John Mahin. 

CHOCOLATE ICING. 

One cup powdered sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 inch 
squares of Baker's chocolate, 1 teaspoon vanilla. Mix sug- 



94 CAKES AND ICINGS 

ar and butter together. Dissolve chocolate and add to sug- 
ar and butter. Then add enough cold coffee to make it of 
the right consistency to spread. 

J. C. D. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM FILLING. 

One square Baker's chocolate melted with 1 tablespoon 
water, ^ cup sugar. Beat the yolks of 2 eggs in a cup, 
fill the cup with milk and add to chocolate, cooking until 
creamy. Spread thickly between layers leaving 2 table- 
spoons for top. To this add very slowly powdered sugar 
until stiff enough for icing and spread over the top of the 
cake. 

Mrs. J. T. Gascoigne. 

MAPLE SUGAR FILLING. 

Dissolve 1 lb. soft maple sugar in ^ cup boiling water. 
Boil without stirring until it threads from the spoon. Beat 
slowly into stiffly whipped whites of 2 eggs. Chopped nuts 
may be added. 

Mrs. J. T. Gascoigne. 

COFFEE FILLING. 

One cup sugar and 3 tablespoons strong coffee boiled 
without stirring until it hairs. Then pour slowly and beat 
into stiffly whipped whites of 2 eggs and spread. Add 
chopped nuts if liked. 

MARSHMALLOW FROSTING. 

Boil together 1 cup sugar and one-third cup water until 
the mixture hairs. Stir in beaten whites of two eggs and 
a scant half teaspoon vanilla. Heat a dozen marshmallows 
and stir them in last. 

M. WyckoflP. 

CARAMEL ICING FOR CAKE. 
Two cups light brown sugar, 1 cup cream, butter the size 



CAKES AND ICINGS 95 

of walnut, vanilla. Cook until it forms a soft ball in cold 
water, then beat until stiff. 

Jennie Woodworth Barrett. 

FROSTINGS 

To give nice consistency to boiled frosting, add 8 or 10 
fresh marshmallows while frosting is boiling hot and beat 
until smooth. It will keep soft and will not sink in cake. 

For a quick frosting take about two tablespoons juice 
from canned fruit and stir thick with powdered sugar. 

Clara D. Manley. 



THE ELECTRIC 




WITH A 



Practical and Scientific Washing Principle 




Wringing from 
rinsing or liiuing 
water while ma- 
chine is washing 
another load. 



work; in fact it makes washing on 



It should make little difference to you as a pur- 
chaser whether a machine is "Electric," "water 
n-otoi" or whether it be driven by gasolene engine, 
wind mil! or by hand if it does n»t have a practical 
washing principle. 

It IS not rubbing clothes that actually cleans them, 

if It was you could rub them on a smooth surface 

which would be very much easier on the 

•^ clothes as well as on the person doing the 

work. This you know would not get them 

clean, but by a slow, hard, laborious rub- 

. in* process over a rough surface (the 

U .. ssh boardi a simple washing principle is 

1 finally arrived at, which is getting water 

' i't" the clothes and out of the clothes, 

i.i the onig scientific and practical 

ing principle and the process bg 

h clothes are cleaned. 

have the machine that mctuallp 
handles the water, forcing the hot 
suds and air into, around, through 
mil through the clothes about 100 
imes a minute, with much greater 
iorce and with much greater effic- 
iency than is possible to produce 
on a washboard, this without the 
slightest injury to the most delicate 
fabrics and in a fraction of the 
time, and with a fraction of hard 
e of the easiest parts of the housework. 



This IS HOW and WHY the Judd "MAKES GOOD" 

Tub is made of hard rolled copper and solid brass, reinforced; cannot 
shrink, warp, crack, leak or rust and is hygienic and aanitarg, 

JUDD LAUMDRY MACHINE COMPANY 



129 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago 

(Opposite Marshall Field & Co.) 

TELEPHONE RANDOLPH 4864 



Cookies and Small Cakes 



"Up from out the baking cellars, 
Comes a whiff that makes a feller's 

Dreams awake. 
And the next it has him mumbling 
Of the gingers, brown and crumb- 
ling, 

Grandma'd baked." 



98 COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 

OLD ENGLISH RECIPE FOR CRULLERS. 

Two tablespoons melted butter, 3 cups sugar, 3 well 
beaten eggs, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 cups sweet milk, 3 teaspoons 
Dr. Price's baking powder, 3^ grated nutmeg. Flour enough 
to roll out. Fry in hot lard and roll in powdered sugar. 

Mrs. James B. Gascoigne. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

One large cup sugar, 1 cup thick sour milk, 1 level tea- 
spoon soda dissolved in milk, 2 eggs, ^ teaspoon salt, 2 
tablespoons melted butter, and flour to make a soft dough. 

Mrs. J. A. James. 

"ROX." 

One scant cup shortening, 1^^ cups brown sugar, 3 eggs 
beaten separately, 3^ cups flour, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved 
in 3 tablespoons warm water, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, ^ 
teaspoon each of cloves and allspice, 1 cup each of chopped 
English walnuts and raisins (or dates.) Cream butter, 
sugar and yolks; add spices, flour and fruit, whites last. 
Drop in teaspoonfuls on well greased tins. 

Clara D. Manley. 

GINGER DROPS. 

One egg, 1 cup sugar, ^ cup molasses, >4 cup butter, 
3^ cup of cold water, 2>4 cups flour — or enough to make a 
stiff dough, 1 teaspoon ginger, 1 of cinnamon. Drop on 
greased tins, leave room to spread while baking. 

Mrs. George B. Reynolds. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

One half pint molasses, % lb. sugar, %. lb. butter, 1}^ 
pints flour, 1 tablespoon ginger, 1 teaspoon each of cloves 
and cinnamon, >^ teaspoon soda. 

Mrs. H. B. Ridgway. 



COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 99 

GINGER DROPS. 

One egg, 1 cup sugar, ^ cup molasses, 3^ cup butter, 
^ cup cold water, 2)^ cups flour or enough to make a 
stiff dough, 1 teaspoon ginger, 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Drop 
on greased tins, leaving room to spread. 

Mrs. George B. Reynolds. 

KLENETTER. 
(Swedish Christmas Cookies.) 

One-half cup yolks of eggs, ^ cup cream, ^4 cup of 
white sugar, grated rind of 3 lemons and enough flour to 
roll out thin. Cut out with a j agger into fancy shapes and 
fry in deep fat. 

Elin Nilson. 

CHRISTMAS COOKIES. 

One lb. flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 lb. sugar, ^2 
lb, butter, 3 eggs, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, rind of 3^ lemon. 
Mix butter with flour and baking powder. Stir eggs with 
sugar, add all ingredients and knead well. Put dough 
in a cool place and let stand over night. It may stand a 
few days even without harm. Roll out as for cookies 
and bake in moderate oven. Grease pans with parafiin. 

Clara A. Sargent. 

OAT MEAL COOKIES. 

One cup lard, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 6 teaspoons sweet 
milk, 2 cups flour, 2 cups oatmeal, 1 cup raisins or nuts 
chopped, 1 teaspoon soda, and salt. 

Mrs. Morris R. Eddy. 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

One cup sugar, 2 cups oatmeal, 2 eggs, ^ cup shorten- 
ing, 2 cups flour, pinch of salt, 1 cup chopped raisins, a 
teaspoon soda dissolved in a teaspoon of hot water. Cut 
and bake carefully. 

Mrs. U. S. Grant. 



100 COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

One cup sugar, Yz cup butter, ^ cup lard, 2 cups oatmeal 
\y2 cups flour, XYz cups raisins, 3 eggs, ^ teaspoon soda, 
1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 tablespoon vingear. Drop from 
teaspoon into well greased pan leaving room to spread. 
Bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. H. B. Williams. 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 

One cup brown sugar, ^ cup English walnuts broken 
small, Yz cup raisins cut in two, Yz cup melted butter, Yz 
cup sweet milk, 2 squares chocolate, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 egg, 
lY cups flour. Cream the sugar and butter, add ^gg, flour, 
milk, soda, melted chocolate and lastly nuts and raisins. 
Drop from spoon on buttered tins. When baked, cover 
each with chocolate frosting made as follows : Three- 
fourths cup sugar, Y\ cup grated chocolate, 3 tablespoons 
cream, 1 teaspoon butter, 2 eggs. Cook the above mixture 
over boiling water till glossy, then beat well. 

Mrs. D. A. Hayes. 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 

Whites of 4 eggs beaten stiff, ^ lb. powdered sugar, Y^- 
lb. chopped nuts, 2 squares Baker's chocolate, flour to thick- 
en. Drop on greased tins by spoonfuls. 

Mrs. Trelease. 

TEA CAKES. 

One cup sugar, ^ cup butter, 2 eggs, 1 cup milk, 1^ 
cups flour, 1 large teaspoon baking powder, Y^ cup currants, 
vanilla. 

Miss Grace Ericson. 

PHEBE CAKES. 

Two cups molasses, Y'^ cup butter, ^ cup lard, 2 eggs, 
6 tablespoons vinegar, 4 teaspoons soda, 5^ cups pastry 
flour, 1 teaspoon each ginger and cloves. Melt butter and 



COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 101 

lard, add molasses, then vinegar, then soda dissolved in 
warm water. Add eggs well beaten, then flour which has 
been mixed with spices. Bake as drop cakes. 

Mrs. Gary G. Calkins. 

LACE CAKES. 

Two eggs well beaten, 2j^ cups rolled oats, 2 teaspoons 
of melted butter, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla. Mix all the ingredients together, drop a teaspoon- 
ful for each cake, abut 2 inches apart on greased tins. Bake 
in hot oven, watch closely, take out when a light brown. 
Remove from tins while still warm by running a thin knife 
under the cakes. 

Mrs. E. Huntington. 

SPONGE DROPS. 

Beat 3 eggs to a froth and add 1 teacup sugar; stir into 
this 1 heaping cofifee cup flour, into which 1^^ teaspoons 
lemon. Drop in teaspoonfuls about 3 inches apart on thin 
baking powder have been thoroughly mixed. Flavor with 
buttered sheets. Bake in a very quick oven. Watch them 
closely as they burn easily. 

Mrs. T. P. Frost. 

CURRANT COOKIES. 

Two cups light brown sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 eggs, 1 
teaspoon soda dissolved in a little hot water, ^ cup sweet 
milk. 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon and cloves and ^ nut- 
meg.. 1 cup floured currants and flour enough to roll. 
Place in ice box at least an hour before rolling out. 

Jennie Woodworth Barrett. 

HERMIT CAKES. 

Two eggs. 2 cups sugar. 1 cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 
1 cup English currants, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon mixed 
spices (cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg.) Mix as soft as 
possible with just flour enough to roll. Sprinkle with gran- 



102 COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 

ulated sugar and roll lightly in. Cut in rounds and bake 
in a quick oven. These will keep for months if locked up. 

Mrs. Olive E. Baker. 

HERMITS. 

One and one-half cups brown sugar, ^ cup butter and 
Yz cup shortening (or 1 cup butter), 3 eggs well beaten, 1 
cup seedless raisins, 1 cup chopped walnuts, 1 teaspoon soda 
in ^ cup boiling water, 3 cups flour, 1 teaspoon baking 
powder. 

Mrs. H. H. Harris. 

SOFT COOKIES. 

One cup sugar, J/^ cup butter, 2 eggs, ^ cup milk, 1^ 
teaspoons baking powder. Put all together with 2 cups 
flour and beat well. 

C. E. McCabe. 

PECAN WAFERS. 

Four eggs beaten well together, 2 cups brown sugar, 6 
heaping tablespoons flour sifted 3 times, J^ teaspoon salt, 
1 teaspoon baking powder, 2 cups chopped pecans. Drop 
from teaspoon and bake 6 minutes in hot oven. 

Elizabeth Bragdon. 

RICH COOKIES. 

One cup sugar, % cup butter, 2 eggs, yolks and whites 
beaten separately, 1 tablespoon cream, 1 even teaspoon bak- 
ing powder. Flour enough to roll out very thin. Dip soft 
brush or tissue paper into the white of an tgg beaten a little, 
rub over tops of cookies, dredge lightly with granulated 
sugar before baking. 

Mrs. Alfred L. Lindsey. 

ORANGE WAFERS. 

One cup sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons orange 
juice, 2 tablespoons grated orange rind, 1 teaspoon baking 



COOKIES AND SMALL CAKES 103 

powder, sufficient flour to make a soft dough. Roll thin 
and cut small. 

Mrs. C. M. Stuart. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

One cup hot water, ys cup butter, 1 cup flour, 3 unbeat- 
en eggs. Boil water and butter together ; slowly sift the 
flour in ; cool and when luke warm stir in the unbeaten eggs 
one at a time. Drop by spoonfuls on buttered pans and bake 
slowly for thirty minutes. When cold fill with whipped 
cream, sweetened. 

Mrs. H. H. Harris. 

CHARITY CAKES. 

One pound of flour, 5 eggs beaten separately, 1 lb. sugar, 
2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 grated orange peel, 1 grated 
lemon peel, 1 lb. each of seeded raisins and almonds, 3^ 
lb. chopped citron. Flavor with cloves and cinnamon. 
Drop on buttered paper and bake. 

Louise E. Whitehead. 

GRANDMOTHER'S GINGER COOKIES. 

One cup hot water, 3 teaspoons soda, 1 cup lard, cotto- 
lene or bacon fat, 3 cups New Orleans molasses, 3 tea- 
spoons ginger and 1 teaspoon of salt. Add pastry flour 
enough to make a soft dough. Roll quarter of an inch 
thick ; cut, and bake in very hot oven. 

Mrs. J. T. Gascoigne. 



The best ingredients assure the best 
cooking. Pure — Rich — Sweet. 

Carnation Milk. 



Sterilized Evaporated 

Adds delicacy to everything cooked with it. 
excellency by this recipe: 



Prove its 



Cream Biscuit 

Put 1 quart sifted flour into a bowl; 
add to it a heaping tablespoon of but- 
ter or lard; rub well together with the 
hands until the flour is thoroughly 
greased; add 2 heaping teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, salt, six tablespoons Car- 
nation Milk, seven tablespoons water, or 
enough to make a soft dough; mix and 
knead quickly, roll out about half an 
inch thick, and bake in a quick oven 
fifteen or twenty minutes. 




Carnation Milk is un- 
equaled in flavor and 
purity — best for table — 
best for cooking. It is 
twice as rich as ordinary 
milk — immeasurably clean- 
er and purer. Just try 
it and you'll use it always. 

"Baby" Can 5c 
Tall Can 10c 

Your Grocer 



SfoSSi will send it. 



Bread and Breakfast Cakes 



' 'You must rise,' said the leaven 
7 can't/ said the dough; 
'Just examine me, please, 
And you'll find it's no go.' 
' 'You must,' the tormentor insists, 
'It's all right' ; 

You must rise zvhen I tell you. 
And ivhat's more, be light.' " 

— James Russell Lowell. 



106 BREAD AND BREAKFAST CAKES 

SALT RISING BREAD. 

Many think that salt-rising bread is a lost art or too slow 
a process, with too much uncertainty as to results, for the 
modern housewife to undertake. By nine o'clock (if you 
can rise at six) you can have three loaves of sweet delicious 
bread baked which will be the envy of all your friends, if 
you will follow these directions. Pour boiling sweet milk 
on a heaping tablespoon of corn-meal and stir to a smooth 
paste. Set this, snugly covered, in a real warm place over 
night. The next morning this should be swelled up light. 
Heat half a coffee cup of sweet milk and cool to a warm 
temperature (not scalding) with a coffee cup of water. 
Into this stir a pinch of salt, a pinch of soda, a level table- 
spoon of sugar, the light meal and flour for a smooth 
batter. Set this in warm water, covered, till it foams up 
twice as light as first quantity. Next, in a deep pan or 
bowl, put a coffee cup of sweet milk, a pint of warm water, 
the light sponge and flour to make a smooth stiff batter. 
Sift over this an inch of flour. Set container in warm 
water all snugly covered, and when the sponge breaks 
through all over and at the edges, sift a pile of flour on 
the moulding board and pour out on it the light sponge, 
catching it up and kneading it into a soft mass. Make into 
three loaves and put into greased pans allowing about an 
inch for rising. Grease top of loaves with butter. When 
level with the pan sides, bake in a quick oven forty min- 
utes and cool in cold or cool air. This will be the most de- 
licious bread you ever tasted. 

Mrs. C. E. Haile. 

WHOLE WHEAT BREAD. 

Three and a half cups of luke warm water, one cake 
compressed yeast, one large tablespoon shortening, one lev- 
el tablespoon salt, one level tablespoon sugar, 9 cups whole 
wheat flour. Mix in a batter with half the flour at night 
and set to rise in a warm place. Early next morning knead 
to a stiff dough, set to rise until twice the original size, 
make into loaves and set to rise to double their size. Rub 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST CAKES 107 

loaves with melted butter, bake 1 hour in moderate oven 
then turn on sides to cool. 

Mrs. Olive E. Baker. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Make a sponge of ^ yeast cake, 1 teaspoon sugar. 2 
cups warm water, and white flour. When light add 1 tea- 
spoon salt, Yi teaspoon baking soda, ^ cup molasses, and 
graham flour (sifted) to make a dough-— not so stiff as 
ordinary bread dough. Put in greased and floured bread- 
tin and bake in slow oven Y\ of an hour or more. 

H. C. Crew. 

OATMEAL BREAD. 

One cup Quaker Oats, 3^ cup molasses, ^ cup boiling 
water, 1 large spoon lard. Mix together at noon and 
cover. At 9 o'clock stir in 1 cake yeast soaked in a cup 
water, add 1 teaspoon salt and flour to make stiff enough 
to work. Cover till morning, make into loaves, let rise to 
double the size. Bake 1 hour. 

Mrs. M. D. Gloss. 

OATMEAL BREAD. 

Scald 1 cup rolled oats with 2 cups water and 1 teaspoon 
lard. When cool add 1 cup sugar, 1 qt. flour, 1 teaspoon 
salt, Yi cake compressed yeast dissolved in Yz cup warm 
water. In winter let rise over night. In summer it is best 
to set the sponge in the morning. Add 2 cups flour. ^ 
cup (or more) of chopped walnuts. Put into pans and let 
rise to double the size. Bake 45 minutes. Use quick oven 
at first, then slow. This makes 2 good sized loaves. Do 
not knead unless there seems to be difficulty in using all 
the flour. 

Miss Jane Scott. 

BRAN BREAD. 

Four cups bran flour, 2 cups white flour, ^^ teaspoon salt, 
2 rounded teaspoons soda, 2 eggs beaten light, 2 cups butter 
milk or sour milk, 6 tablespoons molasses, ^ package seed- 



108 BREAD AND BREAKFAST CAKES 

ed raisins. Mix well with hand and bake in moderate oven 
about 1 hour. Easy to make, good to eat, and very effica- 
cious. 

Mrs. Carrie W. Raymond. 

BRAN BREAD. 

Two eggs, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons molasses, 1^ 
cups sweet milk, 1 cup graham flour, 1 heaping tablespoon 
baking powder, 2 cups wheat bran. Bake 30 minutes in a 
moderate oven. 

Mrs. A. E. Wessling. 

NUT BREAD. 

Scald 1 cup oatmeal in 2 cups boiling water and 1 round- 
ed tablespoon lard. When cool add 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 
even cups flour, 1 even teaspoon salt, and ^^ cake com- 
pressed yeast dissolved in a cup warm water. Set over 
night. In the morning add 1 even cup walnuts, chopped 
not too fine, and also enough flour to keep from sticking 
to the board when you knead it. Let it rise in pans to the 
top. Bake 45 minutes in an oven at first quick, then slow. 

Mrs. A. L. Fanning. 

NUT BREAD. 

Three cups flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 1 cup sug- 
ar, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 cup chopped walnuts. Mix well. Add 
1^ cups milk, 1 egg. Let stand in bread pan 20 minutes. 
Bake 1 hour like bread. 

Mrs. D. A. Hayes. 

NUT BREAD. 

One half cup nuts, 1 cup grated bread crumbs, 1 cup 
molasses with ^/^ teaspoon soda, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, j/z 
teaspoon ginger, 3 tablespoons melted butter, 1 egg beaten 
into the melted butter, 1 cup milk. Steam for 2 hours. 

Ella Dahl Rich. 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST CAKES 109 

RAISIN AND NUT BREAD. 

Two cups graham flour, 1 cup sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 
Yz cup molasses, >^ cup raisins, 1 cup English walnuts, 1 
teaspoon salt. Pour in greased baking powder cans, steam 
an hour and a half, remove cover and bake 15 minutes. 

Mrs. John H. Long. 

CURRANT BREAD. 

One egg, Yi cup sugar, 1 pint milk, ^ teaspoon salt, 1 
cup currants, 1 quart flour, 3 level teaspoons baking pow- 
der. Mode : Beat ^gg yolk with sugar. Add a little flour 
"to bind," then salt, milk, flour, currants and baking pow- 
der in order given. Let stand Yi hour. Makes 1 large 
loaf or 2 small. 

Mrs. S. J. Herben. 

NEW ORLEANS CORN BREAD. 

Cream together 1 generous tablespoon butter and Yi cup 
sugar, beat in 2 eggs without separating. Dissolve 1 level 
teaspoon baking soda in a little warm water, then add to 1 
pint of sour milk and stir into butter, sugar and eggs. Now 
add 2 cups flour (level) and 1 cup cornmeal sifted together, 
beating the whole very vigorously. Bake in a loaf or sheet 
in a moderate oven about 45 minutes. 

Mrs. C. A. Wilson. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

One heaping pint graham flour, 1 small pint yellow corn 
meal, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 heaping teaspoon soda dissolved in 
\Ya pints sour milk, 1 small half pint molasses. Makes 2 
loaves. Steam three hours, then bake 20 minutes. 

Elizabeth Bragdon. 

FINGER ROLLS. 

Sift together 2 cups flour, ^ teaspoon salt, 1 heaping 
teaspoon baking powder. Rub into this 1 teaspoon butter, 



110 BREAD AND BREAKFAST CAKES 

add water to make a soft dough, form rolls the shape of 
fingers and bake in finger-roll pans in hot oven 20 minutes. 

Mrs. T. P. Frost. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUITS THAT NEVER GO 
WRONG. 

One quart flour, 8 level teaspoons baking powder, 1 level 
teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons shortening — butter or lard or 
one of each — milk or milk and water, to make stiff dough. 
Sift together baking powder and flour. When the dough 
is mixed, knead until smooth. Roll 3^ inch thick and cut 
out. This makes 18 biscats or 24 biskittens. Bake about 
15 minutes in a hot oven. 

H. C. Crew. 

CHELSEA BISCUIT. 

Sift together 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 
Yz teaspoon salt, 3 tablespoons sugar. Add 3 tablespoons 
lard. Rub together and add 1 egg well beaten and milk 
enough to make a soft dough. Roll out to about ^ of an 
inch thick. Cream 2 tablespoons butter and spread over 
dough ; sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon ; roll carefully 
from you. Cut in slices Yi inch thick. Place close together 
in baking dish. Bake 15 minutes. 

Mrs. T. F. Holgate. 

SWEET BISCUIT. 

One cup sugar, ^ cup sour cream, )A, cup sour milk, 
1 teaspoon soda, Yz teaspoon salt. Mix very soft, mould 
and cut into biscuit. 

Mrs. H. H. Harris. 

PIN-WHEEL BISCUIT. 

Two cups flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 3^ teaspoon 
salt, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, Y, cup milk, 
Yz cup raisins (finely chopped). 2 tablespoons citron, 
(finely chopped), cinnamon. Mix and roll to Ya inch thick- 
ness, except fruit, sugar and cinnamon which must be 
sprinkled over the rolled-out dough. Roll like a jelly roll, 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST CAKES 111 

cut off pieces }i inch thick. Place on buttered tins and 
bake 15 minutes. 

Mrs. John H. Long. 

SODA BISCUIT. 

One quart sifted flour, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons 
cream of tartar and 1 teaspoon salt. Mix thoroughly and 
rub in 2 tablespoons each of butter and suet melted together 
with 1 pint of sweet milk. Bake in quick oven. 



A. R. Vawter. 



JOHNNY CAKE. 



A favorite recipe at Bois Blanc Island, Straits of Mack- 
inac. One cup sugar, 1^ cups sour milk, ^ cup butter, 
J4 teaspoon salt, ^4 teaspoon ginger, 2 eggs, 1 cup white 
flour, 2 cups yellow corn meal, 1 even teaspoon soda. If 
sweet milk is used, omit the soda and substitute 3 teaspoons 
baking powder. 

Ruth S. Atwell. 

MUFFINS. 

One tablespoon butter, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 eggs. Add 
1 cup sweet milk, 3 teaspoons baking powder, flour to 
make stiff batter. Bake twenty minutes in quick oven. 

Mrs. C. B. Cleveland. 

BLUEBERRY MUFFINS. 

One-third cup butter, % teaspoon salt, 1 egg, }i cup 
milk, 2 cups flour, 4 even teaspoons baking powder, 1 cup 
fresh blueberries. Cream the butter, add sugar gradually, 
then alternately the egg beaten and mixed with the milk, 
and the flour sifted with the baking powder. Stir in the 
berries lightly and bake in hot pans 25 minutes. 

Mrs. A. L. Fanning. 



112 BREAD AND BREAKFAST CAKES 

BRAN MUFFINS. 

Two cups bran, 1 cup flour, 1^/2 cups sour milk, 3 table- 
spoons N, O. molasses, ^ teaspoon soda. 

Mrs. H. B. Ridgway. 

DATE MUFFINS. 

One-third cup of butter, 54 cup sugar, creamed, 1 egg 
well beaten, ^4 cup milk, 2 cups flour, sifted, 2 full tea- 
spoons baking powder, little salt, 1 lb. dates washed and 
cut in pieces. Bake in gem tins. 

Mrs. Carl Williams. 

CORN MEAL MUFFINS. 

One cup yellow corn meal, ^ cup white flour, 1 cup sour 
milk, Yz teaspoon soda dissolved in the milk, ^ cup sugar, 
1 ^gg, pinch salt. 

Mrs. A. D. Sanders. 

CORN GEMS. 

One tgg, \y2 cups sour milk, 1 cup corn meal, 1 cup 
flour, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, butter or cotto- 
lene the size of an egg, small teaspoon soda. If sour cream 
is used instead of milk, butter may be omitted. These may 
be successfully made with sweet milk and 1}^ teaspoons 
baking powder. Bake in gem pans. 

Mrs. Curme. 

RICE GEMS. 

One cup warm boiled rice, ^^ teaspoon salt, yolks of 2 
eggs well beaten, 1 tablespoon melted butter. Add alter- 
nately 1 cup sweet milk and 1^ cups flour, then cut and 
fold in the whites of 2 eggs well beaten and dry. Bake in 
hot, well greased gem pans from 20 to 30 minutes in toler- 
ably hot oven. 

Mrs. D. D. Thompson. 

HUCKLEBERRY CAKE. 
One cup sugar, ^ cup butter, i/^ cup milk, 1 egg, 1^ 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST CAKES 113 

teaspoons baking powder, 1^ cups flour, 2 cups huckle- 
berries. 

Mrs. S. A. Kean. 

WAFFLES. 

One pint milk, 3 eggs beaten very light, 1 teaspoon melt- 
ed butter, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt and 
enough flour to make a soft batter. 

Mrs. T. P. Frost. 

POPOVERS. 

Two eggs, Yz pint milk, 1 pint flour. Makes 12. Mode : 
Beat eggs, yolks and whites together. Add milk and pour 
slowly on the flour, stirring constantly. When perfectly 
smooth pour into piping hot muffin irons, greased. Bake 
Yz hour in hot oven. 

Mrs. S. J. Herben. 

SALLY LUNN. 

Two eggs, well beaten, 2 tablespoons sugar, salt to taste, 
1 pint sweet milk, 2 pints flour (after sifting), ^ cup but- 
ter and lard (melted), 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder. 
Bake in shallow tin and serve immediately. 

Mrs. H. B. Williams. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

Make a fairly rich baking powder biscuit dough. Rolf 
out thin in a rectangular sheet. Fold over once and then 
again. With a sharp knife cut into 2^ inch squares and 
bake in a hot oven. This recipe was brought from Ireland 
by my mother and we children always considered them 
very superior to the ordinary baking powder biscuit. 

Mrs. J. A. Scott. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 

Two cups sour milk. 1 cup sweet milk, ^ cup molasses, 
3 cups yellow cornmeal, 1 cup wheat flour, i4 cup English 



114 BREAD AND BREAKFAST CAKES 

currants, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons soda. Mix well and 
put in well greased Boston brown bread tins, or baking 
powder cans, each 7^ full ; steam 2^ hours ; then put in 
hot oven for five minutes before taking out of tins. 

Mrs. Peter F. Jensen. 

POTATO ROLLS. 

Two cups scalded milk, 1 cup flour, 1 cup mashed potato, 
Yz cup lard, 2 eggs well beaten, salt, 1 cake yeast dissolved 
in Yz cup warm water. Mix and let rise 2 hours; then 
make into a stifif dough by adding about 1 quart of flour. Let 
rise 2 hours more ; knead, shape into rolls, put in pans and 
let rise 2 hours before baking. These are delicious made 
into small Parker House rolls and baked quickly. 

Mrs. H. W. Price. 



CINNAMON ROLLS. 

When making white bread, leave 2 cups of dough in the 
bread bowl; beat into this Yz cup of sugar, ^ cup of 
chopped raisins or currants, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon of butter, 
1 large teaspoon of cinnamon. Beat thoroughly. Drop 
from a spoon into greased muffin tins, filling them half full. 
Let rise one hour, or until light. Bake 20 minutes. 

Mrs. George A. Foster. 

SCOTCH SHORT BREAD. 

One-half pound butter, 4>4 oz. sugar, 1 lb. flour. Chop 
the flour and butter together, knead in the sugar, roll into 
a sheet half an inch thick and cut in shapes. Bake upon 
buttered paper in a shallow tin until crisp and of a delicate 
yellowish brown. 

Mrs. H. M. Coverly. 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST CAKES 115 

SCOTCH SCONES. 

Three cups flour, 2 even teaspoons each of baking pow- 
der and sugar, small teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon each of but- 
ter and lard, milk to make a batter. Rub the butter and 
lard into the flour and mix all with the milk. Roll out on 
board, cut any desired shape and bake on griddle. 

Mrs. H. M. Coverly. 



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EVANSTON, ILLINOIS 



Pickles and Preserves 



'We eat zvhat we can; and what we 
can't eat, zve can." 



118 PICKLES AND PRESERVES 

DUNDEE MARMALADE. 

Wash thoroughly 12 oranges and 6 lemons.. With a 
sharp knife cut each crosswise in the thinnest flakes pos- 
sible. (Do not use end pieces.) Pick out the seeds, put 
them in a bowl and cover with a pint of warm water. Pour 
5 quarts of cold water over the sliced fruit and let every- 
thing soak for thirty-six hours. Then put the sliced fruit 
and water into a preserving kettle, also the water which 
has been drained off the seeds, and allow all to simmer 
for two hours. Now add 10 lbs. of sugar, which has been 
warmed in the oven, and boil until the preserve jellies, 
which ought to be in an hour or so. Pour the marmalade 
into jelly glasses and seal. This marmalade, if properly 
made, will be like an amber jelly. 

Mrs. J. McCallum. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Slice very thin, rind and all, twelve good flavored, medi- 
um sized navel oranges and four lemons. Cover with four 
quarts water and let stand for 30 hours. At the end of 
that time boil for two hours; then add 8 lbs. sugar. Boil 
an hour longer and put in glasses. This is delicious and 
has no bitter taste. 

Mrs. J. E. Lukey. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

One dozen good sized oranges, 3 lemons, pulp and juice 
of 1 grape fruit, 8 lbs. sugar. 9 teacups water. Shave oranges 
and lemons as thin as possible, add grape fruit and water, 
leave over night in enameled kettle. Boil 2 hours or until 
the rind is very soft. (It hardens a little after sugar is 
added.) Add sugar and boil 1 hour, turn into glasses, leave 
uncovered until next day. 

Mrs. Fulcher. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Four oranges, 2 lemons cut in thin slices. To 1 pint of 
this mixture add 1^ pints cold water. Boil 30 minutes. 



PICKLES AND PRESERVES 119 

Let stand over night and in the morning add 1^^ lbs. sug- 
ar to each pint. Boil 40 minutes and pour into glasses. 

Mrs. G. W. Price. 

AMBER MARMALADE. 

Shave 1 orange, 1 lemon and 1 grapefruit very thin re- 
jecting nothing but seeds and fiber; measure fruit and add 
to it three times the quantity of water. Let stand over 
night in an earthen dish and next morning boil for ten 
minutes only. Stand another night and second morning 
add pint for pint of sugar and boil steadily till it jellies. 
This rule is supposed to make 12 glasses. The product 
should have a limpid appearance, the strips of fruit being 
well defined in a clear pale jelly. To this end stir as little 
as possible during required cooking. 

Mrs. S. A. Kean. 

RHUBARB AND ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Three large oranges. 18 medium stalks rhubarb. Slice 
oranges very fine and rhubarb in ^^ in. pieces without re- 
moving skins. Mix, measure, and add equal amount of 
sugar. Mix thoroughly and let stand 3 or 4 hours or over 
night. Then boil rapidly until a little on ice will thicken 
like jelly. 

Jennie Woodworth Barrett. 

GRAPE FRUIT MARMALADE. 

Six oranges, 3 grape fruit, 3 lemons. Extract the juice 
and pulp, rejecting all seeds and pith. Put rind through 
meat chopper. Mix thoroughly and add 4 quarts water 
and put in a cool place until morning. Then put into a pre- 
serving kettle and cook until rind is transparent, (about 
2 hours.) Add 10^^ lbs. granulated sugar, and cook until 
jellied or until mixture will hold up rind. Put into jelly 
glasses. When a day or two old, cover with paraffine. 

Mrs. Sherman Kingsley. 
PLUM CONSERVE. 
Six lbs. blue plums, after removing pits and quartering, 



120 PICKLES AND PRESERVES 

4 lbs. granulated sugar, 2 lbs. seeded raisins, ^ lb. English 
walnuts, 5 oranges, juice of 1. Boil rind of the five until 
tender and chop fine. Mix the ingredients and boil 20 min- 
utes, no longer. Add nuts just before taking from the fire. 

Mrs. E. J. McKee. 

CURRANT CONSERVE. 

Five pints currant juice, 5 pints sugar, 1^^ lbs. raisins, 
juice of 4 oranges and the peel chopped fine, juice of 1 
lemon and peel chopped fine. Boil slowly 40 minutes, and 
fill jelly tumblers. 

Mrs. E. C. E. Dorion. 

GRAPE CONSERVE. 

Five lbs. grapes, 3 large oranges, cut in small pieces, 1 
cup chopped English walnuts, 1 lb. raisins, 4 lbs. sugar. 
Pulp the grapes. Cook them until soft and press through 
colander to remove seeds. Add other ingredients and 
boil 20 to 25 minutes. 

Caroline Spalding. 

PINEAPPLE CONSERVE. 

Three pineapples, 4 boxes strawberries, 5 lbs. sugar. 
Put pared pineapples through meat grinder, add to berries 
and sugar. Cook till stifif as jelly and seal while hot. 

Mrs. H. B. Williams. 

PRESERVED GRAPES. 

Pick over and wash one large basket of grapes. Separ- 
ate pulp from skins and cook in its own juice until free 
from seeds, then strain. Cover the skins with water and 
cook. When they are nearly dry add strained pulp juice 
and two-thirds as much sugar as grape mixture. Boil 
twenty minutes and turn into jars. 

Mrs. E. C. E. Dorion. 

TOMATO PRESERVES. 
Use small, pear shaped, yellow tomatoes. Scald and re- 



PICKLES AND PRESERVES 121 

move skins. To each pound of totnatoes add 1 pound of 
sugar. Let them stand over night. Pour off juice, cook it 
down to a rich syrup, and add 2 lemons which have been 
sliced thin and boiled in water to cover, until peeling is ten- 
der. Then put in tomatoes and cook until done. Tomatoes 
should be transparent when done. 

Mrs. James Edwin Marshall. 

PINEAPPLE HONEY. 

Pare one large pineapple. Put through meat grinder. 
Measure 1 cup of sugar for each cup of fruit. Add water 
enough to cover sugar and boil until a syrup, then add 
pineapple and boil until pineapple is soft, or syrup is thick. 

Mildred B. Jones. 

PEAR CHIPS. 

Eight lbs. pears sliced thin, 6 lbs. white sugar, 6 lemons, 
juice and thin rind sliced, 6 ounces preserved ginger, 
chopped. Combine all and let stand over night, then cook 
for 2 hours very slowly until clear and dark. Fill jelly 
tumblers. 

Mrs. E. C. E. Dorion. 

BAKED QUINCES. 

Perfectly ripe, yellow quinces are delicious baked. Core, 
fill and sprinkle the fruit liberally with sugar, put a small 
amount of water in the baking dish and set in a slow oven 
until well done. A clean, amber jelly should surround the 
quinces. They need no flavoring. 

Mrs. Bentley Masslich. 

PICKLED PEACHES. 

Eight lbs. of pared peaches, 4 lbs. of sugar, 1 pint of 
vinegar, 1 lb. of raisins, % lb. stick cinnamon. Boil sugar, 
vinegar, raisins and spice together for 10 minutes ; then 
add fruit and cook until tender. 

Mrs. William A. Dyche. 



122 PICKLES AND PRESERVES 

PICKLED PEACHES. 

Eight pounds pared peaches, 4 lbs. sugar, 1^ pints vine- 
gar, y2 lb. raisins, j^ lb. cinnamon. After paring peaches 
press into each, 4 cloves and 4 cassia buds then proceed in 
the usual way. 

Mrs. J. F. Oates. 

TOMATO BUTTER. 

Seven lbs. tomatoes, 3 lbs. sugar, 1 pt. cider vinegar. 
Cook sugar and tomatoes 3 hours, add vinegar, cook 1 hr. 
longer. Cloves and cinnamon to taste. 

Mrs. B. F. Foster. 
(Taken from Y. L. M. S. Cook Book.) 

SPICED GRAPES. 

Press grapes from skins and after heating pulp put it 
through a colander to remove the seeds, then mix with the 
skins and measure. To 5 lbs. fruit take 4 lbs. granulated 
sugar, 1 tablespoon powdered cinnamon, 1 teaspoon pow- 
dered cloves, Yz pint vinegar, and ^ pint grape juice. Boil 
very slowly for 2 hours, put into sterilized glasses and 
cover with paraffine. This is especially nice with cold 
meats. 

Mrs. Sherman Kingsley. 

TOMATO RELISH. 

Peel and chop very fine 1 peck ripe tomatoes and put 
in colander to drain. Throw away the juice and keep the 
thick part. Add 2 cups chopped onions, 2 cups chopped 
celery, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup white mustard seed, J/2 cup 
salt, 1 teaspoon black pepper, 4 teaspoons cinnamon, 4 red 
peppers chopped fine, 2 quarts vinegar or less if the mix- 
ture seems too thin. Put into a stone jar or cans and cover 
tight. This does not need cooking and will keep in- 
definitely. 

Mrs. S. A. Kean. 



PICKLES AND PRESERVES 123 

GREEN TOMATO MINCEMEAT. 

One peck of green tomatoes, chop fine, squeeze and drain 
off juice. Cover with hot water and two tablespoons of 
salt. Boil a few minutes and drain off. Do this three times. 
Then add 3^ peck of chopped apples, 3 pounds yellow C 
sugar, 2 cups of vinegar, 1 cup chopped suet, 2 tablespoons 
of ground cinnamon, 1 tablespoon of cloves and 1 of nut- 
meg, 1 lb. of raisins and 1 of currants. Boil until apples 
are done. Can in fruit jars and seal tight. More sugar if 
preferred. 

Mrs. Helen Stewart Claassen. 

CANADA PICKLES. 

Slice green tomatoes, salt and let stand over night. In 
the morning press and drain and add one-fourth as much 
onion which has been put through the meat grinder. Peel 
and slice half as many hard apples as tomatoes. Boil vine- 
gar enough to cover, spice to taste with cloves, cinnamon 
and a little red pepper. Add sugar in the proportion of 1 
cup to each 3 pints of pickle. After the vinegar has boiled 
pour over pickle and let come to a boil, then set in fireless 
cooker for 3 hours. Drain off the vinegar, boil it up once 
and then pour it over the pickle to seal. 

Mother Walker. 
CHILI SAUCE 

Eighteen large ripe tomatoes, 1 green pepper, 3 onions. 
2 tablespoons salt, y^ cup sugar, 2 cups vinegar, 1 teaspoon 
each cloves, cinnamon and allspice. Chop fine, tomatoes, 
onions and green pepper (from which seeds have been re- 
moved). Mix well together. Stew, slowly. Bottle tight. 

Mrs. M. D. Gloss. 

OIL CUCUMBER PICKLE. 

Slice with potato sheer 300 small cucumbers. Sprinkle 
with salt, let stand overnight. In morning mix together 1 
cup olive oil, 1 oz. celery seed, 2 oz. each of black and white 



124 PICKLES AND PRESERVES 

mustard seed. Pour this over the cucumbers and add vine- 
gar to cover. Pack in jars. No cooking. 

Mrs. Richard C. Hall. 

CELERY SAUCE. 

Three ripe tomatoes, 10 large onions, 5 bunches celery, 
15 tablespoons sugar, 5 cups vinegar, 5 red peppers — seeds 
removed — 4 tablespoons salt. Chop vegetables and mix 
all together. Cook 1^ hours. 

E. J. McKee. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Put large green cucumbers in brine for 9 days. If then 
too salt let them stand in fresh water for several hours. 
Remove from water and cut lengthwise, being careful not 
to cut clear through. Remove seeds, wipe dry as possible 
and fill the cavity with seeded raisins and sliced lemon. 
Tie each cucumber together with twine and place in a 
jar. Pour over them boiling syrup made in same propor- 
tion as for pickled peaches or pears, adding cinnamon and 
cloves to hot syrup. When cold drain off syrup, boil and 
pour once more over the cucumbers. If at any time syrup 
is lacking, prepare more so that the pickles may be well 
covered before packing them away. 

Mrs. F. M. Vawter. 

CORN RELISH. 

Chop together until fine 1 head cabbage, 6 red peppers 
from which all seeds have been taken, 4 onions. Cook 
until tender in a syrup made by boiling together 1 quart 
water, Yi cup salt, 2 cups sugar, ^4 lb. mustard. Then add 
the corn cut from 12 ears of green corn. Cook ten min- 
utes longer and can. 

Mrs. George S. Bridge. 

INDIAN RELISH. 

Chop fine 12 large ripe tomatoes (peeled), 12 large tart 
apples, and 4 large onions; to them add 1 quart vinegar; 



PICKLES AND PRESERVE S 125 

mix and boil until tender; then add ^ cup salt, 3 cups 
sugar, 1 teaspoon each of ginger, cinnamon and cloves, and 
Yz teaspoon red pepper. Boil down until quite thick and 
bottle. 

Mrs. C. E. Clifton. 

GREEN TOMATO SWEET PICKLE. 

One peck green tomatoes sliced ; sprinkle with 1 cup salt ; 
let stand over night. In morning drain and boil for 20 
minutes in 2 quarts water and 1 quart vinegar. Turn off 
the liquid and let tomatoes drain in a colander; then sim- 
mer for 15 minutes in the following: Two quarts brown 
sugar, 1^ quarts cider vinegar, 1 tablespoon each of ground 
cloves, allspice, ginger, cinnamon and mustard. Can. 

Mrs. Andrew Lindsey. 

PRESERVED EGG PLANT (Delicious). 

Nine pounds tgg plant, 7 lbs. granulated sugar, 1 lb. 
figs, 2 lemons. 1 oz. ginger root. Add the sugar to the 
chopped tgg plant and let stand over night. In morning, 
put lemons and figs through the meat grinder and add them 
with the ginger root to the egg plant. Boil for about 3 
hours, or until of the proper consistency. Fill into jelly 
glasses. 

Mrs. Salene. 



St. Benedictus Olive Oil 

Supreme Virgin Olive Oil of France 



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Bon Vincent Olive Oil 

Best Lucca Olive Oil of Italy 



' ■ 



Either one will be sure to please the most fastidious 



Jevne's SOVEREIGN BLEND OF TEA, 

the finest cup, "Liquid Gold" Splendid 
Aroma, Exquisite Flavor. $L00 per lb. 

dJEVNI 

Importers and Grocers 

32-34 So. Wabash Avenue 

CHICAGO 

Telephone Central 1-2-3-4 

Express Charges prepaid to any point in the United States 



Favorites of Our Favorites 



The things that mother used to 
cook 

Most of us know quite well 
about; 

Here are the others — turn and 
look — 

That father used to tell about. 

—Wilbur D. Nesbit. 



128 FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 

DOUGHNUTS. 
Dr. Frost's favorite rule. 

One egg, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup of milk (sweet), 1 spoon 
baking powder, ^ spoon of salt, stir thick with flour, 
mould, cut in strips, roll and twist, fry brown in hot Ko- 
nut. 

METHODIST WELSH RAREBIT. 

Melt 1 tablespoon butter in chafing dish ; stir in 1 tea- 
spoon cornstarch, add 3^ cup milk or thin cream and cook 
2 minutes. Add ^^ lb. cheese cut in small pieces and stir 
until melted. Season with ^ teaspoon salt, Ys teaspoon 
mustard, and a sprinkling of cayenne pepper. Serve on 
soft toast. 

J. L. Alabaster. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD. 

(Rev. Edgar Blake's favorite pudding.) 
Three-fourths of a cup of sugar, melted and browned 
in a saucepan, added to 1 quart boiling milk, salt and va- 
nilla to taste. To this add 4 eggs beaten slightly. Turn 
in buttered mold, place in a pan of hot water and bake 
about 30 minutes. Serve cold with plain or whipped cream. 
With this pudding serve angel cake. 

OLYMPIC DOUGH-GODS. 

Two cups of flour, 1 tablespoon of bacon or bear's grease 
well worked in — the more thoroughly, the better; ^ tea- 
spoon of salt, 2 teaspoons of baking powder, 1 teaspoon of 
sugar. Mix with cold water to make a stiff batter, but do 
not knead or mould. Put dough in a long-handled, greased 
frying pan, and bake over an open fire till the bottom is 
well done ; then hold the pan at such an angle as to catch 
the heat of the flame on the top. Shift till all parts of 
the top are browned, and the dough is well cooked. Eat 
with butter or maple syrup. 

Solon C. Bronson. 



FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITE S 129 

CHEESE CUSTARD. 
(Another favorite of Bishop McDowell's.) 

One teacup grated cheese, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon butter, 
1 large tablespoon milk. Rub the butter to a cream, add 
cheese, milk, and a little salt. Bake in deep earthen plate 
ten minutes. 



DOUGHNUTS. 

One cup sugar, 2 eggs, 3 tablespoons lard creamed in the 
sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 cup milk, 1 small teaspoon soda in 
the milk, 3^ cups sifted flour, ^ teaspoon cream of tar- 
tar, y^ teaspoon baking powder. 

Herbert F. Fisk. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

The life of French dressing is the seasoning. Too often 
it is merely a tame combination of oil and vinegar. My 
friend emphasized a "clove of garlic." If one clove is 
good, a dozen must be better. Crush these in a bowl, add 
plenty of salt, paprika and Worcestershire sauce, and beat 
with the air of a connoisseur. Good for all green salads, 
especially at business luncheon. If in doubt about the 
flavor, on returning to the office ask your secretary if she 
detects any delicate odor, and if she suggests that you do 
not call on your clients for a day or two, you may know 
the seasoning was all right. 

William Boyd. 

GREEN CORN CAKES. 

(Dr. M. C. Bragdon's favorite breakfast dish.) 

One pint raw corn cut fine, 1 cup of milk, ^ cup of flour, 
2 eggs beaten separately, 1 tablespoon of melted butter, 
salt and pepper to taste. Beat well and bake on hot griddle 
like ordinary griddle cakes. 

RECTOR'S PUMPKIN PIE. 
(By C. B. Cleveland.) 

Twelve eggs, 3 cups sugar, ^ gallon pumpkin, 1 quart 



130 FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 

rich milk, 1 tablespoon molasses, cinnamon, nutmeg, gin- 
ger and mace. 

HOW TO BROIL A STEAK. 

(Recommended by Mr. William A. Dyche.) 
When you are so lucky as to get a beefsteak, don't spoil 
it in the cooking. If you have much else to see to besides 
the steak, you had better have something else for dinner, 
for it is a sin to put a nice steak on the coals, and leave 
it to squirm and warp and dry up until it is as tough as 
shoe leather. But if you have a conscience void of offence 
with all men, and are able to concentrate your energies upon 
the business, put your steak upon the fire. Now you must 
know that the outside of a broiled piece of meat must be 
crisp and (turn it) the inside juicy, to make it the most 
palatable and (turn it) nourishing. If you allow it to rest 
long with one side to the fire (turn it) the juice and flavor 
are lost. The great art (turn it) is to expose the meat at 
the start for a moment to such an intense heat, that (turn 
it) the fiber may be seared in such a manner as to seal, as 
it were, the moisture (turn it). Steak can be cooked in 
this way until it will not look bloody when cut, and (turn 
it) will satisfy fully those who like it well done. Butter 
is worse than wasted, but of course (turn it) you'll have 
it on the table for such as wish to disguise the taste of beef 
(turn it). It may not be impertinent to suggest (turn it) 
that as the steak is just done, the potatoes also just done, 
the family may gather round the table so as to receive the 
steak upon their hot plates. There will be time for grace 
before eating, and you will be thankful after, whether it 
is customary or not in your family to say so. 

— Y. L. M. S. Cook Book. 

\ NEW ENGLAND BAKED BEANS. 

Li^-- (By Mr. William Deering.) 

One pint white navy beans soaked over night. In morn- 
ing pour ofif water, cover with cold water and cook until 
beans crack open. Pour off this water, add ^4 lb. salt 
pork, 1 tablespoon molasses, 1 tablespoon butter and water 
to cover. Bake 7 to 10 hours, keeping moist with water. 



FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 131 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 
(By Mr. William Deering.) 

Put 2 cups yellow corn meal in a pan ; cover with suffi- 
cient boiling water to moisten; in another pan put 1 cup 
white flour, 1 cup yellow cornmeal, 2 cups sour milk, ^ 
cup molasses and beat well together. Add to first pan of 
cornmeal 1 teaspoon soda and Y^ teaspoon salt. Pour con- 
tents of both pans together, beat five minutes and steam 
five hours. 

PEACH MARMALADE. 

Peel and stone peaches and cut in small pieces. Allow 
^^ lb. sugar for each pound of fruit. Heat the fruit slowly, 
stirring often to prevent burning. Boil ^ hour and then 
add sugar. When nearly done, add juice of 1 lemon and 
chopped kernels of 6 peaches for every 2 pounds of fruit. 

William A. Dyche. 

RED RAREBIT. 

One tablespoon flour, butter size of egg, Yz pint of milk, 
juice of a can of tomatoes. Scald tomatoes and milk, 
cream butter and flour and add to liquid ; season with pap- 
rika and salt. Add 1 lb. of cheese cut in small pieces, and 
stir until melted and thickened a little. Serve on toast or 
crackers. 

E. C. E. Dorion. 

SPOON BREAD. 

One coffee cup white cornmeal, Yi teaspoon salt, 3 eggs, 
1 tablespoon butter, 2 teaspoons baking powder, enough 
milk to make a very thin batter. First, scald the meal with 
hot water ; stir in the salt and yolks of eggs, beat well. Add 
heaping tablespoon butter (melted). The last thing, add 
the stiffly beaten whites of eggs, and the baking powder. 
Cook in slow oven for three-quarters of an hour. This 



132 FAVORITES OF OUR FAVOKlTES 

recipe makes enough for seven or eight people served gen- 
erously. 

Mr. Frank B. Dyche. 

BAVARIAN CREAM. 
(A favorite dessert of Rev. David G. Downey.) 

One cup hot milk, 1 pint cream, ^ box gelatine, % cup 
cold water, y^ cup sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla, or any other 
flavoring. Soak the gelatine in the cold water and add the 
sugar. Mix and add the hot milk. Place the mixing bowl 
in a pan of ice water and let it stand until the mixture 
stiffens a little. Then beat, add the cream whipped, and 
when light pour in mold. Do not let mixture get too hard 
before adding whipped cream or lumps will form. Serve 
with or without whipped cream. If a plainer desert is de- 
sired, the recipe may be used with 3^ pint of cream. 

RECEIPT FOR CODFISH BALLS. 

One cup salt codfish, 2 cups potatoes, 1 egg, yi table- 
spoon butter, ]4> teaspoon pepper. Soak fish in cold water ; 
then cut into small pices. Cook fish and potatoes in boiling 
water until potatoes are soft, and then strain. Mash care- 
fully and add butter and egg well beaten. Take up with 
spoon and drop ball in deep fat for 1 minute. 

W. H. Dunham, chef. 

JIM DANDY COOKIES. 

Two eggs, \y2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter and lard mixed, 
1 cup sweet milk, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon 
salt, any flavoring desired. Mix very, very soft, roll thin, 
sprinkle with sugar. Bake in a quick oven. 

F. C. Eiselen. 

FROZEN BEEF. 
(For winter.) 

Select any cut of fresh beef, free from bone. Place out 



FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 133 

of doors in a covered dish, letting the meat freeze until 
solid. Slice very thin, put in a hot frying pan, cover and 
stir frequently until the water has cooked out of the meat. 
Season with salt, pepper, and plenty of butter. Let the 
meat brown. Make a cream dressing of milk and flour, 
cooking until thick. If desired, make a brown milk and 
flour dressing. Serve with baked potatoes. 

Horace M. Ford. 

LAMB HASH. 

Take 1^ cups of roast lamb, remove all gristle but not 
all the fat, and chop fine. Add 1^ cups of chopped pota- 
toes, and 2 tablespoons of chopped Spanish onion. Season 
with salt and pepper. Heat a generous tablespoon of but- 
ter in a skillet and put in the hash mixture. After it has 
thoroughly heated through and slightly browned, stir in one 
cup of rich gravy and cover, so as to steam through for 
three minutes. Serve at once. 

Herbert F. Fisk. 

SHORT CAKE. 

]\Ieasure 3 cups flour, add 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
rub in Yi cup butter; beat 1 egg light and add 1 cup of 
cold water, stir into the flour. Spread on two shallow pans, 
which have been well greased. Sprinkle 1 teaspoon sugar 
over the top of each. Bake from 10 to 15 minutes in a 
hot oven. Put any kind of crushed fruit between the lay- 
ers. 

Alonzo C. Fry, 

PLUM CONSERVE. 

Two baskets blue plums, 6 oranges, 4 lemons, 1 lb. rai- 
sins. Wash and stone the plums ; put oranges, lemons and 
raisins through a meat grinder and add to plums. To each 
pint of fruit, add 1 pint of sugar. Cook mixture slowly 
for two hours, stirring constantly after it begins to boil. 
Put in glasses or stone crocks and cover with melted par- 
affine. 

Mr. George A. Foster. 



134 FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Three eggs, 1 tablespoon each of flour and sugar, 1 tea- 
spoon mustard, 1^^ cups sour cream, ^ cup vinegar, ^ 
tablespoon melted butter. Mix dry ingredients first, add 
eggs well beaten, then cream butter. Put on the stove in 
a double boiler, add vinegar a little at a time very slowly 
as it begins to thicken, then remove from the fire ; add salt 
to taste as soon as cool. After standing, thin with sweet 
cream. 

James B. Gascoigne. 

SALAD A LA BASSO. 

In the center of a cluster of crisp lettuce leaves put 
pulp of two oranges, and one medium-sized Bermuda on- 
ion sliced very thin; pour over this a French dressing (the 
French dressing should have sugar added). 

Marion Green. 

SUGAR COOKIES (Excellent). 

Two cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 eggs, 1 cup of sour 
cream, 2 teaspoons soda, nutmeg; add pastry flour to make 
a soft dough and bake in a quick oven. 

John T. Gascoigne. 

"GOGEBIC" OMELETTE. 

Two eggs, 4 tablespoons milk, 3^ slice bread (crumbed). 
1 saltspoon salt. Beat yolks of the eggs, add the milk and 
bread crumbs. Whip the whites of the eggs stififly, first 
adding the salt, then lightly fold into the yolk mixture. 
Pour into a buttered pan, fry, and when lightly browned, 
fold together. 

Hugh H. Harris. 

DEVIL'S FOOD CAKE. 

Cream together 3/2 scant cup butter and 1 cup of sugar. 
Beat the yolks of 4 eggs until light and add 1 cup of sugar. 



FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 135 

Combine these 2 mixtures. Add alternately 1 cup of milk 
and 2 cups of flour mixed with 2 heaping teaspoons baking 
powder; then the whites of 4 eggs beaten until stiff, and 
finally 2^^ squares of melted chocolate. Bake in three lay- 
ers about half an hour. Spread with chocolate frosting 
made as follows : Boil together 1 square of chocolate, 2 
cups of sugar, ^ cup milk, yolk of 1 egg, vanilla, and Yi 



teaspoon vmegar. 



Chauncey Hobart 



CARAWAY CUP. 

Juice of 2 lemons, 1 orange, 1 scant cup sugar, 1 pint 
water, 1 quart ginger ale. Add a few sprigs of mmt, and 
cherries. 

James Taft Hatheld. 



CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Make a cup of white sauce with a heaping tablespoon 
butter, 2 tablespoons flour and 1 cup of rich milk; when 
smooth, add ^ pint of small oysters and stir until their 
edges curl. Butter large oyster shells and fill them with 
the mixture, covering them with fine bread crumbs and 
dots of butter. Brown in the oven. 

Nathan Wilbur Helm. 



DOUGHNUTS. 
(Dean Holgate's favorite.) 

One cup sugar, J4 tablespoon butter, 1 ^gg, 3^ teaspoon 
nutmeg and cinnamon, 1 cup sour milk, 1^ teaspoons 
cream of tartar, 1^ teaspoons soda, Ij^ teaspoons salt, 
4 cups flour. Sift flour, salt, soda, cream of tartar and 
spice. Rub in butter and add sugar, ^gg well beaten and 
sour milk. Make dough as soft as possible, but use more 
flour if necessary when rolling out. 



136 FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 

DR. STEPHEN J. HERBEN'S FAVORITE "T." 

One-fourth teaspoon black tea (tip leaves), 1 pint bub- 
bling hot water, 3 whole cloves (heads on), 1 slice lemon. 
Have porcelain teapot hot. Then add tea and water. Press 
lemon juice on the sugar; pour tea in hot cup; add cloves, 
and drink with cheer. 



Professor U. S. Grant's Sunday night dish — Popcorn in 
milk. 



A PREACHER'S FAVORITE WHAT TO EATS. 

In summer, watermelon and ice cream; in winter, cocoa 
and buckwheat cakes. But all the year round, chicken with 
dumplings and gravy. 

D. A. Hayes. 

PRUNE WHIP. 

Re-heat one large cup of prunes, having juice enough to 
prevent burning. Stir all the time. When the fruit falls 
from the stones, take from fire. Remove stones and beat 
well. Add the whites of two eggs beaten until they are 
dry; mix thoroughly; serve with plain or whipped cream. 

R. D. W. Johnson. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 
(Partial to N. M. Jones.) 

One small cup rice ; wash in several waters and let stand 
in cold water 30 minutes. Take 2 quarts boiling water and 
1 teaspoon salt. Drain rice and add to boiling water. Let 
boil hard 20 minutes and drain. While hot, add 1 table- 
spoon butter. Beat yolks of two eggs and add when nearly 
cold. Mold into cakes. Set away to harden ; fry. Can 
be made round and fried like doughnuts, or made flat and 
fried in the frying pan. 



FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 137 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 
(Also partial to N. M. Jones.) 

Put into quart measure 1 cup molasses. Fill up with 
fresh buttermilk. Add 1 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons soda 
dissolved in 1 tablespoon boiling water, 2 cups cornmeal, 2 
cups graham meal, 2 eggs well beaten, 1 tablespoon melted 
butter. Steam 4 hours in closed pail. 

My favorite — Sally Lunn. 

James A. James. 

BLUEBERRY MUFFINS. 

To 2 eggs well beaten, add 2 tablespoons melted butter 
and beat well. Then add gradually 1 cup milk. Sift to- 
gether 1% cups flour, 1 cup granulated sugar, 2 heaping 
teaspoons baking powder, ^ teaspoon salt; add these dry 
ingredients to the eggs, butter and milk, beating the whole 
very vigorously. Lastly, add 1 cup blueberries, floured. 
Bake in a quick oven in generously buttered muffin tins. 

Alfred L. Lindsey. 



CRANBERRY SAUCE. 

Three pints cranberries, 1^^ pints granulated sugar, 1 
pint water. Cook together for 5 minutes. Do not stir after 
it comes to the boiling point. 

Alfred L, Lindsey. 

The favorite dessert of Peter C. Lutkin — Bread and apple 
pudding. 

LYONNAISE POTATOES. 

Put 3 tablespoons butter in a saucepan and in it fry 1 
tablespoon chopped onion. When the onions turn yellow, 
add 1 quart cold boiled potatoes which have been cut into 
dice and seasoned with salt and pepper. Stir with a fork, 
being careful not to break the potatoes. When hot, add 



138 FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 

1 tablespoon chopped parsley and cook two minutes longer. 
Serve immediately on a hot dish. 

William D. Murdock. 

WALNUT TAPIOCA PUDDING. 
(Bishop McDowell's favorite dessert.) 

Three tablespoons tapioca soaked 3 hours. Put into 1 
quart milk, draining off water. Boil 45 minutes. Add the 
beaten yolks of 4 eggs to 1 coffeecup of sugar. Stir into 
pudding 5 minutes before removing from fire. Flavor with 
vanilla. Beat whites to stiff froth with 5 tablespoons pow- 
dered sugar. Chop English walnuts fine and spread over 
meringue. Brown in oven. 

CORN BREAD. 

One cup cornmeal, 1 cup flour, 2 cups sweet milk, 2 eggs, 

2 rounding teaspoons baking powder, 2 even tablespoons 
butter (melted), ^ level teaspoon salt. All cornmeal may 
be used, or part cold boiled rice, instead of flour. The eggs 
must be thoroughly beaten — yolks and whites separately 
When all the ingredients have been put together, give a 
last rapid beating of the mixture and bake in a shallow 
pan. Do not have oven too hot. The cake should be about 
two inches in thickness when done and smooth and vel- 
vety in texture. 

Mr. John Mahin. 

HOW TO SCRAMBLE EGGS. 

There are people who advocate putting the egg on a 
slippery spot and forcing it to scramble the best it may. 
But this is cruel to the egg and infelicitous in results. 

Properly scrambling eggs is an accomplishment in itself. 
Eggs should not be scrambled haphazardly. This thing of 
grabbing an egg, hurling it into a frying pan and disar- 
ranging its interior economy with a hat pin or a poker or 
a stove lid lifter may be all very well for the person who 
is in haste, but people who are in haste should not eat eggs. 

Select your eggs with care. Choose eggs that have bru- 
nette shells. Do not open them with a selection by the 



FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 139 

glee club. Take a knife and kindly but firmly strike the 
Ggg on its equator. This does not fracture the shell com- 
minutedly, so to speak, and allow the inmost thoughts of 
the egg to flow over your fingers and meditate upon the 
floor. Open the egg as you would an oyster, and gently 
drop the contents into a bowl. Now have your frying pan 
ready. Have it hot. Into it gracefully toss a piece of but- 
ter the size of your gas bill for one day. When the butter 
has melted, dust some pepper and salt into the eggs in the 
bowl and pour them into the frying pan ; then at once begin 
agitating the eggs with a long-handled spoon. To do this, 
you will hold the egg bowl in one hand, the handle of the 
frying pan in the other, the long spoon in the other, and 
with the other put the pepper and salt boxes back on the 
kitchen table. Continue stirring the eggs until they are 
done just right, then turn them out of the frying pan into 
a plate and say, "There !" Eggs scrambled in this way are 
thankful; otherwise they are justly resentful. 

Wilbur D. Nesbit. 

BAKED APPLES. 

Pare and core 6 large apples. Fill the cores with chopped 
nuts ; sprinkle with granulated sugar, and add from 3^ to 
1 cup of water. Bake in quick oven and serve with whipped 
cream. 

R. H. Pooley. 

ESCALLOPED FISH. 

Two pounds white fish boiled, boned and picked fine ; 
1 can mushrooms added to fish. Cream for filling: 1 pint 
cream thickened, 1 teaspoon onion juice, good-sized lump 
of butter, salt and pepper to taste. Fill the ramequins first 
with layer of cream, then layer of fish. Cover the top with 
rolled crackers ; bake 20 minutes. 



Fried mush, without syrup. 



Walter M. Pond. 
James A. Patten. 



140 FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 

FISH HASH. 

(A favorite breakfast dish of Mr. Charles P. Stevens.) 
One can Burnham & Morrill's fish flakes, add equal quan- 
tity of cold boiled potatoes ; chop fine ; add butter size of 
a walnut, brown on both sides in skillet; pork fat or bacon 
grease preferred to lard or butter. Chopped onion can be 
added if liked. 



POTATO SOUP. 
(Rev. W. O. Shepard's favorite soup.) 

In a saucepan containing 4 quarts of hot water, 2 ounces 
of chopped bacon, 6 small onions (chopped), 1 teaspoon 
salt and 1 teaspoon pepper. Boil for 15 minutes. Peel, 
slice, and add 1 quart of raw potatoes and boil the whole 
again until the potatoes are reduced to a pulp. 

RAISIN PIE. 

(Mr. C. N. Stevens' favorite pies.) 

One cup seeded raisins chopped fine, Yz cup sugar, 1 ^%^ 
well beaten, 1 tablespoon flour, ^ cup hot water poured 
over raisins ; mix all together and cook just about 5 min- 
utes. Fill into the pastry and bake with a top crust. 



SWEET POTATO PIE. 

One-half pint mashed and strained sweet potatoes ; mix 
with 1 pint milk while potatoes are hot; two eggs beaten 
separately, then together; one teaspoon vanilla, Yz oi Yi 
pint measure of sugar, 2 tablespoons melted butter. Mix 
all together, fill crust and bake. 

WAFFLES. 

(Favorite breakfast dish of Dr. Charles M. Stuart.) 
Two eggs, 2 cups of milk, 2 tablespoons butter, 2% cups 
of flour, XYz teaspoons baking powder, Yi teaspoon salt. 



FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 141 

JONATHAN APPLES. 

Eat fifteen a day. 

John A. Scott. 

POOR MAN'S PUDDING. 
(By George H. Tomlinson.) 

One quart fresh milk, 2 tablespoons rice, y^ cup sugar. 
Bake in a moderate oven two hours, or until the pudding 
takes on a creamy color and consistency. Serve cold. 

CURRANT PIE. 
Warranted not to set one's teeth on edge. 

Dr. W. A. Thomas. 

MEAT SAUCE. 

(Constructed on strictly correct lines, and approved by 

Thomas E. Tallmadge, architect of the First 

M. E. Church.) 

Slice %. lb. of bacon, put it in a frying pan and try out 
all the fat. Remove the bacon and add 1 tablespoon flour 
after the fat has become very brown. Stir this until 
smooth ; add 3^ pint stock and stir continually until it boils ; 
add 1 tablespoon each of Worcestershire sauce and mush- 
room catsup, salt and pepper to taste ; then add 1 pint of 
fresh or canned mushrooms. If fresh, simmer gently for 
15 minutes; if canned, only 5 minutes. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites of 7 eggs, yolks of 5 eggs, 1^4 cups sugar sifted 
4 times, Ys teaspoon cream of tartar, 1 cup Swansdown 
flour. 1 teaspoon vanilla, pinch of salt added to whites of 
eggs. Measure, sift and set aside sugar and flour. Beat 
yolks to a foam. Whip whites to a foam, adding cream of 
tartar and beating until very stiff. Fold in sugar, then 
yolks, then flavoring, and lastly the flour. Bake in an un- 
greased pan in a moderate oven 40 to 50 minutes. 

Walter Ward. 



142 FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 

BOILED EARS. 
Just boil in salted water, and eat off the cob. 

Carl S. Williams, 

DELICIOUS BREAKFAST DISH. 

Take your favorite breakfast food, shake gently from 
the box into your dish, dust a little sugar over, then cover 
with cream and eat with spoon. This agrees with the most 
confirmed dyspeptic. 

H. B. Williams. 

MOTHER'S CAKE. 

One good cup butter, 1^^ cups sugar, 3 eggs beaten sep- 
arately, 1 teaspoon of lemon or vanilla, 1 saltspoon mace, 
Yz cup milk, 2^ cups pastry flour, 1 heaping teaspoon bak- 
ing powder. Bake in a loaf. 

Mr. S. F. Wilson. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 

One ^gg, well beaten, Yz cup sugar, Yz cup shortening, 1 
cup sour milk, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 cup flour, 2 cups Indian 
meal, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon salt. Bake quickly. 

Fred A. Wells. 

BROOK TROUT A LA NATURE. 

Being noted for going away and staying until my friends 
wonder — and as man's greatest enjoyment is in eating what 
he likes best when served under congenial conditions and 
surroundings — my favorite recipe is fried brook trout. 
First catch the speckled beauties if you can. If they are 
easily attracted by one's flies, then be choice as to size 
and condition, if wary, take what you can get. As soon 
after they are out of the water as would be humane, re- 
move the parts you do not care to consume, and otherwise 
prepare for cooking. Then take the spider and in it place 



FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 143 

a number of strips of "bacon what is bacon" and remove 
when nice and crisp. In order to get bacon in this crisp 
condition it is necessary to start a fire with the ever handy 
birch bark and dry wood. This is generally easily done, 
way up in nature's playground, in the beautiful Lauren- 
tides of the Province of Quebec. After the bacon is crisp, 
remove it and in the bacon grease in the spider, place 
the trout, fry and turn and turn and fry, until thoroughly 
done. Then from the larder select such other delicacies 
as will grace a meal for a king, and go at it with both 
hands, one is not enough for the delicate appetite which 
air, exercise and surroundings give to the man turned 
Indian. 

William A. Vawter. 

OLD FASHIONED RICE PUDDING. 
(President Abram W. Harris' favorite pudding.) 

Small half cup of rice in a pint of milk, sweetened to 
taste. Place on back of stove to simmer, stirring occasion- 
ally, and add milk as it boils down until a quart of milk 
is used. Brown in hot oven. Serve cold. 



THE IMPERIAL DANISH RICE PUDDING. 
Given by Dr. J. M. Buckley. 

Two tablespoons rice, 3^ lb. sugar, 3 pints milk, 5^2 pint 
cream. Soak the rice for twenty-four hours in water. Then 
bake 3 hours and add the cream when the pudding is near- 
ly done. 

RECIPE, PATENTED. 
For cooking beefsteak in the woods. 

By Bishop William A. Quayle. 

Buy a beefsteak, paying for it, if that inconvenience be 
found necessary. Go valiantly to some piece of woods shut 
off from human observation. Build a fire, using last year's 
leaves for kindling and balsam-breathed broken branches 



144 FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 

for fuel. Take time. Have no haste. Loaf, and invite 
your soul while the fire gets agoing. Have no skillet. A 
skillet will destroy the cooking. Have no dishes, they will 
destroy the eating. Be calm. No neurotic can do the busi- 
ness. It requires great calmness and poise in a transaction 
with beefsteak in the woods. Cook on a stick, taking plen- 
ty of time. Drop the steak in the ashes a few times — how 
many times depends on the taste of the COOKEE. When 
cooked, eat with vast deliberation, using fingers only, as 
forks are a disparagement. When eaten, stop. Say grace 
before, during and after. 



CREAMED OYSTERS ON TOAST. 

One pint of cream, one pint of oysters, one tablespoon 
flower, salt and pepper to taste. Let the cream come to a 
boil. Mix the flour with a little cold milk and stir into the 
hot cream. Let the oysters come to a boil in their own 
liquor then skim and drain off all the liquor and add to the 
cream sauce. Add a dash of paprika. Serve hot over bits 
of buttered toast. 

Mr. Wm. F. McKenzie. 



A BACHELOR BREAKFAST. 

Blessed with a good appetite, on which waits a good di- 
gestion, having cultivated a somewhat discriminating taster 
and not having had an income that quite keeps the pace, why 
should I try to decide what my favorite recipe is? Canai«e to 
cheese, I enjoy viands to the full, if they be simple, tooth- 
some, and wholesome, for "the chief pleasure (in eating) 
does not consist in costly seasoning or exquisite flavor, but 
in yourself." 

How foolish then to attempt the selection of a "best" 
among so many "good." Let me rather tell you of one 
breakfast prepared and eaten alone, than which none ever 
tasted better. 

A long summer punctuated three times a day by hotel and 
restaurant fare, which is the bane of the traveling man. 



FAVORITES OF OUR FAVORITES 146 

Tired nature finally objected and directed me to put into 
practice some of my kitchen theories, and this is the break- 
fast. 

The percolator having been loaded with a generous charge 
of freshly grown coffee and the pump started; the peaches 
were then cut and sugared, ready for the cream, and the 
kitchen table spread, to be close by the fire, not overlooking 
a goodly supply of butter and rolls. Three or four lumps of 
sweet beef fat were well tried out in the hot frying pan, 
then a good sized beef tenderloin steak with a sprinkle of 
salt, added, and when half done a few half inch cuts of a 
beefsteak tomato. The pan and its contents were left to the 
tender mercies of the fire, while the peaches were eaten and 
the coffee poured, then I went up against the steaming fat 
steak and tomatoes, each of which had drawn richness of 
flavor from the other, as it can only be done in the despised 
skillet. Oh me ! Oh my ! ! 

Robert N. Collyer. 



THEOBOLD'S 

Pastry, Candies, 

Ice Creams 

and Ices 

Telephone 244 

600 Davis Street -:- Evanston, 111. 



The Finest of Clothing "Ready to 
Wear" and Gents' Furnishings of 
the "Better Sort." 

Karger's Clothes Shop 

Phone 724 
812 DAVIS STREET -:- EVANSTON. ILL. 



Queen Esther Sweets 



'Give no more to ev'ry guest 
Than he is able to digest; 
Give him ahvays of the prime, 
And but little at a time." 



148 QUEEN ESTHER SWEETS 

PINOCHE. 

Four cups brown sugar, 1 cup thin cream, butter the 
size of an egg. Boil 15 minutes. Add ^ teaspoon vanilla. 
Beat for 5 minutes and add 1 cup chopped walnuts. 

Helen Beals. 

FUDGE. 

Grate 2 squares or ounces of chocolate and stir into J^ 
cup miilk, add 2 cups granulated sugar and ^ cup or less 
of corn syrup (Karo corn syrup is best). Put over the 
fire and stir in 2 tablespoons butter. When chocolate is 
melted allow to cook slowly, stirring once in awhile. When 
the mixture makes a soft ball between the fingers when 
tested in cold water it is done. After actual boiling has 
begun, about five minutes will finish it. Take from the 
fire and add a teaspoon of vanilla, beat thoroughly, gran- 
ulation will soon begin, when the mixture must be immedi- 
ately turned into a buttered pan or plate. Cut in squares 
when nearly cold. 

Gertrude Curme. 

FUDGE DELIGHT. 

Take two cups of sugar, ^ cup of milk, and bring to a 
boil ; then add butter the size of a walnut. When it makes 
a soft ball in water, put in two squares of melted chocolate 
and a teaspoon of vanilla. Take from the fire, and stir in 
slowly, yi lb. of cut marshmallows and a cupful of chopped 
pecans and almonds. Pour into pan and do not cut until 
thoroughly cold. 

Pauline Therese Dorion. 

FRENCH CREAM CANDY. 

Break 1 egg into a bowl, and add to it the same amount 
of cold water. Now mix with it XXX confectioner's sugar 
until stiff enough to shape into oblong balls ; flavor to taste. 
Press an English walnut or pecan on each side and lay on 
a platter to dry. 

Irene Sargent. 



QUEEN i^^STHER SWEETS 149 

CHOCOLATE CRiEAM TAFFY. 

Three cups of sugar, ^ cup of butter, 1 cup of milk, Yz 
square of chocolate. Boil ten minutes, and when done add 
1 teaspoon of vanilla. Remove from the fire and beat with 
the egg beater until it begins to sugar around the kettle. 
Pour in buttered pan and cut into squares. 

Irene Sargent. 

HOME-MADE TAFFY. 

One cup brown sugar, 2 cups maple syrup, 1 tablespoon 
butter, 1 tablespoon vinegar. Put into saucepan in order 
given, mix well and boil until it will harden when dropped 
in cold water. Pour out into greased tins, to cool. 

Miss Kaley. 

CARAMELS. 

Two tablespoons butter, 3 tablespoons Karo corn syrup. 
Mix well and add 2 cups brown sugar, 1 can Borden's con- 
densed milk (18 cent size.) Mix and stir well while boil- 
ing. Boil until brittle in cold water. Add vanilla and nuts 
and pour out. 

Ruth S. Atwell. 

CREAM NUT BARS. 

Two cups sugar, ^ cup milk, 1 cup chopped nut meats, 
1 teaspoon vanilla and 1 tablespoon butter. Boil the sugar 
and milk until it forms a soft ball in cold water. Add but- 
ter and let stand to cool. When cool, add nuts and vanilla. 
Beat until quite hard, turn on a dampened cloth, knead un- 
til creamy, shape into roll and let harden. Cut in shape 
of bars. 

Gladys Smith. 

WALNUT CREAM BARS. 

Chop quantities of walnuts fine, melt over slow fire the 
desired quantity of fondant. Add the nuts, turn into pan 
lined with buttered paper and cut into bars, when cold. 



150 QUEEN ESTHER SWEETS 

Finely chopped citron and raisins can be used the same 
way. 

Rachel Bangs Jones. 

NUT CANDY. 

Put in an iron kettle, 2 cups granulated sugar, and stir 
it constantly until melted as quickly as possible. Then 
stir in 1 cup peanuts or any kind of nuts preferred and pour 
out into buttered pans to cool. Brazil nuts make a rich 
candy. 

Elizabeth Gascoigne. 

PEANUT CANDY. 

Three-fourths cup peanuts rolled fine. Melt 1^ cups 
granulated sugar, add nuts and pour quickly into a buttered 
tin. 

TURKISH DELIGHT. 

To 1 box of Nelson's gelatine dissolved in 1 cup hot wa- 
ter, add Yz cup water and 1 quart granulated sugar. Boil 
together, then add the juice and grated rind of 1 orange and 
the juice of 1 lemon. Boil about ten minutes. Before 
pouring into tins add Yz lb. walnut meats. Let the "De- 
light" remain in tins over night. Cut into squares and roll 
in powdered sugar. 

Jane Scott. 

ORANGE CANDY. 

Two cups sugar, juice of 1 orange. Boil till it hardens 
in water, then pull. 

MAPLE SUGAR CANDY. 

One pint maple syrup, 1 lb. cake maple sugar, 1 cup 
water, butter size of small egg. Boil until it will wax in 
water. Beat while cooling. Add 1 cup walnuts just be- 
fore pouring into pan. 

Mildred Jones. 



QUEEN ESTHER SWEETS 151 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

One cup molasses, 1 cup sugar, piece of butter the size 
of an egg, 1 tablespoon vinegar. Boil, but do not stir, un- 
til it hardens when dropped into cold water. When done 
stir in a teaspoon of soda and beat well. Pour in buttered 
pans and when cool pull until white. 

ICE CREAM CANDY. 

Boil together 3 cups sugar, }i teaspoon cream of tartar, 
Yz cup boiling water, ^ tablespoon vinegar without stir- 
ring until, when tried in cold water, the mixture becomes 
brittle. Turn out on a well buttered platter to cool. As 
edges cool fold toward center. As soon as it can be 
handled pull until white and glossy. While pulling flavor. 
Cut into sticks or small pieces as desired. 

Ernestine Leigh. 

FONDANT. 

Two cups granulated sugar, enough milk to dissolve sug- 
ar, perhaps ^ cup. Stir on stove till dissolved, do not let 
boil. Remove grains of sugar around edges and spoon. 
Boil without stirring, try in water, and remove from stove 
when it makes a firm but not a crisp ball. Let stand in 
cold water until you can bear your fingers in it, then stir 
and beat, then knead as it begins to harden. Flavor while 
creamy and add chopped nuts, cocoanut, candied fruits or 
anything of that sort. 

Mrs. Geo. H. Tomlinson. 

MARSHMALLOW CHOCOLATE FUDGE. 

Two cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 2^^ squares Baker's choc- 
olate, yl lb. marshmallows, 1 teaspoon butter. Boil sugar, 
milk and chocolate for a few minutes before putting in 
butter. Boil until it makes soft balls in a cup of cold 
water. When done add a pinch of salt, then let it stand 
until nearly cool. Stir until it begins to thicken. Add 
marshmallows cut in pieces. Pour on buttered plates and 



152 QUEEN ESTHER SWEETS 

when cool cut in squares. The marshmallows should be 
left in pieces, not dissolved. 

Caroline Spalding. 

DIVINITY CANDY. 

Two cups granulated sugar, J/^ cup water, ^ cup Karo 
corn syrup. Boil until it strings. Pour this over the beat- 
en whites of two eggs. Add vanilla and chopped nuts. 

Mary Harris. 

ORANGE STICKS. 

Take 3 thick skinned oranges, and remove the peel in 
sections. Cut into narrow strips with scissors or sharp 
knife. Cover with cold water, bring to boiling point, and 
cook slowly until tender. Make syrup of 1 cup sugar and 
Yz cup water. Boil until it hairs. Drain peel from water 
and add to syrup. Boil for 3 minutes, drain, and roll in 
granulated sugar. 

Eleanor Holgate. 

TO GLACE FRUITS. 

The fruit must be perfectly dry. If oranges, separate 
each section carefully without breaking the inner skin. 
Stand them in a warm place to dry. Put two cups of gran- 
ulated sugar in a granite saucepan, moisten it with Yz cup 
of water, and place over the fire to boil. Do not stir after 
the sugar is dissolved. Boil gently about 15 minutes, or 
until it will break quickly when dropped in cold water. If 
brittle without being sticky, it is just right. The syrup 
must never be stirred. Now take it quickly from the fire, 
add 1 tablespoon of lemon juice and stand in a basin of 
boiling water to keep the syrup from candying. Take fruit 
on the point of a large skewer, or with the sugar tongs; 
dip into the syrup and stand in a warm, dry place to dry. 
English walnuts and almonds are glaced the same way. Do 
not attempt to glace fruits or nuts on a damp day, or when 
there is any steam in the kitchen from other cooking. 

Irene Sargent. 



QUEEN ESTHER SWEETS 153 

BOLOGNA, 

One pound of English walnuts, 1 lb. figs, and 1 lb, of 
dates. Wash and stone dates, cut out hard ends of the 
figs and shell the walnuts. Chop all together until fairly 
fine; then butter the hands and knead mixture until it 
clings well together. Shape with hands in form of bologna 
and set away in a cold place, 

Irene Sargent. 




A Reputation for Correct 
Cooking Knowledge Stands Back of 

T^rsRorers 

OWN BLEND 

Coffee 

Here is a coffee, the most 
exquisite in taste, with no 
disagreeable after effects, guar- 
anteed always to be the same 
— at a moderate price. 
Mrs. Rorer, one of the world's 
best known cooking author- 
ities, spent months in South 
America selecting the planta- 
tions on which the berries for 
this coffee are grown — the 
blend is the result of her long experimenting — 
She considers it the finest combination possible — 
The roasting of the coffee is carried on in a mod- 
ern factory, under Mrs. Rorer's own direction. 
It is the coffee Mrs. Rorer wanted 
fof her own family and friends 

— it was at the wish of these enthusiasts that 
she arranged to sell this coffee nationally. 

Try a package today — it is sealed in a wonder- 
ful container with three paraffine layers — not 
one whit of that delicious aroma of the natural 
ber is lost. 

And send to us for Mrs. Rorer's booklet of 
recipes. We'll send it free — please mention 
whether or not your grocer carries Mrs. Rorer's 
coffee when you write. 

Harry B. Gates, President, 

Climax Coffee & Baking 
Powder Company 




Main St. 



Indianapolis, Ind. U. S. A. 



One sip of this 

Will bathe the drooping spirits in 

delight, 
Beyond the bliss of dreams.'' 

— Milton. 

"Polly put the kettle on — 

(It has been sterilized, I hope?) 

Polly put the kettle on — 

{And zvashed zvith antiseptic soap?) 

Polly put the kettle on — • 

{The ivatcr's filtered, scrubbed, 
sun-dried, dusted, polished, shak- 
en, brushed, sifted, pasteurized 
and ironed I see!) 

Polly put the kettle on; we'll all 
take tea." 



156 BEVERAGES 

COFFEE (35 CUPS.) 

One lb. coffee tied up loosely in 4 cheesecloth bags, 2 
gals, water. Let water come to a boil, then drop into it the 
bags of coffee. Let boil about 30 minutes, or until of the 
required strength, then remove the bags. 

RUSSIAN TEA. 

Juice from 18 lemons, lYz lbs. sugar, y^ lb. "Golden 
Pekoe" or some other very strong tea. Boil sugar in 3 
cups water for 20 minutes and set aside to cool. When 
cool add the lemon juice strained through cheese-cloth. 
This should make 2 quarts. Put tea into a cheese cloth 
bag and bring to a boil in 1 quart cold water. Simmer 5 
minutes and add, after cooling, to the lemon syrup. This 
should make about 3 quarts. Add ice-water to make 7 
quarts. 

Mrs. A. L. Lindsey. 

TEA PUNCH. 

Make a qt. of rich, heavy sugar syrup and while hot pour 
over 1 cup orange juice, 1 cup pineapple juice, and Yz cup 
strawberry or currant or cherry juice or a mixture of these 
if preferred. Let stand until cool, then add one cup of 
chopped ice to thoroughly cool. Make 1 pint strong tea, 
mixture of English breakfast and Orange Pekoe if possible. 
Take 1 teaspoon of tea for each cup of water and let this 
water be freshly boiled and just come to a boil. Much care 
must be taken in making this tea as the success depends 
upon the flavor of the tea which should be there supporting 
the fruit flavors without actual detection as tea. 

Mrs. Morris R. Eddy. 

CHOCOLATE (16 CUPS.) 

Four squares Baker's chocolate, cut fine, 2 teaspoons corn- 
starch, 4 tablespoons sugar, 1 pinch salt. Stir all together ; 
pour over 3 cups boiling water and boil five minutes. Add 
6 cups boiling milk. Can be made long time before needed. 

Mrs. N. M. Jones. 



BEVERAGES 157 

FRUIT PUNCH. 

Boil 2 cups sugar and 1 quart water 20 minutes. Pour it 
boiling hot over the following: ^ cup lemon juice, ^ cup 
orange juice, 1 cup strawberry juice, Yz cup canned cherry 
syrup, 1 cup chopped pineapple. When ready to serve di- 
lute with ice water and add 1 cup fresh strawberries quart- 
ered, 1 banana sliced and ^ cup stoned cherries. 

Mrs. C. N. Stevens. 

ORANGE MINT CUP. 

Use pulp of 2 large oranges. Add 1 tablespoon pow- 
dered sugar, 1 tablespoon finely chopped mint, ^ table- 
spoon lemon juice. Chill and serve in cocktail glasses, 
garnished with mint. 

Mildred Johnson. 

RASPBERRY SHRUB. 

Place red raspberries in a stone crock. Put in just 
enough good cider vinegar to cover them. Let stand over 
night, then squeeze as for jelly. Add 1 pint granulated 
cane sugar to each pint of juice. Boil 10 minutes, skim if 
necessary, seal in glass jars. 

Mrs. U. S. Grant. 

GRAPE JUICE WITHOUT SUGAR. 

One basket of thoroughly ripe Concord grapes. W^ash 
and remove from stems. Put in a kettle and add one quart 
of water. Cook until grapes are thoroughly done. Strain 
through a jelly bag. Bring juice to a boil and pour imme- 
diately into bottles and seal. 

Mrs. James Edwin Marshall. 

UNFERMENTED GRAPE JUICE. 

Six pounds concord grapes picked from stem, 6 quarts 
water. Boil until skin and seeds separate. Strain through 
colander. Then through wire sieve, then cheese cloth. 
Add 1 lb. loaf sugar. Boil 1^^ hours. Bottle while hot. 
Keep in cool place. 

Mrs. N. M. Jones. 




Old Dutclv 

Cleanser 




Miscellaneous 



'What's there? 

Things for the cook, sir; hut 
knozv not zvhat." 



160 MISCELLANEOUS 

TO SET COLOR IN WASH GOODS. 

Soak the goods for several hours in a solution of sugar 
of lead in water, in the proportion of 1 tablespoon to 1 
gallon. 

To make a lotion for the hands, use two ounces of bay 
rum, two ounces of glycerine and two ounces of lemon 
juice. 

To fringe celery, cut the stalks in two-inch lengths. 
Stick plenty of coarse needles into a cork; draw half the 
stalk through the needles. When done lay in a cold place 
to curl. This looks well as a garnish for sliced chicken. 

Two apples placed in your cake box will keep the cake 
moist. 

Try washing your silver once a week in boiling water 
with a teaspoon! ul of soda in it ; then wipe quickly on a 
clean dry towel. It will not need polishing as often if 
treated in this way. 

TO TAKE OUT RUST SPOTS. 

Wet the spot with water, cover with equal parts of cream 
of tartar and salt. Wet often and keep in the sunshine until 
the stain is gone. Renew the application if necessary. 

Miss Alice Raddin. 

TO SET COLOR IN WASH GOODS. 

To a pailful of water just below the boiling point, add 
1 heaping tablespoon of black pepper. Into this put the 
goods and allow it to remain until the water is nearly cool. 

Miss Raddin. 

A GOOD FURNITURE POLISH. 

Four tablespoons turpentine, 4 tablespoons olive oil, 1 
teaspoon lemon juice and 10 drops household ammonia. 



MISCELLANEOUS 161 

This polish must be thoroughly shaken before using, and 
applied with an old flannel or silk cloth. Rub briskly and 
thoroughly. Use a second cloth to rub the mixture into 
the grain of the wood and a third for the final polish. 

Mrs. T. F. Holgate. 



Your weights are correct 
So are ours 

W. E. Barbour & Co. 

Wood, Coal, Coke, 
Flour, Feed & Seeds 

Office and Yard : Private Exchange all Departments 

Noyes Street and C. M. & St. P. Telephones: 

Railroad Evanston 2600 

Evanston, Illinois Wilmette 155 

Careful Measuring 

is essential in Cooking 
EVEN MORE 

Exact Methods 

must be used in the care of money 

City Npdonal Bank gives 

especial attention to small details 

OFFICERS 

JOSEPH F. WARD, President 
WILLIAM S. MASON, Vice-President 
CHARLES N. STEVENS, Cashier 
HURD COMSTOCK, Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

FRANK H. ARMSTRONG JOSEPH B. PADEN 

THOMAS BATES JAMES A. PATTEN 

DAVID R. FORGAN HENRY A. PEARSONS 

WILLIAM S. MASON JOSEPH F. WARD 



Table of Weights and 
Measures 



'Measures, not men, have ahvays 
been my mark." 

— Oliver Goldsmith. 





Table of Weights and 


Measures 


In 


the following table the spoonful is measured 


level, 


then cut lengthwise for a half spoon and further 


divided crosswise for a quarter spoon: 1 




4 Salt spoons equal 1 teaspoon. 




3 Teaspoons equal 1 tablespoon. 




4 Tablespoons equal ^ cup or ^ gill. 




2 Gills equal 1 cup. 




2 Pints equal 1 quart. 




4 Quarts equal 1 gallon. 




1 Tablespoon liquid equals ^ ounce. 




2 Tablespoons butter equals 1 ounce. 




4 Tablespoons flour equals 1 ounce. 




4 Tablespoons salt equals 1 ounce. 




3 Tablespoons sugar equals 1 ounce. 




1 Pint brown sugar equals 12 ounces. 




Piece of butter the size of an egg equals Wz ozs. 


The following will weigh 1 pound each: | 




4 Cups flour. 




2 Cups butter. 




2 Cups granulated sugar. 




2^ Cups powdered sugar. 




3 Cups meal. 




2 Cups solid meat. 




10 Eggs. 




1 Pint finely chopped meat, packed solidly. 


One 


gallon of ice cream will serve 25 persons. 



The A. F. Johnson 
Dairy Co. 

Invites you to inspect their new 
plant, when you will understand why 
they can sell the finest grade of 

Pure Milk 
and Cream 

Call them up and they will explain 
the methods they use for giving you 
from the selected cows, and the 

Freshest and Purest Milk 
Sold in Evanston 

under the name 

Special Infant Milk 

Come and visit us. Both will enjoy 
the call. You will be placed under 
no obligations to us. 

Telephone 316 

622 CLINTON PLACE 



Phone that order to 
Aiken 

He sells the very 
best in groceries 
and meats .... 

F. J. Aiken 

Phones 511 and 531 - 2002 Maple Ave. 

Shirts Done by Hand 

Our work gives a touch of individuality 
noticed by particular people. 

Freeborn's Hand Laundry 

J. C. FREEBORN 

Telephone Evanston 50 -:- Through line — No toll 
6963 North Clark Street 

Thos. E. Connor 

Hardware 

House Furnishing Goods 

605-607 Davis St. -:- Evanston, 111. 



TWO STORES IN ONE 

Rhodin Bros. 

Best in Groceries 

Telephone 1221 

R. Huber 

Best in Meats 

Telephone 2817 

82 1 NO YES STREET 

Where a Child Fares as well as his Father 

L. H. Butler 

Groceries and Meats 

1945 Maple Ave. Phones, 2440-2441 

A Good Cook uses only the 
Best Utensils 

We have them and will be pleased to fill 
your order. 

North Shore Hardware Company 

Telephone 11 618 DAVIS STREET 



GROCERIES 

Meats, Vegetables, 
Fruits, in fact, 
Everything You 
Eat at Cut Prices 

CHARGE ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 




Patronize 

our 
Advertisers 



m U 1912 



One copy del. to Cat. Div. 



JAN 20 \9\2 



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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




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