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Full text of "Queens Borough, New York City, 1910-1920; the borough of homes and industry, a descriptive and illustrated book setting forth its wonderful growth and development in commerce, industry and homes during the past ten years ... a prediction of even greater growth during the next ten years ... and a statement of its many advantages, attractions and possibilities as a section wherein to live, to work and to succeed"

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QUEENS BOROUGH 

NEW YORK CITY 

191O192O 





ISSUED BY THE 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

OF THP 

BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

NEV7YORK CITY 
10LO 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
WALTER I. WILLIS, SECRETARY 



From the collection of the 

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San Francisco, California 
2006 




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Drawing by Hugh Ferris 

THE INDUSTRIAL HIGHROAD TO QUEENS BOROUGH 

THE NEW YORK CONNECTING RAILROAD BRIDGE 

ACROSS THE EAST RIVER AT HELL GATE. 



QUEENS 
BOROUGH 

NEW YORK CITY 
191 1920 




A descriptive and illustrated book setting forth its 
wonderful growth and development in commerce, 
industry and homes during the past ten years, 1910 
to 1920; a prediction of even greater growth dur- 
ing the next ten years, 1920 to 1930; and a 
statement of its many advantages, attractions 
and possibilities as a section wherein to live, to 
work and to succeed. 

Compiled and Edited by 

WALTER I. WILLIS 

Secretary 



ISSUED BY THE 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

NEW YORK CITY 

1920 



Copyrighted 1920 by the 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS, 
NEW YORK CITY. 



PRESSES OF 

THE L. I. STAR PUB. CO. 
QUEENS BOROUGH. 



INTRODUCTION 




HE past decade, from 1910 to 1920, might properly be called 
the "Construction Period" in the history of the development of 
Queens Borough ; for, during that time, there have been con- 
structed new bridges, highways, tunnels, rapid transit exten- 
sions, hundreds of industrial plants, and thousands of 
homes of every description, the total cost of w r hich ex- 
ceeds a quarter of a billion dollars. 

The expenditure of this vast sum of money has resulted in making Queens 
Borough, once but a "county on Long Island" now a real integral part of New 
York City. Its many residential and industrial centers which even today are 
separated by large, undeveloped, intervening areas, are expanding so rapidly that 
they will soon grow into one continuous built-up community. 

The growth of Queens Borough during the past ten years, despite the lack 
of cheaper transit facilities, has been marvelous. What it will be in the next ten 
years with transit facilities equal, and in many cases, superior to every other 
section of New York City, will surprise even the most confident. Today Queens 
is well started on the most wonderful development that has ever taken place 
in any borough of New York City, or, for that matter, in any city of the world. 
It is the purpose of this publication to set forth the commercial, industrial, 
financial and residential advantages and possibilities of the Borough of Queens 
considered by itself. It is not generally realized how great a city Queens Borough 
would be separated from its political connections with New York City. With an 
area of 117 square miles, or 37% of the land area of New York, it is as large as 
Philadelphia and three times as large as Boston. With a population of 500,000 
in 1920 it would be among the first twelve cities in the United States. Industrially, 
Queens ranks 15th in the annual value of its manufactured products. Not more 
than three cities in the country exceed it in the value of plans filed for new 
buildings. 

Its banking facilities are of the best ; its schools and churches are unexcelled. 
It has 200 miles of waterfront on the East River, Flushing Bay, Long Island 
Sound, Jamaica Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. Its natural advantages are unsur- 
passed. 

Queens is indeed "The Borough of Magnificient Opportunities" and "The 
Fastest Growing Borough of New York City." 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



HISTORICAL NOTES 




N MAY 6th, 1626, Peter Minuet, the first Dutch Governor, pur- 
chased the Island of Manhattan for the West India Company, 
paying to the Indians in beads, buttons and other trinkets to the 
value of $24 for their real estate. During the latter part of 
1638, Wilhelm Kieft, the third Dutch Governor, thought it well 
to secure more land for the company; and he purchased from 
the Indian Chiefs, during that and the following year, nearly all of the territory 
now comprising the County of Queens. The purchase price is not recorded. 

In 1664, when Governor Peter Stuyvesant surrendered New Amsterdam to 
the English, the name of the City was changed to New York. This resulted in 
other changes of names, such as : Vlessigen to Flushing, Rusdorf to Jamaica, 
Breuckelen to Brooklyn. In 1672 the Dutch recaptured the City and its name was 
changed to New Orange. In 1674, possession was restored to the English and 
the name of New York was again resumed. 

Thomas Dongan, who was appointed Governor by the Duke of York, insti- 
tuted in that year, the long desired Colonial Assembly which permitted the in- 
habitants of the province to participate in legislation. The representatives of 
the settlers took their seats October 17, 1683 and passed 14 Acts, one of which 
was the division of New York into twelve counties. Queens County, named 
after Queens Catherine of England, was one of the twelve counties. 

Queens County, as organized by the Act of November 1, 1683, had an area 
of 396 square miles, including all of what is now known as Nassau County. Its 
entire length from east to west was 26 miles, and its breadth from north to south 
about 16 miles. The county was divided into six municipal corporations, or 
towns ; namely, Newtown, Flushing, Jamaica, North Hempstead, Hempstead and 
Oyster Bay. 

The first conveyance of land obtained from the Indians was made to the 
settlers in 1643 and embraced most of the territory included within the original 
town of Hempstead where the first county courts were held. The location of 
the county court remained in Hempstead until the early "seventies" when it was 
removed to Long Island City, the Legislature of New York State in 1872 author- 
izing the erection of the Court House and appropriated the necessary funds for 
its construction. 

The Bill permitting the incorporation of "Long Island City," which had 
formerly been a part of Newtown, was passed by the Legislature in 1870. It 
consolidated into one municipality the following villages : Blissville, Hunters 
Point. Astoria, Ravenswood, Dutch Kills, Steinway, Middletown, and Bowery 



NEW YORK CITY 



Bay. Long Island City continued as a separate municipality for 28 years until 
it was consolidated with New York. The boundaries of Long Island City were: 
on the north, East River and Bowery Bay ; on the east, Town of Newtown ; on 
the south, Newtown Creek ; and the west, the East River. 

At the election held November 6, 1894, the question of consolidating with 
the City of New York was voted upon by the residents of Queens County. The 
majority of votes in favor came from the Long Island City section whose inhabi- 
tants, because of their proximity to New York, had been in favor of the project 
for many years. The western part of the county therefore became part of the 
City of New York, and is known as Queens Borough ; while the eastern part of 
the county was erected into a separate county, known as Nassau, taking its name 
from the early name for Long Island. 

That part of Queens County comprehended in the consolidation comprised 
Long Island City (1st Ward), the towns of Newtown (2nd Ward), Flushing 
(3rd Ward), Jamaica (4th Ward), and that portion of the town of Hempstead 
extending westward, from the eastern limits of the incorporated village of Far 
Rockaway, to Rockaway Beach Inlet, now known as the 5th Ward. Its territory 
comprised an area of 117 square miles and included therein were eight incorpor- 
ated villages besides Long Island City, namely: Flushing, College Point, White- 
stone, Jamaica, Richmond Hill, Far Rockaway Arverne and Rockaway Beach. 
There were also many unincorporated villages chief among which were Hollis, 
Queens, Springfield and Little Neck. 




MOORE HOUSE 

Broadway and Shell Road, Elmhurst 
(Newtown) 

Built in 1661 by Captain Samuel Moore, 
son of Rev. John Moore who laid out 
Newtown. The house has remained in the 
family ever since. 



BOWNE HOUSE 
Bowne Ave. 



Street, 



and Washington 
Flushing. 

Built in 1661 by John Bowne and used for 
forty years as a meeting place of Quakers. 
The house stands today, inside and out- 
side, much as it was when first built, and 
has remained in the family ever since. 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



THE GROWTH OF NEW YORK MADE 
QUEENS BOROUGH 

HE story of the development of Queens Borough and the growth 
of New York City as a whole are inseparable. The reasons 
for the industrial, commercial and financial supremacy of New 
York City must be understood in order to properly lead up to 
the subject of this publication. 
Why is New York City the largest and most important city, not only in the 
United States or in the Western Hemisphere, but in the entire world? Why is 
it the greatest industrial and financial center of the United States? Why do 50% 
of the imports and exports of the United States go through the Port of New 
York? Why are over 10% of all of the factories of the United States to be 
found within the five boroughs of New York? Why is New York the terminal 
of practically every American railroad? 





AIRPLANE VIEW OF NEW YORK AND ITS WONDERFUL HARBOR 
THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS is SHOWN BETWEEN THE BROAD WHITE LINES 



NEW YORK CITY 




One hundred years ago New York City did not lead either in population, 
industry or commerce, for the ports of Boston, Philadelphia, and Charleston 
handled a commerce as great, if not greater, at that time than New York City. 

The six main reasons for its growth from a population of less than 100,000 
in 1800 to a metropolis of over 6,000,000 in 1920 may be briefly summarized as 
follows : 

1. Nature's gift of an ideal, land-locked harbor with deep water. 

2. The opening of the Erie Canal in 1825 

3. The use of steel and concrete in building construction enabling the City to 
grow vertically. 

4. The inauguration of rapid transit permitting the City to grow horizontally. 

5. The utilization of electric power. 

6. The annexation of adjoining territory through legislative enactment. 




Compliments of Department of Docks, City of New York 
Murray Hulbert, Commissioner of Docks and Director of the Port 



10 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF, QUEENS 

1. The Port of New York 

Great wars have been waged to secure for other Nations what nature gave 
America a great port, an ideal land-locked harbor, perfectly accessible to all 
other great ports, and a natural market for the raw products of all the countries 
of the world. No other harbor in the United States rivals the harbor of New 
York in size. The Port of New York, including New Jersey waterfront, has 
771 miles of shore proper, and today 986 miles of waterfront measured along 
shore and around piers. Of this last figure 21% is in Queens Borough. The 
Port of New York is peculiarly favored also in the area of its harbor, which is 
sufficiently large to permit the anchorage and maneuvering of a large number of 
vessels. Steamship companies can dock their boats in close proximity to the 
very heart of the city, to its important markets, its large mercantile establishments, 
and its leading hotels. 

How little did Hendrick Hudson dream when on September llth, 1609, as 
the "Half Moon" was cautiously guided through the Narrows and anchored in 
full view of Manhattan Island, that it would, within three centuries, become the 
home of Europe's overflowing population. 

2. The Erie Canal (Now Known as the State Barge Canal) 

George Washington, it is related, with wonderful foresight, nearly 50 years 
before the Erie Canal was opened to commerce through the State of New York, 
solemnly warned the states of Virginia and Maryland to prepare without delay 
to grasp for their own the commerce of the interior of the country by building 
and opening a water route from the Atlantic across the Alleghenies to the Great 
Lakes and the Mississippi. He predicted that New York would some day open 
water communication between the Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean, stating 
that commerce when once fairly established in any channel can be deflected only 
with the greatest difficulty, if at all. Virginia at that time had a larger population 
and commerce than New York but was deaf to the warning of her greatest son. 
The result was that New York became the chief port and the commercial metrop- 
olis of the United States and the trade of the West flowed from and to the sea- 
board by way of the Hudson River, the Erie Canal and the Great Lakes. 

The Erie Canal, opened in 1825, marked a new epoch in the history of 
transportation in this country. It served as the most direct route for bringing 
grain from the West to New York City for trans-shipment to all parts of the 
world. (This was before the era of railroad construction, which did not start 
until after 1830). It marked the turning point in the development of New York 
City and State. 

New York became the "Empire State" as a result of the opening of the 
Erie Canal, a position that it has uninterruptedly held ever since. Boston and 



NEW YORK CITY 11 

Philadelphia both had a greater ships tonnage in 1790, Boston had a greater ton- 
nage in 1800 and 1810 ; but between 1820 and 1830, New York took the lead and 
held it. Naturally, therefore, the Port of New York immediately had the advan- 
tage over its rivals on the Atlantic Ocean for grain commerce. Ships from all 
over the world came to New York for this valuable freight, bringing with them 
not only the products of those countries, which served as raw material for manu- 
facturing, but also hundreds of thousands of immigrants who settled in New 
York and vicinity. This created both an abundant labor supply and plenty of 
raw materials which was, and is, an ideal condition for manufacturing. 

The Erie Canal gave New York cheaper freight rates which is the magic key 
that spells production. The first through rail line between New York and Chi- 
cago was opened in 1852 and it was not long before the competition between the 
rail and water routes was keen. It is contended that the present schedule of class 
rates between New York and Chicago was determined by the competition afforded 
by the water routes. The other trunk line railroads, in their effort to secure a 
share of the grain commerce, sought terminals at New York and an intense rivalry 
in rates began, which, for a long period, gave New York a decided advantage 
over all other Atlantic ports. 

3. The Use of Steel and Concrete in Building Construction 

The continuous rebuilding of New York City with steel and concrete, where 
brick and stone were used, is the most talked about single instance in the life 
of the city. Strangers write magazine articles about it and old New Yorkers 
coming up out of the subway at unfamiliar stations find skyscrapers, where six 
story brick buildings formerly stood. 

The reason is simple. The foundations must be built to support the weight 
of the entire building. Using brick and stone, it is not practicable to build much 
over six stories as the thickness of the supporting walls at the street level become 
too wide. By the use of steel for the frame work with hollow tile walls hung 
almost like curtains, the weight of a 25 or 50 story building can be carried to 
concrete foundations reaching far into the earth without any appreciable greater 
width at the street level. 

The city then began to grow vertically, and an ever increasing population, 
equal to city after city, was piled in layers one on top of the other. 

4. The Inauguration of Rapid Transit 

Huge office buildings, apartment houses and hotels brought about a greater 
congestion in travel, and additional transportation problems faced the city. 

Rapid transit permitted the City to expand to grow horizontally. First 
came the horse cars, and the elevated roads with trains of wooden cars drawn by 



12 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



little steam engines ; then came the electrified trolley lines and elevated railroads ; 
then came the new subways and tunnels with their steel express trains ; and 
lastly, the electrification of such railroads entering New York as the New York 
Central, the New York, New Haven and Hartford, the Long Island Railroad, and 
the Pennsyvania Railroad with their huge terminals and their tunnels under the 
adjoining rivers. 

As the City continued to grow, its expansion eastward was at first limited 
by the East River, which acted as a barrier. It therefore followed the line of 
least resistance and grew northward embracing Harlem, Washington Heights 
and the Bronx. 

With the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge, however, in 1883, the gradual 
rounding out of the city began. New bridges and tunnels were opened to Brooklyn 
and the population of that Borough increased from 600,000 in 1880 to over 
2,000,000 in 1920. 

In 1900, when the first subway was being built from the Battery to the Bronx, 
that Borough only had a population of 200,000, but as a result of this rapid 
transit its population has become 700,000 in 1920 an increase of 500,000 in 20 
years. 

The Bronx grew ahead of Queens only because it was easier to build tunnels 
under, and construct bridges over, the Harlem River than the East River. Its 
real growth, however, did not begin until after the subway was placed in opera- 
tion in 1904: 

The people of any city are, in a way, comparable to electricity, for they travel 
"along the line of least resistance." Two million residents of New York travel 
daily on the subway and elevated lines between their homes, shops and offices. 

In the past, the line of least resistance has been the longest line of travel. 
The vast army of employees in Manhattan would travel daily many miles north- 




THE BATTERY IN 1885. 



NEW YORK CITY 



13 



ward to the Bronx, and many miles southward and eastward: to Brooklyn, to 
reach their homes. With the opening of all of the new transportation lines east- 
ward into Queens Borough, the line of least resistance has now become the short- 
est line of travel, and the development in population and industry which has 
taken place in Brooklyn and the Bronx will be repeated during the next ten years 
in the Borough of Queens. 

Prior to 1909, the only means of direct transportation from Queens Borough 
to Manhattan was by ferry across the East River from the foot of either Borden 
Avenue, or Fulton Street, Long Island City, to 34th Street and to 92nd Street, 
Manhattan. Before that time indirect communciation was possible through the 
Borough of Brooklyn and the tunnels and bridges connecting it with Manhattan. 

The first link joining Manhattan and Queens, and eliminating the East 
River as a barrier to the spread of population and commerce eastward, was the 
opening of the Queensboro Bridge in March 1909 for trolley and vehicular traffic. 

The second link was the inauguration on September 10th, 1910 of the silent, 
swift and smokeless electric train service from the magnificient Pennsylvania 
Station at 33rd Street and 7th Avenue, Manhattan, through the tunnels under 
the East River and over 70 miles of tracks of the Long Island Railroad in Queens, 
serving every section of the Borough. 

The third link was the opening of the "Queensboro Subway" on June 22, 
1915. from Long Island City through the tunnels under the East River to 42nd 
Street and Lexington Avenue, Manhattan, connecting with the Interborough 
Subway System in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and the Bronx. 




THE BATTERY IN 1920. 



14 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



The fourth link was the completion of the New York Connecting Railroad 
Bridge in 1917 over the East River at Hell Gate, providing an all rail route be- 
tween Queens Borough and the New England States and saving on an average 
24 hours in the shipment of freight. 

The fifth link was the operation on July 23rd, 1917 of the Second Avenue 
"L" across the upper level of the Queensboro Bridge, bringing into close touch 
the most congested section of the city on the East Side of Manhattan with the 
least developed portions in the Borough of Queens. 

The sixth link was the operation in the spring of 1920 of the Brooklyn Rapid 
Transit trains, through the new tunnels under the East River at 60th Street, to 
the Bridge Plaza Station in Long Island City and connecting with the rapid 
transit extensions to Astoria and Corona. 

5. The Utilization of Electricity 

While the use of electricity applies to all cities, it has a special application 
to New York for without it we would not have the modern rapid transit systems, 
the tall office buildings, the huge hotels and apartment houses. Electric power is 
required for the operation, lighting and heating of the surface, subway, elevated 
and railroad trains. Electric light is required for the office buildings, hotels and 
apartment houses. Without electrically operated elevators, the skyscrapers of 
New York would not be possible. 




B. F. Smith, Jr., Artist Collection of Percy R. Pyne, 2n<? 

LOOKING SOUTHWARD FROM 42ND STREET IN 1855. 



NEW YORK CITY 



15 



6. The Annexation of Adjoining Territory 



Then again, New York City has grown by certain Acts of the State Legis- 
lature, consolidating adjoining communities as boroughs of the Greater City. 
A metropolis grows first by its natural expansion ; then leaps forward by adding 
large areas to itself, taking into the city over night many villages and settlements ; 
and, thereupon, proceeds to consolidate its position by filling up the intervening 
area with rows of homes, stores and factories. 

New York City in 1898 absorbed the large areas of Queens, Brooklyn, and 
Richmond, including as they did a chain of former villages, some of them as old 
as Manhattan itself. Today, New York City extends from Long Island Sound 
to the Atlantic Ocean, stretching across the backbone of Long Island through the 
Borough of Queens. The old city lines have been abolished and rapid transit 
extensions are rapidly obliterating all traces of the former city limits. 




TIMES SQUARE IN 1920. 
LOOKING SOUTHWARD FROM 44-TH STREET. 



16 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 
Long Island City Old and New 




THE PAYNTAR HOMESTEAD 

Jackson Ave. and Queensboro Bridge 
Plaza, Long Island City. 

Torn down recently to give way to the 
advance of industry and commerce into 
Queens Borough. 



Another view of the Bridge Plaza in 1920 
shewing the Brewster automobile factory 
and the "Electric Building" in which are 
the offices of the Queensboro Chamber of 
Commerce. 

From the million dollar rapid transit station 
at this point, subway and elevated cars 
operate to every section of New York 
City. 





1111 II II ~ 

mi rfif 
lllf! 



Jamaica Old and New 




THE HISTORICAL KING MANOR 
Once the home of Rufus King, first 
Ambassador from the United States to 
Great Britain. 



BUSINESS CENTER OF JAMAICA 

showing Jamaica Ave. "L" extension 
operated by Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co., 
to Brooklyn and Manhattan for single 
fare. 



NEW YORK CITY 



17 



THE WATERFRONT 




EW York's harbor and the rivers which flow into it have made 
the city the Metropolis of the Western Hemisphere. Without 
this great asset New York would not transact 50 per cent of 
the total foreign commerce of the United States nor would 
ninety per cent of the trans-Atlantic passenger traffic pass 
through this gateway. 

Just as New York's original site was determined by its harbor, and its growth 
in the past has been based upon its waterfront, so its future greatness is pre- 
dicated upon the further development and efficient utilization of its hundreds of 
miles of waterfront. 

The 315 square miles of land included in the five boroughs are so divided 
and indented by nearly 175 square miles of water as to give it a total water- 
frontage, as measured along the shore line, of 578 miles, all within the city limits. 
A straight line 578 miles in length, would extend from New York City to Charles- 
ton, South Carolina. 

Thirty-four per cent of this natural waterfrontage of New York City is in 
the Borough of Queens a substantial asset which gives Queens a marked com- 
mercial superiority. 

The East River and Flushing Bay are the western and northern boundaries 
of the Borough. On the south, for a distance of four miles, Newtown Creek 
is the dividing line between Queens Borough and Brooklyn. Further to the 
south, the vast expanse of Jamaica Bay and its numerous islands again divides 
the two boroughs. The Atlantic Ocean is the extreme southern boundary, and 
the ten miles of beaches on the Rockaway Shore are unexcelled from Maine to 
Atlantic City. 

The adoption, in 1913, of the Dual Subway System brought about the con- 
struction and operation of rapid transit extensions into Queens Borough from 
Manhattan and Brooklyn. To a large extent, the rapid transit problem of New 
York was solved by this comprehensive system of transportation. The most 
important problem facing the city today is the adoption of a similar compre- 
hensive plan for the development of its entire waterfront. Federal, state and 
city officials should cooperate in the preparation of such plans as will coordinate 
these great resources of the city. No plan will be complete, however, unless 
thorough consideration is given to the facilities which Queens Borough has to 
offer with its 200 miles of shore line. 

Three vast waterway improvements the Panama Canal, the New York 



18 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

State Barge Canal, and the Intra-Coastal Waterway will bring more commerce 
from the sea and from the interior to the Port of New York. 

The Panama Canal has enormous commercial possibilities for New York, 
opening new markets both in the United States and in the Far East to the manu- 
facturers and shippers of this city. It is causing a general readjustment of world 
trade routes. Oriental goods will come direct to New York instead of being 
trans-shipped by rail at San Francisco or Seattle. Goods manufactured in New 
York can compete in the markets on the Pacific Coast with those produced in the 
Middle West. 

The Intra-Coastal Waterway, almost unknown to a majority of New York- 
ers, will give a continuous land-locked waterway from Boston, through Cape Cod 
Bay, Cape Cod Canal, and Long Island Sound, into the East River, along the 
shores of Queens Borough, to New York Harbor; and then through the canals, 
rivers, bays and sounds down the entire Atlantic coast, around Florida and the 
Gulf of Mexico, to the mouth of the Rio Grande, at the Mexican border. It will 
cost a total of more than $100,000,000, and will stimulate the coastal commerce 
to New York. 

The advantages of Flushing Bay in connection with this great coastal water- 
way are unusual, and doubtless it will not be long before many of the coastwise 
boat lines will maintain docks in this ideal harbor for the receipt and delivery 
of freight. The Red Star Towing Co., recently purchased 6 acres with 1,000 ft. 
of waterfront for development. 

The New York State Barge Canal, the advantages of which are described 
at greater length elsewhere, will bring a greater tonnage from the Great Lakes 
for use both in New York and for trans-shipment to domestic and foreign ports. 

Although the present facilities in New York for handling this growing com- 
merce are limited, the two hundred miles of waterfront of Queens Borough offer 
a solution for the future development of the Port of New York. 

The many miles of valuable waterfront in Queens still remaining undeveloped 
along Newtown Creek, the East River, Flushing Bay, Flushing Creek and Jamaica 
Bay have every advantage for immediate improvement. 

The Borough of Queens has 196.8 miles of natural waterfront; 39.5 miles 
of improvements, or developed waterfront, as measured around piers and along 
the heads of slips ; or a total of 219.5 miles of waterfront measured around the 
natural shore line and piers. This represents approximately 34 per cent of the 
natural waterfront, 14 per cent of the developed frontage, and 29 per cent of 
the entire waterfrontage of the entire City of New York. This is clearly shown 
by the following table : 



NEW YORK CITY 19 

Developed Water Total Length 

Frontagei (Measured (Measured 

Length cf around piers and around piers 

Borough Shore Line heads of slips) and shore Unas) 

Queens 196.8 miles 39.5 miles 219.5 miles 

Brooklyn 201.5 " 102.7 " 258.9 " 

Bronx 79.8 " 19.8 " 89.0 " 

Richmond 57.1 " 32.6 " 82.0 " 

Manhattan 43.2 " 76.8 " 96.4 " 



Total 578.4 271.4 745.8 

The Merchants' Association in 1914, after studying the traffic and terminal 

* 

facilities of the city, stated: 

"It is the opinion of this Association that immediate steps should be 
taken to promote and secure the adoption of a comprehensive plan for 
the development of the Port of New York. The need for such a plan 
rests primarily in the facts : 

(A) That no general plan or movement has ever been made to utilize 
the many acres of the Port that possess economic and physical 
advantages. 

(B) That competition within certain restricted areas has raised the 
value of land, wharf and terminal sites to an amount where the 
interest and rental charges thereof are increasing the cost to the 
shipper and consumer beyond economic necessity. 

(C) That the efforts of public authorities and private interests have 
heretofore been directed solely toward the remedying of and 
planning for restricted areas which comprise only a few of the 
units of the entire port problem." 

Murray Hulbert, Commissioner of Docks of the City of New York, states 
that while it is of course speculative how far realty values will be affected by the 
proposed waterfront improvements, calculations based upon an estimate of the 
Department of Taxes and Assessments, demonstrate that $100,000,000 expended 
on harbor improvement would add $1,330,000,000 to the real estate valuation of 
the city. (In other words, for every dollar spent on waterway improvements, 
thirteen dollars would be added to the real estate values of the city). 

The average person scarcely comprehends the influence of our harbor on 
each phase of the everyday life of our city. Let anything interfere with the con- 
tinuous movement of ships in and out of New York and the city would suffer as 
if shaken by an earthquake, business would totter, the great retail trade would 
disintegrate and real estate values would take an inconceivable tumble. 



20 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

FOREIGN TRADE 

One advantage which Queens Borough offers to manufacturers, either for 
their main plants or for the establishment of branch plants, is the cheapness and 
convenience of handling their foreign trade. 

There are several factors which contribute to the Port of New York handling 
50 per cent of the imports and exports of the country. The first is the fact that 
New York is the terminus of nine great railroad systems (New York Central; 
Delaware, Lacka wanna & Western ; Baltimore & Ohio ; Erie Railroad ; Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad; New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad; Lehigh Valley 
Railroad; Central Railroad of New Jersey; and Long Island Railroad), which 
handle more tonnage of diversified freight than any other group of railroads in 
the world. 

Freight seeks the port equipped not only with the best terminal facilities, but 
from which there are the greatest number of boats sailing to foreign and coast- 
wise ports. Other Atlantic and Gulf ports may have considerable export freight 
but as they do not attract imports, boat service to and from them is more or less 
irregular. In other words, manufacturers shipping from New York are assured 
that their products will move with greater dispatch. If their shipments miss one 
vessel another will probably sail to the same port within a few days. At other 
ports it might be a matter of weeks or even a month before their goods would be 
forwarded, with interest charges on capital invested piling up on the goods thus 
delayed, not mentioning the inconvenience to both the buyer and seller from the 
delay. 

The ability of the Port of New York to furnish cargo in and out has given 
it a position of preeminence. Steamship companies from all over the world 
maintain regular sailings to and from New York. Manufacturers located in 
Queens can truck their shipments to any of the several hundred piers throughout 
the city. 

NEWTOWN CREEK 

Newtown Creek, which is known as the "busiest waterway of its size in the 
world," is a tidal arm of the East River, dividing the Boroughs of Queens and 
Brooklyn for a distance of four miles. It empties into the East River directly 
opposite 34th Street, Manhattan. 

The importance of this stream is strikingly shown by comparing its activities 
with those of the Mississippi River, which from New Orleans to St. Paul is 1,000 
miles in length and flows through the heart of a great industrial section. Accord- 
ing to recent figures, 5,500,000 tons of freight are carried annually on the upper 
and lower reaches of this longest river in the world. While for the three years 
1915-16-17, the tonnage on the four miles of Newtown Creek averaged 5,620,000 



NEW YORK CITY 



21 



tons. The value of the tonnage on the Mississippi River is approximately 
$100,000,000 per annum, while on Newtown Creek, it has averaged more than 
$200,000,000 per annum for the past ten years. 

The chief commodities transported on this surprising waterway are copper 
ore and its products, petroleum, lumber, coal, chemicals and building materials. 
In 1917, 517,601 tons of copper ore and copper manufactures were transported 
on Newtown Creek a tonnage valued at $230,000,000, which is an amount 
greater than the total value of all the manufactured products of either Kansas 
City, Minneapolis or San Francisco, and greater than the value of exports from 
Boston or Philadelphia. 

Huge oil refineries on both sides of the stream ship annually 250,000,0000 
gallons of petroleum. There is still room for growth both in the commerce on 
the stream and the manufacturing plants which now line its borders. There are 
large undeveloped tracts in Queens adjoining this stream such as the Degnon 
Terminal with huge industrial plants that have been erected during the past 
seven years, and where many more will be erected during the coming ten years. 
One of the largest undeveloped tracts of land at the head of the stream is the 150 
acre tract of the Palmer Waterfront Land and Improvement Company, in the 




VERNON AVENUE BRIDGE OVER NEWTOWN CREEK 



22 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

Maspeth section, which is served by rail as well as water, and on which several 
large manufacturing plants have been located within the past few years. 

The character of tonnage on this waterway can best be shown by the follow- 
ing table for one recent year, 1917 : 

Article Estimated Value Net Tons 

General Merchandise $ 8,734,301 132,602 

Coal and other fuel and cord wood 4,337,378 1,373,035 

Lumber, railroad ties and piles 6,940,388 443,027 

Steel and products 1,254,557 32,369 

Copper ore and products 180,275,507 413,837 

Petroleum 15,744,584 868,464 

Brick, (building and fire) 722,197 242,734 

Crushed stone 130,041 155,309 

Gravel and sand 450,198 656,908 

Cement, lime, etc 1,855,511 306,519 

Paving blocks 32,275 31,164 

Plaster, whiting, sulphur, chalk, etc 506,505 58,262 

Fertilizer and steam bone 632,702 88,109 

Ice 141,279 47,093 

Ashes, cinders and slag 85,670 100,890 

Molasses 528,000 48,768 

All other materials J^490,916 _155,404 

TOTAL . . .$226,862,015 5,154,500 

The Federal Government is now starting dredging operations which will 
provide for a channel varying from 250 to 125 feet in width, and 20 to 18 feet 
in depth, at mean low water, from the East River to the head of navigation in 
the creek. The mean range of tide is 4^ feet. More than 1,475,000 cubic yards 
will be dredged from the channel. The appropriation of $510,000 for this work, 
included in the Rivers and Harbors Bill of 1919, was secured through the joint 
efforts of the Queensboro Chamber of Commerce and Congressman Charles Pope 
Caldwell. 

The tonnage and value for the 10 years 1908 to 1918 inclusive is given in 
the following table : 

Year Tonnage Value 

1908 4,181,528 $229,994,000 

1909 5,113,628 253,003,000 

1910 3,861,852 139,378,000 

1911 5,435,016 191,747,000 

1912 4,921,843 225,416,000 

1913 5,141,516 226,962,000 

1914 4,445,556 147,739,000 

1915 5,756,102 147,086,000 

1916 5,915,150 201,581,000 

1917 5,215,820 294,701,000 

1918 4,369,136 322,960,000 

TOTAL . . . .' 54,337,197 $2,380,567,000 

AVERAGE PER YEAR. . . 5,433,719 238,056,700 



NEW YORK CITY 23 

Some further idea of the immense commerce of this waterway can be obtained 
from the figures compiled by the Department of Plant and Structures of New 
York City, which show that during the year 1918, 59,389 boats passed through 
the Vernon Avenue Bridge, 56,735 passed through the Greenpoint Avenue Bridge, 
27,000 through the Meeker Street Bridge and 5,007 through the Grand Street 
Bridge. 

Steamers schooners and unrigged vessels are the principal freight carriers. 
Their drafts range from 5^ to 20 feet; 2 to 19 feet; 2 to 18 feet respectively. 
Some steamers of still larger draft lighter in their cargoes. 

Among the larger plants on the Queens shore of Newtown Creek are the 
National Sugar Refining Company, Nichols Copper Company, National Enam- 
eling and Stamping Company, General Chemical Company, Standard Oil Refin- 
eries. American Agricultural Chemical Company, and the Wrigley Chewing Gum 
Company. 

DUTCH KILLS CREEK 

During 1914 bulkhead lines were established by the United States Govern- 
ment for Dutch Kills Creek, a tributary of Newtown Creek, thus putting this 
stream under the jurisdiction of the War Department. The bulkhead lines as 
approved on October 29, 1914, give a width varying from 200 feet at its junction 
with Newtown Creek to 150 feet at the head of the stream, and include a large 
basin in the Degnon Terminal where car floats can be docked. The widths of the 
channel to be dredged under the appropriation of $510,000 mentioned previously, 
range from 160 feet at Newtown Creek to 75 feet at the turning basin. The 
Long Island Railroad plans to establish at this point a large wholesale public 
market, estimated to cost nearly $5,000,000. 

Among the larger industrial plants in the Degnon Terminal served by this 
stream are : Loose Wiles Biscuit Company, American Ever Ready Works, White 
Motor Company, Sawyer Biscuit Company, Defender Manufacturing Company, 
Pittsburg Plate Glass Company, Marcus Ward, Brett Lithograph Company, 
Waldes, Inc., Norma Company of America, Manhattan-Rome Company, Amer- 
ican Chicle Co. and The Palmolive Co. 

EAST RIVER 

Elaborate plans have been prepared by the United States Government engi- 
neers for the improvement of the East River from the Battery to Long Island 
Sound. The plans include the dredging of a 40-foot channel as far north as the 
Queensboro Bridge and the removal of existing shoals and reefs, a 40-foot chan- 
nel on the west side of Blackwell's Island, a 30-foot channel on the east side 
of Blackwell's Island adjacent to the Long Island City shore, and the deepening 
and widening of Hell Gate and the removal of dangerous shoals. 



24 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




Courtesy of E. W . Spofford Copyright 1916. 

Airplane view of Queens Borough's 200 miles of water front looking East 
from mid-town Manhattan. 

The East River in the foreground, Newtown Creek on the right, Flushing Bay 
on the left, and Jamaica Bay and the Atlantic Ocean in the distance. 



NEW YORK CITY 



25 




This vast water front, representing 34% of the entire water frontage of 
New York City, is a substantial commercial asset giving Queens Borough unusual 
industrial advantages. 

Congress has recognized its value by appropriating large amounts for the 
deepening and widening of the channels in the East River, Newtown Creek, Flush- 
ing Bay and Jamaica Bay. 



26 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

The completion of this project will develop a more symmetrical harbor for 
New York and relieve the present congestion of water traffic in the North River. 
The improvement is an important part of the Intra-Coastal Waterway. An 
original appropriation of $1,250,000 was included in the 1917 Rivers and Harbors 
Bill for beginning the work; the cost of the entire project will be approximately 
$37,000,000. 

The improvement of the East River will permit an increase in the number 
of vessels of large tonnage using the River. Many vessels which can now only 
come in at high stages of the tide, owing to the lack of sufficient channel depth, 
complete their cargoes in upper New York Bay by lighter. It will enable steam- 
ships to use the shorter and safer inside route through Long Island Sound, rather 
than the Atlantic Ocean, to reach New York. It will give an additional entrance 
and exit for the battleships of our Navy, increasing their efficiency in protecting 
New York in the event of an attack by a fleet of foreign battleships. 

The plans also include a deepening of the channel known as "Bronx Kills," 
which will give a direct route from the Harlem River into Flushing Bay. At 
present it is necessary for boats coming from the Hudson River, through the 
Harlem River, to take a circuitous route around both Randall's Island and Ward's 
Island and through Hell Gate to reach Flushing Bay. This is of special import- 
ance for the future development of Flushing Bay and the accessibility of the 
Barge Canal Terminal located there. 

Marginal Freight Railroad. The location of two Barge Canal Terminals 
on the East River in Long Island City and Astoria has given considerable impetus 
to the project of a proposed marginal freight railroad along the East River as a 
further development of the waterfront of this section. The construction of such 
a freight railroad, with its float bridges, classification yards, etc., similar to that 
proposed for the waterfront in South Brooklyn, would give direct rail connec- 
tions to the shippers of this section with every railroad system entering the port 
of New York. 

Queensboro Terminal. This terminal, which was opened on July 1, 1914, is 
located on the East River and Vernon Avenue, between 13th and 14th Streets, 
Long Island City, and is a branch of the Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal, 
which has been in operation since 1876, and which today handles over two mil- 
lion tons of freight a year. Shipments may be made through this terminal to 
and from all railroads in the United States (except Pennsylvania R. R.) with 
the same dispatch and freight rates as though delivered to or received from the 
separate freight stations of railroads in Manhattan, thus saving large cartage 
charges to shippers located in Queens Borough. 



NEW YORK CITY 



27 




QUEENSBORO TERMINAL ON EAST RlVER 

The tonnage handled by this terminal for the first 5 years since its opening 
is as follows: 

19141915 24,310 tons 

19151916 32,819 " 

19161917 31,054 " 

19171918 30,004 " 

19181919 . . 25,882 " 



TOTAL 144,069 tons 

Public Docks. There are four public docks located on the East River water- 
front in Long Island City, all of which are under the jurisdiction of the Depart- 
ment of Docks of New York City. They are located as follows : 

1. Foot of Nott Avenue 

2. Foot of West Avenue 

3. Foot of Broadway 

4. Foot of Jamaica Avenue 

These docks can be used by the manufacturers and shippers of Queens Bor- 
ough to the extent determined upon by the District Superintendent (Telephone 
Astoria 159). Shippers who are not located on the waterfront are thus given 
equal advantages in the receipt and delivery of their freight by water. Cargoes 
of brick, lumber, coal, crushed stone, building material, sand, gravel, etc., can 
be unloaded from barges, lighters, scows or schooners at these docks. The 
wharfage rates can be obtained upon application, but in general are 2c. per ton 
up to 200 tons, and ^c per ton for any excess over that amount. 



28 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



FLUSHING BAY FLUSHING CREEK 

Great strides have been made in the past ten years in the development of 
Flushing Bay and Flushing Creek as commercial waterways. They hold a 
stragetical commercial position, located, as they are, directly opposite the Harlem 
Ship Canal and at a point where the East River broadens into Long Island Sound. 
Flushing Bay is about 12 miles by water northeast of the Battery and 6 miles by 
highway, from the Queensboro Bridge. It is about two miles in length with 
widths varying from 300 feet to 1^ miles. 

Flushing Creek is a tidal stream tributary to Flushing Bay and extends Z l /2 
miles inland. 

The first project adopted by the United States Government for the improve- 
ment of Flushing Bay was on March 3, 1879, and provided for making and main- 
taining a channel 6 feet deep at low water, at an estimated cost of $173,500. 

Bulkhead lines have been established for both Flushing Bay and Flushing 
Creek by the United States. The lines for Flushing Creek were originally estab- 
lished March 6, 1911 and amended October 29, 1918. The lines, as amended, are 
250 feet apart from the mouth of the Creek three miles inland ; and 200 feet 
apart for the last half mile, extending in a straight line to the head of tide water, 
or what is known as the "Head of the Vleigh." 

It is believed that the future needs of this stream will require a greater width 
than those fixed by the present bulkhead lines, and in 1913 the Commerce Com- 




EAST RIVER AT WHITESTONE 



NEW YORK CITY 



29 



mittee of the Chamber advocated a width of 300 feet in a straight line from the 
mouth of the Creek to the head of the proposed improvement. Several hearings 
and conferences were held at that time with the officials of the Federal and City 
governments and the abutting property owners, but due to the existing docks and 
improvements on the east side of the stream, and the unwillingness of the owners 
on the west side to cede the necessary land for the widening, the plan was 
abandoned. 

Steps were then taken to secure appropriations from the United States Gov- 
ernment for dredging a deeper channel. Through the combined efforts of the 
Chamber and former Congressman John J. Kindred, an appropriation of $255,- 
700 was included in the Rivers and Harbors Bill of 1913. This was the first 
appropriation made since the original project was adopted for a 6-foot channel 
in 1879. Contract was awarded for dredging a channel 200 feet in width and 10 
feet deep in March 1914. The work was completed in 1915 from the East River 
near College Point to a point in the Creek at the Jackson Avenue Bridge. 

In order to dredge a deeper channel in Flushing Creek, beyond the Jackson 
Avenue Bridge, it was necessary for the City of New York to secure title to all 
land between the established bulkhead lines. A bill was passed in 1913 by the 
New York State Legislature "granting to the City of New York such right, title, 
and interest as the State of New York may have in and to land under water in 
Flushing Creek and Flushing Bay." This legislation enables the City of New 
York to exchange title with abutting property owners to compensate them for 
any necessary upland taken to dredge between the established bulkhead lines. 
Further legislation was introduced and adopted which amended the Charter of 
the City of New York so as to permit the inclusion of bulkhead lines as a part 
of the city map. 

Proceedings are now under way for the acquisition of title by the City. The 




BRIDGE OVER FLUSHING CREEK AT JACKSON AVENUE 



30 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

rule maps, prepared by the Topographical Bureau, are ready for submission to 
the Board of Estimate. The Damage Maps, showing each parcel of land and 
owner, are being prepared, and will be ready by the summer of 1920. Title will 
then be vested in the city to all upland between the bulkhead lines title to land 
under water already being vested in the city by legislative enactment. 

Just as soon as these steps have been completed, the U. S. Government will 
proceed with the deepening and widening of the channel in Flushing Creek. 

It is understood that the Government engineers have plans prepared for 
deepening the channel in Flushing Bay in the near future from its present depth 
of 10 feet, at mean low water, to 17 feet. 

Industrial and Commercial Development Large undeveloped tracts of land 
are available on all sides of Flushing Bay and Flushing Creek at a low cost per 
acre, suitable for industrial, commercial and residential development. One of 
the important undertakings that has rapidy progressed in this section is the work 
of the Flushing Bay Improvement Company, which, for the past nine years, has 
been filling in some 400 acres of the low-lying salt meadows on the west side of 
the Creek to 12 feet above mean high water. This stupendous task, which calls 
for a fill of 8,000,000 cubic yards, is being carried forward at the rate of several 
thousand cubic yards per day with ashes and excavated material from Brooklyn, 
brought by means of scows and special dump cars of the Long Island Railroad. 
It is understood to be the intention of the owners of this tract to develop same 
for factory sites. The section has the advantage of both water and rail shipping 
facilities. A street system has been laid out by the Topographical Department 
for this area with marginal waterway streets running parallel to Flushing Creek, 
which will afford an opportunity to load direct from a ship or barge into the 
warehouse or factory. 

The Long Island Railroad owns a tract of land adjacent to that of the Flush- 
ing Bay Improvement Company and has plans for an important railroad terminal 
and yard at this point. Car storage yards and repair shops for both the Inter- 
borough Rapid Transit and Brooklyn Rapid Transit trains will be located on the 
Flushing Meadows in connection with the extension of the Corona "L" to 
Flushing. 

The Degnon Realty and Terminal Company also owns a large tract of land 
which they are improving for manufacturing sites. They have dredged a 30-foot 
channel in Flushing Bay along the shore line of their property, hydraulically 
pumping the bottom of the channel for the "fill" to raise the grade of their 
upland. 

This section is within 16 minutes running time, on the Long Island Railroad, 
from Pennsylvania Station, Manhattan, and 22 minutes running time from Grand 
Central Station, via the Queensboro Subway, over the Corona "L" extension, 



NEW YORK CITY 31 

which will be extended in the near future across the meadows to Flushing. Trains 
of both the I. R. T. and B. R. T. will operate to this section, giving rapid transit 
facilities for a single fare to all sections of New York City. It is one of the few 
remaining places in New York for mammoth and unobstructed factory and ware- 
house development. During the next 10 years a development will undoubtedly 
take place in this locality that will transform it from its present barren condition 
to a huge industrial community. 

The State of New York acquired in 1914 over 400 feet frontage on Flush- 
ing Bay near the mouth of Flushing Creek where work is now in progress on the 
construction of a Barge Canal Terminal as part of the canal system of New York 
State. 

A tentative plan was prepared by the Dock Department of New York City 
in 1913 for the development of the whole westerly shore of Flushing Bay from 
Sanford's Point to Jackson Avenue for a freight terminal. The plan provided 
for the extension of the shore line and the construction of a marginal street along 
the outer edge of which would be built a set of railroad tracks with spurs leading 
out to the end of a series of 1000 foot piers. The plan, as prepared, showed 16 
piers, 200 feet in width with docking basins 300 feet wide. 

That this whole industrial scheme has possibilities for realization in the near 
future is the opinion of men who are keeping an eye on the industrial trend of 
Queens Borough. 

Commercial Statistics. The principal commodities handled on these water- 
ways are coal and other fuel, cement, lime, lumber, gravel and sand, ashes and 
cinders. The draft of loaded vessels varies from 2 to 14 fet. The bulk of 
freight is carried in scows and in schooners. The following i a a statement of the 
tonnage and value for 10 recent years : 

Year Short Tons Value 

1908 126,458 $1,774,900 

1909 277,300 879,700 

1910 563,029 1,256,880 

1911 394,328 3,251,548 

1912 942,614 989,745 

1913 917,561 969,011 

1914 858,714 968,461 

1915 677,460 1,066,295 

1916 710,547 1,137,195 

1917 1,355,620 3,508,600 

1918 335,801 1,251,323 



TOTAL 7,159,432 $17,053,658 



FLUSHING BAY JAMAICA BAY CANAL 

For many years there has been an effort made to have the State of New York 
construct a canal connecting Flushing Bay and Jamaica Bay in order to provide 
a short-cut from the Hudson River through the Harlem River, Flushing Bay 
and the said canal for canal boats bound for Jamaica Bay. No appropriation has 
been made, however, by the State of New York for its construction. 

The route selected begins at Cornell Basin of the Jamaica Bay channel, 
bending westerly across the ridge between the creek and the next 
valley to the west, crosses the Ridgewood acqueduct west of Three-mile Millroad, 
and Rockaway Boulevard about a quarter of a mile west of the junction with 
Rockaway Road, then follows the natural valley through the present farms, cross- 
ing Hawtree Creek road near its junction with Lincoln Avenue, and Liberty Ave- 
nue just east of Van Wyck Avenue. From Liberty Avenue the line runs just 
east of Van Wyck Avenue and nearly parallel to it, following the natural depress- 
ion to the railroad. It crosses the railroad just east of Dunton Station, thence 
northerly to the Maple Grove Cemetery property, crosses the summit of the main 
ridge in the cemetery, crosses Queens Boulevard, and thence down the ravine 
across the Union Turnpike to the meadows at the head of Flushing Creek to the 
200 foot channel planned by the United States Government, and follows this 
channel to Flushing Bay. 

Surveys of this proposed canal were made by the state engineers in 1913, 
and a report made to the legislature on March 11, 1914. The estimate of the 
cost at that time was $20,338,000, which was based upon the assumption that New 
York City would construct the channel in Jamaica Bay, together with the basins 
extending from that channel ; also, that the Federal Government would con- 
struct the channel from the mouth of Flushing Creek to the head of the proposed 
improvement at Livingston Street. 

For a distance of about two miles through the upland in the center of the 
Borough, which is approximately 125 feet above the sea level, it is proposed to 
construct a double reinforced concrete tunnel having channels of 50 feet each 
with columns between the channels. The height of the top of the tunnel from 
the water level will be over 30 feet. The tunnel will extend a distance of approx- 
imately 10,800 feet, or from Union Turnpike to a point 800 feet south of Liberty 
Avenue. Such a tunnel would obviate the necessity of spanning highways with 
expensive bridges. The balance of the canal, however, will be an open cut 200 
feet in width. The minimum depth throughout the canal at low water would 
be 12 feet, and tidal locks or gates would have to be provided. 



NEW YORK CITY 



33 




PROPOSED HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS, SHOWING PARTICULARLY THE ROUTE 
OF THE SUGGESTED CANAL TO CONNECT FLUSHING BAY AND 

JAMAICA BAY 




BATHING SCENE, ROCKAWAY COAST 



34 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

Such a canal would give a landlocked waterway the entire distance from 
Buffalo to Jamaica Bay and would enable the barge canal boats to bring their 
cargoes to the port now being developed at Jamaica Bay, where these cargoes 
could be transferred to ocean-going vessels. It would provide for the trans- 
portation of lumber, cement, coal and general merchandise into the heart of 
Queens Borough. The canal would also overcome the objection that has been 
raised by those who fear that barges could not, in heavy weather, safely make 
the passage from the Lower Bay in New York into the ocean entrance to Jamaica 
Bay by the way of Rockaway Inlet. 

JAMAICA BAY 

Jamaica Bay in the southern portion of the Borough is approximately eight 
miles long and four miles wide, and covers an area of about 20 square miles. 
It is separated from the Atlantic Ocean by the Rockaway Peninsula (5th Ward 
of Queens Borough), and is connected with the Atlantic Ocean by a channel 
known as the "Rockaway Inlet," which is about eight miles east of the Narrows. 
A comprehensive plan adopted for the development of this great landlocked 
waterway includes a wide channel skirting the entire Bay, with several basins 
extending into the Queens Borough shore. The completion of this improvement 
will open for commercial, industrial, and residential development, a large terri- 
tory south of the Jamaica, Richmond Hill and Woodhaven sections of Queens 
Borough. 

The State of New York has granted the City of New York all right and 
title in and to all of the lands under water in Jamaica Bay for the creation of a 
new harbor in cooperation with the Federal Government. The project involves 
the dredging of an entrance channel and protecting it by riprap jetties ; and the 
dredging of a main interior channel along the west and north sides of the Bay at 
the expense of the United States Government. The City of New York is to 
make appropriations for dredging the basins, bulkheading the waterfront, and 
make suitable highway and railroad connections with the upland. It provides for 
making and maintaining a channel with a width of 500 feet and a depth of 18 
feet, at mean low water; to be increased as the needs of commerce require and 
as may be further authorized by Congress, to a width of 1500 feet for the entrance 
channel and 1000 feet for the interior channel, and to a minimum depth of 30 
feet. The length of the channel included in the project is 12 miles. The mean 
range of tide is 4^ feet. 

The approved estimated cost to the United States for the original work is 
not to exceed $7,430,000 in any event ; to the City of New York, from $15,000.000 
to $70,000,000, according to the extent of the work undertaken. 



NEW YORK CITY 



35 




THE FINEST BEACHES ON THE ATLANTIC OCEAN ARE ON THE ROCKAWAY PENNINSULA. 

Commercial Statistics. The freight at present consists of coal, building 
material, lead, tin, mineral oil, road materials, fertilizing products, garbage and 
refuse to Barren Island. 

The tonnage and value during 6 recent years is as follows : 

Short Tons Value 

1912 425,551 $5,150,000 

1913 816,132 5,346,878 

1914 768,550 5,171,668 

1915 750,867 7,049,795 

1916 736,775 9,887,021 

1917 256,011 8,171,231 

In December 1919 an appropriation of $7,500,000 was made by the Board 
of Estimate of New York City for the construction of six 1000 foot piers. The 
appropriation was made, however, contingent upon the United States Govern- 
ment approving of increasing the depth of the present channel from 18 feet to 
30 feet, from Rockaway Inlet to the head of Mill Basin. Just as soon as this 
change has been made by the Government, the above appropriation will be 
expended as follows : 

Bulkhead wall between Barren Island and Mill Basin. . .$1,500,000 \ 

6 Piers 1000 feet long, 200 feet wide 3,000,000 

6 Storage sheds 2,700,000 j 

Dredging Channel to 30 feet 300,000 



TOTAL. 



,$7,500,000 



36 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

BARGE CANAL TERMINALS. 

As a result of the combined efforts of the Queens Chamber of Commerce 
and Borough President Maurice E. Connolly, the State of New York in Decem- 
ber 1914, acquired title to property on the waterfront of the Borough of Queens 
at three different locations for Barge Canal Terminals. These locations, which 
include a total water frontage of over a quarter of a mile, and approximately 10 
acres of land, are as follows : 

1. East River, north of Queensboro Bridge'. A strip 681 feet in length on 
the East River near the foot of Rogers Avenue and extending 150 feet inshore 
from the established bulkhead and pierhead lines, or approximately 104,700 
square feet. This location for a Barge Canal Terminal is well adapted to the 
present and future industrial and commercial needs of Long Island City. It has 
direct and easy access to the marginal waterfront street, namely, Vernon Avenue ; 
is only about 2,000 feet from the entrance of Queensboro Bridge itself, and 
geographically is admirably situated for any development along the waterfront. 
It is, moreover, centrally situated for the vast number of factories now located 
in Long Island City. 

The improvement of this site under Terminal Contract No. 217, of October 
23rd, 1918, provided for the repair of the existing bulkhead and for the con- 
struction of a freight house and crane track at a total of $75,000. 

Terminal Contract No. 42, dated November 13th, 1918, provided for paving 
the terminal site with granite block pavement at a total cost of $53,500. All of 
this work has been completed and the Barge Canal Terminal is ready for the use 
of receivers and shippers of freight. Additional contracts have been let for 
cranes and miscellaneous equpiment. 

Not only will barges from the State Canal be handled here, but as far as 
possible, all of the shipping that manufacturers in Queens desire to move by 
water. Superintendent Edward Walsh of the Department of Public Works of 
New York State has appointed a harbor master in charge of this terminal and 
another to be in charge of the terminal on Flushing Bay. 

2. Hallet's Cove, Astoria The property acquired at this point on Hallet's 
Cove, a small indentation of the East River, extends 400 feet northerly from 
the foot of Broadway to a point between Camelia Street and Jamaica Avenue, 
comprises approximately 160,270 square feet in area, and extends from the 
Boulevard outshore to the bulkhead and pierhead line. The bulkhead and pier- 
head lines are coincident at this place, and it is possible for the State to excavate 
a basin in this large area whereby an extensive terminal can be laid out. The 
location is well adapted geographically for a terminal, as it has direct connection 
with several arteries of travel connecting Long Island City, Astoria and Flushing. 



NEW YORK CITY 



37 




LOCATION OF THREE BARGE CANAL TERMINALS ON THE WATERFRONT OF 

QUEENS BOROUGH 



Terminal Contract No. 45 was awarded to the Mohawk Dredge and Dock 
Company of Amsterdam, N. Y., on November 28, 1919, for the improvement of 
this terminal at an estimated cost of $255,275. .The contract requires that the 
work shall be completed by May 28, 1921, and provides for the necessary exca- 
vation, construction of bulkhead walls, and grading. Further contract will be 
awarded for a freight house, cranes and miscellaneous equipment. Facilities 
will be provided for handling bulk and miscellaneous freight. 

3. Head of Flushing Bay The site selected has an approximate frontage 
of 400 feet on Flushing Bay, just west of the mouth of Flushing Creek and north 
of Jackson Avenue, and is about 400 feet in depth. It is admirably located and 
will serve not only the growing communities of Flushing, College Point, and 
Corona, but many other inland sections, such as Jamaica, Forest Hills, Richmond 
Hill, Bayside, Whitestone, etc. Notwithstanding the fact that navigation in 
Flushing Creek extends considerably further inland, the terminal as located will 
not be subject to the inconveniences of drawbridge navigation. 



38 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Terminal Contract No. 43, awarded on July 25th, 1919 to McHarg-Barton 
Company of New York City for a total sum of $151,340, provides for excavating 
a terminal basin, constructing a bulkhead wall and a frame freight house. Con- 
tract is to be completed by July 25, 1920. Additional contract will be made for 
paving, cranes and miscellaneous equipment. Facilities will be provided for 
handling bulk and miscellaneous cargoes. 

Queens Borough will have all three terminals, as pointed out above, whereas 
to date there have been two terminals established on the waterfront in Brooklyn 
and only one in the Bronx. The action of the State in acquiring these three 
terminals is a practical example of what can be accomplished through organized 
effort by the business men of a community through its Chamber of Commerce. 

When the Chamber was organized in 1911, a Commission appointed by the 
State had just completed its hearings on the proposed location of Barge Canal 
Terminals. As the business men of Queens had not been organized, and there- 
fore did not present a united demand for terminals, no provision was made for 
their establishment in the Borough, although, even at that time, nearly 5 per cent 
of the assessed valuation, population, and manufactured products of the State 
were included in the Borough. 

A Barge Canal Terminal is a freight station on the waterfront, to or from 
which the public can truck freight shipped via canal boats, just the same as they 
do from freight stations on railroads. 

The manufacturers and merchants of Queens will all benefit by the reduction 
in the cost of transporting commodities of every kind, as there is not a section 
of the Borough which will not be within easy trucking distance of at least one of 
these three terminals. 




VERNON AVE. BARGE CANAL TERMINAL, LONG ISLAND CITY, JUST NORTH OF 

QUEENSBORO BRIDGE. 



NEW YORK CITY 

BRIDGES 



39 




HE first step in the gradual rounding out of New York City dur- 
ing the past forty years was the spanning of the East River by 
immense aerial highways, eliminating this waterway as a bar- 
rier to the spread of population and commerce eastward into 
Queens and Brooklyn. 
Three huge bridges connecting Manhattan and Brooklyn the Brooklyn 
Bridge, opened in May 1883; the Williamsburg Bridge, opened in December 
1903 ; and the Manhattan Bridge, opened in December 1909 have been, and are 
today, important factors in the growth of Queens Borough. All three bridges 
serve indirectly, through the Borough of Brooklyn, the residential and business 
interests of Queens. 

As the business center of Manhattan grew northward, and as the population, 
commerce and industry of Queens Borough continued to increase, the necessity 
for a direct connection between Manhattan and Queens became more and more 
necessary. Shortly after Queens became a part of New York City, the efforts 
of its residents to secure the construction of such a bridge were rewarded, for in 
June 1901 a contract was let for the piers and in November 1903 contract was 
let for the steei superstructure of the Queensboro Bridge. On March 30, 1909, 
the bridge was completed and officially opened to the public. 

Immediately following the opening of the Queensboro Bridge, many large 
industrial plants, formerly located in Manhattan, began to seek sites in Queens 
for the erection of new plants. This influx of factories has grown year by year, 
and the number of vehicles and passengers using the bridge daily has continued 
to increase to such an extent that plans are already being made to urge the con- 
struction of still another bridge connecting Queens with Manhattan and the 
Bronx by spanning the East River in the vicinity of Hell Gate. 

QUEENSBORO BRIDGE 

No better proof of the rapid development of Queens Borough and adjacent 
territory on Long Island during the past decade need be given than a statement 
of the amazing growth of the daily traffic of passengers, vehicles and trolley 
cars crossing the Queensboro Bridge since its opening in 1909. 

Each year a traffic count for a period of 24 hours is made by the Department 
of Plant and Structures (formerly Bridge Department) and the results below 
show 900 per cent increase in vehicular traffic and 150 per cent increase in the 
number of persons who daily cross the Bridge during the past 10 years. 



40 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



DATE 

Nov. n, 1910 

Dec. 28, 1911 

Oct. 24, 1912 

Oct. 29, 1913 

Nov. 5, 1914 

Oct. 28, 1915 

(a) Dec. 7, 1916 

Oct. 25, 1917 

1918 

Oct. 21, 1919 

(a) 



ERSONS TROLLEY CARS VEHICLES 


44,329 


i,75i 


1,810 


47,694 


2,284 


2,352 


59,529 


2,796 


3,644 


81,760 


2,924 


6,691 


87,850 


3,091 


7,207 


93,654 


3,212 


9.505 


79,482 


2,967 


9,858 


93,897 


2,113 


i3,43i 



SECOND AVE. "L" 
CARS 



1032 



No Official Count Made 
109,691 1,516 18,801 1,183 

The decrease in number of persons and trolleys in 1916 resulted from 
the operation of the Queensboro Subway between 42nd Street, Man- 
hattan, and the Bridge Plaza, Long Island City. 




Courtesy E. W . Spofford. 

View showing five bridges spanning the East River. The New York Con- 
necting Railroad Bridge at Hell Gate is shown in foreground. The proposed 
Tri-Borough Bridge would parallel this route a short distance to the south. 

The Queensboro Bridge across Blackwell's Island joining Long Island City 
with Manhattan at 59th Street is also shown. 



NEW YORK CITY 



41 



INCREASE IN MOTOR VEHICLES 

(b) Operation of 2nd Ave. "L" trains on upper level inaugurated July 23, 

1917. 

The increase in the number of motor driven vehicles as compared with horse 
drawn is particularly interesting. In 1913, there were 1899 horse drawn (25%) 
and 4792 motor driven (73%} or a total of 6691 vehicles crossing the bridge 
in 24 hours. In 1919 the number of horse drawn had decreased to 1207 (7%} 
and the motor driven had increased to 17,594 (93%} or a total of 18,801. A 
large part of this increase is due to the many new automobile manufacturing 
plants and service stations which have located in Queens Borough during the past 
ten years. The picture below shows very clearly how close together are the 
"Automobile Sales Row" on Broadway, Manhattan, and the many automobile 
service and manufacturing plants in Queens Borough. 




The three bridges Williamsburg, Manhattan and Brooklyn- 
lower Manhattan with Brooklvn are seen in the distance. 



-connecting 



In the central foreground may be seen the largest gas plant in the world 
The Astoria Light, Heat and Power Co. where all the gas consumed in Man- 
hattan is manufactured. 



42 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




Photo by Dr. W. T. Kilmer 

THE QUEENSBORO BRIDGE AT NIGHT 



Goers-Dagor Lens 




The 52-foot wide vehicular roadway of the Queensboro Bridge. 18,000 
vehicles used this roadway on Oct. 21, 1919. On a summer day as many as 30,000 
automobiles use this roadway. It is the great commercial highway connecting the 
industrial sections of Queens Borough with the mercantile sections of Manhattan. 



NEW YORK CITY 43 

HISTORY 

December 2, 1899 The general plan for a cantilever bridge from Second 

Avenue, between 59th and 60th Streets, Manhattan, across 

Blackwell's Island to intersection with Jane Street, Long 

Island City, was submitted to the Secretary of War. 

November 15, 1900 Ordinance authorizing construction approved by Mayor 

of New York City. 

February 23, 1901 Plans were approved by War Department. 
March 21, 1901 Board of Alderman authorized condemnation proceedings for 

the land required. 
June 27, 1901 Contract was let for construction of the six masonry piers to 

Ryan & Parker for $745,547; work commenced July 19th. 
November 20, 1903 Contract let to Pennsylvania Steel Company for construc- 
tion of steel superstructure at $5,132,985. 

December 31, 1903 Contract let to Williams Engineering & Contracting Com- 
pany for towers on piers for $685,000. 
June 15, 1908 Contract of Pennsylvania Steel Company for steel superstructure 

completed. 

March 30, 1909 Bridge opened for pedestrians and vehicles. 
June 12, 1909 Celebration of completion of bridge commenced. 
September 19, 1909 Operation of surface cars over bridge began. 
July 18, 1911 Bridge tolls abolished by Board of Aldermen. 
July 23, 1917 Second Avenue "L" operated across upper level from Manhattan. 

FIXED STATISTICS 

Type Continuous cantilever, without suspended span ; steel towers. 

Grades on Bridge and Approaches Queens approach, 3.4 per cent; Man- 
hattan approach, roadway, 3.5 per cent; trolleys, 5.8 per cent; main bridge spans, 
3.4 per cent; the middle, 1,700 feet, is level. 

Width of Waterway Pier line to pier line, west channel, 939 feet; east 
channel, 793.2 feet. 

Clear Width of Navigable Openings, square with the channel Between 24 
foot contours, west channel, 860.7 feet; east channel, 216.3 feet. 

Material of Bridge Medium steel, except top chord eye-bars and pins, 
which are nickel steel. 

Foundation Two anchor piers to rock ; 4 main piers to rock. 

Facilities One roadway, 53.25 feet wide; 2 sidewalks, 16.33 feet; 2 surface 
car tracks ; 2 elevated car tracks. 

Can Pass in Either Direction in One Hour (maximum) Passengers 
(vehicles), 14,400; passengers (cars), 315,200; foot passengers, 24,500; total 
354,100; 172,050 eastbound, 172,050 westbound. 



44 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

Original Contract Price Land, $4,635,000; approaches, bridge, $13,496,500. 
Final Cost, Including Land, etc. $18,131,500. 

Total length of bridge from east side of Second Avenue, Manhattan, to Jack- 
son Avenue, Queens, including Queens Plaza, 8,601 feet. The length of spans 
are: Manhattan anchor spans, 469.5 feet; west channel span, 1,182 feet; island 
span, 459 feet; east channel span, 984 feet; Queens anchor span, 459 feet. The 
clear height over East River is 135 feet. 

PROPOSED TRI-BOROUGH BRIDGE 

A bill has been introduced in the New York State Legislature authorizing the 
City of New York to proceed with the construction of a new bridge over the East 
River connecting Queens Borough with the boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. 
Tentative plans, which have already been prepared by the Department of Plant 
and Structures for this new highway, estimate its cost between $15,000,000, and 
$20,000,000. 

The proposed bridge would have terminals at Second Avenue and Potter 
Avenue, Queens ; 125th Street and First Avenue, Manhattan ; and St. Ann's 
Avenue and Southern Boulevard, Bronx. The total length of the bridge would 
be about 15,000 feet and it would parallel the present approaches of the span of 
the New York Connecting Railroad Bridge from Astoria crossing the East River 
at Hell Gate, across Randall's Island and Ward's Island where it would fork, one 
branch (for vehicles and foot traffic) leading to 125th Street, Manhattan, 
and the other branch (for transit lines, vehicles, and foot traffic) to the Bronx. 

The construction of this bridge would mean that the upper part of Man- 
hattan, as well as the Bronx, would be made more accessible to Queens Borough, 
which naturally means a reduction in the cost of handling products transported 
between these boroughs. 

An important reason given for the construction of this bridge is the oppor- 
tunity which would be afforded for the extension of the present Astoria "L" to 
upper Manhattan and the Bronx making the labor supply of these great resi- 
dential centers more available for the many industrial plants in Queens Borough. 

BRIDGES CONNECTING QUEENS WITH BROOKLYN; BRIDGES 
CROSSING INTERIOR WATERWAYS. 

Name Water Crossing Type of Clear Height Greatest Length of Length of Total uidth 

Bridge Above M.H.W. Span Bridge App. of Bridge 

Feet Feet Fee* Feet Feet 

Vernon Avenue Xewtown Creek Bascule 24 172 1698.6 1500 60 

Greenpoint Avenue... " Swing 15 206.7 282 75 32 

8 200 284 84 31 



Grand Street. ...... 





Swing 


10 


229.6 


55o 


320 


36 


Borden Avenue. 


..Dutch Kills Creek 


Retractile 


3-5 


169 


265 


90 


50.5 


Flushing 


..Flushing Creek 


Bascule 


12 


68 


351 


262 


52 


Strong's Causeway.. 
Little Neck.. 


..Flushing Creek 
. . Allev Creek 


Swing 
Swing 


2 

2 


135 

90 


135-2 
157-2 


44 
65 


33-2 
18 



NEW YORK CITY 



45 





TRANSPORTATION 

THE NEW YORK CONNECTING RAILROAD 

HE New York Connecting Railroad was completed and placed 
in operation in April 1917 for passenger service. Freight 
service was inaugurated January 17th, 1918. 

The importance of this enormous and costly undertaking 
to the industrial and commercial life of Queens Borough can- 
not be overestimated. It is not only of inestimable value to 
the thousands of manufacturing establishments now located in the Borough, but 
will be the deciding factor in bringing thousands of new industrial plants into 
Queens. 

Connecting as it does, thousands of miles of tracks operated by the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad System with the thousands of miles operated by the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad System and its connections in the New Eng- 
land States, this new Railroad has placed all of the Borough of Queens on the 
main line of these vast transportation systems and has enabled shippers and 
receivers of freight in every section of the Borough to save both time and money 
in the receipt and delivery of. their raw materials and finished products. 

It has given Queens Borough an all rail route with the mainland and has 
done away with the necessity for lightering freight cars across the East River to 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad terminals. Today long trains of 
freight cars are operating over this new route bringing into Queens, with greater 
dispatch, commodities of every description and taking back to all parts of the 
United States the products of the industrial plants of the Borough. 

The New York Connecting Railroad, incorporated April 1892, was granted 
a Certificate on February 14th, 1907 by the Board of Rapid Transit Railroad 
Commissioners of the City of New York, authorizing it to construct and operate 
a railroad from a point in the Borough of Brooklyn, through the Borough of 
Queens, and across the East River, Ward's Island, Little Hell Gate, Randall's 
Island and Bronx Hills to a point in the Borough of the Bronx, a distance 'of 
approximately 12 miles. The certificate and franchise were approved by the 
Board of Estimate and Apportionment on February 15th, 1907 and by the Mayor 
on March 14th of the same year. 



46 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

The bridge itself, which is the largest of its kind in the world, cost 
$18,000,000. The total cost including the approaches and construction work to 
Bay Ridge was $30,000,000. The total length of the bridge including the 
viaducts is more than three miles. The main span across the East River at Hell 
Gate connects the Astoria section of Queens with Ward's Island, and Ward's 
Island is in turn connected with Randall's Island, which is connected with the 
Bronx. 

The massive granite piers of the bridge rise to a height of 240 feet and are 
1,000 feet apart. The big steel arches which support the deck of the bridge are 
3,000 feet in length, rising to a height of 300 feet above the water. The deck is 
150 feet above the river and the clearance for vessels at mean high water is 140 
feet, permitting the tallest masts of the largest vessels afloat today to pass safely 
beneath it. 

The Railroad is used not only for freight service but two of the four tracks 
are used for passenger traffic. Through passenger trains operate from Boston 
to Washington and other cities. The structure after leaving the bridge across 
the East River gradually descends in Queens to a level near the surface at Wood- 
side where one branch, for passenger trains, extends to the Sunnyside Yards of 
the Long Island Railroad and is carried into the tunnels under the East River to 
the Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan. Another branch, for freight trains, 
continues through the Newtown section, where the route is gradually depressed 
and becomes partly tunnel construction, until Lutheran Cemetery is reached. 
Here it enters a tunnel more than a half mile in length and is carried over the 
tracks of the Long Island Railroad to the Evergreen section where it again passes 
through tunnels under the East New York section of Brooklyn, and thence 
through a "cut" to the Bay Ridge section on the waterfront of South Brooklyn. 
From this point freight cars are lightered across the Upper Bay to the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad yards at Greenville, N. J. 

Efforts are now being made by the Queens Chamber of Commerce to have 
freight tunnels constructed under the Narrows connecting South Brooklyn and 
Staten Island to provide for an all rail route to connect with all the trunk lines 
which terminate on the Jersey side of the harbor. 

The interchange point of the New York Connecting Railroad for the 
delivery of freight to Long Island Railroad is at Fresh Pond Junction, situated 
on the Montauk Division, about half way between Long Island City and Jamaica. 



NEW YORK CITY 



47 




TROLLEY LINES 

P to the years 1915-6-7, when the new rapid extensions into 
Queens were placed in operation, the development of the Bor- 
ough was entirely dependent upon the Long Island Railroad 
and the trolley lines. 

With 200 miles of trolley tracks radiating to all parts of 
the 'Borough, connecting many widely separated communities, 
Queens began to grow to its present importance. 

The most important addition to the trolley facilities of the Borough during 
the past ten years was the completion of the line which operates from Second 
Avenue, Manhattan, across the Queensboro Bridge and over Queens Boulevard, 
to Jamaica, a distance of 10 miles. The line was placed in operation to Win- 
field in January 1913, to the Long Island Railroad Station, in Jamaica, in 
January 1914, and to South Jamaica in April 1916. 

The effective cooperation of the Queens Chamber of Commerce secured the 
retention of the franchise for this road when in 1912 proceedings had been started 
to rescind the franchise for failure on the part of the South Shore Traction Com- 
pany (to whom it was originally granted) to construct the line. 

Modern, side-door passenger cars, which make this trip in about half an 
hour, have made accessible for greater home development, thousands of acres of 
land through the center of the Borough which formerly had no transportation 
facilities except one or two stations on the Main Line of the Long Island Rail- 
road. 

Another important improvement to the trolley facilities of the Borough 
was the operation of the cars of the Brooklyn, Queens County and Suburban 
Railway over the extension of this line from Dry Harbor Road (Middle 
Village) to Fulton St. (Jamaica), a distance of approximately three miles, 
which began September 25th, 1917. This extension furnishes a shorter and 
more direct route between Jamaica, Richmond Hill, Kew Gardens and Forest 
Hill to the Williamsburg bridge and City Hall, Manhattan. 

NUMBER OF FARE PASSENGERS 



Year 


New York 








Man. & 




Ending 


& Queens 


N. Y. & L. I. 


L. I. Electric 


N. Y. &No. Ocean 


Queens 




June 


County 


Traction 


Railway 


Shore Trac- Electric 


Traction 




30th 


Railway 


Co. 




tion Co. Co. 


Co. 


Total 


1910 


20,277,761 


7,080,303 


3,519,080 


2,103,868 


1,449,062 


34,430,074 


1911 


23,640,701 


7,758,657 


3,837,468 


2,084,758 2,230,951 


2,969,950 


42,522,485 


1912 


25,450,728 


7,834,539 


3,826,087 


2,755,140 2,647,904 


2,668,334 


45,182,732 


1913 


2,6950,656 


8,040,320 


4,084,666 


2,761,466 2,876,607 


2,753,299 


47,467,014 


1914 


26,744,147 


8,088,288 


4,367,692 


2,878,546 2,171,551 


4,728,472 


49,973,696 


1915 


26,835,060 


8,549,769 


4,404,800 


2,940,272 3,100,473 


6,855,734 


52,686,108 


1916 


28,373,608 


8,294,525 


4,418,933 


2,901,530 3,008,609 


7,170,198 


54,167,403 


1917* 


21,481,773 


8,574.489 


4,464,017 


2,787,813 3,149,360 


8,093,565 


48,551,017 


1918* 


18,895,235 


8,988,026 


3,972,356 


3,972,194 3,109,695 


5,940,482 


43,544,988 


1919* 


20,490,616 


9,916,443 


4,166,612 


2,716,602 3,439,412 


5,993,890 


46,723,575 



^Decrease resulted from operation of rapid transit trains. 



48 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Name of Railway 


Lines Operated 


Miles 
of 
Track 


Incor- 
por- 
ated 


Remarks 


From 


To 


New York & 
Queens County 
Railway 

1 


New York 
via Queens- 
boro Bridge 
& Long Isl- 
and City 

Flushing 


L. I. Citv 
Dutch Kills 
Steinwa3 r 
Astoria 
Ravenswood 
Calvary 
Elmhurst 
Corona & 
Flushing 
College Point 
& Jamaica 


/4.58 


1806 


Owned bv the Interboro 
R. T. Co". 


*New York & 
Long Island 
Traction Co. 


City Line, 
Brooklyn 

Jamaica 


Ozone Park, 
Laurelton, 
Woodhaven 
Jamaica. 
Hollis &Queens 


41.80 


1894 


Owned jointly by the L. 
I. R. R. & the Interboro 
R. T. Co. 


*Long Island 
Electric Railway 
Co. 


Jamaica 


Hollis, Queens 
& Hempstead 


25-85 


1899 


Owned jointly by the L. 
I. R. R. & the Interboro 
R. T. Co. 


*New York & 
North Shore 
Traction Co. 


Flushing 


Whitestorie, 
Bayside, Great 
Neck, Roslyn, 
& Port Wash- 
ington 


37-72 


1902 


Operation started July 
1910 


Ocean Electric 
Railway Company 


Far Rock- 
away 


Hammels, Belle 
Harbor, Rock- 
away Beach 


15-59 


1897 


Owned by the L. I. R. R. 


Manhattan & 
Queens Traction 
Corporation 


New York 
via Queens- 
boro Bridge 
Long Island 


L. I. City, Elm- 
hurst, Forest 
Hills, Kew Gar- 
dens, Jamaica 


19.48 


1903 


Local service started 
1909; Line to -Jamaica 
1914 


tBrooklyn, 
Queens Co. & Sub- 
urban R. R. 


Bk. (Metro- 
p'lit'n Ave.) 
Brooklyn 
( Cypress 
Hills) 


Jamaica 
Woodhaven, 
Richmond Hill, 
Jamaica 


27.00 


1893 


Owned by the Brooklvn 
R. T. Co.. 


tBrooklyn 
Heights Railroad 
Co." 


Bk. (Rgwd) 

it a 

Bk. (Rgwd) 

Mhtn. (De- 
lancey St.) 


Richmond Hill 
(Myrtle Ave.) 
Flushing 
North Beach 


55-00 


1887 


Owned by the B. R. T. 
Co. 



*Operated in both Queens Borough and Nassau County. 
tOperated. in both Queens Borough and Brooklyn. 



NEW YORK CITY 



49 




PENNSYLVANIA STATION 

HE magnificient Pennsylvania Station, situated in the heart of 
the midtown business section of Manhattan and located on the 
Seventh Avenue Subway, is within a few minutes walk of 
the theatrical and shopping districts. It is one of the prin- 
cipal gateways to the Borough of Queens. 

Any publication setting forth the advantages of the Queens 
Borough section of New York City, would be incomplete with- 
out a statement as to the facilities which are provided by this gigantic terminal 
for the residential and business interests of the fastest growing borough of New 
York City. 

The Station is built after the Roman Doric Style of architecture and covers 
the entire area bounded by Seventh and Eighth Avenues and 31st and 33rd 
Streets, covering more territory than any other building in the world, constructed 
at one time. It is larger than the Union Station at St. Louis, and more spacious 
than the new station at Washington. It covers eight acres of ground, and took 
six years to complete. It has a capacity of 144 trains per hour, has eleven station 
platforms with a total length of nearly four miles. 




BlRDSEYE VlEW OF PENNSYLVANIA STATION 



50 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

Ten years ago September 12th, 1910 this station was opened for oper- 
ation of the trains of the Long Island Railroad giving electric train service 
to all parts of Queens Borough. Passengers can go from this station in modern 
comfortable steel coaches, electrically operated, to the furthermost points in 
Queens Borough in half an hour. 

Four minutes after starting, passing through tunnels under Manhattan Island 
and the East River, trains emerge into the Sunnyside Yards in Long Island City. 
Nine minutes after starting the first stop is made at Woodside, 5 miles distant 
from the Pennsylvania Station. 

The amazing growth in the number of Long Island Railroad passengers, to 
and from Queens Borough and all sections of Long Island, has necessitated the 
enlargement and remodeling, three different times within the past nine years of 
that part of the Station along 33rd Street, devoted to the use of the Long Island 
Railroad. 

More than 100,000,000 passengers have entered and departed on the Long 
Island Railroad alone in the past nine years. It is estimated that 75% of these 
passengers travel to and from stations located in Queens Borough. 

The following statement gives a good idea of the remarkable growth in the 
use of this station by both the Long Island Railroad and the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road. 

Passengers For Year 1911 For Year 1919 Percent 

Arriving & Departing Number Percent Number Percent Increase 
Long Island Railroad 6,224,429 64 19,843,205 66 220 
Pennsylvania Railroad 3,638,005 36 10,200,000* 34 180 

Total 9,862,434 100 30,043,205 100 200 

Lehigh Valley Railroad 408,000 

Baltimore & Ohio " 510,000 

*Estimated 

The total number of Pennsylvania Railroad passengers arriving and leaving 
New York City during 1919 was 40,800,000 which was made up as follows : 
10,200,000 to and from Pennsylvania Station. 

22,440,000 to and from Newark, Harrison and Manhattan Transfer. 
4,420,000 to and from steam trains at Jersey City. 
2,040,000 Cortlandt Street Ferry. 
1,700,000 Desbrosses Street Ferry. 

The remarkable transportation facilities which this Station places at the dis- 
posal of the residents of Queens Borough are unique, for no other borough of 
New York City possesses similar advantages. This wonderful transportation 
service from Manhattan to Queens, combined with the Rapid Transit service of 
the new subway and elevated extensions from Manhattan and Brooklyn to all 
sections of Queens, has resulted in a building development of homes and fac- 
tories that was equaled by only three cities in the United State in 1919. 



NEW YORK CITY 



51 



THE LONG ISLAND RAILROAD 




HE silent, swift and smokeless rapid transit service rendered by 
the Long Island Railroad to the residents of every section of 
Queens Borough is distinctive. With the advantages of both 
steam and electric trains, under river tunnels, and nearly 200 
miles of single track in Queens Borough and with modern all- 
steel car equipment, the transportation facilities offered by this 
railroad are ahead of those provided for any other section 
adjacent to Manhattan. No other borough of New York City has the advantage 
of similar service. 

Trains of big, comfortable steel cars, electrically operated, from the terminals 
in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Long Island City, carry more than 150,000 passengers 
daily to and from their homes and places of business. 

The growth during the past ten years in the number of commuters who use 
this road to rjeach their homes in the attractive residential sections of Queens has 
exceeded even the most optimistic expectations of those who planned the costly 
improvements which have made these facilities so valuable to the present and 
future residential, industrial and commercial interests of Queens Borough. 




PASSENGER STATION AND OFFICE BUILDING, JAMAICA. 



52 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

The number of passengers on the Long Island Railroad, who enter and leave 
the Flatbush Avenue Station in Brooklyn, is almost as great as the total number 
of both New York Central and New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad pas- 
sengers using the Grand Central Station. 

The number of Long Island Railroad passengers who enter and leave the 
Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan has grown from 6,224,429 in 1911 to 19,843,205 
in 1919, an increase of 220%, in less than 10 years. 

Although there are more railroad lines operating to New Jersey towns within 
the Metropolitan area, they are steam roads without direct terminals in Manhat- 
tan or Brooklyn. Their service to commuters cannot be compared with that 
rendered by the Long Island Railroad to the residents of Queens. 

The fact that an express station on the original subway in New York was 
located at Grand Central Station gave the New York Central and New Haven 
Railroads a decided advantage from 1904, when the subway was placed in oper- 
ation, to 1918 when the Seventh Avenue Subway was opened with an express 
stop at Pennsylvania Station. Commuters who formerly lived in Westchester 
County and Connecticut now find it more convenient to use the Pennsylvania 
Station to reach homes in Queens Borough. The tide of travel has turned east- 
ward. 

Since 1901, when the Pennsylvania Railroad acquired control of the Long 
Island Railroad, the entire system has been practically rebuilt, with an expendi- 
ture of over $60,000,000 for eliminating grade crossings, providing additional 
tracks, rolling stock and stations. All of this work has been done in conjunction 
with the vast improvements of the Pennsylvania system in and around New 
York City, estimated to have cost over one hundred million dollars. 

HISTORY 

The Long Island Raliroad Company one of the first steam railroads of the 
United States was incorporated in April 1834, to build a line from the village 
of Greenport, L. I. to the water edge in the village of Brooklyn, to connect with 
steamboats at Greenport to make a through line from New York to Boston. The 
first line built was from Brooklyn to Jamaica in 1834; Long Island City to 
Jamaica in 1860; Long Island City and New York and Flushing Junction 1854; 
.Whitestone and Whitestone Junction 1868; Rockaway Junction and Far Rock- 
away 1873 ; Great Neck and Port Washington 1898. 

ELECTRIFICATION 

Electrical work on the lines of the Long Island Railroad commenced in 1904 
and electric service was started from Brooklyn to Rockaway Park across the 
Jamaica Bay trestle, July 28, 1905 ; from Brooklyn to Jamaica, August 30, 1905 ; 
to Belmont Park, October 2. 1905 ; Springfield Junction, October 16, 1905 ; and 



NEW YORK CITY 



53 




MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF PASSENGER STATIONS IN QUEENS BOROUGH 
ON THE LONG ISLAND RAILROAD. 

Valley Stream via Hammel and Far Rockaway, December 11, 1905. On May 
17, 1906 electric service was extended from Springfield Junction to Valley Stream 
completing a loop around the eastern section of Jamaica Bay ; on May 26, 1908 
the service was extended to Hempstead and Garden City. 

On September 10, 1910, electrical operation was inaugurated from Pennsyl- 
vania Station, Manhattan, to Jamaica and Long Beach ; also, via Glendale cut-off, 



54 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



to Rockaway Beach. On October 22, 1912, electric service was started from 
Pennsylvania Station, via Flushing, Bridge Street, to College Point and White- 
stone; and on Octboer 21, 1913 to Flushing. Bayside, and other stations, to Port 
Washington. 

Today the Long Island Railroad operates 400 miles of line of which more 
than 70 miles are in Queens Borough some two and others four and six tracks. 
Eighty-five percent of the road in Queens in electrified. 

TUNNELS 

The construction of the four steel tunnels from the Pennsylvania Station 
under the Island of Manhattan and the East River, connecting not only the Bor- 
ough of Queens, but all of Long Island, with the heart of New York, was one 
of the greatest railroad projects ever undertaken. Great engineering difficulties 
were encountered on account of the number of tubes and the rapidly moving 
express and local trains they were built to stand. The length of each tunnel 
from Pennsylvania Station to the First Avenue shaft is 5,199 feet; First Avenue 
shaft to Long Island City shaft, 3,955 feet ; Long Island City shaft to portal 3,950 
feet. 

SUNNYSIDE YARD 




SUNNYSIDE YARD, LONG ISLAND CITY. 
FIERCE-ARROW SERVICE STATION IN BACKGROUND. 

The Sunnyside Yard is a part of the huge terminal system of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad and the Long Island Railroad and is said to be the largest and 
most scientifically arranged passenger car yard in the world. It has an area of 
190 acres used for that purpose of car storage and for overhauling and cleaning day 
coaches and Pullman cars ; also for making up trains preparatory to their trip 
to the Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan, from which they run to all parts of 
the trunk system of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The yard is 5,500 feet in 
length and 1,550 feet in width. There are at present 73 miles of track in the 
yard arranged in a system of loops that have a capacity for the storage of 2,000 
cars. In the construction of the yard over 2,300,000 cubic yards of dirt were 
moved. The yard is traversed by eight stately steel bridges and viaducts, some 
of which cost over $500,000, providing for carrying the highways of Queens 



NEW YORK CITY 



55 




FLATBUSH AVE. STATION, BROOKLYN. 

across the net work of tracks. Nearby is the power house that supplies the 
power for the entire electrical operation of the Long Island Railroad and con- 
tains 32 boilers, set in batteries of two boilers each, with a capacity of 37,500 
Horse Power, or 50,000 Kilowatts of electrical power. The building has a 
capacity of double the present amount of machinery, or 100,000 Kilowatts. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

NORTH SHORE DIVISION 

The completion of the electrification of the North Shore Division from Win- 
field to Port Washington, estimated to have cost $1,500,000., which included the 
elimination of grade crossings through Flushing, and the inauguration of through 
electric service on this line, has resulted in a great saving of time to all residents 
on this branch, and has done away with the former inconvenience of changing 
cars at Woodside. 
WOODSIDE-WINFIELD CUT-OFF L 

The completion in 1916 of this important improvement eliminated ten grade 
crossings, straightened the main line doing away with a double curve, and af- 
fected a considerable saving in time for all trains to and from both the Pennsyl- 
vania Station and the Long Island City terminal. The improvement included 
a massive six-track steel bridge more than 200 feet in length over Queens Boule- 
vard. The joint rapid transit transfer station on the Corona Elevated extension 
is on this straightened line. The increase in the number of tickets sold at this 
rapid transit station from May 1917, when it was placed in operation, to Septem- 
ber 1919 tells its own story as to the convenience of this joint station for the 
interchange of passengers. The number of tickets sold in May 1917 was 42,100; 
the number in September 1919 was 71,900. 



56 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




STATION AT BROADWAY, FLUSHING. 

JAMAICA IMPROVEMENT L 

The biggest railroad improvement in the Borough during the past ten years 
was the completion of the new Jamaica transfer station and yard, costing over 
$3,000,000. This station was opened to the public in March, 1913. As a result 
of the improvement many dangerous highway crossings at grade were eliminated 
and passengers from all parts of Long Island are now afforded easy and quick 
transfer between trains, doing away with former delays. The station includes 
12 passenger tracks and five wide platforms. The improvement also included 
the construction of a six-story, concrete-steel station and office building. The 
main station is now at Sutphin Avenue, 1,500 feet west of the old station. 

The improvement has given a great stimulus to the development of Jamaica 
and other sections in the central and southern part of the Borough. The great 
increase in the yard capacity permits an increase in the number of trains without 
resulting in congestion and consequent delay and danger. The extent of the 
benefit of the improvement can be appreciated by the fact that over 100,000 
passengers pass through this station on an average for every day of the year. 

GRADE CROSSINGS 

In addition to the elimination of grade crossings as a result of the improve- 
ments at Woodside, Flushing and Jamaica, important work has also been done 
at Fresh Pond Road and Metropolitan Avenue, at Bushwick Junction, Hollis, 
and in Far Rockaway. The elimination of grade crossings in Richmond Hill on 
the Montauk Division, and along the Atlantic Division through Woodhaven and 
Morris Park will be undertaken shortly. 

There are today approximately 169 grade crossings on the Long Island Rail- 
road in Queens Borough. 



NEW YORK CITY 



57 



WOODSIDE TRANSFER STATION 

Through this joint station, passengers on any division of the Long Island 
Railroad, whether North Shore, Main Line, or Rockaway Division, are able to 
transfer directly to the Queensboro Subway and Second Avenue "L" rapid tran- 
sit trains of the Interborough and the Broadway-59th Street Line of the B. R. T. 

The importance of this station as a transfer point is directly proportional to 
the number of Long Island Railroad trains which stop there. About seventy-four 
percent of the trains stop today. The Queensboro Chamber of Commerce be- 
lieves that more trains should stop at that point for the interchange of passengers, 
at the same time realizing that passengers bound for all points in New York City 
can go through to the Pennsylvania Station and make connections there with the 
Seventh Avenue Subway. 



'OUGLA5TON x - 




MAP SHOWING RELATION OF THE WOODSIDE STATIONS OF THE LONG ISLAND 

RAILROAD AND THE RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEMS AS A CONVENIENT TRANSFER 

POINT. INSERT PHOTOGRAPH SHOWS THE Two STATIONS, 

ONE ABOVE THE OTHER. 



58 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

PASSENGER TRAFFIC 

Lying within a radius of 15 to 20 miles from the business sections of Man- 
hattan and Brooklyn is the great suburban zone of the Borough of Queens. This 
is one of the most wonderful residential sections in the world. The following 
table will give the reader an adequate idea of the immense growth in travel in 
the past ten years to and from Brooklyn and New York to Queens Borough and 
Long Island. 
Year No. of Passengers Carried Increase No. of Commuters 

(Tickets) 
'1910 30,978,615 3,511,854 142,427 

1911 33,867,228 2,888,613 162,318 

1912 37,319,812 3,452,584 183,025 

1913 40,606,183 3,286,317 203,886 
I9H 42,127,526 1,521,343 216,728 

'1915 42,629,325 501,799 226,391 

1916 45,802,555 3,213,230 254,803 

1917 50,796,028 4,993,473 275,712 

1918 55,004,086 4,208,058 294,045 

1919 64,067,541 9,063,455 367,057 
The following table gives the number of passengers entering and leaving 

the three principals terminals for the past ten years : 

Year L. I. City Brooklyn Penna. Sta. Local Total 

1910 6,332,878 13,455,991 1,422,999 9,766,837 30,978,615 

*I9II *3,3o8,938 14,094,003 6,224,429 10,239,853 33,867,228 

1912 3,071,004 15,772,402 7,732,184 10,744,222 37,319,812 

1913 2,318,568 17,501,524 9,629,021 11,157,070 40,606,183 

1914 1,471,541 18,064,729 11,031,845 11,559,411 '42,127,526 

1915 1,242,061 18,135,150 11,807,512 11,444,662 42,629,325 

1916 1,167,087 19,666,344 13,225,091 11,745,033 45,802,555 

1917 1,210,578 23,118,805 14,459,259 12,007,386 50,796,028 

1918 1,676,045 23,824,123 15,595,142 13,908,776 55,004,086 

1919 1,399,352 27,543,674 19,843,205 15,231,310 64,067,541 
(*The opening of the Pennsylvania Station in September diverted the trains, 

and therefore the passengers, from the former terminal in Long Island City.) 

To carry the above passengers in and out of the terminals The Long Island 
Railroad operated, during 1919, 88,140 trains in and out of the Pennsylvania 
Station and 103,390 trains in and out of Flatbush Avenue. 

FREIGHT 

The Long Island Railroad Co. serves all parts of Queens Borough and is a 
Terminal Line for all of the Trunk Lines entering New York City. Except in 
and from nearby points, New York rates, (with few exception) apply to and 
from nearly all points in the Metropolitan District on Long Island, which includes 
the following stations in Queens Borough : 

Blissville Elmhurst Jamaica Richmond Hill 

College Point Flushing Laurel Hill Whitestone 

Corona Forest Hills Long Island City Winfield 

Glendale Ozone Park 



NEW YORK CITY 59 

To and from points beyond Flushing and College Point on the North Shore ; 
Jamaica on the Main Line, and Ozone Park on the Rockaway Beach Division; 
the through rates are slightly higher than the rates to and from the above points. 

The New York Connecting R. R., with its bridge over Hell Gate, provides 
an all-rail servcie on traffic to and from New England routed via the N. Y., N. H. 
& H. R. R. The rates via this route to and from all points in Queens Borough 
(except Fresh Pond Junction the interchange point) are slightly higher at the 
present time than the rates to and from Manhattan. 

FREIGHT CARRIED BY THE LONG ISLAND R. R. L 

No. tons Increase 

Year carried Decrease ( ) Revenue 

1910 3,814,209 218,352 $3,100,064 

1911 3,996,7i/ 182,508 3,258,402 

1912 4,268,313 271,596 3,43S,'J43 

1913 4,147,072 121,241 3,327,768 

1914 4,480,231 333J5I 3,739,567 

1915 4,443,333 36,898 3,865,745 

1916 5,134,838 691,505 4,397,210 

1917 5,271,509 136,671 4,623,578 

1918 5,798,876 527,367 5,713,724 

1919 5,912,833 H3,957 6,280,426 

FACILITIES FOR RECEIPT AND DELIVERY OF FREIGHT 

The facilities of the Long Island Railroad for handling freight in the Bor- 
ough of Queens are as follows: 

Auburndale, Carloads only. Team track capacity 12 cars. 

Bayside, Carloads and less. Team track capacity 16 cars. 

Blissville, Carloads only. Greenpoint Avenue & Newtown Creek. Team 

track capacity 20 cars. 

Blissville Docks, Located on Newtown Creek, between Vernon & Greenpoint 
Avenues. Ample facilities are provided for handling freight 
between boats and cars when destined to or shipped from 
points on the Long Island Railroad. 

Broad Channel, Less than carloads only ; handled under special restrictions. 
Under jurisdiction of Hammel Agency. Charges on in- 
bound freight must be prepaid. 

College Point, Carloads and less. Team track capacity 14 cars. 

Corona, Carloads and less. Team track capacity 19 cars. 

Douglaston, Carloads and less. Team track capacity 27 cars. 

Elmhurst, Carloads and less. Team track capacity 11 cars. 

Evergreen (Bklyn) Carloads only. Team track capacity 23 cars. 

Far Rockaway, Carloads and less. Team track capacity 52 cars. 

Flushing, Carloads and less. Myrtle Avenue near Farrington Street. 

Team track capacity 24 cars. 

Forest Hills, Carloads and less. Team track capacity 22 cars. 

Fresh Pond, Carloads and less. Team track capacity 33 cars. 

Glendale, Carloads and less. Private siding. Shippers must arrange 

with owners for use of same. 



60 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Goose Creek, 

Hammel ( jgg 

Hollis 
Howard Beach, 

Jamaica 

Little Neck, 
Long Island City 



Ozone Park, 

Queens, 
Richmond Hill, 

Rockaway Park, 

Rosedale, 
St. Albans, 
Springfield, 
The Raunt, 



Whitestone, 
Winfield, 



Less than carloads only; handled under special restrictions. 
Under jurisdiction of Hammel Agency. Charges on in- 
bound freight must be prepaid. 
) Carloads and less. Team track capacity 15 cars. 

Carloads only. Team track capacity 16 cars. 

Carloads and less. Under jurisdiction of Ozone Park 
Agency. Charges on inbound freight must be prepaid. 
Team track capacity 11 cars. 

Carloads and less. Johnson & Van Wyck Avenues. Team 
track capacity 50 cars. Wagon scales. 

Carloads and less. Team track capacity 12 cars. 

Carloads and less ; Jackson Avenue and Eighth St. ; entrance 
Arch St. and at Crane St. Team track capacity 60 cars. 
Wagon scales. 

Carloads only ; Harold Avenue, Jackson Ave. and Madden St. 
Team track capacity 151 cars. Electric crane, capacity 20 
tons. Office Jackson Avenue and Eighth Street. 

Carloads and less. Freeland and Ocean Avenues. Team 
track capacity 40 cars. 

Carloads and less. Team track capacity 25 cars. 

Carloads and less. Jamaica and Lefferts Avenues. Team 
track capacity 44 cars. 

Carloads only. Under jurisdiction of Hammel Agency. Team 
track capacity 15 cars. 

Carloads and less. Team track capacity 9 cars. 

Carloads only. Team track capacity 12 cars. 

Carloads and less. Team track capacity 13 cars. 

Less than carloads only ; handled under special restrictions. 
Under jurisdiction of Hammel Agency. Charges on in- 
bound freight must be prepaid. 

Carloads and less. Team track capacity 17 cars. 

Carloads and less. Team track capacity 21 cars. 

MONTAUK POINT HARBOR 



The announcement of the U. S. Shipping Board in July 1919 that plans were 
being prepared for the construction of two gigantic ocean liners, 1,000 feet in 
length, and the development of port and terminal facilities at Fort Pond Bay 
at the eastern end of Long Island, thus reducing the trip between Plymouth, 
England, and the United States approximately 120 miles, is of more than ordinary 
significance to Queens Borough as well as the rest of Long Island. 

This announcement has revived the plans contemplated several years ago 
by the Pennsylvania and Long Island Railroads to develop Montauk Point as a 
port of entry for large ocean-going steamers. 

The interest of Queens Borough in this plan lies in the fact that it would, 
if put into effect, add very materially to the importance of the Borough as a 
freight shipping center. The Long Island Railroad would then become a trunk 
line of national importance with busy terminals at both ends instead of at just 
one end as at present. Naturally Long Island City as one terminal, would enjoy 
additional industrial advantages for as a railroad grows in importance so do its 
terminals. 



NEW YORK CITY 



STEWART RAILROAD 



61 



It seems incredible in these days of electric railroads, elevated and subway 
lines, that there should be a district half the size of Manhattan Island, entirely 
within the boundaries of New York City, and only eight to fifteen miles from 
Herald Square, without transit facilities of any sort whatsoever. Most of this 
territory, which is in the Third Ward of Queens, lies between Flushing and 
Bayside on the north, and Jamaica and Creedmore on the south, and is within 
sight of the Metropolitan Tower. Here the old fashioned farmer raises corn and 
potatoes as of fifty years ago. It is a beautiful rolling country, an elevated 
plateau, and admirably adapted for thousands of homes for those who work in 
the business sections of the metropolis, a half hour's travel distant. 

On September 27, 1915, the Long Island Railroad applied to the Public 
Service Commission for permission to construct and operate a double track 
branch road from a point west of Lawrence Street, Flushing, on the North Shore 
Division, southeasterly through this undeveloped farm territory to a point at 
Floral Park where it would connect with the Main Line. 

On January 27, 1916, the Public Service Commission granted the Long Island 
Railroad its approval for the construction of this branch road under its franchise 
rights, of 1839, received from the Legislature of New York State. The approval 
was conditional however, upon the railroad company obtaining from the city of 
New York the right to cross existing streets. 

The city authorities maintained that a new franchise by the Board of Esti- 
mate and Apportionment was necessary. The railroad wished to proceed under 
its old Charter rights. Failure to adjust this question halted the program at 
that time, and while the railroad was under Federal control, no further 
action could be taken. It is believed that this plan will soon be revived and a 
more successful outcome will result. 

The "Central Railroad of Long Island," commonly known as the "Stewart 
Railroad" was built in 1871 by A. T. Stewart and placed in operation in 1873 and 
abandoned in 1879, remaining idle ever since. 




SHOWING ROUTE OF "STEWART RAILROAD" FROM FLUSHING TO FLORAL PARK. 



62 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



WHOLESALE MARKET 




ONE OF THE PROPOSED MARKET BUILDINGS. 



Elaborate plans were prepared several years ago by the Long Island Railroad 
for the establishment of a large wholesale and retail market on the property 
owned by it on the west side of Dutch Kills Creek between Hunterspoint Avenue 
and Borden Avenue. The tract comprises 10 acres of land and would have both 
railroad and water shipping facilities. The plan contemplated involved the ex- 
penditure of $5,000,000. for the construction of several massive structures, 
including a cold storage warehouse, fish market, vegetable and fruit market and 
meat market. The location is considered ideal by wholesale commission men for 
it is much nearer the truck farms of Long Island than Wallabout Market in 
Brooklyn or Harlem Market in Manhattan, thus requiring a shorter haul by 
wagon. It would be a big central distributing depot from which retailers of all 
the boroughs of New York could be supplied. Motor trucks can start from this 
point and reach any point in the city within a half hour. 

The Long Island Railroad, it is understood, is willing to cooperate in a plan 
for financing the erection of these market buiidlngs. 



NEW YORK CITY 



63 



STATIONS-BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

The following tables give the names of every station on the Long Island 
Railroad in the Borough of Queens, of which there are more than sixty, and also 
the distances of same and the time of travel from either the Pennsylvania Station 
in Manhattan or the Flatbush Avenue Station in Brooklyn : 



ATLANTIC AVENUE DIVISION TO BROOKLYN 



Time (Minutes} 



Station 


Distance 


Local 


Express 


Union Course 


6.3 


18 





Woodhaven 


6.7 


16 





Woodhaven Junction 


7-2 


20 


16 


Clarenceville 


7-8 


22 




Morris Park 


8.2 


24 


19 


Dunton 


8.7 


26 




Jamaica 


9-3 


28 


19 


Jamaica (Union Hall Street) 


9-9 


31 


25 


Hillside 


10.6 


34 


.29 


Hollis 


n-S 


36 


3i 


Bellaire 


12.8 


38 


33 


Queens 


13.2 


40 


35 


MAIN LINE TO PENNA. STATION, MANHATTAN 


Time (Minutes') 




Station 


Distance 


Local 


Express 


Woodside 


5-0 


10 


10 


Grand Street 


6.3 


13 




Forest Hills 


8.7 


15 


14 


Kew Gardens 


9-7 


17 


15 


Westbridge 


10.4 






Jamaica (Main Street) 


H-3 


24 


18 


Jamaica (Union Hall Street) 


11.9 


25 


23- 


Hillside 


12.7 


30 


25 


Hollis 


13-6 


32 


28 


Queens 


15-2 


35 


3i 


MONT AUK DIVISION TO LONG ISLAND CITY 


Time (Minutes) 




Station 


Distance 


Local 


Express 


Fresh Pond 


3-9 


16 


12 


Glendale 


5-2 


20 




Richmond Hill 


7-6 


24 


19 


Jamaica 


9-1 


30 


24 


NO. SHORE DIVISION TO PENNA. STATION, NEW 


YORK. Time (Minutes) 




Station 


Distance ' 


Local 


Express 


Winfield 


5-9 


12 


II 


Elmhurst 


6.6 


14 


12 


f Corona 


74 


17 


13 


Flushing (Bridge Street) 


9.6 


21 


19 


(a). College Point 


1 1.0 


24 


21 


Malba 


12.0 


26 


25 


_ Whitestone 


12.7 


28 


27 


Whitestone Landing (Beechhurst) 


13-3 


30 


29 


(Flushing (Main Street) 


9-5 


22 


16 


[ Murray Hill 


10.3 


2 4 


18 


Broadway 


II.O 


27 


21 


(b) 4 Auburndale 


11.7 


29 


2 4 


1 Bayside 


12.6 


32 


2O 


| Douglaston 


13.9 


35 


23 


I Little Neck 


14-5 


37 


25 


(a) Whitestone Division. 








(b) Port Washington Division. 









64 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

X "' 



FAR ROCK AW AY & ROCK AW AY BEACH DIVISIONS 



Distance 



Brooklyn Manor 


IO.I 





Woodhaven Junction 


10.5 


7-2 


Ozone Park 


10.8 


7-5 


Aqueduct 


12.1 


8.8 


Howard Beach 


12.6 


9-3 


Hamilton Beach 


13-2 


IO.I 


Goose Creek 


14.6 


"3 


The Raunt 


15-5 


12.2 


Broad Channel 


I6. 3 


I3-I 


Hammel 


17-6 


14-3 


Holland 


17.9 


147 


Steeplechase 


I8. 3 


15-0 


Seaside 


18.4 


15-2 


Rockaway Park 


19.2 


15-9 


*Arverne 


18.6 


15-3 


*Egdemere 


19.7 


16.4 


*Far Rockaway 


20.8 


17-5 


*Via Jamaica Bay Route 


MONT AUK DIVISION 






Distance 


New York 


Brooklyn 


Cedar Manor 


12.8 


10.8 


Locust Avenue 


13-6 


11.6 


Higbie Avenue 


14.6 


12,6 


Laurelton 


15-1 


13-1 


Rosedale 


16.0 


14.0 


St. Albans 


14.1 


I2.I 


Springfield 


iS-3 


13-3 



New York 



Neiv York 



30 
32 
34 
35 
37 
34 
37 



Ex p. 

23 

25 
27 
28 
30 
28 



(Minutes) 
Brooklyn 



Time (Minutes) 
Brooklyn 



Local 
28 
30 
32 
34 
36 
3i 
33 



Ex p. 

27 
29 
3i 
28 



WAR RECORD 

Although having but 400 miles of main line track, the fact remains that The 
Long Island Railroad performed a service during the War period, both for the 
United States Government and for its regular patrons, which has no parallel even 
among the largest trunk line railroads in the country. Briefly summarized, here 
is how the War record of the Long Island compares with the troop traffic of all 
the roads : 



NEW YORK CITY 65 

All other 

Long Island Railroads 
Railroad in the U. S. 
Total number of .troops handled by all railroads on Government 

Orders, from April, 1917, to November 3Oth, 1919 15,724,058 

Troops moved to and from Long Island Camps by The Long Island 

Railroad, from July, 1917, to October 3ist, 1919 3,264,315 

Troops handled by The Long Island Railroad account furloughs and 

civilian visitors to Camps 1,120,949 



Total 4,385,264 

Special troop trains operated by all roads 25,103 

Special trains operated by The Long Island Railroad to carry troops 

and visitors to and from Camps 8,024 

Total number of passengers, baggage and special freight cars required 

by all railroads to move troop traffic 327,930 

Number of cars necessary to move troop and visitors to and from 

Long Island Camps 79,6:6 

Number of tons of freight moved to and from Camps by The Long 

Island Railroad, from July, 1917, to October 3ist, 1919 1,316,146 

Cars required to haul the above freight, about 38,000 

This voluminous war traffic unequalled by any single railroad as far as the 
movement of troops is concerned was handled safely and expeditiously with 
the same number of locomotives and the same number of passenger and freight 
cars that the Long Island owned and operated before the United States entered 
the War. The following statement has been authorized by an executive of the 
railroad : 

"Handicapped by the inability to have new passenger cars constructed, and 
also unable to borrow cars from other lines, during the War period, still, with 
the limited equipment at its command, it was possible to take care of the ex- 
traordinary demands of the War Department, without interfering seriously with 
the greatest movement of commuters and other passengers the Long Island Rail- 
road had ever experienced. 

"There was but one way of handling this unprecedented traffic, and that 
was to keep the equipment in constant use, shopping cars and engines only when 
they had reached a stage where it would have been dangerous to continue them 
in service. Naturally, when the War was over and the troops were demobilized, 
the passenger equipment needed such extensive repairs that this inevitable con- 
dition worked more or less hardship on the Long Island traveling public, in the 
shape of frequent train delays and overcrowding of cars, due to lack of motive 
power and an insufficient number of serviceable cars, 

"It is encouraging to announce, however, that progress is being made toward 
rejuvenating the wornout equipment, locomotives are being overhauled at outside 
shops, 100 new steel passenger cars are in the course of construction and slated 
for early delivery, and the men in the transportation service are co-operating 
wholeheartedly with the management in providing the safe, quick and efficient 
service which it is desirous to furnish at all times, and which Long Island Rail- 
road patrons are entitled to receive." 



66 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




RAPID TRANSIT 




HE most important improvement in Queens Borough during the 
past decade was the completion and operation of all the rapid 
transit extensions from Manhattan and Brooklyn, as part of the 
Dual Subway System, into various sections of the Borough. 
These five extensions comprise 18 miles of subway and elevated 
roads, some of which are two track and others three track, 
making a total of 50 miles of single track. They include a total 

of 42 stations. The cost to date for their construction and equipment, including 

stations but not rolling stock, exceeds $10,000,000. 

RAPID TRANSIT MAP 

The Rapid Transit Map issued as a supplement to this book, shows more 
clearly by different colors than any number of words could, the three separate 
systems of rapid transit included in the Dual Subway System. The map effec- 
tively demonstrates how a large portion of Queens Borough has today the ad- 
vantages of the three systems of rapid transit an advantage which is only 
shared by that part of Manhattan south of 59th Street. The reader will note 
that the B. R. T. System (indicated by green lines) does not extend further 
north in Manhattan than 59th Street, where it turns eastward into Queens Bor- 
ough; that the Interborough Elevated System (indicated by purple lines) does not 
extend into Brooklyn at all, but does serve Queens Borough through the exten- 
sion of the Second Avenue "L" across the upper level of the Queensboro Bridge ; 
that the Interborough Subway System (indicated by red lines) serves Queens 
Borough, Manhattan, Brooklyn, and the Bronx. In addition, the map clearly 




FROM TO 

GRAND CENTRAL STATION, 42ND ST., QUEENSBORO BRIDGE PLAZA STATION, 

MANHATTAN LONG ISLAND CITY 

IN TEN MINUTES RUNNING TIME 



Map of Dual Subway System 

Adopted 1 by the Public Service Commission of the Firat District and the 
Board of Estimate and Apportionment, Mar eh 19, 1913. 

Lines of Interborough Subway System _ Red 

Lines of Interborough Elevated System . Purple 
Lines- of Brooklyn Rapid Transit System. . Green 



Queens Borough receives greater benefits from the Dual 
Subway System than any other Borough of New York City, for 
the subway trains of both the Interborough" and the Brooklyn 
Rapid Transit and the Second Avenue Elevated trains of the 
Interborough all operate over the Astoria and Corona extensions, 
giving these sections a single fare over all the rapid transit lines 
in Greater New York. Neither the Bronx, Brooklyn, or Man- 
hattan north of 59th Street, have the benefit of all thfee divisions 
oi transit;: as the Brooklyn Rapid Transit line does not extend 
north of 59th Street, Manhattan; and the Interborough Elevated 
lines do not reach Brooklyn. 

Residents of Jamaica, Richmond Hill,, and- Woodhaven, arc 
able to travel for a single fare through Brooklyn and northward in 
Manhattan to 59th Street. 

The figures in small circles in Queens Borough along the 
Astoria and Corona extensions, and also in Manhattan and the 
Bronx,,, give the time in minutes for the Interborough express 
trains from,' Grand Central Station to reach stations on the rapid 
transit lines. The time to the stations in the Bronx is figured for 
trains operating from Grand Central Station over the new Lexing- 
ton Avenue subway. 

The figures in small circles in Brooklyn and on the Jamaica 
Avenue extension, the Liberty Avenue extension, and the Lutheran 
Cemetery extension in Queens Borough, give the running time of 
Brooklyn Rapid Transit trains from Park Row or Chambers Street. 
The Fulton Street line time is over the Brooklyn Bridge, and that 
of the Lutheran Cemetery and the Jamaica Avenue and Liberty 
Avenue lines over the Williamsburg Bridge via Broadway. 



WE CERTIFY that this map is a correct representation of Greater New York, and that the 
Rapid Transit Iines shown, are according to the Dual Subway Plan approved and contracted 
for by the Public Service Commission, and compiled from data received from the Interborough 
and Brooklyn Rapid Transit Systems. 
Copyright 1920. RAND MCNALLY & Co. 



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Queens Borough Facts 

(Compiled by the Chamber of Commerce 
of the Borough of Queen*) 

Area 117 square miles 37$ of New York City. 

Assessed Valuation $650,000,000 in 1920. 

Banks 36 banking offices with total resources of $750,000,000. 

Beaches 10 miles of magnificent beaches on the Atlantic 
Ocean. 

Buildings Plans filed 1919 for $50,000,000; Greater than every 
city in the United States except Chicago, Philadelphia, 
and Detroit. 

Factories 2000 industrial establishments in 1920, employing 
75,000 men and women with annual products valued at 
$250,000,000. 

Parks 20 parks with over 1,000 acres. 

Population 500,000 in 1920. Estimated population of 
1,250,000 in 1930; 2,075,000 in 1940; 3,000,000 in 1950. 

Railroads 71 miles of Long Island Railroad tracks aggregat- 
ing 174 miles of single tracks, most of which is electrified. 

Rapid Transit 50 miles of single track on five extensions from 
Manhattan and Brooklyn. 

Trolley Lines 225 miles of trolley tracks. 

Waterfront 219 miles of waterfront (measured around piers 
and natural short line) on Newton Creek, East River, 
Flushing Bay, Flushing Creek, Jamaica Bay and Atlantic 
Ocean. 

Queens, the Borough of Magnificent 
Opportunities 

Queens, the Fastest Growing Borough 
of New York City 



NEW YORK CITY 67 

shows that in point of time the greater portion of Queens Borough is nearer to 
the center of Manhattan than either the Boroughs of Brooklyn or the Bronx. 

The Dual Subway System adopted by the Board of Estimate and the Public 
Service Commission on March 19, 1913, comprises not only the 296 miles of 
track, which then existed, on the elevated and subway lines of the Interborough 
Rapid Transit and the Brooklyn Rapid Transit, but 324 miles of new construc- 
tion, or a total of 620 miles of single track. 

The cost of the entire system, old and new, was more than $600,000,000. 
All of this gigantic system of rapid transit is at the disposal of the Queens Bor- 
ough residents for a single fare. 

The transportation of passengers in New York is being revolutionized by 
these new lines in Manhattan, and other boroughs, with the extensions eastward 
into Queens Borough. 

GREAT BENEFIT TO QUEENS 

Today the majority of the residents of Queens are able to travel between 
their homes and places of business in the various boroughs of the city, conven- 
iently, rapidly and at a single fare. 

It is almost impossible to exaggerate the effect of this improvement on the 
future development of Queens Borough. When the original subway was opened 
in Manhattan in 1904 passengers were enabled to travel in through trains from 
the Battery to Washington Heights, or points in the Bronx distances of from 
10 to 17 miles for a single fare. This resulted in the construction of thou- 
sands of new apartment buildings, and the establishment of thousands of new 
homes, as well as a remarkable increase in the realty values in these districts, 
which had been largely undeveloped land previous to the operation of rapid 
transit lines into them. But right across the East River, only a mile or two 
from the most congested sections of Manhattan, Queens was at that time with- 
out adequate transit facilties and had no connections whatever with the rapid 
transit lines of the city. Its only rail connection was by trolley cars, requiring 
in most cases an additional fare and one or more changes in cars to reach the 
desired destinations in the business and shopping centers ; or, by the trains of the 
Long Island Railroad with their higher rates of fare. 

The progress of Queens Borough, prior to 1915-1917, when the new rapid 
transit extensions were placed into operation, was remarkable despite the lack 
of cheaper transit facilities. What it will be in the next ten to twenty years 
with transit facilities equal, and, in many cases superior, to every other section of 
New York City, will surprise even the most confident. 

These new rapid transit extensions are now serving as an outlet for the 
congested population of Manhattan, Brooklyn and the Bronx into the thousands 
of acres of undeveloped land in all parts of Queens Borough. They will make 
cheaper homes, with more light and air, accessible to the millions of employees 
and residents in other parts of the city. 



68 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




THE MASSIVE CONCRETE STRUCTURE IN THE CENTER OF QUEENS BOULEVARD, 
LOOKING TOWARDS THE BRIDGE PLAZA. 




ANOTHER VIEW OF THE CORONA "L" LOOKING EAST, SHOWING THE ENORMOUS 

UNDEVELOPED TERRITORY, ONLY 3 TO 4 MILES FROM THE HEART OF 

MANHATTAN, AVAILABLE FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF HOMES. 



NEW YORK CITY 



69 



EXTENSIONS INTO QUEENS BOROUGH 

The following tabulation gives a list of the extensions from Manhattan and 
Brooklyn into the various sections of the Borough of Queens, all of which are 
today in operation. For the purpose of clearness these lines are divided into 
groups, viz : 

"Group A." Extensions into the First and Second Wards from Manhat- 
tan connecting with the Transfer Station on the Bridge Plaza, Long Island City. 

"Group B." Extensions into the Second and Fourth Wards from Brook- 
lyn. 

GROUP A 



2. 



Type of Miles No. of 
Construction Tracks 

Qneensboro Subway from Grand Cen- 
tral Station to Long Island City. Subway 1.60 2 
Extension of Queensboro Subway to 



By 

I. R. T. 



Operation 



June 22, 1915 



Queensboro Bridge Plaza, Long Island 

City. Elevated 0.89 

3. Astoria Line from Bridge Plaza 
northerly through Second Avenue to 

Ditmars Avenue. Elevated 2.51 

4. Woodside and Corona Extension 
easterly from Bridge Plaza over 
Queens Boulevard. Greenpoint Ave- 
nue and Roosevelt Avenue to Elm- 
hurst and Corona. Elevated 4.48 

5. Extension of Second Avenue "L," 
Manhattan, across Queensboro Bridge 

to Long Island City. Elevated 1.64 

6. Broadway-59th Street Line from 7th 
Avenue under East River to Long 

Island City. Subway 2.23 



I. R. T. Nov. 5, 1916 



I. R. T. 
B. R.T. 



I. R. T. 
B . R. T. 



Feb. i, 1917 
1920 



April 21, 1917 
1920 



I. R. T. July 23. 1917 



B. R. T. June 



1920 



GROUP B 



1. Myrtle Avenue Extension to Luth- 
eran Cemetery, Ridgewood. 

2. Extension from City Line, Brooklyn 
over Liberty Avenue, to Lefferts 
Avenue, Richmond Hill. 

3. Extension from Cypress Hills, Brook- 
lyn, over Jamaica Avenue to Grand 
Street, Jamaica. 



Elevated i.oo 2 B. R. T. Feb. 22, 1915 



Elevated 2.16 3 B. R. T. Sept. 25, 1915 



Elevated 4.44 



B. R. T. May 28, 1917 

(Richmond Hill) 

July 3, 1918 

(Jamaica) 



RAPID TRANSIT CENTERS 

There are today three important rapid transit centers in Queens Borough as 
follows : 
1. BRIDGE PLAZA, LONG ISLAND CITY. 

From this point, which is not only the most important rapid transit center 
in Queens Borough, but one of the most important in the entire city, rapid transit 
lines radiate in all directions. 

(a) To the north, a three track elevated line through Jackson Avenue to Second 
Avenue and Ditmars Avenue, Astoria. 



70 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



(b) To the east, across Diagonal Street and the Sunnyside Yards to Queens 
Boulevard, thence over the concrete structure to Greenpoint Avenue, where 
the steel structure begins and extends to Woodside, Winfield, Jackson 
Heights, Elmhurst and Corona. This line will later be extended to 
Flushing and other sections of the Third Ward. 

(c) To the south, the Queensboro Subway to the Grand Central Station, Man- 
hattan, which will be extended to Times Square, enabling passengers to 
transfer without an extra fare to the through north and south lines, oper- 
ated by the Interborough on the east and west sides of Manhattan, into 
Brooklyn and the Bronx. 

(d) To the west, the 60th Street tunnel of the B. R. T. under the East River, 
connecting with the Broadway-59th Street Line ; and the Second Avenue 
"L" of the Interborough Rapid Transit, across the upper level of the 
Queensboro Bridge operated to Park Row. 

2. JAMAICA. 

While the entire Fourth Ward receives great benefits from the 
elevated extensions operated by the Brooklyn Rapid Transits through 
Woodhaven, Ozone Park, Morris Park and Richmond Hill, Jamaica has 
become a greater transit center than ever. It is not only the railroad cen- 
ter of Long Island, but is also a great trolley center. 




JOINT TRANSFER STATION AT WOODSIDE 



NEW YORK CITY 71 

3. WOOD SIDE. 

At the intersection of Roosevelt Avenue, Woodside and the six tracks 
of the Long Island Railroad there has been constructed and placed in 
operation a joint transfer station that is of the utmost importance to all 
sections of Queens served by the North Shore Division, Main Line, and 
the Rockaway Division of the Long Island Railroad. Passengers using 
these divisions are able to transfer conveniently at this point to and from 
the Corona "L" operated by the Queensboro Subway and Second Avenue 
"L" trains of the I. R. T. and the Broadway-59th Street Line of the B. 
R. T. In other words, all Long Island Railroad passengers have at their 
disposal at this point, the whole of the city's comprehensive transit system 
for a single fare. 

The elevated railroad tracks and platforms are on the highest level 
and the Long Island Railroad tracks and platforms are on the lowest 
level. Between these two levels a mezzanine floor facilitates the inter- 
change of passengers. 

QUEENSBORO SUBWAY 

On June 22, 1915, the operation of train service began in the Queensboro 
Subway between Lexington Avenue, Manhattan, and Jackson Avenue, Long 
Island City. This was the first rapid transit service directly connecting the two 
boroughs, and an event which marked a new epoch in the history of Queens and 
the commercial relations of the two sections of the city so near to each other but 
separated by the East River. 

Although this tunnel, which had formerly been known as the "Steinway 
Tunnel" and "Belmont Tube" was completed in October 1907, suits in the 
Court to test the legality of the franchise prevented its being operated, thus deny- 
ing Queens Borough the advantage of this service for almost eight years. In 
the meantime, the Interborough Subway trains were operated ten miles north- 
ward to points in the Bronx and Manhattan giving the resident of Westchester 
County greater advantages from the subway system of New York than enjoyed 
by any section of Queens Borough itself. 

The operation of the Queensboro Subway was extended Feb. 15th 1916 to 
the Hunterspoint Avenue Station, and on November 5th 1916, to Court Square 
(llth Street) and to the Bridge Plaza Station. 

The growth of traffic on this line can be shown by the increase in ticket sales 
for the corresponding months of the past five years. 

TICKET SALES 

Station July 1915 July 1916 July 1917 July 1918 Jan. 1920 

Jackson Avenue 102,250 207,230 178,440 218,700 371,510 

Hunterspoint Avenue 26,780 31,090 53,490 "54,540 

Court Square (nth St.) 57,200 73,600 104,260 

Total 102,250 234,010 266,730 345,790 530,310 



72 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

CHRONOLOGY OF QUEENSBORO SUBWAY 

1887 N. Y. and L. I. R. R. Co. organized to build tunnel, with William 

Steinway as leading spirit. 

May 1892 Construction began in Long Island City. 
1903 Belmont Syndicate acquires tunnel franchise for $80,000. 
January 16, 1906 Mayor McClellan orders probe of franchise validity. 
October 29, 1906 Work begun on extension of tunnel to Van Alst Avenue. 
January 1907 Supreme Court upholds validity of franchise. 
February 6, 1907 City begins annulment proceedings. 
May 4, 1907 Property owners' injunction dissolved. 
May 16, 1907 North tube cleared. 

July 31, 1907 Public Service Commission starts validity probe. 
August 8, 1907 South tube cleared. 
September 24, 1907 First official trip of inspection. 
November 14, 1907 Queens residents demand operation of tunnel. 
November 22, 1907 Appellate Division upholds franchise. 
December 10, 1907 Justice Davis decides against franchise. 
March 6, 1909 Appellate Division settles all points of controversy in favor 

of tunnel company. 
June 14, 1910 Governor Hughes signs bill permitting franchise to go to 

Interboro. 

September 27, 1910 Interboro offers to turn tunnel over to city. 
November 18, 1910 City officials inspect tunnel. 
January 2, 1912 State begins suit. 
March 19, 1913 Dual subway contracts signed, assuring operation of tunnel 

as a part of the Dual Rapid Transit system. 

April 3, 1914 Interboro delivers assignment of tunnel rights to city. 
April 13, 1914 Reconstruction contract awarded. 

June 16 1915 Name of tunnel is changed to "Queensboro Subway," at re- 
quest of Queensboro Chamber of Commerce. 
June 22, 1915 Tunnel is formally opened for operation. 

EXTENSION TO TIMES SQUARE 

The Dual Subway Contracts provide for the construction of an extension of 
the Queensboro Subway westward from its present terminus at Grand Central 
Station to Times Square. The delay in starting this work has been due first, to 
the impossibility, from an engineering standpoint, to begin the construction work 
until the Diagonal Station at 42nd Street, connecting the Park Avenue and Lex- 
ington Avenue Subways, was completed. This was placed in operation in 
August 1918. Since that time new ideas have been advanced for this extension, 
which, if adopted, will be a big improvement over the original plan. 

The original plan would have simply continued the present subway under 
42nd Street to a point between Sixth Avenue and Broadway where all pas- 
sengers, transferring to the north and south subway on the West side, would be 
compelled to walk an average distance of 750 feet, or nearly four city blocks. 

Both new plans which have been suggested propose deflecting the line under 
Bryant Park to 41st Street where it could be constructed 

(a) to a point directly under the middle of the Seventh Avenue station plat- 
forms of the Interborough at Times Square, thus requiring only a short 
walk up one flight of stairs to reach the express and local trains operating 
on the west side of Manhattan ; or 

(b) so that direct connection with the local tracks of the Seventh Avenue Sub- 
way could be made for through operation between lower Manhattan and 
the extensions in Queens to Astoria and Corona. 



NEW YORK CITY 73 

The latter plan is not only practical from an engineering and operating 
standpoint but entirely feasible in every way. The only objection which has 
been made to it is the fact that it would decrease the number of local trains, 
operating on the west side line, north of 42nd Street. As it is understood that 
the local west side tracks are being used to only 66% of their capacity, it would 
be possible to add the Queensboro subway trains south of 42nd Street without 
cutting down the service north of Times Square. 

BRIDGE PLAZA STATION 

On October 7th, 1913 contract was delivered to Snare & Triest, amount 
$884,859 for the construction of the Bridge Plaza Station. Additional work 
brought the cost to over $1,000,000. The operation to the station started Novem- 
ber 6, 1916. 

The Bridge Plaza Station is 480 feet long with two levels, each having four 
tracks, or eight tracks in all. The four tracks on the lower level of the station 
are for trains to Manhattan, while the four tracks on the upper level are for 
trains to Astoria, Corona, and Brooklyn. The north platforms, and two tracks 
on both levels, are for B. R. T. trains operated through the 60th Street Tunnel ; 
while the south platforms, and two tracks on each level, are for the Queensboro 
Subway and Second Avenue "L" trains of the Interborough. 

The station has entrances on the Bridge Plaza at Crescent Street and Pros- 
pect Street. The entrances lead to a mezzanine floor and above are two levels, 
all trains on the same level going in the same general direction. 

The running time from this station through the Queensboro Subway to 
the Grand Central Station is approximately ten minutes, and over the Second 
Avenue "L" to Park Row twenty-five minutes. 

The growth in traffic is shown by the increase in the number of tickets sold 
as follows : 

Date Number of Tickets Sold 

January 1917 127,000 

January 1918 209,300 

January 1920 219,500 

ASTORIA EXTENSION 

On March 11, 1913, contract was delivered to Cooper & Evans, amount 
$860,743, for the construction of the Astoria Extension. Although the work 
was completed by January 1915, this extension remained idle until February 1917 
awaiting the completion of the Bridge Plaza Station and the extension of the 
Queensboro Subway. 

The terminus of this line at Ditmars Avenue is less than four miles in a 
straight line from Grand Central Station, a distance less than that to 125th 
Street, Manhattan, or to the Battery. 



74 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



The operation of the Astoria Extension was an important step in the re- 
making of New York City, connecting as it does, the most congested and least 
developed portions of the city.. These two boroughs of the city, practically 
within sight of each other, but with the East River between them, were separated 
almost as much by the fact that in money it cost twice as much, and in time three 
or four times as much, to pass from one section to another, as between other 
sections of the city. 

By the opening of this line, the fare was halved and the time quartered to 
and from a section both ripe for development and less developed than any other. 

Two months after this line was placed in operation the United States en- 
tered the European War and shortly thereafter the restrictions placed upon all 
new building construction made impossible for this section to capitalize this great 
asset. Had the line been placed in operation when it was completed in 1914 or 
1915, hundreds of new apartments would have been completed before the United 
States entered the war. Now, in 1920, three years after operation started, this 
community is beginning to realize the immense advantages of its excellent transit 
facilities and is rapidly being developed with up-to-date apartment houses, which 
will offer those who live there superior living accommodations. 

The growth of the passenger traffic is indicated by the ticket sales at the 6 
stations on this line shown by the following table. 



Station 
Beebe Ave. 
Washington Ave. 
Broadway 
Grand Avenue 
Hoyt Avenue 
Ditmars Avenue 

Total 



Feb. 1917 
58,500 
30,000 
67,740 
65,620 
53,900 
30,358 

306,118 



Ticket Sales 
Feb. 1918 Feb. 1919 



53,900 
42,780 
108,600 
96,300 
88,700 

55,220 

445,500 



45,000 

53,400 

130,100 

131,600 

107,000 

68,700 

535,8oo 



Jan. 1920 

67,000 

73,700 

156,200 

164,400 

131,200 

77,500 

670,000 




STATION AT BROADWAY AND SECOND AVENUE 



NEW YORK CITY 75 

CORONA EXTENSION 

The contract for the construction of the extension to Woodside, Winfield, 
Elmhurst, Jackson Heights, and Corona, was delivered on March 11, 1913 to 
the E. E. Smith Contracting Company, amount $2,063,588. 

On April 21, 1917 service was inaugurated through the Queensboro Subway 
at Grand Central Station, Manhattan, to the terminus of this line at Alburtis 
Avenue, Corona. 

This three track line, nearly five miles in length, extends through a territory 
in the First and Second Wards of Queens, which today is but partially developed 
with detached dwellings and large modern apartment houses. The farthest 
point on this line is only six and one-half miles from Grand Central Station, 
or the same distance as the subway station in the Bronx at 149th Street. 

The vast area served by this route is unequalled anywhere in New York 
City for the construction of apartment houses. Nowhere else in the city can 
there be found broad undeveloped acres within so short a distance of the heart 
of Manhattan. 

The Corona "L".as well as the Astoria "L" are the only two rapid transit 
extensions in New York City, which are operated by both subway and elevated 
trains of the I. R. T. and subway trains of the B. R. T. This dual operation 
gives advantages to the communities served by these routes, which are not en- 
joyed by any other section of the city ; in short, the Corona and Astoria exten- 
sions hold a unique place in the transportation system of New York City. 

New York City, at last, can avail itself of its largest borough, with all the 
advantages which it affords for better living facilities. A great and sparsely 
settled section is now within the single fare zone and the growth of passenger 
traffic on this line as shown by the following table of ticket sales at the eleven 
stations, is convincing proof that the people prefer going out into the open to 
going up in the air for living quarters and it gives a foretaste of the far-reaching 
adjustments of the residence sections of New York which these new extensions 
into Queens are bringing about. 

Ticket Sales 

Stations May 1917 May 1918 Jan. 1919 Jan. 1920 

Rawson Street 13,560 33,940 41,600 49,400 

Lowery Street 1,691 4,945 4,140 5,280 

Bliss Street 18,300 34,68o 21,200 19,340 

Lincoln Avenue 13,050 21,630 17,900 18,160 

Woodside 42,100 72,840 65,600 82,260 

Fiske Ave. 23,050 35,45o 36,000 45,560 

Broadway 13,980 16,450 18,800 24,020 

25th Street 35,28o 52,740 55,260 66,400 

Elmhurst Avenue 31,000 48,900 53,200 59,4OO 

Junction Avenue 52,740 71,300 76,260 92,765 

Alburtis Avenue 118,100 162,100 172,300 223,600 

Total 362,851 554,975 562,260 640,625 



76 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




This is NOT the elevated extension to Corona, Astoria, or South Richmond 
Hill. It is a photograph taken in 1879 looking north from 89th St. and Columbus 
Ave., Manhattan. The view below was taken at the same spot ten years later, 
or in 1889. The same remarkable development is bound to follow in Queens 
along the new rapid transit extensions. 




Courtesy Interborough Rapid Transit Co. 



NEW YORK CITY 



EXTENSION TO FLUSHING 



77 



On April 22, 1913, the Public Service Commission adopted the "Flushing- 
Bayside Route." It was approved by the Board of Estimate on June 12, 1913 
and the necessary property owners consents obtained to complete its legalization. 

In 1915 the Long Island Railroad, realizing the competition which this line 
when completed and operated, would give the North Shore Division, which it 
closely parallels, offered to lease its tracks from Corona through Flushing, to the 
Nassau County Line at Little Neck, and to College Point and Whitestone. The 
accompaning illustration shows clearly what a large proportion of the Third 
Ward of the Borough of Queens would have been benefited had this plan been 
consummated. 




PROPOSED EXTENSION OF RAPID TRANSIT FROM CORONA, THROUGH FLUSHING, 
TO LITTLE NECK AND WHITESTONE, USING TRACKS OF LONG ISLAND RAILROAD. 

Failure on the part of the city, the Public Service Commission, and the Rail- 
road Company to agree on terms; the unwillingness indicated by the I. R. T. 
and B. R. T. to operate their trains over the tracks if leased; and the placing of 
the Railroad under Federal control in 1918, all combined to prevent the accom- 
plishment of this great improvement for the transportation of the residents of 
the Third Ward to and from Manhattan. 

Two miles distant from the present terminus of the Corona "L" is the 
attractive and populous residential section of Flushing, all of whose residents 
must now pay two fares in order to use the rapid transit lines of the city. 

In view of the fact that the I. R. T. and B. R. T. require immediately ade- 
quate storage yards and car repair shops, along the Corona "L" and the most 
advantageous location for these yards and shops is on the Flushing Meadows, 
about half way between the present terminus of the line and Flushing (Main 
Street), it is believed that when the line is extended it will be built the entire 
distance to Flushing. 

While this will not serve directly all of the residents of the Third Ward, it 
is a big step forward and the extension to this point should be built without delay. 



78 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



LUTHERAN CEMETERY EXTENSION 

The first extension from Brooklyn into Queens Borough was the "Lutheran 
Cemetery Extension," a continuation of the Myrtle Avenue Line in Brooklyn, 
for a distance of one mile into the Ridgewood section of Queens Borough. The 
contract for the construction and elevation of this two track road was delivered 
on February 27th, 1914 to F. W. Burnham, cost $500,000. The line was placed 
in operation February 22, 1915. 

The operation of this road enables the residents of the densely populated 
Ridgewood section of Queens Borough to reach, for a single fare, all sections 
of Brooklyn and Manhattan served by the B. R. T. 

The passenger traffic on this extension is shown by the following table of 
ticket sales at the 4 stations in Queens Borough : 

Stations March 1915 March 1917 Jan. 1920 

Seneca Avenue 122,928 122,583 158,507 

Forest Avenue 170,262 170,757 226,316 

Fresh Pond Road 94,648 123,810 253,316 

Metropolitan Avenue 25,554 27,772 61,131 



Total 



699,924 



413,392 444,922 

LIBERTY AVENUE EXTENSION 

The second rapid transit extension from Brooklyn into Queens was the 
operation of the Liberty Avenue "L" from the "City Line" (Brooklyn), to Lef- 
ferts Avenue, Richmond Hill, a distance of over two miles of two track road, 
serving the important communities of Woodhaven, Ozone Park, Morris Park, 
and South Richmond Hill. 




THE OPERATION OF THE LIBERTY AVENUE ELEVATED, WHICH CAN BE SEEN IN THE 

BACKGROUND, RESULTED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF HUNDREDS 

OF THESE MULTIPLE FAMILY DWELLINGS. 



NEW YORK CITY 



79 



The contract for the construction of this line was delivered on February 9, 
1914 to the Phoenix Bridge Company, amount $707,661. Through operation 
to the terminus of this line began September 25th 1915. 

In this section of the Borough there have been erected since the completion 
and operation of the line more single family and multiple family dwellings of 
moderate cost than in any other section in the city. Block after block of homes 
have been erected and sold, in many instances, before the foundations were com- 
pleted. 

This rapid transit line serves a vast area south of the Atlantic Division of 
the Long Island Railroad. The actual running time from Park Row to the 
terminus of this line is less than that required to reach Washington Heights on 
the subway. 

The passenger traffic on the six stations in Queens Borough on this exten- 
sion is as follows : 

Ticket Sales 

Jan. 1916 Jan. 1918 Jan. 1920 

6,120 6,423 8,291 

17,557 20,018 27,358 

28,185 27,368 30,290 

12,955 16,861 21,353 

ii,452 16,076 31,155 

4i,76o 49,357 57,565 



Stations 
Hudson Street 
Boyd Avenue 
Rockaway Boulevard 
Oxford Avenue 
Greenwood Avenue 
Lefferts Avenue 



Total 



118,029 



136,103 



186,002 



JAMAICA AVENUE EXTENSION 

The third rapid transit line from Brooklyn into Queens operated by the 
B. R. T. was the Jamaica Avenue "L," an extension 4^ miles in length from 
Cypress Hills, Brooklyn, to Grand Street, Jamaica. Operation to Greenwood 
Avenue, Richmond Hill started May 28, 1911 and to the terminus in Jamaica on 
July 3, 1918. 




JAMAICA AVENUE "L" LOOKING WEST 



:80 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

The contract for the first section was awarded to Post & McCord, amount 
:$724,340; for the second section to Conners Brothers, amount $726,168; for 
the stations to P. J. Carlin Construction Company, amount $280.700 ; or a total 
.cost of $1,731,208. 

Jamaica Avenue, over which this railroad is operated, is today almost solidly 
built up with stores, tenements and homes the entire distance from the Brooklyn 
Line to Jamaica. Thousands of new homes are now being built in the territory 
served by this line, which has today the largest passenger traffic of any of the 
five extensions within the Borough of Queens. 

The operation of this line, which means so much for the future industrial, 
commercial and residential growth of Jamaica, Richmond Hill and Woodhaven, 
marked the consummation of eight and one-half years effort on the part of the 
former Fourth Ward Transit Committee which was organized in 1910, and the 
Queensboro Chamber of Commerce, which was organized in 1911. Passengers 
can travel for a single fare the entire distance from Jamaica, through Brook- 
lyn, to downtown Manhattan and northward on the Broadway-59th Street Subway 
to Long Island City and over the extensions to Astoria and Corona. 

The growth of traffic on this route as shown by the ticket sales has been as 
follows : 



Stations August 1917 

Elderts Lane 44,440 

Forest Parkway 83,472 

Woodhaven Avenue . . . . 69,659 

Freedom Ave. (iO2nd St.) 49,547 

Greenwood Ave. (iiith St.) 67,068 

Spruce St. (i2ist St.) 
Metropolitan Avenue 
Queens Boulevard 
Sutphin Road 
Newark Ave. (i6oth St.) 
Cliffside Ave. (i68th St.) 

Total 314,186 



Ticket Sales 
August 1918 
54,527 
94,437 
71,479 
63,237 
63,643 
31,775 
11,046 
20,383 
46,348 
99,456 
79,051 



635,362 



Jan. 1920 

55,271 
122,349 
95,100 
80,072 
84,603 
4L547 
15,709 
24,393 
37,245 
102,444 

51,348 
710,081 




MAIN STREET, FLUSHING 



NEW YORK CITY 



81 



SIXTIETH STREET TUNNEL 

The Dual Subway contracts provided for the operation of both the Second 
Avenue "L" trains of the Interborough and the Broadway-59th Street subway 
trains of the B. R. T. across the Queensboro Bridge to connect with the transfer 
station at the Bridge Plaza, Long Island City. When it was realized that the 
proposed arrangement for carrying the B. R. T. trains across the Bridge on the 
vehicular roadway would have resulted in a. serious reduction of the present width 
of 52 feet, every effort was made to have the plan changed so as to leave the 
roadway undisturbed, and still retain both new lines of transit. 



B. . T. MONTHLY 



B. K. T. MONTHLY 



60 m STREET -EAST RIVER TUNNEL 




ShfbOrnen ,\Jh*lm^, Cut on^fav \flaatfjif^_ eifated Sfnjcitre 



The Degnon Contracting Company presented a plan in December 1914 to 
the Board of Estimate for the building of two tunnels under the East River at 
60th Street for the operation of the B. R. T. subway trains. The advantages of 
this plan for leaving the roadway intact, for avoiding any change for rearrange- 
ment of the present lines in Queens and for the early operation of both the 
Queensboro subway and the 2nd Avenue elevated trains, were so great that 
the Board of Estimate on February 19, 1915 officially approved the tunnel 
method of bringing the B. R. T. cars to Queens and requested the Public Service 
Commission to present a bill to the legislature authorizing the tunnel. 

The contract for the construction of the tunnel was awarded August 3, 1916, 
to Patrick McGovern & Co., for $4,194, 797. The work was started September 
12, 1916 when the shaft was sunk at Vernon Avenue on the Queens Borough 
side. 

The tunnel was "holed through" on October 15, 1918, and the time since has 
been devoted to lining the tunnel with concrete, installation of ties, running 
tracks, third rail, cable and signal equipment. 

The two tubes are 18 feet in diameter, with a total length of 16,176 feet, or 
approximately 3 miles. The distance from the Bridge Plaza station to the 
portal is 2700 feet or approximately ^2 mile and from that point to the west 
side of Vernon Avenue, the construction was the "cut and cover" type. 

At one point the tube is 125 feet below water level. This is in the center 
of the West channel. As many as 1,000 men worked on the job at one time. 

The contract for the track installation was awarded to Thomas Crimmins 
Contracting Company for $94,973, on June 11, 1919. 



82 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

CROSSTOWN ROUTE 

In 1912 when the various routes to be included in the Dual Subway contracts 
were being considered by the Public Service Commission and the Board of Esti- 
mate, the Queens Chamber of Commerce urged the construction of the Crosstown 
Route which would provide a through north and south rapid transit line connecting 
Queens with Brooklyn without the necessity, as at present, of crossing and re- 
crossing the East River to travel to and from these boroughs, via the rapid transit 
system. 

Opposition developed, however, against the construction of the line as origin- 
ally planned. This opposition had its inception in the antagonism of the property 
owners in the Franklin Avenue section of Brooklyn, who objected to the con- 
struction of an elevated railroad in front of their premises, and this opposition 
extended to other sections of the suggested route, finally preventing it from being 
included in the Dual Subway contracts signed in March 1913. 

Brooklyn more than Queens has suffered from this lack of foresight and 
attempts have been made since by the Brooklyn business interests to revive the 
matter. The determination as to whether the route, when constructed, shall be 
subway or elevated in Brooklyn is a matter involving financial considerations and 
local residential pride. The route after it crosses Newtown Creek naturally must 
become elevated in Queens to connect with the Bridge Plaza Station. 

All interests in all sections of both Queens and Brooklyn should work together 
now to secure the adoption of a definite policy for the form of construction and 
financing the cost of the north and south line between the two boroughs, which 
is an essential feature in any proper solution of the transportation problems of 
New York City. 

The benefits of such a line are too great to long delay its construction. It 
would make available the great labor supply in Brooklyn for the hundreds of 
industrial plants in Queens; give the residents of both boroughs improved and 
increased facilities; and decrease the distance, cost and time of travel between 
these two great boroughs. 

DUAL OPERATION OF THE ASTORIA AND 
CORONA EXTENSIONS 

The difference in the width of the cars operated by the Interboro and the 
Brooklyn Rapid Transit has caused the delay in the extension of the service from 
the Bridge Plaza over the extensions to Astoria and Corona. The station plat- 
forms, location of tracks and third rail on these extensions when built were con- 
structed for the operation of the nine foot wide cars of the subway and elevated 
trains of the Interboro. In order that the ten foot wide cars of the B. R. T. may 
operate through these stations, a strip from the station platform must be re- 
moved so as to provide sufficient clearance. Other structural changes are also 
required. 



NEW YORK CITY 



83 




On the rapid transit map, issued as a supplement to this book, the proposed 
'Crosstown Route" is shown by a dotted green line extending southward from 
Bridge Plaza Station in Long Island City over Vernon Avenue and across New- 
town Creek, through the Greenpoint, Williamsburg and Bedford sections of 
Brooklyn and joining with the Fulton Street Elevated Line at Franklin Avenue 
where the Brighton Beach Line operates southward through Flatbush and Sheeps- 
head Bay to Coney Island. 



84 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



THE PART PLAYED BY THE QUEENSBORO 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

This chapter would not be complete without a statement regarding the part 
which the Queensboro Chamber of Commerce took in bringing about the con- 
struction and operation of the five extensions, with their fifty miles of single 
track in Queens Borough, carrying today more than 150,000 passengers 
daily. 



EXISTING SUBWAYS 

SUBWAYS UNOERCONSTROCTtC* 

PROPOSED INTERtBOROUGH 

EXTENSIONS 




Extensions which the Tnterborongh of- Proposed "Triborough System" for 
fered to build in Manhattan, Brooklyn which plans were prepared by the original 
and the Bronx. Public Service Commission, 1907-1910. 



NEW YORK CITY 85 

The Queensboro Chamber of Commerce, more than any one other single 
agency, may be credited for this great accomplishment which has made the 
Borough today a real integral part of New York City. 

The two maps, which are herewith reproduced from an article published in 
the "Outlook" in July, 1910, show what consideration was being given at that 
time by the operating companies and city officials to the need of Queens Borough 
for direct connection with the rapid transit system of the City. Although new 
lines were being projected 10 to 15 miles northward in the Bronx and an equal 
distance southward in Brooklyn, nothing was planned for Queens Borough, only 
a mile or two across the East River from the center of the City. 

The late Mayor Gaynor termed as "cornfield routes" the lines which Queens 
asked to have constructed. Today these "cornfield routes" are producing the 
greatest crop of factories and homes that have ever been produced in any section 
of New York City. 

It was not until the Queensboro Chamber of Commerce was organized in 
1911 that any recognition was secured from the city officials and operating com- 
panies. The rapid transit extensions into Queens described in this chapter, were 
included in the Dual Subway Contracts as a result of the organized, continuous 
and persistent efforts on the part of the business men of Queens Borough work- 
ing through the Queensboro Chamber of Commerce. 

Compare the two maps shown on the opposite page with the Rapid Transit 
Map, printed in colors between pages 66 and 67, and you will appreciate what 
far-reaching effects this great accomplishment will have on the future develop- 
ment of Queens Borough and New York City. 

GROWTH IN PASSENGER TRAFFIC 

The increase in the number of passengers carried on all the rapid transit 
extensions in Queens Borough is shown by the following tabulation of ticket 
sales for certain months from the time that the first line was opened in 1915 to 
January 1920: 

MONTH TICKET SALES 

B. R. T. I. R. T . Tota i 

March J 9i5 413,392 4I3)392 

J ul y J 9i5 384,549 102,250 486,799 

Oct IOI 5 553,759 170,780 724,539 

Dec - *9 l6 601,913 557,82 4 1,159,737 

Feb - : 9!7 515,884 746,878 1,262752 

May 1917 689,681 1,216,031 1,905,712 

July I9I 7 924,503 1,121,730 2,046,233 

Sept. 1918 1,278,142 1,588,415 2,866.557 

J an - IQ2 1,596,007 2,141,882 3,837,889 



86 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




INDUSTRIES 

QUEENS BOROUGH AS A MANUFACTURING 

CENTER 

That industry is the basis upon which all community growth and prosperity 
largely depends is best proven by the figures compiled by the United States 
Government, of the manufacturing plants and the number of industrial employees 
in New York city, which show that one out of every seven persons is so employed, 
and therefore one out of every three persons in the city is supported by such 
employment. 

The importance of the industrial development of Queens Borough, past, 
present and future, and its relation to the residential, commercial and financial 
development of the Borough, requires no further comment. 

ZONING LAW 

The best evidence that Queens Borough is destined to become the greatest 
manufacturing center in the East is the large proportion of its vast area which 
has been set aside for this purpose. In 1916, when every street in the entire 
city was laid out as either (a) unrestricted, (b) business, or (c) residential, 
22,000 acres of Queens Borough's 75,000 acres were placed in the unrestricted 
zone. This means that 34 square miles an area within five square miles of 
being as large as the entire Borough of the Bronx has been set aside for the 
present and future industrial development. While this area is only 30 percent 
of the total area of Queens, it is 50 percent larger than the entire area of Man- 
hattan Island. Were this industrial area to be lifted entirely out of the Borough, 
there would still remain 53,000 acres for residential and commercial purposes, 
or, an area greater than that of the Borough of Brooklyn. This presents in a 
striking manner the vast extent of the industrial possibilities of Queens Borough. 

Furthermore, these building restrictions were placed upon the city at a 
time which gave Queens every advantage for controlling, in a definite and as- 
sured manner, the harmonious development of the entire Borough. Where fac- 
tories and homes have been built alongside of each other in the more highly 
developed parts of the city, resulting often in the deterioration of residential com- 
munities, this condition cannot arise in the future in Queens Borough. Factories 
will be grouped by themselves in definite areas, set aside for that purpose, while 
homes will be built in other restricted areas. Queens Borough will not grow in hap- 



NEW YORK CITY 



87 



hazard fashion. Its industrial and residential areas, while separate and distinct, 
are perfectly coordinated. 

DEVELOPEMENT PRIOR TO 1909 

It is an interesting fact that even in 1909, prior to the construction of the 
Queensboro Bridge, and prior to the operation of the Pennsylvania Long Island 
Railroad tunnels, the New York Connecting Railroad, and the rapid transit 
extensions, the Borough of Queens, considered as a city by itself, exceeded every 
other city in the United States except 14 in the annual value of its manufacturing 
products. The United States Census of 1909 showed that Queens Borough at 
that time had 771 factories employing 23,891 men and women, and with capital 
invested amounting to $145,307,000, turned out manufactured products for that 
year valued at $151,180,000. For that same year Queens Borough exceeded 
every one of 19 separate states of the Union in the value of its manufactured 
products, 18 states in the amount of capital invested in manufacturing, 11 states 
in the number of factory employees and 10 states in the number of manufactur- 
ing establishments. 




Million dollar printing and binding plant of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 
now being erected on Thomson Avenue, Long Island City. The company will remove from 
its present location at Madison Avenue and 24th Sreet (Metropolitan Building), Manhat- 
tan. The J. F. Tapley Co., who bound this publication, have leased 100,000 square feet 
of floor space in this building. 



88 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




Looking south from Queensboro Bridge in Long Island City. Numerous attractive 
industrial plants, mostly concrete construction, have been erected in . this area in the past 
five years. 



The nineteen states which Queens exceeded in the value of manufactured 
products were : 
Alabama Idaho 

Arizona Mississippi 

Arkansas . Montana 

Colorado Nevada 

Delaware New Mexico 

Florida North Dakota 

Oklahoma 

That these figures are even more true today is evident from the amazing 
industrial growth which has taken place in Queens during the past ten years, 
a growth that has become the talk of New York. 



Oregon 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Utah 

Vermont 

Wyoming 




View from Sunnyside Yards looking east. The first glimpse of Queens Borough all 
Long Island Railroad passengers obtain when emerging from East River tunnels from 
Pennsylvania Station. 

Photograph, taken April 1920, shows the concrete pouring towers which have become 
symbolic of the industrial growth of Queens. 



NEW YORK CITY 



89 




Among the factories shown here are the American Chicle Co., Old Reliable Motor 
Truck Corporation, Rolls-Royce Service Station, Wappler Electric Co., Houpert Machine 
Co., Repetti, Inc., Perfect Window Regulator Co., Lauraine Magneto Co. 

INDUSTRIAL GROWTH 19091916 

Every five years the Bureau of Census of the United States Department 
of Commerce compiles complete figures regarding manufacturing in each village, 
city and state in the country. The census figures for 1914 show a remarkable 
growth in Queens Borough over the previous census of 1909. In the order of 
their importance, from a percentage standpoint, the increase in the several items 
was as follows : 

Salaried Employees 62.7% 

Salaries 50.8% 

Wages 35.0^0 

Wage Earners 30.7% 

Capital Invested 29.0% 

Number of Factories 26.6% 




At the extreme left is the Service Station of the Packard Motor Car Co. of New York. 
Then comes the $500,000 Service, Sales and Export Building of the White Co. (Motor 
Trucks), the $1,000,000 building of the American Chicle Co., the handsome structure of 
the American Ever Ready Co., and the huge sunlighted factory of the Loose-Wiles Biscuit 
Co where Sunshine Biscuits are made. The last four buildings are all on the property 
of the Degnon Realty and Terminal Co. 



90 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

It must be remembered that 1914 was a year of marked industrial depression 
due to the beginning of the World War, while 1916 was a year of intense activity. 
The following table gives the census figures for 1909 and 1914, and also for 
1916, when an industrial survey was made by the Queensboro Chamber of Com- 
merce. 
i 

1909 1914 1916 

No. of Factories 771 975 1,169 

No. of Employees 27,841 37,201 63,964 

Value of Products $151,488.000 $164,789,000 $323,198,000 

Capital Invested $145,307,000 $187,990,000 Not obtained 

Salaries and Wages Paid $ 18.546,000 $ 25,750,000 $ 46,921,000 

The publication of an analysis of the industrial survey of Queens for 1916 

prompted the New York Herald at that time, in an article entitled "Queens Has 

.Nothing So Huge As Its Industries," to state : 

"It is the industries that give the city its overflowing population, its 
million tenements, its thousands of office and mercantile buildings, its 
beehive factories, its hotels, restaurants, theatres, department stores, 
and shops, its wealth of gold, its multitude of spenders, its dazzling splen- 
dors, its world-wide influence ; and that makes necessary its amazing 
web of transit lines, its countless automobiles, its great railroad ter- 
minals, its constantly increasing supply of electric power and the daily 
extension of its telephone system. 

"Industry is the key that has unlocked to New York all the tightly- 
barred doors of the world, and it is through these now wide open doors 
that the gold of all the world is flowing into the coffers of the merchants 
and the pockets of the workers in this, the city of world-wide demand 
and unlimited supply. 

"Assessed values, estimated at more than half a billion dollars, tell the 
tale of the effect of industrial enterprise on Queens Borough's realty." 
The records of the Bureau of Buildings of Queens show that plans were filed 

<iuring the past ten years for factory construction amounting to $34,507,808, as 

follows : 

Year Value Year Value 

1910 $1,408,317 1915 $1,498,305 

191 1 2,125,360 1916 2,829,275 

1912 3,318,920 1917 2,103,847 

1913 1,726,642 1918 2,782,332 

1914 2,815,130 1919 14,199,100 



NEW YORK CITY 



91 



INDUSTRIAL CENSUS OF QUEENSBORO 1916 



No. Em- Annual 

Groups of Industries No. Plants ployees Pay Roll 

METAL WORKING INDUSTRY 276 1,818 1,625,000 

Smelters and refineries 2 24,405 $19,906,200 

Foundries (all kinds) 13 58? 546,600 

Machine shops, machine manufac- 

facturers and metal specialties 81 3,145 2,507,300 

Sheet metal works 40 5,561 4,392,200 

Structural steel fabrication and iron 

works 31 T .373 1,289,700 

Electric and gas specialties 12 2,377 1,262,000 

Wire Goods 5 85 36,600 

Automobiles and parts 47 6,312 5,481,800 

Aeroplanes and parts I 70 91,000 

Ship and boat building 12 583 483,000 

Car Repairing IS 1,573 1,380,000 

Gas & water works; pub. service plant 17 921 811,000 

WOOD WORKING GROUP 146 7,762 6,186,200 

Lumber yards and house trim and 

cabinet shops 70 3,626 2,225,000 

Furniture 18 1,539 1,160,800 

Caskets 4 282 222,500 

Pianos and musical instruments 13 2,026 2,073,500 

Cooperage 6 109 177,400 

Carriages and wagons 35 180 90,000 

TEXTILE INDUSTRIES 30 2,681 1,778,200 

Silk goods 18 2,327 1,508,600 

Carpets and rugs 2 no 62,500 

Dyeing and finishing 9 184 162,100 

Cordage I 60 45,000 

KNIT GOODS 23 1,147 638,100 

Garment and needle industry 160 6,209 2,646,900 

PAPER AND PAPER PRODUCTS 10 332 184,300 

STONE AND STONE PRODUCTS 109 2,009 2,124,200 

Cut stone 38 1,699 1,872,200 

Monumental work 55 207 174,000 

Cement products 13 63 46,000 

Asphalt products I 25 24,000 

Plaster products 2 15 8,000 

FOOD PRODUCTS, including bakeries, 

confectionery and dairy products. .139 3,146 1,864,800 

ARTIFICIAL ICE 15 233 168,900 

MALT LIQUORS 3 265 275,600 

BOTTLNG AND SOFT DRINKS 3 31 15,000 

SUGAR REFINING i 630 520,000 

ANIMAL PRODUCTS not incl'dg fertilizers 4 148 28,200 

LEATHER AND LEATHER GOODS.. 37 3,261 1,486,200 

Shoes ii 2,728 1,094,900 

Harness and Saddles 17 65 41,000 

Other leather goods 9 468 351,300 

RUBBER INDUSTRY 10 2,584 1,667,000 

PEARL BUTTON INDUSTRY 14 573 338,100 

CHEMICALS, DYES, DRUGS AND 

PREPARATIONS 35 2,087 1,693,300 

PRINTING AND PUBLISHING 37 1,423 842,200 

OIL REFINING AND OILS 9 1,920 1,723,000 

PAINT, VARNISH AND INK 21 688 592,900 

CIGAR MANUFACTURE 39 1,620 980,000 

LAUNDRIES (STEAM) 11 243 114,300 

TOY MANUFACTURE 5 97 60,000 

CLAY PRODUCTS 5 263 178,250 

GLASS AND GLASS PRODUCTS 11 686 512,000 

MOTION PICTURES 10 156 172,000 

CELLULOID AND SHELL 2 50 30,200 

BAG AND CARPET CLEANING 4 315 195,000 



TOTAL 1,169 



63,966 



$46,921,050 



Value of 

Annual Prod. 

108,200,000 

$177,761,000 

1,421,000 

8,100,000 
10,917,000 

4,348,000 

5,822,000 

79,000 

37,448,000 

150,000 

1,275,000 



20,893,000 

8,798,000 

3,323,000 

790,000 

5,975,000 

505,000 

190,000 

5,225,000 

4,420,000 

310,000 

395,ooo 

100,000 

1,724,000 

3,349,500 

1,379,000 

7,735,ooo 

6,597,000 

863,000 

150,000 

100,000 

25,000 

i3,477,ooo 

741,000 

1,100,000 

40,000 

42,000,000 

685,000 

2,574,500 

1,813,000 

76,500 

685,000 

2,874,000 

1,329,000 

11,699,000 

3,016,000 

11,880,000 

6,368,000 

3,800,000 

234,000 

133,000 

506,000 

1,630,000 

645,000 

70,000 

300,000 

$323,198,000 



92 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




Queens Borough has become the Motion Picture Center of the East. Here 
are two of the new studios. The $1,000,000 studio of the Famous-Players Lasky 
Corporation is now being completed. Ground will shortly be broken for the 
Selznick Studios. Other large motion picture studios are also to be erected. 




The United States Census of manufacturing for 1919, which is now being 
compiled, will not be ready for distribution until 1921 at the earliest. While no 
attempt will be made here to estimate in advance what the figures will be, it is 
certain that they will show the largest increase for any five year period in the 
history of Queens Borough. 



NEW YORK CITY 93 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT IN 1920 

Queens Borough today is without doubt developing more rapidly from an 
industrial standpoint than any other borough of New York City. It is also one 
of the fastest growing industrial communities in the United States. Prior to 
the war the fact that one new substantial industry established in Queens each 
week was considered a good record. During 1919 this record was doubled, for 
at least two new industries located each week in Queens during that year. In 
1920 and succeeding years a record of one new industry each day will not be 
considered remarkable when all the advantages that Queens Borough has to 
offer are understood. 

What are the reasons for this great industrial development ? It is the result 
of four main causes. 

1. New enterprises, constructing plants for the production of new articles, nat- 
urally seek Queens Borough as the most economic and efficient location. 

2. Manufacturers with their main plants in the Middle West desire to establish 
branch plants in the East to supply both the New York market and their 
foreign trade; manufacturers whose present plants are unfavorably located 
with respect to transportation, housing, labor, raw materials ; and manufac- 
turers seeking branch factories more strategically located so as to remove 
competitive handicaps. 

3. Factories which have been operating in the more highly developed boroughs 
of New York, and finding it impossible to expand except at enormous cost 
because of the high price of land adjacent to their present establishments, 
seek new sites in Queens Borough where they can purchase sufficient land 
at low cost to provide for both their present needs and future expansion. 

4. Plants in Queens Borough, finding their business growing, either purchase 
new sites and erect new buildings or construct enlargements to their present 
factories. 

The principal reasons why manufacturing plants are leaving Manhattan, 
and even Brooklyn, to establish in Queens Borough, may be summed up as fol- 
lows : 

1. High Rents. 

2. High cost of land makes expansion at present location too expensive. 

3. Congested condition of streets causes trucking difficulties with delays in 
shipping. 

4. Greater cost of rehandling shipments of raw materials and finished products 
as compared with loading and unloading direct from private switches obtain- 
able on the Long Island Railroad. 

5. Loss of time between factories and homes of employees. 



94 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

NINETEEN REASONS THAT ATTRACT NEW 
INDUSTRIES TO QUEENS BOROUGH 

The borough of Queens has so many advantages that it is rapidly becoming 
one of the greatest manufacturing centers in the United States. Some of the 
principal reasons which have resulted in attracting hundreds of new industries 
to establish manufacturing, assemblying, shipping and storage plants in the 
Borough are the following: 

1. LOCATION. If a circle is drawn with Grand Central Station as its center, 
and with a radius of 10 miles, there will be a larger area of Queens Borough 
within that circle than of any other Borough. Queens is much nearer to the 
business center of Manhattan than is any other Borough. In fact, the 
geographical center of New York City is Queens Borough. 

2. RAPID TRANSIT. The operation of the five new rapid transit extensions 
into Queens from Brooklyn and Manhattan by the Brooklyn Rapid Transit 
Company and the Interborough Rapid Transit Company places at the disposal 
of the residents of Queens Borough the entire comprehensive system of 
rapid transit in New York City for a single fare. 

3. MARKET. It is always an advantage for the manufacturer to have his 
factory located near a large market. Queens is part of the largest market in 
the world the city of New York the focal point for the transaction of 
business and the distribution of commodities for the United States. Twenty 
seven percent of the buying population of the United States is located within 
100 miles of New York City a market of tremendous possibilities. Within 
a commuting radius of thirty miles, 7]/2 percent of the population of the 
United States lives. Furthermore, the home consumption of manufactured 
goods of all kinds is enormous. Everything to eat, or to wear, or that can 
contribute to the pleasure, health or comfort of mankind has a ready sale 

and quick distribution in New York City and vicinity. 




NEW HOME OF THE REMINGTON TYPEWRITER Co. IN FLUSHING. 
1920 FROM THE NATHAN MFG. Co. 



PURCHASED IN 



NEW YORK CITY 



95 





Illinmiii 




Where Spearmint Chewing Gum in made. The factory of the Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co., 

in the Maspeth section of Queens. Twenty acres of ground 

have been acquired for future expansion. 

4. GOOD ROADS. To realize the advantage of trucking facilities good roads 
are an absolute necessity. Queens has the best paved highways of any sec- 
tion of New York City. 

5. QUEENSBORO BRIDGE. Spanning the East River across Blackwell's 
Island opened in 1909, gives a direct route for vehicles of all descriptions 
from 59th Street and Second Avenue (Manhattan) to Long Island City 
(Queens Borough). Thirty thousand vehicles have crossed this bridge in 
one day. 

6. LABOR SUPPLY. In every industrial center the labor supply is one of the 
most important features. In New York City there is a labor supply not be 
found in any other American City. Queens has available this unlimited sup- 
ply of labor from a population of over 7,500,000 within easy traveling dis- 
tance, ranging from unskilled labor to the highest skilled mechanics. 

7. HOUSING FACILITIES. The Borough of Queens offers advantages 
superior to any other section of Greater New York for the housing of em- 
ployees of factories. For those who prefer to live within walking distance 
of their work small houses and apartments in quiet locations can be obtained. 
Trolleys, rapid transit lines and electric railroads make available all parts of 
the City of New York, and even the adjoining suburbs in Nassau and West- 
chester Counties, for housing workingmen and executives. Electricity, gas 
and water are everywhere provided. Sewers are installed. The best schools, 
churches of all denominations, beaches, parks and theatres and all requisites 
for pleasure are here. 



96 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

8. AVAILABLE SITES. There is no section of New York where so much 
acreage is available for industrial development as in the Borough of Queens. 
There are 22,000 acres available for manufacturing purposes. The manu- 
facturer who has a good location and is surrounded by favorable conditions 
has an advantage over his competitors. Numerous waterfront sites are to 
be had with a depth sufficient to accommodate vessels of large draught, at 
prices much lower than any other waterfront property in the city. Along 
the Connecting Railroad and the Pennsylvania Long Island Railroad are 
thousands of acres where sidings may be had bringing cars to the factory 
door and saving all expense for carting. Other locations within easy hauling 
distance of both railroad and piers are to be had at attractive prices, varying 
according to location, but always far below in price the same class of property 
anywhere else in New York City. 

9. LOW COST OF LAND. The price of land is much lower than in Man- 
hattan and other Boroughs, and floor space with many facilities which Man- 
hattan cannot offer such as abundant light and air, direct tracking facilities, 
etc., can be had at very reasonable prices. 

10. RAILROAD FACILITIES. There are in Queens today over eighty miles 
of railroad, some of which is two, four and six tracked. This amount of 
railroad through the Borough gives an adequate opportunity for sidings 
direct to factory premises. 

11. FREIGHT RATES. "Metropolitan Freight Rates" apply to Queens just 
as they do to Manhattan, and goods shipped into the Borough from more 
than 100 miles, or shipped out further than 100 miles get exactly the same 
freight rates that the same commodities shipped in or out of Manhattan 
receive. These New York rates apply as far as College Point, Flushing, 
Jamaica and Ozone Park. 

12. ELECTRICITY AND GAS. Electric power rates are very advantageous. 
They are as low as the rates in any city on the Atlantic seaboard, and com- 
pare favorably with companies in other parts of the United States which 
manufacture electric power by steam. Gas for power, illumination or heat- 
ing can be obtained at reasonable rates. 

13. WATERFRONT. The 200 miles of waterfront and 35 miles of docks and 
bulkheads on the East River, Newtown Creek, Flushing Bay, Flushing Creek, 
Jamaica Bay, and the Atlantic Ocean, indicates the tremendous amount of 
waterfront that Queens has available for shipping and for future develop- 
ment. 

14. CONNECTING RAILROAD. The New York Connecting Railroad, with 
its massive bridge over Hell Gate, connecting Queens Borough with the 
Bronx, and the Pennsylvania Long Island Railroad system with the New 
York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, gives an all rail route for freight 
traffic. 

15. FINANCIAL CENTER. As a financial center New York City is more 
than six times greater than any other city in the country, twenty-six percent 
of the banking power of the United States being centered in it, and ten per- 



NEW YORK CITY 



97 



cent of the banking -power of the world. Queens is a part of this great 
banking center, and has today 35 banking offices throughout the Borough, 
(nineteen State banks, seven National, four savings and five trust company 
offices) with resources aggregating $750,000,000. 

16. BARGE CANAL TERMINALS. Three terminals of the State Barge 
Canal are located in the Borough of Queens, as follows : 1st, on the East 
River, just north of the Queensboro Bridge, Long Island City ; 2nd, on 
Hallet's Cove, East River, in the Astoria section of Long Island City; 3rd, 
Flushing Bay, just west of the mouth of Flushing Creek. These terminals 
place all of the advantages of the $150,000,000 deeper and wider State Barge 
Canal at the disposal of the shippers of Queens Borough, and materially 
reduce the cost of transportation of raw materials and manufactured 
products. 

17. QUEENSBORO TERMINAL. A branch of the Brooklyn Eastern Dis- 
trict Terminal Company is located on the East River, just south of the 
Queensboro Bridge. This Terminal receives and delivers freight each day 
for every transportation line in the United States except the Pennsylvania 
System, giving prompt and economical transportation and eliminating the 
necessity of carting to all the separate freight piers in Manhattan. 

18. FOREIGN TRADE. New York is the gateway through which 50 percent 
of the exports and imports of the United States pass. For the manufacturer 
who is interested in the systematic development of the export markets, the 
Queens Borough section of New York City furnishes the best location for his 
plant as it possesses direct shipping facilities and enables him to make an 
aggressive campaign in pushing the sales of his products in the world 
market. 

19. WELFARE OF EMPLOYEES. One of the greatest gains which can 
be made by removing a manufacturing establishment from the congested 
sections of New York City to the open spaces of Queens Borough is the 
improvement of factory conditions and its effect upon the personnel of the 
plant physically, mentally and morally. Greater efficiency exists in a well 
lighted, well-ventilated, sanitary and modern manufacturing plant. 




NATIONAL SUGAR REFINING Co., LONG ISLAND CITY. ONE OF THE LARGEST, MOST MODF.RN 
AND EFFICIENT PLANTS IN THE WORLD. ESTABLISHED 1897 IN QUEENS BOROUGH. 



98 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




STEIN'WAY & SONS PIANO FACTORY, ESTABLISHED 1876. 



BENEFITS DERIVED BY BUSINESS MEN OF QUEENS 
FROM NEW INDUSTRIAL ESTABLISHMENTS 

The establishment of a new factory in any section of the Borough of Queens 
radiates its influence to all other sections of the Borough and increases the busi- 
ness possibilities for every one. One new factory whether established in Long 
Island City, Flushing, College Point, Woodside, Jamaica or Glendale, or else- 
where in Queens, bringing 10, 100 or 1,000 new employees into the Borough, 
adds new population and wealth to the entire community, creating a greater 
prosperity for all and benentting: 

1. The Manufacturer: By increasing the labor supply and guaranteeing its 
permanency. 

2. The Merchant : By increasing the number of his customers. 

3. The Banker : By increasing the number of depositors. 

4. The Real Estate Developer and Broker :By increasing the demand for land 
both for factory sites and for homes for executives and workingmen. 

5. The Transportation Companies' By increasing the number of passengers 
carried. 

6. The Gas and Electric Companies: By increasing the number of con- 
sumers of power, light and heat. 

7. The Builder: By increasing the demand for homes of all types to house 
the increased population. 

8. The Retailer : By increasing the number of families living in the Borough 
with their increased purchasing power. 

9. The Professional Man : By increasing the number of his clients. 



NEW YORK CITY 



99 



RANK OF SEVENTEEN LEADING MANUFACTURING 
CITIES IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1914 

(From Official United States Census figures) 



City Rank 

New York City i 

Chicago 2 

Philadelphia 3 

Detroit 4 

St. Louis 5 

Cleveland 6 

Boston 7 

Buffalo 8 

Pittsburg 9 

Milwaukee 10 

Baltimore 11 

Cincinnati 12 

Newark 13 

Minneapolis 14 
QUEENS BOROUGH .. 

Jersey City 15 

San Francisco 16 

Kansas City, Kan. 17 



City Rank 

Manhattan 

Brooklyn 

QUEENS 

Bronx 

Richmond 

Total 



Value of 
Manufactured Products 

$2,292,831,693 
1,483,498,411 
784,499,633 
400,347,912 
360,479,868 
352,418,052 
284,802,479 
247,516,476 
246,694,018 
223,555,142 
215,171,530 
210,860,386 
210,601,047' 
187,854,159 
164,789,000 
164,528,608 
162,299,795 
159,700,168 

NEW YORK CITY 



No. of 


Average Number 


Factories 


of Employees 


29,621 


585,279 


10,115 


3i3,7io 


8,454 


251,286 


2,036 


99,603 


2,787 


85,058 


2,345 


103,317 


3,138 


78,894 


2,225 


54,4i6 


i,74i 


69,620 


1,728 


61,839 


2,502 


73,769 


2,135 


59,86: 


2,275 


63,084 


1,349 


28,295 


975 


31,630 


770 


3l,O2l 


2,334 


31,758 


2,201 


13,095 



$1,519,143,429 
515,302,755 

164,789,000 

58,708,792 

34,887,000 
$2,292,830,976 



No of 
Factories 

21,807 
6,096 

975 

1,271 

192 

30,341 



Average Number 
of Employees 

385,901 
140,831 

31,630 

19,387 
7,479 



585,229 




GARFORD MOTOR TRUCK Co. 



STANDARD STEEL CAR Co. 



Two new automobile service stations now being erected on the Bridge Plaza, 
Long Island City. 



100 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



NEW INDUSTRIES 



The following are a few of the larger and nationally known industrial con- 
cerns which have either purchased property or erected plants in Queens Borough 
during the past year or two. 



NAME 

American Chicle Co. 

American Radiator Co. 

Anchor Cap & Closure Co. 

Art Ornamental Company 

Blickman, S. & Co. 

C. H. Motors Corporation 

Cole- Duncan Boiler Works 

Connelly Iron Sponge & Governor Co. 

Egleston Brothers & Co. 

Eureka Rubber Company 

Fahnestock Electric Co 

Famous Players-Lasky Corporation 

Fruit Products Corp. 

G. M. Film Printing Corp. 

Garford Motor Truck Co. 

Gehnrich Indirect Heat Oven Company 

General Carbonic Company 

Johnson Coin Counting Machine Co. 

Karpen Brothers & Co. 

Latham Litho & Printing Co. 

Lauraine Magneto Company 

Liquid Carbonic Company 

Loft, Inc. 

McHugh Willow Furniture Co. 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 

Norma Company of America 

Palmolive Company 

Payet Silk Works 

Perfect Window Regulator Co. 

Piel Company, G. 

Pittsburg Plate Glass Company 

Pyroxloid Company 

Remington Typewriter Company 

Repetti, Inc. 

Sawyer Biscuit Company 

Sea I sand Thread Company 

Selznick Pictures Corporation 

Sheperd Company, C. E. 

Standard Steel Car Co. 

Tapley Company, J. F. 

Tiffin Products Inc. 

Waite-Bartlett Mfg. Co. 

Waldes & Company 

Walworth Manufacturing Co. 

Wappler Electric Company 

White Company 

Wm. Wrigley Company 



LOCATION ARTICLE MANUFACTURED 

Long Island City Chewing Gum 

Laural Hill Radiators 

Long Island City Rubber Rings 

Celluloid Articles 
Metal Stampings 
Auto Trucks 
Boilers 
Iron Pipes 
Iron Works 
Rubber Goods 
Electric Supplies 
Motion Pictures 
Fruit Products 
Motion Picture films 
Motor Trucks 
Ovens 

Carbonic Gas 
Coin Wrappers 
Furniture 

Woo >ide Posters 

Long Island City Magnetos 

Carbonic Gas 
Candy 
Furniture 
Printing Plant 
Ball Bearings 
Soap 

Silk Dyeing 
Window Regulators 
Auto Horns 

" " " Glass 

" " Celluloid Articles 

Flushing Typewriters 

Long Island City Candy 

" Biscuits 

Whit?tone Thread 

Long Island City Motion Pictures 

" Bookbinding 

Automobiles 
" " Bookbinding 

Candy 

" " X-Ray Apparatus 

" " " Koh-I-Noor Fasteners 

" " Iron Pipes 

" " " X-Ray Apparatus 

" " " Motor Trucks 

Maspeth Chewing Gum 



NEW YORK CITY 



101 




ASTORIA MAHOGANY Co. EST. 1876. 




WM. DEMUTH & Co., RICHMOND HILL, MANUFACTURERS OF SMOKING PIPES 

AND ACCESSORIES. EST. 1900. 



102 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



"MADE IN QUEENS" 



Acids 

Acousticons 
Agate Ware 
Aircraft 
Airplanes 
Airplane Motor 

Heat Indicators 
Airplane Parts 
Airplane Propellers 
Aluminum Castings 
Angle Plates 
Aniline Colors 



Baby Carriages 

Bags & Bagging 

Ball Bearings 

Bank Fixtures 

Banners 

Barrels (Steel & Wooden) 

Bath Tubs 

Batteries 

Beds & Bedding 

Billiard Tables 

Biscuits 

Bisulphite of Soda 

Blank Books 

Blowers, Exhaust 



"A" 

Antiseptics 
Architectural Bronze 
Architectural Iron Work 
Architectural Patterns 
Architectural Woodwork 
Artesian Well Drillers 
Artesian Well Machinery 
Art Goods 

Artificial Stone 
Auto Bodies 
Auto Horns 

"B" 

Boats 

Boilers 

Boiler Compound 

Book Binding 

Bottles 

Box Springs 

Boxes 

Braids 

Brass & Bronze Castings 

Brass Faucets 

Brass Locomotive Appliances 

Brassieres 

Brick (Fire) 

Bronze (Architectural) 



Auto Tires 
Auto Trucks 
Automobiles 
Automobile Motor 
Heat Indicators 
Auto. Parts & Accessories 
Automobile Specialties 

Automobile Equipment 
Auto Wheels 
Autopeds 
Awnings 

Bronze Ware 

Bowling Alleys 

Bronze Powders 

Brushes 

Buckets 

Buckles 

Buffing Machines 

Building Material 

Building Stone 

Builders Supplies 

Bungs 

Bushings 

Buttons 

Button Machinery 



Cabinets Chemicals 

Candy Chewing Gum 

Cans Chicory 

Canvas Goods (Tents) Cigars 

Canvas Upper Rubber Sole Cleaning Machinery 

Footwear Clips 

Carbonic Acid Gas Clothing 

Carburetors Coffee 

Cardboard Coin Wrappers 
Carmel, Burnt Sugar Coloring Colors 

Carpets Colored Optical Glass 

Caskets Combs 

Celluloid Commercial Auto Bodies 

Cement Composition Flooring 
Chains 

"D" 



Dairy Supplies 

Davits 

Dental & Druggists' Rubber 

Goods 

Dental Instruments 
Diamond Saw Machinery 
Dictographs 
Dictophones 



Dies 

Disinfectants 
Disenfecting Appliances 
Display Fixtures & Forms 
Door Sash and Trim 
Dress Shields 
Drop Hammers 

"E" 



Electric Machinery Appliances Electric Switchboards 
Electric Supplies Electricity 



Concrete 

Copper Smelting & Refining 

Copper Tanks, Vats & Coils 

Cordage 

Cornices 

Corsets 

Crackers 

Cranes & Hoisting Machinery 

Creamery Machinery 

Creosoting 

Crullers 
Cutlery 
Cut Outs 



Drugs & Preparations 

Dryers Colors 

Dumbwaiters 

Dye Stuffs 

Dyeing 

Dyewood Extracts 



Electric Polishing & Plating 
Emery Grinders 



NEW YORK CITY 



103 



Fasteners 

Fat Melters 

Fertilizer 

Fibreloid 

Fire Extinguishers 

Fireproof Doors & Windows 

Gas (Acetylene) 
Gas (Illuminating) 
Gas Fixtures 
Gas Lighting Fixtures 

Hand Bags 
Hats 

Hardware 
Headwear 



Fireworks 
Flashlights (Daylo) 
Flavoring Extracts 
Floors (Cement) 
Florists' Supplies 

"G" 

Gases (Oxygen & Hydrogen) 
General Machine Work 
Glass 
Gloves 

"H" 

Heating Apparatus 
Hides 
Hoisting Buckets 



Folding Boxes 

Forgings 

Fruit Products 

Fur Dressing & Dyeing 

Furniture 



Glue 

Granite Monuments 

Greases 



Household Supplies 
Hospital Supplies 
Hydroplanes 



Ice 

Ice Cream 

Illuminated Street Car Signs 

Industrial Cars 

Japans 



Inks and Printing Inks 

Insecticides 

Iron Stairs 

"J" 

Jewelers' Boxes 



Iron Work 
Ivory Goods 
Instruments 



Kitchen Utensils 



Labeling Machines 

Laces and Embroideries 

Lacquers 

Lamps 

Laundry Equipment 



Knit Goods 

"L" 

Leather Dressing 
Leggings 
Life Boats 
Life Rafts 



Lighting Fixtures 

Liquid Soap 

Lithographing 

Loose Leaf (Binding Devices) 




Ballinger & Perrot, Architects and Engineers. 
THE NEW YORK CONSOLIDATED CARD Co, THE TIFFIN PRODUCTS, INC. 



104 



CHAMBER or COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Macaroni 

Machinery Castings 

Machines (Special) 

Magnetos 

Mahogany Veneers 

Malt 

Marble Cutting 

Matches 

Mattresses 

Medicines 

Nickle Ware 

Oil 

Oil Stoves 

Packing Boxes 

Paint 

Painters' Supplies 

Paper Bags 

Paper Novelties 

Paper . Specialties 

Pattern Making 

Radiators 

Radium Dials 

Ratan and Wicker Ware 

Safety Guards 

Salad Dressings 

Saws 

Scarfs 

Scouring Powder 

Screw Machine Products 

Seats and Chair Seats 

Sheet Iron Work 

Sheet Metal 

Sheet Metalware 

Sheets 

Ships 

Shippers Supplies 

Tallow Products 

Tanks 

Telephone Booths 

Terra Cotta 

Textiles 

Undertakers' Supplies 
Varnish 



"M" 

Metalcrete (Liquid) 
Metal Goods 
Metal Specialties 
Meters (Water) 
Metal Polishes 
Metals and Metal Work 
Metholoid 

Mill and Cabinet Work 
Mill Work 

"N" 
Novelties 

"O" 
Organs 
Ornamental Iron 

"P" 

Pearl Button Machinery 
Petroleum 
Pharmaceuticals 
Phonographs 
Pianoforte Materials 
Pianos 
Pickles 

"R" 

Ribbons 
Roofing 
Rope 

"S" 
,Shoes 
Signs 
Silk 

Silk Finishing & Dyeing 
Silk Shoe Binding 
Silver Novelties 
Skates 
Skirts 
Smelting 
Soap 
Starch 
Stationery 
Steam Specialties 

"T" 

Thermometers 
Tin Cans 
Tobacco Pipes 
Toilet Preparations 
Tools 

"U" 
Underwear 

"V" 
Veneers (Mahogany, etc.) 



Motometers 
Motor Boats 
Motor Trucks 
Mirrors 

Motion Pictures 
Music Cabinets 
Musical Strings 
Mustard 



Ovens 
Overalls 

Pillows 
Pillow Cases 
Pipes (Smoking) 
Playing Cards 
Plumbers' Supplies 
Polishes 
Printing Presses 

Rubber Products 
Rubber Specialties 
Rubber Tires 

Steel and Iron Work 
Steel Barrels 
Steel Plate Construction 
Stencil Machines 
Stencil Oil Paper 
Stone Cutting Machines 
Store Fixtures 
Structural Iron 
Structural Steel 
Sugar Refining 
Surgical Instruments 
Switches 



Toys 

Train Indicators 

Transparencies 

Twine 

Typewriters 



Ventilators 



Waterproofing 
Waterproofing Compounds 
Welding Machines 
White Goods 

X-Ray Machines 
Yarn 



Willow Furniture 
Window Screens 
Window Regulators 
Woodenware 

"X" 



Woodwork (Interior and Ex- 

terior) 
Wrapping Machines 



NEW YORK CITY 105 

FACTORIES 

The following list of Queens Borough factories is by no means complete. 
It includes only the larger and more important industrial establishments. There 
are hundreds of small plants with less than ten employees, which are classed as 
"factories"; such as bakeries; small print shops; garages, where automobile re- 
pairing is done ; and homes in which a few employees are engaged in needle 
trades. 

This list includes only such factories as 

(a) Own their own plants 

(b) Rent at least 2500 square feet of floor space, or 

(c) Employ 10 or more people 

The capital invested in manufacturing in a community, and not the number 
of factories, is the true index of its industrial strength. Furthermore, as this 
list is printed in April 1920, the names of the industrial establishments locating 
in Queens Borough from that time on cannot be included. 

BOLD FACE indicates Membership in Queensboro Chamber of Commerce, 
(a) Property purchased, factory not completed. 

Number of Year 
Employees Established 
Company and Address Articles Manufactured April, 1920 in Queens 

A 

Acme Reed Furniture Co., Woodside Furniture 12 1893 

ACORN SILK CO., L. I. City Broad silk 75 1913 

Adler Veneer Seat Co., L. I. City Seats 85 1910 

AEOLIAN COMPANY. L. I. City Pianos, victrolas 117 1915 

AMERICAN AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL CO., 

(PRESTON WORKS), Blissville Chemicals 100 

American Apothecaries Co., L. I. City Druggists' supplies 32 1905 

AMERICAN BALSA CO., L. I. City Life boats, motor boats, life 

preservers 200 1910 

AMERICAN BLAU-GAS CORP.. L. I. City Blau-gas, dri-gas 16 1917 

AMERICAN CHICLE CO., L. I. City Chewing gum. confectionery 450 1916 

AMERICAN CLIP CO., L. I. City Paper clips, etc 75 1903 

American Die & Tool Works, L. I. City Dies and tools (a) 1919 

AMERICAN DRUGGISTS SYNDICATE, L. I. City. Drugs and chemicals 900 1907 

AMERICAN EVER READY WORKS. L. I. City. ... Flashlights (Daylo), storage 

and dry batteries 1700 1915 

American Fibre Chair Seat Corp., L. I. City Chair seats 75 .... 

AMERICAN HARD RUBBER CO., College Point... Hard rubber articles 1325 1854 

American Radiator Co., L. I. City Radiators (a) 1919 

ANCHOR CAP & CLOSURE CORP., L. I. City Caps for tumblers, mason jar 

rubber rings 400 1920 

ANDERSON. E. D., INC., L. I. City Automatic machinery 90 1915 

ANDREWS LEAD CO., L. I. City White lead 18 1920 

ANTHONY CO.. L. I. City Liquid fuel 65 1912 

ART ORNAMENT CO., L. I. City Toilet articles 50 1920 

Astoria Boat Works, L. I. City Boats 22 1913 

ASTORIA MAHOGANY CO., L. I. City Mahogany lumber and veneer. . . 400 1876 

ASTORIA LIGHT, HEAT & POWER .CO.. L. I. 

City Illuminating gas 875 

Astoria Pearl Button Co., L. I. City Pearl buttons 20 

ASTORIA SILK WORKS, L. I. City Silk 232 

ATLANTIC HYGIENIC ICE CO.. Woodhaven Ice 10 

ATLANTIC RUBBER MFG. CORP., College Point. . Rubber articles 230 

ATLANTIC MACARONI CO.. L. I. City Macaroni 40 

AUTO SALES CORPORATION, L. I. City Slot machines 100 

B 

Barber Shoe Co.. Frank. L. I. City Shoes 51 1896 

Barker Sweet Mfg. Co., Jamaica Saws 20 1909 

Barthels Mfg. Co., Glendale Braids and laces 100 1903 

Bayer, Gardner Himes Co. L. I. City Hardware for builders 25 1913 

Bayview Ribbon Co., Glendale Ribbons 50 1908 

BEACON FALLS RUBBER SHOE CO., College 

Point Shoes, rubber footwear 700 1916 

BELLON. INC.. AUGUST, Rockaway Beach Structural and ornamental iron 10 1895 

BLACK BEAR CO., L. I. City Oils and factory supplies 10 1890 

Bielecky Bros. Co. Woodside Willow and reed furniture 10 1916 

BLICKMAN. S.. L. I. City Sheet metal specialties 250 1920 

BOYCE-VEEDER CO., L. I. City Fire extinguishers.... 70 1919 

BRADBURY CO., F. L., L. I. City Crullers 160 1913 

BRADLEY MFG. CO.. A. J., L. I. City Stencil papers 10 1911 



106 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

Number of Year 
Employees Established 
Company and Address Articles Manufactured April, 1920 in Queens 

BRADLEY & SON, WILLIAM, L. I. City Cut stone and marble 100 1907 

Brandes Mfg Co., Julius, College Point Silk 25 1885 

BREWSTER & CO., L. I. City Automobiles 995 1909 

BRIGGS, INC., STEPHEN, L. I. City ! . . Barrels 20 1900 

BROCKVVAY, FITZHUGH & STEWART, INC., 

Evergreen Labels and fibre shipping con- 
tainers 125 1918 

BROOKLYN FOUNDRY CO., L. I. City Grey iron castings 150 1914 

Brown Co., A. B.. Winfield Window screens and weather 

strips 17 1917 

BROWN & CO., GEORGE, L. I. City Stone cutting 150 1850 

BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER CO., L. I. 

City Billiard tables, .bowling alleys, 

phonographs, auto tires 100 1904 

BRETT LITHOGRAPH CO., L. I. City Lithographing 170 1914 

Bulls Eye Rubber Co., L. I. City Rubber heels 15 1918 

Buhler, Edmund, L. I. City Sewer pipe 10 1910 

c 

C-H MOTORS CORPORATION, L. I. City Automobile assembling 50 1920 

Callister, W. L. & G. T., Queens, L. I Wagons 54 1852 

CALMAN & CO., EMIL. L. I. City Paint and varnish 46 1850 

CARBOLA CHEMICAL CO., L. I. City Disinfecting whitewash 10 1919 

CARPENTER CO., JOHN R., Jamaica Sash, door and trim 125 1888 

CASSIDY CO., INC., L. I. City Lighting fixtures 125 1915 

GATING, WILLIAM B., Winfield Rope and cord 60 1892 

CENTRAL SMELTING & REFINING CO.. L. I. 

City Smelting and refining 15 1898 

Chase Roberts & Co., L. I. City Paint 50 1895 

CHILTON PAINT CO., College Point Paint and varnish 30 1911 

CLAUDEL CARBURETOR CO., INC., L. I. City. . . Carburetors 10 1919 

CLOCHESSY. JOHN, Rockaway Beach Paper bags and folding boxes. . . 60 1918 

CODEX ANTISEPTIC CO., L. I. City Antiseptics 10 1920 

COLE-DUNCAN BOILER WORKS, L. I. City Boilers 20 1919 

COLLEGE POINT BOAT CORP., College Point. . . .Boats 60 1917 

Colodor Engineering Corporation, L. I. City Strainers for autos 10 1920 

COLUMBIA PAPER BAG CO., L. I. City Paper bags 100 1903 

COMFORT SANDAL CO.. L. I. City Sandals and shoes 90 1915 

COMMERCIAL RESEARCH CO., Flushing Metal etching, chemical and 

welding products 50 1915 

Compound Specialty Co.. L. I. City Paint 10 1902 

CONCORD CONSTRUCTION CO., Ridgewood Ornamental iron work and forg- 

ings 10 1905 

Concrete Steel Co., L. L City Reinforcing bars (a) 1919 

CONNELLY IRON SPONGE & GOVERNOR CO., 

L. I. City Iron pipe 20 1920 

Cork & Zicha Marble Co., L. I. City Marble works 14 1915 

Cornellist Textile Co., L. I. .City Flushings 30 1913 

COURTADE JOS. & SONS, L. I. City Piano cases 10 1919 

CUNNINGHAM, W. J Brass foundry 20 1852 

CUNNINGHAM, THE CHRISTOPHER CO., L. I. 

City High pressure steam boilers .... 65 1 862 

D 

DEERY. JOHN J. CO., INC., L. I. City Marble sawing 18 1916 

DEFENDER MFG. CO.. L. I. City Sheets and pillow cases 200 1916 

Delatour Beverage Corp., L. I. City Beverages 25 1919 

DEMUTH, WM. & CO., Richmond Hill Tobacco pipes and smokers' arti- 
cles 1000 1900 

DE NOBILI CIGAR CO., L. I. City Cigars 700 1906 

Detroit Pressed Steel Wheel Co., L. I. City Solid steel disks for automobile 

wheels 25 1919 

Diamond Red Paint Co.. L. I. City Paints 10 1919 

DICTOGRAPH PRODUCTS CORP.. Jamaica Acousticons. dictographs 185 1906 

Dillman Baking Co., Inc., Brooklyn Hills Bakery products 115 1915 

DOMESTIC SOAP MFG. CO.. L. I. City Soap 14 1891 

Donaldson Roman Stone Co., Richmond Hill Structural stone 40 1914 

Druckerman, L. & M.. Woodhaven Embroideries 100 1888 

Dukeshire Steel & Forge Co.. Maspeth Forgings 20 1918 

DURKEE, E. R. & CO.. Elmhurst Spices and food products 269 1918 

DUVALIAN PRODUCTS CORP., L. I. City Leather specialty goods 45 1914 

E 

ELANDES RIBBON CO., INC., Whitestone Silk ribbons 275 1915 

Elcaya Facial Cream Co., L. I. City Facial creams 

ELIAS JOSEPH & CO., L. I. City Glass, mirrors, etc 125 1915 

ELMHURST ICE CO.. Elmhurst Ice 20 1918 

EMPIRE ART METAL CO., College Point Hollow steel doors, interior trim 400 1913 

EMPIRE TUBE & STEEL CORP.. College Point Steel tubing 300 1919 

EMERSON PHONOGRAPH CO.. INC., L. I. City. . .Phonograph records 400 1920 

Empire City Iron Works. L. I. City Ornamental iron (*) 

Eppinger & Russell, L. I. City Creosoted lumber, piling and ties 

Evergreen Knittin? Mills, Evergreen Knit goods 32 1892 

EUREKA RUBBER CO., L. I. City Rubber products 25 1916 

Expanded Metal Safety Guard Co., L. I. City Metal guards 15 1920 



NEW YORK CITY 107 

Number of Year 
Employees Established 
Company and Address Articles Manufactured April, 1920 in Queens 

F 

FAHNESTOCK ELECTRIC CO., L. I. City Spring binding posts, electrical 

supplies 20 1916 

FAMOUS PLAYERS-LASKY CORP., L. I. City Motion pictures 500 

Fassler & Klein Iron Works, L. I. City Iron works 15 

Federal Brass & Bronze Co.. L. I. City Architectural brass and bronze. . 17 

Feigin, F. A., L. I. City. . Cabinet makers 35 

Fenner, Geo. L., L. I. City Printing inks, etc 10 

FISHER. JOHN C. MFG. CO., L. I. City Metal specialties 20 

Franklin Brass Foundry, L. I. City Castings 35 

FRISCH TOILET MIRROR CO., L. I. City Toilet mirrors 14 

Fruit Products Corp., L. I. City Fruit products (*) 

G 

G. M. FILM PRINTING CO., L. I. City Film printing (*) 1919 

Gahagan, W. H., Arverne Shipbuilders 150 

Garford Motor Co., L. I. City Service station (*) 

GARSIDE. A. & SONS, INC., L. I. City LShoes 300 1918 

GAUMONT MOTION PICTURE CO., Flushing. .. .Motion pictures 150 1912 

GEHNRICH INDIRECT HEAT OVEN CO., Flush- 
ing Ovens and oven equipment 100 

GENERAL CARBONIC CO., L. I. City Carbonic gas 50 1919 

General Chemical Co.. Laurel Hill Chemicals 200 1900 

Gillies, James, L. I. City Stone yard 10 

GLEASON-TIEBOUT GLASS CO., Maspeth Glass 250 1903 

GOLDBERG & DAVIDSON, L. I. City Buttons 20 1920 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., L. I. City Automobile tires 50 1913 

GOULD-MERSEREAU CO., L. I. City Drapery, carpet and cabinet 

hardware 140 1919 

Grady Mfg. Co., The, L. I. City Metal polish 20 1914 

Gray, C. M. Marble & Slate Co.. L. I. City Marble cutting 12 1908 

GREENPOINT-SOUTHERN CO., L. I. City Mattresses, box springs, pillows 35 1919 

GREENPOINT FIRE BRICK CO., L. I. City Fire brick, boiler refractories. . . 40 1868 

GROSSMAN, MORGAN, L. I. City Shoes 50 1920 

H 

Haering & Matter, College Point Silk dyeing 35 1905 

HARMON COLOR WORKS, College Point Dry and pulp colors 20 1916 

HARROLDS MOTOR CAR CO., L. I. City Fierce-Arrow service station 350 1913 

HEATLESS DENTAL WHEEL CO., L. I. City Dental appliances 28 1916 

HELLMAN, RICHARD, INC., L. I. City Blue Ribbon mayonnaise 82 1915 

HELLMAN MOTOR CORP., L. I. City Ford automobiles (a) 1920 

Hill Button Works. L. I. City Buttons 100 

Hill Laundry Equipment Co., L. I. City Laundry equipment 10 1917 

Himoff Machine Co., L. I. City Machines 30 1916 

HOLLIDAY KEMP CO., INC., Woodside Dyes, aniline colors 25 1916 

HORN HOLLAND CO.. L. I. City Paints and varnishes 40 1914 

HOUPERT MACHINE CO., L. I. City Machine shop 175 1918 

Howard Printing Co., L. I. City Printing 50 1920 

Hoskins, R. H. Shoe Co., L. I. City Shoes 75 1914 

HOWELL, FIELD & GODDARD, INC., L. I. City. . Fireproof doors and windows... 100 1912 

HUBER, JOSEPH, INC.. L. I. City Auto bodies 25 1900 

HUGHES, WM. & CO.. INC.. Glendale Cotton waste 25 1919 

HUNTER ILLUMINATED CAR SIGN CO., Flush- 
ing Street car destination signs, 

sheet steel products 65 1910 

H. & N. Carburetor Co.. L. I. City Carburetors 10 1916 

I 

IMPERIAL METAL MFG. CORP., L. I. City Metal specialties... 100 1913 

IMPERIAL PAINT CO., L. I. City Paint 48 1913 

Indian Refining Co., L. I. City Oils 26 1914 

INTERNATIONAL MOTOR CO., L. I. City Automobiles 7.S 1919 

INTERNATIONAL OXYGEN CO.. College Point. . .Oxygen apparatus 14 1915 

International Silk Winding Co., L. I. City Silk winding 10 1920 

IRVING IRON WORKS Subway grating and safsteps... 200 1907 



J 



J. M. SKIRT CO., Woodside Skirts 75 1913 

Jackson, J. A., L. I. City Marble cutting 10 1905 

Jamaica Consumers' Ice Co., Jamaica Ice 30 1907 

JENSEN'S AUTO BODY WORKS, L. I. City Auto bodies 14 1913 

JETER A. H. & CO., INC., L. I. City Metal specialties 18 1913 

JOHNSTON, H. S. DRUG CO., Elmhurst Drugs and chemicals 20 1898 

JOHNSON COIN COUNTING MACHINE CO., 

L. I. City Coin wrapping machines 50 1919 

JUST, GEORGE A. CO.. L. I. City Fabricated iron and steel. . . . 200 1903 



108 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

Number of Year 
Employees Established 
Company and Address Articles Manufactured April, 1920 in Queens 

K 

KARPEN, S. & BROS., L. I. City Upholstered furniture. . . 350 1920 

REINER WILLIAMS STAMPING CO., Richmond 

Hill Drawn and stamped sheet metal 300 1912 

KLEIN BROTHERS, L. I. CITY Japanese bamboo furniture 80 1902 

Klein, J., Iron Works, L. I. City Structural and ornamental iron 20 1911 

KLEINERT, I. B. RUBBER CO., College Point Rubber specialties (dress shields) 1200 1884 

KNICKERBOCKER ICE .CO., L. I. City Ice 100 1919 

KOZAK & McLOUGHLIN, L. I. City Shoes 300 1916 

KRAEMER BROS. CO.. College Point Sash, frames, doors, etc 35 1885 

L 

L. W. F. ENGINEERING CO., College Point Aeroplanes, cabinets 100 1916 

LA COUR IRON WORKS, L. I. City Structural steel. ornamental 

iron, cranes and hoists 80 1912 

LA FRANCE SOAP & PERFUME CO., L. I. City.. Soaps and perfumes 10 1920 

LALANCE & GROSJEAN MFG. CO., Woodhaven. . .Agate, nickel, steel ware 1700 1850 

Lang, Carl & Hoffman, L. I. City Silks 250 1915 

LATHAM LITHO & PRINTING CO., Woodside. . . . Posters, car cards (*) 1920 

LAURAINE MAGNETO CO., L. I. City Magnetos 60 1919 

Lewis & Vought Corp., L. I. City Airplanes , 65 1917 

Lion Varnish Co.. Evergreen Varnish 10 1905 

Lissberger, Marks & Son, Inc.. L. I. City , White lead 100 1907 

LOFT, INC., L. I. City ,. Candy 1000 1915 

LONG ISLAND MFG. CO., College Point Hats 80 1919 

LONG ISLAND STAR PUB. CO., L. I. City Printing 65 1864 

LOOSE-WILES BISCUIT CO., L. I. City Sunshine biscuits, cakes and 

crackers 1400 1914 

M 

McHUGH, JOS. P. & SON, L. I. City Willow furniture... 60 1919 

MALLINSON, H. R. & CO., INC.. L. I. City Silk 211 1885 

Manhattan Pearl Button Co.. L. I. City Pearl buttons 14 1896 

MANHATTAN-ROME CO., L. I. City Metal beds and couches 175 1917 

MANHATTAN SILK CO., College Point.. ..Silk . 200 1890 

MATHESON LEAD CO., L. I. City ..White lead, oxides... ... 55 1890 

MAYER, C. B. CO., L. I. .City Interior woodwork 30 1919 

MAYER & LOWENSTEIN, L. I. City Varnishes, japans enamels 50 1865 

Maxwell Motor Car Co., L. I. City Service station 10 1920 

MERRILL BROTHERS, INC., Maspeth Drop forgings. hammers, etc... 100 1906 

METAL STAMPING CO., L. I. City Auto accessories 200' 1904 

METROPOLITAN ELEC. MFG. CO., L. I. City.... Switchboards 264 1910 

METROPOLITAN LIFE INS. CO., L. I. City Printing and binding 300 1920 

METROPOLITAN TOBACCO CO. Jamaica. . -Cigars 45 1907 

MEURER STEEL BARREL CO., INC., L. I. City. Barrels " 200 1912 

MEYERS, WILLARD F. MACHINE .CO., L. I. City. Machines . 60 1880 

MIGEL, J. A., INC., L. I. City silk 100 1915 

Miller, Julius, L. I. City Shoes" 250 1910 

Mirrolike Mfg. Co.. L. I. City '.', Polishes' " 12 1917 

MODEL BRASSIERE CO., Elmhurst. . Clothing 350 1917 

MOORE'S BAKERY. L. I. City. . Bakintr 58 1853 

MOTOMETER COMPANY, THE, INC., L. I. City'. '. Motomet'e'rV ".'.'.'.'. 450 1916 

MOTT, J L. IRON WORKS, L. I. City . Iron works, etc 10 1919 

MULLEN & BUCKLEY, INC., Far Rockaway Window screens and porch 

screens 100 

Muller Paper Goods Co., Ridgewood p ap er goods 1902 

Multiple Storage Battery Co., Jamaica. .. Storaee batteries 75 1919 

MUNICIPAL STUDIO, L. I. City . . . . . . . '. \ Motion pictures" ! () 1920 

N 

NATIONAL BRIDGE WORKS. L. I. City Structural steel 150 1904 

NATIONAL .CASKET CO., L. I. City Caskets, undertakers' supplies. . . 250 1915 

NATIONAL CHAIN CO.. College Point Chains 150 1915 

NATIONAL ENAMELING & STAMPING CO., 

Laurel Hill Enamel ware 800 1897 

National Indicator Co., L. I. City Train indicators 28 1912 

NATIONAL LABELING MACHINE CO.. L.I. City. Labels 15 1916 

NATIONAL SUGAR REFINING CO. OF N. J., 

L. I. City Sugar 850 1897 

NATIONAL VARNISH CO., L. I. City Varhish 50 1908 

Needham. A. W. Machine Co., L. I. City LLMachines 15 1902 

NEPTUNE METER CO., L. I. City Water, gasoline and oil meters. . 750 1892 

NEW AMSTERDAM GAS CO., L. I. City Illuminating gas 600 

NEW YORK ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 

CO.. L. I. City Terracotta 200 1886 

NEW YORK CONSOLIDATED CARD CO., L. I. 

City Playing cards 450 1915 

NEW YORK & QUEENS ELECTRIC LIGHT & 

POWER CO.. L. I. City Electricity 857 1901 

NEW YORK & QUEENS GAS CO.. Flushing Illuminating gas 100 1854 

NIAGARA KNITTING MILLS CORP., L. I. City . .Bathing suits 15 1920 

NICHOLS COPPER CO., Laurel Hill Copper refining 1045 1873 

NORMA COMPANY OF AMERICA, THE, L. I. 

City ; Precision ball bearings 350 1919 

NORMAN-SETON, INC., Winfield Metal doors and fireproofing 84 1910 



NEW YORK CITY 109 

Number of Year 
Employees Established 
Company and Address Articles Manufactured April, 1920 in Queens 

o 

OAKES MFG. CO., L. I. City Dyewood extracts 130 1883 

Oakland Motor Car Co., L. I. City Service station 80 1919 

OLD RELIABLE MOTOR TRUCK CORP., L. I. 

City Motor trucks 100 1918 

Operaphone Mfg. Co., L. I. City Phonograph records 37 

ORGANIC SALT & ACID CO., INC.. L. I. City Salicylates and Pharmaceuticals 50 

ORESENIGO CO., THE, INC., L. I. City Furniture 300 1915 

P 

PACKARD MOTOR CAR CO. OF N. Y., L. I. City . Automobile service station 600 1909 

PARAGON PLASTER CO., Jamaica Plaster 25 1908 

PARTRIDGE, E. S. CO., L. I. City Service station (Owen Magnetic 

Biddle, Liberty 55, Lex autos) 55 1919 

Pathescope Co. of America, The, L. I. City Motion picture machines and 

films 18 1916 

PATTERSON SARGENT CO., L. I. City Paints and varnishes 50 1919 

PAYET SILK DYEING CORP.. L. I. City Silk dyeing 45 1920 

Peerless Glass Co.. L. I. City Glass bottles 250 1900 

PELLETIER, NAPOLEON, Maspeth Tin cans 30 1900 

Perfection Doll Co., L. I. City Character dolls 38 1915 

PERFECT WINDOW REGULATOR CO., L. I. 

City Auto window regulators 170 1920 

PIEL, G. CO., INC., L. I. City Automobile horns 125 1911 

PIROXLOID PRODUCTS CORP., L. I. City Celluloid articles 150 1919 

Pisani Bros., L. I. City Marble cutting 10 1904 

PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS CO., L. I. City Glass 150 1919 

POLACHEK BRONZE & IRON CO., L. I. City Bronze and iron works 100 1912 

PRATT & LAMBERT CO.. L. I. City Paints and varnishes 50 1850 

PREMIER METAL ETCHING .CO.. L. I. City Name plates, dials, castings 125 1917 

PRESSED & WELDED STEEL PRODUCTS CO., 

INC., L. I. City Pressed and welded sheet steel 

products 75 1913 

PROPPER SILK HOSIERY CO., L. I. City Silk hosiery 26 1919 



Q 



QUEENSBORO BRASS & BRONZE FOUNDRY, 

L. I. City Brass and bronze 14 1914 

Queens Pattern Works, Astoria Patterns 15 1914 

QUEENS BOROUGH GAS & ELECTRIC CO., Far 

Rockaway Electricity and gas 200 1902 

Queensboro Tool & Die Co., L. I. City Dies and tools 12 1916 

QUEZAL ART GLASS DECORATING CO., Mas- 
peth Optical glass 40 1902 

QUIGLEY FURNACE SPECIALTY CO., Jamaica. .Furnace material and appliances 10 1916 

R 

R. & L. BALLBEARING CO., L. I. City Ball bearings 10 1920 

RAINIER MOTOR CORP., Flushing Motor trucks 200 1916 

RAVENSWOOD PAPER .MILL CO., L. I. City Boxboard and lining 90 1905 

RECKNAGEL. A., INC., L. I. City Hardware, factory and contract- 
ors' supplies 10 1890 

REED, A. L. CO., Richmond Hill Leather goods 175 1902 

REICHARD-COULSTON, INC., L. I. City Dry paint 20 1906 

REICHEL, KURT, INC., Ozone Park Fabric gloves 20 1917 

Remington Typewriter Co., Flushing Typewriters 750 1920 

Renaissance Corset Co., Flushing Corsets 40 1919 

REPUBLIC AUTO PARTS CO., L. I. City Auto accessories 

REX PAINT .CORP., L. I. City Paint .... 

Rhodes, R. W. & Co.. L. I. City Rubber brushes, etc. 50 1891 

Richey. Brown & Donald. Maspeth Iron work 200 1895 

REPETTI, INC., L. I. City Candy 285 1920 

Richmond Hill Foundry, Richmond Hill Soft iron castings 30 1906 

ROLLS-ROYCE, LTD., L. I. City Service station 50 1913 

Rogers-Peet Co., Maspeth Clothes 175 1919 

RONZONI MACARONI CO., INC.. L. I. City Macaroni 50 1919 

ROSENWASSER BROS., L. I. City Shoes and leggings 1800 1913 

RUSSELL FOUNDRY & MACHINE CO.. L. I. 

City Castings 100 1870 

S 

SAWYER BISCUIT CO., L. I. City Biscuits () 1919 

SCHIRMER, G.. INC., L. I. City '. Music publishers 195 1915 

Schults Baking Co., Jamaica , Baking ISO 1911 

SCHWANDA & SON, B., Winfield Pearl buttons 95 1902 

Sea Island Thread Co., Whitestone Thread 1920 

Scriven, J. A. & Co.. L. I. City Knit underwear 11 1916 

SELF CLASP ENVELOPE CO., L. I. City Envelopes 60 1920 

SELZN.ICK PICTURES CORP., L. I. City Motion pictures.... () 1919 

SEXAUER & LEMKE. INC., L. I. City Structural steel and iron.. 75 1900 

SHEPHERD, C. E. CO.. L. I. City Book binders 200 1919 

Shore Instrument Mfg. Co., Jamaica Scientific testing instruments.., 55 1920 

SHOREHAM NOVELTY CO., Winfield Novelties (celluloid) 100 1917 



110 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

Number of Year 
Employees Established 
Company and Address Articles Manufactured April, 1920 in Queens 

SHUTTLEWORTH, EDWIN CO., L. I. .City Cut stone, marble SO 1906 

SIMMONS, JOHN CO., L. I. City Pipe, iron fittings, etc 50 1918 

Smith & Andrews, L. I. City Clothes 32 1920 

SMITH, EDWARD & CO., L. I. City Varnish and colors 1827 

SMITH, PETER H.. L. I. City Ladies' underwear 20 1920 

SOHMER PIANO CO., L. I. City Pianos 138 1886 

SORENSEN, C. M. -CO., INC., L. I. City Surgical apparatas (*) 1920 

SPEAR & CO., Woodhaven Caps and hats 50 1910 

Stacey Canadian Skate Co., L. I. City Skates 30 1920 

STANDARD OIL CO. OF N. Y., L. I. City Oil refining 1000 1885 

STANDARD STEEL CAR CO.. L. I. City Service station 30 1920 

STAR RIBBON CO., L. I. City Rihbons 100 1906 

STAR SILK WORKS, L. I. City Silk 14 1919 

STAUNCHWOOD SHOPS, Flushing Toys 10 1919 

STEIN-DAVIES CO., L. I. City Starch products 35 1904 

STEINER MFG. CO.. L. I. City Hydrometer outfits for autos... 20 1919 

STEINWAY & SONS. L. I. City Pianos 969 1876 

STREBEL & SON, CHAS., Ridgewood Structural steel and iron 25 1908 

STUEBNER IRON WORKS, L. I. City Iron 125 1918 

SUPREME PICTURES, INC., Flushing Motion pictures 15 1919 

SWEENEY & GRAY CO., L. I. City Artesian well machinery 25 1893 

T 

TAPLEY, J. F. CO.. L. T. City Bookbinding 264 1920 

TECHNOLA PIANO CO., L. I. City Vocalions (talking machines)... 245 1913 

TEEPE, J. CHAS., INC., L. I. City Woodenware, tables, furniture.. 52 1916 

TEXAS CO.. L. I. City Oil 42 1915 

Thermokettle Co., L. I. City Coppersmiths 10 1917 

THIBAUT-WALKER CO., L. I. City Varnishes, japans, dryers 32 1908 

Third Ward Ice Co., Flushing Ice 12 1907 

THOMSON, JOHN, PRESS CO., L. I. City Machinery 145 1902 

Tiffany Furnaces. Corona Tiffany glass 40 1893 

TIFFANY STUDIOS, Corona ^Bronze castings 155 1904 

TIFFIN PRODUCTS. INC., L. I. City Candy 450 1919 

TOCH BROTHERS, L.I. City Paint, varnish, chemicals 95 1903 

TOCK SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS CORP., 

L. I. City Screw machine products 100 1917 

TRAITEL MARBLE CO., THE, L. I. City Marble, mosaic tile 87 1904 

TRANSPORT SERVICE, INC., L. I. City Electric trucks 62 1919 

Trilsch, Oscar Co., Whitestone Jewelry cases, paper boxes 100 1906 

Truscon Steel Co., L. I. City Steel 20 1918 

u 

UNITED BUTTON CO., Maspeth Buttons 250 1918 

Universal Electric Welding Co., L. I. City Electric welding 12 1915 

V 

V. & O. Press Co., The. L. I. City Presses, dies, sheet metal ma- 
chinery 125 1904 

Valvoline Oil Works, Maspeth Oils .' . . . 10 1913 

VAN BRUNT, WM. C., INC., L. I. City Structural steel and ornamental 

iron work 25 1912 

VAN IDERSTINE CO.. Laurel Hill Fat rendering 300 1906 

Vantine, A. A. Co., L. I. City Perfume 30 1917 

Victor Baking Co. Jamaica Baking 15 1917 

VOSKA FOELSCH & SIDLO., L. I. City Interior marble 43 1906 

Vogt, Walter J. & Co., Glendale Novelties and trimmings 35 1911 

w 

Waite & Bartlett. L. I. City X-Ray apparatus 30 1920 

WALDES & CO., L. I. City Snap fasteners and small metal 

parts 66 1919 

WALTERS PIANO CO. L. I. City Pianos 65 1914 

Walker Vehicle .Co., L. I. City Automobile trucks 34 1918 

WAPPLER ELECTRIC CO., L. I. City X-Ray apparatus 275 1919 

WARD. MARCUS, INC., L. I. City Writing paper, tablets 175 1917 

WEISBERG-BAER CO., THE, L. I. City Interior woodwork 150 1905 

WELDRITE CO. INC.. L. I. City Welding and machine work.... 10 1915 

WEST DISINFECTING CO., L. I. City.. Disinfectants and appliances 132 1901 

WHITE CO.. L. I. City Motor truck service station 500 1919 

WHITE A. J., LTD. Jamaica Pharmaceuticals 

WICKE, WM., RIBBON CO., Glendale Narrow ribbons 200 1898 

Wild, Joseph & Co.. L. I. City Carpets 100 1885 

Willie, John. Astoria Knit goods 25 1916 

WILLEY. C. A.. CO.. L. I. City Varnish and paint 100 1890 

WILLIAMSON. D. D. & CO. L. I. City Drugs and chemicals 1875 

WILSON PRINTING INK CO , W. D., L. I. City Ink 18 1881 

Wissmach Glass Co.. Paul, L. I. City Glass 10 1916 

WRIGLEY, WM., JR., CO., Maspeth Chewing gum 274 1919 

Y 

YOUNG & METZNER, L. I. City Jute bags and bagging 218 1893 



NEW YORK CITY 



111 




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112 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

RESIDENTIAL ADVANTAGES 




EW YORK CITY is faced in the Spring of 1920 with the most 
serious shortage of housing facilities in its history. For the 
first time in years the city is underbuilt. The stoppage of 
building construction during the war, the increased cost of 
materials, labor and transportation have all combined to bring 
about a condition which can only be remedied by the construc- 
tion of thousands of new homes of every description to house the present as 
well as the future population of 'the city. 

The logical area for the construction of these new homes is in the Borough 
of Queens. Its many attractive residential communities, served by both the new 
rapid transit extensions and the Long Island Railroad, are nearer to the business 
center of Manhattan than a large proportion of the residential communities of 
either Brooklyn or the Bronx. 

Queens Borough possesses the unusual advantage of having within its bor- 
ders thousands of acres of undeveloped land only a short distance from the 
business and population centers of the city. A circle with a 10 mile radius, 
drawn from Grand Central Station in Manhattan as its center, will include 54 
square miles of Queens Borough as compared with 50^2 square miles of Brooklyn, 
24 square miles of the Bronx and 20 square miles of Manhattan. 

The close proximity of this great undeveloped territory to the business cen- 
ters of New York, coupled with the excellent new rapid transit service, now 
available for a single fare to all parts of the city, gives Queens potentialities for 
immediate housing development, unequalled by any other borough. 

Moreover, as the cost of this land today, per lot or per acre, is so much less 
than any other property in the city with equal transportation advantages, it is 
evident that the increased cost of building construction can, to a large extent, 
be offset by the lower cost of land in Queens Borough. 

Those who are familiar with the vast area of Queens Borough, its great 
industrial development of the past ten years, its geographical relation to the 
adjacent boroughs, its new bridges, tunnels, electric railroads, and its many 
attractions and advantages from a residential standpoint, look forward to the 
construction of thousands of apartment houses, detached dwellings and multiple 
family homes in every section of the borough during' the next ten years. Queens 
Borough offers today to the home seeker, the builder and the investor, oppor- 
tunities far superior to those offered by any other section of New York. 

One object of this publication is to impress upon anyone who has not as 
yet become familiar with the transformation which has taken place in Queens 
during the past ten years, that its many new rapid transit lines have now made 
the Borough a real integral part of New York City. 

The territory adjoining the East River, where industrial and commercial 
establishments are so rapidly being built and which is served by every rapid 
transit line of the city, is the most convenient location for housing those who are 
employed in the industrial establishments in Long Island City, and those who are 
living today in the congested sections of Manhattan. 



NEW YORK CITY 



113 




MOONLIGHT ACROSS THE BAY 

Beginning at Woodside and extending eastward to the City Line at Little 
Neck and southward to Jamaica are many high-class residential sections. Still 
further south is the immense area stretching to Jamaica Bay accessible to all 
by the rapid transit and electric railroads from Brooklyn and Manhattan. Across 
Jamaica Bay is the 10 mile long Rockaway Peninsula fronting on the Atlantic 
Ocean, until recently considered too distant in point of time for all year residence, 
but now being built up with attractive homes of permanent residents, who can 
reach their offices in the business centers quicker than most commuters from 
other suburban sections. 

When it is realized that the residents of a large proportion of Queens 
Borough can reach the business, shopping and theatrical centers in Manhattan in 
less time than it takes the residents of the Bronx and Brooklyn, and of even the 
Washington Heights section of Manhattan, the reasons for the marvelous growth 
of New York eastward into Queens will be appreciated. 

All of the advantages of a home in the country, combined with facilities for 
reaching office or workshop in a surprisingly short time, are still available within 
this biggest borough. 

To every one who loves the soil and grass, or who cherishes the trees and 
pure air, a new life is opened. Within 10 to 15 minutes after boarding a modern 
electric train at Pennsylvania Station, or rapid transit trains of the city's subway 
system, one finds himself looking out upon neat suburban homes and gardens, 
refreshing the eyes wearied by the city with its scenes of rush and bustle and its 
monotonous stretches of brick and stone. 




A GARDEN IN THE "GARDEN BOROUGH." 



114 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




ROLLING HILLS MAKE THE NUMEROUS GOLF COURSES IN QUEENS UNUSUALLY ATTRACTIVE 

With every natural advantage of diversified country; of cheap, rapid and 
comfortable transportation facilities; ideal climate, attractive home surround- 
ings, and moderate priced land values; its refined and cultured population; its 
schools, churches and clubs, among the best in the country; the Borough of 
Queens offers to home seekers all that can be desired. Here one can find the 
joys of golf, fishing, boating, swimming and all other outdoor games. 

A ROUND CITY 

The most efficient city from a residential, industrial and social standpoint 
is the "round city," or one that has grown equally in all directions from the 
business center. For generations Manhattan Island has suffered all the evils of 
congested population due to its narrowness and to the barrier which the East 
River placed in the path of its inhabitants seeking homes in Queens Borough. 
The average density of population in Manhattan today is approximately 175 
persons per acre, while in Queens Borough, just across the East River, it is less 
than 7 persons per acre. With fifty thousand acres in Queens an area three 
times as large as Manhattan still undeveloped, there is every opportunity for 
the present and future population of the city to be housed comfortably in modern 
dwellings only a short ride from the business centers. 

The first step in the gradual rounding out of the city began with the con- 
struction of bridges and tunnels to Brooklyn. The complete rounding out of the 
city, however, will take place during the next ten years as a result of the new 
bridges, tunnels and rapid transit railroads which now connect Queens with 
Manhattan. 




A SPANKING BREEZE ADDS ZEST TO THE JOYS OF YACHTING 



NEW YORK CITY 



115 




FLUSHING HIGH SCHOOL 

The business center of Manhattan has gradually moved northward until 
today it is directly opposite Queens Borough. A generation ago the shopping 
center was located between 14th Street and 23rd Street. Then it moved to 
34th Street and from there to 42nd Street. Today huge office buildings are 
even being erected in the 57th Street zone. Its growth further north is limited 
by Central Park. The permanent business center of the city was fixed by the 
construction of Grand Central Station at 42nd Street and Park Avenue, and the 
Pennsylvania Station at 33rd Street and Seventh Avenue. Today, not only 
the big office buildings, the mammoth department stores and huge hotels, but 
the many theatres, restaurants, and 'loft buildings in this midtown zone, testify 
to the permanence of this all day, twenty-four hour, business center of New 
York. 

. . As the residential communities of Queens Borough have been put in such 
close touch with this business center by the many new transportation lines east- 
ward from 34th Street, 42nd Street and 59th Street, can there be any doubt that 
the largest home building development in New York City will take place in 
Queens Borough during the next ten years. 

Knowledge of these facts will quickly convince anyone that Queens is the 
most convenient home borough of New York City where millions of people will 
live in health and contentment, in modern dwellings amid beautiful surround- 
ings, with plenty of light and air, trees and gardens. 




SURF BATHING IN THE ATLANTIC 



116 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

REMARKABLE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT HAS 
GIVEN IMPETUS TO RESIDENTIAL GROWTH 

One of the most important factors contributing to the present residential 
growth of Queens is the large number of modern, self-contained, huge industrial 
plants which have been erected throughout the borough during the past 10 years. 
Each new industry radiates its influence to every nook and corner of the bor- 
ough. Long Island City with its waterfront, its rail facilities and its nearness to 
the great retail centers of Manhattan has become the greatest manufacturing 
center in New York City. Every new manufacturing concern, establishing either 
in Long Island City or in other parts of the borough, requires the construction 
of new homes to house its employees. Tenements and multiple family build- 
ings are needed nearby for the unskilled wage earners. Detached dwellings 
and apartments, within convenient travelling distance by trolley, train or rapid 
transit, are needed for the higher paid skilled mechanics and operatives. For 
the executives of these same plants, Queens Borough offers every attraction 
for the establishment of their homes in its many beautiful residential com- 
munities. 

A gigantic pent-up metropolis, through the aid of bridges and tunnels, has 
burst its bonds and a deluge of trade and population is flowing eastward into 
Queens. The construction of immense industrial plants has drawn workers 
from all parts of the United States, who must be housed, fed and supplied with 
living necessities, thus creating .a demand for new and more local forms of busi- 
ness. 

DEMAND FOR HOMES 

Statistics compiled by the Queensboro Chamber of Commerce of the 
number of employees in the factories in different sections of the borough, and 
the location of their residences, show that 50% of these employees live today 
outside of Queens Borough in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx or elsewhere. 

The object of this compilation was to show whether or not an attractive 
field existed for new home building. The figures demonstrate beyond any doubt 
the necessity for the greatest possible construction of homes of all types in all 
sections of the borough. 

A striking illustration of this fact is shown by the figures of just one in- 
dustry the Loose-Wiles Biscuit Company, whose huge plant was completed and 
placed in operation in 1914. In March 1920 this company had 1400 employees, 
of which 800 lived in Queens Borough and 600 lived elsewhere. Practically 
every one of the employees who reside in other boroughs have indicated their 
desire and intention to live in Queens when sufficient housing facilities are pro- 
vided. 



117 




HOMES LIKE THESE IN FLUSHING ARE BEING BUILT IN MANY SECTIONS OF QUEENS 

The present homes of the employees of this company are distributed as 

follows : 

QUEENS BOROUGH 800 

Manhattan 353 

Brooklyn 197 

Bronx 14 

Elsewhere . 36 



TOTAL 



1400 



The location of the homes of those who live in Queens Borough are as 
follows : 

Long Island City 470 Ridgewood 7 Woodhaven 3 

Woodside 27 Flushing 19 Richmond Hill 23 

Winfield 22 College Point 4 Jamaica 53 

Corona 80 Whitestone I Hollis 7 

Elmhurst 75 Bayside 3 Springfield 6 



118 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



With this information in mind, as well as the fact that several new in- 
dustries are establishing each week in Queens Borough, bringing hundreds of 
new employees into the Borough, it is evident that this is the most attractive 
field for builders in New York City. 

It has been estimated that for every dollar spent in the erection of new 
factories, four dollars must be spent for housing facilities. Although new 
factory construction has taken place in Queens during the past three years, 
1917 to 1919 inclusive, amounting to $19,000,000, which would require, on the 
foregoing basis, an expenditure of four times that amount, or $76,000,000 
for homes; there has been in that same time only $42,000,000 spent in Queens 
for the construction of additional housing facilities. This proves the necessity 
for an immediate expenditure of at least $34,000,000 for housing facilities 
for the employees of those factories, not taking into account the necessity of 
providing homes for the thousands who now work and live in Manhattan, but 
who have been attracted to Queens by the operation of new rapid transit lines. 
$100,000,000 could be spent for that purpose today and still the supply would 
not meet the present demand. 




THE "OwN-YouR-OwN-HoME" DESIRE CAN BE FULLFILLED IN THE NEW 
APARTMENT HOUSES AT JACKSON HEIGHTS. 



NEW YORK CITY 



119 



RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT 

VERY section of Queens Borough, from the East River to' the 
Atlantic Ocean and from the Brooklyn Line to Nassau County, 
is today undergoing rapid transformation. Thousands of resi- 
dents, who previously lived in Manhattan and Brooklyn, have 
been attracted to Queens by the operation of its many new 
rapid transit lines, and other thousands are coming from all 

over the United States as a result of the establishment of large commercial and 

manufacturing enterprises. 

Figures compiled by John W. Moore, Superintendent of the Building 

Bureau of Queens Borough, show that home construction during the past ten 

years totaled $138,615,000. The figures for each year are as follows: 




Year 

1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 



Value 

$12,069,150 
17,710,344 
14,413,915 
14,324,215 
14,067,365 



Year 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 



Value 

$17,509,644 

16,735,719 

9,945,696 

3,573,175 

28,266,709 



The fact that during the closing year of the past decade Queens took third 
place among the five boroughs of New York City in real estate transactions 
speaks for itself. The total transactions for 1919 amounted to $289,240,000; 
an increase of 175% over the previous year. This total was made up as follows: 



1919 

Sales $178,940,000 

Mortgages 63,800,000 

New Buildings 46,500,000 



1918 

$74,300,000 

22,500,000 

8,860,000 



TOTAL $289,240,000 $105,660,000 

Five years ago, where there was then a cabbage patch, now looms large 
apartment houses ; where potatoes were hoed until a year or two ago, are now 
located streets of attractive homes. On every block throughout the Borough 
the noise of the hammer and the music of the saw is heard, and yet, with all 
this building activity, the demand for homes is unprecedented. 

Queens Borough offers the tonic of ocean air, the sweep of breezes over 
sunlit fields, air untainted by smoke and soot, the charm of nestled bays and the 
beauty of thousands of acres of natural park land. 

The character of the residential development taking place throughout Queens 
may be more conveniently treated in five zones, each representing one of the five 
Wards, or political sub-divisions, of the Borough. 



120 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




Airplane view from Laurelton, looking towards Manhattan, showing the 
proximity of the vast residential areas of Queens Borough to the business and 
industrial centers of Manhattan and Brooklyn. 

This great undeveloped territory is only 10 to 20 miles from Pennsylvania 
Station. 



NEW YORK CITY 



121 




Here is where the future millions of New York City's ever increasing popu- 
lation will be housed with plenty of room for homes with gardens and only a 
short ride on the Long Island Railroad Electric trains, or the rapid transit lines 
of the city's subway and elevated system. 



122 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



FIRST WARD 

The First Ward, or Long Island City, contains seven and one half square 
miles, or an area one-third as large as Manhattan Island. Bounded on the south 
by Newtown Creek, and on the west and north by the East River, it is most 
advantageously situated from a commercial standpoint. In no other equal area 
of New York has there been such a tremendous industrial development as that 
which has taken place in this section during the past ten years. Practically one- 
half of the factories of Queens Borough are located in Long Island City. 

It is the eastern terminus of the Queensboro Bridge, joining Manhattan at 
59th Street ; it is directly connected with 42nd Street by the Queensboro Subway, 
and with 59th Street by both the Second Avenue "L" and the new 60th Street 
tunnel. In this section are the large railroad terminals and shipping facilities 
of the Long Island Railroad. One-half of its area has been set aside for indus- 
trial development and the other half for business and residential development. 
It is of distinct urban character being as favorably situated as that section of 
Manhattan which lies directly across the East River. As it has superior railroad 
facilities, it may be safely predicted that Long Island City will constitute the 
future industrial center of New York City. 

The new rapid transit lines bring this section much nearer to the distributing 
agencies in the heart of Manhattan than either the Bush Terminal on the shores 
of South Brooklyn, the Staten Island waterfront, or that of Jersey City. With 
twelve stations on the Queensboro Subway and the Astoria and Corona elevated 
extensions, this entire area will undoubtedly be solidly built up within the next 
ten years with tenements and multiple family homes, providing living accommo- 
dations for the thousands who are engaged in the manifold local business enter- 
prises, and the thousands who, working in Manhattan, can reach homes in this 
section in less time than it takes to travel to the Bronx or upper Manhattan. 





APARTMENT HOUSES IN LONG ISLAND CITY 



NEW YORK CITY 



123 



Long Island City includes the former villages, or communities, known as 
Astoria, Steinway, Hunters Point, Dutch Kills, Ravenswood and Sunnyside. 

Building operations now under way, amounting to several million dollars, 
are but a "drop in the bucket" to what is needed here to house the 40,000 em- 
ployees of the local industries. 

The housing requirements of this section can only be met by the construc- 
tion of block after block of tenements and multiple family dwellings. The un- 
developed territory adjoining Queens Boulevard, served by the Corona "L," and 
only twelve minutes ride from Grand Central Station, should be built up with 
homes at once for it is the largest available undeveloped tract nearest the business 
heart of the city. 




MODEL FLATS ERECTED IN LONG ISLAND CITY AND RIDGEWOOD 



SECOND WARD 

The old town of Newtown, now known as the Second Ward, contains an 
area of 14,084 acres, or 22 square miles, which is exactly the same area as Man- 
hattan Island. It includes such residential communities as 
Blissville Forest Hills Maspeth 

Middle Village 



Corona 

Elmhurst 

Evergreen 



Glendale 
Jackson Heights 
Laurel Hill 



Ridgewood 

Woodside 

Winfield 



124 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




GARDEN APARTMENTS, JACKSON HEIGHTS 

The northern portion, served by the Corona "L", the North Shore Division 
of the Long Island Railroad, and the trolley lines of the New York & Queens 
County Railway Company (all of which make direct connections with midtown 
Manhattan), extends from Long Island City eastward to Flushing Bay and 
Flushing Creek. 

The central portion, served by the Main Line of the Long Island Railroad 
and the Manhattan & Queens trolley line on Queens Boulevard, extends from 
Elmhurst southward through Forest Hills to Jamaica. 

The western portion, adjoining Brooklyn, is served by the elevated exten- 
sions and trolleys from that borough, the Montauk Division of the Long Island 
Railroad, and, to some extent, by the trolleys of the New York & Queens 
County Railway. 

The furthermost point in the Second Ward is no further distant from 
Herald Square than 191st Street in Manhattan, 176th Street in the Bronx, or the 
Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn. The entire area is sparsely settled and contains 
thousands of acres as yet untouched, but admirably adapted for the erection of 
homes. 

At Jackson Heights, Elmhurst, large modern apartments are now being 
erected, as well as attractive single family dwellings. In the Woodside, Elm- 
hurst and Corona sections hundreds of houses of the two family type, tenements 
and small cottages, suitable for the thrifty industrial workers are under con- 
struction. 

Jackson Heights, an apartment development of 350 acres of the Queens- 
boro Corporation, is one of the brightest spots during the past five years in the 
real estate horizon of Queens Borough. The progress made in the construction 
of Garden Apartment houses during that period is but a small start of what will 
be completed during the next five to ten years. Labor difficulties alone held 
back, during the past year, the construction of many additional apartment build- 
ings, which would have relieved to a large extent the present housing shortage. 



NEW YORK CITY 125 

Forest Hills is a high class suburban residential community, including the 
500 acre development of the Sage Foundation Homes Company, known as 
"Forest Hills Gardens" on the west side of the Long Island Railroad tracks ; and 
the 500 acre development of attractive detached dwellings of the Cord Meyer 
Development Company on the east side of the Long Island Railroad and ad- 
joining Queens Boulevard, where hundreds of beautiful homes have been erected 
during the past ten years for the executives of the industrial and financial insti- 
tutions of Queens Borough and for the executives whose offices are located in 
Manhattan. 

Ridgewood and Evergreen, adjoining the Brooklyn boundary line, are the 
most populous portions of the Borough, being built up with multiple family 
dwellings. A large proportion of those who live in these sections work in Brook- 
lyn. Several thousand 4, 6 and 8-family apartments have been built here during 
the past ten years. 

Maspeth, Laurel Hill and Blissville, adjacent to Newtown Creek, contain 
many large manufacturing establishments which require the construction of 
moderate priced homes to house the employees. 




At Forest Hills is the West Side Tennis Club where the National Tennis 
Tournaments have been held each year; also, the unusually attractive Forest 
Hills Inn adjacent to the railroad station. 

THIRD WARD 

Bounded by Flushing Bay and the East River on the north, Nassau County 
on the east, Jamaica on the south, and Flushing Creek on the west ; this section, 
with its area of 30 square miles, is almost as large as the Borough of the Bronx, 
and no further distant from the business center of Manhattan. 

It includes many attractive residential communities among which are 
Auburndale College Point Little Neck 

Bayside Douglaston Malba 

Beechhurst Flushing Murray Hill 

Broadway-Flushing Kissena Park Whitestone 



126 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Flushing is one of the oldest communities in the United States. There are 
standing today buildings erected 250 years ago. It is noted for its broad, well- 
paved streets lined with majestic shade trees. Many beautiful residences, some 
of which are of great historical interest, front upon the older streets. It is an 
important social and commercial center. It contains a number of important 
manufacturing establishments, the latest being the Remington Typewriter Com- 
pany. 

Kissena Park, adjoining the municipal park of that name containing 90 
acres of woodland and lake, has been built up with hundreds of attractive frame 
and stucco homes. 

College Point, next to Long Island City, is the most important industrial 
center in Queens Borough, including more than 20 factories, the oldest of which 
is the American Hard Rubber Company, established in 1854. A large proportion 
of the population is employed locally in these manufacturing plants. While it 
is well built up with detached dwellings, there is need for the construction of 
additional homes to house the growing population. It is served by the White- 
stone Branch of the Long Island Railroad and by the New York & Queens County 
trolley line. 

Malba, a restricted residential tract, fronts on Powell Cove, an identation 
of the East River where it broadens into Long Island Sound. It has its own 
golf course, bathing beach and yacht pier. Many distinctive homes at moderate 
cost are being erected here. 

Whitestone, also located on the East River, includes Beechhurst, a residen- 
tial development located on a high plateau overlooking Long Island Sound. 

Between Flushing and Bayside are Murray Hill, Bowne Park, Broadway- 
Flushing, and Auburndale, all of which are rapidly being developed with attrac- 
tive detached homes. At Broadway-Flushing 225 detached dwellings are now 
being erected on the property of the Rickert-Brown Company. 

Douglaston on Little Neck Bay, includes Douglaston Park and Douglas 
Manor, both of which are high class residential developments, the latter upon a 
peninsula jutting into the Bay. 

Little Neck Hills, another residential tract, located on the crest of a high 
hill adjoining Nassau County is being built up with moderate priced single 
family dwellings. 




MALBA ON LONG ISLAND SOUND 



NEW YORK CITY 



127 




TYPE OF HOMES UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN SECOND, THIRD AND FOURTH WARDS 

FOURTH WARD 

Bounded by Brooklyn on the west, Nassau County on the east, Jamaica Bay 
on the south and for a distance of two miles on the north by a deeply wooded 
municipal park; this Ward contains 38 square miles, or an area nearly twice 
as large as the Borough of Manhattan. 

The Fourth Ward was originally the old township of Jamaica, which was 
settled in 1656. It includes the following communities: 
Aqueduct Howard Beach Queens 

Brooklyn Manor Hillside Rosedale 

Bellaire Jamaica Richmond Hill 

Broad Channel Kew Gadens St. Albans 

Clarenceville Laurelton Springfield 

Dunton Morris Park South Ozone Park 

Hollis Ozone Park Union Course 

Woodhaven 

Due to the concentration at Jamaica of practically all of the Long Island 
Railroad lines of traffic, this section has become one of the most important com- 
mercial, financial, and residential communities of Queens Borough. 

The residential development of the entire Fourth Ward has been due largely 
to the excellent transportation facilities which connect it with Brooklyn. The 
Atlantic Avenue Division of the Long Island Railroad, on which both express 
and local trains operate, enables the residents to transfer conveniently to the 
subway trains of both the Interborough and B. R. T. in Brooklyn and reach 
the business centers of Manhattan in less than half an hour. 

The extension of the B. R. T. elevated system for a distance of four miles 
on Jamaica Avenue, and for a distance of two miles on Liberty Avenue, has given 
the majority of residents of this great residential territory rapid transit service 
for a single fare to the business centers of both Brooklvn and Manhattan. 



128 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Jamaica Avenue, extending from the Brooklyn Line at Cypress Hills to 
the former village of Jamaica, is lined throughout its entire length with stores 
and tenements. Directly to the north is the highland the backbone of Long 
Island upon which are many beautiful residential developments. 

Woodhaven has been built up during the past ten years with thousands of 
small moderate priced detached dwellings. 

Richmond Hill, just east of Woodhaven, is one of the most attractive resi- 
dential communities in the Borough. 

Kew Gardens, to the north of Richmond Hill and adjoining Forest Hills, 
has been artistically laid out, and from its hills one commands a view of Jamaica 
Bay and the Atlantic Ocean on the south, while on the north can be seen Flushing 
Bay, Long Island Sound and the tall buildings of Manhattan. This tract of 350 
acres is being developed with high class detached homes. 

Jamaica, although one of the earliest settlements in the United States, in- 
cludes many new residential developments, among which are Jamaica-Hillcrest, 
comprising 200 acres just north of Hillside Avenue on the crest of the hills over- 
looking the town, and, further to the east, the beautiful residential tract known 
as Jamaica Estates, comprising 500 acres laid out in a deeply wooded tract. 

Hollis, Bellaire Park, Holliswood and Queens Village lie between Jamaica 
and the Nassau County line, and are all attractive residential communities in 
which are hundreds of detached frame and stucco dwellings. The erection of 
500 additional houses in Queens Village is now under way. . 




STREET SCENE, RICHMOND HILL. 



NEW YORK CITY 129 

South of the Atlantic Avenue Division of the Long Island Railroad is that 
immense territory extending to Jamaica Bay, which includes Ozone Park, South 
Richmond Hill, Morris Park, Howard Beach, Springfield, St. Albans, and 
Laurelton. 

The operation of the Liberty Avenue "L" through this section has resulted 
in the construction of row after row and block after block of moderate priced 
homes which are sold to eager tenants even before the foundations are com- 
pleted. 

Howard Beach is a unique residential development fronting as it does on 
Jamaica Bay and on Shellbank Basin a channel 300 feet wide with a depth of 
30 feet extending inshore for a distance of a mile. Hundreds of bungalows, 
the homes of all year round residents, have been erected in this ideal residential 
tract during the past ten years. 

Laurelton, situated three miles south of Jamaica, is less than 14 miles from 
Pennsylvania Station. It comprises about 5,000 building lots, more than half 
of which have already been improved with sidewalks, curbing, water, gas and 
electricity, parked streets, beautiful trees and shrubbery. The type of homes now 
being built are single family dwellings of moderate cost. Plans have been pre- 
pared for the erection of a 200 room apartment hotel. 

Jamaica Park South, a residential development of 300 acres, is rapidly being 
built up with attractive detached homes of moderate cost. 

FIFTH WARD 

The Fifth Ward comprehends the Rockaway Peninsula, which extends from 
Far Rockaway (the eastern limit of New York City) westward along a sandy 
point nearly 10 miles long and approximately half a mile wide, separating 
Jamaica Bay from the Atlantic Ocean. 

On this peninsula are many seaside developments including Arverne, Belle 
Harbor, Edgemere, Far Rockaway, Holland, Hammels, Rockaway Beach and 
Seaside, all of which have been attractively laid out and have all of the con- 
veniences of the city in the way of street improvements and public service. 

The Rockaway Peninsula is not only the great summer resort and play- 
ground of New York City, but has become an all year residential section for 
hundreds who work in the business sections of the city. All of the built-up 
section is only 30 to 40 minutes from the business districts in Manhattan via the 
electric trains of the Long Island Rairoad. From 50 to 75 trains are run each 
way week days, and twice that number on Sundays during the summer months. 

In 1785 Tack-a-Pou-Sha, chief of the Rockaway tribe of Indians, and his 
sachems deeded what was known as Rockaway Neck to John Palmer, a New 
York merchant. At that time it was a stretch of waste beach and sand dunes, but 
today the sand dunes have been converted into stucco and mortar, and a veritable 
Qty-by-the-Sea has grown up, stretching from Belle Harbor on the west to 



130 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Nassau County on the east. With its boardwalk on the ocean, its broad 
macadamed streets, magnificient hotels and handsome residences and public 
parks, there is no more attractive section in New York City for either summer 
homes or all-year-round residences. 

Seaside, Holland and Hammels are filled with amusement resorts of many 
kinds, and their hotels and bathing pavilions cater to a floating population that 
reaches over 100,000 on a summer day. The hotels are filled every season. 
Arverne, Edgemere and Far Rockaway have not only many modern large hotels 
but thousands of private dwellings, cottages and boarding houses to accommo- 
date the vast throng of dwellers. Far Rockaway has a large permanent popu- 
lation and many fine business blocks. 




SOUTH STREET, FAR ROCKAWAY 

HOMES FOR ALL . 

With such a variety of homes from which to choose, it would be strange 
indeed if any one failed to find an appropriate and convenient spot in which to 
locate a home in Queens Borough according to their desires. 

Homes are available not only for factory workers, but for men in every 
walk of life, homes for the salaried man and the man in moderate circum- 
stances, as well as the fine estates and dwellings of the wealthy. Queens possesses 
unsurpassed attractions for all for the man who wishes his little garden patch, 
where his desire for farming can be gratified, or for homes in modern apartment 
buildings. 



NEW YORK CITY 



131 




THOUSANDS OF THESE BUNGALOWS HAVE BEEN BUILT AT ROCKAWAY BEACH 

Queens has been designated as the "Home Borough of New York City" for 
it is estimated that over 50% of its homes are owned by the occupants. 

While Queens is essentially a borough of small homes, the cost of land 
being relatively cheap when compared with prices in Manhattan, Brooklyn and 
the Bronx, and while ten years ago the presence of apartment houses was hardly 
known, yet today hundreds of apartments, ranging from 4 to 10 rooms, can be 
found in all sections of the Borough. 

An interesting feature of the realty development of Queens has been the 
progress in certain areas of restricted property of the construction of single 
family dwellings ranging in cost from $10,000 to $50,000 each. The occupants, 
who are usually the owners, have come mainly from Manhattan, desiring the 
privacy of a home in a detached dwelling, and are able to secure better accommo- 
dations for the same expenditure of money, or equal accommodations for less 
money. 





HOMES AT LAURELTON 



132 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



BUILDING DEVELOPEMENT 

It is only by comparing the building record of Queens Borough for 1919 
with that of other cities in the United States that one can realize the full signifi- 
cance of the wonderful development now taking place within its borders. 

Plans were filed during 1919 for new buildings, and additions to existing 
buildings, estimated to cost $50,000,000. Only three cities in the United States 
outside of New York City Chicago, Philadephia and Detroit exceeded Queens 
Borough in this respect for the past year. 

CITY PLANS 
Chicago 6590 

Detroit 21473 

Philadelphia 14142 
Queens Borough 8910 

This record was as great as that of the ten largest cities in the State of New 
Jersey Jersey City, Newark, Atlantic City, Bayonne, Camden, Passaic, Pater- 
son, Elizabeth, Trenton and Hoboken. 

The following tables show the total number of new buildings for 'which 
plans have been filed in Queens Borough since its consolidation as a part of New 
York; and also the number, classification and value of the plans filed for 1919. 
Neither table includes the cost of alterations to existing buildings which would 
add to these totals several millions of dollars. In 1919, alone, plans were filed 
for 3,699 alterations estimated to cost $3,500,000. 



ESTIMATED VALUE 

$105,080,000 

82,995,000 

63,627,000 

46,022,000 



Year 

1898 

1890 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

IQI3 
1914 

IQI5 

1916 

"1917 

"1918 

1919 



1898 1919 Inclusive 
Number 

772 
1,011 

947 
1,450 
1,231 
1,321 
1,923 
3,251 
4,070 
3,929 
3,896 
4,758 
4,133 
5,374 
4,821 
4,646 
4,596 
5,756 
5,331 
3,6n 

2,222 
8,910 



TOTAL 69,049 
*Decrease due to the World War. 



Value 


Number 


$2,538.216 


5209 


3,341.269 


551 


2,920,091 


48 


4,710,492 




5,159,979 


62 


4,829,929 




8,863,774 


2 


12,827,960 


36 


17,003,216 


7 


15,994,259 




13,842,300 


19 


19,407,921 


108 


15,144,377 


9 


22,212,258 


3 


19,624,222 


i 


17,521,235 


41 


18,098,290 


17 


20,316,392 


2235 


20,009,382 


99 


11,635,253 


553 


6,768,138 




46,022,607 








8910 


262,719,853 



1919 Estimated 

Classification Cost 

Frame Dwellings $19,987,4/9 

Brick Dwellings 3,774,480 

Frame stores and Dwell- 
ings 270,050 

Brick Stores and Dwell- 
ings 408,200 

Frame Tenements 10,000 

Brick Dwellings 2,739,500 

Brick Stores and Tene- 
ments 137,000 

Theatres 1,010,200 

Factories 12,060,000 

Churches 184,000 

Schools 458,000 

Hotel 500,000 

Storage Warehouses ... 1,151,600 

Office Buildings 353.9OO 

Garages 2,796,077 

Stables 6,750 

Other Frame Struc- 
ture 174,551 



$46,022,687 




WHY QUEENS is CALLED THE "BOROUGH OF HOMES." TYPE OF HOMES IN JAMAICA, FLUSHING, 

DOUGLASTON, KEW GARDENS, FOREST HlLLS AND OTHER SECTIONS OF QUEENS BOROUGH. 



134 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

While the value of new buildings constructed for 1919 was more than twice 
as great as the largest previous year, which was in 1911, when $22,212,258 in 
new buildings were erected; the comparison to be a fair one should include the 
increased cost of building construction in 1919 as compared with 1911. Never- 
theless it is eloquent testimony from the home builders, manufacturers and in- 
vestors as to their faith in Queens Borough when such an amount is spent in one 
year in the face of the high cost of building. 

The following table, compiled from data prepared each year by the Long 
Island Railroad, gives an estimate of the number of buildings constructed in the 
various sections of Queens Borough for the past ten years. These figures are 
simply the number of buildings, irrespective of their character, size or value : 

Total 
1909-1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1909-1919 

Arverne 414 95 119 86 53 317 1084 

Auburndale 6 6 5 10 27 

Bayside 560 74 37 12 2 33 718 

Broad Channel 58 44 42 144 

Broadway-Flushing & Murray Hill . . . 288 45 86 23 6 57 505 

Bushwick Junction, Maspeth & Middle 

Village 1259 377 15 1651 

College Point 554 73 113 60 20 30 850 

Corona 2095 134 190 100 8 73 2600 

Douglaston 177 18 48 2 34 279 

Dunton 483 55 55 31 15 17 662 

Edgemere 185 37 34 19 80 815 1 160 

Elmhurst 912 332 132 208 228 402 2214 

Far Rockaway 429 42 34 9 14 8 536 

Flushing 1573 265 186 232 4 40 2300 

Forest Hills 456 88 102 58 3 58 765 

Fresh Pond 4 9 68 81 

Hollis 365 44 160 10 21 101 701 

Howard Beach 47 29 50 31 48 205 

Jamaica 3247 410 450 300 44 530 5081 

Kew Gardens 192 41 50 28 25 66 402 

Laurelton (Rosedale) 50 u 3 11 6 29 113 

Laurel Hill 45 6 9 12 72 

Little Neck 57 22 19 10 3 25 136 

Long Island City 2290 504 313 212 269 200 3788 

Malba 60 9 9 6 39 123 

Morris Park 702 190 170 85 34 65 1246 

Queens Bellaire 279 53 52 24 40 281 729 

Richmond Hill 1935 530 216 162 30 175 3048 

Ridgewood and Glendale 679 630 532 97 9 1947 

Rockaway Beach 2461 326 451 425 i 267 3931 

St. Albans 89 14 19 10 8 34 174 

Springfield 266 38 40 50 75 . 469 

Whitestone 370 38 49 22 91 570 

Winfield 551 27 18 14 5 18 633 

Woodhaven (Sect.) 2189 476 455 391 55 830 4396 

Woodside 86 19 23 19 2 2 151 



NEW YORK CITY 



135 




BANKS 

OMMUNITIES may be measured by various standards ; by pro- 
duction, by consumption and by conservation of capital. A 
comparison is given herewith of the increase during a seven- 
year period, 1913-1920, in the resources and deposits of the 
banking institutions which serve the business and residential 
interests of Queens Borough. 
The most important recent development in the banking facilities of the Bor- 
ough has been the recognition on the part of the large financial institutions, whose 
main offices are downtown 
Manhattan, of the business 
opportunities which exist in 
New York's fastest grow- 
ing borough. 

Although both the 
Corn Exchange Bank and 
the Title Guarantee and 
Trust Company maintained 
several branches in Queens 



for many years past, three ^-JL 





THE BANK OF THE MANHATTAN Co., 
JAMAICA. 

recent mergers have been effected 
which will still further increase the 
banking facilities of the borough. The 
Queens County Trust Company has 
been merged with the American Trust 
Company; The Bank of Long Island 
has been merged with one of New 
York's oldest financial institutions 
The Bank of the Manhattan Com- 
pany ; and the Irving Trust Company, 
which maintains a branch in Long 
Island City, has become a part of 
THE AMERICAN TRUST Co., JAMAICA the New York National Irving Bank. 



136 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



There are today, thirty-six banking offices in Queens Borough. Of this 
number four are savings banks, four trust company banks, nine national banks 
and nineteen state banks. All of the savings banks, eight of the national banks 
and one state bank are distinctly Queens Borough financial institutions. This 
leaves twenty-three banks which are branches of trust companies, state banks 
and nationals banks whose main offices are in the heart of the financial district 
of Manhattan. 

The Bank of the Manhattan Company recently acquired a large plot at Ful- 
ton and Union Hall Streets, Jamaica, where a handsome new main office will be 
erected. The Long Island City Savings Bank has just completed the construction 
of one of the finest bank buildings in the borough, and the Title Guarantee and 
Trust Company is now erecting a new bank and office building at Bridge Plaza, 
Long Island City. 

The growth of the financial institutions serving Queens is perhaps the best 
index of the growth of the borough, not only in population and industry, but 
in commerce and building development ; in fact, in every phase of business pros- 
perity. 



SAVINGS BANKS 
Resources 



Deposits 



Long Island City Savings ! 


1920 
$15,160,000 


I9U 
$7,194,000 


1920 
$13,459,000 


1913 
$6,603,000 


Jamaica Savings 


9 127 ooo 


5,264,000 


8,40^,000 


4,960,000 


Queens County Savings (Flushing) 
College Point Savings 


6,365,000 

2,7^6,000 


3,536,000 
1,601,000 


5,892,000 
2,519,000 


3,251,000 
1,453,000 














The Bridge Plaza The financial center of Long Island City. Here are 
the New York National Irving Bank, The American Trust Company and the 
Corn Exchange Bank (Plaza Branch). 



NEW YORK CITY 



137 



STATE BANKS 

Resources 
1920 1913 

(a) Bank of the Manhattan Co. $253,359,900 $8,611,000 

(b) Corn Exchange Bank 211,679,000 82,021,000 

Hillside (Richmond Hill).. 1,900,000 627,100 

TRUST COMPANIES 

$12,285,000 $2,877,000 
56,175,000 



Deposits 

1920 19*3 

$200,200,700 $7,274,000 

184,767,000 73,087,000 

1,800,000 490,500 



(c) 

(d) 



American Trust ;Co. . , 
Title Guarantee & Trust 



Co. 



45,636,000 



NATIONAL BANKS 



(e) 



(f) 



N. Y. National Irving Bank. $82,000,000 

Bayside National 1,270,000 

Flushing National 1,299,000 

Jamaica, First National 3,380,000 

Ozone Park, First National.. i,935,ooo 

Whitestone, First National.. 689,000 

Far Rockaway National 1,979,000 

Ridgewood National 6,235,700 

First Nat'l of Richmond Hill 1,924,000 



$17,367,000 
296,300 
422,400 
986,400 
685,400 
282,800 
848,000 
1,225,100 



$10,817,000 
35,380,000 



$75,741,000 
1,300,000 

602,000 
3,190,000 
1,764,000 

418,000 
1,783,000 
4,539,400 
i,733,ooo 



$1,969,600 
28,160,000 



$14,971,000 
234,700 
202,600 
809,200 
555,700 
186,900 
741,800 
971,000 



(a) 



1913 figures are those of the former Bank of Long Island. Main office in Queens 
Borough is at Jamaica. Other branches are maintained at 



Long Island City 
Corona 
Elmhurst 
College Point 



Ridgewood 
Fresh Pond Road 
Richmond Hill 
Woodhaven 



Flushing 

Far Rockaway 

Rockaway Beach 

Seaside 



(b) 
(c) 

(d) 
(e) 

(f) 



Four branches in Long Island City and one in Flushing. 

1913 figures are those of former Queens County Trust Company. Branches in 
Jamaica and Long Island City. 

Branches are located in Long Island City and Jamaica. 

1913 figures are those of the former Broadway Trust Company, which later became 
the Irving Trust Company and now the New York National Irving Bank. 
Incorporated April 1920. 




Photograph taken April 1920 shows new Long Island City Savings Bank 
Building, the First Mortgage Guarantee Company new building, the Title Guar- 
antee and Trust Co. building upon which construction work had just started, 
and Long Island City branch of The Bank of the Manhattan Company. 



138 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

LIGHT, HEAT AND POWER 

The development of a modern community is dependent upon an adequate 
supply of electricity and gas for power, heating and lighting purposes. It is an 
advantage from an industrial standpoint to be able to obtain reliable electric 
power from a central station source of supply for the operation of machinery 
and for the lighting of factories and homes. Gas for heating and power pur- 
poses, as well as lighting, is economical and dependable. 

ELECTRIC COMPANIES 

The New York and Queens Electric Light and Power Company, whose main 
offices are on the Bridge Plaza., Long Island City, serves the First, Second, Third 
and Fourth Wards of the Borough; while the Queensboro Gas and Electric 
Company, whose offices are in Far Rockaway, serves the Fifth. The total out- 
put of these two companies increased from 15,000,000 kilowatt hours in 1911 
to 66,000,000 kilowatt hours in 1919. 

The New York and Queens Electric Light and Power Company was formed 
in 1900 by the consolidation of the various companies operating in the former 
towns in Queens County prior to its becoming part of Greater New York. 

The Queensboro Gas and Electric Company was formed in 1902 and serves 
not only the Rockaway Peninsula (Fifth Ward), but also a part of Nassau 
County. 

Electricity supplied by a central station requires no investments for engines, 
generators and auxiliaries and for the floor space which they occupy. It does 
away with the cost of fuel, labor supply, fire regulations and increased taxes and 
insurance. It is reliable, safe, clean, efficient and economical. Electricty is 
supplied to all parts of Queens Borough at rates which compare favorably with 
those of any city on the Atlantic coast generating power by steam. The system 
of the New York and Queens Electric Light and Power Company is inter-con- 
nected with the electric power systems located in Manhattan and Brooklyn, thus 
insuring against break-downs. Exceptional facilities are offered to manufac- 
turers and residents for power and light. Detailed rates may be obtained upon 
application to the Companies. 

GAS COMPANIES 

Illuminating gas for lighting, heating and industrial uses is supplied to resi- 
dents and manufacturers of the Borough by several different companies. The 
total production of gas manufactured in the Borough increased from 6,000,000 
M. cubic feet in 1911 to 30,000,000 M. cubic feet in 1919. 

The immense plant of the Astoria Light, Heat and Power Company, cover- 
ing an area of 350 acres, is located in the extreme northwest section of Long 
Island City. All of its output is sold to he Consolidated Gas Company of New 
York which supplies the Boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. This plant is 
said to be the largest of its kind in the world and represents an outlay of more 
than $100,000,000. 



NEW YORK CITY 139 

The entire nine units of which the plant will ultimately be composed will 
have a capacity of 250,000,000 cubic feet daily. It is now producing 50,000,000 
cubic feet daily, and, with the new unit which is now under construction, will pro- 
duce 80,000,000 cubic feet per day within a short time. 

The First Ward (Long Island City) is supplied by the East River Gas Com- 
pany, a subsidiary of the New Amsterdam Company; the former being the dis- 
tributing company, and the latter the manufacturing company, which in addition 
to supplying Long Island City, supplies a large amount to Manhattan. Its plant 
is located on Vernon Avenue and East River at the foot of Webster Avenue. 

The Newtown Gas Company, which serves the Second Ward, and the 
Woodhaven Gas Light Company, the Richmond Hill Gas Light Company and 
the Jamaica Gas Light Company, which serve the Fourth Ward, are all sub- 
sidiaries of the Brooklyn Union Gas Company. 

The Third Ward is served by the New York and Queens Gas Company a 
subsidiary of the Consolidated Gas Company of New York. 

The Fifth Ward is served by the Queens Borough Gas and Electric Company 
which manufactures both gas and electricity. 

TELEPHONES 

In 1910, 47,750 messages were sent daily from 9,613 telephones in Queens 
Borough, as compared with 92,167 messages from 24,203 telephones in 1915, and 
186,125 messages sent daily from 40,834 telephones in 1920. In other words, 
in 1920 the total number of calls will approximate 68,000,000 (136 per capita) as 
compared with 17,000,000 calls in 1910 (60 per capita). This is an increase of 
300% and affords a striking picture of the rapid growth of the Borough in the 
past decade as indicated by the development of its telephone system. 

To serve the telephone users of Queens, the New York Telephone Company 
now maintains in the borough five Commercial Offices and twelve Central Offices. 
The commercial offices are located in Long Island City, Jamaica, Flushing, Far 
Rockaway and Richmond Hill. The central offices are Astoria, Bayside, Far 
Rockaway, Flushing, Forest Hills, Hammels, Hollis, Hunters Point, Jamaica, 
Newtown, Richmond Hill and Springfield. 

At the present time the Telephone Company is carrying out a large program 
of expansion in Queens Borough, which calls for the immediate expenditure of 
several millions of dollars. In the past five years the Telephone Company has 
spent three and a half millions of dollars to extend and improve its plant in 
Queens, and expects to spend over five million dollars in the next five years for 
further extensions to care for the business, residence and manufacturing develop- 
ments of the Borough. 

This program involves the construction of new cable and pole lines and large 
additions to the Astoria, Richmond Hill, Far Rockaway and Hammels Central 
Office Buildings and the enlargement of the switchboards in the Astoria, New- 



140 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



town, Jamaica, Richmond Hill, Hammels, Flushing, Bayside and Far Rockaway 
Central Offices. This work is designed to build up the telephone system in 
Queens to meet all demands for service during the next few years. 

As it is generaly known, when the United States entered the World War, 
the Government ruled that the commercial telephone business was a non-essential 
industry. Under that ruling there was no telephone construction for two years 
except for meeting the needs of the government and war industries. In the 
same period the Telephone Company's reserve supply of spare facilities which 
enabled it in normal years to meet all demands for service promptly, was used 
up. When the Armistice was signed there began a tremendous boom in business 
accompanied by a record-breaking demand for telephone service. The Telephone 
Company had not sufficient spare facilities available for meeting this demand and 
although it accomplished a great deal during 1919 in furnishing the needed new 
facilities it by no means met the demand in full. 

The Company's 1920 program outlined above tells its own story of the Com- 
pany's efforts to regain the ground lost during the war. It is sparing neither 
money nor effort to expand its facilities and working organization, so that it 
can restore the telephone service in Queens Borough to its former high standards. 




JAMAICA EXCHANGE AND 
COMMERCIAL OFFICE. 



XEWTOWN EXCHANGE JUST 
COMPLETED AT ELM HURST. 



NEW YORK CITY 



141 




HE chief executive of the Borough of Queens is the Borough 
President. The Presidents of the Boroughs are elected every 
four years at the same time as the Mayor, Comptroller, and 
the President of the Board of Aldermen, and the present term 
expires December 31st, 1921. The Presidents of the Boroughs 
are also members of the Board of Estimate, which controls 
the finances of the city. The President of the Borough presides over all local 
boards, which are empowered to initiate such improvements as grading and pav- 
ing streets and constructing sewers, subject to the approval of the Board of Esti- 
mate if they involve an assessment. All petitions for local improvements should 
be addressed to the President of the Borough for presentation to the local board 
having jurisdiction. The President of the Borough has cognizance and control 
of all matters relating to the improvement and repair of .public buildings within 
the Borough except schools, hospitals, fire and police stations. He is empowered 
to exercise the supervision vested in the city over the construction of new 
buildings, except such powers as are directly vested in the Tenement House De- 
partment. The Borough President may appoint a Commissioner of Public Works, 
whose duty it is to discharge all the administrative powers of the President re- 
lating to streets, sewers, public buildings and schools. In addition to other 
powers, the President of the Borough of Queens has jurisdiction over the clean- 
ing of streets, the removal of ashes and garbage, and the preparation of the 
topographical map. 

BOROUGH GOVERNMENT 

Office Name Address 

President Maurice E. Connolly Long Island City 

Secretary ; Joseph Flanagan " 

Private Secretary Hugh Hall " 

Commissioner of Public Works F. X. Sullivan " 

Asst. Commissioner of Public Works W. A. Shipley " 

Consulting Engineer Clifford B. Moore " 

Supt. of Buildings J. W. Moore " 

' Sewers j. R. Higgins " 

'' Street Cleaning Daniel Entholdt " 

'' Public Buildings Joseph Sullivan " 

Eng. Topographical Bureau C. U. Powell " 

Supt. of Highways John J. Kindred " 

COUNTY GOVERNMENT 

Office Name Address 

County Judge : Burt Jay Humphrey Long Island City 

Sheriff William N. George 

District Attorney Denis O'Leary " 

Commissioner of Jurors T. C. McKennee " 

County Clerk Edward W. Cox Jamaica 

Surrogate Daniel Noble " 

Public Administrator Randolph White " 

Coroners ..Dr. H. W. Neail 

Dr. W. H. Nammack Far Rockaway 



142 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

CITY OF NEW YORK MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Estimate and Apportionment 
Mayor Name Address 

Mayor J. F. Hylan City Hall, New York, N. Y. 

Comptroller Charles L. Craig Municipal Bldg. " 

President Board of Aldermen.FioreUo H. La Guardia City Hall " 

Boro. of Manhattan. Henry H. Curran Municipal Bldg. " 

Bronx H. Bruckner 3rd Ave., 177th St., Bronx 

Brooklyn .Edw. Riegelman Borough Hall, Brooklyn 

Queens . . .Maurice E. Connolly " " L. I. City 

Richmond .C. D. Van Name New Brighton, S. I. 

City Departments Commissioner 

Plant & Structures Grover A. Whalen Municipal Bldg., New York 

Docks & Ferries Murray Hulbert Pier A, North River " 

Parks (Queens) V. C. Benninger Forest Pk., Richm'd Hill, L. I. 

Health ' Dr. R. S. Copeland Centre & Walker Sts., N. Y. 

Charities B. S. Coler Municipal Bldg.. New York 

Licenses J. F. Gilchrist 57 Center St. " 

Tax & Assessments J. A. Cantor Municipal Bldg., " 

Water Supply, Gas & Electricity^. ]. Hayes Municipal Bldg., " 

Deputy Commissioner James Butler Municipal Bldg., L. I. City 

(Queens) 

Fire Commissioner T. J. Drennan Municipal Bldg., New York 

Police Richard Enright 240 Centre St., 

Tenement House Frank Mann Municipal Bldg., 

Corporation Counsel VVm. P. Burr Municipal Bldg., " 

LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT 

The legislative power of the city is vested in the Board of Aldermen, the 
members of which are elected every two years, and the President of the Board, 
and the Presidents of the five Boroughs. The following are the Aldermen from 
the Borough of Queens: 

Neivtoim District 
District Name Address 

Sixtieth Samuel J. Burden Long Island City 

Sixty-first 4. A. Alwell Glendale 

Sixty-second F. J. Schmitz College Point 

Jamaica District 

Sixty-third C. A. Post Flushing 

Sixty-fourth W. B. Hazelwood Richmond Hill 

NEW YORK STATE LEGISLATURE 
Senate 

The County of Queens constitutes the Second and Third Senate District for 
the State of New York. 
District Name Address 

Second J. L. Karle Ridgewood 

Third P. J. McGarry Long Island City 

Assembly 

Assembly District Name Address 

First P. A. Leininger Long Island City 

Second B. Schwab Ridgewood 

Fourth E. J. Neary Corona 

Third N. M. Pette Jamaica 

Fifth R. Halpern Richmond Hill 

Sixth H. Baum Union Course 

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 
House of Representatives 

First F. C. Hicks Port Washington 

Second C. P. Caldwell Forest Hills 

United States Senate : William E. Calder James W. Wadsworth 



NEW YORK CITY 143 

QUEENS--A BOROUGH OF VAST RESOURCES 

BY MAURICE E. CONNOLLY 
President of the Borough of Queens 

There is no more interesting example of community development than that 
presented by the changes wrought in the Borough of Queens in the last ten years. 
If any one were to picture in his mind the borough as it was at the end of the 
last decade and compare it with the borough as it is today, it would seem as 
though Aladdin with his wonderful lamp had transformed it. 

Ten years ago the Borough of Queens consisted of a collection of villages 
more or less disconnected. It was joined to Manhattan by ferries that ran in- 
termittently. The Queensboro Bridge had just been opened as a toll bridge, but 
no trolleys were operating on it and traffic was very small indeed. Many of the 
streets in the borough were almost impassable with prolonged disrepair. Rapid 
transit was not even anticipated. Our population was only 280,000. The in- 
dustrial products of the Borough were worth but $150,000,000 per year. The 
total value of the real estate of the borough as shown upon the tax books was 
$293,235,905. The borough had no comprehensive sewer system. It had only a 
few local sewers in Long Island City, Flushing, Jamaica and other villages. Gar- 
bage was disposed of by most primitive and unsanitary methods. Street were 
uncared for, unsightly and dirty. The city map, which is the plan and basis 
upon which all public improvements are based, was but 24 per cent complete. 

There was no unity of purpose, each independent community shifted for it- 
self, and the undeveloped areas between were cared for by no one. 

And what of today ! The arms to two systems of rapid transit have been 
constructed with routes in the borough. Direct transit connection with Man- 
hattan has at last been accomplished, and for the first time in its history Queens 
can be reached from Manhattan and the Bronx for a single fare. The elevated 
transit systems of Brooklyn have been extended well into the borough, and the 
trolley lines have been greatly improved. Many of the important arterial high- 
ways were paved for the first time since consolidation, this pavement work being 
paid for by the city at large. The borough now houses more than 1500 factories 
with products worth $248,000,000 per year. There has been a great inrush of 
people looking for homes. Practically every house in the borough is tenanted, 
and great numbers of buildings are in course of construction, despite the high 
prices of materials, in an attempt to house those who are clamoring to come here. 
No more striking proof of the confidence of large capital in the future of this 
borough can be offered than the substantial character of the improvement re- 
cently constructed by the Pennsylvania Railroad and the New York Connecting 
Railroad. 

During the last ten years the Borough of Queens has laid, repaved and 
resurfaced 146 miles of streets. In all, it has constructed approximately $10,- 
200,000 worth of public improvements. There has been prepared and adopted 



144 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



final maps for 22,800 acres. Building operations have increased tremendously. 
The Zoning Law has been established, so that there is now no haphazard building. 
The intensive development of Manhattan being precluded, the natural outlet for 
the overflow of building development is into Queens. The house refuse and 
street cleaning wastes are disposed of in a scientific manner, in the most modern 
of model disposal plants. These plants are so located as to create the minimum 
disadvantage to the communities they serve, great care having been exercised in 
the selection of their sites. Mosquito breeding meadows have been reclaimed into 
broad acres, which will soon be covered with model factories. Some of the finest 
residential suburbs in the world are located in the borough. The Queens-Boule- 
vard and the Jamaica Bay Boulevard projects are in such a condition that they 
can be physcially improved at any time, the only reason why the construction has 
been delayed being the unsettled conditions resulting from the war. 

During the past ten years the borough has grown beyond the expectations 
of most of us and during the next ten years wonderful growth is almost certain 
to be experienced, when some of our plans begin to bear fruit. Large capital and 
industries have, by their reception, been given confidence in the manner in which 
the public improvements are being carried out and important work is in progress. 
It is a matter of common knowledge that, due to its natural advantages, its close 
proximity to the business and pleasure centres of Manhattan, its healthful and 
attractive environment, the topographic and geographic formation, Queens must 
ultimately be the greatest of the five boroughs. It contains, complete in itself, 
residences for the laborers, mechanics and owners ; and factories to supply work 
for all. There are freight and water terminal facilities, and every natural ad- 
vantage that a commercial city should possess. The growth of the borough is' 
progressing upon sound, natural and stable lines. We have emerged from the 
war and are marching on into the greatest prosperity which this borough has ever 
known. 







AMERICAN HARD RUBBER Co., COLLEGE POINT. ESTABLISHED 1854. 



NEW YORK CITY 



145 



MORTGAGES 

More than $200,000,000 was invested in mortgages on Queens Borough im- 
proved and unimproved property during the past ten years. The title companies 
have been the most active lenders, although the savings banks and building and 
loan associations have put out large sums. These loans are made to investors 
who acknowledge the firm basis upon which loans are made in Queens and the 
value of the Borough real estate. The figures given in this article indicate that 
real estate in Queens Borough is upon a satisfactory basis. Viewed from the 
standpoint of a real estate developer and investor, and those who are promoting 
the advancement of Queens Borough, it is a more than satisfactory situation. 



Year ending July ist 



Dec. 3ist 



Jan. ist to Aug. ist 



Realty 
Mortgages 
1912 $25,493,973 

1913 23,768,190 

1914 18,870,093 

1915 19,371,757 

1916 21,519,811 

1917 16,326,260 

1918 10,052,067 

1919 10,980,054 



Trust 

Mortgages 

$ 13,534,750 

309,168,592 

45,068,457 

52,287,042 

30,519,811 

272,300 

796,799 

704,600 



AREA 

The Borough of Queens is not only the largest of the five boroughs of New 
York City, but is larger than every city in the United States except Los Angeles, 
New Orleans, Chicago and Philadelphia. It has exactly the same area as the 
County of London, England, in which there is a population of 4,500,000. 

Queens Borough contains 117.36 square miles, or 75,111 acres, and repre- 
sents 37.4% of the total area of New York City. It is more than five times as 
large as Manhattan, nearly three times as large as the Bronx, and is almost as 
large as Brooklyn and Richmond combined. 



Queens . . . 
Brooklyn . 
Richmond 
Manhattan 
The Bronx 

Total . 



In Acres 

75,iii 
49,680 
36,600 
14,038 
26,017 



Area 

In Square Miles 
117.36 
77.62 
57-19 
21-93 
40.65 



Per Cent of Total 

37-4 
24.7 
18.2 
6.8 
12.9 



201,446 3I4-75 

AREA OF QUEENS BOROUGH BY WARDS 



Ward Upland 

First 4,740.6 

Second 13,968.7 

Third 19,355-2 

Fourth 25,189.2 

Fifth 3,920.7 



Acres 
Under Water 

116.0 

149.0 
5,610.8 
2,060.7 



Totals 67,174.4 



7,936.5 



Total 

4,740.6 

14,084.7 

19,504.2 

30,800.0 

5,98i.4 

75,110.9 



IOO.O 



Square Miles 
7.41 

22.01 
30.47 
38.12 

9-35 



117-36 



Included in Queens Borough are 1186 acres (2 square miles) of municipal 
parks; 1960 acres (3 square miles) of cemeteries; and 7936 (12^ square miles) 



146 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



of land under water; leaving a balance of 100 square miles available for resi- 
dential and industrial development. The fact that not only one-half of this area 
is within 10 miles of the business center of New York, and that more of Queens 
Borough is within that distance than any other borough is shown by the follow- 
ing table : 



Square Miles 



From Grand Central Terminal 
I Mile Circle 

2 

3 
4 

5 
6 

7 

8 

9 

10 



Queens 

1.22 

4.12 

8.46 

14.09 

20.29 

26.16 

33-68 

43-13 

53-91 



rooklyn 


Bronx 


Manhattan 








2.63 


0.42 





7-85 


2.IO 





12.18 


5-45 





15.01 


10.41 


0.70 


16.81 


16.46 


2.89 


17-75 


22.75 


6.65 


18.51 


31.62 


11.26 


19.30 


41-39 


16.70 


20.16 


50.41 


24-13 


20.20 



POPULATION 

Not more than twelve cities in the United States exceed Queens Borough in 
population, for it has a population in 1920 of approximately 500,000. It jumped 
from 25th place in 1900 to 19th place in 1910, and it is expected that it will ex- 
ceed every other city except New York, Philadelphia and Chicago by 1930, when, 
without doubt, it will have a population of 1,000,000, as a result of the great 
influx of homeseekers, due to the great industrial development and the operation 
of its many new rapid transit lines. 

Although the United States Census figures for 1920 were not available when 
this publication was printed, the following tabulation gives an estimate of the 
population in the various communities included in Queens Borough. 



Community 
Long Island City 
Ridgewood 
Corona 
Elmhurst 

Woodside-Winfield 
Forest Hills 
Flushing 
College Point 
Whitestone 
Bayside 
Douglaston 
Little Neck 



Est. Population Est. Population 

1920 Community 1920 

90,000 Richmond Hill 50,000 

70,000 Jamaica 40,000 

40,000 Woodhaven 30,000 

18,000 Ozone Park 16,000 

13,000 Queens 4.500 

3,000 Hollis 4,000 

35,000 Springfield-St. Albans 3,ooo 

16,000 Laurelton 3,ooo 

7,000 Seaside 7,900 

7,000 Far Rockaway 25,000 

1,400 Hammels 15,000 

1,200 



WATER SUPPLY 

A large proportion of Queens Borough (particular the First and Third 
Wards) is supplied by the famous Catskill Water System, insuring the very finest 
water for drinking purposes as well as manufacturing uses. One big main has 
a capacity of 40,000,000 gallons per day. 

Among the private water companies which furnish various sections of the 
Borough are : 

(a) Citizen's Water Supply Company, Second Ward ; 

(b) Jamaica Water Supply Company and Woodhaven Supply Company, 
Fourth Ward; 

(c) Queens County Water Company which supplies the Fifth Ward. 



NEW YORK CITY 



147 



ASSESSED VALUATION AND TAX RATE 

The amazing growth of the Borough of Queens since it became a part of 
New York City is shown by the following tables which set forth the increase in 
the assessed valuation of land and improvements. 

The increase in the total assessed valuation from $103,752,000 in 1899 to 
$636,409,000 in 1920 or a total increase of $532,657,000 in 21 years (an average 
per year of $25,370,000), is the result of the hundreds of new industrial estab- 
lishments and the thousands of new homes which have been constructed in the 
borough during that time. The total assessed valuation has almost doubled since 
1910, and is today greater than that of Brooklyn when that borough became a 
part of New York City. 



Year 



1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 

1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
I9IS 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 



Ward i 
Ward 2 
Ward ^ 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 



Total Real Estate 

Assessment 
$ 103,752,600 

104,427,772 

107,179,620 

108,859,704 

123,781,723 

131,379,723 
140,404,990 
159,446,205 
217,668,775 
296,458,080 
308,112,605 
334,563,060 
446,569,352 
456,750,530 
477,702,836 
488,686,756 
509,515,9/8 
539,394,614 
569,865,007 

591,599,075- 
604,827,476 
636,409,159 



Value of 
Improvements 
No 

Separate 
Value 
Given 

$ 45,147,250 

50,113,225 

65,144,845 

73,354,150 

88.111,404 

06,557,609 

107,770,243 

131,268,935 

140,794,500 

156,026,337 

166,008,357 

180,899,338 

198,002,225 

262,163,139 

279,616,500 

292,249,696 

317,182,349 



ASSESSED VALUATIONS BY WARDS 



1910 

73,492,875 
70,671,120 
50,850,550 
85.836,985 
27,099,030 



Real Estate $307,950,560 

Real Estate of Corporations 11,695,500 
Special Franchises 14,917,800 



1920 

$130,570,550 

156,170,525 

78,637,570 

141,768,020 

53,547,910 

$569,694,575 
37,577,450 
29J37J34 



Total 



Borough 

Queens 

Bronx 

Brooklyn 

Richmond 

Manhattan 

New York City 



$334,563,o6o $636,409,159 

ASSESSED VALUATION NEW YORK CITY 



Tax Rate 
Per $100 

$ 3.27 
2-34 
2-35 
2.31 
1-47 
1-57 
i-55 
1-55 
1-53 
1.66 
1.72 
1.81 

1-73 
1.84 
1.85 
i. 80 
1-95 
2.06 
2.09 
2.41 
2.37 
2-54 



Increase 
$ 66,077,675 

85,499,405 
27,787,020 

55,931,035 
26,448,880 

$261,744,015 
25,881,850 
14.219,334 

$301,845,199 



1899 

103,751,600 
123,702,030 
609,822.267 

40,265,464 
2,054,003,875 


1920 

$ 636,409,159 
753,^08,264 
1,937,811,205 

111,821,102 

5,186,771,887 



Increase Per Cent Inc. 

$ 532,657,559 513 

629,606,234 509 

1,327,988,938 219 

71,555,728 177 

3,131,868,012 153 



$2,932,445,464 $8,626,121,707 $5,693,676,243 194 



148 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE 

BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

CITY OF NEW YORK 

(Incorporated April, 1911.) 

'To Promote the General Welfare of the Borough of Queens, City of New York, 

and to Foster Its Commerce." 

EXECUTIVE OFFICES 

Bridge Plaza, Long Island City, New York City. 

Telephone, Astoria 2500. 
The officers and directors of the Chamber for the year 1920-21 are: 



President, H. Pushae Williams, 

Vice-President, James E. Clonin, 

Vice-President, George H. Willcockson, 

Treasurer, P. A. Rowley, 

Secretary, Walter I. Willis, 

SENIOR COUNCIL 
William H. Williams, President 

Robert W. Higbie, 
Charles G. M. Thomas, 
George J. Ryan, 

Term Expires 1922 
John H. Penchoen 
Edward Roche 
Edward A. MacDougall 
Charles G. Meyer 
John W. Rapp 
EXECUTIVE STAFF 

Walter I. W r illis 



Term Expires 1921 
Theodore Steinway 
George C. Dickel 
Ray Palmer 
Michael J. Degnon 
John F. Galvin 



Flushing 

Long Island City 

Elmhurst 

Jamaica 

Flushing 

1911-13 

1913-15 

1915-17 

1917-19 

Term Expires 1923 
John Adikes 
John M. Demarest 
Stuard Hirschman 
Henry J. Mullen 
Morris L. Willets 



Secretary 

Mgr. Traffic & Industrial Bureaus 

Ass't Secretary 

Ass't Secretary 

Ass't Secretary 



P. W. Moore 
John J. Sonderman 
Percival Mullikin 
E. R. Hudson 





A LUNCHEON CLUB ADJOINS 
CHAMBER OFFICES AND 
CLUB ROOM. 



CLUB ROOM FOR MEETINGS AND PRI- 
VATE CONFERENCES, ADJOINS THE 
EXECUTIVE OFFICES. 



149 

ARE 650 BUSINESS MEN AND 

WHY PUBLIC SPIRITED CITIZENS OF QUEENS BOROUGH 
MEMBERS OF THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

REASON IThe Traffic Bureau 

This Bureau is organized to render to members a service of information and 
advice regarding rates, routes, classifications, claims and any problems which may 
arise in connection with the shipment of goods. It is constantly operating to 
protect the Borough of Queens from undue discrimination in transportation mat- 
ters and to safeguard the interests of Queens Borough business men in all matters 
relative to the general adjustment of rates. Monthly meetings of the "Traffic 
Club" are held for the discussion and solution of mutual shipping problems. 
REASON 2 The Industrial Bureau 

Clears all industrial information concerning Queens; renders service to 
established manufacturers and to those seeking a location for their plants in this 
vicinity. The Industrial Manager cooperates with real estate owners and brokers 
to make such a space available. The Bureau maintains on record all of the in- 
dustrial plants in Queens Borough. 

The "Personnel Managers' Club," which holds monthly meetings, at which 
problems of employment, housing, welfare, sanitation, "turnover," and other 
labor questions are discussed by the individuals responsible for such work in the 
factories of Queens. 

REASON 3 The Chamber is only representative organization of the Borough 
of Queens including in its membership men from every section of the Borough, 
who are interested in the industrial, financial, commercial, residential, and gen- 
eral development of Queens Borough. 

REASON A The Chamber promotes your prosperity by advancing the business 
interests of Queens Borough. 

REASON 5 It protects members from unjust exactions. 

REASON 6 It promotes business friendship and thereby lessens, removes, or 
prevents friction and misunderstanding between business men. 
REASON 7 It broadens business men's views on government and business. 
REASON 8 Secures .important improvements. City, state and national offi- 
cials recognize organized business men and when the Chamber recommends 
improvements to transit facilities, waterfront, highways and other important 
matters, its recommendations are received favorably and given thorough con- 
sideration. 
REASON 9 Queensborough Magazine 

Publishes each month the Queensborough Magazine which reports the rapid 
growth of the Borough, which at the present time has no counterpart anywhere 
else in New York City. 
REASON 10 Committees 

A dozen standing committees are working constantly for the interests of 
Queens' business men and dealing with transit, waterway development, manu- 
facturing, borough planning, highways, legislation, arbitration, schools, parks, 
sewers, water and housing. In addition there are many Special Committees 
working on specific problems. 



150 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




t/3 



O 

o 



u 



-.l 



c 





rt 

CQ 



ffi 



NEW YORK CITY 



151 



MEMBERSHIP (April 22, 1920) 



Name 
James H. Abraham.... 

*H. L. Adams 

J. A. Adamson 

John Adikes 

*Frederick H. Adler 

*O. G. Alexander , 

E. D. Anderson 

Bob Andrews 

Charles Lee Andrews.. 

Wallace V. Andrie 

Victor Anthenill 

*Harold H. Anthony 

Edward D. Appleton. . . 
Walter D. Appleyard. . 
James C. Archer , 

F. E. Armstrong , 

B. L. Atwater 

George Atwell 

Martin Bach 

F. Eugene Backus 

Isaac Baer 

*Otto Bahls 

*George F. Bahntge 

Dr. Joseph Bainton 

John M. Baker 

*Herbert W. Ballantine. 

*J. Herbert Ballantine. . 

*John H. Ballantine.... 

Walter F. Ballinger 

Joseph Banker 

*W. E. Barber 

Alfred M. Barrett 

John T. Barry 

*Charles A. Barton 

*Thomas F. Baumann... 

W. A. Baumert 

Ambrose F. Becker.... 
*Philip L. Becker 

Henry L. Bell 

August Bellon 



Hal Benedict 

Alfonso Bertoni 

*E. T. Bedford 

Charles R. Bettes 

Arthur S. Beves 

Louis Bingmann 

Leon Birck 

C. H. Birdsall 

*Arni Bjornson 

James P. Black 

S. Blickman 

^William D. Bloodgood.. 

Samuel J. Bloomingdale. 

E. L. Blun.... 

William J. Boardman. . . . 



Carl Bomeisler. 

Paul Bosse 

John Bossert. . . 
J. B. Bouck, Jr. 

F. G. Bradford. 
A. J. Bradley.. 



Peter J. Brady N. Y. City. 

Edward H. Bragg N. Y. City. 



"Philip B. Brewster 

"William Brewster 

Stephen Briggs 

Arthur W. Brockway. . . 



Robert T. Brooks L. I. City. 

*Eugene L. Brown N. Y. City. 

Frank G. Burke N. Y. City. 

D. Calandra L. I. City. 

Charles E. Callahan L. I. City. 

Henry L. Caiman N. Y. City. 

Antonio Cantore L. I. City. 

*Phiral Memberships 



Address Business Elected 

, .N. Y. City Vice-Pres. Mayer & Loewenstein Oct. 8, 1915 

. .W. Ft. Lee, N. J..Selznick Pictures Corp Oct. 20,1919 

.N. Y. City District Engineer, Lockwood, Greene & Co. 

(Architects, Engineers and Constructors) .... Feb. 3, 1919 

. .Jamaica Flour and Feed Merchant Charter 

, .L. I. City Auditor, Manhattan & Queens Traction Co June 16,1916 

..Jamaica Asst. Cashier, Bank of the Manhattan Co Dec. 15,1916 

.L. I. City Pres.. E. D. Anderson, Inc Feb. 28, 1918 

. .L. I. City American Lead Co Apr. 22, 1920 

..Flushing DeCoppet & Doremus (Member N. Y. Stock 

Exchange) Feb. 16,1912 

.Brooklyn Knickerbocker Ice Co Feb. 28,1918 

, .L. I. City Millwright and Engineer Apr. 22, 1920 

.L. I. City Clonin & Messenger Mar. 8,1917 

.L. I. City Vice-Pres., J. F. Tapley Co June 16, 1916 

, .L. I. City Treas., New York Consolidated Card Co. Mar. 8,1917 

. .Jamaica Real Estate Auctioneer June 18, 1918 

. . Richmond Hill . . . Coal and Wood June 18, 1918 

.Brooklyn Vice-Pres., Wm. Wrigley, Jr., Co Dec. 6, 1918 

.L. I. City Pres., Northeastern Supply Co. (Lumber) Nov. 20, 1917 

.Brooklyn Pres., Quezal Art Glass & Decorating Co June 18, 1918 

.Forest Hills Coal and Wood May 12, 1919 

. L. I. City Weisberg-Baer Co Apr. 6, 1917 

.L.I. City Vice-Pres.. Transport Service, Inc Sept. 27, 1918 

.L. I. City Mgr., L. I. City Branch, American Trust Co.. Mar. 15. 1920 

.N. Y. City Board of Trustees, St. John's Hospital Apr. 4, 1919 

.L. I. City Architect Feb. 20, 1920 

.L. I. City Neptune Meter Co. (Director and Publicity 

Manager) June 24, 1919 

.L. I. City Pres., Neptune Meter Co Jan. 26, 1917 

.L. I. City Vice-Pres., Neptune Meter Co Jan. 26,1917 

.N. Y. City Ballinger & Perrot (Architects, Engineers and 

Constructors) May 12. 1916 

.L. I. City Art Ornament Co Mar. 15, 1920 

.N. Y. City Red Star Towing & Transportation Co May 12,1919 

. N. Y. City Deputy Public Service Commissioner Aug. 25, 1919 

.L. I. City Pres., D. D. Williamson & Co Sept. 13, 1917 

.L. I. City Genl. Sales Mgr., N. Y. & Queens Elec. Light 

& Power Co June 16, 1916 

.L. I. City Treas., Transport Service, Inc Nov. 25, 1919 

.College Point Manufacturer of Cheese Apr. 13, 1914 

.N. Y. City Laurelton Sales Co.. Inc. (Real Estate) Jan. 12,1920 

T I. City Mgr., American Chicle Co Apr. 10,1916 

.Bayside Bayside Supply Co. (Lumber, Coal, etc.) Oct. 8,1915 

.Rockaway Beach. Pres., August Bellon, Inc. (Structural and Or- 
namental Iron) July 25, 1918 

.College Point Hal Benedict Studios (Motion Pictures) Feb. 20, 1920 

.L. I. City Genl. Mgr., DeNobili Cigar Co Nov. 25, 1919 

.L. I. City Pres.. Repetti, Inc. (Candy) Apr. 22, 1920 

.Far Rockaway. . .Chief Engr., Queens County Water Co Mar. 9,1913 

.N. Y. City Receiver, American Blau-Gas Corp. (Gas, Blau- 

Gas and Dri-Gas) Aug. 25, 1919 

.Glendale Steeplejack and Rigger Apr. 22, 1920 

.Flushing Real Estate and Building June 16, 1915 

.L. I. City Pres., Johnson Coin Counting Machine Co Jan. 12,1920 

.Flushing Mgr., Bank of the Manhattan Co. (Flushing 

Branch) J u ly 25, 1918 

.L. I. City Supt. Burns Bros. (Coal) July 19.1917 

.N. Y. City Metal Goods Dec. 6,1918 

.N. Y. City Pres., Wm. D. Bloodgood & Co., Inc. (Real 

Estate) Oct. 25,1912 

.N. Y. City Pres. Bloomingdale Bros., Inc. (Dept. Store).. Feb. 16,1912 

.'College Point Manhattan Silk Co Aug. 25, 1919 

.Jamaica Chairman Board of Directors, First National 

Bank of Jamaica Apr. 4, 1919 

.Imperial Metal Mfg. Corp. (Metal Specialties) July 19^ 1917 

.Pres., Premier Metal Etching -Co Feb. 28,1918 

.Pres.. Louis Bossert & Sons, Inc. (Lumber) .. .Apr. 9,1918 
. Treas., Pratt & Lambert (Varnishes and Enam- 
els) Oct. 20,1919 

. Manager, Gaumont Motion Pictures Co Feb. 16, 1916 

. A. J. Bradley Mfg. Co. (Stencil Papers and 

Ink) Sept. 13, 1917 

. Supervisor, Board of City Record Apr. 4, 1919 

. Vice-Pres., Egleston Bros. & Co., Inc. (Iron 

and Steel Merchants) June 24, 1919 

.Treas., Brewster & Co. (Automobiles) Dec. 6,1918 

.Pres.. Brewster & Co. (Automobiles) Charter 

. Pres., Stephen Briggs, Inc. (Barrels) July 25, 1918 

. Secy.-Treas., Brpckway-Fitzhugh-Stewart Inc., 

(Labels and Fibre Shippers' Containers) June 24,1919 

. Vice-Pres., Geo. A. Just Co. (Structural Iron 

and Steel) Feb. 3,1919 

. Rickert-Brown Realty Co Nov. 25, 1919 

.Manhattan Soap Co Dec. 15,1916 

.Vice-Pres.. Atlantic Macaroni Co Feb. 16,1916 

.Mgr., Plaza Business School Dec. 6,1918 

. Emil Caiman & Co. (Paint and Varnish) Oct. 25,1912 

. Real Estate Apr. 22, 1920 



L. I. City. 

L. I. City. 

Brooklyn. . 

L. I. City. 

, Flushing . . 

L. I. City. 



. ..L. I. City. 
...L. I. City. 
...L. I. City. 
. . .Brooklyn. . 



152 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Name 

Abbott L. Carpenter. . 
*L. H. Carragan 

Henry A. Cassebeer. . 
Theodore Cassebeer... 

George W. Cassidy. . . . 

E. W. Caswell 

William B. Gating 

E. Oliver Champ 

H. Chandler 

Miles S. Charlock 

Charles A. Christman. 

C. A. Christoffers 

W. W. Clark 

Audley Clarke 

John Clarke 

William E. Clarke 

Edward J. Clarry. . . . 

John Clochessy 

'James E. Clonin 

W. E. Code, Jr 

William C. Cole 

Bernard P. Colen 

William Collins 



Frederick H. Cone 

Thomas I. Conerty 

R. T. Conley 

"Andrew J. Connell 

C. C. Cooper , 

C. W. Copp 

D. Corin 

W. R. Couch 

Joseph N. Courtade, Jr.. 
Charles E. Covert 

Morton R. Cross 

Thomas W. Cullen 

Christopher Cunningham 

W. J. Cunningham 

Wm. H. Dahman 

Arnold H. Dale.. 



Richard F. Dalton. . . 

Thomas Daly 

Albert Dasburg 

J. Sherlock Davis.... 

R. H. Davis 

Max Davidson 

Joseph P. Day 

Daniel Lacy Dayton. 
Harry L. Dayton.... 

J. Wilson Dayton. . . 

John J. Deery 

Richard A. Deeves. . 
Michael J. Degnon. . , 

Frank Dehn 

John M. Demarest.., 



P. E. Demarest 

Leopold Demuth.... 
Frank Devlin 



A ddress 

. .L. I. City 

. .N. Y. City 

.L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

.Maspeth 

.Malba 

. .L. I. City 

.N. Y. City 

. .L. I. City 

. .N. Y. City 

.L. I. City 

, .Brooklyn 

. .N. Y. City 

. .L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

. . Rockaway Beach 

. .L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

..L. I. City 

. .N. Y. City 

. .N. Y. City. 

. . Far Rockaway . . 

. .L. I. City 

. .College Point. . . 
. .Brooklyn 

.Flushing 

. .Brooklyn 

. .Brooklyn 

. .N. Y. City 

. .Jamaica 

. .N. Y. City 

. .N. Y. City 

. .Brooklyn 

. .L. I. City 

.Woodhaven 

. .L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

. .Corona 

. .L. I. City 

. .Brooklyn 

. .N. Y. City 

. .L. I. City 

.N. Y. City 

. Bayside , 

. .L. I. City 

. Bayside , 

. .L. I. City 

. .N. Y. City 

. .N. Y. City 

. .Elmhurst , 

. .Forest Hills. . , 



Business Elected 

. F. L. Bradbury Co. (Doughnuts and Crullers) . June 18, 1918 

.Sales Mgr., General Carbonic Co Nov. 25, 1919 

Charter 

. Steinway & Sons (Pianos) Charter 

.Cassidy Co., Inc. (Lighting Fixtures) Apr. 6,1917 

. Supt., Rolls-Royce Service Sta Mar. 15,1920 

.Prop., Gating Rope Works Feb. 20.1920 

.Real Estate Apr. 10,1916 

. E. S. Partridge, Inc. (Automobiles) Jan. 12,1920 

. Pres., Century Audit Corp May 12,1916 

. Lumber Merchant Jan. 12, 1920 

. Rex Paint Corporation Aug. 25, 1919 

.Tiffin Products, Inc. (Confectionery) Aug. 25,1919 

.Audley Clarke Co. (Building Material) Feb. 3,1919 

. Pres., John Clarke & Co.. Inc. (Brokers in 

Spices) Jan. 14,1918 

. Clarke Stamp Pad Co Apr. 22, 1920 

. Clarry Lumber Co., Inc June 24, 1919 

. Paper Bags and Folding Boxes May 21, 1918 

.Clonin & Messenger (Brick, Lime and Cement) . .Apr. 12, 1912 

. Pres., Hunterspoint Lumber & Supply Co Aug. 16, 1916 

. Jas. A. Stevenson Co. (General Trucking) Nov. 25,1919 

.Sec'y, Emerson Phonograph Co.. Inc Apr. 22,1920 

. Walter Kidde & Co. (Engineers and Contract- 
ors) Apr. 22, 1920 

. Vice-Pres., Andrew Cone Advertising Co Oct. 5,1916 

. Conerty-Sullivan Coal Co Jan. 4,1918 

.Eastern Mgr., Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co May 12,1919 

.Vice-Pres., Empire Art Metal Co Aug. 16,1916 

.Pres., Greenpoint Fire Brick Co July 25,1918 

.Real Estate Feb. 9.1914 

. Anchor Cap & Closure Corp Feb. 20, 1920 

.Pres., C-H Motors Corp Feb. 20, 1920 

.Joseph N. Courtade & Sons (Piano Cases) Aug. 25, 1919 

.Vice-Pres., U. S. Title Guaranty Co Feb. 16,1912 

.Pres., Cross & Brown (Real Estate) June 19,1913 

. Deputy Tax Commissioner Mar. 8, 1917 

.Pres., Christopher Cunningham & Co. (Boilers) .Oct. 8, 1915 

. Brass Foundry Apr. 22. 1920 

.Supt., Lalance & Grosjean Mfg. Co Sept. 8,1911 

. Pres., Queensborough Brass & Bronze Foun- 
dry, Inc Feb. 20, 1920 

. Treas., N. Y. Architectural Terra Cotta Co... Apr. 9,1913 

. Builder Jan. 26, 1917 

Pres.. Plaza Tire & Rubber Co., Inc Mar. 15,1920 



George C. Dickel.... 
Alexander Dienst.... 

Henry M. Dietz 

John A. Dilliard 

William F. Dobbins.. 
Chas. Nelson Dodge. 

H. Doggweiler 

John I. Doherty 

W. H. Dohrmann... 
James A. Donald.... 
Edward Donner 

William F. Donovan. 

A. H. Doolittle 

J. H. Doolittle 

Edw. J. Dotterweich. 
H. W. Drake 

John Drew 

Henry Duchardt 

Stephen J. Duffy 

W. B. Dukeshire 

A. M. Duncan 

B. Waller Duncan. .. 



.L. I. City 

.Richmond Hill. 
.L. I. City 

.Woodhaven. . . . 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

.Brooklyn 

.N. Y. City 

.N. Y. City 

.N. Y. City... 
.N. Y. City 

.Brooklyn 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

.Brooklyn 

.L. I. City 

.N. Y. City 

.Buffalo 

.Brooklyn 

. Elmhurst 

.N. Y. City 

.Brooklyn 

.Maspeth 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City 



*Plural Memberships 



Pres.. Cross, Austin & Ireland Lumber Co Jan. 4,1918 

Real Estate Oct. 7,1914 

. Treas., Goldberg & Davidson Co Mar. 15, 1920 

. Real Estate Auctioneer Sept. 8, 1911 

. Real Estate Nov. 25, 1919 

.First Mortgage Guarantee Co Oct. 20,1919 

. Real Estate Feb. 20, 1920 

. Pres., John J. Deery Co. Inc Jan. 4, 1918 

. John H. Deeves & Bro. (Builders) Feb. 20, 1920 

. Pres., Degnon Realty & Terminal Impvmt. Co.). Sept. 8, 1911 

.Pres., Elmhurst Ice Co., Inc Apr. 22,1920 

. Vice-Pres., Sage Foundation Homes Co. (Real 

Estate) Dec. 8,1911 

.Principal, Bryant High School Apr. 6.1917 

. Pres., William Demuth & Co. (Tobacco Pipes) . .Apr. 9, 1915 
. Sec'y.-Treas.. Oakes Mfg. Co. (Drugs, Chem- 
icals and Dyes) Sept. 13, 1917 

.Pres., Dickel Construction Co June 19.1913 

. . National Sugar Refining Co Sept. 27. 1918 

.Real Estate and Insurance Oct. 20,1919 

. Engineer, Louis Gold, Inc. (Builder and Real 

Estate) Oct. 20, 1919 

, . 4th yice-Pres., Metropolitan Life Ins. Co Nov. 25, 1919 

, . Traffic Mgr., National Sugar Refining Co. of 

New Jersey Aug. 25,1919 

..Sec'y, J. A. Migel, Inc. (Silk) Oct. 20. W19 

. . Sec'y, Degrfon Realty & Terminal Improvement 

Co June 18. 1918 

..Pres.. Atlantic Hygienic Ice Co Feb. 3,1919 

. . Lumber Merchant May 31, 1917 

. . Donner House Wrecking Co., Inc. (Second- 

Hand Lumber Merchants) Aug. 25. 1919 

..Vice-Pres., Flushing Bay Improvement Co.... Oct. 11.1915 

, . Claudel Carburetor Co Feb. 20, 1920 

..Real Estate Developer Apr. 13,1914 

..Manufacturer Concrete Machinery May 9,1918 

, . Com'l Manager, N. Y. Telephone Co., L. I. 

Division) Dec. 19 1913 

..Branch Supt., Model Brassiere Co Feb. 20,1920 

..Real Estate Nov. 25, 1919 

..Treas.. J. P. Duffy Co. (Building Material) ... June 24 1919 

. . Sec'y-Treas. Dukeshire Steel & Forge Co July 25,1918 

. . Sec'y, Cole-Duncan Boiler Works .Oct. 20, 1919 

. . General Mgr., Manhattan & Queens Traction 

Corp Dec. 6,1918 



NEW YORK CITY 



153 



Name 

"Fred S. Dunn 

Frank Dunnel. Jr 

T. Coleman DuPont. . . 
Eugene W. Durkee.... 



Address 
...L. I. City.. 
... Elmhurst. . . 
....N. Y.City.. 

. . . .Elmhurst. . . 



H. Gordon Duval L. I. City. 



Charles P. Early 

*Lee J. Eastman 

Henry F. Ecks 

Adolph J. Egelhof 

"Theodore W. Egly 

Samuel Eichen 

A. D. Eldert 

Byron E. Eldred 

Lewis A. Eldridge 

Joseph Elias 

*Jesse F. Ellsworth.... 

A. Ephraem 

Oscar Erlandsen.. 



L. I. City 

N. Y. City 

L. I. City 

N. Y. City..., 

L. I. City 

N. Y.City 

. . . .Jamaica 

. . . .Flushing 

..N. Y.City 

L. I. City.... 

L. I. City 

College Point. 

Jamaica 



Leander B. Faber 

Walter S. Faddis 

Thomas E. Fagans 

Archie Fahnestock 

Michel Feldine 

J. U. Ferris 

*Benjamin J. Field 



. . . .Jamaica 

N. Y. City..., 

. . . .Elmhurst 

....L. I. City.... 

L. I. City.... 

College Point. 

....L. I. City.... 



'Raymond Charles Finch. .. .Flushing 



Joseph Fischel 

John C. Fisher , 

Edward W. Fitzpatrick. 
Lewis W. Flaunlacher. . 
A. H. Flint 

James W. Florida 

Thomas J. Foster...... 

Clifford S. Fox 

William Fox 

James Frank 

Charles W. Frazier.... 
*George H. Frew 

William J. Friedrick. . . 

Wm. E. G. Gaillard 

Robert C. Galindo, Jr.. 

John F. Galvin 

Thomas C. Gannon. . . . 

Garret J. Garretson .... 
John R. Garside 

Chas. L. Gehnrich 

Leonard Genovese 

William R. Gibson.... 

Earl A. Gillespie 

John T. Gleason 

Marshall W. Gleason.. 
*A. C. Goddard.... 

*C. H. Goddard 

Leon G. Godley 

*Louis Gold 

W. S. Goldfrank 

Simon Gottschall 

Charles J. Grant 

Edward Grauer 

John A. Gray 

L. W. Greiner 

T. Edward Gresslee.... 

Adolph J. Gretschel 

John W. Grey 



.L. I. City.... 
.L. I. City.... 
.L. I. City..., 
.N. Y.City... 
.College Point, 

.L. I. City... 
.L. I. City... 

.L. I. City... 
.N. Y. City... 
.N. Y.City... 
.L. I. City... 
.N. Y. City... 
.L. I. City... 
.N. Y.City... 
.L. I. City... 
.L. I. City... 
.N. Y. City... 

. Elmhurst. . . . 
.L. I. City... 

.L. I. City... 

.L. I. City... 
.Woodhaven. . 
. Woodhaven. . 
.L. I. City... 
.Brooklyn. . . . 
.L. I. City... 
.L. I. City... 
.N. Y. City... 
.Brooklyn. . . . 
.N. Y. City... 
.L. I. City... 
.L. I. City... 

, .Jamaica 

.L. I. City... 

.N. Y. City... 



....L. I. City. 

L. I. City. 

. . . .Flushing.. . 



Morgan Grossman L. I. City. 

J. D. Hackett N. Y. City. 

A. Hager L. I. City. 

John J. Halleran Flushing... 

Tames T. Hallinan Flushing.. . 

John J. Halpin N. Y. City. 

fohn W. Hamilton N. Y. City. 

William J. Hamilton Corona. . . . 

*Plural Memberships 



Business Elected 

, . . Asst. Treas., Queensboro Corporation Aug. 16. 1916 

...Automobile and Tractor Merchant Mar. 15,1920 

, . . Manufacturer June 24, 1919 

, . . E. R. Durkee & Co. (Spices and Food Prod- 
ucts) Apr. 6,1917 

, ..Pres., Duvalian Products Corp. (Leather 

Goods) Feb. 20, 1920 

,.. Treas., A. Recknagel, Inc (Hardware) Mar. 15,1920 

, . . Pres., Packard Motor Car Co. of N. Y Nov. 25, 1919 

, . . Domestic Soap Mfg. Co Apr. 4, 1919 

. .. Vice-Pres.. Wills-Egelhof Co., Inc. (Builders) . .Apr. 4,1919 
...Asst. Mgri, New York National Irving Bank.. Apr. 22, 19"20 

. . . Shore Acres Realty Co Sept. 8, 1911 

...Pres., John R.Carpenter & Co. (Lumber) July 25,1916 

. . . Pres.. Commercial Research Co. (Metal Etching, 

Welding, Chemical Products) Aug. 16, 1916 

. .. Sec'y-Treas., N. Y. & East River Ferry Co Feb. 28, 1918 

. . . Joseph Elias & Co. (Glass) June 16, 1915 

. .. Mgr.. Corn Exchange Bank (Astoria Branch) . .Dec. 20, 1912 

. . . L. I. Manufacturing Co. (Hats) Oct. 20,1919 

. . . Pres., Metropolis Engineering Co. (Engineers 

and Surveyors) Nov. 19, 1915 

...Justice, Supreme Court of New York Dec. 8,1911 

...Vice-Pres.. Cauldwell Wingate Co. (Builders) . .Oct. 8,1915 

. . . Mgr., Elmhurst Coal Co Feb. 20, 1920 

. . . Mgr., Fahnestock Electric Co Nov. 25 ? 1919 

. . . Pres., Lauraine Magneto Co Aug. 25. 1919 

. .. Asst. Treas., Beacon Falls Rubber Shoe Co June 18. 1918 

...Pres., Howell Field & Goddard, Inc. (Metal 

Doors and Fireproofing) June 16, 1915 

Chief Engineer, Hunter Illuminated Car Sign 

Co Sept. 27, 1918 

. . Comfort Sandal Mfg. Co May 9, 1918 

...John C. Fisher Mfg. Co. (Metal Specialties) . July 25,1918 

...Contractor Apr. 4,1919 

...Vice-Pres., M. & L. Hess. Inc (Real Estate) .. Jan. 12, 1916 
. . . Vice-Pres., L. W. F. Engineering Co. (Air- 
craft and Accessories) May 21,1917 

. . Gen'l Service Mgr., Packard Motor Car Co. 

of N. Y Jan. 12, 1920 

. . . Chm. Board of Directors, National Bridge 

Works (Structural Steel and Iron) June 10, 1914 

. . . Supt. of Distribution, East River Gas Go Apr. 9,1913 

..Pres., Fox Film Corporation June 16, 1916 

...Attorney. Real Estate Feb. 9,1914 

...Pres., Brett Lithographing Co Oct. 8,191 

..Mgr., Corn Exchange Bank (55th St. Branch) . .Apr. 6, 1915 
Asst. Treas., Old Reliable Motor Truck Corp.. Oct. 20. 1919 

. . Gaillard Realty Co., Inc Feb. 20, 1920 

. . . Jurgen Rathjen Co. (Coal) June 24, 1919 

...Pres., Metal Stamping Co. (Auto Accessories) . June 19,1913 
Queens Representative. Pennsylvania Cement 

Co '. Apr. 4,1919 

...Official Referee. N. Y. State Supreme Court.. Feb. 28,1918 
Pres., A. Garside & Son, Inc. (Women's 

Shoes) May 12,1916 

. . Vice-Pres., Gehnrich Indirect Heat Oven Co. 

(Ovens, Sheet Metal) Oct. 29,1919 

. . . Building Contractor Apr. 22, 1920 

...W. R. Gibson Co., Inc. (Builders) Mar. 15.1920 

. . . Lumber Merchant Charter 

. . . Sec'y-Treas., Codex Antiseptic Co Mar. 15, 1920 

Pres.. Gleason-Tiebout Glass Co Feb. 10,1915 

. . . Treas., Howell, Field & Goddard Jan. 12, 1912 

...Pres., American Drugeists' Snydicate June 16,1915 

...Vice-Pres.. American Chicle Co Aug. 25,1919 

...Engineer and Builder Aug. 25,1919 

...Sec'y, Stein-Davies Co. (Dextrine, Starch) Nov. 25, 1919 

...Pres., Star Ribbon Mfg. Co July 25,1918 

..Pres. and Treas., Marcus Ward, Inc. (Station- 
ery) Aug. 16, 1916 

...Mgr. Metropolitan Tobacco Co Dec. 6.1918 

. . . Sec'y-Treas., Sweeney & Gray Co. (Machinists 

and Hydraulic Engineers) Mar. 15, 1920 

...Mgr., Liquid Carbonic Co. (Soda Fountains, 

Bottling Machines) Nov. 25, 1919 

. . . Real Estate Apr. 22, 1920 

: . . Real Estate, Insurance and Mortgage Loans. . June 24, 1919 
Pres., Supreme Pictures. Inc. (Motion Pic- 
tures) Jan. 12.1920 

Morgan Gross Co., Inc. (Shoes) Mar. 15,1920 

. . . . Labor consultant Sept. 27, 1918 

Motorcycles Apr. 22, 1920 

...Real Estate. Appraisals Sept. 8,1911 

. . . Lawyer (Hallinan & Groh) Apr. 4. 1919 

. . . Scott. Gerard & Bowers (Lawyers) Mar. 8, 1917 

...Hamilton & Chambers Co. (Engineers) Apr. 6,1917 

Real Estate Charter 



154 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Name Address Business Elected 

F. I. Hamm Jamaica Mgr., Jamaica Poster Advertising Co May 9, 1918 

*George B. Hanavan L. I. City Vice-Pres., L. I. Star Publishing Co May 9,1918 

M. Hanensen N. Y. City Pres., Piroxloid Products Corp Mar. 15, 1920 

*E. Irving Hanson N. Y. City Mgr.. H. R. Mallinson & Co. (Silks) Nov. 25, 1919 

Wallace J. Hardgrove Flushing Operators Associates, Inc. (Real Estate) June 16, 1916 

William E. Harmon College Point Treas. and Gen'l Mgr., Harmon Color Works, 

Inc Nov. 13, 1916 

Judson A. Harrington N. Y. City Industrial Real Estate Feb. 16,1916 

H. Trowbridge Harris L. I. City Real Estate and Insurance Feb. 20, 1920 

John T. Harrison N. Y. City Asst. to Vice-Pres., Fidelity and Deposit Co. 

of Maryland (Surety Bonds) Nov. 13, 1916 

James F. Hart Brooklyn Hart Waterproof Mfg. Co.. Inc. (Canvas 

Goods) Dec. 6,1918 

W. E. Haskin L. I. City Vice-Pres., Pressed & Welded Steel Products 

Co., Inc Dec 6,1917 

Robert R. Haslett Brooklyn L. I. Editor, Brooklyn Daily Eagle May 12,1919 

S. R. Hatchett N. Y. City Pres., Sawyer Biscuit Co Jan. 12, 1920 

Harold Hawkins L. I. City Real Estate ; Apr. 22, 1920 

Elbert W. Hawley . Bayside C. H. Hawley & Sons (Coal and Wood) May 12 1919 

A. M. Hayes L. I. City Sec'y, Van Iderstine Co Nov. 20, 1917 

S. P. Hayward L. I. City Connolly Iron Sponge & Governor Co. (Pipe).. Mar. 15,1920 

Henry Hellman L. I. City Ford Dealer Apr. 22, 1920 

Richard Hellman L. I. City Pres., Richard Hellmann, Inc. (Food Prod- 
ucts) Sept. 13, 1917 

*David G. Helme L. I. City McLoughlin & Helme (Plumbing Contractors) . .Mar. 15,1920 

F. W. Herz L. I. City Pres., National Varnish Co Aug. 25. 1919 

H. G. Heyson Far Rockaway. .. Pres., National Bank of Far Rockaway Apr. 4,1919 

Frederick C. Hicks Washington. D. C.U. S. Congressman Jan. 12,1916 

Harry H. Hicks Rockaway Beach. Pres., Hicks, Hicks & Hicks, Inc. (Lumber) .. July 25,1918 

*Hamilton A. Higbie Jamaica Treas., Long Island Finance Corporation June 16. 1916 

*Robert W. Higbie Jamaica Pres.. Long Island Finance Corporation Charter 

F. J. Hildebrand Ridgewood Pres., Concord Construction Co. (Ornamental 

Iron Work and Forgings) July 25, 1918 

Stuard Hirschman N. Y. City Real Estate Charter 

A. C. Horn L. I. City Treas., Horn Holland Co. (Paints and Var- 
nishes) Oct. 5,1916 

H. J. Houpert L. I. City Pres., Houpert Machine Co Aug. 25, 1919 

*F. Ray Howe N. Y. City Vice-Pres., Queensboro Corp. (Real Estate) .. .June 16,1916 

Stephen J. Huber L. I. City Joseph Huber, Inc. (Commercial Auto Bodies). Feb. 20, 1920 

*R. S. Huddleston L. I. City Pres., Astoria Mahogany Co Dec. 16, 1916 

Allen J. Huke N. Y. City Asst. N. Y. Manager Rockland & Rockport 

Lime Co June 24, 1919 

E. Covert Hulst L. I. City Director, First Mortgage Guarantee Co Apr. 9, 1913 

Burt Jay Humphrey L. I. City Queens County Judge Charter 

*Richard Fenley Hunter. .. .Flushing Gen'l Mgr., Hunter Illuminated Car Sign Co.. Oct. 8,1915 

S. V. V. Huntington L. I. City Pres., Edward Smith & Co. (Varnish Makers 

and Color Grinders) Apr. 22, 1920 

William F. Hurley L. I. City Asst. Mgr.. Matheson Lead Co Nov. 25, 1919 

Morris Jacobs L. I. City Real Estate May 12, 1919 

Percy C. James Jamaica James & Hawkins, Inc. (Hardware, Paint, 

Auto Supplies) Dec. 15,1916 

"William T. James Flushing Pres. Queens County Savings Bank Oct. 22,1913 

Charles Jensen L. I. City Jensen's Auto Body Works Jan. 12, 1920 

Charles T. Jensen Bayside Sec'y, Queensboro Lumber Co., Inc June 24. 1919 

Allen H. Jeter L. I. City A. H. Jeter & Co., Inc. (Roofing and Sheet 

Metal) Feb. 3,1919 

Wm. H. Johns N. Y. City Pres., George Batten Co. (Advertising) Nov. 19, 1915 

E. C. Johnson N. Y. City Gen'l Mgr., Standard Steel Car Co. Apr. 22, 1920 

Henry C. Johnson, Jr L. 1. city Real Estate, Appraiser and Auctioneer June 24. 1919 

Remsen Johnson Brooklyn Jere Johnson, Jr., Co. (Real Estate Auctioneer) Sept. 27, 1918 

F. Cliffe Johnston N. Y. City Gen'l Mgr., Palmer Waterfront Land & Im- 

provement Co Sept. 13, 1917 

Henry S. Johnston Elmhurst Pres., H. S. Johnston Drug Co Charter 

William A. Jones, Jr N. Y. City Attorney Feb. 16,1912 

John Kaiser L. I. City Supt., Technola Piano Co Apr. 4. 1919 

H. Kaltenhauser L. I. City Pres., National Labeling Machine Co., Inc July 25,1918 

William J. Kam Buffalo (Non-resident member) Jan. 12. 1920 

H. B. Kanter L. I. City H. P. K. Electric Co. (Industrial Electrical 

Engineers) Apr. 22, 1920 

Charles I. Karasik Elmhurst Business Manager, Ravenswood Paper Mill Co. 

(Boxboard and Lining) Apr. 9,1918 

John Karmazin L. I. City Sec'y and Gen'l Mgr., Waldes & Co.. Inc. 

(Small Metal Goods, Koh-I-Noor Fasteners) . .Feb. 20, 1920 

Leo Karpen.. . .N. Y. City. . , ..Managing Director, S. Karpen & Bros. (Fur- 
niture) Oct. 20,1919 

*Frederick W. Kavanaugh. .N. Y. City Howard Estates Development Co. (Real Es- 
tate) Feb. 10,1915 

Elmer A. Keeler N. Y. City Keeler's Coal Pockets Jan. 4, 1918 

*Owen A. Keenan L. I. City Local Commercial Mgr., N. Y. Telephone Co.. June 16,1916 

Henry A. Keiner Richmond Hill. .. Pres.. Keiner Williams Stamping Co. (Drawn 

and Stamped Sheet Metal) July 25,1918 

Henry P. Keith N. Y. City Attorney Apr. 22,1920 

Kawdon W. Kellogg Jamaica Attorney * June 16, 1915 

Warren Kelly N. Y. City Sec'y-Treas., Jos. P. McHugh & Son (Willow 

Furniture) Nov. 25, 1919 

Robert W. Kemp... ..Woodside Pres.. Holliday Kemp Co., Inc. (Dyes, Aniline 

Colors) Feb. 28,1918 

F. Kempf L. I. City Triangle Service Station Apr. 22. 1920 

HowardB. Keppel L. I. City Vice-Pres., Defender Manfg. Co. (Sheets and 

Pillow Cases) May 12, 1916 

E. J. Kestenbaum L. I. City Treas., Republic Auto Parts Co June 24, 1919 

John J. Kindred L. I. City Kindred's Sanitarium Oct. 25, 1912 

*Plural Memberships 



NEW YORK CITY 



155 



Name *' 

*F. W. Kirch 

*George M. Kirchmer.... 
"James Klase 

Jack K. Klein 

Jacob Klein 

Joseph J. Kleinhenz. 

F. J. Kline 

William J. Knott 

W. W. Knowles 

Hermann Koch 

-*U. S. Kolby , 

Alexander Konta 

A. Kornblum 

Alfred Robert Kraemer. 

V. P. Krauss 

*Louis C. Kunz 

Walter Kutzleb 

L. U. LaCour 

Fred J. Lancaster 

~*Wm. C. Lange 

LeRoy Latham 

L. Laudisi 

William Law 

*Arvine C. Leach 

John Anderson Leach.. 

G. Howland Leavitt.... 
Ernest A. L'Ecluse.... 

F. E. Lee 

A. H. Leipert 



Fred C. Lemmerman. 

W. H. Lersner 

H. S. Leverich. ; . . . . 
Alfred Levy 

Adolph Lewisohn. . . . 

Sam A. Lewisohn. . . . 
*J. Henry JLienau. . . , 

Harvey K.. Lines.... 

Paul R. Lipman 

"*Henry Locicnart. Jr.. 

George \V. Loft 

"Jacob L. Loose 

"Kenneth U. Loose. . , 

*h'ranK l_oru 

-*J. Willard Lord 

C. H. Low 

Albert E. Lowe...., 



Address 

.L. I. City 

.Brooklyn 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

, .L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

. .N. Y. City 

. .L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

.N. Y. City 

. .N. Y. City 

. College Point. . . 

. .L. I. City , 

. .L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

..N. Y. City 

. .College Point. . 

. .Brooklyn 

..L. I. City 

..L. I. City 

..L. I. City 

..L. I. City 

. .Flushing 

..N. Y. City 

..Laurel Hill 

..N. Y. City 



.Glendale 

.College Point. . 

.N. Y. City 

.N. Y. City 

.N. Y. City 

.N. Y. City 

,.L. I. City 

.Flushing 

.L. I. City 

.N. Y. City... 

.N. Y. City 

, .Kansas City. . . 

, .L. I. City 

. .N. Y. City 

..L. I. City 

. .College Point. . 
. .N. Y. City 



Btisiness Elected 

.Vice-Pres., Astoria Mahogany Co May 21,1917 

.Claim Agent, Brooklyn Union Gas Co Feb. 11,191. 

.Pres., Queensboro Storage & Warehouse Corp.. Apr. 22, 1920 
.Klein Bros. (Japanese Bamboo Furniture) ... .Apr. 4,1919 

.J. Klein Iron Works Jan. 12,1920 

. Pres., Queens Haulage Corp Oct. 20, 1919 

.American Clip Co Dec. 6,1918 

. Kew Gardens Hotel June 24, 1919 

. Architect Feb. 20, 1920 

. Real Estate . . '. Apr. 22, 1920 

. Asst. Sec'y and Asst. Treas., American Ever 

Ready Work Sept. 13, 1917 

.Vice-Pres.. Perfect Window Regulator Co Mar. 15,1920 

. Treas.. Allyn Hall Realty Co Nov. 20, 1917 

. Sec'y & Mgr., Kraemer Bros. (Lumber and 

Masons' Materials) Feb. 20, 1920 

. Supt. and Chemical Engineer, Toch Bros. 

(Paints and Varnishes) June 18, 1918 

. Sec'y-Treas., The Motometer Co., Inc May 9,1918 

. Pres., Organic Salt & Acid Co., Inc. (Drugs 

and Chemicals) Nov. 20, 1917 

. Pres., LaCour Iron Works (Structural Steel 

and Iron) j u i y ig ; 1917 

.Realty Operator Oct. 25.1912 

. Pres. and Gen'l Mgr., Empire Tube & Steel 

Cor P- , Aug. 16, 1916 

. Pres., Latham Litho. & Printing Co May 12 1916 

Banker "-. v .' '. Au 8- 25, 1919 

.John Simmons Co. (Pipe, Iron Fittings, etc.).. Feb. 3,1919 

..Sec'y, First Mortgage Guarantee Co Nov. 20 1917 

. First Deputy Police Commissioner of N. Y. 

City; Attorney Charter 

',', Sec'y-Treas., L'Ecluse Washburn & Co. (Real 

Estate) Apr. 9,1918 

. . Traffic Mgr.. Nichols Copper Co. (Copper Re- 
fining) ...... , j une 24, 1919 

, . N. Y. Service Mgr., International Motor Co. 

(Machining, Auto Assembling, etc.) Feb. 20,1920 

, . Real Estate & Insurance Mar. is[ 1920 

. . Treas.. Chilton Paint Co Oct.' 8 1915 

Real Estate , Anr n'lQlA 

m ~. ,, , , * .rvpr. 10, iyi*t 

. . Traffic Mgr., Toch Bros Qct 20 1919 

. . Banker ' Feb ". 10 ' ms 

..Banker p eb IQ lgi5 

..National Sugar Refining Co. of N. J Sept. 27^ 1918 

..Coal, Wood and Building Maetrials Jan. 4 1918 

. . Vice-Pres., Greenpoint- -Southern Co. (Mat- 
tresses, Box Springs, Pillows) Nov. 25, 1919 

. . Real Estate, Banker June' 2o', 1914 

..Pres., Loft, Inc. (Confectionery) .Feb. 28 1*918 

. . Loose Wiles Biscuit Co Sept. 26* 1913 

. . Asst. Mgr.. Loose Wiles Biscuit Co .Sept. 27^ 1918 

..Vice-Pre., Cross & Brown Co. (Real Estate) . .Nov. 19*, 1915 

..Mgr., Pierce Arrow Service Station Mar. 15,1920 

. . Pre., National Chain Co July 25* 1918 

r - M. Film Corp. (Motion Picture Films), 



G. 



Fred R. Lowe 

Clarence M. Lowes 



Victor A. Lownes 

F. H. Luce 

Clarence A. Ludlum 

'George W. Luft 

K. J. Kundgren 

Andreas P. Lundin 

*D. E. McAvoy 

John B. McCaw 

Frank B. McCord 

Alfred E. F. McCorry. . . 

George B. McEwan 

Archibald C. McLachlan. 

'George C. McLoughlin. . . 

H. E. McLoughlin 

"Edward J. McMahon.... 

Patrick McMeel 

Robert W. McMullen 

Dwight MacDonald 

George C. MacDonald.... 

James A. Macdona'd 

Edward A. MacDougall.. 
J. E. Mace 



Carleton Macy 

Jacob Maisel 

H. R. Mallinson 

D. S. Mallory 



.Jamaica 

.Brooklyn 

. Woodhaven .... 

.Woodhaven 

.N. Y. City 

.L. I. City 

.Richmond Hill. 

.N. Y. City 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

.N. Y. City 

.N. Y. City 

.Corona 

. .Jamaica 

.L. I. City 

. .L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

.N. Y. City 

.Brooklyn 

. .N. Y. City 

. .L. I. City 

. .N. Y. City 

. .N. Y. City 

. .N. Y. City 

..Far Rockaway 

. . Woodside , 

. .N. Y. City 

. .N. Y. City 



*Plural Memberships 



Pres., Municipal Studios Jan. 12,1920 

..Treas., Fred Adee Corp. (Plumbing Supplies) . .Feb. 20. 1920 
.. Pres., Flushing National Bank; Treas.. Dime 

Savings Bank of Williamsburg Apr. 9, 1918 

. . Spear & Co. (Caps and Hats) Aug. 16, 1916 

..Supt., Woodhaven Water Supply Co Apr. 9,1918 

..Vice-Pres.. The Home Insurance Co Charter 

..Treas., American Druggists' Syndicate Sept. 27, 1918 

Real Estate Investments Mar. 15, 1920 

..Pres., American Balsa Co Oct. 7,1914 

.. Treas., Wm. D. Bloodgood & Co. (Real Estate). June 16, 1916 

..Sec'y. F. Piel Co., Inc. (Auto Horns) Dec. 6,1918 

.. Vice-Pres. & Treas., Post & McCord (Builders) .Feb. 20, 1920 

. . Cantilever Aero Co Apr. 6, 1917 

. . Corona Lumber Corp Jan. 12^ 1920 

. . Principal, Jamaica Training School for Teach- 
ers Dec. 15,1916 

.. McLoughlin & Helme (Plumbing Contractors) . .Mar. 15, 1920 

. . Kozak & McLoughlin (Ladies' Shoes) Dec. 15,1916 

. . N. Y. National Irving Trust Co June 24, 1919 

..Vice-Pres., Wm. Hmghes & Co., Inc. (Cotton 

and Woolen Waste) Mar. 15, 1920 

. . Life Insurance Nov. 25, 1919 

. . MacDonald & Bostwick (Lawyers) Nov. 13, 1916 

. . Sales Mgr., Loose Wiles Biscuit Co Aug. 25, 1919 

..Trustee. Queens County Savings Bank Charter 

. . Pres., Queensboro Corporation Charter 

..Gen'l Mgr., Menley & James, Ltd. (Import. 

Export and Manufacturing Chemists) Jan. 12, 1920 

. . Pres. Queensboro Gas & Elec. Co Mar. 7, 1913 

. .J. M. Skirt Co Sept. 28, 1918 

, ..Pres., H. R. Mallinson & Co. (Silks) Nov. 25, 1919 

. . Asst. Treas.. Dictograph Products Corporation 

(Acousticons, Dictographs) ' . . . Sept. 27, 1918 



156 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Name Address Business Elected 

Alrick H. Man N. Y. City Pres., Kew Gardens Corp. (Real Estate) Charter 

Ellery W. Mann Rockaway Park. . Vice-Pres., H. K. McCann Co. (Advertising) .. Mar. 15,1920 

*C. A. Marston L. I. City Factory Mgr., American Ever Ready Works. . . .Mar. 15, 1920 

Franklin J. Mason L. I. City Contractor Apr. 4, 1919 

*J. S. Masterman N. Y. City Printing Mgr., Metropolitan Life Ins. Co Oct. 20, 1919 

*A. F. Mathews L. I. City Mathews Model Flats Co., Inc. (Real Estate and 

Builder) Apr. 13, 1914 

Ernest Mathews L. I. City Mathews Building Co Jan. 26, 1917 

*G. X. Mathews L. I. City Mathews Model Flats Co., Inc. (Real Estate 

and Builder) Apr. 13, 1914 

*Carl C. Mattman, Jr L. I. City Asst. Supt. and Pur. Agt., Astoria Silk Works. Nov. 25. 1919 

Charles Mattman L. I. City Treas., Astoria Silk Works Apr. 6, 1917 

*Theo. Thos. Mattman L. I. City Astoria Silk Works Nov. 25, 1919 

C. B. Mayer L. I. City C. B. Mayer Co. (Interior Woodwork) Feb. 20,1920 

Edward W. Merrill, Jr Maspeth Pres. Merrill Bros., Inc Jan. 4, 1918 

Henry Mayer L. I. City Vice-Pres., Niagara Knitting Mills Corp Feb. 20, 1920 

*Martin A. Metzner L. I. City Young & Metzner (Bags and Bagging) Dec. 19,1913 

Herbert Mead, Jr L. I. City Sec'y-Treas., Indiana Quartered Oak Co . . .Apr. 22, 1920 

Jacob Meurer L. I. City Pres.. Meurer Steel Barrel Co Sept. 27, 1918 

Charles G. Meyer N. Y. City Sec'y, Cord Meyer Development Co. (Real 

Estate) Charter 

Frank Meyer N. Y. City Asst. Sec'y, Famous Players-Lasky Corp. (Mo- 
tion Pictures) June 24, 1919 

*George C. Meyer Forest Hills Cord Meyer Development Co Oct. 5, 1916 

Henry W. Meyer Ridgewood Pres., Ivanhoe Co. (Builder and Real Estate). .Apr. 6, 1917 

Willard F. Meyers L. I. City Pres., Willard F. Meyers Machine Co., Inc Feb. 28. 1918 

*William S. Milan L. I. City Mgr., Bank of the Manhattan Co Feb. 28, 1918 

C. C. Miller Brooklyn Eclipse Box & Lumber Co Mar. 8, 1917 

Julius Miller L. I. City Julius Miller Shoe Co Apr. 22. 1920 

C. C. Mollenhauer Brooklyn Real Estate June 10, 1914 

Benjamin Moore L. I. City Moore's Bakery; Vice-Pres., L. I. City Sav- 
ings Bank July 25, 1918 

Robert E. Moore L. I. City Austin & Moore, Inc. (Electrical and Indus- 
trial Engineers) Oct. 20,1919 

William H. Moore N. Y. City N. Y. Mgr., The White Co. (Motor Trucks) .. .Aug. 25.1919 

David G. Morrison L. I. City. ...... Director, L. I. City Savings Bank Sept. 27, 1918 

Thomas Morrison, Jr L. I. City Mgr., Acorn Silk Co May 9,1918 

A. W. Morse L. I. City. . v ... Vice-Pres., The Anthony Co. (Liquid Fuel 

Engineers) Feb. 28, 1918 

George H. Mullen Far Rockaway. .. Pres., Mullen & 'Buckley, Inc. (Window 

Screens) Sept. 27, 1918 

Henry J. Mullen Jamaica Pres., H. J. Mullen Contracting Co., Inc Apr. 12.1912 

Kearn J. Mullen N. Y. City U. S. Fidelity & Guaranty Co May 12, 1919 

J. P. Muller N. Y. City Pres., J. P. Muller & Co. (Advertising) July 19,1917 

Roswell F. Mundy N. Y. City Treas., L. I. City Realty Co Jan. 26, 1917 

William P. Myers L. I. City Manhattan-Rome Co. (Metal Beds and Couches)Aug. 16. 1916 

Alfred Nathan Flushing Pres., Nathan Mfg. Co. (Steam Injectors and 

Locomotive Appliances) May 12, 1916 

H. V. H. Neefus N. Y. City Francisco & Jacobus (Engineers and Archi- 
tects) Feb. 20, 1920 

Nicholas Nehrbauer L. I. City Plumbing Contractor Nov. 25, 1919 

C. A. Neidig Blissville Supt., American Agricultural Chemical Works 

(Preston Works) Jan. 12,1920 

Archibald Nesbett Bayside Contractor Aug. 16, 1916 

Isaac Neuschotz N. Y. City Pres., Fritsch Toilet Mirror Co Jan. 12, 1920 

RichardS. Newcombs N. Y. City Pressinger & Newcombe (Lawyers) Sept. 13, 1917 

Harvey B. Nevins N. Y. City Harvey B. Newins, Inc. (Real Estate) May 12.1919 

R. H. Nimmich Winfield Pres., Shoreham Novelty Co May 9, 1918 

*W. M. Nones L. I. City Pres. and Treas., Norma Co. of America (Ball 

Bearings) June 16, 1916 

C. G. Norman Winfield Pres., Norman-Seton, Inc. (Metal Doors and 

Fireproofing) Sept. 21, 1915 

*Myer Nussbaum N. Y. City Treas., Howard Estates Development Co. (Real 

Estate) ; Attorney June 16, 1916 

Francis J. Oakes. Jr Boston Vice-Pres., Oakes Mfg. Co. (Drugs. Chemicals, 

Dyes) Sept. 13, 1917 

George M. O'Connor L. I. City Plumbing and Heating Contractor ...May 9,1918 

*M. O'Malley L. I. City Supt., Metropolitan Life Insurance Co Aug. 16.1916 

Jos. R. Oppenheimer ~. L. I. City Sec'y, West Disinfecting Co Nov. 19, 1915 

W. E. Orr L. I. City Pres., C. A. Willey Co. (Varnish and Paint) . . .Feb. 3, 19l9 

Eugene J. Orsenigo L. I. City Orsenigo Co., Inc. (Furniture) Nov. 13, 1916 

Frank O'Sullivan Garden City Purchasing Agent. Doubleday, Page Co. (Book 

Publishers Aug. 25, 1919 

Ray Palmer L. I. City Pres., New York & Queens Electric Light & 

Power Co Nov. 19, 1916 

John W. Paris N. Y. City Pres., Paris-Hecken Co. (Real Estate) Feb. 28, 1918 

F. James Parks N. Y. City Treas., Self Clasp Envelope Co Apr. 22, 1920 

William Bowne Parsons. . . .N. Y. City Attorney Nov. 13, 1916 

Eugene Pauly N. Y. City Commission Merchant Feb. 16, 1916 

Jerome Payet L. I. City Pres., Payet Silk Dyeing Corp Oct. 20, 1919 

Jos. J. Paymer L. I. City Central Smelting & Refining Co July 25. 1918 

Alvan T. Payne L. I. City Attorney June 2,1911 

Napoleon Pelletier Maspeth Pelletier Can Co June 18, 1918 

John H. Penchoen L. I. City Mgr.. Title Guarantee & Trust Co June 18, 1918 

John Moore Perry Elmhurst Farmer May 12,1919 

A. N. Peterson L. I. City Pres., Brooklyn Foundry Co Apr. 9,1918 

John W. Petry L. I. City Pres.. John W. Petry Co. (Plumbing, Heating 

and Ventilating) Nov. 25, 1919 

Franklin Pettit N. Y. City Real Estate Feb. 3.1919 

Jacob Pfeffer L. I. City Coal, Wood, and Building Materials Apr. 9,1918 

C. J. Phillips N. Y. City Asst. Gen'l Mgr., Brooklyn Eastern District 

Terminal Jan. 12,1920 

*Plural Memberships 



NEW YORK CITY 



157 



Name 

John Polachek . . . . 

W. A. Porter 

*James H. Post. . . . 

Paul Leon Price. . . 

Leo Propper 

Thomas F. Purcell. 
*F. A. Purdy 

\V. S. Quigley 

Edward A. Quin. . . 
*D. \V. Quinn, Jr., 

Thomas M. Quinn. 

John T. Rainier. . . 
*Fred G. Randall... 

John A. Rapelye. . . 
*John W. Rapp 

""Justin J. Rathjen. . 
Arthur L. Reed. . . , 

F. H. Reeve 

Jacob Reichert 
William C. Reid... 
James J. Reilly. . . . 
John B. Reimer. . . 



Address 

.L. I. City 

. Maspeth 

.N. Y. City 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

.N. Y. City 

.N. Y. City 

.Jamaica 

.L. I. City 

.Flushing 

.L. I. City 

. Elmhurst 

.College Point. . 

.L. I. City 

.Richmond Hill 

.N. Y. City 

.Brooklyn 

.Greenpoint.. . . 

.L. I. City 

.Ozone Park. . . 



John H. Rhodes L. I. City 



Sol Richman 

*Charles H. Rickert 

E. J. Rickert 

*A. B. Ricketts 

W. N. Ridge 

John M. Riehle 

Walter F. Ring 

Harry D. Robbins.... 

Walter Roberts. . , 



Laurel Hill. 

N. Y. City.. 

N. Y. City.. 

L. I. City.. 

N. Y. City.. 

N. Y. City.. 

Brooklyn. . . 

N. Y. City.. 

L. I. City.. 



*J. H. Robinson 

Edward Roche 

Mathew Rock 

Clinton T. Roe 

Edwin P. Roe 

Fred Roffe 

Charles A. Rohr 

Joseph M. Roman 

Emanuele Ronzoni 

Morris Rosenwasser . . . 
*P. A. Rowley 

Emil Runge 

Frederick Russell 

H. E. Russell 

Edward Ruth, Jr 

George J. Ryan 

A. M. Ryon 

Samuel Salvage 

Harry D. Sammis 

D. M. Sarkisian. . . 



N. Y. City 

....Far Rockaway 

N. Y. City 

N. Y. City 

. . . . Whitestone. . . 

L. I. City 

N. Y. City 

. ...L. I. City 

....L. I. City 

L. I. City 

. . . .Jamaica 

. . . .Flushing 

L. I. City 

L. I. City 

Winfield , 

L. I. City 

. . . .Flushing , 

....N. Y. City 

N. Y. City 

N. Y. City 



Sol Schildkraut Jamaica. 



Gustave Schirmer.... 

F. J. Schleicher 

Louis Schlesinger. . . . 

Carl Schneeweiss 

Eugene Schoen 

John G. Schumacher. 
*Alfred B. Schupp... 

Henry T. Schwanda. 

Felix Schwemer 

Melvin W. Scott.... 

Maurice Seiderman . . 
*Louis J. Selznick. . . . 



*Myron Selznick 

*Otto Sepp 

Ernest Sexauer 

Charles W. Shaeffer., 
'William Shaw 

J. C. Sheaff , 

C. E. Sheppard 

'Johnson Shipman.... 



.N. Y. City 

.L. I. City.... 

.N. Y. City 

.L. I. City 

, .Newark 

.Flushing 

.L. I. City.... 

.Winfield 

, .College Point. 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City.... 
.N. Y. City 

..W. Fort Lee., 
.L. I. City.... 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City 

.L. I. City.... 
.N. Y. City 

, .N. Y. City 

.L. I. City.... 



Edwin Shuttleworth. 
Bohumil W. Sidlo.. 



..L. I. City 

..L. I. City 

Philip L. Sillman L. I. City 

*Plural Memberships 



Business Elected 

. . Pres., John Polachek Bronze & Iron Co July 25,1918 

. . Pres., United Button Co Nov. 20, 1917 

. . Pres., National Sugar Refining Co. of N. J Feb. 20, 1920 

. . Mgr., Irving Iron Works Oct. 5. 1916 

..Propper Silk Hosiery Co. (Silk Hosiery) Feb. 20,1920 

. . Surety Bonds Feb. 28, 1918 

. . Sec'y, Repetti, Inc. (Candy) Apr. 22, 1920 

..Pres., Quigley Furnace Specialties Co June 18,1918 

. . N. Y. Mgr., J. L. Mott Iron Works Feb. 20, 1920 

. . Vice-Pres., American Trust Co Feb. 3.1919 

..Undertaker Apr. 4,1919 

..Pres., Rainier Motor Corp Dec. 15,1916 

. . Vice-Pres., Queensboro Corporation Charter 

. . Real Estate Feb. 20, 1920 

. . Pres., Empire Art Metal Co. (Metal Works, 

Fireproofing) June 2, 1911 

..Pres.. Jurgen Rathjen Coal Co Oct. 5,1916 

..Pres., A. L. Reed Co. (Leather Goods) Feb. 16,1916 

..Real Estate Mar. 7,1917 

..Reichert Towing Line May 21,1917 

. . Leary & Co. (Lumber Merchants) June 16,1915 

. . Real Estate Broker , Apr. 22, 1920 

. . Pres., First National Bank of Ozone Park (Coal 

and Building Supplies) May 21,1917 

. . Victory Warehouse Corp (Cartage and Light- 
erage Facilities) Nov. 21, 1917 

. . Supt., National Enameling and Stamping Co.. Oct. 25,1912 

..Vice-Pres.. Rickert Realty Co., Inc June 19,1913 

..Pres., Rickert Realty Co., Inc June 2,1911 

..Factory Mgr., Neptune Meter Co Jan. 26,1917 

. . Pres., Metropolis Land Co Nov. 19, 1915 

..Pres., L. I. Sound Realty Co Feb. 16,1916 

. . Pres., Ring Gibson Co. (Builders) Feb. 19, 1915 

. . Pres.. H. D. Robbins Co. (Investment Bankers) .June 18, 1'918 
. . Mgr., William Bradley & Son (Cut Stone and 

Marble) Apr. 12, 1912 

. . Cross & Brown Co. (Real Estate) Oct. 20, 1919 

..Roche's Baths June 6,1912 

. . Merchant Tailor Oct. 8, 1915 

.. Sec'y, L. I. Bond & Mortgage Co.; Attorney. .Charter 

..Pres., First National Bank of Whitestone June 24,1919 

. . Treas., Kelly & Kelley (Engineers) Feb. 3, 1919 

..Commercial Engineers (General Electric Co.).. Feb. 20,1920 

. . Roman-Callman Co. (Real Estate) Nov. 20, 1917 

. . Pres.-Treas.. Ronzoni Macaroni Co., Inc Oct. 20,1919 

..Pres., Rosenwasser Bros. (Leggings and Boots) .Dec. 9,1914 
. . Vice-Pres., Bank of the Manhattan Company. . .Nov. 19, 1915 

. . Real Estate May 12, 1919 

. . Pres., Russell Foundry & Machine Co Charter 

..Supt., Reichard-Coulston Co Feb. 28,1918 

. . Real Estate and Insurance July 19, 1917 

..Real Estate and Insurance Feb. 16,1912 

..Coal and Mason Supplies Apr. 10,1916 

..Manufacturer Artificial Silk Yarn July 25.1918 

. . Asst. Sec'y. Farmers' Loan & Trust Co Apr. 6, 1917 

. . Pres., Gould Mersereau Co. (Drapery, Carpet 

and Cabinet Hardware) Oct. 20, 1919 

. . Jamaica Auto & Supply Co. (Autos and Ac- 
cessories) Apr. 9,1918 

. . G. Schirmer, Inc. (Music Publishers) Nov. 19, 1915 

.. Sec'y, W. D. Wilson Printing Ink Co., Ltd Apr. 4, 1919 

..Louis Schlesinger, Inc. (Real Estate) Apr. 22.1920 

. . Mgr., George Brown & Co. (Cut Stone) Feb. 20, 1920 

..Gen. Mgr., International Oxygen Co Oct. 7,1914 

..Farmer Oct. 8,1915 

..Supt., Motometer Co., Inc May 9,1918 

..Mgr., B. Schwanda & Son (Pearl Buttons) July 19,1917 

..Pres., Atlantic Rubber Manufacturing Corp... June 14.1914 

..Factory Mgr., R. & L. Bearings Co Feb. 20,1920 

..Pres., Star Silk Works Jan. 12,1920 

..Pres., Select Pictures Corp.; Treas., Selznick 

Pictures Corp Oct. 20, 1919 

, ..Pres., Selznick Pictures Corporation Oct. 20,1919 

..A. & P. Motor Trucking Corp.; Queensboro 

Warehouse Corp Oct. 20. 1919 

. . Treas., Sexauer & Lemke, Inc. (Structural 

Iron and Steel) Jan. 26,1917 

. . Supt., Standard Oil Co. of N. Y. (Devoe 

Works) Apr. 4,1919 

. . Supt., Standard Oil Co. of N. Y. (Empire 

Yard) Apr. 4,1919 

. . Mgr.. Patterson Sargent Co. (Paints and Var- 
nish) Sept. 27, 1918 

..C. E. Sheppard Co. (Book Binders) Apr. 22,1920 

. . Purchasing Agt., Neptune Meter Co. (Water 

Meters) Jan. 26,1917 

..Pres.. Edwin Shuttleworth (Cut Stone and 

Marble) July 25, 1918 

. . Pres., Voska, Foelsch & Sidlo, Inc. (Interior 

Marble) June 18, 1918 

. . Astoria Mahogany Co Sept. 13, 1917 



158 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



Name Address Business Elected 

Charles RSilvernail L I City Mgr., Queensboro Storage & Warehouse Corp.. Apr. 22,1920- 

Joseph I. Simmons N. Y. City Sec'y, John Simmons Co. (Pipe, Iron Fittings, 

Charles Simonson Elmhurst Real Estate ' .' .' ." . . .' . . . .' .' . . . . .' .' .' .' .' .' . . . . ' ' pb' 16* 1912 

I rl i Sk ^"c"-'il J" I' l ty Asst - Sec>y ' Queensboro Corp. (Re'aV Estate) .' .'Aug. 16,1916- 

*Chare S W. Smith. L. I. City Traffic Mgr., Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co Sept. 27 1918 

Charles W. Smith L. I. City Supt., Standard Oil Co. of N. Y. (Pratt 

Edward M Smith Elmhurst Mgr. , Newtown ' Gas Co '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. Sept. 27^1918 

*rank R. Smith Jamaica Coal. Wood and Mason Supplies Apr. 8,1917 

L. C. L. Smith L. I. City Consulting Engineer Apr. 10 1916- 

Le r y L - Smith L. I. City Editor, L. I. Star Publishing Co Nov. 19. 1915 

Morrell Smith w Far Kockaway. . . Architect Aug. 25, 1919- 

c er i 'r> c L- I- City Manufacturer Women's Clothing Mar. 15. 192O 

bamuel R. Smith Jamaica Bank of the Manhattan Company Sept. 27, 1918 

Valentine W. Smith Far Rockaway. . . Vice-Pres., Bank of the Manhattan Co Sept. 27, 1918 

Walter S. Smith N. Y. City Vice-Prcs., Red Star Towing & Transporta- 

. T c j tion Co.) May 12, 1919- 

H. L. Snyder L. I. City Treas., N. . Y. & Queens Electric Light & 

Power Co.) June 16, 1916- 

Harry J. Sohmer L. I. City Sohmer Piano Co Oct. 7. 1914 

George Solms Richmond Hill. .. Pres., Richmond Hill National Bank May 9! 1918 

redenck A. Sondheimer. . .L. I. City Black Bear Co. (Oils and Factory Supplies) .. .May 9,1918 

Charles M. Sorenson N. Y. City Pres., Charles Sorensen Co.. Inc Apr. 22, 1920 

Maynard H. Spear Flushing Vice-Pres., N. Y. & Queens Gas Co Jan. 12,1916- 

A. W. Spence N. Y. City Treas., Harrolds Motor Car Co. (Pierce Arrow 

Service Station) Apr. 9,1918 

G. J. Staats N. Y. City Plumbing and Heating Contractor Feb. 16,1912 

Mathew J. Stacom L. I. City Pres., Island Lumber Co., Inc Apr. 22.1920 

George Stanley Roslyn Pres., N. Y. & North Shore Traction Corp Mar. 15, 1920 

James C. Stansbury Jamaica Jas. H. Stansbury, Inc. (Lumber and Coal) Apr. 4. 1919 

Charles Sterner L. I. City Sales Mgr., Steiner Mfg. Co (Automotive Sup- 

j I ' i | i plies) Feb. 20,1920' 

Theodore Stemway N. Y. City Steinway & Sons (Pianos) Charter 

George J. Stelz College Point Gen. Mgr. and Treas., College Point Boat Corp. Jan. 12,1920 

Chester G. Stewart Brooklyn Mgr., M. Goodwin & Co. (Lumber) Jan. 12,1920 

Isaac R. Stewart Brooklyn Pres., Anchor Cap & Closure Corp Mar. 15,1920' 

Frederick Storm Bayside First National Bank Dec. 19, 1913 

Elmer G. Story Bayside Pres., First National Bank Oct. 20,1919- 

Charles L. Strattard Flushing Staunchwood Shops (Toys) Jan. 12.1920 

Henry F. Strebel Brooklyn Chas. Strebel & Sons (Structural Steel and 

Iron) Jan. 4,1918 

Frank L. Stiles Jamaica Mgr., N. Y. Title & Mortgage Co Mar. 15, 1920 

G. L. Stuebner L. I. City G. L. Stuebner Iron Works (Structural Steel 

and Iron) Sept. 13, 1917 

H. E. Sturcke L. I. City Treas., General Carbonic Co Nov. 25, 191? 

Jacob Sulzbach College Point Pres., N. Y. Watering Co. (Silk Ribbons) Apr. 13,1914 

Benjamin H. Sweet Jamaica Real Estate Feb. 11.1915 

T. B. Swennes L. I. City Supt., Texas Co. (Oils) Feb. 20,1920 

Seymour Taft L. I. City Taft's City Garage (Autos and Accessories) Apr. 9, 1918 

E. J. Tarof N. Y. City Traffic Mgr.. Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co. 

(Billiard Tables, Bowling Alleys and Phono- 
graphs) ..Sept. 13, 1917 

Martin Tepper L. I. City Pres., Heatless Dental Wheel Co. (Dental Ap- 
pliances) July 25, 191S 

Ira L. Terry Flushing Real Estate Apr. 4,1919 

Charles G. M. Thomas N. Y. City Vice-Pres.. Consolidated Gas. Co. of N. Y.; 

Chairman. Board of Directors N. Y. & 

Queens Electric Light & Power Co Charter 

John W. Thomas N. Y. City Gen'l Agt., Travelers' Insurance Co Apr. 10,1916 

Wm. H. Thompson L. I. City Real Estate May 9, 1918 

Ralph M. Thomson N. Y. City John Thomson Press Co. (Machinery) Feb. 3.1919 

*W. D. Ticknor N. Y. City Goodrich-Lockhart Co. (Real Estate) July 25,1918 

Bernard W. Timoney L. I. City Architect and Builder Apr. 4, 1919 

Josiah B. Tisdale L. I. City Tisdale Lumber Co. (Lumber, Coal. Wood) Jan. 12,1916 

Henry M. Toch N. Y. City Toch Bros. (Paint, Varnish and Chemicals) .. .Mar. 7. 1'913 

C. R. Tock L. I. City Pres., Tock Screw Machine Products Corp Sept. 27, 1918 

Thomas H. Todd N. Y. Crty .Real Estate June 24,1919 

L. J. Towneley L. I. City Mgr., Metropolitan District. National Casket Co. 

(Caskets and Undertakers' Supplies) Apr. 4,1919 

George H. Townsend L. I. City Motometer Co., Inc Apr. 22, 1919 

Benjamin D. Traitel L. I. City.. ..Pres., Traitel Marble Co. (Mosaic, Tile Mar- 
ble Works) Nov. 19, 1918 

William C. Van Brunt L. I. City Pres., William C. Van Brunt, Inc. (Structural 

Steel and Iron) Nov. 25, 1919 

John Cornelius Vander Pyl. College Point. ... Personnel Supervisor, American Hard Rubber 

Co Sept. 27, 1918 

Benjamin C. Vanderwater. .L. I. City.., . . Mer., Corn Exchange Bank (Queens County 

Branch) Dec. 20, 1912 

D. A. Van Derwerken Corona Tiffany Studios (Architectural Iron and Bronze, 

Lighting Fixtures) May 21. 1917 

Theodore J. Van Horen Brooklyn Pres., Jamaica Property Corporation Nov. 25, 19 

Garrett M.'Van Siclen Jamaica Coal and Wood Mar. 22. 19 

Pete- Van Siclen Jamaica Farmer Feb. 10,1915 

Paul L. Veeder L. I. City Sec'y-Treas., Boyce-Veeder Corp. (Fire Ex- 
tinguishers) Apr. 22, 1920 

L. J. Viehmann L. I. City Pres. and Treas. J. Chas. Teepe, Inc. (Wood- 

enware and Cabinet Work for Household Use) .May 9, If 

August Vogel L. I. City Pres.. Imperial Paint Co Oct. 5, 1916 

F. A. Von Moschzisker N. Y. City Agent Real Estate Dept., Pennsylvania Rail- 

road Co.) June 16, 1915 

*Plural Memberships 



NEW YORK CITY 



159 



Name Address Business Elected 

*Edwin S. Votey L. I. City Vice-Pres. and Gen'l Mgr.. Aeolian Co. (Pianos, 

Victrolas and Musical Instruments) Mar. 8, 1917 

A. W. Walch L. I. City Sec'y, L. I. City Industrial Branch, Y. M. C. A. Feb. 3, 1919 

R. O. Walker L. I. City Thibaut & Walker Co. (Varnishes) Nov. 25, 1919 

N. A. Wallace L. I. City Mgr.. La France Soap & Perfume Co Mar. 15, 1920 

*J. J. Walsh Laurel Hill Personnel Mgr., Nichols Copper Co June 24, 1919 

R. Randel Wangeman L. I. City Ten Eyck & Wangeman Dec. 6, 1918 

Frederick H. Wappler L. I. City Treas.. Wappler Electric Co. (Electric and 

X-Ray Apparatus) Aug. 25, 1919 

Fred A. Wasserman Whitestone Treas., Elandes Ribbon Co., Inc. (Silk Ribbon). July 25, 1918 

F. J. Weber Jamaica Photographer Apr. 22, 1920 

Richmond Weed N. Y. City Attorney Charter 

*William W. Weitling College Point Treas., American Hard Rubber Co Oct. 22,1913 

J. J. Wesley L. I. City Metropolitan Electric Mfg. Co. (Electrical Spe- 
cialties) July 25, 1918 

Charles M. White Jamaica Mgr. and Treas., Paragon Plaster Co. (Wall 

Plaster) Aug. 25, 1919 

'Herbert F. White L. I. City Mgr., Plaza Branch. Corn Exchange Bank Feb. 20, 1920 

*H. Winslow White L. I. City Pres., Columbia Paper Bag Co Jan. 12,1916 

George H. Wicke Glendale Pres., William Wicke Ribbon Co July 25.1918 

J. A. Wigmore N. Y. City Investments June 2,1911 

W. J. Wilkinson N. Y. City Zeese Wilkinson Co. (Color Plates, Engraving, 

etc.) Dec. 6,1918 

*George H. Willcockson L. I. City Vice-Pres., Loose- Wiles Biscuit Co Apr. 10, 1916 

*Morris L. Willets L. I. City Sec'y. Columbia Paper Bag Co Feb. 3, 1919 

*Alex. S. Williams L. I. City Chairman of Board, Astoria Mahogany Co Charter 

*H. Pushae Williams L. I. City Attorney; Pres., First Mortgage Guarantee Co. .Charter 

*Remsen T. Williams L. I. City Vice-Pres.. Astoria Mahogany Co Nov. 13, 1916 

Timothy S. Williams Brooklyn Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co June 19, 1913 

W. H. Williams N. Y. City Banker Charter 

*Donald Wilson N. Y. City Gen'l Freight Agt., Long Island Railroad Oct. 5,1916 

*Odbert P. Wilson L. I. City Vice-Pres., Norma Co. of America (Ball Bear- 
ings) Feb. 20, 1920 

* Wilbur C. Witherstine Jamaica Mgr., Queens County Branch, Title Guarantee 

& Trust Co June 19. 1913 

William O. Wood L. I. City Pres., N. Y. & Queens Co. Railway Co Oct. 7, 1914 

*P. H. Woodward N. Y. City Gen'l Passenger Agt., L. I. Railroad Apr. 9. 1920 

*Ray P. Woodin Jamaica Mgr., Title Guarantee & Trust Co Apr. 13, 1914 

C. Curtis Woodruff L. I. City C. Curtis Woodruff & Co. (Builders and Con- 
tractors) Aug. 16, 1916 

Walter Burnett Woodruff.. L. I. City Treas., John T. Woodruff & Son (Builders) .. Jan. 26, 1917 

George E. Woods L. I. City Astoria Light. Heat & Power Co Nov. 3, l9ll 

Frederic E. Wright L. I. City Pres.. Weldrite Co., Inc Apr. 22, 1920 

*I. H. Wright Jamaica Mgr., N. Y. Telephone Co June 16. ^16 

Frank W. Yager Flushing Yager & Wagner (Coal, Wood, Masons' Sup- 
plies) Jan. 4,1918 

William T. Yale Jamaica Vice-Pres., Yale Land Co Dec. 8, 1911 

H. Yellin College Point Eureka Rubber Co Jan. 12, 1920 

'Nicholas P. Young L. I. City Young & Metzner (Bags and Bagging) Dec. 19,1916 

C. J. Zimmerman N. Y. City Pres., Carbola Chemical Co Aug. 25, 1919 

*Plural Memberships 

If you desire to cooperate with the prominent business men and public spirited 
citizens of Queens Borough, fill out the following and mail to the office of the 
Chamber. 



192 



Chamber of Commerce of the Borough of Queens 

Bridge Plaza, Long Island City, N. Y. 
Gentlemen : 

I hereby make application for membership in the Chamber of Commerce of the Borough 
of Queens, New York City, and, if elected, will abide by the rules and regulations of the 
organization as set forth in its By-laws. 



Dues $25 for each sLv 
months, payable May 1st, 
and Nor. ist. 

Initiation fee $25. 



(Name) 

Address 

Business 



160 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




GffOWTH OF MMBRSH/f> 
/9//-/32O 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OP THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



CITY OF NEW YORK 



That the Queensboro Chamber of Commerce is keeping pace with the won- 
derful industrial, commercial, financial and residential growth of the Borough, 
can be readily seen by this chart indicating an increase from 55 charter members 
in 1911 to 625 members in April 1920. 

While our goal for this this year is 800 members, it is evident that at the 
present rate of growth the membership will soon be numbered by the thousands. 



NEW YORK CITY 



161 




For Every 



Food O 



ccasion 



there is a SUNSHINE BISCUIT to do its full 
share in making that occasion a success. 

For example. kfc Tak - horn - a Biscuit" is 
supreme for Sandwiches "Splits-in-two" no 
crumbs an exclusive feature. 

SUNSHINE BISCUITS are baked in 
Queens at the Wonder Bakery with the 
Thousand Windows. 

JOOSE-^ILES BISCUIT (3>MPANY 

Brandies in over 100 Cities. 
Bakers of 



Everyday 



scurfs 



162 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



THE LYON SPRING BUMPER 

THE BEST SELLING AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORY IN THE UNITED STATES 
OVER 1,000,000 SOLD ANNUALLY 




WHEN YOUR CAR IS EQUIPPED WITH LYON BUMPERS YOU ARE 
ALLOWED 15% ON COLLISION INSURANCE. 

MANUFACTURED EXCLUSIVELY BY 



METAL STAMPING COMPANY 



JOHN F. GALVIN, PRESIDENT 



LONG ISLAND CITY 



Telephone 926 Astoria 



Established 1860 




BUILDERS 



WALTER B. WOODRUFF 



1 Bridge Plaza 
Long Island City 



NEW YORK CITY 163 




Our two hundred million dollars of resources are 
adequate to deal with the largest financial enter- 
prises. 

We place no limit on our service within the bounds 
of sound banking. 

Whatever our customers demand of us in the way 
of modern banking service, we are prepared to give 
willingly, definitely and with the efficiency and 
dispatch of a fully equipped, well balanced organ- 
ization. 

The growth of our customers' business finds us 
ready and waiting to fill their larger needs. 

Come in and let us help you with your problems. 

BANK OF THE MANHATTAN COMPANY 

CHARTERED 1799 
40 Wall Street 31 Union Square 



Richmond Hill 
Woodhaven 
Ridgewood 
Fresh Pond 


Jamaica 
Far Rockaway 

Rockaway Beach 
Seaside 
Elmhurst 


Long Island City 
Flushing 
Corona 
College Point 



BANK OF LONG ISLAND SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY 
AT QUEENS OFFICES 



-,ii!iHiiiiiunii!iiiii!iniiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii niinniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiinniininnniiiiiiiinniliiiiiinniiiniiiiiiniiiiinm 



164 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




FIRST MORTGAGE GUARANTEE COMPANY 



(First Mortgage Guarantee Company Building) 

15 BRIDGE PLAZA NORTH 
LONG ISLAND CITY, BOROUGH OF QUEENS, CITY OF NEW YORK 



First Mortgages and Mortgage Certificates Guaranteed 
as to Principal and Interest Netting 5%% to purchaser 



1 25 ACRES WITH 
WATER FRONT 

DEEP WATER AT BULKHEAD LINE 
CONVENIENT TO TROLLEY LINES 
EIYE CENT EARE TO NEW YORK CITY 

SUITABLE EOR 

HONE DEVELOPMENT, MOVING PICTURE 
PURPOSES, OR LARGE MANUFACTURING PLANT 

KOUWENHOVEN ESTATES, |NG, 

15 BRIDGE PLAZA ' 
LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 
TELEPHONE ASTORIA 1874-5 



IRVING 

FOR 

ANCHORS 

MISC. IRON & STEEL 
FORCINGS 



PATENTED 



IRVING SUBWAY 

NOV. 26. 1912 MARK 

VENTILATED FLOORING 

AND 

PATENTED TRADE 

IRVING SAFSTEP 

MARK 

Catalogs 2A63 and 2CI 

IRVING IRON WORKS CO. 

LONG ISLAND CITY. N. Y. 



NEW YORK CITY 165 

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(7aeftson}jeig/its 

Yf PLAN OF 
(/TENANT-OWNERSHIP 

OF GARDEN APARTMENTS 



IS 1HE IDEAL APARTMENT 
HOME OWNERSHIP PLAN 

Jackson Heights is the ideal place to live, with its 
Tennis, Golf and other outdoor amusements, and 
its vigorous Community Life. 

Jackson Heights is only 20 minutes by Rapid 
Transit from midtown Manhattan. 

To reach Jackson Heights : Take the Queensboro 
Subway at 42nd Street Subway Station (Corona Line ) 
direct to 25th St. station. 

Iff Ifll THE \v'-' / 
QUEENSBORO CORPORATION 

Jackson Heights Office Manhattan Office 

pposite 25th St. Subway Station 50 E. 42d St., Cor. Madison Ave. 
Telephone Newtown 2361 Telephone Murray Hill 7057 

Long Island City Bridge Plaza North 

Telephone Aetona 801 



JfllllllllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM^ 



166 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



VISIT tKe most rapidly developing section of Greater 
New York and see some of our attractive residences 
and factory sites. Transportation and skipping 
ideal. A little time spent in investigating tins section will 
be time well spent. My office is at your service. 



GEORGE J. RYAN 

Real JJstate, ^[ortgage Loans and Insurance 
46 JACKSON AVENUE, (Near 4th Street) 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 

Telephones 3451 and 3452 Hunters Point 



APPRAISER OF REAL ESTATE 



250 ACHES ON FLUSHING BAY-EAST RIVER 

4000 FEET OF DEEP WATER FRONT 
7Y 2 MILES FROM HERALD SQUARE 

IDEAL FOR LARGE MANUFACTURING PLANTS 

Long IslandPennsylvania R. R. and N. Y. & Queens Trolley pass through the 
property. 5 cent fare to heart of N. Y. City. 

Labor in this section, in fact throughout Queens, has not joined in making 
such abnormal demands as have been made in other sections of the country 
where munitions are manufactured. The greater number of industrial workers 
own their own homes and are not affected by the unusually high living costs 
prevailing in other localities. Existing homes, and plans for further and quick 
housing, assure the same conditions in the future. 

CONVINCING PROOF Following companies with thousands of employees 
immediately surround this property: American Hard Rubber Company, Nathan 
Manufacturing Co., Empire Art Metal Co., Inc., Kleinert Rubber Co., L. W. F. 
Engineering Co., Rainier Motor Truck Co., Chilton Paint Works, College Point 
Boat Corp., Hunter Illuminating Sign Co., National Chain Co., International 
Oxygen Co., Red Star Shipbuilding Corp., Beacon Falls Rubber Shoe Co., S. W. 
Rubber Co., The Master Machine Works, and others. 
Population of 50,000 Flushing, College Point, Whitestone all within 2 miles. 

For full information inquire 
JOHN W . R A P P 

EMPIRE BUILDING COLLEGE POINT, LONG ISLAND 

2nd Ave., and 9th Street Telephone 1000 Flushing 



NEW YORK CITY 167 

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Corn Cxtijange 




N EW YORK 

ESTABLISHED 1853 

BEAVER AND WILLIAM STREETS 



Member of 
Federal Reserve System and of New York Clearing House 

Hi 1 

Capital and Surplus, $12,000,000 
Net Deposits, $150,000,000 

The Trust Department acts as Executor, Trustee, 
Administrator, Guardian, Agent and Depository 
of Securities. 



FORTY-THREE BRANCHES IN GREATER NEW YORK 



BRANCHES LOCATED IN QUEENS BOROUGH 



Astoria Branch 

75 FULTON AVENUE. ASTORIA 



Plaza Branch 

BRIDGE PLAZA AND ACADEMY STREET 



Steinway Ave. Branch 

252 STEINWAY AVENUE 



Flushing Branch 

116 MAIN STREET. FLUSHING 



Queens Co. Branch 

JACKSON AVENUE AND 4TH STREET 



Accounts Respectfully Solicited 



168 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




By making the American Trust Company Trustee, 
experts who thoroughly understand local condition's 
will supervise and conserve the principal as well as 
see to it that the income is promptly paid to the 
legatees. 

Our Bank is ready to meet your every need, and our 
officers are always at the service of the busy man, or 
woman, who desires advice. 

The American Trust Company 



Bridge Plaza North, 



Long Island City 



In Jamaica : 375 Fulton Street 

In Brooklyn : 203 Montague Street 
In Manhattan : 135 Broadway 




THE L- W- F ENGINEERING GUMPflNY, 

COL.UE.GE. POINT, NEW YORK. 



NEW YORK CITY 




GREENWAY TERRACES AND FOREST HILLS INN. 

jf oreet Dills <3arfcens 

is the property of the Sage Foundation Homes Company and is recog- 
nized to be the most comprehensive accomplishment in garden city or 
model town planning yet undertaken in America. 

Lest confusion and an indefinite impression exist as to just what 
Forest Hills Gardens is and represents, and in order to confute any 
opinion that it has been developed and undertaken with certain char- 
itable or philanthropic objects in view, it is well to state that this is 
not its aim. 

Forest Hills Gardens is a high-class suburban residential commu- 
nity conducted upon strictly business principles. It is a new type of 
high-class home community not to be confused with the usual ephem- 
eral development filled with absurb fancies and individual idiosyn- 



cracies. 



It is a successful project along garden city or model town plan- 
ning lines and contains the basis of a liberal education in this work. 

Residents of Queens Borough particularly should visit Forest 
Hills Gardens and become familiar with this great progressive under- 
taking, located in their Borough. 

SAGE FOUNDATION HOMES COMPANY 

Forest Hills, L. I., and 47 West 34th Street, Manhattan 







TYPICAL SEMI-FIREPROOF DWELLINGS. 



170 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



LONG ISLAND CITY 
INDUSTRIAL Y PROPERTIES 



Conveniently located to 
Dual Rapid Transit 
System ; Also locations 
witk Rail and Water 
facilities 

HENRY DUCHARDT 

10 EAST 43RD STREET, NEW YORK 



RON *- STEEL 

BARS A SHAPES 

BURDEN IRON PRODUCTS 



ROUNDS SQUARES 

FLATS HEXAGONS 

TOOL STEEL 
COLD DRAWN STtEL 



ANGLES 

TEES 

BEAMS 

CHANNELS 

ESTABLISHED 1829 



HOOPS BANDS 

PLATES SHEETS 

BLACK 

AND 
GALVANIZED 



EGLESTON BROS. & CO., INC. 

166 SOUTH STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

Cable Address: Egleston, N. Y. 



NEW YORK CITY 171 

LATHAM LITHO & PRINTING CO. 




THE above picture is a preliminary sketch of our 
new Long Island City Plant which we are ex- 
pecting to build during 1920, to add to the Industry 
and Beauty of Queens Borough, and to take care of 
our increasing need of space and facilities. 

And our purpose is to have a building of some 
beauty and attractiveness, something to properly 
express the Advertising Value and the Art Value of 
our product. Our main product is 

Billboard Posters 

such as you see along the roads and highways every- 
where, called 24-sheet Posters. Our special Facil- 
ities and Equipment along this line are the biggest 
and best in the country. 

"Many of our customers say that we are making 
the best Billboard Posters that are produced, as to 
Advertising Art and Design, and as to quality of 
Paper, of Colors, and of durability of Inks. 

We are making at present about 40fc of all the 
Commercial Posters produced in the country due 
alone to our special and superior knowledge and 
facilities along that line. Our further specialties are: 

Window Displays, Cut-outs, 
Hangers, Car Cards, Show Cards, 

and other such Advertising Material. 
Until we get into our new plant, our address is 



Bush 
Terminal 



LHTH7IM 



LITHO 

' &< 

PRINTING 



Brooklyn 
N. Y. 



172 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




SURE FOOTED 

ON ALL ROADS IN A' L WEATHER 
FABRICS CORDS 

Win Absolute Confidence 
By Unvarying Performance 

The Choice oi Motorists 
Who Know Quality. 

MORE MILES 
BETTER SERVICE 
REAL ECONOMY 



MADE BY 



THE BmCK-BALKE- 
COLLENDER GO., 



OF 
NEW YORK 



39 W. 32nd St., New York, N. Y. 



DEALERS EVERYWHERE 




ALBERT B. TEN EYCK 
C'Y-TREAS. 



150 

TELEPHONE 151 ASTORIA 



R. RANDEL WANGEMAN 
PRESIDENT 



TEN EYCK & WANGEMAN, INC. 



104 MAIN STREET 

Realty Investments 
Estates Managed 
Insurance 
Renting 



LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 

REPRESENTING 

Aetna Casualty & Surety Co. Massachusetts F. & M. Ins. Co. 
Aetna Life Ins. Co. Niagara Fire Ins. Co. 

The Automobile Ins. Co. Reliance Ins. Co. 

London Assurance Corporation Westchester Fire Ins Co. 
Hudson Insurance Co. 



ALBANY. N. Y. 
ASHEVILLE. N. C. 
BALTIMORE. M. D. 
BOSTON. MASS, (z) 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
BUFFALO. N. Y. 
CHICAGO. ILL. 
CLEVELAND. O. 
E. CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 
HARLEM. N. Y. 
INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 




LOUISFVILLE. KY. 
LONG ISLAND CITYN.Y 

NEW HAVEN. CONN. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 
ONEIDA. N. Y. 

PITTSBURO, PA. 
ROCHESTER. N. Y. 
SCRANTON, PA. 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



MAIN OFFICE: 

Metropolitan District 

Jackson Avenue - Bridge Plaza 



Casfeet 

Company 



NEW YORK CITY 173 




The Fierce-Arrow Service Building in Long Island City is located on 

Jackson and Freeman Avenues at 5th and 6th Avenues, and 

extends through to Webster. 

Giving Greater New York 

A Greater PIERCE ARROW 

Greatness in a motor car or truck depends partly upon 
perfected service. And the Fierce-Arrow in New 
York has at its beck ahd call the best-equipped service 
station in America. 

Its 200,000 square feet of floor space are equipped 
with modern machinery and every facility to give 
Fierce-Arrow owners prompt and valuable service. A 
complete stock of supplies and parts, valued at more than 
$175,000, is constantly carried. 

Experienced mechanics, trained in Fierce-Arrow con- 
struction at the Buffalo factory, are here to look after 
your passenger car or truck. 

These unusual facilities cut down the time required for 
adjustments, replacements and overhauling. They mean 
better continuous results from all Pierce- Arrows in this 
territory. 

Whoever puts a Fierce-Arrow to work in New York has 
as good a car or truck as can be built, backed up by as 
efficient a service as can be created. 

HARROLDS MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

Salesrooms : 

NEW YORK CITY : 233 West Fifty-Fourth Street 
BROOKLYN; 1119 Atlantic Ave. POUGHKEEPSIE; 57 Market St. 



174 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




PLANT: 

Freeman Avenue and William St. 
Long Island Ciiy 



REGISTERED 



Acorn Silk Company 






N. Y. OFFICE AND 

SALESROOM: 
334 Fourth Avenue 

Nev> York City 




Emil Caiman & Co. 

100 William St. New York 

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FACTORY 

Vernon & Harris Aves. 
Long Island City 

Manufacturers of the 
highest grades of 

Enamels Varnishes 

Baking Japans 

Etc. 



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ESTABLISHED 
1850 



Tel. 391 Astoria 

VOSKA, FOELSCH & SIDLO, INC. 

OFFICE & FACTORY 

Mills St. Astoria, L. I. 

Near 92nd St. Ferry 

Marble Work of Every Description 



Joseph J, Kozak 
Pres. 



Henry E. McLoughlin 
Vice-Pres. & Trems. 



KOZAK & MCLOUGHLIN, INC. 

LADIES FOOTWEAR 

Factory: 14th St. & Governor Place 
Long Island City, N. Y. 

Tel. Hunterspoint 191 



NEW YORK CITY 



175 




'T'HE MANHATTAN-ROME COM- 
ANY is the New York branch! of 
(he Rome Metallic Bedstead Company, 
of Rome, New York. The concern 
operates similar branches in Baltimore, 
Boston and Chicago. 

The Manhattan-Rome Company it- 
self opeiates branches, in) Albany 
Buffalo, Newark, New Haven, Phila- 
delphia, Rochester and Wilkesbarre. 
This entire division is supplied from 
the factory in Long Island City and 
handled as a salt s-unit from the show 
rooms in the Marbridge Building. 

Rome Products-metal beds, springs 
cots, couch-beds and hammocks are 
recognized as standard throughout the 
country. 





MANHATTAN-ROME ICOMPANY 

LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW^YORK 



Sales Offices: 
) I Marbridge Bldg 
M 47 W. 34th Si 



Factory: 
Anable Avenue 
Long Island City 




176 



CHAMBKR OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



DEFENDER HANUFACliC CO, Inc. 

PEARSON STREET DEGNON TERMINAL 
LONG ISLAND CITY 




MANUFACTURERS OF 

SHEETS, PILLOW CASES, 
BED SPREADS, ETC. 



QueensborougK 
Lumber Co., Inc. 



MASONS' MATERIALS 



FLUSHING YARD 

40-80 West Bradford Avenue 

Telephone 3386 Flushing 

BAYSIDE YARD 

Park Avenue and 2nd Street 

Telephone 63 Baypide 

WHITESTONE YARD 

llth Avenue and 22nd Street 

Telephone 1646 Flushing 



For More Than Half a Century 
This Triangle Trade-Mark 




HAS IDENTIFIED 



The World's Best Pipes 

MANUFACTURED BY 

WM. DEMUTH & CO. 

NEW YORK 



NEW YORK CITY 



177 



JflClTROST 

TRBLETSUGHR 

The tablet which dppeais io discnmitustitiA 
people. Lack piece whiie,pure and perfect 
OPumform size. No chips in the box, 
no waste cm ike table. ----- 
IQQ% Pure 



THE NATIONAL SUGAR REFINING GO. 




178 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



"ARMOR" 



REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



QUALITY BOILER ARCHES AND JAMBS, SIDE WALL 
AND BRIDGE WALL BLOCKS. 




GREENPOINT FIRE BRICK CO. 

Office: 111 Clay Street, Brooklyn 
Branch : Borden Avenue, L. I. City 



Docks-EAST RIVER 

Harris Avenue to Englis Street 
Telephones 4151-4152 Hunters Point 



YOUNG & 

iags and 



OFFICE AND FACTORY; 

321 to 379 Vernon Avenue 

LONG ISLAND CITY 

N. Y. 



1855 



19*0 



J. & T. ADIKES 

Grain Seeds Flour 

Produce Feed Groceries 



JAMAICA 



FLUSHING 



pop NOTCH 

1 BEACON^ FALLS 1 1 
RUBBER FOOTWEAR 

Made -with patented heels that last as long 
as the soles. Rubbers and canvas 3 hoes 
with rubber soles that fit better, look 
better and wear better than the ordin- 
ary kind. That's why they 
are Top Notch. Look for the 
Top Notch cross trade mark. 

BEACON FALLS RUBBER SHOE COMPANY 

College Point, Long Island, New York, 
New York City 106 Duane Street 



NEW YORK CITY 



179 





N the Borough of Queens, twelve min- 
utes from Pennsylvania Station, New 
York City, eighty-seven trains daily. 
Twenty-five minutes by trolley from Long 
Island City, Fifteen minutes by automobile 
from Long Island City on Queens Boulevard. 
Houses for sale houses built to order Lots 
for sale easy terms." 

OFFICES 

(Eorb ilepr iptelnpnwtt 

62 Htlliam trert, Jfflanljattan 
3FnreBt ^tU0, Borough of <0uppn0, H. 31. 

e B25B IFarrat Sillr. 



180 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



TIFFANY 




STVDIOS 




Entrance and Vestibule Doors, Gates and Archways, 

Marquises, Candelabra, Bank Screens, Check Desks, 

Tablets, Clocks, Stair Railings, Elevator Fronts 

and Cars, Andirons, Statuary Bronze, Etc. 

LIGHTING FIXTURES 

Chandeliers, Wall Brackets, Entrance Torcheres, Ceiling 
Discs and Tiffany Lighting Glassware 

CORONA, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 



QUEENS HEADQUARTERS FOR 

%umber, timber 
' Supplies 

5,000,000 ft. Stock of Long and Short Leaf Yellow Pine and 
Spruce, Rough or Dressed. 

All sizes from 1" x 2" Furring Strips to 14" x 14'* Timber. 

Steerco Sand and Gravel Mixture, Sand, Stone, Gravel, 
Cement, Brick, Lime, Brick Partitions, Etc. 

STEVEDORING AND TRUCKING 

Ibunterspoint Xumber & Supply Co., unc. 

3>e0non Germinal, X. fl. tt\> t R 1?. 

Phone 2986-7-8 Hunterspoint 



NEW YORK CITY 181 

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ONE THIRD OF OUR 




comes from Queens County through our 
Jamaica Office in the Post Office Build- 
ing, and its all good business. 

WE WANT MORE OF IT ! 

We examine and guarantee Titles to 
Real Estate and we make Loans on 
building operations and homes. 

See Mr. Jacobs, our Manager in Jamaica, 
and he will give you courteous and 
prompt attention. 



HO1VIE TITLE 




Capital and Surplus, over $1,200,000 



HENRY J. DAVENPORT, President 

HARRY B. HAWKINS 

DWIGHT COMSTOCK ^ Local Board 



Home Office: 383 Jay Street, Brooklyn, New York 



182 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



BUY IN QUEENSBOROUGH 



SHEET METAL 



PRODUC IS 




ARC, OXY-ACETYLENE, ELECTRO-SPOT 



WELDING 



SEND US YOUR BLUE PRINTS 



FOR 



QUOTATION 



THE HUNTER ILLUMINATED CAR SIGN CO. 

FLUSHING, - NEW YORK 



JUST ENTERING QUEENS 



KEW GARDENS INN 

Just completed at K.ew Gardens, Long Island, 
is our latest hotel, thoroughly modern and up 
to date. Operated on the residential American 
plan 

UNDER KNOTT MANAGEMENT 

NOW OPERATING IN NEW YORK CITY 

HOTEL HOLLEY HOTEL ALBERT HOTEL WELLINGTON 

HOTEL EARLE HOTEL IRVING HOTEL LE MARQUIS 

HOTEL JUDSON THE BERKELEY THE VAN RENSSELAER 

Write or Phone Manager for Rates 

GEO. H. WARTMAN, Manager 

Telephone RicKmonJ Hill 3892 



NEW YORK CITY 



183 



A VITAL SHAVING TRUTH 



THREE IN ONE OIL 

PREVENTS RUST 
LUBRICATES 
CLEANS AND 



POLISHES 

TALKING MACHINES 

SEWING MACHINES 

TYPEWRITERS 

ELECTRIC FANS 

RAZORS 1 STROPS 

FIRE-ARMS 
MAGNETOS. COMMUTATOR' 



FURNITURE 8. WOODWC 

REE IN ONEOll" 




Does your razor shave "clean and 
smooth" one day, then scrape and 
pull the next? 

Rust causes the difference. very 
razor blade has a fine "saw" edge. 
You cannot wipe it absolutely dry. 
Lather and moisture cause invisible 
rust to form over night between the 
microscopic teeth of the razor edge. 
This destroys its keenness and makes 
the razor pull. A drop or two of 
3-in-One prevents this rust. Before 
tomorrow morning's shave do this : 
Moisten tip of thumb and finger with 
a drop of 3-in-One and draw edge of 
razor blade between. That's all. 



3-in-One Oil 

puts real joy into your shaving. Effective for 
both old style and safety razors. 
To make your strop take hold of the razor better, 
rub a few drops of 3-in-One into it occasionally. 
You'll notice the difference at once. 



FREE Special Razor Saver 
Circular and generous sample of 
3-in-One, sent anywhere 
without charge. Ask for 
both on a postal card. 



3-m-One is sold at all store* 
in 1 oz., 3 oz. and 8 oa. 
bottles and in 3 oz. Handy 
Oil Cans. 




Triree-in-One Oil Co., 165 AER. Broadway, New York City 



184 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



MAHOGANY 



LUMBER and VENEERS 






, INC. 



and Yards: 
LONG ISLAND CITY 



New York Office: 
347 MADISON AVE. 



JURGEN RATHJEN COMPANY 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

COAL 



ANTHRACITE 



BITUMINOUS 



WE SPECIALIZE IN FACTORY TRADE 

COAL POCKETS 
Foot of Twelftk Street and Vernon Avenue 

Telephone 3456-3457 Hunterspomt 

Jackson Avenue and Madden Street 

Telephone 769 Astoria 

Phone and Ask Us to Have Our Representative Call 



NEW YORK CITY 



185 




AERO VIEW OF LAURELTON 



Laurelton 



Long Island 



THE GARDEN SUBURB IN NEW YORK CITY 

Unexcelled Transit - All Public Utilities 

A well developed community on the south side of 

Queens Borough 

Wonderful shade trees and beautiful flowers 
Highly restricted but moderately priced 
Twenty-five minutes from Manhattan 

LAURELTON SALES COMPANY, Inc. 

LMJRELTON BUILDING 

Thirty-third Street and Seventh Avenue 

Phone 1119 Greely Office on Property 




186 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



"SERVICE THAT PLEASES" 

Henry M. Dietz 

iiiiiiiuiiniiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimniiiiiiiiiiniiiiininiiiinn 

REAL ESTATE 

Homes and Factory Sites 



Mortgage Loans Negotiated General Insurance 

390 NINTH AVENUE 
LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 



LONG ISLAND FOUNDRY CO., 



INCORPORATED = 



H 



eavy an 



Light Grey 

IRON CASTINGS 



lltK and 12th Streets 

Near East Avenue 
Long Island City, N. Y, 

Telephone Hunterspoint 1794 



r ots, Plots, Houses, 
[Factory Sites 

and 

Water Fronts 

In Long Island City and 
Vicinity 



FOR SALE BY 

ROE H. SMITH & CO. 

137 Fulton Ave. 
Long Island City, N. Y. 



NEW YORK CITY 



187 



, <i .4.*.iMtHH'********************** 
1* 




An Institution for Service 

The Greatest Service Station for Motor-driven Vehicles in 
the World! The Packard Motor Car Company of New 
York has brought a great institution to the Borough of 
Queens. 

A modern building of eight stories, containing 326,650 
square feet of floor space devoted to the upkeep of motor 
cars and trucks. 

Employment is given to over 650 persons who have ideal 
working conditions, including a restaurant and other up-to- 
date methods for the welfare of its employees. 
This great institution serves both the individual and the 
business organization. It brings cars and trucks from all 
over Greater New York and Westchester County to the 
Borough of Queens. 

It serves practically every line of business, from those who 
handle the raw material to those who market the finished 
product. 



THE PACKARD MOTOR CAR COMPANY 
of NEW YORK 

Long Island City, New York 



NEW YORK 
BROOKLYN 
WHITE PLAINS 
POUCHKEEPSIE 



NEWARK 
PATERSON 
PLAIN FIELD 
JERSEY CITY 
HARTFORD 



NEW HAVEN 
NEW LONDON 
SPRINGFIELD 
PITTSFIELD 



188 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



' ' One policy of The Home of New Vbr recommends another. ' ' 

ELBRIDGE G. SNOW, President 

THE HOME ORGANIZED 1853 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

]SJ T7 Vy V Q J^ J^ Home Office : No. 56 Cedar Street 
Cask Capital, $6,000,000.00 



Statement, January 1, 1920 



Cask Assets, - 

Cask Capital, - 

Liabilities, - 

Net Surplus, - 

Surplus As Regards PolicyKolders, 



$54,595,060,31 

6,000,000.00* 
32,769,09399 
15,825,966.32* 
21,825,966.32* 



Aircraft, Automobile (Combination Policy). Explosion. Fire and Lightning, Hail. Marine 

(Inland and Ocean). Parcel Post. Profits and Commissions, Registered Mail, 

Rents. Rental Values, Riot and Civil Commotion, Srrmkler Leakage, 

Tourists' Baggage, Use and Occupancy, Windstorm 



STRENGTH 



REPUTATION 



SERVICE 



DICKEL 

Construction Co. 

Builders of 
Model Homes 

Real Estate Investments 



Guaranteed 
first mortgages for sale 

Money to loan 
for first mortgages 



73 DENNINGTON AVENUE 
WOODHAVEN, N. Y. 

Phone 634 Richmond Hill 




\\/E are now offering investors 
guaranteed First Mortgage 
Certificates netting 5^% per an- 
num in amounts of $500.00 and 
upwards. 

Come in and let us explain the merits 
and convenience of this ideal form 
of guaranteed investment. 



32 Court Street, Brooklyn 

'Phone 7370 Main 

346 Fulton Street, Jamaica 

'Phone 700 Jamaica 



NEW YORK CITY 



189 



FASTENER 




REG. U.S. 
PAT. OFF. 




T TNDER the direction of special- 
ists from the Prague plant 
of W aides 1 Co., this factory in Long 
Island City equipped with exclusive 
and patented machinery is now 
producing the KoH - 1 - nOOF 

Triumph Snap Fastener. 

the fastener used and endorsed 
by the world's leading fashion 
creators. 

WALDES & CO, Inc. 

FACTORY: 

Creek Street and Anable Avenue 
Long Island City 
SALES OFFICES: 

315 Fifth Ave. 

New York City 




The Largest Snap Fastener Plant In America 



190 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



WRIGLEY'S 

SEALED TIGHT KEPT RIGHT 




WRIGLEY'S 

JUICY FRUIT 

CHEWING CUM 





METROPOLITAN AND WOODWARD AVES. 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



1 o JPurchasers 01 



Buyers of Improved Real Estate 
in any Borough 01 the City 
who need a Loan to finance 
their purchase would do well 
to consult us first. 
We have ample funds to lend 
on New York City real estate. 

TITLE GUARANTEE & 
TRUST CO. 



Capital 
Surplus - 



- $5,000,000 

- $11,000,000 

137 W. 125th Street 
175 Remsen Street 



176 Broadway 

370 E. 149tt Street 

BROOKLYN 

350 Fulton St.. Jamaica 
67 Jackson Ave., L. 1. City 

90 Bay Street, St. George, Staten Island 



C. CURTIS WOODRUFF & CO 

MASON BUILDERS 
GENERAL CONTRACTORS 



213 Tenth Street 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 

Phone 2646 Hunters Point 



HOMES AND HOME SITES 

At 
HOWARD BEACH 

The Most Accessible Surburan 
Community In New York City. 

HOWARD ESTATES DEVELOPMENT COMPANY 

51 Chambers St., N. Y. City 



NEW YORK CITY 



191 



jzrarajHJHJBJHJHJEmrajErajBiHJHfErEfHraj^^ 




Electrical Service to industry 

\ S Electrical EngmeeringSpscialists we 
are prepared to meet every electrical 
requirement of industry in accordance with 
the highest standard of engineering practice. 
The installation ot complete power 
in a new factory, the entire revision ot an 
existing system to meet new conditions, the 
successful application of electric power to 
unusual or difficult manufacturing pro- 
cesses, planning and installing an up-to-date 
lighting system, meeting promptly all main- 
tenance requirements of our customers all 
these are in the day's work. 

We are dealers in General Electric 
Company motors and control apparatus and 
carry the only stock in the Borough of 
Queens of these motors which are recog- 
nized as a standard of efficiency and 
reliability. 

AUSTIN # MOORE, Inc. 
Industrial Electrical Engineers 

BRIDGE PLAZA, LONG ISLAND CITY 
Warehouse and Shop at Wilbur Ave. , , , } Office: Astoria 592 

telephone? ct A ^ nr\r 

and Crescent St. > SH P : Aetona 906 




LraraiajEiBJEraiaiajajafaiHraraiijajHjajaj^^ 



192 

Ol 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



ID 





(PATENTED) 




Ball, Roller, Thrust and Combination Bearings 
"' m 



THE NORTH SHORE 



Offers the most convenient home 
for Long Island City and Queens 
manufacturers. 

Let us send you a list of places to 
fit your requirements. 

Several fine acreage places both on 
and near the water. 

L'ECLUSE, WASHBURN & CO. 



INCORPORATED 



NORTH SHORE SPECIALISTS 



1 WEST 34iH STREET 



NEW YORK 



TELEPHONE 2295 GREELEY 



GLASS 

OF ALL DESCRIPTION 

For Building Construction 

GLASS 

For Automobile Bodies 
and Wind Shields 

GLASS TOPS 

For Furniture 



Joseph Elias & Co., Inc. 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 

Telephone Astoria 1100 



TELEPHONE 
388 ASTORIA 



GEORGE M. O'CONNOR 



PLUMBI NG 
CONTRACTOR 



Steam and Hot Water Heating 



154 FULTON AVENUE 
ASTORIA 

NEW YORK CITY 



NEW YORK CITY 



193 




Twenty-seven years ago the Neptune Meter Company foresaw 
the present great development oi Queens Borough. 

Foresight has been backed by faith and energy with the result 
pictured. 

NEPTUNE METER COMPANY 



194 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



American Ever Ready ^A^ orks 

OF NATIONAL CARBON CO., Inc. 

Long Island City, N. Y. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

tVEREADY 

DAYLO, "TUNGSTEN" BATTERIES, MAZDA MINIATURE LAMPS, 

ELECTRICAL MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, NON- 

SULPHATING STORAGE BATTERIES 



Don't ask for a TrtEREAlfrl The light that says 

"Flashlight" get an |fljjYJJPli "THERE IT IS" 




"CANDIES OF DISTINCTIVE QUALITY" 

r I T HE noticeable superiority of Tiffin Chocolates is the 

* result of the selection .of the finest materials, the 

exact blending of rich cream, with nuts, and pure fruits, 

and their exceptional combination with the wonderful 

chocolate coating. 

Distinctively Delicious. 

Tiffin Candies may be purchased at 
the finer stores and at Tiffin Shopj. 

TIFFIN PRODUCTS, Inc. 

Jackson and Second Avenues 



NEW YORK CITY 195 




STEIN WAY 

The Instrument of the Immortals 

There has been but one supreme piano in the history of music. 
In the days of Liszt and Wagner, of Rubinstein and Berlioz, the 
pre-eminence of the Steinway was as unquestioned as it is today. 
It stood then, as it stands now, the chosen instrument of the 
masters the inevitable preference wherever great music is un- 
derstood and esteemed. 

STEINWAY & SONS, Steinway Hall, 
107-109 E. 14th St., New York 

Subway Express Stations at Door 



"Made in Queens Borough" 



196 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



= iUSK^t ^.^S^^--* -Sr-OV 

i^ JNibir ^^^ 




A GLANCE AT THE ABOVE TELLS OUR STORY 



ALL RAILROADS AT YOUR DOOR- 
CARTAGE ELIMINATED 

Rapid Transit Service connecting with Bor- 
oughs of Manhattan, Bronx and Brooklyn for 
single fare. 

Ten Minutes to Grand Central Station, Times 
Square and 5Qth Street and Fifth Avenue. 

More factories have been located in this 
vicinity than any other part of Greater New 
York during the past year. 



For Information Apply To 
DEGNON REALTY AND TERMINAL IMPROVEMENT COMPANY 

DEGNON TERMINAL RAILROAD CORPORATION 
Telephone Vanderbilt 4087. 51 East 42nd Street, New York City. 



NEW YORK CITY 



197 




PEGNON 

TERMINAL 



llHl 



GATEWAY TO WORLD'S GREATEST MARKETS 



(Opposite 42nd and 59tn Streets, Manhattan) 

THE HOME OF LARGE INDUSTRIES 
MANUFACTURERS 

The following industries after investigating the advantages offered by DEGNON 
TERMINAL as a location for their plants; located there: 



LOOSE-WILES BISCUIT COMPANY 
AMERICAN EVER READY WORKS 
THE WHITE COMPANY 
JOHN SIMMONS CO. 
THE CONCRETE STEEL CO. 
NORMA CO. OF AMERICA 
DEFENDER MFG. CO. 
PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS CO. 
MANHATTAN SOAP CO. 
HUNTERSPOINT LUMBER & SUPPLY 
CO. 

AND 



WISSMACH GLASS CO. 
AMERICAN CHICLE CO. 
SAWYER BISCUIT CO. 
S. BLICKMAN, INC. 
BRETT LITHOGRAPHING CO. 
HENRY WALDES CO. 
MARCUS WARD, INC. 
MANHATTAN-ROME CO. 
PALMOLIVE CO. 
FAHNESTOCK ELECTRIC CO. 
OPERAPHONE CO. 
OTHERS. 



FACTORY SITES FOR SALE 

In Plots Ranging from 4,000 sq. feet, to 200.000 sq. ft. in area. 

WITH AND WITHOUT RAIL AND WATER SHIPPING FACILITIES 
Convenient for trucking to Manhattan and Brooklyn 

BUILDERS 

SITES FOR APARTMENTS AND TENEMENTS 

Adjoining the Above Industries 

Employing over 8,000 workers who Require Homes. 

Rapid Transit Lines on Two Sides of Degnon Terminal Reaching Manhat- 
tan, Brooklyn and Bronx for a single fare. 

For Information Apply to 
DEGNON REALTY AND TERMINAL IMPROVEMENT COMPANY 

DEGNON TERMINAL RAILROAD CORPORATION 
Telephone Vanderbilt 4087. 51 East 42nd Street New York City. 



198 



National Bridge Works 

"&TEEL WHEN You WANT IT." 

Telephone 

Hunters Point 3966 Main Office and Works : 

Hunters Point 3967 

Hunters Point 3968 REVIEW AVENUE, LONG ISLAND CITY 

Hunters Point 3969 NEW Y QRK 

Hunters Point 3970 

BrancK Sales Office: MERIDEN, CONN. 



Plain and Fabricated Steel. Prompt and Dependable Service 
Assured Auto Truck Delivery 

Minimum Stock on Hand. 6,000 Tons of Beams, Channels, Plates, 
Angles and Structural Bars 

Shop is Modern and Well Equipped to Fabricate All types of Steel 

Structures 



RUSH WORK A SPECIALTY. 



PHONE GREENPO INT 807-808-809 
NIGHT PHONE-GREENPOINT 2047 

FIFTY-EIGHT YEARS AS STANDARD FOR QUALITY IN THE 

MANUFACTURE AND REPAIRS OF BOILERS AND 

PRESSURE TANKS 



THE CHRISTOPHER 




427-447 GREENPOINT AVENUE 
BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



BOILERS : PRESSURE TANKS 

JACKETED ITANKS; STORAGE TANKS, STACKS, FLUES, ETC. 
LICENSED GASOLINE TANK BUILDERS 

BOILER REPAIRS BY EXPERTS AT SHORT NOTICE 



NEW YORK CITY 



199 




FRANCISCO C& JACOBUS 



ENGINEERS AND ARCHITECTS 



New York City 



Chicago 



[1892 Hunters Point Works 
Tel> "[3260 Flusning-Night Service 

ESTABLISHED - 1905 
INCORPORATED - 1916 



COLE-DUNCAN BOILER WORKS 



INCORPORATED 



Boilers, Tanks, Stacks, Breechings 

and Special Plate Work oi. 

Every Description. 

Boilers Repaired and Retubed by Competent 
Workmen . 

379-385 BORDEN AVENUE 
LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 



A. M. DUNCAN 

Secretary and Treasurer 



ROSENTOER BROS. 



INCORPORATED 



MANUFACTURERS 

BOOTS, SHOES, 
LEGGINGS AND 
OVERGAITERS 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES AND FACTORIES 
LONC ISLAND CITY, N. V. 




AMERICAN CHICLE Co., LONG ISLAND CITY 




ANCHOR CAP & CLOSURE CORP., LONG ISLAND CITY 



Industrial Buildings 
Process Equipments 
Power Houses 
Mecnamcal Equipment 
Standardized Buildings 




ONE OF OUR HOUSING DEVELOPMENI 

BALLINGER & PERRCJ] 

ARCHITECTS, ENGINEER! 
(Qualified b 




S. KARPEN & BROS., LONG ISLAND CITY 




PATTERSON-SARGENT Co., LONG ISLAND CITY 




A VIEW ACROSS THE VILLAGE GREEN 

-NEW YORK & PHILADELPHIA 
\ND CONSTRUCTORS 
26 years experience) 



Hotels 

Office Buildings 
Institutions and Schools 
Cnurcnes 

Housing and Town 
Planning 



202 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



PHONE cASTORIA 101 



ESTABLISHED 1890 




Recknagel, Inc. 



407414 STEINWAY AVENUE 
LONG ISLAND CITY 



HARDWARE 

FACTORY, MILL <> CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



ROOFING 



TINSMITHS 



LEADERS 



LIVE AT 

BROADWAY 

ON THE 
HILL 

FLUSH ING 

HO FEET ABOVE THE SEA 

CHOICE BUILDING LOTS AND 
PLOTS FOR SALE 



MONEY ADVANCED 
TO BUILD 



ALLYN-HALL 
REALTY CO. 

320-322 FIFTH AVENUE 

PHONE MADISON SQ. 1412 



CROSS 6? BROWN 
COMPANY 

18 East 41st St., New York City 

Telephone Murray Hill 7100 



Has Built and Sold Over 325,000 

Square Feet 
Of Fireproof Factory Space. 

In Long Island City 
125,000 Square Feet Now Under 
Construction. 



Will Build To Suit and Lease or Sell 

On Easy Terms 
Location as Selected. 



Factory and Factory Sites 
With and Without Railroad Siding 

We specialize in 
Industrial Properties 



NEW YORK CITY 



203 



^^y&y^;^^y^MMMM&^^ 




FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS 

REPLICAS FROM ENGLISH, FRENCH AND 
ITALIAN SCHOOLS 




INCORPORATED 



Factory : 

Skillman Ave. 6? Rawson St. 
Long Inland City 



Showroom : 
112 West 42nd Street 
New York City 



1firfrmirir8a>8\1iVi\1fr8\^^ 



204 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



UJ 

in 



hi 






VJ7 

in 

LU 

JC. 
U7 

in 

UJ 



\n 



IT, 

bU 

X 



r 



A Location Service 
For Manufacturers 

Ci. A complete listing of all available space, land 
or buildings, with and without railroad sid- 
ings, on waterfront and inland, in or near 
New York City. 

C Clients of this office will finance and erect 
buildings on a long term lease, or sell the com- 
pleted buildings on easy terms. 

American' Chicle Co. 

Sawyer Biscuit Co. 

Defender Mfg. Co. 

Rome Metallic Bedstead Co. 

The Aeolian Co. 

and other leading manufacturers 

located in Long Island City through 

M"&~L 



HESS 



Business Property 

INDUSTRIAL DEPT. 
907 Broadway, New York Telephone Stuyvesant 4200 



U7 

UJ 
uJ 

.1 

U7 

tn 

LU 

I 



vn 

uf 



vn 






ESTABLISHED 
1880 



INCORPORATED 

1915 




OVEN BUILDERS 

FOR 

JAPANNING 
ENAMELING 
LACQUERING 

GENERAL 

SHEET METAL 

WORKERS 




OVEN T3J3K 



GEHNRICH INDIRECT HEAT OVEN CO,, L 

.SKILLMAN AVE., HONEYWELL AND BUCKLEY STS. 



LONG ISLAND CITY 



NEW YORK CITY 



205 



FACTORY BUILDINGS 



OF REINFORCED CONCRETE 
AND MILL CONSTRUCTION 

ANYWHERE 
IN GREATER NEW YORK 




REPETTI, Inc. 



1 will erect buildings containing any- 
where from 10,000 to 100,000 square 
feet of manufacturing space for any 
responsible prospective lessee. 

I will build and sell the structure for 



a small cash consideration, taking a 
mortgage, to be amortized over an 
agreed period, for the balance. The 
plan will make it possible for the client 
to reduce rental overhead to approx- 
imately one-half present cost. 



New Buildings I Have Erected in Queens Borough 

(a) REPETTI, INC., 14th St. and Ely Ave., L. I. City 

(b) FRUIT PRODUCTS, Washington and 6th Aves. 

(c) PERFECT WINDOW REGULATOR CO., Harris and 

Van Alst Aves. 

(d) PIROXLOID PRODUCTS CORP., 8th St., near Jackson 

Ave. 

(e) C. H. MOTORS, Ely and Henry Sts. 

(f) TRANSPORT SERVICE, INC., Harris Ave. 

(g) GEHNRICH INDIRECT HEAT OVEN CO., Skillman 

Ave. and Honeywell St. 

(h) C. E. SHEPPARD Co., Van Alst Ave. and 12th St. 
(i) ART ORNAMENT CO., 3rd St. and Jackson Ave. 

LOUIS GOLD 

44 COURT STREET BROOKLYN, N. 

Phone Main 7050 



206 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




MOTT PLTJMBIXG IS GIVING SATISFACTORY SERVICE 
IN COUNTLESS INDUSTRIAL PLANTS THROUGHOUT THK COUNTRY 

WRITE FOR OUR CVTALOHUK OK MOUKRN .PLUMBING! 1SQUIPMENT FOR FACTORIES 

THE 3. L. MOTT IRON \VORKS 

118 FIFTH AVKNUK. NEW YORK llo BROADWAY, LONG ISLAND CITY 



DONNER 

HOUSE WRECKING CO., INC. 



DEALERS IN 



NEW AND SECOND 
HAND LUMBER 

OFFICE AND YARDS: 

ELY AVENUE AND NORTH JANE STREET 
LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 



TELEPHONE ASTORIA 338 




/ Ullli- / ;// 'Hint I 1 

/ THE MOTORjHEATj INDICATOR 

'/' JTR^CTORsfrRUCKS. AUTOMOBILES 

/ //' ' '///" ill -'i ' I 



Ho natter where you go there on the radiator 

caps of automobiles, trucks and tractors you 

will find a Boyce Loto-Leter (the motor temper- 
ature indicator). 

A good motor is worth keeping good, and that 
alone is the mission of the Boyce lioto-lleter. 




THE MOTO-METER CO., Inc. 

Long Island City New York 




208 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



C. A. WIILEY CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




"R.ADE MAR.K 



Automobile Paints, Colors 
Varnishes, Etc. 

LONG ISLAND CITY 
NEW YORK 



Howell, Field & 
Goddard, Inc. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Standwell Standardized 
Steel Covered Doors 
and Combination Steel 
Bucks, Jambs and Trim 

LATITE ASPHALT SHINGLES 

Patented 

Cost Less to Buy 
Cost Less to Lay 

THAN ANY OTHER GOOD ROOF 
OFFICES AND FACTORY: 

Review Avenue, L. I. City 



Telephone 



Hunters Point 



Knickerbocker 

Ice 

Company 



The NAME of KARPEN 



Karpei) 



CHICAGO 
MICHIGAN C1TY-NEWTORK 



distinguishes our Furniture from the 
c rdinary 

S. KARPEN & BROS 



DESIGNERS 



MANUFACTURERS 



SHOWROOMS 

111 W. 37th St.. New York City * 

8th St. & Wabash Ave.. Chicago. 111. 

FACTORIES 

Chicago 
Michigan City Long Island City 



NEW YORK CITY 



209 



G 



IBSON 



MODEL STUCCO HOME 

DEVELOPMENT 



:s 



AT ELMHURST MANOR 

WITH AUTO DRIVEWAYS 




The Perfect Low Priced American Home 

Designed and constructed for the Homeseeker 
who desires the best at the least cost 

The Ideal Home Place for the Children 

Well Drained, Sewered, Convenient to Schools 
Churches, Stores and Amusements 

W. R. GIBSON 

BUILDER AND DEVELOPER 

OFFICE AND BUILDINGS 

Burnside Avenue and Thirty-Seventh Street 

Elmhurst Manor, L. I. 

PHONE NEWTOWN 2073 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




INDUSTRIAL REAL ESTATE 

FACTORIES - - LOFTS - WATER FRONTS - - LOTS 

Queens Borough a Specialty 

FOURTEEN YEARS' ACTIVE EXPERIENCE 

ALL LOCATIONS AND INDUSTRIAL TERMINALS ANALYZED (FROM AN 
ABSOLUTELY IMPARTIAL STANDPOINT) ACCORDING TO 
THE CUSTOMER'S REQUIREMENTS 

52 VANDERBILT AVL, NEW YORK 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION 




Isaac Baer, President Telephone 

Meyer Weisberg, Treasurer c^lstoria 433 

The Weisberg-Baer Co. 

mghgrade INTERIOR WOODWORK 
Window Frames, Sash and Doors 

BOULEVARD TO EAST RIVERA 
LONG ISLAND CITY 



TELEPHONE ASTORIA 1007 

NIGHT RESIDENCE PHONES 

LENOX 9318 

ASTORIA 2970 



J. KLEINHENZ 
W. HUBER 



QUEENS HAULAGE CORPORATION 

MOTOR TRUCKING AND STORAGE 

EXPORT HEAVY HAULING TO ALL PIERS OUR 

SPECIALTY. 
ANY CAPACITY TRUCKS 

1037-1039 BOULEVARD, ASTORIA. L. I. 



LONG DISTANCE 
RIGGING AND HOISTING 



CASSFDY COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

DESIGNKRS AND MAKERS OF 
LIGHTING FIXTURES 



101 PARK AVENUE 
AT FORTIETH ST. 

NEW "YORK 



FACTORY 

-ai WILBUR AVBNUE 
LONG ISLAND CITY 



NEW YORK CITY 



211 



Largest Life Insurance Business in the World 



METROPOLITAN 
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

(INCORPORATED BY THE STATE OF NEW YORK) 



HALEY FISKE, President 



FREDERICK H. ECKER, Vice-Pres. 



Total Amount of Outstanding Insurance .... $5,343,652,434 

Larger than that of any other Company in the World. 

Ordinary (annual premium) Life Insurance paid for in 1919 $910,091,087 

More than has ever been placed in one year by any Company in the World. 

Industrial (weekly premium) Insurance paid for in 1919 - $508,590,405 

More than has ever been placed in one year by any Company in the World. 

Total Insurance placed and paid for in 1919 - - - $1,418,681,492 

The largest amount ever placed in one year by any Company in the World. 

Gain in Insurance in Force in 1919 - - - - - $914,140,618 

More than ever has bean gained in one year by any Company in the World. 
The Company gained more insurance in force in 1919 than any other Company 
wrote. 

Number of Policies in Force December 31, 1919 - - - 21,770,671 

Larger than that of any other Company in America. 

Gain in Number of Outstanding Policies .... 1,986,410 

Larger than any Company in the World has ever gained in one year. 
Assets ' $864,821,824.55 

Increase in Assets during 1919 $89,367,126.27 

Larger -than that of any other Company in the World. 

Liabilities $835,736,487.38 

Surplus $29,085,337.17 

Number of Claims paid in 1919 289,125 

Averaging one policy paid for every 30 seconds of each business day of & 
hours. 

Amount paid to Policy-holders in 1919 $73,581,759.91 

Payment of claims averaged $505.93 a minute of each business day of 8 hours. 
Metropolitan Nurses made 1,300,883 visits free of charge to 256,000 sick Industrial 

Policy-holders. 

Metropolitan men distributed over Twelve Millions of pieces of literature on 
health 
Bringing the total distribution to over 200,000,000. 

Reduction in general mortality at ages 1 to 74 in eight years, 17.9 per cent. 

Typhoid reduction, 6g per cent.; Tuberculosis, over 33 per cent.;, Heart 
disease, over 23 per cent.; Brighfs disease, over 25 per cent.; In- 
fectious diseases of children over 46 per cent. 

In general reduction and in each case of disease, this is far greater than that 
shown by statistics of the Registration Area of the United States. 

Death Rate for 1919 on its Industrial Business lowest in History of Company. 



212 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




THE BOROUGH'S NEWEST 
INDUSTRY 

BOOK 
MANUFACTURING 

Located in the New, 
Up-to-the-Minute 



METROPOLITAN LIFE BUILDING 

Court Square, Long Island City 
AFTER DECEMBER 1st, 1920 

J. F. TAPLEY COMPANY 

ESTABLISHED 1850 
NOW AT 

531-3-5 West 37th Street, Manhattan 




Mailind Container of this book supplied by 





BROCKXW^FITZHUGH'STEWART-INC. 

DECATUR ST. AND IRVING AVE. 
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 

Makers of 

Label s Folding B oxe s Fibre and 
Corrugated Shipping Containers. 




This publication was bound by a Queens Borough industry 7. F. Tapley Company; 
and mailed in containers supplied by another Queens Borough industry Brockway- 
Fitchugh-Stezvart, Inc. 



NEW YORK CITY 



213 





QUEENS' NEWSPAPER 




Devoted to the Civic 
Social and Manu- 
facturing Development 
of 

QUEENS 
BOROUGH 



Home of Long Island Star Publishing Co. 
Star Square, Radde and Henry Streets 



Advertising the wants of its people 

Insisting on the rights of its citizens 

And encouraging the growth of its manufacturing 

This Star has not been dim since 1864 

To reach the people of Queens 
Advertise in the Daily Star 

PRINTING, BOOKBINDING 

LARGEST PLANT IN QUEENS 

Commercial. Social and Legal Printing of Every Character 
THIS BOOK IS FROM OUR PRESSES 

WHEN YOU NEED PRINTING OUR ADDRESS IS 

STAR SQUARE 

RADDE AND HENRY STREETS. LONG ISLAND CITY 
TELEPHONE 1 9QO ASTORIA 

Long Island Star Publishing Company 



This publication was printed by one of the oldest Queens Borough industries Long 
Island Star Publishing Company. 



214 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



JAMAICA PROPERTY CORP. 

THEODORE J. VAN HOREN, PRESIDENT 

Telephone Jamaica 878 

Sutphin Boulevard and Jamaica Avenue 

JAMAICA, NEW YORK CITY 

Lots - Plots - Acreage - Factories 
Residential Property 

ON THE HILL BY THE LAKE NEAR THE BAY 

Properties Sold, Rented, Exchanged 

Lots ior Builder on Terms 



Jamaica Park South 
Athens Heights 



SALES AGENT FOR 

Sutphin Park Arcadian Terrace 

Jamaica Villa Park Jamaica Harbor Plaza 




BRETT LITHOGRAPHING CO. 

FINE OFF-SETT COLOR PRINTING 
ANABLE AVENUE, PEARSON AND MFADOW STREETS 



NEW YORK CITY 



215 




Queensborousfn 



AND- 



The White Company 




This company enters the industrial me ol Queensborough 
with the establishment of its New York Branch selling 
offices, service station and Foreign Department offices in a 
new building now being completed at School Street and 
Thomson Avenue, Long Island City. 

To serve the entire metropolitan district, the installation 
and maintenance service available to users of White Trucks 
has been highly developed. Every facility has been pro- 
vided to give White users a 100% transportation service 
and to take care of the steadily increasing demand tor 
White Trucks. 

THE WHITE COMPANY 

Cleveland 
New York Branch : Madison Ave. at 45th Street 



216 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



The Plant Back of the 




STATION No. 1 FLUSHING 



ELECTRIC 

An important factor in determii 
These modern distributing stations are typic 1 

ADEQUATE arl 



Low 
Rates 



Borough of Queen^ 



NEW YORK C& QUEENS 
ELECTRIC LIGHT C& POWER CO. 



NEW YORK CITY 



217 



Electric Power Service 




STATION No. 2 JAMAICA 



POWER 

ing the location of your factory 

:of the plant and equipment which provide 

iRELIABLE POWER 

the 

New York City 



Unlimited 
Capacity 



BRIDGE PLAZA, LONG ISLAND CITY 



218 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



J. P. DUFFY CO. 

BRICK - LIME - CEMENT 

TERRA GOTTA BLOCKS 

AND OTHER 

MASONS' BUILDING MATERIAL 



ASTORIA YARD: 
JACKSON AVE. AND MADDEN ST. 



Brooklyn: 
Second Ave. and 51st St. 



New York. 
138th Street & Park Avenue 




WICKE RIBBON GO. 

GLENDALE, L. I. 




(\ 



Phone Hunterspoint 2070 




ELECTRIC CO. 



ELECTRICAL MACHINERY 
AND APPARATUS REPAIRED 

Expert Rewinding 

A. C. and D. C. Motors 

and Generators 



Maintenance, Repairs, Contracting 
and Installation 



150 JACKSON AVENUE 
LONG ISLAND CITY 



NEW YORK CITY 



219 




H 
en 
Pi en 



w 9 

I 

6 

U Q 



W Q 

* 

Q 

w 



220 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



TRANSPORT SERVICE, INC. 

HARRIS AVENUE AND SHERMAN ST. 
LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 



Gasoline & Electric Vehicles 

Motor Trucks 

Pleasure Cars 

Parts 

Motor Repair & Rebuilding 

Commercial and Pleasure 

Bodies. 
Painting, Trimming and 

Upholstering 
Machine Shop 
Blacksmith Work 
Carburetor Service 
Magneto Service 
Bittery Service 
Garage 
Emergency Service 




Roadside Repair and Tow- 
Ing. Day and Night. 

Auto Trucks 

Storage Warehouses 

Export and Import 

Shipments and Freight Col- 
lections from all Piers 
and Terminals In Greater 
New York. 

Carload Lot Spot Distri- 
butions a Specialty. 

Out of Town Accounts So- 
licited. 

Merchandise Transported to 
all Parts of the World. 

Custom House License No. 
202. 



TELEPHONE ASTORIA 1881 1882 



The Ronzoni 



M 



acaroni 

_ INCORPORATED 



i Co. 



612616 Jackson Avenue 
Long Island City, N. Y. 



GRADY MFG. CO. 



250-256 Ely Ave, 
Long Island City 




NON-INFLAMMABLE AND 
INFLAMMABLE 



IMPERIAL METAL MFG. CORP. 





81-3-5 SUNSWICK ST., L I. CITY 

MFRS. OF SPRINKLER TOPS AND METAL SPECIALTIES 



FREDERICK A. RUSSELL, MANAGER 

NEWTOWN CREEK TOWING CO. 

RIVER AND HARBOR TOWING 

BOATS SUPPLIED WITH POWERFUL PUMPS 
FOR FIRE OR WRECKING PURPOSES AND 

TESTING BOILERS 
BOATS LAY UP AT HUNTERS POINT BRIDGE 

MAIN OFFICE 

9 JACKSON AVE., LONG ISLAND CITY 

MAIN OFFICE TELEPHONES ( 3841 ( HUNTERS 
DAY AND NIGHT | 3842 i POINT 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 



221 




The New Home Colony 



Fifteen Minutes from Grand Cent- 

tral Subway Station. 5c. Fare. 

100 Acres Under Development. 

Adjoining the New 60 Acre Million 

Dollar Water Front Park . 



100 HOUSES NOW BUILDING 



Six and seven rooms, with heated garage 
and private driveway. Colonial hH^K, rar- 
quet floors, white enamel trim, hot water 
heat, tiled bath and kitchen. 

Take Queensboro Subway train from 
Grand Central Subway Station, direct to 
the property, one block from Ditmars 
Avenue Station. 

By motor, from Queenshoro Bridge fol- 
low left branch of Elevated road to Dit- 
mars Avenue Station. 

Send for photographs, floor plans and 
particulars. Brokers protected. 




&trkprt=$rnum 



Tel. Murray Hill 1190 



Co. 

52 Vanderbilt Avenue 




NEW QUEENS BOROUGH PLANT OF 

JOHN SIMMONS CO. 

(ONE CITY BLOCK) 

LONG ISLAND CITY 



222 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



For Expert Opinions 



on 



Queens 

Borough 

Real 

Estate 

Consult 

Mr. Halleran 
of the 

Halleran Agency 

Flushing, N. Y. 



EDWARD SMITH & COMPANY 

West Ave., 6th & 7th Sts. 

Long Island City 

New York 



1827 



iiiiiilliiiiililHiiliHiiliiiiuiiiiiiHiiiliiii .;';::;ii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiuiiiiir 

Varnish Makers 

and 

Color : Grinders 



Phone Hunterspoint 4045 

JOHN A. PETRY 

87 Filth Street 
Long Island City, N. Y. 



WASTE 

AND 

WIPERS 



ON - THE - SPOT " DELIVERY 
20000 Lb. m Stock 



NEW YORK AGENT 

HAGY BROTHERS, Inc. 

PHILADELPHIA 



The 



Brooklyn Daily Eagle 
JobPrintingDepartment 

Largest Plant in Brooklyn 
and Long Island 



I 



inspection PROGRAMS 

and patron- REPORTS 

age. A sta# of ART WORK 

e ffi c ie n t and 



COLOR WORK 
EN G RAVING 



courteous repre- 

sentatives are at 

your service for 

consultation, advice, and estimates 

of cost. 



Fifth Floor, *.* Eagle Building 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
305 Washington Street 
Telephone 6200 Main 



NEW YORK CITY 



223 




A Few 
Electrical Installations 

OF THE 

H. B. K. 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 

91 JACKSON AVENUE, LONG ISLAND CITY 



Industrial, Electrical Power and Lighting 
Installations 

A Fully Equipped Modern Repair Shop 

for Motors and Electrical 

Apparatus 

Westmghouse Agents in the Borough of 
Queens 

Telephone 
612 Hunterspoint 




Orrf&ntcSalt and Acid Co. L.I.C. 



Salt and Acid Co. NewerK N.J 




G.Piel Co, Inc. 



Adler Vetieer Sat Ca. 



224 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 





o. 



INCORPORATED 



STEEL CONSTRUCTION 

29 zSvoactwciu, jVew < ,yow& (oifai, 

DESIGNERS, FABRICATORS AND CONSTRUCTORS 

OF 

STEEL BRIDGES, BUILDINGS, TANKS, TOWERS, 

SUGAR FACTORIES, WARE HOUSES AND 

STORAGE BUILDINGS 

TWENTY FIVE YEARS SERVICE SUPPLYING FACTORY AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS OF STEEL OR 
CONCRETE; STEEL CONSTRUCTION IN BARGES, BRIDGES. TRESTLES, VIADUCTS. STACKS, TANKS, 
RADIO AND TRANSMISSION TOWERS, MINE SHAFTS AND HEAD FRAMES, STRUCTURAL STEEL 
SHAPES, REINFORCING STEEL. CORRUGATED STEEL AND STEEL SASH. 

PHONE, WRITE OR WIRE FOR OUR REPRESENTATIVE 
YOUR INQUIRIES WILL RECEIVE OUR IMMEDIATE ATTENTION 



Lawyers 

Title ana Trust 
Company 

Capital $4,000,000 

Surplus and Profits - 5,994,552 



Examines and insures titles to real 
property. Lends money on bond and 
mortgage. Sells first mortgages and 
mortgage certificates, guaranteed as to 
principal and interest; and first mort- 
gages without guarantee. 

Allows interest on deposits subject 
to check or on certificate. Designated 
depository for court funds and money 
of bankrupt estates. Acts as executor 
and trustee. Transacts all trust com- 
pany business. 

160 Broadway, New York 

188 MONTAGUE ST., BKN. 44 COURT ST., BKN. 1354 B'WAY, BKN, 
367 FULTON ST., JAMAICA, N. Y, 
3S3 E. I49FH STREET, NEW YORK 
160 MAIN ST., WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. 



LONG ISLAND 

E 



359 Fulton Street 

Jamaica, N. Y. 
Telephone Jamaica 100 

ROBERT W. HIGBIE 
PRESIDENT 

HAMILTON A. HIGBIE 
VICE PRESIDENT fc TREASURER 

WM. H. SHANNON 
SECRETARY 

MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS 



NEW YORK CITY 225 



Matching the Growth of Business 

Entering the seventieth year of its service 
to business, the Irving National Bank 
has completed the circle of its functions 
by merger of its allied institution, the 
Irving Trust Company. The union is 
the natural outcome of close association 
and common ownership, now that the 
amendment of the federal bank law per- 
mits the two institutions to join forces 
without sacrifice of customer service. 

To the friendly personal service which 
the Long Island City Office offered 
before the merger, the union of the two 
Irvings enables its officers to add the 
facilities and resources of the greater in- 
stitution and to place at the disposal of 
depositors every modern banking service, 
national and international. 

IRVING NATIONAL BANK 

LONG ISLAND CITY OFFICE 
BRIDGE PLAZA, LONG ISLAND CITY 



EDWARD E. McMAHON, Jr. THEODORE W. EGLY 

MANAGER A SST. MANAGER 




226 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



TELEPHONE PLAZA 2149 



ESTABLISHED 1892 



TELEPHONE PLAZA 646 



G. J. Staats 
PLUMBING CONTRACTOR 

733 Lexington Avenue, New York 

Experience of more than a QUARTER CENTURY of Plumbing for 

Factories, Office Buildings, Terminals, Piers, Residences 

Work Installed in Any Part of the United States 



First National Bank 

of Whitestone 

Organized 1907 

Capital $56,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided 
Profits - - - - $56,000.00 

Every Facility to Depositors 
Open Monday Evenings 



FOR 



STANDARD GRADES 



OF 



BRICK-CEMENT 
LIME 

CALL ON 

CLONIN & MESSENGER 



LONG ISLAND CITY 



TELEPHONE 1881 HUNTERS POINT 

Sweeney & Gray Co. 

ESTABLISHED 1893 

MACHINISTS AND HYDRAULIC ENGINEERS 

Artesian Wells 

DRILLED AND DRIVEN 
CORE, TEST. WASH AND FOUNDATION BORINGS FOR 

ARCHITECTS, ENGINEERS AND BUILDERS 

INCREASED WATER SUPPLY BY OUR NEW METHOD 

EXPERT REPAIRS TO WELLS 

WORKS: 81-83-85 SIXTH ST., L, I, CITY, N.Y. 




'imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiuiu 

Everything 

for the 

Automobile 



THOROUGHFARE 

GARAGE AND 

AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

QUEENS BOULEVARD AT 
ELM HURST 



AGENCY 
WITH SERVICE 

DISTRIBUTORS FOR QUEENS 
OF THE FAMOUS 

HOWE TIRES 




NEW YORK CITY 227 



THE CENTURY AUDIT CORPORATION 

(Incorporated 1913) 

ACCOUNTANTS and AUDITORS 

FOR NUMEROUS ENTERPRISES IN QUEENS BOROUGH 



41 Park Row 
MILES S, CHARLOCK New York ' N ' Y ' 

PRESIDENT Cortland 2142-3 



uy Your Varnishes in Queens ! 



TVTE make a study of tne require- 
ments of individual manufact- 
urers, and we might [\3e able to 
improve tne finish of your product 

Varnishes for Automobiles, Furniture and Trim. 

Black Baking Japans in All Grades. 

Liquid and Japan Dryers that will Dry. 

Exinolite, the All-Purpose Varnish 

THE THIBAUT & WALKER CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF VARNISH SPECIALTIES 
7276 Nintk Street Long Island City, N. Y. 



228 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



"Old Reliable ' 

"THE DUE TRUCK WORTHY Of THAT NAME" 

OLD RELIABLE MOTOR 
TRUCK CORPORATION 

LONG ISLAND CITY 

Factory and Service Station 
ELY AND HARRIS AVENUES 

Manufacturers of 

2/^2, 3J^, 5 Ton Worm Drive Trucks 
aucl 1]/2 Ton Chain Drive Trucks 

Dump Trucks a Specialty 
SERVICE AT YOUR DOOR 

Affiliated witK Chicago, III. 
Established 1911 



Edward Ruth, Jr. 

4 Woodside Ave., Winfield, L I. 

Telephone 1847 Newtown 




REAL ESTATE 

INSURANCE OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 

MORTGAGE LOANS 



H. J.MULLEN CONTRACTING CO. 

INCORPORATED 

Paving and 

Sewer 
Construction 



JAMAICA 



NEW YORK 



COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES 

u 

Harvey B. Newins 



INCORPORATED 



522 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK 



r2962 

VANDERBILT J 2963 
I 2965 



Matheson Lead Co. 

Manufacturers of 

White Lead 
Flake White 
Litharge 
Red Lead 
Orange Mineral 

Office and Works 

559-571 VERNON AVENUE 
LONG ISLAND CITY. N. Y. 



TELEPHONE ASTORIA 3300 



PA YET 



SILK DYEING CORPORATION 

BOULEVARD AND WEBSTER AVENUE 
LONG ISLAND CITY 

DYERS AND FINISHERS 

OF ALL CLASSES OF 

SILK AND WOVEN TEXTILES AND 
JERSEY CLOTHS 

ALL GOODS INSURED AGAINST THIEF AND FIRE 

DURING IN OUR POSSESSION 
TWENTY MINUTES FROM THE SILK MARKET 



A NEW ARRIVAL 

TO FILL THAT LONG NEEDED WANT 

DROP IN AND SEE OUR LINE 

Office Furniture 
Filing Devices 
Stationery 
Printing 




Tel., 
Astoria 3020. 

598 Jackson Ave., 
L. I. City 



NEW YORK CITY 



229 




COLUMBIA 
HOIST AND MACHINE CO. 

ELECTRIC 

CRANES AND HOISTS 



LABOR SAVING 
DEVICES 



BORDEN AVE. 



L I. CITY 



LA COUR 
IRON WORKS 

ENGINEERS 8c CONTRACTORS 

STEEL CONSTRUCTION 



L. U. LA COUR, C. E. 
S. J. DEVOE 



E. V. VORM 

BORDEN AVE. 



L I. CITY 



Telephone 211 Richmond Hill 



EARL A. GILLESPIE 

Lumber 
and Trim 

97th Avenue and 98th Street 
WOODHAVEN JUNCTION 



LONG ISLAND 



Queens 
Advertising Agency 

48 Jackson Avenue 

LONG ISLAND CITY 



EXPERT SERVICE 

FOR EVERY 
ADVERTISING NEED 



T . , f 1458 1 

lelephoness 3450 f Ilunterspoint 



230 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



BROOKLYN EASTERN DISTRICT TERMINAL COMPANY 




/^UEENSBORO TERMINAL Located East River and 14th St., 
N^ Long Island City. Shipments may be made through this Terminal 
in connection with the following roads : 



New York Central 
West Shore 
New Haven 



Erie 

Lehigh Valley 

Baltimore & Ohio 



Central Railroad of N. J. 
D., L. & W. 
N. Y. 0. & W. 



LOOSE LEAF 

THE Cesco Line comprises a Complete 
assortment of modern business tools 
Loose Leaf Binders and Accounting Forms 
for every conceivable purpose. 

It is a line of individuality each item 
from the vest pocket book to the highest grade 
ledger with some distinguishing features, 

Exceptional facilities for the manufacture of 
Ruled Forms. Manifold Billing Blanks and all 
Loose Leaf Sheets. 

Catalogue on Request 

THE C. E. SHEPPARD CO. 

VAN ALST and 13th STREET, LONG ISLAND CITY 

NEW YORK CITY 




NEW YORK CITY 231 




(flatten* 

Long Island 
The High Point of Queens 

Kew Gardens is 16 minutes by train from Pennsylvania 
Station, Manhattan, and it is not over 15 minutes 
run by automobile from Bridge Plaza, Long Island City. A 
finer climate and a more beautiful development than any 
other nearby suburb. We offer plots full of individuality 
and a home-building plan that will interest you ; also new 
houses just finishing. 

EJgewortk Smith, Inc. 



Sole Agent 



New York Office at 

1 West 34th Street 

Phone Greeley 5250 



Kew Gardens Office at 

City Bound Station Platform 

Phone Richmond Hill 1713 




COKE jv WOOD 

Anthracite f~^ g"*\ A Bituminous 

V^J \J \ LJ 

DOMESTIC AND STEAM SIZES 

For over 70 years we have been supplying 
the merchants and manufacturers of this 
vicinity with the best quality of coal and 
can nil your requirements efficiently, 
speedily and with the least possible delay. 



Lumber, Mill Work and Trim 
1000 Boulevard, L. I. City, N. Y., Phone Astoria 790 



232 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 




NEW YORK CITY 



233 




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234 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



ROMAN-CALLMAN Co. 



INDUSTRIAL LOCATIONS 
CONSTRUCTION FINANCED 



~|^ 
Jt%.EAL 



PLOTTAGE FOR 
APARTMENT HOUSES 



BRIDGE PLAZA 



LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 



Some Important Industries We Have Located Here 



METROPOLITAN LIFE INS. CO. 
STANDARD STEEL CAR CO, 
GOULD MESEREAU CO. 
L. J. SELZNICK INC. 
UNITED BUTTON CO. 
J. F. TAPLEY CO. 
WAPPLER ELEC. CO. 
G. PIEL CO. 
PALMOLIVE SOAP CO. 
EMERSON PHONOGRAPH CO. 
GEHNRICH IND. OVEN CO. 
WM. C. VAN BRUNT CO. 
MAURICE MILLER 
AUTO SALES CORP. 
CHAS. M. SORENSON. INC. 
MILLER SHOE CO. 
HIMOFF MACHINE CO. 
EMPIRE CITY IRON WORKS 
HILL BUTTON WORKS 
HARDITE METALS, INC. 
LAURAINE MAGNETO CO. 
WALKER VEHICLE CO. 
MORGAN GROSSMAN 
DELATOUR BEVERAGE CORP. 



Printing Plant 
Service Station 
Drapery Hardw. 
Studio 
Buttons 
Book Binding 
Surgical App. 
Auto Parts 
Warehouse 
Phono. Records 
Enam. Ovens 
Iron Works 
Smelting Plant 
Vending Mach. 
Surg. Apparatus 
Shoes 

Auto. Mach. 
Struct. Iron 
Celluloid But. 
Metallurgy 
Magnetos 
Auto Trucks 
Shoes 
Beverages 



200,000 square ft. 

150,000 " 

130,000 " 

120,000 " 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

70,000 

60,000 

55,000 

50,000 

40,000 

30,000 

30,000 " 

30,000 

30,000 " 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 " 

20,000 " 

20,000 



ROMAN-CALLMAN Co. 



INDUSTRIAL LOCATIONS 
CONSTRUCTION FINANCED 



ESTATE 



APARTMENT HOUSES 



BRIDGE PLAZA 



LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. 



NEW YORK CITY 



235 



CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY 

OF 
ADVERTISERS 



ACCOUNTANTS and AUDITORS 
Century Audit Corporation 227 

ADVERTISING 
Queens Advertising Agency 229 

AIRPLANES 
L. W. F. Engineering Co 168 

ANCHORS 

Irving Iron Works 164 

APARTMENTS 

Queensboro Corporation 165 

ARCHITECTS and ENGINEERS 

Ballinger & Perrot 200-1 

Francisco & Jacobus 199 

ARTESIAN WELLS 

Sweeney & Gray Co 226 

AUTOMOBILES 

Harrolds Motor Car Co. (Fierce- 
Arrow) 173 

Old Reliable Motor Truck Co. ...228 
Packard Motor Car Co. of N. Y. ..187 

Transport Service Inc 220 

Thoroughfare Garage '.226 

The White Company 215 

AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES & 

SUPPLIES. 
Brunswicke-Balke-Collender Co. ..172 

Metal Stamping Co 162 

Motometer Co. Inc 207 

Thoroughfare Garage 226 

Transport Service, Inc 220 

BAGS & BAGGING 
Young & Metzner 178 

BALL BEARINGS 
Norma Company of America 192 

BANKS 

American Trust Company 168 

Bank of the Manhattan Company ..163 

The Corn Exchange Bank 167 

First National Bank of Whitestone 226 
New York National Irving Bank . . .225 

BATTERIES 
American Ever Ready Works 194 

BEDS & BEDDING 

Defender Manufacturing Co 176 

Manhattan-Rome Co 175 

BILLBOARD POSTERS 
Latham Litho & Printing Co 171 

BISCUITS 
Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co ' 161 

BOILERS 

Cole-Duncan Boiler Works, Inc. . . . 199 
The Christopher Cunningham Co. . . 198 



PAGE 

BOOK BINDING 

Long Island Star Publishing Co. . . .213 
J. F. Tapley Co 212 

BOXES (Cardboard) 
Brockway-Fitzhugh-Stewart, Inc. ..212 

BRICK 

Clonin & Messenger 226 

J. P. Duffy Co 218 

Greenpoint Fire Brick Co 178 

Hunterspoint Lumber & Supply Co. 180 

BRONZE & IRON WORK (Ornamental) 
Tiffany Studios 180 

BUILDERS (Homes & Factories) 

Ballinger & Perrot 200-1 

Cross & Brown Co 202 

Degnon Realty & Terminal Improv. 

Co 196-7 

Dickel Construction Co 188 

W. R. Gibson 209 

Louis Gold 205 

Hamilton & Chambers Co. Inc 224 

M. & L. Hess, Inc 204 

C. Curtis Woodruff & Co 100 

John T. Woodruff & Son 162 

CANDY 
Tiffin Products, Inc 194 

CASKETS 
National Casket Co 172 

CASTINGS (Iron) 
Long Island Foundry Co 186 

CEMENT 

Clonin & Messenger 226 

J. P. Duffy Company 218 

Hunterspoint Lumber & Supply Co. 180 

CHEWING GUM 
Wm. Wrigley Jr. & Co 190 

COAL 

Jurgen Rathjen Co 184 

Tisdale Lumber Co 231 

COLOR GRINDERS 

Edward Smith & Co 222 

CONTAINERS (Shipping) 

Brockway-Fitzhugh-Stewart, Inc. ..212 
CRANES & HOISTS (Electric) 

Columbia Hoist & Machine Co. ...229 
DOORS & WINDOWS 

Howell, Field & Goddard, Inc 208 

The Weisberg-Baer Co 210 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS & 
CONTRACTORS. 

Austin & Moore, Inc 191 

H. B. K. Electric Co 223 

Quinn Electric Co 218 



236 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 

CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS (Continued) 



ELECTRIC POWER & LIGHTING 
N. Y. & Q. Elec. Light & Power Co. 216-7 

ENGINEERS & CONTRACTORS 

Ballinger & Perrot 200-1 

Francisco & Jacobus 199 

Hamilton & Chambers Co., Inc 224 

LaCour Iron Works 229 

H. J. Mullen Contracting Co 228 

FACTORY SITES 

W. D. Bloodgood & Co 232-3 

Cross & Brown Co 202 

Degnon Realty & Terminal Imp. Co. 196-7 

Henry Duchardt 170 

Judson A. Harrington 210 

M. & L. Hess, Inc 204 

Kouwenhoven Estates, Inc 164 

George J. Ryan 166 

Jamaica Property Corp 214 

Harvey B. Newins 228 

John W. Rapp 166 

Roman-Callman Co 234 

Roe H. Smith & Co 186 

FILING DEVICES 

Sadlier-Walters Co 228 



FLASHLIGHTS 
American Ever Ready Works 194 

FLOUR & FEED 
J. & T. Adikes 178 

FURNITURE 

S. Karpen & Bros 208 

The Orsenigo Co 293 

GARAGES 

Thoroughfare Garage 226 

Transport Service, Inc 220 

GLASS 
Jos. Elias & Co. Inc 192 

HARDWARE 
A. Recknagel, Inc 202 

HAULING 

Queens Haulage Corp 210 

HOTELS 

The Knott Hotels 182 

Sage Foundation Homes Co 169 

HOUSES 

Allyn-Hall Realty Co 202 

Dickel Construction Co 188 

W. R. Gibson 209 

Howard Estates Development Co. 190 

Laurelton Sales Co 185 

L'Ecluse, Washburn & Co 192 

Cord Meyer Development Co. ...179 

Rickert Brown Realty Co 221 

Sage Foundation Homes Co 169 

Edgeworth Smith, Inc 231 

Roe H. Smith & Co 186 

HOUSE WRECKING 

Donner House Wrecking Co., Inc. 206 

HYDRAULIC ENGINEERS 
Sweeney & Gray Co 226 

ICE 

Knickerbocker Ice Co 208 



INSURANCE 

Henry M. Dietz 186 

Home Insurance Co 188 

Home Title Insurance Co 181 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. ..211 

Edward Ruth, Jr 228 

George J. Ryan 166 

Ten Eyck & Wangeman 172 

INTERIOR WOODWORK 
The Weisberg-Baer Co 210 

IRON 

Egleston & Bros. Co., Inc 170 

Irving Iron Works 164 

LaCour Iron Works 229 

LIGHTING FIXTURES 

Cassidy Co., Inc 210 

Tiffany Studios 180 

LIME 

Clonin & Messenger 226 

J. P. Duffy Co 218 

Hunterspoint Lumber & Supply Co. 180 
Queensborough Lumber Co., Inc. . . .176 

LITHOGRAPHING 

Brett Lithographing Co 214 

Latham Litho & Printing Co 171 

LOOSE LEAF BINDERS 

C. E. Sheppard Co., The .--- 230 

LUMBER 

Astoria Mahogany Co 184 

Donner House Wrecking Co., Inc. 206 

Earl A. Gillespie 229 

Hunterspoint Lumber & Supply Co. 180 
Queensborough Lumber Co., Inc. . . .176 
Tisdale Lumber Co 231 

MACARONI 
Ronzoni Macaroni Co., Inc 220 

MACHINISTS 

Sweeney & Gray Co 226 

MARBLE 
Voska, Foelsch & Sidlo, Inc 174 

METAL POLISHES 
Grady Mfg. Co 220 

METAL SPECIALTIES 

Imperial Metal Mfg. Corp 220 

METERS 

Motometer Co., Inc. (Autos) 207 

Neptune Meter Co. (Water) 193 

MIRRORS 
Jos. Elias & Co., Inc 192 

MORTGAGES & LOANS 
First Mortgage Guarantee Co. ...164 

Dickel Construction Co 188 

Henry M. Dietz 186 

Lawyers Title & Trust Co 224 

Long Island Finance Corp 224 

George J. Ryan 166 

Title Guarantee & Trust Co 190 

United States Title Guaranty Co. . . 188 



NEW YORK CITY 



237 



CLASSIFIED LISTOF^ADVERTISERS. (Continued) 



PAGE 

NEWSPAPERS 

Long Island Star Publishing Co. . . .213 
OFFICE FURNITURE & SUPPLIES 

Sadlier-Walters Co 228 

OIL (Lubricating) 

Three-In-One-Oil Co 183 

OVEN BUILDERS 

Gehnrich Indirect Heat Oven Co. ..204 

PACKING BOXES 
The Weisberg-Baer Co 210 

PAINT & VARNISH 

Emil Caiman & Co 174 

Matheson Lead Co 228 

Edward Smith & Co 222 

C. A. Willey Co .208 

PAVING & SEWER CONSTRUCTION 
H. J. Mullen Contracting Co. ...228 

PIANOS 

Steinway & Sons 195 

PIPE (Iron) 
John Simmons Co 221 

PIPES (Smokers) 
Wm. Demuth & Co 176 

PLUMBING SUPPLIES & CONTRACT- 
ING. 

The J. L. Mott Iron Works 206 

George M. O'Connor 192 

G. J. Staats 226 

PRINTING 

Brett Lithographing Co 214 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Job Printing 

Dept.) 222 

Latham Litho & Printing Co 171 

Long Island Star Publishing Co. . . .213 
Sadlier-Walters Co 228 

-REAL ESTATE 

Allyn-Hall Realty Co 202 

W. D. Bloodgood & Co 232-3 

Cross & Brown Co 202 

Degnon Realty & Terminal Imp. Co. 196-7 

Dickel Construction Co 188 

Henry M. Dietz 186 

Henry Duchardt 170 

Halleran Agency 222 

Judson A. Harrington 210 

M. & L. Hess, Inc 204 

Howard Estates Development Co. . . 190 

Kew Gardens 231 

Jamaica Property Corp 214 

Kouwenhoven Estates, Inc 164 

Laurelton Sales Co 185 

L'Ecluse, Washburn & Co 192 

Cord Meyer Development Co. ...179 

Harvey B. Newins 2a8 

Cjueensboro Corporation 165 

Roman-Callman Co 234 



Rickert Brown Realty Co 221 

John W. Rapp 166 

Edward Ruth, Jr 228 

George J. Ryan 166 

Sage Foundation Homes Co 169 

Edgeworth Smith, Inc., 231 

Roe H. Smith & Co 186 

Ten Eyck & Wangeman 172 

RIBBONS 

Wm. Wicke Ribbon Co 218 

ROOFING 
A. Recknagel, Inc 202 

SAND 

Hunterspoint Lumber & Supply Co. 180 

SHEET METAL PRODUCTS 
Hunter Illuminated Car Sign Co. ..182 

SHINGLES (Latite Asphalt) 
Howell, Field & Goddard, Inc. ...208 

SHOES & RUBBERS 
Beacon Falls Rubber Shoe Co. ...178 

Kozak & McLoughlin 174 

Rosenwasser Bros. Inc 199 

SILK DYEING 

Payet Silk Dyeing Corp 228 

SILKS 
Acorn Silk Co 174 

SNAP FASTENERS 
Waldes & Co., Inc 189 

SPICES 
E. R. Durkee & Co 219 

SPRINKLER TOPS 
Imperial Metal Mfg. Corp 220 

STACKS 

The Christopher Cunningham Co. 198 
Cole-Duncan Boiler Works, Inc. . . . 199 

STATIONERY SUPPLIES 
Sadlier-Walters Co 228 

STEEL 

Egleston & Bros. Co., Inc 170 

Hamilton & Chambers Co., Inc 224 

Irving Iron Works 164 

LaCour Iron Works 229 

National Bridge Works 198 

STORAGE 

Queens Haulage Corp 210 

Transport Service, Inc 220 

SUGAR 
The National Sugar Refining Co. . . . 177 

TANKS (Steel) 

Cole-Duncan Boiler Works, Inc. . . 199 
Hamilton & Chambers Co., Inc 224 

TERMINALS (Freight) 

Brooklyn Eastern Dist. Ter. Co. 230 
Degnon Realty & Terminal Imp. Co. 106-7 



238 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISERS. Continued 



TIRES (Auto) 
Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co. ...172 

TOWING 
Newtown Creek Towing Co 220 

VARNISHES 

Emil Caiman & Co 174 

Edward Smith & Co 222 

The Thibaut & Walker Co 227 

C. A. Willey Co 208 



VENEERS 

Astoria Mahogany Co 184 

WASTE 

John A. Petry - 222 

WELDING (arc-oxy-acetylene-electro) 

Hunter Illuminated Car Sign Co. ..182 
WHITE LEAD 

Matheson Lead Co 228 

WIPERS 

John A. Petry 222 



ALPHABETICAL LIST 

OF 
ADVERTISERS 



PAGE 

Acorn Silk Company 174 

Adikes, J. & T. 178 

Allyn-Hall Realty Co 202 

American Ever Ready Works 194 

American Trust Co., The 168 

Astoria Mahogany Co., Inc 184 

Austin & Moore, Inc 191 

Ballinger & Perrot 200-1 

Bank of the Manhattan Company. . .163 

Beacon Falls Rubber Shoe Co 178 

Bloodgood & Co., W. D. 232-3 

Brett Lithographing Co 214' 

Brockway-Fitzhugh-Stewart, Inc 212 

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, The (Job Print- 
ing Dept.) 222 

Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co., The .172 
Brooklyn Eastern" District Terminal 
Co 230 

Caiman & Co., Emil 174 

Cassidy Co., Inc 210 

Century Audit Corporation, The 227 

Clonin & Messenger 226 

Cole-Duncan Boiler Works, Inc 199 

Columbia Hoist & Machine Co 229 



PAGE 

Commonwealth Fuel Co 184 

Columbia Paper Bag Co 

Corn Exchange Bank, The 167 

Cross & Brown Co 202 

Cunningham Co., The Christopher . . . 198 

Defender Manufacturing Co., Inc. ..176 
Degnon Realty & Terminal Improve- 
ment Co 196-7 

Demuth & Co., Wm 176 

Dickel Construction Co 188 

Dietz, Henry M 186 

Donner House Wrecking Co., Inc. . ..206 

Duchardt, Henry 170 

Duffy Co., J. P 218 

Durkee & Co., E. R 219 

Egleston Bros. & Co., Inc 170 

Elias & Co., Inc., Joseph 192 

First Mortgage Guarantee Co 164 

First National Bank of Whitestone. .226 
Francisco & Jacobus 199 

Gehnrich Indirect Heat Oven Co., Inc. 204 

Gibson, W. R 209 

Gillespie, Earl A 229 



NEW YORK CITY 



239 



Gold, Louis 205 

Grady Manufacturing Co 220 

Greenpoint Fire Brick Co 178 

H. B. K. Electric Company 223 

Halleran Agency 222 

Hamilton & Chambers Co 224 

Harrington, Judson A 210 

Harrolds Motor Car Co i?3 

Hess, Inc., M. & L 204 

Home Insurance Company, The 188 

Home Title Insurance Company of 

New York 181 

Howard Estates Development Com- 
pany 190 

Howell, Field & Goddard, Inc 208 

Hunter Illuminated Car Sign Co., The 182 
Hunterspoint Lumber & Supply Co., 
Inc 180 

Imperial Metal Manufacturing Cor- 
poration 220 

Irving Iron Works Company 164 

Jamaica Property Corporation 214 

Jurgen Rathjen Company 184 

Karpen & Bros., S 208 

Kew Gardens Inn 182 

Kew Gardens 231 

Knickerbocker Ice Co 208 

Kouwenhoven Estates, Inc 164 

Kozak & McLoughlin, Inc 174 

L. W. F. Engineering Co., Inc 168 

LaCour Iron Works 229 

Latham Litho & Printing Co 171 

Laurelton Sales Co., Inc 185 

L'Ecluse, Washburn & Co., Inc 192 

Lawyers Title & Trust Co 224 

Long Island Finance Corporation ...224 

Long Island Foundry Co., Inc 186 

Long Island Railroad Co 

Long Island Star Publishing Co 213 

Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co 161 

Manhattan-Rome Company 175 

Matheson Lead Company 228 

Metal Stamping Company 162 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Co 211 

Meyer Development Co., Cord 179 

Motometer Co., Inc., The 207 

Mott Iron Works, The J. L 206 

Mullen Contracting Co., H. J 228 

National Bridge Works 198 

National Casket Co 172 

National Sugar Refining Co., The ...177 

Xeptune Meter Co 193 

Xewins, Inc., Harvey B 228 

Newtown Creek Towing Company ..220 
New York National Irving Bank ...225 



PAGE 
New York & Queens Electric Light & 

Power Co 216-17 

New York Telephone Company . . . 
Norma Company of America, The ...192 

O'Connor, George M 192 

Old Reliable Motor Truck^ Company .228 
Orsenigo Co., Inc., The 203 . 

Packard Motor Car Company of New 

York, The 187 

Payet Silk Dyeing Corporation 228 

Petry, John A 222 

Queens Advertising Agency 229 

Queens Haulage Corporation 210 

Queensboro Corporation, The 165 

Queensborough Lumber Co., Inc. ...176 
Quinn Electric Company 218 

Rapp, John W , 166 

Recknagel, Inc., A 202 

Roman-Callman Company 234 

Rickert-Brown Realty Co 221 

Ronzoni Macaroni Co., The 220 

Rosenwasser Bros., Inc 109 

Ruth, Jr., Edward 228 

Ryan, George J 166 

Sadlier- Walters Co 228 

Sage Foundation Homes Co 169 

Sheppa'rd Co., C. E 230 

Simmons Co., John 221 

Smith, Inc., Edgeworth (Kew Gar- 
dens) -- 231 

Smith & Co., Edward 222 

Smith & Co., Roe H 186 

Staats, Gustave J 226 

Steinway & Sons 195 

Sweeney & Gray Co 226 

Tapley Company, J. F 212 

Ten Eyck & Wangeman, Inc 172 

Thibaut & Walker Co., The 227 

Thoroughfare Garage 226 

Three-In-One Oil Company 183 

Tiffany Studios 180 

Tiffin Products, Inc 194 

Tisdale Lumber Co 231 

Title Guarantee & Trust Co 190 

Transport Service, Inc 220 

United States Title Guarantee Co. ... 188 
Voska, Foelsch & Sidlo, Inc 174 

Waldes & Co., Inc. . .- 189 

Wangeman, Inc., R. Randel, 172 

Weisberg-Baer Co., The 210 

White Company, The 215 

Wicke Ribbon Co., Wm 218 

Willey Co., C. A 208 

Woodruff & Co., C. Curtis 190 

Woodruff & Son, John T 162 

Wrigley, Jr. Co., Wm 100 

Young & Metzner 1 78 



240 



CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH OF QUEENS 



CONTENTS 



INVITATION . . 
FRONTISPIECE 
TITLE PAGE . 
INTRODUCTION 



PAGE 
i 

2 

3 

5 



HISTORICAL NOTES 6-7 

GROWTH OF NEW YORK CITY 8-16 

WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENT 17-38 

Foreign Trade 20 

Newtown Creek 20-23 

Dutch Kills Creek 23 

East River 23-27 

Public Docks 27 

Flushing Bay Flushing Creek 28-31 

Flushing Bay Jamaica Bay Canal 32-34 

Jamaica Bay 34-35 

Barge Canal Terminals 36-38 

BRIDGES 39-44 

Queensboro Bridge 39-43 

Tri-Borough Bridge 44 

Other Bridges 44 

NEW YORK CONNECTING RAILROAD ...45-46 

TROLLEY LINES ..47-48 

PENNSYLVANIA STATION 49-50 

LONG ISLAND RAILROAD 51-65 

History 52 

Electrification 52-54 

Tunnels under East River 54 

Sunnyside Yard 54-55 

Improvements 55-56 

Woodside Transfer Station 57 

Passenger Traffic 58 

Freight Traffic and Facilities 58-60 

Montauk Point Harbor 60 

Stewart Railroad 61 

Wholesale Market 62 

Stations Boroughs of Queens ...63-64 

War Record 64-65 

RAPID TRANSIT 66-85 

Rapid Transit Map 66 

Benefits to Queens 67 

Extensions into Queens Borough 69 

Rapid Transit Centers 69-71 

Queensboro Subway 71-73 

Bridge Plaza Station 73 

Astoria Extension 73-74 

Corona Extension 75 

Extension to Flushing 77 

Lutheran Cemetery Extension ... 78 

Liberty Avenue Extension 78-79 

Jamaica Avenue Extension 79-80 

Sixtieth Street Tunnel 81 

Dual Operation 82 

Crosstown Route 82-83 

Part taken by Chamber 84-85 



PAGE 

Growth in Passenger Traffic 85 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 86-110 

Queens as a Manufacturing Center 86 

Zoning Law 86 

Development prior to 1909 87-88 

Industrial Growth 1909-1916 89-90 

Industrial Census 1916 91-92 

Industrial Development 1920 93 

Nineteen Reasons that Attract New 

Industries 94-97 

Benefits from New Industries 98 

Rank of Queens in Manufacturing ... 99 

New Industries 1918-1919 100 

Articles Made in Queens 102-104 

Factories 105-1 10 

RESIDENTIAL 111-131 

Residential Advantages 112-115 

Effect of Industrial Development ... 116 

Demand for Homes 116-118 

Residential Development 119-131 

First Ward 122-123 

Second Ward 123-125 

Third Ward 125-127 

Fourth Ward 127-129 

Fifth Ward 129-130 

Homes for All 130-131 

NEW BUILDINGS 132-134 

BANKS 135-137 

LIGHT, HEAT AND POWER 138-139 

Electric Companies 138 

Gas Companies 138-139 

TELEPHONES 139-140 

GOVERNMENT 141-142 

QUEENS A Community of Vast Re- 
sources. (By Borough President 

Maurice E. Connolly) 143-144 

MORTGAGE LOANS 145 

AREA 145-146 

POPULATION 146 

ASSESSED VALUATIONS 147 

WATER SUPPLY 147 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE BOROUGH 

OF QUEENS 148-160 

Officers, Directors, Executive Staff. 148 

Reasons for Membership 149 

Ninth Annual Dinner 150 

Alphabetical List of Members (April 

22, 1920) i5i- I 59 

Application Blank 159 

Chart of Membership Growth 160 

ADVERTISEMENTS 161-234 

Classified Index 235-238 

Alphabetical Index 238-239 

CONTENTS 240