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Full text of "QUIPS AND CRANKS - 1914"

Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quipscranks1914davi 



mms. 




'h 



-DJi V/DSO/y 



QVIPS^i^CRANKS 

VOL. XVII ^ MCNXIV 





DR. WILLIAM JOSEPH MARTI 



To 
Dr. WiW'iam Joseph Marfm 

ovir new Presiaen^, 

a thorough scholar, a true {riend, a wise leader, 

a capable adm'msVraVor, and a Clir'isVian gentleman, 

tills volume o\ 

Qu't(>s and Cranks 

■ Is dedicated bvj tlie editors, in recognition o{ 

Vi'is untiring efforts on belialf ot tbe College we love 



^^ rsio 



OUIPS ^i^CRANKS 



n^. »*'•'■■' - -.^WM.^'- ■ ■ " ■ ^ ■ -^^ 



acu 



ity 



William Joseph Martin, A.B., M.D.. Ph.D., LL.D.. President 

John Bunvan Shearer, A.B., M.A., D.D., LL.D., l^ice-Presidenl 
Professor of Bible 

Caleb Richmond Harding, A.B., Ph.D. 
Professor of Greek 

William Richard Grey, A.B., Ph.D. 
Professor of Latin 

John L. Douglas, A.B., M.A. 
Professor of Mathematics 

James M. Douglas, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Physics and Geology 

Mark Edgar Sentelle, A.B., M.A., D.D. 
Professor c.v Philosophy 

Joseph Moore McConnell, A.B.. M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of History and Economics 

Thomas W. Lingle, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Languages 

Howard Bell Arbuckle, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

John Wilson MacConnell, B.S., M.A., M.D. 
Professor of Biology and Physical Training 

Maurice Garland Fulton, A.B., M.A. 
Professor of English 



^ ^^^^ 



/=\ ISIO 



^ QUIPS .^^JCRANKS^ 



Archibald Currie, A.B., M.A., LL.D. 
Professor of Law 

Charles N. Wunder, A.B., Ph.D. 
Professor of Astronomy 



Assistants in Chemistry 
C. C. Minter, W. L. Menzies, R. W. Guthrie 

Assistants in Physics 
B. F. PiM, M. A. BoGGs, C. B. Bailey, J. P. Marsh, J. H. Rouse 

Assistants in Bible 
A. S. Anderson, W. T. Bitzer 

Assistants in History 
C. B. Ratchford, J. P. Williams 

Assistants in Mathematics 
J. E. CousAR, E. R. Campbell, F. W. Price 

Assistants in German 
U. S. Alexander, Z. V. Roberson 

Assistant in Economics Assistant in English 

Z. V. Roberson W. A. McIlwaine 

Assistant in French 
R. Perry 

Assistant in Biology Assistant in Latin 

H. B. Overcash F. W. Price 



^^ ^^^^ 



Hast'e VViee, ni^mpli, and brin^ sviUi llice 
Jesi: and vjovtth-ful ;jollitij; 
Quibs and Cranks and wanVon wiles, 
Nods and becks and wreathed smiles. 



y=x r>JO 



„ QUIPS filCRANKS^ 



ci 



cnjor L»lass rocm 



l^ow the last slone is laid, and the builders 

|n silence look back on their work; 
1^ ow the sadness of parting comes o'er us, 
[^ re the contest of life is begun. 
T'o the bravest, the truest, the strongest. 
Ever the victory shall belong; 
Even the weakest among us 
1^ eed feel not the breath of despair; 

For the stones that we laid up with toil 
Overbear any thought of dismay. 
Up the path. then, of life shall we labor. 
Rough and steep through the climbmg may be — 
T ake the lesson we learned in the quarries. 
F very one his own trials to meet, 
E very one with no fear of disaster — 
N ol a heart that shall fail to respond. 

Like brothers thai follow one calling. 

On the task we have worked toward this goal. 

Y outh's fire warmed our hearts toward each other 

A nd the slogan we learned was not vain. 

Let the gates of the future swing open. 

E ntreat not the Fates to delay. 

N ow the moment has come — we are ready. 

T o things that are new we press forward, 
O n the fields of the future recall. 
Until Death comes to claim us forever, 
T he days that we spent piling stones. 



■^^ ^5 



/A rvjo 



„ QUIPS HR„CRANKS„ 



n 



S SLOW our ship her foamy track 
Against the wind was cleaving. 
Her trembhng pennant still looked back 
To that dear isle 'twas leaving. 



So do we part from all we love 
From all the joys that bind us — 
So turn our hearts, wheree'er we rove, 
To those we've left behind us. 



^^ ^ ^5 




Vincent William Archer Montreal. N. C. 

"Everyone lilacs to hear himself hrap" 
The original and only genuine "Donkey" — a 
combination of the pecuhar and the odd. He 
won fame in his first year at Davidson by defeat- 
ing "Doc" Siler in a dual Track meet. Smce 
then, he has won fame in almost every con- 
ceivable way — on the Class gridiron, in the class- 
room, and in the dormitories. For several years, 
he has been the dependence of the Class fool- 
ball team by reason of that good right foot of 
his. which has sent many a punt sailing over the 
enemy's line. "Donkey" is a bright lad. and 
has a peculiarly fafcinating way of saying things 
backward that appeals to his hearers. We are 
not willing to believe that he has done his best 
in every way while in College, and are expecting 
to hear great things of him when he gets out :n 
the world. He can certainly make a name for 
himself if he will. 



Joseph Alle.v Avers Ca=s, W. Va. 

"Btca in from other ficlh lo gel his final 
polish here" 

Avers came to us from the broad fields of 
Mississippi, after absorbing all that the people 
of that State could teach him, to finish his edu- 
cation with us. While he has been with us only 
one year, we can truly say that he has won a 
place for himself by his sterling merit, and is 
sincerely liked by all who know h m. Neat, 
unobtrusive, good-natured, and gentlemanly, he 
is always welcomed in any gathering, yet he does 
not spend his time in loafing. Had he roomed 
on the campus instead of in the village, we feel 
sure that A^'ERS would have made even more 
of his one year among us, for we would all 
have known him better. Our only regret is that 
he came to us in our Senior year instead of in 
our Freshman. 





Clarence Bernard Bailey. ..Greenwood. S. C. 



"Eilecmed 

\'ou may 
"Bill" or "B 
him. whenever 
may always co 
record bears wi 
conscientious \\ 
lo loaf. Yet 
working while 



J respccled by all ivbo l^noiv h'lm" 
call him "Red" or "RusTv". 
Bernard," and whatever you call 
r there is anything to be done, you 
:ount on him to do his share. His 
ivitness to the fact that he is a hard, 
worker, and he seldom finds lime 
he's no recluse. He believes in 
he works, and playing while he 
plays. Science is his "long suit," and whenever 
in doubt as lo his whereabouts it is only neces- 
sary to make a round of all the laboratories. 
Don't omit any of them — he might be in the 
very one you missed. He's the one man who 
knows all the inside athletic dope, too. In fact, 
Bill is one of Fourleen's all-round good men, 
and a gentleman at all times and under all con- 
ditions. 



"No 



William Tinslev Bitzer 
Valdosta, Ga. 

strives lo s/imc in olhcn' 



BlTZER is master of the difficult art of study- 
ing, being able to gel up a whole lesson while 
fome of the rest of us are reading the intro- 
ductory paragraph. It is not in his make-up to 
dissimulate. He believes in letting his colors fly. 
and he tells one just what he thinks or doesn't 
think. As a friend, he'll stick through thick and 
thin. He is a rash ladies' man in theory, but 
when it comes to "brass tacks" he shows up miss- 
ing. At the start of his College career, BlTZER 
was given a little too much to philosophizing, but 
a little active service will give him th 
toning, and his power to think will 
keenly. 



e proper 
come in 



/^^2^ 



B.S.: Eu.; K Z- Gry- 
phon. 

Honor Roil Iwo years 
Ctau Baseball: Class Foot 
ball; Manager Senior Fool 
ball Team: F.xcculive Com 
miltee Athletic Associa 
lion ; Secretary - Trcasuri 
Alhlclic Asfociation: Oi 
chestra and Glee Club. 




A. 


B.; Phi, 


CI 


iss 1 lislorian; I lonor 


Roll 


four years; Magazine 


Staff 


Junior Orator; F.s- 


!ayis 


's Medal; Supervisor 




William Keith Boswell 
Waterbury, Md. 
'■/( (a/fC5 more than a fool lo hoU his longue" 
"W. K." comes lo us from the North, and 
we are glad that he decided to come as far 
Soulh as Davidson to pursue his education. Be- 
sides attending his classes, he leaves his room 
three times a day — for his meals. Verily, he is 
the man who put "the stud in study"; but he is 
sure of winning out in the end. Quiel in his 
ways, he has to be known to be appreciated, but 
when once known is truly appreciated. He 
leaves with the assurance of being one of the 
men whom we know will succeed. We hope to 
be able to call him "Doctor" some day, and our 
best wishes go with him in search of his Ph.D. 



Robert Frank Brownlee 
Anderson, S. C. 
"Whence is thy learning? Halh thy toil 
O'er hoolfs consumed the miilnishl oil?" 

Good looking? Well, a man who has posed 
as photographers* model ought to be good-looking. 
And "Huck" is a ladies' man with it — ask 'em! 
But aside from his social activities, "Huck" 
has taken time to work hard, and consequently 
he has made good, both in his studies and his 
athletics. When the football team needed an 
able end, "Huck" was always ready — and 
somehow ihe other team always found it out. 
Popular among his classmates, he carries away 
wilh him the good-will and best wishes of every 
man on the campus. 



^-3^43 



B. S. 




f7^^ 



B.S.; 11 K'l'. 

Class Basket-ball; Man- 
ager Class Basket-ball; 
Class Baseball; Class Foot- 
ball; Coach Class Football; 
Scrub Football; Sub on 
Varsity Football Team ; 
Pan-Hellenic Council. 




S->nNF.v Bruce 
Pickens, S. C. 
"A poUsheJ gentleman, withal!" 
"Icky" numbers every man in the Class among 
his friends. Although quiet and inclined to be 
studious, he takes a holiday occasionally — espe- 
cially when the boarding-house baseball season 
i> at hand, for "Icky" loves his first base — so 
well in fact, thai it was once rumored that he 
sang first bass; but no just person would make 
such an accusation now. It is said that there is 
a girl in Pickens, S. C, and — but that is quite 
another story. "IcKv" has made good with us, 
and for him we predict a bright future. 



DANrEl_ 1 EMPLETON t AI.nWELl- 

Mount Ulla. N. C. 
"An affable and courleoui gentleman" 
Dan is a member of that caliber of students 
who never have to lie awake at nights wonder- 
ing whether they are going to make a pass the 
next day. because Mount Ulla's representative 
goes South when it comes to tickets. Too, when 
Fourteen was battling for the football cup, Cald- 
well was one of the mainstays on the team 
which captured that coveted honor. In the Lit- 
erary Society, the same gentleman shines. O. K. 
as he is along these lines, nowhere does DANtEL 
Templeton star quite so stellarly as with the 
fair sex. "The pains of love be sweeter far, 
than all the other pleasures are." he reiterates. 
Therefore, we shall be on hand to see the one 
who comes at Commencement time to claim that 
blue "rag" that has been glistening around here 
during the year. 



B.S.: Eu.; i;.\ E. 
Monor Roll. 




A. B.; Phi. 

Class Football; Junior 
Commencement Orator ; 
Inler-Socicty Debater; 
Commencement Marshal. 




ERNtM Rai Campbeli Davidson. N. C. 

"A good scholar, and a ripe one" 

You would not think, when you first saw 
"Skinny" shuffle into class, dragging his feet 
wearily under him, sling of? his cap, and flop 
down, that there was anything under thai 
touseled hair of his. But sit in the professors 
chair a day. and you'd find it out. The lobes 



of "Skinny's" b; 
fissures cylindrical, the 
indeed, we would venture 
examination. "Skinny's" 
full of mathematical mo 
live on this science. Pi 



athe 



said to be elliptical, the 
cerebellum parabolic — 
to prophecy that, upon 
brain would be found 
dels, so much does he 
erhaps we can account 



some of his "ec 
Iricilies." But. though always Skinny, he 
never been a skinHinl. and you will find hii 
good chum. A good Society worker and fo 
ful speaker, well read and a creditable wr 
we prophecy for him a professional chair s 
day. and an ultimate LL.D. (long-le< 
daddy). 



Ja.mls L.'sGLiiU Collar, Jr. 

Bishopville. S. C. 

"/ saj) the earth did shake ni/icn / vas born" 

Who can explain this wonder of creation? 
Oh. thou gullible youth! JiM really is a wonder. 
To know him is to like him — but he does not 
purchase his popularity at Scolield's. For JiM 
is a true scholar, and much study hath made 
him such. He has the "git up and git" in him 
that makes a man. Many have been the limes 
when Jim has held the line in Class Football; 
and a sturdy tackle he was. too. But he was 
destined for higher things, and now a "D. C." 
reposes on his manly breast. He is one or the 
men who have made good all the way round, 
and we know that success will be his with a big 
S. Luck to you. Jim! 



(-2^^ 



B.S.; Phi. 

Honor Roll four years; 
Magazine Staff; Critic Phi. 
Society; Alternate Com- 
mencement Orator, 




A. B.; Eu. 

Honor Roll two years; 
Class Football; Scrub 
Football; Coach Class 
Football; Captain Scrub 
Football Team. Mag- 
azine Staff, Vice-President 
Senior Class; President Eu. 
Society. 




looked 
double tune 
easily that 



Robert I avlor Crawford.. Greensboro. N. C. 
"H'hat 15 il? — Three guesses!" 
Crawford stopped talking once, but everybody 
prised that he apologized by making 
ever since. He can laugh, too. so 
ou would think he used "ihree-in- 
one ' on it. He was a terror to the Freshmen in 
his Sophomore year, but rumor has it that he 
received a North-Pole reception one night from 
'Dr." Cook and his bovine roommate, since 
which he has been sadder and wiser. Crawford 
IS a greal walker as well as talker, and has made 
a careful survey by feet of all Davidson's future 
suburbs. He has tried his hand al almost every- 
thing, his head at almost every study, and his 
feet once al football. Lately, he joined the 
Greensboro Club, and thinks the Gate City to be 
much congratulated. Without studying much, he 
has taken a srood stand in his class, and revels 
in Math. Versatile, hard-headed, jolly, and a 
good companion when you know him. is our 
nicknameless RoBERT TaYLOR. 



Lewis Broyles Crayton Charlotte, N, C 

"The combine J qualities of a man and a great 
athlete" 
Where he got the name "Pete " no one knows, 
but "Pete" he is, and "Pete" he will always 
be to his College mates. No one has yet been 
found who could talk or grin exactly like 
"Pete," though many have tried to counterfeit 
these charms. As a ladies' man, he is not espe- 
cially at home, but you just ought to see him on 
the football or baseball field! As captam of the 
baseball team, he has infused the men with his 
own "pep," and always done what he could for 
the honor of the College and the Class. In foot- 
ball, he is something of a combination of a war- 
horse and brick wall. But he's never so happy 
as when in the Chemistry Lab. — and we feel 
sure that he will be highly successful in this, his 



pro 



^5^^ 



AB. 

Cla.. Foolb, 




^a^^a/ 



B.S.: BHII. 

Class Football; Varsity 
Football; Varsity Baseball 
three years; Captain Var- 
sity Baseball; Executive 
Committee Athletic Asso- 
ciation; Wearers of D 
Club; President of Wear- 
er, of the D, roach Class 
Football. 




Newton Blair Dulin Bowling Green, S. C. 

"Smooth funs the Tvaier Tvherc the broo^ is Jeep" 

DuLIN was not. originally, a '14 man. He 
entered with the Class of '13. but had the good 
sense to drop out a year and become a member 
of Ihe illustrious Class of '14. The advantage, 
however, was not all on one side. It may be 
that he profited by the change — it is certain that 
the Class profited, for it gained a man whose 
presence would add to any Class. DuLIN is not 
very well known among the college men as a 
whole, but to those who know him well, he is a 
friend worth having. Earnest, studious, ambi- 
tious, and alwavs loyal to the interests of the 
Class and College, we are glad to be able to 
claim him as a *I4 man. He does not make a 
fuss about his work, but he always manages to 
get his work done someway — and that's the kind 
that counts in the end, i:n'l it) 



Avon Hall Elliot 
Thornwall. N. C. 

"Trul}) a man" 

Avon never says much, but everybody on the 
campus likes him. His smile is always handy, 
and he is never spoken to without calling it out. 
He IS a man on whom one can depend, and a 
faithful worker, either in his studies, the Sociely. 
or on the athletic field. Many an underclass- 
man has quailed in class football before his de- 
termined onslaught. He is the kind of man that 
forms the backbone of the Class, and he leaves 
us. a credit to 1914 and to his Alma Mater. 
For him we prophecy every success. 



B.A.; Eu. 

Class Football two years; 
Class Baseball: Punctuality 



Roll 

terms. 



Ho 



Roll 



two 




A. B.; Phi. 



s 


ecrela 


y, Treas 


urer and 


Pre 


s.dent 


of Ph,. 


Socety; 


Me 


Tiber 


Student 


Counc. 1 


one 


year 


Membe 


r Debat- 


ing 


Counc 


il: Chairman De- 


bat, 


Tg Counch CI 


ass Foot- 


ball 


two 


years. 






Henry Laurens Elliott Winnsboro. N. C, 

"There is always room for a man of power" 
A man whj has the God-given faculty of mak- 
ing a brilliant success of whatever he under- 
takes. "Bo" came to us as a quiet, unassum- 
ing, gentlemanly fellow, always attending to his 
own business, yet ever ready to lend a helping 
hand to a comrade. He has made a name for 
himself as a football and baseball star, and at 
the same time has led the student body in class 
standing with apparently no trouble at all. The 
simple fact that he is president of the Student 
Body tells more plainly than words where he 
stands in the estimation of the students. What 
more can a man ask than to be the leader of 
the College in athletics, in studies, and in social 
and collegiate activities? "Bo" leaves Davidson 
with the hearty wishes of every man in College 
for his brilliant success, in whatever he shall 
undertake. 



James Wilson Gibbon 
Charlotte, N. C. 

"Never was man more genial and happy ihan he" 
A versatile man, who could have done more 
if he would. A crackerjack basket-ball player, 
good at baseball, and a star chemist, he is now 
developing evidences of ability as a public 
speaker. (Don't ask JiM about that — he'll for- 
get that he's a Church member.) But if you 
want to see JiM shine, put him in a crowd of 
ladies, and give him about a minute to get 
started. Then watch out! JiM is the kind of 
men who make a class what it is — who has done 
his work well without being narrowed by close 
study, who has made numberless friends and re- 
tained them, and who has not forgotten the fact 
that he is a gentleman always. 



A. B.; Eu.; K 1; Gry- 
phon. 

Honor Roll four 
years; President Student 
Body; Student Council 
three years; Chairman Pan- 
Hellenic Council; Execu- 
tive Committee Athletic 
Association; Vice-Presi- 
dent Athletic Association; 
Class Baseball; Captain 
Class Football; Varsity 
Football; Coach Senior 
Football Team ; Soph. 
Banquet Speaker; Junior 
Representative at Soph. 
Banquet. 



J^^^' 






^t'^ 






V^^' "^ 






£^-- 


t J 


^' ^i' 


n 


^ 


\ 



B.S. 



^hi.; KA. 



Supervisor Phi. Society; 
Captain Soph. Basket-ball 
Team; Manager Class 
Baseball; Captain Scrub 
Basket-ball; Class Base- 
hall Team; Class Foot- 
ball; Captain Senior 
B..sket-ball Team; Varsity 
Basket-ball; Manager 
Varsity Basket-ball; His- 
torian of Class. 




Robert \\'eslev Guthrie SpnngheM, W. \a 

"A /lappj) soul thai, all ihc 7va\i lo Heaven. 
Halh a summer's Jay" 

This Happy son of WesI Virginia look a room 
on ihe lop floor of Chambers when he first came, 
and kepi his own counsel strictly for a whole 
year. About all we knew about him m his 
Fresh year was his strict Methodism. In his 
Soph. year, he dropped one floor lower, and 
began to thaw out. Then as a Junior he 
blossomed into the darling of the campus. His 
fame for wil began first in the halls of the 
Eumenean Society, where he was certain or 
unanimous applause at every word and gesture. 
But a good thing cannot be selfishly kept long, 
so the Society reluctantly yielded up their humor- 
ous idol to the wider fame of the whole hill. 
Robert Wesley is an exhaustless bundle of 
sunshine: his company a guaranteed cure for 
the oloomiest blues; his wit of the kindest sort, 
never smacking of the caustic. We are frankly 
jealous of the Methodists. 



Robert Stuart Haltiwancer 
Ninety-Six. S. C. 

"For his heart is tilfe the sea. 
Ever open, hravc. and free" 

From the babyhood of our class. "Halti" has 
A-ays been a loyal Fourleen-er. W hen we 
ught for football cups, no foot could lift the 



ill Quite like his; whei 
iseball ground, his bat 
ictor in every game; wh< 
e basket-ball floor, his 
as the forwards' delight, 
id contributions to our 



we battled on the 
was c considerable 
n we tumbled around 
long reach at center 

Thus in his support 
victories. Halti won 



• undying esteem of the Class. As for the 
A of the College, he drew them with his 
lely jokes. For four years, he has been one 
Ihe best smile-producers on the hill. Every 
ng with him passed off with a smile; from 
! slubborn crayfish in "Bug " lab. lo the hutch- 
ing of his name by blundering linguists. 



A. B.; Eu. 

Magazine Staff; QuiPS 
AND Cranks Staff; Vale- 
dictorian Eu. Society; Re- 
viewer Eu. Society. 




B.S.; Eu. 

Class Baseball; Class 
Basket-ball; Class Fool- 
ball; Punctuality Roll t%vo 




Crawford Averv Hart Moon 



lie. N. C. 



-A. 



the Jalj 15 long" 



In Ihe words of Colonel. "He's a good old 
boy," and that seems to be the opinion of every- 
body about "Craw." Steady, jolly, ruddy of 
head and warm of heart, with a slock of jokes 
ihal is unsurpassable and a geniality of spirit cer- 
tainly irresistible. He is looking forward to the 
day when he can hang out his shingle and benefit 
the human race by dispensing dough pills and 
sweet-lasting syrups. In the role of heart- 
smasher. "Rusty" is perfectly at home; as a 
burner of the midnight oil. he scores high; and 
when it comes to provoking laughter and a gen- 
eral feeling of optimism, few there be who can 
beat him. We foresee for him a long and useful 
career. Heaven grant him some noble nook! 



Fred Jay Hay. Jr Farm School. N. C. 

"He adorned whatever subject he either $polge 
or "Dtrote upon with the most splendid 
eloquence ' 

Studious, an indefatigable worker, a good 
speaker, "there" with the pen. critical, with a 
voice of much merit, and a basket-ball artist of 
no mean ability, he has been on hand with the 
goods ever since he hit the hill. Fred is the last 
of a series of brothers who came to Davidson to 
drink at this fountain of knowledge, and. verily, 
the last shall be first, because F. J. has nobly 
imbibed. As in the case of his predecessors, he 
is expecting, one day. to look out for the welfare 
— religiously — ^of some flock, and we feel sure 
he is going to make good. "My Genevieve" is 
his song from morn (ill night; shooting the profs 
his cherished diversion; and writing editorials is 
the variety which spices his life. 



^^^^ 



A. B.; Phi. 




A. B.; L-.u. 

Honor Roll three terms; 
Magazine Staff one year ; 
Ouips AND Cranks Staff 
one year; Edilor-in-Chief 
Magazine: Secretary Class; 
Secretary Y. M. C. A.; 
Manager Class Basket-ball; 
Captain Baskel-hall two 
vrars; Secretary Ministerial 
H.,nd; V. M. C. A. Cabi- 
net; Class Historian; Senior 
C ommencemcnt Orator; 
I ..saviM's Medal. 




Henri I 
Slai 



-CoJ bte 



iha 



N. C. 

man who first invented sleep" 



A boxing boul in his Freshman year caused 
this demon to be styled Hercules. It was nat- 
urally shortened to "Herc." in order to econ- 
omize time in addressing him. In the same year, 
he took the Nazarite vow. Some phases of it 
have probably been broken, but the razor has 
not yet gone upon his face. "Herc's" luck is 
a proverb about the campus. He knows all 
about the Peace of Utrecht, and why Napoleon 
ascended the heights of Marengo. He is also 
the inventor of all chapel-culting schemes. He 
studies when he feels so disposed, but few are 
the tickets he fails. He's some Herc. that's all. 



Walter ."-' iii m k | ■,•.;! - 
Laurinburg, N. C. 

"Allvayjs at home to his friends" 
Of course, he's called "Je.sse " — no one would 
expect anylhmg else. .And it is as Jesse that 
this man has won for himself a standing place 
in the regard of his Class. He's one of the 
laziest lookmg fellows you ever saw, but get 
him started, and you have a pretty lively bundle 
of energy. He has always been a firm believer 
in the superior merits of old *I4, and for several 
years he has battled for the class in basket-ball, 
baseball, and football. A genial, pleasant, warm- 
hearted, easy-going boy, we all like him, and 
are glad that he was a member of the '14 Class. 




t^^S^ 



B. 


s. 


- 


\ K; 


Gryphon 


CI 
Clas 
ball; 
Pan 


^B 

He 


Ba 
aseb 
Clas 
Hem 


eball- 
ill: C 
s Ba 
c Co 


Captain 
ass Foot- 
sket-ball: 
incil. 




John Edward Johnston 
Davidson. N. C. 

"A hanJiomc face I's Nature's best gifl" 

Ed is a "tarheel" only temporarily. Al heart, 
he is a loyal "sandlapper," his allegiance being 
suspended for a time for the sake of expediency. 
With his picture here before you, it is useless 
to say that he is a good-looking rascal, but the 
repetition helps to entrench. Ed is another of 
those South Carolinians who simply can't be 
held in when it comes to the girls. He and 
McGregor "work out" strong together, engender- 
ing mutual inspiration to heart trafficking. He 
has the lucky gift of a sense of humor to the 
keenest extreme; sees the point of a joke before 
it is half-grown, and can see the ridiculous in a 
Rash. Here's every best wish to our happy Ed. 



Thomas Pinckney Johnston, Jr. 
Salisbury, N. C. 

-UnUss someone chokes lum fir si. he'll talk '""'- 
self to death" 

For versatility and variety of talents, CoACH 
IS one of the best in College. He is a good 
musician, but not one of the long-haired kind; a 
bright student, though not a cranky "boner"; 
an artist; a writer; a lively conversationalist; a 
good class footballist. Perhaps he shines most 
brilliantly as a conversationalist, for only rarely 
in his career has he treated us to "brilliant 
flashes of silence." Full of "pep," he infuses a 
sideline crowd as a good cheer leader. CoACH 
has town loyalty, too. for. though an artist with 
the ladies, he saw to it that his heart was en- 
meshed just a little off of the campus. As a 
little prophesy from us. CoACH will make good. 



A. B.; Eu.; 
Clatt Football. 




^^a^ 



Or 


hestra and Glee Club 


three 


years; Leader Glee 


Club 


Magazine Staff two 


years 


QuiHs AND Cranks 


Staff 


Vice-President So- 


. lelv 


Firsl Critic Society; 


( 1.,,., 


Football four years; 


< l.rA 


Basket-ball two 


ycdis 


Cheer Leader two 


years 


Chief Commcnce- 


ment 


Marshal. 




Charles Leonidas King 



"A 



ng men. 



In 



Porlerdale. Ga 

I lo the end" 

the mos 
man car 



our humble opinion, here stands 
briMianI example m College of what a 
make of himself If he will. "Charlie" 
us fresh from the coltonfields of Georgia, and 
those who knew him m the early days say (hat 
he was the personification of greenness. Today, 
ork, he stands as one of the 
■n of the Class— a leader 
ever grown larger and has 
:s allegiance. One of the 
ihe student body, he never 
the test of his actions; 



after four years of 
most conspicuous 
whose followmg h 
never wavered in 
most popular men 
seeks public app 



inspi 



he do 



whose Christianity 
not seek to display his religion; a manly man. 
yet always modes! in displaying his manly 
qualities. He is a debater and an orator of ex- 
ceptional ability, a companion of remarkable 
pleasantness, a friend whose trueness has been 
tried, and a leader who is always to be trusted. 
We are looking tor Charlie lo make a name 
high up en the list of the 
nation's honored 



/^^^ 



A.B.; Eu. 

Student Council I w o 
years; Vice-President. Re- 
spondent. Reviewer, and 
President of Eu. Society; 
J u n lo r Commencement 
Orator; Senior Orator; 
First Allernate Debating 
Team; Intercollegiate De- 
bating Team ; Fresh-Soph 
Debater's Medal; Presi- 
dent of Y. M. C. A. 




William Whitenlk .MiClmh Hickory, N. C. 
"/ ne'er have fell the k'm of love nor maiJen\ 
hand in mine" 

Wilson may have his double, and Roosevelt, 
loo, but there will always be but a "single 
Parson." A moral Galahad; a faithful stu- 
dent; conscientious; a veritable Jew at bar- 
gains; a terrible enemy lo noisy Freshmen, un- 
faithful student-councilmen, and the "moral 
lepers'; a waler-drinking and physic-absorbing 
fiend; holder of a unique three-year dumpless 
record: a "high-loned" orator; joking and joked 
wilh, but with friends everywhere — ihis is the 
original combination, "Pars." He will stay 
single, too, unless he can screw his courage up to 
the asking point. The axis of the world slicks 
out visibly ihrough Hickory, and Hickory girls 
are the best — as long as they are on the other 
side of ihe lennis set (Pars is quite a pushing 
lennis player). But gel him oft, and he is as 
inleresling a chatterer as you'll find — jolly, con- 
genial and full of fun. "Good lands a living, 
boy"; "Now let me tell 
you" — these will be fre- 
quent landmarks; but 
Pars is a good egg. His 
ambition is to teach, and 
next year no doubt we will 
hear of Professor Mc- 
COMB and the 
"Readmg and writing and 
'riihmelic 
Taughl to ihe lune of the 
Hickorv slick" 



Clas. Baseball; 
Football. 




Manchester, 
'.'Vcxf to faiih in Cod. 



f^ill, 



labo 



"Spooks" is not one of those fellows who go 
about to the sound of drums, bedecked in a lot 
of showy tinsel ; but he's always there. He's 
rather orthodox — in fact, he still insists that 
Doctor Shearej grades his papers by weight. He 
has religiously taken a small amount of exercise 
in the gym. and spent the rest of his energy 
struggling with his College course. If anybody 
ever thought they saw him loafing outside of 
Rumple porch, it must have been an hallucina- 
tion — he doesn't do it. that's all. It is our opinion 
that Spooks will give the world value received, 
and more. 



James Henry Mrl.wi - Alaiihews, N. C. 

"A man he is of /loncsll) ami irusi" 
The charge of being a politician will never 
be marked ud against McEwEN, because he 
simply IS not built that way. Things come to 
him, and office-seeking is as far from him as the 
East is from the West. Mac is a modest, 
wholesouled. can-be- relied-upon sort of person- 
age. Always appearing cheerful, assiduously 
making good grades, doing his duty with a will, 
he is one of the best men in the Class. His 
ability as a speaker is recognized by all of his 
fellows, and 'tis a foregone conclusion that one 
of these days he is going to make some staid 
congregation sit up and take notice at his ser- 
mons. We are lookinp forward to his making 
a mark in this old world, a mark of which he 
will have a right to be proud. 



A. B.: Phi. 

Superviior 
Phi. Tociely. 



and Critic of 




/^^^ 



A. B.; 


Phi. 


Class 


Football ; Class 


I'rark T 


L-am; Inler-Socielv 


Debater; 


Second Alternate 


Debating 


Team; Valedic- 


torian PI 


i. Societv; Com- 


rncnccmen 


t Marshal; Presi- 


dent M< 


iklenburK County 


Club; 11 


inor Roll. 







^^^^B^" *-^^^^hh 



John Ruper: 

Dillon. S. C. 



Neill MclNMi Dillon. S. C. 



'The 



the mirror of the soul" 



Girls are strong on eyes — which partly accounts 
for Rupert's being such a heart-smasher. And 
the same eyes that win the girls introduce him to 
men as a man. Thev mirror a personality of 
manhness. frankness, honesty, and truth. Mc- 
Gregor's best friends are those who know him 
most closely; and he has not an enemy, to our 
knowledge. We did not know him very well 
until his Junior year, but since then we have 
taken a peculiar delight in honoring him — from 
the Student Council, where we want our best 
thinkers, to the Marshalship, where we want our 
best lookers. The most conservative betters 
amongst U5 are always willing to pul high stakes 
on Rupert. 



"The light that lies 
In ivomans eyes 
Has been my heard 



nJoing" 



This product of the Palmetto State hails from 
that section where they drmk good wine, dispense 
genuine Southern hospitality, and believe in rear- 
ing good-lookmg damsels — which. perhaps, 
accounts for "Inms' " one weakness. Mac is a 
faithful student, a crackerjack businessman, a 
great churchgoer, an inveterate sleeper, a rec- 
ord-breaker on rapid dressing, with a penchant 
for the epistolarian art; of a nervous tempera- 
ment, and possessed of that aforesaid glaring 
predilection — he is crazy about the ladies. 
Though "fearfully and wonderfully made " when 
it comes to attributes, the gentleman from South 
Carolina is a fine chap, all wool and a yard 
wide. "Shine* is his favorite expression, and 
Rev. Neill McInnis and WIFE is his ambition. 



Eu.: 



11 K 



A.B.; 
Gryphon. 

President Senior Class; 
\'ice-President Y. M. C. 
A.; Business Manager Mag- 
azine; Commencement Mar- 
shal: Student Council one 
year; Y. M. C. A. Cabi- 
net; Treasurer Society; 
Senior Representative Soph 
Banquet; Class Football. 
Baseball, and Track; Man- 
ager Class Track Team. 




"C^^S 



A. B.: Eu. 



Secretary and Treasurer 
of Class: Treasurer Eu. 
Society; Punctuality Roll. 




Robert Lee McKinnon Laurinburg, N. C. 

"Men of /eHJ coords are the best men" 
"Stump" is a unique man. We never saw 
htm gel mad. He always goes about with a 
genial good humor that wins and keeps friends, 
and a never-failing good nature that can sec 
the doughnut instead of the hole. StuMP can 
be dignified, though, and sometimes utters phil- 
osophic truths and solemn conclusions with a 
Delphi-oracular air that would humble any 
Freshman. You can always find him at home, 
from 2.00 to 2.15 every afternoon, on Rumple 
Porch, leaning against one of the pillars; and 
on festive davs and the first of the month 
smoking a cigar almost as big as he is. His only 
failing IS an aversion to sweet discourse with the 
fair sex, and he has already signed for a reserva- 
tion in the Bachelor's Hall of Fame. But we 
prophecy that there will eventually be a "lime 
and lied" in the life of ihis earnest, genial, big- 
hearted fellow. Some tell him he ought to be 
a "STUMP-speaker"; but he has decided to have 
his letters addressed. Rev. 

ROBT. L. McKlNNON, 

D.D. 



A. B.: Phi. 

Firil Critic Literary So- 




WiLLiAM Lamar Menzies 
Hickory, N. C. 
'Quii;( in appearance, with motives un^nolun" 
A peculiar combination is BiLL — quiet as the 
Sphinx as a rule, but as entertaining as the mis- 
chief when you get to know him. He is the 
chemist of the Class, and what he doesn't know 
about that subject would fill only a very thin 
pamphlet. He may be found in the lab. at any 
hour, where he will extend to you a most hos- 
pitable greeting. In short, MenZIES is a capital 
sort of chap. Always attending to his own busi- 
ness, possessed of pleasing manners, a studious 
mind, and an indomitable will. No one knows 
what he is going to do for a livelihood during 
the rest of his days, but whatever sphere in life 
he chooses will be filled by a man of diligence 
and capability. 



^^^^ 



As&islant 
Chemical Society 



ball two years; 
Chemistry; 




He's 
s thai 



Iames Pearsall Marsh 
MarshviUe. N. C. 

"Il pavs (o he happy" 

If you know "Blondie." you like hin 
one of those congenial, good-nalured fell 
never gets mad unless somebody sells his books 
and goes off with the money — and even then he 
comes to the conclusion that maybe they needed 
the money more than he did. He's been our 
star in class baseball, and his baiting average 
would make Tv Cobb's look like a Chinese 
penny on Wall Street. He studies Math, be- 
cause he likes it. and is scientifically inclined — 
works Math, too much; not too little. .Around 
Junior Speaking. Commencement, etc.. "Blondie" 
always stars with the pentle sex. .A good 
round man is "BloNDIE." 



B.S.; 


1< -; 


Gr 


vpho 


Class 
BaTeball 


Bas 
Captai 
Team 


ball 
™ J 


th 
u n i 




Harold Myers Marvin Jacksonville. Fla. 

"An inlellecl of hiihesi aorlh, a heart of pureil 
gold" 
In every class there stand out a very few men 
who are born leaders, and Marvls is one of 
those few. For four years he has had a place 
in the confidence and affection of both faculty 
and students that few men ever have. .As a 
member of the Student Council, he has guarded 
with extreme diligence those stcred principles 
which Davidson cherishes. Whether editing the 
Annual, in the debating arena, or engaged in 
any other activity, the honor of the College has 
always been his aim. He is a man whom all 
classes of students respect and admire, whom 
the faculty rely upon, and whose departure from 
Davidson will leave a large vacancy. To say 
that he is a graceful orator, a debater of excep- 
tional force, a writer, an exceptional student, 
does not fully describe him. for more tha.i all 
norable man ; a friend lo be 
)und. trusted to the end. 

A. B.; Eu.; K \: Gry- 
phon. 

President Soph Class: 
Member Student Council 
three year;; Sec'y.. Re- 
viewer, and Pres. Eu. So- 
ciety : Exec. Com. .Ath. 
Ass'n; .Asst. Bus. Msr. 
Atasazine; Magazine Staff; 
Commencement Marshal; 
J u n I or Commencement; 
Orator; Mgr. Soph. Ban- 
cuet; \'ice-Pres. Student 
Bodv; Quips and Cr\nks 
.'^laff three years; Ed.-in- 

C'ief OuiPS AND Cr\NKS; 
'■■n'Or-Senior D e b a I e r s' 
Medal: Y. M. C. .A. Cabi- 
net: Honor Roll fo..r years; 
Intercollegiate Debating 
Team. 




Edward Clark Murray. Jr. 
Graham, N. C. 

"My strength is as the strength of ten 
Because my heart is pure" 

Ed came here a mere striphng of a lad, but 
leaves — a man from the ground up. He is one 
of these triangular chaps, constituted accordine 
to that well-balanced formula of the Y. M. C. A.. 
which means that he is a good athlete, a good 
frtudent, a good boy. Quiet, thoroughly reliable, 
steady, and unsophisticated. As president of the 
ministerial band, and captain of the gym team, he 
has been "Johnny on the spot," and it is not go- 
ing far wrong to say that he will make a success 
at whatever he attempts. He is bound for Union 
Seminary, so he says, and we anticipate for him 
a D.D. before many years. May the dews of 
heaven fall thick in blessings on him. 



Will:am Rucgles Norris Chester, S. C. 

"He did nothing in particular, and did it TVell" 
From the time that William Rugcles made 
the first perfect mark on Bible for the Class 
of 1914, until he passed seven tickets last Fall, 
he has — no, not made the Honor Roll each term, 
but has made a place for himself in the esteem 
of his fellows. In fact, he hcs done everything 
else except make the Honor Roll, from playing 
the Y, M. C, A. organ in the wee sma' hours of 
the morning to spending the afternoons of his 
Senior year in laboratories — including being 
out one day for Class football. He knows the 
names of all the animals, insects, and reptiles 
in South America, and calls the islands of the 
South Sea by their first names. He's an enigma 
to most people, but rub elbows with him, and 
you'll find him a thoroughly good fellow. 



A. B.: Phi. 

Gym Team three years; 
Captain Gym Team; Sup- 
ervisor and Vice-President 
Phi. Society; President 
Ministerial Band, Volun- 
teer Band, 





Query Pharr Charlotte. N. C. 

"A man of cheerful ]ie5lerJays and confident 



Ion 



ch man is liked by some other 
man who is hked by every 



In everv cla 
man, but here 

man in the student body, for his genial disposi- 
tion and happy countenance. Always optimistic, 
and always smiling. **Bum" lacks little of being 
an ali-round student. The very name "Bum" 
is sufficient to drive away sorrow and brin-^ 
a smile to the face of all who know him. As a 
business man. he has a keen eye for anything 
that will benefit the Annual, the Lyceum Course, 
or Q. Pharr. As an athlete, he has been the 
shining star of the *14 Class for two years, 
alwavs displaying true sportsmanship, and fight- 
ing for the honor of the Class as few men ha\e 
ever done. As Manager of the Lyceum Course, 
he has shown the same business ability which 



hii 



the well 
business man in College. 
IS a true friend, a happy 
companion — and long 
after he has left Davidson 
he will be remembered a. 
one of those manly men of 
whom Davidson is proud. 



B 


S.; 


Phi.; Gryphon. 


F 


rsl Cr.lic Phi 


. Society; 


Commenccmenl 


Marshal ; 


Class Fc 


olball lb 


ee years; 


Cao 


am 


Senior 


Football 


Tea 


m; 


Assistant 


Manager 


Bas 


ball 


Assisia 


nl Mana 


eer 


Lyceum; M 


an age r 


Lvc 


urn- 


Assistant Mana- 


Ber 


Handbook; 


Manager 


Har 


dboc 


k; Busin 


ess Ma.ia- 


ger 


OuiPS AND 


Cr.\nk.<;; 


Y. 


M. 


C. A. 


Cabinet; 


Deb 


atin^ 


Council 






Benjamin Franklin Pim. Jr. Atlanta. Ga 

"There was a \ioung feltoru named PiM 
And he was exceedhglv slim" 

Bui this enabled him to play good Tennis, and 
many have been the players to go down in defeat 
before his skillful racquet. Frank is a versatile 
lad. withal, a regular jack at all trades, and 
good at moii of them. Besides his athletic 
ability, he is no mean musician. He has a rich, 
full voice, and his musical talent is also ex- 
pended on the melodion. There is also a current 
rumor that he can play a valve trombone, but 
as this was not given for publication, we won't 
vouch for its truthfulness. 

But we all like him. He has made good in 
his studies, and in the Literary Societies; and 
success is in store for him. 



^a^^ 



A. B.; M. A ; Eu. 

Declaimers Medal : 
Honor Roll; Vice-Presi- 
dent Society; Junior Ora- 
tor's Medal; Manager De- 
bating Council; Tennis 
Team; Manager Tennis 
Association; Senior Com- 
mencement Orator; Y. M 
C. A. Cabinet. 




Clyde Bank^ Rauhiokd 



"There was a Utile mt 
And he said. ' Little 



n. and he had a Utile soul ; 
soul, let us /rji, Ir^, try'?" 



Allhough RaTCHFORD is the Zaccheus of our 
Class, you don't often "gel him up a tree." If 
you make the mistake of insulting his dimmulive 
dignity and importance, you are liable to find 
that he's little but loud. "Ratch" is quite a 
warrior of the tennis court, as many an opponent 
will testify. In Society, he is famous for suit- 
ing the length of his speeches to that of himself. 
but occasionally he surprised us with an eloquent 
foretaste of Junior-Senior Speaking. "Brevity 
is the soul of wit." and RaTCH is always ready 
with a joke, a gibe and a laugh. He is alwavs 
neat, always pleasant, and always on the job 
when it comes to business. He is a man who has 
developed greatly since he entered College, who 
has proved himself a thoroughly likable com- 
panion, and who will not soon be forgotten by 
his classmates. 



Zee X'a.nce Robei^son 
Durham, N. C. 

"TheM sal! there are more able mea than I, hut 
I'll have to get my glasses" 

Zebulon Vance Roberson — critic, orator, 
poet, athlete — what shall I say? Zeb's char- 
acteristic is distinctiveness of style — a distinct 
way of saying and doing things. This has given 
him success in everything — study, friendship, and 
athletics. Everybody likes Zeb, and we all 
feel that some day we may say proudly. "I was 
a classmate of his." He is going to be a parson, 
but even that will never separate him from his 
"old meerschaum." If he puts the "PEP" into 
his sermons he puts into his campus work, look 



^^^2/ 



A. B. 
PunrI 



Eu. 
ality Roll. 




/^^"^ 



A. 


B.; Phi.; 


Gryphon. 


Class Football 


two v-ars; 


Scrub 


Football 


, Varsity 


Footb 


all; Assis 


ant Base- 


ball 


Manager; 


Manager 


Vars 


ty Baseba 


1; Fxecu- 


live 


Committee 


Athletic 


Asso 


lation; 


oaslmaster 


.Soph 


Banquet; 


President 


lunio 


r Class; 


Exchange 


l.dito 


r Magazin 


; Athletic 


1'. d i 


or Qui 


PS and 



Cranks; Commencement 
Marshal; Student Council 
two years; Secretary and 
Vice-1'resident Society. 




James BcintN sfske 



Iroy, N. C. 



"Men of brains are inJicaleJ fcy if>eir feet" 

Behold the gentleman of the numerous initials 
and the modest grin. SiSKE is a man for whom 
Colleqe life has done wonders, and no man in 
the Class has developed more in the past two 
years than this same gentleman. His marked 
fondness for Greek, and his deadly aversion to 
all forms of outdoor exercise except walking, 
are his chief characteristics — unless an appetite 
can be counted a characteristic. SiSKE can do 
much if he will, for he has ability in a high 
degree, and the fact that he has not been on the 
Honor Roll for four years is simply a tribute to 
his good judgment, for he sought other things 
than book knowledge: and. if our word may be 
taken, he has gained what he sought in large 
measure. He is a man who must be known to 
be appreciated, but when once known is never 
forgotten. .A good debater, a good orator, and 
a man of unusuallv sound judgment, we predict 
for him a bright future. 



<S^^ 



A. B.: Phi. 

Punchiality Roll: Honor 
Roll: First .Alternate De- 
bating Team: Inter-Society 
Debater: .Alternate Com- 
mencement Orator. 




\X iLLt.iM Hltchisov Sprint. Jr. 
Wilmington. N. C. 
"A /olja/. just, and upright gentleman" 
If there is one person who can take care of 
five girls at Junior Speaking or Commencement, 
and not have something go wrong, it is the gentle- 
man named above. "Bill" also insists that the 
shortest route from Wilmington to Davidson is 
via Birmingham and Chattanooga. He knows 
exactly how to accomplish thmgs with a minimum 
of work, being able to pass five tickets with an 
average of 70^.->. His honors bear ample wit- 
ness to his popularity, and he has been one of 
the mainstays of the student body during his 



B.S.; Phi.; K.\. 

Executive Committee Ath- 
letic .Association : Assistant 
.Manager Football; Presi- 
dent .Athletic .Association; 
Commencement Marshal: 
President Phi. Society; 
\arsitv Basket-ball: Cap- 
tain \arsitv Basket-ball; 
Class Baseball ; Qlips 
AND Cranks Staff; Stu- 
dent Council; Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council. 



K«WSf W^ 




William Francis Strait. Rock H 

"Much corn lies under the straHf that's not seen" 
"Crooked." our only represenlative from 
Rock Hill who stood to his guns for the whole 
four years, is a man of few words. He be- 
lieves in minding his own business, and not 
meddling in things that do not concern him. 
However, he is far from anything like cynicism. 
Penetrate his slight covering of reserve, and you 
find a ready and sprightly wit. He goes "strait" 
for the hard things that most of us are afraid of 
— as witness his taking both Junior Chemistry 
and Junior Biology in the same year, with their 
labs so endlessly long. "Crooked" is certainly 
"all there" — and here's our health to him in 
whatever he undertakes. 



John Gillespie Thacker Greensboro. N. C. 

"A combination of pigm^J and athlete" 

"Glp" is best known when altired in the red 
lights of the Gym Team, and it is well worth the 
time it takes to watch this slenderly-built fellow 
perform on the apparatus, no matter what it is. 
He has been well called "some gymnast!" Gyp 
IS the only man who entered with 1914 attired in 
short trousers, who has had the courage to stick 
lo his guns to the end. He lengthened his 
trousers soon after he entered, but his size is 
still the same, and bids fair to stay the seune. A 
little bundle of energy and nerve, a splendid 
end on the Class football team, a cheerful and 
entertaining companion, we all like him. and wish 
him the greatest success. 



B. S.-. K i. 
Clan Football 




B.S.; Phi. 
Gymna 



II K<l'. 



m Team four 
years; Assistant Manager 
Gym Team; Captain Gym 
Team; Class Baseball 
Team two years; Class 
Foniliall Tram two years. 




Charles Douglas Whiteley 
Greensboro, N. C. 
"Bid me Jiicourse; I n^^ll cnchanl ihine car" 
If ever there lived a man who enjoyed a good 
time, this is the one. Charles didn't come to 
college to bury his head in books, or to squander 
his time — a truly happy medium he has hit 
throughout his four years. He is a hard worker, 
pleasant speaker, stickier for principle, fine 
looking, fond of the weed, and has a veritable 
catalog of excellent characteristics. C. D. is 
some debater, by the way. having brought him- 
self into connection with a medal for argument's 
sake. Cupid found an easy mark when he tackled 
this heart, and now it begins to look like "14 will 
point with pride to at least one benedict m the 
near future. May the gods look with favor upon 
him. 



Samuel Baker Woods Charlottesville. \'a. 
"5omc(imc5 / 5c( an' thinl( : and somelima I juil 
set" 
Like the placid waters of the Susquehanna. 
"Chink" wends his peaceful way among us 
here. He is a firm believer in the phrase "I 
should worry." In his Fresh year, he received 
the unanimous vote of the student body for the 
laziest man, and it has stuck to him since, al- 
though he really does not deserve the name at 
all. There are few men in the Class who have 
taken the part that Chink has in the Class 
athletics, or who have considered the interest of 
old Fourteen more than he has done. He was 
once persuaded lo be a sport, and "work out" 
with the ladies, and they have been clamoring 
for a sight of him since, but Chink says 
"nevermore." There's only one original Chink 
in the world, and we have him here — a like- 
able, good-natured. popular fellow. always 
pleasant, and always a friend lo those who know 
him. 



Freshr 
Medal; 
Society ; 
ciely. 



lan-Soph Debaters' 
Second Critic Ph.i. 
President Phi. So- 





1 



B.S.; K .V. 

Class Football two years; 
Class Basket-ball two years; 
Class Baseball; President 
V^irgmia Club. 



QUIPS HS^PRANKS^ 

HisVoryj Nineteen Fourteen 

^ 1^ '' HE Fall of 1910 will always be a date pecul'arly dear and lasting in the 
A '^ memories of a certain band of one hundred and thirty young fellows, for it was 
^""^ on that memorable date that the goal idealized for so many years had finally 
become real, and as the Class of 1914 this band of youths enrolled themselves as Fresh- 
men at the Alma Mater of their fathers, brothers, and uncles — the College whose glories 
they had heard sung from time immemorial. 

As Freshmen, we were treated in a similar manner to those who had preceded 
us. Although real hazing had been stopped a year before, the Sophomores were always 
"on the job," and we never lacked attention at their hands. However, before the season 
had hardly opened, we had distmguished ourselves, and accomplished a feat that had 
never been done before in the history of Davidson. In the annual baseball game between 
the Sophomores and Freshmen, we drove the Sopti pitchers from the mound, and defeated 
them by a large score. Right then it became evident that enlisted under the banner of '14 
were some of the most promising of young athletes. 

Football season opened, and here 1914 was well represented. It must be 
remembered that it was a Freshman who took in a fumble and made the touchdown 
against Carolina in 1910. 

But not alone in athletics did our excellencies consist — for at the end of the term 
there were to be found more Freshman names on the "Honor roll than had ever been 
found before or since from a Freshman class." 

After the Summer vacation, we returned to the hill much delighted to be Soph- 
mores. It was soon seen that a few had perished in the whirlpools and cross-currents of 
the sea of knowledge, thus leaving the original band somewhat smaller in numbers. Of 



^^^^ 



„ QUIPS iHCRANKS^ 

our Sophomore year we are justly proud. In the Fall, it was a product of ' 1 4 that led 
the college in marks by a good margin. The following Spring, it was the Sophmores who 
defeated all contesting rivals, and won the football cup. Then followed the Banquet in 
Charlotte, which was admitted to be the best thai was ever pulled off. For 1914, it will 
certainly be an occasion never to be forgotten. Dr. Sentelle, Professors Douglas and 
Currie were there to lend experience, wisdom, and wit to the occasion. 

It is to Dr. H. L. Smith that we give the credit of safely guiding us over the first 
two and hardest years in our struggle to atta-n the "sheepskin," the modern emblem of 
knowledge. But at the beginning of our Junior year Dr. W. J. Martin was given the 
chair of control, and to him we looked for guidance in the remain-ng two years of our 
course. Again in this year we won the football championship, and so the cup, which 
must soon be ours. In the Spring, we contested with the Seniors for the baseball cham- 
pionship; but luck broke with the Seniors. It was during this year also that we were all 
given a very rare privilege, namely: the opportunity for manifesting our wisdom and learn- 
ing in the form of an oration before an audience we were ever ready to please and impress. 
No one can doubt now that we succeeded nobly. 

When the roll was called for the last lap of our course, only about forty-eight 
answered to their names. But the remaining few continued in that spirit of harmony, 
progress, and unity which characterized them from the first. By this time so many of our 
men had made their Varsity or Scrub letter, that the Class team was quite reduced in 
strength, and we lost the coveted cup. Our course is not over yet, but the end is in sight, 
and it cannot be long before that earnestly desired "DIP" is ours. 

When the end of our college days has come, and we enter into the business of 
life, within a world cold, cheerless, and dreary, certainly those who learned to fight, 
master, and win at the Alma Mater of their own, their fathers, brothers, and uncles, will 
in that same courageous spirit seek and find success. 



^^^^ 




FAMILIAR SCENES 




Ui.MAN S. Alexander Charloite. N. C. 

A. B.; Phi. 
Class Baseball; Class Basket-ball; Vice-President Phi. 
Society; Junior Respondent for Society; Honor Roll; 
Magazine Staff. 



Louis H. Anderson Anderson, S. C. 

B.S.; BO II; Gryphon 
Student Council one year; Class Football Team; Class 
Track Team; Class Historian; Executive Committee of 
.Athletic Association; Coach Junior Football Team; Var- 
sity Football; Manager Class Track Team; Varsity Track 
Team; Manager Varsity Track Team; Wearers of the 
"D"; President Soph. Class. 



Marion A. Boccs Liberty. S. C. 

A. B.; Eu. 
Punctuality Roll; Class Baseball; Class Football. 



M. Griffon Boswell Greensboro. Ga. 

B.S.; Eu. 




Rowland Brown Red Springs. N. C. 

B.S.; nKA 
Orchestra two years; Leader of Orchestra two years; 
Glee Club two years. 



J. Edward Carter Mount Airy, N. C. 

A. B.; Phi.; Gryphon 
Secretary Society; Declaimer's "Rep."; Assistant 
Manager Magazine; Student Council; Commencement 
Marshal; Vice-President Student Body; Manager Class 
Basket-ball; Class Football; Gym Team; Junior Repre- 
sentative Soph. Banquet. 



J. A. Carriker Harrisburg, N. C. 

A. B.; Phi. 
Varsity Track Team; Class Football; Treasurer Phi. 
Society. 



Wii.soN M. Cosby Mount Airy, N. C. 

B.S.; KA 
Class Football; Varsity Football two years. 




James Ralph Dlnn Camden. S. C. 

B.S. 



J. Enoch Faw Marietta. Ga. 

A. B.: Eu.; 11 K*; Gryphon 
Declaimer's "Rep."; Manager Soph. Banquet; Manager 
Manager Orchestra; Magazine Staff; Assistant Manager 
Quips a.nd Cranks; Commencement Marshal. 



Charles M. Gibbs 
A. B.; Eu. 
Secretary and Treasurer of Class; Treasurer Eu. 
Society; Vice-President Eu. Society. 



G. \X'. GiCNiLLlAT. Jr. 



S. C. 



.A. B.; Eu. 



Honor Re. I three ye 




W. Stewart Gilchrist Charlotte, N. C 

B.S.; Phi.; Ben 

Varsity Track Team three years; Manager and Cap- 
n Track Team; Captain Class Track Team; Class 
jskel-ball; Manager Class Basket-bail; Class Football; 
agazine Staff; QuiPS AND Cranks Staff; Gym Team 
o years; Vice-Pres.dent Junior Class; Second Critic 
>ciety; Supervisor Society; Commencement Marshal; 
'earers of the "D"; Secretary and Treasurer of Wearers 
the "D." 



William W. Griffln Ninety-Six. S. C. 

B.S. 
Class Football. 



James M. Hall Red Springs, N. C. 

B. S.; i:-\E 



F. I.. HarKEY Charlotte, N. C. 

A. B.; Phi. 
Class Football; Vice-President Phi. .'^cciety. 




James C. Harper Lenoir. N. C. 

Orcherlra three years; Glee Club; Treasurer Glee Club; 
Secretary Y. M. C. A.; Class Track Team; Supervisor 
Society; Critic Society; Magazine Staff. 



James E. Howell Rockingham. N. C. 

A.B, 
Scrub Football Team; Varsity Football Team; Captain 
of Varsity Football Team; Coach of Class Football; Sec- 
retary and Treasurer of "D" Club; Vice-President Athletic 
Association; Executive Committee. 



A. Rav Howland Charlotte. N. C. 

A. B.; Phi. 
Class Basket-ball. 



NcRMAN Johnson Atlanta. Ga. 

A.B.; Eu. 
Declaimer's Medal; Honor Roll; President Junior 
Class; Magazine Staff; Student Council; Treasurer Y. M. 
C. A.; Vice-President Eu. Society; Secretary Eu. Society; 
Track Team; Member Wearers of the "D"; Class Moni- 
tor; Soph. Banquet Soeaker; President Tennis Association; 
Captain Class Track Team. 




E. E. Jones Sumler, S. C. 

B.S. 



Lex W. Kluttz Chester, S. C. 

A. .B.; Eu.: Ki;; Gryphon 
Varsity Baseball two years; Class Football two years; 
President Fresh. Class; Fresh. Representative at Soph. 
Banquet; Track Team two years; Assistant Manager Foot- 
ball; Wearers of the "D" ; Vice-President Student Body; 
Manager Fresh. Basket-ball. 



Malcolm M. Knox Pine 

A.B. 



Harry L. McCaskill Bainbridge. Ga 

B.S. 




John C. McDonald Charloiie, N. C. 

B.S.; Ki: 
Class Basket-ball three years; Captain Soph. Basket- 
ball; Varsity Basket-ball; Class Baseball; Scrub Base- 
ball; Cla-s Football two years. 



W. A. McIlwain - .- Kochi, Japan 

A. B.; Eu. 
Honor Roll; Orchestra and Glee Club; Class Histor- 
ian; Secretary Damage Committee; Secretary Volunteer 
Band. 



J. 11. \V. McKay Charlotte. N. C. 

B.S.; KS ■ 



Harry W. Mai.loy. Jr Laurinburg, N. C. 

B.S.; :^ A K; Gryphon 
Assistant Manager Baseball. 




H. B. OVERCASH 

B.S. 



Honor Roll thn 



j. W. O'CONNELL - Charlotte, ]'.. C. 

B.S.; II Kl. 
Class Foolhall; Class Basket-ball; Scrub Football. 

B. R. ONeal : Greenville. S. C. 

B.S.: Ben 

Paul. D. Patrick Greenville, S. C, 

B. S.; Eu. 
Punctuality Roll; Class Football. 




Frank W. Price „ Nanking. China 

A. B.; Eu. 
Honor Roll; Student Council: Vice-President Class; 
Treasurer Y. M. C. A.; Secretary and Respondent So- 
ciety; Debating Council; Secretary-Treasurer Student 
Bodv; Magazine Claff; Qu:ps AND Cranks Staff; First 
Alternate Debating Team; Fresh. -Soph. Declaimer'i 
"Rep."; Fiction Medal. 



R. K. RoBENSON Charlotte. N. C. 

A. B.; niv* 

Class Football; Class Basket-ball; Cheer Leader. 



J. H. Rouse - Valdosia, Ga. 

B.S. 



Charles H. Rowan Cameron. N. C. 

A. B.; Phi. 
Punctuality Roll: Secretary. Second Critic, and Vice- 
President Phi. Society; Member of Debatine Council; 
Inter-Society Debater; Soph-Fresh Debaters' Medal. 




Earle Rowland Sumter. S. C. 

A. .B.; Eu.; K2; Gryphon 
Manager Class Track Team; Secretary Eu. Society; 
Student Council; President Junior Class; President Sumter 
Club. 



.Alfred Scarborough Sumter. S. C. 

A. B.; Eu.; Ben 
Student Council two years; Commencement Marshal; 
Varsity Track: Debating Council; Y. M. C. A. Cabmet; 
Masa:ine Staff. 



W. McLaurin Shaw Sumter. S. C. 

A. B.; Eu. 
Assistant Manager Baseball; Manager Junior Football 
Team; Secretary of Eu. Society; Class Football Team; 
Class Baseball; Class Track Team. 



M. J. Shirley Honea Path. S. C. 

B.S.; Eu. 
Vice-President Eu. Society; Class Baseball two years. 




Wmlum M. Winn _ Sumter. S C 

B.S. 

Class Baske.-ball ,wo years; Gym. Team two years 
Manager Gym. Team. 




D. Caldwell Young Davidson. N. C 

A.B. 






Jumor Class HisVorij 



o 



N 1 HE fifth day of the ninth month ol the year eleven, there was mourn'ng 

throughout the land, for the darhng sons of an hundred and eight households 

were departing on the pilgrimage in quest of wisdom. And their parents thereat 

did weep (as d d they themselves, shedding tears not a few) ; but even so they 

set out, clad in new and strange garments, and having like ones in their trunks. 

At the halls of Davidson did they meet on the morrow, to attend the older 
knights who before them had essayed the ardous journey — to some of whom remained 
but one year of trial. And here were the five score and eight Green Men, for so the 
youngest were called, divided among the companies to be menials, until they had acquired 
wsdom enough to be fools. Some were in the company called Watts, some in the 
Chambers, and others in Rumple and among the Georgians. 

So they set out on their first year's journey, and began the search for wisdom. 
Now as they went their way, it seemed that wisdom was strewn and buried in little stones 
along the way, and verily at times the digging therefor was arduous. And some fainted 
at the sight of the task, and refused to gather, and others delayed to rise with the day to 
cons'der their search. For this, some, when ten times they had lain idle in the morning, 
were sent weeping away until they should learn more diligence. 

Now as they went on, the vanity of the Green Men increased, and they did hire 
a maker of pictures to portray their hkeness as they stood in company assembled. But 
the thing was noised abroad, and the wise fools among their fellows, being filled with 
jealousy, came upon them when they were met together, and cast water on them, and there 
was great consternation. But when their clothes were dried, they betook them to the 
artist again, in secret, and he did shoot them. 

And it came to pass, when the required number of weeks were fulfilled, that the 
youths were required every one to show to those in command over them the number and 
manner of stones which they had gathered. And those among them who had not gathered 
were commanded not to return after the days of absence and rest which were granted. 
But seven there were, a goodly number, who were given honors as being the best searchers 
for wisdom. 

But not only in gathering wsdom were these Green Men concerned, but also in 
making to themselves names. Some acquired renown for prowess in sporing with a pig 
skin, and some with the ball and bases, and others among them by their manner of speak- 



^ ^5 



r^OUIPS ffljSCRANKS^ 



ing, and by sundry other means. And one there was to whom was given the name 
"Snipe," for he was a mighty hunter for this manner of fowl, for they all abounded along 
the first part of the journey. 

So journeying, the band of youths grew in their store of wisdom, but because of 
the sap in their heads these parts did swell. Therefore, when they had returned to renew 
their journey after the days of heat where wisdom could not be found, they were called 
the wise fools. And at this time some did join them who were green also, and with much 
labor did they obtain a welcome with them. 

Now as they went on in this their second year, it seemed good to them to appomt 
a night, and on it to have good cheer and fellowship together, and rest from the weariness 
of gathering learning. And then there was such a goodly time as is not often seen among 
men, for all were clothed in fair raiment, and some were appointed to rejoice the minds 
of their companions with seemly words, while food and drink did gladden their hearts. 
But on the following m.orning there was a refraining from rising, and a strange taste in 
the mouth of the youths. 

As this and other things did con-e to pass, it seemed that the swelling of heads 
was departing, and there was an increase in wisdom, so that the youths knew that they 
knew nothing. But some there were who found marvelous things ere this came to pass, 
for one did find an ancient animal such as hath not been seen by man, nay not by tjie 
ancients, even a trilobite, and great fame was his therefor. But some say that he saw a 
vision. 

Thus as they traveled, the second year, too, did pass, and again they rested from 
their quest. And in the tenth month they came again to take up their journey, and were 
now called The Younger Ones, for now they had been fully turned from their folly and 
did begin to grow. 

In this year did their wisdom increase, so that men marveled thereat, but they 
themselves did trenr.ble, because their wisdom was too great for certain of their com- 
panions, who had fallen away, to the half of their first number. Moreover, those who 
guided them, seeing their increase in knowledge, did decree that they everyone should 
speak unto the people in a clear voice, telling them of the wonders of wisdom. And thereat 
was great trerr.bling and smiting of knees, yea, the knees of the writer hereof do also 
tremble, and his hand, as w^th palsy. Therefore must his pen be stopped, and the history 
be kept in silence until this terrible thing be come to pass. 



^ ^^^^ 



OUIPS UlCRANKS 



Ife=^S^i=^=^^siJ^^^ 



As Heard One N'l^lit a\ Junior SjpeaUing 



c 



HE silver moon is a silver boat 
In a Sliver tinted sky ; 
And would that just we two might float, 
Together in that silver boat, 
And watch the clouds go by. 



And in that silver boat there'd be 

No one but you and I. 
There'd be no one around to see. 
And time would pass most pleasantly. 

And years would roll on by. 

And always we would happy be. 

As we sailed through the sky. 
Twould carry only you and me — 

No need for others would there be — 
And years might roll on by. 

It is a silver tinted dream. 

This moon and boat and sky. 
And yet how wonderful 'twould seem 
If we might sail that endless stream 
And let the years go by — - 
Together — you and I. 



^ ^5 



rv^OUIPS fflKCRANKS^ 

Sojpli Class Historij 

HNOTHER year has passed, with its snares and pitfalls, and again comes the 
task of the historian to record both the successes and failures of '16. Ever 
since our entrance, we have gone straight ahead to win distinction for our- 
selves, and honors for our Class — in the classroom, on the athletic field, and 
in every branch of college life. 

Although we are now m our second year, we can with little trouble remember 
our first visit to the Hill — how we were treated by the Sophs; remarkably well, consider- 
ing that we were only Fresh. The Sophs certainly upheld the high standard of our 
honor system, especially that article forbidding hazing; for, with the exception of a few 
harmless wettings, we were allowed to pass unmolested through our career as Freshmen. 
This good example was not in vain, for never have Freshmen been better treated than the 
members of the 1917 Class. The first week after their arrival, a few of them got a little 
damp, but since then they have been spending their first year among us in peace. Let us 
hope that hazing at Davidson will forever be a thing of the past, and that the honor 
system will always be honored and obeyed. 

When we gathered at Davidson this year as mighty Sophs, there were a number 
of old faces missng, but when we numbered the faithful, we found that there were still 
one hundred loyal supporters of 16. Soon after our arrival, we gathered and elected 
officers for the year. L. A. Mullen was elected President; J. P. Williams, Vice-Presi- 
dent; W. G. Morrifon, Secretary-Treasurer, and W. C. Copeland, Yell Leader. We 
also selected as our Class yell, one composed by Copeland. At a later meeting, we chose 
Mullen as Toastmaster of the Soph Banquet, and W. G. Morrison, Manager. Since 
the banquet has come off, we justly feel that it was indeed the "best ever held"; and 
every man there fell amply repaid for going. 

Imm.ediately after our arrival, in the Fall, we got down to the real work of 
"shooting" the professors, and we have had rather an up-hill contest, having had to fight 
against a Sophomore's inclination and nature, for everyone knows that they do not have 



(^ ^^ ^5 



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QUIPS 




CRANKS 



ka 



any loo much love for their studies. So far, we have been very successful, and although 
there was not a multitude who made the honor roll, most of us managed to squeeze through, 
at any rate. 

Our athletic stars have been far more numerous than our honor men. Even in 
our Fresh year, we had a number of men on the Varsity teams, and pushed the upper 
classes hard in the class athletic contests. This year, a greater number of men made the 
football team and won their D's than last year. We had a good class team, and although 
we did not win the championship, we put up a hard fight. We are confidently expecting 
to be well represented on the Varsity baseball and track teams this Spring. 

On the whole, we consider our Soph year a success, and feel certain that our 
endeavors have not been in vain. We have tried to be diligent and faithful in our studies, 
and we feel that it has been the brightest and most beneficial year that we have so far 
experienced. We only hope that we can fare as well in the future as we have while Sophs. 




^^-^^^ 



y=v rsio 



^ QUIPS JRCRANKS^ 



So}^\\ 



omore Ulass 



CI 



Adams. Minor Revere A.B Siaiesvillc, N. C. 

Arrowood, John Bartley A.B Hemp, N. C. 

Bain. Franklin Munns A.B Wade, N. C. 

Bain. Lattie Alfred A.B Wade. N. C. 

Baker. Archie Eve _ B.S Charleston. S. C. 

Bennett, Robert Hays B.S Trenton. Tenn. 

Bird. Eldred Holloway A.B Hazelhurst. Miss. 

Blake. William Kennedy, Jr A.B Greenwood. S. C. 

Brown. Benjamin McClure B.S _ Cornelius. N. C. 

Carson. James H B.S Charlotte, N. C. 

Carson. William Clifton B.S Atlanta. Ga. 

Cashion. Avery Ted B.S Davidson, N, C. 

Clary. Ernest Gilmer A.B China Grove, N. C. 

Cloud. Joel Mable B.S Hamlet, N. C. 

Coleman. William Osce B.S Chappells. S. C. 

Copeland. William C A.B Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Craig. Hugh Curnette A.B Matthews. N. C. 

Cranford. Spencer Rouse B.S ., Davidson. N. C. 

Crawford, Lawrence Aylette A.B Greensboro, N. C. 

CuRRiE, Ernest Mc Arthur A.B Fayetteville, N. C. 

Dumas. Walter Alexander B.S Atlanta. Ga. 

Edgerton. Lacy Graves B.S Goldsboro, N. C. 

Eikel. Leonard Hugh A.B Fort While, Fla. 

Fairley, Alexander McIver. Jr B.S Laurinburg, N. C. 

Farrior. Norman Player A.B Rose Hill, N. C. 

Finley, Richard Gwyn B.S North Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Foster, Gurdon Robert. B.S Davidson, N. C. 

GiBBS, Archie Baird A.B Davidson, N. C. 

Gillespie. James T B.S _ Florence, S. C. 

Gi.oer, Joseph Alexander B.S Bowman, Ga. 

Good, James Frederick B.S Greenville, S. C. 

Hay, Sam Burney A.B Cornelius, N. C. 

Hender.son, Arthur Irwin B.S Charlotte, N. C. 

Hender.son, Edward Palmer B.S Aiken, S. C. 

Hicks. Lewis Glasgow B.S Wilmington, N. C. 

Hill. Thomas Morley B.S Statesville. N. C. 

Hooper. Olin Stewart A.B Porterdale, Ga. 

Howard, John Witherspoon A.B Morganton, N. C. 

HoYT, George Brown A.B Atlanta, Ga. 

Hudson, George Alexander A.B Davidion, N. C. 



^^ ^^^^ 



a 



QUIPS 



/=\ rsiD 



5»l£MNKS« 



Hughes. Robert Dawson B.S Cedar Grove, N. C. 

Hughes, Robert Earl A.B Cedar Grove, N. C. 

Johnson, Walter Alexander _...A.B Mount Berry, Ga. 

Jones, Robert Hayne B.S Greenwood, S. C. 

Knox, Paul Hamilton B.S Pineville. N. C. 

Law, VUlliam Latta, Jr B.S Rock Hill, S. C. 

LovEN, Eugene B.S Cold Spring, N. C. 

McBrvde, John Malcolm A.B Red Springs, N. C. 

McCoRMiCK. Hugh _ A.B Manchester, N. C. 

McDonald. Kenneth Angus B.S Cotton. N. C. 

McIntire, Edwln James B.S Wilmington, N. C. 

McKeithen, Archie Murdock B.S Cameron, N. C. 

McKenzie, Will.am Cameron B.S Bannockburn, S. C. 

McKiNNON, William Boston 8.S _ Brunswick, Ga. 

McLean. .Archibald Douglas B.S Lumberton, N. C. 

McLeod, John Daniel A.B Carthage. N. C. 

McNeill. James Purdie, Jr A.B Florence. S. C. 

McNeill. Thomas Ruffin B.S Fayeiieville. N. C. 

Mack, Joseph Bingham B.S Decatur, Ga. 

Minter. Hugh Roderick B.S Davidson, N. C. 

Monroe. Doucald McDougald A.B Manchester, N. C. 

Morrison. Harlee A.B Loray. N. C. 

Morrison, Julian Knox B.S Stalesville, N. C. 

Morrison. William Gilbert A.B Okolona. Miss. 

Mullen. Leroy Arthur A.B Shawnee, Okla. 

Murray, Robert Lebby \.B _ Graham, N. C. 

Nuttall. Dan Morrison ___ A.B Rockingham, N. C. 

Crmand, Harry White B.S Bessemer City, N. C. 

Patton, James Godfrey, Jr B.S Decatur. Ga, 

Payne, John Lewis B.S Washington, N. C 

Perry, Roy^ BS Easley. S. C. 

Rourk, William Carleton ...B.S Washington. N. C. 

Scott, Henry Allan A.B Fort Smith. Ark, 

Shaw. Duncan A.B Fayeiteville. N. C 

Smith. Frank Hollingsworth .A.B. Easlev. S. C. 

SoMERViLLE. Walter Gray A B. _ Mitchells. Va. 

Sparrow. Thomas DeLamar A.B Washington. N. C. 

Stough. Frank Cornelius _ B.S Cornelius. N. C. 

Stouch. Michael Alfred _ B.S Cornelius. N. C. 

Thomson. Wardlaw Perrin B.S Rick Hill, S. C, 

Tompkins. Arthur Smyly, Jr B.S Edgefield. S. C. 

Wertz. John Chappelle Maxwell B.S Davidson, N. C. 

Williams. John Payne B.S Chattanooga. Tenn. 

Vii LIAMS9N. Orin Conway A.B Cha-lotte. N. C. 

Wilson. James Frank B.S Donolas. Ga. 

W'LSON. Thomas Ira A.B Mount Ulla. N. C 

Witt. William Tazewell A.B Mount Airy. N. C 



C^r 



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A:x IMO 



CRANKS 



ka 



Frcsli Class H'jstorij 



^■^1 EPTEMBER ihe fourth. 1913. will always be a memorable dale for the Class of 1917. for 
fc^H^ it was then that we gathered on the old "Hill." one hundred and twenly-lhree strong, and 
£ W began our career as a Class. As we look back now, from the viewpoint of a more extensive 

' experience, we can realize how we must have appeared — but then, we all have to be Fresh 

some time or other, and it is a matter of pride to us that we could have our Freshman days in an insti- 
tution where new men are not looked upon as being created solely for the pleasure and amusement of 
the upper classmen. 

Our first few days and weeks were but the repetition of those through which every Freshman Class 
has passed. We were frankly afraid— afraid of everything and everybody except the other Freshmen, 
and sometimes were even afraid of them. Not that the upper classmen did anything to make us afraid of 
them — on the contrary, they all did everything in their power to make things pleasant and aggreeable for 
us. The Sophs, as we expected, came around to visit us occasionally, but beyond a few wettings and 
"dumpings" we did not suffer even at their hands. Thanks be that we came to Davidson after hazing. 
as it was in the old days, had been abolished! 

Soon after our arrival, we elected officers for the year, and selected our class colors — which up 
to that lime had consisted of the one color, green. After we had organized thus far. it was considered 
necessary for us to have a picture, and we had a meeting for the purpose — but it rained, as it always 
does at Davidson when the Fresh get together. However, we finally succeeded in having one picture made. 

While it is still far too early to characterize our work for the year as a success or a failure, we 
feel that it has been more of the former than the latter. In athletics, we have been more successful than 
a Freshman Class has a right to expect, and hope to be able to keep up our record in the three years 
which lie ahead of us. The whole Class did not succeed in making the honor roll, but we were at least 
represented, and will no doubt do better in the future. 

On the whole, our year, if not a brilliant success, has at any rate been a very pleasant and profit- 
able one, and we can wish no better for the succeeding Freshman Classes than that they will be treated 
as well as we have been. 



^^^^ 



pp^ 



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CRANKS 



kO 



Fres\iman Class 



Ansley, Campbell Wallace Thomasville, Ga. 

Bain, John Martin Fayelleville. N. C. 

Bate. William Calhoun Bamsvillc. Ga 

Bond. David Barnett, Jr. Liihonia. Ga. 

BoNEY. Norwood Bruce Wallace. N. C. 

Brower, James Graham Sumter. S. C. 

Brown, Andrew Ripley. Miss. 

Browning, Paul Greenville. S. C. 

Bullock, Jack Bullock, N. C. 

BuRCiN, Lawrence L Horseshoe, N. C. 

Caldwell, John Grier Huntersville, N. C. 

Campbell, Herman Archibald ..Aberdeen, N. C. 

Carmichael, McKinnon Newbern, N. C. 

Carroll, Alexander Thomas Benneitsville. S. C 
Carroll, Duncan McColl Benneitsville. S. C. 

Chennault, Frank Leroy Anderson, S. C. 

Cooper, George Long Graham, N. C. 

Craig, Augustus Rochester .Pendleton, S. C. 

Craig, William Gilbert Blackwood, N. C. 

Crawford, Dav:d Craighead Rock Hill. S. C. 

Crayton, Joe Thompson Charloiie, N. C. 

Critz, Robert, Jr Winston-Salem, N. C. 

CuRRlE. .'\rchibald Murphv Fayetteville. N. C. 

Davis, James Donald Linden, N. C. 

Faison, John Butler Jersey City, N. J. 

FiNLEY. Thomas Augustus 

North Wilkesboro. N. C. 
Gary. George Robert Coleman Whitmire. S. C. 

Graham, Richard Malcolm Forest, Miss. 

Hacood. Ben Folcer. Easley, S. C. 

Hall. Vircinius Cormick Wilmington, N. C. 

Halliburton. Robert Alexander 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Hamilton, Evelyn Harrison Atlanta, Ga. 

Hampton, Edwin Goodloe ...Fordyce, Ark. 



Harding. Robert Henry Davidson, N. C. 

Harris. Samuel Caldwell Albermarle, N. C. 

Hassell. William Taylor Fredericksburg, Va. 
Haynesworth, Hugh Clarence Sumter. S, C. 
Henderson. Steven Thomas Charlotte, N. C. 

HoBSON, John Kemp Buchanan, Va. 

House, Robert Wood Nashville, Tenn. 

Howard, Rawls Tarboro, N. C. 

Hudson, Dav d Venable David:on, N. C. 

Hughes. John Henry Cedar Grove. N. C. 

Hughes. Sam Watkins Cedar Grove. N. C. 

Hunter, Parks Caldwell Matthews, N. C. 

Jones, John Roderick Sanford, N. C. 

Julian. William Alexandria... .Thomasville, N. C. 

Keesler. Samuel Reeves. Jr Greenwood. Miss. 

Keesler. William Parish Greenwood, Miss. 

Laird, John Parry, Jr Decatur, Ga. 

Lane. Davis Woodson Palalka, Fla. 

McBrayer, D. p., Jr Anderson, S. C. 

McCaskill. John Calvin, Jr Bainbridge, Ga. 

McCoLL, Zeb Archibald EIrod, N. C. 

McCoRMicK. John Duncan Parkton. N. C. 

McDonald, Graham Cotton, N. C. 

Macintosh, William Ocala, Fla. 

McIvER, Benjamin Jay Carthage, N. C. 

McKay, Robert Witherspoon Sumter, S. C. 

McKeithen. Dan Ingram .'Xberdeet.. V.. C. 

McKinnon. Lanch Dixon Laurinburg. N. C. 

McKinnon. Murdock Laurinburg. N. C. 

McLean, Archie Franklin Rowland, N. C. 

McLeod. Daniel CALH0UN....Red Springs. N. C. 

McLeod, James Carlisle Florence, S. C 

McMillan, Zeb Vance Red Springs, N. C. 

McNair. Alexander Mortimer. Jr. 

Hartsville, Z. C. 



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QUIPS 




CRANKS^ 



McGlLL. BOVD Kershaw. S. C. 

Mann, John Walter _ Mebane, N. C. 

Mattison. Wilbur Erskine Anderson. S. C. 

Mayfield. Harry F Anderson, S. C, 

Miller, James William Sherrill's Ford. N. C. 

Mitchell. Francis Marion ...Edisto Island. S. C. 

Mitchell. Thomas J Thomasville. Ga. 

Morgan. Herbert Seth Atlanta. Ga. 

Mullen. Thomas Lee Hunlersville. N. C. 

Neal. William Henry Charlotte. N. C. 

Nisbet. Everett Phifer Charlotte. N. C. 

Paisley. John C Gibsonville. N. C. 

PoE. Thomas McConneli Greenville. S. C. 

Porter. Reuben Walker Jonesville. S. C 

Price. Philip Barbour Nanking. China 

Rankin, Carl Emmett ...GibsonviUe, N. C. 

Ratchford. Raymond H Gastonia. N. C. 

Reese. Algernon Beverly Charlotte. N. C. 

Robertson. Maynard E Charleston. S. C. 

Roddey. Benjamin Dunlap Rock Hill. S. C 

Sayad. William ^'ohanna,,.- Urumia. Persia 

Shane. Robert Wicks Columbia, S. C. 



Shaw. Harry Faison Wilmington. N. C. 

Simpson, Robert Lee Spencer. N. C. 

Smith. Jeffry Dee - Mount Airy. N. C, 

Smith, John Duncan Red Springs, N, C. 

Smith. William Joel Abbeville. S. C. 

SoMERViLLE, Thomas Hugh Rapidan, Va. 

Thames, P. B., Jr Manning. S, C. 

Thomason, Eugene Healan Charlotte. N. C, 

Walker, Cosmo Lowry Columbia, S. C. 

Walker. Guy Andrews. N, C, 

WatKINS, John C Anderson. S. C. 

Weedon, Fanning - Spartanburg. S, C. 

Wharton, William Lacy Smithfield. N. C. 

White, Benajah N.. Jr Danielsville. Ga, 

White. Theron Long Danielsville. Ga. 

Williams. Chas. Barkley Buena Vista, Miss. 

Williams. Joe Thomas Stuart, Va. 

Willis. James Ellington Bainbridge, Ga. 

Winecoff. Eugene Monroe 

Kenansville. N. C. 
Yandell. Benjamin Franklin ...Charlotte. N. C. 
Young. Archibald Lafayette Davidson. N. C. 




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QUIPS 




CRANKS 



^n 



Eclectics 



Alford, Ernest Leslie Chipiey. Fla. 

Baker. Francis Hayne Savannah, Ga 

Bernhardt. George Harper Lenoir. N. C. 

Bradfield. Lloyd La Grange, Ga. 

Brady, F?,ank _ Siatesville, N. C. 

Brown, Rowland Angus Red Springs, N. C. 

Choate. James Leighton, Jr. Huntersville, N. C. 

Christenbury, Lloyd Davidson, N. C. 

Cranford. Spencer Rouse Davidson. N. C 

Cranford. Wilson Hersburc Davidson. N. C. 

Crayton. Louis Broyles Charlotte. N. C. 

Crisp. Mark Sellers. Jr. Falkland. N. C 

Dick. Gaither Pierson .Sumter, S. C. 

Golden. Curry Franklin Talladega, Ala. 

Hall. James McKeithen Red Springs. N. C. 

Hood. James Corbett Sumter. S. C. 

Howell. Charles Sebert Rockingham. N. C 
Howell. James Ernest Rockingham, N. C. 

Jones. Edward Eugene Sumler. S. C. 

Jones. Ralph 5 Greenwood, S. C. 

King. Robert Vaughn Okolona, Miss. 

Kluttz, Lex William Chester. S. C. 



Knox. Adrian Carson Huntersville. N. C. 

McCowAN. James Leon Florence. S. C. 

McEachern. Neill Alexander St. Pauls, N. C. 

McGeachy. David McLean St. Pauls. N. C. 

McKay. James Hamilton Woodrow 

Columbia. S. C. 

McKay. John Leach Wagram. N. C. 

McRae. Rae Alexander Mount Gilead, N. C. 

Mackey. Arthur Holmes Greenville. S. C. 

Menzies, William Lamar Hickory. N. C. 

Moore. Robert Hanna Yorkville. S. C. 

Nash. Frank Lewis Lumberton. N. C. 

Neisler. Charles Eugene ...Kings Mountain. N. C. 
O'CoNNELL. Jasper Walker Charlotte. N. C, 

OsTEEN. William Thacker Greenville. S. C. 

Panella. Joseph Anthony Charlotte. N. C. 

Peters. Robert Lynn Knoxville. Tenn. 

Powell, Benjamin Charlotte, N. C. 

Spencer, Clarendon Rivers Whiteville, N. C. 

Steyerman. Laurence Betram Thomasville. Ga. 

Thompson, Edwin Beveridge Smithville, Ga. 

Thompson, John Elliott Whiteville, N. C. 





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D^=^^-^-— <k !f^^<d}^ ^ ^ ^ : — ^43 



15 



Tlic College Girl 

HE rose leaf flushes in her cheeks; 

The sunshine glitters in her hair; 

Her hps a challenge, when she speaks 
And shows the pearls embedded there. 
Upon the campus, down the streets. 
She sets our raptured brains awhirl ; 
We follow in her train, discreet. 
She rules us all — the College girl. 

What matter if the lights seem dark. 
And studies throw us in a daze? 
She has the power to drop a spark 
That lights our minds with sudden blaze. 
A thousand other girls may strive 
The D. C. banner to unfurl; 
There's only one sweet maid alive — 
We love her, all — the College girl. 

Let other students boast the grace 
Of girls for whom they claim the prize; 
We love one perfect form and face. 
With features rare, and starry eyes. 
This lass of whom I sing today. 
Of glowing cheeks and hair a-curl, 
When leaving D. C. fades away 
And dies in dreams — the College girl. 



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QUIPS ^fllRCRANKS 



r^dD 




/%lUi^ 



-nustr- 



^^^^ 




Dr. Howard B. Arbuckle 
chemistry 
It is with a feeling of peculiar pride that we claim Dr. 
Arbuckle as a member of our Faculty. He has been with us 
only one year, yel in that year he has won for himself a last- 
ing place m the hearts of all Davidson men, by the beauty of 
his character and the earnestness of his nature. A man who 
shows unassumed. simple friendliness to all. who always has a 
word or smile of encouragement, and a man of lofty Christian 
principles, we are proud to call him a Davidson man. 



Dr. Charles N. Wunder 
astronomy 

Dr. Wunder came to us unheralded from that State which 
has produced so many "wonders"— Virginia, and we hope that 
It will be many a year before he sees fit to leave his duties at 
Davidson to return to that State. Dr. Wunder is strongly 
mterested in all forms of athletics, and lost no time in showing 
his interest. He has won to him all those who have been so 
fortunate as to know him, and it is our hope that his presence 
may lend encouragement for years to come. 



ckson has been with us for only four 
, who handles the money," he has beco 
He had been with us for only a f 



months, but as 

me very quickly 

days befc 



Mr. F. L. Jackson 

BURSAR 

Mr. Ja 
the "man 

known. ne iiau uccii v>nii uo .«. .^...j - --j- 

we felt that he was one of us. and that feeling grows stronger 
as time passes. An old Davidson graduate, he is familiar with 
all that pertains to the student life and welfare here, and has 
done much since he came to make things easier for the students 
A gentleman of remarkable business ability, sunny and attrac- 
tive disposition, and strong Christian character. 



Ill afjpreciahon of Hieir mVercst m Hie attileVic 

life o{ \\\c College 

\r\e edit'ors l^ake jpleasure in dedicaVrnd 

this porhon of Hie Annual 

\o Hie men 

wlio have jusV become a |part of \\^e Faculti) 



/=\ INIO 



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OUIPS ^^eCRANKS 



^a 




KFRR^ r.vMf 



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f^ IMD 



^ QUIPS IM.CRANKS^ 



Executive CommtHee Aililet'ic Association 

Dr. J. W. MacConneli Chairman 

W. H. Sprunt . President 

J. E. Howell Vice-President 

C. B. Bailey Secretary and Treasurer 

Z. V. RoBERSON . Manager Baseball 

L. B. Cravton Captain Baseball 

L. W. Kluttz Manager Football 

J. E. HowELl Captain Football 

Z. V. RoBERSON Student Body Representative 

C. B. Bailey Student Body Representative 

Dr. J. M. McConnell Faculty Advisor 

Prof. A. Currie Faculty Advisor 



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'^-V(?vLMuLJa. YYUOX^ I /-=^^^^^^^g^^^=^^£^= 




Howell (Captain) Tackle 

Weight, 160; height, 5 feel II inches 

Captain Howell is one of the best hnemen that Davidson ever had. Not- 
withstanding his handicap of weight — and he is one of the hghtcsl tackles thai 
ever wore a X'arsity sweater at Davidson — he has all that go to make up a player 
that counts — perseverance, tenacity, 
was not just a captain in name, but 



nd he 

—he has all that go to make 
-and his middle name is fight, 
always on the job as an examp 



,-\nd he 
- and an 
inspiration to his team-mates. He was again chosen to lead the team for next 
season, and we all know ihat he will (ill the place with credit to himself and to 
the glory of the Red and Black. Our best wishes to you. Captain Howell. 



Weight. 160; height. 5 feet 10 inches 

Cosby was equally good on offense and defense, and always played brilliantly 
He was absolutely sure on a tackle, and seldom failed to gain his distance when 
carrying the ball. "Pud" was one of the mainstays of the team, and a man that 
will live in Davidson athletic history as a star end. That touchdown against 
Wake Forest last Fall, and his playing against A. & M. the year before — to say 
nothing of all the other limes — would entitle him to Davidson's athletic Hall of 
Fame. 




ROBERSO.N 



Weight. 138; height. 5 feet 8 inches 

This was Zee's first year as a regular, but he played 1 
IS one of those who fights all the time, not knowing what it 
clean, steady player, he plays the kind of game that the sp 
Many players, too. have been inspired to go at it again by he 



Cuaril 



"V, 



Zeb 

is to give up. A 
clators like to see. 
ring Zeb's "Never 



iind that." Davidson loses in him 
place that will be hard to fill next year 



od football player, and he leaves 




Qtiarlerhacli: 



Weight. 138; height, 5 feet 8 Inches 



Davids^ 



kno 



use of It in football after hn 
put his thoughts into execution and fo 
weakness of the opposing side, and thai 
steady, calm, and dependable, and he i 
last whistle. 



Bo's" long suit is using his head. And he 



He not only thought hard, but he 
ht hard. He could easily size up the 
nake capital use of it. He was always 
rer believed the game was lost until the 



Brady 



This Freshman 
a good while. H( 
the opposing line, 
add ?ome worthy 



- CuarJ 

Weight, 176; height, 6 feel 

proved himself to be one of the best linemen at Davidson for 

was fast and aggressive, and many times would break through 

and throw the runner for a loss. BraDV ought to be able to 
tars on to that D. 




Peters Center 

Weight. 175; height, 6 feet 1 inch 

"Pete" could be counted on to be in everything. It was no easy job lo pass 
the ball, and then gel out of the line and gel in ihe interference around end, but 
Peters was always there. He was a sure tackle, and whether it was straight 
through, off lackle. or a wide end run, he was in the play. And he always had 
the "Pep." 



End 



Weight, 172: height. 6 feet 



" The feature of the game was the playing of Crayton at end," etc. That 
was the usual write-up. And Pete did play a smashing end, from start to finish. 
.Although his first try-out for Varsity, he made a place m the first game, and 
held it with credit throughout the season. 



Anderson 



Tacl{lc 



Weight. 170; height. 6 feel 2 inches 

"Andy" added materially to the strength of the line. He could always be 
counted on to do his share, whether it was opening up holes, or plugging them up 
The breaking of his ankle in mid-season created a vacancy hard to (ill. He 
ought to come back strong next season. 





Gloer CuarJ 

Weight. 235; height. 6 feet 2 inches 

"Sum." our lilliputian elephant, is the man who brought the average of the 
team up about eight pounds. It is needless to say that the opposing team couldn't 
run anything over him. This was his first year in football, and he played a 
remarkably good game for a new man. 



Walker 



NXlTHERINGTON ..- Fultbacli 

Weight, 155; height, 5 feet 7 inches 

An operation during the Summer kept "Dutch" out of the game until the 
Thanksgiving mix-up. But he came back with a vengeance then, much to Wake 
Forest's discomfiture. And time after time he made brilliant runs around end, 
and wiggled through holes when there seemed to be no hole. He also very 
effectively look McKinnon's place as punier for the team, and really made his 
letter in that game. 



Halfhack 



Weight, 168; height, 5 feet 10 inches 

When "Steve" tackled a runner, he knew thai a man had hit him, and that 
runner Hkewise fell the contact with Mother Earth. He had a special adaptability 
for handling forward passes — for both sides — usually managing to get those that 
belonged to him, and the other fellows, too. He never loafed in practice, and 
his work in the games bore witness to the fact. 



McKlNNON t Fullback 

Weight. 185; height, 5 feet II inches 

Ju«l when he was finding his stride, "Mac" got his collarbone broken, and 
was laid up the last of the season. He had a "boot" on him that measured up 
to any team we met. and thereby rescued us from many a close place. His line 
plunging likewise gained many a yard for the Red and Black machine. He 
tackled fiercely, and held on tenaciously. We are counting on him for next year. 



Weight. 138; height. 5 feet 8 inches 

Rkd. although very light, and a new man. plaved so W( 
u as one of the men chosen for the big Thanks<:iving game, 
are synonyms. No man is big enough to run over him. 
enough to throw him for a loss. D. C. is lucky that she w 
on for three more years. 



Halfhack 



11 all season that he 

•Rkd" and 'Gnt" 

and no line strong 

II have him to count 



T. H. SOMMERVILLE -- Halfhacif 

Weight, 145; height, 5 feet 11 inches 

"Summertiml" upset the dope, for instead of the mildness which his name 
would imply he is a veritable whirlwind. He was counted on by Coach to make 
a large part of the end runs, and he showed ihal the right man had been picked. 
This was his first vear in football, and with a year's experience he should be one 
of D. C.'s best. 





Keesler FuUbacI; 

Weight, 128; height. 5 feet 5 inches 

"Just watch little Keesler run, " is what the fellows said when practice began 
last Fall. "How little Keesler did run," is what they said about him at A. & 
M.. after the game; but you had belter not ask an A. & M. man about it. 
Keesler is a natural football player, very fast, a good side-stepper, and a sure 
tackle. If he shows the ability next year that he did this, and with his added 
experience, he should make a second Tiny Graham. 




Coach Cook 



busln( 



vho 



ecialisl. and like 
true in athletics. Such a m; 
Carolinas and Virginia as a 
i man who exemplifies the rea 



Yise an all-round man. is a 
1 is Coach Cook. He is 
rue sportsman. At David- 
Davidson spirit. Since he 



The man ir 
rarity. The 
known througl 
son, he is kno 

has been here, he has had the task of making almost new teams in every branch 
of sport, and anyone acquainted with sports knows that's no child's play — it's a 
man's job; and CoACH CoOK has filled the bill admirably. He's a friend of 
every man on the campus; and every man on the campus is his friend. 



L. W. Kluttz. Jr. 



Man 



You know the manager is the man who rides around over the country with the 
team, and looks prosperous. Of course he has no place on the team — all he has 
to do is buy the tickets, count the men to see that all are there, show 'em to the 
ticket collector, order the eggs and toast, buv the chewing gum, see that there's 
a sponge and some muddy H-0 on the field. Of course, he has a few little 
things like advertising, selling the tickets, seeing that the officials get theirs, and 
making the game pay. Then he's the man who lends all the fellows on the team 
money ; gets cussed out for his inconsideration if we lose, and a few other little 
things like arranging a schedule that suits every member of the student body — 
that's Lex. 

And wherc's the man who ever saw Lex ruffled or cussing his luck? That's 



not his way. That 
man that's all right i 



will (il 
around, 



the place i 
and an cxc 



1 better need not 
nt manager 



lid. I le 



^ QUIPS ii^CRANKS^ 



Scrub FooVball Team 



White _ Center 

McKay Righl Guard 

Miller Lefl CaarJ 

Hughes Right Tackle 

COUSAR , Lefl Tackle 

O'CONNELL Right End 

Brownlee Lefl End 

Williams Quarterbacli 

Ratchford _ Right Halfback 

Wilson Left Halfback 

Julian Fullback 

SUBS 
McNeil Craig Crayton Watkins 

Scrubs 

^^^^ HE strength of a pyramid depends largely upon its base or foundation, and so it is that the 

M '^k qualities of the Varsity which insure its lasting fame, upon investigation could often be traced 

^L^^ directly to the Scrubs. These are the men who bear the brunt of the grueling scrimmage 

day after day. sacrificing iheir own interests to the advancement of the first team. These arc 

the downtrodden, long-suffering, ever-enduring martyrs to the glorious cause of a Davidson football team. 

But do not think for a moment that they are not a healthy handful for the Varsity to manage sometimes. 

So let us remember the Scrubs when we recount the glowing achievements of the Varsity men. 

And lei us remember also that many of our foremost heroes "rise from the ranks." So this band of 

uncouth worthies, "unknown, unhonored. and unsung," is not at all without prospects. The man who gels 

a D. C. one year, and returns the followmg year to win renown on the first team, is just the kind of 

man that we need. And there have been many of this class here in the past. 

Then here's to you. Scrubs, you little bow-legged, rough-necked veterans. We'll nol forget you, 
knights of the tattered jersey, for we have seen in you all the nerve and grit, endurance and fightmg mad- 
ness that go to make up that well-known, universally honored, glorious thing called Davidson spirit. 

So here's a health to you, members of the second team. You may be Scrubs; but you're good 
ones, and we are justly proud of you. 



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QUIPS 



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CRANKS 



^a 



leason 



W 



HEN the season of 1912 ended, il looked as if Coach Cook would have almost enough 
Varsity men back with which to start a team for 1913. But alas, those who had 
adorned their sweaters with those much envied "D's" began to fall by the wayside. So 
that when College opened in September, only three of the warriors — Howell, Cosby, 
and Peters — could be found. About these, the coach and captain must build a learn. 



HOT! Well, if you have never spent an hour or so on the red surface of Sprunt Athletic Field, 
you can't appreciate that little monosyllable. The tall wiregrass seemed lo be a perfect tropical jungle, 
for "monkeys" were grmnmg from every blade. And then, out there where the grass doesn't grow, it's 
an embryonic Sahara, with red dust in the place of glistenmg sand. Perspiration? No. just plain old- 
fashioned sweat. And so the prelimmanes moved along, while everybody on the squad thought longingly 
of those eight places to be filled, and dreamed likewise of the dopes and peanuts at Skils. or that pastime 
made famous by Sir Walter Raleigh. 

Manager Kiuttz imported the Piedmont Institute team for the first conflict. They looked pretty 
well, and all was wonderment as to what the outcome would be; and the Coach made it plain lo the 
squad that the men who started that game were not necessarily the best men there — in fact, there were 
plenty others there just as good, and better. But when everybody in that lot except the center and 
guards made a touchdown, they were sent in for a bath. And that night it was still in doubt who would 
go lo Clemson for the first real affair. 

Clemson was paying 
for amusement. As for the 
that's all they did. McKinr 



lenses, so the trip was made in a chair car. Brady and "Slimuel" served 
me. the Techs on a fluke made a touchdown at the very be^nning — and 
kicked a placement, and the game ended 6-3. 

And now all was centered in the game with the University of North Carolina, in Greensboro. 
All the students that could raise five dollars went down to lend their moral — and immoral — support. 
Carolina came up with the whole squad. It was still hot! The little red machine was not badly fright- 
ened by the Carolina brawn. The game was anybody's until, worn out by sheer force of the numbers of 
fresh men, the fates gave one touchdown to the White and Blue. Both teams left disappointed. We 
hoped to win; they expected a few more touchdowns. 

Come to think about it, the less said about the A. & M. game the better. But then they were 
South Atlantic Champions — and we will just remind you here that Keesler made a fifty-yard run for a 
touchdown. That boy "shore" did run. 



Then came that Ir 
they missed it but little ii 
canoeing. And. sad to si 



to Knoxville. The Te 
weight. The game was played on 
. we lost again — 9-0. But there we 



re reputed to have a team of giants, and 
field that would have served belter for 
■ other things to that trip. Think of the 



^^^^ 



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QUIPS 




CRANKS 



=^Q 



team having to be away from the hill for five whole days! Bui ask the team! The mountain scenery on 
the way, two box parlies at Slaub's Theater, a sorority reception, were some of the side issues. And 
last, but in no wise least, a certain Miss Jones. She very kindly served as headquarters for the team; 
but for particulars ask Bo Elliott or McKinnon. 

Newberry next came to see us. They were elated over a recent victory, and claimed to expect 
our scalp. Our team, a bit too confident, put up a poor exhibition, but got away with a score of 32 to 0. 
This game cost McKlinnon a broken collarbone; and our punter was gone, while South Carolina loomed 
up on the horizon. 

This Palmetto team of Red Edgerlon's was stronger than usual, but we kept up hope, and pointed 
to the fact that they had never beaten us at home, and seldom away from home. However, they played 
better than ever, broke our precedent, and shrouded the campus in gloom. 



Of the Thanksgiving ga 



ill find 



another place 



How much of a success this season was, we leave to you. We have had better seasons — likewise 
worse. But it must be remembered that Coach Cook had to make a new team. Also, let it be borne in 
mind that we stand between the upper and nether stones. The big teams 
in every way; as for the smaller ones, the scores speak for themselves. 
every man on the team felt that "Cod Almighty hates a quitter" — there 
we leave in the able hands of Coach Cook and Captain Howell. Her< 
the glory of Davidson! 



ire certainly out of our class. 
From the Coach to the subs, 
ere no loafers. Next season 
a toast to your success, and 




^^^^ 



'CiCAiVlS 




SENIOR FOOTBALI TEAM 



seniors 



Bailey Manager 

Pharr Captain 

Elliott, Brownlee, Cousar Coacha 

Bailey Center 

Johnston, T. P., Johnson, J. E. CuarJs 



Elliot. A. H., Mattison Tacl(les 

Thacker, McGregor Ends 

Woods Quarlerhacl; 

Pharr Fullback 

James, Haltiwancer Halfhaclfi 



Dulin. Strait, DuBose. Archer Subs 



*i^|— ^^OU liave to hand il to 'em — they died hard! The athletic cup was almost m sight "(or 

H W keeps": but the onslaught of the Fresh was just a little too much for them, and one lone 

W^T touchdown did the work. It's a rather hard job anyway to build up a team after the Var- 

^C^" «l sily and scrubs have been claiming men for four years, and Captain Bum Pharr and 

Coach Elliott deserve much praise for the showing made. It v>-as a clean, hard-working, 

long-scrapping bunch, that Senior team. 




JUNIOR FOOTBALL TEAM 



Juniors 



Shaw Manager 

Carter Captain 

Anderson. O'Connell Coaches 

Jones Center 

Patrick, Carriker Guards 

Boccs, Rowland 



Shaw. Stewart Tackles 

Carter, O'Neal Ends 

Price Qaarlcrbaclg 

Harper. Gilchrist Halfbacl(s 

Knox Fullback 

Subs 



15 



I IF. Juniors were struggling againsi overwhelming odds in allempting lo produce a team this 
year, and as a result their team look no part in the glorious scrimmages familiarly known as 
Class Football games. They deserve credit for the spirit which they manifested even to the 
last minute, and it is their proud boast thai "no team has yet crossed their goal-line." 




^-iua. 


iq^^HJ 


icm^^aoB^^i^QLflt^c 


3Ci 


^^^*^ 


^^^ 


I 


f ~~— " — 


■ --.-^ *:; •'^:*^^;*.. -^><*«.- 


"i 







SOPHOMORE FOOTBALL TEAM 



So|p^ 



omorcs 



"NX'lLSON - „ - Manaoer 

HiCKS _ Captain 

WiTHERlNCTON, GlOER. WiLSON Coaches 

Edgerto.n _ _ Center 

Craig. Morrison. \%'. G .Guards 



Mlllen. McKenzie Tackles 

McNeil. Cranford Ends 

Hicks _ _... Quarterback 

Choate Fullback 

.Adams. Hill ...Halfbacks 



Subs 



Thompson, Bird. McKetthe.v. Payne. Moore. 
Scott. Law. Morrison. R. \^'. 



^^^^ HEISE gridironiles played with the usual sophistic characteristics, but neither fortune nor the 
M /^^ fates were kind, and so they are yet in the class with Robert E. Lee and the Seniors. Slim 
^ W Gloer planted, and Outch watered, but the lowly Fresh had a wee bit too much for 'em. 
^^^ They were defeated, but are not yet whipped, and may still be a factor in the struggles 

that break the monotony of Januaries. 




FRE5HMAV FOOTBALL TEAM 



Frcsli 



men 



Laird Manager 

Williams _ Captain 

Howell, Walker, Brady Coaches 

Miller Center 

Paisley. Sayad Guards 



Hughes, Shaw Tacl(les 

Ansley, Watkins Ends 

Williams Quarlerhacif 

Cravton. Ratchford Halfbacks 

Critz FuHbach 



Keesler. Robertson, Carmickle. Crawford, 
Rankin 

^^^^^^ HE Fresh — ihe Fresh! Where is ihat old lime Hoodoo thai used to play such havoc with 

M /^^ the hopes of this lot of verdancy? It ain'l no more. All that's history. Just something 

^^ W lor the whitllers to tell to iheir listeners. Without doubt, '17 had the best team on the field. 

^^"^^ and they won. They have three years yet, and we are hopmg that some of the men who 

upheld so well the class colors wjll ere long grace a Varsity sweater, and aid in winning laurels for the 

Red and Black machine. 



All-Cl 



ass I earn 



MiLLF.R Center 

Johnston Right Guard 

McKenzie Left Guard 

Mattison Right Tackle 

Hughes Left Tackle 

McNeil Right End 

Watkins '. Left End 

Hicks \- Quarterback 

RatchfoRD , Left Halfback 

CrITZ '. - Right Halfback 

Pharr Fullback 




o^ 



OUIPS 







VarsUij Baseball Team o{ 1913 



W. T. Cook 




Coach 


L. H. Wilkinson 




Manaser 


E. H. Graham 




Captain 


Crayton 




First Base 


Graham 




Second Base 


Brown 




. Shortstop 


WiTHERINGTON 






Kluttz 




Leftfield 


W'hitener 






Howell 




RightfieU 


OSTEEN . 




Pitcher 


Morrow 




Pitcher 


Bell .._. 




Pitcher 


Wolfe . . 




Pitcher 


Alford 






Elliott ... 








SUBSTITUTES 





Cosby 



Hughes 




^^^^ 




n 



/^ MD 



„. QUIPS IM.CRANKS^ 

Baseball Sclieaule for 191H 



Mai 

M 

M 

M 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apr 

Apri 



h 23 — Calawba College al Davidson 

h 27 — Oak Ridge Institute at Davidson 

h 30 — Buffalo Leaguers at Davidson 

h 31 — Trinity College at Gastonia 

1— Guilford College at Davidson 

3 — Trinity College at Davidson 

8 — Trinity College at Durham 

9— Wake Forest College at Wake Forest 

10— A. & M. College at Raleigh 

13 — Winston-Salem Leaguers at Winston-Salem 

1 5 — University of South Carolina at Columbia 

16 — University of South Carolina al Columbia 

17 — Presbyterian College of South Carolina al Clinton 

18 — Presbyterian College of South Carolina at Chester 

2 1 — University of North Carolina at Charlotte 

24 — Wake Forest College at Davidson 

25 — ■^^'ake Forest College at Charlotte 

28 — Lenoir College at Davidson 

30 — North Carolina Deaf and Dumb Institute at Davidson 



May 7 — University of South Carolina at Davidsi 



Tlic 19m Prospcc»u8 



IT'S a known fact that one can never tell — one may only conjecture. So what can be said about 
our baseball lean\ for the coming season? For. as a matter of fact, when this "dope" appears 
you will know more about the team than we are even able to conjecture now. Nevertheless, the 
outlook for a wlnnmg team this Spring is pretty good right now. The weather man so far ha? 
not been very considerate this Sprmg, but every time old Sol has been good enough to lend a 
few rays there has been all kinds of limbering up gomg on. and all are eagerly waiting for the big show 
to start. 

Five of last year's regulars — Captain Crayton. Kluttz, Witherington, Brown, and Osteen — are in 
school again this Sprmg. and ought to serve as an inspiring nucleus about which to build a team. But 
there are a number of new men here who look as if they have the idea of making somebody hustle 
for the places. Among the new men who look good are Walker. Sommerville. Currie, Panella. Stough, 
Chnstenbury. Coach Cook is not making any predictions at this juncture; but we all seem to have a 
hunch, and expect big things. 



^^ ^ 




^;;;^;^j^;Omi.c^^^ 



Cfe 



QUIPS 




CRANKS 



^D 



Track Team 



Gilchrist 
Anderson 



Kluttz 



Morrison, W. G. 

CURRIE 



Prrrv 
Gignilliat 



DUBOSE 




/=^ rsiD 



^ QUIPS .lif^.CRANKS^ 




--^^-= 




IN ACTION 




TVPICAl. St INKS 



^A r>jo 



^^^ 



0UIP5 «i®CRANKS 



ka 







Varsity) Basket-Bail 



SpRUNT (Captain) Guard Reese 

Gibbon (Manager) Forward JaMES 

SoMMERViLLE Forward Laird 

McDonald Forward 



Guard 
Center 
Guard 



^^^^ 




VARSITY BASKET-BALL TEAM 




iLMUR BA^KLl-BALl, 1 LAM 




JUNIOR BASKET-BALL TtAM 




SOPHOMORE BASkET-BALL TEAM 




fRLSHMAN BASKtT-BALL TtAM 



„ QUIPS fJM.CRANKS^ 



Class BaskcV-Ball Teams 



Brownlee Manager Gibbon, James Fonvards 

Gibbon Caplatn Haltiwanger Center 

Woods, Murray . Guards 



Juntors 

Carter Manager Robinzon Captain 

Alexander, McDonald, Young Forwards 

Robinson Center Winn, O'Connell Guards 



SopWs 

Mack Manager Carson, Mack, Hoyt Forwards 

Carson Captain Currie . Center 

Perry, Edgerton, Bird Guards 



FrcsVi 

NiSBET . Manager YoUNG, NiSBET, Critz Forwards 

Reese . Captain Sommerville Center 

Reese, Laird, Ansley Guards 



o^ 



0UIP5 



rk f^JO 



LsriMINiiVS 



^^ 




GiGNILLIAT 
MiTCHF.LL 

Price 
NoRRrs 



Boxers' Club 




C. L. King 


Hercules Hill 


McIlwaine 


Faison 


Bond 


Spencer 


Gloer 


OVERCASH 



^^^^ 



D^ 



QUIPS 



f^ IMD 



ay^CRANKS 



ka 





C^^^^B 



Tennis 



^ ^ " HE usual free-for-all lournamenl was held early m October last Fall, and there were a greater 
M /^^ number of evenly-matched teams than usual. The entire tournament was highly inlerestmg 
ft ■ from start to finish, and the first tournament resulted m the wreath of victory being placed on 

^^^^^ the brow of that lengthy team composed of Pim and Johnson. 

The singles tournament, however, was a complete surprise, in at least one particular. 
It was usually conceded that Crawford would walk away with the first place, but it was also considered 
a settled fact that either Pim or Johnson would easily secure second berth. .As a matter of fact, however. 
Crawford won first, and Cranford second. This enabled them to challenge Pim and Johnson for the title 
in doubles, which they did. The result was a victory for Crawford and Cranford, and consequently 
they composed the Intercollegiate team for the year. 

A trip to Trinity College resulted disastrously for Davidson, as we lost in both singles and doubles 
But this defeat was largely offset by a signal victory over Guilford, in both singles and doubles, here 
"on the Hill." Some Spring games are contemplated, and we hope for a series of victories unmarred by 
defeat. 



^^^^ 



"^ 



Q--^ 



QUIPS 



/=\rsiC3 



CRANKS 



=^a 











TcMMIS Club 






Ratchford 




Price 




BOGGS 


PlM 




Marvin 




Ansley 


Crawford 


McEwEN 


DuBosE 


Johnson 


DULIN 




Caldwell 


Sprunt 





^^^SH;^^ 



D^ 



QUIPS 



"liCRANKS^ 




Gym 



Thacker 

McKf.ithan 



nasium I earn 

Murray, Captain 

Winn 

Thomasson 



Gilchrist 

Blake 




SEEN IN PRACTICE 



^OUIPS ffil» CRANKS^ 



Advice Vo Gummers 



(A gummer is an uninlermilient pest, who seeks to perfect friendship by the 
steam-roller methods, and is utterly blind to all hints and implications. Do you know one?) 



IT'S very nice to have a friend who's always kind and true. 
But to stick around and stick around, I surely would not do. 
Ah, Friendship is a beauteous thing, as everybody knows. 
But sometimes let your poor friend have a chance to change his clothes. 

To be the very bestest friend is nothing short of grand. 
But don't go round and look as if you'd like to hold his hand. 
^'es! smile when he smiles joyously; at his misfortunes weep; 
But try at least, when night comes on, to give him time to sleep! 

A best friend is a sacred thing; you'll never have one twice. 

But sometimes let him rest a bit from hearing your advice. 

That he'll forget you when you're gone do not be apprehensive. 

And don't wear out the poor boy's chairs, for chairs are so expensive! 

And let him sometimes see the world without your sheltering arms, 
For some day he must face that world, its dangers and its harms. 
In short, don't act as if to say: "If you should go below. 
At the furnace gates down yonder, I'll be waiting for you, Joe!" 



^^^t^ 



QUIPS 



/=\ rsiD 



:±:i^ 



CRANKS 



^D 




Arcli'ibalcl Jones 



O M E . ye disconsolate 
miserable Freshmen. 

List while this wonder- 
ful lale 1 unfold; 

Come ye from Georgia. 
W atts. Rumple, and 
Chambers: 

Stay till the whole of 
my slory is lold. 

'Tis a fantastical tale 1 
will tell you — 
Ponder it deeply, nor let it depart; 
Think on its precepts, and learn from its teach- 
ings; 
Treasure them all in the depths of your heart. 

First 1 must tell you the scene of my story — 
'Tis here — the College we all know so well. 
But if you'd have me go more mto details. 
It is a lale of old Chambers I tell. 

In the dim past, far back in the seventies 
Then were the facultv onlv small bovs. 
Helper, indeed, was a child in his cradle— 
"Tis said he made a most horrible noise. 

Bui to go back to the tale I am telling. 
There came to College the Fall of one year 
One man possessed of an aspect so dismal 
All said he looked most exceedingly queer. 

And when they asked him to tell what his name 

was. 
He replied to them in sad. dismal tones. 
That the thing given to him at baptism. 
Summed up in tolo was Archibald Jones. 

Having said this he shut up like a mousetrap. 
Never again did he utter a sound. 
He formed no friendships, nor did he want einv. 
But solitarily tramped he around. 

For many nights it was thought that he studied 
As he went straight to his room, locked his door. 



nd locked both hi; 



seen nevermore. 



Pulled up his transom, 

wmdows, 
.And until mornmg was 



But soon (was noticed he knew not his lessons — 
He seemed but waiting for class to get through. 
Then when folks thought of these long nightly 

vigils. 
They began wondering: "X^Tiat can he do?" 

There was a certain young student in College, 
lust what his name was I can't think today. 
'Tis said he came here a seeker of knowledge. 
But as to that — well. I really can't say. 

But he was filled with that curse, curiosity. 
Other folks' business he pondered much more 
Than his own matters, and CMie day in passing. 
Came to a halt before Archibald's door. 

Heed now my words, oh. ye innocent Freshmen! 
Think on them carefully when you're alone. 
He would have been safe if. stead of attending 
Other folks* business, he'd minded his own. 

But he did not. but with movements called catlike 
Softly he knelt at the corridor floor. 
Next he apolied his left eye to the keyhole. 
And then w-hat do you suppose that he saw? 

There at the table was Archibald seated. 
Flushed was his cheek, and his eves flashed and 

rolled— 
.■\s he caressed it. and blessed it. and pressed it — 
There on the table — a great heap of gold! 

Can you imagine our friend on the ouiside? 
See his amazement, his petrified stare? 
\\ ith that left eye from his head almost popping 
Through the old keyhole — he seemed rooted 
there ! 

Gold! Countless thousands lay there on the table! 
Gold! ^'es. a fortime kmgs might not despise! 
Gold! \X ith its promise of pleasure and power! 
Can we but wonder he felt some surprise? 



c^ 



^^^^ 



D^ 



QUIPS 




CRANKS 



^"jLM 




Then like a thunderbolt left he the keyhole! 
Jumned to his feel, and with one mighlv shove 
Precipitated himself at the doorway. 
And crashed right through the glass transom 
above! 

Into the room like a wild streak of lightning 
Came he headforemosl. Grabbed Archibald's 
head. 



Bit him and scratched him, and strangled and 

mauled him, 
And in two minutes the miser was dead! 

Threw he himself on that heap on the table. 
Pressed and caressed it, but soon naused for fear. 
I hinking that folks who should hear the pro- 
ceedings 
Might think the whole thing just a little bit queer. 



--^^— 



I^ 



QUIPS 



f:\ rsID 



CRANKS 



^i 



Just ihcn a most diabolical projecl 

1 o his cerebrum from hell did arise. 

He thought of those hollow columns of Cliambers 

Which held the portico up lo the skies. 

In one of those darksome pits he would hide him. 
From such a grave he could never come back. 
So. without worrying more on the matter. 
He tied poor Archibald up in a sack. 

Down in that column he dumped him headfore- 
most; 

Laughed he with glee when the bones hit the 
ground; 

Thought that his worries and troubles were ended. 

But stop! Say. what was that horrible sound? 

It was a wail, long drawn-out. and expressing 
The untold agonies of a lost soul. 
Trembled and thrilled like a shriek of the dying. 
Rose up and swelled from the mouth of the hole! 

But the scared mortal had waited no longer, 
Down the dark staircase like lightning he flew. 
Parted forever from Davidson College, 
But — just think of it — he took the gold, too! 

Where he had gone they could never discover. 
Where he slopped running they never could tell. 



But the one thing that all people agreed on 
Was. that forever in terror he'd dwell. 

But even now in the arcades of Chambers 
We may hear, sometimes, the hollow-voiced tones 
Of that sad Shylock that asks for his ducats. 
That is the spirit of Archibald Jones! 

.Ah yes. in truth there's no rest for the weary. 
He cannot sleep, now his treasure is gone; 
So every night when the lights have been lowered 
Wanders he, ever alone and forlorn. 

Some nieht perhaps, when you're walking 

through Chambers, 
You'll feel a wind that is icy and cold- 
Something will touch you — 'twill be wet and 

clammy ; 
Something will whisper: "Oh, where is my gold?" 

Then friend, delay not. but run like the dickens, 
Gel yourself quickly lo fire and light. 
Cross yourself fervently — Heaven will help you. 
Spirits, at that sign, will leave you in fright. 

But if you question the truth of my story, 
Down in that column you'll find all the bones 
Of that bad mortal, whose name, as he told them. 
Summed up in loto was .Archibald Jones! 




^^^^ 



■^5 




Zdiendat 




JHid}Ki}uf^»IO 



a^ 



QUIPS 




.^.CRANKS^ 



Calenclar 





Septembei 
Septembe 
Septembe 
Septembi 
Septembt 
Seplembi 
Septembi 
Septemb. 



Septembe 
Septembe 
Septembe 

Septembe 
Septembe 
Septembe 
Septembe 
Septembe 
Septembe 

October 
October 
October 
October 
October 

October 
October 
October 
October 
October 
October 

October 
October 



F.PTEMBER 4— Davidson enters upon the "greatest year m the history of the College." 
I he new arrivals give excellent exhibition of their swimming and running abilities. 

September 5 — The College comes into possession of a Bond far from maturity. "Bo" 
Elliot receives his first dumping. 

6 — Bitzer hits the Hill, and relates his experience with the Hon. W. J. Bryan. 

7 — First Sunday for 1917-ers. We are given a 55-minute sermon. 

8 — Fresh reception — "O, where is my wandering bed tonight?" 

9 — Found — A ladies' handkerchief. 
10 — Bird, of logarithmic fame, returns. 
12— W. K. Boswell. one week late, as usual. 

13— Walker, on Fresh Bible, tells about the apples in the garden of Eden. 
15 — Marvin cuts breakfast; goes to Cornelius in the rain to meet his girl, but she doesn't 

come on that train. 
16 — Hamilton is sent on an errand to Dr. Shearer's. 
18 — "Slim " Cloer loses two pounds, and begins taking a Ionic. 

20 — The Harkey coat of arms emblazons our architecture hither and yon. Who said any- 
thing about Stipulator? 
22 — Tennis tournament. Presbytery meets. Classes over at 1.00 p. m. 
24 — John D. takes a little sprint around the campus as a pre-breakfast m 
27 — The weekly Georgia evening open-air concert. 
28 — No more Sunday chapel. 
29— Mclnnis tries out with the Glee Club. 
30 — Jim Gibbon buys a cake of Ivory soap for the session of '1 3-' 1 4. 



invigo 



off at 10.55. 

e to Dr. Fulton, m the shape of an 
t that Shadrach. Meshach. and Abednego are 



2 — "ei5 Ti" served on Senior Bible. 

3 — Fresh have a meeting. Rain. 

5 — First no-chapel Sunday. Alarm clocks g( 

7 — Spencer hands m a masterpiece of literati 

8— Fresh Bible answers bring to light the fa 

the first three books of the Bible. 
9 — Ed Williams cracks a near joke in the tonsorial parlor. 
10— "PARSE" McCOMBS IS DUMPED. 

II — "On to Greensboro." 

13 — Everybody — even the faculty — attends the circus. 
14 — Charles King goes exploring to the rear of Rumple. 

16 — Hay, at 11.59 p. m., takes one last long, lingering, admiring look in the gl 
symmetrical contours of his physiognomy before crawling; between the sheet 
18 — The Junior Class presents Baker with numerous volumes of "Standard Songs 
21 — "Gip" Thacker decides to relieve the monotony, and go on Class. 



^^^^ 



0& 



QUIPS 



f^ IMO 



CRANKS 



^Q 



October 24— Dr. McConnell's house burns. The 

without ceremony. 
October 26— "Donkey" Archer is at Church. 
October 28— The Mesopotamia joke is pulled off. 
October 30— Dunlop Roddey smokes a La Folwin 



B.ble 



tld Fresh Ceek Cla 



adjour: 



Novembe 

Novembe 

Novembe 
Novembe 

Novembe 
Novembe 
Novembe, 
Novembe 

Novembei 
Novembei 
Novembe 
Novembe 

Novembe 
Novembe 
Novembei 
Novembe 

Decembe 
Decembe 
Decembei 
Decern bei 
Decembe 
Decembe 
Decembei 
Decembei 
Decembe 
Decembe 
Decembe 
Decembe 



1— Newberry goes down before the terrific onslaughts of the Red and Black gridiron 

warriors. Price takes picture of the faculty. 
3 — Picture day. The umbrella tree cannot ward off the precipitation. The verdant ones 

are deluged. 
4 — The Astronomy papers come back. 
5— Meeting of the Junior Astronomy Class called at chapel. "Project" in our midst once 

more. 
8— We hear "the law as laid down by Mr. Rowland." 
10 — King resigns as reviewer of the Eu. Society. 

12 — Pete Perry, engrossed in his books, almost misses making his usual evening downtown trip 
13 — "Andy" turns the lights on on lime, for the first time since he began rooming at the 

power-house. 
16 — Everybody sleeps late, and "Help" does a heavy Sunday morning business. 
17— Rupe McGregor takes his customary Monday trip to Charlotte. 
19 — A fellow named Smith makes a touchdown from kick-off against the Varsity. 
22 — We hear that DuBose will accept a position as professor of Latin in Wun Wan College, 

China. 
25 — Exam, schedule goes up. Words "rotten" and "putrid" heard all over the 
26 — Mcllwaine gives his views on story telling. 
27— Davidson 6; Wake Forest 0. 
28 — Senior speaking. Wealth of oratory and fair damsels. 

2 — The Greek laboratory meets in extra session. 
4 — Willie Sprunt goes to Charlotte — first time sii 
5 — Red-letter day — Bill Copeland actually buys 
7— Great commotion about 7.42 a. m. — Here Hi 



campus. 



ice December 3 
some tobacco, 
gets to Chape 
Exams I 



the music begins, 
nearing the horizon. 



8 — Fellows start to drag out their dust-covered book: 
10 — "Some guy got my chair" ("Chink" Wilkinson). 
II — Bell rope cut. No chapel — almost. Exams begin. 
13 — Georgia and Rumple have a scrap on the campus. 
19- — Somebody " lows as how these here 'zams is a gettin' irksum." 
23 — Davidson is left to slumber while we go home to see what Santa Claus wil 
28— We hear that the trains don't stop at our seat of learning during the holid 
29— The vacation students hold chapel exercises. Mr. Samuel Baker Woods 



bring us 
ys. 
resides. 



January 5 — A little colony of punctuality roll aspirants come early to avoid the 
January 6, 7, 8 — They wearily arrive by twos and threes. Misery again. 



^^-- 



/^ rsio 



„, QUIPS .liiMCRANKS^ 



January 9 — Professor Robcrson lakes his Dutch class. 

January 10 — Mullen begins lo concoct Hebrew jokes for the Sophomore banquet. 

January 13 — MclKvaine and Gulhne, pugilists. Farrior makes a name for himself. 

January 15 — 'Tis rumored on the campus that "Oos" Alexander bids fair to become a second George 

Cohan. 
January 18 — Wonders never cease. We are to have golf links. 
January 20 — Bitzer receives a letter from the president(?). 
January 23 — .Alarm clock expostulates in chapel. King cuts. ^??-'?????? 
January 24— What next? Movies m Shearer Hall! 

January 26 — Spencer decides to enter the field of oratory, and joins the Eu. Society. 
January 27 — The panoramic. "Quiet, for just one minute, please." 
January 29 — Pim makes valiant fight for the assistant Ireasurership of the Y. M. C. A., but Mr. Smith 

wins out. 
January 30 — Sparsely settled upper lip foliage makes its debut at Davidson, Fourteen Class most 

seriously susceptible. 
January 31 — W hiteley and Mclnnis begin to think Long's school-house the only spot on the map, 

February 2 — Groundhog Day. "Chipmunk" Thompson sees his shadow. 

February 3 — Fresh-Junior Cochrane feels and responds to the call of the briny deep. Seniors back 
to Bible Class. 

February 4 — Harper becomes gym director at the public school. 

February 6 — L. H. Anderson finds that he will hereafter be compelled to back up lo a door when he 
wants to knock. 

February 9 — First call for baseball candidates. 

February 10 — "Full well they laughed with counterfeited glee 
At all his jokes, for many a joke had he." 

February 13 — Friday, the thirteenth. A hoodoo, sure. First real snow of the season. 

February 14 — Moi^ snow. Poor Fresh! 

February 16 — Sophomore Banquet. The banqueters hear about the time the toastmaster went to see 
"Leopard Spots." 

February 18 — Colonel discontinues selling "dopes." "Nothing but Coca-Cola goes across my counters.' 

February 20, 21 — Junior Speaking. Calico wherever you look. Air full of noise. 

February 22 — Madam Murphy pays us a visit. 

February 23 — John Payne and Howard gain notoriety by jumping off the train with the pockelbook and 
handbag of some coy feminines. 

February 25 — Junior "reps" announced. 

February 27 — George Earnhardt and Hans Wagner, of Pittsburg, have a birthday. 

February 28 — Some Freshman wants to know why tomorrow is not the twenty-ninth of February. Evi- 
dently, all of the fools are not dead yet. 

March 1 — The instigators of the calendar are found celebratin' with a sack of peanuts. 

+ •!• + 

Let those who here have suffered 
That their foibles should be sprung, 
Take comfort — the omitted 
Are the fellows really stung! 



^^ ^ 



FRATERNITIES. 





PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 



Pan-Hcllcmc Council 



<OWNLEE 


James 


DuBosE 


Mattison 


n K * 


2 AE 


15 n 


nK A 




Sprunt 


Elliott 






K A 


K 5 





A> 



i:=l. 






r LEr 



/=i TMD 






Ka|)|)a Aljplia 



Established 1865 



Sigma Chat><'er 



Colors: Crimson and Cold 



Flower: Magnolia 



--^^- 



„ OUIPS .ill CRANKS^ 

Kajplpa Al(>Vta 
+ 

FRATER IN URBE 

Dr. C. M. Richards 

4- 

CLASS 1914 

W. H. Sprunt J. W. Gibbon H. M. Marvin S. B. Woods 

* 

CLASS 1915 

W. M. Cosby J- H. W. McKay 

4- 

CLASS 1916 

JNO. L. Payne J. H. Carson L. G. Hicks T. D. Sparrow 

4- 
CLASS 1917 
C. W. Ansley a. B. Reese A. M. Currie 



p: 









-^r-i^::j(X 



:i /I 






A iMO 






Si^ma Alf)lia Ejps'ilon 



Founded 1856 at University of Alabama 



North Carolina TVieta 

Established at Davidson in 1883 
Colors: Old Cold and Royal Purple 



Flower: V'wkl 



^^^^ 



f=K rsio 



^ QUIPS J^..CRANK5^ 

S'l^ma AljpKa Ejpsilovi 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Dr. J. M. Douglas Prof. A. Currie Dr. J. U'. MacConnell 

Prof. J. L. Dougla.<; 



FRATER IN URBE 
Dr. J. D. Munroe 

+ 

CLASS 1914 
S. Bruce W. S. James 



CLASS 1915 
H. W. Malloy G. p. Dick J. M. Hall 

CLASS 1916 
A. S. Tompkins, Jr. W. G. Morrison 

J. K. Morrison W. B. McKinnon 

E. L. Alford J. B. Mack 

A. D. McLain 



CLASS 1917 
E. G. Hampton B. F. Hagood C. B. \Xilliams 



^^^^ 



ct^ 



QUIPS 



""« CRANKS 



^Dl 



Established 1904 
North Caro\'ma E[>s\\on 



Colors: Cold and IVhile 



Flower: Red Rose 



^5" 



^^^^^ 



a:* rsID 



„. QUI PS liSCRANKS^ 



■i- + 

CLASS 1914 
R. F. Brownlee J. G. Thacker 



CLASS 1915 
J. E. Faw R. K.. Robinson J. W. O'Connell 



CLASS 1916 

F. H. Smith NX'. T. Osteen 

C. F. Golden R. L. Peters 

A. M. Fairlev 



CLASS 1917 

W. J. Smith H. F. Shaw H. F. Mavfield 

R. Howard S. T. Henderson 



rm -^^^ 



M IMO 



,QUIPS ffiJl^CRANKS^ 



Bcia TiicVa Pi 



Founded I 839 



?W\ Alpha Chapter 

Established at Davidson in 1858 as Phi of Beta Theta Pi; re-established 1884, 
as Sword and Shield Chapter of Mystic Seven; United 1889 with Beta Theta Pi, 
becoming Phi Alpha. 

Colors: Pink ^nJ Blue Flower: Rose 



^ -=^^^ 



n^ 



QUIPS 



^^ fMO 



iH CRANKS 



s^ 



^D 



Beta TVicta Pi 



FRATER IN FACULTATE 
Dr. W. J. Martin 

■■ 6...L Joe." 
+ 



P. W. DuBosE 



CLASS 1914 
T. P. Johnston 



L. B. Crayton 



J. W. S. Gilchrist 



CLASS 1913 
L. H,, Anderson 
A. Scarborough 



B. R. O'Neal 



CLASS 1916 
E. P. Henderson 

W. P. Tj^ip^MPSON 

R. S. Witherington 

P. Browning 



A. E. Baker 
L. A. Mullen 
J. L. Cloud 



CLASS 1917 
E. P. NisBET -<"~ W. A. Julian - ''"•'" 

S. R. Keesler-^""' M. E. Robertson - 5v-«-^- 

W. R. Keesler-«'"' J. T. Crayton - "J"' " 

B. D. RoDDEY-'^'^'^y" T. McC. Poe - ■^'"^-''" 



^^^^ 



P\ INIO 



OUIPS H* CRANKS^ 



Pi Kajplpa Aljpiia 

Established 1869. Re-established 1894 
4, 4, 

Beta CViafjVer 

Colors: CarrKi and Old Cold Flower : Li7p of the Valley and 

Cold Standard Tulip 



^ ^^^^ 



/=\ ISIO 



OUIPS ffiim:RANK5 






:^a 



Pi Ka|3(>a Aljplia 



FRATER IN FACLLTATE 
Dr. H. B. Arbuckle 



J. E. Johnston 



CLASS 1914 
J. R. McGregor 



M. E. Mattison 



F. A. Hill 



CLASS 1915 
R. A. Brown 



H. L. McCaskill 



CLASS 1916 
T. M. Hill J. R. McNeill. Jr. 

J. T. Gillespie W. C. McKenzie 



CLASS 1917 
W. E. Mattison J. E. \X'atkins 

J. C. McCaskill \X'. G. Sommern-ille 



^^^^ 



jPk IMO 



^ QUIPS .IiMCRANK5,„ 



Ka^lpa Sigma 



Founded at the University of Bologna in 1 400 
Established at the University of Virginia in 1867 



Delta Cha)>Ver 

Established 1890 
Colors: Scarlet. IVhik, and Emerald Green Flowf.R: Lih of the Vallev 



^^^-= ^ 



D^ 


QUIPS 


ifftCRANKS^ 






Kajplpa S'j^ma 






FRATER IN URBE 






Chas L. Grey 


C. B. 


Bailey 


CLASS 1914 

H. L. Elliott 



W. F. Strait J. P. Marsh 

CLASS 1915 
J. C. McDonald L. Kllttz E. Rowland 



CLASS 1916 
G. H. Bernhardt R- G. Finley 

J. G. Patton, Jr. \X'. L. Law 



CLASS 1917 

R. Critz V. C. Hall J. D. Smith. Jr. 

C. '\Xalker D. C. Crawford 

D. C. McLeod 

T. H. Sommernille A. Y. McNair J. P. Laird. Jr. 

T. A. Finley J. D. Dams 



^^ ^ 



_ QUIPS .fil^ CRANKS^ 

My Oia Frat P*m 

I'M A plain old business plodder, who don't give a rap for frills. 
And I'm worried less by fashions than I am by stocks and bills; 
Though my w fe insists that in me Nature planned a perfect man, 
I'm afraid that I'm not building in accordance with that plan. 
I have never owned a watch, or worn a chain or fob or ring. 
And in fact I'm out of sympathy with all that sort of thing, 
i indulge no taste for baubles, yet what thoughts come thronging in 
When I see some college youngster "flash" the old "Frat" pin. 

At the sight of that old emblem I forget that I am gray, 

And my pulse beats just as strongly as upon that far-off day 

When a band of student brothers taught me mystic grip and sign. 

And I rode their goat in triumph, and that shining badge was mine. 

Father Time has not been idle, and those boys of long ago 

Now are scattered far and widely, and their heads are crowned with snow, 

But their hearts, I know, beat warm.ly, for they keep alive within 

All the principles embodied in that old "Frat" pin. 

How my thoughts go flying backward to youth's iridescent day. 
When the world all lay before me and hope beckoned on the way! 
Now another generation claims the center of the stage. 
While I'm ready to write "Finis" at the bottom of my page. 
I'll confess a strange emotion sets my very soul aglow 
As I greet again by proxy those old boys of long ago. 
How it starts my nerves a-tingling! How it warms my heart withm. 
When I couple past and present with that old "Frat" pin! 

— Syllabus 



^ ^^^^ 



_ QUIPS gg.CHflNKS, 



GrvjlpU 



ons 

""^^■^^ \ ORDER composed of members of the Senior 
^^^M Class of the College, whose object it is to draw 
^ ^ ■• closer the bonds of friendship between class- 
irates; to abolish the differences and misunderstandings 
which frequently exist during the first three years; and 
to stimulate interest in the welfare of the College, and 
do all that is possible for its upbuilding. It numbers among 
its members the leaders in almost every phase of College life 
— and 't is the constant aim of these men to use their in- 
fluence, both individually and as a body, for the good of the 
msti;ution. A medal is offered each year by the Gryphon 
Order for the man who. in the estimation of a body of 
judges, has done the most for the College during his course. 



^^ ^ 



QUIPS .iliCRANKS 



^ MfW..--. ^^^iji T^^ w... ..... .;^^ 



Order o{ \\\e Grij|p\ion 



roberson 

Pharr 

Elliott, H. L. 

Marsh 

Marxin 

Bailey 

James 

McGregor 



^^ ^ 



A NO 



QUIPS J^^CRANKS^ 



TVic SwcctcsV Words 



W 



HA I are the sweetest wordsP" I asked 

The lover fond and true. 
Fie smote his breast, he rolled his eyes. 

And murmured: "I love you." 



What is the sweetest word, my friend? 

I asked it of another. 
His face It up with joy — he said: 

"The sweetest word is Mother." 

Lastly I asked my father dear ; 

He did not look dismayed. 
But cried out as with heart and soul: 

"The sweetest word is PAID." 



-^ ^^1^ 



m, 







'^ ^; 




P . . 




OOIPS .IMCRANKS^ 



:umenean 



Soc'ieVij 



FIRST TERM 

C. L. King President 

M. J. Shirley Vice-President 

R. Perry Secretary 

C. M. GlBBS Treasurer 

H. M. Mar\IN Revieiver 

* + 

SECOND TERM 

H. M. Marvin President 

N. Johnson Vice-President 

J. P. Williams Secrclar\i 

C. M. GiBBS Treasurer 

C. L. King Reviewer 

THIRD TERM 

J. E. COUSAR President 

C. M. GiBBS Vice-President 

W. G. Morrison Secretary^ 

R. W. Guthrie Rcvierver 



^ ^^^^ 




Presidents 

oi 

Eu Societij 




t (J M F.N LAN MAR^HALs 







«*-<S- 



OUIPS iilCRANKS 



Pli'»laniliro|p'»c Soc'ietxj 

+ 1- 

FIRST TERM 

Sprunt, \X'. H President 

Rowan, C. H Vice-President 

Payne, J. L. Secrelarv 

Carricker, J. A. Treasurer 

Pharr, E. Q. Critic 

McBrvde. J. M. First Supervisor 

FiNLEY. R. G. Second Supcn'isor 

4- 4- 

SECOND TERM 

Elliott, A. H President 

Alexander, U. S Vice-President 

CURRIE, E. McA Secretary 

Carricker, J. A Treasurer 

Johnson, T. P Critic 

Copeland, W. C First Supervisor 

Shaw, D. . .. Second Supen'iior 

+ + 

THIRD TERM 

Whiteley, C. D President 

Harkey, F. L Vice-President 

Farrior, N. P Secretary) 

Carricker, J. A , Treasurer 

McKinnon, R. L Critic 

Williamson. O. C First Supervisor 

McCormick, H Second Supervisor 

Xm ^^ ^5 




Presidents 
PW\ Societ\) 




nil \M !!R('l*li M \R>M N 




Intercollegiate Dcbafm^ Team 

C. L. King Porlerdale. Ga, 

H. M. Marvin Jacksonville, Fla. 

(Both members of the Eumenean Society) 

■h -i- 
Debates 

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 

QUEEN'S COLLEGE AUDITORIUM. CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

NOVEMBER 27, 1913 

Resolved:— That the Commission Form of Municipal Government Should Be Generally Adopted in 
the United Stales. 

Davidson defended ihc negative, and lost. 

+ + 

WAKE FOREST 

SALEM COLLEGE AUDITORIUM. WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 

APRIL 13, 1914 

Resolved :-Thal all Candidates for Elective Offices in the State of North Carolina .Should be Nominated 

by a System of Direct Primaries, Modeled after the Wisconsm I'h.n. Rather ih.in by 



the Convention System. 

David;. 



to argue the affirmati' 



/=\ r>JD 



QUIPS MiSMCRANKS 



n- ^iJ^es.^ -^ 







/A IMO 



^. QUIPS ,li§^.CRANK5^ 

Youn^ Mcn*s CV»nsf»an Association 



OFFICERS 

C. L. King President 

J. R. McGregor Vke-Prcsidenl 

J. C. Harper Secrelar]) 

F. W. Prick Treasurer 

-^ 4- 

CABINET 

F. J. Hay Devotional 

J. R. McGregor Missionary 

A. S. Anderson Bible Study 

H. M. Marn'IN Reception 

B. F. PlM Membership 

E. Q. PhaRR ..Lyceum 

A. Scarborough Treasurer Mission Department 



=^^^^ 



A IMO 



^ QUIPS .laCRANKS^ 



Student Council 

H. L. Elliott Chairman 

SENIOR MEMBERS 
J. R. McGregor W. H. Sprunt, Jr. 

A. H. Elliott Z. V. Roberson 

C. L. King H. M. Marvin 

JUNIOR MEMBERS 

Earle Rowland 
Alfred Scarborough F. W. Price 

J. E. Carter 

SOPHOMORE MEMBERS 
L. A. Mullen L. G. Hicks R. G. Finley 

+ + 

FRESHMAN MEMBER 
H. A. Campbell 



^ ^^^^ 



Annual 5f a 




H. M. Marmn Florida 

Ediior-in-Chief 

E. Q. PhaRR - North Carolina 

Business Manager 

J. E. Faw Georgia 

Assistant Business Manager 

T. P. Johnston, Jr North Carolina 

An Editor 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

F. J. Hay North Carolina R. \X'. GuTHRIE West Virginia 

W. H. Sprunt. Jr. North Carolina J. W. S. GlLCHRlST North Carolina 

Z. V. Roberson North Carolina F. W. PRICE China 

J. G. Patton Georgia 



MflG.STflFF 




Fred Jay Hay, Jr. 
J. R. McGregor 



Editor-in-Chief 



North Carolina 
South Carolina 



Business Manager 

J. E. Carter North Carolina 

Assistant Business Manager 



Zeb V. ROBERSON 



North Carolina 



Exchange Editor 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
r. p. Johnston, Jr North Carolina J. C. Harper 

H. M. Marvin Florida 

J. E. CousAR, Jr. South Carolina 
W. T. BiTZER Georgia 



North Carolina 

J. E. Faw Georgia 

F. W. Price China 

U. S. Alexander North Carolina 



R. W. Guthrie (West Virginia) Correspondent "Meandering Meditations" 

Alfred Scarborough (South Carolina) ...Correspondent for Y. M. C. A. 

J. W. S. Gilchrist (North Carolina). Correspondent for Athletics 

E. R. Campbell (North Carolina). Correspondent for Societies 



A^ ISID 



QUIPS liim:RANKS 



^D 



Wearers o\ \\^^ "D" 



^ ^ 4. 



Cosby 



ROBERSON 

McKlNNON 

Howell 



FootbaW 

Brady 

Anderson 
Peters 



Crayton 



Crayton 

WiTHERINGTON 
4- 
BasebaW 

WiTHERINGTON 



Elliott 

Gloer 



Osteen 



Brown 



+ 

TracU 



Gilchrist 
Johnson 



DlBose 
Kluttz 



Walker 



Kluttz 



^^^^^ 



„ QUIPS ,^iM,CRANK5^ 

To Miss Mais'ic McGcaclivj 

ON HER SIXTV-NINTIl RIRTHDAY 

4- + *!• 

(Note: Tlie publicalion of ihis poem has bei-n authorized by the Freshman Class) 

+ -I- + 



K 



H ! years of life sit lightly on your head 
Nor have they left their furrows on your brew: 
E'en now we seem to see the youth that's dead. 
And girlhood seems to linger even now. 



Although that life has run full many a year, 
It must have been one gladsome summer time ; 
We see no traces of the sigh nor tear; 
No discord marks the meter of that rhyme. 

And still the fortes of girlhood we descry. 
Nor has time ever frightened them away — 
We see the tnppmg step, the droopmg eye 
As it was in that golden yesterday. 

The memories of long forgotten years 
This day come trooping in with all their train; 
You see the joys, the griefs, the smiles, the tears. 
They pass today before you once again. 

And so today we would salute you queen. 
And if that brow with silver now is crowned. 
Then silver, where the gold one time was seen. 
We reverence, where the gold one time was found. 



^^^^ 



" ■ 



1 1 P^C ;^*«« 
WMiiiik ^M/iiiB §Mf/iJ§' '^//am 



I fi 





^ ^ m w W 

11 f f ^ * 



D^ 



QUIPS 



/A IMD 



CRANKS 



£0 





G 


eorgia 


Club 


Baker 








Bates 


Dumas 








Gloer 


Bond 








Morgan 


White 








Hooper 


Mitchell 








Mack 


Steyerman 








White 


Carson 








HOYT 


Ansley 








PiM 


Johnson 




Patton 

King 

Johnson, 


N. 


BOSWELL 






Hamilton 





^^^^ 



« MO 



^OUIPS ffiilCRANKS^ 



Tcnncsscc-Virgm'ia Club 



Anderson 



Edgerton 



Price. P. B. 



Ayers 



HOBSON 



Sommer\ille, T. H. 



Bennett 



McIlwaine Sommer\ille, W. G. 



Guthrie 



Price, F. W. Woods 



Williams 



=^^^^ 



D^ 



QUIPS 




CRANKS 



-sO 



V ^. 





THE 

HEBREW 



^ 



^^^^ 





s 


emor Hebrews 




Bailey 




Caldwell 


Marnin 


Brownlee 




DuBosE 


McGregor 


Bruce 




Elliott 


McInnis 


Crayton 




Hay 


McKlNNON 


Crawford 




Johnston 
Strait 


NORRIS 



a^ 



QUIPS 



/:% IMO 



.CRANKS^ 








MinisVcnal Band 



Whitely 


McInnis 


McKlNNON 


Johnson 


Johnson 


Rankin 


Cooper 


BOSWELL 


Hamilton 


Smith 


King 


Price 


ROURK 


Thompson 


Johnson 


Williams 


Farrior 


MUNROE 


McGeachy 


Price 


Carmichael 


Bain 


Howland 


Morgan 


\X'hittington 


Carriker 


HOBSON 


GiBBS 


Patrick 


Craig 


Murray 


Bain 


Bird 


Wilson 


Scott 
Graham 


Roberson 



^^^^ 



^ 



f=\ IMO 



Cfe^ 



QUIPS ii^CRANKS 



^D 




Orc^csVpa and Glee Club 



Bailey 


Morrison, 


W. 


G 




Witt 


Baker 


Ansley 








McIlwaine 


Morrison, J. K. 


Johnston 








Harper 


Payne 


McGEACH-i 








Brown 


Faison 








Faw 





^^sm^^ 



f=K ISID 



[fe^ 



QUIPS liMCRANKS 



-jS2 



..ci^SH. 




Miss'iss'ijplp'i Club 



Williams 
Kf.f,slf.r, W. R. 
Morrison 



Graham 
Brown 
Bird 



Keeslf.r, S. R. 



--^5^— 



P\ IMD 



Q^ 



QUIPS .Ifl^.CRANKS^ 




Dumas 



Kodak Club 



Hooper 



McRae 



Keesler 



Mar\in 



Bond 



Simpson Johnson Mavfield 

McKeithen Price 



^=^^^^ 



■^ 



^=^ fMO 



Cb 



OUIPS lilRCRANKS 







Sumter Club 



McKay 



SCARBORO 



Rowland 



Brower 



Havnsworth 



Martin, Mascot 



Si iaw 



Jones 



^^^^ 



^:* rsio 



QUIPS li^CRANKS 



p^=^-^^^i^^ - - .^^.jy p }^. ^ ^ 






Mecklenburg Club 




Young 


Halliburton 


O'Connell 


Alexander 


Reese 


K.NOX 


Henderson 


Neal 


Pharr 


Cashion 


Robinson 


HOWLAND 


Gilchrist 


Harkey 

McEWEN 


Choate 



^^^^ 



t^ 



OUiPS 



/=\ r«JO 



iiS^ 



CRANKS 



da 




Price, F. W. 
McIlwaine 
Hudson, G. A. 
Price, P. B. 



T^c Orientals 



DuBosE 
Hudson, D. V. 
Wilkinson 
Woods 



^^^^ 



QUIPS 



A IMD 



CRANKS 



^1 




WarrcnVon H»^li Scliool Club 



Hall 

Bullock 

McKay 



Danis 

Carter 

Campbell 



McBryde 

Elliot 

McNeil 



^ 



■^ 



/=\ IMO 



„ QUIPS 1»..CRANK5^ 




Brown 

Crawford, L. A. 
McMillan 
McCleod 



Robeson County) Club 

Jno. D. Smith, President 

Hall 
McCall 
McLain 
Nash 



McEachern 
Crawford, R. T. 

McCoRMICK 

McGeachy 



^^^^ 



A IMO 



QUIPS ffil^CRANKS 



;^a 




Scrajp-IroM Club 

DuBosE Johnston 



PiM 



NUTTALL 



Wharton 



Payne 



Crawford 



^^^ 



Q^ 



QUIPS 



"HCRANKS^ 



■■■''C^-X'TS,r=^i'V7ri--C7^=- 



im-v* 




a 
if 










m 


Ifc ''4*- 


, ^A 



Greater Atlanta Club 



Johnson Pim Carson Mack Dumas Pat" 



HOYT 



Hamilton Laird 



Dr. Arbuckle 



^^^^ 



PX IMD 



^ QUIPS ai^ CRANKS^ 



LUlioMia Club 




MEMBERS 

D. B. Bond 
Da\id B. Bond 
D. Barnett Bond 
Da\id Bond 
Barnett Bond 
Mr. Bond 
Da\id Barnett Bond. Esquire 



LITHONIA CLUB 

Da\id Barnett Bond President 

Daxid B. Bond. Vke-President 

D. Barnett Bond .-. Secretary-Treasurer 

^^ ^ 



a^ 



QUIPS 



/ =» IMP 



:^^ 



CRANKS 



ka 




ditorial 



those who so ably helped to make it what 
remember the many difficulties with which 
Perhaps there is something herein 
so, we assure you that it was far from our 
forbearance for our fault. 



rorcword 

IN presenting this volume of Ql'IPS 
AND Cranks, it has been our con- 
stant aim to reflect the varied and 
diverse fields of College life. \^'e 
are too deeply conscious of its many short- 
comings, and our only apology is that we 
have done the best we could. If there be 
praise to offer, we only ask that it be given 
it is; if there be blame, we only ask that you 
our way has been beset. 

that will give pain or offense to someone. If 
intention that it should be so, and we beg your 



IT SEEMS almost unnecessary at this late date to say anything of the men who 
became part of our Faculty this year, but it is our first opportunity to do so. Il 
was with a feeling of unmixed pleasure that we welcomed all of these men to the 
College, and it is with genuine sincerity that we now speak of their first year as a success. 
All of them are men of high character and attractive personality ; all of them are intensely 
interested in athletics : and while it may be too late to bid them welcome, it is not too late to 
assure them of our hearty support and co-operation. 



^^^^ 



"^5 



Dfe 



QUIPS 




CRANKS 



^a 



'^^1^ HILE the entire staff of QuiPS AND Cranks performed their duties 
^ W / admirably and well, we feel particularly indebted to certain of these men 
^^^r for their work. Perhaps foremost among these should be mentioned 
Messrs. Guthrie and Gilchrist, who worked with tireless energy and perfect will- 
ingness at all times, and were always on the watch for anything and everything which 
would tend to improve the Annual. Their work was good in all departments ; and it is to 
them that we owe the newspaper. Mardly less valuable in his contribution was Mr. Zeb 
Roberson, who handled the entire Athletic Department, with the help of Mr. Palton, who 
has done much more than the usual Sophomore member of the staff. 

Not all the work, however, was done by members of the Staff. Mr. J. Russell 
Minter. of the 1913 Class, although at work this year, found time to do a large part of 
the drawing work for this year's Annual; and if the book be a success in this department 
it is due in large measure to the kindness and willingness, not to mention the very evident 
ability, of Mr. Minter. We are glad to acknowledge our debt to him, and to extend our 
thanks for his timely and appropriate work. 



'=X-,.gZlZxt-nLSt--< 




^^^^ 



^S> 






Miss Cornelia Shaw 
The truest friend a College man ever had 



« IMO 



^OUIPS HP CRANKS 



W 



Wlio*s Who, as \\\e Seniors Sec It 



ELL. il was some election. Bribery was very much in ihc majority prior lo ihe casting 
of the voles, and some fellows simply did pull oft a whole catalog of underhand stunts 
in order lo gain some of the coveted places on the ticket. 



.•\s a starter, it was brought to light that "Bo" Ellioll is the most popular student in college, but 
Kupe McGregor ran him a mighty close second. There were numerous other aspirants for the place, but 
they stood only a slim chance against the successful candidates. 

Marvin was decided to be the most influential man in our midst, while Charlie King and "Bo" 
made a fine showing. 

Davidson is known far and wide for her athletes and her athletic attainments, so choosing a man 
who can rightfully claim "the best athlete" laurels was no easy matter. However. "Bo" Elliott polled the 
highest number of voles for this exalted position, and will go down in history as one of D. C.'s cxcelUnlcsl 
athletes. 

Norman Farrior came out on lop in the race for the most religious man. Price's sanctimonious 
altitudes on some occasions, and "Parse" McCombs' ministerial exterior, gave these two slight advantages 
over others who really should have gotten large majorities. 

It was almost a tie when the supervisors of the election came lo counting for the "best egg." 
"Bum" Pharr obtained a hair's breadth advantage over Zeb Roberson. by settin' up the dopes at Skit's 
one day to a bunch of eligible voters. 

Who under the sun could have had a look-in on the "laziest man" job, so long as Hercules Hill 
remained in college? Why, no one, of course. Did ever a human being breathe the atmosphere of this 
earth who was as lazy as this fellow Hill? He "went South," you bet, on this run for the place for 
which nobody is ever a candidate, but which always goes lo the most deserving victim. 

Every fellow voted for himself on the "hardest-worked man " proposition. Naturally, you would 
not expect to find a chap who thought any other guy "dug in " more than he; but the editor of Quips 
AND Cra.nks believes that ihe honor, if there be any to such a capacity as this, belongs lo him. 

There was really no use in taking a vote to decide who was the best business man in College, for 
ihere'i only one man here who can make money at absolutely anything, and still keep the good will of 
all parties concerned: and that man, of course, is "Bum" Pharr. The combination of best business man 
and "best egg " it a hard one lo beat, when il comes to the money-making proposition. 



r^ -=^^-= 



Dfe 



QUIPS 




CRANKS 



^d3 



(Our friend Guthrie nalurally hesitated to proclaim himself as the wittiest man in College, but 
the undeniable fact is that it was the one position for which there was no contest. He received the 
unanimous vote of every man who could lay his hands upon a blank, as being the particularly 
luminous star of the College; and any who have heard him will have no difficulty in recognizing that the 
wreath was well placed. — Editor.) 

Freddie Hay, who stands at the helm of that famous publication known as The Davidson College 
Magazine, made all of the rest of us look like a two-cent piece with a hole punched therein, when it came 
to ascertaining who our best writer was. 

You know there is one gentleman in every college, the terror of boarding-houses and dining-rooms, 
who persistently keeps on hand an aching void which is eternally desiring replenishing. The biggest eater 
on the "Hill" seems to be "Slimuel" Gloer. but he is pushed for the first place by Bobby McKay, whose 
tendencies toward the table and its viands are unusually strong. 

Fifty-five per cent, of the Seniors swore that they had been engaged; the other forty-five per cent, 
affirming as decidedly in the negative. We take the word of the minority; but a good many of us cannot 
help thinking a great many of the majority were sadly mistaken when they voted, taking a puppy love 
infatuation and seeming engagement of their youthful days for the real thing. 

Other determinations gathered at the election were as follows: 

Best dressed man JuLtAN. Scarborough Most congenial Sprunt. Pharr 

Handsomest man L. H. ANDERSON. Julian Biggest Crip. ..Senior Law, Public Speaking 

Most brilliant Marvin. Elliott Hardest ticket Soph. Latin, Political 

Best all-round man Elliott (unanimous) Science. Fresh. Creek. 

Best orator King, Marvin Most popular professor— Dr. Sentelle, Dr. J 

Best debater Marvin. King M. Douglas. 

Most gentlemanly Scarborough, McGregor Do you smoke — Yes. forty per cent.; No. the rest. 

Man of greatest ability Marvin, Elliott Occupation next year?— Teach, 13; continue 

Biggest bluffer "Coach" Johnston. Siske education. 10; undecided. 15; loaf, I — H. H. 

Biggest politician PiM. SisKE Life work? — Ministry, II; undecided, 18; farm. 

Hottest sport "Joc" MoRRIsON, McInnis •*; law, 5; medicine. 8. 

Biggest tightwad FaisON, McCombS. BiTZER Favorite game — Football. tennis. baseball. 

Most perfect lady PiM. Crisp marbles, and horseshoes (in the order named). 

Shortest man Shirley Average cost of college course — $1,641. 

(The work of counting the ballots was done by Mr. C. B. Ratchford. while Mr. Guthrie took the 
results and put them in the above form. To both of them we extend our thanks for their aid.) 



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In \\\e Glow of Eventide 

_^^^^ EMINISCENSES conslilule themselves in such manner as to delegate this a strikingly pre- 
^B ^^ emincnl day to me. Looking backward over the annoes which have gone, never to be 
B ■ recalled, a feeling of sadness and longing pervades the once quiescent portals of my breast, 
'' ^ and my optics grow dim with an inevitable haziness as I contemplate the heroic deeds of 

my deciduous forefathers, who, in the tear-stained past, braved the saline stretches of watery 
Neptune, and never more were seen by those so closely knit to them by sanguinilies of recognizability 
Noble men they were, as they sailed the boisterous seas in search of golden treasure; but nobler were 
ihey because of the valiant stand they took on terra firma, expeditiously betaking themselves from pur- 
suing cadaverous cannibals, who, eventually, made a toothsome meal from their bodies, and ingeniously 
converted their bones into weapons of warfare. 

My heart thrills with an innate pride as 1 divert my wandering thoughts to the achievements of 
•uch illustrious ancestors, and I would that my tongue could utter the ennobling and everlasting punctilious 
cogitations of my tanlamounted prophylactum. 

One hundred and forty years ago today (32 of Septober), one of the staunches! types of my 
precursors, Trafalgar Auslerlilz, that highly touted gunsmith of Calcutta, overwhelmingly defeated the 
Manilobian forces in the fiercely contested engagement known as the siege of Troy. Remember ye not 
how gallantly he commanded his troops, and caused to be hauled down the British Jack which had been 
waving over that ill-fated city for ninety-six centuries? 

Too, do you not picture in your mind the testicular tactics executed by Waterloo Osseous-section, 
when, after it looked as though all the powers of earth were arrayed against him in toto, he, with inscrut- 
able wisdom, guided his flagship through the rocky entrance to the harbor of Valparaiso, then guarded 
by sixty-live twenty-inch guns, decreed that submission must be his or he would blow the whole nation 
into axle grease, and, with a calmness that would make the Dead Sea turn green with envy, he won, 
without firing a shot, or losing a life, the greatest battle in all history — Marathon. 

And. would this eulogistically inclined insinuosily be complete without some reference to Piffle 
Ishouldworry ? Pif was some swell concoction. He is the personage who gave variety to the spice of 
life, who put the dot over the i and the subscript over the iota. He was conversant with every living 
being, both east and west of the equator, and. in fact, was the most cosmopolitan egg that ever rolled 
around this pigiron world. 

And can I forego the delightful pleasure of relating to you some fundamental fictitions regarding 
the hero of modern civilization) ^X hat a specimen of the genus homo he was! How he placed the 
wheels of demolilicalion hydrostatically aloft while shaping the environment of our atmosphere. 'Twas 
he who put the turn in turnip, the pump in pumpkin, and the sugar in coffee. Why, long before Fulton 
looted his little horn up on the Hudson, the gentleman in question was riding the blue deep in the most 



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luxuriously appointed steam yacht ever seen in the seas. Years prior to the dale of the initial running o( a 
locomotive in these United Stales, this chap was touring around in his country in a handsome Pullman, 
attached to one of the swiftest trains ever placed upon steel rails. A stack of books as long as from 
here to the moon and halfway back would scarcely begin to contain the record of the accomplishments 
of this ancestor of ancestors, a figure whom I am proud to depict, the acme of invenlionary genius — 
Peter Peduncle Penobscot. Pedunc was born on the planet of Jupiter, just sixty-three minutes after the 
Declaration of Independence was typewritten and had received the "John Hancock" of Anglo-Saxon, 
and corroborated by Mr. Saxon's private secretary. He lived until the day on which they moved the 
city of New York to the Pacific Coast, in order to afford the citizens of that metropolis an opportunity 
to see the sun set in the ocean over that way which dashes its cooling spray on the rockbound coasts of 
California. Before he died, he uttered those immortal words. "Give me the world fenced in, with a 
potato patch on the outside. 

So it is with a deep sense of appreciation that 1 narrate to you some of the untarnished endeavors 
of the world's most honored men. How they have dared to breathe the smoke of battle, to ride the 
rolling waters, and to lift mankind from the depths of a magnanimous insensibility, and place him in 
the beautiful refulgent rays of a sagamantious acerdotal. 

Poesy dwells within my being when my thoughts touch such memorable matters as these, and. 
with the rhythmical rhymist of old, I can say 



As sure's the bark grows on the tri 
1 love my girl, and she loves me. 




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FratcmU'ics 

(With Apologies) 

PRATERNITIES are composed mostly of men. Female fraternities are called 
Sororities. 
Fraternities are called frats. Frat comes from a Greek word, mean- 
ing "We'll all drink together." Sorority comes from the same language, and means "Do 
others, before you get done." 

A man who belongs to a fraternity is called a frat man. He is frequently called 
other things, but they would not look well in print. 

To conceal the real purpose of the fraternities, meetings are held. These meet- 
ings are scenes of great debates. In these, the frat men decide whether or not they will pay 
their bills. 

Frats have rituals and blackballs — rituals to make the members think they belong 
to something; blackballs for the wide-eyed Freshmen. 

A frat man is called a Greek. A man who does not belong is called a barbarian. 
Many Greeks are barbarians, and many barbarians want to be Greeks. 

Fraternities have initiations, which closely resemble the Spanish Inquisition. How- 
ever, nobody dislikes these but the Freshman. 

The chief aim of a frat man is to get money from father. 

Most great men are frat men ; such as "Bill" 1 aft, "Woody" Wilson, and 
"Jocko" Morrison! 



THOSE WHO SIT IN THE SEAT OF THE SCORNFUL-THE SENIORS IN THE BACK 
SEAT AT CHAPEL 



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Letter to Ma 

Davidson. N. C, September 8. 1913 

..^^■^^ EAR MA: — I now take my pen in hand to rite you a few lines. I landed at 
I ■ this here plase day before yistiddy, and I must say that it by far surpasses my 
,J^^^^ wildest imaginings of such a plase. I have heered that there wuz largur, 
grandur plases, but danged if I believe it ! 

Me an some other Freshmans wuz met at the train by a Crowd uv Fellers, just 
as nise and corjul as cud be. They had some sorter deception Commity what tole us all 
to go up to Chambuz — but I tole em I didn't want To just then, cuz I wanted to look 
aroun. One mighty pleasant Feller wanted me to join a Society what he called the 
Pressing Club, but I remembered what that there Almanac they sent us said about not 
joining these here funny Societez right away, so tole him I would see him later. That 
afternoon I got me a room, and am rooming with Friend John D. Smith, from Philadel- 
phus, Robeson County, in this here State. 

It shore is a good thing Dad gave me all that money fore I left, cause College is 
a turrible expensive plase. I had to pay for several other things besides vittles. One of 
the best things that I bought is a student body ticket. A Feller what is only here for a 
few days sold it to me for two dollars and a half. He said it would let me in to all 
student body meetings, and give me a right to vote, too. Say, Ma, which hand do you 
use to vote? Another valueabel thing I got was a sprinkler bath privilege, which lets me 
wash in any of them. Ma, them sprinkler baths shore is wonderful things — it's just like 
being out in the rain. I can't hardly wait for Saturday night to come. I also bought a 
Chapul seat and a campus ticket; them things wuz not menchuned in the Alamanac, but 
the Feller said as how I would have to get em. I also bought a pretty brass thing witch 
WU7 scrude to the floor, and they said it wuz used for a stove, but I ain't been able to 
find out yet how to light it. 

The Main building shore is a big plase. It's got big high brick posts called collars 
— but they don't look nothin like one. Up on top is a round porch called a caterpillar, 
or somethin 1 ke that. They sure is one awful brite idea connected with that building. 
Some Feller put two tin barrels up on top, and ran some pipes down the chimneys, and 
now the Fellers can get water without havin to go to a pump ; and it's hot, too. The fire 



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in the chimneys does that. I don't know how they'll fill up the barrels when they run 
dry, cuz I ain't saw nobody takin water up yet. Guess they're waitin for rain. 

They is a lot of Fellers here what wears pins on their vest. The other Fellers 
call em fat men or somethin like that, but they don't look specially fat to me. John D. 
says you have to make aphcashun to get to be one. I haven't decided yet whitch one to 
joine, but have sent all of them my aplicashun, and will tell you more about it later. I 
think wimmen must belong to em, as I seen a girl with one of the pins on. 

A tall red-headed Feller stopped me and asked me if I had ever matrickulated 
yet. I told him 1 thought I had a slight case of it the same summer Pa stuck a nail in 
his toe, and had toe-main poisoning. We got to talkin, and he sed he wuz President of the 
Y. M. Q. C. C. — You Must Quit Cussin' Club. He is also a member of the Mysterious 
Band. He tola me not to put too much stock in riches, and go to bed prompt at ten 
o'clock. I tole him much obliged, and at home we go at nine-thirty. 

Well, I must close with much love now, as I got to study some. Kiss Pa and 
all the rest of the animuls for me. 

Your affeckshionate son 

Bud 

P. S. — Please eckscuse pencil, somebody borrud my pen and ink. 





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Hop 



elessness 



"""TP"^^ ROL ND Ivm gleamed the city's lurid lights 
^^^^B And on his heart a sickening chill they cast; 
^ ■^ * Before him the dark water; twice he bites 
His lips, poor boy ! he'd come to this at last. 

Farewell each lingering hope, each cherished plan. 
For now they slowly, sadly fade away. 
And leave him there, a sick, heartbroken man, 
A gloomy ghastly ghost, too sad to pray ! 

His thoughts revert to that dear happy home 
\\ here he, when but a child, once loved to dwell. 
And later, like some truant b^rd, had flown 
Away. He knew his folly now too well ! 

.And then he thought of long-held hopes of bliss. 
Lugubriously from his sight they passed. 
Poor human being! all had come to this. 
Before him the dark water stretched at last. 

Full well he knew all would be finished soon. 
But without one protest he would not stoop 
To Fate. So meekly lifting up his spoon. 
He quavered: "Waiter, do you call this soup?" 



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Social Rules and Regulations 

(Approved by Faculty) 

' 1 — Place and Chaperonace. 

All parties are to be held in the Shearer Biblical Hall, or such public dance halls 
as omit all chaperones, for ihey are a nuisance on all occasions. 

2 — Time. 

The aforesaid parties shall be held on school nights, in fact any evening which is 
convenient. Examination per-od is suggested as a good time to hold these parties, as a 
little recreation is needed between crams. 

3 — Hours. 

Parties must never close before 2.30 a. m. If held in Charlotte, they may close 
later, so as to give the boys all morning m which to get home. Formal parties may last 
indefinitely. 

4 — Expense. 

This is a mere detail. One cannot spend too much on parties, as they are a 
splendid form of amusement. 










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LcHcrs of a Cii'mese Sciioolboij 

i -I- I- 

Wang Senfong enters Davidson 

To the Honorary Esq. CraJy, of Shanghai, ivho .supply Ami-rican Education to mc: 

^^^^^^^ EAR MR. SIR: — This noble institution have lastly opened its gates, and I am recorded ai 
I H a Freshman of the Intellectual Degree. The train which is defined in this region as the 
^^^^^^ "dumb dumb line" (when I asked for why, a Seniorman declaimed that I was "dumby"). 
bears me hereto, and I descend with baggage in one arm. and checks in another, into a rep- 
resentation man of the Y. M. C. A. He requires my name, and I instruct him. while he manipulates mc 
to the Free Lunch Counter of the College for hamwich and introduction. 

I try to engage conversationally with my upright friend with the badge, and succeed failfully. 
According as our polite Chinese custom. I require his age. 

He look shockly in surprise to me. and echo, "My age?" 

Before he report, a man behind a cigar pass by and assist him. "He is forty-three years aged." 

"Oh! Ah!" I intrude astonishedly. and marvel at such falsication in goodly Davidson. 

"That is the gym." my friend direct laterward with his chin. 

"Jim who?" 1 pronounce politefully. 

"Jim Nasium." he utter explainly. and I repress my surprise that buildings has human names. My 
surroundants laughs m concourse. 

I am led to a room for the night with a Sophomoreman. who is demanded to preserve me in good 
condition till the tomorrow. "You had better beware the bleeding Sophomoremen" advised a kind friend, 
but the Sophomoreman with me displays no wounds on his surface, and I marvel why for they declare 
this. 

The next day inst. I enter the institution with form, by answering an index of questions regarding 
me. before, now, and hereafter, and why for should I come here. I explained the blame on you. Then 
I was assigned to studying, and paid my $s to the moneytaker. 

It was negotiate to me that the college rooms were abundantly occupied, and I ask it where to 
abide. I was instruct to a home room on the street for the temporary, and his Hon. a Seniorman directed 
me and my possessions hereto. 



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A Sophoreman introduced me to him. and a^k to know with jolly teelh where I "put up." 

"Put up what,'* I require ignorantly. 

"Put up yourself." he returns stately. "Room." 

I inform the house lo him and the room, and ask him to come on. but he move back, quothing 
very \'. M. C. A.-ly that he would invile the pleasure of visiting me tonight, to which I was in very 
gratitude. 

But when I related this kind friend to the lady m the home, she smilefully warned me that the 
Sophomoremen were often Pharisees, and I enterlain her notion entirely. 

My kind friend, who I was advised to call Hon. "Bucky" Knocks, postpone his engagement, and 
I retire lo my couch, but was awake very starlly by a loud emotion out of the window. 

For the following which happened. 1 quote to you ihe conversing of Hon. "Bucky" with a 
brother Sophomoreman. which I overfound the morrow morning. 

"Of the entire luck," declaim him rageiy, "this were the most inferior. I elevate a ladder after 
middle-ni£»ht to that Chink's window, or which was in my calculating. Having crawled the window, 
and perceived the location of his couch. I approached it softfully. in purpose lo shove it over him. But 
there are a sudden interruption in the doorway. A white kimona people stood thereto before me, and 
scream womanfully, 'Robbers'. 1 apologize immediately, *Oh, Miss Janet. I have caused a serious mistake. 
Forgive me'. 'I will call mother.' she exclaim squeakingly. 'For good sake, don't'; I anguish in terror, 
and come lo my knees. 'Will you leave right now, then?* she cry; 'if I don't summon.' 1 heartily agree, 
and flee from the embarrassment. I cannot get the Chink now till he abides in the dormantary'," and he 
ceased in cannibal temper. 

The after mail, he received the following cpi?tle enjoining from mc. 

"Chinks can have white kimonas. and scjueak like womanhood. For why were you so scared o^ 
mc? Signed, Wanc Senfong. ' 

I will dream laughing tonight. Ynu will reprove I did not become the actions of a Presbyterian 
heathen, but I was not lo be deplored a fool by the Sophomoreman. 

Hoping you are the same. 

Yours truly 

Wang Senionc 



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Glcc Club Concert 

(A5 11 bllOLLD BL) 
+ 

Personnel 

First Tenor de la Skyscraper Primo Arrowood 

Second Tenore Tremulo a la Wheeze THOMPSON, E. B. 

First Basso profundo de la tempo pianissimo disgusto McGeacHY 

Short Stop Barytonio la beato somnambula Price, F. W. 

Second Basso a la lionissimo Barber Shop RoDDEY 

* 

Repertoire 

One Squealsy Solemn Thought (Con expressione) Mr. THOMPSON 

The Moss-Covered Molar that Hung in Grandpa's Jaw QuARTET 

Our New Baby is a Howling Success ...McGeacHY 

Far from the Old Soaks at Home MoRRISON, J. K. 

Sacred Duet — Sister's Teeth Are Plugged with Zinc — Messrs. Arrowood and 

RoDDEY. 

Like an Onion Needs Its Fragrance QUARTET 

You Remind Me of Someone I Want to Forget Mr. THOMPSON 

Duet — Father's Shoes Will Soon Fit Willie MESSRS. MoRRISON AND McGeachy 

Grand Finale — One Parting Kick I Give Thee — Entire Company, with Ballet 
Girls. 



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Now Wouldn'i W Be Funnij I{— 

X"^r LIM should catch the mumps? 

«0|k Awchie Baker got to Chapel on time? 

K^ J The Chapel should be heated on a cold morning? 

Norman Johnson got a little taller? 
A few of the Fresh should speak to upper classmen? 
Dr. Shearer should be seen without his basket? 
'Archibald" Currie should get energetic? 
Etc. 



The silvery moon had risen, 
Oh, how then- hearts did burn! 
Her lips was up 'gainst his'n 
And his'n up against her'n ! 




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Tliat Needless Cliaf)ei 



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WAS llic Iwenly-ninth day of December, 1914 — clear, cold, and penelraling. About eight 
o clock in the morning, a bell might have been heard pealing out its joyful summons over 
ihe deserted campus of the College, for alas! all had departed to their respective— and. lei 
us hope, respectable, homes, leaving the joys of the College to some seven men. 

1 hese same seven men. after long and heated discussion, had decided that this particular day 
should be set apart for a memorial service in the Chapel, lo be held at the usual time, and in the usual 
manner. All preparations were made, and the seven retired joyfully to their downy(?) couches in antici- 
pation of the treat awaiting them on the morrow. That is why. promptly at eight o'clock the next morn- 
ing, the bell began its insistent summons to the sleeping to awake. 

Promptly on the first stroke of the last bell, young Wilkinson, sometimes known as the "Chink" 
(perhaps because of his aversion lo that particular form of worldly goods known as chink), came run- 
ning out of Chambers Building, collar and tie in one hand, with the other holding up ihe nether garments 
which covered his limbs, his shoes and coal unbuttoned, and hair disheveled; but none of these minor 
details hindered his progress toward the designated place of morning worship. To this young man mu5t 
be given the honor of being the first in attendance; but he was quickly followed by Big Chief Mullen. 
.Alphabet Wertz. DuBose. Marvin, and one of the Woods boys. The service was temporarily delayed on 
account of the tardiness of Doctor Chink Woods, who was to lead the service, A messenger was hastily 
despatched to his abode to arouse him. and some moments later the venerable Doctor was seen hurryng 
acro:s the campus, clad only m pajamas, slippers, a bathrobe, and his usual dignity. 

When the Doctor entered the building, ihe student body, represented by Marvin, promptly moved 
off the register, which had been left cold in order to get the usual daily effect during the Winter, and 
look his seal. The facully, which was Mr. Mullen, occupied the usual faculty seats In the rear of the 
building. Mr. DuBose constituted the orchestra of eight pieces, and the rendition of ihc doxology was 
truly beautiful and impressive. ."Xfter singing of the doxology. in which the entire student body and 
faculty joined. Doctor Woods announced a hymn, and asked that everybody stand and sing. It is said 
that the singing of this hymn was heard for several blocks away in the city, and several members of the 
erstwhile faculty quickly dressed and came to the scene of activity to learn the source of the heavenly 
music. 

Doctor Woods, or as he is familiarly called by the boys who love him so dearly. "Pretzels." read 
several chapters from the Book of Hezektah. laying special emphasis upon the words, "Lo, here am I." 
He then called upon Mr. XX'ilkinscn lo lead in prayer, but Mr. Wilkinson asked that he be excused, on 
account of a difficulty in arliculalion. The facully. Mr. Mullen, very quickly accepled the privilege, and 
led the student body in prayer. 



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Every memhcr of the faculty had some announcements to make In regard to the work for the 
New Year. 

The student body decided to ask the faculty to grant a holiday of one week for Easter, and a 
committee of three was appointed to consult with the president regardmg this matter. At the meeting of 
the Athletic Association, the annual basket-ball game with the Charlotte Y. M. C. A. was announced, 
and It was urged upon all to go. One member of the faculty offered to lend the money to any who 
needed it. for he said that he had been a student himself, and "knew just how It felt" to be financially 
embarrassed. 

The other meetings were not of any importance, and it was not long before all the students were 
on their way to breakfast. Several men were injured slightly in the usual jam at the door, as was only 
natural when one considers that the entire student body had been delayed some minutes in getting off to 
breakfast; but it is thought that they will all recover readily. 

Several men have been heard to express themselves as being highly pleased with the meeting, 
and no doubt there will be another meeting as soon as the faculty declares the Easter holiday. 







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g^.-^-— ^ . ^m ^ ^^^:- ■ ^-o 



l\\e Dollar In^crsoll, or Tlic Watcli Tliat 
Made Time Notorious 

X"^V' PRINGTIME was carefully but tearlessl\ wending its way along the boule- 
SM^ vard of Autumn, while the all-too-short day? of Winter were smoothly bcng 
^mm^ equatorialized by the Sumn;er solstice. Snow had bended low the arborescent 
adornments of Saskatchewan, though fruit hung in abundance on the pineapple 
bushes of Southern Bolivia. I was casually strolling amidst the verdure and fragrance of 
a certain locality of none too positive cognomen. The day had about spent its little life, 
and the grimy hand of darkness was stealthily touching hill and dale here and there over 
the distance of Nova Scotia, and the twittering of the crow could be heard as he sailed 
across the green fields to his nest in a massive oak at the foothills of Mount Everest. A 
groundhog ran across my path en route to his mansion in the subterranean passageways of 
purgatory. 

Numberless sounds came to my ears, some of which had a tendency to make the 
corpuscles of my constitution to compistulate with an effervescing enhansibility. I was 
becoming grossly excited, with so many new experiences forcing themselves thus unceremon- 
iously upon me. The incongruity of the occasion was extemporaneously unendurable, 
when, suddenly, through the foliage of the forest to the east, I saw the rising moon coming 
into view above the faraway sustaciated menflariancencies. Due to some unexpositorial 
delusion, the heavenly bodies have always had a soothing, yea a comforting, indeed, a 
most consoling, effect upon me. Immediately my fevered brow and throbbing bosom 
became as calm as the loudest silence. A flood of memories swept through my peaceful 
brain, as I gazed fixedly at the Luna Latanica et Asteranica. Blissfully exquisite 
elementaries of boyhood days, when Love's young dream initiated its delectations into 
my life, stood before me as plainly as though I had reverted through some forty years. 

I was entranced. The realities of the present had no horrors for me now. My 
surfatorial paradoxicalness had given way to some strange teleoinflated endogenous 
apathy. A peculiar exclusiveness was twining its fetters around me as I stood there 
beneath the great dome of atmosphereiosity. 



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Gradually, I was cognizant of being slowly lifted to ethereal regions. Finally, I 
reached the Bambosiosity of Gerevantual, where people live as long as they care, and 
die when they please ; where life is a continuous round of Blissfulissimusses and Delighted- 
ingtatoses. Wonderful are the sights of that original sphere, and would that I were 
given the powers of transference to rehabilitate to you the excresiences thereof. 

Next, in some pacificac'ous manner, I was carried to the great exchange of all the 
universe, where a man may trade off his old troubles for new ones. All the aggravations of 
my college days I bartered for a paroxysmal cumulation of (issaparous appetencies. 

While on my way to one of the four corners of the swapsitory, I became ine.x- 
tricably conglomerated in corr.passtorial tendencies, and was surreptitiously ferro, ferre, 
tuli, lalumed off into oblivion, from which 1 have never returned, but where I am spend- 
ing the rest of my days as lineman for the Neoterical Wireless Corporation, Inc., in hopes 
that sometime, away back in the future, I may get into communication with my great-great- 
great-grandchildren, who live in the imagination of an extraordinarily imaginative 
cranium. 




FLUNKED! 



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^_ Mfw.r- ^^iJP^^..^.^.-- .^ 



^1^^^^^ AR'S a man in de moon, 
■ I Dar's a man in de moon, 

0^^*^^ And think o' de things dat he sees 
When he shmes do\vn m June, 
When he shmes down in June, 

And peeks through de leaves an' de trees. 

An' I 'spec' frum his place 

Way up yonder m space, 
He hez heard Love's sweet story so ol' ; 

Though he's heard it befo' 

Still each time loves it mo' — 
It's a story dat never gits col'. 

An' I guess when he sees 

Lovers down 'mongst de trees, 
Dat his smile am a good thing ter see; 

Fer ter know hearts is twinin' 

While his beams is shinin' 
Mus' appeal to dat man — 'twould ter me ! 



Km S^^^ 



QUIPS IIP CRANKS 



Prcf 



reface 

FEELING that Noah Webster had never had the 
advantages of a strictly up-to-date college edu- 
cation, we thought it incumbent upon us to pub- 
lish a work which should contain the revised meanings of 
the words in most common use today. 

We feel sure that you will use our Dictionary with a 
great deal of pleasure and profit, and we assure you that it 
is the very highest authority. 

(Copies of this splendid work may be obtained from the 
publishers at cost. Bound in half-morocco, only $598.00 
for the set of fourteen volumes. Terms arranged to su t 
purchaser. Only one set to a customer. Apply at once. ) 



A GRIND I AM. A GRIND I'LL BE, 

A GRIND THROUGH ALL ETERNITY 

—J. K. MORRISON 



^ ^^^^ 



P\ fMO 



■ QUIPS liM.CRANKS^ 



A 

A — Correct form of "uh. " 

Anxious — State of student's mind about the time reports go out. 

Apparatus — The ultimate object of laboratory work (to find the apparatus). 

Antiquated — Faculty wouldn't allow us to print definition. 

Answer — Something sought after by professors. 

Angora — A hairy, homy animal, frequently lost by students. 

.Affluence — We have not yet been able to comprehend the meaning of this word. 

Address — Frontispiece of a letter for money. 

Ablution — See Bath. 

Ape — See Freshman. 

Aqua — Commercial name for booze. 

Archangel — A term synonomous for student. 

Armful — A plump girl. 

Average — Usually about seventy per cent. 

B 
Babble — See girls. 

Baggage — A little of everything in one bag. 
Backwoods — Where they come from. 
Balance — A joke on the Bank. 
Baptist — See Wake Forest. 
Bare — A large, hairy animal. 

Baritone (Beartone) — Cross between tenor and bass. 
Bass — Polite form of growl. 

Bedding — Meaning unknown. Thought to be a species of mattress. 
Bull — See Meat. 

Bill — William when he's 1 ttle. Short for "Please remit" (Never heard at Davidson). 
Bone — To make folks believe that you're really studying. 
B. V. D. — "Verily it sticketh closer than a brother." 
Broke — ^'hat General Sherman called war. 

c 

Calendar — Something which tells us when it's time to go to Church. 
Call (morning) — A vam repetition. 

Camel — A very foolish animal that makes one drink last it two weeks. 
Cat — An inhabitant of the Bug Lab. 



^^ ^5 



^ QUIPS .JIRC RANKS^ 

f^"~ I ..''"' ■ — . ■ ... , .., * ^L^ ' V-J -xJ .^.X-xXJ-X^ . ' ,.,.,. ^ , ..BllM 



Chafing-dish — A female frying-pan. 

Chaste — Something done to Freshmen (Sometimes incorrectly spelled Chased). 

Check — A small monthly visitor. 

Chicken — A nice lookmg girl. Very seldom used as meaning a form of meat. 

Classes — Means employed to keep the faculty out of mischief. 

Coat — Somethmg to cover the holes m a shirt. 

Coffee — A dark brown drink, sometimes known as "slops. ' 

Cold — Condition of radiators on Sunday afternoon. 

Cone — A delusion and a snare. 

Cream — What goes in it. 

Crip — A purely nominal study, such as the evolution and nature of matter. 

Cut — To get suddenly sick at Class time. 



Dad — The man who's always broke. 
Darn — See Socks. 

Dear — The way the letter starts. Venison. 

Deposit — An agreement with the Banker to cancel your overdrafts. 
Done — Past tense of "do," such as "I done it." 

Duds — Glad rags. Sunday-get-a-beating clothes. Something to put on. 
Dunce — Now obsolete at Davidson; formerly one whose head was composed mostly of 
bone. 



Eloquence — See Bull. 

Endowment — What we're waiting on. 

Eat — To wrap one's self about food. 

Elective — Deceiving name for something which isn't. 

Experiment — Doing work to find out somethmg you already know. 

Expel — An idle threat. 



Farewell — A fond embrace. 

Flask — Something which contains the staff of life. 

Flush — See Poker. 

Forget — Something the student frequently does; the Professor never. 



^ ^^^^ 



QUIPS i^CRANKS 



t^w..^.,..-.^ 



G — A frequent harmless expression. 

Gape — A polite hint to company that it's leaving lime. 

Garb — Your clothes when they're not pressed. 

Gentleman — A man when he wants to ask a favor. 

Green — Freshman class colors. 

Grits — Running mate of beef. 

Gush — To speak sweet honeyed nothings in strict confidence. 

H 

Hack — Old form of taxicab. See Depot. 

Hardtack — Correct name for biscuit. 

Harem — See Turkey. 

Hash — Review of reviews. 

Hazy — The condition of a student's reply. 

Heat — The ultimate object of a radiator; not as yet attained. 

Holiday — What's been abolished at D. C. 

Hose — Same thing as socks, only longer. 

I 

Ice — The result of keeping water in a steam-heated dormitory. 

Icthyosaurus — The difference between a frog. 

If — We couldn't think of a satisfactory definit-on, the word applies to too many thing". 

India-Rubber — Material of which necks are made. 

Ink — Ten cents' worth of nothing in a pretty bottle. 

Institute — Davidson. 

Intoxicated — Polite remark about a man who staggers. 

It — What we're all seeking. 

J 

Jack — A very present help in time of trouble. 

Jackass — Prehistoric animal which, according to Darwin, was the forerunner of the 

College Freshman. 
Jaw — The reason we talk. 
Junk — See Furniture. 
Joke — A near-funny story intended to incite laughter. 



^ ^^^^ 



A=^ IMD 



„ QUIPS ffil CRANKS^ 



K 

Kiss — An approach lo Paradise. One method of spreading disease. 
Know — What we're supposed to do. 

L 

Label — A paper which says "this is the only genuine. " 

Labor — Meaning unknown, and we don't care to discover it. 

Lamp — What we use for study after midnight; the father of "midnight oil. 

Late — Baker's favorite word. Also jee Chapel. 

Lather — The first installment on a shave. 

Learn — A hopeless task. 

Laugh — An intermittent noise supposed to be emitted when a joke is told. 

Love — The eternal contradict-on. 

Luxury — A Sunday morning snooze. 

M 

Mark — The thing that produces indignation in the home folks. 

Man — A student who manages to get his "d p. " 

Marriage — The end of life. 

Meander — The way in which students go through parallel readings. 

Mile — Distance to grub when you're hungry. 

Model — Term applied to Seniors. 

Mister — Term applied to Seniors by Freshmen only. 

Manicure — The divinity that shapes our ends. 

N 

Never — The date on which some of us will get our d'plomas. 
Night — The time when everybody (?) studies. 
Naughty — Sa'd to mean not very nice. 
Note — A young letter. 

o 

Oh — Exclamation used when a Professor corrects a student. 
Oath — Exclamation used after the student leaves the room. 
Oh Gee — Contraction of "Whoops, my dear." 
Optimist — The guy who sees the doughnut. 
Old Man — Affectionate term for father. 



^ ^^^^ 



OUIPS iilCRANKS 



^^^_>^w-- .JM^\^ M.^':^1J ^'^*'"^T L^ 



p 

Pa— See Dad. 

Paronomasia — Look it up; that's what we had to do. 

Partridge — A bird which is bought and shown to admiring friends as a proof of gun- 

manship. Ask Jim Carson. 
Pawn — Correct form of hock. 

People — Those who don't go to College: the hoi polloi. 
Pill — A sure cure for anything in the world. 
Prescription — A piece of paper written in Greek which says: "Three times a day 

before meals. Price, two dollars. " 
Postage — The price of a letter. 
Press — See Moonlight. 

Punt — Kicking the ball before it has a chance to get out of the way. 
Pony — Dignified name for a jack — usually an interlinear. 
Professor — An individual who is hopelessly lost. 
Publication — The only one in existence is QuiPs AND Cranks. 



Question — "Something frequently asked by fools which wise men cannot answer. 

R 

Razor — Something used to peel the face with. 

Reindeer — Corrupt form of "Rain, dear. " 

Rent — See Bursar. 

Reports — "Nothmg to say, my father: nothing at all to say." 

Roof — A network affair of tin, through which to study the stars. 

Runt — Name applied to diminutive individuals of the genus homo. 



Sabbath — "Oh, that glorious sleep." 

Sal\AT10N — An interlinear jack. 

Sandwich — Packing material. 

Scarce — The way money looks to us all the time. 

Sha\'E — Removing traces of our ancestry — according to Da 

She — The Queen. 

Shoe — Creator of corns. 

Skirt — Familiar name for a dress which has a lady in it. 



^^^^ 






Sin — Meaning unknown. 

Sleep — Meaning unknown. 

Song — An expression of misery. 

Stung — What the fellow says the girl was — after it's all over. 

Stocking — Female sock. " 

Summary — Hash. 

Swear — Now obsolete. 

Sympathy — "What every woman knows." 

T 

Talk — Exercise for the jaw; never for the brain. 

Tennis — A game in which white trousers and a variety of racquets are necessary. 

Thin — A story of how you got left in Charlotte. 

Tip — Paying somebody to do something you d'dn't want done. 

Trousers — Pants when they're new. 

u 

Uncle — Pa's brother. 

University — Several Colleges served on one dish. 

Useless — An adjective applied to study. 

V 

Vaudeville — A would-be naughty show which doesn't succeed. 

Victuals — Same thing as grub. 

Vulgar — Bad, obscene, such as "Pshaw"; "Oh, Piffle." 

w 

Wager — A bet in which a girl takes part. 

Wet — What water is, and also what it does; mostly does. 

Writing — Modern hieroglyphics. 

Y 

Yarn — What we call the other fellow's story. 

Yes — The opposite of No. 

Yesterday — The burial ground of all our hopes. 

z 

Zero — A tiny circular mark which to students means nothing, but to their parents means 

something very definite. 
ZyG0M0RPH0U.S — The reason a chicken has feathers. 



^^ ^ 



D^ 



QUIPS 



/=V IMD 



.CRANKS^ 



I 



AM a-\veary, brother dear. 
And am a-feeling sad. 

My heart is dreary, brother dear, 
Alas, I feel so bad! 



"I've only met her, brother dear. 
And yet I saw her smile — 
And can't forget her, brother dear. 
She could make hie worth while. 



"But now the joy within me fades — 
Is this true love, dear brother?" 

"No, fool, that is the three limeades 
^'ou drank one after another." 




^^^^ 



_ QUIPS li^CRANKS^ 



Wc Wonder 

IF Dr. Harding will ever miss a class? 
If the Fresh got snowballed last February? 
If Thompson ever drank a dope? 
If "Jerry" will ever dismiss a Class on time? 
What College was intended for? 
Mow much the Annual will "go in the hole" this year? 

•J- ■\- ■{• 

Extracts from \\\z Notebook of "Mouse-Trap Charlie" 

' ' "^^^^^ BISCUIT in (he hand is worth two in the kitchen, and even likewise doth a mouse 
^^b^H between the sheets provoke more pleasure than several of them in hiding elsewhere. ' 

W ^^J^^ "Verily, my son, a pestiferous friend is much to be feared. He causeth more 

trouble than a half-dozen enemies. He cometh to kiss thee good-night, and then tieth 
knots in thy sheet whilst thy back is turned. Yea, he even runneth off with thy night garments, so thai 
thy sleep is much disturbed." (Such an one is Pharr.) 

"Much study is a weariness to the flesh, and cramming is a burden scarcely to be borne. There- 
fore, my son. lake time, and do thy loafino at Skit's, so that thou shall not become pale and emaciated, 
even like a Spooks," 

"When thou hasi anything to eat, lock thy door, and put a dark cloth over thy transom, so that 
strangers may think that thou sleepest. Only in such wise shalt thou be able to eat in peace. If thy 
door be opened, and thy transom not darkened, verily many friends shalt thou have, and they shall 
come in and devour all thy substance." 

"Be not afraid to make liberal use of Hinds and Noble's publications, for they are of much 
value — a very present help in time of trouble. It is thy duly to help support these deserving gentlemen." 

"When thou visiles! ihy home, wear a lengthened face, so that thy parents shall say to one another 
"Verily, he doth study hard. He needeth a long rest, and more recreation.' Then shall thy days at 
home be long, and when the time for leaving hath arrived, then shall thy old man slip thee a five-plunk 
note, and whisper in thine car: 'Splurge like a man, and have much pleasure'. " 



"THE HAIRS OF MY HEAD ARE NUMBERED", AND I CAN'T FIND 
THE BACK NUMBERS. ROLAND BROWN 



^ -=^^<= 






'WILD ANIMALS I HAVE KNOWN"- JOHN D. SMITH, BILLY PERSIAN, AND SKIT 



QUIPS Ji l..CRflNK5^ 



I 



Office Rules 

(As found on Bum Phair's door one day) 

F THE door IS not open, kick it ; it was made to stand open at all times. 

If we are very busy, make all the fuss you can. We are here for your 
accommodation, and will be glad to listen to you. 

If you chew tobacco, spit on the wall — it doesn't leak; or, if you are near the 
Radiator, take a shot at that. 

If we are not in, and you see anything you want, take it; we are always glad to 
oblige our friends. 

If we are counting money, take part of it; it will save us the trouble of counting it. 

If the Freshman is in, and asleep, dump him; it won't hurt the bed. 

If there is anything to eat lying around, eat it; we should be more careful. 

If we are writing letters to "our girl, " look over our shoulder, and read what we 
have to say. If you find a mistake, call our attention to it. 

If you want to borrow money, say so; we are running a bank. 

If we are studying, cuss a little; we should not be so thoughtless. 

If we are looking over the "dope " for the Annual, join us; we would like to have 
your criticism. After leaving, be sure to tell all your friends about it, so they will know 
what to expect. 

Above all else, ask all the fool questions you can think of; they are the kind that 
we love to answer. 

THE SEAT OF THE MIGHTY" SLIM GLOER'S CHAIR 



^^^ ^ 



QUIPS 




CRANKS 



^a 




W 



HEN Time, who steals our cares away. 
Shall steal our pleasures, too; 
The memory of these days shall live. 
And half our joys renew. 



^^^^ 



OL R lliouglils icvcrl llirough the years gone by lo 
llie college days of Woodfin Rampley and 
Clifton Murphy, who, in their eagerness to pro- 
mote the general welfare of Davidson College, would have 
established a newspaper in our midst, had it not been for the 
concerted opposition of a horde of narrow-minded students, 
unmindful of the splendid plan the two gentlemen would have 
|iul into execution. 

However, the progressive element of the present fully 
realize the generous spirit of the would-be journalists of long 
ago, recognize how unstintedly they worked for the cause 
which was so near and dear to their hearts, and who finally 
were thwarted in their efforts, leaving D. C. with sorrowful 
countenances and bleeding hearts. 

Therefore, it is in memory of these noble souls that we 
dedicate the following pages, trusting that they will come to 
feel that their work was not in vain. 




THE WEATHER 



Getting Fairer 



THE EXPOSTULATOR 



It Para to 

ADVE-RTISE 

With U« 



Vol. 13 -No. 23. 



PUBLISHED YESTERDAY BEFORE DAYLIGHT Price: Unknown 



MULLEN^YS NAY 

Mount Mourne, X. C. — Shaw- 
nee W. Mullen here today gave 
a statement to the newspapers 
making it clear that he will not 
be in the race for governor next 
campaign. "I am not a candidate 
for governor. I have not said. 
nor authorized anyone to say for 
me that I would accept the nomi- 
nation. I am deeply grateful to 
friends for letters received sug- 
gesting my candidacy and offer- 
ing support. I sincerely appre- 
ciate all these, but my purpose is 
to remain in private station, and 
bamboozle my friends and fellow 
citizens." 

The probable candidates for 
.governor as thus far developed 
arc: P. W. DuBose, H. B. Over- 
cash, A. S. Anderson, Edward 
Johnson, C. D. Whitely, and 
W. S. James. 




PHILOSOPHICAL 



Philadelphia, Pa.— Prof. Rupert 
McGregor, of Watts University, 
president of the American Philos- 
ophical Association, was the prin- 
cipal speaker tonight at the first 
general session of the Associa- 
tion's thirty-fifth annual meeting. 
President McGregor spoke on 
"The Trend of College Phil 
osophy." The only other speaker 
at tonight's session was Neill Sea 
wright Mclnnis, president of the 
Pennsylvania Philosophical So- 
ciety, who formally welcomed the 
members of the Association to 
Philadelphia. 

Today was Hven over to sec 
tional conferences. A half-dozen 
sections of the Association held 
meetings, each discussing a par 
ticular topic of ohilosophical in- 
terest. Those sections of which 
Prof. William McCombs and Dr 
James Gibbons were chairmen, re- 
ported very lively meetings. 

Many members devoted much 
of the afternoon to visiting his 
torical points about the city of 
"Brotherly Love." 



GREAT CALAMITY 
BARELY AVERTED 

LEADING CITIZEN NARROW- 
LY ESCAPES FEARFUL 
DEATH— QUICK ACT/ION 
OF PHARR SAVES HIS 
L I F E — HARROWING DE- 
TAILS BELOW. 

(Special to 'ihe Expostulator) 
One of Davidson's most promi- 
nent and influential citizens, C. L. 
King, narrowly escaped a horrible 
injury, probably resuhing i n 
death, last evening about 11.30; 
and had it not been for the quick 
action of Mr. Bum Pharr, who 
happened to be standing nearby, 
Mr. King would undoubtedly have 
been in a serious condition today. 
As it is, he is rather badly shaken 
up, and is exceedingly nervous 
from the effects of the scare. He 
is tlenying himself to all callers 
for a few days, but Dr. James 
Gibbons, his attending physician, 
remarked casually to our repre- 
sentative that he thought Mr 
King would be all right by to- 
morrow night. 

It seems that Mr. King had 
disrobed, as was his usual custom 
before retiring for the night, and 
had donned a suit of very attrac- 

( Continued on page 2) 



CONFLAGRATION 

A very disastrous accident oc- 
cured about nine o'clock last night, 
when the apartments of one of 
our leading citizens was almost 
ruined by fire and water. F. W. 
Price was sittin" in his easy chair, 
smoking a La Folwin before retir- 
ing, and inadvertently dropped oflf 
to sleep with the lighted cigar in 
his mouth. It is supposed that the 
gentleman's head must have fallen 
forward, which caused the ignited 
end of the Havana to come in 
contact with the lace on Mr. 
Price's dressing gown, setting that 
imported garment on fire. Price 
suddenly awakened, greatly fright- 
ened. Running madly around the 
room, he set fire to a number of 
the sporty pictures on the wall, 
the window curtains, and various 
other articles suscentible of in- 
flammability. His cries of "Fire" 
were heard by neighbors, who 
"turned the hose" on the young 
man from the Orient. The flames 
were extinguished, but not before 
they had done much damage. 



STILL AT LARGE 

Prof. Zebulon Roberson, who 
shot an honor man, and mortallx 
wounded several other near-honor 
men yesterday, and today fought 
a posse in the forests near Heidel- 
burg, a suburb of Exenstophen. 
has disappeared tonight. Constable 
Pip Young, of Abscence Town- 
ship, was killed after he had ar- 
rested Roher.son on a charge of 
assault and battery preferred by 
the Dutch Class. After killing 
Young, Roberson went to a cer- 
tain home in the citv, looking for 
his sweetheart, and shot two gen- 
tlemen who were not up on the 
declension of de dosh du deedle 
dur de dum um zu. 

Roberson fled before ofl'icers 
reached the scene. During the 
night, a posse exchanged shots 
with him in the woods. Today, 

(Continued on page 11) 



THE EXPOSTULATOR 



GREAT CALAMITY 
(Continued from page 1) 

live pajamas. He asked Mr. 
Pharr to extinguish the light for 
him as soon as he had arranged 
himself in hed. Pharr did as re- 
quested, 1)ade him good-night, and 
turned to leave the room. As he 
did so, he heard a shout of mortal 
pain and terror from King, and 
quickly turned on the light again 
to see what was the trouble. As 
he did so, King fairly flew by him, 
with all the bedclothes hanging 
to his person, and screamin^r for 
help at the top of his voice, while 
a ferocious mouse was pursuini 
him closely. Pharr, nerving him 
self to meet the exigencies of the 
occasion, bravely tackled the beast 
and after a terrific strtiggle, the 
noise of which was heard several 
doors away, he succeeded in 
catching hold of a rope tied 
around the animal's neck, and then 
he quickly strangled it into a state 
of submission. 

Felt the Brute's Claws 
Mr. King says that" he thinks 
someone, in an endeavor to play a 
joke on him, placed the wild 
animal in .some position where it 
would be disturbed when he en- 
tered the bed, for he distinctly 
felt the brute's claws as it attacked 
one of his limbs. When he 
attempted to kick the brute off, it 
started crawling toward his neck, 
and it was at that time that he 
shouted for help, with the result 
Siiat Pharr quickly ran back. 

An examination of the captured 
specimen by Dr. i rilobite Over- 
cash showed clearly that it was 
one of the few members that have 
remained from the carboniferous 
age, and as such is unusually 
ferocious. It is thought that it 
will be r.resented to the British 
Museum, as neither Pharr nor Mr. 
King care to keep the animal in 
captivity. 

Bravery Commended 
Mr. King is to be congratulate* 
on his narrow escape, and we have 
heard many complimentary re 
marks regarding the bravery and 
promptness of Mr. Pharr im 
venturing to attack the vicious 
animal single-handed and un- 
armed. 



FIRE DEPART- 
MENT REPORT 

The annual report of tin.- Imal 
Fire Department, which has- just 
been compiled by ."Kssistant Chief 
J. W. S. Gilchrist, reflects great 
credit upon the Department, show- 
ing that the laddies have done ex- 
cellent work during the past twelve 
months. The report as compiled 
by Mr. Gilchrist is, in part, as 
follows : 

"It is gratifying to report that 
while the number of tire alarms 
received during the year has been 
somewhat in excess of that of 
previous years, the loss of prop- 
erty by fire and water is much 
less than that in any of the past 
seventy-six years. 

The number of alarms received 
during the year was "0.824. Of 
this number, 54,381 came from the 
Georgia ward, while Oak ward 
gave only one call, this single 
alarm coming in the month of 
November, when Monsieur T. 
Roddey tried to hide the stove 
under his bed. 

In addition to the above, we had 
one call from out of town, for 
which no alarm was turned in. 
In this instance we sent a detail, 
and all needed assistance was 
rendered." 

It is also proper to mention 
that Assistant Chief Gilchrist did 
valiant work himself, as did 
Hoseman Hay, and Laddermen 
Price, Phnrr, Carriker, and Cran- 
ford. Much credit is due Chief 
W. E. W. Williams, whose lusty 
voice was instrumental in sound- 
ing many alarms, and who 
directed the work of the local 
fighters with great generalship. 

The year for the Fire Depart- 
ment begins on the first day of 
February, owing to the fact that 
the following dav is Groundhog 
Day. 



LOCAL NOTES 



PROFESSOR 

OVERGASH 

In an interview today with 
Prof. Bax Overcash, one of our 
reporters was advised that the 
bio-geological scholar's latest 

ork will be on sale within a few 
days. The Professor was in 
seclusion for over a year writing 
this volume; which will no doubt 
have an enormous sale. As has 
been noted in our columns on 
previous occasions, the title of the 
i>ook will be "The Eccentricities 
of the Trilobite." The Professor 
spent some months doing research 
work in Iredell County and his 
laboratory in preparation for this 
literary production. 



BUM JOKES 

BUM MANAGEMENT 

BUM PHARR 



Prof. E. Q. Pharr. of this city, 
win leave for New York, where 
he will attend the meeting of the 
International Committee of the 
United Sulphurious Association of 
Liars. He will remain several 
days conferring with the com- 
mittee concerning some wildcat 
schemes he has concocted at odd 
moments and stuck up his sleeve. 



Tonight at the spring meeting 
of the Consolidated Clubs of the 
city, Zebulon Vance Roberson 
will be the guest of honor. Col- 
onel Roberson is on a visit South 
for a short recuperative period 
after his strenuous three months' 
participation in the Exchange. 
By way of reminiscence, our hon- 
ored visitor will speak this even- 
ing on "How I Put the National 
League on a Paying Basis." 

Samuel B. Woods was removed 
yesterday morning from h ? apart- 
ments to St. Smiklefritz Hospital, 
in a precarious condition. For 
vears Mr. Woods has been a 
sufferer from insohrietacious in- 
somnia. During the last few 
weeks he had been probably ptow- 
ing worse, and it was decided that 
his removal to more comfortable 
quarters would be best. .A.fter 
a consultation of the hospital staff 
of physic'ans last night, it was 
given out that the patient had 
very slight chance for recovery. 



THE EXPOSTULATOR 




COTILLION 

The cotillion given by Mr 
Thomas Prince Johnson, Monday 
night, at the Country Club, was 
one of the most deiightful func- 
tions of the midwinter season 
Miss Dunlop Roddev led with Mr. 
Johnson, and Miss Frankie Pini 
and Mr. Barnard Bailey assisted 
The favors were beautiful, and 
some were unique. In the first 
figure, the ladies received Aus- 
tralian tinted cauliflower, and 
the men jardinieres. One of the 
most beautiful was called the but- 
terfly figure, and for this the lights 
were turned out, and for eacl" 
young woman a pair of exquisite 
wings, bril'iant in weave and 
beauty, was fastened on the 
shoulders, and the young men 
dancing with the butterflies car- 
ried electric sparklers. Another 
favor figure gave the ladies 
vanity boxes and the gentlemen 
shaving sticks. 

After midnight, a delicious sup- 
per was served at a large round 
table at which the chaperones wen 
seated, and the younger people 
were at two long tables. 

The clubhouse was appro- 
priately decorated with preen and 
crimson flowers, and Professor 
Brown's orchestra of eight piece* 
furnished the music. 

The chaperones were Mrs. H 
L. Elliot, Mrs. W. K. Boswell, 
Mrs. Query Pharr, Mrs. W. L 
Menzies, and Mrs. L. B. Crayton 
The other guests were Miss Dun- 
loo Roddev, Miss Frankie Pirn 
Miss Willie Norris, Miss Tinsic 
Bifzer. Miss Beatrice Powell, Miss 
Jeemie Carson, Miss Norman 
Farrior, Miss Rankin. Miss Fred- 
die Hav; and the men were Mr. 
Will McCombs, Mr. John Gloer, 
Mr. Fred Harkey, Mr. Avery 
Hart. Mr. Willie Spnint. Mr. 
Barnard Bailev. Mr. McGeachv 
Mr. Spooks McCormick. and Mr. 
James Euchandermal Cousar. 



KINDERGARTEN- 

Miss Minnie Arrowwood had 
her little Kindergarten Class to 
cive an entertainment last week 
for their parents and friends. The 
little tots enjoyed the novelty of 
performing immense'y, and the 
older folks vvere delighted. The 
entertainment' began with a son" 
"Welcome to You," sung by the 
entire Kindergarten. Master 
Georgia Hamilton then recited 
"The Village Blacksmith," and 
little Raesdale O'Neal sang "The 
Birdies' Ball." Next was the fun- 
bonnet chorus, in which were little 
Oavid Bond — Lane. Jessie Mc- 
Keithan, Willie Mclver, and — . 
who sang "A Sunhonnet Song." 
Latta Law and Clifford Carson 
next appeared in a little dialoc 
entitled "Whose Blossom is Oo?" 
The program closed with the 
"D-A-I-S-Y Song" by five cute lit- 
tle tots dressed in white and yel- 
low. In order of position, thev 
were Rawls Howard, Teddie 
Henderson, Kathleen Shane, 
Oavie Crawford, and Ralphine 
Dunn. The entertainment was 
treatly enjoyed, and we all hope 
Miss Minnie will have another 
one soon. 



BROWN-SMITH 

Miss Usa Alexander enter- 
tained at cards Saturday after- 
noon, in honor of Miss Rowland 
Brown. The house was I'.tnd- 
somely decorated with potted 
niants, orchids, and coronations. 
The prize for the highest score 
was won hv Miss Marion Mit- 
chell, an' Miss Brown, a prize as 
guest of honor. 

During the afternoon, little 
Miss Dorothy McKeithan. dressed 
.Ts Martha Washington, presented 
the prizes, and in a neat little 
rhyme announced Miss Brown's 
encatrement to Mr. Jnhn Din- 
widdie Smith, of the Old North 
State Tobacco Comnany. the we<i. 
ding to take place May 20. This 
announcement will be of interest 



to the entire State, as Miss 
Brown is a great granddaughter 
of the martyr, John Brown, of 
Civil War fame, and is a popular 
young woman, with a wide circle 
of friends. Mr. Smith is a pop- 
ular young athletic trainer, and 
made some enviable records on 
'he track during his college days. 
He is now engaged in trainitig 
the cigarette rollers of the big 
tobacco concern. 

Those who enioved Miss Alex- 
ander's hospitality, besides the 
euest of honor, were: Mesdames 
King, Elliot. Murray, Woods, and 
Bain. Also Misses Scarboroueh, 
Crisp, Carson, Bitzer, Hay. Price, 
Baker, Weedon, and Menzies. 

MUSICFEST 

Miss Wilson Cosby gave a de- 
lightful musicfest last night, at 
the home of Mr. ind Mrs. 
Thomas Sparrow, on Elm 
Avenue. Miss Cosby's voice was 
in fine fettle, and each and every 
number was heartily enjoyed by 
the friends who were invited to 
hear her. Miss Cosby has sung 
in grand opera several seasons in 
New York. 

Miss Crisp, who was the idol of 
the society circle in the city last 
season, has been married, and 
will, in company with her hus- 
band, visit here on her honey- 
moon. 

Mr. Earlicious Rowland was 
host at a luncheon yesterday at 
the Mecklenbure Inn, given in 
honor of Miss • Lattie Law. 

Mr. Darwin Huxley Brass 
Spenser, entertained Mr. and 
Mrs. Overcash at dinner last 
evening, at Helner's. the new 
cabaret restaurant. Mr. Spen- 
ser's graceful figure was shown 
to great advantage in the new 
dances — the tadpole wiufle. and 
the coca-cola gicele. which are 
danced in the aisles of this popu- 
lar restaurant. 

Miss Srarhoro entertained the 
Sninster Sewing Circle. Monday 
afternoon. 

The Friday Afternoon Book 
Cli'b will meet at three o'clock, 
with Mrs Hercules Hill 



THE EXPOSTULATOR 



THE EXPOSTULATOR 



DAVIDSON, N. C. 



EDITORS 

J. W. GUTHRIE and R. W. GILCHRIST 



PubUshed at Spnamodic Intervali 
SubKCriplion Price, Unknown 



EDITORIAL 

It is not our prerogative as an 
influential newspaper to dog- 
matize as to what shall be done 
in our city and what shall be re- 
frained from — we desire only to 
suggest and noint out various 
evils ocoftsionally, and leave to 
the cqnsideration of our fair- 
minded readers what course shal' 
be taken. But, when we see 
somethin"- most radically out of 
harmony with the surroundings, 
and which has been trfiis for some 
while without receiving attention. 
it becomes our duty, as the 
wielder of the iournalistic pen, tc 
speak very plainly. For a good 
many years, the Southern Rail- 
way has been running trains 
through our town, and giving u! 
good service, but the appreciation 
shown has not amounted to a,« 
much as the music in a cornstalk 
fiddle. Many tunes the 7.30 p. m 
train arrives, and not more than 
nine-tenths of the college boys are 
there to meet it, and these only 
stand around with their hands in 
their pockets gawking at the pas 
sengers. There must be a change 
for the better. More people mus' 
go to the station every day. Try 
to meet every train, and go in 
and ask the express a^rent if he 
doesn't think he has a package 
for ■"ou from home. You should 
always go down to the tele- 
graph office at twelve o'clock, to 
see whether your watch is correct 



inquire of the agent how late the 
I'cxt train is, and, in fact, spend 
jrst as much of your time at the 
station as yOu possibly can spare 
Don't be a tightwad, and sit in 
your room with your head buried 
in a book, but open up, and show 
your twentieth century broad- 
visioned senses, and go to the 
depot whenever a train is due. 
You might see someone go 
through sometime whom you 

know. 

* * * . 

Always, with the gay socia' 
season at co'lege, comes the criti- 
cism of the new dances. A great 
deal has been said on both sides 
and it is impossible to present all 
the arguments to our readers. I 
is our nersonal opinion that the 
tango, if danced correctly, is all 
right; but that some of the other 
dances are not. There is neither 
grace nor beauty in some of the 
dances that have been produced 
at the dansants and tango tea? 
here this season, and high life ha? 
been almost too high for good 
taste. Such dances as the "Junioi 
Astronomy Fall," the "Coal 
Swiper Wiggle," and the 
"Tommy Trot" are a disgrace to 
an enlightened society such as we 
have here. If our social leader? 
would confine themse'ves to the 
older and more dignified dances 
we believe a more general spirit 
of satisfaction would prevail. 

* * * 

Somebody now comes to the 
front, and claims that there is r 
screw loose at the Insane Asylum 
— the accoi'nts are not right. \Vc 
didn't think that anything there 
was supposed to be right. 



When the roll is called up 
yonder — will Baker be there on 

time? 

* * * 

He who sleeps on the floor 
need not fear dumping. 



CURRENT POETRY 



ODE TO DUTY 

Duty ! ah, lovcl" word, which 
personified, drives dull care away 
and brings gladness into dark 
and saddened lives. Your form, 
so ethereal in constitution, so 
ambrosial in delectation, so ex- 
quisite in delineation, haunts the 
very portals of my indulgence. 

You ride upon the wings of ex- 
clamation, and pause at the well 
of superficiality, and sob your 
•irief of sapondolgence. Never 
does your presence enter the de'e- 
gadations of frezicndum, nor do 
you spread your caressing con- 
viviality amid the rostrujuhader- 
casens which make life to swell 
with semblanworcranstalter. 

Go on your way, and drink in 
he wine of the cods who fash- 
■oned you, but ponder lest you 
disturb the quietude of my joy- 
nusness, as I sail so merrily 
down the stream of Konfinctions. 
"arewell. proud monarch, fare- 
well : and may you live long and 
•Prosper. 



One of the most beautiful lit- 
tle poems that has come to our 
tab'e in some time is the quat- 
rain. "My Darling." in last week's 
Oilhcrrv Gacette. We pnhlish in 
full this striking bit of verse, 
from the plug, Mr. Jimson Weed : 

"I'm crazy 'bout you, Josephine, 
But I won't fort'et you quick ; 

Bi't like a piece of chewing cum. 
I'll stick, and stick, and stick" 

A plaintive, tender thine in the 
5hane of metrical beauty is that 
■^edicatorv poem to Mi=s Minnie 
Arrowood, bv Mr. lichottom 
Scott, the author of Ihe we'l- 
known "Odes to Sapolio," tbe 
rythmical harmony of which 
runs: 

(Continued on page 10) 



THE EXPOSTULATOR 



PERSONAL AND PERTINENT 




Mr. James Cousar Curious re 
cently received a letter from a 
former flame of his. Madam 
Murphy. 

Miss Celestine Siske has bought 
her a new vacuum with which she 
combs her hair every evening. 

Mr. Collie McDonald appeared 
on the streets yesterday chewing 
a new brand of tobacco. Blue 
Billygoat. 

Mr. C. M. Gibbs has recently 
joined the Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. Shanghai Foo Chow Wil- 
kinson left yesterday for the Fiji 
Islands, via Morganton, to enter 
the consular service. 

Mr. Chippy Crew Harper now 
teaches caiist,henics at the David- 
son Graded School. 

C. D. Whitely will leave Sat- 
urday night for a visit to Newton, 
where he apparently has some- 
thing to look after every few 
weeks. Kind of strange how 
Charles eases up that way. 

M*. Crooked Strait has re- 
turned from a visit to Scofield, 
accompanied by Mr. Skeeziks 
iJumas. 

Mr. Frederick Hay has found it 
necessary to take a small mirror 
on class with him, in order that he 
may ascertain whether or not he 
has his hair parted correctly, and 
his tie stationed at the right angle. 

Mr. Neill Mclnnis is now tak- 
ing a correspondence course witl 
the Great Northern Amotclogical 
School, of Detroit, and hopes to 
receive a certificate for the com- 
pletion of a renuircd number of 
hours' study next summer some 
lime. The course he is pursuing 
is called, in the Michican institu- 
tion's catalog, "The Six Months' 
DrI 1 in Pronosing." 

Mits Rawls Howard acci- 

' ■">■ bit her tongue off yes- 

in trying to introduce 

Haltimangiskie and Gig- 

ir .riTviich to some of her friends. 

It is rumored tint Mr. HctcuIc 
Hill wi'I make the punctuality roll 
this Spring. 



Station Agent Archer announces 
that hereafter his hours on duty 
will be lengthened from ten to 
twelve. 

Mr. Evangelical C. Murray was 
on the hill yesterday, represent- 
ing the Old Dominion Brewing 
Company, of Danville, Va. 

Mr. James Carson accidentally 
stumped his toe on the Chambers 
Building as he was walking 
across the camous yesterday. 

W. A. Mcllwane returned to- 
day from New Orleans, where 
he attended a meeting of the 
Southern Story Tellers' League, 
of which he has lately become 
president. 

Andrew Scroggins Anderson 
has lately had installed in his 
rooms an electrical device, 
which serves breakfast to Mr. 
Anderson's energetic rootiA-mate, 
Mr. Chinese Woods, while the 
gentleman from the Orient lies 
peacefully upon his downy couch. 

The last report from Woody 
McKay was to the effect that he 
was coon hunting in the Canal 
Zone. 

An Associated Press report 
comes just as we are going to 
press stating that Hon. Isaac 
Walton was elected at a late hour 
counsel for the Staunton (Va.) 
Greek shoe-shining parlors. 

Friends and acquaintances will 
be glad to hear that E. B. Thomp 
son, formerly in the employ of 
the Chinmunk Goober Company, 
as traveling salesman, has lately 
accepted a position as Southern 
representative and manager for 
The Dope Bottling Company, 
with headquarters in Columbia. 
.'i. C. Mr. Thompson is eminently 
fitted for the work he has recently 
taken up, as he is a connoisseur 
of the first water, and The 
F.xpostulator wishes him the high- 
est measure of success in his new 
'abors. 

An employee from the State in- 
stitut'on for the feeble-minded 
came yesterday to lake Messrs. 
Joseph Mack and D. B. Bond to 
the Morganton Home. 



Perhaps the volume which will 
have the largest number of re- 
prints after its initial anpearance, 
will be the neat little book just 
from the press, whose author is 
none other than the noted thinker, 
philosopher, and promoter, Hon. 
sViliiam Edward Williams, B. P. 
(Bachelor of Poetry), known to 
the reading public as "Den Lib." 
Mr. Williams has taken to the 
realms of fiction this season, and 
now gives us the beautiful little 
story, quite unique both in olot 
and description, of "Those Sec- 
ond-Hand Books." 



A truly dainty l-'ttle pamphlet 
has appeared this month from the 
pen of 6enior C. L. King. This 
work is bound in leather, and 
bears on the cover the figure of a 
man bent and searching for some- 
thing in the corner of a small 
room. The contents make an en- 
joyable evening's reading, and 
tell the story of a quest the author 
had in his youth, which never he- 
fore has reached the public. The 
title is "The Quest for the Lost 
Lucre." 

Herr W. K. Boswell has just 
had issued, from the printing- 
house of Van Monscnigrin, Fan- 
dekanslogger, and Waxelzubben, 
three volumes of the edition 
Supcrbelas of the works of the 
great scientist, Everett Bishon. 
who spent much of his life with 
Herr Boswell. and whose say- 
ings are well known . to the Ger- 
man author and biographer. 

BOOKS LATELY 

RECEIVED AT 

THE LIBRARY 

Menzies — "The Cordiality of 
Science." 

Williams, Shorty — "Short Chap- 
ters from a Hiker's Diary." 

Golden — "A Short Course in 
Chemistry." 

(■Continued on page to) 



THE EXPOSTULATOR 



GAS 

NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL 

BOUNTIFUL SUPPLY ON HAND 
AT ALL HOURS 



CAN FURNISH IN CARLOAD 
LOTS IF NECESSARY 



WRITE, PHONE, OR TELEGRAPH, OR MERELY INSINUATE TO 

W. T. BITZER 



No. 34 CHAMBERS BUILDING 



THE EXPOSTULATOR 



FORUM 



TO ABOLISH LOCAL OFFICE 

Dear Editor : — Permit me a few 
lines of space in your very valu- 
able paper, in which I may bring 
before the nublic a matter which, 
it seems to me, should receive the 
consideration of every one of 
your readers. 

For sometime past, I have 
noticed how poorly the local post- 
office is patronized. One can eo 
there any time, from earl-- morn- 
ing until late at night, and 
scarcely more than two or three 
persons can be found in the build- 
ing, even at the most strategic 
times. It does seem that more 
young men, especially, would use 
this great convenience the Gov- 
ernment has placed at our serv- 
ice. If there is not an increase in 
the daily attendance at the build 
ing, I am advised through re 
liable parties that the Secretary 
of Agriculture will discontinue 
the office, and have all mail sen 
to Mount Mourne. 

I appeal to your public-spirited 
readers to get behind this matter, 
and request folks to go to the 
postoffice at night, at least, and 
call for their mail, though they 
don't hear from anyone oftener 
than once a month. By doinf 
this, the authorities will rea'izc 
that we are taking some interes 
in the affairj of the nation, and 
are not, as they think, fearinp 
that the country is going to the 
bow-wows. 

With kindest regards for you 
and your family, I am 

Pessimistically yours 
M. U. T. T. Guggenslaughter 



Dear Editor: — There seems to 
have been much disgust evoked 
jately with regard to the turn- 
ing on of the electric current ir 
our neighborhood. The power 
plant is in charge of an incom 
petent guy from 'the State in 
which the Aliens, of much note 
once resided. He chews somr 
kind of evil-looking weed, and, 



therefore, I am heartily in favor 
of firing this gink, and hiring him 
over again, which, I feel sure, 
will be sufficient to remedy ail of 
the roocus some folks have 
stirred up. 

With best regards to you, Mr 
Editor, and all of your noble 
force of skilled printers, etc., I 
beg to remain 

Obscurely 
A Pregressive Citizen 



GIFTED MUSICIANS 

Mr. Editor: — For quite a while 
it has been my purpose to call to 
the attention of the perusers of 
your splendid sheet the high- 
class musical talent which so un- 
stintingly gives its service to our 
iocal Y. M. C. A. on Thursday 
evenings. We were around to 
one of the Association meetings 
the other week, and the singing 
and playing were superb. A 
certain lengthy beanpole sort of 
a gentleman dextrously tapped 
the ivories, while a Mr. Hooper^ 
and a young man named Farrior~ 
were heard in the choir alonp 
with Mr. Sommcrville, a little 
fellow named Johnson, an elderly 
gentleman wearing a moustache, 
but wi;h a very sweet voice, 
named Mclnnis, a very solemn 
Mr. McGeachy, and a fellow thc> 
called Mcllwaine. Oh, yes, a 
skinny little baldheaded boy drew 
the squeak out of a fiddle witli 
Mifch skill and grace, too. I 
would urge ail who can to hear 
these gifted musicians who are in 
our midst. 

Jim Swicgled 



Dear Mr. Editor: — For a Ion.? 
time I have had a matter on my 
heart, but have hesitated to bring 
it before the students here. How- 
ever, I believe that what I write 
is for the best interests of the 
students, so I will be silent no 
longer. It is this: I have noticed 
among our se'ect student body 
'hat there are some who seem to 
be very careless of their personal 
.'ippearance, Only the other night I 
saw two wearing these nasty soft 
shirts, and I have heard that one 
yovne man went to Chanel last 
i'uesdav without having his shoes 
polished I think probably it was 



because he was a Freshman, and 
didn't know any better ; but I 
think he ought to be told, as one 
can't be too careful in things so 
important as these. Now let's 
all get together, and try to do 
better. 



YOUTHFUL ATHLETE 
COVERS HIMSELF 

WITH GLORY 

One of the most sensational 
featijres of the football season at 
Davidson, occured on November 
13. Blumenthal Williams, famil- 
iarly known ainong the students 
as "Jno. D.," had been holding a 
lowly place as center on the team 
usually styled the "Squirts." 
Coach Cook, lacking a man, 
placed "Jno. D." at center on the 
scrubs, for a mix'up with the 
Varsity. The Varsity scored a 
touchdown or so, and were kick- 
ing off to the scrubs. Brady by 
chance made a short kick, that 
went directly at "Jno. D." By a 
rare display of discernment, he 
seized the flyinc pigskin with 
eager grasp, and like a meteor 
dashed toward the goal. Peters 
dived at the runner, only to be 
side-stepped ; Slimue! Gloer made 
an attempt to stop him, but was 
met by the strong stiff-arm of 
"Jno. D.," and fell into a massive 
heap at his feet. With the spring 
of a tiger, the athlete leaped over 
him and soed on. Captain Howell 
was eluded, and Cosbv. who had 
hitherto not failed of a tackle, 
made a flving pluna-e, only to fall 
where "Jno. D." had been. "Bear 
Cat" Keesler, the fleet, managed 
to sieze one leg, only to be shaken 
off. Onward, onward, with on'y 
a short distance to the coveted 
white line. At the five-yard line. 
Laird tackled, and he'd on tenac- 
iously, but the determined run- 
ner struggled forward, and a sec- 
ond later placed the oval behind 
the line, snuarelv be'.ween the 
posts. Chaerined, cowered, dis- 
mayed, the Varsity members 
raised themselves from t h e 
pround. A mighty shout from 
'he_ sidelines rent the welkin. 
Poised, lithe, graceful, Jno. D. 
stood there. He was eagerly 
siezed and carried off on the 
shoulders of his team mates — 
sic gloria. 



THE EXPOSTULATOR 



HELP WANTED 



COACH— Wanted immediately, 
a Matli coach, to assist me make 
up back work. Three terms to 
pass off. Experienced and well- 
armed man necessary, and no 
Freshman need anply. — Sk. Camp- 
bell. 



MUSIC— Wanted, a music in- 
structor. Must be abb to pla> 
Alexander's Ragtime Band, and 
to sing "When Your Golden 
Hair Turns Gray." Pupil is no 
apt ; anplicant must bring creden- 
tials for his Ions-suffering and 
patience. No Ethiopian wanted 
— Uhlman S. Alexander. 



INSTRUCTOR in gibing- 
must be full bred, and holder of 
diploma in subject. Sophomores 
not wanted. Apply to Pers. 
Sayad. 



AGENTS for our new patent 
perambulators and babv car- 
riages — colors, red and black 
Must be interested in the uplift 
of children.— Bond, O'Neal & Co. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACH- 
ERS for my Old Ladies' Class, 
which is becoming too large 
Must not say "doggone," and 
must be able to repeat Coleman 
by l.tart. — John D. S. 



QUARTET SINGING 

AT THt EMPIRE 

THEATER 

The Empire has an additional 
attraction this week, in the "Six- 
teenth Century Quartet," other- 
wise known as the "Orpheus 
Four." This quartet, which has 
been heard here on several occa- 
sions during the last two or three 
months, drew a large crowd las' 
night, and its songs were roundly 
applauded. The singers are well 
known here, having been on the 
Parcel's Post circuit for some 
time. Their names, as tl-ev an 
pear on the register at the Rumple 
Inn, are: Legs Johnioi, Physic- 
Pirn, Postoffice Hoyt, and General 
Delivery Hamilton. 



THE INJUSTICE OF AMERICAN JUSTICE 




MALCOLM J. SHIRLEV 



We reproduce above an Asso- 
ciated Press photograph of M. J 
Shirley, who, last evenin'', made 
a ringing address on "The In- 
justice of American Justice." 
We quote a few sentences from 
his masterful appeal ; "Justice is 



justice, and I can prove it beyond 
the shadow of a doubt. Injustice 
is injustice, quite as truly. 
America is retrograding with re- 
spect to this justice business. 
Let us have liberty, and give us 
peace." 



TWO REEL FEATURE 



AT THE 



Thesarius 



THIS WEEK 
"THE SutdmnQ OF WILLIE McCOMBS" 



THE EXPOSTULATOR 



C 



^MLJ^S ' 



The barometer fell yesterday— 
and busted. 

"How do you nronounci 
v-a-r-d-e-v-i-1-l-e ?" 

"Vodeville. I'he 'u' is silent 
like 'q' in billiards." 

Why does a doer license cos 
more than a marriage license? 

I Efuess it's worth the differ- 
ence! 

What makes people so curious? 

We are not able to answer thi' 
qi'estion. but woii'd refer vo'i to 
W. T. Bitzer, who is an author- 
ity on matters curious and in- 
quisitive. 



FASHION NOTES 

Neck'aces are worn this year 
with little bells, which hang i'-s' 
oyer the Adam's Apple. " Thip 
gives a pleij-ng diversion when- 
ever one wishes to swallow. 

The neiv split troi'sers, whirl 
were introduced Junior Speak- 
ing by Mr. Bum Pharr, are ex 
pected to be in full vogue b- 
Commencement. D r o p - s t itch 
hose with red polka-do*s are gen- 
erally worn underneath. 



EXECUTOR'S NOTICE 

Having qualified as executor 
of the last will and test.Tment o" 
the late Skeeter Jones, of Sumter 
S. C., this is to notify all nerson' 
having cLnims aeainst the es'a'r 
of the said deceased to exhibi 
them to the undersiwnH, on or 
before the fwentv-third dav o' 
next month, or this notice will W 
p'eaHed in bar of their recovery 
AM persons indebted to said es'a'r 
will p'enee make immediate pay 
ment. This, the twentieth day o 
this mc'h. 

CuDpy Shaw, Executor 



MARRIAGE LICENSES 

John Harrison Rouse to Willr 
Bitter. 

Pierpont Morgan to Marj 
Crisp. 



NEGRO SITUATION 

Minneapolis, Minn. — "Social 
conditions in the South are tend- 
ing to develop in the negro a 
rac'al conscioisness, and to or- 
ganize a negro nationality," de- 
c'ared Crawford A. Hart, of 
Johns Hopkins University, today, 
before the American Soiological 
Society, which is meeting here. 

"The nationa'izing tendency 
among negroes is the result of the 
white man's ostracism- of their 
b'ack brother," said Dr. Hart. He 
adversely criticised the pub'ir 
utterances of Senator Vardaman 
of Mississinpi and Gov. Cole 
Blease. of South Carolina. 

The learned researcher from 
Baltimore is an authority on 
matters regarding the negro man 
nnd the members of the Associa- 
tion were held for more than two 
hours listening to the address of 
Dr. Hart. 



Professional C^rds 



Ekee Bn-re. Attornev-at-law 
Oeorgia Building, No. 348. 



Blonde Marsh. Expert Physic- 
ist. Bell Row, No. 70. 



Stump McKinnon. Doc'or of 
McCombery. Medical BuMding. 



W. H. Sprunt, Consulting 
Mathematician. The Wattery. 



Newly Concocted Jokes 

Guaranteed Not Over Forty- 
Eight Hours Old 
They are all Beans. From 
Sanitary Foolish House 

THE MARKET OF QUALITY 
FARRIOR'S 

Phone — Norman, Once 



TRY A WELSH RABBIT 

Meals served at any hour 

A clean eating-house 

Prompt service 

The HAULTERWONGER CAFE 
SLOOZER LANE 



Hear Mlaa Arrowood at the 
Grand. 



TO CURE THE BLUES IN 
ONE MINUTE 

Take EXPOSTULATIVE SANG- 
UINE SACCHAROSTIC tablets. 

Dealers refund money if 
it fails to cure 

J. P. MARSH'S signature on 
each tablet 

Twenty-five cents per box 



HILL AND ROBERSON 

Practical Chemists 

Discoverers of H-iO 

Destructive Formulae our Spe- 
cialty 

(Prepared while you wait) 



THE TRUMPETING TRIO 

Twenty-five years on the road 

Both Vocal and Instrumental 

teaching 

Engagements Solicited 

Sienor Hart, Chief Musician. 

Signors Mclnnis and Whitely, 

Assistants 



F. PRICE, Amateur Detective 

Fathomer of the great 
Library Mystery 

Five desperadoes taken single- 

hanJed. 

For further part'culars, see 

D Archer, 107 >/^ Burns Building 



HENRY W. SAVAGE 
Presents 

HELEN MclLWANE 

and 
K. L, WHITINGTON 

In their gorgeous 
production 

THE COLLEGE 
WIDOW 

One Entire Week 



10 



THE EXPOSTTJLATOR 



BOOK NEWS 

(Continued from page 5) 

Anderson — "Physics, As I Took 
It." 

An extraordinarily invaluable 
piece of workmansliip has ins 
reached our hands from the print- 
incr-shop of Doithlen'clit. Sheet S 
Co. This product of the noted 
hovse, whose unsurpassed en- 
pravins and bindins are the talk 
of the western hemisphere can- 
not, in point of exterior hand- 
someness, outshine the peculiarly 
striking and well nhrased paees 
of master treatises on the subiec 
which the author has a hi?hb 
preeminent ripht to set forth. The 
Hon Joseph P. Williams is to b'^ 
heartily consratrilated upon this 
the crownin? clory of his s'^ead- 
ily upward climb in the field of 
literature, "Some Phases of the 
Need of Exhaustive Oratory." 

Monsieur DuRose has just piV 
before the public his trca'ise on 
the Latin laneuasje, a hiebl" in- 
structive and enfertainin? work 
"The Beauties of Latin Phil- 
osophy" is the caption of this, the 
emint^nt scholar's latest effort ir 
the field of classic thouErbt. Wr 
proenost'cate an enormous sale 
for this va'ur.ble addition to the 
literature of the day. 

Resemblinar R. L. Stevenson's 
"Child's Garden of Verse" comes 
the new hook "Pearls for the 
Litt'e Ones" by F. J. Hay, who is 
peculiarly addicted to this line of 
bull. 



BEST SELLERS 

Here is the season's list of best 

sellers : 

Wild Animals I Have Known 
Personnl'y, by H. O. G. McLean 
Price. $1.00. 

Thoughts on the Constitution 
by W. T. Bitzer— Free. 

Teddy Roosevelt and L by Zeb 
Roherson. Price, $500. 

John D. Smith— An Autobio 
granhy. bv James Hall. Price, "sc 

Near Poems and Far — From 
Poems by Gilk. Absolutely Free. 

Classic Myths. by Darwin 
Spencer. Price, 50c. 

The Pursuit of Elusive -Fqua- 
fion, by Ernest Campbell. Price, 
five cents a grab. 




euniPINC BACKSLIOBHi 



FOR 

CORROBORATED 

HAIR 

RESTORER 

See 

F. H. BAKER 

"He Sure Can Do You 

Good" 



L. B. Crayton 

Compounder of 

and Dealer in 

TESTED PURITY 

CHEMICALS 

Sucessor to 

S. J. LANIER 



HARKEY 
STIPULATOR 

Mecklenburg's 

Leading Newspaper 

Stipity — Stipity 

Stip 



DANCE! 

I TEACH YOU HOW 

GRACEFULLY 

MISS LATTA LAW 



CURRENT POETRY 
(■Continued from page 4) 

" 'I'm always sadder when I sing', 
She sang in accents wild. 

And all the fel'ows, listcn'np. 
Said, 'We are too, my child'." 

We pive our readers the benefit 
of the foUowiiia: snatches of ex- 
chuiciatinely, that is, exquisitely 
Ivrical extravanganzas, from the 
Harkcy Stipulator, Meck'enburg's 
newest newspaper, edited by 
Messrs. Harkey and Alexander. 

There once was a sweet young 
Baraca, 

Who sat on a creat big fire- 
cracker, 

(How foolish !) 

They sat in the moon's pa'.e 
splendor. 

.A. wondrous happy pair — 
.•\ youth in the pride of manhood, 

A girl with golden hair. 

She turned her swee^ face to him, 
And softlv did she say, 

"Tom, dear, there's someone com- 
infr ; 
So take your arms awav." 

As a representative type of the 
ni'w style of economic poetry, pro- 
duced voluminously by the Deen 
Thinking School of Adam-Smith- 
'tes, we erive soace to this cor- 
sieoi'sly expressed, yet Walt Whit- 
manly simplified, sentiment. 

These here days surely is hard 
times, 

I wish the government would 
lend us 

Some cash, to spend for things 
we need, 

I've got to buy me some suspend- 
ers. 



EXAM. PAPERS 
MARKED DOWN 

To 69, 58, 35, etc. 

Get them from me 
D. W. LANE 



I=k IMD 



D^ 



QUIPS ^mCRM\^S 



ka 




>.F\VBERR1 -\i\\\\>>^'.> I.AMI. 




V. M. C. A. BUILDING 



/=\ (PMO 



QUIPS .^«, CRANK5 



z^ot 




^5" 



/AMD 



^ QUIPS ..lilCRANKS^ 



w 



E have tried to make the following pages as 
interesting as the ones that you have just 
looked over. Look over the advertisements; 
and, when you want to buy anything, go to them, and tell 
them why you are trading with them in preference to the 
"Cheap Skate" across the street. They ha%e helped you, 
and now it is up to you to help them. Stand by them, for 
they are our best friends. By doing so, you will help the 
next year's manager to get out a good Annual. 



^^ ^5 



YADKIN HOTEL, Salisbury, N. C. 



J. F. SOMERS. Manogf, 



ONE HUNDRED ROOMS, SEVENTY WITH PRIVATE BATH 
EUROPEAN CAFE IN CONNECTION 



HOT AND COLD RUNNING WATER IN EVERY ROOM I ! 



That each may be accepted at iheir face 
value. That each may be worthy of the 
other's respect. That the principles and 
purposes of each may express simple 
honesty. This is our conception of the 
squaredealin the business world. Most of 
us aie just plain "Folks" at heart, and few 
there are of us but want all that is justly 
our due. Yet the Folks" we know to 
be considerate, generous, and fair are 
those to whom your mind turns first- 
May we be worth of that first thought. 




^yA ANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

Detroit.Mich. 

We Mak,e Qreek Letter Fraternit}; Jewelry and Class Pins 
WRITE FOR CATALOG. IF INTERESTED 



ISAAC HAMBURGER & SONS 

BALTIMORE, M D . 



ONCE A CUSTOMER, ALWAYS A CUSTOMER 



See our Representatives, and he convinced 

BRUCE & JAMES, AGENTS 

DAVIDSON, N. C. 



THE ONLY UNE IN AMERICA BACKED 
BY REAL MERCHANT TAILORING 



THE LATEST STYLES IN THE LATEST 
FABRICS ALWAYS ON DISPLAY 



TYPEWRITERS 

EVERY MAKE; REBUILT 
AND SECOND-HAND 

PRICES FROM $20 UP 



i 



Be. Repair Department in Southern States. We sell Safes, Add.ng 
Machines, and Office Furniture. Typewriter Ribbons for all Mach.nes 



J. E. CRAYTON & CO 

CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

••ITS RIGHT IF IT'S FKOM US" 



Columbia Theological Seminary 



THORNTON WHALING. I). D.. I.I, I: 

President, and Professor of Theology 

W. M. McPHEETERS. D. D , LI,. I). 

Professor of Old Testnment Kxegesis 

H. A. WHITE, PH. D.. D. D.. LL. D 

Professor of New Testament Exegesis 

R C. REED. D. D., I.I,. D. 

Professor of Church History 

J. O. RE.WI.S. D. D. 

Instructor in Missions 



ROY Z. THOMAS. A M.. PH. D. 
Oratory and Education 



Full Professor of English Bible to be elected 
in May. I"J14. Scholaiship for Qualified 
Students. No charge for Tuition or Room 
Rent and Board. Fuel and Lights at cost. 

Write to PteiiJent foi Catalog and other Information 



The lOell-dressed man is not 
necessarily the expensively- 
dressed one 



Our Clothes are good enough for artyone 
and within the reach of eoeryone 



SEE OUR AGENTS 

Hopkins Tailoring 

Company, BalUmore, mj. 



Represented iji Lynch & Bruce 
Davidson, N. C. 



"JORDAN'S-ON THE SQUARE" 

W. J. CHAMBERS. President D. A. MCLAUGHLIN. Secretary 



DON'T EXPERIMENT 

GET i^^j'^^J^.^JP CANDY 




YOU KNOW IT'S THE BEST; AND IT'S ALWAYS THE MOST 

APPRECIATED. BECAUSE EVERYBODY ELSE 

KNOWS IT'S THE BEST 

R. H. JORDAN & CO. 

THE REXALL STORE" 
GRADUATE NURSES' REGISTER PHONES 6 and 7 



PRESIDENT WILSON 

has decided opinions, and so expresses them. He says: 
JTe are in this world to provide^ not for ourselves alone, 
but for others, and that is the basis of economy.'''' No 
one is in a position to overlook the importance of this 
subject, or to ignore this claim. ''^ Save for Others,'''' 
says President Wilson, and he means for loved ones and 
dependents. You are not doing your full duty towards 
yourself or those dependent upon you unless you build 
up a fund against that time when j'cw;- earnings diminish 
and cease. 

A POLICY IN THE 

Equitable Life Assurance Society 

WILL ACCOMPLISH THIS 



FOR INFORMATION 
WRITE, PHONE. OR CALL 

J. PENN QUARLES, Manager 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



W. J. RODDEY & CO. 

ROCK HILL, S. C. 
Managers South Carolina and Western North Carolina District 



SCOF/ELD'S 

(electric sign on the corner) 

FANCY GROCERIES. ALL KINDS OK TOBACCO 
CIGARS AND CIGARETTES 

STUDENTS' SUPPLIES DAVIDSON, N. C. 



LOOK FOR THE BIG ^«^.« AND MAKE US YOUR 

HEADQUARTERS 




Apollo and Gulh Candies "" 200 NORTH TRYON STREET 

^ SUB-POSTOFFICE 

Fine Drugs and Toilet Articles CHARLOTTE. N C. 



"An Up-to-Date Cafe, Run b^ a College Man, for College Boys" 



"FRAZIER'S CAFE" 

229 WEST TRADE STREET 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Come in, and Try Our Famous Club Breakfast or Supper 



Davidson College 

Davidson, N. C. 



^ y '^ HE EQUIPMENT of Davidson consists of thirteen campus buildings (not 
M ^^^ including residences); gymnasium; a dozen or more tennis courts; athletic field; 
^L ^P laboratories fir Chemistry. Physics, and Biology, with ample apparatus; water 
^^*^^ works ; electric lights; sixteen bathrooms ; and a library of twenty- three thousand 
purchased volumes. This external equipment, however, can be duplicated by any institution 
having sufficient funds for the purpose. Some of its unique possessions, not shared by other 
institutions, are as follows: 

1. The character of the student-body, which represents the cream of Southern 
Presbyterian home-lraining. from Maryland to the Gulf. All visitors and matriculates from 
other colleges comment on the cordiality, harmony, and manliness of its campus atmosphere, 
Its traditionary and deep-rooted "Honor System," and its freedom from vice and dissipation. 

2. The rigid elimination by the Faculty of unworthy or incorrigibly idle students, 
without regard to their own or their parents* wealth or social position. 

3. The close and personal supervision exercised over each individual student by the 
President and Faculty. The professors at Davidson regard the work of class-room and 
laboratory as only one part of their duty and responsibility. The Faculty meets every 
week, and its chief topic of discussion is the character, habits, and progress of each student. 

4. The completeness of the records kept of each student. Since the adoption of 
its new system of student records, every visitor from another institution asserts that he has 
never seen anything so detailed and complete. Without this mtimate knowledge of the 
individual student, such personal supervision on the part of the Faculty would be impossible. 

5. The fullness and detail of the reports sent to parents. No institution known to 
the writer keeps such students' records, and no one even approximates the fullness of the 
reports now sent by Davidson to the parents of its students, covering not only a young man's 
class standing, but his associates, habits, attentiveness in class, diligence, punctuality, earnest- 
ness of purpose, improvement or retrogression, etc. 

6. The church privileges of the students. In the neighborhood of so many Southern 
Colleges and Universities, each denomination is represented by a struggling, inefficient. 
unattractive mission-church. Under these circumstances, it is no wonder that growing and 
vigorous intellectualism. comparing such an exponent of religion with the ability and learning 
of its class-rooms and laboratories, should adopt a campus altitude first of indifference to a 
religion and finally of ill-concealed contempt. 

The Davidson students see church life at its best, participated in by the intellectual 
leaders of the College community. The church building is modern, the congregation main- 
tains its own home and foreign missionaries, and is noted for its harmony, intelligence, and 
liberality. 

In addition to the formal catalog, the College publishes a Special Bulletin, written 
for the information of prospective students and their parents. Either or both will be sent 
on request. Address the President. 



GILMER- MOORE 
COMPANY 



HIGH-GRADE 



SHOES, TRUNKS, BAGS 
AND SUITCASES 



Largest Trunk Department 
in the City 



16 SOUTH TRYON STREET 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



MILLER -WHITE 
COMPANY 

yresrripttmt 



KODAKS AND KODAK 
SUPPLIES 



MOORESVILLE, N. C. 



FOR QUICK SERVICE 



DAY OR NIGHT 



PHONE 393 



CHARLOTTE TRANSFER COMPANY 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




'Do 1 remember the stories that 
Jim Wheeler used to tell at college 

— wlien we all ^ot around in a ring — 
and lit up our Fatinia Cigarettes — 
well I should say yes! Ha, Ha! And 
do you know I have never found 
a cigarette, since, that pleases me 
as well as Fatimas — mighty good 
smokes." 

It's just this sort of satisfaction that has made 
Fatimas the l)i};}rest selling cigarette in tiiis 
country! I'laiis lookiiijr paekafje — but inside, 



twenty of the best. 



J^aAUfJfutaAUJo^occo Or, 



fATIMi 

^ TURMSH BLEND ^ 

CIGARETTES 

'Distinctively Individuar 20 ;6r 15^ 




DAVIDSON BRANCH OF 

America II Trust 
C o III p a n y 

Capital and Surplus, 5630,000 

Solicits accounts of individuals, firms 
and corporations 

Interest Paid on Time Deposits 



Spfcial allenlion given to business oj 
Davidson College Students 



MANAGING COMMITTEE: 

W. H. THOMPSON, Cashier 
J P. MUNROE. Chairman 
W. J. MARTIN 



MinTi:-.n:TTON 

COMPANY 

yrcscriptinu 
Bnt^i^tsts 

Students' Supplies a 
Specialtv 



We carry Lowney and Nunnally 
Candies 



Agents for Waterman's Ideal 
Fountain Pens 

DAVIDSON, N. C, 



THE SELWYN HOTEL 

FIREPROOF 

Located in the Hear! of Charlotle, Convenient to Railroad 

Stations, Street Cars, Business, and 

Shopping Center 



EUROPEAN PLAN 



Rooms, $1 .50 and up; with Bath, $2.00 and up 
MOST MODERN AND LUXURIOUS HOTEL IN THE CAROLINAS 



EASTMAN 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 



Prepares young men and women for positions 

of trust and responsibility, and 

assists them to 



PAYING POSITIONS 



Comprehensive courses of study, liberal policy, 

faculty of specialists, strong lecture course, 

ideal location, excellent record of fifty 

years, more than fifty thousand 

alumni. 

Prospectus and Calendar may be had 
upon application 

ADDRESS 

CLEMENT C. GAINES, M.A., LL.D., President 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 



GARIBALDI, BRUNS & DIXON 



12 and 14 South Tryon Stree 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Watch Repairing. EograTiog. and Maaufactunng of Special Piecet in Gold or Silrer 

High-Class Gold Jewelry, Watches, Diamonds, Cut Glass 
Hand -Painted China, and Sterling Silver 

Mail Orders Filled Promptly Satisfaction Guaranteed 



WE DESIRE YOUR TRADE 

No matter if you go to a Drug Store only once a year, we are 
anxious to get your trade. The more you know about our 
store, the aiore you will like everj'lhing connected with it. 

WOODALL & SHEPPARD 

AGENTS FOR INCORPORATED 

NUNNALLYS FINE CANDIES WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WHEN IN CHARLOTTE 

STOP AT THE 

GEM RESTAURANT 
COMPANY 

D. H. SIMPSON, Manager 
1 7 and 1 9 South Tryon Street Charlotte. N. C. 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 
TOBACCO 

It goes equally well with the Moonlight Sonata or Rag — The leaf, the 
selection of experts — aged hanging in the warehouse for two years. A 
maturing that is seldom accorded any leaf. What happens — all harsh- 
ness gradually vanishes — it becomes a leaf of rich mellowness — a flavor 
cs seductive as the strains of good music — too smooth to bite the tongue. 

The true art of producing smoking tobacco is manifested in Velvet — it takes time — 
takes patience — the making expense is more. But 
^Velvet U Velvet At your dealers. 




©imon Cljeolociical 



emmarp 

Richmond, Va. 

The foremost training school for ministers 
in the South. Seven professors. One hun- 
dred students. Modern equipment. 
Thorough-going and practical courses of 
study. Lights, fuel, and board at cost. 
No charge for tuition or room rent. Ses- 
sion begins third Wednesday in Septem- 
ber. For catalog, applv to 

Rev. W. W. Moore, D. D., LL. D. 
President 



WEAR 

Walker -Made 

CLOTHES 

UE SPECIALIZE ON 

COLLEGE CLOTHES 

WALKER MAKES THEM 
BETTER 

SEE 

ROWLAND & McKAY 

AGENTS 



CLASS RINGS, PRIZE CUPS, and anything in the way of DIAMOND 
JEWELR'^' or WATCHES, you will find our selection both the largest, 
best, and most reasonable in price for the QUALITY you get. 



WBn Brothers 

Comer Main and Hampton Streets 
Phone 1045 Columbia, S. C. 



Positively no plated goods or imitations in stock. All mail orders 
have our personal attention, with a guarantee to please. Do not 
buy until you have seen or inquired about our goods. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

PREMIER CARRIER OF THE SOUTH 

OPERATING OVER 7000 
MILES OF RAILROAD 

Quick and convenient schedule to all points 
NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, and WEST 



Through Trains between the Principal Cities and Resorts of the 
South, affording First-Class Accommodations in every respect. 

ELEGANT PULLMAN SLEEPING CARS on all Through 
Trains. Dining, Club, and Observation Cars. 



For Speed, Comfort, and Courteous Employees 
Travel via the 

SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



For rates, schedules, or any other information, call on your 
Agent or, write 

H. F. GARY R. H. DeBUTTS 

General Passenger Agent Division Passenger Agent 

WASHINGTON, D. C. CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



FRANKLIN 

Photographer 




302 North Tryon Street 
Charlotte North Carohna 



Phones 1 68 and 756 Residence 1 308 

AUTEN'S 
Auto Hire 

PLEASURE 

COMMERCIAL 

EMERGENCY 



Five - and Seven - Passenger Cars for all 
Occasions 

Garage Opposite Postoffice 

WE MAKE TRAIN CALLS 



VV/HEN YOU WANT something that is up-to-date in the 

JEWELRY LINE, write us for catalog and prices. 

Estimates on special work furnished at any time, as we have 

the most complete Repair and Manufacturing Shop in the city. 



O. S. EL AM 



JEWELER 



"The Lillle Store, With The Big Stock" 
Piedmont Theater Building CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



L. C. SMITH 
TYPEWRITERS 



BEST 



. f £" "3!SBtr]'y | fB |lb-^ 




MADE 



BALL BEARING LONG WEARING 

PRICE, $100.00 

Others sell for less, 
but you never get 
more than you pay for 

H'RITE FOR CATALOG 



J. E. CRAYTON & CO. 



DEALERS 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



SAZERAC mm 



)th 



Velvet 



A Blend 

from 

the Tropics 






Jno. M. Scott & Co. 

■DISTRIBUTERS 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



A. P. W. 



TOILET 
PAPER 



A light, soft tissue of the finest 
quality, made from absolutely 
dean, pure stock. Upon receipt 
of one dollar, we will send (Ex- 
press prepaid J to any point in 
the United States, One Year's 
supply (10,000 Sheets), and nickel- 
plated fixture. Money refunded 
if not satisfactory. 

A. P. W. PAPER COMPANY 

37 Colonie Street ALBANY, N. Y. 



THE 
Automatic 



SAVAGE 

Pistol^ 




Special Features embodied in tiiis Arm which will Appeal to You 

TKX SHOTS— Double the number in any ordinary re\olvcr, 
anil two more than other automatics. 

ACCURACY — The only automatic which locks at the breech 
while the bullet traverses the barrel, insuring extreme accuracy as well as freedom 
from fouling. 

SIMPLICITY — Fewer parts than other automatics. Completely dismounts by hand' 
without the aid of tools. 

SAFETY — Breech automatically locked during the time of discharge. Cannot be 
fired unless the trigger is pulled. Safety positively locks it against discharge. 
CONVENIENCE — Length, only 6'2 inches. Weighs but nineteen ounces; full- 
blued finish. 

SAVAGE ARMS COMPANY 



502 SAVAGE ARMS COMPANY 



UTICA, N. Y. 



=3 




th^ Electric City Engraving Co. 

B U FFALO. N.Y. 



U//- MADE THE ENGRAVINGS FOR THIS BOOK. 



B= 



=a 



GOOD 


A FULL LINE OF 

GROCERIES 1 

Davidson North Carolina j 

1 


CO^I^ 


REASONABLE 
PRICES 

Leave Orders with Cashier 
of Bank 

C L GREY 

DAVIDSON, N. C. 




R. J. SHELTO N 

LIVERY, FEED 

AND 

SALE STABLES 

Good Horses Quick Service 

Reasonable Rates ! 

Phone No. 74-L DAVIDSON. N. C. | 

• 
• 


We Earnestly Solicit You are as Welcome i 
Your Patronage to Look as to Buy } 

Armour's Haberdashery 1 

NEAR POSTOFFICE | 

Regal Shoes Altman Neckties j 
Manhattan Shirts 

In Fact, Everything New and Up-to-Date In 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

ARMOUR BROS. & THOMPSON. DAVIDSON. N. C. j 



D^ 



QUIPS 




CRANKS 



^Q 



For H 



cr 



I'D fight for her, do right for her. 
And, oh, what bliss 'twould be! 
I'd care for her, and bear for her 
All she might ask of me. 
I'd work for her, and shirk for her 

No task, however great. 
I'd plead for her, and bleed for her. 

Nor curse a cruel Fate. 
I'd leap — for her — the deep for her; 

I'd swim from Spain to here. 
I'd run for her, I'd shun for her 
All that I hold most dear. 
I'd live for her, I'd give for her 
A kingdom, rank and file. 
I'd try for her, then die for her. 
And do it with a smile! 

And yet when when all is said and done, 
You know she's not the only one. 



There's one sad tale that makes me roar. 
I hear it often, more and more; 
It is repeated o'er and o'er: 
"Man never loved like this before! " 



^^^ 




Central Barber 
Shop 

CONNER & WALTERS 

PROPRIETORS 
Phone 2102 CHARLOTTE. N. C. 



Hickory Manufacturing 
Company 

HICKORY, N. C. 

Manufacturers of 

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS 

Mantels, Moldings, Lumber, Etc. 

Fine Hardwood Work 
a Specialty 

Write for Send Us 

Catalog and Your Plans 

Prices for Estimates 



Furniture That Is One Hundred Per Cent. Good 



Ve'Tell BIGELGNV^ 
i.C<3rpet5 6' RuA* 



'.aEu^l 




That is the kind we sell; and the 
price is always low compared with 
quality. If you are looking for sat- 
isfaction in your FURXITURE, 
RUGS. CURTAINS, and DRAP- 
ERIES, you should see us. 

We study your wants, and with 
one of the largest stores in the State 
are prepared to meet the most 
exacting requirements. 



Lubin Furniture Company, Charlotte, N. C. 



Davidson's 
Sanitary Grocer 

The Best In Everything 
for COLLEGE BOYS 



I have a Full Line of Fancy Cakes, Crackers, 
Candy. Fruits, Cold Drinks, Cigars, and Tobacco 

Also Choicest Staple and 
Fancy Groceries 



JNO. H. WERTZ 



WHY send it elsewhere, 
when we give you quick 
and satisfactory work for less 
than others? WE want your 
job printing. Qel our estimates. 



The Enterprise 

MOORESVILLE. N. C. 



Phone 89 



DAVIDSON, N. C. 



Established 1872 



Excelled By None 



E. A. WRIGHT 



n08 CHESTNUT STREET 



PHILADELPHIA 



ENGRAVER-PRINTER-STATIONER 

Manufacturer of 

Class and Society Pins, Medals 



Exclusive Designs In 
STATIONERY (FRATERNITY AND Class) CALLING CARDS 



DANCE PROGRAMS 

MENUS 

LEATHER SOUVENIRS 



INVITATIONS 

SHINGLES 

CERTIFICATES 



ENGROSSING CERTIFICATES. MEMOIRS. TESTIMONIALS 



MEN'S WEAR 


SOUTHERN 




CAFE 




AUTEN & HUNTER 


Gibson - IVoolley 


OPEN T)AY AND ^IGHT 


Company 


First-Class in Every Respect 


FOR MEN WHO KNOW 


509 WEST TRADE STREET 
CHARLOTTE. N. C. 


PIEDMONT THEATER 


Home of Keith Vaudeville 


CHARLOTTE, N. C 


DAILY 3.30, 7.30 and 9 P. M. 


PROGRAM CHANGES 


MONDAYS and THURSDAYS 


''Always a Good Show— Of ten a Great Show" 
...., , 



Goodrum's 
Store 

SHOES and MEN'S 
FURNISHINGS 

DAVIDSON, N. C 


Brown & Knox 
Mercantile 
Company 

We carry a Complete Line of 

General Merchandise 
and Furniture 

DAVIDSON, N. C 


STONEWALL HOTEL 

F. R. DORSETT, Manager CHARLOTTE. N. C. 

EUROPEAN 

125 ROOMS 50 BATHS 

HOT AND COLD RUNNING WATER 
IN EVERY ROOM 

CAFE IN CONNECTION 

"ASK THE MAN WHO STOPS HERE" 



trteCollese 

PRESSING CLUB 



t 



TOBE JOHNSON 

PROPRIETOR 



CRANFORD'S 
STORE 



NEAR THE BANK 



We Solicit the 
PATRONAGE 

of the Students 



DAVIDSON, N.C. 




§7<^^ B%M'MS2S 



LARGEST IN THE SOUTH 

The 

Ben Vonde 

Company 

••QUALITY" 

"DYERS AND 

FRENCH CLEANERS 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



ALKAHEST 

"COVERS DIXIE LIKE THE DEW 

The Leading 
Southern Agency 

For the Best 
Lyceum Attractions 

ALKAHEST LYCEUM 
SYSTEM, ATLANTA, GA. 

HEALY BUILDING 



1 



SO MANY PEOPLE SAY: "I LOVE MUSIC. BUT I DONT PLAY." THEY 
NEED A STIEFF PLAYER PIANO 

It enables you to " skip " the years of expensive study — 
the hours, days, and weeks of practice — and play instantly 
any piece in the entire musical -world— Well ! Every 
member of your family can play Vifith this u^onderful 
instrument 

PLAYS LIKE A VIRTUOSO-AS YOU WOULD IF YOU HAD DEVOTED 
A LIFETIME TO THE STUDY OF MUSIC 

Come and inspect the STIEFF Player Piano. Let us play 

your particular kind of music. And look into our twenty 

per cent, saving, our "Easy Plan." Visit the factory 

warerooms 



CHAS. M. STIEFF 



219 SOUTH TRYON STREET, CHARLOTTE. N. C. 
ESTABLISHED 1842 OPPOSITE ACADEMY OF Mua 



SHOT CHEWING TOBACCO 

IS THE ULTIMATE RESULT 
OF THE EFFORTS AND EXPERIENCE OF LIFELONG MANUFACTURERS 

TRY JUST A NICKEL'S WORTH 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Company 

WINSTON-SALEM. N. C. 



J. C. CUSHMAN 

"THE PHOTO SHOP' 




MAKERS OF MODERN PHOTOGRAPHS 
COMMEROIAL PHOTOGRAPHY A SPECIALTY 



PHONE 2636 
3 WEST FIFTH STREET. CHARLOTTE. N. C. 



DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 



COPYING AND ENLARGING 



YOUR KODAK MAN 



SUSSM AN" 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



KODAKS AND SUPPLIES 



LANTERN SLIDES 



CENTRAL HOTEL COMPANY 

AMERICAN PLAN 

A. N. PERKINS, Manager CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



EAT AT 

Brannon-Hahn 

ICE CREAM 



ti 



AVOID CHEAP CONDENSED CREAM 

CREATIONS 

COMBINING CARELESSNESS 

WITH A LACK 

OF CLEANLINESS AND QUALITY 

CHARLOTTE. N. C. 



Helper's 
Lunch Room 




OPEN ALL THE TIME 

When You Are Hungry 

WILL TREAT YOU RIGHT 

Near the Postoffice Davidson, N. C. 



: 

Cottrell & Leonard 

ALBANY, N. Y. 


1 

( <Miiiii('i'(-i:il rrlntiiiu 

(if cviTV ili'scriiiliiiil 

The cla.ss ..r Mililinj; uailU.I l..v lii.jM 
cn-lomers is the kiiul Ih it will give iliKilily 
and standing; t<j their business— a siU-nl bnt 
forcefnl tcsliniony to the fact tlint due con- 
sideration has ))een given to the pullinE 
power of proi»erly printed stationery. 

We are pre|)arefl to I'lac-e v«ai on a bii;h 
plane in that respect 

I'n'sltylcriiin St:iiul:irfl 
I'liltiisliiii^ C(iin|i:iii> j 

J16 .N<.rlli Trycn Slrec-l I'lioiie 'i4,'i j 
Charlode, IS. C. 

i! 


MAKERS OF 

CAPS AND GOU'NS 

TO AMERICAN COLLEGES AND 
UNIVERSITIES 

FROM THE ATLANTIC TO THE PACIFIC 


Class Contracts a Specialty 

i 




3ELK BROTHERS 

Carolina's Largest Distributers of 
Reliable Merchandise 

^ Charlotte Monroe Greensboro 
STORFS AT Gastonia Concord Sanford | 
( Yorkville Salisbury Waxhaw } 


.••••••...••....•...-- .- .- __-.**. *-..^««*«. ---..••••••••. ••«.••.* 




THE COLLEGE BOYS' DRINK 

// wakes \)ou in the morning 
Invigorates you in the eoening 
Redoes you at night 
Delicious and refreshing all the lime 
For Students and Loafers 

Call for E Anywhere! 




tf)Olt?, tte Jlortsit 



INCORPORATED 

Carnations, Roses, Violets, Palms, and Pot Plants 
Bridal Bouquets, Funeral Designs --^ 
Decorations Solicited 
^tore JJijont 1443 

j 30C i}ortf) Crpon Street = = Cl)nrlottc, J^. C. 

! 

1 



f1 



WE WANT TO FURNISH THAT 
"Trat" ^oom or "2!)eu 

'i ou will find our Slock o( 

furniture, ^loor (Tovcrings. anb "IDrapcrics 

highly suggestive, and absolutely up-to-date in every respect 

Lcl us mail you a Catalog, or. brtler still, call and "look us over." Wc susgnt. when askoj lo do 
so. or carry out lo ihc Irtler your own ideas. 

P. S— UV sdl Viclrolas and Victor Rccords.IPianolas and Pianola Music Roll, 

LATEST MODELS- LATEST SELECTIONS 



4^arker-(&ar6ner (Eompau^ 



CHARLOTTE 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Hammerless Repeating Shotgun 



Tlii.-: Motlel 2S. 12 gauge ]7lar//n ^iiotgun i< the fine.-t repeating gun in the 
world. It has every up-tn-iiate feature, perfected far beyond all previous 
standards, and it ha; exciu;ive a.lvantages not obtainable in other guns. 
Note the?e features : Hammerless — Solid Steel 

Breech i iiiii le ,t- well as out)— Solid Top— Side 

Ejection — Matted Barrel (as on our highe-t grade 

l.aiiiiiier guns')— Press-Button Cartridge Release 

(to remove loaded cartridges O'lickly from maga- 
zine vvi;li>.nt \v. irking tlir-mgli action I — Double 

Extractors — Take-Down Feature — Trigger and 

Hammer Safety. Price, $22.60. 




The ilodel 28 i- a fine appearing, beautifully 
balanced gun. witliom :,ny ubiecti.inable humps 
or bumps: its Solid Steel Breech (not a shell of 
\voocl"> permit- .•. ;!: >" ''.igli'v symmetrical gun 
\', irb'^'Ut =:;c-!'"cir2 -:rii'';ii!i or -aictv : it is the 
SEifest breech-loading shotgun ever built. 

Our free circular give= large illustration of gm 
and full descripiiiin. Our complete l-:3-page cata- 
log of all orhcr Zl^nrlin repeating rifles and shot- 
g-.:ns mailed for three stamps postage. 



(Inr l';n-p;,i:e Ideal Hand Book te'Js about re-' 
1 'aJing a" canri.ige-; :r.ai!ed for 6c. stamps. 



Willow Street, New Haven, Conn. 



One Hundred Rooms Free Sample Rooms 

THE MECKLENBURG HOTEL 

■• FIVE STORIES OF SOLID COMFORT •' 
CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



Good enough for eoenbody; not loo gooa for anybody 



When in Charlotte, Stop at the Mecklenburg 

W. C. PETTY. Manager 

Elevator Service Cafe Open Day and Night 



A REAL GUN 




L. C. Smith Specialty Grade, equipped with Automatic Ejector 
and Hunter One trigger. 

$100.00 NET CASH 

SEND FOR CATALOG. OR ASK YOUR DFALER 

The Hunter Arms Company 

7 HUBBARD STREET FULTON, N. ^'. 



^ Outfitters to ^ 

the Great American Athlete 

Qu.lily- Nol Qusnlhy. How Go<xl - Sol I low M.r 

Baseball, Football, Basket-Ball 
Soccer Supplies 




ALEX TAYLOR & CO. 

ATHLETIC SPECIALISTS 

Taylot Biiildins 
Oppwilf Manhallan Hoi 



SEE OUR AGENTS 

COOK & MULLEN 



EAT AT 

loan's 



QUICK LUNCH COUNTER 

anb groUj fat 

Fresh Candies, Dopes, Cigars 
and Cigarettes 

an tl)f iL^fSt 

Open every day and late 
at night 

an lloaffis aiUcltomf 
DAVIDSON, N. C. 



QUEENS COLLEGE 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

IvOcateil in a wooded campus of twenty-live acres, in the beautiful suburlj of 
Myers I'ark. fifteen minutes by electric lines from Southern Railway Station. 

Faculty of college g^ra<le, from the best universities and colleges. 

B. .\. degree. Schools of Music, Art, and Expression 

I-ive buildings— .'Vdministration. Music, Science and Art, and two Dormito- 
ries erected in 191.i 1914. Equipment new and modern Sanitation unexcelled. 

Has Fitting School for girls from one and two ami three years High Schools. 

LITERATURE ON REQUEST 



JOHN L. CALDWELL. A. M., D, D.. PRESIDENT 



Eves! Eves! Eye s! 



We all have some trouble with our 

eyes, one time or another. 

If yours need attention, let me see 

you at vour convenience, and I will 

gladlv examine them for you, and fit 

glasses if necessary. 



E. D. PIJETT 

CHAKI.OTTE, N. C. ' 



"Ask Jack McGee, he knows" 

A Resort for Gentlemen 

Phone 900 

Cigars, Lunches, Soda 
Baseball Headquarters 

Telegraphic Returns by 
Innings from Four Leagues 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. j 



Drink 



Very Refreshing 



MUSICAL 
HEADQUARTERS 



Victor, Edison, and Columbia Talking 

Machines and Records. 

Pianos and Player Pianos. Sheet 

Music, Player Piano Music 

and Strings for all 

Instruments. 



ANDREWS MUSIC 
STORE 

213 NORTH TRYON STREET 
CHARLOTTE. N. C. 



Brady, the Printer 

STATESXILLE. N. C. 

Printing of Quality 

All Work Done Piomplly 



Repiesented bu 

P. W. DuBOSE 

OAK ROW 
Davidson - - - North Carolina 



The Best of Jewelry, Watches, etc. 

AT REASONABLE PRICES 



FITTING GLASSES A SPECIALTY 

Watch and Spectacle Repairing. We grind our own lenses 

We give careful attention to all students. 



R. F. Henry Jewelry Company 



Jewelers and Oplometrists 



STATESVILLE, N. C 




Observer Printing House 



CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



B. R. GATES, MANAGER 





^■■^HIS BOOK WAS MADE BY US THROUGHOUT. OUR FACILI- 
/ij TIES FOR PROMPT PRODUCTION OF COLLEGE PUBLICA- 

^U/ TIONS, CATALOGS, ETC., ARE UNSURPASSED. CONSULT 
US BEFORE PLACING YOUR NEXT PRINTING ORDER. 



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